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929.2 
D4394e / 
15557 / 



GEMHALOGY COLLECTION 



3 1833 01237 4481 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/chronologyancestOOeard 



HONCHAUNCEY MDEP 
AT THE AGE OF 83 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY 

_OF 

CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

WITH FIFTY-FOUR OTHER AFFILIATED FAMILIES 

OF NEW YORK. NEW JERSEY AND 

NEW ENGLAND 



AN APPENDIX ON THE HEGEMAN ANCESTRY 

WITH TWENTY-FIVE OTHER AFFILIATED 

FAMILIES 

COMPILED BY 

WILLIA.M A. EARDELEY, M. A. 



NEW YORK 
1918 



v^7 



y 



1555798 



Copyright, 1918 

BY 

CHAL'NCEY M. DEPEW 



PREFACE 

The desire of an individual to trace his or her ancestry and to per- 
petuate, in print, the salient facts in the lives of these same ancestors, is 
commendable to the last degree. Hence this book of Records with the 
main authorities for the facts herein contained. 

The 1907 Ogden Family Genealogy sa\'s "There is something peculiarly 
gratifying to the average American citizen to be able to trace his lineage to 
the primal days of colonial life, and especially to a worthy, virtuous and 
honored ancestor ... the undying satisfaction in the knowledge that one 
is heir to strong and enduring ancestral character: in the fact of being able 
to point back to him who first came to the New World. . . . There is 
much fascinatio;-. ir. the tracing Lack of aiiCvistral lines, in spite of the many 
discouragements and the tediousness of the work." 

The realization that one's ancestors were patriotic citizens, who fought 
for the independence of this Great American Republic, should be a strong 
incentive for the descendants to emulate such sterling deeds. 

The mingling of the blood of the fine French Huguenot Families of 
Depew and See; of the Dutch Families of Cranckheyt and Siboutsen and 
Van Lent and Wiltsie and Van Boerum and Storm and Van Wert; of the 
English Families of .Mitchell and Alinot and Sherman and Prescott and 
Ogden and Root and Curtiss and Wellington and Winship and Wilder and 
Willard; with the touch of the Irish in the Johnston Family — has given us 
one of our grandest men in the person of the Honorable Chauncey .Mitchell 
Depew. 

The author lays no claim to originality in the arrangement of this book, 
but has endeavored to follow the accepted lines. 

Special thanks are here rendered to .Mr. Robert Brown .Miller, of 

[iiil 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 



Brooklyn, New York, for help on the Cranckheyt and Depew and See lines; 
to Mr. Frank Emil Rapp, of Brooklyn, New York, for Lent and .Mitchell 
data; to Mr. Francis Bacon Trowbridge, of New Haven, Conn.; to Mr. 
Henry Mills, of Fairfield, Conn.; to .Mr. Franklin Couch. LL.B., of Peekskill, 
New York; to .Mr. Charles Elliott Warren, of New York; to .Mr. Ganson 
Dopew, of Buffalo, New York; to Mr. Sherman Lawrence Depew, of 
Detroit, Michigan; and to Mr. Charles Cook Paulding, of New York. 

WiLLiA.M A. Eardeley, Compiler 



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iDopiJc 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGES 

Title i 

Preface iii> iv 

Table of Contents v 

List of Twenty-One Paternal Ancestors vii 

List of Thirty-Five Maternal Ancestors ix 

Appendix: List of Hegeman Ancestors xi 

List of Illustrations xiii 

The Family of Du Puy in France xv-xix 

Noted Members of the Du Puy Family xxi-xxxiv 

Biography of Honorable Chauncey Mitchell Depew . . 12 

Deed 23 December, 16S5. to Ryck's Patent 245-249 

Services of Ancestors, and Honors 251-260 

Authorities Consulted 261-267 



[V] 



TWENTY-ONE PATERN.AL ANCESTORS, NEW YORK 







PAGES 










PAGES 


I. Crankheyt 


• 33-4 1 


1 1. 


See 71-72 


2. Depew 




1-32 


12. 


Siboutszen 






33-35 


3. de Plancken . 




73 


!3- 


Storm . 






67-69 


4. Hendrickse 




85 


14. 


Straitsman 






76-77 


5. Hermansen 




61 


15- 


Ter Bosch 






75 


6. Jacobs 




81-83 


16. 


Teunis 






33 


7. Janse . 




81 


•7- 


Van Boerum 






85-86 


8. Lent . . . 




61-65 


18. 


Van Wert . 






81-84 


Q. Meyerings 




7^-77 


19. 


Weyt . . 






3 


10. Monfoort . . 




73-74 


20. 


Wiltsie 






75-79 


21. 


Wc 


uters . 




. . 81-84 









THIRTY-FIVE MATERN.AL ANCESTORS, NEW YORK 
NEV/ JERSEY AND NEW ENGLAND 



1. Abbott 

2. Bond . 

3. Brooks 

4. Butler 

5. Butterfield 

6. Curtis 

7. Dunster 

8. Hammond 

Johnston 

Knell . 

Alinot . 

iMitchell 

13. Newman 

14. Ogden 

15. Palgrave 

16. Palmer 

17. Parks . 



35. 



Wi 



PAGES 










PAGES 


I2I-I23 


18. 


Platts 167 


107 


19. 


Prescott . 






I 67- 1 69 


I77-I7S 


20. 


Root . . 






91-94 


1 6 1 - 1 62 


21. 


Sawyer 






165-166 


43 


22. 


Sherman . 






53-59 


97-101 


23- 


Stevens 






163-164 


175-176 


24. 


Swayne 






1 1 7- 1 20 


1 10 


25- 


Sweetman 






183-185 


S7-90 


26. 


Thebaut . 






1 1 1 


95-96 


27. 


Ward . . 






117 


143-15 1 


28. 


Weed . . 






125-127 


43-52 


29. 


Wellington 






129-131 


103-106 


30. 


Welles . . 






98 


107-1 16 


31- 


Thomas Wheeler 


45 


• 133-135 


32. 


Timothy Wheeler 


• 157-159 


141-142 


33- 


Wilder . . . 


153-156 


1 79- 1 8 1 


34- 


Willard . . . 


171-174 


nship 




• • 137-139 









THE APPENDIX ON THE HEGEMAN ANCESTRY 

WITH T\\"ENTY-FOUR OTHER AFFILIATED 

FAMILIES 









PAGES 






PAGES 


I. Alberts .... 211 


14. 


Klock .... 


211-212 


2. Balster 






■95 


15- 


Le Febre . 


219 


3. Callen 






217 


16. 


Lott .... 


223-225 


4. Claes . 






230 


17- 


Margits . . . 


187 


5. Clock . 






211-212 


18. 


Niven .... 


235-244 


6. Cornell 






207-210 


19. 


Onderdonck . 


2 1 3-2 1 6 


7. Cornelise . 






207-2 1 


20. 


Rapalje 


201-206 


8. Derie . . 






219-222 


21. 


Remsen 


197-200 


9. De Witt . 






223 


22. 


Trico .... 


201 


10. Duryea 






219-222 


2 3- 


Van der beeck 


197-200 


1 1. Folckertsen 






229-233 


24. 


Vander Vliet . . 


227-228 


12. Gerretse . 






227 


25- 


Verscheur . 


217-218 


1 3. Hegeman . 






1 87- 1 96 


26. 


Wallace . . . 


235 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

Portrait of Chaunxey M. Depew, 

AT THE Age of 83 Frontispiece 

PAGE 

Coat of Arms of the Du Puy Family v 

Portrait of Isaac Depew i 

Portrait of .Martha .Mitchell Depew 3 

Portrait of Chauncey .M. Depew, Graduate of Yale 

University in 1856 13 

Portrait of Chalncey .M. Depew, Secretary of State 

of New York in 1S63 19 

Portrait of Chauncey .M. Depew, President of New 

York Central Railroad in 1S85 21 

Portrait oh Chauncey .M. Depew, Senator of the United 

States in 1899 23 

Portrait of Chauncey Root Mitchell 43 

Portrait of .Martha .Minot .Mitchell, Born Sher.man . . 51 

Portrait of Roger Sher.man, Signer of the Declaration 

of Independence 53 

Portrait of Roger .Minot Sherman 57 

Portrait of Judge Robert Johnston 87 

Portrait of Chauncey .M. Depew, Jr 187 

The Depew Ho.mestead in Peekskill, New York .... 245 



DEPEW AND iMITCHELL ANCESTRY 

THE FAMILY OF DU PUY IN FRANCE. 

The following records are taken from the igi6 printed "Colonial Men 
and Times," by Mrs. Lillie Du Puy Van Culin Harper, of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, 624 pages, as found by this lady "At Bibliotheqiie Nationale, 
Paris, France, .'\pril 21, 191 1, in a 'Histoire Genealogique des Famillie de 
De Puy-Montbrun, par Guy Allard, a Grenoble, 16S2,* pages 4, 5, 6, 7, 
and printed by her at page 369." 

"DU PUY" 

At Paris France. Guy Allard 

Notice of Seven Branches of " DU PUYS" 

"Du Mas" 

"De Rochefort" 

" De Bellecombe" 

"Du Puy de Murinais" 

" De Montbrun" 

" De la Jonchere" or "de Villefranche" and 

" De Condray." 

Arbre Genealogique 
Premiere B/anche. 

I. Raphael de Podio (qui est celle de Du Mas). 

II. Guy ou Hugues 1096: married de Poisieu 

III. .Alleman !, 11 15. Rodolphe. Romain. Raimon, Grand Maitre 
married de Saint Jean. 
Veronique Ademar. 

IV. Hugues 1 147. Guillaume, a fait branche qui est 
married celle Septieme Branche de Condray 
Florie de Moiranc. 12 10. 



C H R O N O L O G 'I' AND A N C E S T R "l' OF C H A U N C E Y M 



V. Alleman II, 1229; married. 

VI. Alleman III, 1282; 
married 

Beatrix Artaud. 



XI. 



XII. 



Eynier. 



VII. 


Alleman 


IV, 


Bastet a 


Florimon 


Ripert 


Hugues 




1316; 




fait branche 


Hum 


bert 


married 


married 




married 




de .Mont- 


Jean, 




Eleonor de 


.Arnande 




Eleonor 




brun, 1340. 






Durfort. 


de Rosans 




Alleman 




Beatrix 
married 
Baltesard de 
Chaussen 






They had 
Argistence. 

Agnes 
married 
Hugues de 
Bardoneche 


Sa femme. 


VIII. 


Alleman V, 1 


1342; married 


Ayna 


rde des 


RoUans. 




IX. 


Gillet, I 
married 
Alix de 


390; 
Bell 


ecombe. 






Eynier. 





Gillet II, 1416; 
married Florence 
de Hauteville. 
Beatrix de Tolignan. 

Florimont Eynier, 
1444: married 
Caterine de 
Bellecombe 



Artaud Eynier. Francois, 

a fait branche. 

de Belle- Guilluame. Alleman. 

combe, i 393. Cecille. 

Dedier, Claude. Jean, 



Eccles. 

Guionet. 

Marg. 



Eccles. 



Antoine. 
Beatrix. 
Eleanor. 



Amard, 
Chev. 
de S. 
Jean. 



Caterine 
married 
Antoine de 
Montclar. 



Avme. 



Jacques, 1475; Francois. 

married Francoise Astrand. 

Jacques had nine children by Jeanne de Vesc. 

f xvi 1 



THE FAMILY OF DU PUY IN FRANCE 



XIII. I. Jean, 1541; married Perrone de Mantonne; this is the line of 

Bartholomew De Puy of Virginia. 

2. Jacques, Ecclesiastic. 

3. Honorat, 1527; married Peronete de Claveson. 

4. Guillaume. 5. Charles. 6. Anne. 

7. Caterine married Claude de Marsane. 8. Claudine. 
9. ivlagdelaine married Jean Galbert. 

Honorat and Peronete had four children: 

XIV. Pierre. Francois, 157 1 ; Claude Anne. 

married married 

Jeanne Pelissier. Guigonne de Jouven. 

Francois and Jeanne had three children: 

XV. Jacques, 1618; Fran?ois, a fait Franfoise married 
married Martha branche. (De Hector de Forets. 
de Sibeut. Rochefort), 1630. 

Jacques and Martha (de Sibeut) had five children: 

XVI. Alexandre. Francois, 1659; Jeane. Antoine. Marie. 

married 

Antoinette de Lastic. 

Deuxieme Branche, qui est celle De Rochefort: 

XV. Franfois, 1630; married Catarine de Suffise. 

XVI. Franfois Laurent. Joachim. Jean-Franfois. Jeanne, 
married 

XVII. Joseph married 

XVIII. Laurent 11, married 

XIX. Jacques II. 

Troisieme Branche, qui est celle De Bellecomhe: 

X. Artaud Alleman, 1393; 
married Aynarde de .Vlurinais. 

XI. Francois, 1429; Falcon Antoine, Marguerite Jeanne, 
married a fait la branche married de Guigues. 
de Murinais. la Balme. Boniface. 

f xvii 1 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

Francois, 1429, had 

XII. Gillet, 1463; married 

XIII. Gabriel, 1524; Aymar Antoinette 
married Chevalier of S. married Amien Robe. 
Catarine Virien. Jean. 

Quatrieme Branche, c'est celle de Murinais, divided into two. 
******* 

Cinquieme Branche, qui est celle De Montbrun: 

VII. Bastet, 1340; married Marguerite de Montauban. 

VIII. Guillaume, 1362; Hugues Alleman Beatrix. Mabille 
married married married married 
Polie de .Montlor. Armande Gilete d'Agout; Hugues. 

de Rosans had Bastet. Ademar. 

had Perceval 
Briande; Beatrix; 

married Jacques married 

de Villemu. Dragomet de Moroce. 

Guillaume, 1362; married Polie de Montlor, and had 

IX. Bastet. Fouquet, 1406; Bastet. Alleman. Pierre-Girard. 
married 

Fouquet, 1406; married ; and had 

X. Jean, 1466; Aymard, Jeanne. Charlote. 
married Chevalier de S. Jean Religieuses. 
and had 

XI. Fourquet, 1490; Antoine. Morquet. Bonne, 
married Ecclesiastic . . . Guinot du Bot. 
Louyse d'Urre, 

and had 

XII. Aymar, 1551; Jacques. Jean. Nicole 
married married 
Caterine Valette. Aymar 

de Cleu. 
Jeanne married Antoine de Reviere. 



Caterine 


Blanche 


married 


married 


Antoine 


Gabriel 


Faure. 


Blain. 



THE FAMILY OF DU PUY IN FRANCE 



Aymar, 1551; married Caterine Valette, and had 
XIII. Aymar; Disdier. Charles, 1575, Renee Isabeau 

he had Chev.de married married married 

Pompee, S. Jean. Justine Barthelemy Jean 

Eccles. Alleman. de Barjact. Flotte. 

Jeanne married Gasper de Theys. 

Blanche married Laurent Alleman, Jacq. de Baronat, Philip, Philibert 
de S. Andre. 



Charles, 1573; married Justine Alleman, and had 
XIV. Justine. Louyse. Jean, 1592, 

married Lucresse de 
la Tour, and had 



Madelaine. 



XV. Charles-Rene. Jean. Alexandre. Rene, Justine. Antoinette. 

a fait 
branche qui est Marquerite. 
de la Jonchere ou 
de Villefranche, 1659. 

Septieme Branche, qui est celle de Condray: 

IV. Guillaume, 1210; married , and had 

V. Guillaume II, 1262: married , and had 

VI. Guillaume III, 1266; married , and had ' 

VII. Pierre, 1309, etc. 



NOTED MEMBERS OF THE DU PUY FAMILY 

The family of Du Puy was one of culture and refinement, and was also 
intellectually inclined, as we find them filling various professions. 

Hugues Du Puy, 14 19. Knight in an engagement. 

William Du Puy, 1437; married Jean L'Evesque. Gave his oath to the 
reigning Duke in the presence of the nobles of Saint Malo, in 1437. 

Pierre Du Puy, 1489, was Chamberlain to King Louis XI in France 

Du Puy (Lord du Chesne) took part in engagements in 1479-15 13. 

Joachim Du Puy, James Du Puy, Knights of Malta, 1525, and in 1562. 

Francis Du Puy, 1543. Steward or Trencher to the King. Captain 
of Nancy in 1543. 

"Reign of Elizabeth. Denizens in London, 1571. Peter de Puys, 
born in France, stationer, resident since 1566." 

"French Protestant Exiles," by Agnew, page 34. 
"Peter de Puis, born in France, stationer. Noel de Puis, his brother, 
and servant came in 1571 — sojourner with Marques Stacie. 

"Marques Stacie, French person born in Stegehera, broker, ..." 

"French Protestant E.xiles," page 74. 

Pierre Du Puy, born at Agen, 1582, died 1651. A French writer. He 
was also a successful Librarian and Councellor to the French King, Louis 
XIII, who reigned from 1610-1643. Jacques Du Puy, brother to Pierre, 
was his able assistant. 

"Hugunot Society of London, Volume 4, page 52. French Church of 
Southampton, 1596." 

"30 Juin — .Abraham, fils de Germain Ozane et de Judith Catel, s. f. P. 
Nicholas Du Puy." 

[xxi] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C H S T R 'l' OF C H A U N C E Y 



Du Puy Marquis de Monthrun in 1620. Lord of Rochefort of Saint 
Andre, of Montmejean; originally of the province of Dauphine. 

"Persons Naturalized by Royal Letters-Patent. Westminster, London, 
1682. John Du Puy, John Du Puy, minor." "French Protestant E.xiles," 
Volume 2, page 47. 

Philip Du Puy and David Du Puy were brothers and served as officers 
under William, Prince of Orange, 1650-1702. Both of the Du Puy brothers 
were killed at the Battle of the Boyne, in Ireland, in 1690. 

The Du Puy brothers, with many other Huguenots, fought bravely under 
the Duke de Shomberg and were considered heroes at the Battle of the 
Boyne. 

Some of the soldiers or their descendants came to Pennsylvania with 
' the Scotch-Irish. 

In France, in 1686, Jean Mascarene, with a fellow-prisoner, .Mr. Du Puy, 
of Caramen, was sentenced to the galleys for life. This was done because 
both professed the Protestant religion. .Mr. Alascarene writes: "Our 
property was confiscated, with the tine of 1,000 crowns, to the King; next 
we vvero i^kcn to the Parliament ... of Toulouse, where a few days 
later we were separated. .Mr. Du Puy remained in the conciergerie, and 
I was transferred to the Prisons of the Hotel de Ville, from which I write 
you." 

These are the words of .Mr. ALascarene to Mr. de Vie, his lawyer, written 
from the prisons of the Hotel de Ville. December i, 1687, Paris, France. 

Huguenots Naturalized by Royal Letters- Patent, Westminster, 16S7. 
Elias Dupuy, Elizabeth, wife of, and children. Mary, .Michael, Daniel, 
Elizabeth, Elias, Mary-Anne, Francis and Joseph. 

In 1688 Peter Dupuy. In 1698 Andrew Dupuy. In 1700 Philip 
Dupuy. "French Protestant Exiles." 

William of Orange, and .Mary, his wife, were crowned in 16S9 King and 
Queen of England, France and Ireland. 

"Social Life in Virginia," by Bruce, page 259. Among the citizens of 
the same county (Elizabeth City, County of Virginia) in 1692 was David 
Du Puy. 

[ xxii ] 



NOTED MEMBERS OF THE D U P U Y FAMILY 

"1695, French Church, Norwich, England, November 2. Marie, 
daughter of Jean Du Puits and .Marie Estere, was baptized. Sponsors — 
Mr. Franfois La Colombin, .Michele Motte, wife of Jean de Cleare." 

"18 June, 1695 — at a wedding in St. Patrick's, Dubhn, Ireland, one of 
the witnesses is Monsieur David de Poey." "French Protestant E.xiles," 
Volume 2, by Agnew, page 102. 

"OiTicial Summary — The three French Infantry Regiments passed re- 
view before Major-General Ramsey at Ostend, England, 14th August, 
1698. Captain Du Puy's, 2 Sargeants, i Drummer, 20 Sentinels," page 91, 
"French Protestant Exiles," Volume 2, by Agnew. 

Henry Depew, born 1749, died New York City 5 May, 1846; aged 97 
years. Mr. Depew served in the Revolutionary War and was at the 
surrender of Yorktown and other battles. 

Served in the War of the Revolution between 1775-17S3. "James 
Dupee, Peter Du-pee, William Dupee; Bounty Warrant. John Dupey of 
Prince Edward County, Virginia. "Report of the Secretary of War in 

1835" 

James Dupuy, Jr. (Captain). "Revolutionary Soldiers of Virginia. 
Report of the State Librarian." Page 147. 

In 1802 Rabaut Du Puy became an eminent statesman and presided 
over the Constituent Assembly in France, and by his integrity and broad- 
minded statesmanship shed lustre upon his Huguenot antecedents. 

Le Sieur Du Puy was among the noble Norman Barons who followed 
William the Conqueror, and took part in the Battle of Hastings in 1066. 
His name is on the Battle Abbey Roll, and his illustrious lineage is associated 
with the ivy-mantled towers bearing his name, "Chateau de la Hai-Dupuis." 
His coat-of-arms is painted opposite his name, "sur se grande tableau" 
(on the roll or list). See Goube's "History of Normandie." 

In the records of this house are found besides warriors, many Du Puys 
celebrated as Counselors, Ministers of State, Bishops and Cardinals, no 
less than four of them having been granted the Cardinal's Hat — Imbert 
Du Puy in 1327, Gerard Du Puy in 1375, Jacques Du Puy, born 1497, and 
one created Arch-bishop of Barri in 1557 was made Cardinal by Pope 
Julius II, and in consequence was Protector of Poland and President of the 
Order of Carmes and Malta; he died 26 April, 1583. 

f xxiii 1 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

Gerard Du Puy, Cardinal, . . . was made a brother at S. Florent, 
afterwards at Marmontier. He was made a Cardinal in 1375; he died 14th 
of February, i 389. 

Jacques du Puy, Cardinal, Arch-bishop of Bari, born at Nice, in Prov- 
ence, 9th of February, 1497. He was made a Cardinal in 1551 ; he died at 
Rome on Monday 26th of April, 1563, in the 69th year of his age; his body 
was buried by Antoine Du Puy, his nephew. Cardinal Du Puy had written 
several works; he was buried at the Church of St. Marie de la Minerve. 

Louis Du Puy, native of the town of Romans, in Dauphine, in the i6th 
century, was the son of a celebrated physician named Guillaume du Puy, 
and he himself excelled in the same profession. He lived at Poitiers and 
translated from the Greek into the French several treatises in a scholarly 
manner, and was of the same reputation as his father. 

Jean du Puy, Puteanus, a brother of the Order of Augustins, Professor 
of Theologie in the University of Toulouse; he died in 1623, in high honor 
and with a reputation of great piet_\'. 

Henri du Puy, or Ericius Puteanus, born at \'enloo, in the Duchy of 
Gueldre on the 4th of November, 1574; he studied at Dordrecht, Cologne 
and Louvain, and traveled to Italy, Rome, Padua and Milan; he died 
at the Chateau de Louvain on the 17th of Septem.ber, 1646, in the 72nd 
year of his age; he married Magdelene-Catherine de la Tour at Milan in 
1604. Henri Du Puy was classed among the most learned authors of his 
age. The city of Rome honored him and his issue in 1603 with citizenship 
and enrolled him and his posterity among the patricians. See "Abstract 
of Genealogy of the old house of the Du Puys, 1733," by Nicholas Balthazar. 
Henri Du Puy and his wife had four children: 1. Jean-Etienne, afterwards 
called Jesuite Du Puy; 2. Fauste Du Puy, m.entioned in 1628; 3. Juste Du 
Puy, who became secretary to the Arch bishop of Cosma; 4. Maxmilian 
Du Puy, who studied the same as his father. 

Franfois du Puy, General of the Order des Chartreux; native of Saint 
Bonet en Forez . . . mentioned in 1503, was chosen by the Bishops 
of Valence and of Grenoble to be their official, and exercised this office with 
great probity and knowledge. Finally he renounced the world and re- 
ceived the habit of Chartreux from the Bishop of Grenoble. He com- 
posed a work on the Psalms, in imitation of Saint Thomas, printed in 1520; 
he died 17th September, 1521. 



NOTED MEMBERS OF THE D U P U Y FAMILY 

Clement Du Puy, sixth son of Geofroy Du Puy, was a celebrated lawyer 
of the Parliament of Paris, and acquired a great reputation by his knowledge, 
eloquence and his uprightness. He was consulted in all great affairs of the 
State. He died when 48 years old on the 22nd August, 1554. He had 
married Philippe Poncet; they had three children: i. Clement Du Puy 
Jesuite; 2. Claude Du Puv; 3. Judith Du Puy. 

Clement du Puy Jesuite, son of Clement du Pu_\' the lawyer, horn at 
Paris, had a great reputation in his times for his theology and for his charity. 
His merits as a scholar raised him to take part in the principal affairs of the 
day and throughout the Province of France; he died at Bordeaux in i ;c,S. 

Claude du Puy, son of Clement Du Puy and of Philippe Poncet, was 
Counsellor to the Parliament of Paris. He was brought up by his Mother, 
who taught him the teachings of Turnebe, Lambin and .A.urat, or Dorat. 
He studied philosophy under the famous Cujas. He took a voyage into 
Italy whe.f-e he met the great men of that country, such as Ful\ius, Ursinus, 
Paul Manuce, . . . and m,any others. He was made Counsellor at 
Paris on the yth February, 1376; he died the ist of December, 1594, in his 
49th year. 

Christophe du Puy, eldest son of Claude Du Puy and Claude Sanguin, 
Counsellor to the Parliament, was made at Rome the Cardinal of Joyeuse. 
He gave great service to Monsieur de Thou in the first part oi his History. 
He had great zeal and was often consulted by Pope Urban \"III. He died 
on the 28th of June, 1654, aged nearly 75 years. 

Pierre du Puy, son of Claude du Puy. Counsellor to the Parlian-ient. 
He was Counsellor to the King and garde of his bibliotheque. He was a 
scholar the same as his father. He had great judgment and was assiduous 
in his studies. His principal friends were the historian De Thou and the 
celebrated Nicolas Rigault. These formed a Triune Three. Pierre died 
at Paris on the 14th of December, 165 1, aged 69 years. Nicolas Rigault, his 
friend, wrote his life which was printed in 16S1 in London. Henri de 
Valois made his funeral oration. Pierre Du Puy was the author of a vast 
number of valuable books and histories. Jacques Du Puy, his brother, 
Prier de Saint Sauveur, aided him in the compilation of all his works. 
Jacques Du Puy was made Garde of the Library of the King, and he died 
on the 17th of November, 1656. 

[ XXV ] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C E S T R "l' O !- C H A U N C E Y M . D f; P E W 

Germain Du Pu\', Pretre of the Oratoire, Cure of Chatres, . . . 
Chamoine of Saint Jacques de I'Hopital. a Paris, where he lived many 
years. He was a writer and author; he died in 1713, more than a sep- 
tuagenarian. He was the author of a number of works. "Le Grand 
Dictionnaire Moreri," Paris, pages 630 and 640. 

Noble Ftienne du Puy, ;\riter, Lord of Sauvescure; married by contr.-i:t 
Marie de Lupe and passed into the house of the Noble de la Motte, paroisse 
de Pouillon, the 4th August, 1644. 

Courcelle's History gives the House of De Pou\' coat-of-arms the same 
as the Du Puys, and says thc_\- are all of the same family, and that that is 
only another way of v.-riting Du Puy. 

The " Du Puys" in the Hal! of the Crusaders, Versailles, France, 1096 
A. D. In the Hall of the Crusaders, Room 5, there is a picture of Raymond 
Du Puy in the embrasure of the Middle Window. The co.at-of-arms of 
Raymond Du Puy is on one of the pillars and "Huges Du Puy, 1056," is 
up near the ceiling in the left-hand corner, as one faces the windows and 
Raymond Du Puy's picture. This is a magnificent Hall, and is the Pride 
of France; and our hearts gluwcd and thrilled within us, as we stood and 
looked at these crests and pictures, and felt that after almost nine hun- 
dred years we, the 24th generation with the "Du Pu>" blood in our veins, 
could rejoice to-day in the honor that they so well merited. (Mrs. 
Harper.) 

In the "Chateaux de Versailles, or Palace of the Hall of the Cru- 
saders," Room 21, we saw on the central arch, to the far left, a coat-of-arms 
marked " 1096 Raymond de St. Gilles, Comte De Toulouse." This room 
has also, in upper left-hand corner over the window, a coat-of-arms of 
"Hugues Du Puy, Sgr. (Lord) de Pereins d'Apifer de Rochefort. 1096." 
In Room 17 there was a picture of "Raymond de Saint Gilles, Comte De 
Toulouse, 1 105." This picture has a most noble face. The head wears a 
golden jewelled crown. The right hand is extended; the left grasps a 
powerful sword. A long, heavy blue-gray robe drapes his figure, while a 
broad red cross decorates his left shoulder. Also in Room 21, on the left 
hand of the central arch I found: A coat-of-arms, dated 1 1 19, " Raymond 
Du Puy; ler Gd. Maitre de I'ordre, de St. Jean de Jerusalem, Premier or 
first Grand Master of St. John of Jerusalem." In Room 21, on the left 

[ xxvi 1 



NOTED M E .\l B E R 5 OF THE D U P i: Y FAMILY' 

hand of the center arch may be found: Cross, dated 1128: "Hugues de 
Payens, ler Gd. .Maitre de I'Ordre du Temple." Premier or First Grand 
Master of the Order of the Temple. In Room 18, we saw a most beautiful 
painting by .Monsieur Gibot of the "Defense de la Celesyrie par Raymond 
Du Puy, Grand .Maitre de I'ordre de Saint Jean de Jerusalem, 1130." 
The Defense of Celesyrie by Raymond Du Pu>', Grand .^Iaster of the 
Order of St. John of Jerusalem, 1130. .Vnother painting jast above this 
one shows Raymond Du Puy made prisoner by a body of Turks, 11 30 
(28th, 4th month, 1910.) 

Du Puy is a very ancient French name, being one of the oldest in France. 
Puy signifies .Mountain; du equals "of the." In French, " Pu\- (du)"; 
in Latin, "de Podio." 

In the First Crusade Hugues Du Puy, one of the Dauphin's Knights 
and a Crusader, for the Conquest of the Holy Land, accompanied by his 
three sons, .■^dolph, Romain and Raymond, went with Godefroy de Bouillon 
to Palestine in the year 1006. 

Raymond Du Puy, 11 13, founded and was the First Grand .Master of 
the .Military Order of the Knights of St. John, of Jerusalem (i 1 13). This 
military order v/as afterward styled the " Knights Templars," in 1121; also 
the "Knights of .Malta." and acquired much wealth and wielded great 
power for several centuries. The Du Puy "coat-of-armis" v,"as a device with 
a gold shield with a red lion rampant, showing his teeth, and v,ith his 
tongue extended; also his claws. The tongue and clav.'s were blue. The 
coat-of-arms of the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem, the Crusaders, was 
a broad white cross of eight points on a red field. .According to the custom 
of the age of cnivalry, Raymond Du Pu_\-, when he had becom.e a Knight of 
Saint John of Jerusalem, quartered his own coat-of-arms with those of the 
Order of Saint John of Jerusalem. This latter coat-of-arms was deemed 
superior to that of the individual coat-of-arms. He therefore placed the 
arms of the order in the superior places of his shield, i.e., the First and 
Fourth Quarters, while he placed the arms of his father, Hugues Du Puy, 
in the Second and Third Quarters. 

"Le Grand Dictionnaire Historique du iMoreri, Volume VI H. Published 
at Paris, .MDCCLIX" (1759), page 632. Congressional Library at 
Washington, D. C. 

[ xxvii ] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y .M . D E P E \V 

In 1033 the Emperor Conrad le Salique (and not Henri II, in 1103) 
went as head of an army to take possession of the Ro>-alties of Aries and de 
Bourgogne, . . . One should find in the History of "Conrad le Salique," 
Emperor of Germ.any, 1033. what part Raphael de Podio, Grand Chamber- 
lain of the Empire, took in the conquests by the Emperor of Aries and 
Bourgogne, in France. Thus Y\-e might find the history of Raphael de 
Podio antedating the year 1033. (Mrs. Harper.) 1st Generation. — 
Raphael Du Puy, in Latin de Podio, Grand Chamberlain of the Empire, 
went with him; he was made Gouverneur of these new estates; after a time 
the descendants of Raphael du Puy were possessed of several states in 
Dauphine until the reign of Louis XI, who reunited all these souverainetes 
to the crown. The tomb of Raphael du Puy was opened at Pereins in 
1610 by order of .Monsieur le Compte de la Roche, gouverneur of Romaines 
in Dauphine. They found his body extended on a slab of marble, his 
sword on one side, his spurs on the other, and upon his head a helmet of lead, 
with an inscription thus translated into French by the historian, .Marquis 
of Saint .Andre-Montbrun: "Raphael de Podio, General de la cavalerie 
Romaine, and Grand Chambellan de I'Empire Remain." In the house 
of T)v P'U' in Dauphme, there ^-^y be ^een a medal of gold of the same 
Raphael, on the reverse side of which is written: "Raphael de Podio, 
Grand Chambellan de I'Empire Romain, under I'Empereur Auguste, 
Christ regnant in the chair." Only Octavian and Strabon, and Henri II, 
had the title of "Cesar Auguste." 

I. Raphael De Podio had a son: 

2nd Generation.^Hugues Du Puy I, Lord of Pereins. of Apifer and of 
Rochefort. He went to the conquest of the Holy Land with his three 
children and his wife, Deurard de Poisieu, in 1096. 

Guy Allard, page i, "Histoire Genealogique de Famille de Du Puy- 
Montbrun a Grenoble, 1682." Grenoble is just south of Lyon, in France. 

"The family of Du Puys had as a surname de Podeolo, de Psuato, de 
Puteolo, or de Podio. They are to be found at the siege of Nice by .\dmiral 
Soliman, of the Turks. 

"Then when the City of Azare had been captured he (one of this Du Puy 
family) obtained the Civil Rights under the name of Wido of Pusato. 
This cannot be a mistake because when Peyrins and the other places of the 

f xxviii 1 



NOTED MEMBERS OF THE D U P U Y FAMILY 

Romans were dependencies of the ancient kingdom of Bourgoyne, . . . 
it was necessary that among those who took part in the Crusades there 
should be some of this country; I have arranged a part of the names of the 
gentlemen who were in this party . . . Guy de Chevrieres, Alleman 
. . . Rodolphe and Romain du Puy, sons of Hugues. Their surname 
was de Podio." Hugues 1 founded the Abbey of Aiguebelle, order of St. 
Bernard, diocese of "St. Paul-trois-Chateaux." Me was one of the gallant 
Generals of Godefroi de Bouillon, and was in many brave encounters, so 
that this prince gave him the souverainete of the City of Acre, or Ptolemaide, 
a city in Syria, on the coast. 

" Hugues de Podio, this very (or most) excellent warrior Csaid Albert d'.Aix) 
was given this city." He had four sons: i. Alleman I; 2. Rodolplie, to 
whom Godefroi de Bouillon gave several lands in the Holy Land, and who 
was killed in combat in the valley of Ran. ; 3. Romain, who was killed in the 
principalities that Godefroi had given him; 4. Raymond du Puy, Second 
Recteur or Grand Master of the order of Saint John of Jerusalem. See 
"The Great Historical Dictionary," by Lewis Moreri; printed in 1694 at 
London. Raymond du Puy died in 1 160. Grand Master of the Order of 
St. John ot Jerusalem, and was ot Dauphiny. He went to the Holy Land 
with Godfrey of Bullen, and after taking Jerusalem devoted himself to serve 
the poor, and the Pilgrims in the Hospital of St. John in that city. Having 
already manifested his valor in battle, Gerard, who was Rector of the 
Hospital, dying, Raymond du Puy was chosen to succeed him. He pre- 
scribed Laws to his Order, took in many Brethren, divided them into three 
Degrees; namely, Knights, Servants at Arms, and Chaplains. All his rules 
or constitutions were confirmed in 1123 by Pope Calixtus II, and in i i 30 
by Innocent II, who gave them for their standard a Cross Argent in a Field 
Gules (the Malta Cross). He equipped his troops and sent them to 
Baldwin, the second King of Jerusalem, assisted him at the siege of Ascalon 
and contributed very much to the taking of it. See " Le Grand Dictionaire 
Historique," by Moreri, published 1759, at Paris. 

Raymond du Puy succeeded in i iSS Gerard, the one who founded this 
order. He was of the illustrious House of Du Puy, and had been made, in 
1 1 13, Maitre de I'hopital of the City of Jerusalem." Gerard had been 
called Gouverneur de I'hopital. Raymond made a new constitution, con- 
firmed by Calliste II in 1 123, and by Innocent 1 1 in 1 130, by which they had 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

a right to carry in war a silver cross, to-day called the cross of ".Malta," 
"in a Field gueulles." Raymond du Puy armed his troops and went to the 
help of Baudouin II, King of Jerusalem, and there they conquered the 
armies of the Infidels. In the year 1153 the King of Jerusalem was about 
to raise the siege of Ascalon, but the Grand .Maitre Du Puy persuaded him 
to remain before the city, and it surrendered in a few days. This conquest 
brought him a great deal of glory, which came to be heard b>- the Pope, 
Anastase IV, who accorded to his Order great privileges. Raimond was 
presented with a magnificent palace to live in. This made him have the 
jealousy of the other prelates in Jerusalem and the Holy Land. But the 
Order was maintained by the Sovereign Pontiff in these exemptions and in 
his privileges. This Grand-Maitre died in 1160, and was succeeded by 
Auger de Balben. Raymond du Puy is the first to have taken and carried 
the title of "Grand .Master of the Order," and he did not m.ake use of it 
until after Roger, King of Sicily, had given it to him in several letters that 
he had written to Raymond. This was all copied by Mrs. Harper at the 
library in Paris, France. (See " Bosio & Baudouin hist de I'order of S. 
Jean de Jerusalem"; also, IM. de Valbonnay's Recherches concernant 
Raimond Du Puy premier president ue ia chambre des Comptes de Dauphine 
in Volume VI, part I.") Guy Allard's "Histoire Genealogique de Familiie 
de Du Puy-.Montbrun a Grenoble, 1682," page 15. 

3rd Generation. — ist child — Alleman Du Puy I, Knight, Lord of 
Pereins, of Apifer and of Rochefort, at Dauphine during the time that his 
father, mother and brothers took the voyage to the Holy Land. As his 
inclinations did not seem to take him with them, he had the pleasure of 
receiving his parents again, who returned happily. .Alleman remained at 
home and cared for his home and his parents, showing by his conduct that 
he wished to make happy their declining years. He was not lacking in 
courage, either, as is demonstrated on several occasions. He had learned 
that William, Count de Forcalquier, of Ambrun, and of Gap, and .Marquis 
of Provence had attacked Giraud and Giraudet Ademars, Lords of .Monteil 
and of Grignan, who rendered homage for the land of .Monteil, and that this 
prince, in the year 1 1 15, had come himself almost to the gates of .Monteil, 
that are called Montielmart, a city of Dauphine, in order to compel these 
brothers to acknowledge him. He knew also that the Count de Valen- 



NOTED MEMBERS OF THE D U P U 'i' FAMILY 

tinois had given troops to the brothers, so he joined them and encouraged 
them with much help in several diiTerent encounters, until his brothers 
acknowledged that the defeat of the Count de Forcalquier was a part of the 
work of Alleman du Puy I. They acknowledged their indebtedness still 
further by giving to him in marriage their sister Veronique Ademar. .Mrs. 
Liliie Harper has seen a manuscript or deed dated "6 of the Kale of May, 
1 143," in favor of this Alleman, by Wiliiam-Hugues Ademar, Lord of Mon- 
teil, of the House of iMontbrun .... Veronique, wife of Alleman 
was a daughter of Giraud .Ademar, Lord of Monteil, de !a Garde and of 
Grignan, and niece of Aymar, .'\rchbishop of du Puy, so celebrated in the 
wars of the Holy Land. Lambert and Giraudonnet Ademar were his 
brothers. They died at the siege of Jerusalem and were great friends of 
Raimond Du Puy, Grand Master of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem. 

4th Generation.— Hugues Du Puy II, Knight, Lord of Pereins, Roche- 
fort, Apifer, and Montbrun; he took the Cross and went to the Crusades 
in 1140 with Ame HL Count of Savoye and acquitted himself with much 
glory; he married Floride Moiran, daughter of Berlion de Moiran. 

5th Generation. — ist child — Alleman du Puv H, Knight, Lord of 
Pereins, Rochefort, Apifer and Montbrun, carrying the name of Montbrun, 
and rendering homage in 1229 to Aimar de Poitiers, Count of Valentinois 
and of Diois. In an act of acquisition (dated 23 October 1267), he himself 
says "he is son of Hugues du Puy and grand-son of Alleman du Puy; and 
it is also written in the act that Guillaume is son of Alleman I." See 
"History of the house of Poitiers," by Andre Du Chesne. Alleman Du Puy 
11 married Alix, Princess Dauphine. They had: i. Alleman Du Puy III. 
2. Ainier, who went on a journey to Tunis, where the Africans were defeated 
by the French. (See Joinville.) (In the year 1270.) 

6th Generation.— I St child— Alleman Du Puy III, Knight, Lord of 
Pereins, Rochefort, Apifer, Montbrun, Rhelianette, Baux, Solignac, Bruis, 
Bordeaux, Ansenix and Conisriea. In his will dated 23 September, i 304, he 
divides into parts with Ainier his brother, which took place in i 30S, all those 
lands received from Alleman, their father, and those that had been acquired 
through Guillaume, their cousin, established in Berri. He married Beatrix 
Artaud, daughter of Pierre-Ysoard Artaud, Lord of Glandage and of his 
wife, Alix de Tournon. They had three sons, also other children: i. 



CHRONOLOCl' AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY h\ . DEPEW 

Alleman Du Pu\- !V; 2. Bastet Du Pu>-,, founder of the Branch of Lords of 
Monlbrun: 3. Imbert (or Humbert) Du Pu>', who became a Cardinal and 
Archbishop of Boulogne. All the conclave wanted to make him the Pope, 
but Philippe le Bel (the King) was not willing, because he thought it against 
the interests of the Empereur. 

7th Generation. — ist child — Alleman du Pu\' I\'. Knight, Lord of 
Pereins, Rochefort, Apifer, Ansenix and Conisrieu. He was with the Count 
of Valentinois under King Philiippe V who marched against the people of 
Flamans in 1316. He was routed in 1329 on the journey to Cassel. He 
married Eleanore Alleman, daughter of Jean Alleman, Lord of Lanciol 
(Lantoil). They had Alleman Du Puy \'. 

Sth Generation. — ist child — Alleman du Puy V, Knight, Lord of 
Pereins, Rochefort, Apifer. Ansenix and Conisrieu. He married Ainarde 
de Roland, daughter of Noble Gillet de Roland. They had: i. Gilles, or 
Gillet; 2. .A.inier, or Eynier: 3. Girard, who was made a Cardinal under 
the title of Saint Clement, Bishop of Carcassone and .Abbe of .ALarmontier. 
Ainarde de Roland, wife of Alleman du Puy V, was a widow in 1362, at 
which time she is mentioned with her ?on Gil'es du Puy. 

9th Generation. — ist child — Gilles Du Puy \, Knight, Lord of Rochefort, 
Apifer, Ansenix, and Conisrieu, was alive in 1 348; he made his will 1 1 March, 
1390. He married Alix de Bellecombe. They had: i. Gilles Du Puy il; 
2. Artaud Du Puy, v.'ho founded the Branch of Bellecombe: 3. Ainier 
(or Eynier) Du Puy; 4. Francois Du Puy, alive in 1450: 5. Guiilaume Du 
Puy; 6. Alleman Du Puy; 7. Cecille Du Puy. 

loth Generation. — ist child — Gilles, or Gillet Du Pu>' II, Knight, Lord 
of Pereins, Rochefort, Apifer, and other towns, made his will on the 13th 
May, 1420, in which he says he had had two wives. The first nam.ed 
Florence de Hauteville, daughter of Florimond de Hauteville; the second 
was Beatrix de Tauligman. He had six children: i. Ainier ("or Eynier) 
Du Puy; 2. Disdier Du Puy; 3. Claude Du Puy; 4. Jean Du Puy. alive 
■43'; 5- Aimar Du Puy; 6. Caterine, who married the Noble .Antoine de 
Montbrun, du mandement de Val, etc. 

nth Generation. — ist child — .Ainier, or Eynier Du Puy, officer general 
of the armies. Knight, Lord of Pereins, Rochefort, Hauteville, la Roche, 

[ xxxii ] 



NOTED MEMBERS OF THE DL' PUY FA.MILY 

Montolieu, and Puygiron. alive in 1466; he married Catherine de Belle- 
coinhe, daughter of Ainard II, Lord of Tou\et, etc. They had three 
children: i. Jacques Du Puy; 2. Francois Du Puy; 3. Aime Du Puy. 

i2th Generation. — ist child — Jacques Du Puy, Knight, Lord of Roche- 
fort, Roche-fur Grane, Autichamp, etc.: married first 4 February, 1476, 

Fran^oise Astraud, daughter of N .Astraud, Lord of Marsane; 

married, second, to Jeanne de Vesc, daughter of Talabard de Vesc, Seigneur 
d'Fspeluche, etc., and of Caterine de Sademand. Jacques made his will 
19 Jul}', 1505, in which he mentions his mother, Catherine de Bellecombe, 
and his second wife. They had left Peyrins and lived at Chabillan. By 
his second wife. 

13th Generation. — ist child — Jean Du Pu\' (in English John), Lord of 
Hauteville, alive 10 September. 1541: he married Peronne de Mantonne, 

by whom he had no children ; he married, second , by whom was 

Peter Du Pu\- and Raymond Du Puy. By consulting "Haag's Protes- 
tante France," we find Jean's son, Barthelem}' Du Puy I, made his will 
28 February, i 583. 

14th Geneiadon. — Bartii.elciny Du Puy L or Sr., Lord of Cabrilles; 
married ; they had three children: i. Pierre Du Puy; 2. Ray- 
mond Du Puy married Antoinette Bourraiser; had two children; 3. Jean 
Du Puy married 26 June, 1585, .Madeleine de Saint-.Maurice. 

15th Generation. — Pierre Du Puy; married 

1 6th Generation. — Barthelemy Du Puy II, Lord of Cabrilles, born 
1 581 ; married 

17th Generation. — Jean Du Puy; married about 1652, Anne de St. 
Hyer. 

i8th Generation. — Bartholomew Du Puy, born about 1660; married in 
France, about 1681, Countesse Susanna La \'illian: they spent fourteen 
years in Germany, then went to England in 1609, where they joined a party 
of Huguenots, and sailed for America in 1700; they settled in Manikin — 
town on the James River, seventeen miles above Richmond, Virginia. 
They are the ancestors of the Du Puy family of Virginia. See the printed 
1908 "The Huguenot, Bartholomew Dupuy and his descendants," 456 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

pages, by Reverend Benjamin Hunter Dupuy, of Leesburg, Lake County, 
Florida. 



[ xxxiv ] 



DEPEW AND MITCHELL 
ANCESTRY 




I SAAC DE PE W 



THE DEPEW LINE 

I. Francois' Du Puy, of the rainily of Du Puy in France, came 
from Calais, France, to New York; he was living in 1702. He married, 
first, in the Dutch Church, New Amsterdam: banns 26 August, 1661; 
wedded 26 Septemiber, 1661. to Geertje Williams, daughter of William 
Jacobs Van Boerum; she had eight children. Francois married, second, 
about 1687 to 1689, to Annie Elsten; she had one child. 

The nine children of Francois' Depew were: 

2 + 1. "W"iniam= eldest son; born about 1663 in Bushwick, Long Island, 

New York; married, banns 10 August, 16S8, to "Lysbeth 
We}t" or White. 

3 2. Jannetie= or Jane."- born ; married about 1693 Keilem Ma 

Korry; possibly the name should be Cory; they had four 
children; did she marry, second, before 170S Hendrick 
Hogencamp, of Tappan, New York? 

4 3. Grietje- or Margaret,^ bapt. New York Dutch Church, 1 October. 

167 1 ; sponsors, Pieter Parmentier and Sara du Trieux, daugh- 
ter of Francois dupu and Geertie Willems; married 1694 Jan 
Waard or Ward or Wcedt or Wood, of Haverstraw, New 
York; they had five children. 

5 + 4. Jean= or Jan- or John,^ bapt. New York Dutch Church, 20 May, 

1674; sponsors, Mr. Hans Kierstede and .Margariet Harden- 
broek; married, 16 April, 1701, Jannetje (Wiltsie) Hogen- 
kamp. 

6 5. A child,2 bapt. New York Dutch Church, 14 Februar}-. 1677; 

sponsors, Albert Bosch and Elsje Blanck; this child was .Maria, = 
who married about 1702 Abraham Hendrickse Van Lent or 
Lent; they had nine children. 

[I] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C E S T !{ Y OF C H .\ L^ N C E Y ^\ . D E P F. 



7 6. Sara,= bapt. Dutch Church, Flatbush, Long Island, New \'ork, 

23 February, 1679; sponsors, Gerrit De Leydekker and Anna 

Maria ; married — April, 1704, Herman or Harmen 

Hendrickse Blauvelt; they had eight children; Harmen Blau- 
velt widower of Zara Peu; he was born in "Niuw Jorck" and 
living at Tappan; married 10 October, 1730, Dutch Church, 
Tarr\-town, New \'ork (Number S7), to Caiharina Ecker. 
widow of Nicholas de Vouw; she was horn and living in Phillips 
Burgh, New York. 

8 7. Geertje- or Gertrude, = bapt. Dutch Church, Flatbush, Long 

island, New York, 18 September, 1681; sponsors, Jaques 
La Resiliere and Gertie Simons V. Arsdalen. 

9 8. Nicolaes,= bapt. New York Dutch Church, 17 October. 16S6; 

sponsors, Nicolaes Dupuy and Catalyntie de Vos; married 
about 1711 Barbara or Barber ; they had one child. 

10 9. Mary,- bapt. New York Dutch Church, 3 ALarch, i6Sg: one 
sponsor, Albertus Ringo; daughter of Francois Puy and .Aniiie 
Listen. 

Francois^ De Pew resided, 14 .March, 1661, at "Boswyck," now Bush- 
wick, Brooklyn, New York. In 1677 he was a member of the Dutch Chui'ch, 
Flatbush, Long Island, New York, says Teunis G. Bergen in his 1881 
King's County, New York, Settlers. He had a grant of 80-odd acres on 
Staten Island, New York. 21 December, 16S0, on the south side of Fresh 
Kill; in 1687 he went to Rockland County, New York; in 1702 he went to 
Westchester County, New York, where he died. 

Mr. Frank J. Conkling, of Brooklyn, New York, in the 1901 New York 
Genealogical and Biographical Record, says: "The study of this family 
finds the same eccentricities, or variations in nomenclature, as are found 
in many of the family names of our eari\' settlers. The name is found as 
Depuis, De Pu, De Py, D'Puw, de Pue, De Puuw, De Puw, D'Puy, Puuw, 
Du Pre, Du Puy, Du Puis, Dupue, De Puy, etc. We discover, which- 
ever way the scribes in Colonial times, or decision of the owner, had adorned 
the spelling of the name, that in tracing back to the fountain-head or 

[2] 



MAPTHA MITCi 



THE D E P E W LINE 

source in this country, the line will, if brought within the bounds of Colo- 
nial New York, lead to either one of two sturd_\- Huguenots, who, thinking 
to improve life's fortunes and to exercise religious freedom, packed their 
belongings and set sail under the flag of Holland to the New Dutch 
Colony so recently established in the New World, and named New 
Amsterdam." 

The two emigrants were Nicholas Dupuis from Artois, in the Depart- 
ment of Calais, a division of France then bordering on the Netherlands, 
and Francois Dupuis, a young man from Calais. That they were related 
seems evident from the fact that Francois named a son Nicholas, evidently 
for the senior Nicholas, who with his wife stood as god-parents to the infant 
17 October, 16S6, and, again, both men had land on the Staten Island, 
and both men went up the Hudson River to Rockland County, Nev/ York. 
Nicholas and Francois were Huguenots. Francois, though younger than 
Nicholas, was the first to reach the shores of America. His marriage 
banns, translated, read: "Francoys Dupuis, a >'oung man of Cales, France, 
and Geertje Willems, young daughter of Amsterdam." This announce- 
ment of his coming marriage was a requireinent of the times, and is val- 
uable from the fact that the record is the only one found giving the place 
of his birth. Francois was married one month later in the Dutch Church, 
" Breucklen," New York, being the fifth marriage now on record, and reads: 
"26 Septem.ber 1661 Francois du Puis and Geertie Willems, v.'ith certificate 
from Manhattans" — now New York City; see the 1897 Holland Society 
Year Book. 

See also the Depew note on page 109 of the 1893 Journal of Rev. 
Silas Constant. Also page 103 of Teunis G. Bergen's 1881 Early Settlers 
of King's County, New York. 

SECOND GEXEI^\TION 

2. William- De Pew (Francois'), born about 1663; Marriage banns 
in Dutch Church, New York, 10 August, 1688; he of Menagh, now 
Verplank's Point, New York, to Elizabeth or Betty Weyt or White, of 
Barbadoes, West Indies, but then living near the mouth of the Croton 
River at a place called Kitchawan. 

[3] 



C f! R O N O L O G Y AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E ">• M . D F. P E W 

They had seven children: 

11 i. "Abigael,"' born about 16S9: married about 1704 at Dutch 

Church, Tarrytown, New York (Number 3), to Pieter Fou- 
seur; had eight children. 

12 2. Sara,^ born about 1602; married Dutch Church, New York, 4 

October, 1714, W'illem Thiel or Teel or Teil or Dill; had five 
children. 

13 3. Thomas,^ born about 1696; married, first, about 1717 Cornelia 

Lendel; had three children; married, second, about 1732 
Marietje ■ — — — ; had one child. 

14 4. Anna, 3 bapt. 2 .August, 1608, in Dutch Church, Tarrytown, 

Nev/ York (Number 18); sponsors, Hendrick Abramze and 

wife, Catharina ; she married Hendrick Van 

Ess. 

15 5. Francoys,^ bapt. 20 August, 1700, in Dutch Church, larrv- 

town, New York (Number 36); sponsors, Jan and Catrina 
Van Texel; married, 3 June, 1727, Maritil Van Thesel or Van 
Tassell; had seven children. 
16+6. SOLOMON, 2 born about 1702; married about 1728 Sarah 



17 7. Pieter,' bapt. 28 March, 1703, in Dutch Church, Tarrytown. 
New York (Number 67); sponsors, Celem Quory (or Kellem 
Quori or Kelm Ouorey) and wife, Jannetje (De Pu); married 
before 1729 Elizabeth Blauvelt; had three children; moved to 
Tappan, New York. 

*• 5. Jan' or John- De Pew (Francois.), bapt. 20 May, 1674; alive 1722; 
married in Dutch Church. Tappan, New York, 16 .April, 1701, to Jannetje 
Wiltse, widow of Myndert Hendrickse (Hogencam.p); she was bapt. 7 
January, 1663, in Dutch Church, Kingston, New York; see Wiltse Family. 

They had two children: 
27 I. Geertje,^ bapt. 14 October, 1702, in Dutch Church, Tappan, 
New York (Number 67); sponsors, Jan Waard and Sara De 
Puw; married there i January, 1720, John Concklin or Jan 
Cankely; they had three children. 

[4] 



THE D E; P E W LINE 



28 + 2. John,' horn 24 October, 1705, per Family Bible; married about 
1733, Elizabeth . 

John- De Pew lived in Haverstraw, New York, as per 13 June, 1702, 
census of Orange Count}', New York: "John D'Puy of Haverstraw and 
Janneke, his wife, 3 male children, 3 gerls, no slaves"; see volume one, 
page 366, of E. B. O'Callaghan's 1840 Documentary History of New York 
State; these were the wife's six Hogenkamp children. On the 1712 Census 

of Orange County, New York, John Pew and wife • of Haverstraw, 

New York, two children at home, a boy and a girl, both under 16 years of 
age; see Manuscript LVIl in Albany, Nev.- York. 

The Tappan, New York, Dutch Church records show Jan Puuw and 
Jannetie Wiltsee were sponsors at two baptisms: 

1. Jannetie Talema, bapt. (187) 30 August, 1712, daughter of Teunis 
Talema and wife, Margrietie Hogenkamp. 

2. Jenneke Hogenkamp, bapt. (207) 14 October; born 28 September, 
171 3; daughter of Hendrick Hogenkamp and wife, Teuntie Krom. 

THIRD GE\£R.aTION 

16. Solomon' De Pew (William,- FrancoisO, born about 1702; died 
18 October, 1783, aged 83 years, in Cortlandtown, Westchester County, 
New York; married about 1728 Sarah — ■ — — , born about 1705; diea 30 
December, 1783, aged 78 years, in Cortlandtown. 

They had six children, as per Family Bible: 

1. Abraham,^ born about 1729; died young. 

2. William,* born about 1731 ; died young. 

84 3. Sarah,'' born about 1733; no more trace. 
4. Solomon,* born about 1735; died young. 

85 5. Mary,* born 9 September, 1737; married 30 April, 1756, Henry* 

De Pew; number 93. 

86 6. John,* born 4 June, 1740; no more trace. 

Solomon' De Pew lived near Pue Pond, Cortlandtown, Westchester 
County, New York, which was named after him, and owned land there. 

[5] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C E S T R "l" OF C H A L: N C f. Y M . D H P R W 

28. John' De Pew (Jan/- Francois'), born 24 October, 170;, probabl\- 
in Tappan, Rockland County, New York; died 28 June, 1783, iu Curt- 
landtown, W'estchester County, New York; married about 1733 Elizabeth 



They had five children, as per Family Bible: 

93 + 1. Henry,' born 6 June, 1734; married 30 April, 1756, Mary^ De Pew; 

number 85. 

2. Elizabeth/ born 8 May, 1733; died 10 June, 1742. 

3. Sarah, ■> born iS September, 1736; died 23 Jul\-, 173S. 

94 4. Jane,^ born 4 May, 173S; no more trace. 

95 5. Geertie,'' born 25 June, 1746; no more trace. 

Administration on the estate of John Deocw, of Dutchess County, 
New York, a soldier in Cortland's Regiment, was granted 11 August, 1791, 
to Benjamin Pelton and Philip Pelton and John Trattafas, all of Dutchess 
County; see file box 54, Surrogate's Office, Poughkeepsie, New York. 
The Registry of Deeds, at Pcughliecpsic, Ne-\v York, liber 6, page 314, of 
Mortgages, show that Benjamin Pelton, of Frederickstown, Dutchess 
County, New York, 10 October, 1793. indentured for one hundred and 
eleven pounds, three shillings, and five pence, to Zephaniah Piatt and John 
Bailey, both of "poughkeepsie," five hundred acres of land in Phillipstown; 
bounds, one chain and forty links in course North, fifty-five degrees and 
thirty minutes by the road that leads from Shenadore to Peekskill Hollow; 
Robinson's long lot; "pettit" meadow; Samuel Yeoman's tield. Liber 7, 
page 211, Mortgages, Benjamin Pelton, of Frederickstown, Dutchess 
County, New York, 10 October, 1703, indentured for one hundred and 
eleven pounds, three shillings, and five pence, to Zephaniah Piatt and 
John Bailey, both of "poughkeepsie town," five hundred acres of land 
in Phillipstown on the road that leads from Shenadore to "peekskill" 
Hollow. 

The above is the land, one thousand acres, that was owned by John^ 
De Pew and his son, Henry' De Pew, and his grandson, Abraham^ De Pew. 
Abraham^ De Pew had an orchard and meadow field (kept for fodder 1 
back of Haverstraw, New York, across the Hudson. 

\6] 



THE D E P E W LINE 



The 189S printed book, New York in the Revolution, by James A. 
Roberts, Comptroller, pages 210 and 211, Westchester County, New \'ork, 
Militia: third regiment, Colonel Pierre Van Cortland, commissioned 19 
October, 1775; enlisted men, Abraham Depue and Hennery Depue and 
John De Pue; pages 144 and 145, The .Militia of Dutchess County, New 
York, Sixth Regiment, Colonel Morris Graham; enlisted men, Abraham 
Depue and Peter De Pue; page 146, Robert Johnson and Robert Johnston; 
page 267, Westchester County, New York, Militia, Land Bounty Rights, 
Third Regiment, Captain Samuel Haight; enlisted m,en, Abraham De Peu, 
James De Pew; page 204, Westchester County, New York, Militia, First 
Regiment, Colonel Joseph Drake and Colonel James Ham.man; enlisted 
men, Henry De Pew; pages 207 and 208, Westchester County, New York, 
Militia, Second Regiment, Colonel Thomas Thomas; enlisted men, Arbaham 
Depew. 

FOURTH GENERATION 

93. Henrys De Pew (John,^ Jan,= Francois''), born 6 June, 1734; 
died 16 May, 1788, in Cortlandtown, Westchester County, New Yoik; 
buried 19 May, 1788; funeral held by Reverend Silas Constant (see his 
printed Journal); married 30 April, 1756, Mary^ De Pew (number 8;), 
bom 9 September, 1737; died 14 August, 1789, in Cortlandtown, New 
York. 

They had five children, as per Family Bible; 

209 I. Esther,^ born 29 November, 1757; no more trace. 
2. Henry,* born 4 February, 1759; died young. 

210 3. John,* born 3 June, 1761; probably married about 17S2 Martha 

Mandeville; they had seven children. 

211 +4. Abraham,' born 10 October, 1762; married, first, 4 February, 

1783, Mary Crab; married, second, 13 November, 1787, 
Catherine Cranckheit. 

212 5. Nancy,* born 23 June, 1766; married 5 October, 17S9, Stephen 

Weeks. 



