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Full text of "Church chronology; a record of important events pertaining to the history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints"

HAROLD B. TEE LIBRARY 

BRjr^-^^^M YOUITG UNIVEf^STT^ 

PROVO, UTAH 









Church Chronology. 



A Record of Important Events 



Pertaining to the History of the Church of Jems Christ of 

Latter-day Saints. 



Compiled by Andrew Jenson, 

ASSISTANT CHURCH HISTORIAN. 



Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged. 



PRINTED AT THE DESERET NEWS, 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

1899. 



^^® ^i^BiUHy 



^«Oyo, UTAH 



PREFACE 

TO THE FIRST EDITION. 



In offering to the public this work of reference, the author has the 
satisfaction of knowing that he has been conscientious in its preparation. 
It embodies years of patient labor — a labor of love, rather than a labor 
with prospects of pecuniary gain — and if it shall prove acceptable and 
satisfactory to the people, in whose interest it has been compiled, his 
object will be fully attained. In regard to dates and incidents the work 
will be found reliable, although not perfect. As the sources of informa- 
tion have necessarily in some instances been confined to; current literature, 
and foreign affairs have been frequently dealt with, there may be a few 
technical errors. The author will be thankful to any readers, who may 
discover such mistakes, if they will direct his attention to them, that 
they may not appear in any further editions that may be published. 

ANDREW JENSON. 



PREFACE 

TO THE SECOND EDITION. 



This edition of Church Chronology, conbisting of 25,000 copies, 
is a thorough revision of the first edition, with many new features 
added, and the chronological thread brought down to the close 
of 1898. Before printing, the copy was carefully read to a com- 
mittee appointed by Historian PVanklin D. Richards, consisting of As- 
sistant Historians John Jaques and Charles W. Penrose and Elder A. 
Milton Musser. Great pains have been taken to make the work accu- 
rate and in all respects reliable as a work of reference, and as such it is- 
respectfuUy presented to the public at large, and particularly to those 
who desire correct information in regard to the Latter-day Saints and 
their most remarkable history. 

THE PUBLISHER. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized with 
six members, April 6, 1830, at a meeting held at Fayette, Seneca Co., 
N. Y. Since that time is has continually grown, and its members have 
steadily increased until the greater portion of Utah and parts of Idaho, 
Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico are peopled with 
Latter-day Saints. There are also colonies of Saints in Old Mexico and 
Canada, besides branches and conferences in nearly every State in the 
Union and in Great Britain, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Germany, 
Switzerland, Holland, Belgium, Turkey, New Zealand, Australia, Tas- 
mania, Hawaii, Samoa, Society Islands, Tuamotu Islands, and other 
countries. The Church in her gathered condition consists at the present 
time of forty organized Stakes of Zion, of which twenty-five are in Utah, 
or mostly so, seven in Idaho, four in Arizona, one in Colorado, one in 
Wyoming, one in Old Mexico, and one in Canada. The Saints in 
Nevada and New Mexico belong to Stakes, the headquarters ot which are 
located in Utah. 

The general authorities of the Church consists of, i. The First Pre- 
sidency; 2, The Council of Twelve Apostles; 3, Presiding Patriarch; 
4, The First Council of Seventies; 5, The Presiding Bishopric; 6, 
Church Historians. 

THE FIRST PRESIDENCY. 

Joseph Smith the Prophet, "who was called of God and ordained 
an Apostle of Jesus Christ, to be the first Elder of this Church" (Doc. and 
Gov., 20:2), was the first President of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints. For nearly three years after its organization he acted 
without Counselors, but close by his side and associated with him in 
nearly all his administrations, stood Oliver Cowdery, "who was also called 
of God, an Apostle of Jesus Christ, to be the second Elder of this 
Church,and ordained under his (Joseph's) hand." (Doc. and Cov.,2o:3.) 

March, 18, 1833, agreeable to a revelation given March 8, 1833, the 
Prophet Joseph ordained Sidney Rigdon to be his first and Frederick G. 
Williams to be his second Counselor. Prior to this, at a conference held 
at Amherst, Lorain Co., Ohio, Jan. 25, 1832, Joseph the Prophet had 
been acknowledged as President of the High Priesthood. A similar 
action was taken at a general council, held April 26, 1832, at Indepen- 
dence, Jackson Co., Mo. 

At an important conference held at Far West, Caldwell Co., Mo., 
Nov. 7, 1S37, Frederick G. Williams was rejected as a Counselor to Pres. 
Smith, charges having previously been made against him at a conference 
held at Kirtland, Ohio, Sept. 3, 1837. On the same occasion H)Tum 
Smith was appointed his successor by unanimous vote. Hyrum Smith 
filled his position with honor and ability, until some time after the demise 
of his father, Joseph Smith, sen., who died at Nauvoo, 111., Sept. 14, 
1840. 





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INTRODUCTORY. Vll 

In a revelation given through Joseph the Prophet at Nauvoo, Jan. 19, 
1841, Hyrum Smith was called to take the office of Patriarch to the 
Church, as his father's successor. In the same revelation William Law 
was called to succeed Hyrum Smith as second Counselor to Pres. Joseph 
Smith. William Law occupied this position until April 18, 1844, when 
he, together with others, who like himself had apostatized, were excom- 
municated from the Church. 

Joseph the Prophet was martyred at Carthage, 111., June 27, 1844, 
when the responsibility of presiding over the Church fell upon the Twelve 
Apostles. They constituted the presiding Council of the Church tilJ 
Dec. 5, 1847, when an important council meeting was held at the house 
of Apostle Orson Hyde. On this occasion Brigham Young was unani- 
mously elected President of the Church, with authority to choose his- 
Counselors, which he did by naming Heber C. Kimball for his first and 
Willard Richards for his second Counselor. The following Apostles 
attended this council meeting: Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Orson 
Hyde, Willard Richards, Wilford Woodruff, Geo. A. Smith, Amasa M. 
Lyman and Ezra T. Benson. These transactions on the part of the 
Twelve were ratified by the Church at a conference held in the Log Tab- 
ernacle, at Council Bluffs, Iowa, Dec. 27, 1847, and at the general con- 
ference held in G. S. L. Valley, Oct. 8, 1848. 

Counselor Willard Richards died of dropsy in G. S. L. City, March 
II, 1854. At the general conference, held April 6, 1854, Jedediah M. 
Grant was called to fill the vacancy thus created. 

Counselor Jedediah M. Grant died Dec. i, 1856, and Daniel H. 
Wells succeeded him as second Counselor to Pres. Brigham Young, being 
ordained and set apart to that position, Jan. 4, 1857. Daniel H. Wells 
acted in that capacity till the death of Pres. Young. 

Counselor Heber C. Kimball died June 22, 1868, in Salt Lake City. The 
vacancy occasioned thereby was filled by the appointment of George A. 
Smith to the position of first Counselor in the First Presidency. He 
served in that capacity until his death, which occurred m Salt Lake City, 
Sept. I, 1875. John W. Young succeeded him as first Counselor, being 
sustained as such by the general conference held Oct. 8, 1876. 

Pres. Brigham Young died in Salt Lake City, Aug. 29, 1877, after 
which the Twelve Apostles again presided over the Church, continuing 
to do so for three years, or until the general conference held in Salt Lake 
City in October, 1880, when the First Presidency was organized, for the 
third time, by the appointment of John Taylor as President, with Geo. 
Q. Cannon as his first and Joseph F. Smith as his second Counselor. 

Pres. John Taylor died at Kaysville, Davis Co., Utah, July 25, 
1887, after which the Twelve Apostles presided over the Church till the 
general conference, held in Salt Lake City, in April 1889, ^^ which 
occasion a First Presidency was again organized, consisting of Wilford 
Woodruff, President; Geo.* Q. Cannon, first Counselor; and Joseph F. 
Smith, second Counselor. 

Pres. Wilford Woodruff died in San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 2, 1898. 
At an important council meeting of the Apostles, held in Salt Lake City, 
Sept. 13, 1898, the First Presidency was once more organized, as 
follows: Lorenzo Snow, President; Geo. Q. Cannon, first Counselor; 
Joseph F. Smith, second Counselor. 

By the foregoing it will be seen that five Apostles, namely, Joseph 
Smith, Brigham Young, John Taylor, Wilford Woodruff and Lorenzo 



Vm INTRODUCTORY. 

Snow, have filled the exalted position of President of the Church; five 
(Sidney Rigdon, Heber C. Kimball, Geo. A. Smith, John W. Young 
and Geo. Q. Cannon) have acted as first Counselors: and seven (Frederick 
G. Williams, Hyrum Smith, William Law, Willard Richards, Jedediah 
M. Grant, Daniel H. Wells and Joseph F. Smith) as second Counselors 
in the First Presidency, since the first organization of the Council in 1833. 

COUNCIL OF TWELVE APOSTLES. 

In a revelation, given through Joseph the Prophet, in June 1829, at 
Fayette, Seneca Co., N. Y., the Lord made known that Twelve Apostles 
should be called in this dispensation. (Doc and Cov., Sec. 18.) Nearly 
six years later, on Feb. 14, 1835, at a special meeting, held at Kirtland, 
Ohio, Joseph the Prophet, in accordance with that revelation, blessed 
Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer and Martin Harris, the Three Witnesses 
to the Book of Mormon, to select twelve men who should constitute 
the Council of Twelve Apostles. They were chosen by the Three Wit- 
nesses in the following order: Lyman E. Johnson, Brigham Young, 
Heber C. Kinball, Orson Hyde, David W. Patten, Luke S. Johnson, 
Wm. E. McLellin, John F. Boynton, Orson Pratt, William Smith, Thos. 
B. Marsh and Parley P. Pratt. Most of these brethren the previous year 
(1834) had proved their faithfulness and integrity to the Church as mem- 
bers of Zion's Camp, which journeyed from Kirtland, Ohio, to Missouri 
and back, subject to much suffering and many privations. They were 
ordained to the Apostleship by Joseph Smith, Oliver Cowdery, David 
Whitmer and Martin Harris as follows: Lyman" E. Johnson, Brigham 
Young: and Heber C. Kimball on Feb. 14, 1835; Orson Hyde, David W. 
Patten,Luke S.Johnson, Wm.E. McLellin, John F. Boynton and William 
Smith on the following day, Feb. 15th; Parley P. Pratt on Feb. 2i.st; and 
Thomas B. Marsh and Orson Pratt, who had been absent on missions, in 
April, 1835. At a grand council, held at Kirtland, Ohio, May 2, 1835, 
at which the First Presidency was in attendance, the Twelve were arranged 
according to their age, after which they stood as follows, commencing 
with the eldest: Thomas B. Marsh, David W. Patten, Brigham Young, 
Heber C. Kimball, Orson Hyde, William E. McLellin Parley P. Pratt, 
Luke S. Johnson, William Smith, Orson Pratt, John F. Boynton and 
Lyman E. Johnson. 

In 1837 and 1838 four of the Twelve apostatized, namely, John F. 
Boynton, disfellowshipped Sept. 3, 1837, at Kirtland, Ohio; Lyman E. 
Johnson and Luke S. Johnson, excommunicated April 13, 1838, at Far 
West, Missouri; and Wm. E. McLellin, excommunicated May 11, 1838, 
at Far West. 

July 8, 1838, John Taylor, John E. Page, Wilford Woodruff and 
Willard Richards were called by revelation to fill the places of those who 
had fallen. Elders Page and Taylor were ordained Dec. 19, 1838; Wil- 
ford Woodruff" April 26, 1839, at Far West, Missouri; and Willard Rich- 
ards April 14, 1840, at Preston, England. 

In the meantime other vacancies occurred. David W. Patten was 
killed in the Crooked River battle, in Missouri, Oct. 25, 1838, and Thos. 
B. Marsh was excommunicated for apostasy, March 17, 1839, at Quincy, 
111. To fill the two vacancies occasioned thereby, George A. Smith (or- 
dained April 26, 1839, at Far West, Mo.) and Lyman Wight (ordained 
April 8, 1 84 1, at Nauvoo, 111.), were chosen. 



INTRODUCTOR\ . IX 

William Smith was rejected as an Apostle, at the general conference 
held at Nauvoo, in October, 1845, and finally excommunicated from the 
Church, Oct. 12, 1846. John E. Page was disfellowshipped, Jan. 9, 1846, 
at a council meeting held at Nauvoo, 111. Amasa M. Lyman, who had 
been ordained an Apostle, Aug. 20, 1842, at Nauvoo, and Ezra T. Benson, 
ordained July 16, 1846, at Council Bluffs, Iowa, were chosen to fill the 
vacancies. 

The reorganization of the First Presidency in December, 1847, with 
three of the Apostles (Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball and Willard 
Richards), and the excommunication ot Lyman Wright for apostacy, 
Feb. 12, 1849, made iour vacancies in the Council of the Twelve. These 
were filled Feb. 12, 1849, at an important council meeting held in the 
"Old Fort," G. S. L. City, when Elders Charles C. Rich, Lorenzo 
Snow, Erastus Snow and Franklin D. Richards were ordained Apostles. 

The next vacancy occurred May 13, 1857, when Parley P. Pratt was 
assassinated near Van Buren, Arkansas. George Q. Cannon was chosen 
to fill the vacancy, being ordained an Apostle Aug. 20, i860, in G. S. L. 
City, Utah. 

In October, 1867, Amasa M. Lyman was dropped from the Council 
of the Twelve; and Joseph F. Smith, who had previously been ordained 
to the Apostleship, was chosen to fill the vacancy, Oct 6, 1867, at a 
general conference. 

Geo. A. Smith was chosen as first Counselor to Pres. Brigham 
Young, after the demise of Heber C. Kimball in 1868. Elder Brigham 
Young, jun., who previously had been ordained an Apostle, was chosen 
to fill the vacancy, being sustained as a member ol the Council of the 
Twelve at the general conference held Oct. 9, 1868. 

Elder Ezra T. Benson died Sept. 3, 1869, at Ogden, Utah. Albert 
Carrington was chosen to fill the vacancy, and was ordained an Apostle, 
July 3, 1870, in Salt Lake City. 

Orson Hyde, who had acted as president of the Twelve Apostles, 
from the reorganization of the First Presidency in 1847, to October, 
1875, died Nov. 28, 1878, at Spring City, Sanpete Co., Utah. At the 
annual conference, held April 7, 1879, Elder Moses Thatcher was chosen 
to fill the vacancy. 

After the death of Pres. Brigham Young, in 1877, the Twelve Apos- 
tles presided over the Church nearly three years. Daniel H. Wells and 
John W, Young, who had acted as Pres. Brigham Young's Counselors, 
were .sustained by the Church as Counselors to the Twelve. 

Another reorganization ot the First Presidency took place, Oct. 10, 
1880, at the general conference held in Salt Lake City, three of the 
Apostles (John Taylor, Geo. Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith) being 
chosen to constitute said Presidency. This caused three vacancies in the 
Council ol the Twelve, two of which were filled Oct. 27, 1880, by the 
ordination of Francis M. Lyman and John Henry Smith to the Apostle- 
ship. 

Orson Pratt, the last surviving member of the first Council of Twelve 
Apostles, died in Salt Lake City, Utah, Oct. 3, 1881. The vacancy 
occasioned by his demise, and the vacancy left since October, 1880, was 
filled by the calling of George Teasdale and Heber J. Grant to the 
Apostleship. These brethren were called by direct revelation, through 
Pres. John Taylor, and were ordained in Salt Lake City, Oct. 16, 1882. 

Charles C. Rich died at Paris, Bear Lake Co., Idaho, Nov. 17, 



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INTRODUCTORY. • XI 

1883, and the vacancy caused thereby, in the Council, was filled* by the 
ordination of John W. Taylor to the Apostleship, Oct 16, 1883. 

After the death of Pres. John Taylor, July 25, 1887, the Twelve 
Apostles acted as presiding Council of the Church for about one year 
and nine months, during which time Geo. Q. Cannon and Joseph F. 
Smith occupied their former positions as members of the Council of 
Twelve Apostles. 

At the general conference, held in April, 1889, the First Presidency 
was reorganized, with Wilford Woodruff as President. The vacancy in 
the Council of the Apostles caused thereby, as well as that occasioned by 
the excommunication of Albert Carrington, in November, 1885, and a 
third vacancy caused by the demise of Erastus Snow, May 27, 1888, were 
filled at the general conference, held in October, 1889, by the calling of 
Marriner W. Merrill, Anthon H. Lund and Abraham. H. Cannon to the 
Apostleship. 

Abraham H. Cannon died in Salt Lake City, July 19, 1896, and 
Moses Thatcher was dropped from his position as one of the Twelve 
Apostles, Nov. 19, 1896. The two vacancies thus occasioned were filled 
at the general conference held in Salt Lake City, in October, 1897, when 
Matthias F. Cowley and Abraham Owen Woodruff were sustained as 
members of the Council of Twelve Apostles. 

After the death of Pres. Wilford Woodruff, Sept. 2, 1898, the 
Twelve Apostles once more became the presiding Council of the Church, 
and Geo. Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith were returned to their former 
positions among the Twelve Apostles. But the Apostles only retained 
the presidency a few days. Sept. 13, 1898, the First Pesidency was 
organized the fifth time since the organization of the Church, Lorenzo 
Snow, Geo. Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith being the three Apostles 
chosen to form the new Presidency. This caused a vacancy in the Coun- 
cil of the Aposties, which was filled at the general conference, held in 
Salt Lake City, Oct. 9, 1898, when Rudger Clawson was sustained as 
one of the Twelve Apostles. 

The Council of Twelve Apostles now stands as follows: Franklin D. 
Richards, president, Brigham Young, Francis M. Lyman, John Henry 
Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Heber J. Grant, John W. Taylor, Marriner W. 
Merrill, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham Owen 
Woodruff and Rudger Clawson. 

PRESIDING PATRIARCHS. 

Joseph Smith, sen., father of the Prophet Joseph Smith, was the 
first Patriarch in the Church. He was ordained to that high and holy 
calling, Dec. 18, 1833, at Kirtland, Ohio, under the hands of the 
Prophet Joseph. Oliver Cowdery, Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G. Wil- 
liams. Father Smith continued as Patriarch until his death, which occurred 
at Nauvoo, 111., Sept. 14, 1840. In an important revelation, given 
through the Prophet Joseph,'>Jan. 19, 1841, Hyrum Smith, Father Smith's 
eldest living son, who then acted as second Counselor in the First Pre- 
sidency, was called to succeed his father as Patriarch. He "received" 
the office, Jan. 24, 1841, and kept it until his martyrdom in Carthage 
Jail, 111., June 27, 1844. His brother William Smith, who was also a 
member of the Council of Twelve Aposdes, succeeded him by virtue of 
his birthright, or age, but he apostatized. At the general conference, 



Xll INTRODUCTORY. 

held in October 1845, he was rejected as an Apostle and as a Patriarch. 
He was finally excommunicated from the Church, Oct. 12, 1845. 

After the rejection of William Smith, the Patriarchal office, accord- 
ing to the hereditary order belonged to Asahel Smith (a brother of 
Joseph Smith, sen.), who had been ordained a Patriarch at Nauvoo in 
1844; but his health being poor, he is not known to have magnified his 
office as a Patriarch. Soon afterwards (July 20, 1848) he died at lowa- 
ville, Wapello Co., Iowa. 

John Smith, another brother of the late Joseph Smith, sen., who 
had previously been ordained a Patriarch at Nauvoo, was ordained pre- 
siding Patriarch in the Church, Jan. i, 1849, at G. S. L. City, under the 
hands of Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball. He had been sustained 
as a "Patriarch in the Church" as early as the general conference, held 
at Winter Quarters, April 6, 1847. 

Uncle John Smith, as he was familiarly called, died May 23, 1854, 
in G. S. L City. John Smith, eldest son of the martyred Hyrum 
Smith, to whom the Patriarchal Priesthood descended direct from his 
father, was chosen as his successor. At the time of his father's death he 
was too young to receive the office. He was ordained presiding Patriarch, 
Feb. 18, 1855. in G.S.L.City.by Pres. Brigham Young, and is the present 
incumbent of the office of Presiding Patriarch. 

FIRST COUNCIL OF SEVENTIES. 

The organization of the first quorum of Seventy was commenced at 
Kirdand, Ohio, Feb. 28, 1835. Nearly all the first members consisted 
of men who had distinguished themselves for their faithfulness as 
members of Zion's Camp. When the quorum was fully organized the 
following were chosen to act as its seven presidents; Hazen Aldrich, 
Joseph Young, Levi W. Hancock, Leonard Rich, Zebedee Coltrin, Ly- 
man Sherman and Sylvester Smith. 

Questions arose among some of the brethren in regard to the corre- 
sponding grades of the Seventies and High Priests, and it was ascertained 
that five or six of the seven presidents had previously been ordained 
High Priests. The Prophet Joseph Smith, in a meeting held in the Kirt- 
land Temple, April 6, 1837, counseled these brethren, namely, Hazen 
Aldrich, Leonard Rich, Zebedee Coltrin, Lyman Sherman and Sylvester 
Smith, to join the High Priests' quorum, which five of them did, and the 
following named Elders were chosen to fill the vacancies thus created in 
the First Council of the Seventies: John Gould, in place of Hazen Aid- 
rich; James Foster, in place of Leonard Rich; Daniel S. Miles, in place 
of Zebedee Coltrin; Josiah Butterfield, in place of Lyman Sherman; 
Salmon Gee, in place of Levi W. Hancock, and John Gaylord, in place 
of Sylvester Smith. 

In the summer of 1837 it was ascertained that Levi W. Hancock, 
who was in Missouri at the time of the April meeting, was not a High 
Priest, and he was therefore received back into his former position as one 
of the First Seven Presidents of Seventies, at an important meeting held 
at Kirtland, Ohio. Sept 3, 1837. John Gould, one of the newly 
appointed presidents, was asked by the Prophet Joseph to join the High 
Priests, which he did. After these changes the First Council of Seventies 
stood as follows: Joseph Young, Levi W. Hancock, James Foster, 
Daniel S. Miles, Josiah Butterfield, Salmon Gee, and John Gaylord. 



INTRODUCTORY. Xlll 

Jan. 13, 1838, John Gaylord, together with many others, was excom- 
municated from the Church by the High Council at Kirtland, Ohio, for 
rising up in rebellion against the Church authorities. Elder Henry Harri- 
man was called and ordained Feb. 6, 1838, to fill the vacancy in the 
First Council of Seventies. 

In a meeting of the Seventies, held at Kirtland, Ohio, March 6, 
1838, the council withdrew their fellowship from Salmon Gee for neglect 
of duty and other causes. Elder Zera Pulsipher was chosen and ordained 
to fill the vacancy the same day. The foregoing information about the 
Seventies is obtained from the original record of Seventies kept at Kirt- 
land, Ohio. 

After these two changes the council stood unchanged until the 
Church had removed to Nauvoo, 111. It appears that James Foster, 
instead of gathering with the Saints, settled at Jacksonville, Morgan Co. , 
111. , and had no direct communication with his brethren. Prior to the 
October conference, 1844, he was dropped from his position by the 
council of the Seventies. In the following spring (1845), Albert P. 
Rockwood was called to fill the vacancy caused by the removal of Foster. 

Josiah Butterfield retained his standing as one of the seven Presi- 
dents until a misunderstanding arose between the Prophet Joseph and him, 
and he was finally cut ofT from the Church, Oct. 7, 1844, at the general 
conference held at Nauvoo, for neglect of duty, etc. The vacancy was filled 
the same day by the appointment of Jedediah M.Grant as one of the coun- 
cil of the Seventies, but he was not ordained until some time afterwards. 

Elder Daniel S. Miles died a faithful man in the early part of 
1845, in Hancock County, 111., and the vacancy occasioned by his death 
was filled by Elder Benjamin L, Clapp, in April, 1845. Elder Albert P. 
Rockwood, Benjamin L. Clapp and Jedediah M. Grant were ordained to 
the positions to which they had been elected Dec. 2, 1845. 

After the demise of Willard Richards in 1854, Elder Jedediah M. 
Grant was selected by President Brigham Young to fill the office of 
second Counselor in the First Presidency, thus leaving another vacancy 
in the council of Seventies. Elder Horace S. Eldrege was called, at the 
October conference, 1854, to fill that vacancy, and was ordained about 
the same time in G. S. L. City. 

Elder Benjamin L. Clapp, alter living some years in G. S. L. City, re- 
moved his family to Ephraim, Sanpete Co., where he had some difficulty 
with Bishop Warren S. Snow. After investigation before the Council of 
Seventies, he was dropped from his position in the council, and finally ex- 
communicated from the Church, at the general conference, held in G. S. 
L. City, April 7, 1859. Elder Jacob Gates was called to fill the vacancy, 
at the April Conference, i860, but, being absent on a mission to Europe, 
he was not ordained until October, 1862, some time after his return 
home. 

Elder Zera Pulsipher transcended the bounds of the Priesthood in 
the ordinance of sealing, for which he was cited to appear before the First 
Presidency of the Church, April 12, 1862. It was there voted, that he 
be rebaptized, reconfirmed and ordained to the office of a High Priest, 
or go into the ranks of the Seventies. Subsequently he was ordained 
a Patriarch. Elder John Van Cott was called to fill the vacancy in 
the council of the Seventies, at the October conference, 1862. 

Albert P. Rockwood died in Sugar House Ward, Salt Lake Co., 
Nov. 26, 1879, and at the April conference, 1880, Elder Wm. W. Tay- 



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INTRODUCTORY. XV 

or was called to fill the vacancy and soon afterwards ordained one of the 
First Seven Presidents of Seventies. 

The vacancies caused by the death of Pres. Joseph Young, July i6, 
1881, and of Levi W, Hancok, June 10, 1882, were filled by the ordina- 
tion of Abraham H. Cannon as one of the First Seven Presidents, Oct. 
9, 1882, and Seymour B. Young as another, Oct. 16, 1882. 

Elder John Van Cott died Feb. 18, 1883. Christian Daniel Fjeld- 
sted was called to fill the vacancy. He was ordained, April 28, 1884, 
after his return from a mission to Scandinavia. 

The demise of Elder Wm. W. Taylor, Aug. i, 1884, caused another 
vacancy, which was filled Oct. 7, 1884, by the ordination of John Mor- 
gan as one of the First Seven Presidents. 

Horace S. Eldredge died in Salt Lake City, Sept. 6, 1888, and the 
vacancy caused thereby was filled by the calling of Brigham H. Roberts 
to act as one of the council, at the October conference, 1888. 

Abraham H. Cannon having been ordained an Apostle in October, 
1889, George Reynolds was sustained as one of the First Seven Presi- 
dents of Seventies, at the April conference, 1890. 

Elder Henry Herriman died at Huntington, Emery Co., Utah, May 
17, 1891. Elder Jacob Gates died at Provo, Utah Co., April 14, 1892. 
The vacancies caused by the demise of those two veteran presidents 
were filled by the selection of Jonathan G. Kimball and Rulon S. Wells 
as members of the First Council ol Seventies. The former was sustained 
at the general conference, held in October, 1892, and the latter at the 
general conference, held in April, 1893. 

Elder John Morgan died at Preston, Idaho, Aug. 14, 1894. At the 
following October conference, Edward Stevenson was chosen to fill the 
consequent vacancy in the council. 

Elder Edward Stevenson died in Salt Lake City, Jan. 27, 1897; ^"^ 
at the general conference of the Church, held in Salt Lake City, in 
October, 1897, Joseph W. McMurrin was chosen to fill the vacancy. He 
was ordained by Apostle Anthon H. Lund in Liverpool, England, Jan. 
21, 1898. 

The council now stands as follows: Seymour B. Young, Christian 
D. Fjeldsted, Brigham H. Roberts, George Reynolds, Jonathan G. Kim- 
ball, Rulon S. Wells and Joseph W. McMurrin. 

PRESIDING BISHOPRIC. 

Edward Partridge, the first Bishop of the Church, was called to that 
position Feb. 4, 1831, by revelation. (Doc. and Cov. , Sec. 41.) Later, 
when other Bishops were ordained, he became known as the first or pre- 
siding Bishop. June 6, 1831, at solemn meeting, held at Kirtland, Ohio, 
Isaac Morley and John Corrill were ordained and set apart as counselors 
to Bishop Partridge. 

In a letter written by the First Presidency at Kirtland, Ohio, to 
Wm. W. Phelps and others, in Missouri, under date of June 25, 1833, 
the following occurs : "Let Brother Isaac Morley be ordained second 
Bishop in Zion, and let brother John Corrill be ordained third. Let 
Brother Edward Partridge choose, as counselors in their place. Brother 
Parley P. Pratt and Brother Titus Billings, ordaining Brother Billings to 
the High Priesthood." 

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INTRODUCTORY. XVll 

appointments were not made; but at a meeting, held at Far West, Mo., 
Aug. I, 1837, Titus Billings was elected Bishop's counselor, in place of 
John Correll; and at a conference held at the same place, Nov. 7, 1837, 
Edward Partridge "was nominated to still act as Bishop;" after which he 
nominated Isaac Morley and Titus Billings for his counselors, and they 
"were unanimously chosen." 

These three constituted the head Bishopric ol the Church during the 
life time of Bishop Partridge. 

Bishop Edward Partridge filled his responsible position faithfully, in 
the midst of the most severe persecutions, until his death, which occurred 
at Nauvoo, III, May 27, 1840. 

In a revelation given through Joseph the Prophet, Jan. 19, 1841, 
George Miller was called to the position of Bishop, in place of Edward 
Partridge, deceased. (Doc. and Gov. , 124. 21.) In the same revelation, 
Sec. 141, the Lord says: "I give unto you , Vinson Knight, Samuel H. 
Smith and Shadrach Roundy, if he will receive it, to preside over the 
Bishopric." 

From the documents at our command at present, we are unable to 
learn whether or not the above named brethren officiated in the callings 
whereunto they were called; but at the general conference, held in October, 
1844, at Nauvoo, 111., Newel K. Whitney (who had been called by 
revelation tc act as Bishop at Kirtland, Ohio, Dec. 4, 1831) was sustained 
as "first Bishop," and George Miller as "second Bishop" in the Church. 
From that time till his death Newel K. Whitney was recognized, and 
after April, 1847, sustained by the voice of the general conference, as pre- 
siding Bishop of the Church. He had no regularly appointed Counse- 
lors; but recognized Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball as his chief 
counselors and advisers. 

Bishop Newel K. Whitney died in G. S. L. City, Sept. 23, 1850. 
At the general conference of the Church, held in April, 1851, Edward 
Hunter, who had been ordained a Bishop in Nauvoo in 1844, was 
sustained as presiding Bishop. It appears, however, that he was not 
ordained and set apart to that position till a year later. Like his prede- 
cessor, he received immediate advice from Presidents Brigham Young 
and Heber C. Kimball, and chose no other counselors until October, 
1856, when, at the general conference, held in G. S. L. City, Leonard 
W. Hardy was sustained as first and Jesse C. Little as second counselor 
to Bishop Edward Hunter. 

Counselor Jesse C. Little resigned his position as counselor. At the 
general conference held in Salt Lake City, in October, 1S74, Robert T. 
Burton was sustained as second counselor to Bishop Hunter. He was 
ordained and set apart to this position. Sept. 2, 1875, after his return from 
a mission to England. 

Bishop Edward Hunter died in Salt Lake City, Oct 16, 1883. -^t the 
general conference, held in April 1884, Wm. B. Preston, who had pre- 
viously presided over the Cache Stake of Zion, was sustained as presiding 
Bishop, with Leonard W. Hardy as his first and Robert T. Burton as his 
second counselor. 

Counselor Leonard W. Hardy died in Salt Lake City, July 31, 1884, 
At the general conference, held in October, 1884, Robert T. Burton was 
sustained as first and John O. Cannon as second counselor to Bishop 
Wm. B. Preston. 

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INTRODUCTORY. xix 

from his position. At the general conference, held at Prove, Utah, Co., in 
April, 1886, John R. Winder was sustained as second counselor in the 
Presiding Bishopric. 

Thus Wm. B. Preston, Robert T. Burton and John R. Winder con- 
stitute at the present time the presiding Bishopric of the Church. 

CHURCH HISTORIANS AND RECORDERS. 

The office of Church Recorder was provided for by direct revelation, 
given April 6, 1830, immediately after the organization ot the Church. 
In that revelation the Lord says, "Behold, there shall be a record kept 
among you," etc. (Doc. and Cov., 21:1.) Oliver Cowdery, who had 
acted as a scribe for the Prophet Jo?eph, while translating the Book ol 
Mormon, received the appointment as the first Church Recorder, 

March 8, 1831, John Whitmer, one of the Eight Witnesses to the 
Book of Mormon, was called by revelation to the position of Church 
Historian. "Behold, it is expedient in me", said the Lord, "that my 
servant John (Whitmer) should write and keep a regular history," and 
"it shall be appointed unto him to keep the Church record and history 
continually, for Oliver Cowdery I have appointed to another office." 
(Doc. and Cov., Sec. 47.) John Whitmer removed to Missouri in the 
winter ol 1831-32, and he was consequently unable to attend to his duties 
as Historian and Recorder at the headquarters of the Church, which were 
still at Kirtland. Hence, at a meeting of the Presidency of the Church 
and the High Council, held at Kirtland, Ohio, Sept. 14, 1835, Oliver 
Cowdery was again appointed "Recorder for the Church." 

At a conference of the authorities of the Church and of the Saints, 
held in the Kirtland Temple, Sept. 17, 1837, Geo. W. Robinson was 
elected General Church Recorder, in place of Oliver Cowdery, who had 
removed to Missouri. 

At a general conference, held at Far West, Mo., April 6, 1838, John 
Corrill and Elias Higbee were appointed Church Historians, "to write and 
keep the Church history;" and Geo. W. Robinson was sustained as 
General Church Recorder and clerk to the First Presidency. 

John Corrill apostatized during the Missouri persecutions, and was 
excommunicated from the Church, at a conference, held at Quincy, 111., 
March 17, 1839. 

Elias Higbee was selected to accompany the Prophet Joseph to 
Washington, D.C., as a delegate from the Church to the Federal Govern- 
ment, and later was chosen as a member of the committee appointed to 
superintend the building of the Nauvoo Temple. Owing to these addi- 
tional responsibilities, he was unable to devote much of his time to the 
writing of Church history. He finally died, at Nauvoo, June 8, 1843. 

At the general conference of the Church, held at Nauvoo, 111., Oct. 
3, 1840, Robert B. Thompson was appointed General Church Clerk, in 
place of George W. Robinson, who intended to remove to Iowa. 

Elder Thompson entered upon the duties of his office laithfully, but 
took suddenly sick and died, at Nauvoo, Aug. 27, 1841. 

Oct. 2, 1841. at a general conference, held in the Grove, at Nauvoo, 
111., James Sloan was elected General Church Clerk, in place of Robert 
B. Thompson, deceased. 

At a special meeting, held at Nauvoo, July 30, 1843, Elder Willard 
Richards was appointed General Church Recorder, succeeding James 
Sloan, who had left Nauvoo on a mission to Ireland. 



XX INTRODUCTORY. 

Elder Richards returned irom his mission to England in August, 1841. 
Dec. 13, 1841, he was appointed by Joseph Smith to act as Recorder 
for the Temple, and also as private secretary and general clerk to the 
Prophet. He entered immediately upon the duties of his office, and con- 
tinued the labors connected therewith till June 28, 1842, when he committed 
the business of the office to Wm. Clayton, and left Nauvoo, July i, 1842, 
on a visit to the New England States. From this visit he returned Oct. 
20, 1842. Dec. 21, 1842, the Prophet Joseph again appointed him 
private secretary and historian, while Wm. Clayton was retained as 
Temple Recorder and clerk of the Prophet's temporal business. 

At the general conference of the Church, held at Nauvoo, in October, 
1845, President Brigham Young remarked that "about three years ago. 
Elder Willard Richards was appointed by Pres. Joseph Smith as historian 
for the Church and General Church Recorder." The Saints had previ- 
ously acted on his appointment as recorder, but not as historian. He 
therefore moved that the Church receive the appointment of Brother 
Joseph, and that we continue and sustain Elder Richards as Historian for 
the Church and General ChurchRecorder. ' ' The motion was carried unani- 
mously. Since that time the double office of Church Historian and 
General Church Recorder has been vested in the same person. 

Willard Richards filled the office faithfully until his death, which 
occurred in G. S. L. City, March 11, 1854. At the general conference, 
held in G. S. L. City, in April, 1854, Geo. A. Smith was chosen and 
sustained as Church Historian and General Church Recorder. 

As the Church grew and increased in numerical strength and im- 
portance, the labors of the Church Historian increased proportionately, 
and it became necessary to appoint assistants to the Church Historian. 
Accordingly, Apostle Wilford Woodruff was sustained as assistant 
Church Historian, at the general conference, held in Salt Lake City, in 
October, 1856. Elder Woodruff was the first Elder sustained in that 
capacity by a general conference of the Church. 

Apostle Geo. A. Smith, having been chosen as First Counselor to 
Pres. Brigham Young, was released from his position as Church Histo- 
rian. At the general conference, held in April, 1871, Apostle Albert 
Carrington was sustained in that position, with Wilford Woodruff as his 
assistant. 

Apostle Orson Pratt succeeded Albert Carrington as Church Histo- 
rian and General Church Recorder, being sustained as such at the general 
conference, held in Salt Lake City, May 9, 1874. With Wilford Wood- 
ruff as his assistant, he filled the position till his death, which occurred in 
Salt Lake City, Oct. 3, 1881. 

At the semi-annual conference, held in October, 1883, Apostle Wil- 
ford Woodruff w^as sustained as Church Historian and General Church 
Recorder, and at the next general conference, held in April. 1884, Frank- 
lin D. Richards was sustained as Assistant Church Historian. 

At the general conference, April 7, 1889, Wilford WoodrufT was 
chosen and sustained as President of the Church, and FranklinD. Richards 
was appointed his successor as Church Historian and General Church 
Recorder. At the next general conference, held in October, 1889, Elder 
John Jaques was sustained as assistant Church Historian. Elder Charles 
W. Penrose was sustained in a similar capacity at the general conference, 
held in April, 1896; and Elder Andrew Jenson at the general conference, 
held in April, 189S. 



THE HOLY PRIESTHOOD. 



The Church, which was established 
on the earth by Jesus Christ and his 
Apostles anciently, ceased in course 
of time to exist, through the 
martyrdom of many of its chief re- 
presentatives and the final "falling 
away' ' of the remnant of its members, 
as predicted by the Apostles Paul 
(2 Thess.2-3),and Peter(2 Pet. 2:1), 
and others. 

In the present century the gospel 
of Christ, with its ancient powers and 
Priesthood, has been restored to 
earth anew, through the administra- 
tion of heavenly messengers. Early 
in the spring ot 1820, God the Father 
and his Son Jesus Christ appeared to 
Joseph Smith and revealed the true 
spiritual condition of the world. 
About three years later the angel 
Moroni appeared to him and subse- 
quently visited him periodically for 
several years, imparting important 
instructions. On Sept. 22, 1827, he 
gave into the hands of Joseph Smith 
the plates on which was inscribed the 
history of the early inhabitations of 
America. 

While Joseph Smith and Oliver 
Cowdery were engaged in translat- 
ing the Book of Mormon, from the 
plates, at Harmony, Susquehanna 
Co., Pa., they went into the woods 
to enquire of the Lord respecting 
bapti m for the remission of sins. 
While thus employed, on the 15th of 
May, 1829, a messenger from heaven 
descended in a cloud of light. Hav- 
ing laid his hands upon them, he or- 
dained them, saying: "Upon you, 
my fellow servants, in the name of 
Messiah, I confer the Priesthood of 
Aaron, which holds the keys of the 
ministering of angels, and of the 
gospel of repentance and of baptism 
by immersion for the remission of 
sins; and this shall never be taken 



again from the earth, until the sons of 
Levi do offer again an offering unto 
the Lord in righteousness." 

The heavenly messenger told Jo- 
seph Smith and Oliver Cowdery that 
the ' ' Aaronic Priesthood had not the 
power of laying on ot hands for the 
gift of the Holy Ghost," but that 
this should be conterred on them 
later. He then commanded them 
"to go and be baptized," and di- 
rected that Joseph Smith should bap- 
tize Oliver Cowdery, after which he 
should baptize Joseph. 

The messenger told them "that 
his name was John, thc^ same that is 
called John the Baptist in the New 
Testament, and that he acted under 
the direction of Peter, James and 
John, who held the keys of the 
Priesthood of Melchisedek," which 
Priesthood he said should in due 
time be conferred on them (Joseph 
and Oliver). 

In accordance with the command- 
ment aforesaid, Joseph Smith bap- 
tized Oliver Cowdery, who then bap- 
tizedjoseph. JosephSmith then laidhis 
hands upon the head of Oliver Cow- 
dery and ordained him to the Aaronic 
Priesthood. Finally Oliver laid his 
hands on Joseph and ordained him 
to the same Priesthood. 

Soon after these important events, 
Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery 
"became very anxious" to receive 
the Melchisedek Priesthood, which 
John the Baptist had promised them, 
it they continued faithful. They had 
for some time made this matter a 
subject of humble prayer, and at 
length they met "in the chamber ot 
Mr. Whitmer's house," at Fayette, 
Seneca Co., N. Y. , one day in June, 
1829, They engaged in solemn and 
fervent prayer, when the word of the 
Lord came to them in the chamber 



XXll 



THE HOLY PRIESTHOOD. 



commanding that Joseph Smith 
"should ordain OHver Cowdery to 
be an Elder in the Church of Jesus 
Christ," and that Oliver should or- 
dain Joseph to the same office. After 
that, they were to ordain others, as it 
should be made known unto them 
from time to time. However, they 
were commanded to defer these or- 
dinations until "such times as it 
should be practicable to have their 
brethren, who had been and who 
should be baptized, assemble to- 
gether. ' ' 

This commandment was complied 
with, April 6, 1830, the day on which 
the Church was organized. On that 
occassion Joseph Smith laid his hands 
upon Oliver Cowdery and ordained 
him an Elder in the Church, after 
which Oliver ordained Joseph to the 
office of an Elder. Next, they ad- 
ministered the Sacrament, and then 
laid their hands on each individual 
member ol the Church present, that 
they might receive the Holy Ghost 
and be confirmed members of the 
Church. 

The exact date of the ordination of 
Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery 
to the Melchisedek Priesthood by 
Peter, James and John is not stated, 
but it is generally believed to have 
taken place in June or July, 1829. 
In proof of the ordination we have 
the word of the Lord Jesus Christ, in 
a revelation, given to Joseph Smith 
at Fayette, N. Y., in September, 
1830, as follows: "Listen to the voice 
of Jesus Christ, your Lord, your 
God, and your Redeemer, whose 
word is quick and powerful. * * * 
The hour cometh that I will drink of 
the fruit of the vine with you on the 
earth, and with Moroni, whom I have 
sent unto you to reveal the Book of 
Mormon, containing the fulness of 
my everlasting gospel. * * * And 
also John, the son of Zacharias. ** 
which John I have sent unto you, 
my servants, Joseph Smith, jun., and 
Oliver Cowdery, to ordain you unto 
this first Priesthood, which you have 



received, that you might be called 
and ordained even as Aaron. * * * 
And also with Peter, and James, and 
John, whom I have sent unto you, 
by whom I have ordained you and 
confirmed you to be Apostles and 
especial witnesses of my name, and 
bear the keys of your ministry, and 
of the same things which I revealed 
unto them." (Doc. and Cov. , 27:1, 
5. 7. 8, 12.) 

In a revelation on Church Govern- 
ment, given through Joseph Smith, 
the Prophet, in April, 1830, at Fay- 
ette, the following passage occurs: 
"Commandment were given to Jo- 
seph Smith, jun., who was called of 
God and ordained an Apostle of Je- 
sus Christ, to be the first Elder of this 
Church; and to Oliver Cowdery, who 
was also called of God, an Apostle 
of Jesus Christ, to be the second El- 
der of this Church, and ordained 
under his (Joseph's) hand." (Doc. 
and Cov.. 20:2. 3.) 

In the light of the foregoing it is 
plain that none among the children 
of men at the present time possess the 
holy Priesthood, with divine author- 
ity to administer in the ordinances of 
the gospel, except those who have 
received their ordinations through 
the laying on of hands by men whose 
commissions rest upon the divine 
calling of Joseph the Prophet. This 
being the case, it is desirable that every 
Apostle, Prophet, Patriarch, High 
Priest, Seventy, Elder, Bishop, Priest, 
Teacher and Deacon in the Church 
should be able to trace the Priest- 
hood they hold back to the Prophet 
Joseph. 

For the benefit of the brethren who 
are endeavouring to make proper re- 
cords of these things, we publish the 
subjoined biographical notes, which 
contain the ordinations of nearly all 
the Elders who have been sustained 
and who at the present time are being 
sustained as the general authorities 
ot the Church. The lack of space in 
this little work of reference prevents 
us from including other officers. 



THE HOLY PRIESTHOOD. 



XXUl 



4LDRICH, Hazen: ordained a Sev- 
enty Feb. 28, 1835, under the hands of 
Joseph Smith and others. 

BENSON, Ezra Taft; born Feb. 22, 1811; 
baptized July 19, 1840, at Quincy, 111.; or- 
dained a High Priest Oct. 25, 1810, by Hy- 
rum Smith; ordained an Apostle July 16, 
1846, by Pres. Brigham Young; died Sept. 
3,1869. 

BILLINGS, Titus; born March 2.5, 1793, 
at Greenfield, Franklin Co., Mass.; bapti- 
zed at Kirtland, Ohio, in November, 1830, 
by Parley P. Pratt; ordained a High Priest 
and counselor to Bishop EdnarciPartridge, 
Aug. 1, 1837, under the hands of Edward 
Partridge and Isaac Morley; died Feb. 6, 
1866, at Provo, Utah. 

BOYNTON. John Farnham: born Sept. 
20, 1811; baptized in September, 1832, by 
Joseph the Prophet; ordained an Elder in 
1832 by SidneyRigdon; ordained an Apostle 
Feb. 15, 1835, under the hands of Oliver 
Cowdery, David Whitmer and Martin 
Harris; died Oct. 20, 1890. 

BURTON, Robert Taylor: born Oct. 25, 
1821, in Amersburgh, Ontario, Canada; or- 
dained a High Priest and Bishop and set 
apart as second counselor to Bishop Ed- 
ward Hunter, Sept. 2, 1875, by Edward 
Hunter, assisted by Brigham Young and 
Daniel H. Wells. 

BUTTERFIELD, Josiah; ordained and 
set apart as one of the First Council of 
Seventies, April 6, 18.37, under the hands 
of Sidney Rigdon and Hyrum Smith. 

CANNON, Abraham Hoasrland: born 
March 12, 1859; baptized Ma^ch 12, 1867, 
by his father Geo. Q. Cannon; ordained an 
Elder July 7, 1875, by Geo. Q. Cannon: 
ordained a Seventy 

by ; ordained an 

Apostle Oct. 7, 1889, by Joseph F. Smith, 
assisted by Wilford Woodrurt' and George 
Q. Cannon and nearly all the Apostles; 
died July 19, 1896. 

CANNON, George Quayle; born Jan. 11. 
1827; baptized in .June, 1840, by John Tay- 
lor; ordained an Elder at Nauvoo, by John 
Taylor; ordained a Seventy Feb. 9, 1845, by 
Arza Adams; ordained an Apostle Aug. 
26, 1860, by Pres. Brigham, assisted by his 
Counselors and ten of the Apostles. 

CANNON, John Q.; born April 19, 1857, 
at San Francisco, Cal.; baptized April 19, 
1865, by his father, George Q. Cannon; or 
dained an Elder by Geo. Q Cannon; or- 
dained a Seventy 4"ug. 8, 1881, by Joseph 
F. Smith; ordained a High Priest and set 
apart as second counselor to Bishop Wm. 
B. Preston in October, 1884, bv Pres. John 
Taylor. 

CARRINGTON, Albert; born Jan. 8, 
1813: baptized in July, 1841, by Wm. O. 
Clark; ordained an Apostle July 3, 1870. by 
Pres. Brigham Young; died Sept. 19, 1889, 
in Salt Lake City, Utah. 

CLAPP, Benjamin L.; born Aug. 19, 
1814, in Alabama; ordained and set apart 
as one of the presidents of the 8th quorum 
of Seventy, Oct. 20, 1844. under the hands 
of Joseph Young and Levi W. Han- 
cock; set apart as one of the First 
Council of Seventies Dec. 2, 1845, under the 
hands of Apostles Brigham Young, Heber 



C. Kimball, Orson Hyde, Parley P. Pratt 
and George A. Smith; died in California 
about 1860. 

CLAWSON, Rudger:born Marchl2,l657, 
in Salt Lake City, Utah; baptized when 
about eight years old; ordained a Seventy 
March 7, 1875, by Hiram B. Clawson, who 
was ordained a Seventy Feb. 2, 1845, by 
Joseph Young; ordained a High Priest 
Feb. 12, 1888, by Lorenzo Snow; ordained 
an Apostle Oct. 10. 1898, by Lorenzo Snow, 
assisted by his Counselors and all the 
Apostles. 

CORRELL, John; ordained a HighPriest 
and set apart as second counselor to 
Bishop Edward Partridge, June 6, 1831, 
under the hands of Edward Partridge and 
others. 

COLTRIN, Zebedee; ordained a Seventy 
Feb. 28, 1835, under the hands of Joseph 
Smith and others; died July 21, 1887, at 
Spanish Fork. Utah Co., Utah. 

COWDEHY, Oliver; born in 1805;ordain- 
ed to the Aaronic Priesthood in connec- 
tion with Joseph Smith, May 15, 1829, by 
John theBaptist; baptized and reordained 
by Joseph Smith the same day; later in 
1829, together with Joseph Smith, or- 
dained to the INIelchisedek Priesthood by 
Peter, James and John; confirmed a 
member of the Church and reordained an 
Elder, April 6, 1830, by Joseph Smith; to- 
gether with David Whitmer and Martin 
Harris, he was "blessed by the laying on 
of the hands of the Presidency" (Joseph 
Smith, bidney Rigdon and Fred. G. Wil- 
liams) to select twelve Elders to constitute 
the Council of Twelve Apostles, Feb. 14, 
1835; died March 3, 1850. 

COWLEY, Matthias Foss; born Aug. 2.5, 

1858, in Salt Lake City, Utah, baptized in 
1866 by Samuel Turnbow; ordained an El- 
der Dec. 28. 1874, by Oluf F. Due; ordained 
a Seventy Oct. 11, 1880, by Joseph Young; 
ordained a High Priest Oct. 2.5, 1884, by 
Francis M. Lyman; ordained an Apostle 
Oct. 7, 1897, bv Geo. Q. Cannon. 

ELDREDGE, Horace S.: born Feb. 26, 
1816, at Brutus, Cayuga Co., N. Y.; bap- 
tized June 4.1836, by Libbeus T. Coon; or- 
dained a Seventy Oct. 13, 1844. by Joseph 
Young; chosen one of the First Seven 
Presidents of Seventies in 1854; died Sept. 
6, 1888, in Salt Lake City. 

FJELDSTED, Christian Daniel; born 
Feb. 20, 1829, in Sundbyvester, Amager, 
Copenhagen Amt, Denmark; baptizedFeb. 
20, 18.52, by Chr. Samuel Hansen; confirmed 
by Ole U. C. M0nster; ordained an Elder 
July 25, 1853, b^ Peter O. Hansen, who 
was ordained a Seventy Nov. 17, 1844, by 
Joseph Young: ordained a Seventy Feb. 5, 

1859, byWm. H.Walker, who was ordain- 
ed a Seventy Nov. 24, 1844, under the hands 
of Harrison Burgess, who was ordained 
a Seventy Feb. 28. 18:3.5, by Sidney Rigdon; 
set apart as one of the First Council 
of Seventies, April 28, 1884, by Wliford 
Woodruff. 

FOSTER, James; ordained and set apart 
as one of the First Seven Presidents of 
Seventies April 6. 1837, under the hands of 
Sidney Rigdon and Hvrum Smith. 

GATES, Jacob; born March 9, 1811, at 



XXIV 



THE HOLY PRIESTHOOD. 



St. Johnsbury, Caledonia Co. ,Vt.; baptized 
June 17, l&iS, by Orson Pratt; ordained a 
Seventy in 1838, under the hands of Sidney 
Rigdon and Joseph Smith; set apart 
as a president of the 4th quorum of 
Seventy Oct. 8, 1844; chosen as one of 
the First Council of Seventies in 1862; 
died April 14, 1892. 

GAYLORD, John; ordained a Seventy 
December 20, 1836, by Hazen Aldrich, 
and set apart as one of the First Seven 
Presidents of Seventies April 6, 1837,under 
the hands of Sidney Rigdon and Hyrum 
Smith. 

GEE, Salmon; ordained and set apart as 
one of the First Seven Presidents of Se- 
venties April 6, 1837, under the hands of 
Sidney Rigdon and Hyrum Smith. 

GOULD, John; ordained and set apart 
as one of the First Seven Presidents of 
Seventies April 6, 1837, under the hands of 
Sidney Rigdon and Hyrum Smith. 

GRANT, Heber J.; born Nov. 22, 18.56; 
baptized June 2, 1864; ordained a 
High Priest Oct. 31, 1880, by Pres. John 
Taylor; ordained an Apostle by Geo. Q. 
Cannon Oct. 16, 1882. 

GRANT, Jedediah Morgan; born Feb. 
21,1816; baptized March 21, 1833, by John F. 
Boynton; ordained a Seventy Feb. 28, 
18.35,under the hands of Joseph Smith and 
others; set apart as one of the First Coun- 
cil of Seventies, Dec. 2, 184-5, under the 
hands of Apostles Brigham Young, Heber 
C. Kimball, Orson Hyde, Parley P. Pratt 
and George A. Smith; ordained an Apostle 
and set apart as second Counselor in 
the First Presidency in 18.54, under the 
hands of Brigham Young and others; died 
Dec. 1. 1856. 

HANCOCK, Levi W.; born April 17, 
1803, in Massachusetts; baptized Nov., 16, 
1830; ordained a Seventy Feb. 28, 18.35, 
under the hands of Joseph Smith and 
others; soon afterwards chosen as one of 
the First Seven Presidents of Seventies; 
died June 10. 1882. 

HARDY, Leonard Wilford; born Dec. 
31, 1. 0.5, in Bradford, Essex ColJnty, Mass.; 
baptized Dec. 2, 1832, by Orson Hyde; or- 
dained an Elder soon afterwards; or- 
dained a Seventy March 8, 18.51; ordained 
a High Priest and Bishop of the 12th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, April 7, 1856; set 
apart as first counselor to Bishop Edward 
Hunter, Oct. 12. 1856; died July 31, 1884. 

HARRIMAN. Henry; born June 0, 1804, 
in Rowley, Essex Co., Mass.; baptized in 
1832, by Orson Hyde; ordained a Seventy 
in March 183.5, under the hands of .Joseph 
Smith and Sidney Rigdon; set apart as 
a member of the First Council of Sev- 
enty, Feb. 6, 1838, under the hands of 
Joseph Y'oung, James Foster and Josiah 
Butterfield; died May 17, 1891. 

HARRIS, Martin; born May 18, 1783; 
baptized in 1830; ordained a High Priest 
June 6, 1831, by Lyman Wight; olessed 
Feb 14, 1835, together with Oliver Cowdery 
and David Whitmer, under the hands of 
JosephSmith,SidneyRigdon and Frederick 
G. Williams, to select and ordain the 
Twelve Apostles; died July 10, 1875. 

HIGBEE. Elias; born Oct. 23, 1795, in 
Galloway, Gloucester Co., N. J., baptized 



in 18,32; ordained an Elder Feb. 20,ia3.3, by 
his brother.Isaac Higbee; ordained a High 
Priest by Amasa M. Lyman, about 1835; 
died June 8, 1843, at Nauvoo, 111. 

HUNTER, Edward; born June 22, 1793; 
baptized Oct. 8, 1840, by Orson Hyde; or- 
dained a High Priest and Bishop ^ov. 23, 
1844, at Nauvoo, 111., by Brigham Young, 
assisted by Heber C. Kimball and Newel 
K. Whitney; called and sustained as pre- 
siding Bishop of the Church at the gen- 
eraPconference held in April,1851; ordained 
and set apart to that position April 11, 
1852, bv Willard Richards, assisted by 
Heber C. Kimball; died Oct. 16, 18&3. 

HYDE, Orson; born Jan. 8, 1805; bap- 
tized Oct. 31, 1830, by Sidney Rigdon; or- 
dained a High Priest about 1831; ordained 
an Apostle Feb. 15, 1S3.5, under the hands 
of Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer and 
Martin Harris: died Nov. 28, 1878. 

JAQUES,John;bornJan.7,1827,atMarket 
Bosworth, Leicestershire, England: bap- 
tized in the fall of 1845 by Thos, B. Ward; 
ordained an Elder Jan. 9, 1848, under the 
hands of John Fidoe, Thos. Stevenson 
and Wm. Cartwrisht; ordained a Seventy 
Feb. 2, 18.57, by Wm. Burgess, who was 
ordained a Seventy Oct. 8, 1844, bv Daniel 
S. Miles; ordained a High Priest Dec. 31, 
1898. bv Angus M. Cannon. 

JENSON, Andrew; born Dec. 11, 18.50, 
in Torslev, Hjorring Amt, Denmark; 
baptized and confirmed Feb. 2, 1859, by 
Carl W. .7. Hecker; ordained an Elder 
April 10, 1873, by William H. Folsom, who 
was ordained a High Priest Oct. 7, 1862, 
by Pres. Brigham Young; ordained a Sev- 
enty May 4. 1873, by Geo. Q. Cannon. 

JCHNSON,Luke S;borD No".3,1807; bap- 
tized May 10, 1831, by Joseph Smith; or- 
dained a High Priest Oct. 2.5, 1831, by Jo- 
seph Smith; ordained an Apostle Feb. 15, 
1835, under the hands of Oliver Cowdery, 
David Whitmer and Martin Harris; died 
Dec. 9. 1861. 

JOHNSON, Lyman Eugene; born Oct. 
24, 1811; ordained an Elder and sub- 
sequently a High Priest in 18^31, by 
Jos°ph Smith; ordained an Apostle 
Feb. 14, 1835, under the hands of Oliver 
Cowdery, David AVhitmer and Martin 
Harris; died Dec. 20, 18.56. 

KIMBALL, Heber Chase; born June 14, 
1801; baptized in April, 1832, by Alpheus 
Gitt'ord;ordainedanElder inl832,by Joseph 
Young; ordained an Apostle Feb. 14, 1835, 
under the hands of Oliver Cowdery, David 
Whitmer and Martin Harris; died June 

22, 1868. ::;^ 

KIMBALL, Jonathan Golden; born 
June 8, 18.53, in Salt Lake City, Utah; 
ordained a Seventy July 21, 1886, by Chr. 
D. tjeldsted; set apart as one of the 
First Seven Presidents of Seventies, 
April 8, 1892, by Apostle Francis M. Ly- 
man. 

LAW, William; called by revelation, 
Jan. 19, 1841, to "be appointed, ordained 
and anointed as a Counselor" to Joseph 
the Prophet (Doc. and Cov., 124:91); soon 
afterwards he was ordained and set apart 
as second Counselor in the First Presiden- 
cy, under the hands of Joseph the Prophet 
and others. 



THE HOLY PRIESTHOOD. 



XXV 



LITTLE, Jesse Carter; born Sept. 26, 
1815, at Belfast, Maine; ordained a High 
Priest April 17, 1845, by Parley P. Pratt; 
ordained a Bishop and set apart as second 
counselor to Bishop Edward Hunter, in 
1856; died Dec. 26, 1893. 

LUXD, Anthon Henrik; born May 15, 
1844; baptized May 15, 1856, by Jacob 
Julander; ordained an Elder a few 
years later; ordained a Seventy March 
23, 1864, by Peter Madsen Peel, who 
was ordained a Seventy Nov. 21, 1862, by 
John Tidwell; ordained an Apostle Oct. 7, 
1889, bv Geo. O. Cannon. 

LYMAX, Amasa Mason; born March 
30, 1813; baptized April 27, 1832, by Lyman 
E. Johnson; confirmed the following day 
by Orson Pratt; ordained an Elder Aug. 
23, 1832, by Joseph Smith; ordained a 
High Priest Dec. 11, 1833, by Lyman E. 
Johnson, assisted by Orson Pratt; or- 
dained an Apostle Aug. 20, 1842, by Brig- 
ham Young, assisted by Heber C. Kimball 
and Geo. A. Smith; died Feb. 4, 1877. 

LYMAN, Francis Marion; born Jan. 12, 
1840, at Good Hope, McDonongh Co., 111.: 
baptized in the Elkhorn river. Neb., and 
confirmed July 1,1848, by Amasa M.Lyman; 
ordained anElder inl856,atSanBernardino, 
Cal., by Amasa M. Lyman; ordained a 
Seventy Jan. 7, 1860, at > armington, Davis 
Co., Utah, by John S. Gleason, who was 
ordained a Seventy Oct. 30, 1843, by Pres. 
Brigham Young; ordained a Hich Priest 
March 13, 1869, at Fillmore, Millard Co., 
Utah, by Thomas Callister, who was or- 
dained a High Priest and Bishop Sept. 17, 
1855, in G. S. L. City, Utah, by Edward 
Hunter; ordained one of the Twelve Apos- 
tles Oct. 27, 1880, in Salt Lake City, Utah, 
by John Taylor, assisted by his Counselors 
and nearlv all the Apostles. 

MARSH. Thomas Baldwin; born Nov. 
1, 1799; baptized in September 1830, by 
David Whitmer; ordained a High Priest 
June 6, 1831, by Lyman Wight; ordained 
an Apostle April 26, 18:35, under the 
hands of Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer 
and Martin Harris; died about 1866, at Og- 
den, L^tah. 

McLELLIN, William E.; born 1806, 
baptized, confirmed and ordained an Elder 
in 1831, under the hands of Samuel H. 
Smith and Reynolds Cahoon; ordained an 
Apostle Feb. 15, 1835, under the hands of 
Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer and 
Martin Harris; (lied April 24, 1883. 

McML^RRIX, Joseph William; bornSept. 
5, 1858, at Tooele, Tooele Co., Utah; bap- 
tized in 1866, by Henry W. Lawrence; or- 
dained a Seventy April 21, 1884, by Royal 
Barney, who was ordained a Seventy in 
1835, under the hands of Joseph Smith and 
Sidney Rigdon; set apart as one of 
the First Council of Seventies .Jan. 21, 
1898, by Apostle Anthon H. Lund, in 
Liverpool, England. 

MERRILL. Marriner Wood; born Sept. 
25, 1832; baptized April 6, 18.52, by John 
Skerry; ordained an Apostle Oct. 7, 
1889, by Wilford Woodruflf, assisted 
by his Counselors and most of the Apos- 
tles. 

MILES, Daniels.; ordained a Seventy 
April 6, 18;37, by Hazen Aldrich; set 



apart as one of the First Seven Presi- 
dents of Seventies April 6, 1837, un- 
der the hands of Sidney Rigdon and Hy- 
rum Smith. 

MORGAN', John; born Aug. 8,1842, near 
Greensburgh, Decatur Co., Ind.; baptized 
Nov. 26, 1867, in Salt Lake City, Utah, by 
Robert Campbell; ordained an Elder Oct. 

23, 1868, by VVm. H. Folsom, who was or- 
dained a High Priest Oct. 7, 1862, by Pres. 
Brigham Young: ordained a Seventy Oct. 
8, 1875, by Joseph Young; died Aug. 14, 
1894. 

MORLEY, Isaac; born March 11, 1786, 
in Montague, Hampshire Co., Mass.; 
baptized in November, 1830, at Kirtland, 
Ohio, byParleyP. Fratt; ordained a High 
Priest June 6, 1831, by Lyman Wight, and 
on the same day set apart as a counselor 
to Bishop Edward Partridge; ordained a 
.Patriarch at Far West, Mo., Nov. 7, 1837, 
under the hands of Joseph Smith, Sidnej" 
Rigdon and Hyrum Smith; died June 24, 
1865. 

PAGE,John E.; baptized Aug.lS, ISaS, by 
Emer Harris; ordained an Elder in Sep- 
tember, 1833, by Nelson Higgins;ordained an 
Apostle Dec. 19, 1838, under the hands of 
Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball; 
died near Svcamore, DeKalb Co., 111., in 
the fall of 1867. 

PARTRIDGE, Edward; born Aug. 27, 
1893; baptized Dec. 11, 1830, by Joseph the 
Prophet; ordained an Elder Dec. 5, 1830, 
by Sidney Rigdon; called by revelation to 
be the first Bishop of the Church, and or- 
dained and set apart to that position Feb. 
4, 1831, by Sidney Rigdon; ordained a High 
Priest Jiine 6, 1831, by Lyman Wight; died 
May 27, 1840, 

PATTEN, David W.; born 1800; baptized 
June 15, 1832, by John Patten; ordained 
an Elder June 17,1832, by ElishaH.Groves; 
ordained an Apostle Feb. 15, 18;35, under 
the hands of Oliver Cowdery, David Whit- 
mer and Martin Harris; died Oct. 25, 1838. 

PENROSE, Charles William; born Feb. 
4, 1832, in London, England, baptized May 
14, 1850, by John Hyde, sen.; ordained an 
Elder .Jan. 6, 1851, by Geo. B. Wallace; or- 
dained a Seventy Oct. 27, 1861, by Truman 
Leonard; later ordained a High Priest. 

PRATT, Orson; born Sept. 19, 1811; bap- 
tized Sept. 19, 1830. by Parley P. Pratt; or- 
dained an Elder Dec. 1. 1830, by Joseph 
Smith; ordained a High Priest Feb. 2, 1832, 
by Sidney Rigdon; ordaaned an Apostle 
April 26, 1835, under the hands of David 
Whitmer and Oliver Cowdery; died Oct. 
3, 1881. 

PRATT. Parley Parker; born April 12, 
1807; baptized, confirmed and ordained an 
Elder byOliverCowdery, inSeptember.1830; 
ordained a High Priest June 6, 1831, by 
Joseph bmith; ordained an Apostle Feb. 
21, 1835, by Joseph Smith; died May 13, 
1857. 

PRESTON, William Bowker; born Nov. 

24, 1830, at Halifax, Franklin Co., Va.; 
baptized in February, 1857, by Henry G. 
Boyle; ordained an Elder by Geo. Q. Can- 
non; ordained a High Priest and Bishop 
Nov. 14, 1859, by Orson Hyde; set apart as 
Presiding Bishop of the Church in 1884, 
by Pres. John Taylor. 



THE HOLY PRIESTHOOD. 



"■ PULSIPHER,Zera; born June 24, 1789, in 
Rockingham, VVindliam Co., Vt.; baptized 
and ordained to the ministry in 1832; or- 
dained and set apart as one of the First 
Seven Presidents of Seventies March 6. 
1838, under the hands of James Foster and 
Joseph Young; died Jan. 1, 1872. 

RE TNOLDS, George; born Jan. 1, 1842, 
in London, England; baptized May 4, 18.56; 
ordained a Seventy March 18, 18(56, by Is- 
rael Barlow, who was ordained a Seventy 
in 188,5, by Sidney Rigdon; set apart 
as one of the First Seven Presidents 
of Seventies, April 10, 1890, by Lorenzo 
Snow. 

RICH, Charles Coulson; born Aug. 21, 
1809; baptized April 1, 1832, by Geo. M. 
Hinkle, ordained an Elder May 16, 1832, 
under the hands of Zebedee Coltrin and 
Solomon Wixom; ordained a High Priest 
in April 1836, under the hands of Hyrum 
Smith and Uncle John Smith; ordained 
an Apostle Feb. 12, 1849, by Pres. Brig- 
ham Young; died Nov. 17, 1883. 

RICH, Leonard; ordained a Seventy 
Feb. 28 18^35. under the hands of Joseph 
Smith and others. 

RICHARDS, Franklin Dewey; born 
April 2, 1821; baptized June 3, 1838, by Phi- 
nehas Richards, at Richmond, Berkshire 
Co., Mass.; confirmed June 10, 1838, by 
Gibson Smith; ordained a Seventy April 9, 
1840, at Nauvoo, 111., by Joseph Young; 
ordained a High Priesl May 17, 1844, at 
Nauvoo, 111., by Brigham Young; ordained 
an Apostle Feb. 12, 1849, in the "Old Fort, ' 
G. S. L. City, by Heber C. Kimball. 

RICHARDS, Willard; born June 24, 
1804; baptized Dec. 31. 1836, by Brigham 
Young; ordained an Elder March 6, 1837, 
by Alma Beeman; ordained a High Priest 
Apiil 1, 1838, under the hands of Heber C. 
Kimball and others; ordained an Apostle 
April 14, 1840, by Brigham Young; died 
March 11, 18.54. 

RIGDON, Sidney; born Feb. 19, 1793; 
baptized, confirmed and ordained an Elder 
late in 1830, under the hands of OliverCow- 
dery,Parley P. Pratt, Peter Whitmer, jun., 
and Ziba Peterson. Subsequently he was 
ordained a High Priest by Joseph the 
Prophet, and on March 18, 1833, he was or- 
dained and set apart as first Counselor in 
the First Presidency by Joseph Smith; 
died Julv 14, 1876. 

ROBERTS, Brigham Henry; bornMarch 
13, 18.57, in Warrinj^ton, Lancashire, Eng- 
land; baptized in 1867, by Seth Dustin; or- 
dained a Seventy March 8, 1877, by Nathan 
T. Porter, who was ordained a Sev- 
enty Oct. 6, 1844, by Joseph Young; 
set apart as one of the First Council 
of Seventies in October, 1889, by Lorenzo 
Snow. 

ROCK WOOD, Albert P.; born June 5, 
180.5, in Hollistcn, Middlesex Co., Mass.; 
baptized in 1833; ordained a Seventy Jan. 
5, 1839, under the hands of Joseph Young, 
Zera Pulsipher, Henry Harriman and 
Levi W. Hancock; set apart as one of 
the First Council of Seventies Dec. 
2, 1845, under the hands of Apostles Brig- 
ham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Orson 
Hyde, Parley P. Pratt and Geo. A. Smith; 
died Nov. 26. 1879. 



SHERMAN. Lyman; ordained a Seventy 
Feb. 28, 1835, at Kirtland, Ohio, under 
the hands of Joseph Smith and others. 

SLOAN, James; born at Donaghmore, 
Tyrone Co., Ireland; ordained a High 
Priest Feb. 18, 1838, under the hands of 
Joseph Smith, sen. 

SMITH, Asahel, son of AsaViel Smith 
and Mary Duty; born May 21, 1773, at Wind- 
ham, Rockingham Co, N. H. ; baptized 
June 29, 183.5, at Stockholm, Lawrence Co., 
N. Y., by Lyman E. Johnson; ordained a 
High Priest in 1836, by Don Carlos Smith; 
ordained a Patriarch Oct. 7,1844, atNauvoo, 
111., under the hands of the Twelve Apos- 
tles. 

