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Full text of "St Andrew's College Review, Christmas 1921"

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Ryrie Bros. Limited 

DIAMOND MERCHANTS 
AND SILVERSMITHS 

Special attention given to Class Pins and 
College Insignia 

SEND FOR OUR BOOKLET : 

44 CLUB AND CLASS PINS." 

134-136-138 Yonge Street 
TORONTO 



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The Young Man's 
Shop 

Young fellows know style all 
right, but generally they're not "up" 
on cloth and tailoring. They don't 
have to be when they buy SOCIETY 
BRAND CLOTHES. The label 
means "Good Style, All Wool Fab- 
rics, Hand-Tailoring." That's why 
we sell them. 




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102 Yonge St. 

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Concentrated Filament 

TIPLESS TUNGSTEN 

AND 

TIPLESS NITRO 
LAMPS 

Built to stand excessive jar and 
vibration 

MAXM LAMP COMPANY 

28 Front St. East, Toronto 



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UlUU!!l)'J'J.ir 




61 Bloor West North 8252 



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and 



Crippen 

Photographs 



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"The cut o'them" 



IT takes a good cutter to turn out 
the suit that a particular man 
will wear. 

IT takes a good cutter to give the 
lines and style to suits that St. 
Andrew's boys desire. 

THE Boys' Clothing department 
in this Store specializes in the 
"cut'' of suits and overcoats. 



The Robert Simpson Co. Ltd. 



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H " BUILD STRONG " 



2Kgs: 



Strength may be Moral, Mental 
or Muscular- 
All are qualities of men of might. Nature's own 
food builds strong bodies. 



For "Milk of Quality" phone us 



3 College 20*0 




Company, Limited 



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RATHBONE 






and Co. 



92 Yonge Street 

Importers of 

Exclusive Men's Wear 

FLANNEL and DUCK 

TROUSERS 

SPORT SHIRTS 

and 

BATHING SUITS 

Phone Main 2928 



THE TORONTO 

TROPHY-CRAFT 

COMPANY 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

CLASS PINS 
PENNANTS 
SWEATER CRESTS 
F R A T. PINS 
DANCE PROGRAMS 
CHRISTMAS CARDS 
MEDALS AND 
TROPHIES 



Special designs submitted 
free of charge 

1711 ROYAL BANK BUILDING 
KING & YONGE STS. 

TORONTO 

PHONE ADELAIDE 1731 



I 



TRUE TO HIS WORD 

He Studied Hard and Won a Planet 




"Daddy promised me a new 
Planet bicycle if I passed my 
examinations — and I did." 

Surely no Daddy could offer 
any better inducement for his boy 
or girl to study hard and pass on 
the promise of a new bicycle. 

It's time now to consider 
getting- that wheel, we have a 
nice new stock just the latest 
design and you should see the 
PLANET before buying else- 
where. 

THE PLANET BICYCLE CO. [ 

69-71 QUEEN STREET E. - TORONTO 



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PHONE MAIN 319 

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BACON 
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<Tke Wkyte 

Packing Co. 

Limited 

66 Front St. East, Toronto 

BUTTEB 
EGGS 



ELLIS BROS. 

LIMITED 

DIAMOND IMPORTERS AND 
JEWELLERS 

U 96-98 YONGE ST. 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, 

JEWELLERY, CLOCKS, 

CHINA, SILVERWARE, 

AND ART GOODS 



Highest Quality 

Newest Styles 

Best Values 



55 SZ 



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"For Your Digestion's Sake" 

you are recommended to use 

BERMALINE 
BREAD 

Dr. Andrew Wilson, writing- in the "British Medical 
^ Journal," states — 

"This Bread should be eaten by all inho are in any 
way effected by digestive ailments." 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



NASMITHS LIMITED 



Phone Ma n 6535 



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^[ntbergitp of Toronto ^reste 

Toronto 

Solicits the orders of Student Societies for 



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— PRINTING- 



Invitations, Tickets, 

Programmes, At-Home 

Cards, etc. 



BINDING — 



IN ALL 

ITS 

BRANCHES 



R. J. HAMILTON, B.A. 



Manager 



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DEER PARK GARAGE 
and LIVERY ltd. 



/VortAi /300 

Cars 

For 

Dances, 

Weddings, 

Etc. 

A Call Will Send a Car 
To Your Door in a Jiffy 



Canada's 
Leading 
Outdoor 
Photographers 



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Copying 
and 
Enlarging 
A Specialty 



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Galbraith 

Photo Co. 

Carlton and Yonge Sts. 

Toronto 



TELEPHONE MAIN 6725 



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The BRITISH 


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Boys! : 

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AMERICAN OIL COMPANY t 

LIMITED 


J Branches in princip 


a/ towns and cities in Ontario 
Saskatchrwan and Alberta 


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Quebec, Manitoba, . 

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At. St. Andrew's Tuck 
and Most Good Stores 



Satisfies 
always 

M s LflUGHLIN'S 

GINGER 
ALE 

HYGEiA fr BEST v BEVERAGES 



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IMPERIAL BANK 

OF CAUDA 



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Cap/to/ and Reserve $14,500,000 

Going back through the years since St. 
Andrew's opened, students of all years 
will rememberthe Imperial Bank. You are 
proud of the College record We are proud 
of the Bank's record. 



The nearest Branch to St. Andrew's College is 
at the corner of Yonge and Bloor Sts. 

B. E. Howard, Manager. 
^s- x: 3g st a d - a sng g -a w g - -air - a r- 



Camp Kagawong 



A SUMMER CAMP FOR BOYS 

— 0— 

For illustrated booklet and further information 

apply 

E. A. CHAPMAN, St. Andrew's College 



GAMES 
SAILING 
FISHING 
SHOOTING 
CAMPING 
FIRST AID 
DRAMATICS 
SWIMMING 
LIFE SAVING 
FANCY DIVING 
NATURE STUDY 
CANOE CRUISES 
SAILING CRUISES 




BOXING 

ARCHERY 

BASEBALL 

WRESTLING 

WOODCRAFT 

GYMNASTICS 

CANOEING 

VOLLEY BALL 

CAPTAIN BALL 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

WATER BASEBALL 

ATHLETIC SPORTS 

MANUAL TRAINING 




Real Values In 

Tuxedos 

For Young College Men 



Tuxedos are considered 
correct for all evening 
occasions for young men. 

The ones we are show- 
ing are very smart in cut, 
made of black rich un- 
finished worsteds, " satin 
lapels, silk lined and the 
trousers are stitched with 
black braid. They are in 
every detail equal to those 
for which custom tailors 
will charge you a much 
higher price. 

Our Upstairs Price 



$ 



55 




Full Dress and 
Tuxedo Vests, 
(ill Styles, 
from$3.7-'> up. 



pAscoES 

■- -*- CLOTHES SHOP ^^ 

Second Floor Kent Building - 
Corner YONGEand RICHMOND STREETS 



dfje &L &nbreto'g College 

Review 




Cfjrtetmag, 1921 



Eoitorial Boaro 

MR. A. R. RAMSEY 
R. H. ANDERSON F. R. DAYMENT 

C.H.ARMSTRONG J.V.RUSSELL 

B. B. KING W. A. BEER 

K. B. CARSON E. R. McLELLAND 

^Business /Ifcanaoers 



J. A. CAMERON 
R. J. CAMERON 



W. E. EARLE 

W. G. McMURTRY 



Issued by the Editorial Beard 
EVERY CHRISTMAS, EASTER AND MIDSUMMER 



Cfjristma*, 1921 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Frontispiece: The Memorial Tablet 

Editorial ! 13 

The Life and Death of a Soldier 15 

Baxter Prints 17 

Geometry 19 

The Art Lovers 21 

A Bermudian's Impressions of Toronto 24 

The School 26 

Cross Country Run 33 

Rugby 35 

Our Old Boys 54 

Timely Rimes 58 

Exchanges 62 

Skits 64 

Lower School Skits 74 




UNVEILED BY HIS EXCELLENXY BARON BYXG OF VIMY, ST. ANDREW'S DAY, 1921 ' ~] 



St. Andrew's College Review 

Cbristmas, 1921. 

EDITORIAL. 

With the passing of summer and the varied pleasures of the 
long vacation still fresh in our memories, we assembled in Septem- 
1 er. Those glorious days of smiling weather had seen us at a 
summer camp, a lakeside resort, or travelling in strange lands. 
But just as at the close of the summer term we welcomed our re- 
lease from the school, so now are we cheerfully reconciled to its 
bondage. One of the best indications of the schools' proficiency 
was shown by our splendid University Matriculation results. St. 
Andrew's boys took high places in these examinations. 

During the recreation hours this term our attentions have been 
concentrated on rugby and we have found diversion in daily prac- 
tises. The teams have worked honestly, with little thought for 
personal glory, but rather the glory of St. Andrew's. From the 
members of the first team right down to the spare players among 
the youngsters of the Lower School fourteens we have honestly 
fought for the good of the school. The enthusiasm of the cheer 
practices has been carried to the sidelines, to follow the crimson 
and white to victory. Every one of us has felt a sort of individual 
pride in the success of our team. That they have won the Little 
Big Four championship is significant! 

But our many other interests have not suffered. The Cadet 
Corps, of which we have been justly proud in past years, has 
established a standard we are striving to maintain. By means of 
a slightly lengthened noon hour, the drills have been held regu- 
larly at noon day. 

We feel highly honoured that General His Excellency Baron 
Byng of Vimy inspected us on St. Andrew's Day in connection 
with the distribution of prizes at the college. Ours was the first 
Cadet Corps inspected by His Excellency since his arrival in Canada. 

Amidst all the activities of Prize Day we missed Mrs. Macdon- 

13 



14 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



aid's presence. Since the early part of the term she has been 
abroad, visiting in Scotland and England. The entire school wishes 
her a safe journey and will be glad to welcome her back early in 
the Easter Term. 

A conference of Headmasters representing Eton, Harrow, 
Rugby, and the larger English public schools is now being held at 
Oxford. We take this opportunity to congratulate our headmaster, 
Dr. Macdonald, on being invited to attend. Surely no greater 
honour in recognition of his noble work at St. Andrew's College 
could have been granted. 

And now we are once more at the joyous Yuletide, when, if 
ever come happy times. As the family and friends gather round 
the inglenook, we are reminded of the words from Tiny Tim, "God 
bless us every one." 

A Merrie Christmas to You All. 

F. Roper Dayment. 





LIFE 
1EATM 
©LPSE1R 

mi 




Horace Faishe joined the cadet corps. The captain of the corps 
told him he had volunteered. 

"You have volunteered for the cadet corps," said the captain in 
his affable manner. 

"Oh, have I really?" said Horace, much delighted. "I thought 
of volunteering, but I didn't think that I had told anyone about it." 
"You don't have to think when I'm around," said the captain, 
modestly. 

Thus our hero was enrolled in the cadet corps and turned out 
assiduously for drill each day and soon became the darling of the 
sergeant's heart, the plaything of Fortune and the master of his 
Ross rifle He was not greatly impressed by his fellow cadets — 
they resembled the knights of King Arthur in very few respects, 
and he too found it difficult to visualize himself as Sir Galahad 
in search of the Holy Grail, particularly when he was degraded to 
the awkward squad and drilled by a potential train-announcer for 
the new siation, in the person of the cadet corps captain,, whose 
lusty voice could be heard above the buzz of Spearmint. 

But Horace's optimism returned when a dress parade was held 
and he turned out in his bra' Scotch regimentals. The donning of 
chem caused him considerable worry ; when he found that his knees 
were to be uncovered he almost rebelled and would undoubtedly 
h^ve been shct for desertion had he not conceived the idea of dyeing 

1.5 



16 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

his knees the same colour as his socks, which gave spectators the 
impression that he was a red Indian with the small-pox. Bravely 
he shouldered his rifle and marched down the driveway behind the 
perfectly tuned bagpipes, down the avenue, across the bridge and 
into the great city with kilts swinging, heart beating high and his 
eyes glued to the prominent neck of the boy in front of him. 

Then the great review! A general glanced over the corps and 
nere it was that Horace made the ghastly mistake which cost him 
his life. When the captain shouted, "Present arms !" Horace went 
over to the general and with a courtly bow presented the general 
with his rifle. He was hurried outside by the horrified militia, a 
hasty court-martial was summoned and Horace was condemned to 
be shot at sunrise. 

The condemned ate a hearty breakfast next morning and was 
then led out to be shot, he showed no visible signs of emotion except 
that they had to carry him out. 

'Tut a cigarette in my mouth," he said to the head prefect. 
'You cannot refuse a dying man such a privilege. Silently the pre- 
fect handed him a cigarette and a handkerchief to bind his eyes. 

"Not that, not that!" cried Horace. (The spectators were 
amazed at his daring.) "I would rather use my own," he said, 
taking a re! bandanna from his pocket. 