CHRONOLOGY AND .-^ N C E S T R "l' OF C H A U N C E Y >\ . D E P E Vv 

The following important document explains itself here: 

Fredericks Town 6th Augt. 1791 
Sir) 

Letters of Administration having been 
Granted some \-ears past unto my father 
Henry Depu upon the Estate of John Depu 
Deceased and the said Henry Depu being dead & 
that before the Estate were Wholly settled i do 
hereby request \'ou to grant Letters of Administra 
tion upon the said John Depu (deceased) Estate 
unto Benjamin Pelton or such instruction 
as he may require in my behalf 

(signed) 

Witness's Present Abraham Depu 

Isaac Everitt 

Roland Bailey 

Phil. Pelton 

Gilbert Livingston Esq. 

Surrogate for ye County of Dutches 

Dutchess County Ss Be it remembered that on the eleventh day 

of August 1 79 1 personally appeared before rne the subscriber 

Philip Pelton and on oath declared that he did see Abraham 

Depu sign & delivered the renunciation as his volun- 

-tary act & deed . . . 

Gilbert Livingston Surrogate 
Renunciation of administration on the estate of John Depu 

FIFTH GENER.ATION 

211. Abraham^ De Pew s'Henry,-= John,^ Jan,= Francois'), bom 10 
October, 1762; died 26 December, 1838, rged 76 >ears and 2 months, in 
Peekskill, New York; buried in the old \'an Cortland or St. Peter's ceme- 
tery, Peekskill, New York; married, first, 4 February, 17S3, .Mary Crab; 
she died 28 December, 17S6, leaving one child; m.arried, second, by Rev- 



THE D E P n V,- LINE 

erend Silas Constant, 13 November, 1787, Catherine Crankheit, born 6 
August, 1765; died 17 August, 1847, in Peekskill, New York; daughter of 
Captain James and Esther (Lent) Crankheit. 

Abraham' had one child by his first wife: 

1. Sarah,* horn 23 January, 1784; bapt. in Dutch Church, 

Cortlandtown, New York; sponsors, Hercules Lent and 
Wyntie Van Tessel; died 6 June, 1787. 

Abraham' had eight children by his second wife, as per the Family 
Bible; see page 109 of the printed Journal of Reverend Silas Constant. 

355 2. Esther,^ born 27 June, 1789; bapt. Dutch Church, Cortland- 

town, New York, 18 September, 1791 ; sponsors. Jacobus and 

Esther Kranckheid; married Isaac Denike, Jr.; they 

had two children. 

356 3. James Kronk right,'' born 25 August, 1791; bapt. , 1793; 

no sponsors; married Mary Denike; she died i May, 

1849; he died 28 June, 1S48: they had five children. 

357 4. Nancy,* born 12 September, 1704; died single 6 January, 1868, 

in Peekskill, New York; she is called Anna on the Dutch 
Church records of Cortlandtown, New York; she made her 
will 25 February, i860; proved 25 January, 1S72, at White 
Plains, New York, Surrogate, liber 59, page 59. 

358 5. Elizabeth," born 6 February, 1796; died single 19 December, 

1869, in Peekskill, New York; she made her v.'ill 23 January, 
i860; proved 2 April, 1870, at White Plains, New York, Sur- 
rogate, liber 57, page 586. 

359 6. Henry Weeks,* born 18 .May, 179:-'; died 2 September, 1S50; 

married, first, , .Mary W Tier; she was born 

3 January, 1808; died 3 .March, 1839; 'he had one child, Mary; 
married, second, in Dutch Church, Cortland lov/n, New York, 
30 January, 1842, .Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth, widow of John Hait; 
she was born a Dusenbury; she had one child, Louise; Henry 
made his will 2 September, 1850; proved i October, 1850, at 
White Plains, New York, Surrogate, liber 52, page 510. 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C E S T R "i" OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P c '.%■ 

360 + 7. Isaac/ born 9 August, iSoo; married 26 December, 1832, 

Martha .Minot .Mitchell. 

361 8. Charles Augustus G- ,^ born 6 September, 1804; died 4 

November, 1877; married, first, in the spring of 1833. .Matilda 
Akin Doty, born in Albany, New York, 19 March, iSi i ; died 
26 November, i860, in Peekskill, New York; she had three 

children; married, second, , 1871, Harriet Doty, born 

19 January, 1816; they were sisters; Charles was a bank 
president, and made his will 11 August, 1873; proved 24 
November, 1S77, at White Plains, New York, Surrogate, 
liber 83, page 558. 

His children were: 
Augusta — married Edward Gleason. 
They had one child: 
Edwardina A. Gleason. 

Harriet Louise — married John W. Hait. 
They had two children : 

Louise — married Henry P. Dain; 
Mary — married Charles Fuller. 

Hettie — married Henry W. Searle. 
They had two children: 

Charles D. — married Mary L. Porter; 
Harrison Albert. 

362 9. Morris,^ born 3 February, 1809; died single 8 November, 1841. 

Abraham^ De Pew lived on the Post Road and .Mill Street, in Peekskill, 
New York, at the time of his death. Abraham^ Depew enlisted in the 
Revolutionary Army when aged 16 years and served in the compan}- of 
Captain James Cronckheit. He was a deeply religious man and had daily 
scripture reading and prayer, both morning and night. He was a great 
admirer of the Reverend Silas Constant. 

The 1790 Census, New York State, page 197, Cortland Tov,-n. West- 
chester County, Abraham Depew, Jr., one male 16 years old and upv.ards; 



THE D E P E W LINE 



no males under 16 years of age; two free white females; no other persons; 
no slaves. His home was then between those of Henry Depew and James 
Depew. Abraham^ Depew made his will 22 December, 1838; proved 28 
January, 1839, at White Plains, New York, Surrogate, liber V, page 207. 

SIXTH GEXERATION 

360. Isaac* Depew (Abraham, ^ Henry/ John,^ Jan,= Francois'), born 
9 August, iSoo; died 15 March, 1S60, in Peekskiil, New York; married 
26 December, 1832, Martha Minot Mitchell, born 2 August, iSio; died 
26 March, 1885; see the Mitchell Family. 

They had five children : 

507 + I. Chauncey Mitchell,^ born 23 April, 1834; married, first, 9 

November, 1S71, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 28 
December, 1901, May Palmer. 

508 + 2. William Beverly,' born 8 May, 1837; married i February, 1865, 

Helen Ganson. 

509 + 3- Lawrence Isaac,' born 6 September, 1839; m.arried , 

Frances Matilda Copland. 

510 + 4. Catharine,' born 8 September, 1843; married 2 September, 

i868, Albert Strang, M.D. 

511 +5. Anna Mitchell,' born 6 December, 1844; married 20 June, 

1865, William Henry Paulding. 



Isaac« Depew made his will 7 August, 1866; proved 27 April 1869, at 
White Plains, New York, liber 57, page 298. 

SEVENTH GEN'ER.ATION 

507. Honorable Chauncey Mitchell' Depew (Isaac,* Abraham, ^ 
Henry,^ John,' Jan,^ Francois'), born 23 .April, 1834, in Peekskiil, New 
York; married, first, 9 November, 1871, in New York City, to Elise Ann 
Hegeman, born 16 November, 1848; died New York City, 7 May, 1893; 
daughter of William and Eliza Johnston (Niven) Hegeman; she had one 



"V 



\ 




CHAUNCEVr^, DEPEW 
GRADUATE OF YALE UNIVERSITY IN 1856 



THE D E P E W LINE 

of Willem Jacobs \'an Boerum. He was living at this time in Bushwick, 
east of Brooklyn, but in 1(377 is recorded a member of the Dutch Church 
at Flatbush. In 16S7 he is at Haverstraw, now in Rockland County, New- 
York; in 1702 he crossed the Hudson River and came into Westchester 
County, New York, and settled on a tract originally purchased from the 
Indians in 1685, under a license from Governor Dongan. Though this 
tract fell eventually within the political limnts of the .Manor of Cortland, 
Westchester County, New ^'ork, erected in 1607, its soil was held in tee bv 
its proprietors, from one of whom it vvas named Ryke's Patent, R\'ke being 
the Dutch abbreviation of Richard. Pan of this Patent, on which the 
village of Peekskill, New York, was founded in 1764, belonged to the an- 
cestors of Chauncey .M. Depew. 

The surname Du Puy has undergone many changes in its passage 
through Dutch into English, and we find it recorded as Dupuis, Dupui, 
Dupuy, Depee, Depu\', De Pue, Depu, Depew, etc. John, a grand-son 
of the original Francois, was born 24 October, 1705: Abraham Depevv', 
grand-son of this John, was born 10 October, 1762, and married Catherine, 
daughter of Captain James Cronkite, and became the great-grand-fathcr 
of Chauncey Mitchell Depew. .\braham Depew enlisted in 1777 in the 
Third Regiment of the .Manor of Cortland, commanded b\' Colonel Pierre 
Van Cortland, and subsequently, on the election of Colonel \''an Cortland 
as Lieutenant-Governor of New York State, by Colonel Drake, and served 
until his discharge as a corporal in 1780, at the close of the war. 
Abraham Depew, Captain James Cronkite and the Reverend Josiah 
Sherman, Captain and Chaplain of the Seventh Connecticut Line were 
ancestors who served in the Army under Washington during the 
Revolutionary War. 

Mr. Depew's New England affiliations are derived from his mother, 
who was born Martha .Minor Mitchell, daughter of Chauncey Root and 
Anna MacArthur (Johnston) .Mitchell. 

Chauncey Root .Mitchell, a distinguished lawyer of Westchester County, 
Nevk' York, and afterwards of Delaware County, New York, where he was 
until his death the partner of the famous lawyer and statesman. General 
Erastus Root, was noted for ability as an advocate and orator. Anna 
MacArthur Johnston was the daughter of Judge Robert Johnston of 
Putnam County, Nev,' York, for many years State Senator and Judge. 

[13] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEV/ 

The Judge was a large landed proprietor, owning Lake Alahopac in Putnam 
County and much of the country around it. Mrs. Depew's grand-father 
was the Reverend Justus .Mitchell, a lineal descendant of Major Matthew 
Mitchell, who came to New England in 1633 from Halifax, Yorkshire, 
England. Reverend Justus Mitchell married Martha Sherman, a daughter 
of Reverend Josiah Sherman and his wife .Martha Minot, and a niece of 
the Honorable Roger Sherman, Signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Martha Sherman was fifth in descent from Captain John Sherman, v,ho 
was born in Dedham, County Essex, England, in 1615, and who married 
Martha Palmer, daughter of William and Ann Palmer. 

Mr. Depew's New England ancestr}' thus includes, besides the Mitchells 
and the Shermans, the blood of the Palmers, Winships, Wellingtons, 
Minots, and Johnstons, all notable families in the New World. He is 
descended also from a sister of the Reverend Henry Dunster, the 
first President of Harvard College. His mother, from whom he derived 
many of the characteristics that have conduced to his success, was of 
marked personal beauty, varied accomplishment, and social prominence. 
She died in 1885. 

Peekskill, New York, .Mr. Depew's natal place, named after Jan Peek, 
an early Dutch navigator, has now a population of more than f.fteen 
thousand. The Depew homestead, a picturesque building \\ith a portico 
supported by Ionic columns, is still in possession of the family, and .Mr. 
Depew, although his residence is in New York City, delights to call this 
house and Peekskill his home. The country around it is replete v,ith 
historic and patriotic associations, especially those connected with the 
Arnold and Andre episode, treated so masterfully in one of his orations fsee 
the printed 1896 Orations and After-Dinner Speeches of Chauncev .M. 
Depew, page 231), and doubtless had its influence in forming his character 
in youth. 

The favorable situation of Peekskill on the east bank of the Hudson 
made it the market for the country back of it as far as the Connecticut 
State line, and the shipping-point of its produce to New York, from which 
it is distant about forty miles. The transportation of freight, who!I\' by 
the river, was controlled, almost entirely, by Isaac Depew and his brother, 
both energetic farmers and merchants. There were no railroads in those 
days, but the New York and Albany steamboats, of rival lines, were always 

[14] 



r 1 



THE D n P E W LINE 



a subject of interest, attracting crowds to the bank as they passed up or 
down the river, often racing. Each boat had its partisans, and Vanderbilt 
and Drew, the principal owners, were popular heroes with the youth of the 
village, among whom young Depew was b}' no means backward. These 
boats and his father's business led him early to take an interest in the 
transportation problem, to which in later years he devoted so much time 
and successful study. 

The boy's first instruction was received from his mother, a lady of rare 
education and culture. He was next put in charge of Mrs. Westbrook, 
the wife of an able and well-informed clergyman, who had a small school 
for children under ten. Through the training thus received the apt pupil, 
who was also an omnivorous reader, became informed beyond his years on 
the events and political issues of the past and present, and was often able 
to confound the village oracles who expounded their views at the post- 
office, grocery, bank or drug store. Regarded as a prodigy, he became a 
leader among his fellows, who looked up to him as one who gave unmis- 
takable promise of future brilliancy and usefulness. 

The period between his tenth and eighteenth years was passed at the 
Peekskill Academy, an old-fashioned institution designed primarilv to 
prepare boys for a business career, and its students were expected to go 
out early into the world of work. Isaac Depew had placed his son there 
in the hope that he v/ould join him in his business, but the youth, influenced 
probably by his mother and the instructions of Dr. Westbrook, had visions 
of a more ambitious career. Fortunately these visions were aided by the 
advice of Judge Thomas Nelson, son of the Honorable William Nelson, of 
Peekskill, who remarked to the elder Depew one evening: "You ought to 
send Chauncey to college." This was the entering wedge, and the father, 
after a season of deliberation, concluded to take the judge's advice, though 
when Yale College was suggested, he interposed objections. An old- 
fashioned business man and a Jackson Democrat, he had the distrust of 
Yankees characteristic of a "Hudson River Dutchman,'' and a reader of 
Irving and Cooper. But the wishes of his wife, whose father and grand- 
father were of Yale, and whose descent from New England progenitors 
naturally turned her preferences in that direction, finally prevailed, and 
Chauncey was sent to Yale. 

He entered college in 1832, and was graduated in 1856, in a class that 



15 



CHRONOLOGY' A N D A N C E S T R Y O F C H A U N C E Y ^\ . D E P E W 

became known as the "Famous Class of iSs6," partly on account of the 
general good standing of its members in the various professions, and espe- 
cially because it had two representatives on the Bench of the United States 
Supreme Court at Washington, viz., Henry Billings Brown and David 
Josiah Brewer. In this class, consisting of some one hundred and twenty- 
five men, Depew soon made his mark, winning his way to the front largely 
through personal attractions, but particularly by his gift as a speaker, 
which made him the orator of the class. He seldom lost an opportunity 
to enter into debate and always acquitted himself creditably. His class- 
mates still remember with pride his etTort in the debate between the two 
societies, Linonia and Brothers of Unity, in \\hich he appeared as the 
champion of the former with Wayne MacVeagh of the Class of 1853. 

Depew's personal appearance at this period was striking. He v,as 
taller than many of his classmates and had sharp, well-chiselled features 
marked by the prominent aquiline nose still characteristic of him. His 
abundant yellow hair was worn long, in the fashion of the time, nearly 
reaching his shoulders. He ahvays dressed well, exhibiting a penchant 
for elaborately tied cravats decorated with the pin of his secret societ\-. 

Depew came to College a Democrat. Like liis father and other members 
of the family, he belonged to the conservative wing of the party v.iiHng to 
leave the slavery question in abeyance, nicknamed in New York State 
"Old Hunkers" to distinguish them from the "Barnburners," or "Free 
Soil" Democrats, who were opposed to any further extension of slavery 
into the Territories. There were three Presidential candidates in the 
field in Depew's first year in College, in i8s2: Franklin Pierce, the nominee 
of the National Democratic Party, General Winfield Scott of the Whig 
Party, and John P. Hale of the Free Soil Democrats. In the frequent 
debates on the campus, in which the old topics of Tariff, Internal Improve- 
ments, and National Bank had given place to the more burning questions 
of the day, the Fugitive Slave Law, Personal Liberty Bills, and the extension 
of Slavery, Depew at first upheld the traditional politics of his familv, but 
with the trend of events his principles graduall\' undenvent a change. In 
1853 the famous Kansas-Nebraska Bill caused the disintegration of the old 
parties and a formation on new lines in relation to the slavery question. 
The eloquent discussions of the many phases of these questions by the 
Reverend Dr. Bacon from the pulpit of the Centre Church, and of Wendell 

f 16I 



THE D E P E \V LINE 



Phillips, George William Curtis, William Llovd Garrison, and other famous 
anti-slavery orators from public platforms in New i-laven. aroused in Depew 
a consciousness that he was on the wrong side of the great questions of the 
day and fmally caused him to repudiate the principles in which he had been 
educated and to cast his lot with the "Anti-Nebraska Men." When early in 
1856 the Anti-Nebraska .Men adopted the name Republican Party, later 
characterized by Democrats with a contemptuous addition as " Black 
Republican," Depew transferred his allegiance to the new partv; and 
when, in June, John Charles Fremont, of California, whose explorations 
in the West had won him the title of the " Path-tmder," was m.ade the 
Republican standard bearer, Depew enlisted and becam.e an enthusiastic 
supporter. 

Depew had scarcely received his degree v.-hen he threw himself heart 
and soul in the canvass in support of Fremont and Dayton, m.aking 
speeches in their behalf and beginning his political career which made so 
prominent a figure in ever>- succeeding Presidential campaign. As he 
himself has recorded, his defection from parental principles nearly broke 
his father's heart and caused him to shed tears of mortification when his son 
first appeared on a Republican platform in his native village. 

After leaving Yale College Depew entered the law office of the Honorable 
William Nelson as a student, in 1858 was admitted to the Bar, and in the 
following year began in Peekskill the practice of his profession, in which 
he soon demonstrated his ability. But his earl>- interest in politics did 
not de-^ert him and seemed for a time to interfere seriouslv with his business. 
In 1838 he was elected a delegate to the Republican State Convention, and 
has been elected to every State Convention, with but few exceptions, since; 
he was one of the four De!egates-at-Large from this State (New York) to 
the Republican National Conventions of 1S8S, 1892, 1896, 1900, 1904, and a 
delegate in 1908, 1912, and 19 16. 

In i860 he took the stump for Lincoln and Hamlin, making many 
speeches in many sections of the country. He was then only twenty-six 
years old, but his skill as an orator and his careful analysis of the great 
questions at issue showed that his ability and judgment were in advance 
of his years. In 1861 he was elected a member of the New York State 
Assembly from the Third Westchester District, in which the Democrats 
had usually had a good working majority, a high compliment to his personal 



17 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E ■>' M . D E P E W 

popularity. In this position he exhibited such inteUigence, industr>-, and 
tact, and watched so carefully over the interests of his constituents that lie 
was re-elected in 1862; at the commencement of the Legislative Session 
of 1863 he was named in caucus as his party's candidate for speaker. That 
year the New ''I'ork Assembly was evenly divided politically: b\- Mr. 
Dcpew withdrawing as a candidate, his party friends voted for the success- 
ful candidate, who classified himself as an "Independent Democrat." 
Depew acted as speaker pro ton during part of the session, was chairman 
of the Committee on Ways and Means, as such leader of the majority 
on the floor, and received other honors unusual for one so young in years 
and experience. 

In 1863 Mr. Depew was put on the Republican State (New ^'orkj 
ticket as candidate for Secretary of State. In the previous election the 
Democrats had won a signal victory under their standard bearer, Horatio 
Seymour, one of the purest and ablest statesmen New York has produced, 
and in order to insure success the Republicans were obliged not only to 
exercise care in the selection of candidates but also to put forth their most 
earnest efforts to overcome the prestige of Governor Seymour's popularity. 
But Mr. Depew was equal to the occasion. He won a notable victory, with 
a majority of thirty thousand. He declined a renomination for this office 
owing to business interests. 

When Andrew Johnson succeeded to the Presidency op the death of 
President Abraham Lincuin, one of his earliest acts was to reward Mr. 
Depew for his services to the party. He made out his commission as 
Collector of the Port of New York, then one of the most lucrative gifts 
within the President's bestowal; but before he had sent it to the Senate 
for confirmation he became incensed against Edwin D. .Morgan, then 
United States Senator from New York, because he refused to vote to sus- 
tain his veto of the Civil Rights Bill, and angrily tore up the document. 
Later in President Johnson's administration, William H. Seward, then 
Secretary of State, secured the appointment of Mr. Depew as United 
States Minister to Japan, and it was confirmed by the Senate, but after 
holding the matter under advisement for a month, the position was declined 
for family reasons. 

While thus apparently turning his back on a career that offered the most 
flattering prospects, Mr. Depew felt it his duty to withdraw from politics 

[iS] 



\ 



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HON CHAUNCEY M.DEPEW 
SECRETARY Or STATE OF NEW YORK. (S63 



THE D E P E \V LINE 



and to devote himself assiduously to his chosen profession, the law. This 
he was enabled to do with a greater promise of success than in his earlier 
days, for the experience won in his political career brought with it a con- 
fidence in himself and his resources and a matured knowledge of men and 
of affairs that made him the equal of any among his contemporaries, even 
of his superiors in years. About this time he attracted the attention of 
Cornelius Vanderbilt, whose success in steamboat navigation had won 
him the popular sobriquet of "Commodore," and who had already hid the 
foundation of the great railway s}-stem afterwards known as the "Vander- 
bilt System." Mr. Depew, who had won the friendship of the Commo- 
dore's son, William H. Vanderbilt, was surprised one day by an ofter of a 
position as Attorney in the railway service. 

"Politics don't pay, Chauncey," said the Commodore. "The business 
of the future in this country is railroading." This settled the question of 
Mr. Depew's future and he at once accepted the offer and applied himself 
to the study of railroad transportation, in which he won so signal a success. 
In 1866 he became the attorney for the New York and Harlem Railroad 
Company, and in 1S69, when this road was consolidated v.'ith the Nev,- 
York Central Railroad with Commodore Vanderbilt at its head, Mr. 
Depew was chosen attorney for the new corporation and later becam.e a 
member of its Board of Directors. As the Vanderbilt system expanded 
Mr. Depew's interests and duties increased in a corresponding degree, and 
in 1875 he was appointed General Counsel for the entire system and elected 
a Director in each road of the roads of which it was composed. 

In 1872, at the earnest solicitation of Horace Greeley, .Mr. Depew 
permitted the use of his name as a candidate for Lieutenant-Governor on 
the Liberal Republican or Greeley ticket, and shared, as he had probably 
expected, in the defeat of that party. He acted with the Republican 
Party the next year, and has acted with that party every year since. 

Two years later he was chosen by the Legislature as a Regent of the 
State University, and also as one of the Commissioners to build the State 
Capitol at Albany. 

In i88i, when the famous quarrel with President James A. Garfield was 
followed by the resignation from the United States Senate of Roscoe 
Conkling and Thomas Collier Piatt, Mr. Depew was a favorite candidate 
for the succession for the unexpired term of Mr. Piatt, and v/ould probably 

[19] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C H S T li >' OF C H A LI N C E Y M . D E P E W 

have won if the assassination of President Gartleld had not thrilled the 
nation with horror and brought about a termination of the long struggle. 
In withdrawing his name, Mr. Depew issued a statement urging that 
selections be made without further conflict and in harmony, that "Neither 
the State nor the party can afford to have New York unrepresented in 
the National Councils. A great crime has plunged the Nation into sorrow, 
and in the midst of the prayers and the tears of the \\hole people, supplicat- 
ing for the recovery and weeping over the wound of the President, this 
partisan strife should cease." 

Five years later, when his party controlled a majority of the State 
Legislature, he was the party choice for the United States Senatorship. 
Many business and professional duties obliged him to decline the honor. 

The resignation of William H. Vanderbilt from the presidency of the 
New York Central had led meanwhile to a reorganization of the company, 
in which Mr. James H. Rutter was made president and Mr. Depew was 
made second vice-president; in 1885, on the death of President James H. 
Rutter, Mr. Depew was elevated to the presidency, which latter office he 
held for thirteen years, acting also as president over most of the com.panies 
allied to the Vanderbilt system; he was also a director in twent\--eight 
additional lines. On his resignation of the presidency in 1898, he was made 
chairman of the Board of Directors of the Vanderbilt system of rail- 
roads, a position he still holds. 

In 1888, when Mr. Depew was a Delegate-at-Large from this State 
(New York) to the Republican National Convention, he received the 
seventy votes from the State of New York for the Presidency. On subse- 
quent ballots the vote was increased to ninety-nine. It was at his urgent 
request that his name was withdrawn, and his friends supported Benjamin 
Harrison, who was finally nominated. After election Mr. Harrison ten- 
dered to .Mr. Depew any place in his Cabinet except as Secretary of State, 
which had been promised to .Mr. James G. Blaine, but Mr. Depew felt 
obliged to decline. 

In 1892, at the Republican National Convention, held at Minneapolis, 
when most of the national leaders of the party were opposed to the renom- 
ination of President Benjamin Harrison, .Mr. Depew led President 
Harrison's forces and made many speeches in that city, preceding the 
sessions of the Convention, to create an opinion favorable to Harrison's 

[20] 






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HON CHAU NCEY M. DE PEW 
PRtSlDENT NEW YOt)^ CENTHAL RR,l385 



l^l-j- // 



THE D E P E \\' LI >J E 



renomination, and in the Convention he spoke most eloquently advocating 
the renomination. President Benjamin Harrison attributed his success in 
the Convention in a great part to Mr. Depew. 

To show his appreciation the President invited Air. Depew to accept the 
place in his Cabinet of Secretary of State, made vacant by the resignation 
of Mr. James G. Blaine. 

Again Mr. Depew for business reasons was obliged to decline this new 
and great honor. 

In addition to his railway and political engagements, exacting enough 
to occupy the entire time of a less active man, Mr. Depew had numerous 
social and semi-social duties. 

He is a director of many financial, fiduciary, and other corporations 
and trusts, and a member of societies too numerous to mention here. 
Among the many may be named the following: In New York, the Huguenot 
Society, the Society of the Cincinnati, the Sons of the American Revolution, 
the Union League, the Metropolitan Club, the Century Club, the Holland 
Society, the New England Society, the Colonial Wars Society, Kane Lodge, 
Masons, and 33rd degree in the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Riie, the 
St. Nicholas Society, the ■American Bar .'\ssociation, the New York Bar 
Association, the Westchester County Bar Association, tlie Republican Club, 
the Lotos Club, the Players' Club, the Transportation Club, the Uni- 
versity Club, the Phi Beta Kappa Club, the Psi Upsilon Club, Lafayette 
Post, the New York Chamber of Commerce, the New York Yacht Club, 
the Automobile Club of .Am.erica, the Tuxedo Club. He was for many 
years in succession elecced President of the Yale Alumni Association, 
declining a re-election after a decade of service, and he was for twelve 
years a member of the Yale Corporation ; for seven successive years, too, 
he was President of the Union League Club, a longer term than was ever 
held by any other, and on declining further election he was made an 
honorary life member. .Mr. Depew is also member of the Yale Chapter 
of the Phi Beta Kappa, of the Psi Upsilon Fraternity, and of the Senior 
Society of Skull and Bones, one of the most exclusive of those at Yale. 

In Washington, D. C, he is a member of the Metropolitan Club, the 
Chevy Chase Club, the Country Club, the Alibi Club, and the University 
Club. 

Mr. Depew was Adjutant of the iSth regiment of the New York 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

National Guard. This regiment was mustered into the United States 
service and served during the Gettysburg campaign. He was afterwards 
promoted to be Colonel and Judge Advocate of the fifth division of the 
New York National Guard. He was under the law retired at the age of 
sixty-four and placed upon the retired list. 

In 1899 Mr. Depew was elected a United States Senator representing 
the State of New York, being the unanimous choice of the Republican 
majority in the Legislature; in 1005 he was re-elected. In all he served 
in the Senate twelve years; at the end of the last term his party friends 
in the Legislature of 19 12 voted unanimously in favor of giving him a 
third term, but it so happened that his party did not have the necessary 
majority in the Legislature of that year — though the intention was good, 
the votes were lacking, and the honor went to another, of opposite political 
faith. Mr. Depew as a candidate for United States Senator has received 
the ballots of the members of his party in the State Legislature m.ore often 
than any other citizen of the United States — nam.ely, sixty ballots, one each 
day for sixty days in 1881, and sixty-four during forty-five days in 1911. 

Though burdened with many responsibilities Mr. Depew always fmds 
time for rest and recreation. This is not only because he displays a phe- 
nomenal capacity for the disposal of work, but because he so systematizes 
his labors that one occupation is never permitted to interfere v/ith another. 
His rest and recreation are found rather in change of occupation than in 
the repose which most men seek after their labors, and he returns from 
reading and study to weightier cares refreshed and reinvigorated. 

Mr. Depew's chief recreation is public speaking. "Speech-making is 
a tonic to me," he has said, "and not an occupation of v/ear and tear. It 
gets the mind into another channel and answers the same purpose as the 
G'-eek and Latin translation of Mr. Gladstone; as horse-driving did to Com- 
modore Vanderbilt, and as cards do to many business men. The difference 
between my recreation and that of other business men is that mine is all 
in public." What v.ould be a subject of anxiety and of long and hard labor 
to most men is but a necessary diversion to him. His more important 
orations and addresses are dictated to a stenographer and typewritten, 
though his memory is so tenacious that he never uses notes in delivery; 
but many of his after-dinner speeches are extemporaneous, born of the 
time and the occasion, for he has the rare talent of thinking while on his 

[22] 




HON. ChAUNCEY MDEdEW, 
JNITED STATES SENAtqR.ISSD 



THE D E P E W LINE 



feet and is never at a loss for a word or a simile. At the Republican Na- 
tional Convention in Chicago, 1916, Mr. Depew gave brilliant evidence of 
his wonderful ability and felicity in addressing an enormous audience at 
a moment's notice. Called suddenly to the platform, he delivered one 
of the best of his many e.xcellent speeches. Sometimes Mr. Depew 
has made addresses that were mirth-provoking from beginning to end; 
but oftener he has veiled some serious intent behind the mask of raillery; 
and as often, again, has he spoken on questions whose gravity has forced 
his laughter-loving side into complete retirement. Mr. Depew has often 
been called one of the best after-dinner speakers, but such characterization, 
though eminently true, does him an injustice, for that is but one phase of 
his many-sided eloquence. The author of "Off Hand Sketches of 
Prominent New Yorkers," speaking of Mr. Depew, says, "The character- 
istic of Mr. Depew's speaking is that it does not depend upon \erbal 
jokes nor funny stories for its success. It is the true humor whicr. grows 
naturally out of the subject, and is based upon a comjnon subs'cratum 
of common sense." 

No man in the United States, perhaps in all the world, has attended 
so many public dinners as Mr. Depew, that is, where speeches were made. 
In his time he has been at some 8,000 banquets, as he estimates. Though 
eighty-three years of age, he is to-day as young and alert as a man of half 
his age; in fact more so than many of them. He has formulated his own 
rules for right living and has written them down. He says: " I have seen a 
flow of champagne suggestive of Niagara, but I have never been sub;nerged. 
One rule I have followed for forty years — I pick out of each bill of fare what 
I would have eaten if 1 had stayed at home. At a very large dinner, I 
do not take the oysters. 1 merely touch the soup. ! skip the fish. ! skip 
all dishes upon which the chef has exhausted his art. 1 eat the roast if it 
is lamb or a fowl, and skip it if it is beef. If there is terrapin, I take that, 
because it is very digestible, and I take the game. 1 do not smoke, and 
I never drink anything but champagne, and a very little of th:-,t. The 
next day everything with me — head and vitality — is as usual. 

"There never was a man yet, unless he became dependent upon alcohol, 
whom drink did not dull or deaden. Most of the great speakers that I 
have known never touch anything at dinner. They have told me that 
their mental processes would not work until at least five hours after 

[23] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A li N C Fi Y M . D E P F. \V 

a meal, unless the digestive processes were over. 1 never was troubled 
that way. 

"A curious thing about public men going to a dinner to deliver an 
address is the way in which many of them will lose a national reputation. 
I have seen half a dozen of the finest reputations in the country go to pieces 
at a banquet in New \cnk because the man spoke too long and did not relieve 
his speech, because he thought it beneath his dignity to give a display uf 
humor. 1 remember two dinners in New York where the principal speakers 
were men of national reputation, and there were six others to come after 
them, also of national reputation. They emptied the hall, and when they 
closed there were ver>' few present except the officers and the band. The 
other speakers had also fled. 

" 1 have never experimented with strange food. My health and longevity 
are due m.ore than anything else to the fact that 1 have always been very 
careful what got inside of me." 

At dinners in the White House mian\' important public measures are 
decided. 

In an address delivered by him before the Montauk Club of Brooklyn, 
New York, at a dinner given by that club on April 26, 191 3, in celebration 
of his seventj'-ninth birthday, Senator Depew in speaking of goodfellow- 
ship at dinners, in part, said: "1 have met most of the distinguished men 
and women of my time, in this and other countries, and with scarcely an 
exception the best I ever knew of them occurred at dinner. 

"Judge Robertson, of Westchester County, New York, and I were 
invited by Secretary of State William H. Seward to dine with him in 
Washington on our way to the Republican National Convention which 
renominated President Abraham Lincoln. That dinner changed the vice- 
president from Daniel S. Dickinson, of New York, to Andrew Johnson, of 
Tennessee, and made a different chapter in American history." 

Though Mr. Depew has not. until late in life, filled any important 
national position, he is probably better known, both at home and abroad, 
than many men of world-wide reputation. With a few exceptions, he is 
the best known American living to-day, and his yearly visits to Europe 
have made his personality familiar to almost everybody, from crowned 
heads to the common people. His popularity is owing partly to his accessi- 
bility, for, unlike most prominent men of atTairs, he does not hedge himself 

[24] 



THE D E P E W LINE 



in with impenetrable dignity, but is as ready to welcome the employees as 
the directors of his company; and partly because the kindness of his heart 
prompts such accessibih'ty and makes him a friend of every reporter that 
comes to him for an "item of news." 

.Mr. Depew's orations and addresses are virtually a history of the past 
half century; and not only a mere record of events, but a political, in- 
dustrial, commercial, educational, and social picture of the period in which 
he has been one of the most conspicuous figures. We must not forget, too, 
to note that he has found time to edit a series of the greatest orations of the 
world in twenty-four volumes, and a massive work entitled "One Hundred 
Years of .-Xmerican Commerce," a series of articles illustrating the progi'ess 
of the country during the century. The latter work was published in 
1895. 

He received three-fourths of the Republican vote in the New York 
Legislature for United States Senator in 1877, but withdrew in favor of 
Warner .Miller. 

Mr. Depew received his A.M. in course, and in 18S7, when he delivered 
the annual address to the "I'ale Law School, he was given the honorary 
degree of LL.D. In the following year he was elected a member of the Yale 
G^rporation, a position which he held by re-election until 1906. 

Mr. Depew was elected by the Legislature in 1874 Regent of the Uni- 
versity of the State of New York and held the position for thirty-four years. 
He was also elected by the Alumni for two terms of six years each a member 
of the Corporation of Yale University. 

It is almost needless to say that in Mr. Depew's long service in the 
United States Senate he won the praise not only of his native State of 
New York but of the Nation for his ability and his grasp of the great ques- 
tions of the day. He was more successful than almost anyone in either 
House in getting bills passed relating to his State. 

The Montauk Club of Brooklyn, New York, has indulged in the de- 
lightful habit of giving a dinner in celebration of Senator Depew's birthday 
for many years. On Saturday evening, .April 28, 1017. the club gave its 
twenty-sixth annual "Depew Birthday Dinner." and in recognition of 
the high honor paid him on the eighty-third anniversary of the day of 
his birth, Senator Depew, as usual, delivered one of his instructive and 
happy orations. 

[23] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY' OF C H A U N C E 'i' M . D E P E \V 

His unfailing genialit>- and sincerity of spirit, with his flashing wit and 
his brilh'ant and forcible diction, has placed him in the front rank of popular 
post-prandial speakers of the United States. 

In 1894, there was published "Life and Later Speeches of Chauncey M. 
Depew," a volume of fort\- speeches and 5 10 pages. .Mr. Joseph B. Gilder, 
in his introduction, tells us: "Few living men have been called upon to fill 
so many offices of honor and responsibility, but still fewer, perhaps, have 
waived so many opportunities." "The fact that he himself is more eminent 
than any of his ancestors, though several of them were not without honor 
in their day, has not bated a jot or tittle of the regard in which Mr. Depew 
holds them — any more than the fact that Peekskill boasts no other citizen 
so famous as himself diminishes his just pride in his birthplace." "The 
speech in which he informed the Convention that he was not a candidate 
for the Presidency (of the United States), was one of the briefest, most 
forcible, and most dignified that he had ever m.ade; yet he had never made 
one which gave so little satisfaction to his hearers, for it was felt that the 
group of able and available candidates was grievously lessened by his 
decision." This was in 18SS. "The name of Edison has penetrated to 
remoter corners of the globe than that of Depew, but it would hardly be 
claimed that the personality of the great inventor was familiar to half so 
many men." "The public, which hears little of .Mr. Depew except in his 
off moments — his hours of evening relaxation — has no conception of the 
amount of work he accomplishes. He reaches his office as early as most 
men of affairs, and leaves it later, and transacts daily a volume and variety 
of business that would drive the average man distracted, if submitted to 
him to be disposed of. More than fifty years' familiarity with the matters 
which he is called upon to decide makes his task an easier one than it would 
pro/e to anyone else." "For years his visits to England have been full of 
many activities, and after one of these visits, on his departure, Lord Rose- 
bery telegraphed, 'Your departure eclipses the gayety of nations.' " "His 
model, when historical themes engage his attention, is Macaulay; and his 
preparation to deliver an historical address consists partly in reading over 
several of .Macaulay's essays. The clear staccato quality of his periods, 
in all his serious utterances, must remind the reader or listener of his 
illustrious exemplar: and it would be hard to choose a more effective model 
for such orations, delivered in the main before people who prize lucidity 

[261 



THE DEPEW LINE 



above all other qualities in speech or writing." "The earliest of Mr. 
Depew's utterances, preserved in the two volumes of his public addresses, 
was made in response to the toast on 'Woman,' at the New England Society 
Dinner of December 22, 1S65; and so invariably since then has he been a 
speaker at the New England's annual feasts, that the name of the Society 
cannot be mentioned nowadays without evoking the idea of Mr. Depew 
in the delivery of a post-prandial discourse. The time-honored banquets 
of the (New York) Chamber of Commerce vie with those of the New 
Englanders as a setting for the eloquence of 'Our Chauncey.' Other 
speakers may come and others go, at these two noted dinners; but 
Mr. Depew is as inevitable — and as invariably welcome — as the turkey 
at one or the wines and cigars at both. He is, in short, an integral 
part of the feast." "Mr. Depew, though by no means lacking in ap- 
preciation of the value of his achievements as an orator, is modest 
enough to admit that his most labored efforts are not necessarily the 
happiest." 

Justin McCarthy, the eminent British author and M.P., in his "Remin- 
iscences," discussing Lord Rosebery as an after-dinner speaker, says: "I 
rank him with Charles Dickens, with the late Lord Granville, with James 
Russel! Lowell, and with Chauncey Depew, and I do not knov/ that I 
can say anything higher in praise. 1 had many opportunities of meeting 
Dickens, and of course heard all his readings and heard him deliver several 
after-dinner speeches. Let me say at once that he was the very best 
after-dinner speaker 1 ever heard. I do not quite know whom. 1 should 
put second to him. Sometimes I feel inclined to give Mr. James Russell 
Lowell that second place and sometimes my mind impels me to give it to 
Mr. Lowell's countryman, .Mr. Chauncey Depew." 

In a letter, United States Senator W. G. Harding, of Ohio, has this to 
say about Mr. Depew: "Just about a year ago (1916) it was my privilege 
as Chairman of the Republican Convention at Chicago, to call upon you 
for an address. There was a hiatus which called for speech, and you so 
wonderfully met the difficult requirements that 1 sat in fascinated admira- 
tion and have been ready ever since to pay you unstinted tribute. You 
were ever eloquent in your more active years, but 1 count you the old 
man eloquent and incomparable in your eighties.' May many more help- 
ful and happy years be yours." 

[27] 



C H R O N O L O G "i' AND ANCESTRY 



r C H A U N C E Y M 



The following list contains the mosi important of Mr. Depew's ora- 
tions, addresses and speeches and year of publication. 

1890. Orations and After-Dinner Speeches. 

1891. Addresses. 

1892. Addresses. 

1894. Life and Later Speeches. 

1895. Addresses. 

1896. Addresses. 

1896. Four Days at the National Republican Convention, St. 

Louis, .Mo. 
189S. Autumnal Speeches. 

1899. Birthday Addresses at the Montauk Club, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1900. Addresses. 

1904. Two Volumes of Speeches. 
1908. Addresses. 

1910. Orations, Addresses and Speeches, eight volum.es, edited 
by John Dennison Champlin. 

1910. Mottoes, Aphorisms and Nuggets. 

1911. Recent Speeches. 

1912. Later Speeches. 

1914. Some Views on the Threshold of Fourscore. 

1916. Addresses and Literary Contributions on the Threshold 
of Eighty-two. 

1918. Addresses and Literar\' Contributions on the Threshold 
of Eighty-four. 
On Saturday, May i, 191 5, when The Montauk Club, of Brookl3'n, 
New York, gave its twenty-fourth Annual Birthday Dinner in celebration 
of Mr. Depew's Eighty-first Birthday, he said — "Mr. President and Gen- 
tlemen: For nearly a quarter of a century you have honored me by an 
annual celebration of my birthday. Each anniversary has had in the 
•year since the preceding one much of interest, National and State, and in 
politics, in social evolution, in rapidly changing or crystallizing theories of 
life and government. But if these anniversaries ran back to the dawn of 
history there would be found no year like that through which we are pass- 
ing, and if we could look forward through eternity it is not possible there 
should ever be such another. The forecasts of statesmen are failures. 

[281 



THE D E P E \V LINE 



The laudable and apparent!}' successful efforts of the advocates of peace 
have become suddenly a ghastly farce. The higher ideals of Nations have 
been submerged in racial enmities and trade rivalries. 

Organized Christianity is questioned as to the results of two thousand 
years' teaching, while millions of Christians are killing each other, and all 
the combatants calling upon God to help their just and righteous cause. 
Other millions of v/omen and cliiidren rear rude shelters out of the ruins 
of their once happy hom.es and only relief supplies from neutral nations 
are saving them from star\ation. 

But they are enduring sufferings and death with martyr spirit which 
would not recall, if it was possible, the bread-winner fathers, sons and 
husbands fighting in the field. The agreements of the Hague Tribunal 
solemnly ratified by the contracting governments are shelved for the 
curiosity of the future historian. The warring powers repudiate these 
compacts, and neutral nations dare not protest, because protest means 
action and action means war. The Hague Peace Palace is to let. There 
never were preparations for war of such vast magnitude in order to preserve 
peace, and the perfection of the preparations made war inevitable. The 
irony of the situation is that the line is invisible between the size of armies 
and navies necessary for the national defence and militarism which provokes 
war. 

After exhaustion has brought the belligerents on one side to seek terms 
of surrender, in the wisdom of that settlement will be either the seeds of 
another and more sanguinary war, or a peace which so saves the pride and 
dignity of the vanquished that the peace of the world may be assured for 
all the future. Recent history furnishes two wonderful examples. After 
the Franco-Prussian war victory was followed by vengeance. France was 
impoverished by an indemnity so large that it was expected to pauperize 
her people forever and despoiled of her fairest provinces. Hate and revenge 
grew with the unexpected and m.arvelous recovery and prosperity of 
France, and her sons inheriting the feelings of their fathers are cheerfully 
and enthusiastically battling to right the wrongs of 1S70. In nations as 
with individuals, the spoiler waxes strong, arrogant and reckless. The 
spoiled nurses his wounds and bides his time. The second example is our 
Civil War, North and South, each believing they were right, battled as 
our race will until by force of superior numbers, wealth and equipmient, 

[29] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

the Union won and the Confederates were exhausted. Here in civil 
strife, with its passion and vindictiveness, were the possibiHties of endless 
revolts and revolutions. But the rebel States were welcomed back into 
the Union with the same rights, powers and liberties under a common 
Constitution as the loyal States. The only exaction was the abolition of 
slavery which had been the cause of the war. Union and Confederate 
veterans fight over their battles in memory only at happy re-unions, and 
their children, knowing no North, no South, no East, no West, are proud 
citizens of the United States. For the second time in half a century since 
the close of the Civil War, the South and its economic theories are in absolute 
control of the Government. With militarism eliminated and peace pre- 
served by an international police on land and sea, the greatest of wars may 
prove for mankind the most marvelous of blessings. 

The event of this century which in future years will be regarded as the 
most important and significant of them all is the hundredth \-ear of peace 
between the United States and Great Britain. The subject of internatiunal 
peace is to be the engrossing topic, when this terrible war ends, with states- 
men, publicists, educators and the people. The incontestible fact that 
these two powerful nations, with frequent and graver causes for war than 
man" which have plunged other governments into life and death battles, 
have settled all their difficulties by diplomacy during all these generations 
and have kept a boundary line of three thousand miles without a fort, and 
inland seas washing all their interior shores without a battleship, is a 
monumental argument for the peace of the world. It will grow in the minds 
and imagination of other nations as time rolls on." 

The 1898 National Cyclopedia of American Biography, in 15 volumes, 
on page 330 of volume one, speaking of Chauncey Mitchell Depew — In 
public addresses on grave occasions, the unveiling of soldiers' monuments, 
at Grand Army meetings, on the occasions of gatherings of notable citizens 
for the purpose of discussing some important political or other incident 
or occurrence, Mr. Depew was always thought of among the llrst chosen 
to address the public on whatever topic might be presented. It was 
recognized that his general mental equipment, quickness of understanding 
and aptness of perception of the principal points in any question presented 
to him were quite unusual, while his self-possession and his wit rendered 
him a dangerous antagonist in political discussion and a most popular orator 

[30] 



THE D E P E V.' L, I N E 



under any circumstances. As a mere suggestion of the character of his 
oratory, the following from a speech of Mr. Depew, before a Reunion of 
the Army of the Potomac in 1887, ma_\' be ottered: "This is a repubh"c and 
neither Mammon nor anarchy shall be king. The American asks only for 
a fair field and an equal chance. He believes that every man is entitled 
for himself and his children to the full enjoyment of all he honestly earns, 
but he will seek and find a means for eradicating the conditions which hope- 
lessly handicap him from the start. In this contest he does not want the 
assistance of the red flag and he regards with equal hostility those who 
march under that banner and those who furnish argument and excuse for 
its existence." 

508. William Beverly" Depew (Isaac, *^ .Abraham, ^ Henry,* John,^ Jan,- 
FrancoisO, born 8 May, 1S37, Peekskill, New York; died 2 May, 1897, 
Buffalo, New \'ork; married i February, 1865, Helen Ganson, born 27 
June, 1840, in BulTalo, New York; died 3 September, 1900, in Buffalo, 
New York; daughter of John Scott Ganson and Sophronia (Ballard). They 
resided in Buffalo, New York, and had two children: 

1. Ganson,^ born 6 March, 1866, in Buffalo; married there, 15 November, 

1894, Grace Esther Goodyear; born in Buffalo, 11 August, 1872; 
daughter of Frank Henry Goodx'ear and Josephine (Looney). 
They have two children, born in Buffalo: 

:. Ganson Goodyear, born 2 November, 1S95. 
2. Lucia, born 22 January, 1900. 

2. Mitchell, 5 born 17 May. 1867, in Buffalo; married , Julia Park; 

they have no children : they reside in France and are in 19 15 engaged 
in Hospital Work. 

509. Lawrence Isaac^ Depew (Isaac, ^ .Abraham, ^ Henry,* John,' Jan,= 
Francois'), born 6 September, 1S39, in Peekskill, New York; died 3 

January, 1904, in Detroit, Michigan; married , Frances Matilda 

Copland; born 23 April, 1853, in Detroit, .Michigan. They resided 
in Detroit, .Michigan, and had two children born there: 

[31] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H .'. i; N C i. V M . D F. [' E W 

1. Florence Mitchell, « born i ;; September, 187S: married , in - 



George Dunn Allison; born g May, 1863, in Frcdericktown, Knox 

County, Ohio; son of . They reside in Detroit, Michi.gan, 

and have one child: 

I. Nancy," born 17 August, 1914, in Muskegon, Michigan. 
2. Sherman Lawrence," born 8 August, iSSo; married 24 November, 1906, 
Hazel Hope Pingree, born 17 January, 1S81, in Detroit, Michigan; 
daughter of Governor Pingree of Michigan. They reside in Detroit, 
Michigan. Their children vera born in Detroit: 

1. Frances Pingree,' born 28 May, 191 1. 

2. Valerie Pingree,' born 11 August, 1913. 

510. Catharine' or Kate' Depew (Isaac,*^ Abraham, ^ Henry, ^ John', 
Jan,= Francois'), born 8 September, 1843, in Peekskill, New York; she 
resides in Pelham, N. Y.; miarried 2 September, 1S6S. Albert Strang, 
M.D., born 13 October, 1843, in Yorktown, New York; died 24 January, 
1888, in Yorktown, N. Y., he is buried in the Hillside Cemecerv, Peekskill. 
New York; he was a son of Daniel and Sarah Jane (Tompkins) Strang. 

They had three children: 

1. Martha Depew; married , Alfred H Townley. 

2. Elise Hegeman,° ; married , David A L'Espeiance. 

3. Mary Jane,-' ; single in 1918. 

511. Anna Mitchell" Depew (Isaac, = .Abraham, ■- Henry,^ John,' Jan,= 
Franfois'), born 6 December, 1844, in Peekskill, Nev\' York; she resides in 

Ardsley-on-Hudson, N.Y.; married 20 June, 1865, in ; William Henry 

Paulding; born i August, 1833, in New York City; died 4 December, {897, 
in Peekskill, New York; buried in Hillside Cemetery, Peekskill, New York; 
he was a son of George and his second wife Eleanor (van Mater) Paulding 
and grandson of Major Paulding, the captor of Major Andre. 

They have three children, all born in New York City: 

1. Anne Depew; single in 1918. 

2. Charles Cook; single in 1918; solicitor of The New York Centra! 

Railroad. 

3. William Henry; married 20 .April, 1912, in Peekskill. New York, 

Luella Jewell; born in ; daughter ; they have 

no children; died 26 February, 1916. 

[32] 



THE CRANCKHEYT LINE 

FIRST GENERATION 

I. Harck' Siboutsen, horn about 1615 in Languedoc, South of France; 

died , 16S1 to 16S4 in Newtown, Long Island, New York; married, 

as a young man, in the Dutch Church, New Amsterdam, 16 November, 
1642, to W'j^ntie Teunis, from Naerden, Holland. 

They had 15 children, all baptized, save one. in the Dutch Church, New 
York, the mother's full maiden name being given in each case, so there 
can be no mistake about the size of this large family: 

2 I. Sybout, 2 bapt. 4 December, 1644; sponsors S>bant Claeszen and 

Hendrick Jacobszen and Sara Schepmoes; married — April, 
1669, Marytie Abrahams; they had eight children. 

3 2. Maryken,- bapt. 10 or 20 November, 1647; sponsors, Theunis 

de Metselaer and Reynier Dominicus and Claes Janszen and 
Belitje Cornelis; m.arried 2 February, 1673, Evert Aertszen; 
they had ten children. 

4 3. Tryntie,- bapt. about 1650; not on record; married about 1672, 

Ryck Abrahamsen (now Lent); they had seven children; see 
the Lent Line. 

5 4. Beelitjen,^ bapt. 4 February, 1652; spor.scrs, Lambert Huy- 

bertszen and Jacob Teuniszen and Jan Janszen and Beelitje 
Jacobs; married 19 May, 1675, Coenraedt Tenvck or Ten Eyck; 
they had ten children. 

6 5. Engeltie,2 bapt. 17 May, 1654; sponsors, Jochem Calder and 

Dirck Janszen and Susanna Jans and Annetje Lodowycks; 
married first, 13 June, 1677, Peeter Breestede; they had four 
children; married second, 4 May, 1686, Jan Evertszen; they 
had two children; married third after 1694, John Wendover; 
they had three children. 

[33] 



C H R O N O L O G 'i' AND ANCESTRY' OF C H A U N C E Y y. . D E P tl W 

7 6. Teunisr bapt. 4 July, 1655; sponsors, Arie Dirckszen and 
Jochem Caljer and 1 eunis Teuniszen and Beiitje Jacobs and 
Susanna Jans; married 10 September, 1679, Sophia Hendricx; 
they had ten children: widow Sophia married second Joost' 
Paulding, but had no children by him; he was the ancestor of 
all the Paulding Families in the United States. 

8+7. Jan,- bapt. 28 November, 1657; sponsors, Pieter Syboutszen 
and Jacob Theuniszen and Grietie Huddens and Belitie 
Jacobs; married about 1695, Grietie . 

9 8. Jacobus, = bapt. 1 September, 1659; died 18 February, 1729. in 
Newtown, Long Island. New York; sponsors Jacob Theunis;:en 

de Key and Aeltje Willems; married , Elizabeth 

Hegeman; they had no children. 

10 9. Annetie,- bapt. 19 April, 1662; one sponsor Hillegond Theunis; 

married 26 August, 1685, Johannes Van Vorst; they had nine 
children. 

11 10. Jannetje,- bapt. 3 August, 1664; sponsors Jacob Theuniszen 

Cray and Pieter Janszen and Geertie Theunis; married first, 
about 16S5, John Pinkens; they had two children; married 

second, , Mr. Jumans or Yeomans; they had 

one child. 

12 II. Ariaentje,- bapt. 4 June, i666: sponsor.v. Jacobus De Key and 

Marritie Lievens: married 27 July, 1690, Jan or John Ryder; 
they had three children. 

13 12. Hilletje,= bapt. 22 April, 1668; sponsors, Jonas Bartelszin and 

Tryntie Weymeyers; married first, , Mr. 

Snediker; they had one child; married second, , iMr. 

Frederickse; they had children. 

14 13. Pieter, = bapt. 22 March, 1670; sponsors. Jacobus De Key and 

Geertie Theunis; no more trace; he probably died young. 

15 14. Weyntie,= bapt. 27 March, 1675; sponsors, Karsten Luurzen 

and Engeltie Flercks; married first, about 1694, John Luyster; 
they had one child; married second, about 1699, Peter Hoif; 
they had one child. 

[34] 



THE C R A N C K H E Y T LINE 



i6 15. Joseph,- bapt. 6 August, 1681; "geen getu_\-gen"; no sponsors; 
no more trace; as he and his brother Peter are not named in 
the very full will of their brother Jacobus, and no marriage 
of either, and no baptism of any children to either, both must 
have died young. 

Harck' or Herck' Siboutszen lived on the Heeren Geracht, now Broad 
Street, New York City, adjoining Abraham Ricken. until he moved to 
Newtown, Long Island, New \'ork, about 1650. He v.-as a ship carpenter. 
It has been questioned if he did not have two wives, but, if so. both were 
named Wyntie or Lavinia. He went, in 1630, to the Poor Bov.ery, on the 
south shore of Bowery Bay, Long Island, New York, now Newtown, where 
he died, his wife surviving. See James Riker's 18S1 History of Harlem, 
New York, and his History of Newtown, Long Island, New York, page 316. 
He was granted 21 morgensof land 2 July, 1654, at Aliddleburg, Long Island, 
and iS April, 1664, at the same place, was granted 8 morgens. A morgen 
was a Dutch land measure equal to about two acres. 

His first three sons went to the Manor of Cortlandt, Westchester Count)', 
New York, and assumed the nam.e of Kranckheyt. The brother Jacobus 
Harcksen (or Siboutszen), who remained in Newtown. Long Island, New- 
York, also took the name of Kronckheyt. This name means "bad health" 
and reminds one of the German toast, "Gesundheit ist besser als Krank- 
heit." Why they took such a name, can not now be explained. 

The Dutch Church, New^ York, records show that Jacobus Kranckheyt, 
and Elizabeth Hegeman, syn huys vrouw (his wife), were sponsors, 14 
November, 1714, at the baptism of Elizabeth, daughter of Coenraat Ten 
Yk and Zara Van Vorst. 

In volume XI, page 67, of unrecorded wills, printed, in New ^'ork 
Surrogates' Office, appears the abstract of the following important will: 

"Will of Jacobus Kronckheyt, yeoman, of Newtown, in Queens County, 
New York, dated 18 November, 1728; proved 3 .March, 172S-1729; wife 
deceased; nephew Abraham Lent of Westchester County, son of my sister 
Tryntie, deceased, all my lands vhere I now dwell at a place called 'ye 
poor Bowery'; son-in-law Jacob Ten Eyck; brothers Sybeth and John 
Kronckheyt; to Arisen and Belitie Ten Eyck, and Engeltie Windeford, 
and Aertie Van \'oorst; to Henry Juman, son of my sister Jannettie; to 

^^'^ 1555798 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A f N C E Y .\t . D E P E W 

Ariantie Ryder and Wyntie Hofl"; to the children of my sister Hilletie 
Snediker, deceased; to nephew Peter Luyster, of Oyster Bay, Long Island, 
New York, son of my sister Wyntie Hoff, a mulatto girl named Molly: 
niece Margaret Snediker; to the children of my deceased wife, Elizabeth; 
nephew Henry, son of my brother Theunis, deceased; four sisters Maritie 
and Belitie and Engeltie and Antie; nephew Henr_\-, son of my sister 
Jannetie; to my sister Ariantie; to the children of m>- sister Hilletie, and 
to the said Abraham Lent; nephew Henry Inman; executors nephew Abra- 
ham Lent, and friend Samuel Fish, of Newtown; witnesses Andries Rieke 
and Peter Berrien and one other (name illegible). 



SECOXD GENERATION 

8. Jan= Herricksen Cranckheyt (Hercks' Syboutsen), bapt. 2S Novem.- 

ber, 1657; alive in 1730; married about 1695, Grietje ; possibly 

Brouwer. 

They had five children, all baptized in the Dutch Church, Tarrytown, 
New York: 

62 I. Jan, 3 bapt. (Number 12), 21 April, 1697; sponsors Jan Ecker and 

Rachel Van Weerdt; no more trace. 

63 2. Herrick,^ bapt. CNumber 35), 24 .April, 1699; sponsors, Cornelis 

Van Texel and Marritje Herrickse; no more trace. 

64 3. Fytie^ or Sophia, ^ bapt. (Number 60), iS April, 1702; sponsors, 

Albert Minnelay and wife Meenske (Jans) ; no more trace. 

65 4. Neyritje,' bapt. (Number loi), 4 June, 1705; sponsors Theunis 

Krankheyt and Mettje Wickelen; this was probably Wyntie, 
who married 19 .March, 1719, Matthis Brouwer; they had four 
children. 

66 4- 5. Jacobus, 3 bapt. (Number 166), i June, 1708; sponsors. Jacobus 

Krankheyt and wife Elizabeth (Hegeman); married first, 

about 1735, Geertje ; married second, after 1751, 

Charity . 

[36] 



THE C R A N C K H E V T LINE 



Jan- Herricksen and his three brothers. Sibout and Teunis and Jacobus 
;ill assumed the name of Cranckheyt. It is absurd to try to explain the 
name by assuming that all four brothers were sickly, as has been attempted. 
This is contrary to reason. 

The 1900 History of Westchester County, New York, by Shonnard, on 
pages 166 and 167, says there were two tracts in the town of Cortland 
which neither Van Cortland nor his heirs ever owned; the first, called by 
the Indians Sachus or Sackhoes, became Ryke's Patent, embracing about 
1800 acres between Verplanck's and Peekskill Creek, on which a large por- 
tion of the Village of Peekskill has been built, was bought from the Indians, 
21 April, 1685, by Ryck Abramsen and Jacob Abramsen and Teunis Dckey 
(De Kay) and Seba Harxse and Jacob Harxse and John Harxse. Jacob 
Harxse, name changed to Cranckheyt, bought from the other patentees most 
of this tract. A large part of the village of Peekskill is on this ground. 
The property was divided among the heirs in succeeding generations and 
much of it sold. The remainder, which descended to Chauncey .M. Depew, 
was given by him to the village of Peekskill for a public park, .May 29, 
1901. The second of the two strips on the Hudson, three hundred 
acres parcel front, was deeded 25 April, 16S5, to Jacobus De Kay for the 
value of four hundred guilders, seawant, and became prior to 1732 the 
property of John Krankheyt. It is now the Peekskill State Camp. This 
land had a front on the inner and upper part of Peekskill Bay. 



THIRD GEXER.ATION 

66. Jacobus^ Cranckheyt (Jan^ Herricksen, Hercks' Syboutsen), bapt. 
I June, 1708; died 1773 before 10 February; married, first, about !735, 

Geertje ; Van Tassell, married, second, about 1733, Charity ; 

she had no children. 

Jacobus^ had four children, by his first wife: 

300 + 1. Jacobus^ or James/ bapt. (Number 923) in the Dutch Church, 
Tarrytown, New York, 18 October, 1737; sponsors, Hendrick 
Lent and Margrietie Lent; married first, about 1763, Esther 
Lent; married second, about 1771, Naomi Baker. 

[37] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPE W 

301 2. A daughter,-* horn about 1739; married about 1759, Mr. 

Teller; and had Olche^ Teller, born about 1760; this was 
probably Isaac Teller, born 4 November, 1729; died 24 
December, 176S; his wife Catharine, born 26 February, 1741 ; 
died 12 May, 1766; aged 25 years, 2 months, and 16 da\s; 
both are buried in the Baptist Cemetery, three miles west of 
Yorktown Heights, New York. 

302 3. Hannah,* born about 1743; married , Peter Montross. 

303 4. Margaret,-* born about 1751; married about 1775, John Lent: 

they had four children; she died 23 July, 1827, aged 76 
years. 