SMITH, George Albert; born June 26, 
1817; baptized Sept. 10, 18.32, by Joseph H. 
Wakefield; ordained a Seventy March 1, 
1835, by Sidney Rigdon; ordained an Apos- 
Xle April 26, 1839, by HeberC.Kimball;died 
Sept. J, 1875. 

SMITH, Hyrum; born Feb. 9, 1800; bap- 
tized by Joseph Smith iu Seneca lake, N. 
Y., in June 1829; ordained a High Priest 
June 6, 1831, bj^ Joseph Smith; chosen as 
second Counselor in the First Presidency 
Nov. 7, 1837; ordained a Patriarch Jan. 28, 
1841, under the hands of Joseph the Pro- 
phet and others; died June 27, 1844. 

SMITH, John,familiarly known as Uncle 
John Smith; born July 16, 1781, in Derry- 
field,Rockingham Co., N. H.; baptized, con- 
firmed and ordained an Elder .Ian. 9, 1832, 
by his brother JosephSmith, sen. ; ordained 
a High Priest June 6, 1833, by Sidney Rig- 
don; ordained a Patriarch Jan. 10, 1844, by 
.Joseph Smith; ordained Presiding Pa- 
triarch Jan. 1, 1849, under the hands of 
Brigham Y'^oung and Heber C. Kimball; 
died May 23. 1854. 

SMITH, John, eldest son of Hyrum 
Smith; born Sept. 22, 1832, at Kirtland, O.: 
baptized in 1841, by John Taylor; ordained 
Presiding Patriarch in the Church Feb. 18, 
18.55, by Pres. Brigham Young. 

SMITH, John Henry; born Sept. 18, 1848; 
baptized Sept. 18, 18.56, by Geo. A. Smith; 
ordained an Elder Jan. 16, 1864, by Samuel 
L. Sprague; ordained a High Priest and 
Bishop Nov. 22, 1875, by Pres. Brigham 
Young; ordained an Apostle Oct. 27, 1880, 
by Wilford Woodruff. 

SMITH, Joseph, the Prophet; born Dec. 
23, 1805; ordained to the Aaronic Priest- 
hood May 1.5, 1829, by John the Baptist; 
baptized and re-ordained the same day by 
Oliver Cowdery; later, perhaps in June or 
July, 1829, he and Oliver Cowdery were or- 
dained to the Melchisedek Priesthood by 
Peter, James and John, three of the an- 
cient Apostles, who held the keys of that 
Priesthood; confirmed a member of the 
Church and ordained the first Elder in the 
Church April 6. 1830, by Oliver Cowdery; 
died June 27, 1844. 

SMITH, Joseph, sen.; born July 12, 1771; 
baptized April 6, 1830; ordained a High 
Priest June 6, 1831, by Lyman Wight; or- 
dained a Patriarch Dec. 18. 18.33, under the 
hands of Joseph Smith, Oliver Cowdery, 
Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G. Wil- 
liams;' died Sept. 14. 1840. 

SMITH, Joseph Fielding; born Nov. 13, 
1838; baptized in 1850 or 1851 by Heber C. 



THE HOLY PRIESTHOOD. 



Kimball; ordained an Elder in Maj% 1854, 
by Geo. A. Smith; ordained a Seventy 
March 20, 1858, by George Meyer,who was 
ordained a Seventy July 13, 1845, by Jesse 
P. Harmon, who was ordained a Seventy 
Oct. 8, 1844, by Brigham Young; ordained 
a High Priest Oct. 16, 1859; ordained an 
Apostle July 1, 1866, by Pres. Brigham 
Young, and set apart as one of the Twelve 
Apostles Oct. 8, 1867, by Pres. Brigham 
Young, assisted by all the members of the 
Council of Twelve Apostles. 

SMITH, Sylvester; ordained a Seventy 
Feb. 28, 1835, at Kirtland, Ohio, under the 
hands of Joseph Smith and others. 

SMITH, William; born March 13, 1811; 
ordained a High Priest June 6, 1833, by 
Sidney Rigdon; ordained an Apostle Feb. 

15, 1835, under the hands of Oliver Cow- 
dery, David Whitmerand Martin Harris; 
died Nov. 13, 1893. 

SNOW, Erastus; born Nov. 9, 1818; bap- 
tized Feb. 3, 1833; ordained an Elder Aug. 

16, 1835, by Luke S. Johnson; ordained a 
High Priest in October, 1839; ordained an 
Apostle Feb. 12, 1849, by President Brig- 
ham Young; died May 27, 1888. 

SNOW, Lorenzo; born April 3, 1814; 
baptized June, 1836, by John F. Boyn- 
ton; confirmed by Hyrum Smith; ordained 
an Elder in the winter of 1836-37 by Alva 
Beeman; ordained a Seventy July 17, 1840, 
by Joseph Young; ordained a High Priest 
Julv 18, 1840, by Don Carlos Smith; or- 
dained an Apostle Feb. 12, 1849, by Heber 
C. Kimball. 

STEVENSON, Edward; born May 1, 
1820,at Gibraltar, Spain ;baptized in 1834 by 
Japhet Fosdick; ordained a Seventy May 
1, 1815, under the hands of .Joseph Young 
and others; set apart as one of the 
First Council of Seventies, Oct. 9, 1894, 
by Apostle Brigham Young; died Jan. 
27, 1897. 

TAYLOR, John; born Nov. 1, 1808; bap- 
tized, confirmed and ordained an Elder 
in 1836, by Parley P. Pratt; ordained an 
Apostle I)ec. 19, 1838, under the hands of 
Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball; 
died July 25, 1887. 

TAYLOR, John Whittaker; born May 
18, 1858, at Provo, LTtah Co., Utah; or- 
dained an Elder March 13, 1876, by Wm. 
J. Smith; ordained an Apostle April 9, 
1884, by John Tavlor, assisted by his 
Counselors and most of the Apostles. 

TAYLOR, William W.; born Sept. 11, 
18.53, in Salt Lake City, Utah; baptized by 
his father, John Taylor; ordained a Seven- 
ty Oct. 11, 1875, by Orson Pratt, and chosen 
as one of the First Council of Seventies 
in 1880; died Aug. 1, 1884. 

TEASDALE, George; born Dec. 8, 1831, 
in London, England; baptized Aug. 8, 1852, 
by Robert Till; ordained an Elder April 
30, 1854, by John Tuddenham; ordained a 
Seventy Oct. 18, 1875, by Joseph Young; 
ordained a High Priest July 9, 1877, by 
Pres. Brigham Young; ordained an 
Apostle Oct. 16, 1882, by John Taylor. 

THATCHER. Moses; born Feb. 2, 1842, 
in Sangamon County, 111.; baptized and 
confirmed Dec. 25,1856, by Henry G. Boyle; 
ordained an Elder March 23, 1857, by Henry 
G. Boyle; ordained a Seventy by Brigham 



Young; ordained a High Priest and set 
apart to preside over the Cache Stake of 
Zion in 1877, by Pres. Brigham Young; or- 
dained an Apostle April 9, 1879, by John 
Taylor. 

THOMPSON, Robert Blashel; born Oct. 
1, 1811, in Great Driffield, Yorkshire, Eng- 
land; baptized and confirmed in May,1836, 
in Canada, by Parley P. Pratt; ordained 
an Elder July 22, 18.36, by John Taylor; 
died Aug. 27, 1841. 

VAN COTT, John; born Sept. 7, 1814, at 
Canaan, Columbia Co. N. Y.; baptized in 
September, 1845, by Parley P. Pratt; or- 
dained a Seventy Feb. 25, 1847, by Joseph 
Young; died Feb. 18, 1883. 

WELLS, Daniel Hanmer; born Oct. 27, 
1814; baptized Aug. 9, 1846, by Almon W. 
Babbitt, at Nauvoo, 111.; ordained an 
Apostle and set apart as second Counselor 
in the First Presidency Jan. 4, 18.57, by 
President Brigham Young; died March 
24, 1891. 

WELLS, Rulon Seymour; born July 7, 
1854, in Salt Lake City, Utah; baptized 
about 1862, by Daniel H. Wells; confirmed 
by John V. Long; ordained an Elder Aug. 
15, 1866, by Wm. J. Smith; ordained a 
Seventy Oct. 22, 1875, by Pres. Brigham 
Young; set apart as one of the First 
Seven Presidents of Seventies April 5, 
1893, by George Q. Cannon. 

WHITMER, David; born Jan. 7. 1805; 
baptized in June 1829, Vjy Joseph Smith; 
confirmed April 6, 1830; ordained an Elder 
soon afterwards, and subsequently or- 
dained a High Priest; set apart in 1834 by 
Joseph Smith to preside over the Saints 
in Missouri; "blessed by the laying on of 
hands of the Presidency" (.Joseph Smith, 
Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G.Williams), 
in connection with Oliver Cowdery and 
Martin Harris, Feb. 14, 183,5, to choose the 
Twelve Apostles, in accordance with reve- 
lation (Doc. and Cov., 18:37); died Jan. 25. 
1888. 

WHITMER, John; born Aug. 27, 1802; 
baptized and ordained an Elder at an early 
day; ordained a High Priest June 6, 1831, 
at Kirtland, Ohio, by Lyman Wight; died 
Julv 11, 1878. 

WHITNEY, Newel K.; born Feb. 5, 
1795; baptized late in 1830; called by reve- 
lation Dec. 4. 1831, to the office of a Bishop- 
died Sept. 23, 1853. 

WIGHT, Lyman; born May 9, 1796; bap- 
tized in 1830, by Oliver Cowdery; ordained 
a High Priest June 6, 1831, by Joseph the 
Prophet; ordained aij Apostle April 8, 
1841, by Joseph Smith; died March 31 
1858. 

WILLIAMS, Frederick Granger; born 
Oct. 28, 1787, in Sheffield, Hartford Co., 
Conn,; baptized, confirmed and ordained 
an Elder in November 1830, under the 
hands of Oliver Cowdery, Parley P, Pratt, 
Peter Whitmer, jun., and Ziba Peterson; 
called by revelation to "be a High Priest" 
and a Counselor to Joseph the Prophet in 
March, 1832; ordained and set apart by Jo- 
seph Smith as his second Counselor, 
March 18, 1833; died Oct. 25,1842, at Quincv 
111. •" 

WINDER, John Rex; born Dec. 11, 1820, 
in Biddenden, County of Kent, England; 



XXVUl 



THE HOLY PRIESTHHOD. 



baptized Sept. 20, 1848; ordained a Seventy 
in 1854; ordained a High Priest March 4. 
1872, bj' Edward Hunter; ordained aBishop 
and set apart as second counselor to 
Bishop Wm. B. Preston in 1886, by 
Franklin D. Richards, assisted by George 
Q. Cannon. 

WOODRUFF, Abraham Owen; born 
Nov. 23, 1872, near Salt Lake City, Utah; 
baptized May 3, 1881, by Henry Fowler; 
ordained an Elder Jan. 8, 1894, by Samuel 
H. Harrow; ordained a Seventy June 19, 
1894, by Wilford Woodruff; ordained an 
Apostle Oct. 7, 1897, by Wilford Woodruff. 
WOODRUFF, Wilford;bornMarch 1,1807; 
baptized by Zera Pulsipher Dec. 31, 1833; 
ordained an Elder by Warren Parrish in 
1835; ordained a Seventy May 31, 1836, un- 
der the hands of David W. Patten and 
Warren Parrish, ordained an Apostle 
April 26, 1839, by Brigbam Young; died 
Sept. 2, 1898. 

YOUNG, Brigham, born June 1, 1801; 
baptized, confirmed and ordained an Elder 
April 14,1832, byEieazer Miller; ordained 
an Apostle Feb, 14, 1835, under the hands 
of Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer and 
Martin Harris; died Aug. 29, 1877. 



YOUNG, Brigham, jun.; born Dec. 18, 
1836; baptized in 1845, by his father, 
Brigham Young; ordained a Seventy; 
ordained an Apostle Nov. 22, 1855, by Brig- 
ham Young, and admitted into the Coun- 
cil of Twelve Apostles Oct. 9, 1868, being 
set apart by Brigham Young. 

YOUNG, John W.; born Oct. 1, 1844; or- 
dained an Apostle Nov. 22, 1855, by Pres. 
Brigham Young, but has never been ad- 
mitted into theCouncil of TwelveApostles. 

YOUNG, Joseph; born April 7, 1797, in 
Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Mass.; baptized 
April 6, 1832, by Daniel Bo wen; ordained 
an Elder in 1832, bjEzraLanden; ordained 
a Seventy Feb. 2S, 1835, under the hands 
of Joseph Smith and others, and soon af- 
terwards chosen as one of the seven Pre- 
sidents of Seventy; died July 16, 1881. 

YOUNG, Seymour Bicknell; born Oct. 3, 
1837, at Kirtland, Ohio; baptized in 1818, at 
Carterville, Ohio, by Ezekiel Lee; ordained 
an Elder in the Endowment House, Salt 
Lake City, Utah, April 15, 1856, by Samuel 
L. Sprague; ordained a Seventy Feb. 18, 
1857, by Edmund Ellsworth, who was or- 
dained a Seventy March 8, 1843, by Joseph 
Young. 



Church Chronology. 



1805-1820. 

During the two first decades of the 
Nineteenth Century a number of men who 
were destined to take a most active part 
in the ushering in of the new gospel dis- 
pensation were born. Chief among these 
was the Prophet Joseph Smith, to whom 
the Father and the Son appeared in a 
glorious vision and revealed the apostate 
condition of the religious world. 
1805. 

December. Mon. 23.— Joseph Smith, 
the Prophet, was born in Sharon, Windsor 
Co., Vt. 

Among the prominent men, oldar than 
the Prophet, who became intimately asso- 
ciated with him in establishing the great 
Latter-day worlc, were the following: 
Joseph Smith, sen., born July 12, 1771, in 
Topsfield, Essex Co., Mass.; Martin Har- 
ris, born May 18, 1783, in Easttown, Sara- 
toga Co., N. Y. ; Sidney Rigdon, born Feb. 
19, 1793, in St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pa. ; 
Edward Hunter, born June 23, 1793, in 
Newtown, Delaware Co., Pa.; Edward 
Partridge, born Aug. 27, 1793, in Pittsfield, 
Berkshire Co., Mass. ; Newel K. Whitney, 
born Feb. 5, 1795, in Marlborough, Wind- 
ham Co., Vt. ; Lyman Wight, born May 9, 
1796, in Fairfield, Herkimer Co., N. Y. ; 
John E. Page, born Feb. 25, 1799, in Tren- 
ton, Oneida Co., N. Y. ; Thomas B. Marsh, 
born Nov. 1, 1799, in Acton, Middlesex Co., 
Mass. ; Hyrum Smith, born Feb. 9, 1800, in 
Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vt. ; David W. 
Patten, born about 1800, in the State of 
New York ; Brigham Young, born June 1, 
1801, in Whitingham, Windham Co., Vt.; 
Heber Chase Kimball, born June 14, 1801, 
at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vt. ; Willard 
Richards, born June 24, 1804, at Hopkinton, 
Middlesex Co., Mass.; David Whitmer, 
born Jan. 7, 1805, near Harrisburg, 
Dauphin Co., Pa. ; Orson Hyde, born Jan. 
28, 1805, in Oxford, New Haven Co., Conn. ; 
Oliver Cowdery, born in October, 1805, in 
Wells, Rutland Co., Vt. 
1806. 

Wm. E. McLellin was born this year in 
Tennessee. 

1807. 

March. Sun. i.—Wilford Woodruff was 
born in Farmington, Hartford Co., Conn. 



ApriL Sun. 12. — Parley Parker Pratt 
was born in Burlington, Otsego Co., N. Y. 
November. Tues. 3. — Luke S. Johnson 
was born in Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vt. 
1808. 
November. Tues. 1. — John Taylor was 
born in Milnthorpe, Westmoreland, Eng- 
land. 

1809. 
August. Mon. 21. — Charles Coulson 
Rich was born in Campbell County, Mass. 
1811. 

"^February. Fri. 22. — Ezra Taft Benson 
was born in Mendon, Worcester Co., Mass. 

March. Wed. 13. — Wm. Smith was born 
in Royalton, Windsor Co., Vt. 

September. Thurs. i,9.— Orson Pratt 
was born in Hartford, Washington Co., 
N. Y. 

Fri. 20. — John F. Boynton was born in 
Bradford, Essex Co., Mass. 

October. Thurs. 24. — Lyman Eugene 
Johnson was born in Pomfret, Windsor 
Co., Vt. 

1813. 

January. Fri. 8. — Albert Carrington 
was born in Royalton, Windsor Co., Vt. 

3Iarch. Tues, 30. — Amasa M. Lyman 
was born in Lyman, Grafton Co., N. H. 
1814. 

April. Sun. 3. — Lorenzo Snow was 
born in Mantua, Portage Co., O. 

October. Thurs. 21. — Daniel Hanmer 
Wells was born in Trenton, Oneida Co., 
N. Y. 

1815. 

Joseph Smith, sen., removed with his 
family from Vermont to Palmyra, Wayne 
Co., N. Y. 

1816. 

February. Wed. 2L— Jedediah Morgan 
Grant was born in Windsor, Broome Co. 
N. Y. 

1817. 
June. Thurs. 2fi. — George Albert Smith 
was born in Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., 
N. Y. 

1818. 

November. Mon. 9. — Erastus Snow 
was born in St. Johnsbury, Caledonia Co., 
Vt. 

1820. 

The Baptists, Methodists and Presby- 
terians held protracted revival meetings 



CHUECH CHRONOLOGY — 1831-1828. 



in and about Palmyra, N. Y., which result- 
ed in great contention among the preachers 
and members of the different sects 
who sought to influence the new converts 
to join their respective churches. Joseph 
Smith, jun., (then about fourteen years 
old) , being unable to decide which of all 
the sects was right, and being deeply im- 
pressed with the promise in James 1, 5 : 
"If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of 
God that giveth to all men liberally, and 
upbraideth not; and it shall be given him," 
retired to a grove near his father's house, 
early in the spring of the year, where he 
sought the Lord in earnest prayer. While 
thus engaged, he beheld two glorious 
beings wrapped in a brilliant light, stand- 
ing above him in the air. One of them 
spoke to him, calling him by name, and said 
(pointing to the other), "This is my be- 
loved Son, hear Him." Joseph then asked 
the personages, standing above him in the 
light, which of the sects was right and 
which he should join. He was answered 
that he must join none of them, for they 
were all wrong. The person speaking said 
further that all their creeds were an 
abomination in his sight and that "those 
professors were all corrupt." "They draw 
near to me with their lips, but their hearts 
are far from me ; they teach for doctrine 
the commandments of men, having a form 
of godliness; but they deny the power 
thereof." 



1821=1828. 

These eight years may be termed the 
preparatory period preceeding the restora- 
tion of the Priesthood and the organization 
of the Church of Christ on the earth. The 
angel Moroni appeared to the Prophet 
Joseph Smith, jun., several times and 
finally delivered to him the plates of the 
Book of Mormon. The translation of the 
sacred records was begun, and Joseph 
commenced to receive revelations. 

1821. 
April. Mon. 2. — Franklin Dewey Rich- 
ards was born in Richmond, Berkshire Co., 
Mass. 

1823. 

September. .Sun. 21. — Joseph Smith, 
jun., while engaged in earnest prayer in 
his father's house in Manchester, near 
Palmyra, N. Y., saw the room in which he 
had retired for the night filled with light 
surpassing that of noonday, in the midst of 
which stood a person dressed in white, 
whose countenance was as lightning, and 
yet full of innocence and goodness. This 
was the angel Moroni (sometimes 
erroneously called Nephi) , who informed 
Joseph that God had a work for him 
(Joseph) to do, and that his "name should 
be had for good and evil among all nations." 
The angel quoted many passages of 
Scripture, and told Joseph that the native 
inhabitants of America were a remnant of 
Israel who had anciently enjoyed the min- 
istry of inspired men,"^ that records en- 
graved on plates of gold, containing their 



history and also the fulness of the ever- 
lasting Gospel had been preserved and 
were buried in a neighboring hill. While 
conversing with the angel, a vision was 
opened to Joseph's view, so that he could 
see the place where the plates were de- 
posited, and he was told by the angel that 
he should obtain them at some future day, 
if he was faithful. After imi^arting many 
instructions, the angel disappeared, but 
returned twice during the night, and re- 
peated what he had said on his first visit ; 
he also gave further instructions. 

Jlon. 22. — Joseph Smith, jun., was 
again visited by the angel Moroni 
and received further instructions. He 
related what he had seen and heard to his 
father, who believed his words, and advised 
him to do as he had been instructed. He 
then went to the hill (Cumorah) that he 
had seen in his vision the previous night, 
and soon found the spot where the plates 
containing the ancient records were 
buried in a stone box. He lifted the lid of 
the box and beheld "the plates, the Urim 
and Thummim and breastplate, as stated 
by the angel." While attempting to "take 
them out," the angel informed him "that 
the time for bringing them forth had not 
yet arrived, neither would, until four years 
from that time." 

1824. 

September. Wed. 22. — Joseph Smith, 
jun., again visited the hill Cumorah, ac- 
cording to previous commandment, and 
there received further instructions from 
the angel. On the same day of the two fol- 
lowing years he made similar visits to the 
hill, receiving instructions from the angel 
each time. 

1827. 

January. Thurs. LI. — George Quayle 
Cannon was born in Liverpool, Lancashire, 
England. 

Thurs. 18. — Joseph Smith, jun., married 
Emma Hale, a daughter of Isaac Hale, while 
in the employ of Josiah Stoal, in Chenango 
County, N. Y. 

September. Sat. 22. — The angel Moroni 
delivered to Joseph Smith, jun., the 
ancient records, or the plates of the Book 
of Mormon ; also the Urim and Thummim, 
with which to translate them, and the 
breastplate. 

When it became known that Joseph 
Smith, jun., had obtained the plates, severe 
persecutions arose against him and his 
father's family, and every effort was made 
to rob him of the sacred treasure. 

December.— Owing to persecutions 
Joseph Smith, jun., removed from Man- 
chester, N. Y., to Harmony, Susquehanna 
Co., Pa., but there also persecution awaited 
him. During this and the following 
month he translated some of the characters 
of the plates. 

1828. 

February. — Martin Harris visited Jo- 
seph Smith, jun., at Harmony, Pa., and 
took some of the characters, which had 
been transcribed, and the translation of 
them, to New York City, where he showed 
them to Professor Charles Anthon and 
Doctor Mitchell. 

April. — Martin Harris returned from 
New York City and commenced to write for 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1829. 



Joseph Smith, jun., who continued to 
translate from the plates until June 14th. 

June. — Martin Harris lost the manu- 
script which he had obtained contrary to 
the will of the Lord. It consisted of 116 
written pages translated from the plates 
by Joseph Smith, jun., and has never since 
been recovered. 

July. — Joseph Smith, jun., having re- 
turned to Harmony, Pa., from a visit to his 
father's family in Manchester, N. Y., en- 
quired of the Lord through the Urim and 
Thummim and received the first revelation 
published in the Book of Doctrine and 
Covenants. (Doc. and Gov., Sec. 3.) 



1829. 

During this year the translation of the 
Book of Mormon was completed by Joseph 
Smith, jun., who was assisted by Oliver 
Cowdery as scribe ; the plates were shown 
to the Three Witnesses and the Eight 
Witnesses; the Aaronic Priesthood was 
restored to the earth by John the Baptist, 
and, later, the Melchisedec Priesthood by 
Peter, James and John : Joseph Smith, jun., 
and Oliver Cowdery also commenced to 
preach and baptize. 

February. — Joseph Smith, jun., was 
visited by his father Joseph Smith, sen., 
at Harmony, Pa., and received a revelation 
addressed to him. (Doc. andCov., Sec. 4.j 

3larch. — The revelation known as Sec- 
tion 5 of the Doctrine and Covenants was 
given at Harmony. 

April. iSuH. 5. — Joseph Smith, jun., and 
Oliver Cowdery met for the first time. 

Tues. 7. — Joseph Smith, jun., resumed 
the translation of the Book of Mormon, 
assisted by Oliver Cowdery as scribe, at 
Harmony. 

Later in April, Oliver Cowdery was 
called by revelation to assist Joseph Smith, 
jun., in his labors and stand by him in his 
difiiculties. Oliver was also promised the 
gift of translating like Joseph, if he desired 
it. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 6.) 

The Lord revealed to Joseph Smith, 
jun., that John, the beloved Disciple, was 
given power over death, that he might live 
and bring souls to Christ and to prophesy 
before nations, kindreds, tongues and 
people until the coming of Christ in his 
glory. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 7.) 

Oliver Cowdery was instructed by re- 
velation through Joseph Smith, jun., to 
exercise great faith, that he might know 
the mysteries of God, translate and receive 
knowledge from ancient records. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 8.) 

As Oliver Cowdery did not translate, ac- 
cording to his former desire, he was com- 
manded to write for Joseph Smith, jun., 
until the translation of the Book of Mor- 
mon was finished. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 9.) 

31 ay. — A revelation concerning the alter- 
ation of the forepart of the Book of Mor- 
mon was given to Joseph Smith, jun., at 
Harmony. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 10.) 

— Joseph Smith, jun., was visited by 
Joseph Knight, sen., from Broome Co., N. 
Y., who brought him provisions. Mr. 



Knight being anxious to know his duty in 
relation to the work of God, Joseph Smith, 
jun., enquired of the Lord and received a 
revelation. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 12.) 

FH. 15. — While Joseph Smith, jun., and 
Oliver Cowdery were engaged in prayer in 
the woods, near Harmony, John the Bap- 
tist descended as a messenger from heaven 
in a cloud of light and ordained them to 
the Priesthood of Aaron and commanded 
them to baptize and ordain each other. 
This they did the same day. Immediately 
after being baptized, the Holy Ghost fell 
upon them in great measure and both pro- 
phesied. (See Doc. and Cov., Sec. 13, and 
History of Joseph Smith.) 

Jlon. 25. — Samuel Harrison Smith, who 
had come to visit his brother Joseph at 
Harmony, was baptized by Oliver Cow- 
dery. 

A few days later Hyrum Smith visited 
Harmony to make enquiries about the 
work of God, and received through his 
brother Joseph a revelation, calling him to 
assist in the work. (Doc. and Cov., 
Sec. 11.) 

June. — Joseph Smith, jun., removed from 
Harmony, Pa., to the home of Peter Whit- 
mer, sen., at Fayette, Seneca Co., N. Y., 
where he resided while finishing the trans- 
lation of the Book of Mormon. The Whit- 
mer family was very kind to Joseph, and 
John Whitmer rendered efficient aid as a 
scribe. 

— David Whitmer, John Whitmer and 
Peter Wliitmer, jun., being very desirous 
to know their respective duties, besought 
Joseph Smith, jun., to "enquire of the Lord 
concerning them." He did so through 
the Urim and Thummim, and received the 
revelations known as Sections 14, 15 and 
16 of the Doctrine and Covenants. 

— Hyrum Smith, David Whitmer and 
Peter Whitmer, jun., were baptized in 
Seneca lake, near Fayette. 

— As Joseph Smith, jun., progressed 
with the work of translation, he ascertained 
that three special witnesses "were to be 
provided by the Loi'd" to see the plates and 
bear record of the same. (Ether. 5: 2-4.) 
Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer and Mar- 
tin Harris, being very desirous to "be 
these three special witnesses," received the 
promise by revelation through Joseph 
Smith, jun., that they should "have a view 
of the plates, and also of the breastplate, 
the sword of Laban, the Urim and Thum- 
mim and the miraculous directors." (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 17.) 

— A few days later an angel showed the 
plates of the Book of Mormon to the Three 
Witnesses. 

— Soon afterwards the plates were 
shown by Joseph Smith, jun., to Christian 
Whitmer, Jacob Whitmer, Peter Whitmer, 
jun., John Whitmer, Hiram Page, Joseph 
Smith, sen., Hyrum Smith and Samuel H. 
Smith, who subsequently gave their testi- 
mony as the Eight Witnesses to the Book 
of Mormon. 

— A revelation wss given to Joseph Smith, 
jun., Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer, 
"making known the calling of Twelve 
Apostles in these last days," and contain- 
ing "instructions relative to building up 
the Church of Christ, according to the ful- 
ness of the gospel.". (Doc. and Cot., 
Sec. 18.) 



CHURCH CHRONOLOCtY — ISoO. 



— Joseph Smith, jun., and Oliver Cow- 
dery being desirous to obtain the Mel- 
chisedec Priesthood which had been pro- 
mised them by John the Baptist, engaged 
in "solemn and fervent prayer," at Fay- 
ette, w^hen "the word of the Lord came," 
commanding them to ordain each other. 
But they were to wait for this ordination 
till the others who had been baptized as- 
sembled together. 



1830. 

In the beginning of this year the Book 
of Mormon was printed and published in 
the English language. This first edition 
of the book, consisting of 5,000 copies, was 
printed by Egbert Grandin, at Palmyra, 
N. Y. Soon afterwards the Church was 
organized; the first conferences were held, 
the first missionaries sent out to preach 
the fulness of the gospel, and several rev- 
elations given for the government of the 
Church ; a larare branch was established at 
Kirtland. Ohio. etc. 

March. Martin Harris was commanded 
by revelation through Joseph Smith, jun., 
at Manchester, N.Y., to repent of his sins. 
(Doc. and Cov., Sec. 19.) 

April. An important revelation on 
Priesthood and Church government in 
general was given through Joseph Smith, 
_ jun. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 20.) 
" Tnes. 6. The Church (afterwards named 
by revelation the Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter-day Saints) was organized ac- 
cording to the laws of the State of New 
York, in the house of Peter Whitmer, sen., 
at Fayette, Seneca Co., N. Y., with six 
members, namely, Joseph Smith, jun., 
Oliver Cowdery, Hyrum Smith, Peter 
Whitmer, jun., Samuel H. Smith and David 
Whitmer. Joseph Smith, jun., and Oliver 
Cowdery ordained each other Elders — the 
first Elders in the Church— according to 
commandment from God. They then laid 
hands on all the baptized members present, 
"that they might receive the gift of the 
Holy Ghost and be confirmed members of 
the Church." The Holy Ghost was poured 
out upon them "to a very great degree." 
Some prophesied and "all praised the Lord 
and rejoiced exceedingly." 

The Church was commanded by reve- 
lation to keep a record, and Joseph Smith, 
jun., was named by the Lord a Seer, a 
Revelator, a Prophet, an Apostle of Jesus 
Christ, etc. (Doe. and Cov., Sec. 20.) 

Soon after the organization of the 
Church the Prophet's parents (Joseph 
Smith, sen., and Lucy Smith), Martin Har- 
ris and A. Rockwell were baptized. 

Some persons wlio had been baptized in 
the sectarian denominations desired to join 
the Church without further baptism, but 
the Lord,by revelation through the Prophet 
Joseph, instructed them to enter in at the 
gate, as He had commanded, and not seek 
to counsel God. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 22.) 

Oliver Cowdery, Hyrum Smith, Samuel 
H. Smith and Joseph Knight being anxious 
to know their respective duties in relation 



to the work of God, Joseph the Prophet 
inquired of the Lord and received a reve- 
lation. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 23.) 

Sun. ii.— Oliver Cowdery preached the 
first public discourse delivered by any of 
the Elders in this dispensation. The meet- 
ing was held in the house of Peter Whit- 
mer, sen., at Fayette. Hiram Page, Cath- 
erine Page, Christian Whitmer, Annie 
Whitmer, Jacob Whitmer and Elizabeth 
Whitmer were baptized by Oliver Cowdery, 
in Seneca lake. 

Sun. is.— Peter Whitmer, sen., Mary 
Whitmer, Wm. Jolly, Elizabeth Jolly, 
Vincent Jolly, Ziba Peterson and Elizabeth 
Anne Whitmer were baptized by Oliver 
Cowdery in Seneca lake. 

Late in April the Prophet Joseph vis- 
ited Joseph Knight, at Colesville, Broome 
Co., N. Y., where, under the Prophet's ad- 
ministration, the first miracle was wrought 
in this dispensation, viz: casting out 
devils. 

May. — Newel Knight visited Joseph 
Smith, jun., at Fayette and was baptized 
by David Whitmer. 

June.— The Church held its first con- 
ference, at Fayette. Several of the breth- 
ren were ordained to the Priesthood ; the 
Holy Spirit was poured out in a miraculous 
manner; many of the Saints prophesied 
and Newel Knight and others had heavenly 
visions. 

— Later in June David Whitmer baptized 
Wm. Smith, Don Carlos Smith, Catherine 
Smith and six others in Seneca lake. 

— Joseph Smith, jun., returned with his 
family to his own home at Harmony, Pa. 

—Joseph Smith, jun., Oliver Cowdery, 
John Whitmer and David Whitmer visited 
Colesville, N. Y., where they held meeting, 
notwithstanding the mob, and baptized 
thirteen persons, among whom were Emma 
Smith and Joseph Knight. Joseph Smith, 
jun., was arrested, charged with setting 
the country in an uproar by his preaching, 
tried and acquitted in South Bainbridge, 
Chenango Co., N. Y. Immediately after- 
wards he was again arrested, tried and 
acquitted at Colesville. 

—Joseph Smith, jun. and Oliver Cowdery 
again visited Colesville, but were driven 
away by a mob. 

— An important revelation (Words of 
Moses) was given to Joseph Smith, jun. 
(Pearl of Great Price, page 1.) 

—Joseph Smith, jun. and Oliver Cowdery 
again visited Colesville and confirmed the 
newly baptized members. 

July. — Joseph Smith, jun., was com- 
manded by revelation to devote all his 
time to the interest of the Church, but in 
temporal labors he should "not have 
strength." (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 24.) 

— Emma Smith, the Prophet's wife, was 
called by the Lord to expound scriptures, 
exhort the Church, and make a selection of 
sacred hymns for the use of the Saints. 
(Doc. and Cov., Sec. 25.) 

— The Lord commanded that "all things" 
in the Church should "be done by common 
consent." (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 26.) 

— Oliver Cowdery returned to Fayette 
where he and the Whitmer family became 
disaffected because of a paragraph in one 
of the revelations (Doc. and Cov., 20: 
37) ; but Joseph the Prophet paid them a 
visit and set matters right. 



CHUfiCH CHKONOLOGY — 1831. 



August. — Newel Knight and wife vis- 
ited Joseph Smith, jun., at Harmony, Pa., 
which gave occasion for the appearance of 
a heavenly messenger and a revelation on 
the Sacrament. (Doc. and Gov., Sec. 27, 
and History of Joseph Smith.) 

— Joseph Smith, jun., and others visited 
the branch of the Church at Colesville, 
N. Y., where they barely escaped mob 
violence. 

— Joseph the Prophet removed with his 
family to Fayette, N. Y., on account of the 
persecutions prevailing against them at 
Harmony. At Fayette, Hiram Page had 
obtained possession of a stone by means of 
which he received false revelations. 

September. — In a revelation, given 
through Joseph tlie Prophet to Oliver Cow- 
dery, the Lord said that "those things" 
which Hiram Page had written from the 
stone were not of God, and that none 
could receive commandments and revela- 
tions for the Church except Joseph Smith, 
■jun. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 28.) 

— In a revelation given through Joseph 
the Prophet in the presence of six Elders 
at Fayette, N. Y., the Loi-d spoke of the 
gathering of the Saints, the end of the 
world, the reward of the righteous, the 
punishment of the wicked, etc. (Doc. and 
Cov., Sec. 29.) 

— The second conference of the Church, 
which was continued three days, was held 
at Fayette, N. Y. After considerable dis- 
cussion, Hiram Page and the whole Church 
renounced the stone and all things con- 
nected therewith," after which the power 
of God was made manifest. David Whit- 
mer, Peter Whitmer, jun., Jqhn Whitmer 
and Thos. B. Marsh were called by revela- 
tion to preach the gospel. (t)oc. andCov., 
Sec. 30 and 31.) / 

October.— Oliver CowderV, Parley P. 
Pratt, Peter Whitmer, ju^., and Ziba 
Peterson were called by revelation to 
preach the gospel to the Lafnanites. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 32.) 

— Oliver Cowdery, Parley P. Pratt, 
Peter Whitmer, jun., and Ziba Peter- 
son started westward as the first 
missionaries to the Lamanites. On 
their journey they established a large 
branch of the Church at Kirtland, Geauga 
Co., O. Among those baptized by Par- 
ley P. Pratt was Sidney Rigdon. 

— A revelation calling Ezra Thayre and 
Northrop Sweet to the ministry was given 
J;hrough Joseph Smith, jun., at Fayette. 
(Doc. and Cov., Sec. 33.) 

November. — Thurs. 4. — Orson Pratt, 
then nineteen years old, was called to the 
ministry by revelation through Joseph 
Smith, jun. Brotl ^r Pratt was visiting 
the Prophet at Fayette. (Doc. anl^ Cov., 
Sec. 34.) 

Wed. 24. — William B. Preston was born 
in Franklin County, Va. 

December. — Sidney Rigdon and Ed- 
ward Partridge, from Oliio, visited Joseph 
Smith, jun., at Fayette, N. Y. Sidney 
Rigdon was called by revelation to assist 
Joseph in his labors, and both he and Edward 
Partridge were commanded to preach the 
gospel. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 35 and 36.) 

— The prophecy of Enoch was revealed 
to Joseph the Prophet. (See Pearl of 
Great Price.) 

— The Saints in the State of New York 



were commanded by revelation to gather 
to Ohio. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 37.) 

Sat. 11. — Edward Partridge was bap- 
tized by Joseph Smith, jun., in the Seneca 
river. 



1831. 

The first Elders arrived in Jackson 
County, Mo., and the Saints from the State 
of New York and other places commenced 
to build up Kirtland, O., where the Prophet 
Joseph also located with his family. Jack- 
son County, Mo., was named by the Lord 
a land of Zion where the New Jerusa- 
lem should be built, and where the Saints 
were to gather. The land was dedicated 
for that purpose, a Temple site selected 
and dedicated, and the building of a set- 
tlement commenced. The Elders also be- 
gan to preach the gospel with great zeal. 

January. Sini. 2. — The third confer- 
ference of the Church was held at Fay- 
ette, Seneca Co., N. Y., and a revelation 
given through Joseph Smitli, jun., in which 
the Lord promised the Saints a land of in- 
heritance. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 38.) 

Wed. 5. — James Coville, a Baptist minis- 
ter, who had come to visit Joseph at Fay- 
ette,was commanded by revelation through 
Joseph the Prophet to receive the fulness 
of the gospel. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 39.) ; 

As James Coville rejected the word of ' 
the Lord and returned to his former doc- 
trines and people, the Lord gave a revela- 
tion explaining why he did so. (Doc. and 
Cov., Sec. 40.) 

In the latter part of this month, Jo- 
seph Smith, jun. and wife, in comijany 
with Sidney Rigdon and Edward Partridge, 
left Fayette, N. Y., for Kirtland, Geauga 
Co., O., where they arrived about the first 
of February. 

— Oliver Cowdery and fellow - mission- 
aries arrived in Jackson County, Missouri, 
where they commenced their mission 
among tlie Lamanites on its western bor- 
der. 

February. Fri. 4. — Edward Partridge 
was called by revelation to leave his mer- 
chandise and be ordained the first Bishop 
of the Church. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 41.) 
This was the first revelation given through 
Joseph the Prophet at Kirtland, O. 

Wed. 9. — In the presence of twelve El- 
ders, the Lord gave through Joseph Smith, 
jun., an important revelation on .€!liurch 
government and how transgressors should 
be dealt with. The Elders were commanded 
to go out two and two to pi'each the 
gospel. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 42.) 

3Ton. 14. — Oliver Cowdery, Parley P. 
Pratt, Ziba Peterson, Peter Whitmer, jun., 
and Frederick G. Williams (who had join- 
ed the mission at Kirtland, O.) held a 
council at Independence, Mo., and decided 
that Parley P. Pratt should return to the 
East to report their labors to the heads of 
the Church. 

A woman, wlo pretended to receive 
commandments, laws and other " curious 
matters," visited Joseph Smith, jun., who 



6 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1831, 



inquired of the Lord and received a reve- 
lation in which God said tliat none but Jo- 
seph would be appointed to receive revela- 
tions and commandments, as long as he 
lived and remained faithful. (Doc. and 
Cov., Sec. 43.) 

A revelation instructing the Elders 
who had gone on missions to assemble at 
Kirtland in June following was given to 
Joseph Smith, jun., and Sidney Rigdon, at 
Kirtland. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 44.) 

March. aVoti. 7- — An important reve- 
lation concerning the salvation of man / 
and the calamities of the last days was/ 
given through Joseph Smith, jun., at Kirt-. 
land. The Saints were also commanded tok 
gather means wherewith to purchase a 
land of inheritance on which to build a 
New Jerusalem. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 4.5.) 

Tues. 8. — A revelation was given through 
Joseph Smith, jun., at Kirtland, relative 
to the gifts of the Holy Ghost, and John 
Whitmer was called by revelation to be 
Church Historian. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 
46 and 47.) 

Later in March, the Saints were com- 
manded by revelation to save their money 
to purchase land for an inheritance ; and 
Sidney Rigdon, Parley P. Pratt and Le- 
mon Copley were called by revelation to 
preach the gospel to the Quakers. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 48 and 49.) 

April. — Joseph Smith, jun., continued to 
translate the Scriptures. 

May. —As a number of Elders did not 
understand the different spirits which 
manifested themselves at the time, Joseph 
Smith, jun., inquired of the Lord and re- 
ceived a revelation. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 
50.) 

— The Saints from the State of New 
York and other places commenced to 
gather to Kirtland, O., and vicinity ; and 
Edward Partridge was appointed by reve- 
lation through Joseph Smith, jun., to locate 
them for a short time at Thompson, Ge- 
auga Co., O., agreeable to the principles of 
the United Order. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 
51.) 

June. Man. 6'. — The fourth conference 
of the Church was held, at Kirtland, O., on 
which occasion several brethren were 
called by revelation to the office of High 
Priests. This was the first occasion in 
which this office in the Priesthood was 
fully revealed and conferred upon any of 
the Elders in this dispensation. 

Tues. 7. — Joseph Smith and about thirty 
other Elders were called by revelation to 
go to Missouri and preach the gospel by 
the way. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 52.) 

Later in June, a revelation was given 
through Joseph Smith, jun., at Kirtland, to 
Algernon Sidney Gilbert. (Doc. and Cov., 
Sec. 53.) 

The Saints in Thompson, O., were 
commanded by revelation to remove to 
Missouri. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 54.) 

The Elders, in obedience to revelation, 
began to take their departure for the west- 
ern country two and two. 

About the middle of the month, Wm. 
W. Phelps arrived at Kirtland with his 
family. He was commanded by revelation 
to receive the fulness of the gos- 
pel, and then to assist in writing and 
printing for the Church, and also accom- 



pany the Prophet Jo.seph and Sidney Rig- 
don to Missouri. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. .55.) 
Thomas B. Marsh and others were 
commanded by revelation through the 
Propliet Joseph to go to Missouri. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. .56.) 

Nun. If). — Joseph Smith, jun., Sidney 
Rigdon, Martin Harris, Edward Partridge, 
Wm. W. Phelps, Joseph Coe and A. S. Gil- 
bert and wife left Kirtland, O., for Mis- 
souri. 

/ July. — About the middle of this month 
Joseph Smith, jun., and his companions ar- 
rived at Independence, Jackson Co., Mo. 
The first Sabbath after their arrival Wm. 
W. Phelps preached to a western audience, 
over the boundary line of the United 
States. The following week the Coles- 
ville branch arrived. The Lord revealed 
the location of the New Jerusalem and the 
spot upon wliich the Temple was to be 
built. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 57.) 

August. J/o)i. 1. — A revelation, direct- 
ing the Saints how to locate in the land of 
Zion, was given in Jackson County. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 58.) 

Tiir.s. 2. — The Saints commenced erect- 
ing houses in Jackson County, the first log 
being laid in Kaw Township, twelve miles 
southwest of Independence. The log was 
carried and placed in position by twelve 
men, in honor of the twelve tribes of Israel. 
On that occasion the land of Zion was con- 
secrated and dedicated by Elder Rigdon 
for the gathering of the Saints. 

Wed. :i. — The spot for the Temple, a short 
distance west of Independence, was dedi- 
cated in the presence of eight brethren, 
among whom were Joseph Smith, jun., 
Sidney Rigdon, Edward Partridge, Wm. 
W. Phelps, Oliver Cowdery, Martin Harris 
and Joseph Coe. 

Thin:s-. J.— The fifth conference of the 
Church, and the first in the land of Zion, 
was held at the house of brother Joshua 
Lewis, in Kaw Township, J?'kson Co., Mo. 
/V»/i. 7. — Polly Knight, wiTe of Joseph 
Knight, sen., died in Jackson County, Mo. 
This was the first death among the Saints 
in that land. On the same day Joseph the 
Prophet received a revelation about the 
Sabbath. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 59.) 

Mori. H. — A revelation, directing some 
of the brethren to return to the East, was 
given through Joseph Smith, jun., in Jack- 
son County. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 60.) 

Tkcs. !). — Joseph the Prophet, in com- 
pany with ten Elders, left Independence,* 
Mo., in sixteen canoes, on their return to 
Kirtland, O. 

Tlinrs. 11. — The returning Elders reach- 
ed Mcllwair's Bend (of the Missouri 
river) where Wm. W. Phelps " saw in open 
vision, by daylight, the Destroyer in his 
most horrible power ride upon the face of 
the water; others heard the noise, but saw 
not the vision." 

Fri. 12. — A revelation was given through 
Joseph Smith, jun. at Mcllwair's Bend, 
about the cursing of the waters in the last 
days. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 61.) 

Sa.t. /,;. — Joseph Smith, jun., and com- 
pany met several of the Elders on their 
way to the land of Zion. A revelation was 
given to them through Joseph Smith, jun., 
on the bank of the Missouri river. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 62.) 
Sat. 27.— Joseph Smith, jun., Sidney Rig- 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1832. 



don and Oliver Cowdery arrived at Kirt- 
land, O., from their visit to Missouri. 

Late in August, the Saints were com- 
manded by revelation, through Joseph the 
Prophet, to purchase lands in Jackson 
County, Mo., and the future persecutions 
of the Church were foreshadowed. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 63.) 

September. Sun. 11. — The Saints were 
commanded by revelation through Joseph 
Smith, jun., to forgive one another; and 
the Lord, in speaking of the present time, 
said it was a day of sacrifice and a day of 
tithing for His people. (Doc. and Cov., 
Sec. 64.) 

Mon. 12. — Joseph Smith, jun., removed 
with his family from Kirtland to Hiram, 
Portage Co., O., about thirty miles from 
Kirtland, where he continued the transla- 
tion of the Bible. 

Ezra Booth, formerly a Methodist min- 
ister, came out as an apostate. 

A conference was held in Hiram, at 
which \Vm. W. Phelps was instructed to 
purchase a press and type, at Cincinnati, O., 
for the purpose of establishing and pub- 
lishing a monthly paper at Independence, 
Jackson Co., Mo., to be called the Evening 
and Morning Star. 

October. — Early in this month the reve- 
lation on prayer was given. (Doc. and 
Cov., Sec. 65.) 

Tv.es. 11. — A conference was held at 
Father John Johnson's house, in Hiram, at 
which the Elders were instructed about 
the ancient manner of holding meetings. 

Tues.25. — An important conference was 
held at Orange. Cuyahoga Co., O. Wm. E. 
McLellin and Samuel H. Smith were called 
by revelation through Joseph the Prophet 
to preach the gospel. (Doe. and Cov., 
Sec. 66.) 

November. Tues. i.^At a special con- 
ference held at Hiram, Oliver Cowdery 
was appointed to go to Independence, 
Jackson Co., Mo., with the revelations 
which Joseph the Prophet had received up 
to that time and get them printed. The 
revelation known as the Preface to the 
Doctrine and Covenants was given. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 1.) 

Some of the brethren having criticised 
the language used in some of the revela- 
tions, given through Joseph the Prophet, 
the Lord gave the wisest among the Elders 
permission to write a revelation like the 
least of those the Prophet had received, on 
certain conditions. (See Doc. and Cov., 
Sec. 67.) 

Wm. E. McLellin, as the " wisest man in 
his own estimation," failed in his attempt to 
write a revelation. (See History of Joseph 
Smith.) 

Thurs. .i'.— The revelation called the Ap- 
pendix was given through Joseph Smith, 
jun. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 1.33.) 

In a revelation given through Joseph 
Smith, jun., at Hiram, to Orson Hyde, 
Luke S. Johnson, Lyman E. Johnson and 
Wm. E. McLellin, the Lord explained the 
nature and authority of the Aaronic 
Priesthood, the duties of parents towards 
their children, etc. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 
68.) 

John Whitmer was called by revelation 
to accompany Oliver Cowdery to Missouri, 
and to travel among the different branches 
of the Church in cder to obtain informa- 



tion in his capacity as Church Historian. 
(Doe. and Cov., Sec. 69.) 

Joseph Smith, jun., Martin Harris, 
Oliver Cowdery, John Whitmer, Sidney 
Rigdon and Wm. W. Phelps were appoint- 
ed by revelation " to be stewards over the 
revelations and commandments " which 
had been given. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 70.) 

Oliver Cowdery and John Whitmer 
started for Missouri with the revelations, 
after which Joseph the Prophet, assisted 
by Sidney Rigdon as scribe, resumed the 
translation of the Scriptures. 

December. Thurs. I. — Joseph Smith, 
jun., and Sidney Rigdon were called by 
revelation to go out and preach the gos- 
pel. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 71.) 

Sat. 3. — Joseph Smith, jun., and Sidney 
Rigdon went to Kirtland in obedience to 
revelation. 

Sun. 4. — Joseph Smith, jun., and a num- 
ber of other Elders and members of the 
Church assembled at Kirtland to learn 
their duties. Newel K. Whitney was call- 
ed by revelation to act as Bishop in Kirt- 
land, and the duties of that calling were 
made known. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 72.) 

Thurs. 8. — Geo. Teasdale was born in 
London, England. 



1832. 

Joseph the Prophet visited Missouri a 
second time. The Evening and Morning 
Star, the first organ of the -Church, was 
commenced at Independence, Jackson Co., 
Mo., and many important revelations for 
the government of the Church and the 
instructions of the Saints were given. 

January. — Joseph Smith, jun., preached 
in Shalersville, Ravenna and other places 
in Portage County, Ohio. 

Tues. W.— The Elders were commanded 
by revelation to continue their preaching 
till the next conference. (Doc. and Cov., 
Sec. 73.) 

Later in the month, a revelation, explain- 
ing 1 Cor. 7 :14, was given to Joseph Smith, 
jun., at Hiram. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 74.) 

Wed. 25. — A conference was held at Am- 
herst, Loraine Co., O., at which a number 
of Elders were called by revelation on 
special missions and to preach the gospel 
in different parts of the country. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 75.) 

February. Thurs. i6".— The revela- 
tion known as the "Vision" was 
given at Hiram, in which the 
beautiful doctrine of the three glories 
was explained. In this vision Joseph 
Smith, jun., and Sidney Rigdon "beheld 
the glory of the Son on the right hand of 
the Father," and "saw the holy angels and 
they who are sanctified before HLs throne." 
And after the many testimonies which had 
been given of the Son, they, last of all, 
gave this testimony, that he lived, for they 
"saw him, even at the right hand of God," 
and "heard the voice bearing record that 
he is the Only Begotten of the Father." 
(Doc. and Cov., Sec. 76.) 

March. — A key to John's Revelation was 
given to Joseph Smith, jun., at Hiram. 
(Doc. and Cov., Sec. 77.) 

— The order of the Lord in relation to 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1833. 



the poor was revealed. (Doc. and Cov., 
Sec. 78.) 

— Jared Carter, Stephen Burnett and 
Eden Smith were called by revelation to 
preach the gospel, and Frederick G. Will- 
iams to be a Counselor to Joseph Smith, 
jun. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 79, 80 and 81.) 

Hun. 25. — Joseph Smith, jun., and Sidney 
Rigdon were mobbed and nearly killed at 
Hiram. 

April. Sun. i.— Joseph Smith, jun., left 
Hiram, O., to make a second journey to 
Missouri^ accompanied by Newel K. Whit- 
ney, Peter Whitmer, jun., and Jesse Gause 
to fulfil a revelation. (See Doc. and Cov., 
Sec. 78: 9.) 

Sat. iJ.— Brigham Young was baptized 
by Eleazer Miller at Mendon, Monroe Co., 
N. Y. 

Tites. 24. — Joseph Smith, jun., and com- 
pany arrived at Independence, Jackson 
Co., Mo. 

Thurs. 20. — At a general council, held in 
Jackson County, Mo., Joseph .Smith, jun., 
was acknowledged the president of the High 
Priesthood. 

A revelation "showing the order given 
to Enoch and the Church in his day" was 
given. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 82.) 

Mon. 30. — A revelation concerning the 
rights of women and children in the Church 
was given through Joseph Smith, jun., at 
Independence, Mo. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 83. ) 

May. Tz(es. l.—At a council, held at 
^ Independence, it was decided to print 3,000 
copies of the "Book of Commandments." 

Sun 6'.— Joseph Smith, jun., Sidney Rigdon 
and Newel K. W^hitney left Independence, 
Mo., for Ohio. On the journey Bro. Whit- 
ney broke his leg and was miraculously 
healed. Joseph was poisoned by his 
enemies, but was restored in an instant. 

June. — Joseph Smith, jun., arrived at 
Kirtland, O., and recommenced the trans- 
lation of the Scriptures; thus he spent 
most of the summer. 

— The first number of the Evening and 
Morning Star was issued at Independence, 
Mo. The Upper Missouri Advertizer, a 
newspaper, was commenced about the same 
time in connection with the Star. 

September. Sat. 22 and Svn. 23.-~An 
important revelation on Priesthood was 
given through Joseph Smith, jun., at Kirt 
land, O., as the Elders began to return from 
their missions to the Eastern Stated. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 84.) 

Tnes. 25. — Marriner Wood Merrill was 
born in Sackville, County of Westmore- 
land, New Brunswick. 

November. Tues. 6'.— Joseph Smith re- 
turned home from a rapid journey to 
Albany, New York and Boston. On the 
day of his return his son Joseph was born. 

Tues. 27. Joseph Smith, jun., wrote an 
encouraging letter and revelation to the 
Saints in Jackson County, Mo. (Doc. and 
Cov., Sec. 8.5.) 

December. Thurs. 6.— A revelation, 
explaining the parable of the wheat and 
tares, was given through Joseph Smith, 
jun., at Kirtland. (Doe. and Cov., Sec. 86.) 

Tues. ^5.— Joseph Smith, jun., prophesied 
about the civil war between the North and 
the South which commenced about twenty- 
eight years afterwards. (Doc. and Cov., 
Sec. 87.) 

Thurs. 27.— The revelation known as the 



"Olive Leaf" was given through Joseph 
Smith, jun., at Kirtland, O. It contains 
grand and glorious principles and tells of 
important future events. The Saints were 
commanded to build a House of the Lord at 
Kirtland and to open a school for the 
benefit of the Elders to be known as the 
School of the Prophets. (Doc. and Gov., 
Sec. 88.) 

Joseph Smith, jun., spent the winter of 
1832-33 translating the Scriptures, attend- 
ing the School of the Prophets and sitting 
in conferences. 



1833. 

During this year theFirst[Presidency of 
the Church was organized and the trans- 
lation of the Bible finished by the Prophet 
Joseph ; the corner stones of the Kirtland 
Temple were laid, and the Saints driven 
by a mob from their hom^es in Jackson 
County, Mo. The Church printing office 
having been destroyed by the mob 
in Missouri, a new press and type were 
secured, and the publication of the 
Evening and Morning Star was recom- 
menced at Kirtland, O. 

January. Tues. 22. — Joseph Smith, jun., 
Sidney Rigdon, Frederick G.Williams, New- 
el K. Whitney, Hyrum Smith, Zebedee Col- 
trin, Joseph Smith, sen., Samuel H. Smith, 
John Murdock, Lyman E. Johnson, Orson 
Hyde, Ezra Thayer, Levi W. Hancock 
and William Smith assembled in confer- 
ence at Kirtland, O. On this occasion 
the Prophet Joseph, Zebedee Coltrin 
and Wm. Smith spoke in tongues, 
"after which the Lord poured out his 
spirit in a miraculous manner, until all 
the Elders and several members, both male 
and female, spoke in tongues." Praises 
were sung to God and the Lamb, and 
speaking and praying in tongues occupied 
the conference until a late hour at night. 
(See History of Joseph Smith.) 

Wed. 23. — The conference was continued 
at Kirtland. "After much speaking, sing- 
ing, praying and praising God, all in 
tongues," the brethren "proceeded to the 
washing of feet, as commanded of the 
Lord," according to the practice recorded 
in John 13: 4-l.'>. (See History of Joseph 
Smith.) 

February. Sat. 2. — Joseph Smith, jun., 
completed the translation of the New 
Testament. 

Wed. 27. — The revelation known as the 
"Word of Wisdom," was given through 
Joseph Smith, jun., at Kirtland. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 89.) 

March. F)i. S. — A revelation concern- 
ing the keys of the kingdom and the 
oracles of God was given to Joseph Smith, 
jun., at Kirtland. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 90.) 

-S« /..<>.— Joseph Smith, jun., was com- 
manded by revelation not to translate the 
Apocrypha. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 91.) 

F)"i. /.).— A revelation concerning Fred- 
erick G. Williams was given through 
Joseph Smith, jun., at Kirtland. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 92.) 

3fon. iS.— Sidney Rigdon and Frederick 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1833, 



G. Williams were appointed and set apart 
by President Joseph Smith to be his 
Counselors in the Presidency of the 
Church, according to the revelation given 
March 8th. On the same occasion "many 
of the brethi'en savr a heavenly vision of 
the Savior and concourses of angels." 
(See History of Joseph Smith.) 

Sat. 23. — A committee vs^as appointed to 
purchase lands for the Saints at Kirtland. 

Tues. 26. — An important council vpas held 
by the High Priests in Jackson County, 
Mo., in vFhich some misunderstanding in 
regard to the presiding authorities in that 
land vras amicably settled. 

April. — In this month the first mob 
gathered at Independence, Jackson Co., 
Mo., to consult upon a plan for the removal 
or immediate destruction of the Church in 
that county. 

Sat. 6. — About eighty official and some 
unofficial members of the Church met at 
the ferry on Big Blue river, near the 
western boundary of Jackson County, Mo., 
and, for the first time, celebrated the 
birthday of the Church. 

May. Sat. 4.— Hyrum Smith, Jared 
Carter and Reynolds Cahoon were ap- 
pointed a committee to obtain subscrip- 
tions for building a house for the Priest- 
hood at Kirtland. 

Mo7i. 6. — A revelation on the pre-exist- 
ence of man was given through Joseph 
Smith, jun., at Kirtland, and on the same 
date the Saints were commanded by reve- 
lation to build a House to the Lord at 
Kirtland. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 93 and 94.) 

June. Sat. 1. — The Lord gave further 
instructions to Joseph the Prophet about 
the Temple to be built at Kirtland. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 95.) 

Tues. 4. — A revelation, showing the order 
of the Kirtland Stake of Zion, was given 
to Joseph Smith, jun. (Doc. and Cov., 
Sec. 96.) 

Thurs. 6. — A conference of High Priests 
held at Kirtland, O., instructed the com- 
mittee for building the House of the Lord 
to proceed at once in obtaining material 
for its construction. 

Sun. 23. — Doctor P.Hurlburt, afterwards 
connected with the spurious Spaulding 
story, was excommunicated from the 
Church for adultery. 

Tues. 25. — An explanation of the plat of 
the city of Zion was sent to the brethren 
in Jackson County, Mo. (See History of 
Joseph Smith.) 

July. — By this time about twelve hun- 
dred Saints, including children, had gath- 
ered to Jackson County, Mo. 

Tues. 2. — Joseph the Prophet finished 
the translation of the Bible. 

Sat. 20. — The printing office belonging to 
the Saints at Independence, Jackson 
County, Mo., was destroyed by a mob, who 
also tarred and feathered Bishop Edward 
Partridge and a Brother Allen. 

— Orson Pratt preached in Patten, Can- 
ada. This is supposed to be the first dis- 
course preached by a Latter-day Saint 
Elder in The Dominion. 

Tues. 23. — The Saints at Independence, 
Mo., made a treaty with the mob and con- 
sented to leave Jackson County. Oliver 
Cowdery was dispatched as a special mes- 
senger to Kirtland, O., to consult with the 
First Presidency. 



—The corner stones of the Lord's House 
at Kirtland, O., were laid. 

August. Fri. 2. — In a revelation given 
through Joseph Smith, jun., at Kirtland, 
the Lord commanded that a house be built 
to Him in the land of Zion by the tithing 
of His people. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 97.) 

Tues. 6. — The Saints were commanded 
by revelation to observe the constitutional 
laws of the land, to forgive their enemies 
and cultivate a spirit of .charity toward all 
men. Their rights of self-defense were 
also made clear. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 98.) 

A few days later John Murdock was 
called to the ministry by revelation. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 99.) 

September. Wed. 11. — It was decided 
in council to establish a printing press at 
Kirtland, and publish a paper to be called 
the Latter-day Saints' Messenger and Ad- 
vocate: also that the Evening and Morn- 
ing Star, formerly published in Jackson 
County, Mo., should be published at Kirt- 
land. 

— Bishop Edward Partridge was ac- 
knowledged as the head of the Church in 
Zion, and ten High Priests were appointed 
to watch over the ten branches of the 
Church there. 

October. — Orson Hyde and John Gould 
arrived in Jackson County, Mo., as mes- 
sengers from Kirtland ; and the Church in 
Zion dispatched Wm. W. Phelps and Orson 
Hyde to Governor Daniel Dunklin at Jef- 
ferson City, with a petition from the 
Saints. 

Sat. 5. — Joseph Smith, jun., in company 
with Elders Sidney Rigdon and Freeman 
Nickerson, left Kirtland on a visit to 
Canada. 

Tues. S.— Wm. W. Phelps and Orson 
Hyde presented to Governor Daniel Dunk- 
lin, of Missouri, the petition from the 
Saints in Jackson County. 

Sat. 12. — In a revelation given at Perrys- 
burg, N. Y., Joseph Smith, jun., and Sid- 
ney Rigdon were commanded to continue 
their missionary labors in the East. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 100.) 

Sat. 19. — In answer to the petition from 
the Saints in Jackson County, Gov. Dunk- 
lin, of Missouri, wrote a letter to the lead- 
ing men of the Church in that county, 
promising to enforce the laws. 

Sat. 26'.— Joseph Smith, jun., preached 
and baptized twelve persons at Mount 
Pleasant, Upper Canada. 

Thurs. 31.— A mob attacked a branch of 
the Church, west of the Big Blue, in Jack- 
son County, Mo., destroyed ten houses, and 
beat several of the brethren in a most bru- 
tal manner. 

November. Fri. i.— The Saints at In- 
dependence were attacked by a mob, and 
Gilbert & Whitney's store was partly de- 
stroyed, besides many private dwellings. 

Silt. i'.^The mob attacked the Saints on 
the Big Blue, Jackson County, and beat 
David Bennett severely. 

Jlon. 4.— A skirmish took place between 
a company of Saints and a mob, several 
miles west of the Big Blue, in Jackson 
County. Andrew Barber, one of the Saints, 
was mortally wounded, two of the mob 
were killed, and several others wounded 
on both sides. 

—Joseph Smith, jun., returned to Kirt- 
land, O., from his mission to Canada. 



10 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1834. 



Tues. 5. — Col. Thos. Pitcher, command- 
ing the mob militia, in Jackson County, de- 
manded that the Saints should give up 
their arms, which order was reluctantly 
complied with. During the following night 
and the next day the mob drove the Saints 
from their homes at the point of the bayo- 
net. The exiles were thereby exposed to 
the most severe sufferings from cold and 
hunger. 

TTiurs. 7. — On this and the following day 
the exiled Saints were busy crossing the 
Missouri river from Jackson to Clay 
County, Mo., where the inhabitants re- 
ceivedthem with some degree of kindness. 

Others of the Saints found temporary 
shelter in Ray, Van Buren, Lafayette and 
other counties. 

Wed. 13. — A grand meteoric shower or 
" falling of the stars '" was witnessed 
throughout the land, which cheered the 
Saints and alarmed their enemies. JZ 
[.^December. — Persecution raged against 
tae Saints who had fled to Van Buren 
County, Mo. 

— Oliver Cowdery and Bishop Newel K. 
Whitney arrived at Kirtland, O., with a 
new printing press. 

Fri. 6'.— The Saints in Clay County, Mo., 
sent another petition to Gov. Dunklin, 
praying for redress. 

j/on. i6'.— Joseph Smith, jun., received a 
revelation at Kirtland, O., in which the 
Lord said that he had allowed afflic- 
tions to come upon the Saints in Missouri 
because of their transgressions, but that 
he in His own due time would permit the 
pure in heart to return to their inherit- 
ances. This was illustrated by a parable. 
^Doc. and Cov., Sec. 101.) 

Wed . IS. — The printing office at Kirt- 
land, O., was dedicated and the publication 
of the Evening and blaming Star recom- 
menced with Oliver Cowdery as editor. 

—Joseph Smith, sen., was ordained Pa- 
triarch to the whole Church. 

Thurs. i.9.— Wm. Pratt and David W. 
Patten left Kirtland, O., for Missouri, 
bearing a message from the First Presi- 
dency to the exiled Saints. 

Jtfoa. 23. — Four aged families, living near 
Independence, Mo., whose penury and in- 
firmities, incident to old age, forbade a 
speedy removal, were driven from their 
houses by a mob. 

Fri. 27. — The printing press and ma- 
terials, taken from the Saints at Independ- 
ence, Mo., were disposed of by the mob to 
Davis & Kelley, who removed them to Clay 
County, and there commenced the publica- 
tion of the Jfissoitri Enquirer. 

Twes. .:;h— Wilford Woodruff was bap- 
tized at Richland, N. Y., by Zera Pulsipher. 



1834.. 

The first High Council of the Church 
was organized at Kirtland, O. Zion's Camp 
made its famous march to Missouri, and a 
High Council was organized in Clay 
County, Mo., where most of the Saints, 
who had been expelled from Jackson 
County, had located. 



January. Wed. 1. — A conference of 
the scattered Saints in Clay County, Mo., 
resolved to send Lyman Wight and Parley 
P. Pratt as special messengers to the 
First Presidency at Kirtland, O. 

February, ^fon. 17. — The first High 
Council of the Church was organized at 
Kirtland. The members were Joseph Smith, 
sen., John Smith, Joseph Coe, John John- 
son, Martin Harris, John S. Carter, Jared 
Carter, Oliver Cowdery, Samuel H. Smith, 
Orson Hyde, Sylvester Smith and Luke S. 
Johnson. Joseph Smith, jun., Sidney Rig- 
don and Frederick G. Williams were ac- 
knowledged as presidents by the voice of 
the council. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 102.) 

Wed. 19. — The first case brought before 
the High Council was tried at Kirtland. 

Thurs. 20. — Lyman Leonard, who had 
returned from Van Buren County, Mo., 
and Joseph Summer and Barnet Cole were 
severely beaten with clubs by a mob in 
Jackson County, Mo. 

Mon. 24. — A revelation concerning the 
redemption of Zion was given through 
Joseph Smith, jun., at Kirtland, O. (Doc. 
and Cov., See. 103.) 

Wed. 26. — Joseph .Smith, jun., commenced 
to obtain volunteers for the redemption of 
Zion, in obedience to the revelation given 
on the 24th. 

March. Fri. 28. — Joseph Smith, jun., 
returned to Kirtland from his trip to the 
State of New York, whither he went to 
get volunteers for the exijedition to Mis- 
souri. 

April. Wed. .9.— Dr. P. Hurlburt, the 
apostate, who had threatened the life of 
Joseph the Prophet, was put under $300 
bonds in Chardon, Ohio. 

Thurs. 10.— The United Order at Kirt- 
land was dissolved. 

— The Saints, who had been expeUed 
from Jackson County, Mo., wrote a peti- 
tion to the President of the United States, 
asking for redress. 

Wed. 23.— A revelation was given 
through Joseph Smith, jun., concerning 
the order of Enoch. (Doc. & Cov., Sec. 
104.) 

Thurs. 24. — On this and the following 
six days the mob burned about one hun- 
dred and fifty houses belonging to the 
Saints in Jackson County, Mo. 

3Iay. Thurs. 1. — Over twenty men with 
four baggage wagons left Kirtland, O., for 
Missouri and traveled to New Portage, 
about fifty miles distant, where they 
waited for the rest of the company from 
Kirtland. 

Sat. 3. — At a conference of Elders, held 
at Kirtland, the Church was first named 
"The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints." 

Jfon. -j. — Joseph Smith, jun., left Kirt- 
land with the remainder of the company, 
which was being organized for the relief 
of the suffering Saints in Missouri. 

Wed. 7. — The Prophet's company of vol- 
unteers, known in the history of the 
Church as Zion's Camp, was partly organ- 
ized, consisting of over one hundred and 
fifty men with twenty baggage wagons. 

Thurs. 8. — The organization of Zion's 
Camp was completed, and it traveled 
twelve miles. 

June. Wed. 4. — On this and the follow- 
ing day Zion's Camp crossed the Mississip- 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1835. 



11 



pi river into Missouri. Sylvester Smith 
rebelled against the order of the com- 
pany. 

Sun.8. — Zion's Camp w^as strengthened 
by a company of volunteers led by Hyrum 
Smith and Lyman Wight. It then num- 
bered two hundred and five men and 
twenty-five baggage wagons. 

Jfon. lii.~A large meeting of the citizens 
of Clay County, Mo., held at the Liberty 
court house, failed to adjust the difficul- 
ties between the' Saints and the Jackson 
County people. From the meeting Samuel 
C. Owens, James Campbell and about 
thirteen other mob-leaders started for 
Jackson County to raise a mob, in which, 
however, they failed, as Mr. Campbell and 
six others were drowned in attempting to 
cross the Missouri River. 

Thurs. 19. — Notwithstanding the threats 
of enemies, Zion's Camp passed through 
Riclimond, Mo., and camped at night be- 
tween two branches of Fishing river. A 
mob, numbering over three hundred men, 
who had arranged to concentrate that 
night to attack them, were prevented from 
crossing the river by a terrible storm. 

Siai. 22. — An important revelation was 
givep to Joseph Smith, jun., on Fishing 
river, in which the Lord told his Saints 
that the time for the redemption of Zion 
had not yet come. (Doc. &. Cov., Sec. 105.) 

Man. 2o. — Zion's Camp arrived at a point 
near Liberty, Clay County, Mo. 