The firing squad lined up and took aim, the sergeant dropped 
his arm and Horace lay dead at the foot of a large sign reading, 
"Broadway Girls at the Star." Thus died Horace surrounded by 
beauty as he would have wished, a victim to militarism and instinc- 
tive courtesy. 

Moral : Don't be military, and never be polite to generals. 

K. B. Carson. 



BAXTER PRINTS. 

From the very earliest period it seems to have been man's cus- 
tom to picture the things which exist about him. The earliest 
known tracos of man consist of rude carvings and drawings found 
*'n caves and the excavations of ancient cities. 

Gradually the art of drawing and portraying has reached a 
state which now seems almost perfection. Baxter, a poor printer, 
who lived during the early nineteenth century, invented a process 
of printing very beautiful pictures by means of plates. A plate was 
taken, say a blue one ; this was laid on, allowed to dry and another 
was laid on until the picture was completed simply by means of 
those plates. It oftentimes took eight or nine different plates to 
make one miniature picture. Baxter was unfortunately very un- 
s ccessful, perhaps, because his pictures were a bit too glaring and 
over-coloured. He was forced to sell out his stock in trade to an- 
other man by the name of Louis, whose name often appears on the 
■ater Baxter prints. This man was equally unsuccessful, and these 
pictures were sold at public auction in huge bundles and at a very 
small price. They were thrown into cellars where they remained 
for some fifty or seventy-five years until at length they were 
brought to light, and since have attained a great popularity. 

It would be well, perhaps, to tell something of these pictures and 
what they symbolize or bring to our minds. The colourings of 
these pictures are very bright and outstanding. At first glance they 
might be considered unpleasant to look at, and of little or no value. 
But if you take even the smallest print you can spend a very pleas- 
ant half hour studying it; every minute will reveal some fresh de- 
tail. Naturally, in every picture there is a centre of interest upon 
which these details bear. Oftentimes it is a road or a lane, or river, 
a hedge or row of trees, that is especially noticeable. "The 
Avenue" is a picture which everyone has seen at one time or an- 
other, either in a large or small reprint. It represents a long row 
of trees all leading up 'to a point in the far distance, turning off 
into another road. It portrays many miles in a short distance. In 
tsaxter prinis each feature leading up to the centre of interest has 
dozens of little pictures in itself. These little pictures portraying 
many things which have something to do with the centre of inter- 
est. For instance, in one picture of Baxter's, called, "The Milk- 

17 



81 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

maid," a young woman is seen sitting scrubbing out a large brass 
bowl. Beside her is a small puddle of milky water running down 
a worn path into a streamlet. Behind her is a small boy playing 
inside the thatched cottage. There is a window with a jar of 
flowers in it, and a rude home-made chair and table in the centre 
of the room. Behind the cottage is a row of poplar trees hiding a 
dimmer picture of the stream in the distance. This is only one 
print. There are no doubt hundreds that have been foolishly de- 
stroyed by ignorant people as worthless pictures.. 

Even the smallest of these pictures are very expensive ; only the 
other day a friend of mine sold one — about two inches by three — 
for fifteen dollars. In a certain art store on north Yonge Street a 
picture about ten inches by eight, in a very ordinary frame, was 
listed at seventy-five dollars. 

It seems unfair that the great collectors who can and will pay 
any price for an article upon which they set their fancy should 
force other collectors to pay the same price or do without. 

Seemingly Baxter prints are the "rage" at present among those 
who care for art and painting. Every few years something new 
comes out that possibly isn't heard of for many years to come. It 
has been the same with these pictures. 

It might also be interesting to know that many of the present- 
day settings for old plays are taken from Baxter prints. They 
are considered one of the best authorities on old furniture. 

Baxter prints are not really antiques, but are old enough to be 
interesting as well as educational in many ways. 

M. Shannon. 




For four years I have been attempting to arrive at some logical 
conclusion for the existence of geometry. My diligence, however, 
has met with no success except to root firmly in my mind the fact 
that geometry is a Bolshevist invention which attempts to prove 
that all things are equal. 

Yet, I must admit, there is a thrill in finding the relation of the 
angle RXZ to the line QDS. In fact, the thrill is so great that 
sometimes the victim is rendered unconscious for the remainder of 
the period and possibly the period following. This, of course, de- 
pends on what subject is dealt with in the aforementioned following 
period. 

Let me give you a concrete example of the pleasures of the study 
of geometry. On page two hundred and forty-eight of the Ontario 
High School Geometry (Theoretical) , authorized by the Minister of 
Education for Ontario, we find the following: "A point P moves 
so that the ratio of its distance from two fixed points Q, R is con- 
stant. Prove that the locus of P is a circle (the circle of Apollo- 
nius) ." This statement is accompanied by a delightful little sketch 
of a toboggan slide on wheels, down which the letters R P Q S and 

19 



20 



ST. ANDREW'S COLJ EGE REVIEW 



To the right of this drawing we are given instructions to "Divide 
QR internally at S and externally at T." Now, what on earth has 
QR done to be divided both internally and externally, and how in 
ihe world can we divide poor old QR internally before we divide 
him externally? 

Don't you see now what a thrilling subject geometry can be to 
one of an inquiring mind? As Professor A. N. MacDougall, M.A., 
LL.D., says in his preface/'Similarly the treatment of proportion is 
■ orrelated with the algebraic knowledge of the pupil," and we cor- 
roborate this statement by quoting from the classics, "You said it, 
.7 J rof!" Aspden. 




THE ART LOVERS. 

Wo went to the Grange last Sunday afternoon because we are 
ert lovers. It went with us. It is an art lover; he just adores art 
by his own confession, he also has the finest collection of cigarette 
r ards east of the Humber. It and Us were allowed inside because 







the caretaker was rather small and It and Us are rather husky. 
(We drive the largest milk- wagons on the Sunnyside route.) 

It began proceedings by stopping before a picture of a snow- 
bank and saying with a great rolling of his orbs toward the chan- 
delier, "Ain't it grand, Austin?" — Austin being Us. We agreed that 
T. are vainly trying to coast. It is really quite a thrilling picture. 

21 



22 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



the snow-bank was beautiful, so then It moved over to a picture 
('epicting i. British Columbia chink pulling in a glorious salmon. It 
was greatly taken with this picture because he likes his fish and 
chips at Hong Loo's Cafe, so that the whole affair called up visions 
of past delights to It's impressionistic mind. 

Then we saw a bust of a Victorian person with side chops and It 
stood admiring this work of art for a long time. Perhaps we be- 
came too enthusiastic over the bust because It seemed ashamed as 
he is a great art lover by his own confession. It wanted to leave, 




but we cried, coaxingly, "Come on over and look at these pictures of 
backyards and clotheslines." It wanted to look at skyscrapers be- 
cause he loved higher art. It didn't like the clothesline picture be- 
cause the shirts weren't properly washed, they had spots all over 
them and we explained, "That's the shadowing, sap-head!" and It 
yelled, "Shadowing, nothing! they didn't use Lux." We said, 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 23 

"You're an art-lover?" and It said, "I am, by my own confession." 
So that was settled and It took Us over to a foggy picture in the 
corner. It blew his nose vigorously and we said, "What are you 
doing?" It blew harder and gasped, "I'm a fog horn." 

How wonderful it seemed to be among all these "Objets des 
aits" with It, who was an art lover, by his own confession. Some 
old ladies thought It was an artist. He was walking up close to a 
picture, and then retreating from it backwards like the leader at a 
country barn dance. Then he turned to us and remarked, "Another 
coat of white-lead and it would be perfect." The illusion was com- 
plete because It had a dirty collar and looked enough like a plumber 
to be an artist. 

It and Us came to a picture of a sunset and we stopped ; beside 
us was one who obviously was an anti-prohibitionist with the most 
startling crimson nose we had ever seen. "Wonderful colouring," 
remarked It, gazing at the picture. "Wonderful is right," said Us 
looking at the anti-prohibitionist's nose. 

But after many happy hours It and Us had to leave the Grange 
because the little man who had allowed us to enter had called in the 
police reserves. It and Us left, well satisfied with our afternoon. 
The police sergeant waved good-bye from the front steps as we care- 
fully picked our way to the gate over a thousand odd Yiddish school 
children. K. B. Carson. 



A BERMUDIAN'S IMPRESSIONS OF TORONTO. 

The first impressions of Toronto, gained by a Bermudian, are 
many and varied. They might also be the impressions of any 
large Canadian city in contrast with those of our native island. 

The first striking feature is that of street travelling. On our 
island motor cars are never seen. The Bermuda laws prohibit the 
use of any motor propelled vehicle on any part of the island. In- 
fringement of this law is punishable by a fine of not less than ten 
pounds. A man's standing is reckoned more in terms of horse 
"flesh" than in horse "power." 

Again, the overcrowded condition of the Toronto thorough- 
fares offers another contrast to the streets of the average Ber- 
muda city. Class distinction is more noticeable in Bermuda than 
in Toronto, as the wealthy people are dressed better than the ordin- 
ary citizens, while in Toronto the majority of the people dress 
alike. 

On the matter of buildings another striking contrast is very 
noticeable. The Bermuda buildings for the most part are of stucco, 
very little brick or tile being used on the exterior. The interiors, 
however, are much the same as in any large city, except in the 
manner in which the windows open. In Bermuda they swing from 
a hinge at the top and are opened by pushing out on the lower part 
of the frame. 

The air of a large city is not clean and pure with the tang of 
salt pervading it. The sky always seems to be darkened by a lower- 
ing cloud of soot, which seems to have the effect of dulling the sky 
overhead and the streets below. 

You must not gather the impression that the Canadian city dif- 
fers absolutely from that of Bermuda, such is not the case ; the same 
language is spoken, the roads and walks appear much the same, 
the general layout of things is similar except that all the Bermuda 
city streets terminate on sandy beaches beside the blue water of 
the ocean. 

Street cars, of course, are an object of interest when seen by a 
Bermudian for the first time. The Bermuda streets are almost as 
wide as those of Toronto, and could be made suitable for such 
traffic, but the law prohibits the use of these. The reason for such 
a law is that our tourist trade would be ruined if motor vehicles 

24 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



25 



were allowed to run, as that would spoil the natural beauty and 
quaintness of the island ; also, our coral roads would be ruined. 

Much mere could be written on this subject, but these few im- 
pressions will serve to show you how a Bermudian finds a Canadian 
city such as Toronto full of new things hitherto unseen on his 
native island. 

Thompson II. 




The School 



THE LITERARY SOCIETY. 

On Thursday, 17th of November, at a meeting of the Literary 
Society, the following officers were elected for the current year: 

Dr. Maedonald Hon. President 

Col. Taylor President 

Findlay, A. G 1st Vice-President 

Earle 2nd Vice-President 

King Secretary 

Carson I., Ferguson I., _ Historians 

Form Representatives. 

Carrick I Upper VI. Form 

Russell I Lower VI., Toronto 

Cameron I Lower VI., McGill 

Carrick II Form V. 

Clift Form IV. 

Noonan Form III. 

On Friday, November 18th, the second meeting of the Literary 
Society was held in the assembly hall. It was the first meeting at 
which a programme was offered, the election of officers having been 
held the previous night. 

The Honorary President and President being away, the First 
Vice-President, Allan Findlay, look the chair. The secretary read 
hie minutes of the last meeting, which were approved. Then, as is 
customary, the vice-president gave a short speech, outlining the 
aims of the society, pointing out that the object was not entirely 
to amuse the boys, but to give them practise at public speaking, and 
m opportunity to overcome "stage fright" on the platform, at the 
piano, or at any other form of entertaining. He also asked thel>oys 
to give the committee their best support in arranging the pro- 
grammes. 

The vice-president then called for the first number. The orches- 
tra gradually came together from different parts of the hall and 
began timidly to run through the usual prelude. They soon dived 
into some of the very latest, in which Hunter's saxophone took a 
few liberties. The effect was much enjoyed by all, especially by the 

26 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 27 

"Tarzan Tribe," whose savage breasts were stirred by the beating 
of the drums. 

Ferguson II. spoke to us for a while and then said he was talking 
about his home town. He kept pretty well within the formula. 
Palmer II. played a piano solo. There was no sheet music in evi- 
dence ; he must have memorized it all. We judge he has a very good 
memory. 

Someone sent in a request that Jack Cameron should be called 
upon to sing "Ain't We Got Fun?" He sang for us and was heart- 
ily applauded by the Ottawa "crowd." Harvey also sang. Shannon 
gave a piano solo and then we had a duet by Milne and Berry, in 
which Milne's daring treatment of the bass was the most unique 
feature. Kirkland gave the speech on Hamilton, and Ferguson I. 
read some very interesting History Notes about the past school 
week. 

