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Full text of "Christian Cynosure"

CONTENTS. 



The Annual Meeting 1 

Rev. A. T. Pearson. D. D 2 

What We Know of Secret Societies 3 

Why Oppose Secret Societies 3 

Cheer Up, Comrades' 4 

Post's Banner 4 

The Polar Star (song) 5 

Masonry in Constantinople 6 

Institution Must Be Good 7 

Mother, Home, Heaven 8 

Letter— Rev. P. S. Hehson, D. D 9 

The New Regiment 10 

Speak Truth in Love 10 

How Sow the Seed 10 



Pooling of Reforms 10 

How Arrange Conventions . . . • 11 

How Advertise Meetings 11 

Taking Up Collections 11 

Value of Local Organizations 12 

Advance Along the Whole Line 13 

Secretary J. P. Stoddard to N. C. A 13 

California State Convention 14 

Rev. J. K. Glassford's Renunciation. .... .16 

Correspondence 17 

Path to Success for the Young 19 

Postal Card Symposium 20 

Sarcasm on Lodge Titlesi 21 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



"The National Christian Association, op- 
posed to secret societies," was formed at 
Pittsburg, Pa., in 1868, and incorporated un- 
der the laws of the State of Illinois in 1874. 

The National Christian Association arose to 
me«t a gi-eat want created by the growth of 
secret orders, and the ignorance and silence 
of public teachers as to their nature and ef- 
fects. 

The association is interdenominational. 
The president (1897) is a Methodist Episco- 
pal, and the vice president a United Presby- 
terian. Among the following named officers 



and agents are also the Free Methodist, Con- 
gregational, Lutheran, Friend, Evangelical, 
United Brethren, Baptist, Reformed Presby- 
terian and Independent. 

The principal headquarters of the National 
Christian Association is at 221 West Madison 
street, Chicago, which property is valued at 
$20,000, and is the gift to the association of 
Dea. Philo Carpenter, one of the founders of 
Chicago. 

The association is supported by the free 
will offerings and bequests of friends. The 
Christian Cynosure is its organ and princi- 
pal publication. 



President— Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, Morris, 
111. 

Vice President— Rev. W. T.. Campbell, Mon- 
mouth, III. 

Recording Secretary— Mrs. M. C. Baker, 14 
North May street, Chicago. 

General Secretary and Treasurer— Wm. I. 
Phillips, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 

Editor Christian Cynosure— Rev. M. A. 
Gault, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

T. B. Arnold, C. A. Blanchard, E. A. Cook, 
J. M. Hitchwck, C. J. Holmes, T. B. Rada- 
baugh, E. Whipple, Edgar B. Wylie, H. F. 
Kletzing, J. A. Collins, W. O. Dinius. 
DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Rev. James P. Stoddard, Boston, Mass.; 
Rev. P. B. Williams, Los Angeles, Cal.; Rev. 
Wm. Fenton, St. Paul, Minn.; Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard, Washington, D. C. 




VOLUME XXX 



CHICAGO, MAY, 1897. 



NUMBER 1 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHEISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

TERflS OP SUBSCRIPTION. 

PRICE.— Per year, in advance. $1.00; three months, on 
trial, twenty-five cents; single copies, 10 cents. 

RECEIPTS.— The yellow lable pasted lon the paper or 
wrapper is a receipt for payment ol subscription to 
and including the printed date. 

EXTENSION.— The extension of a subscription is 
shown by the printed lable the second month alter 
a remittance is received. 

DiSCONTINUANCES.-Wefindthat a large number 
of our subscribers prefer not to have their sub- 
scriptions interrupted and their files broken in case 
they tail to remit before expiration. It is therefore 
assumed, unless notification to discontinue is re- 
ceived, that the subscriber wishes no interuption in 
his series. Notification to discontinue at expiration 
can be sent in at any time during the year. 

PRESENTATION COPIES.— Many persons subscribe 
for The Christian Cynosurb to be sent to 
friends. In such cases, if we are advised that a 
subscription is a present and not regularly author- 
ized by the recipient, we will make a memorandum 
to discontinue at expiration, and to send no bill for 
the ensuing year. 



The same old Cynosure, only in new 
form and dress. 



Preserve it for binding. Its new form 
will be much more convenient for that 
purpose. 



The last number of the year will con- 
tain a complete index to all the twelve 
numbers. 



Remember that less frequent visits of 
the Cynosure mean more work in the 
field and a more concentrated fire on the 
strongholds of the secret empire. 



There are six secret college fraterni- 
ties in the Indiana State University at 
Bloomington. Fathers ought to see to 
it that there are none in the college where 
their sons attend. 



Secretary Phillips' long association 
with our publications and the business 
management of the association has made 
him a helper in every department of the 
work. The editor desires to gratefully 
acknowledge his valuable services in pre- 
paring the first issue of the new Cynosure. 



Sectional strife, over histories for our 
public schools, is being fostered by so- 
called patriotic lodges. On the one side, 
the Confederate Vetera:ns' Association is 
moving to place books by Southern wri- 
ters in all Southern schools, and, on the 
other side, the G. A. R. is starting a coun- 
ter movement in the North. Is there no 
way to avert these unfortunate efforts to 
perpetuate civil dissensions? 



The annual meeting occurs next week 
Monday. We hope to see a large num- 
ber of our friends present at the open- 
ing service at lo o'clock in the morning 
at the Cynosure office. The suggestion 
last year of our Director, Rev. E. B. Wy- 
lie, to invite the co-operation of the 
churches proved to be such a profitable 
suggestion that the same plan has been 
followed this year, and instead of one 
conference, as in former years, some 
twenty different meetings will be held, 
which may properly be called anniver- 
sary meetings. The large and enthusi- 
astic meeting in the Moody Church, and 
one in Rev. Dr. Goodwin's First Congre- 
gational Churcn, and one in Coal City 
Presbyterian Church, and one in the 
church of Rev. Dr. Haterius, Swedish 
Lutheran, have already been held. Fa- 
vorable responses have been received 
from Baptist, Presbyterian, ^lethodist 
Episcopal, Congregational, Free Metho- 
dist, Lutheran, United Brethren, Friends 
and United Presbvterian Churches. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



REV. A. T. PIERSON, D. D. 



Our portrait in this number is that of 
a man who was called to take Mr. Spur- 
geon's place and preach in his Taber- 
nacle immediately following the death of 
that' great man. Dr. Pierson is a na- 
tive of Xew York City, and whatever he 
might have become in mercantile or 
other walks of life, he is certainly a born 
preacher, for he has been constantly 
preaching since he was 20 years of age. 
He as admitted to the fellows'hip of the 
Presbyterian Churdi in New York City 
when only 15 years old, and his first 
Christian work and experience was in 
the destitute parts of his native city. 

He was licensed to preach at 23 years 
of age by the New York Presbytery, but 
his first pastorate was over a Congrega- 
tional Church in Binghampton, New 
York. He lias been the pastor of Presby- 
terian Churches in several of our large 
cities. In 1876 he was preaching to one 
of the wealthiest Presbyterian Churches 
in Detroit, Mich., at which time, as he 
says, he was led by a most singular 
searching of heart to see that he had been 
making more or less an idol of literary 
culture, intellectual accomplishments 
and worldly position. His .chief success 
had not been in winning souls or build- 
ing up the kingdom of Christ. At this 
time he was led to so dedicate himself 
and all that he had to his Master, that 
he was not conscious of (having any idol 
left, and for the first time in his life he 
began to know what it was to have real 
communion with God in prayer. 

As author of a number of books, as ed- 
itor of the Misssionary Review of the 
World, as lecturer and preacher in every 
English speaking country, as one of the 
chief speakers and teachers upon whom 
Mr. Moody relies at his Northfiekl Con- 
ference, as a co-laborer with the late Rev. 
Dr. A. J. Gordon, of Boston, and as a 
writer for religious magazines and pa- 
pers, and as a successful evangelist, no 
one man is, perhaps, more widely known 
among all denominations, in this and 
other countries than Rev. Dr. A. T. Pier- 
son. His testimony on the foolishness 
of seeking to promote temperance by se- 
cret lodges, as given by him in one of 
Dr. A. B. Simpson's Christian Conven- 
tions in New York City (Dec, 1896) will 
be re-read, we believe, with increasing 
interest. 



TESTIMONY BEFORE CHRISTIAN ALLIANCE. 

Dr. Pierson said that he had never 
united with any secret society, and in re- 
spect to such organizations, two 
thoughts were uppermost in his mind: 

First, that the Church of Jesus Christ 
was all that man needed for his religious 
and moral nature, and he could see no 
reason why, having the best, he should 
trouble himself about other matters. He 
said that he had never known of any 
good thing being done by secret lodges 
which could not have been better accom- 
plished in other ways. He said that at 
one time in a city where he lived there 
was a "Good Templars' " lodge of seven 
hundred members, including the most 
substantial and worthy men and women 
of the city. He said tliat there was a 
frig^htful amount of drunkenness, and 
one saloon to every twenty houses. You 
would have supposed, said 'he, thNat such 
an organization would 'have done effect- 
ive work against that awful trade in 
strong drink, but, said he, it was not so. 
Such an organization in such a town, in- 
stead of working to remove evil, divided 
first into two parties and then into four, 
on the question, "What musical instru- 
ment shall we have in our lodge?" He 
said that his own experience had been 
that of others ; that 'he had been told by 
members of the Masonic and other bod- 
ies that whether wicked or not they were 
certainly needless. 

The second thought he said was this: 
That Jesus Christ desired his people to 
work in the daylight and not in the dark; 
that Jesus himself did so; that When the 
end of liis life had come, and he was 
questioned respecting 'his disciples and 
his doctrine, he said, 'T ever spake open- 
ly to the world and in secret I have said 
nothing." 



OF WHAT VALUE? 



The I. O. G. T. in India has taken in 
Hindoos until now they have a Hindu 
Good Templar's League. This may 
sound strange to people in America and 
England, wihere they regard the I. O. G. 
T. as a Christian institution. But as 
Templarism is only a watered-down imi- 
tation of Freemasonry, why should it not 
mix things as its motlier lodge does? 
The Masons have European skeptics, 
free-thinkers, etc., mixed up in lodge- 



May, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



love with Hindoos, ^Mohammedans and 
the rest; why should not Good Templars 
be equally liberal and worldly wise? — 
From India \\^atohman, Bombay, India. 
• Xeal Dow said: "I belong to a good 
many temperance organizations, of one 
sort or another. I belong to the Good 
Templars; very nice people; we like tem- 
perance, pass temperance resolutions, 
sing temperance songs, for temperance 
we pray, but, then, practically, we do 
not do very nnich; that is to say. we don't 
vote that way." — From Daily Union Sig- 
nal, Oct. 22, \\ 



WHAT WE KNOW OF SECRET SOCIE- 
TIES. 



BY REV. GEORGE M. ROBB. 



Opponents of secret orders are fre- 
quently met with the accusation, "You do 
not know what you are talking about." 

This statement looks plausible, and. to 
a superficial thinker, may pass for gospel, 
but it is not sound, because there are 
men who have never been in any lodge 
who are more intimately acquainted with 
the working of the whole secret empire 
than many of the members. Outside of 
those who are experts on the question, 
there is a great body of people who con- 
demn secret orders, and the question is. 
Do they know what they are talking 
about? If they do not, then they are 
wrong in condemning them. 

One of the fundamental principles of 
God's government of this world is that 
he never requires a man to do evil that 
good may come. He does not oblige 
him to learn the evil of anything by ex- 
perience in order to be|able to condemn 
it. He does not require that a man shall 
join a secret order before he can intelli- 
gendy denounce it. It is not necessary 
that a man shall join a band of counter- 
feiters, and learn not only what the coun- 
terfeit coin is, but also the whole process 
of making it, in order to intelligently con- 
demn it. Nor is it necessary that a man 
shall know every counterfeit. What is 
necessary is that he shall know the genu- 
ine coin, and whatever does not come up 
to the standard is false. 

God has given a perfect standard of 
right in his Word and whatever does not 
accord with that is wrong. The neces- 
sary thing for the opponent of secret so- 



cieties is to know^his Bible and in that he 
has a touch stone by which to try them 
all, from the least to the greatest. \'ary- 
ing the language of Scripture we may 
say: Beloved, believe not every frater- 
nity, but try the fraternities whether they 
be of God. 

In the Bible we find teachings which 
warrant us in condemning every secret 
order. Then those who have never be- 
longed to secret orders, though they 
have not personal knowledge of what 
may take place behind the screen, are 
justified in condemning them after hav- 
ing applied the infallible standard of 
God's Word and found them wanting. 

There are some things connected with 
secret orders which are not intended to 
be secret. One of these is the fact that 
they are secret societies. I know this one 
fact about them that they are secret. I 
can proceed at once from the standpoint 
of one wholly outside, to condemn them 
simply because they are secret. This is 
the fundamental principle of all of them, 
and it is explicitly condemned as wrong 
by the Bible. Read John iii., 20: "For 
every one that doeth evil hateth the light, 
neither cometh to the light lest his deeds 
should be reproved, but he that doeth 
truth cometh to the light that his deeds 
may be made manifest, that they are 
wrought in God." 

The one fact that they are secret — that 
is, that they do not come to the light, fur- 
nishes me all the basis I need for con- 
demning them, and this is the one fact 
which is always revealed and never con- 
cealed. "To the law and to the testimony 
if they speak not according to this word 
it is because there is no light in them," 
Isaiah viii., 20. Secrecy is wrong, being 
condemned by the word of God: there- 
fore no amount of good which secret so- 
cieties may do can atone for this funda- 
mental evil. 

Svracuse. X. Y. 



WHY OPPOSE SECRET SCCIETIES? 



The secret lodge system is altogether 
unnecessary. Good men do not need it 
to accomplish their purposes, and wick- 
ed men should not be allowed to use it 
for the furtherance of their evil designs. 
It is opposed to the spirit of Christianity. 
Christ said: "In secret have I said noth- 
ing," John xviii., 20. It is opposed to 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May. lb9T. 



tlie teaching's of Christianity, because it 
offers a salvation other than that pro- 
vided by Christ. "There is none other 
name under heaven, given among men. 
whereby we must be saved." Act iv.. 12. 

Their claim to be a charitable institu- 
tion is spurious. They confine their help 
to their own membership, and their mem- 
Ijership is limited to able-bodied men. 
who are not at all likely to become sub- 
jects of charity. A poor man is deprived 
of all the benehts of the order, no matter 
how great his need may be, by a failure 
to pay his dues. They follow the exam- 
ple of the Priest and the Levite, rather 
than that of the good Samaritan. Chris- 
tian men should stay out of the lodge, be- 
cause it brings them into unnecessaiy as- 
sociation with corrupt and vicious men. 
"Be ye not unequally yoked together 
with unbelievers." All patriotic and lib- 
erty loving men should labor for the over- 
throw of the lodge system, because it in- 
terferes with the proper administration 
of justice in a free government. 

E. A. Crooks. 

Blanchard. Iowa. 



CHEER UP, COMRADES, 



BY REV. C. H. STRONG, D. D. 



In the past twenty-five years the lodge 
system has grown at a wonderful rate. 
I have no statistics touching the parent 
societies, ^lasonry and Oddfellowship. 
But the progeny of these 'ancient" or- 
ders has become ver\' numerous, and 
there is no mistaking the family resem- 
blance. The lodge system is like a can- 
cer preying upon the body-politic. ]\ia- 
sonr\- and Oddfellowship constitute the 
heart of the cancer, and what we call the 
minor orders are the roots running out 
into every part of our soc'.al system. 
Much evil has already been wrought by 
tiiese societies, and no good which might 
not have been much greater without their 
conscience destroying practices. In the 
nature of the case, if this canc*."r is not re- 
moved, it will at length take th.e life. 

Is there cause, then, for the National 
Christian Association and the teachers 
of truth on this subject to be discour- 
aged? By no means. Many young men 
and women have been saved from these 
hurtful and corrupting lodges. Public 
sentiment has been much enlig:htened. 



In addition to this, the openly vile con- 
duct of the children of ^lasonry and Odd- 
fellows'hip is bringing these more cun- 
ning parents into general disrepute on 
the part of all lovers of God and truth, 
and of our country. 

Initead of discouragement there is 
great reason to take courage, and to con- 
tinue in well-doing. In due season the 
harvest from the sowing of the truth will 
be ready for the gathering. Keep the X 
ravs of truth continually turned upon 
this monstrous and loathsome cancer, 
and it will be destroyed. Our hope is in 
God. His Word is against this false sys- 
tem. The signs of the times indicate that 
He is about to manifest His power in 
some signal way. 

Sterlinsr. Kan. 



POST'S BANNER. 



The last number of the Cynosure gave 
an account of the }vIasonic effort in the 
Olean. X. Y.. Town Council to compel 
Rev. Woodruff Post to remove his anti- 
saloon and anti-lodge banner from over 
the sidewalk. The ]\Iasons have made 
another move on the banner. The Olean 
(X. Y.) Daily Herald of April 2. 1897, 
sa}"s : 

■"Xearly every one in Olean knows the 
Rev. Woodruff Post, the venerable re- 
, tired ^lethodist minister. Avho resides at 
159I Union street.' He is an aged man, 
who has done a great deal of good dur- 
ing his life, and no one who knows him 
thinks of quarreling with him over his 
views. 

"However, the city government has 
suddenly come to the conclusion, after 
the signs have been hanging over the 
sidewalk in front of 'Mr. Post's residence 
for over a year, that they are an infrac- 
tion of the law. The Z\Iayor has been 
out of town for several days and ^Ir. Post 
went to see City Attorney Hastings 
about the matter, and was informed that 
the sign was a violation of the city char- 
ter and it must be taken down or it would 
cost ^Ir. Post S; a day to keep it up. 

"The City Attorney probably classes 
the sign with street obstructions, biu it 
is certainly not so much one as are hun- 
dreds of other signs, awnings, etc.. that 
hang over the sidewalks on Union street. 

"However, ^Mr. Post's banner still 
waves.'' 



May, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 






THE POLAR STAR, 



Jonathan Hlanchaud. 



Orlando S. Guinnell. 



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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT. 



MASONRY IN CONSTANTINOPLE. 



BV ELIZABETH E. FLAGG. 



Among the converted priests who have 
found a temporary home at Father 
O'Connor's ^lission in New York City, 
it would be difficult to find a more in- 
teresting character than Dr. Vanolli, a 
cosmopoHtan born in Alexandria, Egvpt, 
of mixed Greek and Italian parentage, 
and before his conversion occupying the 
position of missionary apostolic to Con- 
stantinople. 

His family were all wealthy; he had 
splendid prospects of preferment had he 
stayed in the church, for at the very time 
he left a movement was on foot to ele- 
vate him to a bis'hopric, but when the 
light dawned on him these things did 
not move him any more than the poverty 
and persecution surely awaiting him if he 
came out. But it is his experience \vith 
^^lasonry, not Rome, which I propose to 
give the readers of the Cynosure, as I 
have just heard it related by him in a per- 
sonal interview. This thrilling incident 
in the great volume of Masonic outrage 
and wrong shows very conclusively that 
.the ^Masonic dragon in the Turkish em- 
pire is the same vindictive monster that 
we are battling against in America. Tur- 
key is full of secret societies. Masonry 
being there as in every other land the 
mother and controlling spirit of the whole 
brood. 

One day he was called to the bedside 
of a very sick man, who had been a Free- 
mason, but desired, now that he felt his 
last hour approaching, to make his peace 
with the church. Fr. \^anolli received his 
confession, but made it the condition of 
granting him absolution tihat he should 
give him the names of the chief . ones in. 
the order that he might forward them to 
his spiritual superiors at Rome — which, 
by the way, throws quite an incidental 
side light on the confessional in its rela- 
tion to Masonry. Xo wonder Rome finds 
it her most potent weapon in the fight 
with a system too much like herself in 
venom and subtlety for both to occupy 
the same ground in peace. 

After a little hesitation the dying man 
complied and received absolution. No 
ordinary priest can absolve a Freemason, 



but \'anolli, as missionary apostohc, had 
been personally invested with this ex- 
traordinary power by the hands of Leo 
himself. But the Alasonic lodge to which 
he belonged was by no means willing to 
lose its grip on the dead man. When it 
came to the burial, A^anolli found four 
Alasons waiting at the house to perform 
their lodge rites over the body. He quiet- 
ly informed them that this could not be 
allowed. The man had repented and 
been reconciled to the church. It was 
his part to see that he was buried prop- 
erly, according to the Catholic service. 
They were highly indignant and cursed 
him roundly when he insisted that the 
square and compass which they had- 
placed on the casket should be at once 
removed, but his quiet firmness finally 
carried the day. 

They seemed to acquiesce and the pro- 
cession set out for the church, Vanolli 
walking in front of the pallbearers, arid 
the four Masons in the rear. The latter 
watched their opportunity and slyly put 
back the Masonic emblems once more 
on the casket. But Vanolli chanced to 
turn his head and saw the trick. He at 
once stopped the procession, and going 
to the bier, threw the square and com- 
pass into the street. This roused their 
anger to such a pitch that he was attack- 
ed on the spot by two of the Masons, 
who felled him to the ground, but he did- 
not receive any serious injury. He re- 
sumed 'his place at the head of the pro- 
cession, the loyal Catholics forming a 
body guard about him, and thus escorted 
he reached the church, and went through 
the funeral rites without further interrup- 
tion. 

But the lodge did not forget Vanolh's 
brave stand, as the sequel will show. 
About a fortnight after, at 1 1 o'clock at 
night, two men came to the door in a 
closed carriage, and begged that he 
would go in all haste to perform the last 
office for a dying man. The unsuspect- 
ing priest hurriedly took the pyx used 
on sudh occasions, got into the carriage, 
and was whirled away at a rapid rate. 
After they had proceded a long distance 
without stopping 'he grew uneasy, and 
then his captors, for such they were, 
threw off all disguise. 

"There is no dying man in the case," 
they said. "You are in our power now, 
and we demand an explanation of the in- 



May, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



suit lately given our order at your 
hands." 

"I simply did my duty as a priest; I 
have no explanation nor apology to 
make," replied Vanolli. 

After a great deal of threatening lan- 
guage, intended to intimitate him, they 
finally offered to let diim go if he would 
take an oath never to repeat the offense, 
but he firmly refused. 

"I am in your power, gentlemen," he 
said. "You are two strong men, and I 
shall not resist, for it would be useless. 
I have no personal ill-will to any mem- 
ber of the Masonic order, but I must and 
shall do my duty as a priest when per- 
forming the burial service of the church." 

They roughly told (him that they 
''would do him up in such a way that he 
would never be called upon to perform 
another sudh service," and tied a cloth 
so tightly over hig head and face that he 
could not see or hear; then, having stop- 
ped the carriage, struck him several hard 
blow^s over the head, and carried him to 
a cavern in die side of a hill in a wild and 
lonely place, remote from any help, and 
drove away. 

On coming to himself he managed to 
tear away the blindfold and grope his 
way out. But it was two days before he 
got back to the monastery, where he was 
laid up for a week from the effects of 
the assault. Perhaps his rufifianly assail- 
ants were afraid to go to the extreme of 
actually killing a priest so well known 
as Vanolli, but there is no doubt in his 
own mind that they intended to injure 
him much more seriously t^ian they did, 
and 'had not a protecting Providence in- 
terposed he might not be alive to-day to 
tell the tale. 

Whatever we may say of Rome as a 
system of gross error and superstition, 
she is certainly far wiser in her genera- 
tion than the Protestant church, which, 
claiming to be a child of the light, yet 
allows in her communion men who have 
sworn fealty in the secret chambers of 
darkness to another God than hers. And 
however we may inveigh against the 
greedy, grasping and tyrannous Romish 
hierarchy, it is certain that this Catholic 
priest, in "the land of the infidel," could 
have read a lesson to the Protestant min- 
isters of America, who w^ould have tame- 
ly submitted to play second fiddle to the 
lodge and not have uttered a word of 



remonstrance when it insisted on mixing 
with the holy services of the Christian 
church its own semi-heathen and Christ- 
less rites for the dead. 

It is true that a Catholic priest, when 
resisting the encroachments of the lodge 
in sacred places, has this immense ad- 
vantage over his Protestant brother in 
the fact that his church backs him up. 
And it is the sin and the s'hame of Prot- 
estantism that she too often allow^s her 
faithful pastors to fight their battle with 
the dragon single-handed, which would 
not be if, like Rome, she treated secret 
affiliations as a sin, that, while unrepent- 
ed of, must leave the sinner during life 
outside her pale, and deprive him of her 
services at the grave. 

Let us thank God that even the Romish 
church has its heroes. May he send men 
of the same mold into our Protestant pul- 
pits, who will say to the Masonic beast, 
''Stand oflf, for this is holy ground," and 
resist even unto blood before they will 
allow the Baal rites of the lodge to mix 
with the pure worship of Je/hovah. 

218 Columbus ave., Boston. 



THE INSTITUTION MUST BE GOOD. 



My Relatives Are Members— An Experience 

Chicago, III, April 27, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure — It may be of inter- 
est to at least a few of the readers of the 
Cynosure to learn by what process a sim- 
ple home body, full of her daily house- 
hold duties and cares, came to have any 
thoughts on the lodge question. 

About fifteen years ago I came to Chi- 
cago from a quiet little Eastern country 
village, where at least outward morality 
prevailed and Christian principles ap- 
peared to be in the ascendency. 

My grandfather was a member of some 
secret organization: my father was an 
Oddfellow; my dearest uncle \vas a Free- 
mason, and numerous friends and ac- 
quaintances bowed at some mystic shrine 
to which we women would not have 1)een 
permitted to bring our offerings, had we 
so desired. 

Christian work called me to Chicago, 
and often in house to house visiting I 
heard these and similar expressions: "I 
don't need to go to your churches. I'm 
a Freemason, and that is all the religion 
I want. If a man lives up to his Masonic 
principles, he is all rigiht, and I'd trust 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



him sooner than any of your canting 
church members." Though the work of 
the National Christian Association was 
often mentioned in our home, I scarcely 
gave it a passing thought. 

Then I came to my present home, mar- 
ried to a so-called crank on the anti-se- 
crecy question, and the Cynosure came to 
us weekly with its denunciations of Free- 
masonry, its pictured scenes in the lodge- 
room and all manner of what I consid- 
ered "cranky articles upon which the wri- 
ters kneu^ nothing whatever." Some- 
times the ver\' sight of the paper w^ould 
excite me to "righteous indignation," and 
I would hasten to put the disagreeable 
sheet out of sight ; for, didn't I know that 
my father and my dear uncles and my 
loved friends would never be so silly, nor 
would they low^er themselves enough to 
pass through such ridiculous initiation 
ceremonies? 

But the time came when I heard Presi- 
dent Blanchard ring the changes on the 
lodge question, and President Finney's 
works held me spell^bound. I began to 
feel that my fortifications, built upon the 
self-respect of my neighbors and friends, 
were not as secure as they once were. But 
then, Blanchard and Finney and the rest 
might not be infallible, and doubts would 
again assail me until they were thorough- 
ly dispelled by quotations from the Ma- 
sonic ritual and the writings of promi- 
nent Freemasons. 

I am now convinced that Freemasonrv^ 
is a fraud, and one of the most powerful 
enemies of Christ in the land, and that 
the secret lodge is not necessary in order 
to carry forward any good work, and it 
is a positive 'hindrance to any kind of 
Christian service. 

These convictions have come to me 
through the faithful ministry of the 
friends of anti-secrecy wfho were willing 
to sow the good seed in any soil however 
hard or barren it might be, trusting the 
Lord for the increase. His promises, in 
their fullness, are to those who faithfully 
serve Him. It is ours to sow the seed, but 
His to send the plentiful showers. 

Mrs. J. M. H. 

165 Howe str., Chicago. 



MOTHER, HOME AND HEAVEN. 



These three magic words of our lan- 
guage are tlie. greatest in the vocabulary 



of every true heart, and the words often 
spoken by the dying. On them rests the 
safety of the Republic. Whatever will 
belittle the mother, endanger the home^ 
or jeopardize our chances for heaven,, 
must be considered an enemy to the best 
interests of our race. Tliat ther. are 
forces at work which are surely endan- 
gering these bulwarks, we have only tO' 
notice the unrest in church and state. 

In some parts of Egypt there are my- 
riads of ants so small as hardly to be seen^ 
yet they honeycomb trees, pillars, tem- 
ples, and even the Pyramids themselves^ 
all unnoticed until they fall in a great 
ruin. To a few is left the task of seeking 
out and staying the ravages of these se- 
cret destroyers. A father, tilted back in 
his chair, smoking his cigar, and reading 
his Sunday paper, cihucks his little son 
under the dhin and says: "That's right: 
you'll be a man before your m^.ther."" 
This implied compliment to himself and 
to man in general is not lost upon the 
boy. Immediately the stock in father 
goes up, and his mother suffers in com- 
parison. A desire is planted to be a maiv 
just like papa. 

About the time he smokes his first ci- 
gar lie begins to pity his mother that 
"she cnn't smoke, join the Masons, or 
vote." He is overheard to tell his com- 
panions that he shudders when he thinks- 
of the time when he was a 'little girl, 
and wore dresses hisself," and can hard- 
ly bide the time when he can be out 
nights and give no accounting to his 
mother, when no curfew shall ring him 
home. His joys will be full when he can 
be accoutered with tinsel and feathers, 
and go off on encampments, and have 
jolly times, "like father does." 

When this young chap grows up — if he 
should be chosen delegate to the "Gen- 
eral Conference," he will naturally, and 
instinctively vote against "woman's ad- 
mission," as his brothers of the craft have 
done in the past. Divine services will be 
neglected. "Masonry is good enough 
religion" for -him, and litde wonder, his 
chaplain is often a man whom he would 
scarcely recognize outside the lodge- 
room, and his pastor is there "working 
with him." Sacred things lose their sa- 
credness. Motherhood is belittled, home 
disintegrated, the chances of heaven en- 
dangered. Small foxes spoil the vine. 
Small ants cause great structures to fall. 



May, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



and a land honey-combed with societies, 
whose only known object is to discrimi- 
nate in favor of themselves, must work 
disaster sooner or later to the Republic. 
Mrs. H. E. Loveless. 
Wheaton, 111. 



LETTER FROM REV. P. S. HENSON. 



PASTOR FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, CHICAGO. 




I greatly regret that absence from the 
city will make it impossible for me to at- 
tend the conference of the National Chris- 
tian Association to be held next week. 
With the general objects of the Associa- 
tion I am thoroughly in sympathy. 

'Secret political organizations are ut- 
terly foreign to the genius of our free 
American institu- 
t i o n s. Whatever 
plea may be made 
for their necessity 
under despotic gov- 
ernments, w here 
free speech is throt- 
tled and death is the 
penalty of attempt- 
ing reform, surely 
there can be no ex- 
cuse for such secret 
REV. DR. HENSON. oath-bouud cabals 
in a republic like ours, wihere the people 
are the sovereigns and every man has ab- 
solute liberty of political action. ^ 

Wiiat we want in America is not Alach- 
iavelian plotting in secret council cham- 
bers, but an open field and a fair fight. 
And instead of sanctioning the tactics of 
our country's enemies by adopting them 
ourselves, it behooves all Christian pa- 
triots to denounce them everywhere and 
always, and to seek to overwhelm them 
by an avalanche of awakened public sen- 
timent. How infernally mischievous 
such organizations c?an be was luridly 
shown in the infamous conspiracy that 
was uncovered in the Cronin trial. There 
are those who would have us "fight fire 
with fire." Rather let us deluge it with 
water. It is fire from the bottomless pit, 
and the thing to do is to extinguish it by 
all the appliances that Christianity can 
bring to bear upon it. 

I have referred especially to secret po- 
litical organizations, but these same great 
principles apply to organizations that pro- 
fessedly aim at moral and religious ends. 



For myself, I humbly trust I am a Chris- 
tian, and the only religion that I believe 
in is the Christian religion; and one grave 
objection in my own mind to many of 
the secret societies that abound in our 
time is their use of religious forms, in 
which all recognition of Christ is studi- 
ously suppressed. There may be those 
who can use forms without doing vio- 
lence to their consciences; I could not. 
It may be said, indeed, and has been said, 
that these forms 'historically antedate 
Christianity. To which we reply that by 
their own showing these forms are now^ 
out of date. Christians at least cannot 
go back of Christ and in religious ser- 
vices speak and act as though he had not 
come. 

"Suppressio veri, suggestio falsi," is a 
legal maxim of world-wide application. 
Christ himself has said, ''No man cometh 
unto the Father but by me;" and it is as 
wicked to ignore Him in a lodge as it 
would be in a church. 

But, aside from all this, the whole pol- 
icy of founding secret societies for moral 
and religious purposes is as foreign to 
the spirit of the gospel as it is to the gen- 
ius of republican institutions. Its light 
is not to put under a bed or under a bush- 
el, but on a candle-stick, that it may give 
light to all that are in the house. Jesus 
Christ himself has said, "Every one that 
doeth evil hateth the light, neither com- 
eth to the light, lest his deeds should be 
reproved; but he that doeth truth com- 
eth to the light that his deeds may be 
made manifest, that they are wrought in 
God.'' And in his final vindication of 
himself before the high priest he said: 
'T spake openly to the world; I ever 
taught in the synagogue and in the tem- 
ple whither the Jews always resort,, and 
in secret have I said nothing." 

We are often told in vaunting speech 
of the illustrious names that have given 
their sanction to secret societies. No mat- 
ter for that — the name of Jesus is above 
every name, and his name is recorded in 
reprobation of them. Let us follow in 
his footsteps and emulate his spirit, and 
so shall we deserve the designation which 
he himself has given us, "The children of 
light." 

April 15, 1890. 



The N. C. A. will be represented in 
the ''Northlield Conference" in August. 



10 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



EDITORIAL. 



THE NEW REGIMENT. 



The first recruits to the new Cynosure 
reo-iment are ^Ir. Edward Brakeman, of 
Geneva. O.; Rev. T. J. Allen, of Sterhng, 
Kan. Each sent one new subscriber to 
the Cvnosure. We also desire to include 
Attorney Chas. ^IcC. Strickler, of Lan- 
caster, 0.,-as a member, for, though he 
did not secure a new subscriber, he or- 
dered an extra copy for himself. The 
letter from :Mr. Brakeman is of general 
interest in this connection. He writes: 

For the inclosed, please send the Cyn- 
osure to the address of C. E. Cook, Box 
74, :\Iadison, Lake County/Ohio. Thank 
the Lord. I have at last found in the per- 
son of Brother Cook an able coadjutor 
both for myself and the X. C. A. in our 
distinctive work of dismantling the forts 
of darkness. Mr. Cook has had an in- 
teresting experience in "secretism," hav- 
ing been yoked therein with unbelievers 
during fifteen vears. I gave him a pack- 
age oi X. C. A. literature for distribu- 
tion in his lodge-cursed town of fifteen 
secret clans. The above is the result of 
one of my "spins" on my "silent horse," 
which in my last I promised you I would 
take. And now I am ofi on another dis- 
tribution "spin" and a "still hunt" after 
one I think I can make an "Entered 
Apprentice" in the open order of the 
N. C. A. 



SPEAK THE TRUTH IN LOVE 



'The kind of anti-secret address that 
will best impress the people'' seems liable 
to be the one that is least obviously an- 
tagonistic or denunciatory. If the one 
who delivers it is warmly interested in 
the great and noble principles and insti- 
tutions which Masonr}- assails, and feels 
himself to be a champion defending them, 
his address will impress the hearers and 
win their sympathy as a mere attack on 
^Masonry might not. 

A defensive address is legitimate and 
impressive. It avails itself of convictions 
already cherished by the audience. 

Candor is one of the qualities that im- 
press people. They are won by a speaker 
whom thev can trust to "give the devil 
his due." Thev yield him their attention 



and convictions. He appears to look on 
all sides and look only for truth, and 
tliey will go with him where they would 
draw back from a guide obviously deter- 
mined to drag them to one point whether 
or no. Concentrate upon one topic 
worthy of attention, and make your argu- 
ment on that conclusive. Say that one 
thing, and say nothing else with it that 
could seem foreign to it or comparative- 
ly trifling. Fire one solid shot, and hit 
the taro^et. 



HOW TO SOW THE SEED, 



"How to reach the people most effect- 
ually with anti-secret literature" is a prac- 
tical question of the first importance. 
Fortunately, it has several practicable an- 
swers. Subscribe for the Cynosure, to 
be sent to some one not already familiar 
with such literature. Mail tracts and 
pamphlets to people who need them. 
Give exposures and other books to Sab- 
bath schools. Y. AI. C. A. and town li- 
braries. Send the Cynosure to all such 
reading-rooms. Lend books to friends. 
Obtain catalogues of educational institu- 
tions, such as normal schools, theological 
seminaries, academies and colleges, and 
remail your Cynosure each month to 
some pupil, inclosing a few tracts. Send 
Finney on ^^lasonry to the best woman in 
each church in your own town and the 
adjacent towns. These are suggestions 
of the way in which people can be reach- 
ed with X". C. A. literature. 



POOLING OF REFORMS. 



"The relation of the anti-secret move- 
ment to the reforms of the day" is frater- 
nal. It should be the ally of all, hindered 
by none. Entanglement of reforms is 
not always equivalent to the union that 
brings strength. The mere name reform 
must not be taken as a guarantee. Anti- 
secrecy is called a reform, but the facts 
of the case must sanction the name, not 
the name the facts. The same is true of 
prohibition, anti-tobacconism, woman 
suffrage, and so on. If they are reforms 
they are fraternal ; if not, then formal con- 
nections is only complication. 

Again, inasmuch as some who hold to 
one abhor, or are at least indifTerent to 
another, it is doubtful whether formal 



May, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



11 



union can always be secured and made 
real. Xot all who are prohibitionists are 
anti-secretists. ]\Iany of the latter prob- 
ably distrust woman suffrage. All are 
not agreed in their judgment of what is 
real reform and what are merely mis- 
named reforms. Real reforms are mu- 
tually helpful in the inevitable nature of 
the case. But this does not require a 
forced pooling of reforms. 



HOW TO ARRANGE CONVENTIONS. 



''How to arrange for an anti-secret 
convention, and how to get the most out 
of it," would read much the same if "anti- 
secret" were left out, or almost anything 
else were substituted. This teaches the 
wisdom of studying the arrangement of 
political, religious or other conventions 
that have already had good results. How 
do politicians arrange conventions? They 
know how. How do religious leaders, 
or officers of experience, arrange denom- 
inational conventions? Adopt features 
from their plans. Secure the best loca- 
tion, the ]:)est music, the best speakers, 
the best allies, the best forms of adver- 
tising, and the best list of definite, con- 
crete and interesting topics. Leave little 
time for lesser topics. Strike at once 
into heavy themes and great subjects. 
Strain no point, and admit none that does 
not, of its own natural force and weight, 
produce a strain. 



HOW TO ADVERTISE A MEETING. 

''The best way to get people out to an 
anti-secret meeting" may not be the most 
available one. One way is to go in com- 
panies of three to six and call for those 
who can thus be taken along. Another 
is to secure some comparatively inex- 
pensive but drawing attraction. A favor- 
ite singer niay be among the best for va- 
rious reasons. 

Do not rely too exclusively on the sub- 
ject or the speaker to draw an audience. 
Announce one or two features that will 
excite curiosity. For example: "A prin- 
cipal secret of the third degree will be 
told at this meeting in the very words 
used in the lodge." "Those who attend 
the evening session will be told a secret 
of the Knights' degree, wihich even ordi- 
nary blaster ^lasons do not know." "A 
member of the lodge in this town was 



knocked down in the lodge-room on a 
recent evening; a full report of the oc- 
currence will be given at the evening 
meeting." Use personal influence to 
bring people, and whatever else you do, 
be sure to stimulate curiosity. To excite 
curiosity without gratifying it is the first 
principle of advertising. 



SECURING THE BEST RESULTS. 



"How to get the best results from a 
meeting" is about equivalent to "How to 
have the best meeting." The best results 
may be looked for, much in proportion 
as Christian work is done in a Christian 
spirit. Love, considerateness and all 
charity, prayer, earnestness, seriousness, 
and zeal, according to knowledge, max- 
well be yoked with clearness and fullness 
of understanding and definiteness of aim. 

The best workers may be selected as 
likely to do the best work. In selecting 
topics, the more specific take precedence 
of the more general, and the more con- 
crete of the more abstract. 

The newsy element and newspaperish 
quality are desirable. Conclusiveness 
must be in all proofs. \\>ak ones must 
not be mentioned. Points should be 
clearly made. Never should there be 
lacking the vital element of exposure. 
One chief result desired is to extend 
knowledge. Teaching is essential to the 
best results, and teaching involves ex- 
posure. 



TAKING UP A COLLECTION. 

"How to get the best collection" is a 
question partly answered by saying, se- 
cure it when the audience is most aroused 
or when it is in the best humor. But this 
must be taken with a grain of salt, be- 
cause the pause and turn of attention 
might sometimes be a most unfortunate 
check. 

To get a good collection, stimulate cu- 
riosity by advertising: have good music, 
and draw out an audience large enough 
to give a good contribution. Give the 
audience the money's worth in music and 
speaking, and let them feel that they have 
had something worth paying for. Se- 
lect collectors toward whom the people 
feel no antagonism. Children may col- 
lect more than prominent Anti-Masons. 



12 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



In any case, the best collection is liable 
to come from the most generous mood, 
the strongest sense of duty or the most 
vivid conception of the need. A good 
collection is secured by first securing one 
of these. 



VALUE OF LOCAL ORGANIZATION. 



For some years we have been losing 
sight of the value of local organizations 
in our work. The importance of such 
organizations has often been told. Like 
coals of fire when brought together, they 
would kindle one another into a hotter 
glow of interest in the reform work. They 
would greatly inspire the faith and cour- 
age of the members by combining and 
strengthening their influence. Through 
such organizations plans of work could 
be devised, open meetings be held, new 
friends enlisted, literature circulated, and 
lectures and conventions arranged. They 
would thus be doing a most sifinificant 
work, that no other organization is do- 
ing. 

These societies should combine all the 
most valuable features of the A\'. C. T. U. 
and Christian Endeavor work. For each 
meeting, wherever held, there could be 
prepared an appropriate program, con- 
sisting of prayers, praise. Scripture read- 
ings, recitations, talks, or orations, pa- 
pers, or essays, and select readings. Care 
should be taken that these all, as far as 
possible, bear on the most radical refomi 
lines, and the devotional exercises should 
always be a prominent feature. A relig- 
ious revival spirit should perv^ade all the 
exercises. It would seem that in such 
organizations lies the secret of perpetuat- 
ing the lives of many of our reform 
churches in which the spirit of reform and 
testimony-bearing is dying out. 

If there is among the readers of the 
Cynosure a discouraged pastor, who is 
alarmed by seeing the young people in 
his- congregation drifting away from him 
into the secret lodges and other worldly 
snares of the devil, and losing the spirit 
of reform which characterized the church 
in former times, let him call together his 
people, and especially his young people, 
and propose to them such an organiza- 
tion. Let him pray over it, and then or- 
ganize his society with as little formality 
as possible. All the work thenceforth 



should be of a character to interest and 
call into activity all the latent talent of 
the young people; keep them at the front, 
supported iDy the parents and older mem- 
bers of the church; confine their inter- 
est, at all times and in all practicable 
ways, as much as possible in the channel 
of radical reform; help them to investi- 
gate the lodge evil as freely as they do 
any other evil, and at all times remind 
them that Satan's policy is to divert their 
attention and lead them to forsake the 
work of reform and substitute for it some 
other phase of church work. 



HAVE YOU ENLISTED? 



A\'e must add a regiment to our ranks 
of co-workers in securing Cynosure sub- 
scribers. The rank will depend upon the 
number of recruits (Cynosure subscrip- 
tions) secured for the army of our read- 
ers. There can be only one colonel, but 
tJiere are captains, lieutenants, sergeants 
and corporals needed in every city and 
hamlet in our land. Every community 
has in it men and women who love the 
home and the church, and who want to 
make them happier and holier as Jesus 
would have them. It is such that the 
Cynosure needs. \\> have opened a re- 
cruiting office; who will be the firs': to 
enlist? Send names and receive special 
helps. Remember that the Cynosure and 
weekly Xew York Tribune for one year 
are onlv Si. 2^. 



EN ROUTE TO ANNUAL MEETING. 



Secretary \\\ B. Stoddard spoke at 
Coal City, 111., on secrecy to a full house, 
both Sabbath evening, the 2d, and Tues- 
day evening, the 4th. 

Secretary P. B. A\Tlliams spoke to a 
good audience on April 27 in the L"". P. 
Church, Sterling, Kan. He also spoke 
at Lyons, Kan., on April 28. Mr. C. H. 
Strong writes : 

He had a larger audience than at Ster- 
ling and a much larger proportion of se- 
cret order men. He gave these latter a 
Turkish bath. It was a good treatment, 
and will bring forth good results. 

This man from the Western coast is 
well posted, courteous, and fearless in his 
presentation of the truth. 



May, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



13 



AN ADVANCE ALONG THE WHOLE 
LINE. 



RbFORM NEWS. 



PA' PRESIDENT C. A. BLAN'CHARD. 



Xow that we are making a change in 
the form of our labor, it seems to be im- 
portant that all on/ readers should pray- 
erfully and thankfully take hold of the 
work in its new fomi. "The ^Magazine 
Cynosure" is to be devoted exclusively 
to our work. It is to be in a form conven- 
ient for binding. It wiW be easy to devote 
special numbers to special topics, and 
there is reason to hope that it will do a 
work which it has not heretofore been 
able to do. The reduction in price from 
$1.50 to Si will make it easier to secure 
subscribers. In every town friends should 
be asked to give a dollar at least to carry- 
forward the movement and receive the 
Cynosure with its monthly messages from 
the field. 

So far as I can understand, God is 
disposed at this time to give us such an 
opening for our work as we have never 
known before. Pastors of large and 
small churches in city and in countr\' are 
feeling that the secret society movement 
is utterly obstructive of the churches, and 
they are disposed to hear us more freely 
than ever before. Christian people are 
understanding our cause more fully. It 
has seemed to many that we were run- 
ning a tilt against some powerful organi- 
zations which were more foolish than 
harmful. Christian people are coming 
more and more to understand that our 
movement means simply the preserva- 
tion of the Christian church against the 
anti-Christian systems which Satan has 
devised for the dishonor of God and the 
ruin of man. 

We have not the gain in political direc- 
tions which we should have. Politicians 
move last always. The question is not so 
much what is right as what will carry, 
but in every national movement civil af- 
fairs have been determined by religion, 
and if the ministrv* and the church become 
enlightened God will in due time care for 
the makers and administrators of law. In 
everv home where men have light re- 
specting the secret society movement, in 
every church where the truth is free 
there should be thanksgiving and prayer 
and gifts and expectation of blessing. 



NEW ENGLAND'S ANNUAL REPORT, 

BY SECV. J. P. STODDARD. 

A brief resume of progress in Xew En^ 
gland will interest, and, I trust, encour- 
age you. 

The general question has been kept be- 
fore the people; providential occurrences 
have been noted and utilized; the people 
have been taught to some extent the 
puerile initiatory rites; the despotic rule 
and blasphemous imprecations of some 
of the secret clans. ]\Iuch erhphasis has 
been given to the anti-Christian and es- 
sentially pagan religion of lodge wor- 
ship, and the utter inconsistency of a 
Christian's being found in fellowship- 
with those who reject Christ and "frame 
mischief by law.'' 

While direct hostility to the lodge pro- 
vokes insidious attacks from its adher- 
ents, it is no longer true that a minister's 
connection with secret orders is of ser- 
vice in securing a desirable pastorate, or 
that such a union procures for him the 
respect and confidence of his parishion- 
ers if already installed. Recently, and at 
several times during the year, I have 
been applied to for information regarding 
candidates for pastorates, with the asser- 
tion, *Tf he is a ^lason or Oddfellow we 
don't want him." 

This state of feeling is the result of sev- 
eral agencies that have been at work for 
years in Xew England. The meetings 
and mob in Music Hall. March, 1880, left 
an impression that has not been wholly 
effaced. Prior to that stirring event, Rev. 
Dr. Colver and President Finney sowed 
good seed, which is fruitful in these later 
years. Following the ^lusic Hall epi- 
sode came lectures, sermons, discussions 
and ocasional conventions, each adding 
its contribution to the rising current, un- 
til the people were prepared to hear and 
investigate the claims of these pretentious 
orders. Obsen-ation had led in many 
instances to grave suspicions, and, when 
in i8qi the work of tract distribution 
and personal work began.. it was in a soil 
broken and partially prepared for the 
sowing. 

The hand of God that had been guid- 
ing hitherto was clearly revealed in the 
uprising of many good and brave and 



14 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



influential men and women, at tliis jimc- 
ture, to throw the weight of their testi- 
mony ag-ainst the lodge power. Joseph 
Cook, A. T. Gordon. F. O. Cunningham, 
R. D. Grant. O. P. Gifford, Benj. F. True- 
blood. L J. Lansing, ]. j\L Foster, James 
M. Grav.'T. D. Roberts, Ezra T. Mcln- 
tire, 3Jrs. A. J. Gordon, ]\Irs. M. E. A. 
Gleason, Mrs. Hannah J. Bailey, and oth- 
ers of like precious fait^h gave a new im- 
petus to the cause. 

Ever on the alert, the enemy rallied 
and brought their strongest men to the 
front. By setting on high such digni- 
taries as Dr. Lorimer,' Dr. Bates and Dr. 
Gumbart, they endeavor to confuse the 
people and neutralize the testimony of 
their opponents. In this eiTort the craft 
has found a willing ally in the popular 
press, and received countenance and sup- 
port from the silent acquiescence of con- 
servative pulpits. 

A number of influential pastors, who 
have not been identified with the anti- 
lodge movement, have procured books 
of instruction and are quietly working 
among their parishioners, warning those 
not entangled, and trying to dissuade 
those already in. the orders from continu- 
ing longer in such unscriptural and un- 
holy alliance. 

Less apparent help was given to the 
anti-secrecy cause through the protract- 
ed evangelistic services in our city during 
the past winter than I had hoped. Brother 
Moody gave several testimonies against 
the union of Christians with the lodge, 
but his testimony was largely neutral- 
ized by fellowshiping prominent mem- 
bers known to be in good and regular 
standing in the orders. In this, as in 
m.ost instances, practice had more weight 
than precept. People will cling to the 
old maxim, ''Actions speak louder than 
words," and they are not in haste to make 
the 'Svorld-wide evangelist" an exception. 
Men were encouraged, however, to use 
greater freedom, and I chanced to know 
that Brother ?vIoody received many 
words of encouragement both personally 
and by mail for the testimonies he gave. 

Xot all our friends in business have 
the courage to keep and distribute our 
literature, but there are some prominent 
and widely known who keep a supply at 
hand, which they use with customers to 
good purpose, and this is one very hope- 
ful feature in our work. 



In common with many worthy enter- 
prises Ave have felt the stringency of the 
times and have published and distributed 
less literature than last year. Our plan 
is such that we can contract or expand 
our work according to the means in hand 
and so avoid financial embarrassment 
which is always perplexing. We have no 
elaborate plans for the future, but pur- 
pose following as He* shall leajd, and as 
we shall hear Him saying: '"This is the 
way; walk ye in it.'' We shall greatly 
miss the weekly visits of the Cynosure, 
but believe profoundly in the integrity 
and judgment of our brethren, who have 
deemed it wise to make the change. We 
note with satisfaction the broadening of 
work in connection with your annual 
gathering, and pray that a blessing may 
come to each of the churches that wel- 
come you to their sanctuaries; we feel 
an inspiration from your example to un- 
dertake more and greater conquests for 
t'he Master. If God will I purpose visit- 
ing conventions, camp meetings and im- 
portant religious gatherings to do such 
work and in such ways as I may be able 
during the coming season. 



CALIFORNIA STATE CONVENTION. 



Interesting Report by Secretary Williams— Excellent 

Addresses by Able Speakers— Strong 

Testimony by Seceders. 

The California State Association met 
in the Temperance Temple, Los Ange- 
les, Wednesday evening, April 14, 1897. 
The house was called to order by the 
Field Agent, who nominated Rev. C. B. 
Ebey, of Los Angeles, for temporary 
dhairman. He was elected and Mr. Hugh 
Todd was chosen secretary. 

Rev. P. B. Williams gave a synopsis 
of the coast work for the past year. Rev. 
C. B. Ebey delivered the address of wel- 
come. Bro. Ebey is a fine speaker and 
a good, true man. The following will 
show something of his loyalty to our 
cause. In his address he referred to the 
signing oi the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, in which some one said to Mr. Car- 
roll: "If any trouble comes to us for this 
act, you are not in as much danger as 
we, because there are so many Carrolls." 
Mr. C. immediately took the pen and 
wrote "of Carrollton." "Now," he said, 
"there is but one at Carrollton, and that 
is me." Bro. Ebey added: "In this re- 
form I want to record C. B. Ebey. o^ 814 



May, 189' 



CHRISTIAX CYNOSURE. 



15 



Kohler street, Los Angeles." He was 
followed by Bishop Dillon in an able ad- 
v'^ress. 

The next mornnig, after the devotion • 
al exercise, the following committees 
were announced by the chairman : Reso- 
lutions, Bishop Dillon and E. Leonard- 
son; NominatTons, P. B. Williams, L. C. 
Ebey and Hugh Todd; Enrollment, Rev. 
Thos. Fluck and Geo. W. Shealey. 

Rev. P. B. Williams spoke on tlic 
"Origin and Character of Freemasonry." 
Rev. E. Leonardson presented an excel- 
lent paper on, "Why Christians Should 
Xot Unite with Secret Socieiies." He 
was followed by Bishop Dillon in a 
strong arraignment of t-he lodges. At 2 
p. m., quite a nuniber took }jart in the 
testimony meeting. This was especially 
Intel esting. Rev. Clark said: "I was 
an Oddfellow, and they refused to let me 
use Christ's name in prayer. I could not 
stay in when I found this custom of mine 
ofiensive to the Jewish brctliren, and 
that Oddfellowship sustained them 
against Jesus Christ." "Secret Societies 
by a Member." was postponed on ac- 
count of Dr. Bowers being called into 
court as a witness. Air. Shealy was in- 
vited and spoke for about thirty minutes. 
Among other things he said he had am- 
ple opportunity to see the nature and 
workings of ^Masonry in the army during 
the war. He told of a case in his own 
company, he being captain. There was 
a cowardly fellow, who was a Alason, and 
an order came for two men to be fur- 
loughed. The cowardly Alason worked 
with the colonel, who was also a Alason, 
and got the furlough. This was contrary 
to military usage, as no one could 
grant a furlough without the consent of 
the captain or commanding officer. 

"Holiness and Secret Societies'' was 
very ably handled by Rev. Dr. Bresee, 
who had been a ]\Iason for years, and 
spoke from experience. Xo man ever 
used stronger Christian expression 
against the lodges. He confessed that 
he had lost hope in the Government, and 
in the church so far as reform is concern- 
ed, but our business is to save the few 
who will hear the truth. Let a man be 
fully saved and lodgeism will peel of¥ as 
naturally as a scab from an old sore after 
it has healed. The Doctor is an able 
speaker. He 'has a large following here. 
He left the AL E. Church less than two 



years ago, and, with Dr. Wednev, or- 
ganized the "Church of tlie Xazarene,'' 
and now they have nearly five hundred 
members. They are getting some saved 
and sanctified at each meeting. 

Dr. Bowers came in and spoke at this 
juncture on "Secret Societies bv a Mem- 
ber." He said in part: "If 'l should 
stand here and talk till dark I could say 
no more than I can say in a few words: 
There is nothing in secret societies for a 
Christian, but mudh in them detrimental 
to Christianity.' I have taken the thirtv- 
third degree in Freemasonry and I can 
say it required more time to study the 
Ritual of Alasonr}- than it to'ok to rnaster 
Greek and Hebrew while in college, and 
there was nothing in it after all." 

Bishop Dillon followed with an address 
which excelled all. It Avas simply mas- 
terly. ^ He publicly challenged any man 
to a discussion of the' subject of secret so- 
cieties from the Christian standpoint. 
Rev. P. B. Williams read a poem. "The 
Alasonic Auction." 

In the evening the following officers 
were elected: President, Rev. C. B. 
Ebey:\lce President, Rev. W. W. Lo- 
gan; Secretary, Air. Geo. W. Shealev; 
Treasurer, Rev. G. P. Runkle. 

P. B. Williams spoke at length, and 
Bishop Dillon read the report of the com- 
mittee on resolutions, which was unani- 
mously adopted, after 'which the Bishop 
made the closing address. All who were 
present said it was a good convention. 
It was not so well attended as it should 
have been, but for quahty it was hard 
to excel. There was some good done, I 
am sure. 

Bros. Hugh Todd. W. W. Logan. E. 
Hildreth, the Ebeys, Fluck. Curtis^ Leon- 
ardson and others are special friends who 
gave me much assistance in carrying on 
the convention to success. Alav the Lord 
greatly bless them. Letters to the con- 
vention were read from a number of 
friends. The convention is over. May 
its influence be felt manv vears to come. 
P.'B. Williams. 



LETTERS TO THE CALIFORNIA CON- 
VENTION. 



Held at Los Angeles, April I4ard 15. 1897. 

From Rev. S. AI. Ramsey, Cedar^-ille. 
Ohio: I wish I could be with vou, and 
give a little help. I hope the interest 



16 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



shown and the good done may be even 
beyond that of the convention last year. 
No place needs to have the anti-secret 
cause presented more than Los Angeles. 
But I rejoice that the cause has good 
stanch friends there who are able to de- 
fend it. 

Rev. L. E. Cole, Bangor, Calif.: Con- 
vey to the anti-secret convention my best 
wishes and sympathy in the good work 
of separation from the lodge. Tell them 
to turn on the light. Christians must 
either forsake the ways of darkness and 
dwell in the light or stand convicted of 
hypocrisy and deception. "The liglht s'hin- 
eth in the darkness, and the darkness 
cannot smother or vail out the light." 
"Whatsoever maketh manifest is light." 
Turn on the light, brethren — the search 
light of truth. 

Bro. F. H. Horton, Corralitos, Calif.: 
Our Bay cities seem to be w^holly given 
over to secret idolatry. On the last night 
of our convention, on seating myself in 
the electric car for Alameda, a young 
man said he had seen an account of the 
convention and came over to the last ses- 
sion and was much interested in the 
speeches, and wanted to know my objec- 
tions to ^Masonry from a Christian stand- 
point. He said he wanted to lead a con- 
sistent Christian life, but had intended 
to join the Masons and knew of other 
young men who would go with him. He 
said he had been led to suppose there 
could be nothing wrong in it by the ex- 
ample of prominent, Christian men. His 
Sabbath school superintendent, his pas- 
tor, and his presiding elder were Masons. 
I gave him a number of points and re- 
ferred him to literature, and left his case 
with the Lord. His conversation gave 
me food for much thought, especially in 
regard to the responsibility of Masonic 
preachers. 

Rev. S. Bristol, Ventura, Calif.: I am 
in fullest sympathy with you in the anti- 
secret reform. During my entire .public 
life I have been brought in contact in 
greater or less degree with these secret 
societies. Some of them have been com- 
paratively innocent, as for example, the 
Good Templars. But in my opinion, the 
verv best of them would have done bet- 
ter work had the pledge of secrecy been 
left out and all its movements and trans- 
actions been frank and open to the light 
of dav. The need of secrecy was never 



apparent to me. The pledge of the Good 
Templars seemed to me puerile and a silly 
aping of the Masonic Order. It seemed 
to me cowardly, clandestine and un- 
worthy a citizen of this free country and 
a believer in God. And my whole soul 
shrank from it. But of them all the Ma- 
sonic order has been fraught with evil 
influences, baleful and wide-spread, be- 
yond them all. As I have observed, it 
has been largely a political clan, invei- 
gling into its organization political aspir- 
ants, and persons ambitious of place, with 
the assurance of the support of the secret 
order. I have been in places where this 
secret society could dictate to all other 
parties their nominations and control the 
elections. I am ashamed to confess that 
I have known ministers who have join- 
ed the order just to get its influence, not- 
withstanding they knew well that the 
name above every other name — that of 
Christ — is wholly left out in its elaborate 
ritual. The saddest thing about that or- 
der to my mind is its influence over 
its members. I have seldom known one 
converted who belonged to the order. In- 
deed, when I have known an unconvert- 
ed member of the community was a Ma- 
son, hope of his conversion largely died 
out in my heart! And when men have 
consulted me about joining the order my 
advise has been, "If you intend to be a 
Christian, large-hearted, useful, and de- 
vout, then DON'T." 



REV. J. K. GLASSFORD, PHCENIX, ARIZ. 

I was made a Mason in the town of 
Waverly, Iowa, though I was never one 
at heart. I read Morgan's Exposition, 
and was told by Masons that it was false, 
but I was initiated precisely as Morgan 
described. I was practically stripped, was 
neither naked nor clad, and had a cable- 
tow around my neck, and a hoodwink 
over my eyes. I was led around and 
made to repeat the ritual after the Wor- 
shipful Master, and the oaths, with the 
awful penalty of having my tongue torn 
out by its roots, and my body buried in 
the rough sands of the sea, at low water 
mark. Where the tide ebbs and flows 
twice in twenty-four hours — so help me 
God, etc. 

I took four degrees, and began at once 
to expose and hold them up to ridicule. 
\^ery soon three Masons came to see me. 



May, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



17 



I frankly told them 'they 'had lied to me 
and taken $40 of my money, besides 'hum- 
bugging me, and now it was my turn to 
expose them. This I have been doing 
ever since, and will continue to do as 
long as I shall live, God being my helper. 
What a set of liars Masons are, repeating 
their lies over and over. Freemasonry is 
the devil's cfhyroh, having its mock 
•death, conversion and resurrection. It is 
the devil's incubator to hatch out the 
■children of devils. It is satan's master- 
piece, the mystery of iniquity of w'hich 
Paul speaks. 

What is the remedy? Turn on the 
light, expose it, tell men about it in 
churches, and at every convenient sea- 
son. Do not support Masonic ministers 
by paying or going to (hear them. Do 
•not vote Masons into office. Let us do 
our part, so that we shall be without 
l)lame in that great day, even if we are 
hated of all men for Christ's sal<e, yet at 
last we shall win the crown. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 



a.ODGE EXALTED ABOVE THE CHURCH 

Boston, April 19, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure — I was glad, in look- 
ing over the services in this mornings 
paper, to learn that though Easter was ob- 
served in Tremont Temple yesterday, the 
usual display of sabered Knights was 
omitted. Let us 'hope that the pastor's 
•eyes have, in some measure at least, been 
opened and that the last of these pagan 
services have been held in that sancutary 
consecrated to the worsfhip of the true 
•God. Templar services were held in two 
-or three so-called Christian churches, but 
nothing like the accustomed exhibit of 
"fuss and feathers" was visible. The Chi- 
nese "'brethren," however, were not idle. 
"While their Christian (?) brethren were 
worsihiping, the disciples of Confucius 
were making Masons in their lodge at 26 
Harrison avenue, in this city. 

According to this morning's Herald, 
this is a very prosperous lodge of four 
hundred members, to which twenty-two 
were added last evening. Over two hun- 
dred were present, and Grand Master 
Gong Ho presided. A prosperous future 
is predicted for "Wy Gee Hony" lodge, 
and it is quite certain that our Doctors of 



Divinity and Christian (?) Masons will 
not be obliged to visit China or San Fran- 
cisco to enjoy the fellowship, at a com- 
mon altar, from which "all sectarian ten- 
ets are excluded," to worship with broth- 
ers to whom they are "bound by a tie 
stronger than human hands can impose." 
Whether this "tie" is diabolical or Divine 
is not stated, but it is "stronger' than can- 
onical decrees or the decisions of human 
courts, and exalts the lodge above church 
creeds, and legislative enactments and 
binds its victims to a body of dead and 
degrading forms, which are too obscene 
and senseless to be exhibited in public. 
While these things continue and no word 
of warning is heard from our pulpits, and 
some of our prominent clergymen in- 
dorse and sustain them by remaining 
yoked with this Sabbath desecrating sys- 
tem of blasphemy, we have great need 
of a revival of pure and undefiled religion, 
which shall sweep these refuges of lies 
from our city. God in mercy hasten the 
glad day. James P. Stoddard. 



MAN MADE BROTHERHOODS. 



Coulterville, 111., April 26, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure — My mind, when a 
boy, was first directed to the subject of 
secret societies, particularly Freemason- 
ry, by the agitation caused by tlie murder 
of Wm. Morgan. As 'our Heavenly Fa- 
ther causes his sun to shine on the evil 
and on the good, and sends rain on the 
just and on the unjust, should not what 
is good be for all? Am I not by nature 
under dbligation to do all the good I can 
to all men? The only possible increase 
of the natural obligation is by grace, "es- 
pecially to the household of faith." Can 
any artificial brotherhood increase my ob- 
ligation, or influence me to the better 
discharge of the duties I already owe? 

What 'benevolence do members of se- 
cret orders ever show to any that are not 
members of their order? Obser\^ation 
will soon show us that the members of 
secret orders are not united by any real 
brotherly principle, but by the very op- 
posite — namely, a party spirit, and the 
most unmitigated selfishness. ]My obser- 
vation is that men are never made bet- 
ter, but worse, by uniting with secret or- 
ders. 

I may be asked, Are not temperance 
orders an exception? There may be a 



18 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



partial refoniiation from drinking- prac- 
tices for a time, but as it is not founded 
upon a conscientious conviction of the 
sin of drinking; there is no moral refor- 
mation. Xo one of the secret orders 
teaches or enforces Christian morality. 
My experience is that in communities 
where there are secret orders, whoever 
else are members, the most inveterate 
haters of God and of all rig^hteousness 
are leading members. 

• _ J. M. Sloane. 



REPORT OF INTERESTING MEETINGS. 



Coast Agent En Route to Chicago. 

Osage City, Kan., April 29, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure — At La Junta, Colo.. 
V e had a good meeting in the R. P. 
Church, P.ev. E. H. Buck, acting pastor. 
He is loyal and true, and has a faithful 
membership, who can be depended upon 
as real reformers. Five Cynosures will 
now come to La Junta. On the 27t'h we 
were met at Sterling by Rev. T. J. Allen, 
pastor of the R. P. Church, who convey- 
e-d us to his elegant suburban home, 
where we were royally entertained until 
time for speaking. The meeting was in 
the First U. P. Church, Rev. C. H. 
Strong, D. D., pastor. Although it was 
raining, the house was comfortably filled 
with a fine audience. Dr. Spencer, Presi- 
dent of Cooper College, beirtg first to 
press forward and congratulate us. 

Dr. C. H. Strong took us home with 
him, and he and family treated us so 
kindly we shall never forget it. He drove 
us to the station, and came again next 
morning, and met us at the train from 
Lyons. May the Lord greatly bless him 
and family. It is so different when a re- 
former meets such kindred spirits as he 
and Brother Allen, compared with those 
ministers who are shy and stand a little 
back. 

At Lyons Brother John Motter had 
the largest audience that has greeted me 
yet. 

Fie drove us to his home, where his 
good wife and family greeted us kindly 
and administered to all our wants in the 
most hospitable manner. The hall was 
crowded, and about two-thirds were 
lodge men, who put on a bold front, but 
gave me close attention. I was intro- 
duced by Rev. Toliaferro, a Wesleyan 
Methodist Evangelist. Bro. Motter de- 



serves much credit for working up this 
meeting and for bearing the financial bur- 
den. He wanted to bear testimony once 
more to the wickedness of the lodge be- 
fore the Lord should call him home. May 
the Lord bless this dear family for their 
devotion to such a good cause. 

At Osage City I spoke in the Swedisii: 
Lutheran Church, Rev. J. A. Hohnen pas- 
tor. He is a true man, and has a mem- 
bership true as steel. 

The house was full; the leading lodge- 
men were out, and gave excellent atten- 
tion. When I get together with such 
kind friends it makes me feel like stay- 
ing longer. P. B. Williams. 



ENCOURAGEMENTS IN THE WORK. 



On Train, April 30, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure — Again I am en route 
to the annual meeting to give an account 
of my stewardship. I am glad to report 
progress. Never have I secured in one 
year so many new readers to the Cyno- 
sure. Never have the friends in my field 
been more cordial or the wide open doors 
for usefulness more numerous. Cash 
collections, to be sure, have been much 
smaller than at times, but I have not 
gone hungry, nor am I kept from the an- 
nual gathering. 

Recently I have visited several towns, 
and addressed the students of two col- 
leges. I found the German Baptist 
Brethren College at Huntingdon, Pa., en- 
joying a large degree of prosperity. A 
new era seems to be dawning to this^ 
church. Increasing activity grows with 
a knowledge of the situation. The homes 
of the professors, together with the doors 
of the college, wereiwide open to welcome 
your agent. Over an hour was given for 
an explanation of the chart and answer- 
ing cjuestions. I received many expres- 
sions of appreciation, and many subscrip- 
tions to the Cynosure. 

Of all who advocate the anti-secrecy 
cause none are more stanch than the 
Ohio Lutheran Synod. The President 
of the University was ready to aid me at 
a meeting of the students last evening;, 
and the chart talk, with questions, occu- 
pied our time. A substantial evidence of 
sympathy and co-operation was given. 

Among the new subscribers to our pa- 
per is R. C. Smeltzer, of Oberlin, Pa. His 
father has for many years been one of 



Mav. 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



19 



cur lielpers. His son is much respected 
as a churcii worker. How glad such 
fathers must feel to see their sons carry- 
ing forward the work they have begun I 
W. B. Stoddard. 



TRADE UNIONS. 



Chicago, April 30, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure — There seem to be no 
■evils resulting to society and the individ- 
ual from secret orders more pernicious 
than that of the trade unions of the pres- 
ent day. This may be due not so much 
perhaps that there is more evil in this se- 
cret combination than in the others, but 
from the fact that in the struggle through 
which these labor unions assert them- 
selves we see more of the exoteric side of 
their composition and get a fuller view 
of their incomparable gall and selhsh- 
ness than we do of the others. The fact 
that these secret unions assume to mo- 
nopolize labor, from the most skilled me- 
chanic down to the hod-carrier, even 
against the protest of the employer, and 
to enforce their arrogant demands by as- 
sault and murder, as has been so fre- 
quently done in our city, is sufficient to 
bring upon them the unalloyed hostility 
of ever}^ right-thinking person. 

As it is to-day, if a mechanic whose 
family may be starving, gets a call to 
work, when he presents himself, the first 
question asked, not by his employer, but 
by his co-employe, is. Have you got 
your union ticket with all dues paid up? 
If he has not, he can't work and his fam- 
ily must starve, or in the event of tlie 
employer retaining him every other me • 
clianic, and even laborer, will throw down 
his tools and quit the job. Surely, so- 
ciety has just as much interest in the man 
out of the union as in the one who is ni, 
and surely no such imperium in imperio 
■should be tolerated in our country, where 
it is not only the provision of our consti 
tntion "that all men are equal before the 
Inw, ' but the genius of our institutions 
as well. T. H. Gault. 



PATH TO SUCCESS FOR THE YOUNG. 



Error leads to failure. Overcome it. 
Secret societies are a well-traveled road 
to error's headquarters. They wrest from 
their members the exercise of the right 
of private judgment. Some of them are 



criminally rude to woman. They destrov 
the spiritual unity of the marriage rela- 
tions, a gift of priceless value both to hus- 
bands and wives. They break down the 
common brotherhood established by 
God. They interfere with the normal op- 
eration of the legislative, executive and 
judicial departments of government. 

Worshiping God in a manner forbid- 
den by him or invented by men, their re- 
ligion is an abomination to Him. The 
worst member who is tolerated in the se- 
cret orders is not so black as the errors 
of those orders, while the purest per- 
son that ever committed his way to God 
is noc so pure as the principles of the re- 
ligion of our Lord Jesus ' Christ. Xew 
revelations of human possibilities open 
to tlie follower of Christ. Love God and 
do His commandments. Know the Scrip- 
tures and your life will be an ever-in- 
creasing success. Elizabeth B. Cook. 

316 Washington boulevard. Chicago. 



"BLESSED MEMORIES. 



Those familiar with the reform repre- 
sented by the Christian Cynosure from 
its beginning will not need to be assured 
that few, if any, women have suffered as 
much, and done as much for this reform, 
as ]\Irs. ]\Iary A. Blanchard, the wife of 
Jonathan Blanchard, the first editor of 
the Cynosure. She passed to her reward 
in the month of January, 1890, while on 
her way to California. 

It was the desire of her husband that a 
record of her life might be published, and 
in accordance with his wish, this work 
was undertaken by one of his daughters. 
The author has been hindered by a mul- 
titude of home duties and other cares, 
so that the book was not completed until 
quite recently. It has just been published 
by Ezra A. Cook, the first publisher of 
the Cynosure, and makes a neat little 
volume of a little over 150 pages. 

It is written in a clear, interesting stvle, 
and while it is the life of :\Irs. Blanchard, 
it necessarily gives much information re-' 
specting the work of her husband, with 
whom she lived and worked for more 
than half a century. 

The work preserves in a permanent 
form much of the written work of :Mrs. 
Blanchard, which adds to its value for 
all lovers of Christian reform movements. 

It has a number of illustrations, includ- 



20 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



ing photographs of herself, her birth- 
place, two views of the old homestead in 
\'ermont, some of her deceased children, 
and a family group, taken on the Fourth 
of July preceding her decease. In this 
picture are seen the forms of the vener- 
able Jonathan Blanchard and his life- 
long companion, surroimded by children 
and children's children. 

All things considered, every reader of 
the Cynosure cannot fail to be interested 
in the book, and the price asked barely 
covers the expenses of printing and dis- 
tributing, it being the desire of the author 
that as many as possible might be in- 
spired and blessed by reading it. The 
title of the book, "Blessed Memories," is 
very appropriate. It can be secured, post- 
paid, by sending 60 cents to the Cyno- 
sure office. 



A LOVING TRIBUTE, 



Algonquin, 111., April 30, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure — I am glad to be per- 
mitted to arrange music to the beautiful 
hymn composed by the late President 
Jonathan Blanchard, of Wheaton Col- 
lege, 111. I trust the little melody set to 
the words will make a song that will stir 
all lovers of the cause Avhich President 
Blanchard and the Cynosure represented. 

I shall always look backward, with 
great reverence and pleasure, to those 
years gone by, when I was wont to meet 
that man of God and listen to his words 
of counsel and wisdom in the class-room. 
I was in the last class he graduated, the 
class of 1882. Though no more shall 
we see his form and listen to his burning 
words of fervor, yet his personality and 
zeal live in the hearts of many who came 
in touch with his life, for, to know the 
man was to see his unbounded faith in 
God and his loyalty to every cause of 
truth and humanity. Very truly yours, 
O. S. Grinnell. 



VOLUNTEER WANTED. 



Bombay, India, March 4, 1897. 
Rev. W. I. Phillips: 

Dear Brother in Christ — We are heart- 
ily grateful for the warm expressions of 
deep sympathy and kindly interest which 
have been received from yourself and 
many others at this time. We appreciate 
any thought or suggestion on the part 



of others in regard to carrying on the im- 
portant work from which my deceased 
mother has so lately been called. 

Our anti-secrecy and anti-Romanist 
efforts are important branches of the 
work. W. J. Gladwin, my father, has ex- 
pressed a strong desire that some one 
might be sent out from your association 
to take over this branch of the work,,, 
which is represented by the Cynosure in 
the United States, and carry it forward 
more vigorously and thoroughly than 
the Watchman is able to do with its other- 
lines of work. Possibly, he may have 
written to you making the suggestion. 
It is a line of work that needs very much 
to be pushed in India, and we would be 
thankful if some one felt led to come over 
and carry forward this particular line of 
campaign in India. 

We desire your earnest prayers for the 
continuance of God's blessing upon His 
work of free, full and fiery salvation in 
this land. Vivian I. Gladwin. 



OUR POSTAL CARD SYMPOSIUM 



How to Oppo«e Secret Societies? 

We have received the following replies 
to this question since our last issue : 

REV. T. FRASER, GALT, ONTARIO. 

To the drunkard the pastor cries STOP! 

Alcohol is a dangerous leaven. 
To the gambler and dancer — just drop; 

Those practices lead not to heaven. 

If you go by the way of the lodge 
You'll be led to believe all is well; 

And may not get a word from your pastor, 
Though he knew it a straight road to hell. 

W^hat we need here is lectures Christ- 
like. 

REV. JAMES FERGUSON, GERING, NEB. 

First, seek the baptism of the HoIt 
Spirit, and then go in partnership with 
Him who said that "In secret have I said 
nothing.'' Then give your testimon}^ 
against the evil at all times and under 
all circumstances, and leave the result 
with God. 

JOHN H'ELFRI'CH, LARWILL, IND. 

What is mostly needed in this section 
are stalwart Christians, who will dare to^ 
beard the lion in his den — men filled with 
the Holy Ghost, that can speak the truth 
for righteousness' sake without conflict- 
ing with the rights and privileges of oth- 
ers. And then we need lecturers, quali- 



May, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



21 



fied and experienced to demonstrate and 
clinch the truth driven home by tracts and 
literature. 

p. F. THURBER, QUIMBY, IOWA. 

Preach loyalty to God and country and 
show that we cannot be loyal to these and 
to the lodge at the same time. Show how 
it conflicts with the Bible and our national 
constitution. Do not merely throw .the 
sword of the Spirit at them, but wield 
it skillfully and pointedly. Error is de- 
stroyed by the ''word of their testimony/' 
wdiich is the Bible. 

E. BRAKEMAN, 'GENEVA, OHIO. 

First leam just what the lodge is. Then 
bring the Word of God to bear on the 
minds of its Christian dupes. Next send 
all the money you can to the National 
Christian Association, 221 West Madi- 
son street, Chicago, for its most stirring 
literature on the subject, and scatter the 
seed far and wide on the best ground you 
can find, which is the Christian mind and 
thajt of the young. And, lastly, do not 
pray without asking God's blessing on 
those who are giving their best manhood 
and their earnest Christian energy to this 
w^ork of enlightening the world regarding 
the secret empire — the agent of the pow- 
ers of darkness. 

MRS. CLARISSA O. KEELER, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

A good many years ago I heard a lec- 
ture on temperance which left a more 
lasting impression on my mind than any 
I ever heard of the kind. The lecturer 
exhibited illustrations on canvas, to 
show the changes wrought by alcohol on 
the stomach. The words have long since 
been forgotten, but I never forgot how 
a stomach, burnt up with alcohol, looked 
when put upon canvas. 

So it was when I became acquainted 
with Sister Powers, of the Beacon Light 
Mission, and listened to her chart talk 
on secret societies. Before that, though, 
I had heard something about them; yet 
there existed in my mind so much con- 
fusion of thought on the subject that I 
felt I really knew but little about it, and, 
being so hopelessly entangled I cared still 
less. But there the whole system of Free- 
masonry was pictured out right before 
me, and with her explanation of it and 
the performances inside the lodge, I be- 
came deeply interested and a tangible im- 
pression was left, which I can easily recall 
to mind. 



SARCASM ON LODGE TITLES. 



Among the new and startling secret so- 
cieties which we note in this country is 
that of the Independent Order of Hoo- 
Hoos, now spreading in the West, and 
said to be on the point of gaining a foot- 
hold in the East. This joyous body, as 
we learn from chance references to it in. 
the newspapers, is given to holding con- 
catenations at stated intervals, with the- 
aid of such officers as Supreme Snarks,- 
Crrand Vice Snarks, and others as won- 
derful. The exact object which the- 
worthy Hoo-Hoos have for existing has. 
not yet been disclosed to us, though we 
suspect that their aim may be no more- 
serious than to promote the gayety of 
nations. 

But their appearance calls attention' 
anew to the extraordinary faculty pos- 
sessed by the American people for form- 
ing strange secret societies with resound- 
ing names, and managed by officers bear- 
ing reverberating titles. On the whole, 
the Hoo-Hoos, with their Snarks, are 
rather modest, and seem to lack original- 
ity. A few years ago there was said ta< 
exist in the State of Texas a secret so- 
ciety called the Gracious Pack of Free ■ 
and Unterrified Jimplecutes, the head of- 
ficer of which was an Exalted Supreme 
WiDipus-Wallipus, and with a Grand Be- 
nign Old Giascutus and a Chief Reful- 
gent and Iridescent Gee-Whiz. It is pos- 
sible that this order never existed beyond - 
the subtropical imagination of a corre- 
spondent; but, on the other hand, there 
w^as no particular reason to doubt its ex- 
istence. The account sounded, and still 
sounds, reasonable. The calhng of am 
officer Refulgent and Iridescent seems tO' 
us especially probable, since many so- 
cieties, with naities modest and undemon- 
strative rather than otherwise, bestow 
upon their officers titles which stir the 
soul of the listener like the sound of a: 
trumpet. 

Indeed, may not our persistency as a: 
people in launching new and remarkable 
societies result from our love of echoing- 
titles? x^nd may not this love spring from' 
a genuine need for them born of our ut- 
ter lack of titles in civil life? May there 
not be implanted in the human bosom an 
absolute and certain demand for titles 
which causes a man who cannot hope 
ever to become a Sir or a Lordship tcv 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



snatch liungTily at the chance of l^eing 
an Exalted Puissant Grand? Further 
-confirmation of this view may perhaps 
•be found in the fact that every man 
among us who knows enough about a 
cannon to point out promptly and cer- 
tainly the muzzle is a Colonel, while men 
have repeatedly reached the rank of Cap- 
tain and ]\Iajor in civil life who are quite 
at sea on the point of the exact location 
of this important part of a gun, only hold- 
inof, in a o-eneral wav.thiat it is around one 
•end somewhere. But supposing that we 
are correct in tracing the love of society 
-titles, which fairly glow and dazzle by 
their own light, to our national lack of 
orders of nobility, it would be no argu- 
ment in favor of a peerage, but rather the 
reverse, since if the societies satisfy the 
inborn cravings for titles, as they seem 
to do, they are better in the respect that 
the members undeniably pay for the 
thing themselves, while in the case of a 
peerage it is suspected that the untitled 
have in the end to provide more or less 
directly for its board and lodging. 

Not only do the many w^onderful se- 
cret societies seem to satisfy certain needs 
of the jiuman constitution, but it does not 
appear thnt they do any particular harm 
in anv other direction. We arrive at this 
conclusion from the fact that, so far as 
we are aware, there is no Society for the 
Suppression of Societies. It is true that 
among the charges made by an Omaha 
-woman, applying recently for divorce in 
South Dakota, was that her husband be- 
longed to too many secret societies ; but 
he seems to have been an exception. He 
belonged to so many, it appeared by the 
evidence, that attendance upon them all 
practically amounted to desertion. Not 
cnly was he a member of all the standard 
and well-known lodges, but all of the new 
and sporadic as well, including, we sup- 
pose, the Hoo-Hoos. She bore with him 
a long time, not even complaining when 
he joined the Ancient Order of the CoUs 
of the Wild Ass, and became Exahed 
Puissant Chief Colt. But when on one 
of his rare and brief visits to his home 
for the purpose of putting on a uniform, 
in the making of which the ends of the 
earth (especially the bright-colored ends) 
had been robbed, he announced that he 
was about to join the Mystic Band of the 
Noble Sons of Belial, with the hope of 
some day becoming Worshipful Grand 



Eldest Son, she rebelled and started for 
South Dakota. — Haiper's Weekly. 



BOOK NOTICES. 



"The Book of Daniel in the Light of 
Higher Criticism," by I. D. Steel, of 
Nashville, Tenn., and published with ad- 
ditions by H, L. Hastings, of Boston, is 
quite an interesting addition to H. L. 
Hastings' Anti-Infidel Library. It brings 
out in clear relief the hero prophet and 
proves that his instructive history is 
ba^ed upon the most undoubted facts. 

The Modern Woodman Revised Rit- 
ual has just been issued by the well- 
known publisher, Ezra A. Cook. There 
has been quite a demand for' this work 
among pastors of the Lutheran Church. 
Let pastors write to their church papers 
that the secrets of this insurance lodge 
can be had of the National Christian As- 
sociation for 25 cents. 



President Blanchard preached a strong 
sermon on the lodge question last Sab- 
bath evening in Dr. Goodwin's church. 
He will lecture Thursday evening, this 
week, on the same subject in Rev. E. B. 
Wylie's church at Summerdale. These 
meetings are in connection with our an- 
nual N. C. A. gathering. 



The effort of the American Railway 
Union to sustain the Pullman strikerg 
several years ago resulted in the death 
of twenty-six men and w^omen, and the 
wounding seriously of sixty-eight others, 
and the slight wounding of hundreds 
more. 



Rev. T. M. Chalmers, Superintendent 
of the Messiah Mission of this city, 
preached last Sabbath at Galesburg in 
the Swedish Lutheran Church on the se- 
cret society question. 



Rev. J. P. Stoddard's excellent report 
in this number is full of encouragement 
to all friends of the cause. We are sorry 
that our limited space compelled us to 



abridge it somewhat. 



If labor unions of this city could have 
their way all workmen in their lines 
would be cornpellcd to unite with them 
or starve. 



May, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



23 



SelMt^ronouncing 



♦♦ 




5.S.Ceacbcr'8 
ISible 



BOURGEOIS TYPE, 8V0, 

SIZE, sX^7)4^^/2 INCHES. 



This Bible is bound in French Morocco, Divinity Circuit'^ 
Gold Bacli and Side Titles, Linen Lined, Red under Gold^ 

REGULAR PRICE3 $4.00. 



We Will Send, Until Further Notice, this Bible Postpaid, 
and the CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE to New Subscribers 
for Only, -------- 



$3.00 



REMEMBER, this Bible has a Self- Pronouncing Dictionary of Proper Names 
and Foreign Words contained in the Bible. Comprising about 3500 words, 
o-iving the pronunciation, the meaning, and the location of the text where 
the word occurs for the first time. Exhaustive Articles on Biblical History, 
Geography, Topography, Natural History, Ethnology, Botany, Chronology, 
Music and Poetry ; a Complete Harmony of the Gospels, Tables of Parables, 
Miracles, Prophecies, Prayers, Money, Weights and Measures, Jewish Sects 
and Orders, and Fourteen Beautiful Maps in Colors. 



We will send this Bible postpaid to 
any one sending us a list of 10 sub- 
scribers for the CHRiSTIAN CYNOSURE 
at $1.00 each. 

IF NOT SATISFACTORY WE 

WILL TAKE BIBLE BACK 

AND REFUND THE 

MONEY. 



NATIONAL 
CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION, 
Chicago, III. 



Sample of 
Type... 



THE GOSPEL ACCORD 

SAINT MATTI 



CHAPTER 1. 

1 The gpn.enlogy of Christ from Abraham to Joaeph. 
18 He iras conceived by the Holy Ghost, and born 
of the Virgin \fnry. 19 The angelinterpreieth the 
names of Christ. 

THE book of the ^ generation of 
Je'§us Christ, ^the son of Da'- 
vid, ^ the son of A'bra-ham. 

2 ** A'bra-ham begat P^aac; and 
^P^aac begat Ja'cob; and -^Ja'cQb 
begat Ju'das and his brethren; 

3 And S' Ju'das begat Pha're§ and 
Za'ra of Tha'mar; and '^ Pha're? 
begat Es'rom; and Es'rom begat 
A'ram; 

4 And A'ram begat A-mln'a-dab ; 
and A-min'a-dab begat Na-as'son; 
and Na-as'son begat Sal'mOn ; 

6 And Sarm5n begat Bo'oz of Ra'- 



a Luke 3. 23. 
/; Ps. 132. 11. 

Is. 11. 1. 

Jer. 23. 5. 

ch. 22. 42. 

John 7. 42. 

Acts 2. 30; 

13. 23. 

Rom. 1. 3. 
r Gen. 12. 3; 

22. IS. 

Gal. 3. 16. 
dGeu. 21.2,3. 

e Gen. 2,5. 26. 
/ Geu. 29. 35. 

g Gen. 33. 27, 
Arc. 

h Ruth 4. 18, 
A:o. 

1 Chr. 2. 5,9, 
&c. 

i 1 Sam. 16. 1 ; 
17. 12. 

/l-2Sam.l2.24. 
/ 1 Chr. 3. 10, 
&c. 

7/1 2 Kin. 20. 
21. 
t. rt*.— o to 



bus 
Je'§ 

17 
han 
tioii 
ryii 
tee] 
car] 
Chr 

18 
was 
the) 
bef( 
foui 

19 
a ju 
her 
to y 



24 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



CtEOEGE WASHINGTON, to Friends in 1794, 
Quoted hi/ Myron Holley : "The real people occasion- 
ally assembled in order to express tlieir sentiments on 
political sentiments, ought never to be confounded 
With permanent, self-appointed societies, usurping tlio 
right to control constituted authorities, and to dictate 
to public opinion. While the former was entitled to 
respect, the latter was incompatible with all govern- 
ment, and must either sink into general dis-esteem, or 
tinally overturn the established order of things." 



Hon. CadtoaUader C. Golden, Mayor of 
New Tjrk and M. C. : — It is true that I 
have been a Mason a great number of 
years, and that I have held very high 
Masonic oflSces and boners. It is equally 
true that I have for a long time ceased to 
have any connection with the institution 
because I have believed, and do now be- 
lieve, it is productive of much more evil 
than good. I have Jong entertained my 
present opinion, tl f .t a man who would 
eschew all evil »7io% ' i not be a Freemason 




Old 



age 

comes early to the clothes that are dragged up 
and down over the wash-board. It's ruinous. 

Nothing else uses them up so thoroughly and 
so quickly. 

This wear and tear, that tells so on your 
pocket, ought to be stopped. Get some Pearl- 

ine — use it just as directed — no soap with it — 
and see how much longer the clothes last, and 

how much easier and quicker the work is. 
Pearline saves the rubbing. 

^k|2kt1/^ Peddlers and some unscrupulous grocers will tell you 
v^dlLi " this is as good as" or " the same as Pearline." IT'S 
FALSE — Pearline is never peddled, and if your 
grocer sends you something in place of Pearline, 



it Baek 

be honest — send it back. 



513 



JAMES PYLE, New York. 




% 



Arnold's 
Practice c^oOL 

' 1697 




PRACTICAL SPIRITUAL ILLUSTRATIVE 

Arnold's 

Practical Commentary 



ON THE 



International S. 5. 
for 1897. 



Lessons 



Edited by Mrs. T. B. ARNOLD. 

Associate Editors: Mrs. Abbie C. Moekow, Mrs. S. B. Tittering- 
ton, Rev. a. W. Parry, A. M., Rev. E. C. Best. 

A Compendium of Valuable Information, Concise, Concen- 
trated, Comprehensive. 

ONLY 50 CENTS POSTPAID 

The unprecedented reception of our Commentary for 1896, and 
the steady stream of warm and yet unsolicited testimonials which 
have been flowing in during the past years, have stimulated 
greater effort for the 1897 volume. 

Even tliougli you have another you need this. 

The Advance: "The leading purpose of the Sunday-school 
teacher should be conversion. This book is prepared for aiding 
along this line." 

The Union Signal: "The special features of the Commentary 
are the excellency of the tabulated quarterly reviews, the Bible 
Dictionary for each quarter's lessons and the class record book 
bound within the same covers." 

American Wesleyan: "Worth double the price to any teacher." 

Frke Methodist: "Fresh and inspiring, adapted to every de- 
partment of Sunday-school work — Comments biblical and schol- 
arly." 

Christian World: In every sense practical and comprehensive 

Many of our teachers prefer this to any other commentary on 

the International Lesgons. 



T. B. ARNOLD, Publisher, 104 FraDklin Street, Chicago, Ills. 



May, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



25 




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DEGREES 



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PHIS 




MA.SONIC CHART. 

ILLUSTRATING THE RELATION OF SOME OF THE DEGREES AND RITES IN 
FREEMASONRY TO EACH OTHER. 
The accompanying chart represents one hundred and forty two degrees. 

I. The American Rite of 13 degrees; 2. The Scotch Rite of 33 degrees; 

3. The Egyptian Rite of 96 degrees. 4. The Mystic Shrine of one degree. 

5. The Eastern Star of 5 degrees for Master Masons and for women. These are side degrees, and not 
genuine masonry. 

The Symbolic degrees, or Blue Lodge of three degrees, are common to every Masonic rite, whether 
American, Scotch, or Egyptian, or whichever of the Masonic rites, named in Mackey's Masonic Encyclo- 
pedia one may choose to investigate. 

This chart shows in the Blue Lodge the position of the Worshipful Master and some of the other offi- 
cers of the lodge. Several positions of the ca^^didate who is being initiated are also shown. In the Master 
Mason's degree^is recognized the murder, buriai anZ resurrection scene so full of religious signifi. nee to 
Freemasons. ^' 



2(5 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1891 



Standard Works 



-ON- 

Seefet Societies 

x=-OK SALE BY THE 

jiBTIOHiiL CSmSTIBN HSSOGIBTiON. 

221 West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Terms: — Cash with order, or if sent by express 
Q. O D, at least $i.oo must be sent with order as 
a guaranty that books will be taken. Books ai 
•retau prices sent postpaid. Books by Mail »-e at 
v'sk; ot persons ordering, unless 8 cents extra is 
^ent to pay for registering them, when meir safe 
.leilvery is guaranteed. Books at retail ordered 
oy express, are sold at lo per cent discount and 
delivery guaranteed, but not express paid. Pc@^- 
'S.ge stamps taken for small sumft. 

02s^ FKEEMASONKY. 

Freemasonry Illustrated. First 

three degrees. 376 pages cloth, 75c; 
paper, 40c. 

The accuracy of these expositions attested by 
*fl&davits of Jacob O, Doesburg and otJaers, 

Freemasonry Illustrated. 640 

pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 75c. 

A complete exposlton of the Blue Lodge and 
Chapter consisting of seven degrees. Profusely 
Slustrated. 

Knighi Templarisr*! Illustrated. 

341 pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 50c. 
A full illustrated rit al of the six degrees ol 
"ibe Council and Commandery. 

Scotch Rite flasonry^ Illustrated. 

2 vols. Per vol., cloth, $1.00: paper, 65c. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the entir: 
Scottish Rite, comprising all the Masonic degrees 
from 3rd to 33rd inclusive. The first three de- 
grees are common to all the Masonic Rites, and 
are fully and accurately given in "Freemasonry 
Illustrated." Vol. I comprises the degrees from 
3rd to i8th inclusive. 

V'oi. 11 comprises the degrees from 19th to 33rd 
tvciusive. with the signs, grips, tokens and pass- 

'vords f^"^rn X9*- to ^;^d ^^TTefi in'^hi«"'« 

hIand=Book of Freemasonry. 274 

pages, flexible cloth, 50c. 
By E. Ronayne, Past Master of Keystone Lodge 
"No. 639. Chicago. Gives the complete standard 
of Fre 



ritual of the first three degrees 



'reemasonry. 



Freemasonry Exposed. By Capt. 

William Morgan. 1 10 pages, paper, 25c. 
The genuine old Morgan book republished. 

£cce Orient!. Pocket size, full 

roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the First 
Three Masonic Degrees in Cypher, with complete 
Floor Charts of Initiating, Passing and Raising a 
Candidate. 

Cabala. Pocket size, full roan, 

flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the Chapter 
asonic Degrees; 4th to 7th inclusive, in Cypner. 
iving the degrees of Mark Master, Past Master, 



gl the degrees 01 Marie master, rasi 
tTw^Uept Master «nd Rovai ArcL 



Masonic 
Oivi 

Knights of the Orient. Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.^0. 

The Complete Ritual of the Commandery 
Masonic Degrees. Knights of the Red Cross. 
Knight Templar and Knight ot Malta, nth to 13th 
degrees. 



Allyn*s Ritual of Freemasonry, 

By Avery Allyn. Cloth, $5.00. 
Contains the fully Illustrated Ritual of the Blue 
Lodge. Chapter Council and Commandery. n of 
the Scotch Rite Degrees, several Masonic side 
degrees and what is ternied a Key to the Phi Beta 
Kappa, and the Orange Societies. 

Duncan's Masonic Ritual and 

Monitor. Cloth, $2.50. 

Profusely illustrated with explanatory engrav 
iugs, and containing the ritual and work of the or- 
der for the seven degrees, inclu'ang the Royal 
Arch. Though extensively used as an Instruction 
Book and one of the best in the market, it is not 
as accurate as "Freemasonry' xlustrated." 

Richardson's Moni^or of Freema- 

sonrj'. Cloth, $L2v>; paper, 75c. 

Contains the ceremonies of Lodges, Chapters, 
Encampments, etc. Illustrated. Although ex' 
tensively used in conferring the higher degrees, 
it is not only vcy incomplete but inaccurate 
especially as regards the first seven degrees, and 
as to the liigh r degrees it i^ives but a description 
and general idea of th'i degrees rather than the 
full ritual. 

Look to the East. A ritual of the 
first three Masonic Degrees by Ralph 
Lester. Cloth, $2.00. 
Notwithstanding the high price this book is 

very inferior in every way to Freemasonry lUus* 

trated or the Handbook of Freemasonry at a 

quarter the price. 

Council of the Orieint. Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.50. 
The Complete Standard Ritual of Council 



Masonic Degrees in Cypher, 8th to loth inclusive, 
Giving the Degrees of Royal Master, Select Mas- 
ter and Super Excellent Master. 



Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Re- 
vised and enlarged edition, 49 pages, 
paper, 25c. 

An Illustrated Ritual of the Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine. This is a Side Masonic degree con- 
ferred only on Knights Templar and on Thirty- 
wo degree Masons. 

Thirteen Reasons why a Chris- 
tian should not be a Freemason. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages, 

Freemasonry Contrary to the 
Christian Religion. By " Spectator," 
Atlanta, Ga. 16 pages 5c. 

Hon. Thurlow Weed on the Mor- 
gan Abduction. 16 pages 5c. 

This is the legally attested statement of this 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and continement of 
Capt. Morgan in Canandaigua jail, his removal to 
Fort Niagara and subsequent drowning in Lake 
Ontario. 

Freemasonry a Fourfold Con- 
spiracy. 16 pages, 5c. 

Address of Pres. J. Blanchard. This is a most 
convincing argument against the lodge. 

Mah-Hah=Bone; 589 pages; Si. 00 

Comprises the Hand Book, Master's Carpet and 
Freemasonry at a glance. 

ON ODD-FELLOWSHIP. 

Odd-fellowship Judged by its own 

utterances; its doctrine and practice 
examined in light of God's Word. By 
Rev. J. H. Brockman. Cloth, 50c; pa- 
per cover, 25c, 

This is an exceedingly interesting, clear discus- 
sion of the chari ner of Odd-fellowsnip, in the form 
of a dialogue. 



May, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



27 



Revised Odd=feIiowship Illustra- 
ted. Cloth, $[.oo: paper cover, 5octs. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge En- 
campment and Rebekah (ladies) degrees, profuse- 
ly illustrated, and guaranteed -to be strictly ac- 
curate; with a sketch of origin, history and char- 
acter oi the order, over one hundred foot-note 
quotations from standard authorities, showing the 
character and teachings of the order, and an an- 
alysis of each degree by ex-President J. Blanchard. 
This ritual corresponds exactly with the "Charge 
Books" furnished Dy the Sovereign Grand Lodee. 

Sermon on Odd=fellowship and 
other secret societies, by Rev. J. Sar- 
ver, pastor of Evangelical Lutheran 
church. IOC. each. 

This is a very clear argument against secretism of 
all forms and, the duty to disfellowship Odd-fel- 
lows, Freemasons, Knights of Pythias and Gran- 
gers, is clearly shown by their confessed character 
as found in their own publications. 

OTHER EITUALS. 

Revised Knights of Pythias. IIJu^ 
trated. Cloth, 50c: paper cover 25c. 

An exact copy of the new official Ritual Adopted 
by the Supreme Lodge oi the world, with the Se- 
cret work added and fully Illustrated. 

Knights of the Orient Illustrated. 

15c each. 

The full Illustrated Rit'ia j. Ancient Order oi 
the Orient or the Oriental degree. This is a side 
degree conferred mostly 1 Knights of Pythias 
lodges. 

Good Templarisnr Illustrated. 25c. 

A full and accurate exposition of the degrees oi 
the lodge, temple and council. 

Exposition of thi* Grange. 25c. 

Edited by Rev. A. W. Geeslin. Illustrated with 
engravings. 

Ritual of tbs Grand Army of the 

Republic loc. each. 

The authorized ritual of 1868, with signs of re- 
cognition, pass-words, etc.. and ritual of Machin- 
ists' and Blacksmiths' Union, (The two bound to- 
gether.) 

Knights of Labor Illustrated. 25c. 

("Adelphon Kruptos.'") The complete illus- 
trated ritual of the order, including the "unwritten 
work.'' 

Adoptive Masonry Illustrated. 

20c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the five 
degrees of Female Freemasonry, by Thomas Lowe. 

Red flen Illustrated. In cloth 50c. 

each, $2.00 per dozen postpaid. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men. comprising the Adop- 
tion Degree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree, 
Chief's Degree, with the Odes, etc. 

The Foresters Illustrated. Paper. 

cover 25c. each, $2.00 per dozen. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Forest- 
ers, with Installation Ceremonies. 

United Sons of Industry Illustra- 
ted. 15c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the sec- 
ret tradesunion of the above name, giving the 
signs, grips, passwords, etc. 

Rituals and 5ecrets Illustrated. 

$1.00, each. 

Composed of "Temple of Honor Illustrated, 
Adoptive Masonry Illustrated," "United Sons of 
Industry I)'-'strated," and "Secret Societies Illus- 
trated "^ 

Sermon on flasonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. \V. P. McNary, pastor of United Pres- 
byterian church. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

History Nat'l Cnristian Associ- 
ation. IOC. each. 

Its origin, objects, what it has done and aims to 
do, and the best means to accomplish the end 
sought, the Articles of Constitution and By-laws 
of the Association. 

Secret Societies. Cloth 35c, paper 
15c. 

A discussion of their character and claims by 
Rev. David McDill. Pres. J. Blanchard and Rev 
Edward Beecher. 

The Master's Carpet or flasonry 
and Baal Worship Identical. Bound 

in fine cloth. 400 pages. 75c. 
Explains the true source and meaning of every 
ceremony and symbol of the lodge. 

Disloyal Secret Oaths. 5c. 

By Joseph Cook, Boston, He quotes the law of 
Vermont which makes the administration of the 
Masonic oaths illegal. Joseph Cook's address is a 
national treatment of a national subject, and very 
valuable for reference. 

Light on Freemasonry. By Elder 

D. Bernard, Cloth, §1.50. paper, 75c. 

Finney on flasonry. Cloth 75c., 

paper 35c. 

The character, claims and practical workings of 
Freemasonry. By ex-Pres. Charles G. Finney, of 
Oberlin College. 'President Finney was a " bright 
Mason," but left the lodge when he became a 
Christian. This book has opened the eyes ct 
multitudes. 

riasonic Oaths Null and Void: or 
Freemasony Self=Convicted. 207 

pages. Postpaid, 40c. 

This is a book for the times. The design of the 
author is to refute the arguments of those whcf 
claim that the oaths of Freemasonry are binding 
upon those who take them. 

Judge Whitney's Defence before 
the Grand Lodge of Hlinois. 15c. 

Judge Daniel H. Whitney was Master of the 
lodge when S. H. Keith, a member of his lodge, 
murdered Ellen Slade. Judge Whitney, by at- 
tempting to bring Keith to justice, brought on 
hiniself the vengeance of the lodge, but he boldly 
replied to th6 charges against him, and afterwards 
renounced Mason'-v 

General Washington Opposed to 
Secret Societies. loc. 

This is a re-publication of Governor Joseph Rit- 
ner's " \'indication of General Washing-ton from 
the Stigma of Adherence to Secret Societies," 
communicated to the House of Representatives of 
Pennsylvania, March 8, 1837, at their special re- 
quest. To this is added the fact that three high 
Masons were the only perso ,s who opposed a vote 
of thanks to Washington on his retirement to pri- 
vate life-undoubtedly because they considered him 
a seceding Freemasoa 

riorgan's Exposition, Abduction 

and riurder and Oaths of 33 degrees. 

304 pages, cloth, $1.00, 
" Composed of Freemasonry Exposed," by Capt. 
Wm. Morgan; '"History of the Abduction and 
Murder of Morgan;" "Valance's Confession of 
the Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan;" "Bernard's, 
Reminiscences of Morgan Times," and "Oaths 
and Penalties of 33 Degrees." 

Oaths and Penalties of Freemason- 
ry, as proved in court in New Berhn 
tiials IOC. 

The New Berlin trials began in the attempt of 
Freemasons to prevent public initiatirn by seed- 
ing Masons. These trials were held at Xew Berlin. 
Chenango Co,. N. V.. .April 13 and 14. 1831, anv"" 
General Augustus C. Welsh, sheriff of the county, 
and other adhering Freemasons swore to the truth- 
ful revelation of the oaths and penaH.^^s, 



28 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



Grand Lodge flasonry. 5c. each 

Its relation to civil government and the Christian 
religion. B3' Pres. J. Blanchard. The an-Chris- 
tian. anti-republican and despotic character of 
Freemasonry is proved from the highest Masonic 
authorities. 

Masonry a Work of Darkness, ad- 
verse to Christianity, and inimical 
to Republican Government. 15c. 
By Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong (Presbyterian) a 

seceding Mason of 21 degrees. 

Sermon on Masonry. 5c. each. 

Bv Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a Ma- 
sonic Oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, Ohio. 

Story of the Gods. Postpaid, lOc. 

By 1. R. B. .\rnold. Brief sketches from the 
Tiivt'hology of Rome, Creece, Egvpt, India, Persia. 
Phrygia.^Scandina' Id, Africa and America, show- 
ing the relations and unity of the past and present 
systems. The idolatrous'worship of the Masonic 
lodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 

.Masonic Outrages. Postpaid, 20c. 

Compiled by Rev. H. H. Hinman. Showing 
^lasonic assua'lt on lives of seceders, or reputation. 
and on free speech; its interference with justice ir 
courts, etc 

History of the Abduction and Mur- 
der of Capt. Wm. Morgan. 25c. 

As prepared by seven committees of citizens. 
appointed to ascertain the fate of Morgan. 

The Anti-mason's 5crap-Book. 

25c. 

Consisting of 53 "Cynosure" tracts. In cn.s 
book are the views of more than a score of men, 
many of them of distinguished abi'\ty, en the sub' 
iect of secret societies. 

The Image of the Beast; A Secret 
Empire; or Freemasonry a Subject of 
Prophecy. By Rev. Richard Horton. 
Third Edition'. 200 pages, cloth, 6oc. 

Sermon on Secretism, 5c. eacn. 

By Rev. R. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear ayri 
of the objections to all secret societies, and to Ma- 
--prv especially, that are apparent to ail. 

Anti=masonic Sermons and Ad- 
dresses. Cloth, $1 00. 

Composed of " Masonrv a Work of Darkness; '' 
the Sermons of Messrs. Cross, William M'Nary, 
Dow and Sarver, the two addresses of President 
Blanchard, and the addresses of President H. H. 
George, Prof. J. G. Carson and Rev. M. S. Drury; 
•' Thirteen Reasons Why a Christain Cannot be a 
Freemason," " Freema'sonry Contrary to the 
Christiin Religion," and "Are Masonic Oaths 
Binding on the Initiate? " 287 pages. 

Secret Societies, Ancient and 
Modern. 50c. each. 

Contents: The Antiquity of Secret Societies 
The Life of Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, The 

•Origin of Masonry, Was Washington a Mason.' 
Fillmore and Webster's Deference to Masonry, A 
Brief Outline of the Progress of Masonry in the 
United States, The Tammany Ring, Masonic Be- 

mevolence. The Uses of Masonry, An Illustration. 
The Conclusion. 

Secret Societies Illustrated. 

Over 250 cuts, 99 pages, paper cover, 
J25C. each. 

Containing the signs, grips, passwords, em- 
blems, etc., of Freemasonry (Blue Lodge, and tc 
'the fourteenth d^ree of the York rite). Adoptive 
JMasonry, Revised Odd-fellowship, Good Templar- 
ism, the Temple of Honor, the United Sons of In- 
dustry, Knights of Pythias and the Grange, with 
aflBdavits. etc. 

Prof. J. G. Carson, D. D., on Se- 

-cret Societies. loc. each. 

A most convincing argument against fellowship- 
ing Freemasons in the Christian church. 



Sermon cn flasonry. i6 pages, 
5c. By Rev. W. P. :\IcXary, pastor 
TJnited Presbyterian church. ' 

Oaths and Penalties of the ss 
Degrees of Freemasonry. 15c. each. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes half-a-million horri- 
ble oaths. 

Ex=President John Quincy Ad- 
ams. Price, cloth, Si.oo. Paper, 35c. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
gations and Penalties. 

Sermon on flasonry. loc. each. 

By Rev. James Williams. Presiding Elder of 
Dakota District Northwestern Iowa Conference 
M. E. Church— a seceding Master Mason. 

The Mystic Tie or Freemasonry a 
League with the Devil. 15c. 

This IS an account of the church trial of Peter 
Cook and v.ife, of Elkhart. Indiana, for refusing 
to support a reverend Freemason. 

Sermon on Secret Societies. 5c. 

each. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of his sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to examine into the char- 
acter of secret so:ieties, no matter what object 
such societies profess to have. 

Reminiscences of florgan Times. 

IOC. each. 

By Elder David Bernard. This is a thrilling 
narrative of the incidents connected with Ber- 
nard's Revelation of Freemasonry. 

The Broken Seal. In cloth, 75c. 

Paper covers, 40c. 

Personal Reminiscences of the Abduction and 
Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan. By Samuel D. 
Greene. 

Pres. H. H. George on Secret 

Societies. loc. each. 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty of 
Christian churches to disfellowship secret socie- 
ties. 

Narratives and Arguments, 

15c. each. 

Showing the conflict of secret^societies with the 
Constitution and law of the Union and of the 
States. By F^-aucis Semple. 

Secrecy vs. the Family, State 

and Church. loc. each. 

By Rev. M. S. Dury. The antagonism of or- 
ganized secrecy to the welfare of the family, stata 
and church, is clearly shown. 

A Booklet of 107 pages. 25c. 

"The Martvr's Own Monument," by Rev. J. E. 
Roy, D. D., Western Secretary of American Mis- 
sionary .Association: " Christian Politics," by 
ReT. J. Blanchard, late Editor of Christiati Cyno- 
sure: "The Mysterious Machine: Was it Lawn- 
mower, Town-pump. -Balloon, Wheel-barrow, — or 
what? " by Prof. E. D. Bailey, of the Civil Service 
Dept. U. S. Government. 

Are Secret Societies a Blessing? 

A pamphlet of 20 pages. 5c. 

kn address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., pastor 
of the Centenary M. E. church. St. Louis, Mo.. 
Jan. 4, \%\. W, McCoy writes: "That sermon 
ought to be in the hands of every preacher in this 
land, and every citizen's, too." 

Between Two Opinions: or the 
Question of the Hour. 389 pages; cloth, 
postpaid, 75 cents. 

By Miss E. E. Flagg, author of " Little People," 
"A Sunny Life," etc., etc. Everyone who loves 
to read a good story, chaste and elegant in e.x- 
pression, pure in thought, interesting in narrative, 
should read this book upon tbe power of secret 
societies in riolitics. and tbe remedy. 



May, 1897 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



29 



"God's Word prohibits ITie believer from forming 
alliances with the ungodly in society. Whenever the 
Christian surrenders himsRlf to the society of the un- 
believing world, his heart will be led away from God. 
This is especially true of thousands of Christian men 
who have deliberately yoked themselves up with un- 
believers in all manner of secret societies. This course 
of false alliance is doing more mischief to individual 
Christian men by turning their hearts away from God 
and his service, and to the church by depleting and 
robbing her of her male membership, THAN ANY 
OTHER ONE ENEMY" OF CHRIST. There never 
was a time when the cry, 'Come out from among them 
and be ye separate, saith the Lord,' was more needed 
than now."— -F?'om Dr. George F. Pentecosfs Bible 
Studies, 18S9, v- 389. 



-'We have, then, the implied testimony of Freem^v- 
sons themselves, that the Christian church ought to 
have no fellowship with Freemasonry as thus re- 
pealed, and that those who adhere intelligently and 
determinedly to such an institution have no right to 
be in the Christian church. God demands, and the 
world has a right to expect, that the church will take 
due action and bear a truthful testimony in respect to 
this institution. She cannot now innocently hold her 
peace. The light has come. Fidelity to God and to 
the souls of men require that the church, which is the 
light of the world, should speak out, and should take 
such action as will plainly reveal her views of the 
compatibility or incompatibility of Freemasonry with 
the Christian religion." — From Pres. Finney's hook, 
'•^Character, Claims and Practical Workings of Free' 
masonru,"pp. 260,263. 



*'I do not see how any Christian, most of all a Chris- 
tian minister, can go into these secret lodges with un- 
believers. They say they can have more influence for 
^ood, but I say they can have more influence Tor good 
by staying out of them, and then reproving their evil 
deeds. Abraham had more influence for good in 
Sodom than Lot had. If twenty-five Christians go 
into a secret lodge with fifty wlio are not Christians, 
the fifty can vote anything they please, and the twen- 
ty-five will be partakers of their sins. They are un- 
•equally^yoked with unbelievers. 'But, Mr. Moody,' 
some say, 'if you talk that way you will drive all the 
members of secret societies out of your meetings and 
out of your churches.' But what if I do ? Better men 
will take their places. Give them the truth anyway, 
and if they would rather leave their churches than 
their lodges the sooner they get out of the churches 
the better. I would rather have ten members who 
were separated from the world than a thousand such 
members. Come out from the lodge. Better one with 
God than a thousand without him. We must walk 
with God, and if onlj one or two go with us it is all 
cight"^Address by Dwight L.Moody in Farwell Hall, 
Chicago, 1876. 



Ch vrles P. Sumner, j %th,er of the Sen^ 
aior, .md a renouncing A'nyn: — Masonic 
engagements, whether they are called 
oaths, obligations, or promises, ought 
never to be made . They are not sanc- 
tionec' by law and z.ve not obligatory. 
They make it a Masonic crime to divulge 
that which the good c f the community 
reqv>^.res should not be joncealed. 

Philo Carpenter : — This saint of God 
(Moses Stuart) like the old prophets, was 
satisfied with the institutions and ordi- 
nances of God's house, and consequently 
did not glv^ iiis influence or aid in sup- 
plementing the same with human ordi- 
nances and worldly alliances; in other 
words, ho was opposed to secret, oath- 
bound societies, into which many good 
men, and even clergymen, have been, 
and are being "ensnared" 

Horace Oreeley:-'M.&ny persons were 
brought to trial ou er'^/Ount of the mur- 
der of Morgan, but no one was judicially 
found guilty c f murder. It was estab- 
lished by secei ling Masons that the oaths 
— at least in so ne of the highest degrees 
— that were administered, and taken by 
those admitted to Masonic lodges, dis- 
qualified them from serving as jurors in 
any case where a brother Mason of like 
degree was 8 party, and his antagonist 
was not. 

Daniel Webster: "All secret associa 
tions, the members of which take upon 
themselves extraordinary obligations to 
one another, and are bound together by 
secret oaths, are naturally sources of 
jealousy and just alarm to others; are es- 
pecially unfavorable to harmony and mu- 
tual confidence among men living togeth- 
er under popular institutions, and are 
dangerous to the general cause of civil 
liberty and just government. Under the 
influence o^' this conviction I heartily ap- 
proved the law, lately enacted in the State 
of which I am a citizen, for abolishing all 
Bucb. oaths and obligations." 

Gen. Henry Bewail, a companion oj 
Washington:— 1 was initiated an Entered 
Apprentice to the Masonic rites in Octo- 
ber, 1777, at Albany, soon aftsr the 
capture of Burgoyne, being then an offi- 
cer in the American army. ... I 
w>}s led by the influence of this "perfect 
rule of faith and practice," during the 
year 1784, to view speculative Masonry 
in a shape still more deformed. Its char- 
ity appeared to be selfishness, because re- 
stricted to its own members; its religion 
deism because entirely devoid of the 
Gospel. Its history appeared fabulous; 
its claims to antiquity unsustainable; its 
titles fvdsome; its rites barbarous and 
absurd; its oaths extra-judicial, unlaw- 
fully imposed and blindly taken, and the 
penal sanctions annexed, horrid and im- 

nioUB. 



30 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



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f May, 189^ 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



31 



Charles C. Foote: — What would the 
introduction of Christ into Mohamme- 
danism be, but its annihilation? And 
thus would it be with Masonry. 

Albert Barnes, 1849 -.t— Any good 
cause, I think, can be promoted openly; 
any secret association is liable, at least, 
to abuse and danger. 

