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Full text of "The church bells of Kent: their inscriptions, founders, uses, and traditions"

THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OE CALIEORNIA 

LOS ANGELES 



THE 



CHURCH BELLS OF KENT. 










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THE 



Church Bells of Kent 



Inscription?, Jounl)cr5, else? anb (jlrabitions. 



J. C. L. STAHLSCHMIDT, 

PAST MASTER OF THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OK FOUNDKRS, 
MEMBER OF THE ROYAL ARCH.EOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, AND OF THE KENT, ESSEX, AND SURREY 

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETIES ; 

AUTHOR OF "SURREY BELLS AND LONDON BELL-FOUNDERS," EDITOR OF THE 

'■' CHURCH BELLS OF HERTFORDSHIRE," ETC., ETC. 



ILLUSTRATED. 



LONDON: 
ELLIOT STOCK, 62, PATERNOSTER ROW. E.C 

1887. 



cc 



Dcbicatcb 



RIGHT HON. AND MOST REV. EDWARD WHITE BENSON, D.D,, 



NINETY-SECOND ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERnURY 



PRIMATE OF ALL ENGLAND. 



7189S5 



CONTENTS. 



lAOF. 

PREFACE - ^ - - - - " - IX 

PART I. 

AN ACCOUNT OF THE VARIOUS CHURCH BELLS EN THE COUNTY AND 

THEHi FOUNDERS — IN ORDER OF DATE - - - - I 

PART II. 

LOCAL USES OF UELLS — AN ACCOUNT OF SUCH OLD CUSTOMS AS HAVE 
SURVIVED TO THE PRESENT DAY OR ARE TRADITIONALLY KNOWN 
TO HAVE. EXISTED - - - - - - - 121 

PART III. 

DETAILED ACCOUNT O.' THE INSCRIPTIONS ON THIC liJCLLS IN THE VARIOUS 
CHURCHES IN ALPHABETICAL (JRDER — WITH IMF l)L\MI IKK OF 
EACH BELL— NOTES ON THEIR USES — AND EXTRACTS FKOiM CIIUUCH- 
WARDENS' AND OTHTIK ACCOUNTS RICLATINC TO THEM - - \ H) 



PREFACE. 




UIDE-BOOKS are valuable in 
proportion to their accuracy. 
That proposition is, I think, in- 
controvertible — is what a German 
would call ' ein factum der monu- 
mente.' Secondly : It is desir- 
able that a book should be 
written by one well acquainted 
with the subject of which the 
book is to treat. I admit that a 
book may be much more amusing 
(to critics) when compiled by one happily or unhappily 
ignorant of his subject ; but in such a case what the cynic 
Q:ains the truth-seeker loses, 

I have made these remarks because, when nearly ap- 
proaching the end of my labours, I was informed that I was 
forestalling some one else — one whose local and general anti- 
quarian knowledge is far greater than mine. But as for a 
good many years this one particular subject has been my 
special study, which has not been the case, I understand, 

The initial letter used above is from the Oabriel V>c\\ at Boughton Aluplx 



X Preface. 

with the o;cntk'm;in in question, I think I may honestly, and 
without egotism, consider myself to be perfectly competent 
to write about the Church Bells of Kent, whatever may be 
his views or intentions for the future. 

I have dealt with the subject to the best of my ability, and 
in doubtful cases I have been careful to consult those whose 
opinions on such questions are of value. The list of such is, 
I regret, much smaller than it was a very few years ago. We 
have to mourn the loss of our patriarch, the Rev. H. T. 
Ellacombe, and of my dear good friend Mr. Thomas North ; 
and the year 1886 carried away with it Mr. Llewellyn Jewett, 
with his work on the Church Bells of Derbyshire still un- 
finished. I sincerely trust that the one most competent to 
the task, Mr. St. John Hope, may be induced to take it in 
hand and complete it. 

My work, which by the time this book is in print will have 
taken almost the whole of my spare time for three years and 
a half, has been very considerably lightened by the kindness 
of Mr. Amherst D. Tyssen, in placing at my disposal the 
large collection of rubbings and other information gathered 
by him and his father, the late Mr. J. R. D. Tyssen, some 
twenty years ago. My main work has been, to use a com- 
mercial expression, to " post these up to date ;" to supply the 
churches deficient in his collection ; to take the necessary 
" squeezes " for casts, without which it is impossible properly 
to collate and settle the various groupings of bells ; and lastly, 
to obtain extracts from those parish accounts which are still in 
existence. I trust my readers will be satisfied with the 
result. 



Preface. xi 

In all this I am glad to acknowledge the kind help of many 
friends — personal and other. A large proportion of the bene- 
ficed clergy were good enough to reply to my list of questions 
as to the present state of their belfries and the "local uses" 
of their bells. I have thanked them individually in the third 
part of this book. Here I beg to thank them collectively. 

For special assistance I am greatly indebted, first of all, to 
Mr. E. J. Wells, the secretary of the St. Paul's Ecclesiological 
Society, a native of the county, and a devoted campanist and 
practical ringer. He has rendered me most effectual service 
in verifying and cast-taking. My good friend Mr. J. 
Meadows Cowper, of Canterbury, has been equally kind — 
"steeple-chasing" is not his forte — but I owe many thanks 
to him for very much valuable information from the records of 
his city, parochial and civic. 

Another good friend, Dr. Francis Grayling, of Sittingbourne, 
has verified for me the belfries in his neighbourhood, and 
thereby spared me much labour ; for this and for other useful 
information I here record my best thanks. 

I am under much obligation to Mr. Herbert T. Sankcy and 
his partner, the worthy Town Clerk of Canterbury, for kindly 
undertaking several searches in the Registry of Wills, and for 
other help. 

Very many thanks are also due to the Rev. Cecil Deedes, 
for kind assistance in verifying the contents of several 
belfries ; to Mr. Walford D. Selby and Mr. J. A. C. Vincent 
for help at the Record Office ; to Mr. A. D. Tyssen for the loan 
of woodblocks ; and last, but not least, to Dr. R. R. Sharpe, 
the keeper of the records of the City of London, for courteous 

b 2 



xii Preface. 

and valuable assistance during my cxaminalion of the docu- 
ments under his care. 

I am much obliged to Mr. A. S. Lawson, the present 
owner of the Whitechapel foundry, to Mr. S. B. Goslin, of 
the Cripplegate establishment, and to Messrs. Taylor, of 
Loughborough, each and all, for information kindly supplied as 
to work done by them in the county. 

My thankfulness to all who have in any way aided me, and 
my satisfoction at having ended my task, is tempered by only 
one regret, which I mention here to anticipate any hostile 
critic who might fall foul of me for an omission. The regret 
is that I am unable to include any entries from the Sacrist 
rolls of Canterbury Cathedral. They exist from an early 
period ; but the labour of examining them would be very 
great, and probably take several months. My own time is 
too fully occupied for me to dream of undertaking the work, 
and I have been unable to find a substitute. I did indeed try 
at Dr. Sheppard, but he was much too old a bird to be 
caught, although he very kindly promised me full assistance if 
I should undertake the work personally ; but in view of the 
above facts I was reluctantly compelled to relinquish the idea. 
The publication of the Cathedral Archives, however, is a 
matter which doubtless, before long, will be taken in hand by 
the Kent Archa:;ological Society. 

At pp. 24 and 25 I have given the evidence for the identi- 
fication of William Founder with William Dawe. Since that 
was in type I have found the reason why he so persistently 
described himself as William Founder. There was in the 
same ward, and at least partly contemporaneously with him, 



Preface. xili 

another William Dawe, by trade a " white-tawycr," or dresser 
of white leather. I find him on the Hustings Rolls for 1371. 
It is at least possible that the two were father and son. 

At p. 54 I have mentioned William Oldfeild, of Canterbury, 
as casting as late as 1551. Reference to the parish accounts 
of Bethersden (pp. 153 and 154) will show that he was still in 
the trade in 1557, and probably in 1561. 

My ascription of the treble bell at Loose to John Harding 
(see p. 61) is to a certain extent confirmed by the British 
Museum authorities. They pronounce the coins impressed 
on the bell to be " side-faced groats of Henry VHI." 

I have omitted at p. 44 to give the site of Hatch's bell 
foundry. It was, so Mr. James T. Hatch informs me, " on 
the north side of King's Wood, in Ulcombe (which wood ex- 
tends also into the parishes of Broomfield Leeds and 
Langley, in a field called at this day * the Welmonground,' 
evidently a corruption of ' the bellman's ground,' and the 
scoriae and debris remained upon the site within my time and 
memory." I am much indebted to this gentleman for this 
and other information. The date of Thomas Hatch's decease, 
which family tradition states as 1599, but which I have at 
p. 75 surmised as 1601, must be put still later. He was 
churchwarden of Broomfield in 1603, which is the; latest date 
at which I can trace him as alive. 

In the third part of this book I have givcMi tlu; number of 
bells existing at the time of the " Church Goods " Inventoriot^ 
of Edward VI. These are taken from the inventories printed 
in ArchcEologia Canliana, and are prefaced by the initials 
T. R. E,, a concise expression borrowed from " Domesday 



xlv Preface. 

Book," and standing for ''Tempore Regis Edwardi " (Sexti, 
of course, not Confessoris). 

Just as this sheet is going to press, I hear that the ring at 
Birchington has been increased to six by the addition of a 
new treble (by Warner and Sons), and put into thorough 
ringing order by S. SnelHng, of Sittingbourne, 

Finally, I have referred in several places in the book to 
information published by me in a former work, " Surrey Bells 
and London Bellfounders." I have thought it unnecessary to 
reprint what I had there given ; but if any subscriber to this 
should wish to have the former work, he can have a copy on 
application to myself or my publisher, at the original sub- 
scribers' price of i6s., so f^ir as the copies remaining unsold 
are sufficient to supply the demand for them. 



J. C. L. STAHLSCHMIDT. 



FoNTENOY Road, Balham, 
August, 1887. 



ERRATUM. 
Page 4C, line 19 ; for 1743 read 1473. 



PART I. 

CHRONOLOGICAL ACCOUNT. 



THE Church of England possesses within the borders of 
this county 597 places of divine worship. One of 
these — St. Paul's Church, Milton by Sittingbourne — has no 
bell of its own ; but the Town Hall bell is used to summon 
the congregation, and I have therefore treated it as a church 
bell. On the other hand, there are three places where there 
are bells but (practically) no churches. Such are Buckland 
by Faversham, Hope in Romney Marsh, and Warden in 
Sheppey. 

The total number of church bells is approximately 1,952. 
Possibly there may be a few more ; but, this book being 
primarily and mainly antiquarian in its scope and intention, I 
have, in collecting the materials for it, taken but little trouble 
with regard to churches founded within the last qu.'irter of a 
century ; and, in default of better information, I have credited 
such with only one bell apiece— the minimum prescribed by 
our Book of Common Prayer. 

Bells devoted absolutely to secular uses are outside the 
design of this work. There are many such in Kent — over 



Chronoloncal Account. 



Town Halls and market-houses, etc., and possibly there may- 
be an interesting one here and there among them ; but I have 
only (in addition to the Milton bell above mentioned) brought 
one under notice — the clock bell at Leeds Castle. It has, 
indeed, a quasi-church connection, for the " Evening Ave " or 
" Curfew" peal has been rung upon it nightly for upwards of 
four centuries and a half. Apart from this, however, it is a 
most interesting bell — the only specimen in England of French 
workmanship that I know of, I am much indebted to Mrs. 
Wykeham Martin for permission to take squeezes of the 
ornamentation which it bears, engravings from which form 
the frontispiece to these pages : I shall describe the bell in 
due chronological order. 

The total of 1,953 bells is thus distributed 



60 
408 
480 

305 
104 
252 

76 
251 

17 



6 rings 


of 10 


5i „ 


„ 8 ... 


80 „ 


„ 6 ... 


61 „ 


M 5 ••• 


26 „ 


„ 4 ••• 


84 . 


1 


38 „ 


M 2 ... 


Single bells 


Sanctus, 


priest's, and clock 



belh 



1,95, 



Of these the largest is ' Great Dunstan '—the clock bell at 
Canterbury Cathedral ; the most interesting is the Leeds 
Castle bell just mentioned, while the most amusing one is 



Chronological Account. 3 

unquestionably the treble at Addington, with the pious 
medieval inscription of its predecessor reproduced, but gravely 
tortured into unutterable nonsense by a worthy but ignorant 
bell-founder in the early part of last century. 

In point of date the bells may be classified as follows : 



Pre-Reformation bells 


.. 98 


Elizabethan, say 15 70- 1600 


•• 38 


1601 -1 700 


•• 475 


1701-1800 


.. 578 


Present century ... 


.. 711 


Doubtful bells ... 


•• 53 



Such classification cannot be made very exact. For instance, 
there are a few bells which clearly date from the transitional 
period — 1550 to 1570, hardly pre- and certainly not post- 
Reformation bells. I have, not without hesitation, placed 
them among the former — the 98. Again, there are a few 
which really belong to the Elizabethan class, although dated 
in the seventeenth century. Bells of transitional or " over- 
lapping" epochs are always difficult to treat, as will be seen 
later on when we come to the question of the dividing line 
between bells with Lombardic and those with black letter 
inscriptions. 

It is a kind of settled rule with campanists to regard as 
" ancients " all bells cast in or before 1600— those which in 
this county I have placed in the first two categories. The 
rule is an arbitrary one, not, to my mind, without objection, as 
will be gathered from what I have said above ; but in adopting 

B 2 



4 Chronological Account. 

it I am only following my predecessors who have written on 
the subject. 

The proportion of "ancients" in the county is, as will be 
seen, a tritie under seven per cent, of the whole. This is 
very poor as compared with other counties farther away from 
London ; but it is double that in Surrey, and about the same 
as Hertfordshire. It may be attributed to two causes : firstly, 
the excessive energy of the local founders of the seventeenth 
century ; and secondly, to the mania for peals for change- 
ringing which obtained during the early part of the eighteenth 
century. These two causes have without doubt sent many a 
ring of three or four heavy " ancients " literally to pot, to 
provide a light set of six or eight bells for the local ringers 
to exhibit their skill in the melodious but mysterious art of 
grandsire triples, triple bob major, etc., etc. 

My task is now to deal with the bells of Kent in the order 
of their date, so far as can be positively ascertained or 
reasonably surmised. So much has been done during the last 
twenty years in carefully examining and recording the inscrip- 
tions, foundry stamps, and lettering used upon bells in the 
Midland and Southern counties of England, and in collecting 
from various sources — mainly unpublished — information bear- 
ing upon bells and their founders, that a certain amount of 
finality has been attained, and it is not a difficult task now to 
fix the date of a bell — not, as was formerly the case, by 
arbitrary guesswork, but by following certain established rules 
having reference to shape, character of inscription, lettering of 
same, stops used to mark the division of words, founders' 
trade-marks, and initial crosses. It may be useful if I just 



Chronological Accottnt. 5 

explain, briefly, the conclusions my brother campanists and 
myself have come to on these points. 

Shape. — A bell abnormally long in the waist is sure to be 
an old bell. There is an excellent example at Durham, bearing 
the name of a London founder — Richard de Wymbish, whose 
date we know from City records to have been quite early in 
the fourteenth century. It must not be inferred from this 
that a bell which is only moderately long-waisted — i.e., of the 
shape usual down to the end of the seventeenth century — is 
necessarily later in date than a very long-waisted bell. Two 
bells at Bradenham, Bucks, by Michael de Wymbish, probably 
an elder brother of the above-named Richard, and certainly 
earlier in date, are only of normal long-waistedness. 

Character of Inscription. — A simple inscription such as 
+ IOHANNES or -f AVE MARIA, with the letters widely 
spaced out so as to occupy the whole length of the inscription 
band, denotes an early bell. But there are also early bells 
with elaborate inscriptions. One at Goring, Oxon, is almost 
certainly not later than 1 290. 

Lettering. — Inscriptions in Lombardic letters, sometimes 
called Gothic capitals or uncials, are, if with stops between 
the words, earlier than 1400 (approximately). The use of 
black letter came in about 1390, and the two styles prevailed 
side by side for about twenty years. Inscriptions in capitals 
came again to be used in the second quarter of the sixteenth 
century ; but they are readily distinguishable from the earlier 
ones by the absence of stops. Great caution is needed in 
theorising from the actual lettering used ; the fact that two 
bells have inscriptions in precisely the same letters does not 



6 CJivonological Account. 

connote that thc}- arc both by the same founder. Alphabets 
are traced from hand to hand for centuries. 

Stops. —These are used (with scarcely an exception) with 
Lombardic inscriptions only. The earlier consist of two or 
three dots, roundels, or diamonds, placed vertically, and these 
developed into more elaborate combinations. Fleurs-de-lis, 
crowns, leaves, and other stops are used on later bells. 

Foundry Stamps. — Rare with Lombardic bells, as they did 
not come into general use until the beginning of the fifteenth 
century. The assignment of them to their respective owners 
is the great difficulty with campanists. A patient Investiga- 
tion of ancient local records generally furnishes a clue sooner 
or later. 

Initial Crosses. — Very frequendy these are of great assist- 
ance in determining the authorship of a bell, but as they, like 
the letter-stamps, passed largely from hand to hand, they are 
very likely to mislead any but an expert. 

It is almost needless to state that in the above remarks I 
am dealing only with pre- Reformation bells. Since 1570 bells 
are almost as invariably dated as before that time they were 
undated. 

Into the general history of church bells I have no intention 
of plunging. What little is known about them has been 
already detailed by better hands than mine. It may, I think, 
be almost summed up in the phrase, " Bells* have been used 
in the Christian Church for some fourteen centuries and a 
half" Whether they were invented or introduced, we don't 

* Of course I am referring here to large bells — "Signa,' or "Nola' — not 
to small hand-bells, which were used by the ancients. 



Chronological Acconnt. 7 

know. I suspect the latter, and that we must go to the far 
East if we want to learn more. 

How early bells were brought Into England is also 
unknown, but I think we may fairly conclude that Kent was 
the first place where they were introduced, and that not long 
after St. Augustine's time, if not, indeed, by him. No 
records, however, exist alluding to the subject, so far as I am 
aware ; and the fact that there was a detached campanile, in 
the Italian fashion, at Canterbury Cathedral, seems to be the 
only direct evidence in the matter. 

Bells, however, were certainly part of the furniture of 
churches prior to the Norman Conquest. Apart from records 
of provision of such for the larger monastic establishments, 
there is at least one inventory of church goods extant for a 
small village church of quite the early part of the tenth 
century, and in it bells are mentioned. This, however, is, at 
the present day, mere matter of history, no bells now hanging 
having ever been claimed to be of such remote date. There 
are, indeed, only two which can with any reason be claimed to 
be of Norman work — one in the neighbouring county of Surrey, 
and one in Yorkshire. 

Let us now take the bells of Kent in detail. The ninety- 
eight pre-Reformation bells must be subdivided into two 
groups: Firstly, those prior to 1400 — thirty in number — 
which we will call for the nonce " Lombardic " bells ; and 
secondly, those inscribed (mainly) in black letter, and of 
later date than the first group, numbering sixty-eight, which, 
although including the later bells inscribed in capitals, it will 
be most convenient to classify as " Black Letter" bells. 



8 CJironolos^ical Account. 

LoMBARDic Bells. — The thirty which compose this class 
include seven bells which are devoid of inscription, but which 
from their early shape are clearly to be referred to this period. 
We may add to these thirty half a dozen others — viz., three 
which hci\e been re-cast in recent times, two of which we 
have records as existing a century or so ago, and one 
formerly in the Church of St. Mary in Castro, Dover, of 
which an account is preserved in the Surrenden MSS. Thus 
under this head we have exactly three dozen to bring under 
notice. 

And of these, unquestionably, the two earliest are the very 
quaint pair at I wade, locally (and erroneously) supposed to be 
two old ships' bells. I am much obliged to Mr. Francis 
Grayling, of Sittingbourne, for calling my attention to their 
peculiarities, as otherwise, being reported to me as " blank " 
bells, I should not have inspected them personally. They 
are abnormally long-waisted, with cylindrical crowns, and 
perfectly plain sides, and may, I consider, be dated as of the 
first half of the thirteenth century. 

I will next briefly dismiss three other bells, also devoid of 
inscription, but archaic in shape ; they are the bells at Coldred, 
Lullingstone, and Sutton by Dover. I have not seen them 
myself, but they have been examined by competent eyes, and 
are certainly to be placed in the list of early bells, not later 
than 1350, and perhaps much older. 

An early specimen at Stodmarsh comes next for notice. It 
has the inscription (reversed) : 

+ ,^mer GQ^m^E^ ©:mm€rj©r ^j^^m^nw^ 



Chronological Account. 9 

There are no stops between the words, but the shape is 
decidedly early, and the letters are placed on the shoulder- 
angle, which is very unusual. There is a similar instance at 
Bisley in Surrey. The lettering is quite of a rude type. I 
should place its date as not later than 1300; possibly much 
earlier. 

Snargate, in Romney Marsh, has two bells of this period. 
The 3rd is the older of the two ; it is inscribed : 

in exceedingly rudely-shaped lettering, very roughly stamped. 
It has no stop between the words, the letters of which are 
widely spaced. 

The other bell, No. i, has the inscription also widely 
spaced, but much better shaped lettering, and with a single- 
dot stop. 

With the next bell we are on very safe ground as to date, 
for it bears the founder's name. It is the 2nd at Durham, 
which I have already alluded to. The inscription is : 



the lettering of which, together with the floral commencing 
ornament, I have engraved on Plate VII. of my "Surrey 
Bells and London Bell-Founders," in which I have given all 
the information procurable as to this early London bell- 
founder. His date is 1290 to 131 5. The bell in question is 
abnormally long-waisted. 



lO 



Chronological Account. 




Fig. 



I will take next, although somewhat out of date — for it is 
decidedly a much later bell— the 2nd at Chalk. The inscrip- 
tion on this : 

is in the same lettering as the Durham bell just dealt with. 
But I feel sure it is not by the same man. It has the initial 
cross (Fig. i) placed saltire wise, and it 
has a two instead of a three dot stop. I 
have traced this lettering into the hands 
of later founders than Richard Wymbish 
— viz. : William Schep, Peter de Wes- 
ton, and William Revel successively, but 
I cannot find that this initial crass was 
ever used by any of the three. Peter de 
Weston died in 1347, and left a cousin, Thomas, who succeeded 
to his business for a very short time only — as he died in 
the awful Black Death year, 1349. No bells have been traced 
to his hand, but I am inclined to assign this Chalk bell to him, 
on the strength of the variation in the initial cross. If I am 
right its date will be as nearly as possible 1348. 

I now come to a group of eight bells, all clearly by the same 
founder, bearing the same foundry-stamp (P ig. 2.),'" the same 

* I find this shield depicted in Harl. MS. 6163 (a collection of armorial 
bearings made about the middle of the fifteenth century, and believed to have 
belonged to Segar, Garter King-at-Arms). It is there ascribed to " King 
Ethelrcd the Saxon." It is needless to state that armorial bearings were 
unknown in Saxon times ; but it is rather curious that a badge, or supposed 
badge, of a Saxon king should be used as a foundry-stamp in the fourteenth 
century. In the same MS. there is a somewhat similar shield to Fig. 3 
(without the arrow), and ascribed as arms to " King Edmond." 



Chronological Account. 



1 1 




initial cross, and inscribed in the same lettering (z/Zfl^^^- Plate I.). 
They are : 



Bridge 




... 3rd 


Canterbury, St. 


Dunstan 


5th 


St. 


George 


... 2nd 


St. 


Peter 


3rd 


Kingstone ... 




... 3rd 


Patrixbourne 


. . « 


... 2nd 


Postling 


... 


... 2nd and 3rd 



The stop used is a double square dot. They are certainly 
not London cast bells ; their location points to Canterbury as 
their birthplace, and they are clearly of mid-fourteenth 
century date. Can we determine their maker ? I think we 
can. " Ancient records " have preserved his name for us, 
and consequently his date. In the " Pedes Finium," or 

(• — 2 



I 2 Chronological Account. 

"Feet of Fines," of the iSth year of Edward II. (No. 807), 
we have the following : 

" Hec est finalis concordia facta in Curia dni Regis apud 
"Westin in Crastino sci Martini Anno regni Regis 
" Edwardi filij Regis Edvvardi decimo octavo coram 
" Wittmo de Bereford Jotine de Mutford Wittmo de Herle 
" Joline de Stonore & Johne de Bousser Justic & aliis dni 
" Regis fidelib'; tunc ibi presentib5 Int^Wiltm le Belyetere 
" quef & Petrum filiu Henrici Poteman de Cobeham & 
" Isabellam vxem eius deforc de vno mesuagio cum ptifi 
" in Cantuaf Unde pltm convenconis suiii fuit int^ eos in 
" eadem Curia Scitt qd pdci Petrus & Isabella recogfi 
*' pdcm mesuagiu cum ptiii esse Jus ipius Wirti Ut illud 
"quod idem Wilhns het de dono pdcoJj Petri & Isabelle 
" Habend & Tenend eidem Wittmo & her suis de Capit^ 
" dnis feodi illius p svicia que ad pdcm mesuagiu ptinent 
" imppm Et pterea ijdem Petrus & Isabella concesserunt 
" I? se & her ipius Isabelle qd ipi warantizabut p'dco 
" Wittmo & tiedib3 suis p'dcm mesuagiu cum ptifi 
" cont'' oines homines imppm. Et ^ hac recognicone 
" warantia fine & concordia idem Willms dedit p'dcis 
" Petro & Isabelle Centum solidos argenti. 
" Kane." 

Here we have, without doubt, the author of this group 
of bells. At what part of his business career William le 
Belyetere purchased the house in Canterbury it is impossible 
to say, but the record shows that he was there in 1325. 

He places his foundry-stamp sometimes on the inscription 
band and sometimes on the crown of the bell. The bell at 



Cliro^iological Account. 



n 




St. George's Church, Canterbury, has also on the crown a 
small shield with a plain cross upon it, which I shall recur to 
presently. 

The bells at Patrixbourne and Postling have each of them 
this shield (Fig. 3.), of which I am at a 
loss to make out the meaning. I have 
been told that it is to be found " some- 
where in the county," in some stained- 
glass in a church window, and that 
tradition assigns it as armorial bearings 
to Earl Godwin. This last is, of course, 
complete nonsense. But I should like 
to know if the first piece of information 
be correct, and whether it throws any 
light upon the meaning of the shield. 
William le Belyetere apparently had no successor, the 
next Kentish bell-founder traceable being too far off in point of 
date, and moreover, being almost certainly not an east Kent 
man at all. With him his foundry-stamp disappears, but the 
small shield with the plain cross remained in Canterbury, for 
it turns up on bells some 150 years later in date. The 
initial cross, the shield with three crowns, and the letter- 
stamps found their way into the eastern counties — most 
probably to Norwich. There are no less than thirty-eight 
bells in Norfolk inscribed in this lettering, and with the 
cross, and three of them have the shield (Fig. 3). One of 
them has also a well-known shield with three bells, the trade 
stamp at one time of the Braziers, bell-founders of Norwich, 
which is strong evidence that the alphabet was at one time in 



Fig. 3. 



14 Chronoloi^ical Account. 

their possession. The inscriptions on nearly the whole of the 
thlrty-eii^ht are pecuHar to East AngHa. There are also 
some bells in Suffolk — so I learn from Dr. Raven's notes — 
with this letterin^^ and cross, and one of them at least has the 
shield (Fi.<j. 3). 

But the initial cross did not remain at Norwich. It 
migrated somehow to the Midland Counties. There is a 
cross figured by Mr. North (Leicester, No. 71, and Lincoln, 
No. 95), which I have every reason to believe is the same. 
It occurs on bells cast by the Newcomes at the Leicester 
foundry in the middle of the sixteenth century, mostly " alpha- 
bet " bells. Whether the letter-stamps w^ent with the cross, I 
do not know for certain, but it would seem probable that they 
did not, or Mr. North would surely have mentioned it, as they 
are figured in the " Church Bells of Norfolk." 

We have next to notice a pair of bells, only one of which is 
now to be found in Kent ; it is the solitary little tinkler at 
Longfield, and bears the inscription : 

It is only 15^ inches in diameter, and probably owes its 
preservation to its inaccessibility. The maker of it, W^illiam 
Revel, was a London bell-founder of the middle of the 
fourteenth century, and there are several specimens of his 
handiwork still in existence. What little is known of him will 
be found in my " Surrey Bells," p. 25, 

The other bell was the 1st at Stanford, which has dis- 
appeared. It also bore William Revel's name. The record 
of this was preserved by a worthy Kentish antiquary, Bryan 



Chronological Account. 15 

Faussett, of Heppington, who flourished about 1750, and who 
examined a large number of the belfries of East Kent, and 
has left a careful account of his investigations, a copy of 
which was very kindly made for Mr. Tyssen by his descendant, 
the late Mr. Godfrey Faussett, some twenty years ago. 

The next pair of bells claim also London parentage, and a 
similar date. One of them (recast by Mears, in 1862) was 
the tenor at Sutton at Hone, inscribed : 

The other is the present 4th at Bethersden, inscribed : 

The cross and lettering are given on Plate VI. of " Surrey 
Bells." They had two successive owners, Peter de Weston 
and William Revel just mentioned, and by one of them these 
bells must have been cast. Perhaps for choice I would select 
Peter, as he was decidedly in a much larger way of business 
than William. More than that it is impossible to say. I 
may mention here that Peter de Weston's date is 13 28 to 

1348. 

The treble bell at Hartley bears the name of its maker, 
Robert Rider, a London founder, 135 i -1386. The lettering, 
small, but pretty, is given on Plate IX. of " Surrey Bells." 

We now come to a group of three bells — two of which still 
exist : the third has been gone for nearly two centuries — and 
we only know of its existence from the Surrenden MSS. The 



1 6 CJironological Account, 

two arc the 4th at Holy Cross, Canterbury, and the 2nd at 
Snave. They both bear the same inscription in very hand- 
some crowned capitals : 

See Plate II. for specimens of his lettering and his crowned 
initial cross and crowned stop. This last is a good specimen 
of the development from the three vertical dots of which I 
spoke at p. 6. 

The 3rd bell was formerly in the church in Dover Castle ; 
it bore an inscription that it was the gift of Robert de Aston 
in the fourth year of Richard II., and the maker's name, as 
will be given in full detail in the third part of this book. 

Stephen Norton is a bit of a puzzle. That he was a native 
of the county is quite clear ; the family appears to have been 
a widely spread one, and the Christian name, Stephen, was 
common among them. A Stephen Norton had the Royal 
license to found a chantry at Smarden in 1392,* but I don't 
think this was our bell-founding friend. The question is, 
where he carried on his business. If it was within the county, 
why does he so carefully call himself " of Kent" ? I was at 
one time inclined to look upon him as a London founder, but 
at present I can only give all the information about him which 
I possess, and leave the reader to draw his own conclusions. 
We don't know where he learned his trade — it might have 
been with William of Canterbury, but I think their respective 

* Haslewood's " Antiquities of Smarden." 



Chronoloo-ical Accoitnt. 



17 



dates are too far apart, and, further, there is no similarity in 
their style of lettering. 

The earliest mention we get of him is in 1363, and it is in 
the " Feet of Fines," as follows : 

" Hec est finalis concordia fca in Cuf Dili Reg apud Westm 

"adieSci Johis Bapte in quindecim dies Anno Regni Reg 

" Edwardi Icii a conquestu tricesimo sexto coram Rot3to 

"de Thorp Johe Moubray & Johe Knyvet Justic Et 

"postea a die ScT Mictlis in quindecim dies anno Regni 

"ejusdem Regis Edwardi supradco concessa & recordata 

" coram eisdem Justic & aliis dni Reg" fidelib': tunc ibi 

p 
" p'sentib3 Int Jacobu Mathewe de Stapulherst quef & 

" Stephm de Norton Brasiere & Johnam uxem ejus 

" deforc de octo acris tre cu ptiii in Goutherst Unde pttm 

" convencois sum fuit int^ eos in eadem cuf scitt qd (Jdca 

" Stephus & Johna recogii pdcam t^ram cu ptiii esse jus 

" ipius Jacob! ut illam quam idem Jacobus tiet de dono 

" j9dco^, Stephi & Johne tiend & tenend eidem Jacobo & 

"her suis de capit dnis feodi illius p svicia que ad pdcam 

"tram ptinent imppam Et ptea iidem Stephus & Johna 

"concesserunt p se & her ipius Jotlne qd ipi warant pdco 

"Jacobo & her suis pdcam tram cu p'tifi cont^ omes holes 

"imppm Et p hac recogfi war fine & concordia idem 

"Jacobus dedit j^dcis Steptio & Johne decem marcas 

" argenti. 

" Kane." 

Here we have Stephen Norton selling land in Goudhurst. 
In the following year there is another entry, in which we find 
him buying houses and land in Boughton Monchelsea : 

D 



Chronolos'ical Account. 



<!> 



" Hec est finalis concordia fta in Cur dni Reg apud WestiTi 
" in octabis Sci Hillarii Anno Regni Reg Edwardi rcii a 
"conquestn tricesimo septimo corana Robto de Thorp 
"Jotie Moubray & Jofie Knyvet Justic & aliis Dni Reg 
"fidelib; tunc ibi j9sentib5 Int Stepllm de Norton Bel- 
"makere quer et Waltm Totynham & Agn uxem ejus 
" deforc de duob' mesuagiis sexaginta & quinq3 acris tre 
" & quatuor acris prati cu ptifi in Bocton Monchensy unde 
" pttm conuencois sum fuit int eos in eadem cur scih qd 
" pdei Walrus & Agn recogn p'dca mesuagia quinquaginta 
"& quinq^ acras tre & pdm pratu cum ptin de pdcis ten 
" esse jusi plus Steptii ut ilia que idem Stephus feet de done 
" pdco^ Walri & Agn Et ilia remiserunt & quietumclain de 
" ipis Walto & Agn & her ipius Agn jJdco Steptlo & her 
" suis imppm Et ptea iidem Walrus & Agii concesserunt 
" ,p se & her ipius Agii qd ipi warant pdco Stepho & her 
"suis eadem ten cu ptin conf omes tloTes imppm Et con- 
"cesserunt iidem Waltus & Agn p^dco Stepho decem acras 
" ire cu ptin de pdcis tef residuas et remiserunt & quietum- 
" clain quicquid tluerunt in eisdem decem acris terre cum 
"ptin ad imTn vite ipius Agii pdco Stepho & her suis 
" imj)pm Et \) hac recogn concessione remissione quietaclam 
" war fine & concordia idem Stephus dedit pdcis Walto & 
" Agn viginti marcas argenti 
" Kane." 

Among the Kent ArchcTeological Society's charters there is 
one printed in " Arch. Cant.," vol. x., p. 323. It is dated 
48 Ed. III. (1375), and is a conveyance by John de Blakesole 
and Emma his wife, to Roger Dygge, Stephen de Nortone, 
and James de Peckham, of a messuage, a watermill, thirty- 



Chronological Account. 19 

two acres of land, and some annual rents in Wrotham ; 
Stephen being clearly a feoffee or trustee for Peckham. But 
it is, although probable, not equally clear that he was the bell- 
founder. 

As Stephen Norton was, on the testimony of the Dover 
Castle bell, living in 1381, we may safely place his date as 
1363-81. We know, too, for certain, that he was buried in 
Maidstone Parish Church, John Maplesden, by his will, 
dated 1528, requests to be buried in that church, " next to the 
tomb of Stephen Norton, bell-founder." This is all the direct 
information regarding him that I have been able to trace. 
Among the Chancery inquisitions for the 1 7 Richard 1 1 . 
(1394) is one which may refer to him or not. It is an inquiry 
held in accordance with' a writ " Ad quod damnum',' and it 
reports that it will not be to the King's damage or prejudice 
if he should permit Stephen Norton, of Chart by Sutton 
Valence, Stephen, the son of the said Stephen, and others, to 
grant and assign to the convent of the Holy Trinity at 
** Modynden," certain messuages, lands and rents in money and 
in kind, in the parishes of Staplehurst, Headcorn, and Bocton 
Monchesy : the lands in the last-named parish being described 
as nine acres of meadow held of the Prior of Christ Church, 
Canterbury, as of his manor of Hollingbourne, at an annual 
rent of i8d., and certain accustomed services. Now, the fact 
that in 1364 we found Stephen Norton, the bell-founder, 
buying lands in that parish rather argues in favour of his 
identity with Stephen Norton, of Chart Sutton. But even if 
it be so, I do not think his foundry can have been at Chart 
Sutton. In those days bell-founding was not carried on in 

D 2 



20 Clu'onological Account. 

remote country villages, but in the towns, and assuming the 
identity of the two Stephens, I would rather suggest that in 
his old age he had retired from trade and taken up his abode 
at Chart Sutton. Altogether I think Maidstone to have been 
the likeliest place for his foundry. The Rev. W. Scott, of 
Boughton Monchelsea, has been kind enough, in reply to a 
query as to there being any tradition of a bell-foundry there, 
to say that there is none, but that there is a Bell Wood between 
Othani and Maidstone, on the borders of the parish. It is 
quite possible that this may indicate the spot whence Norton 
got his fuel, and so is some corroboration, although slight, of 
my theory as to Maidstone. 

It is clear he had no successor, but the stamps which he 
used found their way to London, and are traceable to the 
successive possession of two or three bell-founders there of 
the fifteenth century. 

There are — or rather were, for one has been recast — two 
bells at Kingsdown by Sittingbourne, of this century. One 
— the smaller — is blank, the other (the recast one) was 
dedicated to St. Katharine. Cross and lettering alike are 
unknown to me, and I am unable to hazard a guess as to its 
maker. The stop is a " two dot " one. 

A bell— the 3rd — at Ringwould, is of the latter part of the 
fourteenth century. The inscription, with a cinque-foil stop 
between the words, is : 

The lettering is graceful and of much the same shape — only 
much smaller — as that on Plate III., which I shall notice 
presently. 



Cli7'07ioloo-ical Accotmt. 



21 



A bell formerly at Petham (the 3rd of the ring), on the 
authority of Mr. Bryan Faussett, should be mentioned here. 
From the nature of the inscription—" VOCOR CAMPANA 
lOHANNIS " — it was almost certainly a Lombardic bell. 

I now come to a group of five bells : 

Burmarsh ... ... ... Treble 

2nd 
Treble 
2nd 
4th 

id of inscription ; but Mr. Tyssen 
states that it is apparently by the same founder as the second. 
Bells with the cross and lettering which these bear are not 
uncommon in the home counties, and are clearly London 
made. The stop is invariably a fleur-de-lis (Fig. 4). The 
cross is Fig. 5. The lettering will be found on Plate III. 



Rodmersham 
St. Mary's 

Seal 

The first of these is devo 





Fig. 4. 



Fig. 5. 



Fig. 5 a. 



I have given in the " Church Bells of Hertford " my reasons 
for assic^nino- these bells to William Burford of London, and 

o o 

I see no cause for altering my opinion. They arc decidedly 



22 



Chronoloi^ical Account, 



the work of his period — 1371-92 — and I know of no other 
founder to whom to ascribe them. It may be interesting to 
note that he was the first Londoner to call himself " Bel3eter ;" 
before his time they all styled themselves " potter " or 
" brazier." This was not the case in the country — William 
of Canterbury, may be noted as a case in point. 

I have printed William Burford's will — a lengthy but 
interesting document — together with what other information 
I have found respecting him, in " Surrey Bells." He was 
succeeded in his business by his son Robert, with whom I 
shall have to deal later on, as he belongs to the " Black 
Letter " period. 

My tale of thirty-six Lombardic period bells is now complete 
with one exception, and that is a bell which, I regret to say, is 
no longer in existence. It was the former treble at Cuxton, 
recast a few years ago. It bore the inscription : 




without any stop between the words ; but it had on the crown, 
three times repeated, a shield (Fig. 6) bearing a chevron 



Chronological Account. 



23 



between three laver-pots, which stamps it as of this date, i.e., 
the close of the 14th century. 

There is a bell at Little Hormead, Herts, inscribed in 
the same lettering and with a wheel-like stop, but without 
the shield on the crown, and with a different cross. There 

are other bells in Kent with this shield 
and with the same cross as the Cuxton 
bell (Fig. 7), but inscribed in black 
letter ; some of which can be abso- 
lutely placed as to their authorship, 
others which were, until quite lately, a 
puzzle to me ; but recent researches at 
Guildhall have brought to light a new 
bell-founder of this period (1395- 1420), 
William Wodeward, and I think the 
Cuxton and Little Hormead bells must be his handywork. I 
will merely advance the theory here, and leave further mention 
of him until I come to deal with the other bells which I con- 
sider must be his. 

Black Letter Bells. — We have now to pass under review 
the remainder of the bells of the pre- Reformation period. 
They number eighty-one — of which there are sixty-eight still 
hanging ; eight more have disappeared recently ; and there are 
five in addition, of which record has been preserved by Mr. 
Bryan Faussett. 

There does not appear to have been any local foundry in 
Kent during the fifteenth century ; all the bells of that date 
come from London sources, with two exceptions, one a French 
bell, the other from the Midland Counties — probably Notting- 




24 



C/iroJiolooical Account. 



h;im. When we come to the sixteenth century, however, we find 
the larger proportion are of local workmanship. 

The eighty-one bells are mostly inscribed in black letter 
smalls, with Lombardic initial letters, and in many Instances 
the latter are those which were used by some of the fourteenth- 
century bell-founders. In the sixteenth century— as I have 
before stated— inscriptions entirely in capitals come in again. 
The bells, therefore, may be divided into two categories, 
" Black Letter " and " Later Lombardic." I now propose to 
treat these in detail, subdividing them into groups, and 
assio-ning each group to its founder according to the best of 
my ability. They are rather difficult to treat exactly in order 
of date, as there were synchronizing bell-foundries in London 
all through the period with which we now have to deal. 

The first craftsman that we have to mention is one who 
belongs to the transitional period between Lombardic and 
black letter bells ; indeed, it was the determination of his 
date which mainly contributed to fixing the former. There 
are, however, no Lombardic bells by him in Kent, and so I 
am treating him as a black letter man. His name is William 
Dawe, and his date, approximately, 1385 to 1418. He has 
hitherto been known to campanists as 
William Founder, from the circular stamp 
(Fig. 8) which he uses as a stop, and 
there have been several shots made at 
his surname. I am rather proud of 
having solved the mystery. My friend 
Mr. Walter Rye very kindly allowed 
me to look throuofh a batch of old 




Chronological Account. 25 

title-deeds relating to property at the East-end of London,* 
and belonging to the Cornwallis family ; among them I found 
two, dated respectively 1393 and 1395, relating to the same 
premises, and executed in the presence of the same four 
witnesses, one of whom stands described in the earlier deed 
as " William Dawe Found'," and in the later one as "William 
Foundor." This is about as strong evidence of identity as can 
be had, I consider, at this lapse of time. 

I find mention of him on the rolls of the Hustings Court, at 
Guildhall, as late as 141 8, again as witness to a deed. It was 
usual in the City for deeds to be executed in the presence of 
the alderman and leading men of the ward, and I take it that 
William Dawe's non-appearance in that capacity after 141 8 is 
fairly good proof of his death. I have failed to find his will. 
The wills proved in the Archdeacon's Court of London are 
missing for a long period from 1420, which no doubt accounts 
for my failure. I have reason to believe that he left a son — 
John — who, however, did not follow the parental calling, but 
apparently retired to the then pleasant suburb of Whitechapel, 
to live at ease on the money accumulated by his father. He 
died in 1435, requesting by his will, dated 2nd January, 1434, 
to be buried in the Church of St. Mary Matfelon, next to 
his mother-in-law — " iuxta matrem uxoris mee." He leaves 
everything to his wife — Alice — who, however, survived him 
but a few months, her will being proved in the following year 
by the sole executor, Richard Hille, whom we shall have to 
notice presently as a London bell-founder. 

" The part of the City which was inhabited by the bell-founders all through 
the Middle Ages. 

E 



26 



Chronolocical Accottnt. 



To return to William Dawe, the four bells in Kent which 
bear his stop (Fig^. 8), are the ist and 2nd at Downe, the 3rd 
at Upper Hardres, and the 2nd at Otham. The initial cross 

on three of these is the well-known 
Fig. 9. The exception is the 2nd 
at Downe, which has the cross 
(Fig. 7) already attributed to William 
Wodeward. It is to be noticed, too, 
that the bell at Upper Hardres has 
also upon the crown four impressions 
of the shield with the three laver-pots 
(Fig. 6). The use of the same 
stamps, by apparently two contemporaneous founders, is very 
puzzling, as will be seen when I come to deal with the next 
group. But as to the four bells under review, there can be no 
possible mistake.* 

It remains to note that the capital letters used on all four 
are alike. I give two of them here as a specimen : 




Fig. 9. 




* William Founder's circular stamp certainly survived him for a long time. 
Mr. A. H. Cocks, whom I am glad to welcome as a working campanist, doing 
good service in Bucks, has found it used as a bell at Radcliff in that county, 
inscribed to St. George, and probably from one of the Reading foundries of 
the sixteenth century. 



Chronological Account. 



27 



They passed into other hands after Dawes demise, as I shall 
show presently. The " smalls," however, vary ; they are all 
of them disproportionately large as compared with the capitals ; 
but those on the Upper Hardrcs bell are not quite so bad as 
the other three. 

I pass to a group of bells which, as I have before men- 
tioned, constitute a severe puzzle. They are, in addition to 
the treble (formerly) at Cuxton, dealt with under the Lom- 
bardic bells, 



( Kemsing 

\ St. Paul's Cray ... 


... 1st 


... 2nd ) 


( Canterbury, St. Paul 


... 3rd j 


\ ,, St. Peter 


... 2nd 1 


\ Brenzett 


3rd 1 


Southfleet 


5th 



It will be noticed that I have bracketed these both to left 
and to right. The left hand brackets denote similarity of 
initial cross ; those to the right similarity of capital letters. 
The first two bells bear the cross Fig. 7. The next three 
have the cross Fig. 10, while the Southfleet bell has a 
similar but larger cross (Fig. 1 1). 

As regards capital letters, those on the Kemsing bell are 
the same as at Cuxton — quite small. The next two have 
them of medium size, the same as those used by William 
Dawe and figured above. The next two have a very much 
larger and handsomer set altogether ; and the same capitals, 
but in this instance crowned, appear on the Southfleet bell. 
With respect to the black-letter " smalls," Kemsing and 



E 2 



28 



ClironoloQ-ical Accotcni. 




Fig. io. 



Fig. II. 



Canterbury St. Paul have comparatively small ones ; the 
other four have the same largest ones as are used by William 

Dawe, which, as regards the 
St. Paul's Cray bell, are utterly 
out of proportion, but with 
the other three harmonize very 
well. As regards other orna- 
mentation, the Kemsing and 
St. Paul's Canterbury bells 
have the small laver-pot shield 
(Fig. 6) on the inscription- 
band ; the St. Paul's Cray 
has it four times on the crown, 
as has also the bell at Canter- 
bury St. Peter's, but only 
three times ; while the Brenzett bell has a much larger 




Fig. 12. 



Chronological Account. 29 

version of the same shield (Fig. 12), also three times on the 
crown. I am inclined to think that this shield was the badge 
of the " Bellemakers' Guild " which flourished about this time, 
and that the use of it was probably free to all members. 

I think my readers will agree with me that we have in these 
seven (including Cuxton) bells as pretty a puzzle to solve as 
can well be found. It is quite possible that some of them 
may be by William Dawe ; but I have elsewhere declined to 
reckon any bells as his that do not bear his foundry-stamp, 
and to that decision I adhere. If they are not his, I know of 
no other founder than William Wodeward to whom they can 
be ascribed ; and as he certainly survived William Dawe, it is 
quite on the card that some of the latter's stamps should 
have passed into his possession. Or there may well have 
been a partnership between the two, which would account for 
the simultaneous use of the same stamps. 

It is impossible without confusion to deal with the fifteenth 
century London bell-founders in strict order of date. I 
propose rather to follow now the various successive owners 
of a particular set of capital letters, so far as I am able to 
identify them. I had thought at one time that the letters in 
question were identical with those sometime used by William 
Dawe, and I stated so in a note at p. 20 of "Church Bells of 
Hertfordshire." Judging from rubbings, my statement ap- 
peared correct, but I have since been able to get casts of 
Dawe's lettering — especially the S — which is, as my reader 
will see, very different from that in the alphabet now under 
consideration, of which I give two examples. I find these 
stamps first in the possession of a founder whose initials, 



30 



Chronological Account. 






Fig. 13. 



Fig. 14. 



judging from the shield Fig. 13, were J. W. ; and as the only 
individual whom I can find connected with the trade and 
with those initials is John Walgrave — some time foreman to 
William Dawe — I have no hesitation in putting them down 
as his. Dawe's stamps, as I have already stated, probably 
passed to William Wodeward (who, however, only survived 
Dawe for a year or two) ; but I strongly suspect that the 
business connection went to Walgrave, bells with this trade- 
mark being frequent. The examples in Kent are nine in 
number, to which may be added one (Denton treble) which 



Chronological Accoiuit. 



3T 



has been broken up and sold for old metal within the last 
twenty years. The nine are : 



Adisham 


... 4th 


Fairfield 


... 1st and 2nd 


Ightham 


... 2nd and 3rd 


Stanstead 


... ist 


Stelling 


... 2nd and 3rd 


Wychling 


... ist 



The initial cross on all of them is Fig. 14. The smalls on 
them differ — two different sets beinof used. 

I have found no trace at Guildhall of Walgrave, the only 
record of his existence being the mention of him in the will of 
John Plot, in 1408 ("Surrey Bells," p. 46); but I do not 
think that his business career was a very long one : I should 
estimate it as from 14 18 to 1440 or thereabouts. Life was 
short in the Middle Ages, and he must have been about sixty 
in the latter year. There is no question, however, that he 
had a decidedly good business ; and, of course, it is quite 
possible he was on his own account before William Dawe left 
this world. 

In connection with the next owner of these stamps, the 
2nd and 3rd bells at Denton and the former 3rd at Ryarsh 
come under review. I am exceedingly concerned to note the 
disappearance of this last mentioned bell, as the dedication of 
It was, I believe, quite unique. It bore the Inscription : 

Hancfa Titrsula mxwxx Ho6aabus Wttis Orafe 



32 Chronological Account. 

All these three bells have the same initial cross as the last 
group, the same capitals and the smaller set of minuscules 
used by John Walgrave ; but they bear a new foundry- 
stamp (Fig. 15), the letters on which doubtless perpetuate 
the initials of its owner. The two Denton bells have in 
addition the shield with three lions passant (Fig. 16). 





Fig. 15. 



Fig. 16. 



I can only offer a suggestion as to the author of this group. 
There are two men connected with the trade about this time 
who have these initials — Robert Crowch and Richard Cress- 
well. The former is named as a legatee in the will of 
William Powdrell, citizen and bell-maker, who died in 1438 ; 
the latter turns up in the will of Richard Hille, founder, 
dated in 1440 ; but as Richard was still only an apprentice 
at his master's death, while Robert was a journeyman two 
years earlier, I think the last-named is the most likely to 
have been the R. C. we are in search of. Perhaps before this 
book goes to press I may find something in the Hustings rolls 



Chronological Account. 



33 



to solve the difficulty. If not, Robert and Richard are both 
pretty men, and I leave my readers to choose whichever they 
like. 

The next group is one of four bells : 

Burmarsh ... ... ... 3rd 

Fairfield... ... ... ... ^rd 

St. Mary's 
Stone in Oxney 

and they are clearly connected with the last two groups, for 
they have the same initial cross and capital letters, while the 
black letter smalls are identical with the larger of the two 
sets used by Walgrave. They have, however, distinguishing 
marks in the following stamps (Figs, 17 and 18). Bells from 



Treble 
^rd 





Fig. 17. Fig. 18. 

this foundry are well known and distinguished as " Royal 
Arms" bells. Evidence given in Dr. Raven's "Church Bells 
of Cambridge" and in the "Church Bells of Herts" leaves, 
I think, little room for doubt that they are the handiwork of one 
I. Danyell, who flourished about the middle of the fifteenth 

F 



34 



ChronoIoQ-ical Account. 



century. There are several of them which bear the initials 
I, D,, but none in Kent,'" 

I must now leave this set of stamps for a time and try back 
half a century, and take up the sequel of the stamps used by 
William Burford before mentioned. He was succeeded in 
1392 by his son Robert, and to this latter I have no hesitation 
in ascribing- the following group of bells in Kent 

St. Martin, Canterbury ... ... 3rd 

Cowden 



Frindsbury 
Hartlip 
Nonington 
St. Mary's 



3rd 
3rd 
5th 
2nd 
3rd 



to which may be added the former 3rd at Langley, recently 
recast or replaced by a modern bell. These are all " black 
letter " bells, but the capitals are those used by the elder 
Burford, and they have either the same cross (Fig, 5) or one 
identical in shape, but on an octagonal instead of a quad- 
rangular stamp (Fig. 5A). They are further differenced by 
having on them also the cross Fig. i, which somehow or 
other had passed into Robert Burford's possession. The 

* I can find no positive trace of this Danycll at Guildhall ; but a deed 
enrolled there in 1435 mentions John Danyell, Senior, of Edelmeton 
(Edmonton), which jjredicates a John Danyell, Junior. Again, in 1496 is 
mention of Jerard Danyell, fishmonger, whose mother, " Alice, wife of John 
Danyell," was buried in the Church of St. Margaret Moses in October, 1481, 
If the inscrii)tion on her tomb was "quondam uxor " {i.e., widow, not wife), 
probably we have here the man. Gerard Danyell's will was enrolled in 15 12, 
and he had property in Lime Street, which is parlously close to the bell- 
founders' quarter. 



Chronological Account. 



3.-) 



capitals on the Langley bell were crowned — like Stephen 
Norton's. 

Robert Burford's date is quite established — 1392 to 1418. 
From his will, dated and proved in the latter year, which I 
have printed at length in " Surrey Bells," it would appear 
that he died childless, and that the foundry with its stamps 
passed into other hands. From the rolls at the Hustings 
Court at Guildhall, I find that his widow, Margaret, married 
one John Dommer, who is described in later deeds as a bell- 
maker, and whom I strongly suspect to have been Burford's 
foreman. Re-marriages, such as this, seem to have been 
almost universal in the Middle Ages. I suppose they were a 
necessity for the sake of protection.* 

The stamps used by Robert Burford passed into the hands 
of a founder who uses the trade-stamp 
Fig. 19; and as I find in the City 
records very shortly after 141 8 one 
Richard Hille mentioned — who was most 
certainly a bell-founder — I have every 
reason for believing him to have been the 
man. My arguments for this will be 
found in "Surrey Bells," p. 54. He was, 
Fig. 19. as I have already mentioned, sole 

* I do not think Dommer continued the business. The widow must have 
been very well-to-do, and there was probably no need. Clearly the stami)s 
passed into other hands, as will be shown directly. Dommer occurs at 
intervals on the Hustings rolls as late as 1438, and he was evidently a man 
of consequence in the ward. The house he and his wife lived in was known 
by the sign of " The Helm on the Hoop," and I trace its transfer from hand 
to hand for many years. It was in Algate Street, outside the City walls, />., 
in Portsoken Ward. 




36 Chronological Account. 

executor to Alice, widow of John Dawe, which is to my 
mind strong evidence for connecting the said John with the 
bell-founding trade, and consequently establishing him as the 
son of William Founder. 

There are only two bells left in Kent which bear the above 
trade-stamp ; the 2nd at Luddesdown and the 3rd at Staple. 
But we know of three more ; the 3rd at the desecrated Church 
of St. Mary Magdalene at Canterbury, sold, it is presumed, 
for old metal when the church was destroyed ; the 4th at 
Cheriton, lately recast, and one of which Mr. Bryan Faussett 
has preserved the record ; the 4th at Great Chart. 

Of these the Luddesdown bell has — without any accom- 
panying legend — a cross (Fig, 5), the 
foundry - stamp (Fig. 19), fleur-de-lis 
(Fig. 4), the cross here given (Fig. 20), 
and another fleur - de - lis, all equally 
spaced round the haunch. The Staple 
bell has the crosses Figs. 5 and 20, 
and the foundry-stamp ; and the lettering, 
both capitals and smalls, is the same as 
^'''^" ^°' that used by Robert Burford. The 

Cheriton bell was alike in every particular. The bell at St. 
Mary Magdalene, Canterbury — dedicated to St. Katharine — 
had also two (doubtless the same) crosses. Of the bell at 
Great Chart no note has been preserved as to the cross or 
crosses — it had the foundry-stamp and the motto — 

^um ^osa ;Pu(sa{a XIiun6i Xllaria ^ocafa 

Richard Hille's will, dated and proved in 1440, is printed 
at length in " Surrey Bells." He left a wife and daughter 




Clwonological Account. 2>7 

both named Johanna ; to the latter he bequeathed two 
hundred marks, to the former the residue of his estate after 
the usual pious bequests and sundry legacies. The daughter 
married Henry Jordan, of whom we shall hear a good deal 
presently ; the widow carried on the business. Among the 
town records of Faversham, there is a contract dated 28th 
March, 19 Henry VI. (1441), between "Johane Hille of 
Londone, widewe," and the parishioners of Faversham, being 
a warranty for the usual term of a year and a day of five new 
bells lately supplied by her. 

Bells are found with the foundry-stamp 
Fig. 19 on them, with a cross on a small 
lozenge-shaped stamp (here given) above the 
shield. These, I have no doubt, are Johanna 
Hille's work. There are none in Kent, how- 
ever, at the present day. 
There is another document among the Faversham archives 
— a similar guarantee for a new tenor bell — but this time the 
contract is with '' Johane Sturdy of Londone, widewe." It is 
dated 38 Henry VI. I think we may take for granted the 
identity of the two " widewes," and conclude that Johanna 
Hille had taken to herself a second husband ; and, again 
widowed, had, as before, still stuck to the business. The second 
husband was one John Sturdy whom I find mentioned on the 
Hustings rolls in 1449, living in the bell-founder's parish of 
St. Botolph, Aldgate. 

There is a bell at Stoke d'Abernon, Surrey, which has the 
founder's initials, I. S., placed on either side of the reverse of 
a silver penny of this period, the coin having placed above it 




38 



Chronological Account. 



the same lozenge-shaped cross as I have above ascribed to 
Johanna Hille. There are also two bells at Watlington, Nor- 
folk, with the same coin and superimposed cross. The Stoke 
d'Abernon lettering is found in Essex in connection with bells 
of this group ; that on the Watlington bells is the same as used 
by Stephen Norton (Plate II.). I take these bells to be the 
works of Johanna Sturdy during her second widowhood. 

At St. Mary Magdalene's Church, Canterbury, now pulled 
down, was formerly a bell (the 2nd) which, with a dedication 
to St. Peter — the capitals of which are those ascribed to the 
Burfords and R. Hille (the " smalls" differ) — had the initials 
I. S. on either side of the silver penny 
just mentioned. The initial cross on 
this is Fig. 21. There was formerly, 
also, a bell with the same coin and 
initials at St. John's Church, Margate, 
which we know, by the donor's name 
upon it, to have been cast about the 
middle of the fifteenth century. I don't 
think I shall be wrong if I place these 
two bells to the credit of John Sturdy, Johanna's second 
husband, and not improbably Richard Hille's foreman while 
the latter lived. The cross (Fig. 21) evidently came into his 
possession after the death of William Powdrell, in 1439, as 
will be noticed presently when I come to mention that bell- 
founder's extant specimens. The consensus of dates which I 
have adduced makes very much in favour of my original 
theory as to the ownership of the stamps used in connection 
with this group of bells. 




Fig. 21. 



Chronological Account. 



I will dismiss next a group of bells connected with the last 
three groups by lettering ; but I am unable, at present, to do 
more than "guess " at the founder's name. They are : 

... 2nd 



Brook 
Newnham 
Penshurst 
Sandhurst 



4th 

3rd and 4th 

4th 




and 



Fior. 



they 
22. 



all bear the foundry-stamp, 
The Brook bell, devoid of 
inscription, has Stephen Norton's cross 
(Plate II.), but uncrowned. The Newn- 
ham bell has the same cross, but crowned, 
and the capitals are those used by 
Norton — it has also the cross, Fig. i. 
The inscription is a somewhat unusual 
Fig. 22. one — 

The Penshurst bells differ between themselves. The 3rd 
has two crosses, one formed of four fleurs-de-lis like Stephen 

Norton's, but on a diamond-shaped stamp 
like Fig. 9, not a square one ; the other 
cross is Fig. 23. The capitals are 
Stephen Norton's, but uncrowned. The 
Penshurst 4th has the same capitals 
crowned — Stephen Norton's crowned 
cross and the cross, F'ig. i. The Sand- 
hurst bell has also Norton's crowned 
capitals, and the same cross, twice re- 
peated, as that on the 3rd at Penshurst, first above mentioned. 




Fig. 23. 



40 



Chronological Account. 



I place the date of these bells as from 1460 to 1485 
approximately, but I have not yet reached that date in my 
examination of the Hustings rolls at Guildhall, where it is 
possible I may find evidence in favour of the theory as to the 
founder's name which I now advance. The arms on the 
shield are those of Kebyll or Keble ; they were borne by Sir 
Henry Kebyll, Lord Mayor in 15 10, and a member of the 
Grocers' Company. In the parish accounts of St. Stephen's, 
Walbrook, under date 1480, there are payments amounting 
to ^5 6s. 8d. for bell-hanging to John Kebyll, wheelwright. 
Wheelwright, of course, means a member of the Wheel- 
wrights' Guild or Company ; and it is quite on the card that 
John Kebyll combined bell-making with bell-hanging, al- 
though I am free to confess that, as far as I know, such a 
thing was unusual in those days. I think on the whole, how- 
ever, the evidence is strong enough to assign these bells pro- 
visionally to a bell- founder of the name of Kebyll, of the date 
I have fixed above. 

A bell at Milstead (the 2nd) which has upon it only the 
impress of three coins of this period, is, of course, quite un- 
placeable. 

The Leeds Castle bell comes in well for notice here. It 
has the inscription : 

+ Ian m cccc kxx u 

In each of the spaces indicated, there is a stop of a man's 
head. Below the inscription there are the three medallions 
autotyped on the frontispiece. They are so very quaint 
that I have thought it best not to have them drawn and 



Chronoloo-ical Account. 



41 



engraved, but to reproduce them in facsimile from my casts, 
with all the blemishes from casting, just as they appear on the 
bell. They depict, as will be seen, the Virgin and Child, the 
Crucifixion of Our Blessed Lord, and St. Michael and the 
Dragon. This ornamentation stamps it unquestionably as of 
French workmanship. I trust, as it is unique in this respect, 
some means will be taken for its preservation ; it is terribly 
worn where the clapper strikes the sound bow, as it well 
indeed may be after 450 years' daily usage ; and as the clock 
hammer strikes forty-five degrees away from the worn part, 
it would seem that "quarter-hanging" would not do much 
good. It is, however, in good hands. 

It will be handiest now to dismiss one more " odd" bell of 
this century, to leave us free to take up another connected 
story. The bell in question is the former 3rd at Luddes- 
down, recast not many years since at the Whitechapel foundry, 
and the ancient inscription reproduced, not very successfully. 
The legend is : 

if)c mmia kafcriua 

The cross is Fig. 24 ; the lettering 
is entirely in black letter, without 
any capitals whatever. Bells with 
this cross and lettering occur in 
Leicestershire and Lincolnshire, and 
there is little doubt they came from 
the Nottingham foundry, which 
raises the question how a bell from 
S a foundry so far off came into the 
belfry of an out-of-the-way church in 

G 



+ 




Fig. 24. 



42 Chronological Account. 

Kent. I think the problem is determinable. I have in the 
'' Church Bells of Herts " mentioned that there were several 
bell-founders in London just about the middle of the sixteenth 
century, whose names we find recorded, but to whom no bells 
can be traced ; and I account for this by the theory that they 
dealt largely in second-hand bells, looted by the Government 
and other robbers from the monasteries and parish churches, 
and sold to the trade at old metal price. The Public Record 
Office contains a large quantity of notices of such sales. I 
believe that some, at all events, of these bells were not broken 
up, but resold ; and I believe, further, that this Luddesdown 
bell is one of such. And I am of opinion that a small pro- 
portion of the pre-Reformation bells now in our belfries owe 
their present resting-places to the same cause. For instance, 
there is a bell of Stephen Norton's at Chiselborough, 
Somerset, which is, to my mind, much too far from its birth- 
place to be in situ, especially when we come to consider the 
very great difficulties of transport in the Middle Ages. I have 
other instances in my mind, but these two will serve, I think, 
as fair samples. 

We must now return to the Metropolis, and the next two 
bells which I have to notice are by a founder whom I have 
only quite recently succeeded In bringing to light. His name 
is William Powdrell, and the two examples of his (the only 
ones I know of) are the 2nd at Stowting, inscribed : 

The cross on this being that (afterwards) used by Johanna 
Sturdy (Fig. 21). The other bell is the former treble at Ship- 



chronological Account. ^^3 

borne, which disappeared in a wholesale sweep some five years 
ago. It bore the legend : 

with the impress of a coin and the same fleur-de-lis as the 
Stowting bell. The capitals used are large flat plain letters, 
and they were afterwards used by Henry Jordan, whom I 
have mentioned before, and whose works I shall take in hand 
next. 

William Powdrell — " civis et campanarius " — occurs in the 
Hustings rolls in 1438 only. His will, dated 21st October, 
1439, was proved two days afterwards in the Commissary 
Court of London (rather speedy work). He desires to be 
buried at St. Botolph, Aldgate — the bell-founders' church — 
next to William Stokes, his former master. He makes the 
usual pious bequests, leaves legacies to his " servants," or 
workmen — Robert Crowch (see p. 32) being one of them — 
and to his executors, Galfridus Brydde — " civis et Brasier " — 
and two others, and the residue to his wife Agnes. 

In chronological sequence to him comes the man into whose 
hands his letters fell, Henry Jordan, citizen and Fishmonger 
{i.e., a member of the Fishmongers' Company, not a fish- 
monger by trade). His business career lasted, so far as City 
records tell, for some quarter of a century — 1442 to 1468 — 
and he must have been unquestionably the largest bell- 
founder of his time, for there is scarcely a county in Mid or 
South England but contains even now, at the lapse of four 
centuries, specimens of his handywork. Those in Kent are 
eleven in number, viz. : 



44 



Chronological Account. 



{Appledore 
Barming 
Bilsington 
Harblcdown 
/ Bearsted 
} Eythorne 
( St. Nicholas' Hospital, Harbledown 2nd 
Brookland ... ... ... ^.rd 

r Buckland by Dover 
\ Milstead 



3rd 

2nd 

2nd 

3rd 

2nd 

2nd and ^rd 



2nd 
3rd 



The first four have the flat-shaped capitals used before him 
by William Powdrell. The second three have those which 
we have traced downwards from John Walgrave to Danyell, 
from the latter of whom they evidently passed to Henry 
Jordan. Brookland has the large capitals ascribed to William 
Wodeward, and used at Brenzett and St. Peter's, Canterbury, 
while the last two bells have only devices without legends. 
The stamps used by him are the following, Figs. 25, 26, 
and 27 : 




Fig. 25. 



Chronolooical Account. 



45 





Fig. 26. 



Fig. 27. 



and all of these appear on nine of the bells in the above list, 
Milstead 3rd has only Figs. 25 and 27, the former being 
stamped twice on it. The bell at St. Nicholas' Hospital, 
Harbledown, has also Figs. 25 and 27, and in addition the 
cross, Fig. 14. 

Ofthese devices, Figs. 14 and 26 indisputably belonged before 
him to Danyell ; the other two are exclusively Jordan's own. 
I may mention that years ago I pointed out to the late Mr. 
North that I was sure Fig. 27 must be the trade-mark of a 
bell-founder who was " free " of the Fishmongers' Company. 
Not long afterwards Mr. Willis Clark found Henry Jordan's 
name mentioned in the accounts of King's College, Cam- 
bridge, and the mystery was solved at once ; for I recognised 
the name as that of one who, a fishmonger by craft, left 
13s. 4d. to be distributed annually to poor founders of London 
through the medium of my own guild — that of the Founders 
— which amount is still annually paid. 

I have printed in " Surrey Bells " all I have been able to 



46 



CJu'onological Account. 



trace as to his parentage and belongings, and his lengthy but 
interesting will. He left the larger part of his very consider- 
able property to the great company of which he was a 
member — in trust for certain pious and charitable uses — and 
by them the greater part of it is still owned and administered, 
some premises in the parish of " Seynt Brigide in Fflete 
Streete in the subberbes of London " alone having passed 
from their possession. It is interesting to note that in those 
days Fleet Street extended eastward as far as Ludgate {i.e., 
half-way up the present Ludgate Hill), for the abuttals of 
the premises in question show them to have occupied the site 
of the public-house now standing at the north-western corner 
of Ludgate Hill. 

Towards the close of the fifteenth century, and for some years 

in the following one, there flourished 
in London a bell-founder named 
Thomas Bullisdon, no doubt a rela- 
tion of Robert Billesdon, who was 
Sheriff in 1 743, and Mayor in 1483.* 
J ordan's stamps, or at all events some 
of them, came into his hands, and 
we have a specimen of his labours 
in the 2nd bell at Cudham, with 
the trade-mark Fig. 28. It has no 
Fig. 28. initial cross, but the capitals are 




* Thomas Bullisdon, merchant of the Staple of Calais, who was M.P. for 
the City in 1492, had property in Portsoken Ward. I hardly think he can 
have been the bell-founder in question, but I have little doubt all three were 
related. 



Chronological Account. 47 

those of the 2nd set mentioned in connection with Jordan, 
and originally belonging to John Walgrave. There is a very 
pretty ring of five bells by him at the interesting old priory 
church of St. Bartholomew the Great in Smithfield. They 
bear his trade-mark, the same capitals as above, and the cross 
Fig. 14. 

We are now approximating to the commencement of the 
sixteenth century, when we come upon the traces of local 
Kentish foundries. In the parish accounts of St. Dunstan's, 
Canterbury, the following entry occurs under date 1 500 : 

" Item payde to Rychard Kerner for new 

making of the same belle ... iij^. viijV." 

The "same" bell being the " Wakerell," or Sanctus bell. 
Here we have clearly a local bell-founder, probably of Canter- 
bury, although I have failed to find the entry of his admission 
to citizenship. The fact of the accounts containing no 
entry of payment for carriage is, I think, fairly conclusive on 
this point. 

There are four bells in Kent which I consider must be 
allotted to him ; two of them are in a Canterbury church, and 
one of those is dated 1505 ; and one of the other two is in a 
church not far distant. Altogether, I think the evidence is 
very strong. The four bells are : 

St. Mary Bredin, Canterbury ... 2nd and 3rd 
Hoath ... ... ... 2nd 

Old Romney ... ... 2nd 



48 



ChronoloQ-ical Account. 




They have all four the same initial cross 
(Fig. 29). The last two bells have, in 
addition, the shield with a plain cross upon it 
which we last saw used nearly two centuries 
before by William le Belyetere (p. 13). The 
luG. 29. 3rd at St. Mary Bredin is the dated bell ; it 

has the inscription : 

the last four letters being undoubtedly intended to represent 
the Arabic numerals, 1505. It is the earliest use of Arabic 
or quasi-Arabic numerals that I know of on an English bell. 
The Hoath inscription is : 

and I am free to confess I am unable to give its meaning. It 
is too early, I think, to stand for the initials of the church- 
wardens. The lettering used is well-shaped Lombardic. I 
give the most characteristic letters here : 




There is another Canterbury bell-founder yet to be alluded 
to, but as he will demand somewhat lengthened notice, I will 



Chroiiolo^^ical Account. 



49 



take first the remaining London-cast pre- Reformation bells 
which are to be found in the county. F^irst comes the 3rd at 
Down, a dated bell. It has the inscription : 

+ HtJrge ntanc S^xrn^c 6co amto 6nt m 6 x\ 

The initial cross is Fig. y^)^ and in each of the spaces above 
denoted there is the stop Fig. 31. Further, it has upon the 





Fig. 30. Fig. 31. 

waist, in addition to the impress of two coins, the arms of the 
Prince of Wales. I have this last on a set of three bells at 
Aythorp Roding, Essex, cast by one John Tonne, a London 
bell-founder of about the third or fourth decade of the sixteenth 
century. I do not, however, think the Down bell can be his ; 
the date is, I consider, too early, and the cross, stop and 
lettering are not those used by him, so far as I know. But 
I do think it is by the founder from whom John Tonne 
learned his trade, and I trust one day to be able to drop upon 
him at Guildhall. The style of his work rather points to his 
being a foreigner, probably a Frenchman. 

H 



50 



Chronological Accotmt. 



There are two bells, Boughton Aluph 3rd and Graveney 
treble, which are the work of William Culverden, citizen and 
brazier of London ; they have his trade-mark (Fig. 32), which 
has frequently been engraved before, although bells by him 
are not very common. His date is 1513-23. Of the two 
bells under review, that at Graveney has an inscription which 
is decidedly a puzzle. It is as follows : 

^ancfe + O IE T?" □ (Fig- zz) ^ O ^ 





Fig. 32. Fig. 33. 

The letters S and P are crowned, the V may be a reversed 
N ; Fig. '^■^ occuVs elsewhere in his bells — on one at Wimble- 
don, Surrey, for instance. I thought when I first saw the 
rubbing that part of the inscription must have been filed or 
chiselled off, but I have ascertained by personal inspection 
that this is not the case. I shall be glad if any one can rede 
me the riddle. The Boughton Aluph bell, dedicated to St. 
Paul has nothing peculiar about it. 



Chronolo(^ical Account. 



51 



Culverden's bell-founding career was very brief. His will, 
dated 29th September, 1522, and proved 2nd June, 1523, is 
printed by Dr. Raven in the " Church Bells of Cambridge- 
shire," 2nd ed., p. 44. From it we find that his foundry was 
in Houndsditch, and that he had sold his premises (leasehold of 
the Priory of the Holy Trinity) and all his trade implements 
to one Thomas Lawrence of London, bell-maker. It is to be 
noted, also, that among the witnesses to the will occurs " John 
Tynny," who is generally supposed to be identical with the 
John Tonne whom I have mentioned above. 

Thomas Lawrence, Culverden's successor, is represented in 
Kent by one bell — the singleton at West Cliffe, inscribed : 

' and having the very handsome 
oblong medallion (Fig. 34), repre- 
senting St. John the Baptist, upon 
the waist. This medallion and the 
lettering, which is peculiar in shape, 
stamps it clearly as Lawrence's 
work, for they occur on undoubted 
examples of his at Margarctting 
and Leaden Roding in Essex. 
The lettering, it is to be noted, is 
Lombardic, and the bell is one 
which might very easily be mis- 
taken for a fourteenth century 
example ; indeed, a friend who 
visited West Cliffe belfry with me, 
and who is a fair judge in such 




Fig. 34. 



II 2 



52 Chronological Accoimt. 

matters, is, I fancy, not quite convinced now that it is a 
" late " Lombardic bell. Apart, however, from the direct 
evidence as to the lettering and medallion, the absence of 
stops and the use of I H S instead of I H C clearly denote a 
sixteenth-century bell. 

The books of the Founders' Company, to which he be- 
longed, contain a few scraps of information about Thomas 
Lawrence. His name first appears in 1523 among the 
yeomanry or freemen ; in 1525 he was admitted to the livery, 
and in 1527 made an "assistant," or member of the court or 
governing body of the guild. He served the office of under 
warden in 1530, and upper warden in 1537, and there, so far 
as the books are concerned, his history ends ; for there are no 
lists of members for 1538 and 1539, and in the 1540 list his 
name is wanting. 

In the Lay Subsidy rolls of 1535-6 for Portsoken Ward, 
" Thomas Lawranns " is assessed at los. on a value of ^20. 
In similar rolls for 1 540-1, his name does not appear. 

The rapidity of his upward career among the founders 
argues, I think, that he must have been a wealthy man ; 
corroborative evidence of which lies in the fact that he paid 
Culverden no less than ^120 for his plant, which was a very 
large sum in those days. He no sooner disappears from 
London than he reappears in Norwich, of which place I 
think he must have been a native. He was admitted to the 
freedom of the City of Norwich on the 23rd March, i54i,and 
he was buried in St. Stephen's Church there on the 3rd 
December, 1545. There is no evidence or reason to believe 
that he practised the bell-founding art after he left London. 



Chronological AccoiLut. 53 

I have now come to the last group of pre- Reformation 
bells, a group made up of eight now in existence, and four 
more known to have existed formerly. As the founder of them 
probably survived Queen Elizabeth's accession, it is quite 
possible that two or three of the eight are really Elizabethan, 
and so properly belong to the post- Reformation series. Cer- 
tainly I think from the cautious character of their inscriptions 
they may, at the earliest, be referred to the transitional period 
of the reigns of Edward VI. and Mary. But it will be most 
convenient to treat of them all under one head, and they are, 
after all, what are technically known as " ancients ;" and as 
their founder was a Canterbury man, William Oldfeild, and 
the bells are a particularly interesting lot, I propose, after 
detailing what little I have been able to find concerning the 
man, to give a full account of each of his works. 

We have no information as to where he learnt his trade. 
His habit of ornamenting his bells shows French proclivities ; 
but this was not unusual among some of the London founders 
of his date, I do not think he can have been an offshoot 
from the Oldfields of the Midland Counties, but it is possible ; 
the name is a common one in many parts of the kingdom, 
and inter alia it is to be found in East Kent, for a Thomas 
Oldfeld was churchwarden at Elham in 1552. 

The first absolute mention of him occurs in the Canterbury 
City Records for 1538, the entry of his admission to citizen- 
ship. 

" 1538. Item the seid Chamberleyn yeldyth accoumptis of the 
" receytis receyved of the Intraunts of six wardcs of the seid Citie as 
" particulerly hereafter appcryth Ncvvyngate, U of Oldefcld, 

" l^cl founder, xvjV/." 



54 Chronological Account. 

In the same year the Chamberlain also takes credit for the 
following : 

" Payd to William Oldfeild, Bclfownder, for putting owte Thomas 
" Bekket from the Commen Scale, and gravying agayn of the same." 

An operation, by the way, which is perfectly evident on the 
City seal to this day. And in the year 1542-3 is an entry 
of a payment to him for "graving of the scochon for 
beggars." 

As to the length of his career I am uncertain ; he was, as 
we find from the parish accounts of Birchington, certainly 
casting in 155 1, and as the average duration of a founder's 
trade-life seems to have been about a quarter of a century, he 
may well have lived into Queen Elizabeth's reign. The 
following entries from the parish registers of St. George, 
Canterbury, probably refer to some members of his family : 

"1558, loth July. Married Richard Trin and Margaret Oldfield, 
" maiden." 

" 1 561, 19th Aprill. Married William Oldfield and Helen Apreys." 

I have quite failed to find his will, either at Canterbury or 
in London. 

I regret very much that I have only been able to find such 
scanty information about him, because he lived at a time of 
which the existing records are fairly abundant. It is a 
curious thing how many of his surname, if not of his family, 
took to bell-founding. For more than a century after his 
date we have them in London, York, and Nottingham, not to 
mention several itinerant ones whose local habitation has 



Chronological Account. 



55 



not been traced. The first of the Nottingham Oldfields 
was his contemporary, and when the history of the Notting- 
ham bell-foundries comes to be written, it is possible some 
connection may be traced between the two. There is, how- 
ever, no similarity in their work as regards lettering and 
ornamentation. 

Now for his bells. They are : 

[ Boughton Aluph 
< Kennington 
V Minster in Thanet 
( Betteshanger 
( Littlebourne 

Bapchild 

Murston 

Westwell 



5th 
5th 
4th 

I St 

2nd 
Single 

I St 

4th 

Similarity of lettering denoted by brackets. That on the 
first three bells is given on Plate IV. That on the next two 
is plain, small, well-formed Lombardic. He is given to the 
use of devices — indeed, the inscription, if it can be so called, 
on the Bapchild bell is, with the exception of the sacred 
monogram, entirely made up of devices. The first four bells 
are certainly pre-Reformation ; the others, I fancy, are " transi- 
tional," as before mentioned. 

The Boughton Aluph bell Is a " Gabriel " bell, i.e., one used 
to ring the morning and evening " Ave " peals upon. It is 
inscribed with the somewhat halting verse — 

:iDTr:i>i<sr3EH B'%sm<2> ^Eimjh^B ^o^(^^{. 



^6 



Chronological Accowit. 



The initial letter of the angel's name is very quaint, and 
will be found at the commencement of the preface to this work. 
There are, of course, no stops between the words, but at the 
end of the legend there is the half-figure of an angel affrontd, 
and on each side thereof Fig. 35, which is more easily drawn 
than described. 




Fig. 35. 

The Kennington bell is similar in its lettering ; the legend 
upon it is : 

Contrary to rule, it has a coin between each word for a stop. 
At the end of the inscription our nondescript friend Fig. 35 
again appears, twice repeated, and between the two a shield 
with the Royal Arms, France and England quarterly. 

Mr. Bryan Faussett states that two other bells (the then 
ist and 2nd) at Kennington bore inscriptions showing they 



C/irojioiocical Account. 



57 



were cast in Catholic times, I think it is very probable that 
they, too, were by William Oldfeild. 

The example at Minster in Thanet is possibly an old " Ave " 
bell. The inscription is unique — 

M<S>J^W OI^B^JFI©^ '^P'MM-'^ :R<Dm ~^^ 

with Fig. 35 as a stop between the words. At the end there 
is the half-figure of an ecclesiastic in surplice with the hands 

clasped in prayer ; and, in addition, the 
founder's trade-mark (Fig. 36). The 
Betteshanger treble, which I have next 
to notice, is a singularly interesting 
bell, the sole survivor of a ring of 
three given to the church at the same 
time by three brothers, as we learn 
from Hasted. Full description of them 
will be found at a later page, under the 
detailed account of the parishes, and need not be repeated 
here. It remains to be noticed that the initial letters of each 
word are slightly larger than the rest, which is not uncommon 
with " later " Lombardic bells. 

The Littlebourne bell has the same lettering as the 
Betteshaneer one, and from the extreme caution of its in- 
scription — 

is probably of transitional date. The initial cross is almost a 
facsimile of Fig. 14, and therefore, I think, unnecessary to be 
engraved here. At the end of the legend is a small shield 




.-8 



ChronoloQ-ical Account. 



with a lion passant, and the impress of a coin ; and below, on 
the waist, is William Oldfeild's trade-stamp (Fig. 36). 

The Bapchild bell, the sole survivor of a ring of tliree, sold 
in the last century to save the farmers' pockets, is most 
interesting. It has upon it the following devices: i. The 
figure of Our Blessed Lord (Fig. 'X,']), with the sacred mono- 
gram ifjC on either side. 2. A shield with the arms of the 
City of Canterbury, but reversed, i.e., the heads pointing the 



I' III'-"" >'" iill "'J''"' 
''"■i'--'>- ll' '// M ,il'' 





Fig. 37. 



Fig. xZ. 



wrong way. 3. The royal arms, as at Kennington. 4. The 
Prince of Wales's feathers, crowned. 5. Oldfield's trade- 
stamp. 6. A curious oval medallion (Fig. 38) of the Annun- 
ciation, with the lily considerably larger than either the 
Blessed Virgin or the Angel. 7. The nondescript Fig. 35, 
with a coin on each side of it. 



CJi7'onological Account. 59 

The Murston bell is uninteresting. It has the if)C, the cross 
as at Littlebourne, a lion passant, and the cross again repeated. 
The Westvvell 4th is somewhat similar. It has the sacred 
monogram twice repeated, with a coin between, and on the 
waist a grotesque figure, the subject or meaning of which is 
far from obvious. It has, apparently, come out imperfect from 
the casting, and so, although I got a good squeeze and a good 
cast therefrom, I cannot quite make out the object. It would 
seem to be an animal with a bird's body and legs, wings, a 
long curled tail, a goat's head, and human arms. Altogether 
a very '' fearful wildfowl." 

One more bell of his remains to be mentioned, and for this 
we are indebted to Mr. Bryan Faussett's notes of 1758. It 
was at the Church of St. Mildred, Canterbury, where, in the 
latter's time, there were five bells, of which only one, the treble 
or second, now remains. The bell now under review was 
then the tenor, and a full account of what the worthy antiquary 
found thereon will be found in the detailed description under 
the head of the parish. The stamp of " Our Saviour figured 
to the waist " which he mentions, was doubtless that on the 
Bapchild bell (Fig. ^j). This and the date 1536 (although 
the last seems somewhat early) prove it, I consider, to have 
been William Oldfeild's work. 

This finishes the pre-Reformation examples in Kent, and 
we now have to deal with the Elizabethan bells, ranging in 
date from 1560 (1575 is the earliest actual date found) to 
1604. They number thirty-eight, to which we may add eight 
recast or replaced recently, and ten more noted by Mr. Bryan 
Faussett, making a total of fifty-six to be noticed. Of these, 

I 2 



6o C/ironoho^ical Accoimt. 

thirty-six are of London make, thirteen are of local manufac- 
ture, four are indeterminable, and the remainder are by 
itinerant founders. I will take the " odds and ends " first, 
then the London bells, and the local ones last, as they form 
the best link with those we shall have to consider when we 
.come to the seventeenth century. 

Indeterminable Bells. — The 2nd at Preston by Faver- 
sham has the motto LOVE GOD and the date 1575. 
The lettering is quaintly ornamented, a kind of compromise 
between Lombardic and Roman. The 2nd at Stodmarsh is 
undated, but is, I think, of this epoch ; the inscription is, 
A BOVE ALL THINGS LOVE GOD; the lettering 
quite plain and of transitional character. The 2nd at Hartlip 
has a long dedicatory inscription, in ordinary Roman capital 
letters, with a diamond-shaped stop between the words, and 
the date 1578. The 4th at Cowden has simply the date 
1584; there are similar examples in Sussex, and they are all 
probably by some Sussex itinerant ; but Mr. Tyssen has not 
succeeded in finding his name, and where he has failed I can 
hardly hope to solve the problem. 

Another Sussex founder did some work in Kent at this 
time as well as in his own county, Hants and Surrey, and his 
bells with the initials A W are well known. He cast bells for 
both Cranbrook and Hawkhurst, as their churchwardens' 
accounts testify, but the bells themselves have long since 
been consigned to the melting-pot. One of his bells survived 
until 1859, however — the tenor at St. Paul's Cray. It was 
dated 1597, and inscribed : 

PRAISE THE LORD 1597. A W 



Chronological Account. 6i 

The parish accounts just mentioned show his name to have 
been Antony Wakefeild ; but there is, as yet, no clue to his 
place of abode. Mr. Tyssen's " Church Bells of Sussex " 
contains mention of other bell-founders of this surname in 
Sussex, and he was doubtless a member of the family and 
certainly very much itinerant. 

John Cole, another itinerant of the latter part of the six- 
teenth century, has left two specimens of his handywork, the 
3rd at Orlestone and the single bell at Shadoxhurst, dated 
respectively 1591 and 1592. Sussex and Hampshire are also 
indebted to him, and at Alresford, in the latter county, he is 
supposed to have lived when at home. He has a weakness 
for reversing his inscription, and for spelling " by " BI. — Vide 
Shadoxhurst, in loco. 

We come now to the London-made bells, and among these 
I will deal first with the treble at Loose, bearing simply the 
initials jj, and the impress of four coins round the same. 
There is a bell at Navestock, in Essex, similarly inscribed ; 
sufficient evidence, I consider, to reckon them both as by a 
London maker. Now Loose is one of the few parishes that 
have preserved their old churchwardens' accounts, and they 
are extant from very nearly the commencement of the seven- 
teenth century. But they contain no mention whatever of 
the casting of this bell, which is reasonable proof that it must 
be earlier. And as there was a London bell-founder in the 
middle of the sixteenth century whose name was John Hard- 
ing ("Surrey Bells," p. 130), I think we may fairly conclude 
the bell to be his. 

The next bell is, so far as is yet known, the sole remain- 



62 



Chronological Account. 




Fig. 



ing example of a London bell- 
founder whose name we have 
known for a long time, one 
Lawrence Wright, whose well- 
designed foundry-stamp is here 
given (Fig. 39) taken from the 
bell now under review, which 
is the 3rd at Thurnham. It 
has the donor's name — in not 
ill-formed black letter with 
rather wonderful old English 
capitals — and the date 1586. 

As this is probably the only occasion when Wright's name 
will come under notice, it may be as well to give here what 
little is known about him. He was employed in the year 1587 
by the authorities of St. Michael's Church, Cornhill, London, to 
recast their great bell, called " Rus," after its donor, William 
Russ, Alderman and Goldsmith, who gave it about 1430. The 
following entry occurs in the vestry minute book, under date 
17th December, 1587 :* 

" agreed yt the bellfownder shall have xiiij^' payd hym now 



" and upon ye lykynge off it here aft y^ pishe will consider off hym 
" better yff y^ bell holld and be betf^ lyked off then it is nowe so 
" moche as his dewe is to be accounted justly and y^ ov''plus is geven 
" hym off benevolenc." 

And we have in the accounts for the year : 



* These entries are from Mr. A. J. Waterlow's " Churchwardens' Accounts 
of St. Michael, Cornhill." 



Chro)iological Account. 63 

" Paide to Lawrence Wrighte belfounder for xxx C & 

xiiijli for newe casting of Rus at vjs ye C ... Ix'' vj^ ix^ * 

" Paide more to hym for C &qrt & xiiij'i of newe mettle 

at vj'^ ye li put into Rus ... ... ... iijH xvij-^ 

" Paide more to hym graunted by a Vestrye ... xvjs iijcl 

Apparently the parish did not like it hereafter, for on the 
loth November, 1588, it was agreed in vestry "that o' bell 
Rus shal be newe cast uppon further advise of the .pishioners," 
Which was duly carried out by Robert Mot, of White- 
chapel. 

Wright's work was evidently cheap and nasty. The price 
of 6s. 8d. per cwt. for recasting is very low for the period, 
and the casting of a bell weighing a ton and a half would 
probably require better appliances than he — evidently a small 
man — had at command ; but he clearly grasped at a big 
order. I am afraid he was hardly so straightforward a 
British tradesman as he should have been. Mr. Tyssen 
found the following curious entries relating to him in the 
Records of the Court of Requests, dated the 34th Eliz. — the 
plaint against him and his reply : 

To the Queens moste excelent majestic. 

In humblewise complayning sheweth unto your excelent 

majestic your subjectes Rowland Rayner Thomas Rayner and 

William Mountsage of Hillingdon in the countie of Midd>^ yomen 

that where about twoo yeres since or more one Lawrence Wrighte 

* There is some error here, probably in transcribing. The price 6s. is 
incorrect, and the amount paid very much too large. I suspect the price 
should be 6s. 8d. ; the sum clearly ought to be ^10 6s. yd. The three 
entries together would then just make up the ^14 voted in vestr). 



64 Chronological Account. 

of London Belfounder did faithfullie promise and undertake to 
and with yo'' said subjects that he woold within shorte time next 
ensuinge the said promise nevve cast and substancially make a 
great bell for your said subjectes and the rest of the parishioners 
there which bell so to be made and hanged up in the bell frame 
att Hillingdon aforsaid in his convenient place emongest fower 
other bells then hanging there shoolde be tuneable and agreable 
with the rest of the said bells and bound himself to your said 
subjects that he woold justlie and trulieperforme the same which 
in troth he never did performe in anie good order but altogether 
contrarie to his said bargaine and agreement made to yo'' said 
subjectes for making of which said bell in manner and forme 
before alleaged your said subjectes became bounde by their 
Deede obligatorie to the said Lawrence w^'^ condicon that they 
would satisfie and paie to the saide Lawrence the full some of so 
much monie as was agreed upon betwixt them for the same in 
manner and forme ensuinge That is to sale wt^in one moneth 
next after that the said Lawrence shoold performe his said 
bargaine and promisse to them made in forme aforesaid one half 
of the said soihe And within six monethes then next after the 
other halfe which some doth plainlie appeare in the condicion 
endorsed upon the said Deede obligatorie which remayneth in 
the custodie of the said Lawrence And forasmuch as the said 
Lawrence hath not in any pointe effectuallie nor justlie per- 
formed his said bargaine and promise yo^' said subjects doth 
forbeare to paie him the said somes of monie as in reason and 
equitie is lawfull for them to do. Nevertheless so it is and it 
may please yo'' Majestic that the said Lawrence of a gredie and 
unconscionable minde hath or meaneth to sue yo'' said subjectes 
upon the said Deede obligatorie intending there gretlie to vex 
troble and charge your said subjectes having no juste cause or 
consideracon so to doo or otherwise maie forbare to putt the 
said bonde in suite till after the death of yo'' said subjectes and 



Chronological Accoiiiil. 65 

then maie vex treble and charge their executors or administra- 
tors or the executors or administrators of anie of them who for 
want of understandinge of the said bargaine shalbe unable to 
defend him in the said suite and so maie be unjustly charged by 
reason thereof contrarie to all right equitie and conscience. In 
consideracon whereof for the avoyding of the perille aforsaid yo"" 
said subjects most humbly beseecheth that it maie please your 
Majestic of your accustomed clemencie to award your most 
gracious writt of Privie Scale to be directed to the said Lawrence 
Wrighte him therbie comaundinge att a certaine dale or time 
therin to be limited personally to apeare before your Majesties 
counsell of yo^ highe Court of Requestes then and there to stand 
to and obey all such order and direction therein conserning the 
bringing in and canselinge of the said bonde as to yo'' Highnes 
said Counsell shall seeme meete and expedient and your said 
subjectes accordinge to their bounden dutie shall daylie praie to 
Almightie God for the long continuance of yo^" Highnes most noble 
and prosperous raigne. 

To which the bell-founder replied : 

The aunswer of Lawrence Wrighte defend to the bill of Com- 
plainte of Rowland Raiyner and Thomas Raiyner and 
William Mountsage complaynnte. 

The said defend, by protestacon not confessinge any matter or 
thinge in the said bill of CompU contayned and materyall to be 
aunswered unto by this defend, to be true in suche manner and 
forme as in and by the said bill of CompU there are surmised yet 
if they were true for asmuche as by the CompU-^ owne shcwinge 
yt dothe manefestly appear that the said Complaynnts maye 
have their sufficient remedy at tlie Conion lavve for the matter 
wherin theyc seeke to be relceved in this most honorable Courte 
if their owne allegacons in that behalfe be true therefore and 

K 



66 Chronological Account. 

for other the defects and ymperfeccons of the said bill this 
defend^ dothe demurre and abide in lavve upon the same for the 
insLifficiencye therof yet nevertheles all the benefitt and advan- 
tage of exception to the insufficiency of the said bill of Compl^ 
to this defend^ at all times hereafter saved then this defend' for 
the better informcinge of this moste honourable Courte of the 
truthe of the matters and poyntes suggested against this defend' 
in and by the said bill of Compl' yf this defendante shall by the 
order and judgement of this moste honorable Courte be forced 
and compelled to make any further or other aunsvver to the said 
byll saith that about fower years paste ther passed speeche and 
comunycacon betwixte this defend' and the said Complaynants 
then parishioners of the said towne of Hyllingdon aboute the newe 
castinge and makeinge of a bell to be hanged upp in the bell 
frame at Hyllingdon aforesaid and in the end this defend' did 
undertake the doeinge thereof and the said Compla'^ did lyke- 
wise undertake and assuer for to paye unto this defend' the some 
of Fortie and seaven pounds to be paied at certaine dales and 
times betwixte them agreed upon and for the better and more 
sure paiement of the said some of fower score and fowerteen 
poundes of lawefuU monye of England neverles w''^ condicon 
therunto annexed or therupon indorsed that if the said compl's 
their executors or assignes or anye of them did satisfie and paie 
unto this defend' or his assignes the said soiTie of seaven and 
Fortie poundes at the daies and times in the said condition 
specified then the said obligacon to be voyd for the better 
expressinge and declaringe of the ctaintie wherof this defend' 
dothe referr himselfe to the condition of the said bonde And 
this defend' became allso bounde to the said Compl'^by obligacon 
in the some of threscore poundes of lyke lawefull monye of 
England to this or the like effecte that wheras this defend' had 
then deliv'ed to the said Compl'"^ one great bell wayeinge twentye 
hundred waighte or theraboutes. 



Chronological Account. 67 

And if ill case it happened that the said bell after the newe 
safe placeinge and hangeinge upp therof in the righte and due 
place wthin the steeple of the parishe Churche of Hyllingdon 
aforesaid shall not be and continue of a true tune good sounde 
and agreable to and with the residue of the bells that then did 
hange in the said steeple or doe not breake or cracke throughe 
defaulte of Workmanshipp by or duringe the space of one yeare 
and a daye then next followeinge if then this defend' his execu- 
tors or assignes at his or their owne proper costes and chardges 
doe not onlye take downe and hange upp the said bell from time 
to time but allso within convenient time and space next after 
notice geven to him or them w'^in the said space of one yeare 
and a daye ymediatly after the nowe next placeinge and hange- 
inge up of the said bell to and with the residue of the said bells 
that then did hange in the said steeple from time to time until 
the said bell shall be and contynue of true sound and agreable 
with the other bells that nowe hange in the said steeple by the 
said space of one yeare and a daye next after the hangeinge up 
of the said bell as aforesaid for the better expressing the cer- 
tainty whereof this def"^ referreth himself to the condicon and 
obligacon aforesaid And this defend' further saiethe that he did 
newe caste and newe make the said bell and hanged the same in 
the said bell frame accordinge to the true intent and meaneinge 
of the contracte and agreement aforesaid and allso accordinge 
to the extent and true meaninge of the condicon of the said 
obligacon. And yet the said Compl's have not sathysfied and 
paied the said some of seaven and fortie poundes or anye parte 
or parcell thereof for the non payment whereof this defend' hathe 
attempted suite upon the said obligacon made unto this defend' 
as aforesaid againste the said Compla'^ at the Comon Lawc and 
the said Compl's have lykewise comcnsed suite against this 
defend' upon the said obligacon of threscore poundes made to 
(? by) this defend' unto the said Comp''^ as aforesaid whcr the 



68 Chronological Account. 

said matter hathe bynne procecuted by the said Compl^s againste 
this defend^ iintill an yssue was thereupon joyned and novve 
restithe to be tried by a jurye of the said Countie of Midd^ And 
without that that ther is anye other matter or thinge materyall 
or eftectuall in the said bill of Complaint menconed or contayned 
and by this deft to be aunswered unto and not herein by this 
defend' sufficiently confessed and avoyded trauersed or denied ys 
true all w^h matters this defend' is reddy to averr and prove as 
this honorable Courte shall awarde and prayethe to be dis- 
missed forthe of this said honorable Courte w''^ his reasonable 
costes and expenses in this behaulfe alreddy wrongefully borne 
and susteined. 

xx"^e clie Aprilis anno Regni R"e Elizabeth &c xxxiiij. 

The issue does not appear, but the two incidents together 
tend to show that Mr. Lawrence Wrieht's "■ commercial 
morality " was not of the most scrupulous kind. 

I pass now to another London bell-founder, Robert Mot, 
the first owner, so far as is known, of the Whitechapel foundry, 
whose trade-stamp is here given (Fig. 40). I have already 
(" Church Bells of Herts ") given my reasons for believing 
that he was a native of East Kent, and the son of one John 
Mott, of Canterbury, who was very busy in 1553 buying up 
hand bells, organ pipes, latten candlesticks, and other loot 
from churches.* The name was and is still an East Kent 
one; I have found it myself recently, and I find it in 
records {"Inquisitions Post Mortem" and other) as early 
as 1392.1 

* "Arch. Cant.," xiv., p. 316, etc. 

t Inquisitions 15 Ric. II., No. 61. " Joh'cs Mot pro Priore and conventu 
ecclie Sancti Grcgorii, extra Cantuar." 



Chronological Account. 



69 



However that may be, he started his foundry somewhere 
about the year 1570, on the north side of High Street, 
Whitechapel, where Tewkesbury Court now is.'" This would 




Fig. 40. 

seem to have been the first extension of the trade from the 
City to the county, quite accounted for by the centrifucral 
force which was then strongly operating in London. He 
carried on the foundry with considerable success until 1606, 
when he sold his business to Joseph Carter, of Reading, and 
he died at the end of March, 1608. I cannot trace where 
he served his apprenticeship and learned his trade, unless it 
was with Thomas Kempe, bell-founder, who was buried at 
St. Botolph's, Aldgate, in August, 1574, the only fact that is 
known concerning him. The period froni 1547 to 1570 must 
have been a " real bad time " for bell-founders. 

* " Church Bells of Sussex,'' p. 35. 



70 Chronological Accotint. 

There are twenty-one bells by Mot still hanging in Kentish 
steeples, and four more which have been recast or replaced 
recently. Worthy Bryan Faussett has also note of nine more ; 
four at Chilham, the 2nd, 3rd, 5th, and 6th, the last being 
evidently a recast of an " Ave " bell, from its having the word 
" Gabrielis " on it. The other five were all at Wye, the 3rd, 
4th, 5th, 6th, and 8th numbers in the ring. 

The four recent disappearances are the 2nd at Ashurst, 6th 
at Hayes, 4th at Lynstead, and 3rd at Staplehurst ; the last, 
however, being sound and whole, has been preserved by 
Messrs. Mears and Stainbank — the present owners of the 
foundry — as a specimen of the handy work of their predecessor. 

The twenty-one are distributed all over the county ; it is 
not worth while to give a list of them here, I think. They 
are mostly inscribed in ill-shaped black letter smalls, with only 
a capital R (in Roman type) for Robert, the surname being 
almost invariably spelt with a small m. The one exception is 
at Biddenden, which has a capital M. This is also a recast, 
for it has " Petris " on it. 

