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Full text of "Christian Cynosure"

II 



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CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



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v.i pr.i 





"In Secret Have I Said Nothing."— </««» Christ, 



WHtATON COLLEGh LlbRAWC 
Wheaton, Illinois 



EZRA. A. COOK & CO., Publishers, 
NO. 13 WABASH AVENUE. 



CHICAGO, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 1874. 



VOL. VI., NO. 25.— WHOLE NO. 208. 
WEEKLY, $2 00 A YEAR. 



Contents. 



Page. 

Topics of toe Time 1 

Editorial Akticies : 

Our New Uepurture S 

A Chicago Physician Threatened ^ 

Mortimer M. Lejjgett s 

Utterly Unreliable ! 

Notes ) 

Our Colleges on Secret Societies } 

Contributed and Select Articles : 

The Masonic Oath from the Standpoint of 

Reason 

The Workingfl of the Craft ! 

A Personal Kecollection of Charles 

Sumnei : ! 

Farmer Grey and the Patron, Poetry ! 

Danger fron the Grange 1 

The Labor (luestiou i 

Reform News : 

From the Olio Agent i 

New Fields Opening in Penua 4 

Correspondence 1 

Notices 5 

Our Mail II 

Forty Years agi: 

Lodge vs. La\r [0 

Sermon on Mascotjy, by W. P. M'Nary '.3 

The Home Cikolf. 

Waiting for tte Adoption, Ptie'ry 

Centenary of ',he Suppiession of Jesuits 13 

Bigotry li 

A Good Mothe- B 

Maxi ms f or waking Men 7 

Children's Corner T 

Temperance Notes. ? 

The SabbatH Schod lO 

Home and Health iints 11 

Farm and Garden ■ 11 

Religions Intelli'^eice - 12 

News of the WeeK IJ 

Pablishcr's Departaent 1(5 

Advertisements... 13,14,15,16 



oif 



^^\t%^\ \\\i^ ^mu 



The War on Ium. — The movement 
against intempermcenow extends from 
Missouri to Maine, In Columbus and 
Dayton, Ohio; Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania; Brooklyn ai^ Nevv iork city, 
New York ; Worc^terj Massachusetts ; 
St. Albans, Vermint; and Bangor, 
Maine, the long-suferiag people have 
moved on the enemies of our race, com- 
monly denominated aloons. In lam-e 
cities like tie ones njmed the results 
are not as jiet appareit, but in a host 
of smaller Wcs the fjiends of temper- 
ance have cimpletely triumphed. From 
three to fur hundred saloons have 
been closedland thus far there are no 
signs of wariness on the part of those 
eng&gedin lie work. An illicit distil- 
lery was laily discovered on Barren 
Island, nearNew York city. A party 
of United Sktes officers made a raid 
on the place, Vun fifty thousand gallons 
of mash intoUhe sea, destroyed the 
tubs and set Ihe building on fire. In 
all such movenenta we may and must 
rejoice. This Wntry will never reach 
the true posilioUn this question, how- 
ever, until a inb who sells liquor is 
locked up justks quickly as a horse- 
thief or a murdeir. Selling intoxicat- 
ing drinks causei nine-tenths of the 
murders and theft\ which our courts 
punish. It is chaper and better to 
lock up the man Vho sells than the 
men who drink. ^^ must do oco or 
the other. 

Makes Men D. 
Ever.— Men who araie against prc- 
isfbitory laws are accuVomed to declare 
that in all places wheri such laws are 
enacted, men drink nire than ever. 
That they hide but contVue to drink. 
The only answer whiA ggch state- 
lents require is, that th^ are enlirelj 



MoRa Than 



untrue. Having traveled extensively 
in States where there are and are not 
prohibitory enactments, the writer 
knows that the States where such laws 
exist are so far superior to those where 
there are none as to be beyond com- 
parison with them. In Massachusei-ts, 
where Good Templarism and Masonry 
have hindered the reform for years, 
there is hardly a hotel in medium sized 
towns were liquor is openly sold, while 
in Missouri villages consisting of a douen 
houses must have their rum shop, 
la Vineland, New Jersey, the traffic is 
illegal and no saloon can live in the 
corporation ; while a man who kept a 
low groggery just outside the limits 
was lately fined thr^'e hundred and 
fifty dollars and sent to states prison 
for six months. The resuU is that 
Vineland paid to support her poor last 
year less than two hundred dollars and 
her police cost about fifty dollars. 
We hazard nothing in saying that 
there is not a town of ten thousand in- 
habitants where saloons exist in the 
United States that, can show such a 
record. In other words, prohibition 
don't make men drink more than ever. 
Tilton's Letter to the Council. — 
Theodore Tilton sent to the Con- 
gregational Council in Brooklyn, and 
to the papers, a letter in which he says 
that he has never slandered any human 
being. This may be true. He did, 
however, say to the writer of this para- 
graph, in January, 1871, that Mr. 
Beecher preached to twenty mistresses 
every Sabbath; repeated the assertion 
several times and authorized its publi- 
cation. This was nine or ten months 
before the publication of the WoodhuU 
scandal. Again in January, 1874, Mr. 
Til ton said, "I spoke hastily to you three 
years ago, and perhaps unwisely, but 
I told no lies about Mr. Beecher. I 
didn't come through the anti-slavery 
fight to be either a liar or a lick-spittle. " 
From these facts it is evident that 
whether he has slandered Mr. Beecher 
or not he has charged him with adul- 
tery. This is the question that agi- 
tates the Congregational churches, 
"Is or is not this charge true ?" There 
will be no rest until this question is 
answered. We hope that the answer 
will be "no." 

A Leeson FOR YoUi\'o Men, — In an 
age like this, young men are inexcusa- 
ble, if they fail to learn that it is only 
rigid adherence to principle which is 
rewarded by lasting fame. When Sen- 
ator Sumner wrote his letter of accept- 
ance to the Legislature of Massachusetts 
in 1851, be said: ''Since true poli- 
tics are simply morals applied to pub- 
lic au'airs, I shall find constant assist- 
ance from those everlasting rules of 
right and wrong which are a law alike 



to individuals and communities." In 
obedience to those rules of right and 
wrong he stood in his place year by 
year, surrendering friends, influence 
and reputation in obedience to his con- 
victions. He declared slavery sectional, 
when by lordly assumption and brutal 
violence it ruled the nation. He de- 
nounced "the crime aerainst Kansas" as 
the peril of his life. He declared ''the 
barbarism of slavery" when pulpit and 
press and people were its obedient 
slaves. When a subservient Senate 
were about to put a merchant into the 
treasury and to repeal the law that 
stood in his way; when that same 
Ssnate were about to annex a debased 
and slothful people to our already suffi- 
ciently distracted land, it remained 
for Charles Sumner to pronounce the 
''I object" that gave us pause, and pre- 
vented national disgrace. It was ako 
allotted to him to introduce a resolu- 
tion providing for the discontinuance 
of the names of battles fought during 
the civil war, on the army register and 
on regimental flags. For every one of 
all these acts he suffered reproach, and 
so far as his enemies could accomplish 
it, infamy; but to-day he looms up 
among the time-serving, wire-pulling 
politicians who surrounded him like 
the pyramids of Gizeh from the Egyp- 
tian sands. Let then this just orator, 
statesman and man go sleep in his na- 
tive soil; and write on his marble 
where the young men of to- day may 
read : There is naught but fidelity to 
truth which is pleasing to God or glo- 
rious to men. 

Robbing Merchants. — The testi- 
mony of Wm. E. Dodge and other 
merchants regarding the revenue laws 
and custom house proceedings in New 
York form, it would seem, an unan- 
swerable argument in favor of free 
trade. Government, to raise money 
for the payment of debts and current 
expenses, levies a tariff upon certain ar- 
ticles. To collect this tariff custom 
houses are established and custom olBfi- 
cers are appointed. Men attempt .to 
defraud the government or are sus- 
pected of doing so, 'and hence rewards 
are offered to spiep, detectives and in 
formers. A law is passed allowing 
men accused of fraud to compromise 
with Officers of the port by the pay- 
ment of money . Unfortunately some 
men are not honest, and m'afiy officials 
are like Murphy and Casey. The re- 
sult is that hone^ houses are com- 
pelled to pay enormous sums for mere 
technical violalioas of law, while bpies 
who are too low for an* honest man's 
contempt, grow rich on their detesti- 
ble toil. Commerce is discouraged 
and corruption increased and rewarded. 
How simple a remedy to abolish 
tariffs and levy a direct tax for. the 
wants of government. .True, il; would 
diminish the number of. 6ffice-holders. 
It would lessen the number of places 
which a shameless official could till 
with drunken and (^shonest peioonal 
servants. It would reduce the estates 
of a few men who live on the oppres- 
sive taxation of their poorer neigh- 
bors. It would, however, lessen the 
expenses of government^ make officials 
more honest and lighten greatly the 
burdens of society. 



OUR COLLEttES AND SECRET SO- 
CIETIES. 



Oberlin College, Ohio, ) 
March 3d, 1874. f 

Oenilemen: — You ask our views and 
the statistics of our college on the sub- 
ject of secret societies . We have views 
on the subject, but no s.ecret societies, 
and no experience. The early founders 
of the school were decidedly opposed 
to secret societies, and the principle was 
adopted at the beginning of excluding 
them. Consequently no secret society 
has ever been established among us. * 
The views of our faculty on this 
question are just as decided as ever. 
There is but one opinion among us. 

The open literary societies are proc- 
perous, and seem to me^t all the wants 
of the students in this direction. They 
work in harmony with the general 
movement ol the college, and their in- 
fluence is wholegome and helpful. ' 
In behah pf the^ Faculty, 
JopJ| Morgan, 
James Dascomb, 
Jas. H. Fairohilp, 

Committee. 
«-•-* 

Masonic Oaths Viewed from the Stand- 
point of Reason. 



BY PROF. 0. F. LUMRYj WHEATON COfc- 

LSGE. ■ • 



An oath to do an immoral act is in 
its very nature annuliity. 

A valid oath presupposes a free 
agent, a man, covenanting to do or not 
to do something; the man himself or 
some other being exacting such obliga- 
tion, and God formally invoked as wit- 
ness to exact the performance of what 
is covenanted or inflict the penalty. 

Every immcralit}', or trespass against 
man, is likewise '3 «in against God. 
Now in every formal oath requiring the 
performance of thee^,.if it be a real 
oath.'Goi^ is supposed to be present to 
-exact the yerformSnce of acts of rebel- 
lioo against his own government and to 
become the minister of sin, a position 
he Expressly repudiates in his Word. 
All the peculiar binding character of an 
oath above pn ordinary promise is de- 
rived from the supposed presence of 
God to enforce the same. If he is 
present, and for the purpose specified, 
then is his kingdom indeed divided 
against itself; but if he is not present 
for such j)urj»ose, then is the adminis- 
tration of such oaths a blasphemous 
and fraudulent farce, and the formula 
used has nothing of the nature of a 
genuine oath. Having the form but 
lacking ihe essence of a binding oath 
it is in the nature of a bogus coin, 
whose only uses are to throw suspicion 
upon genuine money and to deceive; 
since it is certainly supposahle that the 
Mister of a lodge, or the majority of 
its memliers, are godless men, rebels 
against God's authority. If lodge oaiha 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



are genuine oaths, when a man swears 
to obey the Master of such lodge, or 
such lodge itself, we must suppose that 
God stands ready to enforce any obli- 
gations that rebels against his govern- 
ment may impose — a supposition' so.* 
preposterous tbat no sane man can for 
a moment believe it. If such be not 
genuine oaths then are they Satan's 
counterfeits, blaspliemous devices to 
make God and men the ministers of sin. 

If the above positions are correct — 
and I shall be greatly obliged to the 
man that shall point out their essential 
error — the multitudes of poor, blind 
candidates who have suffered their souls 
to be ensnared by such mock oaths will 
find them a "covenant with death and 
a league with hell." 

Having in the above examined Ma- 
sonic obligations in the light of reison 
and the niture of the case, I propose 
in my next to show how they look in 
the light of God's Word. 



The Workings of the Craft. 

(Ad Experieuce.) 



BY WOODRUFF POST. 



The instructions received from my 
father in my boyhood days in regaid 
to Freemasonry, and the fact that a 
person supposed to be dying at our 
home felt compelled to renounce 
Masonry to make his peace with God, 
and the fact that a brother-in-law who 
was a Freemason a':'viBed his son never 
to uaite with any secret society, all led 
me in maturerjears to investigate, and 
I came soon to the conclusion that 
there could be no especi:il benefit de- 
rived therefrom. My first confirmfition 
of its dominancy and arbitrariness was 
had when at conference. I was quiet- 
ly distributing trac s on Freemasonry. 
I then and there had notificaUon by a 
Mafon to "beware", etc. This was the 
first deveiopmeai of the geaius of Ma- 
sanry as concerned my experience. 
This encouraged aiid exuboldened me 
to proceed, for it was very evident that 
freedom and love of Christ could not 
govern the c nference or church if 
ever controlled by Masonry, and the 
sooner we knew where we stood the 
better. 

I was also encouraged by a seceding 
minister who had ''been deceived" and 
took three degrees. la a short time it 
was discovered that all adhering Ma- 
sons, whether professed Christiaas, 
ministers or infidels, expressed the same 
excited feeli'ga when the subj^'cc was 
broached. In the fear of God, much 
prayer and deliberiiion, it was re- 
solved to test oar conference aud 
''strike out" for God and huaaanity. 
Therefore at our Eftst Genesee confer- 
ence held in Phelps, N. Y., Aug., 
18(i9, the following was presented. 
^'■Resolved, That we disapprobate Free 
masonry." Seven reasons were stated 
why. 

This created a sensation and after a 
brief sustaining speech by the mover. 
Masons sprang to their feet and moved 
that the resolution be tabled. Thirty-one 
voted against this motion, sixty-one 
for. The leader of the Masons at this 
time excHed by it, said, 'We Masons 
in thid co'iferen e nurnb^T six y. ^V*- 
now began to bhi- inon- clt-^arly the na- 
ture of "'divint'' Mi-,onry. Providence 



opened the way for another vote in 
1870 at Elmira conference. The 
'•leaven" had been working. At this 
conference there were the signatures 
of most of the leading men, senior and 
junior, in all sixty-nine names in their 
own autographs, to the following: 

"iBesuZ'wed, That without judging any 
man, we affectionately advise the mem- 
bers of this conference for the peace of 
brethren, not to affiliate with the Ma- 
sonic institution." 

, When the vote was taken, it was 
moved to table it. The vote stood 64 
for, 58 against. So we lost this by 
just six Masonic majority. It was ta- 
oled. Yet this year we gained on last 
year twenty-aeven votes. I should 
have said that last year after 
conference,- a member of the con- 
ference visited me at my home 
in Rochester, and said, "Bro. Post, I 
have been a Royal Arch Mason. I 
was glad you took the position you 
did. I fully endorse the speech. It 
has always been my impression that 
ministers should not b ' connected with 
Masonry, and you can use my cami 
whenever it becomes neceasary ." 

The following year at conference in 
Geneva, N. Y., 1871, the village where 
Johnson met his death-blow in a lodge- 
room, the following were offered: 

'' 1st. Resolved, That we protest 
again^st the cornerstones of our 
churches or literary institutions being 
laid by any ceremonies of the Mason- 
ic fraternity. 

"2d. RiSolved,i:h-Ai Article 25, Sec 
2, in our Div-cipime pertaining to a 
Christian man's oath, may not be vio- 
lated with impunity. 

"3d. Resilvfd, That extra-judicial 
oaths, i. e. , all such oaths as are not re- 
quired by the civil magistrates are con- 
demned by God's holy Word, and by 
our D scipbne. 

•'4th. Resolved, Tijat all such oaths 
as are expressed in the following lan- 
guage are forbidden by our Lord; 
therefore, criminal. " 

Here followed some of the Masonic 
obligations, thoa^h the term Masofiry 
was not used. As "I, A. B., most 
solemnly promise and swear that I will 
never reveal any part or psrtsof the pe- 
crets which I have received, am about 
to receive, cr may heraafier be in- 
siracled in, to anv other except ic be to 
a trae brother. Binding myself utidf r 
no less penalty than to have my thro it 
cut across, and my tongue torn out 
bytheroo's. So help me God. Fur- 
therm tc, I promise and swear that I 
will not violate the chastity of a Mas- 
t -rs wife, mother, sister or daughter, I 
knowing them to be such." This cre- 
ated a great sensation among the Ma- 
Hons, and some 'Jacks," one in partic- 
ular, Rtv. T. , Eaid he had all power in 
toe conference and could do as he 
phased, and if I did not behave he 
would have me first located and then 
expelled.' I think it was said to him — 
try! 

But we are sorry to say one Rev. Dr. 
with whom Masons had wrou'^ht dur- 
ing the year in tbeirartful way — T think 
I am safe in saving this, I may be mis- 
taken — turned right aV>nut fwceand r-p- 
D >sed us. N' verthelfcR we had fifty- 
eight vote's while the Masonic vole was 



sixty-one, being three less than last year 
— giving Masonic vote three majority. 
The craft were terribly taken aback, and 
went desperately to work and absolutely 
succeeded in degrading the conference 
— it was so astonishing — in the papssge 
of the following, presented by an aged 
Mason, brother to the Royal Arch here- 
tofore mentioned, seconded by a D. D., 
once a strong defender of the faith, 
against Masonry, viz., "Resolved, That 
we advise our beloved brother Post, to 
desist from his efforts to draw us into a 
discussion upon this subject, which 
can only result in evil to himself, and 
the cause of Jestis Christ." "Tell it 
NOT IN Gath." Our conference 
boundary line was changed, and we 
were last year, Oct., 1872, met in 
Rochester, N. Y., as Western N. Y. 
Conference, and then brother Post had 
enough to do besides "presenting reso- 
lutions. By this time they supposed 
they had got him, but he still Jives — 
God be praised — and triumphs. The 
end is by-andby. 
Ontario, N. Y. 



A. Personal llecol lection of Ciiarles 
Sumner. 



BY SAMUEL D, GREENE. 



One of the honorable of the earth 
is gone to his reward — like his proto- 
type (Moses) he went up in the midst 
oi a clcud. but he got into the mount. 

In Mr. Sumner I lost a dear friend. 
In July, 1833, at the close of the trial 
of Moore and Seavy. for their malicious 
libel on me, he at the age of 22 years 
came with bia hoaored father to my 
house in South Boston, and after a 
kindly greeting from both, he said, 
"Mr. Green, don't let this decision of a 
partial jury eff-^ct you. Your moral 
character stands untarnished in the et- 
timalion of Judge Thacher and many 
unpredjudiced citizens who heard the 
trial, I vouch for them. I have heard 
their expressions, you may yet see the 
triumph uf your principles." After a 
few comforting words from his father 
they left. 'From that day to his death 
he has been a good friend of mine, 
feending me his speeches and many im- 
portant documents, aod answering my 
letters. I will copy one of my letters 
to him from Walnui, Hill, Ohio, M^uch 
24th, 1866:— 

Bon Charles Sumner, 

My Dear sir: — I received your leis- 
ter and speech, "Taxes without repre- 
sentation is tyranny." It is in my 
opinion unanswerable. The master or 
his opologist who have oppressed the 
negro, may attempt it. The cry of 
the South has been, "Give the negroes 
freedom, or an opportunity, and they 
will massacre their ma'^ters." But when 
their freedom is proclaimed they are 
quiet. This Tebukes their former mas- 
ters, ''And they bate him that re- 
buketh in the gate and they abhor him 
that speaketh uprightly. For as much 
therefore, as your treading is upon the 
poor; and you take from him bur- 
dens of wheat: ye have built houses of 
hewn stone, but ye shall not dwell in 
them, ye have planted pleasant vine- 
yards, but ve shfill not drink the wine 
of them " (Amos. v. 10-11). I am 
a behever in the truths of the Almighty 



; id his providence. This nation he 
?queath«ed his people as a land of re- 
gions and civil liberty, aud though 
i may chastise us for our sins, eventu- 
ly your truths uttered to the nation 
d the world will triumph. I have 
1 ved Wilson and believe him a sound 
r an, one of the noble creations of his 
Iiaker; but I fear one screw is a little 
)se, which he will soon tighten and 

will be right again. 

* • » 

Farmer Grey and the Patron. 



By A. THOMPSON. 



e golden haze of the autumn day 
shone down on the smiling river, 
len into the town rode farmer Grey, 
is merrj and hale as ever. 



Efe hair was hoar as the morning's frost 
"hat shone on his meadow grasses; 

E' e day-heams scatter the starry host, 
)r moon to her chamber passes. 

"Here, neighbor Grey," said an up^ercrus: 

'I'llgiye you an introduction 
Tojone who comes as a friend, I tfast, 

To the farmers with instruction/ 

m of the noble Grange is he, 
id believes that our location ; 
Is j^t the place, if we all agree, / 
erect a Patron's station." I 

"lldeed, indeed," said old farmer Grey, 

'is this a son of the thunder / 
That b "oms around in an awfulKvay, 

Vhile the whole world stareain wonder? 

Th it scares our rail-roade out a their wits, 

Till their impudent color chalges, 
Atj 1 gives the rings and the ratals fits, 

'jhat are out of the noble GrAiges? 

Bu;, sir. I have always knownfthegrip . 

Cf our Anglo-Saxon greetiM, 
I A 11^ friendly word never fail/my lip 

On spur of a friendly meetng; 
/ 
But never struck I with hidctn hand. 

Nor bowed to an uuknowi master, 
And much I fear that your lystic band 

Bodes less of good than /isaster. 
/ 
The good you do and the -.Kalth you gain 

Is a doubtful compensttjon, 
Foi'a:d you give to the ghluls that drain 

Out the life-blood of ovJ nation- 

To the power that worksivhen the world's asleep 
To shield the knave aul the traitor. 

And bind the good in aniron keep 
With a demon-wielde^fetter." 
Wheaton, 111. 



Danger froii the Graige. 



[Extract from a [letter to tie Chicago 
Tribune from the ^ec'y of tie National 
Acricultural Congtess.l 

T have been frequently charged as in 
opposition to the order of tie Patrons 
of Husbandry. Until the meeting of 
the National Grange at S. Louis, it 
waa an unjust charge. Trie, I did ob- 
jtotto, and criticise some c its features, 
—among them that of Mcrecy,— but 
never with a view to the Jreaking down 
of the organization. Sice that meet- 
ing, however, notable or its grand 
declaration of purpose without any 
provision for their realzition, and for 
the postponement of aftion upon all of 
the vital questions w^tch came before 
it, even upon the bvsiness-system for 
which so much was xpeeted, I should 
be false t-o the caus to which I have 
been devoted for tie past two years 
were 1 to fail in thcexposuie of those 
weaknesses in thf organization which 
threaten the utterdefeat of the reform 
movement, whici had been so auspic- 
iously inauguratfti. 

T!»ke the tranportation question as 
a case in point the National Grange 
adjouiiied with no expression save that 
of WJrthy M»ter Adams, which, in 
substance, we. a mere admission that 
he ciiuld not omprehend the question, 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



aad, therefore, asked Congress to take 
ti in hand and "regulate" it. We have 
seen Congress and the State Legislature 
dancing attendance all winter to th^, 
grange-magnates, exceedingly anxious 
to curry favor with its million (?) of 
votes. They certainly must be delight- 
ed — as well as the railroad men — at 
this expression of Master Adami, which 
was in no manner modified by any pub- 
lic expression of the grange. It is 
the easiest victory thai ihe railroad-kings 
and their legislative abettors ever won. 
The big companies were getting tired of 
state legislation, because they found it 
effective; and their only hope was to 
get the higher power to interfere in 
their behalf. Just mark how plausible 
is the proposition that Congress shall 
legislate for the long roads which rud 
from state to state, while the states may 
reserve the power over the short roads. 
Will anybody with a grain of sense pre- 
tend to claim that the regulation of the 
short roads, which are practically con- 
trolled in the interest of the through 
lines, and which would be at once con- 
solidated with them, would meet the 
requirements of the people of Illinois ? 
It is the long lines, and their wealthy 
and unscrupulous managers, which 
need regulating, — and they alone. 
No-v, if Congress manages the long 
lines, which practically manage the 
short lines, is it not quite apparent that 
no state legislation — which necessarilv 
yields to national legislation — is at all 
practicable, or indeed possible ? But it 
is not my intention here to discuss this 
question. I have only suggested it to 
show how easily a'"' immense and power- 
ful organization — which has been to the 
present time kept well in hand,-through 
its system of mystification and mean- 
ingless mummeries,— may be committed 
to the ill-digested views of a single indi- 
vidual, and that man one who has aever 
had personal experience of the subject 
which he presumes to treat. If Con- 
gress shall go forward and take such 
action as the " test vote" indicated was 
their purpose, — the overwhelming ma- 
jority clearly indicated that the railroads 
were not opposing it, — the country will" 
have a poisonous pill to swallow, even 
though it is sugar-coated and labeled 
"Reform." When we are suffering from 
its effects we may hear our legislators 
taunting us, as they have before, with 
the assertion, "We did your biddino-. 
Your great grange, through its Worthy 
Master, demanded that we should vote 
for this measure." 

And note how utterly impossible it 
is to controvert such action. The council 
proceedings being secret, the discus- 
sions, too, being confined to those who 
represent one side of the question only 
— how can their fallacious reasonings 
be met and the public mind be really 
educated ? 

In conclusion, then, I do now set my 
face squarely against this grange mo- 
nopoly ; and, feeble though my efforts 
may be, I will oppose its further 
encroachments upon the province of 
free, open discussion, to the extent of 
my ability. As at present oflScered 
and conducted, it is far more threaten- 
mg to the public welfare, to the nation- 
al life, than any railway-corporation that 



has ever been dreamed of. Not that I 
i;harge against i(s officers any wrongful 
intent, but that they are as* 'blind lead- 
ing the blind," and that they are closer 
upon the banks of the ''ditch" than 
they suspect. More anon. 

Chas. W. Greene. 



The Labor CJuestiou from a Christian 
Standpoint. 

[From the Joiirnal, Phila.] 



De Solure, in his celebrated treatise 
on the English Constitution, tells us, 
that "it is a fundamental principle with 
the English lawyers, that Parliameiat 
can do anything except make a woman 
a man or a man a woman." And it 
seems to be ' 'a fundamental principle" 
with all Americans, that Congress and 
the IState Legislatures are endowed with 
a similar power. This opinion has been 
amply, a good deal too amply, illustra- 
ted in the matter of labor reform. In- 
bteid of undertaking to do anything 
vigorously outside of legislative halls, 
labor reformers have been constantly 
besieging the bodies therein assembled, 
to give them eight-hour laws, ten-hour 
laws, graduated taxation, etc. 

This belief in the omnipotence of the 
legislative function is, as I have sug- 
gested, not a delusion of the labor re- 
formers alone, it is an error of the age. 
Temperance men, women-elevators, 
moral and social reformers of every 
kind, seem to think that a legislative 
body is the anointed vice-gerent of 
be:5ven, to whom is intrusted "all power 
in heaven and oa earth." Even so very 
able a man as Mr. Wendell Phillips 
talks as thougn misled by the same 
wili-'o-ihe-wisp. 'To the State House 
with everything,' one would think 
to be his ever-abiding motto. In one 
of his latest speeches — at the anniver- 
sary of the ''Boston Tea Party" — he gave 
utterance to the pivotal idea that I have 
introduced into this essay, that we 
must stop the accumulations of great 
fortunes; but the working out and ap- 
plicattoa of the idea, he said, was in 
the hands of some true successor of 
Thoaias Jefferson, — a politician, be it 
noted. I must differ from Mr. Phillips. 
A religious reformer, like John Wesley, 
would be worth, for the purpose indi- 
cated, a thousand Jeffersons. As Mo- 
hammed is said to have converted a 
hemisphere, with the Koran in one hand 
and a sword in the other; so a Wesley 
with God's law against accumulation in 
one hand, and His sword — -'It is easier 
for a camel to go through the eye of a 
needle than for a rich man to enter 
into t|ie kingdom of God" — in the other, 
would do a work that those compara- 
tively inferior lawgfvers, the world's 
statesmen and politicians, would essay 
in hopeless imbecility. Mr. Phillips, 
who knows well the illimitable superi- 
ority of religious lawgivers above Pitts 
and Jefferson, should have done better 
than he has. He should have disabused 
men of his legislation folly long ago. 
He has had occasion to understand 
thoroui^hly the superiority of the work 
of William Lloyd Garrison to that of the 
crowds of "Hon." gentlemen who, for 
twenty years, have been hammering out 
the details of the great matter Mr. 
Garrison h^jaded down to them for man- 
ipulation. 



From the croppings out of the opin- 
ions I am now considering, I fear the 
next step of the labor-reformers will be 
to go to our legislative bodies and try 
to persuade them to annihilate our pros- 
pective Stewarts and Astore, if not otir 
existing ones. Such will be for labor 
reformers a most miserabie waste of time 
and strength. For, although Mr. Phil- 
lips and Mr. Beecher see the necessity 
of some check to accumulation, the 
average legislator does not; and a pub- 
lic opinion will have to be created in 
its favor before our Senates and Houses 
of Representatives will make a statute 
modeled after the Master's ' 'Lay not 
up for yourselves treasures upon earth." 
The shortest path to the end Mr. Phil- 
lips and Mr. Beecher propose is to 
preach to the world Jesus Christ's gos- 
pel on the subjecf. 

Could the labor reformers succeed 
with legislatures in getting a law against 
unhealthy fortunes, the result would 
be worae even than a waste of time and 
strength. It would make the men of 
organizing minds — unconvinced in rea- 
son, unconverted in conscience, and 
untouched in heart — feel constantly 
that a tyrannical hand was laid on them, 
restraining them from their rightful op- 
portunities. Out of such an enforced 
state, no true cc-operation could grow; 
nothif^g but sullen hate ready to burst 
out into violence at the first incitement. 
Take a lesson from the present relations 
between the late slave-owners of the 
South and their freedmen. There ex- 
ists the beauty of legislation without 
conviction and conversion in belief. 
Nothing but the heavy hand of the 
Federal Government prevents a return 
to the old villainy of slavery ; and even 
that hand is not strong enough for the 
production of co operation ia social de- 
cencies. The co-operation that labor 
wants is the real brotherhood of men 
who " have love one to another." And 
this brotherhood never yet came, and 
never can come, except by men's being 
imbued with the same great principle, 
to which they are striving every mo- 
il' ent to live, from an affectionate reve- 
rence to one great lawgiver, who can 
favor no antagonisms among his chil- 
dren, except antagonisms to the sins 
that sever those children and make them 
wretched in such severance. 

One illustration to which I have al- 
ready referred will answer well again. 
Each early Congregationalist was so 
deeply imbued with the true meaning 
of Matt. 18. 17, as an ecclesiastical 
principle — politics in the matter never 
entering his contemplation — that he 
felt he must eternally believe it, eter- 
nally live it, and to it he must convert 
the world. Buthebeganby being loyal 
to the truth himself; not by asking that 
legislatures should comptl other men to 
be 60. He believed, as all manly men 
do, in working out his own salvation by 
the means that God had put into his 
hand^ Soon came — as always comes 
to such obedient sons of God — the 
brotherhood of men and the sisterhood 
of women like-minded with himself. 
There were, then, "two or three gath- 
ered together in the name" of the Mas- 
ter. And truly, the rcrult to that 
Scrooby Church was all th&t that Mas- 
ter had promised of the gift of power, 



and it was as glorious as heart could 
wish. In the cathedral of St. Paul, in 
London, stands a statute of its architect, 
Christopher Wren. At the statue's 
loot is the inscription, in Latin, "Do 
you seek his monument ? Look about 
you. " Does my reader seek the mon- 
ument of the men of that Scrooby 
Church, wbo, without legislative help or 
Btatemen'a favors, but, rather with the 
bitterest persecution from legislatures 
and statesmen, were true to one of those 
words that "cannot pass away," even 
''though heaven and earth should paES 
away" — let him stand anywhere be- 
tween "the lakes and the gulf," and 
"the Atlantic and the Pacific seas," 
and "lock around" him? One magnif- 
ficent mother republic and forty descend- 
ants »• of unparalleled endowments form 
their monument. The first organiza- 
tion to which these men locked was a 
church, not a state, and they founded 
it for themselves, or, rather it had anoth- 
er founder, but grew up in their hands, 
by their single-eyed, simple, but mag- 
nificent loyalty to a principle that he 
had enjoined. "Two or three gathered 
together in one name," in one of the 
most insignificant hamlets in Europe, 
and the face of earth's civilization is 
changed. Capitols, whose cost is mil- 
lions on millions, become objects of con- 
tempt before a manifestation like th's. 
Well said John Andrew, an experi- 
enced statesman, just as his earthly 
experience was drawing to a close: 
"From all that I can leain, all the good 
things that we have, have come from 
the church." Such good as the labor 
reformers want will have to come in 
the same way. Two or three gathered 
together, say in the city of Philadelphia, 
or in the most obscure corner of the 
land, it matters not which, and accept- 
ing Matthew 6. 19, reverently, in the 
love of God, fraternally, in the love of 
man, ready to live by it, ready to die 
for it, and determined to convert the 
world to it; holding to the promise, "If 
two of you shall agree on earth touch- 
ing anything that they shall ask, it 
shall be done for them of my father," 
and again the civilization of the earth 
shall be changed. For it would not be 
long before such men would gather into 
their fold men with organizing power 
hat a Kirke Boott could not despise. 
Catholics and Episcopalians tried to 
despise Congregationalists, yet the lat- 
ter called to their side an abundance of 
Isaac Johnsons and John Winthrops 
from "paradises of plenty" to New 
England's inhospitable shores. 

No man can tell us from history any 
reform of the same grade and kind as 
that desired by the labor party, which 
received its inception, modeling or esiab- 
ishmentfrom political legislation. The 
thing never has been and never can be. 
Suppose the labor reformers could 
achieve their pet political purposes. 
Suppose they could get an infrangible 
eight-hour law and a perfect system of 
graduated taxation; a most galling evil, 
one that now stings them to madness, 
would still remain. The employee 
would still be a plebian, the wealthy 
employer an aristocrat. Then there 
would be pleading to Congress for 
another civd rights bill. Pray, let's 
stop all this. The labor reformers have 



6 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



%i\t '^ifm 4^n4t, 



•'Waltiufffor the Adoption. 



BOMANS viii. 23. 



Waiting amid the Bhadows 

For the bluehiug of the dawn, 
Waiting amid the darkness 

For the sunlight of the morn ; 
Waiting becanse the appointed age 

Has not told out its years- 
Waiting because a groaning earth 

Has wept not all its tears. 

Toil-worn and very weary — 

For the waiting time is long — 
Leaning upon the promise — 

For the Promiser is strong. 
Waiting because some straying sheep 

Are on the mountiius still, 
They must be sought, and found, and saved, 

It is the Father's will. 

Waiting 'mid cruel taunting 

From many a scorning foe- 
Chilled by the bitter night-winds; 

The lamp of faith burns low, 
Waiting because a patient God 

Ii pitiful and kind — 
The seeking Shepherd may not leave 

Ouo halting lamb behind. 

Waiting 'mid angry billows 

For the breaking of the light— 
Heart-sick, and sad, and fretful 

With toiling all the night 1 
Waiting because the Master stands 

To watch the rising tide. 
And he would have us cast the net 

Upon the other side. 

W'aiting while skies still blacken 

With storm-clouds bunging low, 
Eyes fail with looking upward 

To find the emerald bow. 
Waiting because the Master's eye 

li on the ripening grain 
Th'-impatient sickle must be stayed, 

Wailing the "latter rain." 

Waiting with hands still busy, 

Chiding the tears that fall. 
Stopping sometimes to listen, 

If haply He should call. 
Waiting becauso the mighty stream 

Flows on with ceaseless tide ; 
There's room within the palace halls. 

The open door stands wide. 

Beguiling waiting hours, 
With raptuous thoughts of home, 

Breathing a yearning whisper, 
"When will the Master come?" 



Harkl get thee to the mountains, 
There is sound of distant song; 

The Bridegroom King is coming. 
For his bride bas waited long! 

—Sritish Herald. 



Centenary of the Suppression of the 
Jesuits. 



It was in August, 1773, that a Fran- 
ciscan monk, Ganganelli, better known 
as Clement XIV., set the seal of the 
fisherman to the famous Bull Dominus 
ac Eedemptor, which Buppreesed the 
order of the Jesuits, closed their houses, 
confiscated their property and annulled 
every one of their privileges. It was 
not a step hastily taken on Ganganel- 
li's part; on the contrary, events had 
led up to it in all directions. It was 
only tlie last act in a long series of 
demonstrations against the Society of 
Jesus. The order had made itself en- 
emies on all sides; where it was not 
detested it was despised. Men had 
feared it once — they now flauted its 
pretentions. Singular to say, as its 
foes were those of its own household, 
80 its only friends were found among 
skeptics, like Fredrick of Prussia, or 
schismatics like Catharine of Russia. 

The slaughter of the Janissaries by 
Sultan Mahmoud was not a stranger act 
than this suppression of his own body- 
guard, the Jesuits, by the Pope. The 
explanation of it is to be found in the 
fact that even the Papacy has to re- 
flect the ideas of the age it belongs to- 



The eighteenth century va^ the age of 
Illuminism. The ideas of the encyclo- 
paedia and of a coming regeneration of 
man by the reform of a few Old 
World institutions were dominant 
everywhere. Voltaire was the philos- 
opher, and Rosseau the prophet of a 
coming millenium, The age was 
steeped in Bentiment^lism, in visions of 
Utopias never to be realized. Exag- 
geration and afFrctalion abounded every- 
where. The mannerism of the _ old 
Court and regime broke out now in 
new quarters; it affected philosophers 
and even religious teachers. The Dres- 
den china style of shepherds and shep- 
herdesses were in fashion in real life; 
the age was modish, imggish and af- 
fected. It prated about the rights of 
man, but it overlooked their duties. 
The cant of the seventeenth century 
went after the heroes of Hebrew history- 
that of the eighteenth after the heroes 
of Greek and Roman history, but it 
was a cant in both cases, and the latter 
was the most unreal of the two; for 
the one was founded on authentic his- 
tory, the other on the fictions of Plu- 
tarch and writers of the late empire, 
which passed for history. 

Now, the strength and the weak- 
ness of the Papacy lies in this — that it 
is the creature of the age which it pro- 
fesses to guide. It was reforming in 
the age of the Reformation, as every 
reader of Ranke knows; and in the 
same way it became Rationalist, when' 
deitm was in the ascendant, in the 
so-called Age of Reason. Ganganelli, 
who was elected to the Papacy through 
the influence of France, to carry out 
the work which Choiseul and' the 
French Court had set their heart on, 
was himself a creature of the age. 
A weak, well-meaning man, who would 
have been a passable monk if he had 
never crossed the threshold of a clois- 
ter, he was set to a problem, which has 
been the despair of the boldest and 
most thoughtful minds ever since — viz., 
how to wed the past with the future. 
It is the marriage of January and May ; 
but youth and age cannot thus live to- 
gether even at the bidding of an abso- 
lute pope. He tried to break with the 
past, or, rather, to heal the breach 
which his predecessors had made with 
modern society, and because the Jes- 
uits stoo 1 in his way, and resisted all 
change, he swept them away. But the 
Jesuits were right in their point of view 
and had their revenge in the long run. 
Their maxim was sint at sunt aut non 
sinty and time has proved that they 
were ri^ht. There are institutions 
which cannot reform, and whose only 
safety consists in a stolid resistance lo 
change. Tiie church of Rome is one 
of those institutions. It is like an old 
house, which may hold together for 
a long time if left alone, but to touch a 
brick is to destroy it throughout. lis 
only strength is a certain vis inertiae 
and to modernize it is to bring the 
whole building down with a crash. 

The sequel showed that the Jesuits 
were right in their view of the case. 
Little more than thirty years after the 
expulsion of the Jesuits from Rome they 
were summoned back from their re- 
"treats in Russia by the penitent suc- 
cessor of Clement XIV. The Revolu- 



tion had spent itstlf, and those who 
had sown the wind had reaped the 
whirl-wind. Then came the reaction. 
Loyola redux may be described as the 
motto of the age from 1814 to 1848. 
Thp Jesuits were everywhere present, 
and all powerful in the cabinets of 
kings as well as in the co claves of 
popes and cardinals, As for the 
church of Rome she has drifted more 
hopelessly every year under the direc- 
tion of th« Society of Jesus; and the 
Black Pope, as the general of the Jes- 
uits is called at Rome, is a greater 
power there than the White Pope. 
The one is the titular prince of the 
church, but he is only Sl faineant king, 
like the long-haired Merovingian kings. 
The Mayor of the Palace, the mnjor- 
domo at Rome, is General Beckx, who, 
from the Farnese Palace, held in hand 
the wires which moved the Roman 
hierarchy throughout the world. 

Thus the centenary of the suppres- 
sion of the Jesuits sees them not only 
restored to Rome, but also more pow- 
erful there than ever. Jesuitism is ap- 
parently more in the ascendant than 
ever in the church of Rome. It dic- 
tated the syllabus to a docile and will- 
ing pope; it drew from him the dog- 
ma of the immaculate conception; and 
at last tickled bis personal vanity and 
secured its greatest triumph in the 
definition of his personal infallibility. 
The victories of Prussia and the decis- 
ive measures taken by Germany since 
the war to rid itself of these political 
meddlers, have been a heavy blow and 
sore discouragement; but it has re- 
covered the blow, and has apparently ral- 
lied France to its side. These pilgrim- 
ages to the favorite shrines of Jetuit 
devotion seems to be signs that it has 
not lost its hold on the popular mind. 
In the year 1873 we seem to be furth- 
er off than a century ago from the 
time when the order shall ultimately 
cease to exist. — Witness. 



Bigotry. 



The bigot to laxness is himself 
an inquisitor, and a foe to freely formed 
opinion. He is uneasy upon seeing 
that others have fixed and settled views, 
and attempts to unsettle them bv at- 
tacks upon all definite statements of 
doctrine, ^hy is he not content with 
the liberty which he himself enjoys of 
adopting no particular sentiments, and 
of maintaining, like the ancient soph- 
ists, that there is no absolute truth, 
and that one thing is just as valid as an- 
other ? He is allowed his own dislike 
and rejection of a creed, why should 
he disallow another man's liking for and 
adoption of a creed ? His complaint 
over the freely formed conviction of 
his ffllow-men that the evangelical 
system is the truth of God, is in reality 
a protest aga'n^t their right of priv.Hte 
judgment, and a demand that they 
adopt his opinions upon this point. But 
this is bigotry. If he would be con- 
tent wth his criticism and attack upon 
a particular creed, no fault would be 
found with him. But when, after the 
criticism and attack, he pronounces the 
advocate of the creed to be a bigot be- 
cause he still remains unconvinced by 
his reasonings, and still retains his be- 



lief, he passes the line of free and fair 
discussion, and enters the province of 
intolerance and bigotry. He does not 
meet with this treatment from the de- 
fender of the "faith once delivered to 
the saints." The charge of bigotry is 
not often made by the orthodox against 
the hetrodox, but always by the het- 
erodox against the orthodox. Perhaps 
we are the first since Dr. Johnson to 
direct attention to the bigotry of lax- 
ness. And we do not charge bigotry 
upon the latitudinarian merely because 
he attacks the evangelical creed, but 
because he calls those bigots who are 
not converted by his arguments. 

It is curious to notice how extremes 
meet. The latitudinarian will be found 
to be narrow, when he comes to be ex- 
amined; and the dogmatist will be 
found to be broad, when his real posi- 
tion is seen. The former is restless 
and uneasy upon discovering that his 
fellow-men in large masses are holding 
fixed opinions, and are ready to live and 
die by them. He complains and quar- 
rels with them for so doing. The latter 
is calm and self-possessed. He is satis- 
fied with freely-formed convictions 
and self-consistent creed, and while he 
does his best to convert to his own 
views those whom he regards as being 
in error, yet, if he finds himself to be 
unsuccessful, he enters no querulous 
complaint and indulges in no bitter 
intolerance, because he commits all 
judgment to God and the final day. — 

Chris. Intelligencer. 

«-»-* 

A Good Mother. 



Sometimes one hears said of a good 
wife and mother that "she's a regular 
home body." The phrase is simple, but 
what a world of ennobling qualities It 
indicates, and what a universe of frivol- 
ities it excludeSf The matronly home 
body is indeed "Heaven's best gift to 
man," Dashing ladies, whose mission 
it is to set the fashions, won't you look 
in upon your gentle sister as she sits in 
her well ordered nursery, making the 
children happy with her presence? 
Note how she adjusts their little diffi- 
culties, and admonishes, encourages, 
instructs, amuses them as the case may 
require. Do you think any nurse- 
maid could produce such harmony in 
their little circle ? Is she not an en- 
chantress ? Verily, yes, and her charm 
is 'Move stronger than death" for those 
sweet young faces, where you may see 
her smiles and frowns (though she sel- 
dom has occasion to frown) reflected in 
glee and sorrow like sunlight and cloud 
shadow in a quiet pool. What she i«, 
she will teach her daughters to be; and 
blessed are the sons that hare such a 
mother. — JSx. 



Well-Spknt Life — Dr. Cotton 
Mather, who was born at Boston, U. S. , 
in the seventeenth.century, commenced 
a life of the most active benificence 
when very young, and at the age of 
sixteen adopted as a maxim that a 
power and an opportunity to do good 
not only gives the right of doing it, but 
makes it a positive duty. On this 
maxim he determined to act, and con" 
tinned to do so during the remainder 
of his daj's. Accordingly he began in 
his father's family, by doing all the 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



good in his power to his brothers and 
sisters, and to the servants. After he 
had attained to man's estate, he imposed 
on himself a rule ' 'never to enter any 
company where it was proper for bira 
to speak without endeavoring to be use- 
ful in if, dropping, as opportunities 
might oflFer, some instructiya hint or 
admonition." Not a diy passed wiih- 
out some contrivance on his part "to 
do good ," nor without his being able to 
say, at the close of it, that some part 
of his income bad been distributed for 
pious purposes. 



Maxims for Working Men. 



The savings-bank is a safe debtoc. 

Fifty cents for a good lecture is bet- 
ter than half that sum for a circus. 

Dress ns^atly. A well-clothed man 
commands favor and respect, while one 
in slovenly attire cai. hardly borrow his 
neighbor's saw horse. 

If you wis'n to personally compre- 
hend the completest meaning of the 
old adage "/ fool and his money are 
soon parted," buy a lottery ticket. 

Never sacrifice money far what peo- 
ple will say. It is better to buy a fair 
piece of beef at fifteen cents a pound, 
and leavj the surloin for some other 
man, who would buy your kind except 
for the name. 

The man is always most honored 
who is most excellent in what he un- 
dertakes. It is better to saw wood well 
than to plead law poorly. 

Be hone«t; a cold stove is better 
than a stove hot with stolen fuel. 

The laboring man holds the same re- 
latiorf to the merchant manufacturer, 
attorney, physician and minister, that 
the locomotive does to a train of ele- 
gant and well-filled cars: they would 
stand still forever if the engine did not 
move them. 

There is many an honest, hard-work- 
ing poor man, who rises himself and 
calls his family before sunrise three 
hundred and sixty-five days in the 
year. In nine cases out of ten, when 
his children arrive at his age, they will 
be called up by servants. 

A meerschaum-pipe and bank book 
always quarrel, and the upshot of the 
encounter generally is, that one puts 
the other out of doors. 

Work harder at drilling rocks, far in- 
stance, if your employer never visits 
you than if he frequently does. He 
will know of your faithfulness when he 
pays for the drills. 

The poverty of childhood is more 
frequently than otherwise the stepping- 
stone to wealth. 

It is better to eat one meal a day and 
pay for it, than to eat three and have 
two of them charged. 

The larger your account with Trust, 
the sooner Debt will take your buainess 
into his hands. 

It costs a poor man more to let his 
children wander in their every-day 
clothing, Sabbath-days, than it does 
to dress them for church. 

Want is . a far less uncomfortable 
companion than debt. 

Never envy a rich neighbor; his 
boys will drive your children's car- 
.riages. 

A poor man's character is worth two 
dollars to him, where his hands are 
worth one. 

A full purse and a brandy bottle 
rarely occupy opposite pockets in the 
same coat. - 

Never dodge a dirty job. The rich- 
est deposits of gold are frequently 
overlaid by the deepest debris. — From 
*^ Money and How to Make It." 



«tt 



mmu 



Tiiblt^ Manners. 



LITTLE rOLKS, ABE YOU rOLITE AT TOUR MEALS? 

la tilcDce I must take my seat, 
And give God thanks before I eat ; 
Must for my food in patience wait 
Till I am asked to liand my plate ; 
I must not scold, nor wliine, nor pout, 
Nor move my chair or plate about; 
Witti knife, or fork, or napkin ring, 
I must not play- nor must siug; 
I must not speak a useless word, 
For children must be seen — not heard; 
I must not tak about my foot! 
>orfretif I don't think it good; 
My mouth with food I must not crowd, 
Nor while I'm eating speak aloud; 
Must turn my bead to cough or sneeze, 
And when I ask, say, "If you please ;" 
The table-cloth I must not spoil, 
>or with my food my fingers soil ; 
Must keep my seat when I h»ve done, 
Nor round the table sport or run ; 
When told to rise then I must put 
My chair away with noiseless foot. 
And lift my heart to God above 
In piaise for all his wondrous love. 
— Selected. 



iTud's So> 



'^Mother, did God ever say 'No' to 
you r 

Arthur had been sitting quietly by* 
the window with hi?, book in hand — 
not reading, but^thinking very earnestly 
for some miautes — when suddenly he 
startled his mother with that question 

M(S. Morrow looked a little aston- 
ithed at first, then a grave sad smile 
came over ker face, and then she an- 
swered: ''Yes, dear, a great many 
times." 

Arthur seemed only half satisfied. 
''Why, mother, I don't see ; how do you 
mean ?" 

"What made you ask the question, 
Arthur ?" 

"Why, you see, I was walking from 
school to-day, and I came round by Dr. 
Edward's place to see the flowers: ev- 
erybody said they -looked so beautiful 
after the rain. And when I came up, I 
found little Alice Rsed standing close 
against the fence, with her curly head 
between the railings, looking at the 
flowers as if she waa almost hungry for 
some of them. You know her, don't 
you, mother? Poor Mrs, Rsed's little 
girl, who lives in the old tumble-down 
hous'^ around the corner," 

"Yes." 

"Her father gets drunk so often, and 
don'i do any work; they are very poor. 
Well, when I stopped and stood by her, 
she looked up to me and said, "Ob, 
isn't it beautifcr^ ?" and ht.r eyes shone 
so. Then, just for fua, I said, Alice, 
why doin't you live in such a fiae big 
house, and have such fine flowers ?" She 
shook her head and answered, 'Because 
God says, No.' It sounded strange; I 
could not understand her at first, and she 
looked as if she felt perfectly willing to 
let other people have pretty things, and 
do without herself. I have been think- 
ing about it ever since; wasn't it queer 
for a little thing like her t(» say ?" 

"I*, is just what we all ought to learn 
to say, A.rthur, and say with just that 
little girl's faith and q'liet content. We 
should be much happier if we did. It 
is very hard, sometimes, because we are 
apt to forget that God lovea us so well, 
and always does what is best for us." 

Arthur went and sat down by the 
side of his mother, and said. ''Mother, 
please tell me how God said, No to yo"." 



"He baid it many tim f, my boj, bt- 
f re I learned that it was his tender, 
wise voice speaking for my good. I 
worried and was impatient at crosses 
and disappointments; but oh, how much 
brighter sorrow seemed when I once 
learned that God wrapped it as a cov- 
ering around hs love, that I might 
open wide the hand of faith and fi.d 
my treasure!" 

' 'Once, Arthur, I had a little daughter 
of whom 1 was vtry proud; I said to 
myself, 'I vfill tench her everything 
good aud ni'ble; 1 will take such care 
of her; and by-and-by s-he will gro*v 
up to bfe a comfort and a pleasing com- 
panion 1-0 me,' but God sud 'No ' He 
t ;ok away my darling, and disappoiui- 
ed my desire." 

The next time that God's 'No' broke 
in upon my j 'y, was when your dear 
father died. 1 ieh the sorrow coming, 
and I prayed that my boy might nave a 
father spared to train a^xi lo guide him 
as he grew to manhood. But Gol said 
'No' agair. ; and ob, it was hard, at first, 
to feel tsiat it was the voice of Love 
speaking! It was so dark, I could not 
see the wisdom and mercy of such a 
trial, but God knows best." 

Arthur's head sank lower, and his 
tears fell fast as he lislened. 

"Again, I said to myself, We will 
not leave the old hcus^, though there 
are only us two; we will keep the 
pleasant rooms and the beautiful grounds 
juf-tthe same; and as Arthur grows up, 
be will learn to love the trees which he 
planted and the vines which he trained. 
But God said 'No' to me. The hand- 
some house had to be sold into other 
hands, and we came away from the 
place we loved so, to a more humble 
home. But God has been gracious 
to us, and we have been very happy 
here — you and I, Arthur. Poor Mrs. 
Reed and little Alice have wants and 
sorrows that we know nothing of." 

"But mother, it seems to me that 
there are some people wjiom God nev- 
er s%ys 'No' to; at least, they seem 
to have everything they want." 

**Ah, we cannot tell, my boy; only 
God himielf can see into every heart, 
and understand the secrets of every life. 
Sometimes his 'No' is spuken very low, 
and only one in all the world can hear 
It— rand that may be the one we count 
perfectly happy and wanting nothing." 

"Does God ever say 'No' to me, 
mother ?" 

"Yes, but sometimes you do not rec- 
ognize it as his voice. God has been 
very good to you; but he has begun to 
say his 'No' to you in slight things, so 
as to prepare your faith and patience 
for the greater tria's which must come 
in after hfe. Last week, when you had 
planned a pleasant excursion with the 
boys, and were anticipating so much 
joy, it stormed. You only kept say- 
ing, 'It's to bad! I don't see what it 
rained for, this time !' and you were so 
unhappy that it grieved me to see you. 
Now, you should remember that it was 
the voice of a kind God, refusing you a 
pleasure because he knew it to be best 
that you should not have it; and jou 
s'nould have said, calmly and content- 
edly, as little Alice did, 'God says No." 

"But, mother, it is so hard — don't 
you think it is — to be always contented 



with, every thing tbat comts?" 

'•Yes, Arthur, we are like little chil- 
dren who cry for pretty things which 
they cannot have because mamma says 
'No.' We reach out our hands for some 
pleasure, and we say, Oh, if I can only 
have that, I shall be so happy !' But 
God knows better. He puts out his 
hand and takes away the otiject we long 
for, and his loving voice says 'No.' And 
oh," Arthur, if we could oaly learn to 
lay our hands upon his bosom, as a lit- 
ile chdd refcts on his mother, and to 
feel peaceful and trustful, that all th nga 
wdl work together for our good, how 
much happier we shuuid be !" 

Arthur looked up m his mother's calm 
face, and fe!t that she at least had 
learned to cast all her cire upon Him 
who careth for u^ ! And he restLed to 
learn the lesson, too. W'lh you, my 
young friends. ? Youth is the time to 
begin; before the evil (iAji come, aa- 
cDor yourselves last to God by faith. 
Learn to feel that whatever God sends 
IS the best for you, and what God takes 
away is best for you not to have. Re- 
member that ''God, in cur-'aing, giveth 
better gifts ithan man in benediction;" 
that God's 'No' is more full of love and 
teuder mercy than the sweetest blese- 
ings of the most generous earthly 
vuice." — Selected. 



t^tm\mmi\^. 



— Hou. Nentmiah ir'erry WrtseiecteJ 
Mayor of Newark, N. J,, because of 
his opposition to Sunday liquor selling. 

— A temperance alliance has been 
organized in the seventeenth ward of 
the city of Brooklyn, which maintains 
a free reading-room, open every night, 
with over one hundred d ff^rent papers 
and publications on file. 

— Tom. Foley, who fills the respon- 
sible position of Alderman in Chicago, 
and is a notorious liquor and billiard 
hall keeper, has been appointed by 
Mayor Colvin chairmsn of the com- 
mittee on public schcois. 

—Judge Aldrich, of Worcester, late- 
ly appointed by the Governor to the 
bench of the Supreme Court of Massa- 
chusetts, recently remarked, that, "Dur 
ing the two months and a half which 
he had presided over ihe sessions of 
the criminal court of this county, he 
had observed that at least seven-eights 
of the cases had their foundation in the 
use of intoxicating liquors." He added 
that; "if he could have his way in 
bringing about a remedy, he would 
commence at the other end of the 
crime" — that is, with the liquor-sellers. 

--Statistics of temperance in New 
York shows that the vice is on the in- 
crease, and what is worse that intem- 
perate women are more nearly irre- 
claim-sble than intemperate mea. The 
number of men committed to the work- 
house, from January 1873 to January 
1874, six times for drunkenness, was 
108; number of women committed six 
times, 3,702; number committed seven 
times — men, 28; women, 602; number 
committed ten times — men, 181; wo- 
men, 1,157; number committed one 
hundred times — men, 1; women, 29; 
total committed m four years — men, 
560; women, 9,006, or eighteen females 
to one male. 



8 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



A 



Cliica?o, Thursday, April 2, 18 74. 

The CnnisTiAN Ctnosobe is devoted to op- 
posing Secret Societies, but no great question of 
reform will be ignored in our columns. Articles 
for publication and items of interest will be 
thankfully received, and should be addressed to 
the OfHce Editor, at 11 Wabash Avenue, 
Chicago. 

A "Glorious Success ;" or, "It Might 
Have Been"— Which ? 



Two thousand extra copies of this num- 
ber of the Cynosure will be sent to canvass- 
ers for the paper, and we hope for great 
results. Our subscription list can be 
doubled during April and May if each one 
will TKY TO DO SOMETHING, for Several 
have promised clubs. Every reader of 
the Cynosure can surely get us a three 
months subscriber or two, at fifty cents 
each, with a little eff'oi-t. 

As fast as our list increases we shall try 
to make the Cynosure more and more val- 
uable — shall we have tour encourage- 
ment, readers? Perhaps you have tried be- 
fore with little or no success and so hesitate 
about trying again. Do not forget that in 
spite of past failure you may now have 
complete success, for the cause has made 
great progress in the past year, and you 
can NOW offer a large handsome paper, 
for three months at iifty cents, or a year 
for two dollars. Will you not try and see 
what you can do at once ? Subscription 
papers and samples will be sent free to 
those who order them, but we hope that 
you will try to ^.et at least one subscriber 
without waiting for these. 

The Publishers. 



OUR NEW DEFAllTURE. 



The readers of the Cynosure will without 
an exception be delighted with the trans- 
formation of their paper. Its fine appear- 
ance is not4ue to new type but to a better 
arrangemelt of the old, which must now 
speak for fresh-nibbed pens and in new de- 
partments. These are the improvements 
that will be valued most. 

Beginning with the table of Contents, 
which beside being a sharpener of the 
mental appetite serves the useful purpose 
of an index for reference, we come to a 
place of observation where as from a 
watchtower we have an out-look upon the 
tumultuously busy times. Not unfamiliar 
names come next, as the mental kalicdo- 
scope is turned; and in the argument, the 
experience, the cherished friendship for 
the dead Sumner, and the genial and hon- 
est rhyme we are instructed and fortified 
against the deceptions of an invidious 
foe. No less will the farmer, and the la- 
boring man — and that means nearly all of 
us — be thankful for the help from other 
sources to a better understanding of our 
dangers and their sole remedy. The 
trumpet notes of our reform will claim of 
course the first notice of the men of zeal, 
our Joabs and Benaiahs, and will be 
worth reading by any rare individuals 
who have little or none of their spirit. 
The Home Circle is the teaching place of 
nations and will be so esteemed in the future 
issues of the paper; and with it is the 
Children's Corner. We have not much to 
say of our editorial pages, but in them. 
The sterling words of our fathers — a gen- 
eration fast passing to revered graves, — 
the news of Christian work and progress, 
the passing events, the cheerful notes from 
everywhere and every mail will be found 
to be weekly more interesting. 

"Of new things some are over new,'— 
but such are not our Sunday-school col- 
umn and departments for in and out-door 
hints, n.)r will they be; neither we hope 
ever too old. The publication of perman- 
ent and valuable documents will be a fea- 
ture of the new paper, which being in- 
tended for wide circulation are here given 
first to our readers. 

Altogether we are pleased, though not 
satisfied, with the present number. "The 
path of the just shineth more and more 
unto the perfect day," and so, God grant, 
may the Cynosure. 



A 



CHICAGO PHYSICIAN 
EN ED. 



THEEAT- 



The theory of the lodge is that the 
higher degrees haye in their discretion 
both vengeance and protection for those 
below. Tjue or false, the writer below 
believes it. We call the attention of 
our readers to the following extract 
from what purports to be a letter to the 
editor of the Chicago Times, concern- 
ing the painful and revoltino; matters 
between him and the physician who 
attended his deceased wife ; not to keep 
alive what were best forgotten, but to 
fix the public mind on what deeply and 
seriously concerns us all. The letter 
purports to have been written by a 
Freemason of the thirty-second degree, 
and is a threat of Masonic vengeance on 
the physician, Dr. Johnson, who, it 
represents, is a member of the same 
order. The writer professes to speak 
by authority, and " on the part of our 
order." His letter concludes thus: 
Whether or not the Masonic order 
will take official cognizance of his abom- 
inable offense, I cannot now say, nor, 
were I officially aware that it would be 
done, would 1 be permitted to make 
the fact public. Should the fraternity 
try him, as it should, and punish him 
as he deserves, — were such a punish- 
ment possible, — the fact could never 
come to the knowledge of the public. 

I can only say, that the Masonic fra- 
ternity of this city, in its sentiments, 
repudiates, with loathing and horror, 
the sacrilegious crime of this man. He 
has sunk himself, by his attack upon 
the character of & dead woman, into an 
abyss of Masonic contempt and abhor- 
rence from which no human agency. and 
no time, will, or can, ever extricate him. 
I desire, in the defense of the chivalry, 
decency, and dignity of our beloved and 
all-powerful order, to put these facts 
on record. Having done this, I have 
only to add that l assure the world that 
our order knows how to punish; and 
though the processes are secret, tJiey 
are none the less swift or inexorable. 
Thirty-Second. 
I have put in italics the portions of 
the extract which particularly demand 
public notice, only observing that 
though the writer of this letter may be 
deemed from his writing a weak and 
extravagant person, the view he takes 
of the power of the Masonic order to 
try and "ptww's/t" American citizens in 
secret, according to its discretion, is 
sustained by the standnrd writers of 
the order in this country and in 
Europe. 

Take, for instance, the following 
from Chase's Digest of Masonic Law, 
eighth edition, 1869; title. Powers of 
Grand Lodges: "Maine. To inflict 
such punishment on the delinquent 
and guilty as may appear just and 
proper." The Rhode Island Grand 
Lodge claims, however, to ''punish" 
in the same words; so others. 

The punishments open and published 
to the world in this Digest, are only 
the ordinary repremand, suspension and 
expulsion. But this Times letter-writer 
notifies the world that there are 
'processes" of punishment, "secret," 
"swift," and ''inexorable," and the his- 
tory of the lodge from 1826-31 has 
shown the world that the rule and 
limit of those "processes" are the sole 
secret discretion of the lodge when it 
has its victims in its power. 

Are the people of Chicago generally 
aware that a voluntary society exists ; 



among them, claiming the right toinflct 
death on its members for violating its by- 
laws, limited only by what may seem to 
the lodge-leaders prudent and safe ? 



MOKTIMER M. LEGGETT. 



Some months since the public were 
startled by learning that a student of 
Cornell University had been killed 
while undergoing initiation to a colleigfe 
society. Various accounts of the mat- 
ter were published, some exaggerated, 
and others partial. Many papers dis- 
cussed the matter and took different 
views of the subject. It has now passed 
from general notice. What reason ex- 
ists for recalling it? The good and suf- 
ficent one that the truth has not been 
made known. The whole truth cannot 
be told now. Those who can tell, will 
not, and those who are willing to do 
so, cannot. The facts here stated were 
ascertained from gentlemen of Itha- 
ca, and the inquests which the coronor 
held. 

First, then, the young man, blind- 
folded by a black cloth, was allowed to 
fall from the cliff" by men who were 
conducting him, and probably drunk at 
the time. He was taken to the third 
story of a brick block and kept there 
until he died. He was taken, or rather 
his body was, slunc; over a man's shoul- 
der like a bag of meal, at 2 o'clock 
at night to the undertaker's, where he 
was encjffined. The members of the 
secret society which killed him, then 
tried to get his coffin on the cars with- 
out an inquest, but failed. 

Second, professors and students 
alike tried to prevent any investigation 
of the matter. One of the professors, 
on the morning after the killing, came 
to the editor of the Ithaca Journal and 
asked him to make no mention of the 
matter; saying, '-The boys were after 
a few grapes when the unfortunate 
thing happened; don't say anything 
about it." When the first inquest was 
held , students, members of the society, 
stood there and refused to answer ques- 
tions until instructed by a professor as 
to the answer they should make. On 
this first examination, witnesses sworn 
to tell the truth and nothing else, en- 
deavored to hide the fact that the 
young man was being initiated into 
their secret society, told nothing about 
the blind-fold; in short, while answer- 
ing as this professor directed them, did 
their utmost to hide the truth they 
were sworn to tell. 

The young men who went over the 
cliff with Leggett were guarded by 
the members of this secret society; pro- 
fessors and reporters excluded from 
their rooms and no one free from the 
contemptable oaths of secretism per. 
mitted to exchange a word with them 
until the inquest, when of course their 
secret professor had them instructed in 
the testimony they should give. (This 
is an inference from facts known, and 
not stated absolutely.) 

When the second inquest was held 
many things were learned, but still the 
evidence was evidently untrustworthy to 
the last degree. One young man, a sen- 
ior, said that he never knew of an acci- 
dent on such occasions; and when asked 
about a whiskey bottle that was found 



on the ground, said it wa? customary 
to have a bottle of whiskey in case of 
accident, showing that accidents were 
expected at that time. Several of the 
young men testified it was no part of 
the plan to frighten the candidate, that 
mitiation was made as pleasant as possi- 
ble, that none had been drinking, etc. , 
when a child would know by looking 
at the place they selected for their 
work, that this testimony was untrue. 

Third, after these facts became 
known in Ithaca, the faculty took no 
effective measures to prevent their re- 
currence. They indeed passed a few 
silly and contradictory resolutions, but 
did not root out the secret society that 
murdered Leggett, nor any others. 
President White, who is known only 
to the public as a small politician, made 
a rambling, incoherent speech to the 
students, at one moment endorsing Dr. 
Crosby's article on secret fraternities, 
and the next, saying that eminent 
doctors of divinity were Kappa Alpha's; 
saying that he had by a word abolished 
one Eosiety, and then coming to the 
lame and impotent conclusion that it 
was impossible to abolish them all. 
Vice-President Russell seems to be a 
kindred spirit, for after sitting during 
an hour and a half in a hall were Prof. 
Blanehard was speaking, and more 
than a hundred of his (Prof. Russell's) 
students indulging in conduct which 
would have been a lasting disgrace to 
a like number of Birbary apes, he 
took the platform without asking or 
receiving pernoission; entered on a de- 
fense of one of the young men con- 
nected with the killing of Mr. Leg- 
get; talked of the "moon careering 
through the szare heavens;" and then 
said that he had not a word to say in 
regard to the conduct of the students 
at that time. Prof. Wilder made a good 
stroke for the right, but fights alone ; 
in short, the society which murdered the 
young man whose name beads this ar- 
ticle, and others like it, control Cornell 
University. 

So long 8S this is the case, of course 
Ithp.ca must endure the presecce of a 
smoking, drinking, howling, swearing 
set of young barbarians who lack noth- 
ing but brains to become a low grade 
of Indians. We are far from asserting 
or believing that all Cornell students 
are of this sort; that too many are is 
painfully evident. Let us hope that 
the future may bring to Cornell better 
days. 



UTTERLY UNRELIABLE. 



Who are utterly unreliable? The 
writers and speakers who defend and 
extol Freemasonry, be they members, or 
be they not members of the lodge, 
Whether they are generally intelligent 
and truthful or rot, yet whenever they 
approach this mysterious subject they 
become at once mysteriously unreliable. 

The "Jack" Masons are unreliable 
because they set out with discrediting 
the testimony of the whole cloud of 
witnesses who have renounced Mason- 
ry and disclosed the secrets, which 
stamp indelliWy upon the institution a 
character of evil that admits of no 
vindication. The " Jacks " do not pre- 
tend to justify Masonry as it is describ- 
ed by all seceding Masons. But wh^n 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



9 



they deny the testimony of seeedina" 
Masons, they assert their own entire 
ignorance of what Freemasonry really 
is. Masons do not tell them the secret 
things of the order^ and if seceding 
Masons do not give them truth they 
are wholly incoaipeteat judges of the 
institution they' defend. Their good 
opinions of the order is simply a prej 
udice based not upon the testimony of 
Masons as to facts, but upon their mere 
assertion of opinions, while the facts by 
which alone the correctness of those 
opinion can be determin -d are kept 
secret. The '' Jack " Mascn therefore 
is a mere creature of prejudice, a blind- 
ed partizan, a facile dupe in the h&nds 
of those who use him for their crafty 
purposes and dirty work, while in their 
hearts they despise him as a seryile 
simpleton for thus "judging a matter 
before he hears it; or, hearing the truth, 
rejects it from love of deceit, or of the 
thrift which follows fawning. 

But when Masons defend Masonry, 
an objector may say they surely know 
wheref^f they affirm, and to say they 
are utterly unreliable is to deny that a 
Mason can be a good maa or anything 
but a liar on this subject. Far be it 
from us to bring any such sweeping and 
indiscriminate accusation against Ma 
sons. We never deny that many who 
are called Masons are good men and 
true. But good men and true in the 
evangelical sense of these words are 
not real Masons any more than bad men 
and false are true Christians. "They 
are not all Israel that are of Israel;" 
so they are not all Masons that are in 
the lodges. Miny enter, and finding 
nothing satisfactory or coagenial to a 
Christian spirit, yet not detectiog the 
real iniquity that is so plausibly con- 
cealed in this vast system of counterfeit 
good, they simply stay away from it; 
like Washington, scarcely vi'siting the 
lodge once in fifteen years. Seeing 
nothing very good or very bad, they 
wish well to the members and are will- 
ing to be thought well of by them; 
and perceiving no reasons for testifying 
against the lodge as weighty as those" 
which demand tlieir silence, they simply 
stay away and say nothing. These 
men are not at heart Masons. They 
have been deceived by the counterfeit 
and are but partially undeceived. They 
do not advocate Masonry, yet they do 
not tell what they know, nor frankly 
what they think. Masona and the 
world may construe their tilence as 
approval of Masonry, and hence their 
rejponsibihty is fearful; but to those 
seekins knowledge of the truth in the 
matter they are wholly unreliable. 
Other good men may be more fully 
deceived and therefore verily think that 
Masonry is the good thing it claims to 
be, and in that view may advocate and 
extol the system. Yet they are unreli- 
abp, not merely because they are de- 
cieved on the subject; not merely be- 
cause they consider themselves under 
oath ever to conceal from the world 
every point and iota of fact which dis- 
tinguishes Masonry from a]] other sys- 
tems, and without a knowledge of which 
no man can form an intelligent opinion 
of its moral character; but because 
these witnesses are all at loggerheads 



and disagreement with known facts, and 
with themselves and with each other. 
Among intelligent and honest witnesses 
there is usually substantial agreement. 
This is notably the case with all the 
thousands of seceding Masons from 
Pritchard to the latest seceder m this 
jear of grace, 1874. This striking dis- 
agreement of witnesses on one hand 
and the perfect agreement on the other 
is, we think, conclusive, and ought to 
banish all doubt as to which eide has 
the truth. If any one will take Pritch- 
ard's Masonry Dissected, published in 
1*730, and compare it with Priests' 
Jachin and Boaz, published in 1762, and 
then with Morgan's Masonry Exposed, 
published in 1826, and then with the 
disclosures of Aliyn and Stearns, and the 
still later ones of Richardson, Duncan, 
Tapley and others; all the disclosures 
in fact, except the spurious editions 
corrupted and altered by Masons for the 
expross purpose of breaking the force 
of this agreement, they will iiad the 
testimony of all thes3 witnesses a har- 
monious unity, consistent with all ImowQ 
facts, with themselves and with each 
other. 

Then turn to the testimony of the 
advocates of Masonry. Hon. John W. 
Forney, in a recant eulogy of Freema- 
sonry in Philadelphia, expressed a 
strong desire that the great Centenisl 
celebration should be committed to the 
care and direction of the mystic broth- 
erhood; for the ress'jn, among others, 
"that tbere is no association on this 
continent more intimately connected 
with the history and growth of our 
country." But where in our history is 
it even mentioned ? It might indeed be 
mentioned in connection with the at- 
tempt of that distinguished Mason, Ben- 
edict Arnold , to surrender by the aid of 
Masonic secrecy our array at West 
Point; or with the successful defiance 
of the power and lo,w§ of New York to 
punish the murderers of William Mor- 
gan; hut how either would associate 
the order with the growth of the coun- 
try, and entitle it to distribute for the 
benefit of its clan the $10,000,000 
appropriation asked of (]!oDgres3 for tb.e 
Centennial we are unable to see. Stiil 
more palpably at variance with known 
facts' is his assertion in the same con- 
nection, that " there are no Anti-masons 
now.''' ^ 'l^Qw, nobody is wUUng to admit 
that he ever opposed your organiza- 
tion." How beautifully this harmonizes 
with known facts ! Rather, how clearly 
it shows that Masonic orators are accus- 
tomed to humbug their hearers and to 
set a greater value on falsehood for 
their harangues than upon truth. For- 
ney is not ignorant himself, he only 
presumed his hearers to be so. When 
the great men of an association will 
talk thus recklessly on historical facts, 
is it too much to say they are utterly 
unreliable ? 

Rev. Mr, MuUerjin his Masonic address 
in Rochester, declared that Masonry 
was no substitute for religion; nay, that 
it was not even religious. Rev. Dr. 
Mayer, in his oration at the dedication 
of the Masonic Hall in Weiisvilie, 0., 
said, ' • Masonry is truly the great art 
to promote the perfection of mankind ;" 
and he asks, " Is it not a religion ? A 
religion! No, my brethren, we may 



rather call it the religion. It is entitled 
to this sublime distinction through its 
aim to make'mao'B 1 f^a happy and godly, 
and his deaili. enviable end peaceful. 
It is cf-rtaitdy tJie true relig'on cf man- 
kind." 

Thus their doctors disagree and they 
often cohtiadict themselves rss flatly as 
they do each other. V. G. Edwards, 
in a public Masonic address in Sj^racuse. 
said tbat Masonry embraced men of all 
shades of religious belief, but acknowl- 
edged the supremacy of the Decalogue 
and took the |3ib!e for its guide in all 
things. Mfn of all shades of belief 
cannot acknowledge the supremacy of 
the Decalogue or take the Bible as their 
guide in. any thing'. Thus this Mason 
contradicts .^biniself arid contradicts 
Chase, a standard writer on Masonry, 
who say?, " Masonry has nothing to do 
with the Bible." 

Many ME^.sonic writers clahn that 
Masonry dates as far back as EnocL. 
Still more place it a*; far back as Solo- 
mon. But Dr. Dalcho, one of the 
highest M-asoKs in Morgan times, denied 
that either Adam or Noah, Nimrod or 
Moses, Joshua or David, Solomon /or 
Hiram, or the Saints John, were Ma- 
sons. "To assert they were Fi-eema. 
sons," he says, "may mate the vulgar 
stare, but will rather escite the contempt 
than the admiration of ihi wise." 
While Steinbrenner, the Masonic his- 
torian, says expressly that Freemasonry 
dates no farther back than A, D. 1717. 

Such illustrations of the titter disa- 
greement of Masonic witnesses may bs 
multiplied indefinitely. To say therefore 
that they are utterly unreliable is to 
piit it in the mildest form consistent 
with any reasonable appreciation of so 
pregnant a fact. It is a fact that ought 
to satisfy all men as to whera truth and 
right are in this controversy ; that of a 
truth a deceiving aad lying spirit is the 
all-peivadi'cg tpirlt of Freemasonry. 

Where feihali Our AnisivorsaTy Meeting' 
be held Next Yeaii 



One friend has mentioned Rich- 
mond, Indiana. 

Indianapolis has also been suggested. 

The conditions which m.ake a place 
desirable for such a meeting are : 

First, Railroads accessible from dif- 
ferent parts of the country. 

Secoad, A home sentiment which is 
not hostile to the sntfirests of the Asso- 
ciation. 

Third, Daily papers are desirable, 
as their reports add to the usefulness 
and extend information of the Conven- 
tion. 

Will not all who have an opinion on 
this subject eommuBicate with Pres. 
Bianchard as soon as convenient? 



Lectures. -—Parties desiring lectures 
on the secret orders from President 
Bianchard, or Prof. C. A. Bianchard, 
can have them by application, provided 
one hundred dollars are raised to aid 
in paying the building debt of Wheaton 
College. Any person desiring to aid 
the College or secure lectures, can ad- 
dress either the above-named gentlemen, 
Wheaton, lil. 



Obsrlin College sends an opinion 
on secret orders which appears on our 
first page. The practice of the insti- 



tution on this question is of national 
repute; nor can much be said of the 
history and present condition of the 
College not already well known to the 
public. It is forty years since the town 
was begun, and now in a community 
of 4,000 people — without a dram bar — 
is a Giiristian college with six depart- 
ments: Theological, Collegiate, Scientif- 
ic, Fi^mal", Preparatory and Musical, 
with an attendance of 1,371 pupils, 723 
males and 648 females. This great 
success comee of devotion to God and 
truth. 



Wheaton College. — This institu- 
tior, so well and favorably known to 
the readers of the Cynosure, has never 
been more prosperous than at present. 
Its faculty now number some fourteen 
mi-mbers. Its students are mora nu- 
merous than hitherto; this year about 
two hundred and fifty earnest and able 
young men and women. The Illinois 
subscription toward the payment of its 
debt has now reached eighteen hun- 
dred dollars. More and better than 
all, souls have beeen converted and 
spirit as well a'3 mind strengthened 
for the battle of life. It=. spring term 

begins Thuraday, April 9ch, at 8-^ a.m. 
-*-•-« 

iNOTES. 



— In making up the forms this week it 
was a puzzling question to fix upon the 
proper volume and number. A some- 
what arbitrary compromise has been 
struck between the fortnightly and 
weekly editions, thus: up to September 
7 th, 1871, when the first number of 
the weekly appeared, there had been 
seventy-aine issues of the fortnightly. 
The present whole number is made by 
adding this to the whole number of 
weekly issues. The paper will have 
been published seven years nest Aug- 
ust so we are now in the sixth volume. 
The current number of the weekly 
has been retained that the volume may 
be complete wlien fifty-two papers are 
issued. •^t ' 

— Charles P. Sumner, father of the 
late Senator, was sherifi of Suffolk 
county, Massachusetts, instead of Essex, 
as recently stated in these columns, 
Any who are interested to know his 
opinions on Fr?emaso"ry can find them 
in the Cynosure, September 5-19, 
1872. They were drawn from a per- 
toi;al acquaintance with the institution, 
raid will be interesting at the present 
time. 

— Rev.Miltoa Smith, an sc'.ive mem- 
ber of the first convention (Aurora) in 
the present movement against the 
lodge, died recently at Wheaton. A 
member cf the Wesleyan churcb, he 
faithfully maintained its testimony 
against the slavery and lodge systems 
''through evil as well as good report." 
The Wesleyan church at Wheaton had 
just before suffered another severe loss 
in the death of its pastor, H. R, Will. 

— An error in the notice of Old 
Bock=!, for sale by J. C. Rownd, last 
week requires notice. Robinson's Proofs 
will be sent post paid; Barreul's Me- 
moirs of Jacobinism at the cost of pur- 
chaser, by mail or express according to 
order. These works should be brought 
into active service without delay. 

— Elder Isa^c Jackson and Mrs. Mary 
T. Jackson have been appointed dele- 
gates to Syracuse by the Vernon Co. , 
Association of Minnesota. 



10 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE: 



Uttg 



m 



Ludgre against Law« 



Richard Rush's Letters, 1831. 



I did not 8 t down to write a disser- 
tation on M isonry, nor am I going to 
giye myself to that task. I dwell not 
upon its remote origin and long histo- 
ry ; upon its curious titles, upon its 
ceremonies of oriental mould and celes- 
tial exaltation. I dive not into its 
claims to science, to phiknthrophy, or 
to religion. All these I leave for good 
or bad, for censure or commendation. 
My concern at present is with none of 
these. . I purposely uirn away that 
there may be no diversion from the 
scene I am surveying. I am in a field 
by itself. There my astonis!ied sight 
beholds two figures; the state with the 
broken scepter of the laws in her hand 
on one side, and Masonry with a veil 
over her face on the other. My vision 
is distinct, though the spectacle is so 
protentous. I go not beyond the nar- 
rative that presents it. Keeping to 
that I am guarded against mistake or 
confusion. I have here immovable 
ground under me. I take post as upon 
the verity of a legal record. A few 
facts are all that I waat.and these I have. 
I desire to render the case irresisti- 
ble by its concentration and its simplic- 
ity. I believe Morgan wa^ seized, car- 
ried far from his home by Masons, and 
by Masons murdered. 1 believe that 
this was the result of a conspiracy , en- 
gendered and carried through under 
circumsiances of peculiar deliberation, 
malignity and terror. Yet to this very 
hour, the nefarious deed remains un- 
punished. I have watched the pur- 
suit of justice. 1 see how she is dis- 
heartened, fatigued, worn down by ef- 
forts continued throughout years, to 
clutch these worse than C^labrian ban- 
ditti. I see her at fault; I see her 
countenance in despair. Masons know 
the whole tale of bl cho. Who can de- 
ny th's? Masons conceal it. Who 
can deny this? Can any sentient, rea- 
sonable being sisy that Masonry is not 
at the bottom of the evil. True, there 
are depraved Masons who act in this 
manner and I do not mean to judge 
all other Masons by them ; but Mason- 
ry, corporate, existent Masonry is the 
root. The abandoned fiends of the or- 
der, who know the truth, conceal it 
on system. They are wicked through 
principle. They confound crime with 
virtue; murder, with Masonic merit, 
Like imps of Pandemonium, they re- 
joice and dance in their sin. Like the 
crew in the Mask of Comud, they are 
unconscious of tbeir "foul disfigure- 
ment." The deeper their gui t the 
more they make themselves invulnera- 
ble. You can no more grasp them, 
than if they sink into the earth or 
mount into the air. A spirit inexora- 
ble as death destroyed the life of this 
citisen; and like a spirit it became in- 
visible. It is here — it is ther"? — it is 
gone; nobody can sue it; but society 
feels it. It is the spirit of night. 
The magistrate strikes, but it is into 
vacuity. He follows up the blow, 
again and again, but it falls upon a 
shadow. Is all this nothing t Th it to 



be forj^otten; to be meniioned with in- 
diflfe-ence; to be sneered at as fan- 
faronade ? If the press has turned de- 
serter, and gone over to the enemy 
whose profligate cohorts have over- 
thrown the laws, is that a reason why 
the people should not be true to them- 
selves? Is the whole army to be given 
up because the sentinels have skulked? 
If so, where is our intelligence; where 
our estimate of the popular dignity; 
where our republicanism; where our 
quick, our exalted sense of the country ? 
Where, we may ask, had fled our Jef 
ferson's sagacity, when he told us a re- 
public was the strongest government 
upon earth, since it was the only form 
under which, on a breach of the law 
everyone would fly to its support as a 
personal cccem? Had he heard ol 
the opposing spirit of our day that 
could spurn the laws? Had he heard 
of the spirit, creeping in darkness, that 
could not only cover the guilty with an 
armor impenetrable, but try to throw 
odium on those who cry out for retri- 
bution ? Solon being asked which 
was the most perfect popular govern- 
ment, replied. That where an injury 
done to any private citizen is such to 
the whole body. The blood of a mur- 
dered Roman, of one single Roman, 
could once rouse that whole race of 
freeman as by a voice from above. It 
could call down a just vengeance 
against all who caused the deed. More 
than once it changed their government. 
It expelled the Tarquins; it overthrew 
the Decemvirs. It kindled a holy en- 
thusiasm which nothing could appease, 
until the guilty authors were blasted 
and consumed, that thus the wounded 
commonwealth, a name sacred in Ro- 
man eyes, might have its propitiatory 
sacrifice. It was so that Roman glory, 
that work of ages, as Tacitus describes 
It, that toil of patriots, and statesmen, 
and legislators, and warriors, was 
founded and kept pure. But in our 
boasted republic the blood of an 
American, who was taken from his 
home; bound; tortured; agonized; 
bi rne by the conspirators along the 
high-road?, with an impudent cavalcade 
of carriages and horsemen; cast into a 
fortress over which had floated the sov- 
ereign flan of the Union ; and at last 
<mmolated by harp'es belonging to an 
organized and powerful institution, 
who conceal their crime under the hor- 
r'ble delusions of their mystic tie — all 
this is to go for nothing I 

The institution is not to blame; no, 
it is no fault of the institution ! The 
immolation is to cause no public dismay. 
We are to sit still in stupid gaze; sonae 
beholding it with folded arms, others 
in derision! The press is silent; or 
the press scoffs. The institution even 
turns complainant. It positively grows 
beihgerent; it shows battle. It will 
not be "persecuted." It will have no 
noise made; none of all this flash — and 
rhodomontade — and bluster. The 
small number who are for driving the 
conspirators into the toils, and perma- 
nently breaking up their den to save 
the future from all possibility of similar 
tragedies are denounced, ridiculed! 
They are infected with "'Anti-masonic 
excitement," — they are demagogues, 
office hunters ; they were geiters-up of 



a groundless party, without use or mo- 
tive, or object. Was ever an intelli- 
gent community so treated before? 
Was ever the understanding of rational 
men s ) trifled with ? Did ever corpo- 
rate hardihood in any age or nation as- 
sume a front so brazen faced ? Let it 
go on. It works its proper (ffice. In 
this manner let it perpetuate its power 
of defeating the laws. In grood time 
we shall have some other "afi"air," some 
fresh peccadillo, some new variety in 
the dramatics of mystery, for an even- 
ing's amusemf'Ut, and editors' gibes! 



Ilj4 Mh\l\ itfia^l 



Schedule of Hilile L<-ss(»i!S for Second 
(Quarter, 1874. 



Apr. 5tb, Ex. xx. 1-17— The Ten CommaDcls. 
May 



xxxii. l-ti, 19, 20: Golcleu Calf, 
'■ xxxHi. 12-2(1: People Forgiven. 
" xl. 17-.3(i : Tabernacle eet up. 
Lev. vii. 37, ;^8: The Five Otferiutrs. 
" W " xxii 4-fi, 15-31 ,33-30: The Three 

Great Feasts. ' 

" 17 Num. iii, 5-13: The Lord's Ministers, 
" 24 " xix. 1-111: Israel's Unbelief. 
" 31 " XX. 7-13: The Smitten Rock. 
June 7 Num. xxi. 4-9: Serpent ol Brass. 
" 14 Deut. xviii. fl-Ki: The True Propliet. 
" 21 " xxiv. 1-12: Death of Moses. 
" 28 Review (Sugt'est) Deut. viii. Mercies 
Reviewed. 

LESSON XV. — APRIL 12, 1874. — THE GOLDEN 
CALF. 

SCRRIPTDRE LES-ON.— EX. XXXii. 1-6, 19, 20. 

Commit all; Primxry Verse 5. 

1 And when the people saw that Mo- 
ses delayed to come down out of the 
mount, the people gathered thems^elveiJ to- 
gether unto Aaron, and said unto hiui, 
Up, make us gods, which shallow litfoie 
US; for as for this M 'ses, the man that 
brought ns up out of the land of Egypt, 
we wot not what is become of him. 

2 And Aaron said unto tliem, Bieak 
ofl' the gO'deu earrings, which are in the 
ears of your wives, of jour sous, and of 
your daughters, and bring them unto me. 

3 Aud all the people brake off the 
golden earrings which were in their ears, 
and brought them unto Aaron. 

4 And he received them at their hand, 
and fashioned it with a graving tool, after 
he had made it a molten calf; and they 
said. These be thy go.is, O Israel, which 
brought thee up out of the land of Eiry.H. 

5 And when Aaron saw it, he built an 
altar before it; and Aaron made procla- 
mation, and said, To-morrow is a feast to 
the Lord 

6 And they rose up early on the mor- 
row, and offered burnt off'rlngs, aud 
brought peace offerings; and the people 
sat down to eat and to drink, and rose up 
to play. 

19 And it came to pass, as soon as he 
came nigh unto the camp, that he saw tlie 
calf, and the dancing: and Moses' anger 
waxed hot, and he cast the tables out of 
his hands, and brake them beneath the 
mount. 

20 And he took the calf which they 
had made, and burnt it in the tire, and 
ground it to j owder, and strewed it upon 
the water, and made the children of Israel 
drink of it. 

GOLDEN TEXT.— "Little children keep 
yourselves from idols." — JoJm v. 21. 
TOPIC— One God and one Mediator. 

HOME READINGS. 
M. Ex. xxxii. 1-2(1— The First Golden Calf. 
T. 1 Ki. xii. 25-:33— The Calves of Jeroboam. 
W. 1 Hi. xviii. 17-39— The Worship ol Baal. 
Th.2Ki. X. 12-28— Baal's Worsliiper's Slain. 

F. Dan. iii. l-8'i— The Golden Image. 

S. Hos. xiii 1-16— The Sin of Idolatry. 
S. Acts xvii. lS-31— The Idols of Athens. 

TOPICAL ANALYSIS. 
The Absent Leader, verse 1. 

The Golden Calf, verses 2-4. 

The Idol W^orshiped, " R, 6. 

The Angerof Jebovah, " 7-10. 

The Idol Destroyed, " 19, 20. 

(^iialiflcatioas f>ir Teachers. 

1 Unlitiuff activity. 

'2. P ay fo' and with the class. 

3. Th^ baptism of the Holy Spirit. 

4. Prayerful and careful propara- 
of the t- acher, wiib always a pleasant 
recognition of the scholar, with a daily 
exemplary life. 

5. The most important of all is, to 
mind your busi'iefm. Succesis will fol- 
low. 

6. Punctual ty in attend ince on the 
part of the teachers. 

1. Pro''e^^BingCbri'*tian8 should have 
a more catholic spirit toward all who 
loye the Lord Jesus. 



8. In order to obtain success in our 
work we, as teachers, should adopt the 
following maxims: 

Punctuality in attendance. 

The pure love of Jesus in our hearts. 

Constancy at^ the tliroile of grace, 
interceding for those under our care; 
at the same time pr cticing what we 
preach . . 

9. A deeper worl: of grace in our 
hearts, and a stricter obedience to the 
command, "Go work in my vineyard 
to-day." 

10. Promptness of the teacher one 
great element of tuccess — to be always 
at his posi, or appoint a subsiituie. 

11. As the virtue of the electric 
wire is not in the wire itself, but in its 
connection with ihe voltaic b'ittery, so 
the power of the Sunday School teacher 
IS not in the fervor ot his manner, the 
order and arrangement of his teaching, 
but in his living connection with God, 
and his capacity to act as a connecting 
link between God and the human soul. 

Let us pray earnes ly and always, 
that this capacity in our Sunday School 
teachers may never be weakened or 
destroyed, and our success is sure. 

12. To succeed in our work, we 
need more faith in it. (i. e ) must regard 
our work as appointed and sustained by 
the Master of the vineyard. 

Must be consecrated to our work. 
Every member of the church should 
eek a pkce, ss pupil, teacber or officer 
m the Sunday School 

Must labor for a worthy end. Be 
nore anxious for spiritual life and growth 
than for increase of the members of our 
.-cbools. 

Must have thorough preparation, or 
>^ careful study of tie topics taught, 
Hud the best means of ulusiraiing tnem, 
but relying more upon the Holy Spirit's 
presence than any mental culture. 

Must work from proper motives 
«fhaiever ye do in word or deed, do all 
in tiie name of Jesus. 

13. Superintendents qualified for 
he work by natural gifts, to interest, to 

-uide, direct and control teacher and 
scholars, in firmness, meekness and 
love; coLsecraiion to God of his entire 
(self, and by prayer for the guidance of 
toe Holy Ghost, that all may be for the 
^'lory of God in the salvation of souls. 

Teachers qualified to teach Christ, 
from an earnest love to Christ, and a 
desire to win eoals to him. 

Parents to realize that children have 
souls as well as bodies that need caring 
for, and that God will hold them strictly 
accountable for the moral training of the 
child. The trust cannot be delegated 
to another. 

The church fully aroused to her 
responsibility in regard to Sabbath 
School work, and recognizing it (the 
school) as a part of herself, a moral 
vineyaid in which the tender plants 
(the souls) must ba tenderly cared for, 
tramed to forms of beauty (won to 
to Christ) and finally transplanted into 
the church. 



— A reason for beginning early in 
the preparation of a lesson is sug- 
gested by the S. S. Times in the in- 
terest of pupils who may lack the means 
a'd appliances of study: 

The time to begin preparation is 
about two weeks previous to any given 
Sabbath. One object of this is that 
the teacher may be able to furnish his 
pupils a week beforehand with such 
suggestions and information as may be 
a help to them in studying the lesson. 
Many a child comes poorly prepared to 
>chool because he does not know how 
to catch the main thought of the les- 
son. A stimulating question, some il- 
lustrative fact, a passage of secular or 
biblical history written on a slip of 
paper and put in the Bii)le of each 
scholar will often prove a key to the 
lesson that looks dilh;ult and unprom- 
isinv. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



11 



"^^^t mi |(i^fi(i| 1\\\h, 



HoTf Plants Tiuify the Air. 



Plants g^in their nourishment by the 
absorption through their roots of certain 
substances from the soil, and by the 
decomposition, through their green 
portions, of a particular gas contained 
in the atmosphere — carbonic acid gas. 
They decompose this gas into carbon, 
which they assimilate, and oxygen 
which they reject. Now this phenom- 
enon, which is the vegetable mode of 
respiration, can only- be accomplished 
with the assistance of solar light. 

Charles Bonnet of Geneva, who be- 
gan his career by experimenting on 
plants, and left this attractive subject 
to devote himself to philosophy, only 
in consequence of a serious affection of 
his sight, was the first to detect this 
joint work, about the middle of the 
eighteenth century. He remarked that 
vegetables grow vertically, and tend 
toward the sun, in whatever position 
the seed may have been planted in the 
earth. He proved the generality of the 
fact that, in dark places, plants always 
turn toward the point whence light 
comes. He discovered too, that plants 
immersed in water release bubbles of 
gas under the inflaence of sunlight. 
In 1771 Prestly, in England, tried 
another experiment. He let a candle 
burn in a confined space till the light 
went out, thaf, is, until the contained 
air grew unfit for combustion. Then 
he placed the green parts of a fresh plant 
in the inclosure, and at the end of ten 
days the air become sufficiently purified 
to permit the re-lighting of the candle. 
Thus he proved that plants replace gas 
made impure by combustion with a com- 
bustible gas, but he also observed that 
at certain times the reverse phenome- 
non seems to result. 

Ten years later, the Dutch physician, 
Ingenhousz, succeeded in explaining 
this apparent contradiction. 'I had 
just begun these experiments," says 
that skilful naturalist, '"when a most 
interesting scene revealed itself to my 
eyes. I observed that not only do 
plants have the power of cleaning im- 
pure air in six days or l^nster, as Priest- 
ly's experiments seem to point out, but 
that they discharge this important duty 
in a few hours, and in the most thor- 
ough way; that this singular operation 
is not due at all to vegetation, but to 
the effect of sunlight; that it does not 
begin until the sun has been some time 
above the horizon ; that it ceases entire- 
ly during the darkness of night; that 
plants shaded by high buildings, or by 
other plants, do not complete this funct- 
ion, that is, they do not purify the air, 
but that, on the contrary, they exhale 
an injurious atmosphere, and really 
shed poison into the air about us ; that 
the production of pure air begins to di- 
minish with the decline of day, and 
ceases completely at sunset; that all 
plants corrupt the surrounding air du- 
ring the night, and that not all portions 
of the plant takes part in the purifi- 
cation of the air, but only the leaves and 
green branches. " — Popular Science 
Monthly, 



Brine fok the Presekvation of 
Butter.— To three gallons of brine 
strong enough to bear an egg, add a 
pound of nice white sugar and one table- 
spoonful of saltpetre. Boil the brine, 
and when it is cold strain carefully. 
Make your butter into rolls, and wrap 
each roll, separately in a clean white 
muslin cloth, tying up with a string. 
Pack a large jar full, weight the butter 
down and pour over the brine until all 
is submerged. This brine will keep 
really good butter ptrfectly sweet and 
fresh for a whole year. Be careful not 
to put upon ice butter that you wish to 
keep for any length of time. In sum- 
mer, when the heat will not admit of 
butter being made iato rolls, pack close- 
ly in small j^rs, and, using the same 
brine, allow it to cover the butter to a 
depth of at least four inches. This ex- 
cludes the air, and answers very nearly 
as well as the first method suggested. 

Omelette. — Beat six eggs very light, 
the whites to a stiff froth that will stand 
alone, the yolks to a smooth thick bat- 
ter. Add to the yolks a small cupful 
of milk, pepper and salt, lastly stir in 
the whites lightly. Have ready in a 
hot frying-pan a good lump of butter. 
When it hisses, pour in your mixture 
gently and set over a clear fire. It should 
cook in ten minutes at most. Do not 
stir but contrive, as the eggs "set." to 
slip in a broad-bladed knife under the 
omelette to guard against burning at 
the bottom. The instant "hiss" of the 
butter as it flows to the hottest part of 
the pan will prove the wisdom and effi- 
cacy of the precaution, • If your oven 
is hot, you may put the frying pan in 
it as soon as the middle of the omlette 
is set. When done lay a hot dish bot- 
tom upward on the top of the pan, and 
dextrously upset the latter to bring the 
browned side of the omlette uppermost. 
Eat soon, or it will fall. 

Crop Statistics. 



The National Crop Reporter pub- 
lish -s the estimates of its correspond- 
ents in relation to the percentage of 
last years crops of corn, oats, hay, and 
Irish potatoes which will be consumed 
during the current crop year, the esti- 
mates having reference to the States of 
Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Min- 
nesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin. 
In addition there are also very full re- 
turns in relation to the fruit prospects 
in the same States. The following is 
an abstract of the leading points: 

CORN. 

Tl e total production of corn in 1873 
in the States named was nearly 515, 
000,000 bushels, of which amount 
cearly 65 per cent., or 333,000,000 
bushels, will be used at home. Kansas 
consumes 90 per cent., and Illinois 61^ 
per cent, of the production in the 
respective States. 

OATS . 

The production of oats last year in 
the same States was placed at 168,500,- 
000 bushels, of which nearly 62 per 
cent, or 104,000,000 bushels will be 
required for home uses. The States 
, showing the heaviest and lightest oer- 



ceniage of consumption are the same as 
in the case of corn. 

HAT. 

In the item of hay, the local con- 
sumption in the eight States is averaged 
at 83 3-10 per cent. , the total production 
last year being something )ver 10, 500, - 
000. This percentage represents nearly 
8,900,000 tons. Indiana rates relatively 
the lightest consumer, and shows a sur- 
plus of about 23 per cent. 

POTATOES. 

Out of the 28,000,000 bushels of Irish 
potatoes produced last year in the 
States named, there is an estimated 
consumption of nearly 78 per cent., or 
about 21,666,000 bushels. 

FRUIT. 

la regard to the condition of the 
fiuit buds March 1, there is hardly an 
exception to the most flattering accounts 
from all localities. There were a great 
manj' trees killed last year in v.'irious 
ways, but at present in all living trees 
the buds are, as a rule, in the best pos- 
sible condition for a large crop, with 
favorable weather in the future. 

Khubarh. 



UUK MAIL. 



The German town Telegraph says a 
good word for rhubarb : 

There are a large class who are fond 
of this. It IS among the earliest green 
things; and, though no one classes it 
among the choicest of horticultural 
gifts, io the abr-itract, yet on account of 
its early growth it will always be es- 
teemed. 

Itsearlinesa being one of its valuable 
points, a place should be selected for 
it where it will get all the advantages 
of early spring suns. Some people 
help it by putting barrels over the 
roots. This keeps out the cold, and 
as the rhubaib is stimulated to grow by 
a very little heat, the natural warmth 
of the ground brings it up if the frost 
be kept out. Then the barrels help 
to blanch it a little, and it is not quite 
so Eour as when left to grow naturally 
in its own way. Rhubarb is poor stuff 
when stringy, and it is the aim of 
good growers to have it as pulpy as 
possible. Therefore the soil is to be 
made yery rich indeed — as good as 
manure can make it. When grown in 
this way, even the outside is tender, 
and it may be cut up for use without 
even peeling, as is so often done. Some 
varieties are, however, more tender than 
others. There are, however, four pop- 
ular kinds which, when well grown, are 
all of about equal value. These are 
the Victoria, Linuaeun, Magnum Bon- 
um, and Prince Albert. 

Rhubarb is very rapidly increased by 
cutting an old ' 'crown" to pieces. If 
these are split downward, on a line 
with the growth of the root, every 
piece of root will grow, though it be 
split into a score of pieces; but pieces of 
root will not grow unless there is a por 
tion of the "crown" with it. The 
crown is the upper portion or leaf-bud. 
underjust ground. 

If very large stocks be desired, the 
plants should not be set too close. A 
root to every four square feet is enough 
— that is to say, the plants should 
grow two feet from one another every 
way. As the rhubarb is a gross feed- 
er, if they be put closer than this they 
will likely starve one another. 



Wesley Lamon, Princeton, Ind-, writes: 

"Times are hard with me, and compara- 
tively few take or appreciate the noble 
Cynosure, yet it seems next to impossible 
to get along without it. I have taken it 
several years, and like it better now than 
ever; and when I read tbat it would soon 
be enlarged, 1 'thanked God and took cour- 
age.'" 

Joseph Pershing, Green River, 111., 
writes: 

"I wish you'to continue sending me the 
Cynosure. I do not see that I can possibly 
do without it." 

Merchant; Kelly, Bentonville, lud., 
writes: 

"Do not stop sending it (the Cynosure) 
to me. I would not do without it for 
$25.00 a year. * * I take several other 
papers, but would rather quit taking all of 
them than the Gynosurey 

B. C. H. Smith, Belpre, Ohio, writes the 
following: 

"Mv time expires the 19th of this month, 
but I don't see how I can possibly do with- 
out so valuable a paper, and such a wel- 
come friend in my family. I have not 
the money at present; will send you in 
A.uril, so please continue. When I get 
your enlarged paper I think I can t et 
some subscribers. I hope so at least " 

We hope all our readers who have not 
the cash at hand when their subscriptions 
expire would write us a few words similar 
to the above. Do not allow your names 
to be removed through carelessness or pro- 
crastinatiou. We thank those who are re- 
new! ig so promptly. 

S. B. Kimball, Wheaton, 111., writes: 

''So noble a cause must be sustained. 

J. Williams, Majority Point, 111., writes: 

"I expect to patronize the Cynosure aa 
lorjg as it advocates the principles it does 
at present." 

C. D. Coppock, Quarry, Iowa, writes: 
"I am living in a settlement where Ma- 
sonry is trying to control both church and 
state, by robbing the gallows and states 
prison of its dues, and that under the pre- 
tense of being a moral and benevolent or- 
ganization — and they are snaringmany in- 
nocent young men and leading them to 
the devil as fast as they can. Through 
the kindne.=s of a friend in Ohio, I received 
a copy of your paper. Hence the reason 
why 1 send you this (an order for the Cy- 
nosure and Anti-masonic books, tracts, 
etc.) I shall probably want more tracts 
soon, for I think that we will have some 
lively times here." 

J. W. Turner, Laclede, Mo., writes: 
"It is the man that is face to face with 
the enemy that can appreciate the Cyno- 
sure. I feel more than ever what a gieat 
work the National Association is doing." 

D. Crawford, Crestline, Ohio, writep: 
"I value your paper above all papers I 

have ever taken. I intend to take your 
paper and lend my support to the great 
and good causeit represents while I live." 



Adslress of Anti-mfls nic Lecturers. 



General Agent and Lecturer, J. P.Stod- 
DABD, Christian Cynosure Office, Chicago, 

111. 

State Lecturer for Indiana,.!. T.Kiggins, 
605 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

State Lecturer for Wisconsin, H. H. Hin- 
mau, Ironton, Wis. 

State Lecturer for Ohio, D. Caldwell, 
Carey, O. 

State Lecturer for Kew York, Z. Weaver, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

I. A. Hart, Wheaton, 111. 

C. A. Blanchard, Wheaton, 111. 
P. Elzea, Wheaton, 111. 

W. A. Wallace, Senecaville. O. 
J. B. Nessell, Ellington, N. Y. 
John Levington, Detroit, MicL. 

D. P. Rathbun, Odessa, N. Y". 
S. Smith, Charles City, Iowa. 
R. B. Taylor, Summerlieid, O. 
L. N. St.rattOD, Syracuse, N. Y. 
N. Callender, Green Grove, Pa. 
J. H. Timmons, Tarentum, Pa. 
Linus ■ Jhittenden, Crystal Lake, 111. 
P. Hurless, Polo, 111. 

J. R. Baird, Greenville, Pa. 

T. B. McCormick, Princeton, Ind. 

C. Wiggins, Angola, Ind. 

J. L. Barlow, Bemus Heights, N. Y. 

E. Johnson, Bourbon, Ind. 

Josiah McCaskey, Fancy Creek, Wis. 
C. F. Hawley, Seneca Falls N. Y'. 
Wm. M. Givens, Center Point, Clay Co., 
Ind. 



12 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



|[ulijji<i«$ lln{dftijttti[u, 



Three hundred new converts have just entered Tem- 
ple Street Church, Boston. 

Ninety-three persons were admitted to membership 
in Plymouth Churcli, St. Louis, Mar. 18th. 

A Congregational church, with the Rev. C. A. 
Towle, pasto!-, has been organized in South Chicago. 

An interesting revival work has commenced among 
the students of Northwestern University at Evanston, 
Ilhnois. 

The Methodists have sixchurches in the City of Mex- 
ico, in which about 2,000 worshipers meet each 
Sabbath. 

Mr. Gladstone recently lectured on "The Uses and 
Abuses of Scripture Quotations," before the London 
Open-Air Missions. 

The Union Biblical Institute of the Western and 
Canada Conferences of the Evangelical Association has 
been started at Naperville, HI., in connection with 
Northwestern College. 

Rev. B. M. Arasden. pastor of the Congregational 
church at Manchester, Iowa, reports revivals in the 
■ "eitrhboring churches at Strawberry Point and Edge- 
wood. 

The Baptist Year Book reports 20,-520 churches, 12,- 
598 ministers, and a total membership of 1,633,939; 
being an increase in membership during the year of 
48,707. 

The Protestant Episcopal Communion in the United 
States comprises forty-one dioceses and nine mission- 
ary jurisdictions ; fifty-two bishops; 3,095 priests and 
deacons; 2,700 parishes, and 260,000 communicants. 

The Rev. E. M. Boring, formerly financial agent of 
the Home for the Friendless, has been appointed to 
tlie pastorship of the Methodist Episcopal church in 
Woodstock, 111, lately vacated by Rev. N, Fanning. 

The International Sunday-school Lessons for 1875 
have been selected and announced. The first quarter 
they are in the Book of Joshua; for the second, in 
Judges and Samuel ; and for the third and fourth, in 
the Gospel of John. 

Bishops Weaver and Glosbrenner of the United 
Brethren in Christ have had the pleasure lately of tak- 
ing part in the dedication of tAvo churches in and near 
Georgetown, D. C. 

The TelesC'pe, church paper of this denomination, 
still publishes an extended list of revival notices; the 
list numbered forty-eight last week. 

The New York Conferences of the Wesleyan church 
will all be held during March and April. Bro. Crooks, 
the publishing agent, hopes soon to raise the full $30,- 
000 needed for the church PubHshing House in Syra- 
cuse. Over $17,000 are already subscribed. 

A letter to the Herald and Presbyter says that Mr. 
Hammond's visit wrought a great clearing of the 
moral atmosphere in Alton, 111. The reefing drunkard 
is seldom seen and the profane oath is rarely heard in 
the streets. 

Fellowship meetings among the Congregational 
churches of the West have in several cases been the 
starting point of a work of grace. Such has been ex- 
perienced at Morris and Sycamore, III., Markesan, 
Sparta, La Crosse and West Salem, Wis. 

Mr. Morgan, an English evangefist, has been holding- 
meetings in Indianapolis, in Episcopal churches. The 
effect of his Avork is to cause the clergymen and bishop 
to remove their gowns and go to work among the peO' 
pie in earnest, at the rolling mills and Reform In- 
stitute. 

Dr. Isaac Jennings, one of the early settlers of 
Oberlin, for sixteen years a college trustee, and some- 
what widely known for his theory as a physician of al- 
lowing "nature" to cure disease without the aid of 
medicine, died at Oberlin the other day at the good 
old age of 86, having stood by his medical theo- 
ries to the last. 

At the twenty-second annual session of the Pitts- 
burg Conference of the Evangelical Association, a mem- 
bership of 7,068 was reported; those newly converted 
number 1,442, and 1,256 have been received to mem- 



bership. The East Pennsylvania Conference of the 
same church reports 14,381 members and 3,005 con 
versions. 

A religious exchange .says nothing struck the Euro- 
pean delegates to the Alliance so unpleasantly as the 
vanity and sacrilege of fashionable music in American 
churches. On their return, however, they commend 
us for almost everything else— the music, they cannot 
but express their disgust at that. 

It is said that $60,000 are annually expended for 
the salaries and traveling expenses of the Methodist 
Bishops. This amount is raised from church collec- 
tions, instead of drawn from the profits of the Book 
Concern, as was done until May, 1872. Since that 
time $100,000 have been disbursed to the Bishops 
and $40,000 received from the churches. 

The Illinois Central Presbytery recently passed res- 
olutions upon such amusements as "public and social 
dancing, card-playing and attendance at theatres and 
circuses ;" advising that they be shunned as bringing 
a reproach upon the Christian name and a violation of 
the command, "Abstain from all appearance of evil," 
and that persons openly devoted to such pleasures 
shoiild not be fellowshiped. 

The Rev. John Morrill, who died, Feb. 16, atPecaton- 
ica, 111., at the age of 77, was a veteran Congregation- 
alist preacher. He organizedthe First Congregational 
Church at Rockford, when the nearest post-office was 
at Chicago. He organized the Congregational churches 
at Belvidere, Byron, 111., and many other places in that 
region of country. During the last week of his life he 
had been laboring in a revival in progress in the Meth- 
odist church of Pecatonica. 

The Brooklyn Congregational Council adjourned 
after midnight, Saturday night. As some feared the 
real grievance which called it together was not touched. 
Plymouth church had determined that Mr. Beech er 
should not be discussed, and carried their point. The 
decision is accepted as satisfactory by all three 
churches. Drs. Storrs andBuddington were told that 
they were right in calling the Council, but some of their 
letters were objectionable. Beecher's church was 
wrong in its treatment of Tilton, but not enough for a 
withdrawal of fellowship by sister churches; but if the 
offense was repeated it would be a sufficient reason for 
such action. Thus ends another act in this disgrace- 
ful drama. 



&w$ 4 ^\^ T^A^ 



The City. — Anna Dickinson dehvered her second 
lecture on the Social Evil question, in Robert Collyer's 
Unity Church on Sunday. The passage of the act 
forbidding any city council or board of health licens- 
ing prostitution, took all the wind from the sails of 
the gentry who wanted to introduce the system here, 
and of course deprived the speaker of much of the 
oixtside interest attending her first lecture. 

The uneasy and turbulent mass known as Interna- 
tionals, communists, etc. , met last Sunday afternoon in 
North Chicago to anticipate the town elections of next 
week with a ticket of their own. These are the same 
men with the inevitable leaders of last winter. Es- 
caped from the rigors of European society they know 
only enough of American hberty to abuse it and scout 
its author, Jesus Christ. The threadbare speeches 
against oppression were repeated and nominations made. 
On Monday a large body, disaffected toward the Sun- 
day nominations, held a caucus of their own and a still 
further secession is expected. The doctrine on the labor 
question, in another column, would help these men . 

The reunion of the old abolitionists of the North- 
west will be held in Chicago, June 9th, and will con- 
tinue three days. 

The Sunday Afternoon Lecture Association is the 
latest contrivance to stand between the multitudes of 
Sabbath breakers and God's law. It provides at nom- 
inal expense lectures for all classes on popular and in- 
structive subjects, but presumably not religious, and so 
simply interjects another excuse for delay between the 
soul and its God. 



Ths Country. — Reports from Michigan state that 
the prospects for a large fruit crop are very encourag- 
ing. 

The Illinois Legislatii^-e adjourned on Tuesday, after 
being in session 203 days at an expense to the State of 
$^4,500, and passing 255 bills out of 2,108 intro- 
duced. The compulsory education act and railroad 
bill were most notable of any brought up; the former 
failing to become a law, and the latter, though pos- 
sessing some good points, being probably a damage to 
the interests of the State. 

One of tho=e fearful calamities incidental to our 
large cities took place in New York last week, A four 
story tenement house took fire and their retreat by the 
stairway being cut off, four persons perished. 

Gearhart, the ex-Treasurer of Cherokee County, 
Iowa,, was sentenced to thirty days' imprisonment at 
Fort Madison, for loaning the funds of the county. 

Charles Francis Adams wrote a letter to the anti-in- 
flation meeting in New York on the 24th ult, in which 
he expresses the opinion "that Congress transcended 
its authority when it assumed the right to issue prom- 
ises to pay money which it did not at the same time 
provide any means to pay — and then undertook to 
force the people to take them at a rate higher than 
they were really worth." 

The city authorities of Boston have invited Senator 
Carl Schurz to deliver an oration upon Charles Sum- 
ner, in Faneuil Hall, and Mr. Schurz has accepted. 

Both Houses of the Illinois Legislature have parsed 
the bill to forbid the licensing of houses of prostitu- 
tion. The vote was 112 to 0. This action is an inestima- 
ble boon to the decent citizens of the State and Chi- 
cago in particular; and is worth following by Missouri, 
whose metropolis is in a continual ferment over the 
nuisance. 

The Massachusetts Legislature have been balloting 
a week for a successor to Sumner. The last vote 
stands: Dawes, 95; Hoar, 78; Curtis, 76; Adams, 
15; necessary to a choice, 138. The Dawes' party 
are united and are supported by Ben Butler and 
the manuCacturing, high-tarift" interests of the State. 

Last week some 1,500 men employed in the Erie 
R. R. shops at Susquehanna Depot, Pa. , struck and 
took possession of the. shops and track, stopping, every 
freight and passenger train. Ninety engines and 
1000 cars were run on the s'de tracks. On Sat- 
urday Gov. Hartranft ordered the State militia under 
Gen. Osborne to take charge of affairs and quell the 
rioters, who seriously threatened to blow up build- 
ings aiid take life. The cause of the trouble is the de- 
linquency of the company to pay the hands. Two 
months pay, $102,000, was due. On Monday andTues- 
day the men were paid off and most of them dis- 
charged. 

Congress. — On the 23d ult. the House passed 
the "inflation" bill fixinp- the amount of leo-al tender 
notes now issued, or to be issued, at $400,000,000; 
the Sena,te is yet discussing various propositions of 
the bill. 

In the appropriation bills there has been a reduc- 
tion of $11,000,000 or $12,000,000 from the esti- 
mates of the DejDartments, and it is believed that there 
will be a saving of $25,000,000 as compared with 
last year. 

The District Investigating Committee continues to 
unearth swindles of greater or less amount in sewer 
and fence building, street paving, etc. 

Sec'y Richardson was before the Ways and Means 
Committee on Tuesday, but was very reticent. He 
pretended to know little or nothing of the infamous 
Sanborn contracts. Commissioner . Douglas testified 
that the collection of delinquent taxes was by these 
contracts now in the hands of three persons; before, 
any citizen could give information ; and that the regu- 
lar collectors were amply sufficient. 

Foreign. — The Roman Catholic Bishop of Bologne 
was arrested Mar. 31st, for violating the German ec- 
clesiastical laws. 

The London Times acknowledges the existence of 
a financial panic in that city resembling those of New 
York and Vienna. 

Incendiaries are burning up hundreds of acres of 
sugar-cane in Cuba. Military detachments are sent 
out to arrest them. 

The steamship Nile has sunk between Hong-Kong 
and Japan with all on board, some eighty persons, 
including the Japanese commissioners to the Vienna 
Exposition. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



13 



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Lignt on Freemasonry, 

BY ELD^B D. BIEMED, 

TO WHICH IS APPENDED A 

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The whole containing over five hundred pagsi. 
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es tliat lioM in Fello'ss-- 
ship Adhering: Masosis. 

The three bound in one volume, price f 1. 35 

hmih L}}d\i lo Lif hi si Ihisnr;, 

Showing the Character of the Institution by lis 
terrible oaths and penalties. Bound, in boards, 
50 cents ; lleslble covers, 35 cents. 



ADVEESE TO CHBISTIAHITY, 

And Inimical to a Republican Government 

EtREV. LEBBEDS ARMSTRONG, 

(Presbyterian,) 

A Seceding Mason ef 21 degrees. 

This is a very telling -work an no hon- 
est man that reads it will think of joining 
the Lodge. 

PRICE, 20 cts. Each $1 75 per doz, 
Post Paid. 



Hmm\ m 3mn\\tt 



BY 

Rev. W. p. M'Nary, 

Delivered in the United Presbyterian Church, Bloomington, Ind., 
Sabbath, December 8th, 1873. 



NOTE. — This sermon is published in pamphlet formbyEzKAA. CooK. &, Co. 
Price, 5 cents each; 50 cents per doz., post paid. 



^^Uave no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, bttt 
rather reprove them. For it is a shame even to speak of those things 
which are done of them in secret. But all things that a.re reproced 
are made irianifesthy the light. . . . Wherefore he saith , Awake, 
thou that steepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall qioe tlwe 
light. "—E'ph. V. 11-14 



blessseth himself in the earth, shall bless himself in the God of 
trutb ; and he that sv/eareth in the earth Eliall swear by the God 
of truth," etc. 

3. No person has a right to swear to obey a code of laws, or to 
keep secrets, not knowing what these laws and secrets are, for he 
thereby forswears himself, and blindly gives his conscience into 
the keeping of fallible men. — Jer. iv. 2: "And thou shalt swear, 
The Lord liveth, in truth, in judgment, and in righteousness; and 
the nations shall bless themselves in hiai, and in him shall they 
glory." Mark vi. 23: "And he swear unto her, Whatsoever 
thou shalt ask of me, I will give it thee, unto the half of my 
kingdom." 

These objections (the Ist and 3,) apply to all oath-bound secret 
societies, and we regard both the taking and administering of 
such oaths, a very heinous sin. 

4. These oaths place the members under unlawful penalties, 
and bind the members to help to execute these penalties, which is 
a crime, both against the state and the conscience of the members. 



The testimony of the United Presbyterian church declares ^^^ ^^^^^ penalties are no dead letter upon the Masonic statute 
That all associations whether formed for political or benevolent I jjqqJj Rev Moses Thatcher a - '-- - 



purposes, which impose upon their members an oath of secrecy 
or an obligation to obey a code of unknown laws, are inconsistent 
with the genius and spirit of Christianity, and church members 
aught not to have fellowship with such associations. 
The number of oath-bound secret societies in this country is le 



seceding Mason, says that he has 
^''reliable, historical ecidence of not less than secen indiciduals mur- 
dered under ilasoroic lain." — [See Finney on Masonry, p. 121.] 