Tiies. 24. — Tlie cholera, which during 
several preceding days had attacked some 
of the brethren, broke out in its most ter- 
rible form in Zion's Camp. It continued 
its ravages about four days; sixty-eight of 
the Saints were attacked and thirteen 
died, among whom was A. Sidney Gilbert, a 
prominent man in the Church ; he expired 
on the 26th. 

July, Tue.s. 1. — In company with a few 
friends, Joseph Smith, jun., visited Jack- 
son County, Mo., secretly. 

Thurs. 3. — The High Priests of Zion as- 
sembled in Clay County, Mo., and organ- 
ized a High Council with David Whitmer 
as president and Wm. W. Phelps and John 
Whitmer as counselors. The members of 
the council were: Christian Whitmer, 
Newel Knight, Lyman Wight, Calvin 
Bebee, Wm. E. McLellin, Solomon Han- 
cock, Thos. B. Marsh, Simeon Carter, Par- 
ley P. Pratt, Orson Pratt, John Murdock 
and Levi Jackman. 

Wed. 9. — Joseph Smith, jun., started on 
his return journey to ■ Kirtland, where he 
arrived in the latter part of the month. 

October — The first number of the 
Latter-day Saints' Jfessenger and Advo- 
cate was published at Kirtland, O., taking 
the place of the Evening and Morning 
Star, suspended. 

Thurs. 16. — Joseph Smith, jun., and other 
Elders left Kirtland to visit the Saints in 
Michigan, from which trip they returned 
\n the latter part of the month. 

November. Tues. 25. — Warren A. Cow- 
dery was called by revelation to preside 
over the Saints at Freedom, N. Y., and the 
regions round about. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 
106.) 

Sat. 29. — Joseph Smith, jun., and Oliver 
Cowdery covenanted with the Lord to pay 
their tithing. 



1835. 

The Council of Twelve Apostles and the 
First Quorum of Seventy were organized 
at Kirtland, O. The Book of Doctrine and 
Covenants was accepted by the Church, and 
Joseph Smith, jun., obtained some Egyp- 
tian rolls of papyrus containing the writ- 
ings of Abraham, etc. 

February. — The Xorthern Times, a 
weekly newspaper supporting democracy, 
was commenced by the Saints at Kirt- 
land, O. 

Sat. 14. — At a special meeting held in 
Kirtland twelve Apostles were chosen by 
the Three Witnesses to the Book of Mor- 
mon according to revelation (Doc. and 
Cov., Sec. 18: 37), namely: Thos. B. Marsh, 
David W. Patten, Brigham Young, Heber 
C. Kimball, Orson Hyde, Wm. E. McLel- 
lin, Parley P. Pratt, Luke S. Johnson, 
Wm. Smith, Orson Pratt, John F. Boynton 
and Lyman E. Johnson. Brigham Young 
and Heber C. Kimball were ordained and 
blessed the same day. 

Sun. 15. — Orson Hyde, David W. Patten, 
Luke S. Johnson, Wm. E. McLellin, John 
F. Boynton and Wm. Smith were ordained 
Apostles. 

Sat. 21. — Parley P. Pratt was ordained 
to the Apostleship. Thos. B. Marsh and 
Orson Pratt, who were absent on missions, 
were not ordained until their return in 
April. 

Sat. 28. — The organization of the First 
Quorum of Seventy was commenced at 
Kirtland. 

March. Sat. 28. — An important revela- 
tion concerning the order of the Priest- 
hood was given to Joseph Smith, jun., at 
Kirtland. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 107.) 

3Iay. Sat. 2. — Elders Brigham Young, 
John P. Greene and Amos Orton were ap- 
pointed to preach the gospel to the Laman- 
ites. 

Jfon. 4.— The Twelve left Kirtland on 
their first mission as Apostles. 

July. Fri. .3.— Michael H. Chandler 
arrived at Kirtland to exhibit four 
Egyptian mummies and some rolls of 
papyrus, covered with hieroglyphic figures 
and devices. They were afterwards pur- 
chased by some of the Saints, and Joseph 
the Prophet translated some of the char- 
acters on the rolls. One was found to 
contain the writings of Abraham, subse- 
quently published in the Pearl of Great 
Price ; another the writings of Joseph in 
Egypt. 

August Jfon. 17. — At a general as- 
sembly of the Church, held at Kirtland, 
the Book of Doctrine and Covenants was 
approved, and thus became a law of faith 
and practice to the Church. 

September. Jlon. 14.^ Oliver Cow- 
dery was appointed to act as Church 
Recorder, and Emma Smith to make a 
selection of sacred hymns, according to 
revelation. (Doe. and Cov., 25: 11.) 

October. Sun. 25.— The Twelve returned 
to Kirtland from their mission to the East. 

Thurs. 29. — Joseph Smith, jun., was 
abused by his brother William in a council 
meeting, held at Kirtland. 



12 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1836. 



November, Fri. 27. — Christian Whit- 
mer, one of the Eight Witnesses to the 
Book of Mormon, died in Clay County, 
Missouri. 

December. HecZ. IH. — Wm. Smith be- 
came enraged in a debating school, held at 
Kirtland, and used violence upon the per- 
son of his brother Joseph Smith, jun., and, 
others. 

Sat. 26. — Joseph Smith, jun., with other 
Elders, commenced studying the Hebrew 
language, having previously commenced 
reading Greek. Mr. Seixas, a competent 
professor of languages, was subsequently 
employed as teacher. 

— A revelation, concerning Lyman Sher- 
man, was given through Joseph Smith, 
jun., at Kirtland. (Doc. and Cov. Sec. 108. 



1836. 

The Kirtland Temple was dedicated, and 
the Savior, Moses, Elias and Elijah the 
Prophet appeared to the Elders in that 
building and committed the keys of their 
respective dispensations to the Prophet 
Joseph Smith. The Saints who had re- 
sided temporarily in Clay County, Mo., re- 
moved to another location on Shoal Creek, 
which was organized into Caldwell County. 

January. Fr't. L— Wm. Smith received 
forgiveness of his brother Joseph, and a 
general family reconciliation took place in 
the house of the latter, at Kirtland, O. 

Wed. 6. — At a council meeting, held at 
Kirtland, the High Council of Zion (Mis- 
souri) was reorganized. 

Thurs. 7. — A sumptuous feast, to which 
the lame, the halt and the blind were in- 
vited, was held in Bishop Newel K. Whit- 
ney's house, at Kirtland. 

Sat. K). — In a council of the Twelve 
Apostles, held at Kirtland, President Jo- 
seph Smith said: "The Twelve are not 
subject to any other than the First Presi- 
dency. * * * Where I am not, there is no 
First Presidency over the Twelve." (See 
History of Joseph Smith. ) 

.Smh. i7.— Joseph the Prophet organized 
the several councils of the Priesthood at 
Kirtland, on which occasion the Lord 
poured out His Spirit in a great measure 
upon the brethren, who confessed their 
faults to each other ; the congregation was 
overwhelmed in tears and the spirit of 
tongues came upon them " like the rushing 
of a mighty wind." (See History of Joseph 
Smith.) 

Thurs. 21. — The Presidency of the 
Church, and the councils of Kirtland and 
Zion, met in the evening in the Lord's 
House, at Kirtland, and attended to the 
ordinance of anointing with oil and bless- 
ing each other. The visions of heaven 
were opened, angels administered to them, 
and the house was filled with the glory of 
God. Joseph the Prophet " beheld the ce- 
lestial kingdom of God and the glory there- 
of," the '-transcendent beauty of the gate 
through which the heirs of that kingdom 
veill enter, the throne of God whereon 
was seated the Father and Son," and the 
beautiful streets of the kingdom. He also 



saw Fathers Adam and Abraham. On see- 
ing his brother Alvin, who died before the 
Church was organized, the Prophet mar- 
velled, but the voice of the Lord told him 
that all who had died without a knowledge 
of the gospel, who would have received it 
if they had been permitted to tarry, should 
be heirs of the celestial kingdom of God. 
(See History of Joseph Smith.) 

FH. 22. — The Twelve Apostles, the pre- 
sidency of the Seventy and others were 
blessed and anointed in the Lord's House, 
at Kirtland. ' _ T2 

Thurs. 2S. — The leading authorities of 
the Churcn administered in the Lord's 
House at Kirtland, on which occasion 
angels again appeared to the brethren, and 
other great manifestations of the power of 
God were witnessed. (See History of Jo- 
seph Smith.) 

February. Sun. 7. — The organization 
of the second quorum of Seventy was com- 
menced at Kirtland. 

Jfon. 22.— The sisters at Kirtland met in 
the Lord's House to commence their wftrk 
of making the vail for that building. 

March. Sun. 27. — The Lord's House, 
at Kirtland, afterwards known as the 
Kirtland Temple, was dedicated. It is a 
rock building, 80 feet long and 60 feet wide 
the walls are 50 feet and the tower 110 feet 
high. (For dedicatory prayer, see Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 109.) 

Tues. 2ft. — On this and the following day 
the ordinance of the washing of feet was 
attended to in the Kirtland Temple. 

April. Sun. 3. — Joseph Smith, jun., and 
Oliver Cowdery saw and heard the Savior 
in the Kirtland-Temple. Moses also ap- 
peared before them and committed unto 
them " the keys of the gathering of Israel 
from the four parts of the earth, and the 
leading of the Ten Tribes from the land of 
the north." ThexL Elias appeared and com- 
mitted the dispensation of the gospel of 
Abraham, and finally Elijah the Proptifit 
J^tood before them " and committed to 
them the keys of turning " the hearts of 
the fathers to the children, and the child-, 
ren to the fathers." (See History of Jo- 
seph Smith and Doc. and Cov., Sec. 110.) 

Jfon 4.— The Elders began to spread 
abroad from Kirtland into all parts of the 
land, preaching the gospel. 

May. Tues. i 7.— Mary Smith, aged 93- 
years old, and grandmother of Joseph the 
Prophet, arrived at Kirtland from the 
East. 

June. — Warren Parrish and other El- 
ders were mobbed and arrested in Tenne- 
see for preaching the gospel, and subse- 
quently compelled to leave the country. 

Wed. 2H. — A large meeting of citizens 
held at Liberty, Clay Co., Mo., passed reso- 
lutions to expel the Saints from Clay 
County. 

July. Fri. 1. — In a large meeting of 
Elders, held in Clay County, Mo., it was 
agreed that the Saints should leave the 
county, agreeably to the request of the 
older settlers. 

Jfo)i. .?■;. — Joseph Smith, jun., left Kirt- 
land for a trip to the Eastern States. 

August. — Joseph Smith, jun., arrived 
at Salem, Mass., where he, on August 6th, 
received a revelation, in which the Lord 
said He had many people in that city. 
(Doc. and Cov., Sec. 111.) 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1837. 



13 



September. — Joseph Smith retui-ned to 
Kirtland from his trip to the East. 

—The Saints in Missouri began to re- 
move from Clay County to their newly se- 
lected location on Shoal Creek (later 
known as Far West), in the territory at- 
tached to Ray County. That part of the 
State of Missouri was at that time almost 
uninhabited, but in the following December 
it was organized under the name of Cald- 
well County. 

Thins. 22. — Peter Whitmer, jun., one of 
the Eight Witnesses to the Book of Mor- 
mon, died near Liberty, Clay County, Mo. 

November. Wed. 2. — Preparations were 
made for organizing a banking institution 
at Kirtland, O., to be called the " Kirtland 
Safety Society." 

December. Sun. /<9.— Brigham Young, 
jun., was born at Kirtland. 

Hat. .31.— Bv. Willard Richards was bap- 
tized at Kirtland, by Brigham Young. 



1837. 

Far West, Caldwell Co. Mo., was sur- 
veyed, and the first foreign mission of the 
Church called and sent to England, where 
a successful opening was made. A great 
apostacy took place in the Church, both in 
Kirtland, O., and in Missouri. 

April. Thur. 6. — An important Priest- 
hood meeting was held in the Kirtland 
Temple, in which new presidents were or- 
dained to preside over the Seventies, as 
some of the former presidents were High 
Priests. 

April. FH. 7.— The city plat of Far 
West, Caldwell County, Mo., having been 
surveyed, the sale of town lots was left to 
Wm. W. Phelps, John Whitmer and Edward 
Partridge. Jacob Whitmer, Elisha H. 
Groves and Geo. M. Hinkle were appointed 
a building committee for the erection of a 
house of the Lord at Far West. 

May — A spirit of apostasy and specula- 
tion, affecting every quorum of the Church, 
more or less, became very prevalent at 
Kirtland. 

June. — Early in this month Apostles 
Heber C. Kimball and Orson Hyde were 
set apart by the First Presidency of the 
Church to go on a mission to England. 
This was the first foreign mission of the 
Church. A few days later Willard Rich- 
ards was called to accompany them. 

Tues. Li.— Apostles Heber C. Kimball 
and Orson Hyde and Elders Willard Rich- 
ards and Joseph Fielding left Kirtland, O., 
on their missions to England. 

July. Saf. I. — Apostles Heber C. Kim- 
ball and Orson Hyde and Elders 
Willard Richards and Joseph Fielding, 
accompanied by three brethren from 
Canada, namely, John Goodson, Isaac 
Russell and John Snider, sailed from 
New York on the ship Garrick. They 
arrived in Liverpool, England, on the 20th. 
July. J/o«. .5. — Ground was broken at 
Far West, Mo., for the foundation of a 
Temple, which, however, was not built, 
on account of persecutions. 

Sun. 23. — A revelation concerning the 
Twelve Apostles was given through Joseph 



the Prophet, at Kirtland. (Doc. & Gov. 
Sec. 112.) 

— The gospel was first preached by Lat- 
ter-day Saint Elders in England, in the 
church of the Rev. James Fielding, at 
Preston. 

Thur. 27. — Joseph, the Prophet, was 
persecuted with a vexatious lawsuit at 
Painesville, Ohio. 

Snu. 30. — Nine persons were baptized in 
the river Ribble, at Preston, England, as 
the first converts to the fulness of the gos- 
pel' in England. Geo. D. Watt was the 
first person baptized. 

August. — In the latter part of this 
month Joseph Smith, jun., returned to 
Kirtland, O, from a mission to Canada, 
on which he had started July 27th. 

September. Sun. 3. — At a conference, 
held at Kirtland, Oliver Cowdery, Joseph 
Smith, sen., Hyrum Smith and John Smith 
were appointed assistant counselors to the 
First Presidency. Luke S. Johnson, Ly- 
man E. Johnson and John F. Boynton, 
three of the Twelve Apostles, were disfel- 
lowshipped. 

"iun. 10. — Luke S. Johnson, Lyman E. 
Johnson and John F. Boynton made con- 
fessions and were received back into fellow- 
ship. 

Sun. 17.— Geo. W. Robinson was elected 
General Church Recorder, in place of Oli- 
ver Cowdery, who had removed to Mis- 
souri. 

Wed. 27. — Joseph Smith, jun., and Sid- 
ney Rigdon left Kirtland, O., to establish 
other places of gathering for the Saints, 
and to visit with the Saints in Missouri, 
where they arrived in the latter part of 
October. 

About this time the "Voice of Warning " 
was published in New York City by Par- 
ley P. Pratt. 

October. — The first number of the M- 
ders' ./ouynal,edited by Joseph Smith, jun., 
and published at Kirtland, O., bears date 
of this month. It was published instead of 
the Messenger and Advocate, which had 
been discontinued. 

Fri. 13. — Jerusha F. Smith, Hyrum 
Smith's wife, died at Kirtland. 

November. Tues. 7. — An important 
conference was held at Far West, Mo., 
Joseph Smith, jun., having arrived from 
Kirtland. Frederick G. Williams was re- 
jected as a counselor to Pres. Joseph 
Smith, and Hyrum Smith appointed in his 
stead. David Whitmer, John Whitmer and 
Wm. W. Phelps were sustained as the presi- 
dency at Far West, and a High Council was 
organized consisting of John Murdock, 
Solomon Hancock, Elias Higbee, Calvin Be- 
bee,John M. Hinkle, Thos. Grover, Simeon 
Carter, Lyman Wight, Newel Knight, Geo. 
M. Hinkle, Levi Jackman and Elisha H. 
Groves. 

Fri. 10. — At a general meeting held at 
Far West it was voted that the town of 
Far West " be enlarged so as to contain 
two square miles." 

December. — The printing office at 
Kirtland was destroyed bj' fire, and the 
publication of the Elders' Journal ceased. 
— Joseph Smith, jun. arrived at Kirtland 
O., from Missouri. During his absence a 
number of prominent men, including War- 
ren Parrish, John F. Boynton, Luke S. 
Johnson and Joseph Coe, had united to- 



14 



CHURCH CHKONOLOGY — 183^i. 



gether for the overthrow of the Church at 
Kirtland. 

Fri. 22. — Apostle Brigham Young left 
Kirtland on account of the fury of the 
mob, who threatened to kill him because 
he would proclaim publicly and privately 
that he knew by the Holy Ghost that Jo- 
seph Smith, jun., was a Prophet of the 
Most High God. 

Mon. 2'). — The first general conference 
by Latter-day Saints in England was held 
in the " Cock Pit," at Preston. The 
Church in England numbered already 
about one thousand members. At this 
conference the Word of Wisdom was first 
publicly taught in England. 

Apostacy, persecution, confusion and 
mobocracy reigned in Kirtland, O., at the 
close of the year. 



1838. 

Joseph Smith, jun., and most of the faith- 
ful Saints left Kirtland, O., on account of 
apostacy and persecution, and removed to 
Missouri. Adam-ondi-Ahman, in Daviess 
County, Mo., was surveyed, and organized 
into a Stake of Zion; the revelation on 
tithing was given ; persecutions were re- 
newed against the Saints in Missouri, and 
DeWitt, Adam-ondi-Ahman and Far West 
were taken and sacked by the mob; near- 
ly a score of Saints were massacred at 
Haun's Mill, Joseph the Prophet and 
other Elders imprisoned, and all the Saints 
ordered out of Missouri, under pain of 
death by the exterminating order of Gov. 
Lilburn W. Boggs. 

January. I'vi. 12. — .ioseph Smith, jun., 
and Sidney Rigdon left Kirtland, O., on 
horseback to escape mob violence. They 
traveled toward Missouri. 

February. Jfoii. '>. — In a general as- 
sembly of Saints at Far West, Mo., David 
Whitmer, John Whitmer and Wm. W. 
Phelps were rejected as the presidency of 
the Church in Missouri, because of trans- 
gression. 

tSut. 10. — Thomas B. Marsh and David 
W. Patten were appointed presidents pro 
tern, of the Church in Missouri, until the 
arrival of Joseph Smith, jun., or Sidney 
Rigd(m from Kirtland. 

March. — Answers to certain questions 
on Scripture, principally the 11th chapter 
of Isaiah, were given by revelation through 
Joseph Smith, jun. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 
113.) 

Sui. lO.^Wm. W. Phelps and John Whit- 
mer were excommunicated from the 
Church by the High Council at Far West, 
Mo. Some time afterwards Wm. W. 
Phelps was received back into the Church 
by baptism. 

Wed. /-/.—Joseph the Prophet arrived at 
Far West, Mo., with his family, accom- 
panied by Apostle Brigham Young and 
others. 

April. Fri. 6".— The Saints in Missouri 
met at Far West to celebrate the anniver- 
sary of the organization of the Church and 



transact business. John Corrill and Elias 
Higbee were appointed historians and Geo. 
W. Robinson General Church Recorder and 
clerk to the First Presidency. Thomas B. 
Marsh was sustained as president j)rn tern. 
in Missouri, with Brigham Young and Da- 
vid W. Patten as assistant presidents. 

Sat. 7. — On this and the following day, 
the Church held its first quarterly confer- 
ence at Far West. 

John Whitmer refused to give up the 
records of the Church in his possession to 
the newly appointed Church clerk and re- 
corder. 

Thurs. 12. — Oliver Cowdery was excom- 
municated from the Church by the High 
Council, at Far West, Mo. The following 
day David Whitmer and Lyman E. John- 
son were cut otf . 

Tues. 17. — Apostle David W. Patten was 
called by revelation through Joseph the 
Prophet, at Far West, Mo., to "make a 
disposition of his merchandise," and pre- 
pare for a mission. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 
114.) 

Fri. 20. — Apostles Heber C. Kimball and 
Orson Hyde sailed from Liverpool, Eng- 
land, for America on the ship (iarrick. 
They arrived in New York May 12th, and 
at Kirtland, O., May 22nd. 

Thurs. 2(>. — A revelation was given 
through Joseph Smith, jun., at Far West, 
Mo., concerning the building up of that 
place and the Lord's House. (Doc. and Cov., 
Sec. 11.5.) 

May. Fri. ll.^Wm. E. McLellin was 
excommunicated from the Church, at Far 
West. 

,Sat. /.9.— Joseph Smith, jun., Sidney Rig- 
don and others visited a place on the north 
side of Grand river (about twenty-five 
miles north of Far West) called by the 
Saints Spring Hill, which by revelation 
was named Adam-ondi-Ahman, because "it 
is the place where Adam shall come to 
visit his people or the Ancient of Days 
shall sit, as spoken of by the Prophet 
Daniel." (Dan. 7: 9—14; Doc. and Cov., 
Sec. 116.) 

June. Thurn. 28. — A Stake of Zion 
called Adam-ondi-Ahman was organized 
in Daviess County, Mo., with John Smith 
as president and Reynolds Cahoon and 
Lyman Wight as his counselors. A High 
Council was also organized with John 
Lemon, Daniel Stanton, Mayhew Hillman, 
Daniel Carter, Isaac Perry, Henry Har- 
rison Sagers, AUanson Brown, Thomas 
Gordon, Lorenzo D. Barnes, George A. 
Smith, Harvey Olmstead and Ezra Thayer 
as members. 

July.— The third number of the Elders^ 
.Touriud was published at Far West, Mo. 
The first two numbers had been published 
at Kirtland, O. 

Wed. 4. — The corner stones of the House 
of the Lord, at Far West, Mo., were laid, 
agreeable to a commandment of the Lord, 
given April 26th, 1838. 

Fri. H. — Five hundred and fifteen Saints 
left Kirtland, O., for Missouri, under the 
direction of the Seventies. 

.Si//i. .s'.— Wm. Marks, Newel K. Whitney 
and Oliver Granger were commanded by 
revelation to leave Kirtland, O., and re- 
move to Missouri. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 117.) 

— John Taylor, John E. Page, Wilford 



CHURCH CHROXOLOGT — 1838. 



15 



Woodruff and Willard Richards were 
called by revelation to the Apostleship, 
"to fill the places of those who had fallen." 
(Doc. and Gov., Sec. 118.) 

^In answer to the question, "O Lord, 
show unto thy servants how much thou 
requirest of the properties of the people 
for a tithing," the Lord gave a revelation 
on tithing. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 119.) 

Wed. IS. — A revelation making known the 
disposition of property tithing was given 
through Joseph the Prophet, at Far West. 
(Doc. & Cov., Sec. 120.) 

August. — During this month the Saints 
at De Witt, Carroll Co., Mo., were threat- 
ened by a mob. 

Mon. 6. — The Missourians opposed the 
voting of the Saints at Gallatin, Daviess 
County, and a skirmish occurred, in which 
about twelve brethren gained a victory 
over about one hundred and fifty mobbers. 
Some of the brethren took their families 
into the hazel brush and guarded them 
during the night, through fear of the mob, 

Wed. S. — Joseph Smith, jun., and others 
called on Adam Black, a justice of the 
peace in Daviess County, Mo., and had a 
friendly conversation with him about the 
trouble in Gallatin. 

r7i?</-s.o'0.—Gov.LilburnW.Boggs.of Mis- 
souri, ordered out apai'tof the State militia 
to quell the civil disturbances in Caldwell, 
Daviess and Carroll Counties. The whole 
upper Missouri was in an uproar and state 
of confusion about the '"Mormons." 

September. Jlun 3. —A great number 
of mobbers had collected in Daviess 
County, Mo., with headquarters at Mill- 
port. 

Tues 4. — Joseph Smith, jun., and Sidney 
Rigdon commenced to study law, under 
the instructions of Generals David R. 
Atchison and Alexander W. Doniphan. 

Fri. 7. — Joseph Smith, jun., and Lyman 
Wight appeared before Judge Austin A. 
King, in Daviess County, they and others 
having been falselj' accused of threatening 
Adam Black's life on their visit to his 
house, Aug. 8th. 

jS'wn. P. — Captain William AUred, of Far 
West, frustrated the plans of the mob, by 
arresting three men who were bringing 
guns and ammunition from Richmond, 
Ray Co., Mo., to the mobbers in Daviess 
County. 

October. Jfon. 1. — As the militia, un- 
der Generals Atchison, Doniphan and 
Parks had succeeded in restoring tem- 
porary peace in Daviess County, the mob- 
bers went to De Witt, Carroll Co., and at- 
tacked the Saints there. 

Thurs. 4. — The Kirtland Camp arrived 
at its destination, Adam-ondi-Ahman. 

Sat. 6. — Joseph the Prophet arrived at 
De Witt, Carroll Co., Mo., whither he went 
to assist the brethren who were trying to 
defend themselves against an overwhelm- 
ing mob force. 

Thurs. 11. — After several days' bom- 
bardment, the mob succeeded in driving 
the Saints from De Witt. During the 
siege some of them had perished from 
starvation, and their sufferings had been 
very great. 

Fri. 12.— The exiles from De Witt ar- 
rived at Far West. 

Mon. 15. — The brethren at Far West 
organized for self-defense. 



The mobbers rent,,, ed their depredations 
in Daviess County, by burning the houses 
of the Saints, driving off their stock, etc. 
Col. Lyman Wight, agreeable to an order 
from General Parks, organized a company 
in self-defense. This frightened the mob- 
bers, who fled from the neighborhood, 
after burning some of their own houses, 
of which they wickely accused the Saints. 

Tues. 23. — The Saints were fleeing from 
the smaller settlements into Far West for 
safety, the mobs increasing in numbers all 
around. The most wicked lies were circu- 
lated about the Saints, and their move- 
ments in self-defense were by the State au- 
thorities construed into treason. 

Thurs. 25. — A battle was fought between 
a mob and about seventy-five brethren on 
Crooked river, Ray County, Mo., in which 
Gideon Carter was killed and eleven others 
wounded, among these were Apostle Da- 
vid W. Patten and Patterson O'Banion 
who died soon afterwards. 

Sat. 27. — Apostle David W. Patten was 
buried at Far West. 

— Gov. Lilburn W. Boggs issued his fa- 
mous exterminating order, which gave the 
Saints the choice between banishment from 
Missouri and death. 

About this time Sampson Avard, an 
apostate, secretly organized a company 
called Danites. ' The Church used all 
proper means to expose and counteract 
his schemes. 

Tues. .'SO. — A mob under the leadership of 
Col. Wm. O. Jennings attacked a little set- 
tlement of Saints at Haun's Mill, Caldwell 
Co., Mo., and killed and mortally wounded 
Thomas McBride, Levi N. Merrick, Elias 
Benner, Josiah Fuller, Benjamin Lewis, 
Alexander Campbell, Warren Smith, Geo. 
S. Richards, Wm. Napier, Austin Hammer, 
Simon Cox, Hiram Abbott, John York, 
John Lee, John Byers, Sardius Smith and 
Charles Merrick. Others were severely 
wounded, but recovered. Among these 
were Alma L. Smith, who was healed in a 
most miraculous manner, through prayers 
and faith. 

— The mob-militia, about two thousand 
strong, under command of Samuel D. 
Lucas, arrived near Far West, and the 
citizens prepared for their own defense. 

Wed. 31. — Joseph Smith, jun., Sidney 
Rigdon, Pai'ley P. Pratt, Lyman Wight 
and Geo. W. Robinson were betrayed by 
Col. George M. Hinkle and made prisoners 
in the camp of the mob-militia. 

Xoveinbcr. Thurs. 1. — Hyrum Smith 
and Amasa M. Lyman were bi'ought as 
prisoners into camp. A court martial was 
held, and the prisoners were sentenced to 
be shot the following morning ; they were, 
however, saved through the interference 
of General Doniphan. 

On demand of General Samuel D. Lucas 
the citizens of Far West were forced to 
give up their arms, after which the mob- 
militia pillaged the town, ravished women, 
and committed other acts of barbarity. 

Fri. 2. — Joseph Smith, jun., and fellow- 
prisoners were taken to Far West under a 
strong guard and permitted to see their 
families, from whom they then were rudely 
torn and started under a strong guard, 
commanded by Generals Samuel D. Lucas 
and Robert Wilson, for Independence, 
Jackson Co., where they arrived on the 4th. 



16 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY— 1839. 



Sun. 4. — Gen. John B. Clark arrived at 
Far West with about two thousand troops, 
and the following day he made most of the 
brethren prisoners. 

Tues. 6. — John B. Clark delivered an in- 
sulting speech to the brethren at Far 
West, in which he advised the Saints to 
scatter abroad and never again organize 
with Bishops, presidents, etc. Of the lead- 
ers of the Church, who had been impris- 
oned, he said their fate was fixed, their 
die cast, and their doom sealed, and that 
they would never be seen by their friends 
again. 

The brethren were compelled to sign 
deeds of trust for paying the expense of 
the mob. About sixty men were retained 
as ijrisoners, and the remainder of the 
Saints ordered to leave the State, accord- 
ing to the exterminating order of Gov. 
Boggs. 

Thiirs. 8. — Gen. Wilson placed guards 
around Adam-ondi-Ahman, took all the 
men prisoners and put them under guard. 
A court of inquiry was organized, with 
Adam Black on the bench, which resulted 
in the acquittal of the prisoners. 

Fri. .9. — Joseph Smith, jun., and fellow- 
prisoners arrived at Richmond, Ray 
County, Mo., where they were put in 
chains and much abused by their guards. 
On one occasion the Prophet Joseph re- 
buked the wicked guard with the power of 
God, and stopped the foul conversation 
with which the prisoners were being tan- 
talized. 

Sat. 10. — Gen. Wilson ordered every 
family to be out of Adam-ondi-Ahman in 
ten days, with permission to go to Caldwell 
County and tarry till spring, then to leave 
the State under pain of extermination. 

Tues. 13. — Joseph Fielding Smith was 
born at Far West, Mo. 

— A mock trial, which lasted sixteen 
days, was commenced at Richmond, and 
nearly sixty of the brethren were brought 
before Judge Austin A. King, charged with 
treason, murder, burglary, arson, robbery 
and larceny. Up to that date about thirty 
of the brethren had been killed and many 
wounded since the hostilities commenced 
the previous August. 

Sat. 24. — Twenty-three of the Far West 
prisoners were discharged at Richmond, 
Mo., as nothing could be found against 
them. 

Wed. 28. — The remaining prisoners in 
Richmond were released, or admitted to 
bail, except Joseph Smith, jun., Lyman 
Wight, Caleb Baldwin, Hyrum Smith, 
Alex. McRae and Sidney Rigdon, who 
were sent to jail in Liberty, Clay Co., to 
stand their trial for treason and murder, 
of which they were falsely accused ; and 
Parley P. Pratt, Morris Phelps, Luman 
Gibbs, Darwin Chase and Norman Shearer 
were confined in the Richmond jail to stand 
their trial on a similar charge. 

December. Wed. i(,9.— John Taylor and 
John E. Page were ordained Apostles, at 
Far West, Mo. 

—A petition from the Saints in Caldwell 
County was presented to the Missouri 
legislature, causing much warm debate, 
but the petition was finally laid on the 
table, which meant that the legislature 
would do nothing for the suffering Saints. 



Tlnirs. 27. — Anson Call was brutally 
whipped by a mob, near Elk Horn, Ray 
Co., Mo. 

1839. 
The vSaints who were banished from 
Missouri escaped to Illinois; Joseph the 
Prophet and the other imprisoned brethren 
made their escape. After being kindly 
treated by the citizens of Quincy, Com- 
merce, Hancock Co., 111., was selected as 
a new gathering place for the Saints ; the 
building of a city was commenced and a 
Stake of Zion organized. Most of the 
Apostles started on a mission to Great 
Britain. 

January. Tues. 2f>. — The Elders met 
at Far West to complete measures for the 
removal of the poor from Missouri, and 
pledged themselves to assist each other 
until all were removed. 

February. Thurs. 14. — Brigham Young, 
President of the Twelve, left Far West, 
Mo., for Illinois, on account of persecution. 

Sat. 23. — Many of the fugitive Saints 
having arrived at Quincy, Adams Co., 111., 
the citizens of that place met to adopt 
measures for their relief. 

About this time Sidney Rigdon was re- 
leased from prison in Liberty jail, Mo., on 
bail. 

March. Sun. 17. — Thomas B. Marsh, 
formerly President of the Twelve, Wm. W. 
Phelps, Frederick G. Williams, George 
M. Hinkle and others were excommunicated 
from the Church at a conference held at 
Quincy, 111. 

Wed. 20. — Joseph Smith, jun., who was 
still imprisoned in Liberty jail. Mo., wrote 
an excellent epistle "to the Saints at 
Quincy, 111., and scattered abroad," in 
which was embodied a most fervent prayer 
in behalf of the .suffering Saints, and words 
of prophecy. (See Doc. and Cov., Sec. 121, 
and History of Joseph Smith.) 

A few days later the Prophet Joseph 
continued his epistle and wrote among 
other beautiful gems that which consti- 
tutes Sections 122 and 123 of the Doctrine 
and Covenants. 

April. Fri. 5. — A company of about 
fifty men in Daviess County, Mo., swore 
that they would never eat or drink until 
they had murdered Joseph the Prophet. 

Sat. (>. — Joseph Smith, jun., and fellow- 
prisoners were started from Liberty jail, 
to Gallatin, Daviess County, Mo., where 
they arrived on the 8th, and were again 
subjected to a mock trial before a drunken 
court and jury. 

Thurs. 11. — Ten mobbers made an un- 
successful attempt to kill Stephen Mark- 
ham in Daviess County, Mo., because he 
had testified truthfully in the case of the 
prisoners. 

Sun. 14. — The committee for the re- 
moval of the Saints from Missouri moved 
36 families into Tenney's Grove, about 
twenty-five miles from Far West. 

Man. 1'). — Joseph Smith, jun., and fellow- 
prisoners, started from Daviess towards 
Boone County, Mo., under a change of 
venue. 



CHURCU CHROS'OLOGY — 183!'. 



17 



Tutu, id.— The guard being drunk, Jo- 
seph Smith, jun., and fellow-prisoners 
made their escape. After a severe jour- 
ney they arrived at Quincy, 111., on the 
22nd. 

Sat. :^0.— The last of the Saints left Far 
West. Thus a whole community, number- 
ing about fifteen thousand souls, were ex- 
pelled from their homes on account of 
their religion. 

Wed. 24.— Psirley P. Pratt and feUow- 
prisoners were brought before the grand 
jury of Ray County, at Richmond. Dar- 
win Chase and Norman Shearer were 
dismissed after having been imprisoned 
for six months. 

Thui's.'i"). — Joseph Smith, jun., and others 
visited Iowa for the purpose of finding a 
location for the Church. Commerce, Han- 
cock Co., 111., was finally selected as a 
gathering place for the Saints. 

Ffi. 'X.— 'E.a.vly in the morning a con- 
ference was held on the Temple site at 
Far West, Mo., in fulfilment of the revela- 
tion given July 8, 1838. Among those pres- 
ent were Apostles Brigham Young, Heber 
C. Kimball, Orson Pratt, John E. Page 
and John Taylor, who ordained Wilford 
Woodruff and George A. Smith Apostles, 
"to fill the places of those who had fallen." 
Alpheus Cutler, the master-workman of 
the Temple, then commenced laying its 
foundation, in accordance with revelation, 
by rolling up a large stone near the south- 
east corner. Isaac Russell, John Goodson, 
Luman Gibbs and twenty-eight others 
were excommunicated fi-om the Church. 

May. Wed. I. — The first .purchase of 
land for the Church at Commerce, 111., was 
made by Joseph Smith, jun., and others of 
the committee. The purchase consisted of 
two farms bought respectively of Hugh 
White and Isaac Galland. 

Fn. 3. — Six of the Apostles met Joseph 
the Prophet near Quincy, 111., for the first 
time after his liberation from prison. 

Sat. 4. — A two days' conference was 
commenced on the Presbyterian camp 
ground, near Quincy, 111. The doings of 
the Twelve at Far West on April 26th were 
sanctioned. Elder Oliver Granger was 
appointed to go to Kirtland, O., to preside, 
and the Saints in the Eastern States were 
advised to gather to Kirtland and settle 
that place as a Stake of Zion. On the 5th 
it was decided to send Sidney Rigdon as a 
delegate to Washington, D. C, to lay the 
grievances of the Saints before the Gene- 
ral Government. 

J/o«. 6. — At a conference,held at Quincy, 
III., Wm. Marks was appointed to preside 
at Commerce, and John P. Greene over 
the Saints in New York. A number of 
Seventies and High Priests were called to 
accompany the Apostles on their missions 
to Europe. 

Thurs. 9. — Joseph Smith, jun., left 
Quincy with his family, and arrived the 
following dav at Commerce. 

Wed. 22. — Parley P. Pratt, 'Morris 
Phelps, Luman Gibbs and King FoUett, 
having obtained a change of venue, left 
Richmond, Mo., handcuffed, for Columbia, 
Boone County, where they arrived on the 
26th and were thrown into a filthy dun- 
geon. 

JTune.— The first house erected by the 



Saints in Commerce was raised by Theo- 
dore Turley. 

Man. 24. — The Church purchased the 
town of Nashville, in Lee County, Iowa 
Territory, and twenty thousand acres of 
land adjoining it. About the same time 
another tract of land lying west of Mont- 
rose, Iowa, opposite Nauvoo, was pur- 
chased. 

July. — Much sickness prevailed among 
the Saints at Commerce, which at that 
time was a very unhealthful place, but many 
of them were miraculously healed by the 
power of God. 

Tins. 2. — Joseph the Prophet advised 
that a town be built on the Iowa purchase, 
to be called Zarahemla. 

Thio'S. 4.— After more than seven 
months' imprisonment without conviction, 
Parley P. Pratt and Morris Phelps es- 
caped from the Columbia jail, Boone 
County, Mo. They arrived in Quincy, lU., 
after days of dreadful suffering from 
hunger and fatigue. King FoUett, who 
also tried to escape, was retaken. 

JIo)i. 22. — Elijah Fordham, Henry G. 
Sherwood, Benjamin Brown, Joseph B. 
Noble and many others, at Commerce, 111., 
and Montrose, Iowa, were miraculously 
healed under the powerful administrations 
of the Prophet Joseph, assisted by other 
Elders. 

August. Thurs. S. — Apostles John Tay- 
lor and Wilford Woodruff left Commerce, 
111., on a mission to England. 

Thurs. ^9.— Apostles Parley P. Pratt 
and Orson Pratt and Elder Hiram Clark 
departed from Commerce on a mission to 
England. 

September. Wed. IS. — Apostles Brig- 
ham Young and Heber C. Kimball started 
from Commerce on a mission to England, 
leaving their families sick and poverty- 
stricken. 

Sat. 2i.— Apostle Geo. A. Smith and El- 
ders Reuben Hedlock and Theodore Tur- 
ley left Commerce for England on a 
mission 

October. Sat. .5.— At a general confer- 
ence, held at Commerce, William Marks 
was appointed president of that Stake, 
Edward Partridge, Bishop of the upper 
Ward, aud Vinson Knight, Bishop of the 
lower Ward. Geo. W. Harris, Samuel 
Bent, Henry G. Sherwood, David Fullmer, 
Alpheus Cutler, Wm. Huntington, Thomas 
Grover, Newel Knight, Chas. C. Rich, 
David Dort, Seymour Brunson and Lewis 
D. Wilson were chosen members of the 
High Council. John Smith was appointed 
to preside over the Saints on the other 
side of the Mississippi river, in Iowa Ter- 
ritory, with Alanson Ripley as Bishop. 
Asahel Smith, John M. Burk, Abraham O. 
Smoot, Richard Howard, Willard Snow, 
Erastus Snow, David Pettigrew, Elijah 
Fordham, Edward Fisher, Elias Smith, 
John Patten and Stephen Chase were 
chosen as members of the High Council. 

TJi urs.lT. — Apostle Heber C. Kimball was 
poisoned at Terre Haute, Indiana, but his 
life was saved by the administration of 
Apostle Brigham Young. 

Saf. 19.— The High Council appointed for 
the Church in Iowa met for the first time, 
at Nashville, Iowa. Reynolds Cahoon and 
Lj'man Wight were appointed counselors 
to John Smith. 



18 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 18-iO. 



Tues. ^<y.— Joseph Smith, jun., accom- 
panied by Sidney Rigdon, Elias Higbee 
and O. Porter Rockwell left Commerce 
for Washington, D. C, to lay the griev- 
ances of the Saints before the President 
and Congress of the United States. 

In the latter part of this month King 
FoUett, the last of the Missouri prisoners, 
was tried and set free. 

November. — The first number of the 
Times and Seasons was published at Com- 
merce, III. 

Sun. 3. — James MulhoUand, Joseph 
Smith's clerk, died at Commerce. 

Wed. ,?7. — Brigham Young rebuked the 
wind and waves on Lake Erie, and he was 
obeyed. 

Tliurs. 28. — Joseph Smith, jun., arrived 
at Washington, D. C. 

Dec'eml)er. Thurs. /.v.— Apostles Wil- 
ford Woodruff and John Taylor and Elder 
Theodore Turley sailed from New York 
for England; they arrived at Liverijool 
Jan. 11, 1840. 

Sat. 21. — Joseph Smith, jun., arrived at 
Philadelphia, Pa., (from Washington;, 
where he remained until the 30th, preach- 
ing the gospel. 

184:0 

Joseph the Prophet and other Elders 
visited Washington, D. C, to seek redress 
for the Saints from the Federal Govern- 
ment, but were unsuccessful. Commerce, 
Ill.,was incorporated as the City of Nauvoo, 
and Stakes of Zion were organized in dif- 
ferent parts of Illinois. The Apostles per- 
formed a great missionary work in Eng- 
land, whence also the first missionary was 
sent to Australia. 

January. Sun. i?.— Francis Marion 
Lyman was born at Macomb, McDonough 
Co., 111. 

March. — Multitudes were baptized into 
the Church in the United States and Eng- 
land. Apostle Wilford Woodruff built up 
large branches in Herefordshire, England. 

Wed. 4. — Joseph Smith, jun., arrived in 
Commerce, 111., from Washington, D. C, 
after a fruitless endeavor to obtain redress 
for the wrongs suffered by the Saints in 
Missouri. He had presented to Congress 
claims against Missouri from 491 individu- 
als for about .*1,381,0(K). President Martin 
Van Buren, in answer to Joseph's appeal, 
said, "Your cause is just, but I can do 
nothing for you." The Committee on the 
Judiciary, to whom was referred the 
memorial of the Saints, reported adverse- 
ly to the prayer of the petitioners. 

J/o/t. !'. — Bi-igham Young, Heber C. 
Kimball, Parley P. Pratt, George A. Smith 
and Reuben Hedlock sailed from New York 
on the ship J'titrick- /A«, 7/ for Liverpool, 
where they arrived April 6th. 

April. Mon. H.—A general conference 
of the Church was commenced at Nauvoo, 
111. It continued three days. On the first 
day Apostle Orson Hyde was called on a 
mission to Jerusalem and on the 8th Apostle 
•lohn E. Page was appointed to accompany 
liim, The conference also adopted a series 



of resolutions, expressive of sorrow and 
disappointment at the action (*f the Com- 
mittee of the Judiciaiy at Washington, 
D. C. 

Tnes. 14. — At a council of the Apostles 
held at Preston, England, Willard Rich- 
ards was ordained one of the Twelve 
Apostles. 

Wed. t>.— Apostle Oi-sonHyde left Com- 
merce, 111., on his mission to Jerusalem. 

— At a conference held at Preston, Eng- 
land, where 34 branches and 1,686 mem- 
'oers were represented, it was decided to 
publish a monthly periodical in the inter- 
est of the Church in England. 

Tues. 21. — The Postmaster General at 
Washington, D. C, changed the name of 
the postoffice at Commerce, Hancock Co., 
111., to Nauvoo, and appointed George W. 
Robinson postmaster. 

3Iay. Sat. .9.— Elder Theodore Turley, 
who had been imprisoned in Stafford jaU, 
England, at the instigation of a Methodist 
preacher, was released. 

Wed. 21. — Bishop Edward Partridge died 
at Nauvoo, 46 years old. He lost his life in 
consequence of the Missouri persecutions. 

— The first number of The Latter-day 
Saints' Mitlennial Star was published at 
Manchester, England ; Apostle Parley P. 
Pratt, editor. 

June. By this time the Saints had 
erected about two hundred and fifty 
houses in Nanvoo. 

.S«^ 6". — Forty -one Saints sailed from 
Liverijool, England, on the ship Britannia, 
for the United States, being the first 
Saints that gathered from a foreign land. 
John Moon was leader of the company. 

Sun. 14. — The Bran Green and Gadfield 
Elm conference was organized by Ajjostle 
Wilford Woodruff in Worcestershire, Eng- 
land, consisting of twelve branches. This 
was the first conference organized in the 
British mission. 

,Smh. 2/.— At a meeting held on Stanley 
Hill, Herefordshire, England, the Froome's 
Hill conference was organized by Apostle 
Wilford Woodruff, consisting of twenty 
branches. 

July. — The first British edition of the 
Latter-day Saints' Hymn Book was pub- 
lished in England. 

Tues. ;.— James Allred, Noah Rogers, 
Alanson Brown and Benjamin Boyce were 
kidnapped from Hancock County, 111., by 
Missourians, and taken to TuUy, Lewis 
Co., Mo., where they were imprisoned, 
whipped and ill-treated until nearly dead. 
Brown and Allred escaped a few days 
afterwards. 

Sat. 11. — Apostle Geo. A. Smith ordained 
and set apart Wm. Barratt at Burslem, 
Staffordsliire, England, for a mission to 
South Australia. He was the first mis- 
sionary to that country. 

^fon. 20. — John Moon's company of Brit- 
ish emigrants arrived at New York. 

.Von. 27. — Apostle John Taylor sailed 
from Liverpool for Ireland to open the 
door of the gospel in that country. 

August. — Elder Wm. Donaldson, of the 
British army, sailed from England ff)r the 
East Indies. He was the first mem1)er of 
the Church to visit that country. 

Fri. 21. — Noah Rogers and Benjamin 
Boyce escaped from their unlawful ira- 



CHURCH CHKONOLOGY — l)S4l. 



10 



prisonment in Missouri, during which they 
had been put in irons and suffered much. 

Mon. 31. — Apostle Heber C. Kimball 
baptized Henry Conner, a watchmaker, in 
London, England, as the first fruit of 
preachins: the fulness of thf> fospel in that 
city 

September. — Apostle .Jonn Taylor and 
others first preached the gospel on the 
Isle of Man. 

ATon. S. — The ship Xorf/i America sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with about two 
hundred Saints, under the presidency of 
Theodore Turley, bound for Nauvoo, 111. 

Sun. 14. — Joseph Smith, sen., Patriarch 
to the Church, died at Nauvoo. 

Jfon. 15. — Gov. Lilburn W. Boggs, of 
Missouri, made a demand on Gov. Thos. 
Carlin, of Illinois, for Joseph Smith, jun., 
Sidney Rigdon, Lyman Wight, Parley P. 
Pratt, Caleb Baldwin and Alanson Brown 
as fugitives from justice. 

October. T^r/. .').— At a conference held 
at Nauvoo, Robert B. Thompson was ap- 
pointed General Church Clerk, instead of 
Geo. W. Robinson. Almon W. Babbitt 
was appointed to preside over the Church 
at Kirtland, O., and a committee was ap- 
pointed to organize new Stakes for the 
gathering of the Saints. 

Wed. 22. — A Stake was organized by the 
committee at Lima, Hancock Co., 111., with 
Isaac Morley as president and John Mur- 
dock and Walter Cox as his counselors. 

Sat. 25. — A Stake was organized at 
Quincy, Adams Co., 111., with Daniel 
Stanton, Stephen Jones and Ezra T. Ben- 
son as the presidency. 

Jfon. 27. — A Stake" called Mount Hope 
was organized at the steam mills, Colum- 
bus, Adams Co.. 111., with the following 
brethren as the presidency : Abel Lamb, 
Sherman Gilbert and John Smith. 

November. .Sat. I. — The committee 
organized a Stake called Geneva, in Mor- 
gan Co., 111., with Wm. Bosley. Howard S. 
Smith and Samuel Fowler as the presi- 
dency. 

December. TI>c7. 16. — The charter for 
the incorporation of Nauvoo, granted by 
the State legislature, was signed by Gov- 
ernor Thomas Carlin, but not to take effect 
until the first of Februarv following. 

18-41. 

During this year Nauvoo. 111., began its 
career as an incorporatea city ; the iNau- 
voo Legion was organized, and the corner 
stones of the Nauvoo Temple were laid. 
The Twelve Apostles returned from their 
missions to England, and baptism for the 
dead was commenced in the Church. 

January. — The first number of the Gos- 
pel Reflector, a semi-monthly periodical 
published in the interest of the Church, 
was issued in Philadelphia, Pa. ; Benjamin 
Winr^hester, editor. 

— The first British edition of the Book of 
Mormon was published in Manchester, 
England. 

Tues. W. — The Saints were commanded 
by revelation to build a Temple at Nauvoo, 
ni.. and also a " boar^.-ng house " for the 



accommodation of strangers, which subse- 
quently became known as the Nauvoo 
House. The general authorities of the 
Church and other oflBcers were named in 
the revelation, which also contains import- 
ant explanations on the order of the 
Priesthood. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 12-1:.) 

Sun. 24. — Hyrum Smith succeeded his 
father, Joseph Smith, sen., as Patriarch to 
the Church, and Wm. Law was appointed 
a Counselor in the First Presidency, suc- 
ceeding Hyrum Smith, in that capacity, 
according to revelation. 

Sat. :',(). — At a meeting held at Nauvoo, 
111., Joseph Smith was elected sole Trustee 
for the Chui'ch, to hold the oftice during 
life, his "successors to be the First Presi- 
dency" of the Church. 

February. Mon. 1. — The first election 
took place for members of the city coun- 
cil of Nauvoo. John C. Bennett was 
elected mayor; Wm. Marks, Samuel H. 
Smith, Daniel H. Wells and Newel K. 
Whitney, aldermen ; Joseph Smith, Hyrum 
Smith, Sidney Rigdon, Charles C. Rich, 
John F. Barnett, Wilson Law, Don Carlos 
Smith, John P. Greene and Vinson Knight, 
councilors. 

Wed. 3. — The city council of Nauvoo 
elected Henry G. Sherwood, marshal; 
James Sloan, recorder; Robert B. Thomp- 
sen, treasurer; James Robinson, assessor; 
Austin Cowles, supervisor of streets. 

Thurs. 4. — The Nauvoo Legion.originally 
consisting of six companies, was organ- 
ized with Joseph Smith as lieutenant-gene- 
ral. 

Suti. 7. — The ship Sheflield sailed from 
Liverpool, England with 235 Saints, under 
the leadership of Hiram Clark. 

Sat. 13. — Apostle Orson Hyde sailed from 
New York for Liverpool, on his mission to 
Jerusalem. 

Sun. 14. — The London (England) confer- 
ence was organized with Lorenzo Snow as 
president. 

Tues. 16. — The ship Echo sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 109 Saints, under 
the direction of Daniel Browitt. 

March. — The Saints were commanded 
by revelation to build a city in Iowa Terri- 
tory, opposite Nauvoo, to be called Zara- 
hemla. (Doc. and Cov.. Sec. 12.5.) 

Jfon. 1. — The city council divided the 
city of Nauvoo into four wards. An ordi- 
nance was passed, giving free toleration 
and equal privileges in the city to aU 
religious sects and denominations. 

n'rd iO.— Governor Thos. Carlin, of Illi- 
nois, commissioned Joseph Smith lieuten- 
ant-general of the Nauvoo Legion. 

Wed. 17. — The ship rie.ste sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 54 Saints, under 
the direction of Thomas Smith and Wm. 
Moss, bound for America. 

Mon. 29. — Charles C. Rich and Austin 
Cowles were chosen counselors to Wm. 
Marks, president of the Nauvoo Stake of 
Zion. 

ApriL Tues. 6. — A general conference 
of the Church was commenced at Nauvoo, 
and the corner stones of the Nauvoo 
Temple were laid. The conference was 
continued till the 11th. 

Thnr.-i. S. — Lyman Wight was chosen 
one of the T,.elve Apostles, in place of 
David W. Patten, martyred in Missouri. 



20 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 184-2. 



Wed. i^i.- Apostles Brigham Young, He- 
ber C. Kimball, Orson Pratt, Wilford 
Woodruff, John Taylor, Geo. A. Smith and 
Willard Richards sailed from Liverpool, 
England, on the ship Rochester, accompa- 
nied by 130 Saints. They arrived at New 
York May 20th. 

May. 'S(f/. ^?.— At a conference held at 
Kirtland, O., Almon W. Babbitt was 
chosen pi-esident of the Kirtland Stake, 
with Lester Brooks and Zebedce Coltrin 
as counselors. 

JIan. ?J.— The First Presidency at 
Nauvoo called upon all scattered Saints to 
gather to Hancock County, 111., and Lee 
County, la. All neighboring Stakes out- 
side of these two counties were discon- 
tinued. 

June. /S'«Y. .j.— Joseph Smith was ar- 
rested on a requisition from the State of 
Missouri. He was tried on the 9th and 
liberated on the 10th on a writ of Jutbeas 
corpus, at Monmouth, Wai-ren Co., HI. 

Tues. 22. — Theodore Curtis,who had been 
under arrest in Gloucester, England, five 
days for preaching the gospel, was ac- 
quitted. 

July. Thins. /.Apostles Brigham 
Young, Heber C. Kimball and John Taylor 
arrived at Nauvoo from their missions to 
England. 

Fri. .9. — By revelation, through Joseph 
the Prophet, Apostle Brigham Young was 
commanded to send the "word" abroad, 
and to take special care of his family. 
(Doc. and Cov., Sec. 126.) 

Tues. :/.i. — Apostle Geo. A. Smith re- 
turned to Nauvoo from his mission to 
England. 

Sun. 25. — Wm. Yokum lost his leg by 
amputation, as the result of a wound re- 
ceived in the massacre at Haun's Mill, 
Mo. 

August. Sal. 7. — Don Carlos Smith, 
the youngest brother of the Prophet, died 
at Nauvoo. 

Thuts. -12. — Joseph Smith preached to 
about one hundred Sac and Fox Indians 
(among whom were the chiefs Keokuk, 
Kiskuhosh and Appenoose), who had come 
to visit him at Nauvoo. 

Mon. Ifl. — Apostle Willard Richards ar- 
rived at Nauvoo from his mission to Eng- 
land. 

Wed. 2'i. — Oliver Granger died at Kirt- 
land, O. 

Fri. '27. — Robert B. Thompson, Joseph 
Smith's scribe, died at Nauvoo. 

September. Tues. 21. — The ship Ty- 
rean sailed from Liverpool for New Or- 
leans with 204 Saints, under the direction 
of Joseph Fielding, bound for Nauvoo. 

Wed. 22. — A company of brethren left 
Nauvoo for the Pineries, Wisconsin, about 
Ave hundred miles north, to procure lum- 
ber for the Nauvoo Temple. 

October. Sat. 2. -An important gen- 
eral conference w?s cf)mmenced in the 
Grove at Nauvoo. It was continued till 
the 4th. Joseph Smith declared, as the 
will of the Lord, that the Church should 
not hold another general conference until 
the Saints could meet in the Temple. 
James Sloan was elected Church clerk, in- 
stead of Robert B. Thompson deceased. 
Writ. 6". -Apostle Wilford Woodruff ar- 



rived at Nauvoo from his mission t« Eng- 
land. 

Tliurs. 7. — In a council of the Twelve, a 
number of brethren were called on mis- 
sions, among whom were Joseph Ball to 
South America and Henry Harrison 
Sagers to Jamaica, West Indies. 

Sun. 24. — Apostle Orson Hyde, who had 
arrived at Jerusalem, ascended the Mount 
of Olives and dedicated the land of Pales- 
tine by prayer for the gathering of the 
Jews. 

November. Man. 8.— The temporary 
baptismal font in the Nauvoo Temple was 
dedicated. 

— The ship Chaos sailed from Liverijool 
with 170 Saints, under the direction of 
Peter Melling, bound for Nauvoo. 

Sun. ?/. — Baptisms for the dead were 
commenced in the font in the basement of 
the Nauvoo Temple. 

Wed. 24. — The Ti/rcan company of Brit- 
ish Saints arrived at Warsaw, intending 
to settle Warren, a new town site, one 
mile south of Warsaw, which had been 
selected for a settlement of the Saints, 
but they soon afterwards removed to Nau- 
voo, because of oppression on the part of 
anti-Mormons. 

December. Saf. ^. - The Stake or- 
ganization at Ramus, Hancock County, 
111., was discontinued. 

Jfon. /.i— Apostle Willard Richards was 
appointed Joseph .Smith's private secre- 
tary and general clerk for the Church. 

Wed. 22. — John Snider was called by 
revelation on a special mission to Europe, 
bearing a message from the Twelve. 



1842. 

A large number of Saints from Great 
Britain arrived at Nauvoo, 111. John C. 
Bennett, who turned traitor against the 
Church, sought the Prophet Joseph's life. 
Joseph Smith was arrested on a false 
charge, tried and acquitted; and when the 
officers planned to arrest him again, he 
hid himself and from his places of seclusion 
wrote important communications to the 
Saints. 

January. Thnrs. (!. — A conference was 
held at Zarahemla, la., opposite Nauvoo, 
when a Stake of Zion, previously organ- 
ized there, was discontinued, and a branch 
organized in its stead, with John Smith as 
president. 

Wed. 12. — The ship Tremont sailed from 
Liverpool with 143 .Saints bound for 
Nauvoo via New Orleans. 

February. Wed. 2. — Moses Thatcher 
was 1)orn in Sangamon County, 111. 

Thurs. :i. — Apostle Wilford Woodruff 
took the superintendency of the printing 
office and Apostle John Taylor the editor- 
ial department of the Times and Seasons, 
at Nauvoo. 

Saf. 0. — The ship i/b/je sailed from Liver- 
pool for New Orleans with 270 Saints. 

Sun. 20.— Ttm ship John Cununins sailed 
from Liverpool with about two hundred 
Saints. 

March. — The MiUcnnial Star office ia 



CHURCH CHROXOLOGY — 1842. 



21 



England was moved from Manchester 
(No. 47 Oxford Street) to the Chui'ch 
emigration office in Liverpool (No. 36 
Chapel Street). 

Sat. /2.— The ship Hanovev sailed from 
LiveriK)ol with about two hundred Saints, 
under the direction of Amos Fielding. 

Tues. i.5.— Joseph Smith took charge of 
the editorial department of the Titncs and 
Seasons. 

T?iur.s. 17. — The organization of the Fe- 
male Relief Society of Nauvoo was com- 
menced. It was completed on the 24th, 
with Emma Smith as president; Mrs. 
Elizabeth Ann Whitney and Mrs. Sarah 
M. Cleveland, counselors; Miss Elvira 
Cowles, treasurer; and Eliza R. Snow, 
secretary. 

Stm. 20. — Joseph Smith baptized eighty 
persons for the dead in the Mississippi 
river, after which he confirmed about 
fifty. 

Sat. 26. — John Snider left Nauvoo on 
his special mission to England. 

Sun. 27. — Joseph Smith baptized 107 
persons for the dead in the Mississippi 
river. 

April. Wed. 6'.^A special conference 
of the Church wes held at Nauvoo ; it was 
continued till the 8th, and during its ses- 
sions 27.5 brethren were ordained Elders. 

Wed. 13. — About two liundred Saints 
arrived at Nauvoo from Great Britain. 

Sat. 16. — The Wa.<!j), a miscellaneous 
weekly newspaper, was first published at 
Nauvoo; Wm. Smith, editor. 

Fri. 29. — Joseph Smith wrote: "A 
conspiracy against the peace of my house- 
hold was made manifest, and it gave me 
some trouble to counteract the design of 
certain base individuals and restore peace. 
The Lord makes manifest to me many 
things, which it is not wisdom for me to 
make public, until others can witness the 
proof of them." 

3Iay. Wed. 4. — Joseph Smith gave 
James Adams, Hyrum Smith, Newel K. 
Whitney, George Miller, Brigham Young, 
Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards 
instructions about holy endowments. 

Fri. 6. — Ex - Governor Lilburn W. 
Boggs, of Missouri, was shot, but not 
killed, at Independence, Mo. 

Sat. 7.~The Nauvoo Legion, now num- 
bering 26 companies, or 2,000 men, was 
reviewed and it fought a sham battle, in 
which John C. Bennett conspired against 
the Prophet's life, but failed to carry out 
his design. 

Thiirs. i.9.— John C. Bennett having re- 
signed the mayorship of Nauvoo, Joseph 
Smith was elected by the city council to fill 
the vacancy. 

Tu^.f. ?j.— Chauncey L. Higbee was ex- 
communicated from the Church by the 
High Council of Nauvoo, for unchaste and 
unvirtuous conduct. 

Wed. 2.). — The authorities of the Church 
had at this time withdrawn their fellow- 
ship from John C. Bennett, who soon af- 
terwards left Nauvoo. 

June. Wed. 1. — At a geueral confer- 
ence held in Manchester, England, 8,265 
o.fficers and members of the Church were 
represented. 

July. Sun. ■'{. — Joseph Smith spoke to 
eight thousand people at Nauvoo. 



August. — Apostle Orson Hyde publish- 
ed a i)amphlet of 120 pages in the German 
language, in Germany, entitled "A Cry in 
the Wildei-ness," etc., setting forth the 
rise, progress and doctrines of the Church. 
Saf. 6". — Joseph Smith prophesied that 
the Saints would be driven to the Rocky 
Mountains, where they should become a 
mighty people. 

Jfo>i. S. — Joseph Smith was arrested by 
a deputy sheriff at Nauvoo, by requisition 
from Gov. Thos. Reynolds, of Missouri, 
falsely accused of being accessory to the 
shooting of ex-Governor Boggs. O. Porter 
Rockwell was also arrested as principal. 
A writ of haJ)cas corpu.s- was issued by the 
municipal court of Nauvoo, by which the 
prisoners were released for tiie time being. 
Wed. If). —The deputy sheriff returned 
to Nauvoo to re-arrest Joseph Smith and 
O. Porter Rockwell, but they could not be 
found. To escape imprisonment the 
Prophet had to keep concealed for some 
time. His first retreat was the house of 
his uncle John Smith, at Zarahemla, la. 

Thurs. n.— Joseph Smith concealed him - 
self in the house of Edward Sayer, in 
Nauvoo. 

Thurs. IS. — Rumors being afloat that 
the Prophet's hiding place was discovered, 
he changed his quartei'S from the house of 
Edward Sayer to that of Carlos Granger, 
who lived in the northeast part of Nauvoo. 
Great excitement prevailed among the 
people around Nauvoo on account of John 
C. Bennett's lies. 

Fri. i,9.--Joseph Smith returned to his 
own house. 

Sat. 20.— Amasa M. Lyman was ordained 
one of the Twelve Apostles. 

Sun. 27.— Sidney Rigdon testified in 
public meeting, at Nauvoo, that his daugh- 
ter, Eliza, had been raised from the dead 
by the power of God. 

Jfon. 2.9.— After not showing himself in 
public for three weeks, Joseph Smith 
spoke to an assembly of Saints at Nauvoo ; 
380 Elders volunteered to take missions to 
the various States of the Union for the 
purpose of refuting John C. Bennett's 
lies. 

September. Thurs. i.— Joseph Smith 
wrote an address to the Saints at Nauvoo 
concerning baptism for the dead. (Doc. 
and Gov., Sec. 127.) 

Sat. .3.— Another effort was made to ar- 
rest Joseph Smith without legal process. 
His house was searched, but he eluded 
pursuit, and afterwards kept himself hid 
for some time in the house of Edward 
Hunter. 

Tues. 6*.- Joseph Smith wrote another 
important address to the Saints in relation 
to baptism for the dead, and the necessity 
of keeping records. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 
128.) 

Sat. iO.— Joseph Smith returned home 
undiscovered. 

Saf. 17. -The ship Sidney sailed from 
Liverpool with 180 Saints; it arrived at 
New Orleans Nov. 11th. 

Sun. 25.— The ship .Wed ford sailed from 
Liverpool with 214 Saints, under the presi- 
dency of Apostle Orson Hyde ; it arrived 
at New Orleans Nov. 13th. 

TA?/rs 29.— The ship ffenri/ sailed from 
Liverpool for New Orleans, with 1.57 



22 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 184:0. 



Saints, uiuU-r llu- direction of John 
Snider. 

October. '<i(u. V.— Reports reached 
Joseph Smith that (rov. Thos. Reynolds, 
of Missouri, had offered a reward for the 
arrest of himself and O. Porter Rockwell. 

Fri. ;.— Joseph Smith again left home to 
elude the pursuit of his enemies, leaving 
his wife P^mnia sick. He returned on the 
2()th. 

Til HIS. 1.1. Some of the brethren arrived 
at Nauvoo from the Pineries, Wisconsin, 
with 90,( OO feet of lumber and 24,000 cubic 
feet of timber for the Temple and Nauvoo 
House. 

T/iiirs. .■"(/. —Thomas Ward succeeded 
Apostle Parley P. Pratt as president of 
the British Mission, with Lorenzo Snow 
and Hiram Clark as counselors. 

■Sat. 2.''.— The ship Fimrdld sailed from 
Liverpool with 2.50 Saints, under the leader- 
ship of Apostle Parley P. Pratt. Because 
of ice in the Mississippi river the company 
was detained during the winter in St. 
Louis, Alton, Chester and other places, 
and did not arrive in Nauvoo until April 
12, 1843. 

November. Tiii-s. /.3.— Apostle John 
Taylor succeeded Joseph Smith as editor 
of the 7 hues II ml .SVrt.s-o//.v. 

Tfiiirs. 77.— Alpheus Harmon was frozen 
to death on the prairie, between Nauvoo 
and Carthage, 111., as he was returning 
home from a mission. 

December. Sun. 4. — The city of Nau- 
voo was divided into ten Bishop's wards. 

Weil. 7. — Apostle Orson Hyde returned 
to Nauvoo from his mission to Jerusalem. 

Tues. 20. — Lorenzo D. Barnes died at 
Bradford, England. His was the first 
death of an Elder on a foreign mission. 

Wf'd. 21. — Apostle Willard Richards, who 
had been in the East-several months, was 
appointed Church Historian, etc. 

Mon. 26. — Joseph Smith was arrested the 
third time on a requisition from the State 
of Missouri. 

Tues. 27. — Joseph Smith, accompanied by 
several brethren, left Nauvoo for Spring- 
field, 111., where they arrived on the 30th. 



184:3. 

During this and the preceding year 
Joseph the Prophet preached many power- 
ful sermons and uttered a number of im- 
portant prophecies. While on a visit to 
Dixon, 111., he had a narrow escape from 
being kidnapped under legal pretense and 
taken to Missouri. The revelation on 
celestial marriage was given and the first 
missionaries sent to the Society Islands. 

January. Mon. .'.-Joseph Smith pro- 
phesied that he should not go to Mis- 
souri dead or alive. 

Wed. -/.—Joseph Smith was on trial be- 
fore Judge Pope, of Springfield, on the 
accusation of being an accessoi'y to the 
shooting of ex -Governor Boggs of Mis- 
souri. 

Thur.s. .0.— Joseph Smith was proven 
innocent and acquitted. 

Tues. iO,— Joseph Smith and company 



arrived at Nauvoo from th rip.to Spriug- 
fleld. 

Mon. 76'.— The ship s wanton sailed from 
Liverpool with 212 Saints for New Orleans,, 
led by Lorenzo Snow. The emigrants ar- 
rived at Nauvoo April 12th. 

Tues. 17. — The Saints being overjoyeu 
because of Joseph Smith's release, meet- 
ings of prayer and thanksgiving were held 
at Nauvoo. 

February. Tues. 7. — Apostle- Parley 
P. Pratt arrived at Nauvoo from|,his mis- 
sion to England, 

Thurs. !>. — Joseph Smith received by 
revelation three grand keys, by which bad 
angels, or spirits, may be known. (Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 129.) 

March.— A "\oung Gentlemen's and 
Ladies' Relief Society" was organized at 
Nauvoo, with Wm. Cutler as president. 
—Joseph Smith studied the Germ 
language. 

/* /•/. ■'!. — The Illinois legislature passed 
a bill for repealing the Nauvoo city char- 
ter, which, however, was not approved. 

Sat. 4. — O. Porter Rockwell was taken 
prisoner in St. Louis by the Missourians. 
Wed. .S'.— The ship Yf)i-kshire sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 82 Saints on 
board, led by Thomas Bullock ; the emi - 
grants arrived at Nauvoo. May 31st, viw 
New Orleans. 

Wed. 15. — Joseph Smith prophesied that 

O. Poi'ter Rockwell would get away 

honorably from the Missourians. : 

Tues. 21. — The ship Clai/borne sailed 

from Liverpool with 106 Saints. 

ApriL Sun. ?.-" Important Items of 
Instruction " were given by Joseph Smith, 
at Nauvoo, who also prophesied " that the 
commencement of the difficulties which will 
cause much V)loodshed previous to the 
coming of the Son of Man, will be in South 
Carolina." (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 130.) 

Tfrnrs. a. — At a conference held in the 
Temple, at Kirtland, O., it was decided 
that all the .Saints i-esiding at that place 
should remove to Nauvoo, 111. 

— An important conference, which con- 
tinued its sessions till the 8th, was com- 
menced on the floor of the Temple, at Nau- 
voo, 111. Joseph Smith prophesied that 
Christ would not come until he (Joseph; 
was eighty- five years of age. 

Mon. 10. — About one liundred and fifteen 
Elders were called on missions to differ- 
ent States, at a special conference held at 
Nauvoo. 

Thurs. i:s. — Joseph Smith preached to the 
British Saints, who had arrived at Nauvoo 
the day previous. 

Sun. V.V.— Six brass plates and a skeleton 
were found by Mr. R. Wiley and others, 
near Kinderliook, Pike Co., 111. 

May. Wed. .;.— The first number of the 
Xaui'oo Xeig/ibor, a newspaper, was is- 
sued at Nauvoo, instead of the Wasp, sus- 
pended. 

Tues. 16. On this and the following day 
Joseph Smith made some important re- 
marks al)out the celestial glory, at Ra- 
mus, 111. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 131.) 