The Fawkham bell is inscribed in queer quasi-Lombardic 
lettering, and has the date (his latest in Kent) 1604. Three 
bells by him at Rainham are very good specimens of his styles 
of lettering; the 2nd, dated 1601, has in the same lettering 
as Fawkham : 

The 6th, dated 1582, has his usual style of lettering. The 

inscription is : 

Robert ntof ma6c mc 

with a quatrefoil stop. 



Chronological Account. y i 

The 3rd, dated same as the 2nd, has a similar inscription, 
but the lettering is very different. It is large genuine 
Lombardic with very handsome ornamentation, specimens 
of which are engraved on Plate XIV. of " Surrey Bells." 
The 3rd bell at Smarden has the same letterino". 

There is a puzzle about this last-named lettering which I 
cannot quite unravel. The stamps were clearly originally 
the property of the Braziers, a bell-founding family in Nor- 
wich of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. How Mot 
got possession of them is, of course, unknown, nor do we 
quite know the date ; but it must have been in or before 
1575, for a bell at Barnes, Surrey, of that date has one of 
the letters, and they are occasionally though rarely used by 
him all through his business career, and they passed from him 
to his successor, Joseph Carter, as we shall see presently. 
The puzzle is this : at the very same time and for many con- 
secutive years, the identical stamps were being used by the 
Watts family at the Leicester F'oundry. Ex 7ino disce omnes. 
I will give the first example I come across (there are very 
many). The 6th, 7th, and 8th at Clifton Beds have this 
lettering, with the date 1590 and the name of William Watts 
as their founder. I take it, the only conclusion possible is that 
there were duplicate sets of these stamps, the only instance I 
know of such a thing. 

It remains to be stated that nearly all Mot's bells bear his 
foundry-stamp figured above. His earliest bell in Kent is 
Bredgar 3rd, 1579; his latest, the single bell at Fawkham, . 
dated 1604. 

I pass now to a pair of local bell-founders, who complete 



72 



CJiJ'onolop'ical Accoiint. 



the account of Elizabethan bells, and, as it were, form a con- 
necting link with the next century, for they both clearly had 
successors, in one case the most important founder of the 
seventeenth century. 

The first of them, Giles Reve, is one whom all my 
endeavours have failed to locate. He left no testamentary 
disposition that I can trace, and no parish accounts that I 
have had the opportunity of examining contain any mention 
of him. His dates, so far as extant examples show, are not 
wide — 1584 to 1592 is the extreme range of them. Nor are 
his bells widely scattered, as will be seen from the following 
list of them. None are known to exist outside the county : 



Boughton Monchelsea 


... 3rd 


Frindsbury 


... 4th 


Hoo St. Werburgh ... 


... 3rd 


Leybourne ... 


... 2nd 


Offham 


... ist 


Snodland 


... 2nd 


Stoke at Hoo 


... 3rd 


Cuxton 


... 2nd 


Shipborne ... 


... 2nd 



Only seven of the nine, however, are now in existence, the 
last two having been recast. His lettering is large sprawling 
Roman capitals, and he is much given to the use of coins, 
medals, grotesque figures of men and animals, etc. The 
Boughton Monchelsea example has a very handsome border 
of fleurs-de-lis above the inscription, and a crowned Tudor 
rose, a well-known Elizabethan emblem, used as a stop 



Chronolof^ical Account. y^ 

between the words. On the Frindsbury bell he spells his 
name REWE. The bells at Hoo St. Werburgh and 
Oftham have an ornamental border differing from that at 
Boughton Monchelsea. The Cuxton bell was remarkable for 
having the surname omitted — the inscription was : 

BY ME GYLLES BELLFOANDER 1589. 

As I have before stated, I cannot trace his place of abode. 
The name is not one peculiar to any especial part of Kent, 
and the only evidence in the matter is the neighbourhood in 
which his bells are found. This seems to indicate the 
northern part of Mid- Kent, and an exhaustive search of the 
parish registers might possibly solve the problem ; for this I 
have no time at my disposal, but I should feel grateful for any 
information on the subject. He may have preceded the 
founder whom I shall mention next, and whose (supposed) 
abode was Ulcombe and Broomfield, but I am doubtful. On 
the one hand they both have a weakness for ornamentation ; 
on the other, their styles of lettering differ very much, 

Thomas Hatch, the bell-founder just alluded to, is very 
sparingly represented in the county ; there are only two of 
his bells left, and one of them is cracked and useless. It is 
the treble at St. Margaret's, Canterbury; the whole bell is the 
treble at Langley. They both bear the same date, 1599. I 
know of two others, the former 3rd at Bearstead and 3rd at 
Lyminge ; this latter on the authority of Mr. Bryan Faussett, 
who affirms its date to have been 1585. There was formerly 
one also by him at St. John's, Margate, according to Lewis, 
who wrote in 1725. 

L 



74 Chronological Accotint. 

Thomas Hatch was the first of a series of three bell- 
founders residing at Ulcombe or Broomfield (it seems to be a 
matter of doubt which), who did a very large business in the 
county, their united dates spreading over nearly eighty years. 
He therefore deserves some notice, more, in fact, than I am 
able to give. His lineal descendant, Mr. James T. Hatch of 
Lenham, tells me that he has been quite unable to trace the 
family tree farther back. I too have taken a good deal of 
trouble in the matter, but with equally ill success. Henry 
Hatch of Faversham, who died in 1533, and was a consider- 
able benefactor to that town, was doubtless a member of the 
family, which I find widely distributed, there being branches 
at Mersham, Sellinge, Smarden, Wormshill, Canterbury, and 
at Yalding, Nettlestead, Birling, and West Mailing, and the 
Christian name Thomas is of frequent occurrence ; but I cannot 
positively connect Thomas the bell-founder with any of 
them. I am inclined, however, to look upon him as more 
likely an offshoot from one of the East Kent branches than 
from those settled upon the upper course of the Medway. 
Further, I am by no means certain that his foundry was at 
Ulcombe, although his successors were certainly established 
there, I confess to a lurking suspicion that he lived in the 
good city of Canterbury. The date of his death is uncer- 
tain ; the "family Bible" gives it as 1599 which is certainly 
wrong, for I find him mentioned in a marriage license dated 
in the latter part of 1600. In this he is stated as of Broom- 
field ; but this may only imply that he had retired there to end 
his days. It will be noticed that no bells of his are dated 
after 1599. 



Chronological Accouitt. 



/ 




Fig. 41. 



Thomas Hatch's lettering is Roman type, of a somewhat 
ornamental character, and he uses the foundry-stamp here 
engraved (Fig. 41). The Langley bell 
has also upon it the bust of a man, with 
rather a shock head of hair. The bell 
at St. Margaret's, Canterbury, has a 
series of stamps upon it ; but, like most 
bells in town steeples, they are so badly 
corroded from the sulphurous atmo- 
sphere as to be hardly made out. The 
Elizabethan crowned rose is most recog- 
nisable, but it is not from the same stamp as the one used by 
Gyles Reve. 

With Thomas Hatch my enumeration of Elizabethan bells 
ends, and we come to the consideration of those cast in the 
seventeenth century, no less than 475 in number, the handy- 
work of some twenty-seven or twenty-eight different founders 
— Metropolitan, local, and itinerant. Of these, local men 
contribute a tale of nearly 300. 

It will be most convenient here to continue the story of the 
Ulcombe foundry, under its next two proprietors, Joseph and 
William successively. It will also be most fitting, as there are 
no less than 155 by the former and twenty-five by the latter 
still existing. 

As I have already stated, we have no positive evidence as 
to the date of Thomas Hatch's death ; but as Joseph Hatch's 
earliest date is 1602, we may fairly suppose it to have been in 
1 60 1. It is to be noted that on one of Joseph's earliest bells 
—the 3rd at Waltham— he uses Thomas Hatch's foundry 



76 Chronological Account. 

stamp, Fig. 41. On all (or very nearly all) his other bells he 
uses a circular stamp with three bells on it. 

During the thirty-seven or thirty-eight years that he was 
founding, in spite of local and Metropolitan competition, he 
did a business which may fairly be described as enormous. 
This is clearly proved by the fact noted above, that in 
spite of the very large amount of recasting that has been done 
in Kent during the last and present centuries, there are still 
155 of his bells in Kentish steeples. 

Of these there are entire rings at Boughton Malherbe, 
Fordwich, High Halden, Waltham, and Wouldham. No 
doubt originally there were many more. He was a shrewd 
man of business ; the entries in the Churchwardens' accounts 
of Cranbrook, to those who can read " between the lines " are 
very clear testimony of this. 

He died, childless and wealthy, in September, 1639, being 
buried at Broomfield on the 1 7th of that month. I give here 
a copy of his will and the nuncupative codicil thereto, as 
follows : 

In the name of God. Amen. The xxix''^ of June 1639. 
This is the last Will and Testament of me Joseph Hatch of the 
Parish of Ulcomb in the County of Kent Bellfounder made in 
my sicknes and weake in body but sound and perfect in my 
remembrance I heartily thanke the Lord God for it First and 
above all things I comend my soule into the Hands of Allmighty 
God hopeing for pardon of all my sinns by the death and passion 
of Jesus Christ and by noe other meanes and my body to the 
earth of which it was made to bee buryed in the Parish Church- 
yard of Bromefeild to bee buryed beside my deare Mother and 
Brothers And as conccrneing that porcon of worldly goods which 



CJu'onological Account. 77 

God of his mercie hath sent I give it as followeth Itm. I give 
and bequeath unto the poore people of the Parish of Bromefeild 
the sume of Foure Pounds of lawful! money of England to bee 
given to them by mine Executor at the day of my buryall and 
my Tennants to have the biggest portion Itm. I give and 
bequeath unto my very loveing Wife Jane Hatch my now Dwell 
house with a little house ioyneing to it And further I give her 
a dwelling house, a wheate mill and a mault mill with the 
appurtences belonging to the said houses and all my lands lying 
and being in Ulcomb dureing her natureall life and after her 
decease I give and bequeath it all unto my Brother Thomas 
Hatch to him and his heires for ever Itm I give and bequeath 
unto my Brother Thomas Hatch my house at Maidstone beside 
the little bridge with the lands belonging to it being now in the 
occupation of John Shunks I give to him and his heires for 
ever Itm I give and bequeath unto the said Thomas my 
Brother more my house and lands with the appurtences belong- 
ing to it lying and being in Hedcorne and being in the occu- 
pation of John Wollett to him and his heires for ever Itm I give 
and bequeath to the said Thomas my Brother more one house 
and orchard lying and beinge in Bromfeild and being in the 
occupation of Daniell Morefoote to him and his heires for ever 
Itm I give and bequeath unto the said Thomas my Brother more 
one house and the lands belonging to it lying and being in 
Bromefeild and being in the occupation of John Mills to him and 
his heires for ever Itm I give unto the poore of the P'ish of 
Bromefeild for ever the sume of Fortie shillings the yeare to bee 
paid to them at two severall payments that is to say xx^ at the 
Nativitie of our Saviour Jesus Christ and xx^ at the Feast of 
Easter to bee paid by my Brother Thomas Hatch and his heires 
for ever Itm I give and bequeath unto my Brother Edward 
Hatch all my houses and lands lyingc and being in Harisham 
with their appurtences belonging to them to him and his heires 



78 Chronological Account. 

for ever Itm I give and bequeath unto him the said Edward my 
Brother one house and orchard and all the lands and appurtences 
belonging to it lying and being in Hedcorne and being in the 
occupation of Goodman Giles to him and his heires for ever 
Itm I give unto him the said Edward my Brother one house with 
a corn and outhouse with the lands belonging to it with an acre 
of meadow land neere Thomas Robins all lying and being in 
Bromefeild and being in the occupation of Thomas Willmott to 
him and his heires for ever Itm I give and bequeath unto him 
the said Edward my Brother one house with three peeces or 
pcells of land belonging to it and being in Bromefeild and in the 
occupation of one Colens to him and his heires for ever Provided 
alwayes that the three other dwellings are to have free way for 
the draweing and carreing away water from the well standing in 
one of the peeces or pcells of land afforesaid Itm I give and 
bequeath unto my Sister Elizabeth the Widow of John Goddard 
all the rents and yearely pfitts of all my houses and lands which 
are within the Citty of Canterbury shee paying the quit rents 
goeing out of it dureing her natureall life and afterwards I give 
and bequeath all the said houses and lands to Thomas Hatch my 
Brother and his heires for ever Itm I give and bequeath to 
my Cosen William Clagett and his Wife 8 ac of land more or 
less lying or being in the Parish of Stapleherst to them dureing 
their natureall lives and after to their heires for ever Itm I give 
and bequeath to Joseph Proud the sonne of Thomas Proud my 
Godsonne the sume of Twentie Pounds to bee paid to him within 
one whole yeare after my decease by mine Executor Itm I give 
and bequeath to Joseph Proud the sonne of Richard Proud my 
Godsonne the sum of Twentie Pounds to bee paid to him within 
one whole yeare after my decease by mine Executor Itm I give 
and bequeath unto John Paul my Cosen the sum of Twentie 
Pounds within Six monthes after my decease if hee bee then 
liveing if not to his heires to be paid by mine Executor Itm I 



Chronological Account. 79 

give and bequeath unto Thomas Gilbird and his Wife the house 
wherein hee now Hveth dureing their natureall Hves and after 
to Joseph Gilbird his Sonne my Godsone and his heires for 
ever Itm I give and bequeath to Joseph Hatch my Godsone 
the Sonne of WilHam Hatch the houses and backsides with fruit 
trees that Edward Christian, Widow Baker and Widow Turle 
dwell in being in Bromefeild to him and his heires for ever only 
the said William Hatch is to have the pfitt of the said houses till 
the said Joseph Hatch comes to the age of 24 yeares Itm I give 
and bequeath to Thomas Taylor the sonne of Thomas Taylor of 
Bromefeild late deceased one house and backside being in the 
occupation of Abraham Coppunt in Bromefeild to him and his 
heires for ever Itm I give and bequeath to William Hatch my 
Servant the sum of Twentie Pounds to bee paid to him within 
one whole yeare after my decease to bee paid by mine Executor" 
Itm I give and bequeath unto John Copper my Cosen the sume 
of Tenn pounds to bee paid by mine Executor All the rest of 
my goods and chattells moveables and household I give and 
bequeath unto my loveing W^ife Jane whome I make and ordaine 
my sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament and I 
make and ordaine my Brother Richard Proud my overseer of 
this my last Will and Testament and for his paines I give and 
bequeath to him the sume of Tenn pounds to be paid to him by 
mine Executor within one whole yeare after my decease In witness 
whereof I have hereunto set to my hand and seal Dated the day 

and yeare above written Joseph Hatch X his Marke 

Read sealed and delivered in the puce of us The Marke of X 

Thomas Willmott The Marke of X Daniell Morefote. 

A Codicill nuncupative to bee added and annexed to the last 
Will and Testament in writeing of Joseph Hatch late of Ulcomb 
in the Countie of Kent Belfounder deceased by him uttered and 
declared on or about the Thirteenth day of September Anno 
Dni 1639 being the very next day before his death hee being 



8o Chronological Account. 

then in perfect minde and memory in these or the like words 
follovveinge viz. He willed and gave to the other three Sonnes 
of his Brother in law Thomas Proud not meconed in his Will in 
writeing Twentie Pounds a peece To John Sonne of John 
Woollett of Hedcorn Twentie Pounds To Edward Hatch his 
Brother Fiftie Pounds besids the Legacies given to him in his 
said Will in writeing To Elizabeth Spice his Wives Sister's 
Daughter Fiftie Pounds And to his Brother in law Thomas 
Proud hee gave a debt of Fiftie Pounds due to him by William 
Glover of Canterbury and Tenn Pounds in money to bee paid 
by his Executrix in sueing for the same debt and for recovery 
thereof At what time there were psent together in hearth of 
all the pmisses Jane Hatch the deceased Testator his Wife and 
Executrix, Thomas Hatch his Brother and William Hatch the 
writer of his Will. Jan Hatch. Thomas Hatch. Wil- 
liam Hatch. 

It will be noticed here that there is no bequest of the 
foundry, unless it be included in the residuary bequest to his 
wife, which I do not think. I am rather of opinion that it had 
already during his life-time been made over with the out- 
standing debts due to it to his nephew and successor, William 
Hatch, who had been his "servant" or foreman for some 
years, as evidenced not only by the mention of him in the will, 
but by the presence of his initials on some of the bells cast in 
Joseph's life- time and bearing the latter's name. There are 
instances at Ashford, Bethersden, Birchington, and Hinxhill, 
under date 1633-4. 

William Hatch's business career was in troubled times — 
those of the Civil War and Cromwell's usurpation. Men were 
too busy with other matters to think of bell-founding, and 



Chronological Account. 8i 

consequently his tale of work is very poor compared with 
Joseph's. His largest lots are the ring of three at Lower 
Halstow (1662), and four at Minster-in-Sheppey (1663). His 
total is twenty-five only. He died in 1664, and with him the 
Ulcombe foundry came to an end. 

There were, however, other bell- foundries in Kent during 
the seventeenth century besides that at Ulcombe, and I pro- 
pose now to pass them under review, and, as nearly as may be, 
in order of date. 

Stephen Swan, the first to be noticed, is, like Gyles Reve, a 
puzzle as to his place of abode. There are only four of his 
bells now in existence : 

Challock ... ... ... ... 3rd 

Darenth ... ,.. ... ... 2nd 

West Peckham ... ... ... 3rd 

Seal ... .. ... •••5th 

There was formerly one (the 3rd) at Shipbourne by him, 
and I think the 2nd at Ashurst is also his work ; it has upon 
it only the donor's UDme, but the date and lettering are to my 
mind fairly sufficient proof. Swan's dates only range from 
1609 to 1 6 14; he uses the plain flat Roman letters, so 
common at this period, and a diamond-shaped stop. The 
West Peckham bell has the Royal Arms and the Prince of 
Wales's Feathers upon the waist ; on the Darenth bell are a 
quantity of coins. 

I have been quite unable to discover where he lived ; I had 
thought at one time that he might have preceded the Wilnars 

M 



82 CJironolooical Account. 



i> ' 



(next to be noticed) in the Borden foundry, but a careful 
examination of the Borden registers fails to confirm my 
idea. The name does not occur in them. It is, however, not 
uncommon in many parts of North Kent, and, no doubt, some 
day will bring a solution of the difficulty. 

The Wilnars of Borden, who follow him closely in point of 
date, were not natives of the place where their foundry was 
situated, for the only notices of them on the registers relate 
to their burial, and that of the widow of one of them. This 
is some slightly corroborative evidence of my opinion that 
they, or at least the elder of them, John, learned the trade 
from Swan. The site of the foundry, which seems to have 
been established about i6t8, is well known, and bell-founder's 
refuse has been dug up on it. 

In spite of the serious competition of the Ulcombe and 
London foundries, John Wilnar had a very good business. 
There are still seventy-two of his bells hanging in Kentish 
steeples, ranging in date from 1618 to 1639. He was buried 
at Borden on the 5th of May, 1640. 

Henry Wilnar, probably a younger brother, succeeded him ; 
but only for a few years, his burial being recorded on 30th 
January, 1644. He is very scantily represented: the 3rd at 
Eastry, dated 1629, and the 4th at Challock, dated 1640, are 
all that remain in Kent. These and another two in Sussex 
are all of his works that I know of A^ 

Two of John Wilnar's bells, the 3rd and 6th at Hartlip, 
have their inscription in black letter ; all the rest are in 
Roman type, of the same kind as Swan's, flat broad letters so 
slightly raised upon the surface of the bell as to be hardly 



Chronological Account. 83 

perceptible to sight or touch, and most difficult to get a 
good rubbing from. Mr. Tyssen's opinion, in which I quite 
concur, is that they were not produced with the ordinary 
stamps, but probably by the use of thin letters cut out of card 
or sheet tin. This is somewhat confirmed by the fact that the 
letters occasionally vary in shape and size. 

With Henry Wilnar the Borden foundry came to an end, 
and we must tramp off to East Kent in search of the next 
local founder, just outside the walls of the City of Canterbury, 
in the parish of St. Dunstan, where John Palmar appears to 
have established himself in or about the year 1636, and 
somewhere about the spot where the South- Eastern Railway 
Station now stands. He and his successors, Thomas the 
elder and Thomas the younger, were largely itinerant in their 
operations, like most of the bell-founders of this century. Their 
lettering is uniformly rough and badly stamped, and their 
spelling equally indifferent. 

There are many entries in the registers of St. Dunstan's 
Church relating to them, and I am much indebted to Mr, J. 
Meadows Cowper for kindly extracting them for me. They 
enable me to make up the following pedigree : 



M 2 



84 



Chronolof^ical Account. 



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Chronological Account. 85 

It is not quite established that Thomas Pahnar I. was the 
son of John Palmar I. He may have been a younger 
brother. John Palmar II., in the entry of his burial, is 
styled bell-founder ; but I know of no bells from his 
hand. 

Where John Palmar came from is uncertain ; there is a 
bell at Sandhurst, Gloucestershire, inscribed — " John Palmar 
made mee 1621 " — which may be his. He was decidedly 
itinerant, but I should hardly think he can have wandered 
from Canterbury to Gloucestershire, and would rather opine 
that he was an offshoot from one of the west county foun- 
dries, and that he cast this bell in his early days before he 
set up his household gods in the Metropolitan City. 

Nine bells of his survive in Kent ; the complete ring of 
four at Ickham, and odd bells at St. Peter's Church, Canter- 
bury, Cooling, Graveney, Littlebourne, and Thanington. His 
earliest date is 1638, and his latest in Kent, 1649; this is (or 
rather was) on the 5th at Staplehurst, lately recast ; but there 
are bells at Wisborough Green and Woodmancote, Sussex, 
dated 1656. There is no entry of his burial in St. Dunstan's 
registers, and it is possible he may have died and been buried 
far away while on a journey. 

There is a specimen of his workmanship in a grocer's shop 
in Canterbury, so Mr. J. Meadows Cowper tells me. It is 
used as a mortar, the crown staple having been chipped or 
filed off. The inscription on it is-"IOHN PALMAR 
MADE MEE FOR MARGRET BALDOCKE 1638." 
Nothing is known of its history, but from its small size (it 
weighs about 84 lbs.) it was probably a Sanctus or Priest's 



So Chronoloziccil Account. 

bell. It may have come from the Church of St. Mary Bred- 
man, whence two bells are missing. 

The 2nd bell at St. r^Iartin's. Canterbury, recast in 1S29, 
bore the inscription — " John Palmar, Thomas Palmar made 
me, 1 64 1 " — and this is the earliest date we have for 
Thomas I. There are seventeen of his bells still in exist- 
ence ; three at Adisham, dated 1670 (his latest), two at St. 
Paul's. Canterbury, and two at Patrixbourne, where a note of 
the recasting by him still exists in the parish books. Single 
examples at Acryse, Blean, Brenzett, St. George Canterbury, 
Crundale, West Farleigh, Harbledown, Minster in Thanet, 
Monkton, and at St. Bartholomew's Hospital. Sandwich, make 
up the tale. 

Thomas II. apparently only cast one bell, the 6th at his 
own Church of St. Dunstan. The date of his death is un- 
known. 

John II., as already stated, has left nothing behind him that 
has survived to the present time. 

A foundr}' existed at St. Mary Cray for some years during 
the last quarter of the seventeenth century, under the manage- 
ment of Christopher Hodson ; but as it was clearly only a 
branch of the Hodson's London foundr}", I will postpone 
dealing with it until I come to the Metropolitan bell- 
founders. 

Three bells, two at Hoath and one at St. Maro^aret at 
Cliffe, with the initials I. C. and the date 1696, are, I think, 
the work of a local founder, probably of Canterbury ; but I 
am unable to do more than advance this idea with regard to 
them. 



Chronological Account. 87 

Before dealing- with the London bell-founders, I will dismiss 

the few examples which Kent has of bells from odd makers — 
itinerant and other — dated in this centun,-. 

John Clarke cast the 2nd bell at Eastr)- in 1609. This 
founder's productions occur in all the home counties (except 
Surrey) and as far northward as Cambridgreshire. He was 
an itinerant whose head-quarters have not yet been traced ; 
but evidence adduced in "Church Bells of Hertfordshire" 
tends to show that he was a native of Datchworth in that 
county, but probably not a resident there. 

Four bells, the treble at St. Paul's Cray and three at West 
Wickham, are from the Chertsey foundry, and cast by Bn,-an 
Eldridore the elder : the ist and ^th at the last-named church 
are dated 1640 — the last year of his life — and bear the motto, 
"Gloria Deo in Excelsis," which he invariably used during 
the last ten \-ear5 of his life. The other two bells are dated 
1624, and have his name only. The lettering is plain dat 
Roman type, like that used by the Wilnars, and produced 
doubtless in the same way. All that is known about this 
foundry will be found in " Surrey Bells, "" p. 109. It existed 
for upwards of a century, and had a large business. The 
Kent bells were probably cast "on the spot," not at 
Chertsey. 

The 2nd bell at Kemsing has (without any date) the initials 
\V. \V., doubdess those of the founder. The only other 
examples I know of are at Funtington and West Hampnett, 
Sussex, both dated 1632. The maker is readily recognisable 
from his habit of placing a quantity of initials on his bells. 
There is little doubt he was an offshoot from the Reading 



88 Chronological Acco^int. 

foundry belong-ing to Joseph Carter, and named William 
Wakefield. (" Church Bells of Sussex," pp. ^^ and 44.) 

John Darbie cast the 2nd bell at Frindsbury and the 3rd 
at Rodmersham in 1656 and 1657 respectively. His head- 
quarters were at Ipswich, but not till later on, according to 
Mr. L'Estrange. He was eminently itinerant all through his 
career. He died in 1686. 

William Hull, of South Mailing, Sussex, cast the 3rd bell 
for Sandhurst in the year 1678. He had been foreman to 
John Hodson, a London bell-founder, and of his works in 
that capacity, due mention will be made later on. He seems 
also to have acted in the same way for other founders — 
Michael Darbie of Southwark in 1674, and James Bartlett of 
Whitechapel in 1683 — but from 1676 to the date of his death 
in 1687, he had a foundry of his own at South Mailing. His 
examples are nearly all in Sussex. 

A charming little specimen of Low Country work is the 
Sanctus bell at Frindsbury, bearing the inscription : 

GERRIT SCHIMMEL ME FECIT DAVENTRIA 

1670 

with a very handsome ornamented border. It is only seven 
and a half inches in diameter, and may have been originally a 
ship's bell. Very little is known here of the Dutch bell- 
founders, although their works are not very uncommon ; but 
I do not think a specimen from a Deventer founder has been 
found before. 

I must not omit to mention here a bell-founder who visited 
the county in 1671, as we learn from the churchwardens' 



ChroJiological Account. 89 

accounts of Cranbrook, who employed him after long negotia- 
tion to recast a bell for them, no longer, however, in exist- 
ence. The founder in question was Francis Foster of 
Salisbury, and the place wliere he set up his furnaces, tem- 
porarily, was Rolvenden ; so far away from his native home, 
that had it not been for the entry in the Cranbrook books, 
no one would ever have suspected his presence in the county, 
or of his having been the author of a bell at Rustington, 
Sussex, with his initials and the date 1671, which was doubt- 
less cast at the same time. 

A bell dated 1653, with the initials I. M., at Allington, I 
cannot place at all. The lettering is quite new to me, and the 
initials unrecognisable as those of any founder. 

We come now to the London bell-foundries. During the 
seventeenth century there were two principal ones ; that in 
Whitechapel, carried on by five successive owners, and that 
owned by the Hodson family for the last half of the century 
in some part of London which has not yet been found out. 
There were, however, also minor men enrap^ed in the trade, 
and I think it will be most convenient to dismiss them first. 

Two bells at Wilmington — the ist and 3rd — are by William 
Land, of Houndsditch, London. The former 4th at Crayford, 
lately recast, was also by him. The bell-founders of this 
name are rather difficult to deal with. In the church goods 
inventories for Surrey, of 1552, a sale of old copper and 
lattyn to " Wylliam Lawnd " is noted as having been made 
in 154S-9 by the churchwardens of Bermondsey. He may 
have been a bell-founder, but there is no further evidence on 
the subject. 

N 



90 Chronological Accottnt. 

Some years later, however, an undoubted bell-founder of 
the name turns up in the eastern counties, in connection with 
Stephen Tonni, of Bury St. Edmunds, and later on with 
Thomas Draper, of Thetford. What connection there was 
between these two, and their later namesake of Houndsditch, 
is unknown — probably they were related. The William with 
whom we are more particularly concerned did some casting 
for Eltham, of which the particulars will be found in the 
extracts from the parish accounts In the third part of this 
book. He died intestate in 1637-8, administration of his 
goods being granted to his relict " Precilla " on March 17th of 
that year. 

William Lambart, another small London founder, has one 
example in the county, the 2nd at Beckenham Parish Church. 
I had thought this his only specimen, but I have lately found 
another in Essex. His workmanship does not appear to have 
been of a high order, if we may judge from the inscription on 
the 4th at Richmond, Surrey : 

Lambert made me Weake not fit to Ring 

But Bartlet amongst the rest did make me Sing. 

But this may be only the gibe of the great bell-founder at the 
little one. I find from the books of the Founders' Company 
that he was admitted to the livery on the 29th July, 161 1. 
In his extreme old aofe he seems to have come to want; in 
the year 1679 his name appears among the " Pentioners/' 
with a payment of 20s., the largest sum in the list ; and then 
he disappears, not unreasonably, for he must have been ninety 
years of age. 



Chrouological Account. 91 

Michael Darbie, of Southwark, but mainly, I think, an 
itinerant founder, has six specimens in Kent : Aylesford 4th 
and 5th, Cooling 3rd, Eynsford 3rd and 4th, and Meo- 
pham 4th, all dated in 1651-2. His name also appears on 
the treble at the last-named church, in connection with Anthony 
Bartlett, of the Whitechapel foundry. Dr. Raven, in the 
" Church Bells of Cambridgeshire," roundly abuses him and 
his works, and adduces excellent reasons for so doing. I am 
afraid that the local tradition at Meopham, which will be found 
under the head of that church, somewhat confirms my good 
friend's unfavourable remarks. His dates range from 1650 to 
1 67 1, and he is supposed to have been a relation, probably 
brother of John Darbie, of Ipswich, already mentioned ; but 
the connection has not been quite clearly made out. 

Swingfield Church has one bell, the solitary survivor of a 
ring of three, all cast by John Wood, in 1696. This founder 
is another of the peripatetics, and one, moreover, migratory as 
to his home, a thing very unusual at that time. The contract 
with him for casting the treble bell at Rochester cathedral, in 
1695, is still preserved, and in it he is described as of Chancery 
Lane, London. There is a similar contract preserved at Ber- 
wick in Sussex, dated 24th October, [698, and there his 
address is given as " the parish of Bishopsgate in the Citty of 
London." In the map of Bishopsgate Ward, in INIaitland's 
History of London a " Bell Yard" is marked on the western 
side of Bishopsgate Street Without, which may possibly mark 
the place of his abode. I know of no bells of his except in 
Kent and Sussex ; but perhaps some may turn up in Essex 
now under systematic examination. 

N 2 



92 Ckrouoloo-ical Account. 

Durini;- the last quarter of the seventeenth century there 
was a bell-foundry in London owned by two men of the name 
of Wightman, as to the situation of which I am completely at 
fault at present. They were probably brothers, named re- 
spectively William and Philip. There are no bells in Kent 
by the elder, or by the two jointly ; but Philip is fairly repre- 
sented. Five bells (out of six) at Yalding ; six (out of eight) 
at Dartford ; half the ring at Gillingham, and an odd bell at 
Nettlestead, make up a total of sixteen. No doubt the entire 
rings at Yalding and Dartford were by him. The Dartford 
bells are dated i 702, and so in strictness belong to the next 
century, but are mentioned here for convenience' sake. Wil- 
liam Wightman was made free of the Founders' Company on 
7th P^ebruary, 1686, and appears on the books for some few 
years. He is stated to have been the Royal bell-founder. 

Having disposed of the odds and ends, I next propose to 
take up the history of the Whitechapel foundry, which, at the 
commencement of the century, as already detailed, was in the 
hands of its probable first possessor, Robert Mot. He, in 
1606, sold the business to Joseph Carter, bell-founder of 
Reading, who did not, however, migrate personally, but sent 
his son William to London to manage for him, he being then 
evidently advanced in years. 

Joseph Carter is represented in Kent sparsely but well. 
There are only three bells which bear his name, but they are 
bells of which any founder might be proud — three of the 
finest bells in the county — the ist, 2nd, and 3rd at Wittersham, 
measuring thirty-four, thirty-six, and thirty-nine and a half 
inches respectively. The two smaller have only the maker's 




Chronological Account. 93 

name, and the date 1609 in the large handsome lettering 
before alluded to in connection with Robert Mot. The larger 
bell has the same, and in addition the donor's names incised 
below ; it bears also this mark scratched on 
waist (Fig. 42), which I take to be a sign 
that it was actually moulded by Thomas 
Bartlett, who was foreman to the Carters in 
London, and who eventually succeeded to 
the business. I have seen it on a bell in 
Hertfordshire (Shenley 2nd), stamped, not 
^^" 42- scratched, and with the initials T B, and 

dated 16 16, while the foundry was still in the Carters' hands. 
These bells were, without doubt, cast in London, and sent 
round in a coasting vessel to Rye, whence their transit would 
be easy except for the last steep ascent to Wittersham. The 
oxen must have had a heavy drag. 

Joseph Carter died early in 16 10, his will being proved in 
April of that year. The Reading foundry passed to his son- 
in-law, William Yare, that in London to his son, William 
Carter. Three bells bearing the latter's name still exist in 
Kent, the single bell at Halstead (the sole survivor of a peal 
of five, all by him and dated 1612), Southlleet 3rd (16 10), and 
Stourmouth 3rd (16 15). The first two of these have Thomas 
Bartlett's "private mark." The inscriptions on the last two 
are in the Lombardic lettering before described, at page 71. 
The Halstead bell has black letter with a record of the 
donor's pious gift to God and His Church. 

The exact date of William Carter's death is not known, but 
Mr. Tyssen states that Thomas Bardett succeeded to the 



94 



CJironoloncal Account. 



business in 1619, and he and his descendants carried it on 
until exactly the close of the century. Thomas Bartlett's 
dates range from 16 19 to 1647, but there is nothing in Kent 
later than 1629. It is quite evident that the local foundries 
at Ulcombe and Borden practically drove the London men 
out of the field. His nine examples are at Beckenham, Nos. 
3, 4, 5, and 6 ; Sholdon, Nos. i and 3 ; Otford, treble ; 
Sundridge, 4th, and Keston, singleton. Seven of them, it 
will be noticed, pretty close to the Metropolis. His lettering 
is square ordinary Roman type. He uses the foundry-stamp 
Fig. 43, clearly adapted from Robert Mot's. 




Fig. 43. 

It is rather a singular circumstance that contemporaneously 
with Thomas Bartlett of London there was another bell- 
founder of the same name at Durham, who was buried at the 
church of St. Mary-le-bow on February 3rd, 1632. I know 



Chronological Account. 95 

nothing of this last founder except the above fact of his 
burial ; but I suppose his works still survive in the North 
Country. 

Anthony Bartlett, who succeeded his father, Thomas, at 
Whitechapel, seems to have been equally hampered in Kentish 
work, not only by the Hatches, but also by the rival London 
foundry owned by the Hodsons, who, for some reason, at 
present unknown, cultivated the county of Kent largely. 
There are only seven of Anthony's bells left in Kentish 
steeples ; but to them may fairly be added three lately recast. 
The ten are — four at Queenborough, two at Aylesford (one 
recast), and one each at Meopham, Murston (not in situ)^ 
River and Snodland, these last two having been recast. His 
dates range from 1650 to 1673. The Meopham bell (treble), 
dated in the former year, has, in addition to his name, that of 
Michael Darbie before mentioned. I take it that the latter, 
going or being on the tramp, was commissioned by Bartlett to 
carry out the contract made by him for casting or recasting 
the bell. I know of no other instance of any business con- 
nection between the two. Anthony Bartlett had five children, 
three daughters and two sons, James and Thomas ; the 
former succeeded him at the bell-foundry, the latter went into 
a cognate line of business, that of the simple founder.* The 
books of the Founders' Company record his apprenticeship to 
Edward Swayne for eight years, from 22nd February, 1660. 

* Founders and bell-founders must not be confused ; the former were 
congregated in and about Lothbury ; the latter inside and outside Aldgate. 
Thomas Bartlett (the elder), carrying on business outside the City, did not 
need to, and probably did not, belong to any of the City Companies, certainly 
not to the Founders. 



96 



Chronological Accoiint. 



James Bartlett succeeded to the Whitechapel business in 
1676, and carried it on till the close of the century, dying in 
Januar)\ 1701. He had less opposition than his two pre- 
decessors, and is consequently much better represented. The 
Ulcombe foundry had come to an end before his day, and the 
Hodsons' foundry — at all events in his later days — was 
evidently on the wane. 




Fig. 44. 



James Bartlett was a member of the Founders' Company ; 
I cannot find the entry of his first admission, but he served 
the offices of under warden in [691-2, auditor in 1693-4, 
and upper warden 1695-6. The last entry concerning him is 
in 1698, when he paid a fine for not serving as master in his 
turn. The fine is only a small one (^4), so that he probably 
had good reasons for declining the honour, probably old age 
or ill-health, or both. His foundry-stamp is Fig. 44. 



Chronological Account. 97 

There is a complete ring of five by him at Milton by Sittin^r. 
boiirne ; Hadlow and Sittingbourne have six each, to which 
two smaller bells have since been added ; East Mailing has 
five, with also a later treble added or recast. Odd bells at 
BoLighton Monchelsea, Bredgar, Lenham, West Mailing, St. 
Nicholas, Rochester, and Wychling make his lot up to twenty- 
eight. Dates range from 1681 to 1700. He died without 
issue and intestate ; the foundry passed into other hands, as we 
shall see when the bells of the eighteenth century come under 
notice. 

I have now only the Hodsons' foundry to deal with to 
complete the bells of the seventeenth century ; and it is a 
matter of sincere regret to me that I can say so little about 
them, nearly the whole of my information being derived from 
the bells themselves. John Hodson appears to have com- 
menced business in or before 1654, and from that date until 
1667, most of his bells bear the initials of his foreman, William 
Hull, whom I have already mentioned. In 1669 the 3rd at 
West Wickham has the initials both of William Hull and 
Christopher Hodson, indicating that the latter, presumably 
John's son, was coming to the fore. William Hull's initials 
thenceforward disappear altogether, and Christopher's take 
their place until 1676. Four examples, all cast in 1677, 
state that they are by "John and Christopher Hodson ;" and 
then the business appears to have been split up, John remain- 
ing in London, and Christopher starting a branch or indepen- 
dent business at St. Mary Cray. This lasted until 16S7, and 
during this period, as may well be expected, the bulk of the 
business bears Christopher's name alone, there being twenty- 

o 



g8 Chronoloo-ical Account. 

six of his bells as against sixteen which purport to be by 
John. After 1687, Christopher's name disappears, and we 
have John Hodson by himself until 1693. There are, how- 
ever, only five bells which belong to this last category. I am 
not at all sure, considering the wide interval of time between 
John Hodson's earliest date, 1654, and his latest, 1693, that 
there w^re not two of the name. 

John Hodson's bells in the first or "William Hull" stage 
number twenty-three. They include Nos. 3, 4 and 5 at St. 
Mary Cray, dated 1655, the largest of which alone bears 
Hull's initials ; Nos. i, 3 and 4 at Farningham ; an entire ring 
of five at Milton by Gravesend (to which a treble has been 
since added), the present Nos. 2 and 4 of which {i.e., the old 
Nos. I and 3) are by William Hull ; two bells at Seal, two at 
Cudham, and two at Sundridge, and half-a-dozen odd ones at 
as many different places. 

His examples in the second stage, with the initials C. H., 
are twenty-nine in number. Three entire rings of five each 
at Chelsfield (1672), Hailing (1675), and Woodnesborough 
(1676), make up more than one half of these. For the rest 
there are two at Eynsford, and two at High Halstow, and ten 
odd bells. 

Third stage, " John and Christopher Hodson," number only 
four, as already stated. They are — West Mailing 3rd, 
Meopham 2nd and 3rd, and Pembury 2nd. 

The (presumably) London-cast bells, while the St. Mary 
Cray foundry was in existence, are sixteen : four each at 
Alkham (1683), Appledore (1685), and Brookland (1685), two 
at Staple, and one each at Nonington and Buckland by Dover. 



Chronological Account. 99 

The five bells belonging to John Hodson's " last stage of 
all," are at St. Alphege, Canterbury, St, Nicholas at Wade, 
Lydd, Marden, and Shoreham. 

The site of the foundry at St. Mary Cray is still tradition- 
ally known. It was in the High Street, on or about the spot 
where the blacksmith's forge now stands under the chestnut 
tree at the foot of the hill on which the vicarage is built. 
Entries in the parish registers show that it was certainly 
established in 1677, for on the ist October in that year, the 
baptism of " Christopher, the sonne of Christopher Hodgson" 
{sic), is recorded. The only other entries are the burials of 
" Hugh, son of Mr. Xtopher Hodson," on the i6th May, 
1679; and "Susan Smythe, y*" daughter of Mr. Ch'- Hodg- 
son," on 20th May, 1687. I am much indebted to the Rev. 
Andrew Welch and his son, Mr. Stanley B. Welch, for the 
above particulars. 

The bells cast by Christopher Hodson during his residence 
here, and which now exist, are twenty-six in number. They 
include two entire rings of five each at St. Leonard's, Deal 
(16S5), and Godmersham (1687), and one of three at Dym- 
church (1685), three bells at Plumstead, and two at St. Luke's, 
Charlton. Eight odd bells at various places make up the 
total. No doubt at one time there were a good many more. 
For instance, the bell cast by him at Rochester Cathedral has 
been recast. The last and present centuries have seen a very 
large amount of recasting and remodelling of rings in Kent. 

The Hodsons' lettering is large square sturdy Roman type, 
with a somewhat profuse use of stops and coins. The)' had 
also a weakness for double-lined inscriptions, which involve a 



lOO C/ironoioo-ical Account 



<b 



considerable amount of extra labour to " rub." They must 
have done a very good trade-in their time, for there is scarcely 
a county in southern England which does not contain some 
specimens of their workmanship. 

This finishes the bells of the seventeenth century. There 
are, however, a few founders whose business career belongs 
partly to that and partly to the following century, although 
their Kent examples all date later than 1700, and I will deal 
with them next. 

Matthew Bagley, the son of John Bagley, of Chacombe, 
Northants, was baptized 6th April, 1653, and served his time 
with his uncle, Henry Bagley, a well-known bell-founder, and 
continued there until the year 1685 or thereabouts, when 
he came to London. Probably, after his uncle's death in 
1684, he could not get on with his cousin, Henry Bagley the 
younger, who continued the business at Chacombe. Anyhow, 
to London he came, and established himself on Windmill Hill 
in that part of the parish of St. Giles, Cripplegate, which lies 
outside the City of London, and which was constituted a 
separate parish under the dedication of St. Luke early in the 
eighteenth century. The Wesleyan Tabernacle now occupies 
the site of his works. Beesley's '' History of Banbury " men- 
tions a local tradition that he left Chacombe " in consequence 
of the loss occasioned by the bursting of his mould while cast- 
ing a bell ;" and that he, it appears, went to Woolwich, and 
there lost his life while " proving a piece of ordnance." 

Tradition here is " a little mixed." The tragic affair in 
which Matthew Bagley and his son lost their lives has been, 
I think, split up into two separate events. 



CJironolooicai Account. lOl 

In the books of the Founders' Company from 1686 till 171 5 
I find his name entered in a list of men " Free of other Com- 
panies." He was doubtless paying an annual fee to the 
company for the privilege of binding his apprentices at 
Founders' Hall, as I find him doing in 1688. His principal 
business seems, however, to have been casting ordnance 
rather than bells, and his contract work for this with Govern- 
ment appears to have been large. In the MSS. of Captain 
Stewart, of Alltyrodyn-Llandyssil, under date 1715-16, are 
" several orders to Mr. Bagley to cast and deliver to the office 
of Ordnance divers brass works." * 

And it was in carrying out this work that he met with his 
dreadful end. There is an account of it in the Flying 
Post of Saturday, 12th May, 1716, as follows : 

" Last Thursday night about 9 aclock a tragical accident hap- 
" pened at the Royal Foundry near Upper Moorfields where 
" while the workmen were casting a Canon the metal that was 
" running into the mould flew up on a sudden with very great 
" noise and violence and came down like Drops of Fire not only 
" upon all the workmen but Spectators (of whom there was a 
" great Number to see the performance). Several attended from 
" the Tower particularly Mr. Hall Clerk of the Ordinance who 
" was so sorely wounded that he dy'd next morning. The Master 
" Founder and his son with above 20 others were also very much 
" hurt. Tis generally agreed that this sad accident was owing to 
" the dampness of the Mould." 

The Weekly /ottrnal or British Gazetteer, in a similar 
account, states that " Bagley the Master Founder has lost 

* "Tenth Report H. M. Historical MSS. Com." Fourth appendix, p. 142. 



I02 Chronological Account. 

his Eyes and his son and sixteen others are desperately- 
wounded." 

The lamentable sequel is tersely summed up in the follow- 
ing entries in the burial registers of St. Giles, Cripplegate : 

1 716, May 22, Mathew Bagley. founder — Kill'd. 
„ „ 26, Mathew Bagley, Jun., founder — KilTd. 

He died intestate, administration of his goods being granted 
to his widow Julia in the following year. 

His bells in Kent (or anywhere else) are not numerous. 
A complete ring of five at Northbourne, dated 1711, the 
treble at Addington, 4th at Goodnestone by Sandwich, and 
the 3rd at Old Romney make up the total. The Addington 
bell is very noteworthy for the praiseworthy but ludicrous 
attempt he has made to reproduce the inscription on the 
bell which it replaced. The original legend ran 

CRISTVS PERPETVE DET NOBIS GAVDIA 

VITE 

which from Inability to decipher the Lombardic letters he has 
made into 

ARISTVS PARPATVA DA NOBIS TAVDIX 

VITA. 

Matthew Bagley had another son, hight James, who cast 
the 4th bell for Rochester Cathedral in 1710, and his 
guarantee of this " for a year and a day," on behalf of his 
father, is still preserved among the muniments of the Dean 
and Chapter. 



Chronological Account. 103 

There is a bell by James Bagley at Woodmansterne, Surrey, 
dated 171 7, so he would seem to have gone on for a time 
after his father's death ; but the two just noticed are all the 
productions of his that I know of 

Isaac Hadley was Matthew's contemporary. He was ad- 
mitted to the livery of the Founders' Company and fined for 
steward, 4th May, 1685, and his name appears regularly in 
the quarterage lists until 1705, when it disappears, probably 
through his failure to pay. Eleven years later, on the 6th 
August, 1 716, the minute book records that 

" Mr. Isaac Hadley petitioning the Compy to have his Livery 
" ffine return'd being reduced. The Ct returned him Six pounds 
" accordingly and tooke his Receipt and consent to bee struck 
" out of the Livery for the future." 

I find him binding apprentices at the Hall in 1685, 1687 
and 1 69 1. 

There are three bells bearing his name in Kent, and none 
elsewhere that I know of ; the three are the two bells at 
Higham (old church), and the solitary bell at Kingsdown by 
Wrotham, all dated 1713. I suspect, however, that he had a 
hand in casting the peal of eight for St. Nicholas, Deptford, in 
1 701-2, the 7th of which has the initials S N I H. The 
former pair certainly standing for Samuel Newton, as the 
latter do, I think, for Isaac Hadley. 

Samuel Newton's foundry was, like Bagley's, in the parish 
of St. Giles, Cripplegate, and the site of it is denoted by a 
court called Founder's Court, on the south side of Fore Street, 
a litde westward from Aldermanbury postern. It is marked 
in old Ward maps, but recent rebuilding has obliterated all 



I04 Chronological Account. 

trace of it. He, too, was a member of the Founders' Com- 
pany, made free gth February, 1690, admitted on the livery 
in 1693-4, served under warden, 1706-7, and was elected 
assistant in the same year; was upper warden, 1709-10, and 
master in the following year. He died some time in the 
early part of 1716, between February and May, intestate, 
administration being granted to his widow Deborah in June, 
I 716. He left a son John, who was apprenticed to him, and 
took up his freedom in October, 1722, but with whom, as he 
was not a bell-founder, we have nothing to do. Besides the 
ring at St. Nicholas, Deptford, there is only one other 
bell of Samuel's left in Kent, the 3rd at West Farleigh, which 
is inscribed 

SAM NEWTON & I PEELE MADE MEE 1705. 

There is a bell by him at Kingsbury, Middlesex, and 
another at Totteridge, in Herts, bearing his name alone. Of 
two bells at Rettenden, Essex, one (the 4th) has a similar 
inscription to the West Farleigh bell, the other (the 3rd) has 
I P FECIT only ; both are dated 1704. 

John Peele, whose name we find associated with Newton's, 
was his apprentice, bound to him for eight years, from 5th 
F'ebruary, 1693-4. He was the son of Samuel Peele " Latt 
of Bishopsgatt silkman deceased." Being out of his time, he 
took up his freedom on 8th May, 1704, and was admitted to 
the livery of the Founders' Company in 1705-6. He steadily 
rose, served under and upper warden in due course, and in 
I 72 1 was elected master. There are no other bells by him 
than have been already noted ; but Mr. Bryan Faussett states 



Chronological Account. 105 

that the then peal of five heavy bells at Aldington were by 
him, and dated 1705. The connection of his name with 
Samuel Newton's does not necessarily denote a partnership, 
as will be readily gathered from the many instances already 
mentioned of founder's and foreman's names being found 
together ; but in this case I think the two were in actual 
partnership. Peele was still living in 1752, having left the 
court of the Founders' Company six years before. He had 
evidently fallen on evil days, for in May, 1752, he petitioned 
the court for relief, which was, of course, given, and repeated 
in later years. Three years later his widow applied for and 
obtained like assistance. 

There is a bell (the only one) at Plaxtol, bearing the name 
of William Furner. I cannot trace him as a bell-founder ; if 
he were, he was probably a local genius ; but I think him 
more likely to have been the donor of the bell in question. 
The date is 1 709. There is a trace of him in the Bethersden 
churchwardens' accounts for 1736. 

William Savill, a London man and a member of the 
Founders' Company, cast the single bell at Belvedere in 
1757. His foundry was somewhere in the Minories. There 
are bells by him at St. David's Cathedral and St. Alphcge, 
in the City of London. He served his apprenticeship 
with Joseph Mayor and Wm. Weare, took up his freedom 
in the Founders' Company in 1765, was liveryman in 
1772, under warden 1795, assistant 1796, upper warden 
1797, and master in 1799, and that is all that I know about 
him. 

John Waylett, an itinerant founder with a (supposed) home 

p 



io6 Ch7'onoloo;ical Accoiuit. 

in London, is well represented in Kent from 171 7 to 1727. 
At one part of his career he was certainly travelling for 
Samuel Knight, of Holborn, whom I shall notice by-and-by. 
This was the case in 1721, when he had his furnaces going at 
Hythe, and cast there, inteTf alia, three bells for Stowting. The 
contract for this is still preserved in the parish chest, and will 
be found printed at full length in the third part of this book. 
The contract (which is for a new bell-frame as well as for 
recasting the ring of four bells) is made with Job Potter of 
Leeds, evidently the bell-hanger, and, so far as the recasting 
goes, was carried out by John Waylett for account of Samuel 
Knight, as the inscriptions on the bells themselves tell us. 
Ruckinge, and Elmstead too, both possess bells cast in the 
same year and in the same way. 

Warehorne and Saltwood have some bells also apparently 
cast during this journey, but there is no mention of Knight's 
having anything to do with them. It is possible that the 
orders for Elmstead, Stowting, and Ruckinge were " devilled ;" 
but on the other hand, Waylett was certainly casting for 
Knight in Hertfordshire in 1716. 

Waylett's most important works are a ring of six at 
Hunton, three at Linton, and three at Ash by Sevenoaks, all 
dated 171 7. Five at East Sutton, dated 1719-20. Hythe 
formerly had five by him, cast In 1720. His latest work Is 
the 6th at Bough ton Monchelsea, dated 1727. Altogether 
he has somewhere between forty and fifty specimens In the 
county. He was a hard-working man, his bells being fairly 
abundant all over the home counties, and his workmanship, 
though rough, is honest and good. He appears to have been 



Chroi'oloo'ical Account. lo! 



■-.b 



a native of the eastern counties, and probably learned his 
trade at Sudbury, Suffolk, with John Thornton.* 

From founders other than Londoners during this century 
we have a very few. The 6th at Hoo St. Werburgh is by 
Thomas Gardiner, of Sudbury, Suffolk, whose works are 
found in abundance all over the eastern counties, with dates 
varying from 171 1 to 1759. Very little is known of the 
Sudbury foundry, but when Dr. Raven's long promised 
" Church Bells of Suffolk " appears, we shall doubtless learn 
all about them. It is rather a curious coincidence that while 
Hoo St. Werburgh has the sole example in Kent from an 
eastern counties' founder, the church of Hadleigh, in Essex, 
exactly on the opposite side of the river Thames, has an 
equally unique example from a Kentish founder — a "Wilnar" 
bell. 

The entire peal of six at Mereworth, dated 1746, is the 
work of Joseph Eayre, of St. Neots. He was the son of 
Thomas Eayre, of Kettering, Northants, and started the St. 
Neots foundry some time between 1731 and 1735, putting up 
a large brick building in the shape of a bell. Mr. North's 
" Church Bells of Northants " contains all that is known re- 
specting him, his belongings and successors, to which I beg to 
refer the reader. 

I have already mentioned Samuel Knight, of Holborn, in 

* In the minute-book of the Founders' Company, under date 1740, I find 
it " ordered that Mr. Waylett and Mr. Robert Cattilin, Founders, be admitted 
Love Brothers " (Honorary Members). And in 1742 William Waylett (else- 
where described as Citizen and \intner) was sworn in and admitted. Probably 
we have here a son of John Waylett, but I do not know him as a /'(•//-founder. 

V 2 



io8 Chronological Account. 

connection with John Waylett. He was the last of a family 
of bell-founders, who for the best part of two centuries had 
been carrying on business at Reading ; the first of them pro- 
bably migrated from London about the middle of the six- 
teenth century, and the last found his way back there, 
according to Mr. Tyssen, about 1710. I am rather inclined 
to place it some few years later, as his early Sussex examples 
may well have been cast at Reading or whilst he was still 
residing there. There is nothing in Kent of his earlier than 
1 72 1, and these earliest ones were cast for him by John 
Waylett as already detailed. His bells are exceedingly 
roughly cast, and equally sweet in tone, as everyone who has 
heard the ring at St. Saviour's, Southwark, will agree. It is, 
therefore, not surprising to find that Kent possesses between 
eighty and ninety bells cast by him. Of these the most im- 
portant are — seven of the ring of ten at Canterbury Cathedral, 
dated 1726 to 1728. An entire ring of eight at St. Mary's, 
Dover (1724-5) ; rings of six at Chislett (1729, part recast), 
Hollingbourne (1723), Whitstable (1730), and Wickham 
Breaux (1728) ; of five each at Kingsnorth, Newington by 
Hythe and Sellinge (at this last the tenor has been recast). 
Birchington and Little Chart have four each, Horsmonden and 
Stowting three each, and some nineteen or twenty odd bells 
at various other places complete his lot. He died in 1739, 
and was succeeded in his business by Robert Catlin, who had 
previously been a bell-hanger, doubtless working in connec- 
tion with Knight. He was elected a " love brother" of the 
Founders' Company, 1740 (see p. 107), but there is no record 
as to whether he was ever sworn in as such. 



Chronological Account. 109 

CatHn's bells range in date from 1740 to 1751, and number 
about fifty. There are only two entire peals, viz., Lympne 
five, dated 1742-4, and Teynham six, dated 1743. Faver- 
sham and Hackington have each six out of a total of eight, 
and Leeds six out of a total of ten. Three of the rings at 
Lenham, St. Peter's, and Swanscombe are also by him, and 
there are thirteen odd bells at other churches. 

Catlin was succeeded in the Holborn foundry by Thomas 
Swain, who, however, did very little business in Kent ; two 
bells at St. George's, Gravesend, and one at St. Peter's, being 
all I have found. He retired from business in 1 781, and with 
him this foundry came to an end. I have been unable to 
identify the part of St. Andrew's parish where it was situated, 
but I think it must have been in Shoe Lane. 

I will now trace the fortunes of the Whitechapel foundry 
through the eighteenth century. It will be remembered that 
at my last mention of it, it was in the hands of James 
Bartlett. After his death in 1701 it passed to Richard 
Phelps, who was, according to Mr. Lukis, a native of Ave- 
bury, Wilts. Where he learned his trade it is impossible to 
say. There is a bell at Kempley, in Gloucestershire, which 
bears the name of Thomas Felps, apparently the founder 
thereof in 1680 ; but it is a unique specimen, and I am afraid 
the foundation (no joke intended) is too narrow to build a 
theory upon as to Richard Phelps's paternity. 

As there is a bell at Durham by him dated 1700, it is 
possible he was casting before he took to the Whitechapel 
foundry ; but on the other hand he may have been working 
for James Bartlett, who was in bad health the last few years 



iio CJironolozical Account 



^ 



of his life, as appears from his electing to be fined rather 
than serve as master of the Founders' Company. Richard 
Phelps's occupancy of the Whitechapel foundry very speedily 
revived what was apparently a declining business ; and during 
the whole of his career, 1701 to 1738, he was, I think, in spite 
of Knight's opposition, certainly the principal founder in 
London, probably in the kingdom. 

There are just upon ninety specimens of his handiwork in 
Kentish steeples ; for the most part odd bells, although there 
are some few entire rings. Such are Wingham eight, dated 
1720 ; and its neighbouring parish of Preston with five, dated 
1712 ; and Hever, whose five are dated 1703. St. Alphege, 
Greenwich, has only five left of its original peal of eight, and 
St. George's, Gravesend, only three out of a similar number. 
Eastlinof has five left out of six. Of odd bells Biddenden has 
two and a sanctus, Goudhurst three, Headcorn three, and 
Southfleet three. There are two each at Benenden, Brenchley, 
Chevening, Elmstone, Erith, Lenham, and Wormshill. His 
earliest is the Burham treble (1700), and latest Gillingham 

3rd (1737)- 

Phelps died in August, 1738, and by his will bequeathed 
the foundry, with all its appliances, to his foreman, Thomas 
Lester, who removed it, however, to a fresh site on the oppo- 
site or southern side of High Street, Whitechapel, where it 
has remained ever since. He was a scion of a family of 
decided tastes for founding, for there are Lesters on the 
books of the Founders' Company for nearly two centuries 
before his time. In 1672, Thomas Lester, the son of Thomas 
Lester, of Newbury, Berks, )eoman, was bound apprentice 



Chronological AccotinL 1 1 1 

for seven years to Thomas Holmes. He took up his 
freedom in due course, but never attained to office, and died 
in 1723. 

I have little doubt that Thomas Lester, the bell-founder, 
was a relation. He is described as the son of William 
Lester, late of Bricksworth, Northants, farmer, deceased. 
He was admitted " by redemption," and so it is uncertain 
where he learned his trade, probably with Phelps, who was, 
so far as I know, not a member of any Company. His 
business was outside the City, and it was not necessary. It 
was not until 1743, some years after acquiring the ownership 
of the business, that Lester joined the Company. He was 
elected to the livery in 1 744, and became a member of the court 
in 1750. In 1766 he paid fine rather than serve as warden. 

There are only twenty bells in Kent which bear his name. 
The ring of eight at Harrietsham is his principal achievement. 
There are two each at Birling, Linton, and Marden, and half 
a dozen other " odd " ones. 

In 1752 he took into partnership Thomas Pack, who, like 
himself, had previously been foreman in the concern. He too 
was a founder by descent, son or grandson of Thomas Pack, 
who was son of Thomas Pack, of Ockham, Surrey, yeoman, 
and was apprenticed to Roger Lane in 1671, and died in 
1732. 

Lester and Pack are well represented In Kent ; Wrotham 
has a ring of eight of theirs, Petham and Selling each one of 
six. Great Chart, Chilham, Erith, and Hothfield have each 
four, and there are forty-three others scattered over the 
county. 



1 1 2 Chro7W logical Account. 

Lester died in 1769, providing by his will that his nephew, 
William Chapman, was to be taken into partnership. He 
had previously been employed at the foundry, and the clock 
bell at Canterbury Cathedral, " Great Dunstan," the largest 
bell in the county, dated 1762, bears an inscription that it was 
moulded by William Chapman. Lester's wishes were, of 
course, carried out, and those bells which were in hand at 
the time of his death are inscribed '' Lester, Pack, and Chap- 
man." Such are the 2nd at Willesborough and the (former) 
6th at Tenterden. 

The firm then became " Pack and Chapman " only, and 
their Kentish connection remained as good as ever until 
Pack's death from consumption in 1781, From them we 
have entire peals at Aldington, Boughton under Blean, 
Folkestone (since recast), Sevenoaks, Throwley, Tunbridge, 
and Wye. Eight-and-twenty odd bells make up their tale. 

William Chapman carried on the business alone for but a 
very short time after Pack's death. The 5th at Heme and 
the 5th at Hoo St. Werburgh, dated 1781, are both by him. 
He then took into partnership William Mears, who had 
learned his business at the foundry, and had started in busi- 
ness for himself some four or five years before. I think the 
reason is not far to seek ; Chapman, although in the prime of 
life, was in bad health (he died of consumption four years 
later), and he doubtless preferred that the foundry should pass 
to one who had been already connected with it, and would 
keep up the old traditions. So the firm became Chapman 
and Mears. 

There are ten bells in Kent which were cast by William 



CJironoloQ-ical Account. 



1 1^ 



Mears before the partnership was entered into. They are the 
I St and 3rd at the Church of St. Dunstan, in his native city of 
Canterbury, dated 1777, and the entire peal of eight at St. 
Peter's, Sandwich. 

From Chapman and Mears united we have eighteen 
examples. Chart Sutton ring of six (1783), seven out of the 
ten at Maidstone Parish Church, and five odd bells at other 
places. 

On Chapman's death in 1784, Mears dropped into the 
whole of the business, and for three years his name occurs 
alone on bells. The only entire peals cast during this period 
for Kent were for Hernhill (five, dated 1785) and St. John's, 
Margate (six, also dated 1785) ; two trebles have since been 
added at the latter church. There are nine other odd bells. 
In 1787 the firm became W. and T. Mears, and during the 
next three years sent only some six or seven bells into Kent, 
which have survived till now — most of these are inscribed : 

W & T MEARS LATE LESTER PACK & CHAP- 
MAN. 

Rather a curious case of " throwing back " or atavism in bell- 
founding. 

William Mears retired altogether in 1789, and Thomas 
Mears (the elder) carried the business on by himself for the 
rest of the century, and for some few years into the next. A 
few of his earliest bells, dated in 1790, also bear the reference 
to the prior triple partnership. His principal works dated 
prior to 1800 are the ring of eii^ht at Ash by Sandwich and 



114 Chronological Account. 

that of six at the parish church, Eltham. His odd examples 
number twenty. 

There are two offshoots from the Whitechapel foundry 
during the latter half of the eighteenth century — one 
established close by, and one at the far end of London, in 
Chelsea. 

Sarah Oliver, Lester's grand-daughter, married one Robert 
Patrick, a cheesemonger in Whitechapel, and he, for some 
mysterious reason or other, started a rival business. He pro- 
bably got hold of some of the Whitechapel workmen, and 
he turned out some very decent bells ; but I doubt if the 
venture was altogether a successful one. There are four of 
his bells in Kent — two at Biddenden and two at Chidding- 
stone — all dated 1784. 

Thomas Janaway, of Chelsea, was the other offshoot, and 
his works, too, are of good quality, showing the Whitechapel 
characteristics. He, unlike Patrick, was decidedly successful 
during his business career of nearly a quarter of a century ; 
but his connection clearly did not extend far from London. 
For Kent he cast the ring of six at Bexley in 1763, of which 
the 2nd has been since recast, and that of eight at Bromley 
in 1773. The Priest's bell at the latter church, and odd bells 
at Knockholt and St. Germain's Chapel, Blackheath, are his- 
remaining examples. There were others formerly at Brasted 
and Great Mongeham. 

There is only one other founder of this century to mention 
— "Old" John Warner, who cast the 2nd and 3rd bells for 
Strood in 1 788. He was the elder son of Jacob Warner, who, 
about the year 1 740, was carrying on business in Wood Street, 



Chronological Accoiinf. 1 1 r 

Cheapside, as a brass-founder, although only free of the l^in- 
plate Workers' Company. This was decidedly distasteful to 
the authorities of the Founders' Company, as an abuse of their 
undoubted though rarely enforced rights and privileges, and 
in February, 1740, it was ordered "that the clerk write to Mr. 
Warner as from the Company to desist from exercising the 
trade of a casting founder." But worthy Jacob was a member 
of the Society of Friends — people never very easy to lead or 
drive — and he resisted passively, not to say obstinately, the 
attempt to drive him. There is no direct record of the result 
in the Company's books, but the latter clearly triumphed in 
the long run, after what appears to have been a protracted 
fight. John Warner, Jacob's elder son, was bound prentice 
to a neighbouring " Friend " and founder, John Cutteridge, and 
Jacob was admitted as a love brother, or honorary member. 
There is no entry of this last fact, but it must have been so, for 
in 1 76 1 Tomson Warner, Jacob's younger son, was admitted 
to the freedom by patri?nony. 

John Warner, having duly served his time, was made free 
on August I, 1757, and it is noted that he, " being one of the 
people called Quakers, affirmed " on the occasion instead of 
being sworn. 

In due course Jacob was gathered to his fathers, and the 
two brothers succeeded to the business, the sign of the shop 
being the " Three Bells and a Star " ; they afterwards moved 
to Jewin Crescent, Cripplegate, where Tomson Warner and 
his descendants have remained to the present day. 

In 1780 there was a split between the brothers, and John 
betook himself to Fleet Street, where he established himself 

(.) 2 



] i6 Chronolooical Account. 

as a bell and brass founder, under the name of John Warner, 
and later on as John Warner and Sons. 

There are only two of his bells in Kent, those at Strood 
before mentioned. There are not, indeed, many anywhere — 
the only ring I know of by him being at Shalford, in Surrey, 
of which the tenor has been recast by the descendants of his 
brother. 

He reached a good old age, living well into the following 
century, serving the office of master of the Founders' 
Company for the second time in 1811-12, when he must have 
been at least 75 years of age. His brother Tomson pre- 
deceased him. He, too, had served master in 1786-7. 

And so ends my tale of the eighteenth century bells of 
Kent. 

On the subject of the 711 bells cast during the present 
century there is not much to be written. They can hardly be 
said to be of antiquarian interest — rather, indeed, the other 
way about ; for no doubt in a great many cases they fill the 
places of bells which one would very much rather have seen 
preserved, I may instance Ryarsh and Sutton at Hone as cases 
in point. And in connection with this subject of recasting 
or, rather, replacing (for it is the rarest occurrence, I take it, 
for the new bell or bells to be cast from the metal actually 
contained in the old ones), perhaps I may be permitted a 
slight "growl" on the modern system of splicing, which in so 
many cases has led to unsatisfactory results. I do not think 
that our founders of the present day pay sufficient regard to 
the shape of the bells composing the ring to which they are 
going to add. I will take Sittingbourne Parish Church as a 



Chvoiiological Account. 1 1 7 

case in point. Here two new trebles have been added to the 
original ring of six, and although the new bells are quite true 
in note, yet there is not the music got out of the whole eight 
as there was out of the six. And I think the reason is this : 
the original bells, being exactly two centuries old, are long 
waisted, while the two new ones are of the short type now 
usually cast, what are called " ringers' bells," easy to raise and 
ring ; but from their difference in shape, and consequent 
difference in their curves, dissimilar in their harmonics. My 
firm opinion is, and I shall be glad if some of our enterprising 
founders would institute experiments to confirm or confute 
me, that bells added to a long-waisted ring should also be 
moulded with long waists. This may give at first a consider- 
able amount of additional trouble, but I think the game will be 
well worth the- candle. I may mention that although I have 
instanced Sittingbourne Church in this connection, it is by no 
means the only case. I know of several others precisely 
similar, and in other counties beside Kent. 

Liberavi animam vieani — and now we will proceed to a 
very brief notice of the Kentish church bells of the nineteenth 
century ; and as they are nearly all of London make, I will 
deal first with those cast at the Whitechapel foundry, which 
has steadily continued its operations till now under various 
managements. At the close of the eighteenth century it was, 
as we have seen, in the hands of Thomas Mears, the elder, and 
it continued so until 1804. H^- ^^nt a large number of bells 
into Kent, of which I will only notice the entire rings, which 
are Bobbing (six), Borden (eight), Boxley (six), Cranbrook 
(eight, of which two have since been recast), Frittenden 



ii8 Chronological Account. 

(eight, two of which have also been recast), Hythe (eight, to 
which two new trebles have been added), Sheldwich (six, of 
which the two smallest have been recast), and Shorne, six. 

Thomas Mears the younger was then taken into partner- 
ship, and the firm became T. Mears and Son until 1809. 
There are only two entire rings of theirs in Kent, viz., Eden- 
bridge and St. Laurence ; at the former church the tenor has 
since been re-cast or added, I am not sure which. 

Thomas Mears the younger was alone from 1810 to 1844. 
From him we have the rings at Eastwell, Rolvenden, Tunstall, 
Westerham, and Woolwich Parish Church, and also the ring 
of twelve in the tower at Quex Park, Birchington. The tenors 
at both Eastwell and Westerham have been since recast. 

Charles and George Mears had the foundry from 1844 to 
1859 ; their entire peals are only two, Kilndown and Pluckley. 
Speldhurst has five out of six of their manufacture. Charles 
Mears died in (or I think before) 1859, and for a short time 
George Mears's name alone is found on bells — the tenor at 
Westerham to wit, above mentioned. The firm then became 
Mears and Stainbank, which name is continued to the present 
day, although there is neither a Mears nor a Stainbank in it 
now. The rings at Bekesborne, Cheriton, Crayford, Cuxton, 
St. John's, Deptford, and Leigh were all cast under this latest 
regime. 

The firm of John Warner and Sons, of the Crescent 
Foundry, Cripplegate, descendants and successors of Tomson 
Warner, before mentioned, have only been casting large bells 
since 1850 ; their Kentish rings number five only : Chisel- 
hurst Parish Church, St. Luke's, Deptford, the new church at 



Chronological Accotmt. 119 

Higham, St. Michael's, Maidstone, and St. Peter's at 
Tunbrido^e Wells. 

Messrs. Taylor and Co., the present representatives of a 
bell-founding business which has been carried on for very 
many years at various places in the kingdom, have now been 
long settled at Loughborough. As may be expected from the 
distance away, they are not numerously represented in Kent. 
There are, however, entire rings by them at Charing, Cliffe 
at Hoo, and Folkestone Parish Church, and several other odd 
bells, including Nos. i and 4 of the ring of six at Great 
Chart. 

Messrs. Gillett and Co., of Croydon, are as yet young in 
bell-founding, and are consequently, though nearer in point of 
situation, still more sparsely represented. Brasted and South- 
borough have entire rings by them, and there are odd bells at 
Ashford and Aylesford, and other places, as will be found in 
the third part of this book. 

One solitary bell, the new treble at Willesborough, owes its 
origin to a west-country firm, Messrs. Llewellin and James, of 
Bristol. The bell in question is smoothly and neatly cast, but 
I know nothing of its quality. The firm, however, I under- 
stand, is not without honour in the west of England, where, 
of course, its works are sufficiently numerous to be judged of. 



END OF PART I. 



PART II. 
LOCAL USES. 



THIS book would deal imperfectly with its subject if it 
failed to give some account of the local uses made of 
church bells in the county. These, so far as I have been able 
to collect them, are given in detail under the head of each parish. 
It is a matter of regret to me that the information is imperfect, 
about one-third of the clergy having sent no reply to my list 
of queries, so that the details which are given must only be 
taken as a sample of the whole. 

Local customs may be divided into two classes — ancient 
and modern — the former being survivals of pre-Reformation 
uses, such as the " Evening Ave " or Curfew Peal ; while 
under the latter would be classed peal-ringing on church or 
secular festivals. 

I propose now briefly to summarise the ancient uses which 
still obtain in the county, and then to deal with one which is 
both ancient and modern — the Passing Bell or Death Knell. 
The modern uses I must leave my reader to tabulate for him- 
self, if he will, from the later pages of this book. 

It will be most convenient, in such summary, to take Sunday 

K 



122 Local Uses. 

uses first, then week-day customs, and lastly, special uses 
peculiar to particular times and seasons. 

Sunday Uses. — In the Middle Ages the usual rule for 
services was — Matins at 8, Mass at 9 ; but I think it is 
somewhat doubtful whether, as a general rule, there was a 
separate bell at 9 to call to the higher service. I know of 
no other way of accounting for the fact, that while the survival 
of the 8 o'clock bell is comparatively common, that of the 9 
o'clock is exceedingly rare. 

At some places, however (and those, as a rule, country 
towns rather than villages), the hours were 7 and 8 
instead of 8 and 9. Kent has its examples of this ; and 
at Cranbrook, Edenbridge, Greenwich, and Wrotham, the 
bells are still rung at those hours. At Cobham the 7 
o'clock bell has only recently been discontinued, that at 8 
still surviving. At Speldhurst the peals are at 7 and 8 
from 14th February to 5th November,'" while during the 
other part of the year they are at the normal hours of 8 
and 9. 

The churches where the ancient Matins (8 o'clock) and 
Mass (9 o'clock) bells are still both rung, are Biddenden, 
Leigh, and, as above mentioned, Speldhurst. At Eastry and 
Sittingbourne they were rung until quite recent times. Other, 
but doubtful cases of the " double survival," are as follows : 
Cowden at 8, called " Service Bell," and 9.30, called " Sermon 
Bell ;" Crayford at 8 and 10 (the latter peal may be a survival 
of the ancient sanctus bell rung in the Mass) ; Hawkhurst, 8 

* These are curious dates — St. Valentine to Guy Fawkes. I suspect 
originally the limits were Candlemas and All Saints. 



Local Uses. 123 

and 9, the latter being called " Warning Bell ;" Marden, 
8 and 9.30. 

The 8 o'clock or Matins peal is still rung at Ash by 
Wrotham, Ashurst, Bidborough, Bishopsbourne, Brookland, 
Cobham, North Cray, St. Mary Cray, Eastchurch, Elham, 
Eynesford, Fordwich, Goodnestone by Sandwich, Goudhurst, 
Horsmonden, Hothfield, Hunton, Ickham, Kemsing, East 
Langdon, Loose, Lynstead, Mereworth, Milstead, New- 
church, West Peckham, Piatt,* Rolvenden, Sandhurst, Seal, 
Southborough (?), Staplehurst, Stowting, Strood, Sundridge, 
Warehorne, Westerham, Wittersham, Wye, and Yalding. 
At Kennington, Snave, and Swanscombe it has been rung 
within memory. The bell rung at this hour at Holy Cross, 
Canterbury, Egerton, Frinstead, and Westwell, is called the 
" Sermon Bell," and may or may not be a survival of the old 
Matins peal. The same may be said of the "Warning" 
bells at Hayes and Offham at 8, and at Newnham at 8.30. 
Nine o'clock peals (" Mass Bell ") are rung at Great Mongeham 
and Newington by Hythe only. There are " Sermon" bells 
at this hour at Edenbridge and Kingstone — neither, I think, 
survivals. 

A bell at 9.30 at Hernhill is a solitary abnormal use — pro- 
bably not ancient — and the same may be said of the 10 o'clock 
"Warning Bell" at Ewell. 

Midday Peals. — These— varying slightly as to time — being 
in some places at noon, in others at i o'clock, or at the close 
of morning service, are undoubtedly survivals ol ancient uses, 

* A reminiscence, not a survival, as the church is only about lorty 
years old. 

I'L 2 



124 Local Uses. 

but of what it is rather difficult to say. The midday Angelus 
— so common on the Continent — was almost unknown in 
Enofland ; and I am more inclined to reckon them as survivals 
of the Sanctus peal in the Mass. There is some confirma- 
tion of this theory in the former custom at Aylesford, viz., to 
rin<;- the little Sanctus bell at the close of morning service. 
The churches where midday ringing on Sundays still obtains 
are Biddenden, Edenbridge, Egerton, Ickham, Leigh, 
Great Mongeham, Newchurch, Sandhurst, Seal, Staplehurst, 
Warehorne, Wrotham, Wye, and Yalding. At Kennington 
and Loose it obtained formerly, but has been discontinued. 

A bell at 1.30 at Hawkhurst is stated to be merely a warn- 
ing bell for afternoon service. 

A decidedly peculiar use is reported from Edenbridge, viz., 
a peal at 6 p.m. on Sundays. I am strongly of opinion this 
is a (probably solitary) instance of survival of the custom for 
which the good Protestant Grand Jury of Canterbury pre- 
vented the parson of St. Peter's Church in that city in 1538, 
viz., "tolling the Avie-bell in the said church after the 
evening song done." Altogether the Edenbridge people have, 
of course quite unwittingly, conserv^ed ancient Sunday bell- 
uses very perfecdy. Matins bell at 7, Mass bell at 8 a.m., 
Sanctus peal at i p.m., and Ave peal at 6, added to a doubt- 
ful survival in the shape of a sermon bell at 9 a.m., make up a 
good record. 

Weekday Uses. — The survivals of old bell-customs with 
regard to these are limited to two— the morning and evening 
" Ave " peals — the latter being also known as the " ignite- 
gium " or Curfew. I will deal with the " Morning Ave " 



Local Uses. 125 

first. The only absolute instance which has directly reached 
me of this is Canterbury Cathedral, where it is rung daily at 
5.45 in summer, and 6.45 in winter. At Cowden it has been 
rung until a few years ago, but apparently only during the 
winter months. The historian of Ash by Sandwich states it 
to be rung there at 5 o'clock ; Hasted notes it as rung at 
Dartford at 4, and Boys records its use at the same hour at St. 
Peter's, Sandwich ; but whether these three cases still obtain, 
I know not. One other recorded use — that at St. George's, 
Canterbury (at 4 a.m.), in 1586, is also to be noted. 

An abnormal daily early peal is rung at Smeeth at 8 a.m. ; 
so unusual a custom that it is probably a survival, most likely 
of the morning Ave peal, changed, perhaps, gradually to a 
later hour, to suit the convenience of lazy sextons. 

The Curfew — a bell absolutely secular in its origin, and not 
turned to religious purposes until late in the Middle Ages — 
is very well represented in Kent. Ash by Sandwich, Canter- 
bury Cathedral, Chiddingstone, Cowden, Cranbrook, Dart- 
ford, Hawkhurst, Lydd, Marden, Minster in Thanet, Ring- 
would, and Wye, still preserve the custom. At Folkestone, 
Ickham, Loose, Milton by Sittingbourne, Staplehurst, and 
Westerham, it has only been discontinued in more or lef^s 
recent times, in all cases, I believe, within the memory of 
some now living. Boys states that it was rung in his day at 
St. Peter's, Sandwich, and I dare say it is so still. 

Of special ancient customs, perhaps the most important was 
the " Pancake " bell— originally the Shrivinir bell— rung in the 
forenoon of Shrove Tuesday, to call the faithful to confession 
before the solemn season of Lent. So f^ir as my information 



126 Local Uses. 

goes, there is no present instance of this in Kent, which in 
this compares unfavourably with the neighbouring Httle county 
of Surrey, which has two examples. I am able, however, to 
mention two places, where tradition records its use in com- 
paratively recent times, viz., Milton by Sittingbourne and 
Westerham. 

The "Gleaning" bell, which is heard in so many country 
places, is not, to my knowledge, represented in Kent at all. 
I take it that its principal productions — fruit and hops — do 
not render it necessary. 

A custom, common enough in market towns, is recorded by 
Boys as existing at Sandwich, and is only mentioned here on 
account of the singular local name by which it is known, viz., 
the " Brandgoose " bell, rung at St. Peter's Church to notify 
the opening of the market. 

Another singular local expression may also find fitting notice 
here. In and around Canterbury the Sanctus bell is called 
the " Wakerell," or " Wagerell Bell," in the Edwardian In- 
ventories of 1552. I should much like to have the opinion 
of some competent philologist as to the derivation and mean- 
ing of these two words, " Brandgoose" and " Wakerell." 

I have now only to deal with the Passing Bell, or rather 
the Death Knell, for the ancient use of ringing at the actual 
time of death died out more than a century ago. The normal 
use in Kent seems to be to ring the " Death Knell " as soon 
as notice reaches the clerk or sexton, unless the sun has set, 
in which case it is rung at an early hour the following morning. 

It is usual to repeat the knell early on the morning of the 
day when the funeral takes place ; but I find no instance of 



Local Uses. 127 

its repetition after the funeral, as contemplated and permitted 
by the canon. The manner of ringing the knell varies, of 
course, in different places. It is rarely that the age of the 
departed is tolled, but the use of " tellers " to denote the sex 
is almost universal, and by far the greater number of churches 
use the normal number of tellers, viz., three times three strokes 
for a man and three times two for a woman, with a varying 
use for children, as will be found hereafter. There are some 
places, however, where the " tellers " used are different ; such 
are Biddenden, Birchington, Bishopsbourne, Burham, Chisel- 
hurst, Denton, Folkestone, Frinstead, Godmersham, Goud- 
hurst, Halstead, Harrietsham, Hayes, Hoo All Hallows, 
Littlebourne, Marden, Milstead, Monkton, Newington by 
Hythe, Northbourne, Care, East Peckham, Preston by Wing- 
ham, Rolvenden, New Romney, Smeeth, Staplehurst, Swanley, 
St. Stephen Tunbridge, Upnor, Westerham, Wootton, Wye, 
and Yalding. 

The churches with what I have styled above the normal 
use, as regards " tellers," are 105 in number — too many to 
give a list of here. They will all be found duly noted in the 
third part of this book, to which I must refer my readers. 

They will also find chronicled there all the particulars that 
have reached me as to the comparatively modern uses made 
of the church bells of Kent, principally ringing on church 
festivals, and royal and other anniversaries. I do not here 
wish positively to assert that it was not the custom before the 
Reformation to ring on the great days of the church ; but I 
very much doubt it, except in the larger towns. 

The ordinary complement of bells in a village church was 



128 Local Uses. 

two and a Sanctus bell, and under those circumstances, with 
the bells only hung with half-wheels, ringing was hardly- 
practicable. Change-ringing, even with the larger rings, 
which existed here and there, was quite unknown ; and the 
" ringing of bells " to herald the advent of the archbishop or 
other local magnate, which we read of in some of the old 
monkish chroniclers, would sound very strangely, I fancy, in 
the ears of a " college youth " of the present day. 

I cannot close this chapter without expressing the regret 
which I feel that, take the county altogether, change-ringing 
is so little practised. Over and over again I have inspected 
the contents of belfries, containing good serviceable peals of 
six or eight, only to hear that " they are never rung now " — 
" We ain't got no ringers." And the cause seems to be the 
want of a trifling local support on the part of the well-to-do 
in the place. Church rates are practically defunct, and the 
trifling honorarium which they afforded is no longer forth- 
coming. The burthen of church expenses falls on the rector, 
who has so many calls on his generally slender income as to 
be obliged to cease to respond to the less urgent ones. Land- 
owners and farmers alike have had hard times of late years, 
and are disinclined to give, and so ringers fall off and the bells 
are dumb. I don't know what the Diocesan Societies are 
about, but I have heard very little of their doings during the 
two years that I have spent in bell-work in the county. Let 
us hope for better things in the future. 

END OF PART II. 



PART III. 

INSCRIPTIONS. 



ACOL. No Dedication. i Bell. 

A small mission or school-church, with, presumably, one modern bell. 

ACRYSE. St. Martin. i Bell. 

I., 26-in. THOMAS ^ PALMAR <^ MADE <^ MEE ^ 1664 (^ EDWARD <> 
MARKS <) C <) W 
T. R. E. " Item ij bells in the stepill." 

ADDINGTON. St. Margaret. 4 Bells. 

I., 26-in. ARISTVS : PARPATVA : DA : NOBIS : TAVDIX : VITA : 

MB FECIT 1 7 10 
II., 29-in. I <> W 1635 

III., 3o|-in. lOHN ^ WILNAR <> MADE <) ME <> 1602 
IV., 32-^. <) lOHN ♦ WILMER <> MADE (} ME 

The bell-frame is dated 1732, and there are pits for two more bells (tenor 
and treble) ; none, however, have ever been himg in tliem. 

The inscription on the treble is a puzzle to anyone but the initiated. It is 
clearly — from the stops — a reproduction of a Lombardic inscription, which 
ran 

CRISTVS : PERPETVE : DET : NOBIS : GAVDIA : VITE 

The bell is by Matthew Bagley, of Cripplegate, London, an offshoot from 
the Bagleys of Chacomb, Northants. See p. 100. 

I have no doubt the date 1602 on No. 3 is a mistake for 1620. 

S 



I 30 Inscriptions. 

ADISHAM. Holy Innocents. 4 Bells. 

I., 29-in. TRTER ■ DVMOVLF/l ■ D- D • RECTOR • OF • ADISHAM 
THOMAS • PALMAR ■ MADE • MEE • 1670 

II., 3o!-in. Same as above. 
III., 34-in. Same as above. 

IV., 36-in. (^ (Fig. 14) ^0mcu XHagtralcnc CTampaua (5EV*tt 
XTlcluMc U (Fig. 13). 

For mention of No. 4, see page 31. 

No peculiar uses. In ringing the death knell, tellers are used at both 
beginning and end — 3 x 3 for a male, 3 x 2 for a female. 

One bell tolled for early service. Before Matins and Evensong the bells 
are chimed — "ringing in" for last five minutes, except on first Sunday in the 
month, when a peal is rung before Matins. 

Peals on Christmas Eve and last night of year. 

Best thanks to the Rev. J. H. Carr, Rector. 

ALDINGTON. St. Martin. 6 Bells. 

I., 30^-in. I mean to make it understood. That tho- I'm little yet 
I'm good. 

Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1774 
II., 32-in. Such wondrous Powr to Musicks given It Elevates the 
Soul to Heaven 

Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1774 
IIL, 34iin. Jn"- Robus & Geo- Kilvert rzS?^i-&^ Pack & Chapman of 

London Fecit 1774 
IV., 37-in. W'.' HoBBS & VV"- Marshall ^^^^^y^^s? Pack & Chapman of 

London Fecit 1774 
v., 40-in. Edw? Steed & RobT Steed Church Wardens 1774 °<x. Pack 

& Chapman of London Fecit 
VI., 44-in. Ye Ringers all that prize your Health & Happiness Be 
Sober Merry Wise & youll the same Possess 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1774 
T. R. E. " Item iij bells in the steple." 

In 1758 Mr. Bryan Faussett noted here, " five heavy Bells all cast by John 
Peele a.d. 1705 — the Great Bell bears y" name of William Cade, who was then 
Rector." 



Inscriptions. 1 3 r 

ALKHAM. St. Antony the Martyr. 4 Bells. 

I., 27 in. IH MADE ME 1683 IM IH CW 
II., 2 9i-in. Same. 
III., 3ii-m. MEARS c<c STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1873 
IV., 35-in. <jj(. lOHN ^ HODSON * MADE * MEE ^ 1683 * 
lOSEPH ^ MASH ^ AND % lOHN * HAYWORD * 
CHVRCH ^ WS cjjp 

The former No. 3 was also by Hodson, and bore the same date as the 
others. 

T. R. E. "Item in the stepyll there iij bells." 

Hasted states (incorrectly) that there were only three bells in his time. 

No peculiar uses. Passing bell tolled one hour after death, unless it occurs 
at night, and then at eight the following morning. 

Tenor bell tolled before funerals. 

Bells rung for Sunday services. A " bell tolled before post communion 
service for a minute." 

Peals on Christmas Eve and morning, and on last night of year. 

Third bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to the Rev. J. C. W. Valpy, Vicar. 

ALLINGTON. St. Laurence. i Bell. 

L, i5?>-in. IM 1653 

Bell doubtless by some local artist — probably of Maidstone. 

APPLEDORE. SS. Peter and Paul. 6 Bells and Sanctus. 

Sanctus, i6.\-in. Blank. /? 

I., 31-in. O ^ ^ lOHN ^ HODSON * MAD * MEE * 1685 ^f^ 
10 * HR * CHVRCH ^ WARDNS * FRANCIS * 
DRAYTON * VICAR O 

II., 32-in. -ij? O O •)!(> lOHN * HODSON * MADE * MEE ♦ 1685 
r;|(. 10 * HR * CHVRCH * WARDNS * ^ O * O 'k 

0*0 

IIL, 34A-in. Hmictc :CHcoIa Ora :jPvo Xlbio U © U 

s 2 



cieti 



1 3 2 Inscriptions. 

IV., 37|-in. lOHN * HODSON * MADE * MEE ^ 1685 .$. lOHN * 
OWEN * ^ HENRY * RICHARDSON * CHVRCH * 
WARDNS «■$> O O O O 
v., 40-in. » lOHN * HODSUN * MADE * MEE ^ 1685 * O O 

o o 

* lOHN * OWEN * HENRY * RICHARSON -^ 
CHVRCH * W r|. O 
VI., 45i-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1620 

The stamps on No. 3 are Figs. 25, 26, and 27. See p. 44. 
The tenor bell is cracked. 

ASH BY SANDWICH. St. Nicholas. 8 Bells. 

I., 3ii-in.^ 

XL, 32-in. 

III., 34i-in 

IV., 36-in. 

v., 4o-i_n. 

VL, 42-in. 

VII., 46-in. 

VIII., 51-in. J 

Mr. Bryan Faussett states that the then ring of five bells bore the following 
inscriptions : 

1 1581. (This was probably by Robert Mot.) 

II. Joseph Hatch made me 16 15. 

III. and IV. Joseph Hatch made me 1620. 
V. Henry Wilner made me 1641. 

The late Mr. J. R. Planche in his interesting account of this parish, under 
the title "A Corner of Kent," states that here, "Amongst other ancient 
customs, the curfew still ' tolls the knell of parting day,' and the ' five o'clock 
bell,' rung every morning, though it now only summons man ' to go forth to 
his work and to his labour,' formerly at the same hour called priest and people 
to ' Matins ' " — which last statement is incorrect. Before the Reformation 
" Matins " were not for the laity, unless members of a religious body. The 
early morning (daily) peal was styled the "Ave Bell " or " Morning Angelus," 
and it called church-folk to a certain number of repetitions of the angelic 



Tho^ Mears Late Lester Pack & Chapman of London 
Fecit 1790 Rob^ Tomlin & Rich° Sutton Ch. 
Wardens 



Inscriptions. 133 

salutation. The quotation from Gray's " Elegy," too, is a pretty bit of 
poetical fiction. A bell which is rung at 8 p.m. in the winter months 
oily (there would be no fire to " cover " in the summer), can hardly be said 
to herald the departure of a sun which had set some three or four hours 
before. 



ASH BY WROTHAM. SS. Peter and Paul. 6 Bells. 

I., 27i-in. Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 1795. James Lance & James 
Wayne Church Wardens 

IL, 28-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 

RECAST AT THE CHARGE OF A. J. FLETCHER ESQ-'e 

OF RANDS HOUSE CHURCHWARDEN 1856 
HL, 29-in. lOHN WAYLETT MADE rj, ME \1\1 ^ ^ 
IV., 32-in. c|. lOHN cj. GLADDISH CHVRCH WARDEN 171 7 
v., 34-in. RALPH SELBY THE SON OF WILLIAM SELBY ESQ 

1717 
VL, 38-in. THE REV" SAM^ ATTWOOD M : A : RECT : lAMES 

LANCE HENRY COLLYER CHURCH WARDENS 

RICH°: PHELPS MADE ME 1727 

T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple suted. 

One sacring-bell — one hand-bell presented to be stolen since the inventory 
of 3rd Ed. VI. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice given (but not after sunset). Tenor 
for adults, treble for infants ; intermediate ages denoted by other bells. 

Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female — at commencement. 

On day of burial, bell tolled prior to service only. 

Sundays, a bell chimed at 8a.m. ("Matins Bell"). For services, bells 
(three) generally chimed — occasionally the whole peal is rung. 

There is very little ringing here now, for want of funds to pay the ringers a 
trifle — which is a pity, as the ring is a particularly well-toned one, although a 
" scratch " lot. 



134 Inscriptions. 

ASHFORD. St. Mary. io Bells. 

I., 25-in. ) QiLLETT & C" FOUNDERS CROYDON 
II., 27-in. J 
III., 28}i-in. Lester & Pack of London F'ecit 1762 
IV., 29-in. Same. 

v., 31-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT 1620 
VI., 34-in. WILLIAM HATCH MADE ME 1651 
VH., 37-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT (i^) 1633 

WH 
VIIL, 40-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT 1620 
IX., 43-in. PETRVS PARRIS CW lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT 

1620 
X., 5 1 -in. John Bennett Horton & John Bayly Churchwarden 

1796 Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 
T. R. E. " Item v great bells, one lyttell bell." 
In 1757 the tenor (then No. VI.) was inscribed : 

John Asherst CW Josephus Hatch me Fecit 1620. 

Nos. I. and II. do not, strictly speaking, form part of the "ring ;" they are 
used with the chiming apparatus only. The selection of tunes, one for each 
day of the week, is not very happy. 

ChristchuRch. I Bell. 

Modern bell in fleche, by Gillett and Co., of Croydon, dated 1884. Used 
for services and clock only. 

Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. W. M. C. Clarke. 

AS HURST. ? Dedication. 3 Bells. 

I., 24-in. -'EX^DONO^ ^ GEORGIA j. RYVERS <$> <:>MILITIS^ 

*) 1 6 1 2 <J> 
IL, 25-in. 
Ill 



' ^6-in /^^^'^ ^^ JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1879 



Prior to 1879 there were only two bells — the present treble and a larger 
one, which was by Robert Mot, dated 1594. 



Inscriptions. 



OD 



Passing bell tolled " soon after death." Tellers — 3 x 3 for male or 3 x 2 
for female at etui of knell only. Bell tolled for half an hour before funerals. 
Matins bell rung on Sundays at 8 a.m. 
Bells chimed for services, with five minutes' " ringing in." 
Bells rung at 6 a.m. on Easter Day and Christmas Day. 
Best thanks to the Rev. H. W. O. Polhill, Rector. 

AYLESFORD. St. Pinter. 8 and a Priest's Bell. 

Priest's 13-in. Blank. 

I., 26-in.^CAST BY GILLETT & C^ CROYDON 1885 
HENRY ARTHUR BRASSEY GAVE ME 
n., 27-in. ^ CYRIL GRANT VICAR 

„T V ^°™Tnfr '''•''' 1 CHURCHWARDENS 
ni., 28-m.j JAMES COLE ) 

IV., 31-in. MICHAEL DARBIE MADE ME 1652 T MADGF/l 

v., 33-in. MICHAEL DARBIE MADE ME 1652 I BOGHERST 

VL, 36-in. : : THOMAS GOODMAM I0H>1 TAYLER IVMIOR 

CHVRCHWARDEXS 1708 R: PHELPS FECIT : : 

RECAST BY GILLETT & C^ CROYDON 1885 

VII., 39-in. ROBERT KEMSLEY PHILLIP GRAVE CHVRCH- 

VVARDENS GOD SxWE KING CHARLES Y= 2" 1661 

© 

VIIL, 43-in. AMTHOHY BARTLET MADE MEE 1666 

CAP^ WARD LIVEFTENANT LONG TWO OF HIS 

MA"^'^ HOYMENN ® 

RECAST BY GILLETT & C^^ CROYDON 

The new ring was dedicated at a special service, on Saturday, 19th Decem- 
ber, 1885. 

In 1518, Thomas Cossington, of Alisforde, by his will bequeathed "To the 
buying of a treble bell to the thre belles at Alisforde xx\" — {Ex inform. Mr. 
E. H. IV. Dunkin, in '' Reliquary" for 1877-8.) 

Passing bell rung directly notice of death is received. Tellers — 3 x 3 for 
man, 3 x 2 for woman. Age not marked. 

Sunday services : Bells rung fifteen minutes, toll ten minutes. Priest's bell 
five minutes to finish with. Down to about twenty years ago the small 
Priest's or Sanctus bell was runu at the close of the morning service. I 



o 



6 Inscriptions. 



think this a decided survival of Sanctus bell use, only transferred from the 
" elevation " to the close of the service. Peals on Easter Day and Christmas 
Day at 6 a.m. Old year tolled out and new one rung in. 

Ringing on Queen's birthday and 5 th November. 

Best thanks to the Vicar, Rev. Cyril Grant, for above information, and for 
his kind permission to extract the following from the parish accounts : — 

1608-9 Inprimis for a clapp of the bell 

It. for mendinge the stockes of the bells 

It. pd. to J. Dodson for worke about the belles 

It. pd. to Roberte Gillett for workinge aboute 
the belles 

It. for a rope for the little bell 
1609-10 It. for fovver belropes ... 

Item for making one bel clapper 
1610-11 Item for a bauldrick for the bell 

It. for belropes ... 

It. one daies worke about the bells done by 
Simon Brice ... 
1611-12 Itm. for a bawldricke for y'^ great bell 

Itm. to y" Ring'^ when my L : Byshop did ride 
through y" pish to visit 

Ttm. for trussinge of a bell 

Itm. for mendinge a bell clapp 

Itm. for brads leath"" trussinge a bell & men- 
dinge a clapp 

Itm. for mendinge y" great bell bawldricke ... 

Itm. for a buckle for y*" great bell 

Itm. for trussinge the bells & brads ... 

Itm. for a * for the baldricke of a bell ... 

1615-16 Imp'' for twoe newe baldrickes for the belles & 
mendinge of twoe onli 

Itm. for the mendinge of the great Bell clapp"" 

Itm. for yorne worke about the belles ... '\]s. ]d. ob. 

Itm. vnto Edwarde Simonson for worke about 

the belles ... ... ... ... ... iijj, 

* Undfeciphcrable. 



\s. 




\<)S. 


\\d. 


\\\]S. 


\]d. 




xiiij^. 




iiij^. 


XX. 




yis. 




]s. 


viijV. 


y.s. 




\s. 




\]S. 






v]d. 




xxd. 




vn]d. 


\\]S. 


ijV. 




x'ljd. 




iiij^. 




viij^. 




ijd. 


\-\\]S. 


ui]d. 


XJ'. 





Inscriptions. 137 

Itm. for a bawldricke for the Trebble... ... iij.f. 

Itm. vnto Richard Gillett the young"" for yorne 

worke about the belles ... ... ... xij^. 

Itm. vnto Richarde Gillett the young' for mcn- 

dinge the stocke of the St"" Bell ... ... vjV. 

Itm. for mendinge a bell clapp"' ... ... vjv/.. 

16 16-17 Itm. for mendinge the Belles and the bell 

wheeles ... ... ... ... ... xs. 

Itm. for fower halfe intch boordes to mende 

the bell wheeles 
;, Itm. for fower bell Ropes 

Itm. for mendinge a bell clappe"' and for 

speeckes and nailes for y*" bell frame 
Itm. for three Newe Baldrickes 
Itm. to John Bur for mendinge y" baldrickes of 

the belles 
Itm. unto Gillett for mendinge of a bell 

clapper 
Itm. payde unto Tootinge for twoe hoopes for 

the bell wheeles 
1617-18 Itm. vnto John Bur for the mendinge of twoe 

baldrickes ... ... ... ... ... ij^-. 

Itm. for an yrone Pin for y" baldricke ... \]d. 

Itm vnto Edwarde Simonson for worke donne 

about the belles ... ... ... ... xviij/. 

1618-19 Itm. vnto John Bur for the mendinge of twoe 

baldrickes ... ... ... ... ... w'yL 

Itm. for the mendinge of twoe clappers and 

the makinge of a newe baldrick ... ... \s. \]d. 

Itm. for the mendinge of y" great bels bald- 
ricke ... ... ... ... ... \'\\]d. 

Itm. for fower newe bellropes... ... ... vijj-. \d. 

Itm. for the mendinge of twoe baldricks ... xviij^/. 

Itm. for Iron worke about the belles ... ... iij-v. 

Itm. for worke about the belles ... ... iiij.>". 

1619-20 Received for the ould bell clapper ... ... \\)s. \]d, 

Itm. (paid) for a baldricke ... ... .. \\]s. 

T 



IJ^. 




viijjT. 


xd. 


ij^. 


vij(/. 


vj^. 






xiiij^. 


iiijj'. 





138 



Inscriptions. 



Itm. to Rob' Brise for mendinge of a bell 
wheele ... ... ... ... ... vjV/. 

Itm. for a new clapper for the great bell wainge 

42 pound at v'' the pounde ... ... xviJ5. vj^. 

Itm. for Rob' Newportes charge for and labor 
goinge for lime and tyles and to gob Sayers 
and to Carrie & fetch the great bell 
clapper ... ... ... ... ... \s. 

Itm. to John Wayman for mendinge of a bell 

wheele ... ... ... ... ... \]d. 

Itm. for mendinge of 3 baldrickes ... ... xviij^. 

Itm. one daye for a carpenter to mend the 

frame of the belles . . ... ... ... xvj^. 

Itm. to the Ringers on the Kinges coronation 

day xij^. 

Itm. for mendinge of twoe baldrickes... ... xij^. 

Similar entries in following years. 
1620-21 Itm. for 4 bell ropes ... ... ... ... xijV. vjc/. 

1621-22 Received for g poundes of mettell lost of the 

ould bell at x'' the pound ... ... ... vij^-. \]d. 

