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Full text of "A chronicle, together with a little romance regarding Rudolf and Jacob Näf, of Frankford, Pennsylvania, and their descendants, including an account of the Neffs in Switzerland and America"

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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01419 0158 



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1134410 



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itij:IudiiX0 mx ^cconxxt 0t tite g^jeffs 
in ^xoitztxl^rxfi uxx& Jimjerira. 



laj llix^Jtretlx ®Xtff0x;^ Hjeff, 25311, 

m* S. ^. 



t88e. Cincinnati, O^Ilio. 



Copyright, 1886, 
By ELIZABETH CLIFFORD NEFF. 



1131410 



" I have gathered a posie of other men's flowers, 
and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine 
own." — Montaigne. 



" There is not so poor a book in the world that 
" would not be a prodigious effort were it w^rought 
" out entirely by a single mind, without the aid of 
<' prior investigators." — Johnson. 



(3) 



To my parents, 

Peter and Sarah A. (Biggs) Neff, 
The representatives, as united, of the descendants of Peter 
and Rebecca Neff, these pages are lovingly presented, know- 
ing that unto none other so lenient and appreciative could 
they be given. 

To the former I am indebted for the form, shape, and ful- 
fillment of my work, as the necessary amount of means to 
promote my undertaking, was always willingly and cheerfully 
contributed. 

To the latter a conviction of, and faith in my ability, far 
surpassing my deservings, which, expressed in tender and en- 
couraging words and acts, has stimulated me to the results 
presented in this little book. 

The efforts of the critic may have a tendency to dismay me, 
but my courage will be restored, if I have done my work in a 
measure to merit the approval of those interested in the story. 



(5) 



cii;0txttiits. 



Title-page — Quotations — Dedication 1, 3, 5 

Contents - 7 

Coat of arms of the Naf family ,.. 13 

CHAPTER I. 

Switzerland — Birth of the name — Zurich — Zwingli — Adam Naf — 
350th anniversary at Cappel — Significant fact — Remem- 
brance pamphlet of the Naf celebration at Cappel, Switzer-- 
land — Barbara Neff, martyr — Felix Neff, Pastor of the High 
Alps — Timoleon Carl Von Neff, artist — Paul NefF, pub- 
lisher — Graves of four brothers of the name — Cotton manu- 
facture — Industry of the people 15-41 

CHAPTER II. 

Zurich — The Reformed Cantons — Persecution — Wealth of the 
population — Rudolf and Jacob Naf — Vessel — Rotterdam — 
Landing — Registry — Photograph of signatures and certifi- 
cate — Their parents — Located — Frank ford, near Philadel- 
phia — Advantages offered to settlers — Mrs. Morse 42-50 

CHAPTER IIL 

The Morse home — Her household — Rudolf and Jacob Naf be- 
come members — Obtaining v?ork in the new country — Home 
life— Events of the day— Their Sabbath 51-57 

7 



CHAPTER IV. 

Marriage of Rudolf Naf and Hannah Morse — Purchase of the 
brick house — His success — The brown cottage — Hannah's 
disposition — Rudolf's character 58-62 

CHAPTER V. 

Rudolf and Hannah — Births of their children — Elizabeth — 
Barbara (Jacob married) — Hannah — Mary — Patriotism — 
Naturalization of Rudolf and Jacob— Change of name from 
Naf to Ne£F— Peter born — Birth and death of Johannes — 
Samuel born — Importance of year 1770 — Number and ages 
of descendants in 1784 63-69 



CHAPTER VI. 

1770— Church relations of Rudolph and Jacob NeflP— Extracts 
from Dr. Thomas Murphy's centennial services, 1870, at 
Frankford Church— German copy of the record of Frank- 
ford Church — Rudolph's name on church records — Line of , 
descent 70-87 

CHAPTER VII. 

The Neflf name in this country— The name in Switzerland— 
DiflFerence in spelling of name — Neiff family in Lancaster 
County, Pennsylvania — Mennonites — William Penn's en- 
couragement and sale of property — Francis NeifF, John 
Heni-y NeiflF, Henry Neaf, Jr. — Minding their own business — 
Same sentiment in all Neffs — NeflFs in Huntingdon County, 
Pennsylvania — NeflFs in Virginia — Respect for the name — 
Five adjoining states — Genealogy furnished by D. J. Neff — 
Jacob Neff— His death— Ann NefF- Jacob NeflF, Jr.— Will of 
Jacob NeflF— Children of Jacob NeflF, Jr.— Samuel, brother of 
Peter NeflF— Tables of descent 88-153 

8 



CHAPTER VIII. 

Peter Neff— Trade — Marriage of Peter NeflFand Rebecca Scout — 
Their settlement in their own home in the half of the his- 
toric brick house — Their ages — Description of Rebecca and 
Peter — Birth of Hannah — Death of Hannah, Rudolf's wife — 
Birth of John Rudolph — His name the result of a dream — 
Records from Switzerland — Birth of William — Peter's en- 
joyment of humor evinced by a circumstance — Birth of 
Sarah — The Quakers — Birth of Rebecca — Births of Peter, 
George Washington, and Mary Amanda Neflf— Accident 
at a fire, causing rupture of blood-vessel to Peter — Second 
rupture — Third rupture, which resulted in death — Court 
records regarding Peter's estate. Incident of Rudolph in 
old age — A custom of his— Death of Rudolph NefF— In- 
scriptions upon tombstones — Certified copy of the revoking 
of previous wills — Photographs of signatures — Table of de- 
scent 154-179 



CHAPTER IX. 

Large stone house — Leaving old brick house — Hannah marries 
William Patterson — John Rudolph marries Miss Bird — Two 
sons educated at the academy — Rebecca marries Dr. Thomas 
• J. Biggs — Rheumatism of Rebecca NefF — Services held at her 
house by Pastor Thomas J. Biggs — Circumstance connected 
with these meetings — William marries Miss Wayne — Mary 
Amanda marries Kirkbride Yardley — George Washington 
marries Miss White — Three brothers settle in Cincinnati, 
Ohio — Death of Rebecca Nefi' — Inscriptions upon tomb- 
stones — Signature — Table of descent 180-187 

CHAPTER X. 

Hannah NeflF Patterson; furnished by Bebecca Budd — Re- 
moved to St. Louis, Missouri — Rebecca Patterson marries 

9 



George K. Budd — One of the first Sabbath-school teachers — 
Extracts from Hannah's diary — Death of Mrs. Patterson — 
Obituary from the St. Louis Democrat — Funeral services by 
Rev. Dr. Nelson— Tables of descent 188-201 



CHAPTER XI. 

John Rudolph Neflf; contributed by Josephine M. C. Neff— 
Marries Caroline Bird — Life spent in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania — Death of his wife and daughter — Tribute to his 
memory by Alexander Boyd — His connection vrith various 
public interests in Philadelphia — His business relations — 
Tables of descent 202-224 

CHAPTER Xn. 

William Neflf; furnished by Peter NefF — School days — His letter 
before starting for Lisbon — Stay in Lisbon — Returning home 
— Taken captive — Halifax — Refusal to walk on American 
flag — Style of dress — His release and return to Philadel- 
phia — Business card of John Rudolph and William Neff, 
Savannah, Georgia — His life in the south — Loss of cotton 
ship — Adventure in a stage — Feelings in regard to slavery — 
Engagement to Miss Wayne — Arrangement for business in 
the west — Marries Miss Wayne — Account of journeys over 
the mountains — Engages in beef and pork-packing busi- 
ness — His connection with public enterprises — Question of 
temperance — Church relations — Colored man Anderson — 
Cynthia Pendleton — Maum Minty — His Christian character 
and home life — His death — The De Cliflfords, Smyths, Gres- 
hams, Gordons, Andersons, Wayne family from England, in 
South Carolina and Georgia — Elizabeth Clifford Neff's life 
and character — Recollections of William Neff— Tribute to 
the memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Clifford Neff, by J. M. 
Fuller— Tables of descent... 225-260 



CHAPTER XIII. 

Eebecca Neff; contributed by Sarah A. Neif — Marries Rev. 
Thomas J. Biggs — Life in Frankford — Connection with the 
old church — Removal to the west — Dr. Biggs as Professor at 
Lane Seminary, Presidency of Cincinnati College, President 
of Woodward College, connection with the Bible Society — 
Home on Vine Street — Death of Dr. Biggs — Changes in the 
family — Removal to Gambler — Subsequent life in Glendale — 
Present life in Gambler — The parents of Dr. Biggs, John 
and Sarah, with accounts of their s^ven children. Rev. H. 
W. Biggs, Chillicothe, Ohio— Tables of descent 261-282 

CHAPTER XIV. 

Peter Neflf; furnished by William Howard Neff — Birth — Early 
education — Business capacity — Ability as an accountant — 
Life in Baltimore — Marries Mrs. Lamson — Engages with his 
brothers in business in Cincinnati, Ohio — Removes to Cin- 
cinnati — Interest in public matters — Activity in Sabbath- 
school work — His position during the war — His death — 
Tables of descent 283-296 

CHAPTER XV. 

George Washington NefF; contributed by Laura S. NefF — Early 
education — Graduation from Princeton College — Admitted 
to the bar — Ability as a financier — Interest in public works — 
Marries Miss White — President of various enterprises — 
Death— Tables of descent 297-304 

CHAPTER XVI. 

Mary Amanda NefF — Education and character — Visit to the 
west — Marries Kirkbride Yardley — Life in Cincinnati — 
Early death — Deaths of her children — Death of Kirkbride 
Yardley— Table of descent 305-307 



CHAPTER XVII. 
Samuel NeflF and his descendants.... 308-317 

CHAPTER XVIII. 
Conclusion 318-319 

Chronological index 321-337 

Index 339-351 

Addenda 352 



X2 



"NAF.* 

"Adam Niif, of Wallenweid, near Cappel (according 
" to the certificate of citizenship given by the magis- 
" trates of Husen), had, with great bravery, helped to 
" rescue the banner of Zurich in the fight near Cappel, 
" 1531. Therefor, he received an estate from the 
" Council, and, 1533, Monday, after the anniversary, 
" received as a gift the right of citizenship — (' We de- 
*' cree, on account of his integrity, since he has helped 
" to rescue the Banner and Standard of my Lord in 
" the battle of Cappel, and seized it, having felled an 
" enemy to the ground with a two-handed sword.') 
" He is the first of the race of E'af eligible for a mem- 
" ber of the Council, the greater part of whom re- 
" main settled in his old home, Cappel, and only re- 
" vive his gift of citizenship from time to time (1575, 
« 1627, 1657, 1667, 1677). 

(Here is given the coat of arms, a copy of which is 
opposite.) 



* " Taken from the ' Family Tree, of the families of Naf, of 
" Zurich and Cappel, showing the succeeding generations, by 
" Emil Naf, architect, Zurich (11 Y), New Year, 1881.'" 



X3 






Caat 0t ^xxns 0t tlte llaf ganxilxj. 




<r 




/ 



;^ 



* These cuts of the coat of arms are from rough drawings sent 
the compiler from Canton Zurich, showing the variations of de- 
sign from the same family, which always retain the star and 
cresent in some form. 

X4 



CHAPTER I. 

"®l) take mc back to ^-mitjcrlanli, 
iHi) own, mp icar, mp natiuc lanb." 

For the birth, of the name of NeiF one must turn to 
Switzerland, that most charming of all divisions of 
Europe, within whose confines the climates of nearly 
every part of the known world are lent, "from lands 
" of snow to lands of sun,'" and whose physical pecu- 
liarities, so well known, have produced as results a 
strong, rugged, yet thoroughly refined, people. 

To one part of this picturesque land the attention of 
the reader is directed; it is the canton, " not inaptly 
" called an epitome of all Switzerland," and which 
should be properly termed the parent of Protestant- 
ism — Zurich. 

Around this canton cling many memories dear to 
the Protestant of America. For was it not in the 
Cathedral of Zurich, " to which office he was installed 
" December, 1518," that Zwingli preached, and openly 
opposed the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church? 

Far away in 1531 near the village " that is so pleas- 

" antly situated at the foot of the Albis range, and at 

" the entrance of the Alpine world," the ancestor, 

Adam Naf, distinguished the name and placed the 

X5 family 



family historically prominent in the struggle of Prot- 
estantism in Southern Europe, 

On the 11th of October, more than 353 years ago, 
Adam Kaf, at Cappel, rescued the standard of Zurich 
from desecration. On the 11th of October, 1881, at 
Cappel, the 350th anniversary of this heroic deed was 
celebrated. Gathered together on that day were the 
neighboring families of Naf, in Switzerland, to honor 
and celebrate this good and great man's act. 

It is to be remarked here as signiticaut, that in this 
month of October, of this year 1881, the compiler of 
this chronicle first definitely determined upon a col- 
lection of facts regarding the I^eff family. May not 
the spirits of some of these near or distant relatives 
here gathered have influenced by some subtle and un- 
known agency the mind of the compiler ? 

To the courtesy of a friend and correspondent in 
Canton Zurich, the compiler is indebted for the follow- 
ing description, of the festival of the Swiss Nafs in 
1881 :* 



*Rev. Arnold Naf, Ruschlikon, Canton Zurich, Switzerland. 



X6 Gedenkblatt 



« Gedenkblatt 

" Aq die 

" INafen-Feier 

** gehalten in Kappel 

« den 11 Oktober 1881 

" Am 350 jsehrigen Gedsechtnisstage der Kappeler 

" Schlacht 

" Den Stammgenossen gewidmet 

" von 

«< Arnold Kaf— Schnorf 

" Pfarrer 

* 
— Translation — 

" Remembrance Pamphlet 

« of the 

" iN'af celebration held in Cappel on the 11th of October 

« 1881 

" On the 350th Anniversary of the Battle of Cappel 

" Dedicated to the members of the family by 

« Arnold Mf— Schnorf 

« Clergyman. 



X7 It 



"It was a mild autumnal day of the year 1881. 
" From different sides we saw on the 11th of October 
" members of the 'N'di family journeying to Cappel, 
" the village that is so pleasantly situated at the foot 
" of the Albis range and at the entrance of the Alpine 
" world. 

" Joined with their family relations who live there, 
" they wished to hold a family festival in grateful 
" memory of their ancestor, Adam Naf, who, 350 years 
" before, in the battle near Cappel, rescued the stand- 
" ard of Zurich. 

" In the early morning streaks of mist hung over 
" the landscape, but little by little the country bright- 
" ened up, and when the festal pilgrims entered Cap- 
" pel they were greeted by clear sunshine. In the 
" Hotel Muehle (Mill), where at that time one of the 
" Nafs was landlord, the stranger guests found the 
" most cordial welcome, not only on the part of the 
" landlord, but also from the already assembled mem- 
" hers of the family, who are yet domiciled in Cappel. 

" The large room of the house had been ingeniously 
" adorned with ivy and all sorts of national emblems 
" by well wishing hands, and on the south wall 
" sparkled the ancestor's ancient sword and escutcheon, 
" imbordered with wreaths.* At ten o'clock a. m. the 
" number of partakers had grown to nearly seventy. In 
" joyful association they exchanged greetings, learned 

*For representations of the coat of arms of the Naf family 
descended from Adam Naf, see plate and cuts at the begin- 
ning of this chapter. 

18 to 



" to know each other, and forthwith grew together 
" into a family, and took refreshment as they needed it. 

" Towards eleven o'clock all the participants went 
" up the main street to Zwinglisten [Zwingli monu- 
" ment], whither the serious part of the festival had 
" been removed. Around the monument the neigh- 
" bors had wound wreaths and had erected a simple 
" platform before it. On the left and right of this 
" platform were placed the boys and girls, who had 
" been dressed in the ancient Swiss costume and the 
" colors of Zurich. 

" Around about these the other festival folks placed 
" themselves. On the opposite elevated side of Albis 
" street a considerable multitude of people from the 
" neighborhood assembled themselves. The whole 
" presented all the more a picturesque and festival 
" sight, as the scene was sweetly lighted by the au- 
" tumnal sun. 

" Then a member of the Naf family ascended the 
" platform to deliver an address, the tenor of which 
" was as follows : 

" Honored ones, dear relatives and friends ! 

" To this memorable place I bid you all at the out- 
" set, in the name and by order of the committee 
" that has invited you to to-day's celebration, a hearty 
" welcome. 

"Last ITewYear an honored friend [from foot note, 

" the architect, Mr. Emil Kaf, Hatt] surprised and re- 

" joiced us with a newly prepared ancestral tree of our 

X9 race 



<^ race, from Adam's time down, for which hearty 
" thanks ought to be here returned to him. The 
" thought soon became public that it would be nice if 
" all the persons who there stand so peaceably together 
" on the paper should also come together in nature 
" once, so far as they are yet living, in order to look one 
" another in the eye, and fellow like to press the hand. 

" This idea found, wherever one expressed and dis- 
" cussed it, every-where general approbation. There- 
" fore it was not difficult to come to the resolution to 
" lay hands to the work and to invite to a little festi- 
" val all, young and old, who are reckoned in our 
" family. 

" We were at first undecided, whether we ought to 
" call the reunion together at Zurich or our native 
" town, Cappel. But soon the leaning towards the 
" original home overruled, and with jubilant hearts 
" we joined in the watchword : Let the native and 
" homely Cappel be our place of meeting and festiv- 
" ity ! There, where Zwingli stood so faithful to 
" his work, and sealed it with his heart's blood — there, 
" where our blessed ancestor heroically swung the bat- 
" tie sword and rescued the banner of Zurich — there, 
" and in no other place, shall our meeting again be 
" celebrated ! 

" Concerning the time of our coming together we 
" soon came to an agreement. To-day's 350th an- 
" niversary of the battle of Cappel, of Zwingli's death, 
" and of the glorious deed of our ancestor, appeared 
" to us without any thing farther as the time as if given 
20 for 



" for our purpose. We accordingly let our invitations fly 
" joyfully out into the world in every direction, where 
" people dwell in whose veins the blood of the I^afs 
" flows. 

" Our hope did not delude us. You received our 
" invitation kindly, and to-day, the 11th of October, 
" have completely burst upon Cappel. 

" N^ot only from the neighboring Kaf houses, but 
" from greater distances many of you have hastened 
'• hither. 

" Thanks for this, and to all a hearty welcome to 
" this consecrated spot of earth. 

" May the hours of our association be such that 
" they shall remain a happy recollection to us to the 
" end of our life. May this be our reward, that old 
" ties of friendship, of love, and fellowship be re- 
" newed among us, and new ones be knit, and that 
" our hearts may glow more powerfully for the high- 
" est blessings of life, for which there was once a 
" struggle in this place ! and when we return home 
" in the evening, each one to his sphere of life, may 
" it be with the feeling in the heart and the ac- 
" knowledgment on the tongue : It was a beautiful, 
" good day ; thank God that I was permitted to live 
" to see and celebrate it ! 

" The unostentatious festival, that unites us to-day, 
" belongs undoubtedly to the most peculiarly pleasing 
" that can take place. It is of a sad, domestic sort, 
" passes quietly away and in a narrow frame, and yet 
" our view is by it involuntarily widened, fatherland 
2X and 



" and church stir our hearts, the forms of heroes of 
" former days move before our eyes. The historical 
" ground, upon which we stand, the delightful coun- 
" try that lies in sunshine before us, lend our festival 
" a superior ratification. 

" Even nature speaks here powerfully to the soul. 

" In few places does a more charming, sublime 
" panorama present itself than from here towards the 
" south, where Rigi dips its foot in the dark waves 
" of Lake Zug, Pilatus stretches aloft its rough, won- 
" derful rock peaks, and in the back ground the snow 
" mountains with their glaciers and piles of last year's 
" snow tower towards heaven. Still more charmingly 
" than here by Zwingli's monument an outlook presents 
" itself to the friend of nature, yonder on the heights 
" towards Ebertsweil, than which he can scarcely 
" have found one more wonderful far and near. 

" Yet much more cordially does this rural neighbor- 
" hood address us for this reason, because we call it 
" more strictly our home. With it the career of most 
" of us is most closely linked. 

" Many of you have yet at this hour here your 
" sphere of action, your family, the place in which 
" you daily work with and care for your dear ones, 
" are rejoiced and bear the burdens that are laid upon 
" you, till you go to your eternal home. Many of us 
" were born here. Down yonder in the houses, that 
" look up from between the trees at us, stood our 
" cradles. Over these meads we wandered in the 
" happy time of youth, plucked flowers on them, and 
22 wound 



" wound them into wreaths. Through those forests 
" we strode and meditated on harmless adventures, 
" till riper age and the seriousness of life called us to 
" go other ways. It seems to me as if every tree and 
*' every path in this neighborhood would tell me 
" many things of that time of youth, free from care, 
" that has long since vanished ; and this morning 
" when I once again from a distance saw the church 
" spire of my native place wink over at me, my heart 
" longed to break forth in the Jubilee-Home, over ev- 
" ery thing in the world — for thee only do our hearts 
" beat, thou alone art our world. 0, let us greet thee 
" anew and embrace thee with thankful love, thou 
" dear, trusted home ! Let those, who here stay year in 
" and year out in joy and in sorrow, greet thee ! Let 
'' us, who were born here, but later have found our 
" little place far from thee, greet thee ! Let those 
" also, who see thee to-day for the .first time, greet 
" thee ! Receive us all kindly and peaceably, let us 
" be right glad of thee, awake in our hearts new love 
" to thee ! But when we remember the historical 
" consequence, that belongs to this vicinity, we can 
" not refrain from deeper and more earnest expres- 
" sions. 

" Yonder stood and yet stands in its ruins the Cis- 
" tercian Convent, founded in the yeo^v 1185 by the 
" barons of Escheubach. Many storms passed over it 
" in the course of the century. It was long a lamp 
" of knowledge, faith, and Christian life for a wide 
" circuit. When other cloisters had long since fallen 
23 in 



" in with every possible ruin, men yet lived behind its 
" walls, who had preserved hearts open for the truth 
" and every thing good, and fostered an influential 
" school. It early opened its doors to the Reforma- 
" tion ; its last venerable abbot, Wolfgang Joner, 
" fought in the battle for the cause of the gospel, fell 
" alongside of Zwingli, and was buried with hundreds 
" in the ' old cellar in the barn ' [at Scheuren]. That 
" brings me to the memorable, war-like event, of which 
" Cappel was the scene, 350 years ago. At least, in 
" brief I will and must join to that event, in order to 
" be able to place the deed of our family sire, Adam 
" !N"af, in the right connection and in the proper 
" light. 

" From 1519 on, Ulrich Zwingli, in Zurich, from 
" the pulpit of the great Cathedral, worked for the 
" renovation of the Christian belief and life on the 
" ground of the simple, wholesome gospel of Jesus 
" Christ. His reformation ideas found approbation 
" first in Zurich, then also in Berne, Basil, St. Gallen, 
" and elsewhere. The interior cantons, on the con- 
" trary, the five old places, remained conservative, and 
" showed themselves resolved, in respect to the main 
" points, to abide by the teachings and customs of 
" the hitherto church. Mutual collisions arose, which 
" increased from year to year. Political intentions 
" and personal interests, that mixed in, made the sepa- 
" ration so much the greater and more dangerous. 

" In the year 1527 the reformed classes made up the 

" Christian citizenship, an alliance for the promotion of 

24 the 



" the reformation ideas. The catholic places replied 
" by going into an alliance, at Waldsbut, iu April, 
" 1529, with Austria, the old hereditary enemy of the 
" members of the alliance, that had been repulsed on 
" the Morgarten near Sempach and I^Tafels, at so dear 
" a price. From this resulted the first Cappel war. 
" What would have been better fought out by the 
" weapons of the spirit, of faith, and of love, they 
" must, alas, decide by the sword. 

" On the 9th of June, 1529, the standard of Zu- 
" rich, with 4,000 men, moved toward Cappel. On 
" the following 10th of June, the declaration of en- 
" mity was sent over to the (5) five cantons, that had 
" collected on the Baarerboden, and on the same day 
" the boundary was crossed and the little territory of 
" Zug was invaded by soldiery. The common people 
" in both camps were, however, not so hostile as many 
" of their leaders. Mutual visits w^ere made. Well 
" known is the charming tradition of a repast of 
" milk soup on a land-mark on heaps of stone or 
" turf. 

" The noble Landamman [a Swiss magistrate], Hans 
" Aebli, of Clarus whose heart was long since almost 
" wrung, over confederates being willing to go to war 
*' against each other, observed such an inclination 
" towards a friendly intercourse on both sides. 

" Like a second Niklaus of the Fliie, in the last 

" agreed upon hour, he placed himself between the 

" combative camps. His pathetic plea for peace 

" found a hearing. Kegotiations were brought about 

25 and 



" and led to the wished for result. Without a drop 
" of blood having flown the first public peace was 
" brought about on the 25th of June, 1529. The 
" same required, among other things, that the five 
" cantons should give up the document relating to the 
" confederation with Austria. After long delay it 
" was given up. In the hall of the convent in this 
" place Landamman Aebli tore it into shreds, that its 
" contents should not be known and the flame of pas- 
" sion kindled anew. But the troops of both parties 
" returned home exulting, glad of the peace, to their 
" cottages. But the gaping wound was only super- 
" ficially closed. The peace was not to be of long 
" duration. Zwingli, who looked deeper, had prophet- 
" ically foretold it, when he said to Aebli, 'Alas ! dear 
" good father, this peace is our destruction.' The old 
" frictions continued and new ones were added ; on 
" both sides the souls constantly became more in- 
" censed. As early as the year 1531 the second Cap- 
" pel war followed, after several acts of hostility on 
" both sides had occurred and the reformed had de- 
" creed against the interior cantons an embargo on 
" the exportation of grain. This time it was the 
" catholic clans who got the start of the careless re- 
" formed with the declaration of war. On the 9th of 
" October their messengers assembled at Brunneu and 
" resolved to resort to arms. On the 9th and 10th of 
" October they drew their war power together near 
" Zug on the Baarerboden. 

" In order to offer resistance, the people from the 
26 neighborhood 



" neighborhood first of all assembled near Cappel. 
" Many messengers hastened to Zurich to make the 
" danger known there. On the 10th of October, 
" in the evening, Zurich sent a vanguard of several 
" hundred, and with a few guns, by way of the Alvis, 
" under the lead of Sir George Goldli, of Tiefenau, and 
" Peter Fiissli, captain of rifles. At the same time 
" the people of Kilchberg, Thalweil, and Horgen 
" were warned to set out for Cappel. Upon new 
" alarm reports Zurich, finally, in the evening at 
" seven o'clock, let the common storm be promul- 
" gated, in order to be able soon to follow with the 
" main standard. But it was too late, for as early as 
" the next daj^, Wednesday, the 11th of October, on 
" the day of the inoffensive infant, a bloody battle 
" took place at Cappel. I must surely, for w^ant of 
" time, forbear to paint in detail the particulars of 
" this fight, yet I must mention the main points, be- 
" cause that much will be necessary to bring the 
" deed of Adam I^af plainly before our eyes. The 
" army of the five cantons, on the 11th of October, 
" on the Baarerboden, held its divine service, prayed 
" five Paternosters and five Ave Marias, and sent a 
" messenger with the challens^e to Cappel. Then it 
" set forth, and towards noon appeared beyond the 
" convent in Schonenbiihl [Schonen Hill] and on 
*' Mount Islis. Goldli, with the vanguard and the 
" forces from the neighborhood, took a position at 
" Scheuren ; that is, near the now existing Naf houses. 
" Many urged him to retreat to the wall situated at 
27 Miinchbiihl 



" Mlinchbiihl [Munch Hill] ; others advised against 
" it, and Goldli was not willing to give his consent. 
" Forthwith a fight developed between the vanguard 
" of the five cantons and Goldli's troops. The 
" former advanced by way of Langfeld towards the 
" latter, but were kept in check by the Zurich guns, 
" and were not able, from tlie difliculties of the 
" ground, to come nearer. They soon desisted from 
" further advance and withdrew to their own by way 
" of Liudenfeld. In the afternoon the army of the 
" five cantons changed its position. From the south 
" side of the convent it moved by way of the Biden- 
" los meadow to the chapel of St. Marks, past the 
" present churchyard, by way of Hofacker and Allen- 
" winden to Ebertsweiler summit. During this disloca- 
" tion many Zurichers wished to fall upon the enemy, 
" as they imagined, ' now they are ours;' but Goldli 
" and others hindered it. The Catholics had scarcely 
" reached the summit when the Zurichers, with the 
" main standard, came up, between three and four 
" o'clock, led by Rudolf Lavater, governor of Kyburg, 
" originally Glaser, and William Toning, captain of 
" rifles, landlord of the Red House, accompanied by 
" Ulrich Zwingli as chaplain. The troops were tired 
" and numbered scarcely 700 men. When at the 
" Albis some advised to await the arrival of the troops 
" marching behind. Lavater and Zwingli exhorted 
" them to hasten forward in order to assist their dis- 
" tressed brothers. 

" The Zurichers, at most 2,000 men, had to oppose 
28 thems 



" themselves to 8,000 enemies, it is said. Immedi- 
" ately after the arrival the Zurichers arranged their 
"battle lines. The 'upper troop' or right wing 
" took position at Scheureu, beyond the Naf houses; 
" the ' hinder troop ' or left wing behind the Zwingli 
" monument, north-east from the same. The latter 
" wing constituted the ' power band,' with the main 
" standard. It was decided by the leaders in the 
" camp of the five cantons to defer the attack till the 
" following day. But John Jauch, of Uri, ventured 
" into the Scheuren wood, a little beach grove, be- 
" tween Ebertsweiler summit and the main force of 
" the Zurichers, that had been left unoccupied. He 
" looked on just as a part of the Zurichers withdrew 
" towards Miinch Hill, and disorder on their account 
" reigned. The moment seemed to him a favorable 
" one for an attack. With a few hundred he rushed 
" forth independently from the beech grove towards 
" the enemy. The leader of his party quickly per- 
" ceived it to be advantageous not to leave Jauch in 
" the lurch, but to take up, with all his force, the 
" battle independently begun by him. And so they 
" advanced in two divisions towards the Zurichers 
" from the beech grove out against the left wing, be- 
" hind the Zwingli monument, and through the Cap- 
" pel meadow, against the right wing at Scheuren. 
" Vehemently surged the fight ; it was fought with 
" heroic courage ; the Catholics saw themselves repeat- 
" edly pressed back. But their superiority was too 
*' great. In an hour's time, towards five o'clock, the 
29 dice 



" dice had fallen and the battle was decided fatally to 
" the Zurichers. The wing at Scheuren was pressed 
" back, and the enemy now succeeded in falling upon 
" the side of the wing behind the Zwingli monument. 
" Yonder, by the moss-covered tomb and the Zwingli 
" tree was the most bloody struggle. Yonder the 
" standard-bearer, John Schweizer, held aloft the ban- 
" ner of Zurich, and, like a hero, inflamed the fighters 
" to its defense. Yonder, in the midst of the danger, 
" stood the leaders, Lavater and Toning, the latter of 
" whom fell. Yonder, in the foremost ranks, Zwingli 
" exhorted the fighters and comforted the dying, till 
" he himself, wounded on head and thigh, sank down, 
" crying out, 'What is this for a calamity? you are 
" able to kill the body, but not the soul.' The motion 
" of the fight became constantly more violent ; but 
" the standard-bearer would not yield. The enemy 
" pressed constantly more powerfully on the troop of 
" Zurichers ; these fell by hundreds around the stand- 
" ard. Now flight became the order of the day with 
" the rear guard, especially after Zuger had mingled 
" himself with the Zurichers and called to them, that 
" they should fly and save themselves. After long re- 
" sistance the standard-bearer. Master John Schweizer, 
" of the forges, was also carried away. He reached 
" the mill stream. When he attempted to cross he 
" fell in, and, weighed down by his arms, he perished. 
" Standard-bearer Kleinbaus Kambli rescued the 
" banner from the hands of the dying one, and 
" hastened farther with it. Some of the enemy over- 
30 took 



" took him ; one of these had already seized the ban- 
" ner ; Kanibli cried: 'Is there no honorable Zurich- 
" ers there to save his army's banner?' This Adam 
" E"af, from Vollenweid, heard. This was the decisive 
" moment, when this dear man approached as rescuer 
" of the standard. As arquebusier, under John Hu- 
" ber, of Teufenbach, he had already fought manfully 
" in the battle. Now he courageously swung his 
" sword that he carried with him, and struck from its 
" body the head of the enemy that had seized the 
" banner. Jungbaus Thumysen, who afterwards fell 
" near the church in Hansen, aided him in the light 
" with the halberd. Kleinbaus Kambli was able to 
" hurry farther with the banner. On the other side 
" Ulrich Deuzler, of Nanikon, took it and brought it 
" uninjured to the Albis. Kambli also recovered him- 
" self, and was able during the night to mount the 
" hill. On the field of battle and in the flight the 
" Zurichers left 512 of their number behind, among 
" them 25 clergymen, 26 members of the council, and 
" 65 other citizens of the town. Two large graves, 
" one at the old cellar at Scheuren, and another on 
" the right of the road to Zurich, before you come to 
" the mill creek, were afterwards their resting place. 
" The Catholics took their killed, the number of whom 
" has remained unknown, with them, and placed them 
" in the church-yard at Baar. The approach of night 
" made an end of the pursuit of the fleeing Zurichers 
" at the foot of the Albis. The five cantons turned 
" back to the field of battle, thanked God, and unfor- 
31 tunately 



" tunately cooled the passion of their enraged souls 
" yet on the dead and wounded. 

" Zwingli, lying in the struggle of death, was also 
" discovered among these. After he refused to deny 
" his faith Captain Bockinger, from Unterwalden, 
" gave him the death thrust. In the morning, despite 
" the dissuasions of many leaders, his body was quar- 
" tered and burned by the executioner from Lucerne. 
" But Chaplain John Schonbrunnar, of Zug, who had 
" formerly been canon of the Cathedral of Our Lady, 
" in Zurich, spoke this magnanimous word concern- 
" ing the dying Zwingli : ' Of whatever faith you were, 
" you were still a good ally.' Zwingli's body they have 
" killed and burned, but his soul lives, and his work 
" for God has not been destroyed. The word of truth, 
" that his mouth announced, resounded yet again to- 
" day in our hearts. His blood, that they have poured 
" out, became holy seed, from which ripened, and 
" shall further ripen, fruits which remain forever. 
" After this battle followed many disturbances and 
" events unfavorable to the Reformation, like the bat- 
" tie on the Gubel. 

" Finally negotiations for peace were brought about. 
" A month later on", the 15th and 16th of E"ovember, 
" the second public peace was arranged in a meadow 
" near Deinikon, between Cappel and Baar, by ambas- 
" sadors from both sides, and on the 20th of Novem- 
" ber, it was ratified in Zug. That it was a more un- 
" favorable one for the reformed than the first one is 
" evident. Delays of all sorts, that had occurred 
32 simultaneously 



" simultaneously between the city and province of 
" Zurich, found their release through the Cappel letter 
" agreed upon on the 1st of December. Subsequently, 
" at Zurich, an investigation was instituted against 
" Lavater, the leader of the main force, and against 
" Goldli, the commander of the vanguard, because 
" they were accused of having brought on the sad result 
" of the battle by inconsiderate, yea treasonable actions. 
" Both went forth from the investigation as guilt- 
" less, Lavater retained the office of Judge of Kyburg, 
" and afterwards rose to great honor as he filled the 
" office of Burgomaster for 13 terms from 1544. He 
" died in 1557. Goldli, on the contrary, found it nec- 
" essary to leave ; he changed his settlement to Con- 
" stance, where he died in 1536. 

" His brother Caspar, who had already years before 
" taken up his abode at Lucerne, fought at Cappel in 
" the ranks of the five cantons. 

" After the war the council of Zurich honored sev- 
" eral men, who had distinguished themselves in bat- 
" tie, by especial rewards and high attestations of 
" honor. 

" Kleinbaus Kambli, the bearer of the banner, and 
" one of the rescuers of the same, received the man- 
" agement of the governorship of Egislau [1532- 
" 44]. To Ulrich Denzler, of Nanikon, was presented 
" the citizenship of Zurich, and the so-called ' little 
" banner estate,' was given out to him. The council, 
" in the spring of 1533, likewise honored and rewarded 
" our worthy ancestor, Adam Kaf, of Yollenweid, by 
33 bestowing 



" bestowing upon him and his descen dents the citizen- 
" ship of the town of Zurich, further with the surren-^ 
" der in fee of the herdsman's house at Scheuren, on 
" extremely advantageous conditions. 

" "We have assembled here to-day in order to lay 
" upon the grave of this, our noble ancestor, Adam 
" Naf, a wreath of honored and thankful remem- 
" brance. We honor and praise his bravery, his 
" courage, his presence of mind, with which he dis- 
" tinguished himself during and after the battle. "We 
" honor and praise his love for the fatherland and for 
" his narrower home, which inflamed him to expose 
" his heart to the enemy. 

" We honor and praise his hearty assent to the 
" good cause of the gospel, which drove him into the 
" ranks of those who fought around Zwingli. We 
" honor and praise his love to wife and child, which 
" pressed the sword into his hand to fight that his 
" homely hearth might not be invaded. 

" He was a brave old ally, a whole man, to whom 
" God and the fatherland and family lay near to the 
" heart, and it fills us with noble pride to be able to 
" call him our sire. 

" At this celebration of the memory of him we bow 
" to show ourselves worthy of him, to stand as he, 
" true to the banner of our country, to Zwiugli's 
" church, to the pure gospel and word of God, to wife 
" and child. 

" On this soil, which drunk the blood of the noblest, 

" we pledge our word to fight for every thing that is 

34 good 



" good, and that pleases God : to exhibit a heart glow- 
" ing for whatever benefits home, church, and our 
" family. 

" May scions never be wanting even to the latest 
" descendants of our race, who may do honor to our 
" ancestor, and worthily plant his name wider. Three 
** and a half centuries now has the dear God, blessing 
" and guarding, ruled over our family. From the 
^' depths of our hearts we to-day with one accord pre- 
" sent to him for this the offering of thanks. 

" But may he be with us still farther, and carry us 
" on and on, on the wings of his power and love, and 
" permit the Naf trunk to bear to the latest time twigs 
" and branches, healthy and green with life. 

" The circumstance that it was held in the open air, 
" on the consecrated spot itself, where, 350 years be- 
" fore, the battle heavy with consequences took place, 
^' lent to this simple festival a peculiar charm, and sig- 
" nificance. 1.1344J 

" At the thought of what took place here once, 
" many an eye was moistened. After they had given 
" themselves up to various earnest observations in the 
*' way of conversation, for a while longer they took 
" leave of the Zwingli monument in order to make 
" the Naf houses a visit, of which Adam's family 
*' mansion was adorned with wreaths. A few decades 
" ago still only Kafs lived here. Modern time has 
" now asserted its right even here, as a part of the 
" houses have passed into strange hands. From the 
^' Naf houses a pleasant foot path leads through green 
35 meadows 



" meadows to the near convent. This way this festi- 
" val caravan now took in order to reach the church 
" of the former convent, the no longer public church. 
" As a precious monument to Gothic art it stands there 
" in the midst of green meadows in face of the majestic 
" mountains. 

" With hearts lifted up the feast fellows wandered 
" through its holy spaces, the lofty middle nave, the 
" two side naves, the great choir. The existing 
" grave-stones spoke of times long past, of the found- 
" ers and supporters of the convent. The paintings 
" on glass yet remaining restored by Rottinger, 
" awakened a suspicion of the splendor that had once 
" spread over this house of God, of the holy art that 
" had once found here a consecrated place. The dates, 
" 1527 and '28, on the pulpit and baptismal font, re- 
" called those days when the gospel came to light 
" again here, in order to awake a new spring time for 
" souls. And that it might not end with the mere 
" thoughtful looking at the silent, venerable spaces, 
" but might elevate the hearts, some choral songs 
" were harmoniously sung. 

" "With this closed the earnest part of the celebration. 

" The proper hour was now at hand to return to 
" the ' Mill,' in order at a festive meal to yield them- 
" selves to generous joy and come yet nearer to each 
" other. 

" All the guests were well entertained by their rela- 
" tive, the landlord. Whatever strengthens mankind 
" and rejoices his heart was richly provided. 

36 Soon 



" Soon one mouth after another opened itself in 
" order to regale the assembled ones with mental de- 
" lights in prose and poetry, and to give expression 
" to the enthusiastic and earnest holiday thoughts 
" that moved the hearts of all. Two strange guests, 
" who had in a friendly manner accepted the invita- 
" tion to the feast, also spoke to the company ; the 
" clergyman of the place of festivity, and a curate 
" from Lake Zurich, who without knowing of the 
" pictured celebration was making a visit to the field 
" of battle. 

" The deed of the ancestor was praised in song. 
" We heard his battle sword speak in poetical repre- 
" sentation. The family tree was ingeniously and hu- 
" morously arranged and grouped. The glasses re- 
" sounded to the welfare of the young generation. A 
" second toast was given to the absent ones. 

" The festival mood was kept up by declamation ; 
" in the midst of all, letters and telegrams of greet- 
" ing from Zurich, Yoerdon, and Pesth were read. In 
" the course of the beautiful sunshiny afternoon, a 
" part of the festival guests took a walk to the 
" Ebertsweiler summit, past the little forest that had 
" been so fatal for the battle. All saw themselves richly 
" rewarded and refreshed by the outlook to the plain 
" of the Baarerbodens [ground about Baar], the Rigi, 
" and Pilatus, and the snow peaks of the wreath of 
" Alps. On their return they found the young world 
" engaged in song and dance. Once again the entire 
" company assembled. But swiftly flew the hours 
37 and 



'* and only too early fell the night on the native fields 
" and warned the far dwelling ones to return home. 

" Surely all went home with thankful feeling in 
"the heart; those were hours of joy and pleasure 
" that we have spent in celebration. We were united 
" by a family festival of the most beautiful kind ; at 
" the same time we felt our breasts strike higher for 
" fatherland and church, for that which remains above 
" all change. 

" What on that day was found out may work on 
" in the souls of all and ripen to precious fruits! 
" Alter 50 years, when the most of us are no longer 
" here, be it permitted a new generation, happy, fresh, 
'' and free to celebrate the 400th Jubilee of our family 
" and of the battle of Cappel ! 

" Under the protection and blessing of the Most 

" High, may the race of JSTafs grow and flourish on 

" and on ! 

Amen." 

To those of the name of l^eS this locality should 
be always cherished, for upon Adam JSTaf and his de- 
scendants was bestowed the citizenship of the town 
of Zurich. But its charm does not end with this sig- 
nal character. " Down yonder bej'-ond Cappel in the 
" houses that look up from between the trees " stood 
the cradles of others of our name, upon whose lives 
the world lias paid its tribute of honor. From this 
rugged country came Barbara 'NeH', whose faith in the 
reformed religion was as firm and solid as the hills of 
her native Zurich. She could not be shaken, and for 
38 her 



her cause, she together with many of her heroic coun- 
trymen, suffered death between 1638 and 1643.* 

Almost within the influence of the Cistercian Con- 
vent Felix Neff was born. He who an earnest Prot- 
estant and zealous worker became, when twenty-one 
years of age, a pastor of the High Alps, going from 
hamlet to hamlet on the mountains of Switzerland, 
bearing the good news of the gospel, every-where his 
presence being hailed with delight, turning many souls 
from the darkness into the light. 

His energy and earnestness being greater than his 
physical strength, the latter gave way at the age of 
thirty-one, he dying on the 12th of April, 1829.f 

From this sublime locality, where one can look 
" towards the south where Rigi dips its foot in the 
" dark waves of Lake Zug, and Pilatus stretches aloft 
" its rough, wonderful rock peaks," came Timoleon 
Carl von Keff, an artist of eminence, who wandered 
from these artistic scenes to die in Russia.| How 
strange it is that the spot of all others that should re- 
joice the heart of the artist, and which should produce 
the largest number of such people, is of all others so 
devoid of artists ; but if one does find embosomed 



*It is singular that portions of the family held such a tradition 
regarding the martyrdom of Barbara before the record confirmed 
it. — See Rupp's History of Lancaster Co;, Penn., page 72. 

fLife of Felix i^eff, pastor of the High Alps. — American Sun- 
day-School Union print. 

|Timoleon Carl von NefiF, painter of the picture of St. Isaac, of 
Dalmatia, in the Cathedral of St. Petersburg. Di^d in St. Peters- 
burg in 1879. 

39 within 



within his soul there such talent, as did Timoleon, 
they wander to other countries less picturesque. 

Out of this land filled with grand memories and 
grander scenes, Paul Neff went forth to make his 
name famous as a publisher at Stuttgart, and who now 
points with pride to his ancestral home in Switzer- 
land.* 

In the midst of all the grand and majestic scenery 
of the place rise the mounds to mark the graves of 
four brothers who fell in one battle, an undoubted at- 
testation of the valor of the name.f 

In this locality, where the Nefi" family are so pre- 
valent, it is gratifying to learn, as a historical fact, 
that its people are among the most prosperous and 
best educated workingmen in Europe. 

And it is comforting to people whose parentage 
claims home there, that its people were so progressive 
and advanced as to make it one of the earliest seats 
of the cotton manufacture in Europe, and that its 
looms and spindles have for years produced a product 
in demand throughout civilization. 

Its corn and pasture lands, its vineyards and 
orchards, are evidences of the quiet peaceful industry 
of a people whose representatives scattered out upon 
the earth are making their lives a reflection of their 
fatherland. With all these facts before one it will be 
no wonder if the mind turns eagerly to any chronicle 

* Paul NeflF, publisher, Stuttgart, Germany. 

f The above fact is attested by Paul Neflf, of Stuttgart. 



40 



or romance regarding the name of Neff. Do not be- 
lieve that all that is to follow will be sunshine. 

The heroes are human as are all others who enter 
into this history, and may err, and as " into each life 
" some rain must fall, some days be dark and dreary," 
so we may find it to have been for them and their de- 
scendants. What in the lives of any of those whose 
history may enter into the chapters of this volume is 
good and Christ-like, take that home to yourself — and 
wherein they have done ill forgive, and may their 
failure be but as a light-house, to turn you away from 
the same reef. 



41 



CHAPTER II. 

Thus circumstanced and surrounded this canton 
Zurich, should, and did play a particular and weighty- 
part in the conflicts raging in Switzerland in the 
struggle against the Roman Catholic power — its peo- 
ple individually as well as collectively, even down to 
latter days, feeling the influences thus brought to 
bear upon all. Turning our thoughts particularly to 
this canton, it will be found that these influences have 
shaped even the course of the lives of those wbo be- 
come of deep interest as the story of this volume 
rolls on. 