Carrick I. criticized the meeting and the orchestra gave another 
selection. The programme was concluded by "God Save the King." 

The meeting was very successful, especially considering that 
the organization had only been completed the previous night. 

Another attractve programme was presented by the Literary 
Society on Friday night, the 25th of November. Among the fea- 
tures of the evening were: Col. Taylor's speech, a much enjoyed 
skit by Cameron I. and Thompson, some very good violin music by 
Scott, accompanied by Russell I., and a speech on "Kamloops," by 
Milton. (Kamloops, we found, was his home town.) 



PREBENDARY GOUGH'S VISIT. 

Our school was honoured this term by a visit from Prebendary 
Gough. This iamous speaker congratulated us on our brief but 
brilliant past history. He mentioned his own school life and put in 
a plea for individuality on the part of the schoolboy. He said that 
the chap who has the gift of flowery expression should not be 
checked but rather aided in his special talent. He was highly in 
lavour of school sports and their part in the development of char- 
acter. He mentioned how he kept the British flag always flying 
above his church during the years of war and told us to always keep 
in mind the fact that we won the war by our British obstinacy. On 
the close of his all too brief speech, we gave three hearty cheers for 
our guest and we look forward to his promised visit the next time 
he comes over to Canada. Russell I. 



28 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



THE CADET CORPS. 

The Cadet Corps has been organized and the following officers 
appointed : 

Captain : Cameron I. 

Lieutenants: Findlay L, Earle, Cameron II., Dayment, King. 

Sgt.-Maj.: Armstrong. 

The corps has been engaged in preliminary drill. The first dress 
parade was held on Monday, November 28th. The corps turned out 
on Prize Day as a guard of honour to His Excellency, Lord Byng. 

The corps promises to be even more successful than last year's 
corps. 




THE SCHOOL ORCHESTRA. 



The school orchestra has been reorganized this year and under 
the capable leadership of Mr. Ross is rapidly developing profess- 
ional style. The orchestra is composed of nine players this year 
who are as follows : 

Saxophones — Hunter, Rowell. 

First Violins — Mr. Laidlaw, Scott, Hillary. 

Second Violins — Howell, Cameron II. 

Piano — Russell, I. 

Traps- -Bullock. 

This organization officiated on Prize Day and assists the Literary 
Society. Needless to say, that it will be on hand for the minstrel 
show. 



PRIZE DAY. 

St. Andrew's College has been the scene of many impressive 
gatherings and ceremonies during her history. Annually on St. 
Andrew's Day the many friends of the school have assembled for 
the distribution of prizes. These yearly exercises have had dis- 
tinguished guests, but probably no previous gathering has been 
honoured by so noted a guest and held for so noble a purpose as our 
Prize Day of this year. This was more than a prize day ; it was a 
token of our tribute to those loyal Andreans who gave their all. 

It was under his leadership that many of our own boys fought 
for right and justice; it was under his leadership that many of the 
ninety-nine Old Boys made the supreme sacrifice ; and Baron Byng 
of Vimy unveiled the tablet in their honour during the proceedings 
on prize day. 

With military smartness the college cadet corps was awaiting 
His Excellency at the front of the school, and upon the arrival 
of the Vice Regal party, Baron Byng was given a general salute. 
His Excellency then inspected the corps and expressed himself as 
pleased with its smartness. 

Later, while passing from the Headmaster's office to the as- 
sembly-hall a file of cadets lined either side of the way. As His 
Excellency entered the prayer hall the school orchestra struck up 
"God Save the King." Then followed the opening exercises con- 
sisting of the school hymn, "Fight the Good Fight," a scripture 
reading and prayer by Rev. James Little. 

After four years of awful war we paid respect to the departed 
Andreans last year by hallowing the sacred flags which flew over 
the school during those gloomy days. On this occasion we com- 
memorated their names by a suitable tablet. In his prefatory 
remarks Dr. Macdonald told of the splendid service rendered by 
our boys in all branches of the service, and on every front. A 
leverent silence w r as observed while the Senior Master, Mr. Robin- 
son, read the names engraven on the bronze tablet. His Excellency 
Baron Byng of Vimy then unveiled the tablet with the following 
words, — 

"To the glory of God and in honoured memory of the ninety- 
rdne Andreans whose names appear thereon, I now unveil this 
tablet, presented to St. Andrew's College as a mother's thank- 
offering." 

29 



30 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Far in the distance were heard the notes of the Highland 
Lament, "Flowers of the Forest," played by Cadet Lieutenant Day- 
rnent, and Sergeant Hunter. The pipes grew nearer, and then 
gradually faded away. Cadet Evans sounded the Last Post on the 
bugle as the guard of honour stood with arms presented. 

Dr. Macdonald dedicated the memorial with the following 
words : — 

"To the glory of God and to the sacred memory of Andreans 
who gave their lives in the Great War, I now dedicate this tablet, 
in the sure and certain expectation of the Resurrection, and with 
the fervent hope that for generations to come it will serve to 
remind the boys of this school of the readiness of their forerunners 
to respond to the call of Duty, even to the giving of their lives, and 
that thus it may play its part in maintaining in the life of the 
school a high tradition of service to king, to country, and to 
humanity." 

The Headmaster concluded the ceremony with a short prayer, — 

"0 God, give us of Thy strength that we may take up our lives 
more bravely, and seek to be more faithful in duty, and more loving 
and helpful to others, for the sake of those who are with us no 
longer here on earth. Send us back to the daily round of duties 
more eager to do Thy will, as though in the presence of death 
we had learned to know the deeper meaning of life. And when 
we too are called to leave this world of love and beauty, of joy and 
sorrow, may we be of ready heart to meet our forerunners who 
have passed within the veil. And to Thee, our Father, revealed in 
Jesus Christ be glory forever." Amen. 

"Played St. Andrew's, Old St. Andrew's," the Old Boys' Song, 
was then sung by everyone to the accompaniment of the orchestra. 

At the presentation of prizes Dr. Macdonald voiced the senti- 
ment of the entire school with a hearty welcome to Baron and 
Lady Byng. 

His Excellency presented the prizes for proficiency and also 
the Governor General's medal, while Her Excellency distributed 
the cups for shooting, the Wyld prize in Latin, and the Cooper 
Medal in Science. 

The entire assembly singing the National Anthem concluded 
the service. 

Refreshments were served for the friends of the College in the 
dining-room, while the Governor General's party retired to the 
Headmaster's residence. The masters and cadet officers were here 
presented to their Excellencies. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 31 

When the members of the Vice Regal party were leaving the 
college three cheers were given for Baron Byng and three cheers 
for Lady Byng. The cars then drove between two files of cheering 
cadets from the school to the gates. 

The impressive and well conducted service could not but leave 
in the heart of every Andrean a deep feeling of respect for those 
Old Boys who had so magnificently upheld the tradition of St. 
Andrew's, even unto Death. And among the present generation 
was sensed a feeling of sacred responsibility in the Laurel Crown 
which they have woven, lest for all time to come their spirit of 
service should not be maintained. 

The following received prizes : — 

Preparatory Form, Group A. — 1st, General Proficiency, White 
II. ; 2nd, General Proficiency, Campbell III. 

Group B. — 1st, General Proficiency, Acres; 2nd, General Pro- 
ficiency, Gordon II.; 2nd, General Proficiency, Applegath III. 

Form 1. — 1st, General Proficiency, McLean II.; 2nd, General 
Proficiency, Young; 3rd, General Proficiency, Fraser II. 

Form IIA. — 1st, General Proficiency, Drury II.; 2nd, General 
Proficiency, Cumberland; 3rd, General Proficiency, Dunlap and 
Stollmeyer III. 

Special Prize. — Macdonald III. 

Form IIIB. — 1st, General Proficiency, Duffus. 

Form IIIA. — 1st, General Proficiency, Shortly I.; 2nd, General 
Proficiency, Watts ; 3rd, General Proficiency, Cameron III. ; 4th, 
General Proficiency, Stollmeyer II. 

Form IVA. — 1st, General Proficiency, Munn I. ; 2nd, General 
Proficiency, Dyment ; 3rd, General Proficiency, Stewart I. ; 4th, 
General Proficiency, Hall I. 

Form V.^lst, General Proficiency, Robinson and Beer; 3rd, 
General Proficiency, Easton. 

Lower VI., Toronto Group. — 1st, General Proficiency, Crowther; 
2nd, General Proficiency, Carrick I. ; 3rd, General Proficiency, Day- 
ment. 

Lower VI., McGill Group. — 1st, General Proficiency, Taylor. 

Form Upper VI. — 1st, General Proficiency, Findlay I. ; 2nd, Gen- 
eral Proficiency, Brunt. 

Governor General's Medal. — Smith, E. G. 

Lieutenant-Governor's Silver Medal. — Crowther, T. A. 

Lieutenant-Governor's Bronze Medal — Brunt, R. 

Chairman's Gold Medal.— McKay, D. A. 

Head Prefect's Prize.— Smith, E. G. 



:;_> ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Wyld Prize in Latin.— Findlay, D. H. 
Cooper Medal in Science. — Dayment, F. R. 

48th Highlanders' Chapter of the I.O.D.E. Rifle (for Profici- 
ency in Shooting) . — Carrick, J. A. 
Christie Cup. — Findley, A. G. 
Laurence Crowe Medal. — Milne, J. E. 
Thorley Medal. — Richardson, J. 
Gooderham Medal. — Cumberland, R. C. A. 



ADMIRAL BEATTY'S VISIT. 

Despite an exceedingly busy day in Toronto, Earl Beattyof 
Brooksby paid the school a hurried visit in the morning of Novem- 
ber twenty-eighth. The Admiral's automobile was decked with 
Union Jacks and was accompanied by an escort. Typifying the 
spirit of our vigilant navy not only by his position as commander, 
but also by his resolute manner, he called forth our admiration. 
After signing the visitors' book he shook hands with the staff and 
nodded to our repeated cheers. His request for a holiday was 
granted for the day following St. Andrew's Day. As the party 
drove away it was to the roar of a lusty "Hoot, Mon, Hoot!" 



OBITUARY. 



William Maxwell McCord was born on January 12, 1908. He 
entered St. Andrew's College in September, 1918, going in to Form 
I. During that school year he was absent a great deal of the 
time owing to serious illness. In February, 1920, he returned and 
appeared to be in better health. Unfortunately, in May, 1921, he 
had to undergo another operation from which he seemed to be 
recovering, but on July 25th, 1921, he succumbed to his illness. 

Bright, cheery and hopeful in spite of his handicap, McCord 
took a keen interest in his school and in her general life, with the 
result that he was universally popular with boys and masters. 
His classmates learned with real sorrow on their return in the 
autumn that his physical troubles had finally overcome a weakened 
constitution. 




The stewards were rewarded as usual by two delicious cakes. 

The results of this race show that we have some material worth 
developing, and we look forward to next year's race with great 
expectations. Russell I. 

On the completion of the Rugby season the next athletic event 
of the school is the Annual Cross Country Run. Every day Boys 
were training for it, and there was much talk as to who would 
win the gold medal. Three medals and numerous cakes are awarded 
to the various winners. 

This year the race was run on November 22nd, and the Weather 
Man certainly smiled on us that day. Promptly at four o'clock 
about forty runners lined up for the start, which was given by 
Mr. Ramsey. Exactly twenty-seven minutes later Howell sprinted 
in, thus capturing the gold medal. Second and third places were 
Won by Findiay II. and Fairclough, respectively. All three medal 
winners showed excellent form and finished by sprinting. The win- 
ners of the various cakes, which were presented by Dr. Macdonald, 
,vere : Reid, Lower V., cake ; Earle, First Team, cake ; Ault, Fifth 
Form, cake; Kinsey, Upper Flat, cake; Brank, Third Form, cake; 
Fisher, II., Upper VI., cake; McTaggart, Third Team, cake; Berry, 
Fourth Form, cake ; Beer, Second Team, cake ; Cook, Fourth Team, 
cake; Wilson, I., Lower Flat, cake. 

33 



:;i ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

JUNIOR CROSS COUNTRY RUN. 

On Thursday, November 24th, the annual Junior Cross Country 
Run was held. Despite the coldness of the day over fifty boys 
started. Fairclough, leading all the way around by a wide margin, 
finished first, thus winning the silver medal and the Olympic medal. 
Wilson I., about two hundred yards behind Fairclough, came in 
second, winning the bronze medal. Stollmeyer III., although he 
ran fifth, being the first Lower School Boarder to finish, won the 
Campbell Macdonald Cup. The following were the cake winners : 

IIIA— McLean I. 

1 1 IB— Greig. 

1st Boarder in Lower School — McLennan II. 

1st Day Boy in Lower School — Nugent. 

IIA— McWilliams II. 

IIB — Davidson. 

1st Form — Benzie II. 

Prep. Form — Strathy. 