Payments : 

Itm. for the charges of the new bell 

Itm. for the new bell castinge of her the 
takinge of her downe the carriage hanginge 1" vij/. 
of her up and all other charges concerninge 
the bell 

Itm. for the makinge of the writinges con- 
cerninge the bell payde vnto M' Walter 
ffisher for them ... ... ... ... iiijj-. 

1629-30 Item for takinge downe the thirde Bell ... \yis. 

Item for casting of the 3'' Bell w"' the ouer 
Mettall vij//. 

Item for carrying y° Bell & fetching it 

againe ... ... ... ... ... xx. 

Item for hanging her & mending the second xi-. 

Item for helpe to weigh the Bell twise ... ijj-. 

Item for two bondes for the casting of y" Bell \s. 



5//. 6^. 


8./. 


2li. \2S. 


od. 


\os. 


od. 




6d. 


\s. 


od 


13^. 


Ad 



Inscriptions. 139 

Item for a Rope to take downe the Bell ... j^. \]d. 

Item for helpe aboute y° 2'' Bell to putt in y'' 

Ouggin ]s. 

1632-33 Inp. ffor castinge the third bell 

Itm. for 52'' of newemettall at xij'' the pounde 

Itm. for helpe to take downe and hang vp the 
said bell pd ... 

Itm. more to Robte Goffe 

Itm. more to John Wayman ... 

Itm. for carryinge and fetchinge home the bell 

1633-34 Itm. to Robt Gillett for taking out the Brasses 

of the second Bell when they were to be 

cast and laying them in againe when they 

were new cast 

Itm. to the Clarke for helping him 

Itm. to Christopher Cockerell for castinge the 
saide Brasses together w'' the new Mettall 
w'' was added to them 
1635-36 It. for fower new belropes weighing 23li 
1640-41 ffor help to take downe the greate bell and 
for fetching and carying the Takles vsed 
about taking downe the saide bell ... ... vijV. 

ffor writing a bond for the Belfounders warrant- 
ing the greate belle sufficientie and for (&c.) ]$. \]d. 

Spent upon the belfounder when he came 

over ... ... ... ... ... ... iijj-. 

ffor casting the greate bell and for the new 

mettall w'* was put in paide to Hatch . . . xij//. viijx. 

ffor carying the said bell to casting and fetch- 
ing the saide bell home againe ... ... xiiij.c. 

To John Best towardes his worke and tymber to 

hang the bells paid ... ... ... ... viij//. xiiijy. \]d. 

Since paid to Crust for his iourney coming 
over to see the frame and spent upon him 
for his advice ... ... ... •■• \\\]s. 

ffor oyle ffor the bells when theye were new 

hanged ... ... ... ... ... \\\]d. 

T 2 



]s. 


s]d. 




\]d. 


n]s. 


\]d. 


xj.\ 


\]d. 



1 40 Inscriptions. 

1641-42 It. to George Dayc for the Belleframe and 

hanging the bells pay'' in pte ... ... xix//. xy. 

To Willm Hatch for exchanging the old 

brasses for the bells ... ... ... ... ]U. )s. 

ffor taking dovvne the bells taking downe the 
old frame and laying the same in the 
church ... ... ... ... ... j//. 

ffor carying the old brasses & bringing home 

the new payd to Richard Coates ... ... \]s. \]d. 

ffor a bond of covenante concerning George 
Daye's making y" frame & hanging the 
bell ... ... ... ... ... ... ]s. 

1644-47 ffor a Rope to the little Bell (/>., the Sanctus) \s. 

To Humphrey Bowne of Maidstone for a new 

sett of Bell-Ropes ... ... ... ... xvji-. viij^. 

1647-48 It. for a sett of new Bell Roapes ... ... xv.y. 

1650-51 It. for a new sett of Bell Roapes ... ... xvj.y. 



1660-61 Inprimis to the Ringers when the King was 

proclaymed ... ... ... ... ... 55. od. 

1661-62 It. to y'^ Ringers when the Kings birth daie &c. 

was observed ... ... ... ... 6^. 

To the Ringers upon the v' of November 

given 35. od. 

It. for writing the bargaine betweene Anthony 

Bartlett and y^ Church Wardens concerning 

casting the fowerth Bell pd ... ... 6^/. 

It. for expences when the Bell founder was 

here 2s. dd. 

It. for help and expences when the Bell was 

taken downe pd ... ... ... ... ^s. 

It. more to Willm Long's folk for help when 

y*" Bell was brought home ... ... ... \s. 

It. to John Kidwell for hanging the new bell 

and other work at that tyme about the Bells 

pd 10^. 



5^. lo^. 



Inscriptions. 1 4 j 

It. for candles and beere which the Ringers 
had when the Bells were tryiTied vpon New 
yeares eue i^. srt'. 

It. to Robert Gillett for iron worke about the 
Bells... 

It. to John Birchall for going to Kidwell and 

for helping him twoe dales about the bells 2^-. Q,d. 

It. more spent in beare on New yeares daie 
vpon John Kidwell and the Ringers and 
some other which had helped abouut the 
Bell ^s. 

It. paide for beare when the bell was drawen 

vp in y^ steeple i.r. 

It. paid to the Bell fownder for casting the Bell 7//. os. od. 

It. for the overweight p'' to y'= Bell fownder ... io.y. 

It. for caryage of the Bell to and from the 
Bell founders and for Wharfage at London 
paide Zs. 

It, for carying the Bell from the church to the 

waterside ... ... ... ... ... \s. 

It. more for fetching the Bell from Millhale to 

the Church againe p"* ... ... ... u. 

It. paide more to Willm Long for soe much he 
saide he spent at London staying for the 

Bell and vpon the Bellfounders 35-. 

1665-66 ffor all charges about taking downe y*" great 

Bell paide 65. dd. 

expended ye 12"' & 13"' of ffebruarie about 
bargaining w"' James Bartlett when he took 
the great Bell to cast ... ... ... ^s. 

ffor making a wryting concerning the bargain 

(or agreement) paide ... ... ... \s. 

To James Bartlett in pt when he took the saide 

Bell to cast paide in hand ... ... ... 1//. os. od. 

More to John Tayler in satisfaccon of soe 
much his mony which Thomas Ward 
Disbursed to y° Bell fownder for casting y*" 
Bell 8//. 



1 4 2 Inscriptions. 

More for 20 pownd of mettall put in (more then 

the old Bell weighed) at 10'' p pownd paide \(iS. 8d. 

(Other payments for carriage, wharfage, beer, 
etc., etc.) 
1666-67 Aset of bell ropes, weighing24pounds, costs i45'. 

To the Bell founder for 100 weight of mettall 
adding soe much weight to the Bell more then 
shee weighed before ... ... ... 5//. 05-. od. 

1682-83 Three of the five bells apparently rehung — 
payments entered amounting to^i2 14^-. 6d, 
including " twopence a day for drink for 
y" bell hanger y." Other payments for 
general repairs to bells, wheels, etc., total up 
another ^4 or ^5. 
1688-89 Paid for hanging of two Bells with new wheells 

And new stocks ... ... ... ... 6//. 

Paid for 85 pound of new iron work about y*" 

two Bells att 4*^ p pound ... ... ... i//. Ss. 4d. 

Paid for working the old iron for y" 2 bells ... 6s. 

1693-94 " A sett of Bell Roops " cost ;^ i . 

New bell ropes almost annually until 1713. 
The old ones were the churchwardens' per- 
quisites, being very useful for plough traces, 
etc., when not too much worn. 
1708-9 Gave ye Ringars upon y'' Duke of Marlborow's 

Victory ... ... ... ... ... 4^^. 

Gave ye Ringars upon Lyle being taken ... 4.$-. 

Gave ye Ringars upon Gunpouder treason ... 5^-. 

Paid Tho Wardfor waying of y"" 3 bell ... 2s. 

Paid for warfing y*" bell ... ... ... lod. 

ffor help to gett her out & Into y'' Church & 

to gett her up in y'' steepell ... ... 35-. 

Spent upon y*" Ringars &: y*" bell hangar ... 3^-. 

March 29, 1709. Paid Mr Broumfield* for new casting 
of y" 3"' Bell Thirteen pounds as apears by 
his bill ... ... ... ... ... 13//. 

* Broomfield was a local bell-hanger who evidently acted a.s agent for Robert Phelps. See 
under head of Stowting for a contract made for recasting, etc., with one of these local agents. 



Inscriptions. 143 

Paid him for eight pound of new Bell Mettell 8j. 

Paid him for takeing down y*" other 4 Bells and 

fastning the Brasses & gudjens and hanging 

them up again Three pounds 3//. 

Paid him for new Roles and new Salleys* ... 15.?. 

For ordering y'' Clapers & mending ye wheels \os. 

Paid Dauid Woodde for Carrying & bringing 

y'-' bell from Milhall 5^-. 

Paid Hodges for Beere y" Bell Hangar had 

willst he was heare ... ... ... ... 6^-. 

for Oyle for ye Bells ... ... ... ... 2^-. dd. 

Paid Will : Pett for Iron Worke Done about y" 

bells as apears by his bill ... ... ... \IL \^,s. 

1711-12 A new sett of bell ropes (as usual), £^\^ and 

also 
for a rope for y*" Saints bell ... ... ... 2s. (td. 

BADLESMERE. St. Leonard. i, formerly 3 Bells. 

I., 34-in. iosc^^l) i)o,id) mabc mc 1635 

This bell was formerly one of the ring at Reculver Church, which was dis- 
mantled early in the present century. How it came here I do not know ; 
there was only one bell in Hasted's time, but he notes that two others hud 
been " taken away and sold many years ago towards the repair of the Church." 
I suppose the survivor got cracked, and the present bell was bought to 
replace it. 

BAPCHILD. St. Laurence. i, formerly 3 Bells. 

L, 30-in. 0*0 ilK D i()C U U 5^ O O 

A very curious specimen of the handywork of William Oldfield, of Canter- 
bury, probably cast about 1550. For an account of it and engravings of the 
various stamps see p. 58. 

The other two bells were sold by the churchwardens to purchase the 
chandelier. In a continuation of Mr. Bryan Faussett's notes (by another 

*" Tlic worsted work on the ropes to save clialiiiL; and give a better t^rip. 



1 44 Inscriptions. 

hand) it is stated that the other two " were piously disposed off by the 
Parishioners to defray the expence of some Repairs." 

For service : Bell pulled up and rung, and then lowered and chimed. 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice of death is received ; unless at night, 
when it is rung at 8 a.m. next morning. Bell tolled for ten minutes, and 
then tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 for female. The tellers are also 
given before the funeral (a very unusual " use "). During the cholera epidemic 
it was found necessary to stop ringing the passing bell, the announcement of 
a fresh victim in this way apparently proving injurious to the living, scaring 
them, in fact, into the disease. 

No other peculiar uses, except in relation to " bell coom," or the dirty 
grease from the gudgeons, which is much sought after as an infallible cure for 
ringworm. 

Best thanks to the Rev. James Horan, Vicar. 

BARFRESTON. St. Mary. i Bell. 

I., 15-in. Blank. 

In 1758, Mr. Faussett notes here "two small bells without inscription." 

BAR HAM. St. John the Baptist. 4 Bells. 

I., 3oi-in. lOH^ k WIL^AR ^ MADE <^ ME ^ 1633 
II., 32|-in. Thomas Mears of London Founder 1834 
III., 34-in. BASIL O LUNN O CW O SK Q FECIT Q ME Q 

1730 O O O O 
IV., 37-in. SAMUELL KNIGHT MADE ME 1730 

In 1758, the 2nd bell was similarly inscribed to the treble. Mr. Faussett, 
however, states the date (on both) to be 1623. 

BARMING. St. Margaret. 5 Bells. 

L, 28-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1883 

MARGARITAIsI MARGARETA NUNTIO 
IL, 30-in. Hmtctc X^ctrc Ora X^xo U (Fig. 25) (Fig. 26) \j 

(Fig. 27) :Elobis 
III., 32-in. FILI DEI TE ROGAMUS AUDI NOS Imfarc; 

IV., 35-in. SANCTA TRINITAS MISERERE NOBIS I Mt^^RS & 

v., 38-in. LAUS DOMINI IN ECCLESIA SANCTORUM r^ '^^ ^"^^ ^' 



Inscriptions. 145 

No. 2 bell by Henry Jordan (see p. 43). 

Only three bells before 1SS3, apparently the survivors (i, 2, and 4) of a peal 
of four, as the frame is made for the latter number. 

The two recast bells (i and 4) were both by Joseph Hatch, and dated 
respectively 16 16 and 1629. The cost of the recasting and of the two new 
bells was borne by a local benefactor, Mr. Ellis. The dedication of the new 
ring is thus noticed in " Barming Bells and Home Words " for March, 1S84 : 

"The service of dedication of the bells was held on the nth of February, 
and was attended by a large congregation. The prayers were read by the 
Rev. J. H. Nowers, and after the second lesson, the clergy — among whom 
were the Rev. Canon Elwyn, the Rev. D. H. Whitehead, and the Rev. J. 
Alison — proceeded to the belfry, headed by the choir singing a beautiful and 
appropriate processional hymn, whose opening lines run thus : 

In Sinai's dreary waste 

The trumpet's silver call 
Summoned of old the Jewish host 

To feast and festival. 

A special form of dedicatory prayer was here read by the Rev. J. H. Nowers, 
after which the ringers sounded a short peal, and a final hymn was sung, 

beginning : 

Now at length our bells are mounted, 

To their holy place on high, 
Ever to fulfil their mission, 

Midway 'twixt the earth and sky. 

The Rev. Canon Elwyn then preached eloquently and impressively, pointing 
out how the various sounds of church bells affected Christians, and alluding 
to the inscription upon these bells, and to the generosity of the donor of 
them." 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. The usual tellers — 3 x 3 
for male and 3 x 2 for female— are used, and the age is tolled. 

Funerals : Bell tolled or chimed about 8 a.m., and tolled at intervals during 
the funeral. 

No regular custom as yet for Sunday services, the Rector wisely determining 
to get his ringers well-organized and trained first. 

Ringing in the early morning on the four great festivals— Easter, Christmas, 
Ascension Day, and Whitstin Day. 

U 



146 Inscriptions. 

Special local use on last night of year: Bells rung until 11.45, ^^^"^ prayer, 
then date of year struck on tenor (omitting the centuries). At midnight^ 
twelve struck on treble, and then a peal. 

Ringing also on loyal anniversaries. 

Best thanks to the Rev. T. W. Carr, Rector, who has framed an excellent 
set of belfry rules. 

BEARSTED. Holy Cross. 6 Bells. 

I., 28-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1877 
IT., 3o^in. Wcv ,^3.Ul]t1Gtinc .Soncf In i3^in'c :x3ei U © U 

III., 32-"'in. MEARS &" STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1877 

IV., 34-in. Robcrfus + mot + ine + fccif + 1 B tp 1590® 

v., 37-in. lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME ® 1606 
VI., 40-in. THO^ LESTER OF LONDON MADE ME WILLIAM 
LOT CH: WARDEN 1742 

The former treble was by Richard Phelps, dated 1729, and recording the 
names of its donors " W"' Lott Ch : W. Tho. AUman, W" Eagles, W" Sutton 
& divers other subscribers." 

The former No. 3 was by Thomas Hatch, and dated 1599. 

The stamps on No. 2 are Figs. 27, 26, and 25. 

BECKENHAM. St. George. 6 Bells. 

I., 29-in. The Rev° W Rose Rector Rob'^ Hoggart & Tho^ 
Randell Church Wardens George Grote & Rob"^ 
Tanner Overseers Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 1796 
II., 31-in. WIILIAM ■ LAI^BART MADE • A'E R L 1640 
III., 321-in. THOMAS BARTLET MADE ME 1624 
IV., 36^in. THOMAS BARTLET MADE THIS BELL 1629 © 
v., 4o^-in. Same. 1625 © 

VI., 45-in. Same. 1629 © 

T. R. E. Item iiij bells of bellmetell suted in the steple whereof on was 
broken. 
Item ij litle sacryng bells of brasse. 

Mem. : " one hand bell and one Sacrament bell of brasse " had 
been sold. 
In 1454, Ralph Langle of Beckenham by his will bequeathed " ordinacioni 
nove campane ibidem iij' iiij''." — {Ex inform. Mr. E. H. IV. Dunkin in 
'■'■ Reliquary'''' for 1877-8.) 



Inso'iptions. 147 

Christchurch. I Bell. 

Modern church (1S76) with presumably one modern bell. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

Modern church (1S7S) with presumably one modern bell. 

St. Barnabas. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

St. James. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

St. Michael and All Angels. i Bell. 

Presumably only one modern bell. 

St. Paul. i Bell. 

Modern church (1873), and has probably one bell of that date. 

BEKESBOURNE. St. Peter. 4 Bells. 

I., 3o-in.\ 

^^/■' -^"!"' MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1SS4 
III., 34-m. 

IV., 37-in./ 

These supersede a brace of inscriptionless bells. 

Passing bell rung as soon as possible after death. Tellers — first 2>'^ Z 
for man, 3 x 2 for woman, 3x1 for child, then jjause and toll. 
Funerals : Bell tolled at 8 a.m., and at time of interment. 
Bells chimed for divine service. 
Best thanks to the Vicar, the Rev. H. J- Wardcll. 

BELVEDERE. All Saints. i Bell. 

I., 2i-in. W S 1757 
See page 105. 



U 2 



14S Inscriptions. 

BENENDEN. St. George. 8 Bells. 

I., 30-in. Tho"' Mears of London Fecit 1802 
II., 31-in. Same. 
III., 33-in. JOHN TAYLOR & C° LOUGHBOROUGH 1882 
IV., 35-in. The Rev° Joseph Dunn Vicer Sam"- Hunt & Alex'' 
Wheller Ch Wardens Lester and Pack of London 
Fecit 1764 
v., 38-in. T. Mears of London Fecit 1819 
VI., 40-in. Kunquam Errabo In° Saunders l : l : b : vie : Geo : 
Gibbon Ric : Grant Edm : Gibbon Sam : Hunt 
Managers R. P. Fecit 17 19 
VII., 44-m. DEUS BENEDICAT FUNDATORIBUS NOSTRIS IS 
GG EG RG SH PHILL : GIBBON ARMIGER 
DINISSIMUS BENEFACTOR 
VIII., 49-in. NEWCAST 1753 THE REV^ M'' lOHN WILLIAMS 
VICAR lOHN CARLY SEN'' & THOMAS RICHARD- 
SON CH: WARDENS THOMAS LESTER & THO' 
PACK OF LONDON FECIT 

BETHERSDEN. St. Margaret. 6 Bells and Sanctus. 

Sanctus, 16-in. W H 1662 

I, 30-in. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1759 
II., 33-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1634^ 

W Hj 
III., 35-in. W" Mears of London Fecit 1787 

IV., 38 J -in. ^^m. \ mrwi^w-^B \ j^^mmj-b \ :ei©-- 

v., 42-in. WILLIAM HATCH MADE ME WP FW CW © 1662 
VI., 45-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT TW CW TM CW 
© 1630 

See p. 15 for mention of the 4th bell. 

T. R. E. Item v great bells in the steeple. 

Item a Sanctus bell. 
Bells chimed on Sunday for services. 



Inscriptions. 1 49 

Thanks to Vicar, Rev. Robt. Palmer. 

The churchwardens' accounts here are singularly perfect from the year 15 14 
to the present time— there is, I think, only one year wanting. I am very 
much indebted to their present custodian (Mr. James Adams) for access to 
them, and beg to thank him most heartily for his kind hospitality on the 
occasion of my visit to make the following extracts : — 

15 14-15 It. payed for a newe Belroppe ... ... \xd. 

It. payed for mendynge of the bawdrykks for 

the year iij^. 

(This entry occurs annually for many years 
— it was evidently the sexton's yearly 
allowance.) 
1515-16 Ite. paid for halfe a skynof led', for bawdrykks xd. 

Ite. paid for mendyng of & the 

belwelys ... ... ... ... ... ij^f- 

Ite. paid for makyng of bawderykks ... ... i]d. 

Ite. paid to Elys of plukle to se the bells yf 

they had nede of re,pacions ... ... ... \']d. 

Ite. paid for a nyw belrop ... ... ... ix^. 

Ite. paid for mendyll of a bell wele .. ... \\]d. 

Ite. paid for a planke for a bele wyle... ... \\]d. 

Ite. payd for mendynge of too bele whelys . . . iiji". 

Ite. paid for too nyw belropys ... ... \\]d. 

It. payed for a newe belrope ... ... ... \\]d. ob. 

Itm. payd to John Hasell for yerne vvorke to 

the grete bell and the funt xviij^. 

Itm. payd to Edward Haulnast for mendyng 

of all the belles xviija'. 

Itm. payd for a new bel Rouppe ... ... xjd?. 

Itm. payd for a galan of oycl ... ■■■ ••■ xvjV. 

Itm. payd for mendyng of the hand belles ... iiij^. 

1522-23 Itm. payd for cord for the sancts bcl ob. 

Itm. payd to John Haseel of tent'dyn for men- 
dyng of ij bell clappers ... ••• •■• iij-^' 

Itm. payd to I'homas blake for beryng foreth 
of the forsayd cleppers and brcyngyng a 
geyn ... .•■ •■• ••• •■• ii'j'^- 



I5I6- 


-17 


I5I7- 


-18 


I5I8- 


-19 


I5I9- 


-20 


1520- 


-2 1 


I52I- 


-22 



1 50 Inscriptions. 

Itm. payd for ij new bell Rouppes ijj-. 

1523-24 Itm. payd for mendyng of the stokys of the 

bellesse iiij^. 

Itm. payd for a new bel roop .. ... ... xij^. 

Itm. payd for a new bauwedreke ... ... \d. 

Itm. payd for mendyng of bauwed Rekys ... iijV. 

1525 Ite. paid for having doune of the sanctus bel 

cS: for mendyng of hym .. ... ... ij^. 

Ite. paid for ij nyw belropys ... ... ... xx^/. 

Ite. paid to Robert Sylke for a nyw bawedryk y]d. 

Ite. paid for half a horshede ... ... ... \d. 

1526 Ite. paid for ij nywe bellropys... ... ... xx^. 

1528 Ite. paid to Edmunde Holnest for mendynge 

of the bells ... ... ... ... ... iij^. 

Ite. paid for a nyw bawdryk ... ... ... \\)d. 

Ite. paid to John mapyllysden for stokking of 

the sanctus bell ... ... ... ... yM]d. 

Ite. paid for mendynge of a bras for a bell ... \]d. 
Ite. paid for a j^cell of led' to a mende baw- 

drykks ... ... ... ... ... \\\]d. 

Ite. paid for makyng of a bawdryk ... ... ij^. 

1529 Ite. paid for ij nyw belropys ... ... ... xxj/s'. 

Ite. paid for mendyng of a vyndow in the 

stepyl ... ... ... ... ... yd. 

1530 ffirst paid for mendynge of bawdriks ... ... iij^. 

Ite. paid for ij new belropys ... ... ... xviij^- 

Ite. paid for too nyw bawdrykks ... ... \\\)d. 

1531 Ite. paid for iij nyw belropys ... ... ... xxj^. 

1532 Ite. paid for halfe a horsse hede of lether ... -md. 

1533 lie. payd for mendyng of the bells weylys ... viij^'. 
Ite. payd for ij nyw belropys ... ... ... xvj^. ob. 

Ite. payd for mendyng of one of the canstyks 

& a handbell... ... ... ... ... xvj^ 

11534 Ite. paid for a nyw belrop ... ... ... \y.d. 

1535 Ite. paid for a nyw belroppe ... ... ... xj^. 

1536 Ite. paid for too nywe belropys ... ... xix<2^. 

Ite. payd for a nyw bawdryk ... ... ... ij^. 



Inscriptions. 1 5 1 

Ite. paid for too moo other beiropys ... ... ij^-. 

1537 Ite. payd for a nywe belrope ... ... ... ix^. ob. 

153S fifirst paid for ij nywe beiropys... ... ... xv\\]d. 

Ite. paid for a nothir nyw belrop ... ... hid. 

Ite. paid for makyng of a box for one of the 

bells iiij^. 

1539 Ite. paid for mendyn of too clapys of the bells ixs, 

Ite. paid for mendyng of a handbell ... ... vd. 

154.0 Itni. payde for mendyng of the bells wylse ... vij^. 

Itm. payde for myndyng of a claper of a belle. . . \]d. 

Itm. payde for iij bellropese ... ... ... ij^-. viiij^/. 

Itm. payde for haufe a horse hyde ... ... xij^. 

Itm. payde for a newe bawdryke to Robert 

Sylke... ... ... ij^. 

1 541 Itm. payde for myndynge of a clapper of a 

belle ... ... ... ... ... ... n\]s. \i\]d. 

1542 Itm. payde for bawdrykes ... ... ... n]d. 

1542 Itm. payde for myndynge of a clapper of a 

belle xvj//. 

Itm. payde for a newe baudryke ... ... '^d. 

Itm. payde for iiij newe bellropes ... ... \\]s. n\]d. 

Itm. payde for myndynge of the sanse belle ... ob. 

1543 Itm. payde to Waterman for myndynge of the 

bele n]d. 

and for mete and drynke at the same tyme ... iiij^. 

Itm. payde for myndynge of the belle whcylls 'yi. 
Itm. payde for hanggynge vpe of the rope of 

the sance belle ... ... ... ... jd. 

Itm. payde for bawedrykes to the syxtyn ... iijd. 

1544 Itm. payde for a baderyke ... ... ... y']d. 

Itm. payde for ij new belle ropes ... ... xx]d. 

Itm. payde for myndynge of the grcate belle \d. 

Itm. payde for myndynge of the bawdrikcs ... iij^. 

1545 Itm. payde for ij nywe belleropes ... ... ij.r. vj^. 

Itm. payde for myndynge of the grctc bell ... \d. 

Itm. payde for a lyne for the smalle belle ... yf. ob. 

Itm. payde to the syxtyn for bawderykes . . . 'i\]d. 



1 5 2 Inscripfions. 

1546 Itm. paycle to Water Wythe for myndyng of 

y° secundc bell ... ... ... ... iij^- 

Itm. payde for a nywe bawderyke ... ... vj^/. 

Itm. payde for wyte ladder ... ... ... \v]d. 

Itm. payde for makynge of a bawdryke ... ij^- 

Itm. payde for bawdrykes to thj syxtyn ... iij^- 

1547-48 Itm. payde for belles ropes ... ... ... \'S. 

1550 It. payd ffor a rope to y" sants belle ... ... iiij<^' 

It. payd to Symo Knyght ffor mendyng off y"" 

belle ... vjd'. 

155 1 Itm. p"^ to Ralfe Pellon for & for a 

pynne for the bawdricke of the gret bell ... iij^. 

Itm. p"^ to Thomas Mawdesle for two bawde- 

rickes one for the gret bell and the othtr for 

the thred bell \]S. \'\\]d 

Itm. p'' to Ralfe Pellon for turninge of the thred 

bell claper xvj^. 

Itm. p'' for a quart of oyle for the Bells ... \d. 

1554 It. p'' for whyte ledder & mendyn of the thyrd 

bell wheyll ix^. 

It. payd for on pyntt of oyle for the bells ... iij^. ob. 

It. p'' to Rayffe pelland for leron worke for the 

fourth bell viij^. 

It. for my costs at Canterburye when I bar- 

gaynyd for y" bell ... ... ... . • • viij^. 

It. p'Vto the bellfounder to bynd the bargayne iiij^. 

It. in expencys at the fechyng of y"" same bell xvj^. 

It. p"" to lengle for a bell whyle and hys ex- 

pensys viji-. \]d. 

It. p"^ to Rayffe pelland for leron worke for 

bells xix^. 

It. p'^ to myselffe for tymbre & pvision to haue 

vp the greatt bell vi-. 

1555 Itm. p'^ to William Turner for mendyng the 

bell whyle v^. 

Itm. p"^ to John Bale for makynge of the bell 

whyle vjj. \\\]d. 



Inscriptions. 153 

Itm. p"^ for clepis about the bell whylls ... iij^. 

Itm. p'' for vj tupps for the buckell for the 

baldryks of the Bells ... ... ... \]d. 

Itm. p*^ for makynge of the Bells and mendynge 

of the clappers for the Bells ... ... vij^. 

1556 Itm. p'' to John Sale for makynge of a bell 

whyle and mendynge of the other whiles . . . vij.y. 

1557 Itm. p'* for my expencf at Canterbure when 

I made Bargayne w^ the bellfounder ... ix^. 

Itm. p"^ for my expencf there when the Inden- 
tures where settled ... ... ... ... ix^. 

Itm. p'^ to John Wedtherden for his labour 

and expencf to Cantourbure the same tyme xvj^. 

Itm. p'* for hauynge dovvne of the bell out of 

the Steeple ... ... ... ... ... y\]d. 

Itm. p'' expenc^ when the bell was caried to 

Cantourbury ... ... ... ... ... \\]s. \]d. 

Itm. payd to John Glou' for carynge of the same 

bell to Cantourbury ... ... ... ... \s. 

Itm. for my owne labour when the bell was 

hanged vppe ... ... ... ... vj^. 

Itm. p'^ to John Waterman for hauynge uppe of 

the same bell ... ... ... ... iiiji". 

Itm. p'' to John Wedtherden for writtyng of the 
Indenture and obligacons betwene the Bel- 
founder and the Church Wardens ... ... viij^. 

Itm. p'' for paper ... \\\\d. 

Itm. p'' to William Oldefelde for Shootynge of 

the bell ... ... ... ... ... xxxiij.?. iiij^. 

Itm. p'' for mendynge of one of the bell wheles \d. 

Itm. p'' to Raffe Pelland for mendynge the thred 

bell claper ... ... . , ... ... \\d. 

1558 Itm. payd to Nycolas Harrys for myndyng of 

the bele clapper ... ... ... ... vs. 

Itm. payd to maudesle for wyt ledder ... \)d. 

1559 Itm. payd to thomas lophome for beryng of the 

clapper of the grcte belle ... ... ... iiij^- 



154 Insc7'iptions. 

Itm. payd for a bele Rope ... ... ... xx^. 

1560 Itm. for a lyne for the lytylle belle viij^. 

1561 Itm. layd out for the bele clapper ... ... '\)s. \\\]d. 

Itm. payd for fetting of the seyd clapper ... v^. 

Itm. payd for hangyng of the belle ... ... \]s. \d. 

Itm. payd for yerne worke ... ... ... vj^. 

Itm. payd to the belfounder ... ... ... v//. 

Itm. payd to Rychard whatle (?) for hangynge 

of the belle viiji. 

1562 Itm. payde for ij bele Roppes ... ... \\]s. \)d. 

Itm. for a bele Roppe ... ... ... ... xx^. 

1563 It. for mendyng of the beles ... ... ... \]s. \]d. 

It . payd for a bel Rop ... ... ... ... ij-^. 

1564 It. layd out for mendyng y"" bel claper ... \s, \\\]d. 

It. for a Rop for y*" for bel xv^. 

It. payd to Raff pelan for mendyng iij clapers iiji'. 

1565 It. payd to Rychard Davy for mendyng y" bel 

whell iiij^. 

1566 Item payd y'' sexton to Ring y" bel ... ... \]d. 

Item payd for whyt lether & for oyell ... \]d. 

Item layd out for a bawdrack ... ... ... iiij^. 

Item for a bell rop ... ... ... ... xv\\\d. 

Item payd to gillam for turnyng of a claper ... iiij^. 

Item for a pvnche to pvnche y*" bawderickes \]d. 

Item for a bawderick ... ... ... ... iiij^. 

1567 Itm. for mendyng of a bell claper ... ... \]s. \\d. 

Itm. payd for makyng of bellwhyll and for 

mendyng of a nother bel wheyll ... ... xj.y. iiij^. 

Itm. layd for mendyng of the batheryk & 

lether v]d. 

1568 Itm. payd to Gyllam for yern worke about y*" 

beles vji-. iiij^. 

Itm. payd to Thomas Lopham & Jarman turner 

for makynge y*" bell stokes ... ... ... xjj. 

Itm. for tow bell stokes ... ... ... vj". 

Itm. for ij bell ropes \\]s. \\\]d. 

Itm. for lether for y*" bell ropes ... ... wd. 



Inscriptions. 1 5 5 

Itm. for mendynge iij badrekes ... ... \]d. 

Itm. for ij newe badrekes ... ... ... viiji/. 

Itm. for mendynge tow badrekes ... ... m]d. 

1569 Itm. for a bell Rop ... ... ... ... \x\]d. 

Itm. payd to gyllam for mendynge the bell 

claper ... ... ... ... ... vj^. 

Itm. payd for a new badrec ... ... ... iiij<^. 

1571 Itm. payd for lether for the bell ropes ... \\]d. 
Itm. for grece for the beles ... ... ... '\]d. 

1572 Itm. payd to gyllam for mendynge the sheres 

of the beles iiij^^- 

Itm. payd for mendynge of the bell wheles ... \]d. 

Itm. payd for horse lether to make badreckes vn]d. 

Itm. payd for makynge of a badrecke . . . iiij^. 
Itm. payd to the sayd george (larken) for towe 

dayes work about the beles ... ... ... ij-^. 

Itm. payd to Jarman Turner for ij dayes about 

the same worke ... ••• ••• ••• 'j-^- 

Itm. payd to Raff Pelland mendynge the yerne 

worke about the beles ... ... ... ij^- vj^/. 

Itm. payd to hym for persynge the skyrgogen 

of the fowerthe bell viij^/. 

Itm. payd for makyng a badreck for the great 

bell iiij'2'- 

1573 Itm. payd for mendynge the bell frame ... xviij^. 
Itm. payd for a bell rope xviij^. 



1578 Itm. payd to a carpenter to stoke & mendynge 

the bellframe viij:f. \d. 

1579 Itm. payd for toe newe bell Ropes ... ... iij->"- ^]d. 

Itm. payd for mendynge the gujen of the 

fowerth bell viijd'. 

Itm. for a corde for the letle bell ... ••• j^- 

Itm. payd unto gyllam for mendynge the 

gugen of the great bell & for a yrone wcop xrf. 

Itm. payd for mendyng the claper of the thurdc 

bell iiij-^- 

X 2 



156 Jnscriptunis. 

1582 Itm. for nayles for the letle bell house ... ]d. 
Itm. payd for mendynge the letle belhouse ... iiij"^. 

1583 Itm. payd for halfe a hors hyde to make 

badreckes ... ... ... ... ... xiiij^. 

ij newe bell ropes ... ... ... ... \\\)s. \]d. 

1587 tallow for the badreke lether ... ... ... ]d. ob. 

gillam for a Keye for one of the belles ... ob. 

1588 x\ "sese" made by general consent for recasting 

the great bell, with a list of the contributors, 

commencing " ffyrst m'' wyllyam lovelace 

esquire xx^-.," the total being x//. \\\]s. 

The expences and charges that the sayd 

churchwardens have bene at aboute the 

newe makynge of the sayd bell and what 

money the bell founder receaved for his 

worke accordinge unto his bargayne made 

w"" the parisheners and also for mettall 

that was lakynge to make her of suffyciente 

substance and tunable accordynge to his 

bargayne. 

ffyrst, wee spente when wee made ou'' bargayn 

w* hym iiij^- 

Itm. wee spente when the bell was taken down ix^. 

Itm. wee payd unto Wyllyam Brooke to make 

a weyth to wey her ... ... ... ... xij^/. 

Itm. wee spente when the bell was carrye forth \\)s. \\\]d. 

Itm. wee spente when wee wente to se the bell 

shoott x^- 

Itm. wee spent when the bell was shoott . . . \]S. \\\]d. 

Itm. wee spent more when wee went for the 

bell ij.f. iiij^. 

Itm. payd for a newe staple for the bell ... xvj<^. 

Itm. payd for buckles and brades for the bell x^. 

Itm. we spente when the bell hanged up ... xd. 

Itm. payd to Wyllyam brooke for his help 

then ... ... ... ... ... ... \\)d. 

Itm. payd to george larken for his help then xvjV. 



Inscriplions. 157 

Itm. layd out then for horslether to make 

badreckes ij^. \\d. 

Itm. we weare charged further for that wee cold 

not receave the money of those that wear 

sessed to paye the bell founder accordynge 

to bargayn he did procure a wrytt agaynst us 

the w''"' charges weare ... ... ... ijm. 

Itm. wee payd the baylly for a bande & copie 

of the wrytt ... ... ... ... ... viij^. 

Itm. wee payd more to the baylly after we ded 

agre w"' the bell founder for the wryttes ... ij^. viij^. 

Itm. wee spente when we wente to agre w* 

hym v\\]d. 

Itm. wee spent more when we w^ent to paye 

hym xij^. 

Itm. wee payd for drawynge the action ... yX\\]d. 

Itm. payd for sertayne plankes to make pro- 

vysyon to hange up the bell ... ... \]s, 

Itm. payd the bell founder for shuttynge the 

bell ... ... ... ... ... ... iiij//. yis. 

Itm. payd for thurtene scorr and tene pounde 

of mettall for that she laked so muche of her 

substance to make her tunable at 'vixyi. the 

pounde the whol som is ... ... ... iiij//. X5. 

Itm. payd to John Harrin for wryttynge ou"^ 

fyrst bylles of this ses ... ... ... xij^. 

Itm. payd him mor for wryttynge out this ou" 

accompt to be layd in at the courte when 

wee sued andrewe and capenter for that thaye 

refused to paye the said ses ... • ■ . xij^'. 

Itm. payd hym more for wryttynge this ou' 

accompt into the churche booke ... ... xij^/. 

The som of theis Receyts is x//. yX\)s. xj^. 

1588 Itm. p'' the bell founder for mendyngc the 

seconde bell &: mendynge the claper ... iij.f. vj^. 

1589 Itm. payd for mendynge t\: puttynge in the 

gugen of the 4 bell ... ... ... ... s\\yi. 



158 Inscriptions. 

Itm. payd to brooke & larken for mendynge 

the frame of the 4 bell ... ... •.• xxdT. 

1 59 1 Itm. payd to Kynge for mendynge the bowll 
of the fowerth bell claper and the gugen of 
the tenor and for brads ... ... ... viJ5. 

Itm. payd to Wyllyam Brooke for newe hang- 

inge of the tenor and mendynge the frame xij^. 

1595 Item payed to John Philip for mendinge the 

badricks of the bellse agaynst the crownacion 

day xij^- 

Itm. payed for mendinge the third bell whille 

with one elapse of iorne ... ■•. ■.• vj^. 

Itm. payed for thre tovets of coUes when the 

Bell was sodred ix^. 

Itm. payed for sodringe of the gret bell ... xxx^. 

1596 ij newe bell ropes ... ... ... ... vij.f. y.d. 

1598 2 bellropes at Canterbury the 26 of July ... v^-. xixyi. 

1600 Item layd out to the bell founder the second 

of november 1600 for shooting our bell ... iij//. xvj.f. 
Item payd to John Hills for his helpe to stocke 

our bell \\\]d. 

Item payd to Thomas Maslye for carrying our 

bell and bringing her agayn ... ... vj.y. 

1 60 1 Item layed out when he was sited to court 

about the Bells 
Item layd out for a great Rope 
Item spent when we had in the bells ... 
Item payd for carying of the bells to Brom- 

feild xxjj. 

Item payd for a peece of tymber to take up the 

bells v]d. 

Item payd to M'' Grezbrocke for wryting a bonde 

& a presentment ... ... ... ... xij^. 

Item payd to John Hills for having out of the 

bells xxij^. 

Item payd to John Murvell for worke about the 

bells \]s. V]d. 



3^- 


ij^. 


ix5. 


iiij^. 


ij^. 


iij^. 



Inscriptions. 159 

Item payd to John Hills for hauing up of the 

bells and for hanging of them 
Item to the smith of Woodchurch for mending 

of a clapper ... 
Item payd to Georg Gadsbye for making tS: 

mending a clapper ... 
Item payd to George Morris for mending of a 

clapper 
Item payd to the smith of Woodchurch for 

making of a clapper .. 
Item payd for carrying forth the clapper and 

other worke .. . 
Item payd to the smith of AVoodchurch for 

mending of a clapper 
Item payd to Georg Morris for mending of a 

clapper 
Item payd for carrying for of an other clapper 

to mend ... ... ... ... ... \)d. 

Item Hatch had for shooting of our bells & 

for the metall of the overpluse that went 

into them ... ... ... ... ... 14/. iSjt. 

A note of remembrance of the waight tSi 

charges of the bells 
Imprimis the great bell wayed xiij hundereth 

& a half 
Item the fourth bell wayed xiiij hundereth be- 
fore they weare new shoote 

Item the great bell wayed xv hundereth & 

xxj pownde 
Item the fowrth bell wayed xiij hundereth when 

they weare new made 



vj^. 


X}d. 


iiiji". 


v]d. 


viiji'. 




iij.y. 




vj^. 






viij^. 


\]S. 


x^. 


\]S. 





1606 Item for a rope for the chauncell bell* ... y]d. 

1608 Pd to Robert Hubbart for newe boulcing of 

the clapper of the fourth bell ... ... xijj-. 

* I suppose this must have l)een the sanctus bell, placed in a little pent-house over tiie 
chancel arch. See next entry hut one. It is now at tlie top of the tower. 



1 60 Inscriptions. 

1609 p'^ for mendeing the Saints bell house ... ij^. vj^. 

1612 Item paied to the Bellfounders man when hee 

tooke the bell ... ... ... ... ij^. 

Spent more on him in bread and beare ... v^. 

Item when I went to Feversham to gat the bell 

carried to London for my dinner ... ... \]d. 

Item for my horse meate ... ... ... y]d. 

Item spent when wee tooke downe the bell in 

bread and beare ... ... ... ... xij^. 

Item spent when I went to London to see the 

waight of the bell for fowre dales ... ... iiij.y. 

Item for my goinge upp and downe in the 

barge... ... ... ... ... ... iiij^. 

Item for my horsemeate at Graves ende ... xviij</. 

Item at Canterburie the nexte dale after mid- 

sommer dale when I went to gett longer 

time for the bell ... ... ... ... xij^. 

Item paied to John Hills for takinge downe of 

the bell and to helpe loade him againe ... xviij^/. 

Item laid owte for iij bell ropes which waied 

one and twentie pounde and a half... ... viij^. 

Item for casting of the bell xiij.y. 

Item for my expences when I fetcht the bell at 

feversham ... ... ... ... ... xij^. 

Item paid to Richard Balie for carriinge of the 

bell to feversham and bringing of her againe xx.y. 

161 3 Item beinge sited for the bell... ... ... ij.^. 

Item to my proctor for a motion for a time for 

the bell \s. 

Item the fourth of Julie for the bell founders 

man in bread and beere ... ... ... viij^. 

Item the xviij"' of Julie spent upon the bell 

founder himself supper and breakefast ... \]s. \]d. 

Item spent in bread and wine when the bell 

was taken downe ... ... ... ... '\]s. ]d. 

Item for writing the bondes betweene the Bell- 
founder and the Churchwarden ... ... ]s. 



Inscriptions. 1 6 1 

Item to Hatch the bell founder for three hun- 
dred and a half of nue bell mettle at x'' the 
pounde ... ... ... ... ... xvj//. vj.f. viij^. 

Item laied out to Henrie Carpenter for carringe 

the ould bell and bringing the nue... ... X5. 

Item laied owte to John Hills about the Bell 

for five daies worke at xviij'' the daie ... vij.y. \]d. 

Item for the bellfounders Brothers horse and 

dinner viij^/. 

1614 Item laied out for the Bellfounders dinner at 
Phillipps the 26th daie of Aprill and for his 

horse xviij^. 

14 May Item laied out onto the ropemaker for fovvre 

ropes... ... ... ... ... ... viiji". 4^- 

23 May Item paied to Hatch the Bell-founder 10//. xijy. xviij^/. oh. 

1 62 1 — 12 April, p'' to Alexander Cooke for 4 bellropes 13.?. 

It. p'' to y'^ Bellfounder for suting y° bell ... 7//. io.y. 
It. p^ to hym for shooting y*" brases ... ... i//. \s. 2d. 

It. p*^ to him for 200 & 5 pownde of bell mettell 

at lo^ y" pownd 9//. ^os. \od. 

It. p'' to M'' Trusse for carryeing & recaryeing 

y" bell & o"' charges i ojt. dd. 

It. p^ to Mat. Uavye for taking downe y" bell 
& hanging her up& for fetting in y'' brases... i//. 
1623 Accounte for the belles : 

Inprimis spent when we went to bargayne at 

Lenham 2^. 6^. 

It. paid to Goodman finner for 9 tonne of 

timber 
It. to Goodman Hunte for carryeing of it ... 
It. to John Brickenden of Woodchurch for 3 

planks to make wheeles 
It. for fetching of them 
It. to Thomas Milkcsteede for 80 foote & half 
of ynch borde & half a hundred of ([^ters & 
other peces & for fetching them ... ... 13^. Ad. 

It. to Goodman Crust for making the frame cv 
hanging the belles ... .. ••. ••• 14^'- Sj;. 

Y 



'Ji- 


ly. 




ll. 


\os. 






gs. 


6d 




2S. 


Sd. 



1 62 Inscriptions. 

It. p'^ to Crust for putting up peeces of tymber 

to stay the ropes tS: for saweing those peeces 

& for a gudgen & a boult ... ... ... 135. 

It. for 3 payre of gloues for his men when they 

did reare the frame ,. . ... ... ... is. 

It. spent on them when they had done their 

worke ... ... ... ... ... \s. 

It. for tuning the belles ... ... ... i//. 

It. to Adman for ,5 bellropes ... ... ... 14^. 2d. 

It. to Crust since for making a newe wheele & 

for trussing the belles ... ... ... ^AS. 

It. to Arthur for 2 payre of sheres for stokes & 

for making boultes &c &c ... ... ... 35. 3^. 

It. to Goodman Hunte for fetching a tymber 

balte at Daniel Newers at Plucklye to make 

stockes for y'^ belles ... ... ... ... 5-^. 

1630-1-2 p*^' to the bell fownder for bell mettell ... i//. 12^-. od. 

p'^' for a payer of Indentuers and a bond for to 

have the bell cast ... ... ... ... 35. 

p^' for our expences and for pasture for our 

beasts when we were at the bell fownders ... loi'. dd. 

p'' for a sett of bell ropes ... ... ... 17.^. \d. 

p'' to the bell fownder for shoottinge of the 

great bell ... ... ... ... ... 7//. 

p^ to John Hills for 2 dayes work about the 

bells ... ... ... ... ... ... y. 

(Two similar entries for three and two days' 
work respectively.) 
p^' to Thomas Milsted for a peece of tymber 

to make a rowle ... ... ... ... 3^'. 

p"^' for 2 levers and for rayles ... ... ... 35. 

p"^ for bread and beere for those which did 

help up w'^i the bell .. . ... ... ... li-. 6^/. 

p"' for carrying of the bell ... ... ... \li. 

paid for fetching of a load of stone to woigh 

the bell ... ... ... ... ... \s. ^d. 

paid to Henry Stonstreet for a horse to the 

bell fownders house when we carried the bell gd. 



Inscriptions. 163 

1633 Ite. for a sett of bell ropes i//. 2^-. Gd. 

1634 Paid to the bell fownder for casting of the 

bell* 4//. 13J. 4^. 

Paid more to the bell fownder for mettell to 

put in the bell i//. 4^-. 

Paid for the hire of a horse when wee carried 

the bell for 3 dayes is. 6d. 

Paid to Hills for hanging of the bell ... ... 2s. 6d. 

Paid for our expences when wee carried and 

fett the bell is. 6d. 

Paid for expences for those w'^'^ did help up 

w'h the bell 3^-. 

1637 Ite. for a sett of bell ropes in weight 52'' at 7'' 

by the pound ... ... ... ... i/i. los. ^d. 

1640 (A sett weighing 50 lb. cost ;£i is. 6d.) 

1650 Item to Richard Arrowes for ringing the bells 

and his other service about y'^ church ... i//. loi". 
1662-63 Itm. p'' to W" Hatch the bell founder for 
castinge the fourth Bell and the 5"' Bellf 
accordinge to Articles of Agree' indented ... 12H. it^s. 
Itm. p'' for draweinge three coppies of the 

Articles of Agreemt and two double Bonds ^s. 

Itm. for the hyre of a Horse three journeyes to 

the Bellfounder ... ... ... ... 4^'. 6d. 

Itm. expended those three dales ... ... 4s. 6d. 

Itm, spent when the Bellfounder tookethe bells 

to cast ... ... ... . ■ • ... 6.V. 

Itm. spent upon those y' helped to take downe 

the Bells ... ... ... ... ... y. 4^/. 

Itm. spent when wee p'' the Bellfounder upon 

him and the Ringars ... ... ... 2s. 6d. 

Itm. spent when the bell was taken out of the 

waggon when shee was brought home ... is. 2d. 

Itm. p'' Thomas Tucker for work about tlie 

Bells 9s. 

* The i)rcscnt 2n(l, then the trelile of the rinj;;. 
t The sanclus aiul the prebeul 5lh. 

Y 2 



\li. 2S. 6d. 



IS. 


6d. 


4^. 


6d. 


2S. 





1 64 Inscriptions. 

Itm. p'' Nathaneel Burr for caryinge the Bells 
to the Bellfounder and fetchinge y'" backe 
againe 

Itm. p'' for a new Barderckc for y° Saint's bell i^. 

1666-67 1*^11 ropes, 43 lbs. cost 6d. per lb. 

1683 To James Burr in full for hanginge of the 

Bells ?>ii- 

paid for expences when y*" bells were new 

hanged 2//. os. 3^. 

1690 To Edm Leedes for drawing the Keyes of the 

bells & putting in a batherick to y° tenor ... 4^- 

To him for hemming the' Hosthaire for the 

window & splicing Bell ropes is. 

1 69 1 To the Ringers on the Thankesgiving day 

(? Nov. 17) 

1692 To John Marks for trimminge the Bells 
1700 p'' to y'-' Ringer at gunpouder ploat day 
1706 p'' for Ringing at y'' day of Reioycing for 

Malbory 2s. Gd. 

A set of bell ropes purchased regularly every 
year at this time. 
1713-14 Spent when the bell was taken down ... 2s. 

Paid to M"" Edmunds for carrying the Bell to 

and from London ... ... ... ... los. 

Paid to W"^ Small Rob' Beeching & John 

Brenchley for new hanging y" Bells as p Bill 2//. 4^. 

Paid Tho Bright for carrying the bell to and 

from Maidstone ... ... ... ... 135. 

Paid M'' Phelps for new casting y"" Second Bell* 

weighing 8 Hund. ... ... ... ... 8//. 12s. 

Paid for four Letters from y" Bell founder ... is. 

1 7 16 (iave the Ringers upon the Kings safe return 55. 

1721 We whose names are subscribed to the above 
written account with severall other inhabi- 
tants of this parish do agree & order for y" 
time to come that ten shillings & no more 

* The present 3rd. 



Inscriptions. 



165 



shall be given by y° churchwardens to y^ 
ringers in maner following to wit half a crown 
on y*" Kings birth day & his cronation day 
y^ princes Birthday and y*" fifth day of 
November. 
1736 P'' to M"" ffurner as by bill_;^6 12^-.* 

1759 Paid John Foster of Egerton for making a new 

frame for the Bells & Furnishing a new 
Treble Bell and Hanging of the six Bells & 
making the wood work for 6 Stays ... 

1760 Paid Robert Gilbert for altering the frames and 

the Hanging of the Bells 
1784 Paid Williams Simmons for two Setts of Bell 
Ropes 

1787 p'* M"" Steddy for a New Bell 

p'^ M'^ Steddy for reparing the Bells ... 
p'^ M'' Steddy for new hanging the Bells 



95//. 15^. 
8//. 155. 



3/^ 




S^li 




i/i 


\s. 


Ui 


i^ 



<\d. 



I., 2l|- 



n., 25-in. 



UL, 27-in. 



BETTESHANGER. St. Mary. 3 Bells. 

m^j^^^%j^ ^j^m^iw^ (^^ij^m%^ 

XHcars :Floun6cr :Eion6on XH6cccIi^ 

J WARNER & SONS CRESCENT FOUNDRY LONDON 

1854 

The treble (by William Oldfeild, of Canterbury, see p. 55) is the survivor 
of a ring of three, all of doubtless the same date — some time late in 
Henry VHI.'s reign. We get the following account of them in Hasted 
(Folio Edition, vol. iv., p. 185): 

" On the treble bell is this legend in old English letters, ' Maria plena gracia 
mater misericordie.' An escutcheon, on each side of which 'Sea Maria.' 
The arms: Quarterly 1st, Cocks; 2nd, per chevron, in chief 3 escallops; 3rd, 
two bends ; 4th, a bend ermine between two swans, impaling Clifford and 
Guldeford, (quartered with Colepeper. 

* Sec p. 105, and under Plaxtol, post. 



1 66 



Inscriptions. 



"On the 2nd bell, ' Istoe tres noloe sunt fratrum dona duorum.' An 
escutcheon — on each side ' Scs Thomas.' Arms : Cocks and the other 
three coats first above mentioned. 

" On the 3rd bell, ' Hie olim pastor atq : patronus erant.' Arms the same 
as the 2nd bell, and under, ' Scs Edmundus Rex.' 

" The arms are all reversed from what is mentioned above through the 
ignorance or mistake of the bell founder. At the end of each of the above 
sentences is the reverse of a silver coin of the date of the bells — probably 
Henry VI. 

"Thomas Cocks, who died in 1558, was the patron, and his brother, 
William Clericus, was the pastor. They were the sons of Alice Cocks, the 

daughter of Litchfield. Thomas married Margaret, daughter of Sir 

Lewis Clifford, by Bennet, daughter of John Guldeforde, which Sir Lewis was 
the son of Alexander Clifford by Mary, daughter of Walter Colepeper." 

We have a little further light thrown on the family at p, 184, as follows : 

"Roger Lychfeld died 4 Hen. VHL, and left Betshanger to Edward, son 
and heir of his son William, deceased, in tail, remainder to his son, Gregory ; 
and then in like tail to his three daughters, Alyce Cocks, Joane Rutter, and 
Betryne Wolett, who at length, by the deaths of the said Edward and Gregory 
without issue, became entitled to it, and on the division of their inheritance 
this manor was allotted to Alyce, who entitled her husband, Thomas Cocks, 
Esquire, customer of Sandwich, to the possession of it, and he at the latter 
end of that reign alienated it to John Boys " (of Canterbury). 

The coat of arms (reversed) on the treble is as under : 









2 


I 














o_ 






















Oi 


Cliflbrd 


? 


Cocks 


ro 


"-» 








T) 

































S 


0, 




4 


3 


s 


(D 








Q 


t; 








0^ 




Clifford 


? 


Lichfield 


»-( 


ft) 








~^ 


»-t 


^ 


^ 





V Church Wardens 



Inscriptions. 167 

Baron. — i. A chevron between 3 stags attires fixed to 

the scalps ... ... ... ... ... Cocks. 

2. per chevron. In chief 3 ^5/(?/7t'.f ... ... llVi^^ston. 

3. Two bends Lichfield. 

4. A bend between two swans... ... ... 'i Pctvin. 

Feinme. — Clifford. Chequy or. and az : (fesse or bend) within a bordure. 
Guldeford. A saltire between 4 martlets. 
Colepeper. A bend engrailed. 

BEXLEY. St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 2s\-\n. THOMAS J AN AWAY OF LONDON FECIT 1763 
IL, 27|-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1827 
Tho^ Harman 
Charles Francis. 
III., 28Wn. YE RULERS THAT ARE PUT IN TRUST: TO JUDGE 
OF WRONG AND RIGHT 
BE ALL YOUR JUDGMENTS TRUE AND JUST : 
REGARDING NO MANS MIGHT 
T: JANAWAY FECIT 1763 
IV., 2^\-\x\. Same as on No. i. 
v., 32-in. THOMAS JANAWAY OF LONDON MADE US ALL 
1763 
VI., 36-in. ABRAHAM BODLE & ROBERT REEVES : CH : WAR- 
DENS 1763 Tho^ Janaway of London Fecit 

T. R. E. Item iij bells suted in the steple and one lytle bell and one hand 
bell. 

Hasted notes that prior to 1763 there were five bells new cast in that year 
"into a small peal of 6, besides which there is a sancta bell." This last has 
apparently since disappeared. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Begin with " tellers " — 3 x 3 
for male, 3x2 for female — then minute strokes. At funerals : bell tolled 
until corpse reaches the lich-gate. 

On Sundays, ringing commences half an hour before service. " Ringing 
in " during last ten minutes. 

New Year's Eve ringing discontinued. The ringers evidently looked upon 
it as a purely commercial transaction, and ran the price up too high. 

Best thanks to the Rev. J. M. Fuller, Vicar. 



1 68 Inscriptions. 

BEXLEY St. John. i Rell. 

A modern church with presumably one modern hell. 

Holy Trinity (Lamorby). i Bell. 

Modern church with one modern bell. 

(Welling.) i Bell. " 

Mission Church. 

BEXLEY HEATH. Christchurch. i Bell. 

I., igWn. Thomas Mears of London Founder 1836 

BICKLEY. St. George. i Bell. 

I., 25Hn. J WARNER & SONS LONDON 1864 

BICKNOR. St. James. 4 Bells. 

L, 15-in. NAYLOR VICKERS & C° SHEFFIELD 1862 N" 3222 

II., i8|-in. Same. N"^ 3062 

IIL, 20-ln. Same. N° 3068 

IV., 2 1 -in. Same. N° 3143 

These are all steel bells. 

In 1760 there was but 'one small bell' 

BIDBOROUGH. St. Laurence. 2' Bells. 

L, 24-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 185 1 
II., 251-in. C H 1684 

The remains — so it is said — of a ring of four or five. Local tradition 
affirms the missing ones to have gone to the neighbouring parish of Leigh. 
Doubtless they were sold during the 1 8th century for funds to "repair and 
beautify " the church. 

Thomas Fane, gentleman, of the parish of St. Peter-le-poer, London, by his 
will in 1532, devised sundry lands in this and other Kentish parishes to his 
son, Thomas, with sundry " remainders over ;" — ^lastly to Edward Garth — " on 
condition that he pays c/. to the amendment of the highways about Tunbridge 
within five years, and to a tuneable tenor bell to the bells at Bytborough." — 
{Testamenta Veiusta, p. 657.) 



Inscriptions. 1 69 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received by sexton, but not after sunset. 
Tellers, 3 X 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female — no distinction for age. No knell on 
day of funeral, but bell tolled for about half an hour before the burial. 

Sundays : A bell chimed for five minutes at 8 a.m. (Matins bell), otherwise 
used for services only. 

BIDDENDEN. All Saints. S and Priest's Bells. 

I., 30-in. John Mather Rector Rich" Beale & Jam^ Freeman 
Church Wardens 1784 Rob^ Patrick of London 
Founder 
II., 31-in. The First & Second Bell Subscribed for Anno Domini 

1784 
III., 33-in. HERE YOV MAY SEE THE YOVTH BOVGHT iME 
I : I : R : D : CH : W : R : P : FECIT 1 7 1 2 

IV., 37-in. Robcrtus + Mof + fecit + mc + Pctrio + 1599 R7A 

© 
v., 40-in. Benj^ Behen Ch. Warden 1763. Lester & Pack of 

London Fecit 
VI., 42i-in, Recast 181 2 Rev° Edw° Nares Rector W'" Coley Jn° 

Dean Church Wardens 
VII., 46-in. lOHN MATHER RECTOR . BENI . BEKEN & CHA^ 
DAY CH. WARDENS 1759 LESTER & PACK OF 
LONDON FECIT 
VIIL, so^-in. lOHN lENNINGS ROBERT DIBLY CHVRCH- 

WARDENS RICHARD PHELPS FECIT 17 12 
Priest's 15^-in. Francis Taylor ch : \v : 1717 r : phelps fecit 

The Sanctus or Priest's bell is lying in the church porch, unhung and 
clapperless. It is a pity it is not put to some use. 

Death knell — rung as soon as notice received; tenor bell for men, first, 
tellers of three strokes tivice repeated; toll for five minutes and ring for half 
an hour. Same bell and use for women, but tellers 2x2 only. For children 
of both sexes the 6th bell is used. 

On day of funeral, in early morning the first six bells are each struck thrice 
or twice, according to sex ; same repeated ; then tenor rung for half an hour. 
For children, the first five bells are similarly struck, and then 6th bell rung. 
Tenor tolled in all cases for an hour before burial. 

Sunday ringing— 8 a.m. or "Matins Bell" rung for five minutes (2nd bell) ; 

Z 



I ']0 Inscriptions. 

9 a.m. or " Mass Bell;" two bells (4th and 5th or 6th and 7th) rung for a 
quarter of an hour, and then all eight bells chimed. 

Immediately after sermon 2nd bell rung for five minutes, to denote an after- 
noon service. 

At 2 p.m. the bells are rung as at 9 a.m. This is a very curious custom — 
can it be a survival of anything } 

For service, tenor tolled for twenty minutes. 

Ringing on Easter Day, Christmas Day, New Year's Eve, and when con- 
firmations are held. 

Tenor bell tolled for three minutes before vestry meetings. 

Ringing on the usual loyal anniversaries, and on the Forester's Day. 

There are many notices of peals rung by the Society of Biddenden 
Youths. 

Best thanks to the Rev. W. Peterson, Rector. 

BILSINGTON. SS. Peter and Paul. 2, formerly 3 Bells. 

I., 29-in. MICHAEL lEMETT CH : WARDEN RICHARD PHELPS 
MADE ME 1710 

IL, 39-in. In XHuIfis J5^nnis ^efottcf (Sfampana lol^annis 

u e u 

Both bells are cracked. 

T. R. E. Item iij belles in the steple. 

The stamps on the larger bell are Nos. 27, 26, and 25. 

BIRCHINGTON. All Saints. 5 Bells. 

I., 2Si-in. SAM = KNIGHT ME FECIT 1728 O O O 
II., 29-'in. WILLIAM AS PERSON SK ME FECIT 1728 
HI., 3oi-in. WILLIAM JEPP CW SK ME FECIT 1728 

IV., 35-in. to'jcpl) I)afc(; ma5c xwo^ ® 1633 

WH 
v., 36-in. SAMUEL KNIGHT MADE ME 1730 

Death knell usually rung at 7.30 on morning after death. Tellers at both 
beginning and end — 3 x 3 for male, 2 x 2 for female. On day of funeral 
bell tolled early, and at time of interment. 

Bells chimed for services — " ringing in " on treble for the last five minutes. 

No peals rung now, the bells being out of order. 



Inscriptions. 171 

There is a very light ring of twelve bells in the tower of Quex Park in this 
parish. They are by Thomas Mears the younger, and dated 18 18. 

Best thanks to the Vicar, the Rev. J. P. Alcock, jun., for above informa- 
tion, as well as for leave to extract the following from his parish accounts, 
which are of unusual interest, commencing in the year 1531 : 

1532 Itm. for ij belroyps on to the grett bell and one 

other to the smalbel the p'' ... ... ... xviij//. 

Itm. for one pott of oylle ... ... ... \\]d. ob. 

1533 Itm. Ryngyng at the tempes to thomas nor- 

mane .. ... ... .■■ ... ••- \]d. 

Itm. for one pott of oylle ... ... ... v]d. 

Itm. for one bell roype ... ... ••• x^. 

Itm. for mendyng of the clappyr of the grayt 

bell ij^. vj^/. 

1534 Itm. for one bell rope ... ... ■•■ -•• x^- 

Itm, for mendyng of the grt bell clappyr ... xij^/. 

1535 Itm. for ij bell Roppys ■■• ••• ••• xviij^. 

Itm. for Ryngyng at The tempes \]d. 

1536 Itm. for medyng of The grayt bell clappyr ... xjV. 

1538 Itm. for ij bell rops ... ••• ••• ••• ij-^- 

Itm. for medyng of ij bell clappyrs iij.y. \(\]d. 

1539 Itm. for on bellclappyr medyng xx^/. 

Itm. for on bawdryk ... ... ... ••• ^^d- 

Itm. payt for medyng of the greyt bell clappyr \]s. \d. 

Itm. for one bawdryk to the same bell ... ixr/. 

Itm. for on bell rope ... ... ■•• ••• viij(/. 

1540 Itm. to John Swane for medyng of the bell 

clappyr and the bokkyll ... ... ... ij'^- 

Itm. for one bawdryk ... ... •■• •■• ^^''^^ 

1541 Itm. for Ryngyng at the tempes ij'^- 

Itm. to the Smyth for medyng the greyt beil 

hernesse ... ... •■• •■• ••• ^J"- 

Itm. for one bell Rope ... .•• ••• ^^''^• 

Itm. for mendyng of the bellys to the Smyth xx^. 

1542 Itm. one bell Rope the pee ^v^^- 

Itm. on other bell Rope the pee viij</. 

1543 Itm. for on bell roi)e ... ... ••• ••• ^"^• 

/ 2 



172 



Inscriptions. 



1544 



1546 



1547 

2 Ed. VI. 

1549 



May 



Itni. for one bell rope ... 

Itm. to Thomas Coke for mcndyng of y*" grett 

bells claper ... 
ffor ij bcUropes 

To a carpinter for mendinge of the bellf 
ffor yron \vo''ke for the myddell bell ... 
Itm. for iij bawderyks ... 
Itm. for one bell rope ... 
Itm. for one bell rope ... 
Itm. one bell rope 
Itm. for a bell rope 
Itm. for a bell rope 
Itm. for castying of the scconbell* 
Itm. payd for xiiij pound of nevve mettall & 

for y"" waste ... 
Itm. payd caryn of the bell to Cantorberye ... 
Itm. payd for met & drynke and horse met ... 
Itm. payd to John Pettett for hys horse to 

Cantorbere ... 
Itm. payd for bred & drynke when y'' bell was 

taken done ... 
Itm. payd for y'' belfunders dynnar & his 

chargys 
Itm. payd for a newe bell Roop for y'' seconbell 
Itm. payd for stockyng of ij bells & for mend- 

yng the wyndows in y" steple 
Itm. payd for medyng of the seconde bell 

clapper 
Itm. for y" yeron worke of y" second bell 
Itm. for y" yeron to hange y" gret bell xx" 

pounds wayett &: a halfe of newe yeron 
Itm. for medyng of y° other yerons for the other 

bells & for brads 
Itm. for hauey up of y" secon bell & in meet 

and drynke for them y' hellped us ... 
Itm. payd for mendyng of y" Crete bell 



xiijV/. 

xiij^. 
xx<^/. 

\s. 

xj^. ob. 

viij^. 

viij^. 

xij^. 

xd. 

\\\]S. \\\)d. 

\s. \y.d. 

\\]S. 

ss. \]d. 

\]d. 

\]d. 

yX]d. 
xvij^. 

\\]s. \\\]d. 
\]S. myi. 

\\\\s. \\yi- 

yA]d. 



xviij//. 
'\]d. 



Doubtless by William Oldfeild of Canterbury. 



Inscriptions. i 



/J 



1-2 Ph. & Mary. Itm. for ij bells ropys ... ... ... xix^. 

Itm, for a bawdricke ... ... ... ... xix^. 

Itm. for mendyng of the bell clappers ... iji-. \]d. 

Itm. for a rope for the grete bell ... ... xvj^. 

Itm. for a bell rope ... ... ... ,.. xv^. 

Itm. for iij new bawdricks and yes of yron to 

them ... ... ... ... ... ... \\\)s. \]d. 

Itm. for a bell rope ... ... ... ... xviij^. 

3-4 P. & M. Item for ij bellropys ij^. \\)d. 

2nd Eliz. Item layde out for a belrope for the Great 

bell xvj^/. 

Item layde out for a belrope ... ;.. ... \\\\yL 

Item layde out to y'' Smyth for yorne woorke 

to ye bell(^ \s. 

3rd Eliz. Item layde out for the seconde belroppe ... xvji'. 

Item layde out to a carpenter a dayes woorcke 

ij men for mendyng y" bell(^ ... ... xj^. 

For there meate and dryncke the same tyme... viij^. 

Item for woode to mende the bellf ... ... iiij^^. 

Item layde out to the Smyth for mendyng • 

ij bel clappers ... ... ... ... vj.y. 

Item layde out for the carpenter for trussing 

the iij bells ... ... ... ... ... \s. \\\)d. 

1562 Item for a belrope ... ... ... ... xviij^. 

1563-64 ffor mending the bell ... ... ... ... \s. 

ffor iron worke for the bell ... ... ... >^'^^- 

ffor a bell rope .•• xxij^- 

1567 ffor a bell rope \\\)d. 

ffor ij weynskottes to make the whele for the 

litle bell iiij^- 

p'^ to the worckman and his ij men for three 

daies worcke ... ... ... ... • • • "^'V- 

p^ to John Caules for theyr meat & drinkc ... Vi'. 

1569 paid for a belrope ... ... ... ••• ^^''^• 

1574 Itm. for a bellroppe ... ... ... ••• '^^' 

Itm. for a bellrope ... ..■ .•• ••• ^'-'^^• 

?i576 Ffirst to W" Wartman for a bell rope ... ijj^. iiij^- 



1/4 



Inscriptions. 



1578 



1579 



1581 

1585 

1586 

158S 

1590-91 

1600 



Itm. to Skilton the carpinter for two dales 

worcke for him and two men about trussinge 

upp the belles 
Itm. to W"' Simons for Iron worcke about the 

belles... 
Itm. for ij bell ropes 

Itm. spente at the pullinge downe of the Bell.. 
Itm. in charges aboute Bell 
Itm. for the Bawdricke of the greate Bell 
Itm. the Dinner of V men 
Itm. for the Dinner of the Belfounder and his 

mann... 
Itm. for the daies worcke of a carpinf 
Itm. for the Smithes worcke ... 
Itm. for drincke at the waiynge of the Bell and 

at the castinge of the same ... 
Itm. for iiij horses meate 
Itm. for cariage of the Bell 
Itm. for the castinge and for mettall to the 

Bell 

ffirst makinge the greate Bell clapp"' w'^*' waied 

xxxiij'' at iij^. the li ... 
Itm. for Roundeinge the clapper of the seconde 

Bell 

Itm. for ij Bell Roppes 

Itm. for a belrope 

Itm. to Isaacke Simons for mcndinge the bell 

clapp"^ 
ffor baudrickes to the belles ... 
ffbr two bell Ropes 
for mending the bell clappers ... 
for bell roopes ... 
It. for mendinge the bell clapper 



It. to the carpenter for workcman shipp & 

timeber for the bells ... 
It. payd for bawdrickes 
1605 It. for charges at taking Downe the bell 



xviij^. 

xxij^. 

\]s. \\\]d. 

\\]s. \\\]d. 

xij^. 

xx^. 

x^. 

\]d. 

xviij^. 

xiiij^. 

xvj^. 

vj^. \\\]d. 



vj//. 



VUJ^. 



\\]S. 
\]S. 
\\]S. 



xxd. 
ujd. 



ixd. 

\}s. \n)d. 
ij^. 

iij^. 



4d 
xx'ijd. 
viij^. 

vj^. 

i]d. 
xvujd. 



xxxixs. 
iiiji'. 



viij'/. 



Inscinptions. 



ii- 



VI J jr. 



xxiij^. 


iiij^/. 


\]S. 


viij^/. 




xviij^/. 




xxijd'. 


xviijj. 




XXVi'. 




xij^. 




iiji'. 


\\\]d. 


iij^. 


myi. 


vj^. 


xd. 


\s. 


v]d. 


viij//. 




vj//. 





for part payment 



1606 Inprimis for taking downe the 2 bells 

It. for carrying & recarrying the bells... ... iij//. 

It. for other charge in going & coming 
It. for baudricks 

It. when the belfounder came at Christmas ... 
(Paid by other warden) Inprimis for taking downe the bells 
It. at carying and recarying the bels ... 
It. p*^ to the Carpenter... 
It. p^ to the Sawyers ... 

(Other payments in large detail) 
It. for charges in going to Cant, w*^ the founder 
It. for going \v*^ the founder the 2 tyme 
It. for two new bell ropes 
It. for making the ey of the clapper ... 
It, p"^ to the founder at Christmas 
It. p^ to hire the 2 tyme 

This recasting was clearly by Joseph Hatch. His receipt 
is still preserved, and is as follows : 

Receved by me Joseph Hatch of the pishe' 
of Bromfeild in the County of Kent the 
summe of viij//. w* is in f)t of payment of 
xxiij/z. xviijV. viij^. payable by the wardens of 
the pish of Birchington in the Isle of Than- 
nett for casting ther bells as by an obligation 
more playnly appeareth. I say reC^ by me 
at the handes of Robert Cavill one of the 
wordens aforesayd the viij'*^ day of January 
1606 

Delivered in the presence of Joseph I H Hatch 

James Badnore minister by his m'ke 

1607 to 1619 Only small payments recorded. 

1620 It. for Beer when y«^ Bellfounder came ou' ... 2s. Gd. 

It. at taking down of y'^ Bell ?>s. 4'/. 

It. to Joseph Hatch for casting of y"" bell ... 7//. \(is. 8^/. 
It. for myselfe and my horse 2 Dayes about y*^ 

Bell lo-f- o'^- 



viijV/. 



3^- 


6d. 


2S. 


od. 


2S. 


6d. 


2S. 


od. 




Ad. 


7S. 


2d 



1/6 Inscriptions. 

It. for Beer at y^ taking up of y^ Bell... ... 2S. od. 

It. to y" Shoomaker for mending y*" Bells Bath- 

rickes ... ... ... ... ... \s. od. 

It. to Thomas Trier for carrying y*" Bells «Sc 

shindies ... ... ... ... ... 2//. o^. od. 

It. for my iourney to Canterbury & my horse 
to pay y° Bellfounder his last payment 

It. for a bathricke for on of y" Bells ... 

It. to Thomas Groomes for making y" writings 
betwixt y*" Bellfounder & us... 

It. for another bathricke for on of y" Bells ... 

It. to John Hayward for fetching of that bath- 
ricke .. 

It. to Robert Cauell for work about y" Bells . . . 
1624 It. for a messengers hyre to goe to y" Bell- 
founder & for y*^ Bellfounders supper and 
breakefast when he came ou' ... ... 10^. od. 

It. for making one paire of Indentures between 

him & us ... ... ... ... ... 2s. 6d. 

It. for charges at y" taking downe and up of y" 
Bell 

It. for carrying y" old Bell & bringing y^ new 

It. to y*" Bellfounder for new casting y*" Bell ... 

It. for 31 pound of mettle wayighing more than 

y° old Bell ... ... ... ... ... ili. lis. od. 

No items of much interest for some years. Curiously enough, there are no 
entries at all of the recasting of the present No. 4 in 1633. It would there- 
fore seem to have been done at the expense of some private benefactor. In 
1642, two new bell ropes weighing 20^ lb. cost 6d. per lb., and there are pay- 
ments of 30^. to bell-hanger and his man for nine days' work, and of 26s. for a 
new wheel and other materials. 

During the Parliamentary period, the entries are still more scanty. In 1655 
50 lb. of rope cost 5^. per lb. ; George Smith is paid is. 6d. for mending the 
little bell, and " Nuby " a similar sum " for the little bells baldricke." And 
there are a few other like items. 

Activity commences with the Restoration. 





5^- 


8d 


iH. 


I OS. 


od. 


Ili- 


I OS. 


od. 



Inscriptions. 177 

1663-65 Spent at the Bell founders takeing downe the 

Bells in Beere ^s. 

Spent when we got the Bells into the church is. 

Paid to John Neame for fetching the first two 

bells i//- 

Paid for fetching the Treble from Canterbury 5^-. 

Item at the same time spent on y*" Bell founder \s. 

pd for fetching the Bell frame from Minster ... 5^. 

Spent on the workmen w'-'' came to worke on 

the bell frame ... ... ... ... T.f. 6^. 

pd Tho Fuller for the fframe ... ... ... 20//. 

p'' for 4 bardricks and the putting them on ... 125. 

Item spent on the Carpenter & Ringers that 

daie the bells were hang'' upp ... ... ^s. 

Item p"* Newby for makeing of a Bardrick for 

the fowerth Bell 5.?. 6^. 

p'' Goodman Moyse for 5 Bell roapes ... iS^'. 

It. p'' Robert Twyman for 3 new Clappers w' 

48"' 2//. 8^. 

It. for mending the other clappers 3^. 

Many other payments for the frame and hang- 
ing follow here. 
Item paid Thomas Palmer Bell founder as 
appears by his accquittance the sume of ... 25//. 
1668-9 paid to Goodman Twidden for drilling of 4 
holes in the 3 bell and mending of all the 

rest 3^'- 

paid moer the same time to John Smith for 

lether to use about the belles ... ... 8^. 

1683-4 5 Bell rops cost n-^- 9^- 

Spent upon y'' Ringers on ])ouder i)lott . . . 2jr. td. 

paid Henrie Hills for drink for y"^ Ringers which 

was drink pouder plot 1683 ... ■•• 2s. 6d. 

1684-5 4 Bell ropes cost ^^^- ^^• 

1685-6 for 5 new Belroops wayinge 28"'^ at 5!'' •■• i2j-. 7^/. 

1686-88 To Mary East Smithe (&c.) 

To y" said Mary for mending y^^ bell guggens is. 6d. 

2 A 



178 Inscriptions. 

To y" said Mary for 4 bolts about the bells ... 2s. 
To y" said Mary for forelocks and Keas about 

the bells ^s. Sd. 

To y*" said Mary for speeks and brads about the 

bells ... ... ... ... ... ... IS. 

To Robert Cotton for the Ringers one holiday is. 

paid for the Ringers being pouder Treason ... 2s. 6d. 
To Richard Coleman for Leather about the 

bells ... ... ... ... ... ... 2i. 

1688-9 A set of bell ropes i2>s. 

Henceforward nearly all payments are " as by bill," and the bell entries are 
consequently almost impossible to be picked out. The following relate to the 
last recastings that have taken place. 

1728-9 Spent at a parish meeting about y" Bells ... 4.S. <^d. 

Spent on y^ Bell founders agreeing to cast ... 2s. 

At a meeting and takeing down y'' Bells & 

charges on Founders ... ... ... 17.^. ^d. 

Ordered to M'' Harris & another for seeing y" 

bells weigh'd... ... ... ... ... 2s. 

For Carriage to & from Canterbury y" Bells ... i//. 6^-. 
paid for Help to unload y*" bells when y^ came 

back ... ... ... ... ... ... T^s. 

paid to M' Harris &c. to drink for seing y*" 

bells weigh'd after cast ... ... ... 2s. 

paid for y*" Bell hangers on first comeing 

according to custom 
Spent for help in drawing y*" Bells up in y'' 

Staple 
Paid y" Founders for casting & hanging as ap- 
pears by bills 
1729-30 Paid to Knight y" founder for over mettle last 

years ac' 
Paid for help unloading y° Bell 
Charges on y" Founders 
Paid for help drawing y" Bell up in y'' Steple 
Paid for casting y*" Founders Bill ... ... 5//. 





2S. 


U. 




Ss- 


2d 


25//. 






lli. 


IS. 






3^- 


6d 




3^- 





Inscriptions. 1 79 

Paid for overweight in y*-' mettle of her ... i6i'. 

Paid for hanging her & as it all appears by y" 

bill ... ... ... ... ... ... \li. \os. 

1 730-1 5 Bell ropes ... ... ... ... ... \Zs. 

There is an annual payment of 151. for ringing, and payments for bell ropes 
occur regularly, but not annually, as is very common. 

In 1638, according to Lewis's " History of Thanet," the inhabitants fixed 
the clerk's perquisites for tolling at funerals, as follows : 

Inprimis. The great bell for a knell ... iiiji-. iiij^. 

It. the second bell ... ... ... ... \\]s. 

It. the littell bell \]s. \od. 

BIRCHOLT. St. Margaret. 

This church possessed in 1552 " ij bells in the Steple." In 157S it was 
reported at the visitation that there was no church standing. In Hasted's 
time there were some small portions of the walls still standing — probably 
now " perierunt etiam ruina." 

BIRLING. All Saints. 6 Bells. 

I., 241-in. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1759 
II., 26-in. M"^ Armigill Whitting C" Warden 1746 T : Lester Made 

Me 
III., 28-in. Tho'' Lester Made Me 1746 
IV., 29 in. iooepl) \)aici} mabc \\\c 163 1 

v., 3ii-in. Same. © 1631 

VI., 34-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT RE CW © 1631 

BISHOPSBOURNE. St. M.'vry. 4 I>ells. 

L, 26-in. CHRISTOPHER Q HODSON Q AL^DE Q ME Q ^^^S 

O O 
II., 2S-in. toGcpI) ()afct) wxabc mc TC + CW + ® 16 18 
III., 30^ in. Same. 
IV., 34"in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT TC CW © 1618 

Passing bell rung — unusual " tellers " — one stroke for a man, two for a 
woman. A bell rung at 8 a.m. on Sunday — the old " Matins " bell. 
Bells chimed for service. Sometimes rung, ex. gr., on festivals. 
Best thanks to the Rector, the Rev. 'V. Hirst. 

2 .\ 2 



1 So Inscriptions. 

BLACKHEATH. All Saints. 2 Bells. 

Properly speaking, one and a priest's bell. The latter, 13 J in. diameter, is 
by Warner and Sons, dated 1858 ; the larger bell is presumably from the same 
foundry, and later in date. 

St. John Evangelist. i Bell. 

L, 41-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1853. 

St. Germain. i Bell. 

I., i8-in. THO" JANAWAY LONDON FECLr 1769. 

This chapel was, according to Hasted, built by a Mrs. Graham, who died in 
1698. She is also stated to have endowed it with, inter alia., two pounds per 
annum for ringing the bell. So far, however, as I can learn, this last endow- 
ment has been lost. 

St. Michael and All Angels. i Bell. 

One modern bell. 

Morden College. i Bell. 

A small bell about iS in. diameter, apparently modern and devoid of 
inscription. It hangs in an open cupola over the entrance gate, and is used 
primarily as a clock bell; but it is also used to ring for service, and so is 
included here, although not properly a "church" bell, not being near the 
chapel. 

BLEAN. S.S. CosMAS and Damian. i Bell. 

L, 22-in. W F T P 1650 

Bell by Thomas Palmer, of Canterbury. Date probably 1659 

BOBBING. St. Bartholomew. 6 Bells. 

I., 26^-in. - 
IL, 28kn. 
IIL, 3oiin. 
IV., 32-m. 

v., 35Wn.^ 

VL, 37^-in. Thomas Mears of London Fecit Thomas Colley 
Church Warden 1804 

Hasted notes here only five bells. It would therefore seem that a heavy 
ring of five was recast into a light peal of six in 1804. They were re-hung by 
Warner and Sons in 1884. 



Thomas Mears of London Fecit 1804 



Inscriptions. 



i8i 



Death knell rung morning after death. 

Tenor tolled for half an hour before funeral. 

Bells rung for services on Sundays. No special ringing on festivals, etc., 
either sacred or secular. 

A bell tolled for vestry meeting. 

Thanks due to the Rev. E. D. Carpenter, Vicar. 

Tenor of this beautiful ring has recently cracked from having the clapper 
flight tampered with (September, 1886). 



BONNINGTON. 

I., 23-in. Blank. 



St. Rumwald. 



I Bell. 



T, R. E. Item ij bells in the steple. 



BORDEN. 

I., 3o|-in.^ 
II., 3ii-in. 
in., 33|-in. 
IV., 36i-in. 
v., 39-in. 
VI., 41-in. 
VII., 45J in. 
VIII., 51-in. 



S.S. Peter and Paul. 8 Bells. 



Thomas Mears of London Fecit 180; 



The present eight Bells were cast from a former 
•PEAL OF six M"" John Vinson M" William Wise 
Jun"^ Ch. Wardens Tho"" Mears of London Fecit 
1802 

Clock strikes on tenor. 

Passing bell rung as soon as death is known. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 
3 X 2 for female. No ringing at funerals. 

Peals on Easter Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Eve. Also on the 
Queen's and the Vicar's birthdays. This last is a " local use," peculiar, I 
think, to Borden. 

The ring has lately been put into thorough order, at a cost to the parish of 
about ;^7o, by Snelling, of Sittingbourne. 

Practice every Monday evening, excepting in June, July, and August. 

Best thanks to the Rev. F. E. Tuke. 



1 82 Inscriptions. 

BOUGHTON-UNDER-BLEAN. S.S. Peter and Paul. 6 Bells. 

I., 29-in. AlTHO. I AM BOTH UGHT & SMALL. I WILL BE HEARD 

above you all 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1775. 
II., 31-in. If you HAVE A judicious ear. Youll own my Voice is 
SWEET & Clear 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1775. 
III., 33-in. To Honour both of God & King. Our Voices shall in 
Consort Ring 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1775. 
IV., 34-in. Whilst thus we Join in Chearfull Sound. May Love & 

Loyalty Abound 
v., 38-in. Ye Ringers all that prize your Health & Happiness. 
Be Sober Merry Wise & You'll the same Possess 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1775. 
VI., 42-in. W" Hills & Osborne Snoulton Ch : Wardens 1775. 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 

Passing bell does not seem to be rung unless specially requested. There is 
a knell on day of funeral, and tolling while corpse is carried to grave. 
Bells chimed for Sunday services, " tolling in " on tenor. 
Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. H. M. Spooner. 

BOUGHTON ALUPH. All Saints. 5 Bells. 

I., 2S^-in. jyilliam I)ak() wxaix*. mc R B C w 1653 

II., 29-in. Same. E K C W © 1652 

III., 35-in. .Sauctc ^<x\\\c CDra- ^xq :iIlobis O O x u 

(t'ig- 32) 
IV., 37-in. THO: SPEED CH : WARDEN 1702 R: PHELPS 
FECIT 

v., 4oi-in- :E)-yr:ii<sr-i:H s'%b>w<^ xii©-:d^ ^m- 

e-jixiH ^ u ^ (Fig. 35) 

T. R. E. Item iiij bells in the steple and one hande bell. 
The third bell is by WilHam Culverden (see p. 50). 

As regards the tenor bell, the Rev. P. S. Nottidge tells me he has been 
informed that it was prubably the gift of one of the Burghersh family. I am 



Inscriptions. 183 

afraid his informant's campanistic knowledge is very limited. Anyhow, he was 
mistaken. The Burghersh family sold the Manor in 1365, and the bell is 
nearly 200 years later. It was cast by William Oldfield, of Canterbury, pro- 
bably about 1540 (see p. 55). It bears the figure of a demi-angel in high 
relief, no doubt intended for St. Gabriel. The initial G is very quaint in 
character, and will be found engraved as an initial letter to the Preface. 

A grand old belfry in a very dilapidated condition. The bells, too, are in 
bad order, and one of the trebles is cracked. 

BOUGHTON MALHERBE. St. Nicholas. 3, formerly 4 Bells. 

I., 29I in. ioscpl) I)a{c() iita5c me © 1624 

II., 34i-in. Same. 
III., 38-"in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME PECIT © 1624 

BOUGHTON MONCHELSEA. St. Peter. 6 Bells. 

I., 2S-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1880 
DIGIT PETRO DOMINUS TU SEQUERE ME 
DEO GLORIA ET IMPERIUM IN S/f:CULA S^XU- 
LORUM 
IL, 30-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON t88o 

DEUM TIMETE REGEM HONORIFICATE SUSCITO 
VOS IN COMMONITIONE 
IIL, 32-in. BELL KMAPPE RVD STO^/1 ESQVIRE 1592 
IV., 35j-in. NATHANEL TVRNER CH : WARDEN lAMES BART- 
LET MADE ME 1693 © 
v., 39-in. tosc^r) ^afcl) ma6c mc I C C w o 1614 
VI., 43^-in. ED WEDD O CW O 1727 O lOHN WAYLETT LONDON 
MADE ME O O O O O 
The third bell is by Giles Reve. It has an ornamental border above the 
inscription, and between each word there is a crowned Rose. 

BOXLEY. St. Mary the Virgin and All Saints. 6 Bells. 

I., 30-in. "i /'803 



IIL, 33i-in. 
IV., 35-in. J 



II. , 31-in. \ ^ ^, ^ ^ 1803 

' Thomas Mears of London Fecit ' 



1804 
1804 



II., 


3ii-in- 


III., 


33i-in- 


IV, 


37i-in. 


v.. 


40^, -in. 


T. 


R. E. 



1 84 Inscriptions. 

v., 3S},-in. .Thomas Mears of London Fecit 1804 
VI., 42i-in. John Hunt Church Warden Thomas Mears of London 
Fecit 1803 

Bells re-hung some ten or fifteen years ago, and apparently in excellent 
order. 

In Hasted's time there were here "4 small bells, cast in 1652 by M. Darby." 

BRABOURNE. St. Mary. 5 Bells. 

I., 29-in. jDttliam ()afc() ma6c \\\c FY C W 1656 

WILLIAM HATCH MADE ME HA C W © 1656 

Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1774 

Richard Kennett Church Warden Pack & Chapman 

OF London Fecit 1774 
lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME © 1605 

Item iiij bells in the steple. 
Item one herse bell. 
Mr. Bryan Faussett's note of 1758 as to the bells here is " 5 Bells all made 
by Joseph Hatch, 1656." This is manifestly incorrect as regards I., II., and 
v., but it points to the probable fact that III. and IV. were similar to I. and 
II. in inscription. 

Passing bell rung on day of death. Tellers — the usual 3x3 for man or 
3 X 2 for woman. Bell tolled before funerals and while corpse is being carried 
to the grave. 

Bells chimed for services. Peals on Easter Day, Whitsun Day, New Year's 
Eve, and harvest festival. 

The parish books contain the following entries, kindly sup])lied by the late 
Rev. P. B. Perry Ayscough : 

1699 Spent about putting out* the bells & steeple 

Paid M' Hunt for taking the bells down... 
1702 Paid Jn'^ Walke and W™ Walke Bell hangers 

Paid Jn° Walke and W"> Walke for brasses for the 

bells 

1704 paid Jn" Walke for doing the bells 

1711 paid W'" Walke for work about the bells 

spent on hanging the clapper 

* The work to be done — the steeple was pulled down and rebuilt, and bells re-hun^ 
1699- 1702. 





85. 


lod. 


l//. 


OS. 


od. 


16//. 


OS. 


od. 


l//. 


8x. 


od. 




^s. 


od 




\\s. 


od. 

dd. 



Inscriptions. 185 

BRASTED. St. Martin. 6 Bells. 

I., 2S-in. GILLETT & BLAND CROYDON THIS PEAL (1730) 

WAS RECAST IN 1881 
II., 3o-in.x 

III, 32-in.( QjLLE'p'p ^ BLAND CROYDON 18S1 
IV., 34-in. 
v., 37-in.j 
VL, 40-in. GILLETT & BLAND CROYDON. TPIIS PEAL WAS 
RECAST IN 1881 

J. W. RYND RECTOR 

W FEARON TIPPING^ 

r^ ..j^, , ^ CHURCH WARDENS 

T WELLS j 

The ring which these six replaced were as follows : 

I., 28-in. R: Phelps fecit 1730 

II., 30^-in. Same. 

III., 33-in. Same. 

IV., 34|-in. Same. 

v., 38-in. Same. 

VI., 41-in. THE REV" GEORGE SECKER D : D RECTOR : lOHN 
YOUNG & ROBERT SMITH : CHURCH WARDENS 
1764 
THOMAS JANAWAY OF LONDON FECIT 

BREDGAR. St. John the Baptist. 5 Bells. 

I., 30-in. THE GVIFT OF THOMAS ALDERSEY GENTLEMAN 
1692 
lACOBVS BARTLET ME FECIT 
II., 321-in. lOHN ^ WILMAR ^ MADE <J> ME a i69o 

III., 36-in. + Robert + mot + nmbc + mc + mdlxxix ■^ ^ 

IV., 39-in. lOHM WILMAR 1634 
v., 40-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1842 

In a continuation to Mr. Bryan Faussett's MS., dated 1760, it is noted 
that there were then here " five bells, upon the largest of which y^' clock 
strikes, dedicated to St. John. 

For services : Bells chimed, tolling on tenor, treble rung up for last five 
minutes. 

2 B 



1 86 Inscriptions. 

The following lines are preserved here ; they date from last century 

" My friendly Ringers I to you declare 
You must pay i<i each oath you do swear 
To turn a bell over it is the same fare 
To ring with your hats on you must not dare." 



BREDHURST. St. Peter. 2 Bells. 

x\ pair of modern bells from Whitechapel, dated 1867, which replace a 
brace of ting-tangs, 17 and 20 inches respectively, both without inscription. 

Passing bell an hour after death — rung for half an hour for a child, 45 
minutes for a woman, an hour for a man. This use is peculiar. A bell 
tolled while funeral comes to the church. 

Thanks to the Rev. J. Durst, Vicar. 



BRENCHLEY. All Saints. 6 Bells. 

I., 31-in. G. MEARS & C° FOUNDERS LONDON 1863 
II., 33-in. INTACTUM SILEO PERCUTE DULCE CANO R : 

PHELPS FECIT 1729 
IIL, 36i-in. ioscpl; I)afcl) xacihc \\\C 1610 
IV., 40-in. loHN Relf & I Wimshurst Churchwardens. T. Mears 

OF London FEcrr 181 3 
v., 44j-in. THOMAS FVSHEMDEM C W Q Q 1610 lOSEPH 

HATCH MADE ME 
VL, 47-in. WILLIAM HVl^T C W @ 1610 lOSEPH HATCH 

MADE ME 



St. Luke, Matfield. i Bell, 

This church, built in 1S77, has one bell of the same date. 
Passing bell rung for half an hour as soon as death is known. 
Bell tolled for half an hour before funeral. 
Kindly communicated by the Rev. C. Storr. 

BRENTS. St. John the Evangelist. i Bell. 

Church built 1880, and has one equally modern bell. 



Inscriptions. 187 

BRENZETT. St. Eanswith. 3 Bells. 

I., 33-in. lOH^/I <^ WILMAR (^ MADE ^ xME a 1630 
11. , 36-in. THOMAS PALMAR MADE MEE 1669 BENIAMIN 

HARRIS CW TP Y 
in., 40-in. U U U U (Fig. 12, repeated four times) 

>^ (Fig. 10) ^y^wi^is Sisfo XXlclis "yTocor Campana 

T. R. E. Item iij gret bells and ij hand bells. 
For account of tenor, see p. 27. 

BRIDGE. St. Peter. 3 Bells. 

I., 33-in. Blank. 
II., 36-in. Blank. 
III., 39-in. ^ ,^TgC3 : XIl,^mi.^ : ^^^JT^miLjT^ : 

^j!^mMF^ ■■ j^j^s : m^M'^ u (Fig. 2) 

For mention of tenor bell, see p. 1 1. 

BROADSTAIRS. Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I., 34l-in. NAYLOR VICKERS & C"^ 1861 SHEFFIELD E. RIEPE'S 
PATENT N" 2734 

BROCKLEY. St. Cyprian. i Bell. 

Modern church (18S2), with probably one bell of that date. 

BROCKLEY HILL. St. Saviour. i Bell. 

Built 1866, probably only one bell of that date. 

BROMLEY. SS. Peter and Paul. 8 and a Sanctus Bell. 

I., 29-in. PROSPERITY TO THE PARISH OF BROMLEY 

T: J AN A WAY FECIT 1773 
IL, 30-in. MUSICA EST MENTIS MEDICINA 

THOMAS J AN AWAY FECIT 1773 
IIL, 321-in. HE AND HE ONLY AIMS ARIGHT WHO JOYNS 
INDUSTRY WITH DELIGHT 
THO^JANAWAY FECIT 1773 

2 ]! 2 



iSS Liscriptions. 

IV., 34^in. WHEN FROM THE EARTH OUR NOTES REBOUND 
THE HHXS AND VALLEYS ECCO ROUND 
THO^ J AN AWAY FECLr 1773 
v., 37i-in. THO'^ JAN AW AY FECIT 1773 
VI., 38i-in. THOMAS JANAWAY FECIT 1773 

VH., 42-'in. THE RINGERS ART OUR GRATEFUL NOTES PRO- 
LONG APOLLO LISTENS AND APROVES THE 
SONG 
THOMAS JANAWAY FECIT 1773 
VHI., 47Mn. JOSEPH SHIRLEY & lOHN MANN CHURCH 
WARDENS 1773 
THOMAS JANAWAY FECIT 
Sanctus, 24^-in. THOMAS JANAWAY FECIT 1777 

T. R. E. Item iiij greale bells suted in the steple, one sants bell and iij 
lytle sacrying bells, one hand bell. 

St. John Evangelist. i Bell. 

Modern church (1880), presumably one bell of that date. 

BROMLEY COMMON. Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I., 2ii-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1S41 

BROMLEY. St. Mary, Plaistow. i Bell. 

Built 1863. Has probably one bell of that date. 

BROMPTON (NEW). St. Mark. i Bell. 

A modern church, with doubtless one equally modern bell. 

BROMPTON (OLD). Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I., 29-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1S48 

The Vicar, Canon D. Cooke, says : " AVe have no bells ;" but as he puts 
the objective in the plural and not in the singular, I presume there is still one 
bell, as there was twenty years ago. 

BROOK. St. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I., 28^in. Blank. 

II., 30-in. + u + u 
III., 32i-in. tnsepri Ijafcli matiE mc 1612 



Inscriptions. 189 

T. R. E. " Three bells." 

For mention of No. 2, see p. 39. The foundry-stamp is Fig. 22. 

Death knell — tellers {z^Z ^oi' i^i^le, 3x2 for female) both at beginning and 
end. Bell tolled at funeral. 

Sunday services — bells first rung, then one tolled, fifteen minutes each. 
Bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Rector, Rev. J. Philpott. 



BROOKLAND. St. Augustine. 5 Bells. 

I., 3ii-in. lOHN * HODSON * MADE * MFE * 1685 O •}}(» O 
I ^ EVE * W * CLARKE * CHVRCH ^ WAR- 
DENS «)J(. 

II., 33-in. Same. 

III., 34-in. Q\i '^untcn ^wmtnt X^cnctitcfiJm U ® U (Figs. 27, 26, 
and 25). 

IV., 36-in. lOHN -¥ HODSON •¥ MADE ^ MEE ^ 1685 Q "ilp O '■Jp 
lOHN * EVE * WILLIAM * CLARKE ^ WARD * 
ENS c)J(. 
v., 4 1 -in. Same. 

T. R. E. Item in the steple iiii small bells, and in the ckurch one warn- 
ing bell, one hand bell, and one sacringe bell. 

No. 3 bell by Henry Jordan. See p. 44. 

Death knell — tellers (3x3 for male, 3 x 2 for female) both at beginning and 
end ; toll for quarter of an hour, raise bell, then minute strokes for half an 
hour. 

Funerals — knell after sunrise, bell tolled slowly for an hour, and the same 
again before funeral, and when leaving the church for the grave. 

Marriage peals — rung both before and after wedding, and again in the 
evening. 

Eight o'clock bell on Sunday mornings, "and when sermon" (2nd bell 
used). 

For vestry meetings 2nd bell — " Call bell" — rung. 

The wonderful wooden campanile, like three huge extinguishers one atop of 
the other, is well known. It is probably built of old ship-timber. 

Best thanks to the Rev. W. Baldock, Vicar. 



1 90 Inscriptions. 

BROOM FIELD. St. Margaret. 3 Bells. 

I., 25i-in. Blank. 

II., 26|-in. UtiltiAm Iiafiii malre nte MB CW 1663 
III., 28-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1879 

The former tenor bore the date 1579, but no founder's name or stamp. 

BUGKLAND BY DOVER. St. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

I., 2i-in. 1754 

XL, 22-in. U © U (Figs. 27, 26, and 25). 
III., 25-in. I * S * C * \V r|. IH * ME * FECIT * 16S3 * 

No. 2 by Henry Jordan. See p. 44. 

Death knell, twelve hours after death (but not at night) ; usual tellers 
3 X 3 for man, 3 x 2 for woman. On day of funeral a knell is rung if paid for. 
Begins with age of deceased, and then same as passing bell. 

Sunday services — all three rung for five minutes, then single bell for fifteen 
minutes. 

Old year tolled out and new one rung in. 

Best thanks to the Vicar, the Rev. T. Evans. 

BUGKLAND BY FAVERSHAM. i Bell. 

Church in ruins ; only western end and part of south wall with a handsome 
Norman doorway remaining. The bell, however, is preserved at the farmhouse 
hard by. It is 17^ in. diameter, and bears only the date " 1696." 

BURHAM. St. Mary THE Virgin. 3 Bells. 

I., 25-in. RICHARD PHELPS FECIT 1700 

II., 25i-in. D ^\.%^i^j^^\.^^ \ :©©■ : "yr^"^^X3a:Bj:H 

III., 29-in. RICHARD PHELPS MADE ME 1734 

No. 2 is an exceedingly interesting specimen of quite early fourteenth cen- 
tury work. It is " long waisted," and consequently, although according to its 
diameter it is placed second in the ring, it is deeper in tone than No. 3, and 
should really be considered as the tenor. See p. 9. 

Passing bell rung immediately after death. Tellers (unusual) :iyy- 2, for 
adults, 3x2 for children. 



Inscriptions. 191 

Bell tolled for half an hour before funeral. 

Bells rung for service, " ringing in " for last ten minutes on one only. 

Best thanks to the Vicar, the Rev. W. A. Keith. 

BURMARSH. All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I., 29-in. Blank. 

II., 30-in. + ^oy^msy^^n^B ^ ©'HP? ^ ^lO^ixm^Et 

III., 36-in. + Xiamen XHagtialcnc O^tnipana Gcinf jOrictuME 

D U 

T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple. 

I have not seen these bells myself, but Mr. Tyssen notes on the rubbings 
that Nos. I and 2 are apparently by the same founder. 
The initial cross on No. 2 is Fig. 5, the stop Fig. 4, 
The cross on No. 3 is Fig. 14, and the other stamps Figs. 18 and 17. 

CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL. Christchurch. 10 Bells, Clock 

bell, and Curfew bell. 