The will of Jacobus Crankheyt is recorded in liber 28, page 404, of the 
New York City Surrogate records. 

FOURTH GENER.4TI0N 

300. Captain James' Kronkhite (Jacobus^ Cranckheyt, Jan= Herrick- 

sen, Hercks* Syboutsen), bapt. 18 October, 1737; he died , in Albany 

County, New York, where he had removed, late in life, to reside with his 
daughter, Mrs. John Angus; this was after January, 1804. He married, 
first, about 1763, Hester Lent; born about 1741; daughter of Lieutenant 
Hendrick' and Elizabeth (Storm) Lent (see the Lent Line); married, 
second, about 1771, Naomi Baker. 

Captain James* Kronkhite had six daughters and one son: 

r.+ Catrina.^ born 6 August, 1765; married 13 November, 1787, Abra- 
ham^ Depew. 

2. Rachel,^ born about 1773; married 22 February, 1796, John Mon- 

tross, of Peekskill, New York; no more trace. 

3. Esther.s born about 1775; married 14 January, 1804, John Angus of 

Albany, New York, by Rev. John Basset of the Dutch Reformed 
Church. 

4. Geertie,^ born about 1778; no more trace. 

[38] 



THE C R A N C K H E Y T LINE 



5. Anna/ born 30 December, 1783; died i July, 1861; married, 13 

November, 1808, James D — Lent of Peekskill, New York; they 
had ten children. 

6. A son, 5 born ; he was not 16 in 1790 census. 

7. Maria,* born i .March, 1787; died 15 April, 1871; married , 



Samuel Lent, of Peekskill, New York; they had three children. 

Captain James'' Kronkhite was a merchant in Peekskill, New York; 
also a Supervisor of Rikes Patent, Westchester County, New York. He 
was a Captain in the Colonial .Militia, his Commission being dated 20 Sep- 
tember, 1775; also a Captain in the Third Regiment, Westchester County, 
New York, Militia, War of the Revolution. He was captured in the Revo- 
lution by the British, and suffered imprisonment, but was exchanged. 
The printed 1904 New York in the Revolution, as Colony and State, Sup- 
plement, page 42, The Army, American Prisoners of War, all from the 
State of New York, unless otherwise designated. 

(dated) Pay OfTice, Philad. 
23 November 1784 
Sir: 

Agreeable to your Request of the 13 Inst, to Mr. (John) Pierce, I have 
enclosed you the Account of Monies, etc., advanced to the Officers of your 
State while in Captivity by the several Commissaries of Prisoners, etc. 

Among the names appears those of Captain James Kronkhite and 
Captain John Kronkright 

The printed 1898 New York in the Revolution, second edition, by James 
A. Roberts, Comptroller, pages 210 and 211, Westchester County, New 
York, Militia, Third Regiment, Colonel Pierre Van Cortlandt, Captain 
James Kronkhite, enlisted men Abraham Depue and Hennery Depue and 
John De Pue: (Family Tradition says that Abraham Depew enlisted and 
served in the Company of James Kronkheit: to equip this Company, James 
Kronkheit mortgaged all his property and lost it. 

[39] 



CHRONOLOGY A N' D ANCESTRY OF C H A U X C E Y M . D E P E V.' 

The printed 1SS7 New York State Archives, New York in the Revolu- 
tion, volume one. page 410, by Berthold Fernow, Captain James Kronk- 
hites in (Colonel Gilbert) Drake's Regiment; and page 305, Third Regiment 
(North or Manor of Cortlandt j : 
Colonel Pierre Van Cortlandt 
Lieutenant Colonel Gilbert Drake 
First Major Joseph Strang 
Second Major Ebenezer Purdy 
Quarter Master Isaac Norton 

Commissions issued October 19, 1775: 
Captain James Kronkhyle 
First Lieutenant Abr'm. Lamb 
Second Lieutenant Staars De Grote 
Ensign David Penore 

Commissions issued September 20, 1775, and page 306: 

Changes in the Regiment, June 25, 1778: 
Benjamin Dykeman First Lieutenant 1 

Harmanus Gordinear Second Lieutenant [ Kronkhyte's Company 
John Porter Ensign J 

February 27, 1779, Jonathan Porter, Ensign, Kronkhyte's Company, vice 
John Porter, appointed through mistake. 

The printed 1S6S Calendar of Historical Manuscripts, of New York 
State, War of the Revolution, volume one, page 158, A list of the Officers 
chosen in the several Districts of the North Battallion, Westchester Count)', 
New York, Manor of Cortlandt, (The District late Commanded by Francis 
Lent): James Kronkh_\-te (chosen as) Captain. 

The printed 1914 Historical Register of the Officers of the Continental 
Army, April, 1775, to December, 1783, by Francis Bernard Heitman. nage 
337: James Kronkhite, Captain of Drake's Regiment, New York Militia, 
■1776; taken prisoner at Fort Washington 16th. November 1776; exchanged 
17th. December 17S0; page 178, James Cronkhite, New York Militia, taken 
prisoner at West Chester 24th. December 1779. 

Being an Officer in the Revolutionary Army, the descendants of Cap- 
tain James^ Kronkhite derive thereby membership in the Revolutionary 
Societies. 

[40] 



THE C R A N C K H n Y T LINE 



The printed 1790 Census of New York State, page 197, Town of Cort- 
land, Westchester County, shows James Cronkhite, Jr., one male over 16 
years of age, including the head of the family, one male under 16 years of 
age, six free white females; no other persons; one slave. His home there 
appears between those of Abner Cutler and Abraham Van Tassel. 

FIFTH GENERATION 

Catharine^ Kronkhite and Abraham Depew had a son: 

Isaac^ Depew, born 9 August, 1800, Peekskill, New York; married 26 
December, 1832, Martha Minot Mitchell. 

Isaac« and Martha Minot (Mitchell) Depew had a son: 

Chauncey Mitchell' Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegernan; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



41 



/•;^^.' 



\ 



\ 




CHAUNCE/ ROO^ MITCHELL 



THE MITCHELL LINE 

1. Matthew! .Mitchell; born about 1590 in South Ouram, Parish of 
Halifax, Yorkshire, England; died about 1645, aged about 55 years, at 
Stamford, Connecticut; married 16 April, 1616, Susan Butterfield of Oven- 
den, Parish of Halifax, Yorkshire, England. 

They had eight children, six of whom were baptized at South Ourara, 
England: 

I. Abigail, = bapt. 26 April, 16 18; probably died in infancy. 

3+2. David, = bapt. 14 November, 1619; married, first, about 1650, Sarah 
Wheeler; married, second, about 1677, Elizabeth ; prob- 
ably Graves. 

3. Sarah,-' bapt. 14 October, 1621; married, about 1640, Honorable 

Samuel Sherman; they had nine children. 

4. Martha, = bapt. 26 October, 1623; died 22 November, 1623, in 

England. 

2 5. Reverend Jonathan, = born about 15 November, 1624; bapt. 19 
December, 1624; died 9 July, 1668, in Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts; married , Margaret Boradel, v,^idow, and third wife 

of Reverend Thomas Shepard of Cambridge; Jonathan^ had 
four sons and several daughters; Jonathan^ graduated in 1647 
from Harvard College; he preached 18 years at Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, from 1649 to 1667. 

6. Susan,- bapt. 14 October, 1627; she survived her father and is 

named in his will; no more trace. 

7. Matthew,^ bapt. 5 July, 1629, at Ovenden, England; died 4 Octo- 

ber, 1629, in England. 

[43] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

8. Hannah, 2 bapt. 26 June, 1631, at North Ouram, England; died 
2 April, 1702; she was living at Stamford, Connecticut, at the 
time of her father's death and is one of ihose named in his v.i!l, 
married, first, about 1650, Robert Coe. of Stratford, Connecti- 
cut; they had four children; married, second, about 1G65, 
Nicholas L-dsey, of New Haven, Connecticut; they had one son. 

Matthew' Mitchell sailed Saturday, 23 May, 1G35, from Bristol, Eng- 
land, in the ship James, commanded by Captain Taylor, and arrived at 
Boston, Massachusetts, 17 August, 1635, with his wife Susan and children: 
David, aged 13 years; Sarah, aged 13 years; Jonathan, aged 11 \'cars: 
Susan, aged 8 years, and Hannah, aged 4 years, along with Reverend 
Richard Mather, Reverend Richard Denton, and about one hundred other 
passengers. Matthew was a dissenter and is represented to have been 
not only a very pious man, but a man of very considerable fortune. He 
and his family spent the winter in Charlestown, Massachusetts, and moved 
in the spring of 1636 to Concord, Massachusetts, where he lost consider- 
able property by fire. The next summer he" moved to Saybrook, Con- 
necticut. The next spring, 1637, he went to Wethersfield, Connecticut, 
where he lost still more of his property. 

He here became one of the most extensive l?nd owners in that com- 
munity. He moved again, in 1640, to Stamford, Connecticut — then 
called Rippowam — where he was one of the founders. Mather says: "His 
house, barn and goods were again consumed by fire." He was a Deputy 
in 1637 to the General Court of Connecticut, which voted that "There 
shall be an offensive war against the Pequoitt." He was .Assistant in 
1638. He served in the garrison at Saybrook Fort, under Lieutenant Liun 
Gardiner, in the Pequot War of 1636; also in the encounter with the In- 
dians on the Connecticut River in 1636. "His history shows him to have 
been a man of great enterprise, unbounded resolution, clear and cool 
judgment, and of earnest and positive character. Too conscientious to 
live patiently under laws requiring a form of worship he thought wrong, 
and equally impatient under colonial decision that seemed needlessly 
arbitrary, his staunch uprightness commanded respect, and his unswerving 
justice invited confidence when trials demonstrated character." Mr. H. G, 
Somerby, of London, England, says: "The Mitchells were a family of good 

[44] 



HE MITCHELL LINE 



Standing, and their arms were — a sable, a clievron betvee-.! three escallops 
argent — and are painted on the roof of the chancel of i!:e Halifax Church." 

The Stamford, Connecticut, records of "Town .Meetings," liber one, 
page 9, very much worn and defaced, contain the will of Matthew Mitchell. 

See the printed i86S History of Stamford, Connecticut, by Reverend 
Elijah Baldwin Huntington; also the printed 1S72 History of Ancient 
Woodbury, Connecticut, by William Cothren, volume two, page 15 19; 
also volum.e three, pages 219 to 221, of the 1861 Genealogical Dictionary, 
by James Savage; also the 1886 History of Stratford, Connecticut, by 
Samuel Orcutt. 

SECOND GEXERATION 

3. David= Mitchell (.Matthew'), bapt. 14 No\-ember, 1619; died 
about 1685 in Stratford, Connecticut: married, first, about 1650, Sarah 
Wheeler, daughter of Thomas Wheeler; married, second, about 1677, 

Elizabeth (probably Graves); no children by the second wife. 

David= Mitchell had nine children by his first wife: 
4 I. Deacon Matthew.^ born about 1653; settled in the Society at 
Southbury, Connecticut, before 1682; married about 1676 
Mary Thompson; they had four children. 
54-2. Johu,3 born about 1654; married about 1677 Elizabeth Knell. 

6 3. Nathan, 5 born about 1656; settled in Litchfield, Connecticut; no 

more trace. 

7 4. Abraham, 3 born about 1658: married about 1686 — ; they 

had two children; in 1694-1695 he was in Stratford, Connecti- 
cut, but in 1700 in Windham, Hartford County, Connecticut. 

5. Daniel,' born about 1666; married about 1698 Susanna Sherman; 

they had three children. 

6. Martha, 3 born about 166S; married a^out 16S7, Nathan Baldwin, 

of Milford, Connecticut; they had one child. 

7. Elizabeth, 3 born about 1670; joined in 1692 the Stratford, Con- 

necticut, church; no more trace. 

8. Susanna,' born about 1673: no more trace. 

9. Grace,' born about 1675; married 26 November, 1701, William 

Pixley; they had two children. 

[45] 



CHRONOLOGY A >; D ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P i; v.- 

David= Mitchell came with his father from England. He piirchased or, 
26 February, 1636, of John f^eber or Reeder his home and lot and all his 
interest in the Stratford, Connecticut, lands. At the time of his death he 
was one of the largest landed proprietors of Stratford, Connecticut. The 
1872 History of Ancient Woodbury, Connecticut, by Wiliiam Cothren, 
volume two, page 151S, says: "David Mitchell married Sarah Wheeler, 
daughter of Thomas, so his son Nathan^ Mitchell (then of Litchfield"; 
said in 1724 on the Stratford Land Records; but whether her father were 
Thomas Wheeler of New Haven, or Thomas Wheeler of Milford. or Thomas 
Wheeler of Fairfield, does not appear." A search at Stratford. Connecti- 
cut, of the deeds does not show this deed in the individual book indexes. 
and there is yet no General Inde.x at Stratford for deeds before 1S60. 
Several volumes of their deeds were examined, but Mr. Eardeley did not 
find this deed. If it was recorded some years after it was executed, then 
it is probably in a volume under a later date. The page and volume are 
desired. Sarah Wheeler was not the daughter of Thomas Wheeier 01 
Milford, as his full will is printed in the large 1914 Wheeler Family in 
America, and it names only his ten sons and some nephews and grand- 
children. Thomas Wheeler of Fairfield had a daughter Sarah v.ho mar- 
ried about 1652 Thomas^ Sherwood of Fairfield, and had cliiidren from 
1654 to 1659. Thomas Wheeler of New Haven left no will and the 1914 
Wheeler Family gives him a daughter Sarah who probably married Josian 
Horton of Southold, Long Island, New York, or Francis Say re of South- 
ampton, Long Island, New York. 

The Stamford, Connecticut, records of "Town .Meetings," Hber one, 
page 47, gives the lands there of David^ Mitchell. 

The Fairfield, Connecticut, Probate Records, liber three, volume 1673 
to 1689, have the will of David^ Mitchell, of Stratford, Connecticut, dated 
II March, 1683-1686; proved ; names his widow, Elizaceth; chil- 
dren, Matthew and John and Abraham: the house the deceased purchased 
of John Hubbell, and son, Daniel, and four daughters, Martha and Eliza- 
beth and Susanna and Grace; overseers were widow, Elizabeth, with the 
two sons, Matthew and John, with John Sherman, called a Kinsman, ana 
Mr. Israel Chancy; witnesses, John Birdseye and John Johnson; inventor.', 
dated 29 March, 1686, taken by Samuel Sherman and James Judson and 
Joseph Curtis, selectmen. 



THE MITCHELL LINE 

David- .Mitchell came to Boston, Massachusetts, \\ith his father; went 
to Saybrook, Connecticut, to Wethersfield, to Stamford, Connecticut, 
where he had land in 1650. He was invited to teach the school December, 
1649, in W'atertown, Massachusetts. David^ .Mitchell went in 1665 to 
Stratford, Connecticut, when he had two sons. In November, 1675, he 
was entrusted by the Council of War with important affairs. See the 
printed 1S61 Genealogical Dictionar\-, by James Savage, volume three, 
page 219: also the History of Stratford, Connecticut, by Samuel Orcutt; 
also the 1S54 History of Ancient Woodbury, Connecticut, by William 
Cothren, volume one, page 634. 

The printed Hartford, Connecticut, Probate Records, give the will of 
George Gra\'e, of Hartford, dated 29 October, 16S6 (he died 3 December, 
1692), and names his wife, Elizabeth, and children, John and George and 
Elizabeth .Mitchell and Sarah Loomis and .Mercy Grave: George Graves 
married, 2 .April, 165 I.Elizabeth Ventris; Sarah Gra\'es married. 27 Decem- 
ber, 1 688, Jonathan Loomis, and had five children. See the i860 Genealogi- 
cal Dictionary, by James Savage, volume two, page 294. 

The printed Hartford, Connecticut, Probate Records, give the v, ill of 
George Grave, dated 3 .May, 1699 (he died 20 June, 1699); no wife named; 
sister, Elizabeth .Mitchell; brother, John Grave; cousin (nephew?) John 
Mitchell; brother, Robert Shurly, sole executor; witnesses, Hezekiah 
Wyllys and Nathaniel .Arnold; inventory, dated 10 Jul>', 1699, was taken 
by Thomas Bunce and Ebenezer Hopkins. 

Abraham^ .Mitchell (David, = .Mathewi), married, after — .March, 1697, 
but before 5 July, 1699, to Mary, widow of Samuel Abby, of Windham, 
Connecticut. 

Matthew' Mitchell was in Springfield, .Massachusetts, in .May, 1636. 
His rame is on the first list of the colony at Stamford, Connecticut (Rip- 
powam), 1640-1641, and stands next after the minister. Reverend Richard 
Denton, and is first on the next two lists. He v/ent in 1644, with the 
minister, to Hempstead, Long Islar.d, New York, but soon returned to 
Stamford, Connecticut. His will was proved at Stamford, Connecticut, 
16 June, 1646, as above. He died before 19 .May, 1646, as is evidenced 
from the statement of the court that approved his will. 

See the printed 1S68 History of Stamford, Connecticut, by Reverend 
Elijah Baldwin Huntington, pages 38 and 58 and 2S0; also the printed 

[47] 



CHRONOLOGY AND 



CESTRY OF CHAUNCEY 



probate Records of Hartford, Connecticut, and Hinman's Early Settlers 
of Connecticut. 

THIRD GENERATION 

5. Ensign John^ .Mitchell (David, = AlatthewO, born about 1654; 
died 3 January, 1732, in Woodbury, Connecticut; married, about 1677, 
Elizabeth Knell; born 3 May, 1653, in Stratford, Connecticut; died 19 
January, 1730, in Woodbury, Connecticut; daughter of Nicholas and 
Elizabeth (Newman) Knell. 

They had nine children, all baptized in Woodbury: 

David, ^ bapt. — November, 1679; died young. 
Hannah,^ bapt. — July, 1680; no more trace. 
David, ^ bapt. — April, 16S0-16S1 ; no more trace. 
Elizabeth,^ bapt. — November, 1683; died young. 
Elnathan,^ bapt. — October, 1686; no more trace. 
John/ bapt. — P~ebruary, !688-i689; married, first, 17 January, 
1717, Elizabeth Curtis; married, second, about 1739, iMary 

; married, third, about 1746, Sarah . 

Knell,* bapt. — April, 1690-1691; married , Martha 



12 


I 




2. 


13 


3 


«4 


4- 


15 


5- 


16 +6. 



17 7. 

18 8. 

19 9. 



(Betterus?); they had five children. 
Elizabeth,* bapt. — May, 1693; married , Mr. 

Squire. 
Martha,* bapt. — March, 1696-1697; married, 11 February, 

1720, Abraham Hurd; they had ten children. 

John^ Mitchell was one of the grantees named in the Indian deeds, 
dated 17 March, 1683, for the second purchase of a large part of ancient 
Woodbury, Connecticut. He was also a member in 1709 of the General 
Court of Connecticut. 

FOURTH GENERATION 

16. Lieutenant John* Mitchell (Ensign John,' David,= Matthew'), 
bapt. — February, 16S8-1689; died, 22 April, 1748, in Woodbury, Con- 
necticut; married, first, 17 January, 1717, Elizabeth^ Curtis; bapt. — Sep- 

[48] 



THE i\^ I T C H E L L LINE 



tember, 1697; died, 14 .May, 1738, in Woodbury; daughter of Ensign John'' 

and Johannah Curtis; married, second, about 1739, Alary ; she died 

4 January, 1745; they had no children; married, third, about 1746, Sarah 

; she died a widow 3 September, 1749; they had no children. 

Lieutenant John^ .Mitchell had five children by his first wife, Eliza- 
beth' Curtis: 

38 I. Joanna, 5 born iS November, 1718; married, — June, 1744, Aaron 

iMallory; they had eight children. 

39 2. John, 5 born 12 October, 1720; probably married 18 December, 

1747-1748, Susan Orton; they had three children. 

40 + 3. Asahel,5 born 6 October, 1723; bapt. 13 October, 1723, in Wood- 

bury, Connecticut; married 21 January, 1747-1748, Olive Root. 

41 4. Elnathan,' born 9 February, 1728; he settled in Judea Society in 

Woodbury, Connecticut; he died , 1818, aged 90 years; 

married — November, 1753, Sarah Tenn>', of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; they had four children. 

42 5. Reuben, 5 born , 1733; bapt. 23 September, 1733; died 

5 January, 1737. 

John^ Mitchell was called Sergeant on the 9th of February, 1728, and 
Ensign on the 5th of June, 1737. Two of his slaves were baptized— Bristol, 
negro boy of Lieutenant John .Mitchell, bapt. 22 June, 1740; and Rose, 
black servant of Lieutenant John Mitchell, bapt. i August, 1742. These 
two baptisms are recorded on the Congregational Church records of Wood- 
bury, Connecticut, where Lieutenant John Mitchell lived. 

FIFTH GENEIRATION 

40. Captain Asahel^ .Mitchell (Lieutenant John," Ensign john,^ David, 2 
Mathhew'); born 6 October, 1723, in Woodbury, Connecticut; died 1 .May, 
'797. in West Side, Woodbury, Connecticut; married, 21 January, 1747- 
1748, Olive Root; she was born 4 .March, 1726; died i October, 181 3, aged 88 
years, in Woodbury, Connecticut; daughter of Joseph and Susannah Root. 

They had five children, all baptized in Woodbury: 
'02 I. Reuben, '5 bapt. 25 December, 1748; died 9 November, 1822, 

aged 74 years, in Woodbury, Connecticut; married 

(Susanna ?) Judson; they had seven children. 

[49] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C E S T R \" O V C I-I \ U N C E Y M . U E P E W 



103 2. Daniel/' bapt. 19 August, 1750; died 14 May, 1824, aged 74 

years, in Woodbury, Connecticut; married , Ruth 

Root; they had two children. 

104 3. Susanna,'^ bapt. 1; October, 1732; married, about 1770, Aaron 

Sanford; they had nine children; they went to Greenville, 
New "\'ork. 

105 +4. Reverend Justus, « bapt. 8 September, 1754; went to New 

Canaan, Connecticut; married 7 September, 1779, Martha 
Sherman. 

106 5. Aaron, « bapt. 17 October, 1756; married ■ — , Lucy Judson; 

named Asahel in the text but Aaron in the baptism, in the 
printed History of Woodbury, Connecticut; no more trace. 

SIXTH GENERATION 

105. Reverend Justus, ° Mitchell (Captain .Asahe!,'^ Lieutenant John,* 
Ensign John,^ David,^ Matthew^), bapt. 8 September, 1754, in Woodbury, 
Connecticut; died 24 September, 1806, in New Haven, Connecticut, say 
some authorities; others say he died in New Canaan, Connecticut; married 
7 September, 1779, .Martha Sherman; she was born 8 December, 1758; 
died 24 October, 1S29, in White Plains, New York; daughter of Reverend 
Josiah Sherman, of Woodhridge, Connecticut, and Martha Minot. 

The widow, .\Lartha .Mitchell, married, second, about 1807, William 
Battell, of Torrington, Connecticut. 

Reverend Justus' and .Martha (Minot) Mitchell had four children, the 
first two born and baptized in Woodbury, Connecticut : 

161 I. Elizabeth,' born 28 August, 1780; as Betsey, she was bapt. !2 

November, 17S0; married , Charles Thompson, Esq.; 

they had one son. 

162 2. Sherman,' born 2 July, 1782; bapt. 6 August, 1782; married 

, Hannah Fitch; they had one child. 

163 3. Minot,' born 24 September, 1784: married , Eliza Leeds 

Silliman; they had eight children. 

164 + 4. Chauncey Root,' born 25 June, 1786; married, about 1807, Anna 

MacArthur Johnston. 

[50] 



MARTHA Ml NOT MITCHELL, 
BORN MARTHA SHERMAN. 



THE MITCHELL LINE 



Martha Sherman, the wife of Reverend Justus'^ Mitchell, was a sister 
of the Honorable Roger Minot Sherman, and a niece of the Honorable 
Roger Sherman, who was one of the signers of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. She was an exceedingly intellectual and a beautiful woman. 
The printed 1854 History of Ancient Woodbury, Connecticut, by William 
Cothren, volume one, page 452, says Reverend Justus Mitchell, V. D. M., 
was a native of Woodbury; was graduated in 1776 at Yale College; and was 
settled, in 1783, over the Congregational Church at New Canaan, Con- 
necticut, where he continued to reside. He was a talented and useful man 
in the sphere of his labors. 

The following inscription, copied from his monument in the old grave- 
yard in New Canaan, Connecticut, contains an epitome of his history and 
of his life and character: 

" In Memory of the Rev. Justus .Mitchell, A. .\1., V. D. M., pastor 
of the Church of Christ, in New Canaan, who died suddenl\- in the 
hour of sleep, 24th September, A. D. 1806, in the fifty-second year of 
his age, and tv/ent\'-fifth of his .Ministry. In death was lost: to 
his consort, an affectionate and beloved husband; to his children, a 
kind, revered parent, counsellor and guide; to his tlock, a faithful, 
learned and venerated pastor; to the Church of Christ, a bright 
ornament and example; to the poor, a liberal benefactor; to the 
disconsolate, a comforter and friend. 

"In doctrine uncorrupt, in language plain. 
And plain in manner, decent, solemn, chaste. 
Affectionate in look, and much impress'd. 
By him the violated law spoke out 
Its thunder; and by him, in strains as sweet 
As angels use, the gospel whisper'd peace." 

See the printed 1903 Yale Biographies, volume three, page 623, by 
Franklin Bowditch Dexter. 

In the original manuscript church records of the New Canaan, Conn., 
Congregational Church it is recorded that Reverend Justus .Mitchell, with 
unusual engagedness, preached a sermon at the house of Mr. Theophilus 
Fitch from the text " Is any among you atflicted, let him pray," and 
returned home, retired to bed and died suddenly in a fit. 

[51] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C E S 1 R \- OF C H A U N C E Y .M . D E P E W 

SEVENTH GEXER.ATION 

164. Chauncey Root^ Mitcheil (Reverend Justus/ Captain Asahe!,' 
Lieutenant John/ Ensign John/ David,-' .Matthew^), born 25 June, 1786; 
died — February (or June), 1814-1S15, aged 28 years, in Delhi, Delaware 
County, New York; his remains were later removed and now repose in the 
Hillside Cemetery, Peekskili, New York: although his tombstone says he 
died in June, 181 1, this is a mistake, as he had a child born in 1814; he 
married, about 1S07, Anna MacArthur Johnston, born i November, 17S5, 
at Lake Mahopac, Putnam County. New York; died 21 January, 1864, in 
Peekskili, New York; daughter of the Honorable Robert and Elizabeth 
(Ogden) Johnston. 

They had four children: 

1. Elizabeth Thompson, ^ born 19 October, 180S; married, 10 May, 1832, 

William S Stanley, ALD.; they had no children. 

2. Martha Minot/ born 2 .May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester County, 

New York; died 26 March, 1SS5, in Peekskili, New York; married, 
26 December, 1832, in Peekskili, New York. Isaac Depev/, Esq. 

3. William Ogden,* born 6 June, 1812; died i or 6 June, 1831. 

4. Lucia Johnston,' born 19 August, 1814; m.arried, 6 July, 1844, William 

Govan, M.D.; they had three children. 

Chauncey Root' Mitchell was a lawver at Delhi, Delaware County, 
New York, possessed brilliant talents, and was highly gifted as an orator. 
His death, at the early age of 28 years, was before he had a chance to 
gain a national reputation, for which he was well fitted. In his short career 
he had shown great promise of the same abundant success as has been 
obtained by his renowned grandson. Honorable Chauncey Mitchell Depew. 

Martha Minot^ Mitchell and Isaac Depew, Esq., had a son: 
• Chauncey Mitchell Depew, born 23 .April, 1834, in Peekskili, New 
York; married, first, 9 November, 187 1, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, 
second, 28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



52 






ROGER S - E RMAN 
SIGNER Or ~ry,E. D^CLA=1AT;0N OF 1 N D EPlN DEIINCE: 



THE SHERMAN LINE 

26. Captain Johni Sherman, born about 1604 in Dedham, Essex 
County, England; died 25 January, 1690-1691, in Watertown, Massachu- 
setts; married, about 1638, .Martha Palmer, born ; died 9 February, 

1700, in Watertown; daughter of WilHam' and Ann Palmer. 

They had seven children, born in Watertown: 

48 1. John,= born i October, 1638; killed 19 December, 1675, in the 

war against King Philip in the Narragansett fight in the Great 
Swamp in South Kingston, Rhode island; he had no children. 

49 2. Martlia," born 21 December, 1640; married, 26 July, 1661, Francis 

Bowman; they had nine children. 

50 3. Mary,= born 26 March, 1644; m.arricd, 18 January, 1667, Timothy 

Hawkins; they had one child. 

51 4. Sarah, = born 17 November, 1647; died 17 June, 1667. 

52 5. Elizabeth, = born 15 March, 1649; married, 20 July, 16S1, Samuel 

Gaskell; no more trace. 

53 + 6. Joseph,^ born 14 March, 1650; married, 18 November, 1673, 

Elizabeth Winship. 

54 7. Grace,^ born 20 October, 1655; not married. 

Captain John' Sherman settled in 1634 in Watertown, Massachusetts; 
he was an educated man; he was made a freeman 17 May, 1637; he was 
a cousin of Reverend John Sherman. Captain John came to New Eng- 
land with his father in 1634 from Dedham, Essex County, England. He 
was a soldier in Captain Moseley's Company and was wounded 6 January, 
1676, at Rhode Island in King Philip's War. He was made an Ensign in 
1654, and Captain 1 1 June 1680. He was a deputy to the General Court 
in 1651 and 1653 and 1663 and 1682, and Representative of the Colony of 

[53] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

Massachusetts Bay. He was Clerk of "Ye writs of Watertown" i Octo- 
ber, 1645; Town Clerk in 1648 and often afterwards: Surveyor and Select- 
man often between 1667 and 1680, Steward of Harvard College in 1662, 
Captain of Militia, and often called to manage town affairs. 

The 1870 New England Historic and Genealogical Register, pages 63 

and following, trace the family in England thus: 

Henry Sherman, of Dedham, England, born ; died , 1589: 

married, ; Agnes ; she died , 1580; they had six 

children, among whom was Henry Sherman, born ; died 

— , 1610; married, , Susan Hills; they had eleven child- 
ren, among whom were: 

4. Edmund, born ; married, 26 May, 161 1, Judith .■\ngier, and 

had Reverend John, born 4 January, 1614; came to New England 
and Samuel, bapt. 12, July 1618; married, about 1640, Sarah .Mitchell. 

7. John, born 17 .August, 1585 : m.arried (Grace .Makinr), and had 

Captain John Sherman, born , 1604; married .Martha Palmer. 

See pages 429 and 934 of the printed 1855 History of Watertown, 
Massachusetts, by Dr. Henry Bond; also the 1854 printed History of 
Ancient Woodbury, Connecticut, by William Cothren, pages 680 and 
1544; also the printed 1886 History of Stratford, Connecticut, by Samuel 
Orcutt, page 1283. 

SECOXD GENERATION 

53. Joseph^ Sherman ('Captain John'), born 14 .March, 1650, in Water- 
town, Massachusetts; died there 30 June, 1730-1731; married there i8 

November, 1673, Elizabeth Winship; born 15 April, 1652; died ; 

daughter of Lieutenant Edward and his second wife, Ehzabeth (Parke) 
Winship. 

They had thirteen children, born in Watertown: 

117 I. John, 3 born 11 January, 1674; married, , Mary Bullen; 

they had seven children; w^ent to Marlboro, Massachusetts. 

118 2. Edward, 3 born 2 September, 1677; married, 16 October, 1700, 

Sarah Parkhurst; they had six children; went to Wayland, 
Massachusetts. 

[54] 



THE SHE li A\ AN LINE 



119 



120 


4 


121 


5 


122 


6 


123 


7 


124 


8 


125 


9 



Joseph,^ born 8 Februan', 1679; was a surveyor in Watertown, 

Massachusetts; no more trace. 
Samuel,' born 28 November, 1681 ; he died young. 
Samuel,' born 28 November, 1682; no more trace. 
Jonathan," born 24 Februar>', 1683-16S4; in 1712 was at 

Charlestown, .Massachusetts; no more trace. 
Ephraim,' born 16 .March, 1685; he died young. 
Ephraim," born 20 September, 1686; no more trace. 
Elizabeth, 2 born 15 July, 16S7; married, , .Mr. 

Stephens, of Townsend, .Massachusetts. 
Martha,' born ; bapt. i September, 1689; married, about 

1707, Reverend Benjamin Shattuck; they had nine children. 

126 + 11. William,' born 28 June, 1692; married, first, about 1713, 

Rebecca Cutler; married, second, 3 September, 1715, .Mehit- 
able Wellington. 

127 12. Sarah,' born 2 June, 1694; no more trace. 

128 13. Nathaniel,' born 19 September, 1696; married 31 May, 1726, 

Mary Livermore; they had three children. 

Joseph^ Sherman was a Representative to the General Court 1702 to 
1705, inclusive; was often chosen Selectman and Assessor of Watertown, 
Massachusetts. 



THIRD GEXER.ATION 

126. William' Sherman (Joseph,- Captain John'), born 28 June, 1692, 
in Watertown, .Massachusetts; death not found; married, first, about 171 3, 
Rebecca Cutler, of Charlestown, .Massachusetts: they had one child; she 
died about 1714; married, second, in Watertown, .Massachusetts, 3 Sep- 
tember, 171 5, .Mehitable Wellington, of Watertown; she was bapt. 4 .March, 
1687-16S8; death not found; daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Sweet- 
man) Wellington. 

William' had eight children: one child by his first wife and seven by his 
second wife: 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

182 I. William/ born about 1714; died aged about 16 months. 

183 2. William, ■• born 20 .March, 1716-1717; died 20 April, 1756; 

married 18 April, 1743, Sarah or Ruth Terrill: they had no 
children; went to New Milford, Connecticut. 

184 3. Mehitable," born ; married — ■ , John Battell, of 

Dedham, Massachusetts; he was born 30 April, 1717; died 
18 November, 1800; they had William^ Battell, born 12 
August, 174S, in Dedham, Massachusetts; went to Milford, 
Connecticut; in 1784 to Torrington, Connecticut; he died 29 
February, 1832; married, first, , 1753, Sarah Bucking- 
ham; they had ten children; married, second, , 1807, 

his cousin, Mrs. Martha, widow of Reverend Justus^ .Mitchell, 
and daughter of Reverend Josiah* and Martha (Minot) 
Sherman; see page 50. 

185 4. Honorable Roger, ^ born iq April, 1721, in Newton, Massachu- 

setts; died 23 July, 1793; married, first, , Elizabeth 

Hartwell, daughter of Deacon Joseph Hartwell, of Stoughton, 
Massachusetts; they had seven children; married, second, 12 
May, 1763, Rebecca Prescott, daughter of Benjamin Pres- 
cott, Jr.; they had eight children; see the Prescott Line. 
The first wife died 19 October, 1760, aged 34 years. Honor- 
able Roger^ Sherman was one of the signers of the immortal 
Constitution of the United States and also of the Declaration 
of Independence, and was afterwards a United States Senator. 

186 5. Elizabeth,-' born 17 Juiy, 1723; married 25 February, 1748- 

1749, James Buck, of New Milford, Connecticut; they had 
ten children. 

187 6. Reverend Nathaniel,* born 5 March, 1724; married i March, 

1759, Lydia .Merriam; he graduated at Nassau Hall, Princeton 
College; went to Bedford, Massachusetts. 

188 + 7. Reverend Josiah/ born 2 April, 1729; married 24 January, 

1757, Martha .Minot. 

189 8. Rebecca,'' born ; married 24 .May 1751, Joseph Hart- 

well, of New Milford, Connecticut; they had nine children. 

[36] 



L 



ROGER MINOT SHERMAN 



THE SHERMAN LINE 



FOURTH GENERATION 

i8S. Reverend Josiah^ Sherman (William, ^ Josephs Captain John'), 
born 2 April, 1729; died 24 November, 1789, in Woodbridge, Connecticut; 

married, 24 January, 1757, Martha Minot; born ; died , 

1820, in Durham, New York; daughter of Honorable James Minot and 
Elizabeth (Wilder) Minot, of Concord, Massachusetts. 

They had six children, five of whom were born in Woburn, Massa- 
chusetts: 

1. Honorable Roger Minot, ^ born 9 December, 1757; died 30 December, 

1844; married , Elizabeth Gould; he settled in Fairfield, Con- 
necticut; was an LL.D. and one of the most brilliant and successful 
lawyers that Connecticut has ever produced. As a man, a jurist, 
and a Christian he was pre-eminent. 

2. Martha,^ born 8 December, 175S; married first, 7 September, 1779, 

Reverend Justus Mitchell (see page 51); married, second, about 
1807, her cousin, William Battell, of Torrington, Connecticut (see 
page 50). 

3. Elizabeth, 5 born 26 March, 1761 ; married , John Mitchell, Esq., 

of Woodbury, Connecticut ; no more trace. 

4. Mary,5 born 3 February, 1763; no more trace. 

5. Susanna, 5 born 7 April, 1765; married , Nathaniel Baldwin; 

they had five children; they went to Michigan. 

6. Josiah,5 born ; he went to Albany, New York; no more trace. 

Reverend Josiah^ Sherman w-as graduated in 1754 from Nassau Hall, 
now Princeton University; received the honorary degree of M.A. (Master 
of Arts) in 1758 at Harvard College, and in 1765 the same degree from 
Yale College. After preaching 15 _\-ears at Woburn, Massachusetts, he 
was installed at Milford (New Milford), 23 August, 1775, and resigned 
21 June, 1781; settled then at Goshen, Connecticut, and remained there 
till 1788. He was a Captain and Chaplain of the Seventh Regiment of 
the Connecticut Line in the Revolutionary War, Formation of 1 777-1 781 
Colonel Heman Swift, of Cornwall, Connecticut; enlisted i January, 1777; 

[37] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

discharged 6 December, 1777. The printed iSSo Connecticut in the 
Revolution, on page 217, shows this company went into the field in the 
Spring of 1777 at Camp Peekskill, New York, and in September was 
ordered under General Alexander McDougall to join Washington's army in 
Pennsylvania; they fought at Germantown, Pennsylvania, on the 4th of 
October, 1777, and sufTered some loss; they wintered at Valley Forge in 
1 777- 1 778. 

He was a very acceptable preacher. His elocution was excellent, 
though fluent and rapid. His voice was distinct, his mind discriminating. 
His eloquence was often pathetic, sometimes very powerful, and always 
such as to command the respect and attention of his audience. 

The printed 1S39 American Quarterly Register, volume 11, page 1S8, 
has: Reverend Josiah^ Sherman studied divinitj' with Reverend Dr. 
Bellamy, of Bethlehem, Connecticut, and with Reverend Graham, of 
Southbury, Connecticut. He went, in 1755, to Woburn, Massachusetts, 
having resigned from New Milford, Connecticut, and recommended to 
Woburn, previously to his ordination. He retired to New Milford after 
his resignation from Woburn, and after residing a while with his family at 
Stratford, Connecticut, \\as installed at Goshen, Connecticut, in 1781. 
In 1788 he resigned from Goshen, and after a short residence at 
Sheffield, Massachusetts, accepted an invitation from the Church and 
Society in Woodbridge, Connecticut, to settle with them, but died there a 
few months after his arrival. He published, while at Goshen, a number 
of discourses, one being addressed to infidels, in consequence of the pub- 
lication of Ethan Allen's Theology, another upon the Redemption by 
Jesus Christ, and a third, The History of Melchizedec. 

Martha* Sherman and Reverend Justus Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Root*^ Mitchell, born 25 June, 17S6; m.arried about '807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root^ Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot^ Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26, December, 1832, in Peekskill, New 

York, Isaac Depew, Esq. 

[58] 



THE SHERMAN LINE 



Martha Minot' .Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1S34, in Peekskill, New Yorl:; 
married, first, 9 November, 1S71, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



59 



THE LENT LINE 

Abraham^ Rycken; born about 1610; died about 1689: married, about 
1635, Gertie Hermansen, daughter of Hendrick Hermansen. 

They had nine children, all baptized in New Amsterdam, except the 
first, and all of Newtown, Long Island, New York. 

1 + 1. Ryck^ Abrahamson, born about 1637; married, about 1672, Tryntie 

Syboutsen. 

2 2. Jacob^ Abrahamson, bapt. 14 October, 1640; died in infancy. 

3 3. Jacob^ Abrahamson, bapt. 18 October, 1643; no more trace. 

4 4. Hendrick^ Abrahamson, bapt. 17 February, 1647; died in infancy. 

5 5. Mary^ Abrahamson, bapt. 21 February, 1649; married April, 

1669, Sybout Harcksen Kranckheyt; they had eight children. 

6 6. John^ Abrahamson, bapt. 25 June, 1651 ; married .Margaret 

Krankheyt: Teunis G. Bergen makes this John'* marry , 

1691, Sarah Schouten. 

7 7. Aeltje^ Abrahamson, bapt. 9 November, 1653; married , 

Captain John Hermansen. 

8 8. Abraham^ Abrahamson, bapt. 23 December, 1653; no more trace; 

he is said to have died about 1690. 

9 9. Hendrick' Abrahamson, bapt. 28 September, 1662; married, about 

1682, Catharina ; they had seven children. 

The printed 1905 Lent Family, by Nelson Burton Lent, on page 5, 
gives Jacob' de Ryck; had a son Melchior- de Ryck, who had a son Captain 
Jacob Simons^ De Ryck, who was a wealthy corn merchant of Amsterdam, 
Holland, and who had a son Abraham* Rycken, whose descendants took 
the name of Van Lent or Lent. Teunis G. Bergen, in his 1881 Early 
Settlers of Kings County, Long Island, New York, on page 246, wrote: 

[61] 



C H R O N O L O G 'I' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y ^\ . D E P E W 

Abraham^ Ryke is supposed to have emigrated to America in 1638, residing 
at first in New Amsterdam, where he owned a house and lot. In 163S he 
obtained a deed for land near Rinnegaconck, now Brooklyn, New 'I'ork, 
and on the ist. August 1640 a patent for a plantation, of probably the 
same premises, adjoining the land of Gysbert Ryken and Hans Hansen 
(Bergen), and by another account that of Remmert Jansen (Vander- 
beeck). 

These premises were probably in Bushwick, Long Island, New ^'ork. 
In 1654 he obtained a patent for a plantation in Newtown, Long Island, 
New York, to which he removed. See also the History of Newtown, Long 
Island, New York, by James Riker, page 315; and the History of West- 
chester County, Nev/ York, by Robert Bolton, page 529. 



FIFTH GENER.ATION 

I. Ryck Abrahamson-' van Lent (Abram'' Rycken), born about 1637; 
died before 20 April, 1715; married, about 1672, Tryntie or Catrina Sybout- 
sen; born about 1650; daughter of Harck' and Wyntie (Teunis) Siboutsen; 
see page 33. 

They had seven children, six of whom were baptized in the Dutch 
Church, New York: 

10 1. Lysbeth^ or Elizabeth,^ bapt. 25 .March, 1673; sponsors Abraham 

Rycks and Belitje Jacobs; married, about 1697, Thomas Heyert 
or Hyatt; they had one child. 

11 2. Abraham,* born 10 March, 1674; bapt. 12 May, 1675; sponsors 

Herck Siboutszen and Tryntie Cregiers; married, late in 1698, 
Anna Catrina Meyer; they had eleven children. 

12 3. Rycks, « bapt. 16 April, 1678; sponsors Sybout Hercksen and Wyn- 

tie Teunis; married, about 1703, Mary or Maritje Elizabeth 
Blauvelt; they had three children. 

134-4. Harck^ or Hercules/ bapt. 6 August, 1681; sponsors Herck 
Siboutszen and Abraham Rycken and Geertie Theunis; mar- 
ried, about 1700, Cornelia Van Wart. 

[62] 



THE LENT LINE 



14 5. Grietje^ or .Margaret, «bapt. iSMa_\-, 1684 ; sponsors Jan Hermans- 

zen and Grietie Jans; married, first, 6 .May, 1713-1714, Pieter 

Vosbergen; married, second, , Thomas Benson or Bensen; 

no more trace. 
6. Wyntje,^ bapt. 25 .May, 1687; sponsors Cornelis Janszen Van 
Hooren and .Maria Jans; no more trace. 

15 7. Katherine,f born about 16S8; married, , Abraham or Joseph 

Jones; no more trace. 

Ryck is Richard in English. He, with his two brothers, Jacob and 
Hendrick, adopted the name "van Lent," settled on the .Manor of Cort- 
land, Westchester County, New York, and became the sole owners of 
Ryck's Patent. Ryck^ became an Elder in the Sleepy Hollow Dutch 
Church, at Tarrytown, New York, and was very much respected. See 
page 37, ante, regarding the purchase of Ryck's Patent. On page 10 of the 
printed History of the Lent Family is given in full the deed for the purchase 
of Ryck's Patent, with a photo of the document. 

SIXTH GEXER.-\TION 

13. Harck« or Hercules^ van Lent (Ryck= Abrahamson, Abram* 
Rycken), bapt. 6 August, 1681; died, 1766, before 13 November; married, 
about 1700, Cornelia Van Wert; born, about 1681 ; daughter of Jacob= and 
Belitie (Jacobs) Van Wert. 

They had seven children, all baptized in the Dutch Church, Tarrytown, 
New York: 

106 I. Jacob,' bapt. (Number 46), , 1701; sponsors Ryck 

Abramze and Cristina Joachimze; married 7 .May, 1726, 
Susanna Storm; the\- had six children. 

107 2. Rachgel,' bapt. (Number 75) 26 October, 1703; sponsors, Jacob 

Van Weerdt and Sara Van Weerdt; married 17 September, 
1728, Jacob Lamb: no more trace. 

108 3. Cathariena,' bapt. ^Number 106) 22 August, 1705; sponsors, 

Jan Ecker and Sara Van Weert; married 1 1 April, 1725, Hen- 
drick De Ronde; they had six children. 

[63] 



C>I R O N O L O G Y AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E ^' M . D E P E W 

109 4. Christiann/ bapt. (Number 162) i June, 1 70S; sponsors, Joachim 

Wouterze and wife, Christina (Janse); married, , John 

Lamb; they had four children. 

no 5. EHzabeth," bapt. (Numiber 202) 21 .March, 1710; sponsors, 
Thomas Heyert and wife, Rachgel (De Maree); married, 
, James Lamb. 

111 +6. Hendrick/ bapt. (Number 24S) 25 March, 1712; sponsors, Jan 

Kranckheyt and wife, Grietje; married 20 July, 1734, Eliza- 
beth Storms. 

112 7. Abraham," bapt. (Number 200) 11 January, 1715 ; sponsors, Jan 

Ecker and wife, .Magdaleentje (;\'onck); married , 1740, 

Mary Waldron; they had two children. 

Harck^ Lent was also called Harrack and Hercules. He retired as an 
Elder for the Manor of Cortland, io August, 1726, in the Reformed Dutch 
Church, at Tarrytown, New York. He became blind in his old age. He 
owned meadow land in Orange County, New York, and Dutchess County, 
New York, as is show^n by his will. By several purchases he became the 
owner of a part of Ryck's Patent. 

His will, made 10 April, 1765, proved 13 November, 1766, is found in 
liber 25, page 337, of the New York City Surrogates records. 

SEVENTH GEXER.ATION 

III. Lieutenant Hendrick' Lent (Harck« van Lent. Ryck' Abraham- 
son, van Lent, Abram^ Rycken); bapt. 25 March, 1712; died before 21 
October, 17S2; married 20 July, 1734, Elizabeth Storm; bapt. 25 and 26 
May, 1 7 14; daughter of David- and Esther (See) Storm; she died after 
26 August, 1777. 

They had four children, two of whom were baptized: 

I. Cathrina,^ born 11 September, 1735; bapt. (Number 863) Tap- 
pan, Rockland County, New York, Dutch Church, 18 Sep- 
tember, 1736; sponsors, Harkulius Lent and Cathrina Lent; 
no more trace. 

[64] 



THE LENT LINE 

352 2. Hercules,* bapt. (Number 922) Dutch Church, Tarrytown, New 

York, iS October, 1737; sponsors, Hercuhus Lent and wife 
Cornelia \'an Wert; married, about 1760, W'inchey or Lavinia 
Van Tassel: they had six children. 

353 3. David, s born 10 January, 1735; married 4 August, 1754, Annatje 

or Hannah ; they had five children. 

354 + 4. Hester,5 t^Qj-^ about 1741; married, about 1763, Captain James 

Kronkhuyt. 

Hendrick^ Lent was a military man — Lieutenant of Militia for the 
Manor of Cortland, Westchester County, New York, Justin's Regiment; 
James Ver Planck, Esquire, Captain, and Hercules Lent, Ensign, dated 
16 June, 1738. He was afterward made a Lieutenant of an Independent 
Company for the Manor of Cortland, with James \'er Planck, Esq., as 
Captain, and John Lent as Ensign. 

The will of Hendrick" Lent, dated 26 August, 1777, proved 21 October, 
1782, is found in liber 33, page 387, of the New York City Surrogates 
records. 

EIGHTH GEXER.ATION 

Hester^ Lent and Captain James Kronkhuyt had a daughter: 

Catharine' Cranckheyt, bom 6 August, 1765; married 13 November, 
1787, Abraham Depew. 

Abraham and Catharine' (Cranckheyt) Depew had a son: 
Isaac'^ Depew, born 9 August, 1800, in Peekskill, New York; married 
26 December, 1S32, Martha Minot Mitchell. 

Isaac'" and Martha Minot (Mitchell) Depew had a son: 

Chauncey Mitchell-' Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 

married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 28 

December, 1901, .May Palmer. 



THE STORM LINE 

I. Dirck' Storm; born about 1636; death not found, but said to have 
been Hving in 171 5; married, about 1658, Maria Peters Monfoort; born 
about 1638; death not found; daughter of Peter and Sara (de Plancken) 
Monfoort. 

They had nine children, three of whom were baptized: 

2 I. Marie,= born about 1659; married, about 1679, Casper Spring- 

steen; they had eight children. 

3 2. Gregorus,^ born about 1663; married, about 16S9, Engeltie Van 

Dyck; they had eight children. 

4 + 3. David,= born about 166,;; married, about 1694, Esther Sie. 

5 4. Hendrick,= born about 1667; married, about 1698, Nicsje — ; 

they had three children. 

6 5. Peter,= born about 1669; married, about 1695, Margrietje ; 

they had ten children. 

7 6. Pietronella,= bapt. i June, 1673, in the Dutch Church, Brooklyn, 

New York; " Petranelle," daughter of Dirck Storm and Maria 
Pieteresse of "Breucklen"; sponsors, Jeronimus de Rapalie 
and Hendrica Hainelle and Neeltien Careljouw; married, about 
1699, Pieter Sie; they had two children. 

8 7. Antie,= born about 1676; married, about 1696, Cornelius Van 

Texel or Van Tassell; they had seven children. 

9 8. Aaltje,^ bapt. 20 October, 1678, in the Dutch Church, Flatbush, 

Long Island, New York; daughter of Dirck Storm and Maria 
Peters Monfoort ; sponsors, Laurens Akerman and Janetie Titus; 
she died young. 

[67] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C E S 1 R Y OF C H A U N C E "j' M . D E P E \V 



10 9. Aaltje,- bapt. 31 October, '.6S0, in the Dutch Church. Flatbush, 
Long Island, New York: daughter of Dirk Storm and Maritie 
Peters; sponsors, Jan Gerritsen Dorland and Fytie Martens; 
she probabl}' married, about 1697, Jacob Van Texel or Van 
Tassell; they had seven children. 

On page 2S5 of Teunis G. Bergen's iSSi Early Settlers of Kings County, 
Long Island, New York, is found: Dirck' Storm emigrated 2 September, 
1662, on the ship Fox, Captain Jacob Hu>-s. from the "Maiery of Bos" 
'(Bois de Due), in Dutch Brabant, with his wife and three children, one 
aged 6 years, one 2 years, and the youngest one \-ear of age, settling at 
first in New Amsterdam, in 1665.,- He was appointed by the Court of 
Sessions, 15 December, 1669. tov;n clerk or secretary of Brooklyn, New 
York, which office he held for several years. On the assessment rolls of 
Brooklyn of '675 and 1676; was a member of the Flatbush, Long Island, 
New York, Dutch Church, and was residing in 1677 in New Lotts on 
Long Island; schoolmaster in New Lotts in 1680 and 16S1; town clerk of 
Flatbush in 1681 and for some years afterwards; and a resident of 
Bedford section of Brooklyn in 1694. 

He was a clerk of the Sessions of Orange County, Nevv- York, in 1691, 
as per page 43 of Ruttenber's History of Orange County. On the i6th of 
June, 1702, Dirck Storm and his wife Mary were enumerated among the 
residents of Orange County, New York (now Rockland County). 

On pages 106 and 306 of the 1S81 History of Harlem, New York, by 
James Riker, are found: The three sons who came to America with Dirck' 
Storm were named Gregoris and Peter and David. In 1697 Dirck Storm 
and his family were living on the Phillipse .Manor, near Tarrytown, New 
York, .vhere his descendants became numerous and noted. 

Marcus D. Raymond in his 1894 Souvenir of the Revolutionary Soldiers' 
Monument Dedication at Tarrytown, New York, on page 166, is quoted 
the above, and adds: The Storm Family are the descendants of Dirck 
Storm, who came from Utrecht, Holland, to Harlem, New York, in 1662. 
The coat-of-arms— a Field, a ship at sea under storm sail. The crest — the 
Helmet of a Knight, vizor closed, afironte, surmounted by eagle's wings. 
The motto — In God We Trust. In 1699 David Storm was chosen as one 
of the Deacons (the other being Joachim Wouters Van Weert) in the old 

[68] 



THE STORM LINE 



Dutch Church at Tarrytown, New York, and afterwards served several 
terms as Elder there. AH the early records of tin's Church are in his hand- 
writing. In 1703 a Thomas Storm was Collector of the Manor of Phillips- 
burgh. 

In fact the Storm Family was very prominent in the early days in the 
vicinity of Tarrytown, New York. 

SECOND GENERATION 

4. David^ Storm (DirckO, born about 1664; death not found; married, 
about 1694, Esther Sie; born about 1677; death not found: daughter of 
Isaac= and Marie ( ) Sie. 

They had ten children, eight of whom were baptized: 

27 I. Hester' or Esther,' born about 1696; married 4 November, 1714, 

Willem Hemmen or Hammond; they had five children. 

28 2. Maria,' bapt. (Number 22) 2 August, 1698, in the Dutch Church, 

Tarrytown, Nevv York; sponsors, Jacob Sie and wife, Cather- 
ina; married 31 .August, 1720, Harmanus Gardenier; they had 
five children. 

29 3. Annatje,'bapt. , 1701 (Number 48), in tiie Dutch Church, 

Tarrytown, New York; sponsors, Cornells Van Texel and 
wife, Antje (Storm); married 22 March, 1723-1724, jan 
Canckelie or John Conckling; they had f.vo children. 

30 4. Aeltje,' bapt. 22 August, 1705 (Number no), in the Dutch 

Church, Tarrytown, New York; sponsors, Jacob Van Texe! 
and wife, Aeltje (Storm); married 28 April, 1728, Deleflerins 
Canckely or Deliverance Conckling; they had nine children. 

31 5- Susanna,' bapt. 25 March. 1706 (Number 125), in the Dutch 

Church, Tarrytown, New York; sponsors, Pieter Sie and wife, 
Petronelle (Storm); married 7 May, 1726, Jacob Lent; they 
had six children. 

32 6. Cathariena,' bapt. 30 March, 1708 (Number 134), in the Dutch 

Church, Tarrytown, New York; sponsors, Isaac Sie and wife, 
Antje; she died young. 

[69] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

33 7. Petronella/ hapt. 21 March, 1710 (Number 195), in the Dutch 

Church, Tarrytown, New York; sponsors, Gregorius Storm 
and Geesje Van Dyck; married 10 November, 1733, Willem 
Davids; they had four children. 

34 8. Cathariena,3 bapt. 25 .March, 1712 (Number 239), in the Dutch 

Church, Tarrytown, New York; sponsors, Jacobus Sie and 
wife, Catharina; she probably married 11 January, 172S- 
1729, Elyas De Peu; no more trace. 

35 + 9. Elizabeth,-^ bapt. 25 and 26 May, 1714 (Number 283), in the 

Dutch Church, Tarrytown, New York; sponsors, Abram Van 
Dyck and wife, Elizabeth; married 20 July, 1734, Lieutenant 
Hendrick Lent. 

36 10. David, 3 born about 1716; no baptism found; married, about 

1740, Catharina Lent; they had six children. 

Elizabeth^ Storm and Lieutenant Hendrick Lent had a daughter: 
Hester^ Lent, born about 1741; married, about 1763, Captain James 
Kronkhuyt. 

Hester^ Lent and Captain James Kronkhuyt had a daughter: 
Catharine^ Cranckheyt, born 6 August, 1765; married 13 November, 
1787, Abraham Depew. 

Catharine^ Cranckheyt and Abraham Depew had a son: 

Isaac* Depew, born 9 August, 1800, in Peekskill, New York; married 

26 December, 1S32, Martha Minot Mitchell. 

Isaac' Depev.'- and Martha Minot Mitchell had a son: 

Chauncey MitchelP Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New 

York; married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise .Ann Hegeman; married, 

second, 28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



70 



THE SEE LINE 

I. Isaac' See; born about 1615; death not found; married, about 1640, 
Esther . 

They had, at least, two children: 

2 + 1. Isaac,^ born about 1643; married, about 1671, Marie . 

3 2. Marie, = born about 1645; married, about 1665, Nicholas de Vauz, 

or De Voe; they had five children. 

The printed 1881 History of Harlem, New York, by James Riker, on 
page 371, says: The name was written Cie, or du Cie, or Sieck, or See, or 
Sie, or Zy. Isaac' See had 194 acres of land, two farms, by Patent of 29 
September, 1677, at Karies Neck, Richmond County, Staten Island, New 
York; but after living there some years the family removed to Philips 
Manor, V/estchester County, New York, the father and son in 1697 ap- 
pearing as Church Members at the Sleepy Hollow, or Tarrytown, New 
York, Dutch Reformed Church. Then the name was usually written Sie. 
The family is still numbered among the most respectable residents there, 
and from its branches have come several well-known clergymen. Again, 
on page 356, Mr. Riker says: "With Sir Edmund Andros, in 1674. there 
came the related families of Nicholas de Vaux, Isaac See, Isaac See, Jr., 
and Jean Le Comte, directly to Harlem." 

This is a French Huguenot Family. 

Reverend Dr. Charles W. Baird in his printed 1885 History of the 
Huguenot Emigration to America, volume one, on page 354, gives some 
records of the Walloon families of Leyden, Holland, and has Jean Le Ca, 
a native of Halewyn, was married to Marie des Pre, of Monvau, on the 7th 
of January, 1617; and on page 352, dated 11 August, 1628, Jan la Ca, 
laboureur, five enfants. 

[71] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY' OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E ? E \V 



SECOND GEXER-ATIOX 

2. Isaac^ See (Isaac'), born about 1643; married, about 1671, 
Marie . 

They had, at least, five children: 

4 I. Peter,^ born about 1672, in Europe; married, about 1679, Petro- 

nella- Storm; they had two children. 

5 2. Jacobue,' born about 1675 ; married, about 1699, Catharine ; 

they had eight children. 

6 + 3. Esther,^ born about 1677; married about 1694, David= Storm. 

7 4. Simon, 3 bapt. iS -May, 1679, in the Dutch Church, Flatbush, 

Long Island, New York; sponsors, Simon ; child of Isaac 

"Zy"; no further trace. 

8 5. Isaac, ^ born about 16S1 ; married, about 1702, Antje ; they 

had two children. 



Esther^ See and David Storm had a daughter: 

Elizabeth* Storm, bapt. 25 and 26 May, 17 14; married 20 July, 1734, 
Lieutenant Hendrick Lent. 

Elizabeth* Storm and Lieutenant Hendrick Lent had a daughter: 
Hester^ Lent, born about 1741; married, about 1763, Captain James 
Kronkhuyt. 

Hester^ Lent and Captain James Kronkhuyt had a daughter: 
Catharine'^ Cranckheyt, born 6 August, 1765; married 13 November, 
1787, Abraham Depew. 

Catharine'^ Cranckheyt and Abraham Depew had a son: 
Isaac' Depew, born 9 August, 1800, in Peekskill, New York; married 
26 December, 1832, .Martha Minot Mitchell. 

Isaac' Depew and .Martha .Minot .Mitchell had a son: 

Chauncey .Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New 

York; married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, 

second, 28 December, 190 1, .May Palmer. 

[72] 



THE MONFOOPxT LINE 

Pieter' Monfoort; born about 1605; died 4 January, 1661; married 12 
or 17 January, 1630, at Amsterdam, Holland, Sarah de Plancken (or 
Blanck); she married, second, in the Dutch Church, Brooklyn, New York, 
I January, 1663, Lambert Janse Bosch, from Ootmarsen, in the Province 
of Overyssel. 

Peter' and Sarah Monfoort had six children: 

1. Maria Peters,= born about 1638; married, about 1658, Dirck' Storm; 

see page 67; she must have been left in Holland when her father and 
mother sailed to America. 

2. Janica- or Jannetje Pieters,= bapt. 12 May, 1646; married 12 February, 

1663, William Gerretse Cowenhoven; they had eleven children. 

3. Jan Pieterse,^ bapt. 23 February, 1648; married, first, , Geertje 

Pieters; they had no children: married, second, 17 May, 16S7, Ida 
Abrams Brinckerhoff; they had seven children. 

4. Pieter Pieterse,- bapt. 21 July, 1652; married, about 1675, Marretje 

Pieterse Luyster; they had nine children. 

5. Sarah Pieterse,^ bapt. 2 April, 16^6; married, about 1677, Claes Pieterse 

WyckofT, of Flatlands, Long Island, New York; they had five chil- 
dren. 