5. To swear to keep the secrets of other men, and to protect 
them from punishment, whether they be right or wrong, is a 



ine numuer ui oain-uouuu secrei socieiies lu ims cuuuuy is e- ^^.j^^g ag^iagt the state and the conscience of the individual 
gion, and each one has its own peculiarities so that it would be ^ ,f^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^ ^.^ ^^ ^^ Q^th that u 



may be 



impossible to make an argument against the whole series in the ! ^^jitte^j ^^d conseoueutly unknown, is putting the conscience 
bounds of one discourse. I will therefore conhno my remarks -^^q ^ gjjg^j.g ^ .j 



principally to the society of Freemasons, which is the common fa- 
ther of them all; but we may occasionally refer to other so- 
cieties that have copied the objectionable features of Masonry, ! 
when our remarks will apply to them. Inasmuch as we do not 



II. Our second objection to m.^^.sonky is that it subverts 

JUSTICE. 

The Masonic fraternity is a society of men composing part of 
, . . , ,.^ - -,- ... ,j ,., , community, Itagued together for the purpose of helping each 

desire to speak often upon the subject, we wonld ike to go over, ^^j^g^ secretly. A great kikg in society. It is therefore, in its 
the whole ground, and in doing so we can do but little more thati ,,p nature, opposed to justice. This remark applies with equal 
state our ob.iections catagorically .together with some authorities i f^^.^^ j ^ ^^^^^^ societies in general. 
In proof of what we may assert. We will not be able to make an | ^ ^g^^ ^^j^,^ ^^^^ anything to do with politics or with bu^. 



elaborate argument on many points but will conscientiously en- 1 j^^^g ^^^ ^^.^^ ^^.j^^ was in the army; every student of the 
deavor to keep vvithm bounds of the truth ,_and will hokl our- 1 ^^_j^^^^^^^ person who has bot lived with his eyes shut; 



selves ready to prove any statement which we may make at any j^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ -^.^^^ ^ member of a secret society has the ap 
time or at any place. ' - . •'. . 

We wish it distinctly understood that 
as an institution and not against Masons 
there are many earnest Christians in the order, strange as the fact 



, • ,f ivr pointing power he will always appoint a member of his own fra- 

we speak against Masonry :jgj.^-,y j^ preference to any other, without reference to merit, if 
5 as maividuais. I believe ^^ ^.^^ ^^ g^ without compromisinii himself. They are, there- 



compromising; himselx. iney 
fore, of necessity, "partial men" in community. This partiality 
is felt by community, especially in the trial of violators of law. 
M;isonry swears its members to keep the secrets of each other, 
, T ^ ,. ... T ^- ^ ■ and to fly to the relief of a brother, and to extricate him from 

hand and say to hiin, my brother, you have got into an in- di^culty, whether he be riaht or wrong. Experience proves that 
n that IS unchristian in Its charactec, and immoral in Its in-, jjj ^^^^^ these oaths aS paramount to their civil oaths. I 
fluence, and your connection with it is a reproach to your Christ- 
ianity and dangerous to your soul, come out of it my brother as 



appears to me, and many of them are my warm, personal friends. 

I would not therefore wound their feelings on any account, much 

less injure their character. No ! I would take each one of them 

by the ■ ^ 

stitutionuiuii»uuLmisuaomusoiiaiauLCi^uiiuiuimuiu.iiuiiam- jjjgy y^^.^^^ thesc oaths as paramount 

Cnust- q^Qfg from John Quincy Adams' letter regarding the Morgan 



you love your soul 
I. The first objection to 

SNARING AND UNLAWFUL OATHS. 



MASONRY IS ITS PROFANE. EN- 



trial: "Look at the government of New York, stjuggling in vain 
for dve long years to bring the perpetrators of the murder to pun- 
ishment. See the judges, sheritis, witnesses, jurors, entangled in 
T .„ , ,. ^ ,, . , . .. -n 1 . i- the net of Masonry, and iustice prostrated in her own temple by 

In 1 lustration of this objection we will make some quotations ; ^j^^ ^^^^j^ ^j i,^^^, j^^igibie hand." * * "Go to the records of the 

from tiese oaths. The Entered Apprentice is taken into the lodge , ^^^^^.^ ^^ g„^ witnesses refusing to testify upon the express 

halfnaked, IS make o kneel before the Master and place his leit;.^^ J/ Qf Masonic obligations, avowing that they considered 

hand under the "Bible, compass and square," and his right hand.^^^^gg obUgations paramount to the law of the land." 

upon thena and swear by and on these three symbols, that hei jjj_ q^^^ ^^^J^ objection to masonry is its fj 

will obey the constitutions, keep the secrets of Masourv, &c., and 

closes in these words, "Binding myself under no less penalty than 

to have my throat cut across from ear to ear, my tongue torn out 

by the roots, and my body buried in the rough sands of the sea 

where the tide ebbs and flows every twenty four hours; so help 

me God." — [Light on Masonry, p. 27] 



FALSE preten- 



ses. 



The Master Mason swears upon the Bible, compass and square, 
as before, using these words among others, "That I will support 



Masonry may indeed be regarded as falsehood reduced to a 
system. 

Its long list of false pretenses and the falsehoods which it puts 
into the mouths and ears of its members for the purpose of de- 
ceiving tJiem, and the world through them, show from what paren- 



entage it has sprung. 




and inviolable in my breast as in his own, murder and treason 
excepted, and they left to my own election. That if any part of 
this solemn oath be omitted at this time, I will hold myself amen- 
able thereto whenever informed. That I will not violate the 
chastity of a Master Mason's wife, mother, sister, or daughter, I 
knowing her to be such. Binding myself under no less penalty 
than to have my body severed in two, and my bowels torn out 
and burnt to ashes and the ashes scattered to the four winds of 
heaven, my body quartered and dispersed to the four cardinal 
points of the universe ; so help me God. — [Light on Masonry, p. 73.] 
The Royal Arch Mason swears, as before, using these words : 
"That I will assist a companion Royal Arch Mason when en- 
gaged in any difficulty, and espouse his cause §.o far as to extricate 
him from the same, if in my power, whether he be right or 
wrong. That if the secrets of a Royal Arch Mason are given to 
me in charge, as such they shall remain as inviolable in my breas^ 
as in his own, — murder and treason not ■excepted.'" — [Light on Ma- 
sonry, p. 142.] 

(It is said by some that this last clause, and other clauses that 
might be objectionable to conscientious men, are sometimes omit- 
ted, but that the clause which says^ "if any part of this solemn 



no similarity whatever. 

2. Masonry teaches its members that Solomon w'as its first, 
Most E.xcelleut Grand Master, and that St. John was one of its 
zealous patrons. (See Mackey's Manual, p. 55.) All of which 
is a falsehood and an impious slander ou the characters of pious 
men. (This can be proven by Masonic authority, quoted in 
"Finney on Masonry," pp. 171-2 as follows: 

Dr. Dalclio, the compiler of the book of constitutions for 
South Carolina, says: ''Neither Adam nor Nocdi, nor Nimrod, nor 
Moses, nor Joshua, nor David, nor Solomon, nor Hiram, nor St. 
John the Baptist, nor St. John the Evangelist, were Freimasong. 
Hypothesis in history is absurd. There is no record sacred or pro- 
fane, ]to induce us to believe that those holy men -were Freemasons ; 
and our traditions do not go back to those days. To assert tJiat 
they icere Freemasons may make tlie vulgar stwre, but will rather 
excite the contempt than the admiration of the toise.'^ 

3. Masonry pretends to reveal important truths, and to im- 
part valuable instruction to its members, and induces its mem- 
bers to go on from degree to degree, by promising them "more 
light." But hundreds of seceding Masons testily that there is 



oath be omitted at this time, that I will hold myself amenable j no important truth taught in its w'hole course, and that at every 



thereto whenever informed," is never omitted. There is no 
doubt, however, but that these words were in the original form of 
the Masonic oath.) 

The oath of the Thrice Illustrious Order of the Cross, contains 
these words: "That should I know another to violate any essen- 
tial part of this obligation, I will use my most decided endeavors. 



ad\'ancing step they were humbugged and disappiointed. 

4. Masonry pretends that its secrets never have been, and 
never can be revealed. 

Let me here say concerning this book called "Light on Ma- 
sonry," which I hold in my hand, and from which most of these 
quotations have been made, that it was written by Elder David 



by the blessing of God, to bring such person to the most condign I Bernard, a minister who has been in good standing in the Bap- 



punishment, agreeably to the rules and usages of the Ancient fra 
ternity.'" — [Light on Masonry, p. 199.] 

In the Knight Templar degree, a candidate is made to drink 
wine from a human skull, saying these words: "May all the 
sins committed by the person whose skull this was, be heaped 
upon my head, in addition to my own, should I knowingly and 
willingly violate this, my solemn obligation." — Light on Masonry, I proved 
p. 188.] I tiou of 



list church for fifty year.s, — a man of sincere piety and known 
integrity. He had taken fifteen degrees in Masonry at the time 
of the Morgan murder, and being convinced that it was wrong, 
and that it was his duty to make known its secrets, wrote the 
first fifteen degrees, and presented his exposition to a conven- 
tion of about forty seceding Masons, and it was by them ap- 
A committee Avas then aj^pointed to v\Tite an exposi- 
the other seventeen degrees, for Bernard's book; and 



Now, we have many objections to these oaths, among which '■ that committee having completed its work, jn-esented their ex- 
are the following : [position to a convention of about one hundred seceding Ma- 
1. No one has a right to administer an oath except an officer, i sons, and it was by them approved as a verbatim et literatim 



either of a church or state, and all extra-judicial oaths are wrong. 
— Matt. V. 33: "Again, ye have heard that it hath been said by 
them of old time. Thou shalt not forswear thyself, but shalt per- 
form unto the Lord thine oaths." James 5. 12 : "But above all 
things, my brethren, swear not, neither by heaven, neither by 
earth, neither by any oath : but let your yea be yea ; and your nay, 
nay; lest ye fall into condemnation." 

2. An oath is an act of religious worship, and to swear by the 
"Bible, compass and square," is both profanity and idolatry. — 
Dent. vi. 13 : "Thou shalt fear the Lord thy God, and serve him, 
and shalt swear by hia name." Isa. Ixv, 16: ''He that 



exposition of thirty-two degrees of Masonry. Mr. Bernard is 
still living, and at a convention held in Syracuse, New York, 
last year, asserted that he was now over eighty, and had not 
many years to live, and desired to give his dying testimony to 
the truth of that exposition. 

Here is Morgan's revelation, which I hold in iny hand ; and 
the best evidence that I can produce of the truthfulness of the 
exposition, is the fact that he was murdered by Masons for re- 
vealing their secrets. 

Here is Finney on Masonry, written by Rev. C. G. Finney, D 
D., President of Oberlin College, who took three degrees of Ma 



14 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



sonry, and then left because he was convinced of its unchristian 
cliaracter. ^ 

Here is Macke_v's Manual, written hy Albert G. Mackey, M. 
D., "Past Genera)' Hi, uli Priest of the General Grand Chapter of 
the United States." I pureliased it because it is said to be tlie 
highest Masonic authority that I could get; and I see, bj' com- 
parison, tliat its ceremonies exactly agree with Bernai'd, Mor- 
gan and Finney, as far as he dares to make those ceremonies 
public. 

(It has been frequently asserted since tlie above was spoken, 
that these were perjurecl men, and tliat their testimony would 
not be taken in any court. But if they are perjured men, then 
they have told tbe t^rutli in their exposition ; and as to their testi- 
mony not being taken in court, I know of a case of two men 
wlio committed murder. One of them, after being incarcerated, 
confessed the whole affair, but being a felon, his testimony 
could not be taken in court against Uie other, and tlie other 
man was conseciucntly acquitted, and the one who confessed 
was hung; but everyl)ody believed tlic testimony of tlie felon all 
the same as if it had been tal^en in court. Now, when consci- 
entious men find tliemselves ensnai'ed by a wicked oath, and 
forbidden to tell the truth, and from love of the trutli renounce 
that enslaving oath, as it is every man's duty to do, and come 
out and publisli the truth, and that too in the face of the most 
cruel and jiersistent i)ersecution, sucli men ouglit to be regarded 
as moral heroes and champions of truth, and -will be believed 
by all the unbiased world, notwithstanding that sophistical 
quiljble.) 

John Quincy Adams asserts in his letters, that about 45,000 
out of about 50,000 Masons, left the order at the time of the 
Morgan excitement, and none of all these 45,000 seceding Ma- 
sons ever denied tlie truth of the expositions made by M(U-gan 
and Bernard. In the face, tlicrefore, of all this testimony, I 
wonder that the face of a Christian Mason does not blush when 
he hears his officers assert that the secrets of Masonry have 
never been revealed. 

5. Masonry pretends to be a benevolent order. According to 
Mackey's Manual p. 217, it excludes all old men in dotage ; 
young men in nonage; all women and deformed persons. ("See 
Finney, ]i. 186.) Mackey's Manual further declares, (p. 237,) 
that the Wardens "sliall consider of tbe most prudent and eftect- 
ual methods of collecting and disposing of what money shall be 
given to, or lodged Avith them in charity, toward the relief only 
of any true brother fallen into poverty or decay, but of none 
else." 

Now, when a company of strong, able-bodied prosperous men 
club together, excluding the poor, the weak, and all women, 
and promise to help each other and none else, Would you call 
it benevolence? 

(This remark applies with equal force to the order of Odd- 
fellowship. The language of its ritual is, if any different more 
exclusive than that of Masonry.) I believe it is true that some 
Masonic lodges do give assistance to persons outside of their 
order, but I call your attention to the fact that they never learned 
to do so bj' the teaching of Masonry, and if sucli things are ever 
done, it is because the spirit of Christianity predominates over 
Masonry, in such lodges. 

The fact that Masonry is gro^^•i!ig wealthy out of the monthly 
dues of its members, that it is building costly edifices, and fur- 
nishing tliem with magnificent furniture, that its officers are 
equipped Avitli the most expensive regalia, and are treated to the 
most sumptuous feasts, and that the magnificent Masonic Tem- 
ple that was dedicated in Philadelphia last June, cost $1,475,- 
000, proves that the largest share of their contributions are ap- 
propriated to the support of the "dignity of the order," rather 
than to the cause of benevolence. 

6. It pretends to be a charitable institution. Our Saviour 
teaches the true principles of charity in the fifth chapter of 
Matthew: "Love your enemies, do good to them that despite- 
fully use you and persecute you, &c." 

We have also a beautiful definition of charity in the 13th 
chapter of 1 Corinthians. "Charit}^ suft'ereth long and is kind, 
charity vaunteth not itself is not puffed up, &c." But what does 
Masonry teach ? The oath of the Thrice Illustrious order of 
the cross contains these words: [Light on Masonry, p. 199.] 

"You further swear, that should you know another to violate 
any of the essential points of this obligation, ^^ou will use your 
most decided endeavors, by the blessing of God, to bring such 
persons to the most condign punishment, agreeable to the rules 
and usuages of our ancient fraternity, and this by pointing liim 
out to the world as an unAvorthy vagabond, by opposing his in- 
terests and deranging his business by transferring his name 
after him wherever he may go; by exposing him to the con- 
tempt of tlie whole fraternity, and of the world, during his 
M'hole natural life," &c. Hundreds of men who have come out 
from the order bear testimony that they have received just such 
persecutions as that. The whole Anti-masonic world knows by 
sad experience tliat the spirit of the institution is a spirit of 
malice towards all who dare to ojjpose it, and yet it stands be- 
fore the world with brazen face, and vaunteth itself, boasting of 
its charity. 

7. It pretends to be a moi-al institution. We claim that this 
pretense can be shown to be false under five counts. 

(a). We have just now shown that it inculcates a spirit of 
malice toward its enemies, (b.) It teaches selfishness and an 
unscriptural system of benevolence in opposition to the teaching 
of Christ, which is " Do good unto all men, especially unto them 
that are of the household of faith." (c.) It inculcates falsehood 
by requiring its members to declare in their application for 
membership that they do not apply from any " mercenary mo- 
tives." By putting into tlieir mouths and requiring them to 
repeat all tliese false legends concerning Solomon and IJiram 
Abiff, and by placing its members, by solemn oath, in such a 
position that tliey are under the necessity of practicing habitual 
deception in order to conceal the secrets of the order. We may 
illustrate tliis last statement in this waj^: 

Suppose I say to a Master Mason, Is this in substance the oatli 
of a Master Mason ? (reading it to him,) a question I have a right 
to ask. He will be placed in such a position that if he denies 
that it is, he tells a falsehood; if he admits it, he violates his 
oath; if he evades the question so skilfully as to deceive me, in 
so far as he deceives me he is guilty of deception, and in so far 
as he does not deceive me, lie has revealed the secret and violat- 
ed his oath, and this constant effort of the society to publish 
false pretenses and conceal facts, places its members under the 
necessity of practicing habitual decciition. (d.) It teaches 
obscenity. Tlie manner in which Masoniy administers its oaths, 
at least in the first degrees, is so obscene that I cannot describe 
it here, and the explanation given b.y Mackey in his Manual of 
one of the symbols of Masonry if written here would be liable 
to be suppressed as obscene literature. [See Mackey's Manual, 



pp. 56 and 57.] [See also Mackey's Lexicon, pp. 416 and 417.] 
(e.) It practices idolatry and profanity. It worships the "Bible, 
compass and square;" it administers its oaths and applies titles 
to fallible men which belong onlj' to God, and tliereby worships 
man and profanes God's holy name. The difference between 
the profanity of the troops out on the plains and tliat of Masonry 
is, that one is reckless and impulsive, while the other is delibe- 
rate and systematic. 

We liave now enumerated what we regard as the minor objec- 
tions to Masoniy, and we will proceed to lay before you that 
objection which we regard as of greatest importance to the 
Christian church. We do not, indeed, expect the following 
argument to have much weiglit with Jews or deists, or irrelig- 
ious persons, but it is a matter that ought to have great weight 
in the mind of every Christian man. 

IV. OdR FOtJRTH OBJECTION IS, THAT MASONRY IS A RELIGION — 
AN ANTI-CHRISTIAN RELIGION. 

That Masonry is a religion is evident from the fact that it 
claims for itself every thing that any religion has ever claimed, 
and more than the Christian church claims. 

1. It claims to be divine. In the hymn used at the dedication 
of lodges, we find these words: (Mackey's Manual, p. 186.) 

'■ Hail Masonry divine, 
"Glory of ages shine." 
* * » 

" Thou art divine." 
In the hymn used at the laying of a corner-stone, [Mackey's 
Manuel, p. 180,] we find these v/ords: 

" When earth's foundations first were laid, 

By the Almighty Artist's hand, 

"Twas then our perfect — our perfect laws were made, 

Establislied b_y tliy strict command." 

2. It claims perpetuity. The following question is asked the 
candidate, which he is expected to answer in the afllrmative: 
(Mackey's Manual, p. 149,) " Do you admit that it is not in the 
power of any man, or body of men, to make innovations in the 
body of M:isonry ■?" 

3. It claims that members are God's chosen people. [Mack- 
ey's Manual, p. 196.1 "For thej- be tliy people, and thine inher- 
itance, for thou didst separate them from among all people of 
tlie earth, to be thine inheritance." The Master, in his address 
to the lodge, calls all outsiders "The profane world," "cow- 
ans," (dogs). Of course he includes his own wife, and the 
pastor of his own church, if he is not a Mason. Mackey says 
that all lodges should open with prayer, and gives as a reason 
that secular associations open with iirayer, and it is more proper 
that "religious associations" should observe the custom. [Man- 
ual, p. 11.] When a m'Smber joins the association, he is said, in 
the language of the Manual, " to consecrate his life to the service 
of GodV' 

According to Mackey's Manual, the lodge is " always opened 
in the name of God." 

4. It claims that its lodge rooms and temples are temples of 
God. According to their manuals, their temples are always 
"dedicated to the service of God." • 

At the dedication of the Grand Masonic Temple in Philadel- 
phia., on the 28th of last June, the Rev. John Chambers, D. D., 
made the dedication prayer, and used these words, taken from 
the manual, "We have assembled" • • "to dedicate this 
magnificent Masonic temple to the glory and honor of the one 
living and eternal Jehovali." The cxxii. Psalm was then sung — 
" I was glad when tliej' said unto me, let: us go up into the house 
of the Lord," &c. The old heathen rite of pouring on corn, 
wine and oil, was then performed, and the following words 
used, which by comparison, we see were taken from this man- 
ual : (Mackey's, p. 194,) "In the name of the Supreme- and 
Eternal God, tlie Grand Architect of Heaven and Earth, to whom 
be all glory and honor, I dedicate this Hall to Freemasonry." 

5. It claims that its officers are holy. 
Andrew Rubeno, in his address at Philadelphia, giving a 

charge to the High Priest of the Chapter, used these words: — 
"Let the High Priest of every Chapter, upon whom the holy 
order has been conferred, remember that he has been made such, 
not after the law of a carnal commandment, but after the power 
of an endless life, for he testifieth, " Thou art a priest forever 
after the order of Melchcsidec." 

How a Cliristian man could stand by with the insignia of his 
order upon him, and listen to such blasphemy from one of his 
own officers, I do not know. 

6. It claims to be a saving religion. 
In the language of Masonry, it takes the rough ashler, cuts, 

liews and polishes him, and prepares him to be built into the 
grand temple aboAT'. In their ceremonies they put the candi- 
date symbolically through the whole course of salvation, — the 
new birth, the enlightenment, sauctification, death, resurrection 
and ascension to glory. 

Salem Town, a celebrated Masonic author, in his booji^says: 
[Sec Finney, p. 20.] "In advancing to the fourth degree, the 
good man is greatly encouraged to persevere in the ways of well 
doing, even to the end. He has a name which no man knoweth, 
save he that receiveth it. Then the Freemason is assured of his 
election and final salvation." ■ • "Hence opens the fifth 
degree, where he discovers liis election to, and his glorified sta- 
tion in the kingdom of the Father." • • "Then in the eighth 
degree he beholds that all the heavenly sojora-ners Avill be ad- 
mitted within the veil of God's presence, where they will become 
kings and priests before the tlirone of his glory forever and 
ever." 

In the degree of the Knights of the East and West the candi- 
date is conducted to the "Vacant Canopy," which is at the right 
hand of "The All Puissant, who represents Jehovah," (the pre- 
siding officer.) The sound of the seventh seal, and the conduct- 
ing ot" the candidate to the "vacant canopy," is the representa- 
tion of the end of the world, and the glorification of all true 
MASONS at the right hand of God, having passed through the 
trials of Freemasonry, and " washed their robes in their own 
blood." 

7. It has its priests, altars, sacrifices, libation, symbols, rites, 
ceremonies, prayers, hymns, sermons, benedictions and its hopes 
and promises of future salvation and glory. It has everything 
that any religion has ever had, Jewish, Mohammedan, Hindoo, 
Mormon or Christian, except truth. 

8. It claims more than the Christian church ever claimed, for 
it claims to be the one only true and eternal religion which 
"embraces within itself all sectarian systems," such as Christi- 
anity, Moliammedanism, &c. 

The Christian church does not claim to do anything of itself, 
but by the word and Spirit of Christ. But Masonry claims that by 
its o\Aai inherent virtue without any external influence it can 
[concluded next week.] 



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Descriptive Catalogue of Publications of Ezra A. Cook & Co. 

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FREEMASONRY EXPOSED, 

by CAP'T. WILLIAM MORGAN. 

- THE GENUINE OLD MORGAN BOOK :— republished with en- 
gravings showing the Lodge Room, Dress of candidates, Sl^ns 
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^ Price 25 cents. 

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OR PEESONAL REJUNISCENCES OF THE ABDUCTION AND 
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By SAMUEL D, GKEENE, 

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Many- of our most earnest workers in this cause of God are poor 
men, who would be glad to circulate thousands of pages of Auti- 
masonic literature it thev could have them free 

SHALL WE NOT HAVE AN INEXHAUSTIBLE TRACT FUND ? 

"THE ANTI-aJASONS SCRAP BOOK." 

Contains our 21 Cynosure Tracts, bound together, price 
20 cents. See advertisement. 

.\ddress EzuA A. Cook & Co., 

13 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 



BY >'EV. -W. F. M'NARY. 
Pastor United Presl/yterlan Church, Bloomington. Ind. 
This is a very clear, thorough, candid and remarkably con^ice 
ocriptural argument on he character of Freemasjnry. 

Single Copy, Post Paid, 5 

PerDaz., , BO 

Per Hundred, Express Charges Extra, $.3 50 



TRACT NO. 1: 
HISTORY OF MASONRY. 
BY PRESIDENT J. BLANGHARD, OP WHEATON COLLEGE. 
Tbis is now published in three tracts of four pages each. Price 
of each, 50 cents per 100; $4 per 1000. 

TisACT No. 1, Pit^T Fi/ssT— Shows the origin of Speculative Pree- 
ma-imry, and ia entiled 'HISTORY OP MASONRY'." 

a^KACT No. 1, P.Y.n' Skc .nd— Is entitled "DESPOTIC CHARAC- 
TER OP PREEMASO -- ItY " 

Tr.\.ct No. 1, P.^ui' Third— Is entitled "FREEMASONRY A 
CHaiST-EXCLUDlXGREuiGION " 

TRACT NO. 1, IN SWEDISH; 
translated by Prof. \.. R. CESVIN. A 15-page tract at p.OO 
per loo ; $15.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO, 2: 

MASO.ifl'J S^ J.-iiJER, 
By REV. J, R. BAIRD of Pleasantville, Pa., a seceding Mason 
who has taken 17 degrees. A 3 page tract at 25 cents per 100; 
$2.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. R: 

SECRETS OF MASONHY, 

BY ELI TAPLEY'. 
This is a 4-page Illustrated Tract, showing the signs, grips and 
pass-words, of tee nrst three degrees. 50 cents per 100, or $4.00 per 
1000. 

TRACT NO. 4: 

GRAHD! GREAT GRAHD!! 

BY PHILt CARPENTER. 
This is a 2-page tract, calling the attention of the public to the 
despotic and ridiculous titles of Freemasonry Price 25 cents per 100 ; 
$3 00 per 1,000. 

TRACT. NO, 5: 

Extracts From Masonic Oaths and Penalties, as 
Sworn to by the firand Lodge of Ehode Island. 

This tract is a reprint of a tract published in 1834, and is a very 
weighty document. A 4-page tract at 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 
1000. 

TRACT NO. 6: 

'Hon. John Quincy Adams' Letter. 

GiviDg His and His Father's Opinion of Freemasonry (1831.); 

AND 

Hon. James Madison's Letter, 

Giving His Opinion of Freemasonry (1832). 
Bothof these letters, in one 4-page tract, at 50 cents per 100; *4.00t J THE YOUNG ^MJSK OF AMERICA. Postage, 3 ec-r.t« DetlfiO 
per 1000. iTracts. ^""vib ^rree. ■= -'. ^~-«o._- i- 



TRACTNO. 7: 

SATAN'S CABLE-TCW. 

A 4-page tract. This is a careful analysis of the character of 
Masonic oaths, and shows theiu to he most blasphemous and un- 
christian ; aud the Masonic Cable Tow is clearly shown to be the 
Cable Tow by which Satan is leadinij thousands to eternal death. 
50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 8: 

Is a 2-page double tract, "illustrated. ' The first page repre- 
sents a Mason proclaimimg the wonderfitl wisdom and benevo- 
lence of the order, with an article below, entitled "Freejaa- 
sinry is onJy 152 Years Old," and gives the time and 
place of its birth. 

The second side is entitled, "Marker and Treason not 
Ex'>.«'pt,<>«i," tiud shows that the Masonic order is treasonable in 
its constitution, and is both anti-Republican and anti-Christian, 
Price 25 cents per 100; $2 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 9, ILLUSTRATED: 

FREEMASONRY IN THE CHURCH. 

Copy of a petition for the higlier degrees of Freemasonry, in 
which Blasphemous and Despotic Titles are enumerated and 
prayed for. The Copy was printed for the use of '^Occidental Sov- 
ereign, Consistory S. P. R. .?," 3-id degree— a Chicago Lodge— and 
was ordered by a deacon of a Christian _ hurch who is Grand Orator 
of the Grand Lodge of 111. 

TRACT NO. 10: 

CHARICTEK AND SYMBOLS OF FREliMASONEY. 

A 2-page tract, (illustrated) by its "Grand Secretaries, Grand 
Lecturers, Perfect Prince Freemasons, Grand Inspector, Inquisitor 
Commanders, Grand High Priests," etc. The wonderful symboli- 
cal meaning of "the Cable Tow," "the Square aud Compass," "the 
Lamb Skin, or white Apron,' ' and "the Common Gavel," are given 
in the exact words of the highest Masonic authority. 25 cents per 
100 or $2.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 11 ; 

aim of twm \wk kM£\%\ Hew Ifork. 

TO THE PUBLIC ; 

Concerning the Morgan Murder, and the character of Freema- 
sonry, as shown by this and other Masonic murders. 50 cents per 
100; $4.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 12: 

JUBGE 'WHITNEY AND MASONRY. 

This tract contains a condensed account of Judge Whitney's 
Defense before the Graud Lodge of Illinois, on charse of unma- 
sonic conduct in bringing Samuel L. Keith the murderer of Ellen 
Slade, and a member of his Lodge, to justice, with Judge Whitney's 
subsequent renunciation of Masonry, 
An 8-page tract, $1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 13: 

DR. NATHANIEL COLVER ON MASONRY, 

and 

HOWARD CROSBY, D. D., 

Chancellor of the Universityof New York, on SECRET SOCIETIES. 
A double 2-page tract 25 cents per 100; $2.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 14: 
GRAKI3 LGDGE MASONRY. 
ITS EELATION TO 0:V:L GOVEEiI-.EKT AND THE CEHISTIAN EELIGION. 
Opening address before the Monmouth Convention, by ?SE3. J. 
BLA.TCHARD of WHS.iTON OOLLESE. This is a l(i-page tract at $2.00 
per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

TRACT KO. 15: 

MASONIC OATHS NULL AND VOID- 
A clear and conclusive argument proving the invalidity of any 
oath or obliL-ation to do evil. By RKV. i. A. HART, Secretary 
National Lhristiau Associa[i<in. Published by special order of the 
Association. 50 cents per 100; $4.U0 per luOO. 

TRACT NO. 16 : 
HON. SETH M. GATES ON FREEMASONRY. 

PROOF THAT THE INSTITUTION THAT MURDERED MOKGAN 
IS UNCHANGED IN CHARACTER 
This is a letter to the Monmouth Convention by Hon. Seth M 
Gates who was Deputy Sheriti' oi Genesee County, aud also Secre- 
tary of the Leroy Lodge at the time of Morgan's Abduction. A 4- 
page tract, 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 17: 

Orifia, Obligations ani U'mi ef \\% UraEge. 

WITH A CONSTITUTION OF A FARMERS' CLUB. 

This little tract ought to be put into the hands of every Farmer in 

the United States. Four-page tract, 50 cents per 100; $4 00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 18: 

HON. WM. H. SEWARD ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Estncs from ^ Soeecli o'- K-ow- not ingi n in the U, 3. Senate in 1355. 
The testimony of" JOHN yUINCY ADAMS, MILLARD FILLMORE, 
CHIEF JUSTIC MARSHALL and others, is added. 

A -^page tract, 25 cents per 100; $2.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO, 19. 

BSICKS FOR MASONS TO LAY. 

WASHINGTON, MADISON, MARSHALL, RUSH, HANCOCK, 
ADaMS AND WEBSTBR, give brief clear testimony against the 
Lodge A 2-page tract 25 cents per 100; $2.00 per lOUu. 
TRACT NO. 20: 
OBJECTIONS TO MASONRY. 
By A SECEDING MASON, of Cornton, Vermont. 
This tract contains many strong arguments against the Lodge drawn 
from personal experience, observation and study of its character. 
A 4-page tract at 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per l,00u. 
TRACT NO. 21: 
MASONIC CHASTITY. 

EV EMMA A. WALLACE, 

The author, by wonderfully clear illustration and argument, shows 
ihe terr.bly corrupt nature of Freemasonry. No true woman who 
reads this will ever speak with approbation of this institutiuu. 
A 4-page tract 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1,000. 



GERMAN CYNOSURE TRACT A. 

%\i \%im\ wh a Mi\i\ sb'iili aotbs a Freemason 

By REV. A. GROLB, Pastor, German M. E. Chvu-ch, 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

This is our first German tract, and it is a good one; it ought to 
h ve u large circulation. Price 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 1000. 

ENOCH HONEYl^EIX'S TRACT 



r«opJI<- 



Jo 



."111 KUVWW 



. ^ was victorioos. 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Tlie Christian Cynosure. 

With enlarged size, added ability 
and the earaust cj-opt ration of all wiio 
desire a pure church and a gcvcrniaent 
in thu hands of uuselSsii, honest men, 
the Cynosure vail greatly incretise ita 
circulation during the coming year. 

Men of average integrity need only 
to understand Masonry and kindred in- 
biitutioas to seek their extermiaatio."'. 
Women who desire temperance and 
purity cannot regard with coffipianen- 
cy an institution which ib hostile to 
both. 

Christians who abide in Christ will 
use all the wisdom atid grace God has 
given them in their eQ'orts to overthrow 
an institution which sub t'liites artifi- 
cial lights for the Urn '-Light of the 
world." 

The institution of Freemasonry is 
rooted in hutaan selfishness, Kustaiiied 
by false professions, accommodates Its 
principles to the basest naiures and by 
casting out Christ and at the same 
time professing to save souls from de;'.th, 
it leads our nation towards heatbenisra. 

Ignorance of this bubject ia thinking 
men and women is the chief obytn.cic 
which those who desire to blot it out 
of our country, have lo contend with. 
Will you not use all posvible exerlioas 
in enlarging the c'lculntioa of the Cy 
nosue, that this ignoraacs may be dis- 
pelled? 

All responsible persons who desire 
to promr te this reform are authorized 
to act as sgents. 

All who canvass for the Cynosure 
are allowed a ca'ih commission oi twen- 
ty per cent, or twentj-hv-; per cent in 
books, oae-half this percentage on re- 
newals, and any one sending $100 far 
the Cynosure during three months, will 
be entitled to an extra five per cent. 

TERMS FOR THE GYNOSUaS. 

SnbscTiptions may all be sent at one time, or 
at different times, and in all caees the sender 
should keep au account of the names and 
amounts sent. 

CLUS KATES'. 

Two new sulDScriptions one year $3.50 

One new subscription and one renewal sentten 

days before expiration of subscription 3.50 

5 tew suts., 1 year., 1 copy ires to csader, 9.50 

« ' 11.10 

^ " " " " " V2.70 

8 " " " " " 14.2,5 

10 " " " " " 17.50 

20 •' " " •' " 32 00 

10 Renewals" "• " " 20.00 

50 '■ " " " " S3,00 

Twenty subscriptions or six months coimt the 
same as ten for a year. 



Clubbing List. 



to 



The Weekly Cynosure will be sent for 
one year to old or new subscribers, with 
the following papers (to new subscribers) 
at the annexed reduced rates. 

TUB CYNOSUKE AND 

Christian Statesman 3 00 

Methodist Free Press 3 25 

Golden Censer -3 00 

The Christian (monthly ,with map of 

Palestine 2 75 

do without map , 2 40 

Anti-Masonic Herald 2 25 

Western Rural a 50 

Young Pol ks'Rural(monthl3',with two 

chromos) 2 90 

Science of Health 3 25 

l.*fational Agriculturist and Bee Jour- 
nal 2 CO 

Bee-Keeper's Magazine 2 CO 

Bible Banner 2 50 

Chromo with either of last three 40c ex- 
tra. 
Wood's Household Magazine with 

chromo 2 80 

Earnest Christian 2 80 



ADVERTISXHG HATES. 

^^'AU advertisements are inserted iu bolli 
editions. 
1 square ( 1 inch deep ) one montli $7.00 
1 " "2 '' 10.00 

1 " "3 " ift.m 

1 " " G " 2r,.oo 

1 " " 19 " 40.00 

Discount for £jpace. 
Oji a'equaresS percent, On 3 gunarcslOnerr.prit 

-\r^\^ - -.r---. Act ••* Oil ^^ -"^ 

be suppressed . cent On one col. SOpercem. 



Agents Wanted. 



To sell the publications of Ezra A. 
Cook & Co. Liberal terms cflered. 
Capable persons who are in need of 
pecuniary aid may clear handsome 
profits while at the sime time aid- 
ing the cause, of reform.. 

Apply to Ezra A. Co»k & Co., 
No. 13, Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

A good time to canvass for the Cy- 
nosure ill some localities is just after 
the mail comes in. A good place, the 
pcst-oftiee. 

One hundred and six subscriptions 
were received at the Cynosure office 
laat v/eek. This number includes re- 
nev7al3 six and three mo :itus subscrip- 
tions. We hope these are ordy the 
first fruits of a great harvest. 

We wish to see the principles of the 
Cynosirre, which are the principles of 
the Bible purifying every community; 
triumphant at every local, general and 
national election, and strengthening 
every true Christian church in our land. 
Wiil not all our readers who have this 
earae earnest dtsir J do wha£ they can 
to send the Cynosure throughout the 
length and brer^dlh of the country ? 

A friend from Maine sends a speci- 
men copy of the Cynosure to Uw 
hundred Baptist ministers in his Slate. 
There aro now only five Cynosures sub- 
scribed for ia Maine, but a little leaven, 
if it k.-.eps ioorking will leaven the 
whole lamp. 



-March 12th to 27th, 
for H C Adnms, 



Empioyment for Elderly i'eoplc. 

An elderly lady, a short time ago, 
bought $12.69 worth of Anti-masonic 
publications at our wholesale .rates. 
She bad no famiij to care for except a 
nephew, a young man 'who worked out 
through the day. On a-eceiving the 
books she took copies to her minister to 
interest him in them. She has thus 
far been very successful in selling them. 
We think elderly men and women whose 
heart is in this work, whose strength is 
not eufHcient for severe l^ibor, might 
do much good and find pecuniary profit 
ia Kclling our publication:-. 

We prefer, except in extraordinary 
cases, to have the cash seat in advance. 
From five to ten dollars would give you 
a good assortment of books at our 
wholesale rates. Send for catalogue of 
our publications. 

Ezra A. Cook & Co., Publishers. 



Old Standard Works oil Masonry. 



I am prep.ared to furnish a few 
copies of Robinson's Proofs of a Con- 
spiracy, Barreuil's Memoirs of Jacobin- 
ism, and many other old Masoulc 
bjok-j now out of print. I have made 
arrangements with a large importing 
book establishment, to furnish me any 
book on this question in or out of 
print if it caa be found. 

Ilobinson's Proofs , post paid, $4. 00. 
Barreuil's Memoirs of Jacobinism, 
4 vols. $7.50, to be sent at the cost of 
the purchasers. 

Address John G, Rownd, Summer- 
field, Onio, 
» 3tmarl2 



Letter List.- 

1874. F Axe,- , 

Rev J J Amidon, Pres S B Allen, Mrs 
S B Allen, J Adam?, D A'tor, J W 
Alberty, J W Allen, H Boyd, Rev D R 
Barker, Geo Bristol, A Barrett, Wm 
Bi5.?ett, Geo Burnett, Samuel Beedy, D 
D Bead, C Efendfr, J B.urd,J il Bishop, 
D Countryman ,N Callendtr.D C Cald- 
well 2, II Crall, C D Coppock, J Catter- 
lin, Rev A D Carter, P N Clapsaddle, 
J Dawson, B Doolittle, A W Dorn, H 
Malice, J R Dunn, J B Davis, 8 H 
Edwards, L W E i s, S H Erwii-, J M 
Fiirley. Mary A Forbss, WmB oibbon, 
C F A Gantzokow, A D Gifibrd, S D 
Green, G M Gallup, J Glendenning, M 
liavbaugiij J HoJm, .J Hibbon, R-iV H 
H Hinman 3, G W lioyt, L P H.'ile, J 
S Hitchcock, A T Hemingway, H 
Healwell, P Hurless, Wm H»-artman, 
A Helton, J Hoi stead, W N Plarvey, W 
Hough, D Hill, S Hall, Wm I'dding, S 
H Jamisoo, W Johnson, Wm Kitely, M 
Kelly, W Lamon, J M Leighton, J 
Leemon, W B Loomis, M Morse, G S 
Marcy, A Mayn, F J McQuistoa, C R 
Morsman, J T McHenry, C N May, A 
S Maxo^ell, J May, Macy, J Miichell, 
Mrs C C Milfs, T B McCormick, Mrs M 
B Nithois, S T Orr,H Prindle, J S 
Palmer, W I Phillips, J P Ro^err, Rev 
P S Regue, Sarah E Richards, Rev F 
S Reid, B M Rakestraw, C N Rockwell, 
Mrs L W Rosfiey, J R Spearer, Wm H 
Sawyer, R Shields, D Shattuck, P C 
Stone, J Sager, S Schryver, D Thomp- 
son, J F Temple, Mra B Thompson, Z 
H VanNorman, E VanFossen, J B 
Wiikin, Miss E Wcllman, A Woodle, F 
B Welch, J Wilkinson. 



Chicago, March 31, 1871. 
The following are the latest advices: 
Grain Wheat— Spring, Ko. 1 . . | 1 2(i 

No. 2 1 lOjs 1 ^Vi 

" No. 3 1 17 

" Eejeoted 1 08>4 

Corn— No, 2 59!4 6273 

Kejected 5S!i OO/j 

Oats— No. 2. . . U^j, 

Kejected 43 

Rye— No. 2 no 

Barley— No. 3 1 52 

Flaxseed 2 10 2 15 

Flour, Winter. 5 50 9 25 

SpriuK extra 6 25 6 25 

Sirnerflne 3 00 4 75 

Hay— Timothy, pressed 9 00 14 00 

" loose 1100 13 00 

Prairie, " 9 00 10 50 

Lard 'J% 

Mess pork, per bfcl 15 30 

Butter 28 84 

Cheeae ..-- 12 18 

Eggs 12 13 

Beans 180 2 40 

Potatoes, per bu 1 10 1 40 

Poultry Turkeys per lb 10 14 

Chickens per doz 3 00 4 00 

Lumber- Clear 38 00 55 00 

Common 13 00 14 00 

Lath 2 25 2 75 

Shingles 150 3 75 

WOOJj— Washed .H6 52 

Unwashed 25 32 

LIVESTOCK. Cattle, extra.... 15 6 40 

Good to choice , 5 25 6 00 

Medium 5 00 5 25 

Common 3 50 4 85 

Hogs, 5 00 00 

Sheep 5 50 800 

New ¥ork Rlsi^'ket. 

flour §4 35 1100 

Wheat 1 50 1 00 

Corn 77 9t 

Oats 56 62 

Rye 98 103 

Lard 9J£ 

McBB pork 16 75 

Butter 25 30 

Oiirtsae H 16 

B»as 19 



m I Ip 



ei gffiit M 



Comprises a Complete Code of Regulations, 
Decisions and Oplniona upon Questions and 
Masonic Jurisprudence, Price, §2 25 . 



hm\ Mm Eitud asl Mhi 



Wiio Wants Samples of the Sixteen 
Page Cynosure 2 



Illustrated 
Price $2.50. 



with Explanatory Engraving 



Oliver's Hkiorj of Mkim, 



Comprising a detailed Account of the Kites 
and Ccr..!iaoniO!Jof all the Secret an<J Mysteri 
Oil* lEgtmitlone of the Ancient World, 



Every fnend of the Cynosure-wre hope 
will &o SOMETHING for the enlarged 
paper, and laasiy -uro are sure -will do a 
groat deal. How mncli will YOU do? 
"Ws israut to fiirnisli for canvassing" 
5,000 copies of the 1st &; 2d No. FREE, 
and V7C desii-e YOUS. order for sam- 
plscopies AT ONCE, sothat-we may he 
sure to print enough of them and so 
thatyoTii may get thf-za' fresh and new. 
"We ask you to •work for a large, fine 
looking paper, that is cheap at 32.00 a 
year. "We -will gladly give all our 
friends 20 per cent CASH commission, 
or 25 per cent in books for ne-w snh- 
scriptions. "Will not every pastor that 
reads tho Cynosure, show the enlarged 
paper to his c 'Jigregation, and puh- 
lically urge them to take it, at least for 
three mouths, in order to get a full re- 
port.of the Syracuso Convention, Jane 
2d— 4th? You can in this way strength- 
enyoxir people, yotiLTself, and this cause 
of God, a3id you may save some young 
man fcoin. tho soul slavery of the lodga. 
Hundreds of persons would he glad ef 
aa opportunity to read the Cynosure 
for three months, to chtaiu a correct 
idea of this movement. 



A GIANTS "WANTED, to sell our Stand- 
ard PublicationH, Send stamp for Cata- 
logue and Terras. Address, J. B, FQS,D & 
CO . at Chicago, New York, Boston, Cincinnati, 
or Han Francisco. 4t Mar 17. 



AGENTS "WANTED! 

To sell, direct lo coiisumer.i, The Guou.vdswell ; Or, The 

AUTMOIUTATI VE HISTOKY t^b 

LS' MOVEMENT. 

V.y J. Periam. Kdilor We.-:tcru Rur;;!. Clitcagn. Complete ami 
Reliable, Wrillni vp to Jniiwir,!, 1S74. S Original I'ortr.aits ; 
100 ut]i«r r.uL'iMvin-s. CCr"rhi5 Great "W'nrk is low in price, 
ami sc'iiiiq h>/ f.'if'U'^'fi>ili=:. For terms. terrlLorv, etc.. arldress 
HANN.VKORD i: THOMPSON, 103 E. Wasiiiugtbn St, Chicago. 
CAUTION.— Iiifcrior works, mere cumpilations, :ire being 
pushed. Do not be imposed on. Mr. Periam's work is full, 
authoritatke, aud iudorsod by the Gi'eat Leaders. None other i>.-. 

3m mar 12 



Light on Freemason 17, 

BY BLDEK D. BERNARD, 
with an appendix revealing the myateries of 
Odd.fellowsWpSOO pages Clotli will ba sent to 
any address post paid on receipt of $2. 00. 

The first part of the above work, Ligh 
on Freemasonry, 410 pages jn paper ctvtr, wll 
be sent post paid on Receipt of $1. 

Address, vr. J. SHUEY. 

DA.YTON. OHIO. 



Irais SAis. 



It is decidedly the most bkatttipdl, TASTEriJL 
and SENSIBLE thing of the kind I have ever 
'seen."— fieu F. G. Hibbard, D. D. 

"The most Souiptukal, BBAUTiFOL aud APPno- 
PEiATE Marriage Certificate I have ever seen." — 
Late Rev. H, Mattisun, D. D. 

"Something "new and beautiful, which we 
pronounce the handsomest thing of the kind we 
ever laid eyes on."— Meth. Home Journal, Phila. 
Contains two Ornamental Ovals, for Photographs. 

L EAUTIFtJL LIIE03EAPH 14 1-1 by 13 1-1 incliss. 
25 ots easli, $2.23 per ios- $13 per 100. 

For Sale by Ezra A. Cook & Co.. CHICAGO. 



3. -L. MANLSY. 

ATTORSNTBY-AT-IiAW, 

And Notary Public, 

MILLS CORNERS, Jay County, Indiana. 
Prompt Attention given to the collection of 
Claims, settling estates and all other business 
entrusted to his care. mo Nov. "iO. 

WHEATON COLLEGE! 

WHEATON. ILLINOIS, 

Is well known by the readers of TA« Cynosure. 
Faculty, same as last year, with tho addition of 
two gentlemen. Those wanting information 
should apply to J. Blanchabd, Prcs't. 



College, 

Westfield, Clark Co., 111. 

Classical and Scientillc Departments, open to 
both sexes. Also instruction in JIusic, Drawing, 
Painting, Book-keeping, Penmanship and Teach- 
ng. Address, 

Apr 246 m Bkv. £ UiL. B. AI..LBN, fresH 



mm' imimn mmi 



Containing the Degrees of JTreemasonry em 
braced in the Lodge, Chapter , Council and 
Commandery, embellished with nearly 800 
symbolic Illustrations. Together with Tactics 
aud drill of MasonlcKnIglil.'iood. Also, forms 
of Maaonlo Documents, Kotes, bougs, Masonic 
dates, installations, eto. By D, SicKela. S2 mo 
tack. Price $1.60. 




.1x1.1 \j X li XJhJ LJ XLXJt 



"In Secret Have I Said Nothing." — Jetus Ukriii, 



EZRA A. COOK & CO., Publisheks, 
NO, 13 WABASH AVENUE. 



CHICAGO, THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 1874. 



VOL. VI., NO. 26.— WHOLE NO. 209. 
WEEKLY, $3X00 A, YEAR. 



Contents. 

rage. 

Editokial Articles : 

What shall we do at Syracuse? S 

Coercion of Conscience 8 

Who will appear for U8? !> 

Notes 9 

Topics of the Time 1 

Our Colleges on Secret Societies 2 

Contributed and Select Articles :J 

John G. Stearns 9 

Mr. Moody in England 2 

Points of Difference 3 

Religion and Politics 4 

Was John Wesley a Freemason? 3 

Rbform News : 

From the General Agent i 

From the Ohio Agent 4 

The work in Fulton Co., O B 

CORKESrONDENCB : 

Discipline Enforced B 

Onr Mail .^ 5 

FObtt Years Ago: 

Brief Sketch of Orders that have influenced Governments . . f. 

Sermon on Masonky, hy W. P. M'Nary, (conclnded.) 14 

Tbb Home Cikcle: 

Trnst in Jesus, Poe'ii/ 10 

Religion Tested ". 10 

Jesus 10 

Daily Beauty 10 

Misdirection of a Soul 11 

David Livingstone 11 

Children's Corner H 

The Sabbatti School 7 

Home and Health Hints 7 

Farm and Garden 1 

Rum and Tobacco 13 

Facts and Figures 13 

Religious Intelligence 12 

News of the Week 1 J 

Cotemporary Notes 9 

Publisher's Department 16 

Advertisements IS, 14, 15, 16 



iU^ip 4 \\t tm^, 



t 



God has Nothing to dd with Law. — This statement 
was lately made by a clergyman and reflects the gen- 
eral lack of thought on this question : What is the 
foundation for hum an law ? In answering this ques- 
tion two positions are assumed. One party say, 
God's will is the foundation for all human laws that 
have a right to exist, and no liw bo vever enacted is 
binding which contravenes that law. The other party 
say, Human laws rest on humin consent ard God has 
nothing to do with them. The first party wishes to 
have the authority of God recognized in our National 
and State Constitutions. They wish to have laws 
enacted and enforced against profanity, intemperance, 
Sabbath breaking, and other like things, which are to 
be prohibited, not primarily because they injure men, 
but offasd God. The other party differ in this respect. 
All are hostile to a legal recognition of God or Christ- 
ianity. Some are in favor of laws against the moral 
evils mentioned, basing the law not on Divine will, 
but human reason enlightened by that Divine will, 
while it is safe to say a very large majority of this 
party are hostile to any law prohibiting sins against 
God. Of course if God has nothing to do with law 
the last named division of this party are right while 
the first are illogical. If God has nothing to do with 
law we have only to vote that the " back pay steal " 
was an honorable act and instantly Ben. Butler ceases 
to be a thief and becomes an honest man. If this 
view prevail we have no foundation for law, but the 
shifting quicksand of public opinion and what is crime 
to-day may be virtue to-morrow. This is foolish and 
absurd. God has everything to do with human law. 
He is the author of national as much as individual life. 
" By him kings reign and princes decree justice." By 
his power the kingdoms^of this world are to become 
the kingdoms of our Lord and his Christ. Is it wise 
to disown his authority until it is exemplified by our 
national destruction ? 



the same number was an editorial denouncing sump- 
tuary laws; saying that their result had been and 
would continue to be failure. The coLclusion derived 
from the facts and fancies stated is that we must have 
good wine, ale and beer, prosecuting such persons as 
sell contrary to the regulations in such cases made and 
provided. In the first place a sumptuary Hw is one 
which restrains or limits the expenditure of citizens 
for apparel, food, furniture, and the like, and aa no 
prohibitory legislation has sought this end, it is mere 
folly to talk about sumptuary laws when temperance 
laws are meant. These laws are not to restrain or 
limit the expenses of citizens for clothing, food and 
furniture, but to prevent men from selling a poison to 
their neighbors which makes it impossible for many 
of them to expend anything for these necessary arti- 
cles. If the Trilnme does not know that alcohol is a 
poison, and that crime gnd poverty result from its 
use, it learns very slowly. To say that this poison is 
left out of certain beverages and other cheaper poisons 
are used in its place, does not prove that Intoxicating 
drinks are anything but slow poisons even when pure, 
and every intelligent man knows that they are. Ad- 
mitting then that law and prayer have both failed to 
entirely remove this wholesale poisoning of the race, 
shall we adopt the Tribune's remedy and seek to pu- 
rify the poisons which men are to drink ? 

Or to put the case in another way, because laws 
against murder and stealing are violated in every part 
of the country, shall we abolish those ' ' sumptuary 
laws " and make others requiring men who rob and 
kill to do so in the most scientific and gentlemanly 
manner? How would it do to require every man who 
cuts his fellow's throat to administer chloroform be- 
fore putting in the knife, .ind send a man to state's 
prison, if, in picking a pocket he should tear the 
pants of the man he was robbing, while the mere act 
of murder or theft is unpunished because laws have 
failed to prevent such things ? To do this would be 
just as sensible and effective as to attempt to regulate 
the devilish traffic in ardent spirits which is meaner, 
more cowardly and more destructive to life and prop- 
erty than highway robbery and midnight a«8assi nation. 



portance of carefully watching the men who are in 
office. 

Among other things the men who are office seekers 
should be lain immediately on the shelf. To ask an 
office should be a disqualification for it. Probably eyery 
Senator of the United States begged or bought hit 
way to the chamber. Hon. Charles Sumner being 
the last of those men who used to be sought by others 
for the important offices they aspired to fill. So long 
a«? office seekers are elected to such positions we must 
have such inferior men as now disgrace the seats once 
occupied by Webster, Hale, Calhoun and Clay. "We 
do not demand that our officials be graduates of col- 
leges or members of the church. We do ask that 
they be strangers to the wire-pulling, soul-debasing 
political arts which are the ladder on which our pres- 
ent race of political men have climbsd to power. 



SuMPTDART Laws.— The Chicago Tribune lately 
contained an article on the temperance movement 
declaring that it had not banishad liquor from any of 



Official Corruption. — From the little that be- 
comes known of ofticial dishonesty the immense whole 
may be imagined but can never be described. Lay 
aside the Credit Mobilier and " back pay " swindles, 
and a long list of suspicious occurences leap into view 
which are almost discouraging. Ku-klux-klanmen are 
sent to prison and pardoned by our President. Pay- 
masters are convicted of embezzlement and by his 
word are released from punishment. Counterfeiters 
and circulators of obscene literature have only to ap- 



Thk Brooklyn Council. — Theodore Tilton accused 
Henry Ward Beecher, his pastor, of adultery. Mr 
Wfst, a member of Plymouth church, preferred 
charges against Theodore Tilton for slandering H. W. 
Beecher. At a church meeting held last October, Mr. 
Tihon was present and raid that he was not, and had 
not bee a member of that church for four years. He 
said also that he had no wish to avoid any responsi- 
bility by reason of that fact, and if the pastor, Mr. 
Beecher, had any charges to make against him, he 
would answer. Mr. Beecher said that he had no 
charges to make against brother Tilton, and by an 
almost unanimous vote the name of Mr. Tilton was 
stricken from the roll and the charges against him 
were dropped. 

Two neighboring churches thought this mode of 
settling such grave charges was inconsistent with 
church fellowship and addressed a note of remon- 
strance to Plymouth Church. That body replied 
that they had better mind their own business. A 
lengthy correspondence ensued and finally these two 
churches, (Dr. Storr's and Dr. Budington's) asked a 
council of one hundred and more Congregationalists 
to decide whether members of churches could leave at 
pleasure, even when under charges of a serious charac- 
ter, without any vote, censure or acquital by the 
church; and whether they ought to felowship Ply- 
mouth Church. The questions were six in number, 
but were substantially as stated. The council de- 
cided that members could not sever their church re- 
lations in that way, and that the churches were 
right in their protest against such practices in Ply- 
mouth Church. They also decide that if Plymouth 
Church continued to act in this way no church fel- 
lowship could exist between it and other Congrega- 
tional churches. They, however, expressed the hope 



peal to him and prison walls refuse to hold them. A 

citizen of Washington owns property assessed at nine- • that Plymouih Church would change its course and no 

teen thousand dollars and on it is compelled to pay a I such withdrawal of fellowship be necessary. All 



tax of eleven thousand. It is proved that a few favor- 
ed ones have been by a special arrangement permitted 
to collect taxes due the United States, retaining fifty 
per cent, for the collection, when responsible parties 
offer to do the same work for fifteen per cent. , and the 
men who get the contract have the work done for 
twelve and one-half per cant., retaining thirty-ssven 
and one-half per cent, for their trouble in ' ' seeing " 
the Secretary of the Treasury. Added to all this is 
the plea, born of ignorance or dishonesty, to flood the 
country with paper money, to impoverish the industri- 
ous and enrich the idle. . These things however 



which is very well so far as it goes. The real ques- 
tion has not been, and could not by this council be set- 
tled. It is among the hidden things which will yet 
be made plain. 



— Tembrancb Elbctionb. — City and town elections 
this Treek in several interior States were generally 
warmly contested, temperance being quite generally 
the issue. Clinton. Geneseo, Champaign, Jackson- 
ville, Mattoon, and Monmouth, 111. ; Council Bluffs 
and Keokuk, Iowa; Cleveland and Dayton, 0. ; and 
Adrian, Mich, are reported as anti-temperance; but 



the Ohio towns where it has been progressing. In [.should only arouse the American people to the im- in most of the Ohio elections the cause was victorious. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



OUK COLLEttES ATS'D SECKET SOCIETIES. 



Wheaton, III., Dec. 2Gth. 1873. 

Wheatoa College was chartered in the hands ol 
Wesleyan Methodists and conducted by them as the 
Illinois Institute for about twelve years. It was then 
re-chartered in the hands of the present Board fsitb 
the pledge to keep the testimony of the Wesleyans 
good against slayery and secret societies. 

Soon after I came here, in 18G0, I received a note 
from the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Frec- 
noasoDs in Illinois, inviting me to visit him at hit- 
office in Chicago. As the College was commilted to 
oppose , and (rrand Master Blair to uphold the lodge. 
I did not call as invited, euppo&ing no scood could comti 
from a private interview between p.uch pariies. 

Awhile after, the Master of the local lodge in Whoa- 
ton expresserl to me the hope that the College rule 
against secret societies would be ignored, as autafringe- 
ment of parental rights; and stating that if any stu- 
dent was expelled, under the rule, the College would 
be prosecuted. He was told that the ru'e must be 
enforced until repealed. 

Soon afterward, fifteen students were induced to 
unite with a Good Templar's lodge; two of whom, ad- 
hering to the aanae, were suspended. Application 
was at once made to our ClrcuU Court for a manda- 
mus, requiring our trustees to restore the student and 
revoke the rule. The case went in favor cf the Col- 
lege, It was taken by the Master cf the Wheaton 
Lodge to the Supreme Court of Illinois, where the 
decision of the lower courL was sustained, and the Col- 
lege saved froua the gripe of the lodge. 

From the above and other circumstances, I am led 
to the concIusioD, that the assault on Wheiton Col- 
lege was made in the interest of the Masoaic order, 
and after consultation with its leaders, and perhaps at 
the expense of the Grand Lodge of this State. The 
rule of the College is carefully drawn and properly in- 
terpreted. It simply prohibits attendance en lodge 
meetings, and other acts of membership during con- 
nection with the Institution. 

After this recital I need scarcely add that the Fac- 
ulty of Wheaton College are a unit in favor of the 
rule adopted by the trustees prohibit-^ng membership 
in secret societies, either in the College or outside. 
We object to the secret orders, not merely as socie- 
ties which are secret, but to the secret religic-us cere- 
monies which they all practice, more or less, from the 
largest to the least. Such rites, practiced by mem- 
bers of a body taken promiscuously from the commu- 
nity, professors of religion, and men making no pro- 
fessiou, is nothing less than moral and religious sye- 
tem in which personal piety is not required, nor gen- 
eral justice, but onj fealty to a clan. We regard the 
whole system, therefore, as opposed to true relig- 
ion and just governmsnf, and of course hostile to Go;l 
and man. J. Blattchard, 

President Wlieaton College. 

^«~» 

John (x. Stearus. 



Gonclupion o! his fuueral address, delivered by Rev. Cliarles 
Ayerfrom tlic tcit: "^■-nd I heard a voice from heaven sayiuguu to 
me. Write, Elcssed are the dead which die in the Lord from lience- 
forth: Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors; 
and their works do follow them."— Sev. xiv. I'j; 

When our brother and father, whose remains we 
put away to-day, gave me this his text,, he spoke 
highly to me of this rest, s-iying, "0, will it not be 
sweet! My brother, I have not a cloud." ile was 
converted when fifteen years old, and so has been in 
the battle sixty-three years. Every day of that period 
has marked the advance or retreat as the battift has 
been waged. JVoio rest; now he is sanctified; r.ow 
he has peace. The heart trained in the conflict with 
si't now emerges from the dust and faintings of the 
war into a delightful change of employments, and in 
uttermost and unmingled felicity serves God without 
sin day and night forever. 

The third reason we haye here for the happiness of 
the departed believer is, he is full-handed when he 
enters the presence of the Lord. ITis worJcs follow 
loith him. 

They follow with him as a record, for the remem- 



1 bering love of our Lord will not lose a sigh of his 
diadple, buL he will hold all their lifetime for him as 
a possesion of his heart. 

They f.:llow with him as character, for every en 
deavor for the Lord and his people and his truth is 
holineis Holiness is not a state, but an achievement. 
The holiness of patience and prayer works permanent 
good in the soul ; the holiness cf patience and prayer, 
of self-immolation and selfforgetfulness, of good works 
and of benevolence, of Christian courage and inde- 
pendence, — all holiness has wrought permanent work 
on the spirit, has adorned the spirit, and every decora- 
tion the dead warrior wears, and every scar of battle 
is but the outward sign of inward personal honor. 
Ii-?re many, unconscious here, will wake there with 
ghjd surprise to see themselves eo much more like 
Christ than they had ever thought on earth; for, in 
addition to their cleansing in the blood of Christ, and 
their clothiiig ia the righteousness of Christ, their 
worn cut and b.»ttered arnior will show them to have 
there the character of conquerors and kings. 

Tiieir works wi.il follow with them as reward. 
Every iioly deed on earth finds its counterpart in 
heaven, When the Lord comes and sees the faithful 
tiess of his steward, t-e bestows upon him the honorand 
station for which he is morally qualified. He holds in 
esteem ai:d puts His bounty on his work of faith and 
hibor of love and fight of affl ctions. 

Their works follow with them as trophies. When 
the Roman general came home from the wars he was 
sometimes honored with a triumph, but when they 
come to their home, the Lord has a triumph. They 
will be kings and priests, but will cast their crowns 
and ephods at the Saviour's feet. They will have some- 
thing to render to him. Their own souls will be trc- 
phius, and their souls' deeds and endeavors will be so 
much 'more. The martyrs will bring the flames of 
fire; the apostles their preaching; the praying motherfc 
will bring their children ; the humble soul his faith 
amid doubts and fears and sins; and the old preacher 
his gospel preached for three-score years of disciple- 
ship; and all will ascribe the strength and the honor 
to their Lord and King. 

I will not go out of my text to fiad more reasons 
for the happiness of the departed believer. I have 
mentioned the three furnished by our scripture. He 
is happy because of his life-union with Christ; because 
his life with Christ is now unmingled with the burdens 
and evils of his life here on earth; and because the 
good of this life on earth is now transfigured into 
eternal good in heaven. 

Father Stearns finds and will find his works follow 
with him, lie has preached the Word of God in vari 
ous fields and with various success, interrupted by 
intervals of sickness, dnce he graduated from the 
theological school at Hamilton in 1822. He was born 
inN. H,, Nov.22, 1795, aad,Eohad lived 78 years. He 
was ordained ia Waterville, N. Y., in the year in 
which he left school; married in the same year, and 
began his pastoral work at Syracuse when twenty-seven 
years of age. 

If I were to speak of what seems to me to charac- 
terize him, I should speak of the lofty practical relig- 
loiis tone of his life, and of his undoubted Christian 
courage. What will be for the glory of God, was the 
inquii y of his life. And even if he wrote a fugitive 
piece for a secular newspaper, he never obscured this 
constraint of his own soul. This great aim of life — 
to glorify God — is theoretically accepted by every 
disciple of Christ; but with him it was practical, and 
his conscience urged him or restrained him under the 
guidance of this great law of doing all to God's glory. 
I think we should find this, and not deaire for fame or 
or reward, it was that made him an author, and that 
put him so often into conterversy. He was an uncom- 
promising Baptist; but moie, an uncompromising 
Christian, His life was, for much part of it, a life of 
protest. He protested in books which were publfehed 
against the form and law gf the Presbyterian church, 
but coveted at the same time the fellowship of their 
Calvinism. He protested in the same way against the 
Methodist church, but claimed to have the same heart 



as they to spread the free Gosptl. He protested 
againet the docirlne of salvation as upheld by Univers- 
alists, but announced his joyful faith in the infinite 
love of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. He wrote 
and published on the Sovereignty of God and Moral 
Agency ; on Immortality ; on Regeneration ; on the ■ 
Primitive Church; on Baptism; on Uniyers.Uism ; and 
was constantly pifcparing sometliing fbr the religious 
or secular periodicals of the day ; and ia nothing he 
wrote or printed dees he seem to forget the honor of 
the Lord his God. 

The same great abiding, ruling principle of life led 
him to publish his book on the Nature and Tendency 
of Freemasonry. This book exhau=. Is the subject. It 
has passed to the seventh edition. It brc.ught him 
many enemies, and cost him many friends. He 
wished me to say after his decease that he had co 
regrets for the course of his life wiih respect to Free- 
masonry, and the work he had endeavored to do to 
counteract and overthrow that insiitutbn. 

He rises before me as a tsau of hero'sa;, who could 
and did ever hold up what was !o many the endga of 
weaknees, unabashed by the multitudo of opposers, or 
the coldness of his friends; and held up this banner 
with the truly heroic spirit, and for the glory of God. 

Father Stearns was the honored one in a class of 
seventeen, the first class of the Hamilton Theological 
Seminary of Madison University. His knowledge of 
English literature and of the classic tongue there 
obtained, stood him in good stead throughout his long 
and laborious life, Sixteen of those seventeen arc 
now beyond the flood. All were ministcr^J of Christ., 
All have died in the faith which they preached. Jon- 
athan Wade and Eugenio Kiacaid, two eaiinunt pioneer 
missionaries, were of that class. Kincald alone roraains ' 
now waiting for his cdll. Kincaid and Siearns have 
been of late exchanging through the ma'l messages of 
veteran experiences aud affection. What a happy 
meetiBg those eeventeen will keep ou the other side I 
Give me the wings of faith to rise 

vyithin the vail, and see 
The Saints above, how great their joys . 
How bright their glories be. 

Clinton, JV. Y., January. 1874. 

«-»-«. 

Mi'.Moodyiu Eiigiaiid. 



Mr. Spafford, recently returned from England- 
gives us the following information concerning his work. 
When Mr, Mcody was preparing to leave this country 
about a year eIecc, be corresponded principally with 
two men who were to make arrangenients for h'.mand 
assist him in his work in the British Isles. 

When he landed at Liverpool a letter was placed m 
his hands stating that both of these"men were in their 
graves. 

A stranger, with all the human aid, on which he 
had in a measure relied, cut off, he felt that this was 
a voice of God to him telling him not to make fieeh his 
arm. He went boldly forward, but was looked upon 
him with suspicion. The Christian, a paper witb 
scarcely eleven thousand subscribers, was the only 
paper that dared to mention him or his wcrk. From 
facts subsequently brought out, it appeared ihat the 
people feared that i^r. S\nkey, his companion, and 
that Mr. Moody also, were actuated by mercenery 
motives. 

Still they went prayerfully and earnestly to work, 
and had precious meetings, which were not without 
fruit. They could not, however, unite the ministers, 
in cordial co-operation with them, and after a while 
Mr. Moody said, ''We will go to New Castle ; if we 
cannot unite the clergymen there in a general effort 
for salvation, I will go home." God heard prayer; 
the clergymen joined Mr, Moody in working for the 
salvation of souls, and a great outpouring of the Holy 
Soirit followed. 

From this time on, the obstacles to successful work 
seemed removed. The tide had turned. The papers, 
both religious and secular, were glad to publish any- 
thing concerning their meetings. 

The most striking m.-snifcstation of God's power in 
bringing about union Ohristi-an effort, wa's at Edin- 
burgh. That city, in which, intellectual attainments 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



3 



•were at a premium, and where intellectual pride had bless all, and the Christian church labors for n-1). Ithe United States' and Territories, the Dom 
jua strong partitions between different sects, was the lodge embraces only the chos'-n few. While the | Canada and British Colonies." 

fused into one flowing flame of love to Christ and an Gospel is free, ■' without moaey and with- ut price,'' 2. Eiirly Wesl^tyan principles. Wc find the dis- 
outpouring of Crod's Spirit came like a pentacosta'! and the in-»italion is free, to fd!, the 'halt; the blind eipiinary provisions of Wesley's sccielies so tsirict, that 
shower. and poor; the gcod in ilie loJg-o,if any therj is, is guard- { his members were not allo.Tcl to aarry unconverted 

Mr. Moody's prayer in public soon after he started ed by a fee, which is the key that alone can unlock '. persons, nor to as.aociate in fellowship with the 
out in the Christian warfare was, " 01 Lord, make the treasure house of knowledge to one seeking it ati "worldly minded," which would not, as we see, allow 



us humble." We believe it is his prayer still. 

A memorial fund for him wa^ started by a friend, 
«ud before he heard of the movement, had reached 



ihe shrine ; neither dcos Ihe invitation to its benefilb ! fellowship in a Masonic lodge. Then when Mr. Wes ley 
include the poor, halt or maimed, those most in need. J had been dead about ten year?, according to that Meth- 
The spirit and the work of the Gospel froaa first to | odist giant, Jacob Stanley , President of the Wcsleyan 
cne thousand pounds more or less, (from $4,000 toilast, inclmling all its true worliers, i^ benevolence ; I Methodist churches of England, those Methodists who 
$5, 000. ) As Kooa as he heard of it he told the man- ! laboring for and seeking those who can make no ad.' - ! had joined the secret Eocieties known as the ' 'Friendly 
ager of the enterprise that he would not take one cent jquate returns for the labor bestowed or the benefits t Odds," "DruiJs" and "Loyal Britons," were either 
<'{ the fund. His work had be^n too precious to allow ' received. Christianity is for the masses. The work- ' compelled to renounce their adhciion to the same, or 
even a auepicion that he labored for gain, forest upon it. ings of the lodge see-m to deny one of the fundamental be expelled from the Methodist societies. He says: 
The circiilatiop. of The Christian, the paper which principles of the Gospel, the brotherhood and equality "The ministers were obliged to do this to stop the 
fir^ia'dedhim in hi."; work, hafi increased from 10,000 of man. It is the brother of the lodge and not thetp!ague: ii being an ici'tatioa of Masonry," [See Brii- 
to 40jOOO since last Juno, poor bruised sufferer that fell among thieves. Tiikish Method i.st Magazine^ pp. 66 io 71, 1813.] 

Gospel is pre-eminently full of brotherly kindness 3. A case of alibi. The statement from the Ghrls- 
toward all the race and we are required r.s often as tiav. Age,et al, is that "Jo'm Wesley, the founder 
we have opportunity to do good, even to all men. i of Methodism, wa? initiated into the secrets of that or- 

i Finally, the principles of the lodge are in direct an-jder on October 30, 1738, in lodge 367, Downpatrick, 

This n.-ices33ry and posiiive declaration is made by I tagonism to the Gospel. The Gospel is to be preach- (Ireland)," Now turn to We&UyS Journal October, 
the Siviour himse'f : " Ye c^.nnot serve God and | ed as far and as wide as men are found, and all it&j 1738, and you will find that on the 22d of October, 
nnn^ffion."' Wot long ago the remark was addressed i principles and truth to be as fuliy proclaimed as pes- 1 of that year, he preached at Bloonisburg; on the 25th 
to u-3 personally, "You must be a radi<Ml ; it is noUs|sible, to cause men to fully understand every excel- 'at Bassingshaw, on the 27th at St. Atholins, on the 
well for 2/oi<," Perhaps not, but we have a kind oilience and every good it embraces, as far as it is 1 29 Ih at Islington and at London WVi!, and on No- 
btlief thatit s?i;l be as well for the world. To be i possible to convey or understand, though to under-{ vember 3 J at St. Atholins egiin. 
radical ir>ay :ncur (he displea.sure of some, but there jgtand it fully it must be experienced. The commission i Any one acquainted with the geographical configu- 
is a definite ides that It pleases God. This conclusion! (o Christ's ministers embraces 111 this, "Go ye intoj rations of the "fast anchored islea" on which these 
is reached by triie fact that Clirlst's doctrine and style jail the vrorld and preach tha Gospel to every creature," i things occurred, is aware that London Wall is now 
ot prcacLing wf!s all radicrJ, and God declared from | as also does the instruction ho gave them: " that; one of the thoroughfares of the great metrcpohs, and 
heaven that lie was well pleased ; so much so as toj^jjicii ye have spoken in the ear in closets shall be that the other places named are some of the suburban 



Points of Difference. 



BV KEV. G. H. HUBfi.\RD. 



foi'mand all to hsar him, which does not show dis- 1 proclaimed upon the housetops." Not o 



iving villages of that place. They will further discover that 




^ ^ . . ,^ ,- . . ....... .. — — preacDing 

jng the same (Tjgpel wiLj the same spirit? fact of the Saviour's coming was to reveal, to bring to the gospe', when the Masons claim to have ''initiated 

It is said again that you "disturb the church and | jigiit .j^hat before was not fully known: the love oi i him into the secrets of their order," True there is 

the world," but what are we to do with the utterances ; G°od and the way of salvation ; beoiQain.. with tl-e ^oihing said of his whereabauls on tha evening of Oct- 

of ChiT^t when he snvs tha.^ 1 '-TYisn'^i fnon rIiiII b-"^ i • r t ,\ \ .1 ^ i • " r T j '>^^" 28, 1738, th/ough on the 27th and 2'Jth he 

otUln.t^henhcsa> tha.a man. iocs sha. b.j enunciation ri the angel over the plams of Judea ; , ^^^^^^ J .^^ ^^^ J ^^i^,^.^- ^j,^,^ ^f L^„^l^^_ ^r^^^ ^^^^_ 

they of his own household ; and tnat other also, " i ; fuigHed in the life of him who said, " in secret have | temidate two hundred mile.s or more on the Irish Sea 

corns not to send peace, but a sword.' The preach- i said nothing ; " and culminating in that sublime ex- 1 in a ruda shallop of a hundred and forty years ago, 

pression of Jesus himself : "I am the light of the: and four hundred miles in the lumberinir coaches of 



Jng of Christ disturbed men, it disturbed a dead, 




a point of difference between the preaching of the 
Saviour, and those who for fear of disturbance would 
shut the lips and withhold the trath. 

Then too we think that some things are radically 
wrong, and npcd a radical remedy, to secure a radical 




that they have light or knowledge 
yet refute to impart it. Now the 
ians are forbidden to hide their lij 

or in the lodge-room, but put on a candle-stick, on the listed from the French original, 'lately published at 
hili-top, where it cannot be hid from the view of theBerUn, I incline to think it is a genuine account 



change. Now among the radical doctrines taught by ; ^jost careless observer. " Let your light so shine."! C>a5y if it be, I wonder .the author is suffered to live. 
.he Savioui is the oae quoled fust at the head cf this j Mark you ! Let it shine. Give it an oppcriunity. ' f^ \ ^^^'''"' ^^'^ f T^"^ .^'''*" ''^■''■f "?•' v 

article, and we propose in brief, to contrast sectarian- ! if fj^gre is anvthin^ clearly established H i^" th'^ ' " "^^'^'^'^^^^"^^ f =" ^^^^^ s^^-^*^ '\ ''■> ^^'^'^^ 

■ ,■, ,1 r^ \ ^ 1 ■ ■ ■ 1 J it mere IS tmyimng cieany tb..«DUoneu, .i is in- so many concur to keep! From what motive? 

isra^ with the Gospel and things pertaining thereto, and j feet that concealment and the Gospel are not oompan- ' Through fer.r or shame 5" 

in doing so look only at patent. facts. | jo^^^ and that there are points of difference between i If Rsv. John Wesley had been p, Freemason, would 

One serious objection to secret orgasiizations lies in | them as great as there is between light and darkness, 



the fact that they are used ss a substitute for the 
church, and religion itself ; that it absorbs the atten- 
tion, the time, the energy, the money, and leaves 
room for nothing else ; thet it destroys religious inter- 
ests and absorbes religious men. Thai the lodge is 



From the Syracuse J ourual. 

Was John Wesley a Freemason? 



he not have said more (h.^.n "I incline to think it a 
genuine account?" He would have known whether 
it were true or not, and there is not a doubt but he 
I would have srjid so if he said anything. Who can be- 
I lieve that the "Founder of Methodism" could have 
j been such a hypocrite a^ to have "played possum" 



o the Editor ; 

A few weeks since there appeared in your columns f^bout a thicg he under,^tcoJ so well, as if he had 
run on this basis there can be but little doubt, as facts a statement which has, before and since, been the^''^^^^ ™^^" " Mason in 1738. Again, had he been a 

could be produced to prove this if necessary-, for they rounds of the pre.., to the effect that Rsv. John Wes- ^"'^^ T '° ^f-J^yf^.^'^^ witti the institution 
, , ,, , ^ , , . ,. . •' , _, ,^ would ne have admitted tue supposea truthfulness of 

take the precedent and place of religious meetings, ley was a Freemason, bo spocifio is this article that t^e Maso,:^ic obligation, by ssying. ••! wonder the au- 
Now the interests of religion are first or they are | it gives in the introduction the name of the paper thor is suffered to live?'' Had John Wesley been a 
nothing. Men may be compelled to attend the lod^e, j (CVtrisJian .4f/e, of New York,) from which it was ^ Mason in good standing, would he have asserted as 
but they choDse to do so. The preference of even the ! taken. And states that "Rev John Wesley, the foun- ^''''^^^^y ^™''' *^^^'^ *''"=^ ^"'^'<^-^ shovred Masonry to be 
mofocoo^iTT r>;o,-o ;- f^^ tt,c ,v-„„+;„ ,, f *i ! J j'j f^' lu r • •,- ^ j • .l at. ^ /• .1 ! an "amazing barter on mankind," and if true, that 

professedly pious 1. for the meetings of the lodge, and , der of Methodism, was imtiafed mto the secrets of the , ^j.^^^^^ ^J^ ^^ -^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ . ..^^^. „^ ^^^^^^^ ^^ 

one of the worked out, demonstrated results, is the sub- 1 order on Oct. 30,1738." It gives the number of th^ : keep its pecrets? If * John Wesley, the founder of 
stitution of these meetings for the meetings of the [lodge as 367, and tho place as Downpatrick, Ireland, j Methodism," were a Freemason, what kind of a Free- 
church : not only to put these meetings thus, but jit tells of a dying man, Mr. Martin, as speaking ofi'^^^on was he? If he had not been a FreemaEon, 
create a disrelish for prayer and other spiritual meet- "John Wesley as a brother Mason." ^ ^'^^^ ''■'^^"''^ "^'® ^'^'^'^^ ^^ ^"^^^ ^^°- ^^° ^^^ seeking 



mgs. The result is fatal to souls. Then also it is 
possible to be a stumbling block to a weak brother, 
and by the momentum given him by the example he 
may swing clear past the point of return and be lost. 
The work and organization cf the lodge seem to be 
purely selfish : which is altogether unlike the Gospel 
and church work. While the Gospel is designed to 



-r , , „,,.., ! to make him appear to be what he was not? 

I have four reasons for believing tbe statement a; We do not" intend by this to censure the Journal 
fabrioation : — . forgiving as cuneat iuteliigence, that which is going 

1. Its authenticity, "The Christian Age, a resid- the rounds of the press, but the person who started 
able and reliable paper published in New York," in ■ ^Y^ ' 'jara.'' And we write with the fullest apprehen- 

1,; 1 u :„ .,i„;^^.i <■« v.-,r„ R *. j • 1 j sion of Ber;iarain Fr.aBkIin's assertion, that ''A false 

which It IS claimed to have brst apneared, IS unknown i -,■■.■, -^ ^ -sr • , n • \ c 1 ^i. 
._,„,_,. ,^ ^' ' !bcod wiii £;oirom Maine to Georgia before truth gets 

m Roweh's Amencayi Mtospaper Directory, "contain-; her boois on." Respectfully, L . N. Stritton. 

ing a list of the newspapers and other periodicals in! Wesleyan Office, SyrIcuse, March 21, 1874. 



4 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Reiigiou and Politics. 



As an illustration of the difference 
between the precepts of rtligion and 
American politics, we ssnd you the 
followiun; slip cut from one of our lead- 
ing daily newspapers : 

MR. f.UMSKR AND Til S SOUTH. 

Louisville, March 12. — The Courier- 
Juurnal to-day contains a long and 
feeling double-leaded notice of the 
death of Charks Sumner. Among 
other things, it says: Fifteen years 
ago the newB that Charles Sataner was 
dead would have been received -vyith 
something, like rejoicing by the people 
of the South. Ten years ago they 
would have hailed it as a message 
from heaven telling them that an en- 
emy had been removed from the face of 
the earth. To-day they will read it 
regretfa'Jy and their comment will be 
'He was a great man. He was an hon- 
est man. As he has forgiven us, so 
have we long ago forgiven him.'" 

From this slip it would appear that 
the people of the Souih disliked Sena- 
tor Sumner ao much fifteen years ago 
that his death would have been re- 
sponded to with something like rejoic- 
ing. Ten years ago, or about the lime 
of Lincoln's death, it w„uld have been 
hailed as a message from heaven, grat- 
ifying the bitter, vengeful feelings of 
the South by the removal of their 
worst enemy. But now the South 
forgives him because he has forgiven 
the South ; and it is confessed that he 
was a great, good, and honest man. 

Such is the spirit of politics; it hates 
its enemie?, and would rejoice at their 
death ; and if it forgives them it is for 
value recieved. 

We all know what the spirit of the 
Christian religion is. It teachss us to 
do good to our enemies, to love those 
who hate us, and not to confine our 
good deeds to those who do good to us, 
as the heathen do, and as Masons 
teach. We are not to forgive men 
simply because they forgive us, or be- 
stow favor upon those only who can 
give the true grip. 

We do not write, Mr. Editor, for 
the purpose of showing anything pe- 
culiar in the South ; but to point out 
the wide difference between the politics 
of the United States, and the religion 
which it professes. The one breeds 
hate, war, and revenge; the other 
friendliness, peace and forgiveness. 
War must needs come, but we need 
not entertain a personal hate against 
him who opposes us. The execution 
of the laws of war as well as of peace, 
has nothing to do with hatred, revenge 
or forgiveness, but phould have its 
course irrespective of these qualities. 
Mr. Sumner had no right to forgive any 
one for violating the laws or the rights 
of the people of the United States. 
Nor, as a good, true, and honest man 
had he any choice but to oppose slav- 
ery to the extreme end. Are we, 
American citizens who oppose Ma- 
sonry, to be hated, have our deaths 
prayed for, be regarded as odious to 
heaven itself and worthy of its especial 
wrath, and finally, when such rage 
shall pro7e futile, vain and bootless, 
8re we then to be forgiven for having 
raised our voice against an enormous 
wrong? An the advocates of crime, 
error and falsehood (o forgive us for op- 
posing them? 



• We think it woalfl be snorJ generous 
and sensible in our adversaries to follow 
a Cbrlst^in spirit, do away witii Ma- 
socry, and then there would be no need 
of forgiving ns. Anti masoka . 



I 



%Uxn 






— The General Agent returned to Chica- 
go on Monday morning. He lias a few 
appointments near this city during the 
week and will then work tov.'ard New 
York Ftate. 

— Elder J. L. Barlow is preparing to 
take the field ia May with the support of 
the New York State Association. 

— Bro. J. P. Anthouy has sent an inter- 
esting report of the lectures of Rev. J. M. 
Bishop ill Adams and York counties, Pa., 
of which an account from Bro.Wickey, of 
Mt. Top, appeared last week. Extracts 
will be ready for next number. 

—The v/ay these bretbern Bishop, An- 
thony, Wicktty, audAVeidler went to work 
is certainly an excellent one. Three 
places were v.xsited and light ]:)oured in on 
some hitherto sightless eyes by these 
brethren, who went together, in the Gos- 
pel wa}', and so sti'ongthened each others 
hands. Why may we not hear of mauv 
such meetings V 

— Bro. Caldwell has found a genuine 
sensation it seems. Further iie'.vs from 
that quarter will be looked for with in- 
terest. 

— It is unquestionable that there are 
plenty of cases as aggravated as that 
described by Bro. Stoddard. Is there any 
reason why they should not be reported 
for the "good of the order" of Patrofas'? 

— Elder Isaac Jackson of Minnesota has 
given a number of lectures, and circulated 
many books and documents in Minnesota 
during the past winter. He has been en- 
couraged in this work by the fact that 
several have been kept from the lodge by 
the entrance of the truth which gave them 
light. 

From the ixeiieral Agent'— A (Jraag'c 
Trial. 

Prairie Centrr;, 111., 

March 31st, 1874. 

Dear Bro. K. :— The Patrons of 
Husbandry have been operating at" this 
point for some time, and if the tree is 
known by its fruits, this sprig from tlie 
old trunk of Misonry is a " Upas " to 
ferment, rather than a "Tree of Life" 
to heal discords and promote the wel- 
fare of the community. 

Beguiled and ensnared by arts in 
which the experts of secrecy are so 
proficient, some of the more substan- 
tial and intelligent mea and women 
joined the lodge as "charter mem- 
bers," bat soon learning the heathenish 
character of its ceremonies and the 
deistical tendency of its religion, th?y 
lost all sympathy with, and confidance 
in the movement. They had embark- 
ed in the enterprise in the hope and 
expectation of benefiting the agricultu- 
ral interests of the community, and not 
simply to have a "good time;" and 
when they found that; the '' chief 
feature of instruction was simple non- 
seilfee, and that the time was consumed 
in leading men blind-folded over hlocks j neglect of that paramount duty to pro- 
of wood, laid upon the floor to teach mote the pecuniary interests of each 
them to travel on plowed ground, and other. It would moreover be a reflec- 
such like foolishnesF, they became tion upon the " gods" of the grange to 
disgusted. ; allow this prediction of expulsion to 



Christian and wholly unauthorized in 
the Scriptures. This, with some other 
irregularities, such as disrepect for the 
"gate-keeper,"' and speaking in public 
against their great goddesses, " Ceres, 
Flora, and Pomona," no awakened the 
ire of the craft that they resolved to rid 
themselves of the rr.an who had the in- 
solence to speak irreverently of their 
gods, or dared to utter his sentiment 
in public Vf ith out first oh tainng a per- 
mit from the lodge. Accordingly, 
charges v,'ere preferred against Bro. 
Palmer by s,omebody, and he was cited 
to appear before an au^fust assembly 
of " Patrons " acd answer for his con- 
duct. He was accused of saying to the 
"gate-keeper," '' Jerusalora," instead of 
something else, which was the "pass- 
word ; " filso, of saying that he believed 
the ."ranae to be deiriiaental to the 
peace of the community and the best 
interests of the people, and worst of all 
be not only refused to be himself in- 
stalled chaplain, but as a trustee he 
would not consent that the heathen 
rites of install? tion should be performed 
ill the church. These were certainly 
grave ofFenees and must not pass un- 
punished. The lodge could not brook 
such inEolence. It would never do. 
''• (3ur cr?.ft" is in danger from such 
excessive liberty. This turbulent spir- 
it must bo subdued, and taught to 
venerate the gods of the grange, 
reverence its olliciali?, and obey its 
edict"-, or be " totally expelled from 
the order, without the possibility of 
reinstatement," and be ''forever dis- 
graced among those who were his 
brothers and sisters." 

Bro. Palmer was duly notified and 
summoned to appear before that august 
body against w^hose dignity and deities 
he had dared to npesk. With shutters 
closed and "gate" securely tyled, the 
secretary proceeded to read the char- 
ges against Bro. P. and the by-laws of 
the lodge^ when lo! it appeared that 
the accused had been guilty of no in- 
fraction of this instrument. But this 
sapient tribunal was not to be baffled 
for want of law to justify their action. 
Palmer was obnoxious, and beside, two 
Patrons, devoted to the worship of 
their tutular deities, had wagered an 
oyster Bupper with an equal number 
of '' cowans," that he (Palmer) would 
be expelled, and it weuld never do to 
desert the faithful. This would be a 
violation of that clause of the "obliga- 
tion," by which they had pledged 
themselveB to "render a brother or 
sister of the order, such assistance as 
they may be in need of," and a flagrant 



Having paid their $25 for a charter, 
and the services of an authorized pro- 
ficient, to '' just give them a start," 
they proceeded to elect their officers. 
Rev. .1. S. Palmer was chosen to the 
office of chaplain, and notified to prc- 
p^j-re for his installation. Examimng 



fail, and they would thereby become 
obnoxious to their displeasure and sub- 
ject themselves to trial in the higher 
courts, and expulsion from the favor of 
their titular deities; and besides, this 
whole thing must be "nipped in the 
bud." The safety of the craft depended 



face to face with his accusers, for as he 
had violated no written law of th«' 
order they must abac don law andi 
proceed in a more direct and sure way.. 
A trial would imoeril and might defeat, 
their object. Witnesses acd facts- 
might prove troublesome, and like 
other irresponsible secret cabals they 
resolved themselves into an inquisition 
to make, apply, and execute their own 
laws. 

Bro. Palmer alter hearing his accu- 
sations was permitted to speak and 
then retire. The result of this inquisi- 
torial session has not been officially 
announced to the accused, but inaemuch 
as the indiscreet "cowans" whO' 
wagered an oyster supper, on the re- 
sult, hare been called upon and paid 
their forfeit it is generally believed that 
B.'o. Palmer was expelled. Rumors lo 
that effect have been afloat in the com- 
munity and when these sons of the 
gods shall claim to publish^ the facts 
there can be little doubt but that the 
accused will find himself driven from 
the warm embrace of the grange, to 
suffer on alone in this unsympathetie 
and " heartless world." 

This man of grave offenses is one of 
the oldest and most respected residents 
of La Salle county, having been a citi- 
zen for over twenty-seven years. His 
integrity and ability has endeared him 
to a large circle of friends, and the case 
has awakened much interest in this and 
other communities where he is known,. 
He has the sympathy and approbation 
of the better classes and will probably 
survive the shock. He has extensive 
agricultural interests and is heartily 
enlisted in the Farmers' Movement. 
He has notified the "Worthy Master" 
that when they get through with their 
mummeries and heathen rites and are 
ready to proceed to business like men 
of common sense, he is ready to co- 
operate with them. Whether this 
offer will be accepted or whether these 
men ' ' behind the screen " will pro- 
ceed to defame his character, derange 
his business, and destroy his reputa- 
tion, in addition to expulsion, remaina 

to b'^. seen. 

Bro. Palmer, however, feels but 
little concern. Having acted the part 
of a man and a Christian he feels satis- 
fied to abide the result. Bro. P. is an 
old anti-slavery veteran and thorough 
reformer. He appreciates the value of 
a good paper in his family, and besides 
being a subscriber himself from the 
first, he has sent the Cynosure to 
many friends and neighbors. He ex- 
pects to attend our Anniversary at 
Syracuse and has taken a life-member- 
ship in the National Association. May 
ciod rnise up many such friends to the 
truth. Your Biro, in Christ, 

J. P. Stoddard, 



the ceremonies he found that he was I ypp^ -^^^q suppression of its principles, 

to be installed "as the medium of this ^^,^^ ^^^ favorable opportunity of 

(Prairie Centre) Grange, to hold con- i ^ ^,^ impression must not 

verse with the Master of the Cxreat ) ,-.,.., -.j -x 

Grange above." This he resfused to I be lost. J^either woiud it answer to 

do, believing and declaring it was anti- 1 institute trial .ind bring Bro. Palmer 



From the Ohio Agent.— Is this Another 
Masonic Execntiou? 

Caret, Ohio, April 2, 1874. 
Bro. K. — I have just returned from 
Fulton Co. , 0, , where I spent five days, 
I trust to good account for our cause. 
While there I gave five lectures, and 
preached twice on last Sabbath. On 
Tuesday we held a meeting for organ- 
izing the county, which proved a grand 
success. In organizing we consumed 



THE 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



5 



most of the day, having a session in 
the forenoon and also in the afternoon, 
in which a suitable constitution and by- 
laws were prepared and adopted, also 
appropriate resolutioae, which will be 
given in due time by the secretary 
■elect. We alfo met at night for our 
last lecture of the series delivered in 
dififerent parts of the county. 

But I took my pen for a different 
purpose than to report our meetings, as 
others will sea to that. It is this: to 
record an event of brutality rarely 
•equalled in the annals of history. A 
few days previous to my visit to that 
county, several little boys, playing 
along a stream of water called Bean 
Creek, in the vicinity of Moreno! (a 
town just in the edge of Michigan and 
adjoining this State on the north of 
Fulton Co., 0.,) discovered a box in 
the stream partially out and partially 
under the water. They were induced 
from curiosity to examine the box, and 
succeeded in raising it out of the sand 
and mud, in which it seemed to have 
been buried, and worked it to the shore 
but were unable to raise it upon the 
bank of the stream, it being so heavy. 
They then went up into the village and 
reported what they had discovered, 
whereupon the citizens thronged the 
spot immediately. The box was taken 
up on the bank and opened, and the 
contents proved to be a man in a nude 
condition with every mark of Masonic 
▼engeauce upon his person. His body 
was severed in the midst, and his en- 
trails taken out and wrapped up in pa- 
per and found in the box with the 
body. The left breast cut open, the 
heart and vitals taken out and missing. 
The throat cut across aod the tongue 
torn out, the skull smitten off and the 
face flayed, and otherwise mutilated so 
as to render his identity impossible. It 
appears, from current report that the 
citizens applied to an officer of the law, 
a justice of the peace, and urged upon 
him as a duty to notify the coroner, 
that a jury might be appointed and a 
lawful inquest held over the dead body. 
The justice refused, and others inter- 
fered, claiming that it was a body sent 
to a doctor of the place for professional 
purposes, and placed there for speedy 
decomposition. So the body remained 
all day on the banks, no one daring to 
interfere, as an inquest had not been 
held over the same. The people being 
stirred and excited to their utmost ten- 
sion over the matter, three young men 
concealed themselves near by when 
night came on, to see what disposition, 
if any, should be made of the body. 
And the result of their discovery is 
reported that they recognized three 
men, all Masons, w£o appeared, dug a 
hole in the edge of the stream, and 
then kicked the body into it and covered 
it up. That this report is correct no 
one but the fraternity eeems to doubt. 
I saw one man, a minister, who visited 
the place next day and saw the box 
still on the side of the stream. An- 
other, whose name I shall not now 
give for prudential reasons, but also a 
minister living in Moreaci, who saw 
the body with all the mutilation and 
marks of vengeance before given. I had 
fear for Elder Baird, as he had been at 
Morenci lecturing but a few weeks pre- 



vious, until I saw his article in Cynosure 
of last week, which, however, is without 
date or plsce. D. S. Caldwell, 

The Work ie Fulton Comity, 0. 



Delta, April 2d, 1S74. 
Dear Cvnosure: 

We have just organized the county 
On the 2(Uh uU,, Bro. Caldwell came I joined the Ijdga and became very fsricked. 



before a crowded house and joined the 
church; and as his case seems to bo a 
little peculiar, I desire to give it to the 
readera of the Cynosure. 

He made a profession of religion 
about twenty years ago, and joined the 
Baptist church. For one and a half 
years he was faUhiuI; after which he 



full of fire on this great .subject, and 
lectured ia the P.jppel Grrova U. B. 
church on the eveninjj of. the 26th, 
and at the Whitaker School-house on 
the 27th; again at the (Irove on the 
28th, Ssiturday evening. A raeeling 
was then appoialfcd at Poppel Grove 
on Tuesday, to organize. On the Sr.b- 
bath Bro. Catdwel! preaclied two ex- 
cellent sermons. Oa Moriday he 



At ths iibove meeLina; he became 
very penitent and gave good evidence 
of being recL'Jmed. 

About one weak after his conversion, 
his pastor saw that he was in a dis- 
tressed state of mind. He was sp- 
pro:iched by the pastor v/hen the fol- 
lowing conversation ensued: 

Pastor, — What is wrong? 

Convert. — I am a ruined m.in; I am 



lectured at Spring Hill in the United all tunf^lcd np with secrecy; I cannot 



Brethern church. On Tuesday we 
met to organize. We had not a very 
full attendance, from the feci that Bro. 
Caldwell came before we had expected 
him and we could not. get word to the 
different parts of the county in time for 
the meeting. But all went off smooth- 
ly, except a few ripples ia the secrecy 
element which proved that their 
stronghold was stirred up. After the 
second lecture at the Grove, one Odd- 
fellow on his way home could not 
contain himself and ho "bo'led over," 
but an '• anti" was there to take care 
of him. At Spring Hill a Mason was 
too closely pressed, and when Bro. 



serve two masters; I want to be free, 
but sea no possible chance, I have 
written to the lodge desiring lo loipe 
off (he slate, but they will not release 
me. Their letter (o me hid this state- : 
ment: "Within the last three months 
we have received hundreds of similar 
requests, but we propose to release : 
none." 

Pastor. -—Yv'hiit secret society do you : 
refer to? 

Convert. — I do noi; propose to tell. 
There are very few in tliis section of 
country, but the association extends 
all over this and the old country, es- 
pecially France. If I am ever sum- 



Caldwell, in the course of his remarks, j moned to appear anywhere I must go, 



gave the '' grand hailing sign of 
distress," he denied its corrfctneas, bat 
he had the wrong man to deal with 
for Bro. Caldwell told him that by 
saying that was not right he simply 
said all the rest was correct, and he 
thought himself to have done remark- 
ably well to make only one mistake in 
the whole lecture. The people seem- 
ed to think so too. The Mason seeing 
he lost his jewel looked sorry and 
confused. Tnough he professes to be 
a Christian, yet in his rage, while talk- 
ing to the lecturer after the meeting, 
he used very profane language, but to 
no purpose, 

I wish to remark that Elder Baird 
must have stirred the MasouS to a 
blood pitch, for since he left Morenci, 
Mich., the body of a murdered man 
has been found bearing marKS of mutil- 
ation indicated by the penalties of Ma- 
sonic oaths. Wm. R. BuNor. 



itt«$jj$«i!^itti|> 



Discipline Enforced. 



and if I refuse I will be taken. 

Pastor. — How can they compel you 
when it is not the voice of the govern- 
ment. 

Convert.— But it extends into the 
government and has become the voice 
of the government. That is where they 
will get me into trouble if I join the 
church. What questions touching se- 
crecy do you propose to ask me, if I 
present myself for membership ? 

Pastor. — That you state publicly 
yourself, or through me, that you will 
withhold your presence and dues from 
the lodge so long as you are a member 
of the United Brethren church. 

Convert.— Here is my trouble, if I 
am called upon I wili be compelled to 

go- 
Pastor. — Do you desire to be imel 
Convert. — Ye«,I do. 
Pastor. — You do not ask us to vio- 
late oar law lo accommodate secjet so- 
ciety men ? 

Coavert. — No, I give you credit for 
your position. 

Pastor. — Is the oath in the society 
referred to by you, similar to the Ma- 
sonic ? 

Convert.— I have taken the Masonic 
oath, and know all about it; it is bad 



About two years ago , a member of 
the United Brethren church, oa my 
district, joined the Freemasons. He 
was deaU with according to discipline, 
which resulted in expulsion from the ; enough, but it is nothing in comparison 
church. In connection with our last j to the other- 
quarterly meeting on that field of la- When he uttered the last sentence 
bor, he made application for re-raeni- he shuddered and gave it with empha- 
berahip in the church. He came for- ; sis. He stated that his father had 



pastor, renounce the lodge and state 
that he thought it his duty to join the 
U. B. church. I sliould like to know 
what secret society Le had referetea 
to. 

The power of Masonry is waning. 
The cause is moving slowly butsteadily, 
and permanently. Thack God for men 
that will say what they think to be 
right irrespective of popular opinion. 
S. p! Hot. 
NoTB. — The nameless society re- 
ferred 'o in this letter is not known to 
any of the editors of the Cynosure. 

^ 

The Convention of 187.5. 



A friend says: "Let the meeting 
of the National Association be held at 
Lansing, Mich., next year." Are there 
any remarks Irem others on this sub- 
ject. 

We hope the. very best jilace v?ill be 
recommended before the Convention 
assembles at Syracuge. 



Lecture List. 



General Agent and Lecturer, J. P.Stod- 
dard, Christian Cynosure Office, Chicago, 

III. 

State Lecturer for Indiana, J. T.Kiggin?, 
605 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

State Lecturer for V(''isconsin, H. II. Hin- 
man, Ironton, Wis. 

State Lecturer for Ohio, D. Caldwell, 
Carey, O. 

State Lecturer for ISfew York, Z. Weaver, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

I. A. Hart, Wheaton, 111. 

C. A. Blanchard, Wheaton, 111. 
P. Elzea, Wheaton, 111. 

W. A. Wallace, Senccaville, O. 
J. B. Nessell, Ellington, N. Y. 
John Levington, Detroit, Mich. 

D. P. Rathbim, Odessa, N. Y. 
S. Smith, Charles City, Iowa. 
R. B. Taylor, Summerfieid, O. 
L. N. Stratton, Syracuse, N. Y. 
N. Callender, Green Grove, Pa. 
J. H. Timmons, Tarentum, Pa. 
Linus Chittenden, Crystal Lake, 111. 
P. Hurless, Polo, 111. 

J. R. Baird, Greenville, Pa. 

T. B. McCormick, Princeton , Ind. 

C. Wiggins, Angola, Ind. 

J. L. Barlow, Bemus Heights, N. Y. 

E. Johnson, Bourbon, Ind. 

Josiah McCaskey, Fancv Creek, Wis. 
C. F. Hawley, Seneca Falls N. Y. 
Wm. M. Givens, Center Point, Clay Co., 
Ind. 



OUK MAIL. 



ward to the altar and stood up like a 
hero and publicly renouaced the"lodge 
and was received into the church. 
How much better for the man and the 
church is such a course, than the one 
usually pursued by faint-hearted pas 
tors. At this same meeting there was 
two other Freemasons converted. One 



been a member of the society referred 
to for over forty years; "I joined about 
ten years ago and in 187 I becime a full 
member. It has cost me over $200.00 
•so far. At one time I drew $53.00 of 
the society a^ dividend." 
I I was present when this man pre- 
sented himself for membership in the 



of the latter also renounced the lodge [ church, and heard him, through his 



— J. R. Wright, Wales. 111., sends us 
our first list of twenty-five three months 
subscribers with |10. 

John Pike, Snohomish City, Washing- 
ton Territory, w^rites : 

"Y"ou have my sympathj'. Secret soci- 
eties, I believe, are sapping the very foun- 
dations of our free government." 

E. J. Chalfant, Y'ork, Pa., writes : 

"I am to see the Cynosure is to be en- 
larged. I know it will take better and be 
more respected when it is improved as 
you design. So go ahead and we will 
make it paj'. Send me one extra copy for 
a year from this time. 

This style of a letter is just what the 
publishers need to strengthen their faith. 
The last two sentences, "We will make it 
pay,*' and "Send me one extra copy," are 
the words that clinch the nail. 

Rev. E. L. Harris, Delavan, Wis., 
writes: "I am delighted with the idea of 
enlargement. It (T?ie Cynosure) is entirely 
too small for my reading. Forthough I take 
several other papers thej' are all too time- 
serving for me. I should have made an 
effort to raise a list for you, but I have 
been sick for three months. There are a 
number of true friends in this region but 
as they are all under the infiuence of the 
''Let alone policy" ministers and have 
no leader, the cause suffers. Continue to 
shed light on all the dark places in 
church and state and God will bless you." 

A friend in California speaking of the 
grange, says: " Their boastings remind 
me very much of Goliah's, and I think 
they will find that God has his little David 
yet j and with the enemy's own weapon 
will slay him." 



6 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



W. J. Phillip?, Lodi, 111., a recent grad- 
uate of Wheaton College, ■writes : 

"I Nv'ant tlic Cyii sure as loug as I stay 
in Atnericii. I have circulated quite a 
number of tracts tiiis winter, and hope to 
reap some bauefit to the cause berore I 
leave, in the way of new sub.;Ciiberc. ' 

John Baird, Columbus Cit^', Iowa, sends 
the subscriptions of six persons for a j'eor, 
one for six months and one for three 
months, and writes : 

"We are happy to send you so respect- 
able a club list from thi^ region where se- 
cretism hasthe ascendency." We are glad to 
receive this club. This with a few others 
we have received wc trust are only the 
forerunners of a great boat. 

Merchant Kelley, Bentonville, Ind., 
sends four new subscribers, and writes : 

"I assure you I will get as many sub- 
scribers as I can. On my way to the post- 
office I got the two last named." 

He furnishes us a fresh illustratiou of 
the fact that the harvest is plenleous; and 
that laborers who worl< in season and out 
of season will be remembered." 

F. Manter, Wayue, Maine : 
"If the 'woman's work of love' or 'the 
prayer cure' for intemperance succeeds, 
why not inaugurate it for the anti-secret 
cause?" 

He also suggests plans for making the 
Cynosure more valuable which will receive 
our consideration and for which he has 
our thanks. 

Ladies, do not wait to see you are suc- 
cessful in the temperance cause before 
you oppose secret societies. Is not Free- 
masonry acknowledged as a powerful foe 
to the cause of temperance. From our 
standpoint one legitimate way to oppose 
intemperance is to make it unpopular for 
men to take refreshment at night unac- 
companied by their wives or other re- 
spectable ladies in the company of "breth- 
ren" who are known to indulge in the use 
of intoxicating drinks. 

H. M. Dice, Danville, 111., writes : 

"I have been an Odd-fellow of the fifth 
degree and would say that Bernard reveals 
it verbatim as I learned and practiced it 
in the lodge." 

Oliver MacY, West Milton, O. A young 
man writes that he is working in this 
cause, renews his subscription and wishes 
us success in our "labors against the pow. 
ers of darkness." We love to see young 
men in this work. 

T. B. McCormick, Princeton, Ind., sends 
four new subscribers, orders tracts, and 
writes : 

"I am glad to hear that the paper is to 
be enlarged and wish I could do more 
for it." 

S. H. Erwin, Walla Walla, Washington 
Territory, writes us an interesting letter. 
Says that the people there, ministers and 
others, with a few exceptions (he mentions 
Rev. Mr. Fee and Rev. P. B. Chamberlin 
as exceptions) are bound by secret organ- 
izations ; and that the legitimate fruit of 
these societies is seen everywhere. In- 
tense selfishness. The golden rule seems 
to be reversed. 

J. M. Bishop, Cbambersburg, Pa., sends 
ten six months subscribers and writes : 

"Hold on to your faith in Gcd." We 
feel that there is nothing more reliable for 
us to cling to. * 

J. W. Allen, RipoD, Wis., sends for fifty 
cents worth of Cynosures to distribute at 
bis next town meeting. Is not this plan 
worth following at all meetings where 
thinking people assemble. Send for the 
papers as long before hand as is necessary, 
in order to be sure to have them on hand. 

John Glendcnning, Albany, Mo., writes : 

"The Anti-masonic party is increasing 
In numbers and in strong material, gener- 
ally taking a firm stand." 

He says it is an exciting time in Jlissou- 
ri now and he will send us more news 
when things settle a little. Missouri is 
beginning to talk about n State agent; has 
a political. Anti-masonic paper now in the 
field. There is a great work to be done in 
that State. We pray that those mustering 
hosts may be filled with the Spirit of 
Christ, — that perfect reformer, and that 
tlirough him they may gain a glorious vic- 
tory. 




flucneed (x<;vcrumeiits. 



SOLCMOI^ SOUTUWICK, 18-8. 



Time would fail mo, were 1 equal to 
the task, to trace the progress of eecret 
secieties from the plains of Egypt, 
Judca and Paleistiuc, through the Gre- 
cian and Roman republics and empires; 
and to depict in their true color-, the 
evils T?hich liave invariably fl:wed from 
those dark and corrupt sources. Nor 
can I for the same reason, though the 
theme well suit the occasion, pursue 
the entire thread of such combinations 
in modern Europe. Bat there is one 
fact in history, which is too striking, 
and too full of instruction, to be over- 
looked. Whilit Freemafjonry has ever 
been the most dangerouB, the most 
pernicious of them all, it has attracted 
the least suspicion, and excited the least 
alarm, on the part of either the govern- 
ments or the people of any n.^tion. 

The Gahal and the Star Chamber of 
EnslaEd, whose proceedings wera con- 
ducted in secret, and whose oppressive 
acd pernicious infiueuce was wide and 
deeply felt, soon roused into action the 
free Bpirit of our British ancestor^, and 
could not withstand the current of pop- 
ular indignation. 

The Spanish InguisitioTt, it is true, 
has had a longer reisjn, bat has not 
been less an object of j'^alousy and o^ 
hatred on the psrL of a large portion of 
those states in which it has exercised 
its authcrity. Between this dark and 
tyrannical conclave, and that of Freema- 
Eonry, there has been a perpetual war 
upon the vulgar maxim, I presume, 
that tv?o of a trade can never agree. 
The High Priest of the Inquisitior? 
surrounded by his sack and daggers ; and 
the Great, Grand High Priest of the 
Black Bannered Fraternity, with Holi- 
ness to the Lord inscribed on his mitre, 
and vENGEAKCE emblazoned on his 
breasf-plate, have long been rivals in 
the trade of trick and deception ; have 
louf^ contended in the dark for the 
supremacy of the European Slates; 
have long ran the race of iniqiuity in 
the fields of pic us fraud and midnight 
conspiracy; and whichever of them 
may finally triumph on foreign ground, 
may the Lord, of his infinite mercy, 
preserve our beloved country from the 
fangs of either. 

The llluminati of Germany, and its 
next of kin, the Jaoohin societies of 
France, were the sources of wide-spread 
iniquity and corruption, and these (c- 
gethcr,by finally leaguing with Masonry 
reached the ne plus idlra of turpitude 
*nd crime, treason and murder not ex- 
cepted, brought one of the mildest and 
most virtuous of princes that the annals 
of monarchy had ever known to the 
guillotine, and gave to atheism, anarchy 
and confusion the reins of empire, and 
the plenlitude of mad misrule, and 
malignant and despotic power. But 
for the malign icfl'.ierc:i of t'lese dark 
and mysleriouG combinalionp, France, 
instead of becoming an aceldema — in- 
stead of seeing her fields blighted by 
carnage, the streets of her cities run- 
ni'iEC with blood, and the vultures prey- 



ing upon the flesh of her uabutiod 
dead — instead of seeing the return of 
her ancient monarchy in its most rigid 
forms, might at this day, perhaps, have 
enjoyed the mild eway of a reformed 
government, — a government limiLed in 
its power by the acknowledged sover- 
eignty of the people, and restrained 
by constitutional prefcriptions from 
overleaping the bounds of justice, equi- 
ty and moderation. 

Let us now revert to certain periods 
in our own history, and inquire into the 
temper and disposition with which cer- 
tain societies, plans and propositions, 
not Masonic, but supposed to have been 
pregnant with secrecy and design, have 
been received among us. 

The first society which created suspi- 
cion or alarm as to its supposed secret 
and dangerous design?, was that tvhich 
sprung up at the close of the Revolu- 
tion, composed of oflScera of the Revo- 
lutionary army, and called by its 
founders the Order of Cincinnati, No 
sooner was the society announced than 
the minds of many were agitated with 
fears and suspicions that it aimed at the 
creation of a nobility, the establishment 
of a government founded on the ine- 
quality of m.iakind, and subversive of 
that liberty (or which the Revolution 
was entered into. In vain did the 
advocates of this military combination 
or order appeal to the people for the 
purUy of their motives and the propri- 
ety of their designs; in vain did they 
disown the principles imputed to them; 
in vain did they protest that their only 
object was to brighten and strengthen 
the chain of friendship, to cement the 
bonds of brotherhood formed amid the 
toils and dangers of the revolution. 
For the jealousy of freemen, once 
aroused, is not to be allayed but by the 
clearest explanations or the entire ex- 
tinction of the exciting cause. On this 
occasion it was not allayed, although 
laurel-crowned warriors and popular 
orators and favorites came forward to 
explain and defend the motives and the 
aim of the Cincinnati. On the ground 
of their merits the most eloquent ap- 
peals were made to. the people. They 
were justly represented as the gallant 
military leaders of the Revolution. 
Their swords had gleamed in battle from 
a hundred hills, and es many valleys 
had resounded with their shouts of vic- 
tory or death — death or liberty ! The 
dungeons of the Sugar House and of 
Old Jersey Frisonship had echoed and 
re-echoed to their groans when opprese- 
ed by hunger, thirst, disease and the 
pestiferous effluvia of a confined atmos- 
phere. The frozen plains of Abraham, 
and the burning sands cf Monmouth, 
had drank their blood, freely and pro- 
fusely shed to secure the libertieR cf 
their country. Such were their perils, 
their sufferings and their services, and 
what was their character? It was that 
of highminded honorable men. They 
were not, it is true, the Washingtons, 
for we have never had — wc never can 
have — but one Washington; yet he, 
the matchless hero and sage, was among 
them; he was their leader; following 
in his train as the members of this 
heroic band were such men as Green, 
Gates, Pinckney and Hamilton, men 
without fear and without reproach. 



And yet sii:h men were not to be im- 
plicitiy trusted by enlightened freemen. 
Virtuous precaution, as well as green- 
eyed jealousy, imputed eecret designs 
of a baneful terdcncy to their aBsocia- 
tion. The cry of Aristocracy, Nobility, 
Military Uiurnaticn and Monarchy was 
raised against them. Nor. I repeat it, 
was this clamor confined to the illiter- 
ate multitude or to the unprincipled 
and selfish demagogues, but it came 
froia the lips of the virtuous and ven- 
erable sages, and the pens of more 
than one such were employed in por- 
traying the anticipated evils of this new- 
born and courtly Order. Among oth- 
ers, the eloqxient Edanus Burke, of 
South Carolina, a dietiiigushed actor in 
the Revolution, pronounced it "tho 
modern Pandora," the * ' Hydra-headed 
monfter" and likened it to the famous 
Trojan Horse, from whose bowels were 
to issue the myrmidons of tyranny 
and despotism, ready armed to seize 
upon tho citadel of our liberties and 
trample in the dust the glorious fruits 
of the R3volution. The blaze of his 
eloquence scorched and nipped in the 
bud this military combination, and from 
the day of its birth to the present time 
it has been withering in the shade of 
popular neglect. It is now rarely heard 
of, although the probability is that the 
fears of Mr, Burke and his cc-patriots 
were extravagant if not groundless. 
KesoiutiOKS of a Baptist Council. 



We have received an account of the 
doings of a council composed of minis- 
ters and delegates from the Baptist 
churches in Malone, Jay, Essex and 
Georgia, Yt,, held at Plattshurgh, N. 
y., March, 1831; Elder S. Marshall, of 
Malone, chairman, and Elder Joel Peek 
of Jay, scribe. This council was called 
at the request of brethren of the 
church in Plattsburgh, aggrieved on 
the subject of Freem-asonry, who had 
seceded from Elder Turner and the 
msjority of the church. The following 
were the resolutions passed in reference 
to the subject of Freemasonry: 

Resolved, That we consider specula- 
tive Freemasonry a wicked and corrupt 
institution, opposed to the genius of 
the gospel and condemned by the Word 
of God. 

JResfilved, That, in our judgment, it 
is the duty of every Freemason who is 
a member of the church, to renounce 
all connection with the institution and 
no longer consider himself bound by its 
laws, customs, cblg^ticns or usages, 
and that he give satisfactory evidence 
of the same to the church; and thafin 
case he will not do this he forfeits hia 
standing in the church. 

Resolved, That we consider the griev' 
ed brethren and sisters who called this 
council, and all other grieved members 
of the other party who fellowship the 
doings of this council on Gospel grounds ; 
and ES such, we feel in duty bound to 
fellowship them as the Baptist Church 
of Christ in Plattsburgh. — Vermont 
Telegraph. 



Most Christians keep th ir religion 
in a lump, laid by for great extremities. 
Spread it! My brethren, spread it! 
Take care of tho small occasions, and 
the greater ones will take care of 
♦hemselves. 






. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



The Misdirection of a Soul, 



Robert Barns is the greatest of Scot- 
tisii poets. His genius and perfect 
naturalness are a never-faiiia^ charm. 
There is a fact in his history, recently 
stated by one of his couRlrj'ti greatest 
pulpit orators, which expkins what 
else would be difficult to un 'erstand. 
He was piously educated, and through 
all his life had great respect for relish- 
ion. 

Before his fame as a poet had arous- 
ed the enthusiasm of his countrymen, 
while he was quite a young man, his 
principal and only pleasurable ejKploy- 
inent was, to U';c his own words^ "look- 
ing backwards and forwards in a moral 
and religious way." He lived to walk 
alone upon the hilis, and muse upon 
his destiny amid the sublimity of light- 
ning and storm. The description given 
of the heavenly state in the last three 
verses of the seventh chapter of Uevc- 
ktion, acted upon him like the harp- 
ings of eternity. Urged by consciencej 
touched with fire of truth, he went far 
counsel to a neighboring clergyman, 
who proved himself to be a careless as 
well as a free-thinkiusc shepherd of 
souls. He could not understand his 
case, eo he counseled him to dismiss 
auch gloamy though tSj to dance and 
mingle in gay society, as the best cor- 
rective of his despondency. His seri- 
ous redections vanished, and he was 
lost to rehgioa and to Crod. 

Here was a loss more fatal than a 
train of cars throv?n off the track by a 
wrong switch ; or than if some Great 
Eastern had been wrecked by follow- 
ing false lights on the Irish'coast. A 
greater than Cowpsr or Montgomery, 
in the line of poetry, was made a bale- 
ful star in the intellectual constellation, 
and when, as one of the Srst magnitude, 
he might have guided countless souls 
to Christ, he became but the illumina- 
tor of conviviality and dissipation ; and 
after a few fitful years, went dcwa to 
the grave a disappointed man, with a 
ruined constitution. 

Christian, ii the Pilgrim's Progress, 
was exposed to a similar danger. When 
inquiring the way to the Celestial City, 
he was met by Mr, Worldly-wiseman, 
who nearly accomplished his ruin un- 
der the burning mountain to which he 
directed him, When the soul comes 
to a crisis in its history, as most souls 
do, it seeks some friendly evangelist 
to couQsei it safely. When an immor- 
tal beino; stands at the junction of two 
roads, the one leading to heaven and 
the other to hell, and is in doubt as to 
which he should take, and yet desires 
to follow the right, the wrong counsel- 
or assumes fearful responsibility. The 
misdirected soul may retort to the ' au- 
thor of his ruin, ''I inquired of you the 
way to life, and you turned me into the 
road of death !" — Selected. 



Dr. David Livingstone. 



This distinguished missionary explor- 
er died in Lobisa, in the interior of Af- 
rica, in August last. His explorations 
had led him into marshes, ia crossing 
which he had been obliged to wade, 
with the water at one time for three 
hours above his waist. Ten of his 



pariy died through these exposures. 

Dr. Livingstone was born at Blan- 
tyre, near Glasgow, Scotland, in the 
year ISlV. His parents were in hum- 
ble circumstances. Of his father he 
says : -'He was too conscientious ever 
to become rich, but by his kindness of 
manner and winning ways he made the 
hearlstrings oihis children twine around 
him as firmly as if he had possessed and 
could bestow upon them every advan- 
tage." * 

David was obliged at an early ago to 
eara his own support by work in the 
cotton mills of Blan tyre. But even at 
that time be v/as possessed with a gen- 
uine love of learning. By hard labor 
he purchased the means of satisfying 
his menial appetite, pursuing his stud- 
ies at Glasgow .during the winter 
months, and resuming operations in the 
mills during vacations. We have heard 
from the lips of an old Scotchwoman 
how she Lad seen him reading from 
hia hook as he followed the motions of 
the spinning " mule." 