I., 3ii-in. Thomas Mears London Fecit A D 1S02 Pace 

Reddita 
IL, 32-in. T PowYS D^ W Welfitt V D^ H Radcliffe T"^ E 

Walsey R"" T Mears Fecit 1802 
III., 34-in. Samu^ Norris Gul^ Gostling A M S K 1726 

AD MDCCCLV 

Benj Harrison A M Thesaur° 

H G Austin Archit*^ 
C & G Mears Founders London 
IV., 36-in. U GVL-AYERST STB GVL EGERTON LED JO- 
HANNES GOSTLING AM SAM- KNIGHT 1726 
v., 38 in. U SAM-HOLCOMBE STP JOHN CLARK STP SK 
1726 RB 

VI., 40-in. David Wilkins STP Edwardus Wake STP SK 1726 
ad mdccclv 
Benj Harrison AM Thesaur*^ 

H G AusiiN Archit'^ 
C & G Mears Founders London 



192 Inscriptions. 

VIL, 43Un. U lOHNNES GRANDORGE STP JOHNNES HAN- 

COCKE STP SK 1727 
VIII., 46f in. U EDUARDUS TENISON STP HON-EDUARDUS 
FINCH AM SK FECIT 1728 
IX., 5U-in. RADULPHUS BLOMER STP ELLAS SYDAL STP 

SK FECIT 1726 
X., 57i-in. Ye ringers all that prize your health and happiness 
Be sober merry wise & you'll the same possess 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1778 
Clock Bell, 70-in. Gulielmo Friend STP Decano Lester & Pack of 

London Fecit 1762 W^' Chapman Molded me 
"Bell Harry." lOSEPH HATCH ME FECIT 1635 

Of these the first ten constitute the "ring." The Clock bell (Great Dun- 
stan) is also used as a Death bell. "Bell Harry" is at the top of the centre 
tower, and is used to call to daily matins and evensong. It is also rung daily 
at 5.45 a.m. in summer, and 6.45 a.m. in winter, and at 8 p.m. These, with- 
out doubt, are survivals of the ancient morning and evening "Ave" bells — 
the latter also known as the Curfew or Ignitegium. Its other use is to notify 
the death of the Sovereign or the Archbishop of the province. 

Many thanks for this information to Rev. P. W. Loosemore. 

On the subject of the bells of the earliest successive Metropolitan cathedrals 
history is silent, until we come to that erected by Archbishop Lanfranc in 
1070-77. 

No doubt they had bells. With almost equal certainty we can conclude 
that they were in a detached campanile, after the Italian custom. Such a 
building did actually exist here on an ascertained spot to the south of the 
Cathedral as late as 1382, when it was destroyed by an earthquake. Whether 
the erection which then perished was the work of Saxon or Norman, or later 
times, is unknown ; possibly it had been rebuilt more than once. 

The cathedral built by Lanfranc, as above mentioned, was, as is well known, 
very considerably altered and enlarged, within thirty years, by two successive 
Priors — Ernulph and Conrad — and it is in connection with these two that we 
get the first positive mention of bells. 

Prior Ernulph would seem, from the entry in Anglia Sacra^ to have given 
one large bell — this bell was recast by his successor, Conrad, who added to it 
four smaller ones. Prior Wybert, some sixty years later, added a sixth of 
very large size, the entry concerning it being that he " Signum quoque magnum 
in clocario posuit, quod triginta duo homines ad sonandum trahunt." 



hiscriptions. 193 

This entry is quite conclusive of the fact that the bell in question was not 
rung in our English fashion with a rope, but in the Continental manner by 
treading on a plank or planks fastened across the head stock. Thirty-two 
men hanging on to a bell-rope is clearly impossible. I think, too, we cannot 
doubt that Conrad's five, as well as Wybert's tenor, were all " in clocario " — in 
the campanile. 

The next bell operations of which we have any note are those of Henry of 
Eastry (Prior 1285-1331), who in 1316 added to the other bells in the Cam- 
panile one dedicated to St. Thomas the Martyr, which weighed 8,000 lbs. He 
bought other bells in that and the following year, of which I shall speak pre- 
sently. 

Of later additions to the campanile we have only one record. Prior Hath- 
brand (1339-70) placed " duas magnas campanas in clocario, viz., Jesu et 
Dunstan " — both dedications singularly appropriate, the Cathedral itself being 
dedicated to Our Blessed Lord, and St. Dunstan being not only Primate, but 
also, if chronicles are to be trusted, a bellfounder, if not actually per se, 
certainly per alios. 

Hasted states (incorrectly) that these two bells were in the south-west 
tower. The worthy historian, no doubt, was ignorant of the fact that " clo- 
carius " does not mean clock tower but bell tower, and confounded the old 
detached campanile with the comparatively modern south-west clock tower. 

When the campanile fell from the shock of an earthquake in 1382, no 
doubt the bells were broken ; but there is no record of the disposition of the 
metal. It is, however, I think, traceable. 

We have now to transfer our interest in the subject to the Central or Angel 
Tower, first built by Archbishop Lanfranc. This does not seem to have been 
stocked with bells until the Priorate of Henry of Eastry before mentioned. 
He in 13 17 bought three new bells and placed them in it. The largest is- 
stated to have weighed 1,460 lbs., the middle one 1,210 lbs., and the smallest 
1,124 lbs. They cost j[,(ii 9s., exclusive of the frame and hanging. 

Archbishop Arundel gave a ring of four bells, whose weights are stated ta 

have been 

1,646 lbs. 

2,272 „ 
3.646 „ 
7,188 „ 

respectively, and placed them in this tower. I own that I am rather sus- 
picious as to this " gift," looking to the close coincidence of the date with that 

2 C 



1 94 Inscriptions. 

of the destruction of the campanile, and am much inclined to surmise that 
the Archbishop merely paid for the casting, and that the metal used was that 
of the broken bells- — Dunstan and his fellows. 

Prior Thomas Chillenden (1391-1411) is stated to have given a bell, dedi- 
cated to the Blessed Trinity, which doubtless also found an abode in the 
Central Tower. The record of the benediction of the five bells is still pre- 
served in the Registry at Lambeth, and is as follows : 

Memo^nd qd Octavo die Mensis Aprilis Anno dni Mittimo CCCC">°- 
nono Reveren"i*is jn xpo pater & diis dns Thom'\s dei gra Cantuariefi 
Archiepus tocius ^c*^ unxit benedixit & solempnirconsecravit quinq3 
campanas novas in campanili Angelo^i ext^ chorum sue sancte 
Cantuarieii eccie. pendentes quas prius inibi appendi fecit et dicte sue 
eccie predonavit et diversa nomina eisdem apposuit Prime vidett 
maiori imposuit nomen Trinitatis Secunde nomen Marie Tercie 
nomen Gabrielis Archangeli Quarte nomen Sci Blasij Ac quinte & 
minime nomen Johannis Evangeliste. Presentib3 tunc ibidem 
venabi^z & discretis viris Dfio Johanni Wikeryg Archno Cantuar 
Magris Philippo Morgan vtriusq'^ iuris Doctore ac Wiltmo Milton 
Archno Buck & alijs cticis & laicis in multitudine copiosa 

It will be observed from this that our modern custom of reckoning a ring 
from the treble upwards did not apparently obtain in the fifteenth century, 
the certificate plainly mentioning the tenor as "No. i." This may, however, 
be owing to ignorance on the part of the Diocesan Registrar. 

Quite at the close of the century the tower appears to have been re-built, 
and the five bells consecrated by Archbishop Arundel, and commonly known 
as the " Arundel Ring," were removed thence to the north-western tower, 
which thenceforward bore the name of the Arundel Tower. Other bells, 
however, remained in the Angel Steeple, viz., Eastry's three and two others, 
of whose casting no record seems to have been preserved. These five were 
confiscated by the Crown at the dissolution in 1540, and their metal sold. 
The Rev. N. Battely {Cantiiaria Sacra, Part II., pp. 24, 25) gives the follow- 
ing curious information as to this sale : " From a Record communicated to 
me by my very good brother, Charles Battely, Esq., Keeper of the Records of 
the late Augmentation Office, I am informed that on the 5'^ of July, Anno 
32 Benrici WW., there was sold to Henry Crips, oi Burchington, and Robert 



l7isc7'2ptions. 195 

St. Legcr, ai Feversham, certain Bell-Metal, containing twenty-four thousand, six 
hundreth, one quartern, twenty and one pounds in waight, being parcel of the 
five Bells late in the great Bellfrage of Christchurch in the City of Canterbury.' 

There is some very curious mistake here, which I cannot solve. Hasted 
mentions the above sale (no doubt copying from Battely), and gives the 
weight as 24,646 lb. This, making the bells average nearly 5,000 lbs. apiece, 
is, I think, very much too large. I have carefully examined the Augmentation 
Office papers at the Record Office, but I cannot find the document above 
referred to, and must, therefore, leave the story half untold. 

The Central Tower, now known as " Bell Harry " Tower, contains now 
only one bell — " Bell Harry " — which tradition affirms to have been the gift 
of Henry VHI., and to have been brought out of France. If this be correct 
— and the name given to it seems corroborative — it has been recast, as it now 
bears the date 1635. 

We must now take up the story of the North-Western Tower, to which, so 
far as records serve us, the first donor of bells was Prior Henry of Eastry, in 
1316. He placed therein four bells, three of which, weighing respectively 
2,000, 2,200, and 2,400 lbs., were apparently intended to serve as a ring; the 
fourth, a smaller one weighing 756 lbs., being used only to summon the 
chapter. To this tower, as has already been mentioned, the five bells of the 
Arundel ring were removed. We have no record of any further changes or 
additions, but in 1726 the tower certainly contained six bells, and these were 
then taken down and recast into a peal of eight by Samuel Knight of London. 
They were, however, not replaced in the same tower, but shifted to the South- 
west or Chicheley Tower. The inscriptions, preserved by Hasted, on the old 
ring, show clearly that Eastry's five bells had been recast, probably more 
than once. They were as follows : 

I. Josephus Hatch me fecit 1635 

II. Josephus Hatch me fecit 1636 

III. TG, Prior, Sancte Thoura Ora Pro Nobis 

IV. ER. Robertus Mot me fecit 1585 
V. Joseph Hatch made me 1606 

VI. Beate Trinitati Campana Hec Sacra primo fusa 1408 sccundo 1624 
Josephus Hatch me fecit. 

The inscription on the treble is suspiciously like that on " Bell Harry." 
This brings us to the S.W. or Chicheley Tower. Until 1726 it does not 
seem ever to have held but one bell— Great Dunstan-first given by Prior 

2 C 2 



19^ Inscriptions. 

Molash in 1430, and stated to have weighed 8,105 ^bs. Battely gives the 
following account of its dedication : 

"Magna Campana Cant., a.d. 1459, 14 Die Mensis Junii. Dominus 
Richardus Episc. Roffens. benedixit magnam campanam in Navi Ecclesie in 
honore S. Dunstani Archiepisc. cum magna solemnitate. Prior istius 
Ecclesiae erat ibidem revestitus in Pontificalibus. Ista Campana facta fuit 
Londini Anno 1430 Tempore Domini Wilhelmi Molass." 

Here again the record is not quite so trustworthy as might be wished. In the 
first place it is rather curious that a bell should have to wait twenty-nine years 
for its dedication ; and secondly, there was no Richard Bishop of Rochester 
at or about the period mentioned. 

We may, however, accept the fact of the gift of the bell by Prior Molash. 
It was evidently intended to replace Prior Hathbrand's " Dunstan " destroyed 
in the fall of the campanile. Whether it survived until 1758 is unknown; 
but in that year it or its successor was cracked in an attempt to toll it by 
striking with a hammer. A futile attempt to mend the crack with solder was 
made — of course to no purpose — and it was eventually recast within the 
precincts in 1762 ; an operation which led to the introduction of the Mears 
family to the bell-founding trade. William Chapman, then foreman to and 
afterwards partner with Lester and Pack, of London, being sent down to do 
the work, noticed a youth intensely interested in the performance, and 
offered to take him to London and teach him the business ; the offer was 
accepted, and the youth, William Mears, eventually succeeded to the sole 
ownership of the Whitechapel Foundry, first established by Robert Mot, who 
was probably, as I have shown elsewhere, also a native of Canterbury. 

The Mears are an old Canterbury family, and it is fitting that in dealing 
with the bells of the Metropolitan Cathedral, their name should be mentioned. 
The last of them, Mr. John Mears, has lately passed away at a good old age, 
and I am heartily glad to place on record here the many thanks I owe him for 
help in collecting the materials for this book. 

CANTERBURY. All Saints. i Bell. 

I, 30-in. iascpli I|<tfcl| mairc mc 1627 

T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple and a waggerell bell. 

In 1757-8, according to Mr. Faussett, there were here "three small bells 



Insc7'iptioiis. 197 

all cast by Joseph Hatch, 1627 ; over these hangs in an open turret a small 
bell on w^'' the clock strikes, without inscription." 

Death knell rung — usual tellers, 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 for female. 

Thanks to Rector, Rev. J. Parmiter. 

Holy Cross. 5 Bells. 

I., 28-in. lOHN FISHER CH WARDEN 1739 
n., 29-in, toacplj I|afi:f| ntabe mc 1608 RF 
HI, 31-in. Same. © 1615 IH RC 

IV., 35-in. + b^^^^-Mj^^^-v^s I :£i&^mm^m.m \ 

v., 38^in. lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME © 1608 

RD 

T. R. E. Item iiij bells and a wagerell bell in the steple. 

For account of No. 4 bell, see p. 16. 

Death knell rung —usual tellers, 3x3 for man, 3x2 for woman. A 
smaller bell used for children. 

" Sermon Bell " rung on Sundays at 8 a.m. 

Bells rung on church festivals. 

One bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. P. W. Loosemore. Also to Mr. J. Meadows 
Cowper, to whose interesting work on the parish records of this church — 
entitled " Our Parish Books and What They Tell Us " — ^I am indebted for the 
following entries relating to the bells of this church : 

In 1698, the bells were rung on "King Charles his birthday"; they were 
rung when the King went to Holland and when he came back, and at 
various other times, the cost to the parish being iSi-. (ui. Three new bell 
ropes cost 105. 2d. 

In 1699, bell-ringing cost 125. In 1701, 8i-., three-fourths of the latter 
sum being at the proclamation and coronation of Queen Anne. 

1705 paid natt butler for mending ye bells ... ... 13^'. od- 

1706-7 pd Nath Buttler for making of a new wheel for 

the Bell and new hanging for the Bell ... 1//. 3-v. od. 

170S pd John Eastman for four new Bellropes ... i6.v. dd. 

1716 Bell ropes and bell-ringing cost 32^. 



i9c> 



Inscriptions. 



i-js. 



4S. 



od. 



2d. 



5^- 


od. 


S^- 


od. 


5'- 


od. 


5^- 


od 


8:r. 


(yd. 



1722 Bell ringing paid for to the tune o( jQi 5^. 
A set of Bell Roops and put in them uop 
1725-6 Payd M' Jarman for mending the claper of one 
of the Bells 

1727 Various payments for work about the bells. 

1728 The "dis Bors Ments of John Quested." 
for Ringing for King geore in ter sesion* 
for Ringing one King george Croune Asyone ... 
for Ringing one ye one ye prinse of whale 

Birthday 
for wringing one ye Queens Beth day ... 

1729 March 9, at a vestry for A new bell 
explained by the following minute : 

March ye 9, 1729. At a vestry holden in ye Parish Church of Holy Cross 
Westgat in Canterbury By ye parishoners it was unanimusly agreed That ye 
Church Wardens have a sess Granted at ye Rate of one Shilling In ye pound 
to buy a new bell That is to be a treble bell to make ye ring better & ye 
said bell Is not to Cost a bove twenty one pounds Allowed by us (Thirteen 
signatures follow.) 

Canterbury Nov. 16, 1730. Agreed at A vestry that ye Churchwarden shall 
Be Allowed ye money he shall Disburst on acct of ye New wheele & ironwarke 
That is to be put to ye new bell & other Charges he Shall be at in Repareing 
ye fram & wheels of ye other bells out of ye next sess That shall be granted. 



1730 Nov. 16 pd M"^ Eastman for a tennet rope ... 
Spent on will Baker for Buying ye Mettle for ye 

bell 

Nov. 19 Spent on ye bell founder 
Spt on ye bell founder & potterf 
Nov. 21 Spent at Casting ye bell 
A hors & Cart &: men to help ye bell home 
Lowance at M' Clarks for potterf 
Paid Knight for ye bell ... 
At parkers for lowance for fisher and potter 
Spent at Danll: parkers for getting ye bell up ye 
steeple... 



5^- 



od. 



2 1 //'. 



IS. 


6d. 


IS. 


vi- 


\s. 


ed. 


2S. 


Id. 


45. 


6d. 


\s. 


Id. 


OS. 


od. 



\s. \o\d. 



6d. 



* Accession. 



J Potter was the bell-hanger. 



ilL 


OS. 


9^. 


2lL 


\6s. 


6d. 


ili. 


195. 


Sd. 



Inscriptions. 1 99 

Knight's boy ... ... ... ... ... dd. 

Paid Knight for Casting All ye braces for ye 

bells 

Jan. II Potters bill for changing ye bells 

M"^ Jarman for ironwork 

Paid ye Judge of ye Court for signing ye Sess 

for ye bell ... ... ... ... ... \s. od. 

In 1 73 1, " weging ye bell and Spiles for ye new bells " cost 35'. 7^. Seven 
new bell ropes were also paid for this year. 

This newly added treble did not last very long ; perhaps the " mettle " pro- 
vided by the churchwardens was of indifferent quality. It had to be recast in 
1739, but under what precise circumstances is unknown, as the parish books 
for that year are wanting. The lettering, however, shows it to have been cast 
by Thomas Lester, of the Whitechapel Foundry. 

CANTERBURY. St. Alphege. 3 Bells. 

I., 29 in. HENRY TOMLIN GEORGE MAY CH : WARDENS 

I H MADE ME 1692 
II., 31-in. Blank. 
III., 34-in. ttrsspli fiafcfi ntatjq mc © 16 16 

T. R. E. Item one bell for the dede peple 

Item in the Steple iiij bells and a wagerell bell 

St. Andrew. i Bell. 

I., 3i?>-in. R0bci[fiT0 + m0f + «xc, + t'ccit+ 1597 ® 

Mr. Faussett mentions here four bells in 1757-8, inscribed as follows : 

I. William Hawker Nathaniel Hulse 1699 
II. and III. No inscription. 
IV. Robertus Mott me fecit Anno 1576. 

The worthy antiquary's information is corroborated, as regards the tenor, by 
the following extracts from the i)arish accounts, which have been kindly fur- 
nished by Mr. J. Meadows Cowper : 

1576 It. for casting of the greate bell ... ... lix^. 

It. for earring of the said bell to and from the 
place xij^- 



200 Inscriplions. 

It. for a new stocke for the said bell ... ... xij^. 

It. for ij dais & a halfe of worke of towe car- 

pinters & for bringing & carryeng of a gynn 

& lathers to hang the said bell ... ... vj.f. 

1598 Item payed vnto Chesman for waying the two 

Bells ... ... ... ... ... ... iC\]d. 

Item payed for bread and bere when the bell 

was hounge vp to those that did help and for 

the hanging vp of the bell ... ... ... xij^. 

Item payed for thre Baldrokes for the bells ... i]s. \]d. 

Item payed to master Boddel for his worke ... v]S. \]d. 

Item payed vnto Daves the Smyth for lorn for 

the Bells and the charges of the Church ... xx.f. 

Item payed more to the Belfunder for Tewn- 

ing of the Bells ... ... ... ... '\]s. 

Item payed vnto Ledes for two Brasse peces to 

Lay vnder the Bells ... ... ... ... \s. 'm]d^ 

Item payed for a new Bell waying fyve hundred 

& halfe hundred and xiiij//. at viij^. thepound xxj//'. 
Item payed vnto Yeoman Coxson & Daves for 

takyng downe the Bell ... ... ... iiji'. 

Item payed to Daves the smyth for happes 

hookes & pynes ... ... ... ... \]d. 

This new bell was possibly the one now hanging ; but I am by no means 
sure ; the weight paid for does not quite correspond with the presumed weight 
of the present bell, judging from its diameter. And, again, I do not see how 
Mr. Faussett could possibly have missed the inscription. I am more inclined 
to believe the present bell to have come from St. Mary Bredman. That 
church has lost two bells somehow, and its sole remaining one is by R. Mot, 
and dated 1597. 

CANTERBURY. St. Dunstan. 6 Bells. 

I., 28^-in. This treble was addid to this Peal to make them six 
BY voluntary subscription in 1777. Mears & C° 
London Fecit 
II., 29-in. ANTHO ROOP ARM lAC PEMY VIC SPENCER 
tnaepll Iiafcli mabe me 1629 W SANDYE OECONO- 
MICIS 



Inscriptions. 201 

III., 32-in. This bell was recast by voluntary subscription 1777 

Mears & C° London Fecit 
IV., 35-in. lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME © 1605 

IF CW 

v., 40-in. U(Fig. 2) + ,^Ta@-:XIl,^m3E,^:©m,^®*3[.^ 

VI., 45-in. HENREY LANMAN lOHN HACKTNO C W T P 
M 1676 

In 1758 there were only five bells, and the then 2nd (present 3rd) was in- 
scribed : 

Thomas Palmar made me 1660. Tho Simpson Ch : Warden. 

For account of No. 5 see p. 1 1. 

Passing bell rung " for decent people " an hour after death — " some leave it 
later." This is a little mysterious, but it comes on the authority of the sexton. 
I take it that he means that he does not reckon people " decent " unless they 
send him notice at once. There may be in this an unconscious reminiscence 
of the time when the Passing bell was rung when soul and body were actually 
parting. 

Tellers : For man 3x3, for woman 3x2, for child 3 x 2 on a smaller bell. 

Bells chimed for services. 

Peals on the great Church festivals, at confirmations, and some other special 
occasions. 

I am greatly indebted to Mr. J. Meadows Cowper for the following extracts 
from the parish accounts, which are extant from an unusually early period : 

1485 Item for a rope for the gret bell ... ... viijtf'. 

It. for a rope for the wakereli ... ... ... iij^. 

It. payde to John Long for bawderyks ... xj^. 

Item for ryngyng ij pryncypall dayes .. . ... 'my/. 

It. payd for the reparacyons of the bells ... iijj\ xd. 

It. spent at Wylliam Sprotts when the clappers 

were mendyd ... ... ... ... j//. 

The account for this year begins thus : 

This is the acompte of Wyllyam Balle and John 
Thomas Church Wardeyns of Seynt Don- 
stonys Aol) mcccclxxxv 

2 D 



202 Inscriptions. 

The "reseyts" amount to v//. xix-f. \d. oh. 
The " costs & payments & expensis " come to 
vj//. yA]s. \\]d. 

And the account concludes with the following note, handing down to pos- 
terity for 400 years the fact that worthy John Thomas was very careful of 
No. I : 

" So rest in deb. to John Thomas all thyngs 
clerely acomptyd & alowyd the day & yere 
aboue sayde xiJ5. iiij^. ob. therefore he 
kepyng a chalys in plegge," &c. 

For the next four years the accounts are only summarized. No details are 
given. 

1490 Inprimis payde to Wyllyam Sprotte for schet- 

tyng of the mydyldyll bell claper ... ... viij^. 

It. payde to Ingram for a newe rope to the 

gret bell ix^. 

It. payde to Long for iij bawdryks makyng & 

mendyng ... ... ... ... ... x</. 

Item paid to the ryngers Holy Thursday & 

Corpus Xi day iiij^. 

It. payde to Ingram for makyng clene of the 

stepyll iij^. 

1491 Item payde to the ryngers on Holy Thursday... \]d. 

1492 Itm. payde to the ryngers iij dayes ... ... \]d. 

Item payde to Ingram for a new rope ... xjV. 

It. payde to Wyllyam Sprotte for mendyng of 

a claper ... ... ... ... ... -xiiijV. 

Itm. payde to Ingram for a rope ... ... y.d. 

Item payde to Long for ij bawdrykes xij^. 

Inprimis for makyng of new belclappers & 

mendyng of one ... ... ... xiiji-. iiij^. 

It. payde for iiij new belropis Sm ... ... \\\]s. \\]d. 

It. payde for iij new bawdryks & mendyng . . . xvj^. 

Item payde for v boxis to the belfry y.d. 

Item payde on Corpus ; day & Holy Thurs- 
day to the ryngers for ij yeres ... ... xij^. 



Ifiscn'plions. 203 

1500 "Reseyts" 

Item of the Parysshyns to the making of the 

wakeringbell ... ... ... ... ... \\\]d. 

Payments 
Item payde to the ryngers for Holy Thursday 

& Corpus i day for ij yeres ... ... ... ij^. sn]J, 

Item payed to John Long for mendyng of iij 

bawdryks ... ... ... ... ... vj^. 

Item payde to Roger Hart for mendyng of the 

gret bell whele cs: makyng of ij branchis of 

iron to the corteyns of the Hyghe Awter ... y.v]d. 

Item payde for a rope to the lytyll bell ... \\]d. 

Item payde for a corde to amende the olde 

rope of the wakerrell ... ... ... \]d. 

Item payde for a new rope to the same ... \\\]d. 

Item payde to Rychard Kerner for new makyng 

of the same belle ... ... ... ... iiji-. viij^. 

Item payde on Holy Thursday to the ryngers 

& brekefast ... ... ... ... ... \n]d. 

Item payde for a rope to the gret bell . . . xiiija'. 

Item payde on Corpus Christi day ... ... viij^. 

Item payde for a bawdryk to the ij bell ... vnyi. 

1506-7 (.'') Item paid to Thomas Rowe and his man sokyng 

and hangyng of the bellys ... ... ... \]s. 

Item for iij new bawderyk pro le pece vnyi. Sm \]s. 

Item for mendyng of a bawderyk ... ... ]d. 

Item for a bokyll for a bawderyk ... ... ]d. 

Item paied to John Clere Smyth for makyng 

of iij newe clapperys... ... ... ... ix.f. \d. 

Item paied to Lawrence Rolfe smyth for certeyn 

irnes for the stoke of the bellys ... ... iij-^'. uVyL 

Item paied to Thomas Brooke and Henry 

Symson for their labour aboute the bellys ... 
Item for iij new belle ropys 
Item for lyne for the wakerell belle ... 
Item for a newe wakerell belle 
Item for hangyng of the same belle and for 

irnes and nailez therto ... •-. •■■ \d. 

2 1) 2 



VJ.S-. 




iij.-. 


]d. 




vj./. 


\]S. 


\\\]d. 



204 Inscriptions. 

Item paied to the belfounder for castyng of ij 

newe bellys and for newe nietyll to the same 

bellys vij/z. ij^. 

Item for the belle ryngarys and the standard 

berar one Ascencon Day and Corpus Xpi 

day in expencys for iij yere . . . ... ... ij.^. \]d. 

Item paid for a newe whele for the fore bell . . . iiij^. \\\]d. 

Item for grese and sope for the bellys ... \]d. 

Item resceyvid in metill gadered of the parysshe 

and of other parysshes ... ... ... xxiiij j-. 

1508-14 Item for a rope former (sic) belle ... ... vj</. 

Item for mendyng of the whele of the same 

belle ... ... ... ... ... ... vij^. ob. 

Item for a rope for the wacaryng belle ... iiij^. 

Item for plates & brodde to the lyttyl belle ... iiij^. 

Item to belle rynggeris & berer of baners at 

Corpus Xpi day at vj severall tymes ... \\]s. 

Item for a bawdryk ... ... ... ... y\]d. 

Item for rynggaris & berers of baners at iiij 

tymes... ... .. ... ... ... \]s. 

Item for an other bawdrik & a bokyll . . . viij^. 

1522-24 Item to Laurance Hunton to Codnam for 

mendyng of the bellstoke ... ... ... \\\}d. 

Item for calves heddis for the ryngars for ij 

yeres ... ... ... ... ... ... xiiijV. 

Item for a new baudryk &: mendyng ij olde 

baudrykis ... ... ... ... ... ix</. 

Item for iij newe bell ropys for all the bellis . . . ij.y. iiij^. ob. 

Item for a rope for wakerell ... ... ... vd. 

1524-5 Item for a calues hede flaggis and thredde at 

Corpus xpi day for ryngaris ... ... ... vij^. 

Item for ij ropes for eches for the bell ropys . . . ij^. 

Item to J. Hochyn for mendyng the bell wheles xx^. 

Item for smalle naylles for the seid wheles . . . ij^. 

Item to W. Rychard for mendyng the grete 

bell clapper ... ... ... ... ... \]s. \]d. 

Item to hym (Mathew lokear) for a key for the 

vpper stepyll dore ... ... ... ... iiij^. 



Inscriptio7is. 205 

Item to Mathew lokear for mendyng the second 

bell clapper ... 
1525-6 Item for a bellrope weyng vij Id di price 

Item for calves hede flaggis & thredde apon 

Corpus xpi day 
1526-8 Item for ij calves hedes and ryngers for bothe 

the seid yeres 
Item to William Richars smyth of olde dette 

for amendyng of a belle claper 
Item to M"' Vicary for a rope to the wakerell 
Item for ij truses for the bellis 
1529-31 Item rec of Wynston for the bell clapper 
Item payd for the grete bell clapper ... 
Item payd for the myddle bel clapper 
Item payd for mendyng of the lyttle bell 

clapper 
Item payd for mendyng of a clapper by M' 

Sygnetis tyme 
Item for hangyng of the bels ... 
Item for makyng of a new sterop to the bells 

and naylyng of them 
Item for ij calves heds ... 
Item in brede and drynk 
Item for iij bell ropes ... 

Item, for mendyng of the belwhele 

1532-3 Item for a pllorepe* to one of the bellis 

Item for a echef to the gret bell 

Item for a new gogyne to ye lityll bell had of 

Panton vj^. ob. 

Item for a day & a haufe workyng a bowte the 

fore bell payde to John Hochyn ... ... vij^. 

Item for a bande of yeron ... ... ... ij^. 

Item for drynke ... ... • • • • • • j^* 

Item payde to John Hochyn for mendyng the 

gret bell vij^. 

* .Sic. Query a pullrope, to ring the bell by "clocking," i.e., moving the clapper instead 
of the bell. 

t An additional piece of rope spliced into the old to " eke "" it out. 





x\d. 


i 


\xd. ob. 




\]d. 




■x\]d. 


ij^. 






viij^. 




\\d. 


ij^. 




vj^. 




\\]S. 


iiij^. 


\\]S. 


iiij^. 


\]S. 




\\\y. 






xij^. 




viijia^. 




iiij^. 


\\)S. 






xd 




]d 




]d. ob. 



!o6 Inscriptions. 

Item payd to Larans Houton for the same 

workyng ... ... ... ... ... vj^. 

Item for viij wegies to the gret bell ... ... iiij^. 

Item for brods and naylls to ye gret bell ... \d. 

Item for drynke to the carpyntre ... ... ob. 

Item for brods to the lytyll bell ... ... \d. 

Item for a newe bawderyke for the myddyll 

bell and mendyng of a nother ... ... \\)d. 

1538-9 Fyrst payed for one bell rope ... ... ... viij^. 

It. to Carpenter the smith for mendyng of a 

claj^ofabell xiiij^. 

It. for the ryngers brekefast flaggs & threde on 

Corpus xi day ... ... ... ... v\d. 

It, payed to Maxstede for mendyng of the frame 

of the bells at ij tymes iijV. viij^. 

It. to Carpenter for iren werk of the same ... xiiij^. 

1539-41 Itm. for mendyng of a bawdryke ... ... \]d. 

Itm. for a bellrope ... ... ... ... \\\]d. 

Itm. payed to the Ryngers ... ... ... iiij^. 

Itm. payed to Rynggeres another tyme ... iiij^. 

Itm. another tyme to rynggeres ... ... \]d. 

1540-44 Item payd to William Fuller for a bell roope xiij^. 

Item to stocke for ij bell roopes ... ... xxij^. 

Item to Watson for mendyng of the belles ... \]s. 

Item payd on Corpus xpi Daye for the ryngeres 

brekefaste ... ... ... ... ... • v\d. 

1544-5 Inprimis payd for the ryngers brekefaste on 

Corpus Christi daye for iij yercs ... ... \]s. 

Item to Wyllyam Rychard for yerone vvorke to 

trowse the bellys ... ... ... ... xij^. 

Item for my nowne exspenc at ye trussyng of 

ye bellis ... ... ... ... ... \]d. ob. 

Item payd for ye grett bell rope ... ... xj^. 

Item payde for ye wakerell rope ... ... yd. 

Item for a sterope for ye fore bell ... ... vjV. 

1545-6 Item In primis for iij bell ropis ... ... iiji^. yd. 

Item payde to y'= Ryngeris y'same day (Corpus 

Christi) ij^. 



Inscriptions. 207 

1547-8 Item payd to the Ryngerys that same day 

(Corpus Christi) ... ... ... ... \\\]d. 

1548-50 Item for a wagerell rope ... ... ... xiij^. 

Item for a rope for the fyrst bell ... ... xv//. 

Item for a rope for the second bell ... ... xviij^. 

Item for a rope for the thyrde bell ... ... \)s. 

Item payed to Wynston for a new bawldryke 

and mendyng of an olde ... ... ... xiij^, 

1557-8 Itm. payed for a bell rope for the first bell ... xv^. 

Itm. payed to Rychard Chamberlayne Smyth 
for mendyng of the irens & brodds for the 
sayd bell ... ... ... ... ... xv^. 

Itm. payed to the Carpenter for mendyng of 

the frame & hangyng of the same bell ... \\\]s. y\\]d. 

Itm. for newe castyng of the breses of the sayd 

bell ... ... ... ... ... ... ij.y. 

1566 An Inventory dated this year gives : 

More in the steapele iij great belles forneshed 
one (wakrell bell) ij small peases of tember 
wyth holes in them prepared for a wynch. 

The words wakrell bell have had a pen drawn through them, why is not 
clear, as from later entries it will be seen that the wakrell bell was certainly 
in existence. 

1566-9 Item receyued of Rychard Ames for a oulde 

broken bellerope ... ... ... ... iiij^. 

1567 Item payed for nayles for the wacrell bell-frame iijV. oh. 
Item payed to good man Begelle carpenter 

for makeynge of a bell wheale and mynde- 

ynge of the bellis frames ... ... ... xji-. \]d. 

Item payed to Larance Kenelle for jerne worke 

aboute the frames of the belles ... ... xiiij^. 

1568 Item payed to Rychard Pateson clarke for 

takenge downe the w'kerelle belle and hange- 

gynge of hyr in the stepelle... ... ... \\d. 

Item payed to Rychard Pateson for takeynge 
of the stocke of the fore bylle and hange- 
ynge of hyr up agayne for hym and hys 
company viij^. 



208 



Inscriptions. 



Item payed to Larance Kenelle for nayles and 
ieyrne worke aboute the sayed belle 

Item payed to Tymothye Taylor for a newe rope 
for the greate belle and for myndynge the 
other bell ropes 

1569 Item payed to Wyllyan Baker for mendeynge 

of the baderecke for the great belle 

1570 Payed for a haulter for to mende the mydelle 

belle rope 
Item for a bell rope 

Item for a new bawderyck for the lytell bell .. 
1572 Item payed for a new bell rope 
Item for a wackerall rope 
15 73-4 Item geven the ringers vppon the 17 of of (sic 
Novembre (Accession day) ... 

1575 Item for a rope for a bell 

Item for the ringing at the Feast of the Navytye 

of our Ladye 
The baderyck of the bell 

1576 Item for ij bell ropes ... 
Item grease for the bells 

1579-80 Item for my selfe and my man for one dayes 

worke aboute the bels 
Item for grease for the bels ... 
Item payde the clarke for the ringerse 
Item layd oute for a balderyke for the lyttell 

bele ... 
1580 Item payd John Stone carpenter of Harbol 

doun and his ij men for on dayse worke 

aboute the bels 
Item for braddes about the work v'' and for 

grease ij'^. 
Item payd to the clarke for ringerse ... 
Item for a balderyke mending 



yi\)d. 

\]S. \\\)d. 
iiij^. 

xij^. 

xij^. 

xxij^. 

x^. ob. 

ij5. \]d. 
xviij^. 

iij^. 

xiiij^. 

\s. \\\]d. 

iiij^- 

xxijV. 

\d. 

xij^. 

xij^. 
ij^. 



yid. 
ixd. 



The entries for 1522-31 inclusive are singularly curious. It would seem 
that the ringers' services generally were voluntary and gratuitous, except on 
Holy Thursday and Corpus Christi Day. For these two days they seem to 



Inscriphons. 209 

have been paid, and on the latter of them to have been regaled annually on 
calves' heads. This is one of the most curious local bell-customs I have 
ever met with, and I should be glad if anyone could throw any light on its 
meaning or origin. Were calves' heads considered an especial dainty in the 
first half of the sixteenth century ? Canterbury brawn is world renowned ; but 
I believe it comes from the head of a pig, not of a calf. 
Best thanks to the Rev, J. G. Hoare, Vicar. 

CANTERBURY. St. George. 4 and a Clock bell. 

I., 31-in. tofcpfj Iiatfli matiE mc 1627 

U (Fig. 2) U 

II., 33 in. + Bj^mm ©©rojBi(3:i Q>y\.m^ :p:no 

III., 37-in. THOMAS DVNKIN WILLIAM KILCHELL C W 

THOMAS PALMAR MADE MEE 1664 
IV., 42-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT Q 1623 
Clock bell. Same. 

For mention of No. 2, see p. 11. 

Hasted notes here, in his day, four bells, and one formerly in the turret. 
This last is, of course, the present Clock bell. It apparently had another use 
in bygone days. There is an entry in the city accounts, under date 15 86, of 
an annual stipend of^i 6s. 8d. to be paid to a person, who shall every 
morning at 4 o'clock ring the great bell in "St. George's steeple for one 
quarter of an hour." This w^is clearly, prior to the Reformation, the morning 
"Ave bell" — continued, or, perhaps, re-established on account of its secular 
utility. 

Death knell, according to Rector, rung thrice — after death, on morning of 
funeral, and at time of burial. 

A bell is rung for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to the Rector, the Rev. T. F. Dixon. 

St. Margaret. 3 ]]clls. 

I., 27-in. BY ^ ME ^ THOMAS <) HATCH <> T C> M <) C > W U 1599 
II., 30-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1625 Vi VI 
HI., 33-in. Same. I) E 

T. R. E. Item iij bells and the waggerell bell in the steplc. 
The treble is badly split and quite useless. There is a crowned rose upon 
it under the date. 

Apparently no local uses. 

2 E 



2 I o hiscriptions. 

CANTERBURY. St. Grfxory thk Great. 3 Bells. 

Modern church and equally modern bells. 

St. Martin. 3 Bells. 

I., 25i-in. Blank. 

II., 30-in. T Mf.ars ok London Fecit 1829 
III., 34-in. + (Fig. 5A).S«incta Kafnina ©ra ^1*0 ^oliia + (Fig. i.) 

For account of tenor, see p 34. 

T. R. E. Item iij bells and one wagercll bell in the steple. 

In 1758 the 2nd bell bore : 

John Palmar Thomas Palmar made me 1641 

Death knell as soon as notice is received. Bell tolled for fifteen minutes, 
then tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 3 x 2 for woman. This is repeated on the morn- 
ing of the funeral, and a bell is tolled while the corpse is being carried through 
the parish. 

Bells chimed for services. 

A bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Ikst thanks to the Rev. L. E. Goodwin. 

St. Mary Bredin. 3 Bells. 

I., 19-in. THOMAS FRANCIS CH : WARDEN lyii R : PHELPS 

FECIT 
II., 2ii-in. +(Fig. 29) XnJi XII -^ 

III., 22-in. +(Fig. 29) ^TT-e- : :is)©">r : jkjj-'^roiijcn-^H : 

T. R. E. Item iij bells and the wagerell bell in the steple. 
For account of the two larger of these, see p. 47. 

St. Mary Bredman. i Bell, formerly 3. 

I., 24-in. +1 + 54-9 + 7 + 
This is by Robert Mot, of Whitechapel. 

St. Mary Magdalene. Formerly 3 Bells. 

I., 28i-in. iufcjjfi rjafcli ma^c mc 16 16 
II., 3oi-in. +H'inctc ;pefrc Ot^a X*ca X^alJia -f I O ^ 
III., 32 in. -f Hiincfa ^afcttina ©ra X^ra XltJl'isi+ U (Fig. 19) 



Inscriptions. 



21 I 



I am doubtful as to what crosses there were on No. 2, the inscription was 
very much corroded and the rubbing consequently far from distinct. There 
is no rubbing of No. 3, but I surmise the crosses to be Figs. 5 and 20. 

Church pulled down in 1S71 and bells sold — only the tower left standing. 

St. Mary Northgate. 4 Bells. 

I., 26-in. i0srplj Iiafcfi ^ua^c mc © 1623 
II., 28^-in. iuscplj Ijatcfj watic mc 1616 

III., 31-in. iascpli Iiafiij mal3E mc O 1623 WILLIAM CRIPPr/I C W 
IV., 34i-in. T IMears of London W" Mutton I B Miette Church 
Wardens 1813 
T. R. E, Item iij bells in the steple with a wagerell bell. 
In 175S the tenor was inscribed : 

Joseph Hatch made me 1623. 

St. Mildred. 1 Bell. 

I., 29-in. RICHARD PHELPS MADE ME 171 1 

" Uses " same as at All Saints' Church. 

T. R. E. Item iiij bells in the steple and the wakerell bell. 

Mr. Bryan Faussett's note of 1 758 gives here "5 bells thus inscribed: I. 
and II., Richard Phelps made me 1711; III., no inscription; IV., Joseph 
Hatch me fecit 1622 ; V., Ihs have Marse on the Sovvles of Thomas Wood 
and Margarete his wyfe and the following coat and our Saviour figured to the 
waist." 

A drawing of the arms is given, and on this the late Mr. Godfrey Faussett 
makes the following remarks : " There was a monument to this couple pre- 
served by Weever in this church, in a note to w'' my great-grandfather says, 
'See their coat on the 5th Bell, with this date MCCCCCXXXVI,' but he does 
not mention the date in his account of the bell. * INIargarete his wyfc ' was 
daughter of John Moyle, and these are the arms of Moyle impaled by AVood, 
each quartering some other coat : 



2 E- 



212 Inscriptions. 

"The Blazonry is : i. Ar. a fess raguly betw" 3 fl. de lis or, for Wood. 



3. Gu. a mule passant ar., a cinque foil ar. in chief for 

Moyle. 

4. (As I find from other shields of Moyle and Finch.) 

Ar. a saltier sa. between 4 cinque foils of the 2nd. 

" I can find no name given to this shield anywhere, but I feel inclined to 
hazard a conjecture that it may be Jerdan or Jurdayn, a monument at East- 
well making a Sir Tho^ Moyle husband of a Katheryne Jurdayn, and it being 
somewhat similar to the arms of that name. — T. G. F." 

This bell was doubtless by William Oldfeild (see p. 59). 

CANTERBURY. St. Paul. 3 Bells. 

I., 26-in. EDWARD BACKER lOHN WILLIAMES C W P P 

THOMAS PALMAR MADE MEE 1661 
II., 2Si-in. EDWARDE BAKER lOHN WILLIAMES 3 W THOMAS 

PALMAR MADE MEE 1661 
III., 32-in. ►J^ (Fig. 10) ©"fcvntit J5.nnts Xli^f^^wct CUampaua 
^0l|£ittts U (Fig. 6) 
T. R. E. Item iij bells and a wagerell bell — a bell for the Clok. 

Item ij bells to bere before peple to burying. 
For mention of tenor see p 27. 
Local uses same as at St. Martin's Church. 

St. Petkr. 3 Bells. 

I., 30-in. lOHN LEE SENIOR AND WILLIAM BALDVDKE 
CHVRCH WARDENS 1637 
lOHN PALMAR MADE MEE 

U(Fig.6) U 

II., 34-in. + (Fig. 10) JiTli^^mtra OTvisU ^E^are ^IDt^navc ^r^ 

U 
^xi&iit OvavE 
U (Fig. 2) 

III., 37-in. + B Ji\-\^.}:2>m M^ .ciii5-Ti3E,au e:a.^ 

For mention of the two larger bells, see pp. 1 1 and 27. 
Local uses same as at Holy Cross, ^Vcstgate. 



Inscriptions. 213 

In 153S the good local folks appear to have gone in strongly for the new 
views, for we find the Grand Jury presenting William Sandford, parson of this 
church, " for maliciously tolling the Avie bell in the said church after the 
evening song done, with a view to set up again the Bishop of Rome." 

St. John's Hospital. i Bell. 

vStated by the late Mr. John Mears to be a bell "of no interest." 
T. R. E. Item thre bells in the Steple. 

Item syx lityll bells sometyme called Sacryng bells. 
Only one left in Mr. Bryan Faussett's time — 1758. 

Eastbridge Hospital. No Bell. 

T. R. E. Item a buryall bell and a small bell. 
Item ij bells in the belfrey. 

Poor Priest's Hospital. i Bell. 

Bell inaccessible, but as the place has been desecrated for very many years, 
and the bell used for the clock, it may very possibly be a modern one, sup- 
plied when the place was the City police-station. 

CAP EL. St. Thomas. i Bell. 

I., 2 7fin, ^ lOHN ,) HODSON <) MADE ) ME ^ 1670 .$? C H «)J(> 
T. R. E. Item in the Stepyll ij small bells. 

CAPEL LE FERNE. St. Mary. i Bell. 

I., 25-in. Blank. 

CHALK. St. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I., 28-in. 1634 

II., 29-in. X (Fig. i) XX^e" : ^%m : :RJiiOS : XHiiXil©' 
III., 32-in. lOHM k WIL^IAR <J. MADE ^ ME ^ 1634 

For mention of No. 2 see p 10. 

Death knell "according to custom." Ringing for service, ditto. 

Thanks to the Rev. W. Joynes, Vicar. 

CHALLOCK. SS. Cosmas and Damian. 4 Bells. 

I., 31-in. lOHN ^:> WILNAR '> MADE ^ ME <) 1634 
II., 34-in. lOHN WAYLETT MADE ME 1724 
III., 37-in. <J> STEPHANVS <> SWAN ^ ME h FECIT v 1614 ♦ 
IV., 4iA-in. FIENRY 7 WILNAR (> MADE v ME 1640 



2 1 4 Inscriptions. 

T. R. E. " Fower bells in the Steple." 

Death knell as soon as notice is received. Tellers— 3 x 3 (males) or 3 x 2 
(females). On day of funeral, bell tolled before service and while body is 
carried to the grave. 

Bells rung for services. 

A bell for vestry meetings. 

Ringing formerly on 5th November, now (happily) discontinued. 

Best thanks to the Vicar, the Rev. Julian Pratt. 

CHARING. SS. Peter AND Paul. 6 Bells. 

1., 28-in. \ 
II., 30-in. 

Ill 32-m. ^^ TAYLOR & C^ LOUGHBOROUGH 1S78 

IV., 33-1"- ^ 
v., 37-in. 
VI., 4 1 -in./ 



^'eights : 


cwt. 


qr. 


lb. 




5 


2 







6 


I 


12 




7 


I 


4 




7 


3 


-> 




10 


1 






13 o 15 

T. R. E. Item fower bells in the steeple and a sauncts bell. 
Item ij handbells. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice is given. 

Funerals : Bell tolled before 8 a.m. and at the funeral. 

Bells rung or chimed for service. 

Tenor rung for vestry meetings. 

The four bells and sanctus (the latter doubtless hung in the opening above 
the chancel arch) probably remained until 1590, when, according to the diary 
of a parishioner, " The Parish Church of Charing was burnt upon Tuesday, 
the 4th of August, and the bells in the steeple melted with the extremity of 
the fire. Nothing of the church was left but the bare walls, except the floor 
over the porch and the floor over the turret, where the weathercock doth 
stand. The fire chanced by means of a birding-piece, discharged by one 
Mr. Dios, which fired in the shingels, the day being extreem hot, and the 
same shingels very dry." From Weever we learn that this birding-piece was 
discharged at a pigeon then upon the church. 



Inscriptions. 2 1 5 

The single bell, which was superseded by the present ring, bore the date 
1608, and was probably by Joseph Hatch. A local distich, alluding to this 

bellj ran as follows : 

" Dirty Charing lies in a hole, 

It has but one bell and that was stole." 

A rhyme which is found in many other places where the bell is a "singleton." 
In the present case, however, it is essentially libellous, as Charing lies on the 
slope of the North Downs, more than 300 feet above the sea, and the necessity 
of finding funds for the re-building of the fire-ruined church is quite suf- 
ficient to account for the paucity of bell furniture. Of course the bell was 
not "conveyed," but gotten honestly. The good folks of Charing were quite 

unacquainted with the Latin adage : 

Rem facias, rem, 
Si possis recte, seel non quocunque mode, rem. 

Best thanks to the Vicar, the Rev. A. Starey. 

CHARING HEATH. Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

A modern church, with presumably one modern bell. 

CHARLTON. St. Luke. 3 and a Sanctus Bell. 

L, 22i-in. ABRHAM i WHELOR ) CHVRCH /.> WARDEN C H ;> 

MADE ) ME <■> 1685 
H., 24Hn. CHRISTOPHER ^ HODSON <) MADE <J> ME <J> 1685 '-> 

ABRM ^ WHELOR ^ C !> WARDEN 
III,, 28-in. Joseph Cooper Farmer Floyd Church Wardens iSiS 

T Mears of London Fecit 
Sanctus, i4iin. R: PHELPS FECIT 1713 
T. R. E. Item iij bells of bellmettell hangyng in the steple there. 

Item j saints bell hangyng in the saide steple. 
Hasted states that Sir Adam Newton's trustees (Av;//. James I.) gave a new 
ring of bells to this church. 

St. Paul. 1 Bell. 

I., 35-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 
TO THE CALORY OF GOD 
AND IN HONOUR OF SAINT PAUL 

1867 



2 1 6 Inscriptions. 

CHARLTON. St. Thomas. i Bell 

I., 27-in. J WARNER & SONS FOUNDERS LONDON 1850 

CHARLTON BY DOVER. SS. Peter and Paul. i Bell. 

I., 19-in. iSi I 

St. Bartholomew. i Bell. 

A modern bell. 

CHART (GREAT). St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 30 in. JOHN TAYLOR & C° LOUGHBOROUGH 1S76 

n , 32-in. Same. 

in., 35-in. Same. 

IV., 36-in. Same. 

v., 4o|-in. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1761 

VL, 43i-in. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 1S05 

T. R. E. Item iiij°'' greate bells and a saunce bell. 

Item ij handbells. 
In 175S the five bells were inscribed as under, according to Mr. Bryan 
Faussett : 

L Nicholaus Toke S G H I W 1636 

II. Joseph Hatch made me 16 10 

III. Joseph Hatch made me WM CW 1614 

IV. Sum Rosa Pulsata Mundi Maria Vocata U (Fig. 19) 
V. Joseph Hatch made me 1606 

CHART (LITTLE). St. Marv. 5 Bells. 

L, 27Hn. NATHAMELL O COLr/IGTOM IVN SAMP KmOPIT 

FECIT 1722 
II., 291-in. 2AMVELL KNIGHT Q FECIT Q 17^2 O O O O 
IIP, 32-in. lOHN ASHBEE lOHN lENINGS C W S K FECIT 1722 
IV., 34-in. SAMVELL KMIGHT MADE ME 1722 
v., 37-in. The Rev" M" Tho^ Pearson Rector Io"" Ashbee Io" At- 
way Ch'Jt Wardens R $ Catlin Fecit 1742 *J. 

T. R. E. Item two hande bells. 

Item iiij bells in the Stepyll. 



Inscriptions. 217 

Passing bell rung an hour after death. Tellers : 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 for 
female, then toll for half an hour. 

Bell tolled on morning of funeral from 7 to 8 a.m., and again for half an 
hour before the funeral. 

Bells rung or chimed for Sunday services. 

Ringing on Christmas Eve and on New Year's Eve. 

The re-casting of the tenor in 1742 was carefully noted at the time in the 
parish register by the Rev. Thos. Pearson. 

Best thanks to his successor, the Rev. R. S. Oldham. 

CHART SUTTON. St. Michael. 6 Bells. 

I., 32-in. Chapman & Mears of London Fecerunt 1783 

II., 345-in. Same. 

III., 36-in. Same. 

IV., 38|-in, Same. 

v., 42|-in. Same. 

VI., 45-in. The Rev" M" Henry Jones Vicar Mess"^ Tho^ Marchant 
& Rob''" Pattenden ChWardens Chapman & Mears of 
London Fecerunt 1783 

No information obtainable as to local uses — the Vicar " did not think it 
necessary to reply to " my communication. 

CHARTHAM. St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 30-in. lOHN MOATE THOMAS GEORGE THO~" PEARCE 

S KNIGHT 1728 
II., 31-in. lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME O 1605 
III., 33-v-in. Same 
IV., 36|-in. Same, 
v., 4o-*in. THOMAS DENCE CW AVSTEN HOMVVOOD CW ® 

1605 
VI., 44|-in. Same as No. II. 

T. R..E, Item iiij bells with a Wakerell. 

CHATHAM. St. Mary. 2 Bells. 

I., 281-in. WILLIAM HATCH MADE ME RM SF CW ® 165 1 
II., 38-in. Recast 1812 for Chatham Parish by order of Arch" Cha* 
Windeyer Gideon Davis Church Wardens 

The smaller is only used as a clock bell. 

2 F 



2 1 8 Inscriptions. 

CHATHAM. St. Bartholomew. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

St. John the Divine. 2 Bells. 

I., 20.1 -in. 1798 
II., 3o37-in. T. Mears of London Fecit 1820 

S. Paul. i Bell. 

I., 26-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1854 

CHELSFIELD. St. Margaret. 5 Bells. 

I., 29-in. lOHN ^HODSON^ MADE ^ ME <$> 1672 ci{(,IOHN<J> ALLEN 
O O O O O O 'ijp WILLIAM <;'CHARMAN ^ CHVRCH 
V WARDENS O O O CH O O -il? 
II., 30^ -in. Same. 
IIL^ 32-in. Same. 
IV., 35 W"- Same. 
v., 39-in. Same. 

A maiden peal. 

T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple suted of brasse. 
Item on hand bell of brasse. 

Death knell rung as soon as convenient after death, always within twelve 
hours if possible. 

For a inan tenor bell used ; tolled for an hour, then tellers 3x3. 

For woman 4th bell for same space of time, tellers 3x2. 

For youth from seven to sixteen, same as for man, but with 3rd bell. 

For girl of same age, as for woman, on 2nd bell. 

For children under seven, treble bell used, tellers i x i x i. 

Bell tolled for one hour before funeral, the same one being used as had been 
for the death knell. 

Bells chimed for half an hour before service ; ring in on tenor for three 
minutes. 

Peals on church festivals. Ringing on New Year's Eve temporarily dis- 
continued. 

That on 5th Nov. (happily) obsolete for the last twenty years. 

For vestry meetings, ist and 2nd bells chimed for five minutes. 

Wedding peals usual at end of marriage service. 



Inscriptions. 2 1 9 

There is an endowment for bell ropes here, consisting of a field of about 
three acres, bequeathed by Dame Alice Bray in 15 10. It produces about 
£1 5^. annually. 

The bells were quarter turned and rehung in iSSo by Gillett and Bland, at 
a cost to the parish of ^75. 

Best thanks to Mr. Robert Brooker, churchwarden. 

CHERITON. St. Martin. 6 Bells. 

I. PRAISE GOD IN HIS HOLINESS 

MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1881 
IL PRAISE HIM IN HIS NOBLE ACTS 

MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON t88i 
III PRAISE HIM UPON THE LOUD CYMBALS 

MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1881 
IV. LET EVERYTHING THAT HATH BREATH PRAISE THE 
LORD 
MEARS &: STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1881 
V. YE SPIRITS & SOULS OF THE RIGHTEOUS BLESS YE THE 
LORD 
MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON i88i 
VL DEATH IS SWALLOWED UP IN VICTORY 

MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1881 

Tenor, 7I cwt. 

These replace a ring of four as untler : 

I., 27-in. i0rcpfi I|afcl| ma^e mc WH 1634 
IL, 29|:-in. Same. TP C\V © 1634 

III., 3i|-in. Same. 1607 

IV., 34|-in. y^ (Fig. 20) .Sif XH^ttti^n X2)wmtni X^cjtctrtcfum >^ (Fig. 5) 
U (Fig. 19) 
T. R. E. Item a iij bells in the steple. 

" Sold," ij hand-bells. 
Passing bell falling out of use. A bell is tolled, but there is no rule as to 
time or method. 

A bell tolled at funerals. 

Bells chimed or rung for services ; ring in on one for the last five minutes. 

2 Y 2 



2 20 Insc7'iptions. 

Peals on church festivals and New Year's Eve. 

A bell for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. A. H. Hall. 

CHEVENING. St. Botolph. 2 (formerly 6) Bells. 

I., 2S-in. IN HON : ANN^ F : NATU : MAX : GEOR : ET WIL- 
UM 
HELM : PR : WAL : R : PHELPS MADE ME 17 15 
n., 39-in. Fac : A° : Felicissim^ inaug : GEORGII M : B : F : & Hib : 
Regis F : D : P : P : pro salute rel : prot : Eccl : & Legum 
Regni Edw : Gee : d : d : rector benef : A : Ward R : 
Denham I : Smith T : Cotton ch : w 17 15 R : Phelps 
fecit 

The remains (Nos. i and 5) of a ring of six. Another (No. 3) of the ring 
was in existence twenty years ago, but cracked. It was inscribed : 

M^ 
IN HON : WILHELMIN^ PR : WAL : REGE-E SOBOLIS FELIC : 

MATRIS ••.• I : SMITH T : COTTON CH : W : 1715 

Hasted does not give the number in his day. It is very sad to see two- 
thirds of a ring gradually coming to grief, doubtless through careless usage, 
and so disappearing altogether. 

The ring would seem to have been given, probably by General (afterwards 
the first Earl) Stanhope, to commemorate the accession of George 1. to the 
throne of England. 

CHIDDINGSTONE. St. Mary. 8 Bells. 

I., 22-in. Henry Streatfeild Esq"^ Robert Patrick of London 

Founder 1784 
IL, 24-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1S38 
III., 25-in. Thomas Mears of London Fecit 1813 
IV., 2 5i-in. Same as No. II. 

v., 2 7.V-in. Rev" Sackville Stevens Bale Rector William Seale 
& Richard Price ch . Wardens Robert Patrick of 
London Founder 1784 
VL, 32-in. THOMAS LESTER & THO^ PACK OF LONDON 

R 
FECIT 1753 STEATFEILD MANEAT NOMEN 



Inscriptions. 221 

VII., 36-in. THOMAS LESTER & THO'^ PACK OF LONDON 
MADE ME 1753 W. W. WARD RECTOR BAR- 

T 
NARD HYDE & JOHN WOODGATE GEN CH. 

WARDENS 
VIIL, 38-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 

Laudo Deum verum. Plebem voco. congrego Clerum. 
Defunctos ploro. pestem fugo. Festa decoro : : R"^ 
Catlin Fecit 1750 REDINTEGRATA 1867 

r.!?.'JfM*;^!fr''°|cHURCHWARDENS 
ABRAHAM HALL J 

The curfew is rung here at 8 p.m. between November and March. 

CHILHAM. St. Mary. 8 Bells. 

L, 28-in. \ 

II., 29-in. [ JOHN TAYLOR & C^ LOUGHBOROUGH 1883 
III., 31-in. ) 

IV., 34-in. Recast. Joseph Read Edw° Denne C" Wardens 1810 
v., 361-in. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1760 lOHN 

POTTER BELLHANGER 
VI., 39i-in. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1760 
VII., 43b. STEPHEN SUTTON & EDWARD COZENS CH.. 
WARDENS 1760 LESTER & PACK OF LONDON 
FECIT 
VIIL, 471-in. WADHAM KNATCHBULL VICAR ANTHONY LUKYN 
CURATE 1760 LESTER & PACK OF LONDON 
FECIT 

T. R. E. Item in y'' StepuU in there frames v bells and in the same StcpuU 
on lytell bell. 
Item ij bells caulyd hand bells. 

Payments noted as follows : 

Item to John Nycolson for mcndyng of the bell 

stocke ... ... ... ... ... ... \]s, \\\]d. 

Item for makyng of ij bell roopes ... ... ... x^. 

Item for makyng of y'' third bell clapper and bryng- 

yngwhonie... ... ... ... \s. \\\]d. 



2 2 2 Inscriptions. 

Item for makyng of ij baldryckes and for a new 

bockell xij^. 

Item for makyng of the gret bell rope ... .•• v^. 

The entire peal of six was clearly recast in 1760. In 1757, Mr. Bryan 
Faussett noted here six bells inscribed as follows : 

I. Richard Phelps made me 1709. The gift of y'^ Rev. Mr. John 
Nichols, Mr. Robert Sprakeling and others. 
II. Robertas Mot Me Fecit 1594. 

III. and V. Robertas Mot Me Fecit 1595. 

IV. Joseph Hatch made me 1616. 

VI. Robertas Mot Me Fecit 1599. Gabrielis. 

Sir Dudley Digges left by will in 1638 JQ20 per annum to the Church- 
wardens in trust to pay {inter alia) on 19th May, to the young men of Chilham 
who should ring a peal in remembrance of him, 20^. for their dinner. — ■ 
Hasted. 

CHILLENDEN. All Saints. i Bell. 

I., 22-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1847 
In 1758 the single bell here was one by Joseph Hatch. 

CHISELHURST. St. Nicholas. 8 Bells. 

I., 29-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1858 

II., 3oi-in. Same. 

III., 32^-in. Same. 

IV., 34-in. Same. 

v., 37-in. Same. 

VI., 3S-in. Same. 

VII., 41-in. Same. 

VIII., 46-in. Same. 

These replace a ring of six, which was destroyed in the fire of 1857. 

T. R. E. Item iiij great bells suted of brasse in the Steple and one Saints 
bell of brasse. 
Item ij hand bells and iij sacryng bells of brasse. 

Passing bell as soon as notice received. Tellers at beginning and end — 
three strokes for male, two for female. 



Inscriptions. 223 

Bells chimed for all services — " toll in " for five minutes. 
A peal rung to usher in the New Year after late service, which ends at 12.15. 
Peals at Easter, Christmas, Whitsun-Day, Holy Thursday, and Harvest 
Festival. 

Best thanks to the Rector, the Rev. F. H. Murray. 

Annunciation. i Bell. 

Church built 1870 ; has presumably one bell of that date. 

Christ Church. i Bell. 

Built 1872 ; probably one bell of that date. 

CHISLETT. St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 31-in. IM ■ A LEGACY • GIUE>I BY ■ STEPHEI/1 • HUMT ■ 

GEMT LATE OF • THIS PARISH • WHOE PlOW . 

LYETH ■ BURYED - VA ■ THE CHAMCELL OF • 

THIS • CHURCH • 1681 

SK 1729 
II., 331-in. lOHN FARMAN SK ME FECIT 1729 
III., 35-in. Henry Denne & Jn° Wacher Ch. Wardens 1786 W" 

Mears of London Fecit 
IV., 38i-in. WILLIAM WHITING SAMUEL KNIGHT ME FECIT 

1729 
v., 42-in. THO: LESTER & T: PACK FECIT 1752 
VL, 48-in. SK ME FECIT 1729 lOHN DENN lOHN WHITNALL 
CHURCH WARDENS 
Nos. III. and V., prior to recasting, were also by Samuel Knight, and bore 
the same date as the rest of the ring. 

A tablet on the south wall of the chancel records that Stephen Hunt, the 
donor of the treble bell, died 4th August, 1680, aged 38. 

The Vicar, the Rev. F. G. Haslewood, LL.I). (to whom best thanks), informs 
me that no special customs as to ringing obtain here. 

CLIFFE AT HOO. St. Helen. 8 Bells. 

I., 31-in. JOHN TAYLOR & C° LOUGHBOROUGH i860 
IL, 32-in. Same. 

IIL, 33-in. JOHN TAYLOR & C" FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 
A:D 1859 



^JCHURCHWARDENS 



2 24 Inscripiions. 

IV., 36-in. Same. 
v., 37i-in. Same. 
VI., 39-in. Same. 
VIL, 42A-in. JOHN TAYLOR & C° BELLFOUNDERS LOUGH- 
BOROUGH LEICESTERSHIRE 1859 
VIIL, 47-in. ARCHD^ CROFT RECTOR REV^° E : H : LEE CURATE 
JOHN TAYLOR & C" FOUNDERS LOUGH- 
BOROUGH 1859 
ALBERT G : MURTON^ 
JOHN OSMOTHERLY 

Prior to the recasting in 1859, two of the former peal were inscribed as 
follows : 

(? I.), 31-in. ROBE>IJ. BELIMOVW 

(? II.), 41-in. tofcpfj rjalclj niatrc ntc ® 1616 IC RV AC VL OE E 
OR TM DDT 

No local customs, according to the Rector, Dr. Stanley Leathes. 

CLIFFE (WEST). St. Peter. i Bell. 

I., 28-in. TMB ^IX M^ :^ % M- 

D (Fig. 34) 
See p. 5 1 for an account of this interesting bell, by Thomas Lawrence of 
London. 

CLIFTONVILLE.— F/^/^ Margate. 

COBHAM. St. Mary Magdalene. 5 Bells. 

I, 3ii-in. tofcpfi I|afcf| ma^t mt Q 1632 
H., 33-in. Messrs Huggins & Wells Ch. Wardens Tho^ Mears Late 

Lester Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1790 
IIL, 37-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT Q 1623 
IV., 4oMn. Same. T T W I C W © 1632 

v., 44-in. Same. W H ® 1632 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Tellers both at beginning 
and end — 3 x 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female. Tenor bell used for adults ; 2nd 
for children. Tolled very slowly for half an hour. 



Inscriptions. 225 

This is repeated at noon on day of funeral. At time of funeral, bell tolled 
slowly for fifteen minutes, and more quickly when the body has arrived at the 
gate. 

Sunday Early Peals.- — Until about ten years ago a bell was rung at 7 a.m. 
At 8 a.m. the ist and 2nd are chimed for five minutes, and then the 2nd rung 
for another five. These are, no doubt, survivals of the old " Matins " and 
" Mass " bells, but an hour earlier than usual. 

Services : Bells chimed twenty minutes, rung five. Ringing-in five 
minutes. 

Peals on Christmas Day. 

These uses, however, are in process of alteration, and before these lines are 
in print the following will be the rule : 

" The bells shall be rung in changes for half an hour previous to each 
Sunday, Christmas Day, Easter Day, Ascension Day (evening) services, before 
and after New Year's Eve services, also on Christmas Day and Easter Day 
mornings at 7 o'clock. The bells shall be chimed on Sunday morning at 
8 o'clock for a quarter of an hour, for half an hour previous to service on 
Good Friday, and on all week-day evening services, and for a quarter of an 
hour previous to the week-day morning services." 

Best thanks to the Rev. Arthur H. Berger, Vicar. 

COLORED. St. Pancras. i Bell. 

I., i8^-in. Blank. 

Mr. Faussett notes the existence here of a western gable pierced with arches 
for two bells, but states that the single remaining bell was hanging in a loft or 
turret at the west end. 

I have not seen this bell myself, but Mr. E. J. Wells, the Secretary of the 
St. Paul's Ecclesiological Society, tells me that it is certainly an " ancient.' 

COOLING. St. James. 3 Bells. 

L, 27fin. lOHN k HODSON } MADE ( ME k 1675 <Jl(» O O O O 
00 CH 00000 'iJpOOOO DAVED ,} 
HEATH : CHVRCH /; WARDEN 
n., 3oi-in. lOHPl PALMAR MADE MEE 16 14 
in., aii-in. MICHAEL DARBIE MADE ME 165 1 

The date on No. 2 is certainly a mistake for 1641. 

2 G 



2 2 6 Inscriptions. 

COWDEN. St. Mary Magdalene. 5 Bells. 

I., 26-in. lOHN HOUSON MADE ME 1654 AV H 

II., 28-in. Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 1791 

III., 3o|-in. x(Fig. 5) ^0l|annrs ^,sf ^tlomcn p^iuB + (Fig. i) 

IV., 32-in. ANNO ,} DM } 1584 ^^f 

v., 35-in. I V W 1635 

Yox mention of No. 3 bell, see p. 34. No. 4 is by some unknown founder, 
probably a Sussex "itinerant." 

From Michaelmas to Ladytide the bell from the old steeple is tolled every 
morning at five, and every evening at eight o'clock, telling with iron tongue 
the hour. The small sum of twenty shillings was charged annually upon an 
estate in the parish, about a hundred and fifty years ago, by a person of the 
name of Still, to be paid to the clerk or sexton for the performance of this 
duty ; and, if declined by them, there are always competitors for it* I think 
we have here a clear case of survival of the morning and evening "Ave" 
bells — the latter being better known as the Curfew or " Ignitegium." The 
bequest is recorded on a board in the church, under date 1726. Of course 
there goes with it the usual tradition, that the donor had lost his way in the 
forest, and was guided home by Cowden bells — which may or may not be 
true ; anyway, worthy Richard Still gave his rent-charge upon Waystrood 
Farm as remuneration for a duty which the clerk or sexton of Cowden had 
been performing for many centuries. I regret to have to say that the morning 
peal has been discontinued for the last twelve years, the amount not being 
considered sufficient pay for the double work. 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice is given, but not before 8 a.m. Tellers, 
3 X 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female before tolling. Treble used for infants, 2nd 
for children under eight, tenor for all over that age. 

Sunday Ringing. — Third bell rung at 8 a.m., called "Service" bell; tenor 
at half-past nine, called " Sermon " bell. 

Bells rung for service on the great festivals, chimed on ordinary occasions 
for half an hour previously. 

Peals on New Year's Eve, Queen's Birthday, and Accession Day. 

Ringing on 5th November and 29th May discontinued. 

Vestry (4th) bell also discontinued. 

Best thanks to the Rector, the Rev. R. Abbey Tindall. 

* " ArcliKolugia Cantiana," vi;l. i., puj. 



Inscriptions. 227 

GRAN BROOK. St. Dunstan. 8 Bells. 

I., 31-in. John Elliott & W" Harding Church Wardens 1801 

Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 
II., 3 2 -in. Same. 
III., 34-in. Same. 
IV., 37-in. Same, 
v., 4o|-in. Rev° J. Mossop Vicar 1825 T. Mears of London Fecit 

Henry Miller"! ^ ,,, 

. „ Church Wardens 

Tho'' Butler y 

John Waters J Parish Clerk 
VI., 43-in. John Elliott & William Harding Church Wardens 
1 80 1 Thomas Mears of London Fecit 1801 
VII., 46-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1857 
VIIL, 52-in. The Rev° Rich"^ Podmore Vicar John Elliott & W 
Harding Ch. Wardens Thomas Mears of London 
Fecit 1801 May all whom I shall summon to the 
Grave The blessing of a wsllspent Life Receive 
Old ringing usages are well preserved here. The curfew is still rung, as in 
the days of William the Norman, who did not introduce it, by the way. 

On Sundays the 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. bells are still rung, as they were before 
the Reformation, to call the faithful to Matins and Mass. These times seem 
to have been the usual ones in Kent ; elsewhere they are generally 8 and 9. 
Passing bell tolled as soon as death is known— at first gently, then louder. 
Bells chimed for services. 
A bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Ringing on all festivals. Also on New Year's Eve, Queen's Birthday, and 
5th November. 

Best thanks to the Vicar, the Rev. Alban H. Harrison, for above notes, as 
also for access to the parish books. And herein especially to Mr. William 
Tarbutt, their custodian, for the facilities rendered me, and for much assist- 
ance derived from that local knowledge which he pre-eminently possesses. 
The accounts commence in 1509 with a most interesting inventory of vest- 
ments, plate, etc., belonging to the church, clearly showing the flourishing 
condition of the town of Cranbrook, then one of the [)rincipal seats ot the 
cloth trade. 

The first entry relating to the bells, undated, but clearly prior to 1535, is 
as follows : 

2 G 2 



2 2 8 Inscriptions. 

" M'' the viij daye November there wasse assemblyd dyv's of the honest offe 
the f)yshe when wasse graunted by the goodwyll off Rychard barre to make a 
grett bell under the grett bell thatt now ys ther he havyng graunted toward the 
makyg ther off the letell bell 

" The sayd appoyntemente toke none effect 
" Il^thr ys grawntyd by Rychard bygge toward the sayd bells so thatt theye 
maye be maed accordyng to lowdere Rynge xl5." 

This would seem to mean that Mr. Barre's proposal to add a larger bell to 
the ring by recasting (and adding metal to) the treble was lost, and that the 
amendment to recast the lot was carried. 

No entry now occurs until 1560, when we find : 

Itm. for bread & wyne all the yere past & for 
the Re.pacions of the Bels as apperyth by the 
byll ... ... ... ... ... ... xiijj. \%.d. 

1 56 1 Itm. payd to John Stonnam for mendyng of 

the great bell and iij of the bell whylles ... x5. 

1562 Itm. Receyued of Thomas Beale for a lytle 

bell \]d. 

1564 Itm. paid to Rootes the Carpenter for iij dayes 

in the Churche to haynge the gret bell &: 

makyng of new styll fynding himsellf ... \\]s. 

Itm. his s'vant the same iij dayes fyndyng 

himsellf ... ... ... ... ... xviij^. 

Itm. payd to Thomas benden for yron worke 

to new hange the great bell (&c.) ... ... \]s. \\\]d. 

Itm. payd to Roots for ij dayes & di to trusse 

upp the bells & mendyng the seats «Sc for hys 

s'vant... ... ... ... ... ... iiij.s". 

1565-6 Itm. payd to bysshop for yron worke about the 

bels xij^. 

Itm. payd to Roots for mendyng of the frame 

of the bell vj^. 

Itm. payd for mendyng of the bell whyles to 

Rotts & nayles vij^. 

1567-8 Itm. for viij fote of bourd for the bell whyles... ■ vd. 

Itm. payd to Roots for ij dayes & di worke 

About y'' bells ij-f- vj^. 



Inscriptions. 229 

Itm. for hoopes for the bell whyles iij//. 

Itm. payd to Roottes for xi days worke for the 

seates & niendynge the bells ... ... xjj-. 

Itm. for yron work for the bels ... ... \\\]d. 

Itm. payd for cuttell {sic) bords for the bell 

whyls xij^. 

1570 Payd more to Thomas Ruck for mettellhad of 

hym for the bell ... ... ... ... iiiji-. 

payd to Thomas Portreif for mettell for the 

bell iijV. iiij^; 

Itm. payd to Rootes for mendynge the bell 

whyle xij</. 

1572 Griffith Bishopp appointed " Sexten " and for 
his wages to have yXs. and " the profites of 
the belles," etc. 
1573-4 Geven to the Ringers that did ringe for the 

Queenes Ma"'' ... ... ... ... xij</. 

paide to Bishop the Smith for yron work done 

about the belles ... ... ... ... xvj^. 

paid to a Smithe for mendynge the Chymes ... \\]s. \\\)d. 

pade to Boadle for making the wheele for the 

great belle ... ... ... ... ... \]s. \]d. 

1575-6 Impis payd to Bisshop for bolynge of the great 

bell clapper ... ... ... ... ... vs. 

Itm. payd to Bodle for making of a wheele for 

the first bell 

Itm. payd for a rope for the chyme ... 

Itm. payd to Bodle for making of the frame for 

the lytle bell ou the Chauncell 
Itm. payd to Waggorne for meding of the third 
bellx clapper ... 
1578 Itm. p'' unto Bysshoppe the Smith for yron 
worke About the Clocke & the bells 
Itm. p'^ for mendynge of the clapper of the 
greate Bell and carringe of hym to the 
hamm'* ... ... ... ... ... v^. \d. 

* No (loiil)t one of the local iron foiires. 



m]s. 




l]S. 


xd 


l\]S. 


\]d. 


\\]S. 


iiij^. 




hd. 



Inscriptions. 



1579 



1580 
1581 



tm. paid to Romney for mendynge of the 

seconde Belle wheele 
np'mis p'' to Ralffe Lander ffor mendynge of 

the wheele of the greate bell 
tm. p'' to Boadle ffor mendynge the fframe of 

the greate bell 
tm. p'^ to the Ryngers the xvij"' of November 

last* 

tm. ffor a Roape for the lyttle bell ... 

tm. p'' ffor mendynge the wood worke aboute 

the bells 
iundry small payments for repairs, 
tm. p'^ ffor mendynge a Buckell for a 

Batherycke ... 

t. pd ffor 'if of Bell Mettell 

t. p<^ ffor the cariage thereof ... 

t. p^ to Johnson ffor hangynge of three Bells 

t. p'' to Tourke & his men ffor helpe hangynge 

of the Bells 

t. p"* ffor a Roape ffor the Anthem Bell 

t. p'^ to Eu'nden ffor yrone worke aboute the 

Bells 

t. p^' to ffa"'nte ffor helpyng at the Churche 

and fettyng the Beame to waye the Bells ... 
t. p'^ to Byllingtone ffor carynge home the 

beame 

t. pd to Hatch 

t. p'^ to Tourke ffor ffetting the Beame and 

Carynge home agayne 
t. p'^ to Tourke for hangynge the Bells 
t. p^^ ffor mendynge of the Sheares to hange 

the Bells 

t. p'' ffor Bradds to nayle them onn ... 
t. p'' to M' Taylor ffor caryinge the Bells 



vj^. 



\]S. 



xijc/. 
xviij^/. 

\]S. \\\]d. 





\\]d. 


Iviijy. 




iij^. 


\\\)d. 


ixy. 




ixi'. 






xiiij^/. 


xij.y. 




\)S. 


\\\]d. 




\\\]d. 


xlx. 




iij.y. 




XVi". 






XI jd. 




viij^. 


iij.-. 


v'jd. 



Accession Day of Queen Elizabeth. 



Inscriptions. 2 3 i 

Owynge by the pishe at the fforesayde accompte 
as here After ffolowythe. 

Itm. ffor shottynge the greate Bell ... ... viij//. 

Itm. ffor mettall ffor the thirde Bell j*^ di ... Ivj^. 

Itm. ffor mettall ffor the Treble ... ... iiij//. iiiji-. 

Ti- * * * * 

Itm. ffor mendynge the yron worke of the 

Bells ... ... ... ... ... ... iij^. iiij,/. 

Each of these entries is crossed through and 

marked " paid." 

1582 Itm. p"* to the Bellfounder w'^ was owinge to 

hym the last Church accompt ... ... xv//. 

Itm. p'^ ffor .... makynge of the wheele of 

the great Bell. 
Itm. p'i to hym (Bishop the Smith) more for 

mendynge the Clappers of the iij bells & for 

Brodds ... ... ... ... ... iijj-. 

Itm. p'* to Turcke ffor hangynge up the ij 

Bells and ffor takyng downe the greate Bell iij^-. iiij^. 

Itm. p'' to Byllyngtone ffor caryinge to & fro 

&c. about the bells ... ... ... ... ij^-. \]d, 

Itm. p'^ to Turcke ffor ij dayes worke of hym ^v: 

his man in hanginge up the greate Bell ... iiij^-. 

Itm. p"" to Bearnes fifor that he broke his 

Tymbre Roape ... ... ... ... j^-. 

Itm. p'* to Beade ffor caryinge to & froe of 

Roapes ... ... ... ... ... j^. 

Itm. p'' ffor ij*- of mettall bought at london at 

305. the C ... ... ... ... ... iij//. 

Itm. p'' ffor the porter there & the carryagc 

home... ... ... ... ... ... iij^. viijt/. 

Itm. p'' to Joseph Smyth e ffor makynge a 

wynche & ffor ij dayes & a halffe the worke 

of hym & his ij men in hangynge up the 

greate bell ... ... ... ... ... \\s. 

Itm. i)** ffor an Ironhoke wayingc 14//. ... iijo*. 



232 Inscriptions. 

Itm. p'^ ffor a Staple ... ... ... ... xd. 

Itm. p"" ffor mendynge a Clapper ... ... \\\)d. 

Itm. ffor a Buckle & nayles broades Keyes & 

Rynges viij^. 

Itm. p'' ffor makynge ij puUeyes & a hoke ffor 

one of them ... ... ... ... ... xx^. 

Itm. ffor pecynge of one of the Boults ... s\d. 

Itm. ffor shottynge a Boult & makynge a staple 

wayinge 8'''- \]s. i]d. 

Itm. ffor makynge a Claspe ffor the wheele ... ixd. 

Itm. p'^ to Bearnes ffor carryinge the greate Bell xviij^. 

Itm. p'' ffor a pece of Tymbre & carryage therof ujs. 

Itm. p'* to Tourcke ffor makynge ffast the Bells v]d. 

Itm. p"* to the Bellfound' ffor shottinge the ij*^ 

Bell vj//. 

Itm. p'' to hym ffor iij^ of mettall w'' was putto 

the greate Bell ... ... ... ... v//. 

Itm. p"^ ffor Iron worke ... ... ... iij^. 

Itm. p'* ffor Ryngynge the Bell to the Sermons 

on Satt' dayes ... ... ... ... xijd. 

Itm. p"* to Rycharde Taylor ffor carryage aboute 

the Bells ... ... ... ... ... iijs. in]d. 

1583 " Ringing of the Bell to Sermons" mentioned. 

It. p'' for a roape for the lyttle anthem Bell ... xv]d 

1584 Sundry small repairs only. 

1585 Itm. p'' more to John Wytherden for Ixxxviij'''- 

of yron for a Clapper of the greate Bell ... viijj. iij^/. 

Itm. p'' more to S' Ric'' Bakers ham'man for 
workynge of the sayde yron into a Bell 
Clapper ... ... ... ... ... iiij^-. iiijV* 

Itm, p'' more to John Usborne for makynge & 

workynge agayne of the sayde Bell Clapper ixx 

Itm. p'' more to James Sloman ffor trussinge 
up of the greate Bell & newe hangynge of the 
wheele xijd. 

1586 Itm. to Ewenden for yron worke ffor the iiij'*' 

Bell 'i]d. 



iijs. \]d. 



Inscriptions. 

1587 Sundry repairs. Ringing on 17''' Nov', also 

p*^ for ringynge the mornynge bell ffrom Michaell- 
mas 1586 to Lady day 1587 
1 58S Only small repairs — " Roape for lytle bell " 14^/. 
1589 Small repairs — ■^^'^ and 4'*^ Bells mentioned. 
1589-90 "Ryngers Dynner" on 17"' Nov'' 4^. Ringing 
to Sermons on " Satterdays " 45. 
Itm. p'l for tymbre c^ makynge a ladder to the 

litle Bell 

1591-92 Payments for repairs & ringing — a rope for 

"lytle Bell" 14^. 
1592-3 Itm. p'' for ij Sitacions ffor Dorathie Geaffes 

being in the Bellfry ... ... ... ... jx^. vjV. 

Itm. p^' for the Sumn' his ffees tS: for a p cura- 
tor to answer ffor us... ... ... ... ijV. vjV, 

7593-4 Itm. p'^ to Thorns Hatche for twoe Brasses for 

the great bell xijy. iiijV. 

(Payments also for fixing same and for help.) 
1594-5 "Roape for litle Bell" 12^. Sundry small 

repairs. 
1595-6 Itm. p'' to Richarde Launder the 4"' of 
October 1595 for fyve dayes worcke aboute 
takynge downe of the Bells & ffetchinge 
weights ... ... ... ... ... \s. 

Itm. pd to Willm Weller the same tyme for 
fyve dayes worke about the takynge downe 
of the Bells & fetching the beame and weights 
to weye the sayde Bells ... ... ... \s. 

Itm. p'' to Edwarde Knyght the same tyme for 
one dayes worke to fetch Arabell & to helpe 
abowte the Bells ... ... ... ... xijV. 

(Similar payment to Alex'' Sheaffe weaver. 
Payments for dinners and drink in con- 
nection therewith.) 
Itm. jy' to the sayde John Rede ffor a trussing 
fframe to hange the Bells & ffor a stocke ffor 
the greatc Bell ... ... ... ... xji-. 

2 II 



2 34 Inscriptio7is. 

Itm. p'' to the sayde John Rede for xxxviij 
ffoote of plancke & xxiiij'° ffoote of Tymbre 
to laye under the frame of the Bells ... vij.f. s]d. 

Itm. p'' to Willm Hylls the 14*'^ of Novembre 
1595 for xj dayes worcke of hym selffe & his 
Boye att \]s. \\\]d. the daye ffor helpynge to 
amende the Bell fframe ... ... ... xxix^. \\\]d. 

Ringers Dinner 17''' Nov"' 5^. 

Payment of \os. to Bellfounder — apparently 
earnest money. 

Itm. p'' to John Newberye for carryinge of the 

Bells ffrom the Churche & to the Churche... viiji'. 

Itm. p'' Willm Hylls iS'"^ Jan>' 1596 for a dayes 

worke mendyng the Bell frame ... ... \]s. v\\]d 

Payments to Edw'^ Knight for carrying weights 
to waye the 3''^ Bell — to John Rede Smith 
of ffryttendon for mending the great bell 
Clapper — to Symon Evernden for "work 
about the bells '" — to Rich'' Hovenden 
" for a cable rope spoyled about the Busy- 
ness" 8.J. — to William Hylls for mending the 
frame of the treble bell 2s. — and to Will"' 
Weller for carrying weights and helping. 
1596-7 Payment to Will'" Bressenden for repairs 
56.?. 8d. to Joseph Smith i6(/. 

Itm. p' to Anthoney Wackeffylde the Bell- 
founder the fyrst of September \]li. 

Itm. p'' unto Anthoney Stedman of Beddenden 
for the mendinge of too of the Clapperes of 

the Belles (12'h Sept') xvji-. 

Carrying & fetching same \2d. 

Itm. p' Rich Turcke joyne' for plankes & 

boordes for the Bell wheels... ... ... \]s. 

Itm. p'' to one Hovenden a Roppe macker for 

a Roppe for the Chansell Bell. Som. . . . xij//. 

Payments to John Reede of "js. ^d. for 2 
new Bell Stockes — and of 2>9^- 5^- ^o 
Symon Evenden Smith for Iron worke. 



Inscriptions. 



-OD 



1597-S Itm. p'' to dyveres men at the appointment of 
Anthony Wackfylde Bell ffownder & for the 
prestes Debte to (?) Since Dew the som . . . xj//. xvijj>. iiij^. 
Itm, p'' for mendinge of the Clapper of the 

second bell against the Cronacion day ... \]s. 

Itm. p'' in a breckfast uppo the Ringers at the 
Corronacion daye & for one to Kepp the 
church ... ... ... ... ... ys. \\\]d. 

Sundry payments for repairs in this and follow- 
ing years : 
1603, 29"' April. Rules to be observed by the Sexton : 
ImjJmis that he doe ringe or cause to be rong 
the great bell every morning at fower of the 
Clocke & euye evening at eight thorough 
out the yeare according to the Ancient cus- 
tome. 

It. from tyme to tyme to finde and 

jJvide belropes & bawdrickes to the bells of 
his owne charge as hath bene heretofore. 
(In default, Churchwardens to find and de- 
duct from his wages.) 
1604 Inventory of Church Goods. 

Inprimis v great bells one small bell & a watch 

bell to y^ Clock. 
It. xxviij//. of bell mettell. 
To this last item is added in another hand- 
writing : 
" Deliv'' since by John Vincet Anno 1606 to 
Joseph Hatche when he cast the bells." 
1604-5 p'' the 5"' of July for my charges to Canterbury 

about the bells xiij^/. 

Payments to W'" Hylls and others for repairs. 
1605-6 It. p'' at Canterbury being cited about the bells \)s. \\\]d- 

It. p'' for charges in Riding thither ... ... \]s. 

It. p^' for a Rope for the litle bell xx</. 

It. p'' to Hills for hanging of the great Bell (&c) iij.f. 

It. p'' for charges of my cxconiunicacion and 

absolution about the Bells ... ... ... xij^-. 

2 II 2 



236 Inscriptions. 

In 1606-7 t-^^c Wardens were again "cyted" to Canterbury, and it is quite 
clear that the bells were in bad order, and that the Archdeacon was down 
upon them thereanent, with the upshot that on the nth January, 1606, 
"Sessors" were appointed to make " a Ceasse " for taking down the bells and 
doing what was necessary to put them in order, which turned out to be recast- 
ing the lot. This seems to have been a long operation, as the following 
extracts show : 

1606-7 It. p'' to John Haward ffishenden W^'" Hills & 
Lawrence Wylding for two dayes worke 
apeece in taking downe the Bells ... ... xij^. 

It. p'' to Richard Eyerman for his worke to 
helpe take downe the bells ... ... ... xviij^. 

It. p" to George Martin for making the Inden- 
tures of Covenants and the bands betwene 
the Belfounder & us... ... ... ... \]s. 

It. p'' to Symeon Swainsland Thomas Basden 
\Yam Hadman &: Thomas Peters eche of 
them iijj-. vj^. for helping to haue up the 
bells and to hang them ... xiiijjr. 

It. p'' to Arthur Basden for the like worke ... iij^-. 

It. p"" to Roger Grenowaye for fetching the 
great bell from Broomfield ix5. viij^. 

It. p'' to Warn Hills & Laurence Wylding for 
eche of them a dayes worke to take downe 
the third bell & the Treble againe ... ... \\]s. 

It. p'' to Robert Brickenden for bringing his 

Gynne w"' his Carriage for to wey the bells xij^. 

It. p'' for fetching & carrying of Hatches Beame 

w"' a horse from Broomefield & thither againe \\]s. 

It. p'^ for a horsehire for W^"^ Hills when M"^ 

Gyer & he rode to tune the bells xijV. 

It. p'' to moyses miller for washing* the fower 

bell ij^. 

It. p'' for fetching waightes to wey the treble 
bell 



\\\d. 



* Qy. watching. 



Inscriptions. 



237 





xviij^. 


vj^. 


\\\]d- 


ws. 


iiij^. 




xx^. 


Iij5. 




ij^. 


viij^. 




xviij^. 




ys\d. 



It. p'^ to W^™ Hills for ij dayes worke about 

the Bells iij^. 

It. p'^ to Laurence Wylding for a dayes worke 

about the Bells 
It. p'' to Symeon Evernden for Bell Clappers... iij//. 
It. p"^ to Thomas Baylis for carryage of the great 

bell 

It. p'' to Roger Beale for a clane* to wey up 

the bells 
It. p"* to John Newbery for carriage of y" other 

bells & fetching them from Broomfield 
It. p'' to W^i" Gyer for his Jorney to Broom- 
field & his horse hyre about tuning the bells 
It. p'^ to W-'^" Hills for an other Jorney to 

Broomfield his horse hyre ... 
It. p'' to iiij men to fetch the Gynne agayne 
from the ffrythe howse 
1607-8 It. p'' to William Hills & others for working 
about the bells & for my Jorney to Broom- 
field xxijj,-. \\]d. 

It. p'' unto olde Newberrye for fetching the 
newe third bell for carrying the old second 
bell & for bringing agayne the new second 

bell(&c) xviij5. vj^. 

It. p'' unto John Johnson for helping Hills to 

hang the third bell into her tacklings ... \\\\d. 

It. p'' to Robert Brickenden for using his 

Roape to take the Bells up & downe ... iij^'- 

It. I nmst be allowed for using my owne Roape 
and for sending abroad to get other Roapes 

together iiij^^- 

1608-9 It. p'' for a cable and a hook to take up the 

frame of the bells ... ... ... •■• xws. 

It. p'' to the Sawyers for sawing of Tymber for 

the sayd frame (&c) ... ... ... • • • xxxi". 

It. p'' ^Va■" Hills for two days work helping . . . iij.y. 



Qy. a crane. 







XJi'. 


v'yL 


xix^. 


v]d. 



238 Inscriptions. 

It. p'' to Goodman ratcheherst the Carpenter 
for making of the frame for the bells and for 
hanging up of the bells ... ... ... viij//. 

To William Hills for helping ... 

It. p' to him for using his belropes ... 

It. p'' to John Newberry for carrying the frame 
& other Tymber to the Church 

It. p'' to Symeon Euernden for yron worke (&c.) iij//. 

It. p'' to Andrewe Rucke for 700 of Tackes for 

the behvheles ... ... ... ... \d. ob. 

It. p' to Henry Sanderson for hoopes to use 
about the behvheles ... ... ... ... \]s. \]d. 

It. p'' for making of a band for the deliuering 
of the bells againe from Hatche the bel- 
founder ... ... .. ... ... xij^/. 

It. p'' to ftishenden for making a rowle to let 
down the bells and for his helpe & others to 
take them downe ... ... ... ... \xs. \\\]d. 

Sundries to William Hills ... ... ... \s. \]d. 

It. p'' for John Eennets charges cv- myne in 

Riding to Hatches about the bells ... ... xxd. 

It. p'^ that I layd out in charges for meate 
drinke & lodging for myselfe W--^"^ Hills & 
the carryers & meate for their oxen when the 
bells were fetcht from Hatche ... ... xx]s. v]d. 

It. p'' for vj oxen to help the carryers to bring 
the bells some pte of the waye because they 
did want helpe being ouer loaded ... ... iijj. \]d. 

It. p'' to Egerman for helping downe with the 
Treble & for helping in w'*^ the bells into the 
Churche when they came from the Bel- 
founders xviijV. 

It. p'^ to the two Newberryes for carryng of iij 
bells to the Belfounders &: fetching them 
agayne lix.f. 

It. p'' to Thomas Bankes for carriage of two 
bells to the Belfounders ... ... ... \s. \]d. 



Inscriptions. 239 

It. p'' to Walter Ffoster for fetching ij bells from 

the belfounders ... ... ... ... xvij^. 

It. p'' to John Newberry for fetching a Gynne 

from the ffrythe ... ... ... ... \\\]d. 

It. p'^ to Egerman & Knight for helping about 

the Bells xij^. 

It. p'' that I layd out mo'' about the bells ... 'xx.d. 

It. p'' to Goodman Wyborowe the Carpenter 
for newe hanging the bells & for mending 
the wheles &: stocks cS: helping up w''' the bells iij//. x^. 

It. p'' for candles for him & his men to worke by x^. 

It. p'' Goodman Turke for two newe stockes 

for the bells ... ... ... ... ... \s. 

It. p'' to the Sawyers for sawing of the stockes 

asunder ... ... ... ... ... xijV. 

It. p'' for helpe to haue up the bells ... ... xiiij^, 

William Hills as usual for help ... ... xi". 

It. p'^ to James Cadwell for bringing up to the 

Churche the new stockes for the bells ... \\\yi. 

It. p'' for carrying of Hatches beame to Broom- 
field xvj^/. 

Symeon Euernden for 2 New Clappers (S:c. ... iij//. xiiji-. \\\]d. 
1G09-10 William Hills for worke 2od. 

It. p'' to Richard Egerman & Willia"^ Hills for 
carrying &: fetching the brasses for the bells 
from casting ... ... ... ... ••• iJ-*'- 

It, p'' mo'' to W^"^ Hills for ij dayes worke to 

laye the brasses & to hang the bells . . . iij^'. 

It. p'' for bread & drinke for those w'^^' did help 

him >;'j^''- 

It. p'' mo'- to W^'" Hills for 8" of brasse ... iij^". iiij^- 

It. p'^ to the founders for casting the brasses 
wch wayed out So" & were returnd in agayne 
91" xxxj^. 

It. p'' to Henry Beale for 26'' of mettall at 5'' 

the //. for brasses ... . . • . • • • • x-^- ^^• 

It. p'' for two Skiddcs for the frame of the bells v.f. iiijr/. 



240 Inscriptions. 

Payments to Evernden for iron workc 13^-. 3^. 

and Hills for work \2d. 
1610-11 It. p"' for the litle bell rope ... ... ... . xviij^/. 

An inventory of this year gives : 

Imp'mis five great bells one small bell & a 

watch bell. 
Itm. an yron bludding* to helpe take up the 

belles. 
Itm. a cable with a hooke to pull up the 

bells. 
Itm. a great iron chapef for the same purpose 

bought by Thomas Colwill 1608. 
1611-12-13 Only payments for small repairs. 

1613-14 It. p'' to Joseph Hatche for casting the bells + xl//. 
Payments to W"" Hills for worke and for various 

small repairs, including a " frame for the lytle 

bell." 
1 6 14-19 Various petty payments not worth copying. 
1 6 19— 2"'* April. Regulations as to Ringing of Knells, etc., 

by the Sexton : 
Item that he shall not ring the greatest bell for 

a Knell for any Corps neyther for a Solempne 

bell before the bringing of the Corps to 

Churche except the ptie deceased had landes 

or were esteemed to be worth one hundred 

poundes or were the sonne or daughter of 

one of the same estate. 
Item that the dutie or fees for ringing the 

greatest bell for a Knell shall be iij'- iiij''- and 

for the bury all 2o''- 
Item that his fees for ringing the fourth bell 

shalbe ij"- and for the buryall xij''- 
Similar regulations for 3'''' & 2'"' bells — iS""- & 

10''- and I4''- & lo''- respectively. 

* Qy. bludgeon — probably an iron bar to use with the winch, 

+ rrobal:)ly an iron shoe for a swinging derrick. 

X Final jDayment— the bells being now at last all in good order. 



InscriplioJis . 241 

Item for the small bell S' and for the buryall 

8''- if it be a grown body but if a childe 4''- 
1624 Great Bell ordered to be rung every evening at 

8 from Michaelmas to Lady Day. 
1625-6 It. p'' to the Ringers one Coronation dale ... iij.s-. iujd. 

1 63 1-2 It. paied for a new rope for the Saunce bell ... x\i/. 

1667-8 Item paied for a pece of stufe to make a cech* 

for the second bell & for seting of it oan . . . 35. 6d. 

Item paied for altering the pins of the fourth 

bell claper & sum other worke aboute the 

bells ... ... ... ... ... ... 4i-. 

1669-70 E.xpended w'*^ the beell founder ... ... is. 

1670-1 p'' to Tho Boorman for his help &: whate hee 

expended upon help for to new truss the bells 2^-. 

p'^ for tliree new choulesf for the bells ... i^". 

p'^ to Tho^ Boorman for goeing to Rolvenden 

for to treet with the beell founder himself 6c 

hors ... ... ... ... ... ... 2s. 

Expended on the bell founder when hee came 

to vew the bells ... ... ... ... 2^-. 

p'' to John Goodman & Tho Boorman for 

goeing over to Rolvenden for to make a 

bargaine with the bellfounder ... ... 6s. 

\-)'^ to W'" Wake & for other help for to have 

the bell doune oute of the StepUe ... ... y. <>/. 

p"* to Tho Boorman for goeing to Rolvenden 

hors & himself ... ... ... ••• ^s. 61/. 

p'' to Tho Boorman for carryinge of mettUe to 

Rolvenden for to put to the bell & expenccs 

with the founder ... ... ■•• ■■• 3,s. 

p'^ Tho Boorman 2'- for him & his hors & alsoe 

expended at Rolvenden in beeing there for 

to see the bell cast ... ... ••• •■- 1^- 

p'' to Tho Boorman & other help for to have 

the bell up againe & to W'" Wake & his man 

to haing the bell 95-. 10^/. 

* A catcli. . i Qy. jowls— what fur, I cannot guess. 

2 I 



2S. 




IS. 




\S. 


6d. 


IS. 




13^. 




lOS. 




5'- 


Id. 




Ad. 



242 Inscriptions. 

p'^ to Nalhaniell Bennett for 45 pound of pot 
brass & for 20 pound of peuter for to putt 
to the bell ... ... ... ... ... 2//. 05-. 6d. 

p'' to Tho Boorman for three pound & a half 
of old bell mettle 

p'' to the founder for mettlle ... 

p'' for a staple for the bell 

p'' to M'' Leigh for writeing of a bond 

p'" to M"" Hovenden for carting & fetching of 
the bell 

p'' to ffrancis ffoster bell founder* ... ... GIL 

p^ Henry Cruttenden for altering the claper (&:c.) 
1676-7 p'' for a choule for the 4"^ Bell 
1685-6 p"" toJohnBrumfeild for new hanging of the bells 

and for new Stocks wheels & ropes for the Bells 26//, 

p*^ for writeing the bargaine between him & the 
parish and of a bond for the performeance 
of it ... ... ... ... ... ... 3^. 

Exspended one the Bellhangers & Ringers 
when the Bells wher raised at the first time 
& for Oile for the Bells ... ... ... S^- 2^/, 

1695 paid for casting the second Bell and a Clapper 
and adition of mettall 

Charge in hanging the Bell 

the carriage of the Bell to {sic) 

paid to Richard Daw for a new Clapper and 
other Iron Work 

Spent at the Bell founders and wyre & nailes... 

1702 For two Bell ropes 

1703 For a rope for the Chimes and a Rope for one 

of y'' Bells 

1 7 15-16 to John Brissenden for a sett of Bellropes ... 

for ringing 

To Tho Skinner for carrying two Bells to Maid- 
stone & for Bringing two Back ... ... 2//. 

* Of Salisbury— evidently peripatetie. He cast a bell fur Rustint^ton, Sussex, in this 
year. 



1 4//. 


gs. 




lli. 


3^- 




ill. 


155. 


Ad. 


2li. 


12s. 


qd. 




5^- 


zd 




7^. 


Gd. 




10s. 




lli. 


Ts. 

lOS. 





Inscriptions. 



243 



20//. 



\li. 



40//. 

I o//. 
I oil. 

2li. 

2//. 
l//. 

l//. 

2// 



5^- 
15^. 

\2S. 



Zs. 
\s. 



ids. 

I 2^. 



Gd. 



To Henry Butler for leather for a bell ... Zd. 

To M"^ Hollingworth for writeings ab' y'' 

Bells \os. 

To Cotterell & Mear for beare to workemen 

ab' y" Bell frame 
ffor warfage weighing & Landing the Bells . . . 