E. R. McLelland. 



HOCKEY PROSPECTS. 



Hockey prospects this year are extremely bright as we have five 
old colours, among whom is our star goalee of former years, Cam- 
eron I., and his brother Joe, of last year. The Carrick-Draper de- 
fense is also back, along with last year's captain and brilliant cen- 
tre, Findlay III., who is acting captain this year. Drury is also back, 
and from the practises at the Arena seems as good as ever. 




u 



J 



P<V 







The Rugby season, 1921— what that will recall to every boy who 
has be^n at St. Andrews ! A string of victories — a championship— 
it has been a wonderful year. This is largely due to the careful 
coaching and oversight of Mr. Ramsey and Mr. Church who have 
given us their spare time and vast fund of Rugby experience, that 
we might live up to the school's high standing as the "Rugby of 
Canada." 

The first team started their season badly, their first two games 
L eing defeats, but by consistent hard work they defeated Jarvls in 
a practise game, and then in quick succession Trinity, Ridley and 
Upper Canada fell before them, and a team of which no great things 
were expected became champions. 

The Seconds, on the contrary, never seemed to get started, and 
lost all their games. The Thirds, however, might be called Junior 
Champions if there were such a title, as they won all their games 
by wide margins, and were scored on by only one team. 

The Fourths and Fifths, as usual, turned out some very finished 
victories for the school, and showed good material. The Lower 
School also placed a highly efficient team on their "grid" and lived 
up to their record of not knowing when they were beaten. 

THE FIRST TEAM. 
Personnel. 

Earle — Captain — Outside — A consistent tackier, and handles 
his team well. Very cool under fire. 

Drury — Outside — Another of our noted tacklers. Under every 
kick, he rarely let a back get away. 

Armstrong — Middle — One of our best bucks, and an old colour. 
Showed up well in the U. C. C. game. 

T5 




EARLE, CAPTAIN FIRST RUGBY TEAM 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 37 

Carrick Bros. — Scrims — "Don" and "Jess" are the most effect- 
ive scrims we have ever had. To get through the centre was like 
breaking a stone wall, only a stone wall can't tackle like the Car- 
ricks. 

Cameron II. — Centre Scrim — A new colour, and plays his place 
well. Like most of the team he is a good tackier. 

White I. — Inside — A hard worker, and a good yard gainer, he 
played splendidly in all games. 

King — Middle — Our most effective buck, After years on the 
half-line, it seemed strange to see him on the line. He's quite a 
drop kicker, too. 

Lumbers I. — Flying Wing — Evading Lumbers is like evading 
a freight train — it's impossible. 

Ferguson I. — Flying Wing — A new boy, but by his methods, by 
no means new to Rugby. He proved himself a wonderful tackier, 
and starred in every game. 

Findley I. — Half — His punting was largely responsible for our 
success, although he fumbles at times. His kicking far surpasses 
anything we've had for some time — always a star. 

Findlay III. — Quarter — Bright and cheery — he keeps his head 
in a game, and made yards often — quite a boy. 

Milton — Inside — "Kamloops" is another newcomer — and he, like 
"Fergie," is some player. Runs well, and hits the line hard. 

Morton I. — Half — A hard worker, and a good runner, he is at 
times erratic, but when he gets his good streaks — look out for 
squalls. 



THE LITTLE BIG FOUR RECORD. 

We publish a record of the Little Big Four football champion- 
ships since the year 1902 — the first year that the four schools met 
in annual matches. 

It is interesting to note that the championship during the past 
twenty years has been fairly evenly divided between the schools. 
Ridley has won six times; St. Andrew's, five; U.C.C., four; T.C.S., 
three. In 1915 St. Andrew's and Ridley played a tie game. Both 
of these teams had previously beaten T.C.S. and U.C.C. In 1918, 
the year of the influenza epidemic, only three games were played. 
St. Andrew's and U.C.C. played twice, the former team winning 
both games. Ridley also beat Upper Canada, but no other matches 
were played. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 39 

Another interesting- feature is that no school has held the 
championship for three successive years, while every school, with 
the exception of Upper Canada, has at one period won it for two 
consecutive years. 

The so-called "Little Big Four" is not a league in the ordinary 
sense of the word. The schools have never organized a football 
league. Each year the four headmasters meet in Toronto and ar- 
range a series of friendly matches. There are no league officers 
and there is no championship trophy. The name "Little Big Four" 
was probably coined by the newspapers. The championship list 
shown below really means that these teams have gone through the 
season undefeated. It has never been customary to play off ties 
in the school games: 1902, U.C.C.; 1903, Ridley; 1904, U.C.C. 
1905, Ridley; 1906, Ridley; 1907, St. Andrew's; 1908, T.C.S. 
1909, St. Andrew's; 1910, T.C.S. ; 1911, T.C.S. ; 1912, Ridley 
1913, St. Andrew's; 1914, St. Andrew's; 1915, Ridley-St. Andrew's 
(tie); 1916, Ridley; 1917, U.C.C; 1918, Influenza Epidemic; 1919, 
Ridley; 1920, U.C.C; 1921, St. Andrew's. 



PRACTISE GAMES. 



We played three practise games — one with the Old Boys, score 
unmentionable in favour of "Ernie" Rolph and cortege — but what 
could you do against "Hap" Earle, "Hubert" Rendell, "Joe" Taylor 
and some others? 

Next up-stepp'd Teck, and we stepp'd down. Moriarity scored 
irequently, while "Kamloops" Milton was good for St. Andrew's 
till he was injured. 

The third game was against Jarvis whom we defeated 13-2, in 
a fast hard fought game. 



LITTLE BIG FOUR SERIES— 1921. 

Oct. 22, 1921.— The first game was against T.C.S. at Port Hope. 
Tt was an ideal day for Rugby, and Findlay's kicking was much in 
evidence. The game, which we won, got our team away to a good 
start, and showed up any weaknesses in our line-up: 



40 ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 

i 

S.A.C. T.C.S. 

Lumbers, Fisher III Flying Wing Glasco 

Findley I Halves Cruickshanks 

Morton " Johnson 

" Gooch 

Findlay III Quarter Gow 

Crosby I. Scrim Burns 

Cameron II. " Montgomery 

Carrick I _ " _ Wilson 

White Insides Johnson 

Milton " Penhorwood 

King Middles _ Osier 

Draper " Doull 

Farle Outsides Leonard 

Drury I " Mulholland 

Referee — Smith. Umpire — Cross. 

First Quarter. 

St. Andrew's kicked off and Drury made a nice tackle bringing 
down the T.C.S. man before he had made ten yards. Trinity lost 
the ball on a fumble and King kicked a field goal ; ten minutes later 
he repeated this performance, and two rouges forced by Drury and 
Earle from Findley's punt made the score 8-0. Then St. Andrew's 
started to buck, and Findley on the last down kicked a high spiral 
to Cruickshanks who fumbled and Drury ran over for a touch. 
T.C.S. tried again and again to get away, but Carrick was through 
the line at all times. 

Second Quarter. 

St. Andrew's opened strongly, and ran away from their oppon- 
ents, when they didn't make yards, Findley booted over the other 
half line forcing them to rouge or kicked to the deadline. Milton 
and King made long runs and numerous touches, the period ending 
31-0. 

Third Quarter. 

T.C.S. tried a come back, and Cruickshanks made a nice rune for 
a touch through a broken field, but the S.A.C. men of might came 
a-nibling back, and King ripped down the field for a touch, and a 
few moments later Milton scored another. 



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u st. andrew's college review 

Fourth Quarter. 

St. Andrew's took the ball on a fumble and it is doubtful if 
Trinity saw the ball afterwards, as it only left our hands after a 
touch, or after Findley had booted it over the deadline. The deluge 
ended 54-5. 

St. Andrew's were the better throughout, particularly Findley I 
and III., King, Milton and Carrick — his work in the scrim being 
superb. 

Cruickshanks and Cooger starred for Trinity. The tackling of 
the T.C.S. team was also good. 



S. A. C. vs. RIDLEY. 

Oct. 28, 1921. — The next game was against the formidable 
Ridley machine which had made U.C.C. bite the dust previous to 
our game. Needless to say the team was a trifle nervous but got 
over this before they started to play. The day was ideal. 

S.A.C. B.R.C. 

Lumbers Flying Wing DeWitt 

Ferguson " 

Findley I Halves Cliff 

Morton " Wright 

" Stewart 

Carrick I Scrim. Douglas 

Cameron II. " MacDonald 

Carrick II " Johnson 

White Insides Fairbanks 

Milton " Walker 

Armstrong Middles Bright 

King _ " Smith 

Earle Outsides Counsell 

Drury " Brightway 

Findlay III Quarter Bongard 

Referee — Sullivan. Umpire — Croll. 

First Quarter. 

St. Andrew's took the south end, and started a kicking game, 
using their star, Findley, the outsides forced a rouge, and then in 
ouick succession, another rouge. Ridley then forced the team up 



ST ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW. 43 

the field, but fumbled the ball, and on the third down Findley 
punted a spiral from a little less than half way, and B.R.C. were 
blanked 3-0, as the Earle, Cameron, Drury trio were right on the 
job. King then dropped a neat field goal, and with the score 6-0, 
King made a wonderful buck and made a touch — 11-0; King con- 
verted, 12-0. 

Second Quarter. 

The Old B.R.C. Tiger didn't like the trimming he was getting 
so bucked his way to St. Andrew's quarter where he scored a 
deadline, 12-1. The game was fairly even when Findley kicked 
again, and Drury forced Cliff to rouge, 13-1. The play then turned 
from kicking to bucking, tut both lines were on the job, and the 
rest of the period was scoreless. 13-1. 

Third Quarter. 

Ridley got away to a good start when a fumbled ball gave them 
an easily earned touch. Score 13-6 ; but once more the St. An- 
drew's team showed their remarkable spirit, and held Ridley on 
the S.A.C. quarter line. The B.R.C. frenzied assault soon wore 
itself out, and the period ended 13-6. 

Fourth Quarter. 

St. Andrew's forced the play, and Findley's kicking and Drury's 
tackling forced another rouge and shortly after the redoubtable 
S.A.C. half scored a deadline. For a while the play was at St. 
Andrew's end, but the S.A.C. line was too strong and too heavy 
r tnd held them for the rest of the period and St. Andrew's were 
the victors in the game which decided the Little Big Four. 

For St. Andrew's, Carrick Bros., King, and Drury played re- 
markably fine football, but per usual "Al" Findley was the bright 
light. Cameron II. also played well. 

Ridley's stars were Cliff and Mackenzie, the latter playing a very 
strong game on the line. 



S. A. C. vs. U. C. C. 

Nov. 4, 1921. — On a wet and slimy field the Red and White 
defeated their old rivals and ex-champions, Upper Canada, and for 
a dirty day the game was a good example of "prep" school Rugby. 



44 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

It was our only game at home, and gave our boys a chance to see 
the team in action. 

S.A.C. U.C.C. 

Lumbers Flying Wing Lewis 

Ferguson " 

Findley I Halves King 

Morton I " Lamport 

" Slaght 

Carrick I Scrim MacKenzie 

Cameron II " Bruce 

Carrick II " Pratt 

Milton Insides Penhorwood 

White " Hawke 

King Middles Phippen 

Armstrong " McNaim 

Drury I Outsides Meech 

Earle " - Smith 

Findlay III Quarter Krafts 

Period One. 

St. Andrew's won the toss and chose the south end, and soon 
had the ball on the U. C. C. quarter line. After one or two -in- 
effectual attempts to buck it over, Findley kicked a dead line. Again 
S. A. C. broke up the U. C. C. plays and came crashing down the 
field, and Milton galloped over for a touch. A few moments later 
Findley kicked to Slaght who fumbled, and Lumbers fell on the ball 
behind the U. C. C. line— 11-0. King converted, 12-0. 

Period Two. 

U. C. C. played well in this quarter, holding us to one deadline, 
and had it not been for Findley's kicking might have scored. How- 
ever, our line was too good, although they did allow two kicks to be 
olocked. 

Period Three. 

St. Andrew's came backhand with surprising ease Morton 
crashed off for an 85 yard run for a touch — 18-0, which was con- 
verted — 19-0. Milton bucked for thirty-five yards for a touch — 
24-0. Playing wonderful form by booting and clever plays we soon 
had the score 25-0. The Blue and White then came to life and on 
a strange play on our line made the score 25-5. 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



45 



Period Four. 

U. C. C, heartened by their five points, rushed the play, and 
Lamport crashed over for another touch which King converted, 
25-11. St. Andrew's did not like the way the Upper Canada boys' 
ime was working, so proceeded to break it up most effectively, and 
in a little while Findley booted the last punt and Drury forced a 
rouge— 26-11. 