As he grew to manhcod he deter- 
mined to devote himself to the missionary 
work. He acquired a medic il educa- 
tion, and attended one or two courses 
of theological lectures; and in 1840 
was ordained as a medical missionary 
under the auspices of the London Mis- 
sionary Society. 

He soon 1-ft England for Port Natal. 
There he met with his distinguished 
countryman, the missionary Moffat, 
whose daughter, after a few years, be- 
came LiviEg5tone's wife, and accampa- 
nied him in some of his subsequent ex- 
ploring tours, dying in 1862 of fever 
coutrscted on a journey. 

After Studying the language for two 
years, in 1843 he founded a missiohary 
station at Mabosta. At this place, and 
a station fifty miles north of it, be 
labored for the next six yefir3. He 
afterwards was stationed at Kuruman, 
making, however, many journeys of 
exploratif n. 

In 1856 he returned to England, 
having added to patient and successful 
missionary labor geographical discover- 
ies of great interest and value. 

After publishing his "' Missionary 
Travels and Researches in South Afri- 
ca," he returned to his field of labor 
and exploration in 1858, conducting 
an expedition up the Zimbesi. 

In 1864 he returned to hia native 
country for the last time, and 1865 
found him back in Africa ready to con- 
tinue his explorations of the interior. 
He has been hidden in the wilds cf that 
country ever since. 

His contributions to geographical 
knowledge have been extensive. And 
he has shown to a utilitarian age the 
sp'clac'e cf a man, for humanity's sake 
and for Christ's sake, pushing into un- 
traveled regions, undergoing great 
hardships, and at last meeting his death, 
that he might open up a dark continent 
to the light of the gospel. 

''I view the end of the geographical 
feat," he says, '* as the beginning of 
the missionary enterprise. I take the 
latter term in its most extended signifi- 
cation, and include every effjrt made 
for the amelioration of our race, the 
promotion of all those means by which 
God in his providence is working, and 
bringing all his dealings with man to a 
srloriouH coosymmation. " — £Jx. 



^||i(ilwtt'^ ^m\t(, 



''Look iitffoie ytm Leap." 

Mauy little folks are apt 

To get a hearty thump, 
Eeoanse they do not look before — 

Tliey take the fiual jump. 
Closo hOBide the stony \vall, 

The thorns and briers creep: 
£o 'lis always safe and best — 

To look Def ore you leap. 
V/hen entering life's rugged road. 

Be sure aright to start: 
In paths of virtue ever go^— 

And never from them part. 

— Selected. 



Tltc Promise, 



In the winter, on a very rilippery 
day, a boy wan helping an aged lady 
dofrn s.ome slept:. 

* 'Aren't you afraid of falling down," 
said he? 

' -No , dear, " said the old kdy ; "I'm 
as careful as I can be; and there's a 
piotnise in the Bible that helps rse : 
'He keepeth all his bones; not one of 
them is broken.'" 

"He didn't keep roiae," said the boy ; 
I fell down once, and broke my leg." 

''Perhaps that was bec:>U33 yoti 
did't ask Him, my dean Suppose Mr, 
Broyyn should promise in the newspa- 
per to-morrow that he would . give a 
su't of clothes to every child in New 
York. Now, if you just read the prom- 
ise and go about your play, and don't 
think any more about it, it vfon't do 
you a big of good. But if you go to 
his store and s:?.y: 'Mr. Brown, you 
promised a suit of clothes to every 
child in New York; plea?e give me 
mine;' that would be truBting his 
promise. And tb.?.l's the way we must 
trust Gdi's promise. Try thera, and 
be sure that in some way he will more 
than fulfill them." 



''Are you sick?'' For mothers, you 
know, seem to sleep with one eye and 
ear opep, especially when the fathers 
are away, a-s Georgfe's f?lher wa?. 

'•D^ar mother, ' he caidj, knaeling at 
her bediidc, "I could eo^. sleep for 
thinking of my r:iia words to you. 
Forgive me, mother, ray dear ruother, 
and may Gol help mj n^^vcr to behavfj 
gO Rgaio I"' 

She clssped the peaitent boy in hir 
arms and kissed hi', warm check. 
George is a big man n:jw, but he says 
that was the sweetest moment of hi'; 
life. His strong, healtay, impetuous 
nature became tempered by a gsnll,-- 
ness of spirit. It softened its roui^li- 
nes3, sweetened his temper, and helped 
him on to a true and noble Christi-'in 
manhood. 
I Boys are eometimes ashamtd lo act 
j out their best feelings. 0. if they only 
knew what a loss itia to them not to do 
I so! — Mother's Mago?:ine. 



Tljat Kiss of ray Motiier. 

George Brown wanted to go some 
where, and h's mother was not willing. 
He tried to argue the matter. When 
that would not do,msteiid of saying, "I 
should really like to go, but if you 
cannot give your consent, dear mother, 
I Tviil trj' to be content to stay," he 
spoke roughly, and went off slamming 
the door behind him. Too many boys 
do EO, George was fourteen, and 
with his fourteen years' experience of 
one of the best of mothers one would 
have thought better of him. "B:jt he 
was only a boy. What can you ex- 
pect of boys?" Sj say some people. 

Stop I hear mora. That night GcOrge 
found thorns in hia pillow. He could 
not fix it in anyway to go to sleep on. 
He turned and tojsed, and he shook 
and patted it; but not a wink of sleep 
for him. The thorns kept pricking. 
They were the angry words he spoke 
to his mother. "My dear mother, 
who deserves nothing but kindness, 
and love, and obedience from me," he 
said to himself. "I never do enough for 
her; yet how have I behaved ? her old- 
est boy ! How tenderly she nursed 
me through that fever!'* 

These unhappy thoughts quite over- 
came him. He would ask her to for- 
give him in the morning. But suppose 
soraeth'ug sliould happen before morn- 
ing? He would a;-;k her now, to-night, 
this moment George crept out of bed, 
and went softly to his mother's room. 

''George," she said, "Is that you?" 



Bad Wag'es. 



''1 have left my p'acfj, mother," said 
a poor boy one day vvhen he returned 
from bis work. 

''Why have you left?" said the moth- 
er, "was your master unkicd to you?' 

"No, mother, he v7aR kind esough," 
said the bey. 

"Didn't you like the work?" asked 
the mother. 

"It was the wages I did'atlike," said 
the boy solemnly. "My master wanted 
me to sin, and the wai;ea cf sin is 
death." 

His master had expected him to lie 
about the goods, and deceive and cheat 
the customers ; but the boy said— - 

"No, sir. I can't do such things; I 
will leave your service first." And he 
did leave it; and he was rightabout it 
'00. Sucli boys will make mothers' 
hearts glad, and will find that the Lord 
takes care of those who trust in him 
and will not work for Satan, nor earn 
the wages of sin. 

Such trials do the faithful good. It 
may seem hard to suffer because we will 
not sin , but the rough sea mr.kes the 
sailor, tbe hot furnace makes the pure 
gold, the strongest faith comes from the 
hardest trials, and they wbo suffer for 
Chri.?l's and conscience' sake shall be 
blessed 'nere and crowned with joy 
hereafter. — Little Christian. 



BsTTER THAN GoLD. — We ofica hear 
little boys telling of the wonders they 
will do wh'^n they grow to be men. 
They are looking and longing for the 
time when they shall be large enougli 
to carry a cane and wear a tall hat ; 
and not one of them will say that ho 
expects to be a poor man, but they 
every one intend to be rich. Now, 
money is very good ia its place; but 
let me tell you, httle boyr, what is a 
great deal better than money, and what 
you may be earning all the time you 
are waiting to grow large enough to earn 
a fortune. 'The Bible tells us that "a good 
name is rather to be chosen than great 
riches, and lovJDg favor rather than sil- 
ver and gold." A good name does 
not mean a name for being the richest 
man in town, cr for owning tbe largest 
house, A (^oocZname is a name for do- 
ing good deeds; a name for wealing a 
pleasant face and carrying a cheerful 
hearf.; for always doing right no mat- 
ter what the conseque * ■'^^ may be, 




THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



rian lady of 
in one day nine 



rammers 25 cent? 
carls 35 cents. 



to be 
paviors 35 cents, and iiorssg and 



wealth and position had prayed ftctive and the judge on this pretext ordered the jury 
times in public, and a Methodist I to bring ia a verdict of "not guilty.'' As this will 
riend remarked to her, Hubsequoufly, thai; she would; prevent another indictment for the same crime, there 
The Mennonites of the United States and Can-|expect hereafter to hear her vo'ce in the social prayer-! is a j.jst iDgdignaiion thro-ugliout the country, 
ada have raised §20,000 to aid their Russian bretliren ^ oioeting. _^^^ ^^.^ ^^^.^^ ^^ Susquehanna depot is settled, 

in their proposed .migration to this country. —The Bishop of Manchester having-, at the Church j aud trains having been running regularly several 

—The success of Mr. Moody's labors in GUsgow Congress, expressed his astoaishment that in the dayr, about 500 hands weie re-smployed. 
does not .bate, .ow having progressed several weeks, jjajs of Christ '|the poor ^^f^^^J^^l _.The Brooklyn Board of City Works have decided 
'nd :idclr ' " '""' " '"^^""^iLrTelp^Idrt of the J/Tir)^^^^ engage hereafter its employees by the hour. The 

ana wiacnmg. , ^.^^ ^^ ^^^ difficulty, and say-: "I could not but P^J ^^ laborers is to be fixed at 15 cents an hour, 

—The Observer says that an Association of ihirtj i ^^jj^er as I listened to him that he did not under- 
Baptist clorgymen and a large number ol laymen have j.^j^^^^^j^y ^l^jg ^.^g^ The poos heard Christ gladly 
been formed with Its headquarters 111 Brooklyn, N.Y.,,j^g„j^^gg jjg„Q(jgj.3fQ^^j ^^g^_ He lived among them. , ^-Attorney General Dimmick, of Pennsylvania 

He knew what it was to be hungry and to have ac-' decided that Good Friday was a legal holiday in that 
where to lay his head, and therefore was able to eym- c , j 

.L- -L-L. J.1 ■ i i- J J • 1 ni • loiate, and 

pathize with the poor in tempatioiis and ttials. ChriPii 

gave up hiB glory to save man. And if English bish- 
ness alltiour/n iiKe mm, an unuenommanunai your- ops really want to reach the great masses of the poor. 
nal. ' It wilf bo printed in German and its support- they must copy somewhat Christ's example." 
ers will probably be largely among the Lutherans, j .-Another name is added 1o the consecrated band 

The Plymouth Congregational Church of this city I of lay workers like Moody and Burnell. Major D 

are discussing plana for a new building. The church !W. Whittle has given up hia business and devoted 
edifice formerly occupied was sold after the great fire! himself wholly to the greatest and nobhest of labors, 
to the Roman Catholic Bishop Fohy, and is now St. j the salvation of imm^rtil souls. On the 1st of April 



"to promote freedom of conscience, and the right to 
open communion." 

— Another religious daily journal ha9 been started 
in New York. It will not comp'-te with the Wit- 
although like that, an undenominational jour- 



oa April 4th business was suspended 
genr'rally on that day in Philadelphia. The same 
rule was popularly regarded in New York, and Wall 
street was nearly deserted. 

— A snow storm passed over Iowa, Illinois, Indi- 
ana, and into Canada on the 5th. In several places 
near the centre of Illinoia and Indiana, it was the 
most severe of the season, snow falling six, seven, and 



Mary'8 Cathedral. j he resigned his plice as general agent of the Elgin' ^'"^^° ^^^'^^ inches. 

„, . -. XL D • 1 • rni 1 . J National Watch Co., and a talary of 85,000 a year, i — Boston Auril 6th —The eleventh hallnt tii- a 

-The anniversary of the Presoyterian Theological | p^^, p_ p_ gliss has also resigned his (-- - -~ ^ 

ster of the Firet Congregational Church 
! perintendent of its Sabbath-school, one of the larg- 



SeminaryofChicago,washeldonThursday kst. Twe^l^J: J-^P^,,^-,^:^^^^^ States Senator was taken to-day in the Legis- 



ty-nine students have been in attendance during the year i 



j._ lature, with the following result: Whole number. 



and six graduated. The aggregate receipts for the year- j^ ^j^^ ^j^^^^^^^j ^^^^^ to a choice, 98; Dawes had 67; 

have been ^33,111.87, and Elder C. E. Spring has! ,, :,-d \^ ./. _. ,,. 



secured $20,000 in subscriptions for addiiional build- 
ings. 

A church is being built by the Anti-masonic mem- 

bersof the Methodist chuich of Marengo, lil., in wh'ch 

Rev. Mr. Fanning is expected to preach 

ber bears about one-fourth of the cost. 

who takes Mr. Fanniog's pulpit in Woodstock is said 

to be a high Msson. I 

— Edward N. Kirk, D. D., pastor of Mount Ver-| 
non Congregationalist Church, Boston, died suddenly; 
on Wednesday, April 8 tb. He was president of the; 



meetiogs with the power of song; as Mr, 
helping Moody in Scotland. What a commentr.- 
ly is it upon our clergy when the Lord tlius thrusts 
jut men into hia vineyard, and what a rebake to the 
mercenary motives which, it is too often and too well 
Gae mem ; known, actuate them ! 
Mr. Boring 



'^i|W$ 4 ikt fu\. 



Sankey is Hosr, 67; Curtip, 53; Adams, 7; Banks, 6, and 
Washburn, Whittier, Phillips, and Pierce received 1 
yote each . 

— The Connecticut State election on Tuesday, 
iresiilted in the election of Ingersoll, Democrat, by 
several thousand majority ; both houses of Legislature 
are Democratic. 



The City, — '^^® Rhode Island State election took place on 

the 1st, There were no Democratic nominations for 

—The Baptist Council on the case of Rev. Florence | state offisers, and the vote was light. Henry Howsrd 
McCarthy closed last week with the decision that thei^^^^ re-elected Governor by a majority of 12,269. 



American Missionary Association and was officially con- 
nected with many other religious, educational and be- S hand of fellowship should be withdrawn, and thel , . . t- 

■ - - r-' Union Park Baptist Church were recommended to ^^^'"'^^ C. \ an Zandt was elected Lieutenant Gov- 



nevolent societies, and his death will be very gener- 



ally felt and mourned by the religious community, 

— A lady wrili 
tion, says that many 

miles on Sunday to attend church, and a more atten 
tive and devout congregation cannot be found in any 
civilized community. In prayer they are very earnest 
and display none of the hesitation and backwardness 
which may sometimes be witnessed among the 
white race. 

— The statistics of the Moravian Mission for 1873 
shows 90 mission stations, of which 74 are in America, 
12 in Africa, 2 in Asia and 2 in Australia. The mis- 
sionaries numbered 322, including mis^ioaaries^ wives 
and agents. They have also 1,533 native helpers, 
21,969 communicants in the territory supplied by 
mission labor. The total receipts of the Board for the 
year amounted to $99, COO. 

-Dr. Schaufflir, of the A. B. C. F. M,, writes 
that at length a Bohemian service in cjnnection with 
the mission in Prague has been arranged, and that on 



vote 7,679 to 6,512 for Wm, F. Sayles, 
candidate. The Legislature is Republi- 



Baptist 
dissolve relations with him. The decision is probably I eraor by a 
J. o • • XT u just, but various irregularities in obtaining it create i Prohibition 

og from Sapm, Nesperces Reserva- ^ ' ^hy for McCartny. Mr, Gordon, of^he Wes-' ,^ 
,ny of the Indians travel ten or twelve ^^^n Avenue Church l4 resigned peremptorily be- °'''- 

cause of the difiFerence of his views from those of hiel —The Suez canal appears to be doing a good busi- 
people. Rev. Mr. Ravelin of Temple Baptist Church jness. During the month of January, 111 vessels 
criticised the action of the Council severely in a late [ passed through, paying tolls to the amount of $438,000. 
sermon. McCarthy himself proposes to start an in-' 
dependent church, in which, he told a reporter, the 
sine qua non for membership would he regular con- 
tributions. 

Congress. 



— The tax-gatherer Sanborn is now before the House 
committee cf Ways and Means and is explaining that 
interesting business?, 

— The House Committee on War Claims has agreed 
to allow the claims reported by the Southern Claims 
Commission. They amounted to between 
and $700,000, 



— Low as government authority has sunk in Mex- 
ico, such an outrage as that committed by the Catholics 
upon the missionary Stevens cannot escape punish- 
ment. The priest who prompted the murder is on 
trial for his life, and six of the mob that did the work 
have been condemned to death. 



Foreign. 



—The Senate finally disposed of the finance question 

Sabbath Dec,7th,a°chapel for this service was opened; on Monday by adopting the inflation measure. The 
for the first time. The chapel is a few rods from j House has yet to adopt the bill as amended by the 



the spot where, four hundred and sixty years ago, 
John Huss lived and preached, 

— A new religion has sprung up in Persia, known 
as the "Zurdani." Its followers believe in no proph- 
et, but only worship the Almighty, with no religious 
ceremonies. The principal doctrines are praise of 
the Supreme Being, truth and virtue. It is opposed 
greatly by the followers of the Moslem faith, 

— The Third Presbyterian Church of Chicago which 
has for many years worshiped in a fine large church 
on Washington and Carpenter streets, is now agitat. 
ing the question of-yemoval south-westerly to a more 
central location with respects to its members. The 
pastor. Dr. Kittredge, has been with the church three 
or four years, and in that time the congregation has 
increased by about 900. 



Senate, which it will not be slow to do; and only the 
President's veto is now considered in the way. Of 
this there is slight hope. The most influential and 



-Roohefort, a daring Communist editor of Paris, 
,000 ' who was transported to the French penal colony of 
New Caledonia, has escaped in a small boat, with 
several companions, and is on his way to New York. 
— A dispatch from Calcutta, April 4th, says that 
the condition of the famine stricken districts is gradu- 
ally improving. Over 500,000 persons in the north- 
western portion of Tlshart are still dependent upon 



able members of the Senate, irrespective of party, government aid ; the spring crop except in that prov- 

rose as the final vote was about to be taken and pro- ." . , 

tested against the act, but a headlong majority, led by ^ 

Morton and Logan carried their end. This act author > — Under date cf March 25, President Gonzales, of 

izes increasing the greenback currency 144,000,000, the Dominican Republic, announces the failure of the 

and a further increase of $40,000,000 by the National g^^^^^ j^^^ Company to comply with the terms of 

its lease, requiring pre-payment of the rental, $650,- 



banks. 



The Country. 



000, to the Dominican Government, and the conse- 
quent lapse of all privileges and right granted to the 
Company. 
— The Carlists claim that owing to a revolt in their 



—Gov. Dix has declined to interfere in the case of 
Lowenstein, and the culprit will be hanged on the 
10th of April. ' | 

j — Union College, Schenectady, N, Y. , has just re- i ranks only half of their forces have been engaged in 
iceived from a friend the generdus gift of $50,000, to the recent battles before Bilbao. It is reported that 
—Minnesota has 182 Baptist churches, with 5,987 be made immediately available for educational pw- Qgj,gj.,,i g^^t^g ^j,l al^o^tl arch upon Madrid and 
members. There are eight associations. The mem- poses. ^ oci , ■ j.- * «: • i j- ^ t. 

. r ,• I,- A • n cut cfl Serrano s communications. An ofncisl dispatch 

bers are of many nationalities — American, German, a ^win^lor K,r r^nrpaontJnr- liimoolf .»« « wlmlp 1,. 

French Scandinavian Danish African Thev have , ,^^'°°^^Vy '^^P'^^^®"*'"^ T 7^ • from Serrano's headquarters states that 410 officers 

irencn, ocauGinavian, j^anisn, Airican. iney nave g^j^ g^jj^j. ^q the country merchants, succeeded in , , , ; ,. ^ ,o x . j 

cheating several Cincinnati merchants out of $100,000, 
and has escaped. 



only fifty-six houses of worship, but are building twen- 
ty more. There are 120 ordained ministers in the 
State, but not so many in active service. There are 
forty -eight young men just entering the ministry. 

— An incidental, but useful result of the women's 
temperance reform is that it is teaching the women 



— The trial of Sanborn and others on conspiracy to 
defraud the Revenue department came oflfin Brooklyn 
last week, before Judge Benedict. The counsel for 



how to pray in public, A eonservative Presbyte [defendant made the plea that the indictment was de- 



and men have deserted from General Santos' command 
and come into the Republican lines. Up to the 3d 
inst, there had been no fighting for a week. Both 
sides are strengthening their positions at Abanto. It 
is reported that a force of 600 Republicans were sur- 
prised and captured at Calaf. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



13 



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llEIiiWO 



ADVERSE TO CHRISTIANITY, 

And Inimical to a Republican Government 

BtBEV. LEBBEDS ARMSTRONG, 

(Presbyterian,) 

A Seceding Mason of 21 degrees. 

This Is a very telling work an no hon- 
est man that reads it will think of Joining 
the Lodge. 

PRICE, ao ots, Each $1 75 per doz. 
Post Paid. 



RUM AND TOBACCe. 



Last yCcir England coUected ;ii,000,000 pounds sterling, 
near $1 VO, 000,000, reveinie on tobacco and spirituous liquors, i 
ail enormous but iiuprotitablc revenue, for it is the price of I 
human lives. 

It is currently reported that a Chicago widow, who hasj 



i that the patronage of professedly Christian peoj)le supports 

I this system of Saboath desecration. 

When George the Third came to the throne in iTtiO the 
national debt of England was £130,000,000. The Ameri- 
can war raised it to £260,000,000. The insensate warfare 
against the French revolution made it £570,000,000, and by 



. ,, ,,11,,. 1 i i^li6 time Napoleon was safely landed in St. Helena the debi 

an income of 1100,000, was taken dead drunk ironi the gut- 1 * j * xi ■ • .i ,• ro^. -«Ar,nnn r, 

' ' ^ i amounted to the inconceivable sum ot Z86y,000,000. It 

ter lately, elegantly dressed and diamond bedecked. 



A signilicant commentary on President Grant's extravagant 
use of cigars is his portrait on the internal revenue stamps 



blood, proportion. Gardening near any Southern city is generally 
-Judge j ygj-y lucrative. 



may be safely asserted that every guinea of this debt was 
unnecessary. — James Farton. 

— It is estimated in N©av Orleans that 250,000 bale.s of 
affi.xed to tobacco packages. Vvhat a shock to American ! j^^.^ ^^^^ ^^-^y^^^ yg^^,^^ g^,,^ ^^ from $20 to 50 a ton; 
honor should a cut of Washington or Lincoln be put to hke, ^^^j^ ^,j ^^^ ^,^,-^^^^^^ ^ome Iroixi the Noithwest; potatoes 

^^^' ' {are 84 to 8G a barrel; sweet potatoes ean h^^rdly be had Pt 

To make or sell ardent spirits for common use is as wicked 1^^^ p^j^^. g^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^. ^^^ everything else in 
as to make and sell poisons for the same purpose, 
of murdered eouIs will be recjuircd at their hands 
Baijgat. i English taxpayers have some pretty little bills to pay for 

A saloonist attempted to bluff a woman of Dayton with | t^g pleasure of witnessing the farce known as the Tichborne 
the challenge: "Madam, Christ drank wine, why can't | trial. Mr. Hawkins, who is assisting the Crown officers in 
wcV Instantly the reply was given: ''Yes, sir: and if , the prosecution, received a retainer of $5,000, and has $250 
you will sell wine made from water you may do so." Bick-ipcr day for his services. Mr. Parry, another lawyer on the 
ham gives tlie moral: "Don't quote Scripture to those! same side, had a retainer of $3,750, and gets $150*per day. 
women." Three junior counsel had retainers of $1,000 each, and get 

The Kentucky Legiskture has passed a "local option" 150 each per day. The total cost of the trial to the govern- 
liquor law, providing that twenty voters in any township may ment up to the present time is nearly $2,500,000,000. 
call for a popular vote on the question, and if a majority so; The Chicago Tfihune shows that the logic of facta and 
decide, the sale of liquor in the township shall be prohibited. | gj^j^jg^j^g ;g opposed to Republicanism in Spain, Educa- 

It is a well-authenticated fact that in Scotland, during theUion, the foundation of self-government, is wanting. The 
ten years preceding the passing of the Forbes-Mackenzie | (vfficial statistics shoT? that Spain contains an aggregate 
Act, the quantity of British spirits consumed was 66,000,000 I population of L"), 073,070 sonls, of whom 11,837,391 can 

neither read nor write; 705, 708 can read but cannot write; 
and only a little over 3,000,000 can read and write. There 
are 42'2 Juiticea of the Peace who can neither read or 

There is shaking among the dry bones that are habitually; write; and 711,119 Aldermen and 12,479 memberi of 
moistened with wine. Yesterday a case came before one of i Town Councils who are unable to s'gn their own names. 
the courts which turned upon the genuineness of a favorite j In euch circamstaEces as these, aside from the natural hot- 
brand of wine. What do you suppose the Sherry drank injheadedneBB and blood-thirstiness of the Spaniard, a Repub- 



galloiis; in the ten years which succeeded the passing of the 
act, the quantity consumed v,-as 51,000,000 gallons. — London 
Primitive Mtihodist. . 



the country is made of? Read, ye wine drinkers: "An 
analysis of a ''standard" brand showed that it was compos 



lie in Spain is at least an improbability. 

According to the recent census the inhabitants of Csylon 



ed of forty gallons of potato spirit, iifty-si.x gallons of water, [ number 2,500,000, and are distributed, according to their 
four gallons of capillaire, and ten gallons of grape juice. The j religious belief, as follows: Buddhist, 1,520,575; Sivite, 
delectable mixture makes forty dozen quarts, which sells in I 464 ^414; R-man Catholic, 182,613; Mohammedan, 
the market at $38 per dozen. Rather a profitable business 171^542; Protestant, 24,756; Wesleyan, 6,071; Presby- 



for everybody, except the consumers — they need stomachs 
olass-Uued and backed with fire-brick. The fact is, but httle 
actual wine is imported. The Sherries are adulterated with 
sulphuric acid, and strengthened with alcohol, the Cham- 
pagnes are made of cider and alcohol, Port is a villainous 



terian, 3,101; Baptist, 1,478. There are 5,345 Buddhist 
priests, 1,078 Styite priests, 449 Mohammedan piiests, and 
862 devil dancers, while the Protestant clergy and mission- 
aries number 217, and the Catholic priests 87. 

A scientific gentieraaa says of railway dust: '*0q the 
decoction, and so on through the list. Still the fastidious 1 04 tij of May, I87C, while traveling by rail between Laltley 
drinker smacks his Hps over his sulphuric acid, its price and ^^^ q^^^ ^^^j^ j ^^^^^^ ^ p^^^j. ^^ ^ g^^,^ ^^ ^^^ carriage 
its foreign name commending it to him. Not one of them 



can be induced to touch the real wine, made from real grapes, 
o-rown in America.— -E'ssex Republican. 
«-•-» 

FA€TS AND FIGUKES. 



near the open window, and collected the dust that fell upon 
it. A rough examination of this with the two-thir.;8 power 
showed a large proportion of the fragments of iron: and on 
applying a soft iron needle, I found many of them were 
highly magnetic. Thej'- were mosily loug, thin, and 
The French Assembly has introduced a strange feature in straight, the largest being about 1-50 of an inch, and under 



Republicanism. Ithas passed a bill placing the appointment 
of the mayors of the 37,000 communes France in the 
hands of the central government. 

A recent calculation relative to the principal European 
languages shows that English is spoken by 90,000,000 
persons, Germany 55,000,000, Spanish by 55,000,000, and 
French by 45,000,000. 

Since 1826 only one parliament has existed for more than 
six years. The longest pariiament recorded in English his- 
tory was that elected in 1661, which existed nearly seventeen 
years; and the shortest that elected in 1830, which lasted 
only five months and twenty-six days. The House of Com- 
mons now consists of 658 members, of whom 493 are from 
England and Wales, sixty from Scotland, and 105 from 
Ireland. 

It is stated that the different steam railroads of St. Louis 
employ 1,250 men on Sabbath; the horse cars employ 358 
men, 549 are employed in barber shops, 600 in livery stables, 
4,500 in dram shops, 100 in beer gardens, 7,000 in attendance 
at the theatres, and several hundred in the edditing and car- 
rying of newspapers. But the worst feature of the case is 



the- power used, had the appearance of a quantity of old 
nails." 

The following is a list of the Chief-Justices in the United 
States Supreme Court appointed between 1789 and 1874, 
and the date of their nomination : 

John Jay, New York, Sept. 26, 1789. 

John Rutledge, South Carolina, July 1, 1/95. Ratifica- 
tion refused by the Senate. 

Wm. Gushing, Massachusetts. Jan. 27, 1790. Appoint- 
ment declined. 

Oliver Ellsworth, Connecticut, March 4, 1796, 

John Jay, New York, Dec. 19, 1800. Appointment 
declined. 

John Marshall, Virginia, Jan. 31, 1801. 

Roger B. Taney, Maryland, Dec. 28, 1835. 

Salmon P. Chase, Ohio, Dec. 6, 1864. 

George H. Williams, Oregon, Dec, 1873. Nomination 
withdrawn. 

Caleb Gushing, Massachusetts, Jsn., 1874. Nomination 
withdrawn. 

Morrison R. Waite, Ohio, Jan., 1874. 



12 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



i, rian lady of wealth and position had prayed] ftctive and the judge on this pretext ordered the jury 

jtltiClIigCttft, in one day nine times in public, and a Methodist i to bririg vms. vercict of "not guilty.'' As this will 

' [ friend remarked to her, Kubsequeu^ly, that she would i prevent another indictment for the same crime, there 

—The Mennonites of the United States and Can- 'expect hereafter to hear her vo'ce in the social prayer- jig a just ingdignation throughout the country, 
ada have raised §20,000 to aid their Russian brethren ; meeting. ^ j _r^^^ j.^.^ ^^^.j^^ ^^ Susquehanna depot is settled, 

in their proposed , migration to this country. — 'I'he Bishop of Mancticster having, at the Church jaud trains having been running regularly several 

—The success of Mr. Moody's labora in GliBgow ' Congress, expressed his astoaishment that in the i dayr, about 500 hands weie re-employed. 
does not .bate, now having progressed several weeks. | d^js of Christ «|the poor lll\^^^Jlf\^^J^% \ _-The Brooklyn Board of City Works have decided 
The r. v.val in EoMnburg ,s st.ll gung on 'l-pemng [ -w^tbey -r^^^^^^^^^ engage bereafter its employees by the hour. The 

and widening. : .inn tn t.l,« Hlffi.nlt.v. ar.rl S.V-: <'lcnM not but P^y ^^ laborers is to be fixed at 15 cents an hour, 



—The Observer says that an Association of thirty : ^^^^^^ as I listened to him that he did not under- 
Baptist clergymen and a large number of laymen have |.^j^^^ ^j^^ ^i^jg ^3g_ The poos heard Christ gladly 
been formed with its headquarters in Brooklyn, N. Y., i because he underitood them. He lived among them, 
"to promote freedom of conscience, and the right to I He knew what it was to be hungry and to have ac- 



open communioD. 

— Another raligious daily journal ha9 been started 
in New York. It will not comp'-te with the Wit- 
ness, although like that, an uudenomiuational jour- 
nal. It will bo printed in German and ita support- 
ers will probably be largely among the Lutherans. 



I where to lay his head, and therefore was able to syci- 
patbize with the poor in terapations and ttials. Chripi 
gave up his glory to save man. And if English bish 



are discussing pi 

edificT formerly occupied was sold after the great Ore 
to the Rom-in Catholic Bishop Fohy, and is now St. 
Mary's Cathedral. 

The anniversary of the Presbyteriin Theological 

Seminary of Chicago, was held on Thursday last. Tw6»- 
ty-nine students have been in attendance during the year 



rammers 2.5 cente, paviors 35 cenfs, and horses and 
carts 35 cents. 

♦-Attorney General Dimmick, of Pennsylvania, 

decided that Good Friday was a legal holiday in that 

Slate, and on April 4th business was suspended 

gen-'rally on that day in Philadelphia. The same 

ops rea'lly want to reach the great masses oAhe poor, i r»le was popularly regarded in New York, and Wall 

street was nearly deserted. 

— A snow storm passed over Iowa, Illinois, Indi- 
ana, and into Canada on the 5th. In several places 
near the centre of Illinois and Indiana, it was the 
most severe of the season, snow falling six, seven, and 
even twelve inches. 



they must copy somewhat Christ's example." 

— Another name is added <o the cDnsecra ted band 
— The Plymouth Congregational Church of this city i of lay workers like Moody and Burnell. Major D 
e discussing plana for a n'ew building. The church W, Whittle has given up bis business and devoted 

himself wholly to the greatest and nobLjst of labors, 



the salvation of immorti! souls. On the 1st of Apri 

he resigned his plice as general agent of the Elgin 

National Watch Co., and a salary of 85,000 a year. 

Prof. P. P. Bliss has also resigned his offices as 

chorister of the First Congregational Church and su- , , • , ., r n • t 

perintendent of its Sabbath-school, one of the larg-i ^^^"'■^' ^'^^^ ^^'^ following result: 

■ " w^ . . i_ ^ choice, 98; Dawes had 



and six graduated. The aggregate receipts for the year ; ^;^ -^ ^^^- ^j^^^ ^^ ^^^^^1 ^jj,^ ^^^ ^j^j^^j^ ^^^ ^j^ j^^^ j ] 94 . necessary to 
have been $33,111.87 and Elder C. E. bpring has , ^^^^ ^ with the power of so.ng; as Mr. Sankev is'Hosr, 67; Curtis, 
RPMired S20.000 in subscrmtious for additional build- j ,„,._° T«/r._j„ :„ a.„n„„^ xwu^^ „ '..;.„ ., 



— Boston, April 6th.— The eleventh ballot lor a 
United States Senator was taken to-day in the Lagis- 

Whole number. 
67; 



53; Adams, 7; Banks, 6, and 
helping Moody in Scotland. What a conamentr.-j Washburn, Whitlier, Phillips, and Pierce received 1 
■y is it upon our clergy when the Lord tlius thrusts j,„ 1 



tm 4 ^k^ f ^4* 



The City. 



secured §20,000 in subscript- 
ings. 

Achurch is being built by the Anti-masonic mem- 1 jut men into hia vineyard, and what a rebake to the 

bers of the Methodist church of Marengo, lil., in whxh I oieicenary motives which, it is too often and too well 
Rev. Mr. Fanning is expected to preach. One mem- 1 known, actuate them ! 
her bears about one-fourth of the cost. Mr. Boring 
who takes Mr. Fanning's pulpit in Woodstock is said 
to be a high Mason. 

— Edward N. Kirk, D. D., pastor of Mount Ver- 
non CoDgregationalist Church, Boston, died suddenly 
on Wednesday, April 8th. He was president of thej 
American Missionary Association and was officially con- j 
nected with many other religious, educational and be! 
nevolent societies, and his death will be very gener- 
ally felt and mourned by the religious community. 

— A lady writing from Sapivi, Nesperces Reserva- 
tion, says that many of the Indians travel ten or twelve 
miles on Sunday to attend church, and a more atten- 
tive and devout congregation cannot be found in any 
civilized community. In prayer they are very earnest 
and display none of the hesitation and backwardness 
which may sometimes be witnessed among the 
white race. 

— The statistics of the Moravian Mission for 1873 
shows 90 mission stations, of which 74 are in America, 
12 in Africa, 2 in Asia and 2 in AustraUa. The mis- 
sionaries numbered 322, including misiioaaries* wives 
and agents. They have also 1,533 native helpers, 
21,969 communicants in the territory supplied by 
mission labor. The total receipts of the Board for the 
year amounted to $99, COO. 

—Dr. Schauffljr, of the A. B. C. F. M., writes 
that at length a Bohemian service in connection with 
the mission in Prague has been arranged, and that on 



— The Connecticut State election on Tuesday, 
resulted in the election of IngersoU, Democrat, by 
several thousand majority ; both houECS of Legislature 
are Democratic. 



— The Rhode Island State election took place on 
the 1st, There were no Democratic nominations for 
Slate offisers, and the vote was light. Henry Howsrd 
was re-alected Governor by a majority of 12,269. 
Charles C. Van Zandt was elected Lieutenant Gov- 
vote 7,679 to 6,512 forWm. F. Sayles, 
The Legislature is Republi- 



— The Baptist Council on the case of Rev. Florence 
McCarthy closed last week with the decision that the 
hand of fellowship shovild be withdrawn, and thej 
Union Park Baptist Church were recommended to^ 
dissolve relations with him. The decision is probably ernor by a 
just, but various irregularities in obtaining it create i Prohibition candidate, 
sympathy for McOarttiy. Mr. Gordon, of the Wes- 1 ggg^ 
tern Avenue Church has resigned peremptorily be- 
cause of the diflFerence of his views from those of his 
people. Rev. Mr. Ravelin of Temple Baptist Church 
criticiitd the action of the Council severely in a late 
sermon. McCarthy himself proposes to start an in- 
dependent church, in which, he told a reporter, thej, , ^ ^, ^ -^^ j ■< .t n ^^ ■,- 
sine qua non for membership would be regular con- '««- «»^^ ^'^ ^"^'•^g^ ^« ^^^^ committed by the Cathchcs 

upon the missionary Stevens cannot escape punish- 



— The Suez canal appears to be doing a good busi- 
ness. During the month of January, 111 vessels 
passed through, paying tolls to theamount of $438,000. 

— Low as government authority has sunk in Mex- 



tributions. 



Congress. 



— The lax-gatherer Sanborn is now before the House 
committee cf Ways and Means and is explaining that 
interesting busines?. 

— The House Committee on War Claims has agreed 
to allow the claims reported by the Southern Claims 
Commission. They amounted to between $600,000 
and $700,000. 
_ — The Senate finally disposed of the finance question 

S.'ibbath Dec.7th,a°cbapel for this service was opened on Monday by adopting the inflation measure. The 
for the first time. The chapel is a few rods from I House has yet to adopt the bill as amended bv ihfe 



ment. The priest who prompted the murder is on 
trial for his life, and six of the mob that did the work 
have been condemned to death. 

Foreign. 



sixty years ago. 



the spot where, four hundred and 
John Huss lived and preached. 

— A new religion has sprung up in Persia, known 
as the "Zurdani." Its followers believe in no proph- 
et, but only worship the Almighty, with no religious 
ceremonies. The principal doctrines are praise of 
the Supreme Being, truth and virtue. It is opposed 
greatly by the followers of the Moslem faith. 

—The Third Presbyterian Church of Chicago which 1 ^^^^^ 
has for many years worshiped in a fine large church | 
on Washington and Carpenter streets, is now agitat. 



Senate, which it will not be slow to do; and only the 
President's veto is now considered in the way. Of 
this there is slight hope. The mo3t influential and 



— Roohefort, a daring Communist editor of Paris, 
who was transported to the French penal colony of 
New Caledonia, has escaped in a small boat, with 
several companions, and is on his way to New York. 

— A dispatch from Calcutta, April 4th, says that 
the condition of the famine stricken districts is gradu- 
ally improving. Over 500,000 persons in the north- 
western portion of Tlshart are still dependent upon 



able members of the Senate, irrespective of party, j government aid; the spring crop except in that prov- 
rose as the final vote was about to be taken and pro-j~ 
tested against the act, but a headlong majority, led by ! 
Morton and Logan carried their end. This act author i 



izes increasing the greenback currency $44,000 ,000, 
and a further increase of $40,000,000 by the National 



The Country. 



inco is good. 

— Under date of March 25, President Gonzales, of 
the Dominican Republic, announces the failure of the 
Samana Bay Company to comply with the terms of 
its lease, requiring pre-payment of the rental, $650,- 
000, to the Dominican Government, and the conse- 
quent lapse of all privileges and right granted to the 
Company. 

— The Carlists claim that owing to a revolt in their 



ing the question of removal south-westerly to a morej —Gov. Dix has declined to interfere in the case of 
central location with respects to its members. The! Lowenstein, and the culprit will be hanged on the 
pastor. Dr. Kittredge, has been with the church three 10th of April. i 

or four years, and in that timo the congregation hasi tt ^ ,, o, , . n.r ,r , • ! 1 , , lo /.., . i- i , j • 

increased by about 900 I — Union College, Schenectady, N. Y., has just re- 1 ranks only half of their forces have been engaged in 

jceived from a friend the generdu? gift of $50,000, to i the recent battles before Bilbao. It is reported that 
—Mmnesota has 182 Baptist churches, with 5,987 I be made immediately available for educational pur- Q^^^r.^l Santos will shortly march upon Madrid and 
.omhoi-a 1 here are eight associations, ihe mem-i poses. „^ , . •' . . «. - i i- i 

cut c 11 berranos communications. An oincial dispatch 

-A swindler by representing himself as « whole- f^^^ g^^^^^^.^ 1^^^,^^^^^^^ ^^^^^3 ^^^^ 4^0 ^,K^3„ 

sale seller to the country merchantD, succeeded in ^ 



members 

bers are of many nationalities — American, German, 
French, Scandinavian, Danish, African. They have 
only fifty-six houses of worship, but are building twen- 
ty more. There are 120 ordained ministers in the 
State, but not so many in active service. There are 
forty-eight young men just entering the ministry. 

— An incidental, but useful result of the women's 
temperance reform is that it is teaching the women 



cheating several Cincinnati merchants out of $100,000, 
and has escaped. 

— The trial of Sanborn and others on conspiracy to 
defraud the Revenue department came ofiFin 13rooklyn 
last week, before Judge Benedict. The counsel for 



how to pray in public. A conservative Presbyte ^defendant made the plea that the indictment was de 



and men have deserted from General Santos' command 
and come into the Republican lines. Up to the 3d 
inst. there had been no fighting for a week. Both 
sides are strengthening their positions at Abanto. It 
is reported that a force of 600 Republicans were sur- 
prised and captured at Cslaf. 






THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



13 



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BY ILSSB D. BSENAED, 

TO ■WHICH IS Al'l'Si?DaD A 

Ralatioo of the Mysteries of Odd-fcilew= 

ship by a Klembe? of tho Graft. 

The whole oontaining over five hundred pages. 
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Is a SoUoiarly Review of tbalnstitntioa, by Rev , 
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Price 25 ots. 



Finney on Masonr j. 

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CHEAP EDITION, 



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lliU! ii WO 



ADVERSE TO OHEISTIANITY, 

And Inimical to a Republican Government 

Bt EBV. LEBBBUS ARMSTRONG, 

(Presbyterian,) 

A Seceding Mason of 21 degrees. 

This Is a very telltag work an no hon. 
est man that reads it will think of joining 
the Lodge. 

PRICE, 20 ots. Each $1 75 per doz. 
Post Paid. 



EUM AN!) TOBACCO. ; that the patronage of professedly Christian people supports 

Last year England colleTt^l7i,000,000 pounds sterling,' *^^'^y'^"°' «^ ^^^"^^^h desecration. 

near 8170,000,000, revenue on tobacco and spirituous liquors, ! ^^'^^'^^ ^"^'"S'" ^^'^ '^^''"^ '^^^^ *« "^^^ *'^™"'^ ''^ !'«» ^^''■ 

, , ... ,, f -i • .V ■ ., national debt of England was £130,000,000. The Araeri- 

an enormous but uuprohtablc revenue, for it is the price ofi *= ' ' 

human lives " ; can war raised it to £260,000,000. The insensate warfare 

. T, ■ , „ .1 tin* ou- -1 11. against the French revolution made it £570,000,000, and by 

it IS currcnUy reported that a Chicago widow, who has; . , i ■> i •■^j 

ov, ;., ^™^ ^e *inn nnr^ +1 i i J i *• n <- i "^^ ^ime Napoleon was safely landed in St. Helena the debi 
an income 01 '3)100,000, was taken dead drunk ironi the gut- 1 ^_, / ,, . . ,, ,. ^ 



amounted to the inconceivable sum of Z865,000,000. It 
may be safely asserted that every guinea of this debt was 
A significant commentary on President Grant's extravagant j unnecessary. -James Farton. 

use of ci.oars is his portrait on the internal revenue stamps i t, . ,. ^ , . t., /-, , ,, , 

^ , , , „ , , , . . ^ I — ^t 's estimated in New Orleans that 250,000 bales of 

affixed to tobacco packages. Vvhat a shock to American l„_ „ ^t,-*!, i u . r ^. ^„ . 

K...^.. _. . . .._ nay come thither yearly, sold at .^rom $20 to 50 a ton; 

nearly all the provisions come irom the Noithwest; potatoes 

are $4 to So a barrel; sweet potatoes ean h^,rdly be had Pt 

To make or sell ardent spirits for common use is as wicked „„„ „„;„„. „ r ., * j j , ■ , ■ 

I any price; eggs forty cents a dozen; and everyihdig else in 



ter lately, elegantly dressed and diamond bedecked . 



honor should a cut of Washington or Lincoln be put to like 
use 1 



as to make and sell poisons for the same purpose. The blood 
of murdered souls will be re(|uired at their hands. — Judge 
Daggai. 

A saloonist attempted to bluff a woman of Dayton with 
the challenge: "Madam, Christ drank wine, why can't 
vvCi" Instantly the reply was given: "Yes, sir: and if 



proportion. Gardening near.'iny Southern city is generally 
very lucrative. 

EngHsh taxpayers have some pretty little bills to pay for 
the pleasure of witnessing the farce known as the Tichborne 
trial. Mr. Hawkins, who is assisting the Croivn oQScers in 
the prosecution, received a retainer of $5,000, and has $250 
you will sell wine made from water you may do so." Bick-jper day for his services. Mr. Parry, another lawyer on the 
ham gives the moral: "Don't quote Scripture to those ! same side, had a retainer of $;3. 750, and gets $loO"per day. 
women." "rhrec junior counsel had retainers of $1,000 each, and get 

The Kentucky Legislature has pissed a "local option "1 150 each per day. The total cost of the trial to the govern- 
liquor law, providing that twenty voters in any township mayjinent up to the present time is nearly $2,500,000,000. 
call for a popular vote on the question, and if a majority soi The Chicago Tnhune shows that the logic of facta and 
decide, the sale of liquor in the township shall be prohibited. ; .j^^Sg^^g j^ ^pp^^,^ ^^ Republicanism in Spain, Educa- 

It is a well-authenticated fact that in Scotland, during thejtion, the foundation of self-government, is wanting. The 
ten years preceding the passing of the Forbes-Mackenzie i ^ffi^ial statistics sLov that Spain contains an aggregate 
Act, the quantity of British spirits consumed was 66,000,000 j population of 15,07-3,070 sonls, of whom 11,837,391 can 
gallons; in the ten years which succeeded the passing of the neither read nor wiite; 705,768 can read but cannot write; 
act, the quantity consumed was 51,000,000 gallons.— Zo?? don ^nd only a little over 3,000,000 can read and write. There 
Primitive Mdhodist. ^ ^re 42'2 Justices of the Peace who c^n neither read or 

There is shaking among the dry bones that are habitually: write; and 711,119 Aldermen and 12,479 membtri of 
moistened with wine. Yesterday a case came before one of Town Councils who are unable to sign their own names. 
the courts, Avhich turned upon the genuineness of a favorite! In euch circamstances as these, aside from the natural hot- 
brand of wine. What do you suppose the Sherry drank iniheadedness and blood-thirKtiness of the Spaniard, a Repub- 
thc coijiitry is made ofi Read, ye Avine drinkers: "An j lie in Spain is at least an improbability, 
analysis of a "standard" brand showed that it was compos-: Accordiag to the recent census the inhabitants of Csylon 
ed of forty gallons of potato spirit, iifty-six gallons of water, number 2,500,000, and are distributed, according to their 



four gallons of capillaire, and ten gallons of grape juice. The 



religious belief, as follows: Buddhist, 1,520,575; Sivite, 



delectable mixture makes forty dozen quarts, wlvch sells in 464^414; R.-man Catholic, 182,613; Mohammedan, 
tho market at 138 per dozen. Rather a profitable business 171^542; Protestant, 24,756; Wesleyan, 6,071 ; Presby- 
terian, 3,101; Baptist, 1,478. There are 5.345 Buddhist 
priests, 1,078 Styite priests, 449 Mohammedan piiests, and 



for everybody, except the consumers— they need stomachs 
olass-lined and backed with fire-brick. The fact is, but little 
actual wine is imported. The Sherries are adulterated with 
sulphuric acid, and strengthened with alcohol, the Cham- 
pagnes are made of cider and alcohol, Port is a villainous 



862 devil dancers, while the Protestant cler>y and mission- 
aries number 217, and the Catholic priests 87. 

A scientific gentleman says of railway dust: "On the 



can be induced to touch the real wine, made from real grapes, 
o-rown in America. — Essex Republican. 



FACTS AND FIGUKES. 



decoction, and so on through the list. Still the fastidious; 04 1^ ^f May, 187C, while traveling by rail between Laltley 

drinker smacks his lips over his sulphuric acid, its price and:^^^ c^^p ^iu^ j ^^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^ ^^^^^ ^. ^^^ ^^^^.^^^ 

its foreign name commending it to him. Not one of them ^^^^ ^be opsn window, and collected the dust that fell upon 

it. A rough examination of this with the two-thir.;8 power 
showed a large proportion of the fragments of iron; and on 
applying a soft iron needle, I found many of them were 
highly magnetic. They were mosJy long, thin, and 
The French Assembly has introduced a strange feature in straight, the largest being about 1-50 of an inch, and under 

Republicanism. Ithas passed a bill placing the appointment the. power used, bad the appearance of a quantity of old 

of the mayors of the 37,000 communes France in the nails." 

hands of the central government. The following is a list of the Chief-Justices in the United 

A recent calculation relative to the principal European i States Supreme Court appointed between 1789 and 1874, 

languages shows that P^nglish is spoken by 90,000,000 | and the date of their nomination : 

persons, Germany 55,000,000, Spanish by 55,000,000, and John Jay, New York, Sept. 26, 1789. 

French by 45,000,000. John Rutledge, South Carolina, July 1,1795. Ratifica- 

Since 1826 only one parliament has existed for more thanition refused by the Senate. 

six years. The longest parliament recorded in English his- Wm. Gushing, Massachusetts. Jan. 27, 1796. Appoint- 

tory was that elected in 1661, which existed nearly seventeen ment declined. 

years; and the shortest that elected in 1830, which lasted Oliver Ellsworth, Connecticut, March 4, 1796, 



only five months and twenty-six days. The House of Com- 
mons now consists of 658 members, of whom 493 are from 
England and Wales, sixty from Scotland, and 105 from 
Ireland. ! 

It is stated that the different steam railroads of St. Louis ' 
employ 1,250 men on Sabbath; the horse cars employ 3581 
men, 549 are employed in barber shops, 600 in livery stables, 
4,500 in dram shops, 100 in beer gardens, 7,000 in attendance 
at the theatres, and several hundred in the edditing and car- 
rying of newspapers. But the worst feature of the case is 



John Jay, New York, Dec. 19, 1800. Appointment 
declined. 

John Marshall, Virginia, Jan. 31, 1801. 

Roger B. Taney, Maryland, Dec. 28, 1835. 

Salmon P. Chase, Ohio, Dec. 6, 1864. 

George H. WUIiams, Oregon, Dec., 1873. Nomination 
withdrawn. 

Caleb Gushing, MassachuECtts, Jsn., 1874. Nomination 
withdrawn. 

Morrison R. Waite, Ohio, Jan., 1874. 



14 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



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THIRTEEN REASONS 

Why a Christiiin should not be a Frccinasoui 

KY 

REV. KUBEllT AUMSTKONG. 

The author states liia reasons clearly and care- 
fully and any one of ttiu tliirteen reasons, if 
properly considered, will keep a Christian ont of 
the Lodge. 

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SERMON ON MASONRY 

BY 

Key. W. p. M'Naky, 

Ddircrcd in the United Prcisbytcrian Church, Bloomington, lad. 
Sabbath, December Sth, 18T3. 



( 



[conclusion.] 

rt'dctni, purify ;iiid glorify it.s nicmtacrf?, and thousand.s of its 
members believe it to be all the religion that in necessary and 
resting in it, are content without any other, and must inevitably 
perish in their delusion. 

Yes, Masonry claims to l)e a religion; Masonry is a religion; 
let us now in<|uire what kind of a religion it is. 

It is an ANTi-CniiiSTiAN Religion. 

Wc arc fully .-uvare that in the orders of Knighthood there is 
mention of Christ and Christianity, but witli reference to this 
we have three remarks: 

1. That nine-tenths of its members probably never get so far 
as the oi'ders of the Knighthood or 9th degree, and therefore if 
it embraced ])ure Christianity, ninc-leuths of its member.s would 
die without Christ. 

2. Robert Morris, Grand Master and autlior of a code of 
laws, says: "The orders of Ihe Knighthood compose no part 
of the system of Masonry." This is no doubt true, and we are 
glad to say that much in its favor in view of what follows. . 

3. That the orders of the Knightliood have introduced Chris- 
tianity in order to make a blasphemous mockery of the sacred 
rites of the New Testament as the other orders do of the Old. 
I use the word blasphemous advisedly, as it is the only word that 
expresses the truth. According to Wel^stcr it means "impious- 
ly irreverent." 

I will give a few examples of this imi)i(nisly irreverent use of 
the sacred rites of the Old and New Testaments, as evidence of 
the anti-Christian character of Masonry. In the Royal Arch 
degree the candidate represents Moses at the burning bush. He 
looks bofore him and sees the burning bush (a pot of glowing 
coals with a bush over it) and hears a voice saj'ing: "Put off 
thy shoes from off thy feet for the place Avhereon thou standesi 
is Holy ground." He then takes off his shoes and hears a voice 
saying: "1 am the God of Abraham and the God of Isaac and 
the God of Jacob." — [Light on l^asonry, p. 155.] In the same 
ceremony they represent the children of Israel after the return 
from captivity searching and finding the Ark of the Covenant 
in the debris of the fallen Temple, at Jerusalem. — They open it 
and take out — 1st, the Pot of Manna; 2d, Aaron's Hod that 
budded — (a peach tree twig that some one had hid there) 3d, 
the key to the inetitable degrees of Masonry, [Lighten Masonrj-, 
p. 152."] 

In the Knight Templar degree the candidate is made to drink 
wine from a human skull and say, " This pure Avine I now take 
iu testimony of my belief in the immortality of the soul and 
the mortality of the body, "■■" * * and as the sins of tlic 
world were laid upon tlie head of the Savior, so may all the sins 
of the person whose skull this was, be laid upon mj' head iu 
additi(m to my own, should I kuowinglj^ or williugl}- violate 
this my solemn obligation," &c. [Light on Masonry, p. 182.] 

Is not this a blashhemous mockery of our holy communion V 

In the Mark M;istet's degree ilie Master produces a stone and 
advances toward the candidate reading Rev. ii. 7 : " To him that 
overcometh will I give to eat of the hidden manna, and will 
give lum a M'hite stone, and in the stone a new name written, 
which no man knoweth save him that reeeiveth it. [Ligiit on 
Masonry, p. 109.] 

In the degree of Most Excellent Master they all kneel around 
the I'oom and take hands except the Grand Master, M'ho reads as 
follows from the 24tli Psalm: "Lift up your heads O! ye gates, 
and be ye lifted up yc everlasting doors, that the King of Glory 
may come in." Then they all i-ise up, open the ring and lake 
in the "King of Glory" in the person of the Most Excellent 
Grand Master. Now Ave ask all candid persons what stronger 
■evidence could we have of the anti-Christian character of Ma. 
sonry than this blasphemous ;tnd profane use of the most sacred 
rites of tlie Christian religion? 

But we propose to show that Masonry is anti-Christian from 
its own rites and authorites. The Bible requires as a condition 
of salvation, belief in the Lord Jesus Christ. It declares that 
there is no other name given under heaven or among men 
whereby we must be saved, but the name of Christ. It lays 
down ;is a. condition of acceptance in prayer, that we ask all in 
the name of Christ. "Whatsoever ye .shall ask in my name, be- 
lieving, ye shall receive." 

It teaches that lio man comclh unto the Father' but by Christ. 
It teaches that all men should lioncn- the Sou even as they honor 
the Father. It teaches us to do all Christian work and Avorks of 
charily in the name of Christ, even to the giving of a " cup of 
cold water." It declares that "he that is not with me is against 
me." All religions therefore that teach any other Avay of salva- 
tion, arc anti-Christian. Now, Masonry, as Ave have s.ecn, teaches 
its members that it is a saving religion, and it carefully excludes 
Christ from all its religious j'ites. 

There are man_y prayers in this manual, and in other manuals, 
but not in one of them is there a reference to Christ. Now, I 
freely admit that a person might inadvertently make a prayer 
Avithout reference to Christ, Avhereas Ihe mind might be renting 
on Christ and trusting in him. But in Masonry it is always 
omitted, it is excluded by the hiAV of Masoniy. I have indeed 
heard it said that in some lodges cn^mposed almost or entirely of 
Christians, extempore prayers arc used in Avliich the name of 
Christ is mentioned. But it is contrary to the law of Masonry, 
and Avhen one member objects it must be omitted. 



, in the ceremony of admission to the Royal Arch degree the 
j Master has occasion to read 2d Thess. iii. 6-18, in which the 
I name of Christ occurs twice, and from Avhich the passage 
j receives all its significance and autliority, but that name is 
I omitted in tlie quotation in the manual. "Which proAcs that 
I they dfire not put the name of Christ int* any of their ritual. 
j The Mystic Star, a monthly Masonic journal, published in 
j Chicago, speaking of an address delivered by Grand Orator 
jKinding, of loAva, after praising his ability as an orator, said: 
l"'We regret, howcA'cr, to notice a very exceptional exprcssio)i in 
Brother Kinding's address, Ave refer to the phras-c 'Earth's 
Creator and man's Redeemer, Jesus Christ.' This sentiment is 
purely sectarian, and as such, at variance with Bro. Kinding's 
usual good taste. It is reasonable to suppose that not a tithe of 
those he addressed believed in (hat sentiment." 

What is here said of Masonry is true also of Odd-fellowship 
in a limited degree. It also h;is a ritual and many religious 
rites. It has priests, altars, vestments, prayers, hymns and relig- 
ious ceremonies, from all of which Christ is carefully excluded. 
Grosh, in his Manual, p. 285, says : " The descendants of Abra. 
ham, (Jews) the diverse folloAvcrs of Jesus, the Pariahs (Hindoos') 
of the stricter sects, here gather around the same altar as one 
family, manifesting no difference of creed or Avorship, and dis- 
cord and contention are forgotten in Avords of humanity and 
peace ;" and explains this strong testimony by the fact that they 
"IcaA'c their prejudices at the door of the lodge." Noav I ask, 
can any Ciiristian go into an association Avhcre he cannot take 
Christ Avith him — where he is compelled to leave that " secta- 
rian prejudice " " at the door," Avithout denying the Sou of God ? 

Mackcy, in his Lexicon, p. 404, says: "The religion then of 
Masonry is pure Theism, on Avliich ils members engraft their 
own peculiar opinions, T)ut thcj' are not permitted to introduce 
thein into the lodge, or to connect their truth ov falsehood Avith 
the THUTir of Masonry." But avc need not the admission of Mr- 
Mackey to prove that Masonry is i)ure Theism, for a religion 
that excludes Christ and combines and harmonizes all the relig- 
ions of the Avorld can be nothing else. 

I^ut, says the Mason, the Bible is one of our symbols — one of 
the three great Lights of Masonry; but Ave ask. What arc the 
others'.:' Why, "the Compass and ihe Square." So the Bible is 
placed on tho'same level A\ith the compass and the square, and 
has the same authority. Chase, in his Digest of Masonic Laws, 
1864, p. 206, says : " To require a candidate to profess his belief 
in the divine authenticity of the Bible," or " a state of future, 
rcAvards and punishments, is a serious innovation iu the very 
body of Masoniy." This Ave kuoAV must be true, because Arabs 
and Mormons are Masons, but they Avoukl die before they avouUI 
recognize the Bible. Therefore Chase in his Digest, p. 208, 
speaking on this subject, says : " Masoui-y has nothing Avhatever 
to do Avith the Bible. It is not founded on the Bible. If it Avas 
it Avould not be Masonry, it Avould be something else." 

Let me say concerning that branch of Masonry that does 
accept -the Bible as one of its three great lights, that it takes 
Christ out of the Bible before it takes it into the lodge. And 
when you take Christ out of the Bible you take the soul out of 
it and leave only a lifeless corpse. Christ made man and jilaced 
him in Eden; Christ led Israel through the Avilderness: Christ 
gave the Law upon Mount Sinai; Christ gave us the Bible, and 
both the Old and Ncav Testament testify of him. But Christ, 
the author of the Bible, the giver of the Bible, must stay outside 
of the lodge — "tiled" out among the "coAvaus" and "tiic 
profane world," — while the Avords of Christ, with his name omitted, 
may be carried into the lodges, as of authority equal to that of 
the compass and' square. 

In A'iew of these facts, I ask every candid man. to ans^\er for 
himself. Is not Masonry a Christ-denying, Christ-rejecting relig- 
ion ? Does not every one that goes into the lodge turn his back 
upon the Son of God? "He that is not Avith me is against me." 

Oh, my Christian brethren ! if there be any among you to-day 
Avho have become identified Avith Masoniy, let me ask you iu 
all kindness, Hoav can j-ou stand up in the Temple of Ciirist to 
profess his name, and consecrate yourselves to his service on 
the Sabbath day, and then go into the temple of anti-Christ, 
Avherc you dare not mention his name, on Tuesday? 

If there be an adhering Mason under the sound of my voice ; 
if there be one Avho expects to join that society, I A\'arn j'ou in 
the name of the Lord Jesus Christ of your danger. I pray God 
he may not lay this sin to your charge, and that is all that I can 
do. And on that day Avhen aa'c shall all stand before the judg- 
ment seat of God, your blood Aviil not be required at my hands. 

Concerning the duty of the Christian church in this matter 
we would simply say that no Chsistiau- church Avill receive a 
Mohammedan into ils membership. Why? Because he is a 
believer in a Christless religion. No Clu-istian church Avould 
receiA'c a participating member of the Jewish church into mem- 
bership. Why? Because he is a member of a Christ-dcnA'ing 
church. But Masonry is just as distinctly a Christless and 
Christ-denying religion as either the Jewish or Mohammedan 
church. According to its OAvn best authorities, it is a religion 
of "Pure Theism." 

How can a man be a professor of a religion that is "Pure 
Theism," and be a consistent member of a Christian church? 
How can a man be a member of a Christ- denying religious 
association, and be a consistent member of a Christian church ? 
Hoav can a church, Avhich lays doAvn as its corner-stone that 
Stone Avhich these builders reject, which lays doAvn as its fun- 
damental principal, belief in, and profession of Christ — that 
Christ Avhich Masonry rejects, receive a member of the Masonic 
fraternity to its communion ? 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



15 



Descriptive 



ue of Pubiications 



13 rW abash. Ave., Clriicago. 



lira A. Cook & Co, 




by CAP'T. WILLIAM MORGAK 

THE GENUINE OLD MORGAN BOOK:-republished with cu- 
grnvings showiDf,' llie -.CTige Iloom, Dress of candidates Sie-ns 
Duo Guards, Grips, Etc. -^'fa"". 

This revelation is so accurate tliat Freemasons murdered the au- 
thor for writing it. Thousands have testified to the correctness of 
the revelation and this book therefore sells very rapidly. 

_ ._ „ . „ . P"ce 25 cents. 

Per Doz. Post Paid 

Per hundred by express, (express charges extra!)! 



$3.00 
.$10.00 



THE BROK^H SSAIi. 

OR PERSONAL REMINISCENCES OF THE ABDUCTION AND 
MURDER OF Wm. MORGAN, 

By SAMUEL D. G-REENE, 

Price in cloth, $1.00. Paper covers, 50 cents. 

In Paper Covers per Doz. Post paid $4 60 

'' per hundred by express (ex. charges extra$25.00 
That the book is one of great interest and value is shown by the 
fallowing 

OPINIONS OP THE PKESS. 

"A Masonic Revelation. — Mr. Samuel D. Greene is a venerable 
gentleman of the highest respectability, whose etatemenls seem to 
be worthy of full credence. U'/ie Itj-oie/i i>ea4: or, T'ersonal 
Seminisoences of the JKorgan sibducHon and JUiirder, is the 
title of a book of some three hundred pages just issued by him, 
purporting togivea full and accurate account, from personal knowl- 
edge, of tue Slorgan 'abduction,' and other masonic matters which 
made such an excitement in this country, now almost half a century 
ago." — Con;ireri(tHoiiaiist and liecoi-Uer, Soston. 

" 'Frbbmasonbt Developed.' — 'The Broken Seal: or. Personal 
Reminiscences of the Morgan Abduction and Murder,' is the title of 
ft volume written and just published by Samuel D. Greene, of 
Boston. The author belonged to the same lodge with Morgan, and 
professes to know all about that event which made such a sensation 
throughout the country forty years ago. Tho book contains the 
confession of Morgan's murderer, and much more curious and inter- 
esting matter, including the ceremony of initiation, etc. The au- 
thor opposes Freemasonry as inimical to good government, to so- 
ciety, and. to the Church ; and the story that ho here tells will make 
a sensation in the order, if its statements are really what they pur- 
port to bo. If Freemasonry is what it is supposed by many to be, in 
its obligations, the author of this book must be a bold man."— ^cj- 
ly JJerald, Boston. 

"We are acquainted with Mr. Greene, and have no doubt that hia 
account is entirely reliable, and of greathistoric and moral interest. 
Capt. SVni. Morgan was Mr. Greene's neighbor i-^ Batavia, N. Y,., 
and a member of the pame lodge with him at the time of the great 
excitement in ISiG. The titles to these chapters are sufHciently ex- 
citing to give the book a largo sale: — ' Tho Storm Gathering;" 
"Abduction of Morgan;" "Attempted Abduction of Miller and 
his Rescue;" '-Whiit became of Morgan;" "What Morgan Ac- 
tually Revealed;" "Confession of the Murderer;" "AUegatious 
against Freemasonry, etc." — 'Boston S)ai/^ JVetfi. 

History of T!he Abduction and Murder of 
Cap't. "Wm. Morgan, 

As prepared by Seven Committees of Citizens, appointed to ascer- 
tain the fate of Morgan. 

Thia book contains indisputable, legal evidence that Freemasons, 
abducted and Murdered 'VVm. Morgaiijfor no other olfcncc than 
the revelation of Masonry. It contains the sworn testimony of over 
twenty persons, including Morgan's wile, and no candid person 
after reading tliis book, can doubt that many of the most respecta- 
ble FREEMASONS, in tho Empire State, with others were concerned 
In this crime. 

Single Copy, post Paid, Soconts. 

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Valance's Sonfession of The Murder of 

Capt. "Wnic Morgan. 

This confession of Henry L. "\alanco, one of tho three F.'eemasons 
who drowned Morgim in the Niairara River, was taken frcm the lips 
of the dying man by Lr. Joiin C. Emery, of Racine County, Wiscon- 
sin in 1348; The confession bears clear evidence of truthfulness. 

Single copy, post paid, SO cents. . 

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The Myrstlc Tio or freemasonry a Leagus 
with the Dsvil 

This is an accent of the Church Trial of Peter Cook, and wife of 
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and their very r.ljlo defence pr<^sente<i by Mrs. Lucia (!. Cook, in 
v^hich she clearly nhcws that Freemasonry, is antagonistic to the 
Chri3ti:in Religion . j' rlce iiiO Cents. 

NAHjaATi¥E3M.HB ARGUMENTS, 
ehov/ing the Confliit of Secret Societies v.'ith the Constitution and 
Lav.'S, of the Union and of the States. 

fey FH-AWGIS SEMFLE of 

Dover, lows,. 
The fact that "ccrct Societies, interfere with the execution and 
pervert tho administration of Lav/ is here clearly proved. 

Price 20 Cents. 

The Antisna£3oa's Sci'ap Soo.It, 

COITI'.ISTING ()>' 

2-1 GYIfOSUEE THAGTS. 

In this book are the viev.s of more than a Score of men_, many of 
them of distinguished abin'y. on the ?nbiect of Secret Societies. 

The dangerous tendency and positive evil of organized Secrecy 
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Lecturers and others who witli to find the best arguments against 
the Lodge, should send fori his book. 

Those who wish to circulate Antimasonic Tracts ought to have the 
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Single Copy, postpaid, 20 cents. 

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SERMON ON MASOHH¥, 

BY EEV. W. P. M'KARY, 

Pastor United Presbyterian Churchy Bloomingtoa, Ind. 
This is a very clear, thorough, candid and remarkably coneice 
Scriptural argument on the character of Freemasonry. 

Single Copy, Postpaid, 5 

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A NE-W -WORK OF GREAT INTEREST. 



SECRET SOCIETIES ANCIENT AND MODEM, 

By GEN'E J. W. PHEL,PS. 

240 Pages, handsomely Printed. 

This new book is one that every man should read who wishes to 
be posted on the character and influence of Secret Societies. 
The work is particularly commended to the attention of Officers 

of The Army and Navy, Tlie Sench and The Ciei-gy. 
The "Table of Contents" is as folloTcs: 

,'TuE Antiquity of Secket Societies, The Life ok 
Julian, The Eleowinian MysTEniEs, The Obigdt of 
Masonky, Was Washington a Mason ? Filmoke's and 
Webster's defekence to Masonky, A brief outline of 

THE PROGRESS OF MasONRY IN THE UNITED STATES, ThE 

Tammany Ring, The Credit Mobilier Ring, Masonic 
Benevolence, The uses of Masonry, An Illustration , 
The Conclusion." 

The author has presented information concerning the Old Myster- 
ies and their antagonism to Christianity; the Masonry of Washington 
and his virtual secession from it; the harlotry of Masonry, English 
and American, in assuming charge, of international politics," and treat- 
ies between England and the United States; the disgusting interven- 
tion of the lodge at the close of the French and German war; tlie 
Masonic baptisms; all these and more Gen. Phelps has given, accom- 
panied with clear philosophical dissertations of his own. 

Bible Banner New York. 

Sing le Copy, Post Paid .50 

Per Doz " " " - %i V) 

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WE NOW HAVE 22 ENQLISH TEAOTS, ONE OEEMAH, AHD OHB SWEELISH. 



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Many of our most earnest workers in this cause of God are poor 
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TRACT NO. 1: 

HISTORY OF MASONRY. 

BY PRESIDENT J. BLANCHARD. OF WHEATON COLLEGE. 

This is now published in three tracts of four pages each. Price 

of each, 50 cents per 100; $4 per 1000. 

Tract No. 1, Part PrnsT— Shows the origin of Speculative Free- 
masonry, and '3 entiled "HISTORY OF MASONRY." 

Tkact No. 1, Part Secosd— Is entitled "DESPOTIC CHARAC- 
TER OF FREEMASONRY " , ^,„„ . 
Traot No. 1, Part THiKt>— Is entitled "FEEEMAoONRY A 
CHRIST-EXCLUDING RELIGION.' 

TRACT NO. 1, IN SWEDISH; 
translated by Prof. A. R. CERVIN. A lo-page tract at $2.00 
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TRACT NO. 3: 

MASONIC MCTRDaa, 
By REV. J, R. BAIRD, of I'ieasantvilie, Pa., a seceding Mason 
who has taken 17 degrees. A -^ page tract at a.*) cents per 100; 
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TRACT NO. 3: 

SECRETS OF MASONKY, 

BYELITAPLEY. 

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TRACT NO. 4: 

GRAND! GHBAT G-RAHD!! 

BY PHILO CARPENTER. 
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TRACT. NO, t: 

Extracts From Masonic Oaths and Penalties, as 
Sworn to by thg Grand Lcdgs of EliOdo Island. 

This tract is a reprint of a tract published in 1834, and is a very 
weighty document. A 4-page tract at 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 
1000. 

TitAOTNO. G: 

Eon. John Quincy Adams' Letter. 

eMng His aad Eis Fiitfjsr's Opinion oi' Freemasossry (1831.); 

ANi..' 

Hon. Janie.s Madison's Letter, 

GiTing His 0;>!ai«n of Freeuiasrinvy (tS82). 

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TRACT NO. 7: 

SATAK'S CABLE-TOW. 
A 4-pagc tract. This is n careful analysis of ibc character of 
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christian ; and the Masonic Cable Tuw i< clearly shown to be the 
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TRACT NO. 8: 

Is a 2-page double tract, "iLLUsTUATKn. ' The lirst page repre- 
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lence of the order, with ah article below, entitled "Freejna- 
snnry is only 152 Ysar^i Old," aud gives the time and 
place of its birth; 

The second side is eutitled, ''M'ir'«»r aud Trcasoa not 
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its constitution, and is both anti-Ropnblican and anti-Christian. 
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TRACT NO. 0, ILLUSTK.VTED: 

FRESMASONRY IN Ti^E CHURCH. 
Copy of a petition for the higher dcL'recs of Freemasonry, in 
Which Blasphemous aud Oesporic Titles are enumerated and 
prayed lai. The Copy v,-as printed for the use of '•Occidental Sov- 
ereign Consistory S. P. It. .b',"' J-iW degree— a Chicago Lodge— and 
was ordered by a deacon of a Christian ;hnrch v.-ho is t^raud Orator 
of the Grand Lodge of .11. 

TRACT NO. 10: 

CHARA€TEK AND SYMBOLS OF FiiEEMASOMKY. 

A 2-page tract, (iLLUsxn.VTBD) by its "Grand Secretaries, Grand 
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Commanders, Grand High Priests," eic. The v,-ohderful symboli- 
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TRACT NO. II; 

kibm of fmn Imh bm&% Hew ?ork, 

TO THE PUBLIC; 

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TRACT NO. i=>.: 

_ JUBGE WHITMEY AND MikSOJ^RY. 
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Defense before the Grand Lodge of Illinois, on charge of unma- 
Bonlc- conduct in bringing Samuel L. Keith the /nurderer of Ellen 
Slade, and a member of his Lodge, to justice, with .Judge Whitney's 
Stlbsequent renunciation of Masonry, 
An 8-page tract, $1.00 per 100; *8.00 per 1000. 



TRACT Nv 



V.) 



DR. NATHANIEL COI^VEJt OM MASONRY, 

esud 
HOWARD CROSBY, I). J)., 
Chancellor of the University of New Y'o.-k, ca SECRETSOCIETIES. 
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TRACT NO. 14: 
GRAND liODGE MASONRY. 

ITS EELATION TO CIVIL QOVEEK»ElsT AND THE C3EISTIAK EBLIGION. 
Opening address before the Monmouth Convention, by PEES. J. 
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TRACT NO. 15: 

MASONIC OATHS NULL, AND VOID- 
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TRACT NO. 16 : 

HON. SETH M. GATES ON FREEMASONRY. 

PROOF THAT THE INSTITUTION THAT MURDERED MORGAN 
IS UNCHANGED IN CHARACTER 
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TRACT NO. 17: 

Origin,' Oifations ani Ii^m i Iso Sraage. 

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TRACT NO. IS: 

HON. WM. H. SEIXTARB ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Estracs from .^ Speech oi Ksow-'.'Bof ingim in fne U. S. Senate in 1355, 
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CHIEF JUSTIC MARSHALL and others, is added. 

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TRACT NO, 19. 
BRICKS FOR MASONS TO LAY. 

WASHINGTON. MADISON, MARSHALL, RUSH. HANCOCK, 
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TRACT NO. 20: 
OBJECTIONS TO MASONRY. 
By A SECEDING MASON, of Cornton, Vermont. 
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TRACT KO. 21 : 
MASONIC CHASTITY. 

BV EMMA A WALLACE, 

The aitthor, by wonderfully clear illustration and argument, shows 
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GERMAN CYNOSURE TRAOT A. 

Sis Isasons whj a Ghrislian sbouli lik a tmmm 

By REV. A. GROLE, Pastor, German M. E. Cliurcli, 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

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TO THE YOUNG MEN OP AMERICA. Postage, 3 cents per 100 
Traces. Tracts Fre e. 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



'J'he Christian Cynosure. 

With enl.irjTcd size, added ability 
and the earnest co-operation of all who 
desire a pare church aud a governaient 
in the hands of unselfish, honest men, 
the Cynosure will greatly increase its 
circulation during the coming year. 

Men of aver<^ge integrity need only 
to understand Masonry and kindred in- 
btitutions to seek their extermination. 
Women who desire temperance and 
purity cinnot regard with complacen- 
cy an institution which is hostile to 
both. . 

Christians who s bide in Christ will 
use all the wisdom and grace God has 
given them in their cfifarts to overthrow 
an institution which substitutes artifi- 
cial lights for the true ''Light of the 
world." 

The insti'uUon of Freemasonry is 
rooted in human eclfishress, sustained 
by false professions, accommodates its 
principles to the basest natures and by 
casting out Christ and at_ the same 
time professing to save sou's from death, 
it leads our cation towards heathenism. 
Ignorance of this subject in thinking 
men and women, is the chief obstacle 
which those who desire to blot it out 
of our country, have to contend with. 
Will you not use all possible exertions 
in enlarging the circulation "^f the Cy- 
nosure, that this ignorance may be dis- 
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the Cynosure during three months, will 
be entitled to an extra five per cent. 

Our first issue of the enlarged 
Cynosure was delayed somewhat but. 
we hope hereafter to send out the 
paper ou time. 



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three months, for 85.00; to twenty- 
five persons for §10.00. We have re- 
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past week. Including these clubs, 
and the renewals, one hundred and 
eighty nine subscriptions were received 
at our offioe last week, Eighty three 
more than in the preceding week. 
We mention this to encourage those 
who are at work. 



A150UT 00MMIS8IUSS. 

We receive letters occasionally coh- 
taicing two, thre<», or more subscrip- - 
tions in which nothing is said about i 
commissions. Some friends write "we \ 
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the amount of commission in tracts and ' 
books. Others say, consider it a dona- 
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Cynosure and pay nothing more cheer- : 
fully than commissions. However, our ! 
paper is cheap at if;'2.00 a year and re- 
quires a great addition to our present 
mail list la order to enable us to issue 
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The point of these observations is, 
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Such churches as have testimonies 
against Freemasonry and othef secret 
societies have found the Cyuosiire, in 
those places v/hare it has bton read, a 
great help in intelligently sustaining 
their position. Shall we not receive 
from all such churches a large re- 
enforcement of new subscribers? 

EXTRA V TIES. 

We send out post-paid more than 
two ihousacd copies of the enlarged 
Cynosure for canvassing purposes 
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If persons receiving extra copies, for 
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cient friend to work for the paper and 
put the extra copies where they will 
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Be on t'io look out. For what? 
Opportunities to get subscribers for ti;e 
Cynosure, There are multitudes of 
them; but you will not find them with- 
out looking for them. 



One man ia a part of Indiana where 
money is scarce, has sent in forty-nine 
subscriptions tines last November (only 
a few of these were for leas than six 
months) and several orders for books. 
He is not through working yet. Who 
will compete with him? 



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But get subscribers for six months or 
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Clubbing List. 



The Weekly Cynosare will be sent for 
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at the annexed reduced rftes. 

THE CYNOSUim AND 

Christian Statesman 

Methodist Free Press 

Golden Censer 

The Christian (monthly ,with map of 
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do without map - 

Anti-Masonic Herald 

Western Rural 

Young Folks'Rural(monthly,with two 

chromes) 

Science of Health 

National Agriculturist and Bee Jour- 
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Bee-Keeper's Magazine 

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Letter List, — March 28i,h to April 
4th. 1874.— B M Amsden. L G An- 
dre wf, J Barcet, E Bascom, D W 
Bell, P Bower, Anna Biker, G T Bald- 
win, N B;ngh.^ra. S P Booher, G.-o. P 
BeDt, J L Barlow, Geo Brokaw, A Bl&ir, 
L Bifisstt, A In Boardraai). J F Beau- 
champ, W M Beden, A E Caroenter, 
P Carpenter, M Cfuvies, D S Caldwell, 
H C'ole,D Durgci, E Darling, D Dunwid- 
die, F Densmore, H Da,vi?, J A De Witt, 
Betsey, G Eliioti, Rev P Fuller, A 
D Freeman, R N Fee, -I W Funlr, R B 
Frifbe, L Fowler, N Green jr, A 
Grattan, R Green. C SGitchell, J Gable, 
J S Hitchcock, W R Hoadley, E L 
Harris, J C Halsted, T Johu'oc, R 
Johnsoa, K A Kcisiej', J F Kuhlman, 
W J Knappaii, D Longman, A Lull, 
J N Lloyd, T H layman, J L Miner, R 
Moore, V/m B Bluiigan. L Morse, M C 
Mahan, T B Mc MilUn, H C McCain, J 
Miller, Thos J McLouth, R Nutting, 
E'Zri Osborn, Jas P Rogfrs, J R'ng. H 
Riggs, B G Stijim&n, J P Stoddard, J 
M Sheileb.^rger, (2) Geo Siirlace, B F 
Smith, W W Stririgen J W Searing, .1 
M Stevenson, A D Tomliosoo, Beuj 
Ukh, P V/oodring, R M Webb, H 
Weshburn, J R Right, A Yerke?. 



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amonnta sent. 

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Two new subscriptions one year §3.50 

One new subscription and one renewal bcntton 
days before expiration of subscription 3.50 

5 sew sails., 1 year., 1 ccpy irss to ssnder, 9.50 

6 " •' " " " 11.10 

7 " " " " " i-3.ra 

S " '> " " .' 14.25 

10 " '• " " , " 17.50 

20 ■' " " " " :«00 

lOKenewais" ''■ " " 20.00 

50 '• " " '^ '• 85,00 

Twenty subscriptions or eiK months count the 
?amc as ten for a year. 



THiKTBEN REASONS 
Wiay a CSirsstian sijoiild Esct fee a Bi"reeaiasont 

I5Y 

KEV. ROBEET ARMSTRONG. 

The author states bis reasons clearly and care- 
fully and any one of the thirieen reasons, if 
properly considered, will keep a.Christian out of 
the Lodge. 

Single copy, V)y mail, post paid,.. v 05 

Per doz., " " " 50 

'• 100, express charges extra 3 50 



Boob on Odd/Oellowship. 

Bonaldson's Ocid FelleTcs Text -Book' 
By PascisI Boaaldsoa, D- D.< 

6KAHB IIASTBR OF THE GRAND LODGE OF NOHTH- 
EKN N. y., 

UluBtrated with numerous engravings, showing 
*he emblems of the order. A detailed acccount 
of the Forms, Ceremonies, i'uneral Services and 
Odes with music, and a complete manual for the 
guidance of Officers and Lodges. Pocket edition , 
Tuck, $1,50. 

arosh's Manual of Odd Fellowship^ 

BT 31EV. A. B. GUOSH. 

Containing the history, defence, principles and 
government of the order; the instructions o' 
each degree and duties of every station and offlc c, 
with engravings of the emblems of the orders, etc. 

Price in Cloth, $2.00 

" Tuck, abridged edition, 1.50 

I SOMETHING NEW. | 

AGHARTOF MASONRY 

Showing the degrees from the first to the thirty- 
third, entitled ; 

Degrees of Ancient Accepted Scottisli Frecmasenry, 

According to a Manual by Y/m. M. Cunningham, 
33d Degree. 

A Hanilsoiiis fiiSIiograpb S2.\2S Entbes. 

Price, finely colored, by mail, postpaid, $ T5 

" colored, varnished and mounted on 

roller, by express, charges exira 1 00 



MARSST KEPOSTS 



Chioaso, April 6, 
The foli owing are the latest sdvices: 



1 27 
1 2iH 



Grain Wheat— Spring, No. 1.. 

" No. 2.' 

No. 3 

" Hajected 

Corn— No.2 

iiejeoted 

Oats—No. 2 

Rejected 

Rye— No. 2 

Barley — No. 3 

Flax Seed 

Flour, Winter . 

Spring extra 

Superfine 

Hay — Timotiiy, pressed 

" loose 

Prairie, " 

Lard 

Mess pork, per bbl 10 50 



1 on 

02/2 

58 

445S£ 

«H 

8'J 

1 54 

2 10 
5 50 
S 25 

3 00 
9 5!) 

11 00 
00 



1874. 



59!>i 



01 
1 66 

a 15 

9 25 
6 75 
4 75 
U CO 
13 00 
10 50 



Buttei' 

Cheese 

Eggs 

Beans. . , 

Potatoes, nerbu 
Poultry Tl^key^pe^lb. 



2? 
12 
13 
190 
1 00 
11 

Chickens per doz 3 00 

Lumber— Clear 38 00 

Common 13 00 

Lath 3 25 

Shingles 1 50 

WOUii— Washed 37 

Unwashed 25 

LIVE STOCK. Cattle, extra. ... 25 

Good to choice 5 35 

Medium 5 00 

Common 3 50 

Hogs, 4 75 

Sheep 5 50 



^ew ?ork Fvlarkei. 

Flour $ 5 50 

Wheat 1 53 

Corn 83 

Oats 50 

Rye 9S 

Lard 

Meas pork 

Butter 26 

Cheese H 

ffs-ro . . 19 



IS 
12K 
2 60 

1 35 
13 

4 25 
55 00 
14 00 

2 75 

3 75 
65 
32 

6 50 
6 00 

6 25 
i 75 

5 90 

7 75 



7 50 

1 71 

90 

65 

1 C3 

9% 

16 90 

.30 

16H 



AGEKTS ^WANTED, to sell our Stand- 
ard Publications. Send stamp for Cata- 
logue and Terms. Address, J. B. FORD & 
CO . at Chicago, New York, Boston, Cincinnati, 
or San Francisco. 4t Mar 17. 



AGENTS WANTED! 

To sell, direct, lo confuni'irs, Thk Gbopnd^well ; Or, The 

AUTHORITATIVE HISTORY t"/. 

EAEMEES' MOYEMENT. 

r.r ,J rimiAM IvIUcr Western Rural. Cbicaco. Complete and 
Reliable. llVi«r/i «p lo .rnnnar,/. 1874. S Original Portraits; 
100 utlior EutTiivinijs. CCPTliis Greitt Work is lorn iii price, 
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authoritaiivc, and indorsed by the Great Leaders. .Vo!ie oilier it. 

3 m mar 12 



Light oa Freemasonrv, 

BY ELDSK B. BERNARD, 
with an appendix revealing the mysteries o 
Odd.fellowshlp 500 pages Cloth will be sent to 
any address post paid on receipt of $2. 00. 

The fli'St part of the aboye -work, Ligh 
on Freemasonry, 416 pages in paper c«»«r, wil 

bo sent post paid on Receipt of $1. 

Address, W. J. SHtJEY. 

OA.YTON, Oaio. 

klsior M&ii UUe. 

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"The most ScKiPTunAL, beautiful and Arrno- 
PEiATE Marriage Certificate I have ever seen. — 
Late Rev. fl. Mattisun, D. D. 

"Something new and beautiful, which wc 
pronounce the handsomest thing of the kind we 
ever laid eyes oi\."—Metk. Home Journal, Phiia- 
Contains two Ornamental Ovals, for Pliotographs. 

A EAUTIFUL LITHOSEAPH li M by 18 1-4 inches. 

25 ct5 eich, $2.25 per doz- $16 per 100. 
For Sale by Ezra A, Cook & Co.. CHICAGO. 

J. L. MAKLEY. 
ATTORHSY-AT-LAW, 

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MILLS CORNERS, Jay County, Indiana. 
Prompt Attention given to the collection of 
Claims, settling estates and all other business 
entrusted to his care. 6 mo Nov. 20. 



WHEATON COLLEGE! 

WHEATOJf. ILLINOIS, 

Is well known by the readers of The Cynosure. 
Faculty, same as last year, with the addition of 
two gentlemen. Those wanting information 
should apply to J. Blanchabd, Pres't. 




This Is the title of the beautil'nl new Cliromo, size 11 x 14, given to every subscriber to THE 
LITTLE CORPORAL, the best illustrated Magazine for Boys and Guls published. Each 
number of the Magazine contains choice reading, suitable for the LITTLE FOLKS, YOUNG 
FOLKS, aild OLD FOLKS '*vho have young hearts. It gives in the 4%velve nmnbcrs of 
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"In Secret Have I Said Nothing."— .7««ms Ghritt, 



"■'i)V<no 



EZRA. A. COOK & CO., Pdblisheks, 
NO. 13 WABASH AVENUE. 



CHICAGO, THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1874. 



VOL.: VI., NO. 27.— WHOLE NO. 210. 
WEEKLY, $2 00 A YEAR. 



CoutentSt 

Page. 

Editorial Articles 8—9 

Masonry Subverting the Republic Is Prof. Swing a 

Heretic?.... Rev. B. N. Kirli,D. D....Rev, A.B. Grosh's 

Defense of Odd-fellowship Notes. 

Topics or the Time 1 

Odb Colleges on Secret Societies 2 

CoNTRiBnTED and Select Articles 8 — .3 

Adaptation Satan's Master-piece. . ..A Recollection of 
the Sumner Family The Works and Word of God De- 
graded Something about the Founders of the Grange. 

Reform News 4 

Notes and Notices From Elder Barlow From the 

Indiana Agent York and Adams Co. (Pa.) Meetings 

A Good Work in Prospect. 

Cobrespondbnce B— 6 

More testimony about Morgan Ashore and Afloat 

Experience Meeting The (Question of Fellowship.... 

Our Mail. 

FORTY YB4RS Ago 6 

What Freemasonry is not. 

College Secret Socibtibs 13 

Chapter I . —Origin and Growth. 

The Home CiKCLE 10 

The Price of Truth {Poetry) Florida in March 

Broadening the Base Bible Printing — The Appoint- 
ment of the Sabbath illustrated The Ashantees. 

Children's Corner 11 

The Sabbatn School " 

Home and Health Hints 1 

Farm and Garden 7 

Rum and Tobacco 1* 

I'acts and Figures 15 

Religions Intelligence 12 

News of the Week 12 

The National Christian Association - 14 

Laying the Custom House Corner-stone 9 

Publisher's Department 16 

Advertisements 13, 14, 15, 16 



^tfpp 4 t\t ^mu 



Hanging. — An endeavor has just been made to 
abolisli the death penally in the State of Illinois, sub- 
stituting therefor imprisonment for life. This is a 
natural result.-of the gospel of sentimentalism which is 
so extensively preached at the present time. What 
we need is a rigid enforcement of law, and not a dim 
inuL'fon of its sanctionp. It is because, by reason oi 
money and grips and signs and cowardiett^ bad men 
are allowed to prey upoi the gooi, and the penalties 
of the law are trodden under foot, that crime increas- 
es and life is unsafe. Where law is enforced and peo- 
ple are intelligent, laws will be respected and obeyed. 
One thing we should do, and that is imprison any 
man who fails to furnish his children with an educa- 
tion. An immoral or an ignorant people will violate 
laws made to protect properly and lifp. ;sJ.We have as 
a nation no hope of salvation save in the education 
and Christianization of the people. Unless this is done 
prisons cannot be large enough to hold our criminals, 
and no penalty can be enacted that wili deter from 
crime. Oar course is plain, enf jrce what law we 
have, and seek to produce a state of things that will 
render human laws superfluous, because all are obedi- 
ent to the divine. 



It is of course to be supposed that this gentleman 
stood by and saw the whale covered up, as he could 
hardly speak so authoritatively unless such was the 
case. 



Scientific Dogmatism. — The world has been filled 
with outcries against theological dogmatism, and for 
a religion of reason. This is all well enough. If the 
religion of the Bible is not a rational religion it should 
be abandoned. Those who profess it, claim that it is 
not only a rational system, but the only one which 
has existed, or asks the confidence of men at this 
time. It would be a good thing, however, if some of 
these gentlemen who are so anxious that Christians 
should avoid placing assertion instead of evidence, 
would direct at least part of their attention to the 
fashionable scientific dogmatism of to-day. As an 
example of this loud talk, take the following account 
of a whale's rib which was found in Maryland 200 
feet below the level of the surrounding country. The 
rib being sent to Baltimore, Dr. John F. King, of that 
city, thus discuses concerning it: 

This skeleton was deposited when the continent 
was submerged, at a period when the Alleghany 
Mountains were hidden by the sea, and ages before 
the eastern shore of Maryland became dry land; in 
fact, when the Atlantic and Pacific oceans mingled 
their waters and rolled uninterruptedly across the 
American continent. It was deposited there long 
before any quadrupedal animal or man appeared upon 
the earth — ages before Adam lived. 



Cyclical Deluges. — It must be quite embarrass- 
ing to the gentlemen^gwho ihave made merry over 
Noah's flood, to see how^steadily scientific research is 
demons' riting the (ruth of the Bible story. This 
thought is suggested^by^a little work^under the title 
that heads thisjparagraph.'^ It is an argument to show 
that there have beenjdeluges at intervals of ten thous- 
and five hundredj,year8ln the past, and will continue 
to be, so long as the astronomical .' conditions of the 
earth remain as they nowrare. At present our sum- 
mer is while the earth is in aphelion, and because its 
distance to travel ^is greater and iti motion slower than 
while in perihelion, our spring and sunomer are sev- 
en days longer than our winter and autumn. „;J_^By pre- 
cefsion of equinoxesj^and change of the earth's axis, 
by and by the order of the seasons will be reversed, 
our summer will cime while we are in that part of 
earlh's orbit nearest the sun and our winter when we 
are farthereet away. At that time our spring and 
summer will be seven days shorter than our autumn 
and winter. Until that time the northern hemisphere 
will continue to grow colder and the southern to grow 
warmer. When the seasons are fully reversed, 
about seven thousand years hence, the southern 
seas will be very much warmer than now; the im- 
□aense masses of ice about the south pole^will be brok- 
en up and move north. The cenrer of earth's gravity 
will move north along the plane of the f quatcr, drag- 
ging after it the southern^oceans. The northern hem- 
isphere will become the watery one and the sub- 
merged continents of thefsouth^come to view. This 
catastrophe, which will of course destroy almost or 
altogether the inhabited countries of the earth, will be 
followed in ten thousand five hundred years by an- 
other in a contrary^direction.^^Of course we do not 
affirm that this theory is to be verified, but merely 
suggest that, when the ablest scholars are demonstrat- 
ing the possibility of not only one deluge that should 
cover mountains, but many of them, those who wish 
to sneer at unscientific statements of the Bible be a 
ittle careful^about the point of attack. 

Infidel Scientists. — Dr. McCosh is credited with 
the remark that colleges should have for instructors 
the ablest men in their several departments without 
reference to their religious views. That is. of two 
men, one an infidel and the other a Christian, the 
ablest man should be the instructor, no matter if he 
should be ihe unbeliever. Imagine, if possible, an 
institution made up in this way. Strauss or Renan iu 
Theology; Huxley or Darwin in Biology or Physiolo- 
gy; Tyndall in Natural Sciences; Proctor in Astrono- 
my, and men of like minds in the other departments. 
Put now young men under the care of such minds 
four or five years. Let them see the Bible treated as 
these men are accustomed to treat it. The Sabbath 
used for lectures on astronomy, and prayer sneered 
at as a foolish superstition, then let any intelligent 
man say what the effect must be. If infidels are 
allowed to control the education of the country be- 
cause of a little real or fancied superiority in scientific 
attainment, then the educated men will be infidels. 

We admit that such theology as made Princeton 
(in) famous during the war with slavery, is worse than 
rationalism or atheism, but that only proves that time 



serving theologians should be banished from the class 
room an-i not that atheists should be put in. 

Dr. McCosh is a profound scholar, and very well 
knows that the Christian movement did not begin by 
an appeal to science or scientists. He knows that the 
Reformation began with the Bible and not in the labo- 
ratory. He is a Christian, and knows that the soul is 
of infinite value as compared with mere intellect. Is 
it wise then to favor the employment of infidels as 
instructors when they are dangerous just in propor- 
tion to their ability ? Would it not be wiseer to have 
young people instructed by men who believe in God. 
and Christ, and the Bible, and have average ability in 
their departments, |than to put receptive minds under 
the influence of such men as will use their intellectual 
gifts to destroy in their pupils that faith which gives 
the only valuable knowledge to the immortal soul? 



The Chicago Post Office.— It seems to be de- 
cided by the Masonic brethren that tbey are to lay 
the; corner-stone of this building on"next St. John's 
Day . This laying of t'ae stone is not supposed to in- 
dicate that Masons are topay forlhe building, but that 
they arerto occupyj^it when it is done. ;^^The brethren 
have b( en cut-off from corner-stone laying so far as 
the churches are concerned, and this is supposed to 
be an attempt to get up|a littleexcitement for the en- 
couragement of those who are disheartened by the 
exposures which baye lately been made and the initi- 
ations which have (not) taken place. Of course we 
are not within the cable-tow, but we" have, neverthe- 
less, a few suggestions as io the entertainment for 
that day to be piovided. In the first place^it would 
be we'l to explain to the rural brethren that St. John's 
name is tacned on to Ihis day, not because he was ever 
a Mason, but because the early brethren wanted to 
have a good drunk on that day and thought it would 
make it a little better to call it a St. something. la 
the next place^ a number of experienced craftsmen 
should show how offices are won by valiant Free- 
masons. That Grand Master who made a fortune out 
of the Illinois state prison should tell the rest how to 
get contracts and how to get rid of an old wife. Then 
another Grand Master might tell how to get a good 
berth in the Chicago water works; and still another 
might tell them that when they get money "on the 
square" they must never tell, even if they are sworn lo 
do so. He could also explain how to manage a 
printing steal ''to the glory of the Grand Architect of 
the Universe." Another brother could tell all about 
dodging a halter at Shelby eille. And then a choir 
composed of some of "our greatest and best men," say 
Pike, Mackey, Reynolds and Johnson might sing: — 

Great gods of our Masonic clan, 

Oh! hear us as we pr(e)y, 
Help us to get the offices 

And hide the spoils away. 

Don t let the Anti-masons know 

What we in lodge do plot; 
And keep the maimed and blind and poor 

Far from the sacred spot. 

Oh I let us never, never know 

The vain of plans defeated; 
But help ns steal and drink and sing, 

lill in Grand Lodge we're seated. 

After this, speeches for the good of the order could 
be resumed until it was time to go to the dance, 
which should be a very notable afi'air, tickets ten dol- 
lars, widows and orphans specially invited. By pur- 
suing this or a similar plan it is confidently believed 
the occasion might be made interesting and profitable 
to all. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



OUK COLLEGES ON SELKET SOCIETIES, 



Annvillu, Pennsjlvania, January G, 1874. 
Dear Sirs: — Your requtst, asking my opinion of 
the influence of Freemasonry, etc., is at band. Pre?- 



a factory to turn out vigorous tipplers by the hun-j accompany him to the jail in Leveritt street, and 
drcd, — cannot this glorious and " most moral " of ali show.ed me about the prison; and at the close he in- 
orders do Bometbing ior temperacce?" Masonry uoduced me to Dr. Flint, the prison physician, who 
-.nswers, Yea, in ice secret temperance order?, so- i was Worshipful Master of the lodge in Boston, and as 
called, ail unmistakably Masonic. But need his satan-} the doctor took my hand, the sheriff said, "Doctor, 



sura of duties prevents my giving a full or forma 
statement in reply. , 

My estimate of Freemasonry maybe knov?nfrom ' , ... .,,,-,, i ,, • . i , „ , , 

the statement that the United Brethren church, ofi^ P°f' ^?' ^'^'^"''f i«" know Mavonry don t inter- a member of the lodge of Freemason3 of which Morgan 



I 'c majesty be remiaded of the political world? Must | here is a gentleman, as the woman said at the well of 
not cut his Masonic gown to suit both religion i Samaria, who will t3ll you all you ever dd. He was 



which I am a member, is utterly opposed to it, and 1 
am with the church on this question. My conviction 
is firm that the influence of Freemasonry is baneful in 
whole and in part; that religiously it is a stumbling- 
block; and that socially and politically the benefaction 

it offers to one, is a robbery of others. ,„ , ,, . , , , „ 

-KT ^ • . II J i- . '^i • -.. , I" iemp.ar Knighthco-l,' &ay 

No secret society or so-called fraternity is permitted , , , f - , 

......... ladelphia, " superacids to tae 

within this institution. 

Wishing you success in the accomplislimenl of good 
I shall remain yours very truly, 

L, H. Hammokd, 



fere with either (?) Now see hov/ his reverence can j was a member, whom the Masons murdered. He is 
adapt himse'f to all political castes: Masonry ^laU'- : 3 seceder ." At the last word, the do:;tor twitched 
Pajml, " Know-ncthings;" Masonry Pro-siavery, bis hand from mine, saying ''he wanted nolhiog to 
•'Knights of the Golden Ciicle;" -'Ku-Klux;" etc.;ido with a seceder." I said, "Doctor, I was acquainted 
Anti-slavery Masonry, Union League, etc, ; Masonry | with a Dr. Flint for years; he viras our fam ly physi- 
in m^.rshal array, G. A. R. , and Knight Templars. ; cian while we lived in Leicester.' He was a lovely 



The doctor said, ''he is a connection of 



Adaptation, Satan's Master-piece. 



BV NATUAN CALLENDER. 



s AVra, H, Allen, of Phil-; mac, too," 
delphia, " superadds to tbe four objcts of specula- 1 mine. 

tive Freemasonry, . . two new elements, the religious! This seemed to quiet tbe Grand Master alittU', and 
and military." Mark this, ''Knowledge is power,"' i said, "Will you permit me to ask you a question or 
S3y3 the maxim, .and the colleges of the land are the|t^o?" To v xh he consented. I then ssid to him, 
'^rand source of the higher attainments in knowledge. I ..gu^jpoge you were the mayor of Boston, and you 
says experitnce. Shrewdly docs Satan cut Ws hereunder oath, would you keep your oath's" The 
Masonic garment, adroitly flt his cap, and then lays j doctor said, "yes." '-Doctor, suppose you abtolu'.ely 
his polluting hand on these grand sources of power, ^ne^ that there were men comi.ng to set the city on 
and scores of literary (?) secret societies is the fire, would you set a guard to hinder them?' '-Yes," 



[result. Satan neyer exhibited more diabolical wis- 
dom than when he entered college as a literary gen 
i 'leman, in the various "College Secret Societies.' 
r' Who kiJled llortimer M. LegrjeilV' 



said the doctor. "Suppose that you knew that clan- 
destinely a b>dy of man had murJtred one cit'zsn, 
I and actudly kidnapped another, would yoa send a 
: posse and save him if you coulJ?' '-Yes," says 

no more 



No one in the realm of moral government can use 
this, with the same latitude, as can the angel of the 
bottomless pit and his unscrupulous emissaries. 
Moral rectitude circumscribes the actions of the good 
and sincere of all grades of being, but Satan and his, 

followers can become " all things to all men," in a ^^'^ ""^ "^'''"'^ '"^''^^ --^ ''' ^'^ ^^'^ '^^""^^ windings: ! the doctor. "Well," I continued, "I did 
sense that Paul could not think of doing. Indeed, ii, , ^^''^'^ ^^^ conditions of Masonry already noticed, we j t^an you say you would." Handing my hand he took 
a sense in which it would be" absolutely impossibU | ^'""^ f "'^'^'^ Masonry,^ Sympathetic Masonry, etc , ! it. i briefly narrated to him what I did; "Do you 
that good angels or even God himself should do. 
How exceedingly flexible in morals and religion is 
Lucifer and his time-serving tools ! See how he can 
accommodate the most exclusive, anti-scci?,], and 
misanthropic of systems known among men, to all 
conditions of society I Who would think that men in 
general would endure a system cf religion, which, by 
its very terms of membership, excludes nine-tenths of 
the race of man ? 



etc. Satan, adapting himself to every phase of; blame me?" He replied, "No" 



society, in that master-piece of deception and wicked- 
ness. 

A KecollccliOii of the' Sumner Family. 



BV S. D. UREENB, 



From a memorandum of my first acquaintance with 

Hon. Charles Sumner, now deceased. In 1830. 

Such a system, is Freemasonry, the universal (?); soon after I came from Batavia, N. Y. , to Boston, 

religion! Will not all men in dotige, all in nonage, j Charles Pinkney Sumner, the high sheriff ;,f Suffolk 

all invalids, all females spurn such a trick of the pit as i county, Massachusetts, sent me an invitation to diae 



that, from the face of the earth ? Then look at the 
initiation degradations! Will men in the nossessioc 



with him at his residence in Hancock street, Boston; 

and his note significantly described the viand of 
of their faculties endure them? Wait before you! which his dinner would consist, viz,, tongue. 
answer no. Cannot Satan so cut this Masonic coat as j Thus 1 went at the hour appointed, prepared to 
to fit everything but a good conscience? Yes, yes; [talk. After being seated at tlie table, (Charhs Sum- 
here we have English Masonry, French Masonry, : ner, tlit'n 16 years old, on my right hand, his fathtr 
Scotch Masonry, American Masonry, etc., etc., to fit! at my left in the center of the table, and Mrs. Sum- 
the various nationalities. But how will hs satanic ner opposite him,) Sheriff S.i.mier sdd, "Mr, Greene. 
reverence fit his Masonic garment to the sons tf S;.ll understand you are a professing Christian, will you 
Patrick, O, he will give them Irish Masonry, the crave a blessing?" I did so, thanking God not only 
Molly Maguires, and then a broader system called i for his preserving mercies, but that he would bless 
Jesuitism. But what will he do for the church and : the food in readiness to our nourishment and that our 



Then Mr. Sumner added, ' 'Doctor, you seem to meet 
Mr. Greene like a north-wester, but he has stood Uke a 
sturdy oak in an open pasture, and you haye only 
fanned his leaves." 

Mr. Sumner soon after rencuaced Freemasonry, 
and published his opinion of the instituiioa, Mr. Sum- 
ner would often send me a no'.e inviliag me to take 
a seat with him on the Sabbath in the King's Chap- 
el, and out of politeness I used, to .consent. Charles 

from 1830 has been my friend. More anon. 
«-fr^ 

The Works and Word of God Degraded. 

^Y A PAST ROYAL ARCH M4 80N. 



To any 'profeming Christian Mason of ang and all 
Mawnic Degrees: 

The writer has not taken his pen without '' count- 
ing the cost." He has looked to be assailed from 
"the craft." He is prepared to see himself held up 
as a "perjured maa." Neither fit t; live, ncr pre- 
pared to die. (The very charge implies that the 
truth is told), 

I am greatly strengthened and encouraged by 



words just from the pen of that eminent and beloved 
the clergy? Will he recogniza the professed followers | intercourse at the present time might be acceptable, l^^j.^^^^ ^^f q^^^ -q^^ Jq5jq jj^jj . *« You will denouiice 
of Jesus, whom Masonry insults, as enemies and meet ^ agreeable and of lasting benefit. | ^^^ ^qJ ^quJ^i ^yj^ ^g. but before I took my pea I 

them in open couflct? Not he. He will sooner j After the ceremonies at the table were passed. , ^^^^^^^^^^ myself :' in this whole matter of my 
baptize this hell-bo-n child of infidelity into thtj Sheriff Sumner, (no doubt as an introduction to thel j^^^^j^j^. ^^^1^^ „^j ^^ j^^g^^j^, lif^^ j j^j^^p j^^jg^^l .^j 
""■"■"■'"■ ' " . •» .^ - -- conversation to be held after dinner,) asked me if I [condemned myself. You can find nothing in my past 



degrees. 



Christian name! Do not marvel if Satan and hii- 
staff do transform themselves into angels of 
light. So immediately after thrusting the Masonic 
high-priesthood into the face of our Great High 
Priest, Jesus, in this nineteenth century, we have an 
outfit of "Knights of the Red Cross," "Knights of 
the Christian Mark," etc. "The Holy and Thrice 
Llustrious Order of the Cross!" Can Satan himself 
fit this to the Christian clergy and church ? Will they 
put it on? 0, yes, many of them will wear it along 
with the hood-wink, cable-tow, and sheep-skin. 

But can satanic genius itself fit a system inherentlv 
and supremely selfish to the promptings of benificence ^is do, but he was never called a drunkard till the 
and charity? Yes; we must accept the system a& I f'reemasons called him so." 

preeminently benevolent and charitable! Why, it ^^e ficished our dinners and retired to the parlor; 
takes nearly one-tenth of the money filched from the I when Mr. Sumner said, "Mr. Greene, I want y.,u 
poorer classes of its devotees to take care of their own to give me, (if you are willing,) the whole history of 
sick and poor and bury their dead honorably (?) the kidnapping of Morgan and Miller of your own per- 



was a Freemason? I told himthati had taken three jjf^^ ^j^^j^ ^^^ ^ond slave of Satan, and in all those 



sentiment." ''Was he a drinking man?" '"Yes, sir.' 
"Was he a drunkard?" "No, sir, he drank as oth- 



oh, honor! where is thy dignity? Then, there is the 
Temperance cause. Cannot the system, whrsf 
birth-pl, ce was Appletree-iavern, Covent Ga'den, 
London, and whose very inspiration has always bsen 
its "refreshments, whiskey, and wine libations; in short 



"Were you a member of the same lodge jj^j^g ^^^^.^^ .. j^^ ^^^^-^^ ^y him at his will," that can 
with Captain Wdliam Morgan." 1 said, '-Yes, sir,":by any possibility be spread out and magnified in your 
"What was your business?" "Ikept a hotel and wKsigy^^ ^^ ^-^^^ ^^^ j^ ^^ ^^^^ "My new Master 
trustee of the village. Our village was incorporated ; ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ j^ f^^m myself," He en- 
in 1826, and I was chosen the principal officer to take ij^^^g^ ^^ ^^ "forget the things that are behind." I 
care of its affairs." " Was you personally acquainted ; ^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ j^^ ^^ q^^^ ^^^ aj^ated insfruc- 
with Morgan?" "I was." "What kind of a man ^j^^ „ ^j^g g^^ ^^ q^^ j^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ -^ ^^ 
was he?" "A very sfi'ible man and truly moral in pj^^^^^^g "magnified the law, and made it honor- 
able." I am standing on the very bank of the river 
of death. I see ministers of the Gospel, mingling 
with men in the ceremonies cf the lodge-room who 
nave no pretention to Christianity, and a "necessity 
IS laid upon me;" I must write; I must warn you. 
" Call no man master, one is your Master, even 
Christ." " Come out from among them, and be ye 
separate." 

Happening a few days since in company with two 
Presbyterian gentlemen, ''dyed in the wool," the 
elder, who had imbibed Galvanism from the breast of 
his mother, and who, I fancy holds the " form of 



sonal knowledge," 

I then narrated to him and Charles and Mrs. Sum- 
ner, the facts contained subsequent'y in my lectures, 
afterwards delivered, and now published in the "Broken 
Seal," About 4 o'clock Mr. Sumner invited me to 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



sound words" as laid down in the Assembly's Shorter; of the great Fouader of Christianity I challenge the 
'Oatfchism, it was not a little surnrise to learn that ajorder to pioye their preaumptious assertion. A Mastei 
Presbyterian minister, -'in good and regular stand 



ing," could be found, who believed in Masonry. Now 
while I am quite &uve that this gentleman has for- 
gotten more than ever found a lodgment in my brain, 
I can teach him, and many others with him, Eome| 
things about this " honorable fraternity," that if re- 



Masous' l(>d^e held in the Sincturu Sanctorum or Holy 
of holies of King Solomon's Tcmjnc ! Who believe'; 
It? Who? 

li, is alleged by Masons that the Ark of the Cove- 

; aant was lost, find that it was found among the rubbish 

:of the Tt-mple, in the same place where the '-key- 

j stone of the Royal Arch" was found. It is more than 

" folly and presumplicn. It is wicked, as I cannot but 

hearsed wherd Calvin sleeps, would almost cause a yi^^ n^ jjj ^ minister, ia any one, tT take such a posi- 

moving among his bones. I am devoutly thankful, hod, by his active presence at any Masonic meeting; 

that in comoarison with the Baptist and Methodist or, by continuing to be enrolled as a Mason, to 

churches, but few Presbyterian ministers have been t"'^'^'!'^ ^,^'^ ^^;; 'i^h^ Ark was not lost, but "under 

^ .' J. f . /, . ,. r , curtains," untd Solomon built the iemple and pie- 

80 stupified and infatuated, in seemng after "secidt p^^^j ..-jj^e l^lo^t Holy Place" for its reception, and 

things," as to takeoff their irarment, and put on the ^ what blasphemy for Masonry to assign the sacred 

flannels of the craft, have their fingers stripped of; p'aoe where "He dwelt between the cherubim" as the 

rings, their very shirl-button removed (In one jn-l ''usual place of meeting of a Mastfcr<i' lodge ! 

,„ „ . . ' ■, ,„ I c^ e I But if we pass on in the sca'c of lufacleiity to ihe 

stance, at least, it became necessary to file from' .■ ^ . i • *i tj i a „i a , ^„ ^„ 

' , •' proceedinfs iind work in the Koyal Arch degree, we 

a candiaates flnger a valuable ring,) to , epare them (j^j ^^at here we begin to enter into that state, "even 
suitahli) for initiation. I could lake them to Presby- to the land of darkness and contusion, without order. 
terian churches over which any other than a Mason and where the light is as darUness." The march is 
could not be settled. gradual, but unless the eyes have been opened, and 

Masonry given up, before the blindes! man resche^ 



the degree of "Secret Master," his case seems really 
hopeless. 

Something About the Founders of the Uranf,'c. 



[From the Chicago Tribune, March 28th.] 

Hooic's PoiKT, Hamilton Co. 



Iowa. 



the Editor. 
ir: We have now an official announcement of the 



viz: 



FOUNDERS OF THIS ORDER, 

William Saunders, 0. H. Keliey, A. B, Grosh. 



The iirst and best gift of God to man was woman. 
When the Almighty had ci-eated the earih and al! 
things in it, and garnished heaven with all its glorious 
hosts, he looked with complacency upon the works of 
his hands, and pronounced all "to be good." As day 
after day he progressed with the mat(rfiless work of cre-l 
atioD, new and more beautiful works sprang into exist- y> 
<eQce, who can portray the ecstacy, joy, and unmingledig-. 
adoring love, of the bright and holy ones that surround- 
ed his throne? ''The morning stars sang togeth-^r, 

and all the sons of God shouted for joy." Higher! John Trimble, Jr., J. R.Thompson, F." McDowell, and 
and higher, and louder and sweeter mast those an-IW. M. Ireland. The first five are residents of Wash- 
theins of praise have risen, as each successive day's i '"St^on, D, C, where they are engaged in various 

creation, exceeded in manifestation of wisdom and loye i ''•^"'? ^°^ Vn\ftssional occupations. At least two 
,, J members ot the original firm — or iounders of the or 

the preceding. a c i . i u »■ 

^^ = der, if you please — seem to have been, tor some 

How a wfai must have been the "silence in heaven," cause, ehminated by this new deal. I allude to Mr 
'ot that hour, on the morning ot the sixth day, when] Bryan, who put in some monpy to pay for printing ex- 
the Holy Three in council said, "L3t us make man in Penses at the start, and to I). S. Curtiss, who conirib- 
our image." From the dust he wa. made-but Oh! uted some brain- work,--both resWents of Washington. 
7 K i-e M [T 1. 3 ■ Ihat remarkable string of ponaerous plaiitudts, the 

Aowbaautiful! He had not smusd, and he was perfect. .. Preamble" to the National (Grange) Constitution, 
I think the "morning stars" began that song of songs, was written by Curtiss. 

when first they saw v/ix«,, in the personal image of the A. B. Grosh, in the above-named oflicial list, is a 
coming Emanuel, and in the holy moral image of their '-'^^'^^''®^^'^* preacher; and of his antecedent?, as an 
triune God, stand up before them. organizer of secret orders, no Odd-fellow need be told. 

^y, ■ , ^ . . f o him the Patrons are principally mdeoted for ine 

mere is yet the hnish to be put to this great crea-' ridiculous mummeries and tedious lectures of their 
tive work. Again we hear words of love from the ''beautiful secret work, ' as it is complacently called by 
Holy Trinity, ''It is not good for man to be alone II'^^ ^^°^ author. Its reverend progenitor has been 
will make a Ulpmiel for him." what love in those :®°'"^^^''* unfortunate, if not culpable, in the appiica- 
-„„^j- ■v„„„ jj. ... , t'on of his classical lore to the "make-up' of this ritual. : 

Td tbe.frp ""'I'l r^^'^'.f, ^'^'-^ fru'*'"' *^^*' The terpsichorean feature in the degree of harvester,! 
i " ..if HlTi' I' ''"'''•^ 'T '^f ^' '^'? ^r?- i« ^^^ 4inst which the common se°ns8 and religiou.: 

r 'nr.b «W "" g"-^.^* •^^rr.age day ofJesus with his feelings of the virtuous farmer stubbor.aly and natu.: 
church shad come, and the bells of the New Jerusalem , ...u^ fevolt. He don't want dancing, in his'n. When! 



morality of the ''Master Masou :" "Furthermore, 



shall call all to the wedding feast who shall then be ^ * rr • u -^i .i -.l . j 

f/Min,i '.i,o„;.,„ +u 1!- ^'^ """, '"^■*^ "'^^ "'^,1 we connect Terpsichore with those other ancient god- 

^uL ^^^Yi«g °^ '-fa«7«^J^'=Jg garments.' But ah .^ ^,,,^^ of questionable morals.-Ceres. Pomona, and 
snrJL'n.nf ""'T] °;^"^I^«f ^':^P«ff"ty and as- pi^^a, -wi are excusable for wishing that the auth-i 
r rbphP f ^1^ M ^, '^''' '^fk ,?^^'*^^^«.the ors of the ritual were lesa classical an"d sensuous; and 
^hanLtVh «T {7S'1^,''^^'^^^^^^^^^ the typical selections for the farmer wer^ less 

r^lfn ^K ?f ""''^ ^' '1 ^"'^ '"•^ °^ ""^^ heathen and more Christian in character. Flora is the 

iSrirreiZ,? r^f 'tf "''".'"? '° 5''/ nonage; athe- ! ^ype of the Sixth Degree. She was a heathen god- 
wh'ereT.S hi ^'^T""^'^ '^''^^'' ^""^ ^'''''* ^^«°^^' i dess, whose festival wis celebrated bv the ancients, 
rwil Vr ! • . -L J. • •, , I from the 28th of April till the 1st of'May, with "ex- 

. .^JT!!_' "°^,g'"^ J^'^ ^ ^.P^-^""!" «f lh« distinguished I travagant merriment and laciviousness. " Was she the I 

presiding genius of those banquets, of the privileged i 

Flora, which were held at 

1873, and which were paid 

Anr,a K,r -^n»^r„ ;<■: ™ * ^ -^ 1, ' '"' ""'' "^ '""^ iTciujuB ducs and charter-fees? We do] 

The Vol ' f^n/o^^Th^ ^aT ^r^""' ''\ >' th'^l^ t^^^^t this Heathen goddess is the moPt re-' 

in Ss tJZ m1 • r? ^^r w^' ^f f Upectable and honorable type fo'^r the Christian women 

lowMieSthir'^dT" " " ''"''' " '""''If, ^"^^^■•'^^ '^ acknowledge. If she is how soon,: 

- Qus. What doi a Masters' lodge represent| I t" rortu;1la7ctiL's^ T ""^ °' ^"^"'^^ '^■ 

.f K?. "^ , ^T ^r''''''''"' ^' ^°'y °^ l^«>ie« with as much force to the men? 

ot King Solomon s Temple. \ „ e • u^i j 

n,,^? vtri JJ TVT „ o chus tor an eighth degre 

yaes. — Where did Masons usually meet? 