To Mr. Phelps 

To Tho Bridgland for Bringing two Bells & 

two clappers ... 
To Sam' Bridgland for Carrying y*" first Bell to 

Maidstone to be new Cast ... 
To Dan Eldridge for Ash for the Bells Stays... 
To Good" Harden for carrying y*^ first Bell to 

be new Cast ... ... ... ... ... Zs. qd. 

To Rich. Phelps towards casting the Bells ... 
p"* to Sam Stephenson halfe part for hanging 

the Bells 

p*" Jn" Diamond Towards y" Bell frame 

p'^ James Bridgland for carrying & bringing two 

Bells to & from Maidstone ... 
p"* Tho Bridgland for carrying & bringing of 

y^ Bells 

p*^ M' Allard for carrying 5 bells to London*... 
p'* M"" Edmonds for Bringing y*" Six bells Downc 

Warfage & Weighing 

p'^ & weighing y'' bells ... 

p'i & in takeing downe y*" bell 

frame... ... ... ... ... ... 125. 

p"^ Parks towards carrying y" bell frame ... ds. 

l)"^ Henry Butler for a Baderick 

Debts noted as unpaid at end of year : 
To M' Stephenson for new hanging y° Bells ... 10//. 
To M' Phelps for new casting y" Bells & new 

Clappers ... ... ... ... ... 34//. 

To M"' Edmonds for carriage of bell in 1716... 

To Jn° Diamond remainder for Bell frame (S:c. 36//. 



(ui- 



Cd. 



Zd. 



6d 
Sd 



They were to be cast into a lii^lilcr liiit. 



if six (sec iiLxl ciitiy). 
2 1 



244 Inscriptions. 

The results of tliis do not seem to have been satisfactory, for in April, 1718, 
at a Vestry, the following resolution was made : 

" Whereas three of the six bells are out of order 
Mr. Phelps the bell founder hath agreed to 
cast them into eight bells for twenty guineas 
the parish allowing ten pounds extra for car- 
riage it is therefore ordered by this Vestry 
that the six bells shall be sent to London and 
cast into eight without any further charge to 
the parish except the ;^io." 

This, however, was not carried out ; probably the terms offered were in- 
sufficient, and so the parishioners contented themselves with having two of 
the bells re-cast. 

1718 A letter from M'' Phelps about the Bells 
Ringing at several times ... ... ... 2//. 

p"* Sam Parks for carrying two bells to Maid- 
stone and fetching them home again ... i//. 

p'^ for taking down the Bells for beer ... 

1 7 1 9 p'' M"" Edmonds carrying two bells to London 

& back again ... ... ... -■• i//. 

p'' Jn° Jackson mending Bell Clappers 2 yrs as 

pr Bill \n. 6.9. U. 

p*' M' Phelps for casting two bells adding 14!" 
of mettall fitting Clappers & Carriage from 
y" waterside ... ... ... ... ... 4//. 2s. 

1764 p'' Tho'' Sweeilove for Bell hanging as p' bill... 9//. 

p'' Tho'' Jenner for Leather for the Bells ... 6.f. 

p'' Gilbert the Bellhanger on last years account 5,?. 

1782 — 19 April. At a meeting "assembled for consulting 
about taking down the great Bell and Cast- 
ing the same into three small ones to make 
the peal eight It is unanimously agreed 
that the same shall be done Provided that 
the expence of the same can be defrayed by 
subscri])tion and the superfluous metal." 





Zd. 


9.y. 


S\d. 


95. 




3^'- 


6d. 





125. 




2 2//. 


I OS. 




l//. 


155. 




24//. 


165. 


3^/- 




45. 


7./. 




5^- 






155. 





1)1 script ions. 245 

This was apparently carried out ; but, as the following entries show, the 
parish did not come off scot-free : 

17S3 p'' for an Umbrella* 

p'' M' Gilbert for hanging the bells ... 

1785 Rob' Gilbert (bell hanger) as pr Bill ... 

1786 p'' M' Mears the Bell founder as pr Rec^ 

Exp'^ settling M' Mears's bill 

p'' M' Leigh for a new Tenor rope 
p'^ for an Umbrella* 

Later accounts are unsearched by me ; but I learn from Mr. Tarbutt that 
these eight bells did not last long, that for some years at the close of last 
century two of them at least were out of order, and on the 19th June, iSoi, a 
Vestry determined upon providing an entirely new peal, at an estimated cost 
of about ;z^ 300. The actual cost, however, amounted to ^463 3s. 

Since 1801 the expenses connected with the bells may be briefly summarized 
as follows : 

1812 Rehanging at a cost of. .. ... ... ... ^20 

1825 Fifth bell recast by Mears & some re-hanging 

cost ... ... ... ... ... ... ;^5i 185. id. 

And the carriage ... ... ... ... ;£\ 195. 9^/. 

The bell being cracked was not Id down, but thrown down out of the 
tower. 

1843 Re-hanging cost ... ... ... ... ^Qio \2S. dd. 

The work was so badly done that Mears had to be sent for, and thus we 
find that in 

1845 paid M"" Mears for re-hanging the bells ... ;^ 18 185-. 

1858 The 7"' bell was re-cast & re-hung, cost ... ^^^2 \\s. Zd. 

From 1800 to 1825 new bell-ropes were purchased annually, at a total cost 
of about ;^ioo for these " churchwardens' perquisites." After 1825, however, 
the cost is less, being about ;^4o to 1870, the ropes being allowed to wear 
out before being replaced. 

* Nihil ad rem, of course — but I could not resist inserting llic entries. Wiiat were llic 
umbrellas for? and why were two Ijought wiliiin three years? I sujipose tiicy were for u.'-c 
at funerals in wet weather. 



246 Inscriptions. 

Mr. Tarbutt calculates that the cost of the Cranbrook bells from (say) 1525 
to the present time, calculated at the present value of money, would amount 
to very nearly ^3,000, 

CRAY (FOOTS). All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I., 2\-W\.\ 

II., 23-in.l JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1S63 
III., 25-in. 1 

In 1863, when the church was restored, there were here but two bells, both 
of them cracked and useless. They were sold to Messrs. Warner and Sons 
in part payment for the present peal of three. 

T. R. E. Item ij bells suted in the steple conteynyng in compas eyther of 
them iij foote and a half of brasse. 
Item ij sacrying bells. 

Apparently no local uses. 

CRAY (NORTH). St. James. 3 Bells. 

I., 2ii-in. J. WARNER & SONS LONDON 1S74 
IL, 25-"in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1857 
IIL, 28-in. R: PHELPS FECIT M*^ lAMES BEADLE CH: WAR- 
DEN 1727 

T. R. E. Item iij bells suted in the steple and a litle handbell of . 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 
for female, then tenor tolled (minute strokes) for half an hour for a child, for 
an hour for adults. 

Tenor bell tolled before funerals. 

Sundays : All three bells chimed at 8 a.m. (" Matins" bell). For services 
bells chimed at intervals, toll in on treble last five minutes. 

Bells chimed for Vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Rev. H. W, Johnston, Rector. 

CRAY (ST. MARY). St. Mary. 5 Bells. 

I. , 3 1 ^-in. Rulict^t -t- nt0f + matre + ntc + 1 5 83 © 
II., 33-in. Same. 
III., 35-in. lOHN HODSON ^ MADE ^ ME ^ 1655 $ EM ^ ESP 

CHVRCH W ^ 
IV., 39-in. Same. 



Inscriptions. 247 

v., 42|-in. EDWARD .} MANNING a EDWARD ^ SPVRLING lOHN 
^ HODSON ^ MADE ME M655 ^ 
CHVRCH WARDINGS .jj? W ^ H ^; 

T. R. E. Item v bells suted in the steple and a saincts bell of brasse. 

Bells re-hung by Gillett and Co. in 1882. 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received by sexton, provided it be 
between sunrise and sunset. Tenor tolled for one hour for adults. Tellers — 
3 X 3 for man, 3 x 2 for woman — both at beginning and end. Third bell used 
for children. 

Funeral ringing unusual. A half-muffled peal has been rung lately at the 
funeral of a bell-ringer. 

Sundays : Treble bell rung for five or ten minutes at 8 a.m. This may 
be either the "Matins" or "Mass" bell. According to the usual Kentish 
custom it was probably the latter. 

For services : Bells rung or chimed after being struck three times all round. 
Toll in on tenor for seven minutes, then treble for three. 

Early peals on the great Church festivals. On last night of year a half- 
muffled peal before the-midnight service, tenor tolled for last three minutes 
of year, and after service an open peal is rung. 

Best thanks to Mr. Stanley B. Welch, Conductor of the local Ringers' 
Guild, for above information. He tells me also of a curious occurrence, which 
I will give in his own words : " One evening, when we had stopped our prac- 
tice, our conductor said to the sexton : ' That tenor has been sounding so 
mournful to-night that I'm sure you will have to toll it for a death in a day or 
two.' The sexton, to my astonishment, agreed, and both the men repeated 
their prophecy with certainty on my chaffing them. The bell was tolled for a 
death or funeral on five days out of the following week. Is this a general 
belief, or local ?" 

As to the above facts there is no doubt. The question is, was it a mere 
coincidence or something more? Qiiien sabe? 

CRAY (ST. PAUL'S). St. Paulinos. 3 Bells. 

I., 3o^-in. BRIAN VS ELDREDGE ^ ME FECIT 1624 

U (Fig. 6) U U 

II., 32-in. ►J^ (Fig. 7) XiJlianncs ©visfi (Sfitrc X)i0»'^vc X^vw 
U 
X^ubio Ovavc 
III., 33-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1859 



248 Inscriptions. 

T. R. R. Item iiij bells sated in the steple on saints bell. 

Prior to its being re-cast in 1859, the third bell was inscribed : 

PRAISE TFE LORD ^1597 A W 

This was by Anthony Wakefield, a Sussex itinerant founder (sec p. 60). 
For account of No. 2, see p. 27. 

Passing bell as soon as notice is given. Tenor tolled for an hour. Tellers 
■ — 3 X 3 for man, 3 x 2 for woman, 3 x i for child. 

CRAYFORD. St. Paulinus. 8 Bells. 

I., 26-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1876 

OF WHICH THE TENOR BORE DATE 1624 

IL, 27-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1876 

IN LIEU OF A PEAL OF FIVE BELLS 

III., 28-in. MEARS (as above) 

EDWARD HORNER ]^^,,^^„ ....t^t^t^xtc 

THOMAS HUTCHINSOnK^URCH WARDENS 

IV., 30-in. MEARS (as above) 

BENJAMIN FREDERICK SMITH RECTOR 
v., 32-in. MEARS (as above) 

TO THE Px\RISH OF CRAYFORD 1876 
VI., 34-in. MEARS (as above) 

THIS PEAL OF 8 BELLS WAS PRESENTED BY 
HIS FAMILY 
VII., 37-in. MEARS (as above) 

IN LOVING MEMORY OF DAVID EVANS OF 
SHENSTONE 
VIII., 41-in. MEARS (as above) 

TO THE GLORY OF GOD 

The ring which these replaced were inscribed as under : 

I., 29-in. lOHN k HODSON MADE k ME ^ 1672 '; THOMAS 1} 
EVERS O O -ilp lOHN ^ HVSSEY } CHVRCH h WAR- 
DENS «jj(.CHOOO'){(»WHOO«)|p 
IL, 31-in. lOHN ^ HODSON h MADE k ME ^ 1672 THOMAS ^ 
EVERS (» lOHN HVSSEY ^ CHVRCH ^ WARDENS 
W II O O O C II O O C «ij(> O O O r;!? 



Inscriptions. 249 

III., 33-in. lOHN * HODSON * MADE * ME * 1672 * THO- 
MAS * EVERS ^ lOHN * HVSSEY * CHVRCH * 
WARDENS # CH O O O WH O O O 

IV., 36f in. ©liltrjrImXiV .1^'^"^ :i^.rcif X-Qc I i5 %^^ 161 5 
v., 41-in. THOMAS BARTLET MADE ME 1624 O 

T. R. E. Item iij greate bells of bellmettell hanging in the Steple there. 

Death Knell.^ — ^Tenor for all above eighteen, treble for younger people. 
Tolled for about half an hour. Tellers at end only — 3 x 3 for man, 3 x 2 for 
woman, none for child. 

Funerals. — Bell tolled for half an hour before corpse arrives, and then 
more quickly until it reaches the lich-gate. 

Sundays. — Bells chimed at 8 a.m. and at 10 a.m. Query survivals, the 
last-mentioned hour being a very unusual one. 

For services : Bells alternately rung or chimed. Tolling in for ten minutes. 

The following entries occur in the parish accounts : 

1725 — -Sept. 30. Paid M' Gilburd for ringers when y" King 

dined at May Place ... ... ... ... ii.f. od. 

1820 — Nov. 17. For Beer for the Ringers for the King's 

coming through Crayford ... ... ... loj-. od. 

Best thanks to the Rector, the Rev. B. F. Smith. 

CROCKEN HILL. All Souls. i Bell. 

A modern church with one equally modern bell, and, as the Rev. F. N. 
Style (to whom thanks) tells me, no local uses. 

CROOKHAM HILL. Holy Trinliy. 1 Bell. 

I., 27-in. Thomas Mears Founder London 1842 

CRUNDALE. St. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I., 28i-in. ROBERT CATLIN FECIT 1750 

II., 33-in. WILLIAM IVCE THOMAS PALMAR MADE MEE 1663 
III, 37-in. R0ltcrtiJs-t-m0f + mc-i-tcnf + i593 ©U U U 
T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple. 

Mr. Bryan Faussett thus describes a coat-of-arms on tlie tenor: "(1^') 
3 Gaibs within a Bordurc engrailed (viz. for Kempe) ^^^ many other different 

2 K 



250 rnsc7'iptions. 

quarterings as on ye 3'''' 4"' 5"' 6"" & 8"' Bells at Wye which were cast at the 
same time ; (2'"') a Fess Wavy between 9 Guttes du Sang; (3'''') a Cheveron 
Ermine between 3 Swannes by y" name of Svvann." This refers only to the 
3rd shield. The two first he does not describe, and I cannot well make them 
out from the rubbings. 

Tenor bell unused at present for want of a clapper. 

Passing bell as soon as notice received. Tellers — 3 x 3 for males, 3x2 for 
females. 

A Bell chimed on morning of funeral, and at the interment. 

Bells chimed for Sunday services, then " toll in." 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. W. A. Vaughan. 



CUDHAM. SS. Peter and Paul. 3 Bells. 

I., 27-in. ^ lOHN t^ HODSON 4p MADE 'y ME «ij(. 1661 «){(. I B ^ T E 

•ijp C O O WARDENS O 
11., 29i-in. 3"anctc ^^Sy\^ Ova ^x^ JT^itbia \j (Fig. 28) 
in,, 33''in. I B « T F O CHVRCH h W^ARDENS ^ lOHN '; HODSON 
7 MADEf/ MEH661 ... O •■• W H O 

T. R. E. Item on litle hand bell of brasse. 

Item iiij bells in the steple suted of brasse. 

There were four bells here within living memory— the one which has gone 
had no clapper, and on the occasion of a wedding a local idiot got up in the 
belfry and struck it with a large hammer, with the result of breaking it irre- 
trievably. The metal was sold. 



CUXTON. St. Michael. 5, formerly 3 Bells. 

I., 27-in. 

II., 28-in. 

III., 30-in. 

IV., 33-in. 

v.. -.6-in. 



MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1866 



Here were formerly three bells ; two of them (both cracked) survived until 
the present ring were cast. They bore the following legends : 



Inscriptions. 251 

U (Fig. 6) 

I., 291-in. ^ (Fig. 7) <sT:Eii.Svi?-^.s- :p:E.:m:]pE;i?"yr:E: 

II., 32i-in. * BY o KE o GYLLES o BELLFOAMDER O O * 1589 
For accounts of the two old bells, see pp. 22 and 73. 

DARENTH. St. Margaret. 3 Bells. 

I., 24-in. Blank. 
II., 261-in. V STEPHANVS (; SWAN ^ ME } FECIT ) ANNO ^/ DOMINI 

'; 1609 1/ (Row of 18 coins below) 
III, 29i-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 

REV° JOHN EVELEIGH VICAR 

i?,^!!^^i^^^lx..,l CHURCHWARDENS 1856 
GEORGE GATES/ ^ 

T. R. E. Item iij bells of bras suted in the steple. 
Item ij small bells both of brasse. 

And at St. Margaret's Chapel : 

Item ij bells suted of bras in the steple. 

DARTFORD. Holy Trinity. 8 Bells. 

L, 291-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1882 
II., 3oi-in. P W 1702 
III., 32|-in. P W 1702 
IV., 352--in. William Pope Church Warden ss ^ . - - v^ /^ Pack & Chap- 

iNiAN OF London Fecit 1773 
v., 37-in. P W 1702 
VI., 38i-in. P W 1702 
VIL, 42^in. P W 1702 

VIIL, 46-in. CHARLES MANNING THOMAS WALSTON CIIVRCH- 
WARDENS 
MADE BY PHILIP WIGHTiMAN LONDON 1702 

T. R. E. Item iiij bells suted in the steple, on small bell called the 
Dollyng bell. 
Item on hand bell of brasse tor buryalls. 

2 K 2 



252 Inscriptions. 

Hasted notes here that one of the smaller bells " used till of late to be 
constantly rung as of old custom at 4 o'clock every morning, and again at 
the time of curfew at night " — clearly a survival of the morning and evening 
" Ave " peals. 

DARTFORD. Christchurch. i Bell. 

Modern church with modern bell. 

St. Alban. I Bell. 

Modern church with modern bell. 

DAVINGTON. St. Mary Magdalene. 3 Bells and Priest's Bell. 

Priest's, 12-in. 1774 

I., i6-in. ^ ^\\^t an^ fliaukc S) : ^ 1856 

^aiJlor ;ii^»JU0libwraxt0li 
II., 17-in. Same as above. 
III., i8i-in. 1^ ^^riuUc antr ffiankc ^ : ^. 1856 

On iron bell-frame.' T^W^-^ J^<^^1 M:^^ .S"0:ill ^:BCi^~^- 

jRoi3::m:E)E::3aH 1856 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. Tellers at beginning — 3 x 3 
for man, 3 x 2 for woman — then the age is tolled. 

At seven o'clock on morning of funeral, tellers apparently repeated twice. 

Bell tolled for half an hour before interment. 

Sunday services : Bells chimed fifteen minutes, then Priest's bell lolled 
fifteen minutes. 

Best thanks to the Rev. Canon Moore. 

DEAL. St. Leonard. 5 Bells. 

L, 29Hn. C H MADE ME 1685 
II., 3i-"in. CHRISTOPHER HODSON MADE ME 16S5 
III., 33i-in. Same. 
IV., 37i-in. Same. 

v., 41-in. 000 CHRISTOPHER Q HODSON O MADE ME O 
1685 
EDWARD O SMITH O GEORGE O KNOWLER Q 
CHVRCH O WARDENS O O O 
No. 3 is cracked in the sound-bow. 



Inscriptions. 



-'DJ 



DEAL. St. Andrew. i Bell- 

I., 27-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1850 

St. George. i Bell. 

I., 20-in. 1762 

DENTON. St. Mary Magdalene, 2 Bells. 

I., 3i|-in. +.S'attcfc JOxcam^v;^^ Ora ^xta ^oMs U U 
II., 34|-in. ;]5l0m^n XHagtJateni? (STamjftana (i^eviit XH»^.l<^I>t^+U U 

There were formerly three bells ; the treble, being cracked, was sold about 
twenty years ago. It measured 27I inches, and was inscribed : 

+ TwI|anncs ^.at ^itmcu JE,iita U (Fig 13) 
so that Denton possessed until lately an untouched medieval peal (see pp. 30 
and 31). The cross on each is the same (Fig. 14). The shields on the two 
remaining bells are Figs. 15 and 16. 

Death Knell. — Tellers somewhat unusual — 3 x 3 for man, 3x2 for woman, 
2 X 3 for male under twenty, 2 x 2 for girl under twenty. 

Bell tolled at eight on morning of funeral, and again before the funeral 
takes place until the corpse reaches the gate. 

Best thanks to the Rector, the Rev. C. J. Hussey. 

DEPTFORD. St. Nicholas. 8 Bells. 

I., 3o|-in. £701. 

II., 31-in. 1701. 

III., 33i-in. 1 701. 

IV., 37-in. 1701. 

v., 39Hn. 1702. 

VI., 42-in. 1701. 

VII., 45i-in. S N I H 1701 

VIII., 49i-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1842 
REV" A E SKETCHLEY M A VICAR 

T. R. E. Item v great bells of bell mettell sutcd hanging in the steple 
there. 
Item j little bell called a Saynt bell. 
Mem : " on little bell sold," 



2 54 Inscriptions. 

According to " Registruni Roffense," Isaac Loader, Esq., was a liberal bene- 
factor towards the cost of this peal, the tenor of which was re-cast (so Hasted 
states) in 1780, and, as will be seen above, again in 1842. The tower looks 
very dilapidated outside, and it was stated not long since that it was not safe 
to ring the bells ; but I am told that they are still rung almost daily, and that 
the tower is as stable as when first built. 

I am much indebted to Mr. Geo. Lockyer for trouble taken to find out 
from the parish accounts the names of the founders of the ring. Unfortu- 
nately it was labour in vain, as the accounts do not go back as far as 1701-2. 

DEPTFORD. St. Paul. 3 Bells. 

I., 27j-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1823 

IL, 33i-in. T Mears of Lnodon Fecit 1825 

Tho^ Haycraft) ^ 

T^ o TT r Church Wardens 

Edw° Hawke ] 

IIL, 40^-in. Mess"*^ James Abbott & Rich° Harreden Ch. Wardens 

1772 Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 

Christchurch. I Bell. 

I., 36-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1862 

St. Barnabas. i Bell. 

Presumably one bell of quite recent date. Church built 1882. 

St. John. 8 Bells. 

A peal of eight from the Whitechapel Foundry, dated 1874 — tenor 14 cwt. 

St. Luke. 8 Bells. 

Church built 1872— has a ring of eight bells by Warner and Sons. 

St. Mark. i Bell. 

Built 1883 — presumably one bell of that date. 

St. Peter. i Bell. 

L, 25-in. 4857 

A steel bell. 



Inscriptions. 255 

DETLING. St. Martin. i Bell. 

I., 27-in. iwlVp^i I|*ifc^I ma^c mc 1603 

Pits for three bells still remain — the other two were sold about twenty-five 
years ago for funds to repair the church. 

No local uses. Death knell rung as soon as notice received. 

Thanks to the Rev. John Cave-Browne, Vicar. 

DITTON. St. Peter. 2 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

Priest's i4|-in. Borodino. 1825 

I., 25-in. TM CW WH 1656 
II., 26-in. EDWARD MIDDLETON C W 17 17 

Quite lately rehung and in thorough order. 

DODDINGTON. St. John Baptist. 2 Bells. 

I., 31-in. ROBERT CATLIN FECIT 1751 
II., 33-in. RICHARD PHELPS MADE ME 1712 

In 1760 there were here " six bells, but three of them useless, being cracked 
and out of their frames." So much Mr. Bryan Faussett. It appears, 
however, that this unsatisfactory state of things had been caused by a fire, the 
steeple having been struck by lightning in or about 1650 and badly damaged. 
At the beginning of the present century, it was taken down and replaced by a 
fabric of wood, four of the bells being sold to defray the expense. Of the 
present survivors, only one is in use at present, the other being not in ringing 
order. 

Best thanks to Vicar, Rev. W. J. Monk. 

DOVER. St. Mary. 8 Bells. 

I., 28 Wn. S KNIGHT FECIT 1724 
IL, 29-in. SAMVEL KNIGHT FECIT 1724 
III., 2()\-'vci. Same. 
IV., 3r^-in. Same, 
v., 371-in. FEAR GOD ALL YOV THAT RING 3K FECIT 

1724 
VI., 38-in. lOHN DILL THOMAS lOYNER CHVRCHWARDENS 
SK FECIT 1725 



256 Inscriptions. 

VII., 41-in. HONOVR THE KING SAMVEL KNIGHT MADE 

THIS RING 1724 
VIIL, 46-in. STEPHEN HAMMOND lAMES PERCHE CHVRCH- 
WARDENS S KNIGHT FECIT 1724 
No information to be had as to local uses. 

DOVER. St. James the Apostle, Old Church. i Bell. 

I. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1872 

This is a very poor substitute for the ring of six which it replaces. They 
were, it is understood, traded away for the wretched steel bells now in the new 
church. They were inscribed as follows : 

L" G^ SACKWELL T^ REVELL ESQ^^ GAVE ME I^ GOD- 
WIN THO^ KID 

lOHN ^ WILNAR j) MADE ^ ME 1637 U 

lOHN ^ WILNAR ^ 1637 

lOHN WTLNAR U 

lOHN ■> WILNAR k MADE 5> ME 1637 

Same. W ^ W X) R <i> S 

C^ W 

St. James the Apostle, New Church. 6 Bells. 

L, 29-in. NAYLOR VICKERS & C° 1S62 

II., 31-in. Same. 1861 

III., 35-in. Same. 1862 

IV., 39-in. Same. 1862 

v., 41-in. Same. 1861 

VI., 45-in. Same. 1861 

Steel bells, about as rusty as they make them. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

A small modern bell, inaccessible. 

St. Mary in Castro. i Bell. 

A 29-inch bell by Warner and Sons, dated 1880. 

This exceedingly interesting ancient church has, thanks to God, been 
lately, after some two centuries of desecration and neglect, restored to 



I., 


30^-in. 


IL, 


33^"- 


IIL, 


37-in. 


IV., 


, 38-in. 


v.; 


, 43-in- 


VL, 


, 47-in. 



Inscriptio)is. 257 

His service. Tradition states that in the seventeenth century there was here a 
ring of six bells, but whether they were in the church tower or in the old 
Roman Pharos, as Hasted states, is somewhat doubtful. Tradition is equally 
contradictory as to the fate of the said ring. One authority states that 
Prince George of Denmark, at the intercession of Admiral Rooke, caused them 
to be removed to Portsmouth and placed in the tower of St. Thomas's Church 
there. Another authority slates that the order for removal to Portsmouth 
was never carried out, but that the bells went to St. Margaret at Cliffe. 
Neither of these traditions is, I think, correct ; the dale of the present ring at 
Portsmouth disproves the one, and the fact that St. Margaret at Cliffe 
possesses only one bell, and that of earlier date than the supposed transfer, 
militates equally against the other. The element of truth lying at the bottom 
of all this is, I think, that the bells were broken up and the metal sent to 
Portsmouth Dockyard for casting purposes. 

We have, however, in the Surrenden MSS., a piece of information as to 
one of these bells which is perfectly trustworthy, as being within the personal 
knowledge of the narrator. Sir Edward Deering. It is given as follows in 
"Arch. Cant.," vol. i. It appears that there was at that time (1630) in this 
church a brass (of which a sketch is given) to Sir Robert Astone, and the 
following note is added by Sir Edward : 

"The circumscription of the great bell heere and weighing 3000 lb. weight, 
and which was the gift of that S' Robert Astone, hath every letter fayre and 
curiously cast, and each crowned with a ducal crown ' Dominus Robertus de 
Astone Miles me fecit fieri A° quarto R. Ricardi scdi G.' Lower than this in 
small letters was cast 

" ' Stepne Norton of Kent 
Me n;ade in god intent.' " 

It is to be noted that these last two lines appear on a bell now at Chisel 
borough in Somerset, cast by the said Stephen Norton, and that on the only 
two other specimens of his workmanship known now to exist, viz., those at 
Snave and Holy Cross, Canterbury, the inscriptions are in very handsome 
crowned capitals. See p. 16. 

Best thanks to the Rev. H. Tudor Craig, senior chaplain, Dover, and to the 
Rev. A. du B Hill, our best authority on Hampshire bells. 



2 L 



258 Inscriptions. 

DOWN. St. Mary the Virgin. 3, formerly 4 Bells, 

I., 33-in. + (Fig. 9) j0l|anncs o ©"tttsii o ©^ai^c o X^iijn.tvc o 

^rra o ,l^o&la o (Diiaxte 
IL, 36-in. + (Fig. 7) Hum o XltTsa o ;]S)ulsata o XH«"^i o 

Jl.atci[iua o "^Z^ftata 
III., 39iin. t (Fig. 30) .©"itxtge | mane | f^Vlnitc I trca | anna 1 
^ni I m I tr I xt o 

U 
An interesting trio; see pages 26 and 49. The stop on Nos. i and 2 is 
Fig. 8. That on No. 3 is Fig. 31. 

T. R. E. Item iij bells of brass suted in the steple and one saincts bell of 
brasse and ij hand bells for procession, and a sacryng bell of bras. 

DUNKIRK. St. Saviour. i Bell. 

I., 27Hn. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1841 VILLE OF 
DUNKIRK CHURCH KENT 

The Vicar, Rev. W. J. Springett, tells me there are no local uses. 

DYMCHURCH. SS. Peter and Paul. 3 Bells. 

I., 22-in. CH o MADE o ME O 1685 O O O O 
II., 24-in. Same. 

III., 28-in. CHRISTOPHER o HODSON o MADE o ME o 1685 
00000 
T. R. E. Item ij bells in the steple. 
According to Hasted there were five bells in his time (about 1800), 

EASTCHURCH. All Saints. 5 Bells. 

I., 271-in. lOHN WILNAR 1634 
II., 30-in. lOHN WIENER 1623 
III., 33|-in. lOHN WIENER 1623 WB 
IV., 36-in. lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME 1605 

v., 4oi-in. lOHN WIENER 1623 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. Bell tolled for an hour- 
tenor (query) for adults, treble for children. Tellers at both beginning and 
end — 3 X 3 for male, 3x2 for female. Repeated on morning of funeral. 



Inscriptions. 



259 



Bell tolled for about an hour before burial. 

Sunday uses. Treble bell rung at 8 a.m. for about five minutes (ancient 
" Matins " bell). Bells chimed for services only at present, being in bad 
ringing order, and about to undergo a general overhaul. 

Very hearty thanks to the Rector, Rev. R. H. Dickson, for above notes, 
and also for permission to make the following extracts from the Parish 
Books : 



1662-3 giuan to the ringers at tim^s and spent at 

sauarals 
1663-5 P^i^ to Essex the Bel-hanger for new hanging 
our Bellf 
paid to Thomas Huggens y^ wheeler for Tymber 
used about the Bellf & worke done about 
the Church yard 
paid to Richard Eglestone for iron worke done 

about the Bellf & Church ... 
To Gregory Baylie for sawing ... 
ffor 5 new Bellropes 
ffor oyle for the Bellf ... 

paid more to Essex the Bellhanger in full of his 
worke 
1665-6 for 5 new Bellropes 

for Sallyes for the Bells 
1666-7 Item paid to John Atwater for a new wheele & 
other worke done about y" Bellf 
Item paid to the Wid Manwaring for oyle 
1667-8 for nayles and mending y^ Belfry doore 

for 5 Belropes weighing 28"^ ... 
1668-9 ^'^- f^'" 5 Belropes weighing 30"^ Decemb' 22' 
It. paid to Rich: Eagleston for work to y^ 

Bells 

1669-70 It. payd to Thomas Huggins for mending a bell 
whele ... 
It. for mending the Bells 
It. more for mending the Bell ... 
1670-71 It. payd to Goodman Bromfild for a new whele 
& four days worke don to the bels 



5//. 2S. 



Zli- 5-^'- 



od. 



. lU. 


6s. 


5^. 




iSs. 


6d. 




2S. 




s 


3^- 


4d. 


. ill. 


i.y. 


od. 




IS. 


%d. 




4^. 

IS. 






Ss. 


\xd 




1 6s. 




\li. 







t^s. M. 





^s. 


8^/. 




IS. 


6d. 




\2S. 


M. 


2//. 






L 


2 





26o Inscriptions. 

It. to Yonge for 2 days worke to helpe him ... 2s. 8d. 

It. for feching the Bell whele over ... ... 2s. 

It. spent one the Bellhanger ... ... ... 2s. 

It. for He 6^. 

It. for wood vsed about y^ bells ... ... is. 

It. for 5 bells rops 13^- ^^• 

167 1-2 Item for to horses &: a man to fetch y^ three 

bel whels ouer ... ... ... •■• 4-^' 

Item for 4 new boards to make a petission 

between y*= tener & third ... ... ... 4-^- 

Item for a pint and a i of oile for y^ bells ... is. 

Item for a new seet of bell ropes ... ... 17.^. 9^- 

Item for three new bell wheels ... ... 3//. 

Item for catches & stays & for fower shivers and 

pins ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 9 J. 

Item for 5 days worcke for brumfeild and his 

son ... ... ... ... ... ... 1//. S^- 

1672-3 Item for a horse & a man to fetch y^ treble 
wheel ouer 

Item for a quart of oile for y= bells 

Item p'^ two Will brumfeild his yeares wages* 2/1. 
1675-6 paid to y" ringers agen pouder treason 
1676-7 paid to y"" Ringers att severall times ... 
1677-8 spent upone y*" ringers att severall times 
1683-4 Given to y*" Ringers a gonpouder treson 

It. paid to Richard Eaglestone for Ironworke 
& nailes about y'' bells & other things 
1684-5 given to y'' Ringers att y^ crownation .. . 
1685-6 It. spent upone the Ringers at seueral tines ... 

It. paid to wodgat for mending the bells 

It. paid for new Ropes for y'' bells 
1686-7 It. paid to Will"! loue for 12 dayes worke and 

for som wood about the beles ... ... i//. 

It. given to the Ringears att severil times 

It. paid for som lethers for y'= belles ... 

* Appears regularly for some ten or twelve years, clearly an annual fee for looking after 
the bells and keeping them in order. 



2S. 




2S. 




2S. 




5'- 


3^- 


I IS. 


6d. 


2S. 


dd. 


i8s. 


lod. 


5^~- 




12^-. 


(yd. 


2S. 


6d. 


JSS. 


^d. 


6s. 




7s. 


6d 


3^- 





Inscriptions. 261 

1687-8 paid to y^ Ringars ffor seavarall times ringing 12.?. dd. 

paid to John Egelstone ffor lorne worke be- 
longing to y" bells (etc.) ... ... ... \2s. 2d. 

paid ffor a sett of bell ropes ... ... ... \li. 5.?. 

paid ffor Leathare used att a bell ... ... \s. 4d. 

1688-9 Given to y*" Ringers at three times ... ... los. 

Spent att y" Coronation of King Will & Quen 
Mary on the Ringers & for beere att y^ 

bonfier i//. 3^. 

1689-90 paid for mending y" bells ... ... ... ii.y. 

Given to y'' Ringers ... ... ... ... 55. 

1 69 1-2 Given to y" Ringers a gunpowder treson ... 55-. 

1692-3 paid for belrops ... ... ... ... i//. 

Given to y*" Ringers a crownation day ... 4s. 

paid for fers for a bonfier & for beere att y" 

same time ... ... ... ... ... i//. i8s. 

1694-5 paid for a bathreck for y'' trebble ... ... 2s. 

paid for Ringing y^ Quens Knell ... ... 2s. ^d. 

paid to John Eaglestone for new working y"" 
tenner claper & mending ye trebble claper 
& y" casment... ... ... ... ... 15^'. 6d. 

1695-6 paid for casting y^ brases & new hanging y" 

five bells ... ... ... ... ... 6//. 

Spent in y'' time of y^ bells new hanging ... 5^". 

paid for a new set of bellropes ... ... 15.^. 

paid for Bromfield for his Jorny over to vew y" 

bells & could not agree ... ... ... 5^'. 

Given to y'^ Ringers at severall times ... ... 11^. 

1696-7 paid to John Eaglestone for worke & nailes 
about y" Church & Bells att several times as 

apears by his bills i/i. 16s. 6d. 

1697-8 Given to the Ringers at the proclamacon for 

peace... ... ... ... ■•• •■. 5^- 

1699-1700 paid Mr Burges for a sett of Bell ropes ... 17^. gd. 

paid Thomas Vidgen for 3 Batharicks ... 6s. 

jjaid to Henary Lilly for worke aboute y" Bells 14//. 
for fetting of stufe from y" Key ... ... 5^". 



262 I use ript 20 }is. 

paid i\r Finch for a bond ... ... ... 3.$'. (>d. 

paid Thomas fox for worke dune in y*" Bellfery 4^'. 

1700-1 paid for a new set of Bellropes ... ... i^s. 6d. 

1 701-2 It. paid to Lilly for looking after y" bells one 

year at our Lady day 1702 it being ended* \lt. 
paid to Tho. Vigeon for a piece of sole leather 

for 4'^' bell ^s. 

1702 Given to y*^ Ringers on y" Queen's Crownation 

day 5:f. 

1704 Item paid John Egleston for mending a bell 

clapper & a lock ... ... ... ... 2s. lod. 

1706 Spent on y*" Ringers on y" Union day being y" 

i^' of May ... ... ... ... ... TOi-. 

1707 Given y^ Ringers on y*" 2 9'^^ of May ... ... 55. 

1712-13 Giueng to the Rengers apon Sand Gorge is day ^s. 

Geien to the Ringers more when pece was pro- 
clamed ... ... ... ... ... icy. gd. 

1 7 14-15 Spent on y" Ringers when y*" Arch-Deacon was 

here ... ... ... ... ... ... ^s. 

1716-17 Paid Tho: Vidgeon for a Bathrick for y'^ 5"^ 
Bell ... 

1724 Allowance had when y*" Bell was Hanged 

1725 Paid Jn° Beard for a new Set of Bell Ropes as 

ap'* by Bill ... ... ... ... ... i//. 

1726 Paid Richard Loudon for Buteres for y" Bells 
172S-9 p"* for a Bathareck 

1729-30 p"^ for a new set of Bell Ropes as pr bill ... i//. 
1730 p"^ Hen. Hills for \ a Year Looking after y" 

Bellst 

1730-31 P'* ]^° Beard for y'' Bell Rops... ... ... ili. 

1732-3 for mending y*" Bells clapper ... 

1733 j 

to > No accounts for these years. 
1786 ) 
1786-7 May 26 To M' Rouse for a set of Bell Ropes i//. 9^-. 
17S7 March 24 p"* M' Rouse for Bellropes ... i//. 2>s. 

* Occurs in later years regularly. 

t Occurs again for some ye.Trs in succession. 



3^- 


6d. 


4^. 


lod. 


6^. 


6d. 


25. 


6d. 


2S. 


6d. 


6s. 




lOS. 


6d 


6s. 




6s. 





InscriptiO}is. 



26 



^795~6 Bell Ropes aj pr bill ... 

Paid W Brett for M' Roust for Bell ropes ... 

1798-9 Paid Hodges for Leather for Bell 

1799-1800 Paid Rouss Bell ropes ... 

1835 Claringbold as per Bill for a set of Bell Ropes 

1839 Similar entry 

1840 Paid Taylor for a new strap to a Bell... 

There is very little information in this last book ; nearly all the payments are 
to so and so "as per bill." 



ili. 


I \s. 


6d. 


\li. 


gs 


6d. 




3S 


6d. 


\Ii. 


I IS. 


6d. 


2//. 


15^ 




2//. 


13^ 


6d. 




2.>- 


6d. 



EASTLING. St. Mary. 

I., 25f-in. Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 1793 
IL, 27-in. 



6 Bells. 



IIL, 29-in. 
IV., 30-in. 
v., 32|-in. 
VL, 36-in. 



R: Phelps fecit 17 17 



The reverend D": W*': Wickins sen: rect: W" Wickinsiun: 
CURAT Dan: Kemp Ch: warden R: Phelps fecit 171 7 

Death-knell rung as soon as notice given. Tenor bell used for adults, 2nd 
for children. Commence with tellers z^ Z ^o^ male, 3x2 for female ; then 
chime for twenty minutes, then raise bell and strike a few strokes, finish with 
tellers as at commencement. On morning of funeral at 8 a.m. the bell is 
raised, and after tellers, is rung for a quarter of an hour. Before the funeral 
the bell is tolled. 

For services bells rung or chimed, usually the latter. 

Peals rung on Easter morning, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and on New 
Year's Eve ; and occasionally during the winter months, but there is a diffi- 
culty in keeping a band of ringers. The following lines are on a board in 
the ringing chambers, and as they are unusual in this county, are worth 
printing here : 



This is a bellfry that is free 
And for all them that civil be 
And if you choose to chime or ring 
It is a very pleasant thing. 



ARTICLES. 

There is no music play'd or sung 
Like unto bells when they're well rung 
Then ring your bell well if you can 
Silence is best for every man. 



But if you ring in spur or hat 
Sixpence you pay be sure of that 
And if a bell you overthrow 
Pray pay si.xpence bclorc you go. 



264 Inscriptions. 

EASTRY. St. Mary. 5 Bells. 

I., 35-in. Rubci^f mof + mabe mq O 1584 © 
II., 37-in. ♦ :iul|aunca Clarltc 'Banc Jffccit Campauam 1609 

WILLIAM IDLEY Z THOMAS VVHITFVLDE CHURCH- 
WARDENS 
in., 4o|-m. HENRY <> WILNAR > MADE -^ ME ^ 1629 <?> 
IV., 45-in. xM-^THOMASRAMMELL CHURCH WARDEN RICHARD 

PHELPS MADE ME 1734 
v., 49-in. Thomas Kite William Filpoit Church Wardens ■.• Robert 
Catlin Fecit 1740 

Apparently no passing bell. " A knell " rung at funerals. 

Sunday uses. The "matins" (8 a.m.) and " mass " (9 a.m.) bells were 
rung here until the early part of the present century, when the former was 
discontinued. At present a bell is rung at 8 a.m. for the early celebration, 
and the 9 o'clock bell has been shifted to 9.30. Unless this last is rung for 
any special purpose, it seems rather unmeaning — what one might call a case of 
strangulated survival. 

For other services bells chimed ten minutes, then fifteen minutes' pause, 
then chime five minutes, " toll in " on two bells ten minutes. 

Peal rung on last night of year. 

Wedding peals "sometimes." 

A meadow near the church (now an orchard) was called "bell pasture" 
because one of the bells is said to have, been cast there. This is doubtless a 
true tradition, and refers to the 2nd bell, the maker of which, John Clarke, 
was so eminently peripatetic over all the home counties, that the most 
careful researches have hitherto utterly failed in finding him a local habita- 
tion. 

Best thanks to the Rev. W. F. Shaw, Vicar. 

EASTWELL. St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 29-in. Thomas Mears Founder London 1842 

II., 31-in. Same. 

III., 33-in. Same. 

IV., 35-in. Same. 

v., 38-in. Same. 

VI., 43-in. The Rev" Philip Parsons rector Thomas Dobson Church 
Warden Tho"^ Mears of London Fecit 1794 



Inscriptions. 265 

T. R. E. Item in the steple iij bells and a lytle sanctus bell. 
In 1758, according to Mr. Faussett, Eastwell had but three bells, thus 
inscribed : 

I. Joseph Hatch fecit me 1605 
II. Sancta Maria Ora Pro Nobis 
III. Josephus Hatch fecit me 1653 
This last is clearly wrong, either in name or date ; Joseph Hatch died in 
1639. 

In Hasted's time there were three bells — his date on this point is rather 
uncertain —probably they were the three mentioned by Faussett. In 1794 
these three appear to have been exchanged for (or cast into) the present 
tenor, and Eastwell remained with this single bell until 1842, when the Earl 
of Winchilsea gave the present Nos. i to 5 at a cost of ^295 Zs. 2d. 
Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. G. E. Gwynne. 

EBONY. St. Mary. i Bell. 

I., 25i-in. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 1805 

T. R. E. Item iiij gret bells and a saunce bell. 
Mem. " Stolen " .... a hand bell. 

EDENBRIDGE. SS. Peter and Paul. . 6 Bells. 

I., 31-in. In sweetest sound let each its note Reveal Mine shall 

BE first to lead THE DULCET PeAL T MeARS & SON OF 

London Fecit 1807 
II., 33|-in. When Female virtue weds with Manly worth We catch 

THE rapture and WE SPREAD IT FORTH T MeARS & SON 

OF London Fecit 1807 
III., 34|-in. Hear let us Pause and each with one accord Salute 

the Church triumphant in the lord T Mears cV Son 

of London Fecit 1807 
IV., 36-in. Should battle rage and hostile foes Contend We hail 

THE VICTOR when hes Britains Friend T Mears & Son 

OF London Fecit 1807 
v., 39in. May Peace and Plenty smile on Albions Shore And Wars 

dire Tumult Cease for Evermore T Mears & Son of 

London Fecit 1807 
VI., 43-in. Thomas Mears of London Fecit 181 3 

2 M 



266 Inscriptions. 

In ringing the death knell the age is denoted by the bell used — tellers 3x3 
for male, 3 x 2 for female. A bell tolled at funerals. 

Sunday uses rather elaborate — 7 a.m. ("Matins" bell), 8 a.m. ("Mass" 
bell). Sermon bell at 9 a.m. and again at 2. Bell again at i p.m. and 6 p.m. 
Can these last be survivals of the old mid-day " Angelas " and evening 
" Ave " bells, or is the former " a dim recollection " of the Sanctus bell at 
high mass ? * 

Wedding peals. Bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Ringing on festivals under Vicar's direction. 

The cost of the peal recast in 1807, according to the parish books, was 
about ;!^ 1 80. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. C. F. Gore. 

EGERTON. St. James. 6 Bells. 

I., 27-in. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1759 
IL, 2g-in. Same. 
in.,3i-in. lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME © 1602 
IV., 34-in. Peace And Good Neighbovrhood <^ Lester & Pack of 

London Fecit 1759 
v., 36-in. ROB~" HOPE AND THO~ WILDESH C W 1717 
VL, 39-in. JOSEPH HATCH MADE ME Q 1602 

SP RB 
T. R. E. Item in the stepyll v bellys 

Item a bell over the quier (No doubt the Sanctus bell.) 
.... hand bells. 

Passing Bell. — Tenor tolled thirty minutes, then raised and rung thirty 
minutes ; tellers at finish, 'x,y. :^ for male, 3x2 for female. 

Funerals. — A knell rung at 7 a.m., each bell in turn being made to speak 
seven times. This is done three times foj; a male, twice for a female. Then 
tenor raised and rung half pulls for an hour, with two fifteen-minute intervals 
of silence. A bell tolled for an hour before the service. 

Sundays. — Sermon bell at 8 a.m. (2nd and tenor) and again at noon (2nd 
only). Bells chimed half an hour before service. 

Peals on Christmas morning and on New Year's Eve. 

A bell rung for Easter Vestry. 

There is a bequest called the Bell-rope Charity, no doubt an endowment for 
ropes. 

Best thanks to the Vicar, the Rev. F. R. Mercer, 



Inscriptions. 267 

ELHAM. St. Mary. 8 Bells. 

I., 2S-in. Lester & Pack of London Fecit 1763 

IL, 29-in. Same. 

III., 30-in. Same. 

IV., 32j-in. Same, 

v., 34-in. Same. John Potter Bellhanger 

VI., 36-in. Same. 

■VII., 41-in. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit. Rob VVestfield 

& John Horton Churchwardens 1809 

VIII., 45-in. Lester & Pack of London Fecit 1763 

T. R. E. Item v great belles. 

In 1757-8 Mr. Bryan Faussett notes here " 5 heavy bells all made by John 
Wilnar in y" year 1659." These doubtless came from the church of St. Mary 
at Sandwich, local tradition preserving the record of the transfer ; their date, 
however, was 1639, not 1659; the entry of the payment for their casting is 
given in Boys' " History of Sandwich," and will be noticed in connection 
with that town and church. At present the frame is in bad order and the 
bells can only be chimed. I am sorry to see that the reprehensible practice 
of " clocking " has been introduced. The sooner it is discontinued the better 
for the bells. 

Death knell as soon as notice received. Toll one hour — tenor bell for 
adults, other smaller bells for children according to age. Tellers 3 x 3 for 
male, 3 x 2 for female at end of knell. This is repeated at 8 a.m on day of 
burial, only the bell is " pulled up," not tolled. 

Sundays — a bell chimed at 8 a.m. (" Matins " bell). 

There is a local tradition as to No. 7, that it was sent here by mistake for 
Wye, and that the Wye people have got the Elham bell. 

ELM LEY. St. James. i BelL 

I., i8-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1854 

ELMSTEAD. St. James. 6 Bells. 

L, 27-in. lOHN WAYLETT FECIT OOO1721OOOO 
IL, 28i-in. lOHN WAYLETT FECIT O O 1721 O O O 
IIL, 3i-*in. ST lAMES U U S U K 1721 U U U 

2 M 2 



268 Inscriptions. 

IV., 33|-in. lOHN WAYLETT FECIT 1721 
v., 35-in. Same. 
VI., 40-in. Chapman «Sj: Mears of London Fecerunt 1783 

T. R. E. Item iiij bells in the steple and iiij small hand bells. 

No local uses. The bells were rehung at the expense of Sir J, W. Hony- 
wood, Bart., some five years ago ; prior to this there had been no ringing for 
many years, and the old ringers dying out meanwhile, the old uses passed into 
oblivion. 

Best thanks to the Vicar, the Rev. A. Collett. 

ELMSTONE. Dedication unknown. 3 Bells. 

I., 27-in. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 1808 
IL, 281-in. MR: WILLIAM GIBBS CHVRCH WARDED RICHARD 
PHELPS FECIT 1712 .)|(. 
IIL, 31 Mn. MR: WILLIAM GIBBS CHVRCH WARDEM RICHARD 
PHELPS MADE ME 1712 «ij(. + «j{(> 

In 1758 the treble was like the other two. 

ELTHAM. St. John Baptist. 6 Bells. 

I., 2 7|-in. Tho^ Noves & W" Glazbrook Ch. Wardens 1794 Tho^ 

Mears of London Fecit 

II., 29-in. Same. 

III., 3oi-in. Same. 

IV., 32|-in. Same. 

v., 34|-in. Same. 

VI., 37^-in. The Rev° I Kenyard Shaw Vicar Tho^ Noyes & W" 
Glazbrook Church Wardens 1794 Tho^ Mears of 
London Fecit 

T. R. E. Item iij great bells in the steple and a saunt's bell of brasse. 

Death knell tolled within twelve hours after death. Tellers at end only — 
3 X 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female. 

Bell tolled at funeral. 

Bells chimed for service. 

Peals on Easter Day, Christmas Day, Ascension Day, Whitsun Day, Feast 
of Patron Saint, and Harvest Festival. Also on New Year's Eve and Queen's 
birthday. 



Inscriptions. 269 

Many thanks to Vicar, the Rev. W. J. Sowerby. 

The following entries from " A Bocke of the accountes off the Churche 
Wardens called a Ledgere begininge the xij day of July in the yeare of our 
Lorde Gode 1554," were copied by Mr. Tyssen several years ago : 

1554 the charges of the ij bells Sum=i ... ... \\s. \\\]d. 

Item paid to Robert Esbruke for takinge downe 
of the belle and hanginge of hir upe agayne 
and trussinge of the great bell ... ... \\\)s. \\\]d. 

Item for wainge of the same bell ... ... viij^. 

Item paid for makinge of the oblygatione ... xx^. 

Item paid for carringe of the bell into South- 

warke ... ... ... ... ... ... vj^. 

Item paid for carringe of the bell unto the 
bell fownders to Henry Scrockeson (Church 
Warden) \]S. s\\]d. 

Item paid for brininge home of the bell ... iiij^. 

Item paid for our charges for ij days warke ... iij.y. iiij^. 

Item paid for on hondrethe and a haulf and vij//. 

of mettell for y*" bell a iiij^. the //. Iviijjr. iiij^. 

Item paid to the bell founder for castinge the bell iij//. vij^. 
Sum^ vij//. \]S. vjd. 

Item paid to Bourne for makinge of the bell 

clapper and for irone for the same ... ... vs. 

1556-7 Item paid to the rope maker for a bauldricke for 

the great bell i)s. u\]d. 

Item paid to John Bourne sen"^ for making of 
the great bell clappir and the little bell clapp"" 
and spike for the carpinter for the dogge one 
the neive beame and ij forlocke for the great 
belle over and besides xiiij// of ould irone 
that he had of the jJrishe for ij laye upon 
them v.r. 

Item paid to ould Bourne for makinge of a 
bauldricke viij^. for haulf a hyd of white 
leathers xx^. ijj. iiij^- 

Item pd to the same man for new boults of iron 
spike and chekes \v''> a newe buclec for the 
bell clapp"" and diu''se othe things occupied 
about the great bell iij-^- "ij'^- 



270 hiscriptions. 

Item pf^ to Mills carpinter of Bexley for takinge 
downe of the great belle doune and new hang- 
inge of hire vpe and mendinge of the bell 
whill* ... \\]s. iiijV, 

Item geven to the men that did helpe take downe 
the bell and hange hire againe in bread and 
drinke iiij^. 

Item paid for grease for the bells ... ... \^d. 

Item the iij day of Decemb' 1557 for a new 
clapper for the greate belle wayinge xlvj//. a 
iiij the pounde ... . . ... ... xv.y. 

1558 Imprimis paid the ij day of May to Hunte the 

carpentere for the makinge of a wheele for the 

littelle belle ... ... ... ... ... '\]s. v]d. 

Itm. paid more to the smithe for mendinge of 
the storupe to the same bell ... ... ... iiij^. 

Itm. laid oute for boordes that I had of M"" East 
for to mend the whell of the littell belle and 
the fremes besides .. ... ... ... xij^. 

1559 Itm. paid for a bauldricke for the great bell ... xij^. 

1560 Receaved of John Bourne for the broken bell 

claper viij^. 

Itm. paid for a bauldricke for the great bell ... w'yi. 

Itm. paid for a pine for the baldricke ... ... ]d. 

Itm. paid for the clapper for the littell bell ... v']d. 
Itm. paid to John Petley for makinge a whell 

for the sayd bell ... ... ... ... xviij^. 

Itm. paid for a pine for the baldricke ... ... id. 

Itm. paid for candells that was brent at the hang- 

inge of the bell whill ... ... ... ... ']d. 

Itm. paid for mendinge the storupe of the bell 

whille ... ... ... ... ... ... ]d. ob. 

1561 Item paid for gresse for the bells ... ... \d. 

1562 Imprimis paid for a crosse bare for the meadle 

bell • v]d. 

* An unintelligible word follows, apparently "wergrart," which may mean "where 
cracked ;" I can think of no other explanation. 



Inscriptions. 2 7 1 

Itm. paid for naylles to mend the bells and y" 

churche gate ... ... ... ... ... \]d. 

Itm. paid to John Petley for hanginge the great 

bell faste ... ... ... ... ... x^. 

Itm. paid for ij folke to helpe the carpinter ... xvj^. 

Itm. paid for ij baudes for the bells whille ... \]d. 

Itm. paid for a crosbar for the bell ... ... viyi. 

Itm. paid for naylles for the belles ... ... \]d. 

Itm. paid for a plate for the great bell vvhill ... ij//. 

Itm. paid for greasse for the belles ... ... \d, 

Itm. pay for naylles and mendinge the great bell 

whell ... ... ... ... ... ... \\\]d. 

1563 Itm. paid for making an J for the great bell 

claper ... ... ... ... ... ... iij^. \\\]d. 

Itm. payd for a crosse bare for the great bell ... iiij^. 

Itm. payd for naylles to mende the bell whells ]d. 

1564 Itm. paid to John Petley for mendinge the belles xij^. 
Itm. paid for shuting the storupe of the great 

bell ij^. 

Itm. paid for a staye for the great bell whelle ... v]d. 
Itm. paid for a bell clapper ... ... ... iij^. \\\]d. 

1565 Itm. paid for half a hyde of whit leather to mend 

and for to make the bauldricke when they 

have neade ... ... ... ... ... ij.f. \]d- 

Itm. paid to John Bourne for a bare for the 

great bell ... ... ... ... ... v\d' 

Itm. paid for brades to mend the belles ... '\)d. 

Itm. paid for a bucelle and a pine for the greate 

bell ijV- 

Itm. paid for makinge a bauldricke for the great 

bell iiij^. 

Itm. paid for ij keyes for the belles ... ... \d. 

Itm. paid for a pounde of candelles at the hang- 
inge of the belles ... ... ... ... lij'/. 

Itm. paide for tallow for the bells \d. 

Itm. paid for a stapelle for the great bell ... \d' 

Itm. paid for a pine for the great belles bauld- 
ricke ... ... ... ••• ••• )d' 



\d. 



272 hiscriptions. 

1566 Itni. paid for spykes for the belles and mending 

the sturrupes for the bells and mendinge the 

keyes ... ... ... ... .•■ ••• '^)d. 

Itm. paid for tallow for the belles of All Sayns 

even 
Itm. paid to John Pelley for ij days worke for 

mending the belles ... ... ... ... ^s. 

Itm. paid to John Bourne for a dayes work at 

the mending y" belles ... ... ••. x^/. 

Itm. paid to Henri Stubbs fo a dayes worke at 

the mending y'' belles ... ... ••. x^. 

Itm. paid for a noo J for the great bell claper 

to John IJorne iiF- iiij'^- 

Itm. i^aid lo John l]ournc fo makinge of a 

bawldricke and mending another bawldricke 

for the belles vj^. 

1567 Itm. for making ij new bawldrickes ... ... viij^. 

llm. paid lor whit lether to make the bald- 

ricke of x^. 

llm. i)aid for mending the fore bell claper ... iiij'/. 

Itm. paid for sope for the belles ... ... ij^- 

Itm. jxaid for a new J for the medell bell ... \)s. 

1568 Itm. paid for ij now bawdrickes cs: mending on 

bawdrick for belles ... ... ... ... iij'^. 

Itm. paiil for drinke for the Ringcres at ij times 

when the Queene cam throw the towne 
Itm. paid for sope for the belles 
Itm. paid for mending the belles and the church 

stille 

1 569 Itm. paid for haulf a hid of whit lether and mend- 

inge the great bell bauldricke 
Itm. paid to John Petley for iij dayes worke for 

mendinge the great belle whelle 
Itm. paid to Willm Hamshire for ij dayes worke 

for the same ... 
Itm. paid to John Llourne for bare to bcare the 

bell 





\\\]d. 




\d. 




\\\)d. 


\]S. 




\\]S. 


'wd. 




w]d. 


\]S. 


iiij^. 



hiscripti07is. 273 

Itm. paid to John Eoure for laing the pine for 
the bell ... . . ... ... ... \d. 

Itm. paid to John Boure for mendinge the 

strowp for y"" bell ... ... ... ... \\d. 

1570 Itm. receaved of the wardens of the xv* peny 

for the pament of the amcndinge of the to 
belles vij//. and paid by vs ... ... ... vij//. 

Itm. paid for the charges of the ij belles above 

the sui of vij//. as apeareth by a bille . . . \\s. \\]d. 

Itm. paid for mendinge the beares for the medell 

bell v\d. 

Itm. paid for brodes ... ... ... ... iiij^. 

Itm. paid for iij keyes ... ... ... ... \)d. 

Itm. paid to John Petle e John Bourne for a 
dayes worke a peac for to hang the middlee 
bell ijj. 

Itm. paid for sope fo"^ the bells ... ... ... \]d. 

Itm. paid for nayelles for the bell whille ... \]d. 

Itm. paid for mendinge the storope of the bell \]d. 

Itm. paid for mending the fore bell whille ... \]d. 

1571 Itm. paid for mendinge a bauldricke ... ... \\\]d. 

Itm. paid for castinge of the ij belles to the 

churchwardens ... ... ... ... vij//. 

1572 Itm. paid for mendinge the great bells baul- 

dricks vj^. 

Itm. paid for soppe for bells ... ... ... \d. 

1573 Itm, paid for a bauldricke for the for bell ... xiiij^. 
Itm. paid for a baudricke for the medell bell ... xiiij^/. 
Itm. paid John Bourne formakingc the fore bell 

claper ... ... ... ... ... ••• iij-^- 

1574 Itm. paid for mendinge the medell bell whell the 

same then did reinge for the coronation of the 
quen ... 

1575 Itm. paid for mendinge the great bell bauldryck 

tV for sope for the bells ... • • • ■ • • '^j'^^' 



\}d. 



Lands s(i calli. 



2 N 



2 74 Inscriptions. 

1576 Itm. for mendinge the great bells baudryke and 

for brods changinge in the stocke ... ... xxd?'. 

Fo"" candells for the ringers ... ... ... \d. 

Itm. paid for helpinge to truse the great bell ... y]d. 

payd to John Bourne for iron & worke ... \]s. \\\]d. 

payd for help to hang y'^ belles ... ... ... xijd?^ 

payd for sope for belles ... ... ... ... ij^. 

1577 Itm. payd for y" bel claper ... ... ... viij.y. 

15 78 Itm. paide for a baudricke for y" great bell and 

apinneofiron ... ... ... ... xxj^. 

Itm. rayne owne labour aboute y*" rearinge of y*" 
bellfree lofte ... 

1579 Payed for one pounde of gresse for the bells ... 
Payd unto Willm Roop and unto Willm Brog- 

mington for helping of John Petley about the 

bells 

Itm. payd unto the Ringers on the coronation 

daye ... 
Itm. payed for a haelf one pound of sope for the 

bells 

1580 pd for mendinge of y° roller of the bell and for 

ij inc nailes 

pd to John Dardon for soderinge of o"" middell 
bell 

pd for a sacke of coales... 

pd to Richard Borne for iron worke for y*" bell 

pd to Anthony Nott and for helpinge of him to 
hang the bell ... 

Spent in charges at the takinge down of the bell 
Some xxiiiji'. \\\]d. 

November pd to the Ringers the xvij dale of 
Nou y*" w^ is called Coronation dale 

Spent more in charges on the ringers ... 

pd to Richard Boure for iron work for the 
belles ... 

pd to John Petle and John Gentleman for mend- 
inge the two wheles of y' bells 





xij^. 




\d. 




wd. 


\]S. 


v]d. 




lid. 




\]d. 


XVJ5. 


xij^. 


iiij.f. 




ij^. 


iiij^. 




xij^. 


iij5. 


\]d. 


\s. 


y\]d. 




xvd. 




xd 



Inscriptioiis. 275 

for nailes for the wheles ... ... ... ... \]d. 

for sope for the belles ... ... ... ... \d. 

1 58 1 pd to Thomas Gierke for makinge a new whele 

unto y*" fore bell ... ... ... ... ij^. iiij^. 

for grease for the belles ... ... ... ... iij^. 

pd for ij bvvdrex for the belles ... ... ... \\]s. \\\]d. 

pd for greces for the belles ... ... ... ]d. 

pd to the Ringers the xvij day of November ... iij.f. 

pd more to the Ringers in charges iiiji-. \yi. 

pd unto John Petle for mending the wyell of the 

bell vj^. 

1582 pd for grece for the bells ... ... ... \d. 

for nayles to mende the bell wheeles with other 

necessaryes ... ... ... ••. •■ vj//. 

Itm, for sope & nayles for the bells iiij^. 

17 November Itm. laid out the same day to 
the Ringers beinge then in remembrance of 
Coronation day ... ... ... -.• ix.r. vj^. 

1583 Itm. for takinge downe the bell and all other 

charges |^tayninge to y' only excepted the 
^ Founderes wages as by a bill of |Jticulars may 

appear in toto... ... ... ••• •■• xx: 

Itm. for a pound of sope for the bells ... 

Itm. laid owt for mending the great bell clapper 

and the middell bell clapper w'^ the charges 

to the same belonging 
Itm. paid to the carpenters for worke aboute the 

bells 

Itm. paid more the same time to Rich Borne 

for iron work abowte the bells 
It. payd to the Bell founder for casting the bell iij//. 
It. for mending the bell clappe' charges in 

going ... ... ..• ••• ••• ••• ^J-^* 

It. for grease waxe & sope against the ringing 

daye for the bells iiij^- 

It. in charges on the Coronation day for the 

ringers... ... ... ... •.• ■•• xvx, 

2 N 2 



'\]S. 


vjd. 




u'y/. ob. 


'(\]S. 


iiij^. 


ws. 


\\\]d. 


[]s. 


myi. 


\s. 





276 Inscriptions. 

Receyed gathered of the {^ishe for the bell ... xxiji'. 

1585 paied to the CoUermaker of Leawsam for a 

bawdricke for the great bell ... ... ... iiji'. 

paied to John Peatly for mendinge the great bell 

wheall & for nayles xviij^. 

paid for towe bell ropes iij^. vj^. 

1586 paied for a bell rope for the great bell xviij^. 

paied to John Petlye for stokeing y'' great bell \\\]s. 

paied to Richard Bourne for makinge the iorones 

for the great bell stocke ... ... ... iij^. 

paied for breade & drynke for them that did 

helpe up & down with the bell ... ... ix^. 

paied for soppe ... ... ... ... ... \d. 

paied for Goodman Leayses helpe ... ... ij^. 

1 58 7 paid for a bell rope at the crownation daie last 

1587 xx^. 

paied to Rycard Bouren for nayles and a buckell 
for the newe bawdricke and for mending the 
yornes of the great bell 

1588 paied for mendinge a bawdricke for y*^ fore bell 
paied for a bawdricke for the fore bell ... 
paid for a bell rope for the great bell ... 
paied to Goodman Petley for settinge the greate 

bell faste in the stocke & for John Aleays 
helping of him 
paied for a bell rope for the myddell bell 

1589 Also allowed backe by Thomas Roper for the 

bell ropes aforesayd ... 

1590 paid for the grett bell clapper ... 
paid for brades & nayles for the stocke & for 

the whell for the great bell ... 
paid for brede & drynk for lettyng down & tak- 

ying y' up agayne 
paid to John Pettly for mending of the stock of 

the gret bell for ij dais worke 
paid to Richard Boure for ieren work for the 

stoke of the bell at the same tyme ... 





xij^. 




v]d. 


\)S. 






xvj^. 


\]S. 






xix^. 


ws. 


y]d. 


xi-. 






viij^. 




vj^. 


ij^. 


iiij^. 




xix^. 



Tnscriptio7is. 277 

paid to Goodman Astell & goodman Yonge for 
helpying of the bell when it was taken down 
& sett up agayne at the same tyme ... ... xviij^. 

paid for grece for the bell ... ... ... \]d. 

paid for makyng of the whelle for the grett bell '\]s. 

paid to Richard Bourt for his paynes for carying 
of the claper of the grett bell to Bedford & 
for helpying of the bell at the same tyme ... xijV. 

paid to John Homffere the carpenter for mak- 
inge of the whell for the great belle & for 
fyndyng of the stoufe belongen the^'to & also 
for lokyng to the same bell for one year ... \s. 

paid for a rope for one of the belles ... ... xvj^. 

paid for a sturrupe & a stey for the gret bell & 

for brads ... ... ... ... ... ijc 

paid to Richard Bourne for brads & keys for 

the belles xij^. 

paid to Goodman Astell for helpyng the car- 
penter at the same daye ... ... ... v\\]d. 

paid for ij dais helpyng downe of the bells &: up 

agayne for brede & drynke the same daye ... xijV. 

paid for Grece for the belles the same tyme . . . '\]d. 

J 591 paid to John Homfrey for the mendynge of ij 

belles xviij^. 

paid for mendyng of the bell whelle a pound of 

nayles ... ... ... ... ••■ ••• W- 

paid for the grett belles clapper ... ... viiij^. 

paid to Dickson for makyng of the grett bell 

whell vij^'. 

paid to goodman Wykes for keyes & naylles for 
the grett belle 

paid for a new baderik for the grette bell 

paid for a pownd of grece for the belles 

paid for a badereke for one of the belles 
1592 paid for mendinge of the greatt bell clapper ... 



\]s. 


\]d. 


\]s. 


xd. 




j^. 


\]s. 


hd. 




xij^. 



2 7^ Inscriptions. 

The following entries also occur in another book : 

1610 The carigge of the grete belle to be newe caste 
M Morrte bell fownder dwellinge in white 
cappell wcthe owte Ailgate being agreed 
welliall {ux v/. and to deliver ett at the ^Vate 
that he rercfcd itt att that wass ix hundred 
and a hallefe and att the recessing of the bell 
backeaganc it waied \\)xx. and vij//. more 
then it dcd before there was iij.v.v. and iiij//. 
att \\\]d. the ])ovvnd and iij//. at \\s. \]d. the 
pownd being called ten and tenglaes* the hoUe 
somis... ... ... ... ... ... vij//. \s. 

paied for carreing and brenging home of the 
grete bell from white cap[)ell wethe owte alle 
gale ... x^. 

paied att l.ondcjii brege for lowle and alt All 

gate x</. 

1617 K I'aycd for booHini'.^f ol ihc gri'el WW clapper \\]S. 

|)ayc(l (or niiiKhii!', (»l ij baldiicks ... ... \\d. 

jiaycd lor owltiiig ol llii' ('la|)i)eres ... ... ]s. 

jiaycd lor xij wedges for the slockes of the 

r.clU", xd. 

piiycil all llic WarliociH's tor waeing of (he grett 
bell //I'/f'v llic liiest waicll wars ix' iij ([wa'lres 
and xx//. ij//. and a hallel more of ihe mettell 
waes all the iU'li fowndrres tlie secontl waiett 
01 (hacli wai-s viij' iij ([wartcrcs and vj//. the 
ij ol Aprcll I () I S .. ... ... ... viij.v. 

Payed all I .oiidoii lucd;; (or tolle ... ... viij</. 

pa\((i Iwo woikiiH-ne all llie takiiii; dowiie of 
llic bell and lot loddni;', the s.inie tow the 
( ' 11 lie and liom the ( '.iile ... ... ... iij.v. \'yi. 

|)ayed low l\e(liaid ( 'leaywood llu" ij dav of 
;i|iiell if)iS loi (.iiieini; .nul led him; ol tlie 
yuM bell low .Mid lioiii ilowtiiesduh .. X.v. vji/. 

" " I iii|'l.e,'. " llr.mulh. 

I (,>v. " I). illiii|;, "/.<-. , |iulliii|'. :i new ImII 01 li.iiimici in|; llu" i>Kl our into sliiiju*. 



Inscriptions. 279 

payed the iiij'^ day of Aprill 161S tow Thomas 
Wode bellwhele carpenter for towerninge all 
the iij belles faisted in the stockes ... ... xxj. 

payed for all owre expences there att Lowndone 
for three dayes attending one the belle and 
the fownder 161S ... ... ... ... xxix^. iiij^T, 

10 Aprill 16 iS p<i to Wm Land belfounder in full pay- 
ment of v/. for casting the great bell ... v//. 

pd to M' Waren for making the bond from the 
belfounder Os: his surety for the warranting the 
bell for a year «Jc a day ... ... ... ijj. 

payed for mending of the meddell belles clapper x^. 

payed for a pinte of oyle for the belles ... yj^ 

ELTHAM. HoLv Trixitv. i Bell. 

Church built 1869, has presumably one bell of that date. 

St. Peter. i Bell. 

Built 1S71, has presumably one bell of about that date. 

Christ Church, Shooter's Hill. i Bell. 

Modern church and modern bell. 

ERITH. St. John Baptist. S Bells. 

I., 2S-in. MEARS vS: STAIXBAXK FOUNDERS LOXDOX iSSj 
II., 29-in. Same. 
III., 30-in. James Marsh ch. Warden 1763 Lester ^^ Pack of 

London Fecit 
IV., 3>in. MRS: CORNELIA BATKMAN GAVE loo'^^ TOWARDS 

THESE BELLS 
v., 34l-in. James Marsh Ch. Warden 1763 Lester Cc Pack of 
London Fecit 
VI., 37-in. 1703 : R : PHELPS : FECI T (Rest of inscription defaced.) 
VII., 41-in. Same as Nos. I. and II. 
VIIL, 44;l-in. James Marsh Ch:Wardex 1763 Lester .S: P.\ck of 
London Fecit 



28o Inscriptions. 

The former No. 7 was by R, Phelps, dated 1703. 

T. R. E. Item iij bells suted of brasse in the steple and one litle bell of 
brasse. 

Death knell tolled " at any hour convenient." Tellers at end only — 3 x 3 
for a man, 3 x 2 for woman, 3 x i for child. 

At funerals, tenor tolled when funeral procession comes in sight. 

On Sundays bells rung for morning service, and sometimes for evening. 

Peals on New Year's Eve only. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. T. W. Hardy. 

ERITH. Christ Church. ' i Bell. 

Presumably only one modern bell. 

EWELL. SS. Peter & Paul. i Bell, formerly 3. 

I., 30-in. t0SBpf| I|afcl| malie mc 1603 

There were formerly three bells — one was sold in 1821, being probably 
cracked and useless ; of the inscription on this no record remains. Another 
was sold in 1859; it was Ty^y inches in diameter, and bore the following 
inscription : 

i00Ep{| fjafcli matrc ntc ® 16 10 

This was also cracked. The barbarous local custom of striking the bells 
with a hammer at weddings and on other festive occasions is, so the Vicar 
writes, probably the initial cause of the disappearance of these two bells. 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice of death is received. Bell tolled 
(minute strokes) for an hour. Tellers at beginning only —3x3 for man, 3x2 
for woman, none for children. 

On day of funeral minute strokes from 7 to 8 a.m., and again for fifteen 
minutes before funeral. 

Sundays. — Bell rung for about fifteen minutes before services ; bell also 
rung at 10 a.m. for about five minutes, called " \Varning Bell." 

Bell rung for vestry meetings. 

The sale of the cracked bell in 1821 is noted in the parish books, thus : 

M' St Newing makes up his account with the 
Parish of Ewell, April 19'*^, 182 1. Received 
of W"^ Pitt for a church bell ^14 i7.r. od. 



Inscr'iptions. 281 

The later sale in 1859 is also entered : 

To cash received for Church Bell that was 
cracked and sold by the recommendation of 
Archdeacon Croft ... ... ... ... ^50 14^. 2d. 

While in the expenditure for this year occurs : 

July 12 Carriage of Church Bell to Dover Station ... 5^. 

Dec. 31 Carriage of Church Bell per rail to London 

Bridge t^s. 2d. 

Postage Stamps & incidental expenses attending 

the sale of bell ... ... ... ... 5.^, 

Best thanks to the Rev. J. Turnbull, Vicar. 

EYNSFORD. St. Martin. 6 Bells. 

I., 28-in. THE G^ OF LAD^' DYKE I HARWOOD T COLLINS CH 

W^ R^ CATLIN FECIT 1748. 
IL, 28i-in. lOHN h HODSON ^ MADE <) ME ^ 1674 rij? O O C H 
OOOO')!? 
^ THOMAS ^ KINGSLAND ^ AND ^ THOMAS <5> HAY- 
WORD ^ C ^ WARDENS 
in., 31-in. MICHAEL DARBIE MADE ME 165 1 

HE 
IV., 33-in. MICHAEL DARBIE MADE ME 165 1 
T T 
v., 36-in. lOHN HAYWARD THOMAS COLLINS CHURCH WAR- 
DENS 1746 
Thomas Lester of London Made Me 
VL, 39-in. ^)p lOHN * HODSON * MADE * ME '♦^ 1674 * Q O O 
000'i!('CH^;{(>000 
.jjp THOMAS * KINGSLAND ^ THOMAS * HAYWARD 
* C * WARDENS 4p 
T. R. E. First, iij bells suted of bras in the steple. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received (but not at night). Commence 
with tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female ; on tenor for adults, treble for 
children. Then minute strokes for an hour. 

Knell repeated half an hour before funeral. Tellers as above, then toll, 
quickening as the procession approaches the church. 

2 O 



282 Inscriptions. 

Sunday Mornings. — One or more bells chimed for five minutes at 8 a.m. 
For services bells either chimed or rung— usually the latter — " tolling in " on 
treble. 

Bells in good order and well cared for, but some of them want quarter 
turning badly. 

Many thanks to the intelligent Parish Clerk, whose name I regret I did 
not take. 

EYTHORNE. SS. Peter & Paul. 3 Bells. 

I., 30-in. iofcpli I|.tfcl| ma^c nte © 1622 
II., 33Wn. H'tUL'fa ^IKafcrjina O^a ^r^w ^^x^Vx^ U © U 
III., 36-in. X^mncjt XH*^0tr'ttvnta dampana Ocvct XXl^ti^^i^' 

ueu 

The two larger bells are by Henry Jordan, of London. See p. 44. The 
stamps are Figs. 25, 26, and 27. 

FAIRFIELD. St. Thomas A'Becket. 3 Bells. 

L, 22i-in. + ^r|s U 
II., 23|-in. + TEI|ta U 
III., 25-in. + Haucfe ^^ntrxrec Ot^a '^ty^ ^ittiis n U 

Of these three bells only the treble is usable, the other two are badly 
cracked. See pp. 31 and 33 for account of them. The initial crosses on all 
three are alike, viz., Fig. 14. The foundry-stamp on Nos. i and 2 is Fig. 13. 
The stamps on the 3rd bell are Figs. 18 and 17. 

T. R. E. Item in the steple iij small bells. 

Mem : Sold . . . one handbell and a sacryng bell. 

FARLEIGH (EAST). ? Dedication. 3 Bells. 

I., 30-in. 4p lOHN * HODSON ^^ MADE * ME * 1674 Q O C H 
O O THOMAS ^ SIMES * lOHN * FVLLER =K 
CHVRCH * W <){(. 
II., 3i|-in. itrfcpli Ijafcf| wabc mc © 1610 

WATER 
III., 33 Wn. t0|'tpl| IiafrJi matrc ntc ® 1615 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. 

A bell tolled at 8 on morning of funeral, and again before service. 

Bells rung for Sunday services. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. Canon Elwyn. 



Insci'iplions. 283 

FARLEIGH (WEST). All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I., 26-in. Uiilliam Ijafcfi lua^c nic I L C W 1655 
II., 28-in. TPM 16 STA CW 
III., 29-in. lOHN lOHNSON CHVRCH O WARDEN 

00000 SAM O NEWTON O AND o I PEELE O 
MADEoMEE 1705 

Part of the inscription on No. 2 is illegible. The bell is by Thomas 
Palmar. 

FAR N BO ROUGH. St. Giles the Abbot. 2 Bells. 

I., ii-in. 1664 
II., 281-in. r|, lOHN k HODSON ^ MADE h ME ^ 1667 'ilp W H «jj(. fjjp rjjj, 

T. R. E. Item iij bells suted of brass in the steple. 

FARN INGHAM. SS. Peter & Paul. 5 Bells. 

I., 28j-in. «)|(. SR /} IC V KNT ^ h lOHN ) HODSON h MADE h ME h 

1656 
11., 3o|-in. Jos. Cox & W" Jessup. Ch. Wardens Pack & Chapman 

OF London Fecit 1772 
III., 32-in. DAVID CRVTTELL CW •) lOHN ^ HODSON h MADE 

k ME k 1656 
IV., 34J-in. T ^ C '} YOVMAN <} R ^ B ^; YOVMAN D '/ C ^ C 'i W J 

I + H + MADE^E'; 1656 
v., 38|-in. THOMAS CHAPMAN EDWARD LOXLEY CHURCH 

WARDENS ROB^ CATLIN -j- FECIT 174s-:- 

T. R. E. Item iij bells suted in the steple. 
No peculiar uses. 

FAVERSHAM. St. Mary of Charity. 8 Bells. 

I., 281-in. R' CATLIN 1748 
II., 29^-in, Same. 

III., 3ii-in. RECAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS 18S2 
IV., 33lin. RC 1748 

v., 37-in. Thomas Mears of London Fecit 1797 
VI., 38-in. Robert Catlin Cast Us All 1748 
VII., 421-in. R C 1748 
VIII., 46^-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1872 

202 



284 Inscriptions. 

The former tenor bore the following inscription : 

Rob'^ Lukyn Esq"^ Mayor Rich" Marsh Vicar Step" Rose Hen^ 
Cobb Ch Wardens Rob"^ Catlin Fecit 1748 

Passing bell tolled immediately after death. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 
for female — sixth bell used. The same bell is generally tolled at funerals, but 
occasionally a muffled peal is rung. 

Bells (6th, 7th, and tenor) usually chimed for Sunday services, but rung 
sometimes. Peals on Easter Day, Christmas Day, and last night of year. Also 
on Queen's birthday, Coronation day, Lord Mayor's day (Qy. Prince of Wales' 
birthday), and 5th November. 

There is an endowment from Smith's Charity of 5^. to each ringer, condi- 
tional upon the bells being rung on Christmas Eve (which, if the above 
particulars be absolutely correct, they are not). 

Best thanks to the Rev. C. E. Donne, Vicar. 

FAWKHAM. St. Mary. i Bell. 

I., 25-in. jx(2>i^G^\mi^s ^ xnovi? '^"^^^ ^ 

:H^<sr3i:P? 1604 

T. R. E. Item ij bells of brasse suted in the steple on hand bell of brasse 
for the procession. 
Item on bell called the sacryng bell of brasse. 

FOLKESTONE. SS. Mary & Eaxswythe. 8 Bells. 

I., 29-in. GLORY BE TO GOD ON HIGH 
II., 30-in. AND IN EARTH PEACE GOODWILL TOWARD MEN 
IIL, 32-in. WE PRAISE THEE 
IV., 35-in. WE BLESS THEE 
v., 38-in. WE WORSHIP THEE 
VL, 40-in. WE GLORIFY THEE 
VIL, 45-in. WE GIVE THANKS TO THEE 

MATTHEW WOODWARD MA VICAR 
CHARLES JAMES CHAPMAN CHURCHWARDEN 
JAMES HARRISON CONDUCTOR 
VIIL, 5 1 -in. O LAMB OF GOD THAT TAKEST AWAY THE SINS 
OF THE WORLD HAVE MERCY UPON US 



Inscriptio7is. 285 

This ring, cast by Messrs. Taylor & Co., of Loughborough, in 1879, replace 
a former ring of the same number, which were inscribed as follows : 

I., 30^-in. ALTHOUGH I AM BOTH LIGHT AND SMALL I WILL BE HEARD 
ABOVE YOU ALL PaCK & ChAPMAN OF LONDON FeCIT 
1778 
II., 33-in. I MEAN TO MAKE IT UNDERSTOOD THAT THOUGH I AM LITTLE 

YET I AM GOOD PaCK & ChAPMAN OF LONDON FeCIT 
1778 

III., 34-in. Thomas Baker Esq"* Mayor John Maycock Ch.\varden 
Jacob Stredwick Sidesman T Mears of London 
Fecit 1813 
IV., 37-in. while thus we join in cheerful sound may love and 
loyalty abound Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 
1778 
v., 40^-in. our voices shall with joyful sound make hills and 
valleys echo round Pack & Chapman of London 
Fecit 
VI., 42-in. Same as No. III. 

VII., 44i-in. in wedlock bands all ye who join with hands your 
hearts unite 
so shall our tunefull tongues combine to laud the 

nuptial rite 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1778 
VIIL, 51-in. John Binfield and Thomas Castle Churchwardens 1778 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 
In 1758 Mr. Faussett notes here six bells, thus inscribed : 

I. and III. William Dixon and William Spain Ch: Wardens Lester & 
Pack of London 1759 

II. and IV. R. Phelps fecit me. M^ Lytcott and M' Tho Baylcy C W 

1737 

V. Richard Phelps made me 1707 Tho: Holmes John Fearne C W 

VI. Edward Hammond and John Castle C W 1724 J.W. 

The curfew bell was rung here until i860. 

Death knell rung. Tellers— 3 for a male, 4 for a female (Qy. 3x3 and 2x2 
respectively). 

A muffled peal rung at the funeral of a ringer, or a member of the royal 
family. 



2 86 I use riptions. 

Sundays. — Bells rung for morning service, chimed for evensong. 

On last night of year the old year is tolled out, and at midnight the new one 
rung in. 

Tenor bell tolled on Good Friday. 

Peals rung at weddings, and repeated in the evening. 

Peals on dedication festival, on Queen's birthday, and at the election of the 
Mayor. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. M. Woodward. 

FOLKESTONE. Christ Church. i Bell. 

A modern bell. 

Holy Trinity. 8 Bells. 

A peal of eight modern bells. 

St. John Baptist. i Bell. 

Modern church and modern bell. 

St. Michael and All Angels. i Bell. 

Modern church and modern bell. 

St. Peter. i Bell. 

Modern church and modern bell. 

Emmanuel, i Bell. 

Modern church and modern bell. 

FORDCOMB. St. Peter. 2 Bells. 

Modern church ; has two modern bells which the Vicar reports as prac- 
tically inaccessible. They are dated about 1846, and are probably from the 
Whitechapel Foundry. 

FORDWICH. St. Mary. 4 Bells. 

I., 27-in. iufcpri Iiaicli matie vxt 1633 

II., 31-in. Same. © 1624 

III., 32-in. Same. © 1633 

IV., 34i-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT ® 1633 



Inscriptions. 287 

Passing bell tolled as soon as notice is received. Usual tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 
or 3 X 2 for female at beginning, then minute strokes. 

Tolling also at funerals. 

Sundays. — A single bell tolled at 8 a.m. " to regulate the clocks of the 
parish." Ringing before services. 

Peals at 7 a.m. on Easter Day, Christmas Day, and Whitsun-Day. Old 
year rung out and new one rung in. 

Peals rung after weddings. 

A bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Peal rung when the Mayor is elected on the first Monday after St. Andrew's 
Day. 

Best thanks to the Rector, the Rev. E. Brailsford. 

FOREST HILL. Christ Church. i Bell. 

I, 28-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1877 

St. Paul. . i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

FOUR ELMS. St. Paul. i Bell. 

Modern church with one modern bell. 

FRINDSBURY. All Saints. 5 Bells and Sanctus bell. 

$., 71-in. GERRITT SCHIMMEL ME FECIT DAVENTRIA 1670 
I., 32-in. lOHN (> CLARK <) AND ^ EDWARD (> NORDEN ^> GAVE 

<>ME 1637 I ^ VV 
IL, 32|-in. lOHM AOVMO IHO^ DARBIE MADE ME 1656 

3 W 
III., 37-in. + (Fig. i) 3"it ^0mcn ^wmtnl X^encMcfum + (Fig. 5A) 
IV., 4oi-in. BY ME O G REWE BEL F0VI4DER T B 

1584 
v., 44-in. ROBERT WATSON GENT. I : RAWLINSON I : PENNI- 
STON I:W 1638 RECAST 1865 J: FORMBY VICAR 
T:WICKENDEN W:ELEY CHURCHWARDENS J. 
TAYLOR & C'^ FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 

The old tenor was inscribed as follows : 

ROBERT <) WATSON 'v GENT ^7 I 'v RAWLINSON <? I ^ PENNISTON 

1 W 1638 



288 ' Inscriptions. 

Death knell tolled on tenor. Usual tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 3x2 for 
woman. Tenor tolled for ten minutes at funerals. 

Bells rung for Sunday services, " ringing in " on single bell for last five 
minutes. 

Peal on last night of year from 11 till 12.30. 

A bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. W. H. Jackson. 

For account of No. 3, see p. 34. No. 4 has a curious series of stops 
between the words. 

The sanctus bell (which by the way is unused) is an interesting — if tiny — 
specimen of Dutch handywork. There is a pretty ornamental border both 
above and below the inscription. " Daventria " is of course Deventer, 



FR INSTEAD. St. Dunstan. 5 Bells. 

I., 26|-in. \ 

II., 28-^. ROBERT STAINBANK FOUNDER LONDON 1868 
III., 30-in. J 
IV., 33-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1853 

v., 35-in. ROBERT STAINBANK FOUNDER LONDON 1868 

In 1760 there were here "four bells cast a.d. 1713 by R'i Phelps." In 
1824 only one (the tenor) remained sound ; the other three were badly broken 
and the pieces of broken metal rapidly disappearing. By 185 1, when the 
present Rector was appointed, they had totally vanished, and the 4th bell was 
cracked. It was recast in 1853. In 1868, four new bells were added at the 
cost of Lord Kingsdown. 

Passing bell rung as soon as practicable. Tellers abnormal — three single 
strokes for a man, two double ones for a woman, 3 x 3 for a child. 

Funerals. — Bell tolled at 8 a.m., and again for half an hour before 
service. 

Sundays. — Sermon (tenor) bell at 8 a.m. Bells chimed for service, except 
on the great festivals, when they are rung. 

Peals at 6 a.m. on Easter Day and Christmas Day, and on New Year's 
Eve. 

Occasional wedding peals. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. R. B. Wright. 



Inscriptions. 289 

FRITTENDEN. St. Mary. 8 Bells. 

1847 

II., 28-in, Thomas Mears of London Fecit 1804 

III., 3oi-in. Same. 1804 

IV., 3ii-in. Same. 1804 

v., 34-in. Same. 1803 

VI., 35|-in, Same. 1803 

VII., 39-in. Same. 1804 

VIIL, 43-in. Same as on No. I. 

Vicar, the Rev. J. VV. O. Hallward, states : " No traditions, no peculiar 
customs," I trust correctly. He adds, " No inscriptions," which is certainly 
incorrect. 

GILLINGHAM. St. Mary Magdalene. 8 Bells. 

By Subscription A.D. 1811. H. Radcliffe D.D. Vicar. 
"' * ' S. London & R. Durham Church Wardens T Mears 



II 2 7 ^--in 
'' ' - * V OF London Fecit 

IIL, 29^-in. T: lEFFERIES lA : HICKES CH : WARDENS 1737 
IV., 30 J -in. MADE BY PHILIP WIGHTMAN 1700 
v., 32i-in, Same. 
VI., 34i-in. Same. 

VIL, 381-in. THO^ LESTER MADE ME 1749 
N 
HERY WHITE & RICH° SANDERSON CH o WAR- 
DENS 
VIIL, 4ii-in. THOMAS SIMMONS CHVRCH WARDEN MADE BY 
PHILIP WIGHTMAN 1700 

GODMERSHAM. St. Laurence. 5 Bells. 

L, 3oi-in. CHRISTOPHER O HODSON O MADE o ME O 1C87 

000000 etc. 
II., 32 ^-in. Same. 
III., 36-in. Same. 

2 r 



290 Inscriptions. 

IV., 38Hn. CHRISTO O HODSON O MADE O ME O 1687 O O O 
00000 etc. 
v., 43-in. CHRISTOPHER O HODSON O MADE O ME O 16S7 O 
0000000 etc. 
THOMAS O WANSTALL O EDWARD O BILTING O 
C O WARDENS o O 
T. R. E. Two hande bells . . . four bellys in the steple. 
Payments noted : 

Item payde for a gogyn for the thyrde bell ... iiij^. 

Item paid for a bawdryke ... ... ... ... x\]d. 

Passing Bell. — Tellers at commencement — Z'^Z ^^^ man, 2x2 for 
woman, then tenor tolled (minute strokes; for half an hour. Treble bell for 
children. 

Funerals. — Bell tolled for half an hour at 8 a.m. and again before funeral. 
Sundays. — Before 1865 there was only "alternate" service, and the 2nd 
bell was rung at 7 a.m. or at i p.m., according as service was to be in morning 
or afternoon. Now there is a full complement of services, and the bells are 
rung on the ist and chimed on the other Sundays in the month. In Lent 
and Advent only three bells are chimed — " ring in " five minutes on treble. 
Ringing on church festivals, and on last night of year. 
Best thanks to Vicar, Rev. J. Wilkinson. 

GOODNESTONE BY FAVERSHAM. St. Bartholomew. i Bell. 

I., ii-in. Blank. 

The above is Mr. Tyssen's account of the bell here, but I doubt its correct- 
ness as applied to the present one. It hangs in an open cage at the west end 
and is quite visible, but not accessible without a longish ladder, which, at the 
time of my visit (the height of the hopping season), was not to be got. I 
could see no trace of inscription from below, which, of course, goes for 
nothing ; but the bell is certainly more than 11 inches in diameter— quite 25 
or 26 inches I think — and it has apparently had the edge chipped off for 
tuning, so that it has at one time formed one of a ring. There is a bell 
. missing from Graveney Church ; possibly this is the one. 

GOODNESTONE BY SANDWICH. Holy Cross. 4 Bells. 

I., 22i-in. T Mears of London Fecit 182 i 
II., 34-in. Blank. 



Inscriptions. 291 

III., 36-in. tofcpfj \\^\t\\ matrc nic © 1628 

IV., 40-in. STEPHEN ■ CHVRCIi ■ THO ■ MORRIS •.• CHVRCH- 
WARDENS MATH BAGLEY • OF • LONDOxN • FECIT 

1708 o 

The treble bell, according to Mr. Faussett in 1757-8, had upon it : 

The (? Ihc) Sancta Maria 

and, in addition, " the impression of both sides of a Groat of Henry VIII. 
impressed upon it, as also the Prince's Feathers and Motto, viz., ICH DIEN." 
This was probably one of William Oldfield's bells. See p. 58. 

No. 2 is an "ancient" — -so reports Mr. E. J. Wells. 

Passing bell as soon as notice received. Tellers — 3 x 3 for males, 3 x 2 for 
females. Repeated at funeral. 

Sundays. — A bell rung at 8 a.m. On Communion Sundays at 9 a.m. All 
four bells chimed for twenty minutes before services, " toll in " on one bell ten 
minutes. 

Apparently no ringing on church festivals, only on secular anniversaries, e.g.^ 
Queen's accession, coronation, etc., and on 5th November, unless New Year's 
Eve be reckoned ecclesiastical. 

Wedding peals rung. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. M. T. Spencer. 

GOUDHURST. St. Mary. 8 Bells. 

I., 31-in. The two Trible Bells were Purchased by Subscrip- 
tion 1775 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 
II., 32^-in. Thomas Mears of London Founder 1834 
III., 34-in. To Honour both of God & King Our Voices shall in 
Consort Ring 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1776 
IV., 37-in. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 1805 
v., 4o|-in. THE GIFT OF EDWARD BATHVRST OF FmCH- 
COCKS ESQ: KWAO DOM: 1690 >1E\V MADE 1707 
R: P: 
VL, 42i-in. THE GIFT OF lOHM BATHVRST OF TRILLmO- 
HURST GEMT: AMHO : DOM: 1697 MEW MADE 
1707 R P 

2 I' 2 



292 Inscriptions. 

VII., 48 in. RICHARD PHELPS MADE THESE SIX BELLS AMMO 

DOMIMI 1707 AM>1A REGIMA 
VIII., 54-in. GouDHURST Great Bell Recast 1834 Thomas Mears of 
London Founder 
W. B. Harrison Vicar 

D. West Vj^^rch Wardens 
J. JohnsonJ 

Death knell rung for one hour. Tellers (apparently at finish)— three strokes 
for a man, two for a woman, then age tolled. Bell tolled again for an hour at 
funeral. 

Sundays.— Two bells chimed at 8 a.m. Bells rung for service when there 
is Holy Communion, chimed on other Sundays. 

Peals on the great festivals and on New Year's Eve. 

A bell tolled for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to the Rev. J. S. Clarke, Vicar. 

GRAINE (ISLE OF). St. James. i Bell. 

L, igHn. WILLIAM Q WRI Q SAMVELL Q LONDON 

GRAVENEY. All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I., 31-in. ^"ancfc + O 3E TSC D (Fig. 33) X^ O U (Fig. 32) 
IL, 32-in. + lOHN + PALMAR + MAQE + THIS + BELL + 1637 

+ T B + I W + T P I + PRAISE + GOD 
IIL, 331-in. lOHM WILMER MADE ME 1618 

Treble by William Culverden of London. See p. 50. The inscription is 
decided puzzle ; the letter next to the I may be either a U or a reversed N. 
The stamp next to it (Fig. 33), is also incomprehensible. I had thought at 
one time some part of the inscription had been filed or chiselled off, but it is 
not so. 

The belfry is in a most disgraceful state, by far the worst I was ever in. 
There are pits for four bells, and of the three that hang, only one — the largest 
■ — is in use or usable ; and as that is " clocked," it will probably soon share 
the fate of the rest. No. i has no rope and no boss to the clapper, and is 
reported to be cracked ; No. 2 is clapperless and has a large piece broken out 
of the sound-bow, and the whole of both bells and frame is dilapidated and 
filthy beyond description. 



Inscriptions. 293 

GRAVESEND. St. George. 8 Bells. 

L, 28-in. P WADE ESo MAYOR G" RACKSTRAW G THOMP- 
SON • CH ■ WARDENS © 1771 O O O 
Th. Swain Fecit 
II., 29^-in. Several Gentlemen Strangers gave this Bell 1736 
Recast at the charge of the Parish 1793 John 
Tucker. A.M. Rector Geo. Thompson & James Kirk 
Ch. Wardens 
Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 
III., 33-in. Geo : Arnold Esq'^ Mayor Tho^ Killick Iohn Hales 
Ch. Wardens 
T Mears of London Fecit 1813 
IV., 34-in. THE INHABITANTS OF GRAVESEND GAVE THIS 
BELL THO: HARRIS REC^:W'^': HARRISON HEN: 
WOOTTON CHURCH WARDENS 1736 
v., 37-in. JN":JOYNES WA^:NYNN W": LANCE ANTH : IRE- 
LAND W^':MYERS JN« : FOX JN'^:BOLGER JN": 
HUGHES JA : ROE GEO : CLARKE TRUSTEES 
FOR THE SUBSCRIPTION MONY GAVE THIS BELL 
1736. JOHN APPLEBEE & RICHARD PHELPS 
MADE THESE EIGHT BELLS 
VI., 38^-in. lAMES ■ WADE ■ MAYOR ■ ES'^"^ GAYNHAM • RACK- 
STRAW ■ GEORE • THOMPSON CH • WARDENS 

© ^771 000 
Th°^ Swain Fecit 
VII., 42i-in. THE lURATS GAVE THIS BELL WILLIAM HAF- 
FENDEN ESQ : DEPUTY MAIOR IOHN lOYNES 
ESQ: lUSTICE 1736 

l 
VIII., 47-in. The Corporation gave 50 towards these Bells. 
William Man Esq : Maior 1736. This Bell was Re- 
cast AT the Charge of the Parish 1793 
John Tucker A.M. Rector. Geo. Thompson & James 
Kirk Ch : Wardens.— Tho"^ Mears of London Fecit 

Vol. XI. of " Archasologia Cantiana " (p. xlviii.) mentions that in 1522, at 
Bishop Fisher's visitation, the churchwardens of Gravesend omitted to ring 
the bells in his honour, for which terrible ecclesiastical offence they were cited 
and fined. 



294 Inscriptions. 

According to Cruden's " History of Gravesend," the 3rd bell, prior to re- 
casting in 1 813, bore the same inscription as the present treble. The original 
peal of eight cast in 1736 was by R. Phelps, with whom appears to have been 
associated one J. Applebee, who was, I suspect, the bell carpenter or hanger. 
The tenor was inscribed to the effect that " J. APPLEBEE, R. PHELPS 
MADE THESE EIGHT BELLS." 

GRAVESEND. St. James. i Bell. 

L, 26-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1851 

GREENHITHE. St. Mary. i Bell. 

Modern church and modern bell. 

GREENWICH. St. Alphege. 10 and a Clock Bell. 

L, 29-in. W" Green & R'^ Colegate Ch. Wardens Tho^ Mears 

OF London Fecit 1792 
II., 29J-in. THESE TWO LEAST BELLS WERE BOUGHT BY 
SUBSCRIPTION A.D. 1734 THO : lEFFERY CHA : 
BAYLY CH : WARD^ ^ 
III., 3 if -in. T. Mears of London Fecit 1815 
IV., 32|-in. THE GIFT OF OUR MOST GRACIOUS QUEEN 

CAROLINE R: PHELPS FECIT 1731 
v., 34-in. CHARLES SIMPSON SEXTON R : PHELPS FECIT 

1731 
VI., 38-in. Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 1792 
VIL, 40-in. R: PHELPS FECIT 1731. 
VIII., 43-in. Same. 
IX., 47|-in. Recast 1814. The Rev° G. Matthew Vicar James 
MoRLEY John Tranter Church Wardens 
T Mears of London Fecit 
X., 53-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1824 
Rev° George Mathew Vicar 

Mr Tho'' Orr 'i^ 

,, ^ ^ yCHURCH Wardens 

Mr Charles RitchieJ 

Clock, 314-in. Thomas Mears of London Fecit 1814 



Inscriptions. 295 

T. R. E. Item .... a smale latten bell. 

Item iiij bells, the greatest mesured from brymme to brym iij 

fote vij inches di. 
Item the \]d. iij foot iij inches the iij'^'^ iij foote j inche the 

iiij'^ ij foot xj inches. 
Item j saunts bell of brass .... and ij hand bells of brasse. 
Passing bell only rung when specially requested. Tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 
3x2 for woman. Tenor bell tolled for an hour at time of funeral iJ 
paid for. 

"Sermon bell or early morning bell on Sundays, Christmas Day, and Good 
Friday. Treble and 2nd at 7 o'clock, 7th and 8th at 8 o'clock." This is 
not quite clear. Is either of these last the sermon bell, and if so, which ? Or 
is it rung at some earlier hour still ? Bell chimed for services. 
Peals on Christmas Eve and last night of year. 
A bell rung for the Easter vestry meeting. 

Bells rung on loyal anniversaries, not now (Deo gratias) on 5th November. 
Best thanks to Mr. Henry S. Richardson. 

GREENWICH. Christ Church. 2 Bells. 

1849 

II., 39-in. HEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1876 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I., 27^-in. THOMAS HEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1S39 

St. Mary. i Bell. 

I., 4oi-in. T Hears of London Fecit 1825 

St. Paul. i Bell. 

L, iS^in. J WARNER & SONS LONDON 1865 

St. Peter. i Bell. 

Hodern church and modern bell. 

St. Andrew (Hission Church). i Bell. 

Modern church and modern bell. 



296 Inscriptions. 

GROOMBRIDGE. St. John Evangelist. i Bell. 

I., 2i3j-in. THOxMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 
ELIZA SAINT 1841 

GUSTO N. St. Martin. i Bell. 

L, 25-in. Blank. 

HACKINGTON. St. Stephen. 8 Bells. 

I., 25-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1844 
II., 25J-in. Same. 