Findley, per usual, star. Morton, Milton, Carrick Co., King, 
Lumbers and White were best for St. Andrew's, while Lamport was 
easily the best on the Upper Canada aggregation. 



SECOND TEAM SEASON— 1921. 

The seconds this year have been labouring under difficulties 
owing to the frequent changes in the first team and a lack of 
coaching, however, the team showed good material and was not 
lacking in spirit. 




THE SECOND TEAM 



46 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

The first game was with U. C. C. and the clever U. C. C. team 
ran up an early lead, and won 16 to 7. Palmer II. made the only 
touch for S. A. C. and Palmer I. converted it. In the second half 
Lyon kicked a deadline for the final score of the game. 

Seagram and Mason played well for the winners, while Rivera's 
tackling for the losers was the feature of the game. 

The next game was played with U. T. S. on Wednesday, October 
24th. Once again the seconds allowed a lead of 17 to 6 to be piled 
up against them, and in the second half woke up and held U. T. S., 
scoring the only two points in the final period. The score was 
17 to 8. Plan ton and Goulding showed up well for U. T. S., while 
Lyon and Palmer I. were the stars for St. Andrew's. 

The seconds again tried their luck against U. C. C, but we are 
sorry to say, were beaten rather badly by a score of 25 to 11. 

The following got second team colours: — Lyon (capt.), Mc- 
Murtry, Ashenhurst, Robertson I., Crosbie I., MacLennan I., Curry, 
Plaunt, Sieling, Blauvelt, Whilans, Palmer I., Beer, Rivera. 
Stronach, Fisher III., McRae I., Harrop, Russell II. 



THIRD TEAM SEASON. 

The thirds this year were exceptionally successful under the 
able coaching of Mr. Frank Church, and the leadership of "Ky." — 
"Bud" Taggart. "Mr." Murcheson II. managed the team well. 
The best point about the team was its alertness and speed which 
usually caught their opponents napping. 

The first game was against Model, whom they smothered 77 to 
— nearly a non-stop record. Palmer I. and Grant showed up well 
for us, while "Sam" Manson was the best for the yellow and black. 

The next victory was against Lake Lodge, who were the only 
team who scored against us, however, they fell for 26 to 16. 
Noonan, "Cicero" Robinson and Grant were the S. A. C. lights, 
while "Ackey" was the Lake Lodge star. 

The following Saturday a "light" third team went to T. C. S. 
and following the first team's example, snowed under the Trinity 
representatives to the tune of 33 to 0. 

Marshall, Reid and Ault were best for S. A. C, while Spragg 
was best for Trinity. 

U. C. C. were the next to fall before our victorious onrush, and 
they fell hard by the large score of 37 to 0, although they were 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 47 

by far the heavier team. Ault's runs were the feature, while the 
line played a fine game. 

The last game was a return with Lake Lodge, which finished 
our season — a victory 36 to 1. The ground was frozen, and every 




THE THIRD TEAM 

down someone was laid out. Lake Lodge put up a good fight, but 
the thirds were too fast — everyone starred. 

The following received Third Team colours. Taggart (capt.), 
Ault, Noonan, Easton, Kirkland, Mason, Grant I., Reid I., Robinson, 
Birkett, Anderson, McTaggart, Marshall II., Cameron III., Herch- 
mer, Tucker, Bingham, Crosbie II. 



THE FOURTH TEAM. 

The Fourth Team this year had some very promising material 
and should have had a record season had it not been for the un- 
timely weather. Early in the season they met Model I. on the 



48 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



latter's grounds and defeated them 58 to 5. At a later date they 
defeated a picked team from U. T. S. on our grounds to the tune 
of 17 to 6. 




THE FOURTH TEAM 

The team was well captained by Wood, who has had some ex- 
perience as captain of last year's fifths. Burry played well on the 
half line as did also Callighan at outside wing, and McRae II. at 
quarter. Ferguson II. did well on the bucks, while Kirkpatrick 
showed up excellently in the tackling. 

The following received colours: — Wood (capt.), Munn I., Burry, 
Baldwin, Stephenson, Breithaupt, Drynan, Ferguson II., McRae II., 
Thurber, Kirkpatrick, Dyment, Rennie, Callighan, Cook. 



THE FIFTH TEAM. 

This year's Fifth Team, despite its many setbacks, appeared 
well in the games, winning three out of four. The first game with 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



49 



Glen Holmes ended in a win for St. Andrew's 20 to 11. Later they 
defeated Model II. on the latter's grounds 23 to 0. Their first 
defeat came when they met Upper Canada V. on our grounds and 
were beaten 17 to 11. The last game of the season with U. T. S. 
ended in a victory for St. Andrew's 15 to 8. 




THE FIFTH TEAM 

Bedlington, was captained the team, played well on the half- 
hne as did also Berry on the line bucks. McLaren, who played 
outside wing, made some good tackles. 

The following boys received colours: — Campbell I., Macdonald 
II., Horsfall, Shortly I., Wilson I., Bedlington (capt.), McLaren, 
Banfield I., Alvey, Marshall I., Brown, Fitzpatrick, Berry, Stewart 
I., Lovering, McKenzie, Fair. 



LOWER SCHOOL RUGBY. 

The Lower School Rugby season this year has been quite suc- 
cessful. Of the seven games played we won five. Early in the 



oO 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



season we met and defeated Upper Canada on our grounds 12-6. 
The return game at Upper Canada was more closely contested and 
was only won in the last minute by a brilliant play on the part of 
Stcllmeyer III. Score 9-6. We then defeated Model School twice, 
but were beaten by Lake Lodge at Grimsby 17-6. Later we were 
defeated by Trinity College School on our grounds 5-1. In the 
return game at Port Hope, however, we were victorious, winning 
bv a score of 9-5. 




LOWER SCHOOL TEAM 



The team was ably captained by Graham, who was also good on 
the bucks. Hoops' tackling was excellent, while Carrick I., on the 
half line, and Stollmeyer III. at quarter, were also good. 

The following were granted colours : 

Hoops, Graham (Capt.) ; Newman, Peace I., Noriega I., Smart, 
Murchison III., Bell I., McLennan II., Stollmeyer III., McWilliams 
II., Colebrook, Lentz, Carrick III., McLennan III., Stollmeyer II. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



51 



ALL STARS vs. OAKWOODS. 

In all our accounts we have neglected a great game, in which an 
Oakwood team clashed with a team collected and captained by 
"Spare-Parts" Ferguson. Of course, we won. There was a player 
from every team on the school on this collection. D'Arcy Palmer 
starred as quarter. D'Arcy is on the Seconds. Fair starred, too. 
Fair is on the Fifths. Of course, "Spare-Parts" was there, too — 
and "Don" Carrick — the premier scrim man, spared — ye gods ! ! 

R. H. Anderson. 




UPPER SCHOOL CAPTAINS 



OUR FOOTBALL DINNER. 

On Wednesday evening, November 9th, our football banquet 
was held in the National Club. Mr. T. A. Findley was our host, 
but owing to a serious illness was unable to foe with us. However, 
Mr. "Tiff" Findley, his son, and a former Andrian, very ably filled 
the position of Toast Master, and it was in a large measure due to 
his ability in this office that the evening remains one of our pleasant- 
est memories. 



52 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



The banquet table was tastefully decorated with red and white 
carnations, while in the centre of the table, broad red ribbons 
formed a large St. Andrew's Cross. Neatly painted place cards 
held in position by miniature footballs added to the effectiveness of 
the decorations. 

"The Three Reds," on one side of the table, labelled themselves 
with each other's names, but on being informed each had to make 
speech hastily returned their labels. And for a large part of the 
evening the three gentlemen of the "Pink Thatches" looked un- 
comfortable. 

After a sumptuous dinner, Mr. Findley called on Jules Brazil, 
the versatile entertainer, and Mr. Brazil started the company off 
on a sing-song with that old favourite, "Smile," followed by "Old 
Black Joe" with variations, and "Polly Wolly Doodle," with the 




"Three Reds" starring. "Tiff" Findley then asked Jack Cameron to 
propose a toast to the school, to which Dr. Macdonald responded. 

Dr. Macdonald thanked the boys for the toast, and went on to 
say it was their school. He drew attention to the fact that in spite 
of being a young school, from an educational standpoint it ranked 
second to none in the Dominion. He told us about the origin of the 
Earl Grey half holiday, and how Earl Grey impressed by the spirit 
of the boys, always retained a keen interest in the school. The Duke 
of Connaught had also received a favourable impression of St. An- 
drew's boys. Our Head Master took this opportunity to compli- 
ment Milton on the wonderful keenness he showed in picking up 
Canadian Rugby, and on the gameness and ability he showed in 
every match. 

Mr. "Tiff" Findley brought a message from his father, hoping 
we would have a pleasant evening, and also expressing his regret 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 53 

at not being- able to be with us. Mr. Findley considers Rugby an 
important part of school life. 

Mr. Ramsey then proposed a toast to the team which was re- 
plied to by Earl, who thanked Mr. Findley and expressed his sym- 
pathies and those of the team for him in his trying sickness. 

Cameron I., our manager, then presented Mr. Ramsey, our 
coach, with an engraved cigarette case. This was a gift from the 
team, who feel their victory in a large measure due to Mr. Ramsey's 
great interest in them. 

Mr. Jules Brazil again was called upon and his clever songs, 
coupled with a running fire of appropriate and descriptive verses, 
soon had the team in roars of laughter. Then, joining hands, we 
sang that ever popular song "Auld Lang Syne," and shortly after- 
wards we departed for the "little red school house," one and all vot- 
ing the evening a huge success. 

C. H. Armstrong. 



Our Old Boys 



OLD BOYS NOTES. 

The latter part of last year George W. Mackay paid the school 
a visit. While speaking of his most interesting work in Tamsui, 
Formosa, as principal of the Tamsui Middle School, he told of the 
keen interest taken by his boys in athletics. As an old boy of St. 
Andrew's, we have a peculiar interest in his school. At Dr. Mac- 
donald's suggestion a fund, amounting to fifty dollars, was col- 
lected among our boys, and a handsome silver cup was sent to 
Tamsui. It bore an inscription to the effect that it was presented 
by the St. Andrew's College boys for open annual track champion- 
ship among the boys of Tamsui School. 

Both Russell and Seymour Black have been attending the Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley. Seymour is now in his third year, 
while Russell has returned to Varsity. 

"Bert" Applegath is with the Fidelity Agency of Canada. 

Douglas Holiday is now with the Dominion Bank of Canada. 

Malcolm Isbester is now in Winnipeg at the Tuxedo Barracks. 

R. P. Saunders is connected with the firm of Saunders & Bell, 
Toronto. 

"Kid" Stirrett and "Morris" Earle played throughout the season 
with the Argonaut team. 

G. Smith is president of the first year Arts, and also played, on 
the Varsity Thirds. 

Gilbert N. Tucker graduated from Western University, London, 
Ontario, in June, 1921. 

"Ernie" Rolph played on the University of Toronto First Rugby 
team this year. 

George McGill Vogt, son of Dr. A. S. Vogt, of Toronto, has been 
awarded the Townsend Scholarship at Harvard University, where 
he is at present pursuing post-graduate studies. 

Joe McDougall and Joe Taylor are on the Goblin staff at Varsity. 

G. Robertson is President of the Third Year Arts, Joe Taylor 
is treasurer, and D. K. Findley is on the executive. 

Ronald Lewis is manager of the Riggs Motor Sales Co., Belle- 
ville. 

P. D Mcintosh is taking a post-graduate course at Edinburgh. 

54 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 55 

MARRIAGES. 

Bowden, Harry, October 6, 1921, to Miss Edith Louise Norris, 
of Toronto. 

Bradley, Thomas Bristol, September 8, 1921, to Miss Mar- 
garet Isabelle Fitzgerald. 

Bradshaw, Edwin Oliver, September 21, 1921, to Miss Helen G. 
Flavelle. 

Brouse.. Paul Coursolles, June 1, 1921, to Miss Helen Wins- 
more Ukers, of New York. 

Cantley, Charles Lang, June 17, 1921, to Miss Evelyn Anne 
Wilson, Milngavie, Scotland. 

Dimock, James Edward, October 5, 1921, to Miss Madeline 
Currey. 

Flemming, Paul Rogers, September 21, 1921, to Miss Eliza- 
beth Ogden Jones. 

Fletcher, Dr. Almon, September 21, 1921, to Miss Helen 
Waterson Mowat. 

Goggin, Victor T., September 9, 1921, to Miss Grace Willena 
Ryan. 

Grant, Fraser, October 12, 1921, to Miss Muriel Schofield, 
of Toronto. 

Hamilton, Charles Donald, September 23, 1921, to Miss 
Lilian Mark Irish. 

Lash.. G. Herbert, November 16, 1921, to Miss Jeannie Irving 
Drummond, of Montreal. 