6. Willemtje Pieterse, = born, ; married , Gerret Elbertse 

StoothofT. 

Pieter" Monfoort came at an early period from the Netherlands, where 
he was married prior to his emigration. He obtained a Patent 29 May, 
1641, for a plantation at the Wallabout, Brooklyn, New York, on which 
he resided, and for which he obtained a confirmatory Patent 17 August, 
1643, in which the quantity given is 25 Morgens. He was a Magistrate of 

[73] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

Brooklyn, New York, in 1658, and a Deacon in the Dutch Reformed 
Church at the time of his death. 

See the printed \88i Early Settlers of Kings County, New York, page 
210, by Teunis G. Bergen; and the New York Genealogical and Biographi- 
cal Record, volume 7, pages 152 per 160. 

Maria Peters' Monfoort and Dirck Storm had a son: 
David' Storm, born about 1664; married, about 1694, Esther Sie. 
David' Storm and Esther Sie had a daughter: 

Elizabeth^ Storm, bapt. 25 and 26 May, 1714; married 20 July, 1734, 
Lieutenant Hendrick Lent. 

Elizabeth'* Storm and Lieutenant Hendrick Lent had a daughter: 
Hester^ Lent, born about 1741; married, about 1763, Captain James 
Kronkhuyt. 

Hester^- Lent and Captain James Kronkhuyt had a daughter: 
Catharine^ Cranckheyt, born 6 August, 1765; married 13 November, 
1787, Abraham Depew. 

Catharine^ Cranckheyt and Abraham Depew had a son: 
Isaac^ Depew, born 9 August, iSoo. in Peekskill, New York; married 
26 December, 1S32, Martha Minor Mitchell. 

Isaac' Depew and Martha Minot Mitchell had a son: 

Chauncey Mitchell* Depev.', born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New 

York; married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, 

second, 28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



[74] 



THE WILTSIE LINE 

I. Philippe Maton' Wiltsie; born about 1590, in Tirlamont, Holland, 
probably, or in Copenhagen, Denmark; killed — March, 1632, in Swaanen- 
dael; married, about 161 5, Sopliia Ter Bosch, probably of Overyssel, Hol- 
land; she returned to Holland on the ship Endragt. 

They had seven children: 

2 I. Helena^ or Lyntie,^ born about 1617 in Holland; m.arried, first, 

, Mr. ; married, second, , Adam Roe- 

lantsen; they had three children. 

3 2. Pierre,- born about 1619 in Holland; was taken captive in 1633 

by the Indians, and given to the Jesuits of Canada. 

4 + 3. Ilendrick,^ born about 1623 on the sea; married 10 January, 1660, 

Margarita Meyerings. 

5 4. Macheltje,= born about 1625 at Fort Orange, Albany, New York; 

probably married , Andries Barentsen of New Amster- 
dam. 

6 5. Marten,- born about 1627 at Fort Orange; no further trace. 

7 6. Martin, = born about 1628 at Waal-Bogt, possibly the Wailabout, 

Brooklyn, New York; is said to have gone to Delaware River. 

8 7. Maria, 2 born about 1630; remained in Holland, v/here she mar- 

ried, , William Faestraels; they had live children. 

SECOND GENER.ATION 

4. Hendrick Martense= Wiltse (Philippe Maton' Wiltse); born about 
the spring of 1623, at sea; was still alive 6 July, 1701 ; married, as a young 
man, "van Coppenhagen," in the Dutch Church, New Amsterdam, 10 

[75] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 



January, 1660, to Margarita Meyerings, widow van Herman Jansen; 
daughter of Jan Meyers or Meyrinck and Teuntie Straitsman. 

They had eight children: 

12 I. Sophia,^ bapt. 1 1 December, 1660, in the Wiltwyck, now Kingston, 

New York, Dutch Church; sponsors, Christian Niesen Rump 
and Jan Jansen, and Geertrung Andriessen and Aeltjen Claas; 
married, first, 10 September, 1679, Theunis Hercks Krankheyt; 
they had ten children; see ante, page 34; married, second, about 
1709, Joost' Paulding; but had no children by the second 
marriage; Joost was the ancestor of all the Paulding families in 
the United States. 

13 + 2. Jarmitje,' bapt. 7 January, 1663, in the Dutch Church; page 22 

of the printed copy, Kingston, Ulster County, New York; 
sponsors. Marten Hoffman and Walrave de Mont and Elsjen 
Hendricks; married, first, 23 April, 168 r, iMyndert Hendrickse 
(Hogencamp); married, second, 16 April, 1701, Jan or John 
De Pew. 

14 3. Barber,' bapt. i March. 1663, in the Dutch Church, Kingston, 

New York; sponsors, Joyst Arensen and Margriet Chambers; 
died young. 

15 4. Marten, 2 bapt. 3 April, 1667, in the Dutch Church, Kingston, 

New York; sponsors, Mattys Capito and Lewis HofT and 
Barentje Hansen and Marretje Symens; married 26 June, 
1690, Marretje Van Wyck; they had nine children. 

16 5. Hendrick,^ bapt. 24 November, 1669, in the Dutch Church, New 

Amsterdam: one sponsor, Gabriel Cabosie; married , 

Marretje Van Wyck or Marry Vanderwyck: no further trace. 

17 6. Meyndert,' bapt. 11 February, 1672, in the Dutch Church, New 

York; one sponsor, Jacob Maynarts; married 14 November, 
1694, Maria Broucard or Bourgon or Bragaw; they had one 
child. 

18 7. Theunis,' bapt. 10 January, 1674, in the Dutch Church, New 

York; sponsors, Jacob .Mens and Anna Tielmans; married 
, Diertie ; they had three children. 

[76] 



THE W 1 L T S I E LINE 



19 8. Jacob,^ bapt. S March, 1676, in the Dutch Church, New York; 
sponsors, Tieleman Jacobyen and Jan Pietersen Bosch and 
Wyntie Thewnis; married, about 1700, Abigail Ferguson; they 
had ten children. 

Hendrick^ Wiltsie lived at Kingston, Ulster County, New York, and 
Newtown, Long Island, New York. In 1681 he bought a farm at Hell 
Gate, which in 1706 he conveyed to his son Teunis Wiltsie. Hendrick= 
was a soldier from 1660 to 1667 at Kingston, New York. He enlisted in 
1663 in the Esopus War, was captured by the Indians, and reported killed. 

See the printed 1852 History of Newtown, Long Island, New York, by 
James Riker, page 373; and the printed 19 12 Van Wyck Genealogy, 
page 381. 

Jan Meyers or Meyerings lived in the Dutch Colony at Fort Mar- 
garet, Brazil, where he died; his wife, Teuntje Slraitsman, moved to New 
Amsterdam, where she died 9 October, 1662; they had a posthumous 
daughter, Margaret Meyerings, who married 10 January, 1660, Hendrick 
Martense^ Wiltsie; Margarita Meyerings married, first, about 1657, Her- 
man Janzen, Van Lenneps; Teuntje Straetsman married, second, , 

Tieleman Jacobszen, Van Leuven; Teuntje married, third, 15 June, 1657, 
Gabriel Carbosie, of New Amsterdam or Gowanus, Brooklyn, New York. 

THIRD GENERATION 

13. Jannitje' Wiltse (Hendrick Martense^ Wiltse, Philippe Maton' 
Wiltse); bapt. 7 January, 1663; death not found; married, first, as a young 
woman, "Van de Esopus," in the Dutch Church, New York, volume one, 
page 48, of the printed records, 23 April, 1681, .Myndert Hendrickse 
(Hogencamp), a young man, van Mappelen, Holland: tot New Haerlem; 
beide woonende aen de armen bouwerye; all of New Harlem; both living 
in the Arme Bouwery, or Newtown, Long Island, New York; he died 
about 1700; she married, second, in the Dutch Church, Tappan, Rock- 
land County, New York, 16 January, 1701, Jan^ or John- De Pew. 

Jannitje^ Wiltsie had eight children by her first husband, xMyndert 
Hendrickse Hogencamp: 

[77] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E \y 

1. Hendrick/ bapt. 15 March, 16S2, in the Dutch Church, New York; 

sponsors, Gelyn Ver Plancken and Hendrickje Wessels, son of Myn- 
dert Hendrickszen and Jannetie; married in the Tappan, New York, 
Dutch Church, 24 June, 1713, Teuntie Krom; they had three chil- 
dren. 

2. Margierie,^ bapt. 26 December, 1683, in the Dutch Church, New 

York; sponsors, Theunis Hendrickszen and Grietie Hendricx; she 
died young. 

3. Jan,'* bapt. 30 August, 1685, in the Dutch Church, New York; spon- 

sors, Abram Abrahamszen and Sophia Hendrickx; son of iMyndert 
Hendrickxen and Jannetie Hendrickx; married in the Dutch Church, 
Tappan, New York, 15 October, 1707, Gerritie Van Houten, widow 
of Willem Krom; they had six children. 

4. Margrietje,* bapt. 9 October, 1687, in the Dutch Church, New York; 

sponsors, Wolfert Webber and Lydia Van Dyck, of the same parents; 
married in the Dutch Church, Tappan, New York, i i January, 17 10, 
Teunis Talema; they had four children. 

5. Marten,^ bapt. 9 November, 1690, in the Dutch Church, New York; 

sponsors. Marten Hendricxsen and Maryken Cornelis; son of iMe^'n- 
dert Hendrickxen and Jannetie Hendrickx; no further trace. 

6. Anna,^ bapt. 16 April, 1693, in the Dutch Church, New York; spon- 

sors, Jan Hermanszen and Claesje Blanck, of the same parents as 
previous; married, about 1727, Jan or John Makleen or Makleyn; 
they had, at least, five children. 

7. Myndert,-* born about 1696; baptism not found; this child is given in 

the printed 1908 Wiltsee Genealogy and the printed Cole-Kool 

Genealogy; probably married , Annatie , or Heleena 

Krom; he had one child. 

8. Barbara,^ bapt. 17 April, 1700, in the Dutch Church, Tappan, New 

York (Number 40), of the same parents; sponsors, Hendrick Mar- 
tenze and Margrietje Meyeren; married in the Dutch Church, Tap- 
pan, New York, 24 February, 1722, Edmond Concklin; they had 
three children. 

Jannitje^ Wiltsie had two children by her second husband, Jan' 
or John- De Pew. 

[78] 



THE \V I L T S I E LINE 



9. Geertje/ bapt. 14 October, 1702, in the Dutch Church, Tappan, New 

York (Number 67); sponsors, Jan Waard and Sara De Puw; mar- 
ried there i January, 1720, Jan Cankely or John Conckhn; they 
had three children. 

10. John,^ born 24 October, 1705, as per the Family Bible; baptism not 

found; married, about 1733, Elizabeth . 

John^ De Pew and wife, Elizabeth , had a son: 

Henrys De Pew, born 6 June, 1734; married 30 April, 1756, Mary* 
De Pew. 

Henry'^ De Pew and his wife Mary^ De Pew had a son: 
Abraham^ De Pew, born 10 October, 1762; married 13 November, 1787, 
Catherine Cranckheit. 

Abraham^ De Pew and his wife Catherine Cranckheit had a son: 
Isaac' Depew, born 9 August, 1800, in Peekskill, New York; married 
26 December, 1832, Martha Minot Mitchell. 

Isaac' Depew and his wife, Martha Minot .Mitchell, had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New 

York; married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, 

second, 28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



79 



THE VAN WERT LINE 

I. Jochemi Wouters; possibly Van Goede (i.e., Gouda); born about 
1637; alive I June, 1708; married, about 1658, Christina or Styntie Janse; 
she was alive i June, 1708. 

They had nine children, three of whose baptisms are on record in the 
Dutch Reformed Church, New York: 

2 + 1. Jacob,= born about 1659; married, about 1679, Belitie Jacobs. 

3 2. Janneken,^ born about 1665; married in the Dutch Church, New 

York, 24 October, 1683, Johannes Gerritszen Blauvelt; they 
had four children; he married, second, about 1693, Catie Cor- 
nelisse; they had twelve children at Tappan, New York, 
Dutch Church. 

4 3. Gerrit,= born about 1670; married, about [692, Catalyntje 

Conckling; they had seven children. 

5 4. Anneken Jochemse,= born about 1673; married, first, 4 June, 

1693, in the Dutch Church, Tarrytown, New York, Johannis 
Minne or Minnelay; they had two children; married, second, 
4 May, 1 70 1, in the Dutch Church, Tarrytown, New York, 
Samuel Conckling; they had one child. 

6 5. Catharine, = born about 1675; Johannes Blawvelt and Catje 

Joachimse were sponsors, 24 October, 1695, at the baptism of 
Reynsje, daughter of Johannes and Antje Joachims, at the 
Dutch Church, Tappan, New York, Number 14. 

7 6. Grietje,- born about 1677; probably married about 1695, Jan 

Herricksen Cranckheyt. 

8 7. Rachel, = bapt. 27 September, 1679, in the Dutch Church, New 

York, volume two, page 138; daughter of Jochem Wouterszen 
and Styntie Jans; sponsors, Egbert Fockenszen and Jannctie 
Jans; married 3oOctober, 1698, in the Dutch Church, Tarrytown, 
New York, Abraham de Revier, Jr.; they had two children. 

[81] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 



9 8. Cornelia^ bapt. 25 February, 16S2, in the Dutch Church, New 
York; volume two, page 151; of the same parents; sponsors, 
Hendrick Claeszen and Gerritie Reyniers; no more trace. 

10 9. Sara,- bapt. 28 March, 1686, in the Dutch Church, New York; 
volume two, page 173; of the same parents; sponsors, Jan 
Jacobszen and .Margrietje Snedicker; it is supposed she was 
the first wife of Joseph Carikele or Conckling. 

See the 1901 printed records of the First Reformed Dutch Church, 
Tarrytown, Nev/ York, by Reverend David Cole; also page 394 of the 
printed 1881 Early Settlers of Kings County, New York, by Teunis G. 
Bergen; also the 1910 New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 
on page 49, The Dutcher Family, by Walter Kenneth GrifTm. 

Jochem^ Wouterse was of Flushing, Long Island, New York, and Mid- 
wout, now Flatbush, Long Island, New York, from 1667 to 1683. The 
name is spelled Van Weert and van Waerdt and van Waert and van V/aart, 
etc. Jochem' and his wife were members i June, 1676, of the Dutch 
Church, New York; but in 1693 or earlier were in Philipsburgh, West- 
chester County, New York. Joachim Van Weert (same as Joachim 
Wouters) and his wife Chrystyntje v.ere members in 1697, the first list, 
numbers 6 and 7, of the Duich Church, Tarrytown, New York. Jochemi 

was an Elder there, — , 1699; a note on page 18 of the printed record 

of this Church says: "Joachim Wouter's full name was Joachim Wouters 
Van Weert." Walter Kenneth Griffin says: "Many Hollanders took at 
Tarrytown (New York), for the first time, a family name of record, or 
changed their previous geographical names, e.g., the Rikers, who became 
known as Kranckheits." The study of the Dutch Church records con- 
vinces Mr. William A. Eardeley that it was the Syboutsen (not the Riker) 
family who took the name of Kranckheit; while one branch of the Rikers, 
the ones who went to Tarrytov.n, Nev/ York, took the name of van Lent, 
while Wouterse or van Goede became Van Weert. This was not a custom 
peculiar especially to Tarrytown, but was done elsewhere in the Dutch 
Colonies, as Mr. Griffin was probably aware, e.g.. Van Tuyl became in 
New York City De Key or De Kay; Van Der Beeck, on Long Island, 
became Remsen; Hansen became Bergen; Martin became Wiltse; Ariaense 

[82] 



T H 1-: VAN W B R T LINE 



in Tappan, New York, became Smith; Gcrritszen became Blauvelt; Hen- 
drikze became Hogenkamp, etc. Many other instances could be cited. 
It is not always apparent \\hy these changes took place, but they are 
apparent to any one who takes the trouble to study the early Dutch 
Church records. 

The name "Weert" is allied to the English term Weir, a river or marsh 
dam, and indicates low-lying country, liable to overflow. The Van Weert 
intermarriages with the Dutcher family are numerous. 

SECOND GEXER.-\TION 

2. Jacob= Van Wert (Jochem' W'outers), born about 1659; married, 
about 1679, Belitie Jacobs; Jacob Wouterszen and Belitie Jacobs v/ere 
sponsors 13 December, 1681, at the baptism of Abraham, son of Jan 
Pieterszen and Grietie Cozyn. 

Jacob= and Belitie Van Wert had two children: 
+ I. Cornelia,' born about 1681; married, about 1700, Herrick van 
Lent. 

2. Jacob,' born about 1683; married, about 5704, Belitie ; 

they had three children. 



Cornelia' Van Wert and Herrick van Lent had a son: 
Hendrick^ van Lent, bapt. 25 March, 1712; married 20 July, 1734, 
Elizabeth Storms. 

Lieutenant Hendrick' Lent and Elizabeth Storms had a daughter: 
Hester^ Lent, born about 1741; married, about 1763, Captain James 
Kronkhuyt. 

Hester^ Lent and Captain James Kronkhuyt had a daughter: 
Catharine" Cranckheyt, born 6 August, 1765; married 13 November, 
1787, Abraham Depew. 

Catharine" Cranckheyt and Abraham Depew had a son: 
Isaac^ Depew, born 9 August, 1800, in Peekskill, New York; married 
26 December, 1832, Martha .Minot Mitchell. 

[83] 



CliRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

Isaac' Depew and Martha Minot Mitchell had a son: 

Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New 

York; married, first, 9 November, 1S71, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, 

second, 28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



[84I 



THE VAN BOERUiM LINE 

Willem Jacobs' Van Boerum; bom about 1617; died before 1698; 
married, about 1640, Geertje Hendrickse. 

They had four children: 

1. Hendrick \Viliemse,= born about 1642; married, about 1663, Maria 
Ariaens; they had four children. 

+ 2. Geertruy- or Geertje Willemse,- born about 1644; married 26 
August, 1 66 1, in the Dutch Church, New York, Franfois' De 
Pew. 

3. Jacob Willemse, = born about 1646; married 15 June, 16S4, Geer- 

truyd De Beauvois; they had five children. 

4. Hillegond or Hillegont Willemse,^ born about 1649; no more trace. 

See the printed 1881 Early Settlers of Kings County, ^yew York, 
page 40, by Teunis G. Bergen. 

Willem Jacobs^ Van Boerum and his family came with his sons from 
Amsterdam, Holland, in 1649. They lived at New Lotts, Flatbush, Long 
Island, New York, where he was a magistrate for several years. He was 
allotted, 7 February, 1670-1671, in pursuance of the Patent of Flatbush, 
25 morgens of land, said town between the lands of Jan Hansen (Van 
Noostrand) and those of Adriaen Hegeman, with plain land and salt 
meadows in addition, as per page 16, liber A, of Flatbush records. He 
was a magistrate in 1657 and 1662 and 1663 of Flatbush; he was on the 
assessment roll of 1675 and took the oath of allegiance there in 16S7. 

Geertje Willemse- Van Boerum and Franfois De Pew had a son: 
John' De Pew, bapt. 20 .May, 1674; married 16 April, 1701, Jannetje 
Wiltsie. 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E V/ 

John' De Pew and Jannetje Wiltsie had a son: 

John^ De Pew, born 24 October, 1705; married, about 1733, EHza- 
beth . 

John^ De Pew and Elizabeth had a son: 

Henrys De Pew, born 6 June, 1734; married 30 April, 1756, Alary 
De Pew. 

Henry' De Pew and Mary De Pew had a son: 

Abraham^ De Pew, born 10 October, 1762; married 13 November, 
1787, Catherine Cranckheyt. 

Abraham^ De Pew and Catherine Cranckheyt had a son: 
Isaac" Depew, born 9 August, 1800, in Peekskill, New York; married 
26 December, 1S32, iVIartha Minot Mitchell. 

Isaac' Depew and Martha Minot Mitchell had a son: 

Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1834. in Peekskill, New 

York; married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, 

second, 28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



[86; 



X. 



\ 



\ 



\ 



"^^ 



^ 



JUDGE ROB E PT JOH NSTON 



THE JOHNSTON LINE 

Judge Robert' Johnston, born about 1734, in Ireland; died 19 January, 
1823, aged 89 years, in the town of Carmel, New York; his tombstone is in 
the Presbyterian Cemetery, at Red Mills, Carmel, Putnam County, New 
York; married, about 1770, Elizabeth Ogden; born about 1750; died 27 
September, 1832, aged 82 years; buried in the same cemetery and has a 
tombstone; daughter of L'zal and Elizabeth Charlotte (Thebaut) Ogden. 
They had one son and six daughters: 

1. Mary' or Polly,= born about 1771 ; single; was aged over 60 on the i ith 

July, 1831. 

2. Eliza, = born about 1773; died 1815, before 29 November; married, 

about 1797, Daniel Delavan, of Mount Pleasant, Westchester 
County, New York. 

They had eight children: See the Guardian papers in the Surro- 
gates Office at White Plains, New York: 

1. Mary O ,' born about 1799; died single, about June, 1829; she 

left a will. 

2. Robert,' born about 1801. 

3. Margaret E ,' born about 1803. 

4. Eliza D ,' born 3 May, 1805. 

5. Daniel E ,' born 23 January, iSog. 

6. Charles H .^ born 20 July, 181 1. 

7. Christian S ' (a daughter), born 3 August, 181 3. 

8. Hannah,' born 7 March, 1815. 

3. William Harkness,^ born about 1779; died 10 or 28 January, 1828, aged 

49 years; buried in the same cemetery with his parents; married, 
I May, 1 82 1, Susan Van Wyck; born 24 November, 1786; died 27 
June, 1885; daughter of Theodorus William Van Wyck and Sarah 
(Young); they had three children: 

[87] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

1. Robert Van Wyck,' horn 14 March, 1822; died 17 March, 1S22. 

2. Sarah Van Wyck,' born 23 February, 1823; died 19 November, 

1857; single. 

3. Robert,^ born 22 September, 1825; died single, 13 June, 1897. 

William H.Johnston was Sheriff and Surrogate of Putnam County, 
New York; his will is in liber B, page 262, of the Carmel, New York, 
Surrogate's Office; dated at Carmel 19 February, 1S26; proved 17 
January, 1828; wife, Susan; children, Sarah Van Wyck Johnston and 
Robert Johnston; nephew, William Johnston Mitchell, son of my 
sister Ann Mitchell; my father was Robert Johnston; my mother 
was Elizabeth Johnston: my sister, Mary Johnston; executors, 
Abram Smith, Esq., of the town of Phillips Town, and Alfred 
Lounsberry, of Carmel, and Theodorus Van Wvck, of Fishkill; 

witnesses. William H Sloat and Piatt P Smith and Joseph 

Benedict; codicil, 25 November, 1827, added to my executors 
my brother-in-law. Ward B- Howard, of Cortland, West- 
chester County, New York; file box 468 has the original will; 
file box 557 has the petition, dated 11 July, 1831; says he died 
in Carmel, — January, 1828; widow, Susan, and two infant 
children, Sarah, aged 8 years, and Robert, aged 6 years; depo- 
sition says the bonds and mortgages are in the hands of Mrs. 
Mitchell, who resides in Peekskill, and who is a sister of the wife of 

Ward B Howard; that said Howard married, about 1821, Lucia 

Johnston, after the date of the will of Robert Johnston, and she is 
still living; the heirs of Eliza Delavan, who deceased before Robert 
Johnston; Mary Johnston, aged over 60 years; that Robert Johnston 
died in the years 1821 or 1822, leaving widow, Elizabeth, and Mrs. 
Mitchell (she has four children) and Mary; two other daughters, 
Mrs. Niven and Mrs. Van Arsdale. 

4. Margaret,- born 22 February, 17S2; died 21 April, 1848; married, 14 

October, 1800, Elias Van Arsdale, Senr. See the Ogden line for their 
six children. 

5. Anna MacArthur,^ born i November, 1785, at Lake Mahopac, Putnam 

County, New York; married, about 1807, Chauncey Root Mitchell. 



THE JOHNSTON LINE 



6. Charlotte^ born about 1787; married, about 1810, George W 

Niven, of New York. See the Ogden line for their two children. 

7. Lucia,- born about 1789; married, about i8.->i, Ward B Howard. 

Judge Robert' Johnston came from Armagh, Ireland, in early manhood 
(in 1755, it is thought), to New York City, and engaged in mercantile 
business. Later he moved to Lake .Mahopac, Putnam County, New York, 
and engaged in the same business. He was among the most prominent of 
the early settlers there and became a leader in political as well as com- 
mercial circles. He was an influential Democrat; served as County Judge; 
Member of the New York State Assembly for Dutchess County 1798 to 
1800, Member of the New York State Senate 1804 to 1807, and a Member 
of the Council of Appointment and Revision. He was a member of the 
22nd, 23rd and 24th Sessions of the Assembly, 1798, 1799, 1800, 1801; 
Senator, 28th Session, 1S04-1805; Senator, 29th Session, 1S06-1S07; Senator, 
30th Session, 1808- 1809, 

He was at one time the owner of the entire Lake xMahopac. He married 
after he came to the United States and reared a family of seven children. 
The deeds to his property were destroyed and he petitioned the New York 
Legislature, which confirmed his right to the property he claimed. The 
printed 1886 History of Putnam County, New York, by William Smith 
Pelletreau, page 346, says: Robert Johnston purchased, about 1799, from 
William Smith, the (Red) mills and lands adjoining; and before 1800 he 
purchased from William Smith "the large island in the large pond called 
Hustin's Pond," Lake Mahopac, Carmel, New York; this was sold on 24th 
December, 1828, to Silas Slawson, for five hundred and fifty dollars. 

As his name does not appear on the printed 1790 Census of New York 
State, it would seem he must then have been living in New Jersey, from 
which State his wife came; the 1790 Census for New Jersey was destroyed 
when the British burned Washington, D. C, during the 1812 War. 

The 1885 volume of the Collections of the New York Historical Society, 
Burghers and Freemen of New York, at a Common Council held the ist 
day of April, 1789, Robert Johnston, Shopkeeper, admitted Freeman. 

In April, 1803, Robert Johnston and Joshua M Brett and James 

Burt were elected State Senators in the Middle District. On the 28th 

[89] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CKAUNCEY M. DEPE'.V 

January, 1806, Dewitt Clinton, Robert Johnston and Adam Comstock 
and Henry Huntington were nominated to form a Council of Appoint- 
ment, and were afterwards elected by the House. 

Robert Johnston was a lay Judge of Dutchess County, New York. 
His will is recorded in liber B, page 182, of the Putnam County, New York, 
Surrogate Ofilce at Carmel, New York, and is dated at Carmel 29 Novem- 
ber, 181 5, and proved 29 December, 1824. 

See page 897 of the printed 1897 Commemorative and Biographical 
Record of Dutchess County, New York; also page IX of the printed 188.^ 
large History of Dutchess County, New York, by James H Smith. 

Anna MacArthur- Johnston and Chauncey Root Mitchell had a daughter: 
Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810, in Somers, 
Westchester County, New York; married, 26 December, 1832, 
in Peekskill, New York, Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 

Chauncey Mitchell* Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, 
New York; married, first, 9 November, 1871, EliseAnn Hege- 
man; married, second, 28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



90 



THE ROOT LINE 

4. Josiah' Rootes, born about 1615, in Great Chart Parish, fifty miles 
southeast of London, England; died 4 June, 1683, in Beverly, Massachu- 
setts; married about 1640, Susanna . 

They had six children, the first four all baptized 24 September, 1648: 

5 1 . Josiah,^ born about 1642 ; probably married , Allen ; 

no more trace. 

6 2. Bethia,' born about 1644; no more trace. 

7 + 3. Jolin,= born about 1646; married about 1684, Dorcas Abbott. 

8 4. Susanna,^ born about 1648; married , Mr. Haskins; 

no more trace. 

9 5. Thomas,- bapt. 16 February, 165 1; went to Boston, Massachu- 

setts; married , Elizabeth Gale; they had one child. 

!0 6. Jonathan,- born about 1666; probably married , Abigail 

Gale; no more trace; it is supposed he went to Marblehead, 
Massachusetts. 

Josiah^ Rootes came from Kent, England, 1634-1635, in the ship 
Hercules, of Sandwich, England, John Witherby, master. He joined the 
church in 1648. He had a land grant in 1636 and 1649 in Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, and settled on the Beverly side of the river. He resided in Salem 
and Beverly, Massachusetts. He was a brother of Thomas Rootes and 
Richard Rootes, and probably a brother of Joshua Rootes, of Salem, Mas- 
sachusetts. Josiah had a certificate from the curate of Great Chart Parish, 
England, 20 March, 1634. He was one of the Founders of the Church in 
Beverly, Massachusetts, in 1667. His wife was arrested 21 May, 1692, 
for witchcraft, but was never tried; the principal reason for suspecting her 
vvas that she absented herself from prayers. Josiah made his will 15 May, 
1683, just 19 days before he died. 

[91] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C E S T R 'i' OK C H A li N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

See the printed 1S70 Root and Rootes Families, page 50, by James 
Pierce Root; also the printed 1S54 History of Ancient Woodbury, Con- 
necticut, by William Cothren, volume i, page 674. 

SECOND GENER-^\TION 

7. John= Rootes (JosiahO, born about 1646 in Beverly, Massachusetts; 
bapt. 24 September, 1648; died 25 May, 1723, in Woodbury, Connecticut; 
married about 1684, Dorcas Abbott; born about 1661; died 15 May, 1720, 
in Woodbury; daughter of George Abbott, of Norwalk, Connecticut, and 
Mary (Weed) Abbott. 

They had ten children, all born in Woodbury: 



14 

>5 
16 



17 + 



19 



9. 
10. 



John', bapt. — April, 1683; he died young. 

Susanna, 3 bapt. — May, 1685; married 12 July, 1710, Colonel 
Joseph Booth Minor; they had four children. 

Mary,5 bapt. — May, 1685; married , Robert Warner; 

no more trace. 

Sarah, 5 bapt. — May, 1685; married 8 January, 172S, Joseph 
Prime; no more trace. 

Josiah,' bapt. — March, 1688; married 3 July, 1717, Elizabeth 
Huthwitt; they had five children. 

Bethia,= bapt. — December, 1691 ; died 23 July, 1700. 

John,' born 9 June, 1693; married, tlrst, 4 September, 1717, 
Ruth Hickok; they had five children; married, second, after 
April, 1741, Elizabeth ; they had no children. 

Joseph,' born 9 June, 1698: married about 1720, Susanna 

Bethia,' born 7 February, 1703; no more trace. 

Thomas,' born about 1704; married , 1723, Sarah Hickok, 

daughter of Benjamin Hickok; they had two children. 



John- Rootes had a land grant 2 March, 1676, in Fairfield, Connecticut, 
and went to Woodbury, Connecticut, about 1681-1682. He was a man 
of considerable business afi"airs. 



92 



THE ROOT LINE 



See the printed 1861 Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage, vol- 
ume 3, page 573; also the printed 1870 Root and Rootes Families, page 
53; also the printed 1893 American Ancestry, volume 8, page 573; also the 
printed History of Fairfield, Connecticut, by Mrs. Elizabeth Schenck, 
volume I, page 403. 

THIRD GENERATION 

17. Joseph' Root (John,= Josiah'), bapt. — June, 1698, in Woodbury^ 
Connecticut; died there , 1761 ; married about 1720, Susanna _ 



They had twelve children, all born in Woodbury: 



3' 
32 + 

33 



Gideon,^ bapt. 2 April, 1721 ; no more trace. 

Olive,^ born 4 .March, 1726, in Woodbury; married 21 January, 

1747, Captain Asahel^ Mitchell. 
Thomas,'' bapt. 23 June, 1728; married 29 December, 1757, 

Emma Minor; they had eight children. 
Susanna,* bapt. 30 September, 1729; no more trace. 
Mabel,* born 18 April, 1733; married 22 August, 1754, John 

Root; they had tv.elve children. 
Jerusha,* born 20 June, 1733; married , Mr. 

Minor; no more trace. 
Eunice,* born 2 April, 1737; married 8 March, 1757, Seth 

Minor; they had eleven children. 
Beulah,* born 7 August, 1739; married , Mr. 

Minor; no more trace. 
Joseph,* born 27 July, 1741 ; died — August, 1741. 
Joseph,* born 24 October, 1742; no more trace. 
Ruth,* bapt. 22 April, 1744; no more trace. 
Justus,* bapt. 20 October, 1745; died 20 October, 1753. 

Sergeant Joseph' Root resided in Woodbury, Connecticut, and was 
called Sergeant 22 April, 1744. Susanna Roots died — May, 1748; no 
age, in Woodbury. 

See page 56 of the printed 1870 History of the Root and Rootes Families. 



34 


4 


35 


5 


36 


6 


37 


7 


38 


8 


39 


9 


40 


10 


41 


II 


42 


12 



93 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

32. Olive^ Root and Captain Asahel Mitchell had a son: 
Reverend Justus^ Mitchell; bapt. 8 September, 1754, in Woodbury, Con- 
necticut; married 7 September, 1779, Martha Sherman. 

Reverend Justus^ Mitchell and Martha Sherman had a son: 
Chauncey Root^ Mitchell; born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root^ Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New York, 

Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



94] 



THE KNELL LLNE 

Nicholas' Knell, born about 1625; place not known; died — April, 
1675, in Stratford, Connecticut: ".Mr. Knell, that aged benefactor to his 
country," married about 1650 Elizabeth, widow of Thomas Knowles, and 
daughter of Governor Francis Newman, of New Haven, Connecticut, by 
his wife, Mary . 

They had four children, born in Stratford: 

1. John, = born 24 October, i63i;died 16 January, 1652. 

2. Elizabeth,^ born 3 May, 1653; married about 1677, John Mitchell. 

3. Isaac, 2 born — February, 1655; married 28 December, 1697, Phebe 

Nichols; no more trace. 

4. John,= born 17 December, 1657; no more trace. 

Nicholas' Knell was in Stratford, Connecticut, as early as 1650, and 
there was granted fifty acres of land by the government in 1668, and as 
much more the next year. He seems to have been a man of some conse- 
quence, as he had the "Air." prefix to his name. He disposed of a part 
of his estate by a writing lo June, 1650. 

The Fairfield, Connecticut, Probate Records, liber 3, dated 1675- 1689, 
has the will of Nicholas Knell; no place; dated 24 March, 1670-1671; 

proved ; names only his wife, Elizabeth, and two sons, Isaac and 

John; overseers, Richard Booth and Isack Nicholes and Joseph Hawiey; 
witnesses, David Mitchell and John Minor; inventory taken 15 June, 1675, 
by Isack Nichols and John Curtis and John Picket and Henry Wakelee. 

See the printed 1861 Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage, vol- 
ume 3, page 35; also the printed 18S6 History of Stratford, Connecticut, 
page 1233, by Samuel Orcutt; also the printed 1872 History of Ancient 
Woodbury, volume 2, page 15 19, by William Cothren. 

[95] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C M A U N C E "l" M . D E P H \V 

Elizabeth- Knell and Ensign John Mitchell had a son: 
Lieutenant John= .Mitchell, bapt. — February, 1688-1689; married 17 
January, 1717, Elizabeth Curtis. 

Lieutenant John' .Mitchel and Elizabeth Curtis had a son : 
Captain .\sahel^ .Mitcliell, born 6 October, 1723; married 21 January, 
1747-1748, Olive Root. 

Captain Asahel* .Mitchell and Olive Root had a son: 
Reverend Justus^ .Mitchell, bapt. 8 September, 1754, in Woodbury, Con- 
necticut; married 7 September, 1779, .Martha Sherman. 

Reverend Justus^ Mitchell and Martha Sherman had a son: 
Chauncey Root^ .Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Roof^ .Mitchell and .Anna .MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha .Minot' Mitchell, born 2 .Ma\-, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 
County, New York; married 26 December, 1S32, in Peekskill, New York, 
Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha .Minot' .Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey .Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, .May Palmer. 



96: 



THE CURTIS LINE 

Widow Elizabeth' Curtis, born about 1590, in England; died — June, 
1658, in Stratford, Connecticut. The Fairfield, Connecticut, Probate 
Records, liber i, dated 164S-1 656, page 17, has the will of widow Eliza- 
beth Curtis, dated ; proved 4 November, 1658; names her sons, 

John and William, and Mary, daughter of her son Thomas; John and 
Israel, sons of John Curtis ; Jonathan and Sarah, children of William Curtis ; 
dated at Stratford. 

She had three children: 

1 + I. John,= born about 161 1; married about 1640, Elizabeth (Welles?). 

2 2. Captain William, = born about 1621; died 21 December, 1702, in 

Stratford, Connecticut; married, first, about 1640, .Mary ; 

they had nine children; married, second, after 1676, Sarah, 
widow of William Goodrich, and daughter of Matthew Marvin; 
no children by the second wife. 

3 3. Thomas, = born ; no more trace. 

The printed 1888 American Ancestry, volume 3, page 69, has: John 
Curtis, of Nazing, England, married 19 April, 1610, Elizabeth Hutchins, 

and had John Curtis; born — , 161 1, in Nazing; came to America in 

1632; married , Elizabeth Wells. The Curtis coat-oi-arms is gi\en 

as: Azure a fess dancette between three crowns, or. Crest — A lion in his 
proper colors, issuing forth of his colors, or, and azure, supporting in his 
right paw a shield azure, thereon a fess dancette, or, mantled gules, doubled 
argent. Motto — S.-epere aude. The widow Elizabeth Curtis v,-as at Strat- 
ford in 1652. 

See the printed 1903 Curtis Family; also the printed 1872 History of 
Ancient Woodbury, Connecticut, by William Cothren, volume 2, pages 
1487 and 1488. 

[97] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C E S T R 'l' OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

SECOXD GENERATION 

I. John= Curtis (Widow Elizabeth'), born about 1611 in England; 
died 6 December, 1707, aged 96 \-ears, in Stratford, Connecticut; married 

about 1640, Elizabeth (Welles?); born ; died 9 Aiarch, 1681-16S2, 

in Stratford; said to be a sister of Governor Thomas Welles of Connecticut. 

They had seven children, born in Stratford: 

6 I. John/ born 14 October, 1642; died before 1 685; married , 

Widow Hannah Kimberly; they had no children. 
7+2. Israel,' born 3 April, 1644; married about 1665, Rebecca . 

8 3. Elizabeth," born 2 May, 1647; no more trace. 

9 4. Thomas,' born 14 January, 1648-1649; he went to Wallingford, 

Connecticut; married 9 June, 1674, .Mary .Merriman; they had 
twelve children. 

10 5. Joseph,' born 12 November, 1650; married 9 November, 1676, 

Bethia Booth; they had ten children. 

11 6. Benjamin,' born 30 September, 1652; married, first, 23 March, 

1680- 1 681, Esther Judson; they had six children; married, 
second, 1 December, 1714, Bathsheba Tomlinson, widow of 
Ephraim Stiles; no children by his second wife. 

12 7. Hannah,' born 2 February, 1634-1655; she went to Wallingford, 

Connecticut; married , 1671, Benjamin Lewis. 

John= Curtis was made a freeman in .May, 1658; town treasurer of 
Stratford 29 December, 1675; he was one of the first settlers in Stratford; 
in 1676 he was a Selectman there; he was a Sergeant and Ensign. 

See the 1854 History of Ancient Woodbury, Connecticut, by William 
Cothren, volume 1, page 532; and volume 2, 1872, page 1488. 

THIRD GENER.ATION 

7. Lieutenant Israel' Curtis (Ensign John,= Widovv' Elizabeth^, born 
3 April, 1644, in Stratford, Connecticut; died 28 October, 1704, aged 61 
years, in Woodbury, Connecticut; married about 1665, Rebecca . 

[98] 



THE CURTIS LINO 



They had ten children, born in Woodbury: 

I. Israel/ born iS March, 1666-1667; he died young. 

21 2. Israel/ born 20 iMay, 1668; married , Mary Mallory; 

they had four children; another account says he married be- 
fore 9 December, 16S7, Mary Morehouse, daughter of Samuel 
Morehouse. 

:2 + 3- John/ born 7 October, 1670; married about 1696, Johannah 

23 4. Stephen,^ born 24 August, 1673; married 2 November, 1699, 

Sarah Minor; they had ten children. 

24 5. Peter,^ born about 1674; he probably died young. 

25 6. Hannah,'' born about 1675; married about 1691, Thomas Minor; 

they had nine children. 

26 7. Rebecca, < born — November, 1677; married 21 August, 1701, 

Ephraim Minor; they had five children. 
• 8. Ruth, 4 bapt. — April, 16S0-1681 ; she died young. 
9. Josiah,'' bapt. — November, 1682-1683; no more trace. 
10. Ruth,^ bapt. — September, 1686-1687; she died young. 

The Fairfield, Connecticut, Probate Records, liber dated 1689-1701: 
Israel Curtice, selectman of Woodbury, Connecticut, takes the inventory 
of the Woodbury estate of Joseph Judson; again 1700, Izrael Curtis, select- 
man, of Woodbury, takes the inventory of the estate of the late Reverend 
•NU. Zachariah Walker. Liber 5, dated 1 702-1 750, Fairfield, Connecticut, 
Probate Records, has the estate of Lieutenant Israel Curtis of Woodbury; 
settlement of the estate by agreement between the widow Flehecca and the 
five children— Hannah the wife of Thomas Minor, and Rebecca the wife 
of Ephraim Minor, and Izraell Curtis the land at Stratford, and John 
Curtis and Steven Curtis; there v.as land at Stratford and Woodbury; 
v-itnesses, John Minor and John Sherman and Daniel Beardsley; inven- 
tory- taken 17 March, 1 704-1 705, of the Stratford land by Joseph Curtis 
-'nd Benjamin Curtis; inventory of the estate of Lieutenant Izraell Curtis, 
of Woodbury, who died 28 October, 1704, was taken 20 February, 1704- 
"705, by Matthew Mitchell and Joseph Hikok and John Curtis. 

[99] 



C H R O N O L O G 'I- AND ANCESTRY' OF C H A LI N C E Y M . D E P E W 

FOURTH GENERATION 

22. Ensign John^ Curtis (Lieutenant Israel/ Ensign John,= Widow 
Elizabeth^), born 7 October, 1670, in Woodbury, Connecticut; died there 

14 April, 1754; married about 1696, Johannah ■ — ; born ; died 

I September, 1749, in Woodbury. 

They had eleven children, born in Woodbury: 

42 + I. Elizabeth, 5 born ; bapt. — September, 1697, in Wood- 

bury; married 17 January, 1716-1717, Lieutenant John^ 
Mitchell. 

43 2. Hannah,' born i November, 1699; no more trace. 

44 3. Nathan, 5 born 2 February, 1701-1702; married — May, 1732, 

Martha Preston; they had four children. 

45 4. Abigail, 5 bapt. — March, 1704; married 6 January, 1723-1724, 

David Hurd: they had seven children. 

46 5. Esther,* born 5 April, 1706; married , Joseph Judson, of 

Woodbury; no more trace. 

47 6. Joanna, = born 5 September, 1708; married 4 December, 1729, 

Eliakim Stoddard; they had nine children. 

48 7. John, 5 born 3 February, 171 1; married , Abia ; 

they had ten children. 

49 8. 01ive,5 born 6 May, 1713; married 24 January, 1733, Gideon 

Stoddard, of Woodbury; no more trace. 

50 9. Peter,5 born 1 January, 1716; married 27 November, 1746- 

1747, Mercy Chittenden; they had two children. 

51 10. David, 5 born 21 January, 1718; married , Eunice ; 

they had five children. 

52 II. Eunice, 5 born 20 March, 1720; married 1 August, 1739, Abijah 

Stoddard, of Woodbury. 

42. Elizabeth* Curtis and Lieutenant John Mitchell had a son: 
Captain Asahel" Mitchell, born 6 October, 1723; married 21 January, 
1 747- 1 748, Olive Root. 



THE CURTIS LINE 



Captain Asahel^ Mitchell and Olive Root had a son: 
Reverend Justus' Mitchell, bapt. 8 September, 1754. in Woodbury, Con- 
necticut; married 7 September, 1779, Martha Sherman. 

Reverend Justus' Mitchell and Martha Sherman had a son: 
Chauncey Root' Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root^ Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, Nev/ York, 

Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot^ Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell'" Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



[ lOI 



THE NEWMAN LINE 

Governor Francis' Newman, born probably before 1600 and in England; 
died 18 November, 1660, in New Haven, Connecticut; married about 1620, 
Mary . 

Only one child is discovered: 
1 '\- I. Elizabeth,- born about 1623; death not found; married, first, about 
1643, Thomas Knowles; he died before 164S; married, second, 
about 1650, Nicholas Knell (see page 95). 

There were two Knowles children: 

1. Eleazer^ Knowles, born about 1645; married about 1681, 

Mary ; they had seven children in Vv^oodbury, 

Connecticut. 

2. Thomas' Knowles, born about 1647; no more trace. 

The printed 1895 Street Genealogy, page 4, by iMrs. Mary A. Street, 
has: Reverend Nicholas' Street, bapt. 29 January, 1603, in England; died 

22 April, 1674, in New Haven, Connecticut; married, iirst, , ; 

her name unknown; married, second, after November, 1660, Mary, widow 
of Governor Francis Newman, of New Haven. The printed 1884 Leete 
Genealogy, by Edward L. Leete, has: Governor William' Leete, born 

• ; died 16 April, 1683; married, first, about 1638, in England, Anne 

Payne; they had nine children; she died i September, 1668; he married, 
second, 7 April, 1670, Sarah, widow of Henry Rutherford; they had no 
children; she died 10 February, 1673; William Leete married, third, after 
22 April, 1674, Mary, the widow of Reverend Nicholas' Street, and the 
widow of Governor Francis' Newman; she died 13 December, 1683. 

Governor Francis' Newman was in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1638. 
He was an Assistant in 1653 ^nd after, until he was made Governor in May, 
1638; he died as the Governor. He also served in the important place of 

[103] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

Commissioner of the United Colonies in 1654 and 165S, and in the trouble- 
some relations with the Dutch of New Netherlands. In his barn, in June, 
1639, was formed the compact or civil constitution by which for many 
years the Colony was ruled. In the published 19 14 Historical Catalogue 
of the First Church of Christ of New Haven, Connecticut, by Franklin 
Bowditch Dexter, on the Church Membership List his name is Number 38, 
and his wife, Mary, is Number 39; and she was dismissed in 1675. 

The printed 18S1 History of the Colony of New Haven, by Charles E. 
Atwater, has, on page 41: "Besides these who were related to Reverend 
John Davenport, as his former parishioners, or to Theophilus Eaton by 
family ties, several citizens of London joined the company. Not all of 
them can now be distinguished from those who came from other parts of 
the Kingdom (of England), but there is more or less authority for including 
in such a list the names of Stephen Goodyear, Richard ALilbon, Thomas 
Gregson, William Peck, Robert Newman, Francis Newman, and Ezekiel 
Cheever." Page 1 1 1, a schedule, prepared before April, 1 641, of the names 
of the Planters, shows two persons numbered in his family (i. e., family of 
Francis Newman), 160 acres, 9 acres of meadow, etc. Page 118: .. . the 
corner lot which had been Samuel Eaton's was sold in 1649 to Francis 
Newman. Page 144: "Francis Newman, the owner of the next lot, was 
admitted a freeman in 1640, chosen ensign in 1642 of the train-band, 
lieutenant of the Artillery Company in 1645 upon its formation, secretary 
of the plantation in 1647, and was finally advanced to the highest office in 
the jurisdiction, being chosen Governor after Eaton's death." Page 197: 
"Mr. Samuel Eaton and Mr. Francis Newman, being invited to go with 
the company as magistrates, took the matter into consideration, and on 
the 4th of December (1634) gave their consent conditional" about a com- 
pany settling at Delaware Bay. Page 211, in regard to the exorbitant 
prices charged by the Widow Stolyon at her store, No. 10. That she sold 
needles at one a penny which might be bought in Old England at 12 pence 
or 18 pence per hundred, as Mr. Francis Newman affirmeth." Page 297: 
"Besides the officers already mentioned, 'the trained band' had an ensign, 
four sergeants, and four corporals. In 1642 the ensign, or ancient as he 
was usually styled, was Francis Newman, afterwards Governor of the 
jurisdiction." Page 415: "At the court of election in the following May 
(1638), Francis Newman, who for some years had been secretary of the 

[ 104] 



THE NEW M A N [.IN E 



jurisdiction, was chosen Governor, and William Leete, deputy-governor." 
Page 416: "The votes of the present freemen and some few proxies carried 
the election for Governor to Mr. Newman by plurality of votes, which he 
strongly refused; hut importunity of many in the court at last overcame 
him to accept it. . . . .Mr. Newman and Mr. Leete were re-elected in 
1659 and 1660." On the 17th of October of the latter year a court of 
magistrates was held, at which the following record was made, the Governor 
being absent : "... By reason of the aiflicting hand of God on Nev/ Haven 
by much sickness, the Court could not pitch upon a day for public thanks- 
giving through the colony for the mercies for the past year, and did there- 
fore leave it to the Elders of the Church at New Haven, as God may be 
pleased to remove his hand from the Governor and others, to give notice 
to the rest of the plantations what day they judge fit for that duty, that 
we may give thanks and rejoice before the Lord together." Governor 
Newman died 18 November, 1660. Mr. Davenport, in a letter to his 
friend Winthrop, thus communicates the particulars of his decease: "We 
hoped he was in a good way of recovery from his former sickness, and were 
comforted with his presence in the assembly two Lord's days, and at one 
meeting of the Church on a week day, without sensible inconvenience. 
And on the morning of the day of public thanksgiving, he found himself 
encouraged to come to the public assembly. But after the morning ser- 
mon he told me that he found himself exceedingly cold from head to toe; 
yet having dined, he was refreshed, and came to the meeting in the after- 
noon, the day continuing very cold. That night he was very ill; >et he 
did not complain of any relapse into his former disease, but of inward cold, 
which he and we hoped might be removed by his keeping warm and using 
other suitable means. 1 believe he did not think that the time of his 
departure was so near, or that he should die of this distemper, though he was 
always prepared for his great change. The last day of the week he desired 
my son to come to him the next morning to write a bill for him to be prayed 
for, according to his direction. My son went to him after the beating of 
the first drum, but finding himself not fit to speak much, he prayed him 
to write for him what he thought fit. 

"When the second drum beat, I was sent for to him. But before 1 
came, though I made haste, his precious immortal soul was departed from 
its house of clay unto the souls of just men made perfect. We were not 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A L' N C E Y M . D E P E W 

worthy of him, a true Nathanae!, an Israelite indeed, who served God in 
Christ in sincerity and truth. He honored God in his personal conversa- 
tion, and in his administration of chief magistracy in this colony, and God 
hath given him honor in the hearts of his people." 

Elizabeth^ Newman and Nicholas Knell had a daughter: 
Elizabeth' Knell, born 3 May, 1653; married about 1677, Ensign John 
Mitchell. 

Elizabeth^ Knell and Ensign John Mitchell had a son: 
Lieutenant John-* Mitchell, bapt. — February, 16SS-1689; married 17 
January, 1717, Elizabeth Curtis. 

Lieutenant John'' Mitchell and Elizabeth Curtis had a son: 
Captain Asahel^ Mitchell, born 6 October, 1723; married 21 January, 
1 747- 1 748, Olive Root. 

Captain Asahel^ iMitchell and Olive Root had a son: 
Reverend Justus'' Mitchell, bapt. 8 September, 1754, in Woodbury, Con- 
necticut; married 7 September, 1779, Martha Sherman. 

Reverend Justus* Mitchell and Martha Sherman had a son: 
Chauncey Root' Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root" Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 iMay, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New York, 

Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell-' Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 187 1, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



106 



THE OGDEN LINE 

1. John' Ogden, born 19 September, 1609, in Bradley Plain, Hamp- 
shire, England; died — May, 1682, in Elizabethtown, New Jersey; married 

in Bradley Plain, England, 8 May, 1637, Jane Bond; born ; death 

not found; daughter of Jonathan Bond, of England. 

John' and Jane (Bond) Ogden had six children: 

2 1. John, 2 born in England 3 March, 1638; married , Elizabeth 

Plum or Plumb; they had one child. 
3+2. David, = born a twin 1 1 January, 1639, in England; married about 
1676, Mrs. Elizabeth (Swaine) Ward. 

4 3. Jonathan, = born a twin 11 January, 1639, in England; m.arried 

, Rebecca (Wood?); they had five children. 

5 4. Joseph, = born 9 November, 1642; married , Sarah White- 

head; they had two children. 

6 5. Benjamin, = born about 1654; married , Hannah WoodrufT; 

they had three children. 

7 6. Mary,= born about 1656; married , John Woodruff; they 

had eight children. 

The printed 1907 Ogden Family says: "The facts underlying the life 
and character of John' Ogden, the Pilgrim, have been fully investigated. 
His sterling character having been transmitted through so many honored 
descendants ... so much valuable data connected with his illustrious 
ancestor and the projected lines of descent." His ancestry is here traced 
to 1433. The coat-of-arms — "sable, on a fesse argent, between three 
acorns gold, as many oak leaves vert"; motto — "Tan Que Je Puis" (So 
much as I can do). 

He was in Southampton, Long Island, New York, 17 April, 1640, 
where he owned Shinnecock Hill. To Stamford, Connecticut, in 1641; to 
Hempstead and Northampton, Long Island, New York, 1644 to 1650; 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEY/ 

patentee of Connecticut in 1662: in 1664 he was one of the Founders of 
Elizabeth, New Jersey; was Deputy-Governor there i November, 1665; 
was one of the Burgesses 26 May, 1668; Governor in 1673 of the English 
towns in East New Jersey. PhiHp Carteret was the Governor and pro- 
prietor. John' Ogden and his brother, Richard Ogden, were, in Mav, 
1642, the builders of Governor William Kieft's Srone Church at New 
Amsterdam, by contract with Governor William. Kieft and Gisbert op Dvzk 
and Thomas Willet, of New Amsterdam, Church Wardens, to build a 
stone church in the fort, 72 feet by 50 feet, for the sum of 2500 guilders 
($1,000) to be paid in beaver, cash, or merchandise, one hundred guilders 
to be added if the w^ork proved satisfactory, and the use of the compan>''3 
boat to be given the builders for carrying stone, a month or si.x weeks if 
necessary. The work was duly and satisfactorily completed. The in- 
tegrity and ability of John Ogden in public affairs are well attested. He 
was made a freeman of Southampton, Long Island, New York, 31 March, 
1650, and was chosen by the General Court at Hartford, Connecticut, i6 
May, 1636, and again in 1657 and 1658, as one of the magistrates for the 
Colony. He sat in the General Court, as a Representative from South- 
ampton, New York, in 1659, and in the upper house in May, 1661, and 
afterwards. His name appears repeatedly in the new Charter of Con- 
necticut, obtained 23 April, 1662, by Governor Winthrop from King 
Charles the Second, as one of the magistrates and patentees of the Colony. 
He was held in high honor at home, being one of the first men. He was 
appointed a Justice of the Peace at Elizabeth, New Jersey, 26 October, 
1665, and November i as one of Governor Philip Carteret's Council. In 
the 1668 legislature he was one of the Burgesses from this town. 

The printed 1892 Salisbury's Family Histories and Genealogies, vol- 
ume 2, page 232, has: Mr. John Ogden was chosen i September, 167^, 
to be Schout or Burgomaster of the six towns in New Jersey (Elizabeth, 
Newark, Woodbridge, Piscataway, Shrewsbury, and Middletown), "Give- 
ing and by these presents granting unto the said John Ogden full power, 
strength and authority in their said offices. The said Schout together 
with ye Schepens or magistrates of ye respective Townes to Rule and 
governe as well their Inhabitants as Strangers." John Ogden was vir- 
tually Governor of the English towns in New Jersey and the government 
was administered very much after the fashion of New England. 

f 108I 



THE OGDEN LINE 



John Ogden was a man of more than ordinary mark — a man of sterling 
worth, of whom the town, as well as his numerous posterity, should be 
gratefully mindful; whose wanderings for forty years had justly entitled 
iiim to rank with the "Pilgrim Fathers"; the acknowledged pioneer of 
ihe town, in whose house the first white child of the settlement was born, 
the accepted leader of the people, a pillar of the Church and State, hon- 
ored cind trusted by all. He left the impress of his political and religious 
principles, not only upon his children, but upon the community that he 
had so largely aided in founding. He was held in high esteem by the 
accomplished, sagacious and pious Winthrop. John Ogden had been, both 
al Southampton and Elizabeth, an honored magistrate, loved and trusted 
by the people, and during the Dutch rule, the virtual Governor of the 
English portion of the Province of New Jersey. He was a true patriot 
.ind a genuine Christian, devoting himself while living to the best interests 
of the town, and dying, bequeathed to his sons the work of completing 
v-.hat he had so fairly and effectually inaugurated — the establishment of 
a vigorous plantation founded on the principles of civil and religious liberty. 

His last will and testament is at Trenton, New Jersey, in the books 
"Unrecorded Wills," liber 4, page .2S5; also in the Deeds, liber 4, page 12. 



SECOND GENER^^TION 

3. David= Ogden (John'), born a twin 11 January, 1639, in England; 
died before 27 February, 1691-1692; married about 1676, Elizabeth, widow 
of Josiah Ward, and daughter of Captain Samuel and Johannah Swaine. 
Elizabeth Swaine was born 24 April, 1634, in New Haven, Connecticut, 
and vas still living in January, 1706. 

David- and Elizabeth (Swaine) Ogden had five children, born in Newark 
New Jersey: 

9 + 1. David,^ born about 1678; married about 1700, Abigail Elammond. 

'o 2. Colonel Josiah, ^ born about 1679; married, first, in New York, 
20 August, 1705, Catharine Hardenbroeck; they had three 

children: married, second, , Mary Bankes; they had 

two children. 

[ 109] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N' C E S T R Y OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

11 3. John,' born about 16S1; married , Elizabeth Wheeler; 

they had seven children. 

12 4. Thomas/ born about 1684; married, first, , Dinah ; 

they had five children; married, second, , widow Jean 

Halsted; there were no children by the second wife; Jean had 
been the wife of Caleb Halsted and John Clawson. 

13 5. Swaine,' born about 16S7; died 20 April, 1755, aged 68 years; 

married 5 .May, 171 1, Mary Ackerman, daughter of David 
and Hillegont Ackerman; they had nine children. 

David- Ogden in 1640 was at the eastern end of Long Island, New 
York; he went to Elizabethtown, New Jersey, in 1665; he took the oath of 
allegiance 19 February, 1665-1666, at Elizabeth; in 1670 he was called "a 
stone Church builder"; he went to Newark, New Jersey, about 27 April, 
1676; he was one of the Town's Men of Newark i Januar\', 1679, and again 
4 January, 1680. The printed 1S53 Historical Discourse of the First 
Presbyterian Church in Nevv-ark, New Jersey, by Reverend Jonathan F. 
Stearns, D.D., in a footnote on page 84, the will of David Ogden is dated 
26 December, 1691, and sworn to 27th February, 1691-1692, makes his 
wife, Elizabeth, the executrix, and names children, David, the eldest, and 
John and Josiah and Swaine, and is recorded on page 16 of the Newark 
"Town Book From i6gi". This original Newark Town Book is now in 
the possession of the New Jersey Historical Society in Newark, New 
Jersey. 

THIRD GENERATION 

9. David^ Ogden (David, = John'), born about 1678; died 11 July, 
1734, aged 56 years; both he and his wife are buried in the porch of Trinity 
Church, Newark, New Jersey; married about 1700, Abigail Hammond; 
born about 1676; died 1 1 February, 1760, aged 84 years; her parents have 
not been found and several persons question if her maiden name was 
Hammond. 

David' and Abigail Ogden had seven children, born in Newark, New 
Jersey: 

[no] 



THE OGDEN LINE 



43 I. Sarah/ born 2 No\emher, 1699; married , Nathaniel 

Johnson; they had six children. 

44 2. Abigail/ born 11 February, 1702; married , Colonel 

Joseph Tuttle; they had eight children. 

45 + 3. Uzal/ born about 1705; married about 1729 Elizabeth Charlotte 

Thebaut. 

46 4. John/ born about 1709; married , Hannah Sayre; they 

had eight children. 

47 5. Da\id/ born about 171 1: married , his cousin, Catharine 

Ogden; they had six children. 

48 6. Elizabeth, ■* born about 171 3; married , Captain John 

Johnson; the}' had eleven children. 

49 7. Martha,' born about 1716: married, first, , Caleb Saver; 

they had seven children; married, second, , Thomas 

Eagles; they had no children. 

David' Ogden resided in Nev.-ark, New Jersey, where he v.-as chosen as 
Collector 25 May, 171 3, and as an Assessor and Rate Maker 2 November, 
171 3, and again i November, 1714; VN'as chosen a Freeholder 14 March, 
1721, and then called a Captain. A Freeholder in New Jersey v.as the 
same as Supervisor in New ^'ork State and as a Selectman in Connecticut. 

See page 51 of the printed 1907 Ogden Family. 

The will of David^ Odgen is at Trenton, New Jersey, liber c, page 16, 
dated 18 March, 1726, proved 11 November, 1734. 

FOURTH GEXER.ATIOX 

45. Judge L'zal^ Ogden (Captain David,' David,- JohnO, born about 
1705; died about 1780; death and burial not recorded. So has the 1907 
printed Ogden Genealogy; but, as is shown below, he was born in 171 2 
and died on Tuesday, 25 July, 1780, aged 68 years, in Newark, New Jersey; 

married about 1729, Elizabeth Charlotte Thebaut; born ; death 

not found; daughter of Gabriel Lewis Thebaut, of the Island of Antigua, 
West Indies. 

[m] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A'SCESTKY OF CHAUNCEY M. DHPEW 

They had eight children, as per the Ogden Genealogy: 

132 I. Lewis, 5 born about 1730; married , Margaret Gouver- 

neur; they had four children. 