Ill, 28"in. RT CATLIN FECIT 1746 
IV., 30-in. Same. 
v., 31-in. PROSPERITY TO ALL OUR BENEFACTORS R C 

1746 
VI., 33-in. ROBERT CATLIN CAST US ALL 1746 
VII., 36-in. Prosperity to this Parish R^ Catlin Fecit 1746 
VIIL, 39v-in. R^ Catlin Fecit 1746 

HADLOW. St. Mary. 8 Bells. 

I., 26-in. Pack & Chapman of Lonqon Fecit 1775 
II., 27-in. Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1775 
IIL, 29-in. I AMES BARTLET ME FECIT 1696 ® 
IV., 30-in. Same. 1695 © 

v., 34-in. Same. 
VI., 36-in. Same. 
VII., 38-in. Same. 

VIIL, 421,-in. HENRY BARTON EDMOND NORMAN CH WARDENS 
ANDREW REANY VICAR 1695 lAMES BARTLET 
ME FECIT 

HIGH HALDEN. St. Mary. 5 Bells. 

I., 30-in. iirfcplj I|afcl| ntatie mc 16 n 
II., 33-in. Same. 16 10 

III., 36-in. Same. 1609 

IV., 39i-in. Same. © 

v., 43-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH FECIT 1620 (^ REFOLD MAY 
C AV 



Inscriptions. 297 

HALLING. St. John the Baptist. 5 Bells. 

I., 2Si-in. lOHN h HODSON h MADE h ME h 1675 ^'^ O C H O O O 

HENRY {^ ACORTE ^ CHVRCH /) WARDEN ^)i?000 0')? 
II., 30-in. Same. 
III., 32-in. Same. 

IV., 35-in. lOHN h HODSON h CHRISTOPHER h HODSON 7 MADE 
h ME h 1675 
HENRY'} ACORTE^/ CHVRCH nVARDEN «il(> c)!? O O O O 
v., 39-in. lOHN * HODSON ^ CHRISTOPHER * HODSON * 
MADE * ME ^ 1675 h 
HENRY ^ ACORT ^ CHVRCH r|, WARDEN * O O 
'ijp O O "ilp U 



HALSTEAD. St. Margaret. i Bell (formerly 5). 

I., 29^-in. &cMrafEtr fit gulJ aulJ liis service ttij fijomas Unttisitn 
Ee;jxtirc 
W © C Ula^c Jn Wit ijcarc itf mtr ITori? 16 12 

D 

Bell by William Carter, of London (see p. 93). It is the solitary survivor 
of a ring of five, all similarly dated, dedicated, and inscribed. One other was 
in existence twenty years ago. Under the foundry stamp is Fig. 42, indicating 
that it was moulded by Carter's foreman, Thomas Bartlett. 

Passing bell rung as soon as possible. Tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 2 x 3 for 
woman, 2 x 2 for child. 

Bell rung for vestry meeting. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. R. Wood. 

HALSTOW (HIGH). St. Margaret. 5 Bells. 

I., 28J,-in. J : TAYLOR & C" FOUNDERS LOUGHliOROUGH 1861 
II., 3oi-in. ^)p lOHN h HODSON h MADE ^ ME k 1675 f|. E T v REC- 
TOR r;|(> O O C H O O 
THOMAS h DVNNING ) lOHN h LOAN '} CH^T^LCII } 
WARDENS 0000 - - - 

IIL, 3iJ-in. T. Mears of London Fecit 1825 

2 Q 



298 Inscripfions. 

IV., 34-in. T. Mears of London Fecit 1825 

George Smith ) ^ 

Tv^ ^ \ Church Wardens 

Michael Comport J 

v., 38-in. lOHN * HODSON * MADE * ME * 1675 ^ EDWARD 

* TVRNER * RECTOR 

THOMAS ^ DVNNING * lOHN ^ LOAN ^ CHVRCH 

* WARDENS O C H O 
No peculiar uses. 

Very many thanks to the Rev. Charles Longfield, Rector. 

LOWER HALSTOW. St. Margaret. 3 Bells. 

I., 26i-in. UTilliaut Ijafcll watrpt me 1662 
II., 29-in. Same. 
"III., 3iHn. IH HE CW © 1662 Utiriiaut I|afrlj mat>c nti? 

HAM. St. George. r Bell. 

I., iS-in. 1701 

HARBLEDOWN. St. Michael. 3 Bells. 

I., 27-in. iuVi-'P^I 'I'^iclj iiiai^e mi^ 1603 

I B 

II., 3oi-in. 0761 aan aavH t • t w o t h a i 

III., 33-in. Hitucfi^ Jiatqittua Oti^t ^\xs j^iTbts © U 

The 2nd bell is by Thomas Palmar ; tenor by Henry Jordan iodide p. 44). 
The stamps on this last are Figs. 27, 26, and 25. 

St. Nicholas' Hospital. 4 Bells. 

I., 24-in. t0|*cpr| IjaUii matn| mc 1622 

IL, 251 in. 3EiJl|.tuttis ©"sf ^I^ltrmeu QHtis U + U 

III., 28-in. iuscpli Ijafdi matrq m\ 1619 

IV., 31-in. Same. 1614 

The shields on No. 2 are Figs. 25 and 27 ; the cross between them is 
Fig. 14. 

HARD RES (LOWER). St. Mary. i Bell. 

I., 26-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1832 



Inscriptions. 299 

In 1757-8, the sole occupant of the belfry was inscribed : 

R. P. Fecit 1723 M"" Benjamin Foreman Church AVarden. 

But there must have been more bells than this in years gone by. The ac- 
counts of the Corporation of Canterbury, under date 1542-3, record: 

Receyved of the parishioners of Nether Hardres 
for the cities part of iij bells to them sold out of 
the Church of Saynt Mary Castell ... ... iiij//. 

When, why, and how these three became reduced to one is unknown ; but 
it was clearly before Hasted's time, as he notes only one bell here. 

HARDRES (UPPER). SS. Peter and Paul. 3 Bells. 

L, 271-in. SAM= KNIGHT MADE ME o O 1727 I B o O 
11. , 33|-in. tuVi'Pfl fl'^tcli ma^C UtC 1609 

u u u 

III., 36-in. -f ^"um o Xinsa o jpulsafa o XHuntJi o ^afci^ttta 

U 

The shields on tenor are Fig. 6, the initial cross is Fig. 9, and the stop 
Fig. 8. 

HARRIETSHAM. St. John the Baptist. 8 Bells. 

I., 27-in. THO^ LESTER MADE ME 1744 
II., 27L-in. YOU CANNOT BE MERRY WITHOUT ME 1744 T: 

LESTER MADE US 
IIL, 29i-in. T: L 1742 
IV., 3i-'in. 1742 T •:• L MADE ME 
v., 32i-in. TH" LESTER MADE ME 1742 
VI., 33i-in. Tho^ Lester Made Me 1742 
VII., 37-in. TH'^ : LESTER MADE US ALL & ROB' BOT FEE 

HANGED US ALL 1744 
VIII., 4i^in. Tho^ Lester Made Us All l\mes kniuht alex" liOTiLE 
church wardens 1742 

i to the church v^ liveing call 
cv: to \^ graue i summons all 

202 



3 GO Inscriptions. 

Passing bell rung as soon. as death is known. Tellers — three strokes for a 
man, two for a woman, at beginning. 
Bell tolled both before and after funeral. 
Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. J. W. Nutt. 

HARTLEY. All Saints. 2 Bells. 

II., 22-in. Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1771 

T, R. E. Item ij bells suted in the steple. 

Mem : on hand bell presented to be stolen. 

For mention of treble bell, see p. 15. 
No local uses. 

HARTLIP. St. Michael. 6 Bells. 

I., 2SJ,-in. Messrs Jn° Midhurst & Rich° Goord Ch. Wardens 

W" Mears of London Fecit 1785 
IL, 29-in. lOHM '} EDWARD } ROSERT ^ AMD f; ANDREW I) OS- 
BORNE GEN h HRETHREPl k BORNE h VA k THE ^ 
PAR k ISH k OF h HARTLIP k FOR k LOVE k THEY ^ 
BARE k TO ^ THE SAME f; HAVE k FRELY h GIVEN h 
THIS BELL AM h QMI 1578 
III., 3i^in. 'Sxs\\\\ ^ Untnar fj? mntrc «$? ineq 1628 
IV., 36-in. lOHN k WILNAR k MADE {) ME h 1632 
v., 39-in. ►I^CFig. 5)* %\\ XHwttis J5-iinis Xiffonttt (STampana 

j0l|anttis y^ (Fig. i) 
VI., 42|-in. KtJlin ^ Untnait ^ mairi^ mcc ^ 1628 
For mention of No. 5, see p. 34. 
Treble has a large piece broken out of the shoulder. 

Passing bell rung immediately upon notice given. Age denoted by size of 
bell at discretion of sexton. 

Bells chimed for Sunday services fifteen minutes. " Ring in " on treble ten 
minutes. 

Best tbanks to Vicar, the Rev. F. T. Scott. 

* Or 5a, I am not sure which. 



Inscriptions. 301 

HARTY. St. Thomas. i Bell. 

I., 27-in. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1760 

HASTINGLEIGH. St. Mary. i Bell. 

L, 24-in. JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1862 

T. R. E. Imprimis three bells in the steple. 

Parish united with Elmstead. Probably no "local uses," as Rector does 
not mention any. 

HATCHAM. All Saints. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

St. James. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

HAWKHURST. St. Laurence. 8 Bells. 

I., 3o2-in. + Xialiucss untu tl|c Ji^artr + (BT autr (5 XH^ars 

^DiuntuJU fouttiicrs 1847 
II., 3ii^-in. Same. 

III., 32|-in. THE REVEREND M'^ THO : GLOVER MINISTER 
lAMES TESTOR THO : MARTIN CH. WARDENS 
RICHARD PHELPS MADE ME 1734 
IV., 35-in. lOHN V WILNAR '; MADE h ME h 1633 I B ^; T M } 

C k ^V k 
v., 36?,-in. iwfcvli Ijaftl| ma^c we lOHN SLOMAN C W © 

1613 
VI., 40-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 161 7 
VII., 42J,-in. + ^itlincBs unfa ff|e, ,T£i:0iilr 1612 Xlccasf 1847 Gr ^ 

VIII., 51-in. Rev" Edward Montague Salter Minister T Mears of 

London Fecit 1824 

Francis Ayerst ) ^ ,,, 

^ Churchwardens 

William Gregson) 

Curfew rung every night at 8 from 25th October to loth March, except 
during the twelve days from Christmas to Epiphany. This is without doubt 
a genuine case of survival ; Ilawkhurst Church was built by the Monks of 



302 Inscriptions. 

Battle, and was served from the Abbey as late as 1291, when the first rector 
was appointed. 

Passing bell as soon as notice of death received. 

Sunday Uses. — Peculiar. Bell at 8 a.m. Bell at 9, warning for matins 
at TO. 30; and another at 1.30, warning for evensong at 3. A few years ago, 
in winter, evensong was at 2.30, and then the warning bell was rung at i. 
Bells rung or chimed half an hour before service. Priest's bell used (Qy. 
treble). Peals on all great Church festivals, and on Queen's birthday ; not 
(happily) on 5th November. A bell for vestry meetings. 

Many thanks to Canon Jeffreys. I regret very much I have been unable to 
get access to the parish accounts, which are of peculiar interest. The follow- 
ing few extracts are partly from " Arch. Cant," vol. v., and partly from notes 
made for j\Ir. Tyssen some twenty years ago. 

1549-50 Receipts. 

Itm. for iiij handbells wayenge xx'' ... ... iiij^. iiijV. 

1550-51 Payments. 

Item p'^ to John Browne for ledther for a 

bawderyck ... ... ... ... ... vXyl. 

Item pay"* to Robt Standen for mendynge of 

the bell whylls ... ... ... ... viij^. 

i55i~54 Paid for ij bell ropes ... ... ... ... iiij.r. 

P'^ to the glasyer for mendynge of the bell 

house wyndowe and in the churche besids xiijj-. iiij<^/. 

P*^ to Rychard Seceley for mendynge of the 

frame abowt the great bell ... ... ... x^. 

P"^ to Bolt for makynge of viij bawdericks ... xvj^. 

P"* to Thomas Standen for new laynge the 

gudgyn of the great bell ... ... ... viij^. 

P'' to John Goodman for halffe a horsse hyd xvj^. 

1558-9 Itm. p'^ for whyte lether for the bells ... ... xv^. 

1559-60 Itm. p"^ for makinge the bauderyckes to fre- 

man ... ... ... ... ... ... xiij^. 

P'' for making towe bell whilles ... ... yis. 

P'* for bred and drynck when they wer sett up vijV. 

1568 Layd out for ij bell roopes ... ... ... iiijV. 

1573 It. to Goldsmith for a bell clapper ... ... ij.y. \]d. 

It. for a new vvhyle for the great bell ... ... vij.y. \\\]d. 



Inscriptions. 303 

1594 It is agreyed by the consente of the picynors that a Sesse shall 

be made by halfe a dosen men of the ,piche for the ex- 
chayngynge of the belles before the laste daye of July next 
comynge. 

1596 and xiiij//. xi". uppon a sesse made for castyng of two 

belles & other nessesary reperacyons. 

1597 Also the saied Tho. Butler chargethe himselfe w"^ the receipt 

of xxjj'. vijir/. levyed uppon a sesse made for the castinge & 
repayringe of the Bells in the tyme of John Woodgates church- 
wardenshippe. 
Also the sayed Tho: Butler chargeth himselfe w"' the receipt of 
xxix//. \]s. \\\]d. gathered by a sesse made the xvij''^ of 
September in the xxxviij'^ yere of the Queen for the Re- 
payreige of the church & bells of the f>ishe church of Hawk- 
herst. 

1 60 1 Item there remayneth still in the hands ot the said Richard 
Theball towards the satesfiynge of Anthoney Wakefeild bel- 
founder y*" money due to him for the castinge of one of the 
bells in Tho. Butlers & Rich. Austens yeres ... v//. \\]s. 

The following mem. also appears : 

The treble cast by J. Brett & Tim Mercer Wardens 1633 

The second by 161 3 

The third by 161 7 

The fourth by 161 2 

The tenor by Joseph Hatch, J. Mercer & W'" Chittenden Churchward 1617 

1595 A Tax by John Woodgate for casting 2 Bells. 
Anthony Wakefield cast one Bell 1596 or 97. 

1622 John Robbins p'' for casting one Bell & Mettle. 

HAWKHURST. All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I., 29-in.^ 

II., 30-in.lG. MEARS & C° FOUNDERS LONDON t86i 
III., 32-in.J 



504 



Inscriptions. 

St. Michael. 



HAWKINGE. 

I., 25-in. Blank. 

T. R. E. Item ij bells in the Steple 



Bell. 



St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1882 

Same. 

Same. 

T Mears of London Fecit 1832 

lOHN '} HODSON h MADE } ME <;{(> 1670 .)^ C H .jj? 

■^0lJcr{\JS XH*Ji + XHc fmf + 1602 © 
The cross on tenor between " Mot " and " Me " is this — evidently from an 
old stamp which had come into Mot's hands, for I found it on a fifteenth 
century bell at Little Hadham, Herts : 



HAYES. 

I., 26-in. 

IL, 27-in. 

IIL, 29-in. 

IV., 31-in. 

v., 33Wn 
VL, 37-in. 




T. R. E. Item iij bells suted and one saints bell. 

Mem : a handbell a sacryng bell ij litle bells presented to be 
sold. 

Death knell at earliest convenient time. Tenor used. Tellers — three 
strokes for a male, two for a female ; same on treble for child. 

Sundays. — Fifth bell rung for five minutes at 8 a.m. "to notify service 
at eleven." 



Inscriptions. 305 

Bells rung or chimed for services, then tenor rung for ten minutes, and 3rd 
for five. 

For week-day services a bell generally tolled. Saint's Day use same as 
Sundays. 

No ringing or chiming in Lent. 

Peals at 6 a.m. on the four great festivals. 

A bell (5th) for vestry meetings. 

No ringing except for ecclesiastical purposes. 

Very carefully drawn belfry rules obtain here— erring, if at all, in being a 
little too elaborate. 

Best thanks to the Rector, the Rev. G. V. Reed. 

HEADCORN. SS. Peter and Paul. 8 Bells. 

I., 3o|-in. GIVEN BY John Hudds Richard Greenhill Executor 
Tho^ Bayly Tho^ Ledger C" Wardens 1766 Lester & 
Pack of London Fecit 
IL, 3i|-in. Same, excepting T. Bayly and T. Ledger. 
IIL, 32i-in. S K 1732 
IV., 34iin. R: PHELPS FECIT 1714 
v., 38-ln. RICHARD PHELPS MADE ME 17 14 
VI., 4oi-in. Same. 

VIL, 43^in. EDMOND PECHE DANIEL BENISON CHURCH- 
WARDENS RICHARD PHELPS MADE ME 1720 
VIIL, 49Lin. VNTO THE CHVRCH I DOO YOV CALL DEATH 
TO THE GRAVE WILL SVMMONS ALL 
RICHARD KITE lOHN WORE CHVRCH WARDENS 
SAMVELL KNIGHT MADE ME 1732 

HERNE. St. Martin. 6 Bells. 

L, 3o|-in. THO_ FEARIMAN PETER TALL S K 1724 
IL, 32"in. THO'^ VANDEPEER THO^ STEPHENS CHURCH WAR- 
DENS SAMUEL KNIGHT MADE ME 1737 
IIL, 34-in. ROBERT STAINBANK FOUNDER LONDON 1868 
IV., 371-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT ® 162 1 
v., 40-in. W^' Chapman of London Fecit 1781 Gilbard Pembrook 

Church Warden 
VL, 44fin. ROBERT STAINBANK FOUNDER LONDON 1867 

2 R 



J 



06 Inscriptions. 



In 1758 Nos. 3 and 5 were both by Joseph Hatch, and dated, respectively, 
1624 and 1638. The former tenor was also by him, and dated 1624. 

HERNE BAY. St. Saviour. i Bell. 

I., 20-in. 1S16 

HERNHILL St. Michael. 5 Bells. 

I., 27-|-in. W" Mears of London Fecit 1785 
II., 2 9i-in. Same. 
III., 31-in. Same. 
IV., 33. ^-in. W" Court & John Johncuck Ch. Wardens W Mears 

OF London Fecit 1785 
v., 36-in. Henry Poole Vicar W" Mears of London Fecit 17S5 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 
3 X 2 for female. 

Funerals. — A bell tolled for half an hour at 7 a.m., and again before the 
service. 

Sundays. — A bell tolled at 9.30 a.m., "to call attention to the fact of the 
day being Sunday." Bells chimed for services and on great festivals, rung 
afterwards. 

Wedding peals after any marriage of consequence ; and when a parishioner 
celebrates his "silver" or "golden" wedding— a graceful custom. 

Peals to ring in the new year, on Accession Day, 5th November in the 
evening, and on 29th May at 5 a.m. 

This ring now consists of eight, three having been added in January, 1887. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. W. D. Springett. 

HEVER. St. Peter. 5 Bells. 

I., 28-in. R: P: FECIT 1703 
II., 29-in. Same. 
III., 3oi-in. Same. 

IV., 33i-in. MR : THO : LANCASTER : REC : R : P : FECIT : 1703 
v., 37-"in. MR : WM : STREATFEILD : MR : WM : WICKENDEN : 
CH • WARD : R PHELPS FE ■ 1703 

No. 3 is broken. 



Inscriptions. 307 

HIGHAM (Old Church). St. Mary. 2 Bells. 

I., i6|-in. I H 

II., 331-in. GEORGE SMITH VICAR ANNO DOM ^,1713 
WILLIAM V BOGHURST C h WARDEN 
I ^ HADLEY •:• F •:• 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice of death is given. Tellers : 3 x 3 for 
male, 3 x 2 for female. 

Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. W. S. Wood, D.D. 

HIGHAM (New Church). St. John. 5 Bells. 

L, 25-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1863 
II., 26^-in. Same. 
IH., 27|-in. Same. 
IV., 30-in. Same. 

v., 32|-in. Same. 

HILBOROUGH. St. Mary. i Bell. 

L, 36-in. i0Vcp(j l|'iicf| ntaiiE me 1635 

This bell is one of four which were at Reculver, of which desecrated church 
this is the modern representative. 

HILDENBOROUGH. St. John. i Bell. 

I., 33^-in. ^^Ij0mas XIH^'^t's ^.ctii l]kont»tnt 

HINXHILL St. Mary. 2 Bells. 

I., 32-in. Blank. 

IL, 35|-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT ©1634 
W H 

T. R. E. Item iij gret bells and ij smalle hand bells. 

In 1757 there would seem to have been still three bell?, the smallest of 
which has since disappeared. It was devoid of inscription, like the present 
treble. 

Local uses same as at Brook, which see. 

2 R 2 



3o8 Inscriptions. 

HOATH. St. Mary the Virgin and the Holy Trinity. 3 Bells. 

I., 23 in. I C 1696 

II., 25A-in. + .s" ,ii X3C1 ^ n 

III., 2()\'vs\. I C 1696 

The shield on No. 2 bears a cross plain — it occurs elsewhere (see p. 47). 
The cross is Fig. 29. I am quite unable to guess at the meaning of the 
inscription ; read it forwards or backwards it is equally unintelligible. The 
date {circa 1500) is too early for churchwardens' initials, 

HOLLINGBOURNE. All Saints. 6 Bells. 

I., 31-in. SAMVELL o K>1IGHT o MADE O ME THE LEDARE 

O OF o THIS o RIHG TO BE 1723 
II., 331-in. S KPIIGHT FECIT 1723 T S T T A B 
III., 36-in. 1723 
IV., 37Hn. RICHARD SPICE IOH^/[ TAPLEY SEMER RICHARD 

RVSSELL IV>1ER 1723 
v., 41-in. RICHARD RVSSELL CH WARDED SAMVELL KPIIGHT 

FECIT 1723 
VI., 45-in. EDWARD WATERMAN VICAR RICHARD CHALONER 

SAM~ KMIGHT FECIT 1723 

HONOR OAK. St. Augustine. i Bell. 

Church built 1873 ; doubtless one bell of that date. 

HOO. All Hallows. i Bell. 

I., 2oi-in. Floral ornament only. 

Death knell any time after death between sunrise and sunset. Tellers — 
2 X 3 for male, 2 x 2 for female. 

Funerals. — Bell tolled during procession to church. 

Sunday Services. — Bell tolled three times at intervals. 

The churchwardens' accounts for 1555 contain the following entry : 

Itm. to Wyllm boyer for mendying the bell & frame ... \\\yL 

There is a local (and unreliable) tradition as to a ring of bells being stolen 
from here by men from Leigh, in Essex. 
Best thanks to Rev. E. B. Wensley, Vicar. 



Inscriptions. 309 

HOO. St. Mary. i Bell (formerly 3). 

I., 37-in. + JOHN \ HODSON ■ MADE \ ME % 1662 + PHILLIP \ 

RAYNES I «)!(» •)!(• «i(» lOHN h LEVES ^ CHVRCH ^ 

WARDENS «)Jp W o H o O 

Death knell rung. Tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 

3 X 2 for woman, 
2 X 3 for boy, 
2 X 2 for girl. 

Thanks to Rector, Rev. C. J. Roberts. 

HOO. St. Werburgh. 6 Bells. 

I., 32-in. George Pearce & John Graves Church Wardens •*♦• T 

Mears of London Fecit 1825 
IL, 34|-in. O ^ JOHN \ HODSON \ MADE \ ME \ 1662 X WILLIAM 
\ COSENS \ lOHN X PEETT ^ CHVRCH | WARDENS 
t W O H I «i{(. .Jl(> 



in., 36-in. ^ BY * ME * GYLES REVE -J* BELL ♦ FOVPIDER * 
1588 
On waist, a dragon twice and the crowned rose twice. 
IV., 39|-in. WILLIAM HATCH MADE ME MC HC CW ® 1641 
v., 44-in. Samuel Smith & Thomas Wickens Ch. Wardens W" 

Chapman of London Fecit 1781 
VL, 48-in. THOMAS + GARDINER + MADE + ME 4- SVDBURY 
+ SUFFOLK 4- + 1738 4- 4- 4- 

No ringers ; bells chimed with apparatus. No local customs ; bells only 
used to chime for service or toll for a funeral. 
Thanks to Rev. Percy G. Benson, Vicar. 

HOPE. All Saints (in ruins). 

I., 32-in. Blank, 

Lying unhung in New Romney Church. 

T. R. E. Item ij lytle bells in the steple. 
Item one hande bell. 



3IO Inscriptions. 

HORSMONDEN. St. Margaret. 6 Bells. 

I., 32-in. • S K 1737 

II., 34-in. CARI NATALIS LOCI SEMPER MEMOR G^ H^ SMITH 
MARRIOTT ME D. D. AD 1882 
III., 37-in. S K 1737 
IV., 39 in. S K 1737 

v., 44-in. Thomas Mears of London Fecit 18 10 
VI., 49-in. John Ollive & John Ashdown Ch:Wardens Pack & Chap- 
man OF London Fecit 1769 

Passing bell as soon as possible after death. Bell tolled for an hour, after 
which the tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 3 x 2 for woman. 

Bell tolled for an hour before funeral. 

Sundays. — Eight o'clock peal (two bells). For services bells rung ist 
Sunday in month, chimed only on other Sundays for half an hour before 
service. " Priest's bell " (Qy. treble) last five nfmutes. 

On great festivals, bells rung both before and after service. On Good 
Friday only tenor tolled. 

New Year's Eve : Peal rung. Old year tolled out (twelve strokes) at mid- 
night ; then another peal. 

Bell for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Rector, Rev. H. F. Smith-Marriott. 

HORTON KIRBY. St. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I., 30-in. T. Mears of London Fecit 181 7 

. JR: P: FECIT GOOD CHRISTIANS ALL 
II., 30-in. I ^^^^ rj, ^^ PRAYERS WE CALL "^ 

WE HONOUR TO KING 
AND BRIDES JOY DO BRING *** 
TRYUMPHS WE TE 
AND RING THE DEAD 
IIL, 335-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1826 

T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple suted of brasse. 

In Hasted's time there were five bells ; the other two have long disappeared, 
but the lower beams of their framing still remain. The present middle bell 
is in a most dilapidated condition, having a large piece of the crown and 
shoulder completely broken out. As, however, the lower part of the beJl is 



Inscriptions. 311 

perfect, it is capable of being chimed, and in that way is still used. Its 
mutilated state accounts for the imperfect inscription above recorded. By 
supplying "LL" to the upper line, and " MANS KNELL" to the lower one, 
it may be conjecturably completed. 

HOTHFIELD. St. Mary. 5 Bells. 

L, 281-in. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1762 
II., 30-m. Same. 
III., 3ii-in. Same. 
IV., 33i-in. JOHN SMEED & THO^ HUMPHREY CH. WARDENS 

1762 LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 
v., 37-in. lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME © 1607 
T. R. E. Item iij gret bells in the stepyll and ij hande bells with iij 
sacrynge bells. 
Item a sanctus bell brokyn in the crown. 
Item by this tyme also ij sacrynge bells wantynge. 
In 1758 Mr. Faussett notes here four bells only, inscribed as follows : 
I. Henry Williams C W 1741 Thomas Carter of London Made me 
II., III. and IV. Joseph Hatch made me 1607 

And he states No. II. to be cracked. 

" Thomas Carter " on the treble is clearly a mistake for Thomas Lester. 

Passing bell rung immediately after death. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 
for female. Bell tolled at funeral. 

Sundays.— Eight o'clock bell rung. Bells chimed for services— " before 
chimes, tenor bell for sermon." 

Ringing on Coronation Day. 

Best thanks to Rector, Rev. R. C. Swan. 

HOUGHAM. St. Laurence. 3 Bells. 

I., 27-in. t0feplj ftatclj mairc me T H W F C W 1634 
ir., 28-in. Wn.LI PH.CHER C W RICH" HARVEY H" OF YE 

PAR" S K 1724 
III., 31-in. Blank. 

Passing bell rung as soon as possible after news of death. No difference is 
made in the knell for sex or age. 



3 1 2 InscriptioJis. ' 

Tenor bell rung for Sunday services, five minutes only. 

A bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. Edward R. Orger. 

Christ Church. i Bell. 

Modern church and modern bell. 

HUCKINGE. St. Margaret. 2 Bells. 

I., i8i-in. Blank. 
II., 2iA-in. Blank. 

HUNTON. St. Mar v. 6 Bells. 

I., 27-in. rj. lOHN WAYLETT MADE ^ ME 1717 
II., 30-in. GEORGE HATLEY ^ ^ 17 17 
III., 32-in. lOHN ^ HATLEY ^ «^ 1717 
IV., 32|-in. Same as No. i. 

v., 36-in. ^ lOHN cjl^ BISHOP ^ CHVRCH ^ WARDEN ^ilp 1717 
VI., 4iHn. .$. MR GEORGE ^ PAGE ^ RECTOR <)|(» 1717 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice of death is received. Tellers — 3 x 3 for 
a male, 3 x 2 for a female — then bell tolled for an hour. 

Funerals. — Tenor tolled from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m., and again for an hour 
before the service. 

Sundays. — Three bells chimed at 8 a.m. All six rung for an hour before 
morning service, and two or three before evensong. 

No ringing in Lent. 

Peals on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve ; also on Accession Day, 
Queen's Birthday, May 29th, and November 5th. 

Fourth bell rung for vestry meetings. 

The churchwardens' accounts contain the following entries : 

1675 Item payd Goodman Bingham for oyle for the 

bells 6^. 

Item paid for bell ropes which waid thirty-five 
pound 
1698 paid for a new stock and hanging y'' third bell 

paid for trushing (trussing) y*" treble ... 
1717 for expenses about the bells ... 
payd for Bellropes 
payd to M' Waylett for casting of the bells ... 





IJS. 


6d. 


Ui. 


IS. 






2S. 


(yd. 




8s. 


6,/. 


\H. 


3^- 




.oil. 







Inscriptions. 3 13 

There is no doubt the present ring were cast on the spot — in the church- 
yard, in fact. Local tradition affirms this ; and in digging a grave a few years 
ago the sexton came upon a quantity of bell metal. 

Best thanks to the Rector, the Rev. Canon Hall. 



HYTHE. St. Leonard. 10 Bells. 

I, 28 in. M. A. ROTHSCHILD MP FOR THE BORO 

H B MACKESON ESQ) WARDFNS 

E H RONALDS j ^^- ^^^^^^^I^NS 

J FRIEND CONDUCTOR 
II., 29-in. THESE TWO TREBLES ADDED AD 1861 
III., 3oin. Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 1802 
IV., 3oi-in. Same. 
v., 32-in. Same. 
VI., 34|-in. Same. 
VII., 37-in, Same. 
VIII., 41-in. Same. 
IX., 43-in. Same. 

X., 48^-in. R Shipden EsQ'^-i Mayor W Ferry W Card Church- 
wardens H Down Ringer T Mears London fecit 1802 

Mr. Bryan Faussett's note as to this church (under date 175 7-8) is as 
follows : 

" The tower fell down a few years -ago, but is now rebuilt. It stands at 
the West End. In it hang 6 very Musical Bells. The First or smallest of 
them having been broke by y*" Fall of y" Tower was recast by Robert* Pack 
of London in 1752 the Year the new Tower was finish't. The other 5 were 
all founded by John Waylett in y^ year 1720." 

Here are valuable Corporation records, from the report on which by 
H.M. Historical MSS. Commission I give the following extracts : 

"Ch. Wardens account 1480-81. Extracts: 

" The same William and Henry (C W) answer for a collection for devout- 
ness from certain men & women for the bells and to make the frame of the 
bell tower. Collections on Sundays ' By wvay of indulgence '—-then follow — 

*■ A mislakc for 'rhoma.s. 

2 S 



3 1 4 Inscriptions. 

" Among Expenditure : 

" For two bawdrikes 8^. Paid to the belfoundere in full payment 505-. 8^. 
Paid John Hamme as earnest for doing the work of the bells 4^. Paid for the 
board of John Hame and two men working with him for two weeks iti takynge 
doivjie of the olde frame of stepulle 6s. Expended upon victuals for men 
carrying new timber for the said steeple 2s. ^d. Paid John Hamme and two 
Hammes {sic) working for 10 days upon making the new frame for the steeple 
55-. Paid for 4 gogynys and other ironwork pertaining to the said frame 35'. 
To John Hamme in full payment of his agreement for the same 10//. Paid 
the expenses of John Hamme in the house of William Lune 5^/. Paid for le 
daJ>ero(the largest bell 6s. Sd. For /e daper of the fourth bell 2od. Also 
paid Robert Gierke for le claper. 

"A list then follows of 'Receipts by William Waryne and Henry Her- 
mann from certain men and women for devotion sake towards the bells 
of Hethe and other works pertaining to the steeple of the said Church for 
the time of the account of the said William and Henry.' The sub- 
scriptions of the 12 Jurats are first set forth — 10^. the largest sum being con- 
tributed by William Lune. A long list of Commoners then follows, the 
executors of John Dokeney contributing 205-., the largest sum — 125-. 2d. being 
the subscription of Laurence Marche. The smallest sums are subscriptions 
of one penny each, received from 'one Richard, a laborer,' and five others — 
men and women." 

ICKHAM. St. John the Evangelist. 4 Bells. 

L, 27-in. I0H>1 • FAYERMAM • AMD ■ MICHAEL ■ TRAPPS • 

WARDENS lOHM • PALMAR • MADE ■ MEE • 1641 
n., 3oi-in. Same. '1641 

in., 32i-in. Same. \6\'\ 

IV., 36-in. LORD •!• lEVS •{• CHRIST -t- RESEVE '\' EACH •!• SOL -t- 
FOR •:• HOME •:• THIS -J' BELL -t- SHAL -t- TOL •;• 
AMEN •*♦• lOHN • PALMAR • MADE - ME lOHM • 
FAYERMAM - AMD ■ MICHEL ■ TRAPPS • WARD- 
MES 1641 

One bell is cracked. 

Passing bell rung as soon as possible after death. A knell also rung at 
8 a.m. on morning of funeral, and again at the burial. 



Inscriptions:, 3 1 5 

Sundays. — Bell rung at 8 a.m., and again after morning service. Usual 
ringing for services. 

According to "Arch. Cantiana," vol. xiv., p. 125, Richard Townlcy, by his 
will, dated 1525, left a house and garden for the curfew ringer. Apparently 
the endowment has been lost and the custom has ceased. 

Best thanks to Rector. 

IDE HILL. St. Mary the Virgin. i Bell. 

I., 20-in. 1807 
Bell no doubt a second-hand one. Church quite recent. 

I FIELD. St. Margaret. i Bell. 

I., 2o|-in. C & G MEARS LONDINI FECERUNT 
AD MAGNAM DEI GLORIAM 
D D WILLIELMUS EDMEADES ARMIGER DE NUR- 
STED 1845 

IGHTHAM. St. Peter. ^ 5 Bells. 

I., 25|-in. THE REV" RALPH LEIGH M : A : RECTOR EDWARD 
BATT CHURCH WARDEN R:P: FE' 1732 

II., 27|-in. 4-J5-lUtCC ?VPi XtJ^I'lUUCiJ U 
III., 29J-in. 4-"yrrrx J5-lUt^slint .Scncf jEn J^^l^r^c X'^ct xj 
IV., 32-^-in. W & T Mears Late Lester Pack &: Chapman ok London 

Fecit 1789 
v., 34-in. lOHN <•> WI TNAR <^ MADE A ME « 1620 

For account of Nos. 2 and 3, see p. 31. The crosses are alike — h'ig. 14. 
Foundry stamps, Fig. 13. 

T. R. E. Item iij bolls (? bells). 

Death knell rung " as soon as may be," but always between sunrise and 
noon. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female. Bell tolled at funerals. 
Bells chimed for services. 
A bell tolled for vestry. 

Peals at 7 (? a.m.) on the great festivals. None on November 5th (happily). 
Best thanks to Rev. J. l'olchami)ton, Rector. 

2 8 2 



3^6 Inscriptions. 

IVYCHURCH. St. Martin. 5 Bells, 

I., 32-in. lOHZ WIL>1ER MADE ME 1624 

II., 34-in. Same. 

III., 37-in. Same. 

IV., 41-in. Sam knight fecit 1724 william thomas cw 

v., 44-in. Same as No. i. 

T. R. E. Item iiij bells being in the Stepill. 
Item ij litill bells. 

In 1455, William Warde bequeathed 40^^. to the parishioners on condition 
that they should buy new bells, otherwise the legacy was not to be paid.* 

Passing bell tolled "at death." Tellers — 3x3 for a male, 3x2 for a 
female — then bell tolled quickly for a few minutes, and then minute strokes. 

On day of funeral, bell tolled at 7 a.m., and again at the service. 

Sundays. — Bell tolled at 9 a.m. when there is morning service, and at noon 
when service is in the afternoon. 

Best thanks to Rector, Rev. W. C. L. Wingate. 

I WADE. All Saints. 2 Bells. 

I., i9|-in. Blank. 
II., 20-in. Blank. 

Doubtless the two oldest church bells in Kent — long-waisted, with cj'lindrical 
crowns and perfectly plain sides. They are supposed locally to be two ship's 
bells, and of Low Country manufacture, but I see no grounds for the correct- 
ness of this. The church is, in its earliest parts. Transitional Norman, but 
the tower is Early English, and I think the bells are co-eval with it. 

KEMSING. St. Mary. 2 Bells. 

I., 32-in. + (Fig. 7) ^fcrntji J5-nnts ^cf0ttcf damjtana 

^rrliannts U (Fig. 6) 
ir., 34^-in. ?f? cj, SOLIDEO ^ HONOR ^ ET cj? GLORIA I H C+ + 
TS 4- IF ^ I M 4- GF + WF + AV : ^V 

For mention of treble, see p. 27. Dedication probably to St. John the 
Baptist. The annual fair is on that saint's day, which points to a local guild 
in his honour. 

* "Arch. Cant.," xiii. 452, 



Inscriptions. 317 

Death knell rung morning after death. Tellers — 3 x 3 for a man, 3 x 2 for a 
woman or a child. Bell tolled before funeral. 

Sundays. — A bell rung at 8 a.m. Bells chimed for services. 

A bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. G. B, Lewis. 

KENARDINGTON, St. Mary. i Bell' 

I., 26|-in. Tho maylam chvrch warden Q Ioh^ wayleTT fecjT 1720 
No local uses. Tradition affirms that the church formerly had more bells 

but that they were "destroyed by the Spaniards in the year 1559." I am 

afraid this tradition is not reliable. 

I am obliged to the Rector, the Rev. Sydney B. Lobb. 

KENNINGTON. St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 2S-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 18S3 

V^ MIHI SI NON EVANGELIZAVERO 
IL, 30-in. Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 1804 
III., 32-in. ^HolTcitfus + ^EiaX + m\ + fqrtf 1602 ® 
IV., 33-in. Mess"*^ Jn" Roots & Francis Sibert Ch. Wardens Chapman 
& Mears of London Fecerunt 1784 

v., 37-in. 'J-'MB O y^.Bm O J5-<3aO J^ O ^IXJSC^B -X- 
(Fig. 35) U (Royal Arms) ^ (Fig. 35) 
VI., 40-in. J^t^^J&cittws + XH>?t + Jttc -Y fnnf + 1602 ® \J 

For mention of No. 5, see p. 56. The coat of arms on the tenor is that of 
the EUys family,* who owned one of the manors here. — Ellys, who had the 
manor in 1602, doubtless bore the expense of recasting the then 2nd and 
5th. The cross figured under Hayes is also used by Mot on one of the bells 
here. 

T. R. E. First fyve bells in the stepyll. 

In 175S the (then) treble and No. III. were also pre-Rcformation bells. 

They bore : 

I. Sancta Maria Ora Pro Nobis 

II. Sancte Paule Ora Pro Nobis 

Passing bell rung as soon as possible after death, but always between sun- 
rise and sunset. Tellers at beginning — 3 x 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female. Bell 

* Ar. on a cross sa. five crcsccnls of the field. Nnt five lortiau.xr^ for ( Ircinillc. as staled 
by Hasted, 



J 



1 8 Inscriptions 



then raised and kept up for a short time, then lowered and tolled. Age denoted 
by bell used, e.g., tenor for old people, 5th for middle-aged, 4th for young, 
and so downwards. 

On day of funeral a knell is rung at 7.30 a.m. ; always on tenor. First 
tellers as above, then bell raised for a short time and then lowered, and a few 
strokes tolled. Muffled peals for Vicar or a ringer, or an old inhabitant. 

Sundays. — Formerly a bell was rung at 8 a.m. and i p.m. J'or services 
the bells are chimed, except on great festivals, when they are rung ; there are 
also peals in the early morning on these occasions. 

On New Year's Eve the old year is rung out with a half-muffled peal, and 
the new one rung in at midnight with a full open peal. 

Peals on Queen's birthday and other national and local anniversaries. 

An old inhabitant of the parish, who died in 1883 at the mature age of 94, 
well recollected the old treble's being recast in 1804. He had helped on the 
occasion to draw the bell up to its place in the cage. He had been one of 
the ringers {ot three-quarters of a cent ury\ viz., from 1804 till 1878. In the old 
smuggling times, the earlier part of this century, the ringers were often assist- 
ants in cheating the revenue, and when hard pressed by the officers they would 
carry the smuggled tubs or other packages up into the belfry and fasten them 
up inside the bells, tying them on to the clappers. 

The following entries occur in the parish accounts : 

1 7 1 1 Item paid for new sett of Bell ropes ... ... 15^. o(L 

1 7 13 Item (a similar entry). 

1714 Item paid to y'^ ringers at the Proclaiming of King 

George ... ... ••• ... ... ••• 25-. 6c/. 

Itetn, paid more to y'" ringers at the coranation of 

King George ... ... ... ... ... 55. 

1 715 Item paid for a form of Prayer on Thanksgiving 

on y"" first day of August* 
Item paid to y" Ringers on same day 
T716 Item For a proclamation for the thanksgivingt y*" 

7 day of June 
Item paid to y° (ringers) on the same 
Item paid the ringers at the King's coming home 

* Accession clay of George I. 

f Probably for ihc suppression of the insurrection in .Scotland. 



i.y. 




2S. 


6d. 


\s. 




2S. 


6d. 


2S. 


Gd. 



Inscnptions . 319 

1722 Item P'' at the puting out the Bells* ... ... 55-. Gd. 

Item spent on the bell hanger at several times ... 3^-. 
Item paid for a quart of oyle ... ... ... 2s. 

Item p'' the Bell hanger the full of his money at 2 

payments ... ... ... ... ... js^s. 

Item spent on him att y'' last payin 3^-. 6d. 

and IS. att y" first payin ... is. 4s. dd. 

Item p'' to Edvv'^ Austen for puting up the Sally 

beams ... ... ... ... ... ... 2s. 

For a sett of new Bell ropes ... ... ... 15^-. 

1724 Item p'' goodman Walke his bill for work done 

about the bell frame ... ... ... ... \li. \2s. o\d. 

Paid for oyle ... ... ... ... .. 9^/. 

Item paid Tom^ pain a bill for iron work done 

about the bell frame ... ... ... ... Zs. 

My own bill for timber about the bell frame ... ? ? 
1726 p'^ to goodman Walke a bill for making Bell wheell 

and other work about the Bells ... ... 19^. dd. 

paid for a pint of oyle ... ... ... ... is. 

1729 Item gave the ringers on crownation day... ... 5^". 

p'^ for Bell ropes ... ... ... ... ... 15^'. 

1730 p"* at the King's crownation ... ... ... 2s. Gd. 

1735 Item p'^ to Tho^ Pain for mending the clapper of a 

bell 2J-. Gd. 

1737 Item p'^ to Rich^ Tucker fo five new bell ropes ... i5j-. 

1740 (about) Paid for work dun about the church and 
bells when the bell Tumbel doon as will appear 
by Bill ^ii- ^s. 5< 

1742 Item p^' to William Walke a bill for bell work ... n)s. 

1745 Item gave the ringers for ringing of the Fast day 

for the suppression of the Rebellion ... ... loi-. 

1746 Item paid the ringers for ringing on the Dukest 

birthday ... ... ... ... ••• ••• S^- 

1 75 1 pd M"" Tucker for bell ropes ... ... ... 16^-. 

1755 p'' for two ringing days ... ... •■• ••■ lo-^"- 

* I.e., iniltinsj; out Ihc work to be done on thciii. 
t The Initcher Cumljerlaiul, 



320 Inscriptions. 

1757 Item p'' for bell ropes ... ... ... ... 17.^. 

1775 — July 2. Barber the ringing money for y" year 

1775 5^- 

1783 — May 17. M' Springett a bill for 4 

brasses for the bells ... ... \U. 2s. <)d. 

and ow'tset 21 pound of old Brass 10s. 6d. 12s. _ 3^.. 

1784 — Feb. Paid James Rolfe for carreing the bell to 

Faversham ... ... ... . . ... (^s. 3^. 

M' Sibert Ringing money for year ... ... 55-. 

May 25, James Rolfe for bringing the bell from 

Faversham ... ... ... ... ... 7.^. 

Dec. 31. John Steddy for hanging bell ... ... *^li. ^s, 

M' Welson for bringing the bell Home from 

London ... ... ... ... ... ... i ox. 6d. 

M' William Mears for the new bell in ballance ... 7//. 17.^. 

1786 Howland for a sett of new bell ropes ... ... iqjt. 

1787 M' Sibert the ringing money 5J-. 

1788 M' Steddy for putting the third bell in tune ... 10s. 6d. 
Set of bell ropes ... ... ... ... ... 19.^. 

1789 M' Sibert for ringing money ... ... ... 5.^-. 

1790 — January 3. Paid M"" Springett for Brasses for the 

bells 1//. 8x. 3U 

Very hearty thanks to Canon Welldon and his intelligent parish clerk, Mr. 
Robert Head. 

KESTON. Dedication unknown. i Bell. 

I., 22-in. THOMAS BARTLET MADE ME 1621 

T. R. E. Item ij small bells of brasse suted in the steple on handbell of 
brasse and one smale sacryng bell. 

Only rung for service and at funerals. 
Thanks to Rector, Rev. C. H. Wright. 

KIDBROOKE. St. James. 1 Bell. 

I., 36-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1S66 

* Part of cost of recasting probably included in this ; Steddy was doubtless INlears' local 
agent. 



Iiiscriptions. 321 

KILNDOWN. Christ Church. 6 Bells. 

II li'l^ IV V 1 <Sr*''^**^^^^ ^^ (5i:i>Jitiji^s <QQi?are lilm^iui fecit 

■'Vl.;'45-in. "I ^^ ^^44 

KINGSDOWN BY DEAL. St. John Evangelist. 2 Bells. 

Two small bells of quite recent date. 

KINGSDOWN BY SITTINGBOURNE. St. Katharine. 2 Bells. 

I., i8i-in. Blank. 
II., 19-in. SANCTA KATHERINA ORA PRO NOBIS 
J WARNER & SONS LONDON 1868 

No. I is somewhat long waisted, and was probably by the same maker as 
the larger bell which was recast in 1868. See p. 20. 

No local customs. Thanks to Rector, the Rev. H. J. Hordern. 

KINGSDOWN BY WROTH AM. St. Edmund. i Bell. 

I., 281-in. ISAAC ^; HADLEY A MADE {» ME 17 13 GOD ^ SAUE THE 

tt CHURCH k AND .} QUEEN 

Inscription on sound bow. There are traces of an inscription on the 
shoulder, but it has been erased previous to casting, possibly for want of 
room. 

T. R. E. Item on bell of bras in the steple, and on sacryng bell of bras. 
"On bellsolde." 

KINGSNORTH. St. Michael. 5 Bells. 

I., 28i-in. PRAIS THE LORD YOUR KING 1728 
II., 29^-in. SAMUELL KNIGHT FECIT 1727 
IIL, 3i|-in. ANTHONY lARUIS C W S K FECIT 1727 
IV., 35-^. lOHN TAYLOR OC W O SAMUELL O KNIGHT M<:Gir 
1727 

v., 39-in. THOMAS READER RECTOR S K MADE ME 1728 

T. R. E. Item in the stypull iij bells. 

Item ij handbells with ij sacring bells. 
Bell fittings in bad order ; two of the bells reported to be unusable. 

2 r 



32 2 Inscriptions. 

KINGSTONE. St. Giles. 3 Bells. 

I., 29^-in. Blank. 

II,, 31^-in. tuscpfj Ijatcfi matrc ntc 16 10 

U (Fig. 2) 
III., 361-in. + ,^2?ie- : ^UJ^y^S-Jp^ •■ f^^M-^f-M- : 

For mention of tenor, see p. 1 1. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice is received. Tellers both at beginning 
and end — 3 x 3 for man, 3x2 for woman. For an adult the age is tolled, 
then bell raised for about a quarter of an hour. For child the treble is tolled 
for about twenty minutes. The passing bell is occasionally tolled ; minute 
strokes for an hour. 

At funerals bell tolled. 

Sundays. — " Sermon " bell rung at 9 a.m. For services bells chimed for 
a quarter of an hour, tenor tolled five minutes, " toll in " on treble last five 
minutes. 

Bells rung on Easter and Christmas morning, and on last night of year. 

Bell tolled for vestry meetings. 

Ringing on 5 th November. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. C. H. Wilkie. 

KNOCKHOLT. St. Katharine. 2 Bells. 

I., 24-in. Thomas Janaway of London Fecit 1764 
IL, 25-in. «^ lOHN HODSON MADE ^ MEE ^ 1662 <ij(. R B .)J(. 
W H 

T. R. E. Item in the steple iij bells of bras. 

Apparently no local customs. Thanks to Rector. 

KNOWLTON. St. Clement. i Bell. 

I., 23-in. G. W. H. D'aeth Esq^ 182 1. 

LAM BER HURST. St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 28|-in. I mean to make it Understood That tho' I'm little yet 
I'm good 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1776 



Inscriptions. -723 

II., 31-in. If you have A judicious Ear You'll own my Voice is sweet 
and clear 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecerunt 1779 
III., 33|-in, Such wond'rous Pow'r to Musick's given It elevates the 
Soul to Heaven 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecerunt 1779 
IV., 36-in. Ye people all who hear me ring Be faithful to your 
God and King 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecerunt 1779 
v., 40-in. Whilst thus we Join in chearfull Sound May Love and 
Loyalty abound. Pack & Chapman of London Fecerunt 
1779 
VI., 43 in. Pack and Chapman of London Fecerunt. Thomas 

MORLAND ESQ^ & RiCHARD LaTTER ChURCH WaRDENS 

1779 

The tenor has upon it also the Morland crest. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received, but not after sunset. Com- 
mence with tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 for female. Same on smaller bell for 
children. Then toll for about twenty minutes. This is repeated at 11 a.m 
on the day of funeral. 

Sundays. — Bells rung for services on ist Sunday of the month, and on 
festivals. Chimed on other occasions. 

Peals at Easter, Christmas, and the other usual ecclesiastical and loyal 
anniversaries. 

Many thanks to Mr. W. H. Wallis for kindly help and information. 

LAMORBY. V. Bexley. 

LANGDON, EAST. St. Augustine. 4 Bells. 

R 
I., 26-in. iu|cpf| Iiafcli in^tbc mc 1627 EX DONO M lACOBI 

MASTER 
II., 28-in. iofcpli Ijafcli ntA^c mc 1627 
III., 30-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT ©1627 
IV., 32-in. ROBERT CATLIN FECIT 1749 

Death knell rung as soon as convenient. Tellers at beginning — 3 x 3 for 
man, 3 x 2 for woman ; pause five minutes and then toll for an hour. 

2 T 2 



324 Inscriptions. 

Bell tolled at 8 on the morning of funeral, and again for fifteen minutes 
before service. 

Sundays. — Tenor tolled at 9 a.m. (" Mass " bell). P'or services bells chimed 
fifteen minutes, and "toll in" on tenor. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve only, i)robably accounted for by the bells being 
in bad order. 

A bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. W. D. Astley. 

LANGDON (WEST). St. Mary. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

A small modern bell under arch in gable. 

LANGLEY. St. Mary. 2 Bells. 

I., 2S^-in. U THOMAS + HATCH + MADE + ME U 1599 
n., 33-"in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1S74 

Twenty years ago there were three bells. The tenor, which has disappeared, 
was a Black Letter bell, with the inscription + Sit Nomen Domini Benedic- 
tum +. (See p. 34.) The larger one of the present pair, prior to recasting, 
was of the date 162 1, and cast by Joseph Hatch. 

Death knell as soon as notice received, but not after sunset. Tellers at 
beginning — 3 x 3 for man, 3x2 for woman, 3x1 for child. Toll thirty 
minutes, then ring thirty minutes. Bell tolled on morning of funeral from 
8 till 9, and again for an hour before service. 

Sundays. — Bell tolled for early celebration. For matins and evensong — 
raise bell half an hour before service and ring for five minutes (called 
" Sermon " bell), lower and chime for the last ten minutes. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. W. B. Pusey. 

LEAVELAND. St. Laurence. i Bell. 

L, 18-in. Inscription unproducible in print, a date only. 

Bell somewhat eccentric in shape, and probably the work of a local genius, 
not a bellfounder by trade. What date he meant by the hieroglyph he has 
put on the bell it is difficult to say — I incline to 1581 3 the figures are clearly 
reversed. 



Inscriptions. 325 

LEE. St. Margaret. 8 Bells. 

I., 26-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1886 

II., 27-in. \ 

III., 28|-in. [ MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1874 

IV., 3o|-inJ 

, . /THOMx\S MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 
V "2 "2 —-in 
., jj2i"- I REV" GEORGE LOCK M.A. RECTOR 

^ ■'■•> 342" 1 \VTT T TAM STDFRV "» 
VII., 39i-i„. (^j^o;j^g po3^^^3}cHURCHWARDENS .S40. 

VIIL, 44-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1886 
T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple. 

Item a long ladder and a shorter in the belfrey. 

Death knell as soon as possible. Age tolled, but apparently no " tellers." 
Bells rung for Sunday, chimed for week-day services. No ringing in Advent 
or Lent. Ringing on Patron Saint's Day, and on New Year's Eve. 
Bell rung for vestry meeting for election of churchwardens. 
Best thanks to Rector, the Rev, F. H. Law. 

Christ Church. i Bell. 

L, 25Mn. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1854 

Good Shepherd. i Bell. 

Probably one quite modern bell. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I., 24-in. J WARNER & SONS LONDON 1863 

St. Mildred. 3 Bells. 

Church consecrated 1879, the three bells arc probably of that date. 

LEEDS. St. Nicholas. 10 Bells. 

I., 27 in. THE GIFT OF THE HON: ROBERT FAIRFAX OF 

LEEDS CASTLE RC 1751 
II., 29-in. Same. R C 1751 

III., 29J.-in. Same. R^ CATLIN FECIT 1751 



326 




IV., 


3ol-in 


v., 


32-in. 


VI., 


34-in. 


VII., 


, 36-in. 


VIII., 


. 39-in- 


IX., 


, 43-in- 



Inscriptions. 

THE GIFT OF HON: ROBERT FAIRFAX OF LEEDES 
CASTLE R C 1 75 1 

HEN: MEREDITH ESQ"^ OF LEEDS ABBY BENE- 
FACTOR R^ CATLIN 1 75 1 

WILLIAM WOOLLETT ROBERT HATCH CH WAR- 
DENS R CATLIN FECIT 1751 

lOHN /} WILNAR ^ 1638 

Same. 

HONORI DEI k VSVI k ECCLESIAE lOHN $ WILNAR 
1638 
X., 47I in. HOMORI DEI VWSVI EC^TI^ MEMORI^ lOHAM- 
ms LAMBE XPOFER WOLLET C W lOSEPHVS 
HATCH ME FECIT O 1617 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Tenor bell tolled for half an 
hour, and then rung for the same space of time. 

On morning of funeral, at 8 o'clock, strike eight bells — three times for man, 
twice for woman, once for chiM ; then raise tenor and ring at intervals for 
forty-five minutes. Tenor tolled for an hour at time of funeral. 

Sundays. — Bells used for services only ; " ring in " on treble last two 
minutes. Peal on last night of year. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. A. P. Morris. 



LEEDS CASTLE. 

Clock Bell. !_ Ian # m @ rccc @ xxx # 1j 
D D D 

A striking witness to the fact that a clock is so called because it strikes on 
a cloche or bell. It would seem probable that the first clocks were like this, 
without a face, denoting the time only by striking on a bell or bells at certain 
intervals of time. 

I believe that the mechanism of this clock is very interesting, and that it is 
of the same date as the bell, viz., 1435. That it should have lasted for four 
centuries and a half bears strong testimony to the faithful workmanship of its 
maker. It is without doubt the oldest clock remaining in any secular edifice 
in England. 

I believe the bell to be of French manufacture ; not only from the fact 
of the inscription being in French, but from the medallions below the inscrip- 



Inscriptions. 327 

tion band. They depict the Blessed Virgin and Child, the Crucifixion, 
and St. Michael slaying the dragon (see frontispiece). Such medallions 
are quite usual on French bells, and quite unknown on English ones of this 
date. So far as I know it is a unique example in this country. I am much 
indebted to Mrs. Wykeham-Martin for permission to take S([ueezes of the 
inscription, etc. 

In addition to its use as a clock bell it is used for domestic notices, and the 
curfew is rung on it every night at 8. Local tradition affirms that this lias 
never been omitted since it was first hung. It is worn rather thin in the sound 
bow where the clapper strikes, and needs attention ; but I am afraid quarter- 
hanging would be no use, as it would bring the clock hammer on to the weak 
l^art, and so tend to hasten a crack. 



LEIGH. St. Mary. 5 Bells. 



I., 26-in. \ 
II., 28i-in. 
Ill, 31-in. ►- 
IV., zz\-yci. 

v., 36-in. 



HEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1871 
THOMAS MAY VICAR 



Prior to the recasting, the bells were inscribed as follows : 

L, 25-in. THE GIFT OF ABRAHAM HARRISSON ESQ-^ 1731 

IL, 261-in. THE OF ABRAHAM HARRISSON ESQR 1731 

IIL, 291-in. nWH636 

IV., 3i-"in. I OW ^ MADE ^ ME 1636 

v., 33 i-in. H W 1640 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Tenor for adults, a smaller 
bell for children. Tellers— 3 x 3 for a male, 3 x 2 for a female. 

Bell tolled at funerals. 

Sundays.— Bell rung at 8 (" Matins Bell ") and 9 a.m. (" Mass Bell "), and 
after morning service (Qy. " Angelus " bell, or reminiscence of " Sanctus " 
bell ringing). 

Peals, at Easter, Christmas, and on New Year's Eve. 

Ringing on 5th November (happily) fallen into disuse. 

Best thanks to the Vicar, Rev. H. R. CoUum. 



,28 



Inscriptions. 



LENHAM. St. Mary. 8 Bells. 

I., 29-in. ROBERT CATLIN FECIT 1751 O O O O O O 
II., 30-in. Same. 
III., 32-in. RICHARD PHELPS MADE ME 1709 
IV., 33^,-in. Same. 

v., 36|-in. Robcvtfus + nxtrf + mxj + fecit 1592 ® 
VI., 39J-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT ® 1619 
VIL, 43-in. Richard Barnard Edward Hope Church Wardens 

Robert Catlin Fecit 1751 
VIIL, 5oUn. THOMAS ROBBINS RICHARD CARTER CHVRCH 
WARDENS I AMES BARTLET MADE ME 1686 ® 
The weights are as follows : 

I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI 

VII. 

VIII. 

No information as to local customs. 

The following extracts from the parish accounts were kindly furnished to 
Mr. Tyssen by a former Vicar, the Rev. Charles Parkin, in 1855 : 

1682 It. paid to Robert Hyham for trussinge the Bells 
It. paid for works about the Bells to Taply 

1683 It. paid for a lock for y'' Belfrey door 
It. paid for belropes and putting them on 

1684 It. paid for mendinge a belwheel & nails 
It. paid for a Clapper for y'^ Great Bell 

1685 It. paid Jo" Tapley in p' for hanging the bells 
It. paid Jo" Tritton for a new sett of Bell Ropes 
It. paid Jo" Tapley for the new Bell ... 
It. paid to Jo" Tapley in full for hanging y*^ Bells 

16S7 It. paid Bromfield for new hanging the Tenor and re- 
pairing y^ other bells ... ... ... ... 08 



Cwt. 


qr. 


lb. 


6 





24 


8 


2 


8 


10 


2 


10 


12 


3 


I 


14 


2 


8 


16 


3 


6 


18 


2 


4 


23 









lib. 


s. 


d. 


00 


03 


00 


01 


10 


06 


00 


01 


04 


01 


16 


10 


00 


01 


00 


01 


07 


00 


05 


05 


00 


01 


06 


00 


-^ 


05 


00 


05 


00 


00 



lib. 


s. 


d. 


oo 


05 


■ 00 


17 


17 


09 


00 


05 


00 


00 


02 


06 


00 


04 


00 


00 


01 


06 


03 


01 


00 


00 


10 


00 


00 


or 


oS 


00 


02 


06 


00 


10 


00 


01 


00 


00 


00 


06 


00 


00 


10 


00 


00 


20 


00 



Inscriptions. 329 



It. pd Ad: Walrish for a Bell rope ... 

It. pd M'' Bartlett the Bell founder 

It. pd for skirting & mending y'^ Bells 

It. pd Alban for work about y*" Bells & Dyall 

It. pd at trying y" Bells 

It. pd for Oyle for y"" Bells 

1688 It. pd R. Ffox for Boarding f Bell Loft 

It. pd Jn'^ Parker for ringing y'' Bell ... 

It. pd him for oyle ab' y° Bells & a dust Baskett 

1689 Allow'd y*" Ringers Gunpowder Day ... 
pd Ja Parker for ringing y'^ Bell 

pd to M"" Oliver for Bell ropes ... 

Spent on y" Ringers at y*" Coronation 

1690 Spent on y"" Ringers one Gunpowder Treason & 

proclamation Day of King Will. & Queen Mary ... 
pd James Parker for Ringing of Curfirs 
Spent on Bromfield att the hanging «S^ fitting the 

Bells 

1 69 1 The Ringers for Ringing on the Kings Happy 

Return from Ireland on y*= 25 Der: and the i of 
Jan 

John Bromfield for hanging the bells with 2 new Stocks 
and fixing them in order 

p'^ for a sett of New Bell Ropes 

for Ringing on the Coronation Day ... 

p"* James Parker for Ringing the 8 o'clock Bell 

1692 Paid the Ringers at the Queen's Birthday 

Paid for the Ringers the 5"' of November 

Paid for the Ringers the 26"' of November 

Paid for the Ringers the i January ... 

Paid John Oliver for a Clock rop 

Paid Parker for looking to the Clock... 

Paid Parker for ringing the Night Bell 

1694 Given to the Ringers at the Kings return from 

Flanders 
Paid James Parker for ringing the evening Bell 

1695 ffor oyle for y^ Clock & Bells .. . 



9 


9 





I 


10 







2 


6 




10 







2 


6 




5 







5 







2 


6 




12 





I 










10 







2 


6 




TO 

1 







2 U 



330 


1697 


1698 


lyoo 


1701 



Inscriptions. 



lib. 



s. 


d. 


2 


6 





9 



ffor oyle and Brooms for y" Bells of Church ... 

P^' M-- Road for a pint of Oyle for y"^ Bells 

Allowed y*" Ringers att several times on several occa- 
sions ... ... ... ... ... ... ... I o o 

Paid Transom for ringing y^ Bell ... ... ... 12 3 

Paid Transom for ringing y'= Bell & looking after y*" 

Clock... ... ... ... ... ... ... I 10 o 

For peecing y*^ Clapper of a Bell & sundry smith's 

work ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 12 oh 

1703 Paid Transom towards looking after y^ Clock &i Ring- 

ing y'' Bell 5.y. for i dozen of Tresses 6s. ... ... 11 o 

Given y*" Ringers att y"" victory over y*" ffrench ... 16 

1704 Paid Transom for cleaning y" Bell Loft o 6 

Paid John Tritton for y*" Black Ropes ... ... 15 6 

Paid Transom for digging a hole for y'= Chimes waite o 6 

1707 Spent on the Ringers new years day ... ... ... 5 o 

Paid Peter Epps for mending y" Bell Clapper ... 80 

Spent on the Ringers on St. Georges Day ... ... 5 o 

1709 Paid Edward Gosling for a Clock wheel ... .. i o 

1712 Spent on y" Ringers att A Day of rejoycing ... ... 5 o 

P'* M' Bronifield Towards his looking after y" Bells 
2 years & towards ye compleating y" treble & y'' 
second Bells being new cast & hanging them up 
againe ... ... ... ... ... ... 12 o o 

P"* John Bronifield towards y*" new casting of y*" Bells 

as appears by Bills ... 
P'' Transom for a chime rope .. . 
P'^ for y*" Ringers at severall times 
17 1 7 For Candles & Oyle for y*" Bells 
1720 Paid Transom for a chyme rope as appears by Bill .. 
1726 paid Good" Transom for a chyme rope 
1728 Paid for Ringing eight times ... 
1733 For a set of Bell Ropes 

LEWISHAM. St. M.^ry. 8 Bells. 

I., 28-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1819 
IL, 29^-in. Lester & Pack of London Fecit 1766 



6 








I 


10 





4 










8 


II 


I 


4 


7 




17 





2 








I 


8 






Inscriptions. 331 

III., 3i?,-in. Same as No. I. 

IV., 33:/-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1859 
HONORABLE & REV° H LEGGE DCL VICAR 

S. SOUTHORN IrHTIPCHWARDFNS 

CHARLES ATKINS /^^^^"^"^^^^^^^^ 
v., 37-in. Ye Peopi,e all Who Hear me Ring Be Faithfull to 
YOUR God and King 
Pack «& Chapman of London Fecit 1777 
VI., 39]-in. Cast in 1743 Jn" Baker & Geo: Thornton Ch. War- 
dens Recast in 1776 Paul Valentine & Jn7 Evens 
Ch. Wardens 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 
VII., 43|-in. Henry Corbett & Joseph Hartwell Ch. Wardens 1766 

Lester & Pack of London Fecit 
VIII., 48^-in. This Bell was Paid for by Voluntary Subscription 
1777 Paul Valentine & John Evens Church War- 
dens Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 

T. R. E. Item iiij greate bells of brasse sutyd in the Steple. 

Item on sants bell of brasse called the morowmas bell. 
Item on hand bell & ij sacryng bells of brasse. 

Death knell rung on day of death before sunset. Tenor bell used. Tellers 
— 3 X 3 for male, 3x2 for female ; then raised and tolled, minute strokes. 

Funeral peals when ordered. Bells half muffled. First the age is rung on 
the eight bells, and then tolled on tenor ; ' then drop ten down to twenty, and 
then drop one to nothing, first on the eight bells,' and then tenor tolled. Finish 
with age tolled on tenor. 

Daily Service.s. — 3rd, 4th, and 5th chimed. 

Sundays. — Same three chimed for early celebration, and for children's 
service in afternoon. All eight rung on the first Sunday in the month for 
morning and evening service, and only chimed on other Sundays. 

No ringing in Lent. 

Peals on "royal and parochial" occasions, and on New Year's Eve. Also 
for the Easter vestry. Not (hai)pily) on 5th November. 

A "salary" (qy. endowment) of ^30 15s. per annum for ringing and 
chiming. 

Ik'sl thanks to the Rev. V. Payne Galhvey. 

2 U 2 



T,T,2 Inscriptions. 

LEWISHAM. Ascension. i Bell. 

Corusecrated 1883 ; presumably one bell of about that date. 

St. Mark. i Bell. 

Built 1870 ; probably one bell of about that date. 

St. Stephen. i Bell. 

I., 29|-in. G MEARS & CO FOUNDERS LONDON 1864 

Southend Chapel. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

Transfiguration. i Bell. 

From the Whitechapel Foundry, dated 1883. 

LEYBOURNE. SS. Peter c^- Paul. 2 Bells (i and a Priest's Bell). 
I., 19^-in. 1 82 6 

II., 34-in. D D THOMAS Q GODDIN Q GEHTELMA>1 Q 1585 Q 

w *)!(? *)5? 

ROBARD D OLVER D Y0U>1A"/1 D E D D 

The larger bell is by Gyles Reve ; it has curious figures of beasts upon it, 
more siw. 

There were formerly three bells, but the tower fell some sixty years ago, and 
two of the three were broken and sold, the small priest's bell being provided 
in their stead, and the balance of the purchase money no doubt went in 
* repairs.' 

The family of Olver or Oliver was of some abidance here. Oliver in or 
about 1680 left an annual sum of ^6 for binding apprentices. 

LEYSDOWN. St. Clement. 2 Bells. 

1. 1 CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1874 
II.) VENITE EXULTEMUS DOMINO 

Prior to 1874 there was here only one bell, which is now at Murston. There 
is room in the turret for a third beil. The two present ones are inaccessible 
for measurement. 

•No local uses. 



Insc rip tions. 'x^'^'}^ 

LINTON. St. Nicholas. 6 Bells. 

I., 29-in. «$. PRAISE .$. THE <$. LORD rj. 1717 

II., 3ii-in. ^ lOHN ^ WAYLETT ^ MADE ^ ME 1717 

III., 33-in. ^ lOHN «)}(. ^ RICH cijp C W 17 17 

IV., 35-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1824 

v., 40-in. Tho^ Lester Made Me 1748 

VI., 45-in. T Lester of London Made Me M"^ iohn martin & m'' 

ALEXANDER USBON CHURCH WARDENS 1 746 

LITTLEBOURNE. St. Vincent. 5 Bells. 

I., 28-in. D •:• D IOHN PALMAR MADE THIS BELL 1639 

II., 28J in. + soii^j :E)e^o j^<BisiG>^i e^3? 

©■JikCD:El3;ii. U O 

C (Fig. 36) 
IIL, 32i-in. tttscpli f|afcl| ntatiiJ nie 1610 
IV., 36-in. Raljcrtlis + nt0t + nti^ + fi^cif + 1597 MB® 
V.,39-in. D D © 1650 WILLIAM HATCH MADE ME 

For mention of No. 2, see p. 57. 

Death Knell. — Tellers — 3 for man, 2 for woman, i for child. 

Bells chimed for Sunday services. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve only. 

A bell tolled for vestry meetings. 

Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. N. H. McGachen. 

LONG FIELD. St. Mary Magdalene. i Bell. 

L, i5i-in. + -^^M^i^m'x^^ix^EB ■• xx^^m:i^ -. X3^e- : 

T. R. E. Item ij litle bells of bras suted in the steple. 

Mem: a handbell of brass presented to be stolen. 

See p. 14 for account of this interesting piece of antiquity. Access rather 
difficult. The "descensus," however, is "facihs;" namely, by sliding down 
the roof of the church. 

Death knell rung " when convenient," clerk living at some distance. 

Bell tolled for about twenty minutes. No tellers. 

Thanks to the Rector, Rev. P. H. Jennings. 



334 Inscriptions. 

LOOSE. All Saints. 3 Bells. 

O 
I., 31-in. O H O (on Waist) 

O 
II., 33-in. iuscpli f|atii| matic ntc © 1603 
III., 371-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1635 

Tenor cracked in the sound-bow. 

The treble is a decided puzzle. There is a bell similarly inscribed at 
Navestock, Essex. The parish accounts here, which go far back, contain no 
mention of its casting, which argues in favour of its being older than 161 5. 
See p. 61. 

Curfew bell formerly rung here, but discontinued at least fifty years. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Age signified by size of bell 
used, viz., tenor for adults, middle bell for boy or girl, treble for children. 

A knell on morning of funeral, and bell tolled at time of service. 

Sundays. — Eight o'clock (" Matins ") bell rung. A mid-day bell was rung 
until about thirty years ago. For services, bells chimed fifteen minutes, then 
tenor ten minutes ; " ring in " on treble five minutes (" Parson's " bell). 

Ringing on Christmas Day and last night of year. 

Very hearty thanks to Vicar, the Rev. J. D. Kingdon, for above notes, 
and also for access to parish books, from which I have extracted the 
following : 

16 1 5 It. Layd out for drawing the covenant betwixt 

Joseph Hach and vs ... ... ... 2s. 6d. 

It. Layd out for my expenses when the bell 

was cast & when I went to buy y" timber ... is. dd. 

It. Layd out for wayinge carriing and fetchinge 

y^ bell ... ... ... ... ... ']s. od. 

It. Layd out for lether and newe makeing the 

batheracks for the bells ... ... . . 31. od. 

It. Layd out for boards for makeinge and mend- 

inge the wheels 
It. Layd out for the carpenters worke ... 2//. 

It. Layd out for .48' of ouer mettle to Josheph 

Hatch 2//. 

It. Layd out for makeinge the cradle... 

It. for casting the bell ... ... ... ... 4//. 



2S. 


8d 


OS. 


u. 


OS. 


od. 


OS. 


8d 


I OS. 


od 



Inscriptions. 335 

1606 payd Jesper Shaw for mendind y" bell ... os. 6d. 

} iGiG payd Jesper Shaw for mending y° bell ... i.$-. od. 

161 "J layd out for mendinge the badricke ... ... ix^. 

1618 Ite. payd to John Terry for three bell ropes ... vji-. 
Ite. payd to John Newport for tucking vpp the 

bells ... ... ... ... ... ... ijs. \]d. 

Ite. payd for two new Badricks & mending 

the ould 
Ite. payd William Charlton for mending the 

clappers 

1619 Item for mending y*" bellfree window ... ... iji'. 

Ite. for a locke for y'' bellfree dore ... •■. \\\\]d. 

1620 layd out to Goodman Terry for two bell ropes iij<r. \]d. 
for oyl for the bells ... ... ... ... iij^. 

162 1 laid out for three bell Ropes ... ... ... \s. 

laid out to John Newport for mendinge of the 

fram of the bells and for shingells and other 

worke ... ... ... ... ... \\]s. 

laid out for nailles and for mendinge of the 
clapere of the great bell and mending the 
badrickes ... ... ... ... ... ]s. \n]d. 

1622 Item payd for two bell ropes ... ... ... iijx. \]d. 

Item payd for mending a Badrick ... ... iij^. 

1623 for leather to mend the badrickes and for mend 

of them ... ... ... ... ... \]d. 

Item payd to hem (Newport) more for worke 

he did about the belles to fasten them in ther 

stockes ... ... ... ... ... iij.''". \\d. 

Item payd to hem more for the second bell 

wheele making ... ... ... ... iiij.f. 

1624 Item payde for bell ropes ... ... ... \s. 

Item payde for a badricke 

1625 Item for mending the Clapper of the great 

Bell x\]d. 

Item for mending the great bell Badricke ... iiijV. 

Item paide to John Postc for new hangene the 

midcll bell ... ... ... ... ... \s. 



jj6 Inscriptions. 

1626 Ite. for bell Ropes ... ... ... ... ^s. 6d. 

1628 pd wm Charlton for mending the clapper of 

the tennor bell ... ... ... ... 3.?. 2d. 

1629 Inprimis paid to Joseph Hatch for nevve cast- 

ing & making of the Tennor Bell ... 

Item to him for ouer mettall ... 

Item for getting out of the Bell 

Item paid to M' Mastirs for suspending 

Item paid for loading the bell... 

Item for cariage of the bell 

Item for charges when the Bell was caried . . . 

Item for fetching & waying the Bell ... 

Item for heipe to way the Bell at Maidstone 

Item p'^ for sending a letter to Joseph Hatch 

Item pd for horse hier thether 

Item for getteng the Bell into the steeple 

Item pd to Poste for newe hanging & mend- 
ing 

Item pd for 3 new Badrickes ... 

Item pd for 3 newe ropes 

Item pd to Willia Cha'lton for mending the 
clapper of the Tennor Bell ... 

Item pd for making Ik writing the Articles of 
Indenture betweene Hatch & vs ... 
1631 Itm to Post for a planke to fasten the frame 
of the Bells 

Itm more to Post for his worke about the 
same ... 

Itm paid to Abraham Charlton for hookes 
and rides of the church gate & for nailes & 
Iron wedgs to make fast the frames of the 
Bells 

Itm paid to Terry for Bell ropes 

Itm for mendinge the Bawdricke of the greate 
Bell 

Itm paid to Willm Chalton for mendinge the 
Bell clappers ... 
1634-5 Ilm for a Bell wheele ... 



4//. 


13.^. 


4d. 


4//. 


4^-. 


od. 




T5. 


id. 




IS. 


od. 




OS. 


lid. 




12S. 


od. 




IS. 


2d. 




2S. 


5^- 




OS. 


5^- 




OS. 


6d. 




IS. 


od. 




3^- 


Id. 




Ss. 


od. 




6s. 


lod. 




6s. 


(yd. 




\os. 


4d. 




4S. 


od. 




IS. 


od. 




IS. 


6d. 



3^- 


4d. 


5^- 


6d. 


IS. 


od 


2S. 


6d. 


XS. 





Inscriptions. 

Itm. for Bellropes 

Itm. mendinge the Bell wheele 

Itm. for board to mend the bell wheele 

1635 Itm. delivered the Belfounder in hand 
Itm. for' writing th'articles for the Belfounder 
Itm. paid Goodman Chapman for one day and 

a halfes worke and for a catch for the Bell.. 
Itm. for wayenge the greate bell W^'^ weighes 

930''- paid for it 
Itm. for wayenge the greate bell when she 

came home ... 
Itm. for fetching & carienge the Bell ... 
Itm. for Breade & beere when the Bell was 

pulled up 
Itm. paid to Goodman Chapman for two dayes 

worke about the Bell (&c.) ... 
Itm. for two Bell Ropes 
Itm. for Lether for the Baudricks 
Itm. for the makinge of the Baudrickes 
Itm. paid to the Belfownders man for cominge 

ow' to hang y"-' clajjper 

1636 Itm. layd out to William Tilden for mendin 

the bell whells 
Itm. layd out to the bell fownder for casting of 

the tenor bell 
Itm. for a quittens 
Itm. layd out for a Bellrope ... 
Itm. for worke about the bels (&c.) ... 
Itm. layd out for bel ropes 
Itm. layd out to \Villiam Charlton for the be 

clappers 
163.S Itimc for To beleropes... 

Itime laid out to John Charton for mciuling 

the bels 
Item for a new bcle wheele 

1641 layd out to goodman Terry for two bell ropes 

1642 paid for two bellrojis ... 

1643 Item paid fur bellrops . .. 



iiij//. 





337 


V.S-. 




\\)S. 






\\\]d. 


iij.s-. 


\\\]d. 


iiij.>-. 




\\]S. 




]s. 


\y{. 


]^. 


\\\]d. 


\]s. 


\\\]d. 



\\\)d. 



\\]S. 




\s. 


VJd. 


\]S. 


\'d. 


]s. 


vj./. 


\]S. 


\]d. 


]s. 


iiij(/. 


\s. 






\]d. 


\]s. 


\]d. 


\s. 




\s. 






\\']d. 


6s. 


Ad. 


IS. 


od. 


()S. 


Sd. 


\]s. 




4-v. 


Gd. 


9^. 


6d. 


X 





',',0, 



Insci'iptions, 



1647 It. for three belropse ... 

" for puting out the Kings Armes " ... 
1649-50 Item paid for three new whiles for the beles 

It. for iornwork for the beles ... 
1650-51 It. paid for bell ropes ... 

It. for taking doune the brase in the churche 
1653 Itm. paid to John Charlton for yron vvorke 

about the Bell wheele 
1657 Item for bellropes 
1659 Similar entry ... 
1663 Similar entry ... 

1665 Paid to goodman Chambarlen for a new batha 
reck for the bell 
mor for my worke on the beles 
It. for mending the fram of the beles... 
It. paid to goodman Gilbart for tember for the 

belles frame ... 
It. for a rope for the greate bele 
It. for 2 bell Ropes 
It. payd for mending the bells... 
It. for bell rops... 
It. p"^ for bell Roops ... 
It. p'' for the bethricke of the bells . . . 
p'^ for mending y^ Bell 
p'' for Bellropes 
payde for thre bellropes 
mending the bell 
mending the Bells ... 
It. payd for the bell Rops 
It. paied to Robart Wilkens for new hinging 

the belles and mending the wheles... 
It. paied for the greate bell Rope 
It. paied to Goodman Hatch* for iorne worke 
for the belles... 
1679-80 paid for belropes 
1680-81 for a new belrope 



1666-7 
166S-9 

1671 



1672 




1674 




1676 








1677 




167S 




678-9 





l//. 



6.-. 


od. 


\s. 


Oil. 


I OS. 


od. 


6s. 


od- 


^s. 


od 


OS. 


2d 


i]s. 




7s. 


od 


Ts. 


od 


IS. 


Gd 


IS. 


lod. 


OS. 


6d 


2S. 


od 


95. 


od 


3^- 


4d. 


4^. 


6d 


5^- 


od 


7^. 


6d 


8s. 


6d. 


2S. 


6d 


IS. 


od. 


gs. 


od 


8s. 


6d 


2S. 


od 


2S. 


od 


9S. 


od 


i8s. 


od 


3^- 


6d. 


V- 


gd 


5'- 


od 


2S. 


6d. 



(?) William Hatch, churchwarden this year. 





339 


4S. 


6d. 


IS. 


od. 


'Ts. 


Gd. 



Inscriptions. 

1681-2 For 2 new Belropes 
1682-3 P' Wilkins mending y*^ Bell 
p'' for Three Bellrops ... 
It. paid to goodman Wilkins for hanging the 

bel 7^. od. 

1683-4 It. paid to goodman Wilkines for mending the 
belles... 
16S5 It. for y"" belropes and 3 matts 

It. for work about y° bells and bel wheels 

It. paid for one bathereck for the lettel bell ... 

paied for 3 bell Ropes ... 

paied for a new gouging for the lettel bell and 

poting it in . . . 
It. paied to the Chapender for 5 dayes worke 
&:c. &c. mending . . . the bells 
1687 It. p*^ to gooman copen for menden the bel 

whell 

It. p'' for a set of belrops 
16S9-90 It. p'' Goodman Coppen for a new Beel wheele 
and menden of the other Beels 
1690-1 for belropes ... ... ... ... ... 

for mending y'' bell wheels 
1 69 1-2 for bell ropes ... 
1692-3 for mending y" bell gugen and lathar ... 

for a nu set of bell ropes 
1693-4 paid for bell Ropes 
1 702-3 p'' to Good'" peirce for a new Stock and wheele 

for the tennor bell ... ... ... ... \Ii. \^s. od. 

for mending the two other wheels & pitting in 

new Satys Kiehes and fiting in the 6 brasses 

and taking out 3 godgings and fasening in 

Againe and two ne^/olly Roicls* Sz puting in 

1704-5 p'' to John Broumfield for Hanging y'' Bells ... 

gave to y" Ringers at y" Queen's Coronation... 

1707-8 p'' for a winch for y" Bells 

p'' for Oyl for y" Bells ... 



IS. 


Ad. 


\os. 


od. 


3^- 


6d. 


25-. 


od. 


7.?. 


od. 


2S. 


Gd 


I 05-. 


od. 


2S. 


od 


8^. 


Gd, 


10^, 


od 


7-9. 


od. 


3^- 


od. 


7^-. 


od 


I.e. 


od. 


7.S-. 


od. 


7,^. 


od 



t//. 


2S. 


od. 


12//: 


OS. 


od. 




2S. 


od. 




2S. 


od. 




OS. 


6d. 



Sir, ciy. meanini^. 



.\ 2 



I72S-6 


1726-7 


1729-30 


I75S 


1759 



12S. 


0,1 


3^- 


od. 


65. 


od. 


17^. 


od. 


5^- 


od 


IS. 


6d. 


8s. 


od. 


14s. 


od. 


14s. 


od. 



340 Inscriptions. 

To ]\r Stevenson for mending y" Eell weals ... \li. 

Gave the Ringers at the King's Crown-'" 

Will Jcffery for mending the Bells frame & 

Stuff i//. 

Paid for Trushes* and Bell Ropes 

p'' Abell Crispe for Sheetingt and new linding 

the ball of the Bell Clapper... 
p'^ for a leather for the Clapper 
p'^ for Bell Ropes 
1764-5 for new Stocks J ... ... ... ... i//. 

177S A sett Bell ropes 

The following copy of the contract made with Joseph Hatch for re-casting 
the tenor bell was made by Mr. Tyssen, some years ago, from the original in 
the possession of Walter B. Gilbert, Esq., of Maidstone : 

Articles of Agreement indented made and agreed upon the seventeenth 
day of September anno domini 1635 Between Henry Burdon and Thomas 
Crispe Churchwardens of the Parish of Loose in the County of Kent of the 
one part and Joseph Hatch of Ulcombe in the County aforesaid Bellfounder 
of the other part as followeth viz. : 

Iraprimus the said Churchwardens shall carry or cause to be carried and 
delivered unto the said Joseph Hatch at his dwelling house in Ulcombe the 
Tenor Bell of the parish Church of Loose at or before the last day of this 
present month of September to the intent to have the same Bell newcast 
being now broken. 

Item the said Churchwardens or their Successors shall pay unto the said 
Joseph Hatch his executors or assignes in and upon the last Thursday which 
shall be in the month of May now next ensueing in or at the now dwelling- 
house of Gabriel Knight situate in Maidstone in the County above written the 
sum of four pounds and ten shillings of current English money for the new 
casting of the said Tenor Bell. 

Item the said Joseph Hatch shall new cast the said Tenor Bell and make 
the same tuneable with the rest of the Bells in Loose aforsaid and also shall 
at or before the first day of November next ensueing the date hereof deliver 
the said Bell sound and tuneable at Ulcombe aforesaid unto the said Church- 
wardens or their successors requireing the same. And if it shall happen the 

* Hassocks. + Qy. shilling or casting. % Not for the bells, I think. 



Inscriptions. 341 

said Bell not to prove sound and tuneable to the rest of Bells in Loose afore- 
said then the said Joseph Hatch shall make the same sound and tuneable 
within two months after the bell is delivered unto him and so continue by the 
space of one whole year after she is hanged fit for the ringing and if the said 
Bell shall be broken in ringing within one year after the same shall be hanged 
in the steeple of the Church at Loose or not prove tuneable to the rest of the 
IJells there then the said Joseph Hatch having the Bell brought to him to 
Ulcombe shall new cast the same so often' till the same bell shall continue 
sound and tuneable for the space of one whole year after the same shall be 
hanged in the steeple ready to be rung. 

Item the said Churchwardens or their successors shall pay unto the said 
Joseph Hatch his executors or assignes on the same last Thursday in May at 
the place aforesaid twelve pence a pound for each pound of good metal which 
shall be put into the Bell if the Bell shall weigh so much the more so that the 
same metal which shall be so put in exceed not the weight of twenty-five 
pounds weight and if the same good metal which shall be so put into the 
Bell aforesaid shall exceed the same weight of twenty-five pounds then the 
said Churchwardens shall pay no more for the same but four pence for each 
pound weight of good metal which shall be put into the Bell aforesaid. 

Item if the said Joseph Hatch shall take any metal out from the Bell afore- 
said or spoil or waste any that then he shall ]:iay for each pound twelve pence 
so that there be not above twenty-five pounds taken away or wasted and if 
there be more than twenty-five pounds taken away of the metal of the Bell or 
wasted that then the said Joseph Hatch shall pay thirteen pence for each 
pound weight that shall be taken away or wasted from the entire weight of the 
Bell aforsaid. 

In witness whereof the parties aforesaid to these Articles interchangably 
have put their hands and seals the day and year aI)ove written. 

Joseph Hatch I H his mark. 

Sealed and delivered in the presence of 
John Charlton 
Henry H B Broman 
his mark. 

LUDDENHAM. St. Mary. 1 P,l11. 

I, 32-in. iuscpli Ijafcli iitAttc mc 1610 
T B S C 

000 
O 



342 Inscnptions. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Commence with tellers — 3 x 3 
for male, 3 x 2 for a female, then toll. 

This is repeated early on the morning of the funeral, and before the actual 
service the bell is tolled. 

Otherwise, the bell is only used to summon to service. 

Hasted states that there were three bells here in his time, in which I think he 
is probably correct ; there is plenty of room in the tower for three beUs. The 
frame, however, is for one only, and the sexton knows of no tradition of there 
ever having been more. 

LUDDESDOWN. SS. Peter and Paul. 3 Bells. 

I., 28-in. Blank. 

II., 31-in. + (Fig. 20) f|> + (Fig. 5) U (Fig. 19) «){(> 
III., 34-in. + il|c maria Itafniua 

XHcaxis ■& ^fatnltanU ;i5T.0mtt>etts J>IlLrn^tTn 1866 

The treble seems to be a pre-Reformation bell. For mention of No. 2, see 
p. 36. The old inscription on the former tenor has been reproduced by 
Messrs. Mears and Stainbank ; but if it is intended for a fac-simile, it is cer- 
tainly not the best I have ever seen. See p. 41 for an account of the former 
tenor, which was certainly a Nottingham production. 

Passing bell rung as soon as possible after death. Minute strokes for about 
half an hour. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 for female, both at beginning 
and end. Tenor bell for adults, middle one for children. 

A bell tolled for about half an hour before funeral. 

Sundays. — Treble bell rung for early celebration ; all three chimed for 
other services, ringing in on one bell last five minutes. 

One bell rung for daily matins and evensong. 

Best thanks to the Rev. A. Wigan, Rector. 

LULLINGSTONE. St. Botolph. i Bell. 

I., 282-in. Blank. 

Bell apparently coeval with the church, so says Dr. Raven in his MS. 
notes. 

T. R. E. Item one bell in the steple. 

Mem: cxcepte on bell whereof a cloke is nowe made 

for the comodilie of the parish. 



Iiisci^iptions. 343 

LUTON. Christ Church. i Bell. 

I., 171-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1842 

No local uses apparently. Thanks to Rector, the Rev. E. A. Claydon. 

LYDD. All Saints. 5 Bells. 

I., 30-in. wfcjili I|itfcl| nta^c iitc © 160S 
II., 32-in. Same. 
III., 34?, -in. Same. 

IV., 38-in. lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME © 1607 
v., 43-in. lOHN ^ HVDSON * MADE * ME * 1693 o O HENRY 
O lENKIN O O «ij(> RICHARD o HANNEKIN O 
CHVRCH O WARDENS OOOOOOOO 

Tenor bell tolled (twelve strokes) on the first Saturday in each month for 
sessions. The curfew bell is also rung.* 

There are most interesting Corporation accounts (which I have vainly 
endeavoured to get at), containing frecjuent mention of the church bells. 
From the report on them given in the fifth report of H.M. Historical MSS. 
Commission, I have extracted the following : 

1445 Paid Thomas Love carpenter for making the gynne for casting+ 
of the belfry. Paid Richard Wodeman Carpenter for making 
doors for the new belfry 26^. 8^. 

1445-6 Received of lyjte selvyr 30^. this year which was spent for making 
of the beleflore and hanging the bells. The gift of William 
Say Esquire to the new work of the belfry y. 4^. Lead for 
the belfry mentioned bought in London & shipped to Sand- 
wich. 

1447-9 Delivered to the Church Wardens of Lyde for expenses upon 
the hangyng of the bells 53^. 4^. Paid John Bale and 
Laurence Elys their expenses at London about the bells 
C)S. lod. 
1449-50 Paid John Buntyng an old debt due to the servant of the Bailiff 
of Marshelonde that carts might pass upon the wall (sujjcr 
Wallam) when the belfry was making according to a promise 
made to him 20^. 

* " Arch. Cant.," xiii. 255. j I <lon'l think this word can be correct. 



344 Inscriptions. 

LYDDEN. St. Mary. i Bell. 

I., 9^-in, Blank, 

T. R. E. First ij bells in the stepell. 

Apparently no local uses worth record. Thanks to Vicar, Rev. J. L. 
Latham. 

LYMINGE. SS. Mary and Eadburga. 6 Bells. 

I., 33-in. W^' Sawkins J Cloak Church Wardens 18 10 T Mears & 

Son of London Fecit 
IL, 33^in. lOHN ^ WILNAR ^ MADE <^ ME ^ 1631 {> W N 
III., 34-in. Messrs Tho^ Forderd & Jn" Swaine Church Wardens 
W" Mears of London Fecit 17 85 

IV., 38-in. will'^ march robart wood c w sam~ knight 

FECIT 1727 
v., 41-in. Same as on No. III. 
VI., 46-in. RICHARD KENNETT CHURCH WARDEN 1759 
LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 

T. R. E. Item v belles in the steple. 

Item ij hand belles and ij sacryng belles. 

In 1756-7, Mr. Faussett reports the bells here to be five in number, with 
the following inscriptions : 

I. Present No. II. 

II. J. B. 15S5. In y"" name of God Amen T H 
IIL Present No. IV. 

IV. William Ridgen Samuel Knight fecit 1727 
V. Sancta Maria Ora Pro Nobis. 
Thomas Duffyn, Vicar of this parish, who died 1508, bequeathed ;^20 
towards the tower of the church, and ^12 for a new bell. This last was the 
old tenor (which was recast in 1759), of which Mr. Faussett has preserved for 
us the inscription. 

Local tradition affirms that the smallest bell was cast on the green near the 
church, and that silver coins were thrown into the molten metal by members 
of the Honywood family of Sibton. This no doubt refers to the old treble 
(present 2nd), and is ])robably true. 

Best thanks to the Rev. Canon Jenkins, Rector. 



Inscriptions. 345 

LYMPNE. St. Stephen. 5 Bells. 

I., 29-in. THO I AM BUT SMALL I WILL BE HEARD AMONGST 

YOU ALL •:• R •:• CATLIN FECLr 1742 
IL, 3oi-in. ROBERT CATLIN CAST US ALL 1742 
IlL, 33-in. lOHN BRIDGER lOHN FIRMINGER ROBERT CATLIN 

1742 
IV., 36-in. R .;. C .;. FECIT 1744 

v., 391-in. HENRY BACNALL VICAR THOMAS GREENLAND 
RICHARD HOWARD CHURCHWARDENS R •;• C 
FECIT 1742 
T. R. E. First iiij bells in the stepell. 

Apparently no local uses to record. Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. H. B. 
Biron. 

LYNSTEAD. SS. Peter and Paul. 5 Bells. 

I., 28Hn. lOHN ^ WILNAR ^ MADE ^ MEE ^ 1639 

II., 3 1 i-in. Rubru^firs + uvoi + uic + fccif 1597 © 
IIL, 321-in. lOHN <) WILNAR ■> 1639 
IV., 36-in. RECAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS 1884 

v., 39i-in. R0trexi,tti'a + mut-i-mi:^ + tVcit 1600 © 

The former No. 4 was by Robert Mot, and a very indifferent specimen of 
his workmanship. 

Death knell rung and differentiated for man, woman, and child, but in what 
way is not stated. Tolling at funerals. 

Sundays. — Eight o'clock (" Matins ") bell rung. Two bells tolled (? chimed) 
for services. 

Ringing on morning of Christmas Day and on New Year's Eve. 

A bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. J. Hamilton. 

10 Bells. 



I., 


3oi-in. 


Chapman & Mears of London Fecerunt 1784 


11., 


32-in. 


Same. 17S3 


IIL, 


, 33A-in. 


Same] 17 '"^4 


IV., 


34 in. 


T. Mears of L,ondon Fecff 1S29 



2 V 



3 4 6 Inscriptions, 

v., 37-in, Same as Nos. i and 3. 

VI., 4o|-in. Same. 

VII., 43|-in. W" Mears of London Fecit 1786 

VIII., 47-in. Same as Nos. i and 3. 

IX., 51-in. Same. 

X., 57-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 

REV" JAMES REEVE MINISTER 

HENRY ARGLES ( „T-rTT-r.^TTTTr at-.t-v-t'xto o 

THOMAS LAURANCEf CHURCHWARDENS 1840 

MAIDSTONE. Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I., 26-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1828 

St. Faith. ' i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

St. James (Mission Church). i Bell. 

One modern bell. 

St. John the Evangelist. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

St, Michael and All Angels. 6 Bells. 

A light peal of six by Warner and Sons. It is hoped some day to add two 
more — treble and tenor — and room is left in the frame for them. 

Bells rung for Sunday morning and evening services, chimed for all others. 

St. Paul. i Bell. 

I., 291-in. NAYLOR VICKERS & C° i860 SHEFFIELD N° 2129 
E. RIEPE'S PATENT CAST STEEL 

St. Philip. i Bell. 

One bell by Gillett, Bland, and Co., of Croydon — weight, 8 cvvt. 

St. Peter. i Bell. 

A small 3 cwt. tinkler by Gillett & Co., of Croydon. 

St. Stephen — Tovil. i Bell. 

I., 25-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1841 



Inscriptions, 347 

MALLING (EAST). St. James. 6 Bells. 

I., 29-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1831. 
II., 29|-in. THIS BELL WAS ADDED BY BENEFACrORS 1 B ME 

FECIT 1695 © 
IIL, 31-in. lAMES BARTLET ME FECIT 1695 
IV., 32|-in. Same. 
v., 36 in. Same. 

VL, 40-in. lOHN GROSSE VICAR 1695 ABRAHAM WALTER 
THOMAS HOBERT CH WARDENS 

® lAMES BARTLET ME FECIT 

Death knell rung as soon as practicable. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3 x 2 for 
female. 

Bell tolled at funerals. For old ringers a dumb peal is rung. 

Sundays. — Bells used for services only. Treble bell tolled for early cele- 
bration. For other services bells chimed fifteen minutes and treble tolled 
fifteen minutes. Sermon bell discontinued for many years ; traditionally it 
(the treble, present 2nd bell) was rung on Sunday mornings when there was 
no sermon. 

Vestry bell disused fifty years. 

Peals on Easter Day, Christmas Day, Epiphany, Ascension Day, Whit- 
sun Day, and Harvest Thanksgiving ; also on Queen's Birthday and Accession 
Day. Ringing on 5th November stopped (Deo Gratias) by present Vicar, 
eight years ago. 

The present treble was added in 1831, and the old "Sanctus" bell, which 
hung at the top of the tower, was done away with. This last was locally 
known as the "Tinker" (? Tinkler). 

Best thanks to the Vicar, Rev. S. Wigan. 

Holy Trinity, New Hythe. 3 Bells. 

I. ^ No particulars. They are dated 1S54, and are all but certainly from 
II. I the Whitechapel Foundry, but I do not find them in the f(jundry 
III.) lists. 



MALLING (WEST). St. Mary. 8 Bells. 

1., 26-in. I j^E^/^j^s & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1S69 
II., 27-in. j 

2 Y 2 



34^ Inscriptions. 

III., 2Si-in. <$> lOHN « AN ^ CHRISTOPHER a HODSON <^ MADE 

A ME ,^ 1677 O O 
' IV., 29i-in. lOHM WILMAR 1637 
v., 3iWn. ABRAHAM MASON lOHN FLEETE CHYRCH- 
WARDENS 1698 

I © B lOHN WEEKI,EY IVNIOR GENT 
VI., 34-in. Same as No. 4. 
VII., 372-in- Same as No. 4. 
VIII., 4oi-in. Same as No. i. 

The former tenor had the following inscription : 

^)f?OOO^h lOHN * AN ^ CHRISTOPHER * HODSON ^ MADE 

* ME * 1677 O ')|p RICHARD * SEAGERS * WILLIAM * 

DVMWOOD •¥ CHVRCH * WARDENS 

MAPLESCOMBE. No Church. 

In 1552 : On little bell of bras broken with the fallyng downe cute of the 
saide steple decayed aboute ij yeres last past. 

MARDEN. St. Michael. 6 Bells. 

I., 32-in. At Proper Times My Voice I will Raise &: Sound To 

My Sukscriers Prase Tho^ Lestar Made Me 1745 
IL, 33i--in. M"" John Burr Church Warden 1775 P'^ck & Chapman 

OF London Fecit 
in., 3s|-in. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1758 
IV., 38-in. Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1777 
v., 41-in. Tho^ Lester of London Cast me 

Geo Osborne & Iames Packham C" Wardens 1745 
YI., 46-in. EDWARD o BESBEECH ^ lOHN * HODSON * MADE 
* ME * 1693 * 
•iJpOOOOOOO EDWARD * GARVISS * CHVRCH 
^ WARDENS 

The curfew bell is rung here during the winter months. 
Death knell rung as soon as notice given. Tellers— 3 x 3 for a man, 2x3 
for a woman. Tolling at funerals "from the church to the grave." 

Sundays.— Bells rung at 8 (" Matins " bell) and 9 30 a.m. (Qy., Is this 



MARGATE 


I-, 


. 32- 


in. 


n.; 


. 33- 


■in. 


III.^ 


.36- 


•in. 


IV., 


i 39: 


•-in. 


v., 


4IJ 


L-in. 


VI.. 


, 42- 


in. 


VII., 


45^ 


,-in. 


VIIL, 


52- 


in. 



Inscj'ipiious. 349 

last for 10 o'clock service, or is it the old "Mass" hell a little later than 
usual ?) 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

A bell for vestry meetings. 

Sermon hell used to he rung after morning service. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. T. A. Carr. 

St. John Baptist. 8 Bells. 

T Mears of London Fecit 1823 
Same. 

W" Mears of London Fecit 1785 
Same. 
Same. 
Same. 
Same. 

Jn" Dannddeleon Mess*^"^ Tho^ Wood & Jn" Brooman 
Ch. Wardens 1785 W" Mears of London Fecit 
Hasted notes here six bells, without doubt the present III. to VIII. 
Brayley in his " History of Thanet," dated 1819, states that the tower con- 
tains a ring of five bells, the 3rd and 4th of which are inscribed respectively 
with the following lines : 

XTTTiissi ;i5)c <3 cits ^altcti J^lnmcn CSabt^ielis 

And that the tenor was the gift of one of the Dandelyons, and bore this inscrip- 
tion : 

;i5)auni»Elcim 
I X ^» ^^Ji^inifafi; .©"actta S'xi ^cc ^^m\mna ;i3cafa 
It is quite clear that Brayley was copying from some much older writer, as 
the five bells had been recast into six many years before the date of his 
book. Probably the tenor was the work of John Sturdy (see p. 38), and as 
he was living until 1449, the bell is quite likely to have been the gift of the 
John Dandelyon who died in 1445, and whose brass is still preserved in the 
church. 