Thurs. 11^. — Returning to Nauvoo from 
his visit to Ramus, Joseph Smith dined 
with Judge Stephen A. Douglas, at Car- 
thage,Hancock Co., 111. During the conver- 
sation which took place Josejih i)rophesied 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 184:^. 



23 



that Judge Douglas would aspire to the 
Presidency of the United States, and ad- 
ded that if he ever turned his hand against 
the Latter-day Saints, he should feel the 
hand of the Almighty upon him, etc. 

Tues. 23. — Addison Pratt, Noah Rogers, 
Benjamin F. Grouard and Knowlton F. 
Hanks were set apart for a mission to the 
Pacific Islands. 

FH. 26. — Joseph Smith gave endowments, 
and also instructions on the Priesthood 
and the new and everlasting covenant, to 
Hyrum Smith, Brigham Young, Heber C. 
Kimball and others, at Nauvoo. 

June. T/iurs. 1. — Addison Pratt, Ben- 
jamin F. Grouard, Knowlton F. Hanks 
and Noah Rogers left Nauvoo on their 
missions to the i-acific Islands. 

Thurs. s. — Elias Higbee died in Nauvoo. 
f)U)i. 11. — A conference was held at Lima, 
HI., and the branch at that place reorgan- 
ized, with Isaac Morley as president, and 
Gardiner Snow, Bishop. 

Tues. Vi. — Joseph Smith left Nauvoo 
with his wife Emma to visit her sister, liv- 
ing near Dixon, Lee County, 111. 

Fri. 23. — Joseph Smith was arrested and 
brutally treated by Joseph H. Reynolds, 
sheriff of Jackson Co., Mo., and Constable 
Harmon T. Wilson, of Carthage, 111., with- 
out legal process, and only through inter- 
ference of friends at Dixon saved from 
being kidnapped and taken to Missouri. 

Sat. 24. — The corner stones of the Ma- 
sonic Temple at Nauvoo were laid. 

— Joseph Smith secured a writ of )uibei(.s 
corpus and started towards Ottawa to 
have his case examined by Judge John D. 
Caton, but, arriving at PawT)aw Grove, the 
companj' learned that Judge Caton was 
not at home, and, therefore, returned to 
Dixon the following day. 

Sun. 23. — News of Joseph Smith being 
kidnapped reached Nauvoo, and 17.5 men 
immediately started on horseback to his 
rescue. 

Man. 2H. — Joseph Smith started under 
guard towards Quincy, 111. 

Tues. 27. — The company traveling with 
Joseph Smith was met by the brethren 
from Nauvoo, when it was decided that in- 
stead of going to Quincy to have the writ 
of habea.s t-ofpus examined, the prisoner 
and escort should proceed to Nauvoo. 

Fri. .».— Joseph Smith and company ar- 
rived at Nauvoo, nearly the whole city 
turning out to meet him. In the afternoon 
he addressed the people, giving the history 
of his arx-est. While he was speaking Offi- 
cers Reynolds and Wilson started for Car- 
thage and tried to raise a mob ; afterwards 
they petitioned Gov. Thos. Ford for 
militia to take Joseph out of Nauvoo by 
force. 

July. Sat. 1. — Joseph Smith was tried 
before the municipal court of Nauvoo on a 
writ of hahcu.-f corpus and acquitted. 

Sun. 2. — Joseph Smith had a pleasant in- 
terview with several Pottawattamie chiefs 
who had come to visit him, and a very 
good impi'ession was made upon the Ind- 
ians. 

— The steamboat Maid of Iowa returned 
to Nauvoo, after a very adventurous trip 
in search of Joseph. The brethren who 
had participated in that river expedition. 



numbering about eighty, were blessed by 
the Prophet. 

Mon. .;. — A number of Eklei's were called 
to visit the various counties of Illinois, to 
preach the gospel and disabuse the public 
mind with regard to Joseph Smith's ar- 
rest. 

— Charles C. Rich and a company of 
twenty-five men, who had been out search- 
ing for the Prophet, returned to Nauvoo, 
having traveled about five hundred miles 
on horseback in seven days. 

Tuis. 4. — Nauvoo was visited bj' about 
one thousand gentlemen and ladies from 
St. Louis, Quincy and Burlington. 

Fri. 7. — Mr. M. Braman arrived at Nau- 
voo as a messenger from the governor, to 
learn the particulars of Joseph Smith's 
late arrest. 

Sat. S. — Bishop George Miller arrived at 
Nauvoo from the Pineries with 1.57,000 feet 
of lumber and 70,000 shingles for the 
Temple. 

WecL 12. —The revelation on celestial 
marriage was written in the presence of 
Hvrum Smith and Wm. Clavton. Doc. 
and Cov., Sec. 132.) 

August. Fri. /i.— General James 
Adams, of Springfield, died at Nauvoo. 

T/iiirs. 31. — Joseph Smith moved into the 
Nauvoo Mansion. 

September. Tucs. 3. — The ship Mitoka 
sailed from Liverpool with :280 Saints, 
bound for Nauvoo. 

TT>(/. 6". — At an anti-Mormon meeting, 
held at Carthage, Han-Jock Co., 111., resolu- 
tions were adopted against Joseph Smith 
and the Saints in Nauvoo. 

1- ri. L). — Joseph Smith opened the Nau- 
voo Mansion as a hotel. 

Sat. 30. — Reuben Hedlock and other mis- 
sionaries from Nauvoo arrived at Liver- 
pool, England. 

October. Tins. 3. — Joseph Smith gave 
a dinner party in the Nauvoo Mansion 
to about two hundred Saints. 

Fri. I). — A special conference of the 
Church, which continued its sessions on 
the 8th, was commenced at Nauvoo, 111. 
Serious complaints were made against Sid- 
ney Rigdon. 

Sun. S. — At a meeting of the special con- 
ference at Nauvoo, Sidney Rigdon was 
sustained as a Counselor to Joseph Smith, 
although the Prophet said, "I have thrown 
him off my shoulders, and you have again 
put him on me ; you may carry him, but I 
will not." 

J/o/i. .9. — Addison Pratt, Noah Rogers, 
Benjamin F. Grouard and Knowlton F. 
Hanks 'Sailed from New Bedford, Mass., 
on board the ship Tinioleon,tor the Pacific 
Islands. 

F)-i. 20. — John P. Greene returned to 
Nauvoo, from a mission to the State of 
New Y'ork, with about one hundred emi- 
grants. 

Sat. 21. — The ship Champion sailed from 
Liverpool with 91 Saints, bound for 
Nauvoo. 

Sun. ??.— Apostles Brigham Young. 
Heber C. Kimball and George A. Smith 
returned to Nauvoo from a mission to the 
Eastern States. 

November. Fri. 3. — Knowlton F. 
Hanks, one of the missionaries to the 
Pacific Islands, died. He was the first 



24 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1844. 



Latter-day Saint Elder who died and was 
buried at sea. 

2Ion. (>. — Erastus Snow returned to 
Nauvoo with a company of immigrants 
from Massachusetts. 

Sun. lil. — Philander Avery was kid- 
napped from the neighborhood of Warsaw 
and carried forcibly across the Mississippi 
river to Missouri. 

Dece.'iibor. Sat. 2. — Apostles Orson 
Hyde, Parley P. Pratt, Wilford Woodruff 
arid George A. Smith and Elder Orson 
Spencer received their endowments at 
Nauvoo, 111. ; 3.5 persons were present. 

—Daniel Avery was kidnai)ped from 
Bear Creek, Hancock Co., HI., l)y a com- 
pany of Missourians, and imprisoned in 
Moriticello jail, Lewis Co., Mo., where his 
son Philander was already confined. 

T/mrs. ;. — The German brethren met at 
the Assembly Room at Nauvoo, chose 
Bishop Daniel Garn as their ijresiding 
Elder, and organized to have preaching 
clone in their own language. 

Man. 18. — John EUioth, a schoolmaster, 
was arrested and brought to Nauvoo, 
where he was trif-d and found guilty of 
having kidnapped Daniel Avery and son. 

Tiics. 10. — The Nauvoo Legion paraded 
near the Temple, was inspected by the 
officers and instructed to prepare for meet- 
ing the mob, which was gathering in the 
neighborhood. 

Thtd-s. 21. — The city council of Nauvoo 
signed a petition to Congress, praying for 
redress for the Missouri persecutions. 

Fri. 22. — David Holman's house, near 
Ramus. Hancock Co., HI , was burned by 
the mob. 

M(jn. 2').—0. Porter Rockwell arrived in 
Nauvoo from nearly a year's imprisonment 
in Missouri without conviction, during 
which time he was subjected to very 
cru el treatment. 

— Daniel Avery was liberated from his 
imprisonment in Missouri, his son having 
previously escaped. 

Fri. ,?.'>.— Forty policemen were sworn 
into office in the city of Nauvoo. 

1844. 

.Joseph the Prophet became a candidate 
for the Presidency of the United States. 
Mobs gathered around Nauvoo, and during 
the ensuing troubles Joseph and his 
bi'other Hyrum were martyred in Carth- 
age jail. The Twelve Apostles returned 
from their missions to the Eastern States 
and were accepted by the Saints as the 
presiding Council of the Church. A great 
number of Seventies were ordained. 

January. Tues. 2.— Jonathan Pugmire, 
sen., and Thos. Cartwright, who had been 
imprisoned in Chester, England, about six 
weeks, for the accidental dntwning of Mrs. 
Cartwright during an attempt to baptize 
her, Nov. 23, 1843, were acquitted. 

WcO. .7.— A special session of the city 
council was held at Nauvoo because of 
Wm. Law's intimation that his life was in 
danger. 

FH. .5.— Wm. Marks, president of the 



Nauvof) Stake of Zion, being alarmed on 
account of a fire being kindled near his 
house, made statements before the city 
council; his fears wore unfounded. 

Tues. .9.— Elder Horace S. Eldredge, a 
county constable, was prevented by mob 
force from performing an official duty at 
Carthage. 

Wrcl. ID.. — John Smith, nncli^ to Joseph 
Smith, the Prophet, was ordained a Patri- 
arch. 

Tues. If). — Francis M. Higbee was tried 
before the municipal court of Nauvoo for 
slandering Joseph Smith. 

Tt<r.s. 2:>. — The ship Ffinn>/ sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 21<> Saints under 
the direction of Wm. Kay, bound ffir Nau- 
voo. It arrived at New Orleans, March 
7th. 

3f<>n. 2.'l. —At a political meeting, held at 
Nauvoo, Joseph Smith was nominated a 
candidate for the Presidency of the United 
States. Soon afterwards a large number 
of Elders were sent to the various States 
of the Union to electioneer for him. 

February. Tiies. 6'. —The ship l.tanc Al- 
Icrlou sailed from Liverpool with 60 Saints, 
bound for Nauvoo. 

Wed. 7 — Joseph Smith completed his ad- 
dress to the people of the United States, 
entitled: "Views of the Powers and Policy 
of the Government of the United States." 

Sun. 11. — The ship Sicanfon sailed from 
Liverpool with 81 Saints, bound for Nau- 
voo, where they arrived April 18th. 

Sol:. 17. — The anti-Mormons held a con- 
vention at Carthage, 111., the object being 
to devise ways and means for expelling the 
Saints from the State. 

Tucs. 20. — Joseph Smith instructed the 
Twelve Apostles to send a delegation to 
California and Oregon, to search for a good 
location, to which the Saints could remove 
after the completion of the Temple. 

Wed. 21.— A meeting of the Apostles was 
held at Nauvoo for the purpose of select- 
ing " a company to explore Oregon and 
California and select a site for a new city 
for the Saints." Jonathan Dunham, 
Phinehas H. Young, David D. Yearsley 
and David Fullmer volunteered to go ; and 
Alphonso Young, James Emmett, Geo. D. 
Watt and Daniel Spencer were requested 
to go. 

Fti. 23. — Another meeting was held at 
Nauvoo, in favor of the California and 
Oregon expedition. Several of the breth- 
ren volunteered to go ; among whom were 
Samuel Bent, John A. Kelting, Samuel 
Rolfe, Daniel Avery and Samuel W. 
Richards. 

Sun. 25. — Joseph Smith prophesied that 
in five years the Saints would be out of 
the power of their old enemies, whether 
apostates or of the world. 

Thur,^. 2!). — Moses Smith and Rufus 
Beach volunteered to join the Oregon ex- 
ploring expedition. 

March. Mon. 4. — It was decided in 
council at Nauvoo to eease work on the 
Nauvoo House until the Temple was com- 
pleted. 

T^r.v. ■'). — The ship 01a.,sf/ou' sailed from 
Liverpool witJi 1.50 Saints, led by Hiram 
Clark, bound for Nauvoo, where they ar- 
rived April 26th. 

J/o/t. //. — Joseph Smith and the leading 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1844. 



25 



authorities of the Church held another 
council at Nauvoo about the Saints mov- 
ing to the mountains. 

Sun. 24. — Joseph Smith spoke in public 
meeting against Chauncey L. Higbee, 
Robert D. Foster, Wm. and Wilson Law 
and others, as conspirators against his 
life. 

Trtes. 2H. — Joseph Smith petitioned Con- 
gress to protect the citizens of the United 
States, emigrating west : this he did in 
view of the Saints going to the mountains 
in the near future. 

April. Fri. ,5.— The Masonic Temple, 
which had been erected at Nauvoo, was 
dedicated. About five hundred and fifty 
members of the Masonic fi'aternity from 
various parts of the world were present. 

Sat. 6. — A conference, which lasted five 
days, commenced at Nauvoo. The Prophet 
spoke to 20,000 Saints on the 7th, and on 
the 8th declared the whole of North and 
South America to be the land of Zion. 

Sat. 13. — Under the leadership of Wm. 
Kay, 210 British Saints arrived at Nauvoo. 

Thurs. 18. — Wm. and Wilson Law, Rob- 
ert D. Foster and other apostates, for- 
merly prominent in the Church, were ex- 
commnnicated. 

FH. 26. — Augustine Spencer, Robert D. 
Foster, Charles Foster and Chauncey L. 
Higbee were arrested and fined, in Nau- 
voo, for assault and resisting the officers. 

May. WecJ. I. — Elders Addison Pratt, 
Noah Rogers and Benjamin F. Grouard 
landed on the island of Tubuai (one of the 
Austral group), as the first missionaries of 
the Church to the islands of the Pacific. 

Mon. 6'. — Joseph Smith was arrested at 
Nauvoo on complaint of Francis M. Higbee, 
but took out a writ of Ji(ihr(i.s corpu.s, and 
was tried on the 8th before the municipal 
court of Nauvoo, which resulted in .Joseph's 
acquittal, and Higbee was sentenced to 
pay the cost of suit. 

Tw\s. /J.- Elders Noah Rogers and Ben- 
jamin F. Grouard landed at Papeete, Tahiti, 
Society Islands, as the first Latter-day 
Saint missionaries to that group. 

Wed. /■•). — Anthon H. Lund was born at 
Aalborg. Denmark. 

Fri. 17. —A. State convention was held at 
Nauvoo, III., in which Joseph Smith was 
nominated as a candidate for the Presi- 
dency, and Sidney Rigdon for the Vice 
Presidency, of the United States. 

Sat. IS. — The first number of 77(c J'ro- 
jjhet, a weekly paper devoted to the in- 
terests of the Church, was issued in New 
York City, by a society of Saints. 

Tues. 21. — Apostles Brigham Young, He- 
ber C. Kimball and Lyman Wight, and 
about a hundred other Eidei's,left Nauvoo, 
111., on political missions to the East. 
Apostles Wilford Woodruff and Geo. A. 
Smith and others had left on the 9th. 

Thurs. 2:1. — Joseph Smith had a talk 
with a number of Sac and Fox Indians at 
Nauvoo. 

Sat. 2o. — Josepli Smith learned that the 
grand jury at Carthage had found two in- 
dictments against hiui. one of them for 
polygamy. 

^fon. 21. — Joseph Smith, accompanied by 
a number of friends, went to Carthage to 
have the indictments against lum in- 
i'estigated by the circuit court, but, the 



prosecution not being ready, the cjise was 
continued until next term. 

June. /'/■/. 7. — The first and only num- 
ber of the Nauvoo E.rposifnr was pub- 
lished, edited by Sylvester Emmons. 

Mon. K). — The paper and printing ma- 
terial of the Nauvoo F.ijxjsifof were de- 
stroyed, according to the proclamation of 
the city council, declaring it a nuisance. 

Wed. 12. — Joseph Smith was arrested on 
a charge of destroying the j^.i-^^o.^vYor, tried 
before the municipal court of Nauvoo and 
acquitted. The following day the other 
members of the city council were tried be- 
fore the same court, on a similar charge, 
and honorably acquitted. 

Fri. 14. — Joseph Smith communicated 
the facts connected with the removal of 
the E.K'positor'a printing materials, by let- 
ter, to Gov. Thos. Ford. 

sioi. Hi. — In a public meeting, held at 
Nauvoo, a number of delegates were called 
to visit the different precincts in Hancock 
County, 111., to lay a truthful statement of 
the troubles in Nauvoo before the people. 
Joseph Smith, as mayor of the city, also 
stated the facts in a proclamation. 

— Addison Pratt baptized Ambrose Alex- 
ander, a white man, on the island of 
Tubuai, as the first convert to "Mormon- 
ism" on the Pacific Isles. 

Mon. t'l. — Joseph Smith and a number of 
others were arrested, on complaint of W. 
G. Ware, for riot in destroying the E.r- 
po.<ifor, tried before Justice Daniel H. 
Wells, and, after a long and close exami- 
nation, acquitted. 

— Mobs began to gather in the surround- 
ing country, threatening to drive the 
Saints from Nauvoo. 

Tiir.'i. IS. — The Nauvoo Legion was or- 
dered out and the city declared under 
martial law, by the proclamation of the 
mayor, Joseph Smith. The Prophet de- 
livered his last public address. An extra 
of the War.s-a/c Signnl was read, in which 
all the "old citizens" were called uuon to 
assist the mob in driving away the Saints. 

Wrd. I!). — Mobs were gathering at differ- 
ent points to attack Nauvoo. 

TJix 1:^.20. — General Joseph Smith, with 
other officers of the Legion, examined the 
approaches to Nauvoo as a preparatory 
measure for defense. The Prophet also 
sent for the Twelve Apostles, who were 
on missions, to come home immediately. 

Sat. 22.—ljate in the evening Joseph and 
Hyi'um Smith and Willard Richards left 
Nauvoo and crossed the Mississippi river, 
with the intention to flee to the West, and 
thus escape fi'om their enemies. 

Sim. 23. — Through the solicitation of 
Emma Smith, and several supposed friends, 
Joseph Smith and his companions returned 
to Nauvoo. 

Man. 24. — Joseph and Hyrum Smith, ac- 
companied by seventeen friends, started 
for Carthage, to submit to another trial, 
under pledge of protection from Gov. 
Thos. Ford. On the way they received a 
demand from the governor to surrender 
the State arms in possession of the Nau- 
voo Legion ; Joseph returned and complied 
with the request, and then proceeded to 
Carthage. 

Ti'es. -^o.— Joseph Smith and his bretm*en 
surrendered themselves to a constable at 



5db 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1844. 



Carthage and submitted to a trial, after 
which they were, contrary to law, re- 
manded to prison. 

Wed. .?«.— Gov. Thos. Ford had a long 
interview with the prisoners in Carthage 
jail. He renewed his promises of pro- 
tection and said, if he went to Nauvoo, he 
would take them with him. 

Thurs. ?;.— Gov. Thos. Ford went to 
Nauvoo, leaving the prisoners in jail to be 
guarded by their most bitter enemies, the 
"Carthage Greys." About 5:20 p.m. an 
armed mob with blaekened faces sur- 
rounded and entered the jail, and mur- 
dered Joseph and Hyrum Smith in cold 
blood ; Apostle John Taylor was severely 
wounded, while Apostle Willard Richards 
only received a slight wound on his ear. 

Fri. 28.— Apostle Willard Richards and 
Samuel H. Smith conveyed the bodies of 
the martyrs to Nauvoo, where they were 
met by the officers of the Nauvoo Legion, 
and a very large number of citizens. 

Sat. ?.9. -About ten thousand persons 
visited and viewed the remains of the 
martyred Pi-ophet and Patriarch at Nau- 
voo. The funeral took place in the even- 
ing. 

July. Tkcs. ,?. — Apostle John Taylor 
was brought home to Nauvoo from Car- 
thage. 

Man. 8.~Apost.le Parley P. Pratt ar- 
rived at Nauvoo ; he was the first of the 
absent Twelve to return. 

Sun. :il. — Addison Pratt baptized four 
white men and four natives on the island 
of Tubuai. These natives, whose names 
were Nabota and his wife Telii, Pauma 
and Hamoe, were the first of the Polynesian 
race to embrace the fulness of the gospel. 

Thtirs. ,'>.3. — Erastus Snow and many 
other Elders arrived at Nauvoo. All 
seemed weighed down with gloom. 

Shu. 28. — Apostle Geo. A. Smith and a 
party of brethren arrived at Nauvoo. 

—A branch of the Church, consisting of 
eleven members, was organized by Addison 
Pratt on the island of Tubuai ^Society 
Islands mission;. This was the first 
branch of the Church on the Pacific 
Islands. 

Tue.s. 30. — Samuel H. Smith, brother of 
the Prophet, died at Nauvoo, as a martyr 
to persecution. 

Wed. 31. — Apostle Amasa M, Lyman ar- 
rived at Nauvoo. 

August. Fri. 'i. — A political meeting 
of the citizens of Hancock County, 111., 
was held near the Temple at Nauvoo. 
Great excitement prevailed throughout 
the county. Tiie mob party was deter- 
mined to elect officers who would screen 
the murderers of Joseph and Hyrum 
Smith and exterminate the "Mormons." 

Sat. 3. — Sidney Rigdon arrived at 
Nauvoo from Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Sun. 4. — Sidney Rigdon preached to the 
Saints at Nauvoo, declaring that a guard- 
ian should be appointed to build up the 
Church to Joseph, intimating that he was 
the man who should lead the Saints. 

Tiu's. a. — Apostles Brigham Young, 
Heber C. Kimball, Lyman Wight, Orson 
Hyde, Orson Pratt and Wilford Woodruff 
arrived at Nauvoo. 

Wed. 7.- The Twelve met in council with 
Elder Taylor, at his house at Nauvoo; they 



found him recovering from his wounds, in 
the afternofin, the Twelve, the High Coun- 
cil and High Priests held a meeting in the 
Seventies' Hall, where Sidney Rigdon's 
claim to lead the Church was considered. 

Thurs. H. — A special meeting of the 
Church was held at Nauvoo, in which 
Elder Rigdon haranguec" the Saints about 
choosing a guardian, etc. In the after- 
noon meeting the Twelve Apostles, 
throuh their President, Brisrham Young, 
asserted their right to lead the Church, 
which claim was recognized by the unani- 
mous vote of the people. 

3Ion. l:i.—At a council of the Twelve 
Apostles, Amasa M. Lyman was admitted 
into their quorum, having been previously 
ordained to the Apostleship. Elder Wil- 
ford Woodruff was appointed to go to 
England to preside over the British mis- 
sion. 

Tit urn. I'j. — The Twelve issued an epistle 
to the Saints m all the world, giving such 
instructions and words of counsel to the 
Church as were necessary after the martyr- 
dom of the Prophet. 

Wed. i-.S'.— Wilford Woodruff, Dan Jones 
and Hiram Clark, with their families, left 
Nauvoo for England. 

Sat. 31. — Brigham Young was elected 
lieutenant-general of the Nauvoo Legion, 
and Charles C. Rich, major-general. 

September. S(//i. .S'.— At a meeting of 
the High Council of Nauvoo, Sidney Rig- 
don was excommunicated from the Church. 

Thurs. 19. — The ship Xorfolk sailed from 
Liverpool with 143 Saints, bound for 
Nauvoo. 

Tue.^. '^.^.— Seventy presidents to preside 
over the Seventies, and fifty High Priests 
to preside in different sections of the 
country, were ordained. 

Fri. ?7.— Gov. Thos. Ford visited Nau- 
voo with about five hundred troops antl 
three pieces of artillery, ostensibly for the 
purpose of bringing the murderers of Jo- 
seph and Hyrum Smith to justice. 

Sal. :is. — About this time several per- 
sons in Hancock County were indicted for 
the murder of Joseph "and Hyrum Smith, 
among whom was Jacob C. Davis. 

October. Mon.. 7. — At tl e general 
conference held in Nauvoo Wm. Marks- 
was rejected as president of the Stake and 
John Smith appointed in his stead. 

Tias. ,H. — A reorganization of the Seven- 
ties took place in the general conference 
at Nauvoo. At the close eleven quorums- 
were filled and properly organized, and 
about forty Elders organized as a part of 
the 12th quorum. The senior presidents 
of these twelve (j[uorums of Seventy were 
.Toseph Young (1st), Edson Barney (2nd), 
Elias Hutchins (3rd*, Jacob Gates (4th), 
Henry Jacobs (."ith), Israel Barlow (6th), 
Randolph Alexander (7th), John Pack 
(8th), Philip Ettleman (9th), Albert P. 
Rockwood (10th), Jesse P. Harmon (11th), 
and Hyrum Dayton (12th). 

About the same time the 16th quorum of 
.Seventy was organized, with Dana Jacobs 
as senior president. 

Xoveinber. Sat. .?,;. — Edward Hunter 
was ordained a Bishop and set apart to 
take care of the r^th Ward in Nauvoo. 

December. Sun 1. — Apostle Parley P. 
Pratt was appointed to go to the city of 



OHL'liOH CHRONOLOt^Y — 1845. 



2? 



JNew York to regulate and counsel the emi- 
gration from Europe and preside over all 
the eastern branches of the Church. 

Sun. 22.— The 13th,14th and 15th quorums 
of Seventy were organized in Nauvoo,with 
Charles Bird, .fonathan Dunham and John 
Lytle as senior presidents. 

1845. 

Work on the Nauvoo Temple was pro- 
secuted with much vigor ; mobs attacked 
the outlying settlements in Hancock Coun- 
ty, 111., burned a number of houses, and 
caused much suffering among the Saints. 

January. — During this month the legis- 
lature of Illinois rejjealed the city charter 
of Nauvoo. 

Fri. 3. — Apostle Wilford Woodruff and 
accompanying missionaries arrived at 
Liverpool, England. Wilford Woodruff 
succeeded Reuben Hedlock as president of 
the British mission. 

Sun. 12. — The 17th quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Nauvoo, with Daniel M. 
Kepsher as senior president. 

Fri. 17. — The ship ralmyra sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with a company of 
Saints, under the direction of Amos Field- 
ing, bound for Nauvoo. 

Sun. 26'. — The 18th quorum of Seventy 
was organized in Nauvoo, with John W. 
Bell as senior president. 

February. Sun. H. — The 19th quorum 
of Seventy was organized at Nauvoo, with 
Samuel Moore as senior president. 

March. Sun. 2. — The 21st quorum of 
Seventy was partly organized at Nauvoo, 
vdth Erastus H. Derby as senior presi- 
dent. 

Tiie.s. i.S.— The 20th quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Morley's Settlement. 
Hancock Co., 111., with Hiram Blackman, 
of Bear Creek branch, as senior president. 

April. Sun. H. — The Twelve Apostles 
issued "A proclamation to all the kings of 
the world, to the President of the United 
States of America, to the governors of the 
several States, and to the rulers and peo- 
ple of all nations." 

— The general conference of the Church 
was commenced at Nauvoo, 111. It was 
continued till the 9th and attended by about 
twenty-live thousand people. In honor of 
the Prophet Joseph it was decided by vote 
to change the name of Nauvoo to "City of 
Joseph." 

Man. 7 — At a conference held in Man- 
chester, England, Dan. Jones, who had 
lately arrived from America, was ap- 
pointed president of the Wrexham con- 
ference (Wales), consisting of himself and 
wife. One year later there were seven 
hundred members of the Church in Wales, 
largely through his instrumentality. 

Tuf!^. 8. — At a conference held in Man- 
chester, England, the so-called Joint 
.Stock Company was organized, with 
Thomas Ward as president. 

Wed. .'y.— The 22nd. 23rd, 24th, 25th and 
26th quorums of fJeventy were organized 
at Nauvoo, with David Clough (22nd), 
Benjamin Sweatt (23rd). Lewis Eger 
(24th), Thomas Spiers (25th), and Benja- 
min Jones (26th) as senior presidents. 



Sat. I'-i. — A U. S. deputy marshal of 
Illinois arrived at Nauvoo, with writs for 
Brigham Yoiing and others, but failed to 
arrest them. 

Wed. Hi. — As the city charter of Nauvoo 
had been repealed, a small part of the city 
was incorporated as the town of Nauvoo. 

Thurs. 24. — In a general council held at 
Nauvoo, it was decided to send a written 
appeal in behalf of the Saints to the 
President of the United States, and to the 
governor of every State in the Union, 
except the State of Missouri. This reso- 
lution was subsequently acted upon, but 
without any response, except from the 
governor of Arkansas, who replied in a 
respectful and sympathetic letter. 

May. -Von lit. — Some of the citizens ol 
Nauvoo went to Carthage, to attend the 
trial of the murderers of Joseph and 
Hyrum Smith. 

Sat. 24. — President Brigham Young and 
others who had been secreted for some 
time, to avoid arrest and persecution by 
their enemies, appeared at Nauvoo and 
took part in the laying of the cap stone 
of the Temple, in the presence of a large 
number of Saints. 

Fri. 30. — The murderers of Joseph and 
Hyrum Smith were acquitted by the jury 
at Carthage, although evei'y one who wit- 
nessed the trial was satisfied of their 
guilt. 

June. — At the close of its fifth volume 
the .Uitleitniat Star (England) was 
changed frf)m a monthly to a semi-month- 
ly periodical. 

Sun. S. — The organization of the 27th 
quorum of Seventy was commenced in 
Nauvoo. 

Tuts. Id. — The 27th quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Nauvoo, with Rufus 
Beach as senior president. 

yro)i.23. — A constable came to. Nauvoo 
with writs for the arrest of Apostles Brig- 
ham Young and John Taylor, and others, 
but he did not succeed in finding them. 

Thur.s. 2H. — The first stone was laid for 
a new baptismal font in the Nauvoo Tem- 
ple. 

Fri. 27. —This being the first anniversary 
of the martyrdom of .Toseph and Hyrum 
Smith, the day was spent in prayer and 
fasting by the Saints in Great Britain. 

July. Thurs. .;. Noah Rogers sailed 
from Tahiti, Society Islands, per ship 
Three Brothers, on -his return to Nauvoo, 
111., where he arrived Dec. 29, 1845. He 
was the first Latter-day Saint Elder who 
circumnavigated the globe as a mis- 
sionary. 

Sat. 3. — The first number of the New 
York Mes.-!en;jer was published bj' Samuel 
Brannan in New York City, as a continua- 
tion of the Prophet, suspended. 

Sun. 27. — The 28th and 29th quorums of 
Seventy were organized in Nauvoo, with 
John Gaylord and Augustus A. Farnhaui 
as senior presidents. 

Augu.st. Sat. .</. — Twenty-eight per- 
sons were killed by an explosion in a col- 
liery at Cromstock, near Aberdare, South 
Wales. Several of the Saints employed in 
the colliery escaped, having been warned 
by vision of the catastrophe. 

Sat. 23. — The dome of the Nauvoo Tem- 
ple was raised. 



2? 



•CHURCH CHRON'OLOGY — 184fi 



5m /I. Vi.— The 30th quorum of Seventy 
was organized in Xauvoo, with Sahiel Sav- 
age as senior president. 

September.— One hundred and thirty - 
five teams were sent from Nauvoo to bring 
in the families and grain from the sur- 
rounding country. 

—The few Saints who still remained at 
Kirtland, O., were persecuted by their 
enemies, who took possession of the 
Temple. 

— The ship Orcrjon sailed from Liver- 
pool. England, with a company of Saints 
bound for Nauvoo, 111. 

Wtd. 1(1. — A mob attacked the house of 
Edmund Durfee, in Morley's Settlement. 
Hancock Co., lU., turned the people out of 
doors, set fire to the buildings and threat- 
ened instant death to men. women and 
■children. The mob then burned all the 
other houses, barns and shops in the set- 
tlement and turned the inhabitants into 
the open air. Also a farming settlement 
called Green Plains, inhabited by about 
eighty members of the Church, was burned 
by the mob. 

Affyti. l-'i. — The mob drove Jacob Back- 
enstos, sheriff of Hancock County, from 
his home at Carthage. 

Tues. in. — The mob made an effort to kill 
the sheriff. In his defense O. Porter 
Rockwell killed Frank A. Worrell, one of 
the leaders of the mob. who was an officer 
of the guard at Carthage jail when Joseph 
and Hyrum Smith were killed. 

Thnrf. t>y. — Sheriff Backenstos, with a 
po.i.'if consisting of some seven hundred 
men, surrounded Carthage, 111., to make 
arrests, but the house-burners had fled. 
He also issued a proclamation to the mob- 
bers to disperse, which, however, was not 
obeyed, as they went to Missouri and other 
pla<;es, preparing for new depredations. 

Wed. 24. — As the persecutions in Han- 
cock County continued to rage, the Saints 
commenced to leave their possessions in 
the smaller settlements and flee to Nauvoo 
for protection. The authorities of the 
Church made a proposition to the mob to 
have the Saints leave the State of Illinois 
the following spring. 

Twf.s. 30. — General John J. Hardin ar- 
rived at Nauvoo with four hundred troops, 
pretending to hunt for criminals, but un- 
doubtedly had other motives for his dili- 
gent search of the Temple and other pub- 
lic buildings. 

October, ^^f■d. 7.— The Apostles at 
Nauvoo had an important consultation 
with General John J. Hardin, Senator 
Stephen A. Douglas, W. B. Warren and 
J. A. McDougal, commssioners from a 
convention held in Carthage, about the I'e- 
moval of the Saints. 

Sun. ■',. — The Nauvoo Temple was so far 
completed that a meeting, attended by five 
thousand people, was held in it. 

Mfin. 6". — The first general conference of 
the Saints for three years was commenced 
in the Temple, the Prophet Joseph having 
ordered that they should not hold another 
general conference until they could meet 
in that house. The conference continued 
for three days. Wm. Sm.ith was dropped 
as an Apostle and Patriarch. 

Sun. 1J. — Wm. Smith was excommuni- 
cated from the Church at Nauvoo. 



Saf . 2o. — Major Warren came into Nau- 
voo with a body of troops and threatened 
to put the place under martial law. After 
he had left, the authorities of the Churcn 
sent E. A. Bedell and Bishop Geo. Miller 
with a communication to Gov. Thomas 
Ford. They informed him of Major War- 
ren's threats and implored him to dismiss 
the troops under his command, as the 
Saints had more to fear from them than 
from the mob at large. The governor did 
not grant their request. 

Sun. ?<). — The 31st quorum of Seventy 
was partlj- organized at Nauvoo, with Ed- 
mund M. Webb as senior president. 

November. — Edmund Durfee was killed 
by the mob in Green Plains, Hancock Co., 
111. About the same time Joshua A. Smith 
was poisoned at Carthage. 

Su/i. -'jO. — The attic story of the Nauvoo 
Temple was dedicated. 

December. Jfon. l'>. — After laboring 
nearly one year and eight months on 
Tubu'ai, Elder Addison Pratt left that 
island to join Elder Benjamin F. Grouard, 
who had commenced a most successful 
missionary work on Anaa, one of the 
Tuamotu islands. 

Slot. ?/.— The 32nd quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Nauvoo, with Geo. Mayer 
as senior president. 

Tuc.^. 23. — The famous "Bogus Brigham" 
arrest was made, the officers taking Elder 
Wm. Miller to Carthage, believing that 
they had captured Apostle Brigham 
Young. 

Sat. ?;. — A U.S. deputy marshal visited 
Nauvoo, again searching for the Twelve 
and others, but failed to make any arrest. 

During this month many of the Saints 
received their blessings and endowments 
in the Nauvoo Temnle. 



1846. 

Earlj- in the year the Saints commenced 
to leave Nauvoo, fleeing from the mob, 
which later drove the remnants out and 
took forcible possession of the city. The 
Nauvoo Temple was dedicated, and many 
of the Saints received their endowments 
before going into the wilderness. While 
traveling through Iowa, the exiled Saints 
were called upon to raise five hundred men 
to participate in the war with Mexico. 
Winter Quarters as established on the 
Missouri river. 

January. — The 33rd quorum of Seventy 
was organized with Albern Allen as senior 
president. 

Trip.'i. 13. — At a council held in the Nau- 
voo Temple, to take into consideration the 
means of organizing for the removal of the 
Saints, 140 horses and 70 wagons were re- 
ported ready for immediate service. 

Fi-i. Id. — The ship Liverpool sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 4.5 Saints, under 
the direct'on of Hiram 'Clark, bound for 
Nauvoo rill New Orleans. 

Thurs. :??.— Apostle Wilford Woodruff 
sailed from Liverpool to return to America, 
because of the contemplated removal of 



CHLKCH CHRONOLOGY — 184(5. 



■19 



the Church to the mountains. Reuben 
Hedlock, with Thomas Ward and John 
Banks as counselors, succeeded him in the 
presidency of the British Mission. 

ScU. 24. — A general meeting of the of- 
ficial members of the Church was held in 
the Nauvoo Temple, for the purpose of ar- 
ranging the affairs of the Church, prior to 
its removal from Nauvoo. 

Fri. 30.— The vane was placed on the 
Nauvoo Temple. 

February. ]Ved. 4. — The Saints at 
Nauvoo commenced crossing the Missis- 
sippi river for the purpose of moving west. 
Charles Shumway was the first to cross 
the river. 

— The ship Bfooidija sailed from New 
York with 235 Saints on board. They were 
well supplied with implements of hus- 
bandry, and necessary tools for establish- 
ing a new settlement. They also took with 
them a printing f»ress and materials, which 
afterwards were used in publishing the 
first newspaper issued in California. 

Thurii. 5. — The 34th quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Nauvoo, with David W. 
Rogers as one of the presidents. 

About the same time the 35th quorum of 
Seventy was organized. 

Afon. 9 — A tire, which broke out in the 
Nauvoo Temple, was put out before it did 
much damage. 
^John E. Page was disfellowshipped. 
Tues. 10. — .Joseph Young was appointed 
to preside over the Saints who remained at 
Nauvoo. 

Sun. 15. — Apostles Brigham Young and 
Willard Richards, with their families, and 
Apostle Geo. A. Smith crossed the Missis- 
sippi river for the West. They traveled 
nine miles, and camped on Sugar Creek, 
where Pres. Young spent the following 
day organizing the camps of the Saints. 

Tues. 17. — Apostle Heber C. Kimball 
arrived in the camp on Sugar Creek. Wil- 
lard Richards was appointed camp histo- 
rian and Wm. Clayton clerk. 

Wed. IS. — President Young and a few 
others returned to Nauvoo, but rejoined 
the camp the following day. 

Wed. 25. — Bishop George Miller and 
•ompany were the first to leave the camp 
ground on Sugar Creek to travel west- 
ward. 

Sat. 28. — A petition to the governor of 
Iowa, in which the Saints asked for pro- 
tection while passing through the Terri- 
tory, was approved by the Twelve. At 
this time the camp consisted of four hun- 
dred wagons, very heavily loaded. The 
teams were too weak for rapid journey- 
ing. Most of the families had provisions 
for several months, while some were quite 
destitute. 

March. — During the month the camps of 
the Saints in Iowa traveled about one hun- 
dred miles. The roads were almost im- 
passable most of the way, and the Saints 
suffered much from cold and exposure, the 
weather being very windy and stormy. 

ISun. 1. — The camps of the Saints made 
a general move from Sugar Creek and 
traveled five miles in a north-westerly 
direction. 

Fri. 21. — At a council held at Apostle 
Parley P. Pratt's camp, near the east fork 
of 9iioal Creek, the camps of the Saints 



were more perfectly organized. Brigham 
Young was elected president over aU the 
"Camps of Israel." 

April. — The Saints in England suffered 
spiritually and financially on account of 
the Joint Stock Company business, which 
was urged upon them by speculating 
Elders. 

Fri. 24. — The advance portion of the 
camps arrived at a place on the east fork of 
Grand river, 145 miles from Nauvoo, which 
the Saints called Garden Grove, where a 
temporary settlement was commenced for 
the benefit of the companies which should 
follow after. 

Thurs. 30. — The Nauvoo Temple was 
dedicated privately. Elder Joseph Young 
offering the dedicatory prayer. 

May. Fri. 1. — The Nauvoo Temple was 

publicly dedicated by Apostle Orson Hyde. 

Sun. 10. — About three thousand Saints 

met in the Temple at Nauvoo. Apostle 

Wilford Woodruff preached. 

J/oH. Yi.~Part of the camps continued' 
the journey from Garden Grove, and on 
the 18th arrived at the middle fork of 
Grand river,on the land of the Pottawatta- 
mie Indians, where another temporary 
settlement was established, called Mount 
Pisgah. This was 172 miles from Nauvoo. 
Thurs. 21. — A. general council of the 
camps at Mount Pisgah had under con- 
sideration the subject of sending an ex- 
ploring company to the Rocky Mountains 
that year. The subsequent call for the 
Mormon Battalion, however, made this 
impossible. 

Sun. 31. — Elder Noah Rogers, recently 
returned from a mission to the Society 
Islands, died at Mount Pisgah, Iowa. His 
remains were the first interred in the 
burying ground at that place. 

—A three days' conference convened in 
Manchester, England, in which the busi- 
ness of the Joint Stock Company was the 
main topic. 

June. — Amos Fielding, who returned to 
Nauvoo this month, counted 902 west-bound 
wagons in three days. By this some idea 
may be formed of the number of teams on 
the road at that time. 

Afon. 1. — Elder Jesse C. Little wrote an 
appeal to James K. Polk, President of the 
United States, in behalf of the Saints. He 
afterwards called on the President, Vice- 
President and several members of the 
cabinet. 

— A conference of the Church was or- 
ganized on the Isle of Man, with Samuel 
J. Lees as president. 

Tues. 2. — Pres. Brigham Young left 
Mount Pisgah and continued the journey 
westward. 

F'ri. J2.— Elder Jesse C. Little left Phila- 
delphia for the West, accompanied by Col. 
Thos. L. Kane, who had decided to visit 
the camps of the Saints. 

Sun. 14. — Pres. Brigham Young, Heber 
C. KimbaU, Geo. Miller and Parley P. 
Pratt arrived on the banks of the Missoui-i 
river, with their respective companies. 
Here a ferry boat was built soon af ter- 
wards,when some of the Saints commenced 
to cross the river. 

Tues. 16. — The advance camps of the 
exiled Saints moved back to the bluffs 
across Mosquito Creek, and encamped neaa:- 



30 



CHUBCH CHRONOLOGY— 1846. 



good water, about nine miles from the 
trading post. There they remained till 
the ferry boat was built. 

Mon. w.— At this date about five hundred 
wagons had arrived on the Missouri river ; 
nine of the Apostles were already there. 

Thurs. ,?.■).— The ship /in>okli/n arrived 
at Honolulu, Hawaii, on its way to Cali- 
fornia. 

fiVi. V«.— Capt. James Allen, of the U. S. 
army, arrived at Mount Pisgah and had an 
interview with Apostle Wilford Woodruff 
and Pres. Wni. Huntington and council. 
He was the bearer of a cii'cular to the 
"Mormons," making a requisition on the 
camps of the Saints for four or five com- 
panies of men, to serve as volunteers in 
the war with Mexico. Capt. Allen was ad- 
vised to visit the authorities of the Church 
at Council Bluffs. 

Sal. 27.— John E. Page was excom- 
municated from the Church. 
. Tues. .W.— Capt. Allen arrived at Council 
Bluffs, and on the following day he met 
with the authorities of the Church, show- 
ing his authority for raising five hundred 
volunteers from the camps of the Saints, 
The same day Pres. Young and Capt. Allen 
addressed the brethren who had assembled, 
and the general council voted unanimously 
to comply with the requisition from the 
government. 

July. — The first number of rrophwyd y 
Jvbili (The Prophet of Jubilee) was pub- 
lished by Dan Jones, in Wales, as the 
Church ox'gan in that country. 

— The Saints having continued to arrive 
from the East, there were now fourteen 
companies encamped on the bluffs near the 
Missouri river. 

Fri. .v.— Pres. Brigham Young and others 
started for Mount Pisgah, where they ar- 
rived on the 6th, after having met eight 
hundred wagons and cariiages. 

Turn. 7. — Pres. Brigham Young, Heber 
C. Kimball and Jesse C. Little addressed a 
meeting of the brethren at Mount Pisgah 
on the subject of raising a battalion to 
march to California. Sixty-six volun- 
teered. Geo. W. Langley was sent to 
Garden Grove with a letter to the presid- 
ing brethren there upon the same subject. 
A similar communication was sent to Nau- 
voo. 

ThnrH. 9. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
others left Monnt Pisgah for Council 
Bluffs, where they arrived on the 12th. 

Sat. 11. ~ John Hill, Achibald N. Hill, 
Caleb W. Lyons, James W. Huntsman, 
Gardiner Curtis, John Richards, Elisha 
Mallory and J. W. Phillips were severely 
whipped by mobocrats, while harvesting 
wheat twelve miles from Nauvoo. 

Mon. Vj. — In obedience to a call of the 
authorities of the camps of the Saints the 
men met at head-quarters on Mosquito 
Creek. Col. Thos. L. Kane, who had ar- 
rived in camp, and Capt. Allen were pres- 
ent. Pres. Young, Capt. Allen and others 
addressed the people in regard to furnish- 
ing the battalion. P^our companies were 
raised on that day and the day following. 
The fifth company was organized a few 
days later. 

At this time severe persecutions were 
again raging against the few remaining 
Saints at Nauvoo, and also against the 



"new citizens" who had bought the prop- 
erty of the members of the Church, who 
had already left the city for the west. 

Thiifn.LH. — At a council of the Twelve 
held at Council Bluffs, la., Ezra T. Benson 
was ordained an Apostle, and took the 
place of John E. Page, who had aposta- 
tized. Apostles Orson Hyde, Parley P. 
Pratt and Jonn Taylor were appointed to 
go to England to set the Church in order 
there ; Reuben Hedlock and Thomas Ward, 
who at that time presided over the British 
mission, were disfellowshipped for disre- 
gard of counsel. 

— Four companies of the volunteers were 
brought together in a hollow square and 
mustered into service by their respective 
captains. They were interestingly addres- 
sed by several of the Apostles. A few 
days later (July 20th) they commenced 
their march towards Fort Leavenworth. 

Fri. 17. — A number of men were selected 
to take care of the families of the volun- 
teers. 

Tues. 21.— A High Council was selected 
to preside in all temporal and spiritual 
matters at Council Bluffs. 

Wed. ??.— The fifth and last company of 
the Mormon Battalion left the camps of 
the Saints and started for Ff)rt Leaven- 
worth. 

T/uirs. ?.'i. — Samuel Boley, a member of 
the Mormon Battalion, died on the road to 
Fort Leavenworth. 

Wed. V.V.— The Mormon Battalion passed 
through St. Joseph, Mo. 

— The ship IJroo/.lyu, with the Saints 
from the State of New York, arrived at 
Yerba Buena (now San Francisco), Cal. 

AujEfust. Sal. I. — The Mormon Bat- 
talion, now numbering .549 souls, including 
officers, privates and servants, arrived at 
Fort Leavenworth. 

Fri. 7. — At a council of the Apostles it 
was decided that the brethren on the west 
side of the Missouri river should settle to- 
gether. A municipal High Council, con- 
sisting of Alpheus Cutler, Winslow Farr, 
Ezra Chase, Jedediah M. Grant, Albert P. 
Rockwood, Benjamin L. Clapp, Samuel 
Russell, Andrew Cahoou, Cornelius P. 
Lott, Daniel Russell, Elnathan Eldredge 
and Thomas Grover, was appointed to 
superintend the affairs of the Church 
there. 

— A small company of Saints from Mis- 
sissippi, under the direction of Joha 
Brown, arrived at Pueblo,on the Arkansas 
river, where it wintered, waiting till the 
following spring for the advance com- 
panies of the "Mormon" emigration. 

Slat. i). — The first meeting was held at 
Cutler's Park, where the exiled Saints at 
that time intended to spend the winter. 
The municipal High Council was accepted 
hy the people and the place named Cutler's 
Park, in honor of Alpheus Cutler. This 
place, which now became the temporary 
headquarters of the camps, is three miles 
from the spot where Winter Quarters 
afterwards was built. 

Thin-.s. Li. — Three companies of the 
Mormon Battalion began to move west 
from Ft. Leavenworth, after having re- 
ceived their arms, camp equipage, et". 
On the 14th the other two companies took 
up the line of march. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1S46. 



Sh 



— About this time the mobbers in Han- 
cock County, 111., concluded to drive the 
few remaining "Mormon" families from 
Nauvoo. 

Sun. 23. — Col. James Allen, commander 
of the Mormon Battalion, died at Ft. 
Leavenworth. The command then de- 
volved on Capt. .Jefferson Hunt, as the 
ranking officer, but notwithstanding this, 
Lieut. A. J. Smith shortly after assumed 
the command. 

September. Tues. S'.— Col. Thos. L. 
Kane left the camps of the Saints for the 
East. 

Thurs. If). — The few remaining Saints at 
Nauvoo, of whom only about one hundred 
and twenty-five were able to bear arms, 
were attacked by an armed mob, about 
eighteen hundred strong, who with five 
pieces of artillery bombarded the city for 
several days. The brethren organized for 
self-defense and stopped the mobbers 
about two miles from the city. 

Fri. LI.— The mobbers were prevented 
from entering Nauvoo by the gallantry of 
the "Spartan Band," who fired on the 
enemy with cannons made of steamboat 
shafts. 

— A site for building winter quarters for 
the Saints was selected on the west bank 
of the Missouri river. Teams began to 
return to Nauvoo after the poor. 

— The Mormon Battalion reached the 
Arkansas river. 

Hat. 12. — The battle of Nauvoo took 
place. Wm. Anderson, his son Augustus 
and Isaac Norris were killed, and others of 
the defenders were wounded. The mob 
force, which again was driven back, also 
sustained considerable loss. 

Wed. W. — The enemy was driven back 
from Nauvoo the fourth time. Through 
the negotiations of one hundred citizens of 
Quincy, a treaty was completed, by which 
the Saints should be allowed to move away 
in peace. 

— Some of the families accompanying 
the Mormon Battalion left the main body 
on the Arkansas river, in care of Capt. 
Higgins, for Pueblo. About this time 
Alva Phelps, a member nf the Battalion , 
died. 

Thio's. 17. — The mob entered Nauvoo. 
and, notwithstanding the treaty, immedi- 
ately drove out the Saints, and treated 
some of the brethren in a most brutal 
manner. 

Sitn. 20. — Norman Sharp, a member of 
the Mormon Battalion, accidentally shot 
himself in the arm and died a few days 
later, from the effect of the wound. 

Tues. 22. — A partial reorganization of 
the Nauvoo Legion took place at Cutler's 
Park. 

Wed. 23. — The Saints began to move to 
the new location for Winter Quarters. 

Thurs. 24. — A conference was held at 
Putuahara, Anaa, at which 852 members of 
the Church in the Societ.v Islands mission 
were represented. 

iSun. 27. — The first public meeting at 
Winter Quarters was held. By this time 
most of the Saints had removed from Cut- 
ler's Park to Winter Quarters. 

October. — Apostle Orson Hyde succeed- 
ed Reuben Hedlock as president of the 



British Mission, and the .Joint Stock 
Company was dissolved. 

— Martin Harris and others, followers of 
the apostate James J. Strang, preached 
among the Saints in England, but could 
get no influence. 

Fri. 2. — The Mormon Battalion reached 
Red river. 

-Sat. 3. — The Battalion was divided in 
two divisions, of which the first, contain- 
ing the strongest and most able-bodied 
men, arrived at Santa Fe, N. M., on the 
9tb, and the second, containing the sick 
and the women, on the 12th. 

— Apostles Orson Hyde and John Taylor 
arrived at Liverpool, England, and im- 
mediately issued a circular to the British 
Saints, advising them to "patronize the 
Joint Stock Company no more for the 
present." 

Wed. 7. — The teams which were sent 
back to help the poor away from Nauvoo, 
arrived at the Mississippi river, opposite 
Nauvoo. 

F)-i. 9. — The camp of the poor was organ- 
ized and started for the West. Flocks of 
quails visited the camp and were easily 
caught. This was a providential supply of 
food for the suffering exiles. 

Ti'es. 13.— C3i]yt. P. St. George Cooke as- 
sumed command of the Mormon Battalion 
at Santa Fe, by order of General Kearney. 

Wed. 7-/.— Apostle Parley P. Pratt and 
Elders Franklin D. Richards, Samuel W. 
Richards and Moses Martin arrived at 
Liverpool, England, from the camps of the 
Saints in the wilderness. 

Sat. r,. — On this and the following day a 
general conference was held in Manches- 
ter, England, under the presidency of 
Apostles Hyde, Pratt and Taylor. Dan 
Jones reported one thousand' Saints in 
Wales, and a conference was organized in 
Ireland, with Paul Jones as president. 

Sun. IS. — The sick detachment of the 
Mormon Battalion, consisting of about 
ninety men, left Santa Fe for Pueblo, 
under command of Capt. James Brown. 

Jfoii. If).— The Battalion left Santa Fe 
for California. On the journey it suffered 
much from excessive marches," fatigue and 
short rations. 

Tues. ?;.— Milton Smith, a member of the 
Battalion, died on his way with the sick 
detachment to Pueblo. 

November. — A memorial to the Queea 
of England " for the relief, by emigration, 
of a portion of her poor subjects, " was 
circulated for signatures among the Brit- 
ish Saints. 

Tue.<t. 3. — James Hampton, a member of 
the Mormon Battalion, died. 

Wed. 4.— Milton Kelly, a member of the 
Battalion, died at Pueblo. 

Tues. lO.—A. detachment of fifty-five sick 
men of the Battalion, under the command 
of Lieutenant W. W. Willis, was sepa- 
rated from the main body and started 
back to Pueblo. Two days later John 
Green died. 

Tues. 77.— Capt. Brown's sick detach- 
ment of the Battalion arrived at Pueblo. 

Sat. 2i.— John D. Lee and Howard Egan 
arrived at Winter Quarters, as messen- 
gers from the camps of the Mormon Bat- 
talion beyond Santa Fe. 



dt 



CH U UCH CH UOXOLOG V — 1 847 



—Joseph Will. Richards, a member of 
the Mormon Battalion, died at Pueblo. 

FH. if7.— Capt. O. M. Allen with the re- 
mainder of the sick camp from Nauvoo, 
arrived at the east bank of the Missouri 
river. 

Hat. :^8.— Elijah Freeman and Richard 
Carter, members of the Battalion (Lent. 
Willis' detachment), died, and were buried 
by their comrades four miles south of Se- 
cora, on the Rio Grande. 

—The main body of the Battalion reach- 
ed the summit of the Rocky Mountains. 

December. — Winter Quarters, after- 
wards known as Florence, Nebraska, con- 
sisted at this time of 538 log houses and 83 
sod houses, inhabited by 3,483 souls, of 
whom 334 were sick and T.") were widows. 
There were 814 wagons, 14.5 horses, 29 
mules, 388 yoke of oxen and 463 cows. The 
place was 'divided in 22 Wards, each pre- 
sided over by a Bishop. The Ward on the 
east side of the river contained 210 souls. 

—The Saints on the banks of the Mis- 
souri river made great exertions to pro- 
vide themselves with shelter and food for 
the winter. Notwithstanding this, there 
was much privation and suffering among 
them. 

—The presidency of the Church in Eng- 
land published a balance sheet of the Joint 
Stock Company, showing that the Saints 
had been swindled and their means squan- 
dered by officers of the company. 

Ffi. 11. — The Mormon Battalion had an 
extraordinary encounter with wild buf- 
falos on the San Pedro river. 

F'rL IH. — The Battalion left Tucson. Du- 
ring the remainder of the month it suifer- 
ed almost beyond human endurahce from 
overmarching, and want of food and water. 

,S'M/i. i'O. -Capt. Willis' detachment of 
the Battalion joined the detachments of 
Captains Brown and Higgins at Pueblo. 

Tucs. 'S^. — The Battalion arrived at the 
Pima village, and encampc-d the following 
day by a village of Marico])a Indians. 

18-47. 

The Mormon Battalion arrived in Cali- 
fornia, and the company of Pioneers, under 
the leadership of Pres. Brigham Young, 
crossed the plains and mountains to the 
valley of the Great Salt Lake, where they 
founded Great Salt Lake City. After 
the return to the Missouri river the 
First Presidency of the Church was re- 
organized. About two thousand souls and 
nearly six hundred wagons arrived in G. 
S. L. Valley in the fall. 

January. — The committee who had been 
appointed to settle up the Joint Stock 
Company business in England were able to 
pay one shilling and three pence on the 
pound of capital stock paid in. 

FH. «.— The Mormon Battalion reached 
the mouth of the Gila river. Two days 
later (10th) it crossed the Colorado. 

Th'ura. 14. — A revelation was given 
through Pres. Brigham Young, at Winter 
<4uarters, showing the will of the Lord 
coocerning the camps of Israel (Doc. and 



Cov., Sec. 136) ; in accordance with which 
the Twelve Apostles proceeded to organize 
the camps by appointing captains of hund- 
reds and fifties. The captains were 
directed to organize their respective com- 
panies. 

Ti<e.^. Li). — John Perkins, a member of 
the Mormon Battalion, died at Pueblo. 

—Apostles Parley P. Pratt and John 
Taylor and a small company of Saints 
sailed from Liverpool, England, ))ound for 
New Orleans, but were on account of 
storms obliged to return to Liverpool, af- 
ter nine days of rough sailing. 

Sat. 23.- -Orson Spencer arrived at Liver- 
pool, England, to preside over the British 
Mission as successor to Apostle Orson 
Hyde. Elder Franklin D. Richards had 
had temporary charge of the mission. 

Wvd. 27.— The Mormon Battalion ar- 
rived at San Luis Rey, a deserted Catholic 
mission, and from a neighboring bluff first 
saw the Pacific Ocean. 

Fri. ?.'.'.- The Battalion arrived at a 
point near San Diego, C'al. 

February. .Mon. i. The Battalion was 
ordered back to San Luis Rey, where it 
rested a short time. 

—Apostles Parley P. Pratt and John 
Taylor again sailed from Liverpool, bound 
for New Orleans, where they landed March 
10th. 

J/o/i. /O.— John H. Tippetts and Thomas 
Woolsey arrived at Winter Quarters, as 
messengers fi-om the Battalion boys at 
Pueblo, after extreme sufferings on the 
journey. 

Tu(s. :i:i. — Apostle Orson Hyde sailed 
from Liverpool, England, returning to 
America. He arrived at New York April 
6th, and at the camps of the Saints, on the 
Missouri river. May 12th. 

,S»/(. V<S'.— Arnold Stevens, a corporal in 
the Mormon Battalion, died at Pueblo. 

March.— At this time Winter Quarters 
contained 41 blocks, 820 lots, 700 houses, 
22 wards, etc. 

Thurs. J.— Thomas Ward, formerly 
president of the British mission, died in 
England. 

.Uoii. 15.— Com\1a.i\y B of the Mormon 
Battalion was ordered from San Luis Rey 
to garrison San Diego. 

Fri. U). — Most of the Mormon Battalion, 
except company li, (which was stationed 
as a garrison at San Diego), left San Luis 
Rey for Pueblo de los Angeles, where it 
arrived on the 23rd. 

Sun. 28.— After nearly three years mis- 
sionary labors in the Society Islands mis- 
sion, Elder Addison Pratt sailed from Pa- 
peete, Tahiti, per ship I'roridvnre, on his 
return to America, leaving Benjamin F. 
Grouard in charge of the mission. 

Mon. .?.'>.— A number of the Pioneers at 
Winter Quarters reported themselves 
ready to start for the mountains. 

—About that time David Smith, of the 
Mormon Battalion, died at San Luis Rey. 
April. Mon. 5.— Apostle Heber C Kim- 
ball moved out four miles from Winter 
Quarters, with six teams, and formed a 
nucleus to which the company of Pioneers 
could gather. 

r/((o>'. «.— Apostle Parley P. Pratt re- 
turned to Winter Quarters from hia 
mission to England. 



CHUECH CHEO]<rOLOGT — 1847. 



33 



Sat. 10.— M. S. Blanchard, of the Mor- 
mon Battalion, died at Pueblo. 

Hun. 11. — Company (' of the Mormon 
Battalion was ordered to the Cajon Pass, 
about forty-five miles east of Los Angeles. 

Wed. 14.— Fres. Brigham Young and his 
brethren of the Twelve left Winter Quar- 
ters for the Rocky Mountains. They joined 
the Pioneer camp near the Elkhorn river. 

Thurs. 16. — The Pioneer company was 
organized. It consisted of 73 wagons, 143 
men, 3 women and 2 children— 148 souls. 

Hat. 24. — The Mormon Battalion was or- 
dered to erect a fort on a hill near Los An- 
geles. 

Tues. 27. — Mrs. Hunter, wife of Captain 
Jesse D. Hunter, of the Battalion, died at 
San Diego, Cal. 

May. Tues. 11. — Albert Dunham, of the 
Battalion, died at San Diego, from an 
ulcer on the brain. 

Thurs. 13. — Gen. Stephen F. Kearney left 
Los Angeles for Ft. i Leavenworth, accom- 
panied by about fifteen brethren of the 
Battalion. The general and four of the 
men went by water and the rest by land to 
Monterey. 

Mon. 24. — The sick detachments of the 
Battalion which had wintered at Pueblo, 
took up the line of march for California. 

Mon. 31. — Gen. Stephen F. Kearney's de- 
tachment of theBattalion leftMonterey and 
traveled by way of the Sacramento Val- 
ley, over the Sierra Nevadas, via Ft. Hall, 
Soda Springs, and the Platte River, where 
it met several companies of Saints, going 
west, and arrived at Ft. Leavenworth in 
August. 

June. Tues. 1. — The Pioneers arrived 
at Ft. Laramie. A company of Saints, 
numbering seventeen persons, who had 
left the State of Mississippi the previous 
year, joined the Pioneers at that place. It 
was a part of the company who had win- 
tered at Pueblo ; the remainder of it came 
on with Capt. Brown's detachment of the 
Battalion. 

Thurs. 3. — The Pioneers crossed the 
North Fork of the Platte river at Ft. Lara- 
mie, having traveled on the left bank of 
the Platte, from the Elkhorn to that point. 

Fri. 11. — Amasa M. Lyman, who had been 
sent back from the Pioneer camp, and 
other Elders, met the sick detacliment of 
the Mormon Battalion on Pole Creek. 

Mon. 14. — The Pioneers recrossed the 
Platte river from its south to north side, 
124 miles west of Ft. Laramie. 

— The first company of emigrating 
Saints was organized at Elkhorn river 
for journeying west, and on the 19th about 
five hundred and seventy-five wagons from 
Winter Quarters had crossed the "Horn." 

Wed. 16. — Capt. Brown's detachment of 
the Mormon Battalion reached Ft. Lara- 
mie, and continued the following day 
westward, intending, if possible, to over- 
take the Pioneers, who had passed twelve 
days before. 

Sun. 20. — Thomas Smith was arrested 
and imprisoned at Covington, Warwick- 
shire, England, for having cast out evil 
spirits. After examination, he and Rich- 
ard Currell, the subject of administration, 
were dismissed, there being no cause of 
action. 

Nun. 27. — The Pioneers crossed the 



South Pass of the Rocky Mountains. On 
the following day they met Capt. James 
Bridger who considered it imprudent to 
bring a large population into the Great 
Basin, until it could be ascertained that 
grain could be raised there. So sanguine 
was he that it could not be done, that he 
said he would give one thousand dollars for 
the first ear of corn produced there. 

Tues. 29. — Henry W. Bigler and others 
of the Mormon Battalion, stationed at 
San Diego, cleared the iirst yard for 
moulding brick in California. 

Wed. 30. — Samuel Brannan, on his way 
from California, met the Pioneers at Green 
river, with news from the Saints who 
went out in the ship Brooklyn the year 
previous. 

July. Sun. 4. — Thirteen men of Capt. 
Brown's detachment of the Mormon Bat- 
talion, overtook the Pioneers on Green 
river. 

Wed. 7. — The Pioneers arrived at Fort 
Bridger. 

Tues. 13. — The Pioneers were encamped 
at the head of Echo Canyon ; Apostle Orson 
Pratt was appointed to take 23 wagons 
and 42 men and precede the main company 
of Pioneers into Great Salt Lake Valley. 

Thurs .15. — Company B of the Mormon 
Battalion joined the main body at Los 
Angeles. 

Fri. 16. — The Battalion was honorably 
discharged at Los Angeles. 

Tues. 20. — Eighty-one of the members of 
the Battalion re-enlisted for six months at 
Los Angeles. Four days later they were 
ordered to San Diego, where they arrived 
on Aug. 2nd, and were stationed as a pro- 
vost guard to protect the citizens from In- 
dian raids, etc. Those who did not re-enlist, 
organized into companies for traveling, 
and a few days later took up the line of 
march towards the East. 

Wed. 21. — The advance company of the 
Pioneers camped in Emigration Canyon, 
went into the valley, and a circuit of 
about twelve miles was made before they 
got back to camp at 9 p. m. 

Thurs. 22. — The advance company of 
Pioneers entered Great Salt Lake Valley 
and camped on Canyon Creek. 

Fri. 23. — The advance company moved 
about three miles and camped on what was 
subsequently known as the 8th Ward 
Square of Salt Lake City. Apostle Orson 
Pratt called the camp together, dedicated 
the land to the Lord, invoked his blessings 
on the seeds about to be planted, and on 
the labors of the Saints in the valley. The 
camp was organized for work. The first 
successful plowing was done by Wm. Car- 
ter. A company commenced the work of 
getting out water for irrigation. Pres. 
Brigham Young, who was sick, and those 
with him, encamped at the foot of the 
Little Mountain. 

Sat. 24. — Pres. Young entered Great 
Salt Lake Valley and joined the main 
body of Pioneers at 2 p. m. Not a mem- 
ber of the company had died on the 
journey. 

Sun. 2'). — Religious services were held for 
the first time in Great Salt Lake Valley. 
Geo. A. Smith preached the first public 
discourse and the Sacrament was ad- 
ministered there for the first time. 



34 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1847 



Mon. 26.— Pres. Young and others as- 
cended what is now known as Ensign 
Peak, north of Salt Lake City, and named 
it. 

Tues. 27.— Some Ute Indians visited the 
Pioneer camp. The Twelve and a few 
others started west from the Pioneer 
camp on an exploring expedition. Cross- 
ing the stream which forms the outlet of 
Utah lake, they named it the Jordan 
river, and then proceeded to Black Rock, 
eighteen miles further, where the company 
took a bath in the lake. 

Wed. 2S.— The exploring party returned 
to camp, a council was held and the Temple 
Block located. 

Thurs. 39.-The detachment of the Mor- 
mon Battalion, which had wintered at 
Pueblo, on the Arkansas river, under 
Capt. James Brown, arrived in G. S. L. 
Valley, accompanied by the Saints from 
Mississippi. This increased the number 
in camp to about four hundred souls. 

August. Man. 2. — The survev of a city 
was commenced in G. S. L<. Valley. 

Wed. 4. — Twenty-seven of the re-enlisted 
Battalion boys were ordered to San Luis 
Rey, Cal., to protect the mission property. 

Fri. 6. -The Apostles in G. S. L. 
Valley renewed their covenants by bap- 
tism, and the rest of the company soon 
after followed their example. 

2Ton. .9. — Catharine C. Steele, wife of 
John Steele, of the Battalion, gave birth 
to a female child who was named Young 
Elizabeth Steelf'. She was the first white 
child born in the Valley. 

Tues. iO.— The building of the "Old Fort" 
was commenced by the Pioneers in G. S. 
L. Valley on what is now known as the 
Pioneer Square, Sixth Ward, Salt Lake 
City. 

Wed. ii.— Milton H. Therlkill, three 
years old, was accidentally drowned near 
the Pioneer camp. This was the first 
death among white people in G. S. L. Val- 
ley. 

Wed. 18. — Nearly half of the Pioneers 
left G. S. L. Valley with ox teams,«n their 
return to Winter Quarters for their fami- 
lies. 

Fri. 20. — The returning Battalion boys 
arrived on the Sacramento river. On the 
24:th they reached a settlement of white 
people, and re eived the first news of the 
Saints settling in G. S. L. Valley. 

t>at. 21. — Albert Carrington, John Brown 
and Wm. W. Rust ascended to the summit 
of the Twin Peaks, the highest mountain 
near G. S. L. Valley. 

Sun. 22. — At a special conference held in 
G. S. L. Valley, the city, which had been 
commenced by the Pioneers, was named 
Great Salt Lake City ; the river Jordan 
and the mountain streams on the east side 
of the Valley were also named. 

Thurs. 26. — The second company of re- 
turning Pioneers left G. S. L. Valley for 
Winter Quarters to forward the emigra- 
tion, where they arrived Oct. 31st. On 
their trip they met several companies of 
Saints who followed in the track of the 
Pioneers. Between six and seven hundred 
wagons, with about two thousand souls, 
arrived in the Valley that fall. When the 
Pioneers left for Winter Quarters, the col- 
onists in the Valley had laid off a fort,built 



27 log houses, plowed and planted 84 acres 
with corn, potatoes, beans, buckwheat, 
turnips, etc. 

September. — The members of the Mor- 
mon Battalion who had returned to Cali- 
fornia from the Truckee river were em- 
ployed by Capt. John A. Sutter, digging 
mill-races and erecting mills, near the 
place where Sacramento City now stands. 

Fri. 3. — The returning Battalion boys, 
having crossed the Sierra Nevada Moun- 
tains, reached the place where the unfor- 
tunate Hastings company had perished the 
previous winter. A number of human 
bodies were yet lying unburied on top of 
the ground. Henry P. Hoyt died. 

A few days later the soldiers were met 
by Samuel Brannan, James Brown and 
others, on the Truckee river. Brannan 
brought word from Pres. Brigham Young 
for those who had no means of subsistence 
to remain in California and work uuring 
the winter, and come to the Valley in the 
spring. About half of the company then 
returned to California. 

Wed. S. — Sergeant Lafayette N. Frost, 
of the re-enlisted Mormon Battalion com- 
pany, died at San Diego. 

Mon. 20. — Harriet P. Young, wife of 
Lorenzo D. Young, gave birth to a male 
child, which was subsequently named 
Lorenzo Dow. He died March 22, 1848. 
This was the first white male child born in 
G. S. L. Valley. 

October. Sun. .3.— The Saints in G. S. 
L. Valley were organized into a Stake of 
Zion with John Smith as president and 
Charles C. Rich and John Young as coun- 
selors. Selections for a High Council were 
also made. Charles C. Rich was elected 
chief military commander in the Val- 
ley. 