Rev. John G. Stearns, toeU-known 
author: — Masonry will by no means die 
of itself; nor will it separate itself from 
the church of God. No; it will cling to 
it, like the deadly scorpion to the victim 
■on which it fastens. The church must 
therefore separate from that. 



James O .Birne i, candidate of the Liber- 
ty party for Pres dent, was a Freemason, 
"but never enterei a lodge after he j oined 
the church, and, as ^is sons grew up, he 
cautioned them against joining any se- 
cret order." — Oen. Wm. Birney. 




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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1897. 



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Disraeli, Lord Beaconsfield: "In conduct- 
ing the governments of the world there are not only 
sovereigns and ministers, but secret orders to be con- 
sidered, which have agents every where — reckless- 
agents, who countenance assassination, and, if neces- 
sary, can produce a massacre." 



Charles P. Sumner, father of the Senator, and a 
renouncing Mason : "Masonic engagements, whethei 
they are called oaths, obligations, or promises, ought 
never to be made. They are not sanctioned by law 
and are not obligatory. They make it a Masonic 
crime to divulge that which the good of the commu 
nity requires should not be concealed." 

HON. SAMUEL DEXTER, in an Open Letter to the 
Grand Master of Mass., 1798: "If there be no very 
important reason for upholding Masonry at a moment 
like the present, there is a reason against it. The sys- 
tem of the destroyers of human virtue and happiness 
is to undermine in the dark the castle that cannot be 
carried by storm. Secret agency has overthrown all 
the republics of Europe, and an extended, secret, lev»il- 
ing, self-created society, without any valuable object 
of pursuit, and embracing bad characters as well as 
good, cannot be the subject of approbation of an anx- 
ious patriot." 



Rev. Leonard Bacon, D. D.— Wish- 
ing you good success in your war against 
secret societies. 

Rev. B. p. Aydeldotte, D.D, former 
president of Woodward College, O., {a re- 
nouncing Mason) : —Freem&sonry is a lie 
all over. 

Rev. Justin Edwards, D.D., author 
and head of Andover teminary: ^-When- 
ever the cause of temperance is veiled in 
darkness and secrecy, it must lose its hold 
on the public confidence and sympathy. 

Rev. M. Bennett, long presiding el- 
der M. B. cAi^rc^ — I am pleased to be 
counted in for the movement which is be- 
ing inaugurated against tyrannical organ- 
izations and factitious distinctions in so- 
ciety. 

Dr. Thomas Scott, the great comment 
tator: — Rash oaths are above ail things tc 
be avoided; but if men are entangled by 
them, they ought rather to infringe the 
sinful oaths than to add sin to sin and 
ruin to their own souls. 

Rev. J. C. K Milligan, editor of "Our 
Banner:"— Through, such silence, secret 
connivance and horrid oaths "ever to 
conceal and never reveal," the state of 
our country is rapidly becoming such as 
to alarm every Christian philanthropist. 

Rev. B. T. Roberts, editor of the Free 
Methodist: —For us to keep silent respect- 
ing Masonry, and thus tacitly endorse the 
idea that a man can both accept Christ 
and deny him— that is, be a good Mason 
and a good Christian at the same time, 
would be treason to Christ. 



OUK-^ 




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cents per year. Sample Copy Eree. We want 
canvassers in every community. Send for 
terms. Address 

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Block. 



ZION TABEKrNACLE, Michigan Avenue, Chicago. 

SECRET SOCIEflES'''FOES«GOD, 

HOME, 
CHURCH, 

ftJni \U%m "* STATE. 

Staitling Testimonies on this line, at llhSO a. m., and 7:30 pc jr 




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LORD'S DAY, MAY 23, 
at 2:30 p.m. 



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Wheaton Collegfe, 



WHEATON, ILLINOIS, 







^ THE SUMMER SCHOOL ^ 

^ Opens rionday, June 28, and continues six "^ 

"^ weeks to Friday, August 6. "^ 

^ For teachers, ministers, special students, and those desiring ^ 

^ a restful vacation. •j^ 
Fall term opens Tuesday, September 21, Winter term Tues- 
day, January 4, 1898. 

^ For terms, catalogue etc., address ^ 

CHAS. A. BLANCHARD, President. ^ 




PROF. ELLIOT WHIPPLE. 



CONTENTS. 



Current Notes 33 

Would Jesus Enter Tliei-e? 34 

SeerecT and Citizenship 34 

Make Haste Slowly 38 

Broken Vows 3".) 

Weak Insurance 10 

The False Prophet 40 

The Volunteers of Am'erica 41 

The Work in Chicago 41 

Annual Meeting of the N. C. A. . . 42 

ReiK)rt of Board of Directors 43 

Report of Tre<asurer W. I. Phillips 44 

Great Day at Zion Tabernacle 45 

The Cumberland Presbyterians 16 



Intei-view with Dr. Wm. Lawrence 46 

Even So, What Then? .47 

Lutheran Church Meeting. 47 

Hebrew Mission Meeting 47 

An Important Testimony .48 

N'oit a Perversion of Scripture 48 

Not Wholly Secret .48 

Mission Bands 49 

A Good Suggestion 49 

Proved or Disproved 50 

Odd Fellows on Odd Fellowship 50 

Founded on the Bible 51 

Personal Mention 52 



NfiTIONftL GHRISTlftN ftSSOGlATION. 



"The National ■ Christian Association, op- 
posed to secret societies," was formed M 
Pittsburg, Pa., in 1868, and incorporated un- 
der the laws of the State of Illinois in 1874. 

The National Christian Association arose to 
meet a gi-eat want created by the growth of 
secret orders, and the ignorance and silence 
of public teachers as to their nature and ef- 
fects. 

The association is interdenominational. 
The president (1897) is a Methodist Episco- 
pal, and the vice president a United Presby- 
terian, Among the following named officers 



and agents are also the Free Methodist, Con- 
gregational, Lutheran, Friend, Evangelical, 
United Brethren, Baptist, Reformed Presby- 
terian and Independent. 

The principal headquarters of the National 
Christian Association is at 221 West Madison 
street, Chicago, which property is valued at 
$20,000, and is the gift to the association of 
Dea. Philo Carpenter, one of the founders of 
Chicago. 

The association is supported by the free 
will offerings and bequests of friends. The 
Christian Cynosure is its organ and princi- 
pal publication. 



President— Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, Morris, 
111. 

Vice President— Rev. W. T. Campbell, Mon- 
mouth, 111. 

Recording Secretary— Mrs. M. C. Baker, 14 
North May street, Chicago. 

General Secretary and Treasurer— Wm. I. 
Phillips, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 

Editor Christian Cynosure— Rev. M. A. 
Gault, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

T. B. Arnold, C. A. Blanchard, E. A. Cook, 
J. M. Hitchcock, C. J. Holmes, T. B. Rada- 
baugh, E. Whipple, Edgar B. Wylie, H. F. 
Kletzing, J. A. Collins, W. O. Dlnius. 
DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Rev. James P. Stoddard, Boston, Mass.; 
Rev. P. B. Williams, Los Angeles, Cal.; Rev. 
Wm. Fenton, St. Paul, Minn,; Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard, Washington, D. C. 



VOLUME XXX. 



CHICAGO. JUNE. 1897. 



NUMBER 2. 



PUP.LISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

IJATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

22.1 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

TERnS OP SUBSCRIPTION. 

PRICE.— Per year, in advance. $1.00; three months, on 
trial, twenty-five cents; tingle copies, 10 cents. 

RECEIPTS.— The yellow lable pa-ted lon the paper or 
wrapper is a receipt for payment ot subscription to 
and including the printed date. 

EXTENSION.— The extension of a subscription is 
shown by the printed labia the scconu month alter 
a remittance is received. 

OISCONTINUANCES.-We find that a larq;e number 
of our subscribers prefer not to have their .sub- 
scriptions interrupted and their files broken in case 
they tail to remit before expiration. It is therefore 
assumed, unless notification to discontinue is re- 
ceived, that the subscriber wishes no interuption in 
his series. Notification to discontinue at expiration 
can be sent in at any time Quring the year. 

PRESENTATION COPIES.-Many persons subscribe 
for The Christian CvNobUkE to be sent to 
friends. In such cases, it we are advised that a 
subscription is a present and not regularly author- 
ized by the recipient, we will make a memorandum 
to discontinue at expiration, und to send no bill tor 
the ensuing year. 

In December, 1896, the membership in 
secret orders in the United States was in 
round numbers 5,400,000. 



These fi^ires do not include members 
"of labor or^amzations, secret military or- 
o-anizations or secret college fraternities, 
which would ad-d about a million more. 



For the third consecutive year Direct- 
or J. M. Hitchcock has completed ar- 
rangements with Mr. Moody whereby 
President Blanchard is to address the 
conference of ministers, evangelists, mis- 
sionaries and other Christian workers, 
who meet at Northiield next August, on 
the subject of "Secret Societies and Their 
Effect on the Home, the Church and the 
State." 



This meeting is largely attended by de- 
vout men and women of home aiid for- 
eign lands, and is thoroughly represent- 
ative in character. We should thank God 
for such an opening and such an oppor- 
tunity for heralding this truth to the ut- 
termost parts of the earth. A generation 
of brave men and women has been sacri- 
ficed in getting our case in court. A pa- 
tient, intelligent hearing of our case is 
onlv needful to secure a favorable verdict. 



The amount <A money absorbed by 
thes'C societies annually in the form of in- 
surance fees, benefits, rentals of halls, uni- 
forms, banquets, etc., is estim.ated at more 
than $300,000,000. 

The above figures are taken from a 
carefully prepared article by W. S. Har- 
wood, a prominent secret society man, 
and published in the May number of the 
North American Review. 



Prof. ElHot Whipple, whose picture 
adorns our first page, and whose excel- 
lent article on "Secrecy and Citizenship'' 
in thds number will be read with interest, 
has for many years occupied the chair 
of Social Science in Wheaton College, 
and has a high reputation as a thorough 
and popular instructor. He graduated 
at Dartmouth in 1864 and for some years 
was Principal of the McGaw Normal In- 
stitute, New Hampshire. He was also 
professor in Westfield College, Illinois, 
and In^tute Instructor in Illinois, Indi- 
ana, Neav Jersey, and New Hampshire, 
He liias for several years served as one 
of the Board of Directors of ^le N. C. 
A., and his counsel ihasbeen in\^luable to 
the cause. 



34 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



WOULD JESUS ENTER THERE? 



BY FAS. F. MARTIN. 



"Wlien you enter the lodge's portals, 

And ascend its shining stair, 
I would ask you, softly ask you, 

Would the Savior enter there? 
AA'ould the dear and blessed Savior, 

^^'ho died on Calvary's cross, 
And for us poor erring sinners 

Bore all sorrow, pain and loss, 
Pass the lodge's guarded portals. 

In the dim and misty liglit. 
Enter in mid deeds of darkness, 

Deeds of darkness and of night? 

Would he enter through the portals. 

Where the poor, and halt, and blind 
Cannot from earth's cares and sorrows 

A sweet haven of refuge find? 
I would gently, softly, ask you, 

Would God's dear and only Son 
Enter thrcugh the lodge's portals, 

Where the needy cannot come? 

U'ould he, who is our example. 

He who drank the cup of gall ; 
He whose words and deeds doth teach us 

We should never swear at all, 
Enter through the lodge's portal. 

Swift ascend its shining stair. 
And before the altar of Baal 

Fearful oaths in secret swear? 

"Would he round that heathen temple, 

By a Cable-tow be led' — 
Christ, the man of truth and candor. 

Who in secret nothing said? 
Ere you enter the lodge's portals. 

Ere you tread its shining stair, 
Ask yourself, my friend, the question: 

Would the Savior enter there? 

Perrv'Opolis, Pa. 



SECRECY AND CITIZENSHIP. 



BY PROF. E. WHIPPLE. 



Men are social beings. A single hu- 
inan being, separated from the compan- 
ionship and help of his kind, is the most 
helpless and wretched of animate crea- 
tures. 

Men must associate in families for the 
purpose of producing and rearing off- 
spring; and to make life worth living 
there is imperative need of the tender and 



elevating relationships of family Jife. To 
secure from the earth the comforts and 
conveniencies of life it is necessary that 
men should co-operate in groups larger 
than families, or even clans and tribes. 

In the struggle with nature two can ac- 
complished more than twice as much as 
one, ten vastly more than five times as 
much as two, and, when the numbers 
joined in associated efforts rises to thou- 
sands and millions, the products secured 
are increased in a ratio beyond the power 
of words to express. The co-ordination 
of the activities of the members of even 
the most advanced nation of earth is con- 
fessedly very imperfect; and yet how 
magnificent are the results when com- 
pared with those formerly attained by the 
warring tribes in the territory now occu- 
pied by the United States or even by the 
people of Europe under the feudal sys- 
tem. We are only beginning to get faint 
glimpses of what shall be realized in a 
material way 'when the kingdoms of the 
world shall be fused and molded into the 
kingdom of Jesus Christ, \Vhen all armies 
shall be disbanded; when hatreds, jeal- 
ousies, and rivalries shall be done away; 
when the only form of competition shall 
be in striving to see who can do most to 
promote the general welfare, and when in 
all lands, in all climates, in all conditions, 
men shall vie with one another in the en- 
deavor to secure for all mankind the best 
possible in things material, things moral, 
and things spiritual. 

In order that individuals, families and 
industrial associations may be protected 
in their just rights and enjoy the largest 
possible amount of real liberty, while 
each performs its appropriate function, 
men have everywhere found it necessary 
to organize governments, whose proper 
functions are, as so well stated in the pre- 
amble of the Constitution of the United 
States : 'To form a more perfect union, 
establish justice, insure domestic tran- 
quility, provide for the common defense, 
promote the general welfare, and secure 
the blessings of liberty." 

IMPORTANCE OF GOVERNMENT. 

We can best form a right estimate of 
the necessity and value of a government 
by considering the condition of those who 
are without any. Indeed it is not prob- 
able that a people can be found so de- 
graded as not to have some sort of gov- 
ernmental organization. Where sudh or- 



June, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



35 



ganization is very imperfect and personal 
and property rights are insecure, there 
might makes right, brute force and vio- 
lence prevail, the advantages of indus- 
trial associations are not to be had, civili- 
zation peris/hes, and famine, pestilence, 
and petty warfare desolate the land. An 
absolute monarchy is better than no gov- 
ernment. Probably the wretched people 
of Armenia would prefer the awful des- 
potism of the Czar to their present lack of 
any protection at all. 

BEST FORM OF GOVERNMENT. 

Undoubtedly the best form of govern- 
ment yet devised is that of a constitu- 
tional democracy; but, if God should to- 
morrow annihilate every emperor, sultan, 
king, or other absolute ruler of whatever 
name, could the people of Cuba, Armenia, 
China, or Russia carry on successfully 
self-government, even under the best of 
constitutions? The people of Mexico, 
Central America, and South America 
long ago copied our constitution, but 
what a farce their attempts at self-govern- 
ment have proved to be! Mexico has 
had a few years of comparative peace and 
prosperity, but those acquainted with the 
c^ -".ditions there say that President ijj^ 
is really a military dictator. Practically 
he nominates and secures the election of 
the members of congress, and what few 
intelligent citizens there are in the coun- 
try submit to 'his dictation because they 
believe it to be better than the anarchy 
which would be likely to follow his over- 
throw. Why is self-government impossi- 
ble for the vast majority of the human 
race at present? 

KIND OF CITIZENS REQUIRED FOR A SUC- 
CESSFUL DEMOCRACY. 

Success in this highest, most import- 
ant, and most dif^cult of human organi- 
zations is dependent upon certain well- 
defined conditions. Castelar, the great 
orator-statesman of Spain, has well said: 
**You cannot have a republic without re- 
publicans." Unless a large majority of 
those who exercise political power are 
honest, intelligent, patriotic, and lovers of 
justice, self-government will be a failure. 
No government by the people can long 
endure when any one of the conditions im- 
plied in the above statement is absent. 

For our present purpose, let us con- 
sider the quality of patriotism. It is 
abundantly evident from the way the 
word and its allied terms are used in lit- 



erature that men are substantially agreed 
that the purposes of the state are so im- 
portant that the obligations of patriotism 
are superior to all others except those of 
righteousness, or duty to God. At the 
call of the state men give up their wonted 
occupations whereby they secure the 
m.-ans of subsistence for themselves and 
their families, leave home, and sacrifice 
health and even life itself, and are univers- 
ally praised for so doing. 

STATE MUST BE SUPERIOR TO ALL HUMAN 
AUTHORITY. 

It is a well established principle of po- 
litical science that the sovereignty of the 
state should be exclusive, all -compre- 
hensive, and absolute over all its domain 
and all the people dwelling therein, if it 
is to perform its high functions properly. 
It demands the unhesitating obedience of 
all within its borders, and has a right to 
claim the willing support of all who pro- 
fess to be its citizens. It can not divide 
allegiance. No man has any right to the 
sacred name of citizen of a state who ad- 
mits that any other human authority 
whatsoever, whether without its geo- 
graphical limits or within them, has a su- 
perior or even an equal claim upon him 
for consideration or obedience. 

When a foreigner seeks to Become a 
citizen of the United States he is right- 
fully required to renounce allegiance to 
all other authority. Wlien a person who 
has been a citizen of this country volun- 
tarily assumes the obligations of a citizen 
of some other country, he thereby forfeits 
his rights as a citizen of this. When one 
of our citizens takes upon himself obli- 
gations to any man or to any organiza- 
tion, which may conflict with his duties to 
his country, does he not thereby dis- 
qualify himself for the functions of a citi- 
zen? 

FUNCTION OF CIVIC OATHS. 

The state usually seeks to secure from 
its officials a guarantee for the faithful 
performance of their respective duties by 
putting them under the solemn obliga- 
tions of an oath; and this is considered 
so important that it is required of all ex-- 
ecutive officers, from President to police- 
man; of judges, legislators, jurors, and 
witnesses. Thus the function of the oath 
is necessarily extended to a large portion 
of our citizens, and everyone is liable to 
be included in its application. Can any 
intelligent and unprejudiced niind fail to 



36 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



see that the administration of extra-ju- 
dicial oaths tends to confuse the under- 
standings of those who take such oaths, 
either as to the meaning of an oath, or 
else as to which oath is to be obeyed when 
their oath to the state and their oath to a 
society happen to come into conflict? 

MASONIC OATHS CONFLICT WITH CIVIC OATHS. 

That such conflicts do occur has been 
abundantly proven in the course of ju- 
dicial proceedings. In the case of Cal- 
vin Cook vs. Harvey, which was tried in 
Xew York in 1830, Erastus Day, being 
sworn as a witness, testified that he had 
taken seventeen degrees in Masonry and 
that he considered his Masonic oaths su- 
perior to the oath 'he had just taken be- 
fore the court, consequently he refused to 
answer certain questions, the reply to 
which he considered would be in viola- 
tion of his Masonic obligations. Here let 
it be noted that Mr. Day had just sworn 
to "tell the truth and the whole truth, 
etc.," and now violates that oath in order 
to keep his Masonic oath. At the same 
trial six other persons, called as wit- 
nesses, either refused to answer after be- 
ing sworn, or refused to be sworn at all. 

At about the same date Benjamin Enos, 
Grand King of the Grand Royal Arch 
Chapter, of the State of New York, hav- 
ing been called and sworn as a witness, 
refused to answer certain questions put 
to him by the court in the following 
words: ''No court can impose upon me 
an oath to make me violate any previous 
promise or obhgation; therefore I will an- 
swer no more questions." A Grand King 
of a Grand Royal Arch Chapter may be 
supposed to know what his Masonic ob- 
ligations required of him. 

Passing over numerous similar in- 
stances in which Masonic oaths have 
come into collision with judicial oaths, to 
the detriment of the latter, we note that, in 
a recent trial in England, after a spy, em- 
ployed by the police, under the name of 
Jones, had testified to the doings of the 
Clan-na-Gael, the attorney for the de- 
fence, in the course of a cross-examina- 
tion, asked Jones if, when taking the 
Clan-na-Gael oath, he had intended to 
keep it. Jones replied in the negative, 
Avhereupon the attorney asked Jones if he 
had any more respect for his oath before 
the court "-^rm for his former oath, evi- 
dently thinking to make a strong point 



aganist J ones. 



;:ced not now con- 



sider the rightfulness of the course of the 
spy, but certainly there could be no point 
in the attorney's question unless it be 
granted that the oath taken in the Clan- 
na-Gael could conflict with the oath re- 
quired by the court. 

OPINION OF DANIEL WEBSTER. 

Daniel Webster, speaking of Free Ma- 
sonry, said: ''I have no hesitation in say- 
ing that however unobjectionable may 
have been the original objects of the insti- 
tution, or however pure may be the mo- 
tives and purposes of the individual mem- 
bers, and notwithstanding the many great 
and good men who have from time to time 
belonged to the order, yet, nevertheless, it 
is an institution which in my judgment is 
essentially wrong in the principle of its 
formation ; that from its very nature it is 
liable to great abuses; that among the ob- 
ligations which are found to be imposed 
on its members, there are such as are en- 
tirely incompatible with the duty of good 
citizens; and that all secret associations,, 
the members of which take upon them- 
selves extraordinary obligations to one 
another and are bound together by secret 
oaths, are naturally sources of jealousy 
and just alarm to others; are especially 
unfavorable to harmony and mutual con- 
fidence among men living together under 
popular institutions, and are dangerous to 
the general cause of civil liberty and good 
government. Under the influence of this 
conviction it is my opinion that the future 
administration of all such oaths, and the 
formation of all such obligations, should 
be prohibited by law." 

So wrote the great ''Defender of 
the Constitution" in a letter dated 
Nov. 20, 1835, ^^^ the views there- 
in expressed were placed on the statute 
books of Vermont and several other 
States at about that time. 

OPINION OF REV. JOSEPH COOK.V 

Half a century later Rev. Joseph Cook^ 
the distinguished lecturer, expressing sub- 
stantially the same opinions, spoke as 
follows: Of all I wish to say of secret 
societies, this is the sum : Secret Oaths — 

1. Can be shown, historically, to have 
led to crime. 

2. Are natural sources of jealousy and 
just alarm 4o society at large. 

3. Are especially unfavorable to har- 
mony and mutual confidence among men 
living together under popular institutions. 



June, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



37 



4. Are dangerous to the general cause 
of civil liberty and just government. 

5. Are condemned by the severe de- 
nunciations of many of the wisest states- 
men, preachers, and reformers. 

6. Are opposed to Christian principles, 
especially to those implied in these three 
texts: "In secret have I said nothing;" 
"Be ye not unequally yoked together 
with unbelievers;" "Give no offence in 
anything, that the ministry be not 
blamed." 

7. Are forbidden in some portions of 
our republic by the civil. law,\ and ought 
to be in all portions. X ^^ v 

Prof. Burt G. Wilder, Cornell Univers- 
ity, Ithaca, N. Y.,-^fi^: "I am willing to 
hazard my position upon the truth of the 
proposition that secret societies are un- 
known in heaven, but that they form a 
prominent and essential feature of life in 
the other locality. Light versus dark- 
ness; openness versus mystery; mutual 
confidence versus suspicion and dis- 
trust." 

J. H. FairChild, for many years the hon- 
ored and successful President of Oberlin 
College, gives his opinion in these w^ords : 
"The very idea of a secret combination 
implies a barbarous age, or a state of so- 
cial anarchy, in which such arrangements 
are necessary for safety. There is no 
place for them in a Christian civilization." 

When Benjamin Franklin's brother 
asked his advice about joining the Ma- 
sons, he replied: "One fool in the family 
is enough." 

NEED OF MUTUAL CONFIDENCE BETWEEN 
THE CITIZENS OF A STATE. 

We have seen that men are pre-emin- 
ently social beings, driven to combine by 
the necessity of their circumstances, and 
draw^n to unite in various forms of asso- 
ciations by their inborn longing for fel- 
lowship. There is, however, one essential 
element without which no combination 
can be permanently successful. It is mu- 
tual confidence, which may be called tjie 
cement of society. Whatever creates dis- 
trust, in so far tends to weaken the bonds 
that bind men together and enable them 
to work together for the attainment of 
common purposes. 

Wihen any considerable number of the 
members of any association combine in 
secret, hold meetings, and arrange plans 
in which the rest of the society are not al- 
lowed to participate, there is inevitably 



and rightfully a feeling of distrust aroused 
among those so excluded. It is but nat- 
ural to inquire why the meetings are se- 
cret, what is the purpose of the plans thus 
prepared in secret, and, if the members of 
the secret clique are not intending to gain 
some unfair advantage, what need of any 
secrecy at all? 

These questions can not be silenced by. 
saying that the secret gatherings are sole- 
ly for the purposes of good-fellowship 
and mutual help in fair and honorable 
ways, to which no one could rightly ob- 
ject, because it is apparent that all these 
objects can be attained and are attained 
by open associations. 

SECRECY NOT NECESSARY FOR ANY LEGITI- 
MATE PURPOSE. - 

Nor is it a satisfactory reason for se- 
crecy to say that the initiations, pass 
words, grips, etc., are of advantage in pre- 
venting unw^orthy persons from securing 
the advantages of such societies, because it 
is notorious that they do not have any 
such effect. In fact, a comparison of the 
membership of secret societies in any 
community, with the membership of the 
open societies having similar professed 
objects, would suggest that just the op- 
posite result is produced. 

Human nature being what it is, the 
very fact that the doings of any organiza- 
tion are under the shield of secrecy cre- 
ates a constant temptation for designing 
persons to gain control in order that they 
may use such societies for wrong pur- 
poses, and however benevolent and 
praiseworthy the intentions of their foun- 
ders, and however much good they may 
accomplish for a time, they are sure ulti- 
mately to become the tools of self-seeking- 
scoundrels. 

Chief Justice John ^Marshall, who was 
more influential in establishing the prin- 
ciples upon which the Supreme Court of 
the United States acts than any other man. 
and wdio was himself a Free Mason, said r 
"The institution of Masonry ought to be 
abandoned as one capable of producing 
much evil, and incapable of producing 
any good which might not be effected by 
safe and open means." 

Wendell Phillips made the more com • 
prehensive statement that "Secret socie 
ties are needless for any good purpos«t 
and may be used for any bad one." 

Christ gave us the fundamental rea 
son for the evils of secrecy when he saj>^^ 



38 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June. 1897. 



*'^Ien loved darkness rather than light, 
because their deeds were evil. For every 
one that doeth evil hateth the light, neith- 
er cometh to the light lest his deeds 
should be reproved. But he that doeth 
truth cometh to the light, that his deeds 
may be made manifest that they are 
wroug-ht in God." 
\V:i»eat on - Colic s ?e. 



MAKE HASTE SLOWLY. 



BV J. M. HITCHCOCK. 



Twentv years ago Mr. and Mrs. M. 
lived opposite the writer, on H. street. 
They were a young, newly married cou- 
ple, buoyant, hopeful and blessed with 
neither poverty nor riches. In their cozy 
home there seemed but one want to com- 
plete their bliss, and at length this was 
supplied in the gift of a beautiful baby 
boy. The joy at his advent was shared 
by all the neighbors. The little 'fellow 
was christened "Robert," but somehow 
we never knew him by any other name 
than "Bobbie." 

He was a precocious child, and in his 
physical and mental development quite 
surpassed all other children on the street. 
In learning to walk, talk, stride the wheel, 
play children's games, etc.-, he led his 
mates by several months. Best of all, he 
was a model child in disposition and 
seemed to challenge the truth of David's 
statement: "Behold, I was shapen in in- 
icjuity; and in sin did my mother conceive 
me." Like the Child of Bethlehem, he in- 
creased in wisdom and in stature and in 
favor with God and man. 

Of course, such a child was the pet of 
the street, and the idol of his mother, who 
w'as ever on the alert to make the most of 
his gifts. In his athletic sports the proud 
mother was quite too inclined to encour- 
age her child's powers to the danger lim- 
its. At length it was discovered that un- 
due exercise was working injury to Bob- 
bie's physical constitution. The neigh- 
bors, with studied caution, remonstrated 
with the mother and begged her to de- 
sist from further overtaxing the strength 
of her child, but it was not until Bobbie's 
limbs wxre quite distorted that her atten- 
tion was arrested. 

The celebrated surgeon, the late Dr. 
Parkes, was then consulted and asked to 
jjrescribe for, and, if possible, straighten 



the bow-legs of the child. Fortunately 
the remedy was reasonably certain and 
simple, but was not the work of a day. 
Time was an indispensable element in the 
treatment. Gradual compressers were to 
be so adjusted to the misshapen limbs as. 
to restore them to their normal condition. 
But when the mother came to realize the 
condition of the c'hild, she was impatiently 
anxious for the immediate restoration of 
those 'deformities, which were the direct 
occasion of her own neglect. In her 
anxiety she could not resist the tempta- 
tion to usurp the surgeon's prerogative to 
turn the screw" that tightened the com- 
press upon the deformed limbs, hoping 
thereby to hasten their cure. This effort 
to eliminate time from the problem of 
restoration subjected the child to useless 
pain and retarded his recovery. 

In this simple narrative may be found 
certain parallels and counterparts of our 
modern reforms. Like the mother in the 
above narrative, in our impatience we 
want to immediately correct the evils 
which we have caused ourselves. While 
this nation for many years was agitating 
the slavery question and oblivious to 
other reforms, the drink habit was quietly 
making inroads upon society, and saloons 
were insiduously taking possession of 
our cities and towns. "While men slept 
the enemy sowed tares." There was a 
lengthy era in which there was little if any 
demand for temperance literature, and lit- 
tle call for temperance lectures — if indeed 
there w^ere any temperance lecturers to 
call. 

Well do I remember my unrewarded 
effort twenty-eight years ago to secure a 
man or woman to give a temperance talk 
in Chicago — a city then of three or four 
hundred thousand souls. Now, fortun- 
ately, a goodly number of us have awak- 
ened to a sense of the condition caused in 
large measure by our inactivity. In our 
precipitate haste to undo the evil we fret 
and foam and not infrequently apply ap- 
probrious epithets toward those who are 
not yet ready to come out of saloon par- 
ties. We do well to remember that time, 
patience, and perseverance are indis- 
pensable elements to the success of all re- 
forms. We are doubtless familiar with 
the declaration of the little Sabbath sdhool 
hopeful who told his teacher that "God 
could not make a two-year-old colt in a 
minute." 



r June,'1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



39 



A number of years ago my friend went 
to Oberlin to study theology. He was an 
undergraduate and soon after his arrival 
called on Prof. Morgan for advice as to 
whether he would better complete his 
college course. The old patriarch said in 
his quaint, fatherly way: ''Edward, my 
son, when God wants to make a squash 
he can do it in ninety days, but when he 
creates the hardy oak it requires cen- 
turies." 

The National Christian Association 
may do well to remember that for many 
years after the general dissolution of Ma- 
sonic lodges, they were allowed, unmo- 
lested, to renew their charters and to re- 
establish themselves on every hillside. 
Our work is to dislodge them, even 
should it require all time and part of 
eternity. Whoever thinks this is to be a 
play spell will be, in the parlance of the 
street, " badly left." 

165 Howe street, Chicago. 



BROKEN VOWS. 



REV. J. P. STODDARD. 



Herod, surnamed the Great, was a ty- 
rant. His reign was dharacterized by ini- 
piety and barbarity. His last act contem- 
plated the most atrocious cruelty possible 
in a dying monarch. Sensible of the aver- 
sion in \yhidh 'he was held, and of the joy 
whidh ihis death would occasion, he re- 
solved to forestall that rejoicing and ob- 
tain for himself solemnities befitting the 
demise of a king. 

Conscious that Ihis end was ver\' near, 
he ordered the principal men in 'his realm 
to gather at Jerusalem, where they were 
held prisoners in the hippodrome, await- 
ing (the execution of the king s decree. 

Summoning this sister Salome and her 
husband Alexas to liis bedside, he deplor- 
ed Ihis miserable estate and revealed to 
them his resolve to procure a great and 
sincere lamentation by the slaughter of 
those confined' in the circus, ''as soon as 
he had given up 1ihe glho^t." To assure 
the execution of this decree, tihe king re- 
minded them of their kinsihip, of their in- 
debtedness for clemency, wealth and pro- 
motions received at his 'hands, and then 
to make his purpose dou'bly sure, he add- 



ed an oath, "by the faitJh they owed to 
God," and their dying benefactor. Disre- 
garding the king's wishes and their own 
solemn vow, they ordered the prisoners 
released, and directed them to return to 
their ihomes, before die king's death was 
publicly proclaimed. Tlie king s purpose 
to have a national mourning at his death 
was defeated, a solemn pledge "by the 
faith of God" Avas violated, and Salome, 
with ther 'husband Alexas, registered their 
names with ungrateful kindred and wan- 
ton covenant breakers. 

Accepting Josephus as authority, they 
betrayed a trust whicih, judged by "Ma- 
sonic Law and usage," consigns them to 
the "contempt and detestation of all good 
Masons." "\''oluntarily and of their own 
free will and accord," they covenanted 
with an oath to do the bidding of their 
lawful sovereign, and then as voluntarily 
violated their oath. Like George Wash- 
ington, ab)juring diis allegiance to the 
Britisfti government artd army to w^hidh 
he was bound by an oath, this recreant 
pair obeyed the ihigher law of humanity 
and mercy, and won the approval of all 
who read their record. 

The oath taken by a Mason on uniting 
with a lodge is no more consistent with 
justice in its requirements or less barbaric 
in its execution than the oath administer- 
ed by Herod to 'his sister. His was a judi- 
cial oath and administered by the author- 
ity of a king. The oath taken by Wash- 
ington was supported by the British gov- 
ernment. But the ]\Iasonic oath is mere- 
ly a form without civil or the divine sanc- 
tion, and must therefore be blasphemy. 
Those who take this oath are no more 
bound to keep it than were Salome and 
Alexas to keep the oath of Herod, and 
on the other liand, they are under the 
same obligation to break their vows as 
were those commissioned executioners of 
the king's decree.. To condemn a Ma- 
son for seceding from and exposing the 
iniquitous system is to indorse Herod's 
conduct and condemn the saviors of those 
whom ihe 'had appointed to death. It is 
a censure of the "father of his country." 
for disloyalty to the flag of Great Britain, 
an insult to the intelHgence of a Christian 
and an evidence of depravity or a shallow 
brain on the part of one who presumes 
to make such a charge. 

218 Columbus avenue, Boston. 



40 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



WEAK INSURANCE. 



Insurance is the chief attraction of some 
-secret orders. Lodge insurance comes 
near being what it was called by a recent 
writer in the Cynosure, "the worst form 
•of life insurance.'' It lacks in some de- 
o-ree the essential power of insurance, 
which is to assure and insui'e. Reason- 
able certainty, grounded on safe statistics 
and the natural conditions of actual busi- 
ness, is necessary. The kind of insurance 
adopted by lodges lacks this primary ele- 
ment. 

It is foolish to take a mere certificate of 
membership in place of the legal contract 
called a policy. Besides this, the cer- 
tificate lacks much of valuable detail 
^vhich the policy contract specifies. Com- 
pare any lodge or open "certificate" with 
a "policy" issued by any regular old-Hne 
mutual company located in Massachu- 
setts. Under the laws of the common- 
Avealth the insured and his beneficiaries 
are protected, almost in spite of them- 
selves. The policy cannot lapse. There 
is no possible way in which it can be can- 
celled. But an assessment certificate be- 
comes worthless if payments are discon- 
tinued. Lodge insurance is always of the 
"die to win" type, and that sort of insur- 
ance is always in peril of forfeiture. 

The real insurance policy is secured by 
good investment of premiums deposited. 
Some of the most valuable and produc- 
tive buildings in our cities are those of 
life insurance companies. The policies of 
the insured are title deeds to this real es- 
tate. The insured are its sole owners. 
There are no stockholders in an old-line 
mutual. Dividends come to the insured 
only. 

The writer whom I have quoted haz- 
ards the statement that "a very large ma- 
jority of the policies do not mature." 
Without entering into the question of its 
accuracy I claim that, if even half correct, 
this tells heavily against lodge insurance, 
as it does against all the ''die to win" kind. 
As regards the genuine insurance with 
which it is compared, the maturing of 
policies is not essental. In one sense the 
policy is always mature, for the contract 
names its value at every point. If pay- 
ments stop, even without notice, the pol- 
icy is a valid contract for the amount of 
insurance or cash return already secured 
by premiums deposited. The business is 



virtually a modification of the savings 
bank. Its difiference lies largely in mass- 
ing and averaging receipts and disburse- 
ments. The advantage is that the finan- 
cial shock does not fall on each family in 
succession, but the blow is diffused. 
Otherwise the stopping of wages would 
often be crushing. You can strike with 
a sledge-hammer twenty blows on a 
board held by twenty persons. But strike 
one held by each separately and many of 
them w^ill be hurt. 

No money is made. The woman whose 
husband dies after hve payments seems 
to get relatively more than one whose 
husband dies after twenty have been de- 
posited. But she loses his wages for fif- 
teen years. It was in view of this possi- 
ble loss that she entered into this arrange- 
ment of averaging savings deposits and 
claims according to statistical probabili- 
ties. She does not bear the whole force 
of the sudden change alone. Averaging 
diffuses it. It all comes inevitably, but 
not in such a concentrated and crushing 
vv^ay. All the reasons why this benefit can 
be secured better elsewhere than in the 
weak arrangement in question cannot be 
discussed at length here, but this can be 
urged that the first duty of insurance is 
to make sure. 

The great question in depositing 
money in this or any kind of savings bank 
is, Will this money be kept safely and re- 
turned acording to agreement? ''Die to 
win" insurance cannot answer that ques- 
tion. The best old-line insurance can. I 
know a company that could lock its doors 
to-day, dismiss every agent, and exclude 
all new patrons, and yet pay every cent of 
its detailed and specific contracts, in ex- 
actly the way contracted for. No lodge 
could do that. CERTAINTY. 



THE FALSE PROPHET. 



BY REV. CYRUS SMITH. 

"And! saw three unclean spirits, like 
frogs, come out of the mouth of the dra- 
gon, and out of the mouth of the beast, 
and out of the mouth of the false 
prophet." Rev. i6: 13. And verse 14 
says: "They are the spirits of devils." 
The dragon is the devil, the beast is one 
of his organizations among men ; the false 
prophet is a Satanized minister. His num- 
ber is 666, corresponding to the number 



June, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



41 



of churches which have been cursed by 
Masonic preachers. The three unclean 
spirits are the devils in the principles of 
the first three degrees of Masonry, whose 
posterity is as numerous as the frogs of 
Egypt. The first three degree's of Free 
Masonry ^re the chief corner-stone of 
all lodgery, so that figuratively speaking 
she is "the mother of harlots." 

"The mother of harlots" certainly re- 
fers to an institution with a posterity, and 
character that is described by the word 
"harlot." Nothing in existence fills the 
bill except Free Masonry, and the minor 
orders which cause Christians to commit 
spiritual adultery by stealthily inducing 
them to worship at lodge altars. It is the 
"false prophet," not generally known to 
be such, who in "the livery of heaven" 
can give prestige to evil and cause Israel 
to sin. Oppose a popular evil and you are 
denounced by his followers as "a troubler 
of Israel," but it is not so much so as it 
once was on the secrecy question. 

De Kalb, Iowa. 



THE VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA. 



The "Volunteers of America" failing to 
distingnisih between the false and the true, 
they call evil good and good e^al, and act 
according to that sentiment. Two of their 
captains, one a stafT captain, h'ave inform- 
ed me that belonging to tfhe Free Masons 
or Oddfellows is no obstacle in the way 
of joining tihem, one of themselves being 
an Oddfellow, and avowed his intention 
of joining another secret society. An- 
other of their captains dragged a man 
out of one of their halls because he gave 
a true testimony against Oddfellowship. 

Upon another occasion, after tflie na- 
ture of lodge worship had been fairly ex- 
plained to the audience, the stafif captain 
said: "We do not believe in idolatr}^ If 
you coiiie and join us we shall not ask 
whether you belong to a secret society or 
not." But 'how cruel to leave tiheir mem- 
bers in the jaws of hell ; to receive wolves 
into the siheep-fold an<i then clothe them 
with sheep skins. 

The Volunteers of America do this 
thing and forbid the warning of the sheep 
against the wolves of hell. In evidence 
of this last statement I received the fol- 
lowing from St. Paul, Minn. : 

"The Volunteers of America captain 
here has a drum; he got it from a Free 



Mason, and the agreement was not to let 
you speak in the hall or street." But God 
says: "Judgment also will I lay to the 
line and righteousness to the plummet; 
and the hail sihall sweep away the refuge 
of lies, and Avaters shall overflow the hid- 
ing place. And your covenant witli death 
shall be disannulled, and your agreement 
withihell (Masons) shall not stand; when, 
the overflowing scourge s'hall pass 
through, then ye s^iall be trodden down 
by it." "Now, therefore, be ye not mock- 
ers, lest your bands be made strong; for 
I have heard from the Lord God of hosts 
a consumption determined upon the 
whole eartili." Isaiah xxviii., 17, 18, 22. 
W. FENTOX. 



REFORM NEWS. 



THE WORK IN CHICAGO. 



Chicago, 111., May 14, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure: Last evening Rev. 
J. O. Nelson, the pastor of the Swedish ]\L 
E. Church, on the corner of Oak and 
Market streets, permitted me to speak to 
his people three-quarters of an hour upon 
"The commission of the unpardonable 
sin the indispensable duty of every Free 
Mason." 

Brother Ronayne was present and in a 
brief testimony at the close of the meet- 
ing added his testimony to that of the 
lecturer; and said that when a "Free Ma- 
son becomes a Christian he ceases to be a 
Free Mason,"' thus making a sweeping 
condemnation of the vast multitude of 
bishops, pastors and members of Chris- 
tian churches, who are Free Masons, as 
being nothing but lying hypocrites. 

The pastor himself expressed his holy 
horror of Free Masonry. They are so 
far from having any respect for the Ma- 
sonic bishops of the M. E. Church that 
they have a hoh' horror of them. 

It is currently reported that seven- 
eighths of the pastors of the English- 
speaking Methodist Churches are Free 
Masons. However that may be, it is cer- 
tain that the English-speaking M. E. 
churches are so much in sympathy with 
Free Alasonry that the words ]\Iethod- 
ism and Masonry arc well nigh synony- 
mous. Jesus Christ, after uttering his 
fearful warning against the commission 
of the unpardonable sin, said: "Either 



42 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



make the tree good, and his fruit good, 
or else make the tree corrupt and his fruit 
corrupt: for the tree is known by his 
fruit. O, generation of vipers, how can 
ye, being evil, speak good things? For 
out of the abundance of the heart the 
mouth speaketh." Matt. 12: 33,34. 

Chicago, ]\Iay 20, 1897. 
The fact that the i\Iasonic mind is en- 
mity towards God was well illustrated last 
evening in a conversation with a Baptist, 
who professes to be a Christian. We left 
Dr. Lawrence's prayer meeting at the 
same time and conversed upon the sub- 
ject of Free Masonry. He said that he 
knew nothing whatever about Free Ma- 
sonry, but he had formed a favorable 
opinion of it, which is precisely the condi- 
tion of mind requisite to join the lodge 
and become a true Mason. 

I rehearsed to him the initiatory cere- 
monies of the first degree of Masonry, 
and pointed out to him the identity of the 
rites and ceremonies of that degree, with 
ancient Egyptian devil-worship, its false 
swearing, the swearing away of the right 
of private judgment, its blasphemous as- 
sumption to regenerate, sanctify and save 
the soul; its tm-ning the truth of God, the 
Bible, into a lie; how it makes a sworn 
liar and a sworn murderer of its candi- 
dates; how it lied to the candidate about 
its pretended secrets, which are no secrets 
at all; and of the murder of Captain Mor- 
gan by the Free Masons for writing their 
pretended secrets, which they had fraud- 
ulently sworn him to conceal. 

And after all of this, when I told him of 
Mr. Ronayne, who had publicly worked 
the degrees of blasphemy, lying and mur- 
der that he had sworn to forever con- 
ceal ; after having been a worshipful mas- 
ter and a teacher of Masonry, he de- 
clared that act of Mr. Ronayne to be an 
act of meanness. Thus did this Baptist 
professor of Christianity prove himself to 
be on the devil's side and his profession 
of Christianity hypocrisy. 

W. FENTON. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE NATIONAL 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



It was a beautiful day on Monday, May 
10, when a goodly number of the workers- 
and friends of the anti-secret movement 
gathered in the 'hall on the upper floor of 
the X. C. A. building. The meeting was 



called to order by the President, Rev. S. 
H. S\yarts, who threw into the devotional 
exercises tihe fervor and revival spirit of 
the deep religious awakening which has 
for some time stirred 'his dhurch at Mor- 
ris. 

Besides tihe members o-f the Board of 
Directors, there were present Rev. P. B. 
Williams, tJhe Pacific coast agent, and has 
wife from Los Angeles, Cal. ; Rev. Will- 
iam Fenton, of St. Paul, Minn., agent for 
the Northwest, and Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 
of Washington, D C, agent of the East- 
ern department. Among others present 
were Edmund Ronayne, Mrs. E. A. Cook,, 
and Rev. T. M. Chalmers, of Chicago;, 
Prof. E. F. Bartholomew, of Augustana 
College, Rock Island; Rev. W. H. Chan- 
dler, Elder Rufus Smith, Mrs. W. I. Phil- 
lips, Mrs. Nora E. KelLogg, Mrs. Carrie 
Kennedy and Mrs. Julia W. Fischer, of 
Wheaton. 

In the absence of the Recording Secre- 
tary, Mary C. Baker, Ediltor M. A. Gault 
was chosen secretary pro tem. Comimit- 
tees were appointed on nomination of of- 
ficers,on resolutions and on receiving new 
members. The nominating committee re- 
ported itihe renomination of the officers 
of last year. The report was adopted,, 
and the secretary ordered to cast the bal- 
lot for their re-election. The committee^ 
on receiving new members, recommend- 
ed the names of Mrs. P. B. Williams, 
Mrs. M. A. Gault, Mrs. Carrie Kennedy 
and Mrs. Julia W. Fischer, for member- 
ship in tJhe National Christian Associa- 
tion, wihich was adopted and the names 
added to the roll. 

Very interesting reports 'v^^re then read 
by Rev. E. B. WyHe, Secretary of the 
Board of Directors, and by Rev. W. I. 
Phillips, General Agent and Treasurer. 
These reports were approved and are pub- 
lished in this issue. After prayer by Rev. 
Wm. Fenton the meeting adjourned, to 
meet at 12 m. at Willard Hall. 

The second session was called to order 
in Willard Hall prompitly at 12 o'clock 
by PresidentSwartz, who read Psalm xci., 
after w^hioh Rev. E. B. Wyliie led in pray- 
er. The 'hall was well filled by an attent- 
ive audience, composed largely of busi- 
ness men and pastors of t!he city. The 
two noted singers. Prof. E. O. Excel and 
Prof. Gaibriels, of the Moody Church, led 
in the service of song. President S. H. 
Swartz and President C. A. Blandhard 



June, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



43 



then iol'lowed willh mos/t effective and 
powerful addresses, showing the danger- 
•ous influence of the lodge system, and 
that it was past the hour when any man 
should say, "We cannot know anything 
-about it." 

Rev. P. B. Williams, Rev. Wm. Fenton 
and Rev. W. B. Stoddard, the District 
Secretaries and lecturers, next followed 
with interesting and encouraging ad- 
dresses, in whidh they gave reports of the 
field work of the year. These reports 
shov/ed a most encouraging progress. 
The only drawback was the great finan- 
cial depression, but during the year more 
sermons against the lodge evil ihad been 
preached, more addresses had been given, 
more Cynosure subscribers secured, more 
pulpits found accessible than during any 
previous year. 

Dr. J. A. Collins then reported the fol- 
lowing resolutions, which were unani- 
mously adopted: 

Whereas, Our Master, the Light of the 
world, has directed that we should let 
our liglht shine, and as light is the great 
need of mankind, and as our great com- 
mon enemy, Satan, is the promoter of 
works of corruption, which prosper in 
secrecy ; therefore 

Resolved (i), That we have heard witih 
satisfaction reports of success from our 
Board of Directors, Editor, General Sec- 
retary and Field Agents, as evidence of 
progress and the Divine blessing on the 
work of the National Christian Associa- 
tion, and we are specially gratified with 
the prospect of the formation of an asso- 
ciation in Greait Britain as a co-worker in 
this cause. 

(2) That we commend the Board and 
other officers for their careful and gra- 
tuitous labors. 

3. That we 'highly appreciate the cour- 
age and self-denial of our field agents and 
their able management of their different 
fields, 

(4) That there is need for more pro- 
nounced effort on the part of all friends 
of the cause we represent. 

(5) That we appeal to Christian peo- 
ple without regard to denomination for 
hberal support and patronage of the Cyno- 
sure in its new form, and especially ask 
the patrons of former years to continued 
efforts to extend the circulation of the 
Cynosure, as we regard it as the right arm 
of this whole movement. 



At the closing session in the afternoon 
the discussion was on the financial situa- 
tion and 'how funds were to be secured. 
The District Secretaries, Williams, Fen- 
ton and Stoddard were reappointed, also 
the General Secretary and Editor Phil- 
lips and Gault. Dr. J. A. Collins was ap- 
pointed President of the Board of Direct- 
ors, and the sessions closed with an ear- 
nest prayer by President Blanchard. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS 
OF THE NATIONAL CHRISTIAN AS- 
SOCIATION FOR 1896-7. 



Fleadquarters, Carpenter Building, 221 

West Madison street, Chicago, 111., 

May 10, 1897. 
To the Members of the Association : 

At the annual meeting May 14, 1896, 
the following Board of Directors was 
elected: T. B. Arnold, Chicago; C A. 
Blanchard, Wheaton, III; E. A. Cook, 
Chicago; J. M. Hitchcock, Chicago; c' 
J. Holmes, Chicago; T. B. Radabaugh, 
Chicago; Elliot Whipple,. Wheaton, III; 
E. B. Wylie, Chicago; H. F. Kletzing, 
Naperville, 111.; J. A. Collins, Chicago; 
W. O. Dinius, Chicago. 

The board was organized as follows: 
Committee on Finances and Auditing — 
Elliott W^hipple, H. A. Fischer, and J. M. 
Hitchcock. Committee on Buildings and 
other real estate— W. 1. Phillips, W^ B. 
Stoddard, E. A. Cook, and C. J. Holmes. 
Committee on Publications — T. B. Rada- 
baugh, E. A. Cook, M. A. Gault, T. B. 
Arnold, and W. I. Phillips. Committee 
on Feld Work and Conventions — J. A. 
Collins, W. O. Dinius, together with the 
Finance Committee. 

I. The meetings of the board have been 
well attended and the deliberations have 
been earnest and prayerful. The su- 
preme purpose of all the members of the 
board has been to seek the highest inter- 
ests of this work, as a labor for the king- 
dom of God. More certain are we that 
the cause which is distinctively cham- 
pioned by us is needed by the Christian 
churches in their contest with evil in high 
places. The sentiments expressed so 
generally at the last annual meeting have 
characterized the work of the year. We 
are, therefore, blessed with greater .>ym- 
pathy from the churches and their of- 
ficers. As a result of prayer and a pur- 



44 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



pose to be of service to the I^Iaster 
through the churches, opportunities have 
now and again offered for lectures, 
where heretofore but little encourage- 
ment was given. This providential en- 
trance to the church circles is hailed by 
us as the beginning of a new era in the 
reform against secret societies. It is the 
church's cause. And greater good is 
done when the question is discussed be- 
fore the children of God in their own 
churches. We regard the work done by 
President C. A. Blanchard at the North- 
iield, ^lass., convention, conducted by 
Mr. Moody, as of untold importance, and 
we feel the promptings of gratitude that 
again this year President Blanchard is to 
present the cause before the great North- 
held audiences. 

2. While the spiritual prosperity has 
been marked, we have suffered along with 
the suffering financial world ; yet the ma- 
terial interests of the association have 
been consented with greater care. Many 
hours of concerted thought have been de- 
voted to the matter of obtaining means to 
keep men in the field, and the publishing 
plant busy and unimpaired. With the 
blessing of God we have had gratifying 
success, even in the management of the 
material concerns of the association dur- 
ing this hard year. As in years passed, 
we shall leave to the Treasurer and field 
agents the particulars of their respective 
offices. Much credit is due our Treas- 
urer and General Secretary, W. I. Phil- 
lips, for the faith and wisdom with which 
he has served in this time of financial de- 
pression. His report will be welcomed 
by all. 

3. An important change in the publi- 
cations was made after much delibera- 
tion. By this change the faithful old 
Pole Star, the Cynosure, will become 
more definite in its scope, leaving the 
thousand and one subjects that its col- 
umns may deal with the single, great, neg- 
lected matter of the relation of secret so- 
cieties, to the divine institutions, the 
home, state and church. The Lodge 
Lamp, v/hich has been of much service 
during its brief history, will be discon- 
tinued, and its vitality and brightness will 
be absorbed by the new Cynosure, which 
will come to its readers less frequently 
but better fitted, w^e hope, for this busy 
age of specialties. It will contain the 
beaten oil of the editor's sanctum and of 



the field at large. Editor Gault will carry 
his heart and brain into the new paper, 
and we shall enjoy its convenient form. 
The admirable report of a committee ap- 
pointed by the board to address the con- 
stituency of the association respecting 
the above changes was published in the 
Cynosure of April i, 1897. The exhaus- 
tiveness of that report, which is familiar 
to our readers, makes it unnecessary to 
state the ample reasons for this change, 
which we trust will prove a step in ad- 
vance. 

Closing, we wish to express deep-felt 
appreciation of this care of God through- 
out the year of our labors. The future is 
hopeful. God still reigns and His Son 
is above all and holdeth the hearts of 
kings in his hands. It is for and with 
Him that we have performed the work 
you appointed us to. Respectfully sub- 
mitted, 

CHARLES A. BLANCHARD, 

Chairman. 

EDGAR B. WYLIE, Secretary. 



TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT. 



From May I, 1 896, to April 30, 1897. 

RESOURCES. 

Real estate $37,460 00 

Bills receivable 8,618 68 

Fixtures 832 69 

Publishing material 685 00 

Books in stock 457 91 

Reference library 271 64 

Tracts in stock 616 89 

Cynosure inventory 3, 000 00 

Subscription due on Cynosure 425 91 

Personal accounts due 340 89 

Postage stamps on hand 20 00 

Merchandise on hand, coal, etc 21 00 

Cash on hand May i, 1897 378 00 

$53,128 61 
LIABILITIES. 
Annuity fund — 

Capwell $ (&2 22> 

Johnson 100 00 

Columbia 6,000 00 

New York 550 00 

"1893" 2,50000 

Oregon 753 24 

Ohio 1,000 00 

Woodward 50 00 

$11,635 47 

Vermont fund 239 00 

Illinois 5 00 

Foreign fund i 'j^ 

Cynosure ministers' fund 2>y7 I4 



June, 1897. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 45 

Cynosure extension fund i37 58 gated any member of tlie order to inflict 

Lodge Lamp 76 45 the penalty upon any violator of the Ma- 
Personal accounts payable 2108 ^^^^^ ^q^,; -j^'^js question led to an inter- 
Bills payable. ......... . 1,15000 gg^- discussion, in which Dr. Dowie 

Cynosure subscriptions due subs.. . 1,87591 ^^^-^^^ showed that murder is implied, 

^j- - „Q contemplated and premeditated by the 

]>^. C. A. capital account 37!649 22 fraternity in the Masonic penalty, and the 

individual members, who compose the 

$53,128 61 fraternity, are therefore guilty. 

Respectfully submitted, In the afternoon Dr. Dowie appealed 

WM. I. PHILLIPS, Treasurer. to Rev. Wm. Fenton, of St. Paul, Minn., 

who clearly proved that the ]\Iasonic de- 

AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE. ^^^^^ known as the "Mystic Shrine," one 

,,, ^ , . Chicago May 10, 1897. ^f ^he purposes of which is declared in its 

We, the undersigned, auditors of the Na- .^ 1 t" f. arr^ ^^ ^ 1 

tional Christian Association, hereby certify ritual to be To promptly execute and 

that during and for the year closing May i, P^^nish ^ ^= '"' the violator of obllga- 

1897, we have from time to time examined the tion and desecrator of Masonic vow. Our 

iDooks and vouchers of W. 1. Phillips, Treas- purpose is to strike terror into the heart 

urer, and find the same to be correct. We of the criminal class by bringing them 

have also examined his annual statements and speedily and without mercy to the block 

find the same to agree with his books of ac- or to the bow-string: of the Mvstic 

•count. E. WHIPPLE, Shrine." 

J. M. HITCHCOCK,^^ "To 'arrest, judge and execute within 

the hour, and thus take the law within our 
ow^n grasp and summarily punish the 

GREAT DAY AT ZION TABERNACLE. malefactor. Blood for blood and life for 
life, and as our fleet-footed justice over- 

Sabbath dav, Mav 23, was indeed a takes and punishes the evd-doer, aye, 

-High day in Zion."^ With two brief in- ^^f " ^^ the heart of misdeed, it will be 

termissions for refreshments, the meeting "" ^f f^°^, ^f ^^^^f ^^'^o remain and know 

lasted twelve hours, the whole time being ^^^^ the fate of the departed, 

devoted to the discussion of the deep- ''The day is not far distant when the 

laid plot of Satan to destrov Christianitv "ame and the escutcheon of the Nobles 

and civil government by means of secret ^i the Mystic Shrme will strike a pallid 

societies. Zion's Tabernacle, of which terror to the wild, devouring element of 

Dr. Dowie is the pastor, seats 3,500 peo- crime." Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 

pie, and at the morning and afternoon ser- P^ge 34. 

vice it was nearly filled. About seventy- Bro. Fenton also referred to the obli- 

five seceders were present and testified gation of the degree called "The Holy 

against the lodge and gave their reasons and Thrice Illustrious Order of the 

for leaving the lodge. Cross," as published in the Declaration 

The address in the morning was by the of Independence, from the tyranny of 
ex-Worshipful Master Mason and ex-Ro- Free Masonry, by the celebrated Le Roy 
man Catholic, Edmond Ronayne. He al- convention of 8,000 people, July 4th and 
luded to the relation of Popery to Ma- 5th, 1828. That obligation is as follows: 
.sonry and said that Masonry was organ- "You further swear that, should you 
ized to combat the reformation of the six- know another to violate any essential 
teenth centurv% and in principle was m point of this obligation, you will use your 
harmony with Popery. He expUiined tlie most decided endeavors, by the blessing- 
initiatory ceremonies of the first degree of God, to bring such person to the strict- 
of Masonry as illustrative df the dark and est and most condign punishment, agree- 
-soul-damning principles of the institut.'on. able to the rules and usages of our ancient 

When Brother Ronayne spoke of the fraternity; and this, by pointing him out 

murder penalty of the entered apprentice to the world as an unworthy vagabond : 

obligation, a Free Mason arose and said by opposing his interests, by deranging 

that he had taken ninety-five degrees of his business, by transferring his charac- 

Free Masonn-, and asked Mr. Ronayne ter after him wherever he may go, and by 

if any obligation of Free Alasonry obli- exposing him to the contempt of the 



46 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



whole fraternity and the world, but of our 
illustrious order more especially during 
his whole natural life." Bernard's Light 
on ^lasonry, page 177. 

Thus the question asked by the ninety- 
hfth degree Free iMason in the morning 
was answered in the affirmative directly, 
as it had been answered in the morning 
impliedly. Dr. Dowie preached an ex- 
cellent sermon in which he arraigned by 
their names bishops and pastors who are 
Free ]\Iasons, as lying hypocrites, and 
warned them of their coming doom. 

The theme of the day continued until 
about half-past ten in the evening, with 
unabated interest. Indeed so long as 
God's own people are joined in visible 
church relationship with the lodge work- 
ers of iniquity, the theme will be inex- 
haustible. For God will sooner or later 
have a visible separation of his people 
from the children of the devil and all lying 
hypocrites. 



THE CUMBERLAND PRESBYTERIANS. 



The general assembly of the Cumber- 
land Presbyterian Church was in session 
in this city week before last in their 
church, 6623 Stewart avenue. About 300 
delegates w^ere in attendance and most of 
them wore Masonic badges, displayed 
eagles, keystones, maltese crosses, square 
and compasses in plain sight, indicating 
that they had taken at least from three to 
thirty-seven degrees of Masonic vilifica- 
tion of Christianity and the Lord Jesus 
Ghrist. 

At the close of the morning sesson, 
Rev. Wm. Fenton, who was in attend- 
ance, distributed anti-Masonic tracts to 
them at the door of the church, and N. C. 
A. literature was offered for sale in the 
vestibule. One Free Mason pastor, after 
carefully examining "Free Masonry Illus- 
trated," remarked that he would like to 
own that book. Another Free Mason, 
more high-spirited than the other, ex- 
pressed his indignation at the exposition, 
and soon the pastor of the church ap- 
peared and ordered Bro. Fenton to take 
"his stuff" away, as he could not have his 
guests insulted. At the same time he 
said that he was not a Free Mason and 
that he did not know anything about Free 
^Masonry. 

It was a reckless observation, for, if 
true, how did he know that he was not, as 



in fact he was, insulting the N. C. A., and 
likewise God, to whom he is accountable, 
by ordering the truth that exposes the 
devilish blasphemy of Free Masonry out 
of the reach of his guests, who are in- 
fatuated with that blasphemy, and there- 
fore exposed to the wrath of God? And 
so he treated his guests with the greatest 
possible unkindness, for "Love rejoices 
in the truth," while that which professes 
to be love, while it hates the truth, will 
turn to malice, bitterness, gall and hate 
at the judgment day. The pastor's in- 
junction was obeyed and the truth was 
removed from the church. 

The next day Bro. Fenton again visited 
the assembly, and instead of going into 
the church gave away tracts on the side- 
walk, and was entertaining a group of 
listeners on the street, explaining a chart 
illustrative of the devil's judging Free 
Masons, when the pastor again inter- 
ferred, claiming the same jurisdiction 
over the public street that he had over his 
church. 

A young pastor, having read the "Ex- 
tracts from Masonic Oaths," wanted to 
know the object of it. When Bro. Fen- 
ton told him that its object was to make 
public what is done in Masonic lodges, he 
wanted to know where the writer of the 
tract obtained his information. He was 
told that it was from the book published 
by the Masonic fraternity for the use of 
the lodges — "Ecce Orienti." He then 
said he had lately taken the degrees of 
Masonry, and had never seen "Ecce Ori- 
enti." 

Bro. Fenton said to him: "Now you 
see that the Masons have sworn you to 
keep secret that which is not a secret, 
which is the same as if you were sworn to 
keep secret the news published in the 
daily newspapers." He seemed to feel 
the full force of the illustration and turned 
away from Bro. Fenton, as if he realized 
that he had been caught in a snare and 
fooled by the crafty old Masons. 



INTERVIEW WITH DR. WM. LAWRENCE. 



Having seen a statement that Rev. 
Wm. Lawrence, D. D., pastor of the Sec- 
ond Baptist Clhurch of this city, is a Free 
Mason, and having made the attempt in 
an interview with iiim a few years ago to 
"bell the cat" for his benefit, Rev. Wm. 
Fenton last week conceived the idea of 



June, 189 . 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



47 



swinging that gentleman on his obhga- 
tion, and in pursuance of that desdgn call- 
ed upon him. When he expressed his ab- 
horrence of the manifested opposition to 
secret societies and said that he had not 
yet joined the Free Masons; but that he 
intends to join them as soon as he can 
spare the time to do so. He said : ''You 
would be surprised to know how many 
Baptist ministers are Free Masons." 

Bro. Fenton said: "That is an awful 
thought.-' 

Dr. Lawrence went on to say: "The 
most active and best workers in my 
church are Free ^lasons." He said that^ 
many years ago he read anti-^Iasonic 
books and pretended exposures of Free 
Masonr}-; that he had been much annoy- 
ed by anti-Masons, and that the secrets 
of Free ^Masonry could not be known 
without joining the ]Masons. Bro. Fen- 
ton sihowed him a copy of "Ecce Orienti," 
and told him that it was printed by the 
^Masonic fraternity for the use of Masonic 
lodges. 

Dr. Lavrrence said that it Avas dishonor- 
able for others than ^Masons to have that 
book. 

Of course. Bro. Fenton had to defend 
himself against the charge of doing a dis- 
honorable thing in purchasing "Ecce Ori- 
enti'' of the ^Masonic publisihing- house of 
Redding & Co., 731 Broadway, Xew 
Y'ork. But Dr. Lawrence could not ap- 
preciate his defense. 

He is like "the heathen in his blindness, 
bowing down to wood and stone," "lov- 
ing darkness rather than light." 

This interview established the fact that 
the doctor is a Free ^lason in his heart, 
and can truly tell them in the lodge that 
he desires to join, not from mercenary 
motives, or the solicitations of friends, but 
from having fomied a favorable opinion 
of ]\Iasonry. And which is in harmony 
with "the requisitions to make a Alason," 
namely, to destroy the Christian religion. 
See "Knig^hts Adepts of the Eagle or 
Sun," in Bernard's "Lig^ht on Masonn'." 

He need not join for mercenar\^ mo- 
tives, for this salary from his church is 
said to be six thousand dollars a year, and 
he says that one of his church members, a 
Scotch rite ^Nlason, advises him not to 
join. In this is manifested the depths of 
Satan. As a stool pigeon for Masonry 
Dr. Lawrence can do more for the devil 
outside of the lodge than inside. He being 



outside of the lodge, though loyal to ]\Ia- 
sonry, you cannot swing him on a }vla- 
sonic obHgation. The true principles of 
^lasonry assume that everv* true Free ^la- 
son is made a Mason in his heart before 
he goes to the lodge preparation room. 



EDITORIAL. 



EVEN SO, WHAT THEN? 



Even if paying lodge dues, and main- 
taining active membership, does entitle 
a member to certain real benefits, like 
having a watcher without additional cost 
in case of sickness — what then? Is it 
worth while to abandon loyalty to the 
government and loyalty to the King of 
kings, in order to be allowed to pay 
"dues" entitling to such help in such a 
contingency? Suppose Free ]\Iasonry 
can substantiate its claim that it will help 
on a journey; it is still not worth while 
to sacrifice to the safety or convenience of 
any journey likely to be taken in this 
world, the safety and peace of that last 
great journey out of the world. 



LUTHERAN CHURCH MEETING. 



On the evening of the 17th Rev. \Ym. 
Fenton delivered an anti-^Iasonic lecture 
at Our Savior's Church, Lutheran, corner 
of ^lay and Erie streets, of this city, to an 
intelligent audience of about seventy-five 
or a hundred people. Two pastors were 
present, and the truth about lodge devil- 
worship was cordially received by pastors 
and people. A contribution to defray ex- 
penses was cheerfully given at the close 
of the meeting. One man renounced the 
secret society of whidh he had been a 
member. Another belonged to the 
Knights of Pythias, but, seeing no better 
alternative before him than Ghristianit\% 
and being blinded by the god of this 
world (the Pythian god), lie declared that 
the Knights of P\'thias lodge is better 
than the dhurch, and remained a heatiien 
in his blindness. 



HEBREW MISSION MEETING. 



An interesting meeting to discuss the 
Secret Society question was held in the 
Rev. T. ^I. Chalmer's Hebrew ^lission 
Hall, s88 South Halsted street, Saturdav 



48 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897 



evening-, :May 15. Addresses were given 
by Bro. Chalmers, Revs. H. H. Hinman, 
Wm. Fenton and AI. A. Gault. No part 
of the city is more in need of mission work 
and eadh of the speakers presented Uhe 
question from the plain standpoint of the 
Bible and Christianit};, and were listen- 
ed to by an interested audience, many of 
whom had evidentl}- never heard the sub- 
ject discussed before. Brother and Sis- 
ter Chalmers are much devoted to theii* 
Hebrew mission work, and should have 
the support of all interested in Israel's' 
restoration. They are convinced that se- 
cret orders are a great hindrance in their 
work, and took special pains to adver- 
tise this meeting. 



AN IMPORTANT TESTIMONY. 



Steplhen ^Merritt, of New York, was the 
soul of the Christian Alliance convention 
held last week in the Chicago Avenue 
Church. He magnifies in ah he says and 
does the need of the Holy Spirit. He is 
absorbed with one gireat idea, which is, 
"Be ye filled witlh the Spirit." In his clos- 
ing address before a large audience Fri- 
day e\' ening he gave a most powerful tes- 
timony against the secret lodge. He said 
the Holy Spirit revealed to him that the 
lodge was like Achan's wedge of gold, 
which must be given up before his Di- 
vine presence w^ould be manifested. Mr. 
IMerritt -had climbed almost to the top- 
most round of the Masonic ladder. He 
had been highly 'honored by the Masons, 
who 'had given him a costly Masonic jew- 
el. But this 'he returned to them, and left 
the lodge forever, though it was at a great 
cost of money and reputation. While 
Stephen Zvlerritt gave this important tes- 
timony there were more expressions of 
approval and sympathy fro'm the large 
congregation than at any other time dur- 
ing the convention. 



N©T A PERVERSION OF SCRIPTURE. 

In an intervieAv with a Baptist pastor 
recently, he took exception to our motto 
from the words of Jesus : "I spake open- 
ly to the w'orld, and in secret 'have I said 
nothing." He said he could not see how 
that declaration ihad anything to do with 
the secret society question ; that to start 
out with such a perversion of Scripture 



would prejudice honest Chrisitianis against 
the paper. 

We told him that Jesus, iw^en he utter- 
ed these Avords, was oin trial charged 
with treason against the Roman govern- 
ment. But he gives the High Priest to 
understand that if this had been his aim 
he would (have trained his friends in se- 
cret; die would have retired beihind blind- 
ed windows and tyled doors, and laid iliis 
plans in secret. Who does not know that 
secretism is the tactics of comspirators and 
revolutio-nists the wori'd over? But 
Christ's dharadter and teadhing were the 
very opposite of this. Instead of instruct- 
ing men in secret lodge rooms and bind- 
ing his followers "ever to concede and 
never to reveal," he spake openly to the 
world and said nothing in secret. He 
taug^ht no private or concealed doctrine. 
He did nothing in a clandestine or under- 
handed way. It is sad moral blindness, 
indeed, whidh cannot see 'tlhat this declar- 
ation and practice of Christ places him 
and his true followers in striking conflict 
with the w^hole secret lodge system. 



NOT WHOLLY SECRET. 



Mistaken notions about the inside facts 
of Masonry are found not only outside 
but also inside the lodge. Agreement 
among Masons respecting the items that 
are secret is not to be found. There are 
some secret society men who do not 
scruple to talk about things that others 
would hardly venture to mention. Cer- 
tain it is that not all those things which 
would naturally appear like secrets have 
remained unknown. For example. Ma- 
sons have means of communication and 
recognition. This fact has leaked out, 
and no effort is made to deny it. 

It has also become wxll known that one 
means of recognition is hand-shaking. 
Everybody knows as well as a Mason that 
there is a grip. Some know that its pe- 
culiarity is in the thumb. Perhaps hard- 
ly anything is more a Masonic secret than 
a Masonic oath. Yet everybody knows 
that there is one. Besides, no one doubts 
that part of the oath is the very obligation 
of secrecy. Some know that there are 
covered by the oath not only lodge se- 
crets, like this and other items of ritual, 
but also personal secrets, even to the per- 
sonal secrets of criminals, as in the recent 



June, 1891 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



49 



case at Hartford, where the lodge pun- 
ished severely a member who testified in 
a Connecticut court. \^arious things are 
known, and Masons do not always feel 
themselves bound to preserve the pro- 
found silence their admirers imagine. 
They do not agree on the strict lines of 
required secrecy. Some estimate the ob- 
ligation as absolute and necessarily bind- 
ing. 

But an outsider, claiming that no out- 
sider can know what is inside, in that very 
claim assumes that he, though one of the 
outsiders, knows the inside well. He 
must know, either that the facts cannot 
be breathed outside the four walls of a 
certain room and would be incompre- 
hensible elsewhere; or else, that in some 
way Masons are under a spell of silence 
which cannot be broken. Either notion 
is marvelous to some of us who have 
been inside the lodge. 

His statement of pretended fact im- 
plies great knowledge of Masonry, real or 
assumed. If an outsider can know little 
or nothing, then how can this outsider 
know so much as to know that such in- 
communicableness is an essential ele- 
ment of [Masonry? He assumes the pos- 
session of knowledge in denying the pos- 
sibility of knowledge. 



MISSION BANDS. 



The A\'omen's Baptist ^Missionary So- 
ciety has local mission bands, on which 
X. C. A. mission bands could be mod- 
eled. Some are for women, others for 
children. The N. C. A. mission for lodge 
worshipers of the Sun, needs both. In- 
formation about the plan used in such 
circles would be appropriate matter for 
our Woman's Department. AMU not 
some of our Baptist ladies write the 
Cynosure, either confidential information 
as to the working of circles they have 
known, or else condensed items for publi- 
cation? The former may be more useful. 

Readings from the Cynosure and from 
X. C. A. tracts and books could be used in 
such meetings as a circle would hold. 
Comments on articles read could follow. 
Recitations and singing would enliven 
the gatherings and give variety. Xow 
and then a X. C. A. social or concert sim- 
ilar to a S. S. concert could be given. 
This should, however, be after the circle 
was well established and settled. It could 



then be used to draw attention to the sub- 
ject and perhaps in a secondary way gain 
new members. Everything should be 
kept up to at least a dignified, not to say 
religious or patriotic, standard. 

The name of the local circle need not 
contain the word ''anti." Let the name 
be positive and suggest more than mere 
negative or opposition. X. C. A. Circle 
would be simple and appropriate. The 
.name of the town or church or some 
neighboring river or mountain would dis- 
tinguish it if necessary. The Kearsarge 
X"". C. A. Circle, or the Androscoggin X. 
C. A. Circle would answer for a name. 
Too much machinery and too many of- 
fices should perhaps be avoided. A sim- 
ple circle, with interesting meetings so 
conducted that good people and bright 
children would enjoy them, while at each 
session real information should be ob- 
tained, or fresh impulse secured, ought 
to be valuable help to any community, 
and a bulwark of protection. 



A GOOD SUGGESTION. 



In reply to the question. How can we 
best withstand the influence of secret so- 
cieties? Bro. Isaac Keeler, of Washing- 
ton, D. C, writes us the following wise 
suggestions : 

Circulate and get signatures to a pledge 
like the following: 

Believing that a man's first duty is loy- 
alty to God and to the cause of truth and 
justice and humanity; and, believing that 
no one has the right to promise, much 
less to swear, that he will "conceal and 
never reveal" secrets, the nature of which 
he does not know when he assumes the 
obligation, or which the light of truth, or 
of conscience, may show him ought to be 
exposed, therefore, 

I hold myself free from all such oaths 
and obligations, and am ready to serve tiie 
cause of God, truth, justice and human- 
ity in every straightforward and honor- 
able way, and to the best of my ability; 
and, moreover, I pledge myself to do the 
same. 

I believe also that any person who takes 
upon himself any obligation, of a nature 
contrary to such a one as this, enters into 
an alliance with the kingdom and powers 
of darkness; betrays the cause of God, 
truth, justice and humanity. 

I furthermore believe that if after kind 



50 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



and faithful admonition, he will not re- 
pent and rid himself of such obligation — 
Leviticus v. 4-6 — that he is to be counted 
as their enemy. I believe that this is espe- 
cially true when he has knowingly, spe- 
cifically and wilfully placed himself un- 
der obligation to conceal and never re- 
veal evil and criminal practices, "murder 
and treason not excepted," as is expressed 
in some ]\Iasonic oaths. 

Would not the mere distribution and 
calling attention to some such pledge as 
the foregoing open the eyes of many, con- 
vict some of sin and be fruitful of great 
good? But of course the people should 
be urged to put their signatures to the 
pledge. 



PROVED OR DISPROVED. 



Some of the counts in the indictment 
are severe. Until the strong proof 
brought to their support is broken, a 
man may well hesitate before submitting 
to conditions that may prove inconsis- 
tent with his freedom. 

It is charged, and the charges are sup- 
ported by evidence that would convict 
in a capital trial : That Masonry is a false 
religion ; that it adopts the creed and rit- 
ual of Sun worship; that it knows no 
Christ and tolerates in connection witli 
-Masonr}' nothing of Christianity; that it 
will not use Christ's name in a lodge 
prayer; that it will not allow the Bible 
used as part of lodge furniture to be rec- 
ognized as, in the Christian sense, a revel- 
ation from God. 

That it is a government independent of 
the national government; that its obliga- 
tions are inconsistent with loyalty; that 
within a short time it has severely pun- 
ished a Mason who testified in court, 
where another Mason was condemned for 
crime; that its "third point of fellowship" 
is incompatible with American citizen- 
ship; that the Royal Arch obligation ap- 
pears specially adapted to aid traitors, as 
well as other criminals ; that it is narrow, 
clannish and barbarous, in spirit and 
form, to an extent that removes it from 
the range of modern advanced civiliza- 
tion. 

That its ritual is open to grave objec- 
tions on the score of decency, propriety, 
morality and piety; that its methods and 
associations are degrading in their ten- 
dency and dangerous to the personal 



character of the members; that it has 
been notoriously connected with drink- 
ing and the business of making and sell- 
ing alcoholic beverages; that it is exten- 
sively neglected or abandoned by its bet- 
ter class of victims. 

That it is despised by many who have 
joined; that it has been condemned in the 
severest terms by good men and com- 
petent judges, who have been members;, 
that it is well known to have been re- 
peatedly exposed; that Masons admit that 
it has been exposed; that for conclusive 
reasons, inherent in the ritual and prin- 
ciples of the system, its lodge is one of the 
last places in whic'h a devout Christian or 
loyal citizen could properly be found. 

In view of the fact that for some rea- 
son such statements can be made, and the 
additional fact that they are supported by 
a vast mass of impressive proof, it would 
be prudent to try first to disprove them by 
something more convincing than partisan 
denial, before bending one's neck to a 
yoke and ofifering one's mouth to a gag 
or one's hands and feet to fetters and 
shackles. 



ODD FELLOWS ON ODD FELLOWSHIP. 



At Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, a grand 
lodge was held in 1891. It passed the fol- 
lowing resolution: Whereas, In the re- 
port of the session of the Sovereign 
Grand Lodge of 1888, the following ques- 
tion was submitted to the Grand Sire for 
his decision (No. 58, page 11,105), *Ts it 
lawful for a chaplain to commence and 
finish his prayer in the name of Christ?" 
and in his decision, the Grand Sire, after 
defining the word sect, used these words, 
"In this sense Christianity is a sect, hence 
it is inexpedient, unwise, and, I think, un- 
lawful to make prominent mention of it 
in lodge work;" and. Whereas, By the re- 
port of a committee of the Sovereign 
Grand Lodge, adopted in 1889, the de- 
cision of the Grand Sire was confirmed 
and sustained; and. Whereas, The decis- 
ion of the Grand Sire places our order on 
record as having put a ban on the name of 
Christ, therefore. Resolved, That this 
Grand Lodge petition the Sovereign 
Grand Lodge to reverse the decision of 
the Grand Sire, as given in 1888, in re- 
lation to the name of Christ and prayer, 
and permit perfect toleration in matters. 



June, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



51 



of conscience in all our grand and subor- 
dinate lodges." 

This is not anti-secrecy accusation. It 
is not the work of any one who does not 
know what he is talking about. It is a 
formal Grand Lodge document. It 
teaches that Christ's name cannot be used 
in an Odd Fellow chaplain's lodge prayer. 
It therefore shows Odd Fellowship to be, 
in this respect, on tlie same level as Ma- 
sonry. It charges that the order is on 
record as having put the name of Christ 
-under ban. It intimates that the Odd 
Fellows' order is intolerant "in matters 
of conscience." It shows that in the lodge 
sense, "Christianity is a sect." It also 
-shows that not only the name of Christ 
but also this "sect," called "Christianity, 
cannot receive "prominent mention "in 
lodge work without the perpetration of 
something held "unwise, inexpedient," 
and apparently "unlawful." 



FOUNDED ON THE BIBLE. 



There are two or three stock phrases 
that are old, well-worn whitewash brushes 
lor Free ]\Iasonry. These soon grow 
iamiliar to any one who objects to the 
order. Members seem to believe them- 
selves while they reiterate these excuses 
like parrots. 

One often heard is the above heading. 
It suggests two or three questions. One 
is, how many things are there that are 
founded on the Bible? Of course the 
class — if there is one — includes the 
church. How many more? Some Ma- 
sons say their lodge — though leading 
Masons dispute them — and Odd Fellows 
add their own. 

Another question follows, with refer- 
ence to the inference to be drawn. Ex- 
actly how and with what effect are they 
founded on the Bible? 

We can make the same claim for Eng- 
lish literature. Its theological coloring is 
strong and on the whole Biblical. Its 
moral tone, and its use of the English 
tongue are both referable to the English 
Bible. It is not too much to say that in 
its theological, ethical and literary char- 
acter, English literature is founded on the 
English Bible. Yet every one knows 
that, while this is true in general, yet great 
masses of literary product grossly vio- 
late every rule under which such a 
foundation could be claimed. 



The question becomes pertinent, what 
is the real meaning of this lodge claim? 
What does the apologist mean? How is 
a system so different from the church, so 
opposite and in some respects so antag- 
onistic, in any sense founded on the same 
book? 

One point may be that the Bible is read 
in the lodge. But very- little of it is read. 
Even that is not read as in the Christian 
sense "Sacred Scripture." 

Odd Fellowship, for example, uses a 
parable, introducing it merely as "an in- 
teresting narrative," with no allusion to 
its source. This is a specimen, and such 
work need not go far toward founding a 
system on the Bible. 

When we come to the doctrine of the 
lodge it surely is not Christian. The 
name of Christ must not be used in prayer, 
and it is upon lodge authority that we 
recognize its religion as "pure theism." 
Or if it seems more restricted and specific 
than is consistent with this claim, it is 
nature worship, under the form of Sun 
worship. While this is condemned in the 
Bible, condemnation is hardly a desirable 
ground of Biblical foundation. 

Satan founded the temptation of Christ 
on the Bible. He said: "It is written." 
Odd Fellows twist the parable of the 
Good Samaritan so as to make it teach, 
instead of a liberality that unites Jews 
with Samaritans, with whom they had no 
dealings, the very opposite doctrine of an 
extreme type of exclusiveness and clan- 
nishness. That it uses or misuses the 
Bible is certain, but that it founds its doc- 
trine on the Bible by thus "wresting the 
scriptures" is a preposterous claim. 
Christ's doctrine is world-wide and un- 
divided neighborhood. Odd Fellowship 
finds its neighborhood within four nar- 
row walls and locks its Good Samaritan 
up in a Samaritan lodge. 

Christian men, at least, should stop 
grinding over this old tune. Fooling with 
the Bible is not founding things on the 
Bible. There is. abundant Masonic re- 
proof of the notion that Masonrv* is in anv 
way cognizant of the Bible except as an 
article of furniture and one of the books 
of the law. 

It is high ^lasonic authority that de- 
clares truly that "Masonry is not founded 
on the Bible." This is undeniable, and 
it is high time for Christians to cease from 
reiterating this blasphemous and ill- 



52 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



founded claim. Secret orders are not 
founded on the Bible, but they are con- 
founded bv the Bible. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 



Rev. Gqo. R. ]\lcBurney and wife and 
Rev. J. R. W'ylie of Iowa made the Cyno- 
sure a pleasant calls on their way to the 
Covenanter Synod at Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Rev. J. B. Galloway, of Poynette, Wis., 
cheered the Cynosure office with a call 
last week on 'hie way as a delegate to the 
U. P. General Assembly at Rock Island. 



Dr. H. J. Becker, of O'hio, a stanch 
friend of our cause, has beeii engaged to 
address the Ridgeview Park Assembly, 
Pa., and the Island Park Assembly at 
Rome Citv, Ind. 



Rev. W. P. Tibbdtt and Rev. Jerry Mc- 
Bride, good friends of the anti-secret 
cause, from California, called at the Cyno- 
sure ofhce lately on their way to the U. B. 
conference at Dubhn, Ind. 



Rev. William Beers, for some time the 
devoted U. B. pastor at Petoiskey, Mich., 
has been obliged to leave his work to re- 
cover his health. We hope he will soon 
be able to return to his post. 



Rev. W. L. Squier, pastor of the Pres- 
b}terian Church in lola, Kan., spent a 
Sabbath at Wiheaton with Secretary W. 
I. Phillips, in returning from the Presby- 
terian General Assembly at Eagle Lake 
Assemblv Grounds, Ind. 



Bro. J. Forbes, of Tullahoma, Teiin., 
writes in ans^ver to the question. How to 
withstand the influence of Free Masonry? 
He sa}^s Dr. Mackey gives us the answer 
in these words, "Masonry has stood for 
centuries. If it was an open institution 
it could not stand for as many years.'' 
Bro. Forbes then urges renewed diHgence 
in exposing both by press and platform 
these hidden works of darkness. 



Rev. 'M. A. Gault, of the Reformed 
Presbyterian Churdh, and editor of the 
Christian Cynosure, preadhed a stirring 
sermon last Sabbath evening in the 
Fourth Church. He dealt heavy blows 



at tjhe secret orders of our time, especially 
Masonry, and predicted the judgments of 
God upon our land' on account of the 
prevalence of this false religion. Bro. 
Gault expects to be in the lecture field a 
good deal tlie coming year, and those 
who hear^him will find. him sound, logical, 
eloquent and convincing, without the 
acrimony sometimes manifested on this 
subj ect. — Christian Instructor. 



Milton A. McRae, of Cincinnati, is a 
thirty-second degree Mason and Odd 
Fellow, a Knig'ht of P}iihias and a mem- 
ber of several other orders. He is Secre- 
tary and General Manager of a newspa- 
per league, and is one of the executive 
committee of the American Newspaper 
Publishers' Association. The newspa- 
pers he supervises have a circulation of 
400,000 per day. Is it s'trange that a man 
having such a power of censorship should 
be a prominent Free Mason? 



Dr. J. A. Collins, one of the editors of 
the Christian Instructor, says in his issue 
of May 27: "The Cynostire, the organ of 
the National Christian Association, in its 
new magazine form, has come to our ta- 
ble and makes a fine impression It is 
gotten up in excellent style and its matter 
is such as all will like to read, unless they 
be under some secret S'pell which may 
have perverted their minds. While we 
regret the giving up of the Cynosure's 
weekly visits, we welcome the monthly 
as the next best thing, and we wish for 
it all the success it deserves, and tlhat is 
more than a little. Rev. M. A. Gault is 
still at the helm as editor, and will, it is 
understood, still give his entire energy 
to opposition to secret orders." 



Rev. O. H. Perry, pastor of the M. E. 
Churdh at Hanover, Mich., writes: "I 
am a Thirteenth degree seceded Mason. 
I left the lodge for conscientious reasons 
and resolved not to place any more 
money in that reservoir. Convictions 
have been growing on me against the 
lodge ever since, and this has been used 
against me as a minister by a former Pre- 
siding Elder. Our younger M. E. min- 
isters are joining the lodge in astonish- 
ing numbers. . And we have a superannu- 
ated preacher. Rev. A. A. Knappen, who 



June, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



53 



has been elected Grand Lecturer at a re- 
cent session of the Grand Lodge. It has 
occurred to me that I mig^ht strike a blow 
for the truth in challenging him to a pub- 
lic debate on the question of Secret So- 
cieties.*' 



The Springfield (Mass.) Daily Repub- 
lican says: "The reader who objects to 
having the ^lasons lay the comer-stone 
of our new high school building is per- 
fectly rig'ht. The mere fact that this citi- 
zen protests is enough to rule out a pro- 
ceeding that is open to criticism. It is 
proper for the ^Masonic order or the Odd 
Fellows or any other secret organization 
to dedicate buildings of their own with 
all the pomp and ceremony and ritual 
they may choose to employ — it is another 
matter to invite any one of these secret 
.societies to take charge of the initial cere- 
monies attending the beginning of any 
purely public structure. If it were pro- 
posed to ask the Essenic order, the order 
of American ^Mechanics, the Ancient Or- 
der of Hibernians or what not to lay the 
corner-stone of the high school, there 
vrould be many to ask why that should be 
done. The ^lasonic presence would draw 
out similar criticism and quite as justly. 
Already two citizens of Springfield have 
protested in letters to the Republican. The 
only proper way will be to rule out all se- 
cret societies and let our plain citizenship 
take charge of its own.'' 



Rev. \Vm. Fenton, who has made Chi- 
-cago his home during the pa^ month, 
and who has rendered valuable assistance 
in our work, returns to St. Paul in a few 
days. He expects soon to visit Southern 
^limiesota, Xorthern Iowa and tilie Da- 
kotas, also Xorthern ^linnesota and \\'is- 
consin. Cynosure readers in these parts 
are requested in the name of the Lord 
to arrange meetings for him at as many 
points as possible, and write to him at 
74 South Robert street, St. Paul, ^linn. 
His terms will be 85 and entertainment. 



Rev. John Brown, of Clear Lake, la., 
writes: "This is a ver\- pretty little town. 
W'hat adds much to its interest is the lake, 
to v.-hich visitors come from all parts of 
the State, as a summer resort. There are 
110 saloons here, and ver}' little intemper- 



£.nce, I suppose. But the town is over- 
w-iclmed with secretism of every descrip- 
tion. I am, credibly, informed that more 
than half the inhabitants belong to secret 
organizations of one order or another. 
Brother Fenton lectured here some years 
ago in the park, because he could not get 
a church, not even the opera hall, though 
it is given for all purposes. After the 
preaching he was stoned from the park 
to his lodging, a prominent ^lason re- 
marking that he ougiht to have been shot. 
Brother Stanly, one of the Lutheran min- 
isters, tells me he heard him vdth appro- 
bation, and that he would have been wel- 
come to his church had it been built at 
the time. He assures me, however, if he 
come again that he will be welcome to his 
pulpit, and that he will use his influence 
in bringing out a congregation. Clear 
Lake much needs faithful preaching on 
that subject. Brother Stanly assures me 
that neither of the Lutheran congrresra- 
tions admit secretists.'' 



Elizabeth E. Flagg, of Boston, \\Tites: 
"There are certain advantages in this 
change of the Cynosure to a monthly. I 
can now keep a file for reference, and 
have them bound at the end of each year 
or two. Also it may do away in some 
measure Avith the excuse so frequently 
ofiered to canvassers, of having no time 
to read it. A monthly requires more care 
and pains in editing than a weekly; but 
few people take this into account, unless 
t]'fcy have^had some editorial experience. 
The times are worse than I ever knew 
before, and I have heard people say so 
who were older than I. It seems almost 
impossible to get money for anything. 
Lnless the times alter ver}- much, there 
must be a social and industrial revolu- 
tion in the near future, and it is to be fear- 
ed not a bloodless one. We may be vcr\' 
nigh the time of trouble of which Daniel 
prophesied. All the more need, if so, that 
we should- stand to our guns. We are 
used to being in the minority. How well 
I remember the scorn with which all n)}-. 
friends, with few exceptions, treated my 
work when I first embarked in the anti- 
secret cause. They said I was throwing 
awa\' my time and talents. But as I look 
back on my life to-day I thank God that 
he gave me grace and strength to make 
chc choice. Remember, we serve One of 



54 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



whom it is written, "He shall not fail, nor 
be discoiirao'ed." 



Rev. \Mlson T. Hogg, editor of the 
Free ^Methodist and President of Green- 
ville College, says in his paper of May 1 1 : 
"W^e learn from Rev. M. A. Gault, the 
ble editor of the Christian Cynosure, who 
was a pleasant caller, at this office April 
2^, that beginning with ^the first of May 
the Cynosure will be issued as a thirty- 
two page magazine, pitblished monthly, 
instead of weekly, and sent to subscribers 
at Si per year, instead of $1.50, its form- 
er price. \'\1hile the financial stringency 
of the times lias rendered it necessary, 
the change is not necessarily an indica- 
tion of retrograde movement. In fact, 
we believe a monthly can be made to 
serv^e all tihe ends for wihdch the Cyno- 
sure is published about as effectively as 
a weekly, and even more so if what is 
lacking in the frequency of its visits and 
the number of its articles is made up by 
bringing increased ability to its aid, as 
publishing but once a month should en- 
able its managers to do. There are so 
many more denominational periodicals 
presenting tIhe anti-secrecy reform than 
formerly that the demiand for a weekly es- 
pecially devoteid to that line of work is not 
so great as it once was. The new form 
will certainly be much more convenient 
than the old for reading, and in much 
better sJhape for preserving, binding up 
annually, and so, in process of time, mak- 
ing a valuable cyclopedia of information 
on the subject of secret societies. We 
wish the Cynosure success in its new de- 
parture." 



PUBLICATIONS. 



The Express published at Oban, Scot- 
land, thus kindly acknowledges tw^o pub- 
lications received from this office: 

"We have received tw^o pamphlets pub- 
lished at Xational Christian Association, 
Chicago, strongly antagonistic to secret 
societies. The Congregational churches 
in America are up in arms against all such 
societies. Doubtless the injurious side of 
secret societies is more apparent in the 
land of the stars and stripes tflian in an old 
settled country like this. At any rate, 
such men as Joseph Cook, Boston; Rev. 
E. P. GoodAvin, D. D., pastor of the First 



Congregational Churc'h, Chicago; Rev. 
I. J. Lansing, D. D., pastor of Park Street 
Congregational Churdh, Boston, and 
presidents of CongregaJtional colleges, all 
speak out against these societies. Mr. 
D wight L. Moody says: 'T do not see 
how any Christian, imost of all a Chris- 
tian minister, can go into these secret 
lodges wdth unbelievers." The otJher 
pamphlet, same publisihers, gives facts 
and photograp^hs. The back of front 
page of cover quotes Jesus' words — 'T 
spake openly to the world; I ever taugftit 
in the synagogue, and in the temple, 
wdtither the Jews always resort; and in 
secret 'have I said nothing." Twenty dif- 
ferent religious denominations make 
membersihip in a secret society a bar to 
membership in their churches. Several 
State legislatures 'have prohibited the ad- 
ministration of extra judicial oatlhs with- 
in their commonwealths. We Imve ad- 
mired the beautiful typography of these 
pamphlets, but Chicago is a kind of 
American Edinburgh for artistic fonts of 
type and good printing." 



SING UNTO THE LORD. 



Divine worship has included a song 
service from early times. Vocal music 
has characterized the w^orship of God's 
people, both Jewish and Christian. Sing- 
ing even enters into the universal Chris- 
tian conception of heaven. One book of 
the Bible could hardly be understood if 
this service were not recognized as re- 
ferred to, not to say enjoined. 

The devotional purpose in N. C. A. 
conventions should be made obvious by 
the prominence of this devotional ele- 
ment. "Sing unto the Lord," as well as 
pray unto Him. Praise him as well as 
give thanks. Remember that good sing- 
ing befits the praises of the Lord. Let 
not His praise languish on account of his 
people's thoughtlessness. Praise is 
comely for the upright, and let all things 
be done decently and in order. The con- 
cluding psalm of the Book of Psalms 
w^ould be a good responsive reading for a 
N. C. A. cDnvention. 



Every sensible person ought to know 
that a strike does not mean a quiet aban- 
doning of unremunerated labor. It 
means oftentimes murder and destruction 
of property. 



June, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



55 




The Celebrated 

Marsh 
Reading 
Stand 



—AND- 



Revolving 
Book Case. 

Recognized throughout the civil- 
ized world to be unequaled as an 
Office or Library article, is now 
offered as a 

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to new subscribers. Over 5o,ooo 
now used by the profession, bank- 
ers and business men, who concede 
it is the ''Missing |Link" between 
the Secretary and the Library. ^:. 

34 inches high; by patent extension rod can be raised to 5o inches. 
Oak shelves, with carved oak slats, make the case i5xi5xi2, and ample 
room lor all reference books for daily use. The top> or Dictionary Hol- 
der, 14x18 inches, is large and strong enough for any volume, and is 
adjustable to any angle or height. The base is oak, 12] inches high. 
Between shelves, 1 1 inches. Revolves easily. 

Price of Marsh Stand $10.00 

Year's Subscription to Christian Cynosure, i.oo 

$11.00 



For $5, Money Order or Chicigo Draft, this $10 stand will be ship- 
ped to you and our paper sent }OU one year, all charges paid. 



56 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



James G. Birney, Candidate of the Liberty Party 
for President, was a Freemason, "but never entered a 
lodge after he joined the church, and, as his sons grew 
up, he cautioned them against joining any secret 
order."— 6^e7i. Wm. Birney. 

Lewis Tappan, private journal. 1814 : "Dr. Dixwell 
gave me lectures on Masonr}' at his iiouse." "In Sep- 
tember left the lodge." Letter, Jan. 21, 1829: "1 am 
free to say that I henceforth renounce Freemasonry, 
considering it a useles's and profane institution." 



How did it 



"As to the question of the attitude of Christians to- 
ward the secret orders, two or three things seem tome 
very plain. One of them is this : that the whole move- 
ment of things on the line of secrecy is thoroughly 
antagonistic to the movement on the line of Scripture 
and Christianity." — From address of Rev. E. P. Good- 
win, If. D.,pastor First Congregational Church, Chica- 
gOt to Christian Confercn/^e. April, 1890. 




JOSEPH EITNER, Governor of Pennsijlmnia, 1837: 
"If it be true as the lamented Cold(3n (himself one of 
the initiated) declared, that many a Mason became a 
great man but no great man ever became a Mason, 
how nearly does it concern the youth of our country 
to pause and reflect before they commit their present 
standing and future reputation to the keeping of a 
society, which for its cold-hearted and selfish purposes 
could immolate even the fame of Washington at the 
shrine of its abominations." 



happen that 
the old- 
fashioned, 
laborious 
way of 
was ever 
to woman 
as her par- 
'ij ticular work ? 

/ She ought to 

'^^^ 4; have had the 
v)^ ^V,^^ easiest things 
to do — and strong, healthy 
men have taken up this wash- 
ino- business. Here is a sue- 
gestion. In those families that 
stick to soap and make their 
washing needlessly hard, let the 
men do that work. They're 
better fitted for it. In the famil- 
ies that use Pearline and make 
washing easy, let the women 
do it. They won't mind it 5i7 

MilVmns ^^-'^^ D/^^rlin^ 




Pi?AC't>CAlr Joa. 




PRACTICAL SPIRITUAL ILLUSTRATIVE 

Arnold's 

Practical Commentary 



ON THE 



Internationa! S. S. 

for 1897. 



Lessons 



Edited by Mrs. T. IS. ARNOLD. 

Associate Editors: Mrs. Abbie C. Moekow, Mrs. S. B. Tittering- 
ton, Rev. a. \V. Parry, A. M., Eev. E, C. Best, 

A Compendium of Valuable Information, Concise, Concen= 
trated, Comprehensive. 

ONLY 30 OENTS POSTPAID^ 

The unprecedented reception of our Commenlary for 189G, and 
tbo steady stream of warm and yet unsolicited tesliraonials wLiich 
liavo been flowing in during- tiie past years, have stimuidtedi 
greater effort for the 1897 volume. 

Even tliougrh you have another you need this. 

The Advance: "The leading purpose of the Sunday-school 
teacher should be conversion. This book is prepared for aiding 
along this line." 

The Union Signal: "The special features of the Commentary 
are the excellency of the tabulated quarterly reviews, the Bible 
Dictionary for each quarter's lessons and the class record book 
bound within the same covers." 

American Wesleyan: "Worth double the price to any teacher." 

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Many of our teachers prefer this to any other commentary on 

the International Lessons. 



T. B. ARNOLD, Publisher, 104 Franklin Street, Chicago, Ills. 



June, 189'; 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



57 




]VIASONIC CHART. 

ILLUSTRATING THE RELATION OF SOME OF THE DEGREES AND RITES IN 
FREEMASONRY TO EACH OTHER. 
The accompanying chart represents one hundred and forty two degrees. 

I. The American Rite of 13 degrees; 2. The Scotch Rite of 33 degrees; 

3. The Egyptian Rite of 96 degrees. 4. The Mystic Shrine of one degree. 

5. The Eastern Star of 5 degrees for Master Masons and for women. These are side degrees, and not 
genuine masonry. 

The Symbolic degrees, or Blue Lodge of three degrees, are common to every Masonic rite, whether 
American, Scotch, or Egyptian, or whichever of the Masonic rites, named in Mackey's Masonic Encyclo- 
pedia one may choose to investigate. 

This chart shows in the Blue Lodge the position of the Worshipful Master and some of the other offi- 
cers of the lodge. Several positions of the ca -"didate who is being initiated are also shown. In the Master 
Mason's degree is recognized the murder, buriai at.l resurrection scene so full of religious significance to 
Freemasons. ^' . 



58 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



Standard Works 

-ON- 

Seefet Soeieties 

f^OK SALE BY THE 

;iiinO|i9L GPSTIBN eSSCGIHTION. 

221 West Aladison St., Chicago, III. 

Terms:— Cash with order, or if sent by express 
C. O. D. at least $i.oo must be scut with order a? 
a guaranty that books will be taken. Books at 
' etail prices sent postpaid. Books by Mail p-e at 
risk of persons ordering, unless 8 cents extra is 
sent to pay for registering them, when tneir safe 
delivery is guaranteed. Books at retail ordered 
by express, are sold at lo per cent discount amd 
delivery guaranteed, but not express paid. Post- 
age stamps taken for small sums, 

ON FEEEMASONEY. 

Freemasonry iHustrated. First 
three degrees. y]6 pages cloth, 750; 
paper, 40c. 
The accuracy of these expositions attested by 

affidavits of Jacob O. Doesburg and others. 

Freemasonry Illustrated. 640 

pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 75c. 

A complete expositon of the Blue Lodge and 
Chapter consisting of seven degrees. Profusely 
^ustrated. 

Knight Templarisn Illustrated. 

341 pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 50c. 
A full illustrated rit al of the six degrees ol 
tile Council and Coramandery. 

Scotch Rite flasonrj'^ESlustrated. 

2 vols. Per vol., cloth, $1.00: paper, 65c. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the entir:; 
Scottish Rite, comprising all the Masonic degrees 
from 3rd to 33rd inclusive. The first three de- 
gre'-s are common to all the Masonic Rites, and 
are fully and accurately given in "Freemasonry 
Illustrated." Vol. 1 comprises the degrees from 
3rd to i8th inclusive. 

Voi. 11 comprises the degrees from 19th to 33rd 
hvcjusive, with the signs, grips, tokens and pass* 

Hand=Book of Freemasonry. 274 

pages, flexible cloth, 50c. 
By E. Ronayne, Past Master ot Keystone Lodge 
No. 639. Chicago. Gives the cornplete standard 
ritual of the first three degrees of Freemasonry. 

Freemasonry Exposed. By Capt. 

William Morgan. 1 10 pages, paper, 25c. 
The genuine old Morgan book republished. 

£cce Orient!. Pocket size, full 

roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of tr^e First 
Three Masonic Degrees in Cypher, with complete 
Floor Charts of Initiating, Passing and Raising a 
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Cabala. Pocket size, full ro?n, 

flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the Chapter 
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Knights of the Orient. Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Ritual o( the Commandery 
Masonic Degrees. Knights of the Red Cross, 
Knight Templar and Knight oi Malta, iith to 13th 
c ^a'ees. 



Allyn*s Ritual of Freemasonry. 

By Avery Allyn. Cloth, $5.00. 

Contains the fully Illustrated Ritual of the Blue 
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the Scotch Rite Degrees, several Masonic side 
degrees and what is termed a Key to the Phi Beta 
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Duncan's Masonic Ritual and 
Monitor. Cloth, $3.50. 

Profusely illustrated with explanatory engrav- 
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Richardson's Moni^or of Freema- 
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Contains the ceremonies of Lodges, Chapters, 
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it is not only \c-y incomplete but inaccurate 
especially as regards the first seven degrees, and 
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full ritual. 

Look to the East. A ritual of the 
first three Masonic Degrees by Ralph 
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Notwithstanding the high price this book is 
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quarter the price. 

Council of the Orient. Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.50. 

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Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Re- 
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paper, 25c. 

An Illustrated Ritual of the Nobles of the Mys- 
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wo degree Masons. 

Thirteen Reasons why a Chris- 
tian should not be a Freemason. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 1 6 pages, 
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Christian Religion., By " Spectator," 
Atlanta, Ga. 16 pages 5c. 

Hon. Thurlow Weed on the Mor- 
gan Abduction. 16 pages 5c. 

Thi3 is the legally attested statement of this 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and confinement of 
Capt. Morgan in Canandaigua jail, his removal to 
F"ort Niagara and subsequent drowning in Lake 
Ontario. 

Freemasonry a Fourfold Con- 
spiracy. 16 pages, 5c. 

Address of Pres. J. Blanchard. This is a most 
convincing argument against the lodge. 

Mah=Hah=Bone; 589 pages; ;^i.oo 

Comprises the Hand Book, Master's Carpet and 
Freemasonry at a glance. 

ON ODD-FELLOWSHIP. 

Odd-fellowship Judged by its own 

utterances; its doctrine and practice 
examined in light of God's Word. By 
Rev. J. H. Brockman. Cloth, 50c; pa- 
per cover, 25c. 

This is an exceedingly interesting, clear discus- 
sion of the chari) Xtx of Odd-fellowsnip, in the form 
of a dialogue. 



June, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



59 



Revised Odd=fellowship Illustra- 
ted. Cloth, $i.oo: paper cover, 5octs. 
The complete revised ritual of the Lodge En- 
campment and Rebekah (ladies) degrees, profuse- 
ly illustrated, and guaranteed to be strictly ac- 
curate; with a sketch of origin, history and char- 
acter of the order, over one hundred toot-note 
quotations from standard authorities, showing the 
character and teachmgs of the order, and an an- 
alysis of each degree by ex-President J. Blanchard. 
Ttiis ritual corresponds exactly with the "Charge 
Books" furnished by the Sovereign Grand Lodere. 

Sermon on Odd=fellowship and 
other secret societies, by Rev. J. Sar- 
ver, pastor of Evangelical Lutheran 
church. IOC. tach. 

This is a very clear argument against secretism of 
all forms and, the duty to disfellowship Odd-fel- 
Jows, Freemasons, Knights of Pythias and Gran- 
gers, is clearly shown by their confessed character 
as found in their own publications. 

OTHER RITUALS. 

Revised Knights of Pythias, IIJu^- 
trated. Cloth, 50c: paper <;over 25c. 
An exact copy of the new official Ritual Adopted 
by the Supreme Lodge of the world, with the Se- 
cret work added and fully Illustrated. 

Knights of the Orie<nt Illustrated. 

15c each. 

The full Illustrated Ritna j. Ancient Order oi 
the Orietit or the Oriental degvee. This is a side 
degree conferred mostly a Knights of Pythias 
lodges. 

Good Templarisnr Illustrated. 25c. 

A full and accurate exposition of the degrees of 
the lodge, temple and council. 

Exposition of th^' Grange. 25c. 

Edited by Rev. A. W. 3eeslin. Illustrated with 
engravings. 

Ritual of tbe Grand Army of the 
Republic loc. each. 

The authorized ritual of 1868, with signs of re- 
cognition, pass-words, etc., and ritual oT Machin- 
ists' and Blacksmiths' Union, (The two bound to- 
gether.) 

Knights of Labor Illustrated. 25c. 

("Adelphon Kruptos.") The complete illus- 
trated ritual of the order, including the "unwnttea 
work." 

Adoptive Masonry Illustrated. 

20c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the five 
degrees of Female Freemasonry, by Thomas Lowe. 

Red rien Illustrated. In cloth 50c. 

each. $2.00 per dozen postpaid. 

The Complete Illustrated Rituul of the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men. comprising the Adop- 
tion Degree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree, 
Chief's Degree, with the Odes, etc. 

The Foresters Illustrated. Paper. 

cover 25c, each, $2.00 per dozen. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Forest- 
ers, with Installation Ceremonies. 

United Sons of Industry Illustra- 
ted. 15c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the sec- 
ret tradesunion of the above name, giving the 
signs, grips, passwords, etc. 

Rituals and 5ecrets Illustrated. 

$1.00, each. 

Composed of "Temple of Honor Illustrated, 
Adoptive Masonry Illustrated," "United Sons of 
Industry U'*'strated," and "Secret Societies Illus- 
trated.'^ 

Sermon on flasonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor of United Pres- 
fjyterian church. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

History Nat'l Cnristian Associ- 
ation. iGC. each. 

Its origin, objects, what it has done and aims to 
do, and the best means to accomplish the end 
sought, the Articles of Constitution and By-laws 
ot the Association. 

Secret Societies. Cloth 35c, paper 
15c. 

A discussion of their character and claims by 
Rev. David McDill, Pres. J. Blanchard and Rev 
Edward Beecher. 

The Master's Carpet or flasonry 
and Baal Worship Identical. Bound 
in fine cloth. 400 pages. 75c. 
Explains the true source and meaning of every 

ceremony and symbol of the lodge. 

Disloyal Secret Oaths. 5c. 

By Joseph Cook, Boston. He quotes the law of 
Vermont which makes the administration of the 
Masonic oaths illegal. Joseph Cook's address is a 
national treatment of a national subject, and very 
valuable for reference. 

Light on Freemasonry. By Elder 
D« Bernard, Cloth, $1.50. paper, 75c. 

Finney on flasonry. Cloth 75c., 

paper 35c. 

The character, claims and practical workings of 
Freemasonry. By ex-Pres. Charles G. Finney, of 
Oberlin College. 'President Finney was a " bright 
Mason," but left the lodge when he became a 
Christian. This book has opened the eyes cf 
multitudes. 

ilasonic Oaths Null and Void: or 
Freemasony Self=Convicted. 207 

pages. Postpaid, 40c. 

This is a book for the times. The design of the 
author is to refute the arguments of those who 
claim that the oaths of Freemasonry are binding 
upon those who take them. 

Judge Whitney's Defence before 
the Grand Lodge of I!!inois. 15c. 

Judge Daniel H. Whitney was Master of the 
lodge when S. H. Keith, a member of his lodge, 
murdered Ellen Slade. Judge Whitney, by at- 
tempting to bring Keith to justice, brought on 
himself the vengeance of the lodge, but he boldly 
replied to the charges against him, and afterwards 
renounced Mason'-y. 

General Washington Opposed to 
Secret Societies. loc. 

This is a re-publication of Governor Joseph Rit- 
ner's "Vindication of General Washington from 
the Stigma of Adherence to Secret Societies."' 
communicated to the House of Representatives of 
Pennsylvania, March 8, 1837, at their special re- 
quest. To this is added th^ fact that three high 
Masons were the only perso iS who opposed a vote 
of thanks to Washington on his retirement to pri- 
vate liie-undoubtedly because they considered him 
a seceding Freemason. 

riorgan's Exposition, Abduction 

and riurder and Oaths of 33 degrees. 

304 pages, cloth, $1.00, 
" Composed of Freemasonry Exposed," by Capt. 
Wm. Morgan; ''History of the Abduction and 
Murder of Morgan;" "Valance's Confession of 
the Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan;" "Bernard's. 
Reminiscences of Morgan Times," and "Oaths 
and Penalties ot 33 Degrees." 

Oaths and Penalties of Freemason- 
ry, as proved in court in New Berlin 
v.ials IOC. 

The New Berlin trials began in the attempt of 
Freemasons to prevent public initiatirn by se'^ed- 
ing Masons. These trials \vere held at New Berlin, 
Chenango Co., N. V., .April i^, and 14. 1831. an.^ 
General Augustus C. Welsh, sheriff of the county, 
and other adhering Freemasons swore to the truth 
lul revelation of the oaths and genait^es. 



60 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



Grand Lodge flasonry. 5c. each 

Its relation to civil government and the Christian 
religion. By Pres. J. Blanchard. The an-Chris- 
tian, anti-republican and despotic character of 
Freemasonry is proved from the highest Masonic 
authorities. 

Masonry a Work of Darkness, ad- 
verse to Christianity, and inimical 
to Republican Government. 15c. 

By Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong (Presbyterian) a 
seceding Mason of 21 degrees. 

Sermon on Masonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. J. Dav Brownlee. In reply to a Ma- 
sonic Oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, Ohio. 

Story of the Gods. Postpaid, loc. 

By 1. R. B. Arnold. Brief sketches from the 
mvthologv of Rome. Creece, Egypt, India, Persia, 
Phrygia, Scandina-'ld, Africa and America, show- 
ing the relations and unity of the past and present 
systems. The idolatrous worship of the Masonic 
lodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 

Masonic Outrages. Postpaid, 20c. 

Compiled bv Rev. H. H. Hinman. Showing 
Masonic assualt on lives of seceders, on reputation, 
and on free speech; its interference with justice iv 
courts, etc 

History of the Abduction and Mur- 
der of Capt. Wm. Morgan. 25c. 

As prepared by seven committees of citizens, 
appointed to ascertain the fate of Morgan. 

The Anti-mason's 5crap-Book. 

25c. 

Consisting of 53 "Cynosure" tracts. In ich.s 
book are the views of more than a score of men. 
many of them of distinguished abi'ity, on the sub* 
iect of secret societies. 

The Image of the Beast; A Secret 
Empire; or Freemasonry a Subject of 
Prophecy. By Rev. Richard Horton. 
Third Edition'. 200 pages, cloth, 60c. 

Sermon on Secretism, 5c. eacn. 

By Rev. R. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear ayrw 
of the objections to all secret societies, and to Mi> 
•""Drv especially, that are apparent, to alL 

Anti-masonic Sermons and Ad- 
dresses. Cloth, $1 GO. 

Composed of " Masonry a Work of Darkness;" 
the Sermons of Messrs. Cross, William M'Nary, 
Dow and Sarver, the two addresses of President 
Blanchard, and the addresses of President H. H. 
George, Prof. J. G. Carson and Rev. M. S. Drury; 
"Thirteen Reasons Why a Christain Cannot be a 
Freemason," " Freemasonry Contrary to the 
Christian Religion." and " Are Masonic Oaths 
Binding on the Initiate? " 287 pages. 

Secret Societies, Ancient and 

Modern. 50c. each. 

Contents: The Antiquity of Secret Societies, 
The Life of Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, The 
Origin of Masonry, Was Washington a Mason."' 
Fillmore and Webster's Deference to Masonry, A 
Brief Outline of the Progress of Masonry in the 
United States, The Tammany Ring, Maconic Be- 
nevolence, The Uses of Masonry, An Illustration, 
The Conclusion. 

Secret Societies Illustrated. 

Over 250 cuts, 99 pages, paper cover, 
25c. each. 

Containing the signs, grips, passwords, em- 
blems, etc., of Freemasonry (Blue Lodge, and to 
the foiirteenth d^.gree of the York rite). Adoptive 
Ma'^,^ , Revised Odd-fellowship, Good Templar- 
ism, the Temple of Honor, the United Sons of In- 
dustry, Knights of Pythias and the Grange, with 
affidavits, etc. 

Prof. J. Q. Carson, D, D., on Se- 
cret Societies. loc. each. 

A most convincing argument against fellowship- 
iop' Freemasons in the Christian church. 



Sermon en flasonry. 16 pages, 
Kc. By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor 
TJnited Presbyterian church. 

Oaths and Penalties of the S3 
Degrees of Freemasonry. 15c. each. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes half-a-million horri- 
ble oaths. 

Ex-President John Quincy Ad- 
ams. Price, cloth, $1.00. Paper, 35c. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
gations and Penalties. 

Sermon on flasonry. loc. each. 

By Rev. James Williams, Presiding Elder of 
Dakota District Northwestern Iowa Conference 
M. E. Church— a seceding Master Mason. 

The Mystic Tie or Freemasonry a 
League with the Devil. 15c. 

This is an account of the church trial of Peter 
Cook and wife, of Elkhart, Indiana, for refusing 
to support a reverend Freemason. 

Sermon on Secret Societies. 5c. 

each. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn, The 
special object of his sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to examine into the char- 
acter of secret so:ieties, no matter what object 
such societies profess to have. 

Reminiscences of florgan Times* 

IOC. each. 

By Elder David Bernard. This is a thrilling 
narrative of the incidents connected with Ber- 
nard's Revelation of Freemasonry. 

The Broken Seal. In cloth, 75c, 
Paper covers, 46c. 

Personal Reminiscences of the Abduction and 
Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan. By Samuel D. 
Greene. 

Pres. H. li. George on Secret 

Societies. loc. each. 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty of 
Christian churches to disfellowship secret socie- 
ties. 

Narratives and Arguments,. 

15c. each. 

Showing the conflict of secret societies with the 
Constitution and law of the Union and of the 
States. By Francis Semple. 

Secrecy vs. the Family, State 
anc3 Church. loc. each. 

By Rev. M. S. Dury. The antagonism of or- 
ganized secrecy to the welfare of the family, statci 
and church, is clearly shown. 

A Booklet of 107 pages. 25c. 