In the reformed religion, Zurich must be accorded 
leadership, for in her train followed " Berne, Basel, 
" Schauffhausen, a great part of Glarus, and the ex- 
" terior communities of Appenzell," and on account of 
their devotion bore the proud title of " Calvanistic or 
" reformed cantons." 

Standing thus opposed to the power and teachings 
of Rome with her allies, the " five cantons " leagued 
together to defend the old faith, it is not surprising 
that persecution should have been present here. 

The conditions were no different here than in other 

42 countries 



countries where the iron hand of popery had made 
red the land. 

The persecution, however, appeared in Switzerland 
in a milder form. 

It was a kind of persecution [and it is indulged in 
even to-day in a modified form], that although lack- 
ing the rigor and severity of the religious movements 
elsewhere, and unknown to the world, yet had the ef- 
fect to drive the men of Zurich, and the other 
Protestant cantons, hither and thither over the earth. 

Not, however, without sacrificing some victims to 
the faith* — some who now calmly and sweetly rest 
in beloved Switzerland, awaiting the day when as 
jewels they shall shine in His crown of glory. 

We know of a surety that at the period of the per- 
secutions in Switzerland, and in the early days of the 
knowledge that freedom to worship God according 
to the dictates of conscience was enjoyed in America, 
many noble, patriotic, energetic Swiss left their father- 
land and ties, and planted their own church in 
catholic America. 



The object of this narrative is not to dwell upon 
the people as a whole, but upon two persons who, liv- 
ing in Switzerland, and experiencing the feelings, and 
sharing the trials above indicated, left their native 
home Zurich, never to return to its beloved although 
trying associations. 

No part of Switzerland difi'ers in regard to wealth, 



* History of Lancaster County, Penn., by J. D. Rupp, 1844. 

43 the 



the dense population, the absence of a titled or noble 
class holding an excess of wealth, levels its popula- 
tion to a plane of simple competence and content. 

Fancy, if possible, some rural spot in this canton 
Zurich, where wealth and large land holdings are ab- 
sent, and you possess the nativity of the Neff an- 
cestry. 

Not to the class of early immigrants, who came to 
this country empty handed, with no other object in 
view than the love of exploit, or desire for sudden 
and unearned possession of wealth, that they fancied 
a new country offered, do the subjects of this sketch 
belong, but to that class who desiring the accumula- 
tion of wealth, yet knew that even in a new country 
work must precede success. 

The subjects of this sketch as has been intimated, 
were also actuated by religious motives, to join their 
brethren in this country who having preceded them 
many years, owing to definite and direct persecution, 
had found enjoyment in the freedom obtained in 
America. They were possessed of sufiicient means to 
enable them to reach this country comfortably, and 
after their arrival by economy and Swiss, or Ger- 
man thrift, they were soon enabled to acquire for them- 
selves wealth. 

The two persons who thus together start off from 
their native land, to realize their hopes in America, 
were brothers ; the one Rudolf N'af, the other Jacob 

mf. 

The port from which they sailed was Rotterdam. 
44 The 



The journey from Zurich to Rotterdam, in Holland, 
must have been long, tiresome, and tedious in those 
days. The brothers probably left Zurich in the 
spring, as they reached Philadelphia, Penn., U. S. A., 
on the 11th of September, 1749. The ship they sailed 
in was named "Priscilla; William Meier, captain; 
" from Rotterdam ; last from Cowes ; 299 passengers."* 
An interesting fact, to be stated here, showing the 
education and ability of Rudolf and Jacob, compared 
with other immigrants, is that they signed their own 
names, instead of having the clerk do so for them, and 
spelled the name as follows : Rudolf Kaf, Jacob !N"af. 
A fact that strikes one as a little singular is, that 
wherever their names have been found written to- 
gether, Rudolfs comes first, although he was the 
younger. The following certificate explains^ this /ac 
simile : 

" Secretary of the Commonwealth, Pennsylvania, ss: 
" Harrisburg, June Uh, a. d. 1885. 

" I do hereby certify, that 
" the annexed is a true pho- 
" tographic copy of the orig- 
" inal signatures of Rudolf 
" Wsif, and Jacob Naf, with 
" others, who arrived at Phila- 
" delphia in the Priscilla, Capt. 
" "William Meier, from Rotter- 
" dam, and last from Cowes, in England, and took the 

*Rupp's collection of thirty thousand names of Immigrants in 
Pennsylvania, pages 196 and 197. 

45 usual 




" usual oaths to tlie Government, on the 11th Septem- 
" ber, 1749, as the same remain on file in this office : 




" In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my 
" hand, and caused the seal of the Secretary's office to 
" be affixed, the day and year above written. 
" Jno. C. Shoemaker, 

" Deputy- Secretary of the Commonwealth.'" 

The two brothers, Rudolf and Jacob, having left 
their home, the picturesque and inspiring Switzerland, 
came to America, bringing all the activity of moun- 
taineers, coupled with the determination to brave all 
dangers, and, in this new and prosperous country, 
make for themselves a future worthy their ambitious 
hopes. Their parents had been carefully educated, 
and it was their object and desire to give to their 
children such advantages as would enable them to 
keep abreast their times, to reach out farther, and, in 
short, accomplish more than they had done. 

The disease which caused the death of the father, 
in a few days prostrated the mother, and her strength 
failing, she, too, secure in the salvation, made possible 
through her loving Saviour, passed to her rest. 

At the time of the death of the parents, Jacob was 
46 in 



in his twentieth, and Kudolf in his eighteenth year. 
There were several other children, sons and daughters, 
who were older, all of whom were married, and settled 
in homes on the mountains of Switzerland ; each find- 
ing a world of interest and activity in their own home- 
life, which satisfied them, without venturing to a new 
country. In the death of their parents, Rudolf and 
Jacob acquiesced, yielding as to a decree of Provi- 
dence, to which they should submit. 

They did this from a knowledge acquired in their 
home training, that " He doeth all things well," yet 
not at that time realizing in its fullness the relation- 
ship to Him, who later became their guide and 
support. 

The religion of the parents was not of form and 
outward observance, but in " the hidden man of the 
" heart," yet they openly professed Christ, and were 
zealous Protestants. 

At the time our narrative begins the parents had 
been dead about four years, and the relatives, kind 
and generous, as a rural and hard working class are 
in such a country as Switzerland, had assisted the 
boys, until they found themselves well equipped for 
the struggle necessary in early Pennsylvania. 

They located at Frankford, near Philadelphia, Penn., 
and with hearts full of each other, and a feeling of 
love for the new country, which they ever after cher- 
ished as home, they quietly settled down to work, 
having learned by a careful education, an education 

47 derived 



derived from earnest parents, that honest toil is always 
honorable. 

That the brothers located in this portion of Penn- 
sylvania may be explained by the fact, that as Frank- 
ford was then somewhat remote, and greater dangers 
awaited the early settler, the colonies offered unusual 
inducements in their grants of land, as observe the 
following : 

" Though," says Peter Kalm [Peter Kalm, a Swedish 
natural philosopher and traveler, was born at Ostro, 
Bothnia, in 1715, traveled from 1748 to 1751 in North 
America, and at a later period in Russia; he became 
Professor of Botany at the University of Abo, and died 
1779] " the Province of l!^ew York has been inhab- 
" ited by Europeans much longer than Pennsylvania, 
" yet it is not by far so populous as that colony. 

" This can not be ascribed to any particular discour- 
" agemeut arising from the nature of the soil, for that 
" is pretty good ; but I am told of a very different 
" reason, which I will mention here. In the reign of 
" Queen Anne, about the year 1709, many Germans 
" came hither, who got a tract of land from the En- 
" glish government, which they might settle. After 
" they had lived there some time, and had built houses 
" and made corn-fields and meadows, their liberties and 
" privileges were infringed, and under several pretenses 
" they were repeatedly deprived of part of their land. 

" This at last aroused the Germans. They returned 

" violence for violence, and beat those who thus rob- 

" bed them of their possessions. But these proceed- 

48 ings 



" ings were looked upon in a very bad light by the 
" government. The most active people among the 
" G-ermans being taken up they were roughly treated 
" and punished with the utmost rigor of the law. 

" This, however, so far exasperated the rest, that 
" the greater part of them left their homes and fields 
" and went to settle in Pennsylvania. 

" There they were exceedingly well received, got 
" a considerable tract of land, and were indulged in 
" great privileges, which were given them forever, 
" The Germans, not satisfied with being themselves 
" removed from 'New York, wrote to their relatives 
" and friends, and advised them if ever they intended 
" to come to America not to go to New York where 
" the government had shown itself so unequitable. 

" This advice had such influence that the Germans 
" who afterwards went in great numbers to N^orth 
" America constantly avoided New York, and always 
" went to Pennsylvania. It sometimes happened that 
" they were forced to go on board of such ships as 
" were bound for New York, but they were scarce 
" got on shore when they hastened on to Pennsyl- 
'' vania, in sight of all the inhabitants of New York."* 

Hence Rudolf and Jacob, with the keen insight 
that prompted them through life, came to Frankford, 
to avail themselves of colonial offers. 

Their first effort was to secure comfortable home 
quarters, which they found with a kind old Quaker 

*Peter Kalm's Travels in America in 1747 and 1748, Vol. I., 
pages 270-271. 

49 lady 



lady [you know the Friends have always been nu- 
merous in and about Philadelphia, with their sweet, 
kind, loving faces, their quiet dress, and the all-entranc- 
ing " thee " and " thou '']. 

It was the engaging and promising countenance of 
Rudolf, as dear old Mrs. Morse used to say, that made 
her open her doors to those two young men, Rudolf 
and Jacob. 



50 



CHAPTER III. 

You would doubtless here like to know something 
of dear old Mrs. Morse, her home, and her surround- 
ings. 

An endeavor will be made, as clearly as possible, by 
means of pen and paper, through the medium of 
words. Such a picture will necessarily have many 
incomplete points, but the reader must from his own 
imagination perfect the portraiture. 

Of English descent, she has inherited many of the 
peculiarities of that people, tempered, however, by 
tbe generous impulses prevalent among the people of 
a new country. As to figure and carriage she is 
above medium height, well-proportioned, and of a 
dignified yet kindly bearing. Her face is of that 
sweet, peaceful kind, restful, hopeful, and trustful [too 
few of such faces do we find in our hurried life], but 
in which there is a hint of sadness, occasioned by a 
grief of five years duration ; a grief over the desola- 
tion of her house in the death of a devoted husband. 
You look in her restful moments upon a bright blue 
eye, indicative of benignity, and at the same time of 
resolution. Her hair is auburn, yet a few indications 

51 of 



of age creep to us in the occasional gray hairs that 
are seen. 

At the time that Rudolf and Jacob are first touched 
by her influence, her household consisted of a son, 
Joseph, and a daughter, Hannah. With the means 
left her, she has given her son and daughter all the 
advantages of education possible in so new a country. 

Joseph has inherited much of the appearance and 
disposition of his mother, and has by will and energy 
now become a comfort and support to his mother. 

Hannah has partaken her father's bright black eyes, 
quick perception, and rather hasty disposition. She 
is a. woman having all the elements of sterling worth 
and telling influence to be observed, not only in her 
own life, but which will be felt by those with whom 
she shall come in contact ; all of which is controlled 
and directed by a Christian character, that had taken 
the form of membership in the ^' Society of Friends," 
to which society her mother had always been de- 
votedly and conscientiously attached. 

Fancy the hurry of the work of Monday and Tues- 
day over, and Mrs. Morse settled down for the rest 
of the week, only attending carefully to the wants 
of her little family, in the way of sewing and pre- 
paring the daily three meals, and you are able to ap- 
preciate the contented condition in which Rudolf 
and Jacob found her on a Wednesday morning in 
September, 1749. It is necessary to the story to say 
that at the corner of two streets, in Frankford, stood 
the brown frame house in which Mrs. Morse and her 
52 Bon 



son and daughter lived, for it was at the door of this 
house that Rudolf and Jacob Naf first knocked. 

Their knowledge of the English language had all 
been gathered on their journey to this country. You 
may imagine they could make themselves but little 
understood, having always spoken the dialect of their 
native canton in Switzerland, which partook largely 
of the German, yet was not pure German. It was 
consequently doubly diflicult for them in their present 
situation. Mrs. Morse's perceptions, sharpened by 
Christian hospitality, understood their desire, where 
words failed them, and, after talking a short time 
with them, she agreed to take them into her house. 

Provision was made to board them — each to pay 
her seven shillings and six-pence a week — these terms 
to include washing, board, and their room with light 
[fire was never thought of as necessary for young 
men to have in their room], but light was seldom 
used. As an earnest of their good intentions, they 
each advanced Mrs. Morse one week's payment. 

Cheap living, you may say, but you must remem- 
ber times have changed since then, for it was harder 
at that time to earn seven shillings six-pence, than it 
is now to make twice as much. After partaking of 
a little luncheon prepared for them by their kind 
hostess, they pause for a moment and view their situ- 
ation . 

Strangers in a new country, wholly without friends, 
it is not found that they sat down to regret and think 

53 of 



of their lot, but immediately start out in search of 
work. 

They had not gone far from Mrs. Morse's house, ere 
they came upon a party of men at work digging a cellar 
for a new house ; the appearance of the brothers, and 
their broken language, was the subjectof much jest and 
merriment among the men — after waiting about, and 
trying to be understood, the brothers at last succeeded, 
and were given work excavating and preparing the 
cellar, of what was to be a large double brick house, 
so arranged, that two families could occupy it. It did not 
take them long to prove to the men and their employer, 
that they were no triflers, but honest young men, who 
would build themselves up in this new country, and 
give strength to its history. 

Thus, from day to day, working faithfully at what- 
ever they could obtain to do, they earned sufficient, 
not only to pay for their living, clothing, etc., but 
carefully to husband a little for days in the future. 

It is not possible to stop long, nor note in detail the 
home life of these young men with Mrs. Morse. They 
received every comfort and kind care that a loving 
mother could bestow. Their evenings were spent, 
usually, around the fire-side. The day's work done, 
Joseph would return from his shop, and complete the 
fi.re-side circle composed of Mrs. Morse, Hannah, Ru- 
dolf, and Jacob. He would tell the little family thus 
assembled, of trade and business, relate to them the 
news that passed to and fro during the day at the 
shop, the discussions that occurred between the great 
54 minds 



minds of the village — the talk of neighbors and a 
stray newspaper being the only means of obtain- 
ing current news at this early day. 

Thus, evening after evening, Rudolf and Jacob were 
being unconsciously educated in our language, our 
customs, our laws, and our methods. In the homely 
and simple ways of neighborhood gossip, the brothers 
were building elements of character, suitable to the 
coming republican institutions. 

If the evening's talk related to the unfriendly eflbrts 
of England to lay her iron grasp upon the best inter- 
ests of the colonies, or the conversation had reference 
to the unequal contest that would ensue if England 
and the colonies should face darker days, it all had the 
efiect to warm the hearts of Rudolf and Jacob 
toward the colonies, and to increase the growth of gen- 
uine patriotism, which crowned their lives and hon- 
ored their deaths. 

These evening talks embraced almost all good sub- 
jects, and the effect of them upon the minds of these 
two- foreigners, is but an epitome of the genuine senti- 
ment that pervaded the early settlements, and molded 
the new comers into the race of strong and healthy 
patriots, that two generations ago peopled our land, 
and tends to prove how God worked with his people 
in America, and enabled them to attain what they 
sought after, and which kept building them more 
firmly into a patriotic people, and the country into a 
God-fearing and God-serving land. When the news 

55 gathered 



gathered had been related and discussed, Joseph would 
resume some reading, continued from a previous even- 
ing. Thus the evenings passed in these wholesome and 
delightful ways, the brothers thoughtful, attentively 
considering all that passed, and without much out- 
ward observation, appropriating all they heard in 
some way to their good. 

Meanwhile, the mother and daughter were not idle, 
the former at her spinning-wheel, the latter at some 
bit of homely sewing that a young lady of the nine- 
teenth century would consider far beneath her notice, 
though none the less essential to family happiness and 
concord, reserving her almost wasted energies as she 
does, for some " aesthetic craze," though her soul can 
not begin to boast of half the sestheticism, Hannah, 
in her humble and thankful discharge of every known 
duty, displayed. 

Their sabbaths were spent peacefully and quietly ; 
Jacob often going to the " Friends" meeting with 
Mrs. Morse, which at this time " was the only place 
" of worship in Frankford, and called the ' Old 
" Friends' Meeting House,' the second in the state," 
and anon to the Dutch Reformed Church in German- 
town. Rudolf realized a home feeling with the 
members of the latter persuasion, but was most con- 
stantly found in a place at the " Old Friends' Meeting 
" House," which, strange as it may seem to you, was 
always rather near to Hannah. 

From the evenings described, and the home influ- 

56 ences 



ences brought to bear upon these young men, together 
with their religious observances indicated ; a sufficient 
guide, it is hoped, has been given to the reader to sup- 
ply, by his own imagination, the deficiencies which 
would otherwise exist in this history. 



57 



CHAPTER IV. 

The family circle, as has been described, continued 
unbroken, for some two years, during which time Ru- 
dolf and Jacob had enjoyed the kind and Christian 
hospitality and counsel of dear old Mrs. Morse. 

In the spring of 1751 Joseph Morse married, and 
immediately began life in a house of his own in Phil- 
adelphia, the mother and daughter continuing in the 
little brown cottage, protected, as they were, by the 
companionship of Rudolf and his brother Jacob. 

Into this little brown cottage crept unawares the 
visitor, whose coming is hardly announced by stir of 
drum or herald of trumpeter, who, nevertheless, does 
enter, despite bolts, bars, or locks, and having once 
found entrance, will not be driven thence bj^ any 
known force, but chooses for his arrows whom he 
will; thus intruding, the unbidden visitor chose for 
his subjects Rudolf and Hannah, who little dreamed, 
as the hours rolled round into days, and from days to 
weeks and months, that a stronger tie was binding 
them than that of friendship. 

Rudolf was the first to discover, and having once 

realized, that there was but one who could for him 

"make the home," did not long conceal his knowledge, 

58 but 



but soon communicated to Hannah his new found 
hopes and wishes. A willing and interested counselor 
she found in her mother, who had grown to love the 
two young men as her own children. 

iSTo wonder then that Hannah did not hesitate, but 
entered with bright anticipations upon the future. 
Dear old Mrs. Morse had changed in the past few 
years, and was at this time beginning to show indica- 
tions of declining health and strength. 

Kot much time was consumed in getting ready ; a 
few homely garments, made by the bride for herself, 
was all that was deemed necessary, and on the 6th of 
January, 1752, Rudolf and Hannah were married. 

According to the marriage custom of the "Friends," 
where a member marries "out of meeting," no record 
is kept of such marriage ; for, unless the member re- 
pents, they are removed from all connection with the 
society. 

If Hannah had not so much to prepare, Rudolf had 
more, for, entirely unknown to Hannah, he had pur- 
chased the large double brick house in Frankford, in 
the cellar of which, six years before, he, with his 
brother Jacob, had begun his labors in this country. 
You will wonder how Rudolf was able to acquire so 
much in so short a time. He did not work at his 
trade, which was that of a wheelwright, but at what- 
ever he could find to do, and it did not take him long 
to secure plenty. Observe, too, that while he had 
received in his native country a good and sufficient 
education for his time and station, yet when the activ- 
59 ity 



ity and condition of the country and his own necessi- 
ties required it, he could, and did turn, a willing 
hand to the homely, but honest, labors, that, magic 
like, as in the fable of old, were transformed into gold 
by his touch. He would, as opportunity occurred, 
buy land and sell it at a profit ; so, by making some- 
thing each time to lay aside, soon accumulated wealth. 
You must not forget that the grant of property to the 
early settlers in this locality, added to his own accu- 
mulations, brought him to the position of prosperity 
in which he is now observed. 

To these circumstances must be also added his sta- 
bility of character, which increased his influence and 
opportunities, and he is found revered and respected 
by all who knew him. His age at this time, you must 
remember, was but 25 ; yet his few years of experi- 
ence had made him appear much older ; his compan- 
ions, friendships, and all his associations had been with 
those older than himself. 'No wonder then that his 
beloved wife, Hannah, is found to be six years his 
senior. She is consequently now in her 31st year. 

Ponder this, ye young girls who rush headlong into 
the responsibilities of married life as a wife and 
mother, ere you have first learned the art of govern- 
ing yourselves. H-dnnah's ^^opportunities," as you are 
pleased to call them, had been many, and of the best, 
but the heart had never responded until now, and in 
those days they married for love, and for life, not for 
position, wealth, and separation, if incompatability of 
temperament appeared ; all these were weighed in the 
60 balance 



balance before the vow8 were spoken, that should be 
sacred, " till death us do part." 

To this new house and home Eudolf took Hannah, 
with her mother and his brother Jacob ; the half of 
the house, intended for another family, he rented, 
and the little old brown cottage at the corner of a 
street, dear to both of them, and Hannah's legacy, 
when her mother died, was sold, and its place supplied 
with a more pretentious building. The site always 
suggested recollections to Rudolf and Hannah, for was 
it not his first home in this new country? 

Dear old Mrs. Morse lived but a few weeks after 
they moved to the new house, when, rejoicing in a 
complete faith, she passed outward to her final reward. 

It is an old and homely adage, yet how true, that 
" it takes living with people to find out what they 
" are ; " yes, and married people have to remember 
that the first and most useful lesson for them to learn 
is expressed in the motto, " Bear and forbear." 

Something is known of Hannah's disposition, and 
it may be fancied that, had not the love of God con- 
trolled her, her temper would have often caused her 
pain, for as it was, she often did or said what she at 
once regretted, but was always ready and free to ac- 
knowledge her faults. In succeeding years, observe 
how her strength of character, and, if you choose to 
call it, peculiarities of disposition, present themselves 
from time to time in her descendants. 

To turn for a moment to Rudolfs disposition, it 

should be said that it was marked with strong and 

61 noble 



noble peculiarities, which are never lost in succeeding 
generations, coupled with a gentle yet positive man- 
ner, making his mark in the world by patience, and 
quiet endeavor, not venturing largely, but adhering 
steadily to a purpose. 

There was a something in his character, as well as 
that of Jacob, that marks all of their descendents, 
not that it can be defined, yet to know the families, is 
to see and know that there are strong and pronounced 
peculiarities. Hannah, quick, ambitious, and aggres- 
sive, would have ventured much if left to herself. 

They mutually aided and balanced each other. In 
appearance, Rudolf was quite tall, and rather slender, 
moving slowly and deliberately.* 

In closing this chapter, Rudolf and Hannah are 
left in their new home happy with each other, and at 
peace with the world around them, sharing the pleas- 
ures of this new hearth with the beloved brother 
Jacob. 



*What matter of regret it is that in those early days there 
were not some of the modern appliances for taking pictures, that 
could gladden the eyes, as well as the hearts, of the descendants. 
As it was, Rudolf and Hannah never would consent to have 
their portraits painted, and so no other likeness of them can be 
had than that gathered from their characters and dispositions. 



62 



CHAPTER Y. 

" Where did you come from, baby dear ? 
" Out of the every-where into the here. 

" Where did you get your eyes so blue ? 
" Out of the sky as I came through. 

" What makes the light in them sparkle and spin ? 
" Some of the starry spikes left in. 

" Where did you get that little tear ? 
" I found it waiting when 1 got here. 

" What makes your forehead so smooth and high ? 
" A soft hand stroked it as I went by. 

" What makes your cheek like a warm white rose ? 
" Something better than any one knows, 

" Whence the three-cornered smiles of bliss ? 
" Three angels at once gave me a kiss, 

" Where did you get that pearly ear ? 
" God spoke and it came out to hear. 

" Where did you get those arms and hands ? 
" Love made itself into crooks and bands. 

" Feet, whence did you come, you darling things ? 
" From the same box as the cherub's wings. 

" How did they all just come to be you ? 
" God thought about me and so I grew. 

" But how did you come to us, you dear ? 
" God thought of you and so I am here." 

— George Maodokald. 
63 Elizabeth 



Elizabeth E'af ; born 8th I^ovember, 1752. 

This little stranger, ushered into this strange world, 
opened up to Rudolf and Hannah, whole volumes of 
knowledge and love. Their object and aim now in 
life are to teach these little feet, hands, and heart, the 
ways of truth and right ; they know that the earlier 
the guiding hand is extended, the easier will the child 
follow in after years. 

In business relations Eudolf is found stepping 
steadily forward, with his whole life as true to hon- 
orable living as the magnet to the pole. What won- 
der, then, that his name is daily growing in esteem, 
while his worth and influence are felt far and near. 
To this happy home circle of three, on the 2ud of 
February, 1754, came another little wanderer, Bar- 
bara, named in reverence for the historical ancestor, 
who sufl[ered martyrdom ; and as the cares and anx- 
ieties increased, so did the blessings, Hannah found 
by this time that some way must be arranged that 
other hands might come in and help in the care of 
the children, or rather so help in household work, 
that Hannah, as a true mother should do, could de- 
vote herself entirely to their care and education. On 
the 3rd February, 1756, Jacob married Anna Buser, 
who was of German origin, and they bought a farm 
on the Oxford road, and settled down as energetic 
farmers. 

Again the family circle was added to by the birth 

of another soul into this world of sin and trouble. 

This, too, was a daughter, Hannah Naf, born May 6, 

64 1759 ; 



1759 ; none the less welcome because a daughter, yet 
how earnestly hoped Rudolf for a son, to bear the 
name he so cherished, may be believed by the earnest- 
ness with which, in subsequent years, he to his grand- 
children would say that he prayed " that God would 
" never permit the name of Naf to die out." 

On the 26th day of January, 1762, Mary Kaf first 
saw the light of day, at their home in Frankford. 
True had these older children been sons, they would 
have been called upon to defend and fight for our 
freedom in the years that were to follow. So when the 
years of turmoil are reached for this land of ours, 
in narrating this family history, do not think that 
these truely noble Swiss, and their descendants, will 
be wanting in courage or patriotism, for not being in 
the foremost ranks. 

Rudolf, you will see, will be too old for active serv- 
ice, and his sons below the accepted age. And here 
turn for a moment from home life to the outside 
world, as it affects and is affected by Rudolf and Ja- 
cob ITaf. The two brothers have been in this coun- 
try about fourteen years, and have established homes 
and secured competence. With a home life and fam- 
ily of their own, and having truly adopted this as 
their country and dwelling place, they determined 
to take the step that will make them citizens in- 
deed, and subjects of the English, who at this time 
claimed and received the obedience of the colo- 
nies. Therefore, "At a Supreme Court, held at Phila- 
" delphia, before William Allen and William Cole- 
65 man. 



" mau, Esqs., judges of said court, the eleventh day 
" of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand 
" seven hundred and sixty three, between the hours 
" of nine and twelve, in the forenoon of the same day, 
" the following persons being foreigners,* did appear 
" and were duly qualified and made subjects of Great 
" Britain, under the following act, to wit : 

" Persons ]!Taturalized in Penn. 

" Pennsilvania, 

" Secretary's Office. 

" In pursuance of an act of parliament, made in the 
" thirteenth year of the reign of his present Majesty, 
"King George the Second, Entitled An Act for nat- 
" uralizing such foreign Protestants and others therein 
" mentioned as are settled or shall settle in any of His 
" Majesty's colonies in America.f 

" The following persons being foreigners, and hav- 
" ing inhabited and resided the space of seven (7 )years 
" and upwards in His Majesty's Colonies in America, 
*' and not having been absent out of some of the said 
" colonies for a longer space than two (2) months at 
*' any one time during the said seven (7) years, and 
*' having produced to the said court certificates of 
*' their having taken the sacrament of the Lord's Sup- 
" per in some Protestant or Reformed Congregation in 
" this Province within three (3) months before the 
" said court took and subscribed the oaths, and did 



* Pennsylvania Archives, II series, vol. 2, page. 442. 
■}- Pennsylvania Archives, II series, vol. 2, page 347. 

66 make 



" make and repeat the Declaration prescribed by the 
" said Act to entitle them to the benefit thereof, and 
" thereby become natural-born subjects of Great Brit- 
" ain, as the same is certified into this office by the 
" judges of the said court, viz : William Allen and 
" William Coleman, Esqs., judges of the said court.* 

" Jurors' Names. Philadelphia County, Sacrament, taken when. 
Township. 

" Eudolph Neff. Northern Liberties. April 3, 1763. 

" Jacob NeflF. Oxford, April, 3, 1763." * 

Thus is observed the close and loving intercourse 
between the brothers, continuing even in this act. 

The reader will notice, as before, that though the 
younger, Rudolf took the lead. A still more impor- 
tant fact is here to be noted, and one that the descend- 
ants have perpetuated, which is the changing of the 
spelling of the name — as originally signed by the 
brothers, it will be remembered it was 'Na.f; and, 
though in its pronunciation it is like the Ketf of later 
years, yet it denotes a change, and subsequent chapters 
may prove, that the brothers, Rudolf and Jacob J^af, 
were of a difirerent family in Switzerland, from that 
of others bearing the name of Keff in this country, who, 
in subsequent years, become Keff", having spelled their 
name variously as ISfeif, IS'eifiT, IsTeuf, IS'eff, Koef, 
etc.f 



* Pennsylvania Archives, II series, vol. 2, pages 442 and 444, 
and certified copy from the Secretary of the Commonwealth of 
Penn., in the hands of the compiler. 

f Rupp's collections of 30,000 names of immigrants in Penn- 
sylvania. 

67 Observe, 



Observe, also, that Rudolf is no longer Rudolf, but 
Rudolph. From this being the first record of the 
change in the name from 'N&f to ISTeff, it may be as- 
sumed that Rudolph and Jacob only now fully adopted 
it. The brothers will not, for this change, lose their 
identity ; for character, worth, and perseverance prove 
the man, and not the name only. To return to the 
home circle of Rudolph and Hannah, it should be asked 
if sons have been spoken of? Yes, sons — Pause! 

For on the 15th day of February, 1764, a worthy 
son, of a most noble father and vigorous, active, 
and intelligent mother — Peter i^eff — came to rejoice 
the hearts of these parents — a future honor to his 
father's name, and who, from the first moment it was 
possible, became his constant companion. Not long 
after Peter's birth, Johannes was born, on the 22d Sep- 
tember, 1766, a bright light to his parents that was 
soon extinguished, as he died on the 6th July of the 
following year, 1767. Once more the home circle is 
added to in the birth of Samuel, on the 27th June, 
1768, and who, as the youngest, was the great object 
of interest and solicitude of his mother. His physical 
development was remarkably handsome, accompanied 
with an agreeable, bright manner. 

The year 1770 is of particular importance, as re- 
gards Rudolph in his relation to church and people. 

A few facts centering about this time and circum- 
stance have a peculiar interest, and will, it is hoped, 
be valued by the reader. 

Before closing this chapter, and resuming the his- 
68 tory 



tory of the descendants of Rudolph through the line 
of Peter, his son — in chapter 8th — the number of the 
descendants in 1784 are found to be as follows: 

Rudolph Keff, Hannah Keff, 

In his 57th year. In her 63rd year. 

Their children : 
Elizabeth Neff,* 
Barbara ^eft,-f 
Hannah Keff,I 
Mary 'NeS,^ 
Peter Keff, 

Johannes Keft" — Deceased. 
Samuel Nefl'. 



* Married Adam Baker, 
f Married Adam Strieker. 
I Married Phillip Buckius. 
§ Married John H. Worrell. 



69 



CHAPTER VI. 

Soon after Rudolph's marriage with Hannah, he be- 
came a thoroughly converted man, though his hfe be- 
fore had never been evil. The form of religion that 
he adopted, was that of the Dutch Reformed Church, 
the faith of which was the same that had caused the 
brothers' ancestors to suffer persecution, and which 
continued its milder iniiuence even on the young men, 
suggesting their departure from their native home. 
Jacob also united with the same church, and they all 
held their membership in the church of that per- 
suasion in Germantown. 

To this town and church, " The Market Square 
" Church," it was customary for their children to go 
to be catechised, as there was no church in Frankford, 
until 1770, when, owing largely to the influence and 
energy of Rudolph and Jacob, a plain little structure 
was erected and dedicated to Almighty God. 

You can best understand the energetic spirit of Ru- 
dolph by quotations from " One Hundred Years of the 
" Presbyterian Church of Frankford," by Dr. Thomas 
Murphy, which is a little volume printed in 1872, of 
the centennial services in 1870. " Its founders were 
" most of them Swiss from the city of Basle. A few 
" of them were of the original German settlers of Ger- 
70 mantown 




'fee ^vanfefovd CIxxivclx, ot 1770, as enlavgett 
Itx 18X0. 



" mantown and all this region. They therefore com- 
" menced it as a German Calvinist or German Re- 
" formed Church, with all its services and all its 
" records in the German language. 

" The only important document we have remaining 
" to us of the first period, the period of thirty-two 
" years, the period during which the church con- 
" tinued German Reformed, is a sort of dedicatory 
" record. It is in German. 

In order that its very spirit may remain,"* the follow- 
ing is a copy of the same in the German, also a transla- 
tion ; both taken from the original document in the rec- 
ords of the church at Frankford. For which privilege 
thanks are due to the Rev. Dr. Murphy, and to the party 
who so generously copied and translated the same. 

" Im ISTamen der hochgelobter dreifalltigkeit. Amen. 

" Nachdem es dem Allraachtigen und allein weiszen 
" Gott durch seine gottliche vorsehung gefallen hat. 
" Heinrich Rohrer, sen., 

Rudolph Neff, 
« Jacob Neff, 

" Sirach Schudy, und 

" Georg. Carster, sen. 

" durch seinen heiligen Geist dahin zu leiten. Ihm zu 
" seines ITahmens Yerherrlichung ein Hausz zu bauen. 
" So haben sich die ebengemalde mit mehrenen ihren 
" guten Freundem zur besern Ausfahrung ihres guten 
" Yorhabens besprochen zu welchen dann auf sobald 



* The Presbyterian Church of Frankford, page 50. 

7X beitratten 



" beitratten und ihre Hand — leistung in alien Stiiden 

" auf des fleiszigste zu geben versprocheu: 

" Freidrich Carster, 

" Rudolph Mauer, 

" Jacob Zebely, und 

" Jacob Meyer. 

" Der Anfangs von sammtlich diesen Gleidern ward 
" in Jahr, 1769, im Monat Januar rait Kaufung eines 
" Platzes zu einer Begrabuisz-Stattegemacht, darnach 
" aber werde auf dem nehmlichen Begrabnisz — Platz 
" durch Beistand des AUerhochsten, undmit Hulfe wil- 
" ler Freunde und Gomer, deren fast jeder benahmt zu 
" finden in dem Beilaags Buch ISTo. 1, und denen wir 
" und unsere Kachkomman jedenzeit den Yerbindlich 
" Schuldig sten dank beibehalten werden in Aprill 
" Monath des 1770 sten Jahres diese Kirche zu bauen 
" angefangen man darf wohl sagen, dasz die Fortsets 
" zung dieses Hauses auf eine erwunschte Art unter 
" gottlichen Siegen eines eintrachtigen Verstandnus- 
" zes, eines friedsamen und unermudeten Eifers auch 
" einer gleichmusegin Einigkeit ist beschleuniget 
" worden. So dasz schon den 4th May gleichen Jahres, 
" diese Stella durch eine Predigt von Herrn Fehring 
" damahligen Pfarrer dem Herrm geheiliget, und so 
" dam den machten 11th Kavember durch ebengem- 
" aide Herrn Fehring wurtlich eingesegnet wurde, 
" diese Kirche ist nicht weniger vom alien Schulden 
*' fast gatzlich frei, wie wir hier nachst in diesem 
*' Kirchen Protocoll sehen und wie deszen Beitag, vor 
" Fasten sammt uber die mancherlei, sowohl von Ru- 
72 dolph 



" dolph l^eff als Freidrich Carster empfangene Gel- 
" der, gegoben und uber die gethane Auszahlungen 
" erfaWene Quittungen und Scheine uebst denen von 
" unserer Trusteece empfangenen General Scheine das 
" mehrere zeigen. 

" So und dermaszen dasz wir nicht haben ungehen 
" kommen alien unsern i^ochkomman und denen es 
" zu wiszen nothigen ist, einen ausfuhrlicben Bericht 
" zur Legitimation, einem jeder zum Andenken hie- 
" mit zurudzulaszen. Habt fleiszig Aeht unsere Il^och- 
" folger, seid warden und besorgt dieses Haus zu 
" pflantzen und die Gemeine und Versammlung je 
" langer je mehr zu vermehren und zu verweiten und 
" selbst die Uuterhaltung dieses Baues lasset euch in 
" alien wegen angelegen sein. 

" Wirwunschen darum Jerusalem Gluckmachet die 
" Thore weit und die Thore sehr hoch dasz der Herr 
" Zebaoth, der Herr stark und machtig, der Herr, der 
" Konig, dir Ehre ein ziehe. 'Num. der Herr allmachti- 
" ger Gott, Schopfer Himmels und der Erden, wir 
" empfehlen dir dieses Hausz welches wir auf deinen 
" allerheiligsten ITahmen und zur Verherrlichung de- 
" nies Kahmen's erbauet haben, in deinen gnadigen 
" Schutzund Schirm samt denen die darinneu wohen ; 
" Zerstore alle falschen Kathschlage die wie der dein 
" Wort und Kirche er dacht werden. Gieb jetz, und 
" alle zeit Gnaden, Segen, Frieden und Einig keit, 
" dir sei lob und Dank, Ruhm, Ehr, und Preis in 
" Ewigkeit. Amen." 

73 "In 



" In the name of the Holy Trinity, Amen." 

" Whereas, it has pleased the almighty and all-wise 
" God by his providence to inspire by His Holy Spirit 
" the following persons, 
" Heinrich Rohrer, sen., 

« Rudolph l^eff, 

" Jacob Keff, 

" Sirach Schudy, and 

" George Carster, sen., 

" To build a house to him for the glorification of his 
'' name, so the above named persons have consulted 
" with many of their good friends for the better car- 
" rying out of their good intentions, to which the fol- 
" lowing persons, viz : 
" Fredricb Carster, 

" Rudolph Mauer, 

" Jacob Zebely, and 

" Jacob Meyer, 

" have acceded and have promised to give their assist- 
" ance at all times most diligently. 

" The beginning was made by these persons in Jan" 
" uary, 1769, by the purchase of a piece of ground for 
" a cemetery ; but after that this church was begun to 
" be built, in April, 1770, upon the aforementioned 
" burial ground, through the assistance of the Most 
" High and with the help of willing friends and well- 
" wishers, the name of each one of whom can be 
" found in the minute book, 'No. 1, and to whom we 
" and our descendants will preserve, at all times as in 
" duty bound, the sincerest thanks. 

74 " One 



" One may well say that the progress of this house 
" has been carried forward, in a desirable manner, 
" under God's blessing, through an harmonious under- 
" standing, a peaceful and untiring zeal, and an equally 
" unimpaired harmony. So that on the 4th of May, 
" of the same year, this place was hallowed to the 
" Lord by a sermon of Rev. Fehring, the pastor at 
" that time, and then the following 11th of IS^ovem- 
" ber it was consecrated by the same pastor. 

" This church is not entirely free from all debt ; as 
" we lately saw in the Church Minutes, these debts 
" cover all items, as well as the money received of 
" Rudolph Keff and Fredrich Carster, and the receipts 
" for payments made, together with the general re- 
" ceipts of our trustees, show still more. 

" Therefore, we could not help handing over to our 
" successors, who will know nothing about this, here- 
" with a complete account as proof, to keep it in the 
" remembrance of every one. 

" Let our successors be diligent, and let them have 
" a care to the keeping of the house, and for the en- 
" larging and widening of the congregation, employ 
" yourselves in the maintenance of the house in every 
" way. 

"We wish you success. Oh, Jerusalem. 'Lift up 
" your heads, oh, ye gates, and be ye lifted up, ye 
" everlasting doors, and the King of Glory shall come 
" in.' 

" Kow, the Lord, Almighty Creator of Heaven and 

" Earth, we commend to Thee this house which we 

75 have 



" have built to Your All Holy name and to the glorifi- 
" cation of Your name to Your gracious defense and 
" protection, together with those who dwell therein ; 
" destroy all false doctrines with which we would 
" cover Your word and Church. 

" Give now and forever Grace, Blessing, Peace, and 
" Harmony, and to You be Praise, Thanks, Honor, 
" Esteem, and Glory forever. Amen." 

" This devout and very important document is writ- 
" ten in a beautiful hand, at the beginning of what 
" was intended for a Book of Records ; but, alas, ex- 
" cepting some accounts, it is the last record made for 
" thirty-two years, whilst the church was German Re- 
" formed. 

" We must pause to look at the honored names with 
" which this church originated : 

" George Castor, Rudolph l^eS, Henry Rohrer, 
" Sirach Schudy. Excepting the last, their descend- 
" ants are still with us. The first is grandfather of 
" another George Castor, to whom the church is more 
" indebted than to any other man. 

" And with them were other names not to be for- 
" gotten, some of whose descendants are still promi- 
" nent in the church — Jacob Myer (now Myers), Ru- 
" dolph Mowrer, Jacob Zebley, and Frederick Carster 
" (now Castor), son of George. Their names must 
" never be forgotten while this church stands. It is 
" believed that all these had either come from Switz- 
" erland or were of Swiss descent. We must also put 
" on record the names of some others of those who, 
76 by 



" by their contributions, helped to erect the original 
" edifice. Among them we find Samuel ISTeswinger, 
" Rudolph Shutz, Leonard Froelich, Yost Myers, 
" Jacob Madeira, Jacob Schraid, Jacob May, David 
" Bleuh, Christopher Bender, Frederick Scheibly, 
" George Wilkins, Edward Steils, . . . and a 
" long array of other names, which we must omit. 
" All these helped the good work. 

" It may be curious to learn the dimensions and the 
" cost of the original building (it being enlarged in 
" 1810), The record of these is found in fragments 
" of the old minutes, still remaining. 

" The church edifice, as it was first erected, was 
" only forty feet wide and thirty feet long. That 
" made it just about one-fourth as large on the floor as 
" this building in which we are assembled. Even the 
" specific cost of the various articles of its construc- 
" tion is preserved. 

"As a curiosity, I will name it here: 

" The stone, lime, sand, hair, and hauling, 

" Boards, planks, shingles, and other lumber, 

" Paint, oil, glass, and painting, 

*' Masun work and plastering, 

** Carpenter and cabinet work, 

" Blacksmith work, and other incidentals, 

" Whole cost of building, when finished, 461 15 11 

" or, about two thousand, four hundred dollars ($2,400). 

" For thirty-two years after its commencement, or 

" until 1802, we know but very little, indeed, of the 

77 history 



£ 
133 


s. 
2 


d. 
10 


109 


6 


3 


27 


16 


8 


64 


16 





97 


16 


9 


28 


17 


5 



" history of the church. There were no records kept; 
" or, if they were, they are lost. 

" One or two incidents loom up distinctly in the 
" darkness. One is peculiarly interesting. 

" During the Revolutionary War, after the hattle of 
" Trenton, some of the prisoners captured in that en- 
" gagement were brought and for a time imprisoned 
" in the old building. Of this fact there is no doubt. 
" We were first made acquainted with it by traditions 
" lodging in the memory of the aged. But, besides 
" this, the Rev. D. S. Miller, D.D., of the Episcopal 
" Church, in this place, has kindly communicated the 
" remarkable fact of his having examined a journal, 
" found lately in Hesse Cassel, Germany, which had 
" been written by a Hessian officer who was in the 
" battle of Trenton, and was amongst the captured, 
" and states that they were imprisoned for a time in a 
" church of a little village called Frankford, above 
" Philadelphia. 

"Another interesting fact of that early day was that 
" the old Lutheran Church, on the corner of Church 
" and Adams streets, was built by a few of the older 
" Germans who broke off from this church because 
" the younger members insisted on having occasional 
" services in the English language. 

" But who were the ministers of this church during 
" that first period of thirty-two years ? 

" Tradition gave us the first clue. 

" Old people told us that they had heard of the 

*' preachers in this church coming from Germantown. 

78 They 



" They recollected to have heard the names of Helf- 
" feustein and Hermann among these preachers. They 
" told us of their fathers and mothers going to Ger- 
" mantown to be catechised. 

" This sent us to examine the records of the Mar- 
" ket Square Church, the old German Reformed 
" Church, of Germantown. We found their records to 
" be mere registers of baptism, deaths, and marriages. 

" But if their preachers officiated at Frankford, we 
" ought to find Frankford names among those bap- 
" tisms and marriages. There we found the names of 
" l^efl's and Mowrers and Zebleys and Myers and Froe- 
" liglis. This seemed to make the probability very 
" strong. But another fact reduced it almost to a 
" certainty. The minister who dedicated our old 
*' church building was the Rev. Mr. Foehring. Then, 
*• as the thirty-two years of darkness are broken in 
" upon by the return of our records, in 1802, we find 
" a minute of a settlement made with the Rev. Wm. 
" Runkle for his pastoral services. But iu the Ger- 
" mantown registers we find that the pastor of that 
" church in 1770 was the Rev. Christian Frederick 
" Foehring, and its pastor in 1802 was the Rev. Wm. 
" Runkle. ]!Tow, if the pastors of that church, at the 
" beginning and at the end of the period, preached 
" here, and if we have the other corroborative evi- 
" dence already named, the conclusion is tolerably cer- 
" tain that the supplies for this church during all that 
" period came from that source. This theory was after- 
" wards confirmed when we discovered several works 
79 pertaining 



" pertaining to the early ministers of the Dutch and 
" German Reformed Churches in this country : among 
" them ' The Fathers of the Reformed Church,' by the 
" Rev. H. Harbaugh, and 'A Manual of the Reformed 
" Church in America,' by the Rev. Edward T. Cor- 
" wan. Mr. Foehring supplied this church only a 
" short period — probably from one to two years. 

" This church subsequently became Presbyterian. 

" At first there were no pews in the church. 

"For thirty-seven years there was nothing but 
" benches. But in the year 1807, by great exertion, 
" as the church was still very weak, the benches were 
" removed, pews erected, and a new roof put upon the 
" building. This year, 1807, was a very important 
" one in the history of the church for the event just 
" stated, and others. It was in this year that it form- 
" ally dropped its connection with the German Re- 
" formed body and became connected with the Pres- 
" byterian. The record of this event is tolerably full. 