Brayley states further, on the authority of Lewis, that the inhabitants of 
Margate were wont to repeat the following rhyme, apropos of this bell : 
" John Duundelcon with his great dog 
.Brought over this bell on a mill cog." 



;^SO Inscriptions. 

Mr, G. P. Bevan, in his "Tourist's Guide to Kent," goes farther, and states 
that these lines were on the bell itself. Here are two cases of copying with- 
out verifying. It is a pity that compilers of books don't take a little more 
trouble to ascertain the correctness of the facts they detail. 

The fact of the gift is perpetuated by " Dannddeleon " on the present 
tenor. No doubt, too, the lines are traditional, probably somewhat altered 
from their original form. " Cog " or " Cogue " is an old English term for a 
small vessel or boat. 

Since writing the above I have consulted Lewis's History of " The Isle of 
Tenet," and I find that Brayley has in the main copied from him. Lewis, 
who wrote in 1723, is very severe on the fad for recasting which obtained in 
his day. He states that the church has "five very tunable ones, and by 
much the largest of any hereabouts ; the other parishes having cast their old 
bells anew, and, to save charges, made candlesticks of them as to sound." 

He also gives the inscriptions (incorrectly, however,) on the then treble and 
second as follows : 

Treble. Thomas Hench made me 

Second. Joceb hath made me 1615 T N R P. 

My readers will have no difficulty in fathering these upon Thomas and 
Joseph Hatch, respectively. 

MARGATE. Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I, 41-in. T Mears of London Fkcit 1829 

St. Paul, Cliftonville. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

MARK BEECH. Holy Trinity. t Bell. 

Church about thirty-five years old ; presumably one equally modern bell. 
Death knell as soon as convenient. Tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 3x2 for 
woman. Bell tolled both before and after funerals. 
Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. R. S. Hunt. 

MATFIELD. Vide Brenchley. 



Insci'iptions. 3 5 i 

MEOPHAM. St. John Bai>tist. 5 Bells. 

I., 31-in. I S R W AMTHOMY BAR TLl^T MICHAEL DARBIE 

MADE MEE 1650 
IJ., 32-in. «ij(> o O O O ^ lOHN ^y AN h CHRISTOPHER {. HODSON 
V MAIDE /) ME () 1677 
'iJi'O O O O-iJc* WILLI AM* SWIFT ( FRANCIS vBRIGHTE 
*C^ WARDENS ^ 
IIL, 341-in. lOHN * AN * CHRISTOPHER * HODSON * MAIDE 

* ME * 1677 000 

^ WILLIAM * SWIFT * FRANCIS * BRIGHT * C * 
WARDENS o O O 
IV., 37-in. MICHAEL DARBIE MADE ME 165 1 

W R 
v., 41-in. <jj(. CHRISTOPHER * HODSON * MADE * ME * 1679 
')}(' o o o o 
WILLIAM ^ SWIFT ^ FRANCES * BRIGHT * CHVRCH 

• WARDENS ^ O ^ 

Thorpe ("Registrum Roffense") states that "within the memory of several old 
men, now living at Meopham, some of the bells of the Church being to be 
new cast, and there being wanting a sufficient quantity of metal to do it, some 
persons (one of which is now living) tore off all the brass inscriptions from the 
stones in the Church (except that of FoUham before-mentioned) and threw 
them into the melted metal to add to its quantity." 
^^ This would seem to apply to the recasting of Nos. 2 and 3 in 1677. 

St. Laurence. 6 Bells. 

ARGUPA RESONANS CAMPANULA 
: EAYRE FECIT 1746 
: EAYRE S^ NEOTS 1746 

ENUS REX lUDEORUM FILI DEI 
MISERERE MEI J: EAYRE FECIT 1746 
IV., 34-in. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIA DEI J : EAYRE S^ 

NEOTS FECIT ANNO DOM: 1746 
v., 34^in. C/ELORUM CHRISTE PLACIT TIBI REX SONUS 
ISTE : UTILE DULCI O O O ANNO DOM : 1746 O O 
VI., 38 '-in. DISCE MORI NOSTRO V1VER1<: DISCE SONG EARL 
OF WESTMORELAND ANNO DOM: 1746 



MEREWORTH. 


L, 28-in. 


GRATA SIT 




VOCE I 


XL, 29-in. 


Same motto. I 




+ 


IIL, 31-in. 


IHS NAZAR 



oo- 



/ use ript ions 



iJeath knell rung as soon as notice received, but not alter sunset. Com- 
mence with tellers — -3 x 3 for male, 3x2 for female — always on tenor; then 
toll tenor for adults or 2nd bell for children, and repeat tellers at finish. 

On day of funeral a knell is rung at 8 a.m., but wiihoiit tellers, and the 
tenor is tolled before the service. 

Sundays. — Treble bell rung for a few minutes at 8 a.m. (" Matins" bell). 

For services, bells rung or chimed. 

Peals on Easter morning, Christmas Eve, and Whitsun Day (morning). On 
last night of year, a dumb peal before midnight and an open one after. 

MERSHAM. St. John Baptist. 8 Bells. 

I., 251-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 

THE GIFT OF 
THE REV" R B KNATCHBULL HUGESSEN 
RECTOR 1880 
C BATES ^ 
T BAKER/ CHURCH WARDENS 

II., 27in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 

THE GIFT OF 
SIR WYNDHAM KNATCHBULL BART 
1880 
III., 29-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1847 The 
Gift of the R'' Hon'''-"^ Sir Edward Knatchbull 
Bart 
IV., 29 in. tufcpli li^iUli nmti^ mt 1612 
v., 33-in. Same. © 16 12 

YL, 34-in. Same. 

VIL, 38-in. IOSEPH HATCH MADE ME © 161 2 
VIII. , 42-in. Same. 

T. R. E. Item v great bells yn the stepell with ij corse bells. 

No information as to passing bell. 

Ringing on Easter Day, Christmas Eve and Day, Whitsun Day, and New 
Year's Eve ; also on those Sundays when there is a mid-day celebration. 

The recasting of the ring of five in 161 2 would seem to have been done on 
the spot. In digging a grave a few years since in a corner of the churchyard, 
traces of a fire were found and a piece of (gutter) bell metal. This last was 
I>ut into the melting pot when the two trebles were added in 18S0. 

Best thanks to the Rev. IC. C. Lucey, Rector. 



Inscriptions. ^ c a 

MILSTEAD. St. Mary and Holy Cross. 3 Bells. 

I., 25J-in. THE REVEREND W" BATCHELLER D : D : RECTOR 
R : PHELPS ME FECIT 1730 

n., 27-in. 000 

III., 31-in. U (Fig. 25) U (Fig. 25) U (Fig. 27) 

No. 2 has three coins only. It is difficult to place in point of date, but is 
certainly a pre-Reformation bell. 

Tenor by Henry Jordan of London (see p. 44). 

Death knell as soon as possible, but not after sunset. Tellers— 3 x 3 for 
male, 2 x 2 for female. On day of funeral, a knell at 8 a.m. Strike bell 200 
times, then tellers as above, then toll for a time. Toll again half an hour 
before funeral. 

Sundays. — Tenor rung at 8 o'clock, called "Summons" (? "Sermon") 
bell. 

Bells chimed for service. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. H. Hilton. 

MILTON BY CANTERBURY. St. Nicholas. i BelL 

I., i8-in. 1S29 

MILTON BY GRAVESEND. SS. Peter and Paul. 6 Bells. 

I., 31-in. Thoal'^s Mears & Son of London Fecit 1810 

G Rich W Cook Church Wardens 
IL, 31-in. lOHN J HODSON ) MADE ^ MEE + 1656 \ WILLIAM [ 

HVLL \ 
III., 32i-in. lOHN k HODSON /) MADE ^; MEE {' 1656 \ LETTER ■} 

BROWNE k WATERMAN \ 
IV., 34^-in. THOMAS \ MORRIS % SMITH j W | H | lOHN \ HOD- 
SON h MADE h MEE % 1656 | 
v., 38-in. I lOHN h HODSON k MADE •} ME *} 1656 + lOHN ,) 
SMITH ,} DISSTILAR 
VI., 42-in. 1 lOHN V HODSON J MADE h ME h 1656 h WILLIAM /; 
ANTROBVS k lOHN h HALL k CHVRCH \ WARDNES. 
US TM « PB MASARS % % 

A bell tolled at funerals. 

Three bells chimed for Sunday services. 

2 Z 



354 Inscriptions. 

No ringers and consequently no ringing. 

Thanks to Rev. W. D. Johnston, Rector. 

In Cruden's " History"of Gravesend" it is stated that in 1797 the then five 
bells had not been rung for many years, owing to the dilapidated condition of 
the frame. A new frame was made and the present treble added in 1810 at 
the expense of the parish. The inscriptions are f given in the book, but, as 
usual, incorrectly. 

MILTON BY GRAVESEND. Christ Church. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I., 251-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH MILTON 1845 
AD MAGNAM DEI GLORIAM 

St. Andrew. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

MILTON BY SITTINGBOURNE. Holy Trinity. 5 Bells. 

L, 29-in. O lAMES O BARTLET MADE O MEE 1681 © 
II., sofin. I AMES BARTLET MADE MEE 1681 ® 

III., 324-in. Same. 

IV., 36-in. Same. 

v., 40-in. lOHN O HVNT O THOMAS PACKMAN CHVRCH- 
WARDENS 1 68 1 Q 

The whole ring in bad order, and tenor cracked by carelessness a few years 
ago. 

MILTON BY SITTINGBOURNE. St. Paul. 

There is no bell ; but the bell at the Market House, measuring 28^ inches, 
and inscribed : 

SH ') RF ^ CW <j> lOYm () WILMAR <> MADE {> ME '^ 1631 ^ 

is used to call to service, and for funerals and other parish purposes. It is, 
therefore, reckoned among the church bells. 

It was formerly rung at market-time, and on Shrove Tuesday* and every 
night at eight as curfew until the cholera year. 

* "Pancake" Bell. 



Inscriptions. 355 

MINSTER IN SHEPPEY. SS. Mary and Sexburga. 5 Bells. 

I., 29-in. c;iLLETT & CO CROYDON RECAST 1883 

II., 31-in. luilliam I|afcl| mat»e luc 1663 

III., 33-in. Same. I P 1663 

IV., 36-in. WILLIAM HATCH MADE ME T D T M C W © 1663 

v., 39i-in. Same. S S T D T M C W © 1663 

Death Knell. — Tellers at beginning — -3 x 3 for male, 3x2 for female. 
Then toll for an hour. 
Bell tolled at funerals. 

Sundays. — Bells chimed or rung for service ; " ring in " on 4th hell. 
A bell for vestry meetings. 
Best thanks to Rev. W. Bramston, Vicar. 

MINSTER IN THANET. St. Mary. 5 Bells. 

I., 35-in. iufcpri I|afcl| ntatic mt © 1636 
IL, 37-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1626 
III., 39-in. WILLIAM AMBROSS lOHM GRAPIT C W THOMAS 
PALMAR MADE MEE 1660 

IV., 42 in. KOTi:^^ x3aji:Ei©^-x- :]^:Bi,^Y-x- :Ho:n 

■X- TT^ O (Fig. 36) D 
v., 46|-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1636 

No. 4 is a very interesting bell by William Oldfeild, of Canterbury. (See 
p. 57.) The stop upon it is Fig. 35. 

The curfew is rung (on tenor) at 8 p.m. during the winter months, the 
day of the month being rung on the treble bell. 

No information as to passing bell. 

Sundays. — Bells chimed for service, except on the great festivals and I harvest 
Thanksgiving Day, when they are rung. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. A. H. Sitwell. 

MOLASH. St. Peter. i, formerly 3 P.ells. 

L, 34-in. taJV^tlj Ijafclj m.itrc ntt^ © 1608 

T. R. E. Item in the stepuU iij bells. 
Item on hand bell. 
Stolen, on other lytcll bell. 

2 / 2 



356 Inscriptions. 

Mr. Faussett has preserved for us the inscriptions on the two missing bells ; 
they were Nus. I. and III. in the ring. 

I. Sancte Martine Ora Pro Nobis 
III. Joseph Hatch made me 1622 

MONGEHAM (GREAT). St. Martin. 5 Bells. 

I., 2 7i-in. By subscription 1787 W & T Mears late Lester Pack 

& Chapman of London Fecit 
II., 2 9.Vin. Mears & Stainbank Founders London 1876 
III., 31-in. Rich" Wood Ch Warden W & T Mears late Lester Pack 

& Chapman of London Fecit 1787 
IV., 335-in. Mears & Stainbank Founders London 1876 
v., 36-in. G Mears & C^ Founders London 1862 

In 175S there were only four bells. 

Death knell rung immediately notice is received. Tellers at end of tolling 
— 3 X 3 for man, 3 x 2 for woman, 3 x i for child. 

On day of funeral at 7 a.m. the bell is tolled for about half an hour — " three 
times together for a man, twice for a woman, and once for a child." Before 
funeral, tenor bell tolled for an hour, minute strokes. 

Sundays. — Tenor bell rung at 9 a.m. ("Mass" bell) and at i p.m. Bells 
rung for services. 

On Easter Day and Christmas Day peals at 7 a.m., and in the evening of 
the last night of year. 

Bell rung for vestry meetings. 

Peals on loyal and other secular anniversaries have been discontinued for 
more than twenty years. 

A dumb peal is rung on the death of the Archbishop or of a member of 
the royal family. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. J. B. Harrison. 

MONK'S NORTON. St. Peter. 3 Bells. 

I., 13-in. a\ie patcAt tic.x rx^cafni; 

ann0 lin^tstt mliccixltJtt 

XL, 2i-in. JiT^e- : It^EJJ:^^ : T]k"liC'X : HJ5-Jii"yr,i5.^<i):El 



Inscriptions, 357 

III., 23-in. + m:^^ : BMi^^m-J- ■■ m:Eij:mj-mJ^B 



T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple. 

In 1758, Mr. Faussett notes here " four bells, three of which were made by 
John Wilnar, 1631, the 4th by Joseph Hatch, 1618." 

These probably remained until the year 1847, when the wooden tower in 
which they hung was pulled down, and the four heavy bells sold for funds to 
restore the church. The present three hang in three arches in western gable, 
and were inaccessible at the time of my visit for want of a ladder. Mr. 
George Finn, of Brabourne, however, has taken a good deal of trouble to get 
the inscriptions for me, for which I owe him many thanks. They are in 
modern-antique lettering. 

MONKTON. St. Mary. 3, formerly 4 Bells. 

I., 28-in. iofcpli fiafclj mabc mc M P C W ^ 1633 
II., 29J-in. HP IP T P 1661 
III., 33-in. tufcpli Iiafiii nt.^^c m\i 1615 

The former 4th (tenor) was inscribed : 

T P MADE ME i66r }^^ ]^ CW 

Passing bell rung as soon as possible after death. Tellers (abnormal) — for 
man 3x3, for woman 3-2-3, for child 2-2-2. 

Bell tolled before funerals. 

Sundays. — One bell rung for ten minutes at 10 a.m., three bells chimed at 
10.30, then "ring in " on single bell at 10.45. 

A bell rung for vestry meetings. 

The earliest entry in the parish records connected with the bells is in 
1728. 

October II. Paid y" Ringers at y'' King's Cronation ... ... 2s. Gd. 

Best thanks to the Rev. R. L. AUnutt, Vicar. 

MOTTINGHAM. St. Andrew. 1 Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 



35^ Inscriptions. 

MURSTON. All Saints. 2, formerly 3 Bells. 

I., 25i-in. + n + tljt 
II., 33-in. lOHN CRVX CHVRCHWARDEN 1673 © 

The larger bell came from the Church of Leysdovvn. It is cracked and 
unused ; the other bell — for account of which see p. 59 — is only used to ring 
to service, and occasionally for the passing bell. It is by William Oldfeild, of 
Canterbury. 

Thanks to the Rev. A. Freeman, Rector. 

MYDLEY. No Church. 

In 1552. Item ij smale bells to rynge to servyce. 
iij sacryng bells. 

NACKINGTON. St. Mary. i Bell. 

I, 28-in. lOHM TADHV^TER C W SK 1724 

No change here since 1758, except that the belfry floor is probably much 
more rotten. To any campanist desirous of inspecting this bell I would give 
Punch's advice — " Don't." 

NETTLESTEAD. St. Mary. 4 Bells. 

I., 25-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 

TO THE (tLORY of GOD 

THE GIFT OF FRIENDS 

1885 
II., 27^-in. P W 1700 

III., 28i:-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1885 

TO THE GLORY OF GOD 

THE GIFT OF MARY ALLEN 

IV., 33-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1838 

The 2nd bell is by Philip Wightman, of London, as luas also the 3rd before 
its recasting. 

NEWCHURCH. SS. Peter and Paul. 5 Bells. 

I., 29|-in. c ^ it ntCitxts ftrtrubctts l0n>0n 

It praise yc fr|c C^J^;^ fai: it is 000b fit sintt jiitaisis Vo 
Viwx^ (LHTh fai^ if is pUMcauf a^^ ;u*aisc is camcltt. 
9 9 peter an^ \^^\\\ ueUu-Ijurcl) rcrast m^^L•c.\ll1 



Inscriptions. 359 

IL, 31-in. lOHM ^ WILNAR •} 1637 

III., 331-in. lOHPl ^ WILPIAR h MADE h ME 7 1637 

IV., 37-in. lOHM ^ WILPIAR V 1637 

v., 41-in. Same. 

T. R. E. Item iiij bells in the steple. 

Mem : Sold . . . . ij little sacryng bells. 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. Tellers at beginning — 3 x 3 
for male, 2 x 3 for female. 

Bell tolled at funerals. Occasionally a muffled peal for an old ringer. 

Sundays. — Third bell rung at 8 a.m. ("Matins" bell) and at noon. For 
services : Bells chimed half an hour, " toll in " on one bell ten minutes. 

Peals on Christmas Day and New Year's Eve ; also on Queen's Birthday 
and Coronation Day, and on 5th November. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. W. Cobb. 

NEWENDEN. St. Peter. i Bell. 

I., 20-in. G. MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 

GIVE THANKS i860 SING PRAISES t86o 

In 1 701 the church appears, from the following, to have come considerably 
to grief : 

" 24'^^ April, 1 70 1. Received for the fees of a Faculty to take down the 
ruins selling two of y*^ bells and removing the rubbish of the Parish Church 
of Newenden — with the fiat for the passing of y*^ Faculty at Lambeth in all 

;^5 \']s. A,d. being passed at the Vicar General Office. 

" C. A. Lukin." 

And the following entry in the churchwardens' accounts for that year : 

Paid for an order to take down y*" ruins of y*" 
Chancel & Steeple and repairing y*" Body of 
y'^ Church £s ijs. 4^/. 

Received for y*" Bells ^2 7 1 os. od. 

Apparently no local uses. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. W. R. Greenhill. 

NEWINGTON BY HYTHE. St. Nichot.as. 5 Bells. 

I., 27-in. SAM' KNIGHT o o FECIT o oiy^SOOOOOOO 
II., 30-in. SAM'- o O KNIGHT o O FhXTT o O 1725 



o 



60 Inscriptions. 



III., 3 1 -in. HEMRY BILTOH o CVRET o O S K o FECIT 

1725 O 
IV., 33J-in. WILLIAM o SLODDEN o THOMAS o TAYLOR CH. 

WARDENS o S K FECIT o 1725 o 
v., 38-in. lAMES BROCKMAN ESQ"^ O SAM' KNIGHT FECIT 

1725 o o 

T. R. E. First iiij bells in the stepell wherof wee doo owe to the bel- 
founder for showting* of one of the same bells xxvj^. \\\]d. 

Death knell rung as soon as possible, but not at night. Tellers — 3 x 3 for 
a man, 2 x 2 for a woman — then toll for about an hour. 

Bell tolled before funeral and when proceeding to grave. Peal for ringer 
deceased. 

Sundays. — A bell tolled for a few minutes at 9 a.m. ("Mass" bell). Bells 
rung or chimed for services. No ringing in Lent. 

Peals on Easter morning and New Year's Eve. 

Sometimes a bell for vestry. 

Best thanks to the Rev. L. Buckwell, Vicar. 

NEWINGTON BY SITTINGBOURNE. St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 27i-in. John Fowle & Rich" Sears Church Wardens Pack & 

Chapman of London Fecit 1774 
IL, 291-in. lOHM WILMAR <) 1622 MD RL HB IM WK ID WR 
RB WB CW 
IIL, 32^y-in. Blank. 
IV., 36-in. lOHN WILNARv 1622 
v., 39-in. lOHN ^ WILNAR 1622 
VI., 42i-in. lOHN WILNAR ^ MADE ^ ME 1622 

Death Knell. — Tenor for adults, a small one for a child. Tellers — 3 x 3 
for a male, 3 x 2 for a female. On day of burial, bell tolled for half an hour 
in the early morning, and again for the same period before the funeral. 

Sunday Services. — Bells chimed, ten minutes tolling on tenor, and "toll 
in " on small bell for last five minutes. 

The bells are in bad order, and consequently there has been no ringing for 
the last twenty years or more. They would appear to be "clocked," i.e.^ small 
ropes are attached to the clappers for lazy-pulling. This is a reprehensible 
practice, and very harmful to the bells. 

* Casting. 



Inscriptions. 361 

Local tradition affirms his Satanic Majesty to have been very much about 
when the church was being built. Among other tricks, he is reported to have 
carried off one of the bells and dropped it in a round pool of water, which 
still exists in a boggy hollow hard by. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. G. R. Baker, who supplies the above in- 
formation, but does not vouch for the truth of the last paragraph. 

NEWNHAM. SS. Peter and Paul. 4 Bells. 

I., 24-in. Blank. 
II., 27?, -in. Blank. 

III., 30^-in. Tho^ Wanstall & Tho* Elvy Church Wardens Pack & 
Chapman of London Fecit 1772 

IV., 33i-in. +(Fig. i) J=Lt» Cu'cli ^una X^J^rtmcaf XH^s X^atcc.iua 



+ U (Fig. 22) 

For mention of tenor bell, see p. 39. 

Church restored about twenty years since, and cages for two additional bells 
provided, which, however, have remained unfilled for lack of funds. 

Death knell rung as soon as practicable. Bell tolled for about twenty 
minutes, and finish with tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female. 

On day of burial, a bell tolled at 8 a.m., and again for half an hour before 
the funeral. 

On Sundays, and all days when there is to be Divine Service, a bell is 
tolled for a short time at 8.30 a.m. For services : Bells chimed twenty 
minutes, and then " toll in " on single bell for ten minutes. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. P. Kingsford. 

NONINGTON. St. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I., 321-in. J WARNER & SONS CRESCENT FOUNDRY LON- 
DON 1854 
II., 34-in. ^ (Fig. 5) Hancfa ^KLafc^iiina Oil^t ^v^ XFluDia 

+ (Fig. i) 
III., 37 in. r;{(> lOHN * HODSON * ME * FECIT * 1683 * lAMES 
* NASH ^ AND * ROBART ♦ PAVN1-: * C ^^^ ^\'AR- 
DENS 

% A 







62 Inscriptions. 



The present treble is apparently a substitute for a discarded tenor. In 
1758, Mr. Faussett notes here "3 Heavy bells," Nos. i and 2 of which are 
identical with the present 2 and 3, while No. 3 was inscribed : 

Josephus Hatch me fecit 162 1. 

See p. 34 for mention of No. 2. The initial cross is Fig. 5. I am doubtful 
about the other, but tliink it is No. 1. 

NORTHBOURNE. St. Augustine. 5 Bells. 

I., 25-in. ROBERT CALLAWAY VICAR MATH BAGLEY FECIT 

1711 
II., 27i-in, Vallentine Hoyle Mathew Bagley Fecit 171 i 
III., 3oi--in. Danll Colder Iohn Whyborne MB 171 1 
IV., 33-in. Math Bagley of London Cast These Five Bells 171 i 
v., 36-in. S"^ Rich Sands Chvrch Warden Rob Nethersole M B ■ 
Fecit 17 11 

Passing bell rung as soon as death is known. Tellers — 3 strokes for a man, 
2 for a woman. Bell tolled at funerals. 

Bell chimed for Sunday services, then " toll in." 

Ringing on Christmas Eve and Day, and New Year's Eve. 

Thanks to Rector, the Rev. T. Wood. 

NORTHFLEET. St. Botolph. 6 Bells. 

L, 30-in. LESTER AND PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1758 
II., 32-in. T. Mears of London Fecit 1817 
111.,341-in. LESTER & PACK FECIT 1757 
IV., 37-in. T Mears of London Fecit H J Pitcher R Snovvden 

Church Wardens 181 7 
v., 39Hn. THO" LESTER & THO' PACK OF LONDON MADE 
THESE SIX BELLS 1758 
VL, 43i-in. G. MEARS & CO FOUNDERS LONDON 1864 
FREDERICK SOUTHGATE VICAR 
GEORGE T RICHMOND) 
WILLIAM SPENCER jCHURCHWARDENS. 

According to Thorpe's " Registrum Roffense," a new bell frame was made 
and the bells rehung in 171S. 



Inscriptions . 






NORTON. 

I., 22j-in. Blank. 

Apparently no local customs. 



St. Mary. 



St. Mildred. 



I Bell. 



NURSTED. 

I., 2 7|-in. Blank. 

The Rector " has no information to give." For which, many thanks 



1 Bell. 



St. Peter. 



I, formerly 3 Bells. 



OARE. 

I., 22^-in. Blank, 

Death knell rung at noon or 8 o'clock following morning. Tellers — 3 x 3 
for male, 2x2 for female. Then bell tolled fifteen minutes. 

On day of burial, bell tolled at 8 a.m. for fifteen minutes, and again for half 
an hour before the funeral. 

Sundays. — Bell rung for half an hour for service. 

Very hearty thanks to Mrs. Woolrych, who, in the Vicar's regrettable illness, 
has kindly spared time to reply to my paper of queries. 

OFFHAM. St. Michael. 3 Cells. 

I., 251-in. r|, BY si? ME r^ GYLES <^ REVE ^ BELFOVNDER ^ 

1590 
II., 30-in. ^ lOHN * HODSON » MADE * ME » 1674 » Q C II 
O O O ')!(' ROBART * LVRINDEN * CHVRCH » 
WARDEN O O 'il? 
III., 33i-in. lOHN 7 WILNAR ') MADE a ME ^ 1633 

Death knell rung. Tellers— 3 x 3 for man, 3 x 2 for woman, 3 x i for child. 

Sundays.— Tenor bell rung at 8 a.m., called " Warning " bell. For services, 
bells chimed fifteen minutes, then tenor for same space of time. 

The following entries in the churchwardens' accounts have reference to the 
recasting of the 2nd bell in 1674 : £^ s. d. 

for casting the bell 
for hanging the bell 
for the stocke 
charges about the bell 
for carriage of the bell 
to Brooker for his work* 



No doubt for trussing the hell. Drookc 





06 


05 


GO 




00 


10 


00 




00 


02 


10 




00 


16 


00 




or 


02 


00 




00 


04 


00 


was llie vill 


age smilli. 





A 2 



364 Inscriptions. 

In the year 1664, the sum of ^3 loi-. had been spent "for Repayre of tlie 
Bells." 

Best thanks to the Rev. H. F. Rivers. 

ORLESTONE. St. Mary the Virgin. 3 Bells. 

I., 27-in. lOHM ^ WILMAR ^ 1631 
II., 28-in. I^, W^i635 
III., 30-in. BIME-IOHN COLE BELFOVNDER AN NO DO MI NI 
1591 
T. R. E. First iij bells in the steple. 

Thomas Stokke, of Orlaston, by his will, proved 1525, bequeathed: to the 
rejfecion of the steple of Orleston, v^. 

No local uses. Thanks to E. Ward Oliver, Esq. 

ORPINGTON. All Saints. i Bell. 

I., 29-in. JOHN BRIANT HERTFORD FECIT 1813 

T. R. E. Item iiij greate bells suted of brasse in the steple and one saints 
bell of brasse. 

Steeple was struck by lightning and burnt down about fifty years ago. 
Local tradition says a peal of bells was then carried to St. Mary Cray. This 
is partially correct ; there were only two bells here in Hasted's time, and they 
probably went to, but did not stop at, St. Mary Cray ; they doubtless went on 
to London and were sold to raise funds for the repairs, the present single bell 
taking their place. 

Apparently no local uses. Thanks to Vicar, Rev. J. N. Heale. 

OSPRINGE. SS. Peter and Paul. i Bell. 

I., 36-in. loHN White Vicar Edward Toker Francis Hope Church 
Wardens Robert Catlin fec"^ 1741 

Weever (" Funerall Monuments," p. 278), writing about 1630, states that 
the inscription on the then bell was 

Hac in conclaue Gabriele tu pange suaue. 

He doubtless blundered in copying. See the 5th bell at Southfleet for the 
correct inscription. It would almost seem, from the way he writes, that 
Ospringe had then, as now, only one bell. 



Inscriptions. 365 

Hasted states that there were four bells here in his time (i 790-1800), but 
I think he must be wrong. The parish books record the sale of the other 
bells (probably three) " in the last century," apparently " without authority." 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. Begin with tellers — 3 x 3 
for male, 3 x 2 for female ; then toll bell, and finish with tellers again. This 
is repeated at an early hour on the day of funeral. Bells used on Sunday for 
services only. A few warning strokes half an hour before service, and ring for 
last fifteen minutes. 

Best thanks to the Rev. W. N. Griffin, Vicar, 

OXFORD. St. Bartholomew. 2 Bells. 

I., 291-in. THOMAS BARTLET MADE ME 1622 © 
n., 39l-in. r;{(. o IH ^ MADE .} ME ^ THIS h BELL ^ WAS ^ GIVEN k 
BY ^ ELIZABETH ( POLHILL ^ & ^ HEARE \ PLACED 

E 

AGVST /} Y 7 ^ 1674 k AGED 60 h YEARES ^ o O O 

C H o O o o 

No. I cracked and useless. 

The bell is tolled at funerals. 

Used on Sundays for service only. 

Rung on New Year's Eve. 

Elizabeth Polhill, the donor of the larger bell, was widow of David Polhill, 
who gave the communion plate in 1666. The family were landowners here 
for several centuries. 

Best thanks to the Rev. J. Hunt, Vicar. 

OTHAM. St. Nicholas. 3 Bells. 

I., 30-in. LESTER & PACK FECIT 1755 
II., 321,-in. + lulianncs O Girtett O <^^\^ O ,lS)iitnaiic O ^^I^^ 

HI., 35-in. W : Keeble I: Groombridge ch : w: W: Simmonds a:m: 
RECT : T: Taylor curate R: Phelps made me 17 14 

Middle bell by William Dawe, better known as William Ffounder, of London. 
See p. 26. Initial cross is Fig. 9 ; stop. Fig. 8. 

Passing bell rung an hour after death, if it occurs between sunrise and 
sunset. Begin with tellers— 3 x 3 for man, 3 x 2 for woman, 3x1 for child 3 



o 



66 Inscriptions. 



IS. 


Afd. 


8^. 


Zd. 


4:f. 


od. 



then toll for about half an hour, and finish with tellers every five minutes for a 
quarter of an hour. 

On day of funeral bell tolled for half an hour at 8 a.m., and again for the 
same period before the service. 

Sundays. — Used for services only ; chime fifteen minutes, toll tenor for ten 
minutes, then toll treble (" Parson's " bell) for'last five. 

Very many thanks to Rector, the Rev. F. M. Millard, for above informa- 
tion ; and also for permission to make the following extracts from the church- 
wardens' accounts, which are extant from 1664, with an unfortunate hiatus 
from 1689 to 1 7 16 inclusive : 

1665 p'' for a Bathrick for one of the bells ... 

1666 pd for 2 Bellropes to Tilden 

1667 paid for a bell rope to {sic) 
paid to Jason Day for three new bell whelles 

and a new stock for the tennor and mending 

of the frame ... ... ... ... ... 4//. os. od. 

paid to William Grombridge for Iron worke the 

som of ... ... ... ... ... xds. od. 

paid to M'' Fetten for six new brasses the some 

of ilL 

1671 It. for 2 badreckes 
It. for a stay for a whele 
It. for a sete of bellropes 

1672 It. for oyorns* to the belles waid 18"^ & a 

quarter 
It. for mending the claper of the great bell ... 
It. for Eyorens* for to belles waid 34"' 
It. paide to the Carpenter for hainge {sic) the 

Belles 

It. for timber for the frame 

1681 Item paid for a set of bellropes 
Item for mending of the Claper 

1682 It. to the Battrex of the bel 

1683 It. for 3 bathrikes for y'' bells 
1686 p'' fifor a bartricke fifor a bell ... 

p'' ffor a bell Rope ffor one bell 

'•' Qy. irons (trusses). 



C)S. 


6d: 


5''- 


OCt. 


OS. 


6d. 


ros. 


6d. 


6s. 


id 


IS. 


od. 


I IS. 


Ad 


1 8s. 


od. 


2S. 


od. 


OS. 


od. 


4S. 


od. 


IS. 


od 


6s. 


od. 


IS. 


4d 


3-f- 


od. 



Inscriptions. 



;67 



nearly 



every succeeding 



1687-8 paid for 2 bawcks 
1717 paid for bellropess 

1721 p'' the Ringers Nov. 

(Similar entry in 
year.) 
p' John Willes for mending the wheels and 
other work ... 

1722 payed the Ringers Crouwnation 

1723 Three payments for ringing, is. 6d. each 
paid for new bell rops ... ... ... 

paid for mening of the bel Claper an for hock 

an Climbers* 

1724 Three payments to Ringers of 2s. 6d. each 

Aug. 18, Oct. 20, and Nov. 5. 
1726 p'' Edward Beeson for gobbst for the bels 
p'^ for a seet of bellrops 
1727 — Oct. II p'' the Ringars att the Crownacion 
1 728-1 732 Payments for ringing only. 
1733 p"^ Reader for Bellrops .. . 
1739 p'^ for Bell Ropes 

1 741 pd Tho Betts For Mending The Bell 

pd jno Wiles for Mending the Bell (etc.) 
Spent at hanging the Bell and For Oyle 

1 743 p*^ fof {sic) bell ropes ... 

1744 p^' Tho^ Betts for mending the bell 

1 745 p'i for belrops ... 

1747 Oyle for y*-' Bells 

1748 p^ William Eagels for new Bellropes 

1749 Spent on y^ wringers ... 

1753 p^ for new Bellrops 

1754 p^' for Bellrops ... 

p'' for a New Bell 

for caring the Bell to Maidstone and home 

again ... 
M'' Bensted for caring the Bell to London . . 

* Qy., for a hook and something n(jt identifiable, 
t ',)y., for " joI)s about" the liells. 



45. 


od. 


95. 


od. 


2S. 


Gd. 



155. 

2S. 

gs. 

5^- 



OS. 

c)s. 
gs. 

CIS. 

16s. 
gs. 

IS. 

gs. 
Ss. 
gs. 

OS. 

gs. 
js. 
gs. 
gs. 
I o//. 1 gs. 

5^- 
6s. 



\Ii. 
\li. 



od. 
dd. 

od. 

.6d. 



6d 

od. 
od. 

od. 
od. 
6d 
6d. 
6d. 
od. 
od. 
od. 
Gd. 
od. 
Gd. 
od. 
od. 
id. 

od. 
od. 



368 Inscnptions. 






1757 p'l to Geting y*" Bell up & other Expences ... 


2S. 


0(l 


1758 for new belropes 


C)S. 


od. 


1761 p'' for Bell Ropes 


lOS. 


6d. 


1762 Oyle for y"^ Bells 


IS. 


od. 


1763 p'' for Bell ropes 


10s. 


U. 


OTTER DEN. St. Laurence. 


1 


Bell. 


I., 24-in. I H 






By Joseph Hatch. 







PADDLES WORTH. St. Oswald. i Bell. 

I., 24-in. J WARNER & SONS LONDON 1859 R MARCH C W 

T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple. 

In 1758, "a small crack't Bell," apparently inscribed, but inaccessible for 
want of a ladder. 



PADDOCK WOOD. 

One small modern bell. 



St. Andrew. 



I Bell- 



PATRIGKSBOURNE. 



St. Mary. 3 Bells. 

1664 CHRISTOPHER 



I., 26|-in. THOMAS PALMAR MADE 

(rest illegible) 
U U 

II., 29-in. + 3^-^m : xii,^m:iJ3:- : (^^^M^m%M^ - 

IIL, 30-in. T P C S 

For mention of No. 2, see p. 11. 

Nos. I and 3 are clearly by the same founder ; the lettering on the Palmers' 
bells is never particularly good. The parish registers contain a note of the 
recasting, and mention the weights, 329 and -^ZZ Q respectively,* which I 
do not understand. Judging from the diameters, they weigh about four and 
five hundredweight respectively. 

The ist shield on No. 2 is Fig. 2, the other Fig. 3. For lettering and cross, 
see Plate I. 

* "Arch. Cant.," xiv. 171. 



Lnscriptions. 369 

PECKHAM (EAST). St. Michael. 6 Bells. 

I., 30-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1825 

John Biggenden^^ 

„, . }Church Wardens 

William Allen J 

II., 32i-in, W" Mears of London Fecit 1785 Mess"^^ Jn" Bigoenden 

&: Tho^ Pattenden Ch. Wardens 

III., 35-in. Same. 

IV., 36-in. Prosperity to this parish r c fecit 1747 

v., 39-in. Robert Catlin Cast And Hung Us All 1747 

VL, 43-in. Thomas Mears of London Fecit 18 12 

Edw° Monckton)^„ „^ 

_ ^ \'W Wardens 

John Jeffery j 

Passing bell rung directly after death. Tellers — 3 strokes for male, 2 for 
female. Tolling at funeral. 

Sundays. — For services bells chimed, tenor tolled, "toll in" on treble. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. H. R. Merewether. 



Holy Trinity. 2 Bells, 

Two small modern bells ; probably from the Whitechapel Foundry. 

Passing bell rung on larger bell for adults, smaller for children. Tellers — 
3 X 3 for males, 3 x 2 for females. 

On day of burial a few strokes at 8 a.m. on breaking ground, and bell tolled 
for fifteen minutes before funeral. 

Sundays. — A short peal at 8 a.m. (this cannot be a survival). For services 
bells rung till ten minutes before, then ring in on treble. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. J. C. Whish. 

PECKHAM (WEST). St. Dunstan. 3 Bells. 

iirfcplj Ijattli ma^c mc 1624 

O CHRISTOPHER o HODSON O MADE O ME o 1685 

000 
STEPHANVS A SWAN H ME t FECIT $ ANNO h DOMINI 
D (Royal Arms) ')J('(l'i"- of Wales' feathers) 

■J I 6 I 1 

% B 



I., 


26^-in. 


II., 


29-in. 


IIL, 


i Sifi"' 



3 70 Inscriptions. 

Death Knell. — Tenor for adults, treble for children. Tellers — 3 x 3 for 
male, 3 x 2 for female ; then minute strokes. 

Bell tolled before funeral. 

Sundays.— A bell tolled at 8 a.m. ("Matins" bell). Bells chimed for 
services. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. R. Swan. 

P EM BURY. St. Peter. 3 Bells. 

I., 271-in. O O 
II., 29-in. ^){f lOHN {^ & ^ CHRISTOPHER ^ HODSON k MADE ^ 

me: 1677 «$> 000 

^ lOHN k & ) THOMAS k GIBENS ^ CHVRCH h WAR- 
DENS cjl? o o o 

III., 32-in. lOHN : WILNAR ^ MADE h ME ^ 1620 

Two of these are cracked, the treble and one other. 
Apparently no local uses. 

PENSHURST. St. John Baptist. 6 Bells. 

I., 33|-in. GiLBERTVS spencer ivn : gen : me dedit : R : Phelps fecit 

1701 
II., 35-in. Thomas Mears of London Fecit 1802 
III., 36-in. + jStf ^^2\:^\\\t\\ X>JJn""t ^cncbtcfum + U 



IV., 41-in. + 3:n XIluHis J^nnts defunct C^Jamirana ^^fiamtis 



+ U 
v., 45-in. Michael Saxby Richard \Voodhams ChurchWardens 

Tho"^ Mears of London Fecit 1S02 
VI., 47A-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1619 

Nos. 3 and 4 are by the same founder, see p. 39. The foundry-stamp is 
Fig. 22. The initial cross on No. 3 is Fig. 23 ; the other is like Fig. 9, but not 
quite identical. Initial cross on No. 4 is Fig. i ; the other is that formerly 
used by Stephen Norton, and engraved on Plate II. 

PERRY STREET. All Saints. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 



Inscriptions. 371 

PETHAM. All Saints. 6 Bells. 

I., 25^-in. GEORGIVS III REX LESTER & PACK OF LONDON 

FECIT 1760 
XL, 27-in. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1760 
III., 28i-in. Same. 

IV., 30-b. Same. THO^ HALKE 

v., 32-in. Same. lOHN POTTER BELLHANGER 

VI., 34-in. BRYAN FOSSETT CURATE W^' FOORD CH : WAR- 
DEN 1760 LESTER & PACK FECIT 

Before 1760 there were only three Bells, inscribed: 

I. Richard Phelps fecit me 1706 Thomas Halke C W 
II. Josephus Hatch Feset 16 17 
HI. Vocor Campana lohannis 

In 1760 the tower, which was low and much decayed, was taken down 

half-way and rebuilt, and the present light ring of six substituted for the 

former (probably heavy) three. The weights of the six are thus given by Mr. 

Faussett : 

Cwt. qr. lb. 

I- 3 3 I 

II. 4 I 6 



in. 


4216 


IV. 


4 3 II 


V. 


5 3 2 


VI. 


6 3 6 


Vide 


Bromley. 



PLAISTOW. 

PL ATT. St. Mary. i Bell. 

L, 30-in. THOMAS MEARS LONDON 1843 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Tellers— 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 
for female ; then toll for half an hour. 

Bell tolled for half an hour before funerals. 

Sundays. — Bell rung at 8 a.m. (Reminiscence of " Matins Bell," not a 
survival, as the church only dates from 1S43.) Rung for half an hour before 
services. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. V. T. Gregory. 

^ 1; 2 



I., 


31-in. 


II., 


33-i"- 


Ill, 


35-i"- 


IV. 


37-in. ' 


V. 


4oi-in. 


VI. 


441-in. 



372 Inscriptions. 

PLAXTOL. Dedication Unknown. i Bell. 

I., 2U-in. lOHN : STEEPHENS : CHVRCH : WARDEN : VVIL : 
EVRNER : 1709 

Apparently no local uses. The Rector has kindly searched the parochial 
records for information as to William Furner, whose name appears on the^bell, 
but without success. His name, however, appears nowhere else, and so we may 
probably conclude he was not a bell-founder. He was more likely^the donor. 

Thanks to the Rev. J. Tate. 

PLUCKLEY. St. Michael. 6 Bells. 

r C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 

RESTORED JUNE 1853 

BY SUBSCRIPTION AND RATE 

SIR EDWARD C DERING BART M P 

REV" ASHTON OXENDEN RECTOR 

jEssI shcerI^""^™ wardens 

T. R. E. Item v bells in the steple with a sauncts bell. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Tolled for a quarter of an 
hour — tenor for adults, small bell for children. 

On day of burial, tenor tolled for a quarter of an hour before funeral, and 
again when corpse is carried from church to grave. 

Sunday use not stated. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. Not on 5th November (happily). 

A bell for Easter Vestry. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. E. J. Selwyn. 

PLUMSTEAD. St. Nicholas. 4 Bells. 

I., 27i-in. o CHRISTOPHER O HODSON O MADE O ME O 1686 
000000 
O lOHN O EVERITT o THOMAS O FITCH o CHVRCH 
O WARDENS O 
II., 2g|-in. Same. 
III., 3ii-in. Same. 

IV., 36-in. Tho"^ Mears Late Lester Pack & Chapman of London 
Fecit 1790 
T. R. E. Item iij bells of bell mcttcll sutcd hanging in the steple there. 



Inscriptions. 373 

PLUMSTEAD. St. James. i Bell. 

Presumably one bell of the date 1878. 

St. John Baptist. i Bell. 

Church built 18S4 ; probably one bell of that date. 

St. Margaret. i Bell. 

I., 25^^^-in. XHi'.ai^s ^0Utt^cr ^Ekonbuu 

All Saints (Shooter's Hill). i Bell. 

Church built 1875 ; presumably one bell of that date. 

POSTLING. St. Mary the Virgin. 3 Bells. 

I., 32-in. iafcpli Iiafcli m:iiit mt, 1623 

U U 

II., 35-in. + BMjsi<&:m^ ■■ :ip©'^^mer : omii : :pmo 

n n 

III., 38-in. + sM-'MmmM- : pii^5^:mMM- ■■ ci>:BiM- 

For mention of Nos. 2 and 3, see p. 11. The shields are Figs. 2 and 3. 

T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple with one hand bell. 
Stolen .... one hand bell. 

PRESTON BY FAVERSHAM. St. Katharine. 3 Bells. 

I., i9|-in. J WARNER & SONS LONDON 1853 
II., 22-in. J^OyfG: X (^0:0 X 1575 X 
III., 25-in. G : SYKES T : SMITH CHURCH WARDES 

1725 

No. 2 has a curious *' stop " — an open hand — between the words. See 
p. 60. 

Passing bell rung directly notice is received. Tenor bell tolled, and tellers 
at end of knell — 3 x 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female. 

This is repeated exactly at 7 a.m. on day of funeral ; and the tenor is again 
tolled for about twenty minutes before the service. 

For service on Sundays and weekdays, the bells are chimed for fifteen 



PRESTON 


I., 


27|-in. 


11, 


291-in. 


III., 


3 1 -in. 


IV, 


34-in. 


V, 


> 37i-in- 



3 74 Inscriptions. 

minutes, and then the tenor is tolled for a similar space of time. When there 
is to be a sermon, the tenor bell is raised previous to the chiming. 
Best thanks to the Rev. J. Russell Cooke, Vicar. 

BY WINGHAM. St. Michael. 5 Bells. 

ROBERT WYBORPIE GEMT : BENEFACTOR R : 

PHELPS EEC: 1712 
RICHARD PHELPS MADE ME 17 12 

Same. 
Same. 

M-^: lOHM HARRISOM WILLIAM LVCKIT CHVRCH- 
WARDEl^S RICHARD PHELPS MADE ME 17 12 

Passing bell rung as soon after death as possible. Tenor for old, 2nd bell 
for young people. Tellers— three strokes for males, two for females. 

Bell tolled before funerals. 

Service Uses. — For daily matins, tenor first tolled, then treble ; then the 
day of the month is tolled on the 2nd bell. 

Sundays. — Bells chimed, then tenor tolled until the last two minutes, then 
treble for one and a half minutes ; finally, day of month on 2nd bell. 

No ringing or chiming in Lent. On Good Friday the ** funeral knell " is 
used before all services. 

Peals on all the great festivals, and on their eves. 

No ringing (happily) on 5th November. 

Prior to 1712 there were only four bells. These were sent to London 
and recast into the present ring of five, at a cost of ;^5i Zs. od. The 
carpenter's work for altering the frame was ^15 \os. od. At this period, and 
for some years both before and after, new bell ropes seem to have been bought 
every year. Bell ropes in those days (and, indeed, very much later) were the 
churchwardens' perquisites, being useful for plough traces ; and it was needful 
to secure them before they were too much worn. Many other places in Kent 
tell the same story. 

Very hearty thanks to the Vicar, the Right Rev. Bishop Jenner. 

QUEENBOROUGH. Holy Trinity. 5 Bells. 

I., 24-in. AMTHONY BARTLET MADE MEE 1667 (^ 
II., 25i-in. Same. 
III., 27^-in. Same. 



Inscriptions. 375 

IV., 29-in. Same. 

v., 32-in. THE WORSHIPFUL ROBT": EVANS ESQ: MAIOR 
lAMES ONGLEY CH : WARDEN R : PHELPS I\L\DE 
ME 1722 

The tenor is broken and useless. 

RAIN HAM. St. Margaret. 6 Bells. 

I., 33-in. o CHRISTOPHER O HODSON O MADE O ME o 16S5 
0000000 
O lOHN o TAYLAR o THOMAS o OSBONE o DONARS 
00000 

iL, 34i-in. ^^oi^m^iw^B> ^ ^^om ^ xner ^ 

'JE{^<^'%W X 1601 © 

iiL, 36-in. ^^Qy:^m^\M^^ ^ iiQCDp? •)!(» xi:ie" 
::Re'©'3E^ ^ 1601 © 

IV., 4oi-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1618 
v., 451-in. W^' TUCK & LUKE MILES CHURCH WARDENS 
PACK & CHAPMAN OF LONDON FECIT 1773 
VL, 49-in. Rtj&crf + mat + matic + ntc + 1582 + + x + + 

Here are some old churchwardens' accounts, to which, unfortunately, I 
have been unable to get access. They appear to comprise the years 15 17-19, 
and 1565-69 inclusive. From the account of them which appeared in 
Vol. XV. of " Arch. Cant," I have extracted the following entries relative to 
the bells ; but I do not know whether they are all which the accounts 
contain: 

Payments. Itm. payde to John Bungay for a key for the stepuU 
1517-19 dore 

It. payd to Jacobbe of maydston for a bell clapur 
It. payd to John hurton for hangyng of the gret 

bell and stokkyng 
It. for strykyng downe of the same bell ... 
It. payd to John hurton for makyng of the stepull 

wyndowe and for trussyng of the iiij''' bell ... \]s. 
Itm. payd for mendyng of the baudryks ... ... \\\\]d. 

Itm. payd to Bungay for the lytyll bell clapur and 

other werks done in the churche ... ... vij-v. myi. 



\s. 


iiij^. 


xiji'. 


\\d. 


iij^. 




\\]S. 





3 7^ Inscriptions. 

Itm. payd to John hurton for takyng down of the 

gret bell iij^. 

Itm. payd to Sylke for makyng of bell ropys . . . xijV. 

Itm. payd for Sawyng of borde for the Stepull 

wyndowe... ... ... ... ... ... \\d. 

Itm, for tukkyng gyrdylls ... ... ... ... \)d. 

Itm. payd for borde that the lath was made of ... xij^. 

Itm. payd to John Alen and hys man for fyve days 

werkyng on the florys of the Stepull ... ... \]s. \d. 

Itm. payd to harry Joyner for iiij days werkyng in 

the same werke ... ... ... ... ... \v]d. 

Itm. payd for ther mete and drynke to boungay... iilj.f. iiij^. 
Itm. payd to John hurton for makyng of iij wyn- 

dowys to the Stepull ... ... ... ... viji-. 

Itm. payd to Coklett for reparacon of the bells ... xiijx. 

Itm. payd to Webbe for makyng of ij bell ropys... xij^. 

Itm. payd for ij bell ropys... ... ... ... ixd. 

Itm. payd for ij bawdryks ... ... ... ... xj^. 

Itm. for mending of the ij grett bellys to Cokklett -as. 

Itm. payd to a Smyth of london for a bell clapur xijx. ix^. 

Itm. payd to Bungay for vj Sterroppys for iij wyn- 

dowys of the Stepull and for the lytyll bell 

clapur ... ... ... ... ... ... \s. 

1565-66 Ffirst payed to a Carpenter for hangynge of the 

bells ... ... ... ... ... ... '\]s, vW'yi. 

Itm. payed to Raynold terenden ffor Stockyng of 
the bellys ... ... ... ... ... xx.y. 

1566-68 Itm. payed to hysted ffor makyng of iij bawdryks 

& makyng of a newe Rope for the second bell \i]d. 

RAMSGATE. St. George. i Bell. 

I., 39-in. T. Mears of London Fecit 1827 

Christ Church. 3 Bells. 

One by C. and G. Mears, of London, dated 1847 ; and two by Gillett, Bland, 
and Co., of Croydon. 



Inscrzptioiis. 377 

RAMSGATE. Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

St. Mary. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

St. Paul. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

RECULVER. Formerly 4 Bells. 

In the old church, now dismantled and in ruins, there were in 1758 four 
bells, all made by Joseph Hatch in 1635. One of these is now in use at the 
new church at Hilborough, and there is another at Badlesmere ; the others, 
probably, like last winter's snow, melted. 

There are old parish accounts here, commencing in 1638, and for the 
following extracts from them I am indebted to the Rev. A. T. Browne, curate 
in charge of Hilborough : 

1637-8 It. p'' unto Abraham Twigden for nyne daies and 
a halfes worke att two shillings the daie for 
mendinge of the timber worke of the belles ... igs. od. 
It. for a peece of timber of seaven foote to make 

two stockes for the bells 
It. p"^ for five staples with keies for the belles 
It. p"^ for yronn worke done about the bells by 

Rob' Extill 

It. p<i unto the Clarke for helpinge the carpenter 
It. laid out for a newe roape for the great bell ... 
It, p"* for fetchinge of the stockes t\: yron worke 

from Canterburey ... ... ••■ .•■ 2s. od. 

It. p'' unto Robart Chilton for the trussinge of the 

great Bell i^- od. 

It. more p'" unto Willim Wrigth for cleaningc of 
the steeples & leades & to helpe y*" Carpenter 

About the belles u". A^. 

1638-9 It. payd to Robert Chilton for 2 daycs and for 

boordes and naylcs used about the great bell ... 5^-. lo^. 
It. for a man to help on day ... ••• ••■ i-^'- od. 

^ C 



8.9. 


0^. 


13^. 


od 


I \s. 


2d 


5^- 


lod. 


5-^"- 


Sd. 



I^. 


2d. 


5^- 


6d. 


5^- 


od. 



^i^S Inscriptions. 

It. payde to Edward Gatman for mendinge the 

sheeres and keyes 
It. payde for a bell rope ... 
1640 Itm. p'' to Adrian Moys for y'' second bell rope ... 
Itm. payd to Edw. Gatman for nayles used about 

y'' bells OS. lod. 

Itm, p'' to W"^ Wright for healping y'= carpenter & 

a peice of wood for y° bells ... ... ... is. 6d. 

Itm. payd to Adr. Moys for y° smalbell rope ... y. od. 
1642 It. payde to Adriann Moyse for two bell Ropes 

one for y" second &: on for y'^ third ... ... i2.y. od. 

It. payde to Richard Foster for 2 dayes & a halfes 

work about trussing of y*^ bells and stufe used 

about them ... ... ... ... ... ^s. 6d. 

It. payde to James Morris Smith for nayles and 

plates used about y° bell wheeles & for mendinge 

ofy'^shovell is. od. 

1 644 It. payd to Adrian Moyce for a bell Rope ... y. Sd. 

1645-46 p' to Atherin Mois for a bell rope for the third 

Bell 5.r. 6d 

p"^ Richard Foster for worke about the Bells & 

Lead Latts 5.^. gd. 

p"^ James Morris the Smyth for Keyes Nayles rydes 

& hookes... ... ... ... ... ... 5^. od. 

RIDLEY. St. Peter. i Bell. 

L, lo-in. Blank. 

T. R. E. Item on bell. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. 

Bell rung for half an hour before a funeral, and for a (cw minutes before all 
services. 

Thanks to Rector, the Rev. T. P. Phelps. 

RINGWOULD. St. Nicholas. 5 Bells. 

I., 23-in. I vW 1638 
II., 25-in. Same. 



Inscriptions. 37g 

III, 27-in. + %QyM]^^hy^m^ * ^s>w * :Eioxiie-:m * 

IV., 29-in. I V W 1638 
v., 32-in. u 

DEO h ET i) ECCLESIAE '; DEBIT .) FRANCISCVS h DER- 
ING ^1638 I } W 

For mention of the 3rd bell, see p. 20. The shield on the tenor bears the 
Dering arms — a saltire with a mullet in chief. 

The curfew bell is rung at 8 p.m. in the winter months,* for which there is 
an endowment of a piece of land half an acre in extent, called curfew land. 

Death knell tolled. Apparently no "tellers." 

Sundays. — One bell chimed at the half hour. At the quarter before 
service the bells are generally chimed, but occasionally rung. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

Best thanks to the Rector, Rev. M. A. Nisbet. 

I regret to hear that this entire ring has been recast this year at the White- 
chapel foundry. 

RIPPLE. St. Mary the Virgin. 2 Bells. 

I., 23-in. 1 W 1639 E C C W 
II., 25-in. I k W 1639 

Passing bell rung as soon as possible. Age denoted, but apparently no 
" tellers." 

Sundays. — Bells rung for service only. 
Thanks to Rector, the Rev. H. N. Bernard. 

RIVER. St. Peter. i Bell. 

I., 23L-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1876 

This replaces a pair which were inscribed as follows : 

B 
I., 17-in. S S 1680 

II., 23-in. WILEIAM WHITMILL SAMVELL LAMOTT CHVRCH- 
WARDENS 1671 



Apparently fruiii All Souls' day till Camlleinas. 



O 



C 2 



380 Inscriptions. 

Of these, one had disappeared prior to 1867, and the other was cracked 
and useless. The larger one came from the church of St. Michael, Crooked 
Lane, London, pulled down in making approaches to new London Bridge. 

I cannot even hazard a guess at the founder of the smaller bell. It is so 
small as probably not to be the work of a regular bell-founder. 

No local uses. 

Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. C. Morice. 

RIVERHEAD. St. Mary. i Bell. 

L, 2 6]y-in. T Mf.ars of London Fecit 1831 

ROCHESTER CATHEDRAL. Christ and the B. V. M. 6 Bells. 
I., 34-in. Cast in The Year 1695 Recast in The Year 1770 by Pack 

& Chapman of London 
IL, 34|-in. Blank. 
IIL, 40-in. lOHN r^ WILNAR f; MADE (^ ME 1635 
IV., 44-in. Iames Bagley Of London Made Me 1712 A U R 



IB 

v., 48-in. *CHRISTOPHERVsVhODSON =«^ A"D * MDCLXXXIII 
0000 FECIT 
00000000 ANNOQVE * SERNIS * REGIS * 
CAROLI * IP ^ XXXV (Royal Arms on Waist.) 
VI., 52-in. Fecit Chr^ Hodson. A.D. MDCLXXXIII : Regis Caroli II. 
XXXV 
Refecit Tho" Mears. A. D. MDCCCXXXIV : Regis 
Gulielmi IV. V. 

Very little indeed is known of the history of the bells of the Cathedral until 
comparatively recent times. Mr. St. John Hope, the great authority in all 
matters connected with the history and fabric of the minster, has hitherto 
failed to find any " Fabric " or " Sacrist's " rolls, although he does not quite 
despair of some of them turning up, perhaps, in the Bishop's registry. For 
the present, however, we are driven to the scanty notices to be found in 
" Registrum Roffense," and the chronicle of William de Dene contained in 
"Anglia Sacra." Of the bells (if any) furnished to King Ethelbert's original 
structure, we know absolutely nothing. If there were none at first, doubtless the 
want was soon supplied. English churches certainly possessed bells prior to the 



Inscriptions. 381 

Norman Conquest, for there are records of their casting ; and there is still 
preserved at York an inventory of the goods ot the church of Sherburn in 
Elmet, in the early part of the tenth century, and it includes " iiij hand bellan 
& vj hangende bellan."* 

Nor are we any better informed as to what Bishop Gundult did in this 
respect when he rebuilt the Cathedral in 1080 or thereabouts. No doubt, 
however, he made due provision and, as Abbot Paul de Caen had done at St. 
Alban's Abbey a few years previously, stocked (instauravit) the central tower 
with bells. We have to wait seventy years and more before we come to the 
first recorded bell transaction. In 1 154, Prior Reginald " fecit duas campanas 
et posuit eas in majori turri. Una fracta apposita est ad aliam campanam 
faciendam." The mention of the broken bell clearly shows that this was not 
the first supply of these very necessary adjuncts, and I think that it points 
also to something else of decided antiquarian interest. It will be noticed 
that they were placed in the larger tower. This is readily identifiable, por- 
tions of it still remaining in the angle formed by the north transept and the 
eastern limb. It was, according to Mr. Hope, built previously to the Cathe- 
dral, detached from it, and probably a defensive work. I think we have here 
an instance of a belfry in the original and proper sense of the word, viz., a 
watch-tower ; f and that the broken bell was the watch or alarm bell which 
it had previously held. Such towers, with their bells, are still to be found 
on the Continent ; but I am not aware of one in England unless my theory 
here is correct. 

The three bells placed in it by Prior Reginald appear to have given a name 
to the tower, and as late as the sixteenth century it was known as the " three- 
bell steeple." 

Some years later we find the following : " Thalcbot sacrista fecit 

et cloccam magnam que usque in hodiernum diem optinet nomen predicti 
Thaleboti." 

Later still, in or about the year 1200 : " Radulfus Bretun habuit in custodia 
de fratre suo qui necatus est transfretando, xv marcas argenti. Qui Radulfus 
in articulo mortis assignavit predictas marcas ad faciendam campanam pro 
anima fratris sui. Qui denarii traditi sunt Radulfo de Ros tunc sacriste ([ui 
cepit campanam fractam que longo tempore in navi ecclesie steterat et 
duxit Londonias et fecit campanam que dicitur Bretun que custavit xliv 
marcas." 

* Fabric Roll.s of York Minster, " Surtees Society." 
t See Skeat's "Etymological Diet., Art. Dellry." 



o 



82 Inscriptions. 



About sixty years later (1251-74) we read that " Ricardus de Waledene, 

XX 
monachus, sacrista, fecit campanam vocatam Andream que custavit IIII 
marcas." 

The next entry (and unfortunately the last) occurs in the year 1343, when 
Bishop Haymo de Hythe caused the central tower to be heightened : " Necnon 
et quatuor campanas novas in eodem ponere quarum nomina sunt hec, 
Dunstanus, Paulinus, Itamarus atque Lanfrancus." 

Thenceforward for nearly 300 years the history is a blank. In 1635, as we 
know simply from the inscription, the 3rd bell was recast. 

In 1683 a contract was entered into with Christopher Hodson (described 
as of St Mary Cray, where he had a branch establishment, he being really a 
London founder) to recast the 5th and tenor bells for the sum of^i2o. The 
contract still exists among the muniments, as also a note of the respective 
weights of the old and new bells, as follows : 

Cwt. qr. lb. Cwt. qr. lb. 

Tenor (old) 29 00 10 (New) 30 01 05 

fiifth „ 20 02 16 ,, 21 02 18 

It would seem that the operation was performed somewhere quite handy, if 
not in the Cathedral precincts. 

In 1695, the treble was recast by John Wood, of Chancery Lane, London 
(^nde p. 91), at an expense oi ;Q<). The contract for this has also been pre- 
served. 

In 171 1, the well-known Richard Phelps, of the Whitechapel Foundry, 
suppUed an estimate of ^25 for recasting a cracked bell weighing 15 cwt. ; 
this apparently did not lead to business, as the bell in question (the 4th) was 
recast in the following year by James Bagley, of Cripplegate, London, on 
behalf of his father, Matthew Bagley, who was then very close to the end of 
his earthly career. His warranty for this and the work of " quarter-hanging " 
the 2nd bell is dated ist December, 1712 ; by it he warrants for himself and 
Matthew Bagley, his father, that the 4th bell newly cast by him is a sound 
bell, and also that the 2nd bell, which he agreed to turn, " the striking sides 
or parts being much worne, shall be as good as a new bell, and retain the 
same note." 

The later history of the ring may be gathered from the inscriptions. Pro- 
bably the present six represent and contain much of the metal of the six 
whose manufacture we have chronicled above — Talbot, Breton, and the four 
with saintly dedications. 



Inscriptions. 






ROCHESTER. St. Margaret. 6 Bells. 

I., 28-in. Jno"^ Weller & Tho^ Huggins Ch. Wardens Tho^ Mears 
OF London Fecit 1790 
CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1884 
RECAST 1884 
IL, 29-in. - G. PEAKE VICAR 

T HEDGCOCK 

T littlewoodT 

Same as No I. 

lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1621 
Same. 1624 

Same as No. II. 



CHURCHWARDENS 



III., 32in. 

IV., 34-in. 

v., 36-in. 

VI., 39|-in 

Prior to recasting, the tenor bore the following inscription : 

HE THAT RINGS ME WALL THE TENNOR NOTE I WILL 

TRULEY TELL THO^ BAKER & IN^ HICKOTT CH : 

WARDENS 1 761 LESTER & PACK OF LONDON 

FECIT 

The former 2nd was also of the date 1761, and by Lester and Pack. 

T. R. E. Item in the steple v smawlle bells one lacking the clapper. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Commence with tellers 
(abnormal) — 3 x 3 for a man, 3x2 for a woman, 2 x 3 for a boy, 2x2 for a 
girl ; then toll for about quarter of an hour. Tenor bell always used. 

In 1503, Amisia Manser, of this parish, by her will bequeathed : " Pro 
factura campane ibidem de novo \\]s. \vd. {Ex inform. Mr. E. H. W. 
Dunkin in Reliquary for 1877-8.) 



St. Nicholas. 2 Bells. 

L, 2si-in. lOHN BVRGES THOMAS SYMONS CHVRCHWAR- 
DENS 1695 
I ® B 
IL, 37-in. WILLIAM HATCH MADE ME M C I H C W ® 1654 
T. R. E. No mention of bells in inventory. 



I., 24-in. 



St. Peter. 
J WARNl'LR & SONS LONDON 1858 



I Bell. 



384 Inscriptions. 

St. Matthew Borstal. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell only. 

Bridge Chapel. 

In this chapel, now not in existence, there was a bell in 1552 ; and the 
inventory further presents that a sacryng bell of silver had been stolen. 

RODMERSHAM. S. Nicholas. 4 Bells. 

II., 36-in. uw 1633 

III., 37-in. lOHM DARBIE MADE ME 1657 T A GV WC 
IV., 41-in. lOHN <$> WILNAR ^ MADE ^ ME 1620 

For mention of treble, see p. 21. Cross and stop are Figs. 5 and 4 re- 
spectively. 

Tolling tenor by ringing it up before any chiming for services, always done 
by the old clerk. 

ROLVENDEN. St. Mary the Virgin. 8 Bells. 

I., 28i-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1819 

II., 29|-in. Same. 

III., 31-in. Same. 

IV., 33-in. Same. 

v., 36-in. Same. 

VI., 37i-in. Same. 

VII., 4o|-in. Same. 

VIII., 46-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1827 

John Hutton Hole Church Warden 1820 
Death Knell. — Tenor tolled — then for a male three small bells each 
chimed three times, for a female two bells each twice ; then tenor tolled 
again. For a child under ten, 7 th bell used instead of tenor. 

On day of burial a knell at 7 a.m., and a bell tolled at the funeral. 
Sundays. — A peal at 8 a.m. (" Matins" bell). Bells chimed for services. 
Peals on Easter Day and New Year's Eve. Also on Queen's birthday. 
Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. E. H. Jones, 



Inscriptions. 385 

ROMNEY (NEW). St. Nicholas. 8 Bells. 

I., 27-in. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 1809 
II., 28-in. Chapman & Mears of London P'ecerunt 1784 
III., 31-in. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 1805 
IV., 34-in. Same. 

v., 36-in. Jacob Walter & Charles Rolfe Churchwardens 1776 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 
VI., 38-in. Same. 
VII., 43-in. Same as No. III. 
VIII., 47-in. Iames Brissenden O Iohn Rvssell Q Chvrch Wardens 

R •;• c 1748 

Death knell tolled on tenor for adults, small one for children. Tellers — 
three strokes for man, two for woman, one for child. A bell tolled at funerals 
whilst the body is being taken to the grave. 

Sundays. — Bells chimed for service. Small bell rung after morning service 
to let people know that there is an evening service. 

Peals sometimes on New Year's Eve. 

A bell for vestry and for some meetings of the corporation ; presumably 
those which by an old (and bad) custom, are held /;/ the c/iiinh. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. R. M. South. 

Church the sole survivor of three which existed here in the Middle Ages. 
One of them, dedicated to St. Martin, was removed by authority of Arch- 
bishop Cranmer in 1549. It then contained five bells weighing 46 cwt., and 
valued at ^48 /^s. od., which tradition affirms to have been transferred to St. 
Nicholas.'''" 

ROMNEY (OLD). St. Clement. 3 Bells. 

I., 30-in. i0rcijl| fiafcfi matrix nttt ® 1634 

U 
II., 34-in. ^ BM-mW-M- M:M:iElM- 0^^m5^ ^XXO 

IIL, 36-in. 10: DEFFRAY : R : R ■ CHITTENDEN CHVRCH ; 
WARDEN : MAT BAGLEY : FECIT 1709 . 

An account of the 2nd bell will be found at p. 47. The shield has a cross, 
plain, as at Hoath. Initial cross, Fig. 29. 

" Arch, fnnl.,'' xiii. 241. 



o 



86 Inscriptions. 



ROOKSLEY. No Church. 

In 1552 there were here : ij bells of brasse suted in the steple. 
j sants bell of brasse. 

There are, I believe, still some small remains of this church. The place 
was once of sufficient importance to give its name to the Hundred. The 
family who derived their surname from it are well-known both in Kentish and 
City annals. 

ROSHERVILLE. St. Mark. i Bell. 

I., 3ii-in. G. MEARS & OP FOUNDERS LONDON 

^\\\ Otff 0r (Sxiimtc :Orencfnni :tixjsrn|it Ji:© 1862 
Jf» (M* ©initut lEntuntlti^nt 

RUCKINGE. St. Mary Magdalene. 5 Bells. 

I., 29|-in. SAMVELL KNIGHT MADE ME U 1721 U U 

II., 3i|-in. lOHN U WAYLETT FECIT ME r|. 1721 ^ 

III., 32|-in. 1721 

IV., 361-in. lOHN WAYLETT FECIT ME «)}(. 1721 cjjj, 

v., 412-in. PETER WADELL RICHARD LONKHURS 1740 T : LeSTER MaDE 

Me 

In 1517 Clement Harlakynden bequeathed "^d. "to the bells of Rokinge." 
In 152 1 Roger Haukyns gave 2S. to "the reparacion of the bells in the 
steple ;" and in 1529 John Sharp gave the proceeds of sale of two houses at 
Halton on death of his son without issue, as to 10^., for masses and "the 
residue my feoffees shall cause the mony to go to the byeng of a trebuU bell 
for the churche of Roking."* 

T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple. 
Sold ... a saunce bell. 

Death knell rung. Tellers — 3 x 3 for a man, 3 x 2 for a woman. 

Bells sometimes rung, sometimes chimed, for services. 

A bell for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to the Rev. E. M. Muriel, Rector, 

RUSTHALL St. Paul. i Bell. 

I., 48-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1850 

Death knell rung. Tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 3x2 woman, 3x1 child. 
Thanks to the Rev. F. F. Walrond, Vicar. 

* " Arch. C;inl.," xiii. 234. 



Insci'iptions. 387 

RYARSH. St. Martin. 3 Bells. 

I., 30^-in. Rea° M^ James Thurston Minister Jeremiah Heaver 
Chuurch Warden 1779 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecerunt 
II., 3i|-in. ia|epl| r|<Tfiij watie me 1616 
III., 35-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1879 

The former tenor bore the legend : 

+ (Fig. 14) Hancfa XitrfVrla €Ilnn Ho^aliliiJa g[?liis (Dilate, ^\rx 

:ilia&ts U (Fig. 15) 

A dedication probably unique in England. See p. 31. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice given. 

Bell tolled at funerals. 

Sunday Services. — Bells chimed ; one bell tolled for last five minutes. 

" Fire bell" rung. This is, I think, the only instance in the county. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. E. R. Manwaring-White. 

ST. LAURENCE. St. Laurence. 6 Bells. 

I., 32J^-in. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 1S08 
II., 342-in- Same. 
III., 38-in. Same. 
IV., 4i|-in. Same. 
v., 43|-in. Same. 
VI., 47-in. These Bells were cast Anno Domini 180S Rfa^" Rich" 
Harvey Vicar George Stevens Thomas Wootton 
Church Wardens 
Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 

Information as to local uses, etc., refused by Vicar, for the somewhat 
Hibernian dual reasons : first, that he hasn't got the information ; and 
secondly, that he is going to make use of it himself. 

St. Luke. 1 IJcll. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

St. Kapharine (Manstone). 1 Boll. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

3 1) 2 



388 Inscriptions. 

ST. MARGARET AT CLIFFE. i Bell. 

I., 32-in. I C 1696 

Bell by an absolutely unknown founder; probably a Canterbury man. There 
are two by him at Hoath, and these three are all that exist. 

Local tradition asserts that, in days long since, there were more bells here 
than this one, and that they were sold to x\shford or Portsmouth. From the 
size of the tower, the tradition in its first part would seem to be correct ; but 
no documentary or other evidence exists on the subject. The upper part of 
the tower was in a ruinous state for many years, and the bells may well 
have been sold for funds to repair ; but I don't think they went to Ashford 
Church. 

Very many thanks to the late Vicar, the Rev. E. C. Lucey. 

ST. MARY IN THE MARSH. St. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I., 30-in. + (Fig. i4).Sancfc;ri>ctin^ Ora y^x^x^ ^otits D (Fig. 18) 

U(Fig. 17) 

II., 361-in. X (Fig. 5) s.^m ^ :moxii©-:m. ^ :E)Oiiixi?i3t 

III., 40-in. ^ (Fig. i) ^Eii XHirlfis J^^nuts ^Hcfaucf (ST^^mji.init 
^uliaunis ►^ (Fig. 5) 
T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple. No doubt the same that are now 
there — an interesting untouched pre-Reformation peal. 

ST. NICHOLAS AT WADE. 5 Bells. 

I., 35-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1625 
II., 37-in. tuVcjTii Iiafcli matre mc © 1615 
III., 40-in. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 1S07 
IV., 45 I in. lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME © 1615 
v., 49V-in. THOMAS BRIDOES RALPH GREEDERS CH WAR- 
DENS I H 1692 

ST. PETERS. 6 Bells. 

I., 3r-in. THO^ SWAIN Q MADE MEE IN i777 O O O 

Tho' Swain Fecit. 
II., 31-in. ROBERT CATLIN FECIT 1746 
III., 34-in. Same. 



Inscriptions. 389 

IV., 37^-in. Robert Barfield Henry Shivens Church Wardens 1822 
T. Mears of London Fecit 

v., 39^-in. Robert Catlin Cast us all 1746 
VI., 44i-in. The Rev° John Pigot Vicar John Mockett & Thomas 
Pain Ch. Wardens. Th(/ Mears op London Fecit iSoo, 

Bells generally in bad order and some cracked ; consequently no ringing, 
only chiming for services. Apparently no local customs. 

Best thanks to the Rev. A. Whitehead, Vicar. 

Lewis, in the "History of Thanet " (1723), states : " Anciently five bells, 
which a few years ago were cast into six, the Great Bell being made two." 

Cracked bells recast and ring put in order this year, 1S87. 

SALTWOOD. SS. Peter and Paul. 5 Bells. 

I., 281-in. lOHN WAYLETT MADE ME 1722 
II., 29-in. THOMAS PEPPER IVNER 1722 
III., 30-in. Same as No. I. 
IV., 34|-in. Same as No. I. 
v., 38i-in. DAVID OVLDFIELD THOMAS BLACKCOCK C:W 

lOHN WAYLETT FECIT 1723 
T. R. E. Item iiij bells hanging in the steple of the same parisshe. 
The third word on No. 2 bell is rather a puzzle ; the first letter is clearly 
an I, and whether the words stands for " Junior " or " Tuner," it is equally 
misspelt. I rather incline to the former theory myself, as the name of Pepper 
occurs locally in the registers of this date. 

SANDGATE. St. Paul. i Bell. 

A small modern tinkler, invisible and, according to the Vicar, almost 
inaudible. "Remote, unfriended, melancholy, slow." 

SANDHURST. St. Nicholas. 5 Bells. 

I., 30^-in. t0}'cpl| \\^Xt\\ lUAtu; ntc 1607 A F 
II., 33 -in. lOSKPH HATCH MADE ME ® 1607 
III., 36-in. WILLIA ,5 HVLL MADE ) MEE /; 1678 ^ !j ,} r^ ■} 

THOMAS ^; CRVTTENDEN lOHN ^ RVSELL «} CHVRCH 
/) W «jj(> 

'm "& # •© w w 

IV., 37 j-in. + ^n XTlultis ^ uutit Xlcfjjncf CT'^iup'^Uii ^Ei'llituuia 

+ U (Fig. 22) 
v., 42;|-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT© 1619 



390 Inscriptions. 

For mention of the 4th bell, see p. 39. The crosses are like Fig. 9, but 
not identical. 

Death Knell. — Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 for female ; then toll for 
about an hour. Rung about two hours after death, unless at night, then at 8 
next morning. 

Bell tolled for an hour before funeral. 

Bells rung for five minutes at 8 a.m. on Sundays, and holy-days when there 
is service. (Qy. survival ?) For morning and evening services ring half an 
hour ; small bell alone for last five minutes. Also for five minutes after 
morning service. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

A bell for vestry meeting. 

The following are extracts from " A Register Booke of y" Sesses and dis- 
bursments for y° Church and y" Poore and also divers other necessary thinges 
fit to be kept in memorye." Book ranges from 1615 to 1695, but is not 
perfect : 

1648 Item payd to Gynder for mending the bells 

Item payd the smith for Iron work 
1651 It. payd for repairing the Bells 
1653 Imprimis payd to Steven Gynder for repairing the 

bells ... ... ... ... ... ... 35. od. 

Item payd unto J. Tedman for a new Clapper 

being 37 lb weight ... ... ... ... \^s. od. 

1656 Item payd unto Steph. Gynder for work about the 

bells ... ... ... ... ... ... \li. ifS. 2d. 

1664 It. payd Stephen Gynder for making of a new 

wheel and Trussing of two Bells y'' sum of ... i6.y. Zd. 

1677 payd for Smith's work about the bells ... ... \s. od. 

1678 Item paid to Will. Hull for casting the fourth bell 

and for hanging of others of the bells as his re- 
ceipt makes appear ... ... ... ... 8//. 4^". od. 

Item paid to Will. Woods for Iron work used about 

the belles as his bill makes appear ... ... 2//. is. Sd. 

Item paid to Joseph Cruttenden of Rolvenden for 
carrying the bell to Hailsham and bringing her 
back again ... ... ... ... ... iSj-. od. 

Item paid to Goodman King for stock for y'' third 

Bell xs. 6d. 



4S. 


od. 


IS 


od 


4S. 


id. 



OS. 


oa. 


6s. 


od. 


3S- 


ed. 


Ss. 


6d. 



Insanptions. 391 

Item paid to Will. Moore for going to Hailsham to 

see the Bell made ... ... ... ... ^s. od. 

Item paid to Will. Moore for lodging the Bell- 
founder and fetching the Stocks from the Green 4.$'. (yd. 

Item spent upon the men that did helpe take down 

the bell i-J. od. 

1684 Item paid to M"" Broomfield for new Stocks and 

new wheels and hanging of the bells ... ... 22//. 

Item paid to the men for mending the fourth bell 
Item for expences when we put out the bells 
Item wee spent at several times about the bells ... 

1685 Item paid to Will. Woods for mending the Clapper 

of the 3 bell 2.J. od. 

1689 paid to Will™ Woods for cleaning the brasses of 

the Bells & oil to fill the brasses again i-f- (>d. 

The bells were new hung, fitted with fresh wheels, gudgeons, etc., by 
Messrs. Warner and Sons, in 1876, at an expense of upwards of ^70. 
Very hearty thanks to the Rector, the Rev. George Ridout. 

SANDWICH. St. Peter. 8 Bells. 

I., 27i-in. I MEAN TO MAKE IT UNDERSTOOD THAT THO' I'm LITTLE YET 

I'm good mears &: c'^ fecit 1779 

II., 30-in. TO HONOR BOTH OF GOD & KING OUR VOICES SHALL IN 

CONSORT RING W' MeARS & C° LONDON FECIT 17 79 
III., 32-in. WHILST THUS WE JOIN IN CHEARFULL SOUND MAY LOVE AND 

LOYALTY ABOUD W' MeARS & C° LONDON FECIT 1 779 

IV., 34J-in. music is medicine to the mind Mears & c" 1779 
v., 36-in. IN Wedlock bands all ye who join with hands and 

HARTS unite SO SHALL OUR TUNEFULL TONGUES 
combine TO LAUD THE NUPTIALS RITE MeARS & C" 
FECIT 

VI., 38^in. PEACE & good neighbourwood W" Mears & c" loxdon 

FECIT 1779 
VII., 42-in. YE ringers all THAT PRIZE YOUR HEALTH & HAPPINESS 

BE SORER MERRY WISE & YOU'lL THE SAME POSSESS W' 

Mears & c" of London Fecit 1779 

VIII., 46!-in. FORBES 1779 THE rev" m'' j conant a m rector w w 

braima' w brice ch. wakdicns 1779 



392 Inscriptions. 

It is stated, on what authority is unknown, that prior to the recasting in 
1779 there were six bells, known as the "Six Oxfords," which had been trans- 
ferred here from Christ Church, Canterbury. 

In 1758 there were here " 5 Bells. The 4 smallest were made by Joseph 
Hatch, 1625, and the Largest or Tennor by S. Knight, 1727." — Bryan 
Faussett. 

Boys' " History of Sandwich " states that the recasting in 1779 cost ;^43o 
\2S. 6d., which was defrayed by the metal of the old bells, a subscription 
among the inhabitants, and a moderate contribution from the rates. 

He gives the weights, as follows : 

Cwt. qr. lb. 
I. 4 2 27 

n. 5 o 13 
in- 5 3 15 

IV. 7 I 24 

V. 7 2 23 

VI. 92 I 

VII. II 3 13 

VIII. 15 2 9 

. £ s. d. 



67 3 13 @ £s ^s- o^- 365 19 ii 

Bell ropes ... ... ... ... ... ... i 14 o 

New stocks, iron work, altering frame, etc. ... ... 59 o o 

Landing and wharfage of the old bells 3 18 7 



Weight of the six old bells 55 cwt, i qr. 6 lb. @ 

^4 \os. od. 246 12 6 

Subscription ... ... ... ... ... ... 147 10 o 



The following notes as to local uses here are copied from the same book ; 
I don't know whether they exist at the present day : 

"The Sexton .... has a salary from the parish of 40^. for tolling the 
Tenor whenever service requires. He rings likewise the tenor bell every 
night at 8 o'clock, unless there be a burial at the church, and again in the 
morning at 4 o'clock, from a fortnight after Michaelmas to a fortnight before 
old Lady Day, except on Sundays, and in the 12 days after Christmas, for 
which he has from the Corporation annually 3 pounds, and an allowance of 



Inscriptions. 393 

Gs. 8d. for Candles and Oil. Are not these a continuation of the ancient 
corfew and matin bell ? The Sexton formerly had an annual allowance of 4^. 
from the Corporation for ringing at this church ' brandgose ' bell at i o'clock 
and the ' curfu ' at 8. 

" The sexton also rings the 4th bell at every common assembly by way of 
notice to the freemen that the Mayor and Jurats are proceeding to the Hall. 
This custom originated probably in a decree made in 1534, that at a common 
Assembly, when the Mayor comes into the Hall, a bell at St. Peter's called 
brandegoose bell shall begin to ring and continue to be rung half an hour, and 
fines were fixed for non-attendance in that time. For this and for ringing the 
bell on Market day the Sexton was allowed a salary of 45." 

This " Brandgoose " bell (can any one suggest a derivation ?) was clearly 
the market bell ; the town ordinances laying down that fish and poultry were 
not to be sold until it had been rung. 



SANDWICH. St. Clement. i, formerly 5 Bells. 

]., 32-in. * lOHN ^ HODSON * MADE * ME * 1672 4? lOHN * 
WHEELER «){(' O O O O 
^ ISAAC * PEARCE * CHVRCH * WARDENS c|. r|. CHRIS- 
TOPHER * HODSON 
The other four bells of the ring were similarly inscribed. They were sold 
not many years since to help raise funds for the restoration of the church. 

In 1508 Benett Webbys bequeathed to the reparation of the bells of St. 
Clements vj^. viij^/.— (" Testamenta Vetusta," p. 492.) 

St. Mary the Virgin. i Bell. 

I., 25-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1S76. 
This replaces a bell which bore the following inscription : 

THIS BEL WAS BOUGHT & STEEPLE BUILT AD 17 18 
I : BRADLEY R : HARVEY CH : WARDENS R : P : F : 
The tower fell in 1667, carrying the then ring of five bells with it. It was 
not rebuilt until 171S; in the meantime the bells, so local tradition states, 
were sold to Elham Church. This is doubtless correct, 0.3 has been shown 
in connection with that church. The following entry of their casting appears 
in the parish accounts here : 

3 E 



394 Inscriptions. 

1640 Paid Henry Wilnor for the use of the widow of 
John Wilnor for casteing of our five bells and 
hanging them ... ... ... ... ... ;^32 os. od. 

To Thomas Barret for makeing the quarters to 
strike upon the 4'^^ Bell 23^. 8^., the Dutch paid 
halfe \\s. 6d. 

Prior to 1639 there had been three bells only. 

In Boys' " History of Sandwich " it is stated that in the BederoU of bene- 
factors to be here prayed for occurs i?iter alios : 

" Also for the sowle of Robard Crystmesse of whos goodys was gevyn unto 
the chaunge of these bellys, xl/7." 

The churchwardens' accounts here date back as far as 1444, and of course 
there are entries relating to the bells. The "great bell " or " best bell," the 
" Mary bell," the " little bell," and the 4th bell are all mentioned, from which 
it would seem that the three which were recast into five in 1639 were only the 
remains of a ring of four or five. 

There were also the "sacring " bell, and the " wakerell " or sanctus. 

In the accounts for 1444 to 1582, the items for making new clappers and 
providing new ropes are very frequent. The bells were rung in thunder- 
storms, as ai)pears from the following : 

1507 Paid for bread and Drink for the Ringers on Saint Lambards 

day at night in the Thundering ... ... ... ... jd. 

To the Sexton for drink when it thundered ... ... ... ihd. 

In 1632 it was at a vestry "generally consented by free voices that 
Rob' Liddell shall ring the Bell to the sermon every Saboath day." 

In 1639 the churchwardens were empowered to agree with "John Wilnor 
of Borden in y*" said County, Bell founder," for the recasting. It appears 
that the 3rd bell only was cracked, and that to recast that by itself would cost 
;^i6, while to recast the whole three heavy bells into a light ring of five 
would only cost ;^36 ; so this last was the course agreed to. It would seem 
that the payment of ;^32, above mentioned, was the final payment at the 
end of the " year and a day " for which, doubtless, the bells had been war- 
ranted. 

The cost of the bell purchased in 1718 was ^^'^ 5i". \\d. 

Passing bell rung, but not at any fixed interval. Tellers- — 3 x 3 for male, 
3x2 for female ; both at beginning and end of peal. 



Inscriptions. 395 

On day of burial, bell fung at 7 a.m. for about half an hour, called the 
" knell." Tolled also at time of funeral service. 

Sundays. — Warning bell rung for a few minutes at 9 a.m. or i p.m., accord- 
ing to whether service is in morning or afternoon. Rung also, of course, before 
service. 

Bell rung for vestry meetings. 

In the costs of an obit, the following occurs among the payments : 
To the Sexton for 2 peals with all the bells ... ... 12^/. 

Very many thanks to the Rev. A. M. Chichester, Vicar. 

SANDWICH. St. Bartholomew's Hospital. 1 Bell. 

I., i5|-in. P i66e 

Bell doubtless by Thomas Palmer, of Canterbury. 



St. Peter. 5 Cells. 

^ lOHN k HODSON \ MADE v ME \ 1660 j W T ; I L ■ 

O ^v H o 

C I WARDENS ^^ 
«ijp lOHN % HODSON t MADE \ ME J 1660 \ WILLIAM 

h THOMPSON O ^^ lOHN % LOVEIOY \ CHVRCH 
\ WARDENS 'ijp O VV H O '){(» 
THO^ LESTER & T: PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1758 

v., 3Si-in. ST PHANVS SWAN ME k FECIT h ANNO DOMINI 
1609 ^ 
h WILLIAM h COX h h lOHN v RAVEN k WARDI:NS 
000000 
For mention of 4th bell, see p. 21. Cross is Fig. 5 ; stop, Fig. 4. 
Death knell rung as soon as possible. Tellers— 3 x 3 for man, 3 x 2 for 
woman. 

Sundays.— A peal at 8 a.m., and again at mid-day. 
Ringing on New Year's Eve, and on 5th November. 
A bell for vestry. 
Thanks to the Rev. C. E. Few, Vicar. 

-; E 2 



SEAL. 




I., 


30-in. 


11., 


>3i^ 


-in. 


III., 


34 


-in. 


IV., 


^36i 


-in. 



396 Inscriptions, 

SEAL. St. Laurence. 2 Bells. 

Modern church, with presumably two modern bells. 

SEASALTER. St. Alphege (Old Church). i Bell. 

I., 23-in. Rultcrfira {i wvoX i< m^ >} fi'cit ^ 1592 ® 

St. Alphege (New Church). i Bell. 

I., 421-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 

THE GIFT OF M-^^ WYNN ELLIS OF TANKERTON 
1845 

SELLINDGE. St. Mary. 5 Bells. 

I., 2 7},-in. S K 1723 
XL, 29-ln. SAMVELL KmCHT 1723 
IIL, 31-in. GVLIELMVS HV^T SAMVELL KmCHT FECIT 1723 
IV., 34-in. THO- ELGAR HE^ERY BARTOl^ CW SK 1723 
v., 37i-in. Mess""^ Tho* Baker & Caleb Caister Churh Wardens 
Chapman & Mears of London Fecerunt 1783 

T. R. E. First in the stepell iiij bells. 
Item a hand bell. 

The tenor was also by Samuel Knight, and dated same as the rest^before 

1783- 

One of the ring is cracked and dismounted, awaiting recasting. 

Death knell rung. Tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 3x2 for woman, 2x3 boy, 
2x2 girl. 

On day of burial, a bell tolled at 8 a.m., and again at the time of the 
funeral. 

Sundays. — Bells used for services only. One bell rung for a few minutes 
at the half-hour before — and continuously for the last ten minutes before — 
service. 

A bell for vestry meetings. 

Apparently no peals, the tower being out of repair. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. R. S. Pattrick. 

SELLING. St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 28|-in. Lester & Pack of London Fecit 1766 
IL, 3oJ-in. Same. 



Inscriptions. 397 

III., 32l-in. Same. 

IV., 33-in. These Six Bells Cast by Subscription Anno D^ 1766 

Lester & Pack of London Fecit 
v., 35-in. John Potter Bellhanger Lester & Pack of London 

Fecit 1766 
VI., 38A-in. Same as No. i. 

In 1760 Mr. Faussett gives us the following inscriptions on the then ring of 
four : 

I. Sancte Roberte Ora Pro Nobis 

II. Sit Nomen Domini Benedictum 

III. In Multis Annis Vocor (? Resonet) Campana lohannis 

IV. William Hatch made me Mary 1567 (? 1657) 

SEVENOAKS. St. Nicholas. 8 Bells. 

I., 31-in. George Lake Esq" 1769 I Hope To Make It Under- 
stood That Tho' I'm Little Yet I'm Good 
Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 
IL, 3iA-in. If you Have a Judicious Ear You'll Own my Voice 
is Sweet & Clear Pack & Chapman of London 
Fecit 1769 
III., 33-in. Such Wondrous Pow'r to Music's Given It Elevates 
The Soul to Heaven Pack & Chapman of London 
1769 
IV., 36-in. Ye People all Who Hear me Ring Be Faithful to 
Your God & King Pack & Chapman of London 
Fecit 1769 
v., 39i-in. Whilst Thus we Join in Chearful Sound May Love 
& Loyalty Abound Pack & Chapman of London 
Fecit 1769 
VL, 41-in. Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1769. This Bell 
and Seven Others of the Same Date Were Pur- 
chased BY The Subscriptions of The Parishioners 
Added to The Metal of Six Old Bells Melted 
Down 

MusiCK Is Medicine To The Mind 
VII., 46-in. Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1771 

Jn° Covkll T Wood R Palmer T Mills Overseers 



398 Inscriptions. 

VIII., 5r-in. Pack & Chapman of London Fecit T. Curteis DD 
Rector & Vicar T Wright Mich. Holmden C" War- 
dens 1769 
In Wedlock Bands All Ye Who Join With Hands 

Your Hearts Unite 
So Shall our Tongues Combine To Laud The Nup- 
tial Rite 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Tenor bell used for adults, 
6th for children. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 for female — then toll, and 
repeat tellers at finish. Not repeated on day of funeral — bell tolled for 
service only. 

Bells rung or chimed for Sunday and week-day services. 

Peals in the early morning of Easter Day, Christmas Day, and Whitsun 
Day. On last night of year, a dumb peal rung before midnight and an open 
peal after. 

Best thanks to Sexton, Mr. Hills. 

St. John Baptist. i Bell. 

L J. WARNER & SONS LONDON 1S57 
Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. J. S. Bartlett. 

St. Mary (Kippington). 1 Bell. 

I. GILLETT BLAND & C^ CROYDON 1880 

Weight, 5?> cwt. 

Thanks to Rev. G. E. Tate, Vicar. 

SEVENOAKS (Weald). St. George. i Bell. 

I., 28|-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1839 

SEVINGTON. St. Mary. 4 Bells. 

\ HATCH 1630 
' 282-1"- 1 RECAST MEARS 1SS5 
II., 31-in. i0fcpf| \ixU\\ mat»i| mt ® 1630 
HI., 33Wn. Same. 
IV., 37-in. lOSEPllVS HATCH ME FECi'i' ® 1^30 



Inscriptions. 399 

T. R. E. Item a sacrying bell. 

Item iiij bells in the stepel with an hand bcl for corsyse. 

Prior to the recasting, the treble bore the same inscription as Nos. 2 and 3, 
but without the foundry-stamp. 

SHADOXHURST. SS. Peter & Paul. i Pell. 

I., 32i-in. "aaaNAOJiaa aaoo nhoi aiv m 1592 r t 

T. R. E. ij bells in the steple. 

Sold . . . ij little bells in the churche. 

Hasted states that in his time, the close of the last century, there were 
here three bells. He is, however, not quite trustworthy on this point, and I 
think he is wrong here. There has never been but one within the memory of 
the oldest inhabitant, and the present turret certainly has no -room for more. 
It is, however, I believe, a comparatively recent erection, and therefore of not 
much use as evidence. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 
3 X 2 for female ; no distinction made for children. 

This is repeated at 7 a.m. on the day of the funeral. 

Bell otherwise used only to call to service. 

Thanks to Mr. Woodgate, parish clerk. 

SHEERNESS. St. Paul. i Bell. 

A small bell by Warner and Sons, dated a few years back. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

Also a small bell by Warner and Sons. 

Dockyard Chapel. 3 Bells. 

I., 15-in. 1814 
II., i8-in. 1814 
III., 28-in. C & G MEARS F0UND1-:RS LONDON ^ 

I'he two smaller bells were destroyed in the fire a few years ago. ^\■hat has 
become of the other one I don't know ; but I understand that three new ones 
(19, 21, and 27 inches) have recently been supplied by Messrs. E. Dent and 
Co. The two smaller bells are (and were) quarter bells only. 



400 Inscriptions. 

SHELDWICH. St. James. 6 Bells. 

I., 28|-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1865 
11., 30-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1867 
in., 33-in. Thomas Mears of London Fecit 1801 
IV., 34|-in. Same. 
v., 372-in. Same. 
VL, 42|-in. John Cobb Jun'^ Joseph Humphery ChurchWardens 
Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 1801 
May all whom I shall summon to the Grave The blessing 

OF A WELL SPENT LiFE RECEIVE 

The frame has been altered of late years, and Nos. 4 and 5 are on a higher 
tier than the others ; apparently a clumsy expedient to save expense. There 
is plenty of room on the one tier for all six, but it would have involved almost 
an entirely new frame. 

Death knell as soon as notice given. Tenor bell for adults, 4th for 
children. Commence with tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 for female ; chime 
ten minutes, raise bell and ring for a short time, finish with tellers as at 
beginning. 

At 8 a.m. on day of funeral, sound tellers, then raise bell and ring (double) 
minute strokes. Bell tolled before funeral. 

Peals rung on Easter morning, Christmas Eve and Day, Whitsun Day, 
Ascenfeion Day, Queen's birthday, and (generally) on New Year's Eve. 

Here are very excellent rules for the ringers. 

SHIPBOURNE. St. Giles the Abbot. 6 Bells. 

I., 26|-in.^ 






IL, 281-in. 
III., 31-in. 
IV., 33-in. 
v., 352-inJ 

The old peal of four which these replace, were as under : 
L, 25-in. cj(> ^ancfe C^abml Ora ^rw ^Ulabis 
II., 28-in. © GYIES REVE B F Q 1585 (Curious figures of men and 

animals.) 
III., 29-in. k STEPHANVS $ SWAN k ME k FECIT h § 1614 ^ 
IV., 32-in. IB $ HK ^ CW h h lOHM k WILMAR i MADE $ ME k 1633 



Inscriptions. 40 1 

It will be noticed that an awfully bad shot has been made on the new tenor ; 
Giles Reve, the bell-founder, of 1585, has apparently been confounded with 
the Patron Saint of the church. Old inscriptions had better not be reproduced 
at all than be blundered. See p. 42 for account of former treble, by William 
Powdrell, bell-founder, of London. 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. Toll fifteen minutes, and 
same just before funeral. 

Sundays. — Rung for services only. 

A bell for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to the Rev. A. P. Wharton. 

SHOLDEN. St. Nicholas. 3 Bells. 

I., 27i-in. THOMAS BARTLET MADE ME 1623 ® 

W $ H ^ H m ^ CHVRCHWARDENS 
II., 29-in. «jj(. lOHN k HODSON § C H f MADE ^ ME i 1675 r^ O O 
0000000 
^ WILLIAM k HILDE h GxWE h THIS h BELL h BY 7 HIS 
^ WILL f P ^ B^- ^ W ^ S 
IIL, 3o|-in. THOMAS BARTLET MADE ME 1623 © 

WILLIAM HILDE AND HENRY HARWARD CHVRCH- 
WARDENS 

SHOOTER'S HILL Vide Eltham and Plumstead. 

SHOREHAM. SS. Peter and Paul. 6 Bells. 

I., 27^in. lOHN CAPON ROGER ATWOOD CHVRCHWARDENS 

1693 
II., 28i-in. lOHN 9 HODSON k MADE a 1675 rjJpOOCOCHoo 
^ RIVERS k STEDOLPH ^ GEORGE k SMALL v C r ^^■AR- 
DENS o 
III., 29.1 -in. r;|(. lOHN h HODSON § MADE h ME h 1672 ^)(f EDWARD 
$ OLIVER ^ MINISTER ^'tp WTLLIA^^ k GIBSON ^ 
FRANCIS h EVEREST ^ C 7 W o O C H o 
IV., 32-in. I h W 1635 
v., 34i-in. lOHM WTL^AR 1635 
VI., 39i-in. C & C; MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1S50 

3 F 



402 Inscriptions. 

SHORNE. SS. Peter and Paul. 6 Bells. 

I., 27-in. Thomas Mears of London Fecit 1803 

II., 29-in. Same. 

III., 3 1 -in. Same. 

IV., 32-in. Same. 

v., 34|-in. Same. 

VI., 37i-in. The Rev^ Rob|' Foote Vicar M"^ Jarvis Noakes M"^ William 
BiLBOE Ch. Wardens T Mears Fecit 1803 

No information obtamable from Vicar. 

SHORTLANDS. St. Mary. i Bell. 

Modern church with presumably one modern bell. 

SIBERTSWOLD. St. Andrew. i Bell. 

I., 24-in. Blank. 
A modern bell. 

SIDCUP. St. John Evangelist. 6 Bells. 

tt'' ^o-"'! C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1844 
II., 28-in. j ^^ 

IIL, zo-m.\ 

IV "^^-m 

^;' -'" . ■ - THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1839 
v., 34-m. ' -^^ 



VI., 37-in. 

SISSINGHURST. Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell, stated to be devoid of inscription. Church 
built 1838. 

SITTINGBOURNE. St. Michael. 8 Bells. 

I., 3r-in. Cx\ST BY JOHN WARNER .V' SONS 1884 

VENITE EXULTEMUS DOMINO 
II., 3U-in. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS 1884 
W. H. DYSON VICAR 

HENRY THOMAS TIDY^j ^^^^^^^^^^ ,,r . t.x.t..t^ 
ROBERT CHAPMAN j^HURCH WARDENS 



Inscriptions. 403 

III., 32-in. lAMES BARTLET MADE ME 16S7 © THOMAS 

LVSHINGTON 
IV., 34J-in. lAMES BARTLET MADE ME 1687 © 
v., 38-in. Same. 
VI., 40^ -in. Same. 
VII., 44|-in. Same. 

VIII., 49-in. Same. lOHN KEETE lOHN EASTMAN CHVRCH- 
WARDENS 
WILLIAM CATLETT ® 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. First chime tenor, then raise 
6th or 7th according to age, lower, end with tellers on tenor — 3 x 3 for male, 
3 X 2 for female. Tenor tolled when funeral is passing. 

Sundays. — The 8 and 9 o'clock peals were discontinued about ten years 
ago. The 7th was used, excepting on "Sacrament Sunday," when the treble 
was used at 8. Bells rung for all Sunday services ; " toll in " on tenor last five 
minutes. 

Peals rung on all Church festivals and loyal anniversaries. 

No vestry bell now. 

Best thanks to the Rev. Henry Venn, Vicar. 

The old ring of six is very fine in tone. Not long after their being placed 
here they were an object of admiration of a transatlantic visitor, Samuel 
Sewall, an American judge, who notes thus in his diary, under date 15 August, 
1689 : "So to Sittingburn, lodge at the George, rains hard in the night. In 
the morn a good Ring of 6 Bells entertains us : no whether for the Ringers to 
work." 