"The Martvr's Own Monument," by Rev. J. E. 
Roy, D. D., Western Secretary of American Mis- 
sionary Association; "Christian Politics," by 
Rev. J. Blanchard, late Editor of Christian Cyno- 
sure; *' The Mysterious Machine: Was it Lawn- 
mower. Town-pump, Balloon, Wheel-barrow,— or 
what?" by Prof. E. D. Bailey, of the Civil Service 
Dept. U. S. Government. 

Are Secret Societies a BSessing? 

A pamphlet of 20 pages. 5c. 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., pastor 
of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, Mo.. 
Jan. 4, 1891. \V, McCoy writes: "That sermon 
ought to be in the hands of every preacher in this 
land, and every citizen's, too." 

Between Two Opinions: or the 
Question of the Hour. 389 pages; cloth, 
postpaid, 75 cents. 

By Miss E. E. Flagg, author of " Little People," 
'* A Sunny Life," etc., etc. Everyone who loves 
to read a good story, chaste and elegant in ex- 
pression, pure in thought, interesting in narrative, 
should read this book upon tbe power of secret 
societies in nolitics. and the remedy. 



June. 189' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



61 



A STRIKING LIST OF NEW BOOKS 

This list, repeated from last month, has proved to be of exceptional interest. 
Mostly published since January ist, a very considerable proportion have 
already required second editions. "Practical and Helpful" are the terms 
by which they have been uniformly described. 



The Neglected Continent. A mission 
study of South America. By E. C. Mil- 
lard and Lucy E. Guinness. Small quarto, 
very fully illustrated. Paper, 50 cents; 
cloth, 75 cents. 

An account of the mission tour of Rev. G . C. Gru^ 

and partv through South America, together with a 
histonca'l ."sketch and summary of missionary enter- 
prise in these vast regions. 

Essential Christianity. By Rev. 

Hugh Price Hughes, D.D. New atid 
cheaper edition. i2mo., cloth, |i. 25. 

This deepv spiritual volume is devoted 10 enforc- 
ing the truth that Chris'ianity is not primarily or 
essentially a system of ethical precepts, or of r.i'oral 
rules, nor a scheme of humanitarian relief, nor belief 
in a historic person or event; hut it is a conscious 
and vital intimacy with a living Qhrisi. —Aavunce. 

Topical Outlines of Bible Themes. 

Being an Illustrative Scripture Reference 
Book. By Rev. G. S. Bowes, B. A. i2mo., 
cloth, 410 pages, ^1.50. [In press. ) 

The aim of this work is to present a complete 
scriptural treatment of the most imoortant themes 
of the Bible, with teaching, illustratiou, application, 
etc., wholly Biblical. 

riunicipai Reform Hovements. By 

William Howe Tolman, Ph. D., Secretary 
of the City Vigilance League, New York. 
Introductorv chapter by Rev. Charles 
H. Parkhurst, President of the City Vigi- 
lance League. i6mo. , cloth, $r.oo. 

I take pleasure in heartilv commending the volume 
herewith announced by Wm. Howe Tolman, Ph.D. 
Dr. I'olman has made careful and faithlul stuay of 
the topics which he has discussed, having; had pecu- 
liar facilities therefor, both iu his university re- 
searches and because of his official connection with 
the City Vigilance League and other similar organi- 
zations. There is, I believe, no other work that 
brings together in one volume the matters which are 
included in this, and it will assuredlv prove not only 
an incentive, but a guide to those who are contem- 
plating the organization of movements similar to 
those in progress in New York.— C. H. Parkhurst. 

Prayers for Heart and Home. Morn- 
ing and Evenings Devotions for a Month. 
Bv Rev. B. F. Meyer, B. A. 8vo., flexi- 
ble cloth, 75c. 

A new edif.on at moderate price of an accepted re- 
ligious classic. 

Christ and the Church. Essavs con- 
cerning the Church and the Unification 
of Christendom. Introduction bv Rev. 
Amorv IT. Rrarirnrrl D D. y?*'-'^ ^^ *r -n. 

The papers comprising this volume were delivered 
as lectures before the American Institute of Christian 
Philosophy, at Chautauqua. July, 1S94. The subjects 
were selected b'='cause of the great and growing 
interest m the unification of Christendom" both in 
this country and Kngland. 

Radical Criticism. By Prof. Francis 
R. Eeattie, D. D. Introduction bv Prof. 
\V. W. IVIoore. D. D. i2mo., cloth'. 51.50. 
^ "He is tlioroughly in earnest and uncompromising 
in his opposition to the errors of a destructive criti- 
cism, but his tone is not at all that of a man who is 
trembling for the ark; we venture the assertion that 
his discriminating and dignified papers will do more 
gCKod a-noiu' nitelligeiit ue^nle than all the objurga- 
tion and rhodoiiOutade ofoir slashin^'^'jc olistsco-n- 
bined."— ^///o-/! 5<;/«//»a;_>' J/./^J^///d, Hj.nt^tj,i, Ka. 



The Divine Indwelling. By Rev. E. 

Woodward' Brown. i2mo., cloth, I1.25. 

A carefully prepared exposition of the work of the 
Holy Spirit. The thirty-six chapters cover all the 
various aspects of the question on both its divine 
and human sides. 

The Tongue of Fire. Bv Rev. Wil- 
liam Arthur. i6mo., paper, net 35c.; cloth, 
60c. 

The Ministry of the Spirit. By Rev. 

A. J. Gordon, D. D. 235 pages, i2mo., 
cloth, uniform with the author's earlier 
works, |i.oo. 

Certainly no man was better qualified than Dr. 
Gordon lor writing on this subject. His sweetness 
of spirit has brought him in touch with Christians 
everywhere, and his special qualifications lor writ- 
ing on the office work of the Holy Spirit, will as'-ure 
to them the most thorough treatment of this subject 
yet published. 

Li^e Power; or, Character, Culture 
and Conduct. By Rev. Arthur T. Pierson, 
D. D. i2mo., cloth, |[.oo. 
A practical work of counsel and suggestion in Char- 
acter building. 

God's World, and Other Sermons. 

By Rev B. Fay Mills. Second edition, 
i2mo , cloth, lr.25. 

It must have been some such- sermons as these of 
which Lord Melbourne complained the preacher 
insisted that men must apply their religion to their 
private life. . . These are good sermon- because they 
are sermous that have worked. — Interior. 

Peculiar'y interesting for two reasons: first because 
of the S'lpremely important truths which these ser- 
mons britie into boldness of ouiliue; and second, 
because of the preacher —^iiz/<3>^r^. 

Strong gospel teaching forcibly set home.— 5/anif- 

ard. 

Joseph Hardy Neesima, A sketch 
of his life. By Rev. J. D. Davis D.D, 
Professor of Theology 'in Doshisha Uni- 
versity. Kyoto, Japan. With numerous 
i ilnstrp.tiorc. i2mo., cloth, 5r.oo. 
Was there ever a more wonderful romance in real 

life than the story of Joseph Neesima?— 6^j44/i?n Rule. 
No man or woman can read this book without a 

positive addition to heart-wealth.- ^r//jur T. Fur- 

s.->n. D. D. 

Pictured Truth: A handbook of Black- 
board and Object Teachine:. By Rev.R.F. 
Y. Pierce. Introduction bv Rev. Russell 
H. Conwell, D. D. i2mo., cloth, $1.25. 
Very fully illustrated. 

The increase of object teaching •^nd "chalk talks,'' 
from both pulpit and olatform has created a demand 
for sucro-estive help which this volume attempts to 
supplv Prepared bv an author of lart^e experience 
in this attractive method of imparting and empha- 
sizing important truth, it is believed the work wU 
become at once popu'ar. 

Revival Sermons in Outline. With 
Thoughts. Themes and Plans. By Many 
Eminent Pastors and Evangelists. Edited 
by Rev. C. Perren, Ph. D. Buckram 
cloth, i2mo. Sr.50. 

This work comprises ^Part 1.1 eighteen short chap- 
ters on methods,' plans and suggestions regarding 
revival work bv cfifferent writers, and (Part 11 I a 
large collection of the best outlines of sermons by a 
score or more of the most successful Pastors and 
Evangelists. 



62 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897, 



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June, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



63 



Charles C. Foote: — What would the 
introduction of Ciirist into Mohamme- 
danism be, bat its annihilation? And 
thus would it be with Masonry. 

ALBaKT Barnes, 1849: — Any good 
cause, I think, can be promoted openly; 
any secret association is liable, at least, 
to abuse and danger. 

Rev. John G. Stearns, toellknovm 
author: — Masonry will by no means die 
of itself; nor will it separate itself from 
the church of God. No; it will cling to 
it, like the deadly scorpion to the victim 
on which it fastens. The church must 
therefore separate from that. 



James O .Birne i, candidate of the Liber- 
ty party for Pres\ dent, was a Freemason, 
"but never enterei a lodge after he joined 
the church, and, as ^is sons grew up, he 
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cret order." — Oen. Wm. Birney. 

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64 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1897. 



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* < The Blue Degrees are but the outer court of the 
Temple. Part of the symbols are displayed there 
to the initiate^ but he is intentionally misled by 
false interpretations. It is not intended that he 
shall U7iderstand them^ but it is intended that he 
shall imagine that he docs understand them. Their 
true explanation is reserved for the Princes of 
Masonry.'' — Albert Pike, Grand Commander of 
the Supreme Council, Sovereign Grand Inspectors- 
General, in "Morals and Dogma,," page 819. 

A. M. Sullivan, Ii^ish Leader : "I had not studied 
in vain the history of secret, oath-bound associations. 
I regard them with horror. I knew all that could be 
said as to their advantages in revolutionizing a coun- 
try, but even in the firmest and best of lumds they had 
a direct tendency to demoralization, and are often on 
the whole more perilous to society than open tyranny." 

TiiuRLOW Weed: "I now look back through an 
interval of iifty-six years with a conscious sense of 
liavi ng been governed through the Anti-masonic ex- 
citement by a sincere desire, first to vindicate the vio- 
lated laws of my country, and next to arrest the great 
power and dangerous influences of secret societies." 



Daniel Webster: "All secret associa- 
tions, the members of which take upon 
themselves extraordinary obligations to 
one another, and are bound together by 
secret oaths, are raturally sources of 
jealousy and just alarm to others; are es- 
pecially unfavorable to harmony and mu- 
tual confidence among men living togeth- 
er under popular institutions, and are 
dangerous to the general cause of civil 
liberty and just government. Under the 
influence ox this conviction I heartily ap- 
proved tholaw, lately enacted in the State 
of which I am a citizen, for abolishing all 
such, oaths and obligations." 



Oen. Henry SewaU, a companion of 
Washington: — I was initiated an Entered 
Apprentice to the Masonic rites in Octo- 
ber, 1777, at Albany, soon aft3r ihe 
capture of Burgoyne, being then an offi- 
cer in the American army. ... I 
was led by the influence of this ''perfect 
rule of faith and practice," during the 
year 1784, to view speculative Masonry 
in a shape still more deformed. Its char- 
ity appeared to be selfishness, because re- 
stricted to its own members; its religion 
deism because entirely devoid of the 
Gospel. Its history appeared fabulous; 
it3 claims to antiquity unsustainable; its 
titles fulsome; its rites barbarous and 
absurd; its oaths extra-judicial, unlaw- 
fully imposed and blindly taken, and the 
penal sanctions annexed, horrid and Im- 
T?ious, 




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the word occurs for the first time. Exhaustive Articles on Biblical History, 
Geography, Topography, Natural History, Ethnology, Botany, Chronology, 
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Miracles, Prophecies, Prayers, Money, Weights and Measures, Jewish Sects 
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Sample of 
Type... 



THE GOSPEL ACCORD 

SAINT MATTI 



CHAPTER 1. 

1 The genealogy of Chris/ from Abraham to Joseph. 
18 fie teas conceived by the Holy Ghost, and born 



of the Virgin Mary, 
names of Christ. 



19 The angel interpreteth the 



THE book of the ® generation of 
Je'§us Christ, ^the son of Da'- 
vid, ^ the son of A'bra-ham. 

2 ^A'bra-ham begat I'^aac; and 
^I'^aac begat Ja'cob; and -^ Ja'cQb 
begat Jti'das and his brethren; 

3 And s'Ju'das begat Pha'rg§ and 
Za'ra of Tha'mar ; and ^ Pha're§ 
begat Es'rom; and Es'rom begat 
A'ram; 

4 And A'ram begat A-mln'a-dab ; 
and A-min'a-dab begat Ni-as'soa; 
and Na-as'son begat SarmSn; 

5 And Sai'mSn begat Bo'oz of Ra'- 



a Luke 3. 23. 
b Ps. 132. 11. 

Is. n. 1. - 

Jer. 23. 5. 

ch. 22. 42. 

JolHi 7. 42. 

Acts 2. 30; 

13. 23. 

Rom. 1. 3. 
c Gen. 12. 3 ; 

22. 13. 

Gal. 3. 16. 
d Gen. 21. 2,3. 

e Gen. 2\ 26. 
/ Geu. 29. 30. 

fir Gen. 38. 27, 

A Ruth 4. 13, 
&c. 

lChr.2.5,9, 
&c. 

i 1 Sam. 16. 1 ; 
17. 12. 

A:2Sam.l2.24. 
nChr. 3. 10, 
&c. 

m 2 Kin. 20. 
21. 



bus 
Je'§ 

17 
hSn 
tion 
ryii 
teei 
can 
Chr 

18 
waa 
the] 
bef< 
foui 

19 
aju 
her 
to J 



Wheaton College, 



% 
% 
% 
% 

% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
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% 



WHEATON, ILLINOIS. 




THE SUMMER SCHOOL 






^ Opens flonday, June 28, and continues six "^ 
"^ weeks to Friday, August 6. ^ 

^ For teachers, ministers, special students, and those desiring ^ 



^ 



a restful vacation. 



^ 



Fall term opens Tuesday, September 21, Winter term Tues- 
''^ day, January 4, 1898. ^ 

^ For terms, catalogue etc., address ^ 

CHAS. A. BLANCHARD, President. 

(^ ^* t^ fcj* «5* e^ ti?* «^ «^ . fc?* *^ t^ *£^ t^ t^ t^ tSr' t}r' 



.■m 



UMi 




DANIEL POWERS. 



CONTENTS. 



Current Notes 65 

Soerecy and Citizenship 66 

Th€ Masonic Oath 69 

Freemasonry in Prophecy 72 

American Anti-Masonry 73 

The Northfield Conference 74 

Alx)minations in the Churches 74 

Encouragements in the Work 76 

Freemasonry and Jesuitism. 76 

A Good Month's Work 77 

Masonic Suicides 78 

Bro. Fenton's Program 78 

Bro. Williams' June Meetings 78 

Light in the East 79 



I'nited Brethren Conference 80 

United Workmen 80 

Oddfellowship a Swindle 81 

Letter from New Orleans .82^ 

From the South Land 82 

Obituaries— 

Kev. Ebenezer S. Bunce 82 

Thomas Kingsworth 82 

Daniel Powers 83: 

Knights Templar 83- 

Masonic Rum 83 

Expansion 84r 

Personal Mention 84 

Recent Publications 86 



NATIONftL CHRISTlftN ftSSOCIATION. 



"The National Christian Association, op- 
posed to secret societies," was formed at 
Pittsburg, Pa., in 1868, and incorporated un- 
der the laws of the State of Illinois in 1874. 

The National Christian Association arose to 
meet a gi-eat want created by the growth of 
secret orders, and the ignorance and silence 
of public teachers as to their nature and ef- 
fects. 

The association is interdenominational. 
The president (1897) is a Methodist Episco- 
pal, and th'S vice president a United Presby- 
terian. Among the following named officers 



and agents are also the Free Methodist, Con- 
gregationial, Lutheran, Friend, Evangelical^ 
United Brethren, Baptist, Reformed Presby- 
terian and Independent, 

The principal headquarters of the National 
Christian Association is at 221 West Madison* 
street, Chicago, whicb property is valued at 
$20,000, and is the gift to the association of 
Dea. Philo Carpenter, one of the founders of 
Chicago. 

The association is supported by the free 
will offering® and bequests of friends. The 
Christian Cynosure is its organ and princi- 
pal publication. 



President— Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, Morris, 
111. 

Vice President— Rev. W. T. Campbell, Mon- 
mouth, 111. 

Recording Secretary— Mrs. M. C. Baker, 14 
North May street, Chicago. 

General Secretary and Treasurer— Wm. I. 
Phillips, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 

Editor Christian Cynosure— Rev. M. A. 
Gault, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

T. B. Arnold, C. A. Blanchard, E. A. Cook. 
J. M. Hitchcock, C. J. Holmes, T. B. Rada-^ 
baugh, E. Whipple, Edgar B. Wylie, H. F. 
Kletzing, J. A. Collins, W. O. Dinius. 
DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Rev. James P. Stoddard, Boston, Mass.; 
Rev. P. B. Williams, Los Angeles, Cal.; Rev. 
Wm. Fenton, St. Paul, Minn.; Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard, Washington, D. C. 





'Mesus answered him, — 1 spake openly to the world; aud in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XXX 



CHICAGO. JULY, 1897. 



NUMBER 3 



PUr.LISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

TEJ^nS OF SUBSCRIPTJON. 

PRICE.— Per year, in advance, ?1.0Q; three months, on 
trial, twenty-five cents; single copies, 10 cents. 

RECEIPTS.— The yellow labie pa-.ted lon the paper or 
wrapper is a receipt for payment ot subscription to 
and including the printed date. 

EXTENSSCN.- The extension of a subscription is 
shown by the printed lable the second month after 
a remittance is received. 

DISCONTINUANCES.— We find that a large number 
of our subscribers prefer not to have their sub- 
scriptions interrupted and their files broken in case 
they tail to remit before expiration. It is therefore 
assumed, unless notification to discontmue is re- 
ceived, that the subscriber \yishes no interupiion in 
his series. Notification to discontinue at expiration 
can be sent in at any time during the year. 

PRESENTATION COPIES.— Many persons subscribe 
for The Christian Cynosure to be sent to 
friends. In such cases, if we are advised that a 
subscription is a present and not regularly author- 
ized by the recipient, we will make a memorandum 
to discontinue at expiration, and to send no bill for 
the tnsuing year. 



What prospect is there for an anti- 
secret lecture in 3-our church? 



We have received invitations to lecture 
from about tv^^enty places in Illinois, Indi- 
ana and Wisconsin. 



Will not every friend of the cause put 
forth his best effort to arrange for anti- 
secret meetings in his locality? 



*The greatest need at this juncture is 
for every Cynosure reader to plan and 
work for meetings in the interests of light 
against darkness. 



The Theosophists of Boston are angry 
at Judge Sheldon for denying their prop- 
ertv exemption from taxation 'on the 
ground that Theosophy is a religion. 



W^'hat folly for full-grown people in 
this age to be searching old records to see 
whether their ancestors got across the 
ocean in tmie for them to get into one of 
the many societies for the cultivation of 
snobbcrv. 



Brethren, will you not sw4ng wide open 
the doors for lectures and sermons upon 
this great practical issue of the day? 
Write to the agents in the field or to us 
here w^hat can be done in your communi- 
ty. Open the way for the truth from the 
lips o>f Hving witnesses. 



The annual report of the ^lodem 
Woo'dmen, recently assembled at Du- 
buque, shows an increase during the last 
seven years from 40,000 to 240,000, and 
that they carry $550,000,000 insurance. 
This is not an indication that secret socie- 
ties will die out if onl.v let alone. 



The Theosophists think that if their 
property cannot escape taxation under 
the cloak of religion it ought to be ex- 
empted on the ground that it is used for 
"literary and scientific'' purposes. Their 
chief apostle, Annie Besant, furnishes the 
best model for the murder of language to 
obscure thoug^ht. 



Last week was commencement week at 
W^eaton. The attendance of the alumni 
was larger than usual. The year has been 
prosperous, more than 140 students being 
registered in the conservatory. President 
Blanchard's baccalaureate sermon was 
preached to a crowded dhapel and before 
the graduating class of the college on 
Sabbath, June 20. There were six from 
the business college, four from the con- 
servatory of music, four from the art 
school, eleven from the academy and sev- 
enteen from the college. 



m 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1897. 



SECRECY AND CITIZENSHIP. 



BY PROF, ELLIOT WHIPPLE. 



The State is by far the most important 
of any purely human organization. All 
who dwell within its territory are neces- 
sarily members of it, whether they desire 
to be or not. It powerfully influences the 
conditions of the lives of all its subjects. 
Other organizations may become cor- 
rupt, may decay, may cease to exist, and 
the injury will, at the most, be but partial 
and temporary- : but. if these things hap- 
pen to the state, the resulting evils are 
universal. 

If the government is to be in the hands 
of the people, the need of confidence — 
confidence of the people in one another 
and confidence in the persons elected to 
make and execute laws — is more neces- 
sary than would be the case in any other 
association by just so much as the issues 
are more important and far-reaching. Yet 
such a confidence is precisely what secret 
societies, and especially secret political 
organizations, undermine and destroy, 
^len who are banded together in secret 
associations lose cohesion with the rest of 
the community. Not only so, but suoh 
combinations, like loose stones in a wall, 
-prevent the union of the rest. Washing- 
ton in his farewell address warned his 
•countrymen as follows : 

''All obstructions to the execution of 
the laws, all com'binations and associa- 
tions under Avhatever plausible charac- 
ter, with the real design to direct, control, 
counteract or awe the regular delibera- 
tion and action of the constituted authori- 
ties, are destructive to this fundamental 
principle (the duty of every individual to 
■obey the established government), and 
of fatal tendency. They serve to organize 
faction, to give it an artificial and extra- 
ordinary force, to put in the place of the 
delegated will of the nation the will of a 
party, often a sm-all but artful and enter- 
prising minority of the community; and 
according to the altern,ate triumphs of 
dift'erent parties, to make the public ad- 
ministration the mirror of the ill-concert- 
ed and incongruous projects of faction, 
rather than the organ of consistent and 
wholesomxe plans, digested by common 
counsels, and modified bv mutual inter- 
•ests. 

''However combinations and associa- 



tions of the above description may now 
and then answer popular ends, they are 
likely in the course of time and things to 
become the potent engines by which cun- 
ning, ambitious and unprincipled men 
will be enabled to su'bvert the power of 
the people, and to usurp for themselves 
the reins of government, destroying the 
ver}' engines which had lifted them to un- 
just dominion." 

IMPORTANCE OF PUBLICITY. 

Another thing essential to the success 
of self-government is that all the affairs 
of government should be public in order 
that the people may know at all times just 
how^ their servants, the government offi- 
cials, are performing the duties intrusted 
to them, and that the tremendous power 
of public opinion may promptly be 
brought to bear upon any wrong doing. 
Hence it has come to pass that, in this 
country at least, all legislative and judi- 
cial functions are performed in public, 
and though the publicity, in a certain 
class of judicial cases, exerts a pernicious 
influence, it is thought better to endure 
the resulting injury to society than to 
incur the fearful risks of secret judicial 
action. Custom requires that most exec- 
utive acts should also be puiblic, the prin- 
cipal exception being the neg'otiation of 
treaties. 

Illustrations of the efficiency ofpublic 
opinion are of every day occurrence ; for 
example, the breaking down of the 
Tw^eed ring in New York City as a result 
of the exposures printed in the New York 
Times, the termination of the police 
blackmail system in the same city result- 
ing from the Parkhurst exposure, the 
closing up of open g-ambling in Chicago 
as a result of the efforts of the Civic Fed- 
eration seconded by the daily papers. In 
fact, we constantly see great and strongly 
intrenched evils give way as soon as made 
public in the newspapers, before any legal 
action is undertaken. It is safe to say 
that the most perfect scheme of self-gov- 
ernment, set at work, with all the other 
conditions essential to success, would fail 
if publicity were denied. 

SECRET SOCIETIES PROMOTE SECRET METH- 
ODS IN CIVIL AFFAIRS. 

Now it is easy to see that the tendency 
of secret societies of all kinds is to train 
men to secret instead of open methods of 
doing things. Students in college who 
have for four of the mosit formative years 



July, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



6- 



C^ 



of their lives been managing college poli- 
tics^ in secret associations will be very 
likely to carry the habits thus formed into 
the m'ore important affairs that will after- 
ward engage their attention, and all other 
secret societies for young people must 
inevitably have a similar tendency. We 
are largely creatures of habit and imita- 
tion; when w^e have anyiihing to do, most 
of us proceed to do it as w^e have been 
in the habit of doing similar things, or as 
we have seen others do under similar 
circumstances. Only very strong rea- 
sons ever induce us to. vary from the 
beaten track. 

What, then, is to be said of secret asso- 
ciations for political purposes? If the 
doings of our judges, legislators and ex- 
ecutive ofificers s'bould be subject to pub- 
lic inspection, is it not ecjually necessaiT 
that the processes by which these officials 
are selected and put in power should like- 
wise be open? We guard with the most 
jealous care all the proceedings of the 
actual election of offfcials, from the choice 
of a tO'wn constable up to the counting of 
the electoral votes for President in the 
presence of both houses of Congress, 
and any attem-pt at secrecy is rightly re- 
garded as evidence of fraud. But even 
more important than the election itself is 
the caucus at Ayhich the nominations are 
made, and right here, at the very source 
of political power, the secret political so- 
ciety proposes to exert its potent and 
baneful spell, poisoning the fountain 
which ought to pour forth a current of 
pure, healthful, life-giving influences. 

OPINION OF DOCTOR LIEBER. 

Dr. Francis Lieber, whose work on 
"Civil Liberty^'' was a standard text-book 
in our best colleges for a generation, 
says: '''Publicity begets confidence, and 
confidence is indispensable for the gov- 
ernment of free countries; it is the soul 
of loyalty in jeaJous freemen. This nec- 
essary influence is two-fold — co-nfidence 
..in the government and confidence in 
' society itself. 

"It is with reference to the latter that 
secret political societies in free countries 
are essentially injurious to all liberty, in 
addition to their preventing the growth 
and development of manly character, and 
promoting vanity; because they are, as all 
'' secret societies must inherently be, sub- 
emissive to superior will and decision, a 
vgreat danger in politics, and unjust to the 



rest of the citizens, by deciding on public 
measures and men without the trial of 
public discussion, and by bringing the 
influence of a secret united body to bear 
on the decision or election. 

"Secret societies in free countries are 
cancers against Avhich history teaches us 
that men who value freedom ought to 
guard themselves most attentively.' 

OPINION OF GENERAL GRANT. 

Gen. U. S. Grant said: "AH secret, 
oath-bound political parties are danger- 
ous to any nation, no matter how^ pure or 
how patriotic the motives and principles 
which first bring them together." Exam- 
ples of the workings of secret societies for 
political purposes may be found by study- 
ing the "Carbonari'- of Italy, the secret 
factions that plunged France into the 
"Reign of Terror,"' the "Union League" 
as applied to the negro voters of the 
Southern States and resulting in the in- 
famous "carpet bag" governments, and 
the murderous "Ku Klux Klan." 

SECRET CONSPIRACIES VERSUS OPEN RESIST- 
ANCE TO DESPOTISM. 

Although secret political methods are 
plainly out of place in a country of free 
speech, free press and fair play, the ques- 
tion may be raised as to their admissibility 
in a land where these things are denied;, 
but histor}- bears testimony against them 
there as everywhere else. Search the 
annals of human struggles for freedom 
throughout, and see if you can find a sin- 
o'le well-authenticated instance in which 
a secret oath-bound league has ever suc- 
ceeded in changing the course of public 
affairs in favor of the real interests of free- 
dom and humanity. Harmodius and Aris- 
togeiton killed Pisistratus, but failed to 
free Athens. Brutus and Cassius "re- 
moved" Caesar, but they could not resur- 
rect the Roman repubiic. The nihilists- 
destroyed Alexander II. of Russia, and 
with him perished the movement for con- 
stitutional government in that land of 
tyranny, misery and despair. When the 
conditions are ripe for the overthrow of 
despotism or the introduction of a larger . 
measure of self-government, an open 
appeal to the people and a manly, cour- 
ageous attack upon the intrenchments of 
arbitrary power have ever proved more 
successful than cowardly plotting behind 
closed doors. 

It was an unpremeditated open revolt 
that drove Tarquin the Proud from h's- 



i 






68 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1897. 



throne and established in Rome 'a repub- 
lic destined to endure for half a millen- 
nium. The mightiest movement toward 
freedom of thoug'ht and self-g-overnment, 
as well as freedom of worship, which this 
world has ever known was begun when 
Luther, in the open light of da}* and in the 
face of all Europe, nailed his ninety-five 
theses to the church door of Wittenburg-. 
The circumstances attendant upon the 
founding of the Dutch republic, and the 
evolution of English civil liberty, from the 
'■]\Iag-na Charta" to the "Bill of Rights," 
are filled with examples of how brave 
men. standing sturdily for their rights, 
vron battles for the rig'ht in open, manly 
fashion. 

AMien the grandest experiment in seif- 
g-overnment of all the ages was to be tried 
upon these Avestern shores, our forefath- 
ers organized no secret societies, but, re- 
lying- upon the justice of their cause and 
the support of an intelligent and patriotic 
people, gathered openly in the Continen- 
tal Congress, signed their names to the 
Declaration of Independence, and 
'■pledged their property, their lives, and 
their sacred honor" to maintain that 
Declaration against the most pow^erful 
nation on earth. 

DESPERATE CHARACTER OF SECRET SOCIETIES 

There is one characteristic of secret 
societies which renders their influence es- 
pecially injurious to the citizens of a free 
self-governing state, and that is their 
despotism. Some people suppose that, if 
the ofBcials of any organization are elect- 
ed by the members, and if the laws or 
regulations by which they are governed 
are adopted by a majority vote, liberty is 
secured. But this is far from being true, 
as history abundantly proves. A pure 
democracy, where the will of the majoritv 
can take effect at once vnthout limitation 
or restriction, is the Avorst kind of despot- 
ism, as is shown in the histories of Athens 
and Florence. It has been the proiblem of 
the ages to discover how to prevent the 
power necessarily intrusted to govern- 
ment ofiicials from becoming despotic — a 
problem partially solved in countries in 
Avhich civil liberty is developed to the 
highest extent by constitutions w^hich de- 
fine and restrict the poAvers of of^ce-bear- 
ers, divide the functions of government 
among different departments, each hold- 
ing the others in check, and secure the 



rig-hts of minorities and individuals by 
Avell-defined gTiarantees. 

The tendency of secret societies is to- 
AA-ard the formation of gradatioins, each 
higher degree keeping its doing-s secret 
from all beioAv, and in many instances ex- 
ercising despotic authorit}' over them. 
Setting aside for the present such mur- 
derous associations as the Mafia, the 
]\Iolly Maguires, the Danites, the Ku 
Klux Klan, and the Clan-na-Gael, the 
general character of the multitudinous s'e- 
cret societies AAdiose ostensible objects are 
benevolence, felioiwship and mutual aid 
may be ascertained by a study of one typi- 
cal organization. 

FREEMASONRY A TYPE OF SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Freemasonry is the oldest existing so- 
ciety of its kind, is most widely extended, 
and manifests its inPiUence upon all other 
secret associations by the fact that, 
though they differ widely in their appar- 
ent forms, there is nevertheless impressed 
upon most, if not all of them, a certain 
simhlarit}^ of structure and frequently of 
ritual and phraseology whidh indicates 
that their founders Avere themselves Free 
Masons, or, at any rate, Avere familiar 
Avith and copied from Freemasonry. 
Hence Avhat Ave learn to be true of Free- 
masonry may well be taken to reveal the 
tendency of all allied organizations. The 
despotic character of Freemasonry is es- 
tablished by the testimony of authors Avho 
are everywhere accepteid as true expo- 
nents of their system by Freemasons 
themselves. 

' As to the power of a master of a lodge. 
Mackey's Lexicon of Freemasonry says : 
'Tihe power of a master is absolute. He 
is the supreme arbiter of all questions of 
order, so far as the meeting is concerned ; 
nor can any appeal be made from his de- 
cision to that of the lodge. For no mis- 
demeanor, hoAvever great, can he be tried 
by his lodge.'' Such subordination ma}' 
be needful in an army or on board of a 
ship, but ill befits the free citizens of a 
republic in time of peace. 

Robert Morris, in Webb's Freemason-s 
Monitor (revised edition, page 145) says: 
"The Masonic law has Httle of the repub- 
lican or democratic spirit about it." As 
to the power of the Grand Lodges, Mack- 
ey's Lexicon of Freemasonry says, on 
page 183: "The government of Grand 
Lodges is completely despotic. Vv^'hile a 
Grand Lodsre exists its edicts must be 



July, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



m 



respected and obeyed without examina- 
tion by its subordinate lodg-es.'' The offi- 
cial report of the Grand Lodge of Mis- 
souri contains the following: 

"Not only do we know no Xorth, no 
South, no East, no West, birt we know no 
govermment save our own. To everv' 
governiTient, save that of ^Masonry, and 
to each and all alike, we are foreigners. 
We are a nation of men bound to each 
other only by Masonic ties, as citizens of 
the world, and that world the world of 
Masonry; brethren to each other the 
world over; foreigners to all the world 
iDesides." 

In Webb's ^Monitor, page 196, we read: 
'The first duty of the reader of this synop- 
sis is to obey the edicts of the Grand 
Lodge, right or wrong; his very existence 
a's a Mason hangs upon ihis obedience to 
the powers immediately set above him." 
Such an institution cannot fail to habitu- 
ate men to despotic proceedings instead 
of training them to know and maintain 
their rights as freemen, and readily be- 
comes an instrument in the hands of de- 
signing leaders for the promotion of al- 
most any form of iniquity. 

XORDLY TITLES HOSTILE TO THE SPIRIT OF 
FREE INSTITUTIONS. 

Closely connected with this character- 
istic is another which is utterly hostile to 
the spirit of our institutions. It is the 
frequent use of titles which are often lord- 
ly and grandiloquent, and sometimes ir- 
reverent; for example. Grand Patriarch, 
Prince of Mercy, Sublime Prince, Sover- 
eign Master, High Prie'st, King. 

The opinion entertained by the framers 
of the constitution of the L'nited States 
in regard to such titles is expressed in 
section 9 of Article I. as follows: "No 
titles of nobility shall be granted by the 
United States, and no person holding 
any office of profit or trust under them 
shall, without the consent of Congress, 
accept any present, emolument, office, or 
title of any kind whatosever, from any 
king, prince or foreign state." Are such 
titles any less objectionable when con- 
ferred by a powerful secret organization 
in our midst? The similarity of the va- 
rious secret societies is nowhere more 
strikingly manifested tlian in the use of 
titles. The trail of vanity and an undem- 
ocratic desire for special distinction and 
special privilege is over them all. 

Wheaton Colleoie, 111. 



THE MASONIC OATH. 



BY REV. WM. WISKART, D. D. 



Among the precepts of the Decalogue, 
all of which are of universal and perpet- 
ual obligation, we find the third express- 
ed in the following language: "Thou 
shalt not take the name of the Lord Thv 
God in vain, for the Lord will not hold 
him guiltless that taketh his name in 
vain." 

The original word shav, here ren- 
dered vain, sometimes denotes emptiness, 
vanity or uselessness, and sometimes de- 
ceit, iving or falsehood. It is employed 
in the former sense in such passages' as 
Psalm xxxi., 6; Matt, iii., 14; jer. ii., 30, 
and in the latter sense in such passages as 
Exodus xxiii., i : Dent, v., i7;'Psalm xii., 
3, and xli., 6. Gesenius takes it in the lat- 
ter sense in the third precept of the Deca- 
logue, and renders it as follows: "Thou 
shalt not utter the name of Jehovah upon 
a falsehood ; that is, thou shalt not swear 
falsely." The two meanings, however, 
are so closely connected that they may be 
regarded as but different aspects of 'one 
and the same thing; for that which is 
empty and useless, falsifies and deceives. 
And this word as used in the third pre- 
cept of the Decalogue comprehends both 
of these meanings. 

This precept forbids all use of the name 
of God both vainly or without sufficient 
cause, and falsely or without truth and 
sincerity. A lawful oath is a solemn ap- 
peal to God, upon some just occasion, 
as the omniscient searcher of the heart, 
to witness our sincerity, and as the right- 
eous avenger of all falsehood and hypoc- 
ris}'. to judge and punish us if we swear 
falsely. It is a solemn ordinance of wor- 
ship instituted l)y God for the honor of 
His own name and for the peace and 
\\-elfare of human society. That this ordi- 
nance is grossly abused and perverted 
and the name of God fearfully profaned 
l)y Masons in the lodge will appear from 
the following considerations: 

I. The Masonic oath is taken in a rash 
and inconsiderate manner. Even when 
an oath is imposed by lawful authority, 
when there is a just occasion for taking 
it, and when the matter of it is true and 
just, we are guilty of taking God's name 
in vain, if we take it without a deliberate 
investigation and understanding of these 



TO 



CHRISTIAN cynosure: 



July, 1897. 



facts. A\'e should carefully inquire and 
ascertain, not only whether the ends pro- 
posed are sufttcient to justify us in tak- 
ing the oath, but also whether the matter 
of the oath be in exact accordance with 
the sentiments and intentions of our 
hearts. Otherwise we are guilty of vio- 
lating the divine command in Ecc. v., 2, 
*'3e not rash with thy. mouth and let not 
thy heart be hasty to utter an}thing be- 
fore God." But the ^Masonic candidate 
in his initiation in the lodge is not only 
rushed into the taking of the oath, before 
he -has time to inquire whether it is justi- 
fied by th€ ends proposed, but necessarily 
takes it, before the matter of it can be 
made known to him. Hence we affirm. 

2. In the second place, that the Mason, 
in being initiated into the lodge, swears 
falsely and is guilty of perjury. Whenever 
there is not an exact correspondence be- 
tween the sentiments and intentions of 
our hearts and the words of our mouth in 
taking an oath, whether it be from ignor- 
ance, indifference, or mental reservation, 
we are guilty of swTaring falsely. Tn 
other words, we mtist assert nothing 
which we do not know to be true and 
promise nothing which we do not know 
to be possible and lawful, and which we 
do not sincerely intend to, perform. 

How is it, then, in taking the Masonic 
oath? Why. the fact is, tlhe candidate for 
initiation has no opportunity of know- 
ing wliat the matter of the oath is or of 
considering the import of the language 
in which it is expressed, till he is actually 
engaged in taking it. He is led around 
the lodge-room, half naked, blindfolded 
and with a rope round his neck; is con- 
ducted to the altar and required to kneel 
thereon his naked left knee, with his left 
hand supporting the Bible, square and 
compass, and his right hand resting on 
them. And in this condition the Wor- 
shipful Alaster addresses him, saying: 
''You will say, I, with your name in full, 
and repeat after me.' And then the candi- 
date repeats the oath after the Master 
as follows: 

"I. A. B., of my own free will and ac- 
cord, in presence of Almighty God and 
this worshipful lodge of Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, dedicated to God and 
held forth to the holy order of St. John, 
do hereby and hereon most solemnly and 
sincerely promise and swear that I will 
always hail, ever conceal and never re- 
veal any part, or parts, art or arts," etc. 



Now, it ^^•ill be obseiwed that when 
this candidate appeals to God as the wit- 
ness of his sineerify in what he is about 
to declare, he knows not wdiat he is about 
to declare, and only finds it out afterward 
as it is dictated to him, two or three words 
at .1 time, by the Worshipful Master. Just 
think of that! Appeal to the omniscient 
Gad to witness the sincerity of your in- 
tentions in what you are about to prom- 
ise, when you know not what yon • are 
about to promise, and, of course, cannot 
know whetJier it wo'uld be possible and 
lawful to perform, wthen you certainly can 
have no definite intention in regard to it. 

If this is not eonsummate trifling with 
the ever-blessed name and glorious per- 
fection of the great God, it is not pos- 
sible to conceive of such a thing. It is 
an insult to the omniscience of God and 
a defiance of his power as the rig^hteous 
avenger of all falsehood and hypocrisy. 
And it is very strange indeed that any 
sensible and good man should be induced 
to take such a rash and hypocritical oath. 
, Wq must remember, however, that young 
men who enter the lodge are generally 
so terrified, agitated and bewildered by 
strange cermonies and startHng sounds, 
before they come to the point of taking 
the oath, that in taking it they ''under- 
stand neither wdiat they say nor whereof 
thev affirm." And we may pray for them 
in the language of our divine Master, 
"Father, forgive the'm, for they know 
not what they do." 

3. The Masonic oath is taken without 
any just occasion or cause, and is there- 
fore most emphatically a taking of God's 
name in vain. To interpose t^he solemnity 
of an oath for trivial and unimportant 
purposes, however good, is not only to 
treat the sacred and glorioiis name of 
God with irreverence, but to destroy the 
efficacy of the oath as an ordinance for 
special ends. For example, to employ 
the oath for the confirmation of the truth 
in our ordinary conversiation or for the 
promotion of fideHty in the ordinary du- 
ties of life, would be a fearful profanation 
of the name of God. And such use of the 
oath is absolutely forbidden in Matt, v., 
34-37; James v., 12. 

We can all see that it is no profanation 
of the name of God, or taking of His 
name in vain, to take the judicial oatih, 
whether as a means of official fidelity or as 
an instrument of investigation in our 
courts of justice, because this oath is im- 



July, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



posed by lawful authority and required 
for purposes that are not only good, but 
so necessary to the welfare of civil so- 
ciety as to justify an appeal to the sacred 
name of the Most Hig-h. This oath is 
necessary in order to the impartial ad- 
ministration of justice, the maintenance 
of equal rights and the promotion of mu- 
tual confidence and peace among men. 
But how is it with Masonic oaths? 
They are not imposed by any lawful 
authority, either of the state or the 
church. And they are not necessary as a 
means of promoting any good and impor- 
tant end in civil society, but the very re- 
verse of this. They are the means of sub- 
verting the administration of justice, de- 
stroying equal rigdits and engendering 
mutual suspicion and strife among men. 
And if it would be a profanation of the 
sacred name of God to employ the oath 
for the confirmation of the truth in com- 
mon conversation and for the promotion 
of fidelity in the ordinary duties of life, 
for the reason that such an oath is not 
imposed by any lawful authority and not 
necessary in order to the welfare of civil 
society, but would be adverse to it, may 
not the same thing be most emphatically 
affirmed of the Masonic oath and for the 
very same reason, namely, that it is un- 
authorized and unnecessar}-, nay, most 
antagonistic to the welfare of civil so- 
ciety ? 

We have declared that the Masonic 
oath is a profanation of the name of God 
because it is unnecessary and unauthor- 
ized; but have we not just reason to place 
an additional emp^hasis upon this declara- 
tion when we consider the unnecessarv 
and vain repetition of this oath which 
takes place in the lodge? Why, the en- 
tered apprentice, while kneeling upon 'his 
naked left knee, with his hand upon the 
Bible, has said: "In presence of Al- 
mighty God I promise and swear," three 
times. The fellow-craft, in a similar con- 
dition, has said: 'T promise and swear," 
six times, the Master Mason seventeen 
times, and the royal Arch Mason, count- 
ing all the lower degrees through which 
he 'has passed, has said, *Tn the presence 
of Almighty God I promise and sw^ear," 
not less than sixty-eig^ht times. Now, if 
an oath be necessary, why not make one 
oath include all? Why add an oath to 
every specification, even when the thing 
specified has been included in former 



oaths? \\'hy file oath upon oath, when 
there is not the least semblance of a rea- 
son for it? Is it to insult God bv trifling 
with His great and fearful name? Or is it 
to destroy all reverence and fear of God 
among the members of the lodge, and to 
banish from their hearts all sense of His 
authority? 

4. The Masonic oath is grossly and 
positively immoral. It imposes obliga- 
tions which are in direct conflict with the 
pre-existing and paramount obligations 
of the law of God. For example, the oath, 
"Forever to conceal and never reveal" the 
unknown secrets of Masonry, when for 
aug^ht that we can kn'ow it may be incon- 
sistent withthe will of Godtoconceal them, 
is in conflict with the supreme authority 
of God and with His revealed will, which 
requires us to obey God rather than men. 
The oath to keep a brother Mason's crim- 
inal secrets — ^murder and treason not ex- 
cepted — and the oath to warn a brother 
jMason of approaching danger and extri- 
cate him from his difficulties, whether 
rig^ht or wrong, are in conflict with the di- 
vinelv prescribed duty which we owe both 
to God and to civil society. And when the 
Mason, Avith a solemn appeal to God to 
witness the sincerity of his professions, 
imprecates mutilation and death upon 
himself as a punis'hment for revealing cer- 
tain trifling and absurd secrets, 'he takes 
an oath that is not only immoral, but sav- 
age, monstrous, horribly devilish. 

5. Finally, we beg leave to add that 
Masonic oaths are sinful nullities, wliich 
have no binding force or obligation what- 
ever. The obhgation of all oaths is lim- 
ited to things lawful as well as possible. 
A man can no more place himself under 
a valid obligation to violate the law of 
God than he can to fly to the moon. The 
obligations of the divine law are supreme 
and indispensable and cannot be set aside 
or made void by any obligation that is 
voluntarily assumed or self-imposed. It 
was a part of the traditional teaching of 
the Scribes and Pharisees in the days of 
our Lord that a voluntary vow or an as- 
sumed obligation was sufiicient to annul- 
or make void that precept of the law 
whic^h requires a man to honor his. par- 
ents. 'Tf a man shall say to his father or 
mother, it is Corban — that is to say, a 
gift by whatsoever thou migditest be prof- 
ited bv me — ^he shall l)e free. And ye suf- 
fer him no more to do aught for his fa- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1897 



ther or his mother." Mark vii.. 1 1-12. But 
for such teaching- our God denounced 
tliem as hypocrites and bUnd guides, who 
were making the word of God of none 
ettect by their traditions. 

Xo greater absurdity could be imag- 
ined than to suppose that an immoral 
promise or engagement can be rendered 
obligatory by calling upon God to wit- 
ness it. and to punish the non-perform- 
ance of it. According to this supposition 
any man ma}' at will make void the 
autiiority of the Divine law. Yea, he 
may at any. time employ the author- 
ity of God in opposition to the 
authority of his own most sacred and im- 
mutable law. Masonic oaths are indeed 
very sinful, but the sin consists in mak- 
ing them and not in breaking them. 

Ingram. Pa. 



FREEMASONRY IN I^OPHECY. 



Ingleside, Pa.. April 17, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure — The chang^e in form 
of our paper is certainly an improvement. 
The constant presentation in the paper 
of the special object — secretism — ^we be- 
lieve to be a great step in advance in our 
reform. The quotations from public men, 
dead and living, should be kept to the 
front, so that all may know that great 
men in past and present time knew and 
recognized the dangers of organized se- 
cretism. The interference of these socie- 
ties with legislation, and with the execu- 
tion of the laws of our land, should be 
so constantly and plainly shown that none 
•may be able to deny that organized se- 
cretism is the foe of good government. 

The greatest of all dangers shouM be 
made most prominent. The fact that 
Free ^vlasonry is Baalism, that its preach- 
ers to-day are the successors of those 
false prophets Whom Elijah, with God's 
approval, slew at the foot of Mount Car- 
mel, because they led God's chosen peo- 
ple into idolatry, cannot be too strongly 
emphasized. The fact of the historical 
relations of Free Masonry and Catholic- 
ism should be often and plainly present- 
ed. God himself gave to His servants, the 
prophets, a view of things to come in the 
wonderful books of Daniel and Revela- 
tion. He showed to Daniel and to John 
the history of the world, and of the 
church 6i Jesus Christ in the Avorld, so 
that Ix^lievers might be warned of things 



to come upon the governments of earth 
and the church of Christ. God showed to 
John the beast and the image of the beast,, 
and how they would afHict the church,, 
and the world at large. 

W'e are living in the last age of the pres- 
ent dispensation, and we are required to 
hold up Christ as the true and only light 
of the world lying in darkness. Profess- 
ed ministers of the gospel and professed 
churches of Jesus Christ are to-day count- 
ed by thousands among the worshipers 
of the beast and the image. If these pro- 
fessed Christians are enlightened on the 
subject of secret societies, the plea of ig- 
norance will no longer avail; they must 
come out from among them, or they must 
suffer as parts of the mighty anti-Christ. 
Let The Cynosure keep these facts al- 
ways to the front. Freemasonry is the 
subject of prophecy. 

2. The "Image of the Beast" is to-day 
the ruling power in the state and in the 
nominal church. We live in the day when 
the words of God to John in Rev. xiii., 12- 
18, are fulfilled in our midst. We see the 
Attorney General of the United States a 
devoted Catholic, and our President leav- 
ing the duties he w^as sworn to perform 
to take the higher degrees of Free Ma- 
sonry. We daily read of our Nationial 
Congress doing almost anything or ev- 
erything but to provide revenue for a 
g-overnment going deeper and deeper 
into debt. All men are wondering at the 
things coming upon the earth. God rul- 
eth ; blessed be His name. 

His people, secure in their trust in Him,, 
can read the fulfillment of prophecy, and 
the hastening of the time when the glori- 
ous tidings shall be proclaimed that the 
kingdoms of this world are become the 
kingdoms of our Lord and of His Christ. 
The beast and his image cannot be re- 
formed. God has pronounced the doom 
of the beast in His word. The image 
which men made to the beast shall perish 
and his worshipers shall be punished by 
Him Vvdiose laws they now defy. There 
surely is no nobler work than to dispense 
the world's darkness, and to present 
God's truth to all ; whether men will hear 
or whether they will forbear, the respon- 
sibility is with the individuals themselves. 

In the field of anti-Masonic biography 
I have looked in vain for any history of 
the Hfe and work of Rev. Richard Hor- 
ton, the author of the book published by 



July, 189 ( 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



73 



the National Christian Association, en- 
titled "The Image of the Beast, or Free 
Masonry a Subject of Prophecy." 

I think the book the strongest ever 
written for our reform. If 3^ou could fur- 
iuish a sketch of the life and work of the 
author, and publish it in The Cynosure, I 
believe it would tend to help the cause 
of anti-secretism. 

J. W. SNIVELY. 



AMERICAN ANTI-MASONRY. 



BY M. N. BUTLER, 



The late International Cathohc Anti- 
Masonic Congress at Trent in Austria, 
and the extensive press mention on the 
same, has brought the subject prominent- 
ly before the civilized world, not only re- 
ligiously, but politically as VvtU. Espe- 
cil'ly are the ten million Catholics, and 
all other classes in the United States, 
deeply interested pro and con in this vig- 
orous and far-reaching action. Older 
citizens rememjber most vividly the in- 
tense and widespread agitation of 1826 
to 1836. Fifteen hundred lodges threw 
up their charters and ceased to exist. For- 
ty-five thousand out of hfty thousand 
Free Masons left the order never to re- 
turn. The movement died down, how- 
ever, and the general public lost interest 
in the theme. But when Henry A\'ard 
Beecher and Theodore Tilton were edi- 
tors of the New York Independent the 
discussion was revived. And at Aurora, 
111., in October, 1867, a large convention 
Avas held and the element opposing the 
Masonic order was reorganized. 

The National Christian Association 
w^as set in motion, and it has a very sub- 
stantial building at 221 West Madison 
street, Chicago, as its general headquar- 
ters, where is issued each month its of- 
ficial organ, The Christian Cynosure, an 
ably edited thirty-two page magazine. 
The association also owns the old Ad- 
miral Rowan Building, near Pennsylva- 
nia avenue, and within less than three 
blocks of the National Capitol, Wash- 
ington, D. C. The New England head- 
quarters and a general agent are' in Bos- 
ton. The association has State auxiliar- 
ies, with their offices, agents, lecturers 
and workers. Conventions and delegat- 
ed meetings have been held in most of 
the larger towns and cities of the Union. 
A literature has evolved, and in almost 



every State the distribution of literature 
and discussion is being pushed forward. 
D. L. Moody, George F. Pentecost, that 
world-read lecturer, Joseph Cook, and 
other noted divines, are leading the re- 
Hgious agitation. 

A political almanac before me records 
the American anti-]\Iasonic platform for 
1876. Sept. 14, 1882, a beautiful and im- 
posing monument was unveiled to Will- 
iam Morgan at Batavia, N. Y., in the 
presence of 250 delegates, and a large 
concourse of people. It was erected by 
the voluntary contributions of more than 
two thousand citizens of all religious and 
political beliefs. The religious Avork is 
non-sectarian, and those who have been 
identified therevrith hail with pleasure the 
international Catholic movement along 
this line. 

]\Ien first and foremost in American 
statesmanship and jurisprudence have 
spoken in tones of thunder on this issue. 
John Quincy Adams, President of the 
United States when ]\I organ was mur- 
dered, declared : "I am prepared to com- 
plete the demonstration before God and 
man that the Masonic oaths, obligations 
and penalties cannot by any possibility 
be reconciled to the laws of morality, of 
Christianity or of the land." President 
Fillmore, J. C. Spencer and others affirm- 
ed: "The Masonic fraternity tramples 
upon our rights, defeats the administra- 
tion of justice and bids defiance to every 
government that it cannot control.'' Dan- 
iel Webster, Secretar}' of State, avowed: 
"All secret associations, the members of 
which take upon themselves extraordi- 
nary obligations to one another, and are 
bound together by secret oaths, are nat- 
urally sources of jealousy and just alarm 
to others; are especially unfavorable to 
harmony and mutual confidence among 
men living together under popular insti- 
tutions, and are dangerous to the general 
cause of civil liberty and just govern- 
ment. Under the influence of this con- 
viction it is my opinion that the future 
administration of all such oaths and the. 
formation of all such obligations should 
Ipe prohibited by law." 

John Brown and Lewis Tappan were 
seceded Masons; Myron Holley, Gerritt 
Smith, James G. Birney and nearly all 
the old Abolitionists were outspoken anti- 
Masons. Harper's Mag-azine says: "As 
a large portion of the \Miig party was 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1897. 



merged into the Republican, the domi- 
nant party of to-day has a lineal descent 
from the feelings aroused by the abduc- 
tion of ^Morgan from the jail at Canan- 
daigua." Thurlow Weed and Horace 
Greeley were for years bitter anti-AIa- 
sons, as were Wendell Phillips, Charles 
Francis Adams and.Wm. H. Seward. 
Lincoln, nor none of his cabinet, were 
Free ^Masons, so it appears. 

And now let those who wish to inform 
themselves as to the part Free Masonry 
did play in the great rebellion remit forty 
cents to the National Christian Associa- 
tion and receive by return mail a copy of 
the "American Handbook and Citizen's 
]\Ianual" which is a complete digest of 
the principles, doctrines, religion, gov- 
ernment, philosophy and jurisprudence 
of the order. 

The opponents of Free Masonry affirm 
that it is an English system born in a 
grog shop — Apple Tree Tavern, London, 
in 1 717. They beheve that its royal tech- 
nique and high-sounding titles of nobil- 
itv. as A\'orshipful IMasters, Most Wor- 
shipful Grand Masters, Sublime Princes, 
Kings and Grand Kings stamp it as des- 
potic, un-American and entirely out of 
harm.ony with our popular government 
and free institutions. One thing at least 
seems settled — Freemasonry must again 
pass through the crucible of hottest dis- 
cussion and public investigation and crit- 
icism. WTiether it can survive it better 
than two generations ago remains to be 
seen. 

Kansas Citv, Mo. 



THE NORTHFIELD CONFERENCE. 



Few places would have to undergo less 
change to make them the fit abode of the 
redeemed than the village of Northfieid, 
3Jass. For beauty of situation it would 
not suffer in comparison with any edu- 
cational center in the world. It has all 
the advantages of other school towns, 
without the evils so comm.on to colleges 
of greater age. The characteristic indi- 
viduality of Mr. Finney in his palmiest 
davs was never more deeply impressed 
upon Oberlin than is the evangelistic 
spirit Oi ^Ir. bloody stamped upon the 
community of Northfieid. 

The bewitching beauty of the scenery 
and its heavenly atmosphere contribute 
to make Xorthfield the miost inviting spot 



for Christian retiracy, meditation, recu- 
peration and study in the world. Sucli a 
town is a magnet which attracts to itself 
the heavenly minded, wdiile it repels that 
which is carnal. 

Christian conferences are held at this 
place during July and August each year 
for the study of the W^ord of God, and 
for the discussion of practical means for 
increasing the boundaries of our Lord's 
Kingdom. These gatherings are attend- 
ed by eminent Christian men and women 
from all lands. It would be impossible 
to choose a more auspicious occasion 
than one of these conferences for the 
presentation of the cause of anti-secrecy. 

For the past two years President 
Blanchard has had the ear of the good 
men and women at these meetings and 
has presented our cause with great faith- 
fulness and generally with much accept- 
ance. His voice has reached the re- 
motest parts of the earth, and truth thus 
proclaimed is bearing fruit. By the grace 
of God, and the good fellowship of Mn 
Mood}', the President is to be permitted 
to again speak at the August conference 
on the evils of secret societies and the un- 
wisdom of God's children having fellow- 
ship wdth them. This is an exceptional 
opportunity for doing good. Will every 
Christian man and w^oman who believes 
in the righteousness of our reform and 
believes that God still hears and answers 
prayer devoutly pray that God may con- 
quer prejudices and prepare the hearts of 
the people for the reception of truth, and 
that President Blanchard may be simply 
God's mouthpiece for conveying to the 
assembled people God's thoug'hts con- 
cernins: his own church and oath-bound 



secrecv 



T. M. HITCHCOCK. 



165 HoW'e street, Chicago. 



ABOMINATIONS IN THE CHURCHES 



Henry Varley, the London evangelist, 
has been in this citv holding meetings 
at the Central Park M. E. Church. He 
presents important doctrines of the Bible 
with great clearness and intellectual pow- 
er; but at a safe distance from the devil's 
artillerv; for while he stands in a Metho- 
dist pulpit he is careful to say nothing- 
harmful of that form of devil worship, 
W'hich is the current coin of Methodism, 
namely, lodge worship and lodge secrc- 
cv- He denounces this nation as a na- 



Julv. 1^9: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



tiofi of murderesses and murderers be- 
cause of the wholesale slaug-hter of un- 
born children by their mothers, with the 
connivance of their husbands and para- 
mours. He arraigns the booksellers of 
St. Paul, as they truly are, "vampires of 
hell,*' for selling- the deadly soul-damning 
novels that eat out the vinue of the 
young men and women that read them. 
And he shies a stone or r\vo at the Lu- 
therans and the Roman Catholics. 

He lectures privately to men, and his 
vdit to women, on Sodomy, masmrba- 
tion, onanism, the fatal sin committed in 
the marriage bed, and whoredom with 
women of the town whose bodies he says 
axe putrescent A\-ith disease while per- 
fumed with the apothecar}*'s perfumery. 
But the spiritual worship of the devil's 
cognate to these crimes he leaves un- 
touched: because, we may well believe, 
the great denominations of Christendom 
are dominated with that worship, which 
is s}-mbohzed by the ^Mason's "Point 
-within a Circle" — the symbol of both an- 
cient and modem sun worship, it repre- 
senting the juxtaposition of t^vo things 
worshiped by ancient and modern pa- 
gans and known as nature, or phallic, 
worship, and is condemned of God in 
the last half of the first chapter of Paul's 
Epistle to the Romans. 

It vras that worship tliat is recognized 
and is more or less practiced ::: al' rr:od- 
em lodges, that made Eg}T: :':e ' asest 
of nations and eventuated in a vote of 
the Senate of Rome to banish such lodges 
from Italy in order to save the living 
bodies of men and women from putres- 
cence. And hence we see why God pour- 
ed out His ^^Tath upon tlie ancient Odd 
Fellows on the plains of ^loab and at 
Mount Sinai for the practice of what is 
called to-day Free Masonr}-, Odd Fel- 
lowism, etc.. in the one case destroying 
26,000 of these false worshipers and in 
the other 3,000. For that worship inevit- 
ably leads to the diseases of libertines as 
surely as that the filthiness of the spirit 
leads to the filthiness of the flesh. But 
modern pastors and evangelists dare not. 
for fear of the de\'irs children, preach 
against this worship as did INIoses. Paul. 
and all true prophets and apostles. Hence 
the apparent reason for the silence of 
Henr>- Varley. 

The modern lodge system is hastening 
on to the infinitelv lower than beastli- 



ness, with their bodies symboHzed in 
their point within a circle abomination 
as a god s}'mbol for their worship. The 
testimony given in the late meeting at 
Zion Tabernacle, in Chicago, by seced- 
ing women from the lodge indicates this. 
And when the v.omen's lodges are thor- 
oughly amalgamated with the men's 
lodges the measure of iniquit}- will be 
full. ^Nlackey says: "Looking to the 
mixed sexual character of these lodges 
(Eastern Stan it is not surprising that 
everything is followed by a banquet, and 
on many occasions by a ball. "These." 
says Clavel, "are inseperable from a lodge 
of adoption, and are, in fact, the real de- 
sign of the institution, the initiator}- cere- 
monies being but a pretext." Lexicon 
of Free ^lasonn- — Article. Adoptive 
Masonr}-. 

Xote likewise the ^Ivstic Shrine in 
vrhich they have men personating women 
and doing things too filthy to mention. 
And the Grange has for its male divinitv 
the god Bacchus, and female di^-initie's 
women personating the pagan goddesses 
Flora, Pomona and Ceres — the licen- 
tious goddesses of their spiritual fathers. 
Pagan adulterers and adulteresses these 
lodge" worshipers are. and onlv waiting 
a little while until their bodies are ini^ 
plicated in the debauchery s}-mbolized bv 
their worship. 

^^ atchman, what of t:ie night? The 
perplexity of the rulers of nations, the 
^ cowardice of God's pastors, the denom- 
inations of Christendom defiled with 
lodgism which is -Masonr}-, which is ob- 
scene devil Avorship. "Come out of her. 
ye my people," must soon be the voice 
heard coming out of heaven. 

To join the ]\Iasons is a sure steppins;" 
stone to promotion in church or state. 
Behold the President of the L'nited 
States! a Methodist, a Mason and a 
Shriner. \\'hat an example for the peo- 
ple! 

L}-ing and hypocrisy, or silence Vv-ith 
regard to the same, is essential to being 
a member in any great denomination 
wearing the name of our Lord Jesus 
Christ. Is it not time to pray. "Come. 
Lord Jesus, call out Thy people : destrov 
these churches, destroy these nations, re- 
store tlie kingdoms to Israel. Rei^n 
Thou Thvself. and we will ever wor^liip 
Tiiee." ' \\'. FEXTOX. 

St. Paul, Minn. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1897. 



REFORM NEWS. 



ENCOURAGEMENTS IN THE WORK. 



FROM THE GENERAL SECRETARY. 



All even one hundred new recruits to 
The Cynosure army were received in May. 
There are not quite so many new ones 
for June. The Hst of subscribers was d^oii- 
bled in AMieaton, 111., besides liberal sub- 
scriptions ^vere received to the fund for 
o-eneral work. There is no place more 
loyal than \Mieaton. In Napeiwille my 
reception by the president and professors 
of the Xaper\-ille College was also very 
friendly. The pastor of the College 
Church, as well as the president and Pro- 
fessors Sindlinger and Umbach are now 
numbered among the supporters of our 
work, ^h: Cyrus Smith, of Iowa, is in 
the field for a new club of subscribers, and 
the first fruits of his efforts have already 
reached me. Among the other workers 
is a new one, \lr. Elias Wallick, of Aiich- 
igan, who writes: "Am working to get 
subscribers." 

Calls for literature for free distribution 
have been responded to and supplies sent 
to Arkansas, Massachusetts, Illinois, 
^Michigan and West Virginia. Ministers 
have been reached and also many homes 
supplied. ]\Ir. H. M. Struhm has begim 
a house to house canvass in a town great- 
ly needing the distribution of such tracts. , 
An encampment of the G. A. R. and a 
State Sunday School convention, besides 
Presbyterian, Congregational, Lutheran 
and United Brethren associations have 
been supplied. I have just sent 20,000 
pages to our faithful co-worker in Ohio, 
Air. E. Brakeman. He characterizes se- 
cretism as "heirs vast slaughter-house 
of souls." 

ScA^eral conventions are under way for 
this fall, and I shall be pleased to hear 
from any one that Avould like to have a 
convention in his place, and could help in 
some way to make it a success. 

I have secured an advertisement of our 
books in some fifteen different papers, 
and hope thus to reach for a few weeks 
the eyes, at least, of 50,000 new homes. 
If any of our readers wall get their local 
paper to insert an inch advertisement of 
our books four times, I will send an elec- 
trotype of the ad., and will send The Cyno- 
sure' to the editor of the local paper for 



one year. This will help the cause locally 
and do good generally. Through the 
kindness of Rev. C. C. Potter, the N. C. A.. 
will be represented, at a small cost to the 
association, in the 40,000 edition of the 
U. P. Hand Book. 

A booklet for the foreign work will be 
sent out this mondi and we shall hope to 
see not only a vigorous movement in 
Great Britain, but a mutual co-operation 
that shall be stimulating and helpful. 

All the Hterature sent out is paid for 
from the general funds. We need dona- 
tions very much, and is it too much to^ 
expect at least $1 for the general work 
from every subscriber? Besides pledges,, 
the cash donations during the last two 
months (have amounted to $52.50. The 
donors w^ere Messrs. John Holman, Jas. 
Craig, Paul B. Phillips, G. M. Elliot, E. 
Whipple, R. L. Park, W. L Phillips, Geo.^ 
M. Clark, and Mesdames M. Stevens, 
Lizzie Kessell, Esther L. Gould, Belle 
Ewing, S. H. Nutting and Ada Brewer. 

To those of our friends desirous of 
helping in foreign mission work, I wish to- 
contmend the "Chinese Mission'' in our 
'building here at 221 West Madison street. 
It has been at work now nearly twelve 
years, and during that time there have 
been some fifty conversions among the 
Chinese. Some of the converts are now 
doing missionary work in their native 
land. It is an independent mission, and 
is not only worthy, but needs financial as- 
sistance. Further particulars will be giv- 
en upon inquiry. The present attendance 
is about thirtv-five. 

WAI. I. PHILLIPS. 



FREE MASONRY AND JESUITISM. 



A STRIKING PARALLEL. 

Boston, Alass., June i, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure — Apparently more 
has been accomplis'hed on this field dur- 
ing May than in any month previous. 
Arrangements have been made for five 
meetings in the future. Some pastors are 
beginning to realize that it is very largely 
a question of the church or the lodge,, 
for the young men, and so self-protection 
adds a new impulse to the promptings 
of conscience and the call of duty. 

We have resumed our Monday even- 
ing parlor talks, which had we more room 
I am confident would be more largely at- 



July, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



tended. Last evening we had with us 
Dr. Victor G. A'anoH. a fragment of 
whose experience with the ]^Iasonic 
Brotherhood in Constantinople, Eliza- 
beth E. Flagg has already given to yonr 
readers. All present were deeply im- 
pressed by his artlessness and sincerity, 
and those of us familiar with the second 
section of the :\Iaster ^lasons' degree 
noted a very striking parallel between his 
induction 'into the Jesuit order and 
the death, burial and resurrection drama 
in which the candidate is raised from the 
grave of poor Hiram AbifT to the "sub- 
hme degree of a Master ]^Iason." The 
coicidence is readily seen in the obHga- 
tions, especially in the Christless, pro- 
fane and thoroughly despotic features of 
both. 

JESUIT OATH. 

'T take this oath, and I promise and 
swear in the sight of God and the blessed 
Mrgin, the Apostles Peter and Paul, and 
St. Loyola, and to you, Father, that I 
will keep the rules of poverty, chastity 
and obedience all my life, and I promise 
to defend on land and sea my IToly 
]M other Church and to stand by the \Tcar 
of Christ on earth (naming the Pope) in 
ever}1:hing he by himself or through my 
superiors shall order me. I promise and 
swear to fight all the enemies of the 
church, by all power and by all means 
to destroy them." 

Other vows, more specific and in detail, 
are added as the Xovitiate proceeds, but 
this covers the whole field in a general 
wav. The Doctor gave names of high 
church officials, who were ]\Iasons, anxl 
conhrmed the statement of Dr. L. T. 
Town send that the Black Pope rules the 
lodge through his emissaries in disguise. 
This is to be the thenje of our next ^Slon- 
dav evening's talk opened by an essay 
bv'Miss Flagg, who has been delving into 
the depths of mystic lore, making impor- 
tant discoveries of fraternal fellowship 
and confidential co-operation in secret 
between two factions in Satan's king- 
dom, which to the public appear as sworn 
and irreconcilable antagonists. You, 
Brother Editor, and all who desire to 
know the truth, are cordially in\'ited to 
attend, with the guarantee that which- 
ever side you may take in the discussion, 
vou shall have fair play. 

J. P. STODDARD. 

218 Columbus avenue. 



A GOOD MONTH'S WORK. 



Dublin, Ind., June 2, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure — Since my last report 
I have spoken at Xewton, Kan., in the 
]^iennonite Church, where the house was 
well filled and the audience quite appre- 
ciative; at Harper, Kan., in the ^i. E. 
Church, and in the public school building, 
to crowded houses. It was pleasing to 
see such grand young ministers as Revs. 
Henderson, Pontius and Erb taking a 
strong stand against secret orders. I 
spoke in the Court House in Winfield, a 
meeting arranged by that grand hero. 
Brother \\\ B. Denton. 

The next night I spoke in the Free 
3>Iethodi&t Church in Emporia, and next 
at Denison in the United Pre3b}terian 
Church, which was well filled. Then I 
spoke at Sabetha, in the United Breth- 
ren Church, where the house was well 
filled and the lodge element well repre- 
sented. Then I spoke at Blue Springs, 
]\Io., and then went on to Chicago to the 
annual convention; on ^Monday morning 
in the Carpenter Building, in the after- 
noon in VvTllard Hall, and at night in 
Zion Tabernacle; Dr. Dowie pastor. 
These were all Cjuite interesting meetings. 

]\Iy next appointment was at La Paz, 
Ind., in the V\'esleyan ]\Iethodist Church; 
my next at Payne, O.. Rev. Chas. \\'eyer 
pastor. I received him into the church 
and baptized him in 1881, and licensed 
him to preach in 1883. Payne was mv 
last charge in the East for two years be- 
fore leaving for the coast in 1888. 

Flere I had large audiences. ^ly next 
meeting was at ]\Ietz., Ind., Rev. G. \A'. 
Bechtol pastor. Wt had a good audi- 
ence. I spoke the next night at Alvord- 
ton, O., Rev. A. C. Ritter pastor. Here 
we had a full, house. The next night I 
was at Frontier, ]\Iich., where a large 
congregation greeted me. Rev. H. C. 
Foote is pastor and Rev. A\'. H. Clav. 
D. D., a Presiding Elder, lives here, and 
both were present to cheer the speaker 
on with their hearty aniens. 'My next ap- 
pointment was at Elida, O., where the 
house was crowded. I had been pastor 
here for three years in succession, ending 
with 1883, and was glad to meet old and 
new friends once more. 

I went next to ^Monticello, O., where 
I was greeted by a large and interesting 
audience. An Odd Fellow tried to dc- 



(S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Julv, 1S97. 



fend the order. I went back the next 
Sabbath, and preached for Rev. Sherer at 
Allentown, and in the afternoon at EHda. 

On ^Monday we visited my brother, and 
his family at Rousciilp, Allen Coimt}-. O. 
How pleasant to meet with dear ones 
after months and years of separation. 
From here I went to the General ^lis- 
sionarA- Board meeting.s at ^^lessick. Ind.. 
and then on to the general conference at 
Dublin. Ind.. where I am helping to rep- 
resent Oregon conference in the highest 
body of the church of our choice. Ever}-- 
thing is passing ott nicely. I went back 
to IMessick last Sabbath and preached in 
the morning and lectured in the evening 
to a full house and many outside trying to 
get in. 

Arrangements are being made for me 
to return and speak at a number of places 
in this vicinity. I have spoken during 
]\Iay tvrenty-four times, and received six- 
ty-two subscriptions for The Cynosure. 

P. B. avillia:\IS. 



MASONIC SUICIDES. 



"Washington. D. C, ^lay 31, 1S97. 

Dear Cynosure — The number of ^la- 
sons of high degree who have committed 
suicide of late must surprise those who 
believe that this organization "furnishes 
all tliat the soul of man requires." 

A few days ago the papers annoimced 
that a prominent business man of Alex- 
andria became tired of living and took 
his life. Scarcely had his brother ]\Iasons 
buried his remains and told the world 
that his soul was in the grand lodge 
above, before we read that another sub- 
ject was ready for ^lasonic display. A 
prominent lawyer and real estate agent 
had shot himself. As he belonged to 
m.any secret orders, they doubtless made 
as much display as possible. How sad 
to contemiplate. yet it is almost an every- 
dailv occurrence. \A'hen will we learn 
that "the wav of the transgressor is 
hard?" 

Stopping en route from our annual 
meeting at Cedarv-ille, O., I visited sever- 
al friends and spoke to the students of 
the college at the morning exercise. At 
Columbus, O., I addressed a meeting of 
the voung people in Pastor Long's 
church. Several addresses have since 
been given in this city and vicinit}'. 

Last Wednesday evening I filled an 



appointment made by Rev. Seward, of 
the Free ^Methodist Church at Alexan- 
dria, ^'a. This will let you know there 
is light in the East. We are alive and at 
work tor God and the trtith. 

W. B. STODDAPD. 



BRO. F£NTON'S PROGRAMME. 



St. Paul, ^linn.. Tune 2^, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure — I have been busv at- 
tending the Lutheran conventions, the 
Lutheran Free Church in ^Minneapolis 
and the L'nited Lutheran Church now in 
session in this city, and which adjourns 
to-morrow. I found a great demand for 
the ritual of the ^^lodern Woodmen of 
America. The pastors seem to feel the 
danger of that society to 'their flocks 
more than any other. 

?Nly program is not yet detinitely made 
out. but. God willing, on the 2d of July. I 
vrill leave this cily for a trip through 
Xorthern Iowa and Southern ]vIinnesota 
toward Soutii Dakota. The pastors seem- 
to be well pleased with the new form and 
style of The Cynosure. 

They allowed me to speak of the work 
against secret societies at both conven- 
tions. 

In allusion to the action of one of the 
Lutheran churches in excluding members 
of lodges from its communion, a man who 
does not belong to either church or lodge, 
but evidently sympathizes wich the lodge, 
said to me yesterday: "\Miat do these 
churches want to 'jump onto these lodge 
members for?" " He might, with as 
much propriety, have said: "Wliat does 
a policeman want to jump onto a 
thief, with a stolen sheep on his 
back, for?" Surely, churches ought to 
exchide lodge members from their fel- 
lowship, because they are wolves in 
sheep's clothing, and when they get into 
the churches it is that they may bite, de- 
vour and steal the sheep of the fold. 

W. FEXTOX. 



BRO. WILLIAMS' JUNE MEETINGS. 



Lima. Ohio. Tune 22, 1897. 
Dear Cvnosure — The first of the month 
was spent at Dubhn, Ind., at the general 
conference. One of the greatest success- 
es we consider was the introduction of 
"Finnev on [Masonrv" into the course of 



July, 189" 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



79 



reading for our ministers and the resolu- 
tion requesting the bishops to write, or 
have written during this quadrennial, a 
book on secret societies, setting forth our 
position as a church in regard to them. 

On Tune 2d 'I lectured at Berne, Ind., 
Here the ^lennonite brethren gave me a 
fine audience and a good collection. They 
have a large church here, which numbers 
nearly five hundred, and their Sabbath 
school has an average of six hundred and 
fifty scholars. They are all true anti-se- 
cret, anti-saloon, and anti-devil people. 

I preached one night at the general 
conference. When it adjourned I re- 
turned to Lima and attended the Sab- 
bath school convention of the Auglaize 
annual conference, held at Allentown on 
Elida Circuit. Rev. S. L. Livingston, 
D. D., was President, and Rev. A. J- 
Stemen Secretary. I met a number of 
old friends here, and had the privilege 
of preaching one night, and arranging 
for two lectures on the lodge evil. 

June 1 2th and 13th I spoke at Temper- 
ance and Ida, ^lich. Brother Elisha 
Hitchcock conveyed me to his brother 
George's, who, with his estimable wife, 
entertained me most hospitably during 
my stay. I spoke at the Temperance F. 
M. Church Saturday night to an excel- 
lent audience. The meeting was all we 
could wish. Brother George drove me to 
Ida, ten miles beyond Temperance, where 
I spoke at eleven a. m. to a crowded 
house. Brothers James and Thomas 
Hitchcock also were present. The meet- 
ing was in the Free Methodist Church, 
Rev. ]\Iulholland, pastor. We returned 
ro Temperance, and after resting a few 
hours went to the church to find it crowd- 
ed and many trying to get in. Revs. Phil- 
lips and ^liller, of the U. B. Church, a 
Free Will Baptist and a Wesleyan ^leth- 
odist minister were present to encourage 
us. 

I wish to sar that the Hitchcocks, who 
are brothers of our Director, J. ]M. Hitch- 
cock, are real hosts in the anti-secrecy 
cause. I wish we had a few of them in 
each community. I am sure his Satanic 
Majesty would be aroused more than he 
is. I would vote for a State or district 
convention at Temperance. The anti- 
lodge force is dominant here. My stay 
among them was all too short. ]^Iy next 
appointment was at Jackson Center, O., 
where I spoke in the Seventh Day Bap- 



tist Church, Rev. W. D. Burdick pastor. 

They have a good congregation. The 
night was so warm that many of the peo- 
ple remained outside and listened. There 
were two or three lodge men here, who 
gave evidence to the truth of the exposi- 
tions. One gentleman told me that when. 
Brother Ronayne lectured at Jackson. 
Center some years before he was anxious 
to know whether he had been a ]^Iason. 
or not, and he investigated it to his satis- 
faction, and found that he was much 
brighter as a ^lason than he was or ever- 
could be. Rev. Burdick was pleased to 
have the truth presented on this, as well 
as on other popular evils, to his congre-- 
gation. 

I met here once more my old minis- 
terial brother, Rev. G. W. Staley, of ^lon- 
tra, O., who is an old-time anti-lodge; 
man. I spoke last Sabbath evening in. 
the West Lima ^Mission, Rev. Overholtz- 
pastor. This is an independent church, 
organized here in Lima. They have a 
good Sabbath school and congregation. 
Thursday night I arn to speak at Elgin, 
O., and next Monday night at Alger. 
Beginning with the 30th. I am to fill a 
series of appointments in Henry County, 
Indiana, arranged by Rev. L. D. Thorn-- 
burg, the pastor. Friends in Ohio, ^lich- 
igan and Indiana, please address niQ here 
at Lima, O., for dates. Thus far I have 
fortv-two Cvnosure subscriptions during 
the month. ' P. B. WILLIAMS. 



MORE LIGHT IN THE EAST. 



Xorristown, Pa.. June 24, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure — Several opponunities 
for efi'ective work have presented them- 
selves during the month past. The oppor- 
tunity to anend an annual meeting of the 
German Baptist Brethren was improved. 
They gathered this year at Frederick, Md. 
It was estimated that 20.000 people were 
on the grounds. 

Provision was made for the feeding of 
three or four thousand people at a time. 
Four large beeves were cooked at once 
in supplying the meat required. The 
friends in charge were kind. Had not the 
program been crowded I would have had 
a hearing in the Tabernacle, which seated 
5,000 or more. I was permitted to hang- 
up my chart in places where it attracted 
attention, and I explained to those who 
stopped to listea. I often spoke to audi- 



80 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1897. 



ences of 500 or more. I had books in the 
2\Iesseno-er office to which I called atten- 
tion. Several orders were taken. Seceded 
Brethren came forward and indorsed the 
statements which I made. Others made 
inquiries and expressed desire for lec- 
tures in their churches. Persons living in 
many States ordered our publications. 
Franklin Grove, 111., Frizzleburg, Md., 
AA'illiamson, Pa., Winter Haven, Fla., 
Bluntville, Tenn., Uniontown, Md., Trot- 
wood. Ohio, Chicag-o, Hi., Atlanta, Ga., 
and AMnchester, \^a., are among the 
places to which I mailed light. My at- 
tendance at this great gathering ^will be 
remembered with satisfaction and grati- 
tude. 

Three lectures followed at Minges Mills 
and York, Pa. They were given in Men- 
nonite, Lutheran and Bretliren churches. 
The attendance manifested a live interest. 
A number of names were added to The 
Cynosure list. At Oaks, Pa., the place of 
our late State convention, I was made 
very welcome, as usual, and invited to 
preach last Sabbath. Arrangements are 
made for me to preach again in tihe Wor- 
cester Schwenkfelder meeting house on 
Sabbath and lecture once more in Burr's 
meeting house on Monday evening. I 
took a little walk of ten miles or more yes- 
terday through this magnificent farming 
country, securing Cynosure subscriptions 
and enlisting friends in our work. Every- 
body that can work should be at it now. 
The rains earlier in the season have so 
hindered that there is a rush of work on 
the farms. Haying, corn cultivating, 
har\*esting, etc., all come at once. 

Those who have heretofore refused to 
subscribe for The Cynosure, giving as 
their reason that they had so much rea'd- 
mg. can find little or no such excuse now. 
The new Cynosure need not overtax any- 
one, either in price or amount of reading. 
''3. Inch in Little" is the motto. 

Let us ail push it along. 

W. B. STODDARD. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 



UNITED BRETHREN CONFERENCE. 



Connersville, Ind., June 6, 1897. 
Dear Cynosure — I have had the great 
pleasure of spending the past two days 
in attendance at the quadrennial confer- 
ence of the Radical United Brethren 



Clnirch in Dublin, Ind. A large share of 
these brethren, especially the older ones, 
I have formerly met in their homes and 
enjoyed their earnest sympathy and gen- 
erous hospitalit}'. I met a most cordial 
greeting and was introduced to the con- 
ference. I was impressed with tiie great 
earnestness of these brethren and sisters 
(for one or more women are acting as 
delegates), and that they are a people not 
only of very positive convictions, but of 
earnest consecration to the cause and 
work of the Divine Master. Sucii a peo- 
ple are not likely to make any concessions 
to the love of ease or to an evil pubHc 
sentiment. 

The conviction of the conference on 
the subject of secret societies was voiced 
by ex-Bishop Becker, who was unani- 
mously chosen a fraternal delegate to 
the next annual meeting of the N. C. A. 
He said in substance : "Let it be distinct- 
ly understood that our position on the 
subject of secret societies is unalterabie, 
and that under no circumstances will we 
receive as members those who are affil- 
iated with them. For if v/e do not expect 
persons who are members of other relig- 
ious bodies to become members of our 
church until they have given up their for- 
mer ohufdh relations, surrely we cannot 
consent that any who owe allegiance to 
these unfruitful works of darkness shall 
at the same time be united with us." Much 
regret was expressed that they no longer 
see the weekly Cynosure, but some sub- 
scribers were obtained for the paper in its 
present form. H. H. HINMAN. 



UNITED WORKMEN. 



Farnam, Neb., June 18, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure — My attention has re- 
cently been awakened to the evils of the 
Workmen and kindred lodges by the fol- 
lowing statements made by their own. 
members: 

I. That no creditors can collect a cent 
from the insurance money of a deceased 
Workman. This statement was boastfullv 
made by J. G. Tate, Grand Master Work- 
man of Nebraska, and was londly ap- 
plauded. A member of the Workmen is 
thus encouraged to think that he is do- 
ing right in refusing to pay his just ob- 
ligations, in order to keep up his lodge 
dues. We will suppose that he is in strait- 
ened circumstances and obtains credit 



July, 18t^l 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



81 



for groceries, etc., for a short period, 
but afterward finds that he must either 
fail to pay his dues or the debts which he 
'has solemnly contracted. He chooses to 
pay the former in order to leave his wid- 
ow in good circumstances after his death. 
The widow, in no way, can be obliged to 
make her deceased husband's pledges 
good. In this way the creditor is beat 
out of his honest claim. 

2^ It has been argued that one source 
from which the lodge receives quite a rev- 
enue, and by which it is enabled to keep 
up, is the fact that not a few of its mem- 
bers, after paying much money into its 
treasury, are unable to meet its demands 
and fall out of the ranks, and those who 
remain reap the benefit of their losses. 
No doubt this in many cases proves to 
be the truth; but it is far from being a 
flattering incentive for a poor man to 
join, if he stops a moment to reflect. 

3. A Workman recently acknowledged 
to me that the time would come, at no 
very remote period, when his lodge 
would be no more. His reasoning was 
^ood, and was that by and by, owing to 
the many new lodges coming into being, 
our order will fail to get the needed num- 
ber of recruits to keep the assessments 
very low. As our members become old 
and begin to che ofif rapidly, the assess- 
ments will increase until comparatively 
few vvill be able to meet them. At such 
a period selfishness will, as usual, mani- 
fest itself and the multitudes of young 
men will join the new lodges and grow 
up with them in preference to one in 
w^hich the death rate is so great. The un- 
fortunate ones found in the lodge at this 
period of its existence will be the great 
losers. But how could a true Christian 
have a part in an institution which he be- 
lieves is doomed thus to terminate soon 
after his widow has got the $2,000 insur- 
ance on his life and perthaps just before 
the collapse of the lodge? 

4. Xot long since the writer stood by 
the grave of a Workman who had been 
noted for his profanity and wickedness. 
His lodge conducted the services at the 
grave. Many of its members werq also 
members of orthodox churches who pro- 
fess to believe that such men are eternally 
lost, yet these same men, one of whom 
was a minister, publicly declared that the 
deceased had gone from ''the lodge on 
earth to the supreme lodge in heaven." 



Professing Christians who say that they 
believe that there is a hell and that all un- 
converted men are lost stood by the grave 
and sanctioned these very words! How 
inconsistent! Why do not men either 
leave the church and say they do not be- 
lieve what Christ said with regard to the 
punishment of the wicked or leave the 
lodge and say they will have no part in 
such blasphemv? 

V3I. L. BROWX. 



ODDFELLOWSHIP A SWINDLE. 



I^slarion R. Elder, until recently a mem- 
ber of the Larwill, Ind., Oddfellows' 
Lodge, sends us the following notice of 
arrears, which he received from his lodge 
and his reply. It is an illustration of how 
men's eyes are being opened to the swin- 
dling character of these selfish institu- 
tions: 

Lanvill, Ind., March 19, 1897. 

To Marion Elder: You are hereby no- 
tified that you are in arrears to this lodge 
as follows : To dues ■ to term ending 
Dec. 31, 1896, $2.20; to dues to quarter 
ending March 31, 1897, $1.30; total, 
$3.50. Trusting that this will receive 
vour prompt attention, and that the pen- 
alty attached to non-pa}TTient of dues 
may thus be avoided, fraternally yours, 
W. S. Smith, Sec. : 

To this letter i\Ir. Elder sent the fol- 
lowing reply: 

Larwill, Ind., April 17, 1897. 
V,'. S. Smith: 

Sir — I read your threat dated ^larch 
19, 1897. I informed you last fall that 
I had enough of Oddfellowship, consid- 
ering quality of goods. Joining the lodge 
is a matter of business, a matter of bar- 
gain and sale. 

Oddfellowship claims to have sec'-ot^ 
and hidden mysteries for sale. I paid 
my money expecting to get secrets, but 
what are the facts? A man can buy a 
book for a few cents and get all the se- 
crets. The lodge swindled me out of 
sick benefits, and the whole transaction 
smacks strongly of getting money under 
false pretense. You threaten me with 
a penalty: can it be possible you mecr-. 
l:)lackmail? Don't presume for a momeu. 
that I can be further buncoed. Yours in 
''friendship, love and truth." 

Marion R. Eldc* 



82 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1897. 



LETTER FROM NEW ORLEANS. 



Xew Orleans, April 2S, 1897. 

Dear C^^lOsure — I tliank vou for your 
manifest interest in my ^vork down here 
in "Dixie's Land." 

I am very grateful for the following 
gifts to aid in building our churcli: 
ip4.25 from Rev. J. C. Rochelle. $25 from 
Rev. C. N. Oppermann, and $5 from M. 
L. \\'orcester. 

A Freemason with wdiom I ha\'e been 
compelled to have some dealin;^^ took 
sn undue advantage of me, know^ing as he 
did, my records were destroyed and that 
I have nothing with w'hicli to defend and 
protect myself; he has entered suit 
against me for 595.75- 
f God is the promoter and defender of 
truth and righteousness ; therefore I have 
submitted my case to Him. Our courts, 
lawyers and jurors are all, or most all, 
]\lasons, Oddfellows, Knights of Pythias, 
or some other kind of secretists ; therefore 
we cannot expect very much in the way 
of justice against one of their number. 
A very prominent negro secretist said to 
me not long ago : 

''See here, Davidson, if you would 
learn some sense and stop fighting the 
orders w-e would help build your church, 
but if you don't stop, some of these nights 
you are going to be burnt up alive.'' 

I assured the gentleman, who is a great 
church man, that I w-ould undergo cir- 
cumstances accept a compromising gift 
-from his lodge, nor would I desist in my 
anti-secret course, but that I would con- 
tinue on my way, and trust God for pre- 
ser^-ing me' against Masonic fire or 
vengeance. I ask your readers to pray 
for me. I am sorely in need of $500 cash 
at once to further my work and ask our 
reform friends to please come to my res- 
cue at once, no matter how little they 
give. ]\Iay God help you to keep up the 
w^arfare. I am your humble servant and 
brother in tribulation, 

Francis J. Davidson. 



FROM THE SOUTH LAND. 



I shall be glad to read the Cynosure 
what I can and then pass it on to my peo- 
ple. 

Both men and women belong to some, 
or several of the legvm of secret societies, 
w-hich are the curs^' of colored people. 



Many of them will admit that the socie- 
ties are injuring the churches, but they 
are all in the lodges, and think they must 
keep on to get their benefit, wdiich con- 
sists mainlv in a fine funeral. 

(Rev.) A. W. Curtis. 
Raleigh, N. C, April 24, 1897. 



ENTERED INTO REST. 



FAITHFUL UNTO DEATH. 



Rev. Ebenezer S. Bunce died at his 
home in North LawTence April 11, 1897,, 
in his 78th year. 

Bro. Bunce was born at Butler, Wayne 
County, N. Y., in 181 8. He was con- 
verted at a camp meeting at Mctory, N. 
Y., when only 12 years old, and united 
with the M. E. Church. He was licensed 
to exhort at the age of 14, and to preach 
at 16. He endured the privations of a 
frontier missionary in Wisconsin, being 
twice frozen nearly to death. His in- 
tense sufferings in the last few^ months 
were supposed by his physicians to be 
some of the results of his frontier sacri- 
fices. Bro. M. N. Butler, who sends this 
notice, says he w'as heart and hand in 
every good word and work and a strong 
friend of The Cynosure and anti-secret 
cause. He died triumphing in the Chris- 
tian faith. 



OUR FATHERS— WHERE ARE THEY? 



Sister G. C. Alvord, of West Leroy, 
Mich., sends the following notice of the 
death of Thomas Kingsworth, her grand- 
father, rie had taken The Cynosure for 
more than tw-enty-five years and w'as a 
strong anti-Mason. He was born in 
Boughton, England, July 16, 1812, and 
died at his home in Leroy, Alich., March 
16, 1897, aged 84 years and 8 months. 
He came to America in 1833, and was 
married to Eunice M. Miller, of Wayne 
County, New York, in September, 1835. 
Five children w-ere born to them, onl^ 
two of whom are living at the present 
time. He leaves a widow in feeble 
health to mourn. - She looks fonvard to a 
reunion by and by where pain and sorrow 
cannot enter. Brothers and sisters have 
all preceded him to the other world. He 
was the last of his generation. He was a 
member of the Baptist church more thart 
sixty years and died in the faith. It wa& 
a triumphant entry into the spirit land. 



July, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



83 



DEATH OF A FAITHFUL WITNESS. 



Daniel Powers was born in Trenton, 
Oneirla County, N. Y., Dec. 6, 1821, and 
died in Philadelphia April' 30, 1897, in the 
se^-enty-fifth year of 'his age. In the 
spring of 1862 in Neavport, N. Y., he 
gave his heart to God, and his strength 
and influence to the Methodist Chiircih, 
of which he was a prominent member 
and class leader until 1884, when he 
dianged his church relation, connecting 
himself with the Independent Beacon 
Hill Church, Boston, Mass. He was 
then under the pastorate of Dr. Cullis. 
The effect of his powerful spiritual re- 
form preaching was to fire up the natural 
refoim principles of Bro. Powers as well 
as those of his excellent wafe, Hattie 
Eunice Powers, well known to The Cyno- 
sure readers. Providentially meeting 
wdth Bro. J. P. Stoddard about the year 
1890, their interest was focalized into the 
founding of the Beacon Light Mission, 
which has been a true Beacon Light to 
many a poor benighted soul. 

They both became so deeply interested 
in the reform cause that they opened their 
own house for anti-secret meetings, and 
in co-operatio'n with our modern Elijah, 
the fearless Bro. J. P. Stoddard, the mis- 
sion w^as opened and much good done. 

In 1893 Brother and Sister Powers re- 
moved to Washington, D. C, and opened 
a Beacon Light mission there, where the 
Secret Empire is penhaps the strongest. 
Here they joined the Brethren Church 
and went* on their way rejoicing. They 
removed the mission Oct. 15, 1896, to 
Philadelphia, to 231 Dauphin street, 
where our dear brother finished his work 
on earth, and fell into the blessed sleep. 
It can be truly said of Bro. Powers that 
he was an upright man, and one who fear- 
ed God, and eschewed evil. Sister Pow^- 
ers is now continuing the Beacon Light 
Mission single-handed and needs the 
sympathy and prayers of all w4io are in- 
terested in this, the greatest of all re- 
forms. The two most abominable putrefy- 
ing sores of this age by which the Chris- 
tian dhurdh is grievously affected are abor- 
tion among women, and the Secret Em- 
pire among men. May God, by the pow- 
er of the Holy Spirit, open the eyes of the 
ministry and laitv on these questions be- 
fore it is too late.' H. C CASSEL. 



EDITORIAL. 



KNIGHTS TEMPLARS. 



The twentieth annual conclave of the 
Grand Commandery of Knights Templar 
was held at Meadville in 1873. In his an- 
nual report the R. E. Grand Commander 
said they had 'voluntarily consecrated 
themselves to maintain purity," but after 
the unspeakable knightly doings at the 
Boston triennial, is there much hope that 
purity will be maintained at Pittsburg, 
where the next triennial debauch is ap- 
pointed? In the correspondence is a re- 
port concerning the Connecticut conclave 
at Hartford. "For three days camp dis- 
cipline and routine were observed, clos- 
ing at last with a grand hop." 

So they had squad drills by day and 
quadrills by night. Another of their di- 
versions was New England's "peculiar 
institution," a clam bake. Having read 
some strange utterances and heard of 
some singular transactions at such feasts, 
w^e wrote recently to a distinguished law- 
yer and learned and prominent Mason in 
Maine asking 'him to honestly answer us 
the question: "Do clams intoxicate?" 
Many years ago, while a student in AUe- 
g^heny, the Knights Templars' conclave 
met there and left two permanent impres- 
sions, on my mind — its gaudy, tinseled, 
uniformed procession- and the freshet of 
drunkenness and prostitution that ac- 
companied it. Subjected to our Lord's 
test, "By their fruits ye shall know them," 
this institution is very dangerously im- 
moral. 



MASONIC RUM. 



In its issue of, Feb. 28, 1889, ^^^^ Con- 
gregationalist of Boston contained an ar- 
ticle by Rev. Daniel Dorchester, D. D.. 
which w^as reprinted as a tract for the con- 
stitutional prohibition campaign. The 
following statements are condensed from 
the tract : 

"A distillery firm within three miles of 
the Massachusetts State House has a con- 
tract to furnish 3,000 gallons of rum daily 
to the African trade for the next seven 
years. * * * j\Iy interest in Christian 
missions in Africa led me to investigate 
the internal revenue reports. This, the 
most powerful of all the distilled liquors. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1897. 



is the onlv liquor exported from the Uni- 
ted States to Africa. Almost all the rum 
manufactured in the United States is 
made within live miles of our State 
House. During the last six years the dis- 
tilleries around the Hub made 94 per 
cent, of all madie in this country. The 
amount of rum exported from Boston to 
Africa in the last six years has been 
4.138,284 gallons. How many gallons 
of rum for every dollar Boston gives for 
its evangelization? 

"Almost all the liquor sent from the 
United States to curse Africa is sent 
from Boston. I quote from the report to 
the general conference: 'Worse than the 
stifling slave ship, worse than the shame- 
less auction block, is the inhuman trade 
in rum. which now crov/ns the outrage 
to which, the natives of Asia and Africa 
are subject at the hands of nominally 
Christian volaries!' 

"Well did Sir Riohiard Burton, the fa- 
mous African traveler declare: 'If the 
slave trade were revived wath all its hor- 
rors, and Africa could get rid of the 
white man, with the gunpowder and rum 
Avhidh he has introduced, Africa would 
be the gainer in happiness by the ex- 
change.' '' 

The chief figure representing this Bos- 
ton traffic is also the chief figure in Bos- 
ton ^lasonry. He led the Triennial Tem- 
plar procession: 'he was on the Easter 
platform v/ith Dr. Lorimer when the lat- 
ter celebrated our Lord's resurrection by 
-proposing to go out of the church if the 
Mdsons were not welcome. He is the 
head riot onlv of Massachusetts and 
Rhode Island 'Masons, but also of De 
T^Iolav commandery, that gave his Broth- 
er Lorim.er the peculiar reading desk that 
c;eem.s to either adorn or desecrate Tre- 
mont Temple platform. He and Dr. 
Lorimer are under the Royal Arch ob- 
lioration together. 



EXPANSION. 



While the literature of the N. C. A. is 
helpful to persons already interested, it is 
adapted to awaken interest m others. 
The diffusion of knowledge and enlarge- 
ment of the anti-Baal army are objects 
.neciallv sought. New recruits are al- 
wav=; needed. Church members must be 
brought up nearer to the advance Ime of 
their pastors. ^lore members of churches 



must be brought to the point where they 
will not willingly accept Baalistic pastors. 
In some respects the Cynosure is now 
])etter qualified than before to serve this 
purpose. Its three-month subscription 
may also enable some to send it to out- 
siders in order to give it introduction. It 
can be sent one month to one address, and 
then a notification by postal card will 
transfer it on our mailing list for the sec- 
ond month. A third reader can be reach- 
ed in the same v\ray. The notice should 
reach our office, however, soon after each 
issue, or at least not too late to secure the 
change before the next one. A better 
w^ay might be to have it sent to your own. 
address, and then remail it with a few N.. 
C. A. tracts slipped in among its leaves.. 
The tracts themselves cost little and can 
be mailed in newspapers or by them- 
selves. There are more ways than one to 
widen the area in which the enemy is bet- 
ter known. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 



Rev. T. J. Allien, of Sterling, Kan., w^as; 
a w^elcome visitor at our office recently. 



— President S. H. Swarts spent an 
'hour in The Cynosure office last week, 
and as usual inspired us with his words 
of cheer and council. 



— ^Mr. and Mrs. Joseph McKnight, of 
Blanchard, Iowa, spent a day with the 
editor and visited The Cynosure office in 
returning from the Covenanter Synod at 
Beaver Falls, Pa. # 



Secret college fraternities which are 
dominant in the Northwestern University 
at Evanston came near making a serious 
disruption between faculty and students a 



few weeks ago. 



The Grand Lodge of the Free Sons of 
Israel, many of whom fought for the Turk 
in the recent Greco-Turkish war, closed 
their annual convention at the Audito- 
rium in this city June 17. 



—Mrs. Mattie M. Bailey, of Shenan- 
doah, Iowa, the popular Sabbath school 
worker of that State, with her husband,. 
Dr. Bailey, made The Cynosure a friend- 
ly call last week en route to the Wheaton 
College commencement, of which col- 
lege they are both honored graduates. 



July, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



85 



On two recent Sabbath mornings the 
editor preached in the Fourth U. P. 
Church, Chicago, and in the Friends 
Church at Western Springs. 



A committee of Modern Woodmen re- 
cently reported to a mass meeting at Ful- 
ton, 111., tlhat owing to the <hig^h-handed 
methods of certain officials it was almost 
impossible to get any idea of the financial 
standincr of the order. 



Ex-President Charles G. Finney, of 
Oberlin, was a Free IMason previous to 
his conversion. On receiving Christ 
Jesus as 'his Lord and Savior, he soon re- 
nounced Freemasonry as anti-Christian; 
regarding all secret societies as the works 
of darkness and belonging to the god of 
this world wdio blindfold's his worshipers 
lest the light of the gospel of Christ 
should shine into their hearts. 



Rev. D. B. Gunn, of Dorchester, Mass., 
writes: "I miss the w'eekly visits of The 
Cynosure. It was always more fully read 
by me than any other paper that came to 
my study. I confide in the judgment and 
wisdom of the managers and doubt not the 
mission of the monthly will prove accept- 
able to its readers and accomplish an 
equal amount of good. May the Lord 
greatly bless all the workers in the good 
cause. 



Rev. WoodrufT Post, of Olean, N. Y., 
sends this extract from a letter he received 
from a Alethodist D. D., and ex-president 
of a New York cohege : "It is very queer 
thatthewretched fraternity keep pursuing 
you. I think of ]\Iasonry as I alway^s 
have. The Lord pity us. It is not easy to 
keep sweet and see such a piece of selfish- 
ness flourishing in the church. So many 
take refuge under the wings of this vul- 
ture. I prefer the shadow of the Al- 
mighty.'' 



Rev. O. A. Adams, whites from Hills- 
boro, Ore., that all the county officers 
there are Masons and Odd Fellows, and 
some time ago a Masonic treasurer got 
away with several thousand dollars of the 
public funds. He requests Cynosure 
readers to ascertain and publish the num- 
ber of lodge men holding office in their 
counties, as he regards this an effectual 
way to open the eyes- of the public to the 
monopolizing power of the secret empire. 



Secretary Phillips and Editor Gault be- 
gin this week a series of anti-secret meet- 
ings in Kankakee and Loquois Counties. 
They expect to speak at Peotone, Wood- 
land, Milford, Wellington, Hoopston, 
Rossville, East Lynn, Rankin, Goodwin 
and other points. As they wish, as far .as 
possible, to arrange their meetings sev- 
eral weeks in advance, all friends of the 
cause in the State are requested to write 
them as to when they can hold meetings 
in their locality. 



— Rev. S. O. Rondestvedt, of Grand 
Meadow, Minn., w'rites: 'T am very 
much pleased with The Cynosure in its 
new form. May God bless its effective 
work against one of the W'Orst evils of 
our times. Would to God that all 
churches w^ould awake and shake off the 
sinful yoke with unbelievers in secret so- 
cieties, and stand firm shoulder to shoul- 
der in the spirit of God and fellowship 
with Christ, fighting for the salvation of 
souls, homes, church and state. 



The Illinois conference of the Missouri 
Synod of the German Lutheran Church, 
comprising about 500 delegates, was in 
session a Aveek here, closing June 15. 
They met in St. John's Church, on the 
North Side. This denomination is one 
of the largest and strongest anti-secret 
churches in our land. .Many of them are 
Cynosure subscribers, and during two 
days w^e met with them we received many 
subscriptions for The Cynosure and anti- 
secret pubhcations. Many of these faith- 
ful pastors feel the necessity of fortifying 
their churches against the flood of secret 
orders threatening to undermine ever\'- 
thing. 



— Prof. E. Whipple, of Wheaton 
College, writes us the follow- ing abstract 
from an article in the New York Inde- 
pendent of recent date: "The Masonic 
National Benefit Societ}- of Indianapo- 
lis, Ind., was organized in 1869. ^^^^^ ^^r 
some years paid $5,000 upon death of 
members. In 1890 it had Sio. 350,000 in 
force and its death rate was 21.34 per 
1,000: in 1894 it had $5,010,000 in force, 
and its death rate had increased to 31.62 
per 1,000. It now has a membership of 
al>but 1,000, almost entirely aged and un- 
insurable persons. \\'ho will pay their 
policies as they more and more rapidlv 
pass away?'' 



86 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1897. 



— Elder Riifus Smith and family, of 
Wiheaton, expect to start this week with 
the Christian Endeavor delegation for 
California. Thefr will test the winters 
and climate, and if they are more con- 
g-enial than that of Illinois they may 
spend the balance of their days in the 
land of flowers and fruit. Their self-sac- 
rificing- reform labors will, be missed in 
the Eastern field, but our loss will be 
gain for the Pacific slope. The Elder is 
a long and tried friend of The Cynosure. 
Since its change of form he has ad- 
vanced the money to send it to a list of 
his friends in various States, a noble ex- 
ample for other friends of the cause to 
lollow. 



Mary C. Baker, secretary of the N. C. 
A., was unable to be present at our last 
annual meeting, and sent an interesting 
letter, from v/hich the following is an ex- 
tract : 

''My absence is not because of any 
diminution of interest. Far from it. My 
father, the late Rev. Milton Smith, was 
5l member of the Aurora convention. My 
interest in reform dates from the days of 
my childhood, when I used to hear him. 
^alk against the principles of the Masonic 
order, especially when his uncle, Sir 
Knig^ht Luther Marsh, used to visit us. 
Uncle was anxious father should enjoy 
the benefits (?) of membership in the or- 
der. Father considered it diametrically 
opposed to the religion of Christ; hence 
he resisted all' overtures made to secure 
his initiation. He was often toid th it it 
should cost him nothing to go to tne sum- 
mit ol the grand (?) institution. 

"Allow me to say I am proud of fath- 
er's record as opposed not only to secret 
Drd-ers, but to American slavery, the liq- 
uor traffic and other evils. I intend to 
be a subscriber for The Cynosure in its 
new form." 



Bro. M. X. Butler, of Kansas City, 
writes: Allow me to congratulate on the 
neat, attractive appearance of the May 
Cynosure. The standard magazines are 
the great balance wiheel of American 
journalism. Let the Pole Star shine clear 
and bright and march to the front in the 
new field. Thousands of copies should 
be paid for and sent direct by mail by 
the friends of right to thinking people 
rv^ervwhere. A sample copy is the most 



favorable introduction, and it will win 
friends for the movement at all times. 
The magazine has supplanted the lecture 
platform and the celebrities in every line 
of thought; the best minds are brought 
into touch with the rushing reading mul- 
titudes in these great conseiwers of pub- 
lic opinion, while the reduced price places 
tliem within reach of every intelligent 
man and woman. Success to the bold 
Cvnosure. 



RECENT PUBLICATIONS. 



"Thoughts from the Mount of Bless- 
ing" is an interesting and soul-inspiring 
volume by H. H. Hall, of Oakland, Cal. 

The Christian Mission Herald, pub- 
lished at Bridgetown, Barbados, one of 
the islands of the West Indies, is one of 
our valued exchanges devoted to the 
proclamation of the gospel in its fullness. 

We wish all of our readers could pro- 
cure and read a new book just published 
by S.*B. Shaw, Grand Rapids, IMich., on 
"God's Financial Plan." It is a powerful 
conscience awakener on a much needed 
reform, that of honoring God more with 
our substance. 

"Bible Reasons Why We Are Protest- 
ants" is a strong, meaty sermon by Dr. 
John Flail, of New York. It is in the 
form of a small booklet and can be had 
of Rev. James A. O'Connor, of Christ's 
Mission, 142 West 21st street, New York. 
Bro. O'Connor is a converted Roman 
Catholic priest, \dio is laboring for the 
evangelization of Roman Catholics. 

"Some Modern Substitutes for Chris- 
tianity" is a timely and valuable booklet 
by George Wolfe Shinn, D. D., of New- 
ton, Mass. In it ihe argues strongly 
against Theosophy, Christian Science, 
Spiritualism, Socialism and Agnosticism 
as dangerous delusions. The book is 
published by Thomas Whittaker, Bible 
House, New York. Price 25 cents. 

A new book that has deservedly reach- 
ed a large sale, and an excellent book to 
put into the hands of children, is "Re- 
markable Answ^ers to Prayer." It is pub- 
lished by S. B. Shaw, Grand Rapids, 
Mich., and sold for 35 cents. It is ele- 
gantly bound and full of touching inci- 
dents and illustrated with more than forty 



July, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Roval makes the food pure, , 

wholesome and delicious. 




POWDER 

Absolutel/ Pure 



ROYAL BAKING POWDER CO., NEW YORK. 



TO THE FORE< 



Standard Works 

-ON- 

Szttzi Soeieties 

FGK SALE BY THE 

mmi CPISTIHN HSSOCIHTION. 

221 West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Terms: — Cash with order, or if sent by express 
u. O, D. at least $i.oo must be sent with order a? 
3, guaranty that books will be taken. Books al 
Tetaii prices sent postpaid. Books by Mail #'e at 
TiSk of persons ordering, unless 8 cents extra is 
sent to pay for registering them, when their sale 
sielivery is guaranteed. Books at retail ordered 
£y express, are sold at lo per cent discount and 
delivery guaranteed, but not express paid. PcSi:= 
sg- *stamps taken for small sums, 

ON FREEMASONRY. 



illustrated. First 

376 pages cloth, 75c; 



Freemasonry 

three degrees. 
_paper, 40c. 

The accuracy of these expositions attested by 
nffidavits of Jacob O. Doesburg and otJiers. 

Freemasonry Illustrated. 640 

pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 75c. 

A complete expositon of the Blue Lodge and 
."Chapter consisting of seven degrees. Profusely 
^Jastrated. 

Knighi Templarisr; Illustrated. 

341 pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 50c. 
A full illustrated rit al of the six degrees (A 
the Council and Commandery. 

Hand-Book of Freemasonry, 274 

pages, flexible cloth, 50c. 

By E. Ronayne, Past Master of Keystone Lodge 
No. 639, Chicago. Gives the cornplete standard 
ritual of the first three degrees of Freemasonry. 



BY JAMES BUCKHAM. 



]\IoYe to the fore, 

IMen \vhom God hath made fit for the fray! 
Xot yours to shrink, as the feeble ones may, 
Xot yours to parley and quibble and shirk. 
Ill for the \Yorld, if ye do not God's work. 
]\Iove to the fore ! 

]\IoYe to the fore. 

Say not another is fitter than thou — 

Shame to the manhood that sits on liiy brow! 

Own thyself equal to all that man may. 

Cease thine evading; God needs thee to-day. 

^love to the fore ! 

'Move to the fore. 

God himself waits, and must wait, till thou come. 

3vlen are God's prophets though ages lie dumb. 

Halts the Christ-kingdom, with conquest so near? 

J hou art the cause, then, thou man at the rear. 

2vIove to the fore ! 

— S. S. Times. 



THE ODD FELLOWS' CREED. 



A question asked of the Sovereign Grand 
Lodge of the AVorld by the Grand Lodge of Mas- 
sachusetts. Read its report for Feb. 14, 1889, 
page 336. 

"Question. — Is it lawful for a chaplain to com- 
mence and finish his pra}-ers in the name of 
Christ? 

"Answer. — Our order only requires a belief in 
the existence of a Supreme Being as a qualifica- 
tion for membership, and has no al^nitv with any 
reHgious sect or system of faith. Hence, every- 
thing savoring of sectarianism is not to be toler- 
ated. The words, system' of faith or sect, do not 
have reference merely to sects within the pale of 
Christianity, but have a far broader significance, 
and include all the religions of the world. .In this 
sense Christianity is a sect; hence it is inexpedi- 
ent and, I think, unlawful to make prominent 
reference to it in lodge work. '^ ^ ^'-^ We 
have Jews and may have :\Iohammedans and 
other non-Christian sects within our order, and 
the rule applies to them equally with members of 
the Christian faith." 



'Tn a word, what regeneration by the Word of 
Truth is in religion, initiation is in Odd-Fellow- 
ship.— Rev. A. B. Grosh, in his ^lanual of Od^- 
Fellowship, page 90, edition 1869. 



88 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 189^ 



Scotch Rite flasonrj'^ illustrated.! 

2 vols. Per vol., cloth, Si.oo: paper, 65c J 
The complete illustrated ritual of the entire | 
Scottish Rite, comprising all the Masonic degrees'^ 
from 3rd to 33rd inclusive. The first three de- ■ 
gre'-s are common to all the Masonic Rites, and 
afe fully and accuratelj^ given in "Freemasonry 
Illustrated." Vol. 1 comprises the degrees from 
3rd to iSth inclusive. 

Voi. 11 comprises the degrees from 19th to 33rd 
jwciusiye. with the signs, grips, tokens and pass- 
words fr'^'it, vn-"" t.5 ^-Ixr} ii^,Q:Tee in'"l''ieiTrf> 

Freemasonry Exposed. By Capt, 

William Morgan, no pages, paper, 25c, 
The genuine old Morgan book republished. 

Ecce Orienti. Pocket size, full 

roan, flap, S2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the First 
Three INiasonic Degrees in Cypher, with complete 
Floor Charts of Initiating, Passing and Raising a 
Candidate. 

Cabala. Pocket size, full ro?n, 

flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the Chapter 
Masonic Degrees; 4th to 7th inclusive, in Cypher. 
Giving' the degrees of Mark Master, Past Master, 
^T.*«it KsT'^Wpt Mastej: ^xxd Rova! Arcfe 

Knights of the Orient. 

size, full roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Ritual of the Commandery 
Masonic Degrees, Knights of the Red Cross. 
Knight Templar and Knight of '^lalta, nth to i3tii 
. .-.^rees. 

Allyn's Ritual of Freemasonry, 

By Avery Allyn. Cloth, $5.00. 

Contains the fully Illustrated Ritual of the Blue 
Lodge. Chapter Council and Commandery, 11 of 
the Scotch Rite Degrees, several Masonic side 
degrees and what is termed a Key to the Phi Beta 
Kappa, and the Orange Societies. 



ODD FELLOWS COPY MASONS. 



Children Baptized. 



Pocket 



Duncan*s Masonic Ritual and 

Monitor. Cloth, $2.50, 

Profusely illustrated with explanatory engrav 
ings, and containing the vitual andvvork of the or- 
der for the seven degrees, inclu-'ang the Royal 
Arch, Though extensively used as an Instruction 
Book and one of the best ifi the market, it is not 
as accurate as "Freemasonry" jiustrated." 

Richardson's Moni^or of Freema- 
sonry'. Cloth, $i.2v^; paper, 75c. 
Contains the ceremonies of Lodges, Chapters. 
Encampments, etc. Illustrated. Although ex- 
tensively used in conferring the higher degrees, 
it is not only very incomplete but inaccurate 
especially as regards the first seven degrees, and 
as to the high r degrees it '^ives but a description 
and general idea of th'j degrees rather than the 
full ritual. 

Look to the East A ritual of the 
first three Masonic Degrees by Ralph 
Lester. Cloth, $2.00. 

Notwithstanding the high price this book is 
very inferior in every way to Freemasonry Illus- 
trated or the Haridbook of Freemasonry at a 
quarter the price. 

Council of the Orier^t. Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standt^rd Ritual of Council 
Masonic Degrees in Cypner, 8th to loth inclusive, 
Giving the Degrees of Royal Master, Select Mas- 
ter and Super Excellent Master. 

Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Re- 
vised and enlarged edition, 40 pages, 
paper, 25c. 

An Illustrated Ritual of the Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine. This is a Side MasorJc degree con^ 
ferred only on Knights Templar and on Thirty 
wo degree Masons. 



Rev. W. T. Beadles, the Odd Fellow Chaplain, 
explains that the ceremony only binds the parents 
to bring up the children in the nurture and ad- 
monition of the Lord and for the lodge, but not 
for the church. 

The following article is taken from the Jan. i, 
1897, number of the Odd Fellows' Herald, of 
Springfield, III: 

Monday evening, December 21, was an era 
marker in the history of 1 Grape Creek Lodge, No. 
632, and White Oak Rebekah Lodge, No. 314. 
Many brothers and sisters of these lodges decided 
that they would have their children christened, 
and they fixed on Past Grand Chaplain Rev. W. 
T. Beadles, of Paris, to officiate, and also decided 
that the occasion should be social, festive and for 
the good of the order. Grand Secretary James 
R. Miller, of Springfield, also kindly accepted an 
invitation to be present. 

The lodge room w^as very beautifully decorated 
for the occasion. The Noble Grand's station was 
draped with large American flags, looped with 
bouquets, and across the top were the words of 
Jesus: 

: Suffer Little Children to Come : 
: Unto Me. : 

On the walls was the silk American flag of the 
lodge and also the lodge banner. The baptismal 
altar and the hall was artistically decorated with 
evergreen; the hands of the ladies had passed over 
and made it beautiful. 

At 5:30 Chaplain Beadles conducted the bap- 
tismal services, twenty-seven children being 
christened by him, as follows : 

Leo Victor, Lawrence Turner and Lucy Win- 
nefred, the children of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Fair- 
'hall. 

Mary Ann, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Pierce. 

John, Peter and Margaret, children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Hamilton, of Westville. 

Ralph, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Brown. 

Herbert Henry, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Ray. 

Harriet Hannah, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Hible. 