133 2. Gabriel, 5 born about 1733; probably married 26 May, 1753, 

Mary Shotwell, of Woodbridge, New Jersey, daughter of 
John and Lydia Shotwell: Gabriel was then of Morris, New 
Jersey; they had two daughters, as per Ogden Genealogy: 

1. Mary,^ born about 1755; still single in 1812. 

2. Charlotte,^ born about 1760; married 6 February, 1812, 

Charles Otto Muller, of the Island of Saint Croix, in 
Trinity Church, Newark, New Jersey, the witnesses being 
Mr. and Mrs. Moses Ogden, the uncle and aunt, Mrs. 
Schuyler, the aunt, and Mary Ogden, the sister of the 
bride. 

>34 3- John, ^ born about 1738; no more trace. 

135 +4. Elizabeth, = born about 1750; married about 1770, Judge Robert 

Johnston. 

136 5. Moses, 5 born about 1736; married 10 June, 1759, Mary John- 

son; no more trace. 

137 6. Mary,^ born about 1740; married , Peter Schuyler; no 

more trace. 

138 7. Reverend Uzal,^ born about 1744; died 4 November, 1822, in 

Newark, New Jersey; married about 1776, Mary Gouverneur; 
they had six children. 

139 8. Charles, 5 born about 1748; married, first, 23 July, 1779, Hannah 

Gouverneur; they had eight children; married, second, , 

Ann Clark; no children by the second wife. 

Judge UzaH Ogden was in Sussex County, New Jersey, 15 April, 1740, 
and purchased, with his brothers, John Ogden and David Ogden, the 
Ringwood Iron Works; he was a Justice or County Judge from 1743 to 
1762 in Essex County, New Jersey; in the April Court, 1763, he was Sheriff 

[112] 



THE OGDEN LINE 



of lissex County; in 177S he was a Warden of Trinity Church, Newark, 
New Jersey. 

The first item on the records of Trinity Church, Newark, New Jersey, 
bears the date 21 March, 1742-1743, "Trinity Church to Uzal Ogden, 
[debtor. To one gallon of rum for the stone diggers, no pounds, and four 
shillings." He appears to have furnished all the labor and material, or 
else was treasurer of the funds. See page 64 of the printed 1907 Ogden 
Family Genealogy. 

The printed New Jersey Archives, Newspaper Extracts, Second Series, 
i77<>-'777. volume i, page 331, footnote: "Judge John Ogden (son of 
Captain David Ogden), with his uncie Colonel Josiah Ogden, and his 
brothers David and Uzal, he formed the Ringwood Company, for the 
development of the iron mines and works in the upper part of the present 
Passaic County, New Jersey." Same books. Second Series, 1 779-1 780, 
volume 4, page 546, from the Royal Gazette, Number 400, of (Saturday) 
July 29, 1780: "On Tuesday last (25 July, 1780) died at Newark, in the 
6Sth year of his age, Uzal Ogden, Esq., a gentleman of undisembled good- 
ness, and universally esteemed." The footnote says: "Uzal Ogden, born 
171 3, was a son of David Ogden; he married Elizabeth Charlotte Thebaut, 
daughter of Gabriel Louis Thebaut, of the Island of Antigua. So early 
as 1740 he was associated with his brothers John and David in the pur- 
chase of the Ringwood iron mines in the upper part of the present Passaic 
County. He was Judge of the Essex County Common Pleas 1 743-1 762, 
one of the Surrogates of the Prerogative Court in the Eastern Division of 
New Jersey, 22 March, 1762, and in 1763 was appointed (High) SheriiT of 
the County. The newspaper notice given above is the only record we 
have of the date of his death, and of his age at death." 

He was for many years one of the leading merchants of Newark, New 
Jersey, where he lived. The 1897 printed New Jersey Archives, First 
Series, volume XIX, page 113: "Just imported from Bristol, in the Ship 
Two Friends, Captain Wadmore, by John and Uzal Ogden, and to be Sold 
cheap Wholesale and Retail at their Store at Newark, for ready Money 
or Country Produce at Market price. A choice Assortment of European 
Goods fit for the Season." This is from the New York Gazette, revived 
in the Weekly Post Boy, November 11, 1751. 

[i>3] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E VV 

The printed 1885 New Jersey Archives, volume IX, page 360: 

A Commission was Granted by His Excellency 
Josiah Hardy Esqr. Governor of the Province of New 
Jersey &c. to Charles Read Esqr. Secretary of the 
Province of New Jersey John Smyth, Andrew Smyth, 
and Jonathan Doane, of the City of Perth Amboy, 
Anthony White, and Jam.es Hudd Junr. of the City 
of New Brunswick, Robert Ogden of Elizabeth Town, 
Uzal Ogden and Lewis Ogden of Newark, John So- 
brisco of the County of Bergen, Jacob Dennis & Sam- 
ua! Leonard of the County of Monmouth, Appointing 
them and each of them Surrogates of the Prerogative 
Court in the Eastern Division of the Province of Nev,' 
Jersej', To Hold the same during Will & Pleasure, 
Dated at Perth Amboy the Twenty Second day of 
March in the Second year of the Reign Annoq. Dom. 
1762 with the Prerogative Seal thereto Affixed. 
Signed. 

Chas. Read. Regr. 

FIFTH GENERATION 

135. Elizabeth^ Ogden (Judge L'zal,^ Captain David,' David, = John'), 
born about 1730; died 27 September, 1832, aged 82 years; married about 
1770, Judge Robert Johnston; born about 1734, in Ireland; died 19 Jan- 
uary, 1823, aged 89 years (see page 87). 

Only two of their seven children are given in the printed 1907 Ogden 
Family Genealogy, on page 154: 

403 I. Margaret, = born 22 February, 1782; died 21 April, 1848; mar- 
ried 14 October, 1800, Elias Van Arsdale, Senior. They had 
six children: 

1134 I. Elias,' born 23 August, 1801 ; died 27 January, 1854. 

1 1 35 2. William,' born 30 September, 1802; died 22 .May, 

1885. 

[114] 



THE O G D E N LINE 



3. Margaret/ born , 1805; died 1 May, 1S06, 

aged one year. 

1136 4. Robert/ born 25 October, 1807; died 25 December, 

1873. 

1 1 37 5. Jacob," born 3 September, 1815; died 23 March, 

1864. 

1 138 6. Henry" (M.D.), born 6 September, 1819; died 25 

January-, 1864; married 11 December, 1849, Hes- 
ter Anne Wetmore; born 5 October, 1S26; died 20 
March, 1895; they had one son. 

404 2. Charlotte, 5 born about 1787; married about iSio, George W 

Niven, lawA'er; from 1S12 to 181 5 at Carmei, Putnam County, 
New York; went to Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New- 
York, then to New York City. They had two children: 

1139 I. Robert Johnston' Niven, born about 1812; died 1SS5. 

He had three children: 

William B. Niven, who married Miss Didima. 
Mary Eliza, who married William A. McKinney, 

and they have one child, Charlotte Niven. 
Charlotte, who married the Marquis de Sers of 

France. 

1 140 2. Eliza Jane' Niven, born about 1823; died 29 July, 

1893; married , William Hegeman; born 

about 1816; died 3 October, 1875; son of Adrian 
and Eliza (Balster) Hegeman. They had two 
children: 

I. William Ogden^ Hegeman, born . 

1140a 2. Elise Ann' Hegeman, born 16 Novem- 
ber, 1848; died 7 May, 1893; married 
her second cousin, 9 November, 1S71, 
Honorable Chauncey Mitchell Depew 
(see page 11). 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

Besides the above two children, EHzabeth^ Ogden and Judge Robert 
Jolinston had five other children: 

3. Mary/ born about 1771; died single; she was aged over 60 

years on the nth July, 1831. 

4. Eliza.^born about 1773; married about 1797, Daniel Delavan 

(see page 87 for their eight children). 

5. William Harkness,*^ born about 1779; married i May, 182 1, 

Susan Van Wyck; three children are on page 88. 

6. Anna MacArthur,6 born i November, 1785, at Lake Mahopac, 

Putnam County, New York; married about 1807, Chauncey 
Root Mitchell. 

7. Lucia, « born about 1789; married about 1821, Ward B 

Howard. 

Anna MacArthur"^ Johnston and Chauncey Root Mitchell had a 
daughter: 

Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 May, iSio, in Somers, Westchester 
County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New York, 
Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell* Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
■ 28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



1 16 



THE SWAYNE LINE 

I. William' Swayne, or Swaine, or Swain, born about 1585; death not 
found; the name of his wife is not known. 

They had three children: 

2 + 1. Samuel, = born about 1622; married about 1646, Joannah (Ward?}. 

3 2. Danieir born about 1624; married , 165 1, Dorcas Rose; 

they had nine children. 

4 3. iMaryr born about 1626; it is said she married and moved to New 

Haven, Connecticut, but we do not know to whom she was 
married. 

William' Swayne came from London, England, in April, 1635, in the 
"Elizabeth and Ann"; he was made a freeman in Watertown, Massachu- 
setts, 3 March, 1635-1636; he represented that town in May, 1636: he 
went to Wethersfield, Connecticut; he was one of the Commissioners 
appointed 3 March, 1635-1636 by the General Court "to govern the people 
at Conecticutt, with full Judicial powers"; he went, in 1644, to Branford, 
Connecticut, where he had 435 acres of land. These very early appoint- 
ments to office imply a good repute and a high reputation brought vvith 
him from England for character, administrative ability and dignity of 
position there. He was a member for Wethersfield, Connecticut, of the 
third General Court in the colony held i September, 1636, being called 
"Gentleman"; also he was a member of several later Courts and more 
than once chosen Assistant. When the Pequoids in May, 1637, came up 
the Connecticut River to Wethersfield, they killed several people "and 
carried away two maids," daughters of William Swayne, the eldest being 
aged about 16 years; both were later rescued from Pequot, now New Lon- 
don, Connecticut. 

See the printed 1892 Salisbury's Family Histories and Genealogies, 
volume 2, page 355; also the printed 1862 Genealogical Register, by 
James Savage, volume 4, page 235. 

[ny] 



C H R O N O L O G "l- AND ANCESTRY' OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

SECOND GENERATION 

2. Captain Samuel^ Swayne (William'), born about 1622; died before 
17 March, 1681-1682; married about 1646 Joannah (Ward?); she did not 
die before 5 December, 1690, as several authorities state, as is shown by 
her will given below. 

Captain Samuel^ and Joannah Swayne had nine children: 

5 I. Elizabeth,' born about 1647; bapt. i June, 1651, at New Haven, 

Connecticut; she died 3'oung. 

6 2. Mary,3 born i May, 1649; bapt. 1 June, 1651, at New Haven, 

Connecticut; died aged six years. 

7 3. Joanna, 3 born about 165 1; died 16 September, 1720, aged 69 

years; married -, Jasper Crane; he was born in 1630; 

they had six children. 
8+4. Elizabeth,' born 24 April, 1654; married, first, , her cousin, 

Josiah Ward; they had one son; married, second, about 1676, 

David Ogden. 
9 5. Phebe,' born 24 -May, 1655; she died }'oung. 

10 6. Mary,' born 12 June, 1656; she died young. 

11 7. Abigail,' born about 1657; married , Eleazer Lampson; no 

more trace. 

12 8. Christiana,' born 25 April, 1639; married , Nathaniel 

Ward; they had five children. 

13 9. Sarah,' born 7 October, 166 1 ; married , Thomas Johnson; 

they had five children. 

Captain Samuel= Swayne went in 1644 to Branford, Connecticut. He 
was 27 times a member of the General Court of Connecticut, between 25 
May, 1653, and 7 January, 1663; in 1667 he went to Newark, New Jersev. 
He had previously been a Lieutenant, but after the departure of Captain 
Robert Treat to Connecticut, Samuel Swayne was raised to the captaincy 
in 1673 of the Newark forces. He was from the beginning here one of the 
leading men and prominent in all the most important concerns of the 
Colony. 

f 118] 



THE S W A Y N E LINE 

The printed 1S53 Historical Discourse of the First Presbyterian Church 
of Newark, New Jerse\-, by Reverend Jonathan F. Stearns, page 33, has: 
Samuel Swaine deserves notice as having been constantly chosen for 
"the third man" among the deputies to the General Assembly to supply 
the place of either of the others who might fail, and as such having repre- 
sented the town of Newark, New Jersey, instead of Jasper Crane, in the 
first General Assembly ever held in the Province. He was a millwright 
by trade, and a Lieutenant by office. The old corn mill situated on "Mill 
Brook" near the present Stone Bridge, and erected by Lieutenant Swaine's 
skill, deserves a passing notice as among the primitive "public institutions" 
of our to\\'n upon Passaic River. It was the next considerable under- 
taking after the meeting house, and liberal offers were at first made to 
any who would volunteer in the work, "for the supply of the town with 
good grinding." But "none appearing to accept the town's motion and 
encouragement," the next step was "to set upon it in a general way; and 
moving to Lieutenant Swaine about the matter, he made some proposi- 
tions to the town," and they finally came to an agreement to give him for 
his services "twenty shillings by the week and three pounds over for his 
skill," unless, as the agreement ran, "he shall see cause to abate it, which, 
if he should see cause to do, the town will take it thankfully." On page 
82 Dr. Stearns has of Captain Swayne, that he "happening to be in New 
York when disease seized him, and death seemed to be not far, thus testi- 
fied the readiness of his spirit to answer the last summons: 1, Sam.uel 
Swaine, being in perfect sense and memory, not knowing how long the Lord 
will continue the same mercy to me, being weak under His good hand of 
Providence, and willing to be at His dispose — therefore for life or death to 
leave this as my last testament." The instrument is dated 17 March, 
i68'-i682, and gives all to his beloved v/ife, Joanna. It is recorded on 
page 35 of the Newark Town Book, dated 1691, now in the possession of 
the New Jersey Historical Society at Newark, New Jersey. 

Having come in 1635, Samuel Swayne was in this country from 45 to 
46 years. It may be presumed that he died in that illness, as his name 
does not appear after the list made in 16S0. 

The printed 1901 Archives of the State of New Jersey, volume XX II I, 
page 449, has an abstract of the will of Johanna Swain, widow of Samuel, 
no place of residence named, dated 25 March, 1692, proved 10 September, 

[119] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY' OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E I' E \V 

1693. It names daughter, Elizabeth Ogden; son-in-law, Eliezer Lampson; 
daughter, Abigail Lampson; son and daughter, Jasper and Johannah 
Crane; son and daughter, Nathaniel and Christian Ward; son and daughter, 
Thomas and Sarah Johnson; home lot in Newark, land at the .Mountain, 
land beyond the great swamp. Personal estate, a silver tea box. John 
Curtis and John Browne, overseers. Witnesses, John Browne and Joseph 
Harison. It is recorded in liber 2 1 , page 2 iS, of Essex County, New Jersey, 
Wills; and in liber E, page 165, of Deeds, at Trenton, New Jersey. 

8. Elizabeth' Swayne and David Ogden had a son, Captain David' 
Ogden, born about 1678; married about 1700, Abigail Hammond. 

Captain David' Ogden and Abigail Hammond had a son; 
Judge UzaP Ogden, born in 1712; married about 1729, Elizabeth Charlotte 
Thebaut. 

Judge Uzal5 Ogden and Elizabeth Charlotte Thebaut had a daughter; 
Elizabeth^ Ogden, born about 1750; married about 1770, Judge Robert 
Johnston. 

Elizabeth^ Ogden and Judge Robert Johnston had a daughter; 
Anna MacArthur' Johnston, born i November, 1785, at Lake .Mahopac, 
Putnam County, New York; married about 1807, Chauncey Root 
Mitchell. 

Anna MacArthur^ Johnston and Chauncey Root .Mitchell had a 
daughter; 
Martha .Minot' .Mitchell, born 2 .May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New 

York, Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot^ .Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey .Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1S34, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, .May Palmer. 



[ 120: 



THE ABBOTT LINE 

I. George' Abbott, Senior, born about 1620; died before n March, 
1690; married, first, about 1657, Mary= Weed; born about 1639; died after 
1672; daughter of Jonas^ and Mary Weed; married, second, after 1672, 

Mrs. Johanna Williamson, of Boston, Massachusetts; born ; died 

about 1681 ; no children by the second wife. 

George' and Mary (Weed) Abbott had seven children: 

2 I. John,= born about 1659; married, first, , Ruth Ruscoe; 

they had three children; married, second, , Ruth Betts, 

daughter of Thomas and Mary Betts; no children by the second 
wife. 

3+2. Dorcas,' born about 1661 ; married about 16S4, John Root. 

4 3. Priscilla,- born about 1663; married , (Eleazer?) Slauson; 

no more trace. 

5 4. Mary,2 born about 1665; married after 1689, Jackson; no 

more trace. 

6 5. Jonathan, 2 born about 1667; married 5 June, 1696, Sarah Olmsted; 

they had nine children. 

7 6. George,' born in the year 1669; married , Hannah Hayes; 

they had eleven children. 

8 7. Daniel,' born in the year 1672; alive in 1709; name of his wife is 

not known; they had eight children. 

George' Abbott was in 1640 in Windsor, Connecticut, where he had 
been somewhat indiscreet, probably, in that he sold ammunition to the 
red men, a pistol and powder, a serious Colonial offense, and he was fined 
five pounds for his imprudence. Afterwards, in 1647 or 1648, he went to 
Hartford, Connecticut, where he fell into some trouble, but he found his v/ay 

[12!] 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

to Nonvalk, Connecticut, where he has mention in 1655: his home-lot 
was not on the "Towne Street" but comprised a territory-sHce just north 
of the Le Count family house in East Norwalk. The printed 1S47 History 
of Norwalk, Connecticut, by Reverend Edwin Hall: 9 November, 1671, 
the estate of George "Abbet" was a 75 pound Estate for the children. 
At the aforesaid meeting voted and agreed on, that every one of our 
inhabitants that have not as yet had any estate for their "childring," shall 
have five pounds for every "childe" now in being, to be added to their 
father's estate, and this is to take place in the land that is now layed out 
in ye Indian feild, and not before. On page 62, "Geo. Abbot, 7 Cliildren." 
On page 84: "The Estates of Commonage of the Inhabitants of Nor- 
walk, Presented and Accepted b>' the towne, January the 3d, 1687 — 
George Abitt sen. 125 pounds." He was marshall from 1659 to 1661; 
townsman, 1664; pounder, 1667 and 1668 (his yard for a pound); Sergeant 
Abbott was surveyor in 16SS. See the printed 1896 History of Norwalk, 
Connecticut, by Reverend Charles M. Selleck; also the printed iSCo 
Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage, volume i, page 3. 

The Fairfield, Connecticut, Probate Records, liber 3, dated 1675 per 

1689, has the will of Johanna Abbot, of Norwalk, 19 March, 1682. The 
inventory was taken by John Piatt and Thomas Fitch, Jr., and Jam.es 
Olmstead; George Abbot was added to the above by the court; a special 
court distributed the estate to James Williamson, a son of the deceased 
Johanna Abbot, the daughters, Elizabeth and Sarah, both being under age. 

The Fairfield, Connecticut, Probate Records, liber 4, dated 1689 per 
1701, has the will of George "Abbut," of Norwalk (he died — February, 
1689-1690 in Norwalk), dated 2 May, 1689; proved 4 February, 1690 or 
II March, 1690; names John, the eldest son; Jonathan, Daniel, aged about 
17 years; George, aged 20 years; Dorcas Root; "Precila Slauson"; Mary 
Jackson; son John, executor, and Mark St. John, administrators; wit- 
nesses, Richard Holms and Mathyas Sention, jr.; inventory, 12 March, 

1690, by Walter Hoyt and John Bouton and Samuel Hayes. 

See the typewritten abstracts of Probate Records of Fairfield, Con- 
necticut, published by William A. Eardeley, in four volumes. 

3. Dorcas^ Abbott and John Root had a son: 

Joseph^ Root, bapt. — June, 1698; married about 1720, Susanna . 

[122] 



THE ABBOTT LINE 



Joseph^ Root and Susanna had a daughter: 

Olive^ Root, horn 4 March, 1726; married 21 January, 1747, Captain 
Asahel Mitchell. 

Olive-* Root and Captain Asahel Mitchell had a son: 
Reverend Justus' Mitchell, bapt. 8 September, 1754, in Woodbury, Con- 
necticut; married 7 September, 1779, Martha Sherman. 

Reverend Justus^ Mitchell and Martha Sherman had a son: 
Chauncy Root^ Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root^ Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 May, 18 10, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1S32, in Peekskill, New York. 

Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell' Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; mar.ned, second, 
28 December, 1901, .May Palmer. 



[123] 



THE WEED LINE 

I. Jonas^ Weed, born about 1610; died before 5 April, 1676; married 
about 1637, Mary ; she died before 10 March, i6go. 

Jonas' and Mary Weed had nine children: 

2 I. Elizabeth, 2 born about 1638; married about 1658, John Rock- 
well, of Rye, New York; they had three children. 

3+2. Mary,= born about 1639; married about 1657, George^ Abbott. 

4 3. Dorcas,' born about 1641; married 20 November, 1660, Jam.es 

Wright, of Wethersfield and Middletown, Connecticut; they 
had five children. 

5 4. John,= born about 1643; married, first, before February, 1664, 

Joanna Westcoat; they had four children; married, second, 
before 1678, Marah (Firman?); they had four children. 

6 5. Samuel, 2 born about 1645; married , iMary ; they 

had four children; they went to Danbury, Connecticut. 

7 6. Jonas,- born about 1647; married 16 (or 6) November, 1677, 

Bethia' Holly; they had four children. 

8 7. Hannah, = born about 1650; died 9 November, 171 1; married 5 

January, 1670, Benjamin^ Hoyt; they had six children. 

9 8. Daniel, = born about 1652; married about 1673, Ruth ■ — ; they 

had six children; widow Ruth married, second, 25 July, 1705, 
Peter Ferris; she married, third, 19 January, 1707- 1708, John 
Clapp. 

10 9. Sarah, = born about 1654; married, first, 11 August, 1698, Lieu- 
tenant David= Waterburv'; married, second, after 20 Novem- 
ber, 1706, Benjamin Ferris; married, third, 20 September, 
171 1, Nathaniel Pond; she probably had no children. 

[125] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

Jonas' Weed came in 1630 in Winthrop's fleet to Watertown, Massa- 
chusetts; freeman, 18 iMay, 1631 ; to W'ethersfield, Connecticut, in 1635; to 
Stamford, Connecticut, in 1642; he resigned 29 March, 1636, from the 
Church at Watertown to the Church at W'ethersfield. He gave in 1671 to 
his son Jonas the house where he was then Hving. Descendants have been 
very numerous around Stamford, and have always been among the most 
prominent citizens. 

The F'airfield, Connecticut, Probate Records, liber 3, dated 1675 per 
1689, has the will of Jonas Weed, Senr., no residence named, dated 26 
November, 1672; nam.es his widow, Mary; John, the eldest son; Daniel, 
Jonas, Samuel; daughters, Mary Abbot, wife of George, and Dorcas Wright, 
wife of James; gives unto John Rockwell five shillings and leaves five 
pounds' value in Daniel's hands for Elizabeth; daughter, Sarah; daughter, 
Hannah Hoit, wife of Benjamin; witnesses, Jonathan Bell and Abraham 
Ambler; inventory taken 5 March, 1676, by Mr. Richard Lawes and 
Lieutenant Francis Bell, before John Holly, Commissioner. The same 
records contain the will, 10 March, 1690, of widow Mary Weed, of Stanford; 
inventory by Abraham Ambler and Daniel Scofield; Jonas Weed "swares" 
to his mother's estate and is made administrator. The widow, Mary, with 
her two sons, Daniel and John Weed, administer the estate of Jonas Weed, 
Sr. See the printed 1868 History of Stamford, Connecticut, by Reverend 
Elijah Baldwin Huntington, page 45; also the printed 1862 Genealogical 
Dictionary, by James Savage, volume 4, page 451; also the large manu- 
script Weed Genealogy, by William A. Eardeley, and the published type- 
written Probate Records of Fairfield, Connecticut, in four volumes. 

3. Mary- Weed and George Abbott had a daughter: 
Dorcas' Abbott, born about 1661 ; married about 1684 John Root. 

Dorcas' Abbott and John Root had a son: 
Joseph^ Root, bapt. — June, 1698; married about 1720, Susanna . 



Joseph^ Root and Susanna had a daughter: 

Olive^ Root, born 4 March, 1726; married 21 January, 1747, Captain 
Asahel Mitchell. 

[126] 



■^ i -i3aoi 



THE WEED LINE 



Olive' Root and Captain Asahel Mitchell had a son: 
Reverend Justus^ Mitchell, bapt. 8 September, 1754, in Woodbury, Con- 
necticut; married 7 September, 1779, Martha Sherman. 

Reverend Justus^ Mitchell and Martha Sherm.an had a son: 
Chauncey Root' Mitchell, born 25 June, 17S6; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root' Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot^ Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New ^'ork, 

Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 

Chauncey Mitchell Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New "i'ork; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



[ 127 



THE WELLINGTON LINE 

I. Roger' Wellington, born about 1607-1608 in England; died 11 
March, 1697-1698, in Watertown. Massachusetts; married about 1636, 
Mary Palgrave; born about 1619: died 21 January, 1695; eldest daughter 
of Dr. Richard^ and Anna Palgrave. 

They had six children, born in Watertown: 

2 I. John, = born 25 July, 163S; married 9 June, 16S1, Susanna Straight; 

they had no children. 

3 2. Mary,= born 10 February, 1640-1641; married, first, 2! May, 

1662, Henry Maddock; they had one child; married, second, 16 
September, 1679, John Coolidge, Jr.; they had one child. 

4 3. Joseph,^ born 9 October, 1643; married, first, .Sarah ; 

they had no children; married, second, 6 June, 16S4, Elizabeth 
Straight; they had four children. 

5 + 4. Benjam in ,' born about 1646; married 7 December, 1671, Elizabeth 

Sweetman. 

6 5. Oliver,^ born 23 November, 1648; married , Widow Anna 

Livermore, daughter of Matthew Bridge; they had no children. 

7 6. Palgrave, = born about 1650; married 29 January, 1689-1690, 

Sarah Bond; they had no children; he was a physician in Water- 
town, Massachusetts. 

Roger' Wellington, the Planter, came in 1630 to New England; his 
name is on the earliest extant list of Watertown proprietors; he was made 
a freeman 18 April, 1690; he owned land, 14 acres, purchased in 1636, in 
what is now Belmont, Massachusetts; one of his farms was a part of the 
present Mt. Auburn Cemetery. In 1642 mention is made of a new house, 
barns and the purchase of 16 acres of meadow land near Fresh Pond. 

His will, dated 17 December, 1697, was proved 11 April, 1698. 

[ 129] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

See the printed 1S55 History of Watertown, Massachusetts, by Dr. 
Henry Bond, pages 627 and 963; also the printed 1892 WeUington Geneal- 
ogy; also the printed 1S62 Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage, 
volume 4, page 4S0; also the printed 1877 History of Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, by Lucius R. Paige, page 6S2. 

SECOND GENERATION 

5. Benjamin^ Wellington (Roger'), born about 1646; died 8 January, 
1709-1710, in Watertown, Massachusetts; married 7 December, 1671, 
Elizabeth Sweetman; born 6 January, 1647; death not found; daughter of 
Thomas and Isabel Sweetman, of Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

They had eight children: 

14 I. Elizabeth,' born 29 December, 1673: married about 1692, John 

Fay, of Marlboro, Massachusetts; they had ten children. 

15 2. Benjamin, s born 21 June, 1676; married, first, 16 January, 

1698-1699, Lydia Brown; they had four children; married, 
second, 25 December, 17 12, Elizabeth Phipps; they had tv.'o 
children; went to Lexington, Massachusetts; married, third, 
31 October, 1731, Mary Whitney; they had two children. 

16 3. John, 3 born 26 July, 1678; married 19 May, 1699, Hannah Morse; 

they had six children. 

17 4. Ebenezer,^ born about 1680; married 28 January, 1703, Deliver- 

ance Brown; they had seven children. 

18 5. Ruhamah, 2 born about 1682; married 15 November, 1699, Deacon 

Joseph Brown; they had five children. 

19 +5. Mehitable,^ bapt. 4 .March, 1687-16S8; m.arried 13 September, 

1715, William Sherman, of Newton, Massachusetts. 

20 7. Joseph, 3 bapt. 4 January, 1690-1691; married , Hannah 

; they had one child. 

21 8. Roger, ^ born about 1692; he went to sea; no more trace. 

Benjamin^ Wellington was admitted a freeman — December, 1677. 
He made his will 13 July, 1709; proved 30 January, 1710; his inventory 
totalled 439 pounds, 17 shillings, and 6 pence. 

[130] 



THE WELLINGTON LINE 



19. iMehitable' Wellington and William Sherman had a son: 

Reverend Josiah^ Sherman, born 2 April, 1729; married 24 January, 1757, 
Martha iMinott. 

Reverend Josiah^ Sherman and Martha Minot had a daughter: 

Martha^ Sherman, born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

Martha^ Sherman and Reverend Justus Mitchell had a son: 

Chauncey Root« Mitchell, born 25 June, 17S6; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root« xMitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 

Martha Minot^ Mitchell, born 2 May, iSio, in Somers, Westchester 
County, New York; married 26 December, 1S32, in Peekskill, New York, 
Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second. 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



'3' 



THE PALGRAVE LINE 

Dr. Richard' Palgrave, born about 1590, in England; died before i 
October, 1651, in Charlestown. Massachusetts; married about 1617, Anna 

; born ; buried 17 March, 1668-1669, aged 75 years, in Rox- 

bury, Massachusetts. 

They had seven children: 

1. Mary,= born about 1619, in England; married about 1636, Roger' 

WeUington. 

2. Sarah, = born about 1621, in England; married about 1645, Dr. John 

Alcock, of Roxbury, Massachusetts; they had eight children; he 
graduated in 1646 from Harvard College. 

3. Elizabeth, = born about 1623, in England; probably married , 

Thomas Cooper, of New England. 

4. Rebecca,^ born 25-5 mo. (July), 1631, in Boston, Massachusetts: 

probably married , William Dade, of Charlestown, Massa- 
chusetts. 

5. John,= born 6-1 mo. (.March), 1634-1635; bapt. in Boston, Massachu- 

setts, 9 March, 1634- 1635; married 8 February, 1656, Mary Mave- 
rick; they had no children. 

6. Lydia,= born 15-11 mo. (January), 1635-1636; married , Edmund 

Heylett, of Stepney, England. 

7. Bethya,= born 10-5 mo. (July), 1638; died 21-6 mo. (August), 1638. 

Dr. Richard' Palgrave was one of the first physicians of Charlestown, 
Massachusetts, where he was called "a right godly man and skill full 
surgeon." He applied 30 October, 1630, to be admitted a freeman, and 
he was admitted a freeman on 18 May, 1631; he came in Winthrop's 
1630 fleet; he was a member of the Church at Boston, Massachusetts, 

[133] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CMAUNCEY M . DEPEW 

where he was number 105, and his wife was number 106. Charlestown, 
Massachusetts, "At a meeting of the Inhabitants the 10th of January, 
1634, It was also agreed yt ye Inhabitants under mentioned have planting 
ground laid out unto them between the east end of the lotts above men- 
tioned at the Creek, having New Town pale on the south, vizt. Mr. Rich'd. 
Palsgrave, one acre." His will is dated 4 June, 1651; inventory dated i 
October, 1651, was 313 pounds, and 8 pence. 

His widow, Anna, was in Stepney, County Middlesex, England, 27 
March, 1656, but she returned to New England and made her will at Rox- 
bury, Massachusetts, 11 .March, 1668- 1669; proved i May, 1669. 

See the printed 1855 History of Watertown, .Massachusetts, by Dr. 
Henry Bond, page 627; also the printed 1861 Genealogical Dictionary, by 
James Savage, volume 4, page 339; also the printed 1886 Sands Family 
Genealogy, by Temple Prime, page 66. 

I. Mary= Palgrave and Roger Wellington had a son: 
Benjamin' Wellington, born about 1646; married 7 December, 1671, Eliza- 
beth Sweetman. 

Benjamin^ Wellington and Elizabeth Sweetman had a daughter: 
Mehitable^ Wellington, bapt. 4 .March, i687-!688; married 13 September, 
171 5, William Sherman. 

Mehitable* Wellington and William Sherman had a son: 
Reverend Josiah^ Sherm.an, born 2 April, 1729; married 24 January, 1757, 
Martha Minott. 

Reverend Josiah^ Sherman and Martha Minot had a daughter: 
Martha" Sherman, born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

Martha^ Sherman and Reverend Justus .Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Root' Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root' Mitchell and Anna xMac.Arthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 

[134] 



THE P A L G R A V E LINE 



Martha Minot' .Mitchell, born 2 May, iSio, in Somers, Westchester 
County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New York, 
Isaac Depew, Esq. 

.Martha Minot^ Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey .Mitchell' Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, .May Palmer. 



['33] 



THE WINSHIP LINE 

Lieutenant Edward' Winship, born about 1613, in England; died 2 
December, 168S, aged in his 76th year, in Cambridge, Massaciiusetts; 

married, first, about 1636, Jane , probably a daughter of widow 

Isabel Wilkinson; they had five children; married, second, about 1651, 
Elizabeth Parke; born about 1631; died 19 November, 1690, aged in her 
58th year, in Cambridge; daughter of Richard' and Margery Parks. 

Edward' and Jane Winship had five children: 

1. Sarah,= born — 2 mo. (April), 163S, in Boston. Massachusetts; mar- 

ried 29 September, 1659, James Hubbard; they had two children. 

2. Mary,= born 2-5 mo. (July), 1641; married 8 November, 1664, Eoaz 

Brown; they had four children; she was born in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

3. Ephraim,= born in Boston 29-4 mo. (June), 1643; married, first, 7 

April, 1670, Hannah Rayner; married, second, 9 November, i6-j^, 
Elizabeth Kendall, of Woburn, Massachusetts; he had no children. 

4. Joanna,= born in Boston 1-6 mo. (August), 1645; died, single, 19 

November, 1707. 

5. Edward,- born 8 June, 1648; buried the same day. 

Edward' and Elizabeth (Parke) Winship had seven children : 

6. Elizabeth,^ born 15 April, 1652; married 18 November, 1673, Joseph 

Sherman. 

7. Edward, = born 3 March, 1654; married 14 May, 1683, Rebecca Bar- 

sham; they had seven children. 

8. Abigail, 2 born 13 February, 1656; married 18 March, 1682-1683, 

William Russell; they had four children. 

[•37] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

9. Samuel, = born 24 October, 1658; married 12 April, 1687, Mary Poulter; 
they had five children. 

10. Joseph,^ born 21 June, 1661 ; bapt. 25 August, 1661 ; married , 

Sarah ; they had seven children. 

11. Margery,^ born 11 December, 1665; bapt. 5 February, 1666; married 

12 May, 1687, John Dickson; they had six children. 

12. Mehitable,= born 14 November, 1667; bapt. 17 November, 1667; no 

more trace. 

Edward' Winship was in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1635; he was 
admitted a member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company in 
1638; he was an Ensign; Lieutenant of Militia, in 1660; Deputy to the 
Genera! Court 1663 and 1664, and 1681 to 1686, of Massachusetts Bay 
Colony; freeman 4 March, 1 634-1 635; selectman for 14 years, between 
1637 and 1684. His original estate at Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 
1887 was still in the family. Edward' Winship was one of the most active 
and energetic inhabitants for many years in Cambridge. 

The widow Isabel Wilkinson was early in Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
and had several grants of land; she probably resided in the family of Edward 
Winship, with whom she owned certain lands in common; she died 23 
February, 1655; she had two daughters: 

1. Margaret, born ; married , 1639, Edward GolTe. 

2. Jane, born ; married about 1636, Edv/ard Winship. 

Joanna^ Winship, daughter of Edv\'ard,' devoted herself to the instruc- 
tion of children, and her services appear to have been regarded with great 
favor. She was honored with the appellation of "Mrs.," and her epitaph 
contains a homely but affectionate eulogy of the dead and lamentation 
for the living. On her grave stone, still standing in the old burying-place, is 

"Here lyes the body of Mrs. Joanna Winship, aged 62 years, who 
departed this life November the 19th. 1707. 
"This good school dame 

No longer school must keep, 
Which gives us cause 

For children's sake to weep." 

[138] 



THE W I N S H I P LINE 



Sec the printed 1887 American Ancestry, by Joel Munsell, volume 1, 
pjge 96; also the printed 1S62 Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage, 
volume 4, page 597; also the printed 1S77 History of Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, by Lucius R. Paige, page 695. 

6. Elizabeth^ Winship and Joseph Sherman had a son: 
William' Sherman, born 28 June, 1692; married 3 September, 1715, Alehit- 
able Wellington. 

William' Sherman and .Mehitable Wellington had a son: 
Reverend Josiah^ Sherman, born 2 April, 1729; married 24 January, 1757, 
Martha Minott. 

Reverend Josiah^ Sherman and Martha Minot had a daughter: 
Martha^ Sherman, born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

Martha' Sherman and Reverend Justus Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Root« Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
McArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root« Mitchell and Anna .MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 

Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 
County, New York; married 26 December, 1S32, in Peekskill, New York, 
Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha .Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegem.an; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



139 



THE PALMER LINE 

William' Palmer, born about 1590, in England: his death has not been 

found; married about 1616, Ann ; her death has not been found; 

she married, second, , Francis Plumer. 

William' and Ann Palmer had fwe children: 

1. Martha,^ born about 161S; married about 1638, Captain John Sherman. 

2. Edward, = born about 1620; resided in 1641 in Hampton, New Hamp- 

shire; no more trace. 

3. Christopher,^ born about 1624; married 7 November, 1650, Susanna 

Hilton; they had one child. 

4. Stephen, = born about 1626: given by Dr. Bond but not by Dow. 

5. Joseph, = born about 1630: married 25 January, 1677, Deborah Batchel- 

der; they had eight children; given by Dow but not by Bond. 

William' Palmer was in Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1636-1637; he 
went to Newbury, Massachusetts, about 1637: to Piscataqua, now Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire; to Winnacunnet, now Hampton, New Hamp- 
shire; he was made a freeman 13 March, 1638-1639; he was probabl>" from 
Great Ormsby, County Norfolk, England, as about the year 1650 he 
agreed to release to his son-in-law. Captain John Sherman, of Watertown, 
Massachusetts, land in Great Ormsby. 

See the printed 1855 History of Watertown, Massachusetts, by Dr. 
Henry Bond, page 865: also page 621, of the 1877 printed History of Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, by Lucius R. Paige; also the printed 1893 History 
of Hampton, New Hampshire, by Dow, volume 2, page 899. 

Martha^ Palmer and Captain John Sherman had a son: 
Joseph^ Sherman, born 14-3 mo., 1650; married 18 November, 1673, 
Elizabeth Winship. 

[141] 



U '•■ 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

Joseph' Sherman and Eh'zabeth Winship had a son: 
Wilh'anr' Sherman, born 28 June, 1692; married 3 September, 1715, Mehit- 
able Welhngton. 

William* Sherman and Mehitable Wellington had a son: 
Reverend Josiah^ Sherman, born 2 April, 1729; married 24 January, 1757, 
Martha .Minott. 

Reverend Josiah' Sherman and Martha Minot had a daughter: 
Martha^ Sherman, born 8 December, 175S; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

Martha^ Sherman and Reverend Justus Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Root" Mitchell, born 25 June, 17S6; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root' Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 May, iSio, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, Nev/ York, 

Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell' Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1S71, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



142 



THE MINOT LINE 

I. Elder George- Minot fjohn'), born 4 August, 1594, in England; 
died 24 December, 1671, aged in his 78th year, in Dorchester, Massachu- 
setts; married about 1622, Martha ; born about 1597; died 23 

December, 1657, aged about 60 years, in Dorchester, Massachusetts; her 
parentage not yet found. 

They had five children: 

I. George,' bapt. in England 11 July, 1624; buried there 20 May, 
1626. 

2+2. Captain John,' born in England 2 April, 1626; bapt. in England 
10 April, 1626; married, first, 19 May, 1647, Lydia Butler; mar- 
ried, second, after January, 1667, the widow Mary Biggs. 

3 3. James,' born in England 31 December, 1628; bapt. in England 6 

January, 1628-1629; married, first, 9 December, 1653, Hannah 
Stoughton; they had eight children; married, second, 21 May, 
1673, Hepzibah Corlet; they had no children. 

4 4. Stephen,' born in England 2 May, 1631 ; bapt. in England 9 May, 

1631; married 10 November, 1654, Truecross Davenport: they 
had five children. 

5 5. Samuel,' born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, 18 May, 1635; went 

to Boston, Massachusetts; married 23 June, 1670, Hannah 
Howard; they had five children. 

Elder George- Minot sailed from Plymouth, England, 20 .March, 
1630, and probably came on the "Mary and John"; he was in Dorchester, 
Massachusetts, 30 May, 1630. near the Neponset Bridge, and he owned the 
land which had been known as "Squantum"; he was made a freeman on 
the 1st of April, 1634; he was representative in 1635 and 1636; he was a 
ruling elder for thirty _\'ears; his position was one of prominence in Dor- 

[143] 



CHRONOLOGY- AND A >> C E S T R Y OF C H A U N C E Y ^\ . D E P E W 

Chester, as on the 28th of October, 1634, he was one of the ten men chosen 
to order the affairs of the Dorchester Plantation. His connection with the 
Church was also a prominent one, as his name was the third am^ong the 
seven who signed the Covenant on the 23rd of August, 1636. His grave- 
stone has: 

"Here Lie The Bodies of Unitie Humphrey and Shining Minot, 
such names as these, they never die not." 

He acted as attorney for Robert Barrington. He was among the first 
Pilgrim emigrants to Massachusetts and of the first settlers of Dorchester. 
The records say: "His death was much lamented by the town, whose 
weal he sought and liberties defended." His will is recorded in liber 8, 
page 189, of Suffolk County, Massachusetts, records; his inventory was 
277 pounds, 7 shillings, 7 pence. 

The printed 1897 Minot Genealogy, by Joseph G. Minot, gives the 
coat-of-arms, and says: Thomas Minot, of Saffron-Walden, County Essex, 

England, married , a daughter of Thomas de Hasilden, of L.ittie 

Chesterfield, England: he was Secretary to the Abbott of Walden, Eng- 
land, by whom he was left great possessions. This Thomas Minot left 
two children : 

1. Richard, born ; married , widow Joan Thome. 

2. John, born ; married , to ; they had a son, 

William Minot, born ; married , to . 

This William Minot had a son, John' Minot, born ; married 

, Ann . 

John' and Ann Minot had five children: 

1. Margaret, = bapt. in England, 5 September, 1585; no miore trace. 

2. Mary, 2 bapt. in England, 5 May, 1588; no more trace. 

3. John,= bapt. in England, 29 March, 1590; no more trace. 

4. George,- born in England, 4 August, 1 594 ; bapt. in England, 20 Novem- 

ber, 1394; married about 1622, Martha ; they came to New 

England. 

5. William,- bapt. in England, , 1596; no more trace. 

[ '44] 



THE M I N O T LINE 



See the printed iS6i Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage, vol- 
ume 3, page 216; the printed 1S47 New England Historic and Genealogical 
Register, volume i, pages 176 and 256; also the printed 1SS7 Old Families 
of Concord, Massachusetts, by Potter, page 12; also the printed 1835 His- 
tory of Concord, Massachusetts, by Lemuel Shattuck, page 329. 

THIRD GENER.ATION 

2. Captain John^ Minot (Elder George,- johnO, born 2 April, 1626, 
in England; died 12 August, 1669, at the early age of 43 years, in Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts; married, first, by Governor Thomas Dudley, 19 
May, 1647, Lydia= Butler; born about 1622: died 24 January, 1667, in 
Dorchester, Massachusetts; daughter of Nicholas' and Joice Butler. 

Captain John^ and Lydia (Butler) Minot had six children, all horn in 
Dorchester, Massachusetts: 

6 I. John,^ born 22 Januar}-, 1648; married 11 March, 1670, Elizabeth 
Breck; they had five children. 

7+2. James,^ born 14 September, 1653; married about 1684, Rebecca 
Wheeler. 

3. Martha, ^ born 22-7 mo. (September), 1637; died 23 November, 
1678; she was engaged to marry John Morgan, Jr. 

8 4. Stephen, < born 10 August, 1662; married i December, 1686, Mary 

Clark; they had twelve children. 

9 5. Samuel, ^ born 3 July, 1665; married , Hannah Jones, of 

Concord, Massachusetts; they had one child. 

6. A child, < born about 1667; died in infancy; it is supposed the name 
was Mary. 

Captain John' Minot married, second, after January, 1667, Mary, the 
widow of John Biggs, of Boston, Massachusetts, and daughter of John 
Dassert; she died — July, 1677; she made her will 5 June, 1676: proved 27 
July, 1676; recorded in volume 6, page 262, of Suffolk County, Massa- 
chusetts, records; the second wife had no children. John' Minot resided 
in Dorchester, where he was made a freeman in 1665, the delay being due 

[145] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 



to his persistence in refraining from membership in the Church, which 
was a quahfication for a freeman. 

The printed 1894 New England Historic and Genealogical Register, 
volume 48, page 325, has from the Suffolk County, Massachusetts, records. 
Number 515, liber 6, page 39, an abstract of the will of John Minot, of 
Dorchester, dated 15 July, 1669; it provides for the necessity of his father. 
His wife to dwell in the house and have fifty pounds. His son John one 
hundred pounds over an equal dividend with the rest of the children. 
His daughter Martha, as a particular remembrance of her mother, all her 
mother's clothes and linen. His son Stephen to be placed at some con- 
venient trade. His son Samuel to be brought up as a husbandman (i.e., 
a farmer) and have his portion in land. The estate is not to be divided 
till James is twenty-one. There are other provisions for the division. 
Martha is to be under mother's care, and James, Samuel and Stephen to 
be under the e.xecutors' care. Father Minot, brother Stephen, and my 
son John are to be the executors. Witnesses were Thomas Wilson and 
Timothy Foster. His inventory was taken 28 January, 1669-1670, by 
John Gurnell and Thomas Tileston and Roger Billing, and is recorded in 
volume 6, page 40, of the Suffolk County, .Massachusetts, records. 

FOURTH GENERATION 

7. Captain James* Minot, Esq. (Captain John,' Elder George,^ John'), 
born 14 September, 1653, in Dorchester, Massachusetts; died 20 Septem- 
ber, 1735, aged 83 years, in Concord, Massachusetts; married about 1684, 
Rebecca Wheeler; born about 1666 in Concord; died in Concord 23 Sep- 
tember, 1734, aged 68 years; daughter of Captain Timothy and Mary 
Wheeler. 

They had ten children: 

1. Rebecca, 5 born 9 February, 1685; married 24 December, 1701, 

Captain Joseph Barrett; they had eight children. 

2. Lydia,5 born 12 March, 1687; married, first, 3 January, 1705; 

Captain Benjamin Barrett; they had eight children; married, 
second, , Samuel Stow. 

[146] 



THE M ! N O T LINE 



3. Mary/ born 16 November. 1689; married 26 Septem.ber (or 
December), 1706, Ebenezer Wheeler; they had six children. 
!2 4. Reverend Timothy, 5 born 18 June, 1692; graduated in lyiSfrom 

Harvard College; married, first, , Mary Brooks; they 

had three children; married, second, , Beulah Brown, a 

widow. 

13 + 5. Colonel James, = born 17 October, 1694; married, first, 14 Novem- 

ber, 1716, Martha Lane; married, second, 9 October, 1735, the 
v^'idow Elizabeth (Wilder) Merrick. 

6. Elizabeth, 5 born 29 January, 1697; married 23 April, 1715, 

Captain Daniel Adams; they had eight children. 

7. Martha, 5 born 3 April, 1699; married 30 April, 171 5, James 

Lane, of Billerica, Massachusetts. 

8. Love, 5 born a twin, 15 April, 1702; married, first, 13 December, 

1722, John Adams; they had two children; married, second, 
, Edward Flint. 

9. Mercy,' born a twin, 15 April, 1702; married 13 December, 1722, 

Samuel Dakin; they had twelve children. 

14 10. Samuel, = born 25 March, 1706; married, first, 7 March, 1732, 

Sarah Prescott, of Westford, Massachusetts; they had three 
children; married, second, about 1738, Dorcas Prescott, a 
sister of Sarah; they had five children. 

Captain James^ Minot graduated from Harvard College in 1675; he 
was a preacher in 1685; he also practised physic; he was a Captain and a 
Justice of the Peace in 1692; he taught school for several years in Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts; he went in 16S0 to Concord, Massachusetts; he 
was made a freeman in 1690. 

The printed 1835 History of Concord, Massachusetts, Lemuel by 
Shattuck, on page 379, says: Captain James* .Minot, while a resident 
here, was in 1685, employed as a preacher in Stow, Massachusetts, for 
"twelve shillings and six pence, per day, one half cash and one half Indian 
corn," and in 1686 "for what older towns had given their ministers — 13 
pounds for 13 Sabbaths." He was a representative, and eminently a use- 

[147] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. UEPEW 

ful man. Tradition accords to him a character worthy the following 
epitaph, which is engraven on his gravestone: 

"Here is interred the remains of 
JAiMES Ml NOT Esq A M an 
Excelling Grammarian, Enriched 
with the Gift of Prayers and Preaching, 
a Commanding Oflker, a Physician of 
Great Value, a Great Lover of Peace 
as well as of Justice, and which was 
His greatest Glory, a Gent'n of distinguished 
Virtue and Goodness, happy in a Virtuous 
Posterity, and living Religiously Died 
Comfortably, Sept. 20, 1735 AET. 83." 

Both James Minot and his wife are interred in the Hill Burying Ground, 
Concord, Massachusetts. 

"Here is interred the body of 

Mrs. Rebecca Minot ye virtuous 

Consort of James .Minot Esq. 

(and daughter of Capt. Timothy Wheeler) 

She was a person of 

Serious piety and abounding 

charity, of great usefullness 

in Her Day, and a pattern 

of Patience and holy 

Submission under a long 

Confinement, and resigned Her 

Soul with Joy in her 

Redeemer Sept. 23, 1734 

aged 68." 

In the above family, two sisters married two brothers by the name of 
Barrett, two other sisters married brothers by the name of Adams, a 
brother and a sister married a brother and sister by the name of Lane, 
and two were born on the same day and married the same day. There are 
few parents who have so great reason to be "happy in a virtuous posterity" 

[148] 



THE M I N O T LINE 



as had these. One son, Timothy, was a minister; another, Samuel, was a 
deacon, and eight of the grandchildren were deacons or married to deacons; 
several were clergymen or married to clergymen. Very many of the great- 
grandchildren sustained the same offices, or were otherwise distinguished 
in military, civil or religious life. A large proportion of those who arrived 
at mature age professed religion, and the succeeding and numerous fam- 
ilies were among the most respected, useful and influential in the towns in 
which they lived. 

Very many distinguished men descended from them, am.ong whom 
were Reverend Stephen Farrar and Honorable Timothy Farrar, of New 
Ipswich, New Hampshire; Roger Minot Sherman, of Fairfield, Connecticut, 
and several eminent physicians by the name of Adams, and Honorable 
Roger Sherman and several other distinguished men of New Haven, Con- 
necticut, married descendants. 

Firm GENER.ATION 

13. Honorable and Colonel James^ Minot (Captain James, ^ Captain 
John,^ Elder George, = John'), born 17 October, 1694, in Concord, Aiassa- 
chusett; died there 6 February, 1759, aged 64 years; married, first, 14 
November, 17 16, .Martha Lane; born i October, 1694; died 18 January, 
1 734-1 735; daughter of Colonel John and Susanna Lane, of Billerica, 
Massachusetts; they had three children; married, second, 9 October, 1735 

Elizabeth, the widow of Tilley' Merrick; she was born , 1705; she 

died 13 September, 1779; the daughter of Ephrain and Elizabeth Wilder, of 
Lancaster, Massachusetts; the widow Elizabeth Minot married, third, 
10 May, 1763, Reverend Daniel Rogers, of Littleton, Massachusetts. 

James' and Martha (Lane) Minot had three children: 

21 I. John, 8 born 31 August, 1717; married 26 January, 1744, Sarah 
Stow; they had one child. 

2. Rebecca,^ born 15 May, 1720; married 12 August, 174!, Benjamin 
Prescott, of Danvers, Massachusetts; they had eight children, 
among whom was Rebecca' Prescott; born 20 May, 1742; 
married 12 May, 1763, Honorable Roger Sherman, as his, 
second wife; see page 56, ante. 

[ 149] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DHPEV/ 



3. James, ^ born 20 January, !727-i7.-'.8; married, first, — 



Rebecca Stow; married, second, — -, Susanna Blanchard; 

he had eight children. 

James^ and Eh'zabeth (Wilder) Minot had three children: 

4. Martha^ born 1 February, 1738; died 18 June, 1739. 

+ 5. Martha," born about 1740; married 24 January, 1757, Reverend 
Josiah* Sherman, of Woburn, Massachusetts; see page 57. 

23 6. Ephraim,'' born 17 June, 1742; married 25 September, 1764, 
Abigail Prescott; they had five children. 

Honorable James= Minot was a very distinguished man of his day. He 
was a military officer for about thirty years with the rank of Colonel; he 
was a Justice of the Peace; he represented Concord, Massachusetts, at the 
General Court, and he was a member of the General Kings Council ("His 
Majesties Council"), for many years, in an honorable position, which 
offices he sustained until his death. 

The tombstone of Colonel James^ Minot is in the Hill Burying Ground, 
Concord, Massachusetts, and reads: 

"Here Lye the remains of Col. James Minot 
Esqr. who departed this life Feb. 6, 1759 
in the 65th year of his age. He was of 
Honl. descent, early improved & advanced 
in civil and military affairs. Divers years 
Represented this town at the General Court 
was a justice of the peace, and one of the Hon. 
His Majesties Council for many years, which 
offices he sustained until his death. 
In all which stations and relations of life he 
behaved as the Christian, the Patriot, and the 
Benevolent Friend, and as he merrited so he 
was much loved and honored in his life 
And lamented at his death. 
Memento Mori. 

From Death's Arrest No Age is Free." 

[150] 



THE .M I N O T LINE 



See the printed 1S56 Pilgrims of Boston, Granary Burial Ground, by 
Thomas Bridgman, pages 284 per 299. 

Martha'' Minot and Reverend Josiah Sherman had a daughter: 

Martha' Sherman, born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

Martha' Sherman and Reverend Justus Mitchell had a son: 

Chauncey Root' Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root' Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 

Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810 in Somers, Westchester 
County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, N'ev/ York, 
Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 

Chauncey Mitchell'" Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second 
28 December, 1901, May Palm.er. 



151 



THE WILDER LINE 



1. Thomas' Wilder; born about 1590, in England; died there ; 

married about 1614, Martha • ; born in England ; died 20 April, 

1652, in Hingham, Massachusetts. 

They had five children, all born in England: 
I. John,= born about 1616; stayed in England; no more trace. 
2+2. Thomas," born about 161S; married about 1G41, Anna . 

3 3. Elizabeth, = born about 1621; married — January, 1639, Thomas 

Ensign, of Hingham, Massachusetts; they had three children. 

4 4. Edward, = born about 1623; married about 1652, Elizabeth Ames; 

they had eleven children. 

5 5. Mary,= born about 1625 ; no more trace. 

Thomas' Wilder did not come to New England; but his widow Martha 
came over to America with her son Edward and daughter Mary in the ship 
Confidence from Southampton, England, embarking in 1638; they were of 
Shiplake, Oxdordshire, England; another account says they were from 
Lancashire, England; the son Thomas Wilder is supposed to have come 
over in the same year, 163S; the widow iMartha w^as in Hingham, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1638. 

The printed 1878 Wilder Genealogy, by Reverend Moses H. Wilder, on 
page 145, says: Nicholas Wilder, had a son John Wilder, who also had a son 
John Wilder, and he was the father of Thomas' Wilder. The family had a 
coat-of-arms. See the printed 1862 Genealogical Dictionary, by James 
Savage, volume 4, page 549. 

SECOND GENERATION 

2. Thomas- Wilder (Thomas'), born in England, about 1618; died 23 
October, 1667, in Charlestown, Massachusetts; married about 1641, Anna 

[153] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y .M . D E P E W 

or Hannah ; born ; died lo June, 1692, in Charlestown, 

Massachusetts. 

They had six children: 

7 I. Mary,^ born 30 June. 1642; bapt. 3 July, 1642; no more trace. 

8 2. Thomas, 3 born 14 September, 1644; married, first, 25 June, 166S, 

Mary ; married, second, 17 June, 167S, Mary Houghton; 

he had six children. 

9 3. John,' born about 1646; married about 1673, Hannah Atherton, 

they had six children. 
ID 4. Elizabeth/ born about 164S; no more trace. 
II + 5. Nathaniel,^ born 3 November, 1650; married about 1673, Mary 

Sa\v\-er, 
6. Ebenezer,' born ; this child is listed by James Savage. 

Thomas- Wilder came over to America in 1638; he went to Charlestown, 
Massachusetts, in 1639, where he joined the Church, 30 March, 1640; he 
was made a freeman 2 June, 1640; he went to Lancaster, Massachusetts, 
I July 1659, where he was a selectman: he made his will 22 January 
1667, which names his wife Ann, four sons, and two daughters. 

THIRD GENERATION 

II. Nathaniel' Wilder (Thomas,- Thomas'), born 3 November, 1650, 
in Charlestown, Massachusetts: killed b\' the Indians — July ,1704; married 
about 1673, Mary Sawyer; born 4 July, 1652; death not found; daughter of 
Thomas and Mary (Prescott) Sawyer. 

They had seven children: 

31 I. Nathaniel, "• born about 1675; married 26 Decem.ber, 1707, 

Damaris Whitcomb: they had twelve children; he went to 
Petersham, Massachusetts. 

32 -f 2. Ephraim,^ born 16 .August, 1678; married about 1698, Elizabeth 

Stephens. 

33 3. Mary,^ born 12 May, 1679; she probably married , Simon= 

Stevens, of Lancaster, Massachusetts. 

[154] 



THE \\' I L D E R LINE 



34 4. Elizabeth/ born 14 February. 16S1 : no more trace. 

35 5. Jonathan,^ born 30 April, 16S2 lor 16S5); married 26 .March, 1707, 

Mary How; they had one child. 

36 6. Doroth}-,- born about 16S6; married , March, 1701, 

Samuel Carter; they had five children. 

37 7. Oliver, ■• born about 1692; married about 171 3, Mary Fairbank; 

they had ten children. 

Nathaniel' Wilder, of Lancaster, Massachusetts, a soldier under sentence 
of death in 1676, who had shown his hatred of some friendly Indian in King 
Philip's War, was discharged by the General Court, with Daniel Hoar, his 
fellow oflender, on the payment of cost and some ten pounds each to the 
Indian. His youth might plead in e.xtenuation. He had by the Indian 
War, in which Lancaster, Massachusetts, was destroyed, been driven 
to Sudbury, Massachusetts; where he had Ephraim and Mary and Eliza- 
beth; but he returned to Lancaster. Massachusetts. 

FOURTH GEXER.-\TION 

32. Ephraim^ Wilder (Nathaniel,^ Thomas, = Thomas'), born 16 August, 
1678, in Sudbury, Massachuietts; died 13 December, 1760, aged 93 years, 
and 8 months, in Lancaster, Massachusetts; married about 1698, Elizabeth 
Stephens or Stevens; born about 1680; died 28 May, 1769, aged 83 years, 
in Lancaster, xMassachusetts; daughter of Cyprian and Mary Stephens or 
Stevens. 

They had seven children: 

104 I. Captain Ephraim,' born about 1707; married 17 June, 1731, 

Anna Wilder; they had nine children. 

105 + 2. Elizabeth, 5 born about 1705; married, first, about 1722, Tilley' 

Merrick, of Brookfield, Massachusetts; he was born 28 March, 
1701, in Springfield, ALissachusetts; he died — March, 1732, 
in West Springfield, Massachusetts; they had three children; 
she married, second, 9 October, 1735, Colonel James^ Minot; 
they had three children; see page 147 ante; she married, third, 
10 May, 1763, Reverend Daniel Rogers, of Littleton, iMassa- 
chusetts. 

[155] 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A f N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

106 3. Martha/ born about 1700; no more trace. 

107 4. Dorothy/ born about 1702; no more trace. 

108 5. Eunice/ born about 1709; no more trace. 

109 6. Susanna/ born about 171 1; married , Samuel W'illiard; 

no more trace. 

no 7. Asaph/ born about 1714; married , Zipporah Wheeler; 

no more trace. 

Ephraim^ Wilder, of Lancaster, .Massachusetts, was a brave officer, and 
did good service in the Indian War on the then frontier. He represented 
the town of Lancaster in the General Court, and was chosen a number of 
times as a member of the Governor's Council, but he declined the honor. 
See the printed 1878 Wilder Genealogy, by Reverend Moses H. Wilder, 
page 149. 

105. Elizabeth^ Wilder and Colonel James^ Minot had a daughter: 
Martha^ Minot, born about 1740; married 24 January, 1757, Reverend 
Josiah Sherman. 

Martha' Minot and Revei'end Josiah Sherman had a daughter: 
Martha" Sherman, born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

Martha^ Sherman and Reverend Justus Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Root^ Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root^ Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 

Martha Minot^ .Mitchell, born 2 May, 18 10, in Somers, Westchester 
County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New York, 
Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell'" Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 190 1, May Palmer. 

[156] 



THE TIMOTHY WHEELEP. LINE 

1900. Captain Timothy' Wheeler, horn about 1604, probably in 
England, in Odell, Wiltshire; died 10 July, 16S7, aged about 86 years, in 

Concord, .Massachusetts; married, first, about 1638, Jane ; born 

; died 12 February, 1643, in Concord, .Massachusetts; they had one 

child; married, second, about 1655, .Mary Brooks; born about 1636; died 
4 October, 1693; daughter of Captain Thomas' and Grace Brooks; they had 
three children. 