Sat. ie.— Those of the disc?harged Bat- 
talion boys who did not return to Califor- 
nia arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Mon. is.— Thirty -two of the Battalion 
boys, who were anxious to meet their 
families at Winter Quarters, left G. S. L. 
City for that place, where they ax'rived 
Dec. 18th, after a hard journey. 

November.— Capt. James Brown re- 
turned to G. S. L. Valley from a visit to 
California, bringing about ?5,000 in gold. 

Fri. o. — Neal Donald, one of the Bat- 
talion boys who had re-enlisted, died at 
San Diego. 

December.— Apostle Parley P. Pratt 
and others visited the Utah lake, where 
they launched a boat. 

Sun. 5. — At a council of the Apostles 
held in the house of Apostle Orson Hyde, 
(attended by Brigham Young, Heber C. 
Kimball, Orson Hyde, Willard Richards, 
Wilford Woodruff, Geo. A. Smith, Amasa 
M. Lyman and Ezra T Benson), Brigham 
Young was unanimously elected President 
of the Church, with authority to nominate 
his Counselors, which he did by naming 
Heber C. Kimball as his first and Willard 
Richards as his second Counselor. 

Mon. 6'.— John Smith, the Prophet's 
uncle, was chosen by the Council of the 
Apostles, as Patriarch to the whole 
Church. 

Sai. i/.— Philemon C. Merrill, with fif- 
teen others of the Mormon Battalion, ar- 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1848. 



35 



rived at Winter Quarters ; they left G. S. 
L. City Oct. 8th. 

Thurs. 23. — The Twelve issued an im- 
portant epistle from Winter Quarters to 
all the Saints, announcing, among other 
things, that emigration could be recom- 
menced. 

FH. 24. — A general conference of the 
Church was commenced in a log Taber- 
nacle erected by the Saints on the east 
side of the Missouri river (on the present 
site of Council Bluffs). It lasted four 
days. On the last day (Dec. 27th) Brig- 
ham Young was unanimously sustained as 
President of the Church, with Heber C. 
Kimball as his first and Willard Richards 
as second Counselor. John Smith was 
sustained as presiding Patriarch to the 
Church. 



1848. 

Gold was discovered in California by 
members of the Mormon Battalion. Win- 
ter Quarters was vacated and most of the 
Saints who had spent the winter there re- 
moved to Great Salt Lake Valley . About one 
thousand wagons arrived in the Valley dur- 
ing the year, with immigrating Saints. 
Ogden was founded by Capt. James Brown 
and others. Many extraordinary and 
miraculous cases of healing strengthened 
the faith of the Saints in the British Isles. 

January. Mon. 24. — Gold was dis- 
covered in Sutter's mill race, which had 
been dug by the Mormon Battalion boys. 
This discovery soon put the whole country 
in a fever of excitement. 

February. — Nathaniel Thos. Brown.one 
of Pres. Brigham Young's Pioneer corps, 
was shot and killed at Council Bluffs, la. 

Wed. 2. — By the treaty of Guadalupe 
Hidalgo, Mexico, Upper California, in- 
cluding what is now Utah, was ceded to 
the United States. 

Sun. 20. — The ship Carnatic sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 120 Saints, bound 
for G. S. L. Valley, under the direction of 
Franklin D. Richards. It arrived at New 
Orleans about April 19th, whence the 
company proceeded up the Mississippi and 
Missouri rivers to Winter Quarters, and 
thence commenced the journey across the 
plains. 

March. — About this time Davis County 
was settled by Perrigrine Sessions, who 
located the settlement subsequently called 
Bountiful. 

Man. 6. — The G. S. L. City fort contained 
423 houses and 1,671 souls. The adjoining 
farming field consisted of 5,133 acres of 
l.ind, of which 87.5 acres were sown with 
winter wheat. 

Thurs. 9. — The ship Sailor rrince sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 80 Saints, 
under the direction of Moses Martin. 

Tues. 14. — The re- enlisted company of 
the Mormon Battalion was disbanded at 
San Diego, and on the 25th twenty-five 
men, with Henry G. Boyle as captain, 
started for G. S. L. Valley, where they ar- 
rived June 5th. 



April. Thurs. 6. — At a conference held 
in the log Tabf^rnacle (Miller's Hollow), 
on the east side of the Missouri river, the 
settlement at that place was called Kanes- 
ville, in honor of Col. Thomas L. Kane. 

Thu)-s. 20. — Elder Mephibosheth Sirrine 
died of consumption on the steamer Nia- 
gara, near the mouth of the Ohio river, on 
his way to St. Louis, Mo. 

May. — A company of Saints from Great 
Britain arrived at Winter Quarters. 

Tues. 9.— Twenty- two wagons — the first 
of the season — left Winter Quarters for 
the Valley and traveled twenty- seven miles 
to the Elkhorn river. 

Thurs. 11. — Apostle Orson Pratt left 
Winter Quarters on a mission to England. 

Fri. 26. — Pres. Brigham Young left Win- 
ter Quarters for the second time for G. S, 
L. Valley. 

Wed. 31, — At Elkhorn river, Pres. Young 
commenced to organize the emigrating 
Saints into companies of hundreds, fifties 
and tens; 

June. — In the commencement of this 
month Pres. Young broke camp at the Elk- 
horn and started for G. S. L. Valley, with a 
company consisting of 1,229 souls and 397 
wagons. He was followed by Heber C. 
Kimball's company of 662 souls and 226 
wagons, and Willard Richard's company, 
consisting of 526 souls and 169 wagons. 
The last wagons left Winter Quarters 
July 3rd.leaving that place almost destitute 
of inhabitants. 

— Myriads of big crickets came down 
from the mountains into G. S. L. Valley, 
and began to sweep away fields of grain 
and corn. The grain, however, was most- 
ly saved by the arrival of immense flocks 
of sea gulls, which devoured the crickets. 

Tues. 6. — Capt. James Brown entered 
into negotiations with Miles M. Goodyear, 
an Indian trader, located on the present 
site of Ogden City, for the purchase of all 
the lands, claims and improvements, owned 
by Goodyear, by virtue of a Spanish grant. 
Brown paid $3,000 for the improvements, 
and soon after located himself on the 
Weber. 

Saf. 24. — Captain Daniel Browett, Daniel 
Allen and Henderson Cox, three of the 
Battalion boys, left Sutter's Port, Cal., on 
an exploring trip across the Sierra Nevada 
Mountains. A few days later they were 
killed and their bodies terribly mutilated 
by Indians. 

July. Sun. 2. — About thirty- seven of 
the Battalion boys, who had spent the 
winter and spring in the Sacramento Val- 
ley, Cal., commenced their eastward jour- 
ney from Pleasant Valley, fifty miles 
from Sutter's Fort, with 16 wagons, bring- 
ing with them two cannons. After a dan- 
gerous and adventurous journey they ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City, Oct. 1st. 

Sat. 22. — Patriarch Asahel Smith died at 
lowaville, Wapello Co., Iowa. 

Wed. 26. — Apostle Orson Pratt and fam- 
ily arrived in England from Winter Quar- 
ters. 

August. — Apostle Orson Pratt succeed- 
ed Orson Spencer as president of the 
British mission. 

Wed. 9.— The G. S. L. City fort contain- 
ed 450 buildings and 1,800 inhabitants. 
There were three saw mills and one tem- 



36 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1849. 



porary flouring mill running, and others in 
course of construction. 

Thiirs. iO.— The Saints in G. S. L. City 
had a feast to celebrate the first harvest 
gathered in the Great Basin. 

Sun. IS. — At a general conference, held 
in Manchester, England, on this and the 
following day, 28 conferences and 350 
branches, with a total of 17,902 members 
were represented in the British mission. 
Wm. Howell was called to go to France to 
open up a missionary field in that country. 

September. Thurs. 7.— The ship Erin's 
Queen sailed from Liverpool, England, with 
232 Saints, under the direction of Simeon 
Carter, bound for St. Louis, where the 
emigrants arrived Nov. 6th. Most of 
them remained there during the winter. 

Jfon. IS. — John Henry Smith was born at 
Carbunca, near KanesviUe, la. 

Wed. 20. — Pres. Brigham Young arrived 
in G. S. L. Valley with the advance portion 
of his company. Pres. Kimball's division 
arrived a few days later, and the other 
companies all reached the Valley in good 
season. 

Sat. 23. — Reuben Brinkworth, who had 
been deaf and dumb for five years, was re- 
stored to his speech and hearing under the 
administration of the Elders, at Newport, 
Monmouthshire, England. 

Sun. 24, — The ship Siiilor Prince sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 311 
Saints on board, under the direction of L. 
D. Butler, bound for G. S. L. Valley. 

Thnrs. 2S. — Addison Pratt arrived in G. 
S. L. City from a five years' mission to the 
Society Islands, where about twelve hun- 
dred persons had been baptized. 

October. Sun. 1. — At a public meeting 
held in G. S. L. City, it was voted to build 
a council house by tithing labor, and 
Daniel H. Wells was appointed superin- 
tendent of its erection. 

Su)i. S. — At a general conference held in 
the G. S. L. City fort, Brigham Young was 
unanimously sustained as President of the 
Church, with Heber C. Kimball and Wil- 
lard Richards as his Counselors. 

Jfon. .9. — The Nauvoo Temple was burned 
through the work of an incendiary. 

Tues. 10. — Apostle Willard Richard's 
company arrived in G. S. L. City, having 
been met by teams from the Valley. 

Thurs. 19. — Apostle Amasa M. Lyman's 
company arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Sat. 21. — Oliver Cowdery bore his testi- 
mony to the truth of the Book of Mormon, 
in a conference held at KanesviUe, la. 

November. — The High Council at 
KanesviUe voted to receive Oliver Cow- 
dery back into the Church by baptism, ac- 
cording to his own humble request. Soon 
afterwards he was baptized, and he made 
preparation to take a mission to England. 

December. Sun. .3. — At a meeting, 
held in the G. S. L. City fort, fellowship 
was withdrawn from Apostle Lyman 
Wight and Bishop Geo. Miller, 



1849. 

During this year Utah Valley was settled 
by John S. Higbee and others, Tooele Val- 
ley by John Rowberry and several others, 



and Sanpete Valley by Isaac Morley and 
company. G. S. L Valley was surveyed 
by Capt. Howard Stansbury and Lieuten- 
ant John W. Gunnison, according to order 
from the government. About five hundred 
wagons and fourteen hundred immigrating 
Saints arrived in the Valley, besides a 
number of California emigrants who, dur- 
ing their sojourn among the Saints, were 
converted to "Mormonism" and remained 
in the Valley. The five companies of Saints 
which crossed the plains from the Mis- 
souri river to the Valley this season were 
led by Elders Orson Spencer, Allen Tay- 
lor, Silas Richards, Geo. A. Smith and 
Ezra T. Benson. Capt. Dan Jones, with 
quite a number of Welsh Saints, were in- 
cluded in Geo. A. Smith's company. Elder 
Wm. Howell commenced to preach the 
gospel in France. In consequence of the 
scanty harvest of 1848, breadstuff and other 
provisions became very scarce in G. S. L. 
Valley, and many of the people were com- 
pelled to eat raw hides and to dig sego and 
thistle roots, for months, upon which to 
subsist. Those persons who had, imparted 
measurably to those who had not, so that 
extreme suffering from hunger was 
avoided. 

January. — The first number of ZTdgorn 
Seion (Zion's Trumpet), was issued in the 
interest of the Church in Wales, as a con- 
tinuation of rrophtci/d y Jiibili. 

J/on. 1. — John Smith, uncle of the Pro- 
phet Joseph, was ordained Patriarch to 
the whole Church. 

— The first |1 bill of "Valley Currency" 
was signed by Brigham Young, Heber C. 
Kimball and Thos. Bullock. 

Fri. 19. — Marcus B. Thorpe, one of Pres. 
Brigham Young's Pioneers, was murdered 
in California. 

Man. 22. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
Thos. Bullock were engaged in setting 
type for the 50-cent bills of the Valley pa- 
per currency. This was the first type set- 
ting in G. S. L. Valley. 

Mon. 29. — The ship Zetland sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 358 Saints, bound 
for G. S. L. Valley, under the presidency 
of Orson Spencer. It arrived at New Or- 
leans April 2nd, and the emigrants arrived 
at KanesviUe, Iowa, May 17th, having suf- 
fered much from cholera while passing up 
the Missouri river. 

February.— The Stake of Zion in G. S. 
L. Valley was reorganized with Daniel 
Spencer as president and David Fullmer 
and Willard Snow counselors. A High 
Council was also organized, of which the 
members were: Isaac Morley, Phineas 
Richards, Shadrach Roundy, Henry G. 
Sherwood, Titus Billings, Eleazer Miller, 
John Vance, Levi Jackman, Ira Eldredge, 
Elisha H. Groves, Wm. W. Major and Ed- 
win D. Woolley. 

Mon. .5. — This was a very cold day in G. 



CHURCH CHROIirOLOGY — 1849. 



37 



S. L. City, the thermometer showed 33 de- 
grees F. below zero. 

Tues. 6". — The ship Ashland sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 187 Saints, under 
the direction of John Johnson, bound for 
G. S. L. Valley. 

Wed. 7. — The first number of the Fron- 
tier Guardian, a semi-monthly four-page 
newspaper, was published by Apostle Or- 
son Hyde, at Kanesville, Iowa. 

— The ship Henry TFcn-e sailed from Liv- 
erpool, England, with 225 Saints on board, 
bound for G. S. L. Valley, under the direc- 
tion of Robert Martin. 

Mon. 12. — Charles C. Rich, Lorenzo 
Snow, Erastus Snow and Franklin D. 
Richards were ordained Apostles, to fill 
the vacancies in the Council of Twelve 
Apostles caused by the reorganization of 
the First Presidency and the rejection of 
Lyman Wight. 

Wed. 14. — G. S. L. City was divided into 
nineteen ecclesistical Wards of nine blocks 
each. 

Fri. 16. — The First Presidency and 
the Apostles, in council assembled, divided 
the country lying south of G. S. L. City 
into four Bishop's Wards, namely. Canyon 
Creek (afterwards Sugar House), Mill 
Creek, Holladay (afterwards Big Cotton- 
wood) and South Cottonwood. 

Thurs. 22. — At a council meeting held in 
G. S. L. City, the following Bishops were 
ordained and set apart to preside in the 
City Wards: David Fairbanks, 1st Ward; 
John Lowry, 2nd Ward; Christopher Wil- 
liams, 3rd Ward; Wm. Hickenlooper, 6th 
Ward; Wm. G. Perkins, 7th Ward; Addi- 
son Everett, 8th Ward; Seth Taft, 9th 
Ward; David Pettigrew, lOtli Ward; Ben- 
jamin Covey, 12th Ward ; Edward Hunter, 
13th Ward; John Murdock, 14th Ward; 
Abraham O. Smoot, 15th Ward ; Isaac Hig- 
bee, 16th Ward; Joseph L. Heywood, 17th 
Ward and James Hendricks, 19th Ward. 

Sun. 25. — The ship Buena Vista sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 249 Welsh 
Saints, under the direction of Dan Jones. 

Mon. 26. — Work was commenced on the 
Council House, G. S. L. City. 

March. — Provo, Utah Valley, was set- 
tled by John S. Higbee and some thirty 
others. On March 18th a branch of the 
Church was organized with John S. Higbee 
as president. During the year the settlers 
had some trouble with the Indians. 

— A post oflBce was established in G. S.L. 
City, with Joseph L. Heywood as post- 
master. 

— The Icarians arrived at Nauvoo, 111., 
and bought the ruins of the Temple, with 
a view to refit it for school purposes. 

Mon. 5. — The ship Hartley sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 220 Saints bound 
for G. S. L. Valley, under the direction of 
W. Hulme. It arrived at New Orleans 
April 28th. 

Thtirs. 8. — A convention, which was 
held for three days, convened in G. S. L. 
City. Before its adjournment a State 
constitution for the proposed State of 
Deseret was adopted. Almon W. Babbitt 
was soon after sent as delegate to Con- 
gress, with a petition asking for admission 
into the Union. 

Mon. 12. — An election took place for 
officers of the provisional government of 



the State of Deseret. Brigham Young 
was chosen governor ; Willard Richards, 
secretary; Newel K. Whitney, treasurer; 
Heber C. Kimball, chief judge; John 
Taylor and Newel K. Whitney, associate 
judges; Daniel H.Wells, attornej' general; 
Horace S. Eldredge, marshal; Albert Car- 
rington, assessor and collector of taxes ; 
Joseph L. Heywood, surveyor of highways. 
Magistrates were also appointed for tne 
several Wards. 

— The ship Emblem sailed from Liver- 
pool, England, with about one hundred 
Saints, under the direction of Robert 
Deans, bound for G. S. L. Valley. 

Thurs. 13. — John Van Cott sold a peck 
of potatoes for $5 in G. S. L. City, which 
was considered cheap. 

Sun. 25. — The first public meeting was 
held on the Temple Block, G. S. L. City. 

Wed. 28. — The Nauvoo Legion was partly 
reorganized; Daniel H. Wells was ap- 
pointed major-general. The first com- 
pany organized was under the command of 
Capt. George D. Grant, and those who 
belonged to it were styled "minute men." 

April. — The settlers in Utah Valley 
built a fort near the present site of Provo 
City. 

Sun. 8.— The Fourth Ward, G. S. L. 
City, was organized with Benjamin Brown 
as Bishop. 

Mon. 9. — The First Presidency issued 
the "First General Epistle" to the whole 
Church from G. S. L. Valley. By this 
time the people in the G. S. L. City fort 
had commenced to move out to their city 
lots. 

May. Sat. 5.— Elder Elijah Malin, of 
Winter Quarters, died of cholera, in St. 
Louis, Mo., returning from a mission to 
Pennsylvania. 

June. Mon. 11. — Caleb Baldwin, one of 
the brethren who had been imprisoned 
with the Prophet Joseph in Liberty jail, 
Mo., died in G. S. L. City. 

Sat. 16. — Parties from the east en route 
for the California gold mines began to 
arrive in the Valley, and during the sum- 
mer they traveled through by thousands. 
They brought all kinds of merchandise, 
wagons, tools and farming implements, 
etc., which were sold to the Saints below 
original cost, in exchange for provisions. 

July. — Elder William Howell visited 
France and began to preach the gospel ; he 
baptized the first person on July 30th, at 
Havre, and during the remainder of the 
year he baptized a few more. Among the 
number was a Baptist preacher about 
sixty years old. 

Mon. 2. — The General Assembly of the 
Provisional State of Deseret met for the 
first time in G. S. L. City. 

Sat. 21. — The first endowment in G. S. L. 
Valley was given to Addison Pratt on En- 
sign Peak. 

Tues. 24. — The first celebration to com- 
memorate the entrance of the Pioneers 
into G. S. L. Valley was held in G. S. L. 
City. 

August. Fri. 24.— Wm. W. Phelps 
ascended to the top of Mount Nebo, south 
of Utah Valley, to make scientific obser- 
vations. 

Tues. 28. — Captain Howard Stansbury 
and party of surveyors arrived in G. S. L. 



3^ 



CHURCH CHROXOLOGY— 1850. 



Valley , accompanied by Lieutenant John 
W. Gunnison. 

September. Sat. l.—Wm. Dayton was 
accidentally killed and Geo. W. Bean crip- 
pled for life, by the premature discharge 
of a cannon at Fort Utah (Provo) , Utah. 

.Sun. :i.— The ship .Tames rennell sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 236 Saints, 
under tlie direction of Thomas H. Clark, 
bonnd for G. S. L. Valley. It arrived at 
New Orleans Oct. 22nd. 

M'ed. 5.— The ship Berlin sailed from 
Liverpool with 25:5 Saints, under James G. 
Brown's direction, bound for G. S. L. Val- 
ley ; it arrived at New Orleans Oct. 22nd. 
Twenty-six died on the voyage, of 
cholera. 

Sun. :^3.— Orson Spencer arrived inG. S. 
L. Valley, with his company of British 
S§ints. 

October. Wed. 3. — Three companies of 
emigrating Saints were exposed to the 
fury of a tremendous snow storn near the 
South Pass. Sixty head of cattle per- 
ished. 

.S(//. 6. — The Deseret Dramatic Associa- 
tion was organized in G. S. L. City. 

— On this and the following day a gen- 
eral conference of the Church was held in 
G. S. L. City, at which the Perpetual Emi- 
gration Fund was commenced. John Tay- 
lor, Curtis E. Bolton and John Pack were 
called on missions to France; Erastus 
Snow and Peter O. Hansen to Denmark ; 
Lorenzo Snow and Joseph Toronto to 
Italy; Franklin D. Richards, Joseph W. 
Johnson, Joseph \V. Young, Job Smith, 
Haden W. Church, Geo. B. Wallace and 
John S. Higbee to Great Britain; Charles 
C. Rich and Francis M. Pomeroy to Lower 
California; Addison Pratt, James S. 
Brown and Hiram H. Blackwell to the So- 
ciety Islands, and John E. Forsgren to 
Sweden. A "Carrying Company," for 
carrying goods from the Missouri river to 
the Valley and also to run a wagon j^as- 
senger train, was organized. It was voted 
to lay off a city in Capt. James Brown's 
neighboi-hood (Ogden), and another one in 
Utah Valley (Provo); also to make a set- 
tlement in Sanpete Valley (Manti). For 
the latter Isaac Morley, Charles Shumway 
and Seth Taft were appointed a presi- 
dency. 

-FA. 12.— The First Presidency issued the 
"Second General Epistle" from G. S. L. 
Valley, to the Saints in all the world. 

Fri. i.9.— The missionaries' camp was or- 
ganized for traveling, Shadrach Roundy 
being appointed president. The company 
consisted of 35 men, with 12 wagons, 1 car- 
riage, and 42 horses and mules. Among 
the Elders were Apostles Loronzo Snow, 
Erastus Snow and Franklin D. Richards, 
Bishop Edward Hunter and other promi- 
nent men. It was the first company of mis- 
sionaries sent from the Rocky Mountains. 

November. Sat. 10.— The ship Zetland 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 2.50 
Saints, under the direction of S. H. 
Hawkins. It arrived at New Orleans Dec. 
24th. 

3fon. 12.— The missionaries traveling 
east were attacked by about two hundred 
Cheyenne warriors, on the Platte river, 
but escaped unhurt. 

Jlon. i9.— Sanpete Valley was settled by 



a company, under the guidance of Isaac 
Morley, Seth Taft and Charles Shumway. 
They located near the present site of 
Manti. 

Fri. 23. — An exploring company, consist- 
ing of about fifty men, was organized at 
Capt. John Brown's house, on Big Cotton- 
wood, with Apostle Parley P. Pratt as 
president ; it started the next day to ex- 
plore what is now southern Utah. 

December. — The general assembly of 
the Provisional State of Deseret met for 
the second time and held adjourned meet- 
ings at intervals through the winter. 
Among the important business done was 
the creating of Great Salt Lake, Weber, 
Utah, Sanpete, Juab and Tooele counties, 
appointing a supreme court, chartering a 
State University, etc. 

— The first Sunday school in Utah was 
opened bv Elder Richard Ballantyne, in 
the 14th Ward, G. S. L. City. 

Sat. 1. — Nineteen men on foot arrived in 
G. S. L. City from the East in a very des- 
titute condition, having left their wagons 
in the snow on Echo creek, forty miles 
back. 

Fri. 7. — After an adventurous journey, 
during which an overruling Providence 
was clearlj^ made manifest in behalf of the 
Elders, the missionaries arrived at Old 
Ft. Kearney, on the Missouri river. 

Jfon. 24. — A terrific wind swept over G. 
S. L. Valley from the south. 

Before the end of the year, the Saints 
who had settled on the Little Cottonwood 
creek, south of G. S. L. City, were or- 
ganized into a Ward, named Little Cotton- 
wood, with Silas Richards as Bishop. 



1850. 

In Utah Valley, where a number of new 
settlements were founded during the year, 
the Saints had trouble with the Indians. 
The first missions of the Church were 
opened in France, Italy and Denmark by 
Apostles John Taylor, Lorenzo Snow and 
Erastus Snow respectively, assisted by 
other Elders. Later in the year the first 
Latter-day Saint Elders also arrived in 
Switzerland and in Hawaii (Sandwich Is- 
lands) and commenced missionary labors. 
The Territory of Utali was created by act 
of Congress. 

January. — The British Mission con- 
tained about twenty eight thousand Saints, 
having increased more than ten thousand 
during the last sixteen mouths. 

— Apostle Parley P. Pratt's company 
explored the southern country as far 
south as the mouth of the Santa Clara 
river, beyond the Rim of the Basin. 

Thurs. 10. — The ship Argo sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 402 Saints, under 
the direction of Jeter Clinton. It arrived 
at New Orleans March 8th. 

Mon. 21.— Apostle Parley P. Pratt's 
company on its return from the South went 
into winter camp on Chalk Creek (near 
the present site of Fillmore) , unable to 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1850. 



39 



travel further with wagons through the 
deep snow. Twenty-four of the men with 
the best horses and mules pushed on to G. 
S. L. City, and the remainder followed in 
March. 

February. TJiurs. 7. — A company of 
about one hundred minute men, under 
command of Capt. Geo. D. Grant, left G. 
S. L. City for Utah County, to protect the 
settlers there against the depredations of 
the Indians (Utes). 

i^j'i. S. — On this and the following day a 
battle was fought between the "minute 
men" and about seventy Indian warriors 
under Big Elk, close to Utah Fort (now 
Provo), in which several were killed and 
wounded on both sides. The Indians sub- 
sequently retreated to the mountains. 

Mon. 11. — General Daniel H. Wells, who 
had arrived in Utah Valley with more men, 
pursued the Indians and overtook them 
near Table Rock. Five warriors were 
killed and the rest taken prisoners. The 
next day, when the Indians tried to over- 
power the guard, another battle ensued in 
which several natives were killed. The 
squaws and children were subsequently 
taken to G. S. L. City, and a number of 
the children adopted by citizens. 

3fo)i. IS. — The ship Jottiah JJrddlcy saileA 
from Liverpool, England, with 263 Saints 
under the direction of Thomas Day. It 
arrived at New Orleans April 18th. 

Fri. 22. — A light shock of earthquake 
was felt in G. S. L. Valley. 

March. Sat. 2.— The ship Hartley 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 109 
Saints, under David Cook's direction. It 
arrived at New Orleans May 2nd. 

Sun. 3. — Oliver Cowdery died in the 
faith, at Richmond, Ray Co., Mo., of con- 
sumption. , 

Tues. 5. — A branch of the Church was 
organized at Ogden with Lorin Farr as 
president. 

Tues. 26.— Col. Thos. L. Kane delivered 
his famous lecture on the "Mormons" be- 
fore the Historical Society of Penn- 
sylvania, at Philadelphia. 

ApriL Sat. 6. — The 20th annual con- 
ference of the Church was commenced in 
G. S. L. City; it was continued until the 
8th ; a number of missionaries were called 
to Great Britain, the Society Islands, the 
United States, etc. 

— Elder Wm. Howell organized a branch 
of the Church with six members at 
Boulogne-sur-mer, France. This was the 
first branch of the Church raised up in 
that country. 

Fri. 12. — The First Presidency issued the 
"Third General Epistle" to all the Saints. 

May. F)-i. 24. — Addison Pratt arrived 
at Papeete, Tahiti, on his second mission 
to the Society Islands, accompanied by El- 
der James S. Brown. 

Mon. 21. — The walls of the Nauvoo Tem- 
ple were blown down by a hurricane. 

June. — The water was higher in G. S. 
L. Valley than ever before since the Pio- 
neers arrived. A number of bridges were 
w^ashed away and other damage done. Emi- 
grants en route to California passed 
through G. S. L. City almost daily. 

Sat. 8. — The first mail of the season 
from the States arrived in G. S. L. Val- 
ley. 



Fri. 14. — Apostle Erastus Snow and El- 
ders John E. Forsgren and Geo. P. Dykes 
landed in Copenhagen, Denmark, as the 
first missionaries to Scandinavia, except 
Elder Peter O. Hansen, who had arrived 
there a few weeks before. 

Sat. 15. — The first number of the Deseret 
Xeivs was published in G. S. L. City; Wil- 
lard Richards, editor. 

Tues. 18. — Apostle John Taylor and El- 
der Curtis E. Bolton, accompanied by Wm. 
Howell, arrived at Boulogne, France. 
John Pack arrived a few days later. Soon 
afterwards they all proceeded to Paris. 

Tues. 25. — Apostle Lorenzo Snow and 
Elders Joseph Toronto and Thos. B. H. 
Stenhouse arrived at Genoa, Italy, as the 
first Latter - day Saint missionaries to 
that country. 

July. — Under the new management of 
Apostle Orson Pratt, the Millennial Star 
had increased its circulation from about 
three thousand seven hundred to over 
twenty two thousand. 

Mon. i— Elder Thos. B. H. Stenhouse 
and Joseph Toronto left Genoa, Italy, ac- 
cording to appointment by Apostle Loren- 
zo Snow, to visit the Protestant valleys of 
Piedmont. 

Thurs. 4. — Parley's Canyon, Utah, was 
opened for travel under the name of the 
"Golden Pass"; Parley P. Pratt, pro- 
prietor. The toll was 75 cts. for each con- 
veyance drawn by two animals, and 10 
cents for each additional draught, pack or 
saddle animal, etc. The Newark Rangers, 
of Kendall County, 111., was the first com- 
pany to follow Apostle Pratt through the 
pass, which opened a new road through 
the mountains from the Weber river to G. 
S. L. Valley. 

— The general assembly of the State of 
Deseret held a joint session and passed an 
ordinance taxing the sale of liquor at the 
rate of 50 per cent, ad valorem. 

Fri. i.9.— Elder John E. Forsgren bap- 
tized his brother Peter A. Forsgren, near 
Gefle, Sweden. This was the first bap- 
tism in Sweden by divine authority in this 
dispensation. 

Tues. 23. — Apostle Lorenzo Snow left 
Genoa, Italy, and traveled via Turin to La 
Tour, in the valley of Luzerne, Piedmont. 

Wed. 24. — Pioneer day was celebrated in 
grand style in G. S. L. City; the brass 
band occupied a carriage built for the oc- 
casion, 9 feet wide and 29 feet long, drawn 
by 14 horses. Willard Richards delivered 
the oration. 

Wed. 31.— Pres. Brigham Young and 
Heber C. Kimball left G. S. L. City on 
their first visit to Sanpete Valley ; they 
returned Aug. 12th. 

August.— Lehi, Utah Valley, was first 
settled; about the same time the two 
neighboring towns of American Fork and 
Pleasant Grove were settled. 

3fon. 5. — Pres. Brigham Young pointed 
out the site for a Temple on the hill where 
the Manti Temple, Sanpete Co., Utah, now 
stands. 

3fon. 12.— The first baptisms in Den- 
mark, by divine authority in this dispen- 
sation, took place in Copenhagen, Apostle 
Erastus Snow baptizing fifteen persons in 
0resund. The first man baptized was Ole 



40 



CHURCH CHKONOLOGY — 1850. 



U. C. Monster and the first woman Anna 
Beckstr0m. 

Thurs. i.5.— Apostle Orson Hyde arrived 
in G. S. L. City from Kanesville, Iowa, and 
reported eight hundred wagons with 
"Mormon" emigrants organized for cross- 
ing the plains. 

Sun. 25.— The Sacrament was adminis- 
tered for the first time in Denmark by 
divine authority in this dispensation, at a 
meeting held in Copenhagen. 

Wed. 2S.— Capt. Howard Stansbury and 
suite, having completed their surveys, left 
G. S. L. City, on their return to Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

— Presidents Brigham Young and Heber 
C. Kimball, Apostle Orson Hyde, Bishop 
Newel K. Whitney, Daniel H. Wells and 
others left G. S. L. City for the purpose 
of locating a city on the Weber (Ogden). 
They returned on the 31st, having located 
the corner stake and given a plan for the 
city of Ogden. 

September. Sun. l.—A small branch 
of the Church was organized in Dublin, 
Ireland, by Elder Edward Sutherland. 

Wed. 4. — The ship NoHJi Atlantic sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 357 Saints, 
under the presidency of David Sudworth 
and Hamilton G. Park. It arrived at 
New Orleans Nov. 1st. 

Fri. f). — The semi-annual conference of 
the Church was commenced in G. S. L. 
City ; it continued until the 8th. Willard 
Snow, Edward Hunter and Daniel Spencer 
were chosen as a committee to transact the 
business of the Perpetual Emigrating 
Fund Company. Isaac Morley was au- 
thorized to select one hundred men, with 
or without families, to settle Sanpete 
Valley. 

Man. 9. — The act of Congress providing 
for the organization of the Territory of 
Utah was approved. The original size of 
the Territory was about 225,000 square 
miles, being bounded on the north by 
Oregon, east by the summit of the Rocky 
Mountains, south by the 37th parallel of 
north latitude, and west by California. 

Thur.^. 12. — Capt. Johnson's second fifty 
of emigrants arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Sat. 14. — An ordinance incorporating 
the Perpetual Emigrating Fund Company 
was passed by the general assembly of 
the State of Deseret. 

Su7i. 15. — At a public meeting (resolved 
into a special conference of the Church) , 
held in the Bowery, Salt Lake City, Brig- 
ham Young was chosen president of the 
Perpetual Emigrating Fund Company, 
with Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, 
Newel K. Whitney, Orson Hyde, George 
A. Smith, Ezra T. l^enson, Jedediah 
M. Grant, Daniel H. Wells, Willard Snow, 
Edward Hunter, Daniel Spencer, Thomas 
Bullock, John Brown, William Crosbv, 
Amasa M. Lyman, Charles C. Rich, Lo- 
renzo Young and Parley P. Pratt as as- 
sistants. 

—The first branch of the Church in 
Scandinavia was organized in Copenhagen, 
Denmark, with fifty members. 

Wed ;,S'.— Jabez Woodard joined Lorenzo 
Snow and fellow-missionaries in Italy. 

Tfirtrs. 19.— Apostle Lorenzo Snow and 
Elders Joseph Toronto, Thos. B. H. Sten- 
house and Jabez Woodard ascended a high 



mountain, which they named Mount Brig- 
ham, near La Tour, Valley of Luzerne, 
Piedmont, Italy, and organized themselves 
into the first branch of the Church in that 
country. 

Fri. 20. — Pres. Brigham Young was ap- 
pointed governor of Utah Territory : Ben- 
jamin D. Harris, of Vermont, secretary; 
Joseph Buftington, of Pennsylvania, chief 
justice ;Perry C.Brocchus,of Alabama, and 
Zerubbabel Snow, of Ohio, associate jus- 
tices; Seth M. Blair, of Utah, U. S. attor- 
ney, and Joseph L. Hey wood, of Utah, U. 
S. marshal. 

Man. 23. — Newel K. Whitney, presiding 
Bishop of the Church, died in G. S. L. City. 

Fri. 21. — The First Presidency issued 
the "Fourth General Epistle," from G. S. 
L. Valley, to all the Saints. 

Sun.29. — Amasa M.Lyman arrived in G.S. 
L. City from California, accompanied by a 
number of brethren who returned from 
an unsuccessful trip to the California gold 
mines. A similar company arrived in 
November. 

October. — Springville, Utah Co., was 
settled by Aaron Johnson and others. 

Tue.9. L— Apostle Orson Hyde left G. S. 
L. City for Kanesville, Iowa. 

Wed. 2.— The shij) .fames Pennell sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 254 Saints 
under the direction of Christopher Lay- 
ton. It arrived at New Orleans Nov. 22, 
1850. 

Sat. 5. — The general assembly of 
Deseret met and passed a bill, providing 
for the organization of Davis County. 

Thut:<;. 10. — Polder Geo. P. Dykes arrived 
as a missionary in Aalborg, Jutland, Den- 
mark, where he commenced to baptize 
Oct. 27th. A month later (Nov. 25th) he 
organized a branch , of the Church at 
Aalborg, which was the second branch in 
Scandinavia. 

Sun. I.'L — Bishop Edward Hunter arrived 
in G. S. L. City with the first company of 
P. E. Fund emigrants from the United 
States. 

J/on. 14. — Apostle Wilford Woodruff and 
family arrived in G. S. L. City with a com- 
pany of emigrants. 

Tues. 15.— The mail bringing the first in- 
formation to the Valley of the organization 
of the Territory of Utah, arrived in G. S. 
L. City. 

Thurs. 17. — The ship Josejjh Badger 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 227 
Saints on board, under the direction of 
John Morris ; it arrived at New Orleans 
Nov. 22nd. 

Sun. 20. — James Pace and others witb 
their families arrived on Peteetneet Creek,. 
Utah Valley, and settled what is now Pay- 
son. 

Sat. 2G. — At an adjourned meeting of the 
Seventies, held in the Bowery, G. S. L. 
City, it was resolved to build a hall, to be 
called "The Seventies' Hall of Science"; 
$5,200 worth of shares were subscribed for 
at once, each share being |25. 

Sim. 21. — Apostle Lorenzo Snow baptized 
a man at La Tour, Valley of Luzerne, 
Piedmont, Italy, as the first fruit of 
preaching the fulness of the gospel in that 
land. Soon afterwards a number of 
others were baptized in the same locality. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1851. 



41 



Mon. 28. — Elder Joseph A. Stratton died 
in G. S. L. City, 

November. Sun. .?.— Thomas Ford, ex- 
governor of Illinois, died at Peoria, lU. 

T^u■s. 72.— Apostle Charles C. Rich, O. 
Porter Rockwell and about fifty other 
brethren arrived in G. S. L. City from 
California. 

Mon. 18. — Apostle Orson Hyde arrived at 
Kanesville, Iowa, from his visit to G. S. L. 
VaUey. 

Sun. 24. — Apostle Lorenzo Snow ordained 
Jabez Woodard a High Priest and called 
him to preside over the Church in Italy. 
He also ordained Thos. B. H. Stenhouse a 
High Priest and appointed him to open up 
the gospel door in Switzerland. This was 
done on "Mount Brigham," Piedmont, 
Italy. 

Wed. 27. — The Warm Springs bath-house, 
north of G. S. L. City, was opened with a 
festival attended by the First Presidency, 
a number of the Apostles and other lead- 
ing men ; Heber C. Kimball offered the ded- 
icatory prayer. 

December. — Thirty families, including 
118 men, left G. S. L. City with 101 wagons 
and six hundi-ed head oi stock, under the 
direction of Apostle Geo. A. Smith, for the 
Little Salt Lake Valley, to locate a settle- 
ment there. 

— Elder Thos. B. H. Stenhouse com- 
menced to preach the gospel in Geneva, as 
the first Latter-day Saint missionary in 
Switzerland. 

Mon. 2. — The general assembly of Des- 
eret opened its third session in G. S. L. 
City. After sitting four days the house 
adjourned tiU the first Monday in January, 
1851. 

— The first meeting in the Council 
House, G. S. L. City, was held. 

Sat. 7. — A branch of the Church was or- 
ganized by Apostle John Taylor and co- 
laborers in Paris, France. 

Thurs. 72.— Hiram Clark, Thos. Whittle, 
Henry W. Bigler, Thos. Morris, John 
Dixon, Wm. Farrer, James Hawkins, 
Hiram H.Blackwell, James KeelerandGeo. 
Q. Cannon arrived at Honolulu as the first 
Latter-day Samt missionaries to Hawaii 
(Sandwich Islands) . 

Fri. 20.— A branch of the Church was 
organized by Apostle Geo. A. Smith at 
Payson, Utah Co., with James Pace as 
president. 



1851. 

Great Salt Lake City, Utah, was incor- 
porated and the first officers elected. The 
newly appointed officers for the Territory 
of Utah entered upon the duties of their 
offices. The first Territorial legislature 
convened in G. S. L. City and passed im- 
portant laws. In the spring of the year 
school houses were built in most of the 
Wards in G. S. L. City, and also in the 
country Wards. A railroad (with wooden 
rails) was built from G. S. L. City to Red 
Butte canyon, to bring rocks to the Temple 
Block. Cedar City, Iron Co., North Wil- 



low Creek (now Willard Cityj, Box Elder 
Co., and Nephi, Juab Co., were settled this 
year. North Ogden, Weber Co., was set- 
tled by Solomon, Jonathan and Samuel 
Campbell, John Riddle and others ; Santa- 
quin, Utah Co., by Benjamin F. Johnson 
and others, and Carson County (now in the 
State of Nevada) by Col. John Reese. A 
settlement of the Saints (San Bernardino) 
was founded in Southern California. Mis- 
sions were opened in New South Wales, 
(Australia), and in India. 

January. — City charters were grantea 
to Ogden, Provo, Manti and Parowan, by 
the general assembly of the State of Dese- 
ret.' 

— Udgovn Seion (Zion's Trumpet), the 
organ of the Church in W^ales,was changed 
from a monthly to a semi-monthly periodi- 
cal. 

Wed. 1. — Apostle Franklin D. Richards 
succeeded Apostle Orson Pratt as presi- 
dent of the British Mission. 

— The first native Elder in the Scandi- 
navian mission (Christian Christiansen) 
was ordained by Apostle Erastus Snow, at 
Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Fvi. 3. — The first criminal trial by jury 
took place in the Provisional State of Dese- 
ret, in G. S. L. City. 

Mon. 6. — The general assembly of the 
State of Deseret met in G. S. L. City; 
daily meetings were held until the 17th, 
when it adjourned until the first Tuesday 
in February. Much important business 
was transacted. 

Wed. S. — The ship Mien sailed from Liv- 
ei'pool, England, with 466 Saints, under 
the direction of James W. Cummings; it 
arrived at New Orleans, March 14th. 

Thurs. 9.— The bill incorporating G. S.L. 
City was passed by the general assembly 
of Deseret, and the following officers were 
appointed by the governor and assembly : 
Jedediah M. Grant, mayor: Nathaniel H. 
Felt, Wm. Snow, Jesse P. Harmon and 
Nathaniel V. Jones, aldermen; Vincent 
Shurtliff, Benjamin L. Clapp, Zera Pulsi- 
pher, Wm. G. Perkins, Lewis Robison, 
Harrison Burgess, Jeter Clinton, John L> 
Dunyon, and Samuel W. Richards, coun- 
cilors. 

Sat. «.— The G. S. L. City council as- 
sembled in the Representatives Hall, and 
the officers elect took their oath of office 
from Thomas Bullock, clerk of the county 
court : when the council proceeded to com- 
plete the city organization by electing 
Robert Campbell, recorder; Thomas 
Rhodes, treasurer; and Elam Luddington, 
marshal. The city was divided into four 
municipal wai'ds. 

Mon. 13. — Apostle Geo. A. Smith and 
company of settlers arrived on Centre 
Creek, Little Salt Lake Valley, Utah, 
where they located a town site, which la- 
ter was named Parowan. They commenced 
their settlement by building a foi't. 

S'ni. 18.— On this and the following day 
the Seventies held a special conference in 
the Bowery, G. S. L. City; a number of 
vacancies were filled and other important 
business was transacted. 



42 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1851. 



Man. 20.— Presidents Brigham Young 
and Heber C. Kimball, Apostle Amasa M. 
Lyman, Elder Jedediah M. Grant and 
others left G. S. L. City to visit the set- 
tlements in Davis and Weber Counties. In 
the evening they preached in the house of 
Perrigrine Sessions, and organized a branch 
of the Church; John Stoker vpas ordained 
Bishop. The place at that time was known 
as Sessions settlement. 

Tue.<i. •Jl.—Pves. Brigham Young and 
party held meeting with the people of 
North Cottonwood (Farmington), in the 
school house, and appointed Gideon Brown- 
ell presiding Elder of that branch. 

Wt'd. 22.^The ship (Iroruc W. Bourne 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 281 
Saints, under the direction of William 
Gibson ; it arrived at New Orleans March 
20th. 

iSnn. 26".— Pres. Brigham Young and 
party held meetings with the Saints in the 
south fort, Ogden, when Lorin Farr was 
chosen president of the Weber Stake,with 
Charles R. Dana and David B. Dille as 
counselors. A High Council was also 
organized. Isaac Clark was ordained 
Bishop of the South Ward, with James 
Browning and James Brown as counsel- 
ors ; and Erastus Bingham Bishop of the 
North Ward, with Charles Hubbart and 
Stephen Perry as counselors. 

Mon. 'il. Pres. Brigham Young and 
party held a meeting with the Saints who 
had settled on Kay's creek, (now Kaysville, 
Davis Co.,) and ajipointed William Kay 
Bishop of that Ward. 

— Official news of the organization of the 
Territory of Utah first reached G. S. L. 
City. 

Tues. 2S. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
party returned to G. S. L. City from their 
visit to the settlements in Weber and 
Davis Counties. 

Wed. 2!). — Elder James Henry Flanigan, 
a good and faithful American missionary, 
died of small-pox at Birmingham, England. 

February. Sun. 2. — The ship Ellen 
Maria sailed from Liverpool, England, 
with 378 Saints on board, under George D. 
Watt's direction. Apostle Orson Pratt 
and family also returned with that com- 
pany. The ship arrived at New Orleans 
April 6th. 

Mon. .'i.— Brigham Young took the oath 
of office as governor of the Territory of 
Utah. ^ 

Tues. 4. — The general assembly of 
Deseret again met in G. S. L. City and 
was in session on that and the following 
day ; also on the 10th and on the 24th ; it 
finally adjourned to the fourth Saturday 
in March. 

Sim. !). — The settlers who had located on 
Centre Creek (Parowan), Iron Co., Utah, 
were organized into a branch of the 
Church, under the presidency of Apostle 
George A. Smith. 

3/on. 17. — Robert Dickson opened a 
school in the 14th Ward, G. S. L. City, 
with 18 scholars, teaching phonography. 

March.— Brigham City, Box Elder Co., 
was settled by William Davis, James 
Brooks and Thomas Pierce. 

Tues. 4.— The ship Olympus sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 245 Saints, bound 
for Utah, under the direction of Wm. 



Howell. Some fifty non-Mormon pas- 
sengers were converted and baptized on 
the voyage to New Orleans, where the 
company arrived about April 27th. 

J/oH. 17. — Presidents Brigham Young 
and Heber C. Kimball and others left G.S. 
L. City on a visit to Utah County. 

—Elder Wm. Burton, of G. S. L. City, 
died at Edinburgh, Scotland, where he 
labored as a missionary. 

Wed. W. — A Stake of Zion was organ- 
ized by Pres. Brigham Young at 
Provo, Utah Co., with Isaac Higbee as 
president, and John Blackburn and Thos. 
Willis as counselors. 

Tlinvs. 20. — A branch of the Church was 
organized by Pres. Brigham Young, at 
Springville, Utah Co., Utah, with Asa- 
hel Perry as president and Aaron Johnson 
as Bishop. 

Sun. 23. — Benjamin Cross was ordained 
a High Priest and set apart to act as the 
first Bishop of Payson. 

Jlon. 24. — A company of settlers for 
Southern California was organized for 
traveling, at Payson, Utah Co., and com- 
menced the journey the same day, under 
the presidency of Apostles Amasa M. Ly- 
man and Charles C. Rich, accompanied by 
Apostle Parley P. Pratt and a party of 
missionaries going to different countries 
to preach the gospel. 

Wed. 26".— Pres. Brigham Young and 
party returned to G. S. L. City from their 
visit to Utah County. 

Iiri. 28. — The general assembly of Des- 
eret met and passed a number of resolu- 
tions expressive of their good feelings to- 
ward the government for creating the 
Territory of Utah. 

April. — Pres. Brigham Young dictated 
the plan for a tabernacle to be erected on 
the southwest corner of the Temple 
Block, G. S. L. City. 

—The Eighteenth Ward, G. S. L. City, 
was organized with Lorenzo D. Young as 
Bishop. 

— The schooner Jtavaai, which had been 
built by the Elders and Saints on Tubuai, 
Society Islands mission, for missionary 
purposes, was finished and launched. 

Sat. .5. — The general assembly of the 
Provisional State of Deseret was dis- 
solved. Among a number of other acts 
passed during the session of 18.50-.51 was 
one providing for tlie organization of Iron 
County. 

Sua. 6. — The 21st annual conference of 
the Church convened in G. S. L. City, but 
after the opening exercises it was ad- 
journed to the 7th, on account of the heavy 
rains. 

Mon. 7. — At the general conference held 
inG. S. L. City it was voted to build a 
Temple. Edward Huuter was appointed 
successor to the late Newel K. Whitney as 
presiding Bishop of the whole Church. At 
this time there were about thirty thousand 
inhabitants in Utah, of which nearly five 
thousand were in G. S. L. City. The First 
Presidency issued the "Fifth General 
Epistle" to the Saints in all the world. 

Tues. 22. — Presidents Brigham Young 
and Heber C. Kimball and many other 
prominent men left G. S. L. City to visit 
the Saints in the southern settlements and 
explore the Sevier Valley. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1851. 



43 



Wed. 30. — Pres. Brigham Young organ- 
ized a High Council at Manti, Sanpete 
Co.. Utah. 

May. — The Book of Mormon in the 
Danish language, translated by Peter O. 
Hansen, was published by Erastus Snow 
in Copenhagen, Denmark ; it was the first 
edition of the book printed in a foreign 
language. 

— The first number of the Efoile du 
Deseret (Star of Deseret^, a monthly peri- 
odical published in the interest of the 
Church, was issued by Apostle John Tay- 
lor, in Paris, France. 

Wed. 7.— The first wagons of the season 
direct from Fort Laramie arrived in G. 
S. L. City,laden with provisions. 

Sat. iO.— Pres. Brigham Young and par- 
ty arrived at Parowan, Iron Co., where 
they remained until the 16th. 

Mon. 12. — The first job of blacksmithing 
with Utah stone coal was done by Mr. 
Bringhurst ?t Parowan, Iron Co., in the 
presence of Gov. Brigham Young and 
party. 

Tries. 13. — The foundation of the Seven- 
ties' Hall of Science in G. S L. City was 
completed. 

Wed. 21. — Work was commenced on the 
"Old Tabernacle," in G. S. L. City. 

Sat. 24. — Pres. Brigham Young and par- 
ty returned to G. S. L. City from their 
visit to the southern settlements. 

Sun. 23. — The Saints who had settled at 
American Fork, Utah Co., Utah, were or- 
ganized into a Ward; Leonard E. Harring- 
ton, Bishop. 

Jnne. — Apostles Amasa M. Lyman and 
Charles C. Rich, with about five hundred 
souls from Utah, arrived at San Bernar- 
dino, Cal., for the purpose of making a 
settlement. 

— Elder Joseph Richards, member of the 
British army, arrived at Calcutta, India, 
having been authorized by the presidency 
of the British mission to introduce the 
gospel in that country. 

Tues. 3. — The Channel Islands' mission 
was transferred from the British to the 
French mission, at a special conference, 
held in London, England. 

Sat. 7. — Judge Lemuel G. Brandenbury 
arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Tues. 10. — The Indians stole about sixty 
head of stock near Black Rock, Salt Lake 
Co. 

Sat. 21. — The Saints' assembly hall at 
Aalborg, Denmark, was demolished by a 
mob, which also ill-treated some of the 
brethren. 

Sun. 22. — Elder Geo. Q. Cannon com- 
menced to baptize natives in the district 
of Kula, on the island of Maui, Hawaii. 
This was the commencement of a great 
missionary work on that island; a few 
natives had previously been baptized on 
the island of Hawaii, and one or more at 
Honolulu. 

— Elder Joseph Richards baptized James 
Patrick Meik, Mary Ann Meik, Matthew 
McCune and Maurice White, at Calcutta, 
India, as the first converts to the fulness 
of the gospel in Asia in this dispensation. 
These four, together with Elder Richards, 
were organized into a branch of tlie Church, 
called the Wanderers' branch. 

July. Tues. 1. — Gov. Brigham Young 



issued a proclamation appointing the first 
Monday in the following August for elect- 
ing members to the first Territorial legis- 
lature, according to the organic act. 

Fri. J.— The citizens of G. S. L. City 
celebrated the day by an excursion to 
Black Rock, in the Great Salt Lake. 

Fri. ii. — Apostle Parley P. Pratt 
and company of missionaries arrived at 
San Francisco, Cal. 

— Apostle Orson Hyde and traveling com- 
panions, en route for G. S. L. Valley, were 
attacked by about three hundred Pawnee 
Indians, near Loupe Fork, and robbed of 
several thousand dollars' worth of prop- 
erty. 

Sun. 13.— The Eleventh Ward, G. S. L. 
City, was organized with John Lytle as 
Bishop. 

Sat. 19. — Four of the newly appointed 
Federal oificers for Utah, namely. Judge 
Zerubbabel Snow, Secretary Benjamin D. 
Harris and Indian Agents Stephen B. Rose 
and Henry R. Day arrived in G. S. L. City, 
accompanied by Dr. John M. Bernhisel 
and Alraon W. Babbitt. 

2Iou. 21. — Gov. Brigham Young, by proc- 
lamation, divided the Territory of Utah 
into three Indian agencies, and assigned 
the sub-agents. Rose and Day, their re- 
spective districts. 

Thurs.24. — Pioneer day was celebrated 
in excellent style in G. S. L. City and the 
different settlements of the Saints in 
Utah. 

August. — The first kiln of earthen ware 
was burned at the Deseret Pottery, lo- 
cated near the head of Emigration or 
Third South Streets. 

Jfon. 4. — The first election for delegate 
to Congress and members of the Territo- 
rial legislature took place in Utah. Dr. 
John M. Bernhisel was elected Utah's first 
delegate to Congress. 

Wed. G. — The first branch of the Church 
in the Hawaiian Islands was organized by 
Elder Geo. Q. Cannon, in the Kula district, 
on the island of Maui. 

Fri. 8. — Gov. Brigham Young, by proc- 
lamation, divided the Territory of Utah 
into three judicial districts. Hon. Lem- 
uel G. Brandenbury y,as assigned to the 
first, Hon. Zerubbabel Snow to the second 
and Hon. Perry E. Brocchus to the third 
judicial district. 

Sat. Hi. — The first general conference 
in the Scandinavian mission convened in 
Copenhagen, Denmark, Erastus Snow pre- 
siding. It was continued three days. 

Sun. 11. — Apostle Orson Hyde, Albert 
Carrington and others arrived in G. S. L. 
City from Kanesville, la., accompanied by 
Perry E. Brocchus, one of the newly ap- 
pointed judges for Utah; they brought 
with them a brass cannon. 

September. — Juab County was settled 
by Joseph L. Heywood and others, who lo- 
cated on Salt Creek (now Nephi). 

— Chief Justice Brandenbury, Associate 
Judge Perry E. Brocchus and Secretary 
Benjamin D. Harris deserted their ofiicial 
posts in Utah and went to the States, tak- 
ing with them the 824,000 which had been 
appropriated by Congress for the legisla- 
ture. 

— The Athrawiaeth a Chyfammodau 



u 



CHUECH CHRONOLOGY — 1852. 



(Doctrine and Covenants) was published 
in the Welsh language, in Wales. 

.Sun. 7.— The general conference of the 
Church convened in the Bowery, G. S. L. 
City ; it was continued four days. During 
the conference .Judge Perry E. Brocchus, 
who with the other Federal officers had 
been invited to the stand, spoke insulting- 
ly to the large assembly. 

Thurs. i/.— Elder Hans F. Petersen ar- 
rived at Riisor, as the first Latter-day 
Saint missionarv to Norway. 

Sun. 2i.— The First Presidency issued an 
epistle to the Saints in Iowa, counseling 
them to come to the Valley. 

J/o«. 22.— The first legislature of Utah 
Territory convened in G. S. L. City and 
organized bv electing Heber C. Kimball 
president of the Council, and Wm. W. 
Phelps speaker of the House. 

—The First Presidency issued the "Sixth 
General Epistle" to the whole Church. 

— Amasa M. Lyman and party purchased 
the Ranche of San Bernardino, containing 
about one hundred thousand acres of land. 
The location was about one hundred miles 
from San Diego, seventy miles from the 
seaport of San Pedro and fifty miles from 
Pueblo de los Angeles. 

October. The first number of Ukan- 
dinai'iens Sfjrrni-, a monthly (now semi- 
monthly) periodical, was published by 
Apostle Erastus Snow, in Copenhagen. 
Denmark. 

Wed. 1. — John Hartley, who had met 
vFith a railroad accident, was miraculously 
healed under the administration of Elders, 
at Accrington, England. 

Sat. 4. — A joint resolution, passed by the 
Utah legislature, legalizing the laws of 
the provisional government of the State 
of Deseret, was approved by the gov- 
ernor. 

.Sun. 5. — Elder Maurice White baptized 
Anna, a daughter of a high caste Brah- 
min, at Calcutta, India, as the first native 
convert to "Mormonism" in the East India 
mission. 

Tues. 21 — Gov. Brigham Young, Heber 
C. Kimball, Geo. A. Smith and others left 
G. S. L. City on a tour to the South, for 
the purpose of locating the Territorial 
seat of government. They reached Chalk 
creek, Pauvan Valley, Oct. 28th. 

/'/•if. 24. — The last company of the immi- 
grating Saints for the season arrived in 
G. S. L. City. 

— Elders Hans Peter Jensen and Hans 
Larsen received very cruel treatment from 
a mob on Bornholm, Denmark, for preach- 
ing the gospel. 

Wed. 2.9.— Fillmore, Millard Co., Utah, 
which had just been settled by Anson Call 
and thirty families, was selected for the 
capital of the Territory. 

— Elder James S. Brown was arrested 
by order of the French officials at Anaa, 
Society Islands mission, and the next day 
placed on board a French man-of-war. 

Thurs. .W.— John Murdock and Charles 
W. Wandell, arrived at Sydney, as Latter- 
day Saint missionaries to Australia, and 
commenced to preach the gospel. 

November. — The first number of Zions 
Panier fZion's Banner), a monthly 16-page 
periodical, was published at Hamburg, 
Germany, by Apostle John Taylor. 



Sun. 2.— The first meeting by Latter-day 
Saint Elders in New South Wales, Austra- 
lia, was held by Elders John Murdock and 
Charles W. Wandell at Sydney. 

Fri. 7. — Pres. Brigham' Young and party 
returned to G. S. L. City from Fillmore, 
having come by way of Sanpete Valley. 

Sat. S.— Apostle Parley P. Pratt and 
Rufus Allen arrived as missionaries in 
Valparaiso, Chili, South America, after 64 
days' rough sailing from San Francisco. 

Tnes. i/.— The "University of the State 
of Deseret" was opened in G. S, L. City. 

Sat. 15. — The Deseret Xeivs, which had 
been suspended for lack of paper since 
Aug. 19th, commenced its second volume. 

Wed. 26".- Elder Hans F. Petersen bap- 
tized Peter Adamsen and John Olsen in 
Riisor, as the first fruits of preaching the 
gospel in Norway. 

December. — Three families commenced 
a settlement on Clover Creek (Mona), 
eight miles north of Nephi, Juab Co. 

— TheSanBernardino settlers had erected 
about one hundred dwellings and built a 
stockade fort for defense against the Ind- 
ians. 

— A number of Saints were cruelly 
treated by a mob in Br0ndby0ster, Sjtel- 
land, Denmark. 

2Ion. 1. — The British mission consisted 
of 44 conferences and 679 branches, with 
32,894 members. This is the greatest 
number of Saints ever reported in that 
mission. 

Tues. 2. — A number of fishermen at Ar- 
nager, Bornholm, Denmark, armed them- 
selves and defended two "Mormon" mis- 
sionaries against mob violence. 

Wed. .3.— The first baptism by divine 
authority in New South Wales, Australia, 
took place in Sydney. 

Sun. 7. — Peter Adamsen and John Olsen 
were confirmed members of the Church by 
Elder Hans F. Petersen, at Riisor. This 
was the first confirmation by Latter-day 
Saints in Norway. The Sacrament was 
also administered for the first time by 
divine authority in that country. 

Sun. 21. — A branch of the Church was 
organized at Spanish Fork, Utah Co., (re- 
cently settled) , with Stephen Markham as 
president and Wm. Pace, as Bishop. 

Thurs. 25. — Elder Wm. ■Vv'illes arrived at 
Calcutta, India, as a Latter-day Saint 
missionary from England, sent by Apostle 
Lorenzo Snow to preach the gospel in 
India. 



1852. 

In the spring of this year John D. Lee 
located a ranch on Ash Creek (near the 
present Harmony, Washington Co.), Utah, 
and Cedar Valley was settled by Allen 
Weeks, Alfred Bell and others. Early in 
the year post offices were established at 
American Fork, Springville and Payson, 
Utah Co., Salt Creek (Nephi), Juab Co., 
and Fillmore, Millard Co. About twenty 
companies of emigrating Saints arrived in 
the Valley which included most of the 
Saints who had been located temporarily in 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 185^. 



45 



and about Kanesville (Council Bluffs) ,Iowa. 
During this year the Book of Mormon 
was published in the Welsh, French, Ger- 
man and Italian languages. The mission- 
aries sent to labor in Norway were im- 
prisoned at Frederikstad. In Hawaii 
and Australia the Elders met with con- 
siderable success, but the attempt to open 
a mission in Chili, South America, proved 
a failure. The Elders were banished from 
the Society Islands mission. Missionaries 
were called to India, China, Siam, Cape of 
Good Hope, Prussia, Gibraltar, the West 
Indies and other countries. 

January. »S«n. -/. —The first branch of 
the Churcu in New South Wales, Austra- 
lia, was organized at Sj'^dney, with twelve 
members. 

Sat. 10. — The ship Kennebec sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 333 
Saints, under the direction of John S. 
Higbee. It arrived at New Orleans 
March 11th. 

Mon. If).— The Saints who had settled on 
the river Jordan, south of G. S. L. City, 
were organized into a Ward with John 
Robinson as Bishop. 

Tues. 20. — Elder Knud H. Bruun was 
fearfully whipped and nearly killed by a 
mob at Falkerslov, on Falster, Denmark. 

Tues. 27. — Elder Geo. Q. Cannon com- 
menced the translation of the Book of 
Mormon in the Hawaiian language, at 
Wailuku, Maui. 

Sat. 31. — Nine Saints sailed from Copen- 
hagen, Denmark, for America, being the 
first "Mormon" emigrants from Scandi- 
navia. 

February. — The Territorial Library 
was opened in the Council House, G. S. L. 
City, with Wm. C. Staines, as librarian. 
Congress had appropriated §5,000 towards 
the purchase of books, which were select- 
ed by Delegate Bernhisel. 

Tues. 3. — Legislative acts, providing for 
the organization of the counties of Great 
Salt Lake, Weber, Utah, Sanpete, Juab, 
Tooele, Iron, Davis (previously created by 
acts of the general assembly of Deseret), 
Millard, Washington, Green River and 
Deseret Counties were approved. 

Thurs. 5. —The Utah legislature ad- 
journed, but met again on the 16th. 

Sat. 7. — Gov. Brigham Young approved 
an act, recently passed by the Utah legis- 
lature, appointing probate judges in the 
counties in Utah; to wit., Isaac Clark, We- 
ber Co. ; Joseph Holbrook, Davis Co. ; 
Elias Smith, G. S. L. Co. ; Preston Tho- 
mas, Utah Co. ; Alfred Lee, Tooele Co. ; 
Geo. W. Bradley, Juab Co. ; Geo. Peacock, 
Sanpete Co. ; Anson Call, Millard Co. ; 
Chapman Duncan, Iron Co. 

Tues. 10. — A branch of the Church was 
organized at Mountainville (Alpine), Utah 
Co., Utah; Charles S. Peterson, president. 

— The ship Fllen Maria sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 369 Saints, 
under the direction of Isaac C. Haight. It 
arrived in New Orleans April 6th. 

Sat. 14. — The legislative assembly of 
Utah Territoi'y memoralized Congress for 
the construction of a great national cen- 



tral railroad from the Missouri river to 
the Pacific coast. The memorial was ap- 
proved on the 3rd of March following. At 
the same session, the legislature petitioned 
Congress for the establishment of a tele- 
graph line across the continent. 

Thurs. 26. — Lorenzo Snow and Jabez 
Woodard arrived as the first missionaries 
of the Church on the island of Malta, and 
commenced preaching. A branch of the 
Church, consisting of 26 members, was or- 
ganized there on the 28th of June follow- 
ing. 

March. — A site for a city at San Bernar- 
dino was surveyed by the Saints in Cali- 
fornia. 

Tues. 2.— After an unsuccessful attempt 
to open a mission in South America, 
Apostle Parley P. Pratt and Rufus Allen 
sailed from Valparaiso, Chili, for San 
Francisco, Cal., where they arrived May 
21st. ' 

Thurs. 4. — After establishing a mission 
in Scandinavia, Erastus Snow sailed from 
Copenhagen, Denmark, to return home, 
accompanied by 19 emigrating Saints. 

Sat. 6'.— The ship liovkaivay sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 30 Saints and 
machinery purchased by Apostle John 
Taylor for the manufacture of sugar in 
Utah. It arrived at New Orleans after 
seven weeks' passage. 

— Apostle John Taylor, accompanied by 
about twenty Saints , sailed from Liver- 
pool for Boston, on his return home. 

Thurs. ii.— The ship Itahj sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 28 Scandinavian 
Saints— the first from the Scandinavian 
mission— under the direction of Ole U. C. 
Monster. The company arrived at New 
Orleans May 10th and in G. S. L. City Oct. 
16th, crossing the plains in Eli B. Kelsey's 
company. ^ 

Mon. 15. — G. S. L. County was organized 
with Elias Smith as county and probate 
judge. 

April.— The JnUennial .S7«/-, the Church 
organ in Great Britain, was changed from 
a semi-monthly to a weekly periodical. 

Tues. 6'.— The building subsequently 
known as the Old Tabernacle, which had 
been erected and just completed on the 
southwest corner of the Temple Block, in 
G. S. L. City, was dedicated. This struct- 
ure, built of adobe, was 126 feet long, 64 
feet wide and arched without a pillar. It 
was capable of seating about twenty-five 
hundred people. The ground is now occu- 
pied by the Assembly Hall. 

—The first general conference of the 
Church in the Hawaiian mission was com- 
menced in the valley of lao, near Wailuku, 
Maui. 

I'ri. 9.— A number of emigrating Saints 
lost their lives by the explosion of the 
steamboat Saluda, at Lexington, Missouri. 
There were about one hundred and ten 
Saints on board when the calamity oc- 
curred. 

Sun. 18.— The First Presidencv issued 
its "Seventh General Epistle" to the whole 
Church. 

Thurs. 22. —Pres. Brigham Young, ac- 
companied by Heber C. Kimball, Orson 
Pratt, Wilford Woodruff, Geo. A. Smith 
and others, left G. S. L. City on an explor- 
ing trip. After visiting all the southern 



46 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1852, 



settlements and several Indian tribes, the 
party returned on May 21st. 

7/("(//-.s-. 2.9.— The Deseret Iron Company 
was organized at Liverpool, England, and 
Erastus Snow and Franklin D. Richards 
were appointed general agents and 
managers of the same. 

May. n>f/. .3.— Sixty-nine men were 
killed' bv an accident' in a coal pit, at 
Cymback, near Merthyr Tydfil, Wales; 
among them were nineteen brethren. 

Sat. 8.— Apostles Erastus Snow and 
Franklin D. Richards sailed from Liver- 
pool on the steamship Africa, homeward 
bound. 

—Samuel W. Richards succeeded Frank- 
lin D. Richards as president of the British 
mission. Previous to this the mission was 
divided into pastorates, presided over 
mostlv by American Elders, while the native 
brethren generally had charge of the 
conferences. Each pastorate embraced a 
number of conferences. 

.sv,/. L3.— Wm. Willes reported 189 mem- 
bers of the Church in Calcutta and vici- 
nity, India, of whom 170 were "Ryots," 
who previously professed Christianity. 

Sun. IH.— The Elders laboring on the 
Society Islands being forbidden by the 
French authorities to continue their mis- 
sionai-y labors, Elder Addison Pratt and 
Benjamin F. Grouard with their families 
sailed from Papeete, Tahiti, per ship Culao 
bound for America. The other mission- 
aries followed soon afterwards. 

Mon. .ii.— Elders John F. F. Dorius, A. 
Andersen and others were subjected to 
wicked mob violence, near Skive, .lutland, 
Denmark. 

June. Sun. 27.— Elder Hugh Findlay 
arrived at Poonah, India, from Bombay ,as 
the first Latter- day Saint missionary to 
g that part of the country. 

July. — A townsite called Palmyra was 
surveyed on the Spanish Fork river, Utah 
Co., on which the first house was built in 
the following August. This settlement 
was afterwards united with and absorbed 
in Spanish Fork. 

— The first branch of the Church in 
Norway was organized with eighteen 
members by Hans Peter Jensen, at Riiser. 
A few days later another branch was or- 
ganized at Frederikstad. The third branch 
was established at Brevig, where a hall 
was rented for holding meetings. Brevig 
was made the headquarters of the Nor- 
wegian mission for some time. 

Sdt. 17. — A special conference was held 
at Provo, at which Apostle Geo. A. Smith 
was appointed to preside over the Saints 
in Utah County. He chose Isaac Higbee 
and Dominicus Carter for his counselors. 

Tue.s. 27. — The thermometer stood 127 
degrees F. in the sun, in G. S. L. City. 

Sat. :il. — Elder Christofifer O. Folkman 
was brutally whipped and nearly killed by 
a mob at Tinstad, Bornholm, Denmark, 
where he labored as a missionary. 

•August. — Provo, Utah Co., was di- 
vided into five Hishop's Wards, with Jona- 
than O. Duke as Bishop of the First, 
James lUrd of the Second, Elias H. Black- 
burn of the Third, Wm. M. Wall of the 
Fourth and Wm. Faucett of the Fifth 
Ward. 
— Elder Michael Johnson, who was sent 



to Sweden to continue the work com- 
menced there by John E. Forsgren two 
years previously, was arrested and brought 
as a prisoner to Stockholm, after which he 
was sent in chains six hundred miles to 
Malm0, together with two thieves. 

Sun. 1. — A small branch of the Church 
was organized in Hamburg, Germany, by 
Elder Daniel Garn. 

Thurs. 12. — Hiram Page, one of the 
Eight Witnesses to the Book of Mormon, 
died near Excelsior Springs, Ray Co., 
Mo. 

Tues. i7.— Elder Matthew McCune, a 
member of the British army, arrived at 
Rangoon, Burmah, authorized by the 
American Polders laboring in India to 
preach the gospel in that empire. 

Fri. 20. — Apostles John Taylor, Erastus 
Snow and Franklin D. Richards, accom- 
panied by other Elders, arrived in G. S. L. 
City from their foreign missions. 