Charles Henry and Thomas, children of John 
and Mrs. Hudsonpillar. 

Agnes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Elsdon. 

Flossie, Eliza, William, Edward, Charles and 
Henry, children of Mr. and Mrs. George Ray. 



July, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



89 



Charles Edmond, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edmond 
Roberts. 

William Henry, Lonisa, Edward Robert, chil- 
dren of Frederick Foote. 

Florence Eliza, George .William, Mabel and 
Bessie, children of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bennett. 

Lucy Edna, daughter of William and Mrs. 
Foote. 

George McKinley, son of Mr. and Mrs. George 
J. Coster. 

The services were beautifully conducted by P. 
G. Chaplain W. T. Beadles, and solemn silence 
prevailed among both children and adults. 

After the services the Chaplain said that this is 
a new and unique thing in the history of the 
lodges, but eminently proper; and had not bound 
any of the parents to have their children become 
members of any church, but to bring them up in 
the nurture and admonition of the Lord, so that 
they may become godly men and w^omen, and also 
good Odd Fellows and citizens. 

The Rebekahs had prepared a splendid supper, 
of which all partook, some until they became as 
stif¥ as a bologna sausage. The Rebekahs own 
their own tables and table ware, and they know 
just how to use them. 

After supper the lodge room was a delightful 
scene, young and old joining in blind man's bufif 
and other g-ames. 

Then Dr. Fairhall called the meeting to order 
and introduced Grand Secretary Miller, who said 
that he had never seen a more beautiful sight than 
the christening of these children in this lodge by 
the Grand Chaplain. He spoke w^ords of praise 
for Grape Creek brothers and sisters, and urged 
all to inculcate the high morality of Odd Fellow- 
ship. The Grand Secretary said this is one of the 
best and most helpful meetings he ever attended. 

Bro. William Hamilton sang a song, "The Old 
Folks at Home," of his own composition, which 
was very good and often cheered. He was en- 
cored, and sang, "Let It Be Soon," which brought 
down the house. For another encore he sang the 
"Dutch Baby," which almost killed the audience — 
it was immense. 

, Chaplain Beadles then made a very practical 
and efifective speech for which w^e have not space 
for even an outline. He spoke very warm words 
for tlie Grape Creek brothers and sisters; he said 
he had been an Odd Fellow for many years ana 
had never seen such a service as this; he would 
go away better, feeling a deeper interest in this 
lodge and these children. 

Sister Daisy Smoot recited "Wldder Green," 
and Bro. W\ R. Jewell spoke eloquently and prac- 
tically on the Old Folks' Home, and Bro. John N. 
Scearce spoke on the Junior Order 6f Odd J^el- 
lows, and o-ave a historic sketch of the institution 



ihjrteen Reasokiis why a Chris- 
tian should not be a Freemason. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. i6 pap-es. 

Freemasonry Contrary to the 
Christian Religion. By " Spectator," 
Atlanta, Ga. i6 pages cc. 

Hon. Thurlow Weed on the Mor- 
gan Abduction. i6 pages 5c. 

Thi3 is the legally attested statement of this 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and conlinement of 
Capt. Morgan in Canandaigu?. jail, his removal to 
Fort Niagara and subsequent drowning in Lake 
Ontario. 

Freemasonry a Fourfold Con= 
spiracy. 16 pages, :^c. 

Address of Pres. J. Blanchard. This is a most 
convincing argument against the lodge. 

Mah=Hah=Bone; 589 pages; $1.00 

Comprises the Hand Book, Master's Carpet and 
Freemasonry at a. glance. 



ON ODD-FELLOWSHIP. 

Odd=feIIowship Judged by its own 

utterances; its doctrine and practice 
examined in light of God's Word. By- 
Rev. J. H. Brcckman. Cloth, 50c; pa- 
per cover, 25C0 

This is an exceedingly interesting, clear discus- 
sion of the chara -;ter of Odd-fellowship, in the form 
of a dialogue. 

Revised Odd=feiiowship Illustra- 
ted. Cioth, $1.00: paper cover, 5octs. 
The complete revised ritual of the Lodge En- 
campment and Rebekah (ladies) degrees, profuse- 
ly illustrated, and guaranteed to be strictly ac- 
curate; with a sketch 01 origin, history and char-- 
acter of the order, over one hundred foot-note 
quotations from standard authorities, showing the 
character and teachings of the order, and an an- 
alysis of each degree by ex-President J. Blanchard. 
This ritual corresponds exactly with the *' Charge 
Books" furnished by the Sovereign Grand Lodge. 

Sermon on Odd=fellowship and 
other secret societies, by Rev. J. Sar- 
ver, pastor of Evangelical Lutheran 
church. IOC. tach. 

This is a very clear argument against secretism of 
all forms and, the duty to disfellowship Odd-fel- 
lows, Freemasons, Knights of Pythias and Gran- 
gers, is clearly shown by their confessed character 
as found in their own publications. 



OTHER RITUALS. 



Revised Knights of Pythias. IHu^ 
trated. Cloth, 50c: paper cover 25c. 
An exact copy of the new official Ritual Adopted 
by the Supreme Lodge oi the w^orld, with the Se- 
cret work added and fully Illustrated. 

Knights of the Orient Illustrated. 

15c each. 

The full Illustrated Ritna j,. Ancient Order ot 
the Orient or the Oriental degree. This is a side 
degree conferred mostly a Knights of Pythias 
lodges. 

Good Templarisnr Illustrated. 25c. 

A full and accurate exposition of the degrees of 
the lodge, temple and council. 

Exposition of thf Grange. 25c. 

Edited by Rev. A. W. 3eeslin. Illustrated with 
engravings. 



90 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1897. 



Ritual of tbfi Grand Army of the 
Republic loc. each. 

The authorized ritual of iS6S, with signs of re- 
lognition. pass-words, etc.. and ritual of Machin-' 
3Sts' and Blacksmiths' Union. (The two bound to- 
gether .) 

Knights of Labor Illustrated. 25c. 

("Adelphon Kruptos.'") The complete illus- 
Irated ritual of the order, including the "unwritten 
•arork." 

Adoptive Masonry iIl^strated. 

20c, each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the five 
degrees of Female Freemasonry, by Thomas Lowe. 

Red rien Iliustrated. In cloth 50c. 

each. S2.00 per dozen postpaid. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, comprising the .Adop- 
lion Degree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree, 
Chiefs Degree, with the Odes, etc. 

The Foresters Illustrated. Paper, 
cover 25c. each, S2.00 per dozen. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Forest- 
ers, wth Installation Ceremonies. 

United Sons of Industry Illustra- 
ted. 15c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the sec- 
Tet tradesunion of the above name, giving the 
signs, grips, passwords, etc. 

Rituals and Secrets Illustrated. 

Si. 00, each. 

Composed of "Temple of Honor Illustrated, 
Jidoptive Masonry Illustrated," "United Sons of 
Industry r^-'strated," and "Secret Societies liluS" 
trated " 

.Sermon on flasonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor of United Pres- 
iyterian church, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

History Nat'i Christian Associ- 
ation. IOC. each. 

Its origin, objects, what it has done and aims to 
do, arsd the best means to accomplish the end 
sought, the .Articles of Constitution and By-laws 
•i the Association. 

Secret Societies. Cloth 35c, papei 
15c 

A discussion of their character and claims by 
Rev. David McDill, Pres. J. Blanchard and Rev 
^dvrard Beecher. 

The Master's Carpet or flasonry 
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in fine cloth. 400 pages. 75c. 
Explains the true source and meaning of every 

ceremoay and symbol of the lodge. 

Disloyal Secret Oaths. 5c. 

By Joseph Cook, Boston. He quotes the law of 
Vermont which makes the administration of the 
-Masonic oaths illegal. Joseph Cook's address is a 
Bational treatment of a national subject, and very 
valuable for reference. 

Light on Freemasonry. B}' Elder 
D. Bernard, Cloth, $1.50. paper, 75c, 

Finney on flasonry. Cloth 75c., 

paper 35c. 

The character, claims and practical workings of 
Freemasonry. By ex-Pres. Charles G. Finney, of 
©beriin College. President Fmney was a '* bright 
Mason," but left the lodge when he became a 
Christian. This book has opened the eyes of 
aaultitudes. 



of Grape Creek Lodge and White Oak Rebekah 
Lodge. Bro. Dr. Fairhall followed with practical 
remarks, with historical references; four years ago 
the subordinate lodge was instituted; we have now 
over 80 members; have paid out $300 in benefits; 
have a fund of $500 building association and in 
the treasury $150; a Rebekah Lodge of seventy 
odd members, and about $100 in the- treasury; 
also an Encampment of 40 members and have $50 
or $60 in the treasury. We have done what no 
other lodge has ever done ; we have christened the 
children right into the order. Other lodges will 
do it. Bro. Dr. Fairhall warmly thanked the 
grand officers and other visitors and a rising vote 
Vv'as given. 

The meeting was one of the very best, as they 
always are at Grape Creek. 



COMMENT. 



BY E. ROXAYNE. 



Loking at religious matters from a human or 
rather from a secret society standpoint, one would 
be led to conclude that the different churches 
might as well close up and go out of business or 
into bankruptcy, for the secret societies are doing 
all that churches claim to do, and the}" do more 
of it, and do it better. Whether a dead brother 
had led a good or a bad life, whether he was hon- 
est or dishonest, moral or immoral, an atheist or a 
church member, he is at once and without cere- 
money transferred from the "lodge below" to "the 
celestial lodge above." The candidate receives 
the "new birth" through the ceremonies of initia- 
tion, and by living- in strict obedience to the horri- 
ble oblig"ations and cut-throat penalties of Free- 
masonry especially, he is "free from sin." 

One can mix up in the mad delirium of politics, 
attend rotten primaries, scheme, plan and cheat 
the other fellow out of the nomniation; he can 
attend balls, parties, progressive euchre, or any 
other; he can even "play the races," go to church 
in the morning and to the theater in the evening, 
and if he is a member in good standing of a secret 
lodge, no matter which one, when he dies he goes 
off straight to "the grand lodge above." What 
more than this does a man want? Or can you 
tell us which of the churches can do better? 
Neither Calvinism nor x^rmenianism has any 
standing whatever by the side of the reHgion of 
the secret lodge; and last of all, they baptize chil- 
dren; do so much of it, and do it so well, that no 
church in America can do better. Baptize chil- 
dren, did you say? Yes, surely, read the Odd 
Fellows' Herald, Springfield, 111., Jan. i, 1897. 

*^The services were beautifully conducted," etc., 



July, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



91 



"and solemn silence prevailed." I wonder if the 
Rev. Beadles could do better in his own church, 
or could his Paris congregation maintain more 
solemn silence? And then remember there was 
quite an advantage here, '/the parents were not 
bound to have their children become members of 
any church" — simply good Odd Fellows after they 
were ''brought up in the nurture and admonition 
of the Lord," in connection with an institution 
where the Lord's name even cannot be mentioned; 
where his finished work is despised, denied and re- 
jected, and where not one of the parents knows 
the Lord. And then after the supper and the ''sol- 
emn silence," both "young and old joined in blind 
man's buff and other games," just as they did on 
Pentecost when the 3,000 were baptized; just as 
Philip and the Eunuch did. Act 8; and precisely 
as Ananias and Saul of Tarsus did when the lat- 
ter was baptized at Damascus, Act. 9. Oh, the 
deep down iniquity of secret societies, and the un- 
speakable abomination of those preachers ''who 
say they are apostles and are not," but are found 
to be liars ! It would seem as if the scathing re- 
buke of the Apostle Paul to Elymas, the sorcerer, 
could very appropriately be applied to such men. 
Read the passage in Act 13 :io. 



BRIBE, DIVIDE, AMUSE, RULE, 



BY EX-PRESIDENT J. BLANCHARD. 



Tamerlane had three arts by which he subdued 
and subjugated mankind: bribing, dividing and 
amusing. Odd-Fellowship bribes men by the 
hope of benefits; divides its members from out- 
siders and those of one degree from another by 
secrecy, and amuses them by ceremonies. 

What redeems these opening ceremonies from 
wearisome stupidity is their religious character. 
All beyond the Outside Guardian, hoodwink and 
pledge of secrecy is worship, and puts and holds 
the mind in a posture for receiving the mesmeric 
or spiritual influence of the system and of the 
spirits w*ho inhabit and wield it. They, also, in 
apparently harmless and unimportant particulars, 
commence the perpetual lodge lesson of submis- 
sion and obedience to superiors. This is calcu- 
lated, by degrees, to wean the mind of the initiate 
from the open and free subordination to law, gov- 
ernment, and the religion of Christ, by a weekly 
night-drill in obedience to another system, un- 
known to the true God — the secret empire of "the 
god of this world." 

Odd-Fellowship, like every false system of re- 
ligion, must keep its votaries submissive and 
busy; and these "opening ceremonies," which 
cover six or seven pages in describing theni — 



riasonic Oaths Null and Void: or 
Freemasony SeIf=Convicted. 207 

pages. Postpaid, 40c. 

This is a book for the times. The design of the 
author is to refute the arguments of those wh« 
claim that the oaths of Freemasonry are binding 
upon those who take them. 

Judge Whitney's Defence before 
the Grand Lodge of lilinois. 15c. 

Judge Daniel H. Wliitney was Master of the. 
lodge when S. H. Keith, a member of his lodge^ 
murdered Ellen Slade. Judge Whitney, by at- 
tempting to bring Keith to justice, brought om 
himself the vengeance of the lodge, but he boldly 
replied to the charges against him, and afterwards; 
renounced Mason'-y 

General Washington Opposed to 
Secret Societies. loc. 

This is a re-publication of Governor Joseph Rit- 
ner's " Vindication of General Washington froa: 
the Stigma of Adherence to Secret Societies.^' 
communicated to the House of Representatives of, 
Pennsylvania, March 8, 1837, at their special re- 
quest. To this is added the fact that three higfe 
Masons were the only perso iS who opposed a vote 
of thanks to Washington on his retirement to pri- 
vate liie-undoubtedly because they considered him 
a seceding Freemason. 

riorgan's Exposition, Abduction 
and riurder and Oaths of 33 degrees. 

304 pages, cloth, $1.00, 
** Composed of Freemasonry Exposed," by Capt. 
Wm. Morgan; '"History of the Abduction and: 
Murder of Morgan;" "Valance's Confession of 
the Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan;" "Bernard's, 
Reminiscences of Morgan Times," and "Oaths 
and Penalties of 33 Degrees." 

Oaths and Penalties of Freemason- 
ry, as proved in court in New Berlin 
L.ials IOC. 

Th2 New Berlin trials began in the attempt ot 
Freemasons to prevent public initiatirn by seced- 
ing Masons. These trials were held at New Berlin, 
Chenango Co,, N. Y., April 13 and 14, 1831, an6 
General Augustus C„ Welsh, sheriff of the countjv 
and other adhering Freemasons swore to the trutor 
ful revelation of the oaths and ipena.it^es. 

Grand Lodge flasonry. 5c. each 

Its relation to civil government and the Christiaji' 
religion. By Pres. JT Blanchard. The an-Chris- 
tian, anti-republican and despotic character of 
Freemasonry is proved from the highest Masonic 
authorities. 

Masonry a Work of Darkness, ad- 
verse to Christianity, and inimical 
to Republican Government. 15c. 

By Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong (Presbyterian) i, 
seceding Mason of 21 degrees. 

Sermon on Masonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a Ma- 
sonic Oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, Ohiot 

Story of the Gods. Postpaid, loc. 

By 1. R. B. Arnold. Brief sketches from the 
mythology of Rome, Creece, Egypt, India, Persia, 
Phrygia, Scandina-'^a, Africa and .\menca, show- 
ing the relations and unity of the past and present 
systems. The idolatrous worship of the Masonit- 
lodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 

Masonic Outrages. Postpaid, 20a 

Compiled bv Rev. H. H. Hinman. Showing 
Masonic assualt on lives of seceders, on reputation* 
and on free speech: its interference with justice i» 
courts, etc 

History of the Abduction and Mur- 
der of Capt. Wm. Morgan. 25c. 

As prepared by seven committers of citizens, 
appointed to ascertain the fate of Morgan. 



92 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 189< 



The Anti-mason's Scrap-Book. 

25c. 

Consisting of 53 "Cynosure" tracts. In tiivs 
book are the views of more than a score of men, 
many of them of distinguished ability, on the sut^ 
iect of secret societies. 

The Image of the Beast; A Secret 
Empire; or Freemasonry a Subject of 
Prophecv. By Rev. Richard Horton. 
Third Edition'. 200 pages, cloth, 60c. 

Sermon on Secretism, 5c.' eacn. 

Bv Rev. R. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear ayrir 
of the objections to all secret societies, and to Ma- 
-Trv especially, that are apparent to all. 

Anti=masonic Sermons and Ad- 
dresses. Cloth, $1 00. 

Composed of " Masonry a Work of Darkness;" 
the Sermons of Messrs. Cross, William M'Nary, 
Dow and Sarver. the two addresses of President 
Blanchard. and the addresses of President H. H. 
George. Prof. J. G. Carson and Rev. M. S. Drury; 
*• Thil-teen Reasons Why a Christain Cannot be a 
Freemason,-' "Freemasonry Contrary to the 
Christian Religion." and " Are Masonic Oaths 
Binding on the Initiate? " 287 pages. 

Secret Societies, Ancient and 
Modern. 50c. each. 

Contents: The Antiquity of Secret Societies 
The Life of Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, Tht 
Origin of Masonry, Was Washington a Mason:' 
Fillmore and Webster's Deference to Masonry, A 
Brief Outline of the Progress of Masonry in the 
United States, The Tammany Ring, Masonic Be- 
nevolence, The Uses of Masonry, An Illustration 
The Conclusion. 

Secret Societies Illustrated. 

Over 250 cuts, 99 pages, paper cover. 
25c. each. 

Containing the signs, grips, passwords, em- 
blems, etc., of Freemasonry (Blue Lodge, and tc 
the fourteenth d'.gree of the York rite). Adoptive 
Mac^x^^:,-^, Revised Odd-fellowship, Good Templar- 
ism, the Temple of Honor, the United Sons of In- 
dustry, Knights of Pythias and the Grange, with 
aflBdavits. etc. 

Prof. J. Q. Carson, D. D., on Se- 
cret Societies. loc. each. 

A most convincing argument against feilowshipv- 
iap- Freemasons in the Christian church. 

Sermon en flasonry. i6 pages, 
5c. By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor 
United Presbyterian church. 

Oaths and Penalties of the ss 
Degrees of Freemasonry. 15c, each. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes half-a-million horri- 
ble oaths. 

Ex-President John Quincy Ad- 
ams. Price, cloth, $1.00. Paper, 35c. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
gations and Penalties. 

Sermon on flasonry. loc. each. 

By Rev. James Williams, Presiding 'Elder of 
Dakota District Northwestern Iowa Conference 
M. E. Church— a seceding Master Mason. 

The Mystic Tie or Freemasonry a 
League with the Devil. 15c. 

This IS an account of the church trial of Peter 
Cook and v.ife, of Elkhart, Indiana, for refusing 
to support a reverend Freemason. 

Pres. H. H. George on Secret 

Societies. loc. each. 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty of 
Christian churches to disfellowship secret ^.ocie- 
ties. 



though a single paragraph might answer the ends 
of opening the lodge — are an initiatory drill of 
subjection, copied, in some parts, nearly verbatim 
from the opening of a Masonic lodge. Even^ such 
initiation is a mental debauch, operating on mind 
like tricks, sorcery and fortune telling. 

But the chief power of this fool's-play of depot- 
ism is in the robes of the officers — scarlet, blue, 
black and white, wit^ ' caps the color of their robes, 
while the members' faces are all covered with 
masks. This scene, in a lighted hall, at night, 
guarded by sentinels, and all under such balder- 
dash names as "Odd Fellow," "Noble Grand," 
and the like, forms a hocus-pocus invented in 
sport by ignorant English operatives in 1812, to 
give zest to their idle hours and relish to their 
cups. The trick took like Aaron's calf-worship. 
The cunning have joined it for the sake of its 
funds; the ambitious, for its votes, and, "behold, 
the world is gone after it." 

And this is Odd-Fellowship ! which numbers its 
members by hundred thousands, and reckons its 
revenues by millions! What is it? Where is "the 
hiding of its power?" To one class of thinking 
minds, the greatest mystery of the lodge is that 
sensible, fair-minded men can repeat its twaddle, 
wear its gew-gaw finery, and obey its puerile regu- 
lations. Dr. Leonard Bacon has said of the Ma- 
sonic institution: "It seems to mc. one stupen- 
dous mass of dreary nonsense." And yet Presi- 
dents of this republic have been Masons and Odd 
Fellow^s, and to say they have joined the lodges 
for popularity is to confess their power over civil- 
ized mind in the leading nations of the earth. 

A handful of neighbors in a hall, at night, get 
another neighbor as a candidate for initiation. He 
is taken into an ante-room, asked his nam.e, resi- 
dence, occupation, age, lodge relations, health, 
and belief in a "Supreme Intelligent Being." His 
answers are taken down and signed by his name. 
He then begins to be pledged to conceal what is 
to happen to him in the lodge, which gives a 
devil's dignity to the unknown trifles before him. 
He is blindfolded and led in, lectured, chained, 
and threatened with binding "to the stake." In 
this plight he is led around, his blind taken oiT, 
and he confronted with a grinning human skele- 
ton, with flaming torches held each side. His 
captors then repeat some school-boy lessons on 
death. Hoodwinked again, he is led to one officer 
after another, his blinder being put on and off, till 
the Vice Grand orders th chains off and re-pledges 
him, with his hand on his heart, to conceal the 
whole work of the lodge, and not to wrong it. He 
is then further lectured, twaddled, charged, told 
the falsehood that "Odd-Fellowship presents a 
broad platform upon which mankind may unite," 
when he is just now pledged, and afterward sworn, 
to conceal the whole thing called Odd-Fellowship 



July, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



from that very "mankind" who are to unite on its 
platform. He is now hailed as a brother, and told 
that Odd-Fellowship is not "a mere beneficial so- 
ciety;" that its aim is "to elevate man," and "lead 
him to cultivate the true fraternal relations de- 
signed by the Great Author, of his being-" (See 
the degree); that, in short, it is a religion; that it 
will bring m^en out of the blindness of error and 
the chains of sin, into the liberty of the sons of 
God. And this contemptible farce is preceded b\- 
a solemn prayer to the god of the lodge, and closed 
with an ode on friendship, love and truth. This 
is Odd-Fellowship, and tlie whole of it, the fur- 
ther degrees being but repetitions of similar doses. 
There is but one possible explanation of the fact 
that hundreds of thousands of grown, rational 
men repeat this farrago weekly, and from year to 



50. 



y^ear. It is that Satan is its god. 



To 



treat such a system as frivolous "nonsense" is to 
commit a dreadful mistake. If "the heavens and 
earth" were now in flames — as they one day will 
be (2 Pet. 3: 7) — if one only bridge of escape, 
built by Christ, could give safety to those fleeing 
from the conflagration of the world, and a revolted 
angel should set open false doors, promising to 
lead to Paradise, but actually leading to hell, 
"where their worm dieth not and their fire is not 
quenched" — such is the door of every secret lodge. 
Every pagan shrine, or temple, or man-made re- 
ligion, is such a gateway of perdition, no matter 
what the worships are made of, or what frivolities 
are practiced within them. Legions of devils give 
them their mesmeric power over mind; and while 
the motives of the worshipers are as various as 
their callings and hopes, "their way is as dark- 
ness; they know not at what they stumble." — 
Prov. 4: 19. 



' ' The Blue Degrees are hut the outer court of the 
Temple. Part of the symbols are displayed there 
to the initiate^ hut he is intentionally enisled by 
false interpretations. It is not intended that he 
shall understand them^ but it is intended that he 
shall imagine that he does understand them. Their 
true ex2Jlanation is reserved for the Princes of 
Masonry.'' — Albert Pike, Grand Commander of 
the Supreme Council, Sovereign Grand Inspectors- 
General, in ''Morals and Dog:ii:«," page 819. 



TiiURLow AVeed: "I now look back through an 
Interval of fifty-six years with a conscious sense of 
liaving- been governed tln-ongh tlie Anti-masonic ex- 
citement by a sincere desire, first to vindicate the vio- 
lated laws of my country, and next to arrest tlfe great 
power and dangerous infiuences of secret societies." 



Sermon on Secret Societies. 

each. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of his sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to examine into the char- 
acter of secret so:ieties, no matter what object 
such societies profess to have. 

Reminiscences of florgan Times. 

IOC. each. 

By Elder David Bernard. This is a thrilling 
narrative of the incidents connected with Ber- 
nard's Revelation of Freeaaasonry. 

The Broken Seal. In cloth, 75c. 
Paper covers, 40c. 

Personal Reminiscences of the Abduction and 
Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan. By Samuel D. 
Greene. 

Narratives and Arguments, 

15c. each. 

Showing the conflict of secret societies with the 
Constitution and iaw of the Union and of the 
States. By Fr^incis Sample. 

Secrecy vs. the Family, State 
and Church. loc. each. 

By Rev. M. S. Dury. The antagonism of or- 
ganized secrecy to the welfare of the family, stato 
and church, is clearly shown. 

A Booklet of 107 pages. 25c. 

"The Martyr's Own Monument," by Rev. J. E. 
Roy, D. D.. Western Secretary of American Mis- 
sionary Association; "Christian Politics," by 
Rev. J. Blanchard, late Editor of Christian Cyno- 
sure; "The Mysterious Machine: Was it Lawn- 
mower. Town-pump, Balloon, Wheel-barrow,— or 
what.?" by Prof. E. D. Bailey, of the Civil Service 
Dept. U. S. Government. 

Are Secret Societies a Biessing? 

A pamphlet of 20 pages. 5c. 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D,, pastot 
of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, Mo. 
Jan. 4, 1891. W, McCoy writes: "That sermon 
ought to be in the hands of every preacher in this 
land, and every citizen's, too." 

Between Two Opinions: or the 
Question of the Hour. 389 pages; cloth, 
postpaid, 75 cents. 

By Miss E. E. Flagg, author of " Little People," 
"A Sunny Life," etc., etc. Everyone who loves 
to read a good story, cliaste and elegant in ex- 
pression, pure in thought, interesting in narrative, 
should read this book upon tbe power of secret 
societies in nolitics. and the remedy 



Qen Henry 8ewaU, a companion of 
Washington: — I was initiated an Entered 
Apprentice to the Masonic rites in Octo- 
ber, 1777, at' Albany, soon aft^r the 
capt'.'^e of Burgoyne, being then an offi- 
cer in the American army. ... I 
w*)« led by the influence of this "perfect 
rule of faith and practice,'' during the 
year 1784, to view speculative Masonry 
in a shape still more deformed. Its char- 
ity appeared to be selfishness, because re- 
stricted to its own members; its religion 
deism because entirely devoid of the 
Gospel. Its history appeared fabulous; 
it3 claims to antiquity unsustainable; it3 
titles fulsome; its . rites barbarous and 
absurd; its oaths extra-judicial, unlaw- 
fully imposed and blindly taken, and the 
]:>enal sanctions annexed, horrid and im- 



9(1 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1897. 



With a sharp stick 

you can turn up the dirt and get ground ready 
for planting— but what a clumsy, slow, labori- 
ous, ineffective way of going to work ! Not 
much more so, thou eh, than the old- 
,^^j,yiM "''^'^^xi fashioned way of washing. Think 
.^s»^)^|^^y^W;^^y\^ of it! Grinding the clothes up 
and down on a wash-board, with nothing but soap 
and main strenoth to oet out the dirt. Then 
think how simple and easy is Pearline's way 
— soakino-. boilino;, rinsine. 
You need Pearline for all 







vour washino- and cleanino-. 
You need somethino- better than 




soap or a sharp stick when you're dealing with dirt. 5i6 



Disraeli, Lord Beaconsfield: "In conduct- 
ing the governments of the world there are not only 
sovereigns and ministers, but secret orders to be con- 
sidered, which have agents everywhere — reckless 
agents, v/ho countenance assassination, and, if neces- 
sary, can produce a massacre." 

HON. SAMUEL DEXTER, in an Open Letter to the 
Grand blaster of Mass., 1798: "If there be no very 
important reason for upholding Masonry at a moment 
like the present, there is a reason against it. The sys- 
tem of the destroyers of human virtue and happiness 
is to undermine in the dark the castle that cannot be 
carried by storm. Secret agency has overthrown all 
the republics of Europe, and an extended, seci;et, level- 
ing, self-created society, without any valuable object 
of pursuit, and embracing bad characters as well as 
good, cannot be the subject of approbation of an anx- 
ious patriot." 

-'We have, then, tiie implied testimony of Freema- 
sons themselves, tliat the Christian church ought to 
have no fellowship with Freemasonry as thus re- 
vealed, and that those who adhere intelligently and 
determinedly to such an institution have no right to 
be in the Christian church. God demands, and the 
world has a right to expect, that the church will take 
due action and bear a truthful testimony in respect to 
this institution. She cannot now innocently hold her 
peace. The light has come. Fidelity to God and to 
the souls of men require that the church, which is the 
light of the world, should speak out, and should take 
such action as will plainly reveal her vievvs of the 
compatibility or incompatibility of Freemasonry with 
the Christian religion." — From Pres. Finney's hooky 
'"^Character, Claims and Practvxil Workings of Free- 
masonry T 'PP' 260, ?63. 



ST. JOE & BENTON HiUBOE 



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leaving the dock, foot of Wabash Ave., 
Chicago, every morning at 0:30, arrive 
resorts at 1:30, leave resorts at 4:30 p. 
m., arrive Chicago on return at 8:30 p. 
m. daily. Regular s.teamer also leaves 
at 11:30 p. m. daily and at 2 p. m. 
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Selfsfronouncing.. 
SSCeacber's 




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SIZE, 5Xx7^xi>^ INCHES, 



This Bible is bound in French Morocco, Divinity Circuit 
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REGULAR PRICE, $4.00. 

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and the CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE to New Subscribers 

for Only, - - S3.00 

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REMEMBER, this Bible has a Self- Pronouncing Dictionary of Proper Names 
and Foreign Words contained in the Bible. Comprising about 3500 words, 
giving the pronunciation, the meaning, and the location of the text where 
the word occurs for the first time. Exhaustive Articles on Biblical History, 
Geography, Topography, Natural History, Ethnology, Botlany, Chronology, 
Music and Poetry ; a Complete Harmony of the Gospels, Tables of Parables, 
Miracles, Prophecies, Prayers, Money, Weights and Measures, Jewish Sectfe 
and Orders, and Fourteen Beautiful Maps in Colors. 



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NATIONAL 
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ASSOCIATION, 
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Sample of 
Type... 



THE GOSPEL ACCORB 

SAINT MATTI 



CHAPTER 1. 

I The genealogy of Christ from Abraham to Joseph, 
18 He was conceived by the Holy Ghost, and born 



of the Virgin Mary, 
names of Christ. 



19 The angel interpreieth the 



THE book of the ** generation of 
Je'§U8 Christ, ^ the son of Da'- 
vid, ^ the son of A'bra-ham. 

2 **A'bra-hani begat I'^^ac; and 
^I'^^ac begat Ja'cQb; and -^ Ja'cgb 
begat Ju'das and his brethren; 

3 And ^Ju'das begat Pha'r6§ and 
Za'ra of Tha'mar; and '^Pha'rg^ 
begat £s'rom; and Es'rom begat 
A'ram; 

4 And A'ram begat A-min'a-dab ; 
and A-mIn'9,-dab begat N^-as'son; 
and Na-as'son begat Sal'mOn ; 

6 And Sal'mOn begat Bo'oz of Ra'- 



a Luke 3. 23. 
b Ps. 132, U. 
le. 11. 1. - 
Jer. 23. \ 
ch. 22. 42. 
John 7. 42. 
Acts 2. 30; 
13. 23. 
Rom. 1. 3. 
c Gen. 12.3; 
22.18. 
Gal. 3. 16. 
d Gen. 21.2,3. 

« Gen. 25.26. 
/Gen. 29. 35. 

g Gen, 38, 27, 
&c. 

h Ruth 4, 13, 
&c. 

iChr. 2,5,9, 
&c. 

i 1 Sam. 16. 1 ; 
17. 12. 

A-JSam.12.24. 
/ 1 Chr. 3. 10, 
&c. 

m 2 Kin. 20. 
21. 



bus 

Je'l 
17 
h^ 
tioi 
ryii 
teei 
can 
Chi 
18 
was 
the: 
beff 

fOUi 

19 
a jc 

her 

tO| 



I 




HOWARD CROSBY, D. D. 



CONTENTS. 



CinTent Notes 97 

The Lodge in Politics 98 

The Lodge Subrerts True Government. . 99 

Deluded by tbe Devil 100 

Reformation and Reformers 101 

Awful Iniquity of Freemasonry 102 

Secrecy and Citizenship '. 103 

Oddfellows Counterfeit Baptism 107 

Elder Richard Horton 108 

An Evangelist's Experience 108 

Bugle Note from a Catholic Priest Ill 



New Agencies Possible 112 

Afield in July. 113 

Mi ulster Defends the Lodge 114 

Heathenizing American Churches 115^ 

Shattering Woodcraft 115' 

\'aluable Suggestions 116 

Where Does Patriotisim Come In?. .... . .116 

How to Overcome IIT 

Personal Mention 118 

An Appeal to Minnesota 118- 

New Publications 118- 



NflTIONfiL CHRISTIAN ftSSOCIATION. 



"The National Christian Association, op- 
posed to secret societies," was formed at 
Pittsburg, Pa,, in 1868, and incorporated un- 
der the laws of the State of Illinois in 1874. 

The National Christian Association arose to 
meet a great want created by the growth of 
secret orders, and the ignorance and silence 
of public teachers as to their nature and ef- 
fects. 

The association is interdenominational. 
The president (1897) is a Methodist Episco- 
pal, and the vice president a United Presby- 
terian. Among the following named officers 



and agents are also the Free Methodist, Con- 
gregational, Lutheran, Friend, Evangelical^ 
United Brethren, Baptist, Reformed Presby- 
terian and Independent, 

The principal headquarters of the National 
Christian Association is at 221 West Madlsoa 
street, Chicago, which property is valued at 
$20,000, and is the gift to the association of 
Dea. Philo Carpenter, one of the founders ot 
Chicago. 

The association is supported by the free 
will offering® and bequests of friends. The 
Christian Cynosnre is its organ and princi- 
pal publication. 



President— Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, Morris, 
111. 

Vice President— Rev. W. T. Campbell, Mon- 
mouth, 111. 

Recording Secretary— Mrs. M. C. Baker, 14 
North May street, Chicago. 

General Secretary and Treasurer— Wm. I. 
Phillips, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 

Editor Christian Cynosure— Rev. M. A. 
Gault, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 



BOARD OP DIRECTORS. 

T. B. Arnold, C. A. Blanchard, E. A. Cook,. 
J. M. Hitchcock, C. J. Holmes, T. B. Rada^ 
baugh, E. Whipple, Edgar B. Wylie, H. F. 
Kletzing, J. A. Collins, W. O. Dinius. 
DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Rev. James P. Stoddard, Boston, Mass.; 
Rev. P. B. Williams, Los Angeles, Gal.; Rev. 
Wm. Fenton, St. Paul, Minn^; Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard, Washington, D. C. 





"JwB8 answered him, — I spake openly to the world; aud in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XXX. 



CHICAGO, AUGUST, 1897. 



NUMBER 4. 



PUr.LISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

27.1 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

TERnS OP SUBSCRIPTION. 

PRICE.— Per year, in advance. $1.00; three months, on 
trial, twenty-five cents; single copies, 10 cents. 

RECEIPTS.— The yellow lable pasted lon the paper or 
wrapper is a receipt for payment ot subscription to 
and including the printed date. 

EXTENSION.— The extension of a subscription is 
shown by the printed lable the second moath atter 
a remittance is received. 

DISCONTINUANCES.-Wefindthat a large number 
of our subscribers prefer not to have their sub- 
scriptions interrupted and their files broken in case 
they tail to remit before expiration. It is therefore 
assumed, unless notification to discontinue is re- 
ceived, that the subscriber wishes no interuption in 
his series. Notification to discontinue at expiration 
can be sent in at any time during the year. 

PRESENTATION COPIES.— Many persons subscribe 
for The Christian Cynosure to be sent to 
friends. In such cases, if we are advised tliat a 
subscription is a present and not regularly author- 
ized by the recipient, we will make a memorandum 
to discontinue at expiration, and to send no bill tor 
the ensuing year. 



The need of the hour is to open as 
many doors as possible for meetings. 



This num'ber is largely devoted to se- 
cret societies in politics. 



The excellent articles on secrecy and 
citizenship by Prof. Whipple should be 
preserved for reference by our readers. 
His closing article will be in our next 
issue. 



'Thirty years ago," said Dr. Howard 
Crosby, "I Avas a member of a college 
secret society, and while I had upright 
fellow members and we encouraged liter- 
ary culture, I found the association was 
chiefly a temptation to vice." 



On the night of July 28th in this city 
another Italian was stealthily shot almost 
under the eye of the police by a deadly as- 
sassin of the Maha, whose escape was 
covered by members of the same organi- 
zation. 



Our apparently candid Roman Cath- 
olic correspondent from Michigan, ig- 
nores the fact that Jesuitry, one of the 
most dangerous forms of secret organiza- 
tions, was born and is fostered within his 
church. 



Everv Prohibitionist should read the 
article by Rev. W. A. Campbell, on "The 
Lodge in Politics." Having been for sev- 
eral years editor of the State Prohibition 
paper of Iowa, and chairman of the State 
Comrriittee, he knows whereof he af- 
firms. 



Dr. Hwvard Crosby, whose portrait 
adorns our first page, once said: "The 
secret lodge system belongs to despot- 
isms and not to democracies. Whatever 
in it is not ba'byish is dangerous. We 
have no hesitation in writing secret so- 
cieties among the quackeries of " the 
earth." 



Twenty-six Swedisli societies of Chi- 
cago, representing the Odd Fellows, For- 
e^ers, RoA^al Arcanum, etc., in all near 
3,000 men, in tlieir regalia, headed by 
several bands, paraded the streets on the 
North Side Sabbath morning, June 20. 
At Ogden Grove they 'held a midsummer 
festival, with Alayor Harrison and others 
as speakers. This common practice of 
secret societies is one of the most danger- 
ous influences, destroying tlie Sabbath 
rest. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897, 



THE LODGE IN POLITICS. 



BY REV. W. A. CA:MPBELL. 



But few people have any adequate 
conception of the influence of the lodge 
in politics. There are but few of our 
county or State political papers but are 
owned and run by lodge men. If an 
honest Christian man, who is not a lodge 
man, starts a political paper, 'on some 
great moral issue, which all Christians 
should support, he can seldom make it a 
success financially, because of the boy- 
cott to which he is subjected by the lodge 
men. IMany excellent papers, published 
by the best of men, and supporting the 
grandest issues, have gone down be- 
cause of the boycott to which they were 
subjected by lodge men, and because 
Christians did not rally to their support 
as they should. 

On the other hand, let a lodge man 
start a paper, in support of a very un- 
worthy cause, and all lodge men will 
speak his praise, and herald abroad the 
excellence of his paper, and even Chris- 
tian men, men belonging to anti-secret 
churches, will often rally to his support, 
and make his paper a success financially, 
while their own beloved brother in the 
church had to give up his paper, which 
he would not have had to do had they 
supported him /^.s they did the unworthy 
lodge man. 

For three years and a half the writer 
of this article ran the State prohibition 
paper of lovv^a. The men then at the 
head of the Prohibition party of Iowa 
were anti-secret men and men who stood 
in the fore-front of all reform. Our State 
chairman. Rev. S. A. Gilley, was a Wes- 
leyan Methodist, a strong anti-secret 
man. One of our frequent lecturers was 
the present editor of The Cynosure. Such 
men as these were then at the head of the 
grand and good cause of prohibition in 
Iowa. But I do not recollect a single in- 
stance now where we ever got lodge men 
to arrange for a prohibition meeting in 
their own town, if a known anti-secret 
man was to lecture, even when he was 
not to speak on the lodge question at 
all, but on the grand catholic question 
of prohibition. 

On the other hand, we have known 
lodge men who laid loud claim to be 
prohibitionists when we have announced 
a prohibition lecture in their town, and 



requested them to make all necessary ar- 
rangements as to place of meeting and 
entertainment of the speaker, to abso- 
lutely do nothing, and not even did they 
act the gentleman enough to give us, or 
the speaker, word not to come, or even 
to entertain him and arrange for his ex- 
penses when he had come, but they al- 
lowed him to come and go unheard and 
at his own charges. 

What have the Sons of Temperance, 
or the Good Templars, done to advance 
the cause of prohibition? Absolutely 
nothing. The Sons of Temperance have 
been in the field about fifty years, mak- 
ing loud boasts of the great things they 
were going to do for temperance. But 
what have they done? Nothing, abso- 
lutely nothing that is noticeable. They 
have spent their time and money for self- 
ish ends, or in an underhand political 
way, and have done nothing that we can 
see or feel, to help the good cause, for 
which they claim to exist. 

Then what have the Good Templars 
done in the more than thirty years of 
their existence? • Nothing that the liquor 
men regard as a restraint upon their traf- 
fic. We had thousands of Good Temp- 
lars in Iowa, when I was in the prohibi- 
tion work, and never did they, as an or- 
ganization, aid us any in promoting pro- 
hibition. Some individuals, who were 
Good Templars, it is true were good 
workers in the prohibitiua cause. But 
they did no better work than others who 
were not Good Templars. They would 
have done us just as good service had 
they never entered a Good Templar 
lodge. I say, as a lodge, they did not 
benefit the cause they claimed as para- 
mount to all others. Generally, they were 
the dupes of wily politicians who manip- 
ulated their lodges, or them as individ- 
uals, to keep good temperance men in 
the ranks of the old whisky parties, who 
would not have remained in said old cor- 
rupt parties had they not been deceived 
by designing politicians in their lodges. 

How few have been elected to any 
State or national office of importance in 
the last twenty years who were not lodge 
men! One of the best men, in Iowa, but 
a strong anti-secret man, received the 
smallest vote for Governor on the Pro- 
hibition ticket of any man that has run 
on that ticket since 1890. They are on 
the still hunt for power, and have drench- 
ed every country in blood where they 



August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



99 



have attained to power, in less than 300 
years' existence. 

Mount Auburn, Iowa. 



THE LODGE SUBVERTS TRUE GOV- 
ERNMENT. 



BY MRS. N. E, KELLOGG. 

Much has been said, and justly, of the 
fact that secret lodges reject Christ. Je- 
sus said: "T and My Father are one." 
"He that hath seen Me hath seen the Fa- 
ther." "He that honoreth not the Son 
honoreth not the Father that hath sent 
Flim." And since there is but one God, 
and "one Mediator between God and 
man, the man Christ Jesus," if the secret 
lod^e rejects Christ, and it does, then the 
secret lodge sets aside and ignores God, 
the source of all authority, and so is ut- 
terly subversive of all true government. 

But not only do secret societies reject 
Christ, there is a still more important 
truth: God has, in his Word, set himself 
clearly against secrecy. "Come ye near 
unto me, hear ye this. I have not spoken 
in secret from the beginning," and again, 
"I am the Lord, and there is none else. 
I have not spoken in secret, in a dark 
place of the earth.' Jesus, reviewing his 
life work before Pilate, said: "In secret 
have Lsaid nothing." And looking for- 
ward to these last days, preceding his 
coming again, he said to his disciples: 
"If any mian shall say unto you, 'Lo! here 
is Christ, or there,' behold he is in the 
secret chambers ; believe it not." "God is 
Hght," and "what concord hath light 
with darkness?" 

More than this, not only does the ex- 
ample and character of God show that 
he is averse to secrecy, but he once set 
up a government on earth, himself its 
lawgiver and king, and the laws . that 
were given to his people clearly show 
that God is opposed to secrecy. God 
took a nation of slaves out of Egypt into 
the wilderness, and, on the single con- 
dition of careful, diligent obedience to 
his commands, he promised to "set them 
on high, above all nations of the earth," 
to open to them his" "good treasure," to 
give rain and to bless all the work of 
their hands, and it was added, "Thou 
shalt lend unto many nations, thou shalt 
lend and not borrow.' But what were 
these commandments, in keeping of 



which there was so great reward? In 
general the comm.and was for man to 
love God supremely, and his neighbor as 
himself. In particular, mention may be 
made of three commands: 

(i) "If a soul sin and hear the voice 
of swearing, and is a witness, if he do not 
utter it, then he shall bear his iniquity/' 
Lev. v., I. To put this in common lan- 
guage: If a witness be put under oath, 
and he refuses to testify, he is guilty. 
Thus Christ before the high priest an- 
swered nothing until the high priest 
arose up and said unto him, "I adjure 
thee, by the living God;" that is, he put 
Christ under oath, and then Jesus an- 
swered him. 

(2) "If a soul swear, pronouncing 
with his lips to do evil or to do good, 
whatsoever it be that a man shall pro- 
nounce with an oath, and it be hid from 
him ; when he knoweth of it, then he shall 
be guilty in one of these. And it shall 
be, when he shall be guilty in one of 
these, that he shall confess that he hath 
sinned," Lev. v., 4, 5. That is, if a man 
promises with an oath to do something 
without knowing what he is promising 
to do, it is a sin. For instance, if in a 
secret society a person swears to "obey 
all due signs and summonses" sent to him 
from a lodge, wdiether he finds that the 
thing required of him is to assist a poor 
man, which is a good thing to do, or to 
take a human life, which is an awful crime, 
he has sinned and God's law requires 
him to confess his sin. 

(3) "Take heed to thyself, that thou 
inquire not, saying. How did these na- 
tions serve their Gods? — even so will I 
do likewise. Thou shalt not do so unto 
the Lord thy God. What thing soever I 
command you, observe to do it; thou 
shalt not add thereto nor diminish from 
it," Deut. xii. ,-30-32. That is, in religion, 
nothing less, nor more, than what God 
has commanded, is acceptable to him. In 
the words of Christ, "In vain do they 
worship me, teaching for doctrines the 
commandments of men." These laws of 
God are plainly opposed to the teachings 
and practice of the lodge. 

The oath of the Master ^^lason to con- 
ceal the crimes of a brother, with two ex- 
ceptions, and these left to his option, is in 
direct opposition to the law of God in re- 
gard to witnessing in court. A man call- 
ed to testify in court concerning the 
known guilt of a brother blaster [Mason 



100 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



would be obliged to decide between his 
lodge oath to conceal the crime and the 
law of God to testify to the truth. He 
cannot do both. Thus secrecy endeav- 
ors to take away the fear of God from 
man, and in its place to put the fear of 
penalty, or the ''fear of man" that "bring- 
eth a snare." 

God's law is, "Thou shalt not forswear 
thyself." In lodge practice, however, the 
solemn promise of "secrecy and obedi- 
ence" must always be given before the 
candidate is fully admitted to the secrets 
of the order; thus to set aside the law of 
God, who is the only rightful source of 
human authority, tends to destroy all cit- 
izenship. It is treason against all hu- 
man government. 

In the third place, it seems almost past 
belief, and yet it is true, that the Masonic 
lodge acknowledges that its worship is 
identical with that of the ancient myster- 
ies, or heathen worship. In Mackey's 
Ritualist, page 109, we find this: "The 
single object of all the ancient rites and 
mysteries practiced in the very bosom 
of pagan darkness is still the great de- 
sign of the third degree of Masonry." 
'The sublime degree of a Master Ma- 
son!" And in the same work, article 
''Antiquity of Masonry," are these sig- 
nificant words: 'The Ancient Myster- 
ies, those truly Masonic institutions." 

What, then, is the position of a Chris- 
tian worshiping in a secret lodge? He 
is trying to do what God said, 'Thou 
shalt not do;" namely, worship the true 
God with a heathen rite. Aaron attempt- 
ed to do this when he set up the golden 
calf and "built an altar before it," and 
said, 'To-morrow is a feast of the Lord." 
But it is written, 'They sacrificed to dev- 
ils, not to God. And when the Lord saw 
it He abhorred them, and He said, I will 
hide my face from them; I will see what 
their end shall be," Deut. xxxii., 17, 19, 
20. And again it is said: "They shall 
no more offer their sacrifices unto dev- 
ils," Lev. xvii., 7. And again: "The 
things which the gentiles sacrifice, they 
sacrifice to devils, not to God," i. Cor. 
X., 20. 

And as God does not change, worship 
offered to Him to-day, as then, in a way 
not appointed by Him, is an offense to 
Him. Satan stands behind the false al- 
tar, or the rite, or ceremony not appoint- 
ed by Christ, and receives the worship, 
and as the Holy Spirit of God fills the 



heart of every one who truly worships 
God through Christ, and makes him 
holy; so Satan blinds the mind and fiUs 
the heart of the sincere worshiper at a 
false altar, and makes him devilish. Dev- 
il worshipers cannot, if they would, nor 
would not if they could, make Christian 
citizens, and of necessity the nation itself 
will become — nay is — heathen when a 
majority of its citizens are worshipers at 
false altars. 
Wheaton, 111. 



DELUDED BY THE DEVIL. 



This is the condition of those who are 
bound hand and foot in secret societies, 
I have no use for a religion that does not 
separate the child of God from such 
things, neither is the Lord Jesus Christ 
honored by professing Christians who are 
living contrary to the teaching of God's 
Word. He says: "Ye adulterers and 
adultresses, know ye not that the friend- 
ship of the world is enmity with God? 
Whosoever, therefore, will be a friend of 
the world is the enemy of God," James 
iv., 4. Therefore in the light of Scripture, 
one of two things must necessarily take 
place ; the Christian will come out wiholly 
from these evil things or refuse and live 
under the condemnation of Him who has 
said, "Whosoever therefore will be a 
friend of the world is the enemy of God." 

This is plain enough for any who will 
read with sincere hearts desiring to know 
and do God's will. Secret societies are 
one of the greatest evils existing, and one 
of the greatest hindrances to spirituality 
among Christians. "Ye cannot serve God 
and mammon." Many young people are 
led by the example of their elders into 
these societies blindfolded, not only lit- 
erally, but spiritually; and witfhout stop- 
ping to ask, Are these things of God? 
Will He be pleased or ^honored in this? 
And once wi^in the pale of the lodge, the 
devil holds many of them with cords not 
easily broken; their conscience lulled to 
sleep with the "Fatherhood of God and 
brotherhood of man" doctrine; they are 
content and say, as many do: "This is 
religion enough for me." 

It is hig^h time for us to awake and cry 
out against this growing evil. There are 
the faithful few who are proclaiming the 
truth with no uncertain sound ; but O that 
the churdh of God mig^ht awake and arise 



August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



101 



like one vast army and shake off the fet- 
ters of Saitan that now bind her and set 
herself in array against this foe so mig-hty. 
If all Christians would take their true po- 
sition as they should, then should "one 
chase a thousand and tyv^o put ten thou- 
sand to fligiht." O tihat a warning voice 
might oftener be heard from the pulpits 
•of our land, but they are strangely silent 

Pastors, ^epherds of the flock, a word 
to you. Many of you are as blind as the 
people to w^om you minister, "blind 
leaders of the blind;" if not blind you are 
wilfully disobedient and consequently 
under greater condefmnation, for "he that 
knoweth to do good and doeth it not to 
him it is sin." But the Holy Spirit is 
grieved, for He never, no, never, leads 
into these things, but always out from 
them. Bear this in mind, ye Christian 
people who are praying for the Holy Spir- 
it and for power. Get right with God; 
'give up your idols and get separated unto 
Him 'before wasting any more breath 
praying for that \Vhich you are in no con- 
dition to receive. 

He wants a sanctified, separated peo- 
ple, and if you would abide in Him and 
have His abiding presence in you, it is 
necessary on your part that you meet the 
•conditions, for He wall not, cannot, fill a 
-divided heart. 

"Wherefore come out from among 
"them and be ye separate, saith the Lord, 
and touch not the unclean thing, and I 
will receive you," 2 Cor. vi., 17. "For ye 
aare bought with a price; therefore glorify 
'God in your body and in your spirits, 
•whidh are God^s," i Cor. vi., 20. 

EMMA B. ROSS, 

East Long Meadow, Mass. 



REFORMATION AND REFORMERS. 



BY REV. D. B. GUNN. 



Reformation is the great need of all 
the world at the present time. It has 
been a real necessity everywhere since 
the fall of man. Not alone in heathen 
'Countries, nor in irreligious society, but 
much where there is a profession of mor- 
.ality and sanctity. Nor does the need 
stop with society as such, but in relig- 
ious circles and among those who bear 
the Christian name, even in evangelical 
'Churches is there more or less that needs 
^reforming, in order to elevate members 



and their practices to. the standard given 
by our Lord and Master. They need 
sweeping waves of reformation to purge 
them from the errors of the times, to 
drive out the spirit of worldliness, to sep- 
arate from entangling, hurtful alliances, 
unyoke the many from sworn fellowship 
with unbelievers and the profane, unite 
them to Christ in gospel life and light, so 
as to make of them 'a. peculiar people, 
zealous of good works." 

In order to bring about such reforma- 
tion in society and churches, there must 
be, of necessity, reformers, zealous and 
devoted, w^ho are willing to place ease, 
name, reputation, and themselves upon 
the altar, ready to do and endure, suffer 
reproach, and whatever may be neces- 
sary in defending the faith, promulgat- 
ing the truth, and promoting the cause of 
righteousness. True reformers are not 
held in high esteem by the masses, who 
often brand them as cranks and fanatics, 
narrow minded and ilhberal. But they 
have an illustrious exemplar and leader 
in the person of Him w^ho taught as never 
man taught, and instituted a reformation 
which was to become world-wide and 
everlasting. 

He has had His reformers in every 
age of the world, and they have not lived 
nor labored in vain. They have not al- 
ways achieved immediate success. Many 
have worn themselves out and passed 
away without witnessing the consumma- 
tion of the end for which they strove. 
Faithful sowing does not always result 
in reaping immediate, bountiful harvest. 
The promise to the "steadfast and im- 
movable," who "always abound in the 
work of the Lord," that their "labor shall 
not be in vain in the Lord," is not an as- 
surance that they themselves will gather 
the fruit of their labors. "One soweth 
and another reapeth. Other men labor- 
ed and ye are entered into their labors." 
We all who love Christ ought to be re- 
formers, bold, true and noble. We are 
in duty bound to sow Gospel seed, such 
seed as our Master did. whether we en- 
joy the harvest or die before it is gath- 
ered. There may be blessed fruits of our 
own reformatory work that we do not 
discern or realize to be such. 

There may not be any oveilurning or 
uprooting of the evil at which we direct 
our efforts, but there often is great pre- 
vention. Restraints are laid upon many 
tempted ones, and they are kept from 



K2 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



forming vicious habits, uniting in unholy 
leagues, and committing wicked deeds. 
Public sentiment has been molded, so- 
ciety has been warped back from a wrong 
trend: a better way been cast up; holy 
paths have been opened : many have been 
aided to shun evil companions and their 
ways: while others have been rescued 
and brought out of them. 

Xone will ever know how many have 
been, by the ministries of the National 
Christian Association. Xew England C. 
A., and kindred bodies, through their 
publications and personal workers, led to 
abandon lodges — for very many, in fear 
never tell it — nor the yet greater number 
who are saved from joining them. Re- 
formers have been prominent in all ages 
of the world, and they have not lived and 
toiled in vain. Jesus was the Great Re- 
former of all times, and He stands forth 
to-day calling upon His disciples wher- 
ever they may be, to lay hold of the 
church, the state, society, and the na- 
tions of the world, and press the work 
of reform with all possible powers and 
speed. This shall be one means of pre- 
paring for the "great day of God, when 
the Lord Jesus shall be revealed from 
heaven, with His mighty angels, in tiam- 
ing fire, taking vengeance on them that 
know not God, and obey not the Gospel 
of our Lord Jesus Christ." Abraham 
was a reformer full of faith and of good 
works, and all through that age the gen- 
erations of Israel were aided and blessed 
by him. ]\Ioses and Joshua were model 
reformers, who led their people, held them 
in check when running to evil, gave them 
sound teaching and right impulses to- 
ward well-doing. Samuel and David 
were of like spirit. Elijah was mighty as 
a reformer, made himself felt during the 
reign of a Jezebel-ruled king, called 
God's fire from heaven to aid in his tell- 
ing reform work; slew the idolatrous 
priests; saved Israel from a sweeping 
idolatry, and re-established the worship 
of the true God. Were the same dispen- 
sational regime now in force, what a host 
of priests, worshipful masters, etc., 
would lose their heads, and where would 
their souls be found. 

Daniel and his coadjutors, though in 
captivity in a heathen nation, were en- 
dowed with wisdom and skill to achieve 
victories, set God forth as a m^ighty, mir- 
aculous deliverer and the only true and 
living God. 



Brethren, cahed to be reformers to- 
day, God is the same now that He was 
then, and Avill do as great thino-s for and 
by us, if we are as true to Him, and have 
as great faith. The Apostles were a band 
of reformers, and Paul, the peer of them 
all, was unmistakably in our lead, yet in- 
spiring us by his divinely inspired words, 
among which, specially to the point and 
appropriate to us in our mission against 
secret societies, are those in 2 Cor. vi., 
14-18. As was he, so are we called and 
authorized by the same ^Master and Lord 
to herald the Gospel of salvation and ref- 
ormation am.ong the priests, high and 
low, the doctors, scribes, pharisees, hypo- 
crites, to the churches, lodges, clubs, 
those bound by profane oath, and solemn 
or mock pledges, the enslaved and the 
free, the moral and immoral, to all every- 
where, the Gospel of freedom, of light 
and life in Christ Jesus. O that men 
would seek and accept what this glori- 
ous Gospel offers them, and away with 
all of the man-devised gospels, for they 
are devilish and lead deluded souls to 
hell. 

Time and space in your valuable and 
intensely interesting monthly forbid my 
speaking of later reformers — Luther, 
Calvin, Wesley, Williams. J. O. Adams^ 
Sumner. Blanchard. and hosts of others 
— masters, sufferers, cross-bearing wit- 
nesses and fearless defenders of the true 
faith, who wear crowns of life and joy, 
eternal. 

Cambridge, ^lass. 



AWFUL INIQUITY OF FREEMASONRY. 



BY REV. P. B. WILLIAMS, 



I think that more than one-half of the 
members of the order do not understand 
what ]\Iasonry is. They pass its portals, 
g:o throusfh with the initiation without 
comprehending its meaning. There is 
not one person in five hundred outside of 
the order who advocate it and know 
what they are standing up for. To know 
Free Masonry one must understand its 
spirit and philosophy. To know what a 
church teaches you must go to its con- 
fession of faith, which is its consensus of 
Christian doctrine. So, to understand 
]^Iasonry, one must take their standard 
authorities. 

^Masonry is a religious system, not only 



August, 189' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



103 



a religion, but is mentioned as the relig- 
ion, and is spoken of as that higher relig- 
ion, that religion in which all men can 
agree, which indeed embraces the lower 
religion of creeds and sects. These 
authors recognize Christianity as a sect, 
therefore one can ver}- readily see how 
they exalt }vIasonry above Christianity, 
and thereby seek to supplant it. 

To say that a man can intelligently 
embrace the system of religion called 
Free ^vlasonr}-, and still be true and loyal 
to Christ and His church, is to say that 
a man can be a Christian and a non- 
Christian at the same time. r\Iackey's 
^lanual. page 36: "W'e no longer use 
the bath or the fountain, because in our 
philosophical system the symbolism is 
more abstract, but we present the candi- 
date with the apron, the gauge, and the 
g'avel, as symbols of a spiritual purifica- 
tion." On pages 38 and 39 of the same 
book it is plainly taught that ^lasonry 
proposes to enlighten man's ignorance, 
purify his evil nature and rescue him 
from the world. 

On page 285 of ?\Iackey's Lexicon, un- 
der "Lustration," he says: "The lustra- 
tion in Free I\Iasonry is mental. Xo 
aspirant can be admitted to participate in 
our sacred rites until he is thoroughly 
cleansed from all pollution of guilt." And 
on pages 295 and 296: "The ^Master ]Ma- 
son represents a man under the doctrine 
of love, saved from the grave of iniquity. 
and raised to the faith of salvation. It 
testifies our faith in the resurrection rt' 
the body, and while it inculcates a prac- 
tical lesson of prudence and unshrink- 
ing fidelity, it inspires the most cheering 
hope of that final reward which belongs 
alone to the 'Just made perfect." " 

Have you ever noticed how av/iully 
self-contradictory Free ^Masonry is? Xo 
two authors agree as to its nature or 
practice, and no [Masonic author I have 
ever read goes very far without contra- 
dicting him.self. Li the Kansas Free- 
^.lason of last ^^larch, in an oration be- 
fore the State Grand Lodge, by John D. 
]\Iilliken. appear these expressions: 

"That many who have taken its (]\Ia- 
sonry's) solemn vows make little eftort 
to conform their lives thereto, is too well 
known for refutation. It may even be 
said that a majority of Masons do not 
even approximately live up to its pro- 
fession, and that none are able to meas- 
ure to the exalted standard it has erected. 



What a wonderful system ! Wt had sup- 
posed that, with all their braggadocio 
and high-sounding titles, certainly a 
great many of them had claimed to get 
there in the highest sense of the ^lasonic 
term. And here we are informed that 
none can. 

The reader will observe here how they 
exalt it above Christianity. Christ teach- 
er perfection in His system of religion. 
Yea. he commands it, 3,Iatt. v., 48. But 
here is a system so far above Christianity 
I acording to this Kansas authority) that 
to invite the votary to perfection in it 
would be but an ignus fatuus. 

I am frank to say that, according to 
the teachings of the two systems of re- 
ligion, Free ^Masonry and Christianity, 
no man can be loyal to .both at the 
sam.e time. The duty of the churches 
of America and other countries is to keep 
this fact clearly before the minds of the 
people. We ought to draw the lines 
closer on the subject of patronizing the 
ministry of lodge preachers. To sit un- 
der their ministry ig to become particeps 
criminis. - ^ . ' . 

Lima, Ohio. 



SECRECY AND CITIZENSHIP. 



EY PROF. ELLIOT WHIPPLE. 



Allusion has been made in a former ar- 
ticle to a conflict that may arise between 
the obligations imposed by secret socie- 
ties and the duties owed by every citizen 
to the government under whose protec- 
tion he lives, but one feature of the case 
requires further discussion. Do we know 
what these obligations are? 

Revelations of the Secrets of Free 3^Ia- 
sonry. 

Seceders from nearly all secret socie- 
ties have exhibited, printed and sworn 
to revelations of initiations, oaths, and 
secrets of their respective organizations, 
but adhering members continue to deny 
the truthfulness of these revelations. 
Have we convincing evidence of the real 
facts of the case? 

Here again it seems best to study more 
particularly one typical organization, 
and for the same reasons as before, we 
select Free ]^Iasonry. This institution 
has existed in its present form about 175 
years, has branches all over the civil- 
ized world at least, and embraces in its 



104 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



membership men of all classes. If, as 
its apologists nowadays frequently as- 
sert, its obligations are of a trivial char- 
acter and the highest penalty for their 
violation is only expulsion, how improb- 
able that no disgruntled seceder or ex- 
pelled ]Mason in all these years has ever 
revealed the truth ! 

The report published by the Grand 
Lodge of Illinois in 1868 shows that 
during the preceding year eighty-one 
had been expelled, beside 341 suspend- 
ed and 1,841* demitted. What obliga- 
tion has proved strong enough to seal 
the mouths of those eighty-one expelled 
persons, who certainly could have no 
more favors to expect from the society? 
If the oaths and penalties are substan- 
tially such as seceders afihrm them to be, 
we can understand why the ordinary 
man would hesitate to speak of them 
unless impelled to do so by a very strong 
sense of dutv. 

The fact that apparently good men, 
who are Masons, deny that the revela- 
tions of seceders are correct is partially 
explained when we remember that it has 
always been the policy of Masonry not 
to have its oaths and penalties written or 
printed in any form, for the very good 
reason that if they were so recorded they 
would be almost certain, sooner or later, 
to fall into the hands of non-Masons and 
so become pubhc property. It has been 
a necessary consequence that the form of 
words used has been spread abroad over 
the world and handed down from gen- 
eration to generation by the uncertain 
method of oral communication. Doubt- 
less great care has usually been exercised 
to transmit the exact form unchanged, 
but verbal changes would be sure to oc- 
cur in such lengthy forms administered 
by so many thousand different persons 
so widely separated in time and place, 
and this contingency is recognized and 
provided for by the frequent insertion of 
the proviso that, if any part of the obli- 
gation is omitted, the candidate prom- 
ises to hold himself amenable thereto 
when informed. 

Sometimes, too, the form may have 
been purposely changed so that the ini- 
tiate could say, when confronted with 
the revealed- obHgation, *'I did not take 
that oath." In view of the above con- 
siderations it does not require a very 
profound knowledge of the workings of 
human nature to understand how men, 



who would not be willing to tell what 
they consider an absolute falsehood, will 
nevertheless deny that the oaths of Free 
Masonry have been revealed, because 
some more or less important portion of 
the revealed oath differs from the oath as 
they have heard it administered. The 
testimony that the oaths commonly tak- 
en by persons being initiated into the 
various degrees of Free Masonry have 
been revealed with substantial correct- 
ness is so strong that no unbiased mind 
can fail to be convinced of its truthful- 
ness. 

UNINTENTIONAL TESTIMONY OF ADHERING 

MASONS. 

Adhering Masons frequently bear wit- 
ness to the fact that the revelations are- 
correct without intending to do so, when 
they denounce a seceder, who reveals the 
oaths, as a perjured wretch. Evidently 
the statement of the seceder is either true 
or not true. If not true, he is a liar, but 
he is not a perjurer; therefore, when ad- 
hering Masons call him a perjurer they 
confirm the truth of his statement. 

Again, if the allegations of the seced- 
ers are not true, they might cause tem- 
porary feelings of annoyance; but this 
would be no occasion for the mob vio- 
lence and persistent and vindictive hos- 
tility which have so frequently been vis- 
ited upon those who have published ex- 
posures of Free Alasonry. Moreover, 
book-Masons — that is, men who had' 
never been initiated and who knew noth- 
ing of so-called Masonic secrets, except 
what they had learned from books pub- 
lished by seceding Masons — have fre- 
quently secured responses from adher- 
ing Masons, by using the signs, grips,, 
and pass-words given in the books, thus 
estabhshing the truth of the revelations 
beyond all question. Any one still in 
doubt can easily satisfy himself by ob- 
taining a printed copy of the initiatory 
ceremonies and applying the test to the 
first stranger he meets who is adorned' 
(?) with the square and compasses. 

TESTIMONY OF SECEDING MASONS. 

The testimony of seceding Masons as 
to Masonic oaths and penalties is direct,, 
positive and complete, and the number 
and character of the witnesses is such 
as to leave no reasonable doubt as to the 
truth of what they say, especially when 
we remember that they all had very 
strong motives not to say anything about 



August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



105 



the matter, and very few could have had 
any reason at all for incurring the odium 
resulting from volunteering to become 
witnesses, unless they believed that what 
they told was true and needed to be told 
to save the nation from the evil influ- 
ence of an exceedingly dangerous insti- 
tution. 

In September, 1826, William Morgan, 
a citizen of New York, who was under- 
stood to be preparing a book exposing 
the secrets of Free Masonry, was seized 
by persons then unknown and hurried 
away in a closed carriage, and was never 
seen alive thereafter by his family or 
friends. Nevertheless his book was pub- 
lished and on the 19th of February, 1828, 
forty-six seceding Masons met at Le 
Roy, N. Y., and bore testimony to its 
substantial truthfulness, and at another 
meeting held in the same town on July 4, 
1829, 129 seceding Masons confirmed 
the statement of the preceding conven- 
tion. As a result of the attendant dis- 
cussions, Robert Morris, who is high 
Masonic authority, says that 1,500 lodges 
gave up their charters, and out of a little 
more than 50,000 Masons in this country 
45,000 ceased to attend lodge meetings. 
Is it conceivable that such efifects could 
have been produced unless the revela- 
tions had been substantially true? 

These statements have been abundant- 
ly confirmed at frequent intervals from 
that time to the present by seceding Ma- 
sons whose reputation for ability, wis- 
dom and veracity has been such as to 
make it impossible to doubt the truth of 
their testimony. As examples of such 
witnesses we may mention Chas. G. Fin- 
ney, under whose presidency Oberlin 
College grew to be a great power for 
righteousness throughout the North- 
western States; Nathaniel Colver, D. D., 
Rev. J. R. Baird, Elder David Bernard, 
Edmond Ronayne, Ezra T. Mclntyre, 
Stephen Merritt, and Rev. Gro. F. Pen- 
tecost. 

We have seen above that Masons often 
refuse to testify before the court as to 
lodge secrets, but this has not always 
been the case, as the following extracts 
show: 

TESTIMONY OF ADHERING MASONS IN COURT. 

Wendell's reports of the Supreme 
Court of New York, vol. xiii., pages 16 
and 17, contain the following abstract of 
testimony taken in the lower courts: 



Henry Burlingame testified that he had 
taken the Royal Arch degree of Free 
Masonry and took the following oath: 

''Furthermore I do promise and swear 
that I will aid and assist a companion 
Royal Arch Mason when engaged in any 
quarrel, so far as to extricate him from 
the same, whether right or wrong." Dr. 
Levi Farr testified that he had taken sub- 
stantially the same oath, also the oath to 
keep a worthy companion Royal Arch 
Mason's secrets, when given in charge as 
such, murder and treason not excepted. 
Percey Randall testified that he took the 
oath as^ follows: 'T will keep a worthy 
brother's seciets without exception." 
John F. Hubbard testified the same. 
Hezekiah Read testified that he took the 
oath in Connecticut as follows : 

"I will keep the secrets of a worthy 
companion Royal Arch Mason as I 
would my own." All the above testified 
that they saw nothing wrong in the 
above oaths and believed they could 
properly act as jurors in a case between 
a Mason and a non-Mason. From the 
last clause we discover that the above 
witnesses were all adhering Masons. 

MASONS UNFIT TO SERVE AS JUDGES OR 
JURORS. 

Perhaps they could and would so in- 
terpret the clause, ''Aid and assist a com- 
panion Royal Arch Mason when en- 
gaged in any quarrel-, so far as to extri- 
cate him from the same, whether right 
or wrong," in such a way as to render 
them suitable jurors in a case between 
Mason and a non-Mason, but what non- 
Mason would be willing to have a case 
in which he might be interested against 
a Mason, decided by a Masonic judge or 
by a jury containing one or more Ma- 
sons? Yet this is precisely what is oc- 
curring in our- courts all over the coun- 
try, and will continue to occur frequent- 
ly everywhere until Masons are by law 
rendered ineHgible to be judges or jurors. 
Of course, an attorney can and some- 
times does take a change of venue from 
a Masonie judge or challenge a Masonic 
juror for cause, but the influence of Ma- 
sonry is so powerful that a lawyer sel- 
dom can be found to thus antagonize it. 

In April, 1831, in the case, "Overseers 
of the Poor of New Berlin, in Chenango 
County, New York, vs. Harlow C. With- 
erill," William C. Greenleaf testified that 
he was a Mason of three degrees and 



106 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



took oaths substantially as given by Ber- 
nard. The penalty of the Master Ma- 
son's degree was "to have his body sev- 
ered in two." etc. To the question by 
the plaintiit's counsel, "Where did you 
get your ]\Iasonry — in the papers or in 
Bernard's book?" witness answered, "In 
a just and lawfully constituted lodge." 
In the same trial, General Augustus 
\A'elch, Sheriff of the county, /testified 
that he was a Royal Arch Mason. 
Thought it was in the obligation not to 
speak evil of a brother Master Alason, 
but to apprise him of all approaching 
danger, if in his power; to obey signs, 
summonses, etc., to keep a worthy Mas- 
ter ]\Iason's secrets, murder and treason 
excepted. 

If any part of the obligation is omit- 
ted, the candidate swxars that he will 
hold him.self amenable thereto when in- 
formed. Penalty in the Master Mason's 
degree is "to have the body severed in 
twain the midst and divided to the north 
and south, the bowels burnt to ashes, and 
the ashes scattered to the four winds of 
the heaven," etc. Witness thought he 
swore in Royal xArch degree as follows : 
"I will aid and assist a companion Royal 
Arch Alason when engaged in any diffi- 
culty, and espouse his cause so far as to 
extricate him from the same, if in my 
power, whether he be right or wrong," 
and "a com.panion Royal Arch Mason's 
secrets, given me in charge as such, and 
I knowing them to be such, shall remain 
as secure and inviolate in my breast as 
in his own, murder and treason not ex- 
cepted." 

V\Ttness believes the penalty was as 
follows: "Ah of which I most solemnly 
promise and swear with a firm and steady 
resolution to perform the same, without 
any equivocation, mxental reservation, or 
self-evasion of mind whatever, binding 
myself under no less penalty than that 
of having my skull smote ofi, and my 
brains exposed to the scorching rays of 
the sun, should I ever knowingly or will- 
fully violate or transgress any part of 
my solemn oath or obligation of a Royal 
Arch Alason. So help me God and 
keep me steadfast in the performance of 
the sam.e." 

John Pike, a justice of the peace, and 
Rouse Clark, both testified that they had 
taken degrees in Masonry up to the 
Royal Arch and beyond, and that the 
statements of the preceding witness 



(General Welch) were correct. Mr. Pike's 
testimony covered the whole ground in 
detail and the last two witnesses appar- 
ently made their statements positively 
without the qualifications introduced by 
General Welch. It must be borne in 
mind that these obligations include not 
only the members of the same local lodge,, 
but also all Masons everywhere who 
have taken the same degree. Consequent- 
ly every Mason is pledged to every other 
Mason in the world "to obey signs," "to 
apprise him of all approaching danger, 
if in his power," "to keep his secrets,. 
murder and treason excepted." 

Evidently a man who is bound by such 
an obhgation is unfitted to perform the 
duties that may at arty time be required 
of any ordinary private citizen in aiding 
in the enforcement of the law and in the 
detection and punishment of criminals,, 
and that such -a man should be allowed 
to serve on a jury or as a judge or sheriff 
is to turn the administration of justice 
into a farce. Of course, there are many 
adhering Masons who are honest men 
and good citizens. Such men believe 
that their obligations to the lodge are 
not intended to require them to aid 
criminals to escape, but only to aid 
worthy brother Alasons who have fallen 
into difficulties from which it is right 
that they should be extricated. 

But on the other hand there are many 
Masons who believe their Masonic ob- 
ligations voluntarily assumed are more 
binding than any other duties of any 
kind whatosever; there are many others 
who are only too glad to find an excuse 
to satisfy their own consciences for help- 
ing their friends to escape the conse- 
quences of their crimes; and another 
still larger class of persons who do not 
spontaneously desire to see injustice 
done or crime go unpunished, but w^ho 
have no very strong sense of justice, 
when they receive an appeal to aid a 
brother Mason enforced by a reference 
to their Masonic oaths, are more likely 
to yield to the appeal thaji to stand firm 
for justice and right. 

The real intention of the oath of the 
Master Mason is evident from the clause, 
"Murder and treason except." A Ma- 
son accused of any other crime is to have 
his secrets kept, a course of action which 
is very liable to prevent a brother Ma- 
son from giving testimony necessary to 
prove his guilt, thus leading to refusal to 



August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



101 



testify or to perjury. A magistrate, 
when called upon to issue a warrant for 
the arrest of a brother Mason, or a sher- 
iff, when called upon to serve a warrant, 
may think his obligation "to apprise him 
of all approaching danger, if in his pow- 
er," requires him to send seasonable no- 
tice to the accused. 

The speaker once heard Colonel Fran- 
cis Parker, then Superintendent of 
Schools in Quincy, Mass., tell how, 
when on a scouting expedition in Vir- 
g-inia during the Civil War, he escaped 
capture and probable death by giving 
the Masonic signal to a guerrilla chief. 

During the period of retaliatory exe- 
cutions which followed the employment 
of negroes as Union soldiers, the w^hite 
prisoners confined in Libby prison were 
told that a certain number must be exe- 
cuted, and the requisite men were se- 
lected by lot. One of the unhappy men 
gave the Masonic signal to the rebel offi- 
cer and on the way to the place of exe- 
cution he was smuggled out of danger, 
another Union prisoner led to death in 
his place, and he lived to return to home 
and friends. Many similar stories are 
told illustrating the beneficent (?) power 
of Masonry to compel Confederate offi- 
cers to rescue Union soldiers from dan- 
ger or death. But what view would be 
held by the man selected for execution in 
place of the rescued Mason, if he knew 
the facts in the case? 

Is it to be supposed that Masonic 
oaths were potent with rebel officers 
only? And does any one imagine that 
oaths, which could control military offi- 
cers whose passions were inflamed by 
the fiery scenes of war, would lose their 
potency when applied to civil officials in 
times of peace? What young man of 
promise and ability has not heard the 
siren whisper, "Join the Masons so that 
if you ever get into any kind of trouble 
you may have help, and so that you can 
find promotion to position and power 
otherwise not easily secured?" 

The published records of Masonry 
show that Masons guilty of crime are 
sosiietimes expelled, in which case it is 
to be presumed those who know of their 
expulsion would not be bound to aid 
them in escaping the hands of the law, 
but if criminal law cannot be enforced 
against Masons until a secret and irre- 
sponsible tribunal of brother Masons has 
declared them guilty, it is plain that there 



is no chance for equal justice to ah men. 
It is not strange that Thaddeus Stevens 
said: "By Free ?^Iasonry, trial by jury 
is transformed into an engine of despot- 
ism and Masonic fraud." 
Wheaton College. 



ODDFELLOWS COUNTERFEIT BAP- 
TISiVl. 



BY REV. J. B. GALLOWAY. 



W^e are living in a day when every- 
thing is being tested as in a crucible. The 
Book, the doctrine, the practice of Chris- 
tians is being tried as by fire. ''We are 
in heaviness through manifold tempta- 
tions;" but is it not "that the trial of our 
faith, being much more precious than 
of gold, that perisheth, though it be tried 
with fire, might be found unto praise and 
honor and glory at the appearing of Je- 
sus Christ?" History is continually re- 
peating itself, because the natural man 
is unchangeable. We may still say, "As 
it is written, the people sat down 'to eat 
and to drink and rose up to play." 

This is just what they did last Decem- 
ber at Grape Creek Odd Fellows' Lodge, 
No. 632, in IlHnois, where a Rev. (?) :\Ir. 
Beadles baptized twenty-seven children 
into the order, after which they had a 
feast, and then rose up to play bhnd- 
man's buff and other games. (See July 
Cynosure.) 

One would wonder what formula this 
minister would use in the baptism. He 
could not use the name of Christ, for 
that would be sectarian and contrary to 
their creed. The whole affair must have 
been a sacrilegious travesty of this divine 
ordinance, a species of 'idolatry, with 
Odd-Fellowship as the idol. Shall the 
old faith and practice of infant baptism 
stand; or shall we cast it to the dogs? 

There is one encouraging thought, 
neither men nor devils are apt to imitate 
or counterfeit that which is not good 
and genuine. People who read the Bible 
do receive the impression that it teach- 
es the representative character of par- 
ents and God's proprietorship in the 
children. Hence we have alf kinds of 
imitations of infant baptism. Dr. Dowie, 
of Chicago, has a substitute which he 
calls dedication, by what authoritv or 
formula we know not. Hence mav we 
not say, with renewed assurance, "the 



108 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



old Bible religion is good enough for 
me?'' 

The blood-sprinkled door-posts and 
lintels sheltered the infant of days as well 
as the youth who could see and know 
and believe for himself, and that, too, in- 
strumentally, through the faith of the 
head of the family. 

Lydia and her household, the Philip- 
pian Jailer and his house, and the house- 
hold of Stephanus were baptize'd, and let 
those who assume that these households 
were destitute of children prove their as- 
sumption. In this case the burden of 
proof is with those who assume. To peo- 
ple who humbly accept God's truth there 
is no need for substitutes, either in re- 
ligion itself or in any ordinance thereof. 

Povnette, \\'is. 



ELDER RICHARD NORTON. 



Editor Cynosure^I notice in the July 
number of your issue that a Brother J. 
W. Snively, of Ingleside, Pa., wishes in- 
formation respecting the author of the 
'Tmage of the Beast," whose name 
stands at the head of this article. I pre- 
sume I am able to give any information 
relating to his history that may be de- 
sired. 

I was intimately acquainted with him 
for twenty-five years, more or less, pre- 
vious to his death, which occurred at his 
home near the village of Summerfield, 
Xoble County, Ohio, in the month of 
February, 1877. He was a minister in 
regular orders in the Wesleyan Metho- 
dist Church, between twenty and thirty 
years. He and the writer of this sketch 
labored much together in Gospel work. 
During his ministry he labored on dif- 
ferent charges in the bounds of the Cen- 
tral Ohio Conference of the church al- 
ready named. He usually had success 
in winning souls to Christ as the fruit 
of his efforts in the work of the Master. 

He was not schooled beyond a very 
moderate common district school edu- 
cation, but possessed powers of native 
eloquence and oratory surpassing the or- 
dinary, and in the exercising of the same 
he often moved his congregations entire- 
ly beyond that which ordinary speakers 
are able to do. His flights of eloquence 
were frequently amazing to his hearers. 

He was born in the year 1808, I be- 
lieve, in Ireland, but was brought to this 



country by his parents when quite young. 
In an early day they settled near the vil- 
lage I have named, where he spent near- 
ly all his life, as he never moved his fam- 
ily when assigned to charges. He was in 
the sixty-ninth year of his age when he 
was called from labor to reward in heav- 
en. His widow still lives close by their 
old homestead, with her children, being 
about 87 years of age, and is yet vigorous 
and hale for one of her years. I saw her 
just a few da3^s since. 

Brother Horton wrote the 'Tmage of 
the Beast" in his own house on his farm 
at intervals, and it was there set in type 
and printed on a small hand press by 
William A. Wallace, who had some 
knowledge of the printing art. From dif- 
ferent causes it contained many defects, 
but has been corrected and improved un- 
til it has reached its present state of per- 
fection, and it is once a very desirable 
book and worthy of a very extended cir- 
culation. It can be had at The Cynosure 
office or at the Wesleyan Methodist 
book-room, Syracuse, N. Y. Great peace 
to the memory of its worthy author. "He 
rests from his labors and his works do 
follow him." E. Thompson. 

Senecaville, Ohio. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 



AN EVANGELIST'S EXPERIENCE. 



MANY LEAVING THE LODGE. 



Ruthven, Iowa, June 22, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure — It has been some 
time since I have written anything for 
your paper, but I assure you I have not 
been idle any of the time. I have never 
passed through such persecution and 
abuse as I have since leaving the lodge 
about one year and a half ago. Strange 
as it may seem, the worst form of perse- 
cution has come from the professed fol- 
lowers of Christ, in many cases preach- 
ers of the gospel. 

At Griswold, Iowa, where I held a 
meeting some time ago, one of the Odd 
Fellows stood on the street, and called 
Jesus Christ a bastard. Some of my own 
brethren stood in with him and called me 
a liar, a perjurer and a hypocrite, for ex- 
posing the evils of the lodge. They have 
not only treated me shamefully, but my 



August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



109 



wife and little daughter as well, on ac- 
count of their slanderous reports. The 
following article was written by F. J. 
Stillman, editor of the Jefferson Bee, and 
w^as dictated by H. F. Lawbaugh, who 
was then noble (?) grand. It was pub- 
lished March 25, 1896, in the Sioux City 
Weekly Tribune: 

"AN EXPOSE OF MASONRY." 

''Jefferson, Iowa, March 24. — Mem- 
bers of the fraternal societies in this city 
are very much exercised over an article 
that appeared in the Christian Oracle, a 
religious periodical, in which the author, 
Lawrence Wright, gives what he alleges 
to be an expose of Masonry, Odd Fel- 
lowship and Knights of Pythias. This 
man Wright is a sort of supernumerary 
in the Christian denomination, a rarely 
good man who asserts that these secret 
orders are taking the people to perdi- 
tion at a terrible pace and he has hit upon 
the idea of crushing them at one fell 
swoop. He is a preacher who goes about 
from place to place filling in when the 
regular pulpit supply wants a rest or is 
sick. Until a very short time ago the 
Rev. Lawrence Wright was a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and attended their meetings. While 
there have been no threats from the 
members of the orders which this man 
Wright has set about annihilating, the 
feeling against him is very bitter. Rev. 
D. Hunter, the regular pastor of the 
Christian church in this city, is not only 
a Mason, but a Knight Templar, and 
denounces the alleged expose in severe 
terms." 

The above article was copied by the 
Marcus News of March 29th and replied 
to in the next issue by C. R. Neel as fol- 
lows: 

"In the clipping from the Sioux City 
Tribune a statement is made that 'he 
(Wright) is a preacher who goes from 
place to place, filling in when the regu- 
lar pulpit supply wants a rest or is sick.' 
Now, I know from personal knowledge 
that this is not true. I have been ac- 
quainted with Brother Wright for the 
past five years, and, since entering the 
evangelistic field three years ago, he has 
had more work than he could do. He 
has held meetings in some of our largest 
towns with good success; the result of 
last year's work being 532 additions to 
the church. Rev. D. Hunter, of Jeffer- 
son (referred to in the article) in a per- 



sonal letter denies the statement here 
concerning him. Fraternallv, 

"C.'R. Neel." 
"We, the members of the official board 
of the Church of Christ, in Cleghom, 
Iowa, indorse the above. 

"Robert Prunty, 
"A. McKinney, 
"G. T. Schellenger, 
"W. H. Schellenger. 
"J. L. McGarity, 
"George Prunty." 
I was at home at Jefferson, Iowa, and 
attended church April 25, 1897. At the 
close of the morning ser^-ice I was call- 
ed upon to preside at the Lord's table. 
One of the officers in the church got up 
and left the room, while engaged in the 
communion service, simply because I 
was presiding at the table. Only a few 
evenings before he stood up in the pray- 
er meeting and told how he loved the 
Lord and how dear the Lord was to him. 
The Lord must be exceedingly precious 
to a man who will turn his back upon 
Him and His own institution, simply be- 
cause a brother is presiding at the table, 
who one time was deceived, blindfolded, 
let into the lodge, afterward led blind- 
folded from "Jerusalem to Jericho," but 
had too much respect for Christ and His 
cause to remain in "Jericho," and conse- 
quently got out of "Jericho" and "went 
back to Jerusalem." This officer's name 
is Andrew Ikeman. 

Charles Beck, a Christian gentleman, 
who lives at De Soto, Iowa, told me in a 
private conversation on the lodge ques- 
tion that he had gone into the Odd Fel- 
lows' lodge, but had come to the conclu- 
sion that it was not the place for a Chris- 
tian. 

Bro. W. E. Jones, a minister of the 
Church of Christ, at Schaller, Iowa, said 
to me only a few weeks ago: "Brother 
Wright, your position on the lodge ques- 
tion is all right. I am a Master ?vIason 
myself, but, by the grace of God, I'll 
never go into the lodge-room again. I 
know that in our own little town, where 
we have less than a thousand people and 
twelve lodges, they greatly hinder the 
cause of Christ." He also told me of a 
man living in the town who, when asked 
why he did not come into the church, 
gave as his reason that he was too poor 
to pay anything, and that he did not be- 
lieve in coming: into the church when 



no 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897 



he could not pay anything. This same 
laiin is paying his dues regularly in five 
dift'erent lodges. His wife is also a mem- 
ber of two. 

Brother E. E. Kneedy, a Christian 
preacher for whom I held a meeting at 
Griswold. Iowa, a little more than a year 
ago, said to me one day wdiile there: 
"Brother Wright, I am a Master Mason, 
but I'll give you my word that I'll never 
spend another cent in the lodge, and only 
Avish I had what I have already squan- 
dered in it." He also said: "Brother 
Wright, while you are not a Mason, you 
know more about it than I do, and there 
is no reason why you should not, with 
those books you have in your possession, 
for they give everything just exactly as 
it is in the lodge." 

Brother C. R. Neel, a Christian 
preacher, now located at Laurens, told 
me exactly the same things concerning 
the expose of Masonry, and, furthermore, 
that he never intended to have anything 
more to do with it. He was a Master 
-Mason when I first met him. 

xA little more than a year ago the Odd 
Fellows had a parade at my own home 
in Jefferson, Lowa. John McCarthy, 
now ^layor of Jefferson, told me person- 
ally that he saw in the basement of the 
opera house, wdiere they had their per- 
formance, five barrels of beer bottles (of 
course, it is useless to say they were all 
empty when he saw them). 

Brother IMilton W^ells, a Christian 
preacher, now living at Urbana, Iowa, 
has been recognized as a Mason for 
many years. At the N. E. Christian con- 
vention, which met at Cedar Falls, Iowa, 
^lay, 1896, he said to me: "The stand 
you have taken against secret societies 
is right, and if I had known before I went 
in what I know now I should never have 
gone in." 

While I was holding a meeting at 
Rockwell City, before I had got out of 
the "chain gang," Sister Lizzie Whealan, 
one of the most noble, sweet-spirited 
Christian women I ever met, said to me 
one day, as her eyes for the first time fell 
on the^hree links: ''Brother Wright, if 
you knew how sad it made me feel to see 
vou with those three links on, you would 
take them off and never be seen with 
them on again. They lower your dig- 
nity as a minister of the gospel of Christ." 
The kind spirit in which she said it, and 
the firm, tender, searching look she gave 



me was one of the keenest rebukes I ever 
received in my life. I am glad she said 
what she did. It led me to think seri- 
ously, and now, as the result, I am a free 
man again. 

I have been unjustly and unkindly 
charged of having entered the lodge for 
the purpose of exposing it. I went into 
the lodge in good faith, having no more 
idea of ever exposing it than I had of 
"having my throat cut across, my tongue 
torn out by the roots, and my body bur- 
ied in the rough sands of the sea at low- 
water mark," etc. But when I found 
that Odd-Fellowship formulates a pray- 
er, from which the name of Christ is ex- 
cluded, as Grosli in his manual says, be- 
cause it would be offensive to many of 
the members of the lodge, I cannot, as 
a Christian, a follower of Christ, help but 
take the stand I have taken. 

Now I can do all, as Paul says in Col. 
iii., 17, "In the name of the Lord Jesus, 
giving thanks to God and the Father by 
Him," instead of giving and doing in 
the name of a Christless lodge, which ex- 
cludes His name from their opening 
prayer. Since beginning our meeting 
here the Odd Fellows from other places 
have sent to the lodge here some base, 
detestable, malicious, scandalous letters 
for the purpose of injuring my character 
and the cause of Christ. W. S. Watters, 
of Elmwood, Neb., is one of the gentle- 
men (?) who wrote to the lodge here 
that I was "a. scoundrel and ought to be 
egged out ot town." The secretary of 
the lodge here let me go into the lodge- 
room and see the letter and copy it. I 
then sent it back to Elmwood, Nebr., and 
Bird Critchfield, who himself is an Odd 
Fellow, and John H. Hart, both good 
Christian gentlemen, sent back the fol- 
lowing: 

"Elmwood, Nebr., June 19, 1897. 

''This is to certify that the man who 
signs his name as W. S. Watters to the 
copy of letter on the other side of this 
sheet (containing the above statement) 
does not state the truth. The efforts of 
Brother Wright were crowned with suc- 
cess, and his plain, simple preaching is 
what makes a lasting effect. We there- 
fore recommend him as a true man of 
God and a preacher of the true gospel 
of Christ without fear of any one. 

"Signed: 

"John H. Hart, Elder, 
"Bird Critchfield, Deacon." 



Ausust, 1897, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Ill 



W. H. Lyon, secretary of the Odd Fel- 
lows' Lodge at Jefferson, tried also to in- 
jure me and the cause of Christ by send- 
ing a letter to the lodge here stating, 
among other things, that I was expelled 
from the lodge Alarch, 1896, which he 
knows was not a fair representation of 
the facts, for I sent him a letter dated 
Feb. 20, 1896, in which I plainly stated 
to him and the lodge that I was not a 
member of the lodge any longer, and 
had not been since the ist of January, 
1896. 

There are a great many honorable 
people in all the different lodges, who, 
like myself, were deceived and led in, 
and these will stand for the truth when 
they see it. There seem to be several in 
the lodge here who are of that class, and 
consequently, when these infamous let- 
ters come, they nearly always let me 
know it right away. They did that here, 
and by the time this is in print, I'll have 
another fellow or two cornered, when 
the only chance to- get out is simply to 
confess their lies like the other have 
done. 

A great many of the Christian people 
who are in the Odd Fellows' lodge do 
not know that the opening prayer ex- 
cludes the name of Christ, and are great- 
ly surprised when I show them the pray- 
er, and they see for themselves that it 
does. That is one reason I left the lodge. 
I don't know how to pray and leave 
Christ out of the prayer. When I show 
these things to a true Christian, who has 
become an Odd Fellov/, and that the 
lodge actually misrepresented itself in 
stating to me that there was nothing 
that could in any way conflict with my 
duties to God, to my country, my fam- 
ily or myself, when they knew, or should 
have known, that the opening prayer ex- 
cludes the name of Christ, they say, 'T 
do not blame you for taking the stand 
you have concerning the order." 

I have been a member of the Church 
of Christ twenty-tw^o years, ever since I 
was thirteen years old, and there has 
never been in that twenty-two years a 
hint against my character, until since 
leaving the lodge. Since then I am "a 
notorious liar, perjurer and scoundrel" — 
all because I claim to-be free from the 
obligation to a lodge which misrepresent- 
ed, either wilfully or ignorantly, the facts 
to me, in order to obtain such obligations 
on my part. The Odd Fellows' lodge 



contains the three letters, "F. L. and T.,*' 
which is interpreted to mean "friendship, 
love and truth." Xow, if there is any 
of either friendship, love or truth in cir- 
culating these infamous reports, intend- 
ed only to injure my character and hinder 
the cause of Christ, I fail to see it. 

Xow, brethren, I suggest that if the 
members of the lodges who are Chris- 
tians would pay into the church treasury, 
to be used in taking care of the sick and 
unfortunate, the same amount they pay 
into the lodges, instead of finding fault 
with the church for not doing tljis, 
it would be much more Christian-like. 
The church takes into its care women, 
children, colored people,. the deaf, dumb, 
blind and every class and condition of 
society, Avhile the lodge excludes from 
membership all women and children, all 
colored people, all consumptives, all deaf, 
dumb and blind — in fact, every object of 
benevolence, and then boasts of its great 
benevolence. Sham.e on such pretended 
benevolence. 

I hold no ill-will toward any one, eith- 
er in or out of the lodge, and this letter 
is written in the spirit of kindness, yet 
for the purpose of rebuking sharply 
some who deserve more than a rebuke, 
and helping others to see the truth. 

Lawrence Wright. 



BUGLE NOTE FROM A CATHOLIC 
PRIEST. 



IS THE ROMAN CHURCH ANTI-SECRET? 



Grand Rapids, 3vlich., July 9. 
Rev. ^l. A. Gault— Dear Sir: I see 
you are still fighting for the old cause. 
Your energy is truly admirable. But un- 
fortunately sx)me of your contributors, as 
well as an occasional editorial remark, 
stand in your way. If you really expect 
to conquer your people must first of all 
be truthful and free from bigotry, to be- 
gin with. Bigotry weakens you as well 
as it makes it impossible for many. Cath- 
olics especially, to fight side by side with 
you. And where do you find any Chris- 
tianity in misrepresenting and abusing 
one another? Or how could you expect 
Catholics to read matter in which the\- 
are constantly insulted? I am honest and 
sincere, as are the 240 millions of Catho- 
lics, in opposing secret societies with 



11: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



you. ^^lly can we not work together? 
Why not make The Cynosure a purely 
anti-secret society organ on broad Hnes, 
as it ought to be, to be successful? 

Mr. M. N. Butler, in the July number, 
expresses the same opinion. But when 
you let writers dish up to your readers 
fables and gross falsehoods with regard 
to the Jesuits, how can they believe you 
or your contributors in anything else? 
\Miy, you make the whole affair ridicu- 
lous. There are no oath-bound secret 
societies in the Catholic church. By the 
very fact of joining any one of them a 
Catholic ceases to be a member of the 
church, and if he die without leaving it 
he will be treated accordingly. The Jes- 
uits do not form a secret society, and no 
member of that order, or of the Catholic 
church, and, least of all, no official, 
whether high or low, can be a Mason. 

yiv. J. p! Stoddard has no right to ut- 
ter such false statements when he has 
an opportunity to visit the Jesuits in Bos- 
ton College and find out for himself, as 
you did, Mr. Editor, in Chicago. 

If he swears by that Dr. Vanoli, whose 
past record he does not know, he cer- 
tainly ought to think just as much of his 
Catholic fellow-citizens, whom he can 
and should know 'thoroughly, especially 
since they are not doubtful quantities 
lately washed in the Boston shores, but 
members in good standing, both in 
church and state. 

Personal investigation is the surest 
road to the truth. This road I invite all 
your contributors and readers to take in 
whatever pertains to the Catholic church. 
There are no secrets in it, and all are 
welcome to read our books, inspect our 
churches, confessionals, visit our con- 
vents or institutions, provided they come 
with an honest and sincere intention. To 
aid them in this I shall gladly furnish 
them the address of the nearest priest, 
convent or institution with a letter of in- 
troduction, if they will send me a 2-cent 
stamp for the postage. Let them_ state 
what sort of an institution they wish to 
visit and the largest town or city within 
their reach. 

So you see, Mr. Editor, how I desire 
to deal with you in a Christian spirit of 
truth and fair-mindedness. Let us work 
together, then, to accomplish much 
against secret societies; nay, let us not 
lay down our arms till the enemy be dis- 
persed in shame and confusion. 



Now, if you care to print these hasty 
lines, please print them entirely as they 
are, and oblige, 
Yours sincerely, 

John A. Schmitt, 
Catholic priest, 165 Sheldon street. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 



REFORM NEWS. 



NEW AGENCIES POSSIBLE. 



One hundred dollars will equip, along 
N. C. A. lines, the Rev. W. H. Bonham, 
of Cowden, 111., so that he can lecture 
against the false religion of the secret 
lodges and be self-supporting. 

Sixty dollars of the needed amount has 
already been pledged. Bro. W. H. Bon- 
ham is a Free Methodist minister, w^ho 
has lectured acceptably and forcibly in 
many places in Central Illinois. 

What our brother needs to enable him 
to make his work self-supporting is a set 
of about 100 stereopticon plates, repre- 
senting the various gods of different na- 
tions; the origin of pagan /ceremonies, 
and ancient and modern symbolism; and 
the similarity between them and those 
practiced in the secret lodges of our time. 

This series of stereopticon plates has 
been used in more than a dozen diflferent 
States with telling effect by our co-labor- 
er. Brother I. R. B. Arnold, and has con- 
vinced thousands that Freemasonry is no 
less than the revival of ancient pagan 
worship. Rev. W. H. Bonham 'has made 
the subject a study for several years, and 
has a fine stereopticon outfit, and all that 
he needs is the pictures to enable him to 
start out at once in the work and carry it 
on without any pledge of salary. Can not 
someone pay this $40 needed? It will 
only take four shares at $10 each to make 
it. If anyone can help a little, send it in, 
and write for further information if it is 
desired. 

We are also raising the amount needed 
to send President C. A. Blanchard to 
Northfield, Mass., where the way has been 
opened again by Director Hitchcock to 
have our aims and objects presented to 
the many hundred Christian workers who 
are gathered by Mr. Moody at that con- 
vention during this month. President 
Blanchard gave two addresses in the M. 
E. Church at Pontiac, III, last month on 



August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



113 



the importance of our reform to the wel- 
fare of the church. 

Work is being done for State conven- 
tions in Iowa, Missouri, and lUinois, by 
Rev. W. C. Allen, Rev. S. Ely, and Rev. 
R. W. Chestnut, and others. A State 
convention in its attendance may be chief- 
ly local, but no one can prophesy its in- 
fluence on the State and countr}-. One 
reason may be that friends throughout 
the whole State begin to pray for it. 
•Since the State convention in Missouri 
3, very wide and immensely important 
■door has been opened to its State Presi- 
dent, Rev. Simpson Ely. He has been 
•challenged to defend his position by one 
of the most prominent ministers of his 
denomination, and the church paper, the 
Christian Standard, has agreed to give 
each side full sr^ving in its columns once 
.a month, for eight months. Pray for 
these State conventions. 

A word about the Cynosure. Are you 
•doing all that you can for it? Can you do 
less than to resolve to take it and pay for 
it as long as it remains true to its prin- 
ciples? Many stop the paper because, 
they say, "I do not need it," or ''I am as 
strong an anti-secretist as anyone," and 
so they stop the paper, lessen its sub- 
scription list and greatly cripple our 
•efforts. This ought not to be. 

Friends sent in more than one hundred 
new subscribers last month, but unless 
the several hundred whose subscription 
-expires this month renew, we have lost 
not only in income but in our ability to 
reach communities and affect the coun- 
try. We are now printing 5,000 per 
month — say it shall be 10,000 and }'Ou 
can made it that and increase our work 
fourfold. 

The calls for literature have been about 
the same as last month. About fifty dol- 
lars' worth has been sent to foreign lands, 
half of which has been freely given from 
the fund for general Avork. The total con- 
tributions this month have not been 
equal to the cost of literature sent out for 
free distribution to those who could not 
pay for it, but would give their time to 
putting it where it would do good. If 
the extra fifty cents saved now on the 
price of the Cynosure should be sent for 
the general work it would be very help- 
ful. Some are doing this. 

The donations during July range from 
50 cents to $10, and are from Mrs. N. E. 



Kellogg, Mrs. E. B. Clark, and Messrs. 
Rufus Day, E. Brace, J. C. Berg, P. K. 
Drury, H. A. Fischer, J. Christie, D. H. 
C. Salisbury, and C. W. Sterry. The 
above gifts are verv much appreciated. 
W. I. Phillips. 



AFIELD IN JULY. 



Space will not afford a detailed ac- 
count of meetings held by the editor and 
publisher in July. The evening of the 
26. found us in U. P. Church, near Peo- 
tone, 111., where a fair audience met us 
and five were added to our list of sub- 
scribers. We were kindly entertained at 
the home of Elder R. Gilkerson, who 
drove us to and from the train. 

Sabbath, July 4th, we spent at Wood- 
land, 111., w^here we both preached morn- 
ing and evening in the Christian Church 
and addressed a young people's meeting 
in the afternoon in the M. E. Church. 
Three devoted young men, Charles Pat- 
ton, Rev. Sanford B. Kurts, and F. E. 
Rounds, stood by the cause here as the 
result of a series of evangelistic mieetings 
held last year by Bro. N. W. Deveneau. 
At Milford, the next evening, Bro. Kurts, 
a devoted young minister of the United 
Brethren Church, helped us in holding a 
successful street meeting. 

We spent two evenings at Wellington, 
reaching a large but somewhat disorder- 
ly crowd on the street, and the second 
evening speaking in the Town Hall. 
Here and the next evening at Hoopeston, 
that devoted worker, J. S. Hickman, 
stood by us. The meeting at Hoopeston 
was in the U. P. Church, where nine sub- 
scribers were added to our list. 

Sabbath, July 11, found the editor at 
Hebron, Ind., Avhere he addressed three 
large audiences and was kindly enter- 
tained at the homes of Rev. J. N. Buch- 
anan and Miss j\Iay Richards; the latter 
drove him around Monday with the old 
family horse. Jack, which materially in- 
creased the Cynosure subscription list. 
On Sabbath, the i8th, he addressed Bro. 
A. G. Hastings' large congregation near 
Somonauk, 111., and on Sabbath, the 25th, 
he preached twice and lectured ^Monday 
evening in Rev. R. J. Kyles' church, near 
Normantown, 111. Both these pastors are 
devoted to the. cause and met the lecturer 
at the train, entertained him at the par- 
sonage, and drove around with him on 



114 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



^Monday among their people, rendering 
him every possible assistance in increas- 
ing the Cynosure list. i\Iore invitations 
for lectures have been received than 
either Secretary Phillips or the editor can 
fill. The fields truly are whitening, but 
the laborers are few. 



MINISTER DEFENDS THE LODGE. 



AA'ashington, D. C, July 26, '1897. 

Dear Cynosure — ^During the month 
past I have spoken eighteen times, hold- 
ing meetings in the States of- Virginia, 
Alaryland, and Pennsylvania. The lec- 
ture at Burr's meeting house was well at- 
tended, considering it was in the midst of 
harvest. I spoke five times to fair audi- 
ences in a Union Church, about six miles 
from Bealton, Va. My receipts amount- 
ed to nearly half my expenses. 

On the afternoon of Sabbath, Jtily 4, I 
spoke with others from the gospel wagon 
at Farquier Springs, Va., to an audience 
of probably one thousand. Not a fire- 
cracker did I hear; nor was there any spe- 
cial mention of the day. The friends at 
whose home I was entertained were very 
kind. They had. not been in the South 
long. I saw much in the character of the 
people that made me sad. Prejudice in 
that section is very deep-seated. Of 
course the lodges are thick. They feed 
,on darkness. 

At Rohrersville, Md., I found the 
Radical United Brethren moving happily 
on their ways. Some of the fathers had 
gone to their eternal reward since my 
visit some six years ago. The banner is 
being grandly held aloft by Brother G. 
S. Seiple, pastor in charge. My meet- 
ings were exceptionally well attended and 
will result in good. At Chambers burg, 
Fayetteville and other points in Pennsyl- 
vania I found warm hearts ready to aid 
our good cause. 

Over the mountains, eight miles from 
Louden, Pa., the nearest railroad station, 
I found the town of McConnellsburg. It 
is the county seat of Fulton County. At 
the home of the pastor of the United Pres- 
byterian Church, Rev. J. L. Grove, I 
found a welcome and a home while in the 
valley. There are five churches in the 
town and six ministers. Four of the pas- 



tors were in full sympathy with me. The 
M. E. pastor said he had been a Mason, 
but was not now. This was not because 
he had anything especially against Free- 
masonry. 

A minister from Chicago who reported 
his salary as four thousand dollars a year, 
has been in this town seeking the restora- 
tion of his health. His trouble is of a 
nervous nature. As he is believed to be 
the champion cigarette smoker of the 
town, some did not wonder that he was. 
nervous. He told the writer he belonged 
to eight secret societies. How much a 
ride on the "wild ass of the desert" had 
contributed to his trouble he did not 
state. My first service was in the U. P. 
Church. The Union Service of all the 
churches of the town held in the Re- 
formed Church seemed to fire the lodge 
spirit. After presenting the anti-Chris- 
tian character of the lodge, I threw out 
the challenge to the lodge to defend it- 
self. The lodge minister. Rev. Charles 
Henry Wissner, sent -me a letter contain- 
ing the following: "Owing to ill health 
I would ask that each speaker be limited 
to one-half hour; you to have the first 
period; no cjuestioning or rejoinder to be 
allowed/' 

The discussion was arranged. I, of 
course, had no objection to his violent 
language, if the cause of light should 
gain in the end. He had an opportunity 
to pour out the vials of his wrath and 
show the lodge spirit in good order. I 
was called a liar, perjurer, and other like 
pet names. The truth will be better un- 
derstood in McConnellsburg because of 
this gathering. 

I lectured one evening in Lehmasters, 
Pa., but the interest was so great a sec- 
ond lecture v/as given. Brother J. A. 
Burkholder, who has so nobly assisted in 
other meetings, arranged these. I was 
told the lodge people had been notified 
that I was a dangerous man. A dispatch 
was sent to a lodge minister in Mercers- 
burg fro-m McConnellsburg to "warn the 
brethren of all approaching danger." 
W. B. Stoddard. 



Bear in mind that the men who are 
contributing the most to the anti-secret 
movement are our poorly paid lecturers 
in the held. Are you doing all you can to 
open doors for them to present this vital 
truth? 



August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



115 



HEATHENIZING AMERICAN CHURCHES 

St. Paul, Minn., July 24, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure — Twenty years ago in 
London I heard Mrs. Besant on the plat- 
form, with her partner in infidelity, Brad- 
laup-h. She then turned 'the Bible into 
ridicule and held it up with its author, 
God, to the contempt of such of her audi- 
ence as were like minded with herself to- 
wards God. 

This afternoon I again listened to her 

in this city. Now she has embraced the 

heathenism of India ; and turns the word 

, of God into a lie, so as to weave it into 

the meshes of that heathen religion. 

The whole human race, she says, pre- 
existed, and began to people this world 
one and a half millions of years ago. Hu- 
man souls, she says, are reincarnated. In 
answer to the question, What becomes 
of human souls which Osiris reincarnates 
in pigs? she said that such as are addicted 
to gluttony are thus reincarnated; but 
they may develop into something better 
in the future. 

She spoke of Jesus Christ and the Bible 
with much respect. Hence, the question 
was asked: Shall we be judged by 
Osiris or by Jesus Christ? She repHed: 
"By both." Now, Osiris being none 
other than the devil in gentile worship, 
according to both Moses and the Apostle 
Paul, Mrs. Besant in her answer places 
the devil on the judgment throne, which 
is precisely the same thing that Free- 
masonry does. 

The statement was made that Jesus 
tells us of two souls in the future state, 
one in a state of torment and the other in 
.a state of happiness, and the cjuestion was 
asked: Would the one in torment ever 
come into the state of happiness with the 
other? Ignoring the fact of the impossi- 
ble gulf between them, she cited the fact 
of desire of the one in torment to come 
back and tell his brethren not to come 
there, and argued from that that he would 
finally develop into a fitness for a state of 
happiness. She says no Christian church 
of to-day thinks of making a belief in 
eternal punishment a test of communion. 
And she classes Calvin and Edvrards and 
all such as agree with them as ignor- 
amuses. 

She was received last evening into one 
of the large Christian churches of^ this 
city, where she preached the heathenism 



of India to her heart's content. The pas- 
tor of that church is a Free Mason. And 
no doubt he was well pleased to see Free- 
masonry so ably advocated in public from 
his pulpit. W. Fenton. 



SHATTERING WOODCRAFT. 



Fort Dodge, lo^wa, July 26, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure — Upon urgent re- 
quest from Rev. E. Ballestad, of Thor, 
Iowa, to come and give a lecture on secret 
societies in general and Modern Wood- 
men in particular, I left my own congre- 
gation last Sabbath to give some testi- 
mony against this growing evil. , In the 
morning I found a large congregation, to 
which I preached in the Norwegian lan- 
guage about that righteousness which 
must be greater than that of the scribes 
and Pharisees in order to enter heaven. 

In the afternoon the lecture had been 
announced in the English language, and a 
large audience, which filled the church to 
its utmost capacity, with many outside, 
listened attentively two hours to lodge 
doctrine. The Woodmen were taken by 
surprise, as their own'ritual was exhibited 
and no one ventured to deny it. 

The reprint of this ritual was offered for 
sale, being the very "identical publica- 
tion" of which mention is made in the 
July number of Modern W^oodmen 

The Woodmen are just starting in Thor, 
and this meeting came upon them at a 
very unfortunate time, bringing disrepute 
upon Woodcraft in the eyes of the "pio- 
fane." The truths that were spoken 
found ways to the hearts and it was 
thought necessary to get an antidote right 
on the spot. Accordingly a meeting was 
announced for the evening and every- 
body invited to hear the other side of the 
question, and a speaker was sent for ten 
miles from Ihor. A large gathering as- 
sembled to hear a defense of secret so- 
cieties, and jNIodem \\'oodmen in particu- 
lar. 

While waiting for the speaker some 
local talent opened up by admitting that 
everything that was spoken in the after- 
noon was true. It was also admitted that 
the secrets were out, but the speaker 
thought it necessary to mention a few 
things also in favor of lodges. 

The audience was then treated to one 
hour's nonsense. The members felt this 
and the speaker was called down to give 



116 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



room for imported talent. The speaker 
said t\vo things — first, that he was not 
prepared; second, that he was a Wood- 
man to protect his family. 

Your correspondent got the floor and 
stated that he was not a Woodman in or- 
der to protect his family, and proved that 
the institution was huilt on such a founda- 
tion that it must in course of time go to 
pieces, as history has already demon- 
strated. The anti-secret society men were 
jubilant in Thor, Several rituals were 
sold. The camp voted thanks to your 
correspondent for his visit in Thor. 

O. T. Lee. 



VALUABLE ISUGGESTIONS. 



Alverton, Pa., May 13, 1897. 
Editor Cynosure — Perhaps the follow- 
ing suggestions may be helpful in oppos- 
ing the lodge in one's own community 
and at large. 

1. Have a good knowledge of the 
Bible, especially of those passages which 
condemn the acts and principles of the 
lodge. 

2. Have a thorough knowledge of Ma- 
sonry and as many other lodges as possi- 
ble. The best sources for information are 
(i) The Cynosure, (2) the publications it 
advertises, (3) conversation with seceders, 
and (4) judicious and frienidly private 
conversation with lo>dgemen. 

3. The lodge must be exposed in public 
and private. Great good can be done 
throug^h private conversation with those 
w^ho belong and especially those who do 
not. Abundant opportunities can be 
found in this w^y for turning on the light 

4. Friends of the cause should pay for 
several annual or semi-annual subscrip- 
tions to The Cynosure and have it sent 
to those whom they would like to have 
brought out of the lodge or kept from 
going in. 

5. Friends of the cause should see that 
The Cynosure is sent permanently to 
some college or seminary library. It 

.ought to be in every public library 
throughout the land. 

6. Friends of the cause should send 
The C}Tiosure to each member of the 
graduating class, of all theological sem- 
inaries. If this were done for one year 
these young men would em'brace the 



cause, if they were truly Christ's servants,, 
and 'have the paper continued. 

7. An effort sihould be made to induce 
all literary societies of our land to debate 
the question of secret organizations in. 
all its different phases. This would 
spread the light and w^arn the young. 

8. We must make greater efforts to ful- 
fill the true mission of the church. We 
must go out into the highways and 
hedges; we must visit 'and help the lower 
classes ; we must s'how that church fellow- 
ship is better than lodge fellowship 'by 
doing more practical Christian work. 

9. We must never lose sight of one 
great principle in this reform, that light* 
is a destroyer of darkness. The liglit of 
truth and knowledge will destroy the se- 
cret lodge. I thoroughly believe in what 
I have said and I wi^h, Mr. Editor, that I 
had time and space to explain imyself 
more fully, or that I migthtihave the pleas- 
ure of a personal interview with you. I 
am sending The Cynosure to tw^o minis- 
ters of the gospel. I want to do more in 
this and other v^ays when my circum- 
stances improve. 

BURTON S. FOX. 



WHERE DOES PATRIOTISM COME IN? 



The Boston Herald, reporting a Ma- 
sonic address by Dr. Lorimer, says: 'Tn 
closing Dr. Lorimer further showed that 
the obligations of Masonry have always 
sustained its patriotic character, for, said 
■he, *it has always held that the order must 
rest above party politics, above partisan 
education, and above partisan religion.' " 
The statement is a Httle mixed, but this 
may be due to the reporter not being a. 
Mason. The obligation is in the oath, 
and the Masons^ obligations, as stated', 
in the oath, 'have nothing to do with pa- 
triotism in an explicit way, except in a 
single instance. We are now referring 
only to true and simple Masonry, the 
Blue lodge to which all Masons belong. 

The single exceptional instance is the 
permission to use one's own choice as 
to concealing two crimes, one of which 
is treason. The oath does not compel 
concealment of treason. Whether not 
shielding treason is patriotic enough to 
make an oration about is a question that 
may be left to patriotic judgment. But 
in the same connection the Mason is- 



August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



in 



sworn to conceal all crimes but two. In 
such an obligation it is hard to discern 
patriotism. One of the most unpatriotic 
things is to shield crimes against civil 
law. There is some interest in the mat- 
ter of ^'partisan rehgion/' as set forth by 
a doctor of divinity. His meaning may 
not be elucidated by quotations from Ma- 
sonic authorities. Still one or two may 
be useful as showing how the most emi- 
nerft and authoritative Masonic writers 
hold Masonic religion "above" other re- 
ligion, or, perhaps, "partisan religion." 

Mackey says, "The religion of Mason- 
ry is pure theism." Of course, it cannot, 
like Christianity, be "partisan." The Di- 
gest of Masonic Law says: -"Blue lodge 
i\Iasonry has nothing whatever to do 
with the Bible; it is not founded upon 
the Bible." Of course, it uses the Bible 
together with the Mason's tools to swear 
on, but it is not "partisan." Webb's Mon- 
iton says: "So carefully are all sectarian 
tenets excluded that the Christian, the 
Jew and the Mohammedan harmoniously 
combine with the Buddhist." 