Captain Timothy' and Jane Wheeler had one child: 

1901 I. Sarah, 2 born 22 June, 1640; no more trace. 

Captain Timothy' and .Mary (Brooks) Wheeler had three children: 

1902 2. Mary,= born 3 October, 1657; died 7 October, 1660, aged 3 

years. 

1903 3. Elizabeth,- born 6 October, 1661; married 28 .May, 1678, 

Ebenezer Prout; they had six children. 

1904 4. Rebecca,^ born about 1666; married about 16S4, Captain 

James^ .Minot; see page 146, ante. 

Captain Timothy' Wheeler was early in Concord, Massachusetts, where 
he served in the militia. He was made a freeman • 3 .May, 1640; he was an 
Ensign in 1646; he served in King Philip's War; he was a deputy nine 
times from the year 1663; he was a Captain in the year 1662. It is reported 
that he gave the Ministerial lot to Concord. The printed 1S35 History of 
Concord, Massachusetts, by Lemuel Shattuck, page 386, says: Captain 
Timothy Wheeler was pre-eminent among the men of Colonial times, who 
were influential by reason of their wealth, social position, and official im- 
portance; he was a brother of George Wheeler, of Concord, and a brother 
of Captain Thomas Wheeler, of Concord, Massachusetts. The rise to 

[157] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A L' N C E 'l' M . D E P E W 

prominence of Captain Timothy Wheeler was very rapid after his arrival 
in Concord, and his high influence in the affairs of the Colony within a very 
short time, is the subject of wide mention by all historians. His activity 
in the general welfare of the Colony was continuous, and he took time from 
his military duties to serve on various town civil committees, and to serve 
as representative for i8 years, being a signer of almost every petition pre- 
sented in the town's behalf, during his lifetime there. He was made 6 May, 
1646, the Ensign of the train band, and later becam.e its Captain. His will, 
made i March, 16S6-1687, and sworn to 7 September, 16S7, is printed in 
full in the large 1914 Wheeler Family Genealogy in America, on page 134, 
and is a long document. His widow Mary made her will 20 April, 1691, 
proved 30 October, 1693, and this will is also printed in full in the 1914 
Wheeler Family Genealogy. She could not have been aged 93 at death, 
in October, 1693, as is stated, and still have three children v,'hen she was 
aged over 55 \'ears. 

See the printed 1855 History of Watertown, .Massachusetts, by Dr. 
Henry Bond, on page 721. 

1904. Rebecca- Wheeler and Captain Jam.es^ .Minot had a son: 

Colonel James' Minot; born 17 October, 1694; married, second, 9 October, 
1735, Elizabeth Wilder. 

Colonel James-' .Minot and Elizabeth Wilder had a daughter: 

Martha^ Minot, born about 1740; married 24 January, 1757, Reverend 
Josiah Sherman. 

Martha^ .Minot and Reverend Josiah Sherman had a daughter: 

Martha^ Sherman, born 8 December, 175S; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

.Martha^ Sherman and Reverend Justus .Mitchell had a son: 

Chauncey Root"^ .Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root" Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 

[138] 



THE TIMOTHY WHEELER LINE 



Martha Minot' Mitchell horn 2 May, iSio, in Sorners, Westchester 
County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New York, 
Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April. 1S34, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



[ 159 



THE BUTLER LINE 

I. Nicholas' Butler; born about 1590 in England; died i3August, 1671, 
on Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts; married about 1617, Joice or Joyce 

; born — , in England; died after 13 March, 16S0; her parentage 

has not been discovered. 

They had three children; 

2 I. Reverend Henry, = born about 1619; died 24 April, 1691, aged 72 

years in England; he was graduated from Harvard College in 

165 1 ; had the degree of M.A. ; married , Anne Holman ; he 

went back to England about 1652; Withamfrary, England, and 
Seoril, County Somerset, England. 

3 + 2. Lydia," born about 1622; married 19 May, 1647, Captain John^ 

Minot; see page 145, ante. 

4 3. Captain John,- born about 1625; bapt. 22 September, 1645 (as an 

adult) ; died , 1658, on Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts; 

married about 1650, Mary ; they had a son Captain 

John^ Butler; born about 1652; died about 1733 to 1738; married 

, Priscilla Norton; they had a son Malachi^ Butler; born 

; married , unknown; they had a son Zephaniah" 

Butler; born about 1728; died about 1800; married , 

Abigail Cilley; they had a son John° Butler; bom 17 May, 1782; 
married 27 July, iSi i, Charlotte Ellison; they had a son Major 
General Benjamin Franklin" Butler; born 5 November, 1818; 
married , Sarah Jones Hildreth. 

Nicholas' Butler sailed in June, 1637 from the port of Sandwich, England, 
with his wife Joyce, and three children, and five servants; they were from 
Eastwell, County Kent, England. He came to Dorchester, Massachusetts, 
where in 1637 he had a land grant; in 1647 he was a proprietor in the "great 
lots"; he was a deputy in 165 1 to the Great and General Court of Massa- 

[161I 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D b P t W 

chusetts Bay. He went about 165 1 to the Island of Martha's Vineyard 
Massachusetts. 

See the printed 1895 Ancestry of General Benjamin FrankHn Butler, 
26 pages; also the printed i860 Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage, 
volume one, page 321. 

The printed 1901 to 1905 Palmer Groups, by Emily Wilder Leavitt, 
450 pages, gives two wills in full. 

3. Lydia= Butler and Captain John' Minot had a son: 
Captain James^ Minot; born 14 September, 1653; married about 1684, 
Rebecca Wheeler. 

Captain James' Minot and Rebecca Wheeler had a son: 
Colonel James^ Minot; born 17 October, 1694; married, second, 9 October, 
1735, Elizabeth Wilder. 

Colonel James^ Minot and Elizabeth Wilder had a daughter: 
Martha^ Minot; born about 1740; m.arried 24 January, 1757, Reverend 
Josiah Sherman. 

Martha^ Minot and Reverend Josiah Sherman had a daughter: 
Martha^ Sherman; born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

Martha^ Sherman and Reverend Justus Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Root' Mitchell; born 25 June, 17S6; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root' Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot' .Mitchell, born 2 May, 18 10, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New York, 

Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1S71, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 

f 162 1 



THE STEVENS LINE 

I. Cyprian' Stevens or Stephens, born about 1648 in England; he was 
aged under 14 years in 1660; he was alive in .March, 1691-1692; married, 
first, 22 January, 1672, Mary= Willard; born 7 or 27 September, 1653; death 
not found ; daughter of Major Simon' and Mary (Dunster) Willard ; married, 

second, after 1683, Ruth ; she died before 1693; no children by the 

second wife. 

Cyprian' and .Mary (Williard) Stevens had six children: 

2 I. Cyprian, = born 22 November, 1672; this child is given by James 

Savage, but is not on the Vital Statistics; no more trace. 

3 2. Mary,= born 22-9 mo. (November), 1672; married about 1698, 

Samuel Wright, of Sudbury, and Rutland, .Massachusetts; they 
had seven children. 

4 3. Dorothy, = born about 1675; died in infancy. 

5 4. Simon, = born in Boston, Massachusetts, i 3 August, 1677; married 

about 1701, Mary* Wilder; they had two children; see page 154, 
ante. 

6 + 5. Elizabeth,^ born about 1680; married about 1698, Ephraim^ Wilder; 

see page 155, ante. 

7 6. Joseph,- born about 1683; married about 1705, Prudence Rice; 

they had ten children. 

Cyprian' Stevens came from London, England, about 1660, and is said 
to be a son of Colonel Thomas Stevens of London and Devonshire, England. 
He was at first in Chelsea, .Massachusetts, but went shortly to Lancaster, 
Massachusetts. In the great war of 1675-1676 he had been driven by the 
Indians to make his residence nearer Boston, xMassachusetts, perhaps in the 
interval at Sudbury, .Massachusetts and had authority to receive an Indian 
child of six years, probably of a friendly tribe whose father might be serving 
in our ranks as a soldier but he returned to Lancaster after the peace. 

[163] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D F. P h W 

Thomas Stevens, of London, England, the armourer of Buttolph Lane, who 
contracted there in ALarch, 1629 with our Governor and Company for a 
supply of arms, and was a member of the Company; and besides gave ilftv 
pounds to the common stock, is supposed to be the father of Cyprian' 
Stevens. Our subject was clerk of the writs of Lancaster from 16S2 to 1686; 
he was a soldier 22 February 1675-1676 "under Captain Wheeler and at 
Groton Garrison," and received 14 shillings and 3 pence; and he v/as in the 
west Regiment of Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in March, i6o,i-i6cj2 
of the garrison at Lancaster, Massachusetts. 

See the printed 1S62 Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage, volume 
4, page 1 84. 

6. Elizabeth- Stevens and Ephraim^ Wilder has a daughter Elizabeth' 
Wilder; born about 1705; married, second, 9 October, 1735, Colonel James* 
Minot. 

Elizabeth^ Wilder and Colonel James Minot had a daughter: 
Martha-" Minot, born about 1740; married 24 January, 1757, Reverend 
Josiah Sherman. 

Martha* Minot and Reverend Josiah Sherman had a daughter: 
Martha^ Sherman, born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus .Mitchell. 

Martha^ Sherman and Reverend Justus Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Roof^ Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Roof^ Mitchell and Anna iMacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New York, 

Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 187 1, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 

[ 164 ] 



THE SAWYEPx LINE 

I. Thomas' Sawyer, born about 1616, in Lancashire, England; died in 
Lancaster, Massachusetts, 12 September, 1706, aged 90 years; married 
about 1648 Mary-' Prescott; bapt. 24 March, 1630, in Sowerby Parish, 
Halifax, West Riding of Yorkshire, England; death not found; daughter of 
John' and Mary (Platts) Prescott. 

They had eleven children: 

2 I. Thomas, = born 2 July, 1649; married, first, 11 October, 1670, 

Sarah ; they had one child : married, second, 2 1 Novem- 
ber, 1672, Hannah Houghton; they had at least one child. 

3 2. Ephraim,- born 16 January, 1631; killed by the Indians — 

February, 1676. 
4+3. Mary,- born 4 July (or January), 1653; married about 1673, 
Nathaniel Wilder; see page 1 54, ante. 

5 4. Joshua,^ born 13 March, 1655; died 14 July, 1738; married 

2 January, 1678, Sarah Potter; they had six children; he 
went to Woburn, Massachusetts. 

6 5. James,- born 22 March, 1657; married 4 February, 167S, Mary 

Marble; had — children. 

7 6. Caleb, = bom 2 April, 1659; married here in Lancaster, 28 

December, 1687, Sarah Houghton; they had — children. 

8 7. John,= born 6 April, 1661 ; married 16 June, 1686, Marv Bull or 

Ball. 

9 8. Elizabeth, = born 6 January, 1664; no more trace. 

10 9. Deborah,- born about 1666; died 16 July, 1666. 

11 10. Nathaniel, = born 24-9 mo. (November), 1670; married , 

Mary . 

12 11. Martha,- born 10-6 mo. (.August), 1673; no more trace. 

Thomas' Sawyer came over about 1636; he was probably of Rowley, 
Massachusetts, in 1643, with his brothers William Sawyer and Edward 

[165] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY' OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

Sawyer. Thomas was one of the six original settlers in 1643 of Lancaster, 
Massachusetts; he is said to be a son of John Sawyer of England; he was 
made a freeman in 1634; he held various town ofikes; he was one of Lan- 
caster's first "prudential men in 1653." 

See the printed 1SS9 American Ancestry, volume 4, page 81; also the 
1899 American Ancestry, volume 12, page 208; also the printed 1S70 
Prescott Memorial, by William Prescott, M. D., page 45; also the printed 
Genealogical Dictionary, by fames Savage, 1S62, volume 4, page 31. 

4. Mary= Sawyer and Nathaniel'' Wilder had a son: 
Ephraim' Wilder, born 16 August, 167S; married about 1698, Elizabeth 
Stevens. 

Ephraim^ Wilder and Elizabeth Stevens had a daughter: 
Elizabeth^ Wilder, born about 1705; married, second, 9 October, 1735, 
Colonel James^ Minot. 

Elizabeth* Wilder and Colonel James Alinot had a daughter: 
Martha^ Minot, born about 1740; married 24 January, 1757, Reverend 
Josiah Sherman. 

Martha^ Minot and Reverend Josiah Sherman had a daughter: 
Martha^ Sherman, born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

Martha* Sherman and Reverend Justus Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Root' Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1S07, Anna 
Mac.Arthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root' Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot* .Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1S32, in Peeksklll, New York, 

Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1S34, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 

fi661 



THE PRESCOTT LINE 

I. John' Prescott, born about 1604 or 1605 in Standish, Lancashire, 
England; died about 1683 in Lancaster, Massachusetts; married at W'ygan, 
Lancashire, England, 21 January, 1629, Alary Platts, of Yorkshire, England; 
her birth, and death, and parentage, have not been found. 

They had eight children: 

2 + 1. Mary,= bapt. 24 February, 1630 in Sowerby, Parish of Halifax, 

Yorkshire, England; married about 164S Thomas' Sawyer; see 
page 165, ante. 

3 2. i\lartha,= bapt. 11 .March, 1632, in Sowerby; married about 1655, 

John Rugg; they had two children. 

4 3. John,- bapt. i April, 1635, in Sowerby; married 11 November, 

1668, Sarah ; they had four children; he went in 1679 

to Concord, Massachusetts. 

5 4. Sarah, 2 bapt. , 1637, in Sowerby; married, first, 2 August, 

1658, Richard Wheeler, of Medfield, Massachusetts; they had 
five children; married, second, , Mr. Rice. 

6 5. Hannah, 2 born about 1639; married 4 May, 1660, John Rugg; 

they had six children. 

7 6. Lydia,= born 15 August, 1641, in Watertown, Massachusetts; 

married 28 May, 1658, Jonas Fairbanks; they had seven children. 

8 7. Jonathan, = born about 1643; married, first, 3 August, 1670, 

Dorothy ; they had three children; married, second, 23 

December, 1675, Elizabeth Hoar; they had six children; mar- 
ried, third, 18 December, 1689, Rebecca, the widow of the 
Honorable Peter Bulkely; married, fourth, 18 .August, 17 18, 
Ruth Brown. 

[167] 



C H R O N O L O G 'I' AND A N C E S T R 't' OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E V/ 

9 8. Jonas, = born — June, 164S, in Lancaster, Massachusetts: died 13 
December, 1723; he went to Groton, Massachusetts; married, 
first, 5 October, 1669, Thankful Wheeler; married, second, 14 
December, 1670, Mary Looker; the\' had eight daughters and 
four sons; the youngest son was Honorable Benjamin^ Prescott; 
born 4 January, 1696; died 3 August, 173S; married 11 June, 
1718, Abigail Oliver; they had seven children; among whom was 
Colonel William^ Prescott, born 20 February, 1726; died 13 
October, 1795; he was the famous Commander 17 June, 1775, 
at the Bunker Hill Battle; he married about 1756-1757, Abigail 
Hale; they had one child, Honorable \Vil!iam= Prescott, born 
19 June, 1762; married about 1793, Catharine Green Hickling; 
they had seven children; among whom was William Hickling^ 
Prescott; born 4 May, 1796, in Salem, Massachusetts; died 28 
January, 1859, aged 62 years, S months, and 24 days; graduated 
Harvard College in 1S14; married 4 May, 1820, Miss Susan 
Amory; they had four children; this is the celebrated historian, 
among his works being The History of Ferdinand and Isabella, 
Conquest of Mexico, Conquest of Peru, the Reign of Philip 
Second, Life of Charles Fifth, etc. 

John" Prescott, while born in Lancashire, li\ed in Sowerby, Parish of 
Halifax, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, when he emigrated to New 
England; he is said to be a son of Ralph and Ellen Prescott. He 
was in Watertown, Massachusetts, about 1640; he went to Lancaster, Mas- 
sachusetts, about 1645-1646; he took the oath of allegiance in 1652, but was 
not admitted a freeman before 19 May, 1669; he was with his family when 
he removed shortly after the doleful day of 10 February, 1676. when the 
town of Lancaster, Massachusetts, was wholly abandoned for several years, 
so that no white man lived between the town on the Connecticut River 
and those on the Concord River; in 1682 the number of families in 
Lancaster was not more than a third so large as seven years before. See 
the printed 1861 Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage, volume 3, 
page 480; also the printed 1S52 New England Historic and Genealogical 
Register, volume 6, page 274; also the printed 1870 Prescott Family 
Memorial. 

f 168I 



THE PRESCOTT LINE 



2. Mary= Prescott and Thomas^ Sawyer had a daughter: 

Mary^ Sawyer, born 4 July (or January), 1653; married about 1673, 
Nathaniel^ Wilder. 

Mary' Sawyer and Nathaniel Wilder had a son: 

Ephraim^ Wilder, born 16 August, 167S; married about 169S, Elizabeth 
Stevens. 

Ephraim^ Wilder and Elizabeth Stevens had a daughter: 

Elizabeth^ Wilder, born about 1705; married, second, 9 October, 1735, 
Colonel James^ Minot. 

Elizabeth^ Wilder and Colonel James Minot had a daughter: 

Martha^ Minot, born about 1740; married 24 January, 1757, Reverend 
Josiah Sherman. 

Martha^ Minot and Reverend Josiah Sherman had a daughter: 

Martha" Sherman, born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

Martha' Sherman and Reverend Jutsus iMitchell had a son: 

Chauncey Root« Mitchell, born 23 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root^ Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 

Martha Minot^ .Mitchell, born 2 .May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 
County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New York, 
Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell'" Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, .May Palmer. 



169 



THE WILLARD LINE 



I. Major Simoni Willard. bapt. 7 April, 1605, in Horsemonden, County 
Kent, England; a son of Richard Willard; died 24 April, 1676, in Charles- 
town, Massachusetts; married, first, about 1631, Mary Sharpe, bapt. 16 
October, 16 14; death not found; daughter of Henry, of Horsemonden, and 
Jane (Feylde) Sharpe; they had seven children; married, second, about 
1643, Elizabeth Dunster, a sister of Reverend Henry Dunster, the first 
President of Harvard College, from 1640 to 1654; she died one and a half 
years after marriage; married, third, about 1645, Mary Dunster, said to 
be a cousin to Elizabeth, the second wife; they had ten children; the widow 

Mary Willard married, second, 14 July 1680, Deacon Noyes, of 

Sudbury, Massachusetts; she died — Decem.ber, 1715. 

Major Simon' Willard had seventeen children; seven by the first wife, 
Mary Sharpe: 

2 I. Mary,= born about 1632; married about 1649, Joshua Edmunds; 

they had one child. 

3 2. Elizabeth,- born about 1634; she died young. 

4 3. Elizabeth,- born about 1636; married 8 April, 1653, Robert Blood; 

they had thirteen children. 

5 4. Dorothy, = born about 1637; she died young. 

6 5. Josiah,= born about 1638; married 20 March, 1657, Hannah Hosmer; 

they had eight children. 

7 6. Reverend Samuel, = born 31 January, 1640; graduated from Har- 

vard College in 1659; married, first, S July, 1664, Abigail Sher- 
man; they had eight children; married, second, about 1679, 
Eunice Tyng; they had twelve children. 

8 7. Sarah, = born 27 June (or 24 July), 1642; married 2 July, 1666, 

Nathaniel Howard, of Charlestown, .Massachusetts: they had 
two children. 



[17'] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E V\" 

The second wife of Major Simon' is supposed to have had no children. 

The third wife of Major Simon' had ten children: 

9 8. Abovehope,= born 30 October, 1646; died 23 December, '663, 
aged 17 years; single. 

10 9. Simon, = born in Concord, 23 November, 1649; married, first, 

about 1679, Martha Jacob; they had five children; married, 
second, 30 April, 1702, Elizabeth Walley; married, third, 25 
July, 1722, Priscilla Buttolph. 

11 + 10. Mary,= born in Concord, Massachusetts, 7 (or 27) Septem.ber, 

1653; married 22 January, 1672, Cyprian' Stevens; see page 
163, ante; this Mary was the second daughter of the nam.e, 
in this family, and both lived to be married and have children. 

12 II. Henry, = born in Concord, 4 June, 1655; married, first, 18 July, 

1674, Mary Lakin; they had seven children; married second 
, Dorcas Cutler; they had seven children. 

13 12. John,= born in Concord, 12 January, 1657; married 31 October, 

1698, Mary Hayward; they had four children. 

14 13. Daniel, = born in Concord, 29 December, 1658; married, first, 

6 December, 1683, Hannah Cutler; they had three children; 
married, second, 4 January, 1693, Mary Mills; they had ten 
children. 

15 14. Joseph,- born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, 4 January, 1661; he 

went to London, England; he was married and had two 
children. 

16 15. Benjamin, = born about 1665; married about 1691, Sarah Lakin; 

they had eight children. 

17 16. Hannah, = born 6 October, 1666; married 23 May, 1693, Captain 

Thomas Brintnall, of Sudbury, Massachusetts; they had 
eight children. 

18 17. Jonathan, = born 14 December, 1669; married S January, 1691, 

Mary Brown; they had four children; he went to Roxbury, 
Massachusetts. 

[172] 



THE \V I L L A R D LINE 



Some authorities think the third wife, .Mary Dunster, may also have 
been a sister of the Reverend Henry Dunster. 

Simon' Willard arrived in New England, in May, 1634, with his wife 
Mary, and daughter Mary; in 1635 he went to the new settlement at Con- 
cord, Massachusetts; he went, about 1660, to Lancaster, Massachusetts. 
The printed 1862 Genealogical Dictionar_\', b\- James Savage, volume 4, 
page 555, says, it supposes that Simon- Willard must have had some ac- 
quaintance in England with military duty, for he is made Lieutenant here 
as early as 1637; Captain in 1646; and Major in 1655, the highest rank at 
that time; he was a representative from 1636 to 1649; he was chosen Assist- 
ant in 1657, and held this position till his death, 24 April, 1C76. Before the 
Indians destroyed Groton, Massachusetts, in 1676, to which place he had 
removed a few j-ears earlier, he had established his retreat at Salem, .Massa- 
chusetts, but he died at Charlestown, .Massachusetts, during the session of 
the Court of Assistants. For his services, the government had many years 
before, made him a grant of one thousand acres, which he had never taken 
up but had given to his daughter Elizabeth on her marriage; but his widow 
Mary was compelled to petition for it in the year of his death. The printed 
1877 History of Cambridge, .Massachusetts, by Lucius R. Paige, page 691, 
says, Simon' Willard came in 1634 to America and settled in Cambridge, 
his residence being at the South East corner of Dunster and Winthrop 
Streets; in 1633 he removed to Concord, of which place he was the most 
prominent citizen during his long life; for about forty years in succession, 
he served as Representative and Assistant, and commanded the .Middlesex 
Militia for many years. 

His son. Reverend Samuel- Willard of Boston, Massachusetts, was Vice- 
President of Harvard College. 

See the printed 1858 Willard .Mem.oir, by Joseph Willard. 

II. Mary= Willard and Cyprian' Stevens had a daughter: 
Elizabeth^ Stevens, born about 1680, married about 1698, Ephraim^ Wilder. 

Elizabeth' Stevens and Ephraim Wilder had a daughter: 
Elizabeth^ Wilder, born about 1705; married, second, 9 October, 1735, 
Colonel James'' .Minot. 

[•73] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C E S T R ^^ OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

Elizabeth^ Wilder and Colonel James .Minot had a daughter: 

Martha^ Minot, born about 1740; married 24 January, 1757, Reverend 
Josiah Sherman. 

iVlartha^ Minot and Reverend Josiah Sherman had a daughter: 

Martha^ Sherman, born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

Martha' Sherman and Reverend Justus iVlitchell had a son: 

Chauncey Root' .Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root' Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 

Martha Minot^ .Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 
County, New York; married 26 December, 1832 in Peekskill, New York, 
Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' .Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 

Chauncey Mitchell' Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



174 



THE DUNSTER LINE 



1. Henry Dunster, of Balehoult, in Bury, County Lancashire, England; 
he was alive 20 March, 1640, when he wrote a letter to his son Reverend 
Henry Dunster in New England ; the name of his wife has not yet been found. 

They appear to have had nine children: 

2 I. Reverend Henry,' horn about 1615 in England; died in Scituate, 

Massachusette, 27 (or 18) February, 1658-1659); married, first, 

21 June, 1641, Elizabeth, the widow of the Reverend Joseph 

Glover; she died 23 August, 1643; they had no children; he 

married, second, about 1644, Elizabeth ; she died 12 

September, 1690, aged (? in her 6oth year?); he was the first 
President of Harvard College, 27 August, 1640; from which he 
resigned 24 October, 1654. 

Thomas,' born about 1617; stayed in England. 

Richard,' born about 1619: was here in the spring of 1641 to 
September, 1642. 

Robert,' born about 162 1 ; stayed in England. 

Elizabeth,' born about 1623; married about 1643, Major Simon' 
Willard; see page 171, ante. 

Mary,' born about 1625; married, first, about 1645, Major Simon' 
Willard; see page 171. ante; she married, second, 14 July, 1680, 
Deacon Noyes. 

Rose,' born about 1627; died 24 March, 1650; supposed to have 
married Joseph Hills, of Maiden, Massachusetts, but questioned. 
Dorothy', born about 1629; no more trace. 

Faith,' born about 1632; married 12 May, 1664, John Pago, of 
Groton, Massachusetts. 

[175] 



7+6 



9 
10 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

See the printed iS6o Genealogical Dictionan-, by James Savage, volume 
2, page 82; also the printed 1S73 New England Historic and Genealogical 
Register, volume 27, page 307. 

7. Mary' Dunster and .Major Simon' Willard had a daughter: 
Mary= Willard, born 7 (or 27) September, 1653; married 22 January, 1672, 
Cyprian" Stevens. 

Mary- Willard and Cyprian Stevens had a daughter: 
Elizabeth^ Stevens, born about 1680; married about 169S, Ephraim^ Wilder. 

Elizabeth' Stevens and Ephraim Wilder had a daughter: 
Elizabeth' Wilder, born about 1705; married, second, 9 October, 1735, 
Colonel James= Minot. 

Elizabeth^ Wilder and Colonel James Minot had a daughter: 
Martha-^ Minot, born about 1740; married 24 January, 1757, Reverend 
Josiah Sherman. 

Martha^ Minot and Reverend Josiah Sherman had a daughter: 
Martha^ Sherman, born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus Mitchell. 

Martha'^ Sherman and Reverend Justus ^Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Root' Mitchell; born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root" Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1S32, in Peekskill, Nevv- York, 

Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 28 
December, 1901, May Palmer. 

[176] 



THE BROOKS LINE 

I. Captain Thomas' Brooks, born about 1600 in England; died in Con- 
cord, Massachusetts, 21 May, 1667; married about 1626, Grace ; 

born ; died in Concord, 12 May, 1664; her parentage is not known. 

They are supposed to have had eight children: 

2 I. Hannah, = born about 1628; married 13 December, 1647, Thomas 

Fox; they had two children. 

3 2. Joshua, 2 born about 1630, in England; married 17 October, 1653, 

Hannah Mason; they had ten children. 

4 3. Caleb, = born about 1632, in England, married, first, 10 April, 1660, 

Susanna Atkinson; they had five children; married, second, 

, Hannah Atkinson, sister of his first v/ife; they had two 

children. 

5 4. Gershom,= born about 1634; married 12 March, 1667, Hannah 

Eccles; they had six children. 

6 + 5- Mary,= born about 1636; married about 1655, Captain Timothy' 

Wheeler; see page 157, ante. 

7 6. Thomas,^ born about 163S; he went to Haddam, Connecticut. 

8 7. Hugh, = born about 1640; no more trace. 

9 8. John, 2 born about 1642; he went to Wolurn, Massachusetts. 

Captain Thomas' Brooks was made a freeman 7 December, 1636, then 
being of Watertown, Massachusetts; about this time he went to Concord, 
Massachusetts; he is said to have come from London, England; he was 
Representative for seven years, from 1642 to 1648; he had also an estate in 
Medford, Massachusetts, about 1634; he was a Captain. 

See the printed 1835 History of Concord, Massachusetts, by Lemuel 
Shattuck, page 364; also the printed i860 Genealogical Dictionary, by 

[177] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

James Savage, volume one, page 259; also the printed 1SS7 Concord Families 
by Potter, page 6. 

6. Mary= Brooks and Captain Timothy' Wheeler had a daughter: 
Rebecca' Wheeler, born about 1666; married about 1684, Captain James^ 
jMinot. 

Rebecca^ Wheeler and Captain James Minot had a son: 
Colonel James^ Alinot; born 17 October, 1694; married, second, 9 October, 
1735, Elizabeth Wilder. 

Colonel James-' Minot and Elizabeth W'ilder had a daughter: 
Martha^ Minot, born about 1740; married 24 January, 1757, Reverend 
Josiah Sherman. 

Martha^ .Minot and Reverend Josiah Sherman had a daughter: 
Martha^ Sherman; born 8 December, 175S; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus .Mitchell. 

Martha^ Sherman and Reverend Justus Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Root' Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur Johnston. 

Chauncey Root' Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 
Martha Minot* Mitchell, born .2 jVlay, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 

County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New York, 

Isaac Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot* Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey MitchelP Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 187 1, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



178] 



THE PARKS LINE 

1. Richard' Parks, or Parke, born about 1602, in England: died in 1663 
between 12 July and 19 October in Cambridge, Massachusetts; married, 

first, about 1627, Margery (PCrane?); born , 1595; death not found; 

married, second, , Sarah, the widow of Love Brewster. William and 

Jane Collier had a daughter Sarah Collier, born ; married 15 May, 

1634, Love Brewster, a son of Elder William Brewster, of the Mayflower; 
widow Sarah Parks was still alive in 1678, and living in Duxbury, Massa- 
chusetts; she probably died about 1699. 

Richard' and Margery Parks had three children: 

2 I. Isabel, = born about 1629; married about 1647-1648, Francis 
Whitmore; they had seven children. 

3+2. Elizabeth,- born about 1631; married about 1651, Lieutenant 
Edward' Winship; see page 137, ante. 

4 3. Thomas, 2 born about 1633, in England; married i December, 1653, 
Abigail Dix; they had nine children; he went to Newton, .Massa- 
chusetts. 

Richard' Parks is probably identical with the Richard Perk, a passenger 
II July, 1635, in the ship Defence of London, Edvvard Bostick, master, 
Richard then being aged 33 years, with his wife Margery, aged 40 years, 
and two daughters Isabel aged 7 years, and Elizabeth aged 4 years. His 
wife seems to have died early, and he married again. He was in Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, in 1636. He was in 1642 a proprietor at the 
Farms, now Lexington, Massachusetts. He resided 18 years at Cam- 
bridge. The printed 1854 History of Newton, Massachusetts, page 382, by 
Francis Jackson, says: Richard Parks was a proprietor in 1636 in Cam- 
bridge. His house was near the Cow Common in Cambridge. In a division 
of lands in 1647, he had eleven acres in Cambridge Village, bounding 
west on Mr. Edward Jackson's land, and the highway to Dedham, .Massa- 

[>79] 



lo 



C H R O N O L O G "i' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U >J C E Y M . D E P E \V 

chusetts, was laid out through it in 1648. The very ancient dwelling house 
upon this lot, which was pulled down about 1800, was supposed to have been 
built by him. It stood within a few feet of the spot now occupied by the 
Eliot Church. Previous to 1652, he owned a large tract of land in the north 
west part of the Village of Cambridge, bounded west by the Fuller farm, 
north by the Charles River, east by the Dummer farm, and south and east 
by the Mayhew farm, containing six hundred acres, which he probably 
bought of Pastor John Shepard or his heirs. 

By the will of Richard' Parks, dated 12-5 mo. (July) 1665, and witnessed 
by Elder Thomas Wiswall and Hugh Mason, he bequeathed to his only son. 
Thomas Parks, all his houses and lands, after the decease of his wife Sarah 
Parks; by his inventory, dated 19-S mo. (October), 1665, and taken by John 
Sherman and John Spring, the dwelling house and barn and out houses 
and six hundred acres of land adjoining, whereof twenty acres is broken 
up, it is appraised at 660 pounds; and 29 acres elsewhere is appraised at 
100 pounds— the whole amount of the inventory was 972 pounds, a good 
estate. In 1663, he was released from training on account of his age. 
All his property, except the. six hundred acres and buildings, was equally 
divided between the two daughters. Thirteen years after his decease, 
Thomas Parks, for 45 pounds and is shillings, bought the life estate of the 
widow, the release being dated 26 December, 1678; she was then living in 
Duxbury, Massachusetts, in the Colony of New Plymouth; she is described 
as the relict of Richard Parke, late of Cambridge Village, Massachusetts, 
seeming to indicate she was the mother-in-law of said Thomas Parks. 
Edward Parke, Senr., of London, England, is thought to have been the 
father of Richard' Parks. 

See the printed 1861, Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage, 
volume 3, page 347; also the printed 1861, New England Historic and Genea- 
logical Register, volume 14, page 320. 

3. Elizabeth^ Parks and Lieutenant Edward' Winship had a daughter: 
Elizabeth^ Winship, born 15 April, 1652; married 18 November, 1673, 
Joseph- Sherman. 

Elizabeth' Winship and Joseph Sherman had a son: 
William'' Sherman, born 28 June, 1692; married 3 September, 1715, Mehit- 
able' Wellington. 

[180] 



i:l.{s:. 



THE PARKS LINE 



William^ Sherman and Mchitable Wellington had a son: 
Reverend Josiah'^ Sherman, horn 2 April, 1729; married 24 January, 1757, 
Martha" Minott. 

Reverend Josiah= Sherman and .Martha Minot had a daughter: 
Martha" Sherman, born S December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Fv.everend juiius' .Mitcheil. 

-Martha" Sherman and Reverend Justus .Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Root' .Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807 Anna 
-Mac.Arthur- Jolmston. 

Chauncey Root' .Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 

Martha .Minot^ .Mitchell, born 2 .May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 
County, New York; married, 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, Xew York, 
Issac" Depew, Esq. 

-Martha Minot' .Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell Depew, born 23 April, 1834, in Peekskill, Xew York, 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second; 
28 December, 1901, .May Palmer. 



iSi 



THE SWEETMAN LINE 

I. Thomas' Sweetman, or Swetman, or Swoetman, born about 1610, 
supposed in England; died S January, 1682-16S3, aged 73 years, in Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts; married about 1643, Isabel ; born ; 

she was still alive 12 December, 1709; her parentage has not been found. 

They had ten children: 

2 I. Elizabeth, 2 born in Boston, Massachusetts, 6-1 1 mo. (January), 
1645; died young. 

3+2. Elizabeth,- born 6 January, 1647; married 7 December, 1671, 
Benjamin- Wellington; see page 120, ante. 

4 3. Rebecca,^ born 7 April, 1649; married 7 December, 1671, 

Michael Spencer; no more trace. 

5 4. Mehitable,= born about 1650; no more trace. 

6 5. Sarah, = born 2 May, 1654; married 9 January, 1674, Josiah 

Treadway; no more trace. 

7 6. Thomas,= born 18 January, 1656; died 27 January, 1655-1656; 

un-baptized. 

8 7. Ruhamah,= born 2 March, 1657; no more trace. 

9 8. Samuel, = born 19 April, 1659; bapt. 22 May, 1659; graduated in 

1677 from Harvard College. 

10 9. Bethia,2 born 7 July, 1661; married 12 December, 1692, James 
Hewes, of Boston, .Massachusetts. 

n ID. Hepzibah,2 born 19 June, 1666; bapt. 24 June, 1666; no more 
trace. 

Thomas' Sweetman was made a freeman 2 May, 1638; he was a weaver 
by trade; in 1645, he was in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and resided at the 

[183] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTR-l' OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

north west corner of the present (1877) Harvard College grounds. The 
printed 1877 History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, by Lucius R. Paige, see 
page 668; says on page 59 — 9 June, 1652, " It was voted by the Church that 
Shawshine should be divided as followeth: to xVir. (Reverend Jonathan) 
Mitchell, five hundred acres " ; "The number of every man's lot and quantity 
of acres is as followeth on the other side"; "40. Tho. Swoetman seventy 
acres. 49. Edward Winship two hundred acres. 78. Richard Parke one 
hundred acres." On page 75 — 17-S mo. (October), 1664, a petition that 
the present government is satisfactory, signed by Jonathan Mitchell and 
Tho. Swetman and Richard Park; on page 403, a Petition the 8 (8 mo. 
October), 1673: "I would intreat that favor of this honored Court, that I 
may be freed wholly from training any more, as one not being able to per- 
form that service by reason of a consumptive cough 1 have had about a 
year and a half, and other weakness of body that attend me, besides rny 
age which is very near 63 years; so that 1 find that exercise, when standing 
so long upon the ground, very prejudicious and destructive to my health, 
as I found by experience the last training day, although it was a ^^■arm day. 
So committing myself to your worships favor I rest your humble servant. 

(^Signed) Tho. Swoetman." 

See the printed 1862 Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage, 
volume 4, page 239. 

3. Elizabeth^ Sweetman and Benjamin^ Wellington had a daughter: 
Mehitable' Wellington, bapt. 4 March, 1687-168S; married 13 September, 
171 5, William^ Sherman. 

Mehitable^ Wellington and William Sherman had a son: 
Reverend Josiah^ Sherman, born 2 April, 1729; married 24 January, 1757, 
Martha^ Minot. 

Reverend Josiah'' Sherman and Martha Minot had a daughter: 
Martha^ Sherman, born 8 December, 1758; married 7 September, 1779, 
Reverend Justus^ Mitchell. 

Martha^ Sherman and Reverend Justus Mitchell had a son: 
Chauncey Root^ Mitchell, born 25 June, 1786; married about 1807, Anna 
MacArthur= Johnston. 

[184] 



THE S W E E T M A N LINE 



Chauncey Root« Mitchell and Anna MacArthur Johnston had a 
daughter: 

Martha Minot' Mitchell, born 2 May, 1810, in Somers, Westchester 
County, New York; married 26 December, 1832, in Peekskill, New York, 
Isaac* Depew, Esq. 

Martha Minot' Mitchell and Isaac Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 23 April, 1S54, in Peekskill, New York; 
married, first, 9 November, 1871, Elise Ann Hegeman; married, second, 
28 December, 1901, May Palmer. 



185 



/. 



CHAUNCEY M DEPEW JR 



THE HEGEMAN LINE 

THE LINE OF CHAUKCEY M. DEPEW, JR. ON THE SIDE 
OF HIS MOTHER. 

I. Adriaen' Hegeman, born about 1623; the common ancestor of the 
family in America, emigrated about i650-i65i from Amsterdam, Holland; 
died — April, 1672, on Long Island, New York; married about 1648, 

Catharine Margits; born ; dies , 1690; daughter of Joseph 

Margits of Amsterdam. 

They had ten children: 

2 + I. Jossph,= born about 1650, in Amsterdam; married 2i October, 

1677, Femmetje Rems or Remsen. 

3 2. Hendricus,- born about 1651, in Amsterdam; alive in 17 jo: 

married 12 or 26 April, 1685, Ariaentje Bloodgood; they had 
six children. 

4 3. Jacobus, = bapt. in Dutch Church, New Amsterdam, 9 March, 

1653; sponsors, Jan Evertszen Bout and Fredrick Aicke and 
Anneken Jans; he made his will 3 Februar}-. i 70-:>- i 707 ; 
proved in New York, 29 January, 1741; married 14 
October, 1683, Jannetje Ariens; they had three children. 

5 4. Abraham,- born about 1655, in America; he made his v.'ill 15 

June, 1 71 5; recorded in New York; married 30 August. 1690, 
Geertruy Jans, of New Albany; they had three children. 

6 5. Denyse,= born about 1657; died before 1710; married , 

Lucretia ; they had five children. 

7 6. Isaac,- born about 1659; died about 1700; married 13 February, 

1687, Marytje Roelofse Schenck; they had three children. 

8 7. Benjamin, = born about 1661; alive in 1710; married 9 April, 

1688, Lavennettie or Barentje Jansen; of New Albany; they 
had two daughters. 

[187] 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A IJ N C E Y M . D E P E W 

9 8. Elizabethr bcrn about 1663; married 12 April, 1684, Tobias 
Ten Eyck. 

10 9. John,= born about 1665; married 12 February, 1692, Femmetje 
Titus; both of Flatbush, Long Island, New York; they had no 
children. 

n 10. Peter,= (supposed); 

Adriaen' Hegeman was in 1653 in New Amsterdam: he went 25 April, 
1661, to Flatbush, Long Island, New York, where he obtained a patent for 
fifty morgens, with plain and meadow land in addition, to which he removed. 
This patent is entered 2 February, 1670 on page two, of liber A, of the 
Flatbush records as a double lot on the East side of the road, to the North 
of the land of Willem Jacobse (Van Boerum), and to the south of the land 
of Jan Seubringh, stretching West, a little southerly'; broad fifty rods and 
one foot; in length six hundred rods; containing fifty morgens and sixty 
rods; two pieces of salt meadows, the one Number 12, broad 8 rods, con- 
taining two morgens: the other Number 4, broad 12 rods, containing 3 
morgens, stretching from the woods southerly to the sea; and two pieces of 
plain land, Num.bers 24 and 25, broad taken together forty-eight rods and 
four feet, stretching southerly from the road to the woods, containing five 
morgens. Of this patent his heirs, 26 August, 1603, after his death, con- 
veyed, as per page two hundred of liber A of Flatbush records (on which 
page the patent is entered) a piece of thirty-seven -and-a-half-rods broad, 
and six hundred rods in length, containing thirty-seven-and-a-half mor- 
gens, to his son Abraham Hegeman. He also appears to have obtained a 
patent for another plantation of twenty-four morgens in Flatbush. He 
was a magistrate of Flatbush in 1654, 1655, 1656, 1657, 1658, 1660 and 1663; 
he was schout nscal of the five Dutch to\\ns in 1661 ; he was Secretary of 
Flatbush and Flatiands in 1G30 to 1661 ; of Flatbush and Flatlands and New 
Utrecht and Brooklyn from 1662 to 1665; he w-as Secretary of Flatbush in 
1671 ; and auctioneer. He owned about 74 morgens, or 14S acres of land in 
Flatbush. He was town clerk of Amersfoort in 1663; Schout in 1664 when 
he attended the Midwout Convention. 

See the printed 1S81 Earl>- Settlers of Kings County, Long Island, New 
York, by Tennis G. Bergen, page 135: also the printed 1905, Saint Nicholas 

[ 18S] 



THE H E G E M A N LINE 



Society Year Book, pages 47 and 225: also the printed 1902 Documentary 
History of Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York, by Henry A. Stoutenburgh. 

SECOND GENER.-\TION 

2. Joseph^ Hegeman (AdriaenO, born about 1650, in Amsterdam, 
Holland; died about 1725, on Long Island, New York; married 21 October, 
1677, in the Dutch Church, Fiatiands, New York, (records of the Dutch 
Church at Flatbush), Femmetje (Phebe) Remsen of New Albany; born i 

August, 1657; died , 1745 ; daughter of Rem Jansen Vanderbeeck and 

Janetje Jorese (Rapalie). 

Joseph^ and Femmetje (Remsen) Hegeman had eleven children; 

12 1. Jannetje,' born 24 October, 167S; married , Cornelius 

Hoogland. 

13 + 2. Elbert,' born , i68j; married, 30 April, 1710, Marytje 

Rapalje. 

14 3. Catharine, 3 born about 16S9; married 20 October, 171 1, Tunis 

Bogaert; of Staten Island, New York. 

15 4. Peter' (supposed) born about 1691; married, first, ; 

; married, second, 13 December, 1746, Anna or Magda- 

lena Hoogland; they had five children; he resided in 0_\ster 
Bay, Long Island, Nev/ York; he is listed here by Teunis G. 
Bergen; but not in the Documentary History of Oyster Bay. 

16 + 5. Adriaen/ born 29 October, 1680; married 29 May, 1703, Marytje 

Cornell or Cornellisen. 

17 6. Elizabeth,^ born 2 November, 16S2; married 29 October, 170!, 

Lourens Ditmars. 

i8 7. Rem,^ bapt. S February 1685; he made his v/il! 19 .May, 1759; 
proved at New York, 6 April, 1767; married 6 May, 171 5, 
Peternella Van Wicklen; they had four children; he resided in 
Flatbush, Long Island, New York. 

19 8. Neeltje' (supposed), born about 1693; married 8 September, 
1 7 16, Court Van Voorhees. 

[189] 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY OF C H \ U N C E Y M . D E P F \V 

20 9. Joseph, 3 bant. 21 August, 16S7, in the Dutch Church, Brooklyn, 

New York; sponsors Ares Van de Bilt and Hillitje Rcmse; 
married, first, 1 .May, 1712, Adriaentje Van W'vck; married, 
second, 6 February, 1714, Sarah Vander Vliet; they had nine 
children; he resided at Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 
where he made his will 1 April, 1741; proved at New York, 
5 .May, 1 74 1. 

21 10. Francis, 3 born about i6gy, resided in New Lotts, Long Island, 

New York; no more trace. 

22 II. Frans' (supposed), born about 1690; married 29 October, 1709, 

Antie Ruard; no more trace. 

Joseph^ Hegeman, resided in New Lotts, Long Island, New York. He 
emigrated from .Amsterdam with his father. He was residing in Flatbush, 
Long Island, New York, as early as 165S. He owned there a farm of forty 
and a half morgens of land. In 1677 he was a member of the Dutch Church 
of Flatbush, and in 1690 he was an Elder. 

He took the oath of allegiance in 1687 in Flatbush; he was appointed 
Cornet of Horse in 1689; he opposed in 1690 the Leislerian faction; and his 
name appears on the census of 1698. In 1710, with others, he bought the 
Harlington tract in Somerset County, New Jersey. By order of Governor 
Andros, a list was made out of the owners of the New Lotts of ".Midwout" 
as made 2 .April, 1680 by Joseph Hegeman and Stoffel Probasco, overseers 
of said town. 

See the printed Saint Nicholas Society Year Book, 1905, page 47; also 
the printed 1881 Early Settlers of Kings County, Long Island, New York, 
by Teunis G. Bergen, on page i 35 ; also the printed 1895 American .Ancestr" , 
by Joel iMunsell, volume X, page 78. 

THIRD GENER.ATION 

13. Elbert^ Hegeman (Joseph, = Adriaen'), born , 1687; died 22 

October, 1777; aged in his 91st year; buried in New Lotts, Long Island, 
New York; married 30 April, 17 10 (intentions 8 April, 1710), by Vincentius 
Antonides, in the Dutch Church, Flatbush, Long Island, New York, to 

[ 190] 



I T H E H E G E M A N L 1 N E 

( . 

I 

Marytjc Rapalje; born , 1677; death not found; daughter oi Daniel 

[ and Sarah (Klock) Rapalje. 

t They had two children: 

I 60 + 1. Jacobus,^ born 12 February, 1711; married 4 October, 1732, 

i Gertruyt Onderdonk. 

'; 61 2. Daniel,^ born 22 December, I7i2:died 12 .March, 17S6; married 

I 6 April, 1734, Catharine Onderdonk: they had three children 

i Elbert' Hegeman was of Oostv/ould. or New Lotts, Long Island, New 

I York. The New York Gazette of 10 November, 1777, says of Elbert* 

I Hegeman: "He was no less remarkable for his Piety than his Benevolence, 

I and exhibited to us in a remarkable instance of his Attention to the divine 

Laws of his Creator, having read the Bible through no less than Three 
\ hundred and Sixty-Five Tim.es." 

See the printed 1902 Documentary History of Oyster Bay, Long Island, 
New York, by Henry A. Stoutenburgh, page 248; also the printed iSSt 
Early Settlers of Kings County, Long Island, New York, by Teunis G. 
Bergen, page i 36. 

16. Adriaen' Hegeman (Joseph. = Adriaen'). born 29 October, 16S0; 
bapt. 31 October, 16S0 in the Dutch Church, Brooklyn, New York; sponsors, 
Henderikes Hegeman and Catryna Hegeman; died 28 February, 1747; 
buried at Cedar Sv.'amp, Long Island, New York; married, 29 May, 1703, 

Marytje Cornell or Cornellisen, born April, 1686; died 30 January, 

1828; daughter of Peter Cornellisen and .Margrietje (Verscheur). 

They had five children: 

67 + 1. Peter/ born in Brooklyn, New York, 3 June, 1704; married, first, 
IVlay, 30 1728, Jannetje .Monfoorc: married, second, 4 December, 
1729, Madaleentje Derie; married, third, 13 December, 1747, 
Annetje Hogeland. 

68 2. Femmetje,' born 28 .May, 1708; married 15 November, 1728, 
John Schenck, of Flatbush, Long Island, New York; went to 
Flatlands; they had five children. 

[191] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E 'i' y\ . D H P F. V/ 

69 3. Joseph/ born 29 June, 1710; died 5 February, 1793; married 17 

May, 1735, Sarah Martense; he resided at Cedar Swamp, 
Queens County, New York; they had four children: 

70 4. Adriaen,-' born 10 December, 171,2; married , Dorothy 

Onderdonk; they had three children. 

71 5. Maragritta,-" born 21 July, 1719; married , John Schenck 

of Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York; they had six children. 

Adriaen^ Hegeman resided in New Lotts, Long Island, New York. He 
was at one period residing at Brooklyn ferry. He settled in Oyster Buy, 
Long Island, New York, owning at first West island, at Dosoris. On 24 
April, 1 72 1, he bought 208 acres at Cedar Swamp, on the road leading frcm 
Muskeata Cove to Lucum, from Captain Joseph Dickinson and his son 
Joseph Dickinson. On 12 December, 1725, he bought land from. Zebulon 
Dickinson. The record of dates are found among his papers, which are 
still preserved. 

See the printed 1905 Saint Nicholas Society Year Book, on page 47; 
also the printed iSSi Early Settlers of Kings County, New York, by Teuriis 
G. Bergen, page i 35; also the printed 1902 Documentary History of Oyster 
Bay, Long Island, New York, by Henry A. Stoutenburgh, page 243. 

FOURTH GENERATION 

60. Jacobus^ Hegeman (Elbert,' Joseph, = Adriaen'), born 12 February, 
1711; died 20 December, 1747; at Oyster Bay, Long island. New York; 
buried at Cow Neck; married 4 October, 1732, Gertruyt Onderdonk, born 
22 August, 1713; died 21 February, 1785; buried at Cow Neck; daughter 
of Judge Andries* and Gertrude (Lott) Onderdonk; they resided at Man- 
hassett, or Cov/ Neck, Queens County, Long Island, New York. 

They had four children. 

390 I. Gertruyd, 5 born 13 August, 1733; died 30 August, 1777; married 
17 November, 1758, Joost^ Hegeman; see number 421; she was 
also called Charity. 

[ 192] 



THE H E G E M A N LINE 



391 2. Elbert, 5 born ii February, 1735; died 31 January, 1S02, buried 

at Cow Neck; he was a school master. 

392 3. Andris J ,^ born 16 April, 1739; married 31 July, 1769, 

Dorothy Monfoort; they had three children. 

393 4. Daniel, 5 born i April, 1745; bapt. 19 July, 1745; lost at sea, 

I September, 1772. 

See the printed 1895 American .Ancestry, by Joel Munsell, Volume X, 
page 79; also the printed 1902 Documentary History of Oyster Bay, Long 
Island, New "I'ork, by Henry .A.. Stoutenburgh, page 25!. 

67. Peter^ Hegeman (Adriaen,' Joseph,- AdriaenO, born 3 June, 1704, 
in Brooklyn, New York; (1706 in the History of Oyster Bay) ; bapt. 9 June, 
1906; died 23 September, 1770, at Cedar Sv/amp, Long Island, New York; 

married, first, 30 May, 1728, Jannetje Monfoort; born ; died 3 

December, 1728; married, second, 4 December, 1729, Madaleentje Derie 
(Anna Derje, has the Saint Nicholas Society Year Book), born 29 May, 
1705, in Brooklyn, New York; died 28 October, 1 745; daughter of Joost and 
Helena (Folkerts) Derie; married, third, 13 December, 1747, Annetje 

Hogeland; born ; died 27 May, 1777; no children by the first and 

third wives. 

Peter^ and Madaleentje (Derie) Hegeman had two children: 

420 I. Adriaen,' born about 1731 ; married , Anna}' Sennet; they 

had four children. 

421 +2. Joost^ or George, 5 born i January, 1735; married 17 November, 

1758, Gertruyd" Hegeman; Number 390; she was also called 
Charity. 

Peter* Hegeman, on the 24th May, 1753, bought in Mill River Swamp. 
He sold land to his son Joost Hegeman for six Hundred pounds on 18 April, 
1767. He resided at Cedar Swamp. See the printed 1S95 American An- 
cestry, by Joel Munsell, volume X, page 79; also the printed 1905 Saint 
Nicholas Society Year Book, page 47; also the printed 1902 Documentary 
History of Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York, by Henry A. Stoutenburgh, 
page 257. 

[•93] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A L' N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

The Surrogates Records in New York City, has the will dated 22 
April, 1769; proved 28 November, 1771; of Peter Hegeman, in liber 28,. 
at page 145. 

FIFTH GENERATION 

421. Joost^ or George^ Hegeman (Peter,^ Adriaen,' Joseph,- Adriaen'), 
born I January, 1733, at Cedar Swamp, Queens County, Long Island, New 
York; died there 24 January, 1790; married 17 November, 1758, Gertru}'d 
Hegeman (Num.ber 390), born 13 August, 1735; died 30 August, 1777; 
daughter of Jacobus^ and Gertruyt (Onderdonk) Hegeman; the wife was 
also called Charity. 

They had seven children: 

590 I. Madelina,' born 3 October, 1759; married i 3 November, 1786, 

Thomas Doxey; they had two children. 

2. iMarya,'" born 16 April, 1 761 ; died 26 .April, 1794. 

591 3. James, ^ born 5 .March, 1765; married 12 December, 1795, 

Catharine Onderdonk; they had seven children. 

592 4. Annetje," born 23 June, 1766; married 16 October, 1791, Rern 

Bennet Simonson; they had three children. 

593 5. Peter, '^ born 14 February, 1769; married 2 March, 1795, Rosetta 

Crooker; they had no children. 

594 6. Elbert, « born 5 July, 1771; married 25 January, 1795, .Margaret 

Crooker; they had four children. 

595 +7- Adriaen," born 15 August, 1773; married , Eliza 

Balstes. 

Joost^ Hegeman lived at .Mill River Hollow and Cedar Swamp, Long 
Island, New York: See printed 1895 American Ancestry, by Joel Munsell, 
volume X, page 79; also the printed 1903 Saint Nicholas Society Year Book, 
page 47; also the printed 1902 Documentary History of Oyster Bay, Long 
Island, New York, by Henry A. Stoutenburgh, page 254. 

[ 194] 



THE H E G E M AX LINE 

SIXTH GEXERATION 

595. Adrian*' Hegeman (Joost,' Peter, ^ Adriaen,^ Josephs Adriaen'), 

born 13 August, 1773: died 21 Juh', 1826, in New York; married , 

Eliza Balster; born , 1787; died 17 June, 1S69 or 1S70 on Thursday, 

aged 79 years, in the City of .Mexico, at the residence of her son-in-law 
General William S. Rosecrans, United States Minister to Mexico. 

Adrian'" and Eliza (Balster) Hegeman had three children: 

833 + I- William," born , 1S16; married , Eliza Jane Niven. 

834 2. Ann Eliza,' born ; married 24 August, 1S43, -Major 

General William Stark Rosecrans; born 6 September, 1819, in 
Kingston Township, Delaware County, Ohio; he was still 
living 15 March, 1896; son of Crandall and Jemima (Hopkins) 
Rosecrans; the picture of .Ann Eliza is on page 2S7 of the 
printed 1900 Rosenkrans Family; they had eight children: 
(i) William, 5 (2) James .Addison, ^ (3) Adrian Louis,' (4) 

Lily R ,3 (5) Mary Louise,^ (6) Anna D / (7) 

Carl Frederick,^ (8) Charlotte.^ 

835 3. Adrian," born . 

The printed 1900 Rosenkrans Family, by Allen Rosenkrans, on page 
286 says he was Judge Adrian Hegeman of St. Johns, New Brunswick; but 
the New York City, Surrogates Records, in liber 60, on page 377, have the 
will of Adrian Hegeman, of New York, Attorney at Law, dated 14 February 
1818, codicil 30 September, 1810, proved 10 .August, 1826; names his wife, 

Eliza, sons William and .Adrian; bequest to John C. Flegeman; 

Executors wife Eliza, his brother Peter Hegeman and his son George 
Adrian Hegeman; witnesses Eliza Wiggin and Benjamin Clark and John 
Coffm. 

SEVENTH GEXER.ATION 

833. William" Hegeman (Adrian,^ Joost,' Peter, ■» .Adriaen,^ Joseph,' 

AdriaenO, born , 1816; died 3 October 1875, in New York, married 

Eliza Jane Niven; born about 1823; died 29 July, 1895; daughter 

of George W Niven and Charlotte (Johnston). 

[195] 



HAUNCEYDEPEW, 

LATE SENATOR'S 

SON, DEAD AT 53 

X-~' York. I \T\. ■;-". — li ,.e-;:a'..l — 
ai'-inTey ^t. U'-rpe'-v Jr. son of the 
te Senator Ij;'."»-.'.v a"--l of his f.rsc 
i:=. Mrs. E:=:9 Kric-rr.jin Drpe'.v. die! 
■cav ?: his rcrA'i at'^r aa iiliiess oi 
•^"cra; •-'.■ys of pne'jrr.onia. 
:ir. r ;:?v. v.;o v.as in his 54tl\ 
.'.';!. ■-■1., ur."-?.rr:c"j. Ke was sraJu- 
-' . ::-.::: Cc;ui:ii..:i. Jii-ivsrs.Cy in 1301 
vl v-i-' a niern'uer c: a numter oi 
ccir.;::c-r.t clubs in th'5 Ci^y, ir.ciudinv: 
le Vriversity, the Metropolitan, th? 
ot.i;= ar.d th» Union I-ei-ue. 
H'' is suivived ty i-.is cou'^in. 



I THE REiMSEN LINE 

i 

\ 1. Rem lansen' Van der Beeck, born about 1620 in Holland; died 

I, , 16S1; married 21 December, 1642, Jannetje Rapali or Rapalje; 



born 18 August, 1629; death not found; daughter of George and Catalyntje 
(Trico) Rapalje. 

They had seventeen children: 

1. Annetje,= bapt. 12 March, 1645, in the Dutch Church, New 

Amsterdam; sponsors, Joris Rappalje and Catalyn Joris and 
Margrietje Hendricks; she died young. 

2. Hilletje,^ bapt. 20 January, 1647, ^^ Beiitie, in the Dutch Church, 

New Amsterdam; sponsors, Joris Rappalje and Cataiina Trico; 
she died young. 

2 3. Jan, 2 bapt. 12 January, 1648, in the Dutch Church, New 

Amsterdam; sponsors, Michiel Pauluszen and Hendrick 
Willemszen, Backer, and Sara Rapalje; bapt. g February, 
1648, by another account; married li December, 160!, 
Martha Jans Damon; they had nine children. 

3 4. Joris, = born 2 February, 1650; married 2 Novem.ber, 1684, 

Femmetje Dirks Woertman; they had nine children. 

4 5. Rem,= born 2 December, 1652; married Marratie Van- 

derbilt; they had eight children; see page 47 of Bergen Gen- 
ealogy for 1 68 3 deed. 

5 6. Hilletje,- born 16 September, 1653; married 6 October, 1677, 

Aris Janse Vanderbilt; they had eleven children. 

6 7. Cataiina, = born 4 October, 1655; married iS April, loSo, Elbert 

Adriance; no more trace. 

7+8. Femmetje,- born i August, 1657; married 21 October, 1677, 
Joseph- Hegeman; see page 189. 

[ >97] 



C FJ R O N O L O G ^' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y ^\ . D E I' E W 

8 9. Jannetj'er born about 1639: married supposed 20 April, 16S5, 

Gerrct Hansen Nostrand; the\- had nine children. 

9 10. Annar born 11 April, 1660; married , Jan Gerretsen 

Dorlandt; they had four children. 

10 II. Jacob, = born 11 .April, 1G62; married i3i\la\' (or August), 16S7, 

Gertrude Dircks \'an Dervliet; they had one child. 

11 12. Jeron\-mus,- born about 1664: married about 16SS, Cataiina 

Berryan; had no sons. 

12 13. Daniel, = born about 1665; married , Jane Ditmars; they 

had no sons. 

13 14. Abraham, = born 16 September, 1667; married about 1692, Ann 

Aertsen Aliddagh; they had five children. 

14 15. Sarah, = born 6 December, 1670; married about 1694, Martin 

Adrianse; they had five children. 

15 16. Isaac, = born 4 September, 1673; married, first, about 1699, Sarah 

Monfoort; they had three children; married, second, about 
1708, Hendrikje ; the_\' had six children. 

16 17. Jeremiasr born loSeptember, 1675; married, first, 26 September, 

1698, Heyltje Probasco: married, second, Jannetje 

Voorhees; he had nine children. 