Lockhart, James Watson, October 11, 1921, to Miss Beatrice 
Alma Corsan. 

Lorimer, Norman Holmes, September 24, 1921, to Miss Doro- 
thea Victoria McFaul. 

Macdonald, Gordon C, September, 1921, to Miss Grace Jan- 
ette Hunter, of Durham. 

Mackenzie, William George, October 31, 1921, to Miss 
Marion Eileen Kloepfer, of Vancouver. 

Massey, Raymond Hart, June 6, 1921, to Miss Fremantle, of 
London, England. 

McPhedran, Dr. Frederic Maurice, September 1, 1921, 
to Miss Janet Randolph Grace, of Point Pleasant, New York. 

McPherson, Norman Batten, September 7, 1921, to Miss 
Eunice King Fudger. 

MacPherson, Roderick Hallowell, August 22, 1921, to Miss 
Florence Cecile Reilly. 



56 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Millington, Carl A., October 15, 1921, to Miss Mildred Joy 
Dammann, of Milwaukee. 

Mills, Lesslie Gordon, November 16, 1921, to Mrs. Muriel 
Inman Tyner, of Toronto. 

Smoke, Arthur La Pierre, September 21, 1921, to Miss Helen 
Marjorie Ferguson. 

Whitehead, Armand T., October 5, 1921, to Miss Eva Volia 
Bundy. 

Murray, Gordon, November 24, 1921, to Mrs. Edna Frances 
Kilgour. 



BIRTHS. 

To Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Auld, on July 22„ 1921, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. G^ogre F. Dimock, on August 17, 1921, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth Flavelle, on November 9, 1921, 
a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John S. Galbraith, on July 26, 1921, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Geggie, on September 23, 1921, a 
son (George Johnston). 

To Maj. and Mrs. Robert J. Gill, on July 27, 1921, a son, 
(Charles Allin). 

To Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Earl Graham, on July 16, 1921, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert Everett Grass, on August 10, 1921, 
a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. C. S. L. Hertzberg, on October 6, 1921, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Isbester, of Winnipeg, Manitoba, on 
November 2, 1921, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Johnston, on August 30, 1921, a 
son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Kemp, on July 10, 1921, a son (William 
Alexander). 

To Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Lesson, of Calgary, on October 3, 1921, 
a daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. K. B. MacLaren, September, 1921, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. D. C. McKnight, on June 7, 1921, a daughter, 
(Margaret Jeanne). " 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 57 

To Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth G. Mickleborough, on August 8, 
1921, a daughter (Margaret Evelyn). 

To Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Rolph, on September 2, 1921, a son. 

TO Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Slatter, on November 12, 1921, a daugh- 
ter. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Douglas Spohn, on July 30, 1921, a daughter. 
To Mr. and Mrs. F. Heath Stone, on November 24, 1921, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Stuckey, of Calgary, on July 16, 1921, 
a daughter. 

To MR. and Mrs. G. E. Whitaker, on July 15, 1921, a daughter 
(Margaret Elizabeth). 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Symons, on August 29, 1921, a son. 

F. Roper Dayment. 



TMELYRI] 



BY 




BOLSHEVIKI. 

Once a chap whose name was Mickey 
Said, "I'll join the Bolsheviki, 
And we'll show these bosses quickly 

What is what. 
We will do away with money, 
We'll trade work for beans and honey, 
We'll make cloudy days real sunny 

And why not?" 

"We'll all get a little nervy, 
Turn this old world topsy-turvy, 
And make all the straight things curvy 

For a change. 
We'll put the top right on the bottom, 
Let the bosses know we've got 'em, 
And explain after we've shot 'em, 

Why it's strange!" 

NONSENSE. 

'Twas Christmas time in summer, 

St. Patrick's Day was near, 
While John made preparations 

To greet the glad New Year. 

58 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 69 

He tried his best to conquer 

His love for Arabella, 
Her lips and nose were red as fire, 

Her hair was golden yellow. 

Her birthday was in August, 

She was born the fifth of May, 
She celebrated her sixteenth year 

Upon St. Valentine's Day. 

She lived in Denver, Oregon; 

Her address was Memphis, Maine; 
Her home was New York, Port Credit, 

But she hailed from Lake Champlain. 

They were married in the Maytime, 

On the seventeenth of June, 
Their wedding day was in July, 

It couldn't come too soon. 

THE WISDOM OF MAN. 

"My age? Oh, I'm just twenty-three," 

Declared the maid with eyes of blue; 
The census-taker took his pen 

And calmly wrote down, "thirty-two." 

"Where do your parents live?" he asked. 

"In Hamilton," she said. 
Once more he took his trusty pen 

And wrote down, "Parents dead." 

RHYMING BILL. 

Rhyming Bill, the village sage, 

Sat on a dry-goods box ; 
He gave his pants a mighty heave 

To show his spotted socks; 
He opened up the "Weekly Squawk" 

To read his latest poem, 
And visions of undying fame 

Were foremost in his dome. 



60 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

He read it through with knitted brow 

Then gave his usual spit — 
And said, "These linotype machines 

Can't spell a cussed bit, 
They gone and left the best line out, 

About after the bawl, 
It ain't no use to rack your brains 

For jingly words at all 
For some durn low-browed printer's 

Sure to eb a olfo ftera lal wokn btou ! ! !" 

THE MERRY MAID. 

It was an ancient sailor man 

Who lined up to the bar, 
His beard and dome were flecked with foam, 

His shirt was full of tar. 

He lamped me with his bleary glim, 
And gasped in accents queer, 

"Some wienerwurst to quench my thirst 
And then a can of beer." 

He gobbled down the mouldy dog, 

Inhaled the foaming brew, 
"The dog I've et, my whistle's wet, 

My tale I'll tell to you. 

'Twas off the shores of Africa 
My ship becalmed was laid, 

While mending socks in my ditty box 
I seen a Merry Maid. 

This merry maid she was a beaut, 
Her top lights gleamed like sin, 

I could see her smile at half a mile, 
She waved her lily fin. 

'Twas then my brain got very tired, 

My heart beat very fast; 
The bosun roared, "Man overboard," 

As he seen me diving past. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Out to that merry maid I swam, 

It is my dearest wish 
I'd stayed away that awful day, 

The merry maid was fish." 

The sailor man he turned away, 

And sadly paid his score, 
And softly wept as he slowly step't 

Towards the bar room's swinging door. 



SHE WINS. 

They sat upon the garden stile, 
The youthlet and the maid ; 

"The stars above are not so bright 
As you," he softly said. 

She lifted up her little hand 
Toward Luna's golden light, 

"The. moon above is not so full 
As you, my dear, to-night." 



61 




C. H. Armstrong. 



We are very pleased to have an unusually large number of 
exchanges for our Christmas edition, and hope our friends will 
continue sending- us their much appreciated publications. 

The first on the pile is the October number of the University 
of Toronto Monthly. The Alumni notes in this issue are very in- 
teresting and extensive. 

Here comes something interesting, it's The Chronicle, issued by 
The Niagara Falls High School. The Chronicle is an old friend, 
some drawings or snaps would improve it. 

A large interesting magazine, The Copa De Oro, published by 
the Orland Union High School, is very welcome. This is the first 
number we have received and we hope to be able to put you on our 
exchange list permanently. Don't you think more stories would 
add to your paper? 

The Acadia Athenaeum is very interesting, why not more 
pictures ? 

The Acta Ridleiana is up to its usual high standard, a few more 
stories would improve it. 

We always look for the Red and Gold, an interesting magazine 
edited by the Canadian Academy, Kobe, Japan. Some pictures 
would add materially to your number. 

The Windmill published by Saint John's School, Manlius, N.Y., 
is a bright interesting magazine. We hope to hear from you again. 

Appleby School sends The Argus. Allow us to compliment you 
on your editorial. 

In the Clio from Orange N.J., we have a new-comer. We are 
very glad to get your magazine and hope to exchange some more 
issues. 

62 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 63 

Boone Review, your athletic meet must have been worth seeing 
judging by your records. 

Windsorian: your athletic events are well edited. 

Don't you think, Trinity College, some stories and pictures of 
your school life would improve your magazine? 

The cover of your magazine, Vox Lycee, prepares a person for 
the better things inside. Allow us to compliment you on it. 

The Tallow Dip : your magazine is hard to criticize. We like 
your novel style of illustration. 

The Spring number of The Collegian from St. Thomas High 
School possesses a bilious cover, but the contents are not too hard 
to digest. 

St. Peter's College magazine from far off Adelaide, Australia, 
is a very bright and interesting publication. We hope to hear from 
you regularly. 

Inklings of Ethical Culture School is a little different from most 
of the magazines on our exchange list. We would suggest enlarg- 
ing your paper. 

The printing and general make-up of The Collegian from Strat- 
ford C. I. could be greatly improved. 

Survey Athenaeum, the Engineer's Commencement Number of 
Acadia University is a well balanced little magazine. 

Blue and White, Port Hope High School : a few more sketches 
and photographs would improve your magazine. Your form notes 
are very entertaining. 




Policeman : "Here, my buck, you're exceeding the speed limit." 
Harve Draper : "Why, I've been racing that baby carriage all the 
way up Yonge Street." 



THE ALIBI. 
Master: "Were you to that musical comedy?" 
Innocent Boy: "Why, how could you, sir? I played pool in the 
B] itelight Cigar store that night." 



It happened in Cadet Corps : The captain was shouting, "Tell 
off the company !" and Charley Lewis cried, "No guy can tell me off 
and get away with it." He is to be shot at sunrise if the sergeants 
can find the bolts for the rifles. 



Red Milton : "Yeh, the C. P. R. runs through Kamloops." 
Ferguson : "So does everything else with sense." 



THAT OLD REFRAIN. 

Little drops of water ; 
Little grains of sand, 
Make you take your castile 
And scrub to beat the band. 



The musings of John Walmsley : "I wonder if the King wears 
President suspenders?" 

64 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 65 

Master: "How was your finger injured, Moores?" 
Moores : "I was trying to find out if the tiger over at the zoo 
had any gold teeth." 



Kirkland's Dream : Tiny Fleck, with halo and harp, leading the 
Salvation Army into a United Cigar Store. 



G. B. Russell : "Well, fellers, I guess I'll send my towel to the 
laundry, I get it mixed with the door mat." 



Some of the boys wear those square-hanging, loud-checked over- 
coats, and we overhead a dear old short-sighted lady ask: ''What are 
hose sandwich men advertising;?" 




Said the Parrot to the Lobster: "Aw close your trap, yuh talk more'n a clam!" 

Dean I. : "Gee, I saw a peach of a girl on Bloor Street to-day." 

Red Owens: "Did you stop?" 

Dean I. : "No, she was selling tags for blind sailors." 



NOAH AND JONAH AND TINY. 
Noah was a wise old bird 
Be built a great big ark, 
Of Jonah, too, we've often heard 
He was swallowed by a shark. 
Now, Tiny Fleck is a wise old bird, 
He always keeps in training, 
An athlete, and take my word, 
He comes in when it's raining. 

Dr. Mite. B. Biggar L.I.A.R. 



66 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

HE THOUGHT IT WAS CELLINI'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY. 

Gore: "Oh, sir, this is a shocking book." 

Mr. Goodman: "Give it here at once, what is it?" 

Gore: Handbook for operating a medical coil, sir." 



AN ODE TO A NEW MOTOR CAR. 
(Written by a Master.) 
Divine wagon of Mercury 
How swift your peerless flight! 
How gently you bear unworthy me 
In daytime or at night ! 

Sweet, in low, sweet, in low, 
Oh, vehicle that is mine ; 
You bear me out to Mimico 
And back in time to dine. 

Your body, gleaming, beautiful, 
Pride of your joyful maker, 
I give devotion dutiful, 
My pretty Studebaker! 

Fred Bingham (buttonholing the head waiter at the King 
Eddy) : "Get me a table with lots of elbow room." 




Mugg: "She has a silvery laugh." 
Wtimp: "And two gold teeth." 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



G7 



THE POLACK. 
(A Dialogue.) 

Characters: Charlie Lewis — The Polack; Hink Russell — We'd 
rather not say. 

Scene : The interior of Room 220 adorned with pictures from 
Motion Picture Classic and by Charlie and Hink. 

Charlie (snapping his suspenders against his manly bosom) : 
"Aw, Chrismus, she's a peach!" 

Hink: "She ain't, neither." 

Charlie: "I hate to bawl you out before the fellows, but that 
car can show up any car between Shubenacadie and Stewiacke." 

Hink : "That may be so, but it makes more noise than that red 
necktie of yours does." 

Charlie: "What do you know about a car? You couldn't drive 
jne as far as I could throw a piano." 

Hink : "I could drive a motov when you were wearing overalls." 

Charlie: "Gee, I hate you, and I met six other guys down the 
hall and they all hate you, too." 