Ans.— Oa the ground floor of' King Solomon's 
Temple 




worship shall appeal 
Shall we have Bac- 
ghth degree? 
The Ritual is a ridiculous failure. 
It is owing to the magnanimity and iiind forbear- 



n„-.„ w^™ ^ ^-L L i- 11 , ,, . ' ance of the satirists of the day that we have not been 

Que.. --How many constitute a fellow crafts' lodge ? , already overwhelmed with humorous burlesques upo. 
Ans. — i^ive — two Masters and three fellow crafts. tlio "n,.ann,o,.= " xt^+v,;,,.^ ;» ,v,^..^ »^ u„ f„ „„j ...j 
Qties. — Where did they usually meet? 
Ans. — In the middle chamber of the Temple. 
Ques. — How many constitute a Masters' lodge? 
Ans. — Three Master Masons. 
Ques — Where did they usually meet ? 
Ans. — la the Sanctum Sanctorum of the Kina's 
Temple. ^ 

King Solomon had no more to do with Masonry .^. ...„„. ^„^ .....= ^oo.m^ui, uu, ,m^ wonaer 
than my cow. Learned men know this. In behalf] ful instrument must provoke ire. It is chiefly remark 



the "Grangers." Nothing is more to be feared, and, 
when the laugh is once fairly started, richer fun will 
follow the "grange" than ever did the ' Knights of 
Malta" or the Oriental Order l.OOI." Then the epi- 
taph of the grange will be, "Died of laughter." But 
the laugh is on the other side of the mouth when we 
consider the 

CONSTITUTION OF THE NATIONAL GRANGE. 

The ritual may excite merriment, but this wonder- 



able for canning. If the ritual of the "Grange" is a 
huRibug, the so-called Constitution is a fraud; and the 
selfish schemes of its projectors are certainly well de- 

, signed, and their profits securely guaranteed by this 
drcument. Xo "Dollar Store" or ''Union-Furnishing 
Company" prospectus can excel it. A common im- 
pression is prevailing, that the eo-called National 
Grange is but a new name for "ring," or "Construc- 
tion Company," whose members are fattening upon the 
hard-earned money of the farmers; and there is good 

Joandation in the facts that have leaked out as well 
as in the artful devices of the constitution, for such a 
belief. By that document, the members of the "ring" 
perpetuate themselves in power, and abforb all of the 
money, without any legal, or even moral, accounta- 
bility whatever. This is now becoming better under- 
stood in Iowa, and honest but simple-minded members 
of the order "want to know, you know, ' what be- 
comes of all our money. C. F. Clarkson, of the Des- 

'' moiues Register, whose loyalty to the order no man 

jdare gainsay, in his issue of March Gth, 

I DEMANDS LIGHT. 

j He estimates the receipts of the National Grange for 
the last year at $200,000, — which, I think, is about 
correct, — and asks, "Where is the money? He wants 
'o know how many bogus representatives of the States, 
with their wives, sat in the last session of that august 
jbody, — as they did in the previous one; and how 
much mileage, and per diem, was again paid to them 
iilegaily, out of the farmers 20 cent corn. He also 
significantly inquires if there was another ''back-pay 
grab." 

It ia of no use to make such impertinent inquiries 
and demands. Gentlemen, you can't have your mou' 
ey, and the Order too. The worthy Patriarchs of the 
Grange are securely protected against your reforms, 
atid they disregard your clamors. You are sworn to 
secrecy, and also to respect and obey the "Constitution 
and By-Laws of the National Grange." Don't be die- 
loyal, gentlemen. "You pays your monish, and takes 
your choice!" 

The farmers need this order, or something like it as 
A MEANS OF ORGANIZATION. As a class, we caDuot af- 
ford to remain segregated while all the rest of the 
world are combined against us. It will give us prec- 
ent relief from the oppressions of class-legislatic, 
and will secure us future power. But is it not costing 
us far more than necessary ? Why should it be so ex. 
pensive; and why must it be controlled by these men, 
who, from the very nature of their pursuits can have 
no honest fellowship with us, and who have not, 
from their past actions cannot have, our respect and 
and confidence ? There is but one expedient for those 
who prefer the order as it is, but divested of its ex- 
penses and extortions, and that is a general delegate 
convention of the members, for the purpose of place- 
ing the order under a representative system of gov- 
ernment and of putting its power where it properly 
belongs, — in the hands of the people. The Patri- 
archal system is insisted on by its founders, but surely 
they mistake the intelligence and spirit of a million 
men and women of America. 

D. W. ADAMS, 

so-called Master of the National Grange, says the mem- 
bers of Boston Orange were not farmers, and there- 
iore he deprived them of fellowship. Let us take a 
look at hts pretentions, not only to membership, but 
to the office he fills. The Waukon Standard of Feb. 
5th, published to the town of Waukon, la., where Mr. 
Adams resides, says : ''Mr. Adams is not now, and 
has not been since he became a member of the order, 
a farmer within the meaning of the above instructions ; 
but, during that time, his greater interest has been 
in another direction, he being the senior member of 
the dry goods firm of Adams & Hale, and was also a 
nurseryman at the time of becoming a granger, though 
not now, and never a farmer according to Mr. Golder's 
dj-fioition, that we know of. During our residence in 
Waukon, he has not owned a horse or a cow, to our 
knowledge. Verily, a prophet is not without honor 
save in his own country. 

But this ia not all. Mr, Adams wap, by some hocus- 
pocus, made master, two years ago, of the Iowa State 
Grange, and, by another mysterious process, he be 
came, in January, 1873, master of the pretentious 
National body of Patrons. Now let that aspiring gen- 
tleman, that rigidly-righteous Patron, face the music, 
and tell us whether he was ever Master of a Subordi- 
nate Grange. The Constitution, so often named by 
me provides that the State Grange shall be "composed 
of Masters and Past-masters of subordinate granges": 
and the National Grange shall be composed of Masters 
and Past-mastera of the State Granges."' Now, I 
have it from reliable authority that Mr. Adams was 
never Master of a subordinate grange. That being 
true, he has never been legally entitled to the office 
of Master, either in the State or National Grange. Is 
he not a righteous Jew to throw stones at the Boston 
Grange ? ' ' " arles Whitaker. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Executiye Committee Notice. 



The Executive Committee of the National 
ChriBtian As-sociation are hereby notified 
that a meeting will be held at the Cyno- 
sure Office on Friday, April 24th, at 11 
o'clock A. M. By order of the 

CSAIEMAN. 



''^tim\ Jjtm. 



— The General Agent took a final leave 
of Chicago, until after the Anniversay, on 
Saturday last. He expects to spend a 
month in Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania 
before reaching Syracuse. 

— The New York State Association is 
working strongly and steadily for a thor- 
ough canvass of the State before June. 
Brethren Stoddard and Barlow will spend 
the seed-sowing month of May lecturing 
and organizing for the Anniversary. 

— This Association has also engaged 
Prof. C. A. Blanchard for the month of 
May, with the understanding that the re- 
numeration for his services shall be paid 
to Wheaton College. 

— All will be rejoiced to hear from Bro. 
Kiggins of Indiana again, after so long si- 
ence. The Hoosier State news will again 
be full of interest. 

— Several have inquired for further par- 
ticulars of the Morenci, (Mich.,) afiair re- 
ported last week by Bro. Caldwell. Noth- 
ing further has been received on this case, 
but any new developments will no doubt 
be reported without delay. 

—The General Agent lectured in the 
German church at Batavia, 111., on "Wed- 
nesday night last week. He found an inter- 
esting case of attempted intimidation at 
Geneva, which will appear soon in the 

Cynosure. 

»«-• 

From Elder Barlow. 



Saratoga Springs, N. Y. — A Sharp 
SJcirmisli and an Advance on the 
Enem'ys Works. — The Anti-secret 
Army Encouraged. 
Dear Cynosure: — As you know I 
came here three years ago, impelled by 
a sense of duty, to erect a standard 
against organized and oath-bound se- 
crecy in all its forms. My settlement 
here at Bemis Heigh tp, with my known 
sentiments, was an offense to Masonry 
and its cubs, and became a signal for 
their onslaught. First, slander began 
her envomed work ; but this failing to 
drive me away, one of my members was 
induced to go and unite with the Ma- 
sons, against the known wish of the 
church, and in violation of a contract 
between the church and myself, that 
no more Masonry be admitted to fellow- 
ship among us. It was believed by 
the craft that the church, long unused 
to discipline, had not the strength or 
moral courage to throw off the offen- 
ders; and that, in consequence, I would 
be forced to resign. But here their 
plans miscarried. The offender was 
promptly set aside, and the church, so 
far as she knows, soon freed herself from 
all complicity with these "unfruitful 
works of darkness." 

During all this time, I have, as opportu- 
nity offered, sought for a place some- 
where in this region where I could get a 
congregation together to hear on this 
subject. For a long time I sought in vain. 
Pastors are either members of one or 
the other fraternities, or they have 
one or more in church or congrega- 
tion who are Masons; and they dare 
not even whisper a r.buke, much less 
consent to have their pulpits used by me 
for such a purpose. For instance, I called 
last week upon the pastor, lately in- 



stalled, of a Presbyterian church near 
me, and asked him if his house of wor- 
ship could be obtained. He is himself 
a member of the United Presbyterian 
church, a body, which, as you know, 
disferowsbips all secret societies, mak- 
ing it a test question. But he did not 
dare to have the subject ccme up in 
his church. He said he had two Ma- 
sons in his congregation; neither, as I 
understood him to say, ChriKtians, and 
one of them master of the lodge; and 
it would Dot do to offend this one, as 
he was leader ofhischor! Otempora/ 
mores/ 

At length I heard that there was a 
small Free Methodist church in Sarato- 
ga Springs. I soon called upon one 
of its leading member."', a Bro. Town, 
who introduced me to his pastor, who 
joined him in giving a hearty consent 
for the use of tLeir house. 

Last Friday night, after due notice 
given, I met an intelligent audience of 
2C0 or more, among whom were quite a 
number of Mafons, male and female 
Odd-fellows, etc. Btfore I commenced 
(o speak, we were reminded of the 
"Grid Iron" by an old gentleman who 
was apparently ready for the fray. 
Bro. Mathews, the pastor of the 
church, promptly demanded order, 
and after singing and prayer, gave the 
craft to understand that they might 
take notes of what I was about to say, 
and then appoint their champion, one 
the fraternity would endorse, and he 
should, on any Friday night they might 
choose, have the house for an answer. 
But this did not eeem to please them, 
for they began to interrupt with ques- 
tions before I had fairly introduced 
my lecture. Indeed, my speech was 
mainly shaped by them. One, a pro- 
fessionable gentleman, when I was 
speaking of the omission of the name of 
Christ from their prayers, as well as 
from quotations from the Scriptues, 
asked me with something like a sneer, 
"Will the gentleman be kind enough to 
read to us the extract from Thessalo- 
niaui?, which he says is so garbled?" 
Of course I responded gladly to this ap- 
peal, reading from Sickel's Monitor, 
while Bro. Mathews read from the New 
Testament. This quieted the craft for a 
time, and then they seemed surprised, ap- 
parently never having had their atten- 
tion called to the subject before. But 
having lost their jewel of a silent 
tongue, they kept up a running fire of 
questions, which served, with the an- 
swers, to amuse the audience as well 
as myself. 1 am truly grateful for the 
assistance thus rendered me, making it 
one of the most spicy meetings I have 
attended in a long time. The old saw, 
'•Wounded birds flutter," had such a 
practical exemplification as to satisfy 
"cowans' and * 'profanes" that I was 
not beating the air. 

One man, towards the close of my 
remarks, rose in the rear of the audi- 
ence, with a self-complacent smirk on 
his face, which plainly said, "I'll fix 
him !" and gave birth to the following: 
"Will the gentleman be kind enough to 
tell us how often he has been before a 
committee, and been black-balled?" 
The gentleman questiuner, like an old 
man-of-war's man looking after a shot 
from his • -long Tom," stood as though 



expecting the deslruction of the speak- 
er, but finally slunk ashamed into his 
seat. The craft were again invited to 
reply, and I invited them to take the 
stand then and there, — indeed, dared 
them them to deny my statements ; but 
no denial was forth coming. 

As they were going out, Bro. Math- 
ews sent a parting shot after them, 
suggesting that some of them had 
taken more "Applejack" than was 
good for them, and inviting them to 
attend the temperance meeting on th3 
following Sabbath evening and sign 
the pledge. 

The wife of a mason, on her way 
home from the meeting, inquired of 
her husband as follows: ''Why didn't 
you tell that man he lied when he dared 
you to, when speaking of the fiistoathf 
If it is not as he said, why didn't you 
tell him so?" But the poor fellow as 
to that matter kept his jewel, but sat- 
itfied his wife that |what the speaker 
said was true. One thing he did say, 
repeating it seyeral times, with some 
appearence of indignation, "Then I'm 
not a Christian!" Alas poor man, I 
think it would be well for him to be 
looking for his evidences. 

I hope to return to the charge again 
soon, and then have Prof. B. give them 
a "petard" next month. Many are 
are anxious to hear him. The ball is 
now fairly rolling, and by God's good 
favor will not stop soon. I expect to 
speak in an adjoining county to-mor- 
row evening. 

I have accepted the appointment as 
General Agent and State Lecturer, and 
expect to enter on full work next month. 

Barlow. 



The Work in Indiana. — From the 
State Agent. 



Portland, Jay Co.,Ind., 
April 7, 1874. 

Dkar Cynosure : — I have been anx- 
iously waiting and looking for your ar- 
rival since Saturday, and here you come 
at last on Tuesday evening. I'ye won- 
dered and inquired why it is that you 
do not reach the good people at Port- 
ia d till M'jnday and Tuesday; — and 
at last I've learned the reason. Here 
you come this afternoon, on the. train 
from the South. You should have 
come by Ft. Wayne, instead of going 
all the way round by Indianapolis, and 
then coming back north. 

But then I am really rejoiced to see 
you looking so welll Now, don't think 
I mean to flatter you, — but really I 
felt almost proud as I told the large 
audience in the College Chapel this 
evening, how little you was for a long 
time; and how that your remaining so 
small was all because you had to work 
so hard, and fare so slim ; and then how 
that after passing through the fire 
twice, and the water once, God had so 
multiplied your friends as to enable 
you to grow as large as you now are. 
Well, while you was small you helped 
us lecturers, and workers in our great 
reform marvelously. But now that you 
have grown so large and strong, you 
will do still greater things for us; and 
I trust we will, one and all, work more 
untiringly for you. 

The Anti-masons of Noble county, 



having concluded at their last meeting, 
as reported in your columns, to take 
steps immediately to canvass the coun- 
ty, and call a pohtical convention, sent 
for me to do the canvassing. I began 
the work about the 10th of March, and 
up to the 31st I had spoken at fifteen 
different points in the county, and suc- 
ceeded in securing the election of about 
forty delegates to the convention which 
will be held in Albion, the county 
seat, on the 23d inst. 

I was obliged to come to this county 
to attend the first semi-annual meet- 
ing of ' -The Jay County Anti secrecy 
Association," to be held tc-morrow in 
the College Chapel at Liber, two miles 
Eouth of the county seat, Portland. I 
have spoken five times since coming to 
the county, and will speak twice more. 
I go from heie to Weslfield to attend 
the meeting of the Executive Commit- 
tee on the 14th. Our meetings are 
well attended and good is being done, 
notwithstanding the (Masonic) "heath- 
en rage, and (some of) the people imag- 
'ine a vain thing." You will shortly 
receive a report of the meetirec of the 
Association here, from the secretary. 

The treatment we receive as a rule 
from lodge men is quite different from 
what it was in the same place a year 
or six months ago. Only a few attend, 
and they frequently behave themfelves 
like other folks, only "they look sour." 
But at new points it's the same old 
story, varying only in the details, and 
not of sufficient interest to tell again. 
The cause is extending its victories rap- 
idly. As much as has been paid about 
"the grange movement," I am con- 
vinced that it is at this time doing a 
good work for our reform. It is awak- 
ening the latent anti-secrecy sentiment 
of men all over the country whom the 
Cynosure does not yet reach, and to 
whom the anti-secrecy movement is 
unknown, and would be perhaps for 
some time only for the effect of the 
grange swindle. Then it is helping 
to narrow down the question and bring 
it to a more speedy issue, whether the 
affairs of this nation, social, civil and 
religious, shall be conducted openly 
or secretly. "To this complexion 
must it come at last." I am now stop- 
ping with Bro. Wilson Milligan, — one 
of your true reformers, and his wife is 
not a whit behind him in this, o'r any 
other good work. They have done and 
are still doing a noble work for Jay 
county and the cause generally. They 
made the break alone, but good men 
and women have joined them, and God 
is moving along with them. Youra 
for the war, John T. Kiggins. ** 



York and Adams County Meetings, Pa. 



The sketch of a series of meetings 
in this part of Pennsylvania was pub- 
lished two weeks ago. A letter from 
Rev. J. P. Anthony describes them 
more fully. The first meeting was held 
in the United Brethren church at Frank- 
lintown, the second in Odd-fellows' 
Hall, York Sulphur Springs, the third 
in the United Brethren chmch at Cen- 
ter Mills, Rev. J. M, Bishop spoke 
each evening. The following is de 
scriptive of the last evening's lecture.! 

• ' These secret orders multiply rapid- 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE, 



ly and many say there is no use trying 
to oppose them; they are too many 
and too strong. How slavery has fall- 
en, though mighty in the land ? The 
lecturer spoke of the way Rev. J. 
Blanchard was treated while lecturing 
against slavery in this State. Windows 
in the basement of the U. P. churches 
of Harrisburg and Carlisle were broken 
in. He had to flee from the old stone 
hotel in Chambersburg to save his life; 
was rotten-egged at Warrensburg, and 
only after a second attempt and the aid 
of Mr. Stevens he succeeded in Gettys- 
burg. Where is slavery now J He 
then spoke of the anti-secrecy move- 
ment in the country , the National As- 
sociation, the State Associations, a 
weekly paper expressly given to this 
subject with many others partially given 
to it; and more than twenty five lec- 
turers. Sure the lion is being bearded, 
and this time we are going to cut the 
head off and end his roar. 

The speaker said that he had been 
trying for a while to tree A . B. Grosh's 
(author of Odd-fellows' Manual) church 
relation, and lately had succeeded, and 
found him a Universalist minister. 

Secrecy is a great man-trap. Per- 
sons in business are promised advantage 
by joining. Ministers taken in free, 
then they must recommend the order 
to others. The lodge and its officers 
with the manner of initiation were 
described at each meeting. At the 
close of this lecture a former Odd-fellow 
told the lecturer he was right in all the 
grips but one, and corrected him in 
that. The grranges were treated on at 
some length. 

After Bro. Bishop concluded his lec- 
ture Rev. L. A. Wickey, chairman of 
the meeting, made some remarks on 
the granges. Thus ended the first fire 
in these counties. May the Master 
bless this seed, J, P. Anthony. 



A Good Work in Prospect • 

Bro. Nelson Callender writes, from 
Starruca, Pa., of a proposed campaign 
in Wayne county in that State : 

We have got an appoinment for 
some lectures here by some of our home 
men of the North-east Pensylvanna 
Christian Association opposed to secret 
societies, namely. Elder. S. E. Miller 
and Mr. Raynor, a Presbyterian minis- 
ter who has been discarded by his 
congregation because he circulated 
Cynosure tracts. The Odd-fellows 
have lately organized a lodge here, so 
we think we will hold some meetings 
to counteract them. The Masons are 
terribly exercised in mind in contem^ 
plation of our proposed anti-secret 
lectures, say they shall attend; and 
I hope they will, and if some of them 
do not get hit I shall be disappointed. 
I hope we shall get a political organ- 
ization in our State and nation, as I am 
done voting for Masons, if I vote no 
more at all. 

Yours for an un trammeled Gospel 
and a national government free from 

secret rings. 

♦»» 

— He who should conquer in battle 
ten times a hundred thousand, were 
indeed a hero. But truly a greater 
hero is he who has but once conquered 
himself. 



^'^mj5|to)ttU«(i|^ 



More Testimony about Morgan. 



Waverly, Iowa, March 16, 1874. 

Dear Cynosure: — As you ask for 
correspondence from all parts of the 
country, I beg to be enrolled on your 
list. I have much to tell you, but will 
only relate at present the following con- 
versation I had with a veteran of the 
cause of Christianity who lives here: 

" Well, Father C , you are get- 
ting pretty well along in years." 

'• Yes, I am now seventy years oJd." 

"You used to live in New York in 
your younger days, did you not? and 
must then remember the Morgan affair." 

"The Morgan murder? I think I 
do. I used to live in the village of 
Batavia, where he kept a sort of board- 
ing house. Why, I boarded with hira 
two weeks. I also knew Col. Miller 
well. I can tel! you many things about 
those times , and for the reason that I 
know these things you may count me a 
life-long oppoeer of these evih. " 

"Then you believe Morgan told the 
truth," 

"Yes, I do. He was an estimable 
man, and all who knew him could not 
doubt his truthfulness; and his family 
were beyond reproach. His wife was 
an amiable lady-like woman, and their 
children were well-behaved, quiet and 
obedient, " 

When the conversation turned on the 
finding of his body after he was mur- 
dered, he said : "The body was found 
and recognized by Mrs, Morgan after 
the Masons had tried to make it appear 
that it was the body of some other 
man. A man was found who even 
pretended to recognize it as that of his 
(the man's) father. But Mrs, Morgan 
found some marks and ecars on his per- 
son fully convincing her of his identity." 

I left him two numbers of the Cyno- 
sure, for which he was very grateful. 

There is no use talking Masonry to 
such men as he. 

Yours very truly, Waverly. 

o » » 

Ashore and Afloat. 

York, Pa., Feb. 13, 1874, 
Editor Cynosure: 

I was brought up in the society of 
Friends, and am opposed to war, and 
all brutality; but during the R<?bellion 
I served in the Pennsylvania militia 
and in the United States Navy, 
because I thought it to be my duty 
to do so after considering all the cir- 
cumstances. 

In my adventures as a warrior I saw 
the old beast at work often, and I will 
give you a few letters by way of vari- 
ety, giving my war experience on 1 and 
and sea. 

1 served part of my time on the gun- 
boat Wifisahickon, and part of it on the 
frigate Wabash. Baih vessels belong- 
ed to the South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron. The former vessel, a very 
good one, carrying five guns and cost- 
ing the tax-payers about a quarter of 
a million dollars, was so badly dam- 
aged by drunken officers (all regular 
navy officers, I was told, are Masons,) 
that at the close of the war it was sold 
at $12,000. The S. A. Squadron was 



greatly demoralized by rum, tobacco 
and Freemasonry. There were many 
collisions between the vessels, many 
were run aground, and some were 
captured without a fight. The Wis- 
sahickon collided twice while I was on 
board. And I nearly lost my life sev- 
eral times while in the naval service 
because rum-sellers and the officers 
were so fond of each other. 

When Sherman marched northward 
from Savannah, the Wissahickon with 
several other vessels and about 5000 
troops on transports, were sent up 
Broad River from Port Royal to co- 
operate, but our officers run us aground 
as soon as they could, and we had to 
throw almost everything overloird to 
get clear. I have always thought the 
square and sheepskin had something 
(0 do with this affair; for I knew it to 
be a fact that some of the commissioned 
and non commissioaed officers, and a 
ie^ of the crew were Freemasons. 
And it is certainly true that our vessel 
did aslitde as ',t well could to harm the 
rebels; I presume all well informed Anti- 
masons are of the opinion that Free- 
masonic got up the Rebellion and then 
did all they could to keep it up. No 
Anti-mason who served in our squad- 
roon could have any doubts about it. 
When the anti-secret reform reaches 
the solditrs and sailors they will write 
you some startling letters. The Ma- 
sons mysteries of the Rebelhon will 
amaze the loyal citizens of the Repub- 
lic when they are revealed. 
Yours ti-uly. 

E, J. Chalfant. 



Experiefice Meeting. 



Rev. J. P . LcoAN, Opdyke, 111. 

After I had refused to attend the 
lodge for three years and six months, I 
received a notice to appear and give 
reason why I did not pay dues. Dur- 
ing this three years and six months I 
had told the gentlemen of the order 
that I never would attend the?r meet- 
ings any more. Here follows a true 
copy of my reply writing to the sum- 
mons: 

At Home. | 

RiCHViEW, III., Dec, 20, 1869. \ 
To the Lodge of A. F. A. M. of Rich- 
view, 111., Respfc fully: 
Gentlemen: — I have been notified 
by you to appear this evening and give 
reason why I should not be suspended 
from the privileges of Masonry . 

I answer in writing as follows briefly : 
1st, I know no reason why I should 
not be suspended; 2d, I know no rea- 
son why I should not desire lo he; 3d, 
I know, according to your law, I should 
be; 4th, I know that it is my desire to 
be suspended; 5lb, Masonry has no 
charms for me; 6th, it trammels me in 
the narrow way that leads to heaven; 
the narrow way does not admit it with 
MB. I can gdt to heaven very easy 
without it; easier, too! and eo can you, 
MY FRIENDS ; be careful to enter therein, 

PROMISES. 

I keep my obligations as a Mason 
because of my word, my integrity, and 
wish to be brought under no more ob- 
ligations as a Mason. Also, I promise 
to treat Masons with common respect 
as men, 

REQUESTS. 

Suspend me and respect me as a 
man. Transmit a copy of this to 
neighboring lodges. Given in dupli- 
cate. J. B. Logan." 

The above was received and caused 
indignation. What follows will be 
reported in the next. 

P. S. — I wish the editor and readers 



of the Cynosure to understand that I 
commenced operations against Masonry 
at Riohvie W.Washington Co. , 111. , in the 
year 1869. I made some headway. I 
moved away from there to Webber 
Township, in Jefferson Co., 111., last 
October; have spied out the ground 
and now am ready to operate and re- 
port, but will bring up the missing re- 
ports first. 



0. Reynold?, Hammond, N. Y. — I 
am a Methodist class-leader, but expect 
ere long to be "cast out of the syna- 
gogue," just because I claim that all 
the workers of darkness are the children 
of darkness, and the devil leadeth them 
at his will. But the good Lord is with 
me and will take care of me. 



The question of Fellowship. 

RUSHSYLVANIA, 0. 

Editor of the Cynosure : 
A word for your " half column or 



so. 



In your issue of the l7th of 
February, you say ' ' letters from some 
Methodist brethren have suggested a 
new topic of discussion," namely. 
'* fellowship with secrecy." This may 
be new to some Christian denomina- 
tions, but it is as old to others as their 
very existence. For example, the 
Reformed Presbyterian Church, (com- 
monly called Covenaters; "the United 
Presbyterian Church," the "Secession 
Church," and the ''United Brethern" 
never have knowingly allowed their 
pulpits to be desecrated with Free- 
masons, Odd-fellows, or such like, nor 
their communion tables to be defiled, 
or tainted, or polluted with the hands 
of men who sit weekly in secret con- 
claves with infidels, Mohammedans, 
Hindoos, Jews, Americm savages, 
etc. , etc., (see " Webb's Monitor," 
page 18; Grosh's Odd-fellows Manual, 
page 277 and 280,) and in their or- 
ganization positively exclude Christ 
and the Christian religion, (see Grosh's 
Manual, again, page 277; Odd-fellows' 
Digest, page 39.) 

It always has been unaccountable to 
me to know how a Christian denomi- 
nation could fellowship men who 
"leave" Christ and the Christian 
religion "at the door," when they 
enter into their dark lodges, guarded 
at the door with the tyler's sword, 
(see "Craftsman," page 104; also 
''Webb's Monitor," page 120 ) What 
need of a drawn sword to guard the 
door where men are engaged in honest 
business ? 

Now let me ask our Christian breth- 
ern who fellowiship Freemasons, are 
you not, by so doing, giving counten- 
ance to the dark deeds of those who 
are identified with systems which rob 
the widow and her fatherless children 
of any share in the ''funds which they 
had for years been aiding to accumu- 
late?' (See "Grosh's Manual" page 
193; also '' Odd-fellows Constitution," 
page 50 and 5f.) Again let me ask, 
is or was it any greater sin to fellow- 
ship Henry L, Valance, and his two 
comrades, who took Wm. Morgan out 
into the Niagara river, fastened weights 
to him with ''strong cords," and threw 
him overboard. I ask would it be any 
greater sin to receive them into church 
fellowship, than to receive into fellow 



6 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



ship thoBC who are sworn to uphold 
and conceal such dark deeds of horrid 
cruelty !" 

A word from the Bible to all who 
have in any way been entangled in the 
coila of those dark systems which God 
hates: "Come out from among them, 
and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and 
touch not the unclean thing; and I 
will receive you, and will be a father 
unto you, and ye shall be my sons and 
daughters, saith the Lord Almighty." 
2 Cor. vi. 17, 18. H. George. 



OUll MAIL, 



N. Green, Clayville, N. Y., writes: 
''I am bound to get all the subscrib- 
ers I can. , . The grangers are 
taking them in at Wateryille. When 
they get their eyes open, I suppose 
they can say with the greenhorn that 
they have not made much, but have 
learned something." 

J. M. Shellebarger, Lettsvilie, Iowa, 
sets an example which we hope those 
who are transferred from fortnightly to 
the weekly list will follow; he writes: 

''I am a subscriber to the fortnightly 
and as I will now get the weekly at 
the same rate, I have procured you a 
few new subacribers." 

Robert Moore, Caldwell, O. , writes: 

"If I had the money to spare I 
would send you fifty dollars for books 
and papers for general distribution." 

If persons who desire to have our prin- 
ciples planted in every part of the coun- 
try, can find worthy men or women to 
act as colporters, and either advance 
a little money t j give them a start, ex- 
pecting them to return it after a time, 
or assist and encourage them in other 
ways, our country may in a few years 
be well informed on the subject of se- 
cret societies. 

Rev. P. Fuller, Utica, Minn., re- 
news his subscription and writes: 

"I am in hopes to send you some 
names soon. I will write some for the 
paper." 

We hope our readers from all parts 
of the country, from the British Possess- 
ions, Maine, Minnesota, and the territo- 
ries on the north, through all the in 
tervening parts of the country to Mis- 
sissippi, Texas and California on the 
south and west, will send us whatever 
news of interest there is in their sec- 
tions, whether encouraging or discour- 
aging. 

We want news first, of the progress 
of the Anti-masonic cause; second, of 
the secret society operations; third, re- 
ligions or political news of a more gen- 
eral character. We wish these volun- 
teer correspondents would write as oft- 
en as once a month, but hope they 
will be sure to write as often as once in 
three months or four times a year if un 
able to do more. 

Mrs. Games, Northville, Mich. , sends 
a new subscription and writes: 

**As my health was too poor to look 
for subscribers, I will make the Baptist 
minister at Walled Lake a present of 
the paper. I think he will read it and 
be interested in it." 

John M. Stevenson, Washington, la., 
writes: 

"I am very much pleased with the 
progress you are making and that the 
paper is going to be enlarged. I could 
not get along without it. I have been 
working a little in your behalf, and 
have succeeded in getting four new sub- 
scribers." 

Mrs. Clink, Mehoopany, Pa., writes: 

"God speed the right and hasten the 

day when parents and children will not 

be parted by the ruthless hand of Mr. 

Moneylove." 

W. J. Knappen , of the same place, 
writes : 



"It is hardly possible lo find any to 
BubFcrtbe for the paper. But to me it 
is comforting and cheering. I find by 
it that good is being doae in other places 
and I hope will soon be here When 
the Cynosure comes out in its new 
form I mean to see what can be done 
then. I believe it will be the cheapest 
paper that is published, it is now ac- 
cording to its value and has been since 
I have been acquainted with it." 

Geo. Surface, North Union, lad., 
writes: 

'*! think I am doing all T can for the 
anti-secret cause. I intend to be a sub- 
scriber for the Cynosure as long as I 
live." 

Thomas ,J. McLouth, Manchester, N. 
Y., writes: 

"I started out in , 1 827 as an Anti- 
mason, and I have given my influence 
in opposition to ail necret orders even 
since," 

J, C. Ha'sted, Windsor, 0,, renews 
saying: 

"To withhold from helping so glori- 
ous a cause would be a sin." 

L. Ketchum, Spartansburg, Pa., 
writes: 

"The Patrons of Husbandry have 
started a grange lodge here, and are 
drawing all the farmers and all others 
ttiey can into it. We need light for 
the people here, and I think J. P. 
Stoddard is the man to give the farmers 
the true character of the grange, as 
well as of all other secret orders." 

Mr. Stoddard is to deliver lectures 
at Spartans-burg on his way to New 
York. 

J. William?. Majority Point, 111., 
writes : 

"As soon as I receive a copy of the 
enlarged weekly edition, I intend to 
spend a few days canvassing for sub- 
scribers. I am satisfied if every family 
in this country would read the Cyno- 
sure for only three months, the Mason- 
ic dragon woi'Id fall to rise no more. 
All the people need is light. May God 
bleas th« noble and heroic efforts of the 
Cynosure." 



h^t %m% %p. 



What Freemasonry is not. 



SOLOMON souT^^yICK, 1828. 



So much has been written and said 
upon this subject, that I have found it 
difficult if not impossible, to strike out 
anything new. To have undertaken 
to view it in all its different aspects of 
light and shade ; to have traced the 
history of tie rise and progress of Free- 
masonry alone, with its pretentions 
its aims, its immoral and irreligious 
rites and obligations, and its inevitable 
and baneful tendency to political as 
well as moral turpitude and corruption, 
would have required a volume. There 
are two or three points, however, 
which deserve to be considered Keri- 
ously by those of us who intend to se- 
cede from the Masonic corp«. We shall 
at least ask the two-fold question : Why 
ive withdraw from the institution; and 
hoio we absolve ourselves from the ohli- 
gations toe have taken to support it? 

To the first proposition involved in 
this question, the obvious answer is : 
Because vfe have found by experience 
that Freemasonry is not what it pre- 
tends to be. 

It is not a literary institution; for it 
it has never been known to promote the 
interests of literature, unless we admit 
the clumsy works of some of its pro- 
fessed oracles and panegyrists, such in- 



coherent essays and incongruous com- 
pilations, for example, as Webb's Moni- 
tor, Town's Speculative Masonry, and 
others of similar cast, to be literary 
works, a concession I am not prepared 
to make. A Clinton and a Smith, and 
perhaps several others, have indeed 
written ingenious and eloquent orations 
for some of its holidays. But when we 
read these we perceive too clearly for 
the honor of the order, that their liter- 
ary excellence ie not either from the 
dignity or utility of the subject; that 
it is not literature enriched or orna- 
mented by Freemasonry, but Freema- 
sonry puffed by the good nature, and 
striding vainly on the stilts of literatui-e. 
And while we admire the ingenuity, as 
well as the excessive generosity of the 
orators, in turniug a "day cf small 
things" into a day of fanciful great 
ones; we perceive no reason to laud 
Masonry itself as a literary institution, 
or even as a handmaid of literature. 

It is not a scientific instiuition; for 
there is no branch of Fclence taught 
in its secret retreats. "I have neither 
seen nor he^rd," says an elegant anony- 
mous author, ' 'in all my acquaintance 
with the lodges, the explanation, or 
illustration, of the least principle of 
science." The author I have quoted 
means real science, and this is what I 
mean. I ehaU not deny that such 
science is taught in the lodges , as well 
as out of them, by the learned noodles 
of the order, as tije inspired author of 
the Proverbs alludes to, when he says, 
"A wicked man winketh with his eye, 
he speaketh with his feet, he teacheth 
with his fingers ! " Ingenious monkeys 
and learned pigs, to say nothing of the 
Grecian dog Apollo, and his canine ri- 
vals, Toby and Minetto, are in this >e' 
spect real adepts in Masonic science. 

It is not a religioxis institution. For 
it not only does not lay claim lo any 
religion, except it be that very conve- 
nient, latitudinarian, anything or noth- 
ing system, called the religion of nat- 
ure, and which may be interpreted in as 
many ways as there are flowers in the 
field, or trees in the forest, birds in the 
air, or fishes in the sea. Freemasonry, 
I repeat it, prides hereelfon the exclus- 
ion of all religions, saving this natural 
theology, which, (though it be not 
wholly unfounded,) the dreams of vis- 
ionaries, and sophistry of skepticism 
combined, have wrought into a fanciful 
theory, well calculated to answer their 
purposes; but practically speaking, 
ruinous in its effects upon the best tem- 
poral interests; and chilling, if not 
blighting the immortal hopes of man- 
kind. 

It is not a moral institution ; for too 
many of its oaths, its rites, and cere- 
monies are blasphemous and indecent, 
and consequently immoral in the high- 
est degree. 

It is not a delicate institution. One 
of its most strenuou? advocates, I mean 
Elder Bradley, says, "Our institution, 
founded on the fitness of things for 
men, cannot admit the delicacy of /e- 
male nature to suffer the preparatory 
and Bcutinizing eye of examination, 
necessary for initiation into any one im- 
portant degree in Masonry." The hon- 
est parson has indeed made a queer 



confession for the credit of the order. 
But sigh not, my fair country-women, 
that you cannot enter the temple of 
Masonic mummery and quackery, rath- 
er rejoice that you are excluded. The 
rule which denies you admittance is an 
act of homage to your virtues, and of 
self-condemnation to its authors. When- 
ever you shall have lost the mildness 
and the modesty of woman; whenever 
you shall have become recreant to all 
that constitutes the purity, the beauty, 
and the dignity of your sex, then may 
we look for you, not in the social and 
domestic circle, in your character of 
ministering angels to man's infirmity, 
sorrow, or joy; not in the holy sanctu- 
aries of religion, paying due he mage at 
the altars of your God and Redeemer; 
but amid the orgies of a Masonic lodge 
or a chapel, in the chsracte rs of demons 
or female furies, exciting conspirators, 
kidnappers and murderers, to deeds of 
treachery, of vengeance and of blood ! 

It is not a charitable institution, in 
the true meaning and spirit of charity; 
for its funds are not only dissipated in 
bu'lding stately but useless temples, 
but they are squandered often in the 
most profligate manner, fpr the benefit 
of unprincipled individuals; and the 
very small portion, scarcely equal to 
the "widow's mite," which goes to re- 
lieve real distress, is confined exclusive- 
ly to its own members. 

It is not a patriotic institution^ for 
it merges the love of country in its at- 
tachment to the craft. The principle 
cf patriotism dictates the good of the 
whole, the principle of Masonry, that 
of a part only. 

It is not a, republican institution ; for 
its knights, kings, high pjiests, .and 
other dignitaries more extravagantly 
ridiculous in this age and clime, are at 
war with the simplicity of manners, 
and equality of rights, which distin- 
guish a republican government, and 
are not to be safely tolerated among a 
free people. 

It is not a free institution, in any 
sense of the term. For its members 
are as much enthralled by their infam- 
ous obligations, as an Algerine galley 
slave, or a Turkish mute. 

It is not a mechanical institution; for 
whatever pretentions it may have form- 
erly had, to any operative mechanical 
pursuit, have long since been swallov^ed 
up, and lost sight of in its speculative 
quackery. 

It is not an industrious institution. 
A medical professor, speaking from ex- 
perience, has declared Masonic lodges 
the genuine academies of tippling. 

It is not an honorable institution ; for 
its cunning chiefj and leaders, as I 
know from my own personal and dearly 
bought experience, swindle the young 
and artless out of their morey, under 
false pretenses, and are juctly liable to 
indictment under the statute applicable 
to such cases of fraud. 

It is not a laioful institution; for its 
obligations are diabolically at war with 
the laws both of God and our country. 

These are suSicient reasong to justi- 
fy any rational man in withdrawing 
from it, silently and privately, or loudly - 
and publicly renouncing and denounc. 
ing it. 



^ f 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 




Schedule of Bible Lessons for Second 
quarter, 1874. 



Apr. 
May 



Bth, Ex. XX. 1-17— The Ten Commantls. 
12 " xxxii. 1-li, 19, 90: Golcieu Calf. 
1!) " xxxiii. 12-"20: People Forgiven. 
35 " xl. 17-30: Tabernacle set lip. 
S Lev. vii. 37,38: The Five OU'eriuf^s. 
10 " xxii 4-(t, 15-21, 3iJ-3fl: Tlie Tliree 
Great Feasts. 
" 17 Num. iii. 5-13: The Lord's Jlinisters. 
" 25 " xix. l-IO: Israel's Unbelief. 
" 31 " XX. 7-13: The Smitten Rock. 
June 7 Num. xxi.i-9: Serpent of Brass. 
*' 14 Dent, sviii. fl-lG: The True Prophet. 
" 21 " xxiv. 1-12: Death of Moses. 
" 2S Review (Suggest) Deut. viii. Mercies 
Reviewed, 



LKSSONXVii, — APRIL 26, 1874. — THE TABER- 
NACLE SET UP. 

SCRIPTURB LESSON. — EX. xl. 17-30. 

Commit 17-39 ; Primary Verse 31. 

17 Aiid it came to pass in the first 
month ill the second year, on tlie first day 
of the month, that the tabernacle was 
reared np. 

18 And Moses reared up the tabernacle, 
and fastened his sockets, and set u)3 tlie 
boards thereof, and put in the bars thereof 
and reared up his pillar.s. 

19. And he spread abroad the tent over 
the tabernacle, and pat the covering of the 
tent above upon it ; as the Lord com- 
manded Moses. 

20 And he took and put the testimony < 
into the ark, and set the staves on the ark, 
and put the mercy-seat above upon the ark . 

21 And he brought the ark into the 
tabernacle, and set up the vail of the cover- 
ing, and covered the ark of the ti^stimoujr; 
as the Lord commanded Moses. 

22 And he put the table in the tent of 
the congregation, upon the side of the tab- 
ernacle northward, without the vail. 

23 And he set the bread in order upon 
it before the Lord ; as the Lord had com- 
manded Moses. 

24. And he put the candlestick in the 
tent of the congregation , over against the 
table, on the side of the tabernacle south- 
ward. 

25 And he lighted the lamps before the 
Lord : as the Lord comaianded jMoscs. 

25 And he put the golden altar in the 
tent of the congregation before the vail : 

27 And he burnt sweet incense thereon ; 
as the Lord commanded Moses. 

28 And he set up the hanging at the 
door of the tabernacle. 

29 And he put the altar of burnt ofier- 
Tng by the door of the tabernacle of the 
tent of the congregation, and offered upon 
it the burnt offe»'ing and the meat offering; 
03 the L )rd coiiiuin lei Moses. 

30 And he set the laver between the 
tent of the congregation and the altar, and 
put water there, to wash withal. 

GOLDEN TEXT.— "How amiable are 
thy tabernacles, O Lord of Hosts." — Ps. 
Ixxxiv. 1. 

TOPIC— The dwelling-place of God. 



HOME HEADINGS. 

M. Ex. xl. 1-16— The Tent of Meeting. 

T. 1 Ki. viii. 1-21— The Temple of Solomon. 

W. 2 Ki. XXV. 1-25— tolomon's Temple Destroy'd. 

Th.Ezravi. 3-!9— The Temple of Zerubbabel, 
Matt. xxi. 1-12— The House of Prayer, 
Rev. xxi. 1 -8— God Dwelling with Men. 
Rev. xxi. ;)-27— No Temple in Heaven . 



that fihis plan has increased tha c'nircb 
attendance from h.\H school, within a 
few weeks, fii'ty per cent. Some other 
superintendents might not be able to 
carry out thi3 plan as successfuily as 
Mr. Reynolds, but every faithful super- 
intendent and teacher can exert an in- 
fluence in tVi3 direction. If they will 
be.ir in mind, theo, that the public 
preaching of the cross is God's chcsen 
instrumentaiity for swing sinnere, and 
consider that their pupils, a class of 
them at least, may bo established in a 
habit of church-going or conii;med in 
the neglect of the sanctuary, as they 
are faithful or unfaithful to their trust, 
this icfiuence will be more extensively 
exerted. We can hardly overestimate 
the importance of this part of a teach- 
er's work: — Ux. 



— When President Harrison was 
leaving home for Washington, he was 
advised to get a big dog to keep the 
boys froLo stealing his fruit. The 
President replied: "I wofild sooner get 
a Sunday-school teacher to tell the 
boys belter than to steal. Find the 
boy 1 a teacher, and I will give them 
apples enough." 




Eggs Cooked Hygonlcfiliy. 



p. 

s. 
s. 



Take Your Class to Ciuireh, 



Faithful teachers can do very much 
to establish their pupils in a habit of 
church-going, and there is danger that 
by their indifference in regard to it 
they may do something to confirm them 
in their neglect of the sanctuary. If 
teachers EQanifest a lively interest in 
seeing their pupils regular in their at- 
tendance upon public worship, if they 
convince them that they regard it as a 
matter of vital importance, their influ- 
ence will be felt and it •will bear fruit. 
Some successful expedients for secur- 
• ing this end have been adopted by 
superintendents. A cotemporary states 
that "a superenteiadent in New York is 
accustomed to aek those who do not 
intend to go to church to remain after 
ths school is dismissed, and give him 
the reason. " It is said that William 
Reynolds, of Peoria, 111., asks the 
scholars who have attended churoh in 
the morning to raise their hands, and 



Hard boiled eggs have always been 
considered more difficult of digeslion 
than soft boiled ones. The reason is 
this : the white of an egg is almost 
pure albumeD, Now albumen coagu- 
lates with heat, and is not so readily 
acted upon by the gastric juice; so 
that much of it passes from the stomach 
undigested. Persons with vigorous 
digestion may manage a hard boiled 
egg BO as to extract most of the nour- 
ishment from it, if it be well masti- 
cated and mixed with other food. The 
yolk of the eggs, however, is not ren- 
der.3d worse by bard boiling. Eggs 
boiled just four minutes have the white 
part in a partly* floculeat condition, 
more easily digested, and not so soft as 
to be offensive to any one. An egg 
may be cooked ia water at a tempera- 
ture of about 105*^ Fahrenheit for 
fifteen minutes and leave the yolk well 
cooked, but the white will not be ren. 
dered tough and hard to digest. Though 
more troablesome, is is a good way to 
cook an egg to render it easy of diges- 
tion as well as palatable. Persons 
whose palates will not tolerate a soft 
boiled egg should have them poached 
and dropped on toast. — HcdVs Journal. 



Apple Fruit Cake. — Two cups dried 
apples, soaked over night in warm 
water. Chop fine, simmer two hours 
in two cups molasses, add one cup 
sugar, half cup sour cream, half cap 
sour milk, half cup butter (in the ab- 
sence of the cream increase the butter 
one-half), two eggs, one teaspoonfui 
cream-of-tartar, one and one-half tea- 
spoonsful of soda, spice to suit. This 
will make two loaves. 

To Prevent Moths' Ravages. — 
Hemp, when the blossoms are just 
opened, is an infallible preservative of 
textile fabrics and furs against the at- 
tacks of moths. The stalk, with leaves 



and flowers, is cut when blooming 
(about July), and dried in. the shade. 
It is said to [--reserve its properties for 
several years. 

Apple Pie. — Peei tart apples, stew 
them, strain them through a net strain- 
er, spason thesa whib hot with butter 
or cream, flavor with nulmeg and put 
them on a crust that has been baked 
on a pi 3 plate. Always have sweet 
milk fo drink with apple pie. 

Cup Cake. — Five cups of flour, mix- 
ed with three tablespooaiiful of baking: 
powder, one cup and a half of butter, 
one cup and a half of milk, three eggs, 
nut.meg or bmon juice. Add currants 
if you wifib. 

Poisonous Syrup, — The Western 
Rural lately called the atleistion of its 
readers to the vile character of much 
of the molasses in use. Much of this 
article is now raade from sulphuric acid 
and rags. A simpia tost is tea. If 
th/J molasjes turn tea bkck, it forms 
strong ground for believi.ig it to be 
unfi!'. for use. It may even be a dan- 
gerous poison. 



window as possible. Do not transplant 
them till the plants are strong and 
hardy, and not til! the ground ia warm 
enough to plant corn and then just 
before or after a shower. 



The Journal of the Farm oS"ers a 
few good sugge.=tion3 upon kitchens. 
It recommends that the housewife, 
instead cf wearing out her muscle and 
her temper scrubbing floors, sho'jld 
resort to the simple expedient of paint- 
ing. All that is necessary is two quarts 
of oil, three pounds of ochre and one 
pint of japas, which will paint a floor 
twelve by eighteen feet. The time 
taken to clean a painted floor, and the 
labor saved, are equal to ten times the 
"ost. ■ The writer also suggests, anoth- 
er convenience, viz : A good eized sink, 
five or six feet long by two and a half 
wide at the back; at the top of this 
sink should be a shelf for lamps, vases, 
etc, under it a place for ircaware, and 
at the ends two pi'.rijps — one for hard 
and the ether for soft water. 



Remedy for Feverislmoss. 



Water Melons. 



By sure that you have good seed, i. 
p. , from a large ripe melon. Take a 
good sized box ten or twelve inches 
deep and fill it half full of good manure, 
caver this with tough sod (grass side 
down) from a rich soil. The seeds may 
be put in with a knife at leaet one inch 
and a half apart. Treat them the same 
as cabbage plants, except that when 
the plant gets strong and hardy the 
transplanting is done by cutting out as 
large a piece of the sod as possible with 
the plant. Set them out in heavily 
manured warm rich soil, one in a place 
at least four feet apart. Enormous 
squashes and cucumbers may be raised 
in the same way, and when strong 
vigorous plants are set out early they 
often get the start of bugs completely. 



trivD the ronllry Exercise. 



When persons are feveiish and 
thirsty beyond what is natural, indi- 
cated in some cases by a metallic taste in 
t'ac mouth, one of the best "coolers" is 
to take a lemon, cutoff the fop, sprinkle 
over it some loaf-sugsr, working it down 
into the lemon with a spoon, and then 
suck it slowly. Invalids with feverish- 
nesB msy take two or three lemons a 
day in this manner with marked bene- 
fit, manifested by a sense of coolness, 
comfort »Ed invigoratioD. A leaion or 
two thus taken at "tea-time" is for 
some an entire substitute for the or- 
dinary 'supper of summer, or would 
give many a man a coa^fortable night's 
sleep and an appetite for breakfast, to 
which they are strangerF, who will 
have their cup of tea, or supper of 
"relish," and cakes, and berries, and 
cream. 



Until the garden is planted, fowls 
should have full iiberly to range there- 
in. In the spring, especially, they are 
indefatigable hunters of insects, and 
their natural instinct should not be 
embed in ih's direction whenever they 
will not do positive injury to the plants, 
and this is only for about three months 
after the garden is planted. For this 
reason, the garden ought always to be 
fenced, so that fowls may have the 
range of the farm. 

When there is danger of their dep 
redating upon neighboring places, they 
may be let out an hour or two before 
sundown, the time being then so short 
before roosting time that they will 
neither wander fir or scratch to any 
considerable extent. 

Advantage should be taken of the 
first warm weather to thoroughly clean 
the poultry house, and the wash for 
such portions as are whitewashed should 
have a portion of carbolic acid mixed 
in it, since it not only kills vermin, but 
also tends to prevent their gathering. 
— Western Rural. 



Planting a Strawberry Bed. 



an 



\^\ tt)|ii ^^^\u 



Cabbage Plants. 

If you have not a hot bed in which 
to raise these, a good subs itute iis a 
good sized box about eight inches deep 
filled with rich soil, in which sow- the 
the seeds early and keep the soil moist 
p.nd in a warm, light room as near a 



No farm garden should be without 
ample strawberry bed, since it is 
much cheaper to cultivate them than to 
depend upon the wild fruit for the table. 
One of the great mistakes in this cul- 
ture is in planting the vines in bsde, 
and too closely together. Three feet 
apart between the rows, and twelve 
inches apart in the rows, is near enough 
together. If the runners are kept 
carefully cut the slook of plants will 
entirely fill the rows, and nearly the 
spaces between the rows, by the au- 
tumn of the first season. 

The plants should be planted as early 
in the spring as the soil will admit 
workirsg. leaving only the leaves and 
central bud exposed. Five hundred 
plants will give an ample supply of 
fruit for a large family, and, if Wilson's 
Albany is selected, you may be assured 
of uniform crops of fair fruit, if kept 
clean and covered with mulch daring 
winter. In the spring let the beds 
retain the mulch as long as possible, 
at least until the plants show signs of 
growing beneath. Then remove from 
over the plants, leaving the mulch in- 
tact between the rows.—- W. Rural. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 




Chieaaro, TJinrsrtay, April 16, 1874. 



MASU.MllY SUBVERTING THE KEPUBLIC. 



In another part of this paper will be found the 
Chicago Tribune's account of the intended laying of 
the corner-stone of the new United States Custom 
House in Chicago, by Freemasons. Of all sects, par- 
ties, organizations, orders, secret or open, a Freema- 
son's lodge is the most unfit to put its insignia on a 
United States public building; and the proposal of the 
lodge to practice its heathen ritual, and place its anti- 
Christian date on the cjrner-stone of our new Custom 
House, is a piece of impudence and effrontery which 
has seldom been equ'^Jied and never surpassed. 

The Grand Lodge of Illinois laid the corner-stone 
of our new State House at Springfield, and it was re- 
sented as an insult to the State. The result was, the 
stone was taken out of the wall , and buried in the 
earth out of sight. A similar attempt to lay the cor- 
ner-stone of the new State House at Albany, N. Y., 
was resi-ited by leading New York papers and igno- 
miniously failed; the stoie being laid by the Germans, 
A similar attempt and failure, partial, or entire, oc 
curred in the State of Iowa; and the example of our 
State was cited by those who resisted that profanation. 
That a United States Secretary at Washington, 
should attempt to for-e a national recognition of the 
lodge upon the people of Chicago and the North-west, 
argues great boldness or ignorenca, or both; since the 
attempt hai been so unmistakably condemned by the 
popular voice. There are about half a million of Free- 
masons, one-sighth part of the people of the United 
States. By what right or show of propriety this secret 
sect pats itself forward to represent forty millions 
of people in this country, in laying the corner-stones of 
its public buildings, is beyond the possibility of a guess. 
The ceremony is religious; consisting in part of prayer to 
the god of the lodge; but it is not pretended that the 
religion is that of the Bible; or the god prayed to, the 
God of revelation. And as a civic ceremony it is 
more impudent and revoking still, as its chief lexicon 
(Mackey,) declares, ''The government of a Grand 
Lodge is therefore completely despotic,"' Itis heathen- 
isminsultingCfanstianity, and despotism insulting lib- 
erty. Every voter and every voter's wife and child 
should be moved to their heart's center by this attempt. 
Dr. Post of St. Louis, in his address to the Pilgrim 
Memorial Convention in Farwell Hall, before the fire 
referred to the lodge as setting up the hollow forms and 
titles of kingcraft and priest-craft, that those hated foes 
of humanity might creep back into their empty shells. 
Let Chicago be draped in black if this infamy is at- 
tempted. 



class; a class which we wish was extinct; who preach 
so that truth itself loses its sacredness in their lips, 
because uttered by inspiration of the god of this 
world. 

Dr, Patton, of The Interior, and Professor of The- 
ology, has prosecuted Mr. Swing before his Presbytery 
and the case is attracting public attention to the two 
men. Unless there is more prayer and more of the 
Spirit of Christ than usually falls to the lot of such 
trials, we fear little good will come of it. It will be 
diflScult to prove a man a heretic whose chief error 
lies in what he does not teach, and who, by originality 
and the affectation of it, makes the impression that 
the truths of the Bible are not what serious persons 
have supposed them to mean. "Whoever," says a 
reply to Junius "cries out against established order, 
will always find abettors. Those who know what he 
means, commonly sympathize in his objects ; and those 
who do not know what he means, hope he means 
rebellion," 



REV. E, U. KIRK, D. D. 



IS PROF. SVVIJSG A HERETIC ! 



There is a class of preachers now, as in all past ages, 
whose first principle is hearers. Voltaire said to a 
friend, "One thing is to be borne in mind: whatever 
is true or false, 2 must have readers.^' This was the 
one chief end of Bennett's New York Herald, and is 
still of its humbler imitations. These traffickers look 
on religion and things sacred, as fish for their net, and 
though their methods are diverse, their spirit is one, 
and that not the spir.t of Christ. A minister who 
has intelligence enough to keep inside the dead line 
which separates hurtful error from "damnable here- 
sy;" who will alarm Christians by paradox and double- 
meanings; select those parts of Gospel truth which 
the world has no objection to, and omit those which it 
hates; and slur the receivers of plain Bible truth as 
bigots and narrow-minded; who will speak of theolo- 
gy "as it once was," as though he had a new edition, — 
a man with really moderate parts may contrive by a 
few such simple tricks, to do a large business on a 
small capital. If John Stuart Mill had not been an 
atheist he would hardly have been heard of beyond 
his native country; but the god of this world will 
praise the champions of error by the mouths of the 
millions. 



The American press generally laments the death 
and honors the memory of Dr. Kirk, He was of 
Presbyterian parentage; graduate of Princeton Col- 
lege and Theological Seminary ; pastor in A Ibany ; a 
successful and eloquent revivalist; founder of an 
American chapel in Paris; an early friend of ex- 
President Fmney, and an advocate of reforms . His 
late pastorate was that of the aristocratic Mt. Vernon 
Church, Boston. 

He loathed Freemasonry, and as chairman of the 
publishing committee of the American Tract Society, 
Boston ; he revised and advocated the publication of 
a tract on secret societies. The tract was printed and 
all but two of the committee, Edward S. Rand and 
Deacon Julius Palmer, were for its publication. These 
two gentlemen hesitating, I, P . Warren, secretary of 
the Society, opened correspondence with Theodore 
Cuyler and other prominent clergymen on the pro- 
priety of its publication. Mr. Cuyler, who had 
joined three secret societies, advised strongly against 
the tract, and it was never published in Boston; but 
revised and enlarged by Dr, H, M. Storrs, now chief sec 
retary of the Am. Home Missionary Society, who was 
then a pastor in Cincinnati, it was issued in that city. 
Dr. Kirk, though a reformer, had not the nerve 
or steadfastness of purpose to resist the insidious and 
relentness power of the lodge; he gave way to the 
hard, over bearing influence of A. H. Quint and H. 
M. Dexter; and to-day the Congregationalism of Bos- 
ton stands timid and silent before a power which the 
mass of its members and ministers loathe and dread. 
If another generation should pass and the old men 
and women die who remember the Morgan discuss- 
sions , and no stand be made in that city against the 
lodge, the religion of Boston will cower before Free- 
masonry, as that of the city of Rome did before the 
Pope, before the advent of Victor Immanuel and the 
union of Italy. 

Now, as of old, the pleading voice of God is heard: 
"Who will rise up for me against the evil doers? Who 
will stand up for me against the workers of iniquity ?" 



B. A. GHOSH'S J)EFENSE OF ODD-FELLOWSHIP. 



W6 commenced a review of this in the last Cynosure, 
under the caption of "Coercion of Conscience." It is 
more of an attack upon Anti-masonic churches than a 
defense of Odd-fellowship.. An attack subtle and ven- 
emous, like the serpent's temptation in Eden. In 
order to produce disaffection and stir up mutiny, that 
he may disintegrate and ruin the church, he assumes 
a bland and friendly spirit; cautiously suggesting to 
the one he seeks to fire with wrath and rebeliioa, that 
he would by no means advipe to a violation of his 
church covenant, or the least disrespect to its rules or 
discipline. If he »ere a member of a bigoted and 
tyrannical church he would obey its rules so long as he 
remained a member. He would agitate so long as 
hope of success remained for the repeal of these un 
We fear David Swing, of Chicago, is a man of this 1 charitable and bigoted rules of non-fellowship with 



fraternal orders; and failing in this he would seek in a 
regular manner a change of his church relation by 
uniting with a more Lbenl and Christ-like commun- 
ion. To be a member of the lodge and of a church 
whose narrow bigotry forbids such two-fold member- 
ship would be embarrassing and unpleasant to both 
parties. "I would not advise it," tie says. Don't 
ask us to receive you while your church rule binds 
you, for our liberality will not permit us even to con- 
sider so base a reason for rejecting a worthy applicant. 
But if you are not one of those enslaved bigot? who 
consider church acthemas equivalent to eternal damna- 
tion; if you dare Ihink for yourself even on subjects 
forbidden by your church, you can do one of two 
things, in all charity and wisdom : put the uncharitable 
rule or your charitable self out of the church that 
maintains such bigoted tyranny. 

Such is the spirit of his appeal. What saintly 
blandness and candor mixed with deadly venom! 
Professed charity striking with absolutely murderous 
intent. Were Paul present witnessing such an at- 
tempt to poison the minds of the disciples and turn 
them away from true faith, and its primative exclus- 
iveness of holy fellowship, we cannot doubt he would 
reply as he did to Elymas, " full of all subtlety and 
all mischief, thou child of the devil, thou enemy of all 
righteousness, wilt thou not cease to pervert the right 
ways of the Lord. " Just so of the first tempter, "Yea 
hath God said ye shall not eat of every tree of the 
garden;" as much as to say. Is not that a mistake? 
God could not be so unreasonable ! How bland and 
friendly to both parties! But the vemomous insinua- 
tion that God was illiberal, yea, tyrannical, in imposing 
a needless and mean restraint upon her liberty arous- 
ed the first motions of sin in the hitherto innocent and 
happy mother of our race. Instantly the tempter 
perceiving his advantage follows up the direful im- 
pression by a bold accusation against the law and its 
author: ' God doth know that ye shall hot surely 
die," but be as gods as soon as you have eaten. By 
that bold wickedness the revolt from God was forced, 
and sin brought in— the fount of death and all our 
woe. 

In the same subtlety and by similar means this 
high priest of Baal seeks to seduce men from the su- 
preme and sole worship of Christ, and to supercede 
his worship and his church by the mystic institution 
and deistic rites of Odd-fellowship. He shows an evi- 
dent determination to rule or ruin the churches which 
dare to oppose Odd-fellowship, and yet boasts une- 
qualled liberality. He insists that the churches shall 
entertain the same opinion of Odd-fellowship that he 
does and adopt his rule of fellowship instead of Christ's 
commands to be separate and have no fellowship with 
idolaters or with any unfruitful works of darkness; 
and yet prates against ecclesiastical tyranny while 
seeking to exercise as much of it as the devil himself 
would desire. 

Some one may yet ask. Why is it not as bigSted and 
tyrannical for the church to prescribe rules of fellow- 
ship to Odd-fellows aa for Odd-fellcws to dictate rules 
to the church ? We answer, simply because one is 
from heaven, the other is from men. One ascertains 
Christ's law of holiness and abides by it, the other 
makes laws agreeable to the carnal mind and seeks to 
impose them upon the children of God, 

ODD-FELLOWs' OBLIGATIONS OATHS. 

Mr. Grosh makes a bitter complaint against Anti- 
masons, because they insist that Odd-fellows are 
oath-bound; as if by so doing we make them all liars; 
and he makes a laborious attempt to disprove what 
we assert, viz., that their obligations are oaths. And 
how does he prove this? First he says: — 

" 'The Odd-fellows' Manual' (ch. 2. § 2) declares 
that 'there is not a single obligation administered 
among us inconsistent with any duty we owe to self, 
family, country, mankind, or to our Creator. All the 
aid we are to render each other is and must be within 
the limits of strict humanity and patriotism, of moral- 
ity and religion We are not, therefore, 

an oath-bound irstitution, nor are our obligations 
oaths.'" 

How the assertion that their oaths do not require 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



9 



anything immoral or evil proves that they are not! 
oaths, we are utterly unable to perceive. Nor yet ■ 
how a mere assertion of a thing is any proof at all. i 

His next argument is that this declaraiion of the | 
Manual "has been publicly repeated hundreds of t'mes 
by writers and speakers of the highest character," etc. 
Yes, but the trouble is, the statement is not proof, 
neither does it cover the point in dispute, viz,, that, 
the obligations taken by Jd-fellows in their lodges a?e 
oaths; and such a statement may bj repeated ten 
million times, and conveying no more proof on the dis- 
puted point in the beginning would acquire none by 
repetition. It would still have no application to the 
point in hand. 

Butif these g3utlem3n not only assert that the obli- 
gations of Odd-fellowship require no evil, but with one 
voice declare that these obligations are not oaths, 
what then I Why this would not be testimony as to 
a fact, but merely the assertion of an opinion. The 
opinion may be correct, and it may be icorrect. Men 
are quite liable to entertain mistaken opinions. And 
if these obligations are not oaths and require nothing 
wrong, and this is so material a point, why does not 
Mr. Grosh produce the obligations themselves? Hw- 
ing them every one can form his own opinion, without 
troubling Mr. Grosh or hundreds of clerical, or even 
Quaker Odd-fellows, as to whether these obligations 
really are or are not oaths. No doubt many Odd- 
fellows are honestly of the opinion that their obliga- 
tions are not oaths. Nevertheless, we have not s 
doubt that this is wholly a mistaken opinion, For al- 
though Mr. Grosh and his confreres are determined 
we ehall allow them to think and judge for us in this 
matter, there have been and Ftill are other Odd-fellowe 
who are willing to afford us the opportunity to "think 
and determine for ourselves even, on this matter which 
is forbidden by their" lodge. And these have given 
us the precise words of the various obligations of Odd- 
fellowship and the circumstances in which they are 
taken, and having this opportunity to think for our- 
selves we are clearly of the opinion that they are 
oaths to all intents and purposes. And in holding 
and proclaiming this opinion we arc not olaargi^g oaa. 
fellows witli lying or dishonesty, as Mr. G. claims, 
because he holds an opposite opinion. No reasonable 
man will take offense at another for entertaining and 
expressing an opinion different from his own. We 
have long held and asserted a different opinion from 
that generally expressed by Odd-fellows on the point 
in question, and that we must continue to do until 
they give us the facts and the reasons upon which 
they found their opinions, and those reasons and 
facts shall approve themselves to our judgment as of 
sufficient weight to overcome those on which we have 
founded our opinion. 

Dr. Willis, of Harvard, Mass. , who^e credibility is 
abundantly vouched for and whose disclosures have 
been repeatedly confirmed by other Odd- fellows, has 
given us the first seven covenants of Odd-fellowship. 
Five of the seven commence with a solemn appeal to 
Almighty God. We quote one as a fair sample of 
the others : — 

OBLIGATION OF THE DEGREE OF THE CDVEKA?}T. 

«'Ij, — —, in the presence of Almighty God 

and the members of the covenant degree of this order 
assembled, most solemnly promise, declare and eay 
that I will never divulge or betray the secrets cf the 
degree about to be entrusted to my keeping. I will 
not write them, or cause them to be written or printed or 
engraved in any manner or form whatever; and I 
pledge my sacred honor, that I will to the best of my 
knowledge and full extent of my power, perform all 
the duties I am therein instructed to do." 

Part 2. "I, . do so^menly pledge myself 

to help and support my affi cted, distressed, or perse- 
cuted brother, and warn him of approaching danger, 
whether it be from his own imprudence, or from the 
evil designs of o'hers, or from some accidental cause. 
I will point out his advantage and interest, if it should 
be in my power so to do. I will protect his property, 
succor his wife and family, defend bis character and 
save his hfe and limbs should opportunity offer. And 
I do acknowledge myself solmnly bound in an espec- 
ial covenant with all brother} who can and do prove 
themselves such." 



To give a more perfect view of the obligations of 
the order as a wholf , I remark in passing that the 
pledge of sic^ecy in the white, in the blue, and in the 
scarlet degrees binds the candidate in the words, '*! 
will conceal and never reveal the secrets," etc. , and 
that the init'atory obligation binds him to abide by the 
laws of the order as the covenant degree binds him 
to perform all duties taught in the lodge, making the 
lodge and not God his law-giver. 

Now then, we are prepared to say that if a solemn 
appeal to Almighty God is what makes an oath differ 
from ''j^S) yea and nay, nay," and gives the oath effect 
and power which nobody can deny, then these obliga- 
tions are oaths. With the words of the obligation 
before him one man's opinion is as good as anothei'd, 
as to whether it is or is not an oath. The Odd- 
fellows may assert that they are not oaths, and that 
may be their opinion. But we do not make them liars, 
nor treat them with disrespect when we persist in 
confidently believing and declaring it an entirely mis- 
taken opinion. Certainly the nature of this obligation 
is euch as to c nstitute the I. 0. 0. F. just what we 
understand by an oath-bound secret society. At 
much and as clearly so as Freemasonry or any other 
oath-bouad secret order whatever. 



of Mr. Rodgers, an Englishman who lately visited 
Chicago, of grcbt help in preparing for the lesson of 
April 26th: 

"Tnose who would understand the literal meaning 
of the Tabernacle should read through the books of 
Moses, beginning at the twenty-fifih chapter of Exodus. 
Those who would understand the literal and typical 
meaning, and would feel the spiritual application of 
these services, should read those books along with the 
Epistle to the Hebrews," 



Lajin? the Custom-House Corner-Stone. 



''Pleading for Baal," — Under this head, the Rev. 
James Mathews, of Brooklyn, N. Y., in the Free 
Methodist, makes some sharp points on those who 
plead for such amusements as are a sort of worship 
paid to the ''god of this jjorld." There is, indeed. 
something very revolting in the ministers of the gos- 
pel of Him who said, "Because I have called you out 
of the world, therefore the world hateth yon," plead- 
ing for worldly amusements; and blaming the advo- 
cates of self-denial, as though Christ had not re 
quired it. 

"Of all reformera with whom earth is curgod, 
Those who reform reformers are the worst:'" 



BuRNif G THE Dead . — A meeting was lately held 
in New York city by advocates of '^cramation" or burn 
ing the dead, and the Chicago Tribune for April 4th 

contained an article in favor of this method of dispos- 
ing of our departed friends. One of the speakers ax 
the New York meeting made a most revolting speech 
in favor not only of burning corpses but of scattering 
the ashes over the fields, thus turning the ashes of our 
statesmen, divines, and relatives into a common fer- 
tilizer. The only thing it seems necessary to say 
about this plan ip, that it is heathenish in origin, un- 
necessary in practice, and disgusting in statement and 
advocacy. 

» o * 

Napoleon IV.— A meeting was lately held at 
Chiselhurst looking toward the re-establishment of 
Bonaparti=!t rule in France. Several thousand Fiench- 
men were present, among them sixty-five of the 
siglity-seven prefects under the Empire, and many 
former members of the legislative body. 

In Frince the Bonapartist faction are not idle, and 
it need not surprise any one if a faw months witness 
the erection of the old throne in this unhappy land. 
It has no homes, and, as said the first Napoleon, too 
few mothers. Twenty thousand divorces in a single 
year in Paris, and hundreds of Masonic lodges, wi(h 
the deep stains of martyr blood on every corner of the 
kingdom, or republic, or what-is-it; these are the 
fearful factorR that he must arrange who solves the 
problem: Who can rule France, tKe nation without 
a conscience ? 

•-»« 

KOTES. 



i — Inquiries in regard to reduced railroad fare to 
Syracuse will be answered when something more defi- 
siite is received from the railroad authorities. An 
effort to secure this end is being made. 

— A. B, Grosh, who fills so large a position in the 
literature and offices of Odd-fellowship and the grange, 
and latterly also in these columns, appears to be a 
Uuiversiilist in religious sentiment. 

— The Baptist friendis of the reform, who were 
sorely disappointed with the change that closed their 
denominational organs to their utterances against the 
lodge, will be rejoiced that the Baptist Weekly has 
opened a department for free discussion in which 
correspondents only are responsible for their opinions. 

— Sunday-school students will find this suggestion 



[From the Chicago Tribune, April 8.] 

Although the public mind has haa enough in the 
way of new and remarkable buildings to give its arch- 
itectural taste a continual feast, yet it has not lost 
sight of the fact that the Custom-House, when it 
rises above the fence and gro"Vs so as to overtop its 
surrounding rivals, will be the chief d'oeuvre of all 
the buildings in this city. 

Ttie gratifying news that this coming building is al- 
most ready for the formal ceremony of laying the 
corner-stone, will be received with pleasure. It is the 
design to make the event the occasion of a general 
celebration, and with this end in view a meeting of 
prominent cit'zens was called at the offic3 of Superin- 
tendent Rankin, who has charge of the new Custom- 
House, at 3 p. m. yesterday, to take into consideration 
the arrangement of a programme for the celebration 
of the laying of the corner-stone on the 24th of next 
June. A number of government officials and other 
distinguished gentlemen were present, among whom 
were the Hon. N, B. Jiidd. District Attorney Glovrr, 
Gen. McArthur, Geo. M. How, President of Board of 
Trade, United States Commissioner Phil. A. Hoyne, 
John B. Drake, B. H. Campbell, DeWit C. Creijier, 
and W. H, Bradley. Gen. McArthur called the meet- 
ing to order, and stated that the object of the gather- 
ing was to get an expression from the gentlemen pres- 
ent as to the best plan to observe the occasion appro- 
priately. The Masonic fraternity had expressed a 
willingness to take charge of the ceremonies, and he 
did not know but the public generally would wish to 
participate in the celebration, whatever it might be. 
He called for the opinion of those present. 

Mr. Rankin then read the following letter: 
James C. Rankin, Superintendent Custom-House, 

Chicago: 

Sir: Inclosed pleaee find a copy of a letter from 

the Grand Master of Free and Accepted Masons of the 

■"■^ute of Illinois in rearard to lavinc thi?. r>rn;npr,ofonfl 
of the building under your charge, vThich he desires 

should take place the 24th of June next, together with 

a copy of my reply thereto, from which you will see 

that the Secretary has authorized the laying of the 

corner-stone of the building with Masonic ceremonies. 

You will please confer with the proper authorities 
of the Masonic fraternity and make the necessary ar- 
rangements for the laying of the stone in question, 
bearing in mind that there is no authority under law 
to expend any money for this purpose. Very respect- 
fully, A. B. MuLLETT, Inspecting Architect, 

After some desultory talk, Mr. Judd arose and said 
that, in his opinion, the better way to proceed would 
be to appoint a committee to prepare a general pro- 
gramme of arrangements, leaving it to the Committee 
to decide what shall be done and to arrange for it. 
He suggested the following gentlemen: "For Chair- 
man, Mr. How; members. Sir. Drake, Mr. Bradley, 
Mr. Leiter, Mr. Cregier, Mr. Olsten and Gen. McAr- 
thur. 

Mr. Cregier made a motion that a committee be 
appointed as named, with this amendment, that they 
have the power to add to their number if required. 
The motion prevailed. Mr. Judd wished to know of 
Mr. Cregier how far the Masonic fraternity had betn 
notified of the intended ceremonies, if at all. Mr. 
Cregier replied that they had not been notified, and 
it would be necessary to give notice at once, as it was 
in contemplation by the Masters of the Grand Lodge 
to present some elaborate, characteristic features of 
their order, in the way of ceremonials, and, in order 
to do this properly, the time given for preparation 
must be as great as possible. An objection was made 
to bringing in the city authorities to act with the 
committee. It was thought they could manage the 
matter alone. 

The gentlemen present then informally expressed a 
unanimous suggestion to be acted upon by the com- 
mittee, that the Masonic fraternity be invited to take 
charge of the ceremonies of laying the corner-stone. 
As the representative cf the order, [Past] Grand 
Master Dewitt C. Cregier, was present, the invitation 
may be considered accepted and the question settled. 
I The committee then desiring to go into a secret session 
on ways and means, the other gentlemen and the 
reporters withdrew. The programme to be observed 
will be made public as soon as it is determined upon. 



10 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE^ 



t^llt. "^ifm i^iujt. 



■ The Price «1 Triitli. 



The common 



Gretit trutbB are dearly bought, 
truth 

Such as men give and take from day to day, 
ComeB in the common walk of easy life. 

Blown liy the careless wind across our way. 

Bouglit in the market at the current price, 
Bred of the smile, the jest, perchance the bowl ; 

It tells BO tale of daring or of worth. 
Nor pierces e'en the surface of the .soul. 

Great truths are hardly won. Not formed by 
chance, 

Nor wafted on the breath of summer dream; 
But grasped in the great struggles of the soul, 

Hard buffeting with adverse wind and stream. 

Not in the general mart, 'mid corn and wine: 
Not in the merchandise of gold and gems; 

Notlnthc world's gay hall of midnight mirth; 
Not 'mid the blaze of regal diadems. 

But in the day of conlUct, fear, and grief. 
When the strong hand of God, put forth in 
might. 
Plows up the subsoil of the stagnant heart, 
And brings the imprisoned truth-seed to the 
light. 

Wrung from the troubled spirit, in hard hours 

Of weakness, solitude, perchance of pain; 
Truth springs, like harvest, from the well-plowed 
fleia, 
And the soul feels it has not wept in vain. 

Bonar. 



Florida in Marcli. 



FROM THE CORRESPONDENCE OF A LADY 
PIIYSICIAK. 



We arrived in this eunny land the 
26lh of February, Most of the time 
we have had our windows open through 
the day ; but as the eun sinks, damp- 
ness rises frona every nook, and why 
this atmosphere is called good for con- 
sumptives is past my comprehension. 

We are at J.tscksonviile, the largest 
railroad town in Floiida, Ihe popula- 
tion beinff nearly 7,000. The city ex- 
tends along tne two Slues ui tae .31. 

John's E.iver and covers a large area. 
Years ago it was quite burned 
down; very few houses were here 
three years ago. The orange trees are 
full of ripe fruit and the second blos- 
soming has just commenced. It would 
surprise you to see the trees of every 
kind well leaved out, and the earth 
quite bare of grass with very few flowers 
This is the month for high winds, and 
more or less cold days, yet the gardens 
are expected to bloom also. The whip- 
poor wills sing quite plaintively and 
mocking birds can be bought here for 
$2.50. But the jarring of the cars in 
transporting them north seems to in- 
jure their singing, There is quite a 
passion exhibited here to get them and 
young alligators for pets. The mock- 
ing birds will live on one potato and 
one boiled egg for two days, while the 
alligator will exist six months without 
any food. The young ones are six 
inches in length and upwards. The 
old ones have ferocious jaws, wavy in 
outline so as to hold their prey more 
securely. Their use has never been 
made known, I believe. They generally 
manage to get away if surprised. 
Boatmen do not fear them. 

Hotel expenses are high here. The 
place is quite a rerort for travelers and 
invalids. I attended the Presbyterian 
church on Sabbath. The house was 
full. Most of the congregation had an 
ominous cough and marked debility . 

The St. John's River flows norlh and 
a party of us contracted for a yacht to take 
UB to the mouth of the river, that besides 



a pleasant ride we might see the broad 
Atlantic Ocean. It was such a luxury. 
Such a sense of speed, yet not a jar or 
quiver. I can understand why seamen 
bhould like ship life. In any land con- 
veyance, or on a steamboat, you are 
consious of motion and power; but all 
under the supervision of skillful men 
whose cunning brains you can fathom. 
But a sailboat with a stifl" breeze and a 
smooth sea is one of those irresistible 
things you cannot fathom. 

There were about sixteen of us in 
the company. It was difficult to get 
started from the dock. Soon she be- 
gan to dip water, and a great deal of 
trepidation was exhibited. Some said, 
"This is not pleasure. Do go back." 
Soon the boat righted herself; she had 
about 7,000 tons of iron for ballast 
which helped materially to quiet our 
fears. A very stiff breeze put ten 
miles between us and Jacksonville. 
Twenty-four miles were soon reach- 
ed, and the sail had to be taken 
in. As I think of it now it seems like 
a dream. It was truly fearful, the 
boat so much like a plaything, so t^light 
a thing, to be engulfed in the foaming 
waves. I never had so strong a wish to 
sing. I must have been very much ex- 
cited. How differently strong feelings 
are expressed in different persons. One 
poor woman whose husband and two 
boys were on board begged to go back. 
The boys said, "Can't we go as far as 
the light house ! " This is near the 
mouth of the river. The captain, a 
cool, capable man, said he could p.^ss 
the bar and then there was smooth 
sailing beyond, yet all would be likely 
to get wet. So manv were invalids 
wno ought not to sit with damp cloth- 
ing on the majority cried out to return. 
I gave one lingering glance and was 
resigned. 

At one point not named, we landed 
by means of the life boat along side, 
carrying our lunch baskets with us. 
We here found sweet clover of great 
fragrance of which I soon gathered a 
full hand; also an old fort made of 
oyster shells and clay; the circular 
puncture in many places intimating its 
use in former days. The woods have 
a great variety of cedar. Very few 
kinds besides. The live oak is much 
admired, also the shapely magnolia 
with its thick, dark green leaf, the wild 
fig with leaves similar in shape, but 
thin and light green. There are also 
one or two kindsof the willow. 

A swift, pleasant ride returned the 
party to Jacksonville, and the excur- 
sion down the St. John's Eiver was 
transformed into a glowing picture and 
hung in the mellow light of the halls 

of memory. 

♦-♦-♦ 

Broadening the Base. 



in church fellowship as long as the 
singing and preaching meet the requi- 
sitions of their standard of judgment. 
It is not by broadening the base of 
the church that the world is to be 
saved 'Strait is the gale, and nar- 
row is the Wiiy. " The church of the 
Lord Jesus was not a popular one in 
the usual acceptation of the word, al- 
though it was indeed a church for the 
people. His requisitions v/ere stringent, 
dis sword of discipl ue ruptured family 
ties, called for sacrifices of property, 
cut off right hands, cat out right eyes, 
j^ud required even that life should not 
be dearer than his service. The an- 
cient discipline of the church was severe, 
many were cut off, but the church lost 
no moral power in this excision. The 
limited extent of the church is not its 
weakness in its proposed work of human 
evangelization, IS' it were smaller and 
purer, it would be stronger. If we are 
not holier, more Christlike r.nd unworld- 
ly through o-ar connection with the 
church, it is of little service to Uis, and 
we might as well be out of its com- 
munion. The church will be powerful 
to save the -syorld when she comes up 
out of her wilderness state, Icavjing upon 
the arm of her Beloved, and shining in 
the light of his countenraice. — ■ Zionh 
Herald. 



Bible rrinliag'a 



There is a great tendency in our 
day to liberalize the church so as to 
embrace everybody. Discipline must be 
elastic; generous indulgence must be 
allowed to gratifications of taste and 
appetite; excuses must be received for 
weaknesses of temper, lapses of self- 
restraint, omissions 'of religious duties, 
and a general worldliness of spirit, and 
a great body of intelligent, good-hearted 
amiable, moral, and very humane and 
liberal persons will be pleased to unite 



j For more than two hundred years 
i after the art of printing was invented, 
I no person was allowed to print anything 
i in England without direct pcrmissi-m 
j from the Government. In 158G a de- 
j cree was made that no printing pressps 
should be set up in any pbce out of 
London, except at the two universities. 
No book could thenbs published except 
by the Stationers' Company ; but soon 
after-ward special privileges were grant- 
ed to other persons. One man was 
permitted to publish all the almanacs, 
another all the Uw books, a third all 
the school books, and a fourth all the 
Bible.?. 

Most of these exclusive rights were 
abolished years ago. The one that 
actually lasted the longest v/as that 
which gave a monopoly of almanac pul - 
lishing, a legal decision hriving put an 
end to it in 1775. The right, however, 
to publish Bibles, is still allowed by law 
only to the Queen's printer and the 
University of Oxford. Although the 
law is a "dead letter," and has long 
been disregarded by publishers, yet for 
a great many years every violation of 
it was severely punished. 

One result of the law was that the 
peraoas who had this privilege of print- 
the Bible abused it greatly. Tae copies 
they published were very carelessly 
issued, and eome important texts were 
altered. The copy printed in 1653 
contained the text, "Know ye not that 
the ttn-righteous" (instead of "right- 
eous") * "Shall inherit the kingdom of 
God?" 

The monopolists having the power to 
charge what they please, but ihe price 
was so high that only the rich could 
buy a Bible. So there were few copies 
sold , and those were so badly printed 
that they were hardly worth having. 
At last this unjust system was broken 



down. Thomas Guy, a shrewd book- 
seller of London, sent an agent to Hol- 
land, who bought good type and fine 
paper, and employed Dutch printers to 
put together well-printed Bibles. 

These were carried to England and 
sold in great numbers at a low pricfe. 
Other publishers adopted Guy's innova- 
tion, and the K'ng's printer began to 
see that, like the Ephesian idcl-makers, 
his craft was in danger. He went to 
law and followed the book-smuggleis so 
sharply that they were obliged to dis- 
continue the importation of the sacred 
book. 

But Thomas Gay was not to be de- 
feated so easily. He went to the au- 
thorities of the University of Oxford, 
and by hai'd work, persuaded them to 
sell their privilege. Then he brought 
over to England Dutch workman and 
type, and began to issue large number 
of excellent Bibles at a low price. The 
law was thus evaded, and it has never 
since been really enforced. 

Of course all these Bibles are not 
printed at the University Press, but the 
publishers, in order to be strictly with- 
in the law, obtained the permission of 
the University. 

It is interesting to know that Thomas 
Guy, who was the means of making 
Bibles plenty and cheap in England, 
acquired a very large fortune, and that 
ho used it notably in founding a hospi- 
tal in South wark, (now a part of Lon- 
don,) that still bears his name. — Com- 
panion, 

^» » 

The Appointnioat of the Sabbath Il- 
lustrated. 



A prince nays t«--» beggar, "This 
noble mansion and this vast estate I put 
into your hfinds. I give you the full 
use and enjoyment of it, and power to 
transmit it to your children, but I do 
not alienate my title. As a sign between 
us that the ownership rests still in me, 
as an acknowledgment of my eminent 
proprietorship, and as a witness to my 
rights in case of dispute, I require that 
the fruit of this tree or the produce of 
this field be brought to me every au- 
tumn, or be disposed of eccording to 
my will." Of course, the donor has the 
right to affix this condition to bis gift. 
It might be an eminently wise and pru- 
dent condition. If prescrib«d, every 
consideration of duty and of int-'rest 
binds the beneficiary to observe it, It 
matters not how the fruit is to be dis- 
posed of. The donor might require it 
to be left untouched on the ground, 
still the obligation remains. It might 
be appointed for the use of the poor, 
and then the appropriation of it to other 
purposes would be a double crime, rob- 
bery of Lhe benefactor and robbery of 
the poor. The nobler the use to which 
it is put, the stronger the obligation to 
observe the restriction. So God might 
have appointed the Sabbath as a day 
for some special physical toil, of even 
aimless and useless toil. He might have 
made it a day of weary journeying, a 
day of absolute silence or of utter boI- 
itude, and the irksomeness or useless 
ness of the service would not have im. 
paired its obligation. With great wis- 
dom and kindness he has set it apart 
for the exercise of the noblest faculties 
of the soul and the promotion of man's 



^a 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



11 



highest interests. Instead of silence 
and loneliaesa be has appointed it for 
cheerful praise and loving companion- 
ship. And this appropriation of Sab- 
bath time to the noblest occupations is 
an additional reason for its observance 
and an additional aggravation of its 
neglect. But the obligation does not 
rest on our sense of its pleasantness. 
A man who honestly says, "I can find 
no enjoyment in the Sabbath," is not, 
therefore, released from it. His de- 
praved inclination cannot make void 
the lavrof God. To spend the day ac- 
cording to our inclinations, regardless 
of God's claim upon it, is robbery and 
rebellion. "Man, entering on the no- 
ble heritage of life, received no gift of 
that day. The right to work seven days 
in the week is not to be found in the 
catalogue of human rights. That right 
no man ever had. That right no man 
can get. Human governments cannot 
give it, for it was never given to them . 
An honest man will not knowingly take 
what is not his own. The Sabbath for 
secular business, or for pleasure, or for 
any purpose which God has not pre- 
scribed, does not belong to us, and no 
honest man who knows this will use it 
in this way." And yet men who will 
not steal from men, unhesitatingly vio- 
late the right which God has reserved 
for himselt in the seventh part of time. 
Where this is not done through igno- 
rance of the law, what can we conclude 
but that the man has not the fear of 
God before his eyes ? He may not steal, 
because tlie judgment of men so strong- 
ly condemns theft, or because he is 
persuaded that honesty is the best pol- 
icy, but not because God has forbidden 
theft. Tempt him with the prospeci 
of ccnooalsnent or advantage, and there 
is no reason why he who robs God will 
not rob his neighbor also. — Ch. States- 
man. 

. The Ashantees. 



The Ashantee nation which has just 
been subdued by England is a great 
African power. It numbers about 3,000- 
OOOsouh — of whom some '200,000 
are war-loving barbarians. Every twen- 
ty-one days they hold an adai, or 
"blood- custom," at which yam and 
palm wine having been drank like water, 
skulls are carried in procession to the 
sound of drums made with human skin, 
and most horrible massacres and de- 
baucheries go forward . At the annual 
" Yam- festival," just now coming on, 
they celebrate a still bloodier carnival 
of death, and whenever a cabooceer or 
freeman dies, slaves are killed "to wet 
his grave." They eat the heart and 
drink the blood of a conquered enemy, 
and wear the teeth and finger-bones as 
ornaments. When the king dies, thou- 
sands of wretched slaves and attendants 
are slaughtered over his tomb; in a 
word, it is a land of murder. It was 
meant by nature to be a land of peace 
and plenty, for beyond the thick for- 
est which lies along the coast, stretches 
a fertile and healthy country of rich 
black 60,1, growing two or three crops 
yearly, and lull of vegetable wonders 
and glories yet unnamed. The fruits 
and flowers of Ashantee-land are said to 
6e perfectly marvelous. Curious ani- 
mals, such as the bird called "pookoe," 



and the huge corpse eating ' 'arompe" 
rat, are found in the woods and. clear- 
ings. Reptiles are horribly plentiful, 
ircludin^ enormous boas; a peculiar 
pufF adder, whose bite is certain death; 
scorpions as big as cray fish, and toads 
so large that Bosmin took the first he 
saw for a land-tortoiso. Gold is the 
chief article exported, la that metal 
Ashantee land must be fabulously rich; 
the chiefs wear gold breast-plates and 
golden or gilded war-caps. The caboo- 
ceers go about with lumps of virgin 
gold hung upon their necks and waists, 
some weighing, it is said, four pounds 
and more; and Bowditch hfis described 
golden window-frames in the king's 
palace at Coomassie. A fter the battle 
of Accra, in 182G. the Ashantee King 
sent in as "peace-money" six thousand 
ounces of dust and nuggets, and the 
sword?, muskets, and elephant-tail fans 
are described as being profusely rich 
with goldsmith's work. The Govern- 
ment is a despotic monarchy, the relig- 
ion feticism, modified by African Islam- 
ism. They believe in a Great Spirit, 
who, they say, created six white and six 
black people, and gave the first choice 
between a calabash and a sealed paper. 
The black took the calabash — which 
contained gold, iron, maze, and all the 
wealth of nature— and the whites got the 
scroll, which contained iastructions in 
the right use of all these products. 
Thus the whiles are forever superior. 
As for Coomasiie , the capital, accounts 
differ, one statement making it out a 
poor straggling placa ol' mean huts, and 
another, a really fine and imposing 
city for Africa. — Baj). Weekly, 



Some one. it seems, asb'*'' '^ '•' — ^"^ • 
Witt Talmage, by letter, whether it 
was right to read light, trashy litera- 
ture ; and in reply he said, "In every 
family, wliere the children have eome 
to nine or ten years of age, it has been 
discussed . The family altar is nothing, 
catechisms are nothing, religious in- 
struction is nothing so long as there is 
an unhealthy periodical in the house. 
From the two leprous lips of that one 
sheet, there will be a poison breathed 
on that family Bible, on the piano, on 
the arm chair, on the cradle, on the di- 
ning table, and the whole house will be 
plague-smitten. The question aaiounts 
to this: 'Shall my family be blessed, 
or blasted V 

' 'If there be one gulf deeper in hell 
than another, it shitll be the doom of 
those newspaper men, who've pen is stab- 
bing to death the purity of American 
Society." 

Flutk Wins. 



About thirty years ago (aaid Judge 
P.,) I stepped into a bookstore in Cin- 
cinnati, in search of some books that I 
wanted. While there, a little ragged 
boy, not over twelve years of age, 
came in and inquired for a geography. 

"Plenty of thern," was the sale- 
man's reply. 

"How much do they cost?" 

"One dollar, my lad." 

"I did not know they were so 
much." He turned to go out,' and 
even opened the door, but closed it 



again and cama back, "I have got 
only sixty-one cents," said he: "could 
you let me hr^ve a geography, and wait ; 
a little while for the rest of the mon- 
ey ?" 

How eagerly his bright little eyes 
looked for an answer! and how he 
seemed to shrink within his ragged • 
clothes when the man, not very kindly, ' 
told him he could not! 

The disappointed little fallow looked , 
up to me, with a very poor attempt at 
a smile, and left the store, I followed i 
him and overtook him. 

"And what now?" I asked. 

'•Try another place, sir." 

''Shall I go, too, and see how you 
succeed ? ' 

''0 yes, if ycu like." said he in sur- 
prise- 
Four diflfsyent times I entered with 
him, and each time he was refused. 

"Will you try again ? ' I asked. 

''Yes, sir, I shall try them all, or I 
should not know whether I could get 
one." 

We entered the fifth store, and the 

little fellow walked up manfully, and 

told the gentleman just what he wanted, 

'' and how much money he had. 

, "You want the book very much ?" said 

i the proprietor. 

"Yep, sir, very much." 
: "Why do you want it so very, very 
much V 

"To study, sir. I can't go to 
school, but I study when I can at 
home. All the boys havegotone, and 
they will get ahead of me. Besides, 
my father was a sailor, and I want to 

learn of the places where he used to 
^^ " " ■ 

''Does he go to these places^ Tiow s ' ' 
asked the proprietor. 

' 'He is dead," said the boy, softly. 
Then he added after a while, "I'm going 
to be a sailor, too." 

"Are you, though?" asked Ihe^gen- 
tleman, rising his eyebrows curiously. 
"Yes, s'r, if I live." 
''Well, my hid, I will tell you what 
I will do; I will let you have a new 
geography, and you m^Y pay the re- 
mainder of the money when you can, 
or I will let you have one that is not 
new for fifty cents." 

''Are the leaves all in it, and just like 
the others, only not new ?" 
j ' 'Yes, just like the new ones." 
! ' 'It will do just as well, then, and I 
will have eleven cents left towards buy- 
■ ing some other book. I am glad they 
did not let me have one at any of the 
I other places." 

! The bookseller looked up inquiringly, 
and I told him what I had seen of the 
1 little fellow. He was much pleased, 
and when he brought the book along,! 
saw a nice new pencil and some clean 
white paper in it. 

"A present, my lad, for your per- 
severance. Always have coiirage like 
that, and you will make your mark," 
said the bookseller. 

"Thank you, sir, you are so vety 
good." 

"What is your name!" 
''William Harverly, sir." 
"Do you want any more books?" I 
now asked him. ' 

"More than I can eyer get," he re- 



plied," glancing at tha books that filled 
the shelves. 

I gave him a baak note. "It will 
buy some for you," I said. 

Teara of joy came into his eyea. 

"Can I buy whatlwaut vvith iiJ' 

'Yes, ray lad, anything." 

"Then I will buy a book for moth- 
er," said he; '•! thank you very much, 
and some day I hope 1 can pay you 
back," 

He wanted my name, and 1 gave it 
to him. Then I left him standing by 
the counter so happy that 1 almost en- 
vied him, and many years passed be 
fore I saw him agiin. 

Last year I went to Europe on one 
of the finest vessels tfiat ever plowed 
the waters of the Atlantic. We had 
very beautiful weather until very near 
the end of the voyage; then csme a 
most terrible storm that would have 
sunk all on board had it not been for 
! the captain. 

I Every spar waa laid low, the rudder 
was almost useless, and a great leak had 
shown itself, threatening to fill the 
ship. The crew were all strong, will- 
ing men, and the mates were practical 
seamen of the first-class; but after 
pumping for one whole night, and the 
water still gaining on them, ihey gave 
up in despair, and prepared to take the 
boats, though they might have known 
no small boat could ride such a sea 
The captain, who had been below 
with his charts, now came up; be saw 
how matters stood, and with a voice 
that I heard disticotly above the roar 
of the tempest, he ordered every man 
to his post. 

It was surprising to see those lupn— 

,— - »,,..-crr'«r -fcrr- rf^rOTrg^TTITT Ui lUeir 

captain, and hurry back to the 
pumps. 

The captain then started below to ex- 
amine the leak. As he passed me I 
asked him if there was any hope. He 
looked at me, and then at the other 
passengers, who had crowed up to hear 
the reply, and said rebukingly : 

''Yes, sir, there is hope as long as 
one inch of this deck remains sbove 

j water: when I see none of it, then I 
shall abandon the vessel, and not be- 

I fore, nor one of my crew, sir. Everj- 

i thing shall be done to save it, and if 

I we fail, it will not be from inaction. 

j Bear a hand, every one of you, at the 

; pumps." 

Thrice during the day did we dis- 

1 pair, but the captain's dauntless cour- 

I *g^> perseverance and powerful will 

1 mastered every man on board and we 

j went to work again. 

I "I will land ycu safely at the dock 
in Liverpool," said he, "if you will be 
men." 

And he did land us safely; but the 

I vessel sunk moored to the dock. The 

j captain stood on the deck of the sinking 
vessel, receiving the thanks and the 

' blessings of the passengers, as they 
passed down the gang plank. I was 
the last to leave. As 1 passed, he 

i grasped my hand, and said, 

'•Judge P., do yen recognize me?" 

! 1 told him that I was not aware that 

\ I ever saw him uniU I stepped aboard 

• his ship. 

i "Do you remember the boy in Cin- 

i cinnati?" 

j "Very w€ll, sir; William Harverly." 

I «'I am he," said he. ''God bless 
you! 

j "And God bless noble captain Har- 

I verley." — Selected, 



12 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



K^lt{ji$«$ ftutdliijeiH^. 



— The evangelist Hammond will begin revival meet- 
ings at Jacksonville, 111., in the First Presbyterian 
Church this week. 

The Baptist churchesofNew Hampshire number 

eighty-five with a membership of 8,096. Nearly three- 
fourths of the churches have settled pistors. 

W. H. H.Murray, of the Park Street Congregation- 
al Church, has asked hia people for an assistant pas- 
tor. He takes an annual vacation for fishing and hunt- 
ing excursions. 

— The same minister recently stated that rain was 
one of the objscts for which Christians have no right 
to pray as it would cau?e a viohtioa of natural laws. 
If 60, the Apostle James was greatly mistaken in writ- 
ing verses 17 and 18 in the fifth chapter of his epie- 
tle. 

— A temperance meetin.^ of great power was held 
on a late Sunday evening in the Fifth Presbyterian 
Church, Chicago. Several reformed drunkards testi- 
fied that it was the grace of God in answer to prayer 
which saved them. 

The Jesuits are going ip-to Japan in force, and 

they already outnumber the Protfs'ant miss-onariea. 
They are erecting a large convent in Yeddo. Their 
movements are not relished by the authorities, as the 
country suffered so much from their plottings and acts 
in former times. 

Nearly $20,000 have been subscribed for the new 

Wesleyan Publishing House at Sryracuse, N. Y. , 
and the erection of the building is a^^eured. The es- 
timated cost is $30,000. It is to be of bric'i, three 
stories with mansard roof, completed in tasteful style 
and with room and convenietses for t^e purposes of 
a denominational center. 

—Meetings held by the new lay evangelist, Major 
Whittle, in Waukegan, Geneva Lake, and Turuer 
Junction near Chicigo have been attended mth very 
encouraging results. At the latter place, a powerful 
revival is in progress, especially affecting the adult por- 
tion of community and employees of the railroad 
shops. 

— The Advance says that the recent Brooklyn coun- 
cil has honored Congregationalism before the relig- 
featt?i°^yiS«- crjvin^ that Jhe system is not a rope of 
the lax methods of Plymouth Church is a rebuke to 
Beecherism, it having been assumed that they de- 
manded the liberty or looseness it represents. 

— The Illinois Conference of the Evangelical Assc- 
ciation met in Kankakee last week. The committee 
on Statistics report: Number of ministers in the Illi- 
nois Conference in the traveling connection, 75; Iccal 
ministers, 71; total membership in the Conference, 
8,749; received during the past year, 1,445; ex- 
pelled during the year 84; number of church edi 
fic3s, 101; value of church property , $277,950. 

— The Northarn Christian Advocate makes the 
statemeat that the M. E. church looses seventy-five 
per cent of its probationers. In fourteen years 2,- 
092,686 probationers were reported, of whom only 
509,316 went into full communion, or 22 to 100. 
Or, in fourteen yesra more were lost than would make 
another church as large as itself! The Advocate thinks 
the prevalent revival methods of the church are at 
fault, and that ''such spiritual prodigality in labor 
and souls should be abated." 

— The Chicago Presbytery commenced its annual 
aession on Monday in the Thir 1 Presbyterian Church. 
The presentation of charges and specifications against 
Prof. Swing by Rev. F. L. Patton, editor of the In- 
terior, was the all absorbing business. The two 
charges are that Swing is unfaithful -in maintaining 
Gospel truth and in the exercise of ministerial duty, 
and that he does not receive the doctrines of the 
Presbyterian church. The most important accusa 
tion is that he syrnpathizes with the Unitarians, and 
only remains in the Presbyterian church for the pres- 
ent, thinking he can there do most good. 

— A recent number of the Moravian contains the 
following allusiou to the first missionary society in 
this country: ''It is not a matter of any particular 
importance, but the fact is that the sof-iety cf the United 
Brethren for propagating the gospel was organized in 
Bethlehem, in the year 1787, and was incorporated 
by the Legislature of Pennsylvania in the following 
year (17 88.) It is the oldest foreign mission society in 
the country. Its special aim was the support of miB- 
Bions among the Indians. May its days be renewed as 
of old. The female missionary societies in the con- 
gregations at Bethlehem, Nazareth and Litiz are each 
more than fifty years old," 



^^m 4 i\i^ i^u% 



The City. 

— The arrangements for the Chicago Inter-State 
Industrial Exposition for 1874 have been completed, 
and circulars announcing the fact will next week be 
scattered over the country. It will open Sept. 9th 
and continue until October 10th. 

— The detectives have unearthed several cases of 
robbery committed during a few months past in the 
business portion of the city. The thieves are taken 
and some $15,000 worth of goods restored. The 
ring leaders are young men under age; they say that 
there is no difficulty in perpetrating a robbery, but 
stolen goods are not easily got rid of. Not very com- 
plimentary to our police system, surely, when such 
reasons only guard property. 

— The Methodist ministers' meeting on Monday 
held quite an argument on the Bible doctrine of temp- 
erance; two members, Thomas and Strowbridge, 
holding firmly that moderate drinking was allowed by 
Scripture, and that Christ turned water into real 
intoxicating wine. The Tribune helps out the other 
party by rejecting the story of Cana of Galilee as an 
interpolation, on the authority of Tischendorf and 
other German critics. 

— Police Superintendent Rehm reports for the year 
27,995 arrests, of which 7,269 were for drunkenness. 

Congress. 



— Twenty members of Congress were reported ab- 
sent from their seats on Saturday at a shad bake. 
Where is the American Juvenal ? 

— The Agricultural Department Ir'.ed to revive the 
I Franking nuisance by a bill providing for free trans 
mission of seeds, cuttings, etc., through the mail. It 
was defeated, but the Post OfRce Committee of the 
House got that body to adopt a measure providing for 
free exchanges and no postage on local papers within 
the limits of their county. 

— The inflation measure is still before the House, 
which is discussing lateral issues. 

The Country. 



— The iron manufacturers of the Lehigh, Schuyl- 
kill, Columbia and other regions in Pennsylvania have 
- — '■^ — _^---i- - * .'"' to—- i — *— «.^^ ^fl-R not rcviv" 
ed since the panic of last fall, and a reduction of 
wages was made to save shutting up altogether. The 
workmen have been holding meetings and have drawn 
up their ultimatum, which the manufacturers will not 
accept. There are 630 furnaces reported idle, and 
the number of men unemployed is estimated from 
10,000 to twice that number. The Union to which 
most of the puddlers belong has branches in several 
States, and has 50,000 members or more, and funds 
to sustain a long strike. 

— The steamer Greece from Liverpool has arrived 
in New York with the passengers and crew of the 
French steamer Europe which sprung a leak and was 
abandoned by her officers. A volunteer crew from 
the Greece attempted to bring in the water-logged 
vessel, but were obliged to give up the effort. They 
were rescued and arrived in England several days ago. 
No lives are reported lost. 

— Mayor Havemeyer of New York has written to 
the State Senate that the East River Bridge now 
building is entirely impracticable. Its great weight 
and height, 129 feet above the water, would subject 
it to constant danger in severe gales. He thinks the 
project must end in disaster to all concerned in it. 

— The temperance reform in Pittsburgh is unusually 
prominent. The Mayor proclaimed against sidewalk 
gatherings, and basely threw the responsibility of 
disturbance on the women. They have fearlessly gone 
on with the reform however, and the action of the 
authorities has thrown public sympathy in their 
favor. 

— At a recent party given by the wife of William 
B. Astor, of New York, she appeared in jewelry and 
diamonds said to be worth a million dollars. The 
eight or nine thousand shelterless wretches of that 
city could for the same amount be provided with com- 
fortable lodgings. 

— Boston, April 13th. — The twenty-second ballot 
for a United States Senator resulted as follows: — 
Whole number of votes cast, 219; nc.cem&rj to a 
choice, 110; Dawes, 63; Hoar, 52; Curtis, 62; Adams, 
11; Bullock, 13; Banks, 7; Sanford, 5; Washburn, 
3 ; Whittier, Learned, and Pitman, 1 each, 

— The Wisconsin Institute for the Blind, at Janes- 
ville, was totally destroyed by fire on Monday morn- 



ing. None of the inmates were injured, but lost their 
personal effects. The movable property on the first 
and second floors was saved. 

— The high water on the Mississippi is causing 
great damage in Louisiana. A crevasse of 300 feet 
was made near Baton Rouge and a large district in- 
undated. 

Foreign. 

— The body of Dr. Livingstone has arrived in Eng- 
land. The following account is given of his death. 
His illness from chronic dysentery lasted several 
months, but from the first he thought it would be 
fatal. Arriving at Muilala, beyond Lake Bemba, in 
the Bisa country, he said, ''Build me a hut to die in." 
A hut was built by his followers. The first of May 
he was confined to his bed, and afterwards suffered 
greatly, groaning night and day. The third day ho 
eaid he was very cold, and requested that more grass 
be put over the hut. The fourth day he was insensi- 
ble, and died about midnight. Dr. Livingstone made 
his last entry in his diary April 28th. He spoke 
much and sadly tf his home and family. Chief 
Kitumbo, when informed of Dr. Livingstone's death, 
had drums beaten and guns fired as a token of respect, 
and allowed the followers to remove the body, which 
they placed in a coffin of bark. They then began the 
journey to Unyanyembe, which occupied about six 
months, sending in advance a party with information 
of all that had occurred, addressed to Dr. Living- 
stone's son. At Unyanyembe Dr. Livingstone's body 
was placed in another bark case, a smaller one done 
up to represent a bale of goods, so as to deceive the 
natives, who objected to the passage of the corpse, and 
thus carried to Ziinzibar. 

— A majority of the English Cabinet approve of 
the annexation of the Fiji Islands, on the proposition 
of their king. 

— Letters from Cuba give details of severe encount- 
ers between the Spanish forces and Cubans, in which 
the latter were beaten. 



Lhbabon Valley College is s'tuated in the beauti- 
ful Lebanon Valley, Pennsylvania, on the Reading 
route between Harrisburg and Philadelphia. It is 
under the care of the United Brethren in Christ, as 
will be seen in the brief statement from the President, 
which is sufficient notifi''"*'^"' »* »*« principles, and 
that both sexes are on equality. The institution has 
two large brick buildings, ample grounds, conToniont 
location, and its principles recommend it to the Chris- 
tian parents of central Pennsylvania, 



Jesuitism in Germant. — The contest between Bis- 
marck and the Black Pope still continues. Bismarck 
as yet enforces the laws of the Empire and priests 
and bishops submit or are punished. In Austria, 
too, the tide is rising, which, let us hope may sweep 
out the order of Jesuits from that kingdom. Of course 
the Ultramontanes are sorely distressed, mourn over 
the infidelity of the age and the assassination of Lib- 
erty. Like true Freemasons these religionists degrade 
rob and murder the ignorant masses, and even attempt 
the overthrow of civil government, and when a strong 
hand is laid upon them, cry out in all the agony of 
injured innocence. Every careful reader of history 
knows that though no priest may have a wife of his 
own, any priest could, in the Middle Ages, have the 
wives of any or all his parishoners. Every such read- 
er knows that after ten solid centuries of Jesuitical 
rule, there was not a free school or a free nation inEu- 
rope. Every careful observer knows that in this coun- 
try,the same conspirators have attacked our schools, 
and silently extend their forces until thej shall be able 
to change our title from the "United" to the Papal 
States, Let us lesrn wisdom from the great states- 
man at Berlin and strangle this tiger's cub before it is 
too late. 



notices of the PresSi 



Sbcrbt Societies, Ancient and Modern: An Outline of their 
Rise, Progress and Character with Respect to the Christian Religion 
and Republican Government. Edited by General J. W. Phelps. 
Chicago: Ezra A. Cook <fc Co. 

The author traces back the origin of Masonry and its evil influ- 
ences, particularly as seen and felt in our own country; the Tam- 
many Ring, Credit Mobller, &c. He shows the subserviency of 
some of our public men, such as Fillmore and Webst«r, to its dom- 
inating power. If rtad di«paBti»nat«ly It will Ao gooi. —VnU*ct 
Tr«fiyt*rl»n . 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



13 



COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 



CHAPTER I. 



ORIGIN AND GROWTH. 



It ia nearly centennial year with the secret society system 
of Anoerican colleges. Trustworthy records give it a foreign 
parentage. It sprang from France, that parent of so many 
questionable customs of modern society — a fact that cannot 
be reckoned in its favor. Thomas Jefferson is the reputed 
agent of the importation; its name "Phi Beta Kappa ;" and 
Wilham and Mary college, Virginia, became its first habita- 
tion, December 6th, 1776. From thence to Yale in 1780 
and to Harvard in the year following, it spread to several in- 
stitutions in New England. 

In the Anti-masonic reform of 1826-31 this society was 
condemned for its secret ceremonies. Its grips and signs were 
pubhshed and its secret ceremonials were given up; though 
in 1852 ten chapters were reported, and it still exists at Yale. 
Its change of character at Harvard is thus noticed in the 
Providence American, quoted by the Boston Telegraph of 
September 3d, 1831 : — 

'*We are gratified to learn that the enlightened efforts of 
Adams, Story and Everett, have prevailed and tl at the 
*'Phi Beta Kappa" society at Harvard University abohshed 
the secrets of that association by a vote passed at their meet- 
ing on Thursday evening." 

In 1821, Prof. James L. Kingsley founded the "Chi 
Delta Theta " at Yale. This society died from neglect about 
1843, but has s'nce been nominally revived. Its members 
are now the five editors of the Vale Literary Magazine who 
annually pass it on to their successors. 

Of the college societies now maintaining'a secret character 
" Kappa Alpha " is probably the oldest, dating from 1823. 
" Skull and Bones, " the leading Yale Senior class society, 
was estabhshed 1832, and since that time the number of dif- 
ferent organizations has increased with the growth and num- 
ber of our educational institutions. A limited examination 
shows twenty-five societies, some of which claim from thirty 
to forty t'otcvpt^«." r,T branch associations. 

•' Greek-letter societies" or " Greek fraternities ■ are lerms 
Tised interchangibly for the college secret societies, and are 
derived from the use of Greek initials as the names of the 
different fraternities. These letters presumably stand for 
Greek words or phrases expressing a moral or character 
sentiment; as, "Phi Beta Kappa" is for Fhilosophia 
Uou kubernetes — "Philosophy is the guide of Ufe ;" 
but sometimes a harmonious combination of letters is first 
selected, and the motto fitted to them afterwards. Part of I 
the fraternities, which exist only in a single organization are 
named from their badge pins. These are comparatively few 
in number. The '• Skull and Bones" leads the fist in in- 
fluence, age, and society standing;. "Scroll and Key " and 
• ' Spade and Grave " maintaining a supposed rivalship with 
it among the members of the Senior class at Yale. The 
two former are peculiar to Yale, but have feeble imitators in 
the "Axe and Coffin" of Columbia College, the '' Owl and 
Padlock" at the Michigan University, and the "Skull and 
Serpent" and "Owl and Wand" at the Wesley an University. 
Yale College has a system peculiar to itself, in that each 
college class has its own fraternities. They are thus distrib- 
uted: Freshman class, two; Sophomore, two, (two others 
are defunct); Junior, three; Senior, three. The student in 
passing through the course may have the privilege of initia- 
tion and other supposed benefits annually repeated. A nom- 
inal interest is supposed to be retained by the members of 
each lower class fraternity after they have ceased to act with 
it, and on special occasions they are customarily present, but 
rather as spectators or guests. This fact has operated against 
the secrecy of Freshman societies, visitors often being pres- 
ent who have never been members. In most other institu- 
tions, however, the societies are made up from each of the 
college classes without distinction; so that membership may 
be continued during the entire course. 

A numerical summary of college fraternities has proba- 
bly never been compiled. "Such a task would not be profita- 
ble on this occasion, and only a brief statement will be at- 
tempted, which may however serve the curious as a basis for 
further inquiry. Delta Kappa Epsilon was founded at Yale 



in 1844, and is, as to numbers, probably the largest fraternity 
in the country. In 1871 it had established forty branches 
or chapters, twelve of which were dead. Its aggregate 
membership was 4,750, of which the Yale chapter furnished 
during twenty-seven years, 796. The Delta Phi, founded 
at Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y., 1832, reports in 1870, 
twenty -two chapters and 3,650 members. The PsiUpsilon, 
founded at Union College, Schenectady, N. Y. , in 1833, has 
fifteen chapters and 3,400 members in total. To the two 
latter Yale has furnished, respectively, 740 and 750 mem- 
bers. Theta Delta Chi, established also at Union College in 
1847, had in 1872, 1,018 members. Phi Kappa Psi, estab- 
lished 1852, has a total membership of over 2,000. The 
Yale Freshman societies show these aggregates: the Sigma 
Epsilon in twenty-five classes, 1,011 members, in other col- 
leges, 249; the Delta Kappa in twenty-one classes, 997 
members, and in other colleges, 556. 

Figures are dry reading but they have a certain eloquence 
and positiveness of argument not easy to gainsay. From 
those given above it will be seen that this system is not shut 
up in narrow limits among American students. And addi- 
tional significance must be allowed from the fact that these 
fraternities find constituency and support from a single and 
small class of society, the college students. It is true that a 
large number of our colleges maintain the system, especially 
the more popular and wealthy, and statements have been 
widely circulated to the effect that no institution was separ- 
ate from it; but this is far from fact as will be hereafter 
shown. 

The expense of these societies varies of course with insti- 
tutions, and the class of students supporting them. Some 
are amply maintained by a small tax such as is borne by 
members of any literary or debating society. The other ex- 
treme may be seen at Yale, Avhere initiations cost from fifteen 
to twenty-five dollars and the average expenses of a Fresh- 
man society is 835 to $40 per member; and of a Sophomore 
from $10 to $15 more. The Junior societies are more select 
and smaller, and their expenses for halls, conventions, etc., 
are increased; the individual tax is therefore greater. 

Society Halls are rented at fl50 to 250 per year and often 
nitea up at an expense of 5p J, uou. x>c«i^tv,i.- — 

•what noted for several gloomy, windowless, toomb-like struct- 
ures of brick or stone guarded by heavy iron doors These 
are the halls of two Junior and two Senior class societies, 
and were erected by the individual contributions of the mem- 
bers. These buildings and the lots on which they stand 
cost from $8,000 to $50,000; " Scroll and Keys" property 
being valued at the latter sum. At Williams College ' 
hall worth $10,000 and at Middletown one 
000. The Senior class society is hmited to fifteen members, 
a division of their expenses would therefore give a higher 
pro rata than either of the lower classes. 

The particular benefit to be derived from the Greek fraternity 
is not different, theoretically, from that of the open literary so- 
ciety. Social and intellectual improvement is the claim of its 
members, in the pursuit of which the superior advantages of se- 
lect companions, privacy, the ecZoi of secret sessions, and society 
tradition and honor, place them far above the open organiza- 
tion. Whether all, or even a respectable portion of the col- 
lege brotherhoods present equal or greater facilities for the 
right and full development of the student, is a question for 
succeeding chapters to present. 



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For Sale by EZRA A. COOK & CO.. 

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Light oa Freemasonry, 

BY ELDEE D. BERNARD, 

TO WHICH IS APPENDED A 

Relation of the Mysteries of Odd-fellow- 
ship by a Member of the Craft. 

The whole containing over five hundred page^ 
1 ately revised and republiBheil, Price $2,00 

Walsh's Review of Freemasoniy, 

REVISED EDITION, 

Is a Scholarly Review of the Institution, by EaT, 
Jno. „T. Walsh. 

Frioe 26 ots. 



Finney on Masonry. 

BOUND IN CLOTH, PRICE $1.00. 

CHEAP EDITION, 

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Seventh Edition, Price 40 cents 



Letters on Masonry, 



AKD 



LITEKARY JSOTICES. 



The "Sanitarian" for the present number has a valuable 
article on underdraining, worth reading by those living in 
ill-drained grounds. The magazine has been enlarged and is 
published by the editor, Dr. Bell. 

The ''Illustrated Annual of Phrenology and Physiognomy" 
has an entertaining table of contents, biographical, scientific, 
with hints for health and the household. S. R. Wells, N. Y. 

"Education and Character," an address before the Delta 
Upsilon fraternity (anti-secret), by Prof. Wm. C. Russell, of 
Cornell University; delivered at Amherst, Mass. _ The pro- 
fessor claims to be enlisted against college fraternities. 

"The Midland Monthly" is a new journal, published at 
Monmouth, 111. President Wallace is among the contribu- 
tors. 

"The People's Pulpit" is a new weekly which reports the 
sermons of S. H. Tyng, Jr. Pubhshed by "The Workmg 
Church Pub. Co., N. Y." 



A HewlChapter on Mason- 
ry, Addressed to Clmrcli- 
es tliat liold in Fellow- 
ship AdlierinK Masons. 

The three bound in one volume, price 11-25 



Bernard^ ppdix to Lp 0& Uastnrj, 

Showing the Character of the Ingtitutif n by its 
terrible oaths and penalties. Bound, in boards, 
50 cents ; tioxible covers, 35 cents. 



IE! 

ADVERSE TO CHRISTIANITY, 



And Inimical to a Republican Groverninent 

BtKKV. LEBBEUS ARMSTEONQ, 

(Presbyterian,) 

A Seceding Mason of 21 degrees. 

This Is a very telling work an no hon- 
est man that reads it will think of joining 
the Lodge. 

PRICE, 20 cts, Each $1 75 per do*, 
09t Paid. 



14 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Kiim and Tobacco. 



The California Wme Dealers' Gazette, 
in speakirg of the effscts of the wide- 
spread adulteration of liquor, says: 
" The man accustomed to stimulant?, 
who iaih to satisfy himself that he is 
using the pure article, too often finds, 
after a few years, the reward of his 
negligence, in failing mental powers, 
physical paralysis, and sudden death." 
Pretty forcible testimony from such a 
source. Let it be remembered that 
this adulteration \s almost universal, 
and even the 'pure genuine article," 
is almost equally harmful. 

A working man writes of the bitter 
evil whic'i haunts the steps of his coni- 
pnnions : '* But there is another power 
in the land working against the work- 
ingman, mors pov/eiful and more dan- 
i^erous than all thes3 gigantic monopo- 
lies; a power that makes the ballot-box 
worthless in our hand?, and worse than 
worthless; a power that not only im 
poverishes, but degrades the working, 
ccan; a power that is undermining our 
whole political, social and moral being, 
and threatens to overthrow the first 
principles of liberty, law and order. I { 
mean the whisky power. I would like | 
to tell how and where the political [ 
wires are laid; where the money is left 
lo buy us 'voting cattle.' It is not j 
in work-shops, but in whisky-shops." 

Mr. Moody has had occasion to give \ 
advice to the Sjotch ministers on an 
important questioa. Tho^e brethren 
find intemp 'ranee and drinking habit? 
the chief barrier (o their evangelical 

weffe^pr-dHi^.r^i'eeti.lSJJ.P. wb'?l» they 

ject, they asked the Chicago man's 
opinion. It was to the point. "Ban- 
ish the infercfil sluff from your own 
Bidebop.rJs and tabl<s " — Inlerior. 

I challenge any man who understands 
the nature of ardent spirits, and yet for 
the sake of gain continues to be engag- 
ed in the trafti:, to show that he is not 
involved in the guilt of murder,— 
Lyman Beecher. 