Rem Jansen' Van Der Beeck emigrated from leveren or Jeveren, in 
Westphalia, Holland; by another account from Coevorden, in Drenthe, 
Netherlands; he was in New Amsterdam, 1643 to 1651; he was in 
Beverwyck, now Albany, New York, from 1635 to 1660, where he 
waj nominated in 1655 for Commissaris, and where he sold his house 
and lot in 1660; to the "Waleboght." Brooklyn, New York, in 1643, '" 
which place he owned several houses and lots. In 1663, he v.'as 
complained of by Adriaen Hegeman for carrying off a plough-share, and 
was ordered by the court to replace it in the spot where he found it, and if 
he had any claim to prosecute it at lav/ fsee volume 6, page 5, Records 
of New Amsterdam.) Some authorities sa\- his sons were called Rcm's 
sons, hence the name. This explanation is not entirely satisfactory for the 
change of the name from Van Der Beeck to Remsen; and will not apply 

[198] 



THE R E M S E N LI N E 

in similar instances. We find Hendrick R\'cken was the ancestor of the 
Suydam Family; and Dirck Jansen Van Amsterdam was the ancestor of 
the Dey Family. One must look deeper for these changes in names. 
The printed 1905 Saint Nicholas Society Year Book, on page 255, has, 
Rem Janse Van Der Beeck, the founder of the Remsen Family, was 
descended from German and Dutch Ancestors. He came here in 1642. 
When his father-in-law purchased Wallabout, he brought his family down 
the Hudson River from Albany, and made his home in Brooklyn. He held 
various offices, and became a magistrate during the Dutch Administration. 
At his funeral fifteen of his children, with their wives, husbands, and 
children, were present. The printed 1S52 History of Newtown, Long 
Island, New York, by James Riker, on page 3S5, gives the coat-of-arms, and 
says it was granted them in 1 162 by Frederick Barbarossa, the Emperor of 
the Holy Roman Empire. 

The son Jan= Remsen, made his will 2 May, 1696; proved at New York, 
28 January, 171 i. 

See the printed 1902 Documentary History of Oyster Bay, by Henry A. 
Stoutenburgh, page 460; also the printed iSSi Early Settlers of Kings 
County, Long Island, New York, by Teunis G. Bergen, page 239. 

7. Femmetje^ Remsen and Joseph- Hegeman had a son: 

Adriaen' Hegeman, born 29 October, 1680; married 29 -May, 1703, Marytje 
Cornellisen. 

Adriaen' Hegeman and .Marytje Cornellisen had a son: 

Peter^ Hegeman, born 3 June, 1704; married, second, 4 December, 1729, 
Madaleentje Derie. 

Peter-* Hegeman and Madaleentje Derie had a son: 

Joost^ Hegeman, born i January, 1733; married 17 November, 1758, 
Gertruyd^ Hegeman. 

Joost^ Hegeman and Geertruyd Hegeman had a son: 

Adriaen" Hegeman, born 15 August, 1773; married , Eliza Balster. 

[ 199] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C 1 1 A U N C E Y y\ . D E P E W 

Adrioen^ Hegeman and Eliza Balster had a son; 
William' Hegeman, born , 1816; married , Eliza Jane Niven. 

William' Hegeman and Eliza Jane Niven had a daughter: 
Elise Ann^ Hegeman, born 16 November, 1S4S; married 9 November, 1871, 
Chauncey Mitchell Depew. 

Elise Ann' Hegeman and Chauncey .Mitchell Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 7 July, 1879, in New York City. 



THE RAPALJE LINE 

I. Joris (George) Jansen' De Rapalje, born about 1600; died about 
1665; married about 1623, Catalyntie Trico; born about 1605 in Paris, 
France; died 11 September, 1689, aged 84 years, in Brooklyn, New York; 
daughter of Joris Trico. 

They had eleven children, as per the Family record preserved in the 
New York Historical Society. 

2 1. Sarah= Jorise, born 9 June, 1625, in Albany, New York; she is 

said to be the first female white child born in New Netherlands, 
but this has been disputed; married first,, about 1639, Hans 
Hansen Bergen; they had eight children; married, second, 
about 1654, Tunis Gysbertse Bogaert; they had seven children. 

3 2. Marretje,- born 16 March. 1627; married 18 November, 1640, 

Michael Paulus Vandervoort; they had ten children. 

4 3. Jamietje,= born 18 August, 1629; married 21 December, 1642, 

Rem Jansen' Vander Beeck; see page 197. 

5 4. Judith, = born 5 July, 1635; married Pieter Pietersen 

Van Nest; they had ten children. 

6 5. Jan, 2 born 28 August, 1637; married, first, 26 April, 1660, Maria 

Fredericks (Maer); they had one child; married, second, 
Antie (loerta; they had one child. 

7 6. Jacob, = born 28 May, 1639; killed , by the Indians. 

8 7. Catelyntje,^ born 28 March, 1641; bapt. 29 March 1641, in the 

Dutch Church in New Amsterdam; sponsors, Michiel Paulus- 
-zen and Sara Rapalje; married 16 August, 1664, Jeremias 
Jansen Van Westerhout; they had no children. 

9 8. Jeronemus,^ born 27 June, 1643; bapt. 28 June, 1643, in the 

Dutch Church in New Amsterdam; sponsors, Hans Hanszen 
and Rem Janszen and Jannetje Rappalje; married about 1667, 
Anna Teunis Denyse; they had eight children. 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y !A . D E P E V. 

ID 9. Annetjer born 8 February, 1646; bapt. 11 February, 1646, in 
the Dutch Church in New Amsterdam; one sponsor Sara 
Planck; married, first, 14 May, 1663, Marten Ryerse; they 
had eight children; married, second, 30 January, 1692, Joost 
France or Fransz. 

11 10. Ehzabeth,- born 26 March, 1648; bapt. ?o March, 164S. in the 

Dutch Church in New Amsterdam; sponsors Paulus Leen- 
dertszen \'an dergrift and Pieter CorneHszen and Marritje 
Joris; married about 1665, Dirck Cornehse Hoogland; they 
had five children. 

12 + 11. Daniel, = born in New York, 29 December, 1650; baptized 1 

January, 1651, in the Dutch Church in New Amsterdam; 
sponsors, Lodowyck CorneHszen and Susanna Lievens ; 
married 27 May, 1674, Sarah Klock. 

Joris Jansen^ De Rapalie came from La Rochelle, France, in 1623, in 
the ship Unity; he is said to be descended from a noble family of Brittany. 
He resided at first at Fort Orange, Albany, New York, for about three vears; 
came to New .Amsterdam, 1637 to the Wallabout. Brooklyn, New York, 
on his plantation of 167 morgens, for which he obtained a patent of 33s 
acres of land on the 16 June, 1637, called Rennegaconck, near the present 
site of the United States Marine Hospital: he died soon after the close of 
the Dutch administration. He was one of the twelve men representing 
New Netherlands in 1641: he was a magistrate in Brooklyn, in 1655. in 
1656, in 1657, in 1660, and in 1662. 

The 1897 printed Almy Genealogy, by Charles Kingsbury .Miller, on 
page 91, says. The Rappelye Family was prominent in Bretagne, France, 
where as early as the eleventh century, they possessed large estates and 
ranked among the arriere-ban of the French nobility. The name appears 
as Rappleyea, Raplee, Rapaiyea, Rapaley, Rappley, Rappeley, Rapalje, 
Rapleje, Rappelje, Rappalye, etc. 

The printed 1851, .American Genealogy, by Jerome B. Holgate, on page 

17, says, Gaspard Colet De Rapalje, born 1303 in Chatillon. Sur 

Loir, France, was a Colonel of Infantry 22 Decem^ber, 1543; went to 
Holland after 1548; married , a daughter of Victor .\ntoine Janssen; 

[202] 



THE R A P A L J E LINE 



I they had three children: (i) Gaspard Coligne De Rapalje; (2) Abram 

\ Colet De Rapalje; (3) Breckje De Rapalje, born ; married about 

I 1569, her cousin \'ictor Honorius Jansijn; they had a son Abram Janssen; 

born ; married 13 June, 1594, a daughter of Hans Lodewyck, of 

Amsterdam; they had three children: 

[ I. William Janssen de Rapalje; died single at Gravesend, Long Island, 

New York. 

2. Joris Janssen de Rapalje; married about 1623, Catalyntie Trico. 

3. Antoine Van Salers. 

The printed 1902 Documentary History of Oyster Bay, Long Island, 
New York, by Henry A. Stoutenburgh, on page 445, has the following 
important document: 

"Catelyn Trico, aged about 83 years born in Paris doth Testify and 
Declare that in ye year 1623 she came into this Country with a ship called 
ye Unity whereof was Commander Arien Jorise belonging to ye West 
India Company being ye first Ship yt came here for ye sd Company; as 
soon as they came to Mannatans now called N: York they sent Two 
Families & Six men to harford River & Two families & 8 men to Delaware 
River and 8 men they left att N : York to take Possession and ye Rest of 
ye Passengers went wth ye ship up as farr as Albany which they then 
called for Orangie. When as ye ship came as farr a Sopus which is J^2 way 
to Albanie: they lightned ye Ship wth some boats yt were left there by ye 
Dutch that had been there ye year before a tradeing wth ye Indians upont 
there oune accompte & gone back again to Holland & so brought ye vessel 
up: there were about 18 families aboard who settled themselves att Albany 
& made a small fort; and as soon as they had built themselves some hutts 
of Bark; ye Mahikanders or River Indians ye Maquase: Oneydes: Onnon- 
dages Cayouges, & Sinnekes, wth ye Mahawawa or Ottawav/aes Indians 
came & made Covenants of friendship wth ye sd Arien Jorise there com- 
mander Bringing him great Presents of Bever or oyr Peltry & desyred that 
they might come & have a Constant free Trade with them wch v.as con- 
cluded upon & ye sd natives came dayly with great multicius of Beaver & 
traded them wth ye Christians, there sd Commanr Arien Jorise staid with 
them all winter and sent his sonne home with ye ship; ye sd Deponent 

[203] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E Vv 

lived in Albany three years all which time ye sd Indians were all as quiet as 
Lambs & came & Traded with all ye freedom Imaginable, in ye \-ear i6:.6 
ye Deponent came from Albany & settled at N : York where she lived after- 
wards for many years and then came to Long Island where she now lives. 

The sd Catelyn Trico made oath of ye sd Deposition before me at her 
house on Long Island in ye Walebought this 17th day of October, 1688. 

William Morris, 

Justice of ye pece." 

See the printed 1881 Early Settlers of Kings County, New ^'ork, by 
Teunis G. Gergen, page 234: printed 1852 History of Newtown, Long 
Island, New York, page 267, where the coat-of-arms is given: the printed 
1905 Saint Nicholas Society Year Book, page 244: the printed 1845 History 
of Long Island, New York, by Nathaniel S. Prime, pages 358 to 360; the 
printed 1896 New Y'ork Genealogical and Biographical Record, Volume 
XXVII, page 36; the printed 1889 American Ancestry, by Joe! Munsell, 
volume 4, page 9 1 ; the printed 1S76 Bergen Genealogy, by Teunis G. Bergen, 
page 15. 

SECOND ge\:er.ation 

12. Daniel= Rapaiye (George'), born in New York, 29 December, 
1650; died in Brooklyn, New York, 26 Decem.ber, 1725; married 27 May, 
1674, in the Dutch Church, New York, J. M. (young man) Van N: Orangien 
En Sarah Klock, J. D. (young woman) als voren,; born about 1652; died 
28 February, 1731, aged 79 years; daughter of Abraham and Tryntie 
(Alberts) Klock. 

They had nine children: 

87 I. Joris^ or George, = born 4 March, 1675; bapt. 15 March, 1673, in 

the Dutch Church, New York; sponsors, Hieronymus Rappalje 
and Catharina Clock; married about 1697, Agnes Berrien; they 
had seven children. 

88 +2. Marytie^ or Mary', born about 1677; married 30 April, 1710, 

Elbert' Hegeman; see page 190. 

[204] 



THE R A P A L J E LINE 



I 89 3. Abraham,^ born 14 January, 1677; bapt. 24 January, 1677, in 

[ the Dutch Church, New York; sponsors, Marten Klock and 

I Tryntie Klock; no more trace. 

[ 90 4. Catharine,' born 7 February, 1679; married , Joseph Van 

[ Cleef ; they had one child. 

f 91 5. Annetie,^ bapt. 27 March, iGSi, in the Dutch Church, Flatbush, 
Long Island, New York; sponsors Marten Abramz Klok and 
Anetie Tunis; married , Cornelius Voorhees. 

92 6. Sarah, 3 bapt. 3 June, 1687, in the Dutch Church, Flatbush, 
Long Island, New York; sponsors Hend'k Slecht and Lisbet 
Abrams; married 30 April, 1712-1713, Peter Luyster; they had 
seven children. 

93 7. Altie,3 born about 1689; married , Gilbert Schenck; no 

more trace. 

94 8. Daniel,^ bapt. 11 April, 1691, in the Dutch Church, in Brooklyn, 
New York; sponsors, Mi^hiel Hansen and Tryntie Abrams; 
married 17 October, 1711 Altie Cornell; they had ten children; 
he resided in Newtown, Long Island, New York, where he made 
his will 17 March, 1736-1737; proved at New York 20 .April, 
1737- 

95 9. Cornelia' (supposed), born about 1693; married , Hendrick 

Brinckerhoff. 

Daniel' Rapal>-e resided at first in Wallabout, Brooklyn, New York; he 
appears on the assessment rolls of Brooklyn for 1675 and 1683, where he 
took the oath of allegiance in 1687 as a native; he was an Ensign in the 
Brooklyn Company in 1673; he was a Lieutenant in 1700; he was a member 
of the Dutch Church in Brooklyn in 1677 and an Elder, and a man of high 
respectability. 

See the printed 1902 Documentary History of Oyster Bay, Long Island, 
New York, by Henry A. Stoutenburgh, on page 441 ; also the printed 1889 
American .Ancestry, by Joel Munsell, volume 4, on page 92. 

In the office of the New York City, Surrogate, among the unrecorded 
papers, is the original will of Daniel Rapalye, of "Brookland," dated 29 
September, 1722; proved 10 May, 1728. 



C H R O N O L O G "I' AND A N C H S T R "i' OF C H A U N C E \' M . D E P E Vv' 

88. iMarytie^ Rapalje and Elbert^ Hegeman had a son: 
Jacobus* Hegeman, born 12 February, 171 1; married 4 October, 1732, 
Gertruyt Onderdonk. 

Jacobus^ Hegeman and Gertruyt Onderdonk had a daughter: 
Gertruyd^ Hegeman, born 13 August, 1733; married 17 November, 1758, 
Joost= Hegeman. 

Gertruyd=' Hegeman and Joost Hegeman had a son: 
Adriaen' Hegeman, born 15 August, 1773; married , Eliza Balster. 

Adriaen' Hegeman and Eliza Balster had a son: 
William' Hegeman, born , 1816; married , Eliza Jane Niven. 

William' Hegeman and Eliza Jane Niven had a daughter: 
Elise Ann* Hegeman, born 16 November, 1848; miarried 9 November, 1871, 
Chauncey Mitchell Depew. 

Elise Ann* Hegeman and Chauncey .Mitchell Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell' Depew, born 7 July, 1S79, i^ Nev.^ York, City. 



206 



THE CORNEL I SE LINE 

I. Gelyam' or Guilliame' Cornelise (or Cornele), born about 1620; 
died before 17 July, 1666; married about 1648, ; unknown. 

They had five children: 

2 + 1. Pieter Gilliamsen,= born about 1650; married about 1675, Alar- 

garietje Verscheur. 

3 2. Willem Gillemse,2 born about 1652; married , Margarita 

Polhemus; they had seven children. 

4 3. Cornelius^ (supposed), born about 1654. 

5 4. Jacobs born about 1656; no more trace. 

6 5. Maria,' born about 1658; married probably , Cornelis 

Beackman, of New Utrecht, Long Island, New York; (see New 
York Wills, page 34 of libers one and two). 

Guilliame' Cornelise emigrated at an early period; he is thought to have 
been a Huguenot; he settled at Fiitbush, Long Island, New York; on the 
9 of August, 1658 he procured from Director Pieter Stuyvesant a patent for 
a plantation at Midwout, now Flatbush. He and his son "Pieter Geli- 
amse" paid 4500 guilders in 1661 to Jan Evertse Bout for a "bouwery" in 
Flatbush on the West side of the highway 60 rods in length and 48 rods 
and 8 feet in width containing 48 morgens and 480 rods with building-lots, 
plain and meadow land. The name has been changed to Cornell. 

The New York City, Surrogates Records, libers three and four, page 
194, has the administration of Catalyntie Frans of New York City, granted 
8 May, 1691, to her daughter Elizabeth Cornelison. This may be the wife 
of the Guilliame' Cornelise. 

He had also two pieces of salt meadow of 5 morgens; two pieces of plain 
land of five morgens; two house or building plots on the West side of the 
highway, of 16 rods in length and 12 rods in breadth, with the houses and 

[207] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H .S U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

barns thereon; and also two black draw-oxen, three milk-cows, a wagon 
plough, iron chain, and a cramp-iron to hold saw teeth when filling — all 
for the one sum — as per page 73, of liber B, of Flatbush Records. 

See the printed 18S1 Early Settlers of Kings County, New York, by 
Teunis G. Bergen, page 71. 

SECOND GENERATION 

2. Pieter Guilliamse- Cernel (Guilliame' Cornelise); born about 1650; 
died after 23 May, 1689, in Flatbush, Long Island, New York; married 

about 1675, Margarietje Verscheur; born ; died 29 July, 1713 

daughter of Wouter Gysbertse Voorscheur and Dorothea (Callen). 

They had six children: 

I. A child,' bapt. 5 May, 1678, in the Dutch Church, Flatbush, 
Long Island, New York; sponsors, Cors. Steenwick and Mar- 
garetha ; it must have died young, 

7 2. Gilliam,' bapt, 23 August, 1679; married 4 November, 1710, in 

Flatbush, Cornelia Van Nortwyck; they had six children. 

8 3, Cornelis,' bapt, 13. 'August, 1681, in the Dutch Church, Brooklyn, 

New York; sponsors. Cornells Steenwyck and Grietje Steen- 
wycks; he died 26 May, 1704, 

9 4, Jacobes,' bapt. 11 November, 1683; died iS August, 1699. 

ID 5. Marya' or Maria," born — April, 1686; bapt. 29 April, 1686 in the 
Dutch Church, Brooklyn, New York; sponsors Gerardes 
Beeckman and .Machdeleentje Beeckman; married 29 May 
1703, Adriaen' Hegeman; see page 189, 

II 6, Perer,' born ; married about 1699 Catharine Laning; they 

had two children; he went to Bucks County, Pennsylvania. 

Pieter Guilliamse^ Cernel resided in Flatbush, Long Island, New York. 
On the 14 April, 1668, he, as heir of his father sold to Lowys Jansen about 
27 morgens and 330 rods of the patent of upwards of 48 rnorgens granted to 
his father 9 August, 1658, with salt meadows and plain land, as per page 36 
of liber C of the Flatbush Records. He was on the assessment rolls of 

[208I 



THE C O R N E L I S E LINE 



Flatbush in 1675 and 16S3; and he was on the Flatbush Patent of 16S5; 
and in 1677 he was a member of the Dutch i-leformed Church. He raid 
40 guilders on the 17 July, 1666 for burying his father and mother in the 
Flatbush Church. 

He was commissioned a Lieutenant of the Flatbush Company 8 October, 
1686, as "Pierre Guilleaum" as per page 48 of the Calendar of English 
Manuscripts. He signed his name as "Pieter Wuellemsen '' On the 2 
February, 1670, he was allotted, in pursuance of the patent of Flatbush, a 
double lot in said town lying between the lands of Adriaen Reyerse and 
those of Hendrick Jorise (Brinckerhoff) containing 48 morgens and 39 rods, 
with plain land, as per page 5 of liber A, of the Flatbush Records. 

See the printed 1881 Early Settlers of Kings County, Nesv York, by 
Teunis G. Bergen, page 73. 

The printed 1902 Documentary History of Oyster Bay, Long Island, 
New York, page 177, says Henry A. Stoutenburgh, he does not agree with 
Mr. Bergen, on this family; the wife is here given as Margarietje Venielle; 
but that her name was Verscheur is proved by the will, made 23 May, 16S9, 
and recorded on page 141, of liber A, of the Flatbush Town Records, which 
are now kept in the Hall of Records, in Brooklyn, New York. 

10. Marya^ Cornelise and Adriaen' Hegeman had a son : 

Peter^ Hegeman, born 3 June, 1700; married, second, 4 December, 1729 
Madaleentje Derie. 

Peter* Hegeman and Madaleentje Derie had a son: 

Joost^ Hegeman, born i January, 1733; married 17 November, 1758, 
Gertruyd= Hegeman. 

Joost^ Hegeman and Gertru_\'d Hegeman had a son: 
Adriaen^ Hegeman, born 15 August, 1773; married , Eliza Balster. 

Adriaen^ Hegeman and Eliza Balster had a son: 

William" Hegeman; born , 1816; married , Eliza Jane Niven. 

[209] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C E S T R 1' OF C H A U \ C E Y M . D E P E \V 

William' Hegeman and Eliza Jane Niven had a daughter: 
Elise Ann^ Hegeman, born i6 November, 1S4S; married 9 November, 1S71, 
Chauncey Mitchell Depew. 

Elise Anns Hegeman and Chauncey .Mitchell Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell Depew, born 7 July, 1S79, in New York City. 



[210] 



[ THE CLOCK LINE 

I 

1 I. Abraham' Klock, or Clock, born about 1625; death not found; he 

emigrated about 1645: married about 1650 Tryntie Alberts; her parentage 

!has not been found. 
They had five children: 

2 + 1. Sara,= bapt. 10 December, 165!, in the Dutcii Church, New 
Amsterdam; sponsors, Samuel Janszen and Maxmiliaen Van 
Geeland Hilligond Jans; married 27 May, 1674, Daniel^ Rapalye; 
see page 202. 

3 2. Tryntie, = bapt. 18 January, 1654, in the Dutch Church, New 
Amsterdam; sponsors, Johannes Pietersz. van Brug and Chris- 
tina Capoens; probably died young. 

4 3. Captain Marten, = bapt. 10 September, 1656, in the Dutch Church, 
New Amsterdam; sponsors, Corn. Van Ruyven, Secret., and 
Heyltie Pieters; married (intentions 6 May, 1682), 16 May, 1684, 
Lysbeth Abrahams Vanderheul; he was J. M. Van N. Yorck; 
she was J. D. als voren; beide woonende alhier; daughter of 
Abraham Vanderheul; they had no children; she made her will 
at Nev/town Long Island, New York, dated 25 October, 1744; 
proved 27 June, 1753. and recorded in New York City, Surro- 
gates Records, liber 18, page 304; the same Records have the 
unrecorded will (printed in New York Historical Society Collec- 
tions, volume II, page 86) of Marten Clock, of New York; 
shopkeeper, dated 6 December, 1728; proved 4 March. 1728- 1729 
names his wife Elizabeth; two sisters Sarah, the widow of Daniel 
Rapalye and Catharine, wife of Jacob Boelen of New York, 
goldsmith; to the children of my brother Albert Clock, late 
deceased; to my wife's nearest relations Johannes Vanderheuil 
and the children of Tryntie Clock, deceased wife of my brother 

[211] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P C \V 

Albert Clock, deceased, and .Mary De Milt, the widow of Peter 
De Milt, deceased, and Femetje Wynkoop, wife of Benjamin of 
New York, goldsmith, and the children of Hendrick Vander- 
heuil late of New York, deceased: executors my wife and 
Johanes Vanderheuil and Henricus Boelen; witnesses James 
Parsell and Peter Felton and (name illegible.) 

5 4. Catharina,= born about 1658; married 21 May, 1679, Jacob Boelen; 

they had six children. 

6 5. Albertus,- bapt. 26 September, 1660, in the Dutch Church, in 

New Amsterdam; sponsors, Anthony Van Aelst and Evert 
Duicking and Jannetie Verleth; married 23 May, 16S3, Tryntje 
Abrahams (Van der Heul) ; they had nine children. 

2. Sara= Clock and Daniel= Rapalye had a daughter: 
Marytie^ Rapalye, born about 1677; married 30 April, 1710, Elbert' 
Hegeman. 

Marytie^ Rapalye and Elbert Hegeman had a son: 
Jacobus^ Hegeman, born 12 February, 1711; married 4 October, 1732, 
Gertruyt Onderdonk. 

Jacobus^ Hegeman and Gertruyt Onderdonk had a daughter; 
Gertruyd^ Hegeman, born 13 August, 1733; married iy November, 1758, 
Joost^ Hegeman. 

Gertruyd^ Hegeman and Joost Hegeman had a son: 
Adriaen^ Hegeman, born 15 August, 1773; married , Eliza Balster. 

Adriaen" Hegeman and Eliza Balsier had a son: 
William' Hegeman, born , 1816; married , Eliza Jane Niven. 

William' Hegeman and Eliza Jane Niven had a daughter: 
Elise Ann' Hegeman, born 16 November, 1848; married 9 November, 1871, 
Chauncey Mitchell Depew. 

Elise Ann' Hegeman and Chauncey Mitchell Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 7 July, 1879, in New York City. 

[212] 



THE ONDERDONCK LINE 



LL 



I. Adriaense' (Adriaen') Onderdonck; born about 1635; death not 

found; married about 1660, Belitje ; her parentage has not been 

found. 

They had three children : 

2 + 1. Andries^ (Andrew-), born about 1662; married 11 November, 1683 

Maria Vander VHet. 

3 2. Adriaen, = born about 1664; went to Fosters Meadow, now Elmont 



Long Island, New Yortc; no m.ore trace. 
4 3. Hendrick- (supposed), born about 1666; went to Fosters Meadow. 

Adriaense' Onderdonck came from Holland and went to New Castle, 
Delaware. He came to Long Island, New York, and bought land in 
1672 in New Lotts: he was on the 1675 assessment roll of Flatbush, 
Long Island, New York; in 1677 he and his wife were members of the 
Dutch Reformed Church in Flatbush; he paid one thousand guilders on 
the 12 January, 1677-1678 to Leirert Pieterse for lot number 41 in New 
Lotts, of Flatbush, as per page 27 of liber AA of Flatbush Records; in 1680 
he paid five guilders towards the clergyman's salary; and in 1683 he was 
assessed for 108 acres in said town. The printed 1905 Saint Nicholas 
Society Year Book, on page 256, says, Adrian V::n der Donck (died 1655) 
emigrated from Breda, Holland, previous to 1641, in which year he was 
sheriff of Rensselaerwyck. Later he moved to New Amsterdam, where 
he took a prominent part in civic affairs, being one of the leading op- 
ponents to Governor Peter Stuyvesant, and visiting Holland for the 
purpose of urging the West India Company to give larger liberties to the 
people of the colony. He wrote a description of New Netherlands as it 
was in 1650 which shows him to have been a man of considerable literary 
ability. His wife, whom he married in 1645, was .Mary, a daughter of 

[213] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

Reverend Francis Doughty. His descendants are known by the name of 
Onderdonck. 

See the printed 1902 Documentary History of Oyster Bay, Long Island, 
New York, by Henry A. Stoutenburgh, page 427; also the printed 1881 
Early Settlers of Kings County, New York, by Teunis G. Bergen, page 217; 
also the printed 1S52 History of Newtown, Long Island, New York, byjames 
Riker, page 275; also the printed 1S75 New York Genealogical and Bio- 
graphical Record, volume 6, page 1S3; also the printed American Ancestry, 
by Joel Alunsell, 18S8, volume 3, page 221, and volume 7, page 65. 

SECOND GENERATION 

2. Andries^ Onderdonck (Adriaense'), born about 1662, in New Castle, 
Delaware; died before 3 August, 16S7, in Jamaica, Long Island, New York; 
married 11 November, 1683, Maria Vander Vliet; born about 1663; death 
not found; daughter of Dirck Janse Vander Vliet and Geertje (Gerrets); 
the widow Maria married, second, 1 3 August, 1687, Jacob Janse Vanderbilt 
and had five children by him. 

Andries" and Maria (Vander Vliet) Onderdonck had two children: 

5 I. Adriaen,= bapt. 24 August, 1684, in the Dutch Church in New 

Utrecht, Long Island, New York; died aged 80 years; married 

, Sarah Snediker; they had eleven children; he went to 

Nyack, New York. 

6 + 2. Andries,' born i June, 1686; bapt. 13 June, 1686 in the Dutch 

Church, Flatbush, Long Island, New York; sponsors Jan and 
Gertie V. Vliet; married 2 June, 1706, Geertruyt Lott. 

Andries- Onderdonck on the marriage register is entered as being a 
native of New Castle, Delaware, and both as residents of Flatbush at the 
date of marriage. He is on the Communicant lists of the Dutch Church at 
Flatbush from 1677 to 1683. He moved to, and settled in, the tov>'n of 
Jamaica, and died soon after. It is said he was killed by the upsetting of 
a load of straw. His sons sold his Jamaica farm in 1707 and removed to 
Hemptstead, Long Island, New York. 

[214] 



THE ONDERDONCK LINE 



See the printed 1902 Documentary History of Oyster Bay, Long Island, 
New York, by Henry A. Stoutenburgh, page 428; also the printed 1895, 
Long Island Genealogies, by .Mary Powell Bunker, page 316. 



THIRD GENERATION 

6. Judge Andries^ Onderdonck (Andries,= Adriaense') born i June, 
1686; died 21 November, 1758; buried at Cow Neck Long Island, New 
York, where he resided; married 2 June, 1706 Geertruyt Lott; born 6 May, 
16S8; died 9 December, 1731 ; buried at Cow Neck; daughter of Hendrick 
Peretse Lott and Catrina. 

They had ten children: 

20 I. Maria, ■* born 10 March, 1707; bapt. 14 April, 1707 in the Dutch 
Church, Jamaica, Long Island, New York; sponsors, Jacob 

Janse Vandervilt and Maria Van der Vliet; married , 

Jacobus Monfoort; they had no children. 
Catherine,'' born 10 February, 1709; married 6 April, 1734, 

Daniel Hegeman; they had three children. 
Andries,^ born 14 July, 171 1; married — March, 1732, Sarah 
Remsen; they had six children; to Tappan. 

23 + 4. Gertrude,^ born 22 August, 1713; married, 4 October, 1732, 
Jacobus^ Hegeman; see page 191. 

5. Annetie,^ born blind 16 February, 1716; died 1 November, 1741. 

6. Dorothy, ■■ born about 17 19; married , Adriaen' Hegeman; 

see page 246; had three children. 



24 
25 

26 
27 



29 



Sarah, ^ born 6 June. 1722; married about 1749, Thomas Dodge; 

they had six children. 
Hendrick,' born about 1724; married 20 May, 1750, Phebe 

Treadwell; they had twelve children. 
Adrian,^ born 24 December, 1726; died 1794; married 21 

November, 1755, ALaria Hegeman; born 1736; died 1794; 

they had eleven children. 
Peter, ^ born 26 .March, 1730; married 5 June, 1751, Elizabeth 

Schenck; they had ten children. 

[215] 



C H R O N O L O G 'I' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

Judge Andries^ Onderdonck signed his name "Anderese Onderdonk"; 
he was appointed assistant Judge 30 April, 1756. See the printed 1902 
Documentary History of Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York, by Henry A. 
Stoutenburgh, page 428; also the printed 1895 Long Island, New York, 
Genealogies, by Mary Powell Bunker, page 316. 

23. Gertrude-* Onderdonck and Jacobus* Hegeman had a daughter: 
Gertruyd* Hegeman, born 13 August, 1733; married 17 November, 1758. 
Joost^ Hegeman. 

Gertruyd^ Hegeman an Joost Hegeman had a son: 
Adriaen^ Hegeman, born 15 August, 1773; married , Eliza Balster. 

Adriaen^ Hegeman and Eliza Balster had a son: 
William' Hegeman, horn , 1816; married , Eliza Jane Niven. 

William' Hegeman and Eliza Jane Niven had a daughter: 
Elise Ann" Hegeman, born 16 November, 1848; married 9 November, 1S71, 
Chauncey Mitchell Depew. 

Elise Ann^ Hegeman and Chauncey Mitchell Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell' Depew, born 7 July, 1879, in New York City. 



216 



THE VERSCHEUR LINE 

1. Wouter Gysbertse' Verscheur, or Voorscheur, born about 1630; 
death not found; married, first, about 1653, Dorothea Callen (or Caliier); 
her parentage has not been found; married, second, before November, 
1683, Margrietje Hey; no children by the second wife. 

There were four children, by the first wife: 

2 + 1. Margrietje, = born about 1658; married about 1675, Guillamse' 
Cornelise; see page 208; this child is given on the authority of 

[ the late Robert Brown .Miller, of Brooklyn, New York, who was 

very positive of his notes being correct. 

3 2. Hendrick- (supposed), born about 1660. 

4 3. Magdalena,- bapt. 22 April, 1662; she probably married , 

Barnardus Smith. 

5 4. Jochem,= born about 1665; probably married about 1699, 
Catrina . 

Wouter Gysbertse' Verscheur emigrated in 1649; in 1663 he was on the 
muster roll of Bushwick, Long Island, New York, where in 16S7 he took 
the oath of allegiance. 

See the printed 1881 Early Settlers of Kings County, Long Island, 
New York, by Teunis G. Bergen, page 372. 

2. Margrietje^ Verscheur and Guillamse^ Cornelise had a daughter: 
Marya^ Cornelise, born — April, 1686; married 29 May, 1703, Adriaen' 

Hegeman. 

Marya' Cornelise and Adriaen Hegeman had a son: 
Peter'' Hegeman, born 3 June, 1704; married, second, 4 December, 1729, 
Madaleentje Derie. 

[217] 



C H R O N O L O G 'i' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E V, 

Peter'' Hegeman and Madaleentje Derie had a son: 
Joost^ Hegeman, born i January, 1733; married 17 November, 175S, 
Gertruyd= Hegeman. 

Joost^ Hegeman and Gertruyd Hegeman had a son: 
Adriaen^ Hegeman, born 15 August, 1773; married Eliza Balster. 

Adriaen* Hegeman and EHza Balster had a son: 
William' Hegeman, born , 1S16; married Eliza Jane Niven. 

William' Hegeman and Eliza Jane Xiven had a daughter: 
Elise Ann' Hegeman, born 16 November, 1S4S; married 9 November, 
1 87 1, Chauncey Mitchell Depew. 

Elise Ann^ Hegeman and Chauncey Mitchell Depev/ had a son: 
Chauncey MitchelP Depew, born 7 July, 1S79, in New York City. 



218] 



THE DURYEA LINE 

I. Joosti Duryea, or Derie, born about 1635; died about 1727; 
married about 165S, .Magdalena Le Febre; her parentage has not been 
found. 

They had eleven children: 

2+1. Joost,= born about 1660; married 17 April, i63i, Lena or Helena 
Folkertsen. 

3 2. Peter,= born about 1663; married , Agnietje Nicque 

(Luquier); they had one child; he went to Esopus, Ulster 
County, New York. 

4 3. Charles, = born about 1665; died 1758; married, first, , 

Cornelia Schenck; married, second, , Maria Roberson; 

he had nine children. 

5 4. Cornelis,= born about 1668; he was in 1729 a farmer in Bushwick, 

Long Island, New York; no more trace. 

6 5. Jaques,= bapt. 1 3 or 15 July, 1679 in the Dutch Church in Flat- 

bush; sponsors, Gisbert Tys V. Pelt and his wife Janetje 
Ariens; married ; and had children. 

7 6. Antonette,2 bapt. 11 December, 1681, in the Dutch Church in 

Brooklyn, New York; sponsors, Jan Miserol and Leja Fonteyn 
(or Vantine); married , Mr. Luqueer. 

8 7. Abraham,- born about 1683; died 1763; married , Eliza- 

beth Polhemus; they had nine children. 

9 8. Jacob, = bapt. 21 November, 1686, in the Dutch Church in 

Brooklyn, New York; sponsors, Folkert Dircksen and Eliza- 
beth Lodowycks; he died in 1758; married about 1708, 
Catrina Polhemus; they had eight children. 

[219] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

10 9. Magdalenar bapt. 19 October, 1687, in the Dutch Church in 

New York; sponsors, Volckert Barick and Lysbeth Jans; 
daughter of Joost Durie and Magdalena Lefevre; she died in 

1705 ; married — , Jan Okie or Jan Auke Van Nuyse; they 

had three children. 

11 10. PhiHp,- born about 1689; married 14 August. 1714, Belje Coverts 

or Coverts; no more trace. 

12 II. Simon, = bapt. 26 November, 1693, in the Dutch Church in 

Brooklyn, New York; sponsors Pieter Pra and Marrytje Hey; 
married 20 May, 1715, Annetje Sprung; they had one child. 

Joost' Duryea emigrated about 1675 from Manheim in the Palatinate 
of the R>'n, a French Huguenot; he settled in New Utrecht, Long Island, 
New York, where he united with the Dutch Church: and where he sold a 
new waggon and a farm 5 October, 1681, to Gerret Cornelisen (\'an Duyn) 
as per page 14S of liber A.A of Flatbush, Long island, Records, for 3200 
guilders; he moved to the disputed lands ("debatable ground") between 
Newtown and Bushwick, Long Island, New York, in which latter town in 
1687 he took the oath of allegiance; he was on the Bushwick assessment 
rolls of 16S3 and 1693; his name appears on the 1698 Census of Bushwick, 
as "Joost Dure, Senior (French), as one man, one woman, six children, two 
slaves." The name appears as Duryee, Durie, Durye, Derie, etc. 

The printed 1905 Genealogical Record of The Saint Nicholas Society, 
on page 219, says, Joost^ Duryea, a French Huguenot, emigrated with his 
wife and his mother, and purchased a farm in New Utrecht. See the 
printed 1902 Documentary History of Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York, 
by Henry A. Stoutenburgh, on page 221; also the printed 1881 Early 
Settlers of Kings County, New York, by Teunis G. Bergen, on page 104; 
also the printed 1S80 New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 
volume XI, pages 62 per 70; also the printed 1852 History of New Town, 
Long Island, New York, by James Riker, on page 371; also the 1894 
American Ancestry, by Joel .Munsell, volume 9, on page 78; also the 1893 
Long Island, New York, printed Genealogies, by Alary Powell Bunker, on 
page 200. The un-recorded wills in the office of the New York City, 
Surrogate, contain the will of Joost Derieu, of Bushw}'ck, in Kings County, 

[ 220 ] 



THE D U R \' E A LINE 



on the Island of Nassau, New York, yeoman, dated 13 December 1718; 
proved 9 June, 1727; leaves to his wife Cornelia 7 pounds and 10 shillings; 
to eldest son, Joost, five pounds in bar of all claims as heir at law; all my 
estate to my children Joost, Jacques, Abraham, Charles, Simon, Antonatee 
Lequier, and .Madaline Okee: executor his wife; witnesses Ann Bobin and 
James Bobin and Isaac Bobin. 

SECOXD GENERATION 

2. Joost= Dorie, or Duryea (Joost'), born about 1660; it is said he also 
died in 1727; married 17 April, 16S1, Helena or Lena Folkertsen or Folkerts; 
born about 1663; death not found; daughter of Hendrick and Geertje 
(Claes) Folckertsen. 

Joost- and Helena Duryea had four children, as per page 62 of the 1880 
New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. 

13 + I. M?.gdelientje,' bapt. 29 May, 1705 in the Dutch Church in 

Brooklyn, New York, as a daughter of Joost Duerje and wife 
Lena; sponsors, Joost Duerje Sr. and Antenette Duerje; 
married 4 December, 1729, Peter^ Hegeman; see page 193; the 
Helena who married 31 December, 1743, Gerret \'an Sant or 
Van Zant, was a daughter of Charles^ Duryea. 

14 2. Joost^ (supposed), born ; married . Antje Terhune; 

they had one child; he went to Six Mile Run, New Jersey. 

15 3. Hendrick,^ bapt. 23 November, 1718; married , Marya 

Brinckerhof ; they had three children. 

16 4. Folkert,^ born ; married Geartey Vechte; they had 

one daughter; his will was proved 17 November, 1752. 

Joost= Duryea was a farmer and resided in Bushwick, Long Island, New 
York. 

13. Magdelientje' Duryea and Peter* Hegeman had a son: 
Joost^ Hegeman, born i January, 1733; married 17 November, 1758, 
Gertruyd^ Hegeman. 

[221 ] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E V." 

Joost* Hegeman and Gertruyd Hegeman had a son: 
Adriaen= Hegeman, born 15 August, 1773; married , Eliza Balster. 

Adriaen^ Hegeman and Eliza Baister had a son: 
William^ Hegeman, born , 1816; married , Eliza Jane Niven. 

William^ Hegeman and Eliza Jane Niven had a daughter: 
Elise Ann' Hegeman, born 16 November, 184S; married 9 November, 1871, 
Chauncey Mitchell Depew. 

Elise Ann' Hegeman and Chauncey Mitchell Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell* Depew, born 7 July 1879, in New York City. 



[ 222 ] 



THE LOTT LINE 

I. Peter' Lott, born about 1620; death not found; married about 1652, 
Gertrude ; she died in 1704; her parentage has not been found. 

They had six children; 

2 I. Engelbert,- born — ■ December, 1654, died 20 April, 1730; married, 

27 October, 1678, Cornelia De La Noy; they had seven children. 

3 2. Catrina,= born about 1656; married 22 September, 167S, Douwe 

Jansen Van Ditmarsen. 

4 3. Peter,= born about 1658; married Sarah ; no m.ore 

trace. 

5 4. Abraham r born about 1660; married first , Claesje Lange- 

straet; married, second, , Geertje ; he had eight 

children. 

6 + 5. Hendrick,- born about 1662; married about i685,Catrina (supposed 

De Witt). 

7 6. Johannes,- born about 1664; married , Antje Rapalje; no 

more trace. 

Peter' Lott emigrated in 1652 and settled in Flatbush, Long Island, 
New York, where both he and his wife were members in 1677 of the Dutch 
Reformed Church: he obtained 25 January, 1662, a patent for 24 morgens 
of land in Flatbush, which he sold 22 .March, 1674 to Jan Cornelise Boom- 
gaert; his name appears on Governor Dongan's patent of Flatbush of 1685, 
of which town he was a magistrate in 1656 and 1673, and where he took 
the oath of allegiance in 16S7. From a map on file in the office of the 
Secretary of State at Albany, New York, filed 8 August, 1681. of six farms 
in Flatbush, it appears that " Pieter Lott" owned a farm on the West side 
of the "highway to the ferry" South of Domine Johannes Theodorus 

[223] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

Polhemius's double lot and North of that of " Khn Dirk" (Dirk janse 
Hoogland), "broad before 26 Rods S foot" (about 31 1 and two tenth t'eet 
English measure) "after 27 Rod" (about 325 and eight tenth feet English), 
"long 600 Rod" (about 7241 feet English). This is clearly the lot which 
Edward Griffen conveyed to "Bartel Lot and Pieter Loot," known as 
Number 9, next to the pastor (Domine Polhemius's) land, containing 24 
morgans, on the 28 July, 1653; Griffen purchased from Garret Stryker 
See the printed 1S76 Bergen Genealogy, by Teunis G. Bergen, on page 302 
also the History of Long Island, New York, by Thompson, volume 2 
page 469; also the printed iSSi Early Settlers of Kings County, New York 
by Teunis G. Bergen, on page 192. 

SECOs'D GENERATION 

5. Hendrick Peterse- Lett (Peter'), born about 1662; died about 1728; 
married about 16S5, Catrina (supposed De Witt); her parentage has not 
been found. They had six children: 

30 I. Dorothy,' born 14 December, 16S6; married , William 

Remsen; no more trace. 

31 4-2. Geertruy,' born 4 .May, 16SS; married 2 June 1706, Judge Andries' 

Onderdonk; see page 214. 

32 3. Peter,' born 1 .March, 1690; married supposed 12 November, 1709, 

Femmetje Remsen; they had seven children. 

33 4. Johannes,' born 11 May, 1C92; married ; unknown; they 

had twelve children. 

34 5. Maria,' born 30 October, 1693; still single at the time of her 

father's will; married supposed , Johannes Schenck: 

they had nine children. 

35 6. Antie' (supposed), born 23 .August, 1696; not named in her 

father's will; hence she probably did not marry Folkert Folkert- 
son. 

Hendrick Peterse^ Lott settled in Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 
where in 1683 he purchased 37 acres of land from William Creed; in 16S7 

[224] 



THE LOTT LINE 

he took the oath of allegiance in Flathiish; in 1700 he purchased twelve 
hundred acres in Millstone, New Jersey, in partnership with Polhemus 
and Cortelyou. See the printed 18S1 Early Settlers of Kings County, New 
York, by Teunis G. Bergen, on page 191. The un-recorded wills in the 
ofifice of the New York City, Surrogate, contain the will of Hendrick Lodt, 
proved 6 September, 1728. 

31. Geertruy' Lott and Judge Andries^ Onderdonk had a daughter: 
Gertrude^ Onderdonk, born 22 August, 171 3; married 4 October. 1732. 
Jacobus^ Hegeman. 

Gertrude^ Onderdonk and Jacobus Hegeman had a daughter: 
Gertruyd^ Hegeman, born 13 August, 1733; married 17 November, 1758, 
Joost^ Hegeman. 

Gertruyd= Hegeman and Joost Hegeman had a son: 
Adriaen' Hegeman, born 15 August, 1773; married , Eliza Balster. 

Adriaen^ Hegeman and Eliza Balster had a son: 
William' Hegeman, born , 1S16; married , Eliza Jane Niven. 

William' Hegeman and Eliza Jane Niven had a daughter: 
Elise Ann* Hegeman, born 16 November, 1848; married 9 November, 1871, 
Chauncey Mitchell Depew. 

Elise Ann' Hegeman and Chauncey Mitchell Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell' Depew, born 7 July, 1879 in New York City. 



[225 ] 



THE VANDER VLIET LINE 

I. Dirck Janse' Vander Vliet, born about 1612; (aged 67 3'ears in 
1679); died after 29 May, 16S9: married, first, about 1640, in Europe, 
Lyntje Aertse; they had one child; married, second, about 1652, in Europe, 
Geertje Gerretse; born about 1625; (she was aged 54 years in 1679); died 
after 29 May, 16S9; her parentage has not been found. 

By the first vife, there was one child: 

2 I. Hendrikje,- horn about 1642; married , Jan Nelsie; they 

had one child. 

By the second wife, Geertje Gerretse, there were five children: 

3 2. Gerret,= born about 1654; he went to the Raritan, New Jersey. 

4 3. Jan,= born about 1658; married 2 December, 1683, Geertje Vcrkerk; 

they had five children. 

5 4. Hendrick,= born about 166 r, no more trace. 

6 + 5. Mary= or Margaret,- born about 1663; married, first, about 1683, 

Andries^ Onderdonk; see page 213: she married, second, 13 
August, 16S7, Jacob Janse Vanderbilt. 

7 6. Geertruyd,= born about 1664; married 13 May, 1687, Jacob 

Remsen; they had one child. 

Dirck Janse' Vander Vliet emigrated in 1660 from the Waal, in the 
Netherlands; he settled in Flatbush, Long Island, New York, v/here he 
obtained 24 November, 1654, a patent of 25 morgens, as per the Colonial 
Manuscripts; he was on the Flatbush assessment rolls for 1675 and 1676 and 
1683; he was a magistrate in 1679 and 16S0 and 1681 ; he was a member of 
the Dutch Reformed Church in 1677, and a Deacon in 1680; he was on 
Governor Andross patent in 1677 for the New Lotts of Flatbush, and he 
took the oath of allegiance in 1687 in the said town. 

[227] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

See the printed iSSi Early Settlers of Kings County, New York, by 
Teunis G. Bergen, on page 325. 

He and his wife Geerije made a joint will 15 January, 1679- 1680, which 
is recorded in liber double AA, page 95, of the Flatbush Town Records, 
now kept in the Hall of Records in Brooklyn, New York. 

6. Mary= Vander \']\et and Andries^ Ondcrdonk had a son: 
Judge Andries^ Ondcrdonk, born i June, 1686; married 2 June, 1706, 
Geertru\-t3 Lott. 

Judge Andries^ Onderdonk and Geertruyt Lott had a daughter: 
Gertrude^ Onderdonk, born 22 August, 1713; married 4 October, 1732, 
Jacobus-* Hegeman. 

Gertrude^ Onderdonk and Jacobus Hegeman had a daughter: 
Gertruyd^ Hegeman, born 13 August, 1733; married 17 November, 1738, 
Joost^ Hegeman. 

Gertruyd= Hegeman and Joost Hegem.an had a son: 
Adriaen*^ Hegeman, born 15 August, 1773; married , Eliza Balster. 

Adriaen^ Hegeman and Eliza Balster had a son: 
William' Hegeman, born , 1816; married , Eliza Jane Niven. 

William' Hegeman and Eliza Jane Niven had a daughter: 
Elise Ann- Hegeman, born 16 November, 1848; married 9 November, 1871, 
Chauncey iMitchell Depew. 

Elise Ann' Hegeman and Chauncey .Mitchell Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell' Depew, born 7 July, 1S79 in New York City. 



22S 



THE FOLCKERTSEN LINE 

I. Hendrick' Folckerrsen, or Volckerssen, born about 1634, in Holland; 
death not found; married 26 February, 1655 in the New York Dutch 
Church: "Hendrick Folckers; Van Jever in Oldenburgerlt; En (and) 
Geertje Claes; Van N. Amsterdam"; her parentage has not been found. 

They had eleven children, it would seem: 

2 I. Volckertr bapt. 15 August, 1655, in the Dutch Church in 

New Amsterdam; sponsors, Claes Corneliszeri and Joris 
Jacobszen and Metje Herberts; married, first, 31 October, 
1680, in the Dutch Church in Fiatbush, Long Island, New 
York, "Volkert Hendriksz to Neltje Jans"; married, second, 
, Annitje Flippsen. 

Volkerd Dirkz and Anetje Philips of Bushwick. Long 
Island, New York, had three children, bapt. in the Dutch 
Church in Fiatbush: 

1. Lidea,^ bapt. 26 February, 1682; sponsors, Wm. Aardz 

and Amelia (?Lidia?) Cousard. 

2. Machteld,' bapt. 26 February, 16S2; same sponsors. 

3. Rachel, bapt. 16 November, 1683; sponsors, Wouter 

Gysbrechts and .Marietje Hey. 
Volckert^ probably married, third, , Elizabeth Poulis 

3 2. Derick,= born about 1657; married 25 September, 1691, in the 

Dutch Church in Fiatbush; " Dirck Volkerse to .Maria Dewit" 
he went to New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

3. Juriaen,^ bapt. 5 December, 1660, in the Dutch Church in 
Brooklyn, New York; one sponsor, Hermanus Van Bossum; 
he died 15 December, 1660. 

[229] 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E T E W 

4 4. Juriaen," bapt. 6 November, 1661, in the Dutch Church in 
Brooklyn, New York; sponsors, Symen Janssen and Hermanns 
Van Bossum and Tryntie Claes; married about 1685, Anenietje 
Barens. 

They had two children bapt. in the Dutch Church in 
Brooklyn, New York: 

1. Eytje,^ bapt. 13 November, 1687; sponsors, Folkert 

Hendricksen and Albertje Barens; a child of Jeurien 
Hendricksen. 

2. Jannitje,^ bapt. 8 December, 1680; of Jeurien Hendrick- 

sen and Angenietje Barens; sponsors, Elsje Prevoost 
and Ghysbert Bogaert. 

5+5. Helena,^ born about 1663; married 17 April, 16S1, Joost- Duryea; 
see page 22 i . 

6 6. Jannitje,^ born about 1664; married about 16S0, Pieter Schamp; 

Pieter Schamp and Jannitje Dircks of Bushwick, had three 
children, bapt.: 

1. Johanna,' bapt. 9 January, 1681, in the Dutch Church, 

in Flatbush; sponsors, Jos. Boschleiding and Maria 
Lucas. 

2. Lisbeth,' bapt. 10 August, 1684, in the Dutch Church, 

in Flatbush; sponsors, Volkert Dirks and Lisbeth 
Kokkuyt; Elisabeth, ^ bapt. 10 August, 1684, in the 
Dutch Church, in Brooklyn, New York; sponsors, 
Folckert Dircks and Elisabeth Kockuyt. 

3. Pieterjen,' bapt. 3 August, 1690, in the Dutch Church, 

Brooklyn, New York; sponsors, Michiel Palmentier 
and Macdalena — . 

7 7. Marritje,- born about 1670; married 18 May, 1690, in the Dutch 

Church in Flatbush; "'.Marretje Hendricks to Adam Brouwer"; 
they had three children, two of whom were bapt. in Brook- 
lyn, . 

[230] 



T M E F O L C K E Ml S E N LINE 



1. i\Iadalecntje,5 bapt. 2 April, 1692; sponsors, Volkert 

Hendricksen and Hilligont Hendricks. 

2. Marytje,^ bapt. 4 May, 1695; sponsors, Willem Nasar- 

eth and Lena Nasareth. 

3. Hendrick,' bapt. 15 January, 1699. 

8 8. N'eltie,- born about 1672; married 23 September, 1692, in the 

Dutch Church in Flatbush; "Neltie Volkers to Johanes V. 
der Grif." 

9 9. Claes,'- born about 1674; married about 1700 Neeltie . 

10 ID. Johannes,- born about 1676; married before 170S, Angenietje 

; he went to New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

11 II. Nicholas,- born about 167S; he was living in 1704 in Bushv.ick, 

Long Island, New York; The Calendar of Wills, 627, (F12), 
Nicholas Folkertson, extract from, his will, i April, 1762, real 
estate in "Boswick Township," Kings County, New York, for 
his four children: son Folkert, and three daughters Dina 
Broca, and Anatie the wife of Dirck Woortman and Alarigritie 
the wife of John van Dyck; his wife is not named. 

The above eleven children are given upon the very good authority of 
Mr. Robert Brown Miller, late of Brooklyn, New York, whose careful 
genealogical work is well known. 

Hendrick' Folckertsen resided at The Ferry, in Brooklyn, New York; 
on the 20 February, 1664, he made an affidavit relating to the raid of 
Captain John Scott on the Dutch towns of Long Island, as per page 482 
of volume two, of Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the 
State of New York, 1858, in fifteen volumes, by John Romeyn Brodhead, 
and is as follows: 

Before me, Pelgrom Clocq, by the Right Honorable the Director- 
General and Council admitted a Notary Public, residing in the village of 
Midwout, in New Netherland, and the undernamed witnesses, appeared 
Frederick Lubberts, aged 55 years, Joris Jacobsen, aged 38 years, Barent 
Jansen, aged 56 years, Hendrick Volckersen, aged 30 years, Corneiis Dirck- 
sen, aged about 65 years, Dirck Jansen, aged 32 years, Wynant Pietersen, 

[231] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y h\ . I) E P E W 

aged about 32 \-ears; ail resident Inhabitants of Tlie Ferry, to me, trie 
Notary, known, who hereby declare and testify in favor and to promote 
the ends of justice, on the requisition and at the request of Mr. Adriaen 
Hegernans, Sheriff, residing in the village of Midwout, on Long Island, b\- 
and in the presence of Willem Bredenbent and Albert Cornelissen of 
Breuckelen, there: That it is true and truthful that John Schot cam.e, on 
the I ith of January last, with a troop of Englishmen mounted on horseback 
and marched to The Ferry, making a great noise with blowing of trumpets, 
and hoisted the English flag; whereupon John Schot spoke in English, but 
they could not well understand him. 

Frederick Lubberts declares alone that John Schot spoke with Mr. Secre- 
tary Van Ruyven who asked him if he John Schot would cross over? etc. 

Hendrick Volckertsen declares that he heard Captain John de Yongh, 
also an Englishman, say: If you do not shovv- us the man who made use of 
the axe, we'll set fire to the houses. 

Hendrick Volckertsen and Barent Jansen further declare that John Schot 
struck Martin Kregier's son severe!}-, who, after being beaten, was forced to 
take off his hat to the English; and afterwards he, Barent Jansen, saw 
Ritsaert Panten also strike him, Martin, junior, with a rattan, etc. Dated 
20th February, 1664. 

The printed 1897 Records of New Amsterdam, in seven volumes; on 
page 64 of volume 7, 1674. February 27, James .Matthws, plaintiff, versus 
Hendrick Volckersen, defendant. 

Plaintiff demands from defendant according to account the sum of 
florins 259.18; demands payment. Defendant admits the debt, but says 
he can not pay before he returns from the West Indies. The W. Court 
condemns the defendant to satisfy and pay the plaintiff the said debt. 

See the printed 1881 Early Settlers of Kings County, New York, by 
Teunis G. Bergen, page 114; also the Holland Society Year Book for 1S97 
.and 1898, for the Records of the Dutch Churches in Brooklyn and Flat- 
bush. 

5. Helena^ Folckertsen and Joost- Duryea had a daughter: 
Magdelientje' Duryea; bapt. 29 May, 1705; married 4 December, 1729, 
Peter* Hegeman. 

[232] 



THE FOLCKERTSEN LINE 



Magdelientje^ Duryea and Peter Hegcman had a son: 
Joost^ Hegeman, born i January, 1733; married 17 November, 1758, 
Gertruyd^ Hegeman. 

Joost^ Hegeman and Gertruyd Hegeman had a son: 
Adriaen* Hegeman, born 15 August, 1773; married EHza Balster. 

Adriaen^ Hegeman and EHza Balster had a son: 
WilHam" Hegeman, born — ■ , 1S16; married , Eliza Jane Niven. 

William^ Hegeman and Eliza Jane Niven had a daughter: 
Elise Ann^ Hegeman, born 16 November, 1848; married 9 November, 1S71, 
Chauncey Mitchell Depew. 

Elise Ann' Hegeman and Chauncey Mitchell Depew had a son: 
Chauncey Mitchell^ Depew, born 7 July, 1879, in New York City. 



[233] 



THE NIVEN LINE 

I. Lieutenant DanieU Niven, born , 1742, in I la, an island on the 

west coast of Scotland; died 20 November, 1809, aged 67 years, just out- 
side the village of Newburgh, Orange County, New York; he was buried 
in the Old Town Burying Ground in Newburgh; married about 1781, Jane 

Wallace; born , 1764; died 9 April, 182S, aged 64 years; buried in the 

same cemetery; her parents have not been found. 

They had at least eight children: 

I. A ,= born — April, 1782; died i May, 1783, aged 13 months; 

buried in the same cemetery. 

2 2. Jane W ,- born about 1784; no issue. 

3 + 3. Catharine Walch,= born 28 August, 1801; married 24 July, 1823, 

Henry Ward Stone; they had two sons and five daughters; see 
page 243. 

4 4. Urelia,= born about 1788; died I February, 1796; buried in the same 

cemetery. 

5 5. Elizabeth M ,- born about 1790; married , Hugh 

Speir; no living issue. 

6+6. George Washington,- born , 1792; married about 181 3, 

Charlotte Ogden Johnston. 

7 7. Henry, = born about 1794; married , Jane Luck; they had 

one daughter. 

8 8. Charles,- born about 1796; no more trace. 

The printed 1914 Historical Register of Officers of the Continental 
Army, revised edition, 691 pages, by Francis Bernard Heitman, During 
the War of the Revolution April 1775 to December 1783, on page 414, has, 
Daniel Niven (New York), ist Lieutenant of (William) Malcolm's Addi- 

[235] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A L' N C E Y M . D E P E V,' 

tional Continental Regiment, October, 1776; a Captain on the 2nd. July, 
1777; a Captain of Sappers and Miners, 25th. April, 1779; a Captain of 
Engineers, 4th. March, 17S0; to take rank from the 25th. April, 1770, and 
served to the close of the War. 

The printed 190S New York State Census for 1790, 308 pages, has on 
page 181, Daniel Niven of Newburgh Town, three males over 16 >ears of 
age including the head of the family, four males under 16 years of age, four 
free white females, no other persons, three slaves; he then lived between the 
homes of Nehemiah Everitt and John Abrahams. 

The printed 1846-1847 History of Orange County, New \'ork, 653 

pages, by Samuel W Eager, has on page 15S: Daniel Niven. Esq., — 

This gentleman, though not a resident of the village (of Newburgh), was 
yet so near to it as to entitle him to a short notice. He emigrated from lla. 
an island on the west coast of Scotland, and came to the City of New York 
about the year 1770. Patriotic in all his associations and a true lover of 
human freedom, early in the war, with other patriots, he volunteered his 
services to his adopted country, and v/as actively engaged in various duties 
in and about the City of New York, and in New Jersey. Becoming ac- 
quainted with Washington, who soon saw the stern and determined char- 
acter of the young and active Scotchman, he received a comm.ission as 
Lieutenant of Engineers in the regular army, and was much employed at 
West Point and other places along the river. We are informed he was 
instrumental with others in draw'ing the plan of Fort Putnam at the time 
of its erection; superintended the floating of the great chain across the 
river, more particularly mentioned hereafter — and was at the Point at the 
time of Arnold's treasonable attempt to surrender that post. A more 
particular description of his Revolutionary services is hostile to our plan. 
and we leave them with the remark — that on every occasion he rigidl" 
executed his duty and was equal to the trust confided in him. .-\fter the 
war he came to Newburgh, and purchased the farm with mulling privileges 

and erections from xMr. — Belknap — about two miles \^■est of the 

village where he lived and died. This gentleman (Daniel Niven) was a 
side Judge of the Common Pleas and held the commission of a Justice of 
the Peace for many years. 

It was said of him that when a suitor came and asked process, he made 
it a part of his official duty to learn the exact state of the case and if there 

[236] 



THE N I V E N LINE 



were merits in the application, his business was to effect a settlement of 
the matter without a suit. If the parties, however, in despite of his kind 
offices, would still appeal to the law, he meted them the most rigid justice. 
This friendly and fatherly course of proceeding gained him the good will 
and confidence of his neighbors and no one was more frequently chosen as 
referee or arbitrator to settle disputes, than he. When he sat in his official 
capacity, order and decorum were exacted, and counsel were expected to 
demean themselves respectfully towards the Court under the pains of 
commitment. 