Wright: "Where do you hail from?" 

Leffed: "Oshawa." 

Wright: "Use your handkerchief when you sneeze." 



Hink (consulting Judge) : "What shall I say? (A smile shows 
up his face and he reads) "He took her rowing on the lake " 

Charlie (snapping suspenders) : "Can it!" 

Hink (humorously) : "What? The lake!" 

Charlie : "Chrismus, no. I have a good mind to bawl you out." 

Hink: "Gwan, you old Polack." 

It can be seen that Charlie is on the verge of apoplexy, but for- 
tunately at this point Smooth-Ole-Rufe Carry steps in blotting out 
J? com 220 from view. 

Curtain (or window-blind) , what you will. 



68 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



Abie Plaimt (to manicurist) : "Yes, put points on them so that 
1 can pick my teeth." 



It can be seen that Hink is taken aback by this outburst, but 
happily he sights Judge on the table. 



NON-EXISTENT. 

Blauvelt's laundry-bag. 

Cameron's modesty. 

Cully Wilson's sense of humour. 

G. B. Russel's beauty. 

Ham and eggs at breakfast. 

Church collection. 




'I've just been soaked" said Teddy B. 



"My wife and I have had a falling out," said the balloonist as 
he hit the ground. 



IT WASN'T THAT KIND OF A BOX. 

He had a box at the theatre, but the usher threw him out for 
throwing it on the floor after he had finished the Chiclets. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



(59 



At Bowles they have tooth-picks 
Which patrons may take, 
Anderson ignores them 
He uses a rake. 



There was a fellow called Milne, 
Whose face was decidedly killin', 
At rugby one day 
He could not get away, 
So a place on the Fifths he is fillin'. 





U N DAY. 



Master: "Who was the Greek god personifying manly beauty?" 
Voice from the rear : "Herpicide, sir." 



Mr. Goodman (observing Lewis dandling a bunsen burner) : 
"Where can we get a rattle for Lewis?" 
Lewis: "From a Ford, sir." 



Pavlowa probably is a wonderful danseuse, but in Montreal lots 
of people dance "soused." 



70 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



THE THOUGHTFUL BERRY. 
Berry was out with Thompson II. of amorous fame, when they 
met a girl whom Thommy knew, so Berry said, "I'm Logan Berry 
not Goose Berry !" and left them together. 



Walmsley: "What does a curator do?" 

Leadley: "He blows up the footballs." 

Walmsley: "So that's why Cameron II. is curator." 



Blauvelt: "Yes, my girl and I were going to the show, but she 
lost her money, so we didn't." 







~ OUR WJLE. PiPE.R..~ 

Tom Aspden says: "Pick your sweethearts young because you 
save three and a half cents every time on car fare." 



Cully Wilson: "What's a punt, anyway?" 

Horsfall: "Why, a kick, of course." 

Cully: "Then I kicked my girl all around Lake Simcoe last 

summer.'' 



It is rumoured that Moores stopped a policeman in front of 
E:vton's and asked him where Yonge Street was. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 71 

PRIZE DAY. 

The masters dress in great array, 
And pace the stairs and halls 
With ermine hoods, both bright and gay, 
And odor of moth-balls. 



BERRY (THE GREAT DUKE). 

Scene : The wash room. 

Time: Sunday morning. 

Characters: Kinsey, Berry and Milne. 
Enter Berry. 

Berry: "Ah, the basins await my abluations." (Forthwith he 
falls to work.) 
Enter Kinsey : 

Kinsey: "Why the labour, fair Logan? Can the lily be gilded 
or your chalky skin be made more fair?" 

Berry : "I work because my beauty must be suitably adorned or 
Mance Milne will out-Apollo me in the eyes of Branksome." 

Kinsey: "Even so, Adonis would have to out-slick himself to 
equal the peerless Mance." 
Enter Milne: 

Milne : "How now, palmolive sprites, I see you gambol 'midst the 
soap suds." 

Kinsey, aside to Berry (in his usual low tones) : "Here he is, 
and fair as a Sunday-gating, look up or you will look like a christy 
at a varsity rugby game." 

Berry (aside) : "Never fear, my nose will uphold me." 

Milne prepares to wash, putting a cake of castile on the basin. 

Berry (still aside) : "Now is our chance to rid ourselves of this 
pretty boy r we shall smother him in his own soap suds." 

They seize Milne suddenly and hold his face under the tap. 

Milne: "Help, help jealousy is doing for me!" His struggles 
gradually grow feebler and finally subside. 

Berry (gloating) : "At last I am unrivalled! Oh, how Brank- 
some hearts will nutter now that my great rival is removed!" 

Milne suddenly recovers and runs out. 

Kinsey (wildly) : "I knew his running was good and he has got 
away at last ! !" 

Curtain. 



See Douglas Cook in his great impersonation as "D'Ashcan" in 
the "Three Musqueeters." 



72 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



Dentist: "What do you want these teeth filled with?" 
Lower School Boy : "Gumdrops." 



Horsfall: "Gee, I have a great imagination, I dreamed that 
Cully Wilson was treating the whole flat to pears." 




Hee: "The orator said 'my actions will bear me out.' " 

Haw: "Did they?" 

Hee: "No, the ambulance man did." 

INFLUENCE. 

Some football players died and went to the great Valhalla of all 
football players. The gateman cried to one, "Where did you dwell ?" 
and the answer was, "British Columbia." The gateman cried, "Out- 
side with the small town stuff." Then, he questioned another, "And 
you?" The football player drew himself up proudly, saying, "I 
come from Ottawa." "Pass!" said the gateman, "I used to live 
there myself." So did the Ottawa players inherit the cider lakes 
of Valhalla. 



FAIRY STORIES. 

(1) Blauvelt's prediction that he will make the first rugby team 
next year. 

(2) The Sleeping Princess. 

(3) John Walmsley's statement that Moncton is a city. 

(4) The Three Dwarfs. 

(5) "I forgot to get my leave card signed, sir." — Rufe Curry. 

(6) Little Red Riding Hood. 

(7) "No, sir, I didn't get that joke from Judge."— Hink Russel. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



73 



Mr. Findlay: "Milton, thou shoulds't be living at this hour, 
imgland hath need of thee " 

"Red" Milton: "Gosh! and I was the livest guy around Ram- 
loops." 



"That elusive thing, Beauty !" murmured the poetical Tom Asp- 
den as he gazed at Shannon. 



GUESS? 
There was a boy from Oyster Bay 
Who lived a life both bright and gay. 
The infirmary he always haunted 
By castor oil scarce ever daunted, 
With adhesive plaster on his mop, 
You couldn't tell him from a sop. 



"You hate them so much, my kisses?" said one billiard ball to 
another, 




Adam Apple: "Where's your other eye?' 
Cyclops: "On that girl over there." 



You know those marks on street car- doors to determine whether 
one shall pay full or half fare. Well, Doug. Cook got on a Church 
car and the mark just came to his shoulder, but the conductor let 
him ride on half-fare because he had nothing above his shoulders. 



2010 A.D. : "And this," said the museum curator, "is the towel 
which Bb.uvelt used throughout his life." 



r4 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

The latest leave-card excuse: "My Aunt can't write, sir." 



Thompson I. : "Is that the fog-horn on the bay?" 
Thompson II. : "No, Kinsey has a sore throat." 



BAWL AND FIGHTS HIGHER DETENTION ALGEBRA. 

Introduction: Messrs. Bawl and Fight hope that this algebra 
will enable masters and boys to determine detention more easily 
and quickly by geometry. 

Rule I. : The fact that one skipped down town multiplied by a 
master=ll hours. 

This rule is invariable. 

Rule II.: The L.C.M. L.=late. 

C.=caught. 
M.=master. 
Add these — late-l-caught+master=20 minutes. 
Rule III. :— 

If you don't throw water-Kthe fact that you are innocent 
=2 hrs. work. 
=6 hrs. work. 
For proof apply Hink Russei. 

Rule IV. : Subtraction is impossible in Detention Algebra. Ab- 
solutely nothing can be taken away from any detention that you 
may have, but it is possible for any amount to be added up to one 
hundred hours. 

With these simple rules any simple person can figure out their 
detention in a pimple manner. 

Ten. S. Bawl. 
Bull Fight. 



LOWER SCHOOL SKITS. 

Crowe (as he pounces on Giant) : "The early bird gets the 
arorm." 



Noriega I. (in a burst of enthusiasm to his bath) : 
"0 pretty waters, 
So nice and blue, 
Full a month has passed 
Since I last touched you." 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 75 

Ellsworth : "If you should see Graham riding down the road on 
a donkey, what would it remind you of?" 
Gentles: "A fruit." 
Ellsworth: "What kind?" 
Gentles : "A pair." 



Mr. P. : "I feel tempted to give this class a Latin test." 
Voice from back of the room : "Yield not to temptation." 



Mr. D. : "Are you the teacher in this room?" 

MacLennan III.: "No sir!" 

Mr. D. : "Well, don't be such a blithering idiot." 



Stollmeyer II. (in geometry) : "I know the problem, sir, But I 
can't express it," 

Murchiscn III. : "Send it by freight." 



Colebrook: "What is the capital of Mexico?" 
Smart: "Oh, about thirty cents." 



Barclay I. (putting on a Cadet uniform) : "No wonder the 
Scotch are noted for swearing." 



Puritan Laundry's Motto : "Don't kill your wife, let us do the 
dirty work." 



MacLennan III. is following desperately in his brother's foot- 
steps. 



We wonder where Barclay I. and Parker go on Wednesday 
afternoon ! ! 



There has been a great competition in the Lower School this 
year to get to Mr. Tudball's table. 

The following have won seats : Lentz, Worts, Noriega I., Noriega 
II., Stollmeyer I.-, Stollmeyer II., Stollmeyer III., Barclay. Murchi- 
son III. and Carrick III. were disqualified. 



A woodpecker lit on B 's head 

And settled down to drill. 
He bored away for half a day 
And then he broke his bill. 



76 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



Nurse: ''Did you put that plaster on your chest?" 

Grant V. : "No, nurse, I have no chest, so I put it on my valise." 



Stollmeyer III. says: 

Break ! Break ! Break ! 

At the foot of thy crags, sea, 

But though you've been breaking for ages past 

You're never as broke as me. 



Stollmeyer II. (in church) : "Wake up, here comes the collection 
plate." 

Stollmeyer I. : "Shut up, that's why I'm asleep." 




ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



fl 



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N <wt &nbreto'si College [ 

Toronto 



1 50^/^D OF GOVERNORS 



M «,T*T«„»XT. M 

i 



CHAIRMAN: 
J. K. Macdonald, Esq. 



VICE-CHAIRMAN: 
Colonel Albert E. Gooderham 



GOVERNORS: 

Rev. Prof. Kilpatrick, D.D. 

Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A., LL.D. I 

Sir Joseph W. Flavelle, Bart. f 

D. B. Hanna, Esq. 

Frank A. Rolph, Esq. 

A. M. Campbell, Esq. 

H. E. Irwin, Esq., K.C. 

Sir John C. Eaton s 

D. A. Dunlap, Esq. 

Thomas Findley, Esq. 

Ralph Connable, Esq. 

T. A. Russell, Esq. 

W. B. McPherson, Esq. 

Albert E. Gooderham, Jr., Esq. 

Lyman P. Howe, Esq, 

Kenneth B. MacLaren, Esq. 

Robert J, Gill, Esq. 

i > 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



#len Jfflator 

661 SPADINA AVENUE, TORONTO 
Residential and Day School for Girls 



Principal-MISS J. J. STl ART 

(Successor to Miss Veals) 
Classical Tripos, Cambridge University, England. Large well-ventilated house, pleasantly 
situated. Highly qualified staft of Canadian and European teachers. The curriculum 
H shows close touch with modern thought anJ education. Preparation for matriculation 

examinations. Special attention given to individual needs. Outdoor games. 

School Reopens January 10th, 1922 






Telephone Adelaide 102 

The Macoomb Press 

Printing 

THAT GETS RESULTS 



16 JOHNSON STREET TORONTO 

a g- a g a -g s- m ^r -a- tgw -g- ^ m ^g— ^ g -a g -a » 



»« g- ■* g- ^ g — -a- ta -g srt atg r a m -g — -a g- -a g -a « 

Office Phone M. 2877 Warehouse M. 5236 Produce M. 2390 

STRONACH & SONS [ 

WHOLESALE FRUIT, PRODUCE AND 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Foreign and Domestic Fruits Butter, Eggs, Produce of all Kinds 

Apples and Potatoes in Car Lots 

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LET THE 

i British-American Cleaners and Pressers 

LOOK AFTER YOUR CLOTHES 

Our Special Students Contracts at $5.03 for 12 Suits. Guarantees Satisfaction. 
SUITS CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED. 