These are but few of the citations tend- 
ing to verify Dr. Lorimer's claim. He 
professes Masonry which is above "par- 
tisan religion." Yet there may be a dis- 
count on this because equal authority 
identifies it with the pagan mysteries and 
the worship of the sun. Even if not par- 
tisan, it fellowships or copies the worship 
of "our ancient brethren," the worshipers 
at the "high places." But so far as be- 
ing non-Christian is concerned. Masonry 
is certainly much like what the infatuated 
doctor of divinitv^ claims — free from all 
connection \\'ith the "partisan religion" 
that is held by the profane and unillu- 
minated cowans who belong to Tremont 
Temple Church, But what has that to do 
with patriotism? 



HOW TO OVERCOME. 



Rev. E. M. Coleman, of Almonte, Can- 
ada, sends us the following, all written on 
a postal card. We deciphered it with the 
aid of a magnifying glass: 

"How can we best withstand the influ- 
ence of secret societies? By the attitude 
of power; by the activity of power; by the 
Divinity of power. It is presupposed that 
secret societies from A to Z are deceptive 
to man and derogator}- to God. They 
foster covetousness, barter away right- 



eousness, love darkness and hate iig^t, 
because the deeds of their dupes are evil, 
and they are in the gall of bitterness and 
bond of iniquity; therefore their influence 
is as pernicious as it is universal. Secrecy 
sits in the place of God, and it says: I 
am Christ," "I am His true body," yet it 
is godless, pra\'ing not in the name of the 
Son, it says: "I am the stay of the wid- 
ow," "the help of the orphan and sick,'' 
but it devours widow's houses, therefore 
it must be withstood, overcome, put un- 
der the feet of the Son of God. But how? 

1. By our attitude of power; there ie 
power in attitude, in standing agTiinst an 
evil. A stone lying on the ground crusk- 
es out all life under it, unless it be earth 
worms or creatures that love darkness. A' 
heavy bar against a fence will make it 
sway. Oh, that men and ministers of 
God's truth would make their weight feit 
upon this cosmopolitan parasite, and not 
be past feeling and sight Crush the life 
out of it. Would that they would lean 
mightily against the middle fence of par- 
tition, between sinner and Savior, till it 
topples^ to ruin. This secret influence is 
increasing rapidly. 

2. We can best overcome it by our 
activit}^ of power; overcome by the word, 
of your testimony. When tv\XD forces act 
in opposite directions their resistance is 
equal to their difference, and acts in the 
direction of the greater force. Let the 
anti-secret force increase its power, in 
acting upon the minds and hearts of men, 
and the resultant will tell for God and 
man upon the secret works of darkness. 
Let the acting force be animate; think, 
talk, write, preach, and it will be the testi- 
mony of Jesus speaking openly to the 
world, ever teaching where the lovers of 
light always resort, and sa}-ing nothing 
in secret. The midday admirers of se- 
crecy must cease following Jesus only at 
midnight. If professors of righteousness 
would quit standing, but take to walking, 
yea. nmning, against these odd fellows 
in the dark, it would soon require a Grand 
IMaster Mason to rebuild the walls of the 
sublime temple of darkness. But how 
can we best overcome and put under the 
feet of the Son of God this most rapidly- 
increasing secret influence? 

3. By our Divinity of power. Tlie 
Divinity- is ours. He, the Divine Son, 
because flesh, the power, is ours, too. 
Christ's witnesses overcome by the blood 



118 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



of the Lamb. Yea, there is power in the 
blood of Jesus to wash out the blood- 
stains on the escutcheons of secrecy. The 
blood of Jesus is the Alpha and Omega of 
power. After that the Holy Ghost is 
come upon us; we will have the Divinity 
of power. If the Divine power is not 
made ours, our anti-secret work will be 
leading men only out of the dark into the 
outer darkness and the weeping and wail- 
ing will come afterward," 
Almonte, Canada. 



AN APPEAL TO MINNESOTA. 



The following note from Rev. Wm. 
Fenton, our faithful lecturer for Minne- 
sota and the Northwest, we commend to 
the consideration of the friends in that 
field. He writes: "During the month o^f 
July I have traveled 492 miles and spoken 
thirteen times. My collections amount- 
ed to $13.25, and I sold $6.70 worth of 
books. My railroad and hotel expenses 
were $23.92 cents. While at some places 
the testimony of God's word was cordial- 
ly received, at others the people closed 
their eyes, stopped their ears and hard- 
ened their hearts against it." 

We know the friends of the cause in 
Bro. Fenton's field and especially along 
the line of his last campaign will realize 
that he should receive more remunera- 
tion than to be out some $4 expenses 
more than his receipts. Surely the toil 
and travel of this faithful servant of the 
Lord during the heated term should be 
more liberally rewarded. Will not those 
who have this cause at heart write to Bro. 
Fenton or to our Treasurer, W. L Phil- 
lips, inclosing their contributions to make 
up this deficiency? 



PERSONAL MENTION. 



The Cynosure outlook is encouraging. 
]\Iany new subscribers are enlisting. 

Secretary Phillips and Editor Gault 
will spend the first two weeks of August 
holding meetings in Wisconsin. 

Rev. Samuel F. Porter Is spending t'he 
summer in North Dakota, supplying 
three points with preaching and Sabbath 
school. 

The editor addressed a large audience 
in the opera hall at Naperville Sabbath 



evening, June 27th. It was a union ser- 
vice of the churches under the auspices 
of the W. C. T. U. 

Sister Hattie E. Powers, of the Beacon 
Light, Philadelphia, writes : ''Our pastor 
has forged the last link in the chain that 
binds me to Philadelphia, by appointing 
an Anti-Secret Committee to work und^r 
the auspices of the Brethren church, 
whose doors are open for our use. .The 
perfect number seven, three deacons, 
three young men and myself constitute 
that committee. So, while the head of 
Beacon Light has laid down the laboring 
oar and entered upon th^ new life, we 
rejoice that the work he loved is steadily 
marchinpf on." 



NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



^m;^ 



"True Manliness" is a neat little vol- 
ume by the National Purity Association, 
79 Fifth avenue, Chicago. It rigidly ex- 
cludes the details of vice, 'but paints the 
beauties of virtue in attractive colors. It 
should be in the hands of every boy and 
is helpful to girls and young women. It 
is by Dr. C. E. Walker; price 50 cents. 

"Partisan Politics," the evil and the 
remedy, is a book of 225 pages, by James 
Sayles Brown, of Los Angeles, Cal. It is 
an analysis of the great political parties of 
the country, their morals and methods. 
It throws a flood of light on the political 
corruption of our times and goes far to- 
ward pointing out the remedy which is to 
harmonize our politics with the law of 
God. The book is sold for only 50 
cents and is published by J- B. Lippin- 
cott, of Philadelphia. 

"Our Field and Work" is the name of 
a sixteen-page, three-column monthly, 
which recently dropped upon our table. 
It begins with the July^ number and will 
doubtless have much more than a local 
circulation, as it is the organ of the 
Moody Church and Institute, recording 
many of the richest things said and done 
in that renowned center of Christian ac- 
tivity and enterprise. We congratulate 
the editor, J. M. Hitchcock, on its neat 
and substantial appearance, its interest- 
ing make-up and the rich variety of good 
things that fill its columns. Long live 
the new paper! 



August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



119 



Ro^a! makes the food pure, 

wholesome and delicious. 




POWDER 

Absolutel/ Pure 



ROYAL BAKING POWDER CO., NEW YORK. 



Ch wles P. Sumner, j ither of the Sen- 
ator, ind a renouncing A^'jyn: — Masonic 
engag 'sraents, whether they are called 
oaths, 'Obligations, or promises, ought 
never to be made. They are not sanc- 
tionec' by law and s-re not obligatory. 
They make it» a Masonic crime to divulge 
that which the good cf the community 
reqi»^res should not be joncealed. 



Philo Carpenter: — This saint of God 
(Moses Stuart) like the old prophets, was 
satisfied with the institutions and ordi- 
nances of God's house, and consequently 
did not giv^ his influence or aid in sup- 
plementing the same with human ordi- 
nances and worldly alliances; in other 
words, he was opposed to secret, oath- 
bound societies, into which many good 
men, and even clergymen, have been, 
aDd are being * 'ensnared " 



Oen, Henry SewaU, a corapanion oj 
Washington: — I was initiated an Entered 
Apprentice to the Masonic rites in Octo- 
ber, 1777, at Albany, soon aftar the 
capt'JTC of Burgoyne, being then an offi- 
cer in the American army. ... I 
WRo led by the influence of this "perfect 
rule of faith and practice," during the 
year 1784, to view speculative Masonry 
in a shape still more deformed. Its char- 
ity appeared to be selfishness, because re- 
stricted to its own members; its religioa 
deism because entirely devoid of the 
Gospel. Its history appeared fabulous; 
it3 claims to antiquity unsustainable; its 
titles fulsome; its rites barbarous and 
absurd; its oaths extra-judicial, unlaw- 
fully imposed and blindly taken, and the 
penal sanctions annexed! horrid and im 
nioufl. 



James G. Birney, Candidate of the Liberty Party 
for President, was a Freemason, "but never entered a 
lodge after he joined the church, and, as his sons grew 
up, he cautioned them against joining any secret 
order."— 6?e7i. Wm. Birney. 



Lewis Tappan, private journal, 1814 : "Dr. Dixwell 
gave me lectures on Masonry at his house." "In Sep- 
tember left the lodge." Letter, Jan. 21, 1829: "I am 
free to say that I henceforth renounce Freemasonry, 
considering it a useless and profane institution." 



iiiURLOw Weed: "I now look back through an 
interval of fifty-six years with a conscious sense of 
liaving been governed through the Anti-masonic ex- 
citement by a sincere desire, first to vindicate the vio- 
lated laws of my country, and next to arrest the great 
power and dangerous infiuences of secret societies." 



A. M. Sullivan, Irish Leader : "I had not studied 
in vain the history of secret, oath-bound .associations. 
1 regard them with horror. I knew all that could be 
said as to their advantages in revolutionizing a coun- 
try, but even in the firmest and best of hands they had 
a direct tendency to demoralization, and are often on 
the whole more perilous to society than open tyranny." 



**As to the question of the attitude of Christians to- 
ward the secret orders, tw^o or three things seem to me 
very plain. One of them is this : that the whole move- 
ment of things on the line of secrecy is thoroughly 
antagonistic to the movement on the line of Scripture 
and Christianity."— i^rom address of Rev. E. P. Good- 
?mn, D.D.,pastor First Congregational Church, Chica- 
go^ to Christian Conferpnce April, 1890, 

JOSEPH lilTNER, Governor of Pennsylvania, 1837: 
"If it be true as the lamented Colden (himself one of 
the initiated) declared, that many a Mason became a 
great man but no great man ever became a Mason, 
how nearly does it concern the youth of our country 
to pause and reflect bel'ore they commit their present 
standing and future reputation to the keeping of a 
society, which for its cold-hearted and selfish purposes 
could immolate even the fame of Washington at the 
shrine of its abominations." 

* ' The Blue Degrees are hut the outer court of the 
Temple. Part of the symbols are displayed there 
to the initiate, hut he is intoitionally misled by 
false interpretations. It is not intaided that he 
shall understand them, but it is intended that he 
shall imagine that he does understand them. Their 
true explanation is reserved for the Princes of 
Masonry.'' — Albert Pike, Grand Commauder of 
the Supreme Council, Sovereign Grand Inspectors- 
General, in < 'Morals and Dogri.::^," page 819. 



120 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



Standard Works 



—ON- 

Seerat Soeieties 

FOK SALE BY THE 

mmi CBHISTIBN BSSOGIBTION. 

221 West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Terms: — Cash with order, or if sent by express 
C- O. D.- at least $i.oo must be sent with order a? 
a guaranty that books will be taken. Books at 
T«taii prices sent postpaid. Books by Mail *-e at 
risk of persons ordering, unless 8 cents extra is 
sent to pay for registering them, when their safe 
delivery is guaranteed. Books at retail ordered 
by express, are sold at lo per cent discount amd 
delivery guaranteed, but not express paid. Pt^S= 
sg-e stamps taken for small sami» 

ON FEEEMASONRY. 

Freemasonry Illustrated. First 
three degrees. 376 pages cloth, 75c; 
paper, 40c. 
The accuracy of these expositions attested by 

affidavits of Jacob O. Doesburg and others. 

Freemasonry Illustrated. 640 

pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 75c. 

A complete expositon ot the Blue Lodge and 
;!Ihapter consisting of seven degrees. Profusely 
Rostrated. 

Knight Templarisri Illustrated. 

341 pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 50c. 
A full illustrated ritnal of the six degrees ot 
&e Council and Commandery. 

Hand=Book of Freemasonry. 274 

pages, flexible cloth, 50c. 

By E. Ronayne, Past Master of Keystone Lodge 
No. 639, Chicago. ' Gives the complete standard 
ritual of the first three degrees of Freemasonry. 

Scotch Rite flasonrj'^ Illustrated. 

2 vols. Per vol., cloth, $1.00: paper, 65c. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the entiro 
Scottish Rite, comprising all the Masonic degrees 
Jrom 3rd to 33rd inclusive. The first three de- 
grees are common to all the Masonic Rites, and 
are fully and accurately given in "Freemasonry 
Illustrated." Vol. I comprises the degrees from 
3rd tp i8th inclusive. 

Vol. 11 comprises the degrees from 19th to 33rd 
&.x:iusive, with the signs, grips, tokens and pass- 
^•otds trnm is«- to 33rd '>»jQrree iitwUi«<ve 

Freemasonry Exposed; By Capt, 

William Morgan. 1 10 pages, paper, 25c. 
The genuine old Morgan book republished. 

Ecce Orient!. Pocket size, full 

roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the First 
Three Masonic Degrees in Cypher, with complete 
Floor Charts of Initiating, Passing and Raising a 
Candidate. 

Cabala. Pocket size, full roan, 

flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the Chapter 
Masonic Degrees; 4th to 7th inclusive, in Cypher, 
living' the degrees of Mark Master, Past Master, 
M~Qt F.»"»il«?t Master -and Ravai Arck, 

Knights of the Orient. Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Ritual of the Commandery 
Masonic Degrees, Knights of the Red Cross, 
Knight Templar and Knight oi Malta, iith to 13th 
.»'<:rees. 



Allyn*s Ritual of Freemasonry. 

By Avery Allyn. Cloth, $5.00. 

Contains the fully Illustrated Ritual of the Blue 
Lodge, Chapter Council and Commandery, u of 
the Scotch Rite Degrees several Masonic side 
degrees and what is ternied a Key to the Phi Beta 
Kappa, and the Orange Societies. 

Duncan's Masonic Ritual and 
Monitor. Cloth, $2.50. 

Profusely illustrated with explanatory engrav 
lugs, and containing the ritual and work of the or- 
der for the seven degrees, inclu'ang the Royal 
Arch. Though extensively used as an Instruction 
Book and one of the best in the market, it is not 
as accurate as " Freemasonry ' ./lustrated." 

Richardson's Moni^or of Freema- 

sonrj'. Cloth, $i.2s,; paper, 75c. 

Contains the ceremonies of^ Lodges, Chapters^ 
Encampments, etc. Illustrated. Although ex- 
tensively used in conferring the higher degrees, 
it is not only very incomplete but inaccurate 
especially as regards the first seven degrees, and 
as to the high r degrees it 'rjves but a description 
and general idea of th-j degrees rather than the 
full ritual. 

Look to the East A ritual of the 
first three Masonic Degrees by Ralph 
Lester. Cloth, $2.00. 

Notwithstanding the high price this book is 
very inferior in every way to Freemasonry Illus- 
trated or the Handbook of Freemasonry at a 
quarter the price. 

Council of the Ories^t. Pocket 



SI 



ze, full roan, flap, $2.50. 
le Complete Standj^rd Rit 



The Complete Standj^rd "Ritual of Council 
Masonic Degrees in Cypher, 8th to 10th inclusive. 
Giving the Degrees of Royal Master, Select Mas- 
ter and Super Excellent Master. 

Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Re- 
vised and enlarged edition, 40 pages, 
paper, 25c. 

An Illustrated Ritual of the Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine. This is a Side Masonic degree con- 
ferred only on Knights Templar and on Thirty- 
wo degree Masons. 

Thirteen Reasons why a Chris- 
tian should not be a Freemason. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages, 
5c 

Freemasonry Contrary to the 
Christian Religion. By " Spectator," 
Atlanta, Ga. 16 pages, 5c. 

Hon. Thurlow Weed on the Mor- 
gan Abduction. 16 pages 5c. 

This is the legally attested statement of this 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and confinement of 
Capt. Morgan in Canandaigua jail, his removal to 
Fort Niagara and subsequent drowning in Lake 
Ontario- 

Freemasonry a Fourfold Con» 
spiracy. 16 pages, 5c. 

Address of Pres. J. Blanchard. This is a most 
convincing argument against the lodge. 

Mah=Hah=Bone; 589 pages; $1.00 

Comprises the Hand Book, Master's Carpet and 
Freemasonry at a glance. 

ON ODD-FELLOWSHIP. 

Odd-fellowship Judged by its own 

utterances; its doctrine and practice 
examined in light of God's Word. By 
Rev. J. H. Brockman. Cloth, 50c; pa- 



per cover, 25c. 

This is 



is an exceedingly interesting, clear discus- 
sion of the character of Odd-fellowsnip, in the form 
of a dialogue. 



August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



121 



Revised Odd=felIowship Illustra- 
ted. Cloth, $i.oo: paper cover, 5octs. 
The complete revised ritual of the Lodge En- 
campment and Rebekah (ladies) degrees, profuse- 
ly illustrated, and guaranteed to be strictly ac- 
curate; with a s'ketcn of origin, history and char- 
acter of the order, over one hundred foot-note 
quotations from standard authorities, showing the 
character and teachings'of the order, and an an- 
alysis of each degree by ex-President J. Blanchard. 
This ritual corresponds exactly with the "Charge 
Books" furnished Dy the Sovereign Grand Lod^re. 

Sermon on Odd-fellowship and 
other secret societies, by Rev. J. Sar- 
ver, pastor o^ Evangelical Lutheran 
church. IOC. tach. 

This is a very clear argument against secretism of 
all forms and, the duty to disfellowship Odd-fel- 
lows, Freemasons, Knights of Pythias and Gran- 
gers, is clearly shown by their confessed character 
as found in their own publications. 

OTHER RITUALS. 

Revised Knights of Pythias, IOu»^ 
trated. Cloth, 50c: paper cover 25c. 
An exact copy of the new official Ritual Adopted 
by the Supreme Lodge of the world, with the Se- 
cret work added and fully Illustrated. 

Knights of the Oriemt Illustrated. 

15c each. 

The full Illustrated Rit'ia a« Ancient Order ol 
the Orient or the OrientaJ degree. This is a side 
degree conferred mostly a Knights of Pythias 
lodges. 

Good Templarisn/ illustrated. 25c. 

A full and accurate exposition of the degrees of 
the lodge, temple and council. 

Exposition of the Grange. 25c. 

Edited by Rev. A. W. Geeslin. Illustrated with 
engravings. 

Ritual of tl»fi Grand Army of the 
Republic loc. each. 

The authorized ritual of 1868, with signs of re- 
cognition, pass-words, etc.. and ritual of Machin- 
ists' and Blacksmiths' Union, (The two bound to- 
gether.) 

Knights of Labor Illustrated. 25c. 

("Adelphon Kruptos.") The com^ lete illus- 
trated ritual of the order, including the "unwritten 
work." 

Adoptive Masonry Illustrated. 

20c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the five 
degrees of Female Freemasonry, by Thomas Lowe. 

Red rien Illustrated. In cloth 50c. 

each, $2.00 per dozen postpaid. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, comprising the Adop- 
tion Degree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree, 
Chief's Degree, with the Odes, etc. 

The Foresters Illustrated. Paper. 

cover 25c. each, $2.00 per dozen. 

The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Forest- 
ers, with Installation Ceremonies. 

United Sons of Industry Illustra- 
ted. 15c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the sec- 
ret tradesunion of the above name, giving the 
signs, grips, passwords, etc 

Rituals and Secrets Illustrated. 

$1.00, each. 

Composed of "Temple of Honor Illustrated, 
Adoptive Masonry Illustrated," "United Sons of 
Industry IJ'"strated." and "Secret Societies lUuS" 
trated."^ 

Sermon on flasonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor of United Pres- 
byterian church. 



MISCELLAisTEOUS. 

History Nat'l Christian Associ= 
ation. IOC each. 

Its origin, objects, what it has done and aims to 
do, and the best means to accomplish the end 
sought, the Articles of Constitution and By-lawe 
of tne Association. 

Secret Societies. Cloth 35c, pape*^ 
15c. 

A discussion of their character and claims by 
Rev. David McDill, Pres. J. Blanchard and Rev 
Edward Beecher. 

The Master's Carpet or flasonry 
and Baal Worship Identical. Bound 
in fine cloth. 400 pages. 75c. 
Explains the true source and meaning of every 

ceremony and symbol of the lodge. 

Disloyal Secret Oaths. 5c. 

By Joseph Cook, Boston. He quotes the law ol 
Vermont which makes the administration of the 
Masonic oaths illegal. Joseph Cook's address is a 
national treatment of a national subject, and very 
valuable for reference. 

Light on Freemasonry. By Elder 
Do Bernard, Cloth, $1.50. paper, 75c. 

Finney on flasonry. Cloth 75c., 

paper 35c. 

The character, claims and practical workings of 
Freemasonry. By ex-Pres. Charles G. Finney, o( 
Oberlin College. President Finney was a " bright 
Mason," but left the lodge when he became 2- 
Christian. This book has opened the eyes cf 
multitudes. 

flasonic Oaths Null and Void: or 
Freemasony Self=Convicted. 207 

pages. Postpaid, 40c. 

This is a book for the times. The design of the 
author is to refute the arguments of those who 
claim that the oaths of Freemasonry are binding 
upon those who take them. 

Judge Whitney's Defence before 
the Grand Lodge oi lliinois. 15c. 

Judge Daniel H. Whitney was Master of the 
lodge when S. H. Keith, a mehiber of his lodge, 
murdered Ellen Slade. Jud^e Whitney, by at- 
tempting to bring Keith to justice, brought on 
himself the vengeance of the lodge, but he boldly 
replied to the charges against him, and afterwards 
renounced Mason'-y. 

Generarl Washington Opi>osed to 
Secret Societies. loc. 

This is a re-publication of Governor Joseph Rit- 
ner's "Vindication of General Washinrton from 
the Stigma of .Adherence to Secret Societies." 
communicated to the House of Representatives of 
Pennsylvania, March 8, 1837, at their special re- 
quest. To this is added the fact that three high 
Masons were the only perso js who opposed a vote 
of thanks to Washington on his retirement to pri- 
vate lire-undoubtedly because they considered him 
a seceding Freemason, 

florgan*s Exposition, Abduction 
and flurder and Oaths of 33 degrees. 

304 pages, cloth, $1.00, 

'* Composed of Freemasonry Exposed," by Capt. 
Wm. Morgan; ''History of the Abduction and 
Murder of Morgan;" "Valance's Confession oC 
the Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan;" "Bernard's, 
Reminiscences of Morgan Times," and " Oatlis 
and Penalties of 33 Degrees." 

Oaths and Penalties of Freemason- 
ry, as proved in court in New Berlin 
trials. IOC. 

The New Berlin trials began in the attempt of 
Freemasons to prevent public initiation by se'"ed- 
ing Masons. These trials were held at New Berlin. 
Chenango Co., N. V.. April i> and 14, 1831, am-* 
General Augustus C. Welsh, sheriff of the county, 
and other adhering Freemasons swore to the truth* 
fill revelation of the oaths and Tjena't^es, 



122 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 189'; 



Grand Lodg-e nasonry. 5c. each Sermon on flasonry 



Its relation to civil government and the Christian 
religion. By Pres. J. Blanchard. The an-Chris- 
tian, anti-republican and despotic character ot 
Freemasonry is proved from the highest Masonic 
authorities. 

Masonry a Work of Darkness, ad- 
verse to Christianity, and inimical 
to Republican Government. 15c. 

By Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong (Presbyterian) a 
seceding Mason cf 21 degrees. 

Sermon on Masonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a Ma- 
sonic Oration by Rev, Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, Ohio. 

Story of the Gods. Postpaid, loc. 

By 1. R. B. Arnold. Brief sketches from the 
mythology of Rome, Creece, Egvpt, India, Persia, 
Phrygia, Scandina''ld, Africa and America, show- 
ing the relations and unity of the past and present 
systems. The idolatrous worship of the Masonic 
jodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 

Masonic Outrages. Postpaid, 20c. 

Compiled bv Rev. H, H, Hinman. Showing 
Masonic assualt on lives of seceders^ on reputation, 
and on free speech; its interference with justice ip 
courts, etc 

History o^ the Abduction and Mur- 
der of Capt. Wm. i>^organ. 25c. 

As prepared by seven committees of citizens, 
appointed to ascertait^ the fate of Morgan. 

The Anti=mason's Scrap-Book. 

25c. 

Consisting of 53 "Cynosure" tracts. In cn^s 
book are the views of more than a score of men, 
many of them of distinguished abi'Uy, on the sub* 
iect of secret societies. 

The Jmage of the Beast; A Secret 
Empire; or Freemasonry a Subject of 
Prophecy. By Rev. Richard Horton, 
Third Edition'. 200 pages, cloth, 60c. 

Sermon on Secretism, 50. eacn. 

By Rev. R, Theo. Cross, pastor dongregationa! 
church, Hamilton, N, Y, This is a very clear ayn 
of the objections to all secret societies, and to Ucr 
"^rrv especially, that are apparent to all. 

Anti=masonic Sermons and Ad= 

dresses. Cloth, $1 00, 

Composed of " Masonry a Work of Darkness;" 
the Sermons of Messrs. Cross, William M'Nary, 
Dow and Sarver, the two addresses of President 
Blanchard, and the addresses of President H. H. 
George, Prof. J. G. Carson and Rev. M. S. Drury; 
*' Thirteen Reasons Why a Christain Cannot be a 
Freemason," "Freemasonry Contrary to the 
Christian Religion," and " Are Masonic Oaths 
Binding on the Initiate? " 287 pages. 

Secret Societies, Ancient and 
Modern. 50c. each. 

Contents: The Antiquity of Secret Societies 
The Life of Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, The 
Origin of Masonry, Was Washington a Mason: 
Fillmore and Webster's Deference to Masonry, A 
Brief Outline of the Progress of Masonry in the 
United States, The Tammany Ring, Masonic Be- 
nevolence, The Uses of Masonry, An Illustration 
The Conclusion. 

Secret Societies Illustrated. 

Over 250 cuts, 99 pages, paper cover, 
25c. each 

Containing ..wv, o.g..^, „.-^_. ^ , 

blems, etc., of Freemasonry ( Blue Lodge, and tc 
the fourteenth d-igree of the York rite). Adoptive 
Mafe^.^,^, Revised Odd-fellowship, Good Templar- 
ism, the' Temple of Honor, the United Sons of In- 
dustry, Knights of Pythias and the Grange, with 
afiBdavits. etc 

Prof. J. Q. Carson, D. D., on Se- 
cret Societies. loc. each. 

A most convincing argument against fellowship- 
ia^ 'Freemasons in the Christian church. 



16 pages, 
5c. By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor 
United Presbyterian church. 

Oaths and Penalties of the 33 
Degrees of Freemasonry. 15c. each. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes half-a-million horri- 
ble oaths, 

Ex-President John Quincy Ad^ 
ams. Price, cloth, $Loo. Paper, 35c. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
gations and Penalties. 

Sermon on flasonry. loc. each. 

By Rev. James Williams, Presiding Elder of 
Dakota District Northwestern Iowa Conference 
M, E, Church— a seceding Master Mason, 

The Mystic Tie or Freemasonry a 

League with the Devil. 15c. 

This is an account of the church trial of Peter 
Cook and wife, of Elkhart, Indiana, for refusing 
10 support a reverend Freemason. 

Sermon on Secret Societies. 5c. 

each. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn, The 
special object of his sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to examine into the char- 
acter of secret so:ieties, no matter what object 
such societies profess to have. 

Reminiscences of florgan Times. 

IOC. each. 

By Elder David Bernard. This is a thrilling 
narrative of the incidents connected with Ber- 
nard's Revelation of Freemasonry. 

The Broken Seal. In cloth, 75c. 
Paper covers, 40c. 

Personal Reminiscences of the Abduction and 
Murder of Capt. Wm, Morgan. By Samuel D, 
Greene, 

Pres. H. H. George on Secret 

Societies. loc. each. 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty of 
Christian churches to disfellowship secret socie- 
ties. 

Narratives and Arguments, 

15c. each. 

Showing the conflict of secret societies with the 
Constitution and law of the Union and of the 
States, By F'-^ucis Semple. 

Secrecy vs. the Family, State 
anc3 Church. loc. each. 

By Rev. M. S. Dury. The antagonism of or- 
ganized secrecy to the welfare of the family, state 
and church, is clearly shown, 

A Booklet of 107 pages. 25c. 

"The Martyr's Own Monument," by Rev. J. E, 
Roy, D. D., Western Secretary of American Mis- 
sionary Association; "Christian Politics," by 
Rev. J. Blanchard, late Editor of Christian Cyno- 
sure; "The Mysterious Machine: Was it Lawn- 
mower, Town-pump, Balloon, Wheel-barrow, — or 
what?" by Prof. E. D, Bailey, of the Civil Service 
Dept. U, S. Government. 

Are Secret Societies a BJessIng? 

A pamphlet of 20 pages. 5c. 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., pastoT 
of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, Mo. 
Jan. 4, 1891. W, McCoy writes: "That sermon 
ought to be in the hands of every preacher in this 
land, and every citizen's, too," 

Between Two Opinions: or the 
Question of the Hour. 389 pages; cloth, 
postpaid, 75 cents. 

By Miss E. E. Flagg, author of " Little People," 
"A Sunny Life," etc., etc. Everyone who loves 
to read a good story, chaste and elegant in ex- 
pression, pure in thought, interesting in narrative, 
should read this book upon tbe power of secret 
"'ocieties in nolitics. and tne remedv- 



August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



123 




MASONIC CHART. 

ILLUSTRATING THE RELATION OF SOME OF THE DEGREES AND RITES IN 
FREEMASONRY TO EACH OTHER. 
The accompanying chart represents one hundred and forty two degrees. 

I. The American Rite of 13 degrees; 2. The Scotch Rite of 33 degrees; ' ■ '' 

3. The Egyptian Rite of g6 degrees. 4. The Mystic Shrine of one degree. 

5. The Eastern Star of 5 degrees for Master Masons and for women. These are side degrees, and not 
genuine masonry. 

The Symbolic degrees, or Blue Lodge of three degrees, are common to every Masonic rite, whether 
American, Scotch, or Egyptian, or whichever of the Masonic rites, named in Mackey's Masonic Encyclo- 
pedia one may choose to investigate. 

This chart shows in the Blue Lodge the position of the Worshipful Master and some of the other offi- 
cers of the lods:e. Several positions of the ca ^didate who is being initiated are also shown. In the Master 
Mason's degree is recognized the murder, buriai anu resurrection scene so fall of religions signifi. nee to 
Freemasons. 



124 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 




The Celebrated 

Marsh 
Reading 
Stand 



-AND- 



Revolving 
Book Case. 

Recognized throughout the civil- 
ized world to be unequaled as an 
Office or Library article, is now 
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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



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12(5 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



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August, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



12- 



Charles C. Foote: — What would the 
ictroduction of Ciirist into Mohammt;- 
danism be, but its annihilation? At d 
thus would it be with Masonry. 

ALBttET Barnes, 1849: — Any good 
cause, I think, can be promoted openly; 
any secret association .is liable, at least, 
to abuse and danger. 

Rev. John G. Stearns, well-known 
author: — Masonry will by no means die 
of iiaelf ; nor will it separate itself from 
the church of God. No; it will cling to 
it, like the deadly scorpion to the victim 
on which it fastens. The church must 
therefore separate from that. 



James O.Birne i, candidate of the Liber- 
ty party for Pres dent, was a Freemason, 
"but never entereA a lodge after he j oined 
the church, and, as ^^is sons grew up, he 
cautioned them against joining any se- 
cret order." — Oen. Wm. Birney. 

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128 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1897. 



Bont 
bear 

the bur- 
den of the 
wash- 
board any 
longer. 
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clothes and better for you. sis 

Mn93iPear///7e 

Of all I wish to say of secret societies, this is the 
sum: 
Secret oaths— 

1. Can he shoton hist(yricdlly to have often led to 
crime. 

2. Are natural sources of jesdousy and just alarm to 
society at large. 

3. Are especially unfavorable to harmony and mu- 
tual confidence among men living together under pop- 
ular institutions. 

4. Are dangerous to the general cause of civil lil> 
erty and just government. 

5. Are condemned by the severe denunciations of 
many of the wisest statesmen, preachers, and re- 
formers. 

6. Are opposed to Christian principles, especially to 
those implied in these three texts ; 

"In secret I have said nothing." 
"Be not unequally yoked together with unbelievers.** 
"Give no offence in anything, that the ministry be 
not blamed." 

7. Are forbidden in some portions of our Republic 
by the civil law, and ought to be in all portions. Many 
European governments hold Freemasonry under grave 
suspicion as a mask for conspiracies against throne 
and altar. In Prussia, Poland, Russia and Spain Free- 
masonry is prohibited by law. 

8. Are forbidden to church members by some Chris- 
tian denominations, and ought to be by diW.—From 
address of Joseph Cook to Christian Conference, Aprilt 
aS90. 



JOHN ADAMS : "The use of my father's name fo: 
the purpose of which Mr. Sheppard would now apply 
it, is an injury to his memory, which I deem it my 
duty, as far as may be in my power, to redress. . . . 
While Mr. Gridley lived, he' was the intimate friend,, 
personal and professional, of my father. He died in 
1767. My father often resorted to him for friendly 
counsel, and, as he was Grand Master of the lodge, 
once asked his advice, whether it was worth his while 
to become a member of the society. In the candor of 
friendship, Mr. Gridley answered him— NO,— adding 
that by aggregation to the society a young man might 
acquire a little artificial support but that he did 
not need it, and that there was nothing in the Masonic- 
institution worthy of his seeking to be associated 
with it. So said at that time the Grand Master of the 
Massachusetts Masons, Jeremy Gridley; and such I 
have repeatedly heard my father say, was the reason 
why he never joined the lodge. The use of the name 
of Washington, to give an odor of sanctity to the insti- 
tution as it now stands exposed to the world, is in my 
opinion as unwarrantable as that of my father's 
name."— ie^^er of John Quincy Adams, Aug. 22, 1831. 



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giving the pronunciation, the meaning, and the location of the text where 
the word occurs for the first time. Exhaustive Articles on Biblical History, 
Geography, Topography, Natural History, Ethnology, Botany, Chronology, 
Music and Poetry ; a Complete Harmony of the Gospels, Tables of Parables, 
Miracles, Prophecies, Prayers, Money, Weights and Measures, Jewish Sects 
and Orders, and Fourteen Beautiful Maps in Colors. 



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NATIONAL 
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ASSOCIATION, 
Chicago, 111. 



Sample of 
Type.,. 



THE GOSPEL ACCOBE 

SAINT MATTI 



CHAPTER 1. I 

I The genealogy of Christ from Abraham to Joseph. 
18 He teas concewed by the Holv Ghost, and born 
of the Virgin Sfary. 19 The angel interpreteth the j 
names of Christ. 

THE book of the ^ generation of 
Je'§us Christ, ^ the son of Da'- 
vid, ^ the son of A'bra-ham. 

2 *^A'bra-ham begat I'saac; and 
^l'§^ac begat Ja'cob; and -^ Ja'cQb 
begat Ju'das and his brethren ; j 

3 And ^Ju'das begat Pha'r$§ and 
Za'ra of Tha'mar; and ^ Pha're§ 
begat Es'rom; and Es'rom begat 
A 'ram ; 

4 And A'ram begat A-mln'a-dab ; 
and A-mln'a-dab begat N^-as'son; 
and Na-as'8on begat Sal'mOn; 

6 And Sai'mOn begat Bo'oz of Ra'- 



a Luke 3. 23, 
b Ps. 132. IL 

Ib. 11. L 

Jer. 23. 5. 

ch. 22. 42. 

John 7. 4Z. 

Acts 2. 39; 

13. 23. 

Rom. 1. 5. 
c Gen. 12. 3 ; 

22.18. 

Gal. 3. IS. 
d Gen. 21. 2,3. 

e Gen. Sj. 26. 
f Geo. 2ii. iA. 

ff Gen. 33. 27, 
&c. 

h Ruth 4. 13, 
&c. 

lChr.2.5,9, 
&c 

i 1 Sam. 16. 1 ; 
17. 12. 

A- .'Sam. 12. 24. 
ZlChr. 3.10. 

m 2 Kin. 20. 
2L 



Je'l 
17 
hILB 
tioi 
ryii 
teei 
cax3 
Chi 
18 
wae 
thffi 
beft 
fom 
19 
ajiB 
her 




REV. J. B. GALLOWAY. 



CONTENTS. 



Ciirreut Notes 129 

Masonry— A Discussion 130 

Basic Principle of Masonry 133 

Rule Them Out of the Church 134 

The Lodge Trains Men to Lie 134 

Secrecy and Citizensliip 135 

Freemasonry and Patriotism 138 

Letter from the South 140 

A Veteran Colporteur 140 

The Modern Woodmen Ritual 141 

The Ely- Williams Discussion 142 

Protection in Unity 142 

The Cynosure — Donations — Foreign 
Work 142 



Founder of the Eastern Star 144 

Attention, Ohioans 144 

Cheering Report from Bro. W. B. Stod- 
dard 144 

Bro. Williams in Ohio ^145^ 

Meetings in Waukesha County, W^is 146* 

Oddfellowship and Baal Worship 146- 

Worse Than Russian Thistle 14a 

Freemasonry Under Discussion 147 

Meetings in Columbia County, Wis 147 

Portage (Wis.) Meetings 147 

Personal Mention 148 

Obituary of John Shuh 150 

Publication Notices 150* 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



"The National Christian Association, op- 
posed to secret societies," was formed at 
Pittsburg, Pa., in 1868, and incorporated un- 
der the laws of the State of Illinois in 1874. 

The National Christian Association arose to 
meet a great want created by the growth of 
secret orders, and the ignorance and silence 
of public teachers as to their nature and ef- 
fects. 

The association is interdenominational. 
The president (1897) is a Methodist Episco- 
pal, and the vice president a United Presby- 
terian. Among the following named officers 



and agents are also the Free Methodist, Con- 
gregational, Lutheran, Friend, Evangelical, 
United Brethren, Baptist, Reformed Presby- 
terian and Independent. 

The principal headquarters of the National 
Christian Association is at 221 West Madison 
street, Chicago, which property is valued at 
$20,000, and is the gift to the association of 
Dea. Philo Carpenter, one of the founders of 
Chicago. 

The association is supported by the free 
will offerings and bequests of friends. The 
Christian Cynosure is its organ and princi- 
pal publication. 



President— Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, Morris, 
111. 

Vice President— Rev. W. T. Campbell, Mon- 
mouth, 111. 

Recording Secretary— Mrs. M. C. Baker, 14 
North May street, Chicago. 

General Secretary and Treasurer^- Wm. I. 
Phillips, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 

Editor Christian Cynosure — Rev. M. A. 
Gault, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

T. B. Arnold, C. A. Blanchard, E. A. Cook, 
J. M. Hitchcock, C. J. Holmes, T. B. Rada- 
baugh, E. Whipple, Edgar B. Wylie, H. F. 
Kletzing, J. A. Collins, W. O. Dinius. 
DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Rev. James P. Stoddard, Boston, Mass.; 
Rev. P. B. Williams, Los Angeles, Gal.; Rev. 
Wm. Fenton, St. Paul, Minn.; Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard, Washington, D. C. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to the world; aud in secret have i said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XXX 



CHICAGO. SEPTEMBER, 1897. 



NUMBER 5. 



PUl'.LISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

l^ATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

TERnS OP SUBSCRIPTION. 

PRICE.— Per year, in advance, $1.00; three months, on 
trial, twenty-five cents; single copies, 10 cents. 

IRECEIPTS.— The yellow lable pasted lon the paper or 
wrapper is a receipt for payment ol subscription to 
and including the printed date. 

'EXTENSION.— The extension of a subscription is 
shown by the printed lable the secona month alter 
a remittance is received. 

:01SC0NTINUANCES.-We find that a large number 
of our subscribers prefer not to have their sub- 
scriptions interrupted and their files broken in case 
they tail to remit before expiration. It is therelore 
assumed, unless notification to discontmue is re- 
ceived, that the subscriber wishes no interuption in 
his series. Notification to discontinue at expiration 
can be sent in at any time during the year. 

PRESENTATION COPIES.-Many persons subscribe 
for The Christian Cynosure to be sent to 
friends. In such cases, it we are advised that a 
subscription is a present and not regularly author- 
ized by the recipient, we will make a memorandum 
to discontinue at expiration, and to send no bill for 
the ensuing year. 



Twenty different religious denomina- 
tions make membership in a secret so- 
ciety a bar to membership in their 
churches. 



The modern pagan rehgion called the- 
osophy, like its original in pagan lands, 
is in this country being resolved into a 
secret society and may in time become a 
rival of Freemasonrv. 



The aim of the National Christian As- 
sociation has ever been to give the most 
candid hearing to the advocates of Free- 
masonry. In the discussion in this issue 
between Prof. Ely and Prof. Williams 
our readers will be interested to know if 
the latter can produce any arguments 
that are new or that have any weisfht. 



The way was broken for the White 
Knight Templars to parade and exhibit 
themselves on Logan Day, July 22d, by 
a colored commandary of Knight Tem- 
plars, which was put on parade a few 
days before. Secretists had been some- 
what driven to covert by the assassina- 
tion of Dr. Cronin, for which the general 
public held them responsible. 



The Chicago Record says that on Sab- 
bath, Aug. 22, a thousand members of 
the Grand Army of the Republic were 
expected to leave this city for the en- 
campment at Buffalo. When we remem- 
ber that from a score of other cities a 
greater or less number of G. A. R. mem- 
bers thus trample under foot God's law 
of the Sabbath, we can realize the fear- 
ful immoral influence of such a secret 
organization. The Sabbath reformer 
who ignores the anti-secret society issue 
is either cowardly .or blind to a most dan- 
gerous factor in Sabbath desecration. 



Rev. J. B. Galloway, whose portrait 
we give on our first page, was born of 
humble parents in Ayrshire. Scotland, 
April 4, 1843. He emigrated to South- 
ern Illinois in 1850, and served in the 
W^ar of the Rebellion as corporal in com- 
pany K, One Hundred and Forty-second 
Regiment, Illinois Volunteers. He grad- 
uated from Monmouth College in 1871. 
and from the Theological Seminary in 
1874. He has for a number of years been 
pastor of the United Presbyterian con- 
gregations of Arlington and Caledonia, 
near Madison, which is his third pastoral 
charge. He is an eloquent preacher, an 
excellent pastor, a thorough-going re- 
former and has a strong hold upon the 
affections of his people. 



IW 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



MASONRY.— A DISCUSSION 



Between Professor John Augustus Williams, of 
Harrodshurg. Ky.. and Professor Simp- 
son Ely, of Kirlsville. J\fo. 

IMPEACHMEXTS OF MASOXRY. — NO. I., BY PRO- 
FESSOR ELY. 



In entering- upon this discussion I 
seek only for truth and the right. I 
count niyseh' happy, because my oppo- 
nent is such an honorable, high-minded 
gentleman. Xo abusive epithets nor 
personal innuendoes will have place in ' 
these articles. Only the merits of the 
question will have place here. 

Some months ago I wrote an "Im- 
peachment of I\Iasonry" for the Chris- 
tian Cynosure, of Chicago. I sent a copy 
of my article to John Augustus Will- 
iams, knowing that he was an ardent Ma- 
son. I hoped to lead him from "the er- 
ror of his way" into the freedom and 
Hght of truth. The article elicited a let-' 
ter from him in which he proposed that 
we enter upon an investigation of the 
questions involved; hence, the present 
discussion. It was so unusual and re- 
freshing to find a Mason in high stand- 
ing in the order who was willing to en- 
ter upon such a search for truth, that I 
gladly accepted his proposition. With 
this brief introduction I at once enter 
upon my arguments against what I be- 
lieve to be a great evil. I am to afftrm 
all the counts in my impeachment. I 
number m.y arguments to correspond 
with my impeachments. 

I. I impeach Free Masonry because it 
is secret. I believe it to be a dangerous 
thing for any great organization to be 
bound together by a secret compact. 
The rehgion of our blessed Savior is an 
open religion. It is before the eyes of 
the world, and challenges the closest 
scrutiny, both as to its teaching and its 
methods. Even if Jesus ever taught any- 
thing to his disciples in secret (and he 
did not) he put an embargo upon the 
spirit of secrecy in them, and command- 
ed them to "proclaim it from the house- 
tops." They were not to put their light 
under a bushel, but on a candlestick. 
They were to be like "a city upon a hill 
that could not be hid." They were to 
"let their light shine." They are called 
the "children of darkness." The Savior 



said: "Men love darkness rather than 
light because their deeds are evil." Of 
course I do not maintain that all who 
work in the secret lodge intend to do 
evil; but all must admit that under cover 
of such secrecy wicked, designing, self- 
seeking men — and a vast number of these 
are Masons — can accomplish their pur- 
poses as they could not do were their 
plans, purposes and methods open to the 
light of day. 

Joseph Cook says: "Many European 
governments hold Free Masonry under 
grave suspicions, as a mask for conspira- 
cies against throne and altar," and he 
quotes in this connection the words of 
our Savior, 'Tn secret have I said noth- 
ing." Howard Crosby said: "The se- 
cret lodge system belongs to despotism, 
not to democracies," and Charles Fran- 
cis x\dams adds his testimony in the fol- 
lowing words, "A more perfect agent 
for the devising and execution of con- 
spiracies against church and state could 
scarcely have been conceived." I object 
to Masonry because it is a great secret 
combine of good and bad men. 

11. I impeach Masonry because it is 
Christless. It not only omits Christ, but 
it is anti-Christ. Any religious institu- 
tion which leaves out Christ cannot be a 
fit place for Christian men. Indeed the 
Christian is commanded to do all things 
in word or deed in the name of Jesus 
Christ, giving thanks to God and the 
Father by him (Col. iii. 17). Every Ma- 
sonic prayer, oath and ceremony is in 
violation of this divine exhortation. Ma- 
sonry perverts the Word of God by omit- 
ting the name of Jesus when it quotes 
pas<^ages where His name occurs. Pro- 
fessing reverence for the Bible it cruci- 
fies the Christ of the Bible. At the same 
time it quotes the words of Jesus and 
stabs their Author! Do you ask for tlie 
proof? Listen! "Disbelief in the Di- 
vinity of Jesus Christ does not in any 
^ense afifect Masonic standing." See 
Jud. Dec. G. L. 1869. 

In "Drew's Monitor" we are told: 
"These three degrees form a perfect and 
harmonious whole. Nor can v/e con- 
ceive that anything can be suggested 
more which the soul of man requires." 
Now these three degrees a^e Christless, 
and yet they boast the proud claim that 
tiie soul of man requires nothing more 
than they contain. I knov/ lodges that 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



131 



are almost wholly compose 1 of Clirist- 
A^ss men, and they are Mason.-s of many 
degrees! Can Christians consort with 
such men without comprouusnig tlieir 
religion? 

III. I impeach Masonry l^ecause it 
is a mixture of Biblical and Pagan mJiu- 
ences'. A long chapter can l)e written 
in support of this proposition. I heard 
Robert Morris describe his many trips 
around the world. No one will question 
liis standing as a Mason. In the city 
where I now write, he said in a public 
address that he had worn his iMasonic 
apron around the world, and that he 
never set foot upon any country that he 
^vas not warmly greeted by his fellow- 
craftsmen. Jews, Mohammedans, Amer- 
ican Indians, Chinamen, all had bidden 
Iiirn ^^ elcome. This is made possible be- 
cause my proposition is true. Prof. J. 
R. W. Sloane, D. D., of "The Reformed 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary," 
:sa3's: ''My strongest opposition to Ma- 
sonry is because of its rivalry with re- 
ligion. It steps in before the church, 
and is a false, an idolatrous religion, a 
religion without a Savior, and, therefore, 
;a delusion and a snare to all who engage 
in it, or rest their hope upon it." 

One of the most prominent preacli- 
er^ in my communion, and one who is 
a many-degree Mason, tells me that 
''Masonry is a mongrel institution — a 
mixture of rehgion and barbarism, with 
a preponderance of the latter." He long 
since renounced the lodge because of its 
unholy fellowships. Alexander Camp- 
"bell said: "They are of the world, they 
speak of the world, and the world hear- 
eth them." Its oaths, rituals, and cere- 
monies are far more compatible with pa- 
ganism than with Christianity. It is the 
proud claim of Masons that any one who 
recognizes a God may become a Mason 
so far as his religion is concerned. All 
pagans recognize a Supreme Being; 
"hence there is nothing in pagan religions 
to debar their votaries from becoming 
Masons. Simpson Elv. 

Kirksville. ^lo. 



REPLY TO IMPEACHMENTS.— NO I., BY PRO- 
FESSOR AVILEIAMS. 

I regret that Bro. Ely did not think 
that it was necessary, first of all, to ex- 
plain what he means by a secret society. 
When he argues that Free Alasonrv is 



dangerous because it is secret, he plays 
with an ambiguous term, which fact pre- 
cludes any satisfactory reply. Again, 
there are secret societies that even he 
would not call dangerous, and some that 
even I would oppose. He does not, there- 
fore, mean to denounce all, but only some 
of such societies. But this is playing 
with an undisputed middle term;- and 
he well knows that in such case, also, a 
satisfactory reply is precluded. I can, 
therefore, answer, only in a conjectural 
way, his first objection to Free ^lason- 
ry. He argues that since the institution 
is, in some undefined sense of the term, 
a secret society, it is therefore danger- 
ous, and for the reason that wicked men 
may the more easily accomplish wicked 
designs. But if a combination, secret in 
any sense, is so powerful for evil when 
composed of bad men, I cannot see why 
it might not be as powerful for good, 
when controlled by just men. 

But to afhrm that a secret order is dan- 
gerous in the hands of wicked men is no 
real impeachment of Free Masonry, un- 
til it is proved that Free ]\Iasons them- 
selves are wicked men. Our brother 
feeling the logical necessity for such a 
premise, does indeed venture to say, cau- 
tiously and parenthetically, that "a vast 
number of wicked, designing, and self- 
seeking men are Masons!" But if even 
this were true, it would not meet the 
demand of fair argimient. It must be 
further shown that the business and in- 
struction of the lodges are under the sole 
control of these "wicked ones:" other- 
wise there would be no danger to church 
or state ; the influence of the good would 
either reform or exclude the bad. But is 
it true that such a vast number of Free 
^Niasons are "wicked, designing and self- 
seeking men?" If so, the lodges would 
be the very places for zealous mission- 
aries like Bro. Ely. Jesus sought every- 
where for sinners, and consorted with 
them, not to denounce them, but to re- 
claim them. 

But I must ask leave to deny emphat- 
ically the statement that so vast a num- 
ber of Masons are wicked men. That 
bad men have sometimes worked their 
way into lodges, no one denies : and Bro. 
Ely knows that the same sort of men 
liave sometimes crept unawares into the 
Churches, of Christ. But it is unneces- 
sarv to parade these lamentable facts; 



13:; 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



tliey furnish' no argument against either 
Free ]\Iasonry or Christianity. I affirm 
that go where we may in aU the land, we 
shaU find the lodges composed generally 
of honorable, law-abiding and truth-lov- 
ing citizens. The impeachment of Free 
^Masonry, then, on the ground that, as 
Bro. Ely at last puts it, it is "a great, se- 
cret combine of good and bad men," is 
not logically sustained. 

To the statements of certain gentle- 
men, quoted by Bro. Ely as unfriendly 
lo Free ^Masonry, I might reply by citing 
tlie contrary testimony of as many gen- 
tlemen equally great, wise and good; but 
all this would be irrelevant to the dis- 
cussion. 1 would say, however, in refer- 
ence to the statement of Joseph Cook, of 
Boston, that all despotism, whether of 
Europe or America, Avhether of state or 
church, may justly hold Free Masonry 
under grave suspicion, not, indeed, as a 
mask for conspiracies, but because it 
engenders a spirit that is opposed to every 
form of tyranny, whether of prince or 
priest. 

.-Vs respects the injunction of Jesus to 
his disciples, which Bro. Ely quotes with 
so much pleasure, that "they should let 
their light shine," it applies to all good 
men who have the light of any truth to 
emit or reflect, and certainly to the Fj-ee 
Alasons, whose laudable pursuit is after 
Liglit. And Masons have not been neg- 
lectful of their mission as light-seekers 
and Hght-bearers. They do not, it is 
true, expose the dynamo of their light- 
pla.nt to the rude touch of the profane; 
but the Hght that it generates is trans- 
mitted and distributed abroad till it pene- 
trates the darkness everywhere. I have 
known nu'nisters of the gospel, after 
pleasant evenings of instruction in the 
lodge, carry into their pulpits fresher 
and clearer views of truth. 

>: s^ >•: Y[{s second impeachment is 
that Free ^Masonry is Christless and anti- 
Christ — a crucifier and hypocritical stab- 
ber of Christ! His proof of so grave a 
charge is that a Grand Master of Indi- 
ana has decided that a Unitarian may be 
a Free Mason! He also cites a Bro. 
Drew, who thinks that the three degrees 
of ancient craft Masonry contain all 
that the soul of man requires. Now, it 
would be enough to say, in reply to all 
this, what Bro. Ely well know^s to be a 
fact; that the Masonic brotherhood com- 



prises thousands of as intelligent and 
pure-hearted lovers of Christ as the 
world contains. In the name of Christ 
and the Father they do everything in 
the lodge and out of the lodge, in the 
church and out of it, that may benefit 
their brother man. The true Christian, 
as distinguished from the formalist and 
liter alist, speaks and acts in the name of 
Christ always and everywhere; not, it is 
true, always pronouncing that name as a 
talisman of power, or uttering it to be 
heard of men; but he keeps that name 
ever in his heart. The spirit of the apos- 
tolic precept pervades his life, his un- 
ceasing prayers and his constant service, 
though his lips may "omit" or "leave 
out" the formal repetition of the word. 
By the literalism of my brother's inter- 
pretation of the apostle's injunction, the 
Lord's Prayer would be Christless and 
unfit, without amendment, for Christian 
lips. And we may find a dozen prayers 
in the epistles of this same apostle equal- 
ly "Christless." 

>;: >ic >ic j^-g ti^ij-d objection to Free 
Masonry is singularly expressed. A 
world-wide brotherhood, as testified to 
by Bro. Robert Morris, is admitted as a 
fact ; but Bro. Ely accounts for it on the 
strange ground that "Masonry is a mix- 
ture of Biblical and pagan influences,'^ 
without which mixture, he says, this 
brotherhood of men would not be pos- 
sible! Our brother, and those with him, 
seem to be jealously opposed to any love- 
triumphs among men, unless they are 
accomplished by some ecclesiastical 
agency. But Christ is broader, grander 
and more powerful than all the sectarian 
spirit of this age. In all lands and among 
all peoples, those who love truth and 
honesty seek for it — who lift up their 
hearts searching for the Father, whom 
they, as yet, but feebly know — ^all these 
hearts are Christ's, and they are our 
brethren, and all enlightened Christians 
should hasten to help them. Heaven 
bless every agency that can bind them 
into love for one another, and lead them 
more and more into the light of truth. 

But it is impossible for me to deter- 
mine exactly what the 'brother means by 
that strange "mixture of Biblical and pa- 
gan influences." It seem to be a favor- 
ite war cry with the opponents. One 
of his comrades, who seems to be as lit- 
tle acquainted with Masonry as Bro. Ely, 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



133 



although he is described as once having 
been a many-degree Mason, is quoted as 
saying that Masonry is a ''mixture of re- 
ligion and barbarism." No one can re- 
ply satisfactorily to a proposition, the 
terras of which are undefined and unin- 
telligible. I must ask my brother to ex- 
press his objections, hereafter, strongly 
and briefly as he pleases, but at least in 
clear and transparent language. '''' * * 
John Aug. Williams. 
Harrodsburg, Ky. 



BASIC PRINCIPLE OF MASONRY. 



BY W. B. DENTON. 



Mr. Jno. D. Millekin, in the March 
number of the "Kansas Free Mason," 
says : "The basic principle of Masonry is 
faith in God, yet it leaves each one to 
worship Him according to his own judg- 
ment and conception of duty." The 
Bible says: ''God is a spirit, and he who 
worships Him must w^orship Him in spir- 
it and in truth;" so he who has faith in 
any other god or worships Him in any 
other way is an infidel. 

The commonly accepted definition of 
infidel is "one who denies Christianity 
and the truth of the scriptures." "It in- 
culcates the unfathomless and unbound- 
less charity taught by the Nazarene and 
yet a belief in Him as either man or God 
is not an essential tenet in the Masonic 
faith." The former assertion is not true, 
because Masonry is a fraternity, and 
there is a wide difference between frater- 
nity and charity. 

Fraternity is narrow, selfish and ex- 
clusive, while charity is broad as human- 
ity. There is fraternity among thieves, 
but not "universal benevolence" and 
love for mankind. "With what terms of 
respect knaves and sots will speak of 
their own fraternity." 

Christians have not the right to be- 
lieve whether or not Christ is divine, 
neither can they truly fellowship and fra- 
ternize with those who assume that priv- 
ilege. "No man cometh to the Father 
but by Me." "He that honoreth not the 
Son honoreth not the Father which hath 
sent him." Again he says: "There are 
those who adore and devoutly worship 
the Masons' God, who dispute the claims 
of the followers of the Nazarene, vet Ma- 



sonry welcomes them with cordiality to 
its circle." What' right has Mr. Mille- 
kin to spell "the Mason's God" with a 
capital letter? There is but one true and 
living God, and if an organization wor- 
ships a code of fraternal morals it can be 
classed only with the heathen gods. Yet, 
contrary to the above assertion, ]\Ir. Mil- 
lekin says Masonry is not a religion and 
cannot take its place. What is reUgion 
if it is not worship. They have stated 
prayers, and what is prayer but religious 
worship? If even but one soul w^as lost 
through this false worship, Christians 
should have no part in it. 

There can be no better exponent of 
Christian morals than the Bible. A com- 
plete Bible can be bought for 50 cents. 
All the degrees of Masonry will cost over 
$1,000. If half the amount paid to ]\Ia- 
sonry were devoted to real charity, more 
good would be done and more credit re- 
ceived. In our church a young man was 
denied fuU membership because he went 
fishing on Sabbath. I knew a :\Iason to 
go fishing on Sabbath, but what of that? 
I have known a ]\Iason of high degree to 
do ever and ever so much worse than 
that, yet he remains a high-degree ]\Ia- 
son just the same. If dishonorable 
members can't be turned out, honorable 
ones ought to get out. 

He speaks of the benign influence of 
the "Mystic Tie" in preserving lives and 
preventing outrage.s in time of war. and 
calls it commendable. If war is ever 
justifiable it is when inspired by patriot- 
ism and self-defense. 

For one to compromise with the ene- 
my of his country for the sake of an oath 
sanctioned by neither God nor the state, 
he is false to'his duty and a traitor to his 
friends. No wonder, then, that ]\Iasons 
are accused of defending brother yia.- 
sons in wrong-doing, and voting for 
them regardless of fitness. When ]\Ia- 
sonic oaths are more binding than moral 
and Christian obligations, the ^lasonic 
order is a dangerous institution and 
should be suppressed. 

Winfield, Kan. 



In our good fight of faith against the 
lodge, let us remember the Jewish prov- 
erb" "When the tale of bricks is doubled 
then comes Moses." 

—Rev. I. B. Galloway. 



134 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



RULE THEM OUT OF THE CHURCH. 



BY REV. J. B. GALLOWAY 



The existence of oath-bound, Christ- 
less secret societies raises at least three 
questions: First, a legal question, Is the 
oath right in the sight of God and man? 
Have they a right to administer and re- 
ceive such oaths? If so, where did they 
get that right? Second, a theological 
question, which touches not only thd 
oath but their creed, ritual, forms of wor- 
ship and claims. Third, a social ques- 
tion : Does the word of God, the laws 
of the land and the state of society justify 
the strong in banding themselves togeth- 
er, as against the rest of mankind? In 
other words, are they justified in conceal- 
ing from the family, the church and the 
state ^"heir obligations, methods and pur- 
poses? 

Is it not right, nay, is it not the duty 
of all men, to investigate and solve these 
problems? We af^rm that it is especially 
the duty of the Church of Christ to do 
so; her IMaster and Head has laid this 
burden upon her, "to prove all things 
and to hold fast that which is good." 
Moreover, God has qualified His people 
for this work by the gift of the Holy 
Ghost. We may ''know the spirit of 
truth and spirit of error." "He that is 
spiritual judgeth all things." But this is 
where the so-called great churches have 
failed and are failing to-day. By their 
doctrine of open communion and other- 
wise they make no distinction between 
the clean and the unclean, and thus 
church discipline has become either a 
nonentity or a farce. 

The great D. D.'s or modern Phari- 
sees bind heavy burdens and grievous to 
be borne, and lay them on the shoulders 
of the small witnessing churches, yet they 
tliemselves will not touch them with one 
of their fingers. If these oath-bound 
men v/ere excluded from all churches 
and from the ordinances of the true relig- 
ion, as they ought to be, tlie battle would 
l^e won. Just here is where the blame 
lies. A faithful church is the salt of the 
ea"th and the light of the world. But the 
salt in many cases has surely lost its sa- 
vor. 

The law and the testimony of God's 
word should be so strongly preached and 
insisted on as to crystallize into practice 



— 2L practice that would be common to 
our common Christianity. 

Christians who allow themselves to be 
hoodwinked and cabletowed and go 
cringing to worldly lodge-doors, profess- 
edly seeking light, do then and there sell 
their birthright as sons of light for less 
than a mess of pottage and cease to be 
the light of the world by their own con- 
fession. Their locks are shorn, and they 
become weak as other men, and the Phil- 
istines put out their eyes, so that they can 
see no harm in even a Masonic obliga- 
tion. 

Is this what the apostle means when he 
speaks of men who reject the truth, be- 
ing given over to a strong delusion to be- 
lieve a lie? Preachers w'ho preach and 
sing, "Come to the light," and "The light 
of the world is Jesus," will adjourn their 
meetings and repair to these synogogues 
of Satan to be illuminated by the aid of 
three tallow candles. 

O for another Jeremiah to wail out 
our lamentations ! 

Poynette, Wis. 



THE LODGE TRAINS MEN TO LIE. 



BY REV. WILLIAM KENTON. 



W^hile a man embraces Freemasonry, 
or any esotericism of a lodge, he is not en- 
titled to respect as a rational being in 
matters of religion. He is a rebel against 
his Creator and should never be suffered 
to participate in any council of true re- 
ligion. Neither prophets nor apostles 
of the Bible would or could have toler- 
ated him in their councils for one mo- 
ment. 

When a Modern Woodman of Amer- 
ica sees for the first time an exposition 
of the esoteric work of his lodge it is in- 
teresting to observe his surprise and in- 
dignation in such expression as, "How 
did this get out?" "Where did they get 
it from?" "I did not know that it was 
out." And then, after that, to hear him 
lie about it, and declare that that which 
he has already acknowledged to be a true 
exposure is false; showing that when he 
admitted the truth it was an unguarded 
moment in which he betrayed his sacred 
(?) trust — to he; and that, as President 
Finney would say, "He is a perpetual 
liar," a walking embodiment of a lie. It 
is his sacred (?) duty to lie. 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



135 



It is the tendency of every secret soci- 
ety to make a perpetual liar of every man 
or woman that joins a lodge. The lodge 
plan is the devil's plan to destroy souls; 
hence the Christian is taught to 'Tear 
him, who, after having killed, has author- 
ity to cast into hell.". ''Yea, I say, unto 
you fear him" (Luke xii., 5), i. e., fear to 
disregard God and come under the 
authority of the devil, as every one does 
who joins a secret society. Nearly all 
secret societies assume the authority over 
the lives of their members, and by mak- 
ing liars of its members puts them under 
the authority of the devil to cast them 
into ''the lake which burnetii w^ith fire 
and brimstone," where all liars go. 
"Come not thou, my soul, into their se- 
cret," is the language of a Christian ; for 
they are lying hypocrites, and their God 
was "a liar and a murderer from the be- 
ginning, and abode not in the truth." 

74 South Robert street, St. Paul, Minn. 



SECRECY AND CITIZENSHIP. 



BY PROF. ELLIOT WHIPPLE. 



POWER OF INSTITUTIONS. 

Men are sometimes better and some- 
times worse than the institutions to which 
they belong. In considering the advan- 
tages or disadvantages of any institu- 
tion to society the most important thing 
to be considered is the tendency of its 
influence upon its members, for an insti- 
tution is a powerful instrument for good 
or for evil, and this is especially true of 
one which binds men together by strong 
bonds of mutual obligation enforced by 
the sanction of oaths and penalties. The 
longer an institution has existed, the 
larger the numbers included in its mem- 
bership, and the greater its claims to 
po\ver and influence, the stronger will be 
its hold upon the imagination, the hopes, 
and the fears of its members. Men un- 
organized are a rope of sand, organized 
a band of steel; unorganized a mob, or- 
ganized an army capable of being con- 
trolled and used for whatever purpose the 
leader may desire. United in an institu- 
tion and supported by the consenting 
opinion of numerous associations, men 
will undertake, sufifer, do, dare and exe- 
cute many things that they w^ould never 
attempt as individuals. 



EVIL TENDENCIES OF FREEMASONRY. 

From what we know of Freemasonry 
the following injurious tendencies are ap- 
parent: 

1. To lead its members to consider 
their Masonic obligations as superior to 
their civic duties and so undermine their 
patriotism, unfit them for many things 
they are liable to be called upon to do 
as ordinary citizens, and especially to dis- 
qualify them for holding certain kinds of 
public of^ces. 

2. To increase the strength of tempta- 
tions to wrong-doing by holding out the 
idea that, if liable to be detected and pun- 
ished. Masons may escape punishment 
by the aid or connivance of fellow ]\Ia- 
sons. 

3. To induce Masons in caucuses and 
conventions and in the exercise of ap- 
pointing powers to promote the political 
preferment of fellow Alasons to the detri- 
ment of equally competent and deserving 
non-Masons. Masonry has not usually 
put itself in the attitude of a pohtical par- 
ty. Its policy is rather to have its mem- 
bers in all parties, so that, whichever par- 
ty wins at the polls; Masonry controls 
the lion's share of the offices. 

THE OUTLOOK. 

So much as to the past and the pres- 
ent. What of the future? A comparison 
of the present conditions with those ex- 
isting at any past date shows that the 
world is growing both wiser and better. 
Evil customs and evil institutions, which 
have existed from time immemorial, 
culminate and pass away forever. At the 
moment when they have apparently 
leached their highest point of power for 
evil they are nearest to final destruction. 
The power of the Pope of Rome never 
seemed su potent in northern Europe as 
when Leo X. authorized Tetzel to ped- 
dle indulgences through the cities and 
villages of Germany in the fore part of 
the sixteenth century. 

Slavery in some form had existed since 
the beginning of recorded history, but its 
worst phase was manifested in the shape 
of negro slavery in the United States, 
and it never seemed so powerful as when' 
it annexed Texas in 1845, forced the pas- 
sage of the infamous fugitive slave- law 
of 1850, repealed the ]^Iissouri Coni^pro- 
mise in 1854, and secured the Dred Scott 
decision ni 1857. How incredible it 
seemed then to either pro-slavery men or 



136 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



abolitionists that within ten years from 
the last named date an amendment to 
the constitution of the United States 
should be adopted declaring: "Neither 
slavery nor involuntary servitude shall 
exist within the United States, or any 
place subject to their jurisdiction!" 

A hundred years ago colleges were 
authorized by law to add to their endow- 
ment funds by conducting lotteries, and 
now the last and worst form of lottery, 
the Louisiana Lottery Company, has 
been driven beyond our borders. The 
"saloon" is directly wasting a billion of 
our money and sending a hundred thou- 
sand of our fellow citizens to untimely 
graves every year, besides indirectly 
causing loss, suffering, and moral wreck- 
age beyond the powder of words to ex- 
press or the imagination to conceive, but 
the very greatness and intensity of the 
evil will work a cure. When or by what 
agency the result is to be accomplished 
we cannot foresee any more than the 
method of the abolition of slavery could 
be foretold in 1857, but final and com- 
plete victory is as certain as that God 
reigns and is against the "saloon." 

Secrecy seemed to have received its 
death-blow in consequence of the expos- 
ures and discussions which took place 
between 1826 and 1835, but its "deadly 
wound has been healed," and while good 
men have been busy fighting slavery, se- 
cession and saloons, the old serpent of 
secrecy has revived and crawled back 
into prominence and power. Secret so- 
cieties are organized for social purposes, 
for benevolent purposes, and for mutual 
insurance as well as for avow^edly political 
purposes. They outnumber the church- 
es in all our cities and extend their 
branches to every village in the land. 
They dominate the bar, the press, and 
the pulpit. They lay the corner stones 
of the courthouses and other public 
buildings and have "put their brand 
upon the President of the United States." 

There are, however, tokens of a re- 
action. As in the '50s a faithful few 
were found to oppose slavery, so now 
there are those who witness for the truth. 
Twenty-one religious denominations re- 
fuse to fellowship members of secret so- 
cieties, and many independent churches 
take the same stand, while their local and 
national associations warn their constit- 
uencies against the manifold evils of se- 



crecy. In view of the doings of the Mol- 
lie Maguires, the Mafia, and the Clan-na- 
Gael, an increasing number of newspa- 
pers are opening their columns to a free 
discussion of the matter. The rapidly 
multiplying facilities for the diiTusion of 
information is converting the whole civil- 
ized world into a neighborhood, so that 
whatever happens anywhere is speedily 
known everywhere, the enterprise of 
newspaper reporters and the recognized 
advantages of publicity are rendering it 
more and more difficult to keep anything 
hidden. As the "X" ray is penetrating 
the interior of the human body and re- 
vealing hidden deformities and diseases, 
so the searchlight of truth is flashing into 
all the secret recesses of human society 
and bringing forth to public gaze what- 
soever is being done or planned therein. 

The National Christian Association 
opposed to secret societies, with its head- 
quarters at 221 West Madison street, 
Chicago, III., publishes tracts, booklets 
and The Christian Cynosure, a thirty- 
two page magazine, devoted to this sub- 
ject, and, with its auxiliary associations 
in New England, on the Pacific coast, 
and in several States between, maintains 
four or five lecturers constantly in the 
field, besides having a large list of able 
speakers ready to respond to calls in their 
lespective localities. It scatters tracts 
Vvith an unsparing hand, and no sooner 
does some new secret organization spring- 
up than the National Christian Associa- 
tion secures a complete account of its 
initiatory ceremonies, oaths, passwords, 
grips, etc., and publishes them to the 
world, thus fulfilling that saying of 
Christ: "For nothing is secret that shall 
not be made manifest; neither is anv- 
thing liid that shall not be known and 
come c broad." 

In addition to the eminent men whose 
opinions in regard to secrecy have been 
quoted, the foHowing distinguished 
statesmen, preachers, philanthropists and 
college presidents have borne decided 
testimony against it: John Hancock, 
Samuel Adams, John Quincy Adams, 
James Madison, Edward Everett, Will- 
iam H. Seward, Horace Greeley, Charles 
Sumner, Gerrit Smith, John Wesley, 
William Otterbein, Alexander Camp- 
'bell, Peter Cartwright, J. B. Walker, Al- 
bert Barnes, Richard S. Storrs, D. L. 
Moodv, E. A. Park, Moses Stuart, J. E. 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



137 



Ray, H. L. Hastings, J. G. Fee, J. W. 
Strong, Philo Carpenter, J. Blanchard, 
Horace Mann, Howard Crosby, John 
Bascom, S. C. Bartlett, Timothy Dwight, 
and a host of others, both among the 
Hving and among those who have gone 
to their reward. 

With such facts before them it is but 
reasonable that all patriotic citizens who 
are lovers of justice and righteousness 
should regard all secret societies of what- 
soever name or nature as unnecessary 
and un-American institutions, should 
work zealously to extend among our fel- 
low citizens a knowledge of their evil 
tendency, and should unite their voices 
and their votes to secure everywhere laws 
prohibiting the administration of extra 
judicial oaths, and disqualifying all who 
continue to be bound by oaths which 
place them under special obligations to a 
portion of their fellows from holding any 
office whose functions require an impar- 
tial attitude toward all members of the 
community. 

SUMMARY. 

We have seen that men must associate 
in families to rear offspring and satisfy 
desire for companionship, in industrial 
organizations, to aid one another in se- 
curing the means of living, and in gov- 
ernmental organizations, to secure jus- 
tice and protection; that some form of 
government is a necessity, that the best 
form is a constitutional democracy, but 
that the success of this form requires hon- 
est, intelligent, patriotic, and justice-lov- 
ing citizens; that the claims of the state 
upon its citizens are superior to those of 
any other human authority; that civic 
oaths are used by the state for important 
purposes, and that extra judicial oaths 
seriously interfere with these purposes; 
that our most eminent statesmen and 
thinkers have been opposed to secret so- 
cieties, and that in harmony with their 
views several states have by legal enact- 
ment prohibited the administration of ex- 
tra-judicial oaths; that mutual confidence 
between the citizens of a state is an im- 
portant element for its success, and that 
secret societies tend to impair it; th<it se- 
crecy is unnecessary for any good pur- 
pose; that publicity is another essential 
condition for the successful operation of 
free institutions, and that secret societies, 
by training men to habits of secrecy, *^end 
to promote secrecy in civil affairs, and 



especially in caucuses and conventions; 
that even in overthrowing despotism se- 
cret conspiracies have not been so suc- 
cessful as open resistance; that secret so- 
cieties are dc:«:potic in their organization 
and methods, and so train men for des- 
potic practices; that the lordly titles so 
common in secret organizations are hos- 
tile to the constitution of the United 
States and to the spirit of free insiiiu- 
tions; that Freemasonry is a typical se- 
cret society whose influence is plai'ily 
discernible in the structure and method's 
of the rest; that its secret oaths, obliga- 
tions, and penalties have been revealed 
with substantial accuracy by the nncon- 
s:ious and unintended testimony of ad- 
hering Masons, by the unwilling testi- 
mony of adhering Masons in courts of 
kiw, and by the willing testimony of se- 
ceding Masons in. courts of law and m 
numerous other places, said testimony 
having been given by so many men of 
such high character that there can be no 
reasonable doubt of its truthfulness, and 
nioreo\'er non-Masons have frequently 
tested its accuracy in their intercourse 
with adhering Masons; that the oaths 
and obligations so revealed prove that 
Masons are frequently hindered from 
giving truthful testimony, and are dis- 
qualified for serving as sheriffs, judges, or 
jurors; that institutiojis are very power- 
ful for good or for evil, and that secret 
institutions tend strongly to make men 
worse rather than better; that as the 
world grows wiser and better evil insti- 
tutions, one after another, are yielding 
to the progress of truth and righteous- 
ness ; that although secret societies are 
now spreading abroad through the land 
anci flourishing as never before — a 
niighty power for evil — there are tokens 
that secrecy has reached its culmination 
and that it too shall be swept from the 
earth by the advancing forces of justice, 
purity and light. 

Wheaton Colleo:e, 111. 



I do not believe it possible for a man 
to be an intelligent Christian and an in- 
telligent Mason at the same time. 

— Rev. R. A. Torrev. 



If mothers would do their work well, 
anti-secret reformers and all other re- 
formers would soon be out of a job. 



138 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



FREEMASONRY AND PATRIOTISM. 



BY DR. A. B. .AIIRROR. 



DR. LORIMER'S attempt to ARGUE. 

The Boston Herald of June 15th re- 
ported the centennial of a local lodge m 
Bridgewater, in which Dr. Lorimer made 
an address. His speech was an attempt 
to whitewash ^Masonry as related to the 
government. He argued that because 
a candidate must not have been born a 
slave, and must at the time of initiation 
be not less than 21 years old, therefore 
the spirit of Alasonry is "the essence of 
true patriotism, true American patriot- 
ism.'' He also argued that Masons are 
patriotic because several eminent patri- 
ots were IMasons. Among these he cited 
Washington, to whom, in the course of 
the address, he referred ten times. 

In one of these passages he said: "As 
to the father of our country, it is superflu- 
ous to add more than already has been 
said. But to show the temper of our or- 
der, the brethren during these stirring 
times founded mihtary lodges, and were 
exceedingly anxious to do everything in 
honor of the chief of our armies, Wash- 
ington himself." 

This seems designed to give an impres- 
sion that during the revolution Masonic 
lodges were much to Washington. Tak- 
en in connection with the numerous ref- 
erences made to the General in this 
speech, it seems meant to be a link in 
the chain binding his great name to the 
institution in question. Dr. Lorimer ap- 
parently tried to leave the impression that 
]\Iasonry and the great patriot were 
closely allied during the war, and that 
from this it can be seen that Masonry is 
not unpatriotic. 

Now it was at the end of the year 1783 
that Washington took leave of his offi- 
cers at headcjuarters, and left New York, 
which the British had lately evacuated. 
But so soon as 1798 he writes a letter to a 
clergyman who thought him the grand 
master of American lodges, and speaks 
of correcting the "error you have run 
into, of my presiding over the English 
lodges in this country. The fact is I pre- 
side over none, nor have I been in one 
more than fjnce or twice within the last 
thirty year^-." This proves that he could 
not have been much in lodges during the 
American revolution. In the light of 



Washington's own statement. Dr. Lori- 
mer's continual harping on his name does 
not seem to secure a very reliable proof 
of a vital connection between Masonry 
and patriotism. 

WHY THE BRIDGEWATER SPEECH? 

It is of interest to ask why Dr. Lori- 
mer made the attempt to argue for Ma- 
sonry as he did at Bridgewater. It was 
.a risky attempt, and the result is liable 
to prove it foolhardy. He seems to have 
hoped that the rather too transparent 
art, and too obvious stage machinery, 
would conceal the flimsiness of his real 
claim. There was a good deal of what 
was 

"Full of sound and fury, signifying 
nothing." 

His attempt to squeeze the. essence of 
"i\merican patriotism" out of the fact 
that a man born a slave cannot become a 
Mason is a specimen of his logic, but his 
rhetoric sugar coated its hoUowness. 

But why did he venture even to be- 
wilder such a dangerous question? 

Of course it has but one real answer, 
and that answer he did not give. On the 
contrary, he scurried about, collected in 
desperate need a handful of comparative- 
ly useless material, and then came into 
court to play the pettifogger. It was 
the best he could do, if such an attempt 
must needs be made. But why must it 
be made, and why could he not, like a 
fox in a hole at which the hunter is dig- 
ging, preserve the old Masonic method of 
"dignified silence?" 

One reason might perhaps be found 
by reading the report of Hartford Lodge 
doings with respect to the Griswold ar- 
son case, in the Hartford Courant of Dec. 
25, 1895. Surely some one needed to cry, 
"Great is Diana," or to render it accord- 
ing to Dr. Lorimer's version, "Masonry 
in America is a nursery of patriots." 
What is Masonry a nursery of in Con- 
necticut, or isn't the State of Williams 
the signer of the Declaration, and 
"Brother Jonathan" Trumbull, and Will- 
iam A. Buckingham, in America after 
all? 

What did the state's attorney do? 

What did the press say? Who is at 
this moment in Wethersfield prison? 
Yes, there was great need of some one 
like Dr. Lorimer to say that the candi- 
date must not have been born of a slave 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



139 



mother, and the refusal to initiate him 
proves that great is the American patriot- 
ism of the Masons, "Great is Diana of the 
Ephesians," ancient, and handed down 
from Jupiter. Whoop! Boom! Hoo- 
ray! Glorious, sons of liberty, wave your 
white aprons! 

But all the trouble is not in Hartford. 
There be other cities like Boston and 
Chicago. From the latter the Cynosure 
beams serenely on Hartford, lighting up 
its dark corner even in the presence of 
Boston. Then, there is more than a ru- 
mor that there are in Boston manuscripts 
of certain prize essays awaiting publica- 
tion. These treat the relation of Mason- 
ry to citizenship. If they do not do it 
more solidly and cogently than Dr. Lori- 
mer's speech we hope they will never be 
published, for they will make their own 
side appear weak. However, the knowl- 
edge of such munitions of war accumu- 
lated in Boston may account in part for 
the attempt to trim the lines and make 
a bluff near that city. Anyway, such a 
bucket of whitewash could hardly have 
been mixed for nothing. 

WAS IT MEANNESS? 

The report lately published in The 
Cynosure of an interview by one of the 
N. C. A. lecturers may not give the read- 
er a complete view of the Baptist broth- 
er's side of the case. But it is evident 
that he thought Mr. Ronayne under ob- 
ligation to keep Masonic secrets. There 
are many who share such an opinion, 
and it is easy to see why. Still, there 
have been hundreds of Masons who have 
held a different view of Masonic obliga- 
tions. Outsiders imagine a great deal. 

The report represents this person's at- 
titude by saying that he "declared that 
act of Mr. Ronayne to be an act of mean- 
ness." It is possible that this was not 
the exact phraseology, but no doubt it 
represents the opinion. If Freemasonry 
were a noble, or even a harmless institu- 
tion the opinion could hardly be contro- 
verted. One who estimates Freemason- 
ry so must naturally regard the act as an 
unworthy betrayal. 

But Freemasonry is not the only thing 
Mr. Ronayne abandoned. Another was 
Romanism. Would exposure of Roman- 
ism be meanness? The other day a mis- 
sionary to Catholics, who was not only 
a Romanist in his youth, but also the con- 
fidential intimate of priests, confessed to 



us vices in which he formerly shared 
with them, not the greatest of which was 
gambling. Was it mean in him to tell 
us that when out of sight priests were 
great card players? Would the betrayal 
of Romish vices and principles be wrong 
in Mr. Ronayne? 

Again, the denomination to which this 
Baptist belongs sends missionaries to In- 
dia and China. Is it mean for converts 
to tell the missionaries secrets relating 
to paganism? Must a converted heathen 
retain allegiance to idolatry and heathen 
morals, to such an extent as to conceal 
them from Christians? 

The Baptist brother would probably 
regard these cases as not parallel. To 
him sun worship in Indian temples does 
not appear like sun worship in Masonic 
temples in India and America. He hard- 
ly realizes that in a score of lodges in 
Bombay there is the same worship as at 
the pagan shrines of Bombay, and that 
this sun worship is accredited and frater- 
nized, and even shared in lodges in Chi- 
cago. He probably does not see this. 
distinctly, and our present statement of 
it would probably seem to him absurd. 
We heartilv wish it were. 



PROF. WHIPPLE'S ARTICLES. 



I want to say that I, for one of the 
readers of The Cynosure, wish to express 
my thanks to Prof. Whipple for his very 
able series of articles now appearing — 
"Secrecy and Citizenship." They are to 
be commended for their candor and ac- 
curacy and consequent historical value. 
They deserve to be preserved by every 
student of the subject. 

J. B. Galloway. 



If God extends His sovereign grace to 
a Freemason, and he yields to "Cod he 
ceases to be a Freemason arid breaks the 
obligation with which the devil designed 
to bind his soul to eternal rebellion 
against God, and to eternal damnation. 
But if the Holy Ghost reveals the truth 
to the Freemason, and instead of yield- 
ing to the Holy Ghost he decides to re- 
main a Alason and blasphemes the Holv 
Ghost, he commits what the Lord Jesus 
Christ declares to be an unpardonable 
sin by remaining true to Freemasonrv. 
— Rev. Wm. Fenton. 



140 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 



LETTER FROM THE SOUTH. 



Beauregard, Miss., Aug. i8, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure — I have not forgotten 
you nor the noble cause you represent, 
though I confess that faihng powers, as 
well as a multitude of other duties, have 
kept me from writing as much as for- 
merly. I am spending the latter part of 
the summer here in Copiah County, Mis- 
sissippi, thirty miles south of Jackson, 
the capital of the State. I am preaching 
the Gospel to a w'hite congregation. 
There are plenty of colored people in this 
vicinity, but, like the Jews and Samari- 
tans, they have no dealings with each 
other in any social or religious matters. 
This complete isolation in religious work 
works badly for both races, especially 
for the negro. Colored churches are 
largely left to the care of pastors who 
are "blind leaders of the blind." 

This county has had an unenviable 
reputation in the past for its riots and 
lynchings, and there is great complaint 
of the bad character of the colored peo- 
ple. I see little hope for a change in this 
respect until the white Christians shall 
take enough interest in their colored 
brethren to help them to better methods 
of living and thinking. It is amazing 
that here in the South there are men and 
women that go to Asia and Africa as mis- 
sionaries, and when they return they are 
honored and applauded, while right here 
at home is one of the most important 
and most needy of all missionary fields, 
and men and women who feel constrain- 
ed by the love of God to enter on it are 
largely ostracized. An intelligent self- 
interest, to say nothing of Christian prin- 
ciple, ought to teach them better. 

Nevertheless the average white people 
of the South have many excellent quali- 
lities, some of which are well worthy of 
emulation. They have made commend- 
able efforts to provide by general taxa- 
tion for the education of all the people, 
and if it has proved a partial failure, so 
that now many are asking that the color- 
ed schools be restricted to such support 
as comes from the taxation of the prop- 
erty of colored people, it is largely be- 
cause there has not been an intelligent 



and kindly interest in the enforcement of 
the school law. 

In matters of social reform there is an 
advanced public sentiment. In this large 
county there are no licensed saloons, and 
most of the counties of the State are 
"dry." The press, with great unanimity, 
speaks out strongly against the liquor 
traffic and the lynchings and lawless- 
ness that have disgraced both North and 
South. Southern people are generally 
reverent, believe implicitly in the Bible 
as they have been taught to understand 
it, and are much given to religious dis- 
cussions. They will go long distances 
to hear a controversial sermon. For a 
month past there has been the usual pe- 
riod for revival meetings. There have 
been quite a number in this vicinity. I 
have heard some able doctrinal preach- 
ing. A common plan is to have two 
services a day, with a picnic dinner be- 
tween. 

Just now we are holding a series of 
meetings at this place. The preaching is 
being mainly done by an evangelist from 
Texas. All the preaching has been on 
decidedly radical lines. No idols have 
been spared. The use of tobacco, though 
almost imiversal, has been thoroughly 
condemned. Church gambling and fes- 
tivals have been arraigned. Freemason- 
ry and all forms of lodgery have been 
shown to be un-Christian. Divine heal- 
ing has been advocated, and the coming 
of the Lord proclaimed. 

Here at Beauregard there was once 
the largest Masonic lodge in the State. 
After the great cyclone fourteen years 
ago, that distroyed most of the town, 
there was no lodge left, nothing but the 
old building in which they met and from 
which the lodge symbols are now nearly 
effaced. The spirit of Masonry and other 
forms of anti-Christ are sufficiently prev- 
alent, but the Lord has lifted up a stand- 
ard against it. H. H. Hinman. 



A VETERAN COLPORTEUR. 



Geneva, O., April 11, 1897. 
Dear Brother Phillips — The present 
delivery, together with \Vhat you have 
sent mc prior, aggregates 8,000 pages of 
anti-secret literature received from yoiir 
office. It will be strange, indeed, if this 
bread cast upon the waters is not gather- 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



141 



ed after many days. The command is, 
**Sow thy seed in the morning, and in the 
evening withhold not thy hand, for thou 
knmvest not which shall prosper, this, or 
that, or both alike." In the morning of 
life' I sowed abundantly of anti-slavery 
seed, and now in the evening of my 
earth-day I take from your rich store of 
anti-secret seed, and as best I can sow 
beside all waters; waiting for the bless- 
ing promised in the work of rigliteous- 
ness, which shall be peace, and the effect 
of it is quietness and assurance forever. 
The burden of years and of poverty pre- 
vents me doing for the Anti-Secret So- 
ciety what my heart ardently wishes to 
do. Let those who are in the prime of 
life and know how to war against the Se- 
cret Empire focus the search-light of fact, 
and God's word direct on its darkness, 
and reveal the "hole in the wall and the 
abominations that the ancients do in the 
dark, every man in the chamber of his im- 
agery." See Ezek. viii. 

It pains me to know that the X. C. A. 
is hampered in its work for lack of ma- 
terial aid, and especially in regard to its 
recent losses. I have a friend in an ad- 
joining county; I will go and see him, 
and try to interest him in behalf of the 
N. C. A. I feel sure that I can enlist him 
in our cause. I will shortly report you 
results. The more I investigate secretism 
the more I am convinced that it is evil, 
and only evil, and that continually. Even 
the seeming good in them is virtue's 
counterfeit used as a guise behind which 
to transact villainies that common sinners 
dare not meddle with. Their religion a 
farce, their robes of pretendfed righteous- 
ness have by the N. C. A. been rent di- 
rectly over their vital parts, through which 
gappings the Christ-instructed eye of the 
Christian sees the revolting rottenness 
within. Not the least of its damnable 
work is the tyranny it exercises over the 
press, and especially the religious. 

Recently I sent an article on the Christ- 
less religion of the I. O. O. F. to an edi- 
tor of a religious journal, who is noted 
for his love of challenging the devil, and 
who is really a man of great moral cour- 
age; but I judge from the reasons given 
me with the returned article he feared the 
result if he printed my critique. Said he 
•abhorred secret societies — thought they 
could be killed by filling the minds of its 
Christian dupes with better things — ^bretli- 



ren were more "sensitive on lodger}- than 
on poHtics or religion," and other reasons, 
all of w^hich had in them, in my opinion, 
the element of fear of offending his breth- 
ren who are lovers of their lodges. In 
all my communications with editors of 
papers I have found but t^vo having the 
courage to publish a clear-cut article 
against lodgery. One of the two is The 
Christian Cynosure, and the other a sec- 
ular paper whose editor was so alarmed 
after finding what a row he had raised 
among the fraters by the act, he hastened 
to lie about the reason of publication, 
promised silence in the future, joined the 
lodge, sold out to a Methodist ]\Iason, 
and left the town. E.' BRAKEMAN. 



THE MODERN WOODMEN RITUAL. 



Strand, ]\Iinn., July 3, 1897. 
Editor Cynosure — The ^linnesota dis- 
trict of the Norwegian Synod (Lutheran) 
closed a successful session in Lake Park. 
Alinn., last week.' One of the topics for 
discussion was secret societies. The 
President opened in his annual address 
with warning against those "cursed in- 
stitutions." One session was set aside 
for a meeting on secret societies. The 
Modern Woodmen ij the only flourishing 
lodge in Lake Park, and so the Modern 
Woodmen received special" attention. 
The rituals had been sold the previous 
days and the subject prepared. Lodge 
members denied the ritual. But as luck 
would have it, the July number of the 
^lodern Woodmen just arrived, bring- 
ing the news that en account of some 
"piratical" marauders the rituals had been 
printed so it was necessary to change 
the ritual. This gave the thing away and 
the A\'oodmen in Lake Park felt terribly. 
Thursday evening a special meeting was 
held in which Prof. Hillebox, of Wilmar, 
and Rev. Jno. Halvarson. of ]\Iinneap- 
olis, and your correspondent delivered 
lectures in the English language on se- 
cret societies. Great interest was mani- 
fested. The representatives from .all over 
this and neighboring states will certainly 
bear testimony of what these lodges are 
doing. A }^Iodern Woodman publicly 
testified to the authenticity of the rituals 
and warned everybody to keep out of this 
and other lodges. O. T. Lee. 



142 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



THE ELY-WILLIAMS DISCUSSION. 



Chicago, Aiig. 30, 1897. 
Editor Cynosure — I am glad to hear 
that you are to pubhsh the debate be- 
tween the Rev. Mr. Ely and Air. Will- 
iams, of Kentucky. Our association has 
always encouraged such discussions, 
either throuo-h the columns of The Cy- 
nosure or upon the public rostrum. It 
occurs to me that the terms upon which 
this debate is to be conducted should be 
ao:reed upon between the principals and 
published in the beginning of the debate 
for the benefit of all readers. Personally, 
I trust you may be generous in your be- 
stowal of courtesies upon Prof. Williams, 
who is not in sympathy with our work. 
J. M. Hitchcock. 



PROTECTION IN UNITY. 



Chicago, Aug. 26, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure — I have recently 
been working on a journal devoted to a 
useful class of artisans and the best inter- 
ests of their trade. Probably they have 
been less careful of their welfare than 
any other body of wage-workers, so far 
as organization for their protection is 
concerned, and "strikes" among them 
are of rare occurrence. As a class, I con- 
sider them generally overworked and not 
over-compensated. They are very nu- 
merous, and competition among them is 
very great, and on this account, and be- 
cause they do not combine solidly against 
all the evils that beset them, they really 
suffer industrial oppression, and are, to 
a certain decree, slaves to the public, 
which demands their services during 
long hour? and generally on the Sab- 
bath. I believe, however, these mechan- 
ics are themselves to blame for this con- 
dition. If they were less jealous of each 
other — if there was more unity of inter- 
est among them — they would be strong 
enough to hold in check all ruinous com- 
petition and the exorbitant demands of 
those on whom they depend for a liveli- 
hood. 

But experience proves, and very gen- 
erally, that their attempts in this direction 
have been mostly failures. Surely, if the 
true principles of business were univer- 
sally adopted among them — and in some 
localities they are now w^aking up to 
the need of self-preservation — they could 



rise in their united strength and hold the 
balance of power as between employer 
and employe. I would not advocate the 
adoption by them of senseless initiations 
and secret rituals. I would have them, 
and all other wage-workers, adopt, rath- 
er, the privacy of the family in their 
councils, but everywhere else present a 
bold, manly, front in demanding their 
rights, both as masters and journeymen, 
working in unbroken unison for their 
mutual interests and protection, and gov- 
erning themselves, not as tyrants and 
slaves, but as intelligent, free-born citi- 
zens defending their trade and them- 
selves against the degrading influences, 
under which they now suffer. I do not 
deem it necessary that they should bind 
themselves by violent oaths and brutal 
penalties to secure their rights, but I do 
advocate absolute unity and harmony, if 
such a thing can exist in this conflicting 
and grasping age. 

H. M. Hugunin. 



REFORM NEWS. 



THE CYNOSURE — DONATIONS — FOR- 
EIGN WORK. 



The Cynosures sent out for the last 
three months have averaged 4,660 each 
issue. The number whose subscription 
expired during August is quite large. It 
is hoped that our subscribers will take 
personal interest in not only forwarding 
their own renewals promptly but in send- 
ing their neighbors' also. 

For the next two months the special 
offer is nuade of the Teachers' Bible, ad- 
vertised on another page, free for five 
yearly subscriptions, four of which must 
be new; if any one of our subscribers, 
or of their children, secure four new year- 
ly subscriptions, and send their own re- 
newals, we will send the Teachers' Bible 
advertised herein as a premium. When 
you see the Bible, you will acknowledge 
that it is well worth $4, the retail price. 
If any sample copies of The Cynosure 
are needed, send a postal card request. 

The donations for August are from 
Mrs. Wm. PalHster, $2; Wm. Barris, $1 ; 
E. A. Cook, $25; Robert Gunn, $2; S. A. 
Pratt, $5; J. P. Stoddard, $5; Mrs. John 
Young, $5 ; Mrs. E. A. Dewey, $2 ; Frank 
Bartholemew, $5; E. I. Dewey, $3.50; 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE, 



143 



Walter Phillips, 75 cents; L. E. Bartlett, 
$5; J. F. Icke, 50 cents; Charles M. Op- 
perman, $10; J. H. Wilson, 75 cents; Ho- 
race Frost, $4; Jacob Ackert, $5; W. O. 
Norval, $5; George McCuUough, $1.50. 
This is very encouraging. Coming as it 
did during the ''dry season," it has en- 
abled us to meet most of our expenses 
very promptly. 

Ten dollars of the above amount are 
on the $40 asked for toward the $100 ste- 
reopticon outfit for Rev. W. R. Bonham. 
Seventy dollars of the $100 is now pledg- 
ed. If $30 more is received this month 
Brother Bonham will be enabled to be at 
our State conventions in Illinois. This 
method of presenting the anti-secrecy 
cause is popular, and will be a drawing 
card for the convention. Shall we have 
the $30 needed? Fifty dollars was the 
amount of expenses of President Blanch- 
ard's trip to Northfield, and when it is re- 
membered that his address there resulted 
in at least fifty renunciations of secret or- 
ders on the part of Christian workers 
present, it will be seen that it was money 
well expended. The apparent results 
were the greatest of any single meeting 
that we have ever held. There is $5 still 
needed to make up the total $50 needed 
for that special purpose. 

I told you last month of the large 
amount of literature sent to India. This 
month we have orders from Johannes- 
hurg. South Africa, for booklets and four 
subscriptions for The Cynosure. Brother 
G. H. Agnew in ordering writes: "There 
is very much need of light here. God has 
raised up a man here, a lawyer, who is 
attacking Masonry publicly, but he is 
somewhat handicapped, having but little 
information on the subject. Lately a big 
sermon on Masonry was published in a 
Natal paper. God laid it on the lawyer's 
heart to write the paper asking some per- 
tinent questions. This has stirred the 
Masons. The end is not yet." 

I have received a letter also from Scot- 
land acknowledging the receipt of the 
booklets for special use in Great Britain. 
Dr. Kerr has had a slip printed which 
he inserts in each of the booklets in send- 
ing them out on their mission through- 
out Great Britain. The sUp is headed: 
"Secret Societies in Great Britain," then 
following: 'T approve of the purpose to 
form an association against Freemason- 
ry and other secret oath-bound societies 



in the British Isles." Then follows space 
for name and address, and request to 
have the slips, after they are signed, re- 
turned to Rev. Dr. Kerr, 19 Queen 
Square, Glasgow. We shall be glad to 
receive subscriptions from any .friends 
who want to have a part in organizing the 
work in Great Britain. We must fur- 
nish them literature until they are fully 
organized. 

Rev. Samuel F. Porter, our Southern 
Missionary Agent, is planning another 
tour in the South. WTll not those pas- 
tors in Southern States, who read this 
item, and who would hke Rev. ]\Ir. Por- 
ter to visit them and speak in their 
church, send at once a line to this office 
to that effect. 

Before closing I would like to call at- 
tention to the valuable book which Sec- 
retary J. P. Stoddard is issuing, and 
which will soon be ready for distribution. 
It will be a volume of 150 pages, and will 
contain the "prize essays." It will make a 
very valuable addition to our anti-secrecy 
library. We hope to have the book on sale 
at this ofhce. I also wish to call your 
attention to the exposition of the 
Knights of the Alaccabees, which is ad- 
vertised on another page of The Cyno- 
sure. It is another insurance order with 
prayers and obUgations and horse-play. 
The official history of the order states 
that it is founded upon the history and 
traditions of the ^Nlaccabean Dynasty. 
That Judas Maccabeus, the renowned 
leader, and his followers, "feared not to 
face death in defense of their belief in 
the God of their fathers." This insurance 
order goes on to state that "it takes its 
name from the similarity of purpose it 
has to that which actuated the renown- 
ed Judas ]Maccabeus." It is not probable 
that any of the secret insurance orders 
can show a finer example of bombastic 
pretense than the above. 

Wm. I. Phillips. 



On the evening of July 7th, at Britt, 
Iowa, the pastor of the German Evan- 
gelical Church and Rev. Wm. Fenton 
were locked out of the church where 
thev were anounced to speak on the lodge 
question. A German pastor of a Scandi- 
navian church joined Bro. Fenton, and 
thev addressed a large meeting on the 
street. 



144 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 189^ 



FOUNDER OF THE EASTERN STAR. 



ARRESTED AS A VAGRANT IN WILLIAMSBURG. 



The Xew York Siin of Sept. 3, 1895, 
contained an article with these head- 
Hnes, "Mrs. St. John a A'agrant;" "The 
Founder of the Order of the Eastern Star 
Committed to Jail." The article con- 
tains this statement: "Airs. Elizabeth St. 
John, the orginator of the order of the 
Eastern Star, was a prisoner in the Lee 
avenue police court, Williamburgh, to- 
day on a charge of vagrancy. She w^as 
the protege of the late Robert Macoy, 
one of the highest officers of the Mason- 
ic order, and with him founded the Order 
of Eastern Star, which now^ extends all 
over the country." 

Thus we see that a concubine of one 
of the highest officers in the Masonic or- 
der was his agent in founding the East- 
ern Star. Before Macoy's death he gave 
her his jeweled sword and expensive pa- 
raphernalia of office. Mrs. St. John 
claimed to be his adopted daughter, but 
]\Iacoy's only married daughter repudi- 
ated this claim. When arrested Mrs. St. 
John was found sitting on a coal-box at 
Wythe avenue and Howes street, wrap- 
ped in a horse blanket. She was in the 
Bloomingdale Asylum in 1884. Her 
Eastern Star led her in the opposite di- 
rection from the Star of Bethlehem. 



ATTENTION, OHIOANS! 



DO YOU WANT A STATE CONVENTION? 



Findlay, Ohio, Aug. 26, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure — I want to arouse the 
people of Ohio to arrange for a State con- 
vention to be held in Columbus or some 
other central place about the middle of 
October, to discuss *tlhe different phases 
of the secret lodge system. It has been 
a year and a half now since the last con- 
vention was held in this State. Certainly 
the friends of our cause, should be 
anxious by this time to deal another se- 
vere blow at this wily foe. Let all friends 
plan to be present. 

Some money will be needed to make 
it the success it should be. Who will re- 
spond with financial aid? Mr. W. R. 
Sterrett, Cedarville, Greene County, 
Ohio, is State Treasurer. W. E. 
Schramm, of Columbus, is Secretary. 



Rev. H. J. Becker, D. D., Dayton, Ohio, 
is President. Any communications to 
these brethren will be forw^arded me here 
at Eindlay, Ohio. I may add that Revs. 
S. P. Long and J. E. Williams, and K. 
A. Orvis, of Columbus, Ohio, are mem- 
bers of the executive committee. 

The last convention was a grand suc- 
cess. This can be made better if all will 
do their duty. I shall be pleased to hear 
from friends in the State. If you think it 
unwise to hold a convention say so. It is 
unw-ise unless we make it a success. 
Lodge men try everywhere to mimify our 
w^ork. Let us arouse and get together 
such a convention as will alarm our ene- 
mies. There are few who cannot ar- 
range to go two nights and one day and 
pay their own way, if need be, to help 
swell the numbers of a convention. If 
this call is responded to, plans wdll be 
mentioned in the October issue. Ad- 
dress all letters to me at Findlay, Ohio. 
Rev. P. B. Williams. 



CHEERING REPORT FROM BRO. W. B. 
STODDARD. 



On Floating Hospital, Boston Harbor^ 
Aug. 25, 1897. — Dear Cynosure: Short- 
ly after my last report I attended a synod 
of the English Missouri Lutherans, held 
in Pastor Dallman's Church, Baltimore. 
This young synod holds the same view 
regarding the scriptures and reforms that 
the German, the parent synod of the 
same denomination, does. They are 
therefore intensely anti-secret. I spent 
two days in their company, making many 
new acquaintances and securing new 
readers for The Cynosure. My presence 
was made known and a wish expressed 
that I be given an evening to address the 
synod. Owing to the large amount of 
business this was not found possible. A 
resolution was passed, however, indors- 
ing our work and expressing regret that 
they could not hear the purposed ad- 
dress. 

The ministers of this body are nearly 
all young men full of enthusiasm. The 
reports showed the work growing in 
every direction. Many were making 
great sacrifice that they might maintain 
the truth. A part of the month has been 
occupied with w^ork at home. 

Being intrusted with the settlement of 
the estate of our brother and co-worker. 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



145 



the late Lucius E. Reynolds, I have 
soug'ht to see that his wishes relative to 
the distribution be carried out. In ac- 
cord with his will it has been my privi- 
leo^e to transmit to the treasurer of the 
X. C. A. a check. Aside from the family, 
three other God honoring institutions 
are helped by the gifts of this God fear- 
ing man. Though dead, he yet speaketh. 
May God grant that many lives may be 
made brighter through his kind bene- 
faction. 

As usual I have spoken several times 
in various Washington missions. An in- 
creased interest in the anti-secrecy re- 
form is the result. In Boston I find our 
friends willing as ever to subscribe for 
The Cynosure and generally maintain 
the w^ork. 

The churches here advocating the anti- 
secrecy reform, so far as I am informed, 
are growing in membership, while many, 
trying to exist to please everybody, are 
growing less, thus proving the truth of 
the Scripture, ''He that saveth his life 
shall lose it,'' etc. The preacher who 
acts as a sort of weather cock, turning to 
suit the popular breeze, will sooner or 
later find that the breeze will blow him 
overboard. 

Honest people still love integrity of 
character and life. 

I am to speak to-night in the Claren- 
don Street Baptist Church. This is one 
of the largest and most spiritual churches 
of that denomination in the "Hub." It is 
the home church of our much beloved 
and now sainted President, Dr. A.J. Gor- 
don. The Christ spirit so filling his life 
is very visibly present in his absence. 
Dr. J. A. jMcElwin, who is now in charge 
of this great work is a Cynosure reader, 
and a thorough reformer. 

We are now in Boston Bay running 
toward the ocean. On board the Hos- 
pital are about one hundred mothers, 
with babies mostly in their first summer. 
They come from the thick, dirty tene- 
ment section of Boston. Doctors, nurses 
and Hospital needs are everywhere in 
evidence. What a splendid benevolence. 
Those who have provided money to thus 
help the mothers in whose lives come 
but little sunshne, and the infants whose 
lives are thus spared by the score, are 
surely noble benefactors. I find the man- 
agers of this grand benevolence opposed 
•to secret socieites. The Lodge says: 



"Join, pay your dues, and you will get 
help." Christian benevolence says: 
"Help those who are unable to help 
themselves." 

The fall campaign approaches. The 
fields are white for the harvest. Shall 
we not, with renewed vigor, press the 
battle to the gates? 

W. B. Stoddard. 



BRO. WILLIAMS IN OHIO. 



LODGE CLOSES CHURCHES AGAINST HIM. 

Lima, Ohio, July i8, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure^On the night of the 
first I spoke near Mt. Summit, Ind. Here 
Rev. Thomburg had engaged the Union 
Church, but at the last moment the 
house was locked against us, and we 
went out two miles and a half to a school- 
house, which was crowded. 

The next night we were locked out of 
another Union Church at Millville by a 
mere pigmy of a preacher, assisted by a 
few^ lodge members. I spoke on the 
street to five hundred or more, and told 
them that w^hen I come to a town and 
find a L^nion Church locked against an 
old soldier who served three years and 
went through thirty-seven hard-fought 
battles and received guti-shot w-ounds 
while fighting for the, freedom of the 
country, then I know something about 
secret societies Avithout ever joining a 
lodge. 

The next night I spoke at the German 
Baptist Church called West River. About 
twenty lodge men followed me from Mill- 
ville to hear more on the subject. I be- 
gan by saying: "If the lodge men could 
have controlled the air last night at Mill- 
ville we would have had a cyclone." I 
had a good audience at this point, and 
next spoke three times in the Tabernacle, 
near Hagerstown, and heard our old 
friend and brother, Rev. J. M. Kabrich, 
of White River Conference, Sabbath 
morning. In his plain discourse he 
strongly condemned church worldliness, 
giving the lodges their share. 

These meetings were arranged by the 
young pastor, Rev. L. D. Thomburg, 
who expects to start early in next month 
to California, to engage in church wcrk 
in that State. He wanted to impress 
these plain truths on his old neighbors 
once more before he left them. I then 
attended a camp meeting at Cridersville, 



146 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



Ohio. This was conducted by the Free 
Alethodist Church. I distributed quite 
a number of tracts on the lodge ques- 
tion. 

I next had two good services at 
Greersville, Knox County, Ohio, in the 
Wesleyan IMethodist Church, Rev. A. T. 
^'"estal pastor. The congregation on Sab- 
bath evening could not all get into the 
church. There are staunch friends of our 
cause here. At Holgate, Ohio, I held 
the quarterly meeting for Rev. D. O. 
Tussing, the presiding elder. Rev. S. 
Stevens is the pastor. I spoke four times, 
and have an invitation to return and 
speak on Moral Reform. 

On Tuesday night, the 27th, I spoke 
in the Free Methodist Chapel in this city. 
The audience was not large, but they 
were quite attentive. Some lodge men 
were present. Next Saturday and Sab- 
bath I will be at Columbus Grove, Ohio. 
Any one in Ohio or Michigan wishing 
my services please addresses me here, 
P. B. Williams. 

Lima, Ohio. 



ODDFELLOWSHIP AND BAAL WORSHIP 



MEETINGS IN WAUKESHA CO., WIS. 

An interesting anti-secret meeting 
was held in the Town Hall at Sussex 
Monday evening, Aug. 2, which was ad- 
dressed by Rev. Isaiah Faris and Rev. 
M. A. Gault. Rev. H. N. Cornes, pastor 
of the U. P. Church at that place, at the 
close spoke earnestly in support of the 
cause. The next evening an important 
meeting was held in the Baptist Church 
at Prospect Hill, in Waukesha County. 
A good audience was present. Bro. J. F. 
Icke and Rev. E. J. Roberts, of the Free 
Methodist Church, Waukesha, with a 
'bus load of friends from that city drove 
over to this meeting. It was addressed 
by Revs. W. I. Phillips, Isaiah Faris and 
M. A. Gauh. 

On the next three evenings the same 
speakers addressed meetings at Big 
Bend and Vernon, in the Town Halls, 
and at Mukwonago, in the Congrega- 
tional Church. A good interest was 
shown, and the people gave respectful 
attention to the truth. These meetings, 
including one on wSabbath, Aug. i, in 
Bro. Faris' Church, were all arranged by 
himself and people. They were at im- 
portant points in different parts of the 
countv. 



Grosh's Manual of Odd Fellowship 
has received the commendation and in- 
dorsement of the grand officers of Odd 
Fellows' Grand Lodges in twenty-seven 
of the United States. On pages 92-96 
of that book it is stated that "an institu- 
tion of this character always existed in 
Egypt. It is known as Egyptian Myster- 
ies, and in uniting with it its members 
are declared to be born again." On 
pages 186-188 of Grosh's Manual, Odd 
Fellow chaplains are taught how to pray 
so as not to offend Jews, deists, Moham- 
medans and other liberal religionists, 
and the Supreme Lodge of the order in 
1889 supplemented these instructions by 
explicitly forbidding the mention of the 
name of Christ in any of the lodge pray- 
ers. Yet the Odd Fellows quote freely 
from the Bible in their ritual and pubHc 
service, thus trying to deceive, if pos- 
sible, the very elect as to their real char- 
acter. Let us hereafter call more atten- 
tion to the deceptive and anti-Christian 
character of this false and dangerous re- 
liHon. 



The editor preached in Aurora, Sab- 
bath, Aug. 29, in the United Presbyte- 
rian and Free Methodist Churches. 



WORSE THAN RUSSIAN THISTLE. 



Many of the best farms in North Da- 
kota have ceased producing wheat be- 
cause of the blighting influence of the 
Russian thistle, whose seed was first im- 
ported from Russia with seed wheat. 
Now these thistles have spread so that 
the question of exterminating them has 
been before the State Legislature. To 
let them grow with the wheat, thinking 
that in time the wheat will choke them 
out, is found to be a sad mistake, for in- 
variably the thistles choke out the 
wheat. 

We spent Sabbath, Aug. 22, preaching 
at Yorkville and Dover, Wis. At the 
former church but few remain to hold up 
the banner where once was a flourishing 
congregation. Back in the '40s some 
sturdy United Presbyterians from Scot- 
land located here. One or two of them 
had been Freemasons in the old coun- 
try and brought this worse than Russian 
thistle seed with them. Although they" 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



147 



had little affiliation with the lodge here 
yet they had little to say against it, and 
sometimes spoke in its favor. In time 
this dangerous thistle seed took root un- 
til it has spread over all the community. 
Many of the sons of these fathers have 
joined the Masonic lodge; four sons of 
one of these founders of the congrega- 
tion — one of them an elder — have joined 
the Masons and left the church. They 
claim that these thistles should be al- 
lowed to grow with the wheat. But the 
Presbytery has decided rightly that the 
thistles must go. 



FREEMASONRY UNDER DISCUSSION. 



The discussion of Freemasonry by two 
representative men in the Christian de- 
nomination which we begin in this num- 
ber will be interesting and profitable to 
our readers. The policy of the friends 
of the institution of late has been to join 
the conspiracy of silence. If there are 
any merits on which this dark institution 
can stand they will surely be brought out 
'by so able a writer and prominent Free- 
mason as Prof. John Augustus Will- 
iams. 

On the other hand the friends of light 
will be satisfied that so logical and con- 
vincing a writer as Prof. Simpson Ely 
has undertaken to champion their cause. 
Though only in his forty-eighth year, yet 
he has served as teacher, professor, pas- 
tor, evangehst and president of a uni- 
versity. Scores of converts have been 
added to the church through his labors 
as evangelist in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, 
Kansas, Nebraska, Dakota and Missouri. 
Like all successful evangelists, he is an 
uncompromising witness against all 
forms of secret orders. 

Prof. Ely writes us that the arrange- 
ment is that he and Prof. Williams are 
each to write eight articles of about 1,200 
words each, and these are to appear in 
the Christian Standard of Cincinnati and 
The Christian Cynosure, if the consent 
of the editors can be had. They are also 
to appear in book form if thought neces- 
sary. The Standard editor has consent- 
ed to publish them and states that two 
columns each was to be the limit of these 
articles. But Prof. Williams' first article 
exceeds about double the limit agreed 
upon. Owing to our limited space this 
month we are obliged to cut his article 



down to a little more than the length of 
Prof. Ely's. 



PORTAGE, WIS., MEETING 



An important meeting to discuss the 
secret lodge question was held in the 
courthouse at Portage, Wis., Monday 
evening, Aug. 16. The meeting was ad- 
dressed by Editor Gault and Rev. J. B. 
Galloway, and was the winding up of a 
series of twelve meetings held in that 
county. The meeting had been widely 
announced through the city papers and 
from the pulpits on Sabbath, which 
brought out a large attendance of the 
most influential citizens and fully half 
the audience were ladies. 

At the close of the addresses two 
prominent Odd Fellows, when the op- 
portunity was given, rushed to the de- 
fense of their order, claiming that it was 
founded upon the Bible and Christianity 
and in many respects was superior to 
the church. But it was shown that the 
religion of Odd FeUowship was equally 
Christless with Freemasonry; that the 
question, 'Ts it lawful for a chaplain to 
commence and finish his prayers in the 
name of Christ?" was asked of the Sov- 
ereign Grand Odd Fellows' Lodge of 
the World in 1889 by the Grand Lodge 
of Massachusetts, and was answered by 
the Grand Lodge as follows: 

"Our order only requires a belief in 
the existence of a Supreme Being as a 
qualification for membership, and has no 
affinity with any religious sect or system 
of faith. Hence, everything savoring of 
sectarianism is not to be tolerated. The 
words system of faith or sect do not have 
reference merely to sects within the pale 
of Christianity, but have a far broader 
significance, and -include all the religions 
of the world. In this sense Christianity 
is a sect; hence it is inexpedient and, I 
think, unlawful to make prominent ref- 
erence to it in lodge work. ^ * ^ We 
have Jews and may have Mohammedans 
and other non-Christian sects within our 
order, and the rule applies to them equal- 
ly with members of the Christian faith." 

The audience were also informed that 
on the evening of last Dec. 21 Rev. W. 
T. Beadles, an Odd Fellow, chaplain of 
Paris, 111., baptized into this false religion 
of Odd Fellowship twenty-seven chil- 
dren at a joint meeting of Grape Creek 



148 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



and White Oak lodges. Rev. A. B. 
Grosh. in his ^Manual of Odd Fellow- 
ship, page 90, says: **In a word, what 
regeneration by the Word of Truth is in 
religion, initiation is in Odd Fellowship." 
The natural conclusion from hearing 
these defenders of Odd Fellowship was 
that the Church of Christ had had its 
day. and now might as well close up and 
go out of business, because this grand 
order was doing all the churches claim 
to do and was doing it better and more 
of it. 



MEETINGS IN COLUMBIA CO., WIS. 



After the Z\Iukwonago meeting Friday 
evening Bro. Phillips was called back to 
Chicago on important business for the 
association, and Bro. Gault proceeded to 
Alloa, in Columbia County, near Port- 
age, where, on Saturday evening and on 
Sabbath, he addressed three good meet- 
ings in the U. P. Church. The next 
evening he addressed a large meeting in 
the Congregational Church at Rio, east 
of Portage, where he was kindly enter- 
tained in the home of an old-time friend, 
J. L. Caldwell. The next four evenings 
he and Rev. J. B. Galloway addressed 
good meetings at Poynette, Dakorra, 
Morrisonville and Lodi. Rev. J. D. 
Smith, a faithful friend of the cause at 
Lodi, hired the opera hall, and did every- 
thing possible to make the meeting a suc- 
cess. The pastors of the town were out 
and took part and a good impression 
was made. At Morrisonville the pastor 
of the Swedish Lutheran Church took 
quite an interest. The meeting was held 
here in a pubhc hall, whose owner, a 
Prohibitionist, donated it free of charge. 