Sat. .?.S. — A special two days' conference 
was commenced in G. S. L. City; 106 El- 
ders were called to go on missions, namely 
6 to the United States, 4 to Nova Scotia 
and the British N. A. Provinces, 2 to Brit- 
ish Guiana (South America), 4 to the West 
Indies, 39 to Great Britian, 1 to France, 4 
to Germany. 3 to Prussia, 2 to Gibraltar, 1 
to Denmark, 2 to Norway, 9 to Calcutta 
and Hindostan, 4 to China, 3 to Siam, 3 to 
Cape of Good Hope, Africa, 10 to Australia 
and 9 to the Hawaiian Islands. 

Sun. 2.9. — The revelation on celestial 
marriage was first made public. It was 
read in the conference held in G. S. L. 
City, and Apostle Orson Pratt delivered 
the first public discourse on that principle. 

Mon. :}<). — Apostle Lorenzo Snow return- 
ed to G. S. L. City from his foreign mis- 
sion. 

Tues. 31. — The Utah "run away judges" 
were superseded by the appointment of 
Lazarus H. Reed, as chief justice, and 
Leonidas Shaver, as associate justice. Ben. 
G. Ferris had previously been commission- 
ed as secretary. 

September. — Over seventy Elders left 
G. S. L. City for Europe and the United 
States, Apostle Orson Pratt being among 
the number. 

— Elders John A. Ahmanson ana Jeppe G. 
Folkman were imprisoned four days at 
Brevig, Norway, for preaching the gospel. 

Fri. 3.— The first company of P. E. Fund 
emigrants arrived at G. S. L. City from 
Europe with 31 wagons; Abraham O. 
Smoot, captain. It was met by the First 
Presidency, Capt. Wm. Pitt's band and 
many leading citizens. This company 
brought the remains of Elder Lorenzo D. 
Barnes and Wm. Burton, who died while on 
missions in Great Britain. 

Sun. 12. — A branch of the Church, con- 
sisting of twelve members, was organized 
in the city of Poonah, British India, by 
Elder Hugh Findlay. 

Tuea. 21. — Apostle Orson Hyde arrived in 
G. S. L. City, with his family from Iowa. 
Nearly all the Saints had left KanesviUc 
for the Valley. 

— Mary Fielding Smith, widow of Hyrum 
Smith, died in G. S. L. County. 

October. Wi-d. <l. — The general semi- 
annual conference of the Church was 
commenced in G. S. L. City ; it was con- 



CHUKCH CHROXOLOGT — 1853. 



47" 



tinued till the 10th. A number of home 
missionaries wei-e called to preach in the 
various settlements of the Saints in Utah. 
Wed. 13. — The First Presidency issued 
the "Eighth General Epistle" to the whole 
Church. 

Thurs. 14. — Elders Jeppe G. Folkman 
and Niels Hansen were arrested at Ingols- 
rud, Norway, for preaching the gospel. 
John F. F. Dorius, Christian Knudsen, 
Christian Larsen and Svend Larsen were 
arrested the following day, and Peter 
Beckstrom on the 16th, on similar charges. 
Christian Larsen, Svend Larsen, Dorius 
and Beckstrom were imprisoned at Frede- 
rikstad, while Ole Olsen (who had been 
arrested two weeks previously ) , Christian 
Knudsen, Jeppe G. Folkman, and Niels 
Hansen were confined at Elverhoj. 

Mon. 18. — Apostle Parley P. Pratt ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City from his mission to 
South America. 

iSm«. 24. — A number of missionaries left 
G. S. L. City for India and the Pacific 
Islands. 

November. — A number of native Saints 
in the Society Islands mission were im- 
prisoned and sentenced to hard labor in 
the mountains for holding meetings. 

Wed. 10. — Elders Wm. Willes and Joseph 
Richards left Calcutta, on a trip to the 
interior of India. 

Thurs. 11. — Apostles Erastus Snow and 
Franklin D. Richards left G. S. L. City for 
Iron County where they surveyed a tract 
of land for the "Deseret Iron Company." 
They returned to the city Dec. 12th. 

Fri. 12. — Elder John A. Ahmanson was 
brought as a prisoner to Frederikstad, 
Norway. Thus all the missionaries in 
that country were in jail. 

December. Sun. 3. — Peter Beckstrom, 
one of the imprisoned brethren in Norway, 
was liberated on bail. 

Mon. IS. — The second session of the,Utah 
legislature convened at G. S. L. City, 
and was organized by the election of Wil- 
lard Richards for president of the Council 
and Jed. M. Grant for speaker of the 
House. 

1853. 

This year the Indians under Chief Wal- 
ker waged war against the citizens of 
Utah, of whom a number were killed. The 
"Spanish wall" was built in part around 
G. S. L. City, as a means of protection 
against the Indians. Summit County, 
Utah, was settled by Samuel Snyder, who 
built saw-mills in Parley's Park; a 
settlement of Saints (Fort Supply i 
was commenced on Green river. New 
missions were opened up on the 
Island of Malta (in the Mediterranean), 
at Gibraltar (Spain), and in the Cape 
Colony, Africa. The missionaries and 
Saints in Sweden were subjected to 
cruel and barberous persecution. Some 
were whipped, others imprisoned and a 
number compelled to go into exile. 



January. Sat. 1. — The Social Hall, on 
First East Street, G. S. L. City, was dedi- 
cated; it was erected the year previous. 

Wed. 12. — Elder Daniel Garn was ar- 
rested in Hamburg, Germany, for preach- 
ing the gospel. Soon afterwards he was 
ordered out of the city. 

Sun. lh\ — The ship Forest Monarch 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 297 
Scandinavian Saints, under John E. Fors- 
gren's direction. The company arrived 
at New Orleans March 12th ; at Keokuk, 
Iowa, in the beginning of April ; and most 
of the emigrants reached G. S. L. City, 
Sept. 30th. This was the first large company 
of Saints who emigrated to Utah from 
Scandinavia. 

^fon. 17. — The Deseret Iron Company was 
chartered by the Utah legislature. 

— The ship Ellen Maria sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 332 Saints, under 
the direction of Moses Clawson. It ar- 
rived at New Orleans March 6th, where 
Elder John Brown acted as Church emi- 
gration agent that season. The emigrants 
continued up the Mississippi river to Keo- 
kuk, Iowa, which had been selected as the 
outfitting place for the Saints crossing the 
plains in 1853. 

Wed. 19. — The first theatrical play in 
the Social Hall was presented. 

Fri. 21. — The Utah leerislature closed 
its second regular session. 

Sun. 23. — The ship Golconda sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 321 Saints, un- 
der the direction of Jacob Gates; it ar- 
rived at New Orleans, March 26th. 

Tues. 2.3— Elders Orson Spencer and 
Jacob Houtz, arrived as missionaries in 
Berlin. Prussia. They were banished Feb. 
2nd following. 

Sat. 29. — The missionaries, bound for 
Hindostan and Siam, sailed from San 
Francisco, Cal., per sailing ship Monsoon. 
John M. Horner, a wealthy member 
of the Church in California, contributed 
nearly $6,000 toward defraying the ex- 
penses of these missionaries,' and of those 
goinsj to China, Australia and Hawaii. 

Mon. 31. — Elder Christian Larsen, one 
of the imprisoned missionaries an Frede- 
rikstad, Norway, was liberated. 

February. Sat. -5. — The ship -Terseij 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 314 
Saints, under the direction of Geo. HaUi- 
day; it arrived at New Orleans, March 
21st. 

Mon. 14.— The Temple Block, in G. S. L. ^i^ 
City, was consecrated, and the ground I 
broken for the foundation of the Temple. >J 

Tues. 1-5. — The Elvira Owen sailed from /" 
Liverpool, England, with 345 Saints, under 
the direction of Joseph W. Young. It ar- 
rived at New Orleans March 31st. 

Mon. 28. — The ship International sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 425 Saints, 
under the direction of Christopher Arthur. 
It arrived at New Orleans April 23rd. 

March. Mon. 7. — Edward Stevenson 
and Nathan T. Porter arrived at Gibraltar, 
as the first Latter-day Saint missionaries 
to Spain. 

Wed. 16. — After being confined in prison 
for several months, Svend Larsen was lib- 
erated from the Frederikstad jail, and or- 
dered to preach "Mormonism" no more in 
Norway. 



48 



CHUECH CHEONOLOQY — 1853. 



Man. 2fi. — The ship Falcon sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 324 Saints, under 
Cor. Bagnall's direction. It arrived at 
Nevp Orleans May 18th. 

Wed. 30. — Augustus Farnham and nine 
other American Elders arrived at Sydney, 
New South Wales, as Latter-day Saint 
missionaries to Australia. 

April. .S(//(. .J.— The Saints who had 
settled in Cedar Valley, Utah, were organ- 
ized into a Ward ; Allen Weeks, Bishop. 

Tues. .J.— Elder Jacob F. Secrist was im- 
prisoned at Wissen an der Sieg, Prussia, 
whither he had gone from Hamburg, on a 
visit. The following day he was liberated 
and ordered out of the country. 

Wed. S. — The corner stones of the Temple 
in G. S. L. City were laid under the direc- 
tion of the First Presidencv of the Church. 

— A small company of Saints, in charge 
of Elder Charles W. Wandell, and bound 
for America, sailed from Sydney, Austra- 
lia, per ship Envelope. 

— The ship CantiUus sailed from Liver- 
pool, England, with 228 Saints, under the 
direction of Curtis E. Bolton. It arrived 
at New Orleans in the latter part of May. 

Man. 11.— The Fifth ward, G. S. L. City, 
was organized with Thos. W. Winter as 
Bishop. 

Wed. 13. — The First Presidency issued 
the "Ninth General Epistle" to all the 
Saints. 

Jfon. IS. — Elders Jesse Haven, Leonard 
I. Smith and Wm. Walker arrived as the 
first Latter-day Saint missionaries at the 
Cape of Good Hope. In about four months 
they baptized thirty-nine persons. 

Sun. '24. — The first branch of the Church 
in Sweden was organized by Anders W. 
Winberg at Skurup, in Skaane, called the 
Sjenabseck branch. 

Tues. 26. — Elders Nathaniel V. Jones, 
Amos Milton Musser, Richard Ballantyne, 
Robert Skelton, Robert Owen, Wm. F. 
Carter, Wm. Fotheringham, Truman 
Leonard, Samuel A. WooUey, Chauncey 
W. West, Elam Luddington, Levi Savage 
and Benjamin F. Dewey arrived at Cal- 
cutta as missionaries from Utah to Hin- 
dostan and Siam, after 86 days' voyage 
from San Francisco, Cal. 

Wed. 27. — Elders Hosea Stout, James 
Lewis and Chapman Duncan arrived at 
Hong Koiig, as the first Latter-day Saint 
missionaries to China. Soon afterwards 
they commenced to preach the gospel, but 
meeting with no success, they returned to 
California. 

Fri. 2!). — At a conference of American 
Elders held at Calcutta, Hindostan, Na- 
thaniel V. Jones was sustained as presi- 
dent of the East India mission ; Richard 
Ballantyne, Ro))ert Skelton and Robert 
Owens were appointed to labor in Madras ; 
Wm. F. Carter and Wm. Fotheringham in 
Dinaghpore; Truman Leonard and Samuel 
A. Woolley in Chinsurah, and Nathaniel V. 
Jones and A. Milton Musser in Calcutta. 

—Rodney Badger, one of the Pioneers 
of 1847, was accidentally drowned in the 
Weber river, Utah. 

May. T/i «/•*-.. 5.— Elder .John F. F. Do- 
rius and fellow prisoners, in Norway, were 
finally liberated, after nearly seven 
months' imprisonment for the gospel's 
sake. 



Jfon. 23. — A branch of the Church was 
organized at Cape Town, Africa. 

June. — High water did much damage in 
G. S. L. City. City Creek cut a deep 
channel through the Seventeenth Ward. 

Wed. 1. — The Utah legislature convened 
in the Social Hall, G. S. L. City, and after 
three days' sitting adjourned. This was a 
special session. 

tSun. 5. — Chief Justice Lazarus H. Reed 
arrived at G. S. L. City, and next day 
took the oath of office. 

,Suu. 12. — The first emigrant train of the 
season arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Sun. 19. — A branch of the Church was 
organized on Westmanoen, Iceland, with 
six members. 

Sat. 23.— Elders Wm. F. Carter and Wm. 
Fotheringham returned to Calcutta, India, 
from an unsuccessful missionary trip to 
Dinaghpore, Chunar and Mirzapore. 

July. Jfon. 18. — Alexander Keel was killed 
by Indians under the chief Walker, near 
Payson, Utah Co. This was the com- 
mencement of another Indian war. 

Tues. 19. — The guard at Pleasant Creek, 
Sanpete Co., was fired upon by Indians 
who also, during the following night, stole 
some cattle at Manti, drove away horses 
at Nephi (Juab Co.), and wounded Wm. 
Jolley, at Springville (Utah Co.). 

Sat. 23. — Peter W.Connover's company of 
militia, sent out from Provo to protect the 
weaker settlements, had an engagement 
with the Indians, near the Pleasant Creek 
settlement (Mount Pleasant), Sanpete Co., 
in which six Indians were killed. 

S7in. 24. — John Berry and Clark Roberts 
were fired upon and wounded by Indians 
at Summit Creek (Santaquin), while 
bringing an express through. The in- 
habitants had deserted the place and 
moved to Payson. 

— Elders Richard BaUantyne and Robert 
Skelton arrived at Madras, India, to intro- 
duce the gospel. 

Tites. 26. — The guard at Nephi, Juab Co., 
was fired upon by Indians and David Udall 
wounded in the leg. 

August. Mon. 1. — John M. Bernhisel 
was re-elected delegate to Congress from 
Utah. 

Wed. 10. — The Indians fired upon a com- 
pany of ten men on Clover Creek (Mona), 
Juab Valley, wounding Isaac Duffin and 
killing two horses. 

Sat. 13.— The first number of Zion's 
Watchman, a monthly eight-page octavo 
periodical, published in the interest of the 
Church in Australia, was issued at Sydney 
by Augustus Farnham. 

Wed. n.— John Dixon, a Utah Pioneer of 
1847, and John Quayle were killed and 
John Hoagland was wounded by Indians, 
near Parley's Park, Utah. 

Fri. 19. — Gov. Brigham Young issued a 
proclamation, ordering the Territorial 
militia to be kept in readiness for march- 
ing against Indians, who were killing 
people and stealing stock in various parts 
of the Territory. 

Sun. 21. — Elder Willard Snow died on 
board the steamer Transit, on the German 
Ocean, during his return voyage from 
Copenhagen, Denmark, to England. He 
was buried at sea. 

Tues. 23. — At a Bishop's meeting, held in 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1853. 



49 



the Council House, G. S. L. City, it was 
decided to build a wall around the city. 

Wed. 34. — Elders Samuel A. WooUey and 
Wm. Fotheringham left Calcutta in a gov- 
ernment bullock train on a missionary trip 
to the interior of India. 

Sat. 27. — John Hyde, an American Elder, 
died at Sj'dney, Australia, where he 
labored as a missionary. 

Mon. 29. — Resolutions were adopted by 
the city council, in compliance with ex- 
pressed request of the inhabitants, to 
build a Spanish wall around G. S. L. City. 

September. Sat. 3. — A terrible flood 
caused considerable damage to property 
in Iron County, Utah. 

Wed. 7. — Joseph Chatterly, a member of 
the High Council, in the Parowan Stake of 
Zion, died in Cedar City, Ii'on Co., Utah, 
from the effects of a wound. 

I'ri. H. — Daniel A. Miller's ox-train of 
emigrants, consisting of the last Saints 
from Pottawattamie County, Iowa, ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City. The company con- 
sisted of ?82 souls, 70 wagons, 27 horses, 
470 head of cattle and 153 sheep, and had 
left camp at Winter Quarters June 9th, 
18.53. 

Tues. 1.3. — Wm. Hatton was killed by In- 
dians, while standing guard at Fillmore, 
Utah, 

October. Sat. 1. — James Nelson, Wm. 
Luke, Wm. Reed and Thos. Clark were 
killed by Indians at the Uintah Springs, 
Sanpete Valley. 

Skh. 2. — At a skirmish between the 
whites and Indians, at Nephi, Juab Co., 
Utah, eight Indians were killed, and one 
squaw and two boys taken prisoners. 

Tues. 4. — John E. Warner and Wm. Mills 
were killed by Indians, a few hundred 
yards above the grist mill, at Manti, San- 
pete Co., Utah. 

Thur.^. 6. — The general conference of 
the Church was commenced in G. S. L. 
City. It continued four days. Apostles 
Geo. A. Smith and Erastus Snow were 
called to gather fifty families to strength- 
en the settlements of Iron County, Wil- 
ford Woodruff and Ezra T. Benson fifty 
families to strengthen the settlements in 
Tooele, Lyman Stevens and Reuben W. 
AUred fifty families for each of the settle- 
ments in Sanpete, Lorenzo Snow fifty fam- 
ilies to go to Box Elder, Joseph L. Hey- 
wood fifty families to Nephi, Juab Co., 
and Orson Hyde to raise a company to 
make a permanent settlement on Green 
river, near Fort Bridger. 

— According to the Bishops' reports read 
at conference, the number of souls in the 
varieus settlements in the Territory was 
as follows : Great Salt Lake Citv : 1st 
Ward, 260; 2nd Ward. 149; 3rd Ward, 170; 
4th Ward, 183 ; 5th Ward, 69 ; 6th Ward, 
206; 7th Ward, 384; 8th Ward, 236; 9th 
Ward. 298 ; 10th Ward, 219 : 11th Ward, 
180; 12th Ward, 345; 13th Ward. 454; 14th 
Ward, 662 ; 15th Ward, 501 ; 16th Ward, 
444; 17th Ward, 406; 18th Ward, 241 ; 19th 
Ward, 572. Great Salt Lake County: But- 
terfield Settlement, 71 : West Jordan, 361 ; 
Mill Ci-qek, 668; Big Cottonwood, 161: 
South Cottonwood, 517; Little Cotton- 
wood, 273 ; Willow Creek, 222. Utah Coun- 
ty: Drv Creek, 458; American Fork, 
212; Pleasant Grove, 290; Provo: 1st 

5 



Ward, 423 ; 2nd Ward, 264 ; 3rd Ward, 248 ; 
4th Ward, 424; Mountainville no report; 
Springville, 799; Palmyra,404; Payson and 
Summit, 427; Cedar Valley, 1L5. Juab 
County: Salt Creek, 229. Sanpete County : 
Manti, 647; Pleasant Creek, 118. Millard 
County: Fillmore, 304. Iron County: Paro- 
wan, 392; Cedar, 455. Tooele County: 
Grantsville, 215; Tooele, no report. Davis 
Countj': North Kanyon, 574; Centreville, 
194 ; North Cottonwood, 413 ; Kays Ward 
417. Weber Countv: East Weber, 233 
Ogden: 1st Ward. 449; 2nd Ward, 683 
3rd Ward, 200; Willow Creek, 163. Box 
Elder, 204. 

Thiirs. 13. — The First Presidency issued 
the "Tenth General Epistle" to all the 
Saints. 

Fri. 14. — About thirty Indians attacked 
a few men, who were securing their crops 
at Summit Creek (^Santaquin), Utah Co., 
killed and scalped F. F. Tindrel, and drove 
oflf a number of head of stock. 

Sun. 16. — The main company of the sea- 
son's P. E. Fund emigrants arrived in G. 
S. L. City. 

Wed. 26. — Capt. John W. Gunnison, of the 
U. S. Topographical HJngineer Corps, and 
seven other men, were killed by Indians, 
near the swamps of the Sevier river, in re- 
venge for the killing of an Indian and the 
wounding of two others, alleged to have 
been perpetrated by a company of emi- 
grants bound for California. 

Noveinber. Tites. 1. — The first number 
of the Journal of Biscourse.'i, a semi- 
monthly 16-page octavo paper, was pub- 
lished in Liverpool, England. 

Wed. 2. — Thirty-nine men, equipped with 
farming implements, seeds and othei 
things necessary for establishing a new 
settlement, left G. S. L. City for Greeu 
River County. They arrived at Fort 
Bridger Nov. 12th. 

Previous to this Pres. Brigham Young 
purchased of James Bridger a Mexican 
grant for 30 square miles of land and some 
cabins, afterwards known as Ft. Bridger. 
This was the first property owned by the 
Saints in Green River Countv. 

Sun. 6. — Chase's sawmill, in Sanpete 
County, was burned by Indians. 

Wed. 9. — The Indians burned six houses 
at Summit Creek (Santaquin), Utah Co. 

Sun. 13. — The mail train was attacked 
by Indians six miles from Laramie, and 
three men were killed. C. A. Kinkead, of 
G. S. L. City, was robbed of §10,500. 

Tues. i5.— Another company of settlers 
left G. S. L. City for Green River County. 
They, together with the preceding com- 
pany, located on Smith's Fork and called 
their town Fort Supply. The whole 
colony consisted of 53 men from Great 
Salt Lake and Utah Counties ; John 
Nebeker and Isaac Bullock were among 
the number. 

December. Thurs. i.— Elder Wm. Wil- 
les returned to Calcutta, India, from a 
missionary trip into the interior, after 
being absent nearly one year. 

J/(>«. 12. — The Utah legislature (third 
annual session) convened in G. S. L. City 
and organized by electing Willard Rich- 
ards president of the Council, and Jede- 
diah M. Grant speaker of the House. 

Wed. 2S. — Hiram Clark, once a prominent 



50 



CHURCH CHRON'OLOGY — 1854. 



missionary, committed suicide at San Ber- 
nardino, Cal. 

Thurs. 2.9.— Elders A. Milton Musserand 
Truman Leonard, after laboring in Cal- 
cutta and Chinsurah, India, about nine 
months, sailed from Calcutta for Bombay, 
where they arrived Feb. 9, 1854. 

The so-called Spanish wall built in part 
around G. S. L. City this year was twelve 
feet high, six feet thick at the base, taper- 
ing to two feet six inches six feet from the 
ground, and preserving that thickness to 
the top. It was six miles in length. 



185-i. 



This year the crops in Utah were partly 
destroyed by grasshoppers ; the so-called 
Walker war was terminated and the Des- 
eret alphabet was formulated. Hundreds 
of emigrating Saints from Europe died 
from cholera while sailing up the Missis- 
sippi and Missouri rivers and crossing the 
plains. A Stake of Zion was organized at 
St. Louis, Mo., and a mission opened up in 
New Zealand. 

January. — The Deseret Xeivs was 
changed from a semi-monthly to a weekly 
paper. 

Tues. 3. — Tbeship Jesse Jlunn sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 300 Scandina- 
vian and 33 German Saints, under the di- 
rection of Christian Larsen. It arrived at 
New Orleans Feb. 10th, and the emigrants 
continued up the rivers to Kansas City, 
Mo., which this year was selected as the 
outfitting place for the Saints crossing the 
plains. 

Fri. 6. — Allred's Settlement (Spring 
City), Sanpete Co., which had been de- 
serted by its inhabitants the previous 
summer, because of Indian troubles, was 
burned to the ground. 

Thurs. 12.— The 37th quorum of Seven- 
ty was organized in G. S. L. City, with 
Cyrus H. Wheelock, John Lyon, Jesse W. 
Crosby, Jonathan Midgley, David J. Ross, 
George Halliday and Claudius V. Spencer 
as presidents. 

Some time previous the 36th quorum 
had been organized, with Jesse W. Fox as 
one of the presidents. 

Wed. is.— Elders Samuel A Woolley and 
Wm. Fotheringham arrived, as mission- 
aries, at Agra, Hindostan. 

Fri. 20.— The legislative assembly of 
Utah adjourned. Among the acts passed 
and approved were those providing for the 
organization of Summit, Green River and 
Carson Counties, and defining the bound- 
aries of Davis County. 

Sun. 2:i. — The ship Benjamin Adams 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 378 
Scandinavian and 6 British Saints, under 
the direction of Hans Peter Olsen. The 
company arrived at New Orleans, March 
22nd, and at Kansas City in the beginning 
of April. 

Mon. 2?.— A branch of the Church was 
organized by Edward Stevenson, at Gib- 
raltar, Spain, with 10 members. 

Tues. 3/.— Bishop Isaac Clark died at 
Ogden. 



—A mass meeting was held in G. S. L, 
City for the purpose of taking steps 
towards memorializing Congress to 
construct a national railroad from the Mis- 
souri river, ?•/« th^ South Pass and G. S. 
L. City, to the Pacific. 

February. Saf. 4. — The ship Golconda 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 464 
Saints, under the direction of Dorr P. 
Curtis ; it arrived at New Orleans March 
18th. 

Sku.o. — At a Seventies' quarterly confer- 
ence heidin G. S. L. City,the 38th and 39th 
quorums of Seventy were organized with 
Benjamin F. Cummings and Daniel Mc- 
intosh as senior presidents. 

Tues. 7. — John C. Fremont, with a com- 
pany of nine whites and twelve Delaware 
Indians, arrived at Parowan, Iron Co., in 
a state of starvation. One man had fallen 
dead from his horse near the settlement, 
and others were nearly dead. Animals and 
provisions were supijlied by the Saints, 
and, after resting until the 20th, Fremont 
and company continued their journey to 
California. 

Tues. 14. — Clarissa Smith, Patriarch 
John Smith's wife, died in G. S. L. City. 

Wed. 22. — The ship Windermere sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 484 Saints, 
under Daniel Garn's direction; it arrived 
at New Orleans April 23rd. Many died on 
board from the small pox. 

—Elders A. Milton Musser and Truman 
Leonard sailed from Bombay, India, 
for Kurrachee, Scinde, which place they 
reached Feb. 26th. Kurrachee is about 900 
miles northwest of Bombay. 

March. — Elias Smith succeeded the late 
Willard Richards as postmaster of Great 
Salt Lake City. 

— Ephraim, Sanpete Co., was first settled. 

— The first number of the Latter-day 
Saints' MiUenniul Star and Monthly Visi- 
tor, an eight-page periodical (octavo size), 
was published at Madras, Hindostan; 
Elder Richard Ballantyne editor and pub- 
lisher. 

Sun. 5. —The ship Old England sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 45 Saints, 
under the direction of John O. Angus. It 
arrived at the mouth of the Mississippi 
river April 24th. 

Jfon. 6. — Elders Samuel A. Woolley and 
Wm. Fotheringham returned to Calcutta 
from an unsuccessful mission to the inte- 
rior, on which they visited Benares, Belas- 
pore, Marat, Delhi, Kurnaul, Agra, Cawn- 
pore, Allahabad, etc. 

Saf. 11.— Dr. Willard Richards, second 
Counselor to Pres. Brigham Young, and 
editor of the Deseret Xews, died in G. S. L. 
City, of dropsy. 

Sun 12.— The ship ./oh n Jf. TTood sailed 
from Liverpool, with 393 Saints, including 
58 from Switzerland and Italy, under the 
direction of Robert L. Campbell. It ar- 
rived at New Orleans May 2nd. 

Wed. 22. — The ship .lulia Ann sailed from 
Sydney, Australia, with about seventy 
Saints, bound for Utah, under the direc- 
tion of Wm. Hyde. The company landed 
at San Pedro, Cal., June 1 2th. 

Fri. 24.— Geo. E. Ashburner, captain of 
the police, peremptorily ordered Elders 
A. Milton Musser and Truman Leonard 
out of the cantonment of Camp Kurrachee , 



CHURCH CHEONOLOGY — 1854. 



51 



India, and admonished them not to re- 
turn. 

Wed. 29. — Under the administration of 
Elders JohnS. Fulmer and David B. Dille, 
Halsdeu Marsden, 18 years old, who was 
born deaf and dumb, was miraculously 
healed from his deafness, at Roclidale, 
England. 

April. — A number of Elders were called 
on a mission to the Indians in southern 
Utah. Tliis more directly resulted in open- 
ing up that part of Utah south of the Great 
Basin to settlement. 

Tt<es. 4. — The ship Gennaiiicvs sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 220 Saints, 
under the direction of Richard Cook. The 
company arrived at New Orleans June 12th. 

Thuvs. (>. — The 24th annual conference 
of the Church was commenced in G. S. L. 
City; it was continued till the 9th. On 
the 7th, Jedediah M. Grant was chosen 
second Counselor to Pres. Brigham Young, 
in place of Willard Richards deceased. 
Bro. Grant was set apart on the 9th. Geo. 
A. Smith was sustained as Church His- 
torian. A number of missionaries were 
called to Great Britain, tl e United States, 
Canada and the Pacific Islands. 

iSat. 8. — The ship Marshfield sailed from 
Liverpool, with 366 Saints, including about 
forty from the French mission, under the 
direction of Wm. Taylor. The company 
arrived at New Orleans May 29th. 

Mon. 10. — The First Presidency issued 
its "Eleventh General Epistle" to the 
whole Church. 

Sun. 2.5.— The Sugar House Ward, G. S. 
L. Co., Utah, was organized with Abra- 
ham O. Smoot as Bishop. 

Mon. i"-/. — Twenty-nine Saints sailed 
from England on the ship Clara Wheeler, 
bound for Utah. 

May. Thur J. — Pres. Brigham Young 
left G. S. L. City, accompanied by many 
leading men, on a tour through the south- 
ern settlements, from which he returned 
on the 30th. 

Fri 5.— Apostle Parley P. Pratt left G. 
S. L. City on his second mission to Cali- 
fornia. He arrived at San Bernardino 
June 9th, and in San Francisco July 2nd. 

Mon. 8. — A branch of the Cliuruh, con- 
sisting of 19 members, was organized in 
Piedmont, Italy, where considerable per- 
secution had raged. 

Tues. 23. — Patriarch John Smith died in 
G. S. L. City, and on June 28th John Smith, 
son of Hyrum Smitli, was chosen Patriai'ch 
to the Church in place of the deceased. 

Late in May, (after a "talk" with Pres. 
Brigham Young), the Indian chief Walker, 
surrounded by his braves, and Kanosh, 
chief of the Pauvan Indians, entered into 
a formal treaty of peace at Chicken Creek, 
Juab Co. This ended the Ute war, during 
which 19 white persons and many Indians 
had been killed, a number of the smaller 
settlements had been broken up, and their 
inhabitants moved to the larger towns. 

June. — Apostle Franklin D. Richards 
succeeded Samuel W. Richards as presi- 
rent of the British mission. His letter of 
appointment authorized him "to preside 
over all the conferences and all the affairs 
of the Church in the British Islands and 
adjacent countries." This was the begin- 
ning of what has since been called the 



European mission, which embraces all the 
missions in Europe, and at one time^also the 
Church organizations in Africa, Australia, 
India, etc. 

Fri. 2. — The first company of emigrants 
of the season, boundjfor California, passed 
through G. S. L. City, having left Council 
Bluffs April 12th. 

Fri. 16. — The workmen began at the 
south- east corner to lay the foundation of 
the Temple, in G. S. L. City. 

July.— The grasshoppers made their ap- 
pearance in the fields of some of the settle- 
ments in Utah and did much damage. 

Sat. 8. — Apostle Erastus Snow, accompa- 
nied by other Elders, left G.S.L.City for the 
East, to take charge of the Church in St. 
Louis and the Western States. 

Thurs. 13. — The Jordan river bridge, 
west of G. S. L. City, was crossed by teams 
and herds for the first time. 

Th lO'S. 20. — Elder Gudmund Gudmundsen 
left Iceland, where he had labored upwards 
of three years preaching the gospel, and 
had baptized nine persons. He returned 
to Denmark. 

Tues. 25. — Elder Richard Ballantyne 
sailed from Madras, India, bound for Lon- 
don, where he arrived Dec. 6, 1854. 

August. — The native Saints in the 
Hawaiian mission commenced to gather to 
the island of Lanai, which had been selected 
as a gathering place for them, and the 
building of a city was commenced in the 
valley or basin tnown as Palawai. 

Wed. 2.— Pres. Brigham Young advised 
the presidency of the British mission to 
ship the emigrating Saints from Europe to 
a more northern port than New Orleans, 
as the latter place was very un healthful. 

Tues. 8. — Wm. and Warren Weeks, sons 
of Bishop Allen Weeks, were killed by 
Goshute Indians, in Cedar Valley. 

Sat. 12. — Peter Whitmer, sen., died in 
Richmond, Ray Co., Mo. He was bom 
April 14, 1773. 

Sun. 13. — Elders Geo. C. Riser and Jens 
C. Nielsen, who labored as missionaries ia 
Hamburg, Germany, were arrested and ~ 
imprisoned for preaching the gospel andj 
baptizing a few persons. C V i^- ^ ^^ 

Tues. i.3.— The wall around the Temple 
Block, in G. S. L. Citv, was completed. 

Tues. 22.— Elder Truman Leonard le^ 
Kurrachee, India, with a Masonic friend 
for Kotree, about one hundred miles in- 
land. 

Thurs. 24. — John F. Kinney, of Iowa, 
succeeded Lazarus H. Reed as chief just- 
ice of Utah. 

Tues. 29.— Geo. Mills, one of the Utah 
Pioneers of ISiZ^^ied in Gr. S. L. Citv- 

Thurs. 31.— Col. E. J. Steptoe, who had 
been appointed governor of Utah, arrived 
in G. S. L. City with about one hundred' - 
and seventy-five soldiers. 

September. Tues. 5. — After 23 days' 
imprisonment. Elders Geo. C. Riser and 
Jens C. Nielsen, through the influence of 
Mr. Bromberg, the American consul, were 
liberated from prison, in Hamburg, on con- 
ditions that they should leave the country 
forthwith. 

Fri. 29. — Capt. James Brown's companjF 
of immigrating Saints (with 42 wagons) ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City. 

Sat. 30. — Capt. Darwin Richardson'* 




Sa» 



62 



CHURCH CHKONOLOGY — 1855. 



company of immigrating Saints (40 wagons ) 
arrived in G. S. L. City. 

October. s>ni. I. — Daniel Garn's com- 
pany of immigrating Saints, including the 
Germans, arrived in G. S. L. City. 

2fon. 2.— Elder Wm. W. Major, of G. S. 
Li. City, died in London, England, where 
he labored as a missionary. 

TJiurs. 5. — Elder Hans Peter Olsen's 
company of immigrating Saints, including 
the Scandinavians, arrived in G. S. L. 
City. Many had died from cholera while 
crossing the plains. 

Sun. S. — A printing press and the nec- 
cessary material for printing the Book of 
Mormon in the Hawaiian language arrived 
at Honolulu, Hawaii, but subsequently it 
was shipped to San Francisco, Cal., and 
the printing done there. 

Tueif. 24. — Wm. A. Empey's company of 
immigrating Saints (with 43 wagons) ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City. 

Fri. 27. — Augustus Farnham, president 
of the Australasian Mission, and Wm. Cooke 
arrived at Auckland, as the first mis- 
sionaries to Xew Zealand. 

Sat. 2S. — Robert L. Campbell's company 
of immigrating Saints, the last of the 
season, arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Xoveniber. Sat. 4. — Apostle Erastus 
Snow organized a Stake of Zion in 
St. Louis, Mo., with Milo Andrus 
as president and Charles Edwards 
and George Gardiner as counselors. 
A High Council was also organized, 
, consisting of James H. Hart, Andrew 
Sproule, John Evans, Wm. Morrison, 
James S. Cantwell, Wm. Lowe, Samuel J. 
Lees, Edward Cook, James S. Brooks. 
William Gore, John Clegg and Charles 
Chard. 

Sat. ii.— Professor Orson Pratt dis- 
covered "a new and easy method of solu- 
tion of the cubic and biquadratic equa- 
tions." 

Wed. 22.— The iBrst number of the St. 
Louis /w//«/«a/7/ was published by Erastus 
Snow, in St. Louis, Mo. 

Monday. 27. — The ship Clara Wheeler 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 422 
Saints, under the direction of Henry E. 
Phelps. The company arrived at- New Or- 
leans Jan. 11, 1855, and at St. Louis Jan. 
22nd. 

Tites. 28.— Apostle Charles C. Rich ar- 
rived in G. S.L.City from San Bernardino, 
and Geo. Q. Cannon and others from the 
Sandwich Islands. 

December. J/on. 11.— The Utah leg- 
islature (4th annual session) convened in 
the Council House, in G. S. L. City, and 
organized by electing Heber C. Kimball 
president of the Council, and Jedediah M. 
Grant speaker of the House. 

Sun. 2^.— Patriarch William Draper died 
at Draperville, Salt Lake Co. 

Mon. 25.— The Seventies' Council Hall, 
in G. S. L. City, was dedicated. It way 
53x25 feet, and had cost S3,500. 

Sat. ■)(). — A petition praying for the re- 
appointment of Brigham Young to the 
governorship of Utah, and signed by Col. 
Steptoe and the leading officials and busi- 
ness men of G. S. L. City, was sent to 
Washington, D. C. 

Sun. :il. — The European mission, con- 
sisted of 67 conferences, 788 branches and 



32,627 members. Of these 29,441 were in 
Great Britain, 2,447 in Scandinavia, 299 in 
Switzerland and Italy, 326 in the French 
mission, 56 in the German mission, 40 on 
the island of Malta and 18 at Gibraltar. 



1855. 

This year walls were built around some 
of the settlements in Utah as a means of 
protection against the Indians. The Coun- 
ty court house, the "Lion House" and 
other notable public and private buildings 
were erected in G. S. L. City. The mails 
arrived very irregularly from the States. 
In the spring of this year Morgan County , 
Utah, was settled by Jedediah M. Grant, 
Thomas Thurston and others. During the 
summer grasshoppers did serious damage 
to crops, destroying nearly everything 
green in many parts of Utah. The loss 
and suffering was aggravated by drought, 
the combined evils causing a great failure 
in crops. In trying to establish a settle- 
ment (now Moabj near the Elk Mountains 
(now La Salle Mountains), Utah, troubles 
arose with the Indians and several of the 
brethren were killed. A settlement of the 
Saints was established on Salmon river, 
Oregon (now in Idaho). The Book of 
Mormon was jjublished in the Hawaiian 
language by Geo. Q. Cannon in San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

January. Jfon. 1. — A grand party was 
given by the Utah legislature as a com- 
pliment to Judge John F. Kinney and 
other Federal officials in the Territory, 
and also Lt.-Col. Steptoe with the officers 
of his command. 

Sat. I). — The ship liorkaxcay sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 24 Saints, under 
the direction of Samuel Glasgow. The 
company arrived at New Orleans, Feb. 
28th, and at St. Louis about the 16th of 
March. 

Sun. 7. — The ship .Tames Xesmith sailed 
from Liverpool, with 440 Scandinavian and 
1 British Saints, under the direction of 
Peter O. Hansen. It arrived at New Or- 
leans, Feb. 23rd, and the company con- 
tinued up the rivers to Ft. Leavenworth ; 
afterwards to Mormon Grove. 

Tues. .9.— Thirteen Saints, under the pre- 
sidency of Thomas Jackson, sailed from 
Liverpool on the ship Xera, bound for 
Utah. The company arrived at New Or- 
leans, Feb. 22nd. 

Thurs. 11. — After making a number of fu- 
tile attempts to reach the English speaking 
people of Camp Kurrachee, Elder A. Milton 
Musser entered into a contract with David 
Sair Mohammed to build a meeting house, 
26x20 feet, on the main thoroughfare be- 
tween Camp Kurrachee, and the landing 
near the cantonment. The house was soon 
built and dedic-ated, after which regular 
meetings were held in it till September, 
1855. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1855. 



53 



Fri. 12. — Archibald Bowman was acci- 
dentally killed while quarring rock for the 
Temple, at the quarry, near G. S. L. City. 
Wed. 17. — The ship Charles Buck sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 403 Saints, 
under the direction of Richard Ballan- 
tyne. The company arrived at New Or- 
leans about March 14th, and at St. Louis 
March 27th. 

Fi'i. 19. — The Utah legislature adjourn- 
ed after the usual session of forty days. 

Mon. 2.9. — Walker, chief of the Ute In- 
dians, died at Meadow Creek, Millard Co. 
His brother Arrapeen succeeded him as 
chief. 

February. — The 40th quorum of Seven- 
ty was organized at Farmington, Davis 
Co., Utah, with Ezra T. Clark, John S. 
Gleason, James Harrison, Hyrum Judd, 
Daniel Rawson, Lot Smith and Sanford 
Porter as presidents. Most of the mem- 
bers were ordained March 4, 1855. 

tSai. 3. — Geo. C. Riser, Jacob F. Se- 
crist and a small company of Saints (16 
souls) sailed from Liverpool, England, on 
the ship Isaac ■/eans,honnd for Utah. They 
landed in Philadelphia, March 5th. 

Mon. 5. — Dr. Garland Hurt, of Kentucky, 
Indian Agent for Utah, arrived at G. S. L. 
City. 

Tues. 6. — A grand festival, lasting two 
days, was commenced in G. S. L. City, in 
honor of the Mormon Battalion. 

iSat. 17. — The first number of the Mor- 
mon, a weekly paper, published in the in- 
terest of the Church, was issued in the 
city of New York, by Apostle John Taylor. 

Sun. 18.— John Smith was ordained to 
his calling as Patriarch to the whole 
Church. 

Tttes. 27. — The name of Sessions' Settle- 
ment, Davis Co., Utah, was changed to 
Bountiful. 

— The ship Siddo)is sailed from Liver- 
pool, England, with 430 Saints, under the 
direction of John S. Fullmer. It arrived 
at Philadelphia April 20th, from which 
place the company went by rail to Pitts- 
burg, Pa., thence on steamboats down 
the Ohio river to St. Louis and up the 
Missouri river to Atchison, Kan. 

March. — Mormon Grove, near Atchison, 
Kan., was selected as an outfitting place 
for the Saints crossing the plains this 
year. Eight companies, with 337 wagons, 
commenced the journey for G. S. L. Valley 
from that place in 18.55. 

Mon. 5. — Elders Nathaniel V. Jones 
and William Fotheringham sailed from 
Calcutta, India, homeward bound, via 
China and San Francisco, Cal., after la- 
boring zealously, together with their co- 
laborers, to introduce the fulness of the 
gospel to the inhabitants of India. Elder 
Robert Skelton was left in charge of the 
mission. 

Thurs. 15. — Elder Hugh Findlay, accom- 
panied by a few emigrating Saints, sailed 
from Bombay, India, homeward bound, ma 
China. 

Tues. 27.— Lazarus H. Reed, late chief 
justice of Utah, and a friend to her people, 
died at his home at Bath, N. Y. 

Sat. 31. — The ship Juventa sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 573 Saints, un- 
der the direction of Wm. Glover. It ar- 
rrved at Philadelphia May 5th. From 



there the company went by rail to Pitts- 
burgh, and further on steamboats down 
the Ohio river to St. Louis, Mo. 

April. — The First Presidency issued the 
"Twelfth General Epistle" to the whole 
Church. 

Sun. .1. — The Millennial Star and 
Church Emigration oflice in Liverpool, 
England, was removed from 15 Wilton 
Street to 36 (now 42) Islington, where it 
has been ever since, 

Fri. G. — The 25th annual conference of 
the Church was held in G. S. L. City; it 
was continued for three days ; 154 Elders 
were called on foreign missions. 

Tues. 17. — The ship Cfriniborazo sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 431 Saints, 
including 70 from the Channel Islands, un- 
der the direction of Edward Stevenson. 
The company arrived at Philadelphia May 
21st. 

Sun. 22. — The ship Samuel ('urling sailed 
from Liverpool with 581 Saints, under Is- 
rael Barlow's direction ; it arrived at New 
York May 27th. The emigrants continued 
by rail to Pittsburgh, thence by steamboat 
on the rivers, via St. Louis, Mo., to Atchi- 
son, Kan. 

Thurs. 2!). — The ship Wni. Stetson sailed 
from Liverpool, with 293 Saints, under 
Aaron Smithurst's direction. It arrived at 
New York May 27th. 

Fri. 27. — Seventy- two Saints from Adel- 
aide (South Australia) and Victoria, sailed 
from Melbourne, on board the brig 
Tarquenia, bonnd for Utah, via San 
Pedro, Cal., under the direction of Burr 
Frost. Arriving at Honolulu, Sandwich 
Islands, the vessel was condemned as un- 
safe and the emigrants landed. Shortly 
afterwards some of them engaged another 
passage to San Pedro, Cal. 

May. — The first number of Der Darstel- 
ler der Heiligen der letzten Tage, a month- 
ly 16-page octavo periodical, was published 
by Daniel Tyler at Geneva, Switzerland, 
in the German language, in the interest of 
the Church. ••-^- 

Sat. 5. — The Endowment House, in G.^'Ss 
L. City, was dedicated. ■■- .-. — ■. . . , / 

Tues. 8. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
others left G. S. L. City on a trip to the 
southern settlements. He returned on the 
27th. 

Thurs. iO.— Charles C. Rich, Geo, Q. 
Cannon, Joseph Bull and Matthew F. 
Wilkie left G. S. L. City on a mission to 
California. 

Fri. 11. — A treaty of peace was con- 
cluded with the Ute Indians. 

Sun. 13. — Albert Gregory, who was re- 
turning west from a mission to the States, 
died at Atchison, Kan. 

Wed. 16. — Apostle Orson Hyde and com- 
pany left G. S. L. City for Carson Valley, 
where they arrived June 17th. 

<S'w/i. 20.— The camp of the missionaries, 
called to settle on the Salmon river, Ore- 
gon (now Idaho) , was organized by Thomas 
S. Smith on the bank of Bear river, with 
Francillo Durfee as captain. 

Mon. 21. — A company of about forty men, 
under the presidency of Alfred N. Billings, 
left Manti, Sanpete Co., for a valley near 
the Elk Mountains (La Salle Mountains), 
where they arrived June 15th and com- 






54 



CflUECH CHRONOLOGY — 1855. 



menced a settlement on the left bank of 
Grand river, where Moab now stands. 

Tues. 29. — A small company of Saints 
emigrating to Utah sailed from Calcutta, 
India, per ship Frank Johnson. 

June. Wed. 13. — Andrew L. Lamo- 
reaux, returning missionary from Europe, 
died at St. Louis, Mo. 

F7-i. 15. — Fort Limhi (Idaho; was located 
by Thomas S. Smith and his company of set- 
tlers, on the Salmon river, and on the 18th 
they moved to the site. 

Man. IS. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
others left G. S. L. City on a visit to the 
northern settlements, from which they re- 
turned on the 25th. 

Ftn. 2fJ. — Judge Leonidas Shaver died in 
G. S. L. City. 

July. Sun. 1. — The manufacture of mo- 
lasses' from beets at the sugar factory, in 
the Sugar House Ward, G. S. L. Co., was 
commenced. 

Mon. 2. — Jacob F. Secrist, captain of the 
second company of the season's emigration, 
and returning missioaary, died on Ketch- 
urn's Creek, west of Ft. Kearney. 

Wed i<S'.— Elder John Perry died at Mor- 
mon Grove, Kansas, on his return from a 
mission to England. 

Mon. 23. — The massive foundation of the 
Temple in G. S. L. City was finished. 

Tues. 24. -Wm. Nixon was killed at Pro- 
ve, Utah Co., by the bursting of a cannon. 

Fri. 27. — David H. Burr, surveyor-gen- 
eral for Utah, arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Su7i. 29. — The ship Ci/nosure sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 159 Saints, under 
the direction of George .Seager. It arrived 
at New York Sept. 5th. 

August. Thiirs. 2. — Thomas Tanner, 
foreman of the Public Works' blacksmith 
shop in G. S. L.City, and a Utah Pioneer 
of 1847, died from the effects of a fall, which 
occurred on July .31st. 

Mon. 6. — John M. Bernhisel was elected 
the third time as delegate to Congress 
from Utah. 

Frl. 10.— Jane Amanda Stevens Lewis, 
wife of Philip B. Lewis, died near San 
Bernardino, Cal., on her return from a 
mission to the Hawaiian Islands. 

Sat. i8.— Apostle Parley P. Pratt re- 
turned to G. S. L. City, after a fifteen 
months' mission to California, accompanied 
by a few immigrants. 

September. Sat. i.— Erastus Snow 
and Chas. H. Bassett arrived in G. S. L. 
City from their mission to the States. 

Sun. 2.— The Ute and Shoshone Indians 
met in front of the Deseret Xews office, G. 
S. L. City, and entered into a treaty of 
peace. ^ 

—David Lewis, a survivor of the Haun's 
Mill massacre, died at Parowan, Iron Co. 

Mon. 3. — Capt. John Hindley's company 
of immigrating Saints, the first sf the 
season, arrived in G. S. L. City. It con- 
sisted of 46 wagons and about two hundred 
souls. 

Fri. 7.— The second company of immi- 
grating Saints of the season, consisting of 
.58 wagons, arrived in G. S. L. City, under 
the direction of Capt. Noah T. Guyman. 

—The American bark ./idia Ann sailed 
from Sydney, N. S. V/., Australia, with 
a company of Saints, under the direction 



of Elders James Graham and John S. El- 
dredge, bound for America. 

Mon. 10. — On this and the following day 
a large company of missionaries left G. S. 
L. City for Europe and the States. 

Tues. 11.— Seth M. Blair's train of 45 
wagons arrived in G. S. L. City with a few 
Saints from Texas. 

Wed. 12. — W. W. Drummond was ap- 
pointed successor to the late Leonidas 
Shaver as associate justice of Utah. 

Thurs. 13. — The Horticultural Society 
was organized in G. S. L. City, with Wil- 
ford Woodruff as president. Various other 
societies were organized in the forei^art of 
the year, among which were the "Uni- 
versal Scientific Society", the "Polyso- 
phical Society", the Deseret Philharmonic 
Society and the "Deseret Typographical 
Association." 

Sat. 22. — Elder A. Milton Musser and 
Truman Leonard left Kurrachee, India, for 
Bombay. 

Sun. 23. — James W. Hunt, Wm. Behunin 
and Edward Edwards, of the Elk Moun- 
tain mission, were killed by Indians, who 
also wounded Pres. Alfred N. Billings, be- 
sides burning hay and stealing cattle. The 
following day the colonists left their fort 
and started for Manti, where they arrived 
Sept. 30th. 

Tues. 25. — The fourth company of immi- 
grating Saints of the season, under Capt. 
Richard Ballantyne (45 wagons, 402 soulsj , 
arrived in G. S. L. City, 

Fri. 28. — The fifth company of immigrat- 
ing Saints of the season, under Capt. Mo- 
ses Thurston (33 wagonsj , arrived in G. S. 
L. City. 

October Thurs. 4. — Elders John S. 
Eldredge and James Graham and 28 Saints 
emigrating toUtah from Australia,on board 
the ship Julia Ann, were wrecked on a coral 
reef near the Society Islands. Five per- 
sons were drowned and the rest barely 
escaped with their lives and landed on a 
barren and uninhabited island (SciUy 
Island), where they subsisted on turtle for 
six weeks, when they were rescued. 

Sun. iJ.— Carl G. Maeser, Edward 
Schoenfeld and two others were baptized 
by Apostle Franklin D. Richards, as the 
first fruits of the preaching of the gospel 
at Dresden, Germany. 

Mon. 1-5. — Gov. Y^oung ordered out part 
of the Utah militia, to protect the settle- 
ments in the eastern part of tne Territory 
from the Indians. 

— Elder Orson Spencer died in St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Thurs. i8.— Elder Josiah W. Flemming 
was arrested at Sydney, N. S. W., Aus- 
tralia, on a false charge instigated by 
apostates. After spending the night in a 
miserable prison, he was acquitted and 
liberated the following day. 

Sun. 21. — A branch of the Church, con- 
sisting of eight members, was organized at 
Dresden, Germany. Shortly afterwards the 
number increased to about twenty, includ- 
ing a few in Leipzig. 

Wed. 24. — Capt. Milo Andrus' immigrant 
train, called the third P. E. Fund company 
of the season, arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Mon. 29. — The sixth company of immi- 
grating Saints of the season (39 wagons). 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1856. 



55 



under Capt. C. A. Harpei", arrived in G. S. 
L. City. 

— The First Presidency of the Church, in 
the '-Thirteenth General Epistle," pro- 
posed that the Saints, who emigrated by 
the P. E. Fund, should cross the plains 
with handcarts. 

November. Fri. 2.— Part of the seventh 
or last company of immigrating Saints for 
the season (38 wagons, 62 souls) arrived in 
G. S. L. City; Isaac AUred, captain. Some 
wagons, which had to stop over at Green 
river, arrived on the 13th. 

Tucs. io.— John M. King, formerly a 
member of the Mormon Battalion, died in 
G. S. L. City. 

Sun. 23. — Elders Wm. Walker and Leon- 
ard I. Smith, accompanied by 15 Saints, 
sailed from Algoa Bay, Cape Colony, 
Africa, on the Unify, bound for Utah. 
They arrived in London, England, Jan. 
29, 1856. 

— Elder Truman Leonard sailed from 
Bombay, India, for England. 

Tues. 27. — A grand festival, in honor of 
the returned missionaries, was given by 
the First Presidency in the Social HaU, G. 
S. L. City. About seventy missionaries 
attended. 

Fri. 30. — The ship Emerald Isle sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 349 Saints, 
under the direction of Philemon C. Mer- 
rill. It arrived at New York Dec. 29th. 

— Elder Allen Findlay, a missionary from 
England, who had assisted the American 
Elders in Bombay and vicinity for some 
time, sailed from Bombay, on his return to 
England. 

December. — The Utah legislature 
passed a bill, authorizing an election of 
delegates to attend a Territorial conven- 
tion, the object of which was to draft a 
State constitution, and petition Congress 
a second time for the admission of Utah 
into the Union. 

Sat. i.— Apostle Amasa M. Lyman ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City from California, and 
Wm. Fotheringham and Hugh Findlay 
from India. 

Jlon. 3. — Elder A. Milton Musser sailed 
from Bombay for Calcutta, India, where 
he arrived Jan. 22, 1856. 

3fon. 10.— The Utah legislature (fifth 
annual session) met at Fillmore, Millard 
Co., the new capital of the Territory, and 
organized by electing Heber C. Kimball 
president of the Council, and Jedediah 
M. Grant speaker of the House. 

Wed. 12. —The ship ./ohn ■/. Boyd sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 508 Saints 
(437 Scandinavians, 41 British and 41 Ital- 
ians) , under the direction of Knud Peter- 
son. It ari'ived at New York, Feb. 15, 
1856. A part of the company remained in 
Iowa and Illinois for some time, while a 
portion continued to Utah the same sea- 
son via St. Louis and Florence. 

Jfon. 31. — An able address on plural 
marriage, written by Apostle Parley P. 
Pratt, was read before the Utah legisla- 
ture at Fillmore, Utah. 

1856. 

In the forepart of this year there was 
great scarcity of provisions in Utah. 
Many domestic animals died from starva- 



tion. Beaver County, Utah, was settled 
by pioneers from Parowan. A general 
reformation took place throughout the 
Church, most of the Saints renewing their 
covenants by baptism. This reformation 
extended to the several missionary fields 
in different parts of the world. Many of 
the Saints from Europe suffered severely 
in crossing the plains and mountains with 
handcarts. The practice of paying tith- 
ing was generally introduced among the 
Saints in Europe. 

January. Sat. .3. — Box Elder, Cache, 
Greasewood, Humboldt, St. Mary's, Malad 
and Cedar Counties, Utah, were created 
by legislative acts, approved by Gov. 
Brigham Young. 

Sat 12. — x\n act, passed by the Utah 
legislature, creating Shambip County, 
Utah, was approved. 

Fri. IS.— The Utah legislature adjourned. 

Sat. 26. — At a mass meeting held in G. S. 
L. City, steps were taken for organizing 
the B. Y. Express Carrying Company, to 
carry a daily express from the Missouri 
river to California. In subsequent meet- 
ings shares were taken to stock a thousand 
miles of the road. 

February.— Beaver County, recently 
created by legislative act, was settled by 
Simeon F. Howd and thirteen others from 
Parowan, who located Beaver City. The 
townsite was laid out April 17, 1856. 

— The Indians stole many cattle and 
horses in Utah and Cedar Valleys. On 
Feb. 21st they killed two herdsmen west 
of Utah Lake, and on the 22nd a posse of 
ten men with legal writs called at an In- 
dian camp in Cedar Valley to arrest the 
murderers. A fight ensued, in which one 
Indian and a squaw were killed and Geo. 
Carson, one of the />os*;<',mortally wounded. 
He died on the 23rd. On that day (the 
23rd) Gov. Brigham Young, by proclama- 
tion, ordered out part of the Utah militia 
to fight the Indians. This dilficulty with 
the natives is known in history as the 
"Tintic War." 

Wed. f,'.— Elder Robert C. Petty, of 
Herriman, Utah, died on Grand river, Ind. 
Ter., where he labored as a missionary. 

Fri. 8. — The Saints who were settling on 
Beaver creek, Beaver Co., Utah, were 
organized into a branch of the Church by 
Apostle Geo. A. Smith, with Simeon F. 
Howd as president. 

Tues. 12. — The Seventies, now number- 
ing 40 quorums, commenced a jubilee in G. 
S. L. City, which lasted five days. Their 
hall, which had unuergone a thorough im- 
provement, was again dedicated. 

Jlon. 18. — The ship Caravan sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 454 Saints, under 
the direction of Daniel Tyler. The com- 
pany arrived at New York March 27th. 

Sat. 2.3.— The first number of the West- 
ern Standard, a weelily paper published in 
the interest of the Church, was issued at 
San Francisco, Cal. ; Geo. Q. Cannon, 
editor. 

Tues. 26.— John Catlin and another man 
were kiUed, and Geo. Winn was mortally 
wounded, by Indians, near Kimball's 



56 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1850. 



creek, southwest of Utah lake. Capt. 
Peter Connover, with eighty men, soon 
afterwards crossed Utah lake on the ice 
and pursued the hostile tribe into Tintic 
Valley, where he recovered some of the 
stock" stolen bv the savages. 

Wed. ?;.— Elder Robert W. Wolcott, of 
G. S. L. City, died of smallpox at North- 
ampton, England, where he labored as a 
missionary. 

March. Jfou. .i.— Elder A. Milton Mus- 
ser sailed from Calcutta, for London, 
England, where he arrived July 19, 1856, 
after being 138 days at sea. He came by 
way of the Cape of Good Hope. Capt. 
Winsor, of the VikiiKj, gave Elder Mus- 
ser a free first-class passage. 

Mon. 17.— A convention met in G. S. L. 
City to prepare a State constitution and 
memorialize Cone:ress for the admission of 
Utah into the Union as the State of Des- 
eret. The constitution and memorial were 
adopted on the 27th, and Apostles Geo. A. 
Smith and John Taylor were elected dele- 
gates to present the same to Congress. 

Sun. 23. — The ship Enoch Train sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 534 Saints, 
under the direction of James Ferguson. 
It arrived at Boston May 1st. From that 
city the emigrants traveled by rail via New 
York to Iowa City, Iowa, whence the jour- 
ney across the plains this year was com- 
menced by wagons and handcarts. Daniel 
Spencer acted as general superintendent 
of emigration on the borders, assisted by 
Geo. D. Grant, Wm. H. Kimball, James H. 
Hart and others. 

I'H. 2S. — Elder Hector C. Haight, presi- 
dent of the Scandinavian mission, was ar- 
rested and a conference meeting broken 
up by the police, at Malmo, Sweden. 

April. Sun. 6. — On this and the following 
day the 26th annual conference of the 
Church was held in G. S. L.City. About two 
hundred Elders were called on foreign 
missions. 

Sat. 19. — The ship Samiwl Curling sailed 
from Liverpool with 707 Saints, under the 
direction of Dan Jones ; it arrived at Bos- 
ton May 23rd. From that city the emi- 
grants traveled by rail to Iowa City. 

Mon. 21. — Jacob Whitmer, one of the 
Eight Witnesses to the Book of Mormon, 
died near Richmond, Ray Co., Mo. 

Tues. 22. — A large company of missiona- 
ries, including Apostles Orson Pratt, Geo. 
A. Smith, Ezra T. Benson and Erastus 
Snow, Elder Abraham O. Smoot and many 
other prominent men, left G. S. L. City, on 
missions to the States and Europe. They 
arrived at St. Louis, Mo., June 12th. 

May. Fri. 2. — Elder Robert Skelton, 
after appointing James Patrick Meik to 
preside over the Saints in India, sailed 
from Calcutta, homeward bound. He was 
the last of the American Elders to leave 
India, which was now abandoned for the 
time being as a missionary field. 

Sun. 4.— The ship Tliornton sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 764 Saints, under 
the direction of James G. Willie. It ar- 
rived at New York June 14th, and the emi- 
grants, continuing the journey by rail, ar- 
rived at Iowa City, June 26th. 

Sun. 25. — The ship Horizon sailed from 
Liverpool with 856 Saints, under the direc- 
tion of Edward Martin, The company ar- 



rived safely at Boston, and reached Iowa 
City by rail July 8th. 

Wed. 2S. — A small company of Australian 
Saints, under the direction of Augustus 
Farnham, sailed from Port Jackson, New 
South Wales, bound for Utah. The ship 
touched at Tahiti, Society Islands, June 
22nd, Honolulu, Hawaii, July 16th, and ar- 
rived at San Pedro, Cal., Aug. 15th. From 
the latter place the emigrants traveled by 
teams to San Bernardino. 

June. Sun. 1. — Weber County, Utah, 
was divided into four Bishops' Wards, and 
Erastus Bingham appointed Bishop of the 
First, James G. Browning of the Second, 
Chauncey W. West of the Third and Thos. 
Dunn of the Fourth Ward. 

— The ship Wellffeef sailed from Liver- 
pool, England, with 146 Saints, under the 
direction of John Aubray. It arrived at 
Boston July 13th. The emigrants remained 
in the States until the following season. 

July. Sat. 5. — The ship Liicy Thomp- 
son sailed from Liverpool with fourteen 
Saints, under the direction of James 
Thompson. It arrived at New York Aug. 
8th. 

Sat. t9.— Six families from Mississippi, 
under the direction of Benjamin Matthews, 
arrived at G. S. L. City, as the first immi- 
grants of the season. They brought small 
pox with them into the Valley. 

Thiir.s-. 24. — Pioneer day was celebrated 
on the headwaters of Big Cottonwood 
creek, where a temjsorary bowery had 
been erected for the occasion. 

August. — Apostle Orson Fratt suc- 
ceeded Apostle Franklin D. Richards in 
the presidency of the European Mission. 

Afon. 18.— The last of Capt. Philemon C. 
Merril's company of Saints arrived at 
G. S. L. City. 

Sat. 2'}. — Bishop Isaac Houston, of Al- 
pine, Utah Co., died. 

Jfon. i'5.— Col. Almon W. Babbitt's train 
loaded with government property and 
traveling west, was plundered by Chey- 
enne Indians, near Wood river, Neb. A. 
Nichols and two others were killed, and 
a Mrs. Wilson was carried away by the 
savages. 

September. Cache County was settled 
by Peter Maughan and others, who located 
what is now the town of Wellsville. 

—Col. Almon W. Babbit, Thos. Margetts 
and child, James Cowdy and wife and 
others were killed, and Mrs. Margetts car- 
ried away by Cheyenne Indians, east of 
Fort Laramie. 

Tue.'i. 2. — Capt. John A. Hunt's company 
of Saints, the last wagon train of the sea- 
son, left Florence, Neb., for G. S. L. Val- 
ley, having commenced the journey from 
Iowa City a few months previous. 

Thurs. 11.— Apostle Parley P. Pratt, 
accompanied by other Elders, left G. S. L, 
City on a mission to the States, from 
which he never returned. 

Wed. 17.— A Female Relief Society was 
organized in the 14th Ward, G. S. L. City, 
with Phoebe Woodruff as president. 

Saf. ^f;.— Elder Knud Peterson's wagon 
company of immigrants (mostly Scandina- 
vians) arrived in G. S. L. City. This was 
called the second company of the season. 

Fri. 26\— The first two companies of im- 
migrating Saints, which crossed the plains 



CHUECH CHRONOLOGY — 1857. 



57 



with handcarts, arrived at G. S. L. City, 
in charge of Capt. Edmund Ellsworth and 
Daniel D. McArthur. They were met and 
welcomed by the First Presidency of the 
Church, a brass band, a company of 
lancers, and a large concourse of citizens. 
Capt. Ellsworth's company had left Iowa 
City June 9th, and McArthur's June 11th. 
When they started, both contained 497 
souls, with 100 handcarts, 5 wagons, 24 
oxen, 4 mules and 2.5 tents. 

October. Th urs. :^.— Capt. John Banks' 
wagon company of immigrating Saints, 
and Capt. Edward Bunker's handcart 
company, which had left Iowa City June 
23rd, arrived in G. S. L. City. The immi- 
grants in the latter were mostly from 
Wales. 

— The Deseret Agricultural and Manu- 
facturing Society commenced its first ex- 
hibition in G. S. L. City, called the "Des- 
eret State Fair." 

Fri. 3. — W. M. F. Magraw, formerly 
mail contractor, wrote a defamatory letter 
to the President of the United States, 
about Utah affairs. 

iSat. 4. — Apostle Franklin D. Richards, 
y Daniel Spencer, John Van Cott, Wm. C. 
Dunbar, John D. T. McAllister, Nathaniel 
H. Felt, and a number of other mission- 
aries, arrived in G. S. L. City, having left 
Florence Sept. 3rd. 

Man. 6". — The general semi-annual con- 
ference of the Church was commenced in 
G. S. L. City. It continued three days ; 
177 Elders were called to go on missions. 

Tues. 7.— The Twentieth Ward, G. S. L. 
City, was organized with John Sharp as 
Bishop. 

—Capt. Geo. D. Grant left G. S. L. City 
with a relief company to meet the immi- 
gration. 

fiat. 11. — Capt. Croft's company of emi- 
grants from Texas and the Cherokee Na- 
tion arrived in G. S. L City. 

Fri. 17. — An ordinance was passed by 
the G. S. L. City council, organizing a Fire 
Department. Jesse C. Little was ap- 
pointed chief engineer. 

Tues. 28. — Capt. Edward Martin's hand- 
cart company, detained by the unusual 
early snow storms of the season, was met 
by Joseph A. Young, Daniel W. Jones and 
Abel Garr, at a point sixteen miles above 
the Platte bridge. Three days later the 
company arrived at Grease wood creek, 
where four wagons of the relief company, 
in charge of Geo. D. Grant, loaded with 
provisions and some clothing for the suf- 
fering emigrants were awaiting them. 

November. Sun. 9. — Capt. James G. 
Willie's handcart company arrived in G. 
S. L. City, after great sufferings from 
scarcity of provisions, cold and over-exer- 
tion in the mountains. It left Iowa City, 
Iowa, July 15th, with 120 handcarts and 
six wagons, numbering about five hund- 
red souls, of whom 66 died on the journey. 
Captain Abraham O. Smoot's wagon train 
arrived the same day. 

Thurs. 13. — Joseph A. Young and Abel 
Garr arrived in G. S. L. City with the 
news that the last companies of emigrants 
were perishing in the mountains. More 
teams and provisions were immediately 
forwarded to help them in. 

Tues. 18. — The ship Columbia sailed from 



Liverpool with 223 Saints, under the di- 
rection of J. Williams. It arrived at New 
York Jan. 1, 1857. 

Thurs. 20.— The ladies of Cedar City, 
Iron Co., organized a Female Benevolent 
Society, with Mrs. Lydia Hopkins as pre- 
sident. 

Saf. 22. — Heber Jeddie Grant was born 
in G. S. L. City. 

Sun. 50.— Edward Martin's handcart 
company arrived in G. S L. City, after ex- 
treme suffering. Many of the emigrants 
had died in the mountains, and the hand- 
carts had to be gradually abandoned as the 
relief teams from the Valley were met. 
When the company passed Florence, Neb., 
Aug. 25th, it consisted of 576 persons, 146 
handcarts, 7 wagons, etc. 

December. 3Ion. 1. — Jedediah M.Grant, 
second Counselor to Pres. Brigham Young, 
died in G. S. L. City. 

Tues. 2. — About sixty mule and horse 
teams started from G. S. L. City to meet 
Capts. Hodgett's and Hunt's wagon com- 
panies. 

Fri. 5. — David S. Laughlin, formerly a 
member of the Mormon Battalion, died in 
Cedar Valley, Utah. 

Mon. 8. — The Utah legislature (sixth an- 
nual session) convened at Fillmore and 
organized by electing Heber C. Kimball 
president of the Council, and Hosea Stout 
speaker of the House. It then adjourned 
to G.S. L. City. 

Wed. 10. — The First Presidency issued 
their "Fourteenth General Epistle" to the 
Church. 

— On this and the following six daysCapts. 
Wm. B. Hodgett's and John A. Hunt's 
companies of emigrants arrived in G. S. 
L. City, after much suffering, being helped 
in by the relief trains sent out from the 
Valley. 

'I hurs. 11. —^Contractor Magraw failing 
to carry the mails through, Feramorz 
Little and Eph. K. Hanks left G. S. L. City 
with the mail, for the East. 

Thurs. i8.— The Utah legislature con- 
vened in the Social Hall, G. S. L. City. 

Wed. 2J.— Pres. Brigham Young gave an 
entertainment in the "Lion House" to a 
large number of Elders, lately returned 
from foreign missions. 

1857. 

The winter of 1856-57 was excessively 
severe, snow falling to a depth of eight feet 
in various places in the valleys of Utah. 
The harvest of 1857 was the best Utah ever 
had up to that time. Influenced by false- 
hoods, circulated by Judge W. W. Drum- 
mond and others, the Federal government 
sent an army to Utah, when the citizens 
organized for self-defense. The Elders 
were called home from foreign missions, 
and the Saints who had settled in Carson 
Valley, on Salmon river, on Green river 
and in Southern California were advised 
to abandon their locations and return to 
places nearer the headquarters of the 
Church. 



58 



CHURCH CHEONOLOGT — 1857. 



January. .Swn. 4.— Daniel H. Wells 
was set apart as second Counselor to Pres. 
iirigham Young, in place of the late 
Jedediah M. Grant. 

jTri^ ,9._San Bernardino, Cal., was 
visited bv a violent earthquake. 

February. U></. -/.—A reformation 
meeting was held in No. 42 Islington, Liver- 
pool, England, and on the following day 
the presiding brethren of the British mis- 
sion, including Apostles Orson Pratt and 
Ezra T. Benson, renewed their covenants 
by baptism. This was followed by a gene- 
ral renewal of covenants throughout the 
mission. 

March.— The 43rd quorum of Seventy 
was organized in Tooele County, Utah, 
with John Shields, James Bevan, Thomas 
Lee. Francis D. St. Jeor, George Atkin, 
Hugh S. Gowans and Geo. W. Bryan as 
presidents. 

Man. 2.— The 41st Quorum of Seventy 
was organized in Salt Lake County, Utah, 
with John Van Cott, Wm. C. Dunbar, 
Knud Peterson, Thomas Morris, Leonard 
I. Smith, Wm. Casper and Levi N. Kendall 
as presidents. 