" On the 18th of April, Mr. George Castor was ap- 
" pointed to visit the Presbytery of Philadelphia and 
" solicit from it a supply of ministers for the pulpit. 
" In consequence of his visit and statements, by ad- 
" journment, Presbytery met in this church for the 
" first time on the 8th of December, 1807. This was 
" a memorable meeting in our annals, and we must 
" preserve the names of those who composed it ; they 
" are prominent in the history of Presbyterianism. 

" They were the Rev. Messrs. William Tennant, 

" Green, Archibald Alexander, Janeway, Latta, and 

80 Potts. 



" Potts. Before this meeting was laid the petition of 
'' the German Eeformed Congregation of Frankford 
" composed of about thirty families. The peti- 
" tiou asked that the congregation be taken under 
" care of Presbytery, and pledged that they should be 
" governed by the rules of the Presbyterian Church. 

" Presbytery being assured that these families were 
" nearly all that composed the congregation and that 
" they were then in no other ecclesiastical connection, 
" agreed to take them under its care, and make ar- 
" rangements for furnishing them supplies. This was 
" in the close of the year 1807 when the ecclesiastical 
" change was made. In the next year the transfer to 
" the Presbyterian connection was legalized by an act 
" of incorporation from the state. In this article the 
" reasons given for the change of connection are these : 

" 1st. There were not enough members in the old 
" connection to fill the places of trust required by law. 

" 2d. The shades of difference between the princi- 
" pies of the German Reformed Church and those of 
" the Presbyterians of the United States were unim- 
" portant. 

" 3d. The ministers of the gospel could be maintained 
" only in connection with the Presbyterian Church. 

"To this they subscribed with one mind and left us 
" their names, forty-six in number. After this, one 
" of the first acts of the church in its new connection 
" was the purchase, in the same year (1808), of the old 
" Frankford Academy at the price of two thousand 
" dollars. This the church kept iu operation for a 
8X great 



" great many years afterwards. Frankford and the 
" vicinity were indebted to it as their principal place 
" of learning for a long time. 

" The third period of our church's history begins 
" on the 18th of June, 1809, when the Rev. John W. 
" Doak was installed its pastor, and extends twenty- 
" two years to the fall, 1831, when the pastorate of 
" the Rev. Thomas J. Biggs closed. 

" The outline of the history in that time is this : 
"The pastorate of the Rev. John W". Doak lasted 
" seven years, commencing June the 18th, 1809, and 
" closing September 1st, 1816. Then the church for 
" two years had no stated pastor. On N'ovember the 
" 10th, 1818, the Rev. Thomas J. Biggs was installed 
" pastor, and he remained thirteen years, until the 
" fall of 1831. 

" The Sabbath school of the church was commenced 
" in the spring of 1815. It was projected by Mr. 
" George Castor. By his persuasion Mrs. Martha 
" Dungan commenced the school in the month of 
" April of that year. Its first session was held by the 
" stove in the church, but afterwards in the gallery. 
" Mrs. Dungan had associated with her Mrs. Patter- 
" sou* — the only other teacher. The scholars were 
" for a time all girls — at first only seven in number. 
" Of the Rev. Thomas J. Biggs, whose pastorate here 
" was longer than any other previous to the present, 
" we happily have enough information to enable us to 
" appreciate the high excellency of his character and 

* This Mrs. Patterson was Hannah Neff. 

82 ministry. 



" ministry. He was born in this city l^ovember 29, 1787, 
'' became a member of the Old Pine Street Church in 
" 1807, when the Kev. Dr. Archibald Alexandre was 
" its pastor ; graduated at Princeton College in 1815, 
" some of his classmates being Drs. Daniel Baker, 
" Charles Hodge, S. C. Henry, and Bishop John 
" Johns ; was for a time tutor in Princeton College ; 
" studied at Princeton Theological Seminary, and was 
" ordained by the Presbytery of Philadelphia, and be- 
" came pastor of this church in 1818. 

" After remaining here thirteen years he accepted a 
" professorship in Lane Theological Seminary, at Cin- 
" cinnati. That office he held for seven years, and be- 
" came President of Cincinnati College in 1839. In 
" that position he continued for six years, and for 
" three years more was President of Woodward Col- 
" lege in Cincinnati. In 1852 he was installed pastor 
" of the Fifth Church of that city, and after four 
" years resigned that charge. From that time he 
" ceased from active service. In 1864, at the age of 
" seventy-seven, he fell asleep in Jesus. Of this good 
" man the memory is most fragrant with all those who 
" remember him as pastor of this church, l^one 
" ever speak of him in other words than those of ven- 
" eration and love. There are those still with us who 
" call him blessed for having been instrumental in 
" bringing them into the kingdom. The best tribute 
" to him I have seen is that of Bishop Mcllvaine 
" of the Episcopal Church in Ohio. It was spoken 
" at his funeral : 

83 " ' I have 



*"I have known the deceased for fifty years. I entered 
" the college of New Jersey in 1814. The first time I saw 
" him was when he came forward in the chapel to lead the 
" singing, which he was accustomed to do. Dr. Green was 
" then president of the college. The students were generally 
" irreligious, and opposed and persecuted the few who pro- 
" fessed religion. The latter, only twelve or thirteen in num- 
" ber, one of whom was young Biggs, were very faithful. 
" They were accustomed to meet every evening at nine 
" o'clock for prayer in the room of one of their number, and 
" in these meetings they prayed earnestly for a revival of re- 
" ligion in the college. Prior to this there had never been a 
" revival of religion in the college, and it required great 
" faith to expect it. At length, in answer to prayer, the 
" Spirit of God was poured out, so that in two or three days 
" the largest room in the college was filled with the pre- 
" viously irreligious, asking for the prayers of the pious. 
" The twelve or thirteen were now fully occupied in minister- 
" ing to their fellow-students. The first prayer meeting I 
" ever attended was in the room of young Biggs and Daniel 
*' Baker. Many were brought into the kingdom in connection 
" with this revival. Among the rest were Dr. Armstrong, 
" late Secretary of the American Board of Foreign Missions, 
" and Dr. Hodge, who had previously seemed to be almost a 
" Christian. Since Dr. Biggs came to the West in 1832 
" until his death, our acquaintance was intimate. We did 
" not know each other as Episcopalian or Presbyterian. A 
*' beautiful trait in his character was the largeness of his 
" Christian regards. He was beautiful too in his faith, and 
" the joy fulness of his hope. He never seemed to see God 
" in the pillar of cloud, but always in the pillar of light. 
" Christ was so near to him that he felt no doubts. Great 
84 lovingness 



** lovingness of mind and heart characterized him beyond what 
" is usual. It beamed from his countenance, it spoke from 
*' his voice, and was expressed in his whole manner. He 
" must have been useful, as he was." 

" These twenty-two years were a period of progress 
" in the church. Especially during the ministry of 
" Mr. Biggs many were added to the kingdom of 
" Christ, most of whom have gone with their beloved 
" pastor to the blessed congregation above. The 
" church became then better established, and all her 
" ordinances prepared for the work of the generations 
" that were to succeed."* 

The old church records of those early days which 
were viewed with interest, regarding the building of 
the first edifice, are all written in German, and the 
name of Rudolph is seen on nearly every page — on 
many more than once. It would seem that he had 
been a member of an auditing committee, to pass upon 
all matters relative to the building of the church and 
its iuterests, as well as a donator to this worthy ob- 
ject. 

The quotations and references in regard to the 
church have progressed a little too far for the narra- 
tive, and a return must be made to Rudolph and his 
surroundings. 

It has been observed that Rudolph possessed much 
of the quiet, slow disposition of the German charac- 
ter, which aroused was equal to all emergencies. 

*From "The Presbyterian Church of Frankford," by Rev. 
Thos. Murphy, pp. 50, 56, 63, 68, 71, 75, 77, 80. 

85 The 



The previous part of this history of the ancestors re- 
veals the fact that the jN"effs in their native land were 
noted warriors. 

It will not be surprising to find an iron spirit in 
each and all of the descendants. To the descendants 
of Rudolph in this country of activity and quickness 
of thought will be transmitted his peculiarities, as a 
native of Switzerland, coupled with the vivacity and 
determination of Hannah. 

A digression here may be pardonable to question, 
whether it is ever found even in the descendants of 
pure Germans, their children and grandchildren in our 
country continuing their slow peculiarities of thought 
and action? If not, may it not be concluded, that the 
atmosphere breathed, and the life it produces, with the 
geographical peculiarities, have largely to do with the 
men produced. 

At this particular time of our national history, and 
Rudolph's own experience, his quiet, patient waiting 
resulted in the greatest good : not being in a hurry to 
accomplish his ends, he would, after plans carefully 
matured and determined upon, wait patiently for 
their accomplishment. These plans were often the re- 
sult, in the first place, of Hannah's quick perceptive 
suggestions. In this way be added largely to his 
wealth, and was soon able to give up active labors, and 
engage in many benevolent and philanthropic schemes ; 
always, however, dealing heavily in real estate ; and a 
common saying was, that " all lands he handled turn-ed 
out well." 

8e As 



As these chronicles will henceforth be principally 
devoted to the descendants of Rudolph Neff through 
the line of Peter Keff, the succeeding chapter will be 
devoted to giving, in brief, an account of Jacob Neff, 
brother of Rudolph, and also of Samuel Keff, brother 
of Peter llTeff, and son of Rudolph ; together with a 
short account of some of the other families of Keff 
now in this country, before finally leaving them, trust- 
ing that down to the latest day they may ever be 
found venerated and esteemed. 



87 



CHAPTER YII. 

The purpose of this chapter is to assist the reader 
in the history of the ITeffs in general in this country. 

The names of IsTeiff; Mff, I^aef, Noef, ITaf, and 
Naff occur frequently in the cantons of Switzerland, 
especially in the Protestant cantons. 

Prior to 1749, when Rudolf and Jacob Naf arrived 
in this country, many Swiss, bearing the name of 
Neiff", ISTaef, Neyf, Kef, and N'eff, are recorded as hav- 
ing landed, in this country.* They subsequently all 
became Neff; hence the confusion arising regarding 
relationship and descent. To quote also from a letter 
from Canton Zurich, it would appear that the same 
difference of spelling the name, which, is seen even 
there, does not always denote a marked family dis- 
tinction, but is rather the result of location. Says 
the writer : " The different ways of writing Naf, 
" Naff, Neff, are, to my mind, without significance ; 
" nearly the same change has taken place here also ; 
" true Naf is usually written, and the old records have 
" this spelling only."f 

*See Rupp's " 30,000 names of Immigrants in Pennsylvania." 
■f Letter of Rev. Arnold Naf, of Ruschlikon, Canton Zurich, 
dated July 17, 1883. 

88 Relative 



Relative to the immigrations of the Swiss, particu- 
larly those bearing the name of l^eff in some form, a 
few interesting extracts will be made, bearing more 
particularly upon the three of the name N^eiff, viz : 
Francis Neiff, Heinrich ITeiff, and Johann Heinrich 
^N'eifF, who settled in Lancaster County, Penn., prior 
to 1715. 

"At this critical juncture [1683], the Meunonites 
" were persecuted in Switzerland and driven into 
" various countries — some to Alsace, above Strasburg, 
" others to Holland, etc. — where they lived simple and 
" exemplary lives — in the villages as farmers, in the 
" towns by trades — free from the charge of any gross 
" immoralities, and professing the most pure and sim- 
" pie principles, which they exemplified in a holy con- 
" versation. Some of those about Strasburg, with 
" other High and Low Germans, transported them- 
" selves about the year 1683, by the encouragement of 
" William Penn, to Pennsylvania and settled princi- 
" pally at Gerraantown : the greater part of whom 
" were naturalized in 1709. The French army hav- 
" ing crossed the Rhine, the distressed Palatines, per- 
" secuted by their heartless Prince, plundered by a for- 
" eign enemy, fled to escape from death, and about six 
" thousand of them, for protection to England, in con- 
" sequence of encouragement they had received from 
" Queen Anne, by proclamation in 1708. Among 
" these was a number to be mentioned in the sequel 
" of our narrative. 

" Many also had, prior to the issuing of Anne's proc- 
89 lamation. 



" lamation, determined to seek refuge in America. 
" The Canton of Berne in Switzerland liad employed 
" Christopher de Graffenreid and Louis Mitchel, 
" or Michelle, as pioneers, with instructions to search 
" for vacant lands in Pennsylvania, Virginia, or Caro- 
" lina. 

" One of these, Michelle, a Swiss miner, had been 
" in America prior to 1704 or 1705, traversing the 
" country to seek out ' a convenient tract to settle a 
" colony of their people on.' 

" Many of the ancestors of those who first settled in 
" this county [Lancaster, Penn.], whose lineal de- 
" scendants still possess the lands purchased and im- 
" proved by them, were beheaded, some beaten with 
" many stripes, others incarcerated, and some banished 
" from Switzerland. Of those who suffered, and who 
" might be mentioned, were Hans Landis, at Zurich, 
" in Switzerland, Hans Miller, Hans Jacob Hess, Ru- 
" dolph Bachman, Ulrich Miller, Oswald Landis, 
" Fanny Landis, Barbara l^eff,* Hans Meylin, and 
" two of his sons — all these suffered between 1638 and 
" 1643. Those who emigrated to Pennsylvania had 
" fled from the Cantons of Zurich, Berne, Shaff hausen, 
" Switzerland, to Alsace, above Strasburg, where 
" they remained for some time, thence they came to 
" the province of Pennsylvania." 

Of Francis ISTeiff, it is recorded, as follows : 



*This is undoubtedly the ancestor whose suffering martyrdom 
has been a tradition in the family. 

90 "And 



"And Francis IS'eiff took up lands on the west 
" branch of the little Coneatoga prior to 1715. 

"Not to weary the reader with general details of 
" individual settlers, we shall present a public docu- 
" ment, possessing more than ordinary interest to the 
" numerous descendants of those whose names are 

" recorded in it It is an act passed Anno 

" Regni Georgii II., Regis Magnae Britanniae, Fran- 
" ciae et Hiberniae tertio October 14, 1729 : 

" Whereas, By encouragement given by the Hon- 
" orable William Penn, Esq., late Proprietary and 
" Governor of the province of Pennsylvania, and by 
" permission of his Majesty, King George the First, 
" of blessed memory, and his predecessors, Kings and 
" Queens of England, etc., divers Protestants, who 
" were subjects to the Emperor of Germany, a Prince 
" in amity with the Crown of Great Britain, trans- 
" ported themselves and estates into the province of 
" Pennsylvania between the years one thousand seven 
" hundred and one thousand seven hundred and eighteen : 
'■' and since they came hither have contributed very 
" much to the enlargement of the British Empire, and 
" to the raising and improving sundry commodities 
" fit for the markets of Europe, and have always 
" behaved themselves religiously and peaceably^ and have 
" paid a due regard and obedience to the laws and 
" government of this province : And, whereas, many 
" of said persons, to-wit, Martin Mrylin, Hans Graaf, 
" and others, all of Lancaster County in the said prov- 
" inces, in demonstration of their afi'ection and zeal for 
91 his 



" his present Majesty's person and Government, quali- 
" fied themselves by taking the qualification and sub- 
" scribing the declaration directed to be taken and 
" subscribed by the several Acts of Parliament made 
" for the security of His Majesty's person and Govern- 
" ment, and for preventing the dangers which may 
" happen by Popish Recusants, etc., and thereupon 
" have humbly signified to the Governor and Repre- 
" sentatives of the freemen of this province, in Gen- 
" eral Assembly, that they have purchased and do 
" hold lands of the proprietary and others, His 
" Majesty's subjects within this province, and have 
" likewise represented their great desire of being made 
" partakers of those privileges which the natural born 
" subjects of Great Britain do enjoy within this ])rov- 
" ince ; and it being just and reasonable that those 
" persons who have bona fide purchased lands and who 
" have given such testimony of their afi"ection whatso- 
" ever, as any of His Majesty's natural born subjects 
" of this province can do or ought to enjoy by virtue 
" of their being His Majesty's natural born subjects of 
" His Majesty's said province of Pennsylvania, and 
" obedience to the Crown of Great Britain, should as 
" well be secured in the enjoyment of their estates as 
" encouraged in their laudable affection and zeal for 
" the English Constitution. 

"^e it enacted by the Hon. Patrick Gordon, Esq., Lieut. 

" Governor of the province of Pennsylvania, etc., by 

" and with the advice and consent of the freemen of the 

" said province in General Assembly met, and by the 

92 authority 



" authority of the same, that Martin Meylin, Hans 
" Graaf, etc., Francis Neiff,* Francis N'eiff", Jr., etc., 
" Henry Neiff, etc., John Henry ]^eiff,t John Henry 
" IsTeiff, Jr., etc. [the names are numerous], all of Lan- 
" caster County, be and shall be to all intents and 
*' purposes deemed, taken and esteemed His Majesty's 

" * Francis Neff, his sons Francis, Jr., Henry and Daniel, and 
" the sons of Daniel, namely : Henry and Daniel, grandsons of 
" Francis, the elder, were all natives of Switzerland. On account 
" of religious persecutions, being Mennonites, they fled from their 
" Vaterland to Alsace, thence they emigrated to America and 
" settled at a very early date on a small stream, Neff 's run, which 
" empties into the west branch of the Little Conestoga, where the 
" great ancestor took up a large tract of land, and which is still 
'' owned by some of the lineal descendants of the male and female 
" issue. As it may be interesting to the numerous descendents of 
" one of the first families in this part of the country, we insert a 
" brief genealogy of Francis NefF's progeny as furnished us verbally 
" by Mrs. Magdalen Sehner, aged 79, the great granddaughter of 
" Francis, the elder, and granddaughter of Daniel NefF, who had 
" four sons and two daughters, viz.: Henry, Daniel, John, Jacob, 
" the grandfather of Jacob K. Neflf, M.D., of Lancaster; Barbara, 
"who intermarried with Musselman, and Ann married to Isaac 
"|Kauffman ; Henry, the oldest son of Daniel NefF, married a Miss 
" Oberholtzer, their children were John, Daniel, David, Jacob, 
" Henry, and one daughter, Mrs. Keller, Dr. John Eberli's grand- 
" mother. 

" The original homestead is now principally owned by Gott-lieb 
" Sehner and Jacob NefF. We seek for the descendants of Francis 
" NefF in the male lineage, the numerous NefFs in Lancaster and 
" Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, and in Virginia. In the 
" female, the name of Musselman, KaufFman, Miller, Mayer, 
" Henneberger, Schwar, Sehner, Ruth, Cassil, Florey, Keller, 
" Eberle, — the two last are noticed in the sequel — Bear, Brandt, 
" Shelly, Bowman, and others, principally in this county. 

" f John Henry Neff, known as the ' Old Doctor,' a brother 
" of Francis NefF named. He was undoubtedly the first regularly 
" bred physician in Lancaster County. Who has not heard of 

93 natural 



" natural born subjects of this province of Pennsyl- 
" vania, as if they and each of them had been born 
" within the said province; and shall and may, and 
" every one of them shall and may within this prov- 
" ince take, receive, enjoy, and be entitled to all rights, 
" privileges and advantages of natural born subjects 
" as fully, to all intents and constructions and purposes 
" whatsoever, as any of His Majesty's natural born 
" subjects of this province can, do, or ought to enjoy 
" by virtue of their being His Majesty's natural born 
" subjects of His Majesty's said province of Pennsyl- 
" vania." * 

"We also find record of the naturalization of Henry 
Keaf, Jr., in Lancaster County.f Out of all these 
facts it is interesting to gather that the name has ever 
been one commanding respect. 



" Doctor Hans Heinricli NeflF? So well was Dr. Neff known, that 
" when the boundaries of townships were fixed upon, June 9th, 
" 1729, one of the lines of Manheim Township is thus defined: 
" ' Thence down the said creek to the ^'Old Doctor s Ford." ' Hans 
" Henry NefF, Doctor of Physic, had taken up land on the (^ones- 
" toga, a few miles from the present site of Lancaster city. Among 
" his descendants are, besides the XeflFs, Millers, Tchantzs, Ken- 
" digs. Weavers, Bears, and others. The Neffs were of those " who 
" many years since came into this province under a particular 
" agreement with the late Honorable Proprietor, William Penn, 
" at London, and had regularly taken up lands under him. 'And 
" who it appears to me,' said Gov. Gordon, January 13th, 1729, ' by 
" good information, that they have hitherto behaved themselves 
" well, and have generally so good a character for honesty and industry as 
" deserves the esteem of this Government and a mark of regard for them.' " 

* History of Lancaster County. Pages 69, 70, 71, 72, 119, 121 
to 128. 

f History of Lancaster County. Page 271. 

94 The 



The relationship if any of these Neiffs of Lancaster 
County, to the subjects of this narrative, Rudolph 
and Jacob Naf, will strike the reader as very remote, 
and one that can only be claimed prior to the coming 
of the ancestors to America. 

A little paragraph which is here quoted, may serve 
as an insight into the character and success of these 
worthy Mennonites. 

" Holding peace principles, and taking very little if 
" any part in the affairs of government, they taught 
" their young men that the first great duty of life was 
" for each man to mind his oion business. Practicing 
" upon this maxim they encouraged industry by their 
" own examples, and discouraged ambition by a rep- 
" resentation of the evils necessarily following in its 
" train. Devoting themselves and their families to 
" religion thy labored and were happy." * 

This sentiment must have been embodied and 
taught by those of the German Reformed belief, as 
well as the Mennonites, for it is so truly a character- 
istic of the Neff family " to attend to their own busi- 
ness," which they equally expect to find those doing 
with whom they are brought in contact. As a conse- 
quence, when others do take it upon themselves to 
attend to other business than their own, and that 
other, being any thing relating to a Neff ; they usually 
find that they have aroused a spirit of defensive re- 
sentment that will not hesitate at obstacles that would 
baffle others not inheritinff these traits. 



* History of Lancaster County. Pages 438 and 439. 

95 From 



From the extracts made, the reader will observe 
that the Keff's of Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, 
and the family in Virginia, are all descendants of this 
immigration to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, prior 
to 1715; it is also more than probable that the 
other Neffs around and about Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, who were not descendants of Rudolf or Jacob 
Naf, are also descended from this Lancaster County 
immigration. In Ohio, too, are found those of the 
name, who trace their lineage back to either Hunting- 
don or Lancaster Counties, Pennsylvania. 

That the NefFs generally command respect and es- 
teem, though not rising or even aspiring to great 
prominence, is evident from the following quotation 
from a communication of one who himself bore one 
of the offices named in the extract. " The name is 
*' getting very numerous; scattered over the whole 
" country, and while no one of the name has reached 
" any very prominent position, it is gratifying to know 
" that for good citizens and general respectability and 
" thoughtfulness they will compare favorably with 
" any other of equal numbers. Some years ago there 
" was a Neff each in the Legislatures of Illinois, 
" Indiana, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, and 
" Secretary of State in Indiana at the same time. 
" Five adjoining States you see." * 

* From B. Neflf, New Carlisle, Ohio, member of Ohio Legisla- 
ture named above. 



96 Genealogy 



Genealogy of the NefF Family 
from Public Documents. 
Anno Regni, 
Georgius II Kegis. 
Magnea Britanniae, Franciae Hiberniae Tertio. 
"Francis Ij^eiff was banished from Switzerland on 
account of his religious opinions [Mennonites], and 
was amongst the earliest settlers of Lancaster 
County, about the year 1717, and was naturalized in 
the year 1729, settled in what they called Manor 
land, now Manor Township, Lancaster County, 
Pennsylvania." * 

The following is a list of his descendants : 
Francis l^eiff. 
His children : 
Daniel, 
Henry, 
Jacob, 
John, 
3 daughters. 

^Daniel ^NeS, 
Children : 

Henry JS". 
Daniel, 
^John, 
Jacob, 
2 daughters. 



* The above regarding the NeflF family of Lancaster and Hun- 
tingdon Counties, Penn., from papers furnished by D. J. Neff, of 
Altoona, Penn. 

97 Henry 



Henry NeiF, 

Children : 

Henry !N. 
5 daughters. 
The son, Henry, moved to Virginia, twelve miles 
above "Wheeling.* 

Jacob l!Teff, 
Children : 

Henry N. 

John, 

Jacob, 

5 daughters. 

John ¥eff, 

Descent not known. 

We continue the line of descent through the family 
of Daniel : 

Henry Neff, 
Children : 

Christian 1^. 
Henry, 
Daniel, 
John, 
David, 
Jacob, 
3 daughters. 
* This determines the line of descent of the Virginia Neffs. 

98 Daniel 



Daniel ISTeff, 
Children : 

1 daughter. 



xjohn Keff, 
Married to Fanny Kauffman. 
Children : 

John, 
Andrew, 
Jacob, 
^Daniel, 
Isaac, 
Henry, 
1 daughter. 



Jacob Neff, 
Children : 

Daniel N. 

Jacob, 

John, 

5 dauffhters. 



Daniel Netf, 
Married to Mary Huzette, was son of John Nefi, 
grandson of Daniel E'eff, and great grandson of 
Francis Neitf. 

Children : 

Henry N. 
99 John 



John H. 
^Daniel J. 
"William, 
David A. 
3 daughters.* 



* To the courtesy of Daniel J. NeflF, for the foregoing genealogy, 
thanks are due, and his line of descent is marked thus ^, which 
you observe throughout the generations. 



xoo 





Neiff. 

AND 

Neiff. 


1 

2 
8 

5 
6 
7 


Daniel, 
Born. 
Married 
Died. 




Henry, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 


1 Francis 

Born. 

Married, 

Died. 


Jacob, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 




g John, 
S Born. 
3 Married. 
=^ Died. 

o 


1 

Born. 

Married. 


A daughter, 
Born. 
Married 
Died. 


Died. 


A daughter. 
Born. 
Married 
Died. 




A daughter, 
Born. 
Married 
Died. 


(Residence, Lancaster County, 
sylvania.) 


Penn- 





Erb. 



Steiner. 



Keller. 



Florey. 



xtsx 



11 Daniel Neff. 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



11 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Erb Neff. 



102 



Henry, 
Born. 

Married Anna Oberholser. 
Died. 



Daniel, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



John, 

Born 1761. 

Married Fanny Kauffman. 
o Di<-d September 28, 1819. 



Jacob, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



Barbara, 
Born. 
Married D. Musselman and 

Dwit. [P. Levine.] 
Died. 



Anny, 
Born. 

Married Isaac KaufiFman. 
Died. 



Ill Henry Neff. 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Ill Anna Oberholser Neff. 

Born. 
Married. 
- Died. 



Christian, 

Born April 24, 1773. 
Married Elizalaeth Boas. 
Died June 12, 1861. 



Barbara, 

Born February 26, 1776. 
Married Henry Brubacher, 
Died. 



Magdalen a, 

Born December 6, 1778. 
Married Isaac Kauflfman. 
Died. 



Henry, 

Born August 24, 1781. 
Married Barbara Riitzel. 
Died 1817. 



John, 

g Born April 14, 1784. 

c^ Married Elizabeth Sehner. 

3 Died May 12, 1873. 



Daniel, 

Born February 27, 1787. 

Married. 

Died. 



Nancy, 

Born March 15, 1789. 
Married Joshua Kehler. 
Died January 19, 1874. 



David, 

Born July 20, 1791. 
Married Leah Kauffman and 

Julia Herr. 
Died January 26, 1866. 



Jacob, 

Born December 15, 1793. 

Married. 

Died June, 1877. 



103 



1115 John Neff. 
Born April 14, 1784. 
Married. 
Died May 12, 1873. 



1115 Elizabeth Sehner 
Neff. 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



(Residence of above parties, about 
Dayton, Ohio.) 



104 



Susanna, 

Born April 25, 1811. 

Married. 

Died. 



Nancy, 

Born March 27, 1813. 

Married . 
Died. 



Henry, 

Born July 7, 1814. 

Married. 

Died. 



Jacob, 

Born November 20, 1815. 

Married. 

Died. 



Elizabeth, 

Born October 14, 1817, 

Married. 

Died. 



^ Nancy, 

B; Born November 1, 

£ Married. 

2 Died. 



1819. 



Magdalena, 

Born April 22, 1822. 

Married. 

Died. 



John, 

Born AprillS, 1824. 

Married. 

Died. 



Daniel, 

Born July 14, 1826. 

Married. 

Died. 



John, 

Born July 14, 

Married. 

Died. 



1826. 



David, 

Born January 21, 

Married. 

Died. 



1831. 



1118 David Neff. 

Born July 20, 1Y91. 
Married February 1, 1818. 
Died January 12, 1866. 



1118 Leah Kauffman Neff. 
Born December 12, 1796. 5 
Married February 1, 1818. 
Died March 23, 1840. 



Benjamin, 

Born March 16, 1821. 
Married Elizabeth L. 
and Harriet J. Hay. 
Died. 



Hay 



Isaac, 

Born_ September 9, 1824. 
Married Jane Brunner and 

Parmelia Smith. 
Died 1871. 



Barbara Ann, 

Born March 18, 1827. 
g Married Martin Eshleman. 

2- Died April 16, 1850. 

& ~ 

g Mary Elizabeth, 
o Born April 2, 1830. 

Married J. J. ScarflP. 

Died. 



Cyrus, 

Born February 8, 1833. 
Married Harriet Cory. 
Died. 



Rebecca, 

Born October 12, 1835. 
Married George W. NefF. 
Died. 



Matilda, 

Born June 7, 1838. 
Married Jacob Kissinger. 
Died. 



1118 David Neff. 
Married June 4. 1843. 



1118 Julia Here Neff. 
Born March 14, 1811. 
Married June 4, 1843. 
Died. 



105 



Charlotte, 

Born March 4, 1844. 
Married Wm. H. McClure. 
Died. 



Harriet A. 

^ Born February 8, 1846. 
&• Married Frederick Hogen- 
§ dobler. 

m Died. 



Fannie C. 

Born September 5, 1849. 
Married James Smith. 
Died. 



David Henry, 
Born March 6, 
Married. 
Died. 



1852. 



11181 Benjamin Nepf. 

Born March 16, 1821. 
Married May 18, 1848. 
Died. 



11181 Elizabeth L, Hay Neff. 

Born. 

Married May 18, 1848. 
Died July 29, 1849. 



Mary E. 

Born February 22, 1849. 
Married John S. Pattersoi 
Died. 



11181 Benjamin Neff. 
Married October 11, 1851. 



11181 Harriet J. Hay Neff, 
Born. 

Married October 11, 1851. 6 
Died. 



(Residence of above parties, New 
Carlisle, Clark County, Ohio.) 



Charles H. 

Born November 19, 1852. 
Married Corinna Weakly. 
Died. 



Jennie, 

Born April 9, 1855. 
Married Thorton M. Perrine. 
Died. 



Frank Judson, 

g Born November 25, 1858. 

g Died February 14, 1865. 



William M. 

Born October 18, 1860. 
Died February 14, 1868. 



Grant, 

Born November 22, 1863. 

Died. 



Henry H. 

Born April 21, 1868. 
Died April, 1870. 



106 



113 John Neff. 

Born 1761. 

Married. 

Died September 28, 1819. 



113 Fanny KauffmanNeff. 5 

Born. 

Married. 

■Died March 11, 1806. 



6 



John, 

Born November 3, 1784. 
Married Magdalena Stoner 

and Mary Mongc. 
Died July 12, 1862. 



Andrew, 

Born August 20, 1787. 
Married Elizabeth Grove. 
Died. 



Jacob, 
Born. 

Married Eliza Weight. 
Died. 



o Anny, 

g Born December 31, 1790. 

g" Married H. Swoope and J. 

% Herncame. 

o Died February 8, 1877. 



Daniel, 

Born January 19, 1793. 
Married Mary Huzette. 
Died October 17, 1865. 



Isaac, 

Born April 26, 1795. 
Married Susan. 
Died. 



Henry, 

Born December 8, 1797. 
Married Mary Wallace. 
Died October 4, 1842. 



107 



1131 John Neff. 






Born November 3, 1784. 


1 


Anna, 


Married April 2, 1812. 




Born. 


Died July 12, 1862. 




o Married. 
S Died. 


AND 


2 


a 

2 Fanny, 


1131 Magdat,ena Stoner. 




1 Born. 
'^ Married. 


Born. 




Died. 


Married April 2, 1812 






Died December 10, 1815. 














3 


Mary, 

Born April 9, 1818. 
Married. 




4 


Died. 




Isaac, 






Born October 18, 1819. 






Married. 




5 


Died May 13, 1884. 




Margaret, 






Born March 5, 1822. 






Married. 


1131 John Neff. 

Married May 29, 1817. 




Died. 


6 


Eliza, 




Born July 9, 1824. 






ci Married. 






g Died June 3, 1849. 


AND 


7 


3 Samuel, 

o Born July 18, 1826. 

"■ Married. 




8 


Died November 10, 1875 


1131 Maegaeet Mong. 


John, 


Born August 26, 1794 




Born March 6, 1829. 


Married May 29, 1817. 


9 


Died July 29, 1830. 


Died. 


Benjamin, 






Born February 24, 1831. 






Married. 







Died. 




Henry, 






Born July 30, 1836. 






Married. 






Died. 



108 



1132 Andrew Neff. 
Born August 20, 1787. 
Married. 
Died. 



1132 Elizabeth Geove. 

Born June 13, 1796. 

Married. 

Died. 



Benjamin, 

Born September 14, 1816. 

Married. 

Died. 



Andrew, 

Born September 13, 1818. 
Married Franke. 

Died. 



Jacob, 

Born October 12, 1820. 
Married Franke. 

Died. 



Elizabeth, 

Born September 27, 1822. 
Married Samuel Hatfield. 
Died. 



John Grove, 

o Born November 24, 1824. 
% Died March 10, 1833. 



Mary, 

Born November 13, 1826. 
Married Dr. M. Orlady. 
Died. 



Daniel G. 

Born August 24, 1828. 
Married Susan Nefif. 
Died. 



David, 

Born October 20, 1830. 
Married Knode. 
Died 1869. 



Henry, 

Born March 11, 1833. 
Married Francis Sprankle, 
Died. 



100 



1133 Jacob Neff. 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



1133 Eliza Weight Neff. 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



John A. 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



^ Henry K. 

2 Born. 

S Married Mary Miller. 

» Died. 



Edwin W. 
Born 

Married Lavinia Dorland. 
Died. 



110 



llSJi. Henry Swoope. 

Born January 20, 1795. 

Married. 

Died October 9, 1829. 



1134. Anisty Neff Swoope, 
Born December 31, 1790. 
Married. 
Died February 8, 1877. 



John N. 

Born May 21, 

Married. 

Died. 



1823. 



Peter S. 

Born March 17, 1825. 
g Died November 13, 1827. 



Henry W. 

Born January 8, 1827. 
Married Frances NeflF. 
Died. 



Ann Elizabeth, 

Born February 27, 1829. 
Died August 9, 1830. 



llSJf. Jacob Herncame. 

• Born. 

Married 1835. 

Died. 

AND 



1134. Anny Neff Swoope 
Herncame. 

1835. 



Married 
Died. 



Xll 



1135 Daniel Neff. 

Born January 19, 1793. 
Married November 25, 1819. J/. 
Died October 17, 1865. 



1135 JMary Huzette Neff. 

Born December 8, 1798. 
Married November 25, 1819. 
Died April 26, 1842. 



Anna E. 

Born February 26, 1821. 
Married Abram Harnish. 
Died. 



Henry, 

Born March 16, 1822. 
Married Isabella Oakes and 

Mrs. Amelia Neflf. 
Died. 



Susan, 

Born October 25, 1823. 

Married. 

Died. 



Fanny, 

Born July 29, 1825. 

Married. 
^ Died June 8, 1871. 



John H. 

Born October 9, 1827. 
Married Catherine Musser. 
Died. 



Daniel J. 

Born January 3, 1831. 
Married Susanna B. Gray. 
Died. 



William, 

Born October 18, 1833. 
Married Margaret Cordelia 

Howard. 
Died. 



David A. 

Born April 15, 1836. 

Married. 

Died. 



1X2 



11S51 Abram Haenish. 

Born February 1, 1820. 
Married December 14, 1847. 
Died April 20, 1868. 



11S51 Anna E. Neff Hae- 
nish. 5 
Born February 26, 1821. 
Married December 14, 1847. 
Died 



Mary H. 

Born November 18, 1848. 
Married Rev. John A. Peters. 
Died. 



Emma S. 

Born November 4, 1851. 

Married. 

Died. 



Reid, 

Born March 5, 1854. 

Married. 

Died. 



Daniel N. 

Born June 4, 1856. 

Married. 

Died. 



William Harry, 

Born February 19, 1859. 

Married. 

Died. 



Blanche, 

Born October 4, 

Married. 

Died. 



1860. 



John N. 

Born February 15, 1863. 
Died January 16, 1871. 



1X3 



11S52 Henry Neff. 
Born March 16, 1822. 
Married December 31, 1861. 
Died. 



11352 Amelia Neff. 
Born. 

Married December 31, 1861. 
Died. 



% Anna K. 

^ Born October 22, 1863. 

P Married. 

g. Died. 



1X4 



11S55 John Huzette Neff. 

Born October 9, 1827. 
Married February 6, 1851. 
Died. 



11355 Catheeeste Musser 

Neff. 
Born. 
' Married February 6, 1851. 
Died. 



Mary F. 

Born January 5, 1852. 
Married Joseph Oburn. 
Died. 



Ada, 

Born September 1, 1863. 

Married, 

Died. 



115 



11356 Daniel J. Nepf. 

Born January 3, 1831. 
Married September 24 1873 
Died. 



11356 Susanna B. GrayNeff, 

Born May 3, 1854. 
Married September 24, 1873 
Died. 



Pauline Louise, 
Born April 19, 1885. 
Married. 
Died. 



(Residen 



Penn^^l^vl^T ''''■"''''' ^"°°""' 



XX6 



11357 William Neff. 

Born October 18, 1833. 
Married December 28, 1865. 
Died. 



11357 Margaret Cordelia 5 
Howard Neff. 

Born. 

Married December 28, 1865. 

Died. 



Charles D. 

Born October 21, 1867. 

Married. 

Died. 



William Mason, 

Born March 19, 1870. 

Married. 

Died. 



Mary H. 

Born June 2, 1872. 

Married. 

Died. 



Amelia C. 

Born July 10, 1874. 

Married. 

Died. 



John Frederick, 

Born January 2, 1878. 

Married. 

Died. 



Paul Howard, 

Born July 8, 1880. 

Married. 

Died. 



Joseph Huzette, 
Born February 11, 
Married. 
Died. 



1884. 



117 



1136 Isaac Neff. 

Born April 26, 1795. 

Married. 

Died. 



Edwin, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



William, 
Born. 
Married 
Died. 



Mong. 



Isaac, 
Born. 



1136 Susan 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 







3 Married 






o Died. 




J^ 




Neff. 


Frances, 






Born. 






Married 




5 


Died. 




Susan, 






Born. 






Married 






Died. 



John Morton. 



118 



1137 Heney Neff. 

Born December 8, 179Y. 
Married October 25, 1827. 
Died October 4, 1842. 



1137 Mary Wallace Neff. 5 

Born January 5, 1806. 
Married October 25, 1827. 
Died September 14, 1882. 



Ann Caroline, 

Born Augusts, 1828. 
Married Perry Moore. 
Died. 



Frances Mary, 

Born November 14, 1830. 
Married Henry W. Swoope. 
Died March 4, 1883. 



Michael Wallace, 

Born September 23, 1832. 
^ Died June 25, 1837. 



^ John Henry, 

- Born December 18, 1834. 

2. Died November 8, 1842. 



Susan Gemmill, 

Born January 14, 1837. 
Married William K. Black. 
Died. 



Thomas Calvin, 

Born March 27, 1839. 

Married. 

Died. 



Laura Wallace, 

Born February 8, 1842. 

Married. 

Died. 



X19 



Having thus briefly touched upon the immigration 
to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, turn now to Jacob, 
who, with Rudolf, came to this country in 1749, as 
has been before stated. 

As noted in a previous chapter, Jacob had married, 
and was settled on the Oxford road, near Frankford, 
as a farmer. 

The loving union of the brothers continued until 
death, and they were scarcely separated in the tomb, 
for, within a few feet of each other, in the little grave- 
yard back of the old church in Frankford, repose all 
that is earthly of Jacob and Rudolph ISTeff. 

The stones that mark the graves of Jacob and Ann, 
his wife, are plain and neat; the inscriptions on them 
are in German. In the same grave-lot, nearest the 
mother, repose the remains of their son Jacob. These 
are the only graves of any of the family of Jacob or 
his descendants bearing his name to be found in this 
little old grave-yard ; the dates are as follows : 



Jacob Neff, 

Died 3rd September, 1793, aged 

67 years and 6 months. 



Ann Neff, 

Died 24th February, 1805, aged 

65 years, 8 months. 

120 Jacob 



" Jacob ISTeff, 

" Died ITtli November, 1808, aged 

" 35 years, 10 months, 17 days. 

The descendants of Jacob are numerous, and seem 
to have settled, principally, in and about Philadelphia. 
An insight into the character of Jacob may be ob- 
tained by a reference to his will, a copy of which is 
given here. By it the reader will ascertain the num- 
ber of his children as well as their names. It would 
be impossible in a work of this kind to reach out and 
relate all that might be gathered concerning the de- 
scendants of Jacob, who are scattered here and there. 
This chapter is a mere suggestion — a statement of 
some facts. It is hoped it may be a basis, for some 
one in any one of the lines of the descent, to take up 
the history and work more in detail. 

" WILL OP JACOB NEFF, DECEASED. 

" In the name of God, Amen, I, Jacob Keff, of 
" Oxford -Township, in the county of Philadelphia, in 
" the state of Pennsylvania, farmer, being of sound 
" mind, memory, and understanding, praised be the 
" Lord for the same and all other his mercies, do 
" hereby make my last Will and Testament in manner 
" following, that is to say : 

^^First. 1 will that all my just debts and funeral ex- 
" penses shall be duly paid and satisfied as soon as 
" conveniently can be after my decease. 

X2l *'Item, 



^^Item. It is my will that my beloved wife, Ann 
" I^Teff, shall have the use, interest, and income of all 
" my real and personal estate during the term of her 
" natural life, if she so long remain my widow un- 
" married, subject, nevertheless, to the payment of my 
" just debts and the taxes, and to the support and 
" maintenance of my afflicted son David. But in case 
" my said wife agaiu intermarries, then it is my will 
" that from the day of her intermarriage she shall 
" have and receive the one-third part only of the 
" rents, interest, and income of my real and personal 
" estate, and no more, during her natural life, and the 
" remaining two-thirds of said rents and income shall 
" be received and applied by my executors and the 
" survivor of them for and towards the support and 
" maintenance of my said son David, if he so long 
" live during the natural life of ray said wife, and 
" the overplus, if any, to go to the residium of my 
" estate. 

"Item. After the decease of my said wife I give and 
" devise unto my son Jacob Neff, Junior, all that my 
" dwelling-house, with all that part of my land on 
" that side of the road, being the westwardly side of 
" the great road in Oxford Township, containing 
" about seventy-three acres, more or less, together 
" with the appurtenances ; to hold to him, my said 
" son Jacob, his heirs and assigns, forever, subject, 
" nevertheless, and charged and chargeable with the 
"maintenance, "clothing," and support of my said 
" son David, during all the term of his natural life; 
X22 and 



" and it is my express will and intent that my said son 
" David, during his natural life, shall be provided and 
" supplied with good, wholesome, and sufficient meat, 
" drink, apparel, boarding, lodging, and washing, and 
" the devise hereby made to my said son Jacob is upon 
" this express condition of so maintaining and provid- 
" ing for my said son David, and that my executors, 
" or the overseers of the poor for the time being, shall 
" have a right and authority to inspect and see from 
" time to time that my said son David is so main- 
" tained and provided for by my said son Jacob ; and 
" in case of neglect or refusal on the part of my said 
" son Jacob, his heirs or assigns, to maintain and sup- 
" port my said son David as aforesaid, that then my 
" executors, or the overseers of the poor for the time 
" being, shall enter into and take possession of the 
" said messuage and land, and the same to let and 
" demise, and use and employ the rents, issues, and 
" profits thereof for and towards the maintenance 
" and support of my said son David during his nat- 
" ural life, so, nevertheless, that the overplus of the 
" rents and profits, if any, after the maintenance and 
" support of my said son David, shall be paid to and re- 
" ceived by my said son Jacob, his heirs and assigns. 
'■'■Item. After the decease of my said wife I give and 
" devise unto my son Rudolph Keff, his heirs and 
" assigns forever, all my lands on the eastwardly side 
" of the great road aforesaid, containing about forty 
" acres, more or less, with the appurtenances, subject 

X23 to 



" to the payment of the sum of Five Pounds to my 
" daughter Elizabeth, as hereinafter mentioned. 

^^Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter 
" Esther the sum of One Hundred Pounds, and to 
" my daughter Ann the like sum of One Hundred 
" Pounds, to be paid to them within two years next 
" after the decease of my said wife by my said son 
" Jacob, and I do hereby charge all the real and per- 
" sonal estate in this, my will, given to my said son 
" Jacob with the payment of the said two legacies of 
" One Hundred Pounds each to my said two daugh- 
" ters, Esther and Ann. 

"//tern.. I give unto my daughter Elizabeth the sum 
" of Five Pounds, to be paid her by my said son Ru- 
" dolph out of the land devised to him as aforesaid, 
" which, with what I have heretofore given and ad- 
" vanced for my said daughter, and the amount of her 
" husband's, Christopher Madery's, bonds to me, which 
" I hereby release and discharge, is in full of her share 
" and dividend in my estate. 

"Item. I will that after my wife's decease my per- 
" sonal estate shall be converted into money, which, 
" with all the residue and remainder of my estate, real 
" and personal, whatsoever, shall be equally divided 
" between my five children, Jacob, Rudolph, David, 
" Esther, and Ann, their respective heirs and assigns, 
" part and share alike, as tenants in common, and 
" that my son David's share shall be received by my 
" son Jacob, and applied to the use and support of my 
" said son David. Provided always, and it is my mind 
X24 and 



•*'■ and will that in case any or either of my said 
" children happen to depart this life in his or her mi- 
" nority, without lawful issue, then the part and share 
" of my real and personal estate hereinbefore given 
" and intended for such descendant shall go to and be 
'" equally divided amongst all my surviving children 
•" and the lawful issue of such as shall be then de- 
" ceased, their respective heirs and assigns, part and 
*' share alike, as tenants in common, so, nevertheless, 
" that such issue take and receive such part and share 
" only which his, her, or their deceased parent might 
" have had and taken if then living. Provided, also, 
" that what I have hereinbefore given or intended for 
" my said wife is in lieu and full satisfaction of all her 
" dower or thirds in my estate, and not otherwise ; 
" and further that neither my wife nor my executors 
" shall have any right to cut or sell any growing trees 
*' or timber off my land, and shall not permit or suffer 
" any other person or persons to cut or destroy any 
" except only what shall be absolutely required for 
" keeping up the fences and making the necessary re- 
" pairs of the premises and for fuel for my said wife 
" and tenants on the farm after the dead and fallen 
^' wood shall be first used, any thing hereinbefore con- 
" tained to the contrary notwithstanding. 