The New York Board of State Char- 
ities reports about 10,000 maiiiacs in 
the state, and 6,000 idiot:^, one-third to 
a half of whom were brought to their 
wretched conditioit by their own or 
pareni'd intemperance, 

The total tax receipts from tobacco for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1873, 
were $3 [,38G,10;i. Compared with 
the total receipts for the fiscal year 
June 30, 1872, there was a decrease 
oF collections on manufactured tobacco 
of ail descriptions of $1,172,917. 
There was an increase in the total 
receipts from the manufacture and sale 
of tobacco, snuflf and cigars, in all their 
forms, oyer the preceding fiscal year of 
1650,132. The actual product of the 
year, bo fir as such products have been 
reported, is 110,450,934 pounds, show- 
ing an increase of 9,180,079 pounds. 
The number of cigars, cheroots, etc., 
on which taxes were collected, was 
1,807,134,646, showing an excess over 
the number reported for the preceding 
fiscal year of 279, 328 ,674. There was 
an increase of 544,064 pounds of ex- 
ported tobacco . The aggregate receipts 
for the last fiscal year exceeded the 



Commissioner'sestinaate by $4,075,466. 
It is estimated that the total receipts for 
the current fiscal year will be $100,- 

000,000. 

*-*-^ 

Facts and Figures. 

j Our best lawyers value their time 
from $40 to $50 per hour, which is a 
reasonable charge. If, howeverj the 
case be one where half a million is at 
stake, then instead of a mere fifty you 
will be e.xpected to advance a retaining 
fee of $500, or perhaps $1,000. This 
prevents any one from securing the i 
services of the lawyer thus retained. ■ 
If a lawer, even after receiving such a 
fee, should win the case, he will expect ' 
from $10,000 to $15,000 additional. ! 
Our great lawyers demand pay com- ! 
mensurate with their reputation, and 
hence some of them can boast a prac- 
tice worth $50,000 per year. O'Con- 
nor, previous to his retirement, made 
annually, it is said, nearly four times j 
that sum. Indeed, he was probably i 
paid .'i?200,000 for his services in the ' 
Jumel case. He is now worth more i 
than a million, all of which he has 
made by his own genius and industry. 
— Concord Monitor, 

"Any Senator who does not make ; 
bis cfhce pay at least $100,000 a term, i 
does not use his chances," said a man | 
of the world, perfectly informed of 
what he spoke. Thst many do not use 
their chances, is perfectly certain, and 
equally certain that many do. There 
are men in both houses of Congress who 
would deliberately choose poverty rather 
than riches at the pric3 of their honor. 
Yet this type of men in the Congress 

rarer. Why ? Not because the nation 
is not rich in such men. But because 
the power which prevails does not send 
Euch men ihither. Hoaest men still 
come who are the absolute choice of 
their constituents; but they no longer 
make, as they once did, the majority of 
Congress. That the public sentiment 
of a constituency decides the moral 
standard of a representative, is proven 
by the fact that ia at least some of the 
states? of New England a man who 
could afford to buy his election never 
could be elected, while west of the 
Mississippi a man who does not buy his 
election '.s equally sure of defeat. 
Such is the cupidity aroused by the 
measureless raining and railroad inter- 
ests of the West that more and more 
men are sent hither from that region 
by rich monopolies and corporations, to 
secure certain company ends, or because 
they themselves, a part of those cor- 
porations and monopolies, buy their 
seats in advance. Does it need pro- 
phetic vision to foresee that such polit- 
ical corruption, unless stayed in its 
sure, legitimate result, will end in the 
utter degradation of a republican gov- 
ernment, in the demoralization of na- 
tional character '^—Independent. 

California has about 8,000,000 head 
of sheep. The wool crop in two shear- 
ings, at an average of ten pounds per 
head, would amount to 80,000,000 
pounds, or 15,000.000 more than the 
total product of the United States in 
1871. 

Of the great centers of humanity 
throughout the globe, there are nine 
having a population exceeding 1,000,- 
000 souls, coming in the following 



order: London. 3,251,000; Soochow, 
2,000,000; Taris, 1.825,000; Pekin, 
1,048,080; Yeddo, 1,554,000; Canton, 
1,236,000; Constantinople, 1,075,000; 
Siaug-tan, in the province of Huhan, 
1,000,000; and Techan-;echan-foo, in 
the province of Fokieu, 1,000.000. 

In London there is a safe deposit 
company whose vaults are sunk to a 
depth of fifty feet below tlie surface of 
the street, and form four storifs con- 
nected by a hydraulic lift, and rest on 
a concrete bed tirieen feet in thickneEs. 
The walls are built of fire-proof Staf- 
fordshire bricks a yard in thicknesp, 
with an inner shell of chilled steel, 
three inches thick. The whol eis iccloE- 
ed in an outer wall of Sussex bricks ten 
feet thick. The stories above the ground 
will be used as offices. 



I THE RATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSO- 
CIATION, 

OPPOSED TO SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Presideut— J. G. Carsou, Xenia, O, 
Vice-Presidents— R. B. Taylor, of Ohio ; 

! Aaron Floyd, of Pensylvauia; Luke 
Thomas, of Ind ; Pres. D. A. Wallace, of 

■ Illinois; Georffe Brokaw, of Iowa; N. E. 

; Gardner, of Missouri; N. B. Blauton, of 

' Kansas; Donald Kirkpatiick, of New 

! York; J. W. Wood, of Wisconsin; John 

; Levingtou.of Michii2;au. 

I Concspouding Secretary— I. A. Hart, 
Wheaton, 111. 

! Recording Secretaries — H. L. Kellogg, 
G. L. Arnold. 

Treasurer— H. L. Kelloga;, 11 Wabash 
Ave., Chicago. 
Executive Committee— J. Blanchard, 

: P. Carpenter, I. A. Hart, George Dietrich, 
J. M. Snyder, O. F. Lumry, Isaac Preston , 

! C. R. Hagerty, J. M. Wallace, E. A. Cook, 

: J. G. Terrill, A. Wait, H. L. Kellogg. 
The objects of this Association are to 
expose, withstand and remove secret soci- 

I eties and other like anti-Christian orgaui- 

: zations from church and state. 

I The Association originated in a meeting 
held Oct. 30th, 1867, in the City Hall of 

! Aurora, 111., attended by persons opposed 

j to secret societies, where a committee was 
appointed to make the necessary arrange- 
ments for a National Convention. This 

I was^ held in Pittsburgh, May 5th-7th, 

: ganized. Its subsequent raeetingahave been 
held : Chicago, June 8th-10lh, 1869 ■ Cin- 
cinnati, .Tune 9th-llth, 1870 ; Worcester 
Mass., June Tth-Oth, 1871 ; Oberlin, Ohio 
May 21st-33d, 1872 ; Monmouth, 111. 
May 14th-16th, 1873. Its presiding offi-' 
cers have been in order : Bishop D Ed- i 
wards, Prof. J. c. Web.Mer Judge F D ! 
Parish, Gen. J. W. Plielps, Pres. J. I 
Blanchard. 

The Association employs a General 
Agent and Lecturer, and has secured 
State lecturers for Indiana, Ohio and Illi- 
nois, whose names appear in the list of 
lecturers. The support of the Association 
is entirely voluntary. Funds are greatly 
needed to carry on the work already be- 
gun, and contributions are hereby solicited 
from eyery friend of the reform. Send 
by post-office order, registered letter or 
draft to the Treasurer, 11 Wabash Ave 
Chicago. ' 

■ •-• . 

Lecture List. 



FOR SALE AT THE CYNOSURE 
! OFFICE. 

I Those who wish to know the character of 
! .t^reemasonry, as shown by its own publications, 
t will find many Btandard works in the following 
! Ii3t. 
I No sensible Mason dares deny that such men as 

Albert G. Mackey, the great Masonic Lexicogra- 
: pher, and Daniel Sickels, the Masonic author and 

publieher, are the highest Masonic authority in 

ihc United States. 

Mej's Masonic Ritualist; 

OB 

MONITOEIAL INSTEUOTION BOOS 

Bt ALBERT G. MACKET, 

"Past General High Priest of the Generfil Grand 
Chapter of the United States, Knight of the 
Baglo and Pelican, Prince of Mercy," Etc. 
Etc, Price, »126 

Containing a Definition of Terms, Noticea 
of its History, Traditions and Antiquities, and 
an account of all the Kites and Mysteries oi 
the Ancient World. 13 mo. 626 pageg, $3 00. 

mim KWAL Of TSE imi, 



OB 



Monitorial Instmctlons in the DCKrees oJ 
Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master 
Mason; with CeremonieB relating to Installa- 
tiona, Dedications, Consecrations, Laying of 
Coruer-stonea &c. Price, f 2 UO, 

Paper Covers 8-00. 

MAOKET'S TEXT BOOK 

OF 

MASONIC JUEISPSUDENCB. 

Illugtrattng the Laws of Freemasonry, both 
Written and unwritten. 

This is the Great Law Book of Freemasonry 
570 pages. Price, $2.60 



'SI 



set's 



-.*»,iiB or iTreemasOnry iBnrt^jngjied 

Price, 75 cts 



Eickriso&'s UM of Freenasonrj, 

A Praftlcal Guide to the Ceremonies in 
the Degrees conferred in Masonic Lo<*e 
Chapter, Encampments, &c. Illustrated Edi- 
t'onbound in cloth, $] 25 ; paper, 75 cts 



General Agent and Lecturer, J. P.Stod- 
dard, Christian Cynosure Office, Chicago, 

State Lecturer for Indiana, J. T.Kiggins 
605 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, Ind'. 

State Lecturer for Wisconsin, H. H. Hin- 
man, Ironton, Wis. 

State Lecturer for Ohio, D. Caldwell 
Carey, O. ' 

State Lecturer forNew York, Z. Weaver 
Syracuse, N. Y. ' 

I. A. Hart, Wheaton, 111. 

C. A. Blanchard, Wheaton, 111, 
P. Elzea, Wheaton, 111. 
W. A. Wallace, Senecaville, O. 
J. B. Nessell, Ellington, N. Y. 
John Levington, Detroit, Mich. 

D. P. Rathbun, Odessa, N. Y, 
S. Smith, Charles City, Iowa. 
R. B. Taylor, Summerlield, O. 
L. N. Stratton, Syracuse, N. Y. 
N. Callender, Green Grove, Pa. 
J. H. Timmons, Tarentum, Pa. 
Linus -Jhittenden, Crystal Lake, 111, 
P. Hurless, Polo, 111. 
J. R. Baird, Greenville, Pa. 
T. B. McCormick, Princeton, Ind ' 

' C. Wiggins , Angola , Ind. 

J. L. Barlow, Bemus Heights N Y 

E. Johnson, Bourbon, Ind. ' ' " • 
Josiah McCaskey, Fancy Creek, Wis 
O. F. Hawley, Seneca Falls N Y 

^ Wm. M, Givens, Center Point, Clay Co., 

( 



Em nwmn mmi 

Containing the Degrees of rreemasonrv em 
rl^^ '^ *^^ ^O'^Se, Chapter, council and 
^°^^f?^^^,^^^om^oniBhe(i with nearly 800 
^?^?^^',^ Illustrations. Together with Tactics 
^'?i^'^"<°^^^^«'°*°^°lShthood. Also, forms 
of Masonic Documents, Notes, Songs, Masonic 
dates, mstallations, etc. By D. Sickels. 32 mo 
tncB. Price $1.50. 



Ml %sl of- Maude Ivs. 

Comprises a Complete Code of KegulationB, 
Declslpns and Opinlons-upon Questions and 
Masonic Jurisprudence, Price, $2 25. 

Suacaa's him Silsal aad Hosilor, 

p/lceSawf'* ^"'' Explanatory Engraving 



Books on Odd Fellowship. 

Donaldson's Odd Fellows Text Book, 
By Paschal Donaldson, D- D.> 

GKAND MASTER OF THE GRAND LODGE 01- NORTH- 
BRN N. Y., . 

illustrated with uumcrous engravings, showinji 
the emblems of the order. A detailed acccoun° 
of the Forms, Ceremonies, Funeral Services and 
Odes with music, dud a complete raaiuial for the 
guidance of Officers and Lodges. Pocket edition 
Tuck, $t.50. 



Grosh's Manual of Odd Fellowship 

BT UEV. A. K. GHOSH. 

Containing the history, defence, principles aud 
government of the order; the instructions of 
each degree and duties of every station and office, 
with engravings of the etaibleme of the orders etc' 

Price in Cloth, In 50 

Tuck, abridged edition,'.'.'.".".'!'. '.I'l 00 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



15 



iescrsptive Catalogye of Publications of Ezra 

13 "Wabasli Ave., Cliicago. 




I A NEV/ WORK or GREAT INTEREST. 



by CAP'T. WILLIAM MOKGAN. 



THE GBKUINE OLD MORGAN BOOK:— repnblielied with en- 
gravings showing the TjCKlge Room, Dress of candidates, Signs 
Due Guards, Grips, Etc. ' 

This revelation is to accurate that •^^reemasons murdered the au- 
thor for writing it. Thousands have testilied to the correctness of 
the revelation and this hooli therefore sells very rapidly. 

Price 25 cents. 

Per Doz. Post Paid $2 qq 

Per hundred by express, (express charges extra.) '.'....... $io!oo 

^ > » 

THE BROKEM SEAL. 

OR PERSONAL REMINISCENCES OF THE ABDUCTION AND 
MURDER OP Wm. MORGAN, 

By SAMUEL D. G-REENE, 

Price in cloth, $1.00. Paper covers, 50 cents. 

Id Paper Covers per Doz. Post paid $4 50 

'* per hundred by express (ex. charges extra$25.00 
That the hook is one of great interest and v.alue is shovm by the 
following 

OPIHIONS or THE PRESS. ■ 

"A Masonic Revelation. — Mr. Samuel D. Greene is a venerable 
gentleman of the highest respectability, whose statements seem to 
be worthy of full credence. Y/iy Uroken Seal: or, T'trsonai 
Heminiseenves of the Morgan vihclieotion and Jtfiirder, is the 
title of a book of some three hnndred pages jnst issued by him, 
purporting to give a full and accurate account, from personal knowl- 
edge, of trie Morgan 'abduction,' and other masonic matters which 
made such an excitement in this country, now almost half a century 
ago." — Conf/ref/aiiuiiafisl and liecorder, Sijxton. 

'"Frbbmasonrt Developed.' — 'The Broken Seal: or. Personal 
Reminiscences of the Morgan Abduction aud Mui'der,' is the title of 
a volume written and just published by Samuel D. Greene, of 
Boston. The author belonged to the same lodge with Morgan, and 
professes to know all about that event which made such a sensation 
throughout the country forty years ago. Tho book contains the 
confession of Morgan's murderer, and much more curious and inter- 
esting matter, including tho ceremony of initiation, etc. The au- 
thor opposes Freemasonry a.s inimical to good government, to so- 
ciety, and to the Church ; and the story that he here tells will make 
a sensation in the order, if its statements are really what they pur- 
port to bo. If Freemasonry is what it is supposed by many to be, in 
Its obligations, the author of this book must be a bold niau."— £>««- 
ly Kerald, Jioston. 

"We are acquainted with Mr. Greene, and have no doubt that his 
account is entirely reliable, and of grcathistoric and moral interest. 
Capt. Wni. Morgan was Mr. Greene's neighbor i" Batavia, N. Y,., 
and a member of the same lodge with him at the time of the great 
excitement in 1820. The titles to these chapters are sufficiently ex- 
citing to give the book a large sale:—' Tho Storm Gathering;" 
"Abduction of Morgan;" "Attempted Abduction of Miller and 
hia Rescue;" ''What became of Morgan;" "Yvhat Morgan Ac- 
tually Revealed;" "Confession of the Murderer;" "Allegations 
against Freemasonry, QiQ.^—'Ooston Daily J'l'eH-s. 

History ef Till a A^'^^f'-tipii and Mnrder of 
Cap't. ^Tsm. Morgam, 

Ae prepared by Seven Committees of Citizens, appointed to abcer- 
^''^hiD^bookcraTa'inf Indisputable, legal evidence that Frcomasm^^^^^ 
abducted and Murdered Wm. Morgan, for no other oft cncc than 
the revelation of Masonry. It contains the sworn testimony of over 
wen?r perBons. ^=l"'""g Morgan's wife, and no candid person 
after reacting this book, caS doubt that many ot the most respecta- 
ble FREEMASONS, iniho Empire State, with others were concerned 

in this crime. ,-„.-, o^r-o-nt^ 

Single Copy, post Paid, com 

Per doz. " •■•■ f/;''yX- 

Per 100, Express Charges Extr a , i».v.U. 

' Valance's OonfessionTf The M-ardsr of 
Capt. Weei, Morgasa. 

This confession of Ucnry L. Valance, one of the three F •eemasons 
who drowned Morga,, in the Niagara River, was taken from he lips 
of the dying mfn by L.. John C. Emery, °fF^a"^= bounty Wiscon- 
sin in 134S; The confession bears clear evidence of truthfulness. 

Single copy, post paid, .U cenu. 

Per doz. " 4>i.ou. 

Per 100 Expreso Charges Extra, ■ ■ 8.00. , 

The Mystic SIq or Freemasonry a League 
with the Devil, 

Thifi Is an accoi nt of the Church Trial of Peter Cook, and wife of 
Elkhart indlar /for refusing to support a .^-^^verend Freenni^on^ 
rjid the r very able defence presented by Mrs. Lucia C. Cook in 
which she clearly .hews thai Freemasonry, \^.f"tagouistic to the 

Christian Religion. luce M Cents. 

HARK,ATIVESmWD ARGUMEWTS, 
shovring the Conflict of Secret Societies with the Constitution and 
Laws, o1 the Union and of tho States. 

by FH,AMCTS SAMPLE of 

IDovcr, Ico-a. 
The fact that Secret Societies, interfere with the execution and 
pervert the administration of Law is here ciear ^y. proved^^^^ 

Tke Amtimas oil's Scrap BooZc, 

CONSISTING OP 

21 CYIJOSUIE TEACTS. 

In Ibis book are the views of more than a Score of men, many of 
them of distinguished ability, on the subject of Secret S9cieties. 

Tte da -orous tendency and positive evil of organized Secrecy 
is here shown by the most varied and powerful arguments and illus- 
trntions that have ever been given to the public. . 

Lcclurcrs and others who wi.h to And the best arguments agamst 
ihf Todtfe should send for tills book. ,,i . 4.1, 

Those who wish to circulate Antimasonic Tracts ought to have the 
book to select from. „. PP-nt<i 

Single Copy, postpaid, ^- -if^ "^i^^- 

Per Doz. " • • ■ : ajin'nn 

l^er lOU, Express charges Lxtra »>it'-OU 

SERMON on MABONRYj 

BY REV. "W. P. M'NARY, 

Pastor United Presbyterian Church, Bloomington, Iiid. 
This is a very clear, thorough, candid and remarkably coneice 
Scriptural argument on the character of Freemasonry. 

Single Copy, Postpaid, 6 

Per Doz 

Per HnucleredrExpress Charges Extra, $350 



SECRET SOCIETIES AKCIENT ANl) MODERN, 

By GEN'L 3. W. PHELPS. 

240 Pages, liandsoraely Printed. 

ThiiH new book is one that every man should read who wishes to 
be posted on the character and influence of Secret Societies. 

The work is particularly commended to the attention of Officers 
of Tho Army and Navy, Tlie Bench and Tho Clergy. 
Tho "Table of Contents" is as folloivs: 

,'The Antiquity of Secket Societies, Tue Like of 
.Julian, The Eleusinian Mystekies, The Okigin of 
Masonky, Was "Washington a Mason ? Filmore's and 
Webster's deference to Masonry, A brief outline of 
the progress of Masonry in the United States, The 
Tammany Ring, The CitEDrr Mobilier Ring, Masonic 
Benevolence, The uses of Masonry, An Illustration , 
The Conclusion." 

The author has presented information concerning tho Old Myster- 
ies and their antagonism to Christianity; the Masonry of Washington 
and his virtual secession from it; the harlotry of Masonry, Enj;lish 
and American, in assuming chargi-. of international politics, and treat- 
ies between England and the United States; the disgusting interven- 
tion of the lodge at the close of the French and German war; the 
Masonic baptishis ; all these and more Gen. Phelps has given, accom- 
panied with clear philosophical dissertations of his own. 

Bil/le Banner New York. 

Single Copy, Post Paid, 50 

PcrDoz" " '■ ^ $4 75 

Per Hundred Express Charges Extra %Z'i 00 



WS HOW HAVE 22 ENaLISH TEACTS, ONE SEIiMAN, AND ONE SWEEEKH. 
These tracls are sold at the rate of $1.00 per 1000 pages. 



MrWioaoflracts 



HAS BEEN SECURED AND WE HOPE WILL NEVER BE EX- 
HAUSTED. A friend haspledged this fund a dollar for everv other 
dollar received, so EVERY NEW SUBSCRIPTION TO THE TRACT 
FUND COUNTS DOUBLE- . 

Many of our most earnest workers in this cause of God are poor 
men, who would be glad to circulate thousands of pages of Anti- 

asonic literature it thev could have them free. 

SHALL WE NOT HAVE AN INEXHAUSTIBLE TRACT FUND ? 

"THE ANTI-MASONS SCRAP BOOK." 

Contains our 21 Cynosure Tracts, bonnd together, price 
20 cents. See advertisement. 



Address Ezea A. Coos &, Co., 



13 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 



TRACT NO. 1 : 
HISTORY OF MASONRYe 
BY PRESIDENT J. BLANCHARD, OP WUEATON COLLEGE. 
Thifi^ now published in three tracts of four pages each. Price 
of each, 5D cents per 100; $4 per 1000. . . «„„^„,„Hvp TPree- 

Tract No 1, Pakt Fi)4ST— Shows the origiu of SpecuUHve iJ reo 
niSy,an^.=s entiled 'HISTORY ^J^^,^\^%l^^o'.^.,c CHARAC- 
TiSACT No 1, Part Sbcond— Is entitled "DESIOliO i^hakak^ 
TER OF' FREEMASONRY" "PRF^MA^^ONRY \ 

TR4.CT No 1, Paki- Third— Is entitled ' iREJiSia..-U.Mt i .i. 
CHRIST-EXCLUDING RELIGION." 

TRACT NO. 1, IN SWEDISH; 
translated by Ps-of. A. Ri CESVIN. A 15-page tract at %-lM 
per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 2: 

MASONIC MCJRBSR, 

Bv REV J R BAIRD, of PleasantviUe, Pa., a seceding Mason 

who has taken 17 degrees. A 3 page tract at 35 cents per 100, 

5;-2.O0 per 1000. TRACT NO. 3: 

SECRETS OF MASONRY, 

BY ELI TAP LEY. 

This isa l-nao-e Illustrated Tract, showing the signs, gi['PS and 

pass-words, ol the drst three degree's. 50 cents per 100, or $4.00 per 

^*'"°' TRACT NO. 4: 



BY PHILO CARPENTER. 
This is a 2-page tract, calling the ^ttentioii of the public to tl,e 
despotic and ridiculous titles of Freemasonry. Price 25 cents per 100 , 
,$2 00per 1,00Q. 

TRACT. NO, 5: 

Iztraots From Masonio Oaths and Penalties, as 
Sworn to by the &rand Lodge ofEhode Island. 

This tract is a reprint of a tract published in 18.34 and i| a very 
weighty document. A 4-page tract at 50 cents per 100, $4.00 per 

^''*' TRACT NO. 6: 

Hon. Jolyi Quiiicy Adams' T. 

ah'hiE; Ilss aad Mas Fat 



ov-'3 ©pai23i>n of FreemasoEry (1831.): 

AN" 



TRACT NO. 7; 

SATAN'S CABi:.E-TO"W. 
A 4-pagc tract. This is n careful analysis of the character of 
Masonic oaths, and shows them to be most blasphemous and un- 
christian ; and the Masonio Cable Tow i= clearly shown to be the 
Cable Tow by which Satan is leading thousands to eternal death. 
50 cents per 100; igl.OO per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 8: 

Is a 2-page double tract, '•illustr.^.ted. ' 'I'he first page repre- 
sents a Mason proclaimimg the wonderful wisdom and benevo- 
lence of the order, with an article below, entitled "Fraema- 
sonry is only 152 Years Old," and gives the time and 
place of its birth. 

The second side is entitled, "Mnri^er and Treason not 
JExo<»pt«d," and shows that the Masonic order is treasonable in 
its constitution, and is both anti-Republican and anti-Christian, 
Price 25 cents per 100; $3 per lOOO. 

TRACT NO. 9, ILLUSTRATED: 

FREEEHASONRY IN THE CHURCH. 

Copy of a petition for the hljjher degrees of Freemasonry, in 
which Blasphemous and Despotic Titles are enumerated and 
prayed ior. The Copy was printed for the use ot "-Occidental Sov- 
ereign Consistory ,S. P. P. S," 32d degree— a Chicago Lodge— and 
was ordered by a deacon of a Christian Church who is Grand Orator 
of the Grand Lodge of HI. 

TRACT NO. Ill: 

CHARACTER AND SYMBOLS OF FREliMASONET. 

A 2-page tract, (ili.ustkated) by its "Grand Secretaries. Grand 
Lecturers, Perfect Priace Freemasons, Grand Inspector, Inquisitor 
Commanders, Grand High Priests," etc. The wonderful symboU- 
cal meaning of "the Cable Tow," "the Square and Compass'," "the 
Lamb Skin, or white Apron,' ' and "the Common Gavel," are given 
in the exact words of the highest Masonic authority. 25 cents per 
100 or $2.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 11; 



of 



ill!! 



Km 



M. 



TO THE PUBLIC; 

Concerning the Morgan Murder, and the character of Freema- 
sonry, as shown by this and other Masonic murders. 50 cents ■per 
100; $4,00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 12: 
JUDGE WHITNEir AND MASONRY. 
This tract contains a condensed account of .Judge Whitney's 
Defense before the Grand Lodge of Illinois, on char«e of unma- 
sonic conduct in bringing Samuel L. Keith the murderer of Ellen 
Slade, and a member of his Lodge, to justice, with Judge Whitney's 
subsequent renunciation of Masonry, 
An 8-page tract, $1.00 per 100 ; $8.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 1:3: 

DR. NATHANIEL COLVEK, OST MASONRY, 

and 

HOWARD CROSBY, D. D., 

Chancellor of the University of NewY'ork, on SECRET SOCIETIES. 

A double 2-page tract 25 cents per 100; $2.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 14: 
GRAND LODGE MASONRY. 

ITS EELATION TO CIVIL QOVEENiEKT AND THE CEKISTIAHEELiaiON. 
Opening address before the Monmouth Convention, by PEES. J. 
BLAHOHAED of WHEaTOU COLLEGE. This is a 16-page tract at $2.00 
per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

TRACT SO. 15: - , 

A clear and conclusive argument proving the luvalidity o. any 
oath or obligation to do evil. By REV. 1. A. HART, Secretary 
National Christian Association. Published by special order of the 
Association. 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 10: 
HON. SETH M. GATES ON FREEMASONRY. 

PROOF THAT THE INSTITUTION THAT MURDERED MORGAN 
IS UNCHANGED IN CHARACTER 
This is a letter to the Monmouth Convention by Hun. Seth M, 
Gates who was Deputy Sheriff of Genesee County, and also Secre- 
tary of the Leroy Lodge at the time of Morgan's Abduction. A i- 
page tract, 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 1000. 
TF„A.CT NO. 17: 

,, wjligatigns and lijmii of lb Sraajs, 

WITH A CONSTITUTION OF A FARMERS' CLUB. 
This little tract ought to be put into the hands of every Farmer in 
the United States. S"our-page tract, 50 cents per 100; $4 00 per 1000. 

• TRACT NO. 18: 
HON. \irM. H. SEWARD ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Bztracs from 1 Speech on Ki3ow-'rnot''.ingi:m in the U. S. Senate in 1355. 
The testimony of JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, MILLARD FILLMORE, 
CHIEF JUSTIC MARSHALL and others, is added. 

A 2-page tract, 25 cents per 100; $3.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO, 19. 
BRICKS FOR MASONS TO LAY. 
WASHINGTON, MADISON, MARSHALL, RUSH, HANCOCK, 
ADAMS AND WEBSTER, give brief clear testimony against the 
Lodge A 2-page tract 25 cents per 100 ; $2.00 per 1000. 
TRACT NO. 20: 
OBJECTIONS TO MASONRY. 
By A SECEDING MASON, of Cornton, Vermont. 
This tract contains many strong arguments against the Lodge drawn 
from personal experience, observation and study of its character. 
A 4-page tract at 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1,000. 
TRACT KG. 21 : 
MASONIC CHASTITY. 

BY E3IJIA A WALLACE, 

The author, by wonderfully clear illustration and argument, shows 
the terribly corrupt nature of Freemasonry. No true woman who 
reads this will ever speak with approbation of this institution. 
A 4-page tract 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1,000. 



'in. 



loa. Jame3 Madison's Letter, 

QlYin^ His Opussost of Freemasonry pf^--)- . ., „ 

^oth of theses letters, in one 4-page tract, at 50 cents per 100 ; *.4.00 
: 1000. 



GERMAN CYNOSURE TRACT A. 

Six Seasons wlij a Christian sk'dli noils a Freemason 

By REV. A. GKOLB, Pastor, German M. E. Chvirch, 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

This is ou first German'tract, and it is a good one ; it ought to 
have a large cirrculation . Price 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1000. 

ENOCH HOHEYWEIX'S TJRACT 

TO THE TOUNG MEN OP AMERICA. Postige, 3 cents per 100 
Traces. Tracts free. 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



The Cliristian Cynosure. 

With enlarged size, added ability 
and the earnest co-operation of all who 
desire a pure church and a government 
in the hands of unselfish, honest men, 
the Cynosure will greatly increase its 
circulation during the coming year. 

Men of average integrity need only 
to understand Masonry and kindred in- 
stitutions to seek their extermination. 
Women who desire temperance and 
purity cannot regard with complacen- 
cy an institution which is hostile to 
both. 

Christians who abide in Christ will 
use all the wisdom and grace God has 
given them in their efiforts to overthrow 
an institution which substitutes artifi- 
cial lights for the tiue "Light of the 
world." 

The institution of Freemasonry is 
rooted in human selfishcess, sustained 
by false professions, accommodates its 
principles to the basest natures and by 
casting out Christ and at the same 
time professing to save sou's from death, 
it leads our nation towards heathenism. 

Ignorance of this subject in thinking 
men and women, is the chief cbHacle 
which those who desire to blot it out 
of oar country, have to contend with. 
Will ycu not use all pofsible exertions 
in enlarging the circulation <^i the Cy- 
nosure, that this ignorance may be dis- 
pelled ? 

All responsible persons who desire 
to promote this reform are authorised 
to act as agents. 

All who canvass for the Cynosure 
Ma^lowed a cash commission of twen- 
bookF, one-half this percentage on re- 
newals, and any one sending $100., for 
the Cynosure during three months, will 
be entitled to an extra five per cent. 

ABOUT COMMISSIONS. 

We receive letters occasionally con- 
taining two, three, or more subscrip- 
tions in which nothing is said about 
commissioas. Some friends write ''we 
take no commission. " Others eay send 
the amount of commission in tracts and 
books. Others say, consider it a dona- 
tion to the tract fund. We are glad 
to get workers for the circulation of 
the Cynosure and pay nothing more 
cheerfully than commissions. However, 
our paper is cheap at 12.00 a year and 
requites a great addition to our present 
mail list in order to enable us to issue 
it in this attractive form, so that when 
money is received and nothing said 
about commission we do not, as a rule, 
allow any. 

The point of these observations is, 
tell us what you wish to have done 
with your commission unless you take 
it out before forwarding the subscrip- 
tion money. 



How to Send Money. 

Post oflSce orders, checks or drafts 
on Chicago or towns east of Chicago, 
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the same letter are for different objects, 
write so that the letter can be cut and 



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We discontinue during the first 
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Address letters thus: Subscriptions 
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We thank those who ere renewing 
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"A New BroDui Sweeps Clean." 



We hope our readers and friends 
who desire to see the success of this 
movement will be verv earnest in their 
efforts to obtain new subscribers now. 
The paper is just enlarged. The Con- 
vention at Syracuse is approaching. 

of suijscriBersln order successfully to 
meet the increased expenses of the 
paper. We wish to thank and en- 
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working for the paper. The great work 
is but fairly begun. We are glad to 
realize that so many have enlisted' for 
the campaign. 

Agents and colporters are needed to 
sell Anti-masonic publicationp. One 
man sends for a Eupply saying that he 
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yourselves with a supply of Anti-ma- 
sonic books and pamphlets. Thinking 
men everywhere should have this 
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J. P. Stoddard. 



Agents Wanted. 



D. Freemar, C. F. A. GantzcWow, C. 
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Shaw, A. Stillwell!2. R. S.ockwell, 
Mrs. J. Slade. J. W. Searing, Wm. 
Shaw, W. R. Tippia, E. P. Towa^iey, 
A. Thompson, John Wood, J. Williams, 
J. Worth, G. W. D. White, A. 
Wright, J. Wilkinson, W, D. Liwray. 



fflABES'T BEFOHTS 



CniCAGO, April 13, 
The following are the latest aavicee: 



ADVSaTlSiNia RATES . 
■:^~AU advertlsementB are inserted in hot 
editions. v, 

1 sqaare 

1 

1 

1 " 

1 



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" 2 " 10.00 

3 " 15.00 

" 6 " 25.00 

" 13 " 40;00 



To sell the publications of Ezra A. 
Cook & Co. Liberal terms offered. 
Capable persons who are in need of 
pecuniary aid may clear handsome 
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ing the cause of rkform. 

Apply to Ezra A. Cook & Co., 

No. 13, Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 
< ■ » 

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5th— April 13ih, J. W. Alberty, 1. 0. 
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Britten, L.H. Bishop, P. B. Bates, 
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Sam'i. Beighler, S. H. Crosby, E. S. 
Cook, A. T. Curtiss, N. Callender, J' 
M. Cook, G. J. Carson, P. Ci,penter, 
H. Davis, C.Cogswell, A, Edgerton, A. , 



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TERMS FOR THE CYNOSURE. 

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20 •' " " ■' ' 32 HO 

10 Renewals" "■ " " 20.00 

50 '• " " " " 85,00 

Twenty subscriptions or six months count the 
same as ten for a year. 

THIRTEEN REASONS 

Why a Cliristian shosdd not be a Freemason. 

BT 

REV. ROBERT ARMSTRONG. 
The author states his reason clearly and care- 
fully, and any one of the thirteen reasons, if 
prpperly considered, will keep a Christian out of 

Ssingie copy, o-y mau pvsi, j^i^vi 

Perdoz., " , " " ,')„ 

" 100, express charges extra 3 ."ij; 

I SOMETHING NEW. | 

A CHART OF MASONRY 

Showint; the degrees from the first to the thirty 
third, entitled 

Degrees of Ancient Accepted Scottish Freemasonry, 

According to a Manual by V.'m. M. Cunniugliam, 
33d Degree. 

A Handsome Lithog^raph 22x38 Inches. 

Price, finely colored, by mail, postpaid, $ 75 

" colored, varnished and mounted on 

roller, by express, charges extra 1 00 



if 



Comprising a detailed Account of the Kites 
and Ceremonies of all the Secret andMysteii 
"HB Infltltntlons of tbe Ancient World. 

West^eld College, 

Westfield, Clark Co., 111. 

Classical and Scientific Departments, open to 
both sexes. Also instruction In Music, Drawing, 
Painting, Book-keeping, Penmanship and Teach- 
ng. Address, 

Apr 246 m Rev. £ vml. B. Allbn. PretU 

Clubbing List. 



The Weekx.y Cynosure will be sent for 
one year to old or new sabscriliers, with 
the following papers (to new subscribers) 
at the annexed reduced rates. 

THE CYNOSURE AND 

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Methodist Free Press 3 25 

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Palestine 2 75 

do without map , 2 40 

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chromos) 2 90 

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National Agriculturist and Bee Jour- 
nal 2 60 

Bee-Keeper's Magazine 2 60 

Bible Banner : 2 50 

Chromowith either of lli^three 40c ex- 
tra. ' !• 
Wood's Household Magazine with 

chromo 2 80; 

Earnest Christian 2 80 = 



:6H 
1 22?^ 
1 SO 
1 11 
G2}.i 
CO 
45K 
43 
9J 

5 50 

6 25 
3 50 



Grain Wheat— Spring, No. 1 
No. 2... 
" No. 3.... 
" Bejected 

Corn— No. 9 

Reieota d 

Oats— No. 2 

Rejected 

Rye— No. 2 

Flour, Winter 

Spring extra 

Superfine 

Hay— Timothy, pressed 12 00 

" loose 11 00 

Prairie, " s 00 

Lard 

Mess pork, per bbl 16 60 

Butter 25 

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18':4. 

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64'/2 
61 V4 



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2 26 
Shingles..... I 50 



WOOL— Washed . 

Unwashed 

LIVESTOCK. Cattle, extra... 

Good to choice 

Medium 

Common 

Hogs, 

Sheep 



37 
25 
6 25 
6 35 
5 00 
3 75 
5 25 
5 50 



New Tork Market. 

Flour J 5 80 

Wheat 1 58 



Corn. 

Oats 

Rye 

Lard 

Mess pork. 

Butter 

Cheese 

Bgfrs 



85 

C2 

1 05 



24 
II 
10 



92H 
9 25 
6 37 

4 75 
15 50 

13 00 
10 00 

80 

18 

12 

2 50 

1 35 
65 00 

2 75 

5 85 

14 00 

2 75 

3 76 
55 
32 

6 60 
6 00 

5 25 

4 75 

6 (0 

7 75 



11 00 

1 70 

91 

68 

1 12 

10 1-10 

16 75 

27 

10 



AGENTS WANTED, to sell our Stand- 
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AGENTS WANTED! 

To sell, direct to cunsumers, The Ghou.vdswbll ; Or, The 

AUTMOltl lATI VE HISTORY -^^e 

FAliMEliS' MOVEMENT. 

1\V .7. Perjam. ICditof AVo.stern Rur;il. Chicago. Complete antl 
Reliable, n'rjtien up to Janiiarif, Mili. 8 Original I'orlraiis^ 
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CATITION.— Inferior works, mere compitittiojts, sire being 
pushed. Do lint I-e imposed on. .Mr. I'eriam's work is full. 
authoritative, and indorsed by the Great Leaders, \ojic othci- is. 

3 m mar 12 



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Light on Fresmasonry, 

BY ELDEIi D. BERNARD, 

with an appendix revealing the mysteries o 
Odd.fellowshlp 500 pages Cloth will be eent to 
any address post paid on receipt of $2. 00, 

The flist part of the above work, LIgh 
on Freemasonry, 416 pages in paper etvtr, wil 
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Address, w. J. 8HUEY. 

DAYTON. OHIO. 



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and SENSIBLE thing of the kind I have ever 
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"The most Scbiptukal, beautiful and appro- 
priate Marriage Certiflcate I have ever seen." — 
Late Rev. H. Mattisnn, U. D. 

"Something new and beautiful, which we 
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ever laid eyes on."— JUe<A. Hoiae Journal, Phila. 
Contains two Ornamental Ovals, for Phottgraj/lis. 

A EAUTIFUL LITHOaUAPH \i 1-4 ty 18 1-4 inchos. 
25 cts each, $2. 25 per dos- $1G per 100. 

For Sale by Ezra A. Cook & Co.. CHICAGO. 



J. li. MANLEY. 
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 

And Notary Pnlilio, 

MILLS CORNERS, Jay County, Indiana. 
Prompt Attention given to the collection of 
Claims, settling estates and all other business 
entrusted to his care. 6 mo Nov. 20. 

WHEATON COLLEGE! 

WHEATON. ILLINOIS, 

• I« well known by the readers of The Cynosure. 
Faculty, eatne as laet year, with the addition o 
swo gentlemen. Those wanting iuformatio 
thonld apply to J. Blanohasd, Pres't. 



"In Secret Have I Said Nothing."— Jems Christ, 



EZRA A. COOK & CO., Publishers, 
NO. 13 WABASH AVENUE. 



CHICAGO, THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 1874. 



VOL. VI., .NO. 28.— WHOLE NO. 211. 
'weekly, $2 00 A YEAR. 



Contents. 

Page. 

Editorial AKTroLES 8 — 9 

Is It Foolish? Is it Needless? Review of Grosh's De- 
fense continued Notes. 

Topics op the Time 1 

OcB Colleges on Secket Societies 1 

CoMTRiBUTBD and Select Articles 123 

To Charles Sumner (Po«'rj/) The Masonic Oath from 

the Bible stand Point... And the Spirit was Dumb.. . 

Experience of a Seceding Mason A Question of the 

Hour 

EBroBM News 4 5 

Ohio Anti-Secret State Convention From the Indiana 

Agent — The Jay Co. (lud.) Association Organiza- 
tion in Fulton Co,, O. 

'Correspondence 5_(; 

Masonry in the Navy ^'omen's work for Temperance 

Do Masons ever ask Men to Join the Lodge Our 

Mail. 

FORTY Years A go 6 

A Call to Action. 

College Secret Societies 13 

Chapter II. 

The Home Cikclb 10 

The Higher 'Lite, Poetry Incidents of City Mission 

Work, Washington in Tears Christ our Salvation 

Pat vs. Muscle. 

Ohilbren's Corner 11 

■The Sabbatii School 7 

Home and Health Hints 7 

[Farm and Garden 7 

Religious Intelligence 12 

^ews of the Week 12 

The "Moilie Magulres." 12 

publisher's Department 16 

Advertisements 13, 14, 15, 16 



^ifp\^ 4 i\^ ^mt 



The Benbtolest Sociktie?, — There are wide- 
spread complaints from secretaries of the benevolent 
societies, of falling off in the receipts. Reasons are 
doubtless many, and among them is probably a grow- 
ing conviction that the benevolence of such societies is 
more frequently exercised toward the secretaries than 
any other parties. Go through the State of Illinois, 
and see the multitudes of churches planted and aban- 
doned. See the many graduates of expensive semi- 
aaries, who leave the ministry, and see the many 
weak and inefficient men who ought never to have 
been allowed to enter it. Look at the consistent pro- 
slavery record of the American Board. Consider 
sue h things, and it will not seem strange that men of 
practical, common sense, are refusing to commit their 
hardly-earned njoney to the management of men who 
seem to be most thoroughly skilled in the art of avoid- 
ing' practical questions. A young minister who 
studied two years in a theological- seminary in 
Chicago, said : " When I came to be a minister, I 
found I must fight intemperance, but the only thing 
I had learned in the seminary about the matter, was 
that Christ made intoxicating liquor, and probably 
drank it." 

There has been shown on the part of one of these 
societies, a disposition to preach present truth just in 
proportion as that is done should the societies be sup- 
ported. 



to be some ixtoxicating drink. It may be possible to 
make these learned gentlemen understand that the 
temperance question is not one of etymology. They 
assert that Christ probadly drank fermented liquor. 
If he did, not one of them all, nor all of them to- 
gether, can prove it, and other men as wise as they, 
say that prcbabi.y he did not. 

In this same paper that contains the letter to prove 
that Christdrank "explicitly-fermented' wine, we 
have notices of a railroad agent found dead drunk at a 
rough houee, another gentleman found dead in hit 
room, from drink, and two girls nearly killed by abuse 
in a ealoon. 

Will not these bishops, and doctors, and rabbis, 
meet a state of facts that exists, instead of "yayin" 
about a state of things existant two thousand years 
ago, about which they may be fanatical, and are cer- 
tainly ignorant. 



•' Yayin." — Quite a number of gentlemen are busy 
deciding whether Christ was accustomed to drink in- 
toxicating wine or not. 

Among f,he rest, a Jewish Doctor in Chicago has 
joined the Catholic Bishop Purcell, of Cincinnati, and 
the Presbyterian, Dr. Crosby, in New York. All 
these gentiem n repudiate with scorn, the idea that 
the Saviour was not accustomed to take his glass of 
grog, just as some Presbyterians, and Catholics, and 
Jews, do now. 

The Jewish Rabbi, after stating the meaning of 
"yayin," " shechar," "chermer" and " tirosh," 
says that Christ was accustomed to drink wine every 
Friday evening, and that at the last supper he was 
obliged, by custom, to drink at least four cups of 
wine. He says that this wine might have been fresh 
from the press, but the " laws and customs de- 
manded and preferred ' explicitli/-fermented' viine." 

Exactly what explicitly -fermented wine is, we do 
not know, but from the tenor of the letter, suppose it 



A Repdblican Form of Govbbnment. — The pain- 
ful state of things existing m Louisiana, is well-known 
to GUI readers. A set of cffioialf, wi.o were never 
elected by the people of the Slate, have been in 
power, sustained by the President of the UnHed 
States. A bill is now pending in Congress designed 
to remedy this state of things by ordering a new elec- 
tion. In Arkansas, the Governor has been ejected 
from the State House on a writ of ouster from tht 
Circuit Court, In Mississippi, a majority of the Leg- 
islature are colored men, many of them unable to uu- 
derstand the nature- of bills on which they are called 
to vote. The cowardly and infamous habit of duel- 
ling is reviving, three or four hostile meetings of this 
sort having taken place near New Orleans within a 
month, tv/o of which resulted fatally. It will soon be 
necessary to establish a military government over 
some of these States, or see them disintegrated by the 
force of their inherent corruption. Tiae people, white 
and black, are ignorant; the carpet baggers are, as a 
rule, thieve*; and the few intelligent southerners are 
yet rebels. How can Congrees guarantee to such a 
conglomerate a republican form of govern uient? Take 
away the pressure of the Northern States, and there 
would not, be a government of any kind among such a 
people three months. 

An ignorant and immoral community can be con- 
trolled only by force. Oace and again let it be un- 
derstood, we must educate and we must Christian- 
ize, or we are lost. A nation of beer drinkers will 
always have an emperor, that is, a despot. A na- 
tion of wine drinkers will be a France or a Spain. A 
nation of opium eaters will be ruled by some son ot 
the moon, who can behead every man in his empire, 
so long as his executioners are spared. The Bible 
and the school, these are the pillows of the Republic. 



To Charles Sumner. 



BY JOHN Q. WHITTIBR. 



If I have seemed more prompt to censure wrong 

Than praise the right; if seldom to thine ear 

My voice hath mingled with the exultant cheer 

Borne upon all our northern winds along; 

If I have failed to join the exultant throng 

In wide-eyed wonder that thou standest strong 

In victory, surprised in thee to find 

Brougham's scathing power with Canning's grace combined ; 

That he for whom the ninefold Muses sang, 

From their twined arms a giant athlete sprang. 

Barbing the arrows of his native tongue 

With the spent shafts Latona's archer flung. 

To smite the Python of our land and time, 

Fell as the monster born of Crissa's slime. 

Like the blind bard who in Castalian springs 

Tempered the steel that clove the crest of kings. 

And on the shrine of England's freedom laid 

The gifts of Cumaj and of Delphi's shade — 

Small need hast thou of words of praise from me. 

Thou kuowest my heart, dear friend, and well can'st guess 

That, even though silent, I have not the less 

Rejoiced to see thy actual life agree 

With the large future which I shaped for thee, 

When, years ago, beside the summer sea. 

White in the moon we saw the long waves fall 

Baffled and broken from the rocky wall, 

That to the menace of the brawling flood, 

Opposed alone its massive quietude. 

Calm as a Fate with not a leaf nor vine 

Nor birch-spray trembling in the still moonshine. 

Crowning It like God's peace. I sometimes think 

That night-scene by the sea prophetical— 

(For nature speaks in symbols and in signs. 

And through her pictures human fate divines)— 

That rock wherefrom we saw the billows sink 

In mu' muring rout, uprising, clear and tall 

In the white light of heaven, the type of one 

Who, momently by Error's host assailed, 

Stand's strong as Truth, in greaves of granite mailed; 

And tranquil fronted, listening over all 

The tumult, hears the angel say : "Well done I"' 



OUR COLLEGES ON SErRET SOCIETIES. 



Ohio Central College, 
Iberia, Ohio, Dec. 23, 1873. 

Gentlemen : — A press of 'other duties prevented an 
earlier reply. The other members of the faculty of 
this college. Professors Wallace and Altar, are heart 
and soul opposed to secret societies of every clas<», — to 
Freemasonry and Odd-fellowship, as well as to college 
fraternities. 

No secret society, it is believed, has ever been 
organized among the students of this school, and it is 
determined that none ever shall be with the knowledge 
or consent of the present ms^nagement. 

We believe secret societies to be anti-republican as 
well as anti-Christian, and cordially sympathize with 
the Cynosure in its efforts to uproot and destroy them. 

In behalf of the Faculty of 0. C. C. 

Ed. F. Reid, President. 



Masonic Oatlis from the Bible Stand-point. 



BY PROF. O. F. LUMRY, WHEATON COLLEGE. 



Gen. Grant. — The newspapers say that this indi 
vidual was smoking while he listened to the petision 
of twenty-fiye hundred bankers and merchants for a 
veto of the inflation theft. At the time that he re- 
ceived the Evangelical Alliance, he was not smoking, 
but had been smoking and drinking both; if any re- 
liance can be placed on signs. His face was bloated 
and discolored, bis eyes were watery and listless, in 
fact he was just such a looking man as would be 
called a drunken bloat, if he had been encased in old 
clothes. Surrounded by the incapables who consti- 
tute his Cabinet, the picture was one to cover with 
shame the face of every intelligent American. 



An oath is an acknowledgment of the authority of, 
and an implied declaration of allegiance to, the being 
invoked as witness of the obligation and exactor of the 
oenalty — an act of worship of the most solemn char- 
acter. Hence the Jews were expressly forbidden to 
swear by the heathen godi. Joshua xxiii. 7, reads, 
''Neither make mention of the name of their gods, 
nor cause to swear bij them; neither serve them, nor 
bow down yourselves to them." Also Jeremiah v. 7, 
•'How shall I pardon thee for this? Thy children 
have forsaken me and sworn by them that are no 
gods." In the immediate connection God says that 
he had fed them to the full, and they had committed 
spiritual adultery ; that is, had worshiped the gods of 



2 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



the heathen. Jehovah utters his threatening in Isaiab oaths, forming secret rings to swindle the people whose i stores all his riches. The command therefore to 
Ixv. 11-1 G against those that sacrifice to other gods, interests they had sworn to protect. In countries! " enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy 

and says that he will slay them that men may take where idolatry prevails there are aa many separate oaths |door, pray to thy Father which is in secret " meaLS 

warning and "swear by the God of truth." In Isaiah as gods, and the man who has taken these conflicting j that one should enter in privately, and alone amont^ 
xiviii. 1, Israel is accused of swearing by the name of | obligations knows not which to obey. He therefore the stores of his riches, and there, kneeling down" 
the Lord, "but not in^tuth, nor in righteousness."! obeys that which he thinks will punish him most humbly ask God's blessing on those riches. 
In Jeremiah v. 2-7, chief among the sins of Israel severely if he violates it. The same result is produced' How many wealthy men in America in these days 
for which dire and certain destruction is threatened, il in Christian countries just in proportion to the multi- — how many rich hearers of the word from Mr. 



is said, "Though they say the Lord liveth," (a com- 
mon formula of swearing by the true God) "surely 
they swear falsely." In Hebrews vi. IG, we are told 
that "men verily swear by the greater" and all 
lifser forms of obligation are expressly forbidden. 
James v. 12 reads, "But above all things, my breth- 



plication of bogus or extrajudicial oaths. 



Beecher, could do this with prayerful fcincerity and 



The conclusions to which we come, after, aa we truth ? 
think, a fair examination of the subject, are these: i Mr. Beecher does not discriminate, but receives all 
I let. Masonic obligations are bogus coin; sins to be I alike, publicans, harlots and Masons, at the Lord's 
repented of, not sacred obligations to be fulfilled. table, which he so liberally administers. The charity 

j 2d. No man has a right to swear with his life as a, which he preaches is universal, infinite, and he be- 
ren, swear not; neither by heaven, neither by the i penalty, unless he has a right to take his own life, i stows it freely on all. Surpassing St. Paul, who 
earth, nor by any other oath; but let your yea be j Therefore Masonic oaths are in direct violation of the i directed his followers to come out and separate tlem- 
yea, and your nay, nay; lest ye fall into condemna-: commandment, "Thou shalt not kill." selves from, and not be yoked toaether with certain 

tion." j 3d. They arc opposed to truth and righteousness, ; characters, some of whom were exceedingly like mod- 

The Saviour himself in Matthew v. 33-37, gives the I and hence subversive of all just government. lern Masons, he aspires to the higher and broader 

current view that a man must not break his oath, bur 4th. Being sither oaths by false gods, or false J functions of the Saviour himself, in bestowing mercy 
perform it to the Lord. Now God was invoked as land profane oaths by the true Gcd, they must neceg-iand charity. He imitates the forgiving power of the 
witness, whatever the object sworn by; and the per- sarily undermine and destroy .all true religion. ! Saviour, but has little or no relish for the suifering 

formance of ail oaths, to a Jew, was to the Lord, j <'An<l the Spirit was Dumb." | and the sacrifice. Wealth-getting ia made easy, and 

The legitimate oath as we have seen is by the true ; ,' ' Masonry finds eountenance and comfort under his 

God, or God of truth, aad mast be in truth andj Now when the religion of the country is trying to: preaching. 

righteousness; that is, the thing sworn to must be j purify itself from the foul corruptions that have been : We of the C'j/nosure fully admit the great intellect- 
true and rUfut. This passage uttered by Christ him- j brought upon it by the deceitful, pharisaical craft ofual power of Mr. Beecher, and can fully estimate the 
self expressly and seriatim, forbids all other oaths. Masonry, representing itself and its ally slavery asjefi'ect of that power when directed to the sustentation 
First, we must not swear by anything pertaining to | two " divine" institutions, it is remarkable to observe | of Masonry; but we are not discouraged. Fully con- 
God, aa heaven, his dwelling-place; nor by anything! how silent and dumb stood the religious press and thelvinced of the necessity of a moral reform, and to that 
commonly supposed to be separate from him, as the pulpit. When called on to aid the reform, these two end of ridding the country of Masonry, we shall 
earth; nor by any thing connected with ourselves, as jinslrumentalities of the Christian religion, with rare — ! steadily pursue our course, whatever giants may 
our head. We roay swear by nothing in heaven or very rare institutions — stand dumb and say nevr>r a 'stand in our way, or whether evil spirits stand dumb, 



earth save the true God. Now, the man that violates , word. Or, if they are forced by some who sustain 
this command sins, and the only remedy for sin is re- 1 them to say any thing about Masonry, they pretend 
pentance. .to be very much afraid of using over strong and vie- 

Since the highest Masonic authorities have repeated- j lent measures. They are exceedingly careful, lest in 



ly decided that it ia unmasonic to pray in the name 
of Christ, is it not equally true that Masonic oaths 



casting out evil spirits from society, they should tear 
and lacerate society. They want to cast out devils 



or foam or rage. 



F. H. C. 



[From the Eameet Ckristian.l 

Experience of a Seceding Mason. 



BY REV. A. T. BILET. 



are not administered in the name of Christ? That [easily, so that even the patient himself shall never 
Christ is not the being intended in the formula? If know that the work has been done! In following 
80, then the terrible denunciation given above against 
those that swear by false gods are against those thai 



out this tender mode of treatment, they proceed to 
find excuses for Masonry, and pet it with kind words, 



I had long entertained a good opinion of Masonry, 
and had argued in its favor. I had many friends who 
were Masons, some of them Chris Lian men in whom 
I had the utmost confidence ; had read the Masonic 



take Masonic oaths?} But |d;rant that the true God is^s if it did not mean to be naughty at all, for surely, l Monitor, taking particular notice of everything that I 



meant in the formula used, and suppose a man swears, 
as in the Master Mason's oath, to keep a brother 
Master Mason's secret, murder and treason excepted ; 
or in the Royal A.rch oath, murder and treason not 
excepted. In so doing he puts himeelf in this posi- 
tion: he calls the true God, the God of truth and 
righteousness, to witness that he will, if need be, make 
himself a thief or a murderer, according to all law 
human and divinCj and if he does not he agrees to 
have his life taken in a manner the most shocking 
conceivable. Can impiety and terrible profanity go 
further? 

It was in view of such horrible supplanting of the 



when we pray, are we not directed to go into our 
closet, and pray in secret, as the lodge does? The 
Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, who preaches money- 
making, taking his texts from Wall street, instead of 
from the Bible, complains of Anti-masonry as if it were 
traps or pit- falls, needlessly placed around the church 
to keep out good, pious Masons from thronging up to 
the pulpit to hear the words of One who " in secret 
said nothing." Mr. Beecher does not command his 
Masonic hearers to repent as a needed means of re- 
formation, but he complains of Anti-masons who would 
prevent these Masons from thronging up to liberal 
pulpits where their sin is never to be once men- 



true oath of God among the Jews by the oaths in theitioned! 



heathen mysteries, the boasted and real progenitors of 
modern mysteries, that the prophet Jeremiah uttered 
the broken-hearted vrail contained in the twenty-third 
chapter of his prophecy. Hs charges ihe prophets 
with committing adultery, that is, engaging in false 
worships, and doing the things that invariably accom- 
pany such a course, telling lies and strengthening the 



his times in a single utterance, the prophet says, 
"Because of swearing the land mourneth." Should 
we not fear that the time is not far distant when our 
beloved land will mourn, — nay, does it not already 



considered good in its teachings. I had never read 
an Anti-masonic book or paper — bad heard somethings 
that I considered bad about them — but thought, as 
many others do, that they were false. At times, I 
thought I would never become a Mason; at other 
times thought it would help me in my work as a 
Christian minister, and I had best join them. Finally 
I asked a Christian minister, in whom I had great 
confidence, who is I believe, a Knight Templar, if he 
would advise me to become a Mason: he said he 
would. I then made up my mind to join as soon 
as possible. I made it a matter of prayer ; tried to 
commit my way unto the Lord, and, as far as possi- 
ble, tried to act with an eye single to his glory. I 



thought I could reach men with the Gospel that I 
could reach in no other way ; that I could obtain help 
in church enterprises, and individual pecuniary aid, 
that would make me more efficient in my ministerial 
labors. I prayed God if it was wrong for me to join, 



We were bitterly amused the other day — amused 
and pained at one and the same time, to see the effect 
of this kind of preaching in one instance. A mer- 
chant, who has been accused of defrauding the reve- 
nue (in secret of course) paid six thousand dollars as a 

compromise, in order to be free from the horrors of a to prevent it; if it was his will, to permit it. (The 
wounded reputation, as he belonged to Mr. Beecher's ' question may be asked, Why, then, did God permit 
hands of evil-doers. If a man's religion is false he is church, and did not wish to bring additional scandal kie to get into it if it is wrong? Two solutions pre- 
unsouud all the way through, and ready for any evil j upon it. He was honest, but submitted to be black- ! sent themselves to my mind. The first is, I was in a 
work. Aa if to sum up all the causes of the evil oi] mailed, in secret, rather than throw even a suspi-j partially backslidden condition, and it may be that God 

cious spot upon Mr. Beecher's preaching. Secrecy is could not lead me as he would. I was not walking 
very valuable to Mr. Beecher'a church. I in the noon-day, cloudless light of the Sun of Right- 

But it is a great mistake to suppose that secret arts I eousness. The second is, I speak of it cautiously, it 
and practices find any encouragement in the Bible, i may be that God, who sees the end from the begin- 
That passage of scripture which directs the Christian Uing, saw that I would come out from it: and because 
to go into his closet to pray, does not intend to incul- ' of having been a Mason, have greater power and influ- 
cate merely and alone that unostentatious secrecy jence in working against the abomination.) I applied 



mourn becaude of swearmg? 



?» 



AVe see how recklessly men take upon them solemn 
obligations of allegiance to God and then take other 



oaths entirely at variance with these, binding them- 
selves under penalties horribly wicked and profane. 
What wonder that we recently saw men taking the 
oath of allegiance to our government and swearing to 
l)rotect it as civil officers, and at the same time taking 
and keening other oaths to seek its destruction. More 
recently we have seen other men, under solemn oflicial 



^^1 



which Masonry preaches, but virtually 
practices; but it means also to inculcate in 
nocence, and purity, and honesty in business 
transactions. The Greek word, which is trans- 
lated closet, does not mean our closet of modern 
times; but it means a store-house, granary^ or depos- 
itory of wealth ; that is, the private place where a man 



neverifoi* admission, and was accepted. When I was asked 
in the preparation rooms, if I would cheerfully con- 
form to all the ancient usages and customs of the or- 
der, I replied. Yes ; if there is nothing ag.iinst con- 
science. One man said he guessed there was not. But 
when required to divest myself of clothing, with 
the exception of shirt, and then put on their Masonic 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



drawers, it was certainly against my modesty. When | was from ''Masons, because they were such, and felt' A (Question of Ihe Hour, 

required to say that I had come hither "to learn to bound to help the needy." [Masons of course. ) The I 

subdue my passions," I thought it rather a conference gave me sixty-five dollars, which helped' Thus it is everywhere; most of our ministers are 
hard saying, at least for a Christian man. The idea i me pay some debts and get' some clothing for my '^°'''^° ^^ ^^ Masons, and most of the few who say 
of a Christian going to a Masonic lodge to learn tot wife. I was ordained deacon, blest spiritually, and ^^^^ ^""^ °°* Masons, do, nevertheless, act like Mat- 
subdue hrg passions! 'came back full of hope for the future; and with ^ °'^^- ^^'^^'^ ^'^' or nearly all the officers of a given 
My suspicions of the terrible evil of the institution hitter opinion of Masonry. !^™y ^""^ '" s^^ti^ ^^^g^^ with (he enemy, is it not 
were not arroused much, if any, until I came to the' I went to my new appointment, and k, ' almost ■^!'°^ ^^^* ^''°^ ^'"^^ ^^''^ ^'^^^"'^^'^^ ^^ '^ not high 
obligation in the Fellow Craft degree. When I came i the first thing, I providentially came across "Finney i ^'^^ ^^'^^ ^^® ^^y^'^' soldiers were placed under better 
to the^ckuse in this obligation, "furthermore do you j on Masonry." This completely uptet me. I saw plain- ;°®^^''^- If t^e unnatural connection continues, are 
promise and swear, that you will obey all regular ly that I must give up Masonry. I read everything : °°^ ^^® '^^^^ ^^^^^i^''^ ''^'^1^ *^ b^^^^^^e ^^ disloyal as 
signs and summons, given, handed, sent or thrown to^ I could get on the subject: "Bernard's Light on Ma-'*^^^'' officers? And even though they should nof, are 
you by the hand of a brother Felloe Craft Mason, sonry," Judge "Whitnev'.s Defense before the Grand , ^''^y not liable to be betrayed into the hand of the 
. . . . orlodgeofsuch, if it be within the length I Lodge," "The Broken Seal, "'-The Image of the Beast,", ®'^®'"y' We think theee questions demand pre mpt 
of your cable-tow," the thought of Morgan's murder {copies of the "C?/H.osM.re," '' Methodist Free Fress,'' f^^ profound attention. The issue is upon us, and 
came into my mind. I was terribly excited, though I « 'i^r^e J/ei/iorfis^ " etc. 1 was surprised to find that I '^^'^^. '^ '^'^ avoiding it. Nor ciu any one of ordi- 
I suppose I did not show it. la this excited state ['Masonry was so fully exposed, and became convinced t''^';^ intelligence plead ignorance as an ( xcust. for not 
took the remainder of the oUigition: though when 1 that it was my duty al?o to renounce if, and, as did 1°^'''.^' ''°'" ^''^ ^^'^^^ ""^^ palpable and indisputable. 



had to say that I did it without any mental reserva- 
tion, I thought I would never help kill any one. I 



Finney and other Christian men, expose it to the: ^^"^ ^"'*^"°*^' it is an indisputable fact th^ most of our 
world; that the obligations are not morally binding '^''''''^'■' are in oath-bound league with the Masonic 



from the miaistry altogether, in 
Nor is it much better with the 



wonder howl ever could have been so guilty as to; on anyone, [was deceived as to ils true charac-:*"^ kmdred combinatiocs; it is an indisputa'ole fact 
take such an obligation! Under those circumstan- - ter ; and I have God's Word for it. "If a soul swear, t^^a* Masonry rejects Jesus Christ; rejects the Bible; 

C3S, I could gfit no rest until I went to t'ae Master of ^ and it be hid from him, wh.-n he,^*"' it publishes all this. It is an indisputable fact that 

the lodge about it, and he told me that the obliga- ; knoweth of it he shall con/ess that he hath sinned in'*^'' minister who does not join the lodge, or, at least, 
tioD wa.= taken with the understanding that I would; that thing."— Lev. y. 4, 5. '"^'"=* *« 'o^g«' ''"'«' ^« persecuted in various ways, 

never be called upon to do anything conflicting with Of course this raised a storm of indignation. Ire.,*° even excluded 
duty to God, country or family. ' iceiveda letter advising me to say nothing on the : '^^ ^^' ^^' ^^^^^^- ^^^^ ^^ ' 

(But how was it in the cnse of Morgan? Men were matter; and stating that I had a man in my charge | P"''**'' members; if they do not submit to Masonic 
summoned to attend the lodges, and finally, after con-' "who might be filling good charges to-day, but he isi'"'^' ^^^^ ^""^ annoyed, injured, crushed in a great 
sultations had been held all over the country, it was i unacceptable, even to those who care nothing about ''^™^^ °^ ^^^'^ ^'''^- "^^^^ ^'^ "''^^ °'^^''' ^^^ '°'^' ""^ 
decided that he must die! Eight men had to cast | Masonry, because he will not let it alone." The m,n i'^^ ^^^g« ^^'^ to bring them to submit to lodge rule, or 
lots to see which should kill him. Three of them 
drew lots with D — ^or death — on them, and they put 
him to (Jeathl And this is only conforming to "an 

clent custom? of the order.'') I was fiatisfied with his butis able "to take work, and wanted to, but he could ■^^''''^^ ^'^^ ''^^^''^ ^'^ '"'S^*^ -^^^ privileges as citizens; 
explanation, and went on. 1 not keep still about Masonry. This letter led me, in ' "^^""y ''^'^ '''^°*' '^^^ *^^'^" "'j^i-^cter or business be dc- 

But in taking the obligation of Master Mason, my | connection witH other things, to conclude to t^^^ei'^™^^*^' ''^'^'^ ^^^^""^ '"b'"'^ '" profu^and sdence, lest 
fuspicions were again arroused at the clause, "Fur- 1 nothing more to do with a church so controlled i,y i their houses should be burnt over their heads. As 
thermore do I promise and swear, that a Master Ma- j Masonic influence. But where should I go? The ' ^^ ^^^"^"•^ P''®^''^"''g' ^"^"^'^ ''^ them say, " iMasoury 
Eton's secrets, given to me in charge as such, and I Lord sent Bro. T. S. La Dae out in that country toi''^^^ ^'^''^^''^ ^°^ ^^^^ '-^^'^"-'^ blasphemy I ever read 
knowing them to be such, shall remain as secure and hold quarterly meetings. I attended the meeting. ll"^' ^"* ^ ^°"^^ '^^t give much for that man's life who 



18 Rev. A. C. Hand, known to many of your readers, '^^"'"^ ^^^™ ^^ '^"^ ^'"^^ ^'^"^ ^he cturch, then they 
a man of excelent talents, but is a strong Anti-mason. 1*^'"'^^ *^°'" "»'' ^o^^^^^^ ^7 « ^ock trial, and some- 
He is a superannuate in the Minnesota Conference, "'""'^ ^'^^''"^ *"^^ ^''^^' ^''' ^^^ ^^ ^'^^^ "^^'"^ 




lere lives another good Mason, wl 



there was nothing required of me conflicting with [like a Free Methodist. Glory be io God! I fei, ^^^ tongue by the rooJs," and so on to 'he end of the 

ether duties.l went through with the third degree. I 'that I was among kindred spirits. Tasked God to^^'^'^'": P^''^'^^^- ^""^ "°* ^^'^ ^'■^"^ "^^^'^ ^ ^'''"' 

tried to reconcile these things with conscience, butldirect mo: and I finally asked Bro. La Due, (chair- '^''"*^' 

they were like Banquo's ghost — they would not down. : man of the district,) if he could give me a place to 

I attended a camp-meeting shortly afterward, and i work. It seemed that the Lord had a place already pre-; '^'^.'^^'' ^^^'' ^^^^^'^^ ^''"^' '^^^'^' ^^ the dev 

there, while praying for a personal blessing from God, j pared for me. I wrote to the M. E. presiding elder thai ■'''^'^* preacher, too, said he vfculd join the lodge. 

Masonry came up before my mind, i promised Qodil must withdraw from the M. E. church; giving my ^^°^ 8**^® the following as his reason for doicg so: '• 1 

if Ifout^d that Masonry was wrong 1 would give j reasons for it. I then united with the Free Msthc-;^**^® the support of the brethren, and if 1 join the 

it up. He took me at my vrord, and poured out hia dists, and persecution began. Men have commenced i'Odge 1 will have the support oi tas wcr.d mo. He 

Spirit upon me. This was but a short time belbrelito say all manner of evil against me falsely, i*^'" j*^'^ tne lodge inthispiace. 

started for conference. I was a probationer of the sec- j An ex-presiding elder of the M, E. church says, "All ' Such are a few, and only a few of what I claim to 

end year, in the Minnesota Conference of the M. E. j thinking men will look upon you as a perjured manV'.''^^ indisputable facts, and names can be furnshed if 

church. On my way to the conference, I passed! But I will not take space to enumerate the trials i| accessary. So clear it is that the issue is upon uf, 



a snort 
c Masons 
A ileih- 



through the town where my wife's people lived , she 
had gone before on a visit: and I found them in great 
excitement about Masonry. I found that they had 
an expose of Masonry, written by a Germanj minister 
and published (in German) by Hitchcock and Walden. 
When I found that my wife had read the book, and 



have been passing through. God has wonderfully ; *°d there is but one alternatlvo left for us, namely, 
blesssed and sustained me. He ha? given me cour-jsubmit to the Masonic yoke, or manfully contend for 
age and strength to lecture with Bro. La Due, inthej^liat is dearer to us than life itself. I need not 
presence of Masons who were doing all in their pow-i^^y* that the Masonic yoke is the meanest, the must 
er to make the people believe I was lying. I have : g'^l'ing of all yokes, Hence, he who submits to it, is 
been cited to appear for trial for violation of obligation I not worthy of being called a man. And as it is now 



knew of the practices of the Masons in their nightly | by disclosing the secrets of Masonry, and renouncing I ^^^^^nowledged that preachers join the lodge, that they 

all allegiance to the order. The penalty is death. ; '^^J g«t money both from e;iints and sinnerr, it is 
The committee appointed by the lodge to take tes- ; iioped that the saints will find no diiliculty in finding 
timony in the case, is composed of a representative j better use for their money than to give it to such uc- 
elect to the legislature; a steward in theM. E. church, j ^^cVthy objects. Nor can they fail to see that £o long 
and a prominent lawyer, I hardly think they dare} as they accept of, and support Masonic preachers, as 
attempt to take my life; but they will do all in their 'their pastors, so long the evil of which we complain 



orgies, I was ashamed of the institution. I was al- 
most tempted to get the book and destroy it. I tried 
to keep her relations from knowing that I was a Ma- 
son, but their talk had a great eflfect on me. At St. 
Paul I stopped with my old class-leader, [a man full of 
faith, and about the first thing, before he knew I was a 
Mason, he commenced talking against it. I was getting 
hit on every side. But when I got to conference, 
among so many ministers who were Masons, I felt 
reassured. I had received but little pay from my 
charge for three years , and was in great need, both 
myself and family. A good Christian and warm- 
hearted brother started a subscription to get me a 
suit of clothes — giying four dollars himself. He said 
to me several times, ' 'I want you to consider that 
this comes trom the Lord," But a prominent minis- 
ter, in writing to me afterward, said a part of it 



power to ruin my reputation, and hinder me in this 
world. But I trust in the Lord with all my heart, 
and lean not to my own understanding. In all my 
ways I try to acknowledge him ; and he does direct 
my paths. Glory be to his name ! 

"He leacleth me— oh Ijlessed thought, 
O words with heavenly comfort fronght." 



will continue and increase. — Stv. 
in Meth. Free Press. 



John Levington, 



"In small things," says Spurgeon, "lie the cruci- 
bles and the touchstones. Any hypocrite will come to ^^ 

the Sabbath worship, but it is not every hypocrite I /"" '' "" ' j * 

that will attend prayer meetings, or read the Bible in M^^ndred thousand, w 

secret, or speak privately of the things of God to the [greater hero is he who has butonca conquered him 

saints." jselt^ 



— Wisdom does not show itself so much ia precept 
as in life — in firmness of mind and mastery of appe- 
tite. It teaches us to do as well as to talk; and to 
make our words and actions all cf a color. 

— He who would conquer ia battle ten times a 
ere indeed a hero. But truly a 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Exccutire Committee Notice. 



The Executive Committee of the National 
Christian Association are hereby notified 
that a meeting will be held at the Cyno- 
"surc Office ou Friday, April 2-lth, at 11 
o'clock A. M. By order of the 

CaAlRMAN. 

*■** ^ 

THE NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSO- 
CIATION, 

OPPOSED TO SECKET SOCIETIES. 

President — J. G. Carson, Xcuia, O. 

Vice-Presidents— 11. B. Taylor, of Ohio ; 
Aaron Floyd, of Pensylvauia; Luke 
Thomas, of Ind ; Pres. D. A. Wallace, of 
Illinois; George Brok.aw, of Iowa; N. E. 
Gardner, of Missouri; N. B. Blanton, of 
Kansas; Donald Kirkpatrick, of Iscw 
York ; J. W. Wood, of AVisconsin ; John 
Levingtou, of Michi<:!;an. 

Corresponding Secretary— I. A. Hart, 
Wheaton, 111. 

Recording Secretaries— H. L. Kellogg, 
G. L. Arnold. 

Treasurer— H. L. Kelloga;, 11 Wabash 
Ave., Chicago. 

Executive Commiltee— J. Blanchard, 
P. Carpenter, I. A- Hart, George Dietrich, 
J. M. Snyder, O. F. Lunny, Isaac Preston, 
C. R. Hagerty, J. .M. Wallace, E. A. Cook, 
J. G. Terrill, A. Wait, H. L. Kellogg. 

The objocis of this Association are to 
expose, withstand and remove secret soci- 
eties and other like anti-Christian organi- 
zations from church and stale. 

The Association originated in a meeting 
held Oct. 30lh, 18(37, in the City Hall of 
Aurora, II!., attended by persons opposed 
to secret societies, where a commiltee was 
appointed to make the necessary arrange- 
ments for a National Convention. This 
was held in Pittsburgh, May 5th-7lh, 
18GS, when the National Association was or 
ganized. Itssubseciuent raeelingshave been 
held : Chicago, June 8th-10th, 180!J ; Cin- 
cinnati, June !)th-lllh, 1870 ; Worcester, 
Mass., June 7th-Uth, 1871 ; Oberlin, Ohio, 
^Nlay 21st-23d, 1872 ; Monmouth, 111., 
May 14th-16th, 187^. Its presiding offi- 
cers have been in order : Bishop D. Ed- 
wards, Prof. J. C. Webster, Judge F. D. 
Parish, Gen. J. W. Phelps, Prcs. J. 
Blanchard. 

The Association employs a General 
Agent and Lecturer, and has secured 
State lecturers for Indiana, Ohio and Illi- 
nois, whose names appear in the list of 
lecturers. The support of the Association 
is entirely voluntary. Funds are greatly 
needed to carry on the work already be- 
gun, and contributions are hereby solicited 
from eyery friend of the reform. Send 
by post-othce order, registered letter or 
draft to the Treasurer, 11 Wabash Ave., 
Chicago. 



sponded to the loud call for laborers, 

and leaving the ordinary ministrations 
of his deiiomination, where he can com- 
mand a good, sure salary, has entered 
the field as Siate Lecturer. Shall such 
a rcaa ever have cause to write such a 
letter ag;ain ? God forbid. The Grange 
alone we presume costs Ohio farmers a 
hundred times the amount needed to 
support our State Lecturers, and yet 
the Grange is a curse instead of a bless- 
iiig. Surely Ohio friends of the cause 
will pay their own noble self sacrificing 
State Leclurcr in advance if need be. 
Address contributions to Rev. D. S. 
Csldwel!, Carey, Ohio. They wiil be 
reported by him at the Cynosure office. 



From the Indiana Agent. 



tmm\\ 3m% 



Lecture List. 



^The General Agent was at Oberlin on 
the Sabbath, and has appointments in Me- 
dina county, Ohio, this week. 

— The reformers in Indiana will be glad 
to learn that their efficient State Agent is 
about to remove to Ligonier, in Noble 
county, where he will have better aflvan- 
tiges for reaching his field. He has lect- 
ured twenty-eight times within the last 
month. The .Kxecutive Committee of the 
State Association have appointed him del- 
legate to Si'r.icuse. 

— The letters of two weeks ago on the 
Morenci, (Mich,) murder, have awakened 
some apprehension lest Eider Baird had 
become the victim of the lodge. But a 
late letter from him written at home dis- 
pels such a fear. 

— Prof. C. A. Blanchard starts for New 
York next week. He v/ill speak on the 
way at and near Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Ohio Airti-Secret State Convention. 



General Agent and Lecturer, J. P.Stod- 
dard, Christian Cynosure Office, Chicago. 

State Lecturer for Indiana, J. T.Kiggins, 
605 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

State Lecturer for Illinois H. H. Hinman, 
Farm Ridge, LaSalle Co., 111. 

State Lecturer for Ohio, D. Caldwell, 
Carey, 0. 

State Lecturer for New York, J. L. Bar- 
low, Bemus Heights, Saratoga Co., N. Y. 

I. A. Hart, Wheaton, 111. 

C. A. Blanchard, Wheaton, 111. 
P. Elzea, Wheaton, 111. 

W. A. Wallace, Senecaville, O. 
J. B. Nessell, Ellington, N. Y. 
John Levington, Detroit, Mich. 

D. P. Rathbun, Odessa, N. Y. 
S. Smith, Charles City, Iowa. 
R. B. Taylor, Summcrfleid, O. 
L. N. Stratton, Syracuse, N. Y. 
N. Callender, Green Grove, Pa. 
J. H. Timmons, Tarentum, Pa. 
Linus Chittenden, Crystal Lake, 111. 
P. Hurless, Polo, 111. 

J. R. Baird, Greenville, Pa. 

T. B. McCormick, Princeton , Ind. 

C. Wiggins, Angola, Ind. 

E. Johnson, Bourbon, Ind. 

Josiah McCaskey, Fancy Creek, Wis. 
G. P. Hawley, Seneca Falls N. Y. 
Wm. M. Giveus, Center Point, Clay Co., 
Ind. 
J. L. Andrus, Mt. Vision, N. Y. 
J. M. Bishop, Chambersburg, Pa. 

The Ohio State Agent writes: -'My 
heart is certainly in the work in which 
I am engaged; but financially things 
look exceedingly dark." It makes one's 
heart ache, and we trust it will lead the 
people of Ohio to forward contributiocfi 
promptly for Mr, Caldwell's support, to 
read such words as these we quote 
from his letter. Here i\ noble Chris- 
tian minister, who for the love he has 
for this work of reform, feeling the 
great importance of this cause, has re- 



After consulting with the friends of 
our reform as general]}- as practicable 
as to the time and place of holding our 
State Convention for organiaation, we 
have concluded that we can do no bet- 
ter than to appoint it at Flat Rock, 
SentcA Co., 0. This is not as central 
as we could desire, but all the circum- 
stances indicate ttat this will be the 
most Duccessful place for Buch a gather- 
ing on short notice, in this appoint- 
ment we have the concurrence of Rev. 
L. Moore, President of Northern Cen- 
tral Ohio organization, and other 
friends, and hope that it may meet the 
approbation of our friends generally 
throughout the State. As the National 
j meeting at Syracuse is fast approach- 
ing, .'ind as wc hope to be fiily repre- 
sented in that body, we fix the time 
for holding our Siate meeting to com- 
mence Tuesday evening, the 19 th of 
May, and to continue until Thursday 
evening, the 2l5t. We hope all our 
friends who can possibly atttend will 
do £0, as the convention will be one of 
much interest to our cause in this State; 
and we hope the influence will be 
healthy on other States. Corns one, 
come cM, and let us put this State upon 
a basis in which she can be effectively 
aggressive against this enemy of God 
and humanity. We wish to be able to 
appoinli one or more delegates at this 
meeting from every county in the State 
to the National meeting in June. 
Hope the friends will ail take an inter- 
est in securing funds from each county 
suflieient to defray the expenses of 
their respective delegates. We will see 
that able speakers are present on the 
occasion. Papers favorable please copy. 
D. S. Caldwbll, Stale AtjenL 
Carey, 0,, April 1 3 th, '74. 
P. S. — Persons from all parts of the 
Stats will stop ofif at Bellview, and will 
be conveyed to place of meeting. 



Portland, Ind., April I3th, 1874. 
DfiAE K: — Our convention at Liber 
on Wednesday, the 8th, — being the 
first semi-annual meeting of the Jay 
County Association, was eminently 
a success. Here, as in other places, 
there is an extensive anti-secrecy sen- 
timent, which only needs developing 
and crystalizing. And the work of de- 
velopment and crystahzation goes on 
bravely. I received a letter from Bro. 
Wilson Millig.-in and wife, requesting 
me to visit this region, which I did in 
July last. At that time no lectures 
had been given in this county; and as 
the coKiing of an anti-secrecy lecturer 
had been extensively heralded by friend 
and foe, no small stir was made when 
I arrived and began my work. Some 
opposition was made, which, as usual, 
proved to be ''wind in our sails." Bro. 
Milligan deserves great credit, also his 
wife, for the great interest they have 
manifested in awakening public atten- 
tion to the Anti-masonic movement, and 
in inaugurating an active sentiment, 
the good results of which they are now 
beginning to see. 

This is my fourth visit to Jay coun- 
ty, and the progress of the cause since 
the first, is very encouraging indeed. 
The Association is now fairly under 
headway. Wilson Milligan, of whom 
even Masons are obliged to say, ''he 
is an honest, reliable man," is its pres- 
ident. His white Iccks, hie plain, old- 
fashioned ways, and his record as an 
abolitionist, who was severely censured 
for "preaching politics" from the pul- 
pit, in addition to which, being a resident 
of the county since 1837, and hence 
being known all over it, all seems to 
point him out as ' 'the man for the 
place'' he occupies. Gomer A. Jones, 
of the firm of Jones Bros., the princi- 
pal hardware men in Portland, and a 
graduate of Wheaton College, is the 
gentlemanly and efficient secretary. 
He renders entire satisfaction. The 
friends in Jay county have occasion to 
congratulate themselves upon having 
secured his hearty co-operation; and as 
he is young like myself, I trust I shall 
often be permitted to meet him in the 
front, where the action is hottest. 
The treasurer's place is rery fitly filled 
by my friend and brother, Dr. John A. 
Morehouse, with whom I am now stop- 
ping. He is a "United Brethren," 
•'dyed in the wool," and like Mr. 
Jones, is a young man. These are the 
principal officers: and led by such men, 
by the blessing of God, Jay county 
will triumph over the workings of the 
devil — grange and all. A political 
convention is to be held in July, and a 
full ticket placed in the field. The 
next regular semi-annual meeting will 
be at Westchester in the Congrega- 
tional church. 

I go on the first train south to meet 
the Executive Committee at Westfield 
to-morrow, I expect to see the friends 
at Richmond about holding our next 
National meeting there. I think Indi- 
ana must have the next meeting. 

RICHMOND. 

I have just arrived here, and have 
seen Mr. Nicholson , a friend of some 
prominence, and have presented the 



interests of the anti-secrecy cauEe. 
He informs me that the friends of the 
Richmond Yearly meeting, have re- 
cently made their testimony against 
the lodges more definite, and more 
comprehensive, excluding even the 
good (for nothing) grange from a phce 
in their church. This is as it shoijd 
be. And now that the graceless 
character of the grange is generally 
known, let us hear the testimony of 
the churches. There has been no 
anti-secrecy work done here, outside 
of the Friend's church. Richmond is 
having its share of the "temperance 
excitement," and much good is being 
done. Out of about thirty saloons 
and whiskey selling "holes," only six 
have refused to surrender, and they 
are so " blockaded" that business is 
dull with them. Only three doors 
from where I sit, two faithful Quaker- 
esses are sitting outside the door of a 
saloon, amply provided with shawls and 
umbrellas to protect against cold and 
the snow which is falling. Shortly 
they will be relieved by two others; 
and thus the siege is kept up till the 
saloon is closed at night. By this 
means the most profitable customers, 
(the semi-r€spectable "social drinkers") 
are prevented from going in; they 
cannot so far disgrace themselves as 
to face these brave women, who, with 
a determination, and a degree of self- 
sacrifice truly wonderful, have taken 
their stand directly between them and 
ruin. The result will be, doubtless, 
that saloon keeping will get to be 
both very unpopular and unprofitable, 
and will be abandoned. 

INDIANAFOLIS. 

I arrived here this evening at 4 
o'clock. I am staying with Bro. Rob- 
inson, whom I find in good spirits. 
Westfield, April I4th: evening. 

Hamilton County Association held 
its third regular meeting to-day, and 
transacted some important business, 
which you wiil see by reading the 
minutes, soon to be published. The 
attendance was not as large as could 
be wished, but a characteristic earnest- 
estnesB was manifest. I met Bro. 
Wm. Givens to-day for the first time. 
The Friends in Hamilton county are 
highly pleased with him and have 
arranged to have him serve them 
about three weeks, just before the 
political convention, which is to meet 
on the 22d of July. He is a fine 
specimen of physical manhood, being 
tall and graceful, and a fine speak- 
er. His experience in the lodge (as a 
Master Mason) is related by himself in a 
manner calculated to interest, and im- 
press all honest hearers with the truth- 
fulness of what he says. The Executive 
Committee of the State A ssociation have 
endorsed him as their associate lectur- 
er. Hereafter let the Anti-masons of 
Indiana remember that Bro. Givens 
will be ready to labor for them, pro- 
vided they will take steps to secure him 
a compensation in each locality. He 
lives in Clay county (east of Terra 
Haute,) and those of my readers who 
desire lectures anywhere in the west- 
ern or southern part of the State will 
hereafter depend upon him. Please 
write him immediately that jour locali- 



fiSES 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



ty may have the advantage of hearing 
a man who has been in the lodge. 1 
am yours in a pure gospel, 

John T.' Kiggins. 



The Jay County Anti-secrecy and Re- 
form Association, Indiana. 



Liber, April 8, 1874. 

The Association met at 10 o'clock A. 
M. The morning session was occupied 
in devotional exercises, reading the con- 
stitution, enrolling members, and ap- 
pointing committees to prepare resolu- 
tions for the afternoon session. 

A 1 o'clock P. M., the Association 
assembled and the following topics were 
discussed : 

Can any one intelligently accept and 
hold the essential doctrines of the Bible 
and conscientiously maintain member- 
ship in any secret society f and, What 

is our duty as followers of Jesus toward 

<» 

adhering members of secret societies ? 

The Committee on Resolutions made 
the following report, which was 
adopted : 

Resolved, That we, the Jay County 
Anti-secrecy and Reform Association, 
hereby declare that while we deplore 
the general dishonesty and wide-spread 
corruption with which our land is af- 
flicted, we believe such a state of things 
to be the legitimate fruits of the various 
secret orders of our country. 

Resolved, That we unhesitatingly 
adopt the language of Daniel Webster, 
who, in speaking of Masonry, said, 
"Among the obligations which are found 
to be imposed upon its members, there 
are such as are entirely incompatible 
with the duty of good citizens; that all 
secret associations, the members of 
which take upon themselves extraordi- 
nary obligations to one another, and 
are bound together by secret oaths, are 
naturally sources of just alarm to oth- 
ers; and that the formation and admin- 
istrations of all such oaths and obliga- 
tion should be prohibited by law." 

Resolved, That we hail with joy the 
progress which is being made by the 
anti-secrecy reform in all parts of our 
country. We also note with gratitude 
the prosperity of the Christian Cyno- 
sure, the organ of this reform, and 
gladly endorse and recommend it to 
the leading public as the bold and un- 
compromismg enemy of wrong; that 
next to t|ie Bible it is worthy a place 
in every family ; that we will do all we 
can to extend its circulation, and gen- 
erally to circulate and get the people 
lo read literature giving light on the 
secrecy question. 

Resolved, That we respectfully de- 
mand that our county papers keep 
their columns open for the fair and 
honest publication of all proper com- 
munications and news relating to both 
sides of the secrecy question. 

Resolved, That we look upon the 
grange movement, organized as it was 
by leading Masons and Odd-fellows, 
as a cunning trick of the lodges to tie 
the hands of the farmers from acting 
against them, and to fleece them of 
their hard earned money. We warn 
the people earnestly and affectionately 
against the deceptions of the grange, 
and the confiding of their actions and 
means into irresponsible hands. 

The following resolution was passed 
after quite an animated discussion : 

Whereas, We believe that Free- 
masonry is opposed to the religion of 
Christ, and free government, 

Resolved, That we will not recognize 
any known adhering Mason as a Chris- 
tian minister. 

Rev. Aaron Worth was elected to 
represent the Association as a delegate 
to the National J^ ssociation, to be held 
at Syracuse, N. Y. 

[etenins bksbiok, 



Committee on political action made 
the following report, whfch was unan- 
imously adopted: 

In accordance with the resolutions 
passed at the first meeting of the As- 
sociation, authorizing the Executive 
Committee to take political action, we 
recommend the Executive Committee 
to publish a call for a county conven- 
tion to nominate candidates for the 
coming election, the Convention to be 
held at Portland, July 15, 1874. 

The first annual meeting of the As- 
sociation will be held at Westchester. 
The time of meeting will be made 
known hereafter. 

At the close of the business meet- 
ing Rev. Aaron Worth gave a very 
interesting lecture, stating his objec 
tiona to Masonry and secret societies 
in general. His remarks merited and 
received the beat attention of the large 
audience, who obtained more light on 
the character of secret societies than 
they could from years of gazing toward 
the east in a darkened lodge room, 
' 'seeking for light. " 

The State Lecturer, Rev. J. T. Kig- 
gins, followed Mr. Worth in a short 
but clear and forcible speech, showing 
that it is much easier to go into the 
trap than to come out, and the best 
way is to keep out of the soul ensnar- 
power of secret obligations. 

Wilson Milligan, President. 

G. A. Jones, Secretary. 

«-»>» 

The Organization in Pultou Co., 0. 



Space permits only a condensed ac- 
count of this meeting, which was re- 
ported briefly in a late number. The 
meeting was held in the Popple Grove 
church, on March 31. Rev. D. S. 
Caldwell was elected temporary chair- 
man, and John Whitaker. secretary, 
and committees on resolutions and per- 
manent organization appointed. The 
constitution reported and adopted, con- 
tained these among the other usual 
provisions : 

It shall be the duty of the secretary 
to take the minutes of each meeting, 
and record them in a book provided 
for such purpose ; also to edit for publi- 
cation in the Christian Cynosure, or 
such other paper as this association may. 
select, — such items of each meeting as 
the association may direct. 

3. It is the purpose of this associa- 
tion, and shall be the duty of the mem- 
bers of the same, to oppose by all laud- 
able means, both in their organized 
capacity and individually, all organized 
secrecy, regarding as we do all such or- 
ganizations as detrimental to the best 
interest of the church and State, and 
should not be tolerated under any re- 
publican form of government. 

4. In order to meet the enemy, 
who are fully organized, politically, we 
deem it important that this organiza- 
tion shall, wherever it may seem prac- 
ticable, act in political concert, make 
their own nominations, and vote for 
their own candidates, at least until the 
corruptions of the present political par- 
ties are fully corrected. 

The committee on resolutions re- 
ported the following : 

Resolved, That i he disclosures which 
have been made of the principles and 
obligations of speculative Freemasonry, 
prove it to be an institution of danger- 
ous tendency, liable to be used by the 
ambitious and designing, as an engine 
for exalting unworthy men, and efiect- 
ing improper measures, placing the 
citizen in a situation in which his duty 
to his country must in many instances 



conflict with his obligations lo the fra- 
ternity, and weakening the sanctions of 
morality and religion, by the multipli- 
cation of profane oaths and an irrever- 
ent familiarity with religious forms and 
sacred things. 

Resolved, That it is a feature of 
our government, that all measures 
should be open and amenable to public 
inspection, and the existence of any 
secret society is h(slile to the spirit of 
our institutions. 

Resolved, That the exifctence of 
secret societies in these United States, 
justify fears acd suspicion as to their 
object, in the uninitiated, which has 
a tendency to distract society, and sow 
ill-will and dissensions in community. 

Resolved, That this convention is 
satisfied, from the evidence adduced 
before them, of the substantial truths of 
the Masonic obligation, and that we 
hereby cfter our protest against or- 
ganized secrecy in all its forms. 

On motion, J. W. McQuillin was 
elected President; Judscn Smith, Vica 
President; John Whitiker, Secretary; 
D. Zimmerman, Treasurer. 

On motion, the first annud meeting 
of the association wa3 appointed at 
Spring Hill, 0,, on the ninth day of 
June, 1874, at 1 o'clock, P. M. Bro. 
Caldwell to secure speaker for said 
meeting. On motion, we request the 
Christian Cynosure, Religious Teles- 
cope, and N. W. Republican, to pub- 
lish the proceedings of this meeting. 
J. W. McQuillin, President, Delta. 

John Whitaker, Secretary , Wauseom, 
Fulton Co., 0. 



^mt%\mkm,, 



Masonry in the Navy. 



;. YoEK, Pa., April 10, 1874. 
Editor of the Cynosure: 

In nautical language the right side 
of a ship is called the "starboard" and 
the left side the "pori" side. In the 
navy every crew is divided into two 
"watches" called the starboard and 
port watches. The gunner's mate of 
the Wissachickon bad a small room on 
the port side of the gundeck for his 
armory. The quarter gunner and 
himself were the only persons who had 
any right to go into the armory. The 
gunnel's mate was held responsible for 
everything in the armory, which con- 
tained all the small arms of the ship, 
except the spikes, cutlasses, and com- 
missioned officer's side arms. Every 
man on a ship of wsr has his post, and 
is required to be there as soon as the 
drum beats to quarters. Every man 
too has his own arms and equipments. 
When the drum beats to quarters, every 
man runs to the armory to receive his 
fighting tools from the gunner's mate 
and quarter gunner, and then takes his 
place at one of the large guns. 

During the Rebellion, in the South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, the two 
watches kept watch at night alterna- 
tely four hours. The watch on duty 
always posted two sentinels and slept 
on its arms on deck. Every ship of 
war carries all tools required to repair 
and keep in order all its small arms. 
It also has good mechanics to do such 
work. 

The gunner's mafe of the Wisshick- 
on was a Freemason. He had the 
square and compass on his clothes' bag. 
He was intelligent and a good seaman. 



but took no pains to conceal the fact 
that he was a ' 'copperhead ." When he 
gave the men their arms at night, he 
would give one man a Harpers Ferry 
musket with Sharp's rifle catridges; 
gncther would get a carbine with mus- 
ket cartridges, another would get a 
Sharp's rifle with cirbine cartridges, 
and no one would be able to load his 
weapon. The men would try to trade 
arms and ammunition s") as to o-et 

O 

Eomething they might use,' but the 
canning Mason generally made out 
to foil at least one half of them. Wten 
the drum beat to quarters he would 
mix up all the arms, cartridges, caps, 
etc, 10 such a de^rfe that nearly all 
were useless, and then there would be 
no time to hunt or trade. If there 
was a night call to quarters there would 
ba such a mixture of weapons, etc,, as 
Jtff. Davis' best friend could not have 
beaten. 

At this time I was perhaps the only 
one on the vessel that knew anything 
about Masonry, and my knowledge was 
perhaps very limited. I did not then 
suspect the Masons of treason. The 
crew to a man called it carelessness ; 
but he was not a careless man in other 
matters. When I give all my facts the 
world will be able to decide whether 
this man was only very careless or 
a very bold rebel. 

Yours for the truth, 

Edward J, Chalfant. 



Women's Work for Temperance. 



B'jnker Hill, 111. Apr. 13tb. 
Editors Cynosure: 

I write to tell you we are pleased 
with the Cynosurb''s new departue and 
that the outer circle of the great tem- 
perance wave has reached this land of 
vines and vintners. The waters are 
troubled and it is hoped for the healing 
of the people. 

Deborah awoke last week and with 
pledge in hand, went forth to find men 
to do their so-long-neglected duty, and 
non-votersto use their influence, to in- 
duce those who have the privilege of 
sufl^rage to vote for prohibition candi- 
dates at the coming election. 

She was respectfully treated, and 
procured over a hundred voters names, 
(there are about 250 in town ) , with 
nearly all the non-voters. Daily un- 
ion prajer-meetings are held, and 
mass-meetings, two evenings in the 
week. 

The several saloons were visited by 
the Committee. No names were ob- 
tained, but the keepers appreciate the 
situation, and the interest is constantly 
increasing. 

This reform movement follows in 
the wake of a revival that has roused 
the whole community to action. Many 
feared they should sacrifice their party 
or principle, but as the pledge has be- 
come strengthened by its signatures, the 
timid temperance men are sending in 
their signatures, 

Now, that woman knows she has an 
infiueEce in suppressing saloons, will 
she not find out that there are other 
evils in existence that there are ene- 
mies to her happiness, 

OxE OF THE Te-m. Com. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



l)o Masons ever ask Men to Join the 

Lodge 1 



Earlville III, March 28th 1874. 

Th's question has bo often been asked 
and answered in the affirmative that far- 
ther testimony is perhaps useless; but I 
met to-day on the cars with a case in 
point vcbich it may not be amiss to state. 
Oommencmg with a gentleman from 

L , he remarked, I know that what 

you siy is true. The Masons have 
their lodge over my store and I have 
often been asked to join, but never 
have. I joined the Sons of Tem- 
perance some time ago, and believe 
them to be modeled after Masonry." 

He expressed a decided disapproval 
of the whole cabalistic fam'ly, and 
thought that il a man was loyal to 
Christ, his church, and his ordinance 
of civil government he could get along 
well enough without grips, pa?s-word s 
and secret tokens of recognition. 
Would that we had more such young 
men of like faith and practice ! 

J. P. Stoddard. 



LOU II MAIL, 



Wm. B. Ogelsby, Ridge Prairie, 
111., writes: 

"The trouble here, is, the people 
are so wicked. Many like our princi- 
ples or politics, but not our religion. 
Now friends, I am in favor of one-half 
the paper being truly religious, and on 
the other half, politics, or the best 
manner of managing governmental 
affairs; and let each half of the paper 
be well represented." 

James Stuart, Hokendagua, Pa., 
writes : 

"There are but four of us here who 
are really opposed to the order in this 
community. By the aid of the Cyno- 
sure, Bernard and a little experience, 
we are not only able to give the grips, 
signs, etc., bu'- make them (Freema- 
sons) expose the institution more than 
we who are opposed to them. That 
is, when they do not adhere strictly to 
their jewel, which is silence. Oh, 
how wilfully ignorant are the minds of 
the people." 

J. R. Shearer, E. Nodaway, la., 
writes : 

"Your piper, for which I subscribed 
a few weeks ago, is just making a stir 
in this neighborhood, please send me a 
few sample copies, and we shall try to 
get up a club." 

W. W, Kelly, Kewanee, 111 , writes : 

*' I am greatly pleased, with the ap- 
pearance of the paper. I am with you 
to the end of the war, till he shall 
come whos3 right it is," 

W, W. Hulet, Mason City, la., 
writes: 

"Professors of religion, that claim 
to be anti secret, are so bound by the 
speech of people, especiailj of Mas- 
onic ministers, that they dare not '* cry 
aloud spare not and show the people 
their sins," and some of those that 
were Anti-masonic, huve joined the 
grange, and at once their mouths are 
shut, as to saying anything against 
secretism (i. e. oath-bound). I notice 
the grange is a very large tributary to 
Masonry," 

E. P. TowEley, De Kalb, N. Y., 
writes : 

" A day or two ago a paper of the 
above name was handed to me, and 
from its outspoken sentiments against 
an anti Republican and anti-Christian, 
so largely on the increase, is in my 
opinion a step in the right direction; 
and I hope and trust your paper will 
be sustained." 

He sends bia subscription 



There are multitudes of people 
scattered through the country, who 
would be delighted to see the Cyno- 
sure, who have not yet had their at- 
tention called to it. A letter similar to 
the above, was rtceived from Ontario, 
Canada, two days ago. This shows 
work for our readers. 
E, J. Chalfant, York, Pa., writes: 
"As the Cynosure is now greatly 
enlarged and improved, and by far the 
healthiest paper on the face of the 
earth, I think it should have the larg- 
est circulation of any paper '"in the 
known world." I intend hereafter to 
enclose one of your tracts in every let- 
ter I write, for the purpose of extend- 
ing your circulation. If al! your read- 
ers will do likewise, sly and crafty 
rings will soon be pretty well watched. 
Let all do their duty now ! " 

P, B, Bates, Constantine, Mich., 
writes : 

" I feel a deep interest in the cause 
your paper sustains, and truly believe it 
is on the side with Christ. My father 
subscribed for your paper first of any 
one about here. I have assisted him 
what I could ever since." 

H. P. McClurkin, New Concord, 0., 
writes : 

" May the Lord prosper you in your 
work of faith and labor of love and 
patience of hope." 

Robert Stockwell, Lafayette, Ind, , 
in his eighty-ningth year, renews his 
subscription , and writes : 

'* I doubt if anything can be done 

I here for the cause, unless an influen- 

] tial lecturer will visit Lafayette and 
wake the people up on the great evil of 

i Masonry, and other secret clans. They 

J are all evil, and only evil." 

Quincy Baldwin, Tonganotie, Kan., 
writes: 

'•I have read your paper for five 
years, and do not want to do without 
it." 

John Harley, Pottstown, Pa,, writes: 
" We have a strong secret society com- 
munity here." If coming events cast 
their shadows before, it is time that 
Pennsylvania roused up on this subject. 
— (See article on the MoUie Maguires 
in another part of this paper). 

G. W. D. White, Boone, la., in a 
letter which we have not room to 
quote, writes of the impossibility of be- 
ing true Christians and good Masons. 
We can join with him in the wish that 
every impenitent reader of this paper 
would "Come to Jesus," would 
"Fear God and keep his command- 
ments." We offer as a substitute for 
the false and empty consolations of 
Masonry, the Christian religion as re- 
vealed in the Bible. 

Wm. Shaw, Rushsylvania, 0. , writes : 

"Please give us a strong piece on 
the evil of novels, we believe they are 
doing as much harm as intemperance, I 
and there should be for them a prohi- i 
bition law." You will find articles on j 
this subject from time to time. There | 
is one in type soon to be issued, now, j 
If any of our readers will send us a j 
good original article on this subject 
we will be glad to insert it, 

Sam'l Beighler, Marysville, 0., | 
writes : j 

"I am the only man that takes this , 
paper in this section. I let my neigh- ! 
bors read it and they like it well." j 
Can you not send in a club of new sub- i 

scribers ? i 

I 

Hosea Washburn, Madison, Maine, 
writes : 

"The Masons tell me here that the 
secrets of Masonry have never been re- 
vealed. What do you think?" 

Those secrets technically called the 
secrets of Masonry have been revealed. 
All the transactions of lodges have not 
of course been made public, but their 



oaths, their ritual, etc. , have been re- 
vealed. One hundred and four seced- 
ing Masons testified to the truth of 
Bernard's Revelation at Le Roy, N. Y,, 
July 4th, 1828. Multitudes have tes- 
tified since^that lime, and our state and 
general agents find now many living 
witnesses in different parts of the coun- 
try, who testify to the truth (in every 
essential particular) of the revelations 
of Bernard and Capt. Wm. Morgan. 

A. D. Tomlinson, M. D., Bloomingdale, 
Ind: 

"I am doing what I can here to encour- 
age the good cause." 

E. Darling, Paint Creek, Washtenaw 

Co., Mich., now in his 84th year writes: 

It is evident the grange movement is a 

Masonic breakwater to stave off the final 

; issue. It is quite evident to my mind this 

swindle out of the farmers will operate in 

the end as a powerful means to unfold sa- 

: tanic deception." 

j In closing he gives all associated in this 
I work his benediction. 

C. S. Qitchell, Attica, Ind., writes: 
( "I have no doubtl can secure more sub- 
! scribers because of the enlargement of the 
j Cynosure. These two (enclosed) I could 
! not have obtained at the former size of the 

paper." 
' J. W. Searing, Dover, N. J., writes: 

"I could use one hundred copies of the 
I new style Cynosure in soliciting subscript- 
I ions." 

\ N. Bingham, Oneonta, N. Y., sends a 
I club of three month subscribers with $5,00 
I and writes. 

' ' You will please send to these twelve 
above named persons as directed. Hop- 
I ing and praying that they may be notes of 
I warning to awaken the receivers to duty 
j and action in the all-important cause, —that 
they will continue to take them. Yours," 
I etc. 

I J. N. Lloyd, Belvidere, 111., Shows the 

I right sort of perseverance when he says he 

j has tried though without success to get 

j new subscribers adding: 

! "But shall still keep on trying." 

He sends for extra copies of the new 

' paper. 



$tiu mn M 



A Call to Action. 



Let us then, brethren and fellow-cit- 
izens, from this day forward, no longer 
inquire when or where this hydra- 
headed monster had its birth; for 
whether we trace it to the dark dens of 
idolatry among the Jews and Persians, 
or seek for it in the Pythagorean or 
Egyptian mysteries; whether we derive 
it from the building of Babel or of 
Solomon's Temple; whether it came 
down to us from the Eleusinians of 
Greece, or the caverns of the British 
Druids; whether we owe it to the Man 
of the Mountain, the famous, or rather 
most infamous, father of the Syriac Or- 
der of Assassins, or to the more modern I 
Scotch Mystics and Murderers of York;,j 
whether, indeed, we find that ancient I 
idolatry and superstition were in reality ! 
Freemasonry, or that Masonry has bor- i 
rowed its bloody code and blasphemous j 
rites and lies from ancient idolatry and | 
superstition; whether, in short, any | 
one or neither of these propositions be j 
true, one thing is certain , that Freema- j 
sonry is equally wicked and worthless; i 
equally destitute of true charity, benev- ! 
olence,patrioli8m,morality and religion. ] 
She is St 11 like the whited" sepulchre, or 
the Sodom apple, fair without but foul 
within. 

That I have justly likened Masonry 
to the serpent of Eden, the author, in 
a spiritual sense, of the ruin of our 
race, cannot be denied; for its moral 
and political ravages would have been 



as wide-spread and as fatal as the spir- 
itual havoc and ruin occasioned by the 
maiign efforts-of its prototype, had not 
the sacrifice of the martyred Morgan 
been destined by Almighty wisdom and 
Divine goodness, to open our eyes to 
the dark and sinuous windings, the 
wily and treacherous machinations, the •■ 
steady, foul, and deadly aim, with 
which it was moving onward to blast 
forever the fruits of our Revolution, and 
prostrate in the dust the proud pillars 
of our liberty ! 

Let us not, then, once more I beseech 
you, fellow-citizens, stop^ to inquire 
when and where it originated, or from 
whence it came hither. Be it the off- 
spring of earth or hell — of heaven, we 
know it cannot be — let us look only tOi^, 
its character and designs, as developed 
in the mobocratic and criminal outrages 
at Batavia, and the still more criminal, 
the bloody consumation of those out- 
rages, at Fort Niagara; and let us de- 
termine this day tc wipe the stain of 
its horrible oaths from our souls, and 
burst its iniquitous bonds assunder. 

I could go on and recite the history 
of its triumphs and its defeats, or deg- 
radations, its corruptions and its crimes. 
I could show it under proscription, and 
justly so, in Holland in 1735; in France 
in the reign of Louis the XV. in 1737; 
at Rome by Clement's bull of excom- 
munication in 1638; afterward revived 
by Benedict the XIV. ; and at Berne by 
the Council in 1748; besides numerous 
other and later acts of denunciation, 
brought upon it in Europe by its dark 
and mischievous political intrigues, and 
attempts to usurp governments, which 
were thus driven to the necessity of 
proscribing it in order to save them- 
selves. I could tell of its daggers in 
the hands of the French Jacobins; of 
its dangerous ascendency in the British 
Parliament, where it had the pernicious 
influence expressly to exempt itself from 
the severity of the statute against 
secret societies and treasonable combi- 
nations. I could, with Barruel and 
Robinson, trace its diabolical trinity 
of German desperadoes, Wbishacpt, 
Knigga and Zwack, through the dark 
mazes of midnight conspiracy, in those 
horrible dens where they meditated 
the overthrow of all government, and 
all religion but such as their own 
demonic and wild imaginations should 
dictate. I could show its infernal 
myrmidon drugging the bowl of Bona- 
parte; and the dark and bloody heralds 
of its vengeance pursuing the footsteps 
of Alexander of Russia, to that solita- 
ry and wild frontier of his empire 
where they dispatched him, according 
to order and with their usual skill and 
dexterity which never failed of com- 
plete success until Morgan's cries of 
murder were heard at night in the vil- 
lage of Canandaigua! All this and 
much more, I could spread before you 
in detail, but a crisis has arrived when 
this detail is out of date; a crisis in 
which we cannot stop to imitate the 
wife of Lot, when she paused to turn 
and look back upon the vices and the 
crimes and the consequent sudden ruin 
and desolation of Sodom and Gomorrah 1 
We must now look to the future only; 
and with one united voice, with hearts 
and hands combined, determine to 
crush the monster, and banish forever 
its memory from among u& 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Schedule of Bible Lessons for Second 
(Juarter, 1874. 



Apr. 
May 



5th, Ex. 
12 " 
19 " 
25 
3 
10 



Lev. 



XX. 1-17— The Ten CommandB. 

xxxii. 1-6, 19, 20: Golden Calf. 

xxxiii. 12-20: People Forgiven. 

xl. 17-.30: Tabernacle set up. 

vii. 37, 38: The Five OfferinRS. 

xxii 4-6, 15-21, 33-36 : The Three 

Great Feasts. 
" 17 Num. iil. 5-13: The Lord's Ministers. 
" 25 " xix. 1-10: Israel's Unbelief. 
" 81 " XX. 7-13 : The Smitteji Rock. 
June 7 Num. xxi. i-9: Serpent of Brass. 
" 14 Deut. xviii. »-16: The True Prophet. 
" 21 " xxiv. 1-12: Death of Moses. 
" 28 Review (Suggest) Deut. vlii. Mercies 

Reviewed. 



LESSON xviii, — MAY 3, 1874. — THE FIVE OF- 
FERING.S. 

SCKIPTUBE LESSON. — LEV. vii. 37, 38. 

Commit Lesson. 

37 This is the law of the burnt-offering, 
of the meat-offering, and of the sin-offering, 
and of the trespass-offering, and of the 
consecrations, and of the sacrifice of the 
peace-offerings ; 

38 Which the Lord commanded Moses 
in mount Sinai, in the day that he com- 
manded the children of Israel to offer their 
oblations unto the Lord , in the wilderness 
of Sinai. 

HOME READINGS. 
Lev. 1. 7; Rom. v. 1, 2; xv. 13; Eph. vi. 15; 
Zech. vi. 13; Col. i. 19-22; John xiv. 27; Job xxii. 
81; Ps. xxix. 11; cxis. 165; laa. ix. 6, 7; xxvii. 
5; liii. 5; John xvi. 33; Rom. i. 7: 1 Cor. i. 3; 
Rom. via. 6; Gal. v. 22; Phil. iv. 7; Col. iii. 15; 
2The8B. iil. 16; Isa. xxvi. 3; 2 Pet. iii. 14.) 

The Bible is full of Christ, and we need 
every part of it to see a whole Christ. It is 
a whole Christ that we need — Christ in his 
offices, his character, and his person — 
Christ in the relation in which he stood to 
God and to man — Christ as going to God 
for man, and giving to God all that he 
claimed from man, and then receiving 
from God all that man needed to make 
him perfectly happy — Christ in his humil- 
iation and his exaltation — Christ in the 
lowest parts of the earth, and Christ raised 
to the right hand of God, and made higher 
than the heavens. The Bible is the great 
glass in which Christ is to be seen in all 
the various aspects in which God would 
have us view him. God's great object in 
giving us the Bible is to reveal Christ to us 
— Christ as the Saviour, God's own gift of 
love ; and our object in reading the Scrip- 
tures, should be to find Christ in them. In 
the types of Exodus we have redemption 
by Christ Jesus, and in Leviticus we have 
access to God by Christ Jesus after redemp- 
tion is known and rejoiced in. Christ is 
here seen as the Offering, the Officer and 
the Priest. He meets all God's holy claims, 
and then meets man with ?ois deep cravings 
which nothing on earth can satisfy, and 
he supplies all his need, takes away all his 
fear, and fills him with joy and peace. 

In the sin-offering we see Christ oflering 
himself for our sin ; for what we are in 
ourselves, — sinful creatures. In the tres- 
pass-offering I see Jesus offering himself 
for our sins, our trespasses, the fruits and 
effects of our sinful nature, — ichat we do. 
In the burnt-offering I see Jesus presenting 
those to God, for acceptance as worshipers, 
whose sins he has put away. In the meat- 
offering , I see Jesus in his life, but so pure 
and holy that both God and man may get 
a feast out of him. In the peace-offering, 
which was offered last of all, and was 
placed upon the burnt-offering and the 
meat-offering, I see the blessed results of 
all his toil, and of his death, viz., peace 
with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. 

The offerings are divided into two 
classes; the sweet-savor offerings are one 
class, and those which are not sweet-savor 
offerings are another class. The burnt- 
offering, the meat-offering and the peace- 
offering, belong to the sweet-savor class. 
The sin-offering and trespass-offering are 
not sweet-savor offerings. In the sin and 
trespass-offerings there was a question of 
sin. Sin was upon them by imputation, 
therefore they could not be burnt on the 
brazen altar, which was God's table. The 
fat of the sin-offering was burnt on the 
altar, and the blood was poured out at the 



bottom of the altar ; but the flesh and 
bones, etc., were carried out of the camp, 
and burnt to ashes on the earth, which 
God had cursed because of man's sin (Gen. 
iii. 17 ; Lev. iv. 11, 13 ; xvi. 27.) If any 
part was not burnt, it had to be eal^n by 
the priests in the holy place. None of the 
flesh could be put on the altar, or table of 
God (Lev. vi. 26, 29 ; vii. 6 ; x. 10-2'J).— 
Bee. George Bodgcrs. 

A Word to Mothers. 



Consider it your i-eligious duty to 
take outdoor exercise without fail each 
day. Sweeping and trotting around 
the house wUl not take its place; the 
exhilaration of the open air and change 
of scene are absolutely necessary. Oh, 
I know all about Lucy's gown that 
is not finished, Tomray*s jacket and 
buttonless coat — thrown into your 
lap, as if to add the last ounc3 to 
the camel's back, still I say, up, and 
out. Is it not more important that 
your children in their tender years 
should not be left motherless, and that 
they should not be born to that feeble 
constitution of body which will blight 
every blessing? Let buttons and 
strings go . You will take hold of them 
with more vigor and patience when 
you return, bright and refreshed ; and 
if every stitch is not finished at such 
a moment — and it is discouraging not 
to be able to sympathize in your best 
eflfbrt — still remember that ' 'she who 
hath done what she could" is entitled 
to no mean praise. Your husband is 
undoubtedly the best of men, though 
there are malicious people who might 
answer that that was not saying much 
for him. Still, he would never, to the 
end of time, dream of what you are 
dying of. So accept my advice and 
take the matter in hand yourself.— i>r. 
Dio Lewis. 

Change of Clothing. — It would be 
a great deal better to waar the entire 
winter suits through March, and even 
to the middle of April; and even then, 
until the first week in May, to make 
no change in the outer clothing, nor 
any in the inner garments, except in 
a less heavy woolen next to the skin ; 
for it is only for the three hours em- 
bracing one o'clock in the afternoon 
that winter clothing is at all oppress- 
ive ; while the very warmth of noon- 
day makes the raw dampness of the 
mornina: and the late afternoon special- 
ly felt. All changes to lighter or 
cooler garments should be made at 
dressing in the morning ; and if in any 
case the change leaves the body chilly, 
or if, soon after it is made , the weather 
changes to much cooler, by all means 
promptly, without half an hour's de- 
lay, resume the full winter's dress. 
The old, the young, the invalid, — in 
short, all persons of feeble constitu- 
tions, of small vitality, should be 
especially careful to heed these sugges- 
tions. — HaWs Journal of Healtlu 

Effects Qf Colors upon Health. 
— A correspondent of the Builder 
states that he had occasion for several 
years to examine rooms occupied by 
young women for manufacturing pur- 
poses, and he has observed that while 
the workers in one room would be 



very cheerful and healthy, the occu- 
pants of a similar room, who were em- 
ployed in the same kind of business, 
were all inclined to be melancholy, 
and complained of a pain in the fore- 
head and eyes, and were often ill and 
unable to work. The only difference he 
could discover in the rooms was that 
the one occupied by the healthy 
workers was wholly whitewashed, and 
that occupied by the melancholy 
workers was colored with yellow ochre. 
As soon as the difference struck him 
he had the yellow ochre washed off 
and the walla whitened. At once an 

i improvement took place in the health 

j and spirits of the occupants. 

How TO Make Coffee. — Propor- 
tion, one tablespoonful of coffee to 
about two and a half cups of water 
poured upon it boiling hot. Let it 
stand where it will keep hot, but not 
boil, for about half an hour. If it be 
made fresh, every bit of it every time, 
according to this rule, if drank in mod- 
eration, say one or two cups, I don't 
think it will hurt any one butj be a 
bentfit. 

Spots on Varnish. — Take a soft 
cloth and wet it in alchohol ; rub the 
spot briskly, and it will disappear en- 
tirely; then rub on a little boiled lin- 
ceed oil, and it will be restored to its 
original color and polish. 

The Scientific American says roach- 
es may be exterminated by taking flow- 
ers of sulphur one-half pound, potash 
four ounces. Melt in an earthen pan 
over the fire; pulverize and make a 
strong solution in water, and sprinkle 
the places which they frequent. 

^«t|tt( ait4 ^ai;4»(nt 

Goins West. 



Well, boys, said a thrifty New Eng- 
land farmer, it is evident that we must 
either go West or one or more of you 
will have to get some other employment, 
for it is plain that our little forty-acre 
farm will not afford us all work. Farm- 
er Brown takes a trip West and finds 
that he can get a good Iowa farm of 
200 acres, with some stock besides, for 
the market price of his little eastern 
farm, and a sale is soon made, and 
Farmer Brown and family are westward 
bound. 

The boys are delighted with the new 
prairie farm ; it is so roomy, free from 
stones, and such a fine, rich soil. 

True it does seem odd to live in such 
a ' ' wee hit of a house " and have no 
barn whatever, but all of their neighbors 
get along that way and in the whole 
county there is not to be found as fine 
a barn as they left on their old, l»ttle 
farm at the East. Farmer Brown'a 
wife and two daughters try to rejoice 
with father and the boys at the tine 
western farm, but it is so unpleasant to 
be crowded. All feel this, and the 
girls and mother cheerfully put up with 
the crowding till they can "build," for 
farmer B, declares that he will have as 
fine a house and barn as he left on the 
old place, but the money must be made 
or earned first. 

FARM BUILDINGS. 

A very small frame house, a diminu- 
tive granary with a prairie grass roof, 



with three cjrn cribs and a log cattle 
shed, each built of poles with a prairie 
grass roof, comprised the farm buildings 
at the time farmer Brown purchased 
his prairie farm . 

By industiious toil and the most 
rigid ecomy he and his family yearly 
put a small sum in the bank, besides 
gradually improving his farm and in- 
creasing his stcck. A small addition 
for a good-sized kitchen and abed-rcom 
was added to the old house and at the 
end of three years a fine barn was 
built at a cost of a H.tle over $1,000.* 
A good agricultural paper sugoested 
the plan for it, and for a farm house to 
match, but farmer Brown was too sen- 
sible a man to mortgage the place to 
get the money for both buildings, so ot' 
course the barn came first. Two years 
more passed away and tie house was 
begun, and completed during the year. 
It was a great joy to mother and 
daughters and in fact to all, to change 
from the little old house to the fine new 
one, but had cost nearly $2,000, and 
but partly finished inside, and, worte 
than all to farmer Brown, was the 
thought that he vms $500 in delt, 
though he thought he had more than 
enough to pay for the house. Five 
years more passed and the youngest cf 
the boys was nineteen, making five 
men, and the *'big farm" began to seem 
very small; for farmer Brown scon 
found that even a rich prairie loam 
would not bear cultivation year after 
year without manure, so twc-thirds of 
the farm was now pasture and meadow. 
Two of the boys had been at work for 
neighbors for the past five year?, and 
the oldest, a little over thirty, and was 
to be married in a few weeks, and in- 
tended to "go West." 