At Poynotte the meeting was held in 
the large Presbyterian Church, where 
the State convention was held in 189 1. A 
fine audience was present, and the pastor. 
Dr. W. L. Green, who is also principal 
of the Poynette Academy, said after the 
meeting that in his mind the conclusion 
was crystallizing that the final develop- 
ment of anti-Christ would be in the form 
of the great Secret Empire embracing se- 
cret orders from carpenters' unions down 
to the Nihilists of Russia. 

Bro. Galloway arranged these meet- 
ings and drove the speaker from town to 
town in his carriage and helped him in 
each meeting. He and Bro. Paris both 



said that when a reform became popular 
it became insipid and they felt like stand- 
ing with the few who most needed their 
help. If every county had such pastors 
as these brethren the walls of the Secret 
Empire would soon totter to their fall. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 



Rev. Wm. Fenton addressed an audi- 
ence on the street on the evening of July 
6th at Britt, Iowa, on the lodge question. 

Secretary Phillips has been called to 
Indiana several times during the month 
on important business for the N. C. A. 

Rev. C. C. Potter, of Ironton, la., wih 
soon issue a Pocket Manual for his de- 
nomination. He is publishing it at Mon- 
mouth, 111. 

In Chicago and other places the- meet- 
ings of Theosophists are not to be as free 
to the public as they 'have been. "He that 
doeth evil hateth the light." 

The grand dhapter of Royal Arch Ma- 
sons of Virginia are out in an open cir- 
cular absolutely abrogating all fraternal 
relations with the grand chapter of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Rev. J. P. Stoddard addressed the 
"Universal Peace Union" at Mystic, 
Conn., Aug. 26th, and showed how se- 
cret societies trained and prepared the 
people for war. 

Our correspondents will please consid- 
er our limited space and that an increas- 
ing number desire to speak through our 
columns, and therefore the need of con- 
densing their articles to the last degree. 

A correspondent, writing from North- 
field, Mass., says that President Blanch- 
ard's lecture before the conference on 
the inspiration of the Bi'ble captured Mr. 
Moody and the conference and gave him 
a ready hearing for his lecture, which 
followed on secret societies. 

S. Mathew, of Canby, Ore., an aged 
veteran in our cause, after expressing his 
high appreciation of The Cynosure, says 
because of blindness he has not been able 
to read it for five years, and now that his 
wife is not able to read it for him he is 
obliged to ask its discontinuance. 

As the conflict deepens we find it more 
and more difficult to find open doors for 
the presentation of our cause except in 
those churches that have been educated 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



149 



to exclude secret society members. We 
feel the importance of having- more 
churches raise their standard to this 
point. 

President Blanchard addressed the 
Northfield (Mass.) Conference of Chris- 
tian Workers several weeks ago on the 
secret society issue and found a wide 
door opened and a more free acceptance 
of the truth on this question than at any 
previous conference. Air. Moody and 
several prominent workers at the close 
of the address strongly testified against 
the lodge. 

Secretary W. I. Phillips addressed two 
meetings on the lodge question on Sab- 
bath, Aug. 15th, at Baraboo, Wis. On 
the same day Editor Gault addressed 
two meetings on the same subject in the 
Arhng-ton (Wis.) U. P. Church, and also 
an afternoon meeting in the public 
school at Arlington Station. This made 
twenty meetings held by these brethren 
in Wisconsin in fifteen days. 

Among our callers last month were O. 
E. Odell, Oxford Junction, la.; H. D. 
Whitcomb, of Bloomington, 111.; Rev. 
W. R. Bonham, of Cowden, 111.; Rev. 
Isaiah Paris, Vernon, Wis.; Harry Hunt- 
er, Coulterville, 111.; J. M. Hitchcock, 
Chicago; Prof. J. M. Coleman, of Gene- 
va College, Pennsylvania; Matthew 
Wright, Waukesha, Wis.; Rev. J. C. 
Smith, of Cincinnati, Ohio; Rev. Frank 
Barton, Wheaton, 111., and others. 

A Philadelphia daily says that the 
sweet, strong voice of a Salvation Army 
girl in New Brunswick, N. J., is arousing 
the wrath of the secret societies, which 
nearly all have their headquarters in halls 
near the corner where the Salvationists 
hold their meetings. When the lodges 
meet the singing interrupts the lodge 
meetings and the report says "the goat 
refuses to perform his duty, so that a 
committee was appointed to either try 
and induce the Salvationists to select an- 
other corner or else have them suppress- 
ed by the police." 

Dr. Dowie said in a recent sermon : "I 
w^ant to say here to-day that I was guid- 
ed by God when I struck that blow on 
May 23 last, in this tabernacle; I know I 
was. The worship of Baal in the form 
of the secret society is perhaps the great- 
est foe we have to fight. I did not see 
it with half the clearness I now see it. 



Why, I cannot go anywhere, touch busi- 
ness at any point, touch the government 
at any point, but that I find the secret 
society man guards the door. This coun- 
try, in its government, is wholly, with a 
few exceptions, in the hands of the secret 
society orders. Major McKinley, the 
President, not excepted." 

Last March Elder G. T. Dissette load- 
ed his Gospel Mission wagon with his 
family and musical instruments and trav- 
eled south through Hiawatha and LaAV- 
rence to Fort Scott. Then they passed 
through Lamar, Springfield and Willow 
Springs, Mo. They held gospel meet- 
ings all along the route, at which they 
distributed tracts. They request those 
who can to send them anti-secret pa- 
pers and tracts to Xot, Shannon County, 
Mo. They have a four-horse, four-spring, 
covered wagon, capable of seating six- 
teen persons. In it he carries nine sing- 
ers and a full orchestra. They are do- 
ing a great work, and we hope friends of 
radical reform will remember them in 
their work and labor of love. 

The Christian Cynosure, the well- 
known periodical opposed to secret soci- 
eties, has made a wise change. It has 
changed its form into a pamphlet of thir- 
ty-two pages, neat and attractive in ap- 
pearance, and is now issued once a month 
instead of weekly. Being a magazine 
instead of a newspaper, once a month is 
frequent enough. It is a magazine of 
articles, of facts and arguments, showing 
the evil influence of secret societies on 
the individual, the home, the church and 
the state. At the close of the year an 
index of articles will be published so 
that the bound volumes of this magazine 
will be a valuable book for reference. 
Our people should have this magazine 
in their homes so that they may be more 
ready and able to defend one of the prin- 
ciples of our beloved church. — The Mid- 
land. 

We can always tell when Rev. O. T. 
Lee makes a raid into Minnesota by such 
items as the following, which not unfre- 
quently appear in the St. Paul daily pa- 
pers: "'Mrs. Partington's Brooni Act' 
— Special to the Journal. — Elbow Lake, 
]\Iinn. 'Resolved, That secret societies 
are detrimental to the church of Chris:, 
to family life, and to society at large,' was 
the subject of debate yesterday afternoon 



150 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



between Rev. O. T. Lee, of Northwood, 
Iowa, and Rev. Godward, of this place. 
Great interest was manifested and an im- 
mense crowd Avas present. Lee had 
scored secret and fraternal society men 
in a lecture here last winter and the de- 
bate was the result of a challenge from 
members of the local lodge A. O. U. W. 
Lee made fierce and indiscriminate at- 
tacks upon secret orders. But in the lo- 
cal pastor he met an opponent more than 
a match for him, and secret orders antic- 
ipate such a boom that extra supplies 
of applications for membership must be 
ordered." 

Rev. O. T. Lee, of Northwood, la., 
writes : 

On July 4th Twin Valley congrega- 
tion, Lutheran Swedish Church, was ded- 
icated with appropriate ceremonies. After 
the services the congregation repaired to 
the town hall, where the ladies served a 
fine dinner. After dinner song and 
speeches were in order. Your corre- 
spondent being present, was called upon 
to speak on Secret Societies. Of course 
the request was responded to immediate- 
ly. And as we were assembled in a Wood- 
man hall it was very appropriate that 
Woodcraft received due attention. 

In an adjoining room the lodge had its 
paraphernalia open for public inspection. 
There Stood the saw mill on which the 
candidate is strapped and made believe 
that he will be sawed in two. The ma- 
chine was home-made and could not be 
folded together as some of those that are 
bought. Rituals were offered for sale 
and went like hot cakes, especially on ac- 
count of the cut which represents the 
machine. If Woodcraft could be adver- 
tised in this way aU over the country I am 
of the opinion that the boom would soon 
be to an end. 



OBITUARY. 



JOHN SHUH. 



The charities of these orders are ut- 
terly un-Christian. They have not the 
first inkling of Jesus Christ in them. 
Their plan is to keep out any one who is 
likely to need anything. They shut out 
the maimed and the halt, the women and 
the children, and pick out the able-bod- 
ied men, and propose to give charity to 
those who have paid, and the friends of 
those w^ho have paid, and nobody else; 
this is called charity. It is not charity; 
it is absolute selfishness. 

— Pres. C. A. Blanchard. 



John Shuh was born in the village of 
Dandorflein, Bavaria, Europe, and died. 
June 8th, 1897, aged 79 years. He came 
to America in 1836 and settled in Ohio.. 
For a time he lived in Madison and Clark 
Counties, when in 1856 he moved to 
Whitley County, Indiana, from which 
home he died. He was blessed with ten 
children, six of whom are left to mourn 
the loss of their father. He was a man of 
intense devotion to the cause of Chris- 
tian reform and especially to the anti-se- 
cret reform, to which he made large con- 
tributions. There was no deceipt in his. 
nature. He disHked shams and hypoc- 
risy. The anti-secret cause will miss him, 
and his prayers and consistent Christian 
life will be much missed by his communi- 
ty. We extend our prayerful sympathies 
to his sorrowing widow and fatherless 
children. 



PUBLICATION NOTICES. 

The September Century is an interest- 
ing number, especially the article on 'The 
Alaska Trip." 

The Christian Instructor of Philadel- 
phia is ably edited and gives no uncer- 
tain sound upon all moral issues. Its Chi- 
cago editor. Dr. J. A. Cohins, is back in 
the city to stay, after a prolonged rest in 
Philadelphia. 

None of our exchanges speak out more 
frequently and emphatically in condem- 
nation of secret societies than the Chris- 
tion Nation of New York, now in the 
twenty-seventh year of its publication.. 
As an all-round, reliable religious family 
paper it has no superior. 

We have read with interest and profit 
"Essays on Social Topics," by Lady 
Cook, of Surrey, England. Her style is 
refined and elegant, and she throws a 
flood of light, benevolent and intellectual,, 
upon dark and impure things in our so- 
cial system. This book is cloth, 126 
pages, and can be had of the American 
agent, 7419 Euclid avenue, Chicago, for- 
50 cents; in paper, 15 cents. 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



151 



The Christian Cynosure. Facts and Photographs, 



Official Organ of the National 
Christian Association. 

A 32-page monthly with cover, opposed to 
secret societies, represents the Christian move- 
ment against the secret lodge system; dis- 
cusses fairly and fearlessly the various move- 
ments of the lodge as they appear to public 
view, and reveals the secret machinery of cor- 
ruption in politics, courts, and social and re- 
ligious circles. In advance, $1 per year. 



The Cynosure is published monthly under 
the management of a Board of eleven Direct- 
ors: Rev. J. A. Collins (U. P.), Rev. E. B. 
Wylie (Cong'l), Rev. W. O. Dinins (U. B.), 
Mr. E. A. Cook (Cong'l), Rev. T. B. Arnold 
(Free M.), President C. A. Blanchard, Prof. 
E. Whipple (Cong'l), Mr. C. J. Holmes (Swe. 
Luth.), Mr. J. M. Hitchcock (Indept.), Prof. 
H. F. Kletzing (Evang'l), P. W. Raidabaugh 
(Friend). 

Wm. I. Phillips, Secretary and Business Manager, 
to whom all letters containing money and relating to 
the business of the paper must be addressed at 221 
West Madison Stre t, Chicago, Ills. 

Rev. M. A. Gault, editor Christian Cyno- 
sure, 221 West Madison street, Chicago, 111. 

Testimonies. With Portraits. 

This booklet of thirty pages contains the 
statements of prominent Congregational min- 
isters and Associations on the secret lodge 
system. Postpaid 5 cents each. 

Folly, Expense and Danger 

Secret Societies. 

Ey CHARLES A. BLANCHARD, President 
of Wheaton College. 

They may be rudely classified as religious; 
e. g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfellow- 
ship, the Knights of Pythias, etc.: political, as 
the Know-nothings, Knights of the Golden 
Circle, the Order of American Deputies, the 
Kuklux-Klan, the White League, etc.: indus- 
trial; as the unions of carpenters, bricklayers, 
conductors, engineers, etc.: insurance; as the 
Royal Arcanum, the Modern .Woodmen, the 
Order of the Iron Hall, the Ancient Order of 
United Mechanics, etc.: and the social; as the 
college fraternities. Postpaid 5 cents each. 

BLESSED MEMORIES. 
A life of Mrs. Jonathan Blanchard, by her 
daughter, Mrs. J. W. Fischer, postpaid, 60 
cents. 



In this brief booklet are collected the opin- 
ions on secret societies of some fifty men de- 
vout in piety, profound in scholarship, and 
eminent in statecraft, also the testimonies of 
seceders from the lodge, as well as extracts 
from standard Masonic writers. 

Postpaid 5 cents each. 

Holden With Cords. 

Or the Power of the Secret Empire. A faith- 
ful representation in story of the evil influence 
of Freemasonry, by E. E. Flagg, Author of 
"Little People," "A Sunny Life," Etc. This 
is a thrillingly interesting story, accurately true 
to life, because mainly a narration of historical 
facts. In cloth, $1; paper, 50 cents. 

COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Their custom, character, and eflforts for their 
suppression. By H. L. Kellogg. Containing 
the opinion of many college presidents, and 
others, and a full acount of the murder of Mor- 
timer Leggett. 25 cents each. 

American Hand Book and 
Citizens' Manual. 

By M. N. CUTLER. 

This is a book of 200 pages, yVi by 5 inches, 
and is sent postpaid for 25 cents. There are 
chapters on "Bible and Secretism," "Lodge 
and Saloon," "All-round Reformers," etc., 
etc. 25 cents each. 

MY EXPERIENCES 

WlTXi 

Secret Societies. 

By a Traveler. With a Key to Masonry Illustrated. 



A new edition, greatly enlarged, has been 
issued, embracing chapters on the Language 
of Numbers, Secret Empires, and Good Men. 
containing more Experiences and affording a 
deeper insight into the Hidden Language and 
Workings of Secret Clans, and of the counter- 
feit pretences of good men, than ever before 
published. The Key is an exposition, explana- 
tion and verification of modern Baalism with 
which all should be thoroughly acquainted. 
Postpaid 15 cents each. 

During September and October the Self- 
Pronoiincilig S. S. Teachers' Bible will be 
g-iven as a premium for one renewal and four 
new annual subscriptions to The Cynosure. 
(See advertisement.) 



151 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



Standard Works 



-ON- 

Seefet Soeieties 

FOK SALE BY THE 

KanoniiL cpmsTiBN ossocihtion. 

221 West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Terms:— Cash with order, or if sent by express 
C. O. D. at least $i.oo must be sent with order a? 
a guaranty that books will be taken. Books at 
v-etaiJ prices sent postpaid. Books by Mail ye at 
risk of persons ordering, unless 8 cents extra is 
sent to pay for reg^istering them, when tneir safe 
delivery is guaranteed. Books at retail ordered 
sy express, are sold at lo per cent discount and 
ielivery guaranteed, but not express paid. Fo^^= 
sf e stamps taken for small siim& 

ON FKEEMASONRY. 

Freemasonry Illustrated. First 
three degrees. 376 pages cloth, 75c; 
paper, 40c. 
The accuracy of these expositions attested by 

iifl&davits of Jacob O* Doesburg and others. 

Freemasonry Illustrated. 640 

pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 75c. 



A complete expositon of the Blue Lodge and 
i^hapter consisting of seven degrees. Profusely 
ilustrated. 

Knighi Templarisn Illustrated. 

341 pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 50c. 
A full illustrated rit'^al of the six degrees ol 
the Council and Commandery. 

Hand-Book of Freemasonry. 274 

pages, flexible cloth, 50c. 

By E. Ronayne, Past Master of Keystone Lodge 
No. 639, Chicago. Gives the complete standard 
ritual of the first three degrees of Freemasonry. 

Scotch Rite flasonry^ Illustrated. 

2 vols. Per vol., cloth, $1.00: paper, 65c. 
^ The complete illustrated ritual of the entir:: 
Scottish Rite, comprising all the Masonic degrees 
from 3rd to 33rd inclusive. The first three de- 
gref^s are common to all the Masonic Rites, and 
are fully and accurately given in "Freemasonry 
Illustrated." Vol. 1 comprises the degrees from 
3rd to i8th inclusive. 

Vol. 11 comprises the degrees from 19th to 33rd 
kucjusive, with the signs, grips, tokens nnd pass- 
"vordp fr'^Ttrk m«- to wd s^^jgnree in^Uieit'ft 

Freemasonry Exposed. By Capt. 

William Morgan, no pages, paper, 25c. 
The genuine old Morgan book republished. 

Ecce Orient!. Pocket size, full 

roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the First 
Three Masonic Degrees in Cypher, with complete 
Floor Charts of Initiating, Passing and Raising a 
Candidate. 

Cabala. Pocket size, full roan, 

flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the Chapter 
Masonic Degrees; 4th to 7th inclusive, in Cypher. 
Giving the degrees of Mark Master, Past Mastet, • 
M^^tFxr^dlept Master ^nd Rov%? Arch 

Knights of the Orient. Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.^0. 

The Complete Ritual of the Commandery 
Masonic Degrees, Knights of the Red Cross, 
Knight Templar and Knight ol Malta, nth to 13th 



Allyn's Ritual of Freemasonry. 

By Avery Allyn. Cloth, $5.00. 

Contains the fully Illustrated Ritual of the Blue 
Lodge. Chapter Council and Commandery, n of 
the Scotch Rite Degrees, several Masonic side 
degrees and what is termed a Key to the Phi Beta 
Kappa, and the Orange Societies. 

Duncan's Masonic Ritual and 

Monitor. Cloth, $2.50. 

Profusely illustrated with explanatory engrav- 
ings, and containing the ritual and work of the or- 
der for the seven degrees, inclu-ang the Royal 
Arch. Though extensively used as an Instruction 
Book and one of the best in the market, it is not 
as accurate as "Freemasonry' /lustrated." 

Richardson's Moni^or of Freema- 
sonrj'. Cloth, $L2^; paper, 75c. 
Contains the ceremonies of Lodges, Chapters, 
Encampments, etc. Illustrated. Although ex- 
tensively used in conferring the higher degrees, 
it is not only vfv incomplete but inaccurate 
especially as regards the first seven degrees, and 
as to the high r degrees it o:ives but a description 
and general idea of th"? degrees rather than th& 
full ritual. 

Look to the East A ritual of the 
first three Masonic Degrees by Ralph 
Lester. Cloth, $2.00. 

Notwithstanding the high price this book is 
very inferior in every way to Freemasonry Illus- 
trated or the Handbook of Freemasonry at a 
quarter the price. 

Council of the Orient. Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.50. 
The Complete Standard Ritual of Council 



Masonic D^rees in Cjrpher, 8th to 10th inclusive* 
Giving the Degrees of Royal Master, Select Mas- 
ter and Super Excellent Master. 



Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Re- 
vised and enlarged edition, 40 pages,, 
paper, 25c. 

An Illustrated Ritual of the Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine. This is a Side Masonic degree con^ 
ferred only on Knights Templar and on Thirty-- 
wo degree Masons. 

Thirteen Reasons why a Chris- 
tian should not be a Freemason. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages, 
5c 
Freemasonry Contrary to the 
Christian Religion. By " Spectator," 
Atlanta, Ga. 16 pages 5c. 

Hon. Thurlow Weed on the Mor- 
gan Abduction. 16 pages 5c. 

This is the legally attested statement of this 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and confinement of 
Capt. Morgan in Canandaigu?. jail, his removal to 
Fort Niagara and subsequent drowning in Lake 
Ontario. 

Freemasonry a Fourfold Con- 
spiracy. 16 pages, 5c. 

Address of Pres. J. Blanchard. This is a most 
convincing argument against the lodge, 

Mah-Hah=Bone; 589 pages; $i. 00' 

Comprises the Hand Book, Master's Carpet and 
Freemasonry at a glance. 

ON ODD-FELLOWSHIP. 

Odd-fellowship Judged by its own 

utterances; its doctrine and practice 
examined in light of God's Word. By 
Rev. J. H. Brockman. Cloth, 50c; pa- 
per cover, 25c. 

This is an exceedingly interesting, clear discus- 
sion of the charii •;ter of Odd-fellowship, in the forn* 
of a dialogue. 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



153 



Revised Odd-fellowship Illustra- 
ted. Cloth, $i.oo: paper cover, 5octs. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge En- 
campment and Rebekah (ladies) degrees, profuse- 
ly illustrated, and guaranteed to be strictly ac- 
curate; with a sketcn of origin, history and char- 
acter of the order, over one hundred foot-note 
quotations from standard authorities, showing the 
character and teachings of the order, and an an- 
alysis of each degree by ex-President J. Blanchard. 
This ritual corresponds exactly with the "Charge 
Books" furnished Dy the Sovereign Grand Lodee. 

Sermon on Odd=feIlowship and 
other secret societies, by Rev. J. Sar- 
ver, pastor of Evangelical Lutheran 
church. IOC. each. 

This is a very clear argument against secretism of 
all forms and. the duty to disfellowship Odd-fel- 
lows, Freemasons, Knights of Pythias and Gran- 
gers, is clearly shown by their confessed character 
as found in their own publications. 

OTHER RITUALS. 

Revised Knights of Pythias, I!Ju^ 
trated. Cloth, 50c: paper cover 25c. 
An exact copy of the new official Ritual Adopted 
by the Supreme Lodge of the world, with the Se- 
cret work added and fully Illustrated. 

Knights of the Orie^it Illustrated. 

15c each. 

The full Illustrated Ritua j.. Ancient Order ol 
the Orient or the Oriental degree. This is a side 
degree conferred mostly 1 Knights of Pythias, 
lodges. 

Good Templarisnr Illustrated. 25c. 

A full and accurate exp./sition of the degree« of 
the lodge, temple and ccancil. 

Exposition of thj' Grange. 25c. 

Edited by Rev. A. W. Seeslin. Illustrated with 
engravings. 

Ritual of thfi Grand Army of the 
Republic loc. each. 

The authorized ritual of 1868, with signs of re- 
cognition, pass-words, etc., and ritual of Machin- 
ists' and Blacksmiths' Union, (The two bound to- 
gether.) 

Knights of Labor Illustrated. 25c. 

("Adelphon Kruptos.'") The com^ lete illus- 
trated ritual of the order, including the "unwritten 
work." 

Adoptive Masonry Illustrated. 

20c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the five 
degrees of Female Freemasonry, by Thomas Lowe. 

Red rien Illustrated. In cloth 50c. 

each, $2.00 per dozen postpaid. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men. comprising the Adop- 
tion Degree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree, 
Chief-s Degree, with the Odes, etc. 

The Foresters Illustrated. Paper. 

cover 25c. each, $2.00 per dozen. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Forest- 
ers, with Installation Ceremonies. 

United Sons of Industry Illustra- 
ted. 15c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the sec- 
ret tradesunion of the above name, giving the 
signs, grips, passwords, etc. 

Rituals and Secrets Illustrated. 

$1.00, each. 

Composed of "Temple of Honor Illustrated, 
Adoptive Masonrv Illustrated," "United Sons of 
Industry D'-'strated." and "Secret Societies Illus- 
trated '^ 

Sermon on flasonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor of United Pres 
byterian church. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

History Nat'I Christian Associ- 
ation. IOC. each. 
Its origin, objects, what it has done and aims to 

do, and the best means to accomplish the end 

sought, the Articles of Constitution and By-laws 

of tne Association. 

Secret Societies. Cloth 35c, papc 
15c. 

A discussion of their character and claims bj 
Rev. David McDill, Pres. J. Blanchard and Rev 
Edward Beecher. 

The Master's Carpet or flasonry 
and Baal Worship Identical. Bound 
in fine cloth. 400 pages. 75c. 
Explains the true source and meaning of every 

ceremony and symbol of the lodge. 

Disloyal Secret Oaths. 5c. 

By Joseph Cook, Boston. He quotes the law of 
Vermont which makes the administration of the 
Masonic oaths illegal. Joseph Cook's address is a 
national treatment of a national subject, and very 
valuable for reference. 

Light on Freemasonry. By Elder 
D. Bernard, Cloth, $1.50. paper, 75c 

Finney on flasonry. Cloth 75c., 

paper 35c. 

The character, claims and practical workings of 
Freemasonry. By ex-Pres. Charles G. Finney, of 
Oberlin College. President Finney was a " bright 
Mason," but left the lodge when he became a 
Christian. This book has opened the eyes cf 
multitudes. 

riasonic Oaths Null and Void: or 
Freemasony Self=Convicted. 207 

pages. Postpaid, 40c. 

This is a book for the times. The design of the 
author is to refute the arguments of those who 
claim that the oaths of Freemasonry are binding 
upon those who take them. 

Judge Whitney's Defence before 
the Grand Lodge of Illinois. 15c. 

Judge Daniel H. Whitney was Master of the 
lodge when S. H. Keith, a member of his lodge, 
murdered Ellen Slade. Judge Whitney, by at- 
tempting to bring Keith to justice, brought on 
himself the vengeance of the lodge, but he boldly 
replied to the charges against him, and afterwards 
renounced Masonf-y 

General Washington Opposed to 
Secret Societies. loc. 

This is a re-publication of Governor Joseph Rit- 
ner's " Vindication of General Washington from 
the Stigma of Adherence to Secret Societies," 
communicated to the House of Representatives ol 
Pennsylvania.. March 8, 1837, at their special re- 
quest. To this is added the fact that three high 
Masons were the only perso iS who opposed a vote 
of thanks to Washington on his retirement to pri- 
vate Hie-undoubtedly because they considered him 
a seceding Freemason. 

riorgan's Exposition, Abduction 
and riurder and Oaths of 33 degrees. 

304 pages, cloth, §1.00, 

•* Composed of Freemasonry Exposed," by Capt. 
Wm. Morgan: ''History of the Abduction and 
Murder of Morgan;" "Valance's Confession of 
the Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan;" "Bernard's. 
Reminiscences of Morgan Times," and "Oaths 
and Penalties of 33 Degrees." 

Oaths and Penalties of Freemason- 
ry, as proved in court in New Berlin 
trials IOC. 

Th2 New Berlin trials began in the attempt of 
Freemasons to prevent public initiation by se-'ed- 
ing Masons. These trials were held at Xew Berlin, 
Chenango Co., N. V.. April i^ and 14, 1831, an*-* 
GeneralAugustus C. Welsh, sheriff of the county, 
and other adhering Freemasons swore to the trutli 
tul revelation of the oaths and penal t^es. 



154 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



Grand Lodge riasonry. 5c. each 

Its relation to civil government and the Christian 
religion. By Pres. J. Blanchard. The an-Chris- 
tian. anti-republican and despotic character of 
Freemasonry is proved from the highest Masonic 
authorities. 

Masonry a Work of Darkness, ad- 
verse to Christianity, and inimical 
to Republican Government. 15c. 

By Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong (Presbyterian) a 
seceding Mason of 21 degrees. 

Sermon on Masonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a Ma- 
sonic Oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, Ohio. 

Story of the Gods. Postpaid, loc. 

By I. R. B. Arnold. Brief sketches from the 
mvthologv of Rome. Creece, Egypt. India, Persia, 
PhrygiarScandina' la. Africa and America, show- 
ing the relations and unity of the past and present 
S5'stems. The idolatrous worship of the Masonir 
lodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 

Masonic Outrages. Postpaid, 20c. 

Compiled by Rev. H. H. Hinman. Showing 
Masonic assualt on lives of seceders^ on reputation, 
and on free speech; its interference with justice If 
courts, etc 

History of the Abduction and Mur- 
der of Capt. Wm. Morgan. 25c. 

As prepared by seven committees of citizens, 
appointed to ascertain the fate of Morgan. 

The Anti=mason*s 5crap-Book. 

25c. 

Consisting of 53 "Cynosure" tracts. In thvs 
book are the views of more than a score of men, 
many of them of distinguished abi'Uy, on the sub-' 
iect of secret societies. 

The Image of the Beast; A Secret 
Empire; or Freemasonry a Subject of 
Prophecy. By Rev. Richard Horton. 
Third Edition'. 200 pages, cloth, 6oc. 

Sermon on Secretism, 5c. eacn. 

By Rev. R. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear ayri 
of the objections to all secret societies, and to Mzr 
-"prv especially, that are apparent to alH. 

Anti=masonic Sermons and Ad= 

dresses. Cloth, $1 00. 

Composed of " Masonry a Work of Darkness;" 
the Sermons of Messrs. Cross, William M'Nary, 
Dow and Sarver, the two addresses of President 
Blanchard, and the addresses of President H. H. 
George, Prof. j. G. Carson and Rev. M. S. Drury; 
" Thirteen Reasons Why a Christain Cannot be a 
Freemason," "Freemasonry Contrary to the 
Christian Religion," and " Are Masonic Oaths 
Binding on the Initiate? " 287 pages. 

Secret Societies, Ancient and 
Modern. 50c. each. 

Contents: The Antiquity of Secret Societies. 
The Life of Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, The 
Origin of Masonry, Was Washington a Mason.' 
Fillmore and Webster's Deference to Masonry, A 
Brief Outline of the Progress of Masonry in the 
United States, The Tammany Ring, Masonic Be- 
nevolence, The Uses of Masonry, An Illustration 
The Conclusion. 

Secret Societies Illustrated. 

Over 250 cuts, 99 pages, paper cover, 
25c. each. 

Containing the signs, grips, passwords, em- 
blems, etc., of Freemasonry (Blue Lodge, and tc 
the fourteenth d-^.gree of the York rite). Adoptive 
Mafe,.,.^^, Revised Odd-fellowship, Good Templar- 
ism, the Temple of Honor, the United Sons of In- 
dustry, Knights of Pythias and the Grange, with 
affidavits, etc. 

Prof. J. G. Carson, D. D., on Se- 
cret Societies. loc. each. 

A most convincing argument against fellowship- 
iaf "Freemasons in the Christian church. 



Sermon on flasonry. i6 pages, 
5c. By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor 
United Presbyterian church. 

Oaths and Penalties of the s^ 
Degrees of Freemasonry. 15c. each. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes half-a-miliion horri- 
ble oaths, 

Ex=President John Quincy Ad- 
ams. Price, cloth, $1,00. Paper, 35c. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
gations and Penalties. 

Sermon on flasonry. loc. each. 

By Rev. James Williams, Presiding Elder of 
Dakota District Northwestern Iowa Conference 
M. E. Church— a seceding Master Mason. 

The Mystic Tie or Freemasonry a 
League with the Devi!. 15c. 

This is an account of the church trial of Peter 
Cook and wife, of Elkhart, Indiana, for refusing 
to support a reverend Freemason. 

Sermon on Secret Societies. 5c. 

each. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of his sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to examine into the char- 
acter of secret societies, no matter what object 
such societies profess to have. 

Reminiscences of florgan Times. 

IOC. each. 

By Elder David Bernard. This is a thrilling 
narrative of the incidents connected with Ber- 
nard's Revelation of Freemasonry. 

The Broken Seal. In cloth, 75c. 
Paper covers, 40c. 

Personal Reminiscences of the Abduction and 
Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan. By Samuel D. 
Greene. 

Pres. H. li. George on Secret 
Societies. loc, each. 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty of 
Christian churches to disfellowship secret socie- 
ties. 

Narratives and Arguments, 

15c. each. 

Showing the conflict of secret societies with the 
Constitution and law of the Union and of the 
States. By Francis Semple. 

Secrecy vs. the Family, State 
and Church. loc. each. 

By Rev. M. S. Dury. The antagonism of or- 
ganized secrecy to the welfare of the family, state 
and church, is clearly shown. 

A Booklet of 107 pages. 25c. 

"The Martyr's Own Monument," by Rev. J. E. 
Roy, D. D., Western Secretary of American Mis- 
sionary Association; " Christian Politics," by 
ReT. J. Blanchard, late Editor of Christian Cyno- 
stire; " The Mysterious Machine: Was it Lawn- 
mower, Town-pump, Balloon, Wheel-barrow,— or 
what.? " by Prof. E. D. Bailey, of the Civil Service 
Dept. U. S. Government. 

Are Secret Societies a BSessang? 

A pamphlet of 20 pages. 5c. 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., pasto?: 
of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, Mo.. 
Jan. 4, 1891. W, McCoy writes: "That sermon 
ought to be in the hands of every preacher in this 
land, and every citizen's, too." 

Between Two Opinions: or the 
Question of the Hour. 389 pages; cloth, 
postpaid, 75 cents. 

By Miss E. E. Flagg, author of " Little People,'' 
" A Sunny Life," etc., etc. Everyone who loves 
to read a good story, chaste and elegant in ex- 
pression, pure in thought, interesting in narrative, 
should read this book upon tbe power o^ secret 
•vocieties in Dolitics. ar d the remedy. 



September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



155 




MASONIC CHART. 

ILLUSTRATING THE RELATION OF SOME OF THE DEGREES AND RITES IN 
FREEMASONRY TO EACH OTHER. 
The accompanying chart represents one hundred and forty two degrees. 

I. The American Rite of 13 degrees; 2. The Scotch Rite of 33 degrees; 

3. The Egyptian Rite of 96 degrees. 4. The Mystic Shrine of one degree. 

5. The Eastern Star of 5 degrees for Master Masons and for women. These are side degrees, and not 
genuine masonry. 

The Symbolic degrees, or Blue Lodge of three degrees, are common to every Masonic rite, whether 
American. Scotch, or Egyptian, or whichever of the Masonic rites, named in Mackey's Masonic Encyclo- 
pedia one may clioose to investigate. 

This chart shows in the Blue Lodge the position of the Worshipful Master and some of the other offi- 
cers of the lodge. Several positions of the ca 'didate who is being initiated are also shown. In the Master 
Mason's degree is rfrognized the murder, buriai ai.l resurrection scene so fu!! of religious signifi. 'nee to 
Freemasons. ' 



156 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 




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September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



157 



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158 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 




(See Page 67 Fraternal Degree M. W. A.) 



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September, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



59 



Daniel Webster: "Ail secret as&ocJa 
tions, the members of which take upon 
themselves extraordinary obligations to 
one another, and are bound together by 
secret oaths, are naturally sources of 
jealousy and just alarm to others; are es- 
pecially unfavorable to harmony and mu- 
tual confidence among men living togeth- 
er under popular institutions, and are 
dangerous to the general cause of civil 
liberty and just government. Under the 
influence or this conviction I heartily ap- 
proved the law, lately enacted in the State 
of which I am a citizen, for abolishing all 
such, oaths and oblie'ations/' 



James O.Birnei, candidate of the Liber- 
ty party for Pres dent, was a Freemason, 
'•but never entere 1 a lodge after he joined 
the church, and, as ^is sons grew up, he 
cautioTied them against joining any se- 
cret order." — Oen. Wm. Birney. 




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160 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1897. 



A-head of Pearline ? 

Never ! Not a bit of it ! That is 
but of the question. Probably not 
one of the many washing-powders 
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Pearline would claim to excel it 
any way. All they ask is to be 
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JAMES PYLE, New York. 



A WISE BAPTIST RULE. 

''The Baptist Church Directory" is 
''generally accepted as standard authori- 
ty in matters of Baptist Church Polity." 

Under the heading, "Societies" the Di- 
rectory treats of missionary and other 
societies, and on page 134, in note 4, 
says : 

"As to the propriety of church mem- 



bers connecting themselves with secret 
societies, it may be said that whether 
these societies 'are good or bad in them- 
selves, all the advantages they of¥er may 
be obtained in other les's objectionable 
ways, and since connection with them 
will be a grief to many, and is, at best, of 
very questionable propriety, the safer 
course by far is to avoid them altogether. 



KnioMs of ttie 




The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the 
Order, Including the Un- 
written Work. 

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as follows: The top black, the sides red, six inches deep, and four inches 
of white added to the red, or four inches of white fringe may be used. On 
this will be placed the Bible and Circle, upon which the obligation is'ta- 
ken." — Page 7. 

Ready for Delivery September 15, 1897. 
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Address WM I, PHILLIPS, Bosiness Manager, - 221 West Madisoo Street, CMcago, Ills 



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and Foreign Words contained in the Bible. Comprising about 3500 words, 
giving the pronunciation, the meaning, and the location of the text where 
the word occurs for the first time. Exhaustive Articles on Biblical History, 
Geography, Topography, Natural History, Ethnology, Botany, Chronology, 
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Sample of 
Type... 



THE GOSPEL ACCORD 

SAINT MATTI 



CHAPTER 1. 

I The genealogy of Christ from Abraham to Joseph. 
18 He iras conceived by the Holy Ohosi, and born 
of the Virgin Mary, 
names of Christ. 



19 The angel inierpreieth the 



THE book of the " generation of 
Je'§us Christ, ^ the son of Da'- 
vid, ^ the son of A'bra-ham. 

2 ^A'bra-ham begat r§aac; and 
^I'^aac begat Ja'cob; and -^ Ja'cQb 
begat Ju'das and his brethren ; 

3 And ^Ju'das begat Pha're§ and 
Za'ra of Tha'mar; and '^Pha're? 
begat fis'rom; and Es'rom begat 
A'ram ; 

4 And A'ram begat A.-min'a-dab ; 
and A-min'a-dab begat Na-Ss'son; 
and Na-as'son begat Sai'mOn ; 

5 And Sarm6n begat Bo'oz of Ra'- 



a Luke 3. 23. 
b Ps. 132. 11, 

Is. 11. 1. 

Jer. 23. 5. 

ch. 22. 42. 

John 7. 42. 

Acts 2. 30; 

13. 23. 

Rom. 1. 3. 
c Gen. 12. 3 ; 

22. 13. 

Gal. 3. 16. 
d Gen. 21.2,3. 

e Gen. Si. 26. 
/ Gen. 29. 35. 

g Gen. 38. 27, 

A Ruth 4. IS, 
&c. 

lChr.2.5,9, 
&c. 

i 1 Sam. 16. 1 ; 
17. 12. 

yt2S.tm.12.24. 
/ 1 Chr. 3. 10. 
&c. 

m 2 Kin. 20. 
21. 



bus 
Je'§ 

17 
han 
tioD 
ryii 
teei 
can 
Chr 

18 
was 
the] 
bef< 

fOU! 

19 

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her 

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REV. W. R. BONHAM, 



CONTENTS 



mm 



Masoury— A Discussion 162 

Our Ancient Brethren 167 

Some Objections 169 

Lodge Members in Churcihes .170 

Separation: Separation! 171 

Masoniy and Civil Government 172 

Out of Bondage 173 

Progress of Anti-Secrecy 174 

Secretary Phillips' Report. 175 

Letter from Rev. W. B. Stoddard 176 



Letter from Bro. Fenton 177 

E'diitorial Field Notes 177 

Catalogue of Lodge Crimes 178 

Collapse of Secret Society Insurance .... 170 

Edmond Ronayne 180 

To Friends in Iowa 180 

A Goo'd Example 181 

Anti-Lodge Resolutions 181 

Personal Mention 182 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



"The National Christian Association, op- 
posed to secret societies," was formed at 
Pittsburg, Pa., in 1868, and incorporated un- 
der the laws of the State of Illinois in 1874. 

The National Christian Associatioii arose to 
me«t a great want created by the growth of 
secret orders, and the ignorance and silence 
of public teachers as to their nature and ef- 
fects. 

The association is interdenominational. 
The president (1897) is a Methodist Episco- 
pal, and the vice president a United Presby- 
terian. Among the following named officers 



and agents are also the Free Methodist, Con- 
gregational, Lutheran, Friend, Evangelical^ 
United Brethren, Baptist, Reformed Presby- 
terian and Independent. 

The principal headquarters of the National 
Christian Association is at 221 West Madison 
street, Chicago, which property is valued at 
$20,000, and is the gift to the association of 
Dea. Philo Carpenter, one of the founders of 
Chicago. 

The association is supported by the free 
will offerings and bequests of friends. The 
Christian Cynosure is its organ and princi- 
pal publication. 



President— Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, Morris, 
111. 

Vice President— Rev. W. T. Campbell, Mon- 
mouth, 111. 

Recording Secretary— Mrs. M. C. Baker, 14 
North May street, Chicago. 

General Secretary and Treasurei^-Wm. I. 
Phillips, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 

Editor Christian Cynosure — Rev. M. A. 
Gault, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

T. B. Arnold, C. A. Blanchard, E. A. Cook, 
J. M. Hitchcock, C. J. Holmes, T. B. Rada- 
baugh, E. Whipple, Edgar B. Wylie, H. P. 
Kletzing, J. A. Collins, W. O. Dinius. 
DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Rev. James P. Stoddard, Boston, Mass., 
Rev. P. B. Williams, Los Angeles, Cal.; Rev. 
Wm. Fenton, St. Paul, Minn.; Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard, Washington, D. C. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to the world; aud in secret have 1 said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XXX 



CHICAGO, OCTOBER, 1897. 



NUMBER 6 



PUliLISHKD MONTHLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago. 



TERHS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

PRICE— Per year, in advance. $1.00; three months, on 
trial, twcnty-hve cents; tingle copies, 10 cents. 

DISCONTINUANCES.- W c find that a large number 
of our subscribers preler not to have their sub- 
scriptions interrupted and their tiles brokeii in case 
they triil to remit before expiration. It is therefore 
assumed, unless notification to disconimue is re- 
ceived, tliat the subscriber wishes no interuption in 
his series. Notification to discontinue at expiration 
can be sent in at any time during tlie year. 

PRESENTATION COPIES.-Many persons subscribe 
for The Christian Cynosure to be sent to 
friends. In such cases, it we are advised that a 
subscription is a present and not regularly author- 
ized by the recipient, we will make a memorandum 
to discontinue at expiration, and to send no bill for 
the ensuing year. 



State conventions are being arranged 
for in Illinois, Iowa and Pennsylvania. 
It is proposed to hold the Illinois State 
convention at Coulterville in November. 



If secret societies do not figure in poli- 
tics why is it that the New York Voice 
lays so much stress on the fact that 
Iowa's candidate for Governor on the 
Prohibition ticket, Hon. S'amuel Phelp 
Leland, is a 32d degree Mason and a P. 
D. Y. M. in Oddfellowship. Many Pro- 
Iiibitionists in Iowa remember that when 
their candidate was not a secret order 
man he got little sympathy and support 
from members of secret orders. 



The Modern Woodmen caused a seri- 
ous riot at Fulton, 111., Sept. 30th, when 
they removed their records and headquar- 
ters to Rock Island. W. A. Northcott, 
head consul of the Woodmen ; Adjt. Gen. 
Reece, and three of the Woodmen's 
clerks were attacked and beaten by the 
Fulton mob. Gov. Tanner was tele- 
graphed and ordered out several com- 
panies of the State militia. When the 
troops arrived and were drawn up on the 



platform, the head consul was permitted 
to board the train for Rock Island. 



In the Eli- Williams discussion on the 
question of the oath the Cynosure holds 
that it is right and Scriptural to take an 
oath when properly administered, and 
that the decalogue and institutions given 
under Moses, except the Levitical or cer- 
emonial law, are still binding upon the 
race. 



A press dispatch of September i6th, 
from Washington, says: "President Mc- 
Kinley and the members of his cabinet 
to-day attended the cornerstone laying 
of the handsome new synagogue to be 
erected by the W^ashington Hebrew con- 
gregation on Eighth street, near H. The 
ceremonies were under the direction of 
the Masonic order." 



A serious crisis confronted the Chica- 
go Board of Education lately. The labor 
unions demanded the discharge of all 
nonunion men from the employment of 
the Board. The demand was enforced by 
a strike of workmen on the public school 
buildings. The Board at last was obliged 
to concede to the terms of the strikers in 
order to open the schools at the regular 
time. Thus every interest of the city is in 
the merciless grasp of secret organiza- 
tions. 



By the portrait on the cover and his 
excellent article in this issue we intro- 
duce to our readers Rev. W. R. Bonham, 
who in his late Free* Methodist confer- 
ence was elected elder of the Greenville 
and Litchfield districts, Illinois. He was 
born near Belleville, in 1862. was con- 
verted at the age of 16, and began preach- 
ing at 19, and has held various charges in 
the Central Illinois conference. He is 
a thoroughgoing reformer and wishes' to 
stand in the front line of battle against 
secret societies. 



162 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 



MASONRY.— A DISCUSSION 



Between Professor John Augustus Williams, of 
Harrodshurg, Ky.. and Professor Simp- 
son Ely, of Kirlsville. Mo. 



IMPEACHMENTS OF MASONRY.— NO. II., BY 
PROFESSOR ELY. 

R'. I impeach [NlasO'iiry because of its 
liorrible, unchristian oaths. — ^It will not 
do for our opponents to say, ''Hiow can 
you know anything about its oaths, since 
they belong to a secret order?" Islen — 
good men — ^have turned "State's evi- 
dence," and they have again and again 
divulged to the world the oaths of Ala- 
son ry and all the lesser brood of secret 
societies. They have become almost com- 
mon property. The truthfulness of such 
a man as Charles G. Finney can not be 
called in question, and he again and again 
exposed the inwardness of the whole sys- 
tem. 

The oaths are un-Christian. They are 
self-imposed. There is no legal author- 
ity back of them. Is not this a clear viola- 
tion of the teaching of Jesus in the Ser- 
mon on the Alount? Docs he not forbid 
all manner of self-imposed and unauthor- 
itative oaths? Indeed, I am of the convic- 
tion that he cO'udemns all forms of oaths, 
legal or otherwise. So strong is this con- 
viction that I will not, under any circum- 
stances, permit an oath to be administered 
to me. Nor will it do to say that the Old 
Testament recognized the binding force 
and validity of oaths. That law was for 
the Jews. \\ e are not Jews, to be gov- 
erned by Jewish law. That law provided 
for retaliation, for divorce, for circumcis- 
ion, and for many other things which the 
law of Christ abrogated. 

Xow hear the Saviour. "Ye have 
heard that it hath been said by them of 
old time, Thou shalt not forswear thy- 
self, but shalt perform unto the Lord 
thine oaths; but I say unto you, swear 
■not at all; neither by heaven, for it is 
God's throne; nor by the earth, for it is 
his footstool; neither by Jerusalem, for it 
is the city of the Great King. Neither 
shalt thou swear by thy 'head, because 
thou canst not make one hair white or 
black; but let your communication be 
yea, yea; nay, nay ; for whatsoever is more 
than these cometh of evil." Now who 
will dare to say th^it the spirit and letter 



of Jesus' teaching is not opposed to self- 
imposed and unauthoritative oaths? 

The enormity of Masonic oaths con- 
sists in the fact that men take them con- 
cerning things, of which they know noth- 
ing! They soiemnly bind themselves to 
secrecy concerning teadhings, ceremonies 
and workings about which they are in 
densest ignorance. W'hat moral right 
h^ve I to swear that I will "ever conceal 
and never reveal" the secrets of a relig- 
ion that is both anti-Christian and Pa- 
gan? What moral right have I, before- 
hand, to thus handicap myself concern- 
ing things that I may afterward feel are 
wrong, and ought of right to be revealed? 
Many men have found, after entering the 
Lodge, that there was much of wrong in 
it, and yet they ought not to expose it, be- 
cause they were sworn never to reveal 
and ever to conceal the workings of the 
institution. This is a false notion. A 
revelation would not be perjury. The sin 
is in taking the oath, not in breaking it. 

The form of the oath is inhuman and 
barbarous. Its character is so well known 
that I need not repeat it, nor dwell upon it 
here. John Quincy Adams said, "I am 
prepared to complete the demonstration 
'before God and man, that the Masonic 
oaths, obligations and penalties can not 
by any possibility be reconciled to the 
laws of morality, or Christianity, or of the 
land." This is a severe charge; but he 
knew what he was talking about. So 
strenuously opposed to these unholy ob- 
ligations was Lincoln's Secretary of State, 
William H. Seward, that he exclaimed, 
"Before I would place my hand between 
the hands of other men in a secret lodge,, 
order, class, or council, and, bending on 
my knee before them, enter into co'mJbina- 
tion with them for any o'bject personal or 
political, good or bad, I would pray to 
God that that hand and that knee might 
be paralyzed, and that I might become an 
object of pity and even the mocker}' of 
my fellow men." 

Daniel W'ebster said: "All secret or- 
ganizations, the members of which take 
upon themselves extraordinary obliga- 
tions to one another, and are bound to- 
gether by secret oaths, are naturally 
sources of jealousy and jnst alarm to 
others ; are especially unfavorable to^ har- 
mony and mutual confidence among men 
living together under popular institu- 
tions, and are dangerous to the general 



October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



163 



cause of civil liberty and just government. 
Under the influence of this conviction I 
iieartily approved the law, lately enacted 
by the State of which I am a citizen, for 
abolishing- all such oaths and obliga- 
tions." These are great men. They can 
not be called "cranks" or fanatics. The\" 
have spoken their deep convictions. 

\'. I impeach ]\Iasonry because the hus- 
band is oath-bound to keep its secrets 
from the wife. God's law of marriage 
makes the husband and wife one. This 
unity is absolutely necessary to the peace 
and happiness of the home. There should 
be the utmost candor and mutual confi- 
dence in all the relations between hus- 
band and wife. Such unity can not exist 
where the husband is oath-bound to an 
order or lodge or association that is kept 
a profound secret from the wife. In this 
important particular neither can confide 
in the other. Thus the ven- spirit of God's 
law is violated. Xo man has any moral 
right to belong to an order that excludes 
the presence and mem.bership of his wife. 
Xo man has any moral right to leave nis 
wife and family and consort with men in 
the secret lodge meeting. When men 
and women are joined in wedlock they 
-are equal partners in the holiest earthly 
relation. The lodge destroys this one- 
ness and equality. The mom.ent the hus- 
band becomes a member of the lodge he 
takes a solemn obligation in the form of a 
"cast-iron oath," with severe penalties at- 
tached, that he will never reveal the se- 
crets of the order to any one: and he can 
no more divulge the workings of the 
order to his wire than to any other per- 
son. Is this wrong? It is a mo^t iniqui- 
tous thing! What moral right has a man 
to exclude his wife from his movements 
and associations? If the truth could be 
known, I fear it would reveal the fact that 
the secret club-rooms are at the bottom of 
very much of the domestic strifes, aliena- 
tions, separations, divorce suits and deso- 
late homes which are so alarmingly com- 
mon in our country. 

Surely a man has no right to belong to 
a societ}' into which the wife ma\" not en- 
ter. It may be said, in reply, that this is 
offset by permitting the women to take 
the Rebekah degree or join the Eastern 
Star. "Two wrongs can not make one 
right." The wife has no right to bind 
herself to secrecy from her husband: be- 
sides this, she ousrht to know that these 



women lodges are a kind of sop to hush 
women to silence upon the lodge ques- 
tion. Woman should not be silent. She 
should assert her inalienable right. She 
should demand that her husband abandon 
the secret lodge meeting and forever sep- 
arate himself from the unholy institution. 
It is the verdict of history that any so- 
ciety from which the elevating and soft- 
ening influence of women is excluded 
becomes corrupt and degrading. I do 
not believe an exception is possible. 
\\'omen ought to raise such a "tempest 
in a teapot" that the men would find 
lodge-life no longer among the possibili- 
ties. SIMPSOX ELY. 
Kirksville, AIo. 

REPLY TO IMPEACHMENTS.— NO. II. BV PRO- 
FESSOR WILLIAMS. 

Impeachment X'o. IV. — In this num- 
ber Bro. Ely affirms that the inwardness 
of the whole system of Freemasonry has 
been again and again exposed to the 
world by truthful men, who have turned 
"State's evidence," until its secrets have 
become almost common property. If this 
15 true. I may then reasonably demand: 
\\diy does he continue to impeach it as a 
dangerous institution, because of its se- 
crecy? The legs of the lame are not 
equal: Bro. Ely refutes himself. 

He insists that a man may solemnly 
and voluntarily pledge himself to keep a 
secret, then go straightway and divulge 
it, and yet be a truthful man! The casu- 
istry by which he tries to vindicate a per- 
jured man is peculiar. The sin is not in 
1 --'-.- i^ij^g i-|^g pledge, but in taking it! 
.ind he reasons as follows: ^lasonic se- 
crets are those of "anti-Christian and pa- 
gan reHgion." The absurdity of this 
charge has been already exposed. But if 
it were true, still not even a pagan has the 
right to lie because his religion is false. I 
think that the pagan Socrates, Cicero and 
Cyrus would not have endorsed our 
brother's ethics at this point. 

But secondly, he argues that "self-im- 
posed and extrajudicial oaths" are un- 
christian, because forbidden by Christ. 
•But this is evidently tampering with the 
words of Jesus by interpolating qualifica- 
tions and conditions that render his pre- 
cept puerile. If he forbids swearing, then 
it is wrong, wiiether "self-imposed" or 
not — whether there is human authority 
"back of it"' or not. I object to this gloss- 
ing of a plain precept in order to avoid 



KU 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 



collision with custom or human laAV. If 
taking- an oath is wrong, per se, oi" by 
reason of an express command of J-esus, 
let us boldly affirm the fact befo're Caesar 
and the world. 

Thirdly, he anticipates any appeal to 
the Old Scriptures, in defense of oath- 
taking, by asserting that we are not under 
the law of ]\Ioses. He strangely over- 
looks the fact that oaths were co'mmon 
and divinely permitted before the Jewish 
law was given. The patriarchs swore and 
administered oaths. Jehovah him'self is 
the first on record as having taken an 
oath, thus approving it by his 'example. 

In the fourth place, he appeals directly 
to the precept of Jesus — "Swear not at 
all." But a question of initerpretation 
arises: How are we to understand the 
precept? Bingham says that all the Chris- 
tians of the early church understood the 
prohibition to apply only to the very 
common and idle habit of profane and 
careless sw^earing. Certain it is, that 
Christians continued, from the beginning, 
to m^ake vows and enter sodcmu'ly into 
covenants w^ith promissorv^ oaths. Jesus 
himself was sworn and gave answer un- 
der oath. ■ I know that Bro. Ely will be 
ready with that gloss so tcautiously used 
in his argument, but so bravely disca-rd- 
ed in his practice — that the oath of Jesus 
was "not self-impO'Sed," and that there 
was so'mething like legal "authority back 
of it." But this would have been a mere 
subterfuge on the part of Jesus. For, 
when he w^as adjured, he could have re- 
mained silent, as he did do wihen before 
the court of Pilate ; or he could have pow- 
erfully impressed his own alleged pre- 
cept by proclaiming before his judges and 
the people, Thou shalt not take or give 
an oath! 

We must remember, too, that Paul him- 
self was rather in the habit of swearing; 
and with great impressiveness of argu- 
ment, he quotes the oath of Jehovah, 
who, as he could swear by none greater, 
swore by 'himself. In fact, 'the oath was 
a favorite with Paul, both for rhetorical 
and for logical effect; when he was more 
than usually arousecTto earnestness. And 
lastly, we have in John the subhme pic- 
ture of an angel, standing on the sea and 
on the land, and lifting up his hand to 
heaven, and swearing by him that liveth 
forever and ever. 

If, then, Jehovah himself, and the pa- 



triarchs and prophets generally, as well 
as the Israelites under Moses, and Jesus, 
and Paul, and angels, are all represented,, 
without censure, as swearing, we may 
safely conclude that an oath, wheu sin- 
cerely and religiously taken, is not wrong, 
even though "self-imposed," and without 
any "human authority hack of it." 

But fi'fthly, Bro. Ely objects to the cov- 
enant vow of Masonry because it binds 
men to keep secrets, that as yet they are 
ignorant of. H'C thinks that a secret 
should be first disclosed befoire asking for 
a promise to keep it! This objection 
rather amuses one by its practical absurd- 
ity. We usually ask for a pledge to keep, 
before we venture to disclose a secret. 
The very object of the promise before- 
hand is to in-sure the safety of the secret. 
Prudent men ahvays act on this principle 
of safety and commonsense. A'M mutual 
covenants of social and business life are 
so based. A public officer is sworn to 
execute and obey the laws of the State, 
even before they are known or even en- 
acted. If he finds that he can not con- 
scientiously obey, 'he is always free to re- 
sign without treason to the State or fal- 
sity to 'his vo'w. And if a Mason nnds 
that he can not obey the laws, rules and 
regulations of the lodge, he is free to^ 
leave it without dishonor to himself or in- 
jury to the craft; but not free, morally or 
religiousiy, to betray the comfideuce of his 
brother. 

Besides, while as a matter of wise cau- 
tion, the pledge to keep it is required be- 
fore the "secrets" are imparted, yet Ma- 
sonry with a delicate and just sense of 
propriety, conditions the validity of the 
vow on the assurance that the covenant 
requires nothing that can conflict with the 
duties we owe to God, to our neighbor, 
the State, our families or ourselves; and 
every one is left as a free man to decide 
these duties for himself, subject to the in- 
struction and admonition of his brethren. 

Sixthly, Bro. Ely in the last of his ar- 
gument objects to the Masonic vows, be- 
cause they are "inlhuman and barbarous." 
The trouble with the opponents of Free- 
masonry is that they do not and can not 
understand that it is a grand system of 
moral, religious and philosophical truth, 
"veiled in allegory and ihustrated by 
symbols." They do not, and it seems 
that they can not, understand that there 
are two distinct elements in Masourv — 



October, 1891 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



1>)5 



that of its ritualistic form and that of its 
spiritual essence of philosophy. They 
think that they have caug^ht glimpses of 
its true ritual throug'h the unfaithfulness 
of a few ignorant or treacherous breth- 
ren, and they abuse our symbols without 
the least appreciation oi their inner spirit 
and profound philosophy. Jesus him- 
self, and in fact all the inspired 
teadhers fro-m Moses to John, incul- 
cated truth by similar methods. And Je- 
sus as a teacher met with no greater ob- 
stacle in imparting spiritual knowledge 
than this very sensuous-mindedness of 
his disciples. On one occasion they 
heard him declare, in so'mething like a 
Miasonic figure, that unless they ate the 
flesh and drank the blood of the Son of 
Man they could have no life in them. The 
sensuous Jews murmured at the "inhu- 
• man and barbarous" cannibahsm, and 
many of his dim-sighted disciples ex- 
claimed against the idea as a hard doc- 
trine that no good man could Dear. And 
from that day they renounced him, de- 
mi tted from his school, and walked no 
more with him. The reply of the Great 
Teacher to all this ignorant criticism and 
defection was that his words were sym- 
bolic, his meaning was spiritual. * * * 

'My brother stiTl treats us to quotations 
denunciatory of Masonry. I do not pro- 
pose to discuss these various expressions 
of prejudice and ignorance borrowed 
from others. I could arrav a much great- 
er numiber of quotations fro'm great and 
good men who undersfcand the subject 
about which they write. But this putting 
of others forward into the arena, as so 
many puppets, in our discussion, savors 
too much of a Punch and Judy perform- 
ance. I will say, however, in reference to 
the quotation fro'm John Quincy Adams, 
that with all his greatness in other re- 
spects, Mr. x'Vdams was notoriously one 
of the most credulous and prejudiced of 
men. On these two weaknesses the cor- 
rupt politicians of the day played with 
their usual tact. They led him to believe 
that his defeat for the Presidency would 
be owing to the Freemasons, who gener- 
ally opposed him ; whe'ther true or not, he 
was made to believe it; and hence those 
silly letters were written from which Bro. 
Ely quotes. 

Impeachment No. \\ — I am hardly 
able to find the logical thread with whicli 
to disentangle his remarks under this 



head. I shall, however, for the purpose 
of reply, divide_ the question as foilows.: 
(i) Should a Mason keep the secrets ot 
his lodge from his wife? (2) Should a 
husband consent to receive any secret 
that he may not disclose to his wife? (3) 
What is the wife's duty, right or privilege 
if her husband prove disoDedient? 

I confess that I do not admire my 
brother's view of the conjugal relation; 
and I feel confident that very few good, 
sensible wives will approve them. I have 
just read his remarks to one of the wisest 
and best of them, and her comments is 
adverse to his doctrine; for it is her judg- 
ment that ^'practically carried out, it 
would destroy the peace and happiness of 
many homes." But I find myself unwit- 
tingly quoting, like my brother. 

I. He insists that Masons should un- 
burden themselves o>f their secrets by 
pouring them into the ears of their wives ; 
that there would be no sin in this, for the 
wrong is in receiving, not in giving away 
those secrets. If they do not disclose 
them, says he, mutual confidence is im- 
possible — unity is destroyed — and the 
peace oi home is wrecked! These are 
grave consequences, but they are all im- 
aginary. 

In t^he first place, a good woman would 
lose all confidence in her husband, if he 
deliberately betrayed secrets that she 
knew he had solemnly pledged his honor 
to l<eep inviolate. Her respect for him as 
a man would be greatly lessened, in spite 
of Bro. Ely's assurance to her that her 
husband's oath was ''self-imposed" and 
without "legal authority back of it," and 
that the only wrong was in making the 
promise, not in breaking it! Her deli- 
cate and correct intuition of what is hon- 
orable and manly would be proof against 
all his casuistry. On tiie other hand, her 
confidence in. her husiband would be en- 
larged to greater love and reverence were 
he to preserve his integrity, even under 
threats of assassination. 

In the second place, every intelligent 
wife understands that his reserve does 
110+ arise frotm any lack of confidence in 
her honor, as he suggests, but solely from 
his covenant with others. She can not 
be disturbed, therefore, by any jealous 
suspicions of his distrust; but s'he trusts 
only the more securely in his love and 
faithfulness, assured that he could keep 
no secret that would harm her, or her 



106 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 189'] 



children or himself, or that would do her 
any good to know. This is the beautiful 
confidence that every g-ood wife has in an 
h.onorable husband. 

But in the third place, every wife is not 
a ^•;ise and prudent woman; and a hus- 
band may, in some cases, very properly 
^'•iLilho•ld private matters from his wife's 
knowledge, not because he may not trust 
her honor, but because he may doubt her 
discretion or ability to keep a secret. My 
brother has learned but little o'f woman 
nature, if he has not discovered that 
women are not all discreet keepers of se- 
■crets. They are generally frank and 
communicative; they have but little tact 
in concealing their thoughts and feelings ; 
the phrenologist would say they have but 
■small secretiveness; they are transparent 
^nd generally guileless. And all this must 
be said in her praise; but these qualities 
do not fit her to be the keepeir of all her 
husband's secrets; and it is not always 
safe to trust her with private matters that 
it would do her no good to know, and 
might do much injury to her husband's 
interest and ^her own to betray. Confi- 
dence and unity and peace at home are, 
therefore, better maintained by a hus- 
band's exercising some judgment as to 
what things to reveal and what to con- 
ceal. He must deal with society and hu- 
man nature, even in his home, as he finds 
them, and not as he idealizes them. 

Samson told his wife a certain secret, 
•and great mischief ensued. Again, he 
told his mistress a great secret, and she 
betrayed 'him to his enemies. These 
things took place under the "Jewish law," 
we know; yet Paul says they are all writ- 
ten for our admonition. The Empress 
Josephine was a very frank and candid 
^voman. She was a stranger to all arti- 
fice, so that she could not easily conceal 
her knowledge or her thoughts. Napo- 
leon, consequently, seldom entrusted her 
with any plans which he was unwilling to 
have known to otJhers. ''A secret," he 
once remarked, *'is burdensome to Jose- 
phine." Cato, the censor, used to say 
that he never repented of but three things, 
the firs;t oi which was that he ever trusted 
a woman with a secret. 

2. The second question is, S'hould a 
liusband consent to receive a secret he 
knows must not be communicated to his 
wife? I answer that, frequently, he can 
not and ought not to avoid doing so. 



Friends may go to him in their delicate 
and serious troubles, and make him their 
confidant. He can not, and ou^ht not 
betray them to his wife, which, we have 
seen, may sometimes be betraying them 
to the w^orid. Then, there are profession- 
al secrets — secrets of the penitent, the pa- 
tient, the client — which neither a just 
court nor a curious should ask him to dis- 
close. In fact, many are the secrets com- 
niunicated in the confidence of friend- 
ship, or business, or one's profession, 
V'hich he must keep inviolate in his own 
breast, and which none but a foolish wife 
would incline her ear to hear. I fear that 
my brother's home ethics, if practically 
carried out, would soon destroy the "con- 
fidence, unity and pe'ace" of home and 
neighborhood. 

3. But lastly, what should the wife do, 
when the husband persists in keeping his 
Masonic secrets, and in visiting his lodge 
meetings? Now, I rather admire the 
courage of my brodier in accepting fully 
the consequences of his doctrine. He 
takes the results of his logic like a man. 

If "hubbie" will not tell his wife the 
secrets of the Masons, nor take her with 
him to the lodge at night, then our broth- 
er expects this maltreated wife to raise the 
standard of revolt at home,'tO' keep still 
no longer, to assert her alienable "rights," 
and to dem-and that wherever he goes slie 
will go, and wherever he lodges she will 
lodge! And if he still declines to obey 
her voice, then he exhorts her to voice 
such a tempest in her home that her re- 
fractory spouse will find it impossible to 
live a lodge-life any longer! And he 
strongly intimates that if her discipline 
so far should fail, there remains to her 
not only "domestic strife, but alienation, 
separation, divorce, and a desolated 
h om e . " T hi s p a p e r of o u r b roth e r sa vo r s 
strongly of sedition, and perhaps ought 
to be kept out o'f Masonic ho'mes. For it 
is not every Mason that can stand out 
against the logic of a ho'me made desolate 
'by the fury of a wife determined "to as- 
sert her inaliena'ble rights." And I would 
not wonder if sO'me weak husband who 
went into the lodge like a lamb, should 
have to be led forth at last into the desert 
of a desolate ho^me, a scape-goat, with all 
the sins of the lodge upon his head. 

JOHN AUG. WflLLIAMS. 

Harrodsburg, Ky. 



October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



161 



OUR ANCIENT BRETHREN. 



BY PAST MASTER E. RONAYNE, OF KEYSTONE 
L0D(;E, CHICAGO. 



The expression, ''Our ancient breth- 
ren," is frequently used in the Masonic 
ritual and by Masonic authors, and it is 
always referred to in a sort of boastful 
manner when an effort is being made to 
l)olster up the doubtful antiquity of the 
system, or to explain the symbolis'm of 
any of the lodge ceremonies. "Our 
ancient brethren" did thus and so and 
therefore we, the Free Masons of the 
present day must do thus and so, and 
then, of course, the word "ancient" is al- 
ways expected to impress the ignorant 
and to give Freemasonry at least the 
sanction of a great age. This expression, 
"our ancient brethren," was the very first 
thing that led me to study the Masonic 
system and to try and ascertain what it 
really is, and whence it 'came. In the 
ritual of the first degree we are told that 
"Masonic tradition informs us that our 
ancient brethren assembled on high hills 
or low vales the better to guard against 
the approach of cowans and eavesdrop- 
pers ascending or descending," and in the 
same connection the statement is further 
made that "before the erection of temples 
the celestial bodies were worshiped on 
hills and the terrestrial ones in valleys." 

This, of course, is intended to explain 
why Masonic lodges are always held in 
the upper rooms of buildings. "Our 
ancient brethren" conducted their wor- 
ship — the worship of the heavenly bodies 
— on the hig^hest hills, and hence, of 
course, the Free M'asons of to-day must 
conduct their worship, whatever that may 
be, in the highest rO'Oms of buildings. 
From the above quotations from the rit- 
ual (see Hand-book of Freemasonry p. 
91) it will at once be seen that "Our 
ancient brethren" who conducted their 
worship of the celestial bodies "on the 
highest hills" were the pagan idolaters of 
ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, Phoenicia 
and other countries in which those pagan 
rites were practiced. 

As I iiave said above, this was what first 
led me to study Masonic symbolism and 
to seek to discover where Freemasonry 
came from, I knew nothing about anti- 
masons or anti-masonry, but I procured 
almost every Masonic authority then pub- 



lished, and among others I ran across 
"The Symbolism of Freemasonry," by 
Past Grand Master Mackey. On page 11 
of that book we read as follows: "If we 
seek the origin of the (Masonic) institu- 
tion, moulded into outer form as it is to- 
day, we can scarcely be required to look 
farther back than the beginning of the 
eighteenth century, and, indeed, not quite 
so far." 

Here, then, we have the true origin of 
Masonic lodges, both grand and subor- 
dinate; but now as to the religious phil- 
osophy or the religious ceremO'uies prac- 
ticed in these lodges, how did they orig- 
inate? Hear again What Mackey says in 
the next sentence to that quoted above: 
"But if we seek the origin and first begin- 
ning of the Masonic philosophy we moist 
go away back into the regions of remote 
antiquity, where we shall find this begin- 
ning in the bosom of kindred associa- 
tions, where the same philosophy was 
maintained and taught." An'd again in 
his "Masonic Jurisprudence," p. 95, he 
makes this further statement: "Masonry 
is undoubtedly a religious institution,, 
which 'handed down through a long suc- 
cession of ages from that ancient (pagan) 
priesthood who first taught it, embraces 
the great tenets of the existence of God 
and the immortality of the soul." 

Now, Albert G. Mackey, Past Grand 
Master and Past Grand High Priest of 
Masonry, was possibly the most prolific, 
writer and the best exponent of the Ma- 
sonic philosophy that the world 'has ever 
produced. He surely knew Avhat Free- 
masonry really is and whence it came, and 
he declares emp'hatically that while its 
present organization into grand and 
subordinate bodies reaches back only to 
about the beginning of the eighteenth 
century, yet its religious philosophy and 
its religious ceremonies were both taug^ht 
and practiced by the pagan priesthood 
and among kindred associations of pa- 
gans in Egypt, Greece, Rome, Phoenicia, 
and other pag*an nations, away back in the 
ages of remote antiquity. This fact he 
places beyond the possibility of doubt or 
disputation in every one of nis numerous 
works on Masonry, and so does .every 
other Masonic author, from Anderson 
down to the present time, and in the 
Monitor, which I used in Keystone 
lodge, here in Chicago, it is expressly 
stated that "The Egyptian rite" — prac- 



168 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 



ticed away back befare Jacob's time — 
■"was a dramatic representation. This 
myth is the antitype of the temple legend" 
— in the third degree. "Osiris'* — the pa- 
gan god of Egypt — ^^"and the Tyrian 
architect" — Hiram Abitt of Masonry — 
"are one and the same." Freemasoii's 
Gviide. by Dan. Sickles, p. i86. 

There can be no cavil then, or donbt, or 
dispute as to the true character and ori- 
gin of the Masonic philoso^phy, and 'hence 
ignorant or poorly instructed Masons 
have no standing whatever as to any con- 
troversy on this subject. The Masonic 
pagan god. AVhom Free Masons worship 
in their lodges, is a miserable myth, as we 
have seen above, and now^ let us hear what 
the Almighty and true God — ^^the God of 
Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and the God 
and Father of the Lora Jesus Cnrist — has 
to say in regard to this pagan god and his 
pagan and idolatrous worship. Speaking 
to the Israelites as they w^re encamped 
on the borders of Moab, before entering 
into the land of Canaan, the Lord express- 
ly declares: "Ye shah not go after other 
gods, of the gods of the people which are 
round about you" (Deut. vi. 14); that is, 
the pagan gods, "the celestial bodies'' 
worshipped on "the nighest hills" by 
"our ancient brethren," as quoted above. 
And again, in language still more em- 
phatic if possible, He declares, in Deut. 
xiii. 6-10: 

"If thy brother, the son of thy mother, 
or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife 
of thy bosom, or thy friend, which is as 
thine own soul, entice thee secretly, say- 
ing. Let us go and serve other gods, 
wiiich tliou hast not known, thou nor thy 
fathers, namely of the gods of the peopile 
which are round about you, nig^h unto 
thee or far off from thee, from the one 
end of the earth even unto the other end 
of the earth, thou shalt not consent unto 
him nor hearken unto him; neither shall 
thine eye pity him, neither shalt thou 
spare him, neither shalt thou conceal him, 
Imt thou shall surely kih him * '■•'. * 
and thou shalt surely stone him with 
stone that he die." 

This language is simply terrible in its 
inexorable demands, as coming from God 
in judgment to maintain the exclusively 
separated character of His people, and to 
prohibit them forever from worshipping 
any of the pagan gods round about them, 
such as Osiris in Egypt, Baal in Phoe- 



nicia, Ashtoreth of the Zidomians, or 
Molech, the abomination of the Ammon- 
ites. And be it always remembered that 
the religious philosophy, the ceremonial 
worship, and the priesthood connected 
with those pretended dieties, is the very 
same philosophy, the same worship, and 
the self-same identical priesthood which 
we find reproduced to-day in the Ma- 
sonic system, only under different names. 
Solomon, as we learn from the eleventh 
chapter of i King-s, and who is ignor- 
antly claimed by the rank and file of the 
fraternity to be the first Most Excellent 
Grand Master, built "high places" fortlie 
worship of these strange gods to please 
his wives, and we are informed in i Kings 
xi. 9 that "the Lord was angry with Sol- 
omon because his heart was turned from 
the Lord God of Israel, which had ap- 
peared unto him twice." These "high 
places" were afterwards multiplied not 
only in Samaria and the entire kingdom 
of Israel, but also in Jerusalem and 
throughout the kingdom of Judah, and no 
matter what reforms were effected in the 
kingdom by any of the good kings of 
Judah it was always stated in sorrow, 
"Nevertheless the high places were not 
taken away" (see i Kings 15, 14: 22, 
43; 2 Kings 12, 3: 14, 4: 15, 4-35), until 
finally the people were wholly given over 
to the abominations of the heathen round 
about them, which ultimately led to Ihe 
disruption of the kingdom and to the 
captivity of all the inhabitants. And 
those self-same "high places" are repro- 
duced to-day in the "upper rooms" of 
buildings, wliere Masons meet to stud}' 
the same pagan philosophy and to prac- 
tice the same pagan worship. This is not 
my judgment, nor my opinion, but it is 
the deliberate, mature teaching of every 
Masonic author, from Anderson and 
Oliver down to Sickles, Mackey, and 
Morris. 

And now, my dear professing Chris- 
tian brother, what are you going to do 
with ah this terrible array of proof as to 
where you are and what you are regard- 
ed bv (iod as doing- in the Masonic lodge? 
You cannot plead ignorance any longer 
as to the origin and character of the Ma- 
sonic system, and although you may oe 
ignorant of these thing-s, yet you know- 
only too well that even the name of the 
Lord Jesus Ghrist is not and cannot be 
used in connection with any ceremony or 



October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



16W 



in any prayer of ancient craft Masonry. 
And you also know that vou have sworn 
a fearful oath and bound yourself under 
a most horrible death penalty that you 
"will conform to and abide by ah tjhe laws, 
rules and regulations of the Master Ma- 
son's degree," and hence you have taken 
an oath, even without knowing what you 
were doing, that you would never permit 
}'Our loving Savior's name to be men- 
tioned in any part of the Masonic wor- 
ship or work. He gave His precious life 
for you, and you — what have you done 
for Him? Vou have yoked yourself by 
an oath with the Jews who hate Christ 
and with the infidels who reject Him, and 
thus you are disgracing- vour Christian 
profession; you are acting in direct oppo- 
sition to the express commands of God, 
and you are dishonoring the Lord Jesus 
Christ. Remember, my dear brother, 
you shall one day meet the Lord Jesus, 
whom you are now betraying, and when 
that day comes, where will Hiram A'oitf 
be? 



SOME OBJECTIONS. 

BY DR. A. B. :\I1RR0R. 
A STARTLING CLAIM. 

''Our o'bjects are absolutely public. 
And there has never been any objection 
to any one inquiring into the aims and 
purposes of our order." 

Wliat, then, is it that Masons are not 
willing to have any one inquire about? 
To what, then, do they raise objection? 
Do they merely wish to conceal the per- 
formances of initiation nights, the grips 
and hailing sign, and such like things? 
These, it is true, do not come strictly un- 
der fhe head of aims and purposes, 
though they are involved in carrying our 
the aims and executing the purposes. 

The statement was made by a Boston 
preacher, Dr. Lorimer. K some other 
preacher in or near Boston, should say in 
his pulpit that it is tlie aim and purpose of 
the order to conceal crime and shelter 
criminals, he would find "objection" 
forthwith. He would know that Dr. Lor- 
imer was the only Mason who' thought 
their "objects were absohitely public." 
Of course the statement would be fu- 
riously denied, and equally, of co'urse, the 
denial could be refuted bv the authentic 



documents of Hartford Lodge relating to 
the Griswold arson case. 

A mere reference to the oath the Mas- 
ter Mason takes, would either refute their 
hot denial or evacuate the Englisii lan- 
guage of its meaning. Dr. Lorimer's 
Royal Arch oath, taken long ago, means 
that, or else is devoid of any meaning. 
And yet Dr. Lorimer makes this bald 
statement of publicity of aim and pur- 
pose, in a speech whose every paragraph 
betrays the ai/m and purpose of doing an 
imperativeh- needed job of whitewash- 
ing. 

ABOVE PARTISAN RELIGION. 

What can a Christian minister be sup- 
posed to mean when he says, as Lorimer 
does, that the obligations of Masonry 
have always sustained its patriotic char- 
acter, "for it has always held that the or- 
der must rest above party pohtics. parti- 
san education, and partisan religion." 

"Partisan education" is a hard nut to 
crack. Possibly it squints toward paro- 
chial schools. How ^lasonry "rests 
above" them is still a problem. But what 
is "partisan religion?" Can that phase 
be interpreted to the profane Christians 
and unilluminated saints whose ears have 
never become wonted to lodge twaddle?-' 
If it refers to a state church, or a church 
that plots against the state, it is true that 
Masonry "rests above" or rests below all 
religions, including state religions. It is 
itself a religion, and so, like others, above, 
below, or aside from others, li, then, 
what Dr. Lorimer means, is that it does 
not aim to be a state church, it may be 
asked w^hether any other religion claims 
the rig^ht to lay the corner stones of pub- 
lic buildings. 

DR. LAWRENCE'S POSITION. 

A recently published interview with 
Dr. Win. LaAvrence, of Chicago, in which 
he said that he had not yet joined the 
Freemasons but intended to as soon as he 
could spare t^ie time, affords food for re- 
rtection. He is not the first Baptist min- 
ister who has stood just outside the 
lodge, listened right and left to what he 
heard, decided that there was nothing in 
the objections that need hinder him, and 
concluded that the opposition was prob- 
ably ill-grounded and unreasonable. -If. 
like others, he proceeds to join, he mav, 



170 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 



like them, find that his notion that only 
joining will bring real knowledge, the 
most puerile of superstition's. If he could 
hear what the Baptist ministers say after 
they have pricked tlie bubble, he might 
alter his statement. 

One such, whose case we know thor- 
oughly, was tO'ld before he was fairly in- 
side tiie lodge that exposures liad been 
made. This was a Masonic statement. 

Years before, in his boyhood, he had 
been told by a Mason that Morgan did 
expose ]\Iasonry. After he had been 
sworn, he was told by a Mason what book 
to get in order to read up Masonry. This 
?Nlason had seen the book ased in the 
lodge, where an officer could not depend 
on his memory. 

This is cited ni'erely as proof at band, 
bur there is plenty besides. Multitudes of 
Masons have ceased to regard Masonry, 
iaid it is late to ca/ll any of the numerous 
agieeing accounts of.it "pretended ex- 
posures." All are not equally exact. The 
one just referred to was not the best. But 
the silly notion tha^ no one can know Ma- 
sonry without being a Mason, is hardly 
vvorthy men of the calibre of Dr. Law- 
rence and Dr. Vedder. To one who has 
.actually been m the lodge, and then read 
exposures, such talk has a queer sotmd. 

DR. LORIMER'S brethren. 

It has been a trial to manv of the Tre- 
mont Temple members, to have their 
pastor pursue such a course respecting 
Freemasonry. It was once a strongly 
anti-Masonic church. By a written rule, 
no Freemason could be a member. Dr. 
Colver was its former pastor, and he was 
an eminent anti-Mason who had once 
been a Mason. In any case, such a 
church would naturally be expected al- 
ways to contain many members who saw 
no marked congruity betw^een a Baptist 
church and a Masonic lodge. 

One of the deacons is brother of James 
H. Earle the publisher whose imprint is 
on matter from the pen of Dr. A. J. Gor- 
don and others not dazzled by Masonic 
gewgaws. 

Just when with Dr. Lorimer's help the 
enemy seemed charging upon the Baptist 
hosts in Boston, and to some extent tri- 
umphing, in poured the Templar reserve 
deluging the city with wickedness. There 
was a carnival of drinking and debauch- 
ery. 



The very distiller who was head of the 
gang that gave Dr. Lorimer his angelic 
reading desk, rode at the head of the 
Templar proeession. Dr. Lorimer was 
in Europe out of the way and escaped 
the awkward prominence that might 
have been required of him by this con- 
clave of patrons of barrooms and broth- 
els. 

The thing also happened to come in 
close juxtaposition, and so in more strik- 
ing contrast, with the Christian Endea- 
vor convention. It followed, also, almost 
too closely on Dr. Lorimer's suggestion 
of leaving the church with the Masons. 
It is not surprising that the Masonic 
show did not desecrate Easter Sunday 
this year at Tremont Temple. 

The new Temple escaped that sacri- 
lege. Let us hoipe that thoSiC memhens 
to whom such things are a trial, will be 
spared a repetition of former scenes. It 
will be a pity if Dr. Lawrence gets the 
cable tow round his neck that has so un- 
fortunately led Dr. Lorimer. A man 
who is free should remain so. There is a 
"dead fly in the apothecary's ointment," 
and "the bird with a broken pinion never 
soared so high again." 



LODGE MEMBERS IN CHURCHES. 



BY PRESIDENT C. A. BLANCHARD. 



Christ's followers have a right in His 
church. Whom He receives His church 
should welcome. This is the root prin- 
ciple. The question then falls back one 
step and we are to ask : (May lodge mem- 
'bers be memhers of Christ? Can a child 
of God be a lodge adherent? And this 
question* opens the gate co^mpletely. 
What are the lodges, their doctrines, ob- 
ligations, ceremonies, etc.? 

We are in danger of being confused by 
the multitude of orders and their varying 
rites and oaths. It is not needful, how- 
ever, and if we are careful we may walk 
safely and intelligently through the 
maze. There is, of course, infinity of de- 
tail, but the general principles involved 
are few and easily ascertained. No one 
can dou'bt that Jesus forbids profance 
swearing, that he bids men be humhle, or 
requires them to let their light shine, and 
it is equally clear that lodges, with their 
oaths,- titles, regalia and ceremonies, con- 



October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



171 



travene these and other teaching's. How 
can one truly love the meek and lowly 
Jesus and at the same time enjoy the 
titles, regalia and oaths of Masonry? 

But one may say, Cannot one be truly 
saved and still be so ignorant and blinded 
as to hold membership in a lodge? It is 
not our place to say how much of error 
may consist with salvation. God is piti- 
ful to us all. But it is clearly the duty of 
the church to teach men to do what 
Christ commands, and if there is a saved 
man w'ho does not know that Jesus sa^id, 
''In secret have I said nothing « * ^^ 
follow me," then the church should teach 
him, and when he is informed he will fol- 
low. , 

There is another consideration which 
has always seemed to me so clear and 
important that I am surprised that some 
others seem not to have observed it. 
What would be thought of a man who 
should propose to hold membership in 
a Presbyterian and Baptist church at the 
same time? And would any person have 
a right to object if, on joining one of 
these churches, he should be required to 
bring a letter from the other. This is so 
obviously appropriate that a man would 
be counted foolish to object to it. Yet 
in this case both churches are Christian. 

^lasonic and other lodges are distinct- 
ly and evidently anti-Christ. They at the 
same time profess to teach morality and 
take men to heaven: i. e., they are syna- 
gogues of Satan, and notwithstanding 
men for pecuniar}- or other reasons de- 
sire to hold membership in both. It is 
one of the marvels that it is so. 

It is my judgment that the teachings of 
the church should be so clear and scrip- 
tural that all who come within her intlu- 
ence will understand the natures of the 
two systems. In that case I do not think 
that any Christian will wish to unite with 
the lodge or any lodge man wish to join 
the church until he has left his secret so- 
ciety. 

\Vheaton College. 



SEPARATION ! SEPARATION ! 



BV REV. J. B. GALLOWAY 



Most of the testifying churches prac- 
tice close or restricted communion. In 
fact, it is difficult to see how a church can 
testify apart from this rule. The rule itself 



is the testimony. There is a strange in- 
consistency in some churches, e. g., in de- 
nouncing ^lasons and refusing them 
church fellowship to-day and inviting 
them to communion table to-morrow. 
This is surely one of the most absurd 
things a church ever did. 

1. The argument in favor of this policy 
is founded on i Cor. ii: 28, "But let a 
man examine himself," e^tc. By all means 
commend and command self-examination 
when a man is admitted to the church, 
and also when he comes to the Lord's 
table. But is this meant t<3 exclude all 
examination or judgment in the case by 
the church? Certamly not. For if he- 
may be the sole judge in the one case, 
right reason demands that he be so also- 
m the other. Then is all unity and purity 
of doctrine and practice at an end; and it 
has come to pass as m the days of Israel, 
when they had no judges, that every man 
does what seems right in his own eyes. 
And is not this about the state of things. 
to-day in the so-called great churches? 
Discipline is at an end; and it is impossi- 
ble to deliver anyone to Satan for the de- 
struction of the flesh, according to Paul's. 
command. 

2. Again they say ''it is the Lord's ta- 
ble and therefore the church has no right 
to exercise authority over it." Strange!, 
Has the churc'h ceased to be a govern- 
ment in the world, or to exercise any au- 
thority even over it's own members? The- 
Lord's table is to be governed by the law 
of the Lord in the hands of the officers oT 
the church. If it was our table, Ave might 
invite whom we pleased to it; but being 
the Lord's we have no right to invite 
those whom he does not invite. The 
Lord's table is for the Lord's children.. 
but not necessarily for all the children. 
The table is for communion or fellow- 
ship, but if any of the children sin. and 
are impenitent in regard to the sin, and 
fellowship is interrupted (i Jno. i: 6) 
with the head-Christ, and also necessarily 
with his body, the church. Therefore, 
when one is debarred from the Lord's ta-- 
ble we do not say that he is not a Chris- 
tian. In other words we do not judge his 
standing, but his walk. That we must 
judge. Hence it is said, "\\'ithdraw thy- 
self from every brother that walketh dis- 
orderly." 

P^aul attributes the power of discipline 
to the church, i Cor. 5: 4-7; and in verse: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October, 18^^ 



II. with the characters described, we are 
not to eat. If this refers to a common 
meal, much more does it refer to the 
Lord's supper. The religion of oath- 
bpund secret societies is clearly a species 
of idolatry. What fellowship hadi light 
Avith darkness, or Christ with Belial? Sep- 
aration from evil and from evil-workers 
is clearly the doctrine O'f both Testaments. 
Closes taug'ht this doctrine. N'U. i6: 21- 
31. The priests taught it, Ezra 10: n. 
The Prophets taught it, Kings 18:30. 
Christ taught it, Lu. 6: 22. Paul taught 
the same, 2 Cor. 6: 17, "Wherefore come 
out from among them, and be ye separ- 
ate, saith the Lord," etc. This is the way 
of purity; and the way of purity is the 
way to unity and fellowship. 
Povnette, Wis. 



JVIASONRY AND CIVIL GOVERNMENT. 



BV REV. W. R. BONHAM. 



Anv organization that binds its mem- 
bers under solemn obligation, to inviola- 
blv keep the secrets o^f a feilow member 
even when the keeping of such secrets 
screens a criminal, can but prove a serious 
menace to popular government. If the 
declarations of leadmg Freemasons, in 
their authorized works, are reliable, then 
out o: tne moutn of Masonry itseVi Ave 
condemn it as being inimical to the best 
interests of civil government. Hear the 
following, from high Masonic authority: 

Dr. A. G. Mackey, in his Masonic Ju- 
risprudence (Page 510), says: "Treason 
and rebellion also, because they are alto- 
gether political offenses, cannot be in- 
quired into by a lodge; and although a 
Mason may be convicted of either of 
these acts in the courts of his country, he 
cannot be Masonically punished; and not- 
withstanding his treason, or rebellion, his 
relation to the lodge, to use the language 
of the old charges, remains indefeasible." 

The Grand Lodge of Missouri, in its 
annual report several years ago, said: "To 
every government save that of Masonry, 
and to each and all alike we are foreign- 
ers; and this form of government is 
neither pontificial, autocratic, monarchi- 
cal, repubhcan, democratic, nor despotic ; 
it is a government per se, and that gov- 
ernment is Masonic. We have nothing 
to do with forms of government, forms of 



religion, or forms of social life — ^we are 
brethren to each other all the world over, 
foreigners to all the world besides." W'e 
fail to discover the breathings of a noble, 
unselfish, patriotic sentiment in the above 
declaration. 

We further believe that the Masonic 
obligations imposed by the ofUcers o'f this 
self-constituted despotism, are out of har- 
mony with free popular government, in 
that they frequently prevent the equitable 
administration of civil law and the rig'ht 
o'f trial by impartial jury. Every Mason 
has taken an obligation to keep the se- 
crets of a brother Mason, murder and 
treason excepted, and that at his own op- 
tion. Here let us suppose a case to the 
point under discussion: A Masonic viola- 
tor of State law is before the courts to an- 
swer for his misdeeds, one or more Ma- 
sons are on the jury to decide as to the 
guilt or innocence of the accused. The 
evidence is clear and abundajnt as to the 
guilt of the prisoner, but his Masonic 
brethren in the jury box must hang the 
jury rather than render an honest verdict. 
In other w^ords, they must perjure them- 
selves in the matter o'f their court oath, 
or if they are too loyal and patriotic to 
trample the laws of their 'Country under 
foot, they will be perjured in the matter 
of their lodge obligation. Now we have 
no hesitancy in saying that any institu- 
tion that places honest men in such a 
dilemima is unworthy of the patronage 
and support of honest men. It is a stu- 
pendous fraud upon their confideiice. Ma- 
sonry assures every candidate for initia- 
tion that there is nothing in the obliga- 
tion to be taken that will conflict with his 
duty to his country, but the case above 
referred to reveals how utterly ground- 
less is this assumption ol Masonry. 

I win append the testimony o'f an emi- 
nent witness, the Rev. J. E. Roy, D. D., 
Secretary ol the American Missionary 
Association. He says: "A man is not fit 
to be a juryman who has taken these Ma- 
sonic oaths and holds to them. Such a 
man is not competent to be a oonstalble, 
or a justice o'f the peace. He has disqual- 
ified himself practically and really, for he 
has by these oaths perjured himi&elf for 
the one side or the other, and so is unable 
to do justly in his of^cial relatio-n between 
man and man." Again listen to the dec- 
laration of Col. G. R. Clark, an ex-Mason 
of the 32d degree: "The third point that 



October, 1897, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



173 



addressed itself to me was the unlawful 
oaths that I w^as required to take. I saw 
that these oaths oi themselves were blas- 
phemous; these oaths, some of them, 
bound people to do unlawful acts; unlaw- 
ful so far as the law's of God are concern- 
ed. I saw^ that these organizations w^ere 
harmful; they placed these oaths above 
the laws. These oaths bind people to un- 
lawful acts without regard to the laws of 
the country." From all this, and a great 
deal more that might be produced on this 
line, we conclude that Masonry is detri- 
mental to the best interests of civil gov- 
ernment; and in the language of Dr. 
Howard Crosby: "We have no hesitancy 
in writing it among the quackeries of the 
earth." — Paper read before the Cowden 
(111.) Ministerial Association. 



OUT OF BONDAGE. 

A NORTHFIELD EXPERIENCE. 

The following outline of the manner in 
which the wTiter was led, this year, at 
Northiield, out of Secret Societies, hias 
nothing marvellous about it beyond the 
ordinary dealings of the Blessed Holy 
Spirit with those who are willing to be 
led into His light, yet it may be interest- 
ing and helpful to others who have not 
3'et follow-ed the Divine Lord far enough 
to see w'hat Be would have them do. 

It was the writer's intention this year 
to attend the Ocean Grove meetings in- 
stead of Xorthfield; circumstances pre- 
vented this. Having attended the Stu- 
dents' Conference at Northfield I also de- 
cided not to make a second visit .there 
this year. Three times w^as I led to con- 
sider Northfield; three times I decided 
not to go. A seemingly irresistible im- 
pulse or leading finally changed my mind. 
A chance remark made to Mr. A. G. 
Aloody, in a letter, led him to. call my at- 
tention to Revell Hall as a pleasant place 
to stay, but it w- as not until reaching Wor- 
cester, on my journey, that I finally de- 
cided to select that place, from Worcester 
telegraphing Mr. Moody to keep me a 
room. In all this I Avas wholly uncon- 
scious of what subsequent events showed 
me to be Divine leading. 

Reaching Northfield and Revell Hall 
late in the evening I saw^ none of the g*uests 
imtil next morning, when, at breakfast, I 



found myself placed next to a quiet, gen- 
tlemanly man, introduced to me as Pres- 
ident Blanchard. The acouaintance thus 
made drew us together several times, con- 
\-ersation being turned, by myself, why I 
do not know', to Secret Societies. Presi- 
dent Blanchard's courtesy and culture 
(w^holly in contrast wdth every other anti- 
secret society man before met) made me 
listen attentively to what would have oth- 
erwise been decidedly antagonistic to 
long-cherished beliefs, so that when he 
spoke on the subject my sympathies were 
w^hoUy wdth the speaker, though my mind 
was utterly opposed to his views, had I 
not been predisposed in the speaker's fa- 
vor attention to his views on secret socie- 
ties would have been unlikely on my part. 
His lecture impressed me as the earnest 
conviction of an intelligent Christian man 
and held my attention because of the 
sw^eet, tender, Christ-like spirit with 
which he presented his opinions, opinions 
I w^as compelled to admit were reason- 
able. 

It is not the writer's nature to yield 
easily to views opposed to his own; this 
case formed no exception. Compelled to 
think over what ]\Ir. Blanchard said in his 
evening lecture I very soon rallied my 
wavering forces behind the entrench- 
ments of an admission made to me, per- 
sonally: "He had never belonged to any 
secret society," and argued "He knows, 
nothing except what he has been told by 
perjured men. I know there is no harm 
in these things." 

Leaving the Auditorium disturbed, 
questioning, on the defense, yet gradual- 
ly realizing the weakness of my defense, 
I walked slowly back to Revell Hall con- 
siderably shaken in my own convictions, 
and that evening asked for Divine guid- 
ance in the matter.. 

At the morning praver meeting, Snn- 
day, led by Mr,. D. L. Moody, I felt forced 
to ask the prayers of those present that 1 
miglit be shown the truth. All sorts of 
excuses held me back from making the 
request, but grace w^as given before the 
service closed. Well do I recall IsLr. 
Moody's short, sharp question : "Do you 
wish us to pray for your guidanc' as re- 
gards the lodge business?" My answer 
was, "Yes, I do." Every address given 
that day seemed to be pointed at me. 
The climax came in the evening, the text 
being, ''Harden not your heart." These 



174 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 



words are about all I rememt)'er of the ser- 
mon, their miportance to me overshadow- 
ing every other lesson and application. 
Again returning from the Auditorium 
conviction grew very clear as to What I 
ought to do ; still I would not wholly yield, 
nor did I until again asking Divine guid- 
ance with a perfect willingness to be led, 
not as I wanted, but as He wished. 

No sooner was a decision reached than 
an unthought of duty arose before me. I 
must make the confession to my own 
church on my return home. This seemed 
easy enough at Northfield, but became 
hard by Sunday morning. Excuses mul- 
tiplied: "It is useless," 'It is likely to 
create ill feeling," "Many of your mem- 
bers are secret society men and women; 
you will offend them," ''You will make a 
division in the church,' "Do not be too 
hasty and injudicious," etc., etc. So many 
and seemingly reasonable grew these ex- 
cuses that I almost decided to put off the 
confession until later. Once more grace 
was given, the statement was pi;blicly 
made, and from that hour to my dying 
day I am free from all tliese entangle- 
ments. That the statemeni. made was 
not wholly useless will appear from the 
fact that two young men met me in the 
vestibule, after service, to thank me for 
the words spoken as having led them to 

decide not to join the Society, 

which they were about to do. So soon 
did the Blessed One give fruit to the con- 
fession made in His name. 

I must add, in closing, that the marked 
Christian courtesy of Mr. Blanchard (so 
different from that of all opposers of secret 
societies before met, whose own incon- 
sistencies, false statements and lack of 
Christian courtesy repelled me from 
them) was, without questfon, one of the 
strongest drawings upon my heart and 
conscience. Personally, I am now won- 
dering how I could have so long been 
blind to the truth, which is now so clear 
to me — twenty-nine years (during which 
period having joined seven different so- 
cieties), twenty-five of which in the gos- 
pel ministry. The fact that I did so re- 
main, honestly and co-nscientiously see- 
ing no harm in these affiliations, defend- 
ing the lodge system, and speaking often- 
times publicly in its favor, gives me, and 
I hope will ever give mc, great charity 
for those who are still where I was for so 
many years; as Mr. Moody said to me: 



"When you asked us to pray for you I 
knew what the result would be," so I am. 
convinced that the same result will follow " 
in every case where a man or a woman. 
asks for Divine leading with a perfect 
self-surrender to be taught by Him. L 
am now conscious that never before 
(though I thoug'ht I had often done so) 
did I ask for guidance with a perfect will- 
ingness to be led where Christ Jesus saw 
fit;to lead 'me. 

As one who has time and time again 
defended, in public and in private, the 
lodge system, believing it to be harmless,, 
not only harmless but beneficial and com- 
mendable, I would appeal to the hun- 
dreds of thousands of Christian men and 
women Who are to-day in bondage to. 
what clearer light would reveal to be 
darkness, to "Come out, to be separate, 
to touc'h not the unclean thing" fellow- 
ship with ungodliness; a degree of un- 
godliness wnich cannot be seen until the 
heart fully surrenders to tne teaching of 
the Holy Spirit. Not from the standpoint 
of what I was, but from that of what 1 
now am, by the grace of God through 
Christ Jesus, T would appeal to all Onris- 
tians that they would maKC this a matter 
of earnest prayer, with determination to 
follow where He leads. 

ERNEST WELLES LEY- WES LEY, 
Pastor Park Street F. B. Church, Provi- 
dence, R. L 



PROGRESS OF ANTI-SECRECY. 



Some one has said that "Every reform 
passes through three stages: That of ridi- 
cule, argument and adoption. The anti- 
secret movement, viewed from the human 
standpoint, has seemingly been submerg- 
ed in ridicule, the first step in its progress. 
Leading thinkers Ihave given it but little 
attention, and from the palaces of the rich 
to the peasant's cottage, this great re- 
form has been regarded as a revengeful, 
prejudiced movement, directed against 
certain classes of men for notoriety. But 
amid scorn and ridicule it raises its head 
and cries out in the language of M^elanc- 
thon at the Augsburg Confession: "I 
have no help left but God." 

'But anti-secrecy's righteous cause has. 
not been left to be swallowed up in ridi- 
cule. Already we see it entering into its. 
second stage — argument. Read the clear,. 



October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



175 



logical exipositions of truth in anti-secre- 
cy's behalf; think of men and women giv- 
ing their time to its cause ; read the thrill- 
ing reports that come from anti-secret 
conventions ; and to the thoughtful mind 
will surely come the infallible truth that 
.anti-secrecy is progressing. This being 
the case, let us do all we can to improve 
our opportunity O'f arguing the case be- 
fore the world, so that with God's help 
the third stage of our reform may be has- 
tened — ^adoption. Then its mission shall 
end, and the world will recognize the jus- 
tice of its cause. To which glorious end 
we look, full of hope, and every soldier 
enlisted under this banner shall share in 
the trumph, and join in the joyful strain: 
''To-day the noise o'f battle. 
To-morrow the victor's song." 
GEORGE H. M'QLELLAND. 
New Castle, Pa. 



REFORM NEWS. 



SECRETARY PHILLIPS' REPORT. 



Our old friend, Mr. Isaac Crane, of 
Peru, Indiana, fell asleep on August 4th 
last. His boyhood was spent in the days 
immediately following Morgan's abduc- 
tion and murder, and his opposition to 
secret societies dates from that time. It 
was but natural that he should take an 
active interest in our association as soon 
as it was organized. He continued to be 
its friend and patron until his death. It 
was perfectly natural, since he had nei- 
ther wife nor children, that he should 
leave his property amounting to some 
eight or ten thousand dollars to this as- 
sociation. A nephew has begun suit to 
have the will set aside. This case has al- 
ready taken considerable of my time dur- 
ing the past month and doubtless will 
take much more in the future, as w^ell as 
craising a large expenditure of money on 
the part of the Association in endeavor- 
ing to have the wishes of Mr. Crane car- 
ried out. 

Some of our friends have placed the 
amount of property which they desired 
tiie Association to have after their death 
in its possession before their death, and 
have received an annuity from the Asso- 
ciation, equal to the income from the 
property. This has saved my time, pre- 



vented court costs, and has always work- 
ed satisfactorily to the donors. 

No word of special interest has been re- 
ceived from our friends in India, Africa, 
or Great Britain. Rev. Dr. Kerr, of Glas- 
gow, Scotland, writes that "returns are 
coming in very slowly. We are not yet 
av/akened." I have suggested that prep- 
arations be made for a convention in the 
summer of 1898, and that some one, if 
desired, from this country would attend 
as a delegate and assist in giving promi- 
nence and interest to the movement in 
that country. I presume President Blan- 
chard could be persuaded co attend if the 
way was opened for such a meeting. 

Our friends in Ohio arid Michigan can 
not appreciate the services of Secretary 
P. B. Williams too highly. His last report 
received at this date was for August, and 
showed forty-one addresses, seventeen 
anti- secret, and twenty-four other ad- 
dresses. There were over eighty conver- 
sions in one meeting in w^hich he assist- 
ed, but notwithstanding his abundant la- 
b'ors, he did not receive in collections, 
plus what he received in Cynosure sub- 
scriptions, enough to pay his traveling 
ex])enses. It is well known, I sup- 
pose, tliat he, as well as the other agents, 
receive as salary all that they take in Cy- 
nosure subscriptions in their own field. 
This is the best that the general associa- 
tion can do for them at the present time, 
and that the balance must come from the 
lield of labor. I am confident that the 
friends in Ohio and Michigan are able to 
support Brother Williams, and pay not 
only his traveling expenses, but some- 
thing for himself and wife to live on, and 
hence I have given the above facts. Our 
friends on the Pacific coast understand, 
do they not, that Brother Williams is not 
drawing anything from the Coast Fund 
tb.i^ year, and they can see from the above 
that any amounts due him for past ser- 
vices, or for Cynosure subscriptions, 
ought to be s-ent to him at once. He is 
one of the most helpful as well as one of 
the hardest workers in the cause. 

Rev. Samuel F. Porter came in last 
^^•eek to plan his campaign in the South 
for the coming winter. He will visit col- 
leges and colored churches. He has 
planned iiis headquarters to be in the 
following, cities, in the order named: 
Louisville, Nashville. Chattanooga. At- 
lanta, ^lacon, Savannah, Charleston, Co- 



176 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 



himbia, Raltigh. Richmond, and Wash- 
ington, D. C . After finishing- ijs work in 
one city and surrounding country he will 
proceed to the next and so on. 

Some twenty dollars' worth of N. C. A. 
literature, at cost price, has been sent out 
fr.r free v'istribution during the past 
month, and in this way several thousand 
liomes have iieen reached. Amo.ig our 
voiuntarv VNCskers have been Rev. T. M. 
Chalmers. Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Burk. Eld. 
I. P>ancroft, Gentleman J. W. Suidter, 
\\"m. H. Dawson, and M. N. Butler. We 
acknowledge, very gratefully, the con- 
triiHitions noted below. These amounts 
have already been paid out in meeting the 
liai .ilities oi the association. We need to- 
day v>50G, and hope that any one who has 
u(}t yet given for this work will do so at 
his earliest convenience. If our read- 
ers whose subscriptions to the Cynosure 
are in arrears realized how much we need 
these various small sums, we believe that 
they would make strenuous efforts to 
send in their dollar at once: 

Donations: Estate of L.C Reynolds, per 
W. B. Stoddard, ^^125. Collections dur- 
ing July, August and September, per M. 

A. Gault: Hebron, Ind., $4; Somonauk, 
III, $9.25; Wheatland, 111., $2.10; Aloa, 
Wis., $2.35; Arlington, Wis., $10; Dover, 
W^is., $10; Aurora, 111., $2.50; Peoria, Ilk, 
75c; Smithville, Ilk, $3.25; Hanna City, 
Ilk, $11.50; Hudson, in., $2.45; IVIrs. 
Whitehih, $1; Mrs. Turner, 25c; Joseph 

B. Patton, $9; Mrs. Martha Gault, $2; 
and James A. Turbit, $5. In addition to 
the above I have received from E. E. 
Brace, $20; Wm. Kiteley, $5; Mrs. Em- 
uia B. Ross, $1 ; Mrs. Aaron Lewis, $1. 

Only one dollar was received for the 
stereopticon outfit. Twenty-nine dollars 
are stiU needed to complete the purchase 
of the plates. Ten dollars of the above 
was for the Foreign Fund. 

My address for the first ten days of Oc- 
tober will be Schuyler's Lake, Otsego 
County, New York. I shall probably 
spend the whole of October in New York 
State, and shall be glad to receive word 
ircjm any who would like to have me visit 
them during October or the early part of 
November. Letters addressed to me at 
the Cynosure office will be forwarded. 
WM. I. PHILLIPS. 



LETTER FROM REV. W. B. STODDARD. 



Secret societies and civil government 
are two masters which no man can serve. 



2317 Germantown avenue, Philadelphia,. 

Pa., Sept. 25, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure: Our fall campaign in 
the East opens with much encourage- 
ment. There is an increase of Cynosure 
readers and friends that speaks well for 
the work here. I spent the first part of this, 
nionth in work near Hagerstowm, Mary- 
land. On Sabbath, Sept. 5th, I assisted 
the radical L^nited Brethren Presiding: 
Elder in holding his communion services 
at Chewsville, Md., and lectured the fol- 
lowing evening in the same church. We 
enjoyed a blessed season of profit to all 
who entered into the spirit of the meet- 
mg. We hired the W. C. T. U. hall at 
Keedysville, Md., and spoke to the good- 
ly mmiber that gathered. This is fast be- 
coming a lodge-ridden town. It is re- 
ported that the saloonkeeper and the lib- 
eral U. B. minister, a Rev. (?) Chamber- 
lin, are among' the most active Masons- 
there. This so-called minister of the gos- 
pel recently invited the saloonkeeper and 
company with white aprons and painted, 
poles into his church and eulogized them. 
He told them the Masons preserved the 
Bible during the Dark Ages and other 
lies of a similar nature. Oh, shame on 
such a man. Flow long will the people 
support and listen to such misleadersf 
So many have become ensnared in this, 
place that there is little piety. Many of 
those who see the evil fear to speak out 
and suffer reproach for Christ's sake. 
Bro. S. H. Clopper stood nobly by us,, 
providing home and entertainment while 
I remained. God helped me in talking; 
plainly and faithfully. There were evi- 
dences that the truth had its effect. 

For more than a week I have been in 
Montgomery County, Pa. There are 
many indications that the seed sown in. 
this field has not been in vain. Increased 
interest was everywhere manifest. A 
prayer meeting at a farm house in the 
country afforded an opportunity to unite 
with some forty earnest Christians and 
cheer each other on the way. Meetings 
at the Menonite Church, Skippack, and 
the Chapel, Harleysville, were held with 
encouraging results. Homes were open, 
for entertainment and hearts were glad 
to help on the good cause. In this city 
I find many of our friends wide-awake 
and at work. It is thought that in a city 



October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



177 



of over 1,000,000 souls there should be 
a permanent anti-secrecy organization. 

A call for a meeting to consider this 
matter, and take such preliminary steps 
as may appear wise, is being circulated 
among the ministers of testifying 
churches, and has already been signed by 
several of the more prominent. In view 
of the increasing interest and the desire 
to organize for work, it is thought best 
by many of the friends to call the State 
convention again in this city. It would 
naturally go to the western part of the 
State. I hope to send full plans with 
program soon. I shall be preaching here 
to-morrow. The papers announced that 
the Masonic fraternity would lay the cor- 
ner stone of the new Jewish synagogue, 
to be erected in Washington, D. C. This 
building is to cost $100,000. Surely this 
ceremony is fitting for the murderers of 
Christ. ' W. B. STODDARD. 



LETTER FROM BRO. FENTON. 



St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 23, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure: After "high mass" by 
the pastor of the Swedish Lutheran 
Church at Taylor's Falls, in this State, 
on a Sabbath morning, I preached the 
gospel according to the word of God, 
not keeping out of sight the hidden mys- 
teries of demon worship fellowshipped by 
apostate churches. The "high mass" 
was said in the Swedish language, and 
therefore I did not understand it; but I 
was pleased to have the opportunity of 
preaching the true gospel in the English 
language. In the afternoon the pastor 
took me a distance of seven miles to an- 
other church, Almelund, where I again 
preached upon the same theme. 

On the next day, passing through a 
small village, I met with some Modern 
Woodmen, who alternately confessed 
and denied the exposure of their secrets. 
It was very annoying to them. Passing 
on to Chisago City on the evening train. 
I preached the word of God against the 
lodge to a Swedish congregation assem- 
bled in the school house. Nothing note- 
worthy occurred except to observe what 
liars the lodge makes of its members, and 
how sacred to them is the duty of lying. 

Yesterday I had the pleasure of speak- 
ing to the students of the German Lu- 
theran Theological Seminary, in this city, 
of which Professor Henrv Ernst is the 



President. The young gentlemen are 
deeply interested in the dreadful apostasy 
into which secret societies have drawn 
the churches that fellowship the lodges. 

I met with Rev. Mr. Nelson, presiding 
elder of the Swedish Methodist churches 
in this city. He is terribly indignant to- 
wards an anti-Mason for pointing to his 
bishops as Masons and exposing their 
sin. He says that none of the Swedish 
Methodists are Masons. The only proper 
remedy that I see for the presiding elder 
is to keep away from bad company. 

A few weeks ago a Swedish Methodist 
pastor said before his congregation, after 
1 had spoken to them: 'Tf any of our peo- 
ple see a Free Mason two blocks awa}' 
they will run away from him. Now that 
is sensible. Any of us would run away 
from a cannibal; but the cannibal likes 
his victim well enough to eat him after 
having killed him, while the Methodist 
Bishop swears his victim to rot on a 
dung-hill after being killed; and there is 
a fitness in that; for the Miason Methodist 
Bishop's god is "Lord of the dung-hill" 
— Beelzebub. I have spoken several 
times on the street in this city, in which 
the secret societies are not forgotten or 
kept out of sight. W. FENTON. 



EDITORIAL FIELD NOTES. 



"The priest like .people," could not be 
better illustrated than in the Smithville, 
III., U. P. Church, w^here I preached and 
lectured on Sabbath, Sept. 5, and Wed- 
nesday evening, the 8th. The pastor. 
Rev. John Harper, often preaches against 
the lodge and for many years has kept his 
people well supplied with anti-secret lit- 
erature. I found here not only interest- 
ed, wide-awake audiences, but the pas- 
tor's horse and buggy at my disposal, and 
his obliging son Walter to drive me 
around among the people, so that a sin- 
gle day added about fifteen to our Cyno- 
sure list. 

At Hanna City I addressed four meet- 
ings in the Presbyterian Church, the' 
largest in the town,. and at each meeting 
the house was filled. The pastor, Rev. 
J. S. Onion, said, "The moral, spiritual 
and financial paralysis of the churches in 
this town dates from the origin of the 
lodges some four or five years ago." A 
Presbyterian pastor from Peoria was 
present at one of these meetings, and tes- 



178 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 



titled that he was both an Odd Fellow and 
Knight of Pythias, and, said he, "There 
were two of us initiated in the Odd Fel- 
fellows' lodge the same night, and the 
other fellow was a saloonkeeper." 

x\t Bethel U. P. Church, near Hanna 
City, I preached to a large audience Sab- 
bath morning, Sept. 12, and received 
$19.50, the largest collection at any meet- 
ing during the month. Much of this was 
contributed by a veteran anti-secret re- 
former, Joseph B. Patton, who for many 
years has stood in the front ranks in the 
battle against the lodge. At Peoria I ad- 
dressed a large audience in the Free 
iNIethodist Church. The pastor, Rev. B. 
D. Fay, and Rev. J. D. Marsh, District 
Elder, gave strong testimony at this 
meeting. The secretary of the Y. M. C. 
A. offered their hall for an anti-secret ad- 
dress any time it was not occupied. 

I spent a pleasant day at Monmouth, 
visited the college and took part in the 
chapel exercises. The attendance of new 
students is larger than ever before. Only 
cwo, Prof. Wilson and Prof. Rogers, who 
were here twenty-seven years ago when I 
graduated, remain in the faculty. I visit- 
ed the old Penyx house, where I roomed 
in those college days with Rev. J. B. Gal- 
loway of Poynette, Wis., Rev. James Wil- 
son, D. D., of Belfast, Ireland, and Bro. 
T. H. Gault of 'Chicago. 

Rev. W. T. Campbell, D. D., Vice 
President of the N. C. A., now leads the 
anti-secret reform. The campaign he 
mapped out for me was to hold a series of 
meetings in towns around Monmouth in 
Kovernber or December, closing with a 
convention in the Y. M. C. A. Hall in 
Monmouth. 

As an illustration of what a single copy 
of the Cynosure will accomplish, we re- 
late the following: Rev. Ira C. Suavely, 
of McPherson, Kan., before going home 
from the Moody Institute last summer, 
called at the Cynosure office and was 
handed a sample copy of the paper. On 
his way home he visited his uncle, W. E. 
Snaveiy, at Hudson, III, who had never 
heard of the paper. He began a corre- 
spondence with Secretary Phillips about 
lectures in Hudson, which was paralyzed 
with secret orders. This correspondence 
resulted in my visiting Hudson Sabbath, 
Sept. 19. I found the time most oppor- 
tune, as the pastors were all absent from 
home, so that I addressed three large au- 



diences, one in the M. E. Church Satur- 
day evening, and two on Sabbath in the 
Baptist and M. E. Churches. These large 
churches were crowded on Sabbath. The 
subject had never been presented here 
before and yet we found a number of ear- 
nest friends who had come to see the evil 
of the lodge from its paralyzing influence 
upon the church. 

I preached on Sabbath, Sept. 26, in the 
Free Methodist Church in Evanston. 
This appointment was made by Joseph A. 
Johnston, a student of Northwestern 
University. The lodge question was de- 
bated last summer in one of the literary 
societies and in the language of the stu- 
dents, "Masonry received a black eye." 
The Masons of Evanston knew of it and 
a request was made that a prominent Ma- 
sonic physician have the privilege of ad- 
dressing the society in their hall on the 
subject, but the doctor has not been in- 
vited. The President of this society said 
he would try to secure me an opportunity 
to address the students on this subject. 



CATALOGUE OF LODGE CRIMES. 



Paul warns Christians in his day not to 
have fellowship with the unfruitful works 
of darkness, but rather reprove them. And 
the reason he gives is, "For it is a shame 
even to speak of those things that are 
done of them in secret." That this warn- 
ing of Paul is as applicable in our day 
for Christians to have no fellowship with 
secret organizations is manifest from the 
fearful catalogue of crimes and outrages 
perpetrated behind the blinded windows 
and tiled doors of secret lodge rooms. 
We will enumerate a few of these gleaned 
from the most authentic sources, and 
otliers for which secret lodges are di- 
rectly responsible. 

John Pratt, while being initiated by the 
Modern Woodmen at Woodland, 111., re- 
ceived such spinal injuries that he was 
laid up for six weeks, and it is feared will 
be crippled for life. His wife grieves bit- 
terly over the outrage and testified to it at 
the close of a meeting we addressed in 
that town last July. George Harris was 
so severely injured at Dubuque, Iowa, on 
the night of Dec. 13, 1896, during a Mod- 
ern Woodman initiation that it was fear- 
ed he would lose an arm. 