^''Item, I do hereby nominate and appoint my said 
^* wife Ann, so long as she remains my widow un- 
" married, but no longer, executrix, and my brother, 
" Rudolph Neff, and cousin, Adam Strieker, execu- 
" tors of this my last Will and Testament. 

125 ''Lastly. 



"Lastly. I do hereby revoke all other "Wills and 
" Testaments by me heretofore made and published, 
" and do declare these presents only to be and contain 
" my last Will and Testament. 

" In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand 
" and seal this twenty-sixth day of July, in the year 
" of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety- 
" three. 

(Signed), JACOB NEFF * [seal.] 

" Signed, sealed, published, and declared by the said 
" Testator, Jacob l^eff, for and as his last Will and 
" Testament, in the presence of us, who, at his re- 
" quest and in his presence, have hereunto subscribed 
" our names. 

" (Signed), Sam'l Wheler, 

" R. Whitehead, 

" RoBT. Whitehead. 

"Richard Whitehead and Robt. Whitehead, two of 
" the witnesses to the foregoing will, on oath, do 
" depose and say that the}'' saw and heard Jacob Neff, 
" the Testator, duly sign, seal, publish, and declare 
" the same as and for his last Will and Testament, 
" and that at the doing thereof he was of sound mind, 
" memory, and understanding, to the best of their 
" knowledge and belief. 

" Sworn the 25th day of June,- 1794, before Geo. 
" Campbell, Reg'r. 

" The foregoing will being proved, Probate thereof 



* Fac simile of signature, see page 171. 

126 



" was granted unto Ann ISTeff, executrix, and Rudolpli 
" Nefi" and Adam Strieker, executors therein named, 
" they being first duly sworn- well and truly to per- 
" form the same, exhibit a true inventory, and render 
" a just and true account when thereunto lawfully 
" required. 

" Given under the seals of oflB.ce the day and date 
" aforesaid. 

" (Signed), Geo. Campbell, 

" Register:' 

The son Jacob, spoken of so frequently, and in 
whose trust so much seemed to be placed, is the Jacob 
who died at the age of 35 years, and whose grave is 
found near that of his parents, in the little old church 
yard of the Presbyterian Church at Frankford. From 
the records of the courts, which are given below, this 
son Jacob left several children. 

RECORD OF THE ORPHANS' COURT OF PHILADELPHIA. 

" . 21.) 0. C, November, 1824. 

" No. 88.— Jacob Neff's Estate. 

" On the petition of Rudolph JSTefFand Mary Brock, 
" formerly Mary Nefi", and Daniel Brock, her hus- 
" band, etc. — 

" Setting forth that in the year 1808 Jacob Neff, of 
" Oxford Township, in the county of Philadelphia, 
" farmer, died intestate, seized of personal and real 
" estate, leaving a widow, Mary Neff, now Mary 
" Brock, one of the petitioners, and six children, viz : 

X27 Jacob 



« Jacob Neff, Samuel I^^'eff, Elizabeth Neff, Daniel 
" ifeff, Charles Neff, and Mary Neff." 

To turn to Samuel IS'eff, the brother of Peter and 
son of Eudolph. 

Early in life Samuel married and lived to quite an 
advanced age, leaving nine children, three of whom 
were sons — Jacob, Robert, and Benjamin. 

He was a wheelwright by occupation, and as such 
established himself in business in connection with 
certain blacksmith shops of Peter Neff; the enter- 
prise not resulting well financially, was given up, and 
his subsequent business is not known. 

There are some of his descendants known to be 
living in and about Frankford. Many more are scat- 
tered over different states; their tables of descent, as 
far as possible to be obtained, are given in their chro- 
nological order (see pages 308-317). 

Succeeding chapters will treat of the Neffs in Amer- 
ica through the line of Peter Neff', son of Rudolph 
Neff. 



128 



Jacob Naf. 

Born March 3, 1726. ^ 

Married 3rd February, 1756. 
Died September 3, 1793. 



1 Anna Buser Naf. 

Born June 24, 1739. g 

Married 3rd February, 1756. 
Died February 24, 1805. 



6 



Elizabeth, 

Born November 4, 1756. 
Married Christopher Madera, 

April 30, 1776. 
Died December 21, 1821. 



David, 

Born March 30, 1760. 
Died 1823. 



Esther, 

Born January 20, 1766. 

Married Jacob Folkrod. 
g Died October 8, 1811. 



g Ann, 

o Born August 10, 1769. 

Married David Newell. 

Died January 8, 1844. 



Jacob, 

Born December 30, 1772. 
Married Mary Wolfe. 
Died November 17, 1808. 



Rudolph, 

Born August 29, 1776. 
Married Margaret Rugan. 
Died June 11, 1857. 



129 



1.1. Cheistopher Madera.* 

Born 1750. 

Married. 

Died February 19, 1825. 



4 



S 
11 Elizabeth Neff Madera, 
Born November 4, 1756. 
Married. 
Died December 21, 1821. 



(Residence, Philadelphia, Penn.) 

•* Variously spelled in this country. 
"Madera, Madery, Madury, Madara, 
Madeiry, Madeira, and Madori, were 
originally Madbri of Spain, Protestants 
of Andalusia, who, at a time of perse- 
cution, passed over France into Hol- 
land, and from there sailed to Amer- 
ica." 



Jacob, 
Born 
Married. 
Died December 21, 1825. 



1777. 



Christopher, 

Born 1778. 

Married Martha Campbell. 
Died October 10, 1829. 



Hester, 

Born. 

Married "William Koss. 

Died. 



Elizabeth, 

g Born. 

;:::; Married Arnold Baker. 

^ Died. 



Ann, 
Born. 
Married Francis Asbury 

Cassidy. 
Died. 



David, 

Born January 21, 1797. 

Married. 

Died September 9, 1820. 



John, 

Born January 12, 1800. 

Married. 

Died February 4, 1824. 



130 



13 Jacob Folkrod. 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



13 Esther Neff Folkrod, 

Born January 20, 1766. 

Married. 

Died October 8, 1811. 



(Residence, Philadelphia, Penn.) 



Ann, 
Born. 

Married Jacob H. Gardner. 
Died, 



X3t 



14 David Newell. 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



14: Ann Neff Newell. 

Born August 10, 1769. 

Married. 

Died January 8, 1844. 



William, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



Ellen, 
Born. 

Married David W. Clark. 
Died. 



Elizabeth, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



132 



15 Jacob Neff. 

Born December 30, 1772. 

Married. 

Died November 17, 1808. 



15 Mary Wolfe Neff.* 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Jacob, 

Born, 

Married. 

Died. 



Samuel, 
Born. 

Married. 
Died. 



6 



♦Afterward became Mary Brock. 



Elizabeth, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 

Daniel, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



Charles, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



Mary, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



133 



1& Rudolph Neff. 

Born August 29, 1776. 
Married December 4, 1802. 
Died June 11, 1857. 



Margaret Rug an Neff. 

Born May 24, 1780. 
Married December 4, 1802. 
Died January 23, 1861. 







T 



John, 

Born April 12, 1804. 
Married Mar2;aret Davidson. 
Died September 3, 1869. 



Jacob, 

Born May 29, 1805. 
Married Jane McAllister and 

Adaline King. 
Died July 3, 1839. 



William, 

Born February 10, 1807. 
Died July 9, 1814. 



Elizabeth, 

Born June 23, 1808. 
Married Samuel Baugh. 
Died. 



Rugan, 

Born January 29, 1810. 
Married Elizabetii Madera. 
Died January 9,1861. 

B: Charles, 

S Born October 22, 1811. 

g Married Margaretta Rugan. 

o Died. 

George, 

Born December 22, 1813. 
Married Elizabeth Rugan. 
Died 



William P., 

Born April 1, 1815. 
Married Mary A. Williams. 
Died. 



Thomas, 

Born July 17, 1817. 
Married Julia Hazleton. 
Died January 23, 1850. 

Henry, 

Born January 4, 1821. 
Married Mary A. Fisler. 
Died November 9, 1859. 



Samuel, 

Born June 20, 1822. 
Married Annie Houlston. 
Died. 



X34 



Ml John Neff. 

Born April 12, 1804. 1 

Married January 9, 1834. 
Died September 3, 1869. 



Margaret Davidson 
Neff. 

Born November 11, 1805. 
Married January 9, 1834. 
Died. 



Annie, 

Born June 13, 1836. 
Married. 
n Died February 3, 1883. 



(Residence of above parties, Philadel- 
phia, Penn.) 



X35 



2 Margaret, 

o Born December 17, 1843. 
"■ Married George W. Hunter- 
son. 
Died. 



162 Jacob Neff. 

Born May 29, 1805. 
Married August 17, 1827. 
Died July 3, 1839. 



1 



162 Jane McAllister Neff, 

Born. 

Married August 17, 1827. 

Died. 



Rudolph, 
g: Born August 31, 1828. 
£ Married Emma Louisa 
S Stinger. 
o Died May 6, 1859. 



162 Jacob Neff. 

Married June 29, 1830. 



162 Adaltne King Neff. 

Born July 8, 1809. 
Married June 29, 1830. 
Died 



(Residence of above parties, Philadel- 
phia, Penn.) 



s- Harmanus, 

S Born March 27, 1831. 

2 Married Amanda Glading. 

n Died March 9, 1877. 



X3e 



1621 Rudolph Neff. 

Born August 31, 1828. 
Married February 11, 1852. 
Died May 6, 1859. 



Albert Barnes, 

Born March 3, 1853. 

Married. 

Died November 3, 1884. 



Jane McAllister, 
Born February 11, 1855. 
Died December 24, 1869. 



1621 Emma Louisa Stinger 

Neff. 4 

Born January 21, 1829. 
■ Married February 11, 1852. 
Died December 1, 1862. 



John Chestnut, 
Born July 26, 1857. 
Died May 21, 1872. 



Rudolph, 

Born November 13, 

Married. 

Died. 



1859. 



X37 



M22 Harmanus Neff. 

Born March 27, 1831. 
Married November 5, 1850. 
Died March 9, 1877. 



1622 Amanda Gladestg Neff. 

Born. 

Married November 5, 1850. 

Died 



Mary Ann, 

Born August 26, 1851. 

Married. 

Died. 



Adaline, 

Born January 7, 1853. 

Married. 

Died. 



Robert P. King, 

Born August 5, 1859. 

Married. 

Died. 



Harmanus, 

Born March 10, 1861. 

Married. 

Died. 



William Turner, 
Born October 30, 1864. 
Married. 
Died. 



Lyleete, 
Born January 30, 1866. 
Married. 
Died. 



John Thomley, 

Born August 16, 1868. 

Married. 

Died. 



George Glenn, 

Born January 1, 1870. 

Married. 

Died. 



Amanda Susanna Hagner, 
Born September 4, 1872. 
Married. 
Died. 



138 



M4 Samuel Baugh. 

Born October 12, 1803. 
Married August 23, 1832 
Died 



s 



M4 Elizabeth Neff Baugh 

Born June 23, 1808. 
Married August 23, 1832. 
Died ^ 



(Residence of above parties, Philadel- 
piiia, Penn.) 



139 



Margaret, 

Born June 15, 1835. 
Married William Alexan- 
der Millar. 
Died. 



Henry Neff, 

Born October 4, 1837. 
tj- Married Sarah Owen. 
si Died. 



Elizabeth, 
Born October 8, 
Married. 
Died. 



Rudolph Neff, 

Born March 28, 1845. 
Married Lulu Post Allln. 
Died. 



MS RuGAN Neff. 

Born January 29, 1810. 
Married September 8, 1853. 
Died January 9, 1861. 



1 i Thomas R, 

S Born December 5, 1859. 
S Married. 
^ Died. 



1(35 Elizabeth Madera Neff. 

Born yeptember2], 1818. 
Married September 8, 1853. 
Died. 



(Residence of above parties, Philadel- 
phia, Penn.) 



X40 



166 Charles Neff. 

Born October 22, 1811. 
Married June 6, 1839. 
Died. 



3 



Margaketta Rugan 

, Neff. 

Born February 14, 1816. 
Married June 6, 1839. 
Died April 30, 1849. 



(Residence of above parties, Philadel- 
phia, Penn.) 



14X 



G. Rugan, 

Born September 24, 1840. 
Married Julietta Sagendorf. 
Died. 



Charles W., 

Born July 17, 1842. 

Married. 
5 Died November 17, 1861. 



Catherine R., 
Born February 5, 1845. 
Married. 
Died. 



William Ashford, 

Born August 18, 1848. 
Died June 10, 1850. 



1(3<31 Geoege Rugan Neff, 

Born September 24, 1840. 
Married October 11, 1865. 
Died. 

3 



4 



1661 JULIETTA SaGEN- 
DORF NeFF. 
Born November 19, 1840. 
Married October 11, 1865. 
Died. 



Charles S., 

Born September 15, 1866. 
Died April 26, 1867. 



George S., 

Born June 14, 1869. 

Married. 

Died. 



Henry S., 

c Born September 19, 1871. 

B. Married, 

£ Died. 



Florence Julietta, 
Born November 20, 1877. 
Married. 
Died. 



Frank Rugan, 

Born May 28, 1885. 

Married. 

Died. 



X42 



167 Geoege 'Neff. 

Born December 22, 1813. 
Married October 9, 1845. 
Died. 



Susanna R., 

Born June 29, 1847. 

Married Phillip Edgar Ack- 
ert. 
2 Died. 



1<37 Elizabeth Rugan Neff, 

Born July 18, 1818. 
Married October \), 1845. 
Died July 8, 1883. 



(Residence of above parties, Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y.) 



X43 



§ John R., 

o Born April 14, 1849. 
"^ Married Emnaa Virginia 
Khoades. 
Died. 



1672 John Rugan Neff. 

Born April 14, 1849. 
Married August 12, 1874, 
Died. 



M72 Emma Virginia 
Ehoades Neff. 

Born. 

Married August 12, 1874. 

Died. 



Elizabeth, 
Born July 20, 1877. 
Married. 
Died. 



144 



William P. Neff, 

Born April 1, 1815. 
Married February 27, 1839. 
Died. 



Catherine, 

Born July 20, 1840. 
Married Edwin Quig. 
Died. 



Rudolph, 

Born August 25, 1842. 
Married Mary Emma Col- 

sher. 
Died. 



4 
168 Mauy A. Williams Neff. 

Born November 3, 1819. 
Married February 27, 1839. 
Died. 



(Residence of above parties, Philadel- 
phia, Penn.) 



Samuel Williams, 
Born October 19, 1844. 
Married Eebecca Monaco 

Barcus. 
Died. 



Edward, 

Born August 12, 1848. 

Married. 

Died. 



Emma, 

Born November 26, 1852. 
Married Henry Phillip Har- 

mann. 
Died. 



X45 



W82 Rudolph Neff. 

Born August 25, 1842. 
Married January 26, 18 
Died. 



1682 Mary Emma Colsher 
Neff. 
Born April 24, 1846. 
Married January 26, 1869. 
Died. /C? 



Frank Colsher, 

Born August 25, 1869. 
Died January 15, 1872. 



Edward, 

Born January 21, 1872. 

Married. 

Died. 



Gertrude, 

Born July 12, 1874. 
Died September 29, 1875. 



Blanche, 

o Born October 30, 1876. 

5! Married. 

S Died. 



Anna Colsher, 
Born June 10, 1878. 
Married. 
Died. 



Marion Dunlap, 

Born September 2, 1881. 

Married. 

Died. 



William Peddle, 
Born July 25, 1884. 
Married. 
Died. 



X46 



W83 Samuel Williams 

Neff. 

Born October 19, 1844. 1 

Married September 21, 1871. 
Died. 



1683 Kebecca Monaco Bar- 

cus Neff. 

Born February 15, 1845. 
.Married September 21, 1871. 
Died. 



Howard Barcus, 

Born July 26, 1872. 
Married. 
g Died. 



William Stephen, 
Born May 15, 1879. 
Married. 
Died. 



t47 



Thomas Neff, 

i3orn July 17, 1817. 
Married June 23, 1843. 
Died January 23, 1850. 



169 JuLTA Hazleton Neff. 

Born March 8, 1827. 
Married June 23, 1843. 
Died October 27, 1875. 



Eli 



Born November 6, 1844. 

Married. 

Died May 6, 1881. 



Jacob, 

g Born June 12, 1848. 

t:: MarriedSarah Louisa Yount 

2 Died. 



Fraucis, 
Born July 24, 1850. 
Married Alphonse Lamar- 

tine Beck. 
Died. 



X48 



1692 Jacob Nefp. 

Jiorn June 12, 1848. 1 

Married November 21, 1872. 
Died. 



1692 Sarah Louisa Yount 

Neff. 
Born May 2, 1847. 
Married November 21, 1872. 
Died. 



Paul Jacob, 

Born December 9, 1876. 

Married. 
2 Died. 



(Residence, Spring City, Chester Co., 
Penn.) 



Charles Hazleton, 
Born March 16, 1880. 
Married. 
Died. 



149 



MO Henry Neff. 

Born Januar}' 4, 1821. 
Married October 17, 1844. 
Died November 9, 1859. 



1^0 Mary A. Fisler Neff. 4 

Born March 15, 1823. 
Married October 17, 1844. 
Died. 



(Residence of above parties, Camden 
County, N. J.) 



150 



William R, 

Born November 1, 1846. 
Married Isabella McKee. 
Died. 



Marceline, 

Born March 23, 1850. 

Married. 

Died. 



Howard I., 
Born January 23,1853. 
Married Amelia Warner. 
Died. 



Emma L., 

Born November 12, 1855. 
Married Irwin S. Oliver. 
Died. 



Frank, 

Born May 1, 1859. 

Married. 

Died. 



2 



1601 William R. Neff. 

Born November 1, 1846.1 
Married September 14, 1870. 
Died. 3 



1601 IsABELIvA McKeE 

Neff. 
Born January 14, 1852. 
Married September 14, 1870. 
Died, 



Sarah R. , 

Born July 10, 1871. 

Married. 

Died. 



Mary A. , 

Born September 16, 1873. 

Married. 

Died. 



Florence M., 

Born February 24, 1877. 

Married. 
ff Died. 



Emma L., 

Born September 25, 1878. 
Died September 3, 1879. 



EHzabethP., 

Born October 28, 1879. 

Married. 

Died. 



Henry, 

Born February 24, 1882. 

Married. 

Died. 



151 



1603 Howard I. Neff. 

Born January 23, 1853. 
Married July 1, 1879. 
Died. 



Amelia Warner Neff. 

Born December 7, 1854. 
Married July 1, 1879. ^ 

Died. ^ 



Howard L, 

Born June 11, 1880. 

Married. 

Died. 



Marceline W., 

o Born August 11, 1881. 
S: Died September 3, 1881. 



Mary L. , 

Born February 5, 188 
Died March 23, 1883. 



Leonard W., 

Born January 25, 1884. 
Died March 25, 1884. 



X52 



161' Samuel Neff. 

Born June 20, 1822. 
Married February 27, 1851. 
Died. 



161' Annie Houlston Neff. 

Born October 13, 1833. 
Married February 27, 1851. 
Died. 



(Residence of above parties, Philadel- 
phia, Penn.) 



X53 



Emma V., 

Born November 16, 1851. 
Married John K. Garrett 
Died. 



o Howard L., 

S Born April 15, 1853. 

S' Married. 

S Died. 



Helen P., 

Born May 20, 1866. 

Married. 

Died. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

Years have rolled on, and Peter having completed 
his education according to the best advantages of his 
surroundings, chose to learn a trade, and selected that 
of a blacksmith. 

His position as laborer at the forge did not long 
continue, and shortly he assumed superintendence of 
all his work, which consisted finally, in the oversight 
and management, of several blacksmith shops. Hia 
ability was great enough to see correctly that all 
points fit, and his wise administration of business 
soon exhibited rewards in large financial returns. 

In a few years, while yet a very young man, his 
business worth, coupled with great integrity, seemed 
likely to prove him a rival of his father. 

About the time of Peter's increasing prosperity, 
there is observed an unusual stir at the brick house 
occupied by Rudolph and Hannah, together with their 
unmarried children. What can it all mean ? The 
occupant of the other half of the house has moved 
out. Painters are at work following up the labors of 
the carpenters in repairs. Over it all Kudolph and 
his son Peter keep careful watch that every particular 
may be as they desire. There is another, too, whose 
154 taste 



taste is often consulted and referred to about all this, 
who seems to be living at somewhat of a distance, 
judging from the time consumed by Peter when a 
conference is necessary. Perhaps time will explain 
this mystery. 

The outside work is all accomplished, carpets are 
being put down, and other efforts being made that 
suggest the possibility of an early occupant. 

The reader may no longer be kept in suspense, the 
explanation of all this preparation may be found on 
little cards, written somewhat in this style : 

Aaron Scout and Wife 

Will be glad to see you 

At the marriage of their daughter, 

Rebecca, 

to 

Peter l^eS, 

on the 

4th day of March, 1784.* 

It must be apparent now what all the work at the 
brick house meant. The invitations, about twenty- 
five in number, were sent to the friends and relatives 
of Peter and Rebecca, who were present at the cere- 
mony performed by the pastor of the Little Brick 

* The names and dates are as given in the Family Bible of 
Peter and Eebecca, now in possession of Peter Kudolph Neff, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

155 church. 



church. It was not necessary to inform the friends 
that they would not receive presents, for wedding 
gifts were not customary, save from the parents of the 
contracting parties. Rebecca Scout, now Rebecca 
l!^eff, is the daughter of Aaron and Sarah Scout, of 
Bucks County, who were what is commonly called 
Pennsylvania Dutch. Rebecca was the third child of 
ten children,* consequently, though her father was 
very comfortably off, she could not expect a large 
portion from him ; he, however, provided her with all 
the items thought necessary for a bride, with which to 
furnish her house and home. The ample provision 
furnished by Peter rendered their beginning of home 
and married life a step higher in the scale of comfort 
and elegance than had been that of his father, Ru- 
dolph. After a few hours spent with their friends, 
concluding the festivities of the day, they do not start 
off on a wedding tour of length and expense, but 
quietly take a carriage, and drive to their home, every 
detail of which is of interest to Rebecca. 

The enjoyment of investigating and appropriating 
all the delights centering in and about this new home 
can not be intruded upon, but let it be left to their 
own minds and eternity the pleasures they there re- 
alized. 

There is an old saying, that "matches are made in 
Heaven;" yes, they used to be, but somehow of late 



* Family Bible of Peter and Rebecca NeflF, now in the hands 
of Peter Rudolph NeflF, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

156 people 



people say they get sadly mixed in coming down. 
Not so with Peter and Rebecca ; they are evidences 
of the truth of the first saying, for they began 
life with love, and so death found and severed 
them. 

Rebecca was born on the 27th of April, 1764, and 
was consequently only two months younger than her 
husband; they are at this time past twenty, and the 
future looks very bright before them. In appearance 
Rebecca was rather tall, and not so fleshy as her hus- 
band and his family.* Her face, how can words be 
found to describe it? There is a serene light beaming 
from her eyes of softest blue, a firm yet loving ex- 
pression about the mouth, that indicates the strength 
of character to be evinced from time to time. 

Peter, you remember, is in appearance like his 
mother, bright black eyes, and a quick, vivacious, de- 
termined manner. They are both noble and good, and 
constant attendants upon the hrick church, though 
neither of them are members. 

The routine of home life, with its pleasures, crosses, 
and vexations, came to them as to others ; the various 
anxieties connected with outside friends and relations, 
every thing, and all that is common to human nature, 
they met, and, in united strength, surmounted. 

As the daughters of Rudolph and Hannah have by 
this time married, and settled in and about Philadel- 
phia, or Frankford, securing homes of comfort for 



■-*■ This from Mrs. Kebecca NeflF Biggs, 

157 themselves. 



themselves, Rebecca very naturally becomes doubly 
dear to the new parents, who still occupy the other 
half of the brick h'ouse. 

In this daily discharge of duties, days have rolled 
on, until it is found that Old Time has scored 1787. 

In this year occurs an event to break the monotony 
of daily duties, for another member, on the 8th of 
June, enters this home of love, and in testimony of 
love is named Hannah. 

By this time Rudolph's steps begin to totter, which 
is equally true of his beloved wife, Hannah. They 
both, however, find that, though the step may often 
be weary and slow, yet the heart is active, and the 
distance to the home of Peter and Rebecca is so short, 
that they often cross the threshold of the new home, 
to renew, as it were, therhopes gone by, in hours spent 
with the little Hannah, whose life is all before her, 
whether of weal or woe. 

Among the friends of Peter and Rebecca, grim 
death had often been present, to snatch some loved 
one from them, yet a sorer trial was before them, that 
of parting from their mother, Hannah, who died on 
the 10th of January, 1789, after a short illness, in her 
sixty-eighth year. Some cares and anxieties had 
weighed upon her, and weakened her physical nature, 
80 that after a short illness she was carried beyond the 
cares of this life into an untried future. 

This event made many changes; the home of Ru- 
dolph must be broken up, and, although he has many 
daughters of his own, he chooses to live with Peter, 
X58 Rebecca 



Rebecca having grown so dear to him. It was a say- 
ing of his, " I could live with Rebecca alwaj^s." 

Before her death it had been a constantly expressed 
wish of Hannah's, that a son might be given to Peter 
and Rebecca. This wish found fulfillment, not long 
after her death, as, on the 12th of January, 1789, a 
son was born to them. 

In the morning, as the dear old grand-parent, Ru- 
dolph, went to see the baby boy, Rebecca told him 
how that the night before, in a dream, she saw his 
wife Hannah, who came to her and took the child in 
her arms, and called him John Rudolph. The old 
man's eyes filled with tears, when he told Rebecca his 
christian name was John Rudolph, though in this 
country he had been known only as Rudolph. 

Thus it appears that romance enters into this family 
history, and probably continues, which, in succeeding 
generations, would become of intense interest to the 
descendants, if the record were only preserved as the 
events occur. 

If these chronicles should serve to inspire some of 
those living to continue the records, these pages will 
not have been written in vain. 

This historical fact has been guarded in the family 
with great interest, and handed down, in one or two 
branches, for a definite purpose, as it would now seem, 
to quote from the "Family Tree of the Families of 
" Naf, of Zurich and Cappel, showing the succeeding 
" generations, by Emil ]S"af, Architect in Zurich (11 
" Y.), New Year, 1881," we find the following : 

X59 John 



John Naf, born 1727. 
Jacob Naf, " 1729. 

brothers. 
Sons of Jacob mf. No. 39 

No. 39 Son of Heinrich " 28 

28 " " Jacob " 23 

23 " " Hans " 10 

10 " " Hans " 5 

5 " " Heini " 2 

2 " " AdamNaf, 

who fought with Zwingli, rescuing the banner, as has 
been described. 

The dates throughout this history, regarding Ru- 
dolph and Jacob, are all made from the records of 
their tombstones, as being the only way possible of 
obtaining data regarding their ages. It is well known 
how unreliable all such tombstone records are, in the 
first place, by a want of certainty on the part of those 
erecting the memorial, and secondly, the inroads that 
time makes on such records, destroying a line here 
and there, that an interpretation of them is not likely 
to be correct, after having been a few years exposed 
to the elements. Take, for instance, the tombstone of 
Jacob Nefi", in Frankford ; should the 67 years be 64 
(see page 120), it would make his birth agree with the 
table just quoted, and an error of the kind could so 
easily occur, for, by the obliteration of the cross-line 
in the figure ■4-, a seven is readily indicated. There is 
also a discrepancy between the records in the church 
of his death and that on the tombstone ; and while it 
160 does 



does not prove his age to liave been 64 years at 
the time of his death, it yet shows that there was 
doubt in the matter. The church record and the 
tombstone of Rudolph agree in the main (see page 
168). Every evidence goes to prove that these two 
brothers, John and Jacob N"af, of Switzerland, are 
the Rudolf and Jacob Naf of this history, which 
seems to be further strengthened when we remember 
the fact that Rudolf l^af had a son, whom he called 
Johannes, that lived but a short time. Subsequent 
communications will determine the matter, but this 
history having been written, continues according to 
the records on the tombstones, which indicate Jacob 
as the older. 

From 1789 we pass on to the birth of William, on 
the 7th of February, 1792. Thus is found the home 
circle growing and increasing, and for each addition, 
whole realms of love and wisdom are waiting to con- 
trol and counsel each — for Rebecca, though young, 
has wonderful tact and management to govern and 
direct them, though doing it by love. 

The management of the children and the home was 
her care. Peter found that providing for the little 
household, together with his business, as well as the 
outside work produced by his public spirit, quite 
enough for his hands. He was largely engaged in all 
improvements, such as the making and repairing of 
roads, bridges, etc., and home was the haven of rest 
and comfort that he always looked forward to, after 
his day of labor with the rougher and more un- 
16X friendly 



friendly world. He seems not to have been wanting 
in a real sense and enjoyment of humor. It is re- 
lated that at one time there was a meeting of some 
political interest, at a place not far from Frankford, 
but separated from it by a stream of water, not at all 
times very high, but subject to a sudden rise, if a 
storm came^up. During the meeting such a storm did 
come up ; the question then was how to cross the 
stream. Peter was provided with long, heavy boots, 
quite equal to the time and the emergency, which, be- 
ing observed by a large, fleshy Irishman, with his usual 
Hibernian perception and credulity, accepted the offer 
made by Peter to carry him across the stream on his 
back. Here pause to picture to yourself the situa- 
tion — on the bank of a swollen stream, possibly sur- 
rounded by several spectators from the late meeting, 
see Peter, a man of medium size, with laughing dark 
eyes, standing, with his heavy top boots on, ready for 
the start, and the fleshy Irishman, of avoirdupois 
about two hundred pounds, also ready for the ride. 
They did start, and when in about the middle of the 
swollen stream, Peter informed his burden that it was 
impossible to proceed further, so deposited his load 
then and there. The Irishman, who was a neighbor 
of Peter's, and a man of some wealth, departed to 
his home a wiser and less credulous man, none the 
less a friend and good neighbor. 

On the 26th of June, 1794, Sarah was born — a 

bright little heart, only lent for a short time, for her 

race was soon run, when, at the age of eleven months, 

t62 she 



she died. Thus the first break in the home circle 
here on earth was made, and the first link of the 
chain was gathered in Heaven. 

The influence of the Quakers, on all those living in 
or near Philadelphia, was manifest even in this house 
and home, for Rebecca, although not herself a Quaker, 
early adopted their style of dress. Her children and 
grandchildren remember seeing her in her sombre 
robe, with the plain cap, and the little shawl of white, 
with a silk shawl over it, about the shoulders. One 
set of these three articles, which belonged to her, is 
still in existence, and is in the possession of Mrs. Peter 
UleS, of Gambier, Ohio. In looking at them, one can 
picture the sweet, calm, but resolute face of Rebecca, 
smiling from under the cap through all troubles. 

Are there not some lives that seem to attest the 
power of Christian love and fellowship long before it 
is even known by the possessor, or a public acknowl- 
edgment of faith has been made before the world? 
If such there be, Rebecca's was such an one. 

The household cares and duties have gone on with 
quiet regularity, the three children to gladden the 
hearthstone, until Rebecca is ushered into this world, 
filled with trials and crosses. Hers was a May-day 
blessing to the household, for she came to them on 
the first of May, 1796. 

Time can not be given to dwell upon their child- 
hood days ; they must have been much like those of 
other children that are seen about us now — each turn 
in their every-day life being of interest, and noted by 
163 both 



both parents for the time, and then passed on, and 
forgotten. 

Peter, George Washington, and Mary Amanda fol- 
low Eebecca in succession — Peter, born on the 31st 
of March, 1798; George Washington, on the 19th of 
May, 1800; and Mary Amanda, on the 16th of De- 
cember, 1802. Two years after the birth of Mary 
Amanda, an event occurred that changed and shaped 
the destiny of each member of the family. The 
household at this time, July, 1804, numbers ten in all. 
There is the venerable old grandfather, Eudolph, 
whose advanced age is plainly observed in his totter- 
ing steps and in the childishness that in this year 
began to show itself in many little ways, and which 
continued until his death. Rebecca has grown older, 
with her cares and seven children about her, though 
only in her fortieth year. Peter, too, is really in the 
prime of manhood, being but two months his wife's 
senior, but his physical nature has sustained a shock 
that seems likely to prove too great for his endurance. 
About two years previous to this time, a fire occurred 
in the neighborhood, when Peter, with his usual con- 
sideration for the misfortunes of his neighbors, went 
and took with him a ladder — he was at this time quite 
fleshy — and this load, together with his haste and great 
exertion, caused the rupture of a blood-vessel, and on 
this account he was prostrated for a time by illness, 
during which he was attended by his friend and phy- 
sician, Dr. Benjamin Rush, of Philadelphia. In a 
short time he recovered his strength. From an acci- 
Xe4 dent 



dent caused by falling against a gate of a picket fence, 
he subsequently ruptured this vessel again ; possessing, 
however, great vitality, he rallied, but, in 1804, from 
some trivial cause, the same vessel was again ruptured, 
this time causing more serious trouble, that ended in 
his death, which occurred on the 14th of August, 1804. 

As was customary in previous years, for persons to 
wait until they thought themselves likely to die be- 
fore making any will for the disposition of property, 
so it was with Peter. Cut ofi" in his prime, no act of 
the kind was left to govern and protect those dear to 
him, by securing to them their lawful rights, without 
the interposition of the Courts. 

Consequently are found notices in the Orphans' 
Court, of Philadelphia, when sales of property were 
necessary to be made, thus : " 8th April, a. d. 1807, 
"No. 485,"* is found "a petition for sale." Also, 
from the Orphans' Court Docket, 'No. 24, page 269, 
April 15, 1814, can be found a full account of the 
property left by Peter, as there is filed a petition for 
further sale of the property, enumerating the same. 

On the evening of the 18th of August, 1804, a 
daughter, Matilda, was born, who lived but two 
weeks. Before closing this chapter, linger a moment 
to consider Rebecca, who was surrounded with a world 
of care and anxiety, yet she assumed control with a 
firm resolution, and as each trial and obstacle was pre- 
sented, her courage enabled her to rise above and sur- 



*Orphana' Court Docket, No. 22 [1805-1807], page 199. 

165 mount 



mount them, aided by her valued and trusted children, 
as they, one by one, became able to assist her. 

The property left by Peter, comprising the follow- 
ing lots of land in Frankford, is shown by the follow- 
ing entry : 

" 0. C, June 18, 1813, l^o. 725. On the petition of 
" John R. Neff, eldest son of Peter Neff, late of the 
" borough of Frankford, and county of Philadelphia, 
" yeoman, deceased, setting forth, that the petitioner's 
" said father lately died intestate, leaving a widow, to 
" wit, Eebecca Neff, and issue, seven children, to wit, 
** the petitioner and Hannah, William, Rebecca, Peter, 
" George, and Mary l!^eff, the four last named of 
" whom are still in their minority, and that the said 
" intestate died seized in his demesne as of fee of and 
" in all those certain lots and messuages hereinafter 
" described, to wit : 

" No. 1. A lot on Bristol road, containing 3| acres, 
" more or less. 

"j^o. 2. A lot on Bristol road, containing 10 acres, 
" more or less. 

" Ko. 3. A lot on Bristol road, containing 1 and 
" ^^3^ P''-' ^01"^ or less, with a two-story frame erected 
" thereon. 

"No. 4. A lot on the Bristol road, containing 7 
" acres, more or less. 

" No. 5. A lot on the Bristol road, containing | 
" acres, more or less, with 2 small stone and one frame 
" house erected thereon. 

"No. 6. A lot on Bristol road, containing 1 acre 
166 and 



*' and 5 pr., or thereabouts, with a two-story frame 
" and blacksmith shop erected thereon. 

" ]S"o. 7. A lot on Bristol road, containing 1 acre 
" and 19^ pr., more or less, with a two-story frame 
" house erected thereon. 

"INo. 8. A lot on Paul Street, containing 3 acres, 
" or thereabouts. 

" No. 9. A lot on Adams Street, containing 46 pr., 
" with a two-story frame erected thereon. 

"All of which said described lots and messuages 
" are situated in the borough of Frankford, Oxford 
" Township, and county of Philadelphia ; also another 
" lot, situated on the road leading from the Frankford 
" road to Point no Point, containing 1^ acres, more or 
" less, with the appurtenances." 

This, together with Peter's personal property, made 
an estate sufficiently large for each daughter's portion 
to be a help to her as she began married life ; for the 
sons, enough to give them an education suitable to 
prepare them for business life ; while to Rebecca was 
secured, during her life, a comfortable and cheery 
home, in which the grandfather, Rudolph, had his 
share, until his death, on the 14th of February, 1809, 
at the good old age of eighty-two years. 

An incident in the life of Rudolph is related by one 
of the grandchildren, who states that, as he grew 
older, he became childish, and when he wished to at- . 
tract the attention of any one of them, he would, in- 
stead of speaking, throw at them his large-brimmed 
hat, which he always wore. 

X07 If 



If this mode of address was disregarded by them, as 
it seems frequently to have been the case, he would 
be greatly displeased. To gratify him in his childish- 
ness, Rebecca would, when she left for Philadelphia, 
tell the old grandfather that he must take charge of 
the young people, whom she left in his care. His 
success in the government of tbem was not great, and 
he would in hopeless terms express to Rebecca, on her 
return, his inability to do any thing with them. 

A custom of Rudolph's was to sit outside the front 
door, and drink his daily glass of good cheer, placing 
the glass, when not in use, on a little ledge at the side 
of the door, off which place it would frequently fall 
and break. That he might enjoy his old custom, 
without the repetition of the oft-recurring accident, 
Peter, before his death, had manufactured for his 
father two silver cups, of peculiar size and shape, 
from which ever after he took his beverage. These 
cups were for many years in the possession of Peter 
ISTeff, now deceased, of Cincinnati. They were stolen 
from his house at one time, bnt found, subsequently, 
in Mill Creek bottom; a second time they were stolen, 
and though never recovered, they were traced to where 
they were melted. Rudolph, having revoked, before 
his death, all wills made by him, his estate was dis- 
tributed in accordance with the statutes. A copy of 
the paper is given on page 170. The settlement 
was tedious, since it was not finally disposed of until 
the 18th of August, 1826. 

In the grave-yard at Frankford, back of the old 
168 church, 



church, Hannah and Rudolph are buried, side by 
side. On the headstone at the grave of Hannah, is 
inscribed the following : 

" In Memory of 
Hannah IS'eff, 

wife of 

Eudolph Kefi, 

who departed this life 

January 10th, 1789. Aged 68 years." 

On the footstone the initials — 

"H. N." 
On the headstone at the grave of Rudolph is in- 
scribed the following : 

" In Memory of 
Rudolph Keff, 
" who departed this life 

February 14, 1809. 
" Aged 82 years." 

On the footstone the initials — 
"R. K" 



As this chapter closes, there are remaining in life, 
as members of the family, the following: 
Rebecca Neff, 
Her children, 
Hannah, Rebecca, 

John Rudolph, Peter, 

William, George Washington, 

Mary Amanda. 

X69 "Whereas, 



" C. I." 

"Whereas, I, Rudol[)h ISTeff, of the Borough of 
" Frankforcl, in the County of Philadelphia, wheel- 
" Wright, have, on mature reflection, determined to 
" revoke all wills and testimentary dispositions by 
" me heretofore made, in order that the first and 
" equal distribution may be made in case of intestacy 
" by the Laws of Pennsylvania may take eflect in re- 
" gard to such property as I may die seized or pos- 
" sessed of or entitled to 

"Now these presents witness that I, the said Ru- 
" dolph Neflf, in consideration of the premises, have 
" revoked, and by these presents do revoke, annul, 
" and make void all and every will or writing in the 
" nature of a will by me heretofore made. 

"Witness my hand and seal this 16th day of Oc- 
" tober, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight 
" hundred and four. 1804. 



Sealed and delivered \ 



in the presents of 

John Ketlerz, ) RUDOLPH NEFF. [seal.] 

Matthias Giller,^ 
Joshua Sullivan. 
{Forfac simile of signatures, see following poge.) 



ER,^ \ 

lN. / 



"Phila., Jane 9, 1885. 

" I, Charles Irwin, Clerk, Ofiice of Register of Wills 

" for the City and County of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 

" vania, do certify that the foregoing paper, marked 

" C. I., and attached to this sheet, is a true and cor- 

170 rect 



** rect copy of an original paper filed with the admin- 
" istration papers, etc. (original), in the Register's 
" Office, Philadelphia County, in the estate of Ru- 
" dolph !N"eff, deceased 1809, as the same remains on 
" file. 

" Witness my hand the above date. 
" Chas. Irwin, 

" 1847 iV. Front St., Fhila., Pa." 



(a) 





(6) 



;ic:?^/' 




"Register of Wills, 
' No. 421 Chestnut Street, 
Philadelphia, May 19, 1885. 



Y ss. 
Lia. J 



" State of Pennsylvania, 
" County of Philadelphi 

" Personally appeared before me, a Kotary Public 
" for the County and State aforesaid, Charles Irwin, 
" who, being duly sworn according to law, deposes 
" and says, that he is clerk in the Register of Wills 
" Office, Philadelphia County, Penna., and has access 
X7l to 



" to and charge of all original papers in said office ; 
" that the foregoing, marked a, is a photograph of 
" the original signature and seal of Jacob 'NeS to 
" his original will, made on the 26th day of July, 
" A. D. 1793, and admitted to probate on the 25th 
" day of June, a. d. 1794, (Ann Keff, Rudolph N'eff, 
" and Adam Strieker, Executors) ; said photograph 
" being taken by Louis 'N. Greenig, Photographer, 
" Philadelphia, on the 19th day of May, a. d. 
" 1885. 

"Also, that the foregoing*, marked b, is a photo- 
" graph of the original signature and seal of Rudolph 
" Nefi' to an original paper, made and signed by him 
" on the 16th day of October, a. d. 1804, and which is 
" of itself a document revoking all previous wills 
" made by him, in order that distribution may be 
" made according to the laws of Pennsylvania, which 
" paper is filed with the original administration bond, 
" said estate of Rudolph ITeff being administered on 
" by John H. Worrell, of Oxford Township, Phila- 
" delphia County, on the 20th day of February, a. d. 
" 1809, said photograph being taken by Louis N. 
" Greenig, photographer, Philadelphia, on the 19th 
" day of May, a. d. 1885. 

"Further, that both original documents are on 
" file (the foregoing being of record and the latter on 
" file) in the Office of Register of Wills, Philadelphia 
" County, Pennsylvania. 

" Charles Irwin, 

« 1847 N. Front St., Phila., Fa. 

172 " Sworn 



" Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 19th day 
" of May, A. D. 1885. 

" [notary public seal.] Frank M. Cody, 

" Notary Public. 

"I certify that I am acquainted with the above- 
" named Charles Irwin, and that he is clerk in the 
" above-named office. 
« Frank M. Cody, 

528 Walnut St." 

The following certified copy from the church records 
of the Market Square German Reformed Church of 
Germantown, gives what is there contained regarding 
the Wdi families. 

The Heinrich Naf, here spoken of, does not enter 
into this volume; the only descendant at present 
known of resides in Kutztown, Pennsylvania — Miss 
Haimah Neff. 

The discrepancies regarding the dates in the tomb- 
stone records, and those of the church, indicate an in- 
accuracy, that suggests again the fact that neither the 
tombstones nor the church records are quite correct 
in this country, which strengthens the belief, that 
when absolute certainty is reached, the records from 
Switzerland, as quoted on page 169, will be found to 
be the true dates regarding Rudolph and Jacob Naf, 
who were known in Switzerland as John and Jacob 
Naf, and thus the connection with the family in Switz- 
erland will be established and complete : 

" I hereby certify that the following is a correct 
173 copy 



" copy from the records of the Market Square German 
" Reformed Church, Germantown, Pennsylvania, the 
" same having been examined by me; that the said 
" Book of Records, as therein stated, was commenced 
" in the year 1753, and is now in the possession of 
" the authorities of the said church : 

" MARRIAGES. 

" 1754, January 29. Heinrich Naf married Johanna 
*' Neger. 

"1756, February 3. Jacob Naf married Anna 
" Buser. 

" Original German : 

„35en 29. ^anuor 1754 iDurben getraiit. 
„^einric^ 9Zdf mit Sot)anna DZeger. 
„®en 3. t^ebruar 1756, tourben getraut ^aUl 5Jiaf unt> 
„^nna 33ujer. 

" BIRTHS. 

" 1769, August 10. Anna Neff, daughter of Jacob 
" and Anna Keff. 

„^en 10. ?lugu[t 1769 murbe geboren 5Inna 5?eff, 
Soditer Don ^afob unb ?Inna 3^eff. 

" DEATHS. 

" 1793, September 27. Jacob Neff, from Frankford, 
" aged 69 years and 7 months. 

" 1809, February 14. Rudolph Neff, aged 81 years, 
" -4 months, 18 days. 

„®en 27. ©eptember 1793 ftarb ^aUh D^eff Don 
SroHffurt, 69 ^a^u unb 7 monat alt. 

„®en 14. gebruor 1809 ftarb ^nholpi) ^Jieff, 81 ^a^xt, 
4 OJionate unb 18 Xaqz alt. 
" H. Grahn, Pastor. 

" Philadelphia, September 24, 1885. 

174 "Before 



" Before me, the subscriber, a I^otary Public in and 
" for the City of Philadelphia, personally appeared 
" the above-named Rev. H. Grahn, who, being duly 
" sworn according to law, did declare that the above 
" copy of records, as written, was a true and correct 
" copy of the original entries in the above-mentioned 
" Book of Records of the Market Square German 
" Reformed Church, of Germantown, Pennsylvania. 