JJliufs. i?.— Reformation meetings were 
held at Swansea, Wales, after which the 
presiding Elders, and subsequently all the 
Saints in that mission, renewed their cov- 
enants by baptism. 

Fri. 20. — Henry Mitchell Johnson, for- 
merly a member of the Mormon Battalion, 
died in G. S. L. City. 

Sat. 28. — The ship George Washington 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 817 
Saints, under the direction of James P. 
Park, bound for Utah via Boston. 

Jlon. 30. — Judge W. W. Drummond, in 
framing the letter of his resignation as 
chief justice of Utah, wrote the most 
wicked and abominable falsehoods against 
Gov. Brigham Young and the people of 
Utah, thereby influencing the government 
to send troops against the "Mormons." 

April. Sat. 4. — Cache County, Utah, 
was organized; Peter Maughan, probate 
judge. 

Jlon. fi. — The 27th annual conference on 
the Church convened in G. S. L. City; it 
was continued till the 8th ; 350 Elders were 
called on missions. 

Wed. 15. — Feramorz Little, having ar- 
rived in the States, with the Utah mail, 
wrote a letter to the New York Herald, 
refuting Druramond's falsehoods. 

J/oH. 20. — The Nauvoo Legion held a 
grand parade in G. S. L. City; the election 
of oflBcers took place, and a new system 
for the government of Utah militia was 
inaugurated. 

TJturs. 23. — A company consisting of 
about seventy missionaries, bound for 
Europe and other parts of the world, left 
G. S. L. City with handcarts. They ar- 
rived at Florence, Neb., June 10th, mak- 
ing the trip to the Missouri river in 40},^ 
traveling days. (They rested 7% days.) " 
Fri. 24. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
maoy others started from G. S. L. City on 
a tour to the settlements on Salmon river, 
Oregon (now Idaho). They returned May 
26th. 

Sat. 25. — The ship Westmoreland sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 544 Saints, 
mostly Scandinavians, under the direction 



of Mathias Cowley. It arrived at Phila- 
delphia May 31st, and the emigrants 
reached Iowa City by rail June 9th. 

3Iay.— The Tithing Office Block wall in 
G. S. L. City w?s finished. 

— The 46th quorum of Seventy was or- 
ganized at Payson and Santaquin, Utah 
Co., with James B. Bracken, John Thomas 
Hardy, Benjamin F. Stewart, Wm. Carrol 
McClellan, Geo. W. Hancock and Wm. B. 
Maxwell as presidents. 

— A temporary settlement called Genoa, 
was located for the benefit of emigrating 
Saints, on Beaver Creek, near Loup Fork, 
Neb., about one hundred miles west of 
Florence. The settlers consisted mostly 
of Saints from the St. Louis branch (Mo.). 

Wed. 6. — The Saints who were settling 
Washington, in southern Utah, were or- 
ganized into a branch of the Church with 
Robert D. Covington as president. He 
was ordained a BishoiJ Aug. 1, 1858. 

Sat. 9. — The 4.5th quorum of Seventy was 
organized at Provo, with Robert T. 
Thomas, James Goff, Robert C. Moore, 
Isaac Bullock, Lewis C. Sabrisky, Wm. 
Marsden and Charles Shelton as presi- 
dents. 

Wed. i.?.— Apostle Parley P. Pratt was 
murdered by Hector H. McLean, near Van 
Buren, Ark. 

Fri. 15.— The 47th quorum of Seventy 
was partly organized at Ephraim, Sanpete 
Co., Utah, with Tore Thurston, James A. 
Lemmon, Joseph Clements and Nils Bengt- 
sen as presidents. Most of the members 
of the new quorum were ordained Seven- 
ties on the 17th. 

Sat. 16.— The 48th quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Manti, Sanpete Co., with 
Daniel Henrie as senior president. 

Jfon. is. —The 49th quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Nephi, Juab Co., with 
John A. Woolf, Samuel Pitchforth, 
Timothy S. Hoyt, Geo. Kendall, Miles 
Miller, John Burrowman and David Webb 
as presidents. 

Tiies. 19. — The 50th quorum of Seventy 
was partly organized at Spanish Fork, 
Utah Co., with Dennis Dorrity as one of 
the presidents. 

Wed. 20. — The 51st quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Springville, Utah Co., 
with Alexander F. McDonald, Noah T. 
Guyman, Lorenzo Johnson, Spicer W. 
Crandall, Abraham Day and Hamilton H. 
Kerns as presidents. 

Thurs. 21.— The 52nd quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Provo, Utah, with Alfred 
D. Young as senior president. Quite a 
number of members were ordained on the 
25th. 

—On the same day the 44th quorum of 
Seventy was organized at American Fork, 
Utah Co., Utah, -with Wm. Hyde, James 
McGaw, Shadrach Driggs, Wm. Green- 
wood, James W. Preston, Wm. Fothering- 
ham and Thomas Taylor as presidents. 

Thurs. 28.— The U. S. 2nd dragoons, 5th 
and 10th infantry and Phelps' Battery of 
the 4th artillery— 2,500 men— were ordered 
out as an expedition to Utah, by order of 
Gen. Winfleld Scott. 

Sat. 30.— The ship Tuscarora sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 547 Saints, under 
the direction of Richard Harper. It ar- 
rived at Philadelphia July 3rd, and the 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1857. 



59 



emigrants continued by rail to Burlington, 
Iowa, in the vicinity of which most of them 
sought temporary employment. 

June. tSun. 7. — The .53th and 54th 
quorum of Seventy were organized at 
Ogden, Utah, by Joseph Young and Albert 
P. Rockwood, with Ruf us Allen and James 
Brown 3rd as senior presidents. 

J^ri. 12. — Senator Stephen A. Douglas, 
in a politcal speech,delivered at Springfield, 
111., characterized "Mormonism" as a 
loathsome ulcer of the body politic, and re- 
commended that Congress should apply 
the knife and cut it out. 

Sun. 14. — The 4;2nd quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Fillmore, Utah, with 
Hiram Mace, David N. Raney, Andrew 
Love, J. W. Radford, Edward Frost. Allen 
Russel and John Felshaw as presidents. 

Sat. 27. — The American ship Li(cassm\eA 
from Sydney, N. S. W., Australia, with 69 
Saints, in charge of Elder Absalom P. 
Dowdle, bound for Utah. 

July.^The 55th quorum of Seventy was 
organized at Kaysville, and the 56th quor- 
um at Farmington, Davis Co., Utah. 

Sat. 11. — Alfred Cumming, of Georgia, 
was appointed governor of Utah. 

Wed. 15. — Indian Agent Thomas S. Twiss 
wrote a libellous letter to the government 
at Washington, D. C, about the "Mor- 
mons." 

Sat. IS.— The Tenth Infantry, the van - 
guard of the Utah expedition, took up the 
line of march from Fort Leavenworth for 
the West, under the command of Col. E. 
B. Alexander. The artillery and Fifth In- 
fantry followed a few days later. The 
command of the whole expedition was 
given to Gen. W. S. Harney. 

— The ship Wijoming sailed from Liver- 
pool, England, with 36 Saints, under the 
direction of Charles Harman. It arrived 
safely at Philadelphia, Pa. 

FH. 24.— The people of G. S. L. City 
and vicinity celebrated the 10th anniver- 
sary of the arrival of the Pioneers by a 
feast, near the head of Big Cottonwood Can- 
yon. While the festivities were going on, 
Abraham O. Smoot and Judson Stoddard 
arrived from Independence, Mo., without 
the mails, the postmaster there having re- 
fused to forward them. They reported 
that General Harney with 2,000 infantry, 
and a proportionate number of artillery 
and cavalry, were ordered to Utah. 

August. Sat. 1. — The Utah militia was 
ordered to be kept in readiness for an ex- 
pedition to the mountains, to prevent the 
entering of the approaching army, if nec- 
essary. 

i'Vi. 7. — Apostles John Taylor and Eras- 
tus Snow and other missionaries arrived 
in G. S. L. City from the East 

— The first part of the "Utah Army," 
consisting of the Tenth Infantry and 
Phelps' Batterv, arrived at Fort Kearney. 

Fri. 14. — Geo. Scholes, one of the Pio- 
neers of 1847, died at Big Cottonwood, 
Salt Lake Co. 

— A company of the Carson Valley set- 
tlers returned to G. S. L. City. 

Sat. 15. — Col. Robert T. Burton and 
James W. Cummings left G. S. L. City for 
the East, with seventy men, for the pur- 
pose of protecting the emigrant trains and 



observing the movements of the approach- 
ing army. 

Fri. 21. — Col. Burton's expedition ar- 
rived at Ft. Bridger; on the 30th it 
reached Devil's Gate. 

F)i. 28. — Col. Albert Sidney Johnston 
was appointed successor to Gen. W. S. 
Harney as commander of the Utah expe- 
dition. 

September. Fri. 4. — Part of Wm. 
Walker's company of immigrating Saints, 
including Thos. B. Marsh, formerly a mem- 
ber of the Twelve Apostles, arrived in G. 
S. L. City. 

Tues. 8. — Capt. Stewart Van Vliet, of 
Gen. Harney's staff, arrived in G. S. L. 
City and the following day had an inter- 
view with President Young. After a few 
days' stay he returned to his escort on 
Ham's Fork, and thence proceeded to 
Washington, where he used his influence 
in favor of the Saints. 

Fri. 11. — The Mountain Meadow massa- 
cre took place. 

Sat. 12. — The last of Israel Evans' hand- 
cart company, conisting of 154 souls and 
31 handcarts, arrived in G. S. L. City. 

— Jesse B. Martin's wagon company of 
immigrants arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Sun. 13. — Chr. Christiansen's handcart 
company and Mathias Cowley's wagon 
company of immigrants arrived in G. S. 
L. City. 

Mon. 14. — Delegate John M. Bernhisel 
started from G. S. L. City for Washington, 
D. C, in company with Capt. Stewart Van 
Vliet and others. 

— Joseph A. Kelting, with a company of 
Saints, sailed from Sydney, Australia, 
bound for Utah. 

Tues. 15. — Gov. Brigham Young de- 
clared the Territory of Utah under martial 
law and forbade the troops to enter G. S. 
L. Valley. Large numbers of armed mil- 
itia were ordered to Echo Canyon and 
other points to intercept the soldiers and 
prevent their access to the Valley. 

Thurs. Y7.— Col. Philip St. George Cooke 
left Ft. Leavenworth with the second di- 
vision of the "Utah Army." He arrived 
at Ft. Bridger Nov 19th. 

Tues. 22.~Col Robt. T. Burton and three 
other men camped within half a mile of 
the "Utah Army" (Col. E. B. Alex- 
ander's command), near Devil's Gate. 

Wed. 23. — Col. Burton's men met the 
advance companies of the "Utah Army, 
and from that time were their "immediate 
neighbors"' until they arrived at Ham's 
Fork. 

Sat. 26. — Capt. Wm. G. Young's train ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City with the last of this 
season's immigration. Among the return- 
ing Elders in this train was A. Milton 
Musser, who returned home from a five 
years' mission to India and England, dur- 
ing which he had circumnavigated the 
globe, traveling as a missionary "without 
purse and scrip." 

Tues. 29. —General Daniel H. Wells left 
G. S. L. City for Echo Canyon, where he 
established headquarters. About one 
thousand two hundred and fifty men, from 
the several militia districts, were ordered 
to Echo Canyon, where they engaged in 
digging trenches across the canyon, throw 



60 



CHUBCH CHKON"OLOGY — 1858. 



ing up breast works, loosening rocks on 
the heights, etc., preparing to resist the 
progress of the army. 

October. — The "Mormon" settlements 
in Carson Valley were broken up : most of 
the settlers returned to G. S. L. City in 
the beginning of November. 

— Samuel W. Richards succeeded Apostle 
Orson Pratt as president of the European 
mission. 

Mon. 5. — Lot Smith, with a small com- 
pany of men, surprised and burned two 
trains of government stores, near the Big 
Sandy and Green river. 

Hat. K). — The officers of the Utah expedi- 
tion held a council of war at Ham's Fork, 
and decided that the army should march 
to G. S. L. Valley via Soda Springs. The 
following day the march was commenced, 
but after several days of slow and ex- 
haustive traveling, the expedition was 
forced to return. 

Fri. i6".— Major Joseph Taylor and Wm. 
R. R. Stowell, of the Utah militia, were 
taken prisoners by the U. S. troops near 
Ft. Bridger. 

November. Wed. 4. — Col. Albert Sid- 
ney Johnston joined his command on 
Ham's Fork, with a small reinforcement. 

F7'i. 6'. — Five hundred animals perished 
from cold and starvation around the U. S. 
army camp on Black's Fork. 

Mon. Id. — The "Utah Army" went into 
winter quarters at Camp Scott, two miles 
from the site of Ft. Bridger and 115 miles 
from G. S. L. City. 

December. Fri. 4. — Capt. John R. 
Winder was appointed to take charge of a 
picket guard, to be stationed at Camp We- 
ber, at the mouth of Echo Canyon, to 
watch the movements of the U. S. soldiers 
during the winter. Two weeks later, when 
deep snow fell in the mountains, this guard 
was reduced to ten men. The remainder 
of the militia returned to their homes for 
the winter. 

Mon. 14. — The Utah legislature convened 
in G. S. L. City and organized by electing 
Heber C. Kimball president of the Council 
and John Taylor speaker of the House. 

Mon. '-it. — The Utah legislature unani- 
mously concurred in the message, policy 
and actions of Gov. Brigham Young, in 
stopping the army, etc. 

Tues. 22. — An act disorganizing Green 
River County and attaching it to G. S. L. 
County, was approved. 



1858. 

Awaiting the arrival of the Fede^-al army 
from the East, the Saints in Utah aband- 
oned G. S. L. City and all their northern 
settlements and moved south, but most of 
them returned after peace was restored. 
Nearly all the Elders who had been on 
foreign missions returned home. In the 
spring of this year Kane County, Utah, 
was settled by Joshua T. Willes atToquer- 
ville, and in the fall by Nephi Johnson and 
six others, who located Virgin City. San 
Bernardino, Cal., was vacated by the 



Saints, who removed to Utah. Most of 
them settled at Parowan and Beaver. 
An edition of the Book of Mormon was 
published by James O. Wright and Co., 
3.37 Broadway, New York, for speculative 
purposes and unauthorized by the Church. 

January. Wed. f>. — A memorial from 
the members and officers of the Utah legis- 
lature to the President and Congress of 
the United States, praying for constitu- 
tional rights, etc., was signed in G. S. L. 
City. 

l^at. K). — A large mass meeting of citi- 
zens was held in the Tabernacle, G. S. L. 
City. A petition and resolution, setting 
forth the true state of affairs in Utah, 
were adopted, and, on motion, sent to the 
U. S. government at Washington. 

Tues. If). — Apostles Orson Pratt and 
Ezra T. Benson, and Elders John Scott and 
John M. Kay arrived in G. S. L. City from 
missions to Europe, and Geo. Q. Cannon, 
Joseph Bull and three other Elders from 
California. 

F7'i. 22. — The Utah legislature adjourned, 
without the occurrence of a negative vote 
on any question or action during the ses- 
sion. 

February. Sat. 6'. — Thorit Peck, for- 
merly a member of the Mormon Battalion, 
died at Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah. 

Fn. Hi. — Sixty-four Saints, mostly re- 
turning Elders, under the direction of 
Jesse Hobson, sailed from Liverpool, Eng- 
land, on the ship Empire, which arrived 
at New York March 20th. 

Wi'd. 24. — Col. Thomas L. Kane arrived 
in G. S. L. City by way of Southern Cali- 
fornia. He came voluntarily for the pur- 
pose of bringing about a peaceful solution 
of the existing difficulties between the 
United States and Utah. After conferring 
with Gov. Brigham Young and other lead- 
ing citizens, he went out to the army, 
which was encamped at Ft. Scott (near 
Ft. Bridger). There he had an interview 
with the new governor, Alfred Cumming, 
who concluded to accompany him to G. S. 
L. City. 

Thiirs. 25. — Geo. McBride and James 
Miller were killed and live other brethren 
wounded by a large party of Bannock and 
Shoshone Indians, near Fort Limhi, Ore- 
gon (now Idaho). 

March. — Asa Calkin succeeded Samuel 
W. Richards as president of the European 
mission. 

Sun. 21.— The citizens of G. S. L. City 
and the settlements north of it agreed to 
abandon their homes and go south, all the 
information derived from Eastern papers 
being to the effect that the approaching 
formidable army was sent to destroy 
them. Their destination, when starting, 
was by some supposed to be Sonora. 

Mon. 22. — The ship .7ohn li right sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with about 
ninety Saints, mostly Scandinavians, un- 
der the direction of Iver N. Iversen. The 
company arrived at New York April 23rd 
and at Iowa City May 1st. 

Wed. 31. — Lyman Wight, once a member 
of the council of Twelve Apostles, died in 
Texas. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1858. 



61 



— Bailey Lake, one of a small party from 
Salmon river, traveling south, vpas killed 
by Indians on Bannock creek. The In- 
dians also robbed the company of eleven 
horses. 

April. Man. 5. — Gov. Alfred Gumming 
and Col. Thos. L. Kane, v^ith a servant 
each, left the army at Ft. Scott for the 
Valley. They arrived in G. S. L. City on 
the 12th. The new governor was kindly 
received by Pres. Brigham Young and 
other leading citizens and treated every- 
where with "respectful attention." 

>Saf. 10. — The Saints who were settling 
on Ash Creek, southern Utah, were organ- 
ized into a branch of tlie Church, called 
Toquerville, with Joshua T. Willis as pre- 
sident. 

Mo)i. 19. — Gov. Alfred Gumming and 
Col. Thos. L. Kane examined the Utah li- 
brary, where James W. Cummings showed 
them the records and seal of the U. S. Dis- 
trict Court, alleged to have been destroy- 
ed by the Mormons. This accusation was 
one of the reasons why the army was or- 
dered to Utah. A few days later the gov- 
ernor sent a truthful report to the gov- 
vernment in relation to the affairs in the 
Territory. 

Tues. 21). — Joseph Adair, one of the first 
settlers of Utah "Dixie", died at Wash- 
ington, Washington Co., Utah. 

Sat. 24. — Henry Jones was killed at Sa- 
lem, Utah Co., Utah. 

May. — The citizens of Utah, living north 
of Utah County, abandoned their homes 
and moved southward, leaving only a few 
men in each town and settlement to burn 
everything, in case the approaching troops, 
on tlieir arrival in the Valley, should prove 
hostile. 

Wed. 5. — The Deseret Xews having been 
removed from G. S. L. City to Fillmore, 
Millard Co., the first number of the paper 
published at that place was issued. 

Thurs. 13. — Gov. Gumming left G. S. L. 
City for Camp Scott, for the purpose of re- 
moving his wife to the city. When he re- 
turned, June 8th, he found the city desert- 
ed bv its inhabitants. 

—Elder Samuel Francis Neslen, of 
G. S. L. City, Utah, died of con- 
sumption, in Williamsburg, N. Y., return- 
ing from a mission to England. He was 
buried in the Cypress Hill cemetery. 

Tues. 18.- John Whittaker Taylor was 
born at Provo, Utah. 

June. Fri. 4. — Jens Jorgensen and 
wife, Jens Terkelsen and Christian E. 
Kjerulf were murdered by Indians in Salt 
Creek Canyon, while traveling unarmed 
•on their way to Sanpete Valley. 

Mon. ;.— Ex-Gov. L. W. Powell, of 
Kentucky, and Major Ben McGullough, of 
Texas, sent as peace commissioners by the 
Federal government, arrived in G. .S. L. 
City. 

F?^. 11. — The peace commissioners met 
with Pres. Brigham Young and others in 
the Council House, G. S. L. City, and the 
difficulties between the United States and 
Utah were peaceably adjusted. 

Tne.'i. 15. — Commissioners Powell and 
McCuUough visited Provo. The next day 
Mr. Powell addressed an audience of about 
four thousand persons in the Bowery, at 
Provo, Utah Co. 



Sot. 19. — Col. Thos. L. Kane arrived in 
Washington, D. C. Soon afterwards he 
reported the situation in Utah to Pres. 
Buchanan. 

Mon. 21, — A company of Elders returned 
to G. S. L. City from their missions in 
Europe, Canada and the States. A num- 
ber of these liad sailed from Liverpool on 
the ship t^ndcrtvrifcr, Jan. 21st and others 
on the ship Kntpiri' Feb. 19th. 

Sat. 26. — The army, under Col. Albert 
Sidney Johnston, passed through G. S. L. 
City and camped on the west side of the 
Jordan river. It subsequently marched to 
Cedar Valley, and there located Gamp 
Floyd, about forty miles from the city. 

July. Tlia)-x. 1. — The First Presidency 
and a few others returned to their homes 
in G. S. L. Cit;v', from Provo. They were 
followed by most of the people, who like- 
wise returned to their deserted city and 
settlements in the North, and resumed 
their accustomed labors. 

Sat. 3. — Commissioners Powell and Mc- 
Gullough left G. S. L. City, en routt for 
Washington, D. C. 

Fri. 9. — A party of Elders, accompanied 
by a few immigrating brethren, arrived in 
G. S. L. City, under the leadership of 
Horace S. Eldredge. 

August. Thuvti.l2. — Eli Harvey Pie ce, 
one of the Utah Pioneers of 1847, died in 
G. S. L. City. 

Mon. in. — Wm. Evans was killed by 
lightning near Beaver, Utah. 

September. 3fon. 20. — Iver N. Iver- 
sen's company of immigrating Saints ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City. 

Wt'd. 22.— 'The Dcscrrf Xcics resumed its 
publication in G. S. L. City, after publish- 
ing twenty numbers at Fillmore. 

October. Tues. 12. — Policeman Wm. 
Cooke was shot and mortally wounded, in 
G. S. L. City, by a ruffian named McDon- 
ald. He died on the 18th. The murderer 
escaped. 

Fri. 13. — The remains of Josiah Call and 
Samuel Brown, of Fillmore, Millard Co., 
were found in a state of decomposition, 
near Chicken creek bridge, Juab Go. 
They had been murdered by Indians, Oct. 
7th. 

Thurs. 28. — Jacob Hamblin, with eleven 
men, left the settlement of Santa Clara, 
in southern Utah, to visit the Moquis or 
Town Indians, on the east side of the Col- 
orado river. This was the beginning of 
intercourse with the Indians on that side 
of the Colorado and of the exploration of 
the country, which opened the way for 
colonization by the Saints. 

November. — Notwithstanding Presi- 
dent Buchanan's "Proclamation of Par- 
don," Judge Chas. E. Sinclair, in the Third 
District Court, urged the prosecution of 
the leading "Mormons'" for alleged trea- 
son. 

Thurs. 4. — Associate Justice John 
Cradlebaugh arrived in G. S. L. City, and 
U. S. District Attorney A. Wilson the fol- 
lowing day. 

Mou. ^^i*.— The police in G. S. L. City 
were attacked and fired upon by a party 
of rowdies. Disturbances of the peace, 
robberies and stealinar occurred frequently 
in the city at that time. 

December. — Thurs. 2. — A violent wind 



62 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1859. 



storm visited G. S. L. Valley and did 
much damage to property. Samuel Leaver 
and Wm. Redman froze to death. 

3fon. 13. — The Utah legislature con- 
vened in G. S. L. City and adjourned to 
meet at Fillmore. 

S(tf. 18.— The Utah legislature convened 
at Fillmore, and organized by appointing 
Wilford Woodruff president of the Coun- 
cil pro ton, and Aaron Johnson speaker of 
the house pro tern. It then passed a re- 
solution to adjourn the assembly to G. S. 
L. City. 

Man. 27.— The Utah legislature convened 
in G. S. L. City and organized by electing 
Daniel H. Wells president of the Council 
and John Taylor speaker of the House. 



18 59. 

The Federal judges in Utah exercised 
undue authority and caused considerable 
difficulty by instituting court proceedings 
against the leaders of the Church and 
others. A number of settlements were 
founded in Cache Valley, where a Stake of 
Zion was organized. Provo Valley, Utah, 
was settled at Heber, Midway and Charles- 
ton. 

January.— »S'rt<. i.— The Millennial Sar 
announced to the Saints in Europe that 
emigration to Utah was again open for 
those who had means to take them 
through. 

Tuvs. 11.— A legislative act, changing 
the county seat of Washington County 
from Harmony to the town of Washington, 
was approved. 

Wnl. Hi. —An act passed by the Utah 
legislature reorganizing Carson and 
Green River Counties and attaching St. 
Mary's and Humboldt Counties to Carson 
County, was approved. Genoa was made 
the county seat of Carson and Ft. Bridger 
of Green River County. 

February. The Deseret Alphabet was 
first introduced in Utah. 

— The 58th quorum of Seventy was or- 
ganized at Brigham City, Box Polder Co., 
Utah. Some time previously the 56th and 
57th quorums had been organized. 

Thurs. 3. — The .59th quorum of Seventy 
was organized by Joseph Young at North 
Willow Creek (Willard), Box Elder Co., 
Utah, with George J. Marsh, Thomas W. 
Brewerton, John M. MeCrary, Richard J. 
Davis, Elisha Mallory, Mathew W. Dalton 
and Peter Greenhalgh as presidents. 

FH. //.—The 60th ({uornni of Seventy 
was organized at Ogden, Weber Co., Utah, 
with Luman A. Shurtliff as senior presi- 
dent. 

Fri. 2ry. — The 61st quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Mill Creek, G. S. L. Co., 
with John Scott, James Craigan, Wm. 
Casto, James P. Park, Andrew J. Rynear- 
son, Dudley J. Merrill and Thurston Lar- 
son as presidents. 

March. — Plain City, Weber Co., Utah, 
was settled by Jeppe G. Folkman, Chris- 
topher O. Folkman, Jens Peter Folkman, 
Joseph Skeen, Daniel Collett, John 



Spiers, John Carver, Wm. Geddes and 
others. 

Tues. c"^.- Associate Justice John Cradle- 
baugh, in his charge to the grand jury, 
composed of "Mormons," at Provo, called 
them "fools", "dupes", "instruments af a 
tyrannical church despotism", etc. Provo 
was occupied by a detachment of U. S. 
troops. 

Wed. f).—A small company of Saints, un- 
der the leadership of Joseph Humphreys, 
sailed from Port Elizabeth, South Africa, 
bound for America. They arrived at Bos- 
ton early in May, 18.59. 

3fon. 21. — A small company of Saints 
from Australia arrived at San Francisco, 
Cal., oi route for G. S. L. City. 

Tiics. 22.— Howard O. Spencer, a Mor- 
mon youth, was assaulted and brutally 
beaten on the head by Sergeant Ralph 
Pike, of the U. S. army, in Rush Valley, 
Utah. 

Sun. 27.— Gov. Cumming issued a pro- 
clamation against the presence of troops 
iu Provo. About this time it was reported 
that certain U. S. officials had entered 
into a conspiracy to secure the ar- 
rest of Pres. Brigham Young, and 
that Col. Johnston had promised the 
assistance of U. S. troops under his 
command to effect the arrest. As a 
consequence Gov. Cumming notified Gen- 
eral Daniel H. Wells to hold the militia in 
readiness to prevent the outrage, should 
it be attempted ; 5,000 troops (militia) were 
placed under arms. 

April.- J/on. 4.— The U. S. troops eva- 
cuated Provo. 

Wvd. 6".— The 29th annual conference of 
the Church was commenced at G. S. L. 
City. Benjamin L. Clapp, one of the pre- 
sidents of the Seventies, was excommuni- 
cated from the Church on the 7th, for 
apostacy. 

Mon. 11.— The ship William Tapscott 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 725 
Saints, under the direction of Robert F. 
Neslen. The company arrived at New 
York May 14th, and at Florence, Neb., 
May 2.5th. 

3Iay.— Ti«'.s'. iO.— Gen. Albert Sidney 
Johnston promised protection to all per- 
sons who wished to leave the Territory 
of Utah. 

Wed. 11. — Isaac Allred was assaulted 
and killed by Thomas Ivie, at Mount 
Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah. 

Wed. i8.— Joseph Abbott was killed by 
lightning, while engaged in planting corn 
on the "Old Fort Square," G. S. L. City. 

Tltvrs. 26". — James Johnson, a son of 
Luke S. Johnson, of Shambip County, was 
shot and mortallly wounded by Delos Gib- 
son in G. S. L. City. Death ensued the 
following day. A number of other mur- 
ders, principally among bad characters 
who infested the Territory, took place 
about the same time. 

,Sun. 2.9. — Leo Hawkins, clerk at the His- 
torian's office, died in G. S. L. City. 

June. — Logan, Cache Co., was first set- 
tled. 

July.— »S'im. W.— Hon. Horace Greeley, 
editor of the New York Tribune, arrived 
at G. S. L. City en route for California. 

— The ship Antarctic S2i\\e(\. from Liver- 
pool, England, with 30 Saints, under the 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1860. 



63 



direction of James Chaplow. It arrived 
at New York Aug. 21st. 

Thurs. U.—Geo. W. Bradley was or- 
dained Bishop of Moroni, Sanpete Co., 
which place had recently been settled. 

August. — J/on.L. — Wm. H. Hooper was 
elected Utah's second delegate to Con- 
gress, Hon. John M. Bernhisel having 
served in that capacity since the organiza- 
tion of the Territory. 

Thurs. 7/.— Sergeant Ralph Pike, a U. S. 
soldier, was shot in G. S. L. City, in sup- 
posed retaliation for having cracked the 
scull of Howard O. Spencer with a musket, 
five months previously. 

Mon. ld.—\J. S. soldiers set fire to a hay 
stack at Cedar Fort, Cedar Valley, Utah, 
and fired upon the citizens in the night. 
The soldiers were excited over the killing 
of Sergeant Pike. 

Sat. 20.— The ship Emerald Isle sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 54 Saints, 
mostly Swiss, under the direction of 
Henry Hug. 

Sat. 2r.— The first number of the Jfonn- 
taineer, a weekly newspaper, was pub- 
lished in G. S. L. City; Messrs. Blair, 
Ferguson & Stout editors and proprietors. 
Mon. 23.— Captain James Brown's com- 
pany of immigrants, which had left Flor- 
ence June 13th, and consisted of 353 souls 
with 59 wagons, arrived at G. S. L. City. 

September.— 7// io'6-. i.— Capt. Horton 
D. Haight's wagon company (called the 
Church train), bringing merchandise and 
134 immigrants, arrived at G. S. L. City. 

Sun. J.— Capt. George Rowley's hand- 
cart company, which had left Florence, 
June 9th, with 235 souls, 60 handcarts, and 
6 wagons, arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Thurs. 15.— Capt. Robert F. Neslenjs 
companj' of immigrants, consisting of 372 
souls, with 58 wagons, which had left Flo- 
rence June 26th, arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Fri. 16.— Capt. Edward Stevenson's im- 
migrating company, consisting of about 
three hundred and fifty souls, with 54 
wagons, arrived at G. S. L. City. It had 
started from Florence June 26th. 

Sat. 17. — Alexander Carpenter was 
shot and mortally wounded by Thomas H. 
Ferguson in G. S. L. City. Both were 
non Mormons. 

October. Jfon. 10.— Smithfield, Cache 
Co., was settled by Seth Langton and 
Robert and John Thornley. 

Fri. 2S. — Thos. H. Ferguson, the mur- 
derer, was executed in G. S. L. City. This 
was the first execution of a criminal in 
Utah. 

November. Jfon. 14,— A. Stake of Zion 
was partly organized in Cache Valley, 
Utah. Peter Maughan was appointed pre- 
siding Bishop in Cache Valley. Logan 
"Ward was organized, with Wm. B. Preston 
as Bishop. 

December. Jfon. 12. — The ninth an- 
nual session of the Utah legislature con- 
vened in G. S, L. City and organized by 
electing Daniel H. Wells president of the 
Council and John Taylor speaker of the 
House. 

This year Spring City, Sanpete Co., 
Utah, was resettled under the name of 
Little Denmark. 



I860. 

General Albert Sidney Johnston, left 
Utah with a part of the Federal army^ 
which had been stationed at Camp Floyd , 
Cedar Valley, since 1858. A large im- 
migration arrived in Utah from Europe. 

January. Wed. 25. — John King was ac- 
cidentally killed and buried in a snowslide, 
in Centreville, Canj'on, Davis Co. Utah. 

February. Tiies. 7. — The Social Hall, 
G. S. L. City, was reopened for public 
amusements, which had been discontinued 
there for three years. 

Vi'ed 15. — Wm. Price was ordained the 
first Bishop of Goshen, Utah Co. 

March. Thio-s. I. — Gen. Albert Sidney 
Johnston, commander of the "Utah Army," 
left Camp Floyd for Washington, D. C. 
He had never visited G. S. L. City since he 
passed through with his army on June 26, 
1858. Philip St. George Cooke, formerly 
commander of the Mormon Battalion, suc- 
ceeded Johnston in the command. 

Sun. 4. — Levi Gifford, formerly a member 
of Zion's Camp, died at Moroni, Sanpete 
Co. 

Mon. 19. — Dr. Wm. France died suddenly 
in G. S. L. City. 

Snn. 25. — Apostle Ezra T. Benson moved 
to Logan, Cache Co., having been called to 
Ijreside over the Saints in Cache Valley. 

Fri. 30. — The ship r>ideru'rifer sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 594 British 
and Swiss Saints, under the presidency of 
James D. Ross. It arrived at New York 
May 1st, and the emigrants continued to 
Florence, where Geo. Q. Cannon was act- 
ing as Church emigration agent this year, 
to arrange for the journey across the 
plains. 

April.— Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah, was 
first settled by about twenty families. In 
the following month Calvin Bingham was 
appointed Bishop. Paradise, Cache Co., 
was settled about the same time. 

Sat. 7. — The Saints who had set- 
tled on lower Beaver creek, Beaver Co., 
Utah, were organized into a Ward named 
Minersville, by Apostles Amasa M. Lyman 
and Charles C. Rich; James K. Rollins, 
Bishop. 

— The first "Pony Express" from the 
West arrived at G. S. L. City, having left 
Sacramento, Cal., on the evening of April 
3rd. 

Mo7i. 9.— The first "Pony Express" from 
the East arrived at G. S. L. City, having 
left St. Joseph, Mo., on the evening of April 
3rd. 

—The T'nion Academy was opened in the 
building known as the Union Hotel (after- 
wards Deseret Hospital), with Orson Pratt 
as principal. 

Fri. i?.— Thos. Miles was attacked and 
wounded by Indians, between Ogden and 
Kaysville. The savages proceeded to 
Brfgham City, where they stole horses and 
insulted the citizens. 

Mon. 16. — Hyde Park, Cache Co., was 
settled by several families from Utah 
County. 

Fri. 27. — Jack Cole, a horsethief and 
outlaw, was mortally wounded at Spring. 



64 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY— 1860. 



ville, Utah Co., while resisting the officers 
of the law. 

May. — A large number of the troops 
stationed at Camp Floyd, Utah, left, ac- 
cording to orders, for New Mexico and 
Arizona Territories. 

— Nathaniel V. Jones and Jacob Gates 
succeeded Asa Calkin in the presidency of 
the European mission. 

Thiii-fi. :>. — John W. Brown was accident- 
ally killed by the falling of a rock, near 
Draper, G. S. L. Co. 

tint. 5. — Niels Jensen, one of the early 
members of the Church in Denmark, died 
in G. S. L. City. 

Tui'S. 8. — Jesse W. Johnson was acci- 
dentally killed at Snyder's Mill, in Parley's 
Park. 

Fri. IL—The ship WiUlam Tapsroit 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 731 
Saints (including 312 Scandinavians), un- 
der the direction of Asa Calkin. During 
the voyage small pox broke out among the 
emigrants, who had to remain several days 
in quarantine after arriving at New York 
harbor. They finally landed June 20th and 
continued their journey to Florence, Neb., 
where they arrived July 1st. 

Sai. 12.— G. S. L. City was visited by a 
heavy snow storm, 

Jfou . 2S, — The Indians attacked the mail 
station at Deep Creek, Tooele Co., shot a 
man and stole several horses. 

Thins, 31. — Rees Jones Williams was ac- 
cidentally killed in a saw mill, in Little Cot- 
tonwood Canyon. 

June. Sun. 3. — The first train of mer- 
chandise from the East that season arrived 
in G. S. L. City. 

July. Sun. 22. — Smithfield, Cache Co., 
was attacked by Indians. A fight ensued; 
John Reed and Ira Merrill and two In- 
dians were killed, and several others wound- 
ed on both sides. 

Tnes. 24. — The day was celebrated by the 
citizens of G. S. L. County near the head 
waters of Big Cotton wook. 

s«/. 2s. — The remains of a woman, evi- 
dently killed by the departing soldiers, 
were found in Provo Valley, Wasatch Co. 

August. — Apostles Amasa M. Lyman 
and Charles C. Rich succeeded Na- 
thaniel V.Jones and Jacob Gates in the 
presidency of the European mission. 

Thuis. ?.— Mrs. Ruth B. Clark, of the 
Sugar House Ward, Salt Lake Co., was 
bitten by a scorpion, while asleep, causing 
her death. 

Sat. 4. — A terrible hailstorm visited 
Da\as County, doing a great deal of dam- 
age. 

Thurs.9. — Capt. Warren Walling's train, 
the first company of immigrating Saints of 
the season, arrived in G. S. L. City, having 
left Florence, May 30th, with 160 persons 
and 30 wagons, mostly drawn by oxen. 

Sun. 12. — The Indians made an attack 
upon the mail station at Egan Canyon, 
(Tooele Co.) and the following day on Shell 
Creek Station. A company of soldiers 
came to the rescue and killed 17 Indians. 

Sun. 2>>. — Geo. Q. Cannon was ordained 
one of the Twelve Apostles, in G. S.L.City. 

Mon.27. — Capt. Daniel Robinson's hand- 
cart company (the first of the season), 
consisting of 233 persons, 43 handcarts, 6 
wagons. 38 oxen and 10 tents, arrived in 



G. S. L. City. Pres. Brigham Young had 
sent out wagons with 2,500 lbs. of flour and 
500 lbs. of bacon to help the company. 

Tfiurs. 30. — Capt. J. E. Murphy's immi- 
grant company, consisting of 279 persons, 
38 wagons, 1(54 oxen and 39 cows, arrived at 
G. S. L. City, having left Florence June 
19th. 

September. Sal. i.— Capt. John Smith's 
company of immigrants, consisting of 3-59 
persons and 39 wagons, arrived in G. S. L. 
City. 

J/on. 3. — Capt. James D. Ross' company 
of immigrants, consisting of 249 persons, 
36 wagons, 142 oxen and 54 cows, which 
left Florence June 17th, arrived in G. S. L. 
City. 

Tues. 4.— A portion of Capt. Franklin 
Brown's company of immigrants arrived 
in G. S. L. City. 

Fri. 14. — Capt. Brigham H. Young's 
train of immigrants arrived in G. S. L. 
City. 

Mun. 17. — Capt. John Taylor's company 
of immigrating Saints arrived in (i. S. L. 
City, having left Florence July 3rd. 

Jfo)i. 24. — The second handcart company 
of the season, under Capt. Oscar O. Stod- 
dard, arrived in G. S. L. City, having left 
Florence July 6th, with 126 persons and 22 
handcarts. These were the last immigrants 
who crossed the plains with handcarts. 

^Ved. ?6'. — On this and the two fol- 
lowing days a company of missionaries 
left G. S.L. City, among whom were 
Apostles Orson Pratt and Erastus Snow, 
for the United States and Geo. Q. Cannon 
on his way to England. 

October. — Capt. Jacob Hamblin, left 
Santa Clara, southern Utah, with nine 
men, to visit the Moquis Indians. 

Thurs. 4. — Hon. John F. Kinney arrived 
in G. S. L. City, having been reappointed 
chief justice of the Territory of Utah. 

Fri. o. — Capt. Wm. Budge's train, the 
last immigrant comany of the season, ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City, having left Florence 
July 20th, with over four hundred persons, 
55 wagons, 215 oxen and 77 cows. 

Sun. 21. — A branch of the Church was 
organized at Mountain Green, Weber Val- 
ley, Utah. 

'November. Fri. .?.— Geo. A. Smith, 
jun., (a son of Pres. Geo. A. Smith), one of 
Jacob Hamblin's exploring party, was 
killed by Navajo Indians, in New Mexico. 
The rest of the company were obliged to 
return, and barely escaped with their 
lives. 

Mon. 12. — An extra session of the Utah 
legislature convened in G. S. L. City, for 
the purpose of assigning the Federal 
judges to the various districts, in obedi- 
ence to a proclamation of Gov. Cumming. 

Fri. m. — A terrible storm visited Great 
Salt Lake, Weber and surrounding Coun- 
ties, destroying considerable property. 

December. Jfon. 3. — Starling Graves 
Driggs, one of the Utah Pioneers of 1847, 
died in Parowan, Iron Co. 

7"!<r.s. 4. — The Ute Indian Chief Arrapeen 
died in the mountains between Sevier Val- 
ley and Grass Vallej^ about sixty miles 
south of Manti. 

Jlon. 10. — The tenth annual session of 
the Utah legislature convened in G. S. L 
City and organized by electing Daniel H. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1861. 



65 



Wells president of the Council, and John 
Taylor speaker of the House. 

1861 

Utah was divided, and the western part 
organized into the Territory of Nevada. 
A large number of teams were sent to the 
Missouri river for the poor Saints. The 
U. S. soldiers stationed at Camp Floyd 
were withdrawn from Utah. The over- 
land telegraph line was completed from 
the States via G. S. L. City to California. 
In the fall of the year a large number of 
people were called from the middle and 
northern counties of Utah Territory to 
settle in southern Utah, on the Rio Virgen 
and SaLta Clara. The city of St. George 
and the towns on the upper Rio Virgen 
were located and the resources of the 
country rapidly developed. A missionary 
field was opened in Holland. 

January. Tues. i.— The 13th Ward as- 
sembly rooms in G. S. L. City were dedi- 
cated. 

Thiirs. 3. — Capt. David R. Evans died at 
Brigham City, Box Elder Co. 

Sat. 19. — The Utah legislature ad- 
journed. 

Tues. 29. — Wm. S. Champlin, a survivor 
of the Haun's Mill massacre, died at 
Lehi, Utah Co. 

February. — The 62nd quorum of Seven- 
ty was organized at G. S. L. City, with 
James F. Cleary, Wm. L. Brundage, 
Richard Golightly, Francis Piatt, Henry 
W. Naisbitt, J. D. Ross and Claude Clive 
presidents. 

Sat. 2.—K band of thieving Indians 
(Goshutes) were taken prisoners by a 
posse of men, near Grantsville, Tooele 
Co., but a few days later they escaped, 
after shooting one of the guard. 

Wed. 6. — By order of the commander the 
militarv post of Camp Floyd changed name 
to Fort Crittenden. Secretary of War 
John B. Floyd, after whom the camp 
originally was named, had allied himself 
with the South against the Union. 

3Iarch. Fri. 1. — A branch of the 
Church was organized at Deseret, Millard 
Co., Utah, with Jacob Croft as president. 
Sat. 2. — A bill, providing for the organ- 
ization of Nevada Territory out of the 
western portion of Utah, was approved bj'^ 
President James Buchanan. 

Mon. 4. — A branch of the Church was 
organized in Round Valley (nowScipio), 
MiUard Co., Utah, with B. H. Johnson as 
president. 

April. Sat. 6. — On this and the follow- 
ing day the 31st annual conference of the 
Church was held in G. S. L. City. 

Sun. 14. — Logan, Cache Co., was divided 
into four wards, with Benjamin M. Lewis, 
Henry Ballard, John B. Thatcher and 
Thos.' X. Smith as Bislieps, respectively. 

Tues. 16. — The packet ship Manchester 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 380 
Saints, under the direction of Claudius V. 
Spencer. They arrived at New York May 
18th. 

6 



Tues. 23. — The clipper ship Underivriter 
sailed from Liverpool, with 624 Saints, 
under the presidency of Milo Andrus, 
Homer Duncan and Charles William Pen- 
rose. The company arrived at New York 
May 22nd, and at Florence June 2nd. 

From the 23rd to the 31st of this month 
upwards of two hundred Church wagons, 
with four yoke of cattle to each, carrying 
1.50,000 pounds of flour, left G. S. L. Valley 
for the Missouri river to bring in the poor. 
They traveled in four companies under 
Capts. Joseph W. Young, Ira Eldredge, 
Joseph Home and John R. Murdock. 

Jfon. a**.— Elder Reynolds Cahoon died 
at South Cottonwood. G. S. L. Co., of 
dropsy. 

3fay. Wed. 1.5. — Pres. Brigham Young 
and others left G. S. L. City on a trip to 
the southern settlements, from which they 
returned June 8th. A little later the 
President visited Cache Valley. 

Thurs. 16. — The packet ship Monarch at 
the Sea sailed from Liverpool, with 955 
Saints of various nationalities, under the 
direction of Jabez Woodard, H. O, Han- 
sen and Niels Wilhelmsen. The company 
arrived in New York June 19th. 

Fri. 17. — Gov. Alfred Cumming and wife 
left G. S. L. City, quietly, for the States. 

July. — Tlie rest of the army at Camp 
Floyd, or Fort Crittenden, was ordered to 
the States. In consequence of this, gov- 
ernment property and outfit at Camp 
Floyd was sold at extraordinarily low 
prices. It was estimated that 84,000,000 
worth of goods was sold for $100,000. - 

August. J/o«. 5. — Paul A. Schettler t ,,; 
and A. W. Van der Woude arrived as mis- oO 
sionaries in Rotterdam, Holland. After 
laboring several months, they succeeded 
in organizing a branch of the Church of 14 
members. 

Fi-i. 16. — The first company of immigrat- 
ing Saints of the season, which had left 
Florence May 29th, under Capt. David H. 
Cannon's charge, arrived in G. S. L. City. 
The company consisted of 225 persons, with 
57 wagons. 

September. Jlon. 2. — A company of 
settlers left G. S. L. City for the Uintah 
country, intending to locate a settlement, 
in which, however, they did not succeed. 

Fri. 6. — Apostles Orson Pratt and Eras- 
tus Snow arrived in G. S. L. City from a 
mission of gathering the poor Saints in the 
Eastern States. 

ThiD-s. i2.— Captains Milo Andrus and 
John R. Murdock arrived in G. S. L. City 
with their respective companies of immi- 
grants. 

Fri. 13. — Captains Joseph Home and 
Homer Duncan arrived in G. S. L. City 
with their companies of immigrants. 
Home's company left Florence July 1st. 

Sun. 15. — Capt. Ira Eldredge's train of 
immigrants arrived in G. S. L. City, hav- 
ing left Florence June 30th. 

Sat. 21. — Wm. Cockcroft, the murderer 
of Robert Brown, was executed in G. S. 
L. City. 

Sun. .22.— Capt. Samuel A. WooUey ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City, with his company of 
immigrants, mostly Scandinavians. 

Mon. 23. — The last Church train of the 
season arrived in G. S. L. City, under the 
direction of Capt. Ansel P. Harmon. 



6G 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY— 1862. 



Fri. 27. — Capt. Sextus E. Johnson's 
company of immigrating Saints arrived in 
G. S. L. City, with about sixty wagons. 
This was the last company of immigrants 
that arrived this season. 

October. Thurs. ,3.— John W. Dawson 
was appointed governor of Utah. 

Sun. b".— The semi-annual conference of 
the Church was commenced in G. S. L. 
City. It was continued three days. A 
number of brethren were called to settle 
in southern Utah and turn their special 
attention to the raising of cotton. 

Tues. 8.-- Parshall Terry died at Draper, 
G. S. L. Co. 

Fri. i8.— The overland telegraph line 
was completed from the States to G. S. L. 
City. Pres. Brigham Young sent the first 
telegram, which passed over the line, to J. 
H. Wade, president of the company. 

Thurs. 2J.— The first telegram was sent 
from G. S. L. City to San Francisco by 
Pres. Brigham Young. 

November. Mon. iS.— The Toquerville 
branch, southern Utah, was organized as 
a Ward, with Joshua T. Willis as Bishop. 

Thurs. 28.— A company of Swiss Saints, 
under the leadership of Daniel Bonnelli, 
arrived at Santa Clara, southern Utah, 
having been called to settle there. 

Fi'i. 2£^.— Apostles Geo. A. Smith and 
Erastus Snow, Elder Horace S. Eldredge 
and others left G. S. L. City for southern 
Utah, with a view to locating settlements 
in the valleys of the Rio Virgen and Santa 
Clara for the purpose of raising cotton. 

December. Wed. 4.— At a meeting of 
southern Utah settlers who had arrived 
from the north, it was decided, on motion 
of Apostle Erastus Snow, to build a city 
to be called St. George. 

Sat. 7.— John W. Dawson, Utah's third 
governor, arrived in G. S. L. City, accom- 
panied by James Duane Doty, superintend- 
ent of Indian affairs. 

3fon. 9.— Luke S. Johnson, once a mem- 
ber of the Twelve Apostles, died at Orson 
Hyde's residence, G. S. L. City. 

— The 11th annual session of the Utah 
legislature convened in G. S. L. City, and 
organized by electing Daniel H. Wells 
president of the Council and John Taylor 
speaker of the House. 

Fri. i:{. — The Saints who were settling 
Grafton, southern Utah, were organized 
into a Ward, by Apostles Orson Pratt and 
Erastus Snow, with Franklin W. Young as 
Bishop. 

Hon. 23. — Peteetneet, the famous Ute 
Indian chief, died near Fort Crittenden, 
Utah Co. 

Tues. 31.— Gov. John W. Dawson, left G. 
S. Li. City for the States, under peculiar 
circumstances. Secretary Frank Fuller 
succeeded him as acting governor. 



1862. 

The people of Utah petitioned the Fede- 
ral government the third time for admis- 
sion into the Union as a State. A large 
immigration arrived this year from Eu- 
rope, and the Church sent teams to the 
Missouri river to bring most of them across 



the plains. In response to a call from the 
government a company of militia went 
eastward to protect the mail stations 
against the Indians. In the fall of this year 
the southern settlements in Utah were 
strengthened by the arrival of new settlers- 
from the North. About one hundred thou- 
sand pounds of cotton was raised in Wash- 
ington County. Jacob Hamblin, with a 
small party crossed the Colorado river, 
south of St. George, and went to the Mo- 
quis towns ria the San Francisco Moun- 
tains. On the return trip three of the Mo- 
quis accompanied the party and visited G. 
S. L. City, where they had an interview 
with the leading men of the Church. 

January. Wed. 1. — An important 
council of the Priesthood of the European 
mission was commenced in Birmingham, 
England; it was continued for six days. 

Thurs. 16. — Lot Huntington, an outlaw, 
was killed by O. Porter Rockwell, near Ft. 
Crittenden, while attempting to escape 
from the officers. On the following day, 
while trying to effect their escape, John P. 
Smith and Moroni Clawson, two other out- 
laws, were killed in G. S. L. City. 

Fri. 17. — The Utah legislature adjourned. 
Among the acts passed was one defining 
the boundaries of the Territory and its 
respective counties, after the creation of 
Nevada, etc. The counties were 17 in 
number, namely, Beaver, Box Elder, Cache, 
Davis, Great Salt Lake, Green River, Iron, 
Juab, Milliard, Morgan, Summit, Sanpete, 
Tooele, Utah, Washington, Wasatch and 
Weber. 

Sat. 18. — A flood did much damage in the 
Rio Virgen and Santa Clara Valleys, 
southern Utah. 

Jlon. 20. — A convention for the estab- 
lishment of a State government, assem- 
bled in G. S. L. City. 

Thurs. 2.'i.— The convention of delegates, 
chosen by the people, adopted a State con- 
stitution for Utah and a memorial to Con- 
gress, praying the third time for the ad- 
mission of Utah into the Union as a State 
with the name of Deseret. George Q. 
Cannon and Wm. H. Hooper were elected 
delegates to present them to Congress. 

March. Thurs. 6.— The Salt Lake 
Theater, which had been erected the pre- 
vious season, was dedicated. The building 
is 144 feet long and 80 feet wide. 

Sat. 8.— The Salt Lake Theater was 
opened to the public. The pieces played at 
the opening performance were "Pride of 
the Market" and "State Secrets." 

Sat. 22. — At a conference held in the new 
settlement of St. George, southern Utah, 
that town was divided into four Wards. 

Wed. 26. — Salomon Chamberlain, an old 
member of the Church, and a Pioneer of 
1847, died in Washitigton County, Utah. 

April. Sun. 6. — The 32nd annual con- 
ference of the Church was commenced in 
G. S. L. City ; it was continued until the 
9th. 

Tues. 8. — Mr. Morrill of Vermont, intro- 
duced a bill in the U. S. House of Repre- 
sentatives, at Washington, D.C., to punish 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1862, 



67 



and prevent the pi-actice of bigamy in the 
Territories of the United States. It was 
read twice and referred to the committee 
on Territories. This bill also made it un- 
lawful for any religious or charitable asso- 
ciation in any of the U. S. Territories to 
own real estate worth more than §50,000. 

Wed. .9. — The ship Humholdt sailed from 
Hamburg, Germany, with 323 Scandinavian 
Saints, under the direction of Hans Chris- 
tian Hansen. The company arrived at 
New York May 20th and at Florence about 
the 1st of June. 

Tues. 15. — The ship Franklin sailed from 
Hamburg, Germany, with 413 Scandinavian 
Saints, under the direction of Christian A. 
Madsen. The company arrived in New 
York harbor May 29th and at Florence 
June 9th. Between forty and fifty children 
died of measles on board the ship. 

Mon. 2i.— The ship Athenia sailed from 
Hamburg, Germany, with 484 Scandinavian 
Saints, under the direction of Ola N. Lil- 
jenquist. The company arrived at New 
York June 6th and at Florence June 19th. 

Wed. 23. — The ship John ■/. Boyd sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 701 Saints, 
under the direction of James S. Brown ; it 
arrived at New York June 1st. 

Mon. 28. — The Indians having destroyed 
the mail stations between Fort Bridger 
and North Platte, burned the coaches and 
mail bags, killed the drivers and stolen the 
stock. Adjutant-General L. Thomas, at 
Washington, D. C, made a call upon Pres. 
Brigham Young for a company of cavalry 
to protect the mail route. 

May. — Two hundred and sixty - two 
wagons, 293 men, 2,880 oxen and 143,315 
pounds of flour were sent from Utah to as- 
sist the poor of the immigration across the 
plains and mountains. They traveled in 
six companies under Captains Horton D. 
Haight. Henry W. Miller, Homer Duncan, 
^^-^^ Joseph Home, John R. Murdock and ^jisel 
rr^j P.Harmon. • [■ -\ T 

^O^ ^v n — Col. Patrick Edward Connor was or- 
^^^^ dered to Utah with California volunteers. 
V-'., In July they took up their line of march. 

Thiers. 1. — In obedience to the call of L. 
Thomas, a company of cavalry, numbering 
about one hundred men, left G. S. L. City 
for Independence Rock, under Capt. Lot 
Smith's command. 

Ti((S. 6. — The ship Manchester sailed 
from Liveroool, with 376 Saints, under the 
direction of John D. T. McAllister; it ar- 
rived at New York June 12th. 

Wed. 14. — The ship Wju. Tapscott sailed 

from Liverpool, with 808 Saints, under the 

Indirection of Wm. Gibson, John Clark and 

^ Francis M. Lyman. It arrived safely at 

New York. 

Thiers. 15. — The ship Windermere sailed 
from Havre, France, with 109 Swiss and 
French Saints, under the direction of 
Serge L. Ballif , bound for Utah via New 
York. 

'Sun. IS. — The packet shiTp Antarctic sailed. 
from Liverpool, England, with 38 Saints, 
under the charge of Wm. C. Moody. 

June. — Tues. ■'}. — The anti-bigamy bill 
was passed by the U. S. Senate, considerably 
amended. The House afterwards con- 
curred in the amendments. 

Mon. ,9. — Delegate John M. Bernhisel pre- 
sented the constitution of the State of Des- 



eret, and the accompanying memorial, in 
the U. S. House of Representatives. On the 
10th the Vice-President presented the 
same in the Senate. 

Thurs. 12. — An expedition, or marshal's 
posse, under Robert T. Burton, left G.S. L. 
City for the purpose of arresting Joseph 
Morris and others, encamped on the Weber 
river, a little below the mouth of the 
canyon, 

Thurs. 12. — The Saints at Harrisburg, 
Washington Co., Utah, were organized 
into a branch of the Church, with James 
Lewis as president. 

Fri. 13. — The expedition, under Capt. 
Robert T. Burton, which had baen joined 
by men from the settlements in Davis 
County, arrived before Morris' Camp, on 
the Weber ; and as the Morrisites refused 
to surrender, fire was opened on the camp, 
with fatal effect. 

Sun. 15. — Joseph Morris, John Banks, 
and others were killed and the Morrisites 
taken prisoners. 

Mon. 16. — The Morrisites were brought 
toG. S. L.City. 

Wed. 18. — The Morrisite prisoners were 
on trial in G. S. L. City; some of them 
were fined and others admitted to bail. 

Fri. 20. — President Abraham Lincoln 
approved the act of Congress prohibiting 
slavery in the Territories. 

July. — Much property, including a 
great number of bridges, was destroyed 
in Utah bv floods. 

— Apostle George Q. Cannon succeeded 
Apostles Amasa M. Lyman and Charles C. 
Rich in the presidency of the European mis- 
sion. Jacob G. Bigler had temporarv 
charge of the mission during the absence 
of Elder Cannon. 

Fri. 4. — Utah showed its loyalty to the 
Union by celebrating Independence day in 
grand style, while the rebellion was in 
progress in the East. 

— John A. Ray died at Fillmore, Millard 
Co. 

Mon. 7. — Stephen S. Harding, Utah's 
fourth governor, arrived in G. S. L. City. 
He had been appointed to the governor- 
ship March 31st. 

— Florence, Neb., where thousands of 
Saints were camped, was visited by a ter- 
rible storm, during which two brathren 
were killed by lightning, and Joseph W. 
Young was severely hurt. 

Tues. 8. — The anti-bigamy law was -ap- 
proved by President Lincoln. 

Fri. 11. — Associate Justices Chas B. 
Waite and Thos. J. Drake arrived in G. S. 
L. City. 

Fri. 25. — Donald MeNichols, a member of 
Captain Lot Smith's expedition, was 
drowned in Lewis Fork, about ten miles 
below the Three Tetons, Oregon (now 
Idaho) , while pursuing a band of thieving 
Indians. 

August. — Fri. 29. — Capt. Lewis Brun- 
son's ox-train, which had left Florence 
June 17th with 212 Saints and 48 wagons, 
arrived in G. S. L. City. 

September, — The first number of Die 
Reform, a monthly periodical published in 
the interest of the Church in the German 
language, was issued by John L. Smith, at 
Geneva, Switzerland. 

Mon, 1. — Pres. Brigham Young and a 



68 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1863. 



company of Elders left G. S. L. City on a 
visit to southern Utah, from which they re- 
turned on the 25th. Later in the season 
the President visited the northern settle- 
ments. 

Tues. .9.— Col. Patrick E. Connor ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City, his company of vol- 
unteers remaining in Ruby Valley, Ne- 
vada. 

Tues. 16. — Apostle Amasa M. Lyman, 
and Charles C. Rich, accompanied by 
other Elders, arrived in G. S. L. City, 
from their missions to Europe. 

Tue.^-. ^i.— The independent companies of 
Scandinavian Saints, under the direction 
of Captains Christian A. Madsen and Ola 
X. Liljenquist, which had left Florence 
July 14:h, with about five hundred immi- 
grants and eighty wagons, arrived in G. S. 
L. City. 

Wed. 24.— Capt. Homer Duncan's Church 
train (first), which had left Florence 
July 22nd, arrived in G. S. L. City. This 
train had made the round trip from the 
Valley to Florence and back in 130 days. 

I^ri. 26. — Capt. James Wareham's inde- 
pendent company of immigrants arrived 
in G. S. L. City. 

Sat. 27. — Capt. John R. Murdock's 
Churjh train (second), which had left 
Florence July 24th, with 65 wagons and 
about seven hundred immigrants arrived 
in G. S. L. City. 

October. — Wed. 1. — Capt. Joseph 
Home's Charch train (third), which had 
left Florence July 20th, with about five 
hundred and seventy souls and 52 wagons, 
arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Thurs. 2. — Capt. James S. Brown's inde- 
pendent company (third), which had left 
Florence July 23th, with 46 wagons and 
about two huudred immigrants, arrived 
n G. S. L. City. 

Sun. 0. — Capt. Ansel P. Harmon's 
Church train (fourth) arrived in G. S. L. 
City, with about five hundred immigrants. 
About fifteen ch'ildren died of measles, on 
the plains. 

Thurs. 16. — Capt. Isaac A. Canfield's in- 
dependent company of immigrants arrived 
in G. S. L. City, having been eleven weeks 
on the journey from Florence. 

Fri. ir.— Capt. Henry W.Miller's Church 
train (fifth), which had left Florence Aug. 
8th, with sixty wagons and about six hun- 
dred and sixty- five immigrants, arrived in 
G. S. L. City. The company had suffered 
considerably from sickness, and about 
twenty -eight persons died on the journey. 

— Col. Patrick E. Connor's command of 
750 California volunteers arrived at Ft. 
Crittenden, Cedar Valley, and on the fol- 
lowing day marched to the Jordan river. 

Sun. v.). — Capt. Horton D. Haight's 
Church train (sixth) , in which there were 
about six hundred and fifty immigrants, 
arrived in G. S. L. City. Thirty persons 
died on the journey. 

^fon. 20. — Col. Patrick E. Connor ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City with his command, 
and on the 22nd he located Camp Douglas, 
about three miles east of the citv. 

Wed. ^'y.— Capt. Wm. H. Dame's Church 
freight train, the last of the season, ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City. 

November. Saf. 15. — The 65th quorum 
of Seventy was organized at G. S. L. City, 



with John L. Dunyon, Thos. C. Armstrong, 
Jens. C. A. Weibye, Henry W. Brizzee, 
Gustaf A. Ohlson, Edward W. Tullidge 
and Jens Hansen as presidents. 

Fri. 21. — The 66th quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete 
Co., with Levi B. Reynolds as one of the 
presidents. 

Fri. 28.— The 68th quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Lehi, Utah Co., with 
John Brown, John R. Moyle, Wm. S. S. 
Willes, Orice C. Murdock, John C. Naegle, 
John R. Murdock and Israel Evans as pre- 
sidents. 

Sat. 29. — The 67th quorum of Seventy 
was organized at American Fork, Utah 
Co., with Samuel Mulliner, Stephen Chip- 
man, Thomas Barrett, Washburne Chip- 
man, Lewis Harvey, Calvin Moore and 
Wm. F. Reynolds as presidents. 

December. Jfon. S.—The Utah legis- 
lature (12th annual session) convened in 
G. S. L. City, and organized by electing 
Daniel H. Wells president of the Council, 
and Orson Pratt speaker of the House. 

Wed. W.— Gov. Harding, who proved to 
be a bitter enemy to the people of Utah, 
delivered a very insulting message to the 
territorial legislature. 

F7'i. 19. — Joseph B. Haws, one of the 
early members of the Church, died at 
Spanish Fork, Utah Co. 

— Elder Gustav Pegua, who labored as a 
missionary in Hamburg, Germany, was 
arrested and the following day banished 
from that city. 



1863. 

This year Sevier Valley, Utah, was set- 
tled at Richfield and Monroe. The Sho- 
shone Indians were defeated on Bear 
river by Col. Connor's troops. Nearly 
four hundred wagons were sent to the 
Missouri river after the poor. In the fall 
Bear Lake Vallej' was settled by Apostle 
Charles C. Rich and others who founded 
Paris (now in Bear Lake Co., Idaho). 

January. — ^ti. 16.— The Utah legisla- 
ture adjourned without being able to ac- 
complisli much, as Gov. Harding vetoed 
nearly all the bills. 

Thurs. 29. — Col. Patrick E. Connor, with 
about two hundred troops, defeated a band 
of Shoshone Indians, numbering over four 
hundred, in a ravine on Beaver creek, 
near Bear River, 12 miles north of Frank- 
lin. About sixteen soldiers and some two 
hundred and twenty -five Indians were 
killed, including the chiefs Bear Hunter 
and Lehi. The savages were entirely de- 
feated. This is known in history as the 
battle of Bear river. 

February. Sun. 15. — Elder Nathaniel 
V. Jones, sen., died in G. S. L. City. 

March. — The bitter feelings existing 
between the troops at Camp Douglas and 
the citizens of G. S. L. City came near ter- 
minating in a collision. 

Tues. ■!. — A large mass- meeting was 
held in the Tabernacle, G. S. L. City, at 
which protests were entered against the 
infamous course persued by Gov. Harding 



CHURCH CHROXOLOGY — 1863. 



69 



and Associate Justices Waite and Drake. 
A petition, asking for their removal, was 
drawn up, and subsequently was forwarded 
to President Abraham Lincoln, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

^A Congressional act creating the ter- 
ritory of Idaho was approved. A portion 
of northeastern Utah was included in the 
new territorj'; later (July 25, 1868) this 
became a part of Wyoming. 

Wed. 4. — John Taylor, Jeter Clinton and 
Orson Pratt, appointed in the mass meet- 
ing the day previous, waited on Gov. Hard- 
ing and Judges Drake and Waite, asking 
them, in behalf of the people, to resign 
their official positions, which they refused 
to do. 

Tties. 10. — Pres. Brigham Young was ar- 
rested on a charge of bigamy, under the 
anti-bigamy law of 1862, brought before 
Judge Kinney, and placed under $2,000 
bonds. 

JSaf. 14.— The barque Bowena sailed 
from Port Elizabeth, Cape of Good Hope, 
Africa, with 15 Saints on board, under 
the direction of Robert Grant, bound for 
Utah. 

Sun. 22. — The overland mail coach, with 
four passengers, was attacked by Indians, 
near Eight Mile Creek Station, Tooele Co. 
Henry Harper, the driver, was killed and 
one passenger wounded. Judge Mott, 
delegate to Congress from Nevada, who 
was in the coach, took the reins, drove for 
life and escaped. 

Tues. 31. — Gov. Stephen S. Harding par- 
doned all the Morrisites, who had been 
convicted of resisting the officers, etc. 

April. Wed. 1. — A fight took place be- 
tween a small detachment of U. S. troops 
from Camp Douglas and a party of In- 
dians, near Cedar Fort, Utah Co. 

Sun. 5. — In Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah 
Co., 200 Indians were defeated by 140 
cavalry, under Col. G. S. Evans. Lieut. 

F. A. Queale was killed in the battle. 
Mon. 6. — The thirty -third annual con- 
ference of the Church was commenced in 

G. S. L. City; it was continued till the 
8th; 47 missionaries were called. 

Sun. 12. — A small party of soldiers from 
Camp Douglas had a fight with Indians at 
Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., during which 
several horses were killed. 

Wed. 15. — Two companies of soldiers 
from Camp Douglas attacked a band of In- 
dians in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah Co. 
During the engagement several Indians 
were killed and wounded. Also a few of 
the soldiers were wounded. 

Sat. 18. — The 63rd quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Cedar City, Iron Co., 
with Richard R. Birkbeck, Alexander G. 
Ingram, Christopher J. Arthur, Joseph 
H. Smith, John M. Macfarlane, Francis 
Webster and Robert W. Heyborne as pre- 
sidents. 

— The ship Electric sailed from Hamburg, 
Germany, with 336 Scandinavian Saints, 
under the direction of Soren Christopher- 
sen. The company arrived in New York 
June 5th and at Florence June 19th. 

Mon. 20. — President Brigham Young left 
G. S. L. City, on another trip to the South. 
After visiting the principal settlements as 
far as St. George, he returned to the city 
on May 19th. 



JiTon. 27. — About ten mounted ruffians 
(soldiers) from Camp Douglas made an 
unsuccessful attempt to kidnap a young 
woman in G. S. L. City, and take her to 
camp. 

— Hiram Kimball and Thos. Atkinson 
were killed by a steamboat explosion, at 
San Pedro, Cal., while on their way as 
missionaries to the Sandwich Islands. 

Thurs. 30. — The ship JoJin J. Boyd sailed 
from Liverpool, with 763 (or 766) Saints, 
under the direction of Wm. W. Cluff. 
The emigrants landed in New York June 
1st, and arrived at Florence June 12th. 

May. — Three hundred and eighty-four 
wagons, 488 men, 3,604 oxen, taking 235,- 
969 pounds of flour, started east to assist 
the poor of the immigration ; 4,300 pounds 
of Utah grown cotton was sent east for 
sale, with the teams. The captains were 
John W. Woolley, John R. Murdock, 
Horton D. Haight, Peter Nebeker, Wm. 
B. Preston, Thomas E. Ricks, RoselHyde, 
John F. Sanders, Samuel D. White, and 
Daniel D. McArthur. Horace S. Eldredge 
acted as Church emigration agent in the 
States this year. 

Fri. 8. — A small band of Indians made a 
raid on Box Elder Valley, four miles above 
Brigham City, killing William Thorpe and 
driving off several head of horses. 

— The ship B. S. KhnbaU sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 654 (or 657) 
Saints under the direction of Hans Peter 
Lund. The same day 38 Saints, under the 
direction of Anders Christensen, sailed on 
the ( 'onsignrnent. The emigrants on the B. 
S. Kimball landed in New York June 15th 
and thence continued by rail to Florence. 
The Consignment arrived at New York 
June 20th. 

Tues. in. — The stage from California 
was attacked by Indians, in Deep Creek 
Canyon, 150 miles west of G. S. L. City, 
and the driver, W. R. Simpson, was killed. 
Major Howard Egan, who was one of the 
passengers, caught the reins and drove 
away at full speed. 

Fri. 22. — The Farmer's Oracle, a small 
semi-monthly paper published by Joseph 
E. Jolyison, at Spring Lake Villa, Utah 
Co., Utah, was first issued. 

Sat. 23. — The ship Antarctic saXleA from 
Liverpool, England, with 483 Saints, under 
the direction of John Needham. The emi- 
grants landed in New York July 10th and 
arrived safely at Florence a few days later. 

Sat. 30. — The ship Cijnosure sailed from 
Liverpool, with 754 Saints,under the direc- 
tion of David M. Stuart. It arrived at 
New York harbor July 19th. 

June. Thurs. 4. — The packet ship Ama- 
zon sailed from London, England, with 882 
(or 895) Saints,under the direction of Wm. 
Bramall. It arrived in New York harbor 
July 18th, and the immigrants reached 
Florence a few days later. 

Wed. 10. —The stage coach was attacked 
by mounted Indians between Fort Critten- 
den and the Jordan river, Utah Co. ; the 
driver and another man were killed and 
their bodies fearfully mutilated by the 
savages. 

Thurs. 11.— Gov. Stephen S. Harding, 
who was succeeded by James D. Doty, left 
G. S. L. City for the East. 