But for the attractions of home and 
the earnest protest of mother, sisters 
and their younger brothers, the three 
oldest sons would have gone further 
west three years ago, but farmer Brown 
said he would go wiih them and togeth- 
er they would buy a section, if they could 
sell the old farm for its value. So the 
old place had been for sale several 
years. It soon became evident to all 
that the beautiful farm would not sell 
for its real value. Several neighbors 
had eold out to the very persous that 
had at different times attempted to buy 
of farmer Brown. In vain farmer 
Brown pointed to his fine oi chard, ex- 
cellent fences and buildings that had 
cost over $3,000. It was plainly evi- 
dent that farmer Brown's farm was 
really worth fifteen dollars per Ecre 
more than any other in the township 
on account of these improvements, but 
purchasers would not give it. The 
dear old farm was at last sold at but 
five dollars more per acre than that of 
a near neighbor whoso place was really 
worth eighteen dollars per acre less. 
The moral of this story is: fine farm 
buildings are very pleasant to use, but 

THEY DO NOT PAY, UulcSS tllCy £16 tO be 

*'the old homestead." 

Send the boys West to do the piont er 
work and keep the home which has 
cost the best years of jour life, which 
will not sell for what it is worth, 
but will be a delightful pkce to receive 
thanksgiving day visits in from the 
children, who ere building up their 
little homes further west, and which 
will be a tasteful and quiet retreat for 
old age. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



'\\t 4^\^i$im Cp^^tt^t^. 



riiicairo, I'hnrs'iay, April 23. 1874. 



Tub Chkistian Cynosure. — Our sub cnbers are, 
maLy of them, tried friends. They took the paper 
when it was small and unknown. They did not take 
it to make money, or to get friends, or offices. Thej 
sustained it then, and do now, because it maintains 
principles which they believed to be fundamental to 
our liberties and our religion. Now the paper is en- 
larged and much improved. It is far cheaper than 
mo»t of the two-dollar papers of the country. We 
ask renewed and increased efiforts for our list. We 
want twecty-five thousand subscribers; not for our- 
selvfp, but for our cause. 

There is a great outcry about rings, stealing, cor- 
ruption, and monop)ly. All this is needed, but 
what good will it do, if the reform goes no farther 
than to remove the manifestations of secrecy, and fail 
to reach the principle itself? 

Whisky rings, printing rings, pavement rings, and 
others of like character, are but shapes which Mason- 
ry assumes, to hide its real self while it does its work. 
Did not Masons at Springfield, 111., swear that H. G. 
Reynolds paid them bribe money on the square; and 
th^t they held themselves bound not to reveal it ? 
Did they not refuse to reveal it until compelled bj 
imprisonment? And did not the same men, who bad 
accidentally discovered this Masonic conspiracy, cover 
the whole transaction with the veil of oblivion, and 
pass a vote allowing men who had stolen thirty 
thousand dollars, to draw twenty thousand more 
from the State treasury ? Masonic influence is power- 
ful at Springfield, and almost omnipotent at Wash- 
ington, where every evil on earth seems to find 
champions in the Sovereign Grands of the thirtj- 
third degree. 

Once more then to the battle, friends of ours, — and 
better still, of truth. Remember that he always 
wins who sides with God. Remember that he who 
stands in the way of his chariot wheels, will surely be 
crushed. 

Get your neighbors to subscribe for this paper, that 
pleads for the right. Be faithful and patient. The 
day will dawn. 



IS IT FOOLISH 1 IS IT NEEDLESS ? 



The Tribune of the 13ih inst. , says that the grang- 
ers in Iowa have come to grief by getting Romat 
Catholic? to join them, by means of forged letters 
from Roman Catholic bishops, and finally from the 
Pope himself, granting to Catholics permission to 
join the grange, provided there is nothing in their 
obligations or usages contrary to the teachings of the 
church. On the strength of these letters, or of the 
assertion that such letters have been received, num- 
erous Catholics have joined the Patrons. But it turns 
out that no such dispensations or letters have been 
written by Pope or bishops, and there is great indig- 
nation among the Catholic clergy, and great excite- 
ment among the people. The Tribune editor con- 
cludes that inasmuch as the papal law forbids the 
faithful to join any society which administers an oath 
of secrecy, and the Patrons have ^'foolishly and 
needlessly^' made such an oath a part of their initiatory 
rites, of course the Catholics can not unite with them. 

Now we are glad to have such facts ventilated. We 
do not believe that anything wrong is ever really nec- 
essary or really wise; and yet there is a sense in 
which the children of this world are wiser thun the 
children of light; and whatever is necessary to sweep 
in their schemes, and is cunningly adapted to that 
end, the world are accustomed to consider as neither 
needless nor foolish , but the contrary, even though 
present success may be ultimate ruin. 

The oath of secrecy in the grange foolishly need- 
less! Without such an oath, how could they carry 
out the scheme of deceiving the Cntholicp, by the pre- 
tense of a papal dispensation ? A large amount ol 
most carefully guarded secrecy would be needed in 



sueh a scheme. How could it be foolish or needless 
to employ the full sanctions of an oath to secure it? 
A scheme for taxing the farmers heavily and perpet- 
ually for the benefit of the inventors, the sagamores 
and chief estates of the order, imperiously demands 
secrecy; and nothing but strong guards and fearful 
imprecations can be sufficient to preserve it. " In vain 
.B the net spread in the sight of any bird." If a vast 
political scheme is to be accomplished by a movement 
which wholly disclaims any political designs; or if the 
intention is to extend and strengthen Freemasonry, or 
to organize a new corps in the Grand Army of the In- 
visible Empire, that is to rule and ruin both church 
and state; or if it is indispensable to success, the rank 
and file of the order shall be made to believe that no 
such ends are intended, but merely the promotion of 
the best interests of agriculture, why then, such an 
amount of secrecy is required that no ground weaker 
than those resorted to by the Patrons, would be at all 
adequate. If the Patrons of Husbandry have em- 
ployed the oath of secrecy foolishly and needlessly, it 
is not because that oath is not adapted to their pur- 
pose, and necessary to its success; but it is because 
their purpose is infinitely worse than needless or fool- 
ish, and is hidden under pretensions, just as false as 
that of the Pope's haying lent it his sanction. It is 
because the farmers generally have been duped as 
really as the Catholics, and have been drawn into the 
dark army by pretensions, as crafty and as false as 
this lie about the Pope; and because such lies are 
only the appropriate means for advancing a cause 
which has no other foundation than false pretenses. 

REVIEW OF GROSH'S DEFENSE CONTINUED. 



Instead of furnishing us any valid reason to cLange 
our opinion as to the oath-bound character of the I. 
0. 0, F. , the sophistry and special pleading which 
Mr. Grosh employs not only confirms our former opin-' 
ion, but convinces u» that he himself must be con- 
scious of the indefensibleness of his side of the quet- 
lion. 

First he makes the following admission. 

"'The Odd-fellow's Manual,' in treating of the 
Grand Encampment Degree, states that the 'receiver 
ot this degree appeals to heaven and earth to witness 
he fidelity with which he will represent the interests 
if his Subordinate, and at the same time faithfully 
preserve the secrets, advance the interests, and pro 
mote the welfare of his Grand Encampment.'" 

The Manual here referred to is Mr. Grosh's own 
work; and while it clearly shows the members of the 
Grand Encampment to be oath-hound, it also, by the 
sinking resemblance of their oath as here described, 
to those of the other degrees as giyen by Dr. Willis, 
adds confirmation to the correctness of Dr. Willis' ex- 
posure. 

Having made, this fatal admission, he next under- 
takes to escape from its damaging effect by accusing 
Dr. Cooper of "twisting and turning and misquoting" 
him and Webster's Dictionary in order to prove, as he 
says, that ''our obligations are oaths." Mr. Grosh 
then follows this accusation of twisting and turning 
by an example of ths same thing himself — such as we 
venture to affirm can be cited from no sound or candid 
reasoner, or any other reasoner, against oath-bound 
secrecy. He twists and turns thus: 

"Take his [Cooper's] treatment of Webster's defi- 
nition as a sample. The dictionary defines an oath to 
be "a sol'-mn affirmation or declaration made with an 
appeal to God for the truth of what is affirmed." On 
this our opposer says, " he makes the very essence 
of an oath consist in an appeal to God." Is that all? 
No; but it would not answer his purpose to quote 
more, so be omits — "for the truth of what is affirmed" 
(a very essential part of "the essence of an oath," 
according to Webster!) — and thus he seemingly brings- 
that definition to bear on what the Manual has said of 
an " appeal to heaven and earth." Nor is ths all his 
unfairness. He virtually misquotes the Manual by 
repeatedly printing "heaven" with a capital H 
('"Heaven") — thus making it mean, what the word 
does not mean, as printed in the Manual, i. e., Go'i, 
nstead of the visible neaven. Such is the candor 
and fairness of these predetermined judges of the 
veracity and integrity of their felbw-men! I wonder 
It did not enter their ingenious lainds to misquote a 



little further, and assert that we swear by Heaven and 
by earth, and then quote Matthew v. 33-37, to make 
Jesus convict us of coarse profanity!" 

Verily the Grand Chaplain quibbles. Who says 
the last phrase of Webster's definition is "a very es- 
sential part of the essence of an oath ? Webster does 
not say it, and any one can see that it is not so. Who 
does not know that an oath may be intended either as 
a confirmation of the truth of what one says or to in- 
sure the fulfilment of what he promises. More oaths 
are promissory than affirmatory, and if an appeal to 
God must be "for the truth of what is affirmed^' in 
order to be an oath, then a mere promissory oath, 
such as the President's, to support the constitution, or 
any oath of office, is not an oath. But a promissory 
appeal to God is as much an oath as an affirmative 
appeal, therefore it is not essential what the appeal is 
for, but the essence of the oath is found in the simple 
appeal to God, as Dr. Cooper says, and Mr. Grosh's 
logic is the veriest sophistry. But hear him further: 

"Let us carry out this opposer's mode of reasoning. 
The signers of the Declaration of Independence, and 
Mr. Lincoln in his Emancipation Proclamation, appeal- 
ed to God for the rectitude of their acts — therefore 
they closed those instruments with an oath ! " 

To be sure they did. They asserted the rectitude 
of their acts and appealed to God for the truth of the 
solemn affirmation, lie goes on thus : 

*' The preachers appeal to th;i Bible, and the lawyers 
to the statutes, for proof of their position — therefore 
they swear by Bible and law-book ! Some hymns and 
prayers contain many earnest appeals to God — there- 
fore they are filled with oaths! ' 

An appeal to Scriptures and to law-books as argu- 
ment is not an oath in Mr. Cooper's assumption as to 
the essense of an oath, for there is no appeal to God. 
An appeal to God in prayer or praise has indeed the 
solemnity of an oath; but the appeal has' no reference 
to any purpose for which an oath is ever used. Such 
appeal requires indeed sincerity and truth in the ap- 
pellant, but is worship and not swearing, unless it be 
done in hypocrisy or mockery. Mr. Grosh's logic 
here is indeed like that which he vainly endeavors to 
fasten upon his opponent: "All geese are birds; 
therefore all birds are geese ! " as if he had said all 
oaths are appeals, therefore all appeals are oaths. 
But he complains bitterly of Dr. Cooper's printing 
heaven in his quotation from the Manual with an initial 
capital letter, making it mean God, which he avers 
'' it does not mean." The solemn appeal is "to the 
visible heaven," says Dr. Grosh. What does such an 
appeal to the visible heaven and earth, the clouds and 
clod— what does it mean? We really supposed that 
a solemn appeal to heaven and earth always meant an 
appeal to the intelligences which inhabit them. We 
may have derived this opinion from Christ's declaration 
that "whoso sweareth by heaven sweareth by the 
throne of God and by him that sitteth thereon. Mr, 
Grosh appears to admit that an appeal to God is swear- 
ing by God, and that if '*heaven," in the appeal of 
the Grand Encampment degree, meant God, that ap- 
peal would be swearing by God ; and would, according 
to Christ's teaching, be "coarse profanity.'" And 
indeed we are unable to see why all these premises 
are not correct, and the conclusion, inevitable, that 
this solemn appeal to heaven and earth is ''coarse 
profanity." It is not strange that he wonders we do 
not push our argument to that result. For evidently 
he can see no way out of his dilemma than by a quib- 
ble that would do no credit to a third-rate pettifogger, 
by the puerile assertion that a solemn appeal to heaven 
and earth is an appeal, not to the universe of mind, 
but only to that of inert matter. But the climax of 
logical sublimity is not reached until Mr. Grosh winds 
up with an assertion which shows all his tortuous 
labor of sophistry to have been perfectly needless; 
for, after all, he asserts that the appeal over which all 
this ado is made, is never taken at all in words, i. e. , 
the statement in the Manual is true only in a mystical 
sense, which none but an Odd-fellow can understand, 
and by which, as by most of the outgivings of these 
guileful children of the night and of secrecy, outsiders 
are mocked and misled. Never made in words 1 If 
made at all, never made by one in an hundred of the 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



9 



order! ^^ Only a silent yet expressive appeal hy way 
of a reminder of duty !" Why did he not say so in 
hia Manual ? Why did he not say so at once in his 
defense? He might have saved himself the troubk 
of weavins; his long tortuous net of transparent soph- 
istry, and us the trouble of unraveling it. Since no 
one but he who makes it can know whether a silent 
appeal ia any appeal, or whether it is made to heaven 



and earth or to heaven and hell, we should have has not done with them when he has thus unequivo- 
known that the Manual writer had fooled us once, and cally classed them. He has purposed that all the 
is doubtless at the same game again. Thus he winds secrets of mea, all the hidden things of darkness, 
up by virtually crying out "April fool" tons. And shall be dragged into the light, and thereby receive 



and no taint or tendency to, or shadow of evil, it and Sumner. They have never furnished power to 
could work no po':aible harm to make them as public j move, or brains to direct our great Republic. They 
as the Bible; and now especially as their purity is ^ have simply seized upon what carcasses they could 
earnestly denied, if they were thus pure their friends ; reach to gorge themselves, without comprehending 
would certainly bring them to the light and silence I either the steering apparatus or the engine room, 
forever their accusers. Because they will not do this; We have, however, one consolation, when consider- 
Ohrist's word classes them with the evil. And wejing such bodies as our present Senate and House, and 
are justified in so considerin EC them. And yet Christ Executive. We cannot be worse off, and may te 

better. 



when heaven shall force the honest truth from him he 
will cry out "April fool" to the whole fraternities of 
Odd-fellows and Patrons as the finale of his authorship 
and of all the pompous solemnity of his high priest- 
hood and grand chaplaincies. 

But the point on which he is most sore is that we 
not only persist in declaring his order oath-bound, but 
bound by oaths to do evil. This he deems grevtously 
uncharitable. He denies it, and declares that holy 
Odd-fellows by the hundred deny it; Quaker Odd-fel- 
lows declare that their obligations bind to do good 
only. As we have said concerning the disputed pomt 
whether or not they are oaths, so we say of all this 
testimony as to their character, i. e., whether they 
bind to good or evil, that is a matter of opinion mere- 
ly. Mistaken opinions, even among good men, are 
unhappily no novelty in this imperfect world. There- 
fore we say again give us the very words of your 
obligations and we shall have no need to trouble you 
for your opinion. We can then form our own opinio 
and more satisfactorily than to have Mr. Grosh, or all 
the Odd-fellows in America do our thinking for us. 
We belong to tlie class "who will sometimes think 
and decide for ourselves even on subjects forbidden by 
churches" or lodges. And on the point in question 
we do think we will be able to judge quite as correctly 
as those who have bound their souls by the obligationb 
before having opportunity to consider and reflect upon 
their import and bearings. Having accepted the 
assertions of others instead of thinking for themselves, 
and bound themselves accordingly, they are under the 
strongest kind of bias to make out the opinion they 
have accepted and acted upon to be correct. We are 
free from any such prejudgment and are not afraid to 
apply the strictest rules of truth and justice to the 
matter and to follow them to their legitimate conclu- 
sion, be it what it may. I 
Mr. Grosh taunts church members withjbeing bound 
by their covenants and not daring to think for them- 
selves, or to act otherwise than their church prescribes ; 
but himself denies us opportunity to think for our- 
selves as to the obligations of the I, 0. 0. F. When 
we say those obligations are oaths and they bind to 
evil, if such a thing be possible, he demands insolent- 
ly, Do you judge us by yourselves? Are your 
church covenants oaths? and do they bind you to do 
evil? We answer, they partake of the sacredness of 
an oath that is sworn "in judgment, in truth aud in 
righteousness," but as to requiring evil in the slightest 
degree, Mr. Grosh himself knows they do not. He 
knows that the covenants of the churches he assails 
bind their members to do the will of God as revealed 
in the Holy Scriptures, which are open to all men 
without restriction. To that and nothing else do they 
bind. If Mr. Grosh or any others have aught against 
this rule we have only to say to them, Answer that to 
the Author of that Revelation. 

But all the assertions of Mr. Grosh and of the 
many thousands of American Odd-fellows do not in 
the least weaken our opinion that their obligations are 
oaths; unjustifiable as to the occasion and method of 
taking them, and both tending to and positively re- 
quiring that which is evil. If there is no evil in them, 
Odd-fellows have it in their power to compel all men 
to acquit their obligations of this charge. Bring 
them all out and let them think and judge for them- 
selves. "Every one that doeth truth cometh to the 
light that his deeds may be manifest that they are 
wrought in God." Did the obligations of Odd-fellow- 
ahip possess the perfect purity that is claimed for them 



their merited reward of universal abhorrence and ever- 
lasting contempt. This work has been accomplished 
with respect to the ancient heathen mysteries from 
which our modern mysteries are copied; and it is 
begun with these. 



The Illinois Printing. — Harmon G. Reynolds, 
great Masonic philanthropist, having studied carefully 
the theory of benevolence in the lodge, lately en- 
deavored to apply his knowledge for the glory of the 
Masonic gods and the good of his Masonic fellow 
men. It seems from the testimony that the State 
of Illinois had certain contracts for printing and 
binding to let, and certain parties in Springfield were 
Who Will Help? — Since last September, three about to bid on theee contracts. The gentleman 
THOUSAND FORTT-xn REE DOLLARS AND EIGHTY-FIVE CENTS I whoso name we mention above went to these parties 
have been subscribed toward paying the building! and gave them various sums of money (on the 



gave 
square) in consideration of which they withdrew or 
failed to put in their bids. This enabled the house 
for which he worked to steal from the State thirty 
thousand dollars. An investigation was ordered; 
Masonic witnesses testified to the above facts; not 
willingly, but very reluctantly; and the legislature 
made no arrangements to punish the man who 
bribed, the men who received bribes, or to recover 



debt of Wheaton College. 

The institution still needs about seventeen thousand 
dollars to discharge all its obligations. The sum al- 
ready raised has come from two hundred and thirty- 
three persons, and the average subscription is a little 
over thirteen dollars. 

Cannot every Cynosure subscriber do a little to- 
ward this worthy and glorious object? If we could 

only have a small sum from every one of thoe who|tbe money stolen from the State. In fact, they made 
are heartily opposed to secret societies, every deblj^n arrangement by which these same thieves are 
would be paid, and this noble institution unembar-Lo get about twenty thousand dollars more from the 
rassed and strengthened, plead "for Christ and hi6|gt^te_ ^hen the citizens have paid this money, it 
kmgdom," against the hosts of evil which are gather- Q^jght be well for them to inquire whether a system 
mg for the last great conflict. Don't fear to send t^at enables men to steal from them and avoid 
your offering because it is small, but send at once punishment should be tolerated, and when H. G. Rey- 
what you are able and willing to give, stating that nolds next comes into Grand Lodge it would be appro- 
you do so in response to the appeal m ihe Cynosure, priate to sing: "Hail Masonry divine." And then 

M„ .1 ■ J -11 1 1 1 - J • have Albert Pike, or Allen C. Fuller, or Steohen 

sum -5 thus received will be acknowledcyed ml . „ ,, ^ rr ' c ^^ -i ■ ■ "'■''^"f" 

° j A. Hurlbut oner a prayer oi thanksgiving to the 

these columns, and credited to the "Cynosure sub- i Masonic gods for helping our P. W. G. M. and P. W. 
scription," which is now open. I G. S. out of the scrape. 

C, A. Blanchard, Financial Agent. j *-*^ 

Wheaton 111 . Ohio Central College is located at Iberia, on the 

^^^ Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati railroad, and is 

Inflation.— The bill adding $44,000,000 to the | '« charge of the United Presbyterians, whose testi- 
national currency, and $46,000,000 to the circulation i °^«°y «" ^f «^ societies is well known, and is a guar 
e ^, . , . 1 1. J 1- .1 c. ^ J '^°^y that the position of President Reid m his letter 



ty that the position of President Keid in his letter 
on the first page i? well taken and will be maintained. 
The curriculum of the college comprises a scientific 
classical and preparatory course, to which both sexes 
haye an equal admission. 

■ <» a 

Our friends who are working for the increased cir- 
culation of the Cynosure will be interested in reading 
the article "Oor Subscription List" in the Publish- 
ers' department on the sixteenth page. It is easy to 
see that the 3,886 subscriptions ought to be and must 
be doubled before the Cynosure can be said to have a 
paying list, and at least 2,000 ought to be added to 
this list before and at the Syracuse Convention, or the 
"dry time" in the summer will be exceedingly hard 
on the publishers. 

— The United Presbyterian has the following no- 
tice: 

•'Mr. A, P. Bently, of Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, is said 
to be writing a story founded on the abduction of 
Morgan, of Masonic memory. He is assisted by 
Hon. J. C. Jill, of that city, who was accused of and 
tried for the abduction. It will pretend to give a 
true and reliable account of the historic event. 

It is quite probable that the above is a publication 
in the interest of the lodge, like a certain ' 'Square Ac- 
count" of the same transaction published a year ago 
in the Boston Commercial Bulletin, 

— The third session of the National Agricultural 
Congress will be held at Atlanta, Georgia, May 13th, 
This is a body composed of representatives from agri- 
cultural and horticultural societies of all kinds. The 
order of exercises already prepared shows that the va- 
rioi's interests of the farmer will be ably discussed. 
Mr, Charles W. Greene, Jacksonville, III, is the 
Secretary, and will answer all inquiries concerning 
this convention. He writes that it "will probably take 
steps toward organizing a national system of open as- 
sociations in which free speech and free discussion 
will be the watchwords of its membership." May 
as Lincoln, Stevens, Chase, Seward, Hale, Giddings j heaven speed such a work! 



of the national banks , has passed both Senate and 
House , and now awaits only the signature of the 
President to become a law. 

It is a question whether our national government 
had a right even in war time to issue a single green- 
back. The Supreme Court in '69, held that it was 
illegal to do so, and in '70, changes having been made 
in the court, it held five to four that it was otherwise. 

It was justified by the majority of the court at that 
time, solely on the ground that it was essential to the 
salvation of the country. 

Now, in a time of peace, because it is deemed 
essential to the political palvation of a parcel of dema- 
gogues, they have authorized this increase, in viola- 
tion of personal and party pledges, and for no appar- 
ent reason save the one stated. The premium on 
gold is steadily rising, and of course will continue to 
do so, so long as this policy is continued. Nor are 
we likely to stop at this point. We must have more 
currency or less. So long as we have paper forced on 
our own citizens by act of Congress, our gold and silver 
will go to Europe and the speculators. When it is 
all, or almost all there, the value of all articles will de- 
pend on the number of sheets the government presses 
run off in an hour. In other words, we shall have *• a 
lie as the standard of value." That is, government 
compels its citizens to take a promise to pay as pay- 
ment, and pursues a course that inevitably leads to re- 
pudiation and national dishonor. 

Of course no one need be disappointed that the 
pro-slavery, black-law men who now control the Re- 
republican party, have thus violated every pledge that 
an honorable man would hold sacred. 

The pompous little men who now strut upon the 
stage, were simply the sharks who followed in the 
wake of the ship of state, when steered by such pilots 



10 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE; 



^\i^ '^mt ^ki{U, 



The Higher Life. 

Where's the mau who seeks lor Fame ? 

Haste ! the laurel give him ; 
Unfold the scroll and write his name, 

'Tis all the grave will leave him. 

Where is he who toils for Gold? 

Give ! let naught alloy it— 
When a few brief days are told, 

No more can he enjoy It. 

Where's the bosom swelled with pride. 

Spare ! I would not wound it— 
For death shall twine at eventide 

Ills mean scant garment round It. 

Whet's the heart on Pleasure bent! 

Tour a double measure ; 
Health and lite to-morrow spent, 

(ione will be the treasure. 

Where's the Soul that looks above 

Pleasure, gold and glory; 
Such as earthly passions move, 

Such as lives in story. 

Take each cup of joy away, 
To others lilled aud given. 

Oh, S\'hat arc all these baubles— say- 
To him whoso home is Heaven? 

SdecUd. 



Incidents of City Mission Work. 



' I was a stranger, and ye took me In.'' 



At about seven o'clock one evening, 
'while on his -way from his own residence 
to his mission station, Rev. John P. 
Betker (pastor of the New York City 
Missions Chapel, No. 185 Spring street,) 
met a man. his wife and two children. 
The wife and children were sitting on 
the sidewalk, near the fence which en- 
closed a vacant lot, and the man was 
Btandins; near them. It had just began 
to rain, and the weather was uncom- 
fortably cool. There was a recess in 
the fence where the group were gath- 
ered, and, as it was quite dark, the 
reverend gentleman could not see them 
very plainly. His first impressions 
were that some person had fallen. Ap- 
proaching them, he anxiously inquired, 
"What is the fiiatter here?" 
' "Sir," replied the man, in a voice 
tremulous with emotion, "we have no 
home, and don't know where to go. 
Our land-lady turned us out of the 
house because we could not pay the 
rent; and now we are thinking what 
next to do." 

While this conversation was going on, 
quite a number of passers-by were at- 
tracted to the spot, and all eagerly 
sought inforrmation as to what had 
happened. 

When the case was fully explained 
to them, several said, "What a pity, 
what a pity I Too bad ! Can't some- 
thing be done for the poor, destitute 
family?" 

But no one proposed to do anything. 
After a moment's thought as to what 
he had better do for their temporary 
relief, a plan occurred to the pastors 
mind. He told the man who and what 
he was, and added, "Come with me, 
and 1 will see what I can do for you." 
This remark was warmly applauded 
by the "lookers-on," and the suffering 
family immediately arose and followed 
him, without asking any questions as 
to where he intended to lead them. 
His purpose was to take them to bis 
mission hall in Spring street, and have 
them lodge there for the night. On 
their arrival at the hall, the pastor re- 
plenished the fire in the stove, and tak- 
ing their eldest daughter with him, 
went to a grocery store, bought two 
quarts of milk, two pounds of crackers, 
a loaf of bread and a pound of cheese; 
and returning to the hall, set out a 
table, placed the articles of food upon 



it, and invited them to the repast. 
They ate very heartily. 

Mr. McKenzie, a Christian gentle- 
man , soon after entered the hall to see 
the pastor, and on learning the partic- 
ulars of the case, he put one dollar 
into the poor man's hand ; and as he 
still held him by the hand, speaking 
kindly to Km the while, the poor man, 
overcome with emotion, bowed his 
head; and a big tear fell from his eye 
upon the hand of his benefactor. That 
was a warm tear of gratitude from the 
sky of the poor man's soul, made glad 
by the generous sunshine of Christian 
benevolence. 

Mr. McKenz'C soon after left, and the 
pastor, by placing several church settees 
together , putting the cushions on them^ 
and doubling two of them together for 
pillows, prepared good beds for his 
guests, and then sat down and talked 
to them about Him who became poor 
that we, through his poverty, might 
be rich eternally. He told them of 
God's merciful designs toward them in 
all his dealings; that he even counts 
the very hairs oi our heads, and that 
he knew all about their circumstances, 
and that he doubtless had a merciful 
purpose toward them in permitting 
them to sink so very low in poverty 
and want, as they found themselves 
that night. 

"Study," said he, "the designs of 
God toward you in those afl9ictive prov- 
idences, and see if he does not propose 
thus to bring you to himself by causing 
you to feel your entire dependence 
upon him." 

"Ohl" exclaimed the woman, "it is 
plain, sir, that our Heavenly Father, 
holy and ever blessed be his name , 
would have us humbled and brought 
back to him— for we have wandered 
far from him by wicked works." 

"And," aoded the man, "He sent 
you, sir, to call us back from our wick- 
ed ways; 1 know it; I see it plainly." 
As the reverend gentleman was about 
to leave them for the night, he pro 
posed prayer with them, to which they 
gladly assented. After prayer, he 
shook hands with them, and kissed one 
of their children (the other was fast 
asleep). As he did so, the poor man 
clasped bis hands and cried out with 
tearful delight. 

Early the next morning (Sabbath) 
the pastor returned to the hall and pre- 
pared their breakfast. It was raining 
heavily, and he told them that they 
might remain there all day — which 
favor they accepted gratefully. With 
the Mission Sunday-school, which met 
in the afternoon, they were greatly 
pleased — especially with the reciiations 
and singing by the children. During 
the afternoon conference meeting, they 
were much interested while the per- 
sons present related their Christian ex- 
periences, and as the pastor spoke to 
each words of hope and consolation, 
they frequently wept. 

In the evening a large congregation 
assembled, and the hall was filled. 
The man and his wife were absorbed 
in what they saw and heard. The 
man who preached to them had taken 
them out of the cold, wet street, and 
fed and lodged them in his own church I 
He spoke to them of the loving Jesus, 



of his kindness, and of his power to j 
save perishing sinners; for his text was, 1 
" I will come and heal him." • Those 
destitute ones were subdued and melted 
before the cross ; and when the invita- 
tion was given for persons to arise for 
prayers, the man, his wife and his 
eldest daughter were the first to re 
spond. At the close of the meeting, 
the man, with streaming eyes, and 
with earnest gesticulation, said, "Oh, 
sir, I have been all along in darkness 
until you found us! Now I see the 
light; a blessed light I never saw be- 
fore." 

"Oh, sir, this is a blessed place," 
added the woman. '.'Had we heard 
years ago what we have heard this 
night, it would have been a blessed 
thing for us." 

That evening the reverend gentleman 
procured them lodging at a private 
house. Next day they found apart- 
ments, and Mr. McKenzie geaerously 
paid the first month's rent in advance. 
Mr. Betker then invited the man to his 
office, gave him a Bible and some cloth- 
ing. He was greatly in need of the 
latter, and when he received it he fell 
upon his knees and said, "Oh, blessed 
Lord Jesus! I thank thee for ha\ing 
mercy on me, a poor wretched sinner! 
I prayed -to thee last night for some 
I clothing, and now in Thy great mercy 
[ thou dost answer my poor prayer! 0, 
i how shall I praise thee ? How shall I 
; serve thee? How shall I show my 
love to thee for thy great kindness to 
i me, a poor, wretched, wicked rebel 
j against thee ?" 

j Overcome with emotion, he cculd 
i proceed no further, but gave way to 
i convulsive weeping. While yet on his 
knees, said the pastor to him, "The 
j Lord will always hear your prayers, 
j and provide for you, if you try to serve 
I him with your whole heart, and put 
j your entire trust in him." 
I On the following day the man and 
i his wife signed the temperance pledge, 
and they are now doing well. 

"Sbinefor the right." 

— The National Journal. 



sociaty. On a certain day the loyal 
and disloyal gathered around the camp 
of the ' ' Father of our Country. " Gen- 
eral Gates, against whom charges made 
had been withdrawn, presided. Gene- 
ral Washington arose with his manu- 
script in hand, to read a rebuke to treas- 
on; but tears suffusing his eyes pre- 
vented him. What a 6cene"for some 
American Vernet! He grasped the 
BcroU, dashing away the tears, and 
essayed again to read . But all again 
was filent. His noble frame heaved 
with emotion. In order to suffer his 
agitated feelings to subside , he began 
bunting for his spectacles. "Pardon 
j me, gentlemen," he said, "I have grown 
I gray and blind in the service of my 
country!" What a rebuke -were these 
j words to the concealed promoters of 
i treason ! Many who before might have 
! faltered, were now melted by those 
1 tears. They gathered closer and closer 
around the noble form, and when he 
j closed, they resolved to stand to the 
death by their devoted leader. Those 
tpars, under Providence, may have sav- 
i ed our country. — Selected' 



Christ our Salvation. 



Remember, it is not thy hold of 
Christ that saves thee, it is Christ, 
it is not thy joy in Christ that saves 
thee, it is Christ; it is not thy faith in 
Christ, though that is the instrument ; 
it is Christ's blood and merit. There- 
fore, look not so much to thy hand) 
with which thou art grasping Christ, 
as to Christ ; look not to thy hope, 
but to Jesus, the source of thy hope ; 
look Lot to thy faith, but to Jesus, the 
Author and Finisher of thy faith. We 
shall never find happiness by looking at 
our prayers, our doings, or our feelings ; 
it is what Jesus is, not what we are, 
that gives rest to pur souls. If we 
would at once overcome Satan, and 
have peace with God, it must be by 
"looking unto Jesus." Let not thy 
hopes or fears come between thee and 
Jesus ; follow hard after him, and he 
will never fail thee. 



Washington in Tears, 



At the close of the Revolution it is 
well known that Congress was unable 
to meet its obligations to the army. 
Division of couusol existed as to the 
best method of raising the necessary 
funds to pay off the army before it was 
disbanded. While thus the hopes of 
the unpaid army were alternately ele- 
vated and depressed, some traitorous 
person scattered an anonvmous circu- 
lar among them, fomenting the dissatis- 
faction already existing, and leading to 
open rebellion. The individual who 
was suspected to have been the author 
of this paper was General. Armstrong, 
Washington summoned all the officers 
into his presence to hear an appeal 
which he had prepared, and a copy of 
which is found in Marshall's Life. 
Neither wild lands, however rich, nor 
continental paper, however legal, would 
purchase bread or clothing. The minds 
of the army had been embittered by 
poverty and disappointment, and their 
principles corrupted by the infidel 
French Uterature which flooded our 



Alone. — I want to ask the boys if 
they feel as strong to do right when 
they are all alone as they do when there 
is another boy with them, who wants 
to do right as well as themselves. There 
is a great deal of danger in bad com- 
pany; and there is a good deal of 
strength and safety in good company; 
but, no matter how good our com- 
panions may be, it is not well to be too 
dependent on them. We ought to be 
able to stand alone; for we shall prob- 
ably some time be left alone to resist 
temptation, without the encourage- 
ment or help of others. 



dissolve, 
land, and poisoned all the fountains of power can sunder. 



A MoTHEHS Love.-7-A thing immort- 
al; Time cannot change it; Death can- 
not quench it; Eternity cannot w<iste 
nor destroy it ! • From the cradle to the 
grave it compasses us about, growing 
stronger when temptation besets ub, 
becoming holier when adversity tries 
us, and more God-like to save when 
the blackness of despair gathers its 
horrors around us. Forsaking us not, 
though deserted by all others, it clings 
to us with a spell which no heart can 
with a strength which no 



^■ta^ 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



11 



For the Cynosure. 

rat vs. Muscle. 



BY DR, ,1, H. HANAFORD. 



The manifest tendencies of the pres- 
ent age, and perhaps the prevailing error 
in diet are the selections of concentrated 
fioodrand articles contgining too large a 
per cent, of carbonaceous food, or that 
which merely supports animal heat. 
That such respiratory food is absolr.tely 
essential and must be furnished in large 
quantities, relatively, is notdenied; yet 
it is contended that this supply is far 
in excess of the actual demands of the 
system. Indeed, it is true that this 
respiratory food, or fuel, should be 
about four times as great in quantity as 
that designated to sustain the muscles, 
to say nothing of the elements needed 
for the nourishment of the brain and 
the nervous system. It must be evi- 
dent, if more of this fuel food is used 
than the system demands that confus- 
ion and derangement must be the le- 
gitimate result, since nature makes no 
unreasonable demands. It follows that 
if such an excess of fuel is employed 
the furnace of the system, bo to speak, 
must become over heated, resulting in 
a fevered state of the body, or an undue 
excitement and general inflimmation, 
more or less severe . This undue ex- 
citability results ofiener than otherwise 
perhaps in an irritated or inflimed 
state of the mucous membranes, more 
especially those of the throat, lungs 
and nasal passages, indicated by a 
parched sensation of these surfaces, 
sometimes extending to the lips. It is 
also true that this condition extends to 
the stomach, liver and bowels, laying 
the foundation of many and serious 
diseases and derangements of these or- 
gans so prevalent in all communities. 
It is also true perhaps that most of the 
heart diseases, through sympathy with 
the stomach, are referable to this un- 
natural "firing up," this excessive use 
of fuel-food. 

This fuel-food consists of the sweets 
of all kinds ; the oils, both animal and 
vegetable; with starch, so abundantly 
found in the center of the grains, the 
white mass, in the potato, the legu- 
minous products in sago, tapioca, srrow 
root, and such articles in general use. 
And here it may be remarked that the 
products of the tropics instead of this 
carbon contain the juices, the sub-acid 
juice?, of course calculated to promote 
perspiration, the means of carrying oflF 
excessive heat. It is also true that 
the grains of this region are especially 
rich in gluten, as the muscle-food, with 
a deficiency of starch-fuel; while, as 
we recede from the equator the starchy 
element increases, becomes very abund- 
ant relatively, as we approach the cold- 
est regions, in some of which the train 
oil is taken as a beverage with compar- 
ative impunity . If these principles are 
correct, it is evident that the elements 
of food should vary with the different 
climates and seasons, like our clothing, 
and for the same reasons. But while 
it is admitted that fuel-food should be 
used, the natural result of which is to 
fill cavities and the interstices of the 
muscle, with the fatty deposit, pro- 
ducing plumpness and roundness and 
even greasiness when used to excess, 



there is an imperative -demand for an 
element which will nourish the muscles, 
nitrogenious, differing widely from the 
preceding elements. These muscles 
with the bones constitute the frame 
work of the body, in the framer of I 
which - reside the strength, vigor, and , 
power of endurance — health. This el- | 
ement, the muscle-food, is found in 
abundance in the outer coats of the | 
grains—gluten — -the chemical equiva- 
lent of fibrin, or lean flesh, and of course | 
in the muscles of animals; in albumen, 1 
animal and vegetable, 

These elements with the phosphate 
for the brain and nerves are distributed 
through the various edible products, in 
the precise proportions needed. Yet, 
as a result of ignorance or of depraved 
tastes these are separated , one taken in 
excess^ while the others are discarded. 
While this almost suicidal course is 
pursued, it is manifest that the bones, 
nerves and muscles must correspond- 
ingly suffer. This starvation of a part 
of the system is indicated by the de- 
cayedffind unsightly teeth, the weak- 
ened brain, the shattered nerves, and 
the puny, fliccld and undeveloped 
muscles utterly devoid of all manly 
stamina. 

But can we control th's matter; se- 
curing large, firm and vigorous muscles, 
a proper basis for health ? Seek an 
answer for this question in the course 
pursued by the pugilists, those contam- 
inators of the public morals, by regular 
course of training for their degrading 
conflicts; thus securing a physical stam- 
ina, a strength of limbs and body, a 
power of endurance, a conEolidated 
health which would do credit to better 
citizens. They are subjected to a reg- 
ular course of training ; they diet long 
and systematically, are much in the 
pure air aod sunlight of heaven, avoid 
sensual gratifications, throw aside their 
tobacco and strong drinks, sometimes 
their tea and coffee, (they are not such 
fools as to believe that intoxicating 
liquors promote health and strength) 
and, in fine, observe the laws of health. 
They manufacture health, so to speak, 
having the same confidence in means 
employed as the mechanic has in pro- 
ducing his wares. He thus secures a 
manhness of form, a stamina of muscle, 
a health and agility, a power of endur- 
ance, an ability for usefulness, which 
might honor the best Christian. It is a 
burning shame, a standing rebuke upon 
our advanced civilization, our Christian 
profession, that, while such men can prac- 
tice self-denial as a means of qualifying 
them for their degrading fights, the 
great duty of preserving our health, 
the basis of a life of usefulness, is so 
rarely acknowledged in its full extent 
by the good citizen and Christian. 
The demand for health and vigor that 
we may be useful is far greater than 
that of rowdyism. It requires more 
physical endurance to '*fight the good 
fight of faith" than to fight as do these 
degraded pugilists. "The crown of 
glory" is of far more valuable than the 
purse secured by them for a mere phys- 
ical victory, and demands a far greater 
amount of health and vigor than these 
combatants secure. In short, the 
good citizen and the Christian have 
special obligations to secure health as 
means of si life of usefulness. 



4liiWi?^tt'$ 4mm, 



Willie's Penny. 



Willie's penny made heaven rejoice! 
It would not have bought more than a 
stick or two of candy, or much helped 
a starving family. What did he do 
with it. • 

His sister was a missionary's wife in 
Africa, and the family were filling a box 
to send to her. As one after another 
deposited their gifts, little Willie said, 
'•I want to give myjpenny," 

"What shall be bought with the lit- 
tle offering?" was the next question. 
It was decided to buy a tract, and write 
the history of the gift on its margin, 
and with a prayer for its success send 
it on ita distant errand. 

The box arrived on mission-ground; 
and among its valuable, interesting con 
tents, Willie's gift was laid away unno- 
ticed, and for awhile forgotten. One 
day a native teacher was starting ftom 
the missioa-station to go to a school 
over the mountain where he was to be 
employed. He was well learned in the 
language, and was a valuable help to 
the missionaries ; but, alas I he lacked 
the knowledge that cometh from above. 
He was not a Christian, and had resist- 
ed all efforts for his conversion. This 
was a great grief to the missionaries; 
but they continued to hope. 

In looking oyer some papers, Willie's 
tract was discovered, with the marginal 
explanation , and the fact that prayer 
had been offered in America for its 
success in doing good. It was handed 
to the native teacher. He read it on 
his journey. It opened his eyes; 
showed him that he was a lost sinner, 
in danger of eternal death, and that all 
his learning could not help him. It 
also told him of One who was able and 
willing to save, who had died for him, 
and was waiting to have his great love 
return. 

What years of Christian labor by the 
missionaries had not done was now 
brought about by the penny tract. 
The strong man bowed in penitence 
and humble submission at Jesus' 
feet and became a sincere Christ- 
ian. The missionaries to whom he 
went, praised G od for the change by 
which they became blessed with a god- 
ly teacher. Those who put the tract 
in his hand were overcome with joy; 
for there is joy in heaven 'over one sin- 
i ner that repenteth.' So you see how 
small gifts and deeds will often accom- 
i plish great results, exerting an influ- 
'. ence in this life and the next, for little 
Willie's penny caused rejoicing in heav- 
I en- and on earth. — Selected. 



A Back 0' Bones. 



Little things tell a good deal some- 
times to a sharp observer. Do you 
ever think of it, boys? You, who like 
to get a poor , frightened cat into a 
corner, and stone her, who like to tie a 
tin pail to a dog's tail to see him run 
' himself almost to death; you, who 
I like to get a poor, old "rack-o-bones"of 
! a horse and draw up the reins, and 
j put on the whip, to see how fast you 
I can make him go. Do you ever 
I think you are showing your character 
I in pretty black colors to whoever may 



chance to be watching ? What is * 'a-rack- 
o'-bones," but a once nice, plump, 
sleek horse, worn out with hard work, 
pain, too little food, abuse from un- 
thinking boys and hard-hearted men? 
He has done his best for you. Is this 
a good reason why you should abuse 
him? 

Suppose somebody should call your 
mother a ' 'rack-o'-bones," because she 
is pale and thin, and sad-faced. She 
once had a sweet, rosy face, bright 
eyes, and has lost them in suffering, 
and working, and caring for you. She 
has spent the best of her etreugth, and 
the best of her life for you, and wouldn't 
you quickly resent it if any boy should 
speak slightingly of her? 

Can you give me any better reasBns 
why you should maltreat a poor, lim- 
py, shaky, worn-out horse, whose ev- 
ery rib you cin count, and that hangs 
his head almost to the ground because 
he is too weak and tired to hold it up ? 

Do you feel manly after you have tor- 
mented him? Are you proud to tell of 
it? — Our Dumb Animals. 



How Tender Grapes Are Spoiled. 



First little fox — *'l can't." Some 
of you have formed the habit, when 
an aet of self-denial is required of you 
— some errand for father or mother — 
of saying, "I can't." Beware of this 
little fox. 

Second Utile fox — "Not ju3t now." 
When you are deeply interested in a 
story and it is school-time, you have 
said, "Not just now, " "Pretty soon," 
"In a minute or two." How much 
good do they destroy ? Beware of this 
little fox. 

Third little fox — "It wasn't me." 
When you laugh in the school- 
room everybody says, "It wasn't me," 
or when a ball has gone through the 
school-room window, everybody says, 
*'It wasn't me." It is tbe best way to 
say, ''I had something to do with that." 
Beware of this little fox . 

Fotirih little fox — "I can't help it." 
A little boy has a wretched temper, 
and he says, "I can't help it." He 
has heard grown people say it. A 
little girl always trips and falls, or 
is always knocking something off the 
table, and says, "I ca 't help it." 
When the French army was in danger 
of being defeated by the Austrians, a 
French bugler got into the rear of the 
Austrian army in the early mist of the 
morning and sounded a retreat, and 
the whole army fell back, and the 
French were saved. Be wise, like this 
French bugler, and conquer your tem- 
per, or you will get to be a coward and 
unable to stand up before your duties 
and perform them. 

Fifth little fox— "I don't care." Many 
boys and girls by constantly saying 
this get into habits of not caring. One 
little thistle seed floating in the air, if 
allflwed to take root in the earth, will 
produce thousands of others. A man 
had a great many servants, and in or- 
der to test them he put a great stone 
in the middle of the road. Twenty 
passed by without trying to remove it. 
At last one came up who said it ought 
not to be there, and with great effort re- 
moved it, and found hidden underneath 
a purse of gold to reward him for his 
carefulness. So you will lose the es- 
teem of others, the greatest prize you 
can win, if you do not drive away this 
little fox. 



12 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



I^elijjttyus f{«l4(ir[i^«4^. 



4ttt$ 4 tl{^ mu\. 



— The Congregational church at Sycamore, 111, has 
received fifty-five new members since January Ist, in- 
cluding thirty nine heads of families. 

— Plymouth Church, Brooklyn, has offered Mr. 
Beecher a six-months vacation, with continuation of 
salary and traveling expenses, but he declines. 

— The commencement exercises of the Chicago 
Theological Seminary (Congregational) begin April 
28th, with an address by Pres. Angell, of Ann Arbor, 
before the Society of Inquiry. 

— Some New York gentlemen, interested in Sabbath 
schools, have given $500 to the Presbyterian Board 
of Publication, to be used exclusively in furnishing 
the Shorter Catechism to Sabbath-schools not able to 
buy them. , 

— The Sixteenth General Assembly of the United 
Presbyterian church, meets in the First Church of 
Monftiouth, 111., on the fourth Wednesday (27th) of 
May, 1874, at 7:30 o'clock, P. M. 

— Stephen H. Tyn^, Jr's, large new church was dedi- 
cated on Monday ia New York, and the services will 
continue eight days. Mr. Tyng wants Bishop Potter 
and the ritualists to let him work in his own way, or 
he will leave them. 

— A report is current that in spite of the Brooklyn 
council, Beecher's church has dropped from its roll 
twenty-six names of members who have for various 
reasons absented themselves for considerable periods. 
This may have been done before the council, however. 

— The church at Leland, Mich., Rev. Geo. Thomp- 
son, who was once imprisoned for anti-slavery views, 
pastor, has been enjoying unusual religious in- 
terest. The church is union, founded upon a basis 
of fundamentals to which all denominations can sub- 
scribe. 

— Since Mr. Hammond left St. Louis, meetings are 
continued with little flagging of interest. A daily 
noon prayer-meeting is also a result of his visit, which 
will be permanent. Mr. Hammond has held very 
successful meetings at Hannibal, Mo., and is now in 
Jacksonville, in this State. 

— The General Conference of the M. E. church, 
south, begins its sessions in Louisville, May 1st. It 
is thought the meeting will not be of special import- 
ance; one or two bishops will be elected, and the 
matter of union with the northern body may be dis- 
cussed, but no action is expected. \ 

— The Theological Seminaries of the United Pres- 1 
byterian church at Xenia, Ohio, and Allegheny, Pa. ,| 
have had respectively twenty-nine and thirty students 
in attendance during the last session. A plan for the 
union of the Seminary of the Northwest, at Mon- 
mouth, with the one at Xenia, is under advisement. 

The deficit of $128,000 in the receipts of the 
treasury of the Foreign Board of Missions of the Pres- 
byterian church, promises to be all made up before 
the meeting of the Assembly, to be held in St. Liouis 
in May. Already $121,700 have been received o( 
that £.mount, leaving only $5,300. 

— The Methodists of England have 7,000 churches, 
valued at $00,000,000, gold; 1,300 ministers, and 35,- 
000 local preachers, and between 300,000 and 400,- 
000 church members. Upwards of 1,000,000 persons 
attend their ministry, 600,000 children attend their 
Sunday-schools, and 120,000 attend their day schools 
and other educational institutions. 

— Evangelical Protestantism in Italy may be spm- 
med up as follows: 1. The Waldensian church, 
with 6,000 communicants, 1,200 children in Sabbath- 
schools, and a Theological college at Florence. 2. 
" The Union of the Free Christian Church of Italy," 
with Gavazzi as a prominent leader, numbering about 
30 congregations, and 1,000 communicants. 3. The 
'• Christian chiirches of Italy," numbering about the 
same as the Free Church. 4. The Methodist church, 
with 21 stations, 550 Sabbath-school scholars, and 
900 church members. 

— The American Mission at Beirut' Syria, sustains 
a Sabbath-school of 350 pupils, which uses the Inter- 
national Lessons, supports a colporteur among the 
Bedouins, and its Young Men's Benevolent Society 
sustains another missionary . The school also has a 
monthly paper, in Arabic, called the MornirKj Star, 
edited by Rev. Dr. Jessup. Its teachers are nearly 
all educated Christian natives. In the Syria Mission, 
says a correspondent of the New York Observer^ there 
are 22 Sabbath-schools, and 900 pupils. 2 high 
schools, 02 pupils; 2 female seminaries, 125 pupils; 
and 2,107 scholars in the common schools; the con- 
tributions to benevolent objects in the mission for the 
past year were $1,328. 



The City. 



— The preliminary proceedings for the trial of Prof. 
Swing have been taken by the Chicago Presbytery. 
The trial will not begin for ten days, except at the 
request of the parties. 

— The journeymen shoemakers, members of the 
Crispin society, struck some eight weeks ago. and 
have since been out of work. The manufacturers filled 
their places with new men, and the strikers, having 
lost their places, have started a co-operative association. 

Tiie Capitol. 



— In the Howard Court of Inquiry, the Govern- 
ment has nearly completed its evidence, and the 
council for the defense think of resting their case upon 
the testimony already taken. This investigation is 
into the management of the Bureau, and the court 
has decided that it does not recognize General How- 
ard as resting under any oflacial accusation or suspicion. 

— Delegations from New York and Boston appointed 
by the leading business organizations have visited 
Pres. Grant to protest against the inflation act. The 
first named was received coldly, Senators Carpenter and 
Logan sitting by smoking cigars. The latter were 
snubbed and oi returning home called a meeting of 
citizens to organize against official and party dishon- 
esty. 

— The Civil Service Commission has reported in fa- 
vor of carrying on the Civil Service Reform and appro- 
priating $25,000 for this purpose. 

The Country. 



— The Arkansas troubles between the gubernatorial 
claimants daily assume a more warlike aspect. Both 
sides are reinforced with men and arms, and each 
party is one-half of colored men. The U. S. troops 
are between the combatants and prevent otherwise 
certain bloodshed. 

— The great East River bridge, which is denounced 
by Mayor Havemeyer, of New York, has already cost 
$4,300,000, and will cost $10,000,000 more. 

— The subscription to the Philadelphia Centennial 
Exposition, has reached $4,500,000, and now that 
Sumner, the most dreaded opponent, is gone, an ap- 
propriation of $1,000,000 has been voted by Cong- 
ress for the building. 

— The great Illinois farmer, M. L. Sultvant, of 
Champaign county, has sixty teams, three mules to 
each team, at work before the plow. 

— Gov. Washburn was elected on the 17th to the 
vacant senatorship of Massachusetts, by a coalition of 
the Dawes and Hoar parties. The election is con- 
sidered anti-Butler. Mr. W . is not a leader, but is 
considered an honest man. 

Foreign. 



— Sir G. Wolseley, leader of the English expedi- 
tion to the Ashantee country, Africa, says of Coc- 
massie, the capital of the country : ' 'I certainly believe 
that no more utterly atrocious government than that 
which has thus, perhaps, fallen, ever existed on the 
face of the earth. Their capital was a charnel-house; 
their religion a combination of cruelty and treachery; 
their policy, the natural outcome of their religion." 

— Washington Irvington's '-Life of Mohamet" would 
never be thought an insurrectionary work, but the 
publication of a translation in Bombay not long since, 
provoked a riot among the followers of the "Prophet." 

— Filty-three persons were killed by a fire damp 
explosion in an English mine last week. 

— The French Steamship Company have lost a third 
vessel in six months: the Ville de Havre, the Europe, 
and this week the Amerique is reported abandoned at 
sea. An English vessel found her and towed her into 
port with only a little water in the hold. 

— The Chilian steamer Tacna capsized on the 14th 
with a loss of nineteen lives. 



— The Chicago Tribune is responsible for the fol 
lowing particulars of the Masonic contamination of 
the British Parliament: 

"In the British Parliament there are 133 Freema- 
sons — fifty-six in the House of Lords and seventy- 
seyen in the Commons. Fifteen of the Freemasons 
in the lower House are noblemen; and there are also 
ten sons of Peers who are not in Parliament who be- 
long to this mystic order. The Prince of Wales heads 
the list of Freemasons who have seats in Parliament, 
and Mr. Whalley brings up in the rear. One of the 



bishops, he of Peterborough, ia a Mason, seven dukes, 
eight marquises, seventeen earls, four viscounts, and 
seventeen barons make up the list of Peers who wear 
the apron and have ridden the goat. Neither Mr. 
Gladstone nor Mr. Disraeli is a Mason." 



The *'Mollie Maguires." 



Probably no State in the country is so overrun with 
robbers and desperadoes as Pennsylvania. Almost " 
every largely populated city or town has within its 
precincts a regularly organized band of outlaws, who 
hold the citizens in terror by their frequent and terri- 
ble depredations on person and property. 

Scranton is situated at the upper end of the re- 
nowned Wyoming coal region. Near here, and in the 
same corporation, is Hyde Park, a place of some 10,- 
000 population. This has, of recent years, been the 
scene of many outrages perpetrated by the ' * Mollie 
Maguires," a horde of desperadoes who infest the coal 
country. It is said the ' 'Mollies" originated from a 
secret organization which existed for many years in 
Ireland. The band, which is between 1,500 and 
2,000 strong, is led by Tim O'Donnelly, whose head- 
quarters are in a lonesome, unromantic spot on Key- 
ser's Mountain. In Hyde Park and this city, no less 
than twelve persons have disappeared mysteriously, 
and are said to have been "put away" by the "Mol- 
lies," this year. 

Their plan of operations is said to be as follows : 
When the "Mollies" have determined upon the death 
of any one who has incurred their vengeance, cuts are 
drawn, and the one on whose lot it falls to dispatch 
the victim does his bloody work silently, but surely. 
A man named Jones, a "Mollie," warned a friend 
about a week since, that he was a "marked man." A 
few days afterward, Jones himself was found dead up- 
on the highway. Upon examination, it was found 
he had been stabbed to the heart. Near where he 
laid was the emblem of the "Mollies," — a coffia, skull 
and cross bones, — to which was attached, on a card, 
the words: "So dies a traitor." When the band 
wishes any one to leave the neighborhood, a notice 
bearing some horrible symbol of death is placed on 
the door of his residence, with the written injunction 
that he must leave in twenty-four hours . It is need- 
less to state that the warning is generally heeded. 

In the Schuylkill regions, especially about Mahanoy 
City, Girardsville, Locust Gap, Centralia, Mt. Carmel 
and Shamokin, the "Mollies" pursue their depreda- 
tions without any check, — the people living in con- 
stant fear of their liyes. Hardly a day passes but 
that a "mysterious death" occurs. A few days since, 
a miner, Michael Dougherty, was passing along the 
main street of Centralia, when, all at once, he was 
seen to totter and fall. Persons ran to him, and upon 
reaching the spot, found he had been shot. As no 
shot was heard at the time of the occurrence, the mat- 
ter was, of course, regarded as very mysterious. The 
man was carried home, and on the door of his house 
was found the inscription : "He betrayed the band." 
Th's was followed by skulls, cross-bones, and other 
hidious emblems. By this it was at once known who 
committed the murder. No attempt is ever made by 
the authorities to unravel these crimes, as everybody 
fears the vengeance of the terrible organization. It is 
generally conceded that there is no law in Schuyl- 
kill county. 

It is the popular belief that these brigands are bound 
by the most terrible oath ; and, if one is selected to 
commit murder, and then fails, he is compelled to die 
by his own hand, in the presence of the entire organi- 
zation. 

It is during a miners' strike that the ' 'Mollies" raise 
the mischief generally. Your correspondent has been 
the witness of some terrible scenes at such times. 
Murders are perpetrated ; * 'mine-breakers." and other 
property burned. During the "long strike," no less 
than 100 persons fell victims to the riots and disorder, 
while, at the time of the "stand-out," last winter, at 
least twenty-five atrocious murders were perpetrated. 
— Tribune. 



1^^ 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



13 



FOR SALS AT THE CYNOSURE 
OFFICE. 

Those who wish to know the character of 
Freemasonry, as shown hy its own publications, 
will find many standard works in the following 
list. 

No sensible Mason dares deny that such men as 
Albert G. Mackey, the great Masonic Lexicogra- 
pher, and Daniel Sickels, the Masonic author and 
publisher, are the highest Masonic authority in 
the United States. 



Macbf's Masonic Ritualist 

• OR 

MONITORIAL INSTEUOTION BOOE 
By aleeet g. macket, 

"Past General Hlgli Priest ot tiie General Grand 
Chapter of the United States, Kiilght of the 
Bagle and Pelican, Prince of Mercy," Etc. 
Etc. Price, $1 85 



EDUCATIONAL NOTES. 



Msfi Ln i teM 

Containing a Deflnitlon of Terms, Notices 
of its History, Traditions and Antiquities, and 
an account of all the Ritea and Mysteries oi 
the Ancient World. 12 mo. 526 pajtes, $8 00, 



mim ymiL of m ysss 



Monitorial Instructions In the Degrees of 
Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master 
Mason; with Ceremonies relating to Installa- 
tions, Dedications, Conseorations, Laying oJ 
Corner-stones &c. Price, $3 00> 

Paper Covers 2.00. 



MAOKEY'S TEXT BOOK 

OF 

MASONIC JUBISraUDlNCE. 

Illustrating the Laws of Freemasonry, botH 
written and unwritten. 

This is the Great Law Book of Freemasonry 
570 pages. Price, $2.50 



The report of the CorcntissicDcr of EducalicD, for last 
year, which is now being printed, has a strikingly interest- 
ing table showing the gifts by individuals for educational 
purposes. The names of the benefactors, the amount ul 
each benefaction, and the name of the institution receiving 
the same, are given in detail. The aggregate fcr the year 
tor all purposes was $11,226,977, i.b follows: Universities 
and colleges, $8,238,141; echcds of science, 1780,658; 
schools of theology, ^619,801 ; medic d colleges, etc. ; $78,- 
600; superior instruction of women, $252,005; secondary 
instruction, $575,241; libraries, §379,011; rau-.eums of 
natural history, $131,680; deaf and dumb, $4,000; blind, 
$15,000; Peabody fund, $135.,840; mi&cel'aneous, $17,- 
000. Of this amount our own iState received, for univer&i- 
ties and colleges, $438,325; schools of theology, $20,183; 
ochooh of medicine, $29,300; Kccondaiy iastiuction, $54,- 
500; libraries, $110,717 ; deaf and dumb, and blind, $2,500; 
ffiiiceilaneous, $1,000; making a total of $657,824. The 
Bureau of Education was the first public agency to under 
take the gathering of these facts, the earliest attempt being 
made by the present Commissioner, General Eaton, in 1871, 
the showing for that year being over $8,000,000, and for 
1872 over $10,950,000.— .fi'a;. 

Of 26,202 persons arrested in Liverpool in 1868, 222, or 
about one in 11,000 could neither read nor write. Of those 
arrested for drunkenness end drunlien disorder, 40 percent, 
could neither read nor write. Of 03,000 airests in London, 
17,000 could read and write well; 61, that is, one inatnouE- 
and, had superior instruction; 2,000 could neither read nor 

write; and 84 per cent, couid read only, or read and wiite 
imperfectly. 



m 81 rriEBf 



Or lUuslf atlong of Freemasonry BmbeUlsheO 

Price, 75 cts 

UarUsUiorofFresmsonrj. 

A Practical Guide to the Ceremones in 
the Degrees conferred in Masonic Lodge 
Chapter, Bncampmeats, etc. Illustrated Edi- 
tion. In cloth, *1 25 ; paper, 75 cts. 



mm 



m 



mil 



locking the thumbs, and at the same time gently pressing- 
he wr-^ ts. The word is PMlosopliia Bioit Kubernetes — or. 
Philosophy is the rule, guide or governess of life. The three 
letters forming the initials of the word — in Greek — designate 
the name of the order and involve 'the mysteries of its princi- 
ples. The meaning of the whole is, that it is to philosophy 
we arc to look for a rule of life, and not to religion. To the 
Phibetian, though he may not think so, if is the same as 
Voltaire's ''■ Ecra&ez Vinfame,'" or "crush the wretch," — 
meaning Christ. Philosophy has ever been the watchword 
of the infidel. " 

The ceremonies of initiation in a Yale Freshman society are 
thus described in '' Four Years at Yale," written by a gradu- 
ate of 1869: — 

'' Within a week from the commencement of the term 
about every Fresliman has been pledged and preparations are 
being made for the 'initiation.' The term openf5 on Thurs- 
day, and the traditional time of initiation is Friday night of 
the following week. As tlie darkness approaches, the, dis- 
cordant blasts of tin horns and the rattle of bangers upon the 
pavement admonish the expectant Freshman that the hour 
of their trial is rapidly drawing near. Each one has received 
during the day a black-edged envelope, containing a black- 
edged card or sheet of paper bearing the society badge and 
this fearful summons: 'Freshman [or Mr.] So-and-so: You 
will be waited upon at your room this evening, and be pre- 
sented for initiation into the dark and awful mj'steries of the 
Fraternity. Per order. ' The half of a card of fantastic 



The Chicago daillc-s are beginning the disc'.3S3ioa of the 
propriety of Freennar-ons laying the corsei-stcne of the new 
post-office. The Times of April 19th contains an excellent 
article on the subject. A prominent budnecs man of Chi- 
cago, and a Mason, who is a Presbyterian, says: "The Ma- 
sonic fraternity have no more busiaess to lay the corner- 
stone of the post--ffice than the Presbyterians have." 



Containing the Degrees of rreemasonry em 
braced in the Lodge, Chapter , Council and 
Commandery, embellished with nearly 800 
symbolic Illustrations. Together with Tactics 
and drill of MasonicKnighthood. Also, forms 
of Masonic Documents, Notes, Songs, Masonic 
dates, installations, etc. By D. Sickels. 82 mo 
tuck. Price $1.50. 

Ckt's Eifest i Man kw. 

Comprises a Complete Code of Begulations, 
Decisions and lOpinions upon Questions of 
Masonic Jurisprudence. Price, |2 25. 

Suaca&'g hm Eitiial aai Uositor. 

Illustrated with Explanatory Engravings 
Price $2.60. 



's Eklori of 



lion. 



Comprising a detailed Account of the Rites 
and Ceremonies of all the Secret and Mysteri 
ong Institutions of the Ancient World. 



Books on Odd Fellowship. 

Donaldson's Odd Fellows Text Book 
By Paschal Boaaldson, D- D., 

GBAND MASTER OP THE GRAHD LODQE 01" NOKTH 
BRN N. T., 

Illustrated with numerous engravings, showing 
the emDlems of the order. A detailed account 
of the Forms, Ceremonies, Funeral Services and 
Odes with music, and a complete manual for the 
guidance of Officers and Lodges. Pocket edition, 
Tnck, $1.50. 



Grosh's Manual of Odd Fellowship 

BT REV. A. B. GROSH, 

Containing the history, defence, principles and 
government of the order; the instructions of 
each degree and duties of every station and office, 
with engravings of the emblems of the orders, etc. 

Price in Cloth, $2.00 

" Tnck, abridged edition, ; 1 50 



COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 

CHAPTER If. 

SOxME OF THE MEANS USED BY COLLEGE FKATERSITIE3 FOR LIT- 
ERARY AND SOCIAL PROGRESS. 

Every collegiate institution is a community in itself A 
community of persons who have through desire separated 
themselves to seek and intermeddle with all wisdom; the 
law of association loses none of its force in a collection of such 
spirits, but practically seems more strong. College fiiend- 
ships are proverbial. Likeness in character, taste or study; 
fellowship in religion or unbelief, literary zeal or the pur- 
suit of pleasure draw inevitable lines through every institu- 
tion. Hence originated the secret fraternity system. 
Doubtless it had questionable ends at first, such as the prop- 
agation of infidel sentiments; but, so far as now known, it 
claims to seek nothing but social enjoyment or literary cul- 
ture. Some of the means used to these ends will be de- 
scribed in this chapter. 

Beginning with the first society organized in'this country 
the Phi Beta Kappa, some of the attractive features are pre- 
sented in Allyn's " Ritual of Freemasonry," published 1831, 
in the following terms: — 

"The mysteries of this order are conferred only upon stu- 
dents at colleges where Phi Beta Kappa societies are estab- 
lished, and from among these, those only who have most 
distinguished themselves are selected for initiation. The 
Senior class chooses from the Junior, one-third of its num- 
ber. These are privately informed of their election, and at 
an appointed time, without any formahty, or preparation, are 
initiated. An oath or promise of secrecy is then exacted 
from them. But this is in anticipation of any communica- 
tion to them. An historical sketch of the institution is next 
given, together with the signs, grips, words, and an expla- 
nation of the jewel, or medal, which is always silver or gold, 
and provided at the candidate's expese. The medal is usu- 
ally worn, suspended by a blue and pink ribbon in the 
bosom, or as a watch-key. The sign is given by placing the 
two fore fingers of the right hand so as to cover the left cor- 
ner of the mouth, and then drawing it across the chin. The 
grip is like the common shaking of hands, only not inter- 



design and peculiarly notched edge is also enclosed, and the 
Freshman is instructed to surrender himself only to the per- 
sonage who presents him Avith the other half of that peculiar 
card which will be identified by the ' matching' of the edges, 
no two cards of the many given out having been notched ex- 
actly alike. Sometime between the hours of seven and ten 
our Freshman is called for, identifies the card presented to 
him, and gives himself up to his conductor, who may very 
likely have a companion, wearing a mask, like himself, or 
otherwise disguised. Perhaps they visit some eating house 
where the Freshman treats to an oyster supper; or perhaps 
he promises to give the supper the following evening; or 
perhaps he doesn't care to treat at all. Possibly he has been 
blindfolded from the time he left his room, and has had a tin 
horn blown close to his ear occasionally, on the way, though 
this is unusual . But at length they draw near some public 
building from within which proceed sounds as if of pandemo- 
nium itself. The Freshman is blindfolded for a minute or 
two, is shoved forward, hears a door open and clo;e behind 
him with a bang, and opens his eyes to find himself in pitch 
darkness. However, he at once perceives he is not alone, 
but in the midst of other Freshmen, like himself waiting 
their turn. The noise meanwhile seems louder and louder 
and when an inner door opens and a name is called, it be- 
comes almost deafening. Soon our ' Fresh ' is wanted. A 
red devil in the passage way, assisted by a living skeleton, 
redolent of phosphorus, quickly bhndfolds him and he is 
hurried upward. When has reached an elevation appar- 
ently of several hundred feet, a new element in the continual 
din assures him that he is at last in tlie inquisitorial hall. 
But just as he begins to reply to the last nonsensical [ques- 
tion put by an attendant fiend, some one jostles against him 
and down, down, down he falls until he strikes — a blanket 
held in readiness for him. Then up he flies into the air 
again amid admiring shrieks of ' Go it, Freshie ! ' ' Well 
done, sub!' "Shake him up!' until a new candidate de- 
mands the attention of the tossers. Then he is officiously 
told to rest himself in a chair, the seat of which lets him into 
a pail of water beneath, though a large sponge probably 
saves him from an actual wetting; his head and hands are 
thrust through a pillory and he is leviled in that awkward 
position; he is rolled in an exaggerated squirrel wheel; a 
noose is thrown around his neck and he is dragged beneath 
the guillotine, vi^hen the bandage is pulled from his eyes and 
he glares upon the glittering knife of block tin which falls 
within a foot of his throat and cannot possibly go further. 
Being thus executed, he is thrust into a coffin, which is ham- 
mered upon with such energy that he is at length recalled 
to life, pulled out again and made to wear his coat with the 
inside outward. This is the sign that his initiation is over 
and he can now stand by and enjoy the fun. Ranging him- 
self with the turn-coated classmates whom he finds have pre- 
ceeded him, he looks upon a motley throng of struggling 
Sophomores arrayed in every variety of hideous and fantastic 
disguise, shouting, screaming, horn-blowing and putting the 
Freshmen through the various stages of the ceremony, 
which in his own case has just been completed, while the 
Juniors and Seniors stand by as passive spectators of the 
sport. " 



14 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



But more elaborate processes are not wanting and are often i to enter college until he is old enough to go through these 
gone through with. The Freshman may be shut in a] imaginary terrors without any great amount of flinching; but 
coffin-shaped box and suddenly raised by a rope and pulley 



to a height of several yards, when the bottom of his cage 
dropping allows him to fall on the out-stretched blanket; or 
two or three tire-arms may be discharged over his head at 
tiie moment a trap-door falls beneath his feet, and drops him 
upon a blanket below. Sometimes he is lowered through 
the floor in a coffin as into a grave, and often he is dragged imbibed too freely at their suppers, but they are closely 



in the rare instances when a very young Freshman shows 
signs of faintness at any point of the ceremony, the band- 
age is at once pulled from his eyes and he is declared initia- 
ted: a proceeding which is pretty sure to restore him forth- 
with, 
in OS. 



Nor is it true that drunken men control the proceed- 
A Sophomore or two may be present who have plainly 



and jolted across the stage over blocks of wood in a vehicle 
mucli like a hen-coop on wheels. But some of these more 
brutal sports are now under the embargo of the Yale faculty. 
"The ceremony concluded, the newly initiated are pledged 
to observe the secrets of their society, ordered to assemble at 
the hall early on the following evening and dismissed,— 
thougli not until several have been called upon to ' make 
speeches, ' which are greeted with uproarious mock applause, 
arul sarcastic cries of 'Well done, Freshie! ' ' Good for you! ' 
and so on. Next day the Freshmen pay their initiation fees, 
which vary from five dollars to twice that in different socie- 
ties, and difl"erent years; swing out their badges, most of 
which are lent them by the Sophomores until their own can 
be enoraved upon the back with their name and that of their 
class; "and at 1he appointed hour approach their society hall, 
which they find entirely transformed in appearance since the 
previous night. The Sophomores are now stretched out 
upon the carpeted floor in the center of the hall, smoking, 
laughing and singing, while the Freshmen occupy the seats 
about. \he President orders the reading of the constitu- 
tion, whereto the new members affix their names. A fare- 
well poem and oration are pronounced, or possibly a play 
is acted." 

That the above account is substantially correct there is no 
doubt. It is corroborated by graduates of Yale who have 
witnessed the scene, some of whom have been connected with 
the fraternities, and others who never were. 

This initiation is brutal and foolish enough, but current 
newspaper reports give additional horrors. The following, 
from the correspondence of the New York Sun (Nov. 1873), 
describes briefly the ceremonies of some of the minor socie- 
ties of Cornell University, Ithica, N. Y. ; — 

'' The candidate is then taken from his room after mid- 
night, and led to a secluded room in a secluded street, where 
the members have gathered in masks to see the fun. He is 
bhndfolded and pinioned, and then led over boxes, chairs and 
other obstacles until his shins are barked and he is tired into 
resistlessness. The room is in a commercial building which 
is furnished with an elevator, and down this the victim is 
next dangled at the end of a rope, this frightening process 
•beino- followed by the tossing in a blanket. He is then sat- 
urated with water from squirt guns, after which the blind- 
fold is removed amid hideous noises, demoniac lights and 
fiendisli dresses, and a pledge of secrecy is made. After this, 
he is usually blindfolded again, placed in a coffin, and some 
process resorted to which is intended to convince the victim 
that he is dying. This is sometimes done by suddenly 
drenching the head v/ith water, and then administering chlo 
roform; or by heating the bare breast nearly to a blister with 
a hot shovel held close to it, and then clapping on a large 
piece of ice, under which treatment he becomes insensible. 
When he awakes, he tinds that the bandage and the pin- 
ions are removed, and that he is in a coffin surrounded by 
ghostly forms. If he is sufficiently scared by this, the cere- 
monies arc then closed." 

This description has the supporting testimony of the Buf- 
falo Commercial's c;orrespondent at the same place, but must 
be judged as a newspaper report, to be taken cum grano 
salts, until substantiated. 

Initiations in upper class societies at Yale are more secret; 
but as they last until daybreak and are attended with heavy 
noises and confused uproar, it is hardly to be supposed that 
so much time and trouble would be taken only to make prop- 
er impression upon the students listening without. The in- 
tent of the initiation, especially with the Freshmen, is to 
thoroughly scare and intimidate, but not hurt. As says the 
work above quoted, '' There is nothing specially unpleasant 
aboiit being tossed in a blanket, and Freshmen often toss 
one another for the mere fun of the thing. But a bhndfolded 
man, in a pandemonium of noises and an atmosphere of 
tobacco smoke, flying up and down through ilhmitable space, 
needs all his wits about him if he would keep cool and reas- 
on^himself into a feeling of securityr No one has any right 



watched by their sober companions and prevented from put- 
ting Freshmen through any process outside the regular pro- 
gramme. " It is generally behoved that accidents do fre- 
quently happen, and sometimes of a serious nature; and with 
some societies the jirecaution of having restoratives at hand 
has become habitual. 

In the obhgations imposed on students by the fraternity 
there is probably little chversity. Some boldly reqiure a 
formal oath; others omit the form while the spirit is the 
same. The pledge of the Beta Theta Pi society as adminis- 
tered in the Lambda chapter, connected with the State Uni- 
versity at Bloomington, Indiana, reads thus: — 

" Art. XII. Every individual on being admitted to this 
association shall solemnly bind himself by the following ol)li- 
gation, administered by the president: — 

1. I promise to keep inviolably secret all the signs, sjm- 
bols, objects and proceedings of the Beta Theta Pi, and to 
yield implicit obedience to its constitution, by-laws and in- 
structions. 

2 . I promise to place implicit confidence in every member 
of this association, and to use all honorable means to promote 
his interests and to aid in his preferment. 

3. I promise never to see calmly, nor without earnest de- 
sire and decided eff'orts to prevent it, the ill-treatment, slan- 
der, or defiimation of any one who wears the badge or bears 
the name of Beta Theta Pi. 

4. I promise to preserve inviolate the secrets of every 
member of this association delivered to me as such, or when 
the information requires secrecy for his welfare ; and, further, 
in my intercourse with members to be urbane in my deport- 
ment, courteous in expression, and steadfast in friendship. 

6. I solemnly promise to uphold as an individual the dig- 
nity of the Beta Theta Pi; and, in my intercourse Avith man- 
kind, to maintain my character as one of its members. 

6. I solemnly promise that, if at any time my connection 
with Beta Theta Pi should be dissolved, I will never reveal 
anything of the nature, objects, or business of the association." 

At Monmouth College, Monmouth, 111., the Kappa Phi 
Delta administers tv/o oaths. The first in the ante-room 
before the candidate enters for initiation; before taking it he 
gives satisfactory answers to questions concerning his belief 
in God, the Scriptures, a future state of rewards and punish- 
ments, etc., — an impious attempt at jocularity. The prepara- 
tory obligation reads as follows: — 

" I, A. B., do solemnly swear in presence of Almighty 
God, with my hand upon his sacred word, that I do not be- 
long to any fraternity or secret association at this college. 
And furthermore promise and swear that I will not reveal 
anything I have seen or may see here. So help me God," 

The second oath is administered in the lodge-room after 
the candidate's placed on his knees before the presiding offi- 
cer, who says: — 

" Yo\i do solemnly swear in the presence of Almighty God, 
with your hand upon his sacred word, and before'these wit- 
nesses, the members of the Kappa Phi Delta fraternity, that 
you will not reveal anj'^ of its secrets or make known any of 
its mysteries to anyone except a regularly initiated member; 
that you will always endeavor by your conduct and actions 
to preserve its integrity inviolate; that you Avill take the 
part of a brother Kappa Phi Delta, when assailed in either, 
character or person, to the best of your abihty; that you will 
do everything in your power to.promote the interest and well 
being of each and every brother of the Kappa Phi Delta fra- 
ternity; that you will not initiate or recommend for initiation 
any one whom you think would bring disgrace upon the fra- 
ternity or injure any one of its members; that should you 
possess a Kappa Phi Delta badge you will not dispose of it 
to any one without the consent of the fraternity; that you 
will cheerfully conform to all the established rules and. regu- 
lations of the fraternity ; that you will vote for a Kappa Phi 
Delta in preference to any fraternity or neutral man should 
he be a candidate in either of the hterary societies of the col- 
lege; that you will respond to all calls of the fraternity and 
all its established signs and grips given by any of its mem- 
bers. So help you God." 



ANTI-MAgCNIC BOOHS 

(Not our own Publications.) 
For Sale by EZRA A. COOK & CO., 
13 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 
FOR CATALOGUE OF PUBLICATIONS OF 
EZRA A. COOK & CO.; See page 15 

All book.s sent poet paid, on receipt of retail 
price, but BOOKS SENT BY MAIL ARE NOT 
AT OUR RISK. 

Books ordered by express are sold at 10 per 
cent, discount and SE>iT AT OUR RISK, party 
ordering must pay express charges 

THIRTEEN REASONS 
tVhy a Christian shouSd not be a Freemason. 

BT 

REV. ROBERT ARMSTRONG. 
The author slates his reason clearly and care- 
fully, and any one of the thirteen reasons if 
properly considered, will keep a Christian out of 
the Lodge. 

Single copy, by mail postpaid 05 

Perdoz., " , " " 50 

" 100, express charges extra 3 50 

Light on Frsemasonry, 

BY ILDIS D. BSENAED, 

TO WHICH IS APPENDED A 

Bevflatiora of the Mysteries of Odd-fel 

lonship hy a Blsmlser of the Graft. 
The whole containing over five hundred pages, 
lately revised and republished, Price $2,00 
The first part of the above work. Light on Free- 
masonry, 410 pages i>i paper cov()\ will be soit 
post paid on receipt of $1. 



Kalsli's km of Reeinasoofy. 

REVISED EDITION, 
Is a SoJiolarlyReview of thelnstitntion, byBsv , 
Jko, T. Wawk, 

Price 25 cts. 

Finney on Masonry. 

BOUND IN CLOTH, PRICE fl.CO. 

CHEAP EDITION, 

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BT MAII,, POST -paid: 

Ferdoa $875, 

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Elder Stearns' Books. 

Stearns' Inquiry Into the Kalnre and Tendency of Masonry 
WiiSi an Appendix. 

SEVENTH EDITION. 



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338 Pages, in Cloth 

' Paper — 

Steams' Lietters on Masonry. 

Showing the antagonism between Freemasonry 
and the Christian Religion, 
Price, 30 cents. 



Steams' Review of Ttito Masonic Ad- 
dresses. 

In this scathing review the lying pretentious of 
the order are clearly shown. 
Price, 10 cents. 

Steams' Complete 'Works on Mesonry. 

This book contains the "INQUIRY,-' "LET- 
TERS ON MASONRY" and "A >ii.w Chapteb on 
Masonrt," bound together— three books in one. 

Price, $1.25. 

ijevington's Key to Masonry. 

This is Rev. Mr. Leviugton's last, and in the 
judgment of its sywVaoT, best work on Masonry. 
The contents of the first chapter are as follows: 
"Commencement and growth of Specnlalive or 
Symbolic Freemasonry — A table showing the 
thing at a glance —The use that the Atheists made 
of it — Identical with lUumiuism — Its connection 
with the French Revolution, and with the Iritli 
Rebellion— The action of the British Parliament 
with regard to it— Proofs of its diabolcal pur- 
poses — Its Introduction, doings progress and de- 
signs in the United States." 

Tbe contents of the itleventh chapter are thus 
startling: 

"Knights of the Golden "Circle- Graphic ac- 
count of them by a seceding Knight, and re- 
marks thereon, showing the identity of the or- 
der with Masourv — ciuotations from Sir W^alter 
Scott." 

This work is thrilling in statement, and pow- 
erful in argument. 425 pages, 

Price. $1.35. 

Bernard's k^pk to b^ht os Uasonrj, 

Showing the Character of the Institution by its 
terrible oaths and penalties. Bound, in boards, 
50 cents ; flexible covers, 35 cents. 

Oliver's Historj of Initiation. 

Comprising & detailed Account of the Bites 
and Ceremonies of all the Secret and Mysteri 
ons Tnstltiitlons of the Ancient World. 



ADVEESS TO CHRISTIANITY, 

And Inimical to a Republican Government 

By REV. LEBBE OS ARMSTRONG, 

(Presbyterian,) 

A Seceding Mason of 21 degrees. 

This is a very telling work an no hon- 
est man that reads it will thinJi of joining 
the Lodge. 

PRICE, 90 cts, Each $1 75 per dor, 
ost Paid. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



15 



Descriptive Catalogue of Publications of Ezra h. Cook & Co., 

13 "V^abash Ave., Cliicago 



BOOKS. 



hj CAP'T. WILLIAM MORGAN. 

TEE GBNUINE OLD MORGAN BOOK :-republished with en- 
gravings showing the hoiga Room, Dress of candidates, Sijrns 
Dne Guards, Grips, Etc, ^ ' 

This revelation is so accurate that Freemasons murdered the au- 
thor for writing it. Thousands have testified to the correctness of 
the revelation and this book therefore sells very rapidly. 

T^ ^ ^ , „ . , Price 25 cents. 

PerDoz.Post Paid 42 qq 

Per hundred by express, (express charges extra.)!.".'!!!. $lo!oO 

THIS BROKISM SEAL. 

OR PERSONAL REMINISCENCES OP THE ABDUCTION AND 
MURDER OF Wm. MORGAN, 

By SAMUEL D. G-REENE, 

Price in cloth, $1.00. Paper covers, 50 cents. 

In Paper Covers per Doz. Post paid $4 iiO 

•' per hundred by express (ex. charges extra$25.00 
That the book is one of great interest and value is shown by the 
following 

OPINIONS or THE PBESS. 

"A Masonic Revelation. — Mr. Samuel D. Greene is a venerable 
gentleman of the highest respectability, whose statements seem to 
be worthy of full credence. 'J'ne jiroken Heal; or, Tr'ersonal 
Reminiscences of the Jtforffan ylbduction and Jk^Turder, is the 
title of a book of some three hundred pages just issued by him, 
purporting to give a full and accurate account, from personal knowl- 
edge, of tue Morgan 'abduction,' and other masonic matters which 
made such an excitement in this country, now almost half a century 
ago." — Con!jrer/atiu7ia/ist and 'Jiccordcr, Susion. 

" 'Fbebmasonrt Developed.' — 'The Broken Seal : or. Personal 
Reminiscences of the Morgan Abduction aad Murder,' is the title of 
a volume written and just published by Samuel D. Greene, of 
Boston. The author belonged to the same lodge with Morgan, and 
professes to know all about that event which made such a sensation 
throughout the country forty years ago. The book contains the 
confession of Morgan's murderer, and much more curious and inter- 
esting matter, including the ceremony of initiation, etc. The au- 
thor opposes Freemasonry as inimical to good government, to so- 
ciety, and to the Church ; and the story that he here tello will make 
a sensation in the order, if its statements are really what they pur- 
port to bo. If Freemasonry is what it is supposed by many to be, in 
its obligations, the author of this book must be a bold man."~.Sff}- 
ly Serald, Soston. 

"We are acquainted with Mr. Greene, and have no doubt that his 
account is entirely reliable, and of great historic and moral interest. 
Capt. Wm. Morgan was Mr. Greene's noighbor i'- Batavia, N. Y,., 
and a member of the same lodge with him at the time of the great 
excitement in 1S26. The titles to these chapters are sufficiently ex- 
citing to give the book a large cale: — ' The Storm Gathering;" 
"Abduction of Morgan;" "Attempted Abduction of Miller and 
his Rescue;" "What became of Morgan;" "What Morgan Ac- 
tually Revealed;" "Confession of the Murderer;" "Allegations 
against Freemasonry, etc." — Voston X)aiiy A'ews. 

History of The Abduction and Mnrder of 
Cap't. Wm, !iIoi-'ga2i, 

As prepared by Seven Committees of Citizens, appointed to ascer- 
tain the fate of Morgan. 

This book contains indisputable, legal evidence that Freemasons, 
abducted and Murdered Wm. Morgan, for no other offence than 
the revelation of Masonry. It contains the sworn testimony of over 
twenty persons, including Morgan's v/ifo, and no candid person 
after reading this book, can doubt that many of the most respecta- 
ble FREEMASONS, in the Empire State, with others were concerned 
in tbis crime. 

Single Copy, postpaid,.., 25 cents. 

Per doz. " $2,00. 

Per ICO, Ex press Charges Ex tra, 10. CO. 

Valance's Ocnfession of The Murder of 
Capt, Wsm. Morgan. 

This confession of Henry L. Yalaiico, one of the three Freemasons 
who drowned MorgaL in the Niauara River, was taken from the lips 
of tlao dying man by l)i. John C. Emory, of Racine County, Wiscon- 
sin in 1848 ; The confession bears clear evidence of truthfulness. 

Single copy, post oaid, SOcents. 

Per doz. " $1-50. 

Per 100 Express Charges Extra, » 8.00. 

The Myfstic ^is or Freemasonry a Leagiia 
with the Sevil. 

This is an accent of the Church Trial of Peter Cook, and wife of 
Elkhart, Indiar ■, for refusing to support a Reverend Freemason; 
r.ud their very able defence presented by Mrs. Lucia C. Cook, in 
which she clearly shows that Freemasonry, is antagonistic to the 
Christian Religion. Price '20 Cents. 

HARRATIVESIAWD ARGUMENTS, 
sbov/ing the Conflict of Secret Societies with the Constitution and 
Laws, of the Union and of the States. 

by FRAMCIS S!EMFI.:E of 

SJover, Iowa. 
The fact that Secret Societies, interfere with the execution and 
pervert the administration of Law is here clearly proved. 

Price 20 Cents. 

Tke Amtiasiasoii's Scrap Boo!2t, 

CONSISTING OP 

21 GYNOSUEE TEACTS. 

In this booiv are the views of more than a Score of men_, many of 
them of distinguished ability, ou the subject of Secret Societies. 

The dangerous tendency and positive evil of organized Secrecy 
is here shown by the most varied and powerful arguments and illus- 
trations that have ever been given to the public. 

Lecturers and others who wish to find the best arguments against 
the Lodge, should send for this book. 

Those who wish to circulate Antimasonic Tracts ought to have the 
book to select from. 

Single Copy, post paid, "20 cents. 

Per Doz. '• $1.75 

Per 100, Express charges Extra, $10.00 



SBRMOH ON MASONRY, 

BY REV. 'W, P. M'NARY, 

Pastor United Presbyterian Chur'ch, Bloomington, Incl. 
This is a very clear, thorough, candid and remarkably coneico 
Scriptural argument on the character of Freemasonry. 

Singl e Copy, Poet Paid, 5 

Per Doz, 50 

Per Hnudered, Express Charges Extra, $350 



I A N E"W "WORK OF G REAT INTEREST.! 

SECRET SOCIETIES ANCIENT AND MODERN, 

By GENX J. V7. PHELPS. 

240 Pages, handsoiviely Printed. 

This new book ie one that every man should read who wishes to 
be posted on the character and influence of Secret Societies. 

The work is particularly commended to the attention of Officers 
of The Army and Navy, The Bench and The Clergy. 
Tile "Tahle of Contents" is as follows: 

,'TnE Antiquity of Secbet Societies, The Life of 
Julian, The Eleusinian Mystekies, The Origin of 
Masonry, Was Washington a Mason ? Filmoee's and 
Webster's deference to Masonry, A brief outline of 

THE PROGRESS OP MaSONRY IN THE UNITED STATES, TuE 

Tammany Ring, The Credit Mobilier Ring, Masonic 
Benevolence, The uses of Masonry, An Illustration , 
The Conclusion." 

Sfotkes of <hc Press. 



Secret Societies, Ancient and Modern : An Outline of their 
Rise, Progress and Character with Respect to the Christian Religion 
and Republican (Jovernment. Edited by General J. W. Phelps, 
Chicago: Ezra A. Cook & Co. 

The author traces back the origin of Masonry and its evil influ- 
ences, particularly as seen and felt in our own country; the Tam- 
many Ring, Credit Mobiler, &c. He shows the subserviency of 
some of our public men, such as Fillmore and Webster, to its dom- 
inating power. If read dispassionately it will do gooA.— UnHcd 
Presbyterian. 

The author ha!^ presented information concerning the Old Myster- 
ies and their antagonism to Cihristianity ; the Masonry of Washington 
and his virtual secession from it; the harlotry of Masonrj', English 
and American, in assuming charge of international politics, and treat- 
ies between England and the United States; the disgusting interven- 
tion of the lodge at the close of the French and "German war; the 
Masonic baptisms ; all these and more Gen. Phelps has given, accom- 
panied with clear philosophical dissertations of his own. 

Bible Banner Neiu York. 

Single Copy, Post Paid 50 

Per Doz" " " $4 75 

Per Hundred Express Charges Extra $33 00 



WE ITOW HAVS 22 ENGLISH TEAOTS, OiTE aEF.UAN, AND ONE SWEE13I3H 
These tracts are sold at the rate of $1.00 per lOOO pages. 



4 frioi had for i\% tm MMm i fracli. 

HAS BEEN SECURED AND WE HOPE WILL NEVER BE EX- 
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dollar received, so EVERY NSW SUBSCRIPTION TO THE TRACT 
FUND COUNTS DOUBLE. 

Many of our most earnest workers in this cause of God are poor 
men, v.'ho would be glad to circulate thousands of pages of Auti- 
ma-^nnic literature it they could have thera free. 

SHALL WE NOT HAVE AN INEXHAUSTIBLE TRACT FUND ? 

"THE ANTI-MASONS SCRAP BOOK," 

Contains our 21 Cynosure Tracts, bound together, price 
20 cents. See advertisement. 



Address Ezra A. Cook & Co., 



13 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 



TRACT NO. 1: 
HISTORY OF MASONRY, 
BY PRESIDENT J. BLANCHARD, OP WHEATON COLLEGE. 
This is now published in three tracts of four pages each. Price 
Of each, 50 cents per 100; $4 per 1000. 

Tract No. 1, Part Fikst— Shows the origin nf Speculative Free- 
masonry, and. '8 entiled "HISTORY OF MASONR.Y. '' 

Tract No. 1, Part Second— Is entitled "DESPOTIC CHARAC- 
TER OP FREEMASONRY " „„^„.„.^.TT,^, . 

TRiOT No; 1, Part Third— Is entitled "FREEMASONRY A 
CHRIST-EXCLUDING RELIGION." 

TRACT NO. 1, IN SWEDISH; 
translated by Prof. A. Ri CSRVIN. A 15-page tract at $2.00 
perlOO; $13.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 2: 

MASONIC MURBSR, 

By REV. J, R. BAIRD, of Pleasantville, Pa., a seceding Mason 

who has taken 17 degrees. A 3 nage tract at 25 cents per 100; 

$2.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 3: 

SECRETS OF MASONRY, 
BY ELI TAPLEY. 

This is a 4-page Illustrated Tract, showing the signs, grips and 
pass-words, of tae urst three degrees. 50 cents per 100, or $4.00 per 
1000. 

TRACT NO. 4: 

GRAND! GREAT GRAND!! 

BY PHILO CARPENTER. 
This is a 2-pago tract, calling the attention of the public to the 
despotic and ridiculous titles of Freemasonry. Price 25 cents per 100 ; 
$2 00 per 1,000. 

TRACT. NO. 5: 

Extracts From Masonic Oaths and Penalties, as 
Sv/orn to by the &rand Lodge of Shode Island. 

This tract is a reprint of a tract published in 1834, and is a very 
weighty document. A 4-page tract at 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 
1000. 

TRACT NO. 6: 

Eon, John Quincy Adams' Letter. 

ftli/lng Sis and His Fat&SF's OjsIhIso of FresEaasosjry (1832.); 



iiJ 



J 



^S 



AND 

51 



mson s 



^tter, 



G?.Tms? Hsa Opiaiop. ofFreeraagoury (1832). 
Eoth oi these letters, in one 4-page tract, at 50 eeuts per 100 ; $4.00 
per 1000. 



TRACT NO. 7: 

SATAN'S CABLE-TOW. 
A 4-pagc tract. This is a careful analysis of the character of 
Masonic oaths, and shows them to be most blasphemous and un- 
christian ; and the JIasonio Cable Tow is clearly shown to be the 
Cable Tow by which Satan is leading thousands to eternal death. 
50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NU. 8: 

Is a 2-page double tract, "illustrated. ' The lirst page repre- 
sents a Mason proclalmimg the wonderful wisdom and benevo- 
lence of the order, with an article below, entitled "Freema- 
sonry is only 152 Ifaars Old," and gives the time and 
place of its birth. 

The second side is entitled, '"Murfler and Treason mot 
Exempted," arid shows that the Masonic order is treasonable in 
its constitution, and is both anti-Republican and anti-Christian. 
Price 25 cents per 100 ; $2 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 0, ILLUSTIiATED: 

FREEMASONRY IN THE CHURCH. 

Copy of a petition for the higher degrees of Freemasonry, in 
which Blasphemous and Despotic Titles arc enumerated and 
prayed for. The Copy was printed for the use of "Occidental Sov- 
ereign Consistory S. P. Ji. .y,'' 32d degree— a Chicago Lodge— and 
was ordered by a deacon of a Christian Church who is Grand Orator 
of the Grand Lodge of 111. 

TR.ACT NO. 1(1: 

CHARACTER AND SYMBOLS OF FREEMASOKEY. 

A 2-page tract, (illustrated) by its "Grand Secretaries, Grand 
Lecturers, Perfect Prince Freemasons, Grand Inspector, Inquisitor 
Commanders, Grand High Priests," etc. The wonderful symboli- 
cal meaning of "the Cable Tow," "the Square and Compass," "the 
Lamb Skin, or white Apron,' ' and "the Common Gavel." are given 
in the exact words of the highest Masonic authority. 23 cents per 
100 or $2.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 11; 

Address ofNiama hi] Aiss&ialk, b hi 

TO THE PUBLIC; 

Concerning the Morgan Murder, and the character of Freema- 
Bonry, as shown by this and other Masonic murders. 50 x.ents ner 
100; $4.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 12: 

JUDGE WHITNEY ANI3 MASONRY. 
This tract contains a condensed account of .Judge Whitney's 
Defense before the Grand Lodge of Illinois, on charge of unma- 
sonic coaduct in bringing Samuel L. Keith the murderer of Ellen 
Slade, and a member of his Lodge, to justice, with Judge Whitney's 
subsequent renunciation of Masonry, 
An 8-page tract, $1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 13: 

DR. NATHANIEL COLITEK OH MASONRY, 

and 

HOWARD CROSBY, D. D., 

Chancellor of the University of New York, on SECRET SOCIETIES. 
A double 2-page tract 25 cents per 100; $2,00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 14: 

GRAND I.ODGE MASONRY. 

ITS SELATIOMTO CIVIL GOVEENI^ENT AND THE CEEISIIAN EELICflON. 
Opening address before the Monmouth Convention, by PEES. J. 
BLANOHAED of WHEaTON OOLLEaE. This is a 16-page tract at $3.00 
per 100; $16.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 15: 

MASONIC OATHS NULL AND VOID- 

A clear and conclusive argument proving the Invalidity of any 
oath or obligation to do evil. By REV. 1. A. HART, Secretary 
National Christian Association. Published by special order of the 
Association. 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1800. 

TRACT NO. 16: 
HON. SETH M. GATES ON FREEMASONRY. 

PROOF THAT THE INSTITUTION THAT MURDERED MORGAN 
IS UNCHANGED IN CHARACTER 
This is a letter to the Monmouth Convention by Hon. Seth M. 
Gates who was Deputy Sheriff of Genesee County, and also Secre- 
tary of the Leroy Lodge at the time of Morgan's Abduction. A Pi- 
page tract, 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 17: 

Origin, Oifaiions and k^mi^ cf Ibe Eraggo. 

"WITH A CONSTITUTION OP A FARMERS' CLUB. 

This little tract ought to be put into the hands of every Farmer in 

the United States, Four-page tract, 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 18: 

HON. W^M. H. SEWARD ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Estrass from a Speech 05 Esow-linot';ingj;m in the tJ. S. Senate in 1S55. 
The testimony of JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, MILLARD FILLMORE, 
CHIEF JUSTIC MARSHALL and others, is added. 

A S-page tract, 25 cents per 100 ; S'2,00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO, 19. 
BRICKS FOR MASONS TO LAY. 

WASHINGTON, MADISON, MARSHALL, RUSH, HANCOCK, 
ADAMS AND WEBSTER, give brief clear testimony against the 
Lodge A 2-page tract 25 cents per 100 ; $2.00 per 1000. 
TRACT NO. 20: 
OBJECTIONS TO MASONRY. 
By A SECEDING MASON, of Cornton, Vermont. 
This tract contains many strong arguments against the Lodge drawn 
from personal experience, observation and study of its character. 
A 4-page tract at 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1,000. 
TRACT NO. 21: 
MASONIC CHASTITY. 

BY EMMA A, WALLACE, 

The author, by wonderfully clear illustration and argument, shows 
the terribly corrupt nature of Freemasonry. No true woman who 
reads this will ever speak with approbation of this institution. 
A 4-page tract 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1,000. 



GERMAN CYNOSURE TRACT A. 



Sis Esaso&s" whj a CMian skid sollis a Freemson 

By REV. A. GROLE, Pastor, German M. E. Chureli, 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

This is on first German tract, and it is a good one; it ought to 
have a large cirroulation. Price 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 1000. 

ENOCH HOHEYWEIX'S TRACT 

TO THE YOUNG MEN.OP, AMERICA. Postage, 3 cents "per"'ic0 
Traces. Tracts Free. 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



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The Christian (monthly ,with map of 

Palestine 2 75 

do without map , 2 40 

Anti -Masonic Herald 2 25 

Western Rural 3 50 

Young Folk8'Rural(monthly,with two 

chromos) 3 90 

Science of Health 3 25 

National Agriculturist and Bee Jour- 
nal 2 60 

Bee-Keeper's Magazine 2 60 

Bible Banner 2 50 

Chromo with either of last three 40c ex- 
tra. 
Wood's Household Magazine with 

chromo 2 80 

Earnest Christian 2 80 



Seed-sowing time precedes harvtst. 
If any of our agents scatter tracts and 
canvass for the Cynosure without secur- 
ing subscribers immediately we hope 
they will not be discouraged, but re- 
member they are sowing seed. Do not 
forget it after it is sowed , but keep cul- 
tivating the field, and we feel that a 



harvest is sure. One agent says he 
has spent thirteen dollars in this work 
with very little return, but te intends 
to keep at it and try to infiuerce Chris- 
tian men and women to investigate this 
subject and put their shoulder to the 
work of removing these evils. 



cur. SUBSCRIPTION LIST. 

Reports have come to us occasionally 
that enemies of the Cynosure have 
said that its mail list numbered from 
500 to 1 ,000 names. And now the 
report comes to us that some of our 
friends say we have a subscription list 
of from 15,000 to 20,000. 

For the first five years and a half w^ 
discontinued papers only by special 
order, and our mail list when most 
flourishing (just before the great fire of 
1871, in which the mail list was de- 
stroyed,) numbered between 6,000 and 
7,000. After that tire it again came 
up to more than 4,000, but during 
these years we were all the time sub- 
jected to loss from discontinuances with 
arrears unpaid. Last summer there 
were 1,000 names en our list with the 
annexed dates more than three months 
behind, and half of these were nearer 
six months back than three months, 
and the paper hardly paid expenses. 

After six months careful work, send- 
ing cut circulars, notices, bills, etc. , we 
cosnmenced Jan. 1, 1874, the plan of 
stopping subscriptions when the time 
was out. 

OUR PLAN 

is to send a not'ce to every subscriber 
whose subscription expires in a given 
monthj stating this facL and asking a 
renewal during j the month, or if the 
money is not at hand and the subscrib- 
er would like to continue the paper, we 
ask for information to that eflPect with a 
promise to renew as soon as possible. 
In this way we hope to keep a live 
interest and co-cperation in our work 
without hurtinj: any one'g feelings or 
running up doubtful accounts whiih we 
have no certainty of collecting. 

Oar readers, generally, like the 

NEW ARRANGEMENT, aod WC trUSt it Will 

prove a mutual benefit to the cause and 
to them. 

It lessens our numbers considerably 
just now, but we trust th's effect is only 
temporary, and that our present list, 
which, ou April 17th, numbered 3,886, 
will increase steadily. We feel that a 
very large number of our readers de. 
sire (o tea the Gynosure principles 
established in every Eoaia], moral and 
political circle in our country, acd that 
when they recollect that the population 
of our country is estimated at near 
40,000,000, and the popular vote for 
President in 1872 counted 6,431,147, 
they will see that there is rocm for a 
great increase in the circulation before 
the Cynosure can directly influence an 
average of one in 400 of our inhabitants, 
or one in sixty-four of our voters. 

As long as our readers feel, in the 
language of a correspondent, that the 
Cynosure should be the standard paper 
in every family in the land and labor 
to make it so, so long will we be en- 
couraged and v;it.h God's blessing made 
more powerful ia opposing sin and 
promoting justice and truth. 



ABOUT COMMISSIONS. 

We receive letters occasionally con 
taining two. three, or more subscrip- 
tions in which nothing is said about 
commissioQs. Some friends write ''we 
take nocommisbioD." Others Fay send 
the amount of commission in tracts and 
books. Others say, consider it a dona- 
tion to the tract fund. We are glad 
to get workers for the circulation of 
the Cyno.=ure and pay nothing more 
cheerfully than commissions. However, 
our paper is cheap at $2.00 a year ;)nd 
requires a great addition to our present 
mail list in order to enable us to isEue 
it in this attractive form, so that when 
money is received and nothing said 
about commission we do not, as a rule, 
allow any. 

The point of these observations is, 
tell us wliat you wish to h;.ve done 
with your commission unless you take 
it out before forwarding the subscrip- 
tion money. 



Subscription Letters, received from 
April nth thrcugh April 20th. 

J S Amidon, Mrs S B Allen, J M 
Adair, N B BJanton, Robert Berry, G 
Brokaw, J Bartlett, A Baker, A Bruce, 
D Bermond, S Bennett, James H C!ark> 
D Carpenter, L Chittenden, D S Cald- 
well, C W Dain, Mrs J Eastman, L D 
Felt, M E Fisk. P Fahrney, J H Fait, 
L Gaskill, C Gray, S D Green, P 
Gleason, M Gallup, J A Gibscn, D J 
Harris, A N Hudson, J T Kiggtn?, J 
Keel, H Kumler, T Kingsncrth, J W 
Lewip, T B McCormick, Morgan, H 
Mohler, MrsMcMaban, D S McConihay, 
J Meyers, J L Manley, S Y Orr, A 
Oldfield, S A Proctor, S L Phelps. J 
Powers, J T Russell. J Rose, H H 
RobiuEOD, E Randolls, J A Richards, A 
C Rgad, J Remington, R D Russel, A 
Subscriber, J Simons. D W Sherman , 
L N Stritton, Mrs J P Stoddard, Mrs 
Julia Smith, E Trumbull, B A Wash- 
burn, R R Wilcox, J Wetden, W Whit- 
tin, G G Wickey, J Young, W Jenks 



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TO SELL THE PUBLICATIONS OF 

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Liberal Terms Offered. 

Capable persons who are in need of pecuniary 
a:d may clear 

Handsome Profits, 

While at the same time aiding the cause of Reform 
Apply to EZRA A. COOK & CO., No. 13 
Wabash Ave., Chica;;o, 111. 



I SOMETHINQ NSW. 

A CHART OF MASONRY 

Showing the degrees from the first to the thirty- 
third, entitled 

Degrees of Ancient Accepted Scottisli Freemasonry, 

According to a Manual by V/^m. M. Cunningham, 
33d Degree. 

Designed by Sev. P. Stoddardy to explain Free- 
masonry, as shown by Morgan's Exposition and 
KJchardsou's Monitor . 

A Handsome Litho^rayb 22it28 Incbes. 

Single copies finely colored, post paid $ 75 

Per dozen " " " " BOO 

Per 100 " " " " 35 00 

Single copy, colored, varnished and mounted 

postpaid 100 

Per dozen colored, varnished and mounted, 

postpaid t 50 

Per 100, colored, varnished and mounted, 

express charges extra 50 00 

25 Copies or More Sent at the 100 bates. 



AGENTS WANTED! 

To sell, direct to consumers, Tiie Gijoundswkll ; Or, The 

AUTHORITATIVE HISTORY th's 

EAEMEHS' MOYEMENT. 

Bj J. Periam. Editor Western Rum]. CliicaKO. Complete and 
Reliable. irri((c,i tip to Jnimnry. 1874. 8 Original Portraits; 
100 ..Hier Eiigravincs. (t7"This Great Work is low in price, 
and seUinq hy thoioiands. For terms, territory, eto., address 
HANNAKORn & THOMPSON, 193 E. Washington St., Chicago. 
CAUTION. —Inferior works, mere compilations, are being 
puslied. Do not be imposed on. Mr. Periam's work is full, 
authoritative, and indorsed by the Great Leaders. None other is. 

3 m mar 12 



m&nKST REPORTS 

Chioaso. April 20, 1874. 
The following aro the latest advices : 

Grain Wheat— Spring, Ho. 1 . . $ 1 SI 

" No. 3 1 26 1 2ti/j 

" No. 3 121 

" Rejected 1 13 

Corn— No. 8 64 6454 

Eejected 02;^ 

OatB— Kg. 2... , 45^4 4654 

Rejected 44^ 

Rye— No. 2 92 931^ 

Flonr, Winter 6 00 9 25 

Spring extra 6 25 6 50 

Superfine 3 50 4 87 

Hay— Timotliy, pressed 12 00 15 50 

" loose 11 00 13 00 

Prairie, " s 00 10 00 

Lard 93^ 

Mess pork, • per bbl 16 70 

Butter 25 "0 

Cheese _ 10 18 

Eggs I3i4 

Beans. , 1 90 2 50 

Potatoes, per bu 95 1 25 

Seeds— Plas 2 10 

Timothy 2 25 2 65 

Clover 5 00 5 75 

Lumber— Clear 38 00 55 00 

Common 13 00 14 00 

Lath 2 25 2 75 

Shingles 1 50 3 75 

WOOL— Washed 37 55 

Unwashed 25 32 

LIVESTOCK. Cattle, extra.... CO 25 

Good to choice 5 95 5 75 

Medium 490 510 

Common 3 50 4 65 

Hogs, 5 10 6 oa 

Sheep 3 75 7 00 



J. li. MAKLEY. 
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW, 

And Notary Public, 

MILLS CORNERS, Jay County, Indiana. 
Prompt Attention given to the collection of 
Claims, settling estates and all other business 
entrusted to his care. 6 mo Nov. 20. 



WHEATON COLLEGE! 

WHEATON. ILLINOIS, 

Is well knovm by the readers of The Cynosure. 
Faculty, same as last year, with the addition of 
two gentlemen. Those wanting information 
thould apply to J. Bi.anohabd, Pres't. 



Westfieia, Clark Co., 111. 

Classical and Scientific Departments, open to 
both sexes. Also instruction in Music, Drawing, 
Painting, Book-keeping, Penmanship and Teach- 
ing. Address, 



Apr 246 m 



Rbt. e VML. B. Allbn, PreiU 



New York Market. 

Flour $ 5 90 

Wheat 150 



Corn. 

Oats 

Rye 

Lard 

Mesa pork. 

Butter 

Cheese 



84 

62 

1 05 



24 

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11 00 
1 60 

89 /s 

68 
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17 00 

37 

16 

18 



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lase yrai 



It is decidedly the most beautiful, tasteful 
and SENSIBLE thing of the kind I have ever 
'seen."— iJeti. F. G. HibbaTd,D. D. 

"The most Scriptural, beautiful and appro- 
priate Marriage Certificate I have ever seen." — 
Late Rev. H. Mattisun, D. D. 

"Something new and beautiful, which we 
pronounce the handsomest thing of the kind we 
ever laid eyes on." — Meth. Home Journal, Phila. 
Contains two Ornamental Ovals, for PAottgrajjhs. 

i EAUTIFUL LITHOGEAPH 14 1-1 by 18 1-1 inches. 

25 cts each, $2,25 per doz- $15 per 100. 
For Sale by Ezra A. Cook & Co.. CHICAGO. 



Light on Freemasonry, 

BY ELDEK D. BERNARD, 
with an appendix revealing the mysteries o 
Odd.fellowshlp 500 pages Clotli will be sent to 
any address post paid on receipt of $2. 00. 

The first part of the above work, Ligh 
on Freemasonry, 416 pages »■« paper tever, wil 
be sent post paid on Receipt of $1, 

- Address, w. J. SHUEY. 

DAYTON. OHIO. 



££ 



This is the titio of the beautiful new Chromo, size 11 x 14, given to every subscriber to THE 
LITTLE CORPORAL, the best illustrated Magazine for Boys and Girls published. Each 
number of the Magazine contains choice reading, suitable for the LITTLE FOLKS YOU NG 
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TERMS— ONLY §1.50. Send stamp for specimen number, with Premium List. Address 

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Writing to Papa." J 





"In Secret Have I Said Nothing."— 7«ms Ghritt, 



EZRA A. COOK & CO., Publishebs, 
ITO, 13 WABASH AVENUE. 



CHICAGO, THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 1874. 



VOL. VI., NO. 29.— WHOLE NO. 212. 
WEEKLY, $2 00 A YEAR. 



Contents. 

Page. 

IEditorial Abticles 8, 9 

Special Masonic Votlce — Masonry Subverting the Re- 
public Our Petition to President Grant KeTiew of 

Grosh'B Defense Concluded The Masonic Display 

Topics or the Times 1 

OuB CoLLBSES On Secbbt Societies 1 

'CoMTKiBnTED and Select Articles 2, 3 

Against All Secret Societies, A Letter to Gerrit Smith 

What Shall We Do at Syracuse? An Abominable 

Trinity Is Uncle Sam a Freemason? How Only the 

Decline of the Republic Can Be Prevented A Luther- 
an Testimony. 

RiFORM News 4, 5 

Notices of N. C. A, and Pledges Delegates The 

Pelition on the Corner-Stone. .Lecture List Ac- 
tion of the Executive Committee of Indiana State As- 
sociation General Agent in Berea. Anti-masonic Po- 
litical Action. 

COSBESPONOBNCB 5, 6 

How to Deal with Them The Tract Work Coming 

to 1 he Light Lodge Charity Our Mail. 

WORTT YBiRS -4 GO 6 

College Secret Societies 13 

Chapter II. Concluded. 

The Home CiKCLB 10 

Sweep before your own Door The Cobbler of Ham- 
burgh — Ihe Only True Home Provoke not your 

Ohiidren — Mental Stimulants Advantages of Tem- 
perance in Eating. 

'Children's Corner 11 

The Sabbatti School 7 

Home and Health Hints ^ 

rarm and Garden 7 

Religions Intelligence 12 

Ttews of the Week 12 

Items for Temperance Workers Facts and Figures Lite- 

rnry Notices Wheaton College 14 

Pnbliflher'B Department 16 

Advertisements IS, 14, 15, 16 



%ifp^i 4 il\t tlm. 



Tunas TiT08 Kkndrick. — This gentleman baa just 
been dismissed from the Grand St. M. E, Church, of 
Williamsburg, for drunkenness and immorality. Last 
winter this same man delivered an address before the 
Masons of Brooklyn, which was hailed by the brother- 
hood as another proof that our greatest and best men 
are all Masons. Now that he has been turned out 
of the church for drunkenness and immorality, the 
Anti-masons can show the people of Brooklyn what 
sort of ministers defend Masonry, and the Masons can 
slide him off to some other place to orate and drink, 
and be immoral again. Ho-s? long sh&li these secret 
and Satanic orders fill pulpits with such Masonic 
saints ? 



Applkton akd the Catholics. — It appears from 
the public prints thai the Appletons in revising their 
American Cyclopedia have engsged Catholics to re- 
write all articles bearing on the interest? of their 
church. Under their revision th9 history of dl mat- 
ters of conflict between Protestantism and Rome is 
steadily falsified, and after this assassination of truth, the 
house sends circulars to Catholics asking them to pur- 
chase the lies. It is very likely that they may sell 
more books to priests; but if they enter on such a 
course, the time will come when no Protestant who 
retains his self-respect will have the New American 
Cyclopedia or any other book published by this firm 
on his shelves. We have as yet seen only the accu- 
sation and not the defense. We hope that there is 
some explanation, and if any satisfactory one is made 
we will be glad to make it known to all our readers. 



The Flood. — In the State of Louisiana much 
distress is resulting from the inundation caused by 
breaks in the levees. The State authorities receive 
applications for food daily, and the National govern- 
ment has authorized the issuance of rations to the 
sufferers. S^ Now, as always, pestilence and statvation 
follow in the wake of war. Georgia and Alabama 
have had no crops to speak of for two years past, 
while the whole South is poor, and oppressed by the 
rule of ignorance and debased whites and blacks, 
Debts are piled mountain high, laziness almost uni 



versal, drinking and gambling quite so. These are 
the floods most to be feared for our brethren in the 
South. Years of oppression and rivers of blood are 
yet to be avenged. It is only by humiliation and 
prayer that the carse of God can be averted. Neither 
let us 6uppoE€ that if the South be ruined the North 
will escape. We have been partners in the crimes 
of slavery, and are now partners in the disregard of 
God's law. We have need to return to God to hum- 
ble ourselves before him,j-.to remove the|evils that ex- 
ist, and to prepare the way of the Lord in our own 
hearts, and so far as we may in those of our fellows. 



The Veto.— President Grant bss interposed his "I 
forbid," to save the country from the deluge of paper 
money, which our Congressional Punch and Judys 
vfere about to inflict upon it. For this he deserves 
and will receive the thanks of every citiisen who be- 
lieves in paying debts and disbelieves in repudiat- 
ing honest obligations. Of course this veto is per- 
fectly consistent with the pre.sent rale of political ac- 
tion. That rule is: "We must get the offices, and 
will profess and do what is necessary to that end." 
The politiciauhas but one prayer, and that ie: "Oh, 
Lord, help me to get over the fence in time when the 
parties shift." Of course this makes a politician a 
very contemptible man, and equally, of course, a vast 
majority of politicians are so. Look at the office beg- 
gar's meeting in the Palmer House lately. A number 
of individuals gathered there, who want some public 
place. They did not declare a principle, or express 
an opinion that had any bearing near or remote on 
the interests of the country, their only song was 

We want to save the country. 

And to get a little back pay ; 
We are willing to suffer, and bleed, and He, 

In robbing the Treasury. 

Grant is surrounded by such men; those who 
would chase a black man all over the country for a 
slave catcher, or hug the greasiest man and brother in 
Georgia as their interests require. He smokes and 
drinks, while they write his messages. Is it not about 
time for an American party ? 

Church Discipline . — It is evident that a church 
has power with men just in proportion as it is pure. 
Not that any church is to be composed of perfect men , 
but that all churches should be made up of men who 
refrain from habitual wrong-doing and repent sincerely 
of all lapses from the path of holiness. At present 
the various denominations, little and large, are full of 
covetous men, that is, of idolaters. Hundreds have a 
name upon church rolls who have no worship of God 
in their homes and no prayer in their hearts. Men 
are kept in one church, because if turned out they will 
pay to another^ and when too bad to wish for any 
church they are dropped, as a pastor lately said, "So 
avoid discipline." This it is which has given us our 
gospel of sentimentalism, and filled our churches with 
theatre-going, wine-drinking, card-playing, dancing, 
money-worshiping Christians {?). It is an attempt 
to serve Satan and get to heayen, to fear the Lord and 
worship idols, to yoke Christ and the devil to a sect 
on which sinners may ride to glory. Bad as our case 
is, there is light as well as darkness. There are more 
than seven thousand who have not bowed to Baal. 
There are earnest, humble, praying men and women. 
There are pastors who rise by night to weep over the 
desolate city of God. Let them have faith and cour- 
age. Let the aUiance between the saiat and einner in 
religious matters be broken. Cast societies for the 
support of the ministry to the moles and the bats. 



Let U3 trust ia our God and quit ourselves like men. 
Let us as Cbristians be more tender-hearted, honest, 
liberal and faithful. Then will Zion put on her beau- 
tiful garments, arise and shine. 



Taxiko CncRcnES.- — A movement originatiDf; with 
the auti-relig!0U3 element which opposes the Chris- 
tian amendment, and which has a large support 
from every class, Christian or otherwise, which cries 
out ag'dnst Bible ia schools, Sabbath laws, etc. , is the 
repeal of laws exempting churches and educa- 
tional institutions from taxation. The theory of the 
movement is: first, a check upon the fimssaing of 
vast sums in denominational property, for which the 
Roman Catholics are most notorious; and second, the 
subordination of ail property interests to the state. 
The Christian sentiment which most Btrongly favors 
the plan, is strangely that which haa alw.ays most 
earnestly contended against any union of church and 
state. Bat how can any fail to see that the taxation 
of church property is a dirict attempt to secure such 
an obnoxious union ? They now exist in this country 
independently of SHch other; both seeking the same 
ends — the public weal — one by motives applied to 
the nobler faculties and conscience, the oth'rby inlla- 
enciijg the lower nature. They act independently, 
though exercising a mutual restraint. But to tax the 
organiz.iition which acts on the higher plane, subjects 
it to the lower, debaEe? it by authoiiir, and ia the 
same degree destroys its influence, its power over the 
coii.scieEce of tbe masses. It would be a usurpation 
of force; a violation of the natural law which innrks 
the boundary of each institution; a degradation of 
governraent itself, in demanding for its support a per 
cent, of the voluntary offerings of love and faith. The 
basis of the effort is a plea for cowardice. Soiae 
wealthy church corporations, which transact ia real 
estate, should pay for government protection, it is 
said; and, fearing to apply the rule to these only, the 
whole body of churches, poor and lioh, must pay for 
an existence; or because some sixty mi-lio!5 ot church 
property is remunerative, the other three hundred 
raillion, which is not, should take up a burden ^^hich 
doss not belong to it. There would not be a shadow 
of claim for taxation, were the churches bacE upon 
their right and Scriptural ground of support by free- 
will offerings; on no other can tiiey prosper or fulfill 
their mission. The apostolic churches were a long 
way from carrying on a profitable business in rentals 
and land speculation, or living at the e.vpense of hu- 
man lives from the rent of saloons, as does the Trinity 
Church of New York. But the State has no power to 
lash the church back to duty . The Quixotic attempt 
would be a sacrifice of both. If the blind lead the 
blind, shall not both fall into the ditch? 