" Witness my hand and official seal, this tweuty- 
" fourth day of September, a. d. 1885. 
" [notary public seal.] E. L. Mintzer, Jr., 

" Notary Public^ 

A full examination ha^ been made of the records of 
the church situated on Wallace Street, formerly on 
Race Street, below Fourth, known as the First {Ger- 
man) Reformed Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
Rev. Dr. David Van Home, Pastor. To these records 
reference was made as having been those of the church 
which Rudolf Naf attended for a time, prior to the 
building of the church in Frankford in 1770. 

On these records the names of both Rudolf and Jacob 
Naf appear in connection with baptisms, either of 
their own children or the children of others. They 
are in fault as to names, in some cases, as well as to 
dates, yet they approach the truth of other records so 
nearly as to identify the reference. 

Thus: ''Rudolph Naf and wife, Anna, child born 
" April 27, 1759, baptized May 18th, 1760. 

"Also, Jacob Naf and wife, Anna, had a son, Dau- 
X75 iel 



" iel {Duvid f), baptized at the same time, born March 
" 10th, 1759 ; on the margin is the Latin ' Obit.' 

" Rudolph l^af and wife had a child, Sarah [Mary ?), 
" February 6th, baptized April 30th, 1762; the same 
" marginal entry here is ' Obit.' " 

The above is quoted to show the difficulty experi- 
enced in investigating and reconciling old records, 
and to indicate the thoroughness of the efforts to se- 
cure all information from every quarter. 

The following certified copy explains itself. Notice 
is directed to the name of the son, which, here given, 
is Daniel, in place of David, as in the will. A slight 
change in the formation of a letter or two renders 
such an error possible, and the old records are so 
nearly obliterated that perfect accuracy is almost im- 



lio, 1 

> ss. 
unty. J 



« The State of Ohio, 
" Cuyahoga Co 

"Before me, Louis H. "Winch, a Notary Public 
" within and for said county and state, personally ap- 
" peared Peter ISTeff, Jr., to me well known, who, 
" being by me first duly sworn, upon his oath deposeth 
" and saith that the document hereto attached, and 
" marked "Exhibit A," is a correct and literal trans- 
" lation done into English from the original German 
" of a manuscript leaf said to have been taken from 
" a family Bible now in the possession of the descend- 
" ants of Jacob Naf, said manuscript leaf being a 
" record of the births and christenings of the chil- 
X76 dren 



" dren of the said Jacob Naf, and further affiant 
" saith not. Peter Keff, Jr. 

"Subscribed by the said Peter Neff, Jr., in my 
" presence, and sworn to by him before me, this 
" twenty-third day of l^Tovember, a. d. 1885. 

" In testimony whereof, I have hereunto subscribed 
" my name, officially, and affixed my Notarial Seal, 
" the day and year last above written. 
" [notarial seal.] Louis H. Winch, 

" Notary Public, 

" Cuyahoga County, Ohio. 

« 'ExUbit a: 

" The 30 March, 1760, my son, Daniel, was born, 
" Sponsors at whose christening were Daniel Bechli * 
" and his wife. 



"February 20, 1766, my child, Esther, was born, 
" Sponsors at whose christenings Jacob Zobli and his 
" wife, Esther. 



"Anno Domini, 1769. The 10 August was born to 
" me, into this world, a daughter, whereupon, she re- 
" ceived in holy baptism, the name of Ana, Sponsors 
" at whose christening were I, her Father, Jacob Naf, 
" and her Mother, Ana Naf. 



* Some read Yechli. 

177 "1772, 



" 1772, on the 30 * day of December, was my son, 
" Jacob, born, at whose christening Sponsors were 
" Jacob Zobli and his wife, Esther. 



" 1776, the 20 day of August, my son, Rudolf, was 
" born, Sponsors at whose christening, Rudolf Nef 
" and his wife, Ana.f" 



*31, some read. 

f This is very uncertain ; the writing is very faint, and the 
paper torn. Some think it a contraction for Hannah — space very 
limited. 



17$ 



2 Rudolf Naf. 

Born September 26, 1727. 
Married January 6, 1752. 
Died February 14, 1809. 



2 * Hannah Morse Naf. 

Born 1721. 

Married January 6, 1752. 
Died January 10, 1789. 



* Some records give her name as Anna. 



Elizabeth, 

Born November 8, 1752. 
Married A. Baker, March 15, 

1773. 
Died June 6, 1829, aged 76 

years, 6 months, 28 days. 



Barbara, 

Born February 2, 1754. 
Married Adam Strieker, July 

18, 1779. 
Died. 



Hannah, 

Born May 6, 1759. 
Married Phillip Buckius. 
Died. 



Mary, 

Born January 26, 1762. 
Married John H. Worrell. 
Died January 26, 1842, 
aged 80. 



Peter, 

Born February 15, 1764. 
Married Rebecca Scout, 

March 4, 1784, 
Died August 14, 1804. 



Johannes, 

Born September 22, 1766. 
Died July 6, 1767. 



Samuel, 

Born June 27, 1768. 
Married Eleanor Helveston. 
Died 1839. 



X70 



CHAPTER IX. 

At the time of Peter's death, he was building for 
himself and family a large stone house (the house is 
still standing), intending shortly to leave the old brick 
house, the cellar of which, being the first work his 
father, Rudolph, together with his uncle, Jacob, had 
been engaged upon in this country. The contracts 
for the new house and home were sucli that Rebecca 
continued the work, and with womanly nobility of 
character, directed all, and soon settled with her 
family in the new home. Can you not imagine the 
sadness with which she took up her abode in this 
new home, and remembered the happy "Hanging of 
the Crane," when she, with Peter, .began life, in the 
half of the old brick house? But it is now no time 
for regrets ; life is too real for the living to waste it 
foolishly mourning for the dead. In her purpose and 
effort to carry out the wishes of her husband in the 
training of their children, in the determination to im- 
press upon them the principles and character of their 
father — to reproduce his life in theirs — she reared a 
more beautiful and lasting monument to his mem- 
ory, and gave a nobler and a grander expression of 
her undying affection for him. 

180 Hannah, 



Hannah, who married William Patterson, of ITew 
Jersey, the first of the children to marry, as the 
eldest, had been, in trying moments, her mother's 
comfort and assistant. Happy it proved for the 
mother, that her daughter, after her marriage, could 
and did remain with her. This daughter was always 
known in the family by the name of "Aunt Patty," 
as she greatly disliked the good old name of Hannah. 

Two of Eebecca's sons received a collegiate educa- 
tion — in part, at least — John Rudolph spending two 
years, and George Washington being graduated from 
Princeton College. John Rudolph, afterward marry- 
ing Miss Bird, located in Philadelphia. George Wash- 
ington, receiving his degree from Princeton in his 
eighteenth year, and in the year 1818, subsequently 
studied law with the late Hon. Horace P. Binney, of 
Philadelphia, was admitted to the bar, but, later, 
abandoned the profession, and adopted a business 
life. 

William and Peter embraced the opportunities of- 
fered them at the academy in Frankford. William, 
early developing business talent, assumed at once an 
active life, as will appear in the chapter detailing his 
subsequent career. Peter also went no further than 
the academy, and entered business life. Rebecca re- 
ceived her education in Philadelphia, and in her 
twenty-fifth year, married Rev. Thomas J. Biggs, pas- 
tor of the church of which her grandfather, Rudolph, 
had been one of the founders. 

A brief account of Dr. Biggs will be given in the 
18X chapter 



chapter giving the account of Rebecca's life. Let us 
here digress for a moment to tell of the happy influ- 
ence of this new son-in-law. Keither of the parents 
had made any profession of religion, although Chris- 
tians at heart. Through the influence of the Rev. Dr. 
Biggs, Rebecca became an earnest member of the 
Frankford church. From her sixteenth year she had 
8ufi"ered much from rheumatism, which greatly in- 
creased as she grew older. For the last twenty years 
of her life she was almost helpless ; having lost the 
use of her limbs, she was taken about the house in a 
chair on wheels. Her hands, too, w^ere greatly af- 
fected, the joints of her fingers having been drawn 
out of place by the contraction of her muscles. 

When thus suffering and confined. Dr. Biggs would 
have prayer meetings at her house. These meetings 
are remembered by those who attended as precious 
seasons, when her bright Christian face, full of love 
and patience, shone through all her trials. She ever 
kept her eye towards her Saviour, bright with his re- 
flected light as the eagle's to the sun. There was 
in the town of Frankford about this time, jewelers, by 
the name of Woolworth, who had four apprentices. 
The name of one was M. W. Baldwin. He was an 
industrious, intelligent young man, who attended well 
to his business duties, while he carefully remembered 
his higher obligations. To these prayer-meetings, at 
Mrs. ^Neff's house, he came, and who can tell the 
worth those meetings were to him. Time has gone 
on, and now it is M. W. Baldwin, of locomotive fame. 
182 Only 



Only a few years previous to his death, Mr. Baldwin, 
to one of the descendants, referred with pleasure to 
those meetings of prayer and praise. William mar- 
ried a Miss Wayne, of Savannah, Greorgia, and they 
made for themselves a home in Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Mary Amanda married Kirkbride Yardley, at her 
home in Frankford, shortly after a visit to her brother, 
in the west, where she first met Mr. Yardley. She 
returned with him to his home in Cincinnati. Her 
history, although brief, will be given in a subsequent 
chapter. Rebecca, after her marriage, resided for a 
time in Frankford, and subsequently removed, with 
her husband, to Cincinnati. Peter, who was in busi- 
ness in Baltimore for some time, married Mrs. Isabella 
Lamson of that city, also removed to Cincinnati, 
where he entered into business with his brothers, and 
remained there until his death. George Washington, 
marrying Miss White, of Philadelphia, also removed 
to Cincinnati. In subsequent years it will not be sur- 
prising to find the name of this family numerous in 
and" about Cincinnati. The three brothers, having 
settled and reared their families there, where they each 
were known and individually appreciated, in the early 
days of that city. What a record for a family reared 
by a mother, without the counsel and assistance of a 
father. Each one of the four sons commanded re- 
spect in his line of business, and each^died respected 
and beloved — not one of the four brothers ever in- 
dulging in the humiliating, degrading, and almost 
universal vices of intemperance, etc., that in their 
X63 day 



day, as well as ours, were rife in the land. What an 
example for succeeding generations, and with what 
feelings of gratitude can descendants look back upon 
such a record. Thus five of the children had settled 
in the then far west, leaving their mother, Rebecca, 
with her daughter, Hannah, living in the homestead 
in Frankford. 

The character of love, trust, and energy is shown 
by Rebecca in every act. To have her children so far 
away from her, would have been, to a person wanting 
in resolution, a separation too terrible to have been 
thought of or endured. Knowing, as she must have 
known, that life for her could not be long, she would 
bid them good-bye, with a hearty God speed, and an 
abiding faith in the future each would make. From 
her invalid chair, from day to day, would her sweet, 
loving face look forth, to gladden all who saw her — 
her's being a perfect example of patience throughout 
all those twenty years of her life, when her limbs had 
refused to perform their office. The rheumatism, 
which so afflicted her, was more terrible in its efiects 
at that time, possibly, than at the present, on account 
of the treatment, which was largely that of experi- 
ment. Rebecca was a remarkably sweet singer, and it 
is said that at one time she knew a ballad for every day 
in the year. The days in the cheery sick room passed 
on, with letters from the absent ones, with yearly visits 
from her children in the west, together with frequent 
calls from John Rudolph, the only son now living in 
Philadelphia. Hannah's two children served to glad- 
184 den 



den the long and weary days for Rebecca, who re- 
ceived from the hands of Hannah kind and loving at- 
tentions in her invalid state. 

Thus cared for and surrounded, she lived until the 
cold and trying days of the unfriendly March, of the 
year 1834, came, when, on the 23rd day of that month, 
she passed peacefully to her rest, full of years and 
honors, having spent an useful life of 69 years, 10 
months, and 26 days. 

Her body was borne in reverence and love to the 
little old grave-yard back of the old brick church, in 
Frankford, where lay the remains of Eudolph and 
Hannah 'NeS. By the side of her beloved husband, 
Peter, all that was mortal was placed, and the same 
tombstone covers the graves of both. It is of some 
kind of granite ; the sides, head, and foot are slabs 
about 2J feet high, which support a horizontal slab 
of the same stone, on which is inscribed the following 
[time is doing its usual and successful work in oblit- 
erating the lettering] : 

" In memory of 

" Peter I^eff, 

" Who was born 15th of February, 1764, 

" And departed this life the 

« 14th of August, 1804, 

*• Aged 

" 40 years, 6 months, and 10 days." 

185 "Also 



Also, 

Eebecca Neff, 

relict of Peter Neff, 

who departed this life 

March 23rd, 1834, aged 

69 years, 10 months, 26 days." 



The following is a fac simile of the signature of 
Rebecca Neff, wife of Peter Keff, the son of the senior 
Eudolph ITeff, taken from the records of the Orphan's 
Court, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: 



&^d^X^ 



18a 



25 Peter Neff, 

Born February 15, 1764. 
Married March 4, 1784. 
Died August 14, 1804. 



25 Rebecca Scout Neff. 

Born April 27, 1764. 
Married March 4, 1784. 
•Died March 23, 1834. 



Hannah, 

Born June 8, 1787. 
Married William Patterson. 
Died November 11, 1862. 

John Rudolph, 

Born July 12, 1789. _ 
Married Caroline Bird. 
Died July 23, 1863. 



William, 

Born February 7, 1792. 
Married Elizabeth Clifford 

Wayne. 
Died November 25, 1856. 



Sarah, 

Born June 26, 1794. 
Died June 11, 1795. 



(Residence of above parties, Frankford 
Pa.) 



2 Rebecca, 

S Born May 1, 1796. 

g Married Thomas J. Biggs. 

o Died August 24, 1885. 



Peter, 



Born March 31, 1798. 
Married Isabella Lamson. 
Died July 20, 1879. 



George Washington, 
Born May 19, 1800. 
Married Maria White. 
Died August 9, 1850. 



Mary Amanda, 

Born December 16, 1802. 
Married Kirkbride Yardley. 
Died July 11, 1849. 



Matilda, 

Born August 18, 1804. 
Died September 1, 1804. 



187 



CHAPTER X. 



HANNAH NEFF PATTEESON. 



Hannah 'NeS, tlie oldest child of Peter and Rebecca 
N"eff, who was born in the old brick house, in Frank- 
ford, became quite a remarkable woman. Very early 
in life, when about eighteen years old, which was soon 
after her father's death, she married "William Patter- 
son, of 'New Jersey. Life so shaped itself for her, 
that nearly all the time after her marriage, until the 
death of her mother, which occurred in 1834, she 
spent in the homestead, a comfort and support to her 
invalid parent; her shrewd management, and compre- 
hensive ability in all business matters, rendered her a 
valued counselor in all matters of family concern. 
The younger children, throughout life, always sought 
for and appreciated her judgment. 

She subsequently moved, with her family, to St. 
Louis, Missouri, her daughter having previously mar- 
ried George K. Budd, of Philadelphia, who accom- 
panied them to the west, settling in business in the 
same city. 

The investments in this part of the new world, sug- 
gested and entered into by Hannah, resulted favora- 
bly, and later years attested her appreciation and 
188 ability 



ability to seize all favorable circumstances for the 
advantage of herself and children. 

Truly, her memory is one to be revered. Early in 
life she united with the Presbyterian Church, becom- 
ing an active member and earnest worker, her name 
being associatied with the first Sabbath-school teachers 
in America. In the fellowship of this same church 
she died. 

The following, from her diary, with the notices of 
her death, together with the number and names of 
her descendants, was furnished the compiler by her 
daughter, Rebecca Budd. 

"As the aged wife of her dear pastor, Dr. Biggs 
" [her own dear sister], is still living, in her 89th 
" year, and in full use of all her faculties, I append 
" some portions of her diary, feeling it will comfort 
" her : 

"January, 1818, she writes of the interesting group 
" of children which composed her Sabbath-school 
" class, and of the Kev. Backus Wilber preaching to 
" them. They were then without a pastor, for she 
" adds, * how much do we need a faithful pastor to in- 
" struct and comfort us.' 

" September 29, she writes, 'ray heart rejoices that 
" our Heavenly Father has provided a pastor to pre- 
" side over this little flock,' and Oct. 2nd, she adds, 
" 'this day, in commemoration of our blessed Lord, 
" we again partook of the emblems of his broken 
" body and shed blood. Dr. Janeway preached and 

189 administered 



" administered the sacrament, and the Eev, Mr. Biggs 
" assisting in the holy ordinance.' 

" November 10, 1818, she adds, ' how solemn have 
" the proceedings of this day been. The Rev. Mr. 
" Biggs ordained and installed our pastor — the charge, 
" how great. May God grant him grace and strength 
" to perform his duties, and may we be enabled by 
" grace divine to fulfill ours !' 

"January, 1819, she writes, 'we again assemble at 
" our Lord's table to commemorate his dying love. 
" It is the first time our worthy and beloved pastor 
" has administered the ordinance, and we rejoice that 
" there were added to our little company! ' 

"'Six years,' she adds, 'have now elapsed since the 
" seal was set to the covenant made between God and 
" my soul — to be his and liis only.' 

"It was then, in January, 1813, that she made a 
" profession of religion at Frankford, Penn., and how 
" faithfully she lived up to that profession, all can 
" testify who knew her. 

" From my earliest recollections she was the most 
" self-sacrificing and devoted Christian, abounding in 
" all good works, a tender and loving mother, unsur- 
" passed in devotion, trust, and love, and I feel as- 
" sured she has received the plaudit, ' Well done, good 
" and faithful servant, enter ye into the joy of your 
" Lord ! ' 



190 FROM 



" from the democrat, nov. 14, 1862. 

" St. Louis, Mo. 

" Obituary. 

" Our paper of Wednesday contained the simple 
" notice of the decease, on the previous day [ISTov. 
" 11th], of Mrs. Hannah N'eff Patterson. 

" Funeral services were held at the house of her 
" son-in-law, George K. Budd, Esq., after which her 
" remains were attended by a number of friends across 
" the river, to be conveyed thence to Cincinnati, for 
" intermennt, in charge of her brother, Peter Neff, 
" Esq., of that city. 

"Mrs. Patterson had been a resident of our city for 
" twenty-six years, and had a large circle of friends 
" among our citizens. She was a most amiable 
" woman, and an active, consistent, and exemplary 
" Christian. She was a member of the First Presby- 
" terian Church, in which she attended upon public 
" worship with great constancy and faithfulness, and 
" was regarded by her pastor and fellow-worshipers 
" with more than ordinary esteem and veneration. 
" She had been a consistent professor of the Christian 
" faith for over half a century, and is believed to have 
" been one of the earliest Sabbath-school teachers in 
" America. 

" Who can estimate the amount of good accom- 
" plished by such a life? The applauses of the world 
" are wont to be given to those who act on more con- 
" spicuous arenas, but many of our readers will agree 
" with us in the wish to honor, by a modest tribute, 
X9t the 



" the memory of this godly woman, whose quiet, 
" and peaceful, and happy life among us has just 
" closed. There is no danger of overestimating the 
" value of such lives. We do well to study such 
" characters. Mrs. Patterson was a person of whom 
" those who knew her will be reminded by many 
" passages in Solomon's charming description of ' the 
" virtuous woman,' whose price he wisely describes to 
" be * above rubies.' 

" ' She openeth her mouth with wisdom : and in her 
" tongue is the law of kindness.' 

" ' She looketh well to the ways of her household 
" and eateth not the bread of idleness.' 

" ' Her children arise up and call her blessed.' 

'"Favor is deceitful and beauty is vain, but a woman 
" that feareth the Lord she shall be praised.' 

" Mrs. Patterson was sustained during her sickness 
" by a steadfast hope in the Saviour of sinners, in whom 
" alone she trusted for salvation. 

" She was anxious to depart, she said, and be with 
" Christ, but she added, I will wait patiently God's 
" will, and she did. 'Blessed are the dead who die in 
« the Lord.' 

" The Philadelphia Evangelist, in copying this obit- 
" uary, prefaces it with, ' we copy from the St. Louis 
" Democrat, of the 14th inst., the following notice of 
" the death of Mrs. Hannah 'NeS Patterson, formerly 
" of Frankford, in this county, where she was born, 
" and resided for more than forty years. The de- 
" ceased was a member of the Rev. Dr. Nelson's 
192 churcli, 



" church, St. Louis, in which city she had resided for 
" more than twenty-five years : 
" 'Funeral of Mrs. Nannah Nefi' Patterson, 
" ' November 12, 1862, by Rev. Dr. Nelson.' 

" Man that is born of a woman is of few days and 
" full of trouble. 

"He cometh forth like a flower, and is cut down: 
" he fleeth also as a shadow, and coutinueth not. 
" Job xiv: 1, 2. 

" The days of our years are three-score years and 
" ten ; and if by reason of strength they he four-score 
" years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow ; for 
" it is soon cut off, and we fly away. Ps. xc : 10. 

" For what is your life ? It is even a vapour, that 
" appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away. 
" James iv: 14. 

"A tale that is told — thin vapour, that speedily van- 
" ishes from view the unsubstantial shadow ; such 
" are the Scriptural emblems of this earthly life. 

" Honor thy father and thy mother ; that thy days 
" may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God 
" giveth thee. Exodus xx: 12. 

" Happy is the man that findeth wisdom. 

"Length of days is in her right hand; and in her 
" left hand riches and honour. Proverbs iii : 13, 16. 

"The hoary head is a crown of glory, if it be found 
" in the way of righteousness. Poverbs xvi : 31. 

"The righteous shall flourish like the palm tree: 
*' he shall grow like a cedar in Lebanon. 

193 « Those 



"Those that be planted in the house of the Lord 
" shall flourish in the courts of our God. 

" They shall still bring forth fruit in old age : they 
" shall be fat and flourishing. 

" To show that the Lord is upright : he is my rock, 
" and there is no unrighteousness in him. Ps. xcii: 
" 12, 13, 14, 15. 

"And eue?^ to yoiir old age I am he ; and even to hoar 
" hairs will I carry you : I have made and I will bear ; 
" even I will carry, and will deliver you. Isaiah 
" xlvi : 4. 

" To such comfort in old age aud such divine sup- 
" port may they look forward who lead lives of Scrip- 
" tural piety by faith in the Lord Jesus. Such a se- 
" rene and quiet evening, such a lovely and hopeful 
" sunset may they enjoy whose morning and noon of 
" life have dutifully and devotedly been given to God. 
" Little do I need to say to those who knew her, how 
" pleasantly Mrs. Patterson had these Scriptures ful- 
" filled to her. Those who frequented the sanctuary 
•' where she worshiped, and observed how regularly 
" and how early she was seen in her accustomed seat, 
" and how devoutly she attended upon God's word 
" and ordinances ; those who often felt the friendly 
" pressure of her hand and the kindly beaming of her 
" face upon them, and who sometimes heard her hum- 
" ble and fervent words, expressive of deep Christian 
" feeling, and who observed her blameless life and 
" knew her simple trust in Jesus, feel that the palm 
" tree, green and fruitful and casting a wide aud 
194 pleasant 



" pleasant shade, was her proper emblem. Who has 
" not felt that to pause for a half hour, and rest from 
" life's toil in pleasant conversation with such an aged 
" Christian, gathering the rich clusters of ripe ex- 
" perience, and feeling the restful influence of such 
" Christian society, is like turning aside from a dusty 
" and wearisome march to rest beneath the grateful 
" shadow of a green and thrifty tree? How happy 
" are they, over whose home such a palm tree casts 
" its refreshing shadow, and within whose chambers 
" its delicious and wholesome fruits are garnered : 

" The memory of the just is blessed. Proverbs 
" X : 7. 

''The righteous shall be in everlasting remembrance. 
" Ps. cxii : 6. 

" Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of 
" his saints. Ps. cxvi:15. 

" Mark the perfect wa?2, and behold the upright: 
" for the end of that man is peace. Ps. xxxvii : 37. 

" And I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, 
" "Write, Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord 
" from henceforth : Yea, saith the Spirit, that they 
" may rest from their labours : and their works do 
" follow them. Revelation xiv : 13. 

"They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any 
" more; neither shall the sun light on them, nor any 
" heat. 

" For the lamb which is in the midst of the throne 
" shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living 

X95 fountains 



" fountains of waters : and God shall wipe away all 
" tears from their eyes. Revelation vii: 16, 17. 

"For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, 
" even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God 
" bring with him. 

" Wherefore comfort one another with these words. 
" 1 Thessalonians iv : 14, 18. 

"Hannah N'eff Patterson, daughter of Peter and 
" Rebecca Neff, was born in Frankford, Peun., June 
" 8, 1787, and died iTovember 11, 1862. 

"Her remains were carried from her brother Peter's 
" residence, on Walnut Street, Cincinnati, and interred 
" in Spring Grove Cemetery, representatives from 
" each branch of her family acting as pall-bearers. 
" At the early age of eighteen she was married to 
" William Patterson, of New Jersey, and had two 
" children — 

" Charles ITeff Patterson, 

" Rebecca Patterson. 

" Charles died unmarried, and Rebecca married 
" George K. Budd, of Philadelphia, Penn., now de- 
" ceased, and had five children, grandchildren of Han- 
" nah ]^eff Patterson, all now living. 

" Their names are : 
" Marcia D. 

Charles P. 
« Helen W. 

" Wayman C. 

« Isabella Neff 

196 " Wayman 



"Wayman married, in San Francisco, California, 
" Annabella Parks, and has four children. 

"Isabella Neff Budd married Captain Buchannan 
" "Wade, of the United States Army, now deceased, 
" and has three children, great grandchildren of Han- 
" nah ISTefi Patterson." 



X97 



251 William Patterson, 

Born. 

Married October 24, 1805. 

Died. 



251 Hannah Neff Patter- 
son, 

Born June 8, 1787. 
Married October 24, 1805. 
Died November 11, 1862. 



Charles Neff, 

Born October 18, 
g Married. 
s Died June 6, 1850, 



1806. 



Rebecca, 
Born. 

Married George K. Budd. 
Died. 



198 



2512 George K. Budd, 

Born February 12, 1802. 
Married April' 29, 1830. 
Died September 24, 1875. 



2512 Kebecca Patterson 
Budd, 

Born. 

Married April 29, 1830. 

Died. 



(Residence, St. Louis, Mo.) 



Marcia D. 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



Charles P., 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



5 Helen W., 

z: Born. 
^ Married. 
5 Died. 

3 

Way man C, 
Born. 

Married Annabella Parks. 
Died. 



Isabella Neff, 
Born. 
„ Married Robert Buchanan 
Wade. 
Died. 



25124: Wayman C. Budd, 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



25124: Annabella Parks 
Budd, 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



(Residence, Chicago, 111.) 



Georgia Knight, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 

Wayman Clifford, 

Born. 

Married. 
_ Died. 



^ Brittonl., 
» Born. 
2. Married. 
Died. 



Blanche, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



200 



25125 Robert Buchannan j 
Wade, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died January 8, 1884. 



25125 Isabella Neff Budd ' 
Wade, 
Born. 
. Married. 
Died. 



(Residence, St. Louis, Mo.) 



Robert Budd, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



o George K. Budd, 

;::, Born. 

g- Married. 

S Died. 



McKean Buchannan, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



20X 



CHAPTER XI. 



JOHN RUDOLPH NEFF. 



The eldest son of Peter and Rebecca NefF, John 
Rudolph Keff, was born in the old brick house in 
Frankford, on the 12th of January, 1789, and was, 
consequently, but fifteen years old when his father 
died, in 1804. Cares and responsibilities thus early 
in life thrust upon him, matured him rapidly, and he 
soon assumed management, with his mother, of all 
their business interests, not, however, without fully 
preparing himself by a school education, to which he 
added two years at Princeton. His management of 
his father's estate is attested by the Records of the 
Orphan's Court, Philadelphia. His business relations 
and success are noted in the obituary attached to this 
chapter. As will appear in subsequent chapters, his 
own mercantile advancements he turned to the profit 
of his brothers, as well, with whom he was associated 
in the west. Marrying Caroline Bird, of Philadel- 
phia, his married life was spent in that city. On May 
29, 1843, Caroline died very suddenly, and thus, for 
him, began a long and lonely period of twenty years, 
until his death, in 1863. A portion of this time, his 
house and home were presided over by the queenly 
202 dignity 



dignity of his daughter, Jane, until her marriage, on 
the 10th of June, 1847; after this he still continued 
housekeeping, with valued and trusted servants and 
the companionship of a devoted friend and amanuen- 
sis, Alexander Boyd. Shortly before his death, John 
R. Keff, Jr., removing, with his wife and family, to 
Philadelphia, occupied the house with him, and were 
thus there at the time of his death. 

The following memoirs, and list, with names, etc., 
of his descendants, are as given by Josephine M. 0. 
Keff, wife of John R. Neff : 

" THE LATE JOHN R. NEFF. 

"On the 23rd of July, in the present year (1863), 
" died, at his residence, l^o. 328 Spruce Street, in the 
" city (Phila.), John R. Neff, in the 75th year of his 
" age, an old and respected merchant. Mr. N"eff com- 
" menced life with but few advantages, and he is in- 
" debted to his energy and mercantile talent for that 
" advancement which took him through life success- 
" fully, and enabled him to enjoy, in his old age, the 
" ease and comfort which are secured by affluence. 
" He^was born in the village of Frankford, in Phila- 
" delphia County, in the year 1789. He received a 
" fair education for the time in which he lived, but 
" enjoyed no extraordinary advantages beyond the 
" ordinary tuition of the common school. His prefer- 
" ences inclined to the mercantile profession, and, at 
" a proper age, he was placed in the counting-house 
" of Messrs. Israel, shipping merchants, Front Street, 
203 where 



" where he acquired a thorough knowledge ot the 
" shipping business and of the general principles reg- 
" ulating trade. After he was of age, he continued 
" in the position of clerk, until he had acquired suffi- 
" cient headway to trust to his own efforts. This 
" happy time for him arrived about the year 1815, 
" when he was in the 26th year of his age. He sought 
" an entrance into the western trade, and established 
" himself near the center of that traffic, at No. 266 
" Market Street, which was near Eighth; but he 
"did not long remain in that location, but resolved 
" to turn his attention to shipping interests. In 1817 
" he entered into partnership with his brother, "Will- 
" iam Neff, and the firm established itself at the well- 
" known property of Latimer and Murdock, which 
" extended from the wharf to E"o. 67 l^orth Water 
" Street, and was on the north side of the second 
" alley above Arch Street. The two brothers kept 
" their dwelling at No. 295 Market Street, from which 
" John R. Neff removed, some 3'ears afterwards, to 
" No. 7 South Ninth Street. The firm of John R. 
" and William Neff afterwards removed to No. 37 
" North Water Street, which was below Arch Street, 
" in the square occupied by Stephen Girard, Sam'l 
" Y. Anderson, Gustavus and Hugh Calhoun, Mont- 
" gomery and New^bold, Smith and Ridgway, and 
" others. About 1822 the firm of J. R. and W. Neff 
" was dissolved, with a view to the formation of a new 
" firm — Neff and Brothers, of Cincinnati, Ohio, which 
" was composed of J. R. Neff, William Neft", and 
204 another 



" another brother. The two latter removed to Cin- 
" cinnati. In the west this house was principally en- 
" gaged in the shoe business, and it was one of the 
" largest concerns in Ohio. Subesequently, the busi- 
" ness was extended to Louisville, in Kentucky, where 
" it was represented by ISTeff, Wanton and Compan3^ 

"At No. 37 North Water Street Mr. Neff remained 
" for several years, but, finally, he removed to No. 6 
" North Wharves, which was, we believe, the last es- 
" tnblishment occupied by him. 

"The business of the Neffs in this city and in the 
" western states was extensive and prosperous, and 
" yielded all the partners very profitable returns. The 
" shipping branch was managed by John R. Neff, 
" who established connections with Savannah and 
" other southern ports. His vessels were known as 
" regular packets, and the care and attention bestowed 
" upon the line won general confidence. The brig 
" Francis was a favorite in this line, and was for many 
" years safely navigated from port to port by an old- 
" fashioned seaman, faithful and careful, whose name 
" we will omit, for prudential reasons. The Captain 
" died while in the employment of Mr. Neflf", leaving 
" his family in fair circumstances. But the widow 
" unexpectedly found a generous friend in John R. 
" Nefi. He had kept a regular account of the earn- 
" ings of the brig, and knew how much he had been 
" indebted for its profitable voyages to the care and 
" prudence of the Captain. After the death of this 
" faithful seaman, Mr. NefF balanced the account of 
205 the 



" the earnings of the brig, and footed up what he 
" thought was due, not legally, but generously, as the 
*' Captain's share. We need not say that when Mr. 
" Neff waited upon the widow, and presented her 
" with a check for several thousand dollars, as a debt 
" which, in his own mind, he considered that he owed 
" the Captain, she was overwhelmed by this noble 
" act, which she had no right to expect, as the Cap- 
" tain had always been paid according to his agree- 
" ment. There are few instances that can be named 
" of similar liberality, and the simple narration of the 
" circumstances tells more than volumes could of the 
" kindness and generosity of John R. Keff. 

" Henry Sloan and Charles P. Relf, two of our most 
" estimable citizens, were clerks, about 1821, in Mr. 
" iTeft's store. The excellent qualifications of Mr. 
" ITeflF, and his standing as a merchant, naturally drew 
" him into public positions of trust and responsibili- 
" ties. He was a Director of the Bank of the United 
" States in its best days, and enjoyed the friendship 
" and esteem of the leading men who were then en- 
" gaged in the management of the institution. He 
" was a Director of the old Saving Fund, that venera- 
" ble and responsible society which has ever been 
" managed with justice and with a prudent and hon- 
" est regard to the interest of the worthy poor people 
" who have intrusted their little accumulations to the 
" care of its officers. He was also connected with the 
" well-established and ever-reliable ' Insurance Com- 
" pany of North America,' and gave to its concerns 
206 much 



*' much of his valuable time and attention. The 
" Provident Society and associations of benevolence 
" and charity also engaged his care. To all them he 
" was a valuable and liberal friend. 

"In political life he enjoyed some of the honors of 
" his fellow-citizens. He was a member of the Legis- 
" lature when that trust was honorable alike to the 
" delegate and to his constituents. He served in the 
" General Assembly for two terms. He was also a 
" member of the City Councils, during the good old 
" times when the city was bounded north by Vine 
" Street and south by Cedar Street, and he was a 
" member of the committee on Girard estates at the 
" time when measures were taken to construct the 
" mao;ui±icent colleare edifice which the merchant and 
" mariner had bounteously provided for. 

" Mr. Nejff attached himself, at an early age, to the 
" First Presbyterian Church, of which Rev. James P. 
" Wilson was pastor. He worshiped in the old edi- 
" fice at the corner of Bank and Market Streets. 
" When the congregation removed to Washington 
" Square, Mr. Neff went with them, and he sat for 
" many years under the preaching of the now ven- 
" erable successor to Dr. Wilson, the Rev. Albert 
" Barnes. To every society of a benevolent char- 
" acter under Presbyterian control he was a liberal 
" giver; but he did not confine his charities to the 
"■ sect with which he was affiliated. He was an open 
*' friend of all good works, no matter by what sect 

207 they 



" they might be projected, and his hand and his heart 
" were always ready to alleviate the distressed. 

" Mr. 'NaS married Miss Bird, a daughter of the 
" well-known citizen, Charles Bird, hardware mer- 
" chant, who was once established in active business 
" at IS'o. 98 Market Street. Mr. Bird brought up 
" many excellent young men, who afterward became 
" noted among our first merchants. We may men- 
*' tion in this connection the fact that the brothers 
" Earp — Thomas, Robert and George — were brought 
" up in that store. They were the founders of the 
" well-known firms of Earps and Baxter and Earps 
" and McMain. 

" John K. Neft" leaves behind him that most precious 
" bequest of the merchant — a good name. He was 
" kind, generous, and just. During the latter years 
" of his life he suffered much from disease, but he 
" bore his afflictions with a noble fortitude, and proved 
" how meek and cheerful the true Christian can meet 
" alike the smiles of health and the trials of sickness. 
" He left a large property to his representatives, which 
" is computed to be worth at about half a million of 
" dollars — all honestly earned, and remaining, after 
" many generous and continued benefactions. 

"While attempting a slight tribute to the memory 
" of this lamented gentleman, it would be impossible, 
" within the limits proposed, to offer any fine analysis 
" of character, or to enter on any extended biography ; 
" while, on the one hand, the space usually assigned 
208 to 



" to a newspaper article of this description, would 
" forbid this, upon the other a consideration for views 
" and tastes which were his well-known characteris- 
" tics would equally operate to restrain us. 

"Born in the year 1789, at Frankford, the village 
" which, just north of the city, then had an independ- 
" ent existence, Mr, Neff, in boyhood, entered the 
" service of a raerchantile house [here in Philadel- 
" phia] which was then among the most prominent. 
" Prompt, accurate, and careful, his advancement was 
" rapid and success early assured. Viewing the ex- 
" perience and incidents of this mercantile pupilage 
" as contributing largely to the formation of his char- 
" acter, they continue to be among the most pleasant 
" recollections of his latest days. Enterprises on his 
" own account, entered upon in early manhood, it is 
" believed, were ahke successful; but, in conjunction 
" with his brothers, in the cities of Cincinnati, Ohio, 
" and Louisville, Kentucky, some forty-five years 
" ago, he commenced large mercantile establishments, 
" whose business, through a series of years, proved 
" eminently remunerative. These houses — N'eif and 
"Brothers, of Cincinnati, Ohio; I^eiF, Wanton and 
" Company, of Louisville, Kentuckj-— enjoyed a rep- 
" utation among the highest. Tliese engagements, 
'• however, in a private capacity, did not prevent his 
" early call to public service — first, as representative 
" of the city, in the State Legislature, and, subse- 
" quently, as a member of both branches of the City 
" Council. It is believed by the writer that he was 
209 at 



" at the head of the committee in select council with 
" whom originated the splendid edifice provided by 
" Stephen Girard's munificence. Identified, too, with 
" institutions, both of a business and benevolent char- 
" acter, he devoted to their services, conscientiously 
" and unselfishly, all those powers, mental and moral, 
" which contributed to his success in a private ca- 
" pacity, and, it is believed, his record in connection 
" with the Provident Society, the Philadelphia Sav- 
" ing Fund Society, and Insurance Company of K'orth 
" America, will exhibit nothing to be regretted. 
" While retaining, until the close of life, a warm in- 
" terest in these latter institutions, his active partici- 
" pation in their business had ceased, through bodily 
" infirmity, sev^eral years since. 

" Through a series of years Mr. ITeff was connected 
" as a Director with the Bank of the United States ; 
" but, whatever unhappy memories may be associated 
" with that institution, no measure of policy ad- 
" vanced by him ever contributed to its decay. Pos- 
" sessing the unlimited confidence of the distinguished 
" gentleman who was its presiding officer for so many 
" years, his counsel was peculiarly valued on many 
" trying occasions, and, it is believed, results fully 
" proved this estimate of his sagacity. Unless the 
" writer is greatly mistaken in his recollection, the 
" presidency of the institution was at one time within 
" his reach, but his private business, independent of 
" other considerations, constrained his declinature 
" of it. 

2X0 "While 



""While no sectarian, Mr. !N"eff was yet a decided 
" Christian and warmly attached to the denomination 
" within whose pale he was born and reared, and 
" hence the various institutions pertaining to that 
" branch of the Christian Church [the Presbyterian], 
" and, no less so, those of a more general character, 
" enjoyed largely of his sympathy, and towards them, 
" constantly, for many years, flowed his many bene- 
" factions. Much more might be written in regard to 
" this aspect of his character, but it can be more ap- 
" propriately furnished by other hands. 

"An invalid for some years, and enjoying a compe- 
" tency, Mr. l!^eff sought and secured within his 
" peaceful home that great requisite to his bodily 
" comfort, as he was wont to terra it, peace of mind. 
" Tumultuous as were passing events [during the civil 
" war], their disturbing influences were not permitted 
" to reach him, and thus, amidst this voluntary se- 
" elusion, the latter years of his life were passed. 

"IsTot more serenely do evening shadows fall when 
*' the day is o'er than closed his earthly existence, 
" leaving, as we are persuaded, memories the most 
" pleasant among all who were associated with him, 
" either in business or social life. A." 

This article appeared in a Philadelphia newspaper, 
on August 11, 1863, and was written by Alexander 
Boyd. 

Mr. Neff died July 23, 1863 ; was buried at Laurel 
Hill Cemetery. 

2X1 John 



Joha Rudolph Neff, son of Peter and Rebecca ll^eff, 
was born January 12, 1789 ; died July 23, 1863. 

On the 28rd September, 1817, he married Caroline 
Bird, of Philadelphia, Penn. 

Their children were : 
Jane Bird iTeff, Deceased, 

William Peter IsTeff, " 

Rebecca Neff, Deceased in childhood, 

John Rudolph JSTeff, Jr., " " " 

Charles l^eff. Deceased, 

George Washington ITeff, Deceased in childhood, 
James P. W. l!^eff. Deceased, 

John R. I^eff, Jr. 

Grandchildren of John Rudolph Keff. 
M. Jennie Williams, daughter of Jane B. Neff, who 
married Cyrus M. Williams. 



Rudolph Neff, Deceased, 

Clark Williams Neff, 

Frank iN'eff, Deceased, 

, Mary C. Fefi', 

Percy Neff, 

Caroline B. Neff, Deceased, 

Charles Neff, 
Children of William Peter Neff, who married iJTarcissa 
Williams. 



Caroline 'Neft, Deceased, 

Joseph Seal 'NeS, 

Children of Charles N'eff, who married Mary Seal. 
2X2 Fannie 



Fannie B. Neff", 

Child of Charles JSTeff, who married Louisa Badger, a 

second wife. 



Eudolph Lee Neff, 
Il^Tarcissa Neff, 
Sarah Josephine Neff, 
Jonathan Cilley Neff, 
Children of John R. Neff, Jr., who married Josephine 
M. Gillej. 



Great-grandchildren of John Rudolph Neff. 

Edith Cole, 

Natalie Cole, 

Children of M. Jennie Williams, who married George 

B. Cole. 



Leonora Gurley, 
Child of Caroline B. Neff", who married Henry Gurley. 



William Neff Armel, 
Child of Mary C. Neff*, who married William J. Armel. 



2X3 



252 John Kudolph Neff, 

Born January 12, 1789. 
Married September 23, 1817. 4 
Died July 23, 1863. 



252 Caroline Bied Neff, 

Born December 4, 1799. 
Married September 23, 1817. 6 
Died May 29, 1843. 



Jane Bird, 

Born August 17. 1818. _ 
Married Cyrus M. Williams. 
Died March 28, 1850. 



William Peter, 

Born November 14, 1819. 
Married Narcissa Williams. 
Died November 19, 1877. 



Rebecca, 

Born January 1, 1821. 
Died January 4, 1823. 



John Rudolph, 

Born April 10, 1824. 
Died April 4, 1826. 



e* Charles, 
S Born May 25, 1825. 
o Married, 1st, Mary Seal; 
2nd, Louisa Badg;er. 
Died September 20, 1871. 



George Washington, 
Born July 8, 1826. 
Died September 27, 1832. 



James P. W., 

Born September 4, 1827. 

Married. 

Died September 24, 1855. 



John Rudolph, 

Born October 2, 1828, 
Married Josephine M. Cilley. 
Died. 



2X4 



2521 Cyrus M. Williams, 

Born March 15, 1822. 
Married June 10, 1847. 1 

Died June 20, 1884. 



2521 Jane Bird Nefp Will- 
iams, 

Born August 17, 1818. 
Married June 1 0, 1847. 
Bied March 28, 1850. 



Caroline Nefi", 
Born November 18, 1848. 
Died November 18, 1848. 



M. Jennie, 
Born March 21, 1850. 
Married George B. Cole. 
Died. 



2X5 



25212 George B. Cole, 

Bom January 26, 1838. 
Married February 25, 1880. 
Died. 



25212 M. Jennie Williams 
Cole, 3 

Boin March 21, 1850. 
Married February 25, 1880. 
Died. 



(Residence, Baltimore, Md.) 



Edith, 

Born June 5, 1881. 

Married. 

Died. 



g Natalie, 

3 Born February 9, 1884. 

^ Mai-ried. 

- Died. 



Born November 29, 1885. 
Married. 
Died. 



216 



2522 William Peter Neff, 

Born November 14, 1819. 
Married December 14, 1846. 
Died November 19, 1877. ^ 



2522 Narcissa Williams 
Neff, 
Born January 25, 1826. 
Married December 14, 1846. 
Died. 



(Residence, Cincinnati, O.) 



John Rudolph, 
Born November 1, 
Married. 
Died January 31, 1876. 



1847. 



Clark Williams, 

Born September 7, 1849. 

Married. 

Died. 



Frank Livingston, 
Born October 8, 1851. 
Died November 26, 1867. 



Mary C, 

Born July 5, 1853. 
o Married William J. Armel. 
2: Died. 



Percy Hastings, 
Born July 17, 1855. 
Married. 
Died. 



Caroline B., 

Born June 20, 1857. 
Married Henry Gurley. 
Died September 6, 1884. 



Charles S., 

Born November 13, 1860. 

Married. 

Died. 



James P. W., 

Born February 1. 1863. 
Died July 18, '1865. 



217 



25224 William J. Aemel, 

Born November 24, 1844. 
Married December 31, 1883. 
Died. 



25224 Mary C. Neff Armel, 

Born July 5, 1853. 
Married December 31, 1883. 
Died. 



(Residence, Cincinnati, O.) 



g William Neff, 

^ Born November 16, 1884. j 

§ Married. 

2. Died. 



218 



25226 Henry Gurley, 

Born Januarj"^ 2, 1857. 
Married April 22, 1880. 
Died. 



25226 Caroline B. Neff 
Gurley, 
•Born June 20, 1857. 
Married April 22, 1880. 
Died September 6, 1884. 



Leonora," 

Born February 11/1882. 
o Married. 
2 Died. 



^ Infant daughter, 

"• Died September 6, 1884. 



219 



2525 Charles Neff, 

Born May 25, 1825. 
Married June 19, 1849. 
Died September 20, 1871. 



2525 Maey Seal Neff, 

Born. 

Married June 19, 1849. 

Died March 22, 1854. 



Caroline, 

Born April 12, 1^50. 

Married. 
o Died June 18, 1873. 



3 Joseph Seal, 
o Born February 27, 1854. 
"" Married Harriet Ludlow, 
Died. 



'2525 Chaeles Neff, 

Married April 19, 1859. 



,2525 Louisa Badger Neff, 

Born. 