Personal friendship never relaxed the rigor of the rule, observant him- 
self of order and respect, he enforced them upon others. It was difficult to 
change his opinions when once fairly formed, and nothing but the clearest 
evidence or most forcible reasoning could do it; but when satisfied of error, 
he would 3'ield to the force of truth — little laxity could grow up or thrive in 
personal or public affairs, where he had influence or power to check it. 
The rule with him in jurisprudence and morals was the same, an observance 
of the Law, and the whole Law. An illustration of this feature in his char- 
acter may be gathered from an anecdote or two, which I recollect hearing 
when a boy. .Morgan Lewis, aftenvards Governor of the State (of New 
York), had been holding a circuit court at Goshen which closed its session 
on a Saturday night — and he \\as under the necessity of returning home, 
or hastening to another circuit, he had to tra\'el on the Sabbath which was 
contrary to the statute laws of the State. Phineas Bowman, Esq., who 
then resided at Newburgh, was with the Judge — a man full of fun, frolic 

and the d 1 as ever dwelt in the county; under some pretence, while 

nearing the house of the Justice, left him and rode on before. He hastened 
to find Mr. Niven, and informed him that the Judge was coming in full 
breach of the Sabbath, and that he must stop and fine him. Bowman in 
the meantime, complained of himself, made his excuse therefore, and paid 
his fine. By this time the Judge was near the house and the Justice went 
out; met him in the road, arrested him in his progress, informed him of his 
offence, and he must pay the fine or be detained. The Judge stated his 
case to be one of necessity, justiiled his conduct, and refused to pay; this 
was not a sufficient excuse for the Justice; escape was impossible without 
disgrace, and the Judge, to save himself from capture and detention till 
the next day, paid his fine and was permitted to proceed. This however was 

[237] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M . D E P F. \V 

not the end of it; for the dignity of the Judge was violated, the State in- 
sulted in his person, and he proceeded homeward, breathing vengeance in 
place of submitting to authority like a good cicizen. If we are rightly 
informed, the Judge instituted a suit, to recover the penalty on the ground 
that it was illegally exacted; but he failed in his attempt, and the Justice 
again triumphed over the Judge. At a subsequent period, he also fined 
General James Clinton for a like violation of the Sabbath — who equally 
dissatisfied with the Judge that the penalty was illegally exacted, brought a 
certiorari to the common pleas to reverse the Justice's proceedings, and to 
teach him a lesson, that laws of a mere moral character, were not to be 
enforced against the respectable and honorable in society. In this in- 
stance the humble Justice triumphed over the aged warrior as easily as over 
the subtle jurist in the former case, and the General was taught the lesson 
that all men in this community were alike in the all seeing eye of the Law, 
This was not a mere show of authority, on the part of Mr. Niven, or played 
ofT by him on the parties for popular effect, and no one v/ho knew the man — 
his temper and character, would for a moment suspect it. On his part, it 
was a conscientious fulfillment of the law he had sworn to execute — he was 
known to fine his own son, with other boys for a like violation of the Sab- 
bath. The times have changed so — somewhat in these matters, and men 
have changed with them; but whether for the better, the patriot jurist and 
moralist must determine for themselves. Mr. Niven had been educated 
in and to the observance of a strict moral creed and as an officer endeavored 
to carry out his principles into wholesome and rigorous exercise, fully 
persuaded that it was for the public good. We are of opinion that the con- 
duct of such men are most benign, wholesome and influential upon the 
public mind, and contribute to stay the downward course of vice and 
immorality, as obstructions in a strear.i impede and control its waters. We 
conclude this imperfect note by adding thereto the inscription found on 

his tombstone, written by Doctor John M Mason, who was well 

• acquainted with the subject of remark, which will give the reader a more 
perfect idea of this individual than anything we could write — "Under this 
stone reposes in hope the flesh of Daniel Niven Esq., Strong sense unaided 
by early cultivation, but united with tried integrity, recommended him to 
respect and confidence. Devoted with unostentatious zeal to the best 
interests of society. He approved himself as a private Christian, unassum- 

[238] 



THE N I V E N LINE 



ing and exemplan". As a soldier in the Armies of his Country, alert and 
gallant. As a civil magistrate, a terror to evil doers, enforcing wholesome 
laws, without fear, favor or afl'ection. As an oftlcer in the Church of God, 
disinterested, vigilant, public spirited, faithful. .And having passed through 
an active and varied life, honored by the esteem of the good and the fears 
of bad men, He finished his course in the consolations of that Gospel which 
he had loved, November 20, 1809, aged 67 _\-ears. 

The printed i8g8 Newburgh Bay and the Highlands Historical Society, 
Old Town Bur_\-ing Ground, Newburgh, New York, 180 pages, has the above 
tomb stone record on page 134; also — To the memory of Jane Wallace, 
relict of Daniel Niven, Esq., who entered into her rest April 9, 1S2S, aged 
64 years; Jesus said unto her, " 1 am the resurrection and the life." Mark 
the perfect man and behold the upright man, for the end of that man is 
peace. 

The printed 1850 History of Newburgh, New York, by Edward Manning 
Ruttenber, 324-rxl4-\iii pages, has on page 80, refugees from Nev,- York 
were Adolph De Grove, Derick Amerman, Daniel Niven, and others, to 
New Windsor Precinct; and on pages 212 and 213 Daniel Niven and wife 
were members of the Congregation of the First Associate Reformed Church, 
and in 1803 Daniel Ni\'en v.'as a Ruling Elder; and on page 323 is a reprint 
from the Political Index of the death of Daniel Niven. 

The printed 1885 Contemporary Biography of New York, volume 4, 
350 pages, has on page 162, Daniel Niven, Jr., settled in Newburgh 17S8 to 
1791; born about 1767 in 11a, Scotland; died about 1868, aged loi, in 
Monticello, Sullivan County, New York; moved to New York City before 

1803; married , Ann Van Riper, daughter of John Van Riper of 

New Jersey; he was a member of the .Associate Reformed Church of Scot- 
land; a Free .Ma^on when aged 21, and buried by them; they had General 
Archibald Campbell Niven, born in Newburgh, Orange Count}', New 
York, 8 December, 1803; he was Adjutant General of New York State in 
July, 1843; ^ Representati\e in the 2C)th Congress of the United States 
1845-1847; resided in Monticello, New York; he died 21 February, 1882; 
he married about 1832 Jane Thompson, daughter of .Alexander Thompson 
of Crawford, Orange County, New York; they had three children: (i) 
Alexander Thompson, born 31 December, 1834, in Monticello, New York; 
died 27 September, 1854; lost at sea with the steamer Arctic. (2) .Mary 



239 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY' OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P H W 

C — , born ; married about 1.S74, Dr. W B — ■ Wright 

of Buffalo, New "I'ork. (3) Honorable Thornton A ; born ; a 

member of the 1845 Legislature. 

Ann Van Riper died a few months short of 90 years. 

Daniel Niven, Jr., to New Windsor when aged about 24; back to New- 
burgh; to New 'i'ork City until 1799; back to Newburgh; 1810 back to 
New York City; 181 2 to Alamakating Hollow in Sullivan County, New 
York; 18 16 at Monticello; to Bloomingburgh; 1837 to Newburgh; aged 
about 78 in 1846-1847. See the printed 1873 Sullivan County, New \'ork, 
History, by James Eldridge Ouinlan, on pages 414 and 415. 

The printed 1S6S Calendar of New Y'ork Historical Manuscripts, 
^Revolutionary Papers, volumie one, page 243, Applications of Daniel Niven 
and Benjamin Walker; Petitions, 32: 196: Daniel Niven alledges that from 
his acquaintance he can speedily raise a company, he requests a commission. 
Benjamin Walker of the tirst Battalion of New York, having now offered 
his service a second time, earnestly solicits a commission; February 19, 
1776. 

The printed 1887 New York in the Revolution, by Berthold Fernow, 
volume 15, Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State of 
New York, on page 241, "Danl. Neven" (Nevins), Captain 2 July, 1777; 
war; O. M. R. Daniel Niven became a member of the "Society of the 
Cincinnati." 

SECOND GENERATION 
6. George Washington^ Niven (Lieutenant DanieL); born , 



1792; died 27 August, 1S36, aged 44 years, in New York City; buried in the 
Old Town Burying Ground, Newburgh, Orange County, New York, "In 
memory of George Niven, Esq., of the City of New York"; married about 
181 3 Charlotte Ogden Johnston; born about 1787; daughter of Judge 
Robert Johnston and Elizabeth (Ogden); George W. was a lawyer; and had 
two children: 

9 + 1. Robert Johnston,' born in Peekskill, New York, 20 February, 

1812; married, first, , Elizabeth Babcock; married 

second about i860 Mrs. Louisa (Vanderbilt) Clark. 

[240] 



THE NIVEN LINE 



10+2. Eliza Jane,^ born about 1823; married about 1841, William 
Hegeman. 

THIRD GENERATION 

9. Robert Johnston'^ Niven, (George Washington, = Lieutenant Daniel^, 
born 20 February, 1814, in Peekskill, New York; died 24 November, 1S85, 

in Southampton, England; married, first, — , Elizabeth H ' 

Babcock; born 17 July, 1814, in Brookfield, New York; died i December, 
18 — , in Syracuse, New York; widow of George Stone, daughter of Asa° 
and Elizabeth (Noyes) Babcock; married, second, about i860, Marie 

Louise, widow of Horace F Clark; daughter of Commodore Cornelius 

Vanderbilt and Sophia (Johnson); she was born , 1835 and died 

, 1S91 ; she married about 185 1, Horace F Clark and had one 

child: 

Robert Johnston^ Niven had three children, born in Montrose, Pa. 

II I. William Hegeman,^ born ; died 25 Januar}', 1804; married 

in Syracuse, New York, Amelia Didema; they had no 



children. 

12 2. Eliza J / born ; married in Syracuse, New York, 

8 May, 1880, William A .Mc Kinney; born in Coopers- 
town, New York; son of Edwin and Marcia (Philips) Mc- 
Kinney; they had two children: 

1. Elizabeth, ° born ; died young. 

2. Charlotte,^ born — June, 18S6. 

13 3. Charlotte Elizabeth.^ born ; married in Paris, France, 

, Marquis Paul de Sers of Paris, France. 

10. Eliza Jane^ Niven (George Washington,- Lieutenant Daniel'), born 
about 1823; died 29 July, 1895, aged 72 years, in New York City; buried in 
Trinity Cemetery, New York, vault 986W; married about 1S41 William 

Hegeman, born — , 1816; died 3 October, 1875, aged 59 years, in New 

York City; buried in Trinity Cemetery, New York, vault 9S6W; son of 
Adriaen and Eliza Balster) Hegeman. 

[241 ] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

They had four children: 

14 + I. William Adrian Ogden,^ born 12 Febiuary, 1842; bapt. 22 June, 

1842, in Trinity Church, New York, (volume 2, page 254) bv 

Reverend William Berrian. D. D., Sponsors, William S 

Rushton, and The Parents; married 12 May, 1S69, Anna 
Bradford Clark. 

15 2. Johnston Niven,^ born 7 September, 1S43; bapt. 15 November, 

1843, in Trinity Church, New York, (volunie 2, page 272), by 
Reverend William Berrian, D.D., Sponsors, Robert Johnston 

Niven and The Parents; married, iirst, , Jeannette 

Fenton; married, second, Adelaide O'Donnoghue; he died 12 
November, 1895, aged 52 years, and 2 months, in New York 
City, buried in Trinity Cemetery, New York, vault 986W; he 
had three children: 

1. Johnston Niven, ^ born . 

2. Elizabeth, 5 born . 

3. Adelaide,* born . 

16 3. Eliza Jane,^ born 16 November, 1846; bapt. 29 December, 1846, 

in Trinity Church, New York, (volume 2, page 313), by 
Reverend William Berrian, D.D., Sponsors, Eliza Hegernan, 
and The Parents. 

17 4. Elise Ann,^ born 16 November, 1848; died in New York City, 

7 May, 1893; married in New York City, 9 November, 
1871, Honorable Chauncey .Mitchell' Depew; they had one 
child: 

I. Chauncey .Mitchell, = born in New York City, 7 July, 
1879; graduated from Columbia University, New York, 
1901 ; single in 1917. 

William Balster was buried 11 August, 1810, aged 48 years, from 
Trinity Church, New York (Church Records, volume one, page 342). 

John H and .Ann Bolster, had per the Records of Trinity Church, 

New York, two children: 

[ 242 ] 



THE N I V E N LINE 



1. Mary Jane, horn 30 April, 1852; hapt. 16 May, 1852 (volume 2, page 

409) by Reverend E — Y Higbee, Sponsors, Maria Atwell 

and The Parents. 

2. Barbara L , born 10 Januar}', 1854 (volume 2, page 453), bapt. 

by Reverend Benjamin Isaacs Haight, Sponsors John Atwell and, 
Catharine Barnes. 

FOURTH GEXERATION 

14. William Adrian Ogden-' Hegeman (Eliza Jane' Niven, George 
Washington,- Lieutenant Daniel), born 12 February, 1S42; married in 
Trinity Chapel Church, N'ew York, 12 May, 1S69, (volume 2, page 408), 
he aged 27 and a resident of New York; to Anna Bradford Clark, aged 22 
years and a resident of New York, by Reverend Henry Codman Potter, 
D.D., Witnesses J. N. Hegeman and Louise Clark. 

They had two children: 
18 I. Anna Bradford, ^ born ; married , Viscount 



de Bresson, of the French Army; he was killed in battle. 
They had one child: 

I. Vicomte Chauncey Dcpev/ de Bresson,'' born . 

19 2. Charlotte Niven, ^ born ; married , Marquis 

de Pontoi-Pontcarre. 

3. Catharine Walch= Niven (Lieutenant Daniel); born 28 August 1801, 
in Newburgh, New York; died 30 Jul\', 1876, in Mt. Pleasant, Pennsyl- 
vania; married 24 July, 1823 Henry Ward Stone, born 17 May, 1791, in 
Guilford, Connecticut; died 20 August, 1S81, in Honesdale, Pennsylvania; 
a son of Bille and Rachel (Ward) Stone; they had seven children, all born 
in Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania. 

1. Charles Niven, ^ born 21 August, 1824; died i January, 1830. 

2. Harriet Ward,^ born 15 June, 1826; died 24 May, 1884, in Honesdale, 

Pennsylvania, married 3 April 1845, Honorable Charles Philips 
Waller; born 7 August 18 19; in Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania; died 
Honesdale, 18 August, 1882; they had two children: (i) Elizabeth 
Jev,'ett,^ born 1 1 June, 1846; (2) ALary Stone, ^ born 28 October, 1858. 

[243] 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY OF C H .\ U N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

3. Jane Elizabeth, ' born 21 January, 1829; died Honesdale, 9 March, 

1868; married, 10 January, 1854, Marcus Sayre; they had one 
son: (i) Henry Niven,^ born 4 September, 1856. 

4. Charlotte Niven, 5 born 17 Jul}-, 1831; married 3 October, 1854, Horace 

Chapman Hand, born 15 May, 1830, in Windham, New York; they 
had three sons. 

5 Jannett Scott, ^ born 3 September, 1S33; died in Honesdale, 14 July, 
1885; married 3 October, 1854, Edwin FuHer Torrey, born 4 June, 
1832; they had five children. 

6. William Henry,' born i October, 1835; married 22 January, 1873, 

Cornelia S Short, born 28 March, 1S43, Cincinnatus, Cortland 

County, New York; no children. 

7. Mary Blake,^ born 26 July, 1838; died 17 .^pril, 1853. 

See the Family Genealogy of John Stone of Guilford, Connecticut, Book 
Two, 189S, by Truman Lewis Stone. 



244 






r^Sc': 



h- X ' ■ >" 






^' 
















■Ir^'- 



Ay 






4 1 
I 



^a^!ME;£tfuu> Li/IL'iiain X..<^4^ . 



HISTORY OF RYCK'S PATENT 

DEED 23 DECEMBER ibS,- TO RYCK'S PATENT 

The following is copied from the original on sheepskin 19x24 inches; as 
printed in the 1902 History of the Lent (van Lent) Family, by Nelson 
Burton Lent of Newburgh, New York. 

"Thomas Dongsn, Lieut. Governor and vice Admiral! of New Yorke, 
and its 

Dependencyes, under his Majesty James the second, by the Grace of God 
of England, 

Scottland, France and Ireland, King, defender of the faith, and Supream 
Lord and pro- 
prietor of the Colony and Province of New Yorke and its dependencyes in 
America, 

and to all whom this shall come sendeth greeting, whereas, Teunis De- 
Kay, Richard Abrahamson, Jacom Abrams, Sybout Harche, Jacob Harche, 
and Samuel 

De Kay, all of the Citty of New Yorke, have by virtue of my order or 
iycense bearing 

date the sixth day of .March, Anno Dom, one thousand six hundred eighty- 
four and five, 

according to the law and practice of the said Providence, for a valuable 
consideration pur- 
chased of the natives and Indian ov.^ners, their right, title, interest, clayme 
and demand 

of, in and to all that certain tract or parcell of land hereinafter mentioned 
and express- 
ed for their owne proper uses, and behofes, as by the Indian deed of sale 
thereof bear- 
ing date the twenty-first day of April, Anno Dom, one thousand six hundred 
eighty- 

[245] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

five, remaineing upon record in the Secretary's otfice of the said Province 
may more 

fully and att large appearr, and whereas, Samuel De Kay, one of the 
purchasers, is 

since deceased, and Jacohus De Kay, his father, hath since his decease, 
desired that his 

said purchase and share may be confirmed unto his grandsoune Jacob 
De Kay, to him, 

his heirs, and assigns forever, Now know ye, that by virtue of my Com- 
mission 

and authority, derived unto me and power in me receiving in consideration 
of the quitt 

rent hereinafter received, 1 have given, granted, rattified, and confirmed, 
and by these 

presents, doe give, grant, rattifie, and confirme, unto the said Teunis De 
Kay, Richard 

Abrahamson, Jacob Abrahamson, Sybout Harche, and Jacob Harche, 
Jacobus De Kay, 

Junior, All that certain tract or parcel of Land scituate, lyeing and being 
on Hudson 

River att a certain place called by the Indian Sachus, and stretching by the 
north side 

of Stephanus Courtland his land up to the said River to another Creeke, 
and soo runs 

up said Creelve in severall courses to a certain tree m.arked with Tr. And 
from the 

said marked tree southerly by marked trees all along to a marsh to another 
marked tree marked with Tr, west up to the aforesaid creeke v.hich Ives 
by land Stephanus Courtland's land, including all the meadov.', both fresh 
and 

salt, within the said bounds, containeing in all eighteen hundred acres 
or there- 
abouts, together with all and all manner of Rivers, Riveletts, Runns, 
Streams, 

Waters, Feedings, Pastures, Woods, Underwoods, Trees, Swamps, Moores, 
Marshes, 

[246] 



HISTORY OF RYCK S PATENT 

meadows, easiements, Profits and commodityes. Fishing, Fowling, Hunting, 
and 

Hawking, And appurtenances whatsoever to the said tract, or parcell of 
land, with- 
in the bounds, and limitts aforesaid, belonging or in any wise appertaining, 

TO HAVE 

AND TO HOLD the Said tract or parcell of land and all and singular other the 
prem- 

issers states the said Teunis De Kay, Richard Abrahamson, Jacob Abrams, 
Sybout 

Harche, Jacob Harche, and Jacobus De Kay, their heirs and assigns for- 
ever, to the sole 

and only proper use, benefitt and behoofs of them, the said Teunis De Kay, 
Richard 

Abrahamson, Jacob Abrahamson, Sybout Harche, Jacob Harche, and 
Jacobus De Kay, 

their heirs and assigns forever, To Be Holden in free and comm.on soccage, 
according 

to the termes of East Grenwich in the County of Kent, in his Maj'ts 
Kingdome of Eng- 
land. Yielding, rendering and paying therefore every yeare for the use 
of our sover- 

eigne Lord the Kings Maj'tis, his heirs or successors, or such officer, or 
officers, as by 

him or they shall be appointed to receive the same, ten bushells x x of good 
Winter 

Marketable W'heate yearly on the five and twentyth day of March, att the 
City of New 

Yorke, And for the better preserving the sitte of the recited parcell of 
land and prem- 

issers 1 have caused this Patent to be entered in the Sec'yrs Office of this 
Province. 

Given under my hand and Seales with the Scale of the Province att Fortt 
James, in 
New Yorke, the 23d day of Decemb'r, Anno Dom, 1685. 

(Seal) Thomas Dongan." 

[247] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E F E W 

Endorsed on the back is the following: 

"May it please ye'r Honor: 

"The Atturney Gen'l Hath perused this Patent, and finds nothing 
contained 
therein prejudicial to his .Majesty's interest. 

"x nd Cen 22, 1685. Ba. Graham, Atty." 

Among a large number of receipts of Hercules Lent and others on the 
back, 
is one plainly legible, as follows: 

"Rec'd of Hercules Lent twenty bushels of wheat for two years quitt 
rent for the 

within Tract in full to the 25th of March last. Witness my hand this 22d 
of May, 1729. 

"Arch'd Kennedy, Rec'r Gen'll." 

"Recorded in the Secretar\''s oftlce for the Province of New Yorke, in 
lib. No. I, 
Pages 145 to 148, this 27th da)' of December, 1685. 

J. Spraig, Libr." 

The first settlement, at the place which developed into the Ryck's 
Patent, was Roe-ya-hook, and the Indian village vs'as on the land, near 
and now occupied as a military parade ground, known as the New York 
"State Camp." It v\-as there the white man tlrst placed his feet and on 
that ground the settlement began and in perfect peace with the Indians. 
Ey the help of the Indians, they began to build themselves houses, and were 
always careful to deal justly, truthfully and honestly with the Indians, 
giving them an equivalent for their services rendered. 

The Dutch soon learned the Indian language and the settlement in- 
creased. The Indians proposed to sell the Dutch a tract of land especially 
for the use of the settlement, and July 10, 1641, a council was held and the 
chiefs of other clans united and an agreement was made and the boundary 
of the land designated. It lay east of Annsville Creek, taking the land 
east and south of where Peekskill is located. In April, 1643, the Dutch 

[248] 



HISTORY OF RYCK S PATENT 



paid for their land in goods, as follows: 8 guns. 9 blankets, 5 coats, 14 
fathoms of daffel cloth, 14 kettles, 2 anchors of rum, 5 half vats of strong 
beer, 6 earthen jugs, 12 shirts, 50 pounds of powder, 30 bars of lead, 18 
hatchets, 18 hoes, 14 knives, one small coat, 6 fathoms of strong water 
cloth, 6 pairs of stockings and 6 tobacco boxes. For the above the Indians 
sold them seven thousand two hundred acres of land, and on this land the 
Dutch lived in peace and harmon_\' with the Indians. 

In after j'ears the title to this land was made good to the settlement by 
the government of England, giving a charter grant and patent which was 
called Ryck's Patent, (Richard Patent in Dutch), so called after Richard 
Abrahamson, the principal patentee, who later assumed the English name 
of "Lent." 

Substantially the tract passed to Hercules Lent, Richard's son, about 
1730. Three hundred acres of this land fronting on the inner and upper 
part of Peekskill Bay, New York, was deeded to Jacobus De Kay, April 
25th, for the value of 400 guilders, which ultimately became the property 
of John Kronkhyte, the ancestor of the Cronkhites. 

Ryck's Patent remained a separate political division for representation 
in the Assembly until divided by the New York State Act of 178S. 

After many years there came a time for a division of this land, and 
Hercules Lent (Number iio in the Lent Genealogy) purchased eighteen 
hundred acres of this land, paying 1 50 pounds (8750), on which this branch 
of the Lent Family have lived from the first settlement down to the present 
time, dividing and dividing until what was left in the Cronkhite-Depew 
Family was given by Mr. Chauncey Mitchell Depew to the village of 
Peekskill, New York, for a public Park. 



249 



SERVICES OF ANCESTORS AND 
HONORS 

1. Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company. 

Lieutenant Edward' Winship, 1613-1688; admitted 1638. 

2. Assessor. 

David' Ogden, 1678-1734; in Newark, New Jersey, 1713. 

3. Burgesses. 

Honorable John' Ogden, 1609-1682; East Jersey, 1668. 

4. Church Warden. 

Judge Uzal^ Ogden, 1712-1780; Trinity Church, in Newark, New 
Jersey, 1778. 

5. Civil Constitution, New Haven Colony. 

Honorable Francis' Newman, 1600-1660; signed 1639. 

6. Collector. 

David' Ogden, 1678-1734; Newark, New Jersey, 1713. 

7. College Graduates. 

Honorable Chauncey Mitchell' Depew, born 1834, alive 1918, Yale, 

1856. 
Chauncey Mitchell' Depew, Jr., born 1879; Columbia, 1901. 
Captain James* Minot, 1653-1735; Harvard, 1675. 
Reverend Justus"^ Mitchell, 1754-1806; Yale, 1776. 
Reverend Josiah* Sherman, 1729-1789, Princeton, 1754, Harvard 

honorary M.A., 1758; Yale honorary M.A., 1765. 

8. Colonial Service. 

Thomas' Brooks, 1600-1667; Captain. 

Pieter Guilliamse- Cernel, 1650-1689; Lieutenant, 1686. 

John' Curtis, 161 1-1707; Ensign and Sergeant. 

Israel' Curtis, 1644-1704; Lieutenant. 

John* Curtis, 1670-1754; Ensign. 

Hendrick' Lent, 1712-1782; Ensign in June, 1738, and Lieutenant. 

[251] 



CHRONOLOGY AND A N C F. S T R '»' OF C H A I' N C E Y M . D E P E \V 

John' Minot, 1626-1669; Captain. 

James^ Minot, 1653-1735, Captain in 1692. 

James' Minot, 1694-1759; Colonel 

Matthew' Mitchell, 1590-1645, soldier in 1636, in Pequot War, at 
Saybrook Fort. 

David^ Mitchell, 1619-16S5; Member of Council of War, in 1675. 

John' Mitchell, 1654-1732; Ensign. 

John* Mitchell, 16SS-1748; Sergeant in 172S, Ensign in 1737, Lieu- 
tenant in 1740. 

Asahel' Mitchell, 1723-1797; Captain. 

Honorable Francis' Newman, 1600-1660; Ensign of the Train Band 
in 1642; Lieutenant of the Artillery Company in New Haven in 
1645. 

David' Ogden, 1678-1734; Captain in 1721. 

Daniel^ Rapalye, 1650-1725; Ensign in 1673, Lieutenant in 1700. 

Joseph' Root, 1698-1761 ; Sergeant in 1744. 

John' Sherman, 1604-1691, Ensign in 1654, Captain in 1680. 

Cyprian' Stevens, 1648-1692; a soldier. 

Samuel= Swaine, 1622-1682; Captain in 1673. 

Timothy' Wheeler, 1604-1687; Captain in 1662. 

Nathaniel' Wilder, 1610-1704; soldier in 1676. 

Ephraim^ Wilder, 1678-1769; soldier. 

Simon' Willard, 1605-1676; Lieutenant in 1637; Captain in 1646; 
Major in 1655. 

Hendrick^ Wiltsie, 1623-1701; soldier 1660-1667 '^^ Kingston, New 
York, in the Esopus War. 

Edward' Winship, 161 3-16S8; Lieutenant in 1660. 

9. Commissioner of the United Colonies in New England. 

Honorable Francis' Newman, 1600-1660: in 1654 and 1658. 

10. Cornet of Horse. 

Joseph^ Hegeman, 1650-1725; at Flatbush in 1689. 

1 1. Council Members. 

Honorable John' Ogden, 1609-1682; East Jersey in 1665. 

12. Council of Appointment in New York State. 

Honorable Robert' Johnston, 1734-1S23. 

[252] 



SERVICES OF ANCESTORS AND HONORS 

13. Court of Assistants, in New England. 

Matthew" Mitchell, 1 590-1645; Connecticut in 1638. 
Honorable Francis' Newman, 1600-1660; New Haven Colony in 
1653. 

Honorable William' Swayne, 1585 ; Connecticut. 

Major Simon' Willard. 1605-1676; Massachusetts, 1657 to 1676. 

14. Deacons in the Dutch Church. 

Pieter' Monfoort, 1605-1661; Brooklyn, in 1661. 

Dirck Janse' \'ander Vliet, 1612-1689; Flatbush in 1680. 

15. Deputy Governor. 

Honorable John' Ogden, 1609-1682; East Jersey in 1665. 

i6. Deputy to the General Court. 

Captain Thomas' Brooks, 160D-1667; Massachusetts 1642 to 1648. 
Nicholas' Butler, 1590-1671; Massachusetts in 1651. 
Joris Jansen' De Rapalie. 1600-1665, New Netherlands, in 1641. 
Elder George= .Minot, 1594-1671; Massachusetts, 1635 and 1636. 
Captain James^ Minot, 1653-1735; in Massachusetts. 
Colonel James' Minot, 1694-1759; in Massachusetts. 
Matthew' Mitchell, 1590-1645; in Connecticut, in 1637. 
Ensign John' Mitchell, 1654-1732; in Connecticut, in 1709. 
Honorable John' Ogden, 1609-1682; in Connecticut, in 1659. 
Captain John' Sherman, 1604-1691 ; in Massachusetts, in 1651, etc. 
Joseph- Sherman, 1650-1731; in Massachusetts, 1702 to 1705. 
Honorable William' Swayne, 1585 ; Massachusetts and Connec- 
ticut, both in 1636. 
Captain Samuel-' Swaine, 1622-1692; in Connecticut, 1653 to 1663. 
Captain Timothy' Wheeler, 1604-1687; in Massachusetts in 1663. 
Ephraim* Wilder, 1678-1769; in Massachusetts. 
Major Simon' Willard, 1605- 1676; in Massachusetts, 1636 to 1649. 
Lieutenant Edward' Winship, 1613-1688; in iMassachusetts, 1663 to 
1686. 

17. Elders in Churches. 

Cornet Joseph^ Hegeman, 1650-1725; Flatbush Dutch Church in 1690. 
Hercules^ Lent, 1681-1766; at Tarrytown Dutch Church. 
George^ Minot, 1594-1671; Dorchester Congregational Church. 

[253] 



C H R O N O L O G ">' AND A N C E S T R 1' OF C « A V N C E Y M . D F P E \V 

Lieutenant Daniel' Niven, 1742-1809; in the Associate Reformed 
Church, in Xewburgh, in 1S03. 

Lieutenant Daniel- Rapalye, 1650-1725; Brooklyn Dutch Church 
in 1677. 

David- Storm, 1664 , at Tarry town Dutch Church. 

Jochem' Van Weert, 1637-1708; at Tar.-ytown Dutch Church, in 
1699. 
18. Founders of Towns. 

Nicholas' Butler, 1590-1671, Martha's \'ineyard. 

Jan Herricksen^ Kranckheyt, 1657-1730; Tarrytown and Ryck's 
Patent. 
\ Sergeant John= Curtis, 161 1-1707; Stratford, Conn. 

\ Lieutenant Israel^ Curtis, 1644-1704; Woodbury, Conn. 

William^ De Pew, 1663 — ; Cortlandtown, New York. 

Ryck Abrahamson= Lent, 1637-1715; Ryck's Patent, N. Y. 

Elder George" .Minot, 1594-1671; Dorchester, Mass. 

Matthew' Mitchell, 1 590-1645; Stamford. Conn., 1641. 

David= Mitchell, 1619-1685; Stamford, Conn., 1641. 

Ensign John= Mitchell, 1654-1732; Woodbury, Conn. 

Pieter' Monfoort, 1605-1661; W'allabout, New York. 

Honorable Francis' Newman, 1600-1660; New Haven, Conn., one of 
the planters. 

Honorable John' Ogden, 1609-1682; Stamford, Conn., 1641, Eliza- 
beth, New Jersey, 1664. 

David Ogden, 1639-1692; Elizabeth, New Jersey, 1664. 

Joris Jansen' De Rapaiie, 1600-1665; Waliabout, '637. 

Abraham^ Rycken, 1610-16S9; Bushwick, New York, 1640. 

Josiah' Root, 1615-1683; Beverly, Mass. 

Thomas' Sawyer, 1616-1706; Lancaster, Mass., 1643. 

Captain John' Sherman, 1640-1 691, Watertown, Mass. 

Isaac' See, 161 5 ; Tarrytown, New York. 

Harck' Siboutsen, 1615-16S4; Newtown, New York. 

David= Storm, 1664 ; Tarrytown, New York. 

Captain Samuel- Swain, 1622-1682; Newark, N. J. 

Elder Jochem' Van Weert, 1 637-1 70S: Tarrytown, New York. 

Jonas' Weed, 1610-1676; Stamford, Conn., 1641. 

[254] 



SERVICES OF ANCESTORS AND HONORS 

Roger' Wellington, 1607-1698: Watertown, .Mass. 

Captain Timolh)-' Wheeler, 1604-16S7: Concord, Mass., in 1635. 

Major Simon' Willard, 160^-1676; Concord, .Mass., 1635. 

19. Freemen, giving the right to vote. 

Captain Thomas' Brooks, 1600-1667; '636 at Watertown. 

Sergeant John= Curtis, !6ii-i707; 165S in Connecticut. 

Elder George= .Minot, 1594-1671 ; 1634 in Dorchester. 

Captain John= Minot. 1626-1669; 1665 in Dorchester. 

Captain James-" Minot, 1653-1735; 1690 in Concord. 

Honorable Francis' Newman, 1600-1660; 1640 in New Haven, Con- 
^ necticut. 
^v Honorable John' Ogden, 1609-1682; in 1650 at Southampton, Long 
Island, Nev.' York. 

Dr. Richard' Palgrave, 1 590-1651, in 1631 at Charlestown, Massa- 
chusetts. 

William' Palmer, 1590 ; in 1639 at Newbury, .Massachusetts. 

John' Prescott, 1604-16S3; in 1669 at Lancaster, .'vLissachusetts. 

Thomas' Sawyer, 1616-1706; in 1654 at Lancaster, Massachusetts. 

Captain John' Sherman, 1604-169; ; in 1637, in Massachusetts. 

Honorable William' Svrax'ne, 15S5- ; in 1636, at Watertown, 

Massachusetts. 

Thomas' Sweetman, 1610-1683; in 1638, in Massachusetts. 

Jonas' Weed, 1610-1676; in 1631, in Watertown, .Massachusetts. 

Roger' Wellington, 1607-1698; in 1690, in Watertov/n. 

Benjamin- Wellington, 1646-1710; in 1677, in Watertown. 

Captain Timothy' Wheeler, 1604-1687; in 1640. in Concord, .Massa- 
chusetts. 

Thomas^ Wilder, 1618-1667; in 1640, in Charlestown, .Massachusetts. 

Lieutenant Edward' Winship, 1613-16S8; in 1635 in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 

20. Governors in Colonial Times. 

Honorable Francis' Newman, 1600-1660; of the New Haven, Connec- 
ticut, Colony, 1658 to '660. 

Honorable John' Ogden, 1609-1682; of the English Towns in East 
Jersey in 1673. 

{255] 



CHRONOLOGY- AND ANCESTRY OF C 1 1 A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

21. Honorable. 

Francis' Newman, 1600-1660, Governor of New Haven Colony, 

1638 to 1660. 
John' Ogden, 1609-16S2; Governor of East Jersey in 1673. 
Robert' Johnston, 1734-1 82 3; New York State Senator, from 

Dutchess County, New York. 
Roger^ Sherman, 172 1- 1793; United States Senator. 
Roger Minot= Sherman, 1757-1844. 

22. Judges. 

Adriaen^ Hegeman, 1773-1826. 

Robert' Johnston, 1734-1S23; Putnam County, New York. 

Daniel' Niven, 1 742-1 Soo: Newburgh, Orange County, New York. 

Uzal^ Ogden, 1712-17S0; New Jersey. 

Andries^ Onderdonck, 1 686-1 758; on Long Island, 1756. 

23. Justices of the Peace. 

Captain James^ Minot, 1653-1735; Concord, Massachusetts, in 1692. 
Colonel Jam.es^ Minot, 1694-1759; in Concord, Massachusetts. 
Honorable John' Ogden, 1609-16S2; in Elizabeth, New Jersey, in 
1665. 

24. Magistrates. 

Adriaen' Hegeman, 1625-1672; Flatbush, Nev/ York, from 1654 to 

1663. 

Peter' Lott, 1629 ; Flatbush, New York, 1656 and 1673. 

Pieter' Monfoort, 1605-1661 ; in Brooklyn, New York, in 1658. 
Honorable John' Ogden, 1609-16S2; in Connecticut, in 1656 to 1658. 
Joris Jansen' De Rapalie, 1600 to 1665; in Brooklyn, New York, 

1655 to 1662. 
Willem Jacobs' Van Bcerum, 1617-1698; in Flatbush, New York, 

1657, etc. 
Rem Jansen' Van Der Beeck, 1620-1681 ; before 1664. 
Dirck Janse' Vander Vliet, 1612-1689; in Flatbush, New York, 1679 

to 1681. 

25. Marshal. 

Sergeant George' Abbott, 1620-1690; in Norwalk, Connecticut, 
1659 to 1661. 

[256] 



SERVICES O I- ANCESTORS AND M O N O R S 

26. Merchants. 

Judge Robert' Johnston, 1734-1823; in New York City. 
Judge UzaP Ogden, 1712-1780; in Newark, New Jersey. 

27. Ministers. 

Reverend Justus^ Mitchell, 1 754-1 806; in New Canaan, Connecticut. 
Reverend Josiah^ Sherman, 1 729-1 7S9; in W'oburn, Massachusetts; 
New Milford and Goshen, Connecticut. 

28. Oath of Allegiance, New York and New Jersey. 

Joost' Duryea, 1635-1727; in Bushwick, New York, 1687. 

Cornet Joseph- Hegeman, 1650-1725: in Flatbush, New York, 1687. 

Peter' Lott, 1629 ; in Flatbush. New York, 16S7. 

Hendrick Peterse^ Lott, 1662-1728; in Flatbush, New York, 1687. 
David= Ogden, 1639-1692; in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, 16C6. 
John' Prescott, 1604-1683; in Lancaster, Massachusetts, 1652. 
Lieutenant Daniel^ Rapalye, 1650- 172 5; in Brooklyn, New York, 

16S7. 
Willern Jacobs' Van Boerum, 1617-1698; in Flatbush, New York, 

1687. 
Dirck Janse' \'ander Vliet, 1612-1689; in Flatbush, New York, 1687. 
Wouter Gysbertse' Verscheur, 1630 ;in Bushwick, New York, 

1687. 

29. Overseer. 

Cornet Joseph- Hegeman, 1650-1725; in .Midv.out, Flatbush, New 
York, 1680. 

30. Patentees, or Founders, of Towns. 

Guilliame' Cornelise, 1620-1666; Flatbush, 1658. 

Pieter Guilliamse^ Cernel, 1650-1680; Flatbush, New York, 1685. 

Adriaen' Hegeman, 1625-1672; Flatbush, New York, 1661. 

Peter' Lott, 1629 ; Flatbush, Nev/ York, 1662 and 1685. 

Pieter' Monfoort, 1605-1661 ; Wallabout, New ^'ork. 1641. 
Honorable John' Ogden, 1609-16S2; Connecticut, 1662. 
Joris Jansen' De Rapalie, 1600-1665; Wallabout, New York, 1637. 
Abraham^ Rycken, 1610-1689; Newtown, New York, 1654. 

Isaac' See, 161 5 ; Karles Neck, Staten Island, New York, 1677. 

Dirck Janse' Vander Vliet, 1612-16S9; Flatbush, New York, 1654 and 
1677. 

[257] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y .'■'i . D E P E W 

31. Physicians. 

Captain James^ Minot, 1653-1735; in Concord, Massachusetts. 
Doctor Richard' Palgrave, 1 590-1651; in Charlestown, .Massachu- 
setts. 

32. Revolutionary War Service. 

Abraham = De Pew, 1762-1S3S; private, New York. 

Henrys De Pew, 1734-1788; private. New York. 

John' De Pew, 1705-1783; private, New York. 

James^ Kronkhite, 1737-before 1818; Captain, New York. Arm}- of 

the Revolution. 
Hendrick' Lent, 17 12-1782; Lieutenant, New York. 
AsaheP Mitchell, 1723-1797; Captain, Connecticut. 
Daniel' Niven, 1742-1809; Captain of Engineers, New York. Army 

of the Revolution. 
Reverend Josiah-" Sherman, 1729-1789; Captain, Connecticut. Army 

of the Revolution. 

33. Schout, or Burgomaster. 

Adriaen' Hegeman, 1625-1672; on Long Island, i66i. 
Honorable John' Ogden, 1609-1682; in East jersey, 1673. 

34. Secretary of a Town. 

Adriaen' Hegeman, 1625-1672; Flatbush, New York, 1659 to 166!. 
Honorable Francis' Newman; 1600-1660; New Haven Plantation 

1647. 
Dirck' Storm, 1636-171 5; Brooklyn, New York, 1669. 

35. Selectman in New England; Freeholder in New Jersey; Supervisor in 

New York. 

Sergeant John= Curtis, 161 1-1707; Stratford, Connecticut, 1676. 

Lieutenant Israel' Curtis, 1644-1704; Woodbury, Connecticut. 

Captain David' Ogden, 1678-1734; Newark, New Jersey, 1721. 

Captain John' Sherman, 1604-1691, Watertown, Massachusetts, 
from 1667 to 1680. 

Joseph^ Sherman, 1650-1731; Watertown, Massachusetts. 

Lieutenant Edward' Winship, 161 3-1688; Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts, 1637 to 1684. 

Thomas- Wilder, 16 18-1667; Lancaster, Massachusetts, 1659. 

[258] 



SERN'ICES OF ANCESTORS AND HONORS 

36. Sheriff. 

Judge Uzal^ Ogden, 1712-17S0; Essex County, New Jersey, 1763. 

37. Signer of the Declaration of Independence, 1776. 

Honorable Roger^ Sherman, 1721-1793. 

38. State Legislature. 

Honorable Robert' Johnston, I732-IS23; Senator of New York, from 
Dutchess County. 

39. Surrogate. 

Judge Uzal-i Ogden, 1712-1780; Prerogative Court of New Jersey, 
1762. 

40. Town Clerks. 

Adriaen' Hegeman, 1625-1672; Amersfoort, Long Island, ?\ew York, 

1663. 
Captain John' Sherman, 1604-1691; Watertown, Massachusetts, 

1645. 
Dirck' Storm, 1636-1715; Brooklyn, New York, in 1669; Flatbush, 

New York, in 1681. 
Cyprian' Stevens, 1648-1692; Lancaster, Massachusetts from 1682 

to 1686. 

41. Townsman. 

Sergeant George' .Abbott, 1620-1690; in Norwalk, Connecticut, in 

1664. 
David" Ogden, 1639-1692, in Newark, New Jersey, in 1679. 

42. Town Treasurer. 

Sergeant John- Curtis, 161 1-1707; in Stratford, Connecticut, in 1675. 

43. United States Senator. — Honorable Roger* Sherman, 1721-1793; 

from Connecticut. 
Honorable Chauncey Mitchell" Depew, born 1834; from New York 

State. Twice elected member of the Legislature of New York, 

1861 and 1862, from Westchester County. 
Elected Secretary of State of New York in 1863. 
Declined re-election in 1S65. 
Appointed Adjutant of the 18th regiment. New York National 

Guard, in United States service, i860. 

[259] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M , D E P E W 

Colonel and Judge Advocate of the 5th division, New York National 

Guard. 
Appointed and confirmed by the Senate of United States xMinister 

to Japan in 1S66, and resigned. 
Appointed by Governor Fenton County Clerk of Westchester 

County and declined. 
Appointed by act of Legislature Emigration Commissioner and 

declined. 
Appointed by the Legislature Commissioner to settle boundary 

dispute with Pennsylvania. 
Appointed by the Legislature a Commissioner to build the new 

Capitol at .Albany. 
Elected by the Legislature Regent of the University of the State 

of New York and served from 1S74 to 1904. 
Elected member of the Yale Corporation in 1893 and re-elected 

in 1899. 
Appointed, January i, 1866, Attorney of the Harlem Railroad 

Company and also of the Hudson River Railroad Company. 

By consolidation, September 15, 1869, of these companies into 

the New York Central and Hudson Ri\er Railroad Com.pany, 

became General Counsel. 
Elected Vice-President and General Counsel of the New York 

Central in 1880. 
President in 18S5. 
Chairman of the Board in 1899. 

Offered election of United States Senator in 18S4 and declined. 
Elected United States Senator in 1899. 
Re-elected in 1905. 



260 



AUTHORITIES CONSULTED 

1. Almy Genealogy, 1897, by Charles Kingsbun- .Miller, 136 pages. 

2. Albany, New York, Dutch Church Records, original manuscript, and 

the printed Holland Society Collections: 1633-1700, Baptisms and 
\ Marriages, 1904, 106 pages; 1700-1725, Baptisms and Marriages, 
\ 1905> 139 pages; 1725-174S, Baptisms and Marriages, 1906, 174 

pages; 1750-1764, BaptismiS and Marriages, 1907, 120 pages. 

3. American Ancestry, by Joel Munsell: Volume 1, 1SS7, ioo pages; 

Volume 3, iSSS, 229 pages; Volume 4, 1SS9, 248 pages; Volume 7, 
1892, 286 pages; Volume 8, 1893. 244 pages; Volume 9, 1804, 246 
pages; Volume 10, 1895, 20S pages; Volume 12, 1899, 216 pages. 

4. American Genealogy, 185 1, by Jerome B. Holgate, A.M., 244 pages. 

5. American Quarterly Register, 1839, volum.e 11, 476 pages. 

6. Ancestry of General Benjamin Franklin Butler, 1895, by Mrs. Blanche 

Butler Ames, 26 pages. 

7. Babcock Genealogy, 1903, by Stephen Babcock, M.A., xxx+640 + 119 

pages. 

8. Bergen Genealogy, 1876, by Teunis G. Bergen, 658 pages. 

9. Biography of Honorable Chauncey Mitchell Depew, 191 3, 15 pages. 

10. Calendar of Historical .Manuscripts, New York State, War of the 

Revolution, 1S68: Volume one, 6S2 pages; Volume two, 495 pages. 

11. Cambridge, Massachusetts, History, 1877, by Lucius R. Paige, 731 

pages. 

12. Cemeteries: Baptist, Yorktown, New York, manuscript; Hillside, 

Peekskill, New York, manuscript; St. Peter's, Peekskili, New York, 
manuscript (these manuscripts are in the possession of William A. 
Eardeley); Hill Burying Ground, Concord, Massachusetts; Granary 
Burial Ground, Boston, .Massachusetts, printed 1856, by Thomas 
Bridgman, 406 pages. 

[261 1 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY OF C h' A U N C E Y M . D E P E W 

13. Colonial Men and Times, 1916, by Mrs. Lillie Du Puy Van Culin 

Harper, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 624 pages. 

14. Concord, Massachusetts, History, 1835, by Lemuel Shattuck, 392 

pages. 
13. Concord, Massachusetts, Old Families, 18S7, by Charles Edward 
Potter, 143 pages. 

16. Connecticut in the Revolution, 1S89, at Hartford, xvii + i8o pages. 

17. Contemporary Biography of New York, 1885, Volume 4, 350 pages. 

18. Cortlandtown, New York, Dutch Church Records, at Montrose, New- 

York, Manuscript. 

19. Curtiss Genealogy, 1903, by Frederick Haines Curtiss, 252 pages. 

20. Documentary History of New York, 1849, by E. B. O'Callaghan; 

volumes four: Volume i, 786 pages. 

21. Documents Relative to the Colonial Histor>' of the State of New York, 

1858, in 15 volumes, by John Romeyn Brodhead. 

22. Dutchess County, New York, Deeds at Poughkeepsie, in manuscript. 

23. Dutchess County, New York, 1897, Comm.emiorative and Biographical 

Record, 950 pages, by J. H. Beers & Co. 

24. Dutchess County, New York, History, 1882, by James H. Smith, 562 + 

30 pages. 

25. Early Settlers of Connecticut, by Royal Ralph Hinman, 884 pages. 

26. Early Settlers of Kings County, New York, 1881, by Teunis G. Bergen, 

452 pages. 

27. East Jersey Deeds, manuscript, at Trenton, New Jersey. 

28. Fairfield, Connecticut, History, by Mrs. Elizabeth Hubbeli Schenck, 

Volume I, 1889, xxviii+425 pages; Volume 2, 1905, 538-fxvi page:. 

29. Fairfield, Connecticut, Probate Records, type-written, by William A. 

Eardeley, 4 volumes, 429 pages. 

30. Flatbush, Long Island, New York, Town Records, in manuscript, in 

Brooklyn, New York. 

31. Genealogical Dictionary, by James Savage: Volume i, i860, xv-^^i6 

pages; Volume 2, i860, 599 pages; Volume 3, 1S61, 664 pages; Volume 
4, 1862, v+714 pages; Cross Reference Index to the same, 18S4, by 
Orrando Perry Dexter, 38 pages. 
[ 262 ] 



AUTHORITIES CONSULTED 



32. Hampton, New Hampshire, Histon', 1S93, by Joseph Dow, 1 104 pages, 

in two volumes. 

33. Harlem, New York, History, 1S81, by James Riker, G36 pages. 

34. History of the Huguenot Emigration, 1SS5, by Reverend Charles 

Washington Baird: \'olume 1, 354+xix pages; Volume 2, 44S4-xi 
pages. 

35. Historical Register of the Officers of the Continental Army, 1914, 

revised edition, by Francis Bernard Heitman, 691 pages. 

36. Historical Society of Newburgh Bay and the Highlands, 189S, Old 

Town Cemetery, of Newburgh, iSo pages. 

37. Holland Society Collections: 1897, Brooklyn, New York, Dutch Church 

Records, pages 1 33 per 194; 1898, Flatbush, New York, Dutch Church 
Records, pages 87 per 152. 

38. The Huguenot, Bartholomew Dupuy and his Descendants, 1908, by 

Reverend Benjam.in Hunter Dupuy, 450 pages. 
39- '903 Journal of Reverend Silas Constant, 1750-1825, 561 pages. 

40. Kingston, Ulster County, New York, Dutch Church Records, 1891, by 

Reverend Roswell Randall Hoes, U. S. N., 797 pages. 

41. Leete Genealogy, 1S84, by Edward L. Leete, 168 pages. 

42. Lent Family Genealogy, 1005, by Nelson Burton Lent, 178 pages. 

43. Life and Later Speeches of Chauncey M. Depew, 1894, 510 pages. 

44. Long Island, New York, Genealogies, 1S95, by Mary Powell Bunker, 

350 pages. 

45. Long Island, New York, History, 1845, by Nathaniel S. Prime, 420 

pages. 

46. Long Island, New York, History, 1843, by Benjamin Franklin Thomp- 

son; Volume 1,511 pages; Volume 2, 554 pages. 

47. Lutheran Church, New York, Records, 1903, Holland Society Collec- 

tions, 118 pages, baptisms and marriages. 

48. Manuscript LVIl, in Albany, New York, State Library. 

49. Minot Genealogy, 1897, by Joseph G. .Minot, 55 pages. 

50. Newark, New Jersey, 1691, Town Record Book, manuscript in New 

Jersey Historical Society. 

[263] 



CHRONOLOGY' AND ANCESTRY OF C H A U N C E Y M . D E P E V'.' 

51. Newburgh, New York, History, 1859, by Edward Manning Ruttenbcr, 

324+Ni+viii pages. 

52. Newark, New Jersey, 1853, Historical Discourse in the First Presby- 

terian Church, by Reverend Jonathan French Stearns, 320 pages. 

53. New England Historic and Genealogical Register: Volume G, 1832, 402 

pages; Volume i, 1S47, 400 pages; Volume 14, i860, 390 pages; 
Volume 15, 1861, 374 pages; Volume 24, 1870, 451 pages; Volume 27, 
1873, 463 pages; Volume 48, 1804, 579 pages. 

54. New Haven, Connecticut, 1914, Historical Catalogue of the First 

Church of Christ, by Franklin Bov/ditch Dexter, 469 pages. 

55. New Haven, Connecticut, 1881, History of the Colony, by Edward 

Elias Atwater, ix+611 pages. 

56. New Jersey, Archives, printed, 1885, 1S97, 1901, 1905. 

57. New Jersey in the Revolution, 1872, by .Adjutant General William 

Scudder Stryker, 87S pages. 

58. New Jersey Historical Society Collections. 

59. New Jersey Wills, in manuscript, at Trenton, New Jersey. 

60. Newton, Massachusetts, History, 1854, by Francis Jackson, 1639 to 

1800, 555 pages. 

61. Newtown, Long Island, New York, History, 1852, by Jam.es Riker, 

437 pages. 

62. New York, Dutch Church, Records: 1890, Volume i. Marriages, 

December, 1639 to August, 1801, 351 pages; 1901, Volume 2, Bap- 
tisms, 1639 to 1 731, 664 pages; 1902, Volume 3, Baptisms, 1731 10 
1800, 634 pages. 

63. New York, Gazette, for the 10 Tvovember, 1777. 

64. New York, Genealogical and Biographical Record: Volume 6, 1875, 

206 pages; Volum.e 7, 1876, 187 pages; Volume 11, 1880, 190 pages: 
Volume 27, 1896, 252 pages; Volume 32, 1901, 289 pages; Volume 
38, 1907, 365 pages; Volume 41, 1910, 416 pages. 

65. New York, Historical Society Collections. 

66. New York, In the Revolution, by James A. Roberts; 1898, second 

edition, 534 pages; 1904, supplement, 336 pages. 

[264] 



AUTHORITIES CONSULIED 



67. New York State Archives, New York in the Revolution, 18S7, by 

Berthold Fernow, volume 15, 638 pages. 

68. New York State Census for 1790, printed 1908, 30S pages. 

69. Norwalk, Connecticut, History, by Reverend Edwin Hall, 1847, 320 

pages. 

70. Norwalk, Connecticut, History, 1896, by Reverend Charles iMelbourne 

Selleck, 4S2+xliii pages. 

71. Ogden Family Genealogy, 1907, by William Ogden Wheeler, 532 pages. 

72. Orange County, New York, Census, 1702 and 1712, in manuscript, in 

Albany, New York. 

73. Orange County, New York, History, 1S46-1847, by Samuel W. Eager, 

653 pages. 

74. Orange County, New York, History, 18S1, by Edward Manning 

Ruttenber, 820 pages. 

75. Orations and After-Dinner Speeches of Chauncey .M. Depew, 1896, 

537 pages. 

76. Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York, Documentary History, 1902, by 

Henry A. Stoutenburgh, 966 pages. 

77. Palmer Family Groups, 1905, by Emily Wilder Leavitt. 450+xlii 

page:. 

78. Prescott Family Memorial, 1870, by William Prescott, .M.D., 653 

pages. 

79. Probate Records, in manuscript; at Fairfield, and New Haven, and 

Hartford, and Stamford, Connecticut; at Suffolk County, Massa- 
chusetts, in Boston. 

80. Putnam County, New York, History, 1886, by William Smith Pelle- 

treau, A.M., 771 pages. 

81. Queens County, Long Island, New York, Deeds and Conveyances, at 

Jamaica, in manuscript. 

82. Queens County, Long Island, New York, Surrogates Records, at 

Jamaica; typewritten, by William A. Eardeley, 1914, 105 pages. 

83. Records of New Amsterdam, 1897, by Berthold Fernow, in seven 

volumes. 

[265] 



CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTR"!' OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW 

84. Rockland County, New York, History, i88-|, by Reverend David Cole, 
D.D., 344 pages +75 pages of the baptisms in the Dutch Churches at 
Tappan and Clarkstown. 

83. Root and Rootes Genealogy, 1870. by James Pierce Root, 533 pages. 

86. Rosenkrans Family Genealogy, 1900, by Allen Rosenkrans, 332 pages. 

87. Saint Nicholas Society, 1005, Year Book, 335 pages. 

88. Salisbury's Family Histories and Genealogies, 18S3 and 1892, 4 

volumes, 2232 pages. 

89. Sands Family Genealogy, 1886, by Temple Prime, 91 pages. 

90. Souvenir of the Revolutionary Soldiers' Monument Dedication at 

Tarrytown, New York, 1894, by Marcius Denison Raymond, 211 
pages. 
gi. Stamford, Connecticut, History, 1868, by Reverend Elijah Baldwin 
Huntington, A.M., 492 pages. 

92. Stratford, Connecticut, History, 1886, by Reverend Samuel Orcutt, 

'393 Paiges, in three volumes. 

93. Street Family Genealogy, 1S95, by Mrs. Mary A. Street, 542 pages. 

94. Sullivan County, New York, History, 1873, by James Eldridge 

Ouinlan, 700 pages. 

95. Surrogates Records, in manuscript, for Dutchess County, New York, 

at Poughkeepsie; for New York City; for Putnam County, New 
York, at Carmel; for Westchester County, New York, at White 
Plains. 

96. Tappan and Clarkstown, New York, Dutch Church Marriages, 1604 

to 1831, manuscript 1909 at New York Public Library, by Walter 
Kenneth Griffm, 195 pages. 

97. Tarrytown, New York, Dutch Church Records, 1697 to 1791, by 

Reverend David Cole, D.D., igoi. 252 pages. 

98. Trinity Church, New York, Records, in manuscript. 

99. Unrecorded Wills, in the Office of the Secretary of State, at Trenton, 

New Jersey, in manuscript. 
100. Unrecorded Wills, in the Office of the New York City Surrogate, in 
manuscript. 

[ 266 1 



AUTHORITIES CONSULTED 



101. Van W}xk Family Genealogy, 1912, by Anne Van Wyck, 508 pages. 

102. Watertown, Massachusetts, History, 1S35, by Dr. Henry Bond, 1094 

pages, in two volumes. 

103. Weed Family Genealogy, in manuscript, by William A. Eardeley. 

104. Wellington Family Genealogy, i892, by Mrs. Adaline W. Griswold, 

26 pages. 

105. Westchester County, New York, Census, 1710, manuscript in Albany, 

New York. 

106. Westchester County, New York, History, by Robert Bolton, 1848, 

Volume 1, xxxii + 559 pages; Volume 2, 5S2 pages. 

107. Westchester County, New York, History, 1900, by Frederic Shonnard 

and Walter Whipple Spooner, 638 pages. 

108. Wheeler Family Genealogy in America, 1914, by a committee, xviii + 

1257 pages, in one volume. 

109. Wilder Family Genealogy, 1878, by Reverend .Moses H. Wilder, 394 

pages. 
no. Wiilard Family .Memoir, 1838, by Joseph Willard, 471 pages. 
in. Wiltsee Family Genealogy, 1908, by Jerome Wiltsee. 294 pages. 
n2. Woodbury, Connecticut, History, by William Cothren; Volume 1, 

1854, xii-l-833+vii pages; Volume 2, 1872, x+84i-i6io+viii pages; 

Volume 3, 1879, 705 pages. 
n3. Yale University Biographies, by Franklin Bowditch Dexter, in six 

volumes. 
1 14. The Family of John Stone, of Guilford, Connecticut; Genealogy, 1898; 

Book 2, by Truman Lewis Stone, x + 339 + (9 inde.<) pages. 



267 ] 



Hver a Acen Uptiniiet 



I' ■■jp;--nght by K^L-slonn View Co.) 

Chauncey M. Depew 

Nmety Years Oid ' 7, ■■ _, 



vr 



visdom of 



ti :ne a.'cumuia 
.^.1. rUca.i.ss, the veteran New Tork 
'entral Railroad man, philosopher 
>nreur extraordinary, sat in his 

•irday on his rinetieth birthday 
I nnvsr f-It bov.irr in my Ufe." 
■-••■Ay h,- .-ai,]; ■•]-,„ you know 1 
■v ;'- man uhn va i ninety years 
1 atter> 1 was sixty except one, 

opt;-." 

' ■ ■■ prefiiL'ted the nomination of 

■'■-■id~ti on the tirst bailot at 

1 ar.d his election by n large ma- 



U'^^i^h 



1 1: 






It si Say' lis e :»> 



i'sldOW ai 



^4 Q.-^. 






?P'!%v loft r^ 



KeT Tor, 
Chauncev Si. Dej 
of 5ir.ClO.539 and a i-et c-smt- 
95-!, 241) when ho died Ar..-.: 
it was sho-\-n in a trLir»ji>r : 
today by Deputy 3tac« Taz ; 
sioner Stephenson. 

Stock.s and bv-nds -wem v , 
n6.S23.?S5. The -wicovr. J.t.i- 
and his son, Ch3.nn.:ey M. D-- 
are the principal bfncficiari-s. 
between them the entir"? re-:-;--.' 
tate. Tale university receiv^.s 
000, and the villa'sc of p 
$100,000. 

Wif.knr Gets .Lo.^uc.v. 
Mr5, Depev- rece.ives a 
lega.cy. personal eff.jcto v.o-.-t'-i 
and a Ufe jntere.st :.n half :'.:•? 
, amounting lo S6,S-37,C'5-3. T'.i' 
fns hair of the residue Qoe^ 
Depew's son. hai: d ;., o-.'lt ;■ 
the balance in trust. In ad.ii!' 
son receives the Dcpe'v h^-ri.^ 
West 54th street, vaju'd .-li • 
and personal effects vaiued jt 
T'Tenty-three i n d i v i d u a : 
named amcn^ the logatevs. Ti 
eluded relatives and employes. 
Stang-. a sister, -who died las- 
was left a 1150.000 tr'jsr ''•jr 
property '.n Pelham Kei^ht.".:. 
at J2S.0OO. This goes to t.h_ree 
ters of Mrs. Stan?. 

Relatives .-Vre KemcnvT.r--- 
Charles C. ??.u!i.-5, nor-: 
ceives a SSO.OOO hj^r.-icy and a 
sum pocs to a niece, .Plo:-en.:e 
of Detroit; another niece, A;r 
pew Paulding, recnive:i a S:;im, 
estate. .\ )rrand-.?rh ;■-.<■, ■■ 
Deiyv.- Ct^s -^^;^:;,.n of 'I-. 
France. re_e.- e.-; ■ - Si'j ■;, ■ 
Kazel p. D-jr^ew i.f Ponlia;. 
receives a 550.000 ;e^acv. 

Of :i4,lS2.oi; in stocks tht:. 



- i ■ i 



; on] 
c-d a 



cf 



nal 



re! 5 

- I 



1 issues. The prlr.cir''.'.! 



v.'ere li 

hold! 

t-'onal }jiy.f -jAi conip-a^