OUR COLLEGES ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Martville College. 
Martville, Tenn., Sept. 24th, 187*3. 

Gentlemen:— I believe that secret societies, gener- 
ally speaking, are fraught with mischief and should 
be discouraged, especially in our institutions cfleara- 
ing. We do not allow sny such organizations in this 
college. Opposed to them as I was when a student, 
I will not countenance them while probiding over 
students. 

We are all of us so pressed with duties that we 
have not time to prepare a well written article for the 
public eye. P. M, Bartlett, President. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Airaiust all Secret Societies. 



A LET FEB FllOM PROF, 



SAMUEL 
EMITH. 



N. SWEET TO GSRRIT 



My Dear Sir: — Ag your life, wlilch has been 
gloriously devoted to the Honor and welfare of our 
country, and the happiness of the world, is drawing 
to a close; and as T, too, although eight years younger 
than yourself, being now in luy 69Lh year, am fast 
ripening for the icy embrace of death, will you allow 
me to wiile you for the public page, if your honor 
pleases, on a subj'-^'ct deeply interesting to our beloved 
countrymen. 

Your name is familiar to the public ear, as a phil- 
anthropist, and the eloquent assertion of the people's 
rights, irrespective ot sex or color, throughout the 
civilized world. Eeing a patriot without guile or con- 
cealment, you have always, in common with myself, 
oppoEcd secret societies. In ycur published letter 
from Peterboro, August 10th, 1847, you say: 
"Secret societies are to b3 watched and guarded 
awainsf, as conspiracies against the rights of man," 
Moreover, you are the great apostle of temperance, 
the bless'jd cause 01 which you espoused more than 
half a century ago. When the Emperor of China 
wrote a letter to Sir Isaac Nev?ton, of whom it has 
been said : 

" Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night; 
God said let Newton be 1 and all was light." 

He superfcribed it, " J/>, Ntioton, of Europe,'" 
and it reached the great astronomer. Many thousands 
bear tbe name of Saiilh, in the United States, but if a 
foreigner should addre.-s a letter to Mr. Smith, of 
America, it would doubtless reaoh the beautiful little 
village of Peterboro ! 

0.1 Wednesday evening, January 28tb, 1874, I 
beard Dr. D. 0. Wright, of Rochester, lecture on 
temperance; and, in common with the audience, I was 
greatly pleased. I, however, regret very much that 
he is engaged chiefly in forming societies, called " Sons 
of Temperance." Secret societies are behind the in 
telligencj of this beautiful afternoon of the glorious 
nineteenth century. They are dangerous to all gov 
erament-5, especially to those that are fre^. The con- 
stitution of the United States does not permit even the 
representatives chosen by the people to act with 
closed dorrs, except on extraordinary occasions. It is 
a matter of astonishment, that a nation so jealous of 
its liberties should yet permit within its bosom self- 
created societies, to administer extra-judicial oaths in 
secret! They are instituted to dupe the simple for 
the b'r-nefii, of the crafty. Thej ar.3 temples of 
tyranny, wher3 the initiated swear feaity to an un- 
known prnce. All oaths and promises are void, 
which bind together a portion of mankind in secret 
and selfish ?.ssociationg, tending to limit the benevo- 
lence which we owe to all; or, which, in terms or 
eflf^^ct, deprive others of their equal rights. The 
Bible says: "No man lighteth a candle and putteth 
it under a bushel." The noble cause of temperance 
is not benefitted, but greatly injured by oaths and 
promises of secrecy under its mortal penalty. 

Did our sainted forefathers emigrate from the mother 
country in the May-fiower, to establish an unhallowed 
secret society 3 Did Christ and his disciples withhold 
the benevolent prec?pts of the gospel from all who 
came not with money in their hands, to be initiated in 
the dead of night? Did they cot, on the contrary, 
offer it to all who were disposed to walk in its morn- 
ing effulgence, without money and without price? 
The great Keeper of the green fields beyond the flood, 
established no lodge of secrecy; closed no doors 
against any member of the human family. He did 
not require his followers to wear "lamb-skin aprons;" 
but windows in their breasts. To join a secret society 
is to disregard his bright and glorious example. 
When Dr. Wright requested all to leave the room, ex- 
cept those who had apprised him they would join 
the" Sons of Temperance," before they knew the 
terms of membership, the words of Christ occurred to 
me: ^" Men love darkness rather than light, because 
He gave His followers no cate- 



chisnn, and yet His teaching satisfiesjthe soul as no one|unitedly give King Alcohol, "who is lifting in pride and 
else is able. j agony his thunder-scared front from his couch of 

The late Edward Everett, of Massachusetts, says j everlasting fire," war to the knife, and the knife to 
in a publi.?hed letter from Charleston, June 29th, the hilt, and ''damned be he who first cries, Hold! 
1833, "All secret societies are dangerous, in propor- j enough !" 

tion to the extent of their organization, and the num-i The prayer of one of the wisest and best men of all 
her of their members." The late William H. Seward i antiquity, was: " Oh ! thou eternal king of men and 
expressed the same unfavorable opinion of secret i angels, elevate our minds! Each low and partial 
societies in his letters to me, in one of which, from 
Auburn, April 20th, 1830, he said:— "Mv Dear 
Sir: — Unparalleled in the history of this republic, 
is the vindictive spirit with which Freemasonry, inch 
by inch, visits the advance of truth into hor dark 
cayerns. I look upon you as one with the talent, 
enegry, and enthusiasm, which our young and right- 
eous cause requires, and I hold it indebted to you for 
exertion and uawearied devotion to its prosperity, I 
coyet no higher name lo bequeath to my children, 
than that of being one of the early and constant ad- 
vocates of republicanism, as opposed to false and aris- 
tocratifal Freemasonry." 

Standing secrecy implies shame and guilt. Innc- 
cence seeks no cover. Deception and crime cry, 
" Come night, and shroud us in the mantle of the 
dark." Secrecy is the badge of a tyrannical govern- 
ment. Ours was not organized by the secret fac- 
tions of designing demagogues, directed by the mid- 
Qight conclave. The Father of our country, in his 
farewell address, warned his be!o?ed countrymen 
against all secret societies. As happily expressed by 
Shakspeare, 



passion thence dispel; till this great truth in every 
beart be known, that none but those who aid the 
public cause, can shield their country or themsekeB 
from chains." 

This prayer of Leonidas, my dear friend Smith 
and brother in Christ, is embodied, substantially, in 
the principles we cherish, and which are sanctified in 
our hearts. 



'< What Sliall we do at Syracuse I " 



BY J. L, BARLOW. 



their deeds are evil, " 



" It is a great sin to swear unto sin. 

But greater sin to keep a siut'ul oath. 

Who can l)e bound by any solemn vow, 

To do a murderous deed ; to rob a man ; 

To reave the orphan of his patrimony; 

To wring the widow from her customed right: 

And have no other reason for his wrong. 

But that he was bound by n solemn oath ? " 

The argument in this selection is so palpable in 
favor of violating wicked oaths, that it only needs to 
be contemplated by the candid mind, to produce per- 
fect conviction. The immortal Washington " wot) 
that imperishable fame, wh'ch shall never fade, by 
lifting the glittering steel of the patriot soldier 
above the neglected oath which had once bound him 
to the Biitish throne. Fortunately for the country 
and posterity, he accepted the presidency iu the even- 
ing of life, and the glory of his administration was 
equalled only by the laurel of bis unrivalled military 
fame. He was a farmer at Mount Vernon, but he 
proposed no farmers' secret grange society. "May 
heaven forefend," that the high priests of iniquity and 
Royal Arch viiiaics should succeed in cheating farmers, 
who form the bone and sinew of our Republic out, of 
their hnrd earnings. 

The titles of Templars and Sons of Temperance, 
hke those of Freemasonry, are vain, foolish, and in- 
consistent with our republican institutions, which do 
not tolerate the star and garter of an English lord, 
nor the coronet of a foreign prince, And yet, mem- 
bers of secret societies clothe themselves in al! 
the colors of the rainbow, and decorate themselves 
with as many jewels as are worn by an Indian chief; 
and they expect to be addressed in this country, where, 
as contemplated by our laws, and State and National 
Constitutions, wo are all upon an equal footing, by 
the titles of "Worthy Patriarch." " Grand Scribe," 
•'Most Worshipful," "Most Illustrious Highness," 
"Grand Master," "General Grand High Priest,'' 
" King," ' ' Grand King." General Jackson said in his 
admirable letter of March 27th, 1845, to Commodore 
J. L. Elliott, declining a sarcophagus: "True virtue 
and patriotism cannot exist where pomp and parade 
are the governing passions." In the language of the 
sweet bard of Avon , 

" Most dangerous 
Is Ihat temptation, that doth goad ub on 
To sin in loying virtue." 

The late Rev. Jedodiah Burchard, no less truthfully 
than shrewd, said: "A sugar devil is the worst kind 
of a devil." Those who organize or join secret so- 
cieties, under the pretext of promoting tbe precious 
interests of temperance, substantially "write good 
angel on the devits horn." All the friends of tem- 
perance ought to give each other the right hand of 
friendship, irrespective of any organization, and 



The above question stands at the head and brings 
up the rear of the editorial leader in the Cynosure cf 
April 9th. Of Christian patriots, no mere pertinent 
question can be asked at this time. To Anti-masonic 
Christian voters, and to all Anti-masons, who handle 
the ballot, it is one of overwhelmicg importance. No 
Anti-masoD, with clear convictions, can longer give 
his vote for the minions of the lodge. To do so, is to 
give his sanction to the prolonged existence, and the 
destructive work of secretism. American politics to- 
day are wholly under the control of the lodge", and 
no politician of State or national reputation, dares to 
speak or act iu opposition to its sacred or open be- 
hests. Senator Pomeroy, of Kansas, did dare to 
speak against Masonry in Chicago four years ago, and 
to-day he is politically dead, and every effort is being 
made by the Masonic institution lo ruin him as a man. 

Both tbe great parties of our day are worked in the 
interest of this secret despotism, with Masonry at its 
head. Every Anti-masonic vote cast for either of these 
parties, as at present constituted, serves to strengthen 
the hands and consolidate the workings of this ille- 
gitimate power; and correspondingly to weaken and 
render powerless the hearts and efforts of those who 
love a holy religion and a free, untrammeled govern- 
ment. If these things are true, how important the 
inquiry, "What Shall we do at Stracuse ?" 

Hitherto, we have met siffiply as Ohristians. We 
have prayed. That was well. God has mercifully 
lanswejred our -prayers in the eirection of our labor, 
j which has been to awaken the public mind to a sense 
of the appaUing dangers surrounding u3. We have be- 
come acquainted, and thus mutual helpers in a work 
to which we feel that we are called of God, not only 
as Christians, but citizens. Once we have indeed, 
ventured into the field as voters, but it was feebly 
done, and with divided counsels; and yet with results, 
of which we have uo reason to be ashamed. We have 
tried our steel and know its temper. Much of our 
power is latent, and is yet to be brought into action, 
and effectual steps to do this are to he taken at Syra- 
cuse. 

We have prayed. Now it is time to strip for ac- 
tion. We know our enemy, and whereto find him. 
The ballot has put him where he is, and made bin; 
what he is. The ballot must unmake, and dethrone 
him as a power in our government, and an enhght- 
ened public opinion must drive him from the land. 
To attempt this through either of the parties, as now or- 
ganized, is to stultify and make ourselves the laughing 
stock of the lodge. The anti-slavery men tried this 
modeofaction,anda8a general result, secured "north- 
ern men with southern principles." Success only came 
at last through the formation of a new party, and at the 
end of a cruel war. Let us learn a lesson from the 
past. Let us be apt pupils in the school of Provi- 
dence. Should we accept the advice of some — make 
no political issues at present, wait on the parties for 
Anti-masonic candidates — I have no doubt we should 
get them, as soon as we seem to be a power to be 
respected; but our candidates so found, would prove 



1^^ 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE, 



to be Anti-masonic with Masonic principles, and 
thus our victory be delayed, or indefinitely post- 
poned. I am for no such temporizing action. I have 
seen enough of it. Such ac'ion is but a temporary 
expedient at best, and its tendency is to retard, not 
advance, a good cause. It is " going down to Egypt 
for help." 

The Gyno&ure says: "Erery effort has been made 
to get men of national reputation to address U3 at 
Syracuse. Thus far the effort has failed." I am 
GLAD THE EFFORT HAS FAILED ! If "men of promi 
nence and standing in American politics, though they 
are with us in sentiment, shrink from makini( martyrs 
of themselves by coming among us," let them "e'en 
gang their ain gate. " If our cause is not worth the 
sacrifice, it is not the cause of God and humanity, and 
they are excusable for their timidity. Bat if it be, as 
we believe it to be, the cause of truth and righteous- 
ness, these are not the men to lead us now or here- 
after. O^d is our leader, and ail oar acts as Christians 
and citizens should be wrought in view of this fact. 
If he wants a Moses to lead us out into the '' Deser? 
of Conflict," lying between u? and the " Canaan of 
Victory," we shall find him among our own '"kith 



Holy of Holies, where it remained for 470 years, un- 
til the nation of the Jews returned from Babylonish 
captivity; when the Royal Arch degree was instituted 
and the true name of Crod — which all this time had 
been hidden from the woild — became the Royal Arch 
word. Now this true name of God which is known 
only to Royal Arch Mason, is not Jehovah, but 
Jahbuhlun; which, according to Dr. Mackey (see 
Lexicon, p. 230), is made up thus: Jah, the Syiiac 
name for Jehovah; Bal or Baal, the god of the 
Moabites; and On, or Ann, the god of the Egyptians 
and Hindus. In other wordp, that Baal and On were 
but varying names of the true God, and that when he 
revealed himself in his true character, by hie true 
name, it was Jehovah-Baal-On or Jahbuhiun. 

That the ancient Israelites worshiped Baal is true, 
[t is also probable that they worshiped On, or the Eun; 
but Euch worship was idolatry, punished with death. 
And it is just as absurd (o suppose that God revealed 
himself as Baal and On as that he was Dagon, Moloch 
or Ashteroth. If Royal Arch Masons worship Jah- 
buhlun, they worship a very different being from the 
God who is the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. To 
worship God 93 Jehovah Ba!-On, or Jah-buh-lun, is to 



and kin," and on the way he will develop a Joshua i worship, not God alone, but God and two dtvlh asso- 
who will bring in across Jordan into the " promised i dated in trinity. 

land." Give ui as earthly leaders, men who are not | Now God hss said, "I would not that ye should 
ashamed to be of us while we are small and despised, i have fellowship with devils. Ye cannot drink of the 



men who are safBciently enlightened to see God in 
this cause, and who are in it because he is, and we 
will follow them as representatives of the cause, and 
of God. 

We want no great name or names to help or make 
our cause. The cause shall make the men. 'Tis 
principle we follow. Men are nothing to us only as 
they represent the principle. We have men enough 
among as to man a national ticket. Men who are not 
time-servers, nor office seekers. Such are the men 
wo want to lead us; and it must be our worlc ai Syra 
case to bring forward, nominate, and persuade su 
men to go before us in the impending conflict, and to 
follow them through the varying tides of battle to 
final victory, which is as sure to come, as that our 
principles are right; and us is no true man who re- 
fuses the leadership solemnly tendered him by such a 
body of men as we expect to see at Syracuse in June 
next. We have been sailing along the coasts of De 
clsion and Political Action long enough 
and burn our ships behind us, unfurl our banner to the 
breeze, and push into the fight, trusting in God for 
the result. There are enough among us whom every 
true Anti-mason would follow. But the above in letter 
or in spirit, is my answer to •' What shall wh do at 
Syracuse 3 " 



cup of the Lord and tlie cup of devils. Ye cannot be 
partakers of the Lord's tabh and of the table of dev- 
ils (1 Cor. X. 20 and 21). 

l3 Uncle Sam a Freeia.'ison? 



Aa Alioaiinable Trinity. 



BY H, H. HINMAN. 

"But I say, that the things that the Gentiles sacrifice, 
they sacrifice to devils, and not to God : and I would not 
that ye should have fellowship with devils." — I Cor. x. 20. 

In the legend of the foundation ptone as given by 
Sickels and other Masonic authorities, God is repre- 
sented as revealing himself Masonically to Adam by 
inscribing his name on a cubical stone of white por- 
phery, which stone was hidden by Enoch in the bow- 
els of Mount Moriah, because he foresaw the flood, 
and feared that the true name of God would be lost. 
It remained thus hidden for 1,400 years, until Solo- 
mon in building the temple discovered it. This true 
name of God, which was unknown to the rest of the 
world, was the Master Mason's word and used in the 
Master Mason's lodge held in the Sanctum Sanctorum 
of the Temple. On the death of Hiram Abiff this 
word was lost; for though it was still known to Solo- 
mon and Hiram of Tyre, yet their Master's oath re- 
quired them never to speak it except in the lodge, and 
there could no longer be any lodge, as one of the three 
members composing it was dead, and hence, for the 
Master Mason lodges of the future, a new word was 
substituted. 

But that the true name of God might not be lost 
the foundation stone was placed in an arch under the 



[From the Chicago Times.] 
A number cf derricks have occupied a prominent 
plac3 on the South Side for some considerable time. 
They are supposed to iiidioate the cite of a fsture 
palace presumably the property of the public. At ali 
, j events, this government building is being erected with 
money collected from the neoplo of the United States, 
j without distincticu of religion. At all events, who 
lever owns the concern, astually or praspecUvely, it is 
i not the property of a stcret society. Nevertheless, 
j a number ef men, by accident and for a brief time, 
subordinate offieiab. of the government, have decided 
that this new custom-house and post-offiee is the 
T . , J property of a secret society of which they are mem- 
bers. In accordance with this decision, these subordi- 
nate officials hav3 e7en gose so liar ia their unwarrant- 
ed and illegal impudence as to declare that this secret 
society Ehal! take possession of this government build- 
ing oa the day on which its corner-stone is to bs 
laid, and shall hold possession, to the exclusion of all 
taxpayers who are not members of this secret society, 
and shall conduct public services there according to the 
rules of their secret sworn organizitlon, notwithstand- 
ing that these services are not, and never can be, 
authorized by lav?; notwithstinding that these servi- 
ces are excessively odious to an immense number of 
the taxpayers; notwithstanding that the presence of 
this secret society and its officers in a government 
building can never be made legal ; and notwithstand- 
ing that these services can never be rendered tolerable 
or acceptable to an immense number of tsxpayers 
who are not Freemasons. 

With the principles and purposes of Masonr}', The 
Times has no discussion. With Masonry in the ab- 
stract or the society in the concrete, this article has 
nothing to do. But that the usurpation of a govern- 
ment building by a secret society, is an outrage upon 
community, every reasonable man must admit, and 
every conscie.ntious Mason must affirm it more stren- 
uously than any other man. The society itself does 
not seek to put 6uch an insult and indignity upon the 
rest of the taxpayers. The insult and indignity are 
inflicted by the ring of subordinate government offi^jials 
who thus seek personal advancement in a powerful 
sworn organization, and thus prostitute Masonry and 
beiray the government for their own personal benefit. 
If a body of the citizens who are not members should 
take possession of the building on the appointed day, 
to the forcible exclusion of the officers of this secret 
society, as such, they would be only vidicating their 
inalienable r.ghts. The law, no less than public sen- 
timent, would sustain them. 



How only the DecUiie of the Eepublic caa be Pi"c- 
veiitcd. 

The next century will show us e^ocial changes mate- 
rial, in my opiaien. Great changes in tho relations of 
capital aad labor; great changes m the position of wo- 
man; changes in the nature of government, in the 
relations of church and state — these are the promin- 
ent fscts of the next one hundred years. If they 
come, well. If they do not come, th.».t boy is born, to- 
day, who, like Gibbon, when he wrote the ''Decline 
and Fiill of the Roman Empire," — that boy is born, 
lo-day, who will write the decline a^'^d fail of ttie Amer- 
ican Republic. Because to any thoughtful man it is 
evident that the grasp of associated wealth in an age 
when tho sin of not being rich is only atoned for by 
the effort to become so; the grasp of absociated wealth, 
of bank and railroad and manufacturer on Legislative 
independence, on the possibility of individual icdepend- 
anee, is bo rigid and despotic and inevitable that, un- 
less we evade it by some great social changes, it will not 
be possible for this republic to survive. We see a 
power infinicely grander tbaa that of the feudal barons 
of three hundred years ago, infinitely more irreeisuble 
than that. 

To-d.*y, Mr. Gladstone said, apeaking of Ihechujcb, 
— tho difieatablishaisnt of the English Church: "We 
cannot trust the church beyond the clasp of the Gav- 
ernment's hacd; as a rival power -?;ie.ldir,g Z9O,0OO,- 
000 sterling, it is too grave a charge to the Brit'.sh 
Government." Ninety million pounds — §450,000,- 
000 — loo grave a charge for the British Goverriment, 
three times as sirorig r,s ours; and yet one man, the 
head of the Pennsylvania Ru'road — Mr. Scoll — wields 
§459,000,000, and the very Fweep of his garmQiits as 
he marches east fiom San Fraiicisco to Philadelphia is 
laore than syffioient to6?feep down legislaturea as he 
goes. 

I look for no safety hero except in greit fecial 
ch-angea. i believe that the day is gone by in this 
country when you can get hall' a man's power out 
of him on a system of wages; ii was possible two hun- 
dred years ago. Ignorant, short sighted, narrow 
viewed, the dependeiit ia,bonng class accepted tho 
best they bad offered ibem, and lived from day to day 
and hardly oveilooked the margin of another week ; 
they were contented with the system. But intelli- 
gence, education, responsibdity, the ballot, -h share in 
the GoYernment, has diopcUed all ihat content, and 
unless we have co-cperalioa, unless we have labor 
taken iiito a great cc-partnsisLip with c^.pitsl, labor 
will tear c&pital to pieces. That is in the future. — 
Boston Journal 



A Lutheriia Testhuony. 



In a journal of proceedings the Lutheran Standard 
publishes the following article of the constitution, and 
remark? upon the same, .^>dop;ed by the Free En- 
glish Lutheran GoRference, Webster Co , Mo; — 

Art. VII. — No one shall b3 received into coniiec- 
lioa with thia Confere.nce, unless ho have previously 
furnished due evidence of his occupyisg a souud posi- 
iton in regard to dccirine find cf hi.5 leading a Chris- 
tian life. — No pastor shall be adiriiited who is a 
member of a secret eociefy. 

Memo^rks: — This article ;a drawn up to warn against 
the dtiEger of receiving any miui;Uer into office, 
who i3 a member of secret sccietieB. It i.s required ot 
pastors to lead a Christian life; but no Cbrisliin can 
lead a strict'y Chri:-ti?.n life, if he is a member of a 
secret society, according to the saying of our Lord, 
John 3. 20: "For every o.ie that doeth evil hateth 
the light, neither cometh to the light, lest his deeds 
should be reproved." St. Paul says, 1 Tim. iil. 2. 
"A bishop then must be blameless. The husband of 
one Vidie." He must be blameless in all things 
which he has to reprove in his congregation?. '"The 
husband of one wife" is expressly mention.ed on ac- 
count cf tho heathens being polygamists: a minister 
has to reprove this, and therefore he should not 
nave been a polygamist himself in former days. 
Ignorance mr=y exist about any sin prevaiiicg amcing 
Cbrlstiaus, but it is not therefore excu5.^ble in a 
minister; he should be well posted ia every ihing per- 
taiaing to Christianity and hia office. Secret societies 
are excluding Christ, whilst every Christian should 
"do all things in the name of Jesus Christ;" be- 
longing to a secret society, therefore, implies a de- 
gree of denying Christ, and being "unequally yoked 
together with uiablievers." Their se-caiied good works 
are not really good work.?, as they do not orig- 
inate in faith: they are but works of 5elfi.9hneps. 
They want members to assist them in their own af- 
fairs, and not to a'd the needy and poor. Therefore 
oiicy lead back to heathenism although they profess 
Christian works of love and charity. 



4 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 






The National Christian Association op- 
posed to !;ecret societits, Sixth anniveraa- 
ryin Siiakspoixrc Hall, Syracuse, N. Y., 
.JuDe2— 4, 1874. 



Action of liio Execnlive Committee of 
tlie Indiana State Association . 



%i^m 



mm. 



Plpjdges mads: at Monmouth should be 
paid without delay. Those interested will 
please notice and save being notified more 
particularly. 



T!ie Pcliiiiou on the Corner-Stone. 



(To every Rubscji'.ver and readerof the 
Cynosure wSio belongs t> the United 
Stales: — Cut this petition out at once, 
Pfisto it o'l paper. Get all ihe names 
you can, and the last week in May, 
send to Ri--, L, N. Stralto?), Syracuse, 
N. Y, wfaete our Conventioa meets 
June 2d. We will send them to 
Washington in msss. 

Sub Committee.) 

To Hi3 ExcsLLENcy U. S. Grant, 
President of the Ukited States: — 

The undpr^igried citiz'.'DS respectfully 
ask your Excellency to prevent the lay- 
ing of the corner stone of the United 
States Custom Ilou-.e, Chicago, by the 
Maso.iic Fraternity, as set for June 
24th next; on the ground'. 

1st. Ti-at no ^ect or "order," secret 
or open, bbould use the property of the 
whole peopio for its particular display 
or aggr'jndizement; 

2c'. That. 6in;huse of public buildings 
■has CG color of jast'fioation in the Con- 
Etitutioii or in the lawp, and 

3d. That the Ma.ioni'i order is obacx- 
'o;j'3 to inMltitudes. 



At an adjourned meeting of the Com- 
mittee held at Westfield, Hamilton 
coutsty, April Mth, Rev. W. M. G;v- 
ens was appointed associate Scate 
Agent and Lecturer, to solicit funds 
for the Association and to respond to 
calls for lectures, so far as means may 
be provided for that purpose. Rev. J. 
T. Kiggics was appointed to represent 
the State Association in the approach- 
ing National Convention. 

The Committee would make an earn- 
est appeal to the friends of the cause for 
j. means to render efficient these appoint- 
ments, and secure a thorough canvass 
of the State. L-3t means be at once 
iorwarded to the treasurer, Peter Rich, 
at Westfield, ITamilton cauaty, Ind. 
Especially let those who have pledges 
unpaid forward the same in whole or 
in part, without delay. If our dele- 
gate is to go to the National Conven- 
tion there is need of immediate actioa 
in this matter. 

By order of the Committee. 

11. C. West, Vice-Fres. 



Deio'gates' Certificates. 

We have 427 subscribers in the State 
of New York. We hope to see at least 
half of them at the Syracuse Conven- 
tion. If you r^jake up your mind to 
go, which the sooner you do the better, 
please state that fact to j'cur church, 
your prayer fl3eetiag, or at a meeting of 
your ne'ghbois called to;;;ether for that 
purpose and tell tlsem thai if they 
choose to appoint you a delegate you 
will re|>ort the proceedings of the Con- 
vention on your return. We have blank 
c ,'rt ticcites Ihaii-v/silf^iil for'.ir?.rd t^ acy 
u.'ie wsiting f>r them. Do not fear that 
any locality wiil be too fully represented. 

These reinarks wo hope will be con- 
Bidered and acted upon by friends in 
other S.ates aj well ;is those in New 
York. 



Lecture List. 



General Agent and Lecturer, J. P.Stod- 
DAKD, Christian Cynosure Office, Chicago. 
^. State Lecturer for Indiana, J. T.Kiggins, 
005 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

State Lecturer forliliuois H. H. Hiunian, 
F.irm Kidge, LaSalle Co., 111. 

State Lecturer for Ohio, D. Caldwell, 
Carey, O. 

State Lecturer for New York, J. L. Bar- 
low, Bemus Heights, Saratoga Co., N. Y. 

I. A. Hart, Wheaton, 111. 

0. A. Blauchard, Wheaton, 111. 

P. Ekea, Wheatou, 111. 

V/. A. Walkcc, Senecaville, O. 

.T. B. I'fesseli, Ellington, N. Y. 

.Tohu Levington, Detroit, Mich. 

D. P. Rathbun, Odessa, N. Y. 

B. Smith, Cli3,rles City, Iowa. 
R. B. Taylor, Summerfieid, O. 
L. N. Stratton, Syracuse, K. Y, 
N. Calleuder, Green Grove, Pa. 
J.- H. Timmons, Tarentum, Pa. 
Linus Oliittcnden, Crystal Lake, 1)1. 
P. Hurless, Polo, 111. 

J. K. Baird, Greenville, Pa. 

T. B. McCormick, Princeton , Ind. 

C. Wigsino, Ar>gola,Ind. 
S. Johnson, Bourbon, Ind. 

Jo.3iah McCaskey, Paucv Creek, Wis. 
O. F. llawley, Seneca Falls N. Y. 
Wm. 31. Givens, Center Point, Clay Co., 
Ind. 
J. L. Andrus, Mt. Vision, N. Y. 
J. M. Bishop, Chambersburg, Pa. 



The Chatiuqup, County Association, 
opposed to Secret Societies, wiil hold 
its fifth anniversary on tae tirst day of 
June at Haaover Centre, commencin;^ 
at 10 o'clock A. M. Rev. John Lev- 
ington, of Detroit, Mich. , and other able 
speakers, will be in attendance. En- 
tertainment for all that come, and all 
are respectfully invited. 

J. B. Nessell, Sec'y. 



THE NATIONAL CHEJSTIAN ASSO- 
CIATION, 

OPPOSED TO SECRET SOCIETIES. 

President — J. G. Carson, Xeuia, O. 

Vice-Presidents — R. B. Taylor, of Ohio ; 
Aaron Floyd, of Pensylvania; Luke 
Thomas, of Ind; Pres. D. A. Wallace, of 
Illinois; George Brokaw, of Iowa; N. E. 
Gardner, of Missouri ; N. B. Blanton, of 
Kansas; Donald Kirkpatrick, of New 
York; .J. W. Wood, of Wiaeonsin; John 
Levington, of Micbia;an. 

Corresponding Secretary— L A. Hart, 
Wheaton, 111. 

Recording Secretaries — H. L. Kellogg, 
G. L. Arnold. 

Treasurer — H. L. Kellogg, 11 Wabash 
Ave., Chicago. 

Executive Committee — J. Blanchard, 
P. Carpenter, I. A. Hart, George Dietrich, 
J. M. Snyder, O. F. Lumry, Isaac Preston, 
C. R. Hagerty, J. M. Wallace, E. A. Cook, 
J. G. Terrill, A. Wait, H. L. Kellogg. 

The objects of this Association are to 
expose, withstand and remove secret soci- 
eties and other like anti-Christian organi- 
zations from church and state. 

The Association originated in a meeting 
held Oct. 30th, 1867, in the City Hall of 
Aurora, 111., attended by persons opposed 
to secret societies, where a committee was 
appointed to make the necessary arrange- 
ments for a National Convention. This 
was held in Pittsburgh, May 5th-7th, 
1868, when the National Association was or 
ganized. Its subsequent meetings have been 
held : Chicago, .lune Bth-lOth, 1869 ; Cin- 
cinnati, June 'Jth-llth, 1870 ; Worcester, 
Mass., June 7th-9tb, 1871 ; Oberlin, Ohio, 
May 21st-23d, 1872 ; Monmouth, Bl., 
May 14th-16th, 1873. Its presiding offi- 
cers have been in order : Bishop D. Ed- 
wards, Prof. J. C. Webster Judge F. D. 
Parish, Gen. J. W. Phelps, Pres. J. 
Blanchard. 

The Association employs a General 
Agent and Lecturer, and has secured 
State lecturers for Indiana, Ohio and Illi- 
nois, whose names appear in the list of 
lecturers. The support of the Association 
is entirely voluntary. Funds are greatly 
needed to carry on the work already be- 
gun, and contributions are hereby solicited 
from eyery friend of the reform. Send 
by post-office order, registered letter or 
draft to the Treasurer, 11 Wabash Ave., 
Chicago. 



—The General Agent. J. P. Stoddard, 
is to be at Spartansburgh, Pa., this week. 

— The citizens of Noble countj', Ind., 
met at Albion on the 23d to hold an Anti- 
secret convention and nominate county 
officers. 

— The friends in Illinois may address 
Rev. H. H. Hinman at Farm Ridge, 
LaSalle county, for lectures. He was 
obliged to remove to this state to be with 
aged parents, and his transfer of fields has 
been approved by the Executive Commit- 
tee. 

— The State meeting in Ohio being now 
fairly under way, let every man do his 
part to make it a meeting in every way 
worthy the state and the cause. 

— The approval of Bro. Givens to as- 
sist in Indiana is welcome news. He is a 
seceder and can meet many special ap- 
plications. The call from the State Ex. 
Committee should be heeded by all the 
workers in Indiana. 

—The grange is having a dolorous exis- 
tence in Rock countv, Wis. The same 
energy in every county of Wisconsin 
Would make it a leading Anti-masonic 
State. A counterpart to the advertise- 
ment will be seen in the notes on the ninth 
page. 

■» « » 

Lecture in Berea, O.j 1>y the General 
Agent. 

Berea, 0., April 25, '74. 
Editor Christian Cynosure: — Rev. J. 
P. Stoddard, lecturer and agent ot the 
Association opposed to secret societies, 
spoke in this place last evening. There 
were many present, who, like the 
writer, do not fully sympathize with 
the views of the Association, But it is 
fair and just to say that Mr. Stoddard 
i made a very interesting speech. His 
manner was conciliatory, his arguments 
candid, and if not always convincing, 
they left the hearers in good humor 
and with many suggested thoughts. 
He very carefully avoided bigotry of 
statement, and fully recognized the 
right of every man to to think for him- 
self. 

Various secret fraternities are largely 
represented in Beraa, and the eubject 
is one of general interest. However 
various the people's views, Mr. Stod- 
dard would undoubtedly have a large 
hearing should he make a second visit 

to this place. Brief. 

1 o ■ 

Anti-masonic Political Action. 



IN KOCK COUNTY , WISCONSIN. 



FooTviLLE, Wis., Apr 1 14, 1874. 
We have just gained a victory over 
secrecy in our town election. The Ma- 
sons and grangers worked together; 
but we elected our officers in every 
instance but one. One of our super- 
visors beat the "Most Worshipful Ma?- 
ter" of the Footville Blue Lodge ol 
Masons; he lacked but one vote of 
having two votes to the Mason's one. 
How strange ! an Anti-mason was elec- 
ted ; is the world coming to an end ? 
No, but oath-bound iniquity is com- 
ing to the light. This is the strongest 
grange town in the ccuuty, and the 
grange and Mason ticket was beaten. 
One of the inspectors of election (an 
eaercetic Mason and treasurer of the 
State Grange) was so indignant that 
he went home without s'gning the 
election report, and now he says the 
rabble beat them. 

Last November, the cry among 



grangers in this State was, Hurrah for 
a reform govefnor; we are going to 
reform church, state, railroads and 
agriculture. It would seem that this 
party was stcond to nothing but the 
Supreme Being in power for doing 
good. But what did they do? They 
elected Taylor for governor, a man 
pledged to whiskey rings and railroad 
rings. This man was a blind-folded, 
block-stumbling, elevated granger. H^ 
has given immense tracts of land to 
railroad companies, and he has re- 
pealed the Graham liquor law, or aided 
to. How proud I am to know what a 
protection our noble Governor is to the 
State. (''Yes, such protection as the 
wolf gives to the lamb.") 

But the grangers are having some 
trouble. Two grange stores in this State 
have suspended; liabilities, one $20,- 
000, the other 813,000, and others will 
follow. One man in this county joined 
the grange, took one degree and left 
the noble, elevating institution; he 
says they blind-folded him, led him 
over blocks and pinched his legs twice. 
He paid for four degrees and took one , 
he now advertises ia the country pa- 
per the following: 

' 'For Sale : — Three degrees of the 
grange at grange prices, or will trade 
tor an old Clow reaper. Any one who 
purchases these degrees, I will make a 
present of the first degree as I received 
it in Harmony Grange, No. 76." 

We have learned that the pass-word 
for this year is Adam, and we soon ex- 
pect to hear that Adam and Eve were 
grangers, and that it is the moat an- 
cient and honorable institution in the 
world. Oae of my neighbors joined 
the grange, (they are all pledged to 
trade at thegrange store,) went to their 
cheap store and purchased tea and cof- 
fee ; but when he used the articles, he 
found the tea damaged, and the coflfee 
not a good article. Another granger 
in this county purchased a bill of 
goods amounting to twenty-three dol- 
lar?. He went to auother store and 
found . he could get just the same 
amount for twenty dollars. This cut 
him up some, but he went home and 
commenced using the articles, but to 
hia surprise he found the tea was dam- 
aged and the other articles very inferi-' 
or, and this cut him down some. The 
next night "the grange met he went 
and cut himself loose frfm the money- 
fcaving (ahaving) institution, I was 
talking with a very promiaent granger 
B short time since , and we figured up 
what the institution had cost in this 
town; and he admitted that it had cost 
more than all their agricultural im- 
plements for the Fnme time. 
Come all wlio wish to l)e elevated, 
Come, join thegrange and be elated, 
.Stumble over blocks, eprain ankle or knee ; 
Come one, come all, say Adam, and drink dam- 
aged tea. 

W. C. Stsyenb. 



Those who have canvassed for the 
Cynosure in the past and who are still 
in this good work are greatly encour- 
aged by its enlargement. Many who 
had previously refused to subscribe, 
are now easily induced to take the 
large paper. Let all who have not 
tried to get subscribers for the sixteen 
page paper try now. Fifty cents payg 
for the paper three months, and the 
report of the Syracuse Convention is 
alone worth that 



1 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



IN MONROE COUNTY, MIOH. 

Bedford, Mich., April 9, 1874, 
Dear Cynosure: — Your readers will 
doubtless recollect that last spricg 
we elected every candidate on our 
Anti-masonic ticket, the least majority 
being over sixty, and the highest over 
100 vote3. 

Thia winter Bro. Stoddard visited 
us by request and lectured three times, 
and preached twice. This spring we 
posted notices for a caucus and nomi- 
nated a ticket, placing at its head, 
"Anti secrecy Ticket." Out of 218 
votes cast, one ol the highest officers re- 
ceived 205 and another 209 votes. The 
least majority was between sixty and 
seventy, every man on the ticket 
being elected. The opposition was 
very scattering, and seems to have 
been a weak effort by the Majonic 
sympathizers. Although Masons 

have heretofore held the most im- 
portant offices in the township, I think 
there wa^ but one that run for any 
office, and that was for constable. 

There is a lodge in this town said to 
contain seventy members; how many 
reside within the town I have no means 
of knowing. Truly, Masonry must be 
an image or a myth, for when we 
souaht to smite it, it was nowhere to 
be found. 

Some said they wished to vote our 
ticket, but could not vote its title, so 
they cut off its head and voted for our 
men, others denying that there was 
any issue against secrecy. Others 
charged us with holding a secret cau- 
cus to nominate an Anti-secret ticket. 
One Masonic justice of the peace, whose 
term of office expired this spring, has 
been appointed notary public, and 
yielded up his office without an effort. 
So long as Masons ar3 educated in our 
township offices and thereby held up 
to public view will they be sent to the 
Legislature to make our laws and grant 
Masonic charters. 

James S, Hitchcock. 



IN m'henry county, ill. 

Nunda, III, April 13, 1874. 
Dear Sir: — I wish to say to you that 
we run an Anti-masonic ticket at our 
town meeting, and were beaten, but 
gave them a big scare. The other was 
called the People's ticket, had majori- 
ties from twenty to fifty in a vote of 
270. So we made good show for the 
first time. Yours respectfully, 

J. McMillan. 



€^i;w$|j^^«4«Jttf4> 



How to Deal with Them. 



Brattleboro, Vt. 
Editors Cynosure: 

The great majority of the people of our 
village are opposed to liquor drinking, 
and have kept temperance meetings go- 
ing very assiduously. One of the edit- 
ors of the village papers used to take a 
prominent part in these proceedings, 
and at the same time turn a penny by 
advertising liquor for sale in his paper. 
At last he was told by one of the prin- 
cipal men of the village that he musij 
stop bis liquor advertisements ; and he 
did. 

Now, Mr. Editor, I think that we 



Anti-masons ought to take the same 
course with newspapers that advertise 
the lodge by publishing its stupid pro- 
ceedings. We ought to refuse to take 
such papers ; for the lodge, in my opin- 
ion, is more demoralizing than the grog- 
shops. If we sustain papers that sus- 
tain the lodge, we thereby sustain the 
lodge itself. 

I have one friend who has dropped 
his religious paper that he had taken 
for years, because it would not publish 
Anti-masonic articles, choosing to go 
with the worldly crowd, fearing Masonry 
more than it did Anti-masonry. And 
I have another friend who will not com- 
mune with the workers of darkness, but 
has come out from among them. This 
js the kind of courage and decision tha- 
we need if we would reform a corrupt 
church. This is preaching the gospel 
as I understand it. Alpha. 



The Tract Work. 



Our friend, Mr. Honeywell, who 
publishes and distributes thousands of 
copies of the tract, entitled "Address 
of the Young Men of America, at his 
private expense, suggests that the 
friends of the tract work so far ai prac- 
ticable, consult together, and have 
his tract, entitled Address to the Young 
Men of America or another one prepar- 
ed, read, amended if desired, adopted 
at the Syracuse Convention. Then 
raise the money for publishing 200,- 
000 of these leaflets. 

"When our youths' know to a pos- 
dve certainty that lodge victims are 
held by euch murderous penalties as 
ex-Masons report, they then can be no 
more coaxed into lodges than they 

could be into a kennel of rattlesnakes, 
by a gentlemanly assurance that rattle- 
sakes never bite. 

The destruction of slavery cost us 
immense sacrifices. Masonry I hope will 
cost us less. We shall not sacrifice 
more in keeping the feet of our sons 
out of snares, than Christ did in tak- 
ing ours out." 



Coming to the Light. 

The once hidden things of darkness 
are being revealed, and men no longer 
need go into captivity for want of 
knowledge. Since leaving Chicago, I 
have conversed with two Odd-fellows, 
who have taken the encampment and 
lodge degress, and one of whom had 
been "High Priest." Both confirm 
"Bernard's Expose," and one of them 
says it was used as a book of instruc- 
tion in his lodge. 

He related an instance which sets 
the perfidy of some members of this 
order in its true light. A certain 
M. D. wishing to secure the aid of the 
order before going to a western town, 
was received and passed through the 
degrees so rapidly that he did not have 
time to learn them thoroughly. My 
informant said that he furnished the 
Noble Grand with a copy of Bernard, 
who presented it to the doctor with 
the assuran-e that it would enable him 
to master the work of the craft. If 
this was intended as a kindness by the 
N. G, , it was certainly an insult to the 
Dr. It was virtually saying, "You 



have been swindled and deceived, for 
you could have bought for a few shil!- 
ings what has cost you the price of 
your initiation, and your manhood and 
liberty. Yet, if we may judge this 
N. G. by hundreds of adhering mem- 
bers of the order, he would have 
loudly affirmed, had the Dr. asked him 
as to the correctness of Bernard, be- 
fore joining, ''It's all a lie." 

Such is the hypocrisy and deceit 
which lurks in these secret conclaves, 
but which, thank God, is "coming to 
the light." J. P. Stoddard. 

April 14, '74. 



Lodge Charity. 



Some three years ago, an employee 
on the Flint and Pere Marquette railroad 
who was a Mason, accidently got killed 
by the cars, and v/as buried, I be- 
lieve, according to the ritual of the or- 
der. Since that occurence, while in 
conversation with Masons and their 
supporters in regard to Masonic charity 
and benevolence, I have often been told 
by them, that the Masons not only bore 
the expenses of the funeral, but also 
paid up and lifted a mortgage of some 
four hundred dollars which at the 
time of his death encumbered his house 
and lot in the city of Flint, and freely 
bestowed ihis munificence on the widow 
and children of the deceased. 

Now, for some two years past, I 
believe this Masonic story was, per- 
haps, a fact; but you can easily realize 
my astonishment when I found that 
the same mortgage had not been 
paid, but was actually closed, and sold 
according to law, at the court house in 
Flint on the 12th day of March, last. 

Respectfully yours, A. Oldpield. 



OUlt MAIL. 



D. J. HarriP, York Centre, O., writes: 
"I am still trying to increase the circu- 
lation of the Cynosure, but find it to 
be rather slow work; vet, thank God, 
it is a good work. Several say they 
want the paper but have not the means 
to spare at this time (do not torget 
these but call on them hereafter). Oth- 
ers say that they will subscribe as soon 
as their time of subscfipuon expires on 
some other paper they now take. Bro, 
J, R. Baird, of Pennsylvania, lectured 
in the United Brethren church of thia 
place last fall with great ability. The 
result was, many got to thinking and 
some who had intended to join the 
Masons went home from the lecture 
spying that they had had enough of 
Masonry." 

Joseph Warden, Waverly, Iowa, 
writes : 

"My motto is -onward and upward.'" 
P. Fahrney, Dale City, Pa., writes: 
"I have suffered much since I came 
here on account of my anti-secret pro- 
clivities. I have circulated tracts and 
papers but not until the present time 
was I enabled to get a few subscribers. 
The people are timid but the prospects 
are brightened." 

An old veteran in the Anti-masonic 
warfare says that Masons are very 
brave on parade days but are good for 
nothing in a stand-up fight. Persevere 
and press on the battle. 

Joseph Keel, Bolivar, 0., writes of 
the Cynosure and Free Press: 

" I believe in the fear of God, and 
under his divine guidance they are un- 
covering the dark sinks of iniquity, 



that the people, if they will, may look 
in and see for themselves the corruo- 
lions in this age of the world." 

A. N. Hudson, L:wel!, Mich: 

'•I took my p«per with rne lo my 
appointment yesterday and the result 
was two three-months Eubscribers and 
the promise ci two more in ir^o wetks 
when I go again. I shall try it again 
next Sabbath at my other appointment 
and keep trying as long as there is any 
hope of success," 

Where there'd a will thervs's a way. 
We cannot but be encouraged to work 
on when we have such earnest, faithful 
agents working for the paper. Here is 
another. 

D. S, McConihay, Lewiston, W, Va, , 
writes : 

"Being employed on a farm I have 
but little time except wet days and 
Sundays ." 

He sends a club of ten three-months 
subscribers, saying : 

"I think I will try to raise another, 
and may get one of twenty next time." 

J. W. Lewis, Grand Detour, 111., 
writes : 

''I like the appearance of the new 
paper much, and will do what I can (o 
increase its circulation, praying that it 
may prove a power in destroying the 
powers of darkness," 

Sarah A Proctor, New Rutland, 111., 
writes: 

'■I thought I would get a few three- 
months subscriberp, (ten names are en- 
closed) hoping thereby to get people'u 
minds aroused for investigation on the 
subject of secret societies and the evil 
they have done and are still doing. 1 
hope at the end of three months they 
all will renew their subscriptions, or 
some at least." 

Will not all who have obtained three- 
months subscribers keep a list of them 
and during the last part of June make 
an effort to call upon them and obtain 
their renewals? UdIobs some friend 
does this work we may lose many sub- 
scribers that a timely personal request 
to continue might save to the paper 
and to the cause. 

Peter Woodring, . Waverly, Iowa, 
writes : 

"I will send you one of our county 
papers in which you will gee a notice 
of our anniversary meeting and my 
advertisement of the Cynosure. I be- 
lieve in bringing the paper to the notice 
of the people even at my expense." 

We have received two papers from 
Dover, N. J., advertising the Cynosure, 
announcing J. W. Searing as agent, 
who will receive subicriptions. Such 
movements showing a business like de- 
terminsttion to do something greatly 
encourage us. 

Rev. L. N. StraltoD, Syracuse, N. Y., 
writes : 

"Nothing could you have done at 
the Cynosure office lo make its friends 
and foes alike behold and wonder at its 
prosperity and increasing power, than 
by securing its enlargement. Thanks 
both to you and the dear Lord." 

We thank our dear brother of the 
American Wesleyan office for hia cord- 
ial, generous-hearted words. Like 
some others of our warmest friends he 
seems to mistake the meaning of the 
enlargement of the Cynosure. It 
means , we ought to have a list of ten 
thousand or more subscribers. On 
April 17th there were by actual count 
3,886, and Bro. Stratton will endorse 



6 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



!' 



the statement that this must bs doubled 
before we have a paying list. 

In enlarginor the paper the publishers 
endeavored to show their faith in the 
importarice and sure success of ihe 
anti-secrecy reform by their MarTcs. 
And every day strengthens our convic- 
tion that the friends of reform will 
show their faith by working to increase 
its circulation. 

J, A. Richards, Aurora, 111., writes: 

*'I went to LHlle Prairie and worked 
two hours last evening and secured five 
subscribers for the Cynoswie. I might 
have got mora, but I was forced to 
leave early this morning for this place. 
• • • I am in earnest in this great 
work." 

J. A. Gibson, Browaington, Vt. , 
writes : 

"I am pleased with the Cynosure 
and feel the importance of the work in 
which it ia engaged. • • • If I 
have it weekly (it was sent fortnightly) 
I hope to do more good with it." 

T. Kingsnorth, Leroy, Mich,, sends 
five subscriptions and says be recently 
sent ten dollars for a Life Membership. 
Ws hope for many more such Life 
Members of our Association. 

J. L, Manley, Geneva, Ind., writes: 

"Send the Cynosure. I cannot do 
without it as long as I can get money 
to pay three months subscription I will 
send u, 

A determination to stand by an im- 
portant movement when it costs some- 
thing is what, with the blessing of 
God, brings success. 

A, C. Read, Albion, 0., writes: 

•'The Lord bless the whole family of 
the Cynosure readers and increase its 
members a hundredfold." 

In ordering tracts hs says : 

' 'I want those that will be best for 
the interest of the cause in which we 
labor, which is the downfall of Satan's 
empire on earth, and the upbuilding of 
Christ's glorious kingdom here." 

He sends three new subscriptions. 
His health is improving very slowly. 
He has been confiaed to the house by 
sickness for sixteen weeks. 

Eev. L. D. Felt, Markesan, Green 
Lake Co., Wis,, -writes: 

" I hope to be able to send you some 
new subscribers before long. Will do 
all I can to advance the interests of 
your valuable paper. Wish all our 
ministers had a copy." 

Henry Mohler, Covington, O., of the 
German Baptist church, writes: 

"Our church don't allow any secret 
society members to belong to it, under 
our constitution." 

N. B. Blanton, Coffey ville, Kan., 
writes : 

• 'You may pconsider me a life sub- 
scriber for the Cynosure. • • • It 
seems from ray standpoint that St, 
Louis would be the best point for the 
Convention next year." 

What do our Missouri friends think 
about it ? 

T. B. McCormick, Princeton, Ind. , 
writes : 

"I have lectured five times at Dale, 
Spinar county, where we organized a 
county association, of which you will 
hear from the secretary ; and I lectured 
once in Folsomville, Marriot county, 
and T think good was accomplished. 
The ball is moving but I am alone in 
this part of the Stale as a lecturer. 
• • Help will come when God sees 
best. I had to commence the war 
against slavery here in 1854 and al- 
though it resulted in my being an exile 
for nine years from my home I do not 
God is always for the right." 



fmlg %mt% %p. 



regret it. 



The Vigilant Maintenance of Princi- 
ple must Preserve our Liberties. 

SOLOMON BO0THWICK, 1828. 

Those writers, or these orators, who, 
losing sight of the frailty and turpitude 
of human nature, do little else but glut 
our ears with their glowing pictures 
and loud praises of our freedom and 
prosperity; who talk of such fictions 
as Cincinnatus, intent only on his pot- 
tage and his plow, after enjoying the 
honors of the country; and while they 
depict George III. as a tyrant in the 
fervid periods of the Declaration of In- 
dependence, forget entirely that he was 
not the first tyrant and will not be the 
last by thousands, to scourge a long- 
suff')ring and patient people with the 
rod of oppression. 

Such writers and orators are the 
bane and the curse of our country. 
They lead us into a wrong estimate of 
the world, and ourselves ; they lull us 
into a fals3 security, they inspire us 
with a false confidence. They lead us 
to believe, contrary to the experience 
of all age?, that liberty once achieved, 
is in no danger of being lost, and that 
instead of eternal vigilance, which all 
true history proclaims as being essen- 
tial to her preservation, we have only 
to chant her praises in anniversary 
strains, and to pour into the ears of the 
people on every return of this jubilee 
the most romantic fictions and the 
most fulsome flattery; to make divine 
gods of Roman and Grecian demigogues 
and angels of their followers; and, by a 
natural flattering association of ideas , 
liken every popular American, whether 
a civil or military chieftain, and every 
private American citizen to these imag- 
inary historical gods and angels of an- 
tiquity. These Cincinnatii feeding on 
turnips fur the good of their country 
and the Decii plunging themselves into 
bottomless pits for the same godlike 
purpose. 

Fellow citizens, these are the illus- 
ions of young aud ardent minds, the 
fictions of heated imaginations, the ro- 
mances of history beautiful and sub- 
lime, but poetical and visionary. It is 
not by contemplating such pictures that 
we are able to preserve the precious 
inheritance won by the blood of our 
fctthers, but it is by vigilance, eternal 
vigilance al ne, that that choice boon 
of heaven is to be preserved. It is not 
by railing at George III. in his grave, 
and flittering our progenitors and our- 
selves that we are to remain free; but 
it must be by preserving the sovereign- 
ty in our own hands, by diffusing and 
perpetuating the blessings of education, 
by cherishing in our own mindii and 
impressing upon the minds of our own 
children the value of piety and relig- 
ion, as well as that of morality and pa- 
triotism, and by watching with a jeal- 
ous eye in all their steps, and curbing 
by all possible restraints the public 
functionaries from the highest to the 
lowest, to whom we delegate either di- 
rectly or indirectly the powers pre- 
scribed by our constitution. 

The profound Machiavel has said 
that a free government la order to 



maintain itself free, hath need every 
day of some new provision in favor of 
liberty. This is as true as though it 
had been the voice of Moses or Christ, 
or any one of the prophets or apostles ; 
and yet how far have we as a people 
been from acting up to it! If we 
could not every day have improved our 
condition, have we eiezed upon every 
opportunity in which we could have 
done it ? We have in fact reversed the 
admonition in practice; and instead of 
making every day some new provision 
in favor of liberty, we have almost every 
day ad led some new link to the chain 
of slavery. We have forgotten too 
much of what is real in the history of 
human affairs, and remembered too 
much of what is romantic. . . It is 
time then to change our course; to 
look at the dark as well as the bright 
side of men and things; to survey the 
spots on the sun as well as to bask in 
the genial warmth of his beams. 
It ia time to recur to first principles; 
to trust implicitly to no man's profes- 
sions ; but make his moral and political 
conduct the standard of our respect and 
confidence. It is high time to determ- 
ine, that we will not vote for any man, 
who does not come forward and pledge 
himself on paper, in the presence of 
God and his country, to the course he 
will pursue, if elected, — For myself I 
shall not hereafter vote for any man, 
who will not, if a Freemason, openly 
renounce and denounce the Masonic in- 
stitution : nor will I vote for any man 
as a legislator, unless perfectly satis6ed 
that, if elected, he will use his utmost 
endeavors to procure an amendment to 
the constitution, to exclude not only 
Freemasons, but the members of all 
secret societies, from the jury box, and 
from all official honors and emolu- 
ments. 

It will not be sufficient for me — how- 
ever it may be for others — for any man 
to say that he is not a Mason ; or if a 
Mason, that he has not attended a 
lodge for some years past, and such 
like apologies : but he must come out 
openly, boldly, and without reserve, 
and proclaim himself a decided, inflexi- 
ble and zealous Anti-mason, or he shall 
not have my vote : for what I have 
done myself, and have thought myself 
bound by my duty to God and my 
country, to do, I have a perfect right 
to exact from others before I yield them 
my confidence and my vote. I shall 
act upon the principle, that he who has 
not tlie moral courage to take an open, 
bold and manly stand, in a righteous 
cwse — a cause in which the salvation 
of his country demands his service — 
is wholly unworthy the support of free- 
men; and for one freeman I shall 
withhold my support from all such time- 
servers, trimmers and intriguers : and I 
hope and trust in God that every sin- 
cere and honest Anti-mason in the State 
will resolve to act the same part. We 
must effectually destroy the hydra- 
headed monster — Masonry — or all that 
we have done, or may do, short of that 
mark, will be in vain. All other public 
questions vanish into utter insignifi- 
cance, when compared with this. In 
this cause, then, let the fine be drawn — 
let it be fairly understood, that he who 
is not for us is against us : for until this 
great work be consummated, oar coun- 
try is not free — and our beloved and 
venerated fathers have spilt their blood 
not to disenthral, but to enslave their 
posterity I Let the line, then, be 
drawn, I repeat it; and let us toe the 
mark — resolved, as men who know our 
rights, and dare defend them, to stand 
or fall on the glorious and imperishable 
basis of truth andliberty. 



W iM^i\ ^ik^ifl 



Schedule of Bible Lessons for Second 
quarter, 1874. 

Apr. 6th, Ex. ix. 1-17 — The Ten Commands. 

" 12 " xxxil. 1-6, 19, 20: Golden Calf. 

" 19 " xxxiil. 12-20: People Forgiven.. 

" 25 " xl. 17-30: Tabernacle set up. 
May 3 Lev. vii. 37, 38: The Five Offeriugg. 

" 10 " xxii 4-6, 15-21, 33-3G: The Three 
Great Feasts. 

" 17 Num. ill. 6-13: The Lord's Ministers. 

" 25 " xls. 1-10: Israel's Unbelief. 

" 31 " XX. 7-13: The Smitten Kock, 
Jane 7 Num. xxi. 4-9: Serpent of Brass. 

" 14 Deut. xviil. 9-16: The True Prophet. 

" 21 " xxiv. 1-12: Death of Moses. 

" 28 Review (Suggest) Deut. viii. Mercies 
Kevlewed. 



LESSON Xix. — MAY 10, 1874. — THE THBEE 
GREAT FEASTS. 

scriptuhe LESSON. — LEV. xxlii. 4-6, 15-31,. 

33-36. Commit 4-6, 15, 16, 33-36; 

Primary Class, Golden Text. 

4 These are the feasts of the Lord, 
even holy convocations, which ye shall 
proclaim in their seasons. 

5 In the fourteenth day of the first 
month at even is the Lord's passover. 

6 And on the fifteenth day of the same' 
month is the feast of unleavened bread 
unto the Lord : seven days ye must eat un- 
leavened bread. 

15 And ye shall count unto you from^ 
the morrow after the Sabbath, from the 
day that ye brought the sheaf of the wave- 
oflFering ; seven Sabbaths shall be com- 
plete. 

16 Even unto the morrow after the 
seventh Sabbath shall ye number fifty 
days ; and ye shall olBfer a new mcat-oflfer- 
ing unto the Lord. 

17 Ye shall bring out of your habita- 
tions two wave-loaves of two tenth deals : 
they shall be of fine flour; they shall be 
baken with leaven; they are the firstfruits 
unto the Lord . 

18 Ye shall offer with the bread seven 
lambs without blemish of the first year, 
and one young bullock, and two rams : 
they shall be for a burnt-offering unto the 
Lord, with their meat-offering, and their 
drink-offerings, even an offering made by 
fire, of sweet savor unto the Lord. 

19 Then ye shall sacrifice one kid of 
the goats for a sin-offering, and two lambs 
of the first year for a sacrifice of peace- 
offerings. 

30 And the priest shall wave them' 
with the bread of the firstfruits for a wave- 
offering before the Lord, with the two 
lambs : they shall be holy to the Lord for 
the priest. 

21 And ye shall proclaim on the self- 
same day, that it may be a holy convoca- 
tion unto you: ye shall do no servile work 
therein : it shall be a statute for ever in all 
your dwellings throughout your genera- 
tions. 

33 And the Lord spake unto Moses 
saying, 

84 Speak unto the children of Israel, 
saying. The fifteenth day of this seventh 
month shall be the feast of tabernacles for 
seven days unto the Lord. 

35 On the first day shall be a holy con- 
vocation : ye shall do no servile work 
therein. 

36 Seven days ye shall offer an offering 
made by fire unto the Lord ; on the eighth, 
day shall be a holy convocation unto you, 
and ye shall offer an offering made by fine 
unto the Lord : it is a solemn assembly ; 
and ye shall do servile work therein. 



GOLDEN TEXT.— "Now about the 
midst of the feast Jesus went up into the 
temple, and taught." — Jolin vii. 14. 

TOPIC— Redeemed by Christ; sealed 
by the Spirit ; at home with God. 

HOME READINGS. 
M, Ei. xil. 1-19— The Passover Instituted. 
T. Mark slv. 12-26— Jesus at the Passover. 
W. Lev. xxiii. 9-22 — Feast of Pentecost. 
Th. Acts ii. 1-47— The Spirit at Pentecost. 

F. Neh. vlll. 1-18— The Forgotten Ordinance. 
8. John vii. 1.39 -Jesus at the Feast. 
S. Rev. vii. 9-17— The Palm Bearers. 

TOPICAL ANALYSIS. 
The Passover — Christ's People Redeemed. 
Pentecost— Christ's People Gathered. 
Tabernacles— Christ's People at Home. 

SUGGESTIONS TO SCHOLARS, AND 
QUESTIONS FOR STUDY. 
In our last lesson we had the offerings,, 
as food for God's table ; to-day we are in- 
vited to feast with him. These feasts were 
festivaU; they were like the Fourth of 
July, and Thanksgiving. They were mon- 
umenti pointing backward and forward. 
They were types, representing great truths 
that were to follow. In our chapter eight 
are mentioned, but the Sabbath was quite 
distinct from the others. Learn the names 
of all, and ask your teachers what the four 
that were omitted from our lessons were 
intended to teach, and what benefit the 
feasts were to the Jews, Ask how they 



>^ 1 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



traveled to the feasts. If they sung any 
hymns or songs, and what they were. 

What is the first topic ? Which of our 
lessons was upon this ? What day did it 
commence ? The name of the month was 
Nisan. What kind of bread did they eat ? 
How many days did they eat it ? Was Jesus 
ever at the passover ? (Luke ii. 41-51 ; 
Mark 14. 12-26 ) Who is our passover ? 
(1 Cor. v. 7.) Have you ever been to this 
feast ? If you have, the feast of unleaven- 
ened bread teaches how you ought to live. 
The doctrine of this feast is Redemption. 

What is the second topic ? What feast 
have we passed over ? (verses 10-14.) Ask 
your teacher what 1 Cor. xv. 20 meaus. 
What is the feast of Peatecost called in 
Ex. xxiii. 16, xxxiv. 22 ? The name signi- 
fies the fiftieth. Why was it so called ? 
(verse 16.) What did it celebrate ? (Deut. 
xvi. 13-15.) What were they to offer? 
How were they to reap the fields ? (verse 
32.) What occurred fifty days after Jesus 
{the first iheaf) rose from the dead ? (Acts 
ii.) What kind of a harvest was that ? 
Have you ever been gathered into the fold 
of Christ ? 

What is the third topic? What two 
feasts have been passed over ? (verses 
34-37.) What day did the feasts of taber- 
nacles occur on ? How long did it last ? 
What did thev live in during this time ? 
(verse 43.) What did this feast celebrate? 
(verse 43.) Did they ever forge t this feast, 
(Neh. viii. 17.) Read Deut. viii. 10-20? 
and Rev. vii. 9-17.) Will you be at the 
feasts of Tabernacles ? What feasts must 
come before this ? 

_ Lessons. God has given us many mer- 
cies ; let us have season of thanksgiving. 
For his rhdebjied ones, those the Spirit 
has sealeo, he is preparing at a great 
feast of thanksgiving. I will go. — The 
National Sunday School Teachei'. 



Useful Hints. 



An earnest and succeBsful Sunday- 
school laborer, now of Pittsfield, Mass. , 
in his printed New Year'a pastoral ad- 
dress, among other very excellent eug- 
fijestion?, puts this all-important truth 
thus: "We recommend to you all, and 
especially to Sonday-school teachers 
and scholars, the following plan for Bi- 
ble study : 

RpEbAaDy. 

S p'T R U A D T T. 

TpHrIaNtK." 
Mix your praying through all your 
reading, study, and thought. Re- 
member each member of your class by 
name when in your closet. "Tell Je- 
sus" what you would have for each . 
Expect glorious results. 




A Startling Question. 

Here is a little story with comments,' 
from the S. S. Times, which is for 
every superintendent and teacher — a 
story to be pondered with "strong cry- 
ing and tears." 

A poor child straying into a Sab- 
bath-school one day, asked simply, * 'Is 
this tha way to heaven ?" Tde super- 
intendent was for a moment startled. 
Was his school, indeed, the way to 
heaven ? Was he trying to make it so ? 
Were his teachers intent upon the 
same subject? The artless question 
struck home. From desK to class the 
question went around with a thrill. 
What were they all doing? Whither 
were they all tending ? The question 
was like an angel suddenly come into 
their midst to make a record of ail that 
transpired in that school. 0, superin- 
tendents, teachera, make sure of this 
one thing, With all your efforts to im- 
part knowledge, make the salvation of 
the soul of paramount interest ! Wheth- 
er your school be a model, or be strug- 
gling up to perfection, be sure that ev- 
ery scholar shall feel that it is the road 
to heaven ? 



Be Cakkfcl, — A single hard lift, an 
hour of heating work, an evening of 
exposure to rain or damp, a severe 
chill, an excess of food, the unusual 
indulgenca of any appetite or passion, 
a Gudden fit of anger, an improper 
dose of medicine — any of these, or 
other similar things, may cut off a val- 
uable life in an hour, and leave the 
fair hopes of usefulness and enjoyment 
but a shapeless wreck. 

— An Englishman writes to one of 
the scientific journals stating that he 
has discovered a new cure for rheumatic 
gout. He had suffered tortures from 
that disease for several years, but, by 
insulating his bed by means of glass 
stands and sockets under each foot, he 
began to improve immediately. 

— Warts may be removed with ker- 
osene oil. Apply it daily with a camel 
hair pencil. They will generally dis- 
appear in about two weeks. 

— A serviceable filter may be readily 
made as follows: Take a common earth- 
enware flowerpot about nine inches in 
diameter and ten inches in depth. The 
drainage hole is stopped loosely with a 
clean piece of sponge. A layer of 
about two inches of animal charcoal is 
first placed in the pot, then the layer 
of clean sand, upon which a layer of 
three inches of clean coarse gravel is 
placed. The pot can be set over an 
earthen jar, into which an abundance of 
pure water will filter for all drinking 
purposes. 

Genuine Ehasive Soap.— Two pounds 
of good Castile poap, half a pound of 
carbonate of potash, dissolved in half a 
pint of hot water. Cut the soap in 
thin slices, boil the soap with the pot- 
ash until it is thick enough to mould 
into cakes; also add alcohol, half an 
ounce; camphor, half an ounce, harts- 
horn , half an ounce ; color with half 
an ounce of pulverized charcoal. This 
is excellent for removing grease, etc. , 
from clothing. 

Sauce for Puddings or Rolls. — 
Cream six ounces of butter until light 
and white as possible; then stir in 
gradually the same weight of finely 
pulverized white sugar. It looks very 
inviting made up into the shape of a 
little pyramid, thickly strewn with 
grated nutmeg. In addition you may 
use at pleasure vanilla or any other 
seasoning you prefer. 

Delicate Cake. — One and half cups 
of sugar, half a cup of butter. Rub 
this to a cream, add half a cup of 
sweet milk, in which dissolve a half 
teaspoon of soda, and two cups of flour 
in which one teaspoon of cream of 
tartar has been rubbed. Add a little 
salt. Flavor with vanilla, lemon, or 
nutmeg. Beat the whites of four eggs 
to a froth and add last. 



Sleep for Farmers' Wives. 



A farmer's w'fe writes a letter to the 
Rural New York&r^ which she wants 
the "men folks" to read. It is a plea 
for more sleep. Have you a wife, she 
says, who goes about in a listless, spir- 
itless fashion, as though she could but 
just drag herself about? Or is she 



cross and fretful, and do you wonder 
how she came to have such a temper? 
Ten to one, ail she needs to make her 
bright and happy is rest, sleep, and 
loving words. Hire effi:;ient help, that 
the wife who has passed a restless night 
may take advantage of baby's morning 
nap, and have one of her own, or, if 
she chooses, lie down in the afternoon 
and make up the lost sleep. You can 
afford it if you will. Do you begrudge 
a hundred dollars a year for your 
wife's comfort and health ? Why, no 
breeding-mare would ever be worked 
as soma men work their wives ! Give 
women their home rights; help them 
to bear their burdens; give them a few 
kind, loving words every day, and you 
will have healthier and happier wiver, 
children and homes. 

Testing the Vitality of Seed Corn. 



I and firm, and the grain firm, the prob- 
j abihty is that it is good. The two 
j conditions bet?7e9a good and bad may 
be easily discovered by breaking an ear 
that you know to be good, and exam- 
ining it in comparison with one that 
you suspect to be unsound. 

Thus a person with a little experi- 
ence may easily select sound from un- 
sound corn from the crib. Neverthe- 
less, we now advise, as we before 
have done, that this plan of selecting 
seed be not dependent upon another 
year. It is far bstter and cheaper in 
the end to gekct the seed at the time 
of ripening; hang it in an airy plac3 to 
dry, and hereafter keep it dry; and if 
hung over a gentle smoke to assist the 
process of drying, so much the better. 
The smoke will not irjure the corn, 
but it will lend to render it unpalatable 
to the horde of insects that always lie 
in wait to prey upon it Avhen planted. 
— Westitn Rural. 



Many of those who are obliged to 
depend upon corn ripened last year 
will, undoubtedly experience difficulty 
in its germinating promptly, for the 
reason that, owing to the peculiar 
season, the crop ripened imperfectly. 
These remarks will not^ however, apply 
to those who, as heretofore advised by 
the Western Rural, have saved the 
seed in the autumn. We do not hes- 
itate to say that in those sections of the 
country where, from any cause, the 
corn has not ripened as it ought to have 
done, there may be trouble in the ger- 
mination of the Eeed. 

To test the seed, therefore, we ad- 
vise that those in doubt shell from va- 
rious ears more or lass of the kernels. 
Mix them together and, counting 
therefrom ten or a dozen of the grains, 
plant them in a favorable place for ger- 
mination. Note how many of the 
seeds grow readily. From the per- 
centage which grow, an estimate may 
be made of the proper number to drop 
in each hill, in planting the field, to 
ensure a stand. 

Another plan for testing seed corn 
is to examine the general appearance of 
the grain. If it break from the cob, pre- 
senting a black appearance at the point 
of attachment, and, if it leave the cov- 
er and filament with the cob, it is prob- 
able, but not certain, that the seed is not 
sure. It may germinate slowly, or it 
may not germinate at all, according to 
the conditions under which it is placed. 
It is safe to reject such as seed. On 
one side of the kernel and that side 
lying towards the tip of the ear, will 
be found a groove or indentation ; at 
the bottom of this, and next the sur- 
face and, covered with the pellicle of 
skin, will be found the germ of the fu- 
ture plant. If the grain be bright, and 
if, upon raising the germ it be found 
to be of a bright straw color, inclining 
to white, plump, clear and bright, and 
of a distinct shape, not wrinkled and 
shriveled, the indication is that the 
germ is good; but, if otherwise, if it 
be dull shriveled or imperfect throw 
the ear aside. 

Another test is to take the ear and 
break it through the middle. If it 
break brittle, and the cob is bright 



A Talk abjut Plaster. 



At a late meeting of the Ottawa 
Mich. , Farmers' Club the subject of 
the use of plaster was introduced by 
the President, Mr. Wild. 

Mr. DeWitt had used plaster very 
freely and always with good effect. 

Mr. Wild and also Mr. Ferguson, 
agreed that the use of pLsster adds one- 
third to the clover crop. 

Mr. McNaughtonliad experienced 
great benefit from its use on clover, 
more on eandy land than on clay. He 
always got a good catch when he used 
plaster on the land with the seed. 

Mr. Little thought we used too lit- 
tle, and would recommend to double 
the quantity now u^ed. 

Mr. Wild thought we should now 
BOW more clover than we do and U58 
mora plaster. 

Mr. McNaughton believed that best 
way to keep up land was to sow clover 
and plaster. He also gave some in- 
stances of the good effricts of aphes on 
wheat. 

Mr. Hall said that the plaster pro- 
longed the growth of wheat, but was 
no benefit to it. It would do good on 
clover three years. 

Mr. Randall recommended sowing 
plaster on the snow. Clover sometimes 
failed to grow when not plastered. 

Mr. T, B. Lillie us^d clover, but 
thinks barnyard manure the main stay 
to keep up the fertility of the farm. — 
Western Rural. 



Sure Cure for Cattle Lice. 



Take one heaping teaspoonful of cop- 
peras; mix with bran or any other 
kind of meal. If you haven't any 
meal, mix with salt. Two doses will 
drive them entirely away. It will not 
only kill the lice, but it will keep off 
the diseases and give the cattle an ap- 
petite. I have tried it tweny-five 
years, and never knew it to fail. What 
'•Subscriber" says about cattle lice will 
kill the cattle quicker than it will the 
lice. If the cattle, either those with 
the cloth on, or others, lick the cloth 
with the mercurial ointment on, it will 
kill them ; or if they take cold it will 
kill them. — Western Rural. 



8 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



fj^t i)\\t{i$im Cgtmtttt^i 



Chicasro, Tlinrsday, April 30, 1874. 



Prof. C. A. Blanchard started Monday morning for 
New York, to help prepare for our National Anni- 
versary, June 2nd. The Aurora (Congregational) 
Association, at its late meeting with the First Church, 
in the city of Aurora, gave to Prof. Blanchard its ap- 
probation as a licentiate for the Gospel ministry. 
This will enable him with propriety to assist ministers 
of the Uospel wherever he may go. Mr. E. D. Bailey 
was approbated by the Association as a licentiate at 
the same time. He is a member of Wheaton College, 
who has been laboring successfully with the church at 

Big Woods, 111., the last winter. 

♦ ■ »■ 

The following notice appears ia the Chicago papers 
of the 25th inst. If its arrogance and impudence 
have even been equalled, we know not where cr 
when. Read it: 

"Special Maeonic Notice. — The present and past 
grand cfiScers of the Grand Lodge, Grand Chapter, 
Grand Commaudery and Grand Council of the State 
of Illinois, resident in the city; also the present and 
past oflBcers of the Supreme Council, 33d degree, to- 
gether with the past and principal officers of all 
regular Lodges, Chapters, Commanderies, Councils 
and those of the several bodies of the A. and A. 
Scottish rite, of this city, are requested to meet this 
(Saturday) evening, at 7 1-2 o'clock, ia the "Ar- 
mory," American Express Company's building, Mon- 
roe street, near State, for the purpose of making ar- 
rangements for the laying of the '' corner-stone " of 
the United States Government building, on the 24th 
of June next." 

Now we ask, has the Chicago " Armory" ever 
been occupied and used by any other sect or order of 
people but the Freemasons ? Would Methodists be 
permitted to use it for their purposes ? 

And again for the thousandth time, what business 
has a secret order, sworn to selfishness ard proscrip- 
tion, to make arrangements about United States build- 
ings? And further, co not the citizens, who are not 
Freemasons, and who have been put in mockery on 
the committee of two hundred, see that these *' pres- 
ent and past Grand Officers " treat them with utter 
contempt. If this attempt of Freemasonry to take 
the corner stone business out of the hands of the non- 
Maeons, who are appointed on the "two hundred," does 
not awake them to remonstrate at having their names 
used as a mere cover to the lodge, then they are fallen 
low indeed. Will some Freemason " rise to explain?'' 



MASONRY SUBVERTING THE REPUBLIC. 



Elsewhere in this number will be found editorials 
from the Tribune and Times of this city on the in- 
tended laying of the corner-stone of the new United 
States Custom House in ChicagOjby Freemasons. Of 
all sects, parties, organizations, orders, secret or open, 
a Freemason lodge ia the most unfit to put its insig- 
nia on a United States public building; and the pro- 
posal of the lodge to practice its heathen ritual, and 
place its anti-Christian date on the corner-stone of our 
new Custom House, is a piece of impudence and ef- 
frontery which has seldom been equalled and never 
surpassed. The Grand Lodge of Illinois laid the cor- 
ner-stone of our new State House at Springfield, 
and it was resented as an insult to the State. The 
result Avas, the stone was taken out of the wall, and 
buried in the earth out of sight. A similar attempt 
to lay the corner-3tone of the new State House at Al- 
bany, N. Y. , was resisted by leading New York papers 
and ignominiously failed; the stone being laid by the 
Governor. A similar attempt and failure, partial, or 
entire, occurred in the Slate of Iowa; and the example 
of our State was cited by those who resisted that pro- 
fanation. That a United States Secretary at Wash- 
ington, should attempt to force a national recognition 
of the lodge upon the people of Chicago and the 
North-west, argues great boldness or ignorance, or 
both; since the attempt has been so unmistakably con- 
demned by the popular voice. There are about a 
half a million of Freemasons, one-sightieth part of the 
people of the United States. By what right or Bhow 



of propriety this secret sect puts itself forward to rep- 
resent forty millions of people in this country, in lay- 
ing the corner stone of its public buildings, is beyond 
the possibility of a guess. The ceremony is religious; 
conf-isting in part of prayer to the god of the lodge; 
but it is not pretended that the religion ia that of the 
Bible ; or the god prayed to, the God of revelation. 
And as a civic ceremony it is more impudent and re- 
volting still, as its chief lexicon (Mackey) declares, 
"The government of a Grand Lodge is therefore com- 
pletely despotic." It is heathenism insulting Christ- 
ianity, and despotism insulting liberty. Every voter 
and every voter's wife and child should be moved to 
their heart's center by this attempt. Dr. Post, of St. 
Louia, in his address to the Pilgrim Memorial Con- 
vention in Farwell Hall, before the fire, referred to the 
lodge as setting up the hollow forms and titles of king- 
craft and priest-craft, that those hated foes of human- 
ity might creep back into their empty shells. Let 
Chicago be draped in black if this infamy is attempted. 
[The above Editorial is, except a line or two, repub- 
lished from Cynosure of April 16th. It was so forci- 
ble and so marred by the compositor that we are re- 
quested to reinsert it. — Office Ed.] 

OUR PETITION TO PRESIDENT GRANT. 



As instructed by the National Committee, the sub- 
committee have met and agreed on the foi-m presented 
in this number of our paper. It was thought best 
not to insert the fact that Secretary Richardson, who 
controls the Custom-House building, had treated simi- 
lar remonstrances with silent contempt; because of 
the thousands whom we hope to have sign this peti- 
tion to President Grant, but few know that his Secre- 
tary has so treated like petitions, and could not prop- 
erly certify that they did know it, by signing the paper. 
As the paper now reads, honest Freemasons can con- 
sistently sign it if they will. 

Now let every man and woman who can give an 
hour's time to it, cut out the petition from the Cyno- 
sure, paste it on paper, and commence getting signers 
at once; and, the last week in May, forward them to 
Syracuse, " care of Rev, L. N. Stratton." Let us roll 
up from ten to fifty thousand names, and forward to 
Washington from the Syracuse Convention. 

Meantime, let no possible effort be omitted to arouse 
the people, especially the people of Chicago, to avert 
and ward offthe impudence of that harlot of the na- 
tions, the lodge, from the United States Custom-House 
in Chicago. This is the harlot which is making the 
nations drunk with the filth of her fornications. 



KETIEW OF GROSH'S DEFENSE CONCLUDED. 

We ask the reader to refer again to the disclosure of 
the oaths of Odd-fellowship by Dr. Willis, in our sec- 
ond article on this topic, and see if evil does not lurk 
n that obligation, evil of no slight degree, of funda- 
mental character, which, though scarcely perceptible 
at first, is yet capable of vast and horrid and fatal 
expansion. 

First, there is hypocrisy in it. It is a real oath 
pretending to be only a pledge of honor. It binds to 
evil while pretending to bind to good only. 

Secondly, it is an unjustifiable oath, so that it has in 
it the moral wrong and leaven of profanity and blas- 
phemy. 

Thirdly, it is a rash promise to do good or to do 
evil without the opportunity of knowing which it may 
turn out to be. Such blind promising is sinful; a 
snare to the soul ; an enslavement, or utter abrogation 
of conscience; a renunciation of allegiance to God by 
trusting to man instead of God, t, e., taking man's 
word that the thing is right instead of using the 
means God gives us to learn for ourselves from him 
that it is right. This is to reject the Lord from being 
our guide and king. 

Fourthly, in all these oaths there is an insidious 
promise to deceive; or, in other words, to lie. Dr. 
Willis, to mention no other, has revealed the secrets 
of the order. The members can not now "oonceal" 
them as they have sworn to do, but by deception or 
lying. They must do this deliberately and wilfully, 
and that continually by word or action. Even if Dr. 



Willis has not given a true expose (which he surely 
has) yet some one else may truly expose the whole 
secret, and then the oath "to conceal" comes inta 
full force, and it becomes an oath to be a perpetual 
deceiver through life, and to go to the judgment with 
this huge life-long lie in one's right hand. 

Fifthly, the acknowledgment of an especial obliga- 
tion or covenant with all Odd-fellows is contrary to the 
sound doctrine of equal rights and to the divine law 
of impartial benevolence towards all men. For, if this 
obligation requires us to do for Odd-fellows only what 
the command to love our neighbors as ourselves re- 
quires towards every human being, it is not an especial 
covenant unless it is understood to imply that we may 
do less for outsiders than this universal law of love 
demands. If it requires more than the law of equal 
benevolence does towards our brother man, it is evilj 
if it requires less towards outsiders than that divine 
law does, it is evil; and one of the two it must imply 
or it !8 not an especial covenant. Unless, again, yoa 
say it implies only the especiality which Christians 
are directed to concede "to them who are of the 
household of faith," But if this ia the meaning, it is 
evil, for it is a changing and perverting of a law of 
Christ'. It is taking "the children's bread and giving 
it to dogs." What have carnal fraternities to do with 
the divine legacies of Christ to the members of his 
spiritual kingdom? What relation has the partiality 
they exercise towards their fellow conspirators to obe- 
dience to Christ's law of special beneficence to the 
faithful, whereby Christians honor God and goodness, 
and concede to the views of heaven their God-given 
legacy ? None at all. The especial covenant of Odd- 
fellows we must think means a release in a greater or 
less degree from the practice of what the law of im- 
partial and equal love requires towards the brother 
man, who is not a brother Oddfellow ; and the doing 
for the brother Odd-fellow not merely what this divine 
law requires, but more than it requires, or rather what 
it positively forbids: helping him out of dangers 
"arising from his own imprudence" in the way of 
extricating him from justice; pointing out his advan- 
tage, i. e. , helping him to take the advantage of other 
men, as he would not do were his brother not an Odd- 
fellow. Otherwise the specialty of an Odd-fellow's 
covenant has no meaning or reality. It requires, in 
short, a relaxing of God's law to man as such and a 
work of supererogation, a transcending of that law 
towards brother Odd-fellows, Not doing for one what 
God requires, and doing for the other what God for- 
bids. We repeat, therefore, ouv opinion is unshaken 
that OJd-fellows are oath-bound to evil, if such a 
thing CAN be; bound to do good or to do evil, and it 
is hid from them. Still the evil exists and tends to a 
preponderance that is sure in the end utterly to ex- 
tinguish the good and leave but the final ruin which 
God links inseparably to the wrong. 

But, says Mr. Grosh, "would you consider yourself 
bound to do evil if you had taken our obligations as 
you understand them ?" No. If I had taken those 
obligations I should consider them null and void from 
their very sinfulness, and should feel myself bound by 
them only to repent of having taken them, and to 
bring forth fruits meet for repentance by violating them 
as often as I had opportunity, and to do all in my 
power lawfully to destroy the fabric that rests on such 
an evil basis. And I do earnestly advise and entreat 
in Christ's name every Christian to absolve his soul at 
once from the unholy bondage of those sinful oaths, 
and to come out from the fellowship of those who 
acknowledge their binding authority , and henceforth 
to worship and obey the only living and true God, 
who has revealed himself in Christ and him only. 

Away with these shackles of profane covenants and 
precepts of men and deistical worship, this bowing the 
knee to Baal and paying endless tribute to invisible 
empires, Away with such robbing of Christ and his 
cause, such shackles of bondage, from all Christian's 
feet; that with single eye and purpose you may run 
your race and be accepted of Him who will have your 
all or nothing. "What concord hath Christ with 
Belial ? or what part hath he that believeth with an 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE, 



infidel?" Or who is he that can authorize a man to eat 

at the table of the Lord and at the table of devils? to 

bear the part of fellowship in the worship of the 

Father, Sou and Holy G-host, and in the worship of a 

god invented by men ? to meet the demand of deism 

and idolatry ? 

•» ' » 

G£N£BAL UTILITY OF THE "ACT TO ENFORCE 
THE FOURTEENTH AMENDMENT." 



We know that the emergency which brought out 
this "act to protect all persons in the United States in 
their civil rights" wa«i the outrages committed by the 
Ku-KIux Klan upon the colored people. Many of its 
provisions appear to bear with equal force against 
Masonry, for instance, Sec. 6 of this act is as follows: 

*'No person shall be a grand or a petit juror in any 
court in the United States, upon any inquiry, hear- 
ing or trial of any suit, proceeding or prosecution, 
based upon, or arising under the provisions of this act 
(viz: an act to enforce the fourteenth amendment) 
who shall in the judgment of the court be in com- 
plicity with any such combination or conspiracy : (viz : 
a conspiracy of two or more persons .... by 
force, intimidation or threat to prevent, hinder or de- 
lay the execution of any law of the United States. 
or by force, intimidation or threat to influence the 
verdict, presentment or indictoient of any juror or 
grand juror in any court of the United States, etc.) 
and every such juror shall, before entering upon any 
such inquiry, hearing or trial, take and subscribe an 
oath in open court that he has never, directly or indi- 
rectly, counseled, advised or voluntarily aided any 
Buch combination or conspiracy." 

Do not Masons by "intimidation" and "threat," if 
not by ''force," "prevent, hinder," and "delay" the ex- 
ecution of laws in the United States courts ? 

Would not any Mason, (if public opinion was set 
right) be prohibited from holding the place as juror, 
under this act, because he has "voluntarily" aided the 
Masonic conspiracy against equal civil rights ? 

Has not Congress, in the fourteenth amendment, 
and the act to enforce it, done her part towards pro- 
hibiting Masonry from corrupting the decision of 
United States courts? 

Will some of our readers connected with the le- 
gal profession write for the Cynosure an article on 
this subject, answering our questions and throwing 
light on the subject generally ? 



[From tha Chicago Tribune, Apr. S5th] 

The Masonic Display. 



The opponents of Masonry, represented by Mr. 
Philo Carpenter, are improving the opportunity of the 
forthcoming ceremonies attending the laying of the 
corner-stone of the new Government building in this 
city to make their stereotyped protest against the Ma- 
sonic order. Few people, however, will be moved 
by the protest, as it is not aimed against the laying of 
corner-stones by Masons, but against the Masonic fra- 
ternity itself as an organization. These men base their 
hostility to Masonry primarily upon the ground that 
the order ignores religion, and is setting up a school 
of morals in which religion does not figure, and there- 
fore must be dangerous to the public. We do not 
fancy that these worthy men will ever be molested 
by the Masons, or that the community will be harmed 
by them , or that there is any danger growing out of 
the establishment of schools of morals, if they are 
really such, even should they be as numerous as the 
sands of the sea-shore. The advantage of secrecy in 
such schools, however, we fail to appreciate. 

There are, however, reasonable grounds of complaint 
in this instance which will commend themselves to 
people. Why should the Masons lay the corner- 
stones of public buildings any more than the grangers 
or other secret organizations? Why should the erec- 
tion of a public building be made the occasion of glori- 
fication of the Masonic order and a processional dis- 
play ? By what authority, except that of past usage, 
do the Masons appropriate the corner-stones of every 
public building, and make the ceremonies entirely 



Masonic, snd therefore entirely incongruous with the 
general character of the occasion and having no refer- 
ence to it, thereby aggravating a great many psople 
who are not Masons, for it is an undoubted fact that, 
to the majority of people, these Masonic ceremonies, 
when forced upon them, are displeasing. It would be 
just as appropriate for the grangers, the Good Temp- 
lars, the Odd-fellows, or even a secret sesiety of 
students in the University of Chicago, to come forward 
and demand to lay the corner-Etone of the new gov- 
ernment building, as for the Masons. When fiaished 
the building will nave no Masonic significance ; it will 
not be occupied by Masons ; and will not be devoted to 
the propagation or spread of their principles. The 
only point of contact with the order will be the fact 
that trowels will be used in its erection, and that Ma- 
eons wear ihe trowel as a device upon their aprons. 
We admit, however, that this slight coincidence does 
not constitute any valid reason why they should sum- 
marly appropriate eyery corner-stone for their own 
glorification. The new Government building, when 
finished, will, it is to be hoped, be an ornament to the 
city, as it will be a great public convenience in afford- 
ing increaced facilities for the transaction of the postal 
and commercial business of Chicago. It will be devot 
ed to the uses of the United States Government. It 
is, therefore, only appropriate that the municipal and 
Federal authorities, or the architect, should be intrust- 
ed with the duty of laying the corner-stone. As an 
act of strict justice, the stone-masons by whose labor 
its massive walls will rise are more deserving of the 
compliment of laying the corner-stone than the Masonic 
fraternity, who have no claim (o it at all, and who 
exercise this traditional privilege as an advertisement 
of themselves, and an occasion for an imposing display 
of banners and regalia. 



REPLY TO THS ABOVE. 

To the Ed. of the Tribune, 

In ihe Tribune of the 25th inst., you say, "The 
opponents of Masonry, represented by Mr. Philo Car- 
penter .... base their hostility to Masonry, pri- 
marily upon the ground that the order ignores relig 
ion, and is setting up a school of morals in which re- 
ligion does not figure, and therefore must be danger- 
ous to the public." 

As you do not wish to do us injustice, or inten- 
tionally to present a very numerous and rapidly in- 
creasing portion of the American people in an absurd 
and ridiculous light, I beg leave to say, that we base 
our opposition to Masonry primarily on the ground 
that it is a false religion, made of the same "stuflf" 
with the religions of Asia and Africa; and so is no 
system of morals, but subverts the ground of all mor- 
ality and all true religion. 

But we base our opposition to this ' ' order " laying 
the corner-stones of our Government buildings on the 
clear and substantial ground that it ip itself another 
government, hostile to every principle of our Repub- 
lic; that it has its own constitution, laws, courts, pen- 
alties, taxes, legislative and executive officers, is gov- 
erned by its own oaths ; and recognizes a foreign alleg- 
iance. That, in short, it is what the patriot Samuel 
Adams, called, ' ' That solecism in politics, an impekium 

IN IMPSRIO." 

Now, if these indictments can be sustained by the 
authorities and history of the Masonic order (and 
they can), I respectfully submit that in the language 
of Webster, while speaking of the order, " It is a 
cause of jealousy and just alarm," which every patriot 
is bound to aid in exterminating. The court records, 
ana records of the New York State Legislature 
abundantly show, that instead of being a harmless 
system of irreligious morals, it is a system which has 
once successfully defied the judicial power of that 
State, and that it can do it again. At all events, 
this is its true and real character * ' to the best of our 
knowledge and belief; " and we are entitled to b3 
properly represented by the Tribune. 

Meantime we thank the Tribune for its frank and 
manly utterances on the subject, though diflfering 
from us. Respectfully yours. 

One Represented by Mr. CARPENfER. 



NOTES. 

— A preacher of the German Baptists writing from 
Kansas to his church paper, the Christian Family 
Companion^ gives his experience with secrecy. A 
revival effort was made last winter and a number were 
converted under his preaching; but before they were 
proposed for church membership a grange was started 
in the neighborhood and all the converts united, nor 
would they give up the unholy alliance when, coming 
forward for admission to the church , the principles of 
the Christian religion were fhown by the pastor to be 
opposed to any secret system. 

— The *' Supreme Lodge " of the Knights of Pythias, 
met in Pittsburgh, April 23d. It seems that the 
" Supreme Scribe," C. M, Bouton, is a supreme de- 
faulter also. This organization is very supremely 
officered, having a Supreme Chancellor, a Supreme 
Vice do,, a Supreme Scribe, a Supreme Banker, and 
several other "supremes" most important of all 
being that the whole thing amounts to supreme non- 
sense. 

— Odd-fellows were the glory of the land on Mon- 
day, when they celebrated their fifty-fifth anniversary. 
At Dixon, 111. , ex-Vice President Colfax was the at- 
traction — aside from the Odd-fellows themselves, — but 
the weather was so bad that he only had time to say 
that he had been an Odd-feilow twenty-five years; 
that he was glad of it; that we are living in the most 
eventful age the world ever knew; that Odd-fellow- 
ship was one of the greatest of the events; that it was 
Friendship, Love and Truth. Then he smiled; then 
it rained; and then the brotherhood went under cover 
and danced all night — if the usual programme was 
carried out. 

— The ice once fairly broken, and the lodge will 
have lively times at law. The decision of a Cleveland 
court against an Odd-fellow lodge, was lately pub- 
lished. Now we have the following from New York: 
"New York. April 23. — Maj. Burrell, who was in- 
itiated into the Hoboken Lodge of Freemasons, has 
instituted suit for the recovery cf the initiation fee 
and interest, because he is unable to take the second 
degree, and desires to leave the order." Of all the 
swindling institutions in the country, the lodge is 
greatest, and when its dupes get their reason, it 
must disgorge. 

Petition, 



At the meeting of the Executive Committee on Friday 
last the following petition, to be presented to Congress in 
1876 (Centennial year,) was adopted and ordered to be 
printed. Tills will be inserted again, and every subscriber 
should cut it out and get every name signed to it he possi- 
bly can. It has been carefully drawn up and with the 
best legal advice: — 

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States in Congress assembled : 

We, the undersigned citizens oC the United States, 
believing (in the words of Danisl Webster) ''That all 
secret associations, the members of which take upon 
themselves extraordinary obligations to one another, 
and are bound together by secret oaths, are naturally 
sources of jealousy and just alarm to others; are espec- 
ially unfavorable to harmony and mutual confidence 
among men living together under popular institutions, 
and are dangerous to the general cause of civil liberty 
and good government," respectfully ask your honor- 
able body to withdraw the charter given by Congress 
in April, 1864, to the Masonic Hall Association of the 
District of Columbia. 

That it be made unlawful to appoint to official posi- 
tions under the government of the United States, per- 
sons who are under and acknowledge the binding 
character of oaths administered by secret organiza- 
tions. 

We further petition that in United States Courts, 
in all cases, criminal or civil, the right of peremptory 
challenge of jurors who are members of any secret 
society shall be granted to all parties ia litigation who 
are not members of such societies. 

And that membership in any secret society by the 
presiding officer of a court shall be held to be a suffi- 
cient reason for change of venue whenever demanded . 



10 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



^\t '^mt i^tk. 



Sweep Before yonr own Door. 

Do we heed the homely adage handed down from 

days of yore? 
"Ere you sweep your neighbor's dwelling, clear 

the rubbish from your door; 
Let no filth, no rust there gather, leave no traces 

of decay, 
Pluck up every weed unsightly, brush the fallen 

leaves away." 

If we faithfully have labored thus to sweep with- 
out, within, 

Plucked up envy, evil-speaking, malice, each be- 
setting ein — 

Weeds that by the sacred portal of the inner 
temple grow— 

Poison weeds the heart defiling, bearing bitter- 
ness and woe; 

Then, perchauce, we may have leisure o'er cur 

neighbor watch to keep- 
All the work assigned us finished, we before hia 

door may sweep; 
Show him where the moss is clinging — token 

ever of decay — 
Where the thistles, thickly springing, daily must 

be cleared away. 

But, alas ! our work neglecting, oft wo mount the 

judgment seat, 
With his failings, his omissions, we our weary 

brother greet; 
In some hidden nook forgotten, searching with a 

careful eye. 
We the springing weeds discover — some slight 

blemish there descry. 

For his slothfulness, his blindness, we our 
brother harshly chide. 

Glorying iu our strength and wisdom, we con- 
demn him in our pride, 

Ask not why he has neglected, thus before his 
door to sweep; 

Why grown careless, he has slumbered, failed nis 
garden plot to keep. 

On the judgment seat still sitting we no helping 
hand extend 

To assist our weaker brother, his short-comings 
to amend ; 

For his weariness, his faltering, we no sweet 
compassion show — 

From our store no cordial bring him, no encour- 
agement bestow. 

But, while busied with our neighbor, urging 

him to ceaseless care. 
Calling to the thoughtl s • illers, to their labor 

to repair— 
Lol uneeea the dust has gathered, weeds are 

growing where of yore 
Flowers rare and sweet were blooming when we 

swept before our door. 

Ah I how easy o'er our b : ther faithful ward and 

watch to keep I 
But, alas I before our dwelling hard Indeed to 

. daily sweep; 
Harder than to share the conflict, "by the stuff'' 

at home to stay. 
Easier far to sit in judsment than to humbly 
watch and pray. 

— Christian Work. 



Tlie Cobbler of Hamburgh. 



On a fine summer evening in the city 
of Hamburgli, a shoemaker sat at work 
beneath an awning in front of his shop- 
window. Crowds of artisans were 
passing in the street, and above his 
head was a starling, which seemed to 
keep up a busy talk with its kind own- 
er; for while it sang and chattered, he 
would sing one of his fine old German 
paalm tunes. 

While thu3 engaged, a young Jewish 
student stopped, and said: ''Well, 
friend, you seem a merry fellow." 
Hans looked up, and replied : "Merry ! 
to be sure. I am right merry, my 
brother; and why should I not be so?" 
"All are cot so," replied the student 
with a sigh ;" "and your poverty might 
afford a suffioient excuse for sadness. 
I confess, friend, I am surprised to see 
a poor man like you so cheerful." 
"Poorl" exclaimed Hans; "how know- 
est thou, friend, how my account stands 
with the bank? Poor! I am richer 
than thou knowest." '*It may be so," 
said the student with a smile. "I 
must have heard of thy name in the 
Exchange, or of thy ships, but I have 



forgotten when." ' 'Enough," said 
Hans; "thou hast confessed thine iguo- 
Fanco cf me;" and then stopping his 
work, he said calmly and solemnly: 
"Stranger, I am not poor; I am a 
King's son!" The Jewish student, 
with a smiie, made a low bow, and went 
upon his wa3\ 

It was even so; though the world 
knew him not, no more than it knew 
his Elder Brother, that poor artisan 
W8s an adopted son cf the Great King; 
his name was known among the court- 
iers of the palace of the Golden City, 
and his prayers and alms had come up 
as memorials to his honor. He had 
much wealth laid up where thieves 
could not break through and steal. He 
had hia Father's will ia his hand, which 
he had read attentively from day to 
day, and thought often of hia mansion, 
his crown, his titles and his enduring 
possessions. Like Peter the Great 
working as an obscure mechanic, or 
Alfred the Mighty working as a menial 
in a miserabls hovel, this cobbler was 
fulfilling the good pleasure of his Fath- 
er till the time to receive his iahejitance 
should come. Dr. Paysoa said that if 
Christians realized their relation to God 
as children, each could not avoid cry- 
ing in the streets, "I am a son of God! 
I am a son of God !" So Hans com- 
muned as a son with Lis heavenly 
Father, and sung because he was happy. 

A week passed away, the student 
came again to the cobbler's door, and 
making a low bow with his cap in his 
hand, he said: ' 'Good-evening to your 
royal highness." "Halt, friend !'' cried 
Hans; "I am glad to see you again. 
You left me abruptly the other evening. 
I suppose you thought me mad. I am 
not so. I tell you again I am a Kina;'s 
son. When you interrupted me I was 
singing a song about my kingdom. 
Would you like to hear it?' "Surely, 
if it pleases your royal highness," re- 
plied the Jew, doubting the cobbler's 
sanity. Hans sung a hymn on ''Thy 
kingdom come," and then asked the 
student if he understood its meaning. 
His reply was a shake of the head. 
Upon which Hans began to pour out 
his soul in explanation of the kingdom 
of his Messiah, about the promise in 
Eden, its fulfilment in the coming, 
death, resurrection, and reign of Christ, 
of whose kingdom every subject was a 
son, and joint heir to all its riches and 
honors. 

The Jew sat as a child at his feet, 
gazing upon him with hig full black 
eye, and so absorbed with all he heard 
that he was only aroused as from a 
waking dream by Hans taking him by 
the arm, and saying: "Now thou 
seest I am a Kinai's son, and why I am 
happy ; for I know and love this Jesus, 
and all things are mine, whether life 
or death, things present or things to 
come; and, young man," he asked with 
emphasis, " believest thou the proph- 
ets ? I know that thou believest. For 
ualess I mistake thy countenance 
greatly, thy fathers did ; and thou, my 
son, believing in them, must also be- 
lieve in Him whom they have foretold, 
and whom God hath sent to perform 
the mercy promised to thy fathers, and 
to remember hia holy covenant, the 



oath which he sware to thy father 
AbrahaTa. " 

The Jew was silent before the truth 
of God. Unutterable thoughts passed 
through h's mind. From curiosity he 
was led to inquiry, and from inquiry to 
knowledge. Like Moses beholding the 
miracle of the burning buah, he felt 
that ho must turn aside and examine. 
"Where," he asked meekly, "can I learn 
more of this; for I see that tJwu be- 
lievest and hast peace?" '-From this 
book," said Hans, hsnding him a Bible. 
"Go home and read there about the 
kingdom, and return to me when thou 
hast studied the pasjagea I shall point 
out to thee. I shall, like Moses, pray 
for thee, and ask One to pray for thee 
whom thou knowest not, but who know- 
eth thee, and who is greater than 
Moses." The young Jew grasped the 
hand of the cobbler, made a respectful 
bow, and departed. 

He had seen something wonderful) 
and he resolved to know more about it. 
He had seen a man in humble bfe hap- 
pier than any noble or king, and who 
appeared to have acquired the habits 
and manners of a new life. His relig- 
ion seemed to have ennobled him, so 
that i; touched his trade and made it 
honorable; touched his station in soci- 
ety, and rendered it not unworthy of 
one holding good rank in the household 
of God. It was evident that rank with 
God and^ wealth with him did not 
depend upon externals; for the honora- 
bles of heaven were often poor, and yet 
might convey the greatest riches to 
others. This cobbler enjoyed all the 
privileges of his Father's house. The 
shadow of the throne was over him, he 
communed with the King, received the 
best society of the couri, and was hap- 
py in its feastp, music and emoluments. 
Proving that the life was more than 
meat, his calling comprised whatsoever 
things were costly, beautiful, sublime 
and bliss-bestowing. So the Jewish 
student read and weighed the evidences 
of the New Testament in comparison 
with the Oid. He came to Hans and 
conversed about his doubts and discov- 
eries and expectations; and the poor 
disciple became the teacher of the let- 
tered student. The result was his con- 
version to the faith of Christ. He be- 
came the Rev. Mr. N , for many 

years an eminent and successful mis- 
sionary to his Jewish brethren in 
Siberia. 

Let every Christian remember his 
rank; see that he does not dishonor it; 
but in every way recommend it to the 
attention of the world. It does not 
become a king's son to adopt the man- 
ners of a clown. The sons of God 
should be without reproach, and shine 
as lights in the world, putting always 
Jirst the interests of their Father's 
house. He whose citizenship is in 
heaven's nobility, should be aboye the 
world's mendicity. It was an old say- 
ing in the primitive times of the church: 
"I am a Cnristian, and such conduct is 
not permitted unto me ;" and he who 
remembers G^d's words, *'I will be a 
Father unto you," should so dignify 
his calling as to tender it the greatest 
power on earth for the benefit of man- 
kind. When God'd children prove by 
works that their names are enrolled in 



the heraldry of the New Jerusalem, 
converts will be everywhere multiplied. 
— American Messenger. 

«-»« 

The Only True Home. 

The home is never truly home ex- 
cept as the marriage union is sanctified 
by God and the whole domestic life ia 
ruled and blessed by the law of the 
Spirit cf Jeeu? Christ. This alone it is 
that surely exalts and redeems. I 
care not how bright and beautiful may 
seem the future that now opens itself 
to affianced hearts, nor how fine the 
mansion or elegant the appointments 
which they may call their own, nor 
how refined their tastes, how choice 
their associations, or how abundant 
their stores — there is no immunity 
from peril, no realization of the highest 
bliss, unless the Lord of life and glory 
abide in the house, its ever welcome and 
cherished guest and friend. A shadow 
rests upon every family circle where 
his name is not known, where there is 
no open or secret voice of prayer, and 
■^here is not inculcated with sedulous 
care the prcfoundest reverence for God , 
for Christ; for Scripture; for the insti- 
tutions and observances of our holy 
religion; and for the mighty, heavenly 
truths, principles and realities that out- 
last the perishable and fleeting things 
of earth and time. This alone it is, I 
repeat, that truly exalts and redeems, 
purifying love and strengthening trust, 
eliminating every discordant element and 
perfecting every sacred tie, creating in 
each soul a deeper, tenderer interest 
for the lasting good of the other, less- 
ening the crosses and glorifying the 
daily cares of life, giving a juater sig- 
nificance to the marriage union and a 
loftier elevation to its multiform expe- 
riences and allotments, and diffusing 
every where a gracious atmosphere of 
"sweetness and light." — Rev. Dr. A. 
E, Putnam. 



"Provoke not your Children." 

M. I. R., in north-western Ohio, is 
a confirmed infidel. His father was a 
deacon. One day in harvest, little M. 
I. was left at the house after dinner, 
with instruction to bring a jug of water 
to the field at the end of an hour. 
The hour was made to comprise a few 
more than sixty minutes by the playful 
boy. As he approached the men, jug in 
hand, the father, enraged with impa- 
tient thirst, picked up a stone and 
hurled it at the boy. It whizzed close 
by the lad's ear. He was frightened, 
as well he might be; for an inch of 
variation of its course in one direction 
would have caused^ his instant death. 
His fright soon changed toindignatioD; 
his indignation to settled hatred; for 
this was only one of many acts of a like 
character. Said little M. I. in his heart, 
"If that is religion I want none of it." 
From that hour he began to treasure 
up argument and habitual hate against 
the Christian religion. No angel hand 
showed him a better way. Now it is 
probably too late. How blessed are 
the influences of love and reason. Oh, 
for more of that persuasive power in 
parents which leads the child to do 
right and yet feel that he is doing as 
he pleases. To convince a child of 
the hatefulness of an evil way, and the 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



11 



'A- i ...f Jtr- 



Joveliness of a good way, is a blessed 
art. The parent who well, considers 
how much easier it is to lead a child ia 
a bad way that in a good way, how 
much quicker the mind will grasp evil 
than it will good, feels the need of di- 
vine grace. — 7'elescope. 



Mental Stimalaats. 



It is strictly true that the three in- 
tellectual pursuits, literature, science, 
and the fine arts, are all of them strong 
stimulants, and that men are attracted 
to them by the stimulus they give. 
But these occupations are morally much 
nearer to the common level of other oc- 
cupations than you suppose. There is 
po doubt of a certain intoxication in 
poetry and painting; but I have seen 
a tradesman find a fully equivalent in- 
toxication in an addition of figures, 
showing a delightful balance at his 
banker's. I have seen a young poet 
intoxicated with the love of poetry ; but 
I haye also seen a young mechanical 
genius on whom the sight of a locomo- 
tive acted exactly like a bottle of cham- 
pagne. Everything that is capable of 
exciting or moving man. everything 
that girds him with enthusiasm, every- 
thing that sustains his energies above 
the dead level of merely animal exit- 
tence, may be compared, and not very 
untruly, to the action of generous 
wine= The two most powerful men- 
tal stimulants — since they overcome 
even the fear of death — are unques- 
tionably religion and patriotism; ar- 
dent states of feeling both of them 
when they are genuine; yet this ar- 
dor has a great utility. It enables men 
to bear much, to perform much which 
would be beyond their natural force if 
it were not sustained by powerful men- 
tal stimulants. And so it is in the in- 
tellectual life. It is because its labors 
are so severe that its pleasures are so 
glorious. The Creator of intellectual 
man set him the most arduous tasks- 
tasks that required the utmost possible 
patience, courage, self-discipline, and 
whicli at the same time were, for the 
most part, from their very nature, like- 
ly to receive only the most meagre and 
precarious pecuniary reward. There- 
fore, in order that so poor and weak a 
creature might execute its gigantic 
works with the energy necessary to 
their permanence, the labor itself was 
made intensely attractive and interest- 
ing to the few who were fitted for it 
by their constitution. Since their cour- 
age could not be maintained by any of 
the common motives which carry men 
through ordinary drudgery —since neith- 
er wealth nor worldly position was 
in their prospects, the drudgery 
they had to go through was to be 
rewarded by the triumphs of scientific 
discovery, by the facilities of artistic ex- 
pression. A divine drunkenness was 
given to them for their encourage- 
ment, surpassing the gift of the grape. 
— HammertorCs Intellectual Life. 



— ^Humble worker, make up for your 
want of ability by abundant contin- 
uence in well-doing, and your life will 
not be trivial. The repetition of small 
efforts will eflfect more than the occa- 
Bional use of great ones. 



Advantages of Temperance in Eating. 



The ancient physicians of Egypt as- 
cribed all diseases to the overloading of 
the stomach, and their Materia Medica 
was limited to emetics and cathartics; 
and abstinence from food was their 
chief advice. 

Cheyn said that if we would keep 
our stomachs clean, we should find our 
heads clear. The lamentable preva- 
lence of brain diseases is more attribu- 
table to the overloading of the stomach, 
than to overworking of the brain. The 
brain is weakened by jthe general pros- 
tration of the whole system, and first 
proclaims the misuse of its powers. 

The ancient philosophers, from Pyth- 
agoras, all agreed that it was needful 
to relieve the stomach by a careful ab- 
stemiousness , when they desired to make 
demands upon the imagination or rea- 
son for the exercise of all their forces. 

Mc Pitt, when he intended deliver- 
ing an oration before the House of Com- 
mons, dined on cold mutton. 

Newton confined himself to a slight 
diet, while he was composing his des- 
sertation upon colors. 

Boerhaave remarked that the op 
pression of food on the stomach almost 
extinguishes the active powers of the 
mind. 

A mathematician z&n resolve a prob- 
lem before dinner; while after a full re- 
past his mind would be too dull and 
inactive either to study or demonstrate. 
A blind man who had learned to dis- 
tinguish colors by the touch, could do 
it only when fasting. 

Law, the founder of paper credit, 
and a financier of much ability, was re- 
markable for his abstemiousness, and 
ate the smallest possible amount to sup- 
port life when engaged io subjects of 
deep calculation. 

The newspapers of the day are filled 
with notices of sudden deaths, attrib- 
uted to heart disease, when often the 
verdict should be, "died from over eat- 
ing." Habitual over-eating produces 
dyspepsia, nausea, headaches, colics, 
and many of the other ills so common 
to mankind. 

The quality of our food and its prep- 
aration , are often of as much impor- 
tance as its quantity. 

Temperance and simplicity in food 
will contribute more to our health and 
vigor than all the medicines or tonics iu 
the druggists' shops. 

Sir James Eyre, one of the physi- 
cians to Queen Victoria, says, perhaps 
we might lay it down as a rule that the 
majority of men eat twice as much as 
is really required for the support of 
health and strength, but in most cases 
the error is to be referred to ignorance 
of the laws of health, rather than the 
mere pleasure of over-indulgence. It 
is a common mistake among all classes 
that the more we eat the stronger we 
shall be, and nothing is more fully be- 
lieved than that our vigor depends upon 
the quantity as well as the quality of 
our food. — S. 0. J., in Pure Gold. 




[Por the Cynosure] 

The Name of Mother. 



—We make very poor almanacs in re- 
ligion; we have too much variable 
weather. God hag only one dark day 
in his almanac, and that is when a man 
is guilty and impenitent before him. 



Oh ! how much is in that name — 
"Mother!"' It is the whispering of a 
gentle voice that rocks to sleep ia the ! 
cradle of its love every care of life. It i 
has a charm that sustains and cheers 
U3 when everything else earthly fails. 

Mother! It is the voice that we 
never tire in listening to, and its sweet 
tones make us forget life's burdens. 

A mother's love ! can any one fath- 
om it? Pure, deep, and truthful, 
springing from no improper or selfish 
motives, it is always ready to make 
any sacrifice, however painful, for the 
pleasure of the object of its affections. 
We look in vain through the world for 
another example of such love as hers. 

Have you a mother ? Cherish her, 
comfort her, cheer her by your pleas- 
ant looks and consoling words; devote 
the remainder of your life, if you are 
both spared, to the care and comfort of 
her "'who had thine earliest kiss." 

Have you no mother ? None to go 
to iu the trying hour ? None to s'nare 
your troubles and to whom you can 
tell your grief? Do you realize the 
absence of the hands than all others 
most gentle and loving ? Live then, 
to meet her above? Let your life be 
a constant remembrance of her who 
has gone ! 

Dear child, 

"Be kind to your mother, for when thou wast 
young, 
Who lovcjd thee so fondly as she? 
She caught the first acceuts that fell from thy 
tongue, 
And joined in thy innocent glee." 

Youthful reader, thy mother is the 
best earthly friend. The world may 
forget you — thy mother, never; the 
world may willfully do ycu many 
wrongs — thy mother, never; the world 
may persecute you while living, and 
when dead plant the ivy and night- 
shade of slander upon your grassless 
grave; but thy mother will love and 
cherish you while living, and if she 
survive you, will weep for you when 
dead such tears as none but a mother 
knows how to weep. Love thy moth- 
er ? Do you love her ? What is the 
proof? Jesus says "He that loveth 
me keepeth my commandments." 
Now, if you love your mother it will 
manifest itself. Every little boy and 
girl who loves mother will be kind, at- 
tentive, obedient, ready to do quickly 
whatever told, cheerfully, smilingly. 
A son that will disobey his mother, 
exhibit a spirit of unkindness toward 
her, treat her disrespectfully or abusive- 
ly in the least, is sure to smart for it 
sooner or later. Nature herself cries 
out in vengance against it; all heaven 
gathers blackness. The most fearful, 
awful judgments are denounced agaiast 
disobedient, recreant sons and daugh- 
ters. Hark? •'Cursed be he that 
setteth light by his father or his moth- 
er; and all the people shall say, Amen." 
Deut, xxvii. 16. 

' 'The eye that mocketh at his father 
and despiseth to obey his mother, the 
ravens of the valley shall pick it out, 
and the young eagles shall eat it." 
Ptov. XXX. 17. 

There are a great many occasions 



when mothers do not see fit to give their 
children leave to go where and do what 
they wish, and how often are they re- 
bellious and pouting in consequence of 
it! But this is not pleasing to God, 
The true way is cheerful acquiescence in 
mother's decision. Trust her, and 
smooth down your rufii^d feelings by 
the 8weet and beautiful thought, ''My 
mother knows best." It will save 
you many tea's and much sorrow. It 
is the gratitude you owe her who has 
done and suffered so much for you. 

Keep notbing concealed she ought 
to know; never do anything you 
would be ashamed to tell her. Be 
willing always to open the secret re- 
cesses of your heart. 

Be sure to mstke your dear mother 
a special friend, a friend above all oth- 
ers, and chief confidant. Conceal 
nothing from her; but make her ac- 
quainted with the company you keep, 
the books you read, and even the faults 
which you commit. 

Happy the sons, happy the daugh- 
ters who are not afraid to communicate 
to their mother their most secret ob- 
jectionable thoughts, Whilst they re- 
main thus artless and undisguised they 
are free from danger, 

"A mother's love, how pure, 

How tender and how strong I 
How long it will endure; 

How passive bear each wrong I" 

i>. F. Newton. 



To Fut Away Faults. 



One day I was watching a great 
Newfoundland dog. He had been 
told by Lis master to fetch him a 
basket of toolq that the gardiaer hf d 
left in the shed. The great dog went 
to obey his younger master. He took 
hold of the basket with his mouth, but 
he could noi lift it. What did he do? 
Give it up? No, never! One by one 
he took the things out of the basket and 
carried them to his master. 

One by one! That is what we must 
try to do with our faults. Try and 
get rid of them one by one. Jesus 
knows how hard it is for you to do this, 
and so he has given you a word that 
will help you to do it, and that word 
is " To-day." 

I will show you how. Take one 
fault — we will call it bad temper — and 
in the morning, when you get out of 
bed, ask God for Christ's sake to help 
you " to-day " to overcome that bad 
temper. Perhaps by and by some- 
thing will begin to make you feel an- 
gry ; then remember your prayer, and 
try and drive away the angry feeling, 
and say, '' Not to-day ." 

If you have learned any bad, wicked 
words, like some poor children in the 
street, who do not know any better, 
then ask God for Christ's sake to help 
you to day; then, when you are temp- 
ted^to do 80, remember, " Not to-day; 
I will not say wicked words to-day." 

And do the same with all your faults. 
Take them one by one, and try for one 
whole day not to give way to them. It 
will come easier then. — Guiding Star. 



— Our brightest moments are fre- 
quently those which arrive to us from 
the bosom of care and anxiety; the 
gems that sparkle upon the dark 
ground. 



12 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



^[^ifiWtt^ ^ttt^Iipt^I^i 



AuBORA Association. — This conference of Illinois 
Congregational chuicfccs, met on the 2l6t and 22d 
inst., with the First Congregational Church, in Aurora. 
Rev. S. B. Go Ddenow was elected moderator, and Prof 
C . A. Blanchardj scribe. The sermon by Dr. J. B. 
Walker was much eajoyed by the Association and 
audience. Reports from the churches were generally 
encouraging, though there are several destitute of pas- 
tors. Three young men, E. D, Bailey, C. A. Blanch- 
ard, and Jno. A. Watterwortb, were licensed to preach. 
The addrets from the " Pews to the Pulpit," delivered 
by Dea. Towne, of the New England Church, Aurora, 
was very able, permeated by the Spirit of Christ, and 
adapted to do much good. Also the essay on the 
" Womans' Temperance Movement," was well received. 
Its author, the moderator, is well-known to the Cyno- 
sure readers as an able writer. The communion of 
the Lord's Supper was administered by Rev. L. Earn- 
ham and Rev. J. L. Granger, assisted by four dea 
cons from various churches. After this service, the 
Association adjourned to meet at Naperville in Oct. 

— The forty-ninth anniversary of the American Tract 
Society will be held in Dr. Crosby's Church, New 
York, May 13-lY. 

— The American Missionary for May announces 
that the receipts for the first three months of 1874, 
have fallen off eleven thousand dollars, as compared 
with last year. 

— Dr. Adams, of the Madison Square Presbyterian 
Church, New York, has resigned after a forty years 
active service in the Christian ministry in that city. 

— On the 30th of December last, the Presbyterian 
missionaries in Japan, organized a presbytery, which 
will be represented in the next General Assembly at 
St. Louis. 

— Rev. J. E, Roy, western agent of the American 
Home Missionary Society, has been on a trip to 
Texas. On his return, he spent several days in Little 
Rock, the Arkansas capital, and sent several interest- 
ing letters on the gubernatorial fracas to the Tribune 
of this city. 

— Minnesota has 182 Baptist churches, 5,987 mem- 
bers. There are eight associations. The members 
are of many nationalities — American, German, French, 
Scandinavian, Danish, African. They have only 
fifty-six houses of worship, but are building twenty 
more. 

— The revival meetings at Jacksonville, lil., have 
taken a powerful hold on the people. Numerous aud 
iences attend every eveniag, and 1,000 persons have 
signed the covenant that with the help of God, they 
will serve him during their lives. Mr. Hammond 
went on Thursday last to Hannibal, Mo. , for a few 
days. 

— There are in California not less than 650 organized 
churches of all denominations, and 600 church build- 
dings erected, with an aggregate accommodation for 
225,000 sittings. Church property is valued at $7,- 
500,000 . The Methodists lead in the number of local 
societies, having 190. 

— Liast year the ministers of twenty-five Episcopal 
churches of London wore "eucharistic vestments." 
They are now used in thirty churches. Last year 
only eight Episcopal churches in London used 
incense. Now it is used in fourteen. Altar lights are 
used in thirty-six churches. The practice of confes 
sion is increasing. 