Married April 19, 1859. 

Died. 



o Fannie Badger, 

s Born. 

S" Married Samual Evans Ew- 

s ing. 

2. Died. 



220 



25252 Joseph Seal Neff, 

Born February 27, 1854. 
Married June 12, 1879. 
Died. 



25252 Harriet Ludlow 
Nefp, 

Born. 

Married June 12, 1879. 
• Died. 



(Residence, Philadelphia, Penn.) 



221 



25253 Samuel Evans Ewing 

Born. 

Married April 9, 1885. 

Died. 



25253 Fanny Badger Neff 
Ewing, 

Born. 

Married April 9, 1885. 
Died. 



222 



2528 John Rudolph Neff, 

Born October 2, 1828. 2 

Married May 6, 1852. 

Died. 



2528 Josephine M. Cilley 

Neff, 
Born April 10, 1832. 
Married May 6, 1852. 
Died. 



(Residence, Philadelphia, Penn.) 



Rudolph Lee, 

Born August 13, 1 53. 

Married. 

Died. 



Narcissa, 

Born December 8, 1856. 

Married. 
2 Died. 



Sarah Josephine, 
Born_ October 16, 1861. 
Married. 
Died. 



Jonathan Cilley, 

Born Auofust 22, 1866. 
Married Mary Bell Wampole. 
Died. 



223 



25284 Jonathan C. Neff, 

V Born Ausrust 22, 1866, 

Married December 27, 1884. 
Died. 



25284 Mary Bell Wampole 

Neff, 
Born. 

Married December 27, 1884. 
Died. 



(Residence, Philadelphia, Penn.) 



22^ 



CHAPTER XII. 

The following biography of William Nefi, written 
by his son, Peter ISTeff, was furnished by him at the 
compiler's request : 

" WILLIAM NEFF 

" Was born on the 7th day of February, 1792, at 
" Frankford, Penn. His parents were Peter and Re- 
" becca i^eff. 

"In his early boyhood, he attended, with his 
" brothers and sisters, a small school, taught by an 
" old man named Samuel Morrow. It was his cus- 
" torn to use the rod pretty freely, and he would 
" throw it at the boy to be chastised, and make hira 
" bring it up to him to be used in the punishment 
" that followed. William's sister, Rebecca (Mrs. 
" Thomas J. Biggs), relates what she witnessed — 
" that, on one occasion, William went out to the pump 
" for water, and stayed too long; and, as usual under 
" such circumstances, the teacher threw his rod at 
" William, to bring up and take the whipping, which 
" he did, and then walked to his seat, picked up his 
" hat and books, and turning to ' Old Sammy,' said, 
" ' Good morning/ and walked, out of the school- 
225 room. 



" room, and he did not return to it. He afterwards 
" attended a ' Classical School,' taught by one Riley, 
" as principal, and a Mr. Glass, assistant in the class- 
" ics. At this school he passed several years in study, 
" and graduated with a thorough English course. 
" William was twelve years old when his father died. 
" In his sixteenth year, 1808, he began work as an 
" office boy in the commission house of Messrs. Gus- 
" tavus and Hugh Calhoun, in Philadelphia, Peun. 
" With this firm he served out his apprenticeship fully 
" and acceptably to his employers, and he was re- 
" warded by being sent by them to Lisbon, Portugal, 
" in 1813, as supercargo of a ship loaded with cotton. 
" The following is a copy of his original letter, and is* 
" expressive of his love and attachment for his home, 
" his invalid mother, sufiering from rheumatism, and 
" for his brothers and sisters: 

" 'I^EW York, Jan'y 19, 1813. 

" ' Mrs. Rebecca Neff, Frankford, Penn. — 
" ^Dear Mother, Brothers, and Sisters : I have now a 
" task before me, which seems almost beyond my un- 
" dertaking — the bidding farewell to mother, brothers, 
" and sisters (I may almost say to every thing), to all 
" that is dear to me in this world. On leaving Frank- 
" ford, I did not show much dissatisfaction, but, I as- 
" sure you, it was a task for me to leave it as I did. 
" I, however, now feel perfectly reconciled to leave 
" all, both relatives and friends, for a country where 
" I may have greater need for them, and find none ; 
220 where 



" where every soul will be a stranger; where I will 
" have business to transact, and know not with whom, 
" whether friend or foe. I expect to leave this place 
" for Savannah to-day, from whence you will hear 
" from me repeatedly. I hope not to be more than 
" ten days on our tvay from here there, and expect to 
" remain there about the same number of days ; to 
" proceed from thence to Lisbon, and, if fortunate, to 
" be in Frankford five or six months hence. John 
" has promised to write me often to Savannah, Geo., 
" and I hope that the rest of you will not forget me. 

" ' I beg to be remembered to all my friends, and 
" remain an affectionate son and brother, 
" ' William N'eff. 

« ' P. J. O. 

" ' 20th. Why should I think the task too hard to 
" leave my relatives and friends ? — 't is but for a mo- 
" ment, as it were, and then we shall meet again. Why 
" should I think it hard, when we all know 'tis for 
" nay benefit? I cheerfully resign myself to the will 
" of Providence, and trust to his goodness and mercy. 
" The British fleet are now at the Hook, and I expect 
" they will capture us. If they do, I shall see you 
" sooner than I expected. It now blows a fine N. W. 
" wind, and we proceed to sea immediately. Adieu. 
" Still affectionately, William I^eff.' 

" The good ship escaped the perils of the sea and 

" the British cruisers, and its cargo was safely dis- 

" charged. In Lisbon he found a friend in the Amer- 

227 lean 



" ican Consul. He remained at Lisbon several mouths, 
" and fully executed the orders of his employers. 
" Returning home, he took passage on another vessel, 
" but was not so fortunate in escaping the British, 
" for the vessel was captured on the high seas, and 
" William was taken a captive on board a British 
" man-of-war, and into Halifax, a prisoner. The 
" British officer at the Port of Halifax was found to 
" have been a friend of Peter ISTeff, of Frankford. 
" Embracing William, he asked how he came to be 
" there a prisoner (a happier conversation, my father 
" has told me, he never had). A parole was given 
" him, and he entered into the pleasures of the place. 
" An incident occurred while there which William 
" was always proud to relate ; it was being invited to 
" a ball on board a British man-of-war. He was 
" taken from shore in the officers' gig, but when he 
" reached the steps of the gangway to board the ship, 
" he saw that the stars and stripes of his country was 
" the carpet he would have to tread. At once he or- 
" dered the cockswain to put him ashore, and gave 
" his reason that he would not walk on the flag of his 
" country. The next day the officer, his friend, called 
" to explain, as an apology, that such a custom was 
" usual in times of war. To which William replied, 
" that it was not necessary to have invited him to the 
" ball. He was always very precise and neat in his 
" dress, and he frequently spoke of the prunellas and 
" knee-breeches, with gold buckles and silk stock- 

228 ings, 



" ings, which he wore on that occasion. The ruffled 
" shirt bosom he always wore till late in life. 

"In the early fall of 1813, he was released, and re- 
" turned in the noble ship, Koran, to Philadelphia. 
" He met all he had so reluctantly parted with in 
" January, finding himself the most changed of all, 
" by an experience of trials and responsibilities. His 
" mother and family rejoiced with William home 
" again, and likewise did the Calhouns rejoice over 
" the profits he laid on their desk, as the closing act 
" of his services in their commission house, resulting 
" from this successful adventure to Lisbon through 
" the British blockade. The future was now engaging 
" his thoughts. With satisfaction over the past, he 
" laid his plans midst the enjoyments of his home, 
" where, as a filial son, he had for so many years 
" shared its responsibilities and rejoiced in its happy 
" circle of domestic life. While he was at work in 
" Philadelphia, he went home regularly each week. 
" At this time, he was home only for a season, and it 
" seemed a dearer home than ever before. The man- 
" liness of his filial afiection was beautiful. 

"After a few months of leisure at home, he entered 
" upon a new career in life — old associations to be 
" severed, home and friends parted from, for a life 
" among strangers. His oldest brother, John Ru- 
" dolph, being established as a merchant in Phila- 
" delphia, took him into partnership in the winter of 
" 1813, and their card was printed. 

229 {Cojoy). 



« ' John R. and William Keff, 

" Philadelphia, Penn. 

" On the reverse side — 

■William ITeff, 

" Commission Merchant, 

*' Savannah, Geo.' 

"Arriving at Savannah, in the winter of 1813-14, 
" the following card was issued : 

{Cojpy). 
" * William ITeff, 

" Commission Merchant, 

" Savannah, Geo. 

" References to : 

" John C. Jones, Esq Boston. 

" Messrs. Divie, Bethune & Co.. New York. 

" Messrs. Gustavus and Hugh Calhoun. ..Philadelphia. 

" Frederick C. Graf, Esq Baltimore. 

" Christopher Fitzsimons, Esq Charleston.' 

"He remained in Savannah till spring of 1825, be- 
" ing eleven years there, engaged in business as a com- 
" mission merchant and cotton factor. He enjoyed 
" the respect and confidence of all who knew him. 
" Many associations and friendships were formed, 
" which continued through life. As for pastimes and 
" pleasures, incident to the times, he enjoyed hunting 
" and fishing. He was a member of Judge Berrien's 
" famous horse troop, and was very expert, winning 
" enviable distinction as a swordsman. He was ath- 
230 letic 



' letic and a great jumper. The varied pursuits of 
' his southern home engaged his interests and ener- 
' gies. Attentive to all the details of business, he 
' met with prosperity and success; reverses and losses 
' incident to business enterprises were shared. One 
' of their ships, loaded with cotton, was never heard 
' from, all aboard perishing in mid ocean ; as is sup- 
' posed, the ship was struck by lightning and burned 
' up,, as it was reported that a fire at sea was ob- 
' served, during a storm, at about the longitude their 
' ship should have been in at the time. His summers 
' were spent in the north and at Frankford, and the 
' journey he sometimes made in stage coaches. An 
' encounter with highwaymen one night caused him 
' to make the journey afterwards in sailing vessels. 
' The adventure was in this wise : while the stage 
' was jogging along, through a dismal forest in Yir- 
' ginia, and the only passenger, he heard a whistle. 
' This indicated trouble. He at once climbed out the 
' \Vindow to the top of the stage, and observed a man 
' climbing up the 'boot;' he fired his flint-lock pistol 
' at the man, and the driver refusing to whip up the 
' horses, he seized the reins and put the horses to 
' their speed. Words ensued with the driver, but he 
' was overawed, and so the danger passed. He was 
' always convinced that this driver was in league 
' with the parties in the woods, and that his fearless 
' and prompt action saved the treasure he was con- 
' veying, and probably saved his life. Even to a 

231 much 



" much later day, such risks were taken in trans- 
" porting money. 

"Misfortunes in business resulted in their adven- 
" tures in cotton, and William began to plan a busi- 
" ness life at the north in the far west. His desire to 
" leave the south was, at this time, strengthened by 
" what he knew and saw of slavery. He felt that 
"he would not rear a family midst slaves; neither 
" could he own a slave. On one occasion, while on a 
" hunting trip at a friend's plantation, some distance 
" up the river, the slave that was usually appointed 
" by his master to be William's servant while a guest 
" he found bound in the stocks, and suffering from a 
" terrible whipping, given him by the overseer. He 
" could, of course, do nothing but inquire into the 
" case, and ask for the poor slave's release. During 
" the night death came to the poor fellow's relief. 
" The sad story, and its sequel, broke all his attach- 
" ment for plantation life. This trying expterience in- 
" creased his desire to move to the north, and business 
" not proving as successful as the}- had hoped, he de- 
" cided to close out their business in Savannah, and 
" to return north. This was early in the year 1825. 
" During his sojourn in Savannah, he formed an at- 
" tachment which bound him to the place. There 
" were two sisters, the Misses Wayne (whose parents 
" were dead), who lived with their uncle, Geo. An- 
" derson, Esq. Their charms were of such a different 
" character, and so marked, that they were desig- 
" nated as ' night' and ' morning.' Elizabeth Clifford 
232 Wayne 



" Wayne reciprocated William's attention and at- 
" tachment, and on the eve of his departure from Sa- 
" vannah, they became finally engaged to be married, 
" and arrangements were made for it when he should 
" be settled in his new business. lie then leit for the 
" north with a buoyant heart and strengthened de- 
*' terminations. 

"When he arrived at Philadelphia, the details of 
" business to be carried on in Cincinnati, Ohio, were 
" not long delayed in arranging. John Rudolph Neff, 
" the royal brother and capitalist in the new enter- 
" prise, took, as partners, William, Peter, and George 
" W. Il^eff, his three brothers, and William soon ar- 
" ranged for the long journey into the 'far west.' 
" His mother, with her sagacity and forethought, 
" asked her son whether he was engaged to be mar- 
" ried? William told her of his plans regarding this, 
" and she told them to the brother, John Rudolph, 
" who advised him to write Miss Wayne, and inquire 
" if she would not so far change the arrangement as 
" to consent to be married, an<l at once go west. The 
" advice was acted upon, and her consent was given, 
" so that William sailed for Savannah much sooner 
" than they had expected ; and on the 19th May, 1825, 
" William Neff married Elizabeth Clifford Wayne, 
" daughter of Richard Wayne, Esq., of English de- 
" scent. 

"They received a hearty welcome in the old stone 

" house, at Frankford, from all the family, A short 

" time was passed in making the final preparations 

233 for 



" for the move to Cincinnati. Meanwhile Clifford 
" won the affections of all the family, so that when 
" they departed it was the loss also of a daughter to 
" Rebecca and a sister to the children. The long and 
" weary journey ended, they soon began housekeep- 
" ing in the brick building at the south-east corner of 
" Sycamore and Fifth Streets, which was, at that 
" time, in the suburbs of Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1827, 
" they bought the middle one of the three brick 
" houses which stand on the south side of Fifth 
" Street between Sycamore and Broadway, and nearly 
" opposite the M. E, Church (then the old stone 
" building), Wesley Cliapel. Here they resided till 
" 1851, when they moved to his residence, old No. 419 
" West Sixth Street, west of Park Street. At this 
" residence William Neff died, in 1856. 

" It was ever a sad reflection of theirs, that they 
" never revisited their southern home, and there met 
" their numerous friends and relatives. Almost yearly 
" they visited the east, taking their children with 
" them, journeying by slow stages, generally in their 
"• private carriages ; frequent stops were made along 
" the Old National Road to enjoy fishing or hunting. 
" The hospitable landlords of the wayside inns af- 
" forded most enjoyable and comfortable quarters for 
" travelers. At Laurel Hill, among the mountains, 
" several days were usually passed. Their friends and 
" relatives from the south were met during their 
" visits at Philadelphia and other eastern places, and 
" they also had the pleasure of their occasional visits 
234 in 



" in their Ohio homes. Approaching Baltimore, in 
" 1833, they quitted the carriage to try the novel mode 
" of riding in the railway coach. 

" Their last visit to the old homestead and family, 
" in Frankford, v^^as made in 1833. Their return 
"journeys were often shortened by taking a steam- 
" boat at Pittsburg or Wheeling, carrying aboard, 
" also, the carriages and horses. 

"The mercantile and business firm of 'Neff and 
" Brothers' was established in 1825, doing a general 
" wholesale trade in hardware, queens ware, boots and 
" shoes, which proved very successful to all the broth- 
" ers. The firm occupied the building on the south- 
" west corner of Main and Columbia Streets. The 
" ground lease, for 99 years, was made by "William 
" for his brother, John R. Kefif", who continued to re- 
" side in Philadelphia. The buildings, which still 
" stand there, he erected on the ground lease. Dur- 
" ing the flood of 1832, the water stood about five feet 
" on the first floor of this building, and entrance was 
" made through the second-story window by rowing 
" in a yawl from Pearl Street. 

"Drays and transportation wagons were little used 
" in those days. There were no railroads, and no 
" ' commercial travelers' employed. Merchants came 
" in their canvas-covered ' Conastoga wagons,' some- 
" times called ' prairie schooners,' to make their semi- 
" annual purchases of goods, and carried their mer- 
" chandise back with them to their country stores, and 
" in many cases distant towns. The ways of con- 
235 ducting 



" ducting business, as well as the modes of living, 
" were, in many respects, essentially different from 
" what they now are. However, the sum of pleasure 
" and enjoyment, both in business and living, was not 
" the less on account of those modes which we would 
" deplore, if they could be now restored. 

"In 1836 William withdrew from the firm of ' ITeff 
" and Brothers,' and engaged in the pork and beef- 
" packing business, establishing himself at the north- 
*' west corner of Court and Vine Streets, and subse- 
" quently at the south-east corner of Yine and Canal 
" Streets, before the canal basin was abandoned. For 
" nearly nineteen years he was engaged in the pork 
" business. He then became a partner in the steam 
" sugar refinery, on Pearl Street between Elm and 
" Plum Streets, closing, at the end of life, a year of 
" successful business in sugars. 

" William Neff died on the 25th November, 1856, 
" and was entombed in his burial lot in Spring Grove 
" Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

"During the residence of William JSTetf in Cincin- 
" nati, covering a period of thirty-one years, he was 
" active in public enterprises and zealous in good 
" works and investments for the prosperity of the 
" city. 

"In 1829 he was a Director of the U. S. Branch 
" Bank, etc., associated with Peter Benson, Robert 
" Buchanan, and other pioneers. He served as di- 
" rector and president of turnpike and bridge com- 
" panics ; at one time, as President of the 0. & M. R. R. 
236 He 



" He was an importer and breeder of fine stock — 
" Durham cattle, Berkshire hogs, and Southdown 
" sheep — on his once famous Cheviot farm (after- 
" wards the home of the late Hon. Clias. Robb). 

"For full accounts of his farming operations and 
" horticulture, refer to the volumes of the 'American 
" Farm and Garden,' published at Cincinnati, 1832 to 
" 1842. His devotion to agriculture, horticulture, 
" and raising of fine stock extended to his large farm 
" in Edgar County, Illinois, from 1836 to 1852 ; also, 
" to his Yellow Springs farm, in Greene County, 
" Ohio, from 1842 up to the time of his death. Here, 
" as well as enjoying the pleasures of his farm and 
" rural home, he so generously and happily dispensed 
" his hospitalities to relatives and numerous friends, 
" in whose memory the couplet, William N^efF and 
" the Yellow Springs, awaken recollections of happy 
" associations, joyous days of the past, which can 
" not be lived over again, yet are fresh in memory's 
" store-house of pleasures that never will be for- 
" gotten. 

" William 'NeQ was not an aspirant in politics — an 
" old-line Whig, a conservative, and had' a well-bal- 
" anced mind ; his judgment was good. He was on the 
" committee which located the ' Methodist Episcopal 
" Book Concern' at the corner of Eighth and Main 
" Streets, though he urged the corner of Fourth and 
" Main Streets as a better site for it ; also, to locate 
'' the Custom House at the corner of Fourth and 
" Vine Streets, with Josiah Lawrence and others. He 
237 was 



" was one of the incorporators of the Spring Grove 
" Cemetery, January, 1845. He was an active mem- 
" ber of the ' Cincinnati Cliamber of Commerce.' On 
" the great questions of his time — temperance and 
" slavery — he had his share of duty and responsibility. 
" With reference to the temperance question, he acted 
" on the Apostolic injunction, to be 'temperate in all 
" things;' looking at prohibition, in its moral, polit- 
" ical, and legal aspects, he firmly concluded that the 
" traffic in liquors should be regulated, restrained, and 
" controlled by legislative enactments, and that the 
" public intemperate man should be punished. He 
" believed, that if a pure, unadulterated wine could 
'' be produced, so cheap that all could be supplied, 
" this would afford an efficient check to the evils of 
" strong drink. He would have the young reared 
" midst the evils and temptations of intemperance, 
" with the same vigilant care and watchfulness as are 
" exercised over them regarding the various other 
" social evils and temptations. He believed that legal 
" enactments, prohibiting intemperance and the com- 
" mission of crime, do not work out reformation of 
" character; but that laws were for the punishment 
" of offenders, and not against opinions, but against 
" acts and crimes. 

" As a Christian philosopher, he felt the religion of 
" Jesus Christ was the only efficient and appointed 
" remedial agent for all the sins of men ; that any 
" other plan for saving men, body as well as soul, was 
" derogatory to the Divine will and plan, and always 
238 a 



" a failure; that, until the heart is first renewed and 
" made right by the power of the Holy Spirit, that no 
" prohibitory legislation could legislate men to be 
" temperate in any thing. 

" The slavery question pressed issues upon him with 
" fearful forebodings. He was opposed to the exten- 
" sion of the demon of slavery into new territory ; 
" he was also opposed to interference with the insti- 
" tution in the slave states. He could not view, with 
" any allowance, the extreme measures of either the 
" Abolitionists, or the pro-slavery party. He well 
" knew the evils of the system; he abhorred it, and 
" felt that it was encompassed with so many evils to 
" the white people, that Georgia, with other southern 
" states, following the example and experience of 
" those northern states with their unprofitable slave 
" systems, would manumit their slaves by some equit- 
" able and just policy. The slave property, which, 
" by inheritance, fell to his estimable wife, was freed 
" under the laws of the state of Georgia, for she 
" shared her husband's feelings and sympathies on 
" this subject. While he would not countenance the 
" abduction of slaves, yet, when appealed to for aid 
" in behalf of a poor fugitive, he was ready to give 
" help for the fugitive's present necessity, and for his 
" journey onward into Canada. He was more ready and 
" willing to aid the fugitive from slavery when he had 
" escaped and gotten into a free state than he would to 
" be a party to any execution of the infamous 'Fu- 
" gitive slave law' for the capture of the fugitives. 
239 His 



" His strong anti-slavery feelings took deep hold upon 
*' the poor fleeing slave, and cases were not wanting 
" for iiim to practically exhibit his sympathies for the 
" colored people. During the ' ISTegro mob of 1841/ 
" he sheltered a number of colored people. It fre- 
" qaently happened that colored people were ' kid- 
" naped' or arrested and hurried across the Ohio 
" River, and put into jail in Kentucky. When un- 
" dergoing trial, they were almost always remanded 
" back to the party claiming such persons as their 
" slave property. The late Chief Justice S. P. Chase, 
" a friend and neighbor of William Neff, would often 
" plead the cause of such poor blacks. When it be- 
" came evident that the prisoner would be sent into 
" slavery, whether a runaway or not, then Mr. Chase 
" would, at times, confer with William JSTefF about 
" purchasing the black man or woman, as the case 
" might be, and it several times resulted in the pur- 
" chase of the slave from his master. He would then 
" execute the legal papers and manumit the slave. 
" Such freed colored people were full of gratitude, and 
" continued constant friends, and repaid their pur- 
" chase money. 

"I will relate one such incident that came under 
" the writer's own observation. It was the case of 
" one colored man, about twenty-five years old, named 
" Anderson, Avho had, about the year 1833, served my 
" father as coachman, and journeyed with the family 
" to Philadelphia, and returned, driving the baggage 
" wagon. My father always drove the family car- 
240 riage. 



" riage. It was observed that parties followed them 
" in their journeyings. After their return to Cincin- 
" nati, this Anderson was suddenly seized, while shak- 
" ing carpets in the vacant lot by the grave-yard 
" about Wesley Chapel, and hurried across the river 
" into jail in ITevvport, Ky. The trial would have 
" resulted in Anderson being sent back to slavery. 
" My father, with Mr. Chase, went into the jail, and 
" asked Anderson to tell them the truth, whether he 
" was a slave or not, and who was his owner. He 
" confessed that he was a slave, and the man claiming 
" him was his master, and then pleaded that he might 
" not be sent back into slavery. Whereupon, my 
" father purchased Anderson from his master for 
" eight hundred dollars, and gave him his freedom. 
" Anderson proved to be a good cook, and found em- 
" ployment on a New Orleans steamboat. Before he 
" had fully repaid his purchase, he was drawn over- 
" board, in bailing a bucket of water, and was 
" drowned. 

" Cynthia Pendleton, also freed by his aid, was able 
" to purchase several of her family out of slavery. 
" She lived to see her race set free, though it was by 
" the price of the war of the Rebellion; and also old 
" ' Maum Minty,' whose recent death, at the age of 
" over one hundred years, and who will be long re- 
" membered by many, owed her freedom to his aid 
" and protection. 

" William Neff died during the agitation that pre- 

" ceded the outbreak of the slave power into open war 

24X against 



" against freedom and the government. He feared 
'' bloodshed, and said, that if the south drev/ the 
" sword, that slaverj^ \yonld cease. 

" In educational matters ho took a deep and active 
" interest. For the preparation of his own sons for 
" college and business, he had a private instractor, 
" Mr. Montague Phelps, at his Yellow Springs resi- 
" dence. Some friends sent their sons also, and thus 
" formed a private school, of about fourteen boys, 
" from 1842 to close of 1846. In 1842 he was ap- 
" pointed one of the committee to report as to a suit- 
" able place for establishing 'an institution which 
*' should embrace all the branches of female educa- 
" tion.' This resulted in the foundation of the Wes- 
" leyan Female College of Cincinnati. He was also 
'• one of the first trustees of the Ohio Wesleyan Uni- 
'' versity, at Delaware, Ohio. He assisted O. M. 
" Mitchell, in his organization of the observatory on 
"• Mt. Adams, etc. 

"For over twenty-five years William and Elizabeth 
" Clifibrd ISTefi' were faithful, zealous Christians, and 
" earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
" being intimately associated with the events and 
" early history of Wesley Chapel, where they first 
"joined. They were very tolerant and charitable to- 
" wards those diftering in religious opinions and prac- 
" tices. Their piety Avas not that which judged 
" others by their own standards of belief and conduct. 
" In the broadest sense they lived and acted towards 
" others as the Saviour did when his Disciples would 
242 forbid 



" forbid those from casting out devils, because they 
" ' followed not with them ; ' when Jesus said to them, 
" 'forbid hira not, for he that is not against us is for 
" us.' They studied the Scriptures as their sole rule 
" of faith and practice, and followed Christ as their 
" pattern among men. They condemned hasty judg- 
" raent as unchristian. They made their Christianity 
" a joyous service, and used the good things of life 
" which God gave them without abusing them. They 
" wanted to make everybody about them, especially 
" the young, happy and cheerful. They entered into 
" the sports of young people, and 'rejoiced with them 
" that did rejoice.' In non-essentials, and in things 
" not forbidden in God's word, they were indulgent 
" and tolerant, desiring that every one should settle 
" the matters of his conduct and practice by his own 
" conscience with his God, and not have all square 
" their conduct by an inexorable and inflexible rule ; 
" while, on the fundamentals of Christianity, with- 
" out which no one can serve the Lord, they were 
" firm and exacting. Their faith was in the Gospel of 
" Jesus Christ. With such Christian tempers, it is 
" not surprising that they cast the mantle of benevo- 
" lence and moderation over many of the rules of 
" their church — those wherein the 'letter killeth, but 
" the spirit giveth life.' They allowed differences of 
" judgment and of conduct as perfectly consistent 
" with Christian character, and did not claim that the 
" right was always on one side ; nor did they cry, 
" ' The Temple of the Lord are we,' but, quietly and 
243 unobtrusively, 



"unobtrusively, they 'proved their faith by their 
" woi-ks.' They made their home a Christiau liouse- 
" hold, bright and cheerful, and the fireside was the 
" sportive place for amusements and instruction of 
" their joyous children. 

"These facts should be noted: that Elizabeth Clif- 
" ford Wayne was confirmed, at Savannah, by Bishop 
" Dehon, of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and 
" that her fervent evangelical piety exerted its influ- 
" euce for many years prior to her uniting with the 
" Methodist Episcopal Church at the same time her 
" husband, William 'Ne&, joined it. In Savannah he 
" attended Dr. Kolloch's Presbyterian Church. The 
" first years of their life in Cincinnati they were 
" members of Christ Protestant Episcopal Church, 
" under the rectorship of Dr. Johnson; afterwards, of 
" Dr. Aydelote. During the agitation of the slavery 
" question, for a while, they connected themselves 
" with Soule Chapel, and subsequently united with 
" the Park Street Methodist Episcopal Church; and 
" after his death, she quite frequently attended, with 
" her children, the Protestant Episcopal Church, many 
" of her friends and associates being members of 
" Christ Protestant Episcopal Church, under the pas- 
" torate of Rev. J. W. McCarty, Rector. 

" The following was written by the late Rev. Jas. 
" B. Finley, one of those wonderful pioneers of Meth- 
" odism whose fame is throughout the churches, and 
" was published in the Western Christian Advocate : 

244 " RECOLLECTIONS 



" RECOLLECTIONS OF WILLIAM NEFF, ESQ. 

"In 1831 I became acquainted with the late Will- 
" iam NefF, and have been intimately acquainted with 
" him ever since. He was early instructed in the 
" truths of Christianity by a pious widowed mother, 
" and was a firm believer in the inspiration and di- 
" vinity of the Bible; and this had its influence on 
" his heart, and swayed a scepter over his feelings 
" which often brought a deep conviction of the neces- 
" sity of experiencing its power. I was a witness to 
" the struggle of his soul seeking after God, and was 
" with him when he found the Pearl of great price. 
" His passage from death to life was clear, peaceful, 
" and triumphant, and, as pastor, I received him into 
" the church of Christ, and have been intimate with 
" him as a man and Christian till his decease. As a 
" Christian, he was practical and conscientious in the 
" discharge of all his duties to himself, his family, 
" and the church of his choice. He served in several 
" official relations : as a steward, his purse was al- 
" ways open in the support of the ministry and all 
" benevolent enterprises, and in this he had no su- 
" perior, that I know of; as a leader, he was atten- 
" tive and most affectionate in teaching those com- 
" mitted to his care how to fight the good fight of 
*' faith, and to lay hold on eternal life. But his 
" greatest attachment was to his class of children, of 
" whom he had a great number. He had a peculiar 
" talent for instructing them and leading their youth- 
" ful minds to the knowledge of God, the most of 
245 whom 



" whom afterwards became professing Christians and 
" useful members of the church of Christ. He often 
" conversed with me on the early instruction of chil- 
" dren, and said that the Sabbath-school, though ex- 
" cellent in its place, was not sufficient; but that they 
" ought to be classed, and catechised, and prayed 
" with, and taught the truth of experimental religion. 
" As a trustee, he was indefatigable and liberal in his 
" donations. 

" Brother Neff was a great friend of the poor, white 
" or black. I know whereof I speak. For the two 
" years I lived in his family I was his almoner, and 
" during the cold and searching weather, from ten to 
" fifteen dollars per day did I, from his hand, bear to 
" the homes of the needy and destitute, besides the 
" relief his kitchen afforded to the hungry and the 
" naked, and what his excellent wife distributed. He 
" was a safe counselor, both in spiritual and temporal 
" things, and often, for twenty-five years, I have 
" sought his counsel, and have never regretted that I 
" have followed his advice. He was a practical man ; 
" this is well known by the citizens of the city and its 
" business men as well as the church, and the worth 
" of such a man is rarely or properly appreciated in 
" society. He was vigorous, as well as practical, in 
" all his business undertakings, and, in general, suc- 
" cessful. He w^as a peacemaker in society, and often 
" to him was referred difficulties, both in commercial 
" as well as in religious associations ; for he was 
" honest, and his decisions were just and righteous. 
246 He 



" He was generous, and well do I know it. His gen- 
" erosity was not of that kind which lavishes kind- 
" ness on you in yoor presence, and as soon as your 
" back is turned, speaks of you with contempt, and 
" vilifies your character. He was no bigot; his soul 
" was not pent up with narrow, contracted views of 
" Christianity, but he extended the hand and the 
" heart of fellowship to all who feared God and 
" wrought righteousness. 

" He was a politician ; he loved his country ; he un- 
" derstood his own rights and his responsibilities as a 
" citizen, without the desire of the emoluments aris- 
" ing from office. His friendship was ardent, flowing 
" from a heart filled with love to God and man. It 
" was pleasant to be his associate, and of this I had 
" the pleasure for man}- years. 

"Reader, you ask, 'had your friend no faults?' 
" He had his faults incident to humanity, but as few 
" as fall to the lot of men ; and these I covered over 
" with the mantle of love, knowing my own, for love 
" covers over a multitude of our shortcomings. 

" But now he has gone. The Master has come and 
" called for him, and he was prepared to go, and to 
" go cheerfully. His faith was strong in God and the 
" power of his might; his soul was anchored by hope to 
" Him that was within the veil, sure and steadfast, and 
" did not fail him when Jordan's waves around him 
" rolled. He fully experienced God's promise recorded 
" in the 41st Psalm and first three verses ; read it. He 
" crossed Jordan at a bold point. His afilictions 
247 were 



" were short, but no murmur escaped his lips. Hav- 
" ing settled his temporal affairs and set his house in 
" order, he took his leave of his affectionate wife and 
" children, giving each his departing blessing and ad- 
"vice; then to his relations and friends, exhorting 
" all to prepare for death and to meet him in heaven. 
'' I can fancy I hear him singing, with the poet : 

" ' 0, wlio can tell a Saviour's worth, 

" Or speak of Grace's power; 

" Or benefits of a new birth 

" In a departing hour. 

" ' Come nigh, kind death, untie life's thread, 

" I shall to God ascend ; 

" In joys I there shall with him dwell, 

" Joys that shall never end. 

" ' Jesus, the vision of thy face 

" Hath overpowering charms; 

" Scarce shall I feel death's cold embrace, 

" If Christ be in my arms. 

" 'And when you hear my heart strings break, 

" How sweet the moments roll ; 

» A mortal paleness on my cheek, 

" But glory in my soul.' 

"May God comfort the widow, and children, and 
" friends, and bring them and us all to join him in 
" the eternal songs of the redeemed in heaven. 
" November, 1856. Jas. B. Finley.' 



" This occasion is taken to state some facts regard- 
ing our ancestors — the Wayne family, (De) Clifford, 
246 Smyth, 



" Smyth, and Gresham families — hoping that a full 
" history may be compiled of their descendants. 

" Richard "Wayne came from London, England, as 
"junior Major in the Royal Welsh Fusilier 23rd 
" E-egiment (Pierce Butler was senior Major), to the 
" American Colony, in South Carolina, about the year 
" 1760. The 14th September, 1769, he married Miss 
" Elizabeth Clifford, or De Clifford, the daughter of 
" Thomas (De) Clifford, of South Carolina, and he went 
" into mercantile life at Charleston, South Carolina. 
" With his family he moved to Savannah, Georgia, 
*' about the year 1780, where he died, in 1809. He 
" was a Tory. Their children were Eichard and Eliz- 
" abeth Clifford (twins), Mar}^ James Moore, Will- 
" iam Clifford, Thomas, Stephen. 

"Elizabeth Clifford married George Anderson, of 
" Savannah, Georgia. 

" Mary married Richard Montgomery Stites, of ^ew 
" Jersey. 

"James Moore Wayne married Mary Julia Camp- 
" bell, of Virginia. James Moore Wayne was As^o- 
" ciate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United 
" States. His wife survives him, now in her 94th 
" year. 

" William Clifford Wayne married Ann Gordon, of 
" Augusta, Georgia. 

" Thomas and Stephen died in their childhood. 

"Richard Wayne, the eldest child, was born at 

" Charleston, South Carolina, about 1771. Towards 

" the close of that century, he became a merchant at 

249 Augusta, 



" Augusta, Georgia, and in 1800 he married Julianna 
" Smyth, of Chestertowu, Kent County, Maryland. 
" She was educated in England. Her father, Thomas 
" Smyth, was a Colonel in the British army, and mar- 
" ried his cousin, Mary Greshara, and he was a Col- 
" onist. Julianna Smyth Wayne died on the 25th 
" April, 1807, at Savannah, Georgia, being 25 years 
" and 8 months of age. Richard Wayne was chief 
" foreman of the Savannah, Georgia, lire depart- 
" ment, and at a fire he received an injury which 
" caused his death, in December, 1822, and he was 
" buried on New Year's day, 1823. Their children 
" were: Mary Eliza Smyth (after the death of her 
" mother she was called Mary Julia Wayne). She 
" married Robert Pooler, of Savannah, Georgia. 
" Richard Wayne, who married Henrietta Harden, of 
" Savannah, Georgia. Thomas Smyth Wayne, who 
" married Eliza Caldw^ell Roe, of Savannah, Georgia. 
" Stephen Wayne, died eleven days old, soon after the 
" death of his mother, Julianna Smyth Wayne, in 
" 1807. Their daughter, the second child, Elizabeth 
" (De) Cliflbrd Wayne, was born at Savannah, Geor- 
" ffia, the 3rd Januarv, 1803. She married William 
" Neff, the 19th May, 1825, and she died at Cincinnati, 
"■ Ohio, tlie 18th October, 186J:, and was laid to rest 
" beside her husband in Spring Grove Cemetery. 



" This chapter would be incomplete without a trib- 
ute to the memory of Elizabeth Cliltbrd Wayne 
250 Neff. 



" 'Ne&. All who knew her, love to cherish recollec- 
" tions of her; her good influence is leavening, and 
" will continue to leaven so long as a descendant shall 
" remain to rise and call her blessed. Her good works 
" do follow her. 

"The following memorial was published, soon after 
" her death, by Miss J. M. Fuller: 

" TRIBUTE TO THE MEMORY OF MRS. E. CLIFFORD NEFF. 

" It is the duty of all to acknowledge in the dispen- 
" sation of Divine Providence; and while the 'rod is 
" heavy that smites,' it is especially the Christian's 
" privilege to bow meekly in resignation, and feel that 
" 'He doeth all things well.' The hand of God has 
" taken from our circle one whose blameless life and 
" Christian cliaracter pre-eminently fitted her for use- 
" fulness in this life, and for the blessings of that 
" which^ is to come. One of lil'e's brightest lights 
" went out when God took to himself our beloved 
" sister and friend, and we are left to cherish her 
" memory and emulate her many virtues. The church 
" has lost a consistent Christian, her family its guiding 
" star, society an ornament, the poor a friend, and the 
" Home Mission its long and faithful member. 

"Her life was truly spent in the cause of her Ke- 
" deemer, zealous in her work, and trne in all things; 
" the strong staff of Christian fortitude bore her up 
" when afflictions came, and as her days drew well 
" nigh to a close, the hand of the Saviour led her 
"safely through 'the dark valley;' and when the 
251 lamp 



lamp of life was nearly spent, the light of faith 
opened the way, and her pure spirit passed tri- 
umphantly in glory to its God. To her stricken 
family, relations, and friends, we tender heartfelt 
sympathies for their irreparable loss, and unite with 
them in mourning this sad bereavement. 

' 'T is sweet to die with Jesus nigh, 
The rock of our salvation.' 

Cincinnati, Ohio, "j J. M. Fuller, 

October, 1864. j In behalf of the Board of the 
Home Missions of the M. E. Church. 



" We can not live over again our childhood's happy 
days under our parents' roof; memory alone can 
go over the associations of those days. Time and 
changes can not efface these recollections ; and while 
we recall the pious, noble lives of our parents, let 
us, their children and grandchildren, aspire to their 
Christian faith and zeal, and seek to lay up in 
heaven ' treasures ' that shall unite us all again for- 
ever. 



"We have gathered these events in the lives of our 
" parents, not for public gaze, but for the guidance of 
" ourselves, taking the history of our dearest ones as 
" helps to our conduct, that we may make our lives 
" the more noble in all that constitutes true and 
" Cliristian character. 

252 The 



The descendants of "William and Elizabeth Clifford 
(Wayne) E'eff are : 

Children. 
Peter, 

William Clifford, 

Julian na Wayne, Deceased, 

Richard Wayne, Deceased, 

Richard Wayne Neff", Lieutenant, Company L, 4th 
Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, was killed at the battle of 
Chickamauga, at Craw-fish Springs, the 20th day of 
September, 1863. He was buried in 1864, in Spring 
Grove Cemetery. 

John Rudolph, Deceased, 

Elizabeth Clifford Wayne, Deceased, 
Montague Phelps, Deceased, 

Edmund Waggener Sehon, 
James Moore Wayne. 



Grandchildren. 
Elizabeth Clifford, 

Thomas J. Biggs, Deceased, 

William, Deceased, 

Rebekah, 
Peter, Jr., 
Children of Peter Neff, who married Sarah A. Biggs. 



Nicholas W. Thomas, Deceased, 

William, Deceased, 
Clifford Gordon, 
253 Kathrina L. 



Kathrina L., 
Theodore, 
Eliza Clifford, 
Children of William Clifford ISTeff, who married Ellen 
B. Thomas. 



Stewart Maurice, 
Child of M. Phelps ISTeff, who married Susan L. "Wood. 



Clifford Alfred, 
Nina Wayne, 
Edmund Eugene, 
Children of Edmund W. S. Neff', who married Estelle 
J. Fechet. 



Nettelton G., 
Richard Wayne, 
Louise A., 
Children of J. M. Waj' ue Neft', who married Lucille 
Nettelton. • 



254 



253 William Neff, 

Born February'!', 1792. 
Married May 19, 1825. 
Died November 25, 1856. 



253 Elizabeth Clifford 

Wayne Neff. 

Born January S, 180.3. 

Married May 19, 1825. 

•Died October 18, 1864. 



Peter, 

Born April 13, 1827. 
Married Sarah A. Biji 
Died. 



William ClifFord, 
Born April 8, 1829. 
Married Ellen B. Thor 
Died. 



Juliana, AVayne, 

Born September BO, 1832. 
Died February 8, 1837. 



Richard Wayne, 

Born January 23, 1835. 

Married. 

Died September 20, 1863. 

a . 

=r ■ 

£ John Rudolph, 

S Born June 25, 1837. 

o Died September 27, 1839. 



Elizabeth Clifford Wayne, 
Born January 30, 1P40. 
Died January 25, 1841. 



Montague Phelps, 

Born November 14, 1841. 
Married Susan L. Wood. 
Died February 8, 1886. 



Edmund Waggener Sehon, 
Born March 11, 1S43. 
Married Estelle J. Fecbet. 
Died. 



James Moore Wayne. 

Born April 9, 1847. 
Married Lucille Nettelton. 
Died. 



255 



2531 Peter Neff. 

Born April 13, 1827. 
Married February 27, 1850. 
Died. 



2551 Sarah A. Biggs Neff. 

r>orn June 15, 18'21. 
Married February 27, 1850. 
Died. 5 



(The above parties reside at Gambier, 
Knox County, Ohio.) 



Elizabeth Clifford, 
Born August 24, 1851. 
Married. 
Died. 



Thomas J. Biggs, 
Born March 30, 1856. 
Died February 19, 1860. 



William, 

2 Born February 1, 1858. 

£: Died January 20, 1860. 



o Eebekah, 

Born August 2, 186|. 

ed. 
Died. 



Peter, 

Born Marcb 15, 1863. 

Married. 

Died. 



256 



2532 William Clifford Neff. 

Born April 8, 1829. „ 

Married February 14, 1854. «* 
Died. 



2532 Ellen B. Thomas Neff, 

Born February 14, 1834. 5 

Married February 14, 1854. 
Died, 



(The above parties reside at Cincin- 
nati, O.) 



257 



Nicholas W. Thomas, 
Born April 25, 1855. 
Died June 23, 1855. 



Williara, 

Born November 6, 1856. 
Died November 9, 1856. 



Clifford Gordon, 
Born July 19, 1859. 
Married. 

_ Died. 



Katharina L. 

Born August 1, 1861. 

Married. 

Died. 



Theodore, 

Born January 24, 1868. 

Married. 

Died. 



Eliza Clifford, 

Born September 17, 1870. 

Married. 

Died. 



2537 Montague Phelps 

Neff. 
Born November 14, 1841. 
Miirried February 17, 186 
Died Fbbruary 8, 1886. 



1 I E Stewart Maurice, 
Born June 3, 1866. 
Married. 
Died. 



2537 Susan L. Wood Neff. 

Born May 10, 

Married February 17, 1863. 

Died. 



258 



2538 Edmund Waggenek 1 
Sehon Neff. 

Born March 11, 1848. 
Married July 18, 1866. 
Died. 



2 



2538 Estelle J. Fechet 
Neff. 
^Born February 22, 1848. 
Married July 18, 1866. 
Died. 



(The above parties reside at Cleve- 
land, O. 



Clifford Alfred, 

Born May 5, 1867, at 

vannah, Ga. 
Married. 
Died. 



o Nina Wayne, 

S Born December 20, 1869, at 

^ Yellow Springs, O. 

3 Married. 

o Died. 



Ednruind Eugene, 

Born February 3, 1872, at 

Port Huron, Mich. 
Married. 
Died. 



259 



2539 James Mooee Wayne 1 
Neff. 
Born April 9, 1847. 
Married September 30, 18G8 
Died. 



2539 Lucille Nettelton 

Neff. 
Born April 8, 1848. 
Married September 30, 1868 
Died, 



^^natf ^0^^ parties reside at Cincin- 



Nettelton, 

Born September 25, 1869. 

Married. 

Died. 



Richard Wayne, 

g Born April 27, 187 
^ Married. 
S Died. 



Louise Agniel, 
Born July 17, 1875. 
Married. 
Died. 



200 



CHAPTER XIII. 

REBECCA NEFF. 

The ensuing chapter, containing the history of Ke- 
becca ISTefi', the last surviving member of the family 
of Peter and Rebecca Neff, is contributed for the 
use of the compiler by her daughter, Sarah A. Biggs 
N'elf: 

" Rebecca jSTefi' was born on the 1st day of May, 
" 1796, in Frankford, Penn. She was the second 
" daughter of Peter and Rebecca IsTeff ; was educated 
" at Madam George's school, Philadelphia. In her 
" twenty-fifth year she married Thomas J. Biggs, 
" Pastor of the Presbyterian Church, Frankford, of 
" which her grandfather, Rudolph J^efF, had been one 
" of the founders. The marriage took place on the 
" 7th of September, 1820, her sister, Mary, and Miss 
" Castor, with the late Rev. Dr. Hodge, of Princeton, 
" and the Rev. Dr. Steele, of Abington, Penn., being 
" tbe attendants on the occasion. They continued to 
" live in Frankford until the year 1832, during which 
" time six children were born. In that year Rev. Mr. 
" Biggs received a call to the Presidency of "Washing- 
" ton College, Pennsylvania, but declined it to accept 
" a call to a Professorship in Lane Theological Sem- 
26X iuary, 



" inary, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, Ohio, where an en- 
" dowment had been made, conditioned npon the Rev. 
" Mr. Biggs filling the chair. The journey from 
" Frankford to Cincinnati, at that time, required a 
" week of tedious traveling, which they undertook, 
" with five children, the oldest son, Joseph, having 
" gone out with his father the year previous, where 
" he remained with his relatives. 