Part of the frame for the old sanctus bell still exists, close to the eastern 
window of the belfry. It was evidently rung from there. A doorway still 
exists, giving a clear view of the high altar. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

A small " factory-hung " bell, dated 1868, by Warner and Sons. Reported 
locally as " the scourge of the district," rung three-quarters of an hour before 
every service. 



SMALL HYTHE. St. John Baptist. i Bdl. 

I., i7i-in. T ? F 5 

; V 2 



404 



Inscriptions. 



SMARDEN. St. Michael. 5 Bells. 

I., 34-in. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1760 
IL, 37-in. James Pope Ch : Warden 1769 Pack & Chapman of London 
Fecit 

IIL, 39-in. XiO:i3©-m^TStH ^ X3ClO^ ^ xn©- ^ 

'^.^m'^m 1601 ® 

IV., 43-in. THOMAS GREENHILL ROBERT HOOKER CHURCH- 
WARDENS R: PHELPS LONDINI FECIT 1729 
v., 48-in. M'^ THO^ DANE & W^ W^ GIBBON CH : WARDENS 
1760 LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 

T. R. E. Item v bellys and a saunc' bell. 

There is an interesting series of the churchwardens' accounts, from 1536 
downwards. The following entries occur in them : 



1546-7 It. payd to Edward Pellande for medyng of the 
lytle bell claper & for mendyng of the 
canapye 
It. payd for shutynge of xxxiij li of brasse for the 

bellys \\]d. the pownde 
It. payd for xix li of newe brasse vjV. the li the 

snia 
It. payd for new trussyng of the bell and hangg- 

ynge 

It. payd for carynge of the brassys twesse to 
Godmersam 
1548 Itm. resseuyd of Henry Ponnet ffore belle 

brasse & latten 
1557 Itm. paid to father Sharpe for a litle bell 

Itm. to Pelland for mendinge the clapper of our 
bell (& other work) ... 
1563 Itm. rec. of Willm Whytt for a bell and a 
cruett ... 
1572-3 Itm. laid out for the ringers when the quenes 
grace was here 
1573 Itm. layde oute for ringinge for the queene 
1580 For leather for bawdricks 
1585 For carynge the bell to Maidstone 



VIIJ^. 



iiijj". 



XUJi'. 



\]S. 

\]S. 
XJ". 



xxij</. 
iij^. 
vj^. 

xij^. 

iiij^. 
\\]d. 

xxijV. 

xvj^. 

x^. 
yX]d. 
V]d. 



Insc7'iptions. 405 

Sending the bell home from London to Feuer- 

sham ... 
p*^ at feuersham for cariadge and to the water 

balife ... 
for caryinge the bell from feuersham to Chal- 

locke ... 
to Richard Swaisland for bringinge the bell 

home ... 
spent in meat & drink in hanginge up the bell 
1599 Rec from M'' Henrye James towards the bells 
1604 In primis layd out for fetching the bells ffrom 

Fev''sha 
Ite. layde out for carriage 
Ite. for the townes wharfidge ... 
Ite. our brackfast 

Ite. spent a hanginge of the bells up ... 
Ite. payd for carriage the bells and fetchinge 

them home 

P'l to Mayster IMoate* 

1607 P'^ at Cantburie for my charges in going to 

cantyburye to give in my answer for the Kings 

armes cushen and the greate bell 
1609 Item expended in interteyneing the bell founder 

at his first comeing ... 
Item for his chardges in travelling to London 

aboute the bell 
Item paid for the Belfounder his supper at 

Smerdon ... ... ... ... ... iiijji"- 

Item paid at London for makeinge writeinge for 

y'' bell ij-f. \]d- 

Item for his passage by water to London and to 

the water bayliffe for the bell ... ... xvjr/. 

Item paid to M'' Laurence of ffvershame ... lijj'. 

for chardges the third jorney to London when 

he paid for shootinge the bell ... ... vi'. 

* Sec inscription i>n 3i'il hell. 



iij^. 


iiij^. 




xviijd'. 


iijj. 


viij^. 


vj^. 


viij^. 


iiji". 


iiij^. 


XXVJJT. 


viij^. 


xxxiijV. 




viij.f. 






xvj^. 


iiJ5. 


v\\]d. 




\\\)d. 


iijV/. 




xxj//. 






xviij^. 




xviij^. 


xj.-. 


]d. 



4o6 Inscriptions. 

1611 Item payd for our dynners the fowerth of Sep- 
tember when the belle was hadd uppe into the 
steeple... ... ... ... ... ... ij^-. \]d. 

1622 Item to y*^ Ringers on y*" Kings majestyes coro- 

nation ... ... ... ... ... ... 7^f, 

1623 John Rabbett for mending the dogs of the third 

bell and helping to new hang him ... ... \s. 

1632 To John Rabbit for ringing the sermon bell ... 6^. 

1 703 Item given the ringers to ring upon y*" queens 

crovvnacon day ... ... ... ... 5.5". 

1729 P*^ M' Stephenson for casting the bell ... ... 13//. 13^". o^. 

The following bequests are on record : 

In 1464 William Matteras gave five marks towards a new bell. In the same 
year William Marlar, another parishioner, not only gave 13.^. a^d. to the new 
belfry, but he made the new bell his residuary legatee : " residuum vero 
bonorum meorum non legatum do et lego ad novam campanam," are the 
words of his \v'ill. 

In 1498 John Skinner left \2d. — "ad repacoem unius campane itim." 

There is also here (or rather, I am afraid, was) an endowment for bell ropes, 
and the deed by which this was given is sufficiently curious, I think, to be given 
in extenso, from a copy of a horribly bad translation, apparently made in the 
seventeenth century. The " coppie " is as follows : 

Know all men by these presents and to come that I John Hamden have 
given granted in pure and everlasting memory and by this my present writting 
confirmed to y'' maintenance of y"" Rops Cords and Leather together for y" 
Bells in the steeple of Smarden hanging when it shall be needfull the said 
Bells anew be like to repaire six shillings of lawfull ready money yeerly to be 
paid to be Issueing and goeing out for every yeare for ever of all my Lands 
and Tenements wheresoever lying upon y'' Denn of Barthlyden in the parish 
of Smarden to be taken by the churchwardens which for that time being. 
To be paid by me the said John my heiors or assigns at y"" Feast of y° Pass- 
over Three Shillings and at y'^ Feast of St. Michael y** Archangel Three 
Shillings of good and lawfull Sterling ready money yearly to be paid to the 
Church of Smarden, and if it shall happen the aforesaid yearly rent to be 
behinde at any of the times and Termes aforesaid in part or in all, then it 
shall be lawfull for y" Churchwardens of the Church aforesaid (which then 
shall be) with y" p'ishoners of y*" sd Church, into all y^ aforesaid Lands for 



Inscriptions. 407 

y^ rent aforesaid then behinde, To I>istreine, and the Distress or Distresses 
theire so found and taking to Lead and Deteine untill y" sd Churchwardens 
and p'ishoners of y'' aforesaid rent be fully sattisfied. And hereupon when 
the Rops, Cords and Leather shall want to be repaired, the ancient Rops, 
Cords and Leather shall be delivered to me y'' sd John, my heiors and assigns 
and to remaine for ever, and if any of the aforesaid rent shall be remaining 
in Exspence, besids for y*-' use of y*-' aforesaid Bells, then to y*" use of the 
Light of the Altar of y° Blessed Virgin Mary in the same Church to be Dis- 
posed, according to y° Discretion of the p'ish, and I y<= sd John Hamden and 
my heiors, the aforesaid yearly rent with y'' appurtenances to the Church- 
wardens of y^ Church which for that time being, in forme aforesaid will 
warrant for ever. In witness whereof to this my p'sent writting Indented 
Interchangabley to one part have put, And John at Pleine Churchwarden of 
the Church aforesaid on y" other part in y"" name of the p'ish his seale hath 
put, at Smarden on Friday in the Feast of St. Stephen in y'' yeare of the 
reigne of Edward the third after y"" conquest of England y'^ five and fortieth, 
and in the yeare of his reigne of France y^ two and Thirtieth : in the p'sence 
of these Witnesses William Euignden, Simon Chellingden, John Gylot, Thomas 
Watts, Roger Halynghurst, William Baker, and others. 

This is a true coppie of that coppie which was taken out of y original 
Deede in English by Mr. Tho. Curtice. 

The Deede was Dated y" 26'^^ of December in y'= 45"' yeare of the reigne of 
Edward the third and in y*" yeare of our Lord 137 1 (which should be 1367). 

Entries in the parish records note the receipt of this small endow- 
ment, e.g. : 

1 7 19 Received of M"" Greenhill for bell ropes, ending at 

Easter ... ... ... ... ... ... oli. ds. od. 

1796 Received for 2 years Sess due in passing last account 

for the Bell-rope field ... ... ... ... oli. \2s. od. 

The same time 4 old Bell ropes were sold for "js. 

11^., and the money paid to Thomas Londwcll 

(Ch. Warden) on behalf of the Parish. 
1798 Sess for Bell rope field paid by Thomas Hinds ... o/i. 6s. od. 

My informant adds that the last entry of payment occurs in iSii, so that 
it would seem that the endowment is lost. Probably it was considered too 
small to be worth collecting. 



4o8 Inscriptions. 

I am indebted for the above extracts to the Rev. F. Haslewood's books on 
the parish, from which my friend, the Rev. Cecil Deedes, has kindly copied 
them for me. 



SMEETH. St. Mary. i Bell. 

I., 32-in. tulV^Tii IjafcJi maiie ntc ® 1603 
T. R. E. Item iij bells in the stepill. 

In 1758, three bells, one of them noted as " fallen " — which, is not stated. 
Treble remains; of the others II. had no inscription, III. had " Josephus 
Hatch me fecit 1620." The two were probably sold not long after. 

The Rector states that " there were six good bells once." I think he must 
have been misinformed ; I doubt if there were ever more than three. The 
two sold last century were sold by a churchwarden for funds to repair the 
roof, instead of making a rate. This was probably with the concurrence of 
Rector and Archdeacon ; they were not particular in the middle of the 
eighteenth century. 

Death knell rung. Tellers at commencement — 3 strokes for man, 2 for 
woman. A daily morning peal at 8. This is, I think, the sole example in 
Kent. 

Sundays. — The bell is " simply rung for everything." 

Rung for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to the Rev. C. H. Robertson. 

SNARGATE. St. Dunstan. 3 Bells. 

I., 30-in. ^ J5^-M^ ■ (Q^i^miig- 

II., 30-in. lOHN ^ HODSON * MADE * ME * 1673 cj. Q C H Q 
000 
<$> RICHx\RD ^ HALL * CHVRCH * WARDEN * O O 

000 

iiL, 36-in. >i^B>M-^^mwm :iB-^^m^^^M:M^ 

T. R. E. Item in the steple iij bells and in the churche one worning bell 
one hand bell and one sacryng bell. 

For mention of the remarkable treble and tenor bells, see p. 9. 



Insc7'iptions. 409 

SNAVE. St. Augustine. 3 Bells. 

I., 30-in. Benjamin Streeten Church Warden Tho^ Mears of 
London Fecit 1795 

iL, 33-in. + B'm^^'M.Msy^'^i: s> I mQ)isvm<By^\ er | 

III., 37-in. Same as No. i. 

T. R. E. Item iij bells in the stepulL 

See p. 16 for mention of Stephen Norton, the founder of the middle bell. 
The cross, stop, and letters are all crowned. 

The 8 o'clock (" Matins " bell) on Sunday mornings was rung here within 
living memory, but has been discontinued for many years. 



SNODLAND. All Saints. 5 Bells. 

I., 29-in. AIEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 

PRESENTED BY 
REV J G CAREY RECTOR 
EASTER 1873 
II., 3ofin. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 
THE GIFT OF W" LEE ESQ HOLBOROUGH 

III., 34-in. * BY * ME Q GYLLES O RIVE Q "^^ 1589 
IV., 35-in. Same as No. 2. 
v., 39-in. I W <5> MADE ^ ME 1636 

Before the remodelling of the peal there were tliree bells only. Nos. i and^ 
4 are additions. No. 2 replaces the old treble, which was by Anthony Bartlett, 
and dated 1654. 

The bells are hung without wheels, so that they can only be chimed. 



St. John Evangelist. i Bell, 

Frame for six, but only one bell at present, by Gillctt & Co., of Croydon ; 
weight, 7 cwt. 

3 ^ 



4 1 o Inscriptions. 

SOUTHBOROUGH. St. Peter. 6 Bells. 

A light peal, by Gillett and Co., of Croydon, replacing a single bell, dated 
1830 ; the tenor bears the inscription : 

In Memory of Stephen Hurt Langston MA 
24 years Vicar of this parish. 

Passing bell rung directly after death. Tellers— 3 x 3 for man, 3x2 for 
woman. At funeral, minute strokes till procession comes in sight, then more 
quickly until arrival at church. 

Sundays. — An early peal at 8. For services all six rung, "toll in " on tenor 
last five minutes. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. W. H. Chapman. 

St. Thomas. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

Christ Church. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

SOUTHFLEET. St. Nicholas. 6 Bells. 

I., 29j-in. R: PHELPS FECIT 1705 (Rest of inscription defaced.) 
II., 31-in. The Rev'' Peter Rashleigh MA Rector Rob^ French & 
John Colyer Church Wardens 
Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 1794 

III., 321-in. ^^%J^'M.^'X^^^''^s> mJ^^imm^^. xa^©- 

:R©'<sr:i:W- 1610 

W <$> C <5> O <^ P ^-^ CHVRCHWARDENS D (Fig. 42) 1610 
IV., 35in. R: P: FEC^ 1705 

v., 38|-in. ^ (Fig. n) :&iitc Irt OfancIauE ©a&ittBt :iFlunnc 

X^anixq Hwaui^ U (Fig. 6) 
VL, 42-in. THE REV° W" GEEKIE D : D : RECT : lAMES BIGGS 
WESTON COWERS CH : WARDENS M : P : C : R : B : 
RICHARD PHELPS MADE ME 1736 
lOHN GARLAND SIDESMAN 



Inscriptions. 4 1 1 

No. 4 is in a very dilapidated condition, the cannons broken off, and an 
iron band shrunk on just below the shoulder, apparently to counteract the 
effects of a crack in the crown. See p. 27 for account of No. 5. 

T. R. E. Item iiij bells of brasse suted in the steple and ij handbells of 
brasse. 

" Registrum Roffense " is responsible for the following statement : 

" On a brass plate fixed in the south wall of the belfry is this inscription : 
Johannes Swan Magister Willielmus Swan et Ricardus Swan fratres ac Magister 
Thomas Swan et Willielmus Swan nepotes dederunt ecclesie banc campanam 
maxim am." 

SPELDHURST. St. Mary. 6 BeHs. 

I., 29i-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1849 

II., 3ii-in. Same. 

III., 335-in. Same. 

IV., 34-in. Same. 

v., 39-in. T. Mears of London Fecit 181 2 

vL, 42-in. m j^\:mrm © ,cci©-,^:m.@ j^<B^:y^&^ 

1849 

There were only four bells here until 1791, when the church was set on tire 
by lightning and the bells melted. 

Passing Bell. — Tenor for adults, 5th for those from fifteen to twenty-one, 
3rd for children. Bells raised and rung for half an hour ; end with tellers — 
3 X 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female. Not rung before S a.m. or after sun-down as 
a rule. 

Funerals. — Half an hour before funerals the tellers are given, and then the 
bell is tolled until the procession reaches the lich-gate. A dumb peal at a 
ringer's burial. 

Sundays. — From 14th February to 5th November bells are rung at 7, 8, 9, 
and ID a.m. From 5th November to 14th P'ebruary at the three later hours 
only. For services bells rung in changes for half an hour previously, then 
tenor tolled for last five minutes ; and when the clock has struck, the treble 
bell is struck three times. Fifth or tenor rung after morning service to denote 

^ (J 2 



412 Inscriptions. 

another service. Tenor bell rung at 2 p.m., called " Sermon " bell, to show 
there will be sermon as well as service in afternoon. 

Early morning peals on Easter Day, Christmas Day, and Whitsun Day. 
Ringing on Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve, and dedication festival. Also on 
royal birthdays. 

A bell rung for vestries. 

These uses are peculiar and interesting. 

Very many thanks to the Rev. D. D. Mackinnon. 

STALISFIELD. St. Mary. i Bell. 

I., 27^-in. T. Mears of London Fecit 1815 

STANFORD. All Saints. i Bell. 

I., 25-in. lOHN WILNAR MADE ME 1631 

T. R. E. Item ij bellys in the steppyll. 

Mem : Stolen .... a hande bell. 

In 1758 two bells, of which the present one was the larger. The other bore, 
according to Mr. Faussett, 

William (? Willelmus) Revell me fecit. 

Death knell as soon as notice received. Tellers — man 3x3, woman 3x2, 
child 3x1. 

Thanks to Rector, Rev. J. Williamson. 

STANSTED. St. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I., 27-in. ►p (Fig. 14) luriannis ^\i ^0mcn ©"iris U (Fig. 13) 
II., 29-in. (^a^A bp %o\)\\ ^i^arncr aiti> ^>ons (iLon6ott 1882. 
III., 33-in. iutlliam Iiafclj ntat»c «tc T S C W ® 1656 

Account of treble at p. 31. 

STAPLE. St. James. 4 Bells. 

I., 33-in. lOHN O HODSON O MADE O ME O 1680 Q 

RICHARD O TERRY Q WILLIAM Q V/OODWAR Q 
CHVRCH O W O S O 
II., 34i-in. Same. 



Inscriplions. 413 

III., 37i-in. ^ (Fig. 5) ^it ^wmen Xi)i?«ttnt X^Bncbtdiim^^ (Fig. 20) 

U (Fig. 19) 
IV., 41-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1623 

For account of 3rd bell, see p. 36. 

Death knell rung either on morning of death or following morning. Tellers 
— 3 X 3 for a male, 3 x 2 for a female. 

Bells rung before burial, and as body is borne to the grave. 

Sunday Services. — Ring or chime fifteen minutes, then a single bell ten 
minutes, and another for last five. Formerly a bell was rung at 9 a.m. to give 
notice of Holy Communion after Matins. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

A bell for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. R. F. Blake. 

STAPLE HURST. All Saints. 8 Bells. 

L, 29-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 
PRAISE TO GOD THE ETERNAL FATHER 
G. F. REYNER STP RECTOR 1885 
II., 3oi-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 
PRAISE TO GOD THE ETERNAL SON 
J H C M^GILL MA CURATE 1885 
III., 32i-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 
PRAISE TO GOD THE ETERNAL SPIRIT 
JOHN NUNN 



WILLIAM WICKINGSJ™"^^"^'*'^^''-^^ '^^^ 
IV., 35-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1885 

GOD BLESS THE CHURCH 
THIS BELL IS IN PLACE OF ONE CAST IN 1748 
v., 37Hn. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1885 

GOD BLESS THE QUEEN 
THIS BELL IS IN PLACE OF ONE CAST IN 1663 
VI., 40-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1885 

GOD BLESS STAPLEHURST 
THIS BELL IS IN PLACE OF ONE CAST IN 1594 
VII., 44-in. HEMRY TVRMER C W WILLIAM WOLLESS C W ® 
1605 lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME 
T S 



4 1 4 J nsi )i/>/ loiis. 

VIII., 4«.^in. TillS'l'ION'ORVVIlICM IS IN PLACE OF ONE CAST IN 
ir,.i9 AMI) THE 6'"' 5'" 4'" 3"" 2n>'&TREIU>E BELLS 
WIOKIO CAST I5Y MEARS cV STAINI5ANK IN 1S85 
DONA Dia DEO. 

The former ring was of five only, the No. 4 of which is the present No. 7. 
The inscriptions, et< ., on llie others, were as follow : 

I., 34-in. lAMICS LOVE THOMAS HARTICN CII : WARDENS 1748 

T: LICSTICR Ol- LONDON MADE ME 
II., 37-in. UtiUiam Ijatcli mai»c uni 1663 
1 1 1., 4 1 -in. koiuntfuo + XT^at + nn| + fiicU 1 594 © 
v., 49J,-in. ^(.m IIVIVS SOMVS AT CTTRTSTI SALVS TIEPIRICVS 
KICMT RECTOR THOMAS SCOOMi: RICHARD 
l'RA^CI<:S WARDI'lNIvS lOHH PALMAR MADE 

M S MEE 1649 

The weights of the new ring are as follow : 

(^vt. (jr. lb. 



1. 


5 


3 


•9 




II. 


6 


2 


'.3 




III. 


7 





6 




IV. 


H 


2 


6 




V. 


9 


1 


27 




VI. 


I 2 


I 


iS 




VII. 


LS 


2 


8 




Tenor. 


2 1 


2 


13- 


-Note, E b 



They were solemnly dedicated to Cod's service on St. Mark's Day, 1885, 
at a s])ecial service for tiuit pur|)ose, the following account of which is taken 
from the Guardian : 

"The first service in the belfry was conducted by the Disliop of Hereford, 
foinurly I'ellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, the rectory of Staplehurst 
being in (he patronage of that society. This consisted of a few prayers and 
a formal admission of the members of the Ringers' Cuild, sixteen in number. 
Till- I'lishoi) likewise gave a brief and ])ra(tical address to them at 3 p.m. The 
liisho]) lead in ilie behry the prayers which formally dedicated the new peal. 
Immediately ahcr the prayers the bells were rung. At 3.30 the general service 
was commenced with the Old Hundredth as a processional. The service 



Inscriplions. 415 

being ended, a short peal ensued, which was followed by a special hymn. 
The Bishop preached from Exodus xxxix. 43." 

Passing bell tolled immediately after death ; half-minute strokes on 7th 
bell. 

On Day of Burial. — " Funeral knell " at 7 a.m. Commence with tellers 
— 3 strokes for a male, 2 for a female ; then toll for an hour, half-minute 
strokes. Before funeral, " minute bell " tolled for an hour, quickening as 
procession nears church, and again whilst the body is being carried to the 
grave. 

Sundays. — Second and third bells chimed at 8 a.m. (" Matins bell "), and 
again at i p.m. Bells chimed or rung for half an hour before services. 

Peals on Christmas Day and New Year's Eve, also on Queen's birthday and 
festival of the local benefit society (4th June). 

Bell (7th) rung for Easter Vestry. 

The curfew was rung here (on old 4th, present 7th) up till about forty years 
ago. 

Very many thanks to the Rev. J. H. C. McGill. 



STELLING. St. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I., 26|-in. Blank. 

IL, 30-in. + "\r0X jg^gurtini B^ntl JM M-'uxt :E)ci U 
III., 34i-in. + .Sanrfa ^Kafcrina (Dtja ^tja :ill0bts U 

See p. 31 for account of the two larger bells. The treble is rather a puzzle 
— it has ornamented cannons, and is rather longer in the waist tha:i the other 
two. Casting rather rough. Possibly the oldest of the three, l iie crosses 
on Nos. 2 and 3 are Fig. 14 ; the foundry stamp Fig. 13. 

The whole three, so far as frame and fittings are concerned, are in a disgrace- 
ful state of repair. They have not been rung for years; and I am really in doubt, 
as regards the two larger, whether it is quite safe even to chiiiie them. It is a 
thousand pities to see an untouched medicXval peal no better cared for. 

Death knell rung as soon as clerk has notice. Commence with tellers— 
3 X 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female— then toll for half an hour. This is generally 
(but not invariably) repeated at 8 a.m. on day of funeral ; otherwise the bells 
are only used to chime to service. 



4 1 6 Inscriptions. 

STOCKBURY. St. Mary Magdalene. 5 Bells. 

I., 3c-in. lOHN WILNAR 1634 

II., 3iJ,-in- Same. 
III., seln. I0H>1 WILMAR MADE ME 1634 
IV., 38i-in. Same. 

v., 42|-in. I^W 1635 

In 1456, Reginald atte Pette of this parish bequeathed towards a new bell 
called trebyll vj.y. viijV, ("Testamenta Vetusta," p. 286). 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received, but not after sunset. Tenor 
bell used for adults, 4th for those between twelve and twenty, 3rd for children 
under twelve. Tellers, 3 x 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female. 

Minute bell on day of funeral. Same bell used as for passing bell. 

Bells usually chimed, but occasionally rung for services. 

Peals formerly on loyal anniversaries, but discontinued " on the abolition of 
church rates," i.e., when local funds ceased to afford a tip to the ringers. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. T. Cobb. 

STOD MARSH. St. Mary. 2 Bells. 

I., 24-in. + wi:yitmy^^ ^i:€r,^m<s M-XM^jF^mi 

II., 251-in. A BOVE ALL THINGS LOVE GOD 

The smaller bell is a curious specimen of early bell-founding, the lettering 
being placed on the shoulder angle. It is probably earlier than 1300 
(see p. 8). 

The larger bell is probably of Elizabethan date. 

STOKE AT HOO. St. John Baptist. 3 Bells. 

I., 28 in. THE REV':'° A : E : O : HARIS VICAR. TAYLOR & 
C-^ LOUGHBOROUGH 

W : S : MEERS R° ALLEN CHURCHWARDENS 1861 
II., 29i-in. UTiUiam \\^iz\i tnatrc me T B T S C W 1641 



III., 32-in. -ItoooGoRoooooo* 1589 

Death knell rung as soon as possible. Tellers, 3x3 for male, 3 x 2 for 
female. 

Bell tolled before funerals. 



Inscriptions. 4 1 7 

Sundays. — Bells chimed for services. Ring in on tenor last five minutes. 

Treble rung for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. A. E. O. Harris. 

STONE BY DARTFORD. St. Mary. 2 Bells. 

I., 2 7i-in. The Gift of Henry Draper 1691 Thomas Elliot Thomas 
CoLYER Church Wardens Recast The Rev" Thomas 
Heathcote Rector William Netleingham John Sharp 
Church Wardens 1806 T: Mears & Son of London 
Fecit 
n., 31-in. John & Christopher Hodson Made Me 1676 Nicholas 
TooKE Church Wardens Recast The Rev° Thomas 
Heathcote Rector William Netleingham John Sharp 
Church Wardens 1806 T Mears & Son of London 
Fecit 

T. R. E. Item iij bells in the steple suted of brasse a saints bell of brasse 
and two sacryng bells of brasse. 

There were five bells in Hasted's time, but (in 1805?) the spire was burnt 
and the bells melted. 

Passing bell rung as soon as possible after death. 

A bell tolled at funerals. 

Sundays. — Bells rung for service only. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. F. W. Murray. 

Green Street Green Chapel. i Bell. 

Doubtless a small modern tinkler. 

New Brent Chapel. i Bell. 

Doubtless same as last. 

STONE IN OXNEY. St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 28i-in. Mess':^ Sion Rofe & Jn° Milsted Ch. Wardens W & T 

Mears of London Fecit 17S8 
IL, 29-in. Mess'^^ Jon Milsted & Sion Row Ch. Warkkns AV" Meaks 
of London Fecit 1786 

; H 



4 1 8 Inscriptions. 

III., 3oi-in. + (Fig. 14) T52'iJX J^^Si^lxwx Ht^ncf %\\ J5.\rfc :E)ei 

►J. (Fig. 18) U(Fig. 17) 
IV., 332-in- John Milsted & Stephen Samson Church Wardens Tho^ 

Mears of London Fecit 1795 
v., 37-in. SiHON Rose & Jn° Milsted Ch : Wardens 

W & T Mears Late Lester Pack & Chapman of London 

Fecit 1787 
VI., 42-in. SiHON Rose Jn'' Milsted Ch : Wardens W & T Mears 

Late Lester Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1787 

For account of 3rd bell, see p. ^t^. 

T. R. E. Item v bells in the steple one over the chancel and ij hand bells. 

The " one over the chancel " was of course the Sanctus bell. The hole in 
the beam over the chancel arch (through which the rope passed) still remains. 

Parish records state the treble to have been recast in 1720. This was, 
probably, the present second. 

STOURMOUTH. All Saints. 3 Bells. 

L, 2%\-\x\. inV^P^I Ijafdi l^a^e \\\t T 1638 
II., 27-in. Same. 1605 

III., 3oi-in. ^N%y>rs^-%M^mi mM-^^mm^n. ^m^M-^i^m 
XIl©" 1615 

Passing bell rung as soon as possible. Tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 3 x 2 for 
woman. 

Bells chimed on Sundays for services only. 

Ringing on Christmas Day and New Year's Eve; also on 5th November. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. W. J. Smallwood. 

STOWTING. St. Mary. 4 Bells. 

L, 25-in. WILL. ANSELL S K 1721 
IL, 25-in. + ^^M ^ ^ 
III., 28-in. S U K I U W FECIT 1721 
IV., 30-in. lOHN ANSELL RECTOR S K 1721 

For mention of No. 2, see p. 42. 

The Sanctus bell-cote at east end of nave still remains, but tenantless now ; 
the bell, however, was there within living memory. 



Inscriptions. 4 1 9 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. Tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 3x2 
for woman. 

On day of burial, a bell tolled in the morning and again at time of funeral. 

Sundays. — Tenor bell rung at 8 a.m. (" Matins " bell). For services, all 
four bells are chimed. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

According to the parochial records, new bell-ropes were purchased almost 
annually here, as in many other places in the county, so long as church rates 
existed. The old ones were the perquisites of the outgoing churchwardens, 
being very useful (especially when not too much worn) for plough-traces, etc. 
The following agreement for recasting the three old bells into four, in 1721, is 
copied from the original, preserved in the parish chest : 

Articles of Agreement indented made and concluded on the seventeenth 

day of May in the seventh yeare of the raigne of our souaigne Lord 

George by the grace of God now King of Greate britain etc Annoq, 

dni 1 72 1 Betweene William fifuks Churchwarden of the parish Church 

of Sto wting in the county of Kent of the one parte and Job Potter of Leeds 

in the county aforesaid Carpenter of the other parte as followeth — viz. 

Inp"^ Whereas there is belonging to the said Church in Stowting now but 

three old bells it is covenanted granted concluded & mutually agreed by & 

betweene the said parties that the said Job Potter His executors admo""^ or 

assignes shall & will cast or cause to be cast the said three old bells and make 

of them four good tunable new bells But if in case at the time when the 

new bells shall be weigd to the said Churchwarden the four new bells if the 

waite of them be more then the three old was when waid that then the said 

William ffukes his successors or assignes shall pay or cause to be paid unto 

the said Job Potter his heires or assignes the sum of thirteen pence per pound 

for euy pound waite that shall be more then the old bells waid soe that there 

be not exceeded in waite above one halfe hundred waite more but if in case 

the four new bells shall be in waite less then the three old was then the said 

Job Potter his heires or assignes shall pay or cause to be paid unto the said 

William flukes or his successars the sum of twelve pence per pound for euy 

pound as shall be in waite wanting of the waite of the old bells. 

Item the said Job Potter doth for himselfe his heires or assignes covenant 
promise & agree to «S>: with the said W'" ffukes his heires <& assignes That he 
the said Job Potter his heires & assignes shall & will make a good sufficient 
new frame to place the said new bells in & to find all Jron worke stocks i\: 

^ IJ 2 



420 



l7isc7'iptions. 



wheeles & ei'iy thing thereunto belonging (he or they haveing all the old 
worke thereunto belonging) The ropes & the Carriage of the old bells to 
Hythe And fetching of the new bells to Stowting Church when new cast 
which the said W"^ ffukes or his successars is to be at the charge of only 
excepted And further that if in case the said parishioners shall judge or find 
any of the bells not tunable when rung then they being at the charge of the 
carriage as aforesaid the same shall be new cast and made tunable. 

Itm that the said new bells shall be cast i\nd that all the worke shall be 
done and finished strong and substanshally within three months time next 
ensueing after the date hereof fitt to be rung. 

Itm the said William ffukes for inconsideracon of the fJmisses doth for him- 
selfe and his successars covenant promise & agree to and with the said Job 
Potter his heires & assignes That he the said ^Villiam ffukes or his successars 
shall and will well & truely pay or cause to be paid therefore unto the said 
Job Potter his heires or assignes the full & just sume of five & thirty pounds 
of Lawfull money of Create britain in maner & forme following (that is to say) 
seventeen pounds & tenn shillings pt thereof on the day the said bells shall be 
first rung And seventeen pounds &: tenn shillings residue thereof on that 
Twelvemonths next ensueing thereof without any fraud or further delay in 
either of the said payments x^nd for the true performance of all &: ei'iy of 
the abovementened covenants Articles & agreements either of the said parties 
bindeth themselves unto the other firmely by these |^sents In witness wherof 
the said |ities first above named to this fJsent Articles of Agreement their 
hands & scales have hereunto interchangably sett. 

Dated the day & yeare first above written. 

William fukf (^ 
Sealed &: delivered &c in the p'sence of Job Potter (ls) 
Patience Gibson 
Gibson 

This is very interesting. Job Potter was clearly a bell-hanger, and probably 
local agent for Samuel Knight, of London, and the bells were cast by John 
Waylett, at Hythe. The inscriptions also tell us that Mr. John Waylett did 
not recast all the bells ; the present No. 2 was doubtless the treble of the old 
ring of three. 

This No. 2 is rather a puzzle. It is a question whether the initials are 
P W or W P. If we reckon the + as commencing the inscription, as was 
most usual, it would be the latter (see p. 42). 



hiscriptions. 421 

Very hearty thanks to the Rector, the Rev. A. Upton, who has kindly 
looked through the parish records for me, but found nothing of interest but 
the above. It speaks well for the excellence of the work done in 1721, that 
beyond petty repairs bells and bell-frame have wanted nothing done to them 
till within the last year or two, when they have been re-hung. 

STROOD. St. Nicholas. 3 (formerly 6) Bells. 

I., 30-in. WA WC WB SB GB WP 1765 
II., 32-in. WM MUMFORD WM BENNETT CHURCHWARDENS 

JOHN WARNER FOUNDER OF LONDON 1788 
III., 36-in. Same. 

T. R. E. Item iiij belles in the Stepill. 
Item a lytill sanctus Bell. 

Death knell rung immediately after death. Tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 3 x 2 for 
woman • for boy 2x3, for girl 2 x 2 — then ring treble for about twenty minutes. 

A bell tolled for fifteen minutes before funeral. 

Sundays. — All three chimed at 8 a.m. ("Matins" peal), and for services. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

Ic is traditional custom here for a new vicar to "ring himself in." 

Formerly six bells ; the other three (being cracked) were sold about fifty 
years ago, the proceeds being mainly appropriated to the purchase of a new 
clock. 

Best thanks to the Vicar, the Rev. C. H. Banning. 

St. Mary. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

STURRY. St. Nicholas. 5 Bells. 

I., 28|-in. tDfcpli I|aicl| matic mc ® 1622 

II., 3o-"in. The Rev'^ W" Chafy Vicar Tho^ Wotton Tho^ Crouch 

Ch. Wardens Tho^ Mears of London Fecit 1802 

IIL, 34-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1622 

IV., 37-in. Same. 

v., 40-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1856 

Rev° Charles Wharton Vicar 

Tho* Rammell ) ^ ,,, 

[ Church W audkn's 

Wll.l.lAM BOCKWKIJJ 



42 2 Inscriptions. 

In 175S, No. 2 was by Richard Phelps (dated 17 10) and the tenor by 
Joseph Hatch (1622). 

Passing bell tolled (as soon as notice received) for about half an hour. 
Apparently no tellers. 

On day of burial, a half-hour's knell at 7 a.m., and again before funeral. 

Sundays. — Chime twenty minutes for service, then toll for ten minutes. 

Sermon bell discontinued. 

Peals on Church festivals in the early morning, and on New Year's Eve. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. P. B. Collings. 

SUNDRIDGE. Dedication Unknown. 5, and a Sanctus Bell. 

I., sii-in. O O CHRISTOPHER * HODSON ^ MADE * MEE * 
1683 O O 
•¥ ESLY * CRANWELL * CHVRCH * W * lOHN * 
LYNN •¥ 
II., 33-in. ^ THIS h BELL k WAS v RAISED ^, BY THE ^ PARISH 
ONERS >} OF SVNDRISH k O 
«^ WITH ^ THE h ASSISTANCE -) OF '} THEIRE 

FFREINDS 1666 ^ IH « NC SSR O 
«)!(. WO ^ WC MH ^ MADE ^lE ^ O WH O 
III., 34|-in. «-|.IH NC h SSR WO ^ WC.iJ(>OWH Q ^ 

lOHN h HODSON h MADE 'h ME h 1666 ^ 
IV., 38-in. THOMAS BARTLET MADE ME 1619 Q 
v., 44-in. Samuel Wellar Rector Iohn Lancaster IoH^^ Everst 
Church Wardens '\' S K '\' 1737 
Sanctus 1 2^ in. Blank. 

The Rector, in kindly replying to my queries, states " none recast." Messrs. 
Gillett and Co., of Croydon, however, claim to have recast the tenor. As a 
Churchman, I am bound to give clerical assertion preference to lay, and so I 
leave the inscriptions above unaltered, merely noting here the difference of 
opinion. 

Passing bell rung. Tellers — 3 x 3 for man, 3 x 2 for woman. 

Sundays. — Bells chimed at 8 a.m. — a doubtful case of survival, as it seems 
to be a peal in lieu of the sermon bell, formerly rung at this hour. Bells 
chimed for services, excepting on great festivals, when they are rung. 

Peals on great festivals, Ne\v Year's Eve, and Queen's birthday. 



hiscriptioiis. 423 

A bell rung for vestry meetings. 

The sanctus bell is unused. 

Best thanks to the Rev. Egerton D. Hammond. 

SUTTON BY DOVER. SS. Peter and Paul. 1 Bell. 

I., 23|-in. Blank. 
A " long-waisted " bell. 

SUTTON (EAST). SS. Peter and Paul. 6 Bells. 

I., 27-in. PRAISE THE LORD 1720 
n., 28i-in. These 5 bells were new casT ai The charge of ve parish 

BY lOHN WAYLETP 1719 

III., 29-in. lOHN earles & iames waTerman chvrch wardens 17 19 
IV., 3oi-in. EDWARD FILMER ES^ 17 19 
v., 31-in. S'' ROBERT FILMER BAR'^^ 1719 

VI., 37-in. S'' EDWARD FILMER K^ 1614 MEW CAST BY S 
KNIGHT 1723 

SUTTON AT HONE. St. John Baptist. 3 Bells. 

I., 27|-in. Blank. 
II., 32j-in. THO Harris chvrch Warden 1727 
III., 35-"in. G. MEARS & C° FOUNDERS LONDON 1862 

T. R. E. Item iij bells suted in the steple and a dollyng bell iij sacryng 
bells in the Quere. 

Before its recasting in 1862 the tenor bell was inscribed as follows : 

See p. 15. 

SUTTON VALENCE. St. Mary. i Bell. 

I., 32-in. ED-' WELDISH lOHN SHIRLY CH : WARDENS R : 
PHELPS MADE ME 1732 

SWALECLIFFE. St. John Baptist. t Bell. 

I., 20-in. Blank. 



424 Inscriptions. 

SWAN LEY. St. Paul. 3 Bells. 

I., 2S-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1860 

II., 30-in.) ^jg^j^g ^^ STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1867 
III., 32-in. i 

Passing bell rung. Tellers — three strokes for a man, two for a woman. 

Sundays. — Bells used for services only. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve. 

Best thanks to Rev. M. S. Edgell, Vicar. 

SWANSCOMBE. SS. Peter and Paul. 6 Bells. 

I., 3o.Vin. THE GIFT OF SAMUEL CHILD ESQ'^ ROBERT 
CATLIN FECIT 1751 

IL, 32i--in. Thomas Mears of Lonqon Fecit 1804 

IIL, 35-"in. HEALTH AND PROSPERITY TO ALL OUR BENE- 
FACTORS R"^ CATLIN FECIT 1751 

IV., 37-in. Rich" Forrest & Jn" Bayly Ch. Wardens Lester & 

Pack of London Fecit 1769 
v., 4o!',-in. William Bright Iohn Small Church Wardens R. Cat- 
LiN Fecit 1751 

VL, 432-i"- Samuel Bayly & Edward Mason Church Wardens 
Thomas Mears of London Fecit 1802 

T. R. E. Item iij bells of brasse suted in the steple. 
Item j corse bell of brasse. 

The old " Matins " bell at 8 a.m. on Sunday mornings has been discon- 
tinued within memory. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Tenor bell for adults, a 
smaller one for children. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 3x2 for female — both at 
beginning and end. 

Not repeated on day of burial, but bell simply tolled before the funeral. 

Bells chimed or rung for services, usually the latter, as there is a good body 
of ringers in union with the Diocesan Association. 

Best thanks to Mr, T. Coombes. 

SWANSCOMBE. All Saints. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 



I use ripHons. 425 

SWINGFIELD. St. Peter. 1 Bell. 

I., -in. lOHN RICHARDS W 1696 BY ME I W 

T. R. E. iij bells . . . ij little bells. 

In 1758 there were three bells; the other two, which were the smaller ones 
of the ring, were inscribed : IW. IR. 1696. They were clearly all three from 
the same founder — John Wood, of Bishopsgate, London (see p. 91). 

SYDENHAM. St. Bartholomew.. 1 Bell. 

I., 36-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1832 

St. Philip. i Bell. 

Church consecrated 1S66, has probably one bell of about that date. 

Holy Trinity, i Bell. 

Consecrated 1866. Presumably one bell of that date. 

St. Michael and All Angels. i Bell. 

I., 22-in. Blank. 

Christ Church. 1 Bell. 

I., 25i-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 
An obliterated inscription on waist. Probably a second-hand bell. 

St. Matthew. 8 Bells. 

A set of eight hemispherical bells, largest weighing 2^ cwt. They are by 
Mears and Stainbank. 

St. George (Perry Hill). i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

TENTERDEN. St. Mildred. 8 Bells and Sanctus Bell. 

Sanctus, 15-in. Blank. 

I., 3o!-in. By Voluntary Subscription 1769 Non Nonis Solum Sed 
PosTERis Lester & Pack ok London Fecit 

% I 



426 Inscriptions. 

II., 34-m. BELL OF 1769 NON NOBIS SOLUM SED POSTERIS 
RECAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 
1884 
S C LEPARD VICAR 

H A PRATTj CHURCHWARDENS 
IIL, 36|-in. THOMAS LESTER MADE ME 175 t 
IV., 4oi-in. John Bexhill Tho^ Paine Church Wardens Pack & 

Chapman of London Fecit 1774 
v., 44-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1826 
VI., 46-in. RECAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS 1884 
VII., 51-in. Same. 
VIIL, 56-in. BELL OF 17 17 RECAST BY JOHN WARNER & 
SONS 1884 
(Vicar's and Churchwardens' names as on No. 2.) 

The old Nos. 2 and 7 were by Pack and Chapman ; No. 6 was by Lester, 
Pack, and Chapman, dated 1769, the same as No. 2 ; No. 7 was dated 1774 ; 
the old tenor was by Richard Phelps. These all commemorated church- 
wardens, and the tenor the vicar of the day as well. 

Richard Berne, of Canterbury, by his will, dated 28 April, 1461, bequeathed 
to the building of the new bell-tower of Tenterden vj.f. viij^. (" Testamenta 
Vetusta," p. 292). 

Death Knell. — Commence with tellers — three strokes on each of three 
bells for a man, two on each of three for a woman, three on each of two for a 
boy, two on each of two for a girl — then tenor bell is tolled. 

Sundays. — Used for services only. Chime all eight for twenty minutes, 
toll tenor for ten minutes, finish on sanctus ("Parson's") bell. 

A bell rung for vestry meetings. 

The sanctus (or more properly Priest's) bell is at east end of nave, and may 
be ancient, but I rather deem it a seventeenth century production. 

Very many thanks to Vicar, the Rev. S. Campbell Lepard. 

TENTERDEN. St. Michael. i Bell. 

One bell, by Gillett and Co., of Croydon, weight about 8 cwt., dated 1884. 

Apparently no " local uses." 

Thanks to Vicar, Rev. W. M. C. Clarke. 



Inscriptions. 42 7 

TESTON. SS. Peter and Paul. 3 Bells. 

I., 25l--in. T Mears of London Fecit 1832 

II., 29-in. Same. 

III., 33-in. RECAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1875 

T. R. E. Imprimis in the steple three belles. 

TEYNHAM. St. Mary the Virgin. 6 Bells. 

I., 2S-in. R C 1743 

II., 3o|-in. Inscription defaced. 

IIL, 31-in. R C 1743 

IV., 32|-in. Robert Catlin Cast & Hung us all 1743 

v., 36-in. Prosperity to the parish of tinham r'^ catlin fecit 1743 

VI., 392-in- The Rev° M^ Iohn Swinton Vicar Isaac Kemp Richard 
Hubbard Church Wardens RC 1743 

Passing bell rung as soon after death as possible. Tenor used for adults, 
fourth for children. Begin with tellers —3 x 3 for male, 3 x 2 for female — then 
toll for ten minutes, raise bell and ring five minutes, lower and repeat " tellers." 

This is repeated at 8 a.m. on day of funeral, omitting the ten minutes' 
tolling. 

Bells chimed (occasionally rung) for services. 

Ringing on Easter Day, Christmas Eve, Whitsun Day, and New Year's Eve. 
Also on Queen's Birthday, Accession, and Coronation, and on 29th May, and 
5th November. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. E. J. Corbould. 

THANINGTON. St. Nicholas. 3 Bells. 

L, 27-in. tufcpli I|afcl| matte mc, ® 1624 
II., 30-in. GEORGE HOOPER ARTER RVCK WARDENS IOHN 

PALMAR MADE THIS BELL 1638 
IIL, 32-in. i0V»^iti| Iiafcfj malrc me © 1623 

Passing bell rung immediately upon notice of death being received. 
A bell tolled at funerals. 

Sundays.^ — Bells rung for half an hour before services. " Ring in " on 
treble for last five minutes. 
A bell for vestry meetings. 
Best thanks to Rev. W. H. Holman, A'icar. 

X I 2 



428 Inscriptions. 

TH ROWLEY. St. Michael. 6 Bells. 

I., 2y^-in. The Gift of John Montresor Esqr of Belmont in Throw- 
ley 17S0 Pack & Chapman of London Fecerunt 

IL, 31-in. Same. 
IIL, 33-in. Same. 
IV., 34j-in. Same. 

v., 37-^-in. Same. 
VI., 42-in. Same. 

Information as to local uses unattainable. The Vicar has apparently no 
sympathy with any antiquarian work but his own. 

TH URN HAM. St. Mary the Virgin. 3 (formerly 4) Bells. 

L, 28|-in. Blank. 
II., 32-in. Blank. 
IIL, 34i-in. Hcniticits <) ;©ir0i:kritn <} £)j^nitttrrmts <:) Anw <0 1586 © 

All three bells in bad order — one unused, and two reported to be cracked — 
but I think a judicious overhauling would prove this not to be the case with 
more than one, if that. 

The two smaller bells are probably seventeenth century work. The tenor 
is by Lawrence Wright of London (see p. 62), and is, I think, the only speci- 
men of his workmanship now existing. 

Apparently no local uses. 

Best thanks to Vicar, Rev. G. C. Master. 

TILMANSTONE. St. Andrew. i Bell. 

I., 26^-in. T Mears of London 181 6 

In 1758, " I small bell without inscription." 

Apparently no local uses. 

Thanks to Vicar, Rev. J. H. Jaquet. 

TONBRIDGE. SS. Peter and Paul. 8 Bells and Sanctus. 

I., 29-in. I mean to make it understood. That tho' I'm little 
yet am good 
II., 31-in. If you have a judicious Ear. Youll own my Voice is 
sweet & Clear. 



Inscriptions. 429 

III., 32^-in. To HONOUR BOTH OF GOD & KiNG OUR VOICES SHALL IN 

CONSORT Ring 
IV., 34|-in. Whilst Thus we Join in chearful sound. May Love & 

Loyalty abound 
v., 37Wn. MusiCK is Medicine to the Mind 

VI., 40-in. Ye People All Who Hear Me Ring Be Faithfull to Your 
God & King 
VII., 43i-in. Ye Ringers all that Prize your Health & Happiness 
Be Sober Merry Wise & you'll the same Possess 
All the above have in addition : Pack & Chapman of London 
Fecit 1774 
VIIL, 51 in. REV° HENRY HARPUR VICAR • JOHN MUGRIDGE 
& W • MARTIN CHURCHWARDENS 1774 
PACK & CHAPMAN OF LONDON FECIT 
Sanctus, i3|-in. Blank. 

St. Stephen. 3 Bells. 

L, i8-in. J TAYLOR & C^ FOUNDERS 1879 
II., 22-in. Same. 
IIL, 29-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1852 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received. Commence with tellers 
(abnormal) — -3 x 3 for a man, 3-2-3 for a woman, 3x2 for a child ; then toll 
for half an hour. Not repeated on day of burial ; only a bell tolled for half 
an hour before the service. 

St. Saviour. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

TONBRIDGE WELLS. Christ Church. i Bell. 

I., 29-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1S40 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I., 24-in. W Gilbert 1829 

King Charles the Martyr (?). 1 r>cll. 

I., i9|-in. W. GiLiiERT 1821 



430 Inscriptions. 

TONBRIDGE WELLS. St. James. i Bell. 

I., 42-in. G. MEARS & C° FOUNDERS LONDON 1863 

St. John. i Bell. 

L, 29^-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1857 

St. Peter. 6 Bells. 

A ring of six, by Warner and Sons, London. The five largest are dated 
1876 ; the treble was added in 187S. Tenor measures 41 inches, and weighs 
close upon 12 cwt. 

St. Stephen. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

TONGE. St. Giles. 3 Bells. 

L, 24-in. Chapman & Mears of London Fecerunt 1784 
IL, 28-in. Blank. 
IIL, 31-in. lOHW WILMER 1626 

TROTTISGLiFFE. St. Peter. * i Bell. 

L, 31-in. WILLIAA^r HATCH MADE ME I G I D C W Q © 1639 

TUDELEY. All Saints. 3 Bells. 

L, 26-in. Tho'^ Mears of London Fecit 1795 
H., 27-in. W & T Mears of London Fecit 1788 

HL, 31-in. Peter Pearson Ch : Warden : Pack & Chapman of London 
Fecit 1774 

TUNSTALL. St. John Baptist. 6 Bells. 

L, 27-in. -f ;i3i^ttcMcifc 0muia xjpeita [©irmtni ^mnintr + 

mtrrrcxltii + 
n., 28-in. -I- ;t:^aii&afc ;iS)0minlnu in cum&atis b(?nij it0nanfitiijs + 

ntticccxiiii 
HL, 30-in. 4- Jiialibafc ^0ntiniJm in tumbalissi ibliitaiwttis + 

nttm-LWliii 
IV., 32-in. + Omnia sjiiitiliis laXttti^t lIDumtniim + nttrcwxliii 



hiscriptions. 43 1 

v., 35-in. THOMAS HEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1843 
SANCT - SANCT • SANCT - 
DNUS DEUS SABAOTH 
VI., 37-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1843 

MORTUI RESURGENT IN NOMINE DEI AMEN 

WILL. HOWLEY ARCHEP - CANTUAR 

GEORGIO BRIDGES MOORE RECT 

GEORGIO BAKER PAROCH^'^ 

AD MDCCCXLIII 

These six replace a ring of five which were inscribed as follows : 

I. Robertus Mot me fecit 1596 

II. Same. 1600 

III. R. Phelps fecit 1702 

IV. Praise ye the Lord 1573 U 
V. John Wilnar made me 1630 

Apparently no local customs. Many thanks to Miss Moore. 
For service, treble bell rung the last five minutes, tenor tolling ten minutes 
previously. 

ULCOMBE. All Saints. 6 Bells. 

I., 28^-in. The Founder he has Play'd his Part : Wich shews him 
Master of his Art 
So Hang me well and Ring me true And I will sound 

YOUR Praises due 
Lester & Pack of London Fecit 1757 
II., 30-in. mscpfi Iiaicfi \\\?i^^ wxt^ W H ® 1632 
III., 33-in. Same. 
IV., 35-in. Same. 

v., 38-in. WILLIAM HATCH MADE ME C P R N C W © 1640 

VI., 42^-in, the rev° w" bell : rector : GEO'' merriaini & ja^ hope : CH : 

wardens 1757 Lester and Pack Fecit 

UNDER RIVER. St. Margaret. 2 Bells. 

Two small modern bells of no interest, and only used to ring to service. 
Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. John H. Hardy. 



432 Inscriptions. 

UPCHURCH. St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 29-in. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1866 
II., 3oJ-in. lOHN WILMAR 1637 
III., 34-in. lOHM (' WILMAR k MADE ^ ME 1632 
IV., 34-in. Same. 

v., 37Hn. G. MEARS & CO FOUNDERS LONDON 1862 
REV" JOHN WOODRUFF VICAR 
W^' SOLOMON CHURCHWARDEN 
VL, 4o|-in. Same. 

UPNOR. SS. Philip and James. i Bell. 

Church built 1874 ; has one small bell of that date. 

Death knell rung immediately. Three strokes for man, two for woman, one 
for child ; repeated for a quarter of an hour. 
Bell tolled at funerals. 
Rung for services. 
Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. Dr. Bailey. 

WALDERSHARE. All Saints. i Bell. 

L 1832 

Inaccessible for measurement. 

Mr. Bryan Faussett notes here : " One Small Bell, the Gift of Lady Arabella 
Furnese in y" year 17 14 at or soon after her Marriage." 

WALMER. St. Mary. 2 Bells. 

I., 251-in. iafcpli fjafrli matn:! mc 1635 
IT., 27-in. Blank. 

There is an "alarm " bell at Walmer Castle which bears date 1662, and the 
royal initials, C. R. Its diameter is 22 inches. 

St. Saviour. i Bell. 

Bell inaccessible, but certainly modern. 



Inscriptions. 433 

WALTHAM. St. Bartholomew. 4 Udls. 

I., 30-in. ittfcpli Iiafclj matic mc 1631 

II., 3i|-in. Same. © 1631 

III., 34-in. Same. X) (Fig. 41) 1602 

IV., 37-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT ©1631 

The 3rd bell, which is by Joseph Hatch, bears Thomas Hatch's foundry- 
stamp, and is therefore probably his earliest production. There are two 
bells at Egerton, similarly dated 1602, but they have Joseph's own circular 
stamp. 

WARDEN IN SHEPPEY. St. James. 
I., 24-in. Blank. 

Now lying in the belfry at Minster. It is locally believed to be by Joseph 
Hatch, and cast about 1602. 

Church and burial ground washed away by the sea. 

WAREHORNE. St. Matthew. 5 Bells. 

I., 30-in. lOHN WAYLETT MADE ME 1721 

II., 3i|-in. Same. 

III., 32Hn. lOHN WAYLET MADE ME 1721 

IV., 361-in. lOHN WAYLETT MADE ME 1723 

v., 39-"in. THOMAS HODGES WILL~ BVTCHER C W 172 1 

T. R. E. Item fower bells in the Steple. 

Item a saunce bell and a hande bell. 

Passing bell rung in the evening if death occurs before 12, otherwise at 7 
the next morning. Toll for half an hour ; finish with tellers — 3 x 3 for a male, 
3 X 2 for a female. 

Bell tolled for half an hour at funerals. 

Sundays. — Peals at 8 a.m. and at noon. For services, bells chimed half an 
hour. 

Ringing on New Year's Eve and on Benefit Club days. 

Best thanks to the Rev. T. R. Mayhew, Rector. 

3 I- 



434 Inscriptions. 

WATERINGBURY. St. John Baptist. 6 Bells. 

I., 24-in. G MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1859 
THE REV° HY STEVENS VICAR 

E J goodwinI^hurchwardens 
niluvoRKlo^RSEERS 

II., 26|-in. Same. 

III., 28^-in. Same. 

IV., 3r-in. T Mears of London Fecit 1831 

v., 33-in. Same. 

VI., 36-in. Same. 

Steeple destroyed by fire last winter ; the bell frame charred and tenor bell 
cracked. It is now (September, 1886) in London being recast. 

WELLING. See Beckenham. 

WESTBERE. All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I., 20-in.\ 

II., 2i-in.l C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1853 
III., 22-in.i 

In 1758 : " 2 small bells without inscription." 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. Age and sex denoted, but 
how is not stated. 

Sundays. — Used for service only. 

Best thanks to the Rev. J. H. Hughes Hallett, Rector. 

WESTERHAM. St. Mary. 8 Bells. 



I., 


3oi-in. 


THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FOUNDER 1837 


11., 


31-in. 


Same. 


III.^ 


, 34-in. 


Same. 


IV., 


, 36-in. 


Same. 


v., 


, 38i-in. 


Same. 



VI., 41-in. THOMAS MEARS LONDON FOUNDER 1837 
VIL, 45-in. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1837 



Inscriptions. 435 

VIII., 48i-in. G HEARS FOUNDER LONDON 

THE GIFT OF GEORGE LEWIS VICAR 1722 
RECAST 1858 

The curfew was rung here at 8 p.m. until about sixty years ago. The 
"Pancake" bell was discontinued about the same time. 

Passing bell rung. Tellers — three strokes for man, two for woman. A 
smaller bell used for children. 

SuND.ws. — A single bell rung at 8 a.m. Bells chimed for service. 

Peals at Easter, Whitsuntide, and on New Year's Eve. 

A bell for vestry meetings. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. H. C. Bartlett. 

WESTGATE. St. James. 1 BelK 

A small 4 cwt. tinkler by Gillett and Co., of Croydon. 

St. Saviour. 1 Bell. 

Presumably one^modern bell. 

WESTMARSH. Holy Trinitv. i Bell. 

Modern church and modern bell. 

WESTWELL. St. Mary. 4 Bells. 

L, 33-in. lOHN AUTNAR MADE ME 1630 
II., 34-in. iufcjJli I|atcl| ma^c mc ©1609 
III., 36-in. Same. 16 16 

IV., 43-in. tllC itic 
T. R. E. Item iiij ryngyng bells in the bell howse. 
Item one bell over the Chauncell. 
Item ij smalle hand bells. 
No. 4 has a grotesque figure on the waist ; it is no doubt by William Old- 
fcild, of Canterbury (see p. 59;. 

Death knell rung when notice received ; also on morning of funeral. 
SuND.vYS.— A bell rung at 8 a.m., called " Seniion " bell. 
Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. H. H. D'Ombrain. 



436 InscriptionSs 

WHITFIELD. St. Peter. 1 Bell. 

I. Blank. 

Inaccessible for measurement. 

WHITSTABLE. All Saints. 6 Bells. 

I., 25^-in. SAMUEL KNIGHT MADE ME 1730 

II., 26-in. Same. 

III., 28Hn. Same. 

IV., 29|-in. Same. 

v., 32|-in. Same. 

VI., 35-"in. lAMES MARCH lOHN ANDREUS MICHEAL GOAT- 
HAM CW 1730 

WICKHAM BREAUX. St. Andrew. 6 Bells. 

I., 27-in. SAMUELL KNIGHT FECIT 1728 

II., 28-in. Same. 

III., 291-in. S K 1728 

IV., 32-in. Same. 

v., 34-in. S K 1 7 28 lOHN BING lOHN EUERNDEN CH. WAR- 
DENS 

VI., 38-in. ALL = YOUNG RECTOR SK MADE ME 1728 

WICKHAM (EAST). St. Michael. 2 Bells. 

L, 24i-in. ^^ lOHN <^ HODSON ^> MADE <$> ME .)J^ 1660 r;^ WW «$. 

C <> WARDEN 
II., 27-in. Blank. 

T. R. E. Item ij small bells of brasse suted in the steple. 
" on sacryng bell and one hand bell sold." 

WICKHAM (WEST). St. John B.^ptist. 5 Bells. 

I., 29|-in. GLORIA ^ DEO -ij? IN «;!(» EXCELSIS ^ 1640 c;{(. B .jj? E 
IL, 31-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1857 
IIL, 33|-in. •)!(» O «)!p IOHN <> HODSON k MADE ^ MEE i^ 1669 ^ 
EDWARD WOODEN 'ifp 
^ CHVRCH 'i WARDEN ^ ^ WH 4? '^^ -h '^h '-> 



Inscriptions. 437 

IV., 37-in. BRIANVS V ELDREDGE ^ ME ^ FECIT ^ 1624 
v., 42-in. GLORIA t'iif DEO ^ IN r^ EXCELSIS f$» 

BRYANVS «)J(. ELDRIDGE ^ MADE r|. MEE 1640 
T. R. E. Item iiij grete bells suted in the steple and a Saints bell of brasse. 

Nos. I, 4, and 5 are from the Chertsey foundry (see p. 87). 

Passing bell rung. Age denoted by size of bell used. Tellers — 3 x 3 for 
male, 3 x 2 for female. 

A half-mufifled peal after the funeral of any church official or of a ringer. 

Sundays. — Bells chimed for service — three chimes of five minutes each. 
On the great festivals the bells are rung. 

Peals on New Year's Eve, Queen's Birthday and Coronation, and on 
29th May and 5th November. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. H. B. Roberts. 



WILLESBOROUGH. St. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I., 27-in. JOHN JAMES HORATIO PENNINGTON 
LATE SPARROW MA RECTOR 
HENRY BLACKBURN) CHURCH WARDENS 
GEORGE ANDREWS [ EASTER DAY 18S6 
LLEWELLINS & JAMES 
BRISTOL 
II., 30-in. John Seddy Ch. Warden Lester Pack cc Chapman of 

London Fecit 1769 
III., 3iJ-in. lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME ® 1605 
IV. 34-in. Same, 
v., 38-in. WILLIAM FLINTSTONE CW lOSEPHVS HATCH J^IE 

FECIT® 1625 RW 
VI., 4o|-in. GILES MASTERS CW lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT 
1623 

T. R. E. Item fower great bells in the Steple. 

Item iij small bells called Sacryng bells. 

Item one bell being called a hand bell stoUcn out of the wyn- 
dovve of the churche. 
The present No. 2, prior to its recasting in 1769, was inscribed the same as 
Nos. 3 and 4. 



43 S Inscriptions. 

WILMINGTON. St. Michael. 3 Bells. 

I., 2S-in. xtttUiam lanti ma^c mc if ttr 16 18 
II., 30-in. CHRISTOPHER O HODSON O MADE O ME O 1685 

000 
III., 3ii-in. WILLIAM LAND MADE ME 1636 

T. R. E, Item iiij bells suted of brasse in the Steple 

One procession bell and a saints bell of brasse presented to be 
stoUen. 

In 1774 the bells were as they are now. 
Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. 
A bell tolled before funerals, 

Sundays. — Bells chimed for five minutes half an hour before service, and 
one bell rung for last five minutes. 

Best thanks to Vicar, the Rev. R. Jamblin. 

WINGHAM. St. Mary the Virgin. 8 Bells. 

L, 28-in. BEI^ : PARLETT R : PHELPS MADE ME 1720 
IL, 29-in. R : PHELPS FECIT 1720 
III., 32-in. Same. 

IV, 34A-in. R : PHELPS MADE ME 1720 
v., 37-in. Same. 
VI., 39-in. Same. 

VII., 43-in. PROSPERITY APID HAPPYMESS TO ALL OUR 
WORTHY BEMEFACTORS R : PHELPS FECIT 
1720 
VIII., 48-in. THE REVEREMD W : WEWTOM CURAT : T : WIN- 
TER W: EAST CHURCHWARDENS R: PHELPS 
MADE ME 1720 

WITTERSHAM. St. John. 5 Bells. 

I., 34-in. -^Qysm^^'M^^^ (MM^nM^^n. oi©- 



'%^- 1609 
II., 36-in. Same. 



Inscriptions. 439 

III., 39i-in. Same, and the following incised below : 

^ THOMAS ODIARNE ^ lEREMY ODIARNE ^j 

ISAAKE ODIARNE GAVE THIS BELL 1609 

D (Fig. 42) 
IV., 43j-in. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 1808 
v., 46f-in. lOHM (} WILMAR ^; MADE v ME } IB h GF k CW 1629 

T. R. E. Item v gret bells and ij hand bells. 

The frame will take six bells. It would be a decided improvement to add 
a 32-in. treble to this excellent heavy peal. 

Death knell rung as soon as notice is given. Tellers for sex probably as 
usual — 3 X 3 for man, 3 x 2 for woman, 3x1 for child. 

This is repeated at 8 on morning of funeral. 

Sundays. — A bell rung at 8 a.m. This is also rung on Saints' days and 
other week-days when there is going to be service — a somewhat quaint com- 
bination of ancient " matins " and modern " warning " bell. 

For services, bells chimed, except on the great festivals, when they are rung. 

Peals on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, Easter Day, Whitsun Day, 
Ascension Day, Queen's Birthday, and last night of year. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. S. H. Parkes. 



WOODCHURCH. All Saints. 6 Bells. 

I., 31-in. JN« CLARKE JUN"^ & GABRIELL RICHARDS CH : 
WARDENS LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 

II., 33-in. t0repl| fiafcli matiB mc © 1608 
III., 35-in. Same. 
IV., 38-in. lOSEPH HATCH MADE ME © 1608 

v., 42-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT © 1623 
VI., 45-in. JOHN CLARKE JUN'^^ GABRIEL RICHARDS CH : 
WARDENS 1755 LESTER & PACK FECIT 



WOODLANDS. St. Mary. i Bell. 

Modern church with presumably one modern bell. 



440 Inscriptions. 

WOODNESBOROUGH. St. Mary. 5 Bells. 

I., 32-in. ^^0000 CHRISTOPHER * HOUSON ^ lOHN * 
HODSON * MADE * ME ^ 1676 
RICHARD ^ PORDAGE * RICHARD * NEAME * 
CHVRCH * WARDENS O O O O O 
II., 34-in. Same. 
III., 36-in. Same. 
IV., 40-in. Same. 
v., 44-in. Same. 

I have credited this church with five bells, rather unfairly, perhaps, for 
No. 3 of the ring lies in pieces on the belfry floor. The second also is 
cracked. 

WOOLWICH. Sr. Mary Magdalene. 8 Bells. 

I., 27|-in. T Mears of London Fecit 182 i 

II., 2S-in. Same. 

III., 3oi-in. Same. 

IV., 3i|-in. Same. 

v., 34-in. Same. 

VL, 352-in. Same. 

VII., 39-in. Same. 

VIII., 42^-in. Same. 

Hugh Eraser Rector 

William Roff ) ^ 

-r, ,^ i- Church Wardens 

Peter Morgan] 

T. R. E. Item iij bells of bell mettell suted hanging in the Steple there. 
Item j little Saints bell of brasse hanging in the saide steple. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

St. John. i Bell. 

I., 27-in. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON iS^6 

St. Michael and All Angels. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 



Inscriptions 



441 



WOOLWICH. Dock-Yard Chapel. i Bell. 

I., 24^-111. Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1778 

St. George ((Harrison Chapel). i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

Royal Arsenal Chapel. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

WOOLWICH (NORTH). St. John. i Bell. 

Presumably one modern bell. 

WOOTTON. St. Martin. i Bell (formerly 3). 

I., 32-in. mfcpfi I|afcl| mab^ mc ® 1629 

Mr. Faussett (1758) states that the other two bells "were sold not long ago 
in Order to raise money for y<^ Re])airing & beautifying y*^' Church." 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. Use rather peculiar — for a 
man the bell is toUed^^ln triplets, while for a woman double strokes, and for a 
child single strokes are used. 

Bell tolled before funeral. 

Sundays. — Chimed for services. 

Rung for vestry 'meetings. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. R. N. Durrant. 

WORMSHILL St. Giles. 4 Bells. 

I. NAYLOR VICKERS & C" 1863 

II., 25|-in. R Phelps fecit 17 18 
III., 27-'in. THOMAS UVTNALL CHVRCH WARDEN : R : IMIFLPS 

FECIT 1 7 19 
IV., 3a-in. NAYTOR VICKERS & C" 1863 

Treble and tenor are steel bells. 

Passing bell rung as soon as notice received. 

Bell tolled for half an hour before funerals. 

3 1' 



442 Inscriptions. 

Sundays. — Bell chimed for ten minutes, then two separate bells for five 
minutes each. 

A bell rung for vestry. 

No ringing for some years, tower unsafe. 

Best thanks to Rector, the Rev. H. Newport, 



WORTH. SS. Peter and Paul. 2 Bells. 

I., 24-in. JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON i88i 

OLD BELL CAST 1760 RECAST 1881 E. GENT EN- 
GLNEER 
II., 26-in. Same, except date of old bell, which is 1675. 

The former bells had the following inscriptions : 

L LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1760 
II. .$» lOHN k HODSON ^ MADE ^ ME k 1675 r^J? o O O C H 
000 
^'ip RALPH h PHILLPOOT <> CHVRCH '■; WARDEN r;J(. O O O 
000 

In 1758 the treble bore the following inscription : 
Sancta Maria Ora Pro Nobis. 



WOULDHAM. All Saints. 4 Bells. 

I., 29-in. iotVplj IjatL'li* mat»c mc © 1624 

II., 3il-in. Same. 

III., 34-in. Same. 

IV., 37|-in. lOSEPHVS HATCH ME FECIT ® 1624 

T. R. E. Item there remaynet thre bells in the stepull. 

And a sants bell y' is bassellyd awaye by M" Jhon mon beeng 
then person. 

Passing Bell. — Age indicated by size of bell used. Tellers — 3 x 3 for male, 
3 X 2 for female ; then toll for about ten minutes. 

On day of burial a bell tolled for a few minutes at noon, and again for a 
quarter of an hour before the funeral. 

Sundays. — Only chimed for service. 



/use n'/y/ ions. 44-5 

Early morning peals on Easter Day, Christmas Day, Ascension Day, the 
first day of the New Year, and on Accession Day. 
A very excellent set of ringers' rules. 
P>cst thanks to the Rector, Rev. (^ (i. Andrcwes. 



WROTHAM. St. Ckomv.i.. S i'.ells. 

I., 29^-in. Ai/rifoiicn 1 am hoih i.icht & .smam, : i wii.i. v.v. uv.wV' 
AMOVE voi; all: 'I' : Dkstkr iS: V : 1'a( k I'Imii 

'754 
II., 30 in. Ar propkr 'iiMiis our Voices wk will raise : in sound- 
ing TO OUR BkNEKACTORS I'RAISK 

t: LESTER & t: I'ack fecit 1754 
III.,3i-in. . PKACE AND GOOD NICKIMHOURHCK)!) : THOMAS 

LESTICR & TIIO'^ I'AOK Ekcit 1754 
IV., 33-in. Our Voices shall VVini Jovkuli, Sound Make Hills and 

Valleys echo round Eesier h I'ack Fecit 1754 
v., 36-in. V'e Ringers all thai' prize, your Health amd Haim'i- 
NE.S.S. THOMAS LESTER & THO' I'ACK I'l'-CIT 

1754 
Be Souer Mi'.rrv Wise: and you'll 'thic same possess. 
VI., 3X^-in. 'i'o \\()>i()\]\< P<oTH oi- Cod and Kin(; Our Voicics Shall in 
C0N.SORT Ring Thomas Lester & Tiio' I'ack I'lcit 
1754 

VII., 43-in. In WEDLOf.K liANDS ALL YE WHO JoiN. W'l III HaNDS YOUR 

Hear'ts uni'te. So shall our tuneiul Tongues 
c0mi5ine. to laud the nuptial rl'te 
Tho.mas Lester & Thomas Pack ok London Fecit 1754 

VI II., 48^ in. THE rev" doctor JOHN POTTER RECTOR RICIl" TULLJAMES 
& W" WELCH CII. WARDENS 1754 
THOMAS LfCS'TER & THOMAS PACK OF l/)NDON lECTT 

Sunday Ringing. — Peals at 7 and 8 a.m. (" Matins " and " Mass" hells), 
and again at i p.m. Ringing before services. 

Ringing on Christmas morning, and on New Year's ICve. 

A bell for vestry. 

liest thanks to Rector, the Rev. Clanon W. V . I'-rskine Knollys. 



444 Inscriptions. 

WYCHLING. St. Margaret. 2 Bells. 

I., 25-in. ^ (Fig. 14) J^micc >^n lolianups U (Fig. 13) 
II., 27 Wn. I AMES BARTLET xMADE ME 1700 

In 1760 there were three bells; the then treble, which has disappeared, is 
stated to have been inscribed, I I 1639. This is probably an error for I. P. 
(John Palmar). The copyist, a Mr. Smith, who continued Mr. Faussett's notes^ 
niakes an awful hash of the inscription on the then No. II., now the treble. 

WYE. SS. Gregory and Martin. 8 Bells. 

I., 30-in. I mean to make it understood That though i'm little 

VET I'iM GOOD 

II., 30^-in. Whilst thus we join in cheerful sound Mav love and 

LOYALTY abound 

III., 34-in. Such wondrous power to music's given It elevates the 

soul to Heaven 
IV., 36-in. MusicK IS medicine to the mind 

v., 39-in. Ye people all who hear me Ring Be faithful to your 
God & King 
VI., 41-in. While thus we join in cheerful sound May love and 
loyalty abound 
VII., 46-in. Ye ringers all who prize Your health & happiness 
Be sober merry wise And you'll the same possess 
All the above bear, in addition : Pack cS: Chapman of London 
Fecit 1774 
VIII., 52-in. N.B. This new Peal of Bells was cast at the unani- 
mous CONSENT of the Parish. Philip Parsons 
Curate of Wye John Clement &: Rich° Dane 
Churchwardens 1774. Pack & Chapman of London 
Fecit 

T. R. E. Item fyve greate bells and a morowe masse bell. 
Payments noted : 

Item for ropes and reparac'ons of the Bellys ... xxviji'. iiijV. 

In 1758 Mr. Faussett notes as follows with regard to the inscriptions on the 
bells here : 

I. The gift of John Sawbridge of Ollantigh R. Phelps Londini fecit me 
1734 



Inscriptions. 445 

II. The gift of the Town of Wye R. Phelps Londini fecit me 1734 

III. and IV. Robertus Mot me fecit 1594 

V. VI. and VIII. Robertus Mot me fecit 1593 
VII. R. Phelps made me 1709 

No. VII. was broken by the fall (of the steeple in 1685). The treble has 
on it the arms and crest of Sawbridge. Nos. III. IV. V. VI. and VIII. have 
all of them the arms of Kempe, with many quarterings. 

The curfew is rung at S p.m. every evening from 29th September till 25th 
March. 

Death knell very peculiar. Three times ten strokes for a male, twice fifteen 
for a female. Tenor for adults, 5th bell for children. 

Bell tolled for half an hour before funeral. A muffled peal for a ringer. 

Sundays. — A bell at 8 a.m., and again at i p.m. For services chime fifteen 
minutes, then toll 2nd bell fifteen minutes. 

A bell for vestry meetings. 

Ringing on the Great Church Festivals, New Year's Eve, Accession and Coro- 
nation Days, and on nth October (old Michaelmas Day). 

The bell frame bears the inscription : " John Brovmfield made this frame 
1709." 

Very many thanks to the Rev. J. H. Dixson, Vicar. 

WYMENSWOULD. St. Margaret. i Bell. 

I., 25i-in. THO I AM BUT SMALL I WILL BE HEARD AMONG 
YOU ALL 1749 

Death knell rung the morning after death. 

Ring for five or six minutes before funeral. 

Sundays. — Used for services only. 

And for the vestry meeting on Lady Day. 

Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. J. McKee. 

Bell probably, from the inscription, a second hand one. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 6 Bells. 



YALDING. 






I., 32i-in. 


1^ W 


1696 


IL, 35-in. 


P \V 


1696 


III., 37^-in- 


P W 


T696 



IV., 40-in. P W 1697 



446 Inscriptions. 

v., 43 ^-in. THE rev" IOHN ward vicar STEPHEN & HENRY GROOMBRIDGE 
CH • WARDENS 1759 LeSTER & PaCK OF LONDON FeCIT 

VI., 48-in. ROBERT COX CLEMENT ELIOTT C HVRCHWARDENS 
MADE BY PHILIP WIGHTMAN 1696 

Death knell rung as soon as notice received, but not after sunset. Tellers 
at commencement — 3 x 3 for a male, 3x2 for a female ; then raise and set 
tenor. After an interval of one minute the bell is struck twice and set, and 
so on during each minute for the space of half an hour, then lower bell. 

On day of burial, this is repeated at 7.30 a.m. Before funeral tenor tolled ; 
half minute strokes for half an hour, until procession is in sight, then chimed 
until arrival at church gate. 

Sunday. — Two bells chimed or rung at 8 a.m. (" Mass " bell). For services, 
bells rung or chimed at intervals until ten minutes before, then 5th bell for 
five minutes, and treble for the last five. 

Peals at 5.30 a.m. on Christmas Day and Whitsun Day. A half-mufifled 
peal at intervals on Good Friday. Ring on New Year's Eve. An early peal 
on Queen's birthday. 

Within living memory a bell was chimed on Sundays and Saint's days at 
7 a.m. (" Matins" bell), followed by the peal on two at 8, as at present. 

The following entry, as to the recasting in 1696, is in the parish registers : 

Yalding bells were Hanged, Nov' 30* 1696. The Bell Hanger to have 
;£\() ; he finding wheel & stock for treble, the Parish the rest. 
The Weight of the Bells : 





Cwt. 


qr. 


lb. 


Imp. The Tennor. 


18 


01 


15 


the Fifth. 


M 


00 


^3 


Fourth. 


1 1 


01 


19 


Third. 


09 


01 


19 


Second. 


08 


00 


09 


First. 


06 


02 


04 


y<= Tot : 


67 


03 


23 


I 6 Clappers weig : 


01 


03 


GO 



The founder for casting to have 20s. per Hundred, for all new Mettle he is 
to be allowed _;^6 10 shillings p'' Cwt. 
We had 60 c. of o"" own mettall. 

Very many thanks to the Rev. D. Lamplugh, Vicar. 



Inscriptions. 447 

YALDING. St. Margaret. i Bell. 

T., 22-in. C & G HEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1848 

Death knell tolled as soon as notice received. About fifty strokes. 

Tolled also before funerals. 

Rung for services. 

Thanks to Vicar, the Rev. F. F. Starbuck. 



INDEX. 



Navies {or Initials) in italics are tJiose of Bellfounders. 



AcoL, 129 

Acryse, 86, 129 

Addington, 3, 102, 129 

Adisham, 130 

Aldington, 105, 112, 130 

Alkham, 98, 131 

Allington, 89, 131 

Alresford, Hants, 6r 

Appledore, 44, 98, 131 

Ash by Sandwich, 113, 125, 132 

Ash by Wrotham, 106, 123, 133 

Ashford, 80, 119, 134 

Ashurst, 70, 81, 123, 134 

Ave Bell, 121, 124 

Aylesford, 91, 95, 119 124, 135 

Aythoip Roding, Essex, 49 

Badlesmere, 143 
Bagley, Henry ^ 100 

,, James, 102 

,, AIattlieu\ 100 
Bapchild, 55, 143 
Barfreston, 144 
Barham, 144 
Barming, 44, 144 
Barnes, Surrey, 71 
Jjartletf, Anthony, 9i> 95 

„ James, 88, 95, 109 

,, Thomas, 93 
I^earsted, 44, 73, 146 • 

Beckenham, 90, 94, 146 



Bekesbourne, 118, 147 

Bellemakers' Guild, 29 

Belvedere, 105, 147 

Belyetere, Will'" le, 12, 16, 48 

Benenden, no, 148 

Berwick, Sussex, 91 

Bethersden, 15, 80, 148 

Betteshanger, 55, 165 

Bexley, 114, 167, 168 

Bickley, 168 

Bicknor, 168 

Bidborough, 123, 168 

Biddenden, 70, no, 114, 122, 124, 

127, 169 
Bilsington, 44, 170 
liirchington, 54,80, 108, 127, 170 
Bircholt, 179 
Birling, in, 179 
Bishopsbourne, 123, 127, 179 
Bisley, Surrey, 9 
Blackheath, 114, 180 
Blean,86, 180 
Bobbing, 117, 180 
Bonnington, 181 
Borden, 82, 1 17, i8r 
Boughton Aluph, 50, 55, 182 
Boughton under Biean, us, 182 
Boughton Malherbe, 76, 183 
Boughton Monchelsea, 17, 72, 97, 

106, 183 
Boxley, t 17, 183 



Index. 



449 



Brabourne, 184 

Bradenham, Bucks, 5 

Brandgoose Bell, 126 

Brasted, 114, 119, 185 

Brazier, 13, 71 

Bredgar, 71, 97, 185 

Bredhurst, 186 

Brenchley, 1 10, 186 

Brents, 186 

Brenzeit, 27, 44, 86, 187 

Bridge, 11, 187 

Broadstairs, 187 

Brockley, 187 

Bromley, 114, 187, 188 

Brompton, 188 

Brook, 39, 188 

Brookland, 44, 98, 123, 189 

Broomfield, 190 

Buckland by Dover, 44, 98, 190 

Buckland by Faversham, i, 190 

Bullisdoti, Tho% 46 

Bur ford, Robert, 22, 34 

,, William, 21, 34 
Burham, 5, 9, 109, no, 127, 190 
Burmarsh, 21, 33, 191 
Bury St. Edniunds, 90 

Canterbury Cathedral, 2, 108, 112, 

125, 191 
„ All Saints, 196 

„ Eastbridge Hospital, 

213 
„ Holy Cross, 16, 123 

197 
„ Poor Priest's Hospital, 

213 
„ St. Alphege, 99, 199 

„ St. Andrew, 199 

„ St. Dunstan, 1 1, 86, 

1 13, 200 
,, St. George, 11, 13, 86, 

125, 209 
„ St. Gregory, 210 

„ St. John's Hospital, 

313 



Canterbury, St. Margaret, 73, 209 
„ St. Martin, 34, 86, 210 

„ St. Mary Bredin, 47, 

210 
„ St. Mary Bredman, 86, 

210 
„ St. Mary Magdalene, 

36, 38, 210 
,, St. Mary Northgate, 

211 
,,. St. Mildred, 59, 211 

,, St. Paul, 27, 86, 212 

St. Peter, 11, 27, 44, 
85, 124, 212 
Capel, 213 
Capel le feme, 213 
Carter, Joseph, 66, 71, 88, 92 

„ William, 92 
Catlin, Robert, 107, 108 
Chacombe, Northants, 100 
Chalk, 10, 213 
Challock, 81. 82, 213 
Chapma?i, William, 1 1 2 
Chapman and Mears, 1 1 3 
Charing, 119, 214, 215 
Charlton, 99, 215, 216 

„ by Dover, 216 
Chart, Great, 36, 111, 119, 216 
„ Little, 108, 216 
„ Sutton, 19, 113, 217 
Chartham, 2 1 7 
Chatham, 217, 218 
Chelsfield, 98, 218 
Cheriton, 36, 118, 219 
Chertsey, Surrey, 87 
Chevening, 1 10, 220 
Chiddingstone, 114, 125, 220 
Chilham, 70, 111,221 
Chillenden, 222 
Chiselborough, Somerset, 42 
Chiselhurst, 118, 127, 222, 223 
Chislett, 108, 223 
Clarke, John, 87 
Cliffe at Hoo, 1 19, 223 
Cliffe, West, 51, 224 

\ M 



450 



The Chmxh Bells of Kent. 



Clifton, Beds, 71 

Cobham, 122, 123, 224 

Coldred, 8, 225 

Cole, John, 6 1 

Cooling, 85, 91, 225 

Cowden, 34, 60, 122, 125, 226 

Cranbrook, 60, 89, 117, 122, 125, 

227 
Cray, Foots, 246 

„ North, 123, 246 

„ St. Mary, 86, 97, gS, 99, 123, 
246 

„ St. Paul's, 27, 87, 247 
Crayford, 89, 118, 122, 248 
Cressivell, Richard, 32 
Crocken Hill, 249 
Crookham Hill, 249 
Cro7uch, Robert, 32, 43 
Crundale, 86, 249 
Cudham, 46, 98, 250 
Culver den, William, 50 
Curfew Bell, 121, 124, 125 
Cuxton, 22, 27, 72, 118, 250 

Danycll,/., 2>i, 44 
Darbie,John, 88, 91 

„ Michael, 88, 91, 95 
Darenth, 81, 251 
Dartford, 92, 125, 251, 252 
Datch worth, Herts, 87 
Davington, 252 
Dawe, John, 25, 36 
Dawe, William, 24, 27 
Deal, 99, 252 
Death Knell, 126 
Denton, 30, 31, 127, 253 
Deptford, 103, 118, 253, 254 
Detling, 255 
Deventer, Holland, 88 
Ditton, 255 
Doddington, 255 
Dommer,John, 35 
Dover, 255, 256 

St. Mary, 108, 255 

,, St Mary in Castro, 8, 16, 256 



Down, 26, 49, 258 
Draper, Tho% 90 
Dunkirk, 258 
Durham, 94 
Dymchurch, 99, 258 

Eastchurch, 123, 258 
Eastling, no, 263 
Eastry, 82, 87, 122, 264 
Eastwell, 118, 264 
Eayre, Joseph, 107 

,, Thomas, 107 
Ebony, 265 

Edenbridge, 118, 122, 123, 124, 265 
Egerton, 123, 124, 266 
Eldridge, Bryan, 87 
Elham, 123, 267 
Elmley, 267 
Elmstead, 106, 267 
Elmstone, no, 268 
Eltham, 90, 114, 26S, 279 
Erith, no, in, 279 
Ewell, 123, 280 
Eynsford, 91, 98, 123, 281 
Eythorne, 44, 282 

Fairfield, 31, ■7y'i^ 282 
Farleigh, East, 282 

„ West, 86, 104, 283 
Farnborough, 283 
Farningham, 98, 283 
Faversham, 109, 283 
Fawkham, 70, 71, 284 
Felps, Thomas, 109 
Folkestone, 112, 119, 125, 127, 284 

286 
Fordcomb, 286 
Fordwich, 76, 123, 286 
Forest Hill, 287 
Foster, Francis, 89, 242 
Founder, William, 24 
Four Elms, 287 
Frindsbury, 34, 72, 88, 287 
Frinsted, 123, 127, 288 
Frittenden, 117, 289 



Index. 



451 



Funtington, Sussex, 87 
Furner, William, 105 

Gardiner, Thomas, 107 
Gillett and Co., 119 
Gillingham, 92, 110, 289 
Gleaning Bell, 126 
Godmersham, 99, 127, 289 
Goodneston by Faversham, 290 

„ by Sandwich, 102, 123, 

290 
Goring, Oxon, 5 

Goudhurst, 17, no, 123, 127, 291 
Graine, 292 
Graveney, 50, 85, 292 
Gravesend, 109, no, 293 
Greenhithe, 294 
Greenwich, no, 122, 294 
Groombridge, 296 
Guston, 296 

Hackington, 109, 296 
Hadleigh, Essex, 107 
Hadley, Isaac, 103 
Hadlow, 97, 296 
High Halden, 76, 296 
Hailing, 98, 297 
Halstead, 93, 127, 297 
Halstow (High), 98, 297 

,, (Lower), 81, 298 
Ham, 298 

Hampnett (West), Sussex, 87 
Harbledown, 44, 86, 298 
Hardi7ig, John, 61 
Hardres (Lower), 298 

(Upper), 26, 299 
Harrietsham, in, 127, 299 
Hartley, 15, 300 
Hartlip, 34, 60, 82, 300 
Harty, 301 
Hastingleigh, 301 
Hatch, Joseph, 75 

,, Thomas, 73 

,, William, 75, 80 
Hatchara, 301 



Hawkhurst, 60, 122, 124, 125, 301 

Hawkinge, 304 

Hayes, 70, 123, T27, 304 

Hcadcorn, no, 305 

Hernc, n2, 305 

Heme Bay, 306 

Hernhill, 113, 123, 306 

Hevcr, no, 306 

Higham, 103, 119, 307. 

Hilborough, 307 

Hildenborough, 307 

Hille, Johanna, 37 

„ Richard, 25, 32, 35 
Hillingdon, Midd^, 63 
Hinxhill, 80, 307 
Hoath, 47, 86, 308 
Hodson, Chrisf, 86, 97 
„ John, 88, 97 

HoUingbournc, 108, 308 

Honor Oak, 308 

Hoo, All Hallows, 127, 308 
„ St. Mary, 309 
„ St. Werburgh, 72, 107, n2, 309 

Hope, I, 309 

Hormead (Little), Herts, 23 

Horsmonden, 108, 123, 310 

Horton Kirby, 310 

Hothfield, ni, 123, 3n 

Hougham, 3 1 r 

Huckinge, 312 

I lull, iVilliam, 88, 97 

Hunton, 106, 123, 312 

Hythe, 106, n8, 313 

I C, 86 

Ickham, 85, 123, 124, 125, 314 

Ide Hill, 315 

Ifield, 315 

Ightham, 31, 315 

Ipswich, Suffolk, 88 

Ivychurch, 316 

Iwade, 8, 31C) 

Janaway, Tho\ i 1 4 
Jordan, Henry, 37, 43 

^ M 2 



452 



The CJiurch Dells of Kent. 



Kebyll, , 40 

Ke7npe^ Thomas, 69 

Kempley, GlouC, 109 

Kemsing, 27, 87, 123, 316 

Kenardington, 317 

Kennington, 55, 123, 124, 317 

Kerner, Richard, 47 

Keston, 94, 320 

Kidbrooke, 320 

Kilndown, 118, 321 

Kingsbury, Midd-\ 104 

Kingsdown by Deal, 321 

,, by Sittingbourne, 20, 321 

„ by Wrotham, 103, 321 

Kingsnorth, 108, 321 

Kingstone, 11, 123, 322 

K flight, Saiiu/el, 106, 107 

Knockholt, 114, 322 

Knowlton, 322 

Lamberhurst, 322 
Lambert, William, 90 
Lamorby, 323 
Laud, IVili'", 89, 279 
Langdon, East, 123, 323 

West, 324 
Langley, 34, 73, 324 
Lawrence, Thomas, 51 
Leaden Roding, Essex, 51 
Leaveland, 324 
Lee, 325 
Leeds, 109, 325 
Leeds Castle, 2, 40, 326 
Leicester, 14, 71 
Leigh, 118, 122, 124, 327 
Lenham, 97, 109, no, 328 
Lester and Pack, 1 1 1 
Lester, Pack and Chapman, 112 
Lester, Tho\ no 
Lewisham, 330, 332 
Leybourne, 72, 332 
Leysdown, 332 
Linton, 106, in, 2,3Z 
Littlebourne, 55, 85, 127, ^^t^ 
Lleivellin and James, 119 



Longfield, 14, ^2>3 

Loose, 61, 123, 124, 125, 334 

Luddenham, 341 

Luddesdown, 36, 41, 342 

Lullingstone, 8, 342 

Luton, 343 

Lydd, 99, 125, 343 

Lydden, 344 

Lyminge, 73, 344 

Lympne, 109, 345 

Lynstead, 70, 123, 345 

Maidstone, 19, 113, 119, 345 

Mailing, East, 97, 347 

West, 97, 98, 347 
,, South (Sussex), 88 

Maplescombe, 348 

Marden, 99, ni, 123, 125, 127, 348 

Margaretting (Essex), 5 1 

Margate, 38, 73, ii^, 349 

Mark Beech, 350 

Mass Bell, 122 

Matfield, 350 

Matins Bell, 122 

J\ fears, C. and G., 118 
,, and Stainbank, 118 
,, TJio' the Elder, 113, 117 
,, Tho'' the Younger, 118 
„ William, 112 
„ W. and T., 113 

Meopham, 91, 95, 98, 351 

Mere worth, 107, 123, 351 

Mersham, 352 

Mid-day Bell, T23 

Milstead, 40, 44, 123, 127, 353 

Milton by Canterbury, 353 
„ by Gravesend, 98, 353 
,, by Sittingbourne, i, 97, 125, 
126, 354 

Minster in Sheppey, 81, 355 

„ in Thanet, 55, 86, 125, 355 

Molash, 355 

Mongeham, Great, 114, 123, 124, 356 

Monks Horton, 356 

Monkton, 86, 127, 357 



Index. 



453 



Mot, Robert, 63, 68, 92 
Mottingham, 357 
Murston, 55, 95, 35S 
Mydley, 358 

Nackington, 358 

Navestock, Essex, 61 

Nettlestead, 92, 358 

Newchurch, 123, 124, 358 

Newcome, 14 

Newenden, 359 

Newington by Hythe, 108, 123, 127, 

359 
Newington by Sittingbourne, 360 
Newnham, 39, 123, 361 
Newton, Samuel, 103 
Nonington, 34, 98, 361 
Northbourne, 102, 127, 362 
Northfleet, 362 
Norton, 363 

N'orto}i, Stepheii, 16, 38, 39 
Norwich, 13, 71 
Nottingham, 41, 54 
Nursted, 363 

Oare, 127, 363 
Offham, 72, 123, 363 
Oldfeild, Will"\ 53, 153 
Orlestone, 61, 364 
Orpington, 364 
Ospringe, 364 
Otford, 94, 365 
Otham, 26, 365 
Otterden, 36S 

Pack, Thomas, 1 1 1 

,, and Chapman, 1 1 2 
Paddlesworth, 368 
Paddock Wood, 368 
Falma7',John, 83 

„ Thomas, 83 
Pancake Bell, 125 
Passing Bell, 126 
Patrick, Robert, i 1 4 
Patricksbourne, 11, 13, 86, 36S 



Peckham (East), 127, 369 

(West), 81, 123, 369 
Peele, Joh7i, 104 
Pembury, 98, 370 
Penshurst, 39, 370 
Perry Street, 370 
Petham, 21, 1 1 1, 371 
Phelps, Rick\ 109 
Piatt, 123, 371 
Plaxtol, 105, 372 
Pluckley, 118, 372 
Plumstead, 99, 372 
Postling, II, 13, 373 
Potter, Job, 106 

Poivdrell, William, 32, 38, 42, 44 
Preston by Faversham, 60, 373 

„ by Wingham, no, 127, 374 

QUEENBOROUGH, 95, 374 

Quex Park, ii8 

Radcliffe, Bucks, 26 
Rainham, 70, 375 
Ramsgate, 376 
Reading, Berks, 87, 92, 108 
Reculver, 377 
Rettenden, Essex, 104 
Reve, Giles, 72 
Revel, Will'", 10, 14, 15 
Richmond, Surrey, 90 
Rider, Robert, 15 
Ridley, 378 

Ringwould, 20, 125, 378 
Ripple, 379 
K-ivcr, 95, 379 
Riverhead, 380 
Rochester, 97, 383 

,, Cathedral, 91, 99, 102, 

380 
Rodmersham, 21, 88, 384 
Rolvenden, 89, 118, 123, 127, 3S4 
Romney (New), 127, 385 

(Old), 47, 102, 385 
Rooksley, 386 
Roshcrville, 386 



454 



The Clnircli Bells of Kent 



Ruckinge, io6, 386 
Rusthall, 386 
Ryarsh, 31, 387 

St. David's, 105 

St. Laurence, 118, 387 

St. Margaret at Cliffe, 87, 388 

St. Mary in the Marsh, 21, 2,Z', 34> 388 

St. Nicholas at Wade, 99, 388 

St. Peter's, 109, 388 

Salisbury, 89 

Saltwood, 106, 389 

Sandgate, 389 

Sandhurst, GIGS'", 85 

„ Kent, 39, 88, 123, 124, 

389 
Sandwich, 86, 113, 125, 126, 391 
Savill, William, 105 
Si hep, IV'", 10 
Schimmel, G err it, 88 
Seal, 21, 81, 98, 123, 124, 395 
Seasalter, 396 
Sellindge, 108, 396 
Selling, III, 396 
Sermon Eell, 122, 123 
Service Bell, 122 
Sevenoaks, 1 12, 397 
Sevington, 398 
Shadoxhurst, 61, 399 
Shalford, Surrey, 1 1 6 
Sheerness, 399 
Sheldwich, 118, 400 
Shenley, Herts, 93 
Shipbourne, 42, 72, 81, 400 
Sholden, 94, 401 
Shooter's Hill, 401 
Shoreham, 99, 401 
Shorne, 1 18, 402 
Shortlands, 402 
Sibertswold, 402 
Sidcup, 402 
Sissinghurst, 402 
Sittingbourne, 97, 116, 122, 402 
Small Hythe, 403 
Smarden, 16, 70, 404 



Smeeth, 125, 127, 408 

Snargate, 9, 408 

Snave, 16, 123, 409 

Snodland, 72, 95, 409 

Southborough, 119, 123, 410 

Southfleet, 27, 93, no, 410 

Speldhurst, 118, 122, 411 

Stalisfield, 412 

Stanford, 14, 412 

Stansted, 31, 412 

Staple, 36, 98, 412 

Staplehurst, 70, 85, 123, 124, 125, 

127, 413 
Stelling, 31, 415 
Stockbury, 416 
Stodmarsh, 8, 60, 416 
Stoke at Hoo, 72, 416 
Stoke d'Abernon, Surrey, 37 
Stokes, J Fill'", 43 
Stone by Dartford, 417 
Stone in Oxney, ^3^ 4^7 
Stourmouth, 93, 418 
Stowting, 42, 106, 108, 123, 418 
Strood, 114, 123, 421 
Sturdy, Johaiina, 37, 42 

» JoJm, 37 
Sturry, 421 
Sudbury, Suffolk, 107 
Sundridge, 94, 98, 123, 422 
Sutton by Dover, 8, 423 
Sutton (East), 106, 423 
Sutton at Hone, 15, 423 
Sutton Valence, 423 
Stvain, Thomas, 109 
Swalecliffe, 423 
Swan, Stepheti, 81 
Swanley, 127, 424 
Swanscombe, 109, 123, 424 
Swingfield, 91, 425 
Sydenham, 425 

Taylor and C'\ 119 
''Tellers," 127 
Tenterden, 1 12, 425 
Teston, 427 



Index. 



455 



Teynham, 109, 427 
Thanington, 85, 427 
Thornton^ John, 107 
Throwley, 1 12, 428 
Thurnham, 62, 428 
Tilmanstone, 428 
Tonbridge, 112, 127,428 
Tonbridge Wells, 119, 429 
Tonge, 430 
To?i7ie, Jo/in, 49 
Tofuii, Stephen, 90 
Totteridge, Herts, 104 
Trottiscliffe, 430 
Tudeley, 430 
Tunstall, n8, 430 

Ulcombe, 74, 431 
Under River, 431 
Upchurch, 432 
Upnor, 127, 432 

Wakefield, Anthony, 60, 234, 303 

Wakefield, William, 88 
Wakerell Bell, 126 
Waldershare, 432 

Wal grave, Joh7i, 30, 44 
^Valmer, 432 
Waltham, 75, 76, 433 
Warden, i, 433 
Warehorne, 106, 123, 124, 433 

Warner, fohn, 114 

War tier a?id Sons, 1 18 
Warning Bell, 123 
Wateringbury, 434 
Watlington, Norfolk, 38 

Watts, William, 71 

Waylett, John, 105 
Westbere, 434 
West Cliffe, 51, 224 
Westerham, 118, 123, 125, 126, 127, 

434 
Westgate, 435 



j Westmarsh, 435 

Weston, Peter de, 1 o, 1 5 

„ Thomas de, 10 
Westwell, 55, 123, 435 
^\hitfield, 436 
Whitstable, 108, 436 
Wickham Breaux, 108, 436 
„ East, 436 

West, 87, 97, 436 

Wight man, Philip, 92 

,, William, 92 

Willesborough, 112, 119,437 
Wilmington, 89, 438 

Wilnar, Henry, 82 

„ John, 82 
Wimbledon, Surrey, 50 
Wingham, 1 10, 438 
Wisborough Green, Sussex, 85 
Wittersham, 92, 123, 438 

Wodeward, William, 23, 29, 44 

Wood, John, 91 
Woodchurch, 439 
Woodlands, 439 
Woodmancote, Sussex, 85 
Woodmansterne, Surrey, 103 
Woodnesborough, 98, 440 
Woolwich, 1 1 8, 440 
Wootton, 127, 441 
Wormshill, 1 10, 441 
Worth, 442 
Wouldham, 76, 442 

Wright, Lawrence, 62 
Wrotham, 19, iii, 122, 124, 443 
Wychling, 31, 97, 444 
Wye, 70, 112, 123, 124, 125, 1 

444 
Wymbish, Michael de, 5 

„ Richard de, 5, 9 
Wymenswould, 445 

Valding, 92, 123, 124, 127, 445 
Yare, William, 93 
York, 54 



Elliot Stock, Patcritoslcr A" inc, London. 



PLATE 1 








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Surrey Bells and London Bell Founders. 

A Contribution to the Comparative Study of 15ell Inscriptions. 

r.v 

J, C. L. STAR LSCHM IDT. 

The book contains much interesting information as to the early Bell Founders 
of London. It is copiously illustrated with woodcuts, and has fifteen full-page 
plates oi facsimiles of lettering, etc., used on bells. 



0})inion6 of t^e (precB* 



' Bears upon almost every page evidence of deep research.' — City Press. 

' The sequence of Metropolitan bell founders is an amazing " find." ' — Athcmviivi. 

' Honest and thorough.' — Academy. 

' Much that is original, interesting, and curious .... hardly a dull page in the book.' 

Saturday Rcvie'u. 
' Campanists will be delighted with Mr. Stahlschmidt's laborious and scholarly work.' 

Surrey Comet. 

Utiiform with '■Surrey B ell s^^ price 20s. 

The Church Bells of Hertfordshire : 

THEIR FOUNDERS, INSCRIPTIONS, TRADITIONS, AND USES. 

BY THE LATE 

THOMAS NORTH, F.S.A., 

Author of Works on the Church Bells of Leicester, Northampton. Rutland. Lincoln, 

and liedfordshire. 

COMPLETED AND EDITED i;V 

J. C. L. ST AH LSCHM IDT. 

Similar in design and execution to Mr. NORTH'S other works, and as fully illustrated. 



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'A piece of thorough workmanship, worthy of the two men whose names it hc.irs." 

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LONDON : ^liLLIOT STOCK, 62, I'ATKRNOSTKR ROW, K.C. 



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