— An endeavor, successful thus far, is being made to 
establish a college at Aintab in Central Turkey, 600 
miles from Constantinople. One hundred thousand 
dollars is needed for the object, a portion of which 
amount has been subscribed in England and by the 
people of Aintab. Contributions are solicited. 

— The revival work in Glasgow, Scotland , does not 
abate, and it is said that large audiences could be got 
together every two hours, if the strength of the 
workers, Moody and Sankey, could bear it- The 
young men assemble in the city hall on Sunday, 
to the number of 3,000, and have beside, meetings 
during the week. 

— Rev. Henry D. Moore, the high Mason of Vine 
St. Congregational church, Cincinnati, has lately been 
installed pastor over the Congregational church at 
Springfield, III. The efforts of the fraternity in the 
former, to sustain Mr. Moore and a large church, were 
neffectual. They probably found the support of one 
set of religious ceremonies enough, i 



— The Congregational church of College Springs, 
Iowa, D. R. Barker, pastor, has been experiencing a 
wonderful revival, which has raised it up to a self 
supporting basis. This is perhaps the only church ot 
this denomination in Iowa which sent pastor and dele- 
gate to the National Anniversary at Monmouth, and 
one of the few which have no fellowship with the false 
worships of the lodge. 

— The New York City Mission reports thirty mis 
sionaries in the field and 5,655 visits have been made 
among the poor in the month of February. The mis 
sion has seven stations; five Sabbath-scbools, with 1,- 
500 scholars; four churchee, with C27 communicants; 
ten temperance societies, with 4,000 total abstinence 
members; two lodging houses and two reading rooms. 
The Rev. Dr. Hall is chairman of the Board of Man- 
agement. 

— Dundee, Scotland, under the labors of D. L. 
Moody and Prof. Sankey, is enjoying the same won- 
derfully glorious revival that followed their labors at 
Edinburg. The revival at Edinburgh still continues, 
and for months the one absorbing topic among all 
classes of society, in the street, the cars and places of 
business has been the great subject of salvation. 
Crowds of from three to five thousand alt nd these 
roviyal meetings, yet they are noted for their 
quiet and order, and the absence of excitment is as 
remarkable as the revival itself, 

— Bishop Edwards, of the United Brethren church, 
reports the following statistics from the district com- 
prised by the States of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Vir- 
ginia, West Virginia, and parts of New York, Ohio, 
and Tennessee: preaching places, 1219; organized 
churches, 1,102; classes, 1,173; church houses, 565; 
parsonages, 56; Sabbath schools, 667; oflttcers and 
teachers, 6,588; scholars, 34,749; present number of 
members, 38,547; net increase the past year, 2,056; 
total collections for ail purposes $220,482,01. 

— Mrs. Watson, an English lady, for more than thir 
ty years has devoted herself and her fortune to the 
service of her Master, and has conducted schools in 
Athens, Candia, Valparaiso, Smyrna, Beirut, Sidon, 
and Lebanon. In Lebanon she has established a 
number of schools for the natives , including Roman and 
Greek Catholics, Druses, Maronites, etc. She has also 
built a church at Shemlan. Recently three girls' 
schools have been opened by Mrs. Watson in Leba- 
non villages, which are taught by native teachers 
trained by herself. The greater part of the expenses 
in all her enterprises she bears herself. 

— It is said that the Greek Church has been doing 
an effective missionary work in Japan. Since the 
Buddhist faith has fallen into decline in that country 
the Japanese have been greatly interested in finding a 
new religion to take its place, and missionaries from 
Russia have taken advantage of these favorable condi- 
tions to propagate their faith with great zeal. Their 
labors have been attended with much success. Not 
long ago the Bishop of Kamtchatka visited a city of Ja- 
pan, and received a hundred converts into the church 
at one time. It is reported that a number of Buddhist 
priests have been converted, and have assumed the 
functions of Christian minister of the Greek Church. 



4ttr$ 4 \\^ ^U\ 



The City. 

— Globe Theater, a wooden building on the West 
Side, was burned on Monday morning. It was a low 
resort in the midst of houses of prostitution, but was, 
after the great fire, the largest building of the kind in 
the city. 

— The Straits of Mackinaw are open for navigation 
at a much later date than usual this year; but lumber 
craft have for a week or two arrived in considerable 
numbers at this port from the upper lake region. 
Several inches of snow fell on Monday night twenty- 
five and thirty miles west of the city. 

— Dr. Thomas, of the First M. E. church, preached 
a sermon Sabbath before last in vindication of Pro- 
fessor Swing, which did not so much accomplish its 
avowed object, as to call attention of the public to the 
doctrine of Dr. Thomas himself. A minister of the 
Rock River Conference writes that he is ashamed of 
such ''meddlesome discourtesy," and such teachings 
would land the community in religious doubt and 
chaos. 

The Capitol. 



— An appropriation for the Centennial Exposition 
will be discussed by the House next Tuesday. The 
Pennsylvania Senate voted 1,000,000 to the building, 
and not the U. S. Senate as lately stated. 



The President's veto has humiliated the icflitionists, 
but exalted him in the eyes of the large majority and 
the wiser ponion of the people. The currency bill 
will coma up again this week. Meanwhile, compro- 
mise measures are t?lked over, and one authorizing 
free banking and a reduction of the greenback circula- 
tion to $300,000,000 is likely to unite the parties. 

On Monday, eulogies were pronounced, and formal 
resolutions of respect were adopted in the House, 
in memory of the late Senator Sumner, by Congress. 
The most effective speech was made by Lamar, of 
Mississippi, v/ho once left Congress to join the Re- 
bellion. His ple.i for restoration of confidence and 
good feeling between the North and South, was very 
eloquent and effective. 

The Country. 

The number of foreign bound passengers on the 
ocean steamers is much less than for many years — a 
wholesome reaction. 

The Federal Council of the Internationals at New 
York resolved on the 26th to dissolve as the organiza- 
tion has proved a cDmplete failure in this country. 

— Pres. Mitchell of the Milwaukee and St. Paul 
road says it will be impossible to run trains at a profit 
under the new railroad law of Wisconsin, and his road 
will stop running when it goes into effect. 

A little foiir-year-old boy was found horribly mur- 
dered near Boston l&Xaly^ aad the perpetrator of the 
deed proved to be another boy of 15 who acknowl- 
edged the crime, and is thought to be insane. 

---The whisky ring of the Pennsylvania Legislature 
lately gained an important victory in passing a bill 
permitting manufacturers to sell as well as make liqu- 
ors. A large number of ladies from different parts of 
the State were present during the discussion and vote, 
giving- their silent influencs to the right. 

— It is reported from New Orleans th^t the Missis- 
sippi floods have brought partial or entire ruin upon 
25,000 persons in and near that city. Northern cities 
are contributing largely to their relief. Many of the 
finest plantations of Louisiana are under water, a num- 
ber of women and children are reported drowned, 
hundreds are without food and shelter, and vast herds 
of stock are dying for want of food. 

The Arkansas troubles are lessening since Tuesday 
last when the Baxter crowd and the U. S. troops had a 
skirmish in which some of the former were wounded. 
Amid all the conflicting statements it is diflScult to 
determine which side has most right and which most 
wrong. If an honest court can try the case, after the 
combatants have had enough of war, the people may 
know the truth and justice be done. 

— The temperance movement has been quiet for 
some time in Columbus, 0., but on Monday Wagner, 
a saloonist, invited the public to a grand opening. A 
band of ladies went to the place and were ejected 
forcibly by Wagner. There is great excitement, and 
Wagner if on trial for assault. The District Court at 
Des Moines, Iowa, ordered all the saloons closed, but 
has been disregarded. They propose to fight till the 
last. The Constitutional Convention of Ohio after 
several days discussion have voted to submit to the 
people the question of license with restraining laws, or 
"no license." 

Foreign. 



— Castelar has written a letter in fayorof a Federal 
Republic for Spain. 

— The Emperor William closed the session of the 
German Reischstag on Saturday with a set speech of 
little importance. 

— Count Chambord has learned wisdom from his 
former attempt and failure to become King of France, 
and has renewed his conspiracy. 

— The expenses of the British government on ac- 
count of the famine in India, are estimated at $32,- 
500,000, and a loan is proposed to meet the bill. 

— The remains of Livingstone were buried in West- 
minster Abbey on the 16th, attended by one of the 
largest funeral processions ever known in England. 
Stanley was one of the pall bearers. 

— News from Poland gives particulars of the attempt 
to force the people to accept the Russian national 
church. The priests of twenty-six parishes in one 
province have been imprisoned. The peasants refused 
to recognize the Russian priests, in some places ston- 
ing them and attacking the military sent to force them 
to church. At one village the troops opened fire, 
killing many peasants. At another village a number 
of officers and solders were killed and fifty-seven peas- 
ants shot down. Superstition seems matched against 
superstition for self-destruction. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



13 



COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 



CHAPTER II.— (continued.) 



There are other customs more or less frequently connected 
with college fraternities which, from their doubtful or immoral 
character, cannot be looked upon as useful in forming right 
character or taste. They will be briefly mentioned. 

The stated meetings of the Yale -'upper class" societies 
often continue till after midnight; with some the regular 
time for adjourning is two or three o'clock in the morning. 
Special meetings and initiations always continue till near day- 
break. 

In announcing to candidates their acceptance, the mem- 
bers of Yale societies proceed from room to room at midnight 
and after singing a coarse song, announce their errand, receive 
the acceptance of the candidate and dispatch the fruit, cakes 
and wine provided. They then light fresh cigars, sing an- 
other song or two, cheer a little and pass on. 'The procession 
grows more and more hilarious, and its songs hoarser and 
huskier as to utterance, until towards the last it is little better 
than a disorderly crowd whose members are apt to laugh 
when some one smashes a street lamp with a banana, or 
tosSes an orange through a window; and when it has given 
out its final election, It lingers longinglj' about the concluding 
' treat,' and perhaps is at length obliged to drag away by 
main force a few of its tipsiest members, wlio drowsily insist 
on 'making a night of it,' then and there." At initiation 
suppers wine is always provided and sometimes stronger 
drinks, with which the "upper class" men "celebrate" 
themselves into beastiality after the Freshmen have retired. 

Occasionally special meetings are held, and after the close 
of the literary exercises a sack containing one or two bushels 
of peanuts is emptied on the floor, and an indiscriminate 
scramble is made for them by guests and entertainers. This 
instructive exercise is followed by cigars. 

In some societies the sober, substantial students are over- 
borne by the ''fast" and "loud-mouthed" party, Avhich 
gives an ill repute to the whole membership. In others the 
scant literary exercises are helped out by music and dancing, 
smoking, card-playing and occasional suppers. One Delta 
Kappa Epsilon chapter, on special occasions, when a number 
of guests from other chapters are present, prolongs its meet- 
ings until after midnight, and then maixhes through the 
streets, to the number of half a hundred or more, singing 
society songs before young ladies' boarding-schools, or shout- 
ing them out under the college windows. 

Enough has been said of these features of college frater- 
nities to show that much of their energy is spent in practices 
of a debasing and demoralizing character . That their effect 
upon the social natvxre or intelligence of the student is to 
lower the standard of both no one,, who admits the above 
facts or the many others that could be produced, will deny 
It may be claimed that the picture is over-drawn, that a just 
representation of the system is not given. It may properly 
be urged in reply that the oaths or pledges of concealment, 
which cannot greatly vary from those quoted, are a violation 
of the principles of the Bible ; a stain and clog upon the con 
science; and introductory to similar forms in the outside 
world that are everywhere deprecated by right-minded men 
The initiations, rowdyism and immoral practices described 
may be unknown in some institutions where an active and 
strong moral influence prevails. This difference would in a 
great measure vanish if opportunities for indulgence were 
more favorable. The societies are year by year becoming- 
more unified through national conventions and society journ- 
als, and acquaintance begets likeness. Membership in a fra- 
ternity means responsibility for its acts. Every chapter shares 
in the moral delinquency of a single one, as every church and 
member of a rehgious denomination is scandalized by the 
misdeeds of any of its component bodies. 

But there are unexceptional features of the college society 

system. Jealousy and strife are its natural and universal 

companions. President Hitchcock, in his "Reminiscences of 

Amherst College," (p. 320) says of the societies, secret and 

. anti-secret, of that institution : 

"These, at difiisrent periods, have been fruitful sources of 
excitement, jealousy and heart-burning among the students 
and towards the faculty. The secret societies would of course 



have little prestige were they not strongly exclusive, so as in 
fact to leave out a majority of the students, nor unless those 
selected embraced the elite as to scholarship. But the majority 
thus passed by, or rather as they would regard it, made the 
mudsills on which these societies rested, would not ba very 
well contented in such a position, and the same faculty that 
had granted permission for the formation of the secret socie- 
ties could not refuse the application for one of a contrary 
character. But this subjected them to the jealousy of the 
secret societies. There would be a desperate struggle among 
the students to obtain the leading men in the classes for the 
different societ es, and they would ere long come to regard 
this matter as one of the most important interests in college." 
This is the uniform testimony from every institution where 
the secret society has been estabhshed. It is always and 
naturally regarded as a selfish combination to secure privilege 
and promote clannishness among students. Jealousy and 
suspicion cannot be otherwise than aroused against those who 
maintain such obligations as have been given in these pages. 
If there are two or more societies in an institution the evil is 
aggravated by ambitious strife, not inaptly termed ''college 
politics," in which is displayed on a smaller scale, but with 
the same bitter zeal, the intrigue and wire-pulling- of a poUt- 
ical campaign in the outside world, The fraternities in this 
respect serve, not as educators of culture and sense, but of 
finesse and low strategy — an acquisition valuable to the class 
known as "politicians," but not to the upright citizen. The 
points of dispute in these contests are of course various, but 
the open literary societies have perhaps suffered most from 
them. The ''Linonia" and "Brothers in Unity" at Yale 
were justly among the most celebrated organizations of this 
kind in the country. But the wrangling of the secret cliques 
killed them. A graduate of Yale writes of their elections as 
carried on of late years: "The amount of political intrigue 
and wire-pulling and log-rolling expended in deciding the 
first election in these two societies was almost fabulous. The 
three lower classes were vitally interested in the matter, for 
each had a share in the spoils, and a vice-secretaryship might 
be as valuable in taking one man to Sigma Phi as a presi- 
dency in taking another man to Bones or Keys. The bar- 
gains and coalitions and combinations and cross-combinations 
made between the six Junior and Freshman societies were 
therefore all but innumerable." An instance of this conten- 
tion lately occurred in Chicago University, and is thus de- 
scribed by a student in a letter dated March 10th, 1S74: 

"At a recent election in one of our literary societies the 
members of the two secret societies formed opposition parties, 
and after considerable "pulling and hauling," illegal voting, 
etc , succeeded in electing a candidate not desired by the ma- 
jority of the society. An anti-secret party was immediately 
formed, the election proved null and void, and the proper 
man elected. Thus it is that these Greek fraternities are 
breaking up the literary societies-in our colleges throughout 
the United States, but especially in the East; and our college 
papers, with their eyes closed to these facts, are wondering 
what is causing the decline of our once so flourishiuo- and 
beneficial hterary societies." 

These coalitions have not been confined to students, but 
have often affected the decisions of faculiies, particularly in 
the assignment of "college honors" and prizes. As an in- 
stance, Amherst College had at one time 268 students, of 
whom 126 were secret society men, 142 were not. Of the 
forty prizes given, the former received thirty-one, — more than 
three-fourths of the whole, while they numbered less than 
one-half. The number and value of such distinctions given 
to themselves is boastingly displayed by some societies to 
draw in members. Indeed, an undisputable authority says 
that the incumbant of a Greek professorship in one of tlie 
largest of the State Universities was, before his appointment, 
a prominent representative of the college secret societies, and 
is largely indebted to them for his position. 

A recent instance of apt scholarship in the peculiar social- 
ity of the college society was lately witnessed at Cornell Uni- 
versity, Ithaca, N.Y. Professor C. A. Blanchard, of Wheaton 
College, 111. , was, on invitation of the citizens, delivering a 
series of lectures against secret societies in Journal Hall of 
that city. One of his lectures was on the college " brother- 
hoods," and the interested students were present. Their 
behavior is thus described in the Ithaca Journal of January 
23, 1874: 

[CONOLUDSD NBXT WEEK.] 



(Not our own Publicatlous.) 
For Sale by EZRA A. COOK & CO., 
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THIRTEEN REASONS 
U'Isy a i'Siristian slioui^I uoi be a Frccniaeon. 

BT 

REV. ROBERT ARMSTRONG. 
The author states his reason clearly and care- 
fully, and any one of the thirteen reasons if 
properly considered, will keep a christian out of 
the Lodge. 

Single copy, by mail postpaid 05 

Perdoz., " ." " 50 

'• 100, express charges extra ,350 

Light on Freemasonry, 

BY ELDSE 'D, BIBITASD, "" 

TO Y/mCH IS APPSKDED A 

Eevaiaticn of -the Mysteries of Odd-fel- 

iov ship 'oy a ;.'3ember ©f the Craft. 
The wiiole containing over Sva hundred paget. 
lately revised and republiehed, Price $2,00 
The first part of the above work, Light on Free- 
masonry, 410 pages in paper cover, will be sent 
post paid on receipt of $1. 

iaish's Mm of Ffee^iasooff, 

REVISED EDITION, 

Is ,'i Scholarly Review o£ thelnstltTition, by Ret , 
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Price S5 ots. 

on Masojsry. 

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Eld^^r Steams' Books, 

SIcai'Bs' lufjiiiry Into (lie Saiare and Teudeocy of .Uasonry 
With aa Api)C23ili.\, 

SEVENTH EDITION. 

?SS Pages, in Cloth 60 cent.?. 

I. .1 .. Taper ■■ 40 

Sisams' Xictters on Blaioary. 

Showing the antagonism between Freemasonry 
and. the Christian Religion, 
Price, .30 cents. 



Stearns* Revievi^ of Two Magomo Ad- 
drssges. 

In this scathing review the lying pretentions of 
the order are clearly shown. 

Price, 10 cents. 

Steams' Complete Works on Mnsoiiry. 

This book contains the "INQUIRY," "LET- 
TERS ON MASONRY" and "A New Chapter on 
IUasonky,'' bound together— three books iu one. 

Price, $1.25. 



Xievlngton's Key to Masonry. 

This is Rev. Mr. Levington's last, and in the 
judgment of its author, beet work on Jlasonry. 
The contents of the first chapter are as follows: 

"Commencement and growth uf Speculative or 
Symbolic Freemasonnj — A table bhowing the 
thing lit a glance —The use that the Atheists made 
of it — Idenuc;il with Uluminism — Its connection 
with the French Kevolution, and with the Irih 
Rebellion— The action of the British Parliament 
with regard to it— Proofs 01 its diabol cal pur- 
poses—Its Introduction, doings progress and de- 
signs' in the United States." 

The contents of the l-.leventh chapter are thus 
startling: 

"Knights of the Golden Circle— Graphic ac- 
count of them by a seceding Knight, and re- 
marks thereon, showing the identity of the or- 
der with Masonry — Quotations from Sir Walter 
Scott." 

This work Is thrilling in statement, and pow- 
erful iu argument. 425 page;-, 

Prxe, $1.35. 



iernardy ppen'ii:; to L'|!ii on Hascnrj, 

Showing the Character of the Institution by its 
terrible oaths and penalties. Bound, in boards, 
50 cents ; flexible covers, 35 cents. 



ADVIESI TO CHEISTIANITY, 

And Inimical to a Republican Gioveminent 

BtBEV. LEBBEUS ARMSTRONG, 

(i'resbyterlan,) 

A Seceding Mason of 21 degrees. 

This is a very telling work: an no hon- 
est man that reads it will think of joining 
the Lodge. 

PRICE, 20 cts, Each $1 75 per doz. 
Post Paid. 



14 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



I 



Items for Temperance Workers. 



In Pennsylvania where license prevails there are 13,765 
liquor dealers, one to every 270 of the population. 

The proposition to substitute tea for brandy in the Rus- 
eian army has been (submitted to ''specialists," who are to 
report upon "utility and results produced by brandy and 
tea." 

Bock beer, or what is generally called buck beer, is a 
brewing of double strength, which is made at this season of 
the year. The custom is ancient, la oiden times the brew- 
ers believed that a spirit called ''Bock" presided over the 
spring brewing, and imparled to it more than ordinary 
strcn2;th. In time belief in the spirit wan difpolled, but the 
beer in the latter part of April R-as made of double streagih, 
and gradually be c '.me koowa as "buck' beer, whence the 
pictures which ornarfient the windows of the saloons. 

The amount of liquors made and consumed in Austria ie 
very large. The empire is siid to contain 2,622 breweries, 
producing amiuaily 1,136,480,806 li'.ers of beer, or about 
249, 150,747 gallons. In addition to this, the wine pro- 
diictioa amounts t-o about 243,000,000 galloas annually. 
Tue population of (h'i country is about 40,000,000, so. thai 
the avcr?.ge confcump'.ion of every rasn, woman and child in 
the empire is about six galiois of wine and six and one 
quarter gallons of beer. 

The cost of I'quors in the United Kingdom in 1871 was 
$541,000,000, and the liquors drank there in six years, from 
1865 to 1870 inclusive, would build 22,000 miles of ralroad, 
7,000 more tLan tliey now have. The quantity of grain 
used for the six year's drink would m^ke bread sufiicieni 
to support the whole populalioa of the Uaited Kinf/dom for 
two year?, and the amount spent would build a fine house 
for every family of five pereons. In New York cily three 
glasses of liquor are drank for every loaf of bread eaten, the 
iiquor costing thirty cents and the bread ten. If the waste 
cccaaioned by drink could be stayed, a national dtbt would 
be unknow.i and twxes would be triflng; if it coElinues 
without abatement there is danger that the debt will in- 
crease beyond the ability to even meet the intereet. — Carle- 
ton Sentinel. 

The Duke of Orleans, who v;a8 the eldest son of King 
Louis Paillippe, was the inheritor of whatever rights his 
father could transmit. He was a very noble young man — 
physically noble. His generous qiialilies had rendered him 
universally popular. One mormug he invited a few of 
his cump^nions to breakfast, R'i he was about to take his de- 
partute from Paris to j jiu his regiment, lo the conviviality 
of the hour, ha drank a little too much wine. He did noi 
become intoxicated — he was not in any respect a dissipated 
man. In taking the parting gla^-s he slightly lost the bal- 
ance of bis body and mind. Bidding adieu io his compan- 
ions, he entered his carriage; but for that one extra glass ol 
wiae he would luive kept his seat, lie leaped from his car- 
riage, but for that oue extra glass of wine he would have 
alighted on his feet- liis head &lruck the pavement. Sense- 
less and bheliug, be was taken ii:to a beer shop near by and 
died. That extra glass of wine overtbriw the Orleans dy- 
nasty, confi3catf(! their property of one hundred millions of 
dollaTS, and sent the whole family into exile. 

♦♦.• 

Fa its aisd Fig^ures. 

The foUov/iug is the amount cf currency in circulation in 
Great Bntain, Germany and France: Great Britain, $686,- 
421,540; G;rmany, $557,772,098; France, $1,200,545,441. 

In the course of kst vear, there were published in Eng- 
land five hundred and seven new novels, and two hundred 
and twenty-one r.ew volumes of poetry. To these may be 
added, for tiie year's product, half as many more books oi 
the same &ort published in this counlry. A similar fertility 
has occurred in previous years. But how many of these 
books have had any just prstendons to be read or remem- 
bered I To be as chfriiable as possible, it may be asserted, 
that nine-tenths of the annual crop of novels and poems 
represent only the waste of human aspirations. 

The Chicago Council contains forty members, of whom 
more than one-third are directly interested in the liquor- 
traffic; five are manufacturers of intoxicating beverages, and 
ten beepers of public drinking saloons. The school com- 
mittee is composed of five members; one is a distiller and 
two are saloon keepers. The committee on licenses of all 
kinds, of the same number, contains two manufacturers of 
liquors and two falooii-keepers. The chairman of two im- 
portant committees, that more than all others have to do 
with finance, are men who not long since were indicted bj 
the grand jury of the county for bribery. No one can 
reasonably doubt that such appointments mean riot and ras- 
cality. That schemes are on foot to inaugurate the same 
style of administration in all our cities and larger towns in 
the west, is openly proclaimed. 

The English Journal of Science notes that the stokers of 
steamers in hot countries, laboreas in steel -works, iron mills, 
etc., can work without visible detriment to health in temp- 
eratures of from 100 to 212 deg. To this it may be added, 
that, in some parts of Cahfornia, Americans can farm in the 
Bun all day, with the thermometer ranging over 110. In 



fact, it is the humidity of the atmosphere in heated terms 
that works detriment to health and life. In a permanently 
dry air, there are no sunstrokes or congestions at a high 
temperature. 

The most stringent lottery law in the country has re- 
cently been passed by the Ohio legislature. The public or 
private promoter?, backers, ox vendcis lor or on account of 
"any lottery, policy, or scheme of chance of any kind or de- 
scription, by whatever name, style or title the same may be 
denominnted or known, or whereyer located," are, upon con- 
viction, to be "fined in any sum not less than $50 nor more 
than $1C0, and be imprisoned in the county jail not lees 
than ten nor more than ninety days, at the discretion of the 
court." No exception is made for church fair lotteries or 
oewspaper gift distributions. The purchaser of a ticket in h 
lottery can, if dissatisfied, recover the amount and one half 
more, together vrith exemplary damages not less than $50. 

«-»« 

Literary Notices. 



Lectures and Letters is the fifteenth of the N. Y. 
Trilune extras ; contfiining a letter by Bayard Taylor ou the 
discoveries on the Site of ancient Troy; six lectures by the 
celebrated physician, Dr. Brown Sequard, on the nerves; 
four by Prof. Proctor oa astronomy; and one by Prof. 
Chandkr on the Germ Theory of disease. This series is 
bringing a vast amount of current and valuable literature 
within the reach of ail. 

The Galaxy, along with considerable lighter matter, has 
interesting sketches of foreign life and character in Parij 
and Scandanavia, and brings up Eome almost forgotten his- 
tory connected with the Revclulionary war and French 
treaties of that time. A Spanish writer, Cespedes, writes 
of the Temperance Cruside from a foreign stand point. -— 
Sheldon <& Co., IJ'ew York. 

ToK Sanitarian for May appears enlarged and improved 
with papers oa ventiiatioD, Hygiene of dwellings, the Sew- 
erage Questioa, puplio Health Reports, etc. of value to iu- 
teihgent readers. Published at 234 Broadway, New York. 



WHEATON COLLEGE. 



per- 

this 



commodious build- 
'barnic," but massive 



The American Wesleyan, whose editor writes from 

aonal knowledge and honest good will, epoaks thus of 

institution: 

We havfi a heart full of good sentiments for Wheaton 
College. Its advantages are suiperlor. 

1 . It is easy cf eccesr. It is but an hour'd ride from 
Chicago, with which commuacaticns can be made almoet 
hourly any day, by the frequent traia?. Most other points 
of the State and nation by the same means lie within easy 
reach . 

2. Wheaton College has large and 
ingp, — not Gothic, nor Doric, nor yet ' 
tasteful, convenient and well furnished. 

3. Wheaton College is located in a healthy region, where 
the surface is broken into billowy undulaliou and beautiful 
hills affording a well drained surface. 

4. Wheaton College is aa institution of enterprise. It is 
qbri'ast with the advanced scie'ntific thought of the times. 
It has a faculty of fourteen member.s, who are thorough, 
earr;est and profound. Tiiey use the eame standard test 
books of science as Harvard and Yale, without the well 
known infidel creed of the/orme'",orthe worm-eaten systems 
of secretism as allowed in the latter. 

5. No hazing is permitted under any prct-xt; no secret 
society can breathe its free and generous air and live; no pro- 
fanity ov smoking is permitted; no lounging away the Sab- 
bath is indulged when attendance at church is so easy; but 

joyo'is, generous life surrounding them, stu- 
place, and stand upon its 
Every element of usefulness 
and true mauhood baa its every opportunity to develope. 
At larger institutions the professors can spend but little time 
with each student, and in literaiy exercisse, unless one pos- 
sesses unusual br.llianoy, he is lost in the sea of mind that 
floats around him. Not so at Wheaton, every one has a 
part to play in the acts of that mineature but n-vodel world. 

6. Wheaton College is reformatory from foundation stones 
to turret-tops, Knesling in the prairie grass upon that 
beautiful summit more than twenty years ago, a few Wes- 
leyan Methodists, friends of the slaves, of the country and cf 
Christ, consecrated that spot forever to the service of the 
Lord. That consecration is still borne in mind, and adhered 
lo by the present owners and occupants of the institution. 
Though cast out by the majority of Congregationalists from 
that intimate relationship and cordial support which as 
brethren they should give this noble college; nevertheless, 
neither the president nor faculty have a single step to re- 
trace. We know their metal. When the battle is over you 
will find their bodies in the breach, 

7. -A s Wheaton College teaches Wesleyan principles, for 
which cause the world and the popular chuiches cast it out 
as evil, does not this very fact point it out to Wesleyans as 
an object of our sympathy and support? And now as 
eighteen thousand dollars are needed to lift it above all in- 
debtedness, we trust that our brethren will not listen to its 
appeals in vain. Give it students, naoney and prayers. 



with a genial, 

dents become enamored of the 

grounds as though enchanted. 



asonio Books. 

FOR SAUS AT THE CYHOSURE 
OF! ICE . 

ThoBe who wisli to know the character of 
Freemaeonry, as shown hy its own pablications, 
will find many standard works in the lollowing 
list. 

No sensible Mason dares deny that such men as 
Albert G. Mackey, the great Masonic Lexicogra- 
pher, and Daniel bickele, the Masonic author and 
publisher, are the highest Masonic authority in 
the United States. 



lacbf's Masonic liioalist 



MONITOEIAL INSTRUOTION BOOZ 



bt albekt g. mackey, 

"Past General Hlffli rriest of tJie General Grand 
Chapter of the United StitsB, Ejiight of the 
Eagle and Pelican, Prince or Mercy," Etc. 
Etc, Price, %l as 



u 



m w immm^ 



Containing a Definition of Terms, Koticea 
of its History, Traditions and Antiquities, and 
an account of all the Bitca and Mysteries of 
the Ancient World. 12 mo. 626 pages, $8 00. 



fm^i 



IMS. If Ml vm 



OE 



Monitorial Instrnotions in the Decrees of 
Entered Apprentice. Fellow Craft, and Master 
Mason; with rercoibnieB relating to Installa- 
tiouB, Dealcationg, Consecrations, Laying of 
Cornor-stones &c. Price, ?3 00, 

Paper Covers 2.0O. 



MAOKEY'S TEXT BOOK 

MASONIC JUEISPEUDENCB. 

Illustrating the Laws of Freemasonry, both 
Written and unwritten. 

This is the Great Law Book of Freemasonry 
670 pages, Price, $2.50 



Or lUnslrations of Freemasonry Emhelllshed 

Price, 75 ct3 



EisUoa'gMositsrslFrggmso&rj. 

A Practical Guide to the Ceremones In 
the Degrees conferred in Masonic Lodge 
Chapter, Bncimpmeuts, etc. Illustrated Edi- 
tion, la cloth, $125 ; paper, 75 ets. 

Containing the Uegroea ol JTreemasonry em 
braced in the Lodge, Chapter , Council and 
Commandery, embellished with nearly 800 
symbolic Illustrations. Togetherwith Tactics 
and drill of MasonicKnighthood. Also, forms 
of Masonic Documents, Notes, Songs, Masonic 
dates, Installations, etc. By D. Sickels. 32 mo 
tuck. Price |;1.60. 

iitim La 

Comprises a Complete Code of Kegulations, 
Decisions and Opinions upon Questions of 
Masonic Jurisprudence , Price, f 2 25 . 

limii twM IM afii Uonilor. 

Illustrated with Explanatory Engravings 
Price $2.50. 

miver's Hktorj of Initiation. 

Comprising a detailed Account of the Bites 
and Ceremonies of all the Secret and Myeteii 
ot!B InstltutiODB of the Ancient World. 



Books on OW Fellowship. 

Donaldson's 0<ld Follows Test Book 
By Pasoaal Bonaldson, D- B.. 

SBAND MASTER OF THE GRAND tODGB OP NORTH- 
■ BBN N. T., 

Illustrated with numerous engravings, showing 
the emolems of the order. A detailed account 
ol the Forms, Ceremonies, Funeral Services and 
Odes with music, and a complete manual lor the 
guidance of Officers and Lodges. Pocket edition. 
Tuck, $1.50. 

Grosh's Manual of Odd Fellowship 

BT BBT. A. B. GROSH, 

Containing the history, defence, principles and 
government of the order; the instructions of 
each degree and duties of every station and office, 
with engravings of the emblems of the orders, etc. 

Price in Cloth, $2.00 

" Tuck, abridged edition, 1 50 



1^^ 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 




13 "Wabash. Ave., Cliicago 



FREEMASONRY EXPOSED, 

by CAP'T. WILLIAM MORGAN, 

THE GENUINE OLD MORGAN BOOK :— republished with en- 
gravings showing the Lodge Koom, Dress of candidates, Slens 
Due Guards, Grips, Etc. ' ^ ' 

This revelation is so accurate that Freemasons murdered the au- 
thor for writing it. Thousands have testified to the correctness of 
the revelation and this book therefore sells very rapidly. " "' 

- _ „ Prica 25 cents. 

PerDoz.Post Paid 43 0^ 

Per hundred by express, (express charges extra.)!.'!.'!!! $10 00 

THE BROKEH SEAL. 

OR PERSONAL REMINISCENCES OF THE ABDUCTION AND 
MURDER OP Wm. MORGAN, 

By SAMUEL D. QREENE, 

Price in cloth, $1.00. Paper covers, 50 cents. 

In Paper Covers per Doz. Post paid $4 50 

•' per hundred by express (ex. charges extra $25.00 
That the book is one of great Interest and value is shown by the 
following 

OPINIONS OF THi: PRESS. 

' "A Masonic Revelation. — Mr. Samuel D. Greene is a venerable 

fentleman of the highest respectability, whose statements seem to 
e worthy of full credence. !Oie jSroAen Heal: or, T'ersonal 
Seminiscences of the Jt'torgan z^bduciion and Murder, is the 
title of a book of some three hundred pages just issued by him, 
purporting togivea full and accurate account, from personal knowl- 
edge, of tue Morgan 'abduction,' and other masonic matters which 
made such an excitement in this country, now almost half a century 
ago." — Cong ref/ationaiist and 2iecorder, Soston, 

" •Fbebmasonbt Developed.'— 'The Broken Seal: or, Personal 
Reminiscences of the Morgan Abduction and Murder,' is the title of 
a volume written and just published by Samuel D. Greene, of 
Boston. The author belonged to the same lodge with Morgan, and 
professes to know all about that event which made such a sensation 
throughout the country forty years ago. The book contains the 
confession of Morgan's murderer, and much more curious and inter- 
esting matter, including the ceremony of initiation, etc. The au- 
thor opposes Freemasonry as inimical to good government, to so- 
ciety, and to the Church ; and the story that he here tells will make 
a sensation in the order, if its statements are really what they pur- 
port to be. It Freemasonry is what it is supposed by many to be. In 
Its obligations, the author of this book must be a bold man."— .2>at. 
}y fferald, Sosion. 

*'We are acq^uainted with Mr. Greene, and have no doubt that his 
account is entirely reliable, and of great hiBtoric and moral interest. 
Cant. Wm. Morgan was Mr. Greene's neighbor i'^ Batavia, N. Y,., 
and a member of the same lodge with him at the time of the great 
excitement in 1826. The titles to these chapters are sufficiently ex- 
citing to give the book a largo sale: — ' Tho Storm Gathering;" 
"Abduction of Morgan;" "Attempted Abduction of Miller and 
his Rescue;" "What became of Morgan;" "What Morgan Ac- 
tually Revealed;" "Confession of the Murderer;" "Allegationa 
against Freemasonry, etc." — 'Boston tOaity JVews. 

History of The Abduction and Murder of 
Cap't. Wm. Morgan, 

A8 prepared by Seven Committees of Citizens, appointed to ascer- 
tain the fate of Morgan. 

This book contains indisputable, legal evidence that Freemasons, 
abducted and Murdered Wm. Morgan, for no other offence than 
tho revelation of Masonry. It contains the sworn testimony of over 
twenty persons, including Morgan's wife, and no candid person 
after reading this book, can doubt that many of the most respecta- 
ble FREEMASONS, in the Empire State, with others were concerned 
In this crime. 

Single Copy, post Paid, 25ccnts. 

Per doz. " $2,00. 

Per ICO, Express Charges Extra, 10.00. 

Valance's Confession of The Murder of 
Capt, "Wni. Moffgasi. 

This confession of Henry L. Valance, one of tho three Freemasons 
who drowned Morgui. in the ISIiatiara Eivcr, was taken from the lips 
of the dying man by 1ji. John C. Emery, of Racine County, Wiscon- 
sin in 1348 ; The confession bears clear evidence of truthfulness. 

Single copy, post paid, 20 cents. 

Per doz. " '$1.50. 

Per 100 Exprosa ChartrcG Extra, 8.00. 

The Mystic Tie or freemasonry a League 
V\rith the Bsvil 

This is an accon nt of the Church Trial of Peter Cook, and wife of 
Elkhart, Indiaiv , for refusing to support a Reverend Freemason; 
and their very able defence presented by Mrs. Lucia C. Cook, in 
which she clearly shows that Freemasonry, is antagonistic to the 
Christian Rojigion. Price iiO Cents. 

NABHATIVESIAWD ARGUMENTS, 
showing the Conflict of Secret Societies with the Constitution and 
Laws, of the Union and of tho b'tates. 

Iby FRAirCIS SEMFI.E of 

Uover, loTva, 
Tho fact that Gecret Gocioties, interfere with the execution and 
pervert tho administration of Law is here clearly proved. 
Price 20 Cents. 

Tlie Asatiasaasoa'a Scs'ap SooI«, 

CONSISTING OF 

21 CYMOSUEE TEACTS. 

In this book are the views of more tbim a Score of men, many of 
them of distniguishod abidty, on the subject of Scicret Societies. 

The dangerous tendency and positive e-dl of organized Secrecy 
is here sho"wn by the most varied aud powerful arguinents and illus- 
trations that have ever been given to the public. 

Lecturers and others who wish to And the best arguments against 
the Lodge, should sendfor this book. 

Those who wish to circulate Aiitimasonic Tracts ought to have the 
book to select from. 

Single Copy, post paid, 20 cents. 

Per Doz. " $1.75 

Per 100, Express charges Extra $10.00 



SERMON ON MASOKRYj 

BY REV. "W. P. M'NARY, 

Paitor United Presbyterian Church, Bloomington, Ind. 
This is a very clear, thorough, candid and remarkably coneice 
Scriptural argument on the character of Freemasonry. 

a:jsgle Copy, Post Paid, B 

Sin Doz, 50 

Per Hnudered, Express Charges Extra, $350 



A NEW V/ORK OF GREAT INTEREST.! 



SECRET SOCIETIES AEIENT AND MODEEN, 

' By GENX J. W. PHEI.PS. 

240 Pages, handsoniely Printed. 

This new book is one that every man should read who wishes to 
bo posted on the character and influence of Secret Societies. 
The work is particularly commended to the attention of OSicers 

of Tko Ai'iny and "Navy, Tlae Bsncli and Tfes Clergy. 
The Table of Contents" i^ as Ibllo'ws: 

,'TnE Ai-fTiQtiiTY OF Secret SociETiEt^, The Life of 
.Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, The Oeigin of 
Masonry, Was WAsniNGTON a Mason ? Filmore's and 
Webster's deeerence to Masonry, A brief outline of 

THE progress OF MasONKY IN THE UNITED STATES, TliE 

TajMmany Ring, The Credit Mobiliek Ring, Masonic 
Benevolence, The uses op Masonry, An Illustration , 
The Conclusion." 

lotiess of ths Pres5» 



Secret Societies, Ancient and Modern: An Outline of their 
Rise, Progress and Character v/ilh Respect to the Christian Religion 
and Republican Government. Edited by General J. W. Phelps. 
Chicago: Ezra A. Cook & Co. 

The author traces back the origin of Masonry and its evil influ- 
ences, parlicnlarly as seen and felt in our own country; the Tam- 
many Ring, Credit Mobiler, &c. He shows tho subserviency of 
some of our public men, such as Fillmore aud Webster, to its dom- 
inating power. If read dispassionately it will do good. — United 
Presbyterian. 

The author has presented information concerning the Old Myster- 
ies and their antagonism to Christianity; the Masonry of Washingti n 
and his virtual secession from it; the harlotry of Masonry, En^^ith 
and American, in assuming charge of international politics, and treat- 
ies between England and the United Slates; the disgusting interven- 
tion of the lodge at the close of the French and German war; the 
Masonic baptisms ; all these and more Gen. Phclr« has given, accom- 
panied with clear philosopLiioal dissertations of his own. 

JSible Banner New York. 

Single Copy, Postpaid TO 

PerDoz" " " f4 7.5 

Per Hundred Express Charges Extra $:;3 CO 



o^ 



rwi 



W3 nO'^ HAVS 22 SiieLISH TEACK, OKS &EEMAN, AKL ONE SWEEBISH 
These tract.? are sold at the rate of $1.00 per lOOO pages. 



4 ftast liai m tii tm Simklioa of \rdi. 

HAS BEEN SECURED AND WE HOPE WILL NEVER BE EX- 
HAUSTED. A friend haspledgert this fund a dollar for every other 
dollar received, so EVERY NEW SUBSCRIPTION TO THE TRACT 
FUND COUNTS DOUBLE. 

Many of our most earnest v.'orkers in this cause of God are poor 
men, who would bH glad to circulate thousands of pages of Anti- 
masonic literature if thev could have them free. 

SHALL V,'E NOT HAVB AN INEXIIAUSTIBLE TRACT FUND ? 

"TKS A?JTI.MASOHS SCRAP BOOK." 

Contains our 21 Cynosure Tracts, bound together, price 
20 cents. See advertisement. 

Address Ezra A. Coos & Co., 

13 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 



TRACT NO. 1: 
HISTORY or MASOJIRYe 
BY PRESIDENT J. BLANCHARD, OF WHEATON COLLEGE. 
This is now published in three tracts of four pages each. I'rice 
of each, 50 cents per 100; 04 per 1000. 

Tgact No. I, Part Fikst— Shows the origin of Speculative Free- 
masonry, and =B entiled 'HISTORY OF MASONRY." 

Tract No. 1, Part Second— Is entitled "DESPOTIC CHARAC- 
TER OP FREEMASOMRY " 

TR.4.0T No. 1, Part Third— Is entitled "FSEEMASONRY A 
CHRIST-EXCLUDING RELIGION." 

TRACT NO. 1, IN SWEDISH; 
translated by Prof. A. Ri CEiSVIM. A 15-page tract at $2.00 
per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 2: 

MASONIC MURBEa, 

By REV. J, R. BAIRD, of Pleasantville, Pa., a seceding Mason 

who has taken 17 degrees. A 2 page tract at 25 cents per 100; 

$3.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 3: 

SECBETS or EfASONKY, 

BY ELI TAPLEY. 

This is a 4-page Illustrated Tract, showing the signs, grips and 

pass-words, of tUe nrst three degrees. 60 cents per 100, or $4^00 per 

1000. 

TRACT NO. 4: 



BY PHILO CARPENTER. 
This is a 2-page tract, calling the attention of the public to the 
despotic and ridiculous titles of Freemasonry. Price '2.5 cents per 100 ; 
$2.00 per 1,000. 

TRACT. NO, 5: 

Extracts From Masonis Oaths and Penalties, as 
Sworn to by tho Srand Lcdgo of Ehsde Island. 

This tract is a reprint of a tract published in 1S.34, and is a very 
weighty document. A d-nage tract at 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 
1000. 

TRACT NO. 6: 

Eon. John Oiiincy Adams' Letter. 

GiviBg His asad Sis Fiit&er's GplslsE of Freeniitsaarj? (iSSlt); 

AND 

Hon, James Madisoirs Letter, 

CfMrag' His Opinlori of Freeinasanrj (1832). 
Both of these letters, in o!:e ^-pagetrr-ct, at "O cents per 100; $4.00 
per 1000. 



TRACT NO. 7: 

SATAN'S CABI.E.TOW. 

A 4-jpage tract. This is a careful analysis of the character of 
Masonic oaths, and shows thein to be most blasphemous and un- 
christian; and the Masonic Cable Tow is clearly shown to be the 
Cable Tow by which Satan is leading: thousands to eternal death. 
50 cents per 100; $4-00 per 1000. ' 

TRACT NO. 8: 

Is a 2-page double tract, "iLi,u3TR.vrED.' The first page repre- 
sents a Mason proclaimimg the wonderful wisdom and benevo- 
lence of the order, with an article below, entitled "Freema- 
sonry is only 152 Years Oi'i," and gives the time and 
place of its birth: 

The second side is entitled, '"Mni-.^sr and Treason not 
Exoo.pted," and shows that the Masonic order is treasonable in 
its constitution, and is both anii-Kepublican and anti-Christian, 
Price 25 cents per 100; $2 per lOUO. 

TRACT NO. 0, ILLUSTRATED : 
FREEMASONiiY IN THE CHURCH. 
Copy of a petition for the higher degrees of Freemasonry, In 
■which Blasphemous aud Despotic Titles are enumerated and 
prayed for. The Copy was printed for the use of "-Occidental Sov- 
ereign Consistory S. P. Jt. ,?," 32d degree— a Chicago Lodge— and 
was ordered by a deacon of a Christian Church Who is Grand Orator 
of the Grand Lodge of HI. 

TRACT NO. 10: 

CHARACTEK AKD SYMBOLS OF FEEKMASONET. 

A 2-page tract, (illustrated) by its "Grand Secretaries, Grand 
Lecturers, Perfect Prince Freemasons, Grand Inspector, Inquisitor 
Commanders, Grand High Priests," etc. The wonderful symboli- 
cal meaning of "the Cable Tow," "the Square and Compass," "tho 
Lamb Skin, or white Apron,' ' and "the Common Gavel," are given 
in the exact words of the highest Masonic authority. 25 cents ner 
lOOor $2.00 per 1000. ^ 

TRACT NO. 11; 

iilrsss of Safari O^^alj hmA\ New Jorl, 

TO THE PUBLIC; ^ " 

Concerning the Morgan Murder, and the character of Freema- 
Bonry, as shown by this and other Masonic murdera. 50 .cents ner 
100; $4.00 per 1000. ' ^ 

TRACT NO. 12: 

JUDGE ■WHITMEY AND MASONRY. 
This tract contains a condensed account of Judge Wtiltney's 
Defense before the Grand Lodge of Illinois, on char>i;e of unma- 
sonic conduct in bringing Samuel L. Keith the murderer of Ellen 
Slade, and a member of his Lodge, to justice, with Judge Whitney's 
subsequent renunciation of Masonry, 
An 8-page tract, $1.00 per 100; 58.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 13: 

DR. NATHANIEI. COI.VEK. ON MASONRY, 

and 

HOWARD CROSBY, D. D., 

Chancellor of the University of Now York, cu SECRETSOCIETIES. 
A double 2-page tract 25 cents per 100; S'-^ 00 per 1000. 

TKACT NO. 14: 

GRAND ZiODGE MASONRY. 

ITS SDLATIONTO CIVIL Q07i:BNi.:£17T AND THB CBBISTIAHSi:i,!aiO». 
Opening address before the Monmouth Convention, by P2B3. J. 
BLAKCHA5D of WESaTOtT OOIiLSQE. This is a 16-page tract at SS.OO 
per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

TBACT NO. 15: 

mASONIG OATHS NULL AND VOID. 

A clear and conclusive argument proving the invalidity of any 
oath or obligation to do evil. By REV. 1. A. HAET, Secretary 
National Christian Association. Published by special order of tha 
Asaociatlon. 60 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1900. 

TRACT NO. 16: 
HON. SETH M. GATES ON FREEMASONRY. 

PEOOP THAT THE INSTITUTION THAT MURDERED MORGAN 
IS UNCHANGED IN CHARACTER 
This is a letter to the Monmouth Convention by Hon. Seth M, 
Gates who was Deputy Sheriff of Genesee County, and also Secre- 
tary of the Leroy Lodge at the time of Morgan's Abdnctlon. A 4- 
page tract, 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 17: 

Orp, Oi^ations and lifmi of The Braii^e. 

WITH A CONSTITUTION OP A FARMERS' CLUB. 

This little tract ought to be put into the hands of every Farmer in 

the United States, Four -page tract, 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO. 18: 

HON. 'WM. H. SE'WARD ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Extraes from a Speech oi Etow-liEotMngi:m in the U. S. Senate in 1855. 
The testimony of JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, MILLAIiD FILLMORE, 
CHIEF JUSTIC MARSHALL and others, is added. 

A S-page tract, 25 cents per 100 ; $2.00 per 1000. 

TRACT NO, 19. 
BRICKS FOR MASONS TO LAY. 
WASHINGTON, MADISON, MARSHALL, RUSH, HANCOCK, 
ADAMS AND WEBSTER, give brief clear testimony against the 
Lodge A 2-page tract 25 cents per 100 ; $2.00 per 1000. 
TRACT NO. 20: 
OBJECTIONS TO MASONRY. 
By A SECEDING MASON, of Cornton, Vermont. 
This tract contains many strong arguments against the Lodge drawn 
from personal experience, observation and study of its character. 
A 4-page tract at 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per 1,000. 
TRACT NO. 21: 
MASONIC CHASTITY. 

ET EMMA A, WALLACE, 

The author, by wonderfully clear illustration and argtunent, ghowi 
the terribly corrupt nature of Freemasonry. No true woman who 
reads this will ever speak with approbation of this inBtitation, 
A 4-page tract 50 cents per 100; $4.00 per 1,000. 



GERMAN CYNOSURE TEACT^A. 



3S 



isn 



By REV. A. GROLE, Pastor, German M. E. Clinrch, 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

This is ou first German tract, and it is a good one; it ought to 
have a large cirrculation . Price 50 cents per 100 ; $4.00 per lOTO. 

:^WEIX'S TRACT 



TO THE YOUNG IMEN^OF, AMERICA. Postege. 3 cents per ICO 
Traces. Tracts Free. 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



TERMS FOR THE CYNOSURE. 

All who canvass for the Cynosuhe are 
allowed a cash commission of twenty per 
cent, or twenty-five per cent in books at re- 
tail prices, one-half this percentage on re- 
newals, and any one sending $100. for the 
Cynosure during three months, will be 
entitled to an extra five per cent. 

All responsible persons wlw desire to pro- 
mote this reform are authorized to act as 
agents. 

CLUB KATES, 
Are intended for those who wish to give their 
commission to suhscribera 

Suhecriptions may all he sent at one time, or 
at (liflferent times, and iu all cases the sender 
should keep an acconut of the names and 
amounts sent. 

CLUB HATES. 

Two new subecriptionB one year $3.50 

One new giibecription and one renewal sent ten 

days before expiration of subscription 3..'i0 

B aew Bulls., 1 year., 1 copy free to sender, .9.50 

n ** *^ *^ '^ *^ 11. 10 

7 .. " " " " l-.>.70 

u " " " " 14.25 

10 " '• ' ".50 

20 •' " " " " 3200 

10 Renewals" " " " 20.00 

50 '• " " " " 85,00 

Twenty subscriptions for six months count the 
same as ten for a year. 

Bow to Send Money. 

Post office orders, checks or drafts on 
Chicago or towns east of Chicago, and cur- 
rency by express may be sent at our risk. 
If it is not possible to send by either of the 
four ways named, money in a registered 
letter may be sent at our risk, but it is not 
as safe. 

The date at which subscriptions expire 
is with each subscriber's name on the ad- 
dress label. Send renewals before this date 
occurs. Note if this date is changed to 
correspond; if not or if the paper fails to 
come, write without delay. 

A¥e discontinue during the first part of 
each month all subscriptions which expire 
during the preceding one except such as are 
ord&red continued with a promise to for- 
ward the money soon. We do not like to 
lose a single subscriber and will not re- 
move names simply because the cosh is not 
received promptly, if we understand that 
the paper is wanted. Address all letters 
with subscriptions or orders for Books, 
Tracts and donations to the Tract Fund to 
Ezra A. Cook & Co., 13 Wabash Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

1 eanare (1 Inch deep) one month $7.00 
1 " " 2 '' 10.00 
1 " "3 " 15.00 
1 " "6 " 25.00 
1 <» " 19 " 40.00 

XSiseount for Space. 

On aequares 5 per cent. On 8 squareslO per cent 
On 4 " 15 " " On 6 " 20 " 
On Vt col. 85 per cent On one col. 30 per cen 

Clutobing List. 

The Weekly Cynosare will be sent for 
one year to old or new subscribers, with 
the following papers (to new subscribers) 
at the annexed reduced rates. 

THE CYNOSURE AND 

Christian Statesman 3 00 

Methodist Free Press 3 25 

Golden Censer 8 00 

The Christian (monthly ,with map of 

Palestine 2 75 

do without map 2 40 

Anti-Masonic Herald 2 25 

Western Rural 3 50 

Young Folk8'Ilural(monthly,with two 

chromos) 2 90 

Science of Health 3 25 

National Aariculturist and Bee Jour- 
nal 2 60 

Bee-Keeper's Magazine 2 60 

Bible Banner 2 50 

Chrome with either of last three 40c ex- 
tra. 
Wood's Household Magazine with 

chromo 2 80 

Earnest Christian 2 80 



The Cynosure is now printed Weducs 
day and mailed Thursday. At the 
earnest requeot of some of our subscrib- 
ers we shall boou mail the paper one 
day earlier, so that these most distant 
may be sure of getting their paper by 
Saturday. 



OUR SUBSCRIPTION LIST 

was ounted on April 27th and footed 
up 4,028 names. Last week we pub- 
lished the footing for April iVth which 
was 3,886. This you can see is again of 
142 in ten days. 

From the 27th of April until the 
2d of June, the date of the Syracuse 
Anniversary, there are thirty-fiye days. 
If the rate of increase to our subscription 
list continues what it has been during 
the last ten days it will number at the 
date of the Convention 4,525. 

Can we not do better than this ? We 
want to report 6,000 Bubscribcrs at the 
Convention. If half our present list 
would send in one new one soon we 
could do so. The political state of our 
country calls loudly for such a paper. 
The voters want a souud political plat- 
form. AVe have one. We would like 
to send out 30,000 Cynosures contain- 
ing a report of our political Mass Meet- 
ing at Syracuse. 

Remember that if you have five dol- 
lars of the Lord's money that with it 
you can send twelve peraons the Cyno- 
sure for three months; for ten dollars 
you can send the paper to tweaty-five 
persons. These will receive a full rt- 
porfc of the Convention if their names 
are received in time. 

Some of our ageiats are doing all they 
ought in this work. Are you? 



A Subscriber from Canada writes: 
"Please send me some extra Cynosures 
immediately. I want them to take to 
Conference." Cannot at least 100 oth- 
ers do this during the month of May ? 
Will our MontEouth friends remember 
tbe United Presbyterian meetings to be 
held there in in May and have Anti- 
masonic books and tracts on hand? 

If you cannot act yourself, aid and 
encourage some one who can, to do so. 

A friend in Ohio during the last week 
has persuaded a young man to enter 
the work as agent. 



A donation occasionally comes in for 
the free distribution of tracts. For 
every dollar sent in a friend adds anoth- 
er, heiice such gifts count double. 



The President's veto seems to have 
struck the death knell of the republi 
can and democratic parties. Now Is the 
time for reformers to strike long, strong 
blows. ' 'There is a tide which, taken at 
its flood, leads on to fortune." Could 
there be any greater fortune for the 
American people than the establishment 
of a'lti-Eecret society, temperance prin. 
ciples, in favor of the Bible as the 
standard of morah ? Can eflfectual work 
in this direction be done better than by 
secaring a large circulation for the 
Cynosure? 



Only lj972 more subscribers are 
needed to bring our !itt up to 6, 000. 
This is one fair day's work if all inter- 
ested will engage in it. Will you? 

We have wany working agents in 
Indiana, and their State Agent says 
1,000 Cynosures should be put into the 
State this year. We have 470 sub- 
scribers there cow, — nearly half the 
number we are aiming at. How soon 
will the other half be obtained ? We 
hope Indiana will claim the National 
Meeting at Indianapolis next year. One 



or two thousand Cynoswie subscribers 
would aid much in preparing for it. 

The "Moilie Maguires" are a terror 
only in certain parts of Pennsylvania 
now. But lares are sown when good 
people sleep. Is it not best to under- 
stand this and, wide awake, work dilli. 
gently to get the good seed, the Cyno 
sure carries, planted not only in Penn- 
sylvania, but throughout the United 
States, territories and also in Canada? 



ABOUT COMMISSIONS. 

We receive letters occasionally con 
taining two. three, or more subscrip- 
tion? in which nothing; is said about 
commissions. Some friends write *'we 
take no commission." Others eay send 
the amount of commission in tracts and 
books. Others say, coneider it a dona- 
tion to the tract fund. We are glad 
to get workers for the circulation of 
the Cynobure and pay nothing more 
cheerfully than commisfiions. However, 
our paper is cheap at $2.00 a year and 
requires a ^reat addition to our present 
mail list in order to enable us to issue 
it in this attractive form, so that when 
money is received and nothing said 
about commission we do not, as a rule, 
allow any. 

The point of these observations is, 
tell us what you wish to have done 
with your commission unless you take 
it out before forwarding the subscrip- 
tion money. 

« ■ » 

Subscription Letters received from 
April 21si through April 21th. — R T 
Allison, J Auten, J W Allen, J Bald- 
win, A B.'.ker, T P Barker, C Bender, 
G P Bishop, N M Buck, E T Billings, J 
C Taylor, F F Curry, J Corley, J Cas- 
sidy, C Cogswell, L S Coos, J Clapp, M 
J Cole, J Clayton, E Dickinson, J P 
Dops, W Dinius (2,) E V Dow- 
ney, F J Day, K Eidahl, H W Fow- 
ler, M Gallup. W Gilmore, S M Gates, 
W Gorden, H H Hmman, A Holt, A 
N Hudson, P Hurless, J Henry, G W 
Hall, J E Irish, A E Jenks, W L 
Kolb, W J Knappen,, 8 D Kerr. W H 
Linam, D Light, A Larabee, W Milli- 
ean, O Morgan, I S McCash, W Miller, 
A C Moffat, H N Miller (2), A W Mur- 
phy, G Pegler, J G Rownd, D Reed, 
J D Reed, T Relyea, A Showalter, S C 
H Smith, J Schimmerhorn, C Stegner, 
F G Sohman, W H Smith, J Speuce , 
W O Small, J P Stoddard, J W Smith, 
D B Sherk, J A Talmage, D Thomas, 
W Troup, B Ulsh, Marlin a Wood, J 
Wren, B R Wiilits, A Willets, R G 
Wood, N B Whetmore, JW WilkisoD. 

■ ^•^ 

MAREST E.^POB.TS 

Chioaqo. April 28, 1874. 
The following are the latest advices: 

Grain Wheatr-Spring, No. 1 . . $ 1 28^ 

No. a 1 28 1 StiH 

" No. 8 119 

" Rejected 1 10 

Corn— No. 9 64 BiH 

Rejected 62}4 

Oats— No.2... 455Si 46H 

Rejected 44y4 

Rye— No. 2 91 92 

Flour, Winter 7 00 9 00 

Spring extra 8 25 6 50 

Superfine 4 00 4 87 

Hay— Timothy , pressed 16 O'J 18 60 

" loose 14 00 16 00 

Prairie, " 8 00 10 00 

Lard 9'4 

Meee pork, per bbl 16 20 16 70 

Butter 25 84 

Cheese 10 18 

Eggs 12J4 13 

Beans 180 2 50 

Potatoes, per bn 100 130 

Seeds— Flax 2 10 

Timothy 2 5C 3 70 

Clover ... 5 65 6 80 

Lnmber— Clear 88 00 65 00 

Common 13 00 14 00 

Lath 3 25 2 76 

Shingles 150 3 75 

WOOL— Washed 48 65 

Unwashed 26 83 

LIVE STOCK. Cattle, extra. ... 6 00 6 65 

Good to choice 5 00 5 75 

Medium 4 75 5 00 

Common 3 75 4 75 

Hogs, 4 60 5 86 

Sheep 3 75 8 GO 

Now York Market. 

Flour J 5 85 1100 

Wheat 1 60 1 60 

Corn 84 88 

Oats 62 67 

Rye 110 115 

Lard lOH 

Mess pork 16 85 17 00 

Butter 84 88 

Cheue II 16 

BffO ~ 19 1 



Agents Wanted ! 

TO SELL THE PUBLICATIONS OF 

EZRA A. COOK & CO. 

Liberal Terms Offered. 

Capable persons who are in need of pecuniary 
aid may clear 

Handsome Profits, 

While at the same time aiding the cause of Reform. 
Apply to EZRA A. COOK & CO., No. 13 
Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 



SOMETHING NEW. 



ACHART.OF MASONRY 

Showing the degrees from the first to the thirty- 
third, entitled 

Degrees of Ancient Accepted Scottish Freemasonry, 

According to a Manual by Wm. M. Cunningham, 
33d Degree. 

Designed by Sdv. P. Stoddard, to explain Free- 
masonry, as shown by Morgan's Exposition and 
Richardson's Monitor. 

A Handsome Lithograph 22x28 Incbeg. ' 

Single copies finely colored, post paid $ 75 

Per dozen " " " " B 00 

Per 100 " " " " 85 00 

Single copy, colored, varnished and mounted 

postpaid 1 00 

Per dozen colored, varnished and mounted, 

postpaid 7 BO 

Per 100, colored, varnished and mounted, 

express charges extra 50 00 

25 Copies obMobe Sbnt at the 100 bates. 



AGENTS -WANTED! „ 

To sell, direct to consumers. The Geoukdswbll; Or, The 

AUTHORITATIVE HISTORY tYe 

FARMEKS' M0YE3IENT. 

Br J. Pebi»m. Kditor Western Rural, Chicago. Complete and 
Reliable. fVritIm vp to January, ^S!*. 8 Original PortraitB; 
100 other F.ngravincs. OCTTbis Great Work is low in price, 
and SFllina hi, Ihoti'snnds. For terms, territory, etc.. address 
HANNAFOTtD & THOMPSON. 193 E. Washington St., Chicago. 
CAUTION —Inferior works, mere compilations, are being 
poshed. Uo not be imposed on. Mr. Periam's work is full. 
authoritative, and indorsed by the Great Leaders. Aone other is. 

8 m mar 19 



J. L. MANLEY. 
ATTORNBY-AT-LAW, 

And Notary Public, 

MILLS CORNERS, Jay County, Indiana. 
Prompt Attention given to the collection of 
Claims, settling estates and all other businesB 
entrusted to his care. 6 mo Nov. SO. 



WHEATOU COLLEGE! 

WHEATON. ILLINOIS, 

l8 well known by the readers of The Cyno»Mre. 
Faculty, same as last year, with the addition of 
two gentlemen. Those wanting information 
thonld apply to J. Blanohabd, Pres't. 



Westfield College, 

Westfield, Clark Co., 111. 

ClaBBlcal and Scientific pepartments, opM to 
both sexes. Also instruction in Mnslc, Drawing, 
Painting, Book-keeping, Penmanship and Teach- 
ng . Address, 

Apr 246 m Rbv. £ 4sit. B. Allbh, Pre$U 



s mi 



It is decidedly the most bkatitipcl, tasteful 
and SENSIBLE thing of the kind I have ever 
'seen."— iJet). F. G. Hibbard, D- D. 

"The most Scriptural, beautiful and appro- 
PELS.TE Marriage Certificate I have ever seen."— 
Late Rev. H, Mattuon, D. D. 

"Something nbw and beautiful, which we 
pronounce the handsomest thing of the kind we 
ever laid eyes on."— .MetA. Home Journal, Phila. 
Containt two Ornamental Ovals, for Phot,,graph». 

A EAUTirUL LITEOQEAPH 14 1-1 iy 18 1-4 iacho«. 

25 cts each, $2. 25 per doz- $16 per 100. 
For Sale by Ezra A. Cook & Co.. CHICAGO. 



Light on Freemasonrv, 

BY ELDEK D. BERNARD, 
with an appendix revealing the mysteries o 
Odd.fellowBhip 500 pages Cloth will be sent to 
any addregs post paid on receipt of $2. 00. 

The flrBt part of the »bOTe work, Ligh 
on Freemaeonry, 416 pagea in paper cover, yril 
be sent post paid on Receipt of $1. 

Address, w. J. SHUEY. 

DATTON. OHIO. 




E Christian Cyn 




■'In Secret Have I Said Nothing."— /e«w« Ghritt, 



EZRA. A. COOK & CO., Publishekb, 
NO. 13 WABASH AVENUE. 



CHICAGO, THURSDAY, MAY 7, 1874. 



VOL. VI., NO. 30.— WHOLE NO. 213. 
WEEKLY, $2 00 A YEAR. 



Contents. 

Page. 

Bditoki AL Articles 8, 9 

Census Reform Politics. . . Descendants of Balaam, 

Son of Beor Too Good to be True Notes. 

Topics op thk Times 1 

Our Colleges on Secret Societies 2 

Contributed and Select Articles 1, 2, 3 

Family ASa.\TB (Foetry) — My Conflict and the Result 

The Newspaper Press Secrecy Politics as a 

Religious Duty. 

RBrOBMNEWS 4 

Notices — Organization and Lectures In Spencer Coun- 
ty, Indiana. 

COBBESPONDBNCE 4, 6, 6 

Masonry and the Grange Masonry in the Navy Se- 
cret Societies and Mutual Insurance Companies Our 

Mail. 

Forty Years A go . The Armed Legions of the Lodge 6 

College Secret Societies 13 

Chapter II. Concluded. Chapter III, 

The Home Cikcle 10, 11 

On the Last Day (Pottry) ..St. Augustine, America's 

Oldest City Short Lecture on Church Manners 

M. Y. O. B. S....The Giant Planet. 

Children's Corner 11 

The Sahbatn School 7 

Home and Health Hints 7 

Farm and Garden 7 

Religious Intelligence 12 

News of the Week 12 

College Notices 12 

Publisher's Department 16 

Advertisements IS, 14, 15, 16 



even as they also are earning their payment for their 
work ? 



%ifpp 4 i\t t^m. 



Impious Joking. — The very snaall wit of an increasing 
number of popular writers and speakers ekes out an 
existence by the abuse of Scriptural passages and ex- 
pressions. These familiar phrases are very convenient 
to point a joke or turn a low pun with minds empty 
of decent reverence, and of low intelligence. The lat- 
est and lowest instance comes from a reputable organ- 
ization, the Philosophical Society of Chicago. This 
is a society of the "composite" order, made up of 
Jews, infidels, doctors of divinity, physicians, preach- 
ers, lawyers, etc., all gentlemen of standing, who have 
united to become truth seekers. On Saturday even- 
ing last this society was entertained with a lecture on 
the subject: "Oar Father who art at Washington.''^ 
What might have been said is not very material, for a 
mind that can delight itself in blasphemy of this sort 
can do nothing but grovel. But what have three D. 
D.'s of the Congregational, Episcopal and Methodist 
persuasion, — Haven, Powers and Thomas — to say of 
such a performance in the society of whicli they are 
reputed members? 



A Rationalist's Opinion. — Prof. Huxley's scientific 
promulgations surely have not tended to settle com- 
monly received opinions of the Creator and his works. 
But he has written a testimony in favor of the use of 
the Bible in public schools which should cause ablush 
of shame (if that can be) on the cheek of the self-con- 
stituted defenders of theological truth who have joined 
the cry of infidels and Romanists on this question. 



Huxley writes like a man accustomed to examine the 

principle of things, and his well known rationalistic best possible conditions could make him. 



Senator Schdrz's EutOGY on Hon, Charles Sumner, 
delivered in Fanueil Hal), Boston, on Wednesday, 
April 29th; would certainly impress an ordinary, un- 
biased reader as a clear, historical, truthful and pow- 
erful exposition of the life of one of the noblest of 
nature's oflFspring. 

Mr. Sumner seems to have been all that nature 
could make him, — a pure, generous, industrious, 
truthful patriot, whom history, art and travel had en- 
riched with her choicest treasures. 

Having gone through the Latin school st the age of 
fifteen,' through Harvard College from which he grad 
uated at nineteen, then passing from the law school 
through the conditions of lawyer, teacher, lecturer 
and author, enthusiastic, laborious and successful, ex- 
citing the admiration and most honest and cordial en- 
dorsmenf from such men as Judge Story, he spent 
three years in Europe, enjoying the best possible op- 
portunities which learning, wealth and culture could 
offer, for becoming acquainted with the politics, sci- 
ence and literature of Great Britain, Germany, France 
and Italy. At the age of thirty-four years he first 
came prominently forward into public life in the deliv 
ery of an oration at the request of the auLhorities of 
Boston on the Fourth of July, entitled "The True 
Grandeur of Nations." His life seemed to be an 
earnest, honest eflFort to promote the grandeur of this 
nation; and so far as he infiuenced them of all others. 
His noble, unremitting toil in the anti slavery conflict 
is pictured by Senator Schurz, with all the beauty that 
illuminates truth when displayed by a maser artist. 
His great influence during the days of secession and 
rebellion in leading the way for the emancipation of 
slaves is brought out distinctly. 

His wise conduct when chairman of the committee 
on foreign relations in the Mason-Slidell case, in con- 
nection with the Alabama Claims and the wanton in- 
justice of his removal from that position, teaches the 
folly of slavery to party and the depravity of the 
children of men who abuse merit when it conflicts 
with transient, personal, selfish interests. 

When he withdrew from the Republican party the 
base ingratitude of politicians and a large number of 
the people towards their great benefactor, the censure 
of the legislature of Massachusetts, and added to this 
a severe at*ack of the disease which a year later caused 
his death, shows us the wisdom of remembering the 
days of darkness ' 'for they are many. " 

As was said at the outset, Mr. Sumner seems in 
the portrayal of his life by his dibcriminating and 
candid eulogist, to have been all that nature in her 

Descended 



views give him opinion greater weight. He says: 
I have always been strongly in favor of secular educa- 
tion in the sense of education without theology; but I 
must confess I have been no less seriously perplexed 
to know by what practical measures the religious feel- 
ing, which is the essential basis of conduct, was to be 
kept up, in the present utterly chaotic state of opinion 
on these matters, without the use of the Bible. By 
the study of what other book could children be so 
much humanized and made to feel that each figure in 
the vast historical procession fills, like themselves, but 
a momentary space in the interval between two eter- 
nities; and earns the blessings or the curses of all 
time, according to its effort to do good and hate evil. 



from an upright, courageous English family, enjoying 
b11 desirable advantages in early life for the best lite- 
rary training, with a strong and noble physique^ no 
fierce encounters with poverty for his daily bread, he 
put forth a majestic and graceful manhood refreshing 
true hearts as a carefully trained shade tree pleases a 
correct taste. 

He was all that nature could make him. Involun- 
tarily we say how much greater are the triumphs o 
grace. How much safer are the treasures laid up in 
heaven. 

Imitate Mr. Sumner in his honesty, in his purity, in 
his industry, in his devotion to truth , in his opposition 
to the hidden works of darknees, in his generous love 



of humanity, but make the soul of all this Christ and 
his kingdom. 

Those professing to know, say that Sumner was an 
earnest Christian. If this is true, Senator Schura's 
eulogy, so clear and so complete in other respects, is 
certainly defective in not showing that the grace of 
our Lord Jesus Christ sustained and comforted him in 
the trials of his life. 



Family Affairs. 



For the Cynosure. 



BY A. THOMPSON. 



Husband. — Wife put the kett le on, I love to hear 
Its pleasant sona:, and see our sinokin£! cheer. 
And while you get the supper, I'll unfold 
A plan for getting houor, ease and gold. 

Wife. — Why bless you John I never knew before, 
Your mind upon such dizzy heights to soar, 
Has mad ambition caught you by the hair 
And bound you fast on her deceitful chair ? 
What would you be ? no alderman, I ween; 
That for your genius would be low and mean. 
And though as governor a while might do. 
Yet, John, the Senate is the place for you. 
There your great parts all unobscured might shine 
And till the nation with your fame and mine. 

Husband. — Ah ! your old pranks — there, Nancy, that 

will do, — 
Had ever woman such a tongue as you ? 
Were you a Senator, I would be bound. 
You'd beat old Butler on his chosen ground ; 
But if you can your ridicule retain 
I'll show my plan, and strive to make it plain. 
You know our foundry is a large concern. 
There full a thousand all their living earn. 
And vou would think that in pjoportion due 
To what the workmen of the bu-iuess knew, 
Were honesty and soberness combined 
That each and all a proper place would find. 
It is not so, another force appears. 
And into place the oath-bouud brother rears. 
Sets him on high and bids him grandly ride 
O'er worthy rivals cooly set aside. 
'Twas but to-day, I heard our boss declare. 
My steady habits and my skill and care, 
And recommend me as a worthy man 
To be a foreman in the place of Dan 
Whose drinking habits, long a deep disgrace. 
At length have dispossessed him of his place. 
What's the reply ? — ' I would be pleased indeed, 
To give to John the place of Daniel Reid, 
But he's a 'cowan ;' give a hint from me, 
And bid him travel through the third degree." 
Thus spoke the owner so that I might hear 
What was of course intended for my ear. 
And now my plan if you declare it good 
Is to be numbered with the brotherhood. 

Wife. — Amazing wisdom, oracle of light, 

What deep sagacity you show to-night ! 

Yes, round your neck the Mason's halter draw 

And bow the subject of Masonic law, 

And humbly sware through all your mortal life 

To keep your secrets from your worthy wife. 

Yes, join and pay for pass- words and degrees, 

For empty titles aud for private fees 

In one year more than you have given 

In any two to spread the bliss of heaven ! 

And you may be a general or a priest, 

A great high something at the very least. 

Yes, join the lodge, and every night at tea 

I'll read a lecture from a new degree, 

Of bleeding throats aud organs torn out. 

Tongues, hearts and bowels scattered all about, 

Of fiery vengeance chasing to the grave, 

Of malice's tongue let loose upon the slave 

Who dares by any art or plan disclose, 

The awful secrets that the order knows, 

Of human ashes scattered to the blast, 

Of horrid hell when mortal life is past. 

The double hell that waits the hapless knight, 

AVho stains on earth his sacred honor bright. 

Yes, join the lodge and I will undertake 

To keep you posted up aud wide awake 

On all the wisdom and the lore profound. 

That women never knew nor cowan found. 

But mind you, John, as sure as you're a man, 

I'll always look as homely as I can; 

I'll let the cobwebs gather on the wall 

And feed the chickens daily in the hall ; 

I'll wear the hat you hate so much to see. 

And never give you sugar in your tea; 

I'll never put a patch upon your clothes, 

Nor draw a needle through your holey hose. 

But look as crossly sour as spinster Lee 

If you prefer the Masons' lodge to me. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



OUIl COLLEGES ON SErRET SOCIETIES. 



BUHEKA COLLKOK. 

MeBBre. Phllo Carpenter, J. W. R. Sloan, L. N. Stratton, EsqrB., 
Committee: 

Qbntlkmen: — Your circular letter of Sept. 18lh, 
requesting the views of the President and Faculty of 
Eurtka College upon the subject of '* The Influence 
of Freemasonry on the Social, Civil and Moral Char- 
acter of the citiz'^ns of America" has been received 

While, except for the request made, no such article 
would ever have been written, and while there is not 
an entire uniformity in our views, I am disposed to 
state in brief my own convictions and those of my co. 
laborers so far as I know them, not, however, holding 
myself responsible for an exact representation of the 
latter. 

No more than two of our number have ever beer 
connected with any of the secret orders, and I believe 
none with the Freemasons. No member of the Faculty 
could be called a zealous supporter of secret societies. 
Two or three are quite earnestly opposed, and the re- 
mainder regard the question as of individual applica- 
tion not of serious import in connection with our social, 
civil and moral well-being. 

Perfect impartiality is indispensable in consideiinf,' 
this subject, and at the same time it is very difficult. 
Wl at right has one who has never been connected 
with a secret order to assume to speak in regard to 
that of which he can know nothing? On the other 
hand, how can he who, it may be, overcoming scruples 
and doubts to do so, has thoroughly committed him- 
self to a movement, present with freedom its defects 
to his own mind or to others? Whoever attempts to 
become the champion of one or the other side of the 
controversy upon this subject, will most certainly fail 
to be entirely impartial. We may, however, do greai 
good, and such emphatically must be the result of the 
opposition represented by the Christian Cynosure. 
A.ad yet there is not so great force to the objections 
set forth in the inquiries just given as is sometimes 
supposed. 

An intelligent citizen is a competent judge of the 
cUims of Freemasonry, though never having been in 
itiated into its mysteries. The system has its fruits 
which are apparent to all. Its votaries have moved 
among us in all the relationships and stations of life 
and certainly its effects must be visible to the careful 
observer. We cannot suppose that any flagrant im- 
moralities are practiced in the secret conclaves since 
there is no perceptible baneful influence upon the 
characters of those who are durine; a life time partici- 
pants in them. Nor does it exert any very great in- 
fluence in politics, since members of the order belong 
to all parties, often oppose each other, and very rarely, 
as is true even in regard to religious sects, is member- 
ship in the Masonic fraternity a deciding point in the 
election of offi'-ers. Civil freedom has not been jeop- 
ardized nor life and property been made insecure. 
Factious opposition to forms of government has no', 
been observed as a result of Masonry in its entire his- 
tory, nor has education or progress been impeded 
Ministers of the Gospel remain in its membership 
asserting the entire consistency and propriety of such 
a course. Since, then, no fundamental evil can be 
alleged against it, we must institute more careful in- 
quiry to determine what are its tendencies and itt 
cbaractier. Admitting perhaps good influences from 
it, has it any principles of evil whatever? Are there 
any reasons why it should be abandoned? 

As a foundation for proper judgment upon social, 
civil or moral questions the Bible must be recognized 
as the standard of right, the revelation in it of Jesus 
the Christ, the Son of God and the Siviour of the 
world, must be held as fundamental and the fact must 
be asserted that no moral principle, eternal and inde- 
Btru-^table though such principles are, has come to the 
world from any other source than the divine. Mason- 
ry did not introduce philanthropy and morality into 
the world, and though it may claim to have practiced 
them, that is no sufficient argument for retaining the 
system 'f there are less objectionable meane of doing 
the tame. 



What are the evils connected with Freemasonry ? 

1. Time and means are expended unnecessarily. 

2. The attendant upon evening conclaves is drawn 
away from the family circle when he should be at 
home, and to that extent the social tie is weakened. 

3. The pledge and obligation of secrecy arc- 
stronger than required for the legitimate accomplish- 
ment of the objects usually set forth as designed by 
the institution, 

4. The candidate for admission is in the most 
solemn manner initiated into that of which he has noi 
before complete knowledge; and if he shall find any 
thing fundamentally wrong, be is virtually prohibiteo 
from denouncing it. A morally responsible being has 
no right to take such a step in the dark. Being iht 
guardian of his own conscience he cannot so act on 
the assurance of any other human being whatever. 

5. No human imtitution ha3 the right to exact 
oaths. Even the church has, formally, none, and 
civil governments if they require them can only do so 
because they themselves are ordained of God. Free- 
masonry has no suih right, having no divine origin. 

6. Freemasonry gives undue sanctity to that which 
is not divine; in its regular proceedings, on funeral occa- 
sions, etc., it mingles in unhallowed associations its 
own pretensions with the solemn rites of religious 
worship. 

7. It performs its charitable acts not in the name 
of Christ; the individual gives the cup of water in hi^ 
own name or that of his order. Christ does not, 
therefore, as he justly should, receive the glory of all 
our good deeds. 

8. Many Freemasons openly contrast the church, 
as a means of good, with their order, and thus injure 
the influence of God's own organization. Many of 
them are satisfied with their order and reject the 
church founded by the Son of God and for which he 
gave his life and which he requires every free moral 
<gent among men to enter and sustain. 

9. Selfishness is an ingredient of the philanthropy 
of the order, since it distinguishes in its benevolence 
between its members and other men, and gives rather 
as a mutual aid society than because Christ, who has 
commended his own love to us by the infinite gift ol 
himself, requires us to love one another. 

Though Freemasons regard these objections as un- 
just and invalid, thousands are influenced by them 
who may not openly oppose, but yet cannot conscien- 
ciously at*acb themselves to the organizatior, and will 
always regard its influence as detrimental to our civil, 
social and moral life. A. M. Weston. 



My Conflict and the Result. 



Mr. Editor: — Some years ago, as you know, our 
"Grand Traverse Conference" passed resolutions 
against Masonry. (I first started the fight by sending 
a long essay in Conference against Masonry.) The 
Masons were enraged, and rose en-mass to crush the 
Congregational churches of this region. 

I was called out to lecture against them, first in 
Northport, where they had a lodge, then here. All 
the Masons signed a petition to me requesting me to 
give them the lecture I gave at Northport. I did so 
They were out; had a crowded house, a Mason chair 
man, and first rate order throughout for two hours or 
more. But they changed color and turned and 
scowled, but no one said a word till they got out of 
doors; then the chairman said, ' 'It is all a lie." But 
that same man was overheard to say, next morning, to 
three other Masons, '"I watched Thompson close last 
night, but there was not a point I could deny." 

But though they could not deny, they resolved t"^' 
crush me. They said, ''We will starve him out;" and 
ihey tried it. They would not give anything for 
preaching, or to build the church; nor would they let 
iheiT families give, who were regular attendants on the 
preaching. They gave me a good "letting alone;'' 
only they talked against me behind my back , reported 
mnny lies about, and tried to prejudice the people 
against me. I went steadily fprward in my woik 
without noticing their lies, and the Lord helped, 
ihough they would not. The church was finished; 



the people stood by me. I lived without Masons*^ 
money; and they failed, broke down, and had to 
leave, while I hold still the field, and the Lord is bless- 
ing us and sinners are being converted. Glory to his 
holy name ! The work is his, and his shall be all the 
praise. Before they left they seemed conquered in 
their prejudices. They bowed and Rmiled and spoke 
pleasantly to me, and one of them (said to be the 
highest Mason in the State) came to me and confessed 
bis wrong toward me, and wished my forgiveness I 
And again said to me, "For your encouragement, Mr. 
Thompson, I wish to say that your influence over me 
has been for good I am resolved henceforth to throw 
my iLfliience on the side of temperance" (he had been 
a free drinker.) He since wrote me a very friendly 
letter from Salt Lake City, saying that my "counsels 
'o him were among his greenest memories." That 
Mason once said to me, • 'They talk about Morgan's 
being murdered by the Mason. It is all a myth." 
I answered, "It is too late in the day to talk so. The 
thing has been undeniably proven too often." He 
said again, ''If oae who had been a Mason, should 
come out and tell everything just as it is, you could 
not believe him !" What nonsense !— first acknowledge 
he told the truth, and then say you can't believe him 1 
Why? "He is a perjured man." How perjured? 
"Because he has revealed what he swore never to re- 
veal." Indeed! Then he Ms revealed Masonry or 
else he is not a perjured man! So, by Masons' own 
:ihowing. Masonry has been revealed; and why all this 
ado about keeping it secret? 

I once said to a Mason who had just taken the first 
degree, "Now, my friend, you better come up to my 
house and I can tell you all ahout it without your 
having a rope round your neck and being blindfolded 
and dragged and bamboozled around so." He replied 
(without thinking), "0, well, that has all been gone 
through with!" Another seven-degree Mason, who 
has staid with me — a M. E. minister — preached the 
funeral sermon of a very wicked man, but preached 
him straight to heaven, and said, ^'Masonry is the 
highest style of a profession of religion/" And a 
wicked, seven-degree man here says, '"Masonry is all 
the religion I want" But this religion does not make 
them good men. 

I have exposed their abominations and nonsense in 
the hall and in papers, in public and in private. They 
have threatened, but no violence has been inflicted. 
Truth has been triumphant. 

Now, for years, I have been exposing the needless- 
ness and wickedness of running iron furnaces on the 
Sabbath ; showing that they can be run successfully 
and keep the Sabbath ; and for this exposition of their 
wickedness the present iron company seem to be 
•'down on me," and refuse to do anything toward 
sustaining preaching. Very well. Let them keep 
their money. I will try to be faithful, and trust in 
the Master for my support. But rebuke their sins I 
must, though obliged to work hard with my hands to 
support a large family. The prayers of Christians 
are invoked, that we may see, in greater power, the 
glory of God and triumph of truth. Yours for right- 
ousness, George Thompson. 

Leland, Mich. 

^-»-^ 

The Newspaper Press. 



Why is it that the newspaper press of the coun- 
try is so silent on a subject that is of such vital impor- 
tance to our religion and our government, as the 
one which our Association advocates, viz: Opposi- 
tion TO Secret Societies ? Is it possible that Anti- 
masons are all wrong, and the newspaper editors 
of the United States, whom we outnumber ten to 
one, are all right? You will find the average Ameri- 
can newspaper editor quite ready to publish the pro- 
ceedings of Masonic lodges; but if you attempt to get 
him to publish Anti-masonic proceedings, you will 
have a cold shoulder turned upon you at once. You 
will have to pay pretty lareely to have the use of his 
columns, and m-.y not succeed even then; for the 
lodge is all-powerful, and there is not one press in two 



^ 1 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



hundred that dare to offend it by publishing the truth 
against it. 

Never was poor Spain so ridden by priests, as the 
American press is by Masonry. Even editors who 
pretend to the h'gheat respectability, and whose opin- 
ions pass current with Masons and Masonic politicians, 
have either taken or refused money to allow moderate 
Anti masonic articles to j;o into their papers. Any- 
thing in favor of Masonry they publish with grea' 
facility, giving place in their columns cheerfully to tht 
most stupid, unwholesome stuff that comes from the 
lodge, thus depraving the tastes, perverting the judg- 
ment, and confusing the ideas of moral right of their 
readers, but not a word will they ever print against 
Masonry. They will fully suppress the truth, and 
give only one side — the false side of the question. 
Let any unbiased, independent man read the Cyno- 
sure, or any other Anti-masonic paper, only for six 
months, and he will be surprised to find how com^ 
pletely the American press, both religious and politi 
cal, has hoodwinked its readers, and prevented them 
from knowing the truth. 

There is hardly a newspaper of high character in 
the country, whether religious or political, excepting 
a few Anti-maeonic prints of recent date, which has 
foiled to base its interests on the corrupt favors of the 
lodge. Let us take for example the Ntw FbrA; Tril- 
une, which claims to be at the very head of all tht 
newspapera of the country, what are the facts in tht 
case? How many articles against Masonry has an) 
one ever seen in that paper during the last fifteen 
years? A candid answer to that inquiry would have 
to admit that for one such article there has probablj 
been a hundred of the opposite character. By 
Masonry is meant, of course, a generic term, embrac- 
ing all secret organizations. Whatever newspaper 
publishes the proceedings of secret societies, without 
adverse comment on them of any kind, favors those 
societies; and whatever paper favors secret societies , 
favors corrupt influences and false ideas. 

JNothing is more dangerous to liberty in a free 
country, than the newspaper press. While a free, 
manly, independent, disinterested press is the guardian 
of liberty, a corrupt press is the utter ruin of lib- 
erty; and no press could be more corrupt than that 
which courts the impure favors of the Masonic lodge. 
We are to know the tree by its fruits; and by this 
simple rule let us again revert to the first newspaper 
of the country. What did the I7ew York Tribune 
do toward exposing and defeating the corruptions of 
the " Tammany order," a secret ring which has over- 
whelmed New York City with such an immense debt ? 
If we are not mistaken, it sought to palliate and cover 
up that outrage at the expense of the city government. 
And now that an issue of the first importance arises 
between importers and the government, the Trihnne 
devotes a large part of its columns in fayor of the im 
porters against the government. Its columns rever 
berate with the loudest thunder of indignation agai' st 
a little secret ring of detectives employed by the gov- 
ernment against known dishonest parties; but against 
Masonry, the worst and most pernicious of all secret 
rings, one that naturally leads to the existence and 
support of all other secret rings, the Tribune has but 
little to say. The Grange ring, which is one of the 
most dangerous aspects which Masonry has yet 
assumed, finds the Tribune better than posting bills 
and franking privileges, for advertising and furthering 
its proceedings. To be attending to little rings and 
give no heed to Masonry, is but tithing anise and 
cummin, and neglecting weightier matters — matters 
which must be attended to first and foremost above 
all others, or our republican government cannot be 
saved. It may amuse and divert idle readers to see 
the terriers of the Tribune ferret out little nibbling 
mice, while the real Masonic rats are quietly at work 
destroying the dikes and embankments of republican 
government against the desolating fli ods of fraud and 
corruption, which, hke a swollen Mississippi, are 
threatening to pour in upon us. 

What the American public now needs, is a press 
that dares to tell the truth; and to ftseail false princi- 



ple in whatever gigantic proportions it may appear. 
It needs a press that adopts honesty instead of policy 
for its standaid, and which m^kes plain and straight 
the paths of truth, in order to lead men out of the 
mazes into which Masonic indirection has led them. 

Reform. 



Secrecy. 



BY PRES. SMITH, OF NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE. 



Remarks are sometimes made in justification of se- 
crecy which do not seem to be very logical. N > jusi 
discrimination seems to be made; but it is inferred 
ihat because secrecy is just fied and demanded by pe- 
culiar circumstances, it may with propriety be adopt- 
ed as a general rule of ac ion. 

Secrecy cinnot be condemned as always wrong. Ii 
has, indeed, of itself, no moral character. Secrels 
may be committed to us which we should sfcrediy 
keep; not because they are secrets, but because to 
publish them would be an injury to 6o:iety. If the 
same things should be c'mmunicited to us, not as se- 
crets, but with the intention thit they should be 
spread abroad, we should be guilty of the same wrong in 
giving them publicity. 

It i proper that every individual should keep some 
things secret — that some of his thoughts and actions 
should be known only to himself and God. There 
may with propriety be family secrets. In the present 
state of society it would be very imprudent to reveal 
everything said and done in the family circle. But it 
does not follow that a family is justified in keeping a 
guard at the door to prevent others from entering, or 
in putting its members under oath not to reveal any- 
thing said or done. The church may have secret 
sessions, though such sessions are generally cf doubt- 
ful utility. If they are allowable at all, it is that those 
who are interested may be more free in investigating 
wrong doing, and iu giving expressions to their opin- 
ions, while the results of their deliberations are after- 
wards to be revealed. This certainly would not jus- 
tify a church in holding secret sessions a; a general 
rule. The same may be said in regard to the secret 
sessions of a legislative body. If they are ever justi 
fiable, it is for temporary purposes, and as an except- 
ion to the general rule. Secrets are admissable also 
in war. But this does not justify those who are engag 
ed in benevolent efforts, and who have uo thought of 
waging offensive or defensive war against their fellow 
men, in adopting secrecy as a principle of action. 

It may truly be said that secretiveness is not a marls 
of superior virtue. We esteem men, not in proportion 
to their disposition to conceal their thoughts and 
actions, but inproportion as they manifest a dis- 
position to act without disguise. The child 
is free from guile and ha? no secrets; and, in 
after life, just in proportion to its purity of heart and 
life, will it have less occasion for secrecy. So it i- 
with a family or a community. The more ex- 
alted its members are in intelligence and virtue, the 
less tendency there will be to secretiveness on their 
part. If there was no sin in the world, there would 
be no need of necrets. There will be no secrecy in 
heaven. "There is nothing covered that shall not be 
revealed; neither hid that shall not be known." 

In regard to this point, Henry Ward Beecher makes 
some excellent remarks, as follows: ' Secretiveness is 
an instinct of our lower nature. It is the resuit of 
the law of force, for the most part. The Spirit o^ 
Christ is one which refuses to work by principles of 
secrecy. There is nothing that forbids incidental 
secrecy, as in the family. There are some things 
best not to be known. But mostly secretiveness be- 
longs to a state of life where f uce rules, driving men 
to secretiveness for protection. As we rise in the 
scale, however, our true nature is best served by re- 
linquishing secretiveness to the brute creation. Fish 
taken in the Mammoth Cave are said to have no eyes. 
There being no function for it, the organ itself remains 
undeveloped. And so men brought up in secrecy 
lack that moral sense which otherwise would grow in 
them by use. Under despotisms, unity for liberty 



can only be secured by secrcy; and the price paid in 
demoralization of character makes it very questionable 
whether it is best. The open testimony of martyrs 
has done the world more good than all secret plottings. 
Although in the retreats of the family or in one's own 
heart seme things may be withheld, it may be laid 
down 88 a general rule, that, in the operations of so- 
ciety, secrecy belongs to the lowest range of manhood, 
and not to the higher range and spiritual kingdom." 
There can be no doubt that when secrecy is adopted 
as a rule of action, it has a demoralizing tendency. 
Let a virtuous man adopt the principle of secreting 
his thoughts and actions from his fellow-men, or let a 
body of men do the same, and, however pure their 
intentions may be, as they are removed from the 
healthy restraints of society, the tendency must be to 
lead them to approve of sentiments and deeds which 
otherwise they would condemn. Moral, political and 
religious societies are in danger of becoming corrupt, 
even when their doings are exposed to the criticism 
of those without. But the danger must be greatly 
increased when all their acts are hidden from public 
view, and all are bound under strong oaths not to re- 
veal anything that takes pi ice. How long would a 
church retain its purity if all that was said and done 
in its meetings was withheld from the public? What 
an opportunity would be afforded for hypocrites and 
unprincipled men to work evil ? Who does not see 
that by acting thus in secret, without a possibility of 
exposure, the bad would have the advantage of the 
good, and would be likely to take the lead in the op- 
erations of the association? — Evangelical Messenger, 



Politics as a Ueligious Duty. 



[B^om the Northwestern Christian Advocate.! 

No man b-iS a right to shirk politics. Fat ofBc^s 
exisf, and if we do not cire for them, rogues will 
seize t'lem just as thieves steal your stray dollars 
or diamonds. Worst of all, once in office, the power 
of office will be used to rob, outrage and ruin. Some 
governors, congressmen, judges and law makers 
outjht this hour to be in the penitentiary. 

Decent people complain about politics; suppose we 
stop scolding and compel reform. It can be done 
4nd if ever done, done by those who now do nothing 
but listlessly whine about the wickedness of power 
unsalted by the churches. Let us begin now, and at 
the right place Chicago illustrates the comforts 
of cauterizing the wrong end of an evil. Suppose 
we begin further back among candidates arjd plat- 
forms. We shall thus properly shape future elect- 
ions, and at the same time, by healthy fear among the 
elect of yesterday, may prompt them to serve more 
faithfully. 

Let every good man now promise God that he 
will put his hand on politics. If caucuses are not 
abandoned to the tricksters and slumites, primary 
elections will not be held in saloons, amid whiskey, 
smuke, and oaths enough to make a careless daily 
reporter tremble for the country. If necessary, re- 
fuse to go to prayer-mee*ings that night; talk right 
out on the subject; scan delegates; go at first, even 
to a sa'oon caucus; insist on good order; disregard 
the bullies who try to get all power by repelling 
you with sneers about "fanatical Christians;" assert 
your right to shape the state; be your dignifiad self 
there just as you are in the crowd about your 
post office ; silence party hacks, and astonish them by 
the sight of gentlemen doing their duty. 

To your astonishment, that very first election will 
put on new features, and your delegates, nominees 
and your elect servants will gather strength when they 
see that you propose to stand by them just as scamps 
have clung to their companions. 

Reformed national politics depend wholly upon 
reformed local politics. National politicians are power- 
ess without the all-prevading support of Itcal man- 
vgers. Begin at home. Put every local politician on 
his good behavior, and he will see to it that general 
issuts are shaped to your liking through the machin- 
ery he knows so well how to move. Parties are 
not kept together by devotion to abstract principles 
with national applications. Poor human nature is 
not made up after that pattern. If you neglect 
your local constables, coroners or supervisors, your 
whole party in state and nation will fall apart. 
Lesser ambitions and more local desire to get the 
much for the Uttle create the ward, townsh p and 
county influence that cements men. There will never 
be any necessity for attacking a national platform if 
you hold the reins of decency tightly over your 
neighbor who wants to carry his election. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



The Xatioual Christian Association 
opposed to Secret Societies, Sixth An- 
niversary in Shakspeare Hall, Syra- 
cuse, N. ¥., June 2, 1874. 

♦-»♦ • 

— For the information of inquiring 
friends brother Strrttton of the Wesleyan 
■writes that several hundred delegates will 
be entertained at Syracuse. No special 
reduction of railroad fare is yet reported. 
The present rate from' Chicago is $17 ; the 
trip is made in twenty-six hours on trains 
leaving at 8:30 A. M. and 5:15 P. M. 



Pledges Made at Mdnmodth should be 
paid without delay. Those interested will 
please notice and save being notified more 
particularly. 



Ohio Anti-secret State Convention. 



After consulting with the friends of 
our reform as generally as practicable 
as to the time and place of holding our 
State Convention for organization, we 
have concluded that we can do no bet- 
ter than to appoint it at Flat Rock, 
Seneca Co., 0. This is not as central 
as we could desire, but all the circum- 
stances indicate that this will be the 
most successful place for such a gather- 
ing on short notice. In this appoint- 
ment we have the concurrence of Rev. 
L. Moore, President of Northern Cen- 
tral Ohio organization, and other 
friends, and hope that it may meet the 
approbation of our friends generally 
throughout the State. As the National 
meeting at Syracuse is fast approach- 
ing, and as we hope to be fiily repre- 
sented in that body, we fix the time 
for holding our State meeting to com- 
mence Tuesday evening, the 19th of 
May, and to continue until Thursday 
evening, the 2l6t. We hope all our 
friends who can possibly atttend will 
do Eo, as the convention will be one of 
much interest to our cause in this State; 
and we hope the influence will be 
healthy on other States. Come one, 
come all, and let us put this State upon 
a basis in which she can be effectively 
aggressive against this enemy of Gad 
and humanity. We wish to be able to 
appoint one or more delegates at this 
meeting from every county in the State 
to the National meeting in June. 
Hope the friends will all take an inter- 
est in securing funds from each county 
sufficient to defray the expenses of 
their respective delegates. We will see 
that able speakers are present on the 
occasion. Papers favorable please copy. 
D. S. Caldwell, State Agent. 
Carey, 0„ April 13th, '74. 
P. S. — Persons from all parts of the 
State will stop off at Bellview,,and will 
be conveyed to place of meeting. 

»«-« 

Is Indianapolis, St,. Louis or Lansing 
the place for our annual meeting next 
year? Or shall we look still farther? 
One important work for the National 
Anniversary will be to lay out the 
plan of next year's labor, at least so far 
as to fix the place of the next annual 
meeting. If this is done it will aid 
much in making that meeting what it 
ought to be. Will not friends interest- 
ed let us know their views on this sub- 
ject? 

» ^ « 

Lecture List. 



State Lecturer for Ohio, D. Caldwell, 
Carey, O. 

State Lecturer for New York, J. L. Bar- 
low, Bemus Heights, Saratoga Co., N. Y. 

I. A. Hart, Wheaton, 111. 

C. A. Blanchard, Wheaton, 111. 
P. Elzea, Wheaton, 111. 

W. A. Wallace, Senecaville, O. 
J. B. Nessell, Ellington, N. Y. 
John Levington, Detroit, Mich. 

D. P. Rathbun, Odessa, N. Y. 
8. Smith, Charles City, Iowa. 
R. B. Taylor, Summertield, O. 
L. N. Slratton, Syracuse, N. Y. 
N. Callender, Green Grove, Pa. 
J. H. Timmons, Tarentum, Pa. 
Linus Ohittenden, Crystal Lake, 111. 
P. Hurless, Polo, 111. 

J. R. Baird, Greenville, Pa. 

T. B. McCormick, Princeton, Ind. 

C. Wiggins, Angola, Ind. 

E. Johnson, Bourbon, Ind. 

Josiah McCaskev, Fancy Creek, Wis. 
C. F. Hawley, Seneca Falls N. Y. 
Wm. M. Givens, Center Point, Clay Co., 
Ind. 
L. M. Andrus, Mt. Vision, N. Y. 
J. J. Bishop, Chambersburg, Pa. 



THE NATIONAL CHIUSTIAN ASSO- 
CIATION, 

OPPOSED TO secret SOCIETIES. 

President — J. G. Carson, Xenia, O. 

Vice-Presidents — R. B. Taylor, of Ohio ; 
Aaron Floyd, of Pensylvania; Luke 
Thomas, of Ind ; Pres. p. A. Wallace, of 
Illinois; George Brokaw, of Iowa; N. E. 
Gardner, of Missouri; N. B. Blanton, of 
Kansas; Donald Kirkpatrick, of New 
York; J. W. Wood, of Wisconsin; John 
Levington, of Micbinan. 

Corresponding Secretary — I. A. Hart, 
Wheaton, 111. 

Recording Secretaries — H. L. Kellogg, 
G. L. Arnold. 

Treasurer — H. L. Kellogg, 11 Wabash 
Ave., Chicago. 

Executive Committee — J. Blanchard, 
P. Carpenter, I. A. Hart, George Dietrich, 
J. M. Snyder, O. F. Lumry, Isaac Preston, 
C. R. Hagerty, J. M. Wallace, E. A. Cook, 
J. G. Terrill, A. Wait, H. L. Kellogg. 

The objeots of this Association are to 
expose, withstand and remove secret soci- 
eties and other like anti-Christian organi- 
zations from church and state. 

The Association originated in a meeting 
held Oct. 30lh, 18G7, in the City Hall of 
Aurora, 111., attended by persons opposed 
to secret societies, where a committee was 
appointed to make the necessary arrange- 
ments for a National Convention. This 
was held in Pittsburgh, May 5th-7th, 
1868, when the National Association was or 
ganized. Its subsequent meetings have been 
held : Chicago, June 8th-10lh, 1869 ; Cin- 
cinnati, June 9th-llth, 1870 ; Worcester, 
Mass., June 7th-9th, 1871 ; Oberlin, Ohio, 
May 21st-23d, 1873 ; MonmoiUh, 111., 
May 14th-16th, 1873. Its presiding offi- 
cers have been in order : Bishop D. Ed- 
wards, Prof. J. C. Webster, Judge F. D. 
Parish, Gen. J. W. Phelps, Pres. J. 
Blanchard. 

The Association employs a General 
Agent and Lecturer, and has secured 
State lecturers for Indiana, Ohio and Illi- 
nois, whose names appear in the list of 
lecturers. The support of the Association 
is entirely voluntary. Funds are greatly 
needed to carry on the work already be- 
gun, and contributions are hereby solicited 
from eyery friend of the reform. Send 
by post-offlce order, registered letter or 
draft to the Treasurer, 11 Wabash Ave., 
Chicago. 



I 



West District, J. K. Atwood. Two or 
three more are likely to be elected, while 
some will go on their own account." 



't^w %m% 



General Agent and Lecturer, J. P.Stod- 
DAKD, Christian Cynosure Office, Chicago. 

State Lecturer f.)r Indiana, J. T.Kiggins, 
Ligonier, Noble Co., lud. 

State Lecturer for Illinois H. H. Hinman, 
Farm Ridge, LaSalle Co., 111. 



— Rev. H. H. Hinman. who has taken 
the lecture woik in Illinois, called 
on Monday last. He lately lectured in 
Lockporl near Chicago. He has been kept 
from lecturing for a few days by the unset- 
tlement of aflairs incident to removal, but 
will now be ready to correspond with as- 
sociations or break ground in new local- 
ities. 

— Elder A. D. Freeman has been chosen 
delegate to Syracuse from the Greenwood 
(111.) Baptist church ; and will attend. 

— The Dupage County Association of 
this State ha-i auaoauced a semi-annual 
meeting for May 6th in the College Chapel 
at Wheaton. Delegates will be appointed 
to Siracute. 

Brother Kiggins writes that the follow- 
ing delegate? have thus far been reported 
from Ind. : "Slate Association, J. T. Kig- 
gins ; Lower Wabash Conference (U. B.), 
W. M. Givens ; Jay county, Rev. Aaron 
Worth , Hauulton county, J. L. Fall ; 
Cherubusci) Circuit (U. B.), Rev. David 
Holmes ; North Ohio Conference (U. B.), 



Organization and Lectures in Spencer 
County, Indiana. 



On Monday, April IStb, I8'74, a 
county anti secret association was organ- 
ized in Dale, Spencer county, Indiana, 
of which Rev. I. Scammahorn was elect- 
ed President; Rev. A. Brooner, Vice- 
president; Rey. H. Burr, Secretary; 
and N. G. Walter, Treasurer. Sjme 
of the most prominent citizens of the 
county, as well as some of the most pi- 
ous in the churches, are connected 
with this movement. A committee 
was appointed to secure additional sign- 
ers to our constitution, by signing 
which they become members of our 
organization. 

We expect to hold a meeting at an 
early day for the purpose of laying out 
our plans for future operation in procur- 
jngand distributing tracts, circulating the 
Christian Cynosure, employing lectur- 
ers, etc. We have entered into this 
work in the name of Jesus, and have 
already had evidence that God appro- 
bates our course. We earnestly beg 
the prayers of all Christian people that 
our faith may not fail, nor our zeal grow 
cold. 

In accordance with previous arrange- 
ments, Rev. Mr. McCormick, a Congre- 
gational minister, was with us and 
delivered four able and convincing lect- 
ures. Bro. McCormick's gray hairs 
indicate that he is past the meridian of 
life, and will, in a few more years at 
most, quit the field and recieve his re- 
ward. He is remarkably good natured, 
always seems cheerful and lively, but 
never light and trifling. His deport- 
ment during the time we were with him 
gave evidence that he had been with 
Jesus and learned of him. Daring 
the time of his lectures he never 
seemed angry, petulent, excited, or 
embarrassed. He entered upon his 
work so calmly and yet so earnestly, 
that even his enemies seemed to be 
astonished ; and if an expression that 
sounded rough and uncouth should fall 
from his lips, there would scarcely be 
time for prejudice to arise in the 
minds of the hearers, until it would be 
so moistened by the tears which fl iwed 
copiously down the furrowed cheeks of 
the earnest reformer that it would loseitp 
harshness and carry with it a convinc 
ing power that would seem to silence 
opposition. 

During his stay among us a promi- 
nent Mason was heard to say "McCor- 
mick's record is clear, anyhow, for I 
have known him for years". 

His lectures consisted in expositions 
of, and strong arguments against, Free- 
masonry, Odd-fellowship, etc. At the 
close of each lecture he gave opportu- 
nity for any person to ask questions, 
which several persons did, all of which 
he answered in a Christian manner. 
In answer to the question: "Have you 
been a Mason?" He said, 'If I should 
say I had not, I would lie". Having 
read some in Webb's Monitor and de- 
nounced Freemasonry for being a 
Christless institution, a man who said 
he had taken fifteen degrees in Masonry 
arose and said ''I wish to ask if the 



name of Christ is not found several 
times in that book?" "Find it if you 
dare," said the speaker, reaching him 
the book. No search was made for the 
name, and the audience was left to judge 
whether or no it could have been 
found. 

During the lectures Masons and Odd- 
fellows were frequently invited to deny 
anything which they considered false, 
and as they did not do so we concluded 
that truth had been revealed. After 
the lecturer had left, a letter, which 
had been either accidentally or inten- 
tionally dropped by a Mason, was found, 
from which it appears that two promi- 
nent Masons of Dale had written to Dr. 
Swan, of Rockport, a Baptist minis- 
ter, urging him to meet McCormick at 
Dale to defend Masonry. The letter 
found was signed by Dr. Swan at Rock- 
port. Begging pardon of the brethren 
concerned, (knowing that the hidden 
things must sometime be revealed any- 
how) we will quote from this letter: 

''Gentlemen : Your note of the lOth 
inst. , is before me, and in response I 
have to say (with regret) that I will not 
be able to be in Dale on next Monday 
night, consequent upon imperative en- 
gagements in another direction. But, 
indeed, I would love to be there and 
handle McCormick awhile with cast- 
steel fingers, case hardened, and' 
ground to a sharp point." 

Reader, please bear in mind that this 
man is a Christian professed I — a 
miniser ! This grates upon our ears some 
thinglike the horrid oaths of Masonry. 

In conclusion let me say, dearbreth 
ren in the Lord, our work is a great 
one. The enemy is strong. His bul- 
warks are powerful. The struggle is 
to be a fearful one. But we know in 
whom we trust. O let us keep near to 
God. Let us have the same mind that 
was also in Christ Jesus, and while we 
have no compromise to make with sin, 
let us entertain no hardness towards 
those connected with the great evil 
which we oppose. B essed Jesus, arm 
us for the conflict. H. Burr. 



^^(fi$jH>tt4^W4* 



Masonry and the Grange. 



St. Charles, Minn. , April 6, '74. 

Editor of the Cynosure : — Some 
things have lately transpired here 
which look as though Masonry was 
seeking to shelter behind the grange. 
I notice an account of an election last 
month for town officers in an adjoining 
town where I lived several years, and 
know eiglit of the ten officers elected 
as follows: 

First Supervisor, Mason, granger, 
Democrat. 

Second Supervisor, Mason, granger. 
Democrat. 

Third Supervisor, Mason, granger, 
Democrat. 

Clerk, granger. Republican. 

Justice, Mason, Republican. 

Constable,' Mason. 

Treasurer, Mason, Democrat. 

Assessor, Mason, Democrat. 

This town has at least two Republi- 
cans to one Democrat, and I think not 
one-tenth of the voters are Masons, 
and the paper correspondent from that 
town reports it a? a "great victory for 
the Anti-monopoly parly" after a "hot 
contest." Masonry of course was kept 
out of sight, but you will notice seven 



ito^A 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



5 



out of ten officers are Masons, four 
grangers, and perhaps one or two 
more of each, as two I do not know 
about. One Mason who is also a 
granger from that town, said tome ihat 
things are changing, for he voted for 
four Dftmocrats. You will see that they 
are all Masons, and the election was 
really a Masonic victory. 

Another thing looking in the same 
direction is the "grange festival." Ma- 
sonic festivals, Masonic balls, etc. , have 
been in vogue here. This winter I 
hear of nothing of the kind , except the 
grange festival, which is so much like 
the Masonic festivals that I will give 
some extracts from the newspaper ac 
count : 

*'The long talked of entertainment 
by the St. Charles Grange of the Pat- 
rons of Husbandry, took place Friday 
afternoon of last week. Although ar- 
rangements had been made for a large 
attendance, and hundreds were expec- 
ted to be present, for some reason the 
number fell off by nearly one-half. Af- 
ter being called to order by the -'Mas- 
ter and remarks by the State Agent, 
etc., supper was then announced and 
about fifty persons repaired to the din- 
ing hall where a sumptuous f9ast was 
spread." .... "The dancing 
room was next 'n order. . . . The 
pleasurfs of the evening were kept up 
long into the early hours of the 
morning, and the enjoyment was su- 
preme. The festival was a complete 
success. " 

Possibly Masonry will not find as 
safe a shelter as it expects. Some 
grangers own up that the Cynosure 
tra gave them is a true representa- 
tion of their ritual, and appear about 
ready to renounce. 

On coming to this place a few weeks 
since I was greatly surprised to learn 
that a prominent merchant here had 
lately joined the Masons. 

But my surprise was greatly abated 
on reading a letter dated a* this place 
March 31, 1874, and signed by the 
initial of the "Grand King" of the State of 
Minnesota, and published in a Winona pa- 
per, saying that this same merchant was 
elected by the grange as "grange mer- 
chant." 

Since writing the foregoing, my eye 
has fallen on the following puff from 
the "State Agent for the grangers," for 
the Phoenix Iron Works: 

'"I take this occasion to say that the 
above named parties are proprieters 
of the Phoenix Iron Works in this city 
and seem to be doing a flourishing bus- 
ineps in the manufacture of portable 
engines for threshing and other farm 
purposes; also the "Minnesota Seeder," 
which is becoming deservedly popular, 
both at home and abroad; also the 
Hughes Riding Plow, which is coming 
into general use in those States east and 
south of U8, and bids fair to become 
a very popular and valuable imple- 
ment. Messrs Hurlburt & Stevens 
have seen the error of the old meth- 
od of doing business on long notes with 
wide margins for the middle men. And 
I feel it incumbent on me to urge on 
my brother Patrons to extend to them 
as large a share of patronage as is con- 
sistent with your wants. " 

This is the firm that nearly two 
years ago withdrew their patronage 
from E. A. Cook & Co. on account of 
their connection with the Cynoswie, 
and gave their ' 'heavy orders" to oth- 
ers, and warned the "gentlemen of the 
Gynosure^^ that their opposition to the 
iastitution of Freemasonry would have 



the two-fold effect of increasing the num- 
ber and zeal of the brotherhood, and of 
diminishing their income tax. But 
this was done by a member of the 
firm when he was State Senator, and 
had the interests of the State and the 
"public morals" as well as the inter- 
est of the order or brotherhood to look 
after 

This "State Agent for the grangers" 
tells me that they design to sell to out- 
siders at a small per C3nt. above what 
they charge ''Patrons," and perhaps 
some will prefer to buy through the 
''middle men" of the grange rather 
than pay their money and give up their 
manhood to the grange and be contin- 
ually harrassed with "lodge dues, " as 
some of the grangers already are, who 
would like to be free if it were not for 
"being forever disgraced by those that 
were their brothers and sisters," 

It would really be a sad thing for 
the Masons to have the "numbers and 
zeal" increased very much, for they are 
zealous, and as a lawyer who had long 
been a Mason, once said to me, "Ma- 
sonry is only designed for a few, and if 
many get into it, it will spoil it." 

Oren Cravath. 



Masonry in the Navy. 



York, Pa., April 26, 1874. 
Editor Cynosure: 

During the Rebellion, the vessels of 
the S. A. B. squadron sometimes sent 
their cutters with armed ere (vs to lay all 
night at certain places, as picket boats, 
to look out for rebel vessels or blockade 
runners. 

One night I was one of a picket 
crew, sent from the Wissahickon 
in a cutter, to l^y all night at the 
mouth of a river. (I have always 
thought it was the Savannah River, 
but am not sure, as it was dark.) 
The crew consisted of a master's mate, 
and seven men besides my elf. The 
master's mate had a navy revolver; all 
the rest of the crew had muskets, 
horse-pistols, cutlasses, and daggers. 
To a peacable man, we no doubt looked 
like fierce fellows; and Sir John Falstaff 
would have felt proud of such warriors. 
We rowed two miles from the ship, and 
dropped our little anchor. We then 
fixed ourselves for the night. One of 
the men asked the officer if we should 
load our arms. He said yes. We all 
drerw our pistols and found all of them 
out of order. Some had broken locks, 
others bent ramrods, None could be 
loaded, I had no pistol, caps or car- 
tridges. Next we tried to load our 
muskets, but found we had no musket 
caps. Our cutlasses were so dull that 
all of us could not have cut one rebel. 
Our daggers were in good order, as it 
was not an easy task to put them out of 
order. The officer did not seem sur- 
prised at our defenceless condition, but 
said he could use his revolver if neces- 
sary. We had an hour glass and kept 
up hour watches through the night, all 
sleeping in the bottom of the cutter, 
except the sentinel on daty. We were 
within one-fourth of a mile of the shore 
which the rebels held. Had armed 
rebels attacked us, we would have had 
to surrender without a fight. Our offi- 
cer knowing our condition would have 



been a fool to have drawn his revolver 
on armed rebels. But his orders were 
to stay all night, and he obeyed. At 
early daylight we left in a hurry with- 
out ever stopping to take a last look, 

The gunners' mate perhaps could ex- 
plain all the mysteries of this picket 
boat affair, if it would not be '*unma- 
sonic" to do so. Why the master's 
mate did not tell the captain about mat- 
ters that night, all who are investigat- 
ing sheepskinism can guess. And 
what excuse our Masonic captain could 
give for sending us two miles so heavily 
armed with all sorts of old scrap iron, to 
watch his Masonic rebel friends so very 
closely, for a whole night, I can scarcely 
conjecture, I am glad, however, that 
I am not now a United States sailor, on 
guard with only a dagger, and loaded 
with a lot of old rubbish that no Jew 
would buy. Yours for the truth, 

E. J, Chalfant. 



Secret Societies and Mutual Insurance 
Companies. 



Editor of the Cynosure : 

Orleans county, N. Y., has quite a 
number who believe in doing what they 
do openly; these constitute some of 
our best citizens. While there are 
others, who are not members of any 
secret organization, that believe that 
secret societies are of the same benefit 
as a mutual insurance company. 

Some mutual insurance companies 
have proved of great detriment^to the 
public at large, not being a mutual 
benefit but a mutual draining of money 
from the pockets of those interested, 
and filling the pocket-books of a'^board 
of directors. Said board of directors, 
after they had got rich out of the en- 
terprise, published to the world that 
the company had broken down. 

Secret organizations can not be com- 
pared to companies that are of a mutual 
benefit. The doings of the former are 
hidden, and of the latter are known. 
But they can be compared to those 
companies that are a mutual detriment. 
Because what they do is done in secret. 
Their stealings are hidden from those 
interested. Clark D. Kstapp. 



[The following letter accompanied 
photographs of brethren Bishop, Wick- 
ey, Weidler and Anthony, who have 
been lately mentioned as holding in 
connection a series of meetings in South- 
eastern Pennsylvania. We are heart- 
ily thankful to the brother who sends 
them, and hope to meet some day in 
the flesh the noble faces of these 
brethren. A small collection of such 
photographs for the Cynosure office was 
destroyed in the great fire. This will 
begin another. We shouH be glad of 
additions.] 

York Springs. April 20, 1874. 
Editor Cynostire: 

Dear Bro. — Several notices have 
appeared in the Cynosure of our glori- 
ous meeting of the 18th ult, ; and 
thinking it might be interesting to you 
to see pictures of our dear brethren who 
participated in it, and are so earnestly 
engaged in pushing on the good cause , 
I have concluded to send you one of 
Brother Bishop's and one with the four 
on one card. If they meet your ap- 



proval, well and good ; if not, I trust 
no harm is done. 

Secrecy is pretty strong here; there 
were only a few of us who boldly took 
the front ranks in opposition ; but we 
held on through many threats until we 
secured the lecture, and the end is not 
yet. More light is wanted. Bro. 
Bishop secured several subscriptions to 
the Cynosure, and I have since gather- 
ed those enclosed. I am determined 
to do all I can. Though I am but 
young in years, and in meager circum- 
stances, yet I feel that the Lord is on 
my side. Thank God for the Cynosure 
and religious truth. Let us continue 
to battle against these popular evils 
until we gain the victory. The "Lord 
is mighty to save and strong to del ver,' 
and we have^the assurance that if we 
go to him in the spirit of humble and 
earnest prayer, we will be sure of vic- 
tory. Let our motto always be, never 
despair, lut always trust in the Lord. 

Leaving all in the hands of the Lord 
Jesus, I am in love for truth. 
Your brother in Christ, 

H. F. Slaughsnhaupt, 



Our Mail. 



Conrad Stegner, East. Castle Rock, 
Minn., writes: 

"With great joy and satisfaction, I 
received and read your enlarged paper, 
and my heart goes out for this great 
work. Oh that I could do for it all I 
wished. With and through the grace 
of God, I was enabled to bring my mite 
in (since 1850) for abolishmg slavery. 
For temperance, that is total abstinence 
(this is the twenty-fourth year of my 
household), not a drop of alcoholic 
drink came into my house, even for 
medicine. I don't believe in tonics, 
either bitter or sweet. My wife 
brought up seven children as hearty 
and red-cheeked as they could be, m 
whose veins runs not a drop of alco- 
holic poison. Then we go with Geo. 
Trask in the tobacco reform, working 
the last twenty years, and not in vain, 
either, even among my own country- 
men we have helped to gain victory; 
and last, but not least, we have set in, 
since the grange movement begun five 
years ago, to fight the deyil in his own 
secret holes." 

Bro. Stegner promises to write 
to us again about the grange oper" 
ations in his locality. We will be 
glad to hear from him. One step in a 
true reform naturally leads to another. 

A. Baker, Tiskilwa, Til., writes: 

"I am glad to see the powers of 
darkness faUing. I am doing all that 
I can