L. R. Winslow, of Kansas City, was so 
severely injured last winter in a Macca- 



October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



179 



bee lodge initiation that he sued for $2,- 
500 damages. George Weimer, of New 
City, 111., in March, 1894, had his leg 
broken while initiated in a lodge of Red 
Men, and sued for $2,000 damages. Dr. 
Dowie, of divine healing fame, Chicago, 
has published a number of cases in which 
his patients had suffered severe physical 
injuries while initiated into secret orders. 

On the night of July 20, 1896, Frank 
A. Preble was so severely injured in an 
Orange lodge initiation at Waltham, 
Mass., that he entered suit in the civil 
court against the officers of the lodge and 
had them fined $35 apiece. 

Such cas'CS of physical injury in secret 
lodge initiations might be multiplied. 
They are not the most serious phase of 
this evil. In very many cases death is 
the result of such works of darkness. On 
the night of Oct. 10, 1873, Mortimer M. 
Leggett, a student of Cornell University, 
N. Y., came to his death while being ini- 
tiated into the Kappa Alpha secret fra- 
ternity. In 1883 Col. Enoch T. Carson, 
a high degree Mason of Cincinnati, re- 
lates that a certain candidate fell to the 
floor dead while taking the Master Ma- 
son's degree. The sudden nervous shock 
of being knocked into the blanket by the 
setting-maul of Jubelum, caused his heart 
to stop beating. Charles Wetter, pro- 
prietor of a hotel at Winthrop, Minn., 
was killed in Masonic Temple, Minneap- 
olis, on the night of Dec. 2, 1896, while 
being initiated into the Mystic Shrine. 
He was blindfolded and drawn u|) twen- 
ty-five feet to the ceiling and let fall into 
a blanket, but he came down dead. 

Hon. Edward W. Curry, of Leon, 
Iowa, who was at the head of the Demo- 
cratic State Committee during the last 
Presidential campaign, died at Des 
Moines Nov. 18, 1896, from injuries re- 
ceived a few nights previous while being 
initiated into the order of Elks. Rev. J. 
W. Johnston, of the M. E. Church South, 
at Huntington, W. Va., was killed on the 
night of Jan. 10, 18.90, during his initia- 
tion into the Royal Arch degree of Free- 
masonry. An Italian was shot in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., on the night of Sept. 4, 1896, 
by the deadly Mafia. Such assassina- 
tions are alarmingly frequent and the po- 
lice seem powerless to prevent them. In 
the mining districts of Pennsylvania, be- 
tween 1868 and 1870, there were 150 men 
assassinated by the Mollie Maguires. 



A prominent ex-Mason and ex-Oddfel- 
low of Detroit gave us an account ot 
three tragedies occurring during the ini- 
tiation of candidates into the lodge. Two^ 
of these were being initiated as Knights 
of Pythias, one in Indiana near Evans- 
ville, and the other in Illinois. The one 
near Evansville met a shocking death by 
jumping upon supposed rubber spikes, 
which proved to be real iron spikes that 
had not been removed. One at Terre 
Haute, in which the candidate was to- 
bogganed rapidly down a plank and in 
order to escape the plunge into a tank of 
water had his back broken by throwing 
himself to one side. The poor victim will 
linger a suiTering invalid during life, 

O. F. Armstrong, a Chicago printer, 
Avas waylaid and beaten almost to death 
by trades union men on the light of last 
Dec. 15. Such outrages are an almost 
every night occurrence in this city. La- 
bor is in almost abject slavery to the 
lodge. Two men were shot a few years 
ago by labor union men for working on 
the Marquette building without their per- 
mission. Carpenters arriving in this city 
have been robbed of their tools 
and not permitted to work be- 
cause they did not belong to the 
union. William Morgan was abduct- 
ed and murdered near Fort Niagara by 
Freemasons in 1826, because he publish- 
ed the secrets of their order. For the 
same reason Dr. Cronin was foully mur- 
dered in this city by the Clan-na-Gael. 
The fearful loss of life in the Ha}aTiarket 
riot and in the Pittsburg and Homestead 
strikes was due to the influence of secret 
organizations. This is only a partial list 
of the crimes directly chargable to the se- 
cret lodge. Surely if this evil is not ar- 
rested the patriot may well tremble for 
the future of this countrv. 



COLLAPSE OF SECRET LIFE INSUR- 
ANCE. 



The Cynosure for several years has 
been warning fhe peopile. against the co- 
lapse of life insurance fraternities. The 
fact's that they are not legally bound like 
the old-line companies and tliat many of 
them arc going into the hands of receiv- 
ers are just now causing widespread 
alarm in the East. The recent failure of 
the Massadhusetts Benefit Life Associa- 
tion, of Boston, with over $1,000,000 



180 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 189'i 



death claims unpaid, is causing a great 
deal of anxious discussion among the 
members of assessment institutions as tO' 
their liability under their certificates. The 
following dispatch to the New York 
Evening Post explains the situation so far 
as Alassachusetts associations are con- 
cerned: 

Boston. Aug. 2^). — A question which 
has been raised by the failure of the Mas- 
sachusetts Benefit Life Association is as 
to to the liability of policy-holders to as- 
sessment to meet outstanding liabilities 
at the time of the appointmenff of a re- 
ceiver. In the case of the mutual fire in- 
surance companies in this State, this ob- 
ligation is plainly set out in the policy. A 
policy-holder has been held liable for two 
years after his policy lapsed for all losses 
to parties insured while his policy was in 
force. -By the last Legislature this time 
limit was reduced to one year. In New 
York the courts have decided that the 
policy-holders are liahle for debts in- 
curred up to the time of the appoint meut 
of a receiver. 

It has been popularly understood that 
a mem'ber of an assessment life associa- 
tion could terminate his membership and 
'Cancel all personal liability by failing to 
pay any given assessment. If, however, 
the law as expressed in the New Yofk 
cases should be similarly interpreted here, 
the members of all assessment concerns 
will find themselves loaded with liabilities 
which they have not anticipated. 

In the case of the Massachuset'ts Bene- 
fit it is said that the iaw would operate so 
as to compel the policy-holders to pay to 
the receivers about the amount oi two 
regular assessments, after the receivers 
have realized upon the assets of the asso- 
ciation; and, as in the case of ^mutual fire 
companies, the assessiments will be col- 
lected by legal process, like any other 
debt, and if the first assessment fails to 
produce enough to meet all claims an- 
other may be laid, and so on until the 
solvent members make good all the 
claims arising out of their "partnership." 

The Life Insurance Report for 1897, is- 
sued by Supt. Payn of the New York de- 
partment, shows that during the last few 
years 233 of these fraternal organizations 
— 'most of them secret — have gone into 
the hands of receivers. The article in the 
Tribune gives the entire list. 



EDMOND RONAYNE. 

There is no name associated with the 
anti-secret movement better known to 
Cynosure readers than the above. Hav- 
ing learned recently of Mr. Ronayne's 
financial embarrassment, I suggested to 
him that he inform our readers that he 
would give addresses on Freemasonry 
wherever his services were desired, and I 
believed friends would be glad to arrange 
meetings for him and remunerate him for 
his lectures. 

In response to the above suggestion, 
Mr. Ronayne writes: "1 desire to apprise 
my friends through the Cynosure that I 
own a little property here in Chicago, and 
that the support of myself and family is 
dependent upon what I collect from the 
rent of my rooms. Owing to these hard 
times, however, tenants have moved and 
rents are fallen away, so that now I am 
not able to pay my taxes. If, therefore, 
my friends desire to help me, they can ar- 
range for meetings anywhere in Illinois, 
Indiana, Wisconsin or Michigan, and if 
my expenses are paid and a small remu- 
neration besides, I will gladly speak 
wherever called upon to do so. Address 
me at Cynosure office, or at my home, 104 
Milton avenue, Chicago, 111." 

W. I. PHILLIPS. 



TO FRIENDS IN IOWA. 



I wish to say that in all probability I 
will go to Washington, Iowa, in the near 
future. Win friends in that State kindly 
arrange for other meetings, so as to les- 
sen expenses and give me an opportunity 
of reaching as many points as possible 
while in your neighborhood? 

E. RONAYNE, 
Past Master, Keystone Lodge, Chicago. 



A serious strike of the employes of the 
City Street Railway has been threatened 
for several days. The captains of militia 
companies in cities of Northern and even 
Central Illinois have been told to quietly 
get their men ready for service in Chi- 
cago. An order from the superintendent 
of the street railway company, forbidding 
the men to organize, was the cause of the 
grievance. The employes have conceded 
for the present, but the threatened storm 
is gathering which will convulse not only 



October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



181 



the • city but the nation. Never will 
strikes be averted while secret organiza- 
tions exist. 



Rev. W. B. Stoddard, Easle/n Secre- 
tary for the National Christian Associ? 
tion, called in our office and reported th? 
owing to the increased interest in the a,.- 
ti-secrecy reform in this city, it is propos- 
ed to hold the next Pennsylvania State 
co'uvention here. Steps are taken to or- 
ganize a local association that will push 
this important work forward. Pastors 
and members of the non-testimony bear- 
ing churches are very much interested in 
this move. Several have but recently re- 
nounced their lodge affiliations. There 
is reason to believe that the convention it 
is proposeed to hold in November will be 
the largest held in this city.— Christian 
Instructor. 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard preached for Rev. 
T. T. Myers, of Germantown, Pa., on 
vSabbath, Sept. 26. He will likely secure 
Bro. Myers' church for the State conven- 
tion in November. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Passed by the Younjj: People's Society of the 
Brethren Church, of Philadelphia. 

Whereas, We are reliably informed 
that a number of our brethren, among 
them some of our preachers, belong to 
the Masonic fraternity and kindred se- 
cret, oath-bound societies; and 

Whereas, The Word of God prohibits 
the taking of oaths, and commands all 
the followers of the Lord Jesus Christ to 
be a separate and ''peculiar people;" and 
admonishes the children of God to "have 
nothing to do with the unfruitful works 
of darkness;'' and 

Whereas, nearly all oath-bound, secret 
societies purposely omit, and thus vir- 
tually reject Jesus Christ from their insti- 
tutions; and 

Whereas, Among their members there 
are unregenerates, Jews, Catholics, Mo- 
hammedans, Heathens, Infidels, and Lib- 
ertines; and 

Whereas, In most secret societies men 
are sworn to honor, respect and protect 
their fellow members at the expense of 
law and right, if need be; and 

Whereas, Some of the secret societies 
pretend to occupy the place of the 
church, and have recently baptized chil- 



dren into their Christless institutions, it is 

Resolved, That we appeal to all of our 
members who are conscientiousU oppos- 
ed to these societies to earnestly and 
ceaselessly pray for the deliverance of 
such as havL- Ijtconic members of them; 
and it is further 

Resolved, That we regularly, at the 
weekly prayer meetings of the society, 
pra\- (jud to bring light and convictio'n 
upon snch of our brethren as have be- 
come entangled with such worldly, ur.- 
sanctified institutions. 

Whereas, We, the Young People's So- 
ciety of the Brethren Church of Philadel- 
phia, Pa., do not believe that the Lord is 
pleased with such affiliations, and do not 
believe he will signally bless us as a body 
with the presence and power of the Holv 
Spirit as long as we quietly, without pro- 
test, submit to such alliances, it is hereby 

Resolved, That, as the beneficial and 
benevolent features of most secret orders 
are desirable and commendable, we 
memorialize our national conference by 
taking some steps toward the creation of 
a general, voluntary, benevolent fund, to 
help those in need in accordance with the 
sacred gospel and the Apostolic church 
w^hich always provided for the poor 
among them. 

Signed bv Committee: 

L D. BOWMAN, Pastor, 
JACOB C. CASSEL, 
HENRY C. CASSEL. 

H. R. MARTINDALE, Secretary. 
— Brethren Evangelist. 



A GOOD EXAMPLE. 



Rev. H. C. Cassel, of 2317 German- 
town avenue, Philadelphia, writes that 
there will be an informal, non-sectarian, 
anti-secret ineeting at the Brethren 
Church, loth and Dauphin streets, Friday 
evening, Oct. 15. with a view of organiz- 
ing a Philadelphia auxiliary to the N. C. 
A. of Chicago. Our national organiza- 
tion will do all it can to encourage such 
auxiliaries in the way of furnishing liter- 
ature, speakers, etc. A\ould that everv 
community in the land could follow the 
example of these Philadelphia friends. 
We suggest that they hold regular 
monthly meetings and carry out a care- 
fully prepared program consisting of 
prayers, songs, readings and addresses. 
Let the boys and o'irls be enlisted bv o-iv- 



182 

ing them .. ^.... . ... 

take part in song 
etc. 



a part in the program. Let them 
: in songs, recitations, orations, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 



ANTI-LODGE RESOLUTION. 



^Irs. X. E. Kellogg, of \Mieaton, who 
was a delegate to the Eighth District Illi- 
nois ^^^ C. T. U. convention at Elgin, 
Sept. 22-24, informs us that 127 delegates 
were present and great interest was man- 
ifested. The following, among other res- 
olutions, were adopted: 

Resolved, That the rapid increase of 
societies which promote distrust and es- 
trangement in the home, by pledging 
husbands to secrecy from their wives, 
and wives from their husbands, and chil- 
dren from their parents; which absorb 
millions of dollars annually and take the 
time and thought of thousands of men, 
thus robbing the church of their finan- 
cial support, and the great moral reforms 
now in progress, of workers, is just cause 
for alarm. 



WARNING TO KNIGHTS TEMPLARS. 



Charles Hazard, of New York City, 
drowned himself in the Hudson River 
Sept. 23d. In the pocket of his coat was 
found the following note: 'T can stand 
it no longer. Over there is rest." It is 
extremely doubtful whether his poor soul 
found rest over there, for Mr. Hazard 
was a Knight Templar and an anthusias- 
tic ^lason. He was President of the Xew 
York Advertising Company, and was for 
many years the editor of the Elmira, X. 
Y., Telegram. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 



The editor will address meetings in 
Southern Illinois during the first two 
weeks of October. 



Rev. W. R. Bonham writes that he re- 
gards Rum, Romanism and Secret So- 
cieties as a trinity of evil forces calculated 
to work ruin to both church and nation. 
He feels that he would be unfaithful to his 
God, his conscience and his generation if 
he remiained silent on these momentous 
questions. Five years ago he took the 
field with a stereopticon against the rum 
power, and thousands in Central Illinois 
have seen and heard the gospel of prohi- 



bition. He has been so impressed of late 
with the wiles of secretism that he pro- 
poses to begin an aggressive crusade 
with the stereopticon against the lodge. 
Let the friends of our cause do all they 
can to open the way for his meetings. 

Among our most devoted workers 
west of the ^Missouri, are Mr. and Mrs.. 
Rufus Park, of Alexandria, X^eb. Their 
daughter, S. ]\Iay Park, was married 
Sept. I to Charles H. Kimmal, of Con- 
cordia, Kan., Rev. Alexander Litherland,. 
of Council Bluffs, Iowa, officiating. The 
bride and groom are our old-time friends^ 
and have started out in life as all young 
married people should, by subscribing^ 
for the Cynosure. May the Lord bless 
them. 



James E. Phillips, youngest son of Sec. 
W. I. Phillips, finished a course last May 
in Wheaton College in bookkeeping, 
shorthand and typewriting. He has been 
rendering most efficient service in the 
Cvnosure office since June i. 



Rev. E. B. Graham, author of "In the- 
Coils," has retired from the editoiial chair 
of the Alidland of this city. He goes to- 
take charge of a church in Sioux City, 
Iowa. The Cynosure wishes him suc- 
cess in the pastorate. 



Secretary W. I. Phillips spent Sabbath.. 
Sept. 12, at Sharon, Wis., and preached 
twice in the ]\I. E. Church and awakened 
a good interest in the cause. He was. 
royally entertained in the home of J. W. 
Suidtor. On the same tour he also vis- 
ited Monroe, Balmoral and Richland: 
Center, Wis. 



Among our callers last month were: 
Rev. S. A. Atterberry, editor of the Puri- 
ty Review of this city; Mrs. E. A. Cook,. 
E. A. Cook, Mrs. S. Xorthover, Edmond 
Ronayne, Mrs. E. Ronanye, Rev. J. M. 
Wylie, J. M. Hitchcock, Rev. S. S. Stew- 
art, H. M. Hugunin, and E. A. Bell, of 
Chicago ; Rev. R. C. Wylie, of Wilkins- 
burgh. Pa.; Rev. R. J. Kyles, Xorman- 
towm. 111.; Rev. John Harper, Smith- 
ville. 111.; Rev. Samuel F. Porter, Kings- 
ton, in.; Rev. J. G. Brooks, W>anet, 111.; 
J. E. Holyoke, Harvey, 111.; Prof. E. 
Whipple, and Prof. H. A. Eisher, of 
Wheaton College. 



October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



183 



The Christian Cynosure. 

Official Organ of the National 
Christian Association. 

A 32-page monthly with cover, opposed to 
secret societies, represents the Christian move- 
ment against the secret lodge system; dis- 
cusses fairly and fearlessly the various move- 
ments of the lodge as they appear to public 
view, and reveals the secret machinery of cor- 
ruption in politics, courts, and social and re- 
ligious circles. In advance, $1 per year. 



The Cynosure is published monthly under 
the management of a Board of eleven Direct- 
ors: Rev. J. A. Collins (U. P.), Rev. E. B. 
Wylie (Cong'l), Rev. W. O. Dinins (U. B.), 
Mr. E. A. Cook (Cong'l), Rev. T. B. Arnold 
(Free M.), President C. A. Blanchard, Prof. 
E. Whipple (Cong'l), Mr. C. J. Holmes (Swe. 
Luth.), Mr. J. M. Hitchcock (Indept.), Prof. 
H. F. Kletzing (Evang'l), P. W. Raidabaugh 
(Friend). 

Wm. I. Phillips, Secretary and Business Manager, 
to whom all letters containing money and relating to 
the business of the paper must be addressed at 221 
West Madison Stre t, Chicago, Ills. 

Rev. M. A. Gault, editor Christian Cyno- 
sure, 221 West Madison street, Chicago, 111. 

Testimonies, With Portraits. 

This booklet of thirty pages contains the 
statements of prominent Congregational min- 
isters and Associations on the secret lodge 
system. Postpaid 5 cents each. 

Folly, Expense and Danger 

Secret Societies. 

By CHARLES A. BLANCHARD, President 
of Wheaton College. 

They may be rudely classified as religious; 
e. g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfellow- 
ship, the Knights of Pythias, etc.: political, as 
the Know-nothings, Knights of the Golden 
Circle, the Order of American Deputies, the 
Kuklux-Klan, the White League, etc.: indus- 
trial; as the unions of carpenters, bricklayers, 
conductors, engineers, etc.: insurance; as the 
Royal Arcanum, the Modern .Woodmen, the 
Order of the Iron Hall, the Ancient Order of 
United Mechanics, etc.: and the social; as the 
college fraternities. Postpaid 5 cents each. 

BLESSED MEMORIES. 
A life of Mrs. Jonathan Blanchard, by her 
daughter, Mrs. J. W. Fischer, postpaid, GO 
•cents. 



Facts and Photographs. 

In this brief booklet are collected the opin- 
ions on secret societies of some fifty men de- 
vout m piety, profound in scholarship, and 
emment in statecraft, also the testimonies of 
seceders from the lodg^ as well as extracts 
from standard Masonic writers. 

Postpaid 5 cents each. 



Holden With Cords. 

Or the Power of the Secret Empire. A faith- 
ful representation in story of the evil influence 
of Freemasonry, by E. E. Flagg, Author of 
"Little People," "A Sunny Life," Etc. This 
IS a thrillmgly interesting story, accurately true 
to life, because mainly a narration of historical 
facts. In cloth, $1; paper, 50 cents. 



COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Their custom, character, and efforts for their 
suppression. By H. L. Kellogg. Containing 
the opinion of many college presidents, and 
others, and a full acount of the murder of Mor- 
timer Leggett. 25 cents each. 



American Hand Book and 
Citizens' Manual. 

By M. N. eUTLER. 

This is a book of 200 pages, 7^/2 by 5 inches, 
and is sent postpaid for 25 cents. There are 
chapters on "Bible and Secretism," "Lodge 
and Saloon," "All-found Reformers," etc., 
etc. 25 cents each. 



ONLY TEN CENTS. 



Trial subscribers for the balance of 
1897 at the nominal rate of 10 cents for 
three months — October, Xovember and 
December. 

Cannot every subscriber to the Cvno- 
sure send at least one at the above rate? 
There is no easier way to warn ^•our 
neigh l)ors against the lodge idolatry than 
to send the Cynosure for three months. 
The price is nominal, but we hope that we 
may secure in this way a large number of 
permanent subscribers. 



During September and October the SeLf- 
Pronoiincing S. S. Teachers' Bible will be 
given as a premium for one renewal and four 
new annual subscriptions to The Cynosure. 
(See advertisement.) 



184 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 



Standard Works 

—ON- 

Secret Soeieties 

£^0K SALE BY THE 

HfinOHSL WSTiBN BSSOGIBTION. 

221 West Madison St., Chicago, III. 

Terms;— Cash with order, or if sent by express 
0, 0= D= at least $i.oo must be sent with order a? 
8, guaranty that books will be taken, Books ai 
staii prices sent postpaid. Books by Mail 9-e at 
nsk oi persons ordering, unless 8 cents extra is 
§ent to pay for registering them, when ineir safe 
iemery is guaranteed. Books at retail ordered 
Dy express, are sold at lo per cent discount amdl 
iellvery guaranteed^ SDUt not express paid. F®§4 
Ssf 5 stamp's 'mieE for small sram^ 

ON FEEEMASONEY. 

Freemasonry Illustrated. First 

three degrees. 376 pages cloth, 75c; 
paper, 40c. 

The accuracy oi these expositions attested by 
affidavits of Jacob O. Doesourg and others. 

Freemasonry Illustrated. 640 

pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 75c. 

A complete expositon of the Blue Lodge and 
".hapter consisting of .-^evea degrees. Profusely 
•iastrated. 

Knighi Tentplarisn Illustrated. 

341 pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 50c. 
A full illustrated rif al of the six degrees of 
;iutj Council and Commandery. 

Hand=Bock of Freemasarsry 274 

pages, flexible cloth, 50c. 

By E. Ronayne, Pa^t Master ot Keyytone Lodge 
No. 639, Chicago. Gives the complete standanj 
ritual of the hrst three degrees of Freemasonry. 

Scotch Rite flasonry^Diustrated, 

2 vols. Per vol., cloth. $1.00: paper, 65c. 

The complete illustrated rituai of the entire 
Scottish Rite, comprising all the Masonic degrees 
from 3rd to 33rd inclusive. The first three de- 
>>re'='s are common to all the Masonic Rites, and 
■fire fully and accurately given in "Freemasonry 
Illustrated." Vol. I comprises the degrees from 
3rd to i8th inclusive. 

Vol. 11 comprises the degrees from igth to 33rd 
.■^c:usive, with the signs, grips, tokens ^nd p^ss- 
^ords Irrtf^ j^t to 33ra ^sce*'" >of iu«^ir,ti 

Freemasonry Exposed. By Capt, 

William Morgan. 1 10 pages, paper, 25c, 
The genuine old Morgan book republished. 

£cce Orient!. Pocket size, full 

roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of t.*^e First 
Three Masonic Degrees in Cypher, with complete 
Floor Charts of Initiating, Passing and Raising a 
Candidate. 

Cabala. Pocket size, full ro?n, 

flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the Chapter 
^\asonic Degrees; 4th to 7th inclusive, in Cypher. 
Giving the degrees of Mark Master, Past Master 
\/(»>4i^r^Tfr'^\B.ryt Ma-ster ^vad Ro-val Arcb 

Knights of the Orient. Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Ritual of the Commandery 
Masonic Degrees, Knights of the Red Cross, 
Knight Templar and Knight ot Malta, nth to 13th 
_ .'.^rees. 



Allyn's Ritual of Freemasonry. 

By Avery Allyn. Cloth, $5.00. 
Contains the fully Illustrated Ritual of the Blue 
Lodge. Chapter Council and Commandery, 11 of 
the Scotch Rite Degrees, several Masonic side 
degrees and what is termed a Key to the Phi Beta 
Kappa, and the Orange Societies. 

Duncan*s Masonic Ritual and 
Monitor. Cloth, $2.50. 

Profusely illustrated with explanatory engrav 
ings, and containing the dtual and work of the or- 
der for the seven degrees, incluang the Royal 
Arch. Though extensively used as an Instruction 
Bqok and one of the best in the market, it is not 
as accurate as "Freemasonry ilustrated." 

Richardson's Monitor of Freema- 
sonry'. Cloth, $1.2^; paper, 75c. 
Contains the ceremonies of^ Lodges, Chapters, 
EncampmenV3, etc. Illustrated. Although ex- 
tensively used in conferring the higher degrees, 
it is not only vfv incomplete but inaccurate 
especially as regards the first seven degrees, and 
:;s to the high r degrees it -^ives but a description 
and general idea of the degrees rather than th& 
full ritual. 

Look to the East A ritual of the 
first three Masonic Degrees by Ralph 
Lester. Cloth, $2.00. 

Notwithstanding the high price this book is 
► ery inferior in everv way to Freemasonry Illus- 
trated or the Handbook of Freemasonry at a 
quarter the price. 

Council of the Oriss^t. Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.50. 
The Complete Standu/d Ritual of Council 



Masonic Degrees in Cypner, 8ih to loth inclusive, 
Giving the Degrees of Royal Mi 
'ei and Super Excellent Master. 



Nobles of the Mystac Shrine. Re- 
vised and enlarged edition, 40 pages,, 
paper, 25c. 

An Illustrated Ritual of the Nobles ot the Mys- 
tic Shrine. Tlrs is a Side Masonic degree con- 
ferred only on Knights Templar and on Thirty 
wo degree Masons. 

Thirteen Reasons why a Chris- 
tian should not be a Freemason. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages, 
Sc 
Freemasonry Contrary to the 

C'nristlan Religion. By " Spectator," 
Atlanta, Ga. 16 pages 5c. 

Hon. Thurlow Weed on the Mor- 
gan Abduction. 16 pages 5c. 

Thi3 is the legally attested statement of this- 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and confinement of 
Capt. Morgan in Canandaigu?. iail. his removal to 
Fort Niagara jnd subsequent drovming in Lake 
Ontario 

Freemasonry a Fourfold Con= 

spiracy. 16 pages, 5c. 

Address of Pros. J. I31anchard. This is a most, 
convincing argument against the lodge. 

Mah=Hah=Bone; 589 pages; ^ I. OO' 

Comprises the Hand Book, Master's Carpet and 
Freemasonry at a glance. 

ON ODD-FELLOWSHIP. 

Odd'fellowship Judged by its own 

utterances; its doctrine and practice 
examined in light of God's Word. By 
Rev. J. H. Brockman. Cloth, 50c; pa- 
per cover, 25C0 

This is an exceedingly interesting, clear discus- 
sion of the charii ter of Odd-fellowsnip, in the form 
of a dialogue. 



October, 1891 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



IS.') 



Revised Odd=feIlowship Illustra- 
ted. Cloth, $1,00: paper cover, 5octs. 
The complete revised ritual of the Lodge En- 
campment and Rebekah (ladies) degrees, profuse- 
ly illustrated, and guaranteed to be strictly ac- 
curate; with a sketch oi origin, history and char- 
acter of the order, over one hundred toot-note 
quotations from standard authorities, showing the 
character and teachings of the order, and an an- 
alysis of each degree by ex-President J . Blanchard. 
Tliis ritual corresponds exactly with the "Charge 
Books" furnished oy the Sovereign Grand Lodee. 

Sermon on Odd=fellowship and 
other secret societies, by Rev. J. Sar- 
ver, pastor of Evangelical Lutheran 
church. IOC. each. 

This isa very clear argument against secretism of 
all forms and. the duty to disfellowship Odd-fel- 
lows, Freemasons, Knights of Pythias and. Gran- 
gers, is clearly shown by their confessed character 
as found in their own publications. 

OTHER RITUALS. 

Revised Knights of Pythias. IHus- 
trated. Cloth, 50c: paper rover 2sc. 
An exact copy of the new official Ritual Adopted 
by the Supreme Lodge oi the world, with the Se- 
cret work added and fully Illustrated. 

Knights of the Orient illustrated. 

15c each. 

The full Illustrated Rit'ia j Ancient Order of 
the Orieiit or the Oriental iegvee. This is a side 
degree conferred mostly i Knights of Pythias 
lodges. 

Good Templarisnr illustrated. 25c. 

A full and accurate exposition of the degree^ of 
the lodge, temple and council. 

Exposition of thi' Grange. 25c. 

Edited by Rev. A. \V 3eeslin. Illustrated with 
engravings. 

Ritual of the Grand Army of the 
Republic loc. each. 

The authorized ritual of 1868. with signs of re- 
cognition, pass-words, etc., and ritual of Machin- 
ists' and Blacksmiths' Union, (The two boundto- 
gether.) 

Knightsof Labor Illustrated. 25c. 

(".Adelphon Kruptos.'" ) The cooj^ ete illus- 
trated ritual of the order, including tiie "unwritten 
work.'' 

Adoptive Masonry Illustrated. 

20c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the five 
degrees of Fem.ale Freemasonry, by Thomas Lowe 

Red rien Illustrated. In cloth 50c. 

each, S2.00 per dozen postpaid. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men. comprising the Adop- 
tion Degree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree, 
Chiefs Degree, with the Odes, etc. 

The Foresters Illustrated. Paper. 

cover 25c. each, $2.00 per dozen. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Forest- 
ers, with Installation Ceremonies. 

United Sons of Industry Illustra- 
ted. 15c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the sec- 
ret tradesunion of the above name, giving the 
signs, grips, passwords, etc. 

Rituals and Secrets Illustrated. 

$1.00, each. 

Composed of "Temple of Honor Illustrated, 
Adoptive Masonry Illustrated." "United Sons of 
Industry C'-'stratsd." and "Secret Societies lilus- 
tratpH ' 

Sermon on flasonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor of United Fres 
byterian church. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

History Nat'l Cnristian Associ- 
ation. IOC. each. 

Its origin, objects, what it has done and aims to 
do, and the best means to accomplish the end 
sought, the .Articles ot Constitution and By-laws 
oi the Association. 

Secret Societies. Cloth 35c, pape 
15c. 

A discussion of their character and claims by 
Rev. David McDill, Fres. J. Blanchard and Rev 
Edward Beecher. 

The Master's Carpet or flasonry 
and Baal Worship Identical. Bound 
in fine cloth. 400 pages. 75c. 
Explains the true source and m.eaning of every 

ceremony and symbol of the lodge. 

Disloyal Secret Oaths. 5c. 

By Joseph Cook, Boston. He qtiotes the law ot 
Vermont which makes the administration of the 
Masonic oaths illegal. Joseph Cook's address is a 
national treatment of a national subject, and very 
valuable for reference 

Light on Freemasonry. By Elder 

D. Bernard, Cloth. 31.50. paper, 75c. 

Finney on flasonry. Cloth 75c., 

paper 35c. 

The character claims and practical workings of 
Freemasonry. By ex-Pres. Charles G. Finney, of 
Oberlin College. 'President Finney was a " bright 
r\iason," but left the lodge when he became a 
Christian. This book has opened the eyes cf 
multitudes. 

riasonic Oaths Null and Void: or 
Freemasony Sa?f=Convicted. 207 

pages. PosLpaid. 40c. 

This is a book for the times. The design of the 
author is to refuie the arguments ot those who 
claim that the oaths of Freemasonry are binding 
upon those who take then?. 

Judge Whitney's Defence before 
the Grand Lodge of HSinois. 15c. 

Judge Daniel H. Whitney was Master of the 
lodge when S. H. Keith, a member of his lodge, 
murdered Ellen Slade. Judge Whitney, by at- 
tempting to bring Keith to justice, brought on 
hiir.self the vengeance ot the lodge, but he boldly 
replied to the charges against him. and afterwards 
rcncunced Mason'-v 

General Washington Opposed to 
Secret Societies. loc. 

This is a re-publication of Governor Joseph Rit- 
ner"s " \indication of General Washin^^ton from 
the Stigma of Adherence to Secret Societies."' 
communicated to the House of Representatives of 
Pennsylvania, March 8, 1837, at their special re- 
quest. To tills is added the fact that three high 
Masons were the. only perso ^s who opposed a vote 
of thanks to Washington on his retirement to pri- 
vate liie-undoubtedly because they considered him 
a seceding Freemason, 

riorgan's Exposition, Abduction 

and riurder and Oaths of 33 degrees. 

304. pages, cloth. $1.00, 
" Composed of Freemasonry Exposed." by Capt 
Wm; Morgan: '"History ot" the Abduction and 
Murder of Morgan;" "Valance's Confession ot 
the Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan;" "Bernard's 
Reminiscences of Morgan Tunes," and "Oath? 
and Penalties of 33 Degrees." 

Oaths and Penalties of Freemason- 
ry, as proved in court in New Berlin 
i.-ials IOC. 

Tr : New Berlin trials be^ran in the attempt of 
Freerj:!asons to prevent public initiatirn by se'-ed 
ing Masons.^ These trials were held at Xew Berlin, 
Chenango ^0,, N. V., .vpril i^ and 14. 1S31, an.' 
General .Augustus C. Welsh, sheriff of the county 
and other adhering Freemasons swore to the truth 
lul revelation ot the oaths and r>enai*-^es. 



186 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 



Grand Lodge flasonry. 5c. each 

Its relation to civil government and the Christian 
religrion. By Pres. J. Blanchard. The an-Chris- 
tian, anti-republican and despotic character of 
Freemasonry is proved from the highest Masonic 
authorities. 

Masonry a Work of Darkness, ad- 
verse to Christianity, and inimical 
to Republican Government. 15c. 

By Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong (Presbyterian) a 
seceding Mason of 21 degrees. 

Sermon on Masonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a Ma- 
sonic Oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, Ohio. 

Story of the Gods. Postpaid, loc. 

By I. R. B. Arnold. Brief sketches from the 
mythologv of Rome, Creece, Egypt, India, Persia, 
Phrygia,^Scandina' Id, Africa and America, show- 
ing the relations and unity of the past and present 
systems. The idolatrous worship of the Masonir 
lodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 

Masonic Outrages. Postpaid, 20c. 

Compiled by Rev. H. H. Hinman. Showing 
Masonic assualt on lives of secederSj on reputation, 
and on free speech; its interference with justice ir 
courts, etc 

History of the Abduction and Mur- 
der of Capt. Wm. Morgan. 25c. 

As prepared by seven committees of citizens, 
appointed to ascertain the fate of Morgan. 

The Anti-mason's Scrap-Book. 

25c. 

Consisting of 53 "Cynosure" tracts. In thiS 
book are the views of more than a score of men, 
many of them of distinguished abi'xty, on the sub* 
iect of secret societies. 

The Image of the Beast; A Secret 
Empire; or Freemasonry a Subject of 
Prophecy. By Rev. Richard Horton. 
Third Edition' 200 pages, cloth, 60c. 

Sermon on Secretism, 5c. eacn. 

By Rev. R. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear ayn 
of the objections to all secret societies, and to M£> 
'"prv especially, that are apparent to ail. 

Anti-masonic Sermons and Ad- 
dresses. Cloth, $1 GO. 

Composed of " Masonry a Work of Darkness;" 
the Sermons of Messrs. Cross, William M'Nary, 
Dow and Sarver, the two addresses of President 
Blanchard, and the addresses of President H. H, 
George, Prof. J. G. Carson and Rev. M. S. Drury; 
" Thirteen Reasons Why a Christain Cannot be a 
Freemason," "Freemasonry Contrary to the 
Christian Religion," and " Are Masonic Oaths 
Binding on the Initiate.? " 287 pages. 

Secret Societies, Ancient and 
Modern. 50c. each. 

Contents: The Antiquity of Secret Societies 
The Life of Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, The 
Origin of Masonry, Was Washington a Mason.^ 
Fillmore and Webster's Deference to Masonry, A 
Brief Outline of the Progress of Masonry in the 
United States, The Tammany Ring, Masonic Be- 
nevolence, The Uses of Masonry, An Illustration- 
The Conclusion. 

Secret Societies Illustrated. 

Over 250 cuts, 99 pages, paper cover, 
25c. each. 

Containing the signs, grips, passwords, em- 
blems, etc., of Freemasonry (Blue Lodge, and to 
the fourteenth d^^ree of the York rite). Adoptive 
Mai,.^.,,^, Revised Odd-fellowship, Good Templar- 
ism, the Temple of Honor, the United Sons of In- 
dustry, Knights of Pythias and the Grange, witfi 
affidavits, etc. 

Prof. J. G. Carson, D. D., on Se- 
cret Societies. loc. each. 

A most convincing argument against fellowship- 
iiv 'Freemasons in the Christian church. 



Sermon en flasonry. i6 pages, 
5c. By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor 
TJnited Presbyterian church. 

Oaths and Penalties of the 33 
Degrees of Freemasonry. 15c. each. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes half-a-miliion horri- 
ble oaths. 

Ex=President John Quincy Ad- 
ams. Price, cloth, $1.00. Paper, 35c. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
gations and Penalties. 

Sermon on flasonry. loc. each. 

By Rev. James Williams, Presiding Elder of 
Dakota District Northwestern Iowa Conference 
M. E. Church— a seceding Master Mason. 

The Mystic Tie or Freemasonry a 
League with the Devil. 15c. 

This is an account of the church trial of Peter 
Cook and wife, of Elkhart, Indiana, for refusing 
to support a reverend Freemason. 

Sermon on Secret Societies. 5c. 

each. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of his sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to examine into the char- 
acter of secret sojieties, no matter what object 
such societies profess to have. 

Reminiscences of florgan Times. 

IOC. each. 

By Elder David Bernard. This is a thrilling 
narrative of the incidents connected with Ber- 
nard's Revelation of Freemasonry. 

The Broken Seal. In cloth, 75c. 
Paper covers, 40c. 

Personal Reminiscences of the Abduction and 
Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan. By Samuel D. 
Greene. 

Pres. H. H. George on Secret 
Societies. loc. each. 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty of 
Christian churches to disfellowship secret socie- 
ties. 

Narratives and Arguments,. 

15c. each. 

Showing the conflict of secret societies with the- 
Constitution and law of the Union and of the 
States. By F'-ancis Semple. 

Secrecy vs. the Family, State 
anci] Church. loc. each. 

By Rev. M. S. Dury. The antagonism of or- 
ganized secrecy to the welfare of the family, state, 
and church, is clearly shown. 

A Booklet of 107 pages. 25c. 

"The Martvr's Own Monument," by Rev. J. K.. 
Roy, D. D., Western Secretary of American Mis- 
sionary Association; "Christian Politics," by 
Rev. J. Blanchard, late Editor of Christian Cyno- 
sure; " The Mysterious Machine: Was it Lawn- 
mower, Town-pump, Balloon, Wheel-barrow,^or 
what? " by Prof. E. D. Bailey, of the Civil Serv^ice 
Dept. U. S. Government. 

Are Secret Societies a' Bilessing? 

A pamphlet of 20 pages. 5c. 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., pastof 
of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, Mo.. 
Jan. 4, 1891. W, McCoy writes: "That sermoa 
ought to be in the hands of every preacher in this 
land, and every citizen's, too." 

Between Two Opinions: or the 
Question of the Hour. 389 pages; cloth, 
postpaid, 75 cents. 

By Miss E. E. Flagg, author of " Little People,'* 
"A Sunny Life," etc., etc. Everyone who loves 
to read a good story, chaste and elegant in ex- 
pression, pure in thought, interesting in narrative, 
should read this book upon the powei of secret 
<^cieties in nolitics. ar d the remedy. 



October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



187 




•MASONIC CHART?. 

ILLUSTRATING THE RELATION OF SOME OF THE DEGREES AND RITES IN 
FREEMASONRY TO EACH OTHER. 
The accompanying chart represents one hundred and forty two degrees. 

I. The American Rite of 13 degrees; 2. The Scotch Rite of 33 degrees; 

3. The Egyptian Rite of 96 degrees. 4. Tlie Mystic Shrine of one degree. 

S. The Eastern btar of 5 degrees for Master Masons and for women. These are side degrees, and not 
genuine masonry. 

The Symbolic degrees, or Blue Lodge of three degrees, are common to every Masonic rite, whether 
American. Scotcli, or Egyptian, or whichever of the Masonic rites, named in Mackey's Masonic Encyclo- 
pedia one may choose to investigate. 

This cliart shows in the Blue Lodge the position of the Worshipful Master and some of the other offi- 
cers of the lodfje. Several positions of the ca xlidate who is being initiated are also shown. In the Master 
Mason's degree is recognized the murder, buriai ai.Z r-^surrection scene so full of religio'js signifi. nee to 
Freemasons. 



188 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897 




The Celebrated 

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October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



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190 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 




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October, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



191 



Daniel Webster: "All secret associa 
tions, the members of which take upon 
themselves extraordinary obligations to 
one another, and are bound together by 
secret oaths, are naturally sources of 
jealousy and just alarm to others; are es- 
pecially unfavorable to harmony and mu- 
tual confidence among men living togeth- 
er under popular institutions, and are 
dangerous to the general cause of civil 
liberty and just government. Under the 
influence o\ this conviction I heartily ap- 
proved the law, lately enacted in the State 
of which I am a citizen, for abolishing all 
Bucb. oaths and obli stations." 



James O .Birne, u candidate of the Liber- 
ty party for Pres dent, was a Freemason, 
"but never entere 1 a lodge after he j oined 
the church, and, as ^is sons grew up, he 
cautioTied them against joining any se- 
cret order." — Oen. Wm. Birney. 




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192 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1897. 



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cannot adhere to anything, if 
washed with Peariine. 520 



HON. SAMUEL DEXTER, in an Open Letter to the 
Grand Master of Mass., 1798: "If there be no very 
important reason for upholding Masonry at a moment 
like the present, there is a reason against it. The sys- 
tem of the destroyers of human virtue and happiness 
is to undermine in the dark the castle that cannot be 
c trried by storm. Secret agency has overthrown all 
the republics of Europe, and an extended, secret, lev idl- 
ing, self-created society, without any valuable object 
of pursuit, and embracing bad characters as well as 
good, cannot be the subject of approbation of an anx- 
ious patriot." 

"We iiave, tlien, the implied testimony uf Freema- 
sons themselves, that the Christian church ought to 
have no fellowship with Freemasonry as thus *^ re- 
vealed, and that those who adhere intelligently and 
determinedly to such an institution have no right to 
be in the Christian church. God demands, and the 
world has a right to expect, that the church will take 
due action and bear a truthful testimony in respect to 
this institution. She cannot now innocently hold her 
peace. The light has come. Fidelity to God and to 
the souls of men require that the church, which is the 
light of tlie world, should speak out, and should take 
such action as will plainly reveal her views of the 
compatibility or incompatibility of Freemasonry with 
the Christian religion."— i^rom Fres. Finney's hook, 
'Character, Claims and Praetiaal Workings of Free- 
masonry, '' 2?p- 2Q0, ■'?63. 



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the word occurs for the first time. Exhaustive Articles on Biblical History, 
Geography, Topography, Natural History, Ethnology ,'Botany, Chronology, 
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Sample of 
Type... 



THE GOSPEL ACCORD 

SAINT MATTI 



CHAPTER 1. 

1 The genealogy of Christ from -Abraham to Joseph. 
18 He was conceived by the Holt/ Ghost, and born 
of the Virgin Mary. 19 The angel interpreteth the 
names of Christ. 

THE book of the ^ generation of 
Je'§us Christ, ^ the son of Da'- 
vid, ^ the son of A'bra-ham. 

2 **A'bra-hani begat f§aac; and 
^I'lpaac begat Ja'cob; and -^ Ja'cgb 
begat Ju'das and his brethren; 

3 And s' Ju'das begat Pha're§ and 
Za'r^ of Tha'mai ; and ^Pha're? 
begat Es'rom; and Es'rom begat 
A'ram ; 

4 And A'ram begat A-min'a-dab ; 
and A-min'a-dab begat Na-as'son; 
and Na-Ss'son begat Sai'mdn; 

6 And Sal'mOn begat Bo'oz of Ra'- 



a Luke 3. 23. 
b Ps. 132. 11. 

Is. 11. 1. 

Jer. 23. 5. 

ch. 22. 42. 

John 7. 42. 

Acts 2. 30; 

13. 23. 

Rom. 1. 3. 
c Gen. 12. 3 ; 

22. 13. 

Gal. 3. 16. 
d Gen. 21.2,3. 

e Gen. C>. 26. 
/ Geu. 2d. 36. 

g Gen. 33. 27, 

i-c. 

h Ruth 4. 13, 

Arc. 

lChr.2.5,9, 

&c. 

i 1 Sam. 16. 1 ; 

17. 12. 

A-2Sam.l2.24. 
/ 1 Chr. 3. 10, 

&c. 
in 2 Kin. 20. 

21. 



hus 

Je'^ 

17 

han 

tiOD 

ryii 
teei 
car] 
Chr 
18 
wag 
the] 
bef< 

fOU! 

19 
a ju 
her 
to > 






^ ^ ^ J^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^' 

WHEATON COLLEGE 



Wheaton, Illinois. 







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CLASSICAL, saENTIFlQ AND LITERARY COURSES 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL-Fits for any College 

ART SCHOOL-Celebrated for preparing teachers 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

BUSINESS COLLEGE 




send for catalogue. CHARLES A. BLANCHARD. Pres. 







REV. W. B. STODDARD. 



CONTENTS. 



Masonry— A Discussion 194 

Duty As to Freemasonry 197 

Why Oppose Secret Societies?. 199 

Effectual Work 201 

Tlie Lodge Educates for War 202 

An Anti-Masonic Address 204 

Wliat a Masonic Emblem Means 207 

LfOdge Conforming Churches 208 



Seek the Spirit of Christ 208 

From Rev. P. B. Williams 209 

Heathenizing the Jews 210 

L'dtter from Rev. W. B. Stoddard 210 

Editorial Field Notes 211 

The Luetgert Trial .212 

Summoned for Trial .213 

Why Dr. Jackson Was Restored 213 



NMIONftL CHRISTIAN ftSSOClilTION. 



"The National Christian Association, op- 
posed to secret societies," was formed at 
Pittsburg, Pa., in 1868, and incorporated un- 
der the laws of the State of Illinois in 1874. 

The National Christian Association arose to 
meet a great want created by the growth of 
secret orders, and the ignorance and silence 
of public teachers as to their nature and ef- 
fects. 

The association is interdenominational. 
The president (1897) is a Methodist Episco- 
pal, and the vice president a United Presby- 
terian. Among the following named officers 



and agents are also the Free Methodist, Con- 
gregational, Lutheran, Friend, EvangelicaU 
United Brethren, Baptist, Reformed Presby- 
terian and Independent. 

The principal headquarters of the National 
Christian Association is at 221 West Madison. 
street, Chicago, which property is valued at 
$20,000, and is the gift to the association of 
Dea. Philo Carpenter, one of the founders of 
Chicago. 

The association is supported by the free 
will offerings and bequests of friends. The 
Christian Cynosure is its organ and princi- 
pal publication. 



President— Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, Auro- 
ra, 111. 

Vice President— Rev. W. T. Campbell, Mon- 
mouth, 111. 

Recording Secretary— Mrs. M. C. Baker, 14 
North May street, Chicago. 

General Secretary and Treasurer— Wm. I. 
Phillips, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 

Editor Christian Cynosure — Rev. M. A. 
Gault, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

T. B. Arnold, C. A. Blanchard, E. A. Cook^ 
J. M. Hitchcock, C. J. Holmes, T. B. Rada- 
baugh, E. Whipple, Edgar B. Wylie, H. P. 
Kletzing, J. A. Collins, W. O. Dinius. 
DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Rev. James P. Stoddard, Boston, Mass., 
Rev. P. B. Williams, Toledo, Ohio; Rev. 
Wm. Fenton, St. Paul, Minn,; Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard, Washington, D. C. 



"Jesus answered him, — 1 spake openly to the world; aud in secret have 1 said uothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XXX. 



CHICAGO, NOVEMBER, 1897. 



NUMBER 7. 



PU]',LISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

TERnS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

PRICE.— Per year, in advance. $1.00; three months, on 
trial, twenty-five cents; single copies, 10 cents. 

DISCONTINUANCES.-\Vc find that a lar^e number 
of our subscribers prefer not to have their sub- 
scripdoiis interrupted and their files broken in case 
they tail to remit before expiration. It is therefore 
assumed, unless notification to discontmue is re- 
ceived, that the subscriber wishes no interuption in 
his series. Notification to discontmue at expiration 
can be sent in at any time during the year. 

PRESENTATION COPIES.— Many persons subscribe 
for The Christian Cynosure to be sent to 
friends. In such cases, it we are advised that a 
subscription is a present and not regularly author- 
ized by the recipient, we will make a memorandum 
to discontinue at expiration, and to send no bill for 
the ensuing year. 

The Iowa annual State convention has 
been postponed. 

The I'Uinois S late convention will inieet 
in 'Coulter ille about Nov. lo-ii. 



The Pe-\nsylvania State convention 
will meet l i Philadelphia Nov. 22-23. 

'We earnestly urge that the announce- 
ments of the Illinois and Pennsylvania 
State conventions be sent to as many 
church papers as possible, so that all the 
friends may be informed of time and 
place. 



If it is not possible for you to obtain a 
church, school house or hall for an anti- 
secret lecture, then ivy to arrange a par- 
lor meeting and invite your friends and 
neighbors to come' and write for your 
N. 'C. A. 'lecturer to sto^j off the first op- 
portunity and give them a parlor talk. 



These two months are the 'harvest 
time for getting Cynosure subscribers. 
Cannot each of our readers build ovp- 
against their own house by 



least one new subscriber? Will you not 
honestly try? Have you ever seriously 
talked to your neighbor about his duty to 
aid the cause? Try it. It will do your 
own soul good as well as his. 



According to Chicago police records 
1,500 people have "mysteriously disap- 
peared" in this city since May i, 1897, or 
during less than five months. The Clan- 
na-Gael method in removing Dr. Cronin 
may account for some of these disappear- 
ances. 



Past Master Ronayne, the veteran anti- 
secret lecturer, is in much improved 
health. His old-time vigor and enthu- 
siasm in the w^ork has revived and he 
longs again to stand in the front line of 
battle. Some friends in Iowa are arrang- 
ing a series of meetings for him. Let all 
who can arrange meetings for Bro. 
Ronayne write to him at 104 Wilton ave- 
nue, Chicago, or to Secretary W. I. Phil- 
lips, at this office. 



On a lovely Sabbath in November, 
1863, it was observed by .the members of 
the Congregational Church in Byron, 
111., that the pastor preached an excep- 
tionally good sermon. This was oc- 
counted for -when they learned that he 
had a son. This, his first born, was 
named Williston Blanchard, after a great 
uncle and his grandfather. He whose 
face we present on the front page was 
that child. His early years were spent in 
the common school at Byron. Later he 
spent six years in study at Wheaton Col- 
lege. He believed he was called of God 
to follow his father and g:randfather in 
reform work. He obtained ordination as 
a minister of the gospel, and while pre- 
senting divine truth, especially in "oppo- 
sition to the error of the lodges, yet he 
has proved himself an acceptable gospel 
minister. 



194 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897. 



MASONRY.— A DISCUSSION 



Between Professor John Augustus Williams, of 
Harrodshurg, Ky., and Professor Simp- 
son Ely, of Kirl'sville, 3fo. 



IMPEACHMENTS OF MASONKY.— NO. III., BY 
PROFESSOR ELY, 

VI. I impeach Masonry because its 
votaries are pledg-ed to protect one an- 
other in all crimes except mfurder 
and treason, and even these are optional. 
In proof of this impeachment I here sub- 
mit the following affidavit : 

State of Michigan, County of Ot- 
tawa, ss. 

Jacob O. Doesburg, of the city of Hol- 
land, County of Ottawa, and State of 
Michigan, being duly sworn, doth de- 
pose and say, that he has taken the degree 
of a Master Mason, and was a Master 
Mason, and that he knows the oath of a 
Master Mason; that he has read the fore- 
going oath as printed on the reverse of 
this sheet, and that it is substantially 
identical with the oath administered to 
this affidavit when he became a Master 
Mason, and substantially identical wi^tn 
the oath of a Master Mason as this af- 
fiant saw and heard it adnninistered to 
many others who were made Master Ma- 
sons in the presence of the affiant w^hile 
he was a Master Mason. 

Affiant further says on oath that he dis- 
tinctly remembers that the oath of a Mas- 
ter Mason, as it was administered to hrm 
and as he saw and heard i't administered 
to others, contained the covenant: "Fur- 
ther, that I will keep a worthy brother 
Master Mason's secrets inviolate, when 
com-municated to and received by me as 
such, murder and treason excepted." 

And further this deponent says not. 
Jacob O. Doesburg. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me 
this i6th day of September, A. D. 1895. 

(Seal.) Isaac Marsilje, 

Notary Public, in and for Ottawa Coun- 
ty, Michigan. 

Only a year or two 3.^0, in Hartford, 
Connecticut, Dr. Malcolm R. Griswold, 
a Mason, confessed to Dr. Frederick C. 
Jackson that he was guilty of arson. In 
the trial that followed Dr. Jackson testi- 
fied to what his brother Mason had con- 
fessed to him. Charges were preferred 
against Dr. Jackson in the lodge, and ..e 



was expelled "for gross un-^Masonic con- 
duct." 

Report of commissioners : 
To the Wors'hipful Master, Wardens and 

Brethren of Hartford Lodge, No. 88, 

A. F. and A. M.: 

We, the undersigned commissioners 
heretofore appointed to hear the charges 
preferred against Bro. Frederick C Jack- 
son, respectfully report that they have at- 
tended to the duties assigned them and a 
record of the evidence and proceedings 
before them is herewit^h presented. We, 
comimissioners, upon the testimony be- 
fore them find the following facts: 

First. That Bro. Frederick C Jack- 
son has openly violated his sole^mn obli- 
gation in divulging the secrets of a 
brother as follows : 

According to Bro. Jackson's ovvn testi- 
mony in court, Bro. Griswold, under an 
injunction of secrecy, confided to Bro. 
Jackson (each then knowing that the 
other w^as a Mason) that he (Bro. Gris- 
wold) had co-m-matted a crime w*hich 
would consign him to prison, and there- 
upon Bro. Jackson voluntarily went to 
the prosecuting authorities and revealed 
to them the said secret which Bro. Gris- 
wold had confided to him as such; and 
thereafter Bro. Jackson obtained by so- 
licitation from Bro. Griswold, various se- 
cret admissions and confessions relating 
to the same subject, with the intention of 
repeating sudh secret admissions and 
confessions to the prosecuting authori- 
ties, and did so repeat them, knowing, at 
the time, that they were to be used upon 
the trial of Bro. Griswold, and repeated 
them in order that they might be so used 
for the purpose oi Bro. Griswold's con- 
viction. 

Second. That Bro. Jackson showed 
all through the trial of Bro. Griswold a 
malicious and vindictive spirit toward 
Bro. Griswold whidh was prejudicial to 
his case. We, therefore, reconTmend the 
passage of the following resolution: 

Resolved, "That the charges of gross- 
ly un-Masonic 'conduct against Bro. 
Frederick C. Jackson are sustained, and 
that he is guilty of said charges." All of 
which is respectfully submitted. 
George W. Scales, 
James Jordan, 
Horace B. Little, 
James M. Dow, 
S. Harvey Wollerton, 

Commissioners. 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



195 



Hartford, Conn., December i6, 1895. 

Thus these "commissioners" hold it to 
be perjury if a Mason betrays the secrets 
of a brother Mason, even though great 
crimes may be involved. I here give one 
of the obligations common to Masons : 

"Furthermore do I proinise and swear 
that I will keep the secrets of a Master 
Mason, when communicated to me as 
such, as sacred and inviolable in my 
breast as they v^^ere in his own before 
communicated." 

In comparatively recent years there 
has been a change in the Royal Arch ob- 
ligation. While it used to be "Alurder 
and treason not excepted," this clause of 
the oath is now omitted. I can submit 
much more evidence similar to that 
which is here given. 

VIII. I impeach Masonry because it 
has the same burial service for Christian 
and infidel. Sometimes the members of 
the Masonic lodge try to make it apfpear 
that Masonry is not a religion; that it is 
only a mutual protective association, and 
that its. benefits are only for this earthly 
state. Such a claim is false. It has all 
the elements of a religion. It teaches 
Deism, and every member is required to 
recognize a God. Much of its ritual is 
religious, and its burial ser^dce is cer- 
tainly a religious performance. 

In Webb's Monitor, page 286, is this 
statement, "The meeting of a Masonic 
lodge is strictly a religious ceremony." 
On page 369, same book, is the declara- 
tion that, "All the ceremonies of our 
order are prefaced and terminated with 
prayer, because Masonrv is a religious in- 
stitution." In Drew's Monitor, page 127, 
appears the following: "We no'w (as 
Master Masons) find man complete in 
morality and intelligence, with the stay of 
religion added, to insure him protection 
of Deity and guard him against ever go- 
ing astray. These three degrees thus 
form a perfect and 'harmonious whole. 
Nor can we conceive that anything can 
be suggested more which the soul of man 
requires." 

Thus these high and recognized au- 
thorities proclaim to the world that ]Ma- 
sonrv^ is a religion, a complete religion, 
and all that the soul of man requires. All 
classes of infidels, except the Atheist, can 
find an ark of eternal safety by assuming 
the Masonic obligation. Pantheists, 
Deists, Spiritualists, Unitarians, and in- 



fidels to Qirist, may all live together in 
the Masonic fellowship, and, when they 
die, they are at once transported from the 
lodge on earth to the Grand Lodge 
above, and dwell in the presence of. the 
Grand Master of the Universe (God) for- 
evermore. Such is the religious twad- 
dle and blasphemous teaching of iMa- 
sonry ! I have attended Masonic funerals 
of both Christian and infidel members, 
and the ritual was the same, their hope 
was declared to be the same, the end of 
both was peace. 

What boots it if Jesus did say, "He 
that believeth not shall be damned?" 
^lasonry says he shall be saved, and the 
soul of man requires nothing more. 
What, though the great apostle Peter 
said, concerning the crucified and glori- 
fied Jesus, "Neither is their salvation in 
any other?" Masonry spurns the very 
name of Jesus, and declares salvation 
through a Christless institution. At the 
burial of my brethren in Christ, v»'ho were 
Masons, I have had to stand back while 
lecherous infidel dogs conducted the ser- 
vice over their dead bodies. In the name 
of Him w'hose I am and whom I serve, I 
enter my protest here and now. 

Simpson Ely. 

Kirksville, Mo. 



REPLY TO IMPEACHMENTS. — NO. III., BY PRO- 
FESSOR WILLIAMS. 

Impeachment No. Yl. — "CMasons are 
pledged to protect one another in all 
crimes except murder and treason." 
Now, w'hen I first read those words in a 
copy of the Cynosure sent me, I was in- 
dignant that any reputable paper would 
publish so stupid a libel, and I threw the 
paper aside as unfit even for the waste- 
basket. But I thought afterwards that 
Bro. Ely did not perceive the meaning 
of his own language, and that as a Chris- 
tian, he could not have uttered such slan- 
der against thousands of his own breth- 
ren, knowingly and wittingly. I yet 
trust that he did not mean what his words 
plainly import ; also, I would ask leave to 
withdraw from any further discussion 
with him. But he attempts to prove it to 
be true in some sense or other, and that 
proof I will now examine. 

He states that a certain lodge in Con- 
necticut expelled one of its members for 
disclosing to a magistrate the confession 
of a crime 'made to him bv a brother 'Ma- 



196 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897." I 



son in strict Masonic confidence, and that 
snch action of the lodge was a protection 
of the criminal in his crime. He arg-nes 
from that one instance that all Masons 
and lodges of ^Masons protect one an- 
other in crime! Simply to state his ar- 
gument is to expose its fallacy. Were 
Bro. Ely's church to expel a member un- 
justly, as churches have done, it wou'ld 
be very silly to reason from the bad con- 
duct of that one church that all churches 
and all Christians are unjust, and that 
Christianity is a religion of injustice! 
Yet that is the very way that our l3rother 
reason against Masonry. 

But the more completely to expose the 
temper of his "impeachmen't," I affirm 
that the Connecticut lodge did exactly 
right, and had they not expelled that 
treacherous tale-bearer their charter 
should have been taken from them and 
they should have been declared unworthy 
the name of men or Masons. Let us look 
at the facts just as Bro. Ely himself has 
published them. A Mason, under soniiC 
unexplained temptation, committed the 
crime of arson, an ofifense against both 
the lavr of the land and of Masonry. He 
desired to unburden his comscience of its 
secret to some trustworthy friend. He 
went to a certain brother Mason of the 
same lodge, who consented to receive his 
secret, and then pledged himself under a 
Masonic oath to keep it inviolate. 

Now, that false confidant was entirely 
free to decline hearing the confession. 
Xo Mason can force himself upon the 
confidence of another, or be made the re- 
pository of a trust against his will. If it 
be a secret which, when nroperly com- 
municated, he may regret to have accept- 
ed, he must place the blame at the right 
point, not in faithfully keeping, but in 
hastily agreeing to receive the communi- 
cation. Hence, no prudent Mason will 
consent to accept a trust v^hich, when 
communicated, is to be kept under the 
sacred seal of his Masonic honor, unless 
he feels satisfied that such trust will not 
embarrass him. Bu t having once re- 
ceived it, and pledged his honor imder 
oath to keep it, an honorable -man would 
die sooner than betray it. I do not think 
that Bro. Ely understands Masonic ethics 
any better than he dO'Cs the rehgious fea- 
tures of 'Masonry. But to resume the his- 
tory of the case in Connecticut : 

The man who was expelled from th-e 



lodge had thus freely consented to be- 
come the recipient of his brother's secret 
under his solemn pledge to keep it. The 
confession was accordingly intrusted to 
him. But no sooner w^as it imparted than 
the false-hearted man hastened to an of- 
ficer of the law and revealed it! But this 
was not all. Bro. Ely's own report states 
that some further details being necessary 
to justify a prosecution, the man now be- 
cam€ a spy upon his brother, and under 
the mask of Masonic secrecy and friend- 
ship managed to worm from the confid- 
ing brother other facts, for the purpose 
of using them against him to his ruin,, 
and knowing at the time that they would 
be so used! Birt even this, infamous as 
it was, is not all. When the trial, based 
on his treacherous information ca-me off, 
he did all he could, maliciously and vin- 
dictively, to prejudice the case against 
his brother; so says Bro. Ely's report of 
the affair. 

The lodge of which the unscrupulous, 
betrayer and persecutor was a 'member, 
promptly expelled him for un-Masonic 
conduct. And Bro. Ely quotes this fact 
to prove that iMasons are pledged to pro- 
tect one another in crime ! ■ How differ- 
ent 'men are in their moral perceptions, as 
well as in their logical acumen ! Had he 
used these facts to prove thaJt the Masons, 
of Connecticut will not tolerate the pres- 
ence of a treacherously mean and ma- 
licious persecutor of his fellow man, there 
would have been at least good morality 
and good logic in his argument. And I 
believe that a decent jury of anti-iMasons 
would have awarded the poor victim of 
his malice and falsehood Hberal damages 
for malicious prosecution. '-^ ''' * 

rmpeachment No. VII. It is very 
illogical, as every one knows, to argue 
with undefined terms. Our brother has 
been masquerading under them from the 
beginning; and I have had to penetrate 
their imeaning, as well as I could, from 
the context. He still plays with the 
terms, "Christian" and '"infidel" and ''re- 
ligion," to which theHexicO'graphers g*ive 
several different imeanings. This is very 
unsatisfactory in a grave discussion. It 
compels a respondine to use shot, instead 
of balls, in his defense of truth. Against 
this mode of discussion, I again protest. 
It is, however, the usual tactics of those 
who dare not expose themselves to direct 
fire, but shoot from ambush. Do come 



iS'ovember, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



197 



out, my brother, and let me see the very 
Miite of your eye! Tell us what you 
mean by "religion," by "Christian," and 
by "infidel." 

He insists lengthily that Freemasonry 
is a religion, though what he means, no 
one can tel'l. I frankly admit that it is 
pre-eminently religious, though not a re- 
ligion; and that if it were not so, it would 
hardly be worthy the . attention of 
thoughtful men. While it teaches relig- 
ious truth and religious duty, as we have 
already shown, yet it does not presume 
to oppose or supersede Christianity — or 
to be a substitute for the religion of 
Christ. The lodge is not the rival of the 
church as Jesus founded it, though it is 
opiposed to the narrow and bigoted sec- 
tarian spirit of many so-called churches 
of Christ. Its enlightened friends have 
never supported any other view. It 
teaches some fundamental truths oi re- 
ligion, but it does not meddle with sec- 
tarian creeds or parties, just as it incul- 
cates patriotism and subordination to the 
constituted authorities, without meddling 
with politics, or political parties. In all 
these matters, it leaves its votaries free to 
think and act for themselves. There is 
nothing in its teachings repugnant to an 
enlightened Christian faith, yet it is not 
Christianity. There is nothing repug- 
nant to an enlightened Jew, yet it is not 
Judaism. 

It frames no dogma of what is called 
"redemption from the guilt of sin," nor 
decides which is right among the various 
schemes of atonement. It points its dis- 
ciples to the path of righteousness, but 
does not profess to be "the way and the 
life." It is a Hagar who best serves by 
not aspiring to supersede. Intelligent 
Masons all understand this, and object to 
any effort to exalt Masonry as a substi- 
tute for any system of faith or form of 
worship. We can not, therefore, speak of 
the ■Masonic religion, in the sense that we 
speak of the Jewish, Christian, or Mo- 
h.ammedan religions. We properly esti- 
mate the value of its religious teachings 
and influence. Its creed and code have 
been already given in these papers. Its 
mission is to establish a universal broth- 
erhood among men, based religiously on 
those truths that all good men can accept, 
having for its objects peace on earth and 
good will among men, their advancement 
in all useful knowledge, their sei^culture 



in piety and in all true virtuousness, and 
the practice of charity towards all man- 
kind. * '■- '■'' 

But all this talk about the religion of 
Masonry is designed to have some bear- 
ing on his impeachment of the institution, 
because it buries the bodies of the "Chris- 
tian" and the "infidel" with the same for- 
malities! I do not perceive the connec- 
tion, however; still he makes our usual 
burial service a serious objection to Ma- 
sonry. Now, the fact is, that any Mason- 
ic funeral ceremony is comparatively of 
recent date; and there are many rituals 
prepared for the use of lodges, from which 
they are free to make selection. The one 
most generally used, Tbelieve, is Webb's, 
as revised bv Rob. /Morris. Some of 
these rituals are deficient in literary and 
Masonic propriety. I prefer AV ebb's, 
Avhich I change as I think proper to suit 
special occasions. "^^ '"' '•' 

"Masonry," continues he, "spurns the 
very name of Jesus." This is untrue. It 
spurns the name of no great and good be- 
ing. It directs its disciples to the study 
of the beautiful life and wise teachings of 
Christ, given in the gospels, as a light to 
guide his faith and practice. 

"Masonry," he declares again, ignor- 
antly, "proposes salvation through a ■ 
Christless institution." I do not know 
what he means by "salvation," for he 
never defines his terms. But certainly 
Masonry does not bother itself with theo- 
ries of the atonement, baptismal regen- 
eration, the modus operandi of the Holy 
Ghost, or other speculations, that engen- 
der so much strife among Christians, but 
leaving its members to adopt what theorv' 
thev choose, it solemnly declares to tliem, 
that, without faith in God the Father, and 
obedience to his will to the full measure 
or their knowledge and ability, no system 
of theology or sectarian creed can save 
them. JOHN AUG. WILLIAMS. 

Harrodsburg, Ky. 



DUTY AS TO FREEMASONRY. 



In all discussions of Freemasonry it 
must ever 'be borne in mind that its mem- 
bership is composed of three dasses. 
rhere are, first, those wlio no: only re- 
ject Christianity, but wlio actually hate 
and detest the very name of Jesus of Naz- 
areth — these are the Jews. The second 
Class are those who make no profession 



198 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897. 



of Christianity, but who regard 2\Iason- 
ry as a rehgian, "good enoug'h" for th era, 
provided they Hve up to its obligations 
and supposed moral precepts; and, last 
of all, there are the Ghristian ministers, 
Sunday school superintendents and oth- 
er professing Christians. In other words, 
the Jevv's who hate Christ, the non-pro- 
fessors who i-eject Christ and repudiate 
the Bible as containing God's revealed 
will, and the professing- Christians w^io 
make a pretense of trusting Christ for sal- 
vation, and who professedly accept the 
Bible as God's word, comprise the m'em- 
hership of the JMasonic institution. 

Xow in discussing Masonr}^ so far as 
the first two ^classes are concerned, it is 
vrorse than useless to assert that the name 
of Christ is omitted fro'm every prayer 
and ceremony, and rite of ancient craft 
Masonry. The ver}^ fact that Christ's 
name is not and dare not be used in any 
part of Alasonry proper, is simply a 
strong recommendation in its favor in the 
estimation of those members. Jews and 
non-Christians, however, are American 
citizens, and hence, in discussing Free- 
mason ry, with any or all of these m'en, 
we ought to examine it from a purely 
American standpoint alone. 

I will not allude here to the strong in- 
fluence that avarice, selfishness, or tlie 
hope of gain exerts over the minds O'f 
these men, neither will I discuss the so- 
ciabilities of the lodge room; 'but as 
American citizens who make loud pro- 
fessions of loyalty to the government, its 
laws and free institutions, I will ask 'how 
can they at the same tim'e swear a never- 
dying allegiance to Miasonry and pledge 
themselves in advance to "oonform to and 
abide by all its laws, rules and regula- 
tions." 

Freemasonry differs very widely from 
all other institutions in America, except 
the Mafia, the Clan-na-gael, the Hig^h- 
binders, and the Orange association. All 
these are oath-bound and have death pen- 
alties attached to every oath; but the 
oaths and the death penalties of Freema- 
sonry are so heinous, so revolting, and 
so diametrically opposed, not only to our 
national constitution but also to the very 
letter and spirit of our free institutions 
and to the proper enforcement of law, 
that it is almost incredible how any man 
professing allegiance to our American 
principles can at the same time blindly 



swear allegiance to the laws, rules and 
regulations of Freemasonry. The entire 
Masonic system is based upon a series of 
oaths and every oath attached to its va- 
rious degrees is clinched with a death 
penalty so horrible, so revolting and so 
directly contrary, not only to the laws of 
the land but to the very principles of our 
common civilization, that language fails 
to give an adequate idea as to their true 
character. 

For instance, in the first degree, the 
candidate is bound under oath to "have 
his throat cut across, his tongue torn out 
by the roots;" in the second degree he is 
bound under oath to "have his left ibreast 
torn open and his 'heart plucked O'ut;" 
in the third degree he swears to have his 
"body severed in twain, 'bis bowels taken 
from thence and 'burned to ashes," aind 
so on up or down through all its degrees. 
Then, again, all these diiTerent oaths are 
administered not only without any sanc- 
tion of law, but they are absolutely con- 
trary to all law, while- its death penalties 
can only be inflicted by assassination. 
Now in the face of all this, and while I al- 
lude to it only very briefly, yet I cnallenge 
any Mason either to deny or contradict 
what I say — surely it requires no argu- 
ment to prove that the Jewish and non- 
Christian members have no possible ex- 
cuse for their adherence to the Masoinic 
system, unless it is admitted that they 
think more of their Masonic oaths than 
they do of their duty as true American 
citizens. It won't do to assert that many 
of our best 'citizens are Freemasons, but 
are these charges that I make as tO' the 
horrible oaths and the inhuman death 
penalties of Masonry true? If an angel 
from heaven took these oaths and bound 
himself under these blood-curdling pen- 
alties, that would not make them any 
better, and hence what valid excuse can a 
Jew or a non-Chrisitian American citizen 
offer for 'being a Freemason? 

But now, coming to the third class 
above mentioned — ^coming to the profes- 
sing Christian — ^what reasonaJble excuse 
can he offer for his affiliation to the Ma- 
sonic system? He,too, is an American 
citizen, and surely from all I have^said 
above *he ought to feel it his duty as sucli 
to renounce forever all allegiance to the 
horribleness and diabolism of the oaths 
and death penalties of Freemasonry. If 
an American citzen as such cannot be a 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



199 



true American citizen and a true Free- 
mason, how much less can a professing 
Christian be? But what shaU be said of 
his Christian duty? 

In the first place, is he a Christian? Is 
he united by the Holy Spirit to Christ in 
glory? Is 'he a part of the mystical body 
of Christ, and, if so, what are his duties as 
such? Freemasonry as a religious sys- 
tem absolutely rejects Christ. W'hile 
Jewish Masons hate him and the non- 
Christian mem'bers ignore 'him, is it the 
duty of a professing Christian to bind 
himiself Dy an oath to a life-long union 
with Masonry tihat rejects Christ, with 
the Jewish Mason that hates Christ, and 
with the non-^Chrisitian member that ut- 
terly ignores Christ? He makes a loud 
boast of living up to the oibligations aod 
precepts of Freemasonry, but what about 
the obligations and precepts of the gospel 
of ■Christ? Here is one: ''Let every one 
that nameth the name of Christ depart 
from iniquity." (2. Tim. ii. 19.) Is the 
professing Christian in the Masonic lodg-^e 
obeying this divine precept or is he not 
rather obeying his abominable Masonic 
oath? Surely Masonry is an iniquity of 
the very rankest kind. Is the professing- 
Christian then in the lodge departing 
from that "iniquity, or is he not rather re- 
jedting ttlhe divine precept of the Holy 
Spirit and cleaving to the abopiination of 
Hiram Abifif? 

Here is anoither precept: "Be ye not 
unequally yoked together with unbeliev- 
ers," 2 Cor. 6: 14. Say, my friend, you 
a professing Christian in a Masonic 
lodge, are you not yoked by an iron-clad 
oaitih with unbelievers? The above pre- 
cept of the gospel of Christ speaks to you 
as from the inner glory, "Be not unequal- 
ly yoked with unbelievers." Wihat will 
you do with it? Will you here and now 
<Ayey this divine precept and so forsake 
forever the evil associatioms of Masonry 
with its blasphemous oaths and* horrible 
death penalties, or will you stick to your 
Freemasonry and so help the enemies of 
the Lord in their hatred and rejection of 
Him? 

But once more, my friend, tel'l me, do 
you love the Lord Jesus Christ? You 
profess to love Him and you are caMed by 
His name — a Christian. Then listen, the 
Lord Jesus says to you, "If a man loveth 
me he will keep my words." John 14: 23. 
Are you loving Him and therefore keep- 



ing His words while you are a Freema- 
son and yoked up with Jews and infidels? 
You are not, you know you are not; then 
read carefully the 14th and 15th c'hapters 
of John, renounce Masonry, and so obey 
Christ. E. RONAYNE, 

Past Master Keystone Lodge, Chicago. 



WHY OPPOSE SECRET SOCIETIES? 



"Wherefore if they shall say unto you. 
Behold he is in the Secret chambers; be- 
lieve it not." Why are we opposed to 
Secret Societies? Do not good men be- 
long to them? When' so many ministers 
of the gospd, and leading men in the 
church are found in them, surely they 
cannot be wrong! when they are so char- 
itable, and helpful to men, should they 
not be encouraged? But let us look at 
them for a httle, especially the higher or- 
ders, as they are called. We think Chris- 
tians should avoid them because, 

I. We believe it is wrong to swear to 
do an unknown thing; and this is what 
nearly every secret society requires of all 
who enter them. In taking such an oath 
as this, we must give up our judgment 
and conscience into the hands of another. 
No society has a right to require this of 
us, nor have we a right to give such a 
promise to any one. They require those 
entering, to swear to keep their secrets, 
before they know what these secrets are. 
We have no right to keep secret that 
which will injure any individual, or any 
class of persons. It is our duty to make 
such things known. They require their 
members to swear to obey their rules be- 
fore they know what these rules are. They 
may be wrong. They may require us to 
do wrong. Is it right for us to give our- 
selves so entirely into the power of anv 
one? This is to surrender to others, 
some of the most sacred rights God has 
given us. 

2. Their oaths are sinful. These socie- 
ties have no riglit to administer even a 
good oath, nuich less a sinful one. Wlio 
has a right to administer an oath? Not 
everybody; not every society. Only God 
and they who act for God, have a right to 
require an oath. Only offtcers of the 
state, and the cnurch (these acting for 
God and under Him) should administer 
an oath. All other oaths partake of the 
nature of blasphemy. The penalties at 
tached to these oaths of secret societies 



-200 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897. 



are dreadful. The violator in soiiie of 
them agrees to have his throat cut, his 
heart taken out, and such dreadful things 
as these. The State only lias the rig-'ht to 
take life, and that only in case of wilful 
murder. If these penalties were enforced, 
it would be murder on the part of the so- 
cieties. Even if not enforced it is sinful 
to take such oaths. 

3. These st)cieties are selfish in their 
teachings and doings. The Bible con- 
demns selfishness; it is no part of true re- 
hgion. They claim to be benevolent, yet 
they exclude children, the old. women, 
all diseased persons, all who are crippled, 
the poor and needy. They admit only 
the strong and healthy, and such as have 
some means of support. They help omly 
such as are Hkely to be able to give the 
most. Then -confine it to those who- ac- 
tually have given to them; no others can 
receive help from these societies. Where, 
then, is their benevolence? The}' are out 
and out seliis'h. Any insurance coimpany 
is as benevolent as they. 

And more than this, -not one-third of 
their receipts are expended in their self- 
ish charity. Two-thirds or more go for 
buildings, regalia, receptions, suppers, 
dances, and such things. Any insurance 
company conducted in such a reckless 
manner, would be suppressed by law. I 
have read an illustration, something like 
this : A family consisted of father, mother, 
five sons and two daughters. The four 
older sons resolve to form a benevolent 
society, and surely this Avould be a good 
thing! The father co-mes and says, 'T 
would like to become a member of your 
society, for I will soon be unable to work 
and will need help; will you admit me?" 
They reply, "No, we cannot receive you 
because you are too old. You will soon 
become a burden to our society." The 
mother comes and says, 'T would like to 
b)ecome a mem'ber of your society. I know 
\^ou woijld be pleased to help me i/n my 
old age." But they reply, "No, we can- 
not receive you. You are a woman, and 
we do not admit women." 

The sisters came and say, "We would 
like to become mem'bers of your society; 
we are not able to earn as much as yoti, 
and we may need your help some time." 
But they reply, "No, we cannot receive 
you; our laws forbid us to receive wom- 
en." The younger brother, who is a 
cripple, comes and says, "I would like to 



become a member of your society. I 
have been unfortunate, and rendered un- 
able to make a living; you will be g'lad to 
help me!" But they reply, "No, we can- 
not receive you; our laws forbid us to re- 
ceive those who have lost a limb, or are 
unsound in body." A poor neig^i'bor, 
with a large family, who has been their 
servant for many years, cames and says, 
'T would like to become a member of 
your society. I am scarcely able to pro- 
vide for my family; this will be a great 
help to me." But they reply, "No, we 
cannot receive you ; our rules prohibit us 
from receiving those who are not likely 
to be able to support themselves." So 
the four strong, healthy brothers shut 
their hearts against father, mother, sis- 
ters, brother, and neighbor. They are 
willing to help those who need no help, 
and none others. How much of such 
charity do we find in the world — pure 
selfishness. 

4. They pervert the Scriptures. Their 
application of Scripture to themselves is 
absurd and profane. They make believe 
the Scriptures uphold their doings, while 
the passages quoted have no more appli- 
cation to them than to Satan, and no more 
approve their ways than the ways of 
the transgressor. 

5. They dishonor Christ. A number of 
passages of Scri^Dture which they quote 
leave out t^e name of Christ. One pas- 
sage is I Peter 2: 5, 6, 7. The name "Je- 
sus Christ" is omitted, also the two pro- 
nouns referring to him. Another is 2 
Thess. 3: 6-17. The name of "our Lord 
Jesus Christ" is omitted in both the 6th 
and 1 2th verses. Wlhy is this done? Lest 
some Jew, or infidel, or heathen might 
be ofifended. Neither do they pray in fhe 
name of Christ. W'hy is this? Lest 
some Jew, or infidel, or heathen might be 
offended. They prefer to dishonor and 
offend Christ rather than offend some un- 
godly parson. "He that 'honoreth not the 
Son, honoreth not the Father who hath 
sent him." Their religious teaching is 
wrong. Do they claim to be religious, or 
to teach religiom? Let us see. The 'Bible 
is found in every lodge. They ;have chap- 
lains who read passages from the Bible. 
They have prayers at their meetings. 
They have a religious form for the b-urial 
of the dead. The 'highest Masonic au- 
thority, Mackey, p. 40, says: "Masonry is 
a religious institution." Webb, another 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



201 



authority, p. 357, says : ''A meeting of a 
Masonic lodge is strictly a religious insti- 
tution." They teach that those who are 
living up to their rules are doing their 
whole duty, that nothing more is requir- 
ed of them. They teach that they who 
faithfully follow their teachings will go to 
the lodge above, i. e., will be saved. Their 
burial service teaches the same thing. But 
they never mention the name of Christ! 
They studiously avoid all reference to it. 
The Bible teache's that there can be no 
salvation but through Christ. They teach 
and lead men to believe that there is sal- 
vation in some other way than through 
Christ. Their teachings, and that of the 
Bible do not agree. Do they, then, teach 
a false religion? 

6. We believe the teaching of Christ 
is opposed to secret societies. In John 
18: 20, he says, 'T spake openly to the 
world, and in secret have I said nothing." 
John 3: 20, ''For every one that doeth 
evil hateth the light, neither cometh to 
the light, lest his deeds should be reprov- 
ed. But he that doeth truth cometh to the 
lig'ht that his deeds may be made mani- 
fest that they are wroug'ht in God." Piaul 
in Eph., 5, 11-12, ''Have no fellowship 
with the unfruitful -works of darkness, 
but rather reprove them. For it is a 
shame even to speak of those things 
which are done of them in secret." All se- 
crecy is justly liable to suspicion. \\q 
have a right, and cannot help suspicion 
some evil thing, or purpo'se being under- 
neath everything which refuses to come 
to the light. Good is never ashamed of 
itself, or unwilling to come to the ligdit; 
evil always wants to hide itself. Refomi- 
ed Presbyterians believe they should 
obey. Matt. 5: 16. — Rev. T. Ruth in the 
R. P. Advocate. 



EFFECTUAL WORK. 



BY DR. A. B. MIRROR. 



THE NORTHFIELD EXPERIENCE. 

The October Cynosure 'has an article 
entitled "Out of Bondage," which Secre- 
tary Phillips had already sent in tract 
form, enclosed with a recent letter. 1 am 
glad to find it in the Cynosure, for I think 
it a useful study for us who labor in this 
reform. It teaches the efifectiveness of 
ofentleness. The writer of the article was 



one of those ministers who join secret or- 
ders. Four years before his quarter of a 
century in the ministry began, he joined 
the first of seven. In passing various de- 
grees he must have taken many initia- 
tions. 

He was also one of those ministers who 
advocate secret orders. He had done this 
publicly as well as privately. In all this, 
membership and advocacy, he regarded 
himself as more than justified, and toward 
those who still remain where. he -^vas, he 
is now considerate. This was the case 
with which President Blanchard had to 
deal at Northfield. His success gives in- 
terest to his method. One thing he did 
not do. He did not repel. This fisher of 
men did not splash. Twice, in paranthe- 
ses, the author contrasts this worker with 
others whom he had met. ■ Those failed, 
but this one succeeded, and those repell- 
ed, but this helper won. ' 

This suggests that periiaps the effect- 
ive worker need not strain to make the 
strongest statem'ent of lacts and princi- 
ples, or aim to say the sharpest thing that 
can be said. Courtesy, kindness and can- 
dor; obvious knowledge of facts and dis- 
position to treat them trulv; sincere good 
breeding that puts a safe distance be- 
tween frankness and rudeness; are ele- 
ments of power. I have turned back from 
"Out of Bondage" to my own contribu- 
tion in the same number, which took the 
general heading Some O'bjections." I 
am not sure that the wTiter of the other 
article would not have found things in 
mine to repel him. The style in which I 
wrote might, perhaps, affect one still out- 
side so as to help him stay out. Btit 
whether the -same style would not dis- 
quahfy m^e to do rescue work for lodge 
victims is a fair question. A judicious 
reader would say that my aim appeared 
to be to show up Lorimer's work in order 
to shame him and other lodge apologists 
out of such attempts, or to prevent an evil 
influence over others, rather than to win 
Lorimer away from the lodge. One who 
hoped to secure the latter result might be 
wise to choose a gentler method. 

"VEKILV TIIOrGlIT." 

The author of "Out of Bondage" is 
"now wondering" at his former self. It 
has seemed to me that Masons wonder 
at each other. Some are never fascinated 
and infatuated, and they appear perplex- 



202 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897. 



ed when they see others in that condi- 
tion. There was a time when Paul, the 
"servant of Jesus Christ," verily tho^uglit 
Avit'h himseh' that he oug^ht to do many 
things contrary (to the name of the Nazar- 
ene. The author of "Out of Bondage" 
hopes to be charitable, and tells us how 
he used to look at these things. I myself 
have often thoug'ht that I owed it to oth- 
ers in the lodge to remember that I had 
been there. Is it not reasonable to think 
that men who have not understood the 
evil, and who, as yet, think it only a duty 
to advocate the lodge, are in a position to 
hecome the more settled by what they 
think the rudeness and injustice of oppo- 
nents, but to be won to light and truth 
1l>y candor, infused with courtesy? What 
was true of this writer may still be true 
in much the same way of Dr. Lorimer. 
Let us be charitable. Our purpose is 
kind; shall not our method also be kind? 

PRAYER. 

The part that prayer took in the Xorth- 
iield case is worth considering. Lectur- 
ers lecture, and writers write against Msl- 
sonry; let the 'devout also humbly and 
hopefully pray. Elijah did .mock the 
prophets of Baal, but the rain came after 
he prayed. We are interested in this 
work because we think that the Lord is. 
We suppose that he recognizes the lodge 
.as one of the great enemies of his church. 
We should lose interest at once on being 
convinced that he did not care. Then 
why not pray more? Let us confer with 
Him whom we serve. I wish that I were 
to attend this evening an anti-lodge 
prayer meeting. 



THE LODGE EDUCATES FOR WAR. 



The following is an extract from an ad- 
dress by Rev. J. P. Stoddard before the 
Universal Peace convention at Mystic, 
Conn., Aug. 26, 1897: 

Another and more subtile agency is at 
Avork, herding men in clans, and destroy- 
ing that confidence hy which society, 
states and nations are unified. In the 
garb of a humble artisan it began its igno- 
ble career on pagan soil. Nutured 'by su- 
perstition and priest-craft, it cast aside 
its swaddling bands, and donned fhe 
titles, roles and scepter of royalty, and 
assumed the dignity and authority of uni- 
versal empire. Emanuel Rebold, a pro- 
found thinker and competent expounder 



of its landmarks, says it is not its prov- 
ince "to receive, but to give the law." 
Another disting-uished writer adds : "We 
know no government but our own;" 
while a third, of high ofhcial rank, defines 
the terms of membership to be "sur- 
render of private judgment aud unques- 
tioning obedience." 

As an organization, it is perfected in all 
its details. It has a department for every 
grade of intellect. Every condition in 
life; every profession or vocation; ever}' 
possible quality of morality or immoral- 
ity; every conceivable shade of religion; 
every arrtbition known, or that m:ay be 
seardhed out by unregenerated men, may 
find in it an ample field for his ruling 
passion. Its highest court is a "supreme 
council," and its supreme head, "the most 
puissant sovereign Grand Coimmander," 
whose star-chamber cabinet is eighty 
sovereign Grand Inspectors Genenal. 
This august sovereignty is invested with 
legisilative, judicial and executive func- 
tions, and recognizes no superior in 
church or state. 

THEIR NEMERICAL STRENGTH. 

According to the North American Re- 
view of May, 1897, there are over five and 
a half million members of this empire in 
the United States alone. The same au- 
thority is responsible for the statement 
that this body has in its standing army 
"at the present time about two hundred 
and fifty thousand members in the prime 
of life, who are trained in military tac- 
tics and who know the sword and mus- 
ket manual as well as does the cleverest 
'regular.' " Rev. B. T. Roverts, when 
editor of the "Guide to Holiness," after 
extensive research, published statements 
fully corroborating this claim of Mr. W. 
S. Harwood in his Review article. 

August 2^, 1895, was inauguration 
day for one of the most gorgeous mili- 
tar}^ exhibitions ever witnessed in Bos- 
ton. A "Triennial Conclave" had been 
heralded for months, and avhen the city 
fluttered in bunting and resounded with 
martial music, twenty-five thousand sir 
knights, richly caparisoned with flashing 
helmets, burnished sabers and enigmatic 
banners paraded the streets at intervals 
for nearly a week under command of 
America's most noted rum distiller. 
Many of those knights imbibed copious- 
ly and some were "overcome with strong 
drink." At one hotel Bourbon whisky 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



203 



was free to all. At another twenty-two 
thousand bottles of liquor were distrib- 
uted as an expression of the generosity, 
and tippling' habits of the guests. The 
city was thron'ged with females in gay 
attire, who were especially conspicuous 
at night about the corridors and ap- 
proaches to some of the headquarters. 
As estimated by one of our most con- 
servative religious journals, not less than 
one mihion dollars were expended in Bos- 
ton, while another journal puts the en- 
tire expense of the conckve in 1895 at 
six million dollars. That such a body of 
men, represented not an anti-peace con- 
stituency only but an anti-temperance 
league as well, is self-evident and con- 
clusive. 

WHAT IS THEIR INFLUENCE? 

I answer in the words of one of their 
own most gifted orators: "They are in 
almost every place where power is of any 
importance. They are distributed, too, 
with the means of knowing one another 
and the means of keeping secret, and the 
means of co-operating at the desk, in the 
legislative 'hall, on the bench, in every 
gathering of 'business, in every party of 
pleasure, in every enterprise of govern- 
ment, in every domestic circle, in peace 
and in war, among enemies and friends, 
in one pilace as well as another." This is 
the testimony of one within the citadel 
and with every means of knowing where- 
of he affirmed, and it proclaims an order 
of janizaries and spies in our midst. 
''They are in almost every place where 
power is of any importance," acting the 
part of the Jesuit in the Romish hier- 
archy. 

THEIR DOUBLE ALLEGIANCE. 

Aside from the military, there are 
other features germane to this discussion. 
The fact that two governments occupy 
the same territory and seek jurisdiction 
over the same su'bjects should not be 
overlooked. Conflict becomes especially 
imminent when those governments are 
wholly inimical in spirit and forms. Des- 
potism cannot supplant liberty without a 
struggle. Neither can liberty throttle 
and aboiis*!! tyranny without encounter- 
ing opposition. Two oaths or affirma- 
tions, administered to the same person, 
com^manding conduct exactly opposite, is 
liable to result in frequent collisions. 
^Vhen one obligation requires evasion 



and secretion, and the other frankness 
and candor; /when under one bond the 
loyal subject must "ever conceal and 
never reveal" and under the other "tell 
the truth, the w'hoie truth and nothing- 
but the truth," the witness is confronted 
with a perplexing problem. If he Hes, 
"to conceal," he keeps his first oath,. but 
violates his second. If he tells the truth 
the order is reversed and under his oath, 
"never to reveal," he is "a vile and per- 
jured wretch." Under one he is sworn 
not to tell the truth and under the other 
to tell the truth, and is compelled to ab- 
jure one or the other vow. In brief, he 
is sworn to lie one way or the other and 
must choose which horn of the dilemma 
he will take. 

IT IS OATH-BOUND. 

The "Imperium in Imperio," of which 
I am speaking, is not an open govern- 
ment, coming "to the light that its deeds 
may be made manifest." Its altars and 
its star-chambers are beyond tyled por- 
tals, Which no one is permitted to enter 
until under bonds never to disclose what 
he receives or sees in the hidden recess. 
Not in all, but in the ruling departments, 
this bond of secrecy is enforced by penal- 
ties of which President John Ouincy 
Adams said, "a common cannibal ought 
to be ashamed." Here are some of them : 
"To have the throat cut across," "The 
heart torn out/' "The body severed in 
twain," "The skull stricken off and the 
brains exposed to the scorching rays of 
the meridian sim," and so on ad libitum. 
If such a compact is not "a covenant with 
death and an agreement with hell, a ver- 
itable Aceldama and Golgotha, a field of 
blood and skulls," worthy the attention 
of every lover of peace, w^here, I ask. un- 
der the arching heavens can such a com- 
pact be found? Nothing more hostile to 
harmony or 'mutual confidence or provo- 
cative of jealousies and strife can be im- 
agined than such an empire set up in the 
bosom of a free republic. 



George Washington used his influence 
as President of the United States to sup- 
press the secret political societies that 
were springing up at that time, and in his 
farewell address he faithfully warns the 
people against all organizations that have 
for their object to overawe or obstruct 
the due administration of the laws. 



imiiiiipi 



""^ffmrnmrnm 



204: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897 



AN ANTI-MASONIC ADDRESS. 



BY REV. P. B. WILLIAMS 



» The address, of which the following is 
an e^ctract, was recently delivered ^before 
an enthusiastic audience at Columtbus, 
Ohio, by Rev. P. B. ^^'iniams: 

If there was no other reason in all the 
world why a -Christian should oppose se- 
cret societies, to my mind this one is suf- 
licient, that while everything else, the 
family relation, the church of Jesus 
Christ, governmental afifairs, public 
school systems and political- parties are 
all open to the closest investigations and 
the severest criticisms; on the other hand, 
Freemasonry and kindred secret orders 
hide them-selves behind their so-'oalled 
secrecy, as a sort of toudh-me-not, and 
they say to the world at large : "You stand 
back; you cannot criticise here, and yO'U 
' cannot investigate us, because you know 
nothing about us." 

I find a great many individuals, and 
some of them Christian men and women, 
who undertake to excuse themselves 
from taking any position in regard to 
this great question on the ground that "I 
know nothing about secret societies." 
But with the prevalence of secret socie- 
ties to-day — and it must be admitted that 
in many places they are about as numer- 
ous as French pink over in the Willamette 
Valley in Oregon, or dog fennel and rag 
weed in some portions of this great State 
of Oihio — this is an ignorance that no one 
should be willing to admit. It is a conces-- 
cession that I for one am not just ready 
to make, that I know nothmg about se- 
cret societies. (Applause.) 

Of course, the argument is based upon 
the hypothesis that in order to know any- 
thing about secret societies you must nec- 
essarily go through the jugglery of their 
initiation and be admitted to what they 
term the "inner courts" of the orders, and 
there, and tlhere alone, can you know any- 
thing about secret societies. This we 
deny. You do not necessarily 'have to go 
into a theater or circus s'how to know 
w^hat is going on there, if the placards on 
the outside are any indication whatever 
of what is going on within. You do not 
suppose that with the extreme wicked- 
ness of this age, I would 'have to stand 
here before an intelhgent audience and 
argue very lengthily that I would have 



to go to hell to know some'thing about 
hell, when we have got its spirit all 
around us. On the other hand, it is maaii- 
■fest that the secret orders themselves 
have published quite enough to the wor'ld 
in their constitutions, by-laws and prac- 
tical workings that we may know quite a 
good deal about them, without ever en- 
tering a lodge. 

If you attend a Masonic funeral, as I 
did in Harper, Kansas, last 'May, and sav/ 
what the 'best people of the city did see — 
the very wickedest man in the place act- 
ing as chaplain and carrying the word of 
God in (the funeral procession, you might 
know something about Masonry with- 
out ever entering a lodge. Or if you 
could attend a Masonic funeral, as I did 
in the city of Salem, Oregon, four or five 
years ago, and see the Chaplain so drunk 
that he let the Bible fall off into the gut- 
ter, and was so drunk that he could not 
pick it up himself, but another had to pick 
it up for him, then I say again you would 
not need to enter a lodge tO' know so'me- 
thing about Freemasonry. Or w^hen I 
attend the funeral of an Odd Fellow, as I 
did in Rockford, Spokane County, Wash- 
ington, about four years ago, who had 
died in a saloon with delirium tremens, 
and whose last audible expression was, 
"Give me my knife, and I will cut ihis 
heart out," and I see a pro'minent minis- 
ter standing over that dead and lifeless 
Odd Fellow and hear him say, pointing 
down to the lifeless form in the cofftn, 
"Our brother has gone to the Grand 
Lodge above; let us follow in his foot- 
steps and seek to emulate his virtues and 
meet him there," then, ladies and gentle- 
men, I know about what Oddfellowship 
is, without ever attending lodge. (Ap- 
plause.) So with the otlier secret socie- 
ties. 

But if it were true, as the lodgemen 
say that you cannot know anything about 
secret societies without joining, then they 
themselves furnisli a Christian the very 
strongest arguments why he should not 
go in, because a <ihristian has no right 
whatever to go into anything that he 
knows nothing about — and I wauu to say 
right here that the whole secret lodge sys- 
tem from first to last is entirely niconi- 
patible with openness of life and guile- 
lessness of charaoter as required by our 
Lord Jesus Christ, whose disciples we pro- 
fess to be. Jesus said: "I ever spake 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



205 



openly in the temple, and in secret have 
I said nothing." 

There are institutions which are lawful, 
such as the family, the church and the 
ivovernment. They are lawful because di- 
vine, and therefore a Christian may be 
identified with each of these without any 
injury to 'himself or his fellow men; on 
the other hand, institutions such as Free- 
masonry, Oddfellow^hip, Knights of 
Pythias and hosts of kindred secret or- 
ganizations are human, regardless of their 
exalted claims, mefn'bership in which 
from first to last is a matter of volition. 
No man is compelled to belong to the 
Free Masons or Odd Fellows or any 
other secret organization. Men belong 
to these institutions because they wish to 
belong to them, and therefore the burden 
of proof must be in favor of secret so- 
cieties if a Christian is to belong to them, 
but if it can be s'hown that the burden of 
proof is against secret societies, then a 
Christian should not be identified with 
them. No society is lawful which is 
wrong in its end. A society's methods 
must be lawful or the society is unlawful, 
and no society is lawful which imposes 
unlawful duties upon its members, and no 
man, especially a Christian man, should 
be connected with an unlawful society. 
"\^'^e are the cease to do evii and learn to 
do well." At this point, the Christian 
and learned Joseph Cook has said: ''My 
advice to all men is this — ^to those that are 
out of the lodges stay out, and to those 
that are in, get out." He says: "Stay out 
as an American citizen, and in the name 
of patriotism; get out in the name of 
Christ and Christianity, and if need be 
stand alone for Jesus in every Christ- 
like work of reform and benevolence." 
(Applause.) 

A great many of the adhering lodge 
mem'bers tell us, and I hear it continually, 
that none but ignoramuses and narrow- 
minded bigots are opposing the secret so- 
cieties, when the truth of the matter is 
that the greatest men in church and 
state have been pronounced in their views 
against the secret lodge system. In our 
own nation I wisih to mention such hon- 
ored names as John Hancock, Richard 
Rush, John Adams, John Quincy Ad- 
ams, James Madison, Daniel Webster, 
Millard Fillmore, Abraham Lincoln, U. 
S. Grant, \\\ T. Sherman, Phil Sheridan, 
Thurlow Weed, Wendell Phillips, 



Charles Sumner, W^ H. Seward, and 
hosts of others equally prominent; while 
it may be interesting to some of you to 
know that sudh men as Aaron Burr, 
Benedict Arnold and Jefferson Davis 
were adhering Free Masons. In the 
church such men as John and Charles 
Wesley, Alexander Hamilton, and in our 
own day such men as Dwight L. Moody, 
Geo. F. Pentecost and hosts of others 
equally prominent are most pronounced 
in their views against the secret orders. 
To say that these men are ignoram'uses 
and narrow-^minded bigots is to stul/tify 
ourselves at once. 

In the next place I notice that no man 
can lawfully promise to do an act, obey 
an order or si^bmit to laws, until he first 
knows what these laws are. Such a 
promise must lead to a conflict of obhga- 
tions, and no Christian man has any 
moral right to swear to do these tilings. 
Here I wish to say that no Christian man 
can join the Free Masons, Odd Fellows, 
Knights of Pythias, and many other se- 
cret orders, without violating the direct 
and positive command of the Lord Jesus 
Christ. Jesus said: "But I say unto you, 
swear not at all, neither by heaven, for it 
is Con's throne; nor by the earth, for it is 
His footstool; nor by Jerusalem, for it is 
the city of the great King." James also 
says, speaking as Christ's servant: "But 
above all things, swear not." But every 
Free Mason again and again and more 
than thrice again, "Furthermore do I 
most solemny and sincerely promise and 
swear," the very thing Christ has said we 
shall not do; and yet many hundreds and 
thousands Christian men and women will 
say I see no liarm in it. No harm in 
♦what? Why, of course, no harm in doing- 
just exactly what Christ has said we shall 
not do; but I find that the tendency of 
this Sadducean age of the world is to say 
that there is no harm in doing- what 
Christ has forbidden, but there is harm in 
it nevertheless, and we are injured by it 
as professed followers of the Lord Jesus 
Christ. 

In the next place, the promise of an in- 
dividual that there is no harm in it, is not, 
or ought not to be, sufficient for a Chris- 
tian, and I will tell you why — because we 
differ just as materially in regard to our 
view of what is wrong as we do. in re- 
gard to our views of what is rig^ht, and so 
one individual may discover wrong in a 



mmmmmm 



mi'mmmmmmm' 



206 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897. 



lodge that another may fail to discover, 
and therefore a Christian man may not 
join a lodge on the promise of another 
that there is no harm in it for the same 
reason that a Christian man may not 
commit the keeping of his conscience to 
another individual ; but that is what every 
man does when he joins the lodge on the 
promise of another that there is no harm 
in it. > 

Each individual who is about to be 
initiated is met in the ante-room by a man 
who has already been initiated, and this 
individual promises the candidate for in- 
itiation that there is nothing in the initia- 
tion or obligation that he is about to^ take 
that will in any way conflict with his re- 
lations to hisWiily, his church or his 
government. I want to notice that prom- 
ise for a little while, for it is a fact that if 
a promise leading to an o'bHgation is 
false, then the obligation becomes null 
and void. This is too plain for anyone to 
misunderstand. First let us look at it as 
it relates to the family. Here are two in- 
dividuals we will say, who have agreed 
to share the ills and joys of each other in 
the marriage relation. The lady, we will 
assume, is a Christian lady, and the other 
is a "free, white male citizen of 21 years 
and upward, of sound mind and body, 
with some visible means of support," and 
he has a sufhcient amount of money to 
pay for his initiation in the Masonic 
lodge, and he has been persuaded that it 
will be greatly to his advantage to be 
identified with that institution, and ac- 
cordingly he sends in his name and mon- 
ey (his name without his money would 
not amount to anything). His name is 
voted upon, and there is not a singly 
black baU cast, and he is "accepted," as 
they term it. The night comes for him to 
be initiated. We will also assume that it 
is the regular church prayer meeting 
night, and he and his Christian wife go 
on together until they come to the place 
where the streets diverge, and she goes 
on to prayer meeting alone, and he goes 
to the lodge. Of course she returns home 
first, and she waits for her husband's re- 
turn from the lodge, and then she begins 
to tell him about the good prayer meet- 
ing they had, how the pastor read the 
Scriptures and explained them so clearly 
and what good prayers were offered to 
God, and how well the brethren and sis- 
ters spoke, and then she looks over and 



says, "John, what did they do up in the 
lodge to-night," and he is as mum as a 
clam; why, because he has sworn to con- 
ceal and never reveal, even to the wife of 
his bosom, what he did in the lodge that 
night, and yet he was promised that there 
was nothing that would conflict with his 
relation to his family. It does. It cuts 
right square across the institution of mar- 
riage. Marriage was instituted by God 
in the Garden of Eden, when he said that 
it was not good for man to be alone, and 
God defines the marriage relation thus, 
"They twain shall be one flesh." Christ 
says, "They are no more twain but one," 
but the lodge comes in and makes them 
two. 

A little boy down in Los Angeles, Cal., 

a few months ago at the breakfast table, 

said: 

"Papa, where were you last night?" 
"I was at the lodge last night, my son." 
"Papa, what lodge were you at last 

night?" 

"I was at the Masonic lodge last night, 

my son." 

"Papa, where do Free Masons go 
when they die?" 

"They go to the Grand Lodge above." 

Then came the question: 

"Papa, where will mamma go when she 
dies?" 

"Shut up, now, and finish your break- 
fast." 

They tell you it does not conflict with 
a man's relation to his family. It does, in 
every respect. It takes a man away from 
his family at night when he ought to be 
at home with them. There are men in 
the city of Columbus, Ohio, who belong 
to so many lodges that their nights are 
spent at the lodges, and some of them 
have not nights enough so that they can 
put in one night in the week at each lodge 
that they belong to, and their families 
hardly ever see them at home, and there 
are many little children in America to- 
night who will look up in mamma's face 
after saying their prayers, and ask these 
important questions: "Mamma, where is 
papa to-night?" "Does papa love us?" 
'Tf so, why don't he stay at home with 
us?" They go to sleep and dream of papa 
at the lodge, when he ought to be at home 
with them. A lady in Chicago hit the nail 
squarely on the head at this point when 
she said in an open letter, "The secret 
lodges of Amei Ic.i are social club houses, 



■ 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



20^ 



and the truth of the matter is that the 
married women of this country are large- 
ly clubbed to death. My husband," said 
she, "belongs to four lodges, and I stayed 
up until 2 o'clock the other morning wait- 
ing for his return from the lodge, and 
then I said to him what I had wanted to 
say for a long time: 'Husband, suppose 
I should spend four nights out of every 
week at a place where you could not 
come, and where you did not know where 
I was or what I was doing, how long 
would you live with me?' He said, 'About 
five minutes,' and that would be the an- 
swer of every man in the lodges if the 
question were to be put to them by their 
wives, if answered honestly." 



WHAT A MASONIC EMBLEM MEANS. 



BY REV. W. B. STODDARD, 



A doctor in the city of Allegheny, who 
had been a Mason, went into a drug store 
where another doctor stood displaying on 
his watch chain the emblem of a Royal 
Arch Mason. The doctor, whom we will 
call Doctor No. i, took the emblem in his 
hand and said H-E-L-P. "Oh, no," said 
Doctor No. 2, "that is not what it spells." 
But Doctor No. i insisted that it spelled 
nothing else. He said to Doctor No. 2, 
"You would not hang out such a sign if 
you did not expect gain." The question 
naturally comes, Was Doctor No. i right? 
If so, why did Doctor No. 2 wish to con- 
ceal the fact? Is there anything wrong in 
giving special help to those playing the 
widow's son? 

We reply at once and without question 
There need be nothing wrong in the de- 
sire to get or to give help. We all de- 
pend on God and one another. Nor is 
there anything wrong in hanging out our 
sign telling this to the world, provided 
our business be legitimate. The honest 
grocer need not hesitate to say to his 
neighbors: "I wish to help you and in re- 
turn ask your aid." Why, then, should 
the Masonic doctor shrink from acknowl- 
edging the truth, when his sign is not lit- 
erally read, but correctly interpreted ?* 
May not several reasons enter into our re- 
ply? It is a -common saying, "A guilty 
conscience needs no accuser." 

No one knew better than the doctor 
that in going into the iMasonic lodge he 



had sought to secure patronage or some 
undue advantage over other doctors. He 
knew, too, that he hoped to gain this he'lp 
without giving an equivalent. His med- 
icines were no better than were those of 
the non-Mason. His skill was no greater, 
if as great. In short, ne knew that the 
motive that caused him to join the lodge 
and advance in its degrees was selfish, 
low, contempible, and mean. Of course 
a man that would do such an unworthy 
thing would want to hide it. He did not 
like to say to Doctor No. i, "I am a poor 
unfortunate, that don't feel that I can get 
on in the world without artificial sup- 
port." 

Again, an element in his unwilhngness 
may have been, he was making this ap- 
peal for help to his brother Masons with- 
out offering in return any equivalent. The 
grocer says to the world, I will enchange 
food for money. The Mason says to the 
world, I will exchange my knowledge of 
Masonry for — what? Echo answers, 
what! He surely has gained no better 
knowledge of medicine by connecting 
with the lodge. He has no good reason to 
offer why he should have special patron- 
age. %By taking the unworthy lodge 
crutches he acknowledges his inability to 
walk as a man, and meet his fellow doc- 
tors in fair competition on their common 
merits. 

May not the thought of his degrada- 
tion in becoming a Mason have entered 
into the consideration. There is nothing- 
more certain than the B'ible statement, 
"He that humbleth himself shall be ex- 
alted." This has reference to spiritual 
matters. I saw a man a few days since 
rolling in the dust, so drunk he could not 
arise. He was humbling himself in the 
same line as- Masons humble themselves. 
He had most of his clothing on. The fMa- 
sonic initiate has most of his clothing off. 
He was bereft for the time of reason. The 
initiate is supposed to have reason. He 
babbled -without sense. The initiate 
swears at his Creator in most blasphem- 
ous language. So we might continue the 
comparison and find the drunkard the 
least degraded of the two. Oh. shame! 
shame! Have the Masonic doctors no 
sense of shame, that they strut about dis- 
playing these emblems of degradation 
and cries for help? \Miat will not men 
do for gold! How they stoop, and bow, 
and crawl before the monev eod! The 



mmm 



mmmmmmmm 



lOS 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 181)7. 



minister in the desk, •the pohtician in the 
legislature, the doctor in his practice, will 
sometimes do abominable things for so- 
called help. 

Believing the Bible we must answer 
our question in the negative. There is 
no help for the widow's son (the Mason) 
unless he turns from his -folly, acknowl- 
edges God his Father and Christ his elder 
brother. The King is coming to judge 
the world; let us prepare to meet him. 

Pittsburo-, Pa. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

LODGE CONFORMING CHURCHES. 

Bloomington, 111., Oct. 15, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure: Last week we saw 
a notice in our morning paper, saying 
that a Rev. Dr. B. F. Fritz had arrived 
in this city, and all 'who would unite to 
form a United Brethren church iwere in- 
vited to call on him at his residence. 
Having often heard of their testimony 
against the lodge and saloon, and feeling 
a desire to have such testimony in our 
midst, we called on him as invited. We 
w^ere not long in developing the informa- 
tion that he was ''a liberal," or no U. B. 
at all, as we had understood them. It 
seems that their late conference was so 
much chagrined that the United Breth- 
ren were mostly confined to the villages 
and rural districts, and had concluded 
that their lodge and saloon testimony was 
to blame, and had decided to give it up. 
"We can go into the oities," said they, 
"and set up our churches, if we do not 
antagonize these pow^'crful institutions," 
and so the Rev. Dr. Fritz is here. 

We began to explain that all our twen- 
ty or more churches are already meekly 
subservient to the 'lodge and saloon, and 
dare not apply the rule of God's word to 
the devotees of either. We began to say 
that the opening was not good for an- 
other Avorldly conformed church and that 
outside of these points there was not dif- 
ference enough to call for another or- 
ganization, all of which we summed up in 
the statement that we were "a radical.' 
We see we failed to make it plain to the 
reverend doctor, as he has secured a hall 
and begun public services. Now we re- 
member the case of Judas, who failed to 
enjoy the thirty pieces of silver, and we 



recall Daniel Webster, who ruined his 
grand record in favor of human freedom, 
and scoffed at God's "higher law" in 
hope to gain pro-slavery applause, and 
sit in the Presidential chair. But he died 
in utter disappointment, and Theodore 
Parker said of him: "He sold his soul 
to the devil and w^as cheated out of the 
price." Now if this reverend doctor 
United Brethren should fail to achieve 
swell (large) popularity in Bloo'mington, 
because other churches are already 
equally conformed to the world, it will 
indicate to us that the aforesaid cloven- 
footed personage has not abandoned his 
ancient tactics. H. D. Whitconib. 



SEEK THE SPIRIT OF CHRIST. 



De Kalb, Iowa, Aug. 23, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure — The kind of anti-se- 
cret address that will do most good is 
that wdiicli has the spirit of Christ in it. 
And the spirit of Christ w^ill alw^ays cause 
us to strive to be "wise as serpents and 
harmless as doves." The nearer we come 
to this standard, the more God can use 
us and the greater will be the influence 
of the truth, and the more permanent 
will be the w^ork. This is also true on 
every line of Christian reform. We 
should pray that the Lord may give us 
more of His spirit, because He has said: 
"Without Me ye can do nothing." "If 
we have not the spirit of Christ we are 
none of His." If all church members 
were filled with the spirit of Christ the 
lodge could not stand. 

Jesus said: "Every plant which my 
Heavenly Father hath not planted shall 
be rooted up." We must have no fellow- 
ship with the unfruitful works of dark- 
ness, but rather reprove them. This is 
a positive prohibition. Why is it that 
only secret society men and their friends 
object to our teaching that this means 
the lodge? And why can they not men- 
tion an institution which more fully fills 
the bin? 

If the lodge is not the "unfruitful works 
of darkness," then the people of God are 
in ignorance of the thing to be prohibit- 
ed. 

"That which maketh manifest is light." 
The lodge is the exact opposite. It is 
being sworn or solemnly pledged to or- 
ganized concealment. Most certainly the 
Lord intended to prohibit His people 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



209 



from having- fellowship with such ''un- 
fruitful works of darkness." And to 
make it still plainer God said: ''For it is 
a shame even to speak of those things 
wdiich are done of them in secret." A 
Christian, according to Scripture, should 
feel that he would "rather reprove them." 
The churches need more of the mind and 
spirit of Christ on this subject. Let us 
pray for it more fervently than ever. 

Cvrus Smith. 



REFORM NEWS. 



FROM REV, P. B. WILLIAMS. 

Toledo, Ohio, Oct. 20, 1897. 

Editor Cynosure: At the Portage 
camp-meeting for ten days, our reform 
had perfect right of way. Ministers of all 
denominations opposed secret so'cieties. 
Sometimes eight thousand people were 
present and strong testimonies were 
heard from those who had left the lodg'es. 
Rev. Thos. Weyer, a U. B. pastor, of 
Kenton, Ohio, arranged for me to speak 
in Otterton chapel, where a large con- 
gregation greeted me. At Columbus, 
Ohio, Rev. J. E. Williams, a Free Aletho- 
dist pastor, made appointments for me 
to speak three times at New Albany, and 
once at Columbus. I next went to Find- 
lay, Ohio, and spoke a number of times 
at the City Union Mission. Then I lec- 
tured at Hamilton, Indiana, and Berker's 
M. E. Church near Summit Station, 
where my audiences were good. I at- 
tended the North Ohio conference at 
Strasburg, Mich., which is now the 
strongest conference in the United (Breth- 
ren church. A man can speak his senti- 
ments freely against secret societies in the 
presence of these m^en. I had my ho'me 
here w^ith Brother Eli Hansberger, w^ho 
is a seceding Mason, and knows how one 
must be duly prepared before initiation, 
and also how to treat a lecturer of the N. 
C. A. and make him feel at home. 

I went from here to Chicago to confer 
with Bro. Phillips. Then I attended the 
Auglaize conference ajt Wren, Ohio, of 
which I was a 'member for years before 
going West. It was cheering to meet 
once more some of these aged veterans 
who helped to train me in the anti-secret 
cause. Rev. Wm. 'Miller, the father of 



the conference, was the first minister I 
heard preach. He signed my first license 
and gave me my first appointment. He is 
still at his post, and was re-elected one of 
the presiding elders. It was pleasant to 
meet again such grand old heroes ' as 
Revs. D. F. Thomas, S. T. Mahan, G. W. 
Staley, J.Alan, and the hosts of younger 
men who stood true as steel when the di- 
vision came in the church. I had a cor- 
dial reception from Bishop Wright and 
iiad the privilege of representing our As- 
sociation and exp^laining our work. I 
took many subscriptions for the Cyno- 
.sure and sold a large number of books. I 
am not through yet filling appointments 
arranged for at these conferences. 

While at Auglaize 'conference I went 
to Berne, Ind., and addressed a large con- 
, gregaUion intheMennonite Church, yiy 
theme was "The Saloon Evil and the 
Remedy." This people are as loyal, on 
this question as on the lodge question. 
My next appointment was. at Ebenezer 
Mennonite Church, near Blufifton, Ohio, 
w^here I met a good congregation. The 
next night at St. John's ]\Iennonite 
Church near Pandora, Ohio, I addressed 
a large congregation. These appoint- 
ments were arranged by Rev. J. B. Bear, 
of BlufTton, Ohio. I spoke next night at 
North Baltimore, in the Free Methodist 
Church, and the next at.]\Ionclova, where 
I had a good audience, most of them 
lodge people. When we began to turn 
the light on it was like turning over a 
plank and exposing the bugs and beetles 
to the sun. Here the lodgeites or their 
backers had the honor (?) of throwing 
the first egg that I ever had hurled at me. 
It did not touch me, however. Thev 
were greatly worried, to say the least of it. 