485 SPADINA CRESCENT Phone College 5390 

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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Toronto Auto Accessories 



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J. S. GREEN, 
S.A.C., '07-'08 



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Beatty 
Knitting Mills f 



Limited 



Manufacturers o f V-Neck 

and Roll-Collar Sweaters, 

Sweater Coats and Athletic 

Stockings for Clubs and 

Colleges. 

In Pure Wool Only. 

54=56 Wolseley Street 

TORONTO 

Phone College 4148 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Have quality and are the favor- 
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FOUR FEATURES OF 
OUR SHOES 

Better Wearing qualities. 
Perfect Workmanship. 
Better Leather. 
Exclusive Style. 

Our list of satisfied customers in- 
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RDACK& SONS, Limited 

Makers of Men's Shoes for 
over 100 years. 

73 King Street West Toronto 

319 Fort Street Winnipeg 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



j Men's Furnishings 

Direct Importers of all kinds 
of Men's Furnishings of the 
:: :: very best quality :: :: 



SHIRTS MADE TO MEASURE 

An excellent stock to 
choose from 

Gloves, Socks, Ties, House Coats 
Underwear, Etc. 

At Lowest Possible Prices 



COOPER & CO. 

67 & 69 King St. East 

TORONTO 



YOUR HOCKEY OUTFIT 



If variety in selec- 
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our extensive stock 
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inspection. 
We are showing all 
the popular lines 
and many exclusive 
lines of 

SKATES 

BOOTS 

PADS 

GAUNTLETS 

STICKS, Etc. 

Our athletic supplies are used by- 
College and University teams from 
coast to coast — Let us serve you. 



Our new Catalogue No. 8q contains 64 
pages exclusively to Winter Sports. 

The HAROLD A. WILSON Co. Ltd 

297-299 YONGE ST., TORONTO 



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W. H. COX COAL CO. LTD. 



Phone Main 6075 



Wholesale Dealers Urge Householders to try 
\ AMBRICOAL, The Perfect Anthracite Briquet. 
Ask Your Dealer 



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LIMITED 



Wholesale Grocers 

Main 2281-2-3 
59-63 Front St. E. : : 



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' RELAX GARTER f 







COMFORTABLE RELIABLE 

DURABLE 

SLIP ON A PAIR OF "RELAX" IN THE 
MORNING AND IT WILL FAITHFULLY 
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THE SOFT WIDE WEBBING DOES NOT 
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GET A PAIR OF RELAX A T 
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35c. in Lisle. 



50c. in Mercerser. 



Eisman & Company, Ltd., Toronto 

Makers 



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THE LUMSDEN BLDG. 

BARBER 
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YONGE and ADELAIDE 

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Absolutely Sanitary 



The barbers of this establishment 
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to refuse to shave or do any work 
on customers whose faces or 
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COPP'S FINE LINEN 
COPP'S KID FINISH 

CORRESPONDENCE 
PAPERS 

Good taste requires the Lady and 
Gentleman of today to use for 

their Correspondence 

SUPERIOR STATIONARY 

of the correct size. 

The superior qualities of these 
papers are unexcelled in Canada 
today. 

In the following sizes: 

Salisbury — Conventional Ladies' size. 
Regina — Note size. 
Louvain — Oblong size. 
Club — Gentlemen's size. 

also 
Correspondence Cards Visiting Cards 

Ask your Stationer for these. 

The 

Copp Clark Company, Limited 

Toronto, Canada 



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F. A. Bowden & Sons 

Established 1880 
Phone Gerrard 220—221 

Retail Lumber 

LATH, SHINGLES, 

SHEETING, SHELVING, 

CRATING, FLAG POLES, 

BEAVER BOARD, Etc. 



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Cld Boys 
FRANK G. BOWDEN 
HARRY V. BOWDEN 
ARTHUR (Pat) BOWDEN 



Greenwood Ave. G.T.R. Tracks 

Stop 31 Yonge St. 
TORONTO 

Branch: Lansing, Ont. 
g ^g - ^g- -ag- -^ 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



Efje Untoersitp of Toronto H 

] (The Provincial University of Ontario) 

With its federated and affiliated colleges, its various faculties, and its special 
y departments, offers courses or grants degrees in: u 

, ARTS leading to the degree of B. A., M. A., and Ph.D. p 

COMMERCE Bachelor of Commerce. 

APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING B.A.Sc, M.A.Sc. 
C.E., M.E., E.E., Chem.E. 

J MEDICINE M.B., B.Sc, (Med.) & M.D. b 

1 EDUCATION B.Paed. and D.Paed. T 

FORESTRY B.Sc.F. and F.E. 

MUSIC Mus.Bac. and Mus.Doc. 

J PUBLIC HEALTH D.P.H. (Diploim). L 

, HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SERVICE. . 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. 

LAW LL.B., LL.M., & LL.D. (Hon.) 

DENTISTRY D.D.S. 

y AGEICULTURE B.S.A. b 

1 VETERINARY SCIENCE B.V.S., and D.V.S. f 

PHARMACY Phm.B. 

Teachers' Classes, Correspondence Work, Summer Sessions, Short Courses for 
Farmers, for Journalists, in Town-Planning and in Household Science, Univer- y 
sity Classes in various cities and towns, Tutorial Classes in rural and urban com- 
munities, single lectures and courses of lectures are arranged and conducted by n 
the Department of University Extension. (For information, write the Director.) 

For general information and copies of calendars write the Registrar, University 
of Toronto, or the Secretaries of the Colleges or Faculties. 



Z5CS ^g" ^ w g- 3 iaia r -a s rg— a er -a r 

The Very Best SPORTING GOODS [ 



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y EVERYTHING IN B 

HOCKEY SUPPLIES— SKATES, BOOTS, 

\ STICKS, PADS, ETC. M 

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SWEATERS, SWEATER COATS, JERSEYS, ETC. 

4 COLLEGE PENNANTS, CRESTS, ETC. I 

i r 

Write for Catalogue. 



A " 

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PERCY A. McBRIDE 

i YONGE ST., TORONTO. PHONE I 



A l 

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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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LIMITED 

Church and Front Sis. 
TORONTO 

Direct Importers from all 
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Fruits, Nuts, Vegetables, 

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Also 

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Best facilities for the prompt despatch 
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Repair your clothes 
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Puritan Laundry Co., Limited j 

292 Brunswick Ave. :: :: Toronto 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



55] 

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St. Andrew's Boys! 



qQ<» oo^a« 



H PATRONIZE OUR 
ADVERTISERS 



°£>o° oo-feo 



; They ma\e it possible for us to 
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PARK BROS. 

<Pf)otograpf)er£ 

Groups a Specialty 

Telephone Main 1269 328 # YONGE ST. 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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TORONTO 



Every College Boy 
in Canada knows 
this mark — It means 
the Smartest Clothes 
made in Canada. 

THE 

LOWNDES COMPANY 

LIMITED 

142-144 West Front St. 

TORONTO 



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Phones 

Main { Z*JJ Established 188. 

GALLAGHER & CO. 

LIMITED 

Direct Importers and Distributors 

oj 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

FISH and OYSTERS 

to 

Hotels, Clubs and Restaurants 

Hospitals and Colleges 

Railway Dining Cars 
Supplies 

107 KING ST. EAST 
TORONTO 






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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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THE STATIONERY 

IN THE BLUE BOX 




A 

WE. 



GAGE'S HOLLAND LINEN 

The distinctive writing paper for social 

corre spondence. 

A l all good dealers. 

W. J. GAGE & CO. LTD. 

TORONTO -s- WINNIPEG 



B WEBB'S 

Great New Bakery 



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DAVENPORT ROAD 

Foot of Walmer Rd. Hill 

Finest in Canada 

ELECTRIC DELIVERY 

No Stable No Horses 
No Odors 

The Harry Webb Co., Ltd. 

TELEPHONE 
HILLCREST 



TELEPHONE Cf\f\f\ 



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HOCKEY STICKS - SWEATERS 

SWEATER COATS 

CUSHION PENNANTS 



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J. BROTHERTON 

580 YONGE ST. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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H. P. Eckardt & Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 



Church Street 

and 

Esplanade 

TORONTO 



Telephone 
MAIN 4168 




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HENRY SPROATT, L.L.D., R.C.A. 
ERNEST K. ROLPH. 

proattanfcEoip!) \ 



36 NORTH STREET \ 
TORONTO 



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Brown Bros. I 

Limited 

1 and 3 St. Lawrence Market 

1 

Main 868 , 

Main 869 

DEALERS IN 

All kinds of Fresh and Salt \ 
Meats, Hams and Bacons 



33S. 3-g " 



Corned Beef a Specialty 
All Kinds of Poultry in Season 

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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 






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COLES 

Caterer 

and 

MANUFACTURING 
CONFECTIONER 



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Catering a Specialty 
H 



PHONE N. 154 

71 9 YONGE STREET 
TORONTO 



TAYLOR & CO. 



Painters 

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9 BLOOR ST. EAST 
TORONTO 

Phone North 963 



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DANCING LESSONS 



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Private, Class, Single, Group and Couples 

IN ADDITION TO THE LATEST BALL ROOM 
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CLASSICAL, NATURAL and CLOG 

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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



A Real Boy's Shop 
For Real Boys 



'Everything for 
Boys in 
Every Season" 



There are no crusty salesmen to chill 
a fellow to the backbone in our Boy's 
Shop. Our salesmen are human, 
cheery chaps that . smile and chat. 
And there's a big psychological reason 
for this. They are conscious of the 
unbeatable quality of the merchandise, 
the completeness of the variety and 
the excellence of the values. 



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MURRAY-KAY 

COMPANY, LIMITED 
KING & VICTORIA STS. 

Telephone Adelaide 5100 

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Blachford 
Shoes 
For Men 



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are wonderfully economical because 
they keep their smart appearance 
long after cheaper shoes must be 
repaired or replaced. 

Try them next time ! 



H. & C. Blachford 

LIMITED 

286 Yonge St., opp. Dundas E. 

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TWO STORES 



BOND BROS. 

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453 YONGE STREET 

Phone North 350 

Cor. MADISON AVE. 

and DUPONT ST. 

Phone Hillcrest 812 

TORONTO 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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CANADIAN |j 

GOVERNMENT 

\ MUNICIPAL- and [J 

CORPORATION 



BONDS 



4 Bought, Sold and Quoted i 

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Dominion Securities 
cobporation limited 

26 KING ST. EAST :: TORONTO 

MONTREAL LONDON. ENG. 

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Boys — 



Your whole future will be affected by the habits 

which you form to-day. 
^ To learn the value of thrift and acquire the habit f 

of saving is just as necessary to success as is 

knowledge. y 

^ We invite you to open a savings account here — ■ f 

it will encourage you to save systematically. 

CENTRAL CANADA 

\ IJ>AN AND SAYINGS [ 

COMPANY 



i King & Victoria Sts. Toronto. "• 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Buy 

COWAN'S 

CHOCOLATE 

BARS 



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They Are Delicious! 



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CONFEDERATION LIFE ASSOCIATION POLICIES 



are issued providing in addition to all the regular benefits that 



In case 
of 



Total and Permanent Disability ul 



the 
nsured 



1. All future premiums are cancelled 

2. A regular monthly income will be paid the assured 

3. The full amount of the policy will be paid at maturity 



The Association also issues policies on first-class lives for 

$1,000.00 Without Medical Examination 



FULL INFORMATION SENT UPON REQUEST 

CONFEDERATION LIFE 

ASSOCIATION 

HEAD OFFICE : : TORONTO 



J. K. MACDONALD 

President 



JOSEPH HENDERSON, ESQ. 
COL. A. E. GOODERHAM 

Vice-Presidents 



C. S. MACDONALD 

General Manager 



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"For rte REST of Your Life" 



GOLD MEDAL Divanettes 

GOLD MEDAL Felt Mattresses 

HERCULES Bed Springs 

GOLD MEDAL Upholstered 
Furniture 






The GOLD MEDAL GUARANTEED PRODUCTS 
have proved themselves BEST by TEST for 
over 30 years which is one very good reason 
why YOU should demand these PRODUCTS by 
NAME when buying, and why YOU should look 
for the nationally-known TRADE MARK. 



GUARANTEED — 



GOLD MEDAL 



PRODUCTS 



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HEAT- 

For Winter's Cold 

Day or Night — At the turn of a Valve 



RADIANTFIRES OF EVERY STYLE AND TYPE 

We have the largest display in the city 



Can be purchased on easy monthly payments, 
with your Gas Bill. 



Ycu are specially invited to our 



NEW DISPLAY ROOMS • 55-57 ADELAIDE STREET EAST 

(WRITE FOR FREE ROOKLET— "RADIANTFIRES") 



THE CONSUMERS' GAS CO. 

OF TORONTO 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PRESS