"At Walnut Hills, as a Professor, Rev. T. J. Biggs 
" remained for six years. When the division in the 
" Presbyterian Church took place, he resigned his 
" position, and accepted a call to Cincinnati College, 
" as President, in 1838. They then removed to the 
" city. His administration there was successful, but 
" the college building was burned down, and the col- 
" lege suspended. On the 27th October, 1845, he en- 
" tered upon the Presidency of Woodward College, 
" and held the office until the organization of the 
" Woodward High School. Later he spent a few 
"years in the pastorate of the Fifth Presbyterian 
" Church. The latter position he held until failing 
" health necessitated his retiring from all active labors, 
" except that he continued his position as President 
" of the Board of Directors of the House of Retuge 
" until his death, and where he loved to go as long as 
" his health permitted him to ride. Some years pre- 
" vious to his death he was connected with the orgau- 
" ization of the Seventh Presbyterian Church, on 
" Broadway, Cincinnati. In short, his labors were 

232 always 



" always directed toward the promotion of Christ's 
" kingdom. 

"The following extract, from a Cincinnati paper, 
" which appeared shortly after his death, gives, in 
" brief, a history of his life : 

" 'DEATH OF DR. BIGGS. 

" 'Another name is added to the long list of aged Cin- 
" cinnatians, deceased within the last twelve months; 
" and another vacancy occurs to remind us that the 
" generation of noble men who laid the foundations 
" of our city, and contributed largely to establish 
" those Christian and educational institutions, the ad- 
" vantages of which we now so fully eiijoy, are rap- 
" idly disappearing. Yesterday, Rev. Thomas J. Biggs, 
" D.D., was called to his rest. This announcement 
" will not surprise those \Aho were aware of the con- 
" dition of the health of the deceased for some time 
" past; but the announcement of his death will, nev- 
" ertheless, be received with sorrow by our citizens, 
" who have known him from his long connection 
" with the religious and educational interests of Cin- 
" cinnati, and who esteemed and loved him for his 
" many excellent qualities. Faults, he had few; vir- 
" tues, he had many; enemies, he had none; iriends, 
" they were as numerous as his acquaintances. If he 
" has not enjoyed the fame of great men, in the gen- 
" eral acceptation of tluit term, he has been rever- 
" enced as a father in Israel, and as a meek, faithful, 
" and consistent Christian. 

263 Dr. 



" ' Dr. Biggs was born in Philadelphia in the year 
" 1787. He graduated at l^assau Hall, and afterward 
" studied for the ministry at Princeton Theological 
" Seminary, then under the care of Rev. Archibald 
" Alexander, D.D. He afterward was a tutor in 
" Princeton College, and thence removed to Frank- 
" ford, near Philadelphia, where he became Pastor of 
" the Presbyterian Church, and married Rebecca ISTeff, 
" who, after a union of over forty years, survives 
" him. In 1832 he removed to Cincinnati, and be- 
" came one of the professors in Lane Theological 
" Seminary, at its organization. The professorship 
" was endowed by friends at the east expressly for 
" him. Here he remained many years, till the unfor- 
" tunate division in the Presbyterian Church, when 
" he resigned his professorship, and became President 
" of the Cincinnati College, with the lamented Gen- 
" eral O. M. Mitchell and Charles L. Telford among 
" the members of the faculty. He remained Presi- 
" dent of Cincinnati College till its suspension, and 
" then was called to the Presidency of Woodward 
" College, of which he had charge for several years. 
" When Woodward College became a high school, he 
" resigned the Presidency of the institution and be- 
" came Pastor of the Fifth Presbyterian Church, in 
" this city. The growing infirmity of age pressed 
" upon him, and after one or two years of pastoral 
" labor, he resigned his charge, and retired from pub- 
" lie life, except that he continued to serve as Presi- 
" dent of the Board of Directors of the House of 
264 Refuge. 



" Refuge. He was the last surviving member of the 
" convention that founded the American Bible So- 
" ciety.' 

"And the following letter, addressed to his son-in- 
" law, describes his connection with the American 
" Bible Society : 

" 'New York, Jan. 25, 1882. 

" ' Peter IiTeff, Esq., Gambler, Ohio — 

^'- '■ Dear Sir: The American Bible Society was or- 
" ganized in this city in May, 1816, by a convention 
" of delegates from numerous local Bible societies. 
" Among those delegates, I find enrolled the name of 
" Mr. Thomas J. Biggs, representing the Nassau Hall 
" Bible Society, which had been organized three years 
" earlier, at Princeton, New Jersey. By vote of 'the 
" board of managers, all the members of the conven- 
" tion were made directors for life in the American 
" Bible Society. In the annual report for 1820, Mr. 
" Biggs's address appears as Rev. Thomas J. Biggs, 
" Frankford, Penn. 

" ' I do not know of any thing more than this in 
" relation to his connection with the early history of 
" an institution which became at once so conspicuous, 
" and has flourished, with God's blessing, for two- 
" thirds of a century, to the great advantage of the 
" world. Yours, respectfully, 

" ' Edward W. Gilman, 

« ' Cor. SecJ 

" Dr. Biggs's death occurred on the 9th of February, 

" 1864, leaving his wife and six children, all married 

265 save 



" save one daughter, Rebecca, who, with her mother 
" and Maria, the youngest daughter, and her husband, 
" William H. Andrews, remained in the old home- 
" stead, 1^0. 332 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. The 
" daughter, Rebecca, died on the 31st of August, 
" 1865, and Mr. Andrews's' death occurred eight 
" months later. These events left the mother, Mrs. 
" Biggs, and her daughter, Maria [Mrs. W. H. An- 
" drews], with one child alone in the old home. 
" Shortly the housekeeping there was broken up, the 
" property sold, and they all removed to the home of 
" the eldest daughter, Mrs. Peter Neff, Gambler, Ohio. 
" At this place they remained about a year, during 
" which time a second child was born to the widowed 
" daughter, three months after her husband's death. 

"At the close of the year, Mrs. Biggs, with her 
" widowed daughter, began housekeeping again, and 
" in Gambler, where they remained for three years. 
" From Gambler they removed to Glendale, where 
" they lived several years. The death of Mrs. Andrews, 
" which occurred on the 20th of October, 1879, ne- 
" cessitated another change. 

" Mrs. Biggs returned to her daughter, Mrs. Peter 
" iN'eff, Gambler, Ohio, where she is still living at this 
" date, April, 1885. The two grandchildren, Rebecca 
" and Jaennette Andrews, were received by their uncle, 
" Rev. H. W. Biggs, who, having no children of his 
" own, became a father to them indeed. At the ad- 
" vanced age of nearly 89 years, Mrs. Biggs still re- 
" tains all her faculties perfectly, except her hearing, 
266 which 



" which is somewhat impaired. Her general health 
" is good, a marvel to all who know her. 

" Her trials in life have been many, having seen 
" pass away, through great suffering, two sons and 
" two daughters, during all of which she has been 
" sustained by the widow's God. 

" Mrs. Biggs was always most earnest to promote 
" the comfort of her household, which often comprised 
" more than her own family, for at several periods in 
" her life other boys were committed to her husband's 
" care to be educated and trained, usually the sons of 
" old friends, of which there are several prominent 
" men, now living, and filling places of important 
" trust, who have reason to bless God that their young 
" days were spent where they had such careful train- 
" ing, both for their mental and spiritual natures, 
" some of whom have been known to say they were 
" indebted to the care of Dr. and Mrs. Biggs for what- 
" ever good there was in their characters. 

"One son, an earnest, useful Presbyterian minister, 
" Rev. Henry W. Biggs, who has been settled over 
" the First Presbyterian Church of Chillicothe for the 
" last twenty years, and another son, the youngest 
" child, Thomas J. Biggs, a merchant in Cincinnati, 
" Ohio, and the oldest daughter, Mrs. Peter Neff, are 
" all that are left to soothe her declining days." * 



* To the frequently expressed recollections of those early days 
by Kebecca Biggs, regarding our ancestor, may be attributed the 
thought and attention which has become the incentive of these 
pages. 

267 [From 



[From the Philadelphia Public Ledger, 28th August, 1885.] 

" Obituary. — Eebecca Neff Biggs, relict of the late 
" Rev. Thomas J. Biggs, Pastor of the Presbyterian 
« Church at Frankford from 1818 to 1832, died at the 
" residence of her son-in-law, Peter Neff, at Gambler, 
" Ohio, on the 24th day of August, 1885, in the 90th 
" year of her age, sister of the late John Rudolph 
" Neff, of Philadelphia, and the granddaughter of 
" Rudolf Naf, who, with his brother, Jacob Naf, on 
" their arrival from Switzerland, settled in Frankford 
" in 1749, and were among the founders of the Pres- 
" byterian Church there. In 1832 Dr. Biggs removed 
" to Cincinnati, Ohio, having been elected a professor 
" in Lane Theological Seminary. Burial at Spring 
" G-rove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio." 

" A statement of some facts regarding Dr. Biggs's 
" parents and their children are here given. 

"John Biggs and Sarah, his wife, immigrated from 
" London, England, to Philadelphia, Pa., about the 
" year 1782. He was a commission dry goods mer- 
" chant. Sarah Biggs died the last of the month of 
" September, 1793, of yellow fever, at Philadelphia, 
" Pa. During her short and painful sickness, her 
" anxiety was for the religious teaching and educa- 
" tion of her children. The same night that she died 
" her husband composed the following : 

" The bitterness of death, my Lord, is o'er; 

'• My prayer is granted, now I ask no more. 

" O Lord, my God, the author of my life, 

" She, next to thee, is gone, my much loved wife — 

268 " Much 



" Much loved, more dear than all the world beside. 

" With her three times I crossed the ocean wide, 

" My heart, unstrung, now lies down by her side. 

" Her dying groans were sweetly mixed with prayer, 

" Which rose to Heaven and found acceptance there. 

" No visual signature of grief I wear ; 

" My heart is wounded and my mournings there. 

" I've lost a wife, in whom I could depend, 

" A humble, chaste, and faithful bosom friend; 

" No masculine attempt at sovereign sway, 

" But ever ready, willing to obey. 

" A child obedient to her parent's nod, 

" Who early taught their child the fear of God. 

" This marked the maiden and this marked the wife; 

" The fear of God shone bright through all her life. 

" Go thou, loved shade, and join thy happy peers, 

" Released forever from this vale of tears; 

" Religion thy pursuit and heaven thy prize, 

" Go join the innocent, go join the wise." 

" He adds in a note : ' Slie suffered extreme pain. 
" I prayed for an easy descent from life to death, for 
" from the moment she was taken I expected death.' 
" They were not long separated, for early in the 
'' month of October the husband died of the same ep-. 
" idemic. He was buried at midnight. His daughter, 
" Maria, and one female friend alone followed him to 
" his grave. They were, in England, Wesleyan Meth- 
" odists, devout Christian parents, who, when dying, 
" committed their children to their covenant-keeping 
" God. Letters of administration of the estate of 
" John Biggs, deceased, were granted December 6, 
" 1793. The administrator's bond was six thousand 
2$9 pounds, 



" pounds, unto the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 
" ISTo records of the accounts and settlements of this 
" estate can be found. 

" Three children had died before their parents. 
" John, their oldest child, was born in England. He 
" died soon after his parents. The remaining six chil- 
" dren, orphaned, but not friendless, were taken and 
" cared for by good Christian people, and although 
" separated and among strangers, they grew up cher- 
" ishing the most loving attachment for each other, 
" and adorned their lives by an exemplary and con- 
" sistent profession of the Gospel. Their lives became 
" useful. Maria Biggs was born in England. She 
" did not marry. Died in Cincinnati, Ohio, August 
" 11, 1845. She was connected with the first free 
" school of Philadelphia, Pa., founded in 1803 by la- 
" dies of the Presbyterian Church of that city. Her 
" life was devoted as a Dorcas in society and in the 
" church. James Biggs was born about 1784. Early 
" in the nineteenth century he went to London, Eng- 
" land, and studied law. In 1806 he went out from 
" 'New York, in the Miranda expedition, as second 
" lieutenant in artillery. He writes : ' Being per- 
" suaded by my friend, Mr. *****, to commit myself 
" to the chances of an expedition at once extraordi- 
" nary and dangerous.' In 1808 he was back in New 
" York, and wrote his patron and friend, Mr. R. S. 
« G**%^ of Philadelphia, Pa., as follows : 'After a 
•' long interval, I proceed to wind up my correspond- 

270 ence. 



" ence. My disgust has made me willing to dismiss 
" the subject from my thoughts.' 

" To this friend he wrote an interesting account of 
" this Miranda expedition as the events occurred. 

" 1809 finds James Biggs again in London, England. 
" The 11th of March, 1809, he published ' The His- 
" tory of Don Francisco De Miranda's attempt to 
" effect a Revolution in South America, in a series of 
" letters. By James Biggs. Revised, corrected, and 
" enlarged. To which are annexed Sketches of the 
" Life of Miranda and Geographical Notices of Ca- 
" raccas. " Thoughts tending to ambition, they do 
" plot unlikely wonders." — Sliak. London. Printed 
" for the author by J. Gillet, Crown Court, Fleet 
" Street, and sold by Goddard, Pall Mall, and Sher- 
" wood, N'eely & Jones, Paternoster Row. 1809.' 
" Such is the title page of this philosophical and in- 
" teresting history of one of the most remarkable 
" men and expeditions of that age. The author, in 
" his preface to this London edition, says : * The 
" writer of these letters had the best opportunities for 
" ascertaining facts, and in his reasoning upon them 
" he is confident he shall not incur the imputation of 
" illiberality. Though he has freely animadverted on 
" the conduct of the hero of this history, the most 
" conspinuo us political empiric of this age, he avers that 
" no sinister views nor malicious feelings have 
" prompted him to make this expose to the world.' 
" Again he writes : ' This enterprise and incidents af- 
" ford a curious exhibition of human nature. The 
271 boldness 



" boldness of the desigu and the variations of fortune 
" in its progress and execution ; the sufferings and 
" the actions of the adventurers are not wholly un- 
" worthy of the attention of those who wish to be 
" instructed by a view of the obliquities of the human 
" mind or amused by the perusal of eccentric ad- 
" venture.' In October, 1811, he sailed from England 
" for the west coast of Africa, commissioned by the 
" king. On the 2d of September, 1812, he wrote that 
" he was still at Sierra Leone, West Africa, engaged 
" in the suppression of the slave trade. He went into 
" parts of the interior of Africa, and returned to Lon- 
« don in 1813. On the 16th of March, 1814, he wrote 
" from London, England, to his sister, Maria, in l^ew 
" York, U. S. A., saying : ' By perusing a book which 
" I send you, entitled " The Trials of the Slave 
" Traders at Sierra Leone," you will learn ray motive 
" for having accepted the appointment of attorney- 
" general and king's proctor in the court of Vice Ad- 
" miralty in the British colony of Sierra Leone, West 
" Africa, and you will see with pleasure that my time 
" has been employed in an important, honorable, and 
" benevolent manner, not unworthy of your approba- 
" tion.' 

" The full title of this pamphlet, by James Biggs, is 
" 'The Trials of the Slave Traders, Samuel Samo, 
" Joseph Peters, and William Tufft, tried in April 
" and June, 1812, before the Hon. Robert Thorpe, 
" LL.D., Chief Justice of Sierra Leone, etc., with 
" two letters on the Slave Trade, from a gentleman 
272 resident 



" resident at Sierra Leone to an advocate for the 
" abolition in London. London. Printed for Sher- 
" wood, N'eely and Jones, Paternoster Row, and to be 
" had of all other booksellers. 1813.' Mr. James Biggs 
" also wrote numbers of the ' Explorator,' published, 
" 1813-1817, in London, and although his health was 
" greatly impaired by his sojourn in Africa, yet he 
" is found engaged in the law and literary pur- 
" suits, having his office with Hon. Robert Thorpe, 
" LL.D., JSTo. 18 Foley Place, Cavendish Square, Lon- 
" don. He did not marry, and it is supposed he died 
" in 1822. His letters evince the spirit of ambitious 
" and persevering labor, of great affection for his 
" brothers and sisters in America, and an abiding 
" faith in the overruling Providence of God for all 
" the issues of his life work. 

"Joseph L. Biggs was appointed Midshipman in the 
" Navy of the United States, and his commission is 
" signed by Thomas Jefferson, President of the United 
" States, the 16th of January, 1809. The following 
" April he was stationed on the Frigate President ; 
" in the winter of 1810 and 1811, he was with his 
" brother, James, in London, England, on a furlough ; 
"July 29, 1811, he was ordered to the 'Essex;' in 
" October, 1812, he was Lieutenant on the Frigate 
" Constellation. He was an efficient officer, and distin- 
" guished himself in several naval engagements. On 
" the 15th of April, 1813, off iTorfolk, Virginia, he was 
" sent from the Frigate Constellation, in command of 
" a boat and its crew, to the relief of a vessel ; ' his 
273 boat 



" boat was struck by a flaw of wind and upset;' he 
" and ' another officer were drowned.' His body was 
" recovered on the 22nd, and on the 23rd of April, 
" 1813, Joseph L. Biggs was interred in the Protestant 
" Episcopal burial gound, at iJ^orfolk, Virginia, 'with 
" the honors due him as an ofl3.cer.' He was not mar- 
" ried. He was a conscientious Christian, patriot, 
" and soldier. His loss was deeply lamented by his 
" comrades. 

" Phoebe Biggs married, in 1815, the Rev. H. R. 
" Weed, D.D., of the Presbyterian Church. She was 
" a woman of deep personal piety, and an earnest 
" helper to her husband in all church work, and par- 
" ticularly successful among the young people who 
" came under her influence. Dr. Weed was for many 
" years settled over the church at Wheeling, West 
" Virginia. He died December 14, 1870. She died 
" August 12, 1864. 

" Sarah Biggs married Lund Washington, Jr., of 
" Washington, D. C. She died at Marlin, Texas, 
« 1866. Sarah wrote to Phoebe, October 28, 1887, some 
" items about the old rumor of an inheritance lying 
" in Virginia for them, stating that an advertisement 
" had, within a few years, appeared in the Philadel- 
" phia newspapers inquiring for the heirs of Benjamin 
" Biggs ; that this Benjamin Biggs was probably the 
" same Biggs, who, in 1791 or 1792, came to Philadel- 
" phia, Pa., and solicited their father, John Biggs, to 
" join him in asserting legal claims for an estate in 
" Virginia belonging to them. It has always been 
274 supposed 



" supposed that this Benjamin Biggs died of yellow 
" fever, in 1793, as nothing farther was heard from him 
" after the death of John Biggs. The children were 
" all young. She also wrote that the papers, vouchers, 
" evidence, etc., pertaining to this inheritance, were 
" in the possession of Alderman Baker, Esq., of Phil- 
" adelphia. Pa., up to a recent date. 

" Thomas J. Biggs was born 30th October, 1787, at 
" Philadelphia, Pa. After the death of his parents, 
" he was taken by Joseph and Ann Jacobs, of Phila- 
" delphia, to be brought up and educated. They were 
" Wesleyan Methodists. The account of Rev. Thomas 
" J. Biggs is previously given. He married Rebecca 
" :N'eff, the 7th September, 1820. 

" Descendants of the Rev. Thomas J. Biggs, D.D., 
" and Rebecca !N'eff Biggs : 

Children. 
Sarah A. Biggs, 
Joseph A. Biggs, Deceased, 
John W. Biggs, Deceased, 

Rebecca N. Biggs, Deceased, 
Henry W. Biggs, A.M., D.D., 
Maria Biggs, Deceased, 

Thomas J. Biggs. 



Grandchildren. 
For children of Sarah A. Biggs, who married Peter 
Nefi, see page 253. 

275 Cleveland 



Cleveland Biggs, Deceased, 
Kate Biggs, Deceased, 

Frank D. Biggs, 
Josephine A. Biggs, 
Children of Joseph A. Biggs, who married Catherine 
Yankirk. 



Rebecca Andrews, 

Jeanette Andrews, 

Children of Maria Biggs, who married William H. 

Andrews. 



Nathan Hazen Biggs, 
Thomas J. Biggs, Jr., 
Henry W. Biggs, 
Josephine Hazen Biggs, 
Children of Thomas J. Biggs, who married Josephine 
Hazen. 



Great-grandchildren. 

Nathan Hazen, 

Child of Nathan Hazen Biggs, who married Anna 

Danforth Keys. 



276 



Sarah A., 

Born June 15, 1821. 
Married Peter NeflP.* 
Died. 



255 Thomas J. Biggs. 

Born October 30, 1787. 
Married September 7, 1820. 
Died February 9, 1864. 



AND 



255 Rebecca Nbfp Biggs. 

Born Mayl , 1796. 

Married September 7, 1820. 
•Died August 24, 1885. 



For children of this marriage, see 
page 253. 



Joseph A., 

Born November 12, 1822. 
Married Catherine Vankirk. 
Died January 14, 1868. 



JohnK, 

Born July 20, 1824. 

Married. 

Died April 24, 1858. 



Rebecca N. , 

o Born April 10, 1826. 

•;:i Married. 

& Died August 31, 1865. 



Henry W., 
Born March 15, 1828. 
Married Cornelia S. Foinier. 
Died. 



Maria, 

Born July 22, 1830. 
Married Wm. H. Andrews. 
Died October 20, 1879. 



Thomas J., 

Born May 11, 1834. 
Married Josephine Hazen. 
Died. 



277 



2552 Joseph A. Biggs. 

Born lSrovember-12, 1822. 
Married July 3, 1859. 
Died January 14, 1868. 



2552 Catheeine Vankiek 

Biggs. 4: 

Born May 8, 1834. 
Married July 3, 1859. 
Died April 8, 1871. 



278 



Cleveland, 

Born September 2, 1860. 
Died July 24, 1861. 



Francis Dane, 
Born December 22, 1861. 
o Married. 
E Died. 



^ Kate, 

2. Born July 24, 1864. 
Died December 10, 1865. 



Josephine A,, 

Born November 4, 1866. 

Married. 

Died, 



2555 Henry W. Biggs. 

Born March 15, 1828. 
Married August 18, 1853. 
Died. 



2555 COENELIA S. PoiNrEE 

Biggs. 

Born June 3, 1834. 
Married August 18, 1853. 
Died. 



S* No children. 



(The above parties reside at Chilli- 
cothe, Ross Co., O.) 



279 



2556 William H. Andrews. 

Born April 3, 1833. 
Married June 5, 1860. 
Died May 14, 1866. 



'Rebecca, 

Born October 17^ 1863.. y . * . \Sck^ 
Married. Y\^K j;^^\>rA\A^^^ 



2556 Maria Biggs Andrews. 

Born July 22, 1830. 
Married June 5, 1860. 
Died October 20, 1879. 



g Jeannette, 
o Born August 16, 1866. 
"^ Married. 
Died. 



(The above parties reside at Chilli 
cothe, Ross county, O. 



280 



^ <>\) \wl\yl)\{.\j^\a?^vvvQL^;^ 



2557 Thomas J. Biggs. 

Born May 11, 1834. 
Married November 14, 1860. 
Died. 



2557 Josephine Hazen 
■ Biggs. 

Born August 19, 1835. 
Married November 14, 1860. 
Died. 



(Residence, at present, of above par- 
ties, Glendale, O.) 



Nathan Hazen, 

Born November 22, 1861. 
Married Anna Danforth 

Keys. 
Died. 



Thomas J., 

Born June 17, 1865. 

Married. 
g Died. 



S Henry W., 

o Born July 19, 1867. 

Married. 

Died. 



Josephine Hazen, 

Born September 25, 1875. 

Married. 

Died. 



28X 



25571 Nathan Hazen Biggs. 

Born November 22, 1861. 
Married March 20, 1884. 
Died. 



Nathan Hazen, 
Born April 16, 
Married. 
Died. 



25571 Anna Danfoeth Keys 
Biggs. 

Born. 

Married March 20, 1884. 

Died. 



(Present residence of above parties, 
Glendale, O.) 



282 



CHAPTER XIV. 

PETER NEFF, 

The third son of Peter and Rebecca Neff, who was 
born on the 31st of March, 1798, in the old homestead, 
in Frankford, was a man of successful business attain- 
ments. The most of his life was spent in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, the details of which are contributed by his 
son, William Howard Neff, at the request of the 
compiler : 

" Peter Neff, retired merchant, was born March 31, 
" 1798, at Frankford, near Philadelphia, Pennsylva- 
" nia. The family emigrated to this country, from 
" Switzerland, before the American revolution. "When 
" he was very young his father died, and the means 
" of the family being all required for the support of 
" his mother and sisters, he was early taught the ne- 
" cessity of making a living for himself. He received 
" careful instruction in the plain branches of an En- 
" glish education. At the age of fourteen he left 
" school and became a clerk, of Philadelphia. Dur- 
" ing this time, and, in fact, during life, he neglected 
" no opportunity for self improvement. His penman- 
" ship was remarkably clear and distinct, and in all 
" mercantile and arithmetical calculations he attained 
283 a 



" a marked prominence. The interruption of busi- 
" ness, during the war of 1812-1815, threw him out 
" of employment, but when peace was proclaimed, he 
" again obtained a clerkship, and from that time was 
" enabled to support himself without depending upon 
" the family for assistance. His close attention to 
" business induced a favorable proposition for co- 
" partnership from Mr. Charles Bird, a prominent 
" hardware merchant, of Philadelphia, who desired to 
" establish a branch at Baltimore, and Mr. iSTeff, at 
" the age of twenty, became a partner in that busi- 
" ness, with which he was at that time unacquainted. 
" He soon mastered this branch of mercantile busi- 
" ness in all its details, while his sterling integrity of 
" character soon obtained for him a credit, which he 
" preserved untarnished during more than fifty years 
" of active business life. In June, 1824, Mr. Keff, 
" with his brother, William, visited Cincinnati. Al- 
" though the city then numbered but a few thousand 
" inhabitants, he proposed that if his brother would 
" leave Savannah and reside in Cincinnati, he would 
" join him in the wholesale hardware business, and 
" would continue to reside in Baltimore and make all 
" the purchases for the firm. The proposition was 
" accepted, and the brothers, together with John and 
" George, the only remaining male members of the 
^' family, united in forming the first importing hard- 
" ware house west of the Alleghanies. Peter only 
" was acquainted with the business, and he made all 
" the purchases for the firm. He went to Cincinnati, 
284 marked 



" marked the goods, and fixed the price, which was 
'' firmly adhered to. On his return trip Mr. Neff was 
" twenty-three days reaching ITew York, by the most 
" direct route. The facilities of the new firm, and 
" their high commercial credit, soon led on to fortune. 
" In 1827 Mr. E'efi:' married Mrs. Isabella Lamson 
" [Freeman], a lady as remarkable for her mental 
" ability as for her personal graces, whose advice and 
" assistance through life were of very great value to 
" him. Her death occurred March 6, 1844, and was 
" the severest trial he ever experienced. He never 
" re-married. 

" In 1828 Mr. I^efF established a business house in 
" Louisville, Kentucky, which was very successful, 
" and in 1838 it was united with his Cincinnati house. 
" In 1835 he removed from Baltimore to Cincinnati, 
" where he resided the remainder of his life. At the 
" death of his accomplished and lovely wife, his at- 
" tentiou was directed to the necessity of a cemetery 
" for the city, and by his exertions, and the assistance 
" of his brothers, William and George, and other 
" gentlemen, Spring Grove Cemetery was purchased 
" by subscription. It is celebrated for the extent and 
" beauty of the grounds and the costliness and variety 
" of its monuments. Mr. Ketf was always a liberal, 
" public spirited. Christian citizen, ever ready to aid 
" in promoting the welfare and prosperity of the city 
" and the cause of good morals and religion. The 
" temperance reform found in him one of its best 
" friends and earliest advocates. Mr. ISTefif earnestly 
285 and 



" and zealously advocated the establishment of the 
" Chamber of Commerce, for the adjustment of diffi- 
" culties among merchants. The enterprise was 
*' crowned with success, and he was appointed one of 
" its first Vice-presidents. The improvement of the 
" architecture of business houses received his atten- 
" tion in 1850 ; and to his enterprise, sagacity, and 
" example, the Queen City is indebted for many of its 
" beautiful buildings. He always manifested a deep 
" interest in the education of the young, especially in 
" their religious training, and the Sabbath-school 
" found in him a liberal benefactor and wise coun- 
" selor. The organization and establishment of the 
" Poplar Street Presbyterian Church was due to him, 
" and credit is given him for personal supervision and 
" liberal contributions to the same. 

" For more than forty years he was a member of 
" the Second Presbyterian Church, and for many 
" years was President of the Board of Trustees. 

" During the war of the rebellion he took very de- 
" cided ground in favor of the United States govern- 
" ment. As Chairman of the Finance Committee of 
" Hamilton County, he directed the movement and 
" took a very active part in raising the amount, $250,- 
" 000, which prevented a draft in the county. 

" During the Kirby Smith raid, 'a siege of Cincin- 
" nati,' he was untiring in his efforts, and the first re- 
" serve regiment will bear witness to his zeal and de- 
" votion. But his patriotic efforts during the war de- 
" serve still higher commendation. 

286 From 



"From an examination of his papers after his 
" death, it was ascertained that he suggested to Mr. 
" Chase the issuing of government bonds as a means 
" of obtaining the money necessary for carrying on 
" the war. His language was remarkable — ' The 
" banks can not give you the money you want. They 
" have not got it to give. Issue the bonds and obli- 
" gations of the government. The people will take 
" them, and they will give you all the money you 
" want.' 

" The later years of his life were spent in the devel- 
" opment of his property in the western part of the 
" city, where he often received visits from many whom 
" he had aided with loans of money and advice, and 
" thus saved from financial ruin. He was one of the 
" earliest and most steadfast friends of the Cincin- 
" nati Southern Railroad, and constantly predicted its 
" success and great benefit to the city. He died on 
" the 20th of July, 1879, in the 82nd year of his age, 
" and is buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, beside his 
" wife. He left two sons, William Howard and Peter 
" Rudolph NefF." 

Descendants of Peter and Isabella JSTeff : 

Children. 
"William Howard, 
John R., Died in infancy, 

Peter Rudolph. 



287 Grandchildren. 



Grandchildren. 
Wallace Neff, A. M., M. D., 

Helen ISTeff, Deceased, 

Lucy W. Keff, 

Howard Neff, Deceased, 

Isabel Howard IlTeff, 
Mary Shillito I^Teff, 
Edith Sterrett Neff, 
Children of William Howard Feff, who married Lucy 
Wallace. 



Isabella J^eff, 
Margaret Currie Neff, 
Caroline Burnet Neff, 
Frederick Rudolph Xeff, Deceased, 
Alice Gray ISTeff, 
Children of Peter Rudolph l^eff, who married Caro- 
line Burnet. 



Peter Rudolph K'eff, Jr., Deceased, 
Josephine Clark NeS, Deceased, 
Hope Neff, Deceased, 

Rudolph l^eff, 
Susan Clark Keff, 
Robert Burnet Feff, 
Rebecca I^eff, 
Children of Peter Rudolph N'eff, who married Jose- 
phine Clark Burnet, a second wife. 



288 



Great-grandchildren. 



Great-gran d children . 

Caroline ISTeff Maxwell, 

Nathaniel Hamilton Maxwell, 

Rudolph I^eff Maxwell, 

Children of Isabella Neft] who married Colonel Sidney 

D. Maxwell. 



Hugh Gordon Burnet, 

Child of Alice Gray ISTeff, who married Arthur G. 

Burnet. 



2$d 



256 Peter Neff. 

Born March 31, 1798. 
Married July 10, 1827. 
Died July 20, 1879. 



256 Isabella Lamson Neff. 

Born. 

Married July 10, 1827. 

Died March 6, 1844. 



William Howard, 
Born March 29, 1828. 
Married Lucy Wallace. 
Died. 



John K., 
Born August 25, 1829. 
Died September 2, 1829. 



Peter Kudolph, 

Born June 19, 1832. 
Married 1st Caroline Burnet 
2d Josephine Burnet 
Died. 



290 



2561 William Howard 

Born March 29, 1828. 

Married. 

Died. 

AND 



2561 Lucy Wallace 

Neff. 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



1 


Wallace, 




Born. 




Married. 




Died. 


2 


Helen 




Born. 




Married, 




Died. 


WARD 3 


Lucy W. 




Born. 


528. 


Married. 




Died. 


4 


g Howard, 



(Residence of above parties, Cincin- 
nati, O. 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Isabel Howard, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



Mary Shillito, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



Edith Sterrett, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



291 



3563 Peter Rudolph Neff. 

Born June 19, 1832. 2 

Married June 30, 1853. 
Died. 



3563 Caroline Marga- 4 

RETTE Burnet Neff. 

Born December 6, 1833. 
Married June 30, 1853. 5 

Died August 6, 1864. 



Isabella, 

Born April 15, 1854. 
Married Sidney D. Maxwell. 
Died. 



Margaret Currie, 

Born June 22, 1857. 
Married Lawrence MendenhaU. 
^^ied__ 

g Caroline Burnet, 

►;;; Born June 13, 1859. 

S Married William B. Burnet. 

„ Died. 



Frederick Rudolph, 

Born June 15, 18S1. 
Died March 7, 1874. 



Alice Gray, 

Born January 11, 1863. 
Married Arthur G. Burnet. 
Died. 



2563 Peter Rudolph Neff. 

Married June 19, 1867. 8 



3563 Josephine Clark 1' 

Burnet Neff. 
Born December 3, 1848. 
Married June 19, 1867. _, 

Died. 3 

(Residence of ahove parties, Cincin- 
nati, O.) 



Peter Rudolph, 

Born April 17, 1868 
Died July 21, 1868. 



Josephine Clark, 

Born February 7, 1870. 
Died March 8, 1874. 



Hope, 



Born August 30, 1872. 
Died June 22, 1873. 



Rudolph, 

Born January 25, 1876. 
5 Married, 
c; Died. 



g Susan Clark, 

o Born April 11, 1877. 
•-» Married. 
Died. 



Robert Burnet, 

Born May 20, 1878. 

Married. 

Died. 



Rebecca, 

Born September 5, 

Married. 

Died. 



292 



25631 Sidney Denise 
Maxwell. 
Born December 23, 1831. 
Married June 30, 1875. 
Died. 



25631 Isabella Neff 
Maxwell, 

Born April 15, 1854. 
Married June 30, 1875. 
, Died. 



(Present residence of above parties, 
Cincinnati, O.) 



Caroline Neff, 

Born September 25, 1877. 

Married. 

Died. 



Nathaniel Hamilton, 
Born January 28, 18T9, Zo 
Married. 
Died. 



Kudolph Neff, 

Born February 7, 1882. 

Married. 

Died. 



2 93 



35632 Laweence Menden- 

HALL. 
Born. 

Married September 21, 1880. 
Died. 



^5632 Margaret Curry 
Mendenhall. 

Born June 22, 1857. 
Married September 21, 1880. 
Died. 



(Present residence of above parties, 
Cincinnati, O.) 



294 



35633 William B. Burnet. 

Born. 

Married September 19, 1882. 

Died. 



25633 Caeoline Burnet 
Neff Burnet, 

Born June 13, 1859. 
Married September 19, 1882. 
Died. 



(Present residence of above parties, 
Cincinnati, O.) 



295 



25635 Arthur G. Burnet. 

Born July 25, 1856. 
Married September 19, 1882. 
Died. 



25635 Alice Gray Neff 
Burnet. 
Born January 11, 1863. 
Married September 19, 1882. 
Died. 



Hugh Gordon, 
Born September 17, 1883 
Married. 
Died. 



(Present residence of above parties, 
Cincinnati, O.) 



296 



CHAPTER XV. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON NEFF. 



The following pages, regarding George Washing- 
ton Neff, the fourth son of Peter and Rebecca Neff, 
of Frankford, Pennsylvania, are kindly contributed 
by his granddaughter, Laura S. Neff, in response to a 
request from the compiler : 

" George W. E'eff was born May 19, 1800, at Phil- 
" adelphia, Pennsylvania, and died August 9, 1850, at 
" Yellow Springs, Ohio. 

" He received a good practical education, and grad- 
" uated at Princeton College, with highest honors, in 
" 1818, when only eighteen years of age, and after- 
" wards received a thorough business training. 

"He studied law with Hon. Horace Binney, the 
" ITestor of Philadelphia bar at that period, in his 
" first case having as an opposing counsel his old pre- 
" ceptor, over whom he gained a victory. Young 
" Netf, appreciating the grand chances for success 
" in the then far west, came to Cincinnati, in 1824, 
" and commenced a mercantile career which soon 
" ranked him among our ablest and most discreet fi- 
" nanciers, which is saying much, when we remember 
" that Josiah Lawrence, Griffin Taylor, John Kilgour, 
297 John 



" John C. Culbertson, R. R. Springer, "William Barr, 
" and others of the same class of old-school mer- 
" chants, were then in their prime. 

" George W. Neff was active and far-seeing. His 
" business shrewdness intuitively taught him that 
" Cincinnati was admirably located to become a vast 
" metropolis ; but, to give it a fair chance to outstrip 
" its would-be rivals, it must have canals, turnpikes, 
" railroads, and other means of transportation, and 
" at once Mr. Neff successfully put into operation our 
" system of turnpikes, and became one of the most 
" zealous advocates of our canal and railroad systems, 
" being one of the foremost in advocating the con- 
" struction of a great railroad to the south. He was 
" one of the first presidents of the Little Miami Rail- 
" road, and as President of Council, secured the credit 
" of the city in aiding that road. 

" In those days we had no paid fire department, and 
" the very best citizens were volunteers to fight the 
" fiery elements, and of all these brave men, none 
" was more gallant than George "W. Neft', the Presi- 
" dent of the famous ' Independent Red Rovers.' 

" George W. Neft" married, October 1, 1827, Miss 
" Maria White, daughter of Ambrose White, Esq., 
" of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

" In business Mr. Neff' was quick and positive, but, 
" withal, extremely conservative ; and it was this care- 
" ful weighing of cause and eflTect which caused him 
" to be selected as the President of the Firemen's In- 
" surance Company, as its first president, and as Pres- 
208 ident 



" ideat of the Lafayette Bank; the former a corpora- 
" tion which, from its foundation, has always been 
" noted for its solidity. Mr. ]S"eff was a member of 
" the Presbyterian Church. 

"George W. Neff left three children — Ambrose "W., 
" George W., late federal officer in the great rebel- 
" lion, and Caroline. Of these children Ambrose is 
" deceased ; he died December 12, 1862. Ambrose 
" married Miss Rebecca Smith. George W. Neff mar- 
" ried Miss Clara Stanbery, of Columbus, Ohio, daugh- 
" ter of Charles Stanbery, Esq., and niece of Hon. 
" Henry Stanbery, of Kentucky, and Attorney-Gen-' 
" eral under the administration of Andrew Johnson, 
" President of the United States. Caroline IlTeff mar- 
" ried Mr. Samuel C. Humes, who died June 18, 
" 1879." 

The descendants of George W. and Maria W. Nefi: 

Children. 
Ambrose "W"., Deceased, 
George W., 
Caroline. 



Grandchildren. 

George W., Deceased, 

Stewart, 

Clarence, 

Children of Ambrose W. ]!Teff, who married Kebecca 

Smith. 

299 Laura S., 



Laura S., 
Ambrose W., 
Stanberj, Deceased, 
George "W"., 
Mary S., 
Bond, 
Children of George W. ITeff, who married Clara 
Stanbery. 



James, 
Maria !N"., 

Clara N., Deceased, 

Children of Caroline ISTeff', who married Samuel C. 

Humes. 



300 



257 George Washington 

Neff. 
Born May 19, 1800. 
Married October 1, 1827. 
Died August 9, 1850. 



Ambrose W., 

Born August 28, 1830. 
Married Kebecca Smith. 
Died December 12, 1862. 



George W., 

o Born. 

5: Married Clara Stanbery, 

? Died. 



257 Maria White Neff. 

Born. 

■ Married October 1, 1827. 
Died. 



Caroline, 
Born. 

Married Samuel C. Humes. 
Died. 



301 



2571 Ambrose W. Neff. 1 George W., 

Born August 28, 1830. Born. 

Married. Married. 

Died December 12, 1862. Died. 



Stewart, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



2571 Rebecca Smith Neff, 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Clarence, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



302 



2572 George W. Nefp. 

Born. 

Miirried. 

Died. 



2572 Clara Stanbery 
Neff. 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



(Present resilience of above parties, 
Newport, Ky.) 



Laura S., 
Born. 
INIarried. 
Died. 



Ambrose W. 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



Stanbery, 
Born. 

INIarried. 
I Died. 

£ 

S George W., 
° Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



MaryS., 
Burn. 
Married. 
Died. 



Bond, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 



303 



2573 Samuel C. Humes. 

Born. 

Married, 

Died. 



James, 
Born. 
Married. 
Died. 

Maria N., 
P Born. 

Married. 
§* Died. 



2573 Caroline Neff Humes. 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Clara N. 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



(Present residence of above parties, 
Cincinnati, O.) 



304 



CHAPTER XVI. 

MARY AMANDA NEFF. 

Mary Amanda Neff was born on the 16th of De- 
cember, 1802, at Frankford, Pennsylvania; was edu- 
cated in Philadelphia, at Mrs. Baisley's school, and 
grew up a young woman of lovely character and en- 
gaging manners. Upon the marriage of her brother, 
"William, she arranged to accompany him, with his 
wife, Clifford, to their western home, in Cincinnati, 
Ohio. As a result of this, Clifford and Mary became 
life-long and endeared friends, as well as sisters. 
While visiting, with her brother, in Cincinnati, Mary 
met Kirkbride Yardley, a young man from Pennsyl- 
var>ia, and who was associated with the firm of Neff 
and Brothers. An attachment grew out of the ac- 
quaintance, which resulted in an engagement. Mary, 
however, returned to her mother in Frankford. Mr. 
Yardley soon followed, and they were married, leav- 
ing immediately for Cincinnati, where they made for 
themselves a home. Of their children, two in num- 
ber, William and Thomas, both died in their youth. 
The younger, Thomas, died when but five years old, 
after a long and painful illness. William, whose at- 
tachment to his mother had been peculiarly strong, 
305 seemed 



seemed reckless of life after liis mother's death, which 
occurred in July, 1849, of cholera. He was seized 
with the enthusiasm for western adventure, and, in 
1851, went to California. Returning shortly, by way 
of Panama, he was taken with the Panama fever, of 
which he died, in New York City. 

Later, and in the year 1860 or 1861, Kirkbride 
Yardley also died ; so, briefly, and with feelings of 
grief, the curtain must fall upon this branch of the 
family, leaving no descendants to continue the line. 



306 



258 KiRKBEiDE Yaedley, 

Born. 

Married September 22, 1828. 

Died. 



William, 

Born August 2, 1830. 
Married. 
9 Died December 2, 1852. 



258 Maky Amanda Neff 
. Yardley. 

Born December 16, 1802. 
Married September 22, 1828. 
Died July 11, 1819. 



Thomas, 
Bern. 
Married. 
Died. 



307 



CHAPTER XVII. 



ore of 
anil 1)10 

gjesjcjetxxlattts. 



308 



Elizabeth, 

Born November 25, 1787. 
Married William Bruner, 
Died September 7, 1864, 



27 Samuel Neff. 

Born June 27, 1768. 
Married February 3, 1787. 
Died July 4, 1839. 



AND 



27 Eleanor Helveston Neff. 

Born January 16, 1763. 
Married February 3, 1787. 
Died May 31, 1829. 



Jacob, 

Born December 2, 1788. 
Married Mary Jones. 
Died April 15, 1845. 



Mary, 

Born December 25, 1790. 
Married Gardener Fulton. 
Died February 18, 1872. 



Robert, 

Born April 2, 1792. 
Married Harriet Hilt. 
Died April 9, 1835. 



§ Benjamin, 

S Born June 10, 1795. 

3 Married. 

o Died August 9, I860. 



Hester, 

Born January 29, 1799. 
Married John C. Jen- 
nings. 
Died February 5, 1878. 



Hannah, 

Born January 29, 1799. 
Married Amos Corson. 
Died July 8, 1879. 



Eleanor, 

Born June 10, 1802. 
Married Jonathan T. Hough. 
Died December 24, 1878. 



Sarah, 

Born December 11, 1806. 

Married. 

Died August 25, 1872. 



309 



271 William Bruner, 

Born September 10, 1779. 
Married July 21, 1810. 
Died May 14, 1863. 



271 Elizabeth Baker 
Neff Bruner, 

Born November 25, 1787. 
Married July 21, 1810. 
Died September 7, 1864. 



Mary Ann, 

Born August 28, 1811. 
Married March 14, 18c 
Died July. 1873. 



William Martin, 

Born June 7, 1813. 
Married September 6, 1835. 
Died December 4, 1853. 



James Patterson, 

Born September 28, 1815. 
Married July 25, 1839, and May 20, 

1868. 
Died. 



Elizabeth Neff, 

Born September 2, 1817. 
Married November 22, 1 
Died. 



Adam, 

Born Aueust 15, 1819. 
Died April 30, 1823. 



Henry, 

Born' May 13, 1821. 
Married Januarv 9, 1844. 
Died November 29, 1883. 



Sarah Jane, 

Born January 11, 1823. 
Married June 12, 1855. 
Died. 



John Adam, 

Born November 20, 1824. 
Married May 5, 1846. 
Died. 



Thomas Jefferson, 

Born Julv 21, 1826. 
Died July 20, 1827. 



Charles Edward, 

Born April 27, 1828. 
Married December 4, 1846. 
Died. 



Ellen Matilda, 

Born June 10, 1832. 
Married June 16, 1858. 
Died. 



310 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



272 Jacob Neff, 

Born December 2, 1788. 

Married. 

Died April 15, 1845. 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



H! Born. 
£ Married. 
Died. 



272 Mary Jones Neff, 

Born May 8, 1789. 

Married. 

Died October 12, 1876. 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Three sons and four daughters. 



31% 



273 Gardener Fulton, 

Born December 25, 1783. 
Married December 25, 1811. 
Died February 5, 1861. 



273 Mary Neff Fulton, 

Born December 25, 1790. 
Marri<^d December 25, 1811. 
Died February 18, 1872. 



J James R., 




^ Born 


, IHU. 


3 Married 


, 18H4. 


i Died 


, 1856. 



3X2 



274: Robert Neff, 

Born April 2, 1792. 

Married. 