I spoke near Hamilton, Ind., to a full 
house, where I had with me Rev. P. W. 
Botts, pastor of the Free ^^lethodist 
Church, who is an ex-<Mason, and gave 
his testimony to the truthfulness of the 
expositions. At Hudson. Ind., where I 
had not been announced, I preached Sab- 
bath morning and evening and lectured 
on Monday night to fine audiences. Rev. 
E. C. Mason is the pastor. Two of the 
three presiding elders of the North Ohio 
Conference were present to hear and help 
me. At Montgomery, ']\Iich., Rev. Dr. 
Clay, the pastor, was present to introduce 
and cheer me. At Strasburg I had a full 
house, and Rev. R. A'. Gilbert, tent evan- 



210 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



N^ovember, 1897. 



gelist, was present and cheered me on. I 
closed the month by speaking at Findlay 
in the W^esleyan ^lethodist iChurch. 
Since coming to Toledo, where my wife 
and I will make onr winter quarters, I 
have preached a Sabbath again at Mon- 
clova for Rev. Crites, the pastor. I have 
addressed good meetings at N^ew Stai^k, 
and Union Hill, near Bowling Green, 
Ohio. I attended my regimental reun- 
ion at Leipsic, Ohio, which was the first 
time I had met with the boys in twenty- 
seven years. I was called to speak three 
or four times, and a bid for 'men to enlist 
in the so-called G. A. R. fell like a wet 
blanket on non-mem-bers of that institu- 
tion. I told them the G. A. R. must be 
on its last pegs wdien they have to come 
to a reunion to drum up recruits. 

For nearly a wxek I have been sick and 
flat on my back, a new experience for me. * 
The longest I have been up for five days 
is while I have jotted these notes. I shall 
go to my appointments Saturday, if able 
to get to the depot. Please pray for me. 
P. B. WI'DLIAMiS. 

No. 444 Indiana avenue. 



HEATHENIZING THE JEWS. 



St. Paul, Minn., Aug. 30, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure: On the night of Au- 
gust 29th, Rev. E. F. Streeter, of New 
York, gave in this city an exposition of 
the post exilic prophecies ol Zachariah 
relative to 'history. Commenting on the 
fifth chapter he said that the Jews 'had 
learned false swearing from the Gentiles; 
which seemed to produce a sensation in 
the audience. And well it might, seeing 
that the Jews do learn to swear falsely 
from the lips of bis'hops, pastors and pre- 
lates of fallen churches. 

Rev. Dr. John Wright, a 33d degree 
Mason, and pastor of St. Paul's Episco- 
pal Church in this city, tells me that Free- 
masonry is the best institution outside of 
the church in this city; that he advises all 
young men to join -the Masons if they 
can, and that by ■m'eans of Masonry he 
has induced his brother Masons that are 
Jew^s to join his church. 

Therefore, may we not say of his 
church as Jesus said of the Jewish church 
when he came : "Woe unto you, scribes 
and Pharisees, hypocrites; for ye com- 



pass sea and land to make one prose^lyte, 
and wdien he is made, ye make him two- 
fold more the child of 'hell than your- 
selves." (Matt. 23: 15). And that' with 
all the more force when we consider 
Zachariah 2: 83: "He that toucheth you 
(i. e., the Jew) toudieth the appiie of his 
eye." W. FENTON. . 

74 South Robert Street. 



LETTER FROM REV. W. B. STODDARD. 



Valencia, Pa., Oct. 26, 1897. 

Dear Cynosure: Aside from my other 
work I have secured one htmdred and 
thirteen subscriptions to the Cynosure 
since the 6th day of this month. I think 
this is the best record I have been able to 
make. The circumstances have been fa- 
vorable, the weather pleasant, my knowl- 
edge of the friends and field better than 
heretofore. My addresses for the past 
three Sabbaths have been in United Pres- 
byterian pulpits. All the services have 
been large^ly attended. 

I preached for Dr. MoConneli's people 
Oct. loth at Hickory, wdiere the large 
church was wdl filled with an intelligent 
audience. Reform is alwa3^s welco'me at 
Hickory, and at 'Midway, Venice, Prim- 
rose, .McDonald, Oakdale Station, In- 
gram, and elsewhere in Washington 
County. :My first stop was at Scottdale, 
where Bro. J. C. Berg extended a cordial 
welcomie as usual, and our loyal support- 
er, Geo. W. Pritits, and others gave as- 
sistance. A meeting was arranged in the 
Mennonite church, and the truth present- 
ed to an appreciative audience. 

Rev. J. A. Douthe>tt, of the U. P. 
Church, Greensburg, arranged for me 
to address his people Sabbath, Oct. 17th. 
There were many evidences that the seed 
sown there did not fall on stony ground. 
I visited my wife's grandfather, Mr. 
Robt. Dowry, at New Alexander; both 
he and his son, S. O. Dowry, of Greens- 
burg, whose hospitality I enjoyed, are 
reformers. Though feeble in health, he 
watches with unfailing interest the pro- 
gress of reforms. A meeting of the Pitts- 
burg R. P. Presbytery afforded an op- 
portunity to meet several of the veterans 
in reform. 

No meetings of late have been attend- 
ed with more interest than those just 
held at Mars. Secret societies have been 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



211 



under discussion here for some time. 
While in this place I was the guest of 
Rev. D. W. iBerry. At his invitation I 
preached the word to his people Sabbath 
morning. Two lectures against the lodge 
were delivered in the Covenanter church, 
Rev. A. Kilpatrick, pastor. The church 
was crowded both evenings. The Masons 
coming late found chairs in front of the 
pulpit. It was reported that one Mason 
said he would get two ministers to an- 
swer me. I invited discussion, of course. 
The collection here was the largesit we 
have recently received, the amount be- 
ing $11.42. Bro. Kilpatrick clinched my 
argument with a few well-chosen remarks 
regarding his early experience with 'Ma- 
sonry in Bloomington, Ind. I wish he 
woiuld write this experience for the Cyno- 
sure. 

The whole field in this section is ripe 
for the harvest. I reluctantly leave that I 
may turn my face eastward to work \ip 
the convention it is proposed to hold in 
Philadelphia, Nov. 226. and 23d. This 
will be the time of our annual gathering, 
unless soime reason appears w'hy it should 
be changed. I trust all the friends in the 
Staitewhoexpect to attend this convention 
will write me at once, addressing 215 4^ 
street N. W., Washington, D. C. Many 
letters have come to other conventions 
bringing cheer and support from those 
who could not meet with us. Shall we 
not have a larger number than usual this 
year? A good program of able speakers 
wi'll be provided. Rev. Shaw, State Sec- 
retary at New Castle, Pa., promises to 
lead the seceders' testimony service. We 
expect Pres. C. A. Blandhard, my honor- 
ed father, and others of the Old Guard, 
while many new soldiers will doubtless 
be enlisted. 

Let all friends in the State pray for, 
and look toward this meeting. I am billed 
to speak in Hope Mission, Pittsburg, this 
evening, and I expect to get the night ex- 
press and take breakfasit with .wife at 
home. I shall soon be getting thing's in 
line for the convention. Shall I not hear 
from all the friends at once? 

W. B. Stoddard. 



EDITORIAL FIELD NOTES. 



Do not forget our hard, toiling, self- 
sacrificing lecturers in the field. Do what 
you can to arrange meetings and co-op- 
erate with them. 



The severe drouth which has scourged 
lUinois and other States during the past 
few months is a judgment from God be- 
cause of national sin. During a three 
and a half years' drought in Palestine 
God said that the government adminis- 
tration in fostering and establishing the 
idolatrous worship of Baal was responsi- 
ble for it. ''You are the man," says 
Elijah to the wicked King Ahab, ''that is 
troubling Israel." The idolatrous lodge 
worship of our times is largely what is 
troubling our land to-day. 

The first Sabbath of October I preach- 
ed in the Pourth U. P. Church, Chicago, 
which more than any other in the city 
welcom'cs the truth against Baal worship. 
The second two weeks I spent in South- 
ern Illinois. Never have I seen this coun- 
try so prostrated with drouth. It re- 
minds us of the poet's words : 
"Hast thou chosen, O my people. 

On which platform thou shalt stand, 
Ere thy doom from its worn sandals 
Shakes the dust against thy land?" 
On Sabbath, Oct. loth, I preached to 
Rev. E. G. Elsey's people in Oouhervil'le, 
111. Bro. Elsey is a reformer of the old 
school. When a young man 'he was con- 
ductor on the underground railroad in 
Ohio. While pastor in Glenwood, iMinn., 
he was one of Bro. Fenton's strongest 
allies in the anti-secret cause. I can't 
forget my stay in his hospitable parson- 
age at Coulterville. Would there were 
more such families in every town. In 
the evening I preached in Rev. J. L. 
Chesnut's church at a union service of 
the three churches in Coulterville. It 
was an inspiring audience. Bro. Ches- 
nut and Bro. Kerr, of the U. P. Oiurch, 
stood up boldly for the cause. The State 
anti-secret convention is to meet here 
about the second week of November. I 
addressed a Christian Endeavor conven- 
tion in Bro. Elsey's church Oct. 13-14. 
It was a joint convention of the young 
people of some six congregations in 
Southern Illinois. The discussion was 
mostly along reform lines. The attend- 
ance was large and enthusiastic. The 
foilow^ing, among other resolutions, were 
passed : 

'■'Resolved, That we contend against 
the secret power, as it threatens the wel- 



212 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897. 



fare of the home, the church and the na- 
tion." 

On the evening of Oct. 12, I addressed 
the IlHnois Presbytery of the R. P. 
Church in the Old Bethel Church, near 
Sparta. I lectured Thursday evening, 
the 14th, in the U. P. Church at ]\Iarissa, 
Rev. R. \\'. L\IcBride, pastor. He and 
Rev. R. A\'. Chesnut are faithful co-work- 
ers in the cause. The next evening I ad- 
dressed a good meeting in the U. P. 
Church at Sparta. Rev. J. A. Henderson 
pastor. An exiperience meeting followed, 
at which- remarks were made bv Rev. iN. 
Childs, Rev. D. S. Paris, and Rev. W. J. 
Smiley. 

The folloAving Sabbath I spent in Coul- 
terville, assisting Rev. E. G. Eisey in 
communion seiwices, and in the evening 
preadied to a large audience in the U. P. 
Church, near Tilden, Rev. R. E. Wilkin 
pastor. Tuesday evening and Wednes- 
day I attended the U. P. Synod of Illi- 
nois, which met in CoulterviHe. (Minis- 
ters and elders 'were in attendance from 
many churches in Illinois and fro^m Wis- 
consin and lAIissouri. The miain discus- 
sion AA'ednesday forenoon was on ques- 
tions of reform. Dr. W. T. Campbeh, of 
the Second 'Church, iMonmouth, gave a 
powerful address on the secret society 
question. For strong, clear, logical state- 
ment, 'we have never heard it surpassed. 
We hope soon to give it to the Cynosiure 
readers. 

Saturday evening and Sabbath morn- 
ing, Oct. 24, I addressed good audiences 
at Dover, Wis., and in the evening ad- 
dressed a fine congregation in the lEng- 
lish Settlement yi. E. Church, near 
Rochester, Wis. I found most hospitable 
entertainment in the home of Elder Sam- 
uel Wilson, where I stopped on imy first 
lecture tour in 1871, and wdiere I have 
since often enjoyed rest and refreshment. 



THE LUETGERT TRIAL. 



We have read no new book for a long 
time with such thrilling interest as "'Mil- 
lennial Dawn," Volume I\'"., published 
by the Tower Publishing Co., Allegheny, 
Pa. It is an exceedingly interesting 
book of 660 pages and sold in paper cov- 
ers for 35 cents, and 50 cents in cloth. 
The author proves what has long been 
our conviction, that the millennium will 
not be ushered in except through a wid- 
ening passage of judgments and revolu- 
tions. 



"And they all condemned him to be 
guilty of death,*' is what the scriptures 
record of the trial of the Lord Jesus, the 
only perfect man. And after the decision 
the feeling 'was so strong against him 
that some began to spit on him and to 
buffet him, and the servants struck him 
with the palms of their hands. And 
Peter, his professed strongest friend, 
.w'hen charged with being his associate, 
denied, with an oath, that he ever knew^ 
him. 

What a contrast was the recent trial of 
Luetgert in this city, whom nine-tenths 
of (the people believe' to have murdered 
his wife and destroyed her body in the 
vat of his sausage factory. After the 
most protracted and absorbing trial, con- 
suming two 'hundred and forty and a half 
hours, at an expense variously eistimated 
at from $20,000 to $30,000; and after 
sixty-five Ihours of delibeiration, the jury 
failed to agree. And as the judge dis- 
charged them, he said, addressing the de- 
fendant: "Mr. Luetgert, how are you 
impressed?" 

No rhark of disrespect was shown the 
presumed murderer, but on the contrary 
he received the congratulation's of his 
friends. Three out of the twelve jurymen 
voted for acquittal. One of these who 
Imng the jury from the beginning w^as 
S. S. Barber, whose place of business is 
near the Cynosure office, and w^ho is a 
Free Mason. It is reported that one if 
not both the others wdio hung the jury 
were Free Masons, but we have not veri- 
fied it. We are informed that Luetgert 
is a Mason, althoug'h there is a manifest 
eft"ort to conceal his lodge connection. 

Many have expressed the suspicions 
which Rev. D. C. Martin, of Etna, Pa., 
writes, under date of Oct. 21. He says: 
"My suspicions are very strong that 
there are a few Masons or other secret 
society men in that jury; and they are 
hanging the jury, instead of Luetgert. In 
Princeton, Ind., a cold-blooded mnrderer 
was acquitted by a ju^-y that was drawn 
by a Masonic sheriff. I think the judge 
was a Mason. I know his brother is, 
and the murderer w^as a Mason. I be- 
lieve that the jury contained a num^ber 
of Masons. I think it would be greatly 
in the interests of anti-secrecy if you 
could ascertain the secret societv stand- 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



213 



iiiig the Lutg^ert jury. He asserts con- 
fiden'tiy that die jury will not agree. I 
he'll eve he is res1:ing in the protection of 
liis fraternity." 



REV. J. B. GALLOWAY SUMMONED TO 
TRIAL. 



Serious Charges Against the Po3'nette 
Pastor. 

Rev. J. B. Galloway, the highly es- 
teemed pastor of the U. P. congregations 
of Arlington and Caledonia, Wis., caused 
soniowdiat of a sensation at the U. P. 
Synod o-f Illinois, Oct. 20. He was on 
the program for a discussion of "The 
Liquor Oligarchy," and prefaced his ad- 
dress by reading the following letter: 
Mit. Savage, Md., O'ct. 8, 1897. 

Delta Tau Delta Fraternity, office of 
the General Secretary. Rev. J. B. Gal- 
lo'way, Poynette, W>is. : My Dear Sir — 
You are hereby officially notified that by 
luianimous vote of the Arch-Chapter of 
Delta Tau Delta, at its meeting in Chi- 
cago Aug. 23-25, 1897, you were charged 
with treachery to Delta Tau Delta, and 
to your fraternity obligations, the speci- 
fications being as follows : 

1. It is charged that you inv-eig^h 
against college fraternities in general, 
and Delta Tan Delta in particular, and 
confess openly your repentence for, and 
shaime at, having in your foolis'h youth 
become a member of Delta Tau Delta, 
and thereby sanctioned secret orders. 

2. It is furthermore charged that you 
have endeavored by 'means of letter and 
tract to discourage and draw from then- 
fraternity allegiance certain members of 
the Ddta Tau Delta fraternity, notabl}' 
tne members at the University of Wis- 
-consin at Madison. 

To these two charges you are notified 
to plead; and upon receipt of which plea 
3 ou will be notified of time and place of 
trial, and a full bill of complaint fur- 
nished you. 

Yours very truly, 

Henry T. Bruck, Grammarch. 

'Bro. Galloway, in his address following 
the powerful anti-secret address of Dr. \\'. 
T. Campbell, said his object in reading 
tlie above letter was, first to show that 
a 'College secret fraternitv, which he had 
left twenty-five years ago, still claimed 
jurisdiction over him and the right to 



dictate what he should teach and the. au- 
thority to summon him before its tril)- 
unal; and secondly to warn the 'synod of 
tiiese grave charges hanging over his 
liead, so they miglit decide if he should 
still be allowed to address them. 

At a meeting in the court house at 
I'ortage, Wis., last August, before a large 
audience, Bro. Galloway, in an anti-se- 
cret 'Society address, confessed that lie 
nad once joined this secret fraternity and 
also declared his rrenunciation of it. He 
referred to the writer, whose persistent 
agitation of the ciuestion both in college 
and afterwards had done much to open 
his eyes in regard to the evil of secret or- 
ganizations. 



WHY DR. JACKSON WAS RESTORED. 



The New York Evening. Post says: 
"The end of an interesting cnapter of the 
Griswold arson case nas jmst been reached, 
and the result is of no little importance 
to the Masonic fraternity. Frederick C. 
Jackson, superintendent of letter carriers 
of the postoffxce in this city, who was ex- 
pelled from Hartford Lodge, Xo. 88, F. 
and A. YI., about a year ago, on the 
charge of having given testimony against 
a brother Mason, has been reinstated by 
order of Grand Master Kies. 

"Jackson was a student of denistry in 
the office of Dr! Griswold, who is now m 
the State prison for arson. Griswold's 
office was burned, and property was de- 
stroyed amounting to about $30,000. 
Jackson and Griswold were fellow ]\Ia- 
sons, and in the trial the former gave 
testimony which, it is alleged, did much 
to aid in convicting the dentist. After 
Dr. Griswold w^as sentenced, Jackson 
was found guilty by Hartford Lodge of 
betraying a fellow crafesman who was in 
distress, and was expelled. Althoug^h 
there was much chscussion within the or- 
der, the fact was given little or no pub- 
licity.* ( )n the advice of friends in the 
lodge, Jackson appealed under the rules 
to the Grand Lodge. The committee a 
short time ago agreed that under the cir- 
cumstances Jackson was justified in giv- 
ing the testimony. The report was for- 
warded to Grand blaster Kies, who has 
just issued an order to the efifect that 
Jackson is to be restored to all privileges 
of Free Masonry, including membership 



I i\i II I , u-.«Liu#«.i mi w^immmmmtmnfm- 



214 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 181)7. 



in Hartford Lodge, pending final action 
by the Grand lodge." 

This case of expulsion from a Masonic 
lodge for testifying against a brother'Ma- 
son has been extensively used by anti- 
!Masonic writers and speakers and this is 
doubtless why Dr. Jackson has been re- 
stored bv his Grand Lodge. B:ut as Prof. 
AMlliams argues in this issue, his expul- 
sion was in accord with the spirit and leg- 
islation of Freemasonry. The only way 
this treasonable and anti-republican in- 
stitution can clear its skirts of coimphcity 
in crime is to forever blot out that part of 
their oath binding them under death pen- 
alties to conceal each other's crimes. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 



Rev. P. iB. William's' address for the 
v.-inter will be 444 Indiana avenue, To- 
ledo, Ohio. 



Editor Gauit will address the Young 
People's convenrtion of Chicago U. P. 
Presbytery at Wheatland, III, Tuesday 
evening, Nov. 2. 



No booklet published by the N. C. A. 
had so moich to do in firing our interest 
in the anti-secret cause as "Masonic Out- 
rages." Send for it to this office. Price, 
onlv 20 cents. 



Rev. W. I. Phillips returned on the 
26th from nearly a ^month's hard work 
in New York. He reports an interest- 
h'-g campaign which he will write up for 
our next number. 



Shall w^e have a government of laws 
which shall respect and protect the rights 
of all the people, or, shall we submit to 
the dictation and control of secret irre- 
sponsible- despotisms? 



The Preachers' M'agazine for Novem- 
ber is rich in thoughts and suggestions 
for preachers. It is embellished with 
some fine clerical portraits. Send for it 
to Wilbur B. Ketcham, No. 2 Cooper 
Union, New York. Price, $1.50 per 
year. 



Fresident'S. H. Swartz, of the Nation- 
al Christian Association, has been trans- 
ferred to the pastorate of the M. E. 
Church in Aurora. The Cynosure wishes 



him a high degree of prosperity in his 
new and enlarged field. 



"Christ, the Witness," is a 24-page 
booklet pubhshed by the Christian 'Na- 
tion of New Y'ork. It is an address by 
Prof. D. B. Willson, at the opening of 
the R. P. Theolo'gicad Seminary in Alle- 
gheny, Pa., and is a strong protest against 
the liberalizing tendencies of our times.. 
Back to Christ as the only perfect and 
authoritative guide and teacher is the 
motto of the address. 



"Secrecy and 'Citizenship" is an ele- 
gant volume in cloth of 140 pages, just 
published by the New England Christian 
Association. It comprises three prize 
essays out of a list of twenty- one com- 
petitors for prizes of $300, $75 and $25, 
provided by the late Dean Philo Carpen- 
ter. It is the most valuable addition to 
anti-secret 'literature published for some 
time, and should be in the hands of every 
friend of the cause. It can be obtained at 
this office for 50 cents a co^py. 



It will be seen from Rev. W. B. Stod- 
dard's letter in this number that during 
the last three weeks of October he ob- 
tained 113 Cynosure subscribers. And. 
this in addition to addressing -the usual 
number of meetings. This, we believe, 
breaks the record for all lecturers in the 
field of anti-secret reform. Bro. Stod- 
dard is a born reformer. His human 
sympathy and wonderful tact and faculty 
of adapting himself to his auditors makes 
him pre-eminently successful in his. 
chosen field. 



On the night of Sept. 21, 1896, a prom- 
inent Knight Templar minister, Rev. 
James B. Morrison, of Laconia, N. H., 
committed suicide at the Revere House, 
Boston, by suffocating himself with gas. 
At Decatur, 111., on the night of last Nov. 
24, another prominent Knight Templar 
minister, Rev. James Miller, shot him- 
self through the brain in an alley, near 
one of the main streets of that city. Can 
we not find in the horrible and damning 
oaths which these men took in the 
Knight Templar degree and the lower de- 
grees, the secret of that fearful condition 
of conscience and desertion of the Holy 
Spirit which induced them to destroy 
their own lives? 



November, 189, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



215 



The Christian Cynosure. 

Official Organ of the National 
Christian Association. 

A 32-page monthly with cover, opposed to 
secret societies, represents the Christian move- 
ment against the secret lodge system; dis- 
cusses fairly and fearlessly the various move- 
ments of the lodge as they appear to public 
view, and reveals the secret machinery of cor- 
ruption in politics, courts, and social and re- 
ligious circles. In advance, $1 per year. 



The Cynosure is published monthly under 
the management of a Board of eleven Direct- 
ors: Rev. J. A. Collins (U. P.), Rev. E. B. 
Wylie (Cong'l), Rev. W. O. Dinins (U. B.), 
Mr. E. A. Cook (Cong'l), Rev. T. B. Arnold 
■(Free M.), President C. A. Blanchard, Prof. 
E. Whipple (Cong'l). Mr. C. J. Holmes (Swe. 
Luth.). Mr. J. M. Hitchcock (Indept.), Prof. 
H. F. Kletzing (Evang'l), P. W. Raidabaugh 
(Friend). 

Rev. M. A. Gault, editor Christian Cyno- 
sure, 221 West Madison street, Chicago, 111. 

Wm. I. Phillips, Secretary and Business Manager, 
to whom all letters containing money and relating to 
the business of the paper must be addressed at 221 
West Madison Stre t, Chicago, Ills. 

Testimonies, With Portraits. 

This booklet of thirty pages contains the 
statements of prominent Congregational min- 
isters and Associations on the secret lodge 
system. Postpaid 5 cents each. 



Folly, Expense and Danger 

Secret Societies. 

By CHARLES A. BLANCHARD, President 
of Wheaton College. 

They may be rudely classified as religious; 
e. g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfellow- 
ship, the Knights of Pythias, etc.: political, as 
the Know-nothings, Knights of the Golden 
Circle, the Order of American Deputies, the 
Kuklux-Klan, the White League, etc. : indus- 
trial; as the unions of carpenters, bricklayers, 
conductors, engineers, etc.: insurance; as the 
Royal Arcanum, the Modern .Woodmen, the 
Order of the Iron Hall, the Ancient Order of 
United Mechanics, etc.: and the social; as the 
college fraternities. Postpaid 5 cents each. 



BLESSED MEMORIES. 
A life of Mrs. Jonathan Blanchard, by her 
(laughter, Mrs. J. W. Fischer, postpaid, GO 
cents. 



Facts and Photographs. 

In this brief booklet are collected the opin- 
ions on secret societies of some fifty men de- 
vout in piety, profound in scholarship, and 
eminent in statecraft, also the testimonies of 
seceders from the lodge, as well as extracts 
from standard Masonic writers. 

Postpaid 5 cents each. 

Holden With Cords. 

Or the Power of the Secret Empire. A faith- 
ful representation in story of the evil influence 
of Freemasonry, by E. E. Flagg, Author of 
"Little People," "A Sunny Life," Etc. This 
is a thrillingly interesting story, accurately true 
to life, because mainly a narration of historical 
facts. In cloth, $1; paper, 50 cents. 



COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Their custom, character, and efforts for their 
suppression. By H. L. Kellogg. Containing 
the opinion of many college presidents, and 
others, and a full acount of the murder of Mor- 
timer Leggett. 25 cents each. 



American Hand Book and 
Citizens' Manual. 

By M. N. BUTLER. 

This is a book of 200 pages, 7V2 by 5 inches, 
and is sent postpaid for 25 cents. There are 
chapters on "Bible and Secretism," "Lodge 
and Saloon," "All-round Reformers," etc., 
etc. 25 cents each. 

ONLY TEN CENTS. 



Trial subscribers for the balance of 
1897 at the nominal rate of 10 cents for 
three months — October, November and 
December. 

Cannot every subscriber to the Cyno- 
sure send at least one at the above rate? 
There is no easier way to warn your 
neighbors against the lodge idolatry than 
to send the Cynosure for three months. 
The price is nominal, but we hope that we 
may secure in this way a large number of 
permanent subscribers. 



During November and December the Self- 
Pronouncing S. S. Teachers' Bible ^^ill he- 
given as a premium for one renewal and fouv 
new annual subscriptions to The Cynosure. 
(See advertisement.) 



■P"^!^ 



^i^wifnswmiHyWJisLi 



tio 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1897. 



Standard Works 

-ON- 

Seefet Soeieties 

i^Ok SALE BY THE 

Mlimi CllSTIHN eSSSGlHTION. 

221 West Aladison St., Chicago, Hi. 

TERMS;--Cash with order, or if sent by express 
4^. O. D= at least $i.oo must be sent with order as 
■i. guaranty that books will be taken. Books a^ 
\v.Ai_ prices sent postpaid. Books by Mail s-'e ar^ 
r;.««k oi persons ordering, unless 8 cents extra is 
ssiit to pay for registering them, when tneir safe 
^ieiivery is guaranteed. Books at retail ordered 
■zj express, are sold at lo per cent discount aad 
ielif ery guaranteed^ but not express p®l<L F^mP 
£gs stamps takeH for imall §^mi» 

ON FREEMASONRY. 

Freemasonry Hiustrated. First 
three degrees. 376 pages cloth, 75c; 
paper, 40c. 
The accuracy of these expositions attested by 

affidavits ot Jacob O. Doesburg and others. 

Freemasonry Illustrated. 640 

pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 75c. 
A complete expositon of the Blue Lodge and 
Chapter consisting of .'?evea degrees. Profusely 
^^iustrated. 

Knighl Tentplarisri IlStistrated. 

341 pages, cloth, $1.00; paper, 50c. 
A full illustrated rit 'al of the six degrees ol 
^im Council and Cornmandery. 

Hand=Book of Freemasonry. 274 

pages, flexible cloth, 50c. 

By E. Ronayne, Past Master ot Keystone Lodge 
No. 639, Chicago. Gives the complete standard 
ritual of the first three degrees of Freemasonry. 

Scotch Rite flasonry^OIustrated. 

2 vols. Per vol., cloth, $1.00: paper, 65c. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the entire 
Scottish Rite, comprising all the Masonic degrees 
from 3rd to 33rd inclusive. The first three de- 
gre^s^are corhmon to all the Masonic Rites, and 
are fully and accurately given in " Freemasonry 
Illustrated." Vol. 1 comprises the degrees from 
3rd to i8th inclusive. 

Vol. 11 comprises the degrees from 19th to 33rd 
»-.;rjusive. with the signs, erips. tokens and pass- 
x-orrie tr-'^-'xi IS?- to 33rd *^t©e illf^iua^ve. 

Freemasonry Exposed. By Capt. 

William Morgan. 1 10 pages, paper, 25c, 
The genuine old Morgan book republished. 

£cce Orienti. Pocket size, full 

roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the First 
Three Masonic Degrees in Cypher, with complete 
Floor Charts of Initiating, Passing and Raising a 
Candidate. 

Cabala. Pocket size, full ro?n, 

flap, $2.50. ' 

The Complete Standard Ritual of the Chapter 
Masonic Degrees; 4th to 7th inclusive, in Cypher. 



ive. in uyi 
, Past Ma 



)eg . 

Giving the degreesof Mark Master 
M'««t tf3tf"*l«pt Master and R^vai Arck 

Knights of the Orient. Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Ritual of the Cornmandery 
Masonic Degrees, Knights of the Red Cross, 
Knight Templar and Knight of Malta, nth to 13th 
Ci-:;;rees. 



Allyn's Ritual of Freemasonry, 

By Avery AUyn. Cloth, $5.00. 
Contains the fully Illustrated Ritual of the Blue 
Lod.^e. Chapter Council and Cornmandery, ti of 
the Scotch Rite Degrees, several Masonic side 
degrees and what is termed a Key to the Phi Beta 
Kappa, and the Orange Societies. 

Duncan's Masonic Ritual and 

Monitor. Cloth, $2.50. 

Profusely illustrated with explanatory engrav- 
ings, and containing the vitual and work of the or- 
der for the seven degrees, inclu-'ang the Royal 
Arch. Though extensively used as an Instruction 
Book and one of the best in the market, it is not 
as accurate as "Freemasonry' rlustrated." 

Richardson's Mo^i^or of Freema- 

sonrj'. Cloth, $i.2v>; paper, 75c. 

Contains the ceremonies of Lodges, Chapters, 
Encampmenl3, etc. Illustrated. Although ex- 
tensively used in conferring the higher degrees, 
it is not only vf^y incomplete but inaccurate 
especially as regards the first seven degrees, and 
iisto the high r degrees it '^ives but a description 
snd general idea of th-i degrees rather than the 
full ritual. 

Look to the East. A ritual of the 
first three Masonic Degrees by Ralph 
Lester. Cloth, $2.00. 

Notwithstanding the high price this book is 
very inferior in every way to Freemasonry Illus- 
trated or the Handbook of Freemasonry at a 
quarter the price. 

Cotsocll of the Orier?!, Pocket 

size, full roan, flap, $2.50. 

The Complete Standard Ritual ol Council 
Masonic Degrees in Cypner, Sth to 10th inclusive. 
Giving the Degrees of Royal Master, Select Mas- 
ter and Super Excellent Mastei. 

Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Re- 
vised and enlarged edition, 40 pageSj 
paper, 25c. 

An Illustrated Ritual of the Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine. This is a Side Masonic degree con- 
terred only on Knights Templar and on Thirty 
wo degree Masons. 

Thirteen Reasoa^s why a Chriss- 
tsan should not foe a Freemasoo, 
By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages, 

Freemasonry Contrary to the 
Ctirisiian Reifiglon. By " Spectator," 
Atlanta, Ga. 16 pages cc. 

Hon. Thurlow Weed on the Mof= 
gan Abduction. 16 pages 5c. 

Thi3 is the legally attested statement of this 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and confinement of 
Capt. Morgan in Canandaigua jail, his removal to 
Fort Niagara and subsequent drowning in Lake 
Ontario. 

Freemasonry a Fourfold Con^ 
spiracy. 16 pages, 5c. 

Address of Pres. J. Blanchard. This is a most 
convincing argument against the lodge, 

Mah=Hah=Bone; 589 pages; $i.00' 

Comprises the Hand Book, Master's Carpet and 
Freemasonry at a glance. 

ON ODD-FELLOWSHIP. 

Odd=fellowship Judged by its own 

utterances; its doctrine and practice 
examined in light of God's Word. By 
Rev. J. H. Brockman. Cloth, 50c; pa- 
per cover, 25c. 

This is an exceedingly interesting, clear discus- 
sion of the chara ^ter of Odd-fellowship, in the form 
of a dialogue. 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



21' 



Revised Odd=fellowship Illustra=- 

ted. Cloth, $[.oo: paper cover, 5octs. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge En- 
campment and Rebekah (ladies) degrees, profuse- 
ly illustrated, and guaranteed to be strictly ac- 
curate; with a sketch of origin, history and char- 
acter of the order, over one hundred toot-note 
quotations from standard authorities, showing the 
character and teachings of the order, and an an- 
alysis of each degree by ex-President J . Blanchard. 
This ritual corresponds exactly with the "Charge 
Books" furnished by the Sovereign Grand Lodere. 

Sermon on Odd=feIlowship and 
other secret societies, by Rev. J. Sar- 
ver, pastor of Evangelical Lutheran 
church. IOC. each. 

This is a very clear argument against secretism of 
all forms and. the duty to disfellowship Odd-fel- 
Jows, Freemasons, Knights of Pythias and Gran- 
gers, is clearly shown by their confessed character 
as found in their own publications. 

OTHER RITUALS. 

Revised Knights of Pythias, llJu^' 
trated. Cloth, 50c: paper 'Over 25c. 
An exact copy of the new official Ritual Adopted 

by the Supreme Lodge of the world, with the Se- 

«ret work added and fully Illustrated. 

Knights of the Orietit Illustrated, 

15c each. 

The full Illustrated Rit'ia j,. Ancient Order ot 
the Orient or the Oriental degree. This Is a side 
degree conferred mostly i Knights of Pythias 
lodges. 

Good Templarisnr Illustrated, 25c. 

A full and accurate exposition of the degrees of 
the lodge, temple and council. 

Exposition of thf' Grange. 25c. 

Edited by Rev. A. W. jeeslin. Illustrated with 
engravings. 

Ritual of tbfi Grand Army of the 
Republic loc. each. 

The authorized ritual of 1868, with signs of re- 
cognition, pass-words, etc., and ritual of Machin- 
ists' and Blacksmiths' Union, (The two bound to- 
gether.) 

Knights of Labor Illustrated. 25c. 

("Adelphon Kruptos.'') The com^ .'ete illus- 
trated ritual ot the order, including the "unwritten 
work." 

Adoptive Masonry Illustrated. 

20c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the five 
degrees of Female Freemasonry, by Thomas Lowe. 

Red rien Illustrated. In cloth 50c. 

each, $2.00 per dozen postpaid. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men. comprising the Adop- 
tion Degree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree, 
Chief-s Degree, with the Odes, etc. 

The Foresters Illustrated. Paper. 

cover 25c. each, $2.00 per dozen. 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Forest- 
ers, with Installation Ceremonies. 

United Sons of Industry Illustra- 
ted. 15c. each. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the sec- 
ret tradesunion ot the above name, giving the 
signs, grips, passwords, etc 

Rituals and Secrets Illustrated. 

$1.00, each. 

Composed of "Temple of Honor Illustrated, 
Adoptive Masonry Illustrated," "United Sons of 
Industry I)'*'strated," and "Secret Societies Illus- 
trated " 

Sermon on flasonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor of United Pres- 
byterian church. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

History Nat'I Cnristian Associ^ 
ation. IOC. each. 

Its origin, objects, what it has done and aims to 
do, and the best means to accomplish the end 
sought, the Articles ot Constitution and By-laws 
of tne Association. 

Secret Societies. Cloth 35c, papc 
15c. 

A discussion of their character and claims by 
Rev. David McDill, Pres. J. Blanchard and Rev 
Edward Beecher. 

The Master's Carpet or flasonry 
and Baal Worship Identical. Bound 
in fine cloth. 400 pages. 75c. 
Explains the true source and meaning of every 

ceremony and symbol of the lodge. 

Disloyal Secret Oaths. 5c. 

By Joseph Cook, Boston. He quotes the law of 
Vermont which makes the administration of the 
Masonic oaths illegal. Joseph Cook's address is a 
national treatment of a national subject, and very 
valuable for reference. 

Light on Freemasonry. By Elder 

Do Bernard, Cloth, $1.50. paper, 75c. 

Finney on flasonry. Cloth 75c., 

paper 35c. 

The character claims and practical workings of 
Freemasonry. By ex-Pres. Charles G. Finney, of 
Oberlin College. President Finney was a " bright 
Mason," but left the lodge when he became a 
Christian. This book has opened the eyes cf 
multitudes. 

riasonic Oaths Null and Void: cr 
Freemasony Self=Convicted. 207 

pages. Postpaid, 40c. 

This is a book for the times. The design of the 
author is to refute the arguments of those who 
claim that the oaths of Freemasonry are binding 
upon those who take thero. 

Judge Whitney's Defence before 
the Grand Lodge of Hlinois. 15c. 

Judge Daniel H. Whitney was Master of the 
lodge when S. H. Keith, a member of his lodge, 
murdered Ellen Slade. Judge Whitney, by at- 
tempting to bring Keith to justice, brought on 
him.self the vengeance of the lodge, but he boldly 
replied to the charges against him, and afterwards 
rcncunced Mason'-y 

General Washington Opposed to 
Secret Societies. loc. 

This is a re-publication of-Governor Joseph Rit- 
ner's "Vindication of General Washington from 
the Stigma of Adherence to Secret Societies."' 
communicated to the House of Representatives of 
Pennsylvania, March 8, 1837. at their special re- 
quest. To this is added the fact that three high 
l^Iasons were the only perso iS who opposed a vote 
of thanks to Washington on his retirement to pri- 
vate liie-undoubtedly because they considered him 
a seceding Freemason. 

riorgan's Exposition, Abduction 

and flurder and Oaths of 33 degrees. 

304 pages, cloth, $1.00, 
" Composed of Freemasonry Exposed," by Capt. 
Wm. Morgan; '"History of the Abduction and 
Murder of Morgan;" "Valance's Confession of 
the Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan;" "Bernard's, 
Reminiscences of Morgan Times," and "Oaths 
and Penalties ot 33 Degrees." 

Oaths and Penalties of Freemason- 
ry, as proved in court in New Berlin 
tiials IOC. 

The New Berlin trials began in the attempt of 
Freemasons to prevent public initiatirn by seced- 
ing >iasons. These trials were heldatXew Berlin. 
Chenango Co.. N, Y., April 13 and 14, 1S31. anv"* 
General Augustus C. Welsh, sheriff of the county, 
and other adhering Freemasons swore to the trutli 
ful revelation of the oaths and penal t^es. 



•»v»?" 



218 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897. 



The Anti-mason*s 5crap-Book. 

25c. 

Consisting of 53 "Cynosure" tracts. In thiS 
book are the views of more than a score of men, 
many ot them of distinguished ability, on the sub* 
iect of secret societies. 

The Image of the Beast; A Secret 
Empire; or Freemasonry a Subject of 
Prophecy. By Rev. Richard Horton. 
Third Edition'. 200 pages, cloth, 60c. 

Grand Lodge riasonry. 5c. each 

Its relation to civil government and the Christian 
religion. By Pres. J. Blanchard. The an-Chris- 
tian, anti-republican and despotic character of 
Freemasonry is proved from the highest Masonic 
authorities. 

Masonry a Work of Darkness, ad- 
verse to Christianity, and inimical 
to Republican Government. 15c. 
By Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong (Presbyterian) a 

seceding Mason of 21 degrees. 

Sermon on Masonry. 5c. each. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a Ma- 
sonic Oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, Ohio. 

Story of the Gods. Postpaid, lOc. 

By 1. R. B. Arnold. Brief sketches from the 
mythology of Rome, Greece, Egypt, India, Persia, 
Phrygia, Scandinavia, Africa and America, show- 
ing the relations and unity of the past and present 
systems. The idolatrous worship of the Masonif 
lodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 

Masonic Outrages. Postpaid, 20c. 

Compiled by Rev. H. H. Hinman. Showing 
Masonic assualt on lives of seceders, on reputation, 
and on free speech; its interference with justice iv 
courts, etc 

History of the Abduction and Mur- 
der of Capt. Wm. Morgan. 25c. 

As prepared by seven committees of citizens, 
appointed to ascertain the fate of Morgan. 

Sermon on Secretism, 5c. eacn. 

By Rev. R. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregationa) 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear ayri 
of the objections to all secret societies, and to Ma- 
"~nrv especially, that are apparent to alL 

Anti=masonic Sermons and Ad=" 
dresses. Cloth, $1 00. 

Composed of " Masonry a Work of Darkness;" 
the Sermons of Messrs. Cross, William M'Nary, 
Dow and Sarver, the two addresses of President 
Blanchard, and the addresses of President H. H. 
George, Prof. J. G. Carson and Rev. M. S. Drury; 
"Thirteen Reasons Why a Christain Cannot be a 
Freemason," " Freemasonry Contrary to the 
Christian Religion," and " Are Masonic Oaths 
Binding on the Initiate? " 287 pages. 

Secret Societies, Ancient and 

Modern. 50c. each. 

Contents: The Antiquity of Secret Societies 
The Life of Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, The 
Origin of Masonry, Was Washington a Mason.' 
Fillmore and Webster's Deference to Masonry, A 
Brief Outline of the Progress of Masonry in the 
United States, The Tammany Ring, Masonic Be- 
nevolence, The Uses of Masonry, An Illustration. 
The Conclusion. 

Secret Societies Illustrated. 

Over 250 cuts, 99 pages, paper cover, 
25c. each. 

Containing the signs, grips, passwords, em- 
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the fourteenth d'^'^ree of the York rite). Adoptive 
Ma!f.«.,^, Revised Odd-fellowship, Good Templar- 
ism, the Temple of Honor, the United Sons of In- 
dustry, Knights of Pythias and the Grange, with 
afiBdavits. etc. 

Prof. J. Q. Carson, D. D., on Se- 
cret Societies. loc. each. 

A most convincing argument against fellowship- 
iof^ freemasons in the Christian church. 



Sermon on flasonry. i6 pages, 
5c. B^ Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor 
United Presbyterian church. 

Oaths and Penalties of the S3 
Degrees of Freemasonry. 15c. each. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes half-a-million horri- 
ble oaths. 

Ex=President John Quincy Ad- 
ams. Price, cloth, $1.00. Paper, 35c. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
gations and Penalties. 

Sermon on flasonry. loc. each. 

By Rev. James Williams, Presiding Elder of 
Dakota District Northwestern Iowa Conference 
M. E. Church— a seceding Master Mason. 

The Mystic Tie or Freemasonry a 
League with the Devil. 15c. 

This IS an account of the church trial of Peter 
Cook and wife, of Elkhart, Indiana, for refusing 
to support a reverend Freemason. 

Sermon on Secret Societies. 5c. 

each. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of his sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to examine into the char- 
acter of secret societies, no matter what object 
such societies profess to have. 

Reminiscences of florgan Times. 

IOC. each. 

By Elder David Bernard. This is a thrilling 
narrative of the incidents connected with Ber- 
nard's Revelation of Freemasonry. 

The Broken Seal. In cloth, 75c. 
Paper covers, 40c. 

Personal Reminiscences of the Abduction and 
Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan. By Samuel D. 
Greene. 

Pres. H. H. George on Secret 

Societies. loc. each. 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty ot 
Christian churches to disfellowship secret socie- 
ties. 

Narratives and Arguments, 

15c. each. 

Showing the conflict of secret societies with the 
Constitution and law of the Union and of the 
States. By Francis Semple. 

Secrecy vs. the Family, State 
and Church. loc. each. 

By Rev. M. S. Dury. The antagonism of. or- 
ganized secrecy to the welfare of the family, state 
and church, is clearly shown. 

A Booklet of 107 pages. 25c. 

"The Martyr's Own Monument," by Rev. J. E. 
Roy, D. D., Western Secretary of American Mis- 
sionary Association; "Christian Politics," by^ 
ReT. J. Blanchard, late Editor of Christian Cyno- 
sure; " The Mysterious Machine: Was it Lawn- 
mower, Town-pump, Balloon, Wheel-barrow, — or 
what?" by Prof. E. D. Bailey, of the Civil Service 
Dept. U. S. Government. 

Are Secret Societies a BSessing? 

A pamphlet of 20 pages. 5c. 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., pastot 
of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, Mo., 
Jan. 4, 1891. W, McCoy writes: "That sermon 
ought to be in the hands of every preacher in this 
land, and every citizen's, too." 

Betw^een Two Opinions: or the 
Question of the Hour. 389 pages; cloth, 
postpaid, 75 cents. 

By Miss E. E. Flagg, author of " Little People," 
"A Sunny Life," etc., etc. Everyone who loves 
to read a good story, chaste and elegant in ex- 
pression, pure in thought, interesting in narrative, 
should read this book upon the powei of secret 
societies in nolitics. ar d the remedy. 



Kovember, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



119 



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,'i.«E CF ;.'B..v:. 




















IJ:l?;hilV>i!ii!!a 



96" 



:GR::S 



OF 




MASONIC CHART. 

ILLUSTRATING THE RELATION OF SOME OF THE DEGREES AND RITES IN 
FREEMASONRY TO EACH OTHER. 
The accompanying- chart represents one hundred and forty two degrees. 

1. The American Rite of 13 degrees: 2. The Scotch Rite of Z5 degrees; 

3. The Egyptian Rite of 96 degrees. 4. The Mystic Shrine of one degree. 

5. The Eastern Star of S degrees for Master Masons and for women. These are side degrees, and not 
genuine masonry. 

The Symbolic degrees, or Blue Lodge of three degrees, are common to every Masonic rite, whether 
American. Scotch, or Egyptian, or whichever of the Masonic, rites, named in Mackey's Masonic Encyck)- 
pedia one may choose to investigate. ^ 

This chart shows in the Blue Lodge the position of the Worshipful Master and some of the other offi- 
cers of the lodge. .Several positions of the ca viidate who is being initiated are also shown. In the Master 
Mason's degree is rt-ognized the murder, buriai anJ resurrection scene so full of relig:ious signifi. 'nee to 
Freemasons. 



^egiwi!^^jLti.mjuiijii.i.wiiiu*^.tiyi.pBiiPiPiPiiiPiwpi^ . I . .nil 



220 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897. 




The Celebrated 

Marsh 
Reading 
Stand 



—AND- 



Revolving 
Book Case. 

Recognized throughout the civile 
ized world to be unequaled as an^ 
Office or Library article, is now 
offered as a 

PREMIUM 

to new subscribers. Over 5o,ooo 
now used by the profession, bank- 
ers and business men, who concede 
it is the "Missing Link" between 
the Secretary and the Library. 



34 inches high; by patent extension rod can be raised to 5o inches.. 
Oak shelves, with carved oak slats, make the case i5xi5xr2, and ample 
room for all reference books for daily use. The top, or Dictionary Hol- 
der, 14x18 inches, is large and strong enough for any volume, and is. 
adjustable to any angle or height The base is oak, 12 inches high. 
Between shelves, 1 1 inches. Revolves easily. 

Price of Marsh Stand $10.00 

Year's Subscription to Christian Cynosure, 1.00 

$11.00 

For $5, Money Order or Chicago Draft, this |io stand will be ship- 
ped to you and our paper sent you one year, all charges paid. 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



221 



NEW IRON LASTS % HOME SEPAiRiNG OUTHT 

The Latest Neatest, Cheapest aftd Best Outfit Evei Invented. 





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THB HOltfE BKPAIRrNt* nxTTFTr NO, 1. 



Consisting of 38 First-Ctass Tool^ dM M^m t neatly Doxed) Sbowfl id Cut, viz.: 



i Iron Last, 8 inchea„ 

i Iron Last, 6 inches. 

1 Iron Last, 4 inches. 

1 Iron Standard, with Base^ 

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1 Package 4-8 Wire Clinch Nails. 

1 Package 5-8 Wire Clinch Nalli. 

1 Package 6-8 Wire Clinch Nails. 

r> Pairs Star Heel Plates. 

% lb Copper Rivets and Bunn. 

1 Steel Punch. 

1 Sewing Awl, complete. 

1 Pegging Awl, complete, 

1 Wrench for above. 

1 Stabbing Awl, complete. 



I Stoeknife, 

I Shoehammer. 

1 Bottle Rubber CemeBt 

1 Bottle Leather Cement, 

i_ Harness and Saw Clamp> 

1 Ball Wall. 

1. Ball Shoe Thread. 

1 Bunch Bristles. 

4 Harness Needles. 

1 Soldering Iron. 
. 1 Bottle Soldering FiuSC 

i Box Rosin. 
J 1 Bar Solder. 
i 1 Directions for Use. 



All these tools are full-sized, practical, neat, and cheap; not mere toys. 
They enable any person to do his own half-soling, boot, shoe, rubber, har- 
ness, and tinware repairing. 

This Outfit is the result of years of study, experiment, and correspond- 
ence in the manufacture of Iron Lasts and Repairing Outfits- and its prac- 
tical advantages need only to be seen and tried to be appreciated. 

Our Improved Iron Lasts and Standard are one of the handiest tools 
you can have about the place. . The Lasts are four in number, smooth 
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be easily fastened to the bench. No method of hali-soling is now used 
on^ common work, except that of iron last and wire clinch nails. The 
writer of this has been in the business 20 years, and has seen the changes 
from the old wooden lasts and pegs to the modem method, and knows 
it to be complete. 

Our Improved Harness and Saw Clamp is an indispensable too!l in sew- 
ing a harness or filing a saw. The jaws are thrown open mechanically by 
a coiled spring on the bolt. 

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neat strongr box, only $3.00. 

Complete Boot, Shoe and Rubber Repairing Outfit, consistiDg of 31 
first-class tools and materials. The No. 2 outfit contains the same articles 
as the No. 1, excepting the Harness and Soldering Tools, and is gotten up 
for those who have no harness or tinware repairing to do. Price of No. 2. 
neatly boxed, $2.00, or with the paper one year, $2,25. Price of No. 1, 
neatly boxed, with the paper one year, $3.10. 

1^=NEW TERMS: The Gynomre and No. 1 for only $3.00, vr No. 2 
tor only $2 25. 



PPPPPPUppHiPPIIIilij I iJ iiiiii.JJMPMWHjPHIViMMMW 



liillMW 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897. 



'im\ 





(See Page 68 Fraternal Degree M. W. A.) 



Modern Woodmen of America. 



I !_ ]_ T-j ^ ~r i=? j^ -r :e ED , 



The Complete Revised Official Ritual 



OF THE 



Beneficiary and Fraternal Degrees, 

Including the Unwritten or Secret Work, 



And the Installation and Funeral Ceremonies, vvrith the Odes and 
Hymns of the Order. Sent postpaid for 25 cents. 



November, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



223 



Horace Oreeley:- M&ny persons were 
brought to trial o::, ■er^'jount of the mur- 
der of Morgan, but uo one was judicially 
found guilty c f m'lrder. It was estab- 
lished by secei ling Masons thst the oaths 
—at least in so tne of the highest degrees 
— that were administered, and taken by 
those admitted to Masonic lodges, dis- 
qualified them from serving as jurors in 
any case where a brother Mason of like 
degree wars » party, and his antagonist 
was not. 



Bon. CadwaUader C. CoCden, Mayor of 
New York and M. C: — It is true that I 
have been a Mason a great number of 
years, and that I have held very high 
Masonic oflaces and honors. It is equally 
true that I have for a long time ceased to 
have any connection with the institution 
because I have believed, and do now be- 
lieve, it is productive of much more evil 
than good. I have long entertained my 
present opinion, tl r.t a man who would 
eschew all evil ahoi i i not be a Freemason 




BORN 
SEPTEMBER 

18, 
1841. 



FOR MORE THAN FIFTY-SIX YEARS IT HAS NEVER FAILED IN ITS 
WEEKLY VISITS TO THE HOMES OF FARMERS AND VIL- 
LAGERS THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES. 



IT HAS faithfully labored for their prosperity and happiness, for the im- 
provement of their business and home interests, for education, for 
the elevation of American manhood and true womanhood. 

IT HAS told at the fireside interesting and instructive stories of the doings 
of the world, the nation and states. 

IT HAS advised the farmer as to the most approved methods of cultivating 
and harvesting his crops, and the proper time to convert them 
into the largest possible amount of money. 

IT HAS led in all matters pertaining to the welfare of farmers and villagers 
and for ever half a century has held their confidence and esteem. 



It is the NEW YORK WEEKLY TRIBUNE, and we furnish it with the CYNO- 
SURE one year for $1.25, cash in advance. 

Address all orders to CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Write your name and address on a postal card, send it to (Jeo. AV. Best, Tribune 
Office. New York City, and a sample copy of THE NEW YORK WEEKLY TRIBUNE 
will l)e mailed to you. 



ij*ilWiMW).."'>ii> 



vrfim ' ^ B PWi^^iv.*'^ ^ 



224 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1897 




Grin and bear it. 



That's what you'll have to do, if your 
housework tires you out and you won't 
take away the hardest part of it with 
Pearline. That's what women have 
had to do for lo, these thousands of years. 
Pearline has done, and is, doing, 
more to lio-hten and brighten 
woman's work than any other 
one thing-. It saves her time, 
her money, her health and strength, in hundreds of ways. 
Do everv bit of your washing and cleaning with Pearline. 535 

M7//o/?S''''!fsfPe^r///?e 



Charles C. Foots: — What would liie 
introduction of Christ into Mohamme- 
danism be, but ita annihijation? And 
thus would it be with Masonry. 

Albh-rt Barn Eg, 1849: — Any good 
cause, I think, can be promoted openly; 
any secret association is liable, at least, 
to abuse and danger. 

Rev. John G. Stearns, well-known 
author: — Masonry will by no means die 
of itself; nor will it separate itself from 
the church of God. No; it will cling to 
it, like the deadly scorpion to the victim 
on which it fastens. The church must 
therefore separate from that. 



I'liuiiLow AYeed: "I now look back through iin 
interval of fifty-six years with a conscious sense of 
having been governed through the Anti-masonic ex- 
citement by a sincere desire, first to vindicate the vio- 
lated laws of my country, and next to arrest the great 
power and dangerous influences of secret societies." 



A. M. Sullivan, Irish Leader : "I had not studied 
in vain the history of secret, oath-bound associations. 
1 regard them with horror. I knew all that could be 
said as to their advantages in revolutionizing a coun- 
try, but even in the firmest and best of hands they had 
a direct tendency to demoralization, and are often on 
the whole more perilous to society than open tyranny." 



Knights of the Maccabees. 



ILLXJSTCK^ATEr). 



The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the 
Order, Including the Un- 
written Work. 

" The altar is to stand in the center of the hall, covered with drapery, 
as follows: The top black, the sides red, six inches deep, and four inches 
of white added to the red, or four inches of white fringe may be used. On 
this will be placed the Bible and Circle, upon which the obligation is ta- 
ken."— Pa^e 7. 

Postpaid, 25 cents each. 

HMress WM 1. PHILLIPS Business Manager, - 221 West Madison Street, Ctiicago 



SelMt^ronounclng.. 
SS.Ceacber's 




Sible 



BOURGEOIS TYPE, 8V0, 

SIZE, 5Xx7^xi>^ INCHES. 



This Bible is bound in French Morocco, Divinity Circuit' 
Gold Back and Side Titles, Linen Lined, Red under Gold, 

REGULAR PRICE. S4-.00- 

We Will Send, Until Further Notice, this Bible Postpaid, 
and the Christian Cynosure: to New Subscribers 

for Only, - $3.00 

»' — • — ^ — ■ — 

REMEMBER, this Bible has a Self- Pronouncing Dictionary of Proper Names 
and Foreign Words contained in the Bible. Comprising about 3500 words, 
giving the pronunciation, the meaning, and the location of the text where 
the word occurs for the first time. Exhaustive Articles on Biblical History, 
Geography, Topography, Natural History, Ethnology, Botany, Chronology, 
Music and Poetry ; a Complete Harmony of the Gospels, Tables of Parables, 
Miracles, Prophecies, Prayers, Money, Weights and Measures, Jewish Sects 
and Orders, and Fourteen Beautiful Maps in Colors. 



We will send this Bible postpaid to 
^ny one sending us a list of 10 sub- 
scribers for the CHRISTIAH CYNOSURE 
at $1.00 each. 



IF NOT SATISFACTORY WE 

WILL TAKE BIBLE BACK 

AND REFUND THE 

MONEY. 



NATIONAL 
CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION, 
Chicago, 111. 



Sample of 
Type... 



THE GOSPEL ACCORD 

SAINT MATTI 



CHAPTER 1. 

I The genealogy of Christ from Abraham to Joseph. 
18 He was conceived by the Holy Ghost, and bom 



of the Virgin Mary, 
names of Christ. 



19 The angel interpreietk the 



THE book of the ® generation of 
Je'§us Christ, ^ the son of Da'- 
vid, ^ the son of A'bra-ham. 

2 ^'A'bra-ham begat T^aac; and 
^I'gg^ac begat Ja'cgb; and -^ Ja'cQb 
begat Ju'das and his brethren; 

3 And S' Ju'das begat Pha'r6§ and 
Za'ra of Tha'mar; and '^Pha'rg? 
begat fis'rom; and Es'rom begat 
A'ram; 

4 And A'ram begat A-mln'^-dab ; 
and A-mln'^-dab begat N^-as'son; 
and N5,-as'Bon begat Sai'mOn; 

5 And Sai'mOn begat Bo'oz of Ra'- 



a Luke 3. 23. 
b Ps. 132. 11. 

I«. 11. 1. - 

Jer. 23. 5. 

ch. 22. 42. 

John 7. 42. 

Acts 2. 30; 

13. 23. 

Rom. 1. 3. 
c Gen. 12. 3 ; 

22.18. 

Gal. 3. 16. 
d Gen. 21. 2,3. 

e Gen. Cj. 26. 
/Gen. 29.35. 

g Gen. 38. 27, 
&c. 

h Ruth 4. 18, 
&c. 

lChr.2.5,9, 
&c. 

1 1 Sam. 16. 1 ; 
17. 12. 

*2Sam.l2.24. 
/ 1 Chr. 3. 10, 
&c. 

m 2 Kin. 20, 
21. 



hU8 

Je'^ 
17 

h^n 
tioa 
ryii 
teei 
carl 
Chr 

18 
waa 
thei 
bef< 
foui 

19 
a ju 
her 
to ) 






WHEATON COLLEGE ^ 



Wheaton, Illinois. 







CLASSICAL, SCIENTIFIQ AND LITERARY COURSES ^^ 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL-Fits for any College ^ 

ARTSCHOOL— Celebrated for prepafing: teachers ^ 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC ^ 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 

TERMS BEGIN Sept. 2J, ^97, Jan. 4, '98, April 5, '98, and July 4, '98. -,^ 



Send for Catalogue. 



CHARLES A. BLANCHARD, Pres. 



J' J- S' 



J^ J> J' ^ <^ ^ -^ ^ 



J. J> J' ^ ^ '^ ^ 




REV. T. B. ARNOLD, 



CONTENTS. 



A u Auti-Secret Sermon 22G 

Yoked with Unbelievers 227 

Anti-Masonic Sentiment 229 

Danger from Secret Organizations 230 

Lodge Educates for AVar 231 

Secrecy and Citizenship 233 

An Enemy of the Home 234 

Ten Anti-Lodge Points 236 

Can We Believe George Washington?. . .230 

From Secretary Phillips 237 

The Philadelphia Convention 239 

From Rev. P. B. Williams 239 

From Rev. W. B. Stoddard 240 



r'rom Rev. W. Fenton 240» 

Southern Illinois Convention 241 

Edmund Ronayne in Iowa 2*2: 

Editorial Field Notes 242 

An Incident 243 

Re.v. T. B. Arnold 24^- 

Proper to Take an Oath 244 

AA'hen Is an Oath Proper? 244 

Objections to Modern Woodmen 244- 

Was It Masonic Murder? 244r 

Wha;t Prolonged the War? 245- 

Stir Among the Odd Fellows 24^ 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



"The National Christian Association, op- 
posed to secret societies," was formed at 
Pittsburg, Pa., in 1868, and incorporated un- 
der the laws of the State of Illinois in 1874. 

The National Ohrlstian' Association arose to 
meet a great want created by the growth of 
secret orders, and' the ignorance and silence 
of public teachere as to their nature and ef- 
fects. 

The association is interdenominational. 
The president (1897) is a Methodist Episco- 
pal, and the vice president a United Presby- 
terian. Among the following named officers 



and agents are also the Free Methodist, Ood^ 
gregational, Lutheran, Friend, Evangelical^ 
United Brethren, Baptist, Reformed Presby- 
terian and Independent 

The principal headquarters of the National* 
Christian Association is at 221 West MadisoB 
street, Chicago, which' property is valued at 
$20,000, and is the gift to the association of 
Dea. Philo Carpenter, one of the founders of 
Chicago. 

The association is supported by the free- 
will offering® and bequests of friends. The- 
Christian Cynosure is its organ and princi- 
pal publication. 



President— Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, Auro- 
ra, 111. 

Vice President— Rev. W. T. Campbell, Mon- 
mouth, 111. 

Recording Secretary— Mrs. M. C. Baker, 14 
North May street, Chicago. 

General Secretary and Treasurei^-Wm. I. 
Phillips, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 

Editor Christian Cynosure— Rev. M. A. 
Gault, 221 West Madison street, Chicago. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

T. B. Arnold, C. A. Blanchard, E. A. Cook^ 
J. M. Hitchcock, O. J. Holmes, T. B. Rada^ 
baugh, E. Whipple, Edgar B. Wylie, H. F. 
Kletzing, J. A. Collins, W. O. Diniu®. 
DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Rev. James P. Stoddard, Boston, Mass.; 
Rev. P. B. Williams, Toledo, Ohio; Rev. 
Wm. Fenton, St. Paul, Minuw; Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard, Washington, D. C. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openlj to the world; aud in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XXX. 



CHICAGO, DECEMBER, 1897. 



NUMBER 8 



PUr.LISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

22/ West Madison Street^ Chicago. 



TERnS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

PRICE.— Per year, in advance. $1.00; three months, on 
trial, twenty-five cents; single copies, 10 cents. 

DISCONTINUANCES.— Wc find that a larcje number 
of our subscribers prefer not to have their sub- 
scriptions interrupted and their files broken in case 
they tail to remit before expiration. It is therefore 
assumed, unless notification to discontmue is re- 
ceived, that the subscriber wishes no interuption in 
his series. Notification to discontmue at expiration 
can be sent in at any time during the year. 

PRESENTATION COPIES.-Many persons subscribe 
for Thb Christian Cynosure to be sent to 
friends. In such cases, if we are advised that a 
subscription is a present and not regularly author- 
ized by the recipient, we will make a memorandum 
to discontinue at expiration, and to send no bill for 
the ensuing year. 



Wfe omit the Ely Williams discussion 
this month, as for some reason the copy 
has failed to reach us. 



Great improvement in The Cynosure is 
contemplated during the coming year. 
Will not every friend of the cause try to 
add at least one to our list? 



Come, brethren of all classes, and add 
your names to our Cynosure list, and we 
will instruct you how by signs and 
grips and ways that are dark and selfish 
some of our citizens get the advantage of 
you. "Come, thou, with us and we will 
do you good." 



"The truth shall make you free,'' is 
illustrated when men by means of anti- 
secret literature have their eyes opened 
to the dark, selfish and despotic pow^^r 
of the lodge, and rise up in their might 
and throw of¥ its galling fetters as they 
did those of the slave power forty years 
ago. 



Past Master Ronayne writes: "Tell 
your readers that I cannot speak to each 
one of them separately, but if T could I 
would. Ask thpm as a favor to the Lord 
Jesus and in testimony for Him to lend 
their Cynosures to their neighbors. In 
that way the Cynosure will do good and 
writers for the paper will be encouraged." 



The Christian Nation says: "We noted 
with regret that, soon after his inaugura- 
tion, the President was initiated into the 
order of the Mystic Shrine, the ancient 
Arabic order of mingled heathenism, Mo- 
hammedanism, Judaism and Christianity. 
W> wonder at times that so much of mere 
worldly life is mixed with so much ritual, 
yet ever and anon, the high dignitaries 
turn up at some solemn service, making 
patent to all men that Masons meet on a 
level with a company which does not in- 
clude Christ. They make up in pomp of 
ceremony what "they lack in religious 
principle." 



Perhaps no man has done more by 
voice and pen to build up the great Free 
Methodist Church than Rev. Thomas 
Brayton Arnold, the subject of our por- 
trait this month. He has also been for a 
number of years one of our most trusted 
and devoted Board of Directors. For 
years he was editor and pubHsher of the 
Free Methodist, He once wrote: "The 
entire term of conducting the paper, with 
occasional exceptions, has been a period 
of financial straits, but the Lord has 
graciously helped and no financial dis-. 
aster has overtaken us. W> do not at- 
tribute it to our sagacity, but to Divine 
aid. Many times in financial straits have 
I left my desk and gone to some of our 
book storerooms and there implored Di- 
vine guidance and interposition, and have 
received answers of peace." 



22fi 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



D 



AN ANTI-SECRET SERMON. 



BY EEV. T. J. ALLEN, STEKLIXG, KAN. 



"O my soul, come not thou into their secret; 
unto their assembly mine honor be not thou 
united." Gen. xlix. 5-6. 

As our little city has been treated dur- 
ing the past \yeek to a demonstration, by 
one of the most popular orders of the 
day, the Alodern Woodmen, I have 
thought this a fitting occasion to take up 
the melancholy cry of good old father 
Jacob and sound a note of warning con- 
cerning one of the most popular evils 
and at the same time one of the greatest 
menaces to the safety of tlfe republic, viz., 
secret, oath-bound orders. They have 
paraded our streets, their bands have 
given out sweet strains of music; they 
have entertained our people with danc- 
ing and have set forth in eloquent words 
the benefits to be enjoyed in their order. 
After such a log-rolling \\q may expect 
to see the camp full of those who are 
anxious to get, if not something for noth- 
ing, at least much for little. 

Some of these orders are anxious to 
pose as modern, others as very ancient. 
One in particular professes to go back for 
its origin as far as Solomon's Temple; 
but here we' have an account of a secret 
association or combination as old as the 
days of the crippled sire Jacob, and if any 
wish to go still farther back they may find 
the first case on record, a few chapters 
earlier in this same book, when the twelve 
Patriarchs were boys and condemned 
one of their own number to death. The 
aged father had been completely deceived 
in the former case, but now he sounds the 
note of warning against such secret wick- 
edness. So following his example to-day, 
we warn against all such associations for 
the following reasons : 

(i) Because of the ensnaring influence 
of secrecy itself. Though not necessarily 
sinful, yet it is dangerous and ensnaring. 
If the cause is a good one it does not re- 
quire to be advanced by such methods, 
and when they are used it is good ground 
at least for suspicion that the cause itself 
is not good. As a matter of fact, history 
and experience both prove that in ad- 
vancing a good cause openness has al- 
ways proved better than secrecy. Nor is 
it claimed that all secret associations are 
equally bad and deserving of reprobation, 



but that the veil of secrecy has a charm 
for the unwary which it is the duty of the 
church of Christ to warn faithfully 
against. What would be thought even 
by those who are so ready to spend their 
money in these institutions of darkness, 
if the church of our Lord were to propose 
to impart light and wisdom to the un- 
mitiated for the paltry sum of fifteen tO' 
twenty-five dollars, having an indefinite 
number of degrees and increasing the 
price as the series advances? Would 
there not be a universal outcry of decep- 
tion and fraud, and would not secrecy 
soon lose its charm in such a case as this? 
And yet that is what is practiced every 
day upon the willing dupes of the lodge 
system. 

(2) We warn against these associations 
because of the sacrilegious and oftentimes 
blasphemous character of the oaths and 
ceremonies of initiation. These associa- 
tions being neither civil or ecclesiastical 
courts, all oaths administered by them 
are extrajudicial and hence not binding,, 
and the very best way to keep them is to 
break them. This feature of these oaths 
was so fully exposed in the times imme- 
diately following the Morgan murder and 
trial that some of the States of our Union 
passed laws declaring them extrajudicial,, 
and hence not binding. Besides, they re- 
quire that a man forswear himself by 
plighting his sacred honor to keep, he 
knows not what until it is revealed. Then, 
too, in many cases the form of initiation 
is so debasing that a man is at once de- 
bauched of his manhood, his moral facul- 
ties corrupted so that he is made a willing 
subject for what may follow in the work 
of the craft. 

(3) Because of the sinful associations 
to which they lead. How few of them 
are careful to observe temperance prin- 
ciples and practices! Nay, rather, are 
not their conclaves usually bacchanalian 
revelries? And as to the Sabbath, is it 
not true that with many of them this is 
their great day of travel going and re- 
turning? When the G. A. R. met a few 
years ago in the city of Pittsburg were 
not the good old Sabbath laws of that 
great commonwealth trodden under foot 
and the staid old conservative city, with 
its usual Sabbath quiet, turned over to 
its visitors, the officers of the municipality 
not even pretending to control the city? 
And when the special cars left our city for 



December, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



22' 



the reunion at Buffalo recently, did they 
leave early in the week so as to complete 
their journey before the Sabbath? Nay, 
did they not plan their trip by leaving on 
the last day of the week so as to travel 
upon the Lord's day? 

(4) We warn against these associations 
because as a rule they are Christless. 
Where Jesus is not openly rejected He is 
silently excluded. They make no pre- 
tensions to be governed by His law or 
His gospel. Prayers in his name are con- 
trary to the genius of these institutions, 
where infidels, Jews, Mohammedans and 
others are all supposed to meet on an 
equality and where nothing is allowed 
that in any way would interfere with a 
man's politics or his religion. Christians 
may and do belong to these associations, 
but as a rule when they enter they must 
leave their Savior outside the door. 

(5) They are constantly swallowing up 
the money that should go for other and 
better purposes. Think of the vast sums 
of money spent in this way in the num- 
berless lodges throughout our vast coun- 
try by both white and black. Those 
churches which rigidly exclude Baal wor- 
shipers from their communions may not 
be able to capture the rich and the 
mighty, but their people will be all the 
more able to consecrate their entire sub- 
stance to the Lord and to his cause so 
that they will be able to carry on more 
■work and do better service for the Master. 
In this we canot serve two masters. 

(6) They are contrary to the genius of 
our institutions under a free, popular, re- 
publican form of government. Under 
such a government as ours all are sup- 
posed to be free and equal, but where 
men are banded together in these secret, 
oath-bound associations, all do not and 
•cannot have equal rights and advantages 
before the law and in advancement to 
honor in the government. Whether ex- 
pressed in the oath or not, these associa- 
tions do favor their own members in 
courts of justice, in social and pecuniary 
benefits and in promotion to of^ce in the 
administration of the affairs of govern- 
ment. 

Because they take the place of the 
church of Christ and hence are one of 
Satan's greatest devices for keeping peo- 
ple out of the church altogether. They 
may deny this, but it is claimed by some 
-at least of the largest and most danger- 



ous of them that they teach all that it is 
necessary for a man to know, believe and 
practice in this world or in the world to 
come, and that if a man only lives up to 
their standard of morality that is all he 
needs for this life or the next. The mu- 
tual help and aid they give each other 
passes for charity and their code of mor- 
als for religion and when people once be- 
come entangled with these bonds they 
are as a rule of but little service there- 
after in the church. When both are tol- 
erated in any communion there is a house 
divided against itself and hence it cannot 
stand. Now% what should be done in re- 
gard to this matter? 

(i) Study the nature and character of 
these institutions. Expose them by turn- 
ing the light of divine truth upon their 
darkness. Read and circulate the abund- 
ant literature upon this subject, especial- 
ly The Christian Cynosure, the organ of 
the Anti-Secret Association, whose aim 
is to overthrow all thes-e works of dark- 
ness. 

(2) Stay away not only from the lodge 
itself, but also from all parades, proces- 
sions and demonstrations whenever our 
presence could in any way be construed 
into an approbation of any such asso- 
ciation. We are here as elsewhere to 
avoid the appearance of evil. 

(3) Let the churches rigidly exclude 
all such from her communion and the bat- 
tle will soon be won. 

(4) Let the State withdraw charters 
from all such associations, refuse to grant 
any more, declare all such illegal and no 
longer cherish institutions that in the day 
of trouble may prove her ruin. The only 
way the State can control them is by dis- 
allowing them altogether. 



YOKED WITH UNBELIEVERS. 



BY PAST MASTER E. RONAVXE, OF 
LODGE, CHICAGO. 



KEYSTOXE 



Li a previous article I called attention 
to the fact that the ^lasonic fraternity is 
composed of three classes — Jews, who 
hate Christ; infidels, who reject Christ, 
and church members, who are professed- 
ly disciples of Christ, and who are made 
up of preachers, deacons, elders, Sunday 
school superintendents, etc. These three 
classes are yoked together and are bound 
one to the other bv fearful oaths and the 



228 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1897. 



most revolting death penalties of which it 
is possible for the mind of a fiend even 
to conceive. 

Intelligent men .and women of the pres- 
ent day, in looking back upon the history 
of the Spanish inquisition, the auto-da- 
fe and the A'irgin's kiss of the Romisih 
system, are fairly appalled at the murder- 
ous ingenuity displayed in the invention 
of these terrible instruments of torture, 
but yet, when compared with the death 
penalties and the inhuman tortures upon 
which the Masonic system is based, they 
almost fade into harmless, insignificance, 
and what is strange and singular con- 
cerning the whole matter is that when 
the oaths and death penalties of Free- 
masonry are fully and truly set forth be- 
fore the public gaze the revelations of 
even seceding Masons themselves are not 
credited, because men and women cannot 
bring themselves to believe that profess- 
ing Christians and respectable mem- 
bers of society, men holding most honor- 
able positions in commercial, legal and 
political circles, could be guilty of such 
atrocious conduct as to bind themselves 
under the illegal and horrible oaths and 
the revolting and barbarous death penal- 
ties of Freemasonry. And yet such is 
the case, no matter how adhering Masons 
may deny it or how ignorance or preju- 
dice may reject the truth. 

But there is another curious circum- 
stance connected with this matter. In 
discussing this phase of the Masonic sys- 
tem a Freemason will say, possibly a 
preacher or presiding elder, "Well, if as 
you assert the Masons assume these oaths 
and bind themselves under such terrible 
penalties of torture and death, what is 
the reason they never inflict these penal- 
ties?" I answer because they dare not. 
Why does not the Church of Rome in 
Spain and Portugal, Italy and Austria 
inflict any more the abominable tortures 
of the Inquisition, or the horrible death 
embrace of the Virgin's Kiss? Because 
an enlightened pubhc sentiment positive- 
ly forbids the infliction of such brutal and 
inhuman torture and just so it is in re- 
gard to Freemasonry. The Church of 
Rome has never changed and neither has 
Masonry. Infallibility in Romanism ab- 
solutely forbids any change whatever, and 
it is one of the ancient landmarks hand- 
ed down from the early Masonic fathers 
of 1723 that ''it is not in the power of any 



man or body of men to make any inno- 
vation in the body of Masonry." 

No. Freemasonry is unchanged and un- 
changeable. Both systems, both Roman- 
ism and Masonry have resorted to torture 
and assassination in the past, even under 
the color of law, but they dare not do 
such things in this enlightened day and 
age of the world. The question is not. 
Does Freemasonry inflict its brutal death 
penalties now, but does it bind its mem- 
bers under illegal oaths and swear each 
one of them to a mode of death so hor- 
rible and inhuman that the most blood- 
thirsty savage would shrink with fear 
from the infliction of such blood-curdling 
torture upon the body of his victim? I 
say it does, and I defy contradiction in 
regard to this matter. 

Every man initiated into the Masonic 
system, whether he be President Bill Mc- 
Kinley, of Washington, the Right Rev. 
Bishop Judas, of some Methodist confer- 
ence, or Mr. Bill McFadden, the whisky- 
bloated, blear-eyed rum seller of the levee 
district here in Chicago, must kneel be- 
fore the Masonic altar with a hoodwink 
over his eyes, a rope around his neck or 
around his body, his clothing ofif except 
an old drawers, (his arms, breast and 
knees bare, and there and in that condi- 
tion take what Masonry calls "a. solemn 
and binding oath" administered by an in- 
fidel or whisky-soaked worshipful mas- 
ter that he will never reveal what has 
been already revealed over and over 
again, even before he was born. That he 
will answer and obey every sign and sum- 
mons sent or given to him by a Masonic 
lodge or some wild-eyed brother Master 
Mason; that he will conform to and abide 
by all the laws, rules and regulations of 
Masonry when he comes to know them, 
whether "right or wrong;" that he will 
not steal from, cheat, or defraud — any- 
body — no, but a Miasonic lodge or a 
brother Master Mason. Thus he swears 
to be partially honest, or, in other words, 
he indirectly swears to be dishonest. 

That he will keep all the crimes of his 
brother Master Mason as secret and in- 
violable as his own except two — murder 
and treason — and these two left to his 
own option, and thus again he swears to 
become an accessory after the fact. No 
wonder we have so much stealing and 
dishonesty in higth places. Then again 
he swears that he will not commit adultery 



Deceoiber, 1897: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



229 



with — no woman — no, but with a "Mas- 
ter Mason's wife, mother, sister or daugh- 
ter," providing he knows them to be 
such. This is surely swearing to a par- 
tial morality, or, in other words, he in- 
directly swears to be immoral. That he 
will not assist in conferring the ^lasonic 
degrees upon and consequently that he 
will do all he can to withhold ^lasonic 
charity from women, except Masons' 
widows, from all old men, from all young 
men under age, from all free-thinkers, 
and from all inbeciles, and by so doing 
he again indirectly swears to be uncharit- 
able; riiat is, providing ]\Iasonic charity 
to be a reality, which it is not. And, last- 
ly, he swears that should he see the grand 
hailing sign of distress given by a ^la- 
sonic criminal in a court room or else- 
where, that he will "immediately fly to 
his assistance should there be a greater 
probability of saving the Masonic crim- 
inal's life than of losing his own." This 
will make it plain at once why so many 
criminals in high places go unwhipped 
of justice and establishes again the fact 
that the candidate swears to become once 
more an accessory after the crime is com- 
mitted. 

I have given above only a part of the 
^Master ^lason's oath, and while I have 
not adhered literally to the verbiage used 
in the lodge, yet T have given ever}' se-:- 
tion substantially as it is, putting upon 
it no other construction than that which 
every English reader would put upon it. 
and which alone it can possibly bear. And 
now I would respectfully ask of any read- 
er into whose hands this may come, What 
do you think of Freemasonry and what 
do you think of the men who swear such 
an oath as above given? I don't ask, 
neither do I care, whether there be good 
men in ^lasonry, but I do ask whether 
Masonry itself be good? Heaven is 
surely a most delightfully good and holy 
place, and yet we are credibly assured by 
all the churches that the A'ery devil him- 
self, who has brought about all the sin. 
and misery, and crime, and death, froni 
the creation of the human race down to 
the present time, was once a bright ce- 
lestial, being in the very presence of 
God's glory. \\'ill any pei^on be so silly 
as to assert that Heaven cannot be such 
a glorious and happy place because it is 
alleged that the devil came out of it? And 
yet that would be just about as sensible 



as to assert that Freemasonry must be a 
good and glorious institution simply be- 
cause a comparatively few good men go 
into it and stay there. Good men kept 
slaves some years ago; was therefore 
slavery a good institution? The question 
is not as to the character of men, good or 
bad, but as to the horrible oaths and the 
inhuman butcher}- of the Masonic system, 
104 Milton avenue, Chicago. 



ANTI-MASONIC SENTIMENT. 



PKOF. SIMPSOX ELY 



]\Iy discussion with Prof. Williams has 
led to some revelations which to me are 
very gratifying. It has also led to some 
that are very painful. There is a much 
stronger anti-secret sentiment among my 
brethren, and especially among my fel- 
low-preachers, than I had dared to hope 
for. I have many letters pigeon- holed 
that have been drawn out from my breth- 
ren because of the discussion. Xearly all 
of these enthusiastically indorse my po- 
sitions, ^lany of the letters are from 
^lasons, and they say my positions are 
well taken. In a future article I hope to 
give extracts from these letters to The 
Cynosure readers. 

I recently attended our Xational ^lis- 
sionar}- conventions at Indianapolis. I 
did not know what kind of reception 
would be accorded me. on account of my 
articles against ]\Iasonry; but, to m.y very 
agreeable surprise, I have never received 
more hearty congratulations and "God 
bless you's" than came to me from my 
Christian brethren and sisters. ]^Iany 
lodge members congratulated me. ^lany 
assured me that my work had already 
resulted in great good in their communi- 
ties. Some ^lasons told me they had 
been led through my articles to renounce 
the lodge. 

At the close of the first evening session 
a ^lason came to me and said: "I have 
carefully read your discussion \\-ith Prof. 
Williams. Your positions are all well 
taken. You have told the truth. The 
surprising thing is that you should know 
so much about ^lasonry, having never 
been a Mason. I renounced Masonr}- 
last week. Here is a large gold ring I 
want to present you. It was given to 
me by the lodge the night I took the 
fourteenth desrree in Scottish Rite ^la- 



230 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1897, 



sonry. I want you to have it, and I will 
send you my ^Masonic diploma, and such 
other things as you may want. I am 
done with ]\Iasonry." ^^^ith this remark 
he took the ring from his finger and put 
it upon mine. I wear it now^ as I write 
this article. Upon the inside of the ring 
is his name and the Latin motto, "Virtus 
junxit mors non separabit'' (Virtue joins 
or unites; death does not separate). 

Prof. \\'illiams wanted our discussion 
to be in the columns of the Christian 
Evangelist, published in St. Louis. The 
senior editor, J. H. Garrison, would not 
permit it. J. J. Haley, of Kentucky, is 
one of the editors of that paper. I met 
him at Indianapolis, and he said to me: 
"\Mfe and I have read your discussion 
with a great deal of interest, and we have 
come to the conclusion that the lodges 
are the greatest curse of tnis age." 

In a letter just received from Mrs. Ha- 
ley she tells me of a number of prominent 
Masons who have quit the lodge. At 
my suggestion she sent to Secretary Phil- 
ips for anti-secret literature and she says 
they are accomplishing great good. 

]\Iany recmests have come to me to 
publish the discussion in more perma- 
nent form. I may do so. If I should do 
this I will add a few pages of Masonic 
testimony. One Mason, whom I well 
know, sends me an impeachment of Ma- 
sonry from inside the lodge that has al- 
most as many counts as mine contains. 
Heaven be praised for the growing anti- 
secret sentiment! 

Kirksville, A/[o. 



DANGER FROM SECRET ORGAN- 
IZATIONS 



Among the devices of the devil for 
maintaining and strengthening his hold 
upon mankind no one is more effective 
than secret-oath-bound societies. In the 
development of this policy of secret asso- 
ciations, he 'has skilMully planned to bring 
every class under its control. He has or- 
ders whose leading characteristics are re- 
hgious, while in others the promiinent 
feature is political, or industrial, or pro- 
tective, or social. Along with the promi- 
nent feature one or more of the others 
are generally blended. And, besides this, 
ever}' attractive and fascinating element 
is arranged and combined with consul:. - 
mate art. 



There is a recognition of a diviaiity, a 
form of religion, costly temples, and a 
show of worship ; there is the appearance 
of great goodness of aim in the proposed 
better securing of brotherhood, fellow- 
ship, mutual help and charity; there are 
high-sounding titles, showy regalia, pub- 
lic and pompous parade, imposing corivo- 
cations, .and sumptuous banquets. But 
the divinity recognized is not necessarily 
the true God, the religion at best is mon- 
grel and false, the gorgeous temples are 
often the chambers of cruelty and con- 
spiracy, and the worship is a loathsome 
abomination in the sight of God. The 
boasted claim of superior goodness is not 
supported by the facts; the brotherhood, 
while no truer than Christ enjoined, un- 
like His, is confined to the oath-boun'd 
fraternity — all outside this narrow circle 
are regarded as strangers and foreigners ; 
the fellowship, being O'ften with the im- 
moral and vicious, is not so likely to be 
uplifting and purifying, as it is to be de- 
grading and demoralizing, and the mu- 
tual help and charity are only the refine- 
ment of selfisliness. 

The number, extent and influence of 
secret societies are well stated in an arti- 
cle by a prominent Freemason in the May 
numiber of the North American Review. 
In this, he shows that there are in t'he 
United States over fifty distinct secret or- 
ders, with over 70,000 lodges, and 5,500,- 
000 members. This does not include 
members of the various labor organiza- 
tions, and 500,000 members O'f secret 'mil- 
itary orders, as the G. A. R., and tlho>se 
connected with college secret fraternities. 
These num'bers will not inckide as many 
persons, since one man is often a member 
of two or more societies, but it is safe to 
say that in all there are fully 6,000,000 
persons in this country held in the coils of 
secretism. 

At the close of the war O'f the rebelHon 
the principle of secret associations came 
into great favor, many new orders were 
criginated. For the past twenty years 
the increase of mernbership has been ex- 
traordinarily great, and the already enor- 
mous secret power in this nation is still 
being annually augmented at the rate of 
nearly 300,000 members. This writer, in 
referring to the matter O'f selfishness in 
the lodge, makes this frank adlmisisJioii : 
"The broad, rich acres of man's selfish- 
ness are nowhere more carefully fertil- 



December, 1897, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



231 



ized, tended, tilled and reaped than in the 
lodge-room." 

After stating that, "for mere personal 
gratification, aside from any real or im- 
aginary benefits, the members O'f the var- 
ious secret organizations in the United 
States spend annually in costly banquets, 
elaborate uniforms, and other wholly un- 
necessary expenses connected with the 
fraternities, not less than $250,000,000," 
he adds, "it would all but revolutionize a 
large section of American society if the 
wives and daughters of the households of 
the men who belong to these organiza- 
tions should insist on their right to spend 
for their own adornment, or for their own 
personal pleasure, dollar for dollar spent 
by husfband or brother for initiation fees 
and dues, uniforms and regalia, swords, 
plumes, banners and banquets." In fur- 
ther reference to the hindrance to home 
happiness growing out of connection with 
secret societies, this author makes this 
strong statement: ''One does not trifle 
with truth in saying that no human gauge 
can measure the sorrow that comes to 
some families through the too close at- 
tention of husband and father to the 
lodge-room." 

Again, the influence of secret societies 
may well be feared in the State. Their 
oaths show them to be well fitted to shield 
criminals, and prevent the administration 
of justice. The highest Masonic author- 
ity has declared that the dbligation to ren- 
der aid in imminent peril is not cancelled 
by even such crimes as murder and trea- 
son. The principle of submission and 
obedience, involving the surrender of pri- 
vate judgment, renders a Mason who ful- 
ly respects his Masonic obligations an el- 
ement of danger in society, whether ^he be 
a judge, juryman or witness. It is note- 
worthy that the lamentable increase of 
crime, and failure in the execution of the 
law in our land, is simultaneous with the 
abnormal increase in the number and 
membership of secret societies. There is 
much in the nature and working of se- 
cret associations to lead to the conviction 
that there is a close connection between 
the recent wide development of the prin- 
ciple of these organizations and the alarm- 
ing increase of unpunished outrage and 
crime. 

But the gravest charge against secret 
societies is found in the fact that because 
of the peculiar fascination and powerful 



attraction of the lodge, it has a strong 
tendency to induce men to accept it as 
their church, and make its standards and 
laws their guide of right conduct. Hence, 
secret societies are dread rivals of the 
church of Christ. Here may be found in 
good part the explanation of the fact that 
Christian churches are filled so largely 
with women and children. W'hen the at- 
traction of a lodge is so great that a 
church mem'ber will abandon his church, 
rather than the lodge, it is easy to see how 
men will remain outside of the c:h'urch, 
while a/t the same time they are striving 
to reach the greatest number of degrees 
in secretism. — Paper read by Dr. A. J. 
McFarland before the R. P. Synod, at 
Beaver Falls, Pa., May 29, 1897. 



LODGE EDUCATES FOR WAR. 



[Part of an aadress by Eev. J. P. Stoddard, at a Peace 
Con ention iu Mystic, Conn.] 

When a hidden hand is laid upon the 
arm of justice, rogues rejoice, and honest 
men may well be thoughtful. But when 
the tyrant tramples upon the marriage 
vow, sets at defiance the laws of both God 
and man by which the two are joined, 
and dishonors the motherhood of a na- 
tion, he strikes with deadly effect. When 
any clan or order separates those whom 
God has united in holy wedlock, by an 
oath of concealment, that order commits 
an act of ferocious vandalism upon the 
home more terrible in its consequences 
than the tomahawk and scalping-knife on 
the border line of civilization. Wh^n 
thousands of those cliques and clans com- 
bine their influence they become a power 
to wreck homes, incite feuds, array fac- 
tions in hostile bands and precipitate 
them into deadly conflict, more sanguin- 
ary than all the horrors of savage mas- 
sacre. 

The knife quickly ends the sufferings 
of the lamb. But the prolonged agony 
of the neglected wife and mother, who 
can estimate, as sihe awaits the coming of 
her heart's earthly idol from his lodge? 
And when the w^eary hours have passed, 
and the husband appears, she timidly 
asks, "What has kept you so long from 
home and your children to-night? I 
have been so lonely, and so anxious about 
you. It used to be dififerent when you 
spent the evenings with us, before you 
became a Knight of Pythias, an Oddfel- 



231 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1897. 



low and a IMason, and now I hear that 
you have joined the Red Men." 

Coolly the husband replies: "So you 
have been fretting about me, have you? 
Haven't you got plenty of food and coal 
to cook it? You ought to have been in 
bed long ago. And as to telling you 
what I have been doing, that is the very 
thing that I swore not to do. You may 
just as well hush your sobs, and dry your 
tears, for I tell you once for all I am not 
going to perjure myself, just to please a 
woman. I was dubbed a Sir Knight of 
the 'Eagle and Pelican' to-night, and to- 
morrow night I am to be made /Chief 
Sachem' of our 'wigwam;' and do you 
suppose that with a sword in one hand 
and a tomahawk in the other, and a scalp- 
ing-knife in my belt, I am going to be 
cowed down by your peevish sentimental- 
ity? Xot I, madam. Bright prospects 
beckon me on. I shall soon be a 'Sub- 
Hme Prince of the Royal Secret" and 
then an Arabian 'Shriner' worshiping 
with the desciples of Allah, and quaff the 
sparkling elixir drawn from the sacred 
cow of our noble ancestors. And you, 
woman-like, you ask me to surrender all 
this? x\nd for what? For domestic tran- 
quility, forsooth. It's too much to pay. 
The goods are not worth the price. You 
may sing, 'Home, sweet home; there is 
no place like home,' if you like ; but that's 
too prosy for a 'Sir Knight.' We revel 
in pleasure, free from the conventionali- 
ties or restraints of home. Luxuries are 
spread upon our festive board, and beau- 
ties that would ravish the hearts of kings, 
minister with grace and glee as the hours 
fly swiftly by. Talk not to me of the dull, 
monotonous round of humdrum domestic 
tranquiHty. That will do for women and 
old men in their dotage, for the mind be- 
gotten without ambition. But I am Jove- 
born — a Sir Knight, a Patriarch Mili- 
tant, a Chancellor Commander and a 
Big Injun of the Mohegan Tribe, and 
my aspirations shall never be bound by 
a woman's apron string." 

What an insult to chastity is such a 
feted, lascivious, bacchanalian, nocturnal 
orgy when contrasted with the pure, 
sweet, sacred home of a well-ordered fam- 
ily I What an outrage upon the devotion 
of an affectionate wife and mother! What 
is the suffering of the lamb under the 
butcher's hand compared with the an- 
guish of that crushed and bleeding heart, 



and what dire forebodings of evil to that 
home lurk in those malignant oaths of 
separation! 

Do any of you say this picture is over- 
drawn? Would that it were, and that ex- 
treme cases were less frequent. Tone it 
down if you will. Grant that the milk 
of human kindness has not turned to the 
venom of asps, and the glow of affection 
been wholly quenched by the tainted at- 
mosphere and blasphemous oaths of the 
lodge, still the grim spectre of a house 
divided against itself remains. Whatever 
fidelity or unity adorns the household 
is in spite of that lodge covenant which 
sunders those whom God's sacred law of 
wedlock binds in the most intimate rela- 
tion of the human race. Were it possible 
for a Mason to become as selfish, as ar- 
rogant and as heartless as the system to 
which he belongs the gulf of separation 
between the man and his wife would be 
as impassible as that between the rich 
man and Lazarus beyond the grave. 

Excuse, palliate, whitewash this un- 
clean spectre as best you can; cover its 
deformity with the broadest charity, and 
you have still an enemy of the home, a 
disturber of peace, a fruitful source of 
contention and an active agent of the 
devil. When you have done your utmost 
to make this hideous visage an angel of 
peace and good-will among men, then 
multiply your finished work by 2,035,000, 
the number of Pythians, Oddfellows and 
Freemasons in the United States, and 
you have a suggestion of the heart-burn- 
ings, the rivalries, the jealousies, the con- 
tentions and the bitter anguish contrib- 
uted by the secret orders, to fire the pas- 
sions, nourish the hatred and precipitate 
deadly conflict among the people. 

If this work of packing and herding 
and swearing the masses into factions and 
clans goes on, how long will it take to 
produce in such divided homes and dis- 
torted society a generation of men and 
women, too, ''fit instruments for treason, 
strategem and spoils?" When will ambi- 
tious, unscrupulous men, accustomed to 
the salutations of Masters, Generals, 
Princes, Kings and Sovereigns in the Se- 
cret Empire be unable to find some pre- 
text for real war, and the dupes and un- 
derhngs, habituated to taxation, despotic 
rule, and military surveillance, will all the 
more readily bow under the same yoke 
outside their nocturnal secret haunts? 



December, 1891 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



233 



If this work of the Secret Empire goes 
unchallenged, when will this grand peace 
movement witness a perfect state of so- 
ciety wherein the "will of God is done on 
earth as it is done in heaven?" 

That day, the day of the Lord, His 
great day, tarries, but it is clearly fore- 
shadowed on the prophetic calendar. The 
Prince of Peace is ordering the world's 
campaign and arming the nations with 
the sword of the Spirit, which is His own 
blessed Word. To lands shrouded m 
darkness and death He sends light and 
life, and now, when the enemy has come 
in, like a flood, to deluge the civilized na- 
tions in blood. He is lifting a standard 
against him. Among the agencies which 
Christ the King has chosen for the great 
work of subduing the kingdoms unto 
Himself is the "Universal Peace Union," 
with its national, state and minor tribu- 
taries. Its commission is to destroy the 
foxes that spoil the vines, to show the an- 
tagonism between war and the gospel, 
and to uproot and cast out those diabol- 
ical instruments which lead to conflict 
and bloodshed, as Michael and his angels 
ejected the dragon from heaven "by the 
Blood of the Lamb and the word of their 
testimony," this making the terrestrial 
and the celestial one united, harmonious 
family, abiding in unbroken, eternal 
peace. 



SECRECY AND CITIZENSHIP. 



REV. II. H. HIXMAX. 



Three prize essays, edited and supplied 
by the New England Christian Associa- 
tion, Boston, Mass. 

This recent volume of 137 pages that 
has recently appeared is an admirable 
presentation of the chosen theme, and 
ought to be widely read and pondered. 
Though a good degree of candor and 
modesty of statement characterizes all of 
these essays, yet it is quite probable that 
some honest Freemasons and Oddfel- 
lows will take exceptions to some state- 
ments made and positions assumed. Li 
the estimation of many Freemasons this, 
the leading secret society, was never in- 
tended to be used for the perversion of 
justice. They have never so used it, nor 
approved of such use. To them the as- 
surance given them in the lodge that 
the obligations they were about to as- 



sume were not in any wise to interfere 
with any civil or religious obligation was 
understood in its literal import, they be- 
ing the judges. Not considering that to 
concede the right of private judgment 
would be to make the Masonic covenant 
but a rope of sand, they have gone on 
to lead respectable lives and believe and 
teach that their obligations to the lodge 
were in entire harmony with their obli- 
gations to their Maker. 

No one questions that such constitute 
a not inconsiderable portion of the Ma- 
sonic order. Nevertheless it is unques- 
tionably true that Freemasonry, in the 
language of President Madison, is not 
only "susceptible of great abuses, out- 
weighing any advantages to society,'' but 
is in its nature well calculated to be the 
instrument of fraud and the protector 01 
iniquity. That it has been, and is still, 
used to thwart the ends of justice is too 
obvious for denial. The case of Mr. 
Jackson, of Hartford, Conn., who was 
expelled from the lodge because he obey- 
ed his civil rather than his Masonic ob- 
ligations is quite in point. We sometimes 
hear the plea that this is equally true of 
religion, that it is sometimes perverted 
to evil purpo'ses and made a cloak for 
the protection of iniquity. But the cases 
are widely different. There is nothing 
in the Christian religion that even seems 
to countenance iniquity. Its covenants 
all bind us, both in general terms and in 
all particulars, to the highest ideals of 
justice and mercy. It condemns noth- 
ing so much as dissimulation and also 
hypocrisy. Not so with Masonry. Its 
oaths and penalties are shocking. Its 
pledge of secrecy implies dissimulation 
and its covenants are, at least, suscept- 
ible of an interpretation quite out of har- 
mony with absolute justice and purity. 
The Master' Mason's oath, in which he 
promises to conceal all the secrets of a 
iDrother Mason "when communicated to 
him as such," and that he will not be 
criminally intimate with his near female 
kindred, "he knowing- them to be such," 
is sufficient proof of this statement. 

The vicious element in all these orders 
is their organized secrecy. Secrecy is an 
element of power, which can be used 
with little or no responsibility to the law 
or to public opinion. All grantsof irre- 
sponsible power are both liable and likely 
to be used selfishlv. and hence cannot be 



234 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1897. 



safely entrusted to even the best of men. 
Absolute monarchies are not necessarily 
despotisms, but are likely to be so. Slav- 
ery was not ahvvays used to oppress the 
weak, but was often so used, and hence 
was in its nature a crime against human- 
ity. Xow. since men unite in secret or- 
ders for the main reason that they thereby 
obtain advantages which the uninitiated 
do not enjoy, they are therefore (in the 
language of Daniel W'ebster) "a source 
of anxiety and just alarm and ought to be 
suppressed by law." 

Xevertheless I reg^ard the influence of 
secret societies on the civil relations of 
mankind, though an element of great 
danger, as relatively of small importance 
when compared with their influence over 
the religious nature of mankind. It seems 
to me a mistake that these able essays 
were restricted in their scope, and did 
not include a fuller consideration of the 
relation of secrecy to Christianity. Se- 
cret societies have existed from the most 
remote antiquity, and have always had an 
important religious element. Anciently 
they were simply "the secret worship of 
the Pagan gods," and modern Freema- 
sonry, which was patterned after the old 
sun worship, is modern B-aalism. It is 
confessedly a "religious institution," with 
its altars, its prayers, its priests, and its 
promises of salvation. As a religious sys- 
tem it is unlike Christianity, as its Satanic- 
author is unlike the Savior of men. 

The effect of secret societies on the 
character of professed Christians has been 
most deplorable. It has so blunted their 
moral sensibilities that they say and do 
things in the lodge w^hich would never be 
tolerated if do'ne openly, and this iniquity 
they are taught to conceal by all the arts 
of dissimulation and the effrontery of 
falsehood. Great mxultitudes of men are 
misled- by their example, and accept a 
system of pagan ceremonies and a partial 
and perverted morality as their ground 
of hope for salvation. Such a system is 
the deadly enemy of the gospel of Christ 
and as such merits most earnest condem- 
nation of all. 

Beloit, Ala. 



AN ENEMY OF THE HOME. 



Secret society members are organized 
on the principle of taking unfair ad- 
vantage of their fellows; therefore they 
are traitors to both church and state. 



[Part of an address by Eev. P. B. \A iiliams at Colum- 
bus, Ohio. J 

Secret societies also conflict with a 
man's relations to his family in another 
very important matter; it takes the money 
away from the family and pours it into 
the lodge treasury, and I want to say, 
my friends, that the lodge treasuries are 
among the greatest gold bugs and mo- 
nopolies of this land. They have the na- 
tion's weahh hoarded by the million. 
After the drain caused by the liquor traf- 
fic, the next greatest drain on the toil- 
ing masses of this land is the secret so- 
cieties. They are draining the people 
of their hard earnings, and every once 
in a while you will see an account where 
some grand lodge treasurer has abscond- 
ed with the funds. In the last fifteen years 
more than 1,500 of these so-called fra- 
ternal and mutual benefit societies have 
gone into the hands of receivers; in the 
past year more than 100 have gone to 
the wall, and yet I find men and women, 
too, almost climibing over each other to 
get into other societies that are just as 
sure to go down as their predecessors. 
Why so? Because they are on the wrong 
basic principle. The principle of these 
mutual insurance fraternities is that 
when you once fail to pay you forfeit all 
that you have paid. This is an unlawful 
buisness, for it is getting something for 
nothing, a thing that every State pro- 
hibits, and so nearly every State in the 
Union has prohibited mutual life insur- 
ance being carried on — I mean openly. 

When I was stationed at Zanesvilie, 
Ind., the general manager of the People's 
Mutual Benefit Association, of Wester- 
ville, Ohio, said to me : ''You cannot act 
as our agent in the State of Indiana, be- 
cause the State of Indiana prohibits our 
business from being carried on within 
the State; but," he said, "if you find any 
one there that wants insurance with us 
you can act as his agent and write him 
up, and we will issue the policy. You 
see how they whip the devil around the 
stump, as we say, and yet we have or- 
ganized secret societies, carrying on the 
very business that the State says shall 
not be carried on, because they depend 
upon what they call lapsed policies to 
carry 011 their business. You do away with 
the lapsed policy business in mutual in- 



December, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



235 



surance and you will destroy every mu- 
tual insurance society in the land. There 
is loss and g^ain in all business, to be sure, 
but I pity a business that depends upon 
loss to sustain it, but that is mutual life 
insurance — it depends upon loss to sus- 
tain it. 

I am radically opposed to the whole 
business. I believe that a man ought to 
take care of himself — I mean so far as 
managing his own afTairs is concerned, 
but it is patent to any man that none of 
these mutual insurance societies will in- 
sure you unless they are sure to make a 
slice for themselves, but you can make it 
all for yourselves if you will handle your 
own money; so I say it is better for a 
man and better for his family to handle 
his money for himself. I heard of a case 
to-day where a man was a pensioner, 
drawing a pension, and he had to make 
afihdavit, which he had to prove by wit- 
nesses, that he was greatly disabled, in 
order to draw a pension, but after he had 
secured the pension he went to a physi- 
cian and secured the physician's certifi- 
cate to the eiTect that he was perfectly 
sound, and took out a policy for three 
thousand dollars, and then died, and did 
not get his insurance, and the thing caus- 
ed considerable stir, to be sure, and it is 
a question in the minds of thinking peo- 
ple where that fellow went when he died. 
That is what we call "crookedness," and 
there is a lot of crookedness in these so- 
cieties. 

I cannot pass without noticing one 
thing in this connection, and that is those 
men that depend upon these societies and 
fraternities are not what we would call 
independent men. If you approach a 
man wearing a badge, and yoii cannot 
spell out the initials on his badge, just 
spell it p-a-u-p-e-r ; for what is the differ- 
ence between these lodge men and the 
men out at our county farms? The men 
at the county farms say, "Gentlemen of 
the county, we are not capable of taking 
care of ourselves ; won't you take care of 
us?" And the county farms care for 
them. What do these fraternal lodge 
men less than that, for they say, "Gentle- 
men, we are not capable of takmg care of 
ourselves; won't you take care of u>, 
please?" The difference is that one fel- 
low pays a little for it, and the other 
doesn't pay anything unless he has some- 
thing to pay. 



Secret societies conflict with a man's 
relation to his family. When I spoke at 
Harper, Kan., one year ago last May, a 
gentleman, as he went from the church, 
said to a gentleman, "Tell that minister 
that he hit me right where I live, because 
I paid four dollars in the A. O. U. W. 
last week, and two of my children have 
no shoes to wear. It drains the family, 
and takes the money that the family 
ought to have." Out in Portland, Ore., a 
gentleman said to his sick wife, 'T think 

I had better send my lodge dues by Sis- 
ter G., for I do not think you will be well 
enough for me to go to lodge to-night." 
and she said, "Yes, send my dues, too.'^ 
And they succeeded in raking up two dol- 
lars to send to the lodge. In thirty min- 
utes after the lady had gone to the lodge, 
the physician called, and prescribed beef 
broth for one of the children who was 
sick, and then they hustled around to 
find money to buy some beef for broth, 
and after robbing the children's banks. 

I I cents was all they could scare up. Two 
dollars for the lodge, and ii cents for a 
sick family. I say it does interfere witii 
the family in this respect. 

An Irishman was arrested for improvi- 
dence, and he came before the judge, and 
the judge said: "Pat, you are a hard- 
working man; how does it come you are 
here on this charge?" "Why," says Pat, 
"I belong to seven secret societies." I 
tell you, ladies and gentlemen, that these 
organizations take the money that they 
have no right to take. And the lodge 
dues are not all by any means. ^lanv of 
these secret societies have costly regalias 
and costly uniform and paraphernalia, 
which makes a constant drain on the 
membership and consequently upon the 
family as well. Every time 1 see these 
plumed knights, with their burnis>hed 
spears and SAvords, and costly uniform, 
parading the streets of our city (and I 
see them almost every week), they re- 
mind me of the old fellow that sold coal 
for a living, and one morning his servant 
came in, and he said: 

"John, is it very cold this morning?" 

And John said : 

"Yes, master, it is very cold this morn- 
ing." The man said: 

"John, is it cold enough to make one'- 
fingers tingle as they walk down the 
street?'' 



236 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1897. 



"Yes, master, it is cold enough for 
that, sir." 

"Well, John, put up the price of coal lo 
cents per bushel. God pity the poor!" 

And so when I see these gentlemen of 
the fraternities parading the streets in 
their costly regalia, and burnished swords 
and spears, I think they say to me that 
these uniforms cost $75 or $150 for a little 
display. "God pwty the poor." The poor 
cannot get into these secret societies, and 
unless the church of Jesus Ghrist or some 
system of organized charity looks after 
the helpless poor, the helpless poor must 
suffer. If these secret societies were char- 
itable and benevolent, pray tell me \Vhy 
they are not found ofif yonder in the 
slums of our great cities helping the un- 
fortunate, or why they are not found in 
the foreign missionary fields, doing ag- 
gressive work for God. I will tell you 
why — because in the slums of our cities 
and in the foreign missionary fields they 
do not find men with some visible means 
of support, and they wait until the 
church of Jesus Christ goes out and 
brings the people up to a basis where 
they will have some visible means of sup- 
port. 



TEN ANTI-LODGE POINTS. 



BY REV. W. O. BUTLER. 



Ten reasons 'Why I cannot affiUate with 
the Masonic Lodge and be a Christian: 

1. Because all my actions should be 
open to the world. Says my Savior: 'Tn 
secret have I said nothing." 

2. Because I cannot consistently bind 
myself to keep the secrets of a criminal. 

3. Because it is degrading to take 
som.e of the brethren in my arms, in the 
ceremony of opening and closing the 
lodge. I have met men there whom- I 
could not meet on terms of equality on 
the street. 

4. Because I am commanded to be not 
unequally yoked together with unbe- 
hevers. 

5. Because my 'motives were not to 
glorify God in joining the order. Curi- 
osity, and the desire to gain the co-oper- 
ation of others in my own personal af- 
fairs, were the factors. 

6. Because I believe it to be wrong to 
personaite a murder or to kned (know- 
^ngly) while a mock prayer is ofifered. 



7. Because the repetitions of opening 
and closing the lodge are monotonous 
and meaningless; it is time wasted which 
could be spent in the gaining of useful 
knowledge. Recreation, to be profitable, 
must be pleasurable. 

8. Because I can not bind myself w^ith 
an oath to meet upon a level, or 'have all 
things in comimon, with men who are not 
followers of Christ, m^udh less those who 
do not believe in him as a Savior and who 
mock and deride both him and his fol- 
lowers. 

9. Because I can not voluntarily place 
myself under the penalty of death with- 
out having violated any law of the land. 
Some may say the penalties mean noth- 
ing. If meaningless it is worse than 
childish to repeat them. If binding, it is 
a crime to vii^it them upon the offenders. 

10. Because by affiliation I tacitly 
claim there are no others to care for my 
sick. I am bound to distinguish between 
Masons and their families, when there 
should be no such distinction. 



CAN WE BELIEVE GEORGE WASHING- 
TON? 



A man can break even a legal oath un- 
der certain circum'stances. For illustra- 
tion, note this extract from the oath 
which Washington swore as Colonel of 
the Virginia militia to his most sovereign 
lord. King George: 

"And I do solemnly, in the presence 
of God, and of His only Son, Jesus Christ, 
our Redeemer, profess, testify, and de- 
clare, that I db make this declaration, and 
every part thereof, in the plain and ordin- 
ary sense of the words of this oath, with- 
out any evasion, equivocation, or mental 
reservation whatsoever, and without any 
dispensation already granted by the Pope 
or any authority from the See of Rome, 
or any persons whatsoever; and without 
thinking that I am or can be acquitted 
before God or man, or absolved of this 
declaration or any part thereof, although 
the Pope, or any other person or persons, 
or any authority whatsoever, shall dis- 
pense with or annul the same, or declare 
that it was null and void from the begin- 
nmg." 

This oath was a lawful and constitu- 
tional one, while the Masonic oath is both 
illegal and unconstitutional. Then, 
again, the oath of allegiance which Wash- 



December, 1897. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



237 



ington took was lawfully ordained or pre- 
scribed, lawfully administered, and law- 
fully taken or received by him ; while the 
oath of allegiance tak^n by the Masonic 
candidate is not only administered and 
assumed without any warrant or color of 
law whatever, but in fact everything con- 
nected with it, and the several duties it 
imposes, as has been often shown, are in 
direct conflict with both the law of God 
and the law of man. 

Now, was George Washington justified 
in deliberately violating this lawful and 
constitutional oath, while the Masonic 
candidate is a "perjured villain" if he 
violates the outraged and illegal impos- 
ture, which is very often administered to 
him by some infidel or dTam-drinker in 
a lodge of Masons? And if the Masonic 
candidate becomes perjured for violating 
the oath of the lodge, how is it that 
George Washington was not perjured for 
violating the oath of George TIL? 

John Helfrich. 



REFORM NEWS. 

FROM GENERAL SECRETARY PHILLIPS 



The Freemason is horrified by being 
led, stripped and blindfolded, by a rope 
about his neck, till knocked down as 
Hiram Abif¥. The Odd Fellow is led 
blindfolded in chains, the hoodwink is 
dropped, and he confronted with a grin- 
ning human skeleton. The same terror- 
ism is practiced by other scenic methods 
in the Mormon Endowment House, and 
the same effects are produced in a small 
way in every little temperance lodge by 
the night-mystery and mock solemn lec- 
tures and obligations. Thus says Odd 
Fellow Grosh: "All the ancient rites 
began in sorrow and gloom, but end in 
light and joy." This is the devil's cari- 
cature of salvation by Christ, through 
repentance and faith, leading through 
sorrow for sin to *'joy in the Holy 
Ghost." Indeed, this is that "Divine in- 
stitution which Grosh says Odd Fellow- 
ship was" copied from (page 92). And 
in its nature and effects it resembles sal- 
vation as whoredom resembles mar- 
riage — one leading to hell, the other to 
heaven. Hence idolatry is branded as 
soul-adultery throughout the Bible. 
Christ is the bridegroom in the Scrip- 
tures, the devil in the lodge. Christians, 
in worship, are sanctified by the Holy 
Ghost; lodge-men are mesmerized by de- 
mons. — Jonathan Blanchard. 



My labors in New York were in Syra- 
cuse, Utica, Schuylers Lake, Fly Creek, 
Todd Town, Hartwick Seminary, and 
Cooperstown. I was called back to Chi- 
cago by telegram announcing that im- 
portant legal matters affecting the asso- 
ciation demanded my attention. Since 
then I have visited Southern Wisconsin 
and Northwestern Illinois. I should be 
glad to name the many friends who have 
kindly received m^e and assisted in the 
work, if space permitted. Two parties 
executed papers, which will give the as- 
sociation a numiber of thousands of dol- 
lars when their will shall have been pro- 
bated. Many years will pass, we trust, 
however, before such an event occurs. I 
have also been notified of a bequest of 
$5,000 by Mrs. Joanna Bliss, late of Wor- 
cester, Mass., for many years a strong 
friend of the National Christian Associa- 
tion. This bequest, however, will not be 
available for some years on account of an 
annuity provision in it. 

I wish that all could be impressed with 
the fact, as I have been in my late cam- 
paigns on the field, of the good effect of 
tract distribution from house to house, 
where it is followed up for several years 
in succession. It will not destroy the 
lodges any more than the exposure of the 
Jesuits destroys. Jesuitism, but the evil 
is greatly lessened, the people become in- 
telligent on the subject, many are saved 
and lodge membership in the community 
is taken at its real value. This fact is 
very strongly exemplified in a portion of 
Otsego County, N. Y., where house to 
house work has been done for several 
years. 

I had an interesting time at the Ep- 
worth League convention which met in 
Utica, and also at the Presbyterian s>Tiod 
of Northern New York, which met at the 
same place. Rev. Dr. Berry, editor of the 
Epworth Herald, was very faithful in 
warning the Epworth League of New 
York against dancing, but his heart failed 
him when he was asked whether they 
ought to join secret societies, and he d-e- 
ch'ned to answer. The course of both the 
Methodists and Presbyterians is in sharp 
contrast with the brave position of the 
thirty Swedish Congregational congrega- 
tions which met about the same time, in 



238 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1897. 



Xew Haven, Conn. They adopted a 
very explicit and condemnatory resolu- 
tion against the churches fellowshiping 
members of any secret society. 

After my return I visited Mt. Morris, 
Illinois, b}' ini\'itation and made arrange- 
ments for a convention to be held the 
13th and 14th of this month. Among the 
speakers will be our President, Rev. Sam- 
uel H. Swartz, and Rev. I. Bennett Trout, 
President C. A. Blanchard and others. I 
was very cordially received by the pro- 
fessors of the Brethren College, and also 
by ]Mr. George W'indie. It is hoped that 
there will be a good delegation from Mt. 
Carroll. Lanark. Rochelle, Polo and 
other places in the immediate vicinity. 
Let us hear by letter from those who can 
not attend. The success of the Southern 
convention was especially due to Brother 
R. W. Chestnut, but greatly helped by 
the stereopticon views, which we have re- 
cently secured for Brother Bonham. 
Though it was his first effort the judg- 
m.ent of those present was favorable, as is 
shown by the fact that the Leaders of our 
work in that section are arranging for 
Brother Bonham to visit their places in 
the near future. 

Our college and missionary agent. 
Rev. S. F. Porter, writes from Berea, 
Ky., where he gave an address in the col- 
lege chapel before the students and fac- 
ulty and later visited one or more 
churches in the country. 

One of the encouraging facts in the for- 
eign work is that friends, though un- 
known to each other, are yet co-workers 
with each other in lifting up the standard 
against the encroachments of lodgery. 
The London papers contain protests 
against the Masonic service in St. Paul's 
Cathedral on the two hundredth anni- 
versary of its reopening. Only Free Ma- 
sons are to be admitted. This great Ma- 
sonic service, w^hich ought to be a gen- 
eral Christian service, occurs on the sec- 
ond of December. Our brother, W. S. 
Fowler, writes encouragingly of his col- 
porteur work in London. He not only 
distributes tracts, but speaks freely and 
sees some good results. He asks espe- 
cially for the prayers of Christians. I 
have also received a letter from South 
Africa, where the good Mrs. Bridgman 
is carrying forward the testimony. 

The average issue of the Cynosure for 
the past six months has been 4,333. 



There are ^^2 subscribers in arrears. If 
these friends would pay up at once every 
obligation of the association could be 
met. We hope, friends, that you will see 
to it that these little amounts, which in. 
the aggregate are so much, will be among 
your Thanksgiving offerings for the 
mercies of this year. Please notice that 
subscribers receive a postal card receipt^ 
and are not to be governed at present by 
the printed tab on the Cynosure. One 
who has taken the Cynosure for twenty 
years writes: 'T have concluded you are 
fighting a giant evil which you will never 
subdue." Hence he discontinues his 
Cynosure. We hope that he will recover 
from his despondency and re-enlist. 
Luther's wife once put on mourni