Died April 9, 1835. 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



274 Harriet Hilt Neff, 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Two sons, deceased. 



3X3 



275 Benjamin Neff, 

Born June 10, 1795. 

Married. 

Died August 9, 1860. 



575 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



314 



276 John C. Jennings, 

Born September 18, 1792. 
Married June 28, 1821. 
Died May 1, 1825. 



276 Hester Neff Jennings, 

Born January 29, 1799. 
Married June 28, 1821. 
Died February 5, 1878. 



John C, 
Born. 
Married. 
o Died. 

g Eleanor Neff, 
o Born. 
"" Married. 
Died. 



315 



277 Amos Corson, 

Born. '^T^ 

Married March 30, 1820. 
Died. 



277^ Hannah Wilmerton 

Neff, -Jpi^ 

Born January 29, 1799. " 
Married March BO, 1820. 
Died July 8, 1879. 



Hester Neff, 

Born February 10, 

Married. 

Died February 27, 



1821. 
1825. 



John a, 

Born October 5, 1822. 

Married. 

Died February 8, 1871. 



Eleanor NefF, 

Born January 21, 1825. 

Married Kemp. 

Died. 



Rufus L. T. 
o Horn December 17, 1826. 
S Married. 
S Died August 17, 1884. 



Henry B., 
Born November 30, 1828. 
Married. 
Died. 



William A., 

Born November 11, 

Married. 
Died. 



1830. 



Rachel A., 

Born August 17, 

Married. 

Died. 



1832. 



Benjamin F., 

Born July 3, 1834. 

Married. 

Died. 



316 



278 Jonathan T. Hough 

Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



278 Eleanor Neff 
Hough, 

Born June 10, 1802. 

Married. 

Died December 24. 1878. 



1 






Born. 

Married. 

Died. 


2 






Born. 

Married. 

Died. 


3 

Bough, 


Born. 

Married. 

Died. 


4 






Born. 



Four sons and three daughters. 



Married. 
Died. 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



Born. 

Married. 

Died. 



317 



CHAPTER XVIII. 



CONCLUSION. 



In concluding this chronicle, which has been a work 
purely of love — one that has cost very many days of te- 
dious labor, several years of research, and some travel — 
the compiler is aware that much might be said apologet- 
ically. Many imperfections necessarily appear. The 
materials from which information has been gathered 
have been meagre, and, for the comparatively limited 
work of this volume, rather widely scattered. The 
records of families, except of recent date, have been 
but imperfectly preserved, compelling, in some in- 
stances, a resort to public documents that were diffi- 
cult of access. For these reasons, omissions and 
shortcomings will, it is hoped, be dealt with gener- 
ously. Many kindnesses have been extended by those 
appealed to, in contributing all the information within 
their power, which should be and is gratefully ac- 
knowledged. 

It is not unlikely that this volume contains little to 
interest those who do not find in it the names of their 
ancestors. But to those who claim, through the fam- 
ily of Neff, an unbroken line to their ancestral home 
in Switzerland, an interest and enthusiasm, it is 
3X8 trusted, 



trusted, have been awakened — an enthusiasm that 
will lead to the making of further records, records 
more full, and of such facts, as will be conducive of 
comfort, and pleasure, and instruction to succeeding 
generations. 

Should this work accomplish as a result a further 
and more searching inquiry into the history of the 
family, the compiler will have reason to be gratified 
that her work was undertaken. 

To many of the readers, it is the hope that this 
history of relationship may recall many pleasant mem- 
ories of the past; to all, that it will inspire them to 
nobler efforts ; and to the few whose births date far 
back in time, the wishes of the author will be fulfilled, 
if the incidents here related will carry them back to 
days of early and delightful associations, and be a 
means of liuking their youthful and declining days. 

Before closing, a desire might, with propriety, be 
expressed, that succeeding generations venerate and 
esteem their ancestors, and emulate their good deeds, 
verifying the prayers and wishes expressed at the 
350th anniversary, at Cappel. 



3X0 



of 

mnts on gaMjes 0t gtsc^txt. 

I.ANCASTER COUNTY, PENN. 



Name. 


Chronological Number. 


Page. 


Haraish, Abram, 


11351 


113 


Anna E. Neff, 


11351 


113 


" Blanche, 


113516 


113 


Daniel K, 


1135U 


113 


Emma S., 


113512 


113 


JohnK, 


113517 


113 


MaryH., 


113511 


113 


S. Reid, 


113513 


113 


William Harry, 


113515 


113 


Herncame, Jacob, 


113Jt 


107, 111 


AnnyN. S., 


1134 


107, 111 


Neff, Ada, 


113552 


115 


" Amelia C, 


113574 


117 


" Amelia, 


11352 


112, 114 


" Anna K., 


113521 


114 


" Anna Oberholser, 


111 


102, 103 


" AnnaE., 


11351 


112, 113 


" Ann Caroline, 


11371 


119 


" Anuy, 


116 ■ 


102 


" Anny, 


im 


107, 111 


" Anna, 


11311 


108 


" Andrew, 


1132 


107-109 


" Andrew, 


11322 


109 


• ' Barbara, 


115 


102 


" Barbara, 


1112 


103 


321 







Name. 


Cheonological Number. 


Page. 


eff, Barbara Ann, 


11183 


105 


" Barbara Riitzel, 


IIU 


103 


" Benjamin, 


11181 


105, 106 


" Benjamin, 


11319 


108 


" Benjamin, 


11321 


109 


" Catherine Musser, 


11355 


112, 115 


" Charles H., 


111812 


106 


" Charles D., 


113571 


117 


" Charlotte, 


11188 


105 


" Christian, 


1111 


103 


" Corinna Weakly, 


111812 


106 


" Cyrus, 


11185 


105 


" Daniel, 


11 


101, 102 


" Daniel, 


112 


102 


" Daniel, 


11159 


104 


" Daniel, 


1135 


107, 112 


" Daniel G., 


11327 


109 


" DanielJ., 


11356 


112, 116 


" Daniel, 


1116 


103 


" David, 


1118 


103, 105 


" David, 


11151' 


104 


" David Henry, 


11181' 


105 


" David, 


11328 


109 


" David A., 


11358 


112 


" Edwin, 


11361 


118 


" Edwin W., 


11333 


110 


" Elizabeth Boas, 


1111 


103 


" Elizabeth Sehner, 


1115 


103, 104 


" Elizabeth, 


11321^ 


109 


" Elizabeth L. Hay, 


1181 


105, 106 


" Elizabeth, 


11155 


104 


" Elizabeth Grove, 


1132 


107, 109 


" Eliza, 


11316 


108 


" Eliza Weight, 


1133 


107, 110 


" Erb, 


11 


102 


" Fannie C, 


11180 


105 


" Fannie Kauffman, 


113 


102, 107 


322 







NAME. 


Chronological Number. 


Page. 


efF, Fanny, 


113W 


108 


" Fanny, 


1135Jf 


112 


" Frances Sprankle, 


11329 


109 


" Frances, 


11364 


118 


" Frances, 


113Jf3 


111 


" Frances Mary, 


11372 


119 


" Frauke, 


11322 


109 


" Franke, 


11323 


109 


" Franke Judson, 


1118U 


106 


" Harriet J. Hay, 


11181 


105, 106 


" Harriet A., 


11189 


105 


" Harriet Cory, 


1185 


105 


" Henry, 


12 


101 


" Henry, 


111 


102, 103 


" Henry, 


IIU 


103 


" Henry, 


11153 


104 


" Henry H., 


111817 


106 


" Henry, 


1137 


107, 119 


" Henry, 


11310 


108 


" Henry, 


11329 


109 


" Henry K., 


11332 


110 


" Henry, 


11352 


112, 114 


" Isabella Oakes, 


11352 


112 


" Isaac, 


11182 


105 


" Isaac, 


1136 


107, 118 


" Isaac, 


11314 


108 


•' Isaac, 


11363 


118 


" Jacob, 


13 


101 


" Jacob, 


114 


102 


" Jacob, 


1119 


103 


'« Jacob, 


11154 


104 


" Jacob, 


1133 


107, 110 


" Jacob, 


11323 


109 


" J. Grant. 


111816 


106 


" Jane Brunner, 


11182 


105 


" Jennie, 


111813 


106 


" John, 


H 


101 


323 







Neff, 



Name. 


Chbonological Number. 


Page. 


John, 


113 


102, 107 


John, 


1115 


103, 104 


John, 


11158 


104 


John, 


11150 


104 


John, 


1131 


107, 108 


John, 


11318 


108 


John Grove, 


11325 


109 


John A., 


11331 


110 


John H., 


11355 


112, 115 


John Frederick, 


113575 


117 


John Henry, 


11374 


119 


Joseph Huzette, 


113577 


117 


Julia Herr, 


1118 


103, 105 


Knode, 


11328 


109 


Laura Wallace, 


11377 


119 


Laviuia Borland, 


11333 


110 


Leah KaufFman, 


1118 


103, 105 


Magdalena, 


1113 


103 


Madalena Stouer, 


1131 


107, 108 


Magdalena, 


11157 


104 


Margaret Mong, 


1131 


107, 108 


Margaret, 


11315 


108 


Margaret Cordelia 


Howard, 11357 


112, 117 


Mary Elizabeth, 


iim 


105 


Mary Huzette, 


1135 


107, 112 


Mary, 


11313 


108 


Mary Miller, 


11332 


110 


Mary AVallace, 


1137 


107, 119 


Mary, 


11326 


109 


Mary R, 


113551 


115 


Mary E., 


111811 


106 


MaryH., 


113573 


117 


Matilda, 


11187 


105 


Michael Wallace, 


11373 


119 


Nancy, 


1117 


103 


Nancy, 


11152 


104 


Nancy, 


11156 


104 


324 







Name. 


Chkonological Number. 


Page. 


Neff, Parmelia Smith, 


11182 


105 


" Paiiliue, Louise, 


113561 


116 


" Paul Howard, 


113576 


117 


" Rebecca, 


11186 


105 


" Samuel, 


11317 


108 


" Susanna, 


11151 


104 


" Susanna B. Gray, 


11356 


112, 116 


" Susan, 


11353 


112 


" Susan, 


1136 


107, 118 


" Susan, 


11327 


109 


" Susan, 


11365 


118 


" Susan Gemmill, 


11375 


119 


" Thomas Calvin, 


11376 


119 


" William M., 


111815 


106 


" William, 


11362 


118 


" William Mason, 


113572 


117 


" William, 


11357 


112, 117 


NeifF, Francis, 


1 


101 


Swoope, Ann Elizabeth, 


113U 


111 


" Henry, 


1134 


107, 111 


Henry W., 


113Jf3 


111 


John N., 


11341 


111 


Peter S., 


11342 


111 



325 



of 

iumts on SaMjes of gjescjeut* 



J^COB NAF. 



Name. Chronological Number. 


Page. 


Baugh, Elizabeth N., 


164 


134, 139 


" Elizabeth, 


1643 


139 


Henry Neff, 


1642 


139 


" Margaret, 


1641 


139 


Eudolph Neff, 


1644 


139 


" Samuel, 


164 


134, 139 


Folkrod, Ann, 


131 


131 


Esther N., 


13 


129, 131 


" Jacob, 


13 


129, 131 


Madera, Ann, 


US 


130 


" Christopher, 


112 


130 


Christopher, 


11 


129, 130 


" David, 


116 


130 


Elizabeth, 


114 


130 


Elizabeth N., 


11 


129, 130 


Hester, 


113 


130 


Jacob, 


HI 


130 


" John, 


117 


130 


Naf, Anna Buser, 


1 


129 


" Jacob, 


1 


129 


Neff, Adaline King, 


162 


134, 136 


" Adaline, 


16222 


138 


" Albert Barnes, 


16211 


137 


" Amanda Glading, 


1622 


136, 138 


" Amanda Susanna Hagner, 


16229 


138 


326 







Neff, 



Name. Cheonological Number. 


Page. 


Amelia Warner, 


1603 


150, 152 


Anna Colsher, 


M82S 


146 


Ann, 


14 


129, 132 


Annie Houlston, 


Ml' 


134, 153 


Annie, 


Mil 


135 


Blanche, 


M824 


146 


Catherine, 


1681 


145 


Catherine R., 


1663 


• 141 


Charles W., 


1662 


141 


Charles S., 


16611 


142 


Charles Hazleton, 


16922 


149 


Charles, 


166 


134, 141 


Charles, 


MS 


133 


Daniel, 


154 


133 


David, 


12 


129 


Edward, 


16822 


146 


Edward, 


1684 


145 


Elizabeth, 


16721 


144 


Elizabeth Rugan, 


167 


134, 143 


Elizabeth Madera, 


MS 


134, 140 


Elizabeth, 


164 


134, 139 


Elizabeth, 


ISS 


133 


Elizabeth, 


11 


129, 130 


Eliza, 


1691 


148 


Elizabeth P., 


MOIS 


151 


Emma L., 


16014 


151 


Emma Louisa Stinger, 


1621 


136, 137 


Emma V., 


Mtl 


153 


Emma L., 


1604 


150 


Emma Virginia Rhoades, 


1672 


143, 144 


Emma, 


168S 


145 


Esther, 


13 


129, 131 


Florence M., 


16013 


151 


Florence Julietta, 


16614 


142 


Frank Colsher, 


16821 


146 


Frank Rugan, 


1661S 


142 


Frank, 


M0S 


150 


327 







Name. 


Chronological Numbee. 


Page. 


Neff, Francis, 


Mm 


148 


" George, 


167 


134, 143 


" George Glenn, 


16228 


138 


" George S., 


16612 


142 


" Geo. Rugan, 


1661 


141, 142 


*' Gertrude, 


16823 


146 


" Harmanus, 


1622 


136, 138 


" Harmanus, 


16224 


138 


" Henry, 


160 


134, 150 


" Henry S., 


16613 


142 


" Henry, 


16016 


151 


" Helen P., 


16T3 


153 


" Howard L., 


161'2 


153 


" Howard!., 


16031 


152 


" Howard L, 


1603 


150, 152 


" Howard Barcus, 


16831 


147 


" Isabella McKee, 


1601 


150, 151 


" Jacob, 


151 


133 


" Jacob, 


IS 


129, 133 


" Jacob, 


1692 


148, 149 


" Jacob, 


162 


134, 136 


" Jane McAllister, 


162 


134, 136 


" Jane McAllister, 


16212 


137 


" John Rugan, 


1672 


143, 144 


" John Thomley, 


16227 


138 


" John Chestnut, 


16213 


137 


" John, 


161 


134, 135 


" Julia Hazletou, 


169 


134, 138 


" Julietta Sagendorf, 


1661 


141, 142 


" Leonard W., 


16034 


152 


" Lylette, 


16226 


138 


" Marceline, 


1602 


150 


" Marceline, W., 


16032 


152 


" Margaret Rugan, 


16 


129, 134 


" Margaret, 


1612 


135 


" Margaret Davidson, 


161 


134, 135 


" Margaret Rugan, 


166 


134, 141 


328 







Name. Chkonological Ndmbee. 


Page. 


NefF, Mary Wolfe, 


15 


129, 133 


" Mary, 


156 


133 


•* Mary A. Fisler, 


MO 


134, 150 


" Mary A., 


16012 


151 


" Mary L., 


16033 


152 


" Mary Ann, 


16221 


138 


" Mary A. Williams, 


168 


134, 145 


" Mary Emma Colsher, 


1682 


145, 146 


" Marian Dunlap, 


16826 


146 


" Paul Jacob, 


16921 


149 


" Kebecca Mouaca Barcus, 


1683 


145, 147 


" Robert P. King, 


16223 


138 


" Rugan, 


165 


134, 140 


" Rudolph, 


16 


129, 134 


" Rudolph, 


1621 


136, 137 


" Rudolph, 


16214 


137 


" Rudolph, 


1682 


145, 146 


" Samuel, 


152 


133 


" Samuel, 


161' 


134, 153 


" Samuel Williams, 


1683 


145, 147 


" Sarah Louisa Yount, 


1692 


148, 149 


" Sarah R., 


16011 


151 


" Susanna R., 


1671 


143 


" Thomas, 


169 


134, 148 


" Thomas R., 


1651 


140 


"- William P., 


168 


134, 145 


" William, 


163 


134 


" William Stephen, 


16832 


147 


" William R., 


1601 


150, 151 


" William Turner, 


16225 


138 


" William Ashford, 


1664 


141 


" William Peddle, 


16827 


146 


Newell, Ann N"., 


14 


129, 132 


" David, 


14 


129, 132 


" Elizabeth, 


143 


132 


Ellen, 


142 


132 


" William, 


141 


132 


329 







g:amjc5 on gaMjes of gjescjeixt. 

FROM RUDOLF NAJF THROUGH PETER NEFE. 



Name. 
Andrews, Jeannette, 
" Maria, 

" Rebecca, 

William H., 
Armel, Mary C, 

" William J., 

William Neff, 
Biggs, Anna Danforth Keys. 

" Catherine Vankirk, 

" Cleveland, 

" Cornelia S. Poinier, 

" Francis Dane, 

" Henry W., 

" Henry W., 

" John Neff, 

" Joseph A., 

" Josephine A., 

" Josephine Hazen, 

" Josephine Hazen, 

" Kate, 

" Maria, 

" Nathan Hazen, 

" Nathan Hazen, 

•' Rebecca, 
330 



Chronological Number. 

25562 
2556 
25561 

2556 

25224 

25224 

252241 

25571 

2552 
25521 

2555 
25522 

2555 
25573 

2553 

2552 
25524 
25574 

2557 
25523 

2556 

255711 

25571 

255 



Page. 

280 

280 

280 
277, 280 
217, 218 
217, 218 

218 
281, 282 
277, 278 

278 
277, 279 

278 
277, 279 

281 

277 
277, 278 

278 

281 
277, 281 

278 
277, 280 

282 
281, 282 

277 



Biggs, Rebecca N., 

" Sarah A., 

" Thomas J., 

" Thomas J., 

" Thomas J., 
Budd, Anuabella Parks, 

" Blanche, 

" Britton I., 

" Charles P., 

" George K., 

" Georgia Knight, 

" Helen W., 

" Isabella Neff, 

" Marcia D., 

" Rebecca P., 

" Wayman C, 

" Wayman Clifford, 
Burnet, Alice Gray Neff, 

" Arthur G., 

" Caroline Burnet, 

" Hugh Gordon, 
William B., 
Cole, Edith, 

" George B., 

" M. Jennie Williams, 

" " Natalie, 

Ewing, Fannie Badger, 
" Samuel Evans, 

Gurley, Caroline B. Neff, 
" Henry, 
** Leonora, 

Humes, Caroline, 
Clara ^., 
" James, 
♦* Maria N., 
33X 



Chronological Number. 

2554 

2551 

255 

2557 

25572 

25124 
251244 
251243 

25122 

2512 

251241 

25123 

25125 

25121 
2512 

25124 
251242 

25635 

25635 

25633 
256351 

25633 
252121 

25212 

25212 
252122 
252123 

25253 

25253 

25226 

25226 

252261 

252262 

2573 

25733 

25731 

25732 



Page. 

277 

256, 277 

277 

277, 281 

281 

199, 200 

200 

200 

199 

198, 199 
200 
199 

199, 201 
199 

198, 199 

199, 200 
200 
296 

292, 296 

295 

296 

292, 295 

216 

215, 216 

215, 216 

216 

216 

220, 222 

220, 222 

217, 219 

217, 219 

219 

219 

304 

304 

304 

304 



Chronological Ndmbeb. 



Humes, Samuel C, 


2573 


Maxwell, Caroline Neff, 


256311 


Isabella Neff, 


25631 


" Nathaniel Hamilton, 


256312 


Rudolph Neff, 


256313 


" Sidney Denise, 


25631 


Mendenball, Margaret Currie, 


25632 


" Lawrence, 


25632 


Naf, Hannah Morse, 


2 


" Rudolf, 


2 


Neff, Alice Gray, 


25635 


*' Ambrose W., 


2571 


" Ambrose W., 


25722 


" Barbara, 


22 


" Bond, 


25726 


" Caroline Bird, 


252 


" Caroline B., 


25226 


" Caroline, 


25251 


" Caroline Margaret Burnet, 


2563 


" Caroline Burnet, 


25633 


" Caroline, 


2573 


" Charles, 


2525 


" Charles S., 


25227 


" Clark Williams, 


25222 


'* Clifford Alfred, 


25381 


" Clifford Gordon, 


25323 


" Clarence, 


25713 


" Clara Stanbery, 


2572 


" Edith Sterrett, 


25617 


. " Edmund W. S., 


2538 


" Edmund Eugene, 


25383 


" Elizabeth Clifford Wayne, 


253 


" Elizabeth Clifford Wayne, 


2536 


" Elizabeth Clifford, 


25311 


" Elizabeth, 


21 


" Eliza Clifford, 


25326 


" Ellen B. Thomas, 


2532 


332 





Page, 

301, 304 
293 
293 
293 

293 

292, 298 

294 

292, 294 

179 

179 

292, 296 

301, 302 

303 

179 

803 

187, 214 

217, 219 

220 

290, 292 

292, 295 

301, 304 

214, 220 

217 

217 

259 

257 

302 

301, 303 

291 

255, 259 

259 

187, 255 

255 

256 

17^ 

257 

255, 257 



Name. 

Neff, Estelle J, Fechet, 
" Fanny Badger, 
" Frank Livingston, 
*' Frederick Kudolph, 
" George W., 
♦' George W., 
" George W., 
" George W., 
" George Washington, 
" Hannah, 
" Hannah, 
" Harriet Ludlow, 
" Helen, 
" Howard, 
" Hope, 
" Isabel Howard, 
" Isabella Lamson, 
" Isabella, 

♦' James Moore Wayne, 
" James P. W., 
" James P. W., 
" Jane Bird, 
** Johannes, 
*' Jonathan Cilley, 
" John Rudolph, 
*' John Rudolph, 
" John Rudolph, 
" John Rudolph, 
*' John Rudolph, 
" John Rudolph, 
*• Joseph Seal, 
" Josephine M. Cilley, 
" Josephine Clark Burnet, 
*' Josephine Clark, 
" Juliana Wayne, 
" KatharinaL., 
" Laura S,, 
333 



Chronological Number. 

2538 
25253 
25223 
25634 
2572 
25711 
25724 
257 
2526 
23 
251 
25252 
25612 
25614 
25638 
25615 
256 
25631 
2539 
2527 
25228 
2521 
26 
25284 
2524 
25ti8 
25221 
2535 
2562 
252 
25252 
2528 
2563 
25637 
2533 
25324 
25721 



Page. 

255, 259 
220, 222 
217 
292 
301, 303 
302 
303 
187, 301 
214 
179 
187, 198 
220, 221 
291 
291 
292 
291 
187, 290 
292, 293 
255, 260 
214 
217 
214, 215 
179 
228, 224 
214 
214, 223 
217 
255 
290 
187, 214 
220, 221 
214, 223 
290, 292 
292 
255 
257 
303 



Name. 


Chronological Numbek. 


Page. 


eflf, Louise Agniel, 


25393 


260 


" Louisa Badger, 


2525 


214, 220 


" Lucy Wallace, 


2561 


290, 291 


" LucyW., 


25613 


291 


" Lucille Nettelton, 


2539 


255, 260 


" MaryC, 


25224 


217, 218 


" Mary Seal, 


2525 


214, 220 


" Mary B. Wampole, 


25284 


223, 224 


" Mary Shillito, 


25616 


291 


" MaryS., 


25725 


303 


" Mary, 


24 


179 


" Mary Amanda, 


258 


187, 307 


" Maria White, 


257 


187, 301 


" Margaret Currie, 


25632 


292, 294 


" Matilda, 


259 


187 


" Montague Phelps, 


2537 


255, 258 


" Narcissa Williams, 


2522 


214, 217 


" Narcissa, 


25282 


223 


" Nettelton, 


25391 


260 


" Nicholas W. Thomas, 


25321 


257 


" Niua Wayne, 


25383 


259 


" Percy Hastings, 


25225 


217 


" Peter, 


25 


179, 187 


" Peter, 


256 


187, 290 


" Peter, 


25315 


256 


" Peter, 


2531 255 


i, 256, 277 


" Peter Rudolph, 


25636 


292 


" Peter Rudolph, 


2563 


290, 292 


" Rebecca Scout, 


25 


179-187 


" Rebecca, 


2523 


214 


" Rebecca, 


255 


187 


" Rebecca, 


25632' 


292 


" Rebekah, 


25314 


256 


" Rebecca Smith, 


2571 


301, 302 


" Richard Wayne, 


2534 


255 


" Richard Wayne, 


25392 


260 


" Robert Burnet, 


25631' 


292 


334 







Name. 


Chronological Number. 


Page. 


Neff, Kudolph Lee, 


25281 


223 


" Rudolph, 


25639 


292 


" Samuel, 


27 


179, 309 


" Sarah, 


254 


187 


" Sarah A. Biggs, 


2531, 2551 


255, 256 


" Sarah Josephine, 


25283 


223 


" Stewart Maurice, 


25371 


258 


" Stewart, 


25712 


302 


" Stanbery, 


25723 


303 


" Susan Clark, 


25630 


292 


" Susan L.Wood, 


2537 


255, 258 


" Theodore, 


25325 


257 


" Thomas J. Biggs, 


25312 


256 


" Wallace, 


25611 


291 


" William, 


253 


187, 255 


" William Howard, 


2561 


290, 291 


" William, 


25323 


257 


" William, 


25313 


256 


" William Clifford, 


2532 


255, 257 


" William Peter, 


2522 


214, 217 


Patterson, Charles Neff, 


2511 


198 


" Haunah Neff, 


251 


187, 198 


" Rebecca, 


2512 


198, 199 


William, 


251 


187, 198 


Wade, George K. Budd, 


251252 


201 


" Isabella Neff Budd, 


25125 


199, 201 


■ " McKean Buchannan, 


251253 


201 


" Robert Buchannan, 


25125 


199, 201 


" Robert Budd, 


251251 


201 


Williams, Caroline Neff, 


25211 


215 


Cyrus M., 


2521 


214, 215 


Jane Bird Neff, 


2521 


214, 215 


" M. Jennie, 


25212 


215,216 


Yardley, Kirkbride, 


258 


187, 307 


" Mary Amanda, 


258 


307 


" Thomas, 


2582 


307 


William, 


2581 


307 


335 







of 

"^nmts on gaM^s of giescjetit 

FROM RUDOLF NAF THROUGH SAMUEI. NEFF. 



NAME. 


Chronological Number. 


Page. 


Bruner, Adam, 


2715 


310 


Charles E., 


2710 


310 


Ellen M., 


27ir 


310 


Elizabeth B. N., 


271 


310 


Elizabeth N., 


2714 


310 


" Henry, 


2716 


310 


" John A., 


2718 


310 


" James P., 


2713 


310 


" Mary A., 


2711 


310 


Sarah J., 


2717 


310 


" Thomas J., 


2719 


310 


William, 


271 


309, 310 


Wniiam M., 


2712 


310 


Corson, Amos, 


277 


309, 316 


" Benjamin F., 


2778 


316 


Eleanor Neff, 


2773 


316 


Henry B., 


2775 


316 


Hannah Neff, 


277 


316 


Hester Neff, 


2771 


316 


John G., 


2772 


316 


Rachel A., 


2777 


316 


RufusL. T., 


2774 


316 


William A., 


2776 


316 


Fulton, Gardener, 


273 


312 


336 







Chronological Number. 



Fulton, James K, 


2731 


312 


Mary Neff, 


273 


312 


Hough, Eleanor Neff, 


278 


317 


Jonathan T., 


278 


309, 317 


Jennings, Eleanor Neff, 


2762 


315 


Hester Neff, 


276 


315 


JohnC, 


276 


309, 315 


JohnC, 


2761 


315 


Neff, Benjamin, 


275 


309, 314 


" Eleanor Helveston, 


27 


179, 309 


" Eleanor, 


278 


309, 317 


- Elizabeth B. N., 


271 


309, 310 


" Hannah, 


277 


309, 316 


" Harriet Hilt, 


274 


309, 313 


" Hester, 


276 


309, 315 


" Jacob, 


272 


309, 311 


" Mary, 


273 


309, 312 


" Mary Jones, 


272 


309, 311 


" Kobert, 


274 


309, 313 


" Samuel, 


27 


179, 309 


" Sarah, 


279 


309 



337 



%niCizx. 



Names. 



Pages. 



Aebli, Hans, 25, 26 

Ackert, Phillip E., 143 
Alexander, Archibald, 80, 83, 264 

Allen, William, 65, 67 

Allin, LuUu Post, 139 

Anderson, George, 232, 249 

Saml. v., 204 

240, 241 

Andrews, William H. , 266, 276 

*' Maria Biggs, 276 

" Rebecca, 276 

" Jeannette, 276 

Anne, Queen, 89 

Armel, William J., 213 

'' MaryC, 213 

Armstrong, Dr., 84 

Asbury, Francis, 130 

Aydelote, Eev. Dr., 244 

Backman, R., 90 

Badger, Louisa, 213 

Baker, Adam, 69, 179 

" Alderman, 275 

" Arnold, 130 

" Daniel, 83,84 

Baldwin, M. W., - 182, 183 

Barnes, Albert, 207 

Barr, William, 298 

Bechli, Daniel, 177 

Beck, Alphonse Lam., 148 

Bender, Christopher, 77 

339 



Names. 








Pages. 


Benson, Peter, 








286 


Berrien, 








230 


Biggs, Anna Danforth Keys, 








276 


" Benjamin, 








274, 275 


" Catherine Vankirk, 








276 


" Cleveland, 








276 


" Cornelia S. Poinier, 








277, 279 


" Francis Dane, 








276 


" Henry W., 




266, 


267 


275, 276 


" James, 




270, 


271 


272, 273 


" John, 


268 


,269, 


270 


274, 275 


" Joseph, 




273, 


274 


275, 276 


" Josephine, 








276 


" Kate, 








276 


" Maria, 


266 


269, 


270, 272, 275 


•' Nathan Hazen, 








276 


" Phoebe, 








274 


" Rebecca, 


157 


266, 267 


268, 275 


" Sarah, 




253, 


268 


274, 275 


" Thomas, 82, 84, 85, 181, 


182, 189, 


253,261, 


262, 263, 




' 264,265, 


267 


275, 276 


Binney, Horace, 








181,297 


Bird, Caroline, 








112, 202 


" Charles, 








208, 284 


Black, Wm. K., 








119 


Bleuh, David, 








77 


Boyd, Alexander, 








203, 211 


Bockinger, 








32 


Brock, Daniel, 








127 


" Mary, 








127 


Brubacher, Henry, 








103 


Buchannan, Robert, 








236 


Buckius, Phillip, 








69, 179 


Budd, Annabella Parks, 








197, 200 


" Blanche, 








200 


" Britton I., 








200 


" Charles P., 








196 


340 











Names. 




Pages. 


Budd, Georgia Knight, 




200 


" George K., 




188, 196 


" Helen W., 




196 


" Isabella Neff, 




196 


" MarciaD., 




196 


" Rebecca Patterson, 




189 


" Wayman C, 


196 


, 197, 200 


Eurnet, Alice Gray, 




289 


Arthur G., 




289 


" Caroline Burnet Neff, 




295 


" Caroline Margaretta, 




290 


" Hugh Gordon, 




289 


' ' Josephine Clark, 




290 


William B., 




295 


Buser, Anna, 




64, 174 


Butler, Pierce, 




249 


Calhoun, Gustavus, 


204 


, 226, 230 


Hugh, 


204 


, 226, 230 


•Campbell, Julia, 




249 


George, 




126, 127 


" Martha, 




180 


Carster, George, 




71, 74 


■Caraccas, 




271 


Carster, Frederick, 


72, 73, 


74, 75, 76 


Castor, Miss, 




261 


" George, 




7Q, 80, 82 


Chase, Salmon P., 




240, 287 


Cilley, Josephine, 




218 


Clark, David W., 




182 


Clifford, Thomas, 




249 


Cliver, Irwin S., 




150 


Cody, Frank M., 




173 


Cole, Edith, 




218 


" George B., 




213 


" M. Jennie Williams, 




213 


" Natalie, 




213 


•Coleman, William, 




65,67 


341 







Names. 


Pages. 


Corwau, Edward T., Rev., 


80 


Culbertson, John C, 


298 


De Clifford, Elizabeth, 


249 


Thomas, 


247 


DehoD, Bishop, 


244 


Denzler, Ulrich, 


31,33 


Dive, Bethune& Co., 


230 


Doak, John W., 


82 


Duugan, Martha, 


82 


Eberle, John, 


93 


Earp, George, 


208 


" Robert, 


208 


" Thomas, 


208 


Erb, 


101 


Eshleman, Martin, 


105 


Fechet, Estelle J., 


254 


Fiuley, James B., Rev., 


244, 248 


Fitzsimons, C, 


230 


Florey, 


101 


Foehring, Christopher Frederick, 


72, 75, 79, 80 


Froelich, Leonard, 


77 


Fuller, J. M., 


251, 252 


Fussli, Peter, 


27 


Garrett, John K., 


15S 


Gardner, Jacob H., 


131 


George I., King, 


91 


" II., King, 


66, 91, 97 


Giller, Mathias, 


170 


Gilman, Edward W., 


265 


Gillet, T., 


271 


Girard, Stephen, 


204 


Glass, Mr., 


226 


Goddard, 


271 


Goldli, 


27, 28, 33 


Gordon, Ann, 


249 


Patrick, Hon., 


92,94 


Graaf, Hans, 


91,93 


342 





Names. Pages. 

Graf, Frederick C, 230 

GrafFenreid, Christopher De, 90 

GrahD, H., 174, 175 

Green, Dr., 84 

Greenig, Louis N., 172 

Gresham, 250 

Gurley, Caroline B. Nefi, 213 

Henry B., 213 

" Leonora, 213 

Harbaugh, H., 80 

Harden, Henrietta, 250 

Harmann, Henry P., 145 

Hatfield, Samuel, 109 

Hazen, Josephine, 276 

Henry, S. C, 83 

Hess, Jacob, 90 

Hodge, Charles, Rev., 83, 84, 261 

Hogeudobler, Frederick, 105 

Huber, John, 31 

Humes, Caroline Neff, 300 

Clara N., 300 

" James, 300 

Maria N., 300 

Samuel C, 299, 300 

Hunterson, Geo. W., 135 

H.uzette, Mary, 99 

Irwin, Charles, 170, 171, 172 

Israel, 203 

Jacobs, Ann, 275 

" Joseph, 275 

Jaueway, Dr., 189 

Jauch, John, 29 

Jefferson, Thomas, ' 273 

Johns, John, Bishop, 83 

Johnson, A., 299 

Rev. Dr., 244 

Joner, Wolfgang, 24 

343 



Names. 


Pages. 


Jones, J. C, 


230 


Kalm, Peter, 


48,49 


Kambii, Kleinbaus, 


30,31,33 


KaufFman, Isaac, 


93, 102, 103 


Ann, 


93 


Fanny, 


99 


Kehler, Joshua, 


103 


Keller, Mrs., 


93, 101 


Keylerz, John, 


170 


Keys, Anna Danforth, 


276 


KilgoLir, John, 


297 


Kissinger, Jacob, 


105 


Kollock, Kev., 


244 


Lamson, Isabella, Mrs., 


183, 285 


Landis, Fannie, 


90 


" Hans, 


90 


" Oswald, 


90 


Lavater, Eudolf, 


28, 30, 33 


Lawrence, Josiah, 


237, 297 


Levine, 


102 


Ludlow, Harriet, 


220 


MacDonald, George, 


63 


Madera, Jacob, 


77 


Madery, Christopher, 


124 


Mauer, Rudolph, 


72, 74, 76 


Maxwell, Caroline Nefi, 


289 


Isabella Neff, 


289 


" Nath aniel Hamilton , 


289 


Rudolph Neff, 


289 


" Sidney Denise, 


289 


May, Jacob, 


77 


McCarty, J. W., Rev., 


244 


McClure, Wm. H., 


105 


Mcllvaine, Charles P., Bishop, 


83 


Meier, William, 


45 


Mendenhall, Lawrence, 


292, 294 


" Margaret Currie Neff, 


294 


344 





Names. Pages. 

Meyer, Jacob, 72, 74, 76 

Meyers, Yost, 77 

Meylin, Hans, 90,91,93 

Michelle, Louis, 90 

Millar, Wm. A., 139 

Miller, D. S., 78 

" Hans, 90 

" Ulrich, 90 

Minty, Maum, 241 

Mintzer, E. L., Jr., 175 

Miranda, 271 

Mitchell, O. M., 242, 264 

Montgomery, 204 

Moiig, 118 

Moore, Perry, 119 

Morrow, Samuel, 225 

Morse, Hannah, 52, 54, 56, 58, 59 

" Joseph, 52, 54, 58 

" Mrs., 50,51,52,53,54,56,58,59 

Morton, John, 118 

Murphy, Thomas, Rev., 70, 71, 85 

Musselman, 93, 102 

Naf, 13, 14, 18, 19, 21, 35, 38, 159 

" Adam, 13,15,16,18,24,27,31,33,34,38,88,160 

" Anna, 177 

" Arnold, 16,17,88 

" " Emil, 13,^19, 159 

" Hans, 160 

" Heini, 160 

" Heinrich, 160, 173, 174 

" John, 160, 161, 173 

" Jacob, 44, 45, 46, 47, 49, 50, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59, 

64, 65, 67, 88, 95, 96, 160, 161, 173, 174, 175, 177, 268 

" Mary, 65 

" Rudolf, 44, 45, 46, 47, 49, 50, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59, 

64, 65, 67, 88, 95, 96, 161, 173, 175, 268 

Naff, 13, 88 

345 



Neaf, Jr., Henry, 


94 


Neely & Jones, 


271, 273 


Neif and Brothers, 


204, 209, 235, 236 


Neff, Alice, 


288 


" Ambrose W., 


299 


" Andrew, 


99 


" Anna, 


120, 122, 124, 125, 127, 172, 174 


" Barbara, 


38, 64, 69, 90 


" Benjamin, 


96, 128 


" Bond, 


300 


" Caroline, 


212, 288, 299 


" Catherine, 


254 


" Charles, 


128, 212 


" Clara, 


300 


" Clarence, 


299 


" Clark, 


212 


" Clifford, 


253, 254 


" Daniel, 


93, 97, 98, 99, 100, 128, 175, 176, 177 


" David, 


98, 100, 122, 123, 124, 176 


" Edith, 


288 


" Edmund, 


253, 254 


" Eliza, 


254 


" Elizabeth, 


63, 64, 69, 124, 128, 242, 250, 253 


" Esther, 


124, 177 


" Fannie, 


213 


'« Felix, 


39 


** Francis, 


93 


" Frank, 


212 


" Frederick, 


288 


" George, 105, 


164, 169, 181, 183, 212, 233, 284, 285, 




297, 299, 300 


" Hannah, 60, 


61, 64, 68, 69, 70, 82, 86, 154, 157, 158, 




159, 169, 173, 178, 180, 184, 185 


" Helen, 


288 


" Dr. Heinrich, 


94 


" Henry, 


93, 97, 98, 99 


" Hope, 


288 


346 





Names. Pages. 

Neff, Howard, 286 

" Isaac, 99 

" Isabel, 288 

" Isabella, 287,288,289 

" James, 212,253,254 

" Jane, 212 

" Dr. Jacob K., 93 

- Jacob, 67, 71, 87, 93, 98, 99, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 

126, 127, 128, 160, 171, 172, 174, 178, 180 

- Johannes, 68, 69, 161 
♦' John, 93, 97, 98, 99, 100, 159, 169, 181, 184, 202, 212, 

229, 230, 233, 235, 253, 284, 287 

" Jonathan, 213 

" Joseph, 212 

" Josephine, 203, 288 

" Juliana, 253 

*' Laura, 297,300 

" Lucy, 288 - 

" Margaret, 288 

- Maria, 299 
" Mary, 69, 127, 128, 164, 169, 183, 212, 288, 300, 305 
" Matilda, 165 
" Montague P., 253, 254 
*' Narcissa, 213 
" Nettelton, 254 
■" Nicholas, 253 
" Nina, 254 
^' Paul, 40 
" Percy, 212 
'' Peter, 5, 68, 69, 87, 128, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 

161, 162, 164, 169, 177, 180, 181, 183, 185, 186, 
225, 228, 233, 253, 265, 268, 275, 283, 287, 288 

- Rebecca, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 161, 163, 164, 169, 180, 

181,183,184, 185,186,212,226,261, 283, 288, 299 
" Rebekah, 253 

«' Richard, 253,254 

- Robert, ' 128,288 

347 



Names. Pages. 

Neff, Rudolph, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 73, 74, 75, 76, 85, 86, 87, 120, 

123, 124, 125, 127, 128, 154, 156, 157, 158, 

159, 160, 161, 164, 167, 169, 170, 171, 172, 

174, 178, 180, 185, 186, 212, 213, 261, 288 

" Samuel, 68, 69, 87 

" Sarah, 5, 128, 162, 176, 213, 261 

" Staubery, 300 

" Stewart, 254, 299 

" Susan, 288 

" Theodore, 254 

" Timoleon Carl von, 39 

" Wallace, 288 

" WUliam, 100, 161, 169, 181, 183, 204, 212, 225, 233, 

253, 254, 283, 284, 285, 287, 288 

Neff, 88 



Neff, Wanton & Co., 


205, 209 


Neger, Johanna, 


174 


NeifF, Francis, 


89, 90, 91, 93, 97, 99 


" Henry, 


89,93 


" John, 


93 


" Johann Heinrich, 


89 


Nelson, Dr., 


193 


Nettelton, Lucille, 


254 


Neswinger, Samuel, 


77 


Newbold, 


204 


Oberholtzer, Miss, 


93, 102 


Oburn, Joseph, 


115 


Orlady, Dr. M., 


109 


Owen, Sarah, 


139 


Parks, Annabella, 


197 


Patterson, Charles, 


196 


Hannah, 


82, 188, 196 


" John S., 


106 


" Rebecca, 


196 


William, 


181, 188 


Pendleton, Cynthia, 


241 


Penn, William, 


91,94 


348 





Names. Pages. 

Perrine, Thornton M., 106 

Peters, Joseph, 272 

Phelps, Montague, 242 

Poinier, Cornelia, 277 

Pooler, Robert, 250 

Qiiig, Edwin, 145 

Eelf, Charles P., 206 

Riley, 226 

Ridgway, 204 

Rohb, Charles, 237 

Roe, Elizabeth Caldwell, 250 

Rohrer, Heinrich, 71, 74, 76 

Ross, William, 13 

Runkle, William, 79 

Rupp, I. D., 43, 67, 88 

Rush, Benjamin, Dr., 164 

Samo, Samuel, 272 

ScarfF, J. J., 105 

Scheibly, Frederick, 77 

Schraid, Jacob, 77 

Schonbruuner, John, 32 

Schudy, Sirach, 71, 74, 76 

Schweiger, John, 30 

Scout, Aaron, 155, 156 

" Rebecca, 156 

«' Sarah, 156 

Seal, Mary, 212 

Sehner, Gottleib, 93 



Magdalen, 



93 

Sherwood, Neely & Jones, 271 

Shultz, Rudolph, 77 

Shoemaker, John C, 46 

Sloan, Henry, 206 

Smith, James, 105 

" Rebecca, 299 

Smith, 204 

Smyth, Thomas, 250 
349 





Names. 


Pases. 


Smyth, Juliana, 


250 


Springer, R. R., 


298 


Steiner, 


101 


Stanbery, Clara, 


299 


Charles, 


299 


Henry, 


299 


Steele, Rev., 


261 


Steils, Edward, 


77 


Stites, Richard M., 


249 


Strieker, Adam, 


69, 125, 127, 172, 179 


Sullivan, Joshua, 


170 


Telford, Charles L., 


264 


Taylor, Griffin, 


297 


Tennant, William, 


80 


Thalweil, 


27 


Thomas, Ellen B,, 


254 


Thorpe, Robt., LL.D., 


272, 273 


Toning, 


28, 30 


Thumysen, Jungbaus, 


31 


Tufft, William, 


272 


Van Home, Rev. David, 


175 


Wade, Buchannan, 


197 


" George, 


201 


" Isabella, 


201 


" McKean, 


201 


" Robert, 


201 


Wallace, Lucy, 


288 


Washington, Lund, 


274 


Wayne, Elizabeth Cliffi)rd, 


232, 233, 244, 249, 250 




' James, 


249 




Juliana, 


250 




' Mary, 


249, 250 




' Richard, 


233, 249, 250 




* Stephen, 


249, 250 




' Thomas, 


249, 250 


William C, 


249 


Weed, Rev. H. R., 


274 




350 





Names. Pages. 

Wheler, Samuel, 126 

"White, Ambrose, 298 

" Maria, 298 

Whitehead, Richard, 126 

Robert, 126 

Wilber, Backus, 189 

Wilkins, George, 77 

Williams, Cyrus M., 212 

M. Jennie, 212 

" Narcissa, 212 

Wilson, 193 

Wilson, James P., . 207 

Winch, Louis H., " 176,177 

Wood, Susan L., 254 

Wonton, 205, 209 

Worrell, John H., 69, 172, 179 

Yardley, Kirkbride, 183, 305 

" Mary Amanda, 305 

William, 305 

Thomas, 305 

Zebley, Jacob, 72, 74, 76 

Zobli, Esther, 177, 178 

" Jacob, 177, 178 

Zwingli, Ulrich, 15, 20, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 160 



35X 



^Mznd^, 



Data for a chronological table of Dr. John Henry Neiff 
and his descendants, brother of Francis NeifF (see page 93), 
has been obtained in a large degree from the work of " Mil- 
ton B. Eshleman, of Paradise, Lancaster County, Pa., com- 
pleted July 4, 1867," being a blank book, systematized by 
headings of his own, in print, and filled out by pen, of which 
he writes he thinks he made five or six copies, entitled " Reg- 
ister of Consanguinity, containing a Record of Seventy-five 
Families and the Names of Three Hundred and Twenty De- 
scendants of Rev. Jacob Neff, who resides at Strasburg, Lan- 
caster County, Pennsylvania." This Rev. Jacob Neflf was a 
son of Dr. John Henry Neff. Information on this line of de- 
scent, as well as that of others bearing the name of Neff, who 
are not mentioned in this volume, can in many instances be 
obtained by communicating with the compiler, as the data 
was not furnished until after this edition had gone to press. 



352 



HECKMAN 

BINDERY INC. 

..5^ MAY 



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INDIANA 46962