3fon. 22. — James D. Doty, formerly su- 



70 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1854. 



perintendent of Indian affairs, took the 
oath of office as governor of Utah. 

July. Sat. 4.— A fire destroyed §3,000 
worth of property belonging to Daniel H. 
Wells, in G. S. L. City. 

Wed. 8.— The Indians attacked Canyon 
Station, near Deep creek, 150 miles west of 
G. S. L. City, killing four soldiers and Wm. 
Riley, the station keeper. 

TJno-s. 30.— Gov. Doty and Gen. Connor 
made a treaty of peace with the Shoshone 
Indians at Brigham City. 

August. — The troops under command of 
Capt. Smith killed twelve Indians, near 
Schell Creek station, Tooele Co., Utah. 

Jloii.S. — John F. Kinney, formerly chief 
justice of Utah, was elected delegate to 
Congress from Utah. 

Fi-i. 7.— John Titus, of Pennsylvania, 
successor to John F. Kinney as chief jus- 
tice of Utah, arrived in G. S. L. City; he 
took the oath of office on the 12th. 

Sat. 29. — Capt. John R. Murdock's train 
of immigrants, which had left Florence 
June 39th, with 375 souls, arrived at G. S. 
L. City. 

September. Fri. 4. — Capt. Patterson's 
independent train of immigrants, which 
had left Florence June 30th, arrived at G. 
S. L. City. 

Sat. 5. — Capt. John F. Sanders' Church 
train of immigrants, which had started 
from Florence July 6th, arrived at G. S. L. 
City. 

Mon. 7. — Pres. Brigham Young's woolen 
factory, on Canyon creek, commenced run- 
ning. 

Thurs. 10. — Capt. W. B. Preston's train 
of immigrants, which had left Florence 
July 9th, with .55 wagons, arrived in G. S. 
L. City. 

Sat. 12. — Capt. John R. Young's inde- 
pendent train of immigrants, which had 
started fi*om Florence July 7th, arrived in 
G. S. L. City. Several of the immigrants 
were killed in a cattle stampede on the 
plains July 28th. 

Fri. 2.5.— Capt. Peter Nebeker's Church 
train of immigrants, which had started 
from Florence July 25th, arrived at G. S. 
L. City. 

Wed. 30. — Capt. James Brown, formerly 
of the Mormon Battalion and the founder 
of Ogden, died from the effects of an acci- 
dent, at Ogden. 

October. Thurs. 1. — Gov. James D. 
Doty, of Utah, and Gov. James W. Nye, of 
Nevada, formed a treaty of peace with the 
Indians at Ruby Valley. 

Sat. 3.— Capt. Daniel D. McArthur's 
Church train of immigrants, which had 
started from Florence Aug. 6th, with 
about seventy-five wagons, arrived at G. 
S. L. City. 

Sun. 4.— Capt. John W. WooUey's 
Church train of immigrants, which had 
left Florence Aug. 9th, and also Caot. 
Thomas E. Ricks' Church train of immi- 
grants, which had started from Florence 
Aug. 10th, arrived at G. S. L. City. 

—Capt. Horton D. Haight's Church train 
of immigrants arrived at G. S. L. City. 

Mon. i2.— Charles Hopkins, formerly a 
member of the Mormon Battalion, died at 
Petersburg, Millard Co. 

Tues. 13.— C&\>1. Rosel Hyde's Church 



train of immigrants, which had left Flo- 
rence Aug. 11th, arrived at G.S. L. City. 

Thurs. ^5.— Capt. Samuel D. White's 
Church train of immigrants, which left 
Florence Aug. 15th, arrived at G. S. L. 
City. This was the last Church train of 
the season. 

November. Mon. 2.— Robert C.Egbert, 
formerly a member of the Mormon Bat- 
talion, died at Deseret, Millard Co. 

Fri. 20. — The first number of the Cfnion 
Videtfe, a bitter anti -Mormon newspaper, 
was issued at Camp Douglas. Utah. 

3lon. 23.— Seth Taft, a Pioneer of 1847, 
died in G. S. L. City. 

December. Sat. .5.— Ira Jones Willes, 
formerly a member of the Mormon Battal • 
ion, and his son, were accidentally killed 
while crossing a creek, near Lehi, Utah 
Co. 

Mon. 14.— The 13th session of the Utah 
legislature convened in G. S. L. City, and 
organized by appointing Daniel H. Wells 
president of the Council, and John Taylor 
speaker of the House. 

Sat. 19. — Joseph Fielding, one of the 
first missionaries sent from Ame iea to 
England, died at Mill Creek, Salt Lake 
Co. 

Thurs. .37.— Bishop David Pettigrew, 
once a member of the Mormon Battalion, 
died in G. S. L. City. 



1864. 

The Perpetual Emigrating Fund Com- 
pany sent 170 wagons, 1,717 oxen and 277 
men to the Missouri river after the poor 
this year. The first mining districts were 
located, the first mining companies in- 
corporated and the first smelting furnaces 
built in the Territory. A number of new 
settlements were founded in Bear Lake 
Valley. 

January. Tues. 5. — The Daily Videtfe 
succeeding the Union Vidette, was first is- 
sued at Camp Douglas, Utah. Like its 
predecessor, it was a bitter anti-Mormon 
paper. 

Sat. 16. — An act passed by the Utah 
legislature, ci'eating Kane and Richland 
Counties, was approved. 

February. Wed. 10. — Lewis Robbins 
was accidentally killed while quarrying 
rock near St. George, Utah. 

3Iarch.— Circleville, Piute Co., Utah, 
was settled by about fifty families from 
Ephraim, Sanpete Co. 

Thurs. 31. — Apostle Lorenzo Snow had a 
very narrow escape from drowning while 
attempting to land at Lahaina, Maui, 
Hawaiian Islands, with other Elders. 

April. Fri. 1. — Thomas Pierce and 
Robert Spurgeon were killed in a snow- 
slide at the head of Mill Creek Canyon. 
The body of the latter was not found un- 
til May 3rd. 

Tues. .J. — A small company of Saints 
bound for Utah,sailed from Port Elizabeth, 
South Africa, under the direction of John 
Talbot. 

Wed. 6'.— On this and the four following 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — i!S65. 



71 



<iays the 34th annual conference of the 
Church was held in G. S. L. City. 

Fri. S. — At a council meeting held at 
Lahaina, Maui, Hawaiian Islands, attended 
by Apostles Ezra T. Benson and Lorenzo 
Snow and Elders Joseph F. Smith, Wm. 
W. Cluff and Alma L, Smith, Walter M. 
Gibson, who had usurped Church author- 
ity and imposed upon the native Saints, 
was excommunicated from the Church. 

^nn. iO.— Elders Wm. Fotheringham and 
Henry A. Dixon, accompanied by a small 
company of Saints, sailed from Port Eliza- 
beth, South Africa, in the barque Susan 
Pardcw, which arrived at Boston after 60 
day's voyage. 

Thurs. 28. — The ship Monarch of the Sea, 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 973 
Saints, under the direction of Patriarch 
John Smith. It arrived at New York June 
3rd, and the emigrants reached Wyoming, 
Neb., in safety. 

Wyoming, a village seven miles north of 
Nebraska City, Neb., had been selected as 
the outfitting place for the emigrants, 
crossing the plains, instead of Florence. 
About one hundred and seventy Church 
teams were sent from Utah to the Missouri 
river this year, after the poor. 

May. Thurs. 12. — The Saints who were 
settling Salina, Sevier Co., Utah, were or- 
ganized as a Ward by Apostle Orson Hyde, 
with Peter Rasmussen as Bishop. 

Sal. 21. — The ship Ocneral M'Clellan 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 802 
Saints, under the direction of Thos. E. 
Jeremy, Joseph Bull and Geo. G. By water. 
It arrived at New York June 23rd, and 
the company arrived at Wyoming July 3rd. 

June. Fri. ,3. — The ship Hudson sailed 
from London, England, with 863 Saints, 
under the direction of John M. Kay. The 
company arrived at New York July 19th, 
and at Wyoming Aug. 2nd. 

July. Mon. -/.—The Daily Telegraph, 
a newspaper, was first issued, in G. S. L. 
City, Thos. B. H. Stenhouse proprietor 
and editor. October 8th, a semi- weekly 
edition was also commenced. 

August. Fri. .?().— Capt. John R. Mur- 
dock's mule train arrived in G. S. L. City, 
with 78 passengers. 

Wed. 31. — James Calvin Sly, once a mem- 
ber of the Mormon Battalion, died at 
Chicken Creek, Juab Co. 

September. — Elder Joseph Greenwood, 
of American Fork, Utah, died on Bear 
river, from the effects of cold, on returning 
:from a mission to the States. 

— Daniel H. Wells succeeded Apostle 
Geo. Q. Cannon as president of the Euro- 
pean mission. 

Thurs. 1. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
others left G. S. L. City, on a trip to the 
southern settlements. They returned 
Sept. 29th, after visiting 37 settlements 
and holding 39 meetings. 

Thurs. i5. -Capt. Wm. B. Preston's 
train of immigrants, consisting of about 
fifty wagons and four hundred passengers, 
arrived at G. S. L. City. This company 
also brought new fonts of type for the 
Deseret Neivs office. 

Tues. 20. — Capt. Joseph S. Rawlins' 
train of immigrants arrived at G. S. L. 
City. 

J/ort. 26. — Elder John M. Kay, returning 



missionary from Europe, died on the Little 
Laramie, while crossing the plains in Capt. 
Warren S. Snow's train. 

October. — The first number of the 
Peep o^Day,a, magazine devoted to science, 
literature and art, and to opposing the 
"Mormons," was published by Elias L. T. 
Harrison and Edward W. Tullidge, at G. 
S. L. City. 

Sat. 1. — Capt. John Smith's indepen- 
dent train of immigrants arrived at G. S. 
L. City. 

Tues. 4. — Capt. Wm. S. Warren's train 
of immigrants, which had started from 
Wyoming July 19th, arrived at G. S. L. 
City. 

Wed. 5. — Capt. Isaac A. Canfield's train 
arrived at G. S. L. City. 

3fo7i 10. — The surviving members of 
Zion's Camp had a festival in the Social 
Hall, G. S. L. City, This was the first 
gathering of these veterans for 30 years ; 
54 men and 4 women were present out of 
the 63 then known to be in the Territory, 

Wed. 26.— Capt. Wm. Hyde's train of 
immigrants arrived at G. S. L. City. 

November. Wed. 2.^Capt. Warren S. 
Snow's train of immigrants, the last com- 
pany of the season, arrived at G. S. L. 
City. 

Wed. 16. — A destructive hurricane visited 
Davis and Weber Counties. 

December. Mon. 12. — The 14th annual 
session of the Utah legislature convened 
in G. S. L. City and organized by electing 
Geo. A. Smith president of the Council 
and John Taylor speaker of the House. 

Sat. 17. — A landing and site for a Church 
warehouse, afterwards known as Call's 
Landing, was selected by Anson Call, on 
the Colorado river, 125 miles from St. 
George, and the land along the Muddy- 
found suitable to settle on. At that time 
the Church contemplated sending the 
emigrants from Europe, by way of Pan- 
ama, the Gulf of California, and up the 
Colorado river, to this landing, which was 
the head of naviaration on the Colorado. 

Fri. 23. — Samuel H. Davis was acci- 
dentally killed in G. S. L. City, while en- 
gaged in walling up a well. 



1865. 

This year new settlements were founded 
by the Saints on the Muddy, Arizona (now 
Nevada). A long and desperate war be- 
tween the settlers in Sanpete and Sevier 
Valleys and the Indians under the chief 
Black Hawk was commenced. Many of the 
settlers were killed and wounded. 

January. Sun. 8.— The first Latter- 
day Saint settlers on the lower Muddy 
(now in Lincoln Co., Nev.) arrived 
there. Under the presidency olE Thos. S. 
Smith they and other settlers, who fol- 
lowed, located St. Thomas. 

Wed. iS'.— Apostle Orson Pratt and Wm. 
W. Riter arrived as missionaries in Vienna, 
Austria, to open up the gospel door in that 
country. 

Fri. 20.— The Utah legislature adjourned. 

Mon, 23.— The legislature of the State of 



72 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1865. 



Deseret met in G. S. L. City, attended to 
some business and adjourned. 

Sat. 28.— The Church, through its agent, 
Francis A. Hammond, purchased the Laie 
plantation, consisting of C,500 acres of 
land, on the island of Oahu, Sandwich 
Islands, for §14,000, of T. Dougherty. This 
place, which has since been a gathering 
place and mission headquarters for the 
natives of the Hawaiian Islands, is about 
thirty -two miles from Honolulu, the capital 
of the islands. 

February. — A warehouse was erected 
at Call's Landing, on the Colorado river. 

Sat. 4.— A company for building a canal 
from the Jordan river, near the Point 
of the Mountain south, to G. S. L. City 
was partly organized. 

3fon. 13.— The 69th quorum of Seventy 
was partly organized at Parowan, Iron 
Co., with Silas S. Smith, sen., Zachariah 
B. Decker, Abraham Smith, Joseph K. 
Parramore, Horace Thornton, Edward Dal- 
ton and Wm. E. McGregor as presidents. 
Most of the ordinations took place Feb. 
22nd. 

Wed. 15. — James Lindley, James Wiles, 
John MuUcaron and Robert Nicholson 
were killed by a snowslide, while asleep 
in their tent in City Creek Canyon. 

Thurs. 16. — Luther William Glazier, for- 
merly a member of the Mormon Battalion, 
died at Provo, Utah Co. 

Wed. 22.— Geo. Barzee and John Boice, 
jun., perished in the snow, near Franklin, 
Cache Valley. 

March. The people in the Utah Dixie 
settlements suffered much for the want of 
breadstuff, and several of the northern 
counties were infested with the measles. 

Sat. 4. — A grand celebration on the oc- 
casion of the re -inauguration of President 
Abraham Lincoln, was held in G. S. L 
City. 

Mon. 13. — Wm. Millard's house, in the 
20th Ward, G. S. L. City, was destroyed 
by lire, and a little girl burned to death 
and buried in the ruins. 

April. Thiirs. 6".— The 35th annual con- 
ference of the Church convened in the 
Tabernacle, G. S. L. City, and continued 
until the 9th. 

Sun. .9. — John Lowry had a quarrel with 
the Indian chief Jake, in Manti, Sanpete 
Co., Utah, the Indians boasting of having 
killed stock belonging to the citizens. 

Mon. 10. — A small party of men from 
Manti was fired upon by the Indians, near 
Twelve Mile Creek, Saapete Co., and 
young Peter Ludvigsen killed and muti- 
lated by the savages. The same evening 
Elijah B. Ward and James Anderson were 
killed and scalped by the Indians, in Salina 
Canyon, Sevier Co., who also drove away 
consideral»le stock. 

—A special conference, held in G. S. L. 
City, voted to erect a telegraph line 
through the settlements of Utah. 

Wed. 12.~Co\. Reddick N. Allred, with 
84 men, who pursued the Indians, had a 
dangerous encounter with them in the 
mountains, about fifteen miles east of 
Salina, during which Jens Sorenson, of 
Ephraim, and William Kearns, of Gun- 
nison, were killed. The company retreat- 
ed to Salina. 

-The brig Me.cicano sailed from Port 



Elizabeth, South Africa, with 47 Saints on, 
board, under the presidency of Miner G, 
Atwood, bound for Utah. The company 
arrived in New York, June 18th. 

Sat. 15. — News having reached G. S. L. 
City of the assassination of President 
Abraham Lincoln, all business houses in 
the city were closed, and the whole mu- 
nicipality was placed in a state of mourn- 
ing. 

Jfo7i. 17. — The dead bodies of Sorensen 
and Kearns were secured and brought to 
Salina. 

Sat. 29. — The ship Belle IFoocZ sailed from 
Liverpool with 636 Saints on board, bound 
for Utah, under the direction of Wm. H. 
Shearman. The company landed at New- 
York June 1st, and arrived at Wyoming, 
Neb., on the 15th. 

May. Mon. 1. — About sixty mission- 
aries, called at the late conference, were 
set apart at the Historian's Office, G. S. L. 
City. 

Wed. .3.— Pres. Brigham Young, accom- 
panied by five of the Twelve and other 
brethren, left G. S. L. City on a trip to- 
Cache Valley, from which they returned 
on the 11th. 

3fon. 8. — The packet ship B. S. Kimball 
sailed from Hamburg, Germany, with 557 
Saints, under the direction of Anders W. 
Winberg. The company landed in New 
York June 15th and arrived at Wyoming 
June 26th. 

Wed. 10. — A company of 24 Saints, under 
the direction of Wm. Underwood, sailed 
from Liverpool on board the ship David 
Hoadley, bound for Utah. 

Thurs. 18. — A company, consisting of' 
nine missionaries, eleven women, eighteen 
children and six teamsters, left G. S. L. 
City, bound for the Hawaiian Islands. 
Geo. Nebeker was appointed captain ; the 
company had ten wagons. -t 

Sat. 20. — Elder Jesse Yelton Cherry, or 
Centreville, Davis Co., Utah, died of small 
pox in Nottingham, England, where he 
labored as a missionary, i 

Mon. 22. — The missionaries bound for the 
East were organized, with Bishop Wm. B. 
Preston as captain. 

Thurs. 25. — Jens Larsen, a sheep herder, 
was killed by Indians about four miles 
north of Fairview, Sanpete Co. 

Fri. 26. — John Given, his wife and four 
children, were murdered and their bodies 
fearfully mangled by Indians, near Thistle 
Valley, about twelve miles north of Fair- 
view, Sanpete Co. 

Sun. 28. — The Saints who were settling 
St. Joseph, on the Muddy (now in Neva- 
da), were organized as a branch of the 
Church, with Warren, Foote as president. 

Mon. 29. — David Hadlock Jones, a mem- 
ber of the Mormon Battalion, was killed 
by Indians, about three miles northwest of 
Fairview, Sanpete Co. 

June. Thurs. 8.— Col. O. H. Irish, su- 
perintendent of Indian affairs, made a 
treaty with the principal Indian chiefs in 
Utah, at Spanish Fork Reservation farm, 
in the presence of Brigham Young and 
other leading men. 

Sun. ii.— Hon. Schuyler Colfax, speaker 
of the U. S, House of Representatives, and' 
party, arrived in G. S. L. City. He re- 
mained until the 19th. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY 1865. 



73 



Mon. 12. — Schuyler Colfax and two of 
his companions, Lieut.- Gov. -Bross, of Il- 
linois, and Albert D. Richardson, war cor- 
respondent of the Tribune, addressed the 
citizens in front of the Salt Lake House. 

Tues. 13.— Gov. James D. Doty died in 
G. S. L. City. 

iSat. 17. — The Saints who had settled on 
Chalk creek, above Coalville, Summit 
Co., Utah, were organized as a branch 
of the Church, named Upton ; Joseph Huff, 
president. 

Sun. 18. — A petition was drafted to An- 
drew Johnson, President of the United 
Stated, asking for the appointment of Col. 
O. H. Irish to the governorship of Utah. 
It was signed by 250 leading citizens. 

Sat. 2J.— Patriarch Isaac Morley died at 
Fairview, Sanpete Co. 

Thurs. 29. — Lars Petersen, a benevolent 
young man, who had assisted some twenty 
Danish Saints to emigrate, was drowned 
in a small stream, called the Weeping 
Waters, near Wyoming, Neb. 

July. Sat. jf.— The 70th quorum of 
Seventy was organized in Davis Co., Utah, 
with Wm. H. Lee, L. S. Burnham, Samuel 
Bryson, sen., Andrew Dalrymple, A. D. 
Boynton, Henry Tingey and Israel Bar- 
low, jun., as presidents. Nearly all the 
brethren who became members of the 
quorum resided in Bountiful and Centre - 
ville. 

Ttces. 4. — The national holiday was re- 
membered in G. S. L. City, by a grand cel- 
ebration. 

— Hon. J. M. Ashley, of Ohio, chairman 
of the Committee on Territories, in Con- 
gress, arrived in G. S. L. City, on a visit. 

Thurs. 6. — Francis A. Hammond and 
George Nebeker arrived at the Laie plan- 
tation, Hawaiian Islands. 

J^ri. 7. — Pres. Brigham Young, several of 
the Twelve and others left G. S. L. City on 
a missionary trip to Sanpete County, from 
which they returned on the 19th, having 
traveled about three hundred miles and 
held eighteen meetings. 

Fri. 14. — Robert Gillespie and Anthony 
Robinson were killed by Indians, near Sa- 
lina, Sevier Co. 

Sat. 15. — Chas. Durkee, of Wisconsin, 
was appointed governor of Utah. 

Tues. IS. — The militia under Warren S. 
Snow surprised a party of hostile Indians, 
killed twelve and routed the rest, in Grass 
Valley. The command then went east to 
Green river and suffered much by long 
marches and for want of supplies. 

Mon. 24. — The people of southern Utah 
celebrated the day in the pines, 2}i miles 
above Pine Valley, Washington Co. 

— Hon. J. M. Ashley addressed an audi- 
ence in the Bowery, G. S. L. City, at the 
celebration of the Territorial anniversary. 

Wed. 26. — The Indians attacked Glen- 
wood, Sevier Co., Utah, wounded a man 
and drove off nearly all the stock belong- 
ing to the settlement. 

3fon. 31. — A provost guard of soldiers, 
who for some time had been stationed in 
front of the Tabernacle, on the south side 
of South Temple Street, in G. S. L. City, 
was removed. 

August.— Brigham Young, jun., suc- 
ceeded Daniel H. Wells as president of 
the European mission. 



Tues. 1. — Pres. Brigham Young and a 
party of brethren left .G. S. L. City on a 
missionary trip to Cache Valley, return- 
ing on the 10th. 

— After seven months' unsuccessful la- 
bors. Apostle Orson Pratt. and William W. 
Riter left Vienna, Austria, on their return 
to England. They arrived at Liverpool 
Aug. 6th. 

Thurs. 3. — James Davis, one of the 
Mormon Battalion, died suddenly in G. S. 
L. City. 

Wed. 23. — A book, entitled "Joseph 
Smith the Prophet,*' by Lucy Smith, the 
Prophet's mother, published by Orson 
Pratt and Samuel W. Richards, in Eng- 
land, was condemned for its inaccuracy, 
by the First Presidency and Twelve 
Apostles. 

Fri. 25. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
others left G. S. L. City on a missionary 
trip to Tooele County, from which they 
returned on the 27th. 

September. Mon. 4. — Pres. Brigham 
Young and others left G. S. L. City on a 
trip to southern Utah. After holding a 
number of meetings in the iatervening 
settlements, the comi^any arrived in St. 
George on the 15th, and on the 29th re- 
turned to G. S. L. City. 

Fri. 15. — An agricultural fair was held 
in St. George, Utah. 

Mon. IS.— Col. O. H. Irish made a treaty 
with the Piede Indians, at Pinto, Wash 
ington Co., Utah. 

Thurs. 2i.— General Warren S. Snow 
had an engagement with the Indians, near 
Fish lake, 80 miles east of Circleville. 
Seven Indians were killed, and Snow and 
two of his men wounded. 

Fri. 22.— Captain Miner G, Atwood's 
company of immigrating Saints was at- 
tacked by Indians west of Fort Laramie. 
Several of the brethren were wounded and 
one 'woman (Mrs. Grundtvig) carried 
away by the savages. 

Sat. ,30.— Charles Durkee, Utah's sixth 
governor, arrived in G. S. L. City. He 
took the oath of office Oct. 3rd. 

October. Sun. i.— The 71st quorum of 
Seventy was organized at Nephi, Juab Co., 
with Edward Oakey, Samuel Claridge, 
Edwin Harley. Daniel Miller, John Kienke, 
Charles Sperry and Benjamin Riches as 
presidents. 

Sat. 7.— Pres. Daniel H. Wells, who had 
presided over the European mission, ar- 
rived in G. S. L. City. 

Sioi. S.— The semi-weekly Deseret Xews 
was first issued. 

Tues. 10. — The surviving members of 
Zion's Camp had a feast in the Social Hall, 
G. S. L. City. 

Tues. i7.— Morten Pedersen Kuhr and 
wife, Elizabeth Petersen, Wm. Thorpe, 
Soren N. Jespersen, Benj. J. Black and 
Wm. T. Hite were killed by Indians, under 
the chief Black Hawk, near Ephraim, San- 
pete Co. 

— A company of Saints, bound for Utah, 
sailed from Melbourne, Australia, on 
board the barque Albert. 

Sun. 22. — Foster Gordon and wife were 
found murdered in Skull Valley. Four 
discharged soldiers were suspected of the 
crime. 



74 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1«66. 



November.— The first Hebrew marriage 
in G. S. L. City was celebrated. 

Wed. i.— Elder Geo. Simms, of G. S. L. 
€ity, returning home from a mission to 
England, was drowned in the Platte river. 

HV(7. S.— Capt. Miner G. Atwood's com- 
pany of immigrants, which had left Wyo • 
ming, July 31st, with 45 wagons and about 
four hundred souls, arrived at G. S. L. 
City. 

Thnrs. 9.— Pres. Brigham Young issued 
a circular to the Bishops and presiding El- 
ders in the Church, calling upon them to 
assist in the erection of a telegraph line 
through the settlements. 

—Capt. Henson Walker's company of 
immigrating Saints, which had started 
from Wyoming, Aug. 12th, arrived at G. S. 
L. City. 

Thurs. 2.J.— Faust's livery stables, on 
2nd South Street, G. S. L. City, were 
destroyed by fire. 

Wi'd. 2.9.— Capt. Wm. S. S. Willis' ox 
train of immigrating Saints, which started 
from Wvoming, Aug. l.'Jth, arrived at G. S. 
L. City.' The women and children had ar- 
rived previously with relief teams, sent 
out about three hundred and fifty miles to 
meet the immigrants. 

December. Mon. lU-The filteenth 
session of the Utah legislature convened 
in the State House, G. S. L. City, and or- 
ganized by appointing Geo. A. Smith presi- 
dent of the Council, and John Taylor 
speaker of the House. 

Thnrs. i^.— Hon. Wm. H. Hooper, Utah's 
delegate to Congress, left G. S. L. City 
for Washington, D. C. 

Man. 18.— A number of Piede Indians, 
made a break on Kanab, Kane Co., Utah, 
and stole some liorses. 

Sat. 23.— Wm. Naylor, of West Jordan, 
Salt Lake Co., froze to death, while re- 
turning from Cottonwood mill. 

»S'M«. 24.— John Singleton, of American 
Fork, Utah Co., froze to death, near Lehi. 

The winter of 1865-66 was very cold and 
severe in Utah. 



1866. 

The Indian war in southern Utah con- 
tinued, and a number of the smaller settle- 
ments were abandoned by the settlers. 
Ten Church trains were sent to the Mis- 
souri river for the poor. The rock aque- 
duct on North Temple Street, G. S. L. 
City, was built. A meeting house, 36x24, 
feet, was erected by the Saints at Laie, 
Hawaiian Islands. 

January. Mon. 1. — Thefir.st number of 
the Jiivemle Instructor was published in 
G. S. L. City ; George Q. Cannon, editor. 

Tues. 2. — The members of the city coun- 
cil of G. S. L. City met for the first time 
in their new hall, or city building, recently 
erected on the corner of First East and 
First South streets. 

Alon. 8. — Dr. James M. Whitmore and 
Robert Mclntire wei'e killed by Piede 
Indians, near the Pipe Springs" ran eh 
Kane Co., Utah. 

Sat. 20.— The dead bodies of Whitmore 



and Mclntire were found about four miles 
from the Pipe Springs herd house by a 
company of armed men, who also sur- 
prised the murderers camped in a narrow 
gulch, about twelve miles distant, and 
killed seven of them. 

February. Tues. 6.— Titus Billings, a 
Church veteran, died at Provo. 

Jfon. 12.— At the municipal election, 
Daniel H. Wells was elected mayor of G. 
S. L. City. 

March. Sat. ,3.— The Utah Produce 
Company was organized in G. S. L. City, 
with Bishop Edward Hunter as chairman. 
Snn. 4.— The 72nd quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Little Cottonwood, Salt 
Lake Co., with Daniel S. Cahoon, Robert 
Maxfield, Richard Maxfield, Henry W. 
Brown, Willis Smith, Nathan Tanner, jun., 
and Wm. James Panter as presidents. 

Wed.7.—Wm. Poulter was accidentally 
killed in Ogden Canyon, while logging. 

Thitrs. 8. — Carl Widerborg, president of 
the Scandinavian Mission, was arrested in 
Copenhagen, Denmark, on a trumped up 
charge of seduction. After five days' im- 
prisonment he was released, and shortly 
after honorably acquitted. 

April, ^^on. 2. — Joseph and Robei't 
Berrj', and the latter's wife,were killed by 
Indians, about four miles from Maxfield's 
ranch, on Short Creek, Kane Co., Utah. 

— S. Newton Brassfield was shot in G. S. 
L. City by some unknown person. He had 
seduced another man's wife. This caused 
quite an excitement among the anti-Mor- 
mons, and an attempt was made to have 
more troops forwarded to Utah. 

Fri. r?.— The thirty-sixth annual confer- 
ence convened in G. S. L. City and con- 
tinued until the 8th. 

Wed. i,9.— The Indian chief Sanpitch was 
killed at the mouth of Birch Canyon, be- 
tween Moroni and Fountain Green, San- 
pete Co. 

Fri. 20.— The Indians attacked Salina, 
Sevier Co., drove off about two hundred 
head of stock and killed two men, who were 
guarding them. Soon afterwards the set- 
tlers vacated Salina and removed to Gun- 
nison, Sanpete Co. 

Sun. 22. — Alfred Lewis was killed and 
three others were wounded by Indians, near 
Marysvale, Piute Co., Utah. 

Fri. 21. — A gang of soldiers from Camp 
Douglas shot at and insulted a number 
of citizens in the east part of G. S. L. 
City. 

Sun. 2.9. — Andrew Petersen was reported 
killed and Thos. Jones Avery wounded 
while on picket guard, near Fairview, San- 
pete Co. 

Mon. .>'«.- The ship John Bright sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 747 (or 764) 
Saints, under the direction of C. M. Gillet. 
The company landed at New York June 
6th, and arrived at Wyoming June 19th, 
traveling by way of New Haven (Conn.), 
Montreal (Canada), Deti*oit, Chicago, 
Quincy (111.) and St. Joseph (Mo.). 

May. — The Church trains, which this 
year went to the Missouri river for the 
poor, left G. S. L. City in ten companies. 
They numbered 10 captains, 4.56 teamsters, 
49 mounted guards, 89 horses, 134 mules, 
3,042 oxen and 397 wagons : 62 wagons, 50 
oxen and 61 mules were sent for. 



CHUKCII CHRONOLOGY — 1^6(5. 



to 



— A company of armed militia from Salt 
Lake and Utah Counties was sent out to 
assist the settlers in Sanpete and Sevier 
Valleys in protecting themselves against 
the Indians. 

— The 73rd quorum of Seventy was or- 
ganized at South Cottonwood, G. S. L. Co., 
with James Winchester, Harvey E. HuUin- 
ger, Jonas Ericksen, Charles Wilkins, Tho- 
mas A. Wheeler, Peter Ericksen and 
James Maxfield as presidents. 

— The settlers of Piute County moved 
into Circleville, because of Indian troubles. 

Tues. 1. — President Brigham Young in- 
structed the people in Sanpete, Piute and 
Sevier Counties to collect together in 
bodies of not less than 150 men, arm them- 
selves well, protect their stock from the 
Indians, etc. 

Wed. 2. — Mr. Thurston's three year old 
daughter was stolen by Indians, near 
Mendon, Cache Co. She was never re- 
covered. 

Sat. 5. — A Congressional act was ap- 
proved, giving to Nevada a strip of coun- 
try 60 miles wide, containing 20,850 square 
miles, which was formerly a part of Utah. 

— The ship Caroline sailed from 
London, England, with 389 Saints, under 
the presidency of Samuel H. Hill. It ar- 
rived at New York June 11th, and the 
company continued the journey by steam- 
boats and railroad to Wyoming. 

Sim. 6. — At a conference held at St. 
George, Utah, the Saints residing in Pine 
"Valley, at Pinto, Shoal Creek (Hebron), 
and Mountain Meadows, were organized as 
a Ward, called Pine Valley, with Robert 
Gardner as Bishop; the settlements in 
Long Valley, Kane Co., were organized 
into the Long Valley Ward, and the settle- 
ments in Clover, Meadow, Eagle and 
Spring Valleys, Nevada, were organized 
into a Ward, called Panacea, with John 
Nebeker as acting Bishop; Thos. S. Smith 
was sustained as president and Bishop of 
the settlements on the lower Muddy, 
(now in Nevada). 

Wed. 16. — Christian Larsen, of Spanish 
Fork, Utah Co., was killed by Indians 
while herding cows. 

Sun. 20. — A woman in Springville, Utah 
Co., shot and killed a man, who tried to 
seduce her. 

Wed. 23. — The ship American Congress 
(third ship of the season from Europe) 
sailed from London, England, with 350 
Saints, under the direction of John Nichol- 
son; it arrived at New York July 4th, and 
the emigrants reached Wyoming July 14th. 

Fri. 25. — The shij} Kenilworth sailed 
from Hamburg, Germany, with 684 Scandi- 
navian Saints, under the direction of 
Samuel L. Sprague. The company landed 
in New York July 17th and arrived at 
Wyoming July 29th. 

Wed. 30. — The ship Arkivright sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 450 Saints, 
under the direction of Justin C. Wixom. 
It arrived at New York July 6th. 

— A small company of Saints (26 souls) 
sailed from London, England, on the ship 
Cornelius Grinnel, bound for Utah. They 
arrived at New York July 11th. 

Thurs. 31. — The first circumcision of a 
Hebrew child in G. S. L. City took place. 



June. — The settlements on the Sevier 
river, south of Richfield, were broken up, 
because of Indian troubles, and the in- 
habitants sought protection in the larger 
towns. 

Fri. i.— The ship favour sailed from 
Hamburg, Germany, with 201 Scandinavian 
Saints, under the direction of Niels Niel- 
sen. The company arrived in New York, 
July 31st, and at Wyoming, Aug. Hth. 

Sat. 2. — The ship Humboldt sailed from 
Hamburg, Germany, with 328 Scandi- 
navian Saints, under the direction of Geo. 
M. Brown. The company arrived in New 
York, July 18th, and at Wyoming, Aug. 
1st. 

Wed. <>. — A severe wind storm did much 
damage in southern Utah. 

— The ship St. Jfarf: sailed from Liver- 
pool, England, with 104 Saints, under the 
direction of A. Stevens. It arrived at 
New York, July 26th. 

Sun. 10. — The Indians made a raid on 
Round Valley, Millard Co., driving away 
three hundred head of cattle and horses, 
and killing James Ivie and Henry Wright. 

Jfon. 11. — Gen. Daniel H. Wells and some 
militia started for Sanpete Valley, to pro- 
tect the settlements in that and adjacent 
counties, against the Indians. 

Sun. 24. — The Indians made a raid on 
Thistle Valley, Sanpete Co., killed Charles 
Brown, wounded Thos. Snarr and drove 
off 26 horses. 

Tues. 26. — The Indians drove off a band 
of horses and cattle from Spanish Fork, 
Utah Co. A company of men followed and 
overtook the thieves; a battle ensued, in 
which Jonathan Edmiston, of Manti, was 
killed, and others were wounded. Most of 
the stock was recovered. 

August, Jfon. ?0.— Elder C. M. Gillet 
died on the plains, 23 miles west of Fort 
Kearney, while returning fi'om a mission 
to England. 

Tues. 21. — A flood did great damage in 
Sevier County. 

September, Tues. 4. — Capt. Thos, E. 
Ricks' train of immigrating Saints, con- 
sisting of 46 wagons and 251 passengers, 
arrived in G. S. L. City. 

Wed. 5. — Capt. Samuel D. White's mule 
train, which had left Wyoming, July 7th, 
with 230 immigrants, arrived at G. S. L. 
City. 

Sat. 15. — Capt, Wm, Henry Chipman's 
train of immmigrants, which had left 
Wyoming July 13th, arrived at G, S. L. 
City. About one hundred head of cattle 
were stolen from this company by Indians, 
on the plains. 

Tues. 25. — Capt. John D. HoUaday's ox 
train of immigrating Saints, which h?d 
started from Wyoming July 19th, arrived 
in G. S.L.City. 

Sat. 29. — Capt, Peter Nebeker's train 
of 62 wagons and nearly four hundred im- 
migrants, which had started from Wyom- 
ing Aug. 4th, arrived at G. S. L. City. 

— Capt. Daniel Thompson's ox train of 
immigrants, which had left Wyoming 
July 25th, with 84 wagons and about five 
hundred immigrants, arrived at G. S. L, 
City. 

October. 3fon. 1. — Capt. Joseph. S. 
Rawlins' ox train of 65 wagons and over 
four hundred passengers,which had started 



76 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — ll!<67. 



from Wyoming Aug. 2nd, ari'ived at G. S. 
L. City. 

Am«. 7.— Part of Capt. Arza E. Hink- 
ley's relief train, whicii was sent back 450 
miles to meet the last companies, returned 
to G. S. L. City, with 87 passengers from 
Capt. Abner Lowry's train. 

Mon. 8.— Capt. Andrew H. Scott's ox 
train, which had started from Wyoming, 
Aug. 8th, with 49 wagons and about three 
hundred immigrants, arrived at G. S. L. 
City. About thirty of the immigrants 
died on the journey. 

Wed. 10.— The surviving members of 
Zion's Camp had a reunion at the Social 
Hall, G. S. L. City. 

Mon. 15.— Capt. Horton D. Haight's train 
of 65 wagons, bringing the wire for the 
Deseret Telegraph Line, arrived at G.S.L. 
City. 

Mon. 22.— Captain Abner Lowry's train 
of immigrating Saints, the last company 
of the season, arrived at G. S. L. City. It 
had started from Wyoming Aug. 13th. A 
great number of immigrants died of 
cholera on the journey. 

—Dr. J. King Robinson was killed in G. 
S. L. City. 

Ttics. 2.j'.— John P. Lee's ranch, on South 
creek, about eight miles from Beaver, was 
attacked by Piute Indians, who fired the 
house and wounded Josei^h Lillywhite. 

November. J^^i. 30. — Elder Abel 
Evans, missionary from Utah, died at 
Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. 

December. Sat. L— The Deseret Tel- 
egraph Line was opened between Salt 
Lake City and Ogden. On the 8th it 
was opened to Logan and on the 28th to 
Manti. 

iSun. 9. — The 16th session of the Utah 
legislature convened at G. S. L. City and 
organized by electing Geo. A. Smith pre- 
sident of the Council, and John Taylor 
speaker of the House. 

Thurs. 20. — In a letter, addressed to the 
"Leaders of the Mormon Church", a num- 
ber of Gentile merchants in G. S. L. City, 
proposed to leave the Territory if Brigham 
Young would buy them out. A character- 
istic reply from Pres. Young the following 
day was the result, and their proposition 
was declined. 

Thurs. 27. —"Dutch Charley", a burglar, 
was shot and killed in G. S. L. City, while 
in the act of stealing. 



1867. 

The Indian difficulties in the South, 
known as the BlackHawk war, became more 
serious; companies of militia were sent 
from the North to protect the settlers ; but 
nearly all the settlements on the upper 
Sevier and those in Kane County were de- 
serted by their inhabitants, who moved to 
the older and stronger towns for safety. 
Grasshoppers destroyed the crops in differ- 
ent parts of the Territory. No Church 
teams were sent this year to the Missouri 
river for the poor, in consequence of 



which the immigration was compara- 
tively small. 

January. — The Utah legislature pe- 
titioned Congress to repeal the anti- big- 
amy law of 1862, and the general assembly 
of Deseret prayed for admission into the 
Union as a State. 

— The Indians made a raid on Pine Val- 
ley, Washington Co., and captured a band 
of horses. Capt. Andrus, with a com- 
pany of cavalry, followed them, recovered 
most of the horses and killed seven In- 
dians. 

3fon. "i. — John Lowry, sen., one of the 
first settlers of Sanpete Valley, died at 
Manti. 

Tues. y.5.— The Deseret Telegraph Line 
was opened to St. George. 

Wed. 23. — Amasa M. Lyman, in a com- 
munication addressed to the Latter - day 
Saints in all the world, acknowledged his 
doctrine, annulling the atonement of Jesus 
Christ, to be false. 

February. Sun. 24. — The Saints who 
had settled west of the river Jordan, west 
of G. S. L. City, were organized into a 
Ward called Brighton, with Andrew W. 
Cooley as Bishop. 

Mon. 25. — Patriarch Mark Anthony 
Coombs died at Beaver, Utah, 

Tues. 26. — James W. Huntsman died at 
Shoal Creek, Washington Co., Utah. 

March. Thurs. 21.— The Deseret Tele- 
graph Co., incorporated Jan. 18, 1867, was 
organized, with Brigham Young as presi- 
dent. 

— The Indians made a raid on the stock 
of Richfield and Glenwood, Sevier Co. 
killing Jens Peter Petersen and wife 
(Charlotte Amalie) and Miss Smith, all of 
Richfield. 

Fri. 29. — Geo. Davis was accidentally 
killed near G. S. L. City, 

April. Sat. 0. — The 37th annual confer- 
ence of the Church was commenced in G. 
S. L. City. It was continued till the 8th. 

Sat. 20. — Richfield, Sevier Co., was de- 
serted by its inhabitants because of Indian 
trouble. About the same time the other 
settlements in Sevier and those in Piute 
County were abandoned for the same 
cause, as well as the settlements of Berry- 
ville, Winsor, Upper and Lower Kanab, 
Shunesberg, Springdale and Northup, and 
many ranches in Kane County ; also the 
settlements of Panguitch and Fort Sand- 
ford, in Iron County. 

Mon. 22. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
company left G. S. L. City, on a tour to 
"Dixie," from which they returned May 
15h, after traveling seven hundred miles. 

June. Sat. 1. — Lois Lund was killed 
and Jasper Robertson wounded, near 
Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., by Indians, 
who also drove off 40 horses. 

— Twenty Saints sailed from London, 
England, on the ship Hudson, bound for 
Utah. The vessel arrived at New York 
July 19th. 

Su,n. 2. — Major John W. Vance, of Al- 
pine, Utah Co., and Heber Houtz, of G. S. 
L. City, were waylaid and killed by 
Indians on Twelve Mile creek,. Sanpete 
Co., Utah. 

Mon. 3. — Geo. W. Rogers was accident- 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1868. 



ally killed in G. S. L. City, by the falling of 
a bank of earth. 

Fri. 14. — The Indians made a raid on 
Beaver, Utah, and captured a large herd 
of stock. 

Fri. 21.— The steamship Manhattan 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 480 
Saints, under the direction of Archibald 
N. Hill. It arrived in New York July 4th, 
and the emigrants continued the journey 
to North Platte, a station on the Union 
Pacific Railroad, 391 miles west of Omaha. 
From that place the journey across the 
plains was commenced, Aug. 8th, with ox 
teams, under the direction of Capt. Leon- 
ard G. Rice, and the company arrived in 
G. S. L. City Oct. 5th. 

July. — Apostle Franklin D. Richards 
succeeded Brigham Young, jun, as presi- 
dent of ■^.he European mission. 

Sat. 6. — The Saints in Pine Valley, 
Washington Co., Utah, were organized in- 
to a separate Ward, with Wm. Snow as 
Bishop. 

Fri. 19. — The grasshoppers appeared in 
vast numbers and did great damage to the 
crops in Utah during the following few 
weeks. 

Sun. 21. — The Indians made a descent 
upon the stock on Little creek, near Paro- 
wan. Iron Co., but were driven back by a 
company of cavalry. 

Wed. 24. — Brigham Willard Kimball, a 
son of Heber C. Kimball, died on Pole 
creek, while returning from a mission to 
England. 

August. 5a<. .3.— Robert Todd, sen., of 
Tooele, was found dead on the Jordan 
bottoms, G. S. L. Co. 

Sun. 4. — Anson V. Call died on Laramie 
plains, while returning home from a mis- 
sion to England. 

Tues. 13. — The Indians made a raid on 
Springtown, Sanpete Co., killing James 
Meeks and Andrew Johansen. They also 
wounded another man and captured a 
band of horses. 

Tues. 20. — The Harmony branch, Wash- 
ington Co., Utah, was organized into a 
Ward by Apostle Erastus Snow, with 
Wilson D. Pace as Bishop. 

Sat. 24. — The Provo meeting house (81 
feet long and 47 feet wide, with a tower 80 
feet high) was dedicated. 
""September. Thurs. 5.— John Hay, of 
Capt. Wm. L. Binder's company of militia, 
was killed by Indians, near Fayette, San- 
pete Co. 

Wed. 18. — The Indians made another raid 
on Beaver, and drove off two hundred 
head of horses and cattle. 

October. Sun. 6. — The first conference 
held in the large Tabernacle, in G. S. L. 
City, was commenced. It continued until 
the 9th. This structure, which had just 
been completed, was 250 feet long and 150 
feet wide, with its immense roof, arched 
without a pillar. Height of interior, 68 
feet from floor to ceiling. During the 
conference 163 missionaries were called to 
strengthen the settlements in southern 
Utah, and the Saints were called upon to 
assist liberally the following year towards 
emigrating all the poor Saints from Great 
Britain. On the 8th Joseph F. Smith was 
chosen to fill the vacancv in the Council of 



the Twelve Apostles, occasioned by the 
apostasy of Amasa M. Lyman. 

Tues. 22.— Vilate Murray Kimball, wife 
of Pres. Heber C. Kimball, died in G. S. L. 
City. 

November, l^ed. 13.— The Union Pa- 
cific Railway was completed to Cheyenne. 

Thurs. 21.— The first number of the 
Deseret Evening Xeics was issued in G. S. 
L. City; Geo. Q. Cannon, editor. 

December. Sat. I. — Benjamin String- 
ham was appointed to preside over the 
Saints at Bennington (now Leeds) and 
Harrisburg, Washington Co., Utah, as 
acting Bishop. 

Tues. 17.— Bishop Caleb G. Edwards died 
at Ephraim, Sanpete Co. 

Tues. 24. — Millersburgh and other small 
towns in southern Utah, on the Rio 
Virgen, were almost completely destroyed 
by a flood. 

Wed. 25. — John James and wife, of Wil- 
lard, Box Elder Co., were accidentally 
drowned in Sand creek. 



1868. 

During this year the grasshoppers did 
much damage to the crops in Utah, and 
many of the farmers, as well as others, 
sought employment on the Union Pacific 
Railroad, which was now being built 
through the Territory. Names changed to 
Salt Lake City and County. Church teams 
were sent east for the last time to bring 
in the immigration. 

January. Tues. 7. — Geo. R. Galloway 
froze to death near Kamas, Summit Co., 
Utah. 

Jfon. 13.— The 17th annual session of the 
Utah legislature convened in G. S. L. City 
and organized by appointing Geo. A. 
Smith president of the Council, and John 
Taylor speaker of the House. 

Fri. 17. — The first number of the Utah 
3fagazine was published in G. S. L. City, 
Elias L. T. Harrison editor. 

Wed. 22. — The first number of Our I)i.vie 
Ti)nes, a weekly paper, edited and pub- 
lished by Joseph E.Johnson, at St. George, 
Utah, was issued. In the following May 
it changed name to the Hio Virgen Times. 
Wed. 29. — A legislative act was approved, 
changing the names of Great Salt Lake 
City and Great Salt Lake County to Salt 
Lake City and Salt Lake County. On the 
same day an act, changing the name of 
Richland County to Rich County (Utah) , 
was approved. 

February. Thurs. 13. — A legislative 
act incorporating Morgan City, Morgan 
Co., Utah, was approved. 

3fon. 17. — Hiram B. Clawson and Wm. 
C. Staines, who had been appointed Church 
emigration agents this season, left Salt 
Lake City for the East, with .?27,000 to be 
used for gathering the poor. This year 
about seventy thousand dollars was raised 
for the emigration of the poor Saints, 
mainly from Great Britain, an extra effort 
being made on the part of the Saints in 
Utah for that purpose. 

March. Sun. 2.9.— The 74th quorum of 



CHURCH CHHONOLOCiY — 1808. 



Seventy was partly organized at Far- 
mington, Davis Co., with Lot Smith, James 
T. Smith, Oliver L. Robinson, John Leavit, 
Philander Brown, Ellas Vanfieet and 
Charles Wm. Stayner as presidents. 

April. Sat. 4. — Bishop Frederick Ol- 
son's company of settlers was attacked by 
Indians near the Rocky Ford of the Se- 
vier river, between Salina and Richfield. 
During the fight which ensued, Lars Alex. 
Justesen and Charles Wilson were killed 
and others wounded. 

3fon. 6. — The 38th annual conference of 
the Church, which was continued for three 
days, was commenced in Salt Lake City. 

Man. 13. — Heber M. Walker of Pleasant 
Grove, Utah Co., was accidentally killed 
by the stumbling of a horse. 

May. Thurs. 7. — Four Indians made a 
raid on Scipio, Millard Co., and drove off 
fifteen head of horses. 

Jfo)i. 11.— The citizens of Salt Lake City 
commenced an organized warfare against 
the grasshoppers, which appeared in great 
numbers. 

Sat. ie.— Samuel B. Reed, chief of con- 
struction on the Union Pacific Railroad, 
and Silas Seymour, constructing engineer, 
arrived in Salt Lake City, on business for 
their road. A few days later Pres. Brig- 
ha n Young took a contract to do the grad- 
ing on ninety miles of the road, and great 
numbers of men from the valleys turned 
out to labor on it. By this means money 
became more plentiful in the Territory. 

Thurs. 21. — Jeremiah Willey, formerly 
a member of the Mormon Battalion, died 
at Bountiful, Davis C. 

June. — The Union Iron Company com- 
menced operations at Pinto, Iron Co. 

— The Indians continued ti'oublesome in 
Sanpete County, stole cattle and annoyed 
the settlers. 

/ hurs. 4. — The packet ship John Bright 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 722 
Saints (176 from Scandinavia), under the 
direction of James McGaw: the company 
arrived at New York July 13th, and at 
Laramie City, on the Union Pacific Rail- 
road, 573 miles west of Omaha, July 23rd. 

Mon. 8. — Joseph A. Young, Brigham 
Young, jun., and John W. Young left Salt 
Lake City for the head of Echo Canyon, as 
agents for Pres. Brigham Young, to let 
contracts for grading on the Union Pacific 
Railroad. 

Tues. .9. — Ground was broken for the 
Union Pacific Railroad at Devil's Gate, in 
Weber Canyon. 

Wed. 10. — A mass meeting in Salt Lake 
City passed resolutions in favor of assist- 
ing the Union Pacific Railroad through the 
Territory of Utah. 

Sun. 14. — The Star of ffie West, a vessel 
owned by Mr. Meredith, was wrecked on 
the Great Salt Lake, in a storm, while 
used by a surveying party. 

Afon. 15.— On this and the two following 
days, the Church teams, about five hundred 
in number, sent to the terminus of the 
Union Pacific Railroad this season for 
the poor, left Salt Lake City, under Cap- 
tains Edward T. Mumford, Joseph S. 
Rawlins, John G. Holman, William S. 
Seeley, John R. Murdock. Daniel D. Mc- 
Arthur, John Gillespie, Horton D. Haight, 
Chester Loveland and Simpson M. Molen. 



Wed. 17. — John Ager was found drowned 
in the Weber river, near Morgan, Utah. 

Sat. 20. — The packet ship Emerald Isle 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 876 
Saints, under the direction of Hans Jen- 
sen Hals. It arrived at New York harbor, 
after an unpleasant voyage, Aug. 11th. 
The emigrants landed on the 14th and ar- 
rived at Benton, on the Union Pacific Rail- 
road, about seven hundred miles west from 
Omaha, Aug. 2.5th. Thirty-seven deaths 
occurred on the ocean, and others died in 
the hospital in New York. 

3fon. 22. — Heber C. Kimball, first Coun- 
selor to Pres. Brigham Young, died in Salt 
Lake City. 

Tues. 2.1. — Latimer & Taylor's machine 
shops, in Salt Lake City, were destroyed 
by fire. Loss, $12,000. 

Wed. 24. — The packet ship Constitidion, 
the last sailing vessel which brought any 
large company of Saints across the Atlan- 
tic, sailed from Liverpool, England, with 
4.57 British, Swiss and German Saints, in 
charge of Harvey H. Cluff. It arrived at 
New York Aug. 5th, and the immigrants 
continued by rail to Benton. 

Thurs. 2.5.— Niels Christoffersen and Pe- 
ter Smith, of Manti, Peter Nielsen of Fair- 
view, Chr. Jensen and Chr. Nebellah, of 
Mount Pleasant, and Thos. Yeates, of Mill- 
ville, all belonging to the Church trains, 
were drowned at Robison's ferry,on Green 
river, by the capsizing of a boat. 

Tues. 30. — The stea,mshi\:) Mi nnesofa,Mvith 
534 Saints, under the direction of John 
Parry, sailed from Liverpool, England. It 
arrived at New York July 12th, and the 
immigrants reached Laramie City July 
22nd. 

July. Sat. ■^.— Water was first brought 
on the Provo bench, Utah Co., by means 
of a big canal just completed, from the 
Provo river. 

Sat. 11. — The Indians made a raid on a 
horse herd, near Ephraim, Sanpete Co., 
driving off some twelve head of horses. 
The herdsman gave chase, had a fight with 
the savages and recovered most of the 
animals. 

Tues. 14. — The steamship Colorado sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 600 Saints, 
under the direction of Wm. B. Preston. 
It arrived at New York, July 28th, and the 
company reached Benton, Aug. 7th. 

— Elder Ezra J. Clark, son of Ezra T. 
Clark, of Farmington, Davis Co., Utah, 
died near Fonda, Montgomery Co., N. Y., 
while returning from a mission to Great 
Britain, with the company of emigrants 
who crossed the Atlantic on the Min- 
nesota. 

Augu.st. ]/o«. ,7. — At the annual elec- 
tion in Utah, Wm. H. Hooper was re-elected 
delegate to Congress. 

Tues. /i,~David Fisher, of the 10th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was accidentally 
killed while working on the Union Pa- 
cific Railroad, in Weber Canyon. 

Tues. IS. — The settlement of St. Joseph, 
Arizona (on the Muddy), was partly des- 
troyed by fire. 

Wed. 19. — Col. F. H. Head, superintend- 
ent of Indian affairs, and Dimick B. Hun- 
tington, Indian interpreter, had a "big 
talk" with the Indians in Strawberry Val- 
ley, Uintah, and a treaty of peace was 



CHURCH CHltONOLOGY — 186H. 



79 



made with these Indians, who had raided 
the settlements in Sanpete Valley and 
other places. 

— Capt. John R. Murdock's mule train, 
which left Laramie City, July 27th, with 
50 wagons and about six hundred immi- 
grants, arrived at Salt Lake City ; six per- 
sons died on the journey. 

—Robert C. Sharkey was killed by the 
discharge of a gun, in Salt Lake City. 

Thnrs. 20. — Capt. Chester Loveland's 
mule train of 40 wagons and about four 
hundred passengers, which left Laramie 
City, July 25th, arrived in Salt Lake City. 
Two deaths occurreu on the journey. 

— Capt. Joseph S. Rawlins' mule train, 
consisting of 31 wagons and nearly three 
hundred passengers, which left Laramie 
City, July 25th, arrived in Salt Lake City. 
Two died on the journey. 

^^on. 2^.— Capt. Horton D. Haight's 
mule train, which left Laramie City July 
27th, with freight and 275 passengers, ar- 
rived in Salt Lake City. Six deaths oc- 
curred on the journey. 

Sat. 29. — Capt. Wm. S. Seeley's ox train 
of 39 wagons, which left Laramie City 
August 1st, with passengers (272 souls) 
from Williamsburg, N. Y., and freight, ar- 
rived in Salt Lake City. Four deaths oc- 
curred on the trip. 

September. — Albert Carrington suc- 
ceeded Apostle Franklin D. Richards as 
president of the European mission. 

Pres. Brigham Young spent most of the 
summer on preaching tours through the 
settlements. 

Wed. 2.— Capt. Simpson M. Molen's ox 
train of 61 wagons, which left Benton 
Aug. 13th, with freight and about three 
hundred passengers, and Capt. Daniel D. 
Mc Arthur's ox train of 61 wagons, which 
left Benton Aug. 14th with 411 passengers, 
arrived in Salt Lake City. One child died 
in the former and five children in the lat- 
ter company, on the journey. 

Tues. 15. — Capt. John Gillespie's ox 
train of 54 wagons and about five hundred 
immigrants, which left Benton Aug. 24th, 
arrived in Salt Lake City. 

Sun. 20. — At a special conference held 
at Nephi, Juab Co., and attended by Pres. 
Brigham Young and other leading men, 
Nephi was organized into a Stake of Zion, 
with Jacob G. Bigler as president. 

Thnrs. 24.— Capt. Edward T. Muraford's 
mule train of 28 wagons, which left Benton 
Sept. 1st, arrived in Salt Lake City with 
250 passengers. 

Fri. 25. — Capt. John G. Holman's ox 
train of 62 wagons, which left Benton 
Sept. 1st, arrived in Salt Lake City, with 
about six hundred and fifty immigrants. 
A number of the Saints died on the jour- 
ney. 

October. Thurs. i.— Apostle Franklin 
D. Richards and Chas. W. Penrose arrived 
in Salt Lake City from their foreign mis- 
sions. 

Tues. 6. — The general conference was 
commenced in Salt Lake City. It was 
continued three days. For the first time 
in Utah, a full quorum of the Twelve 
Apostles was present at conference. A 
number of missionaries were called to 
strengthen the southern settlements. On 
the 6th Geo. A. Smith was chosen as First 



Counselor to Pres. Brigham Young, in 
place of the late Heber C. Kimball, and 
Brigham Young, jun., was called to fill the 
vacancy caused thereby in the Council of 
Twelve Apostles. 

Fri. 9. — Brigham Young, jun., was set 
apart as one of the Twelve Apostles. 

Wed. l-l. — Henry Erikson was thrown 
from a wagon and killed, at Mill Creek,. 
Salt Lake Co. 

Thurs. 15. — Alexander Ott, an able and 
faithful Elder, died in Salt Lake City. 

Fri. 16. — Zion's Co-operative Mercantive 
Institution commenced operation in Salt 
Lake City, with Brigham Young as presi- 
dent. Co-operative stores were sliortly 
afterwards opened in most of the towns and 
settlements of the Territory. 

Sat. 17. — Samuel Dennis White died in 
Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 24. — A company of sixty-one immi- 
grants, who had been left from some of 
the companies, in New York, because of 
sickness, arrived in Salt Lake City, in 
charge of Fred. C. Anderson, having left 
New York Oct. 3rd. 

November. Sun. i5.— Agnes Taylor, 
wife of James Taylor and mother of Apos- 
tle John Taylor, died in Salt Lake City. 

Fri. 27. — Christian Jorgensen, of Salt 
Lake City, was accidentally killed, while 
working on the Union Pacific Railroad, on 
the Weber. 

December. Tztes. 8.— Daniel Spencer, 
president of the Salt Lake Stake of Zion, 
died in Salt Lake City. 

Wed. ,9. — Leonora Taylor, wife of Apos - 
tie John Taylor, died in Salt Lake City. 

Fri. ii.— Harlam P. Swett was killed 
near Lehi, Utah Co. The murderer es- 
caped. 

Sun. 20. — Patriarch Elisha H. Groves 
died at Kanarra, Iron Co. 

Tites. 22. — David Grant, one of the 
Utah Pioneers of 1847, died at Mill Creek, 
Salt Lake Co., Utah. 

Wed. 23. — Wm. Jennings' fine residence, 
in the I6th Ward, Salt Lake City, was 
dedicated. 

Tues. 29. — Bishop Jonathan O. Duke 
died at Provo. 

Wed. 30. — James Read and Richard 
Gibbs were accidentally killed, while la- 
boring on the Union Pacific Railroad, 
above Round Valley, on the Weber. 



1869 

This year the Saints residing in Millard 
and Beaver Counties and in Bear Lake 
Valley were organized into Stakes of Zion. 
The great Pacific railroad was completed 
through the Territory and a branch road 
built from Ogden to Salt Lake City. Mis- 
sionary labor was considerably revived in 
the United States. 

January.— The first general directory 
of Salt Lake City was compiled by Ed- 
ward L. Sloan. 

Fri. 1. — The first number of Der Stern, 
a monthly 16-page octavo periodical, pub- 
lished in the interest of the Church in 
Switzerland, in the German language, was 



80 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1869 



issued in Zurich ; Karl G. Maeser, editor 
and publisher. 

Mon. 11. — The 18th annual session of the 
Utah legislature convened in Salt Lake 
City and organized with Geo. A. Smith 
president of the Council and Orson Pratt 
speaker of the House. 

Fri. 15. — Ira Ames, a true and faithful 
Elder, died at WellsviUe, Cache Co. 

—The end of the Union Pacific Railroad 
track reached Echo, Summit Co. 

Tues. 1.9.— Elder .John Mace, missionary 
from Utah, died in Leeds, England. 

Thurs. 21. — An observatory was erected 
on the south-east corner of the Temple 
Block, Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 23. — Miss Augusta St. Clair, a tal- 
ented lecturess, died in Salt Lake City. 

Fri. 29. — Chauneey W. Millard, a mur- 
derer, was executed at Provo. 

February.- Patriarch Asahel Perry 
died at Springville, Utah Co. 

Wed. 3. — Simeon Carter, formerly a 
member of Zion's Camp and prominent in 
the Church, died at Brigham City, Box 
Elder Co. 

Jfon. 15. — Rio Virgen County, Utah, was 
created by act of the Utah legislature. 

Fri. 19. — The Utah legislature closed 
its 18th session. ZJ 

Thurs. 25. — The Navajo Indians in- 
vaded southern Ctah and stole stock at 
Harrisburgh. A number of armed men 
from St. George aiid other settlements 
started in pursuit. 

— Delegate Wra. H. Hooper, by an able 
speech in the House of Representatives, 
frustrated a plan to divide the Territory 
of Utah. 

March.— J/o>i. l.—Z. C. M. I. com- 
menced business in the Eagle Emporium, 
Salt Lake City. 

Mon. 8. — The Utah Central Railway 
company was organized, with Brigham 
Young as president. 

— A United States land ofSce was opened 
in Salt Lake City. 

— The University of Deseret was opened 
in the Council House, Salt Lake CiJ;y. 

— The L^nion Pacific Railroad was com- 
pleted to Ogden, and a celebration held 
there in honor of the event. 

Tues. 9. — At a special conference held in 
the State House, at Fillmore, MiUard Co., 
Utah, a Stake of Zion was organized in 
MiUard County, by Pres. Geo. A. Smith 
and Apostles Erastus Snow and Joseph F. 
Smith, with Thos. Callister as president. 
Daniel Thompson was sustained as Bishop 
of Scipio (Round VaUey), and Culbert 
King as Bishop of Kanosh. 

Fri. 12. — The Saints residing in Beaver 
County, Utah, were organized into the 
Beaver Stake of Zion, by Apostles Geo. 
A. Smith and Erastus Snow, with John R. 
Murdock as president. The town of 
Beaver was divided into two Wards, with 
Marquis L. Shepherd as Bishop of the First 
and John Ashworth as Bishop of the Sec- 
ond Ward. The villages of Greenville and 
Adamsville were organized into a third 
Ward, with David B. Adams, of Adams- 
ville, as Bishop. James McKnight was sus- 
tained as Bishop of Minersville. 

—Elder Carl Widerborg died suddenly 
at Ogden. 

Tues. 16. — Senator Pomerov introduced 



a bill in the U. S. Senate, to establish wo- 
man suffrage in Utah. 

Siin. 21. — Franklin B. WooUey, son of 
Bishop Edwin D. WooUey, of Salt Lake 
City, was kiUed by Indians, on the Mohave 
river, near San Bernardino, Cal. 

Thurs. 25. — Parowan, Iron Co., was di- 
vided into two Wards, with Herman D. 
Bayles as Bishop of the First and Samuel 
H. Rogers as Bishop of the Second Ward. 

— Corinne, Box Elder Co., on the Cen- 
tral Pacific Railroad, was located by non- 
Mormons. 

Sat. 27. — The 75th quorum of Seventy 
was organized at Ogden, with Archibald 
Macfarlane, David G. Nelson, Henry J. 
Newman, Joseph A. West, Sanford Bing- 
ham, jr., Wm. Stoker, Richard White and 
Ivar Isaacson as presidents. 

— Indians made a raid on the stock near 
Scipio, Millard Co., and took about one 
hundred head of cattle and horses. 

Sun. 28. — The 76th quorum of Seventy 
was organized in Weber County, with Wm. 
F. Critchlow, David H. Peery, Jeppe G. 
Folkman, Wm. Halls, James Barker, 
Enoch Farr and Edward Edwards as pre- 
sidents. 

April. Thurs. 1.— Major J. W. PoweU 
finished his explorations of the Colorado 
river. 

Sat. 3. — By action of the county court, 
St. Joseph, on the Muddy, was made the 
county seat of Rio Virgen County. 

Man. 5. — Three men were killed by a 
snowslide in MiU Creek Canyon, Salt 
Lake Co. 

Tues. 6'. — On this and the two following 
days the 39th annual conference of the 
Church was held in Salt Lake City; forty- 
six missionaries were called. 

Wed. U.—The dead body of John V. 
Long was found in a ditch, in Salt Lake 
City. 

Tues. 20.— Apostle Orson Pratt left Salt 
Lake City for New York, to publish the 
Book of Mormon in the Deseret alphabet. 

Sat. 24.— The Salt Lake Daity Telegraph 
was moved from Salt Lake City to Ogden. 

May. Mon. 10. — The great Pacific RaU- 
road was completed by the junction of the 
Union Pacific and Central Pacific Rail- 
roads, at Promontory, northwest of Ogden, 
Utah, where the last rail was laid aad the 
last spike (gold) driven, in the presence of 
the chief otBcers of both roads, and a large 
concourse of people. 

3fon. 17. — Ground was broken by Pres. 
Brigham Young at Ogden for the Utah 
Central Railway, a branch road soon af- 
terwards built from Ogden to Salt Lake 
City. 

June. Tues. 1. — The Provo Co-opera- 
tive Woolen Manufacturing Company was 
organized ; Brigham Young, president ; 
Abraham O. Smoot, vice president. A site 
for the factory was also selected, and Na- 
than Davis appointed architect. 

Wed. 2. — Elder Barnabas L. Adams, a 
Pioneer of 1847,died suddenly in City Creek 
Canyon, near Salt Lake City. 

— The Guion & Co's. steamship 3finne- 
sota sailed from Liverpool, England, with 
338 Saints, under the direction of Elias 
Morris. It arrived at New York June 14th. 

Fj-i. 11. — Elder Heman Hyde died in Salt 
Lake City. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY 1869. 



81 



Sat. 12. — James Davidson and wife died 
from want of water on the desert, between 
St. George and the settlements on the 
Muddy. 

Tues. 15. — Hon. B. Q. Wade, late pre- 
sident of the U. S. Senate, and Major- 
General Philip H. Sheridan and staff visit- 
ed Salt Lake City.' 

jSiin. 20. — The Saints residing in Bear 
Lake Valley were organized by Pres. 
Brigham Young into a Stake of Zion, with 
David P. Kimball as president. 

Fri. 23. — The first company of Latter- 
day Saint immigrants who came all the 
way from the Missouri river by rail arrived 
in Ogden by the U. P. R. R., in charge of 
Elias Morris. 

July. Fri. .9.— Senator L. Trumbull 
and the CI. icago Commercial party arrived 
in Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

Sat. 10. — The Chicago Commercial dele - 
gation, headed by Col. J. H. Bowen, called 
upon Pres. Brigham Young, in Salt Lake 
City. 

Thurs. 15. — The steamship Minnesota 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 598 
Saints, mostly from Scandinavia, under 
the direction of O. C. Olsen. The company 
arrived at New York July 28th, and at 
Taylor's Switch, near Ogden, Aug. 6th. 

Hun. 25. — The first shipment of Utah ore 
to California took place. It consisted of 
ten tons from the Monitor and Magnet 
mine. Little Cottonwood, shipped by Wood- 
hull Bros, to T. H. Selby, San Francisco. 

Mon. 26. — Thomas L. Frazier, formerly 
a member of the Mormon Battalion, died 
at Wanship, Summit Co., from the effects 
of stabbing inflicted a few days before by 
a Mr. Kilfoyle. 

fJi^Ved. 28. — The fine steamship Color-ado 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 365 
Saints, in charge of John E. Face. The 
company arrived at New York about Aug. 
10th, and at Ogdea Aug 20th. 

Sat. 31 . — Woodhull Bros, made the first 
shipment of copper ore, ten tons, from the 
Kingston mine, Bingham Canyon. 

August. — The grasshoppers destroyed a 
large portion of the growing crops in 
Cache, Washington, Kane and Iron Coun- 
ties ; other parts of the Territory escaped 
the visitation and gathered abundant 
crops. 

Sat. 21. — The Joint Congressional Com- 
mittee on retrenchment, including several 
distinguished statesmen, arrived in Salt 
Lake City, on a visit. 

Wed. 25. — Frederick Woesner was killed 
by unknown parties, at Montpelier, Rich 
Co.. Utah (now in Idaho). 

— The steamship Minnesota sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 443 Saints, in 
charge of Marius Ensign. The company 
arrived at New York Sept. 6th, and at Og- 
den Sept. 16. 

Mon. 30. — Geo. Francis Train delivered 
an interesting lecture in the Theatre, 
Salt Lake City. The following evening 
he lectured on the subjects, "Doctor, Law- 
yer and Clergyman." 

September. Fri. 3. — Apostle Ezra T. 
Benson died at Ogden, Utah. 

Fri. W.— John Goddard, son of Geo. God- 
dard, was accidentally drowned in the 
Jordan river, near Salt Lake City. 
7 



Sat. jt8.— Bishop Wm. W. Wall died at 
Provo. 

3fon. 20. — The Indians made a raid on 
Fairview, Sanpete Co., and stole eighteen 
head of horses. 

Wed. 22. — Tracklaying was commenced 
on the Utah Central Railway at Ogden. 

— The steamship Manhattan sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 239 Saints, in 
charge of Joseph Lawson. The company 
arrived at New York Oct. 7th, and at Og- 
den Oct. 16th. 

Sun. 26. — Apostle Orson Pratt arrived in 
Salt Lake City from his mission to the 
East. 

October. Sun. 3. — Vice - President 
Schuyler Colfax and party arrived in Salt 
Lake City, en route from California to the 
East. 

Tites. 5. — Vice-President Colfax de- 
livered a speech from the portico of the 
Townsend House, Salt Lake City, in which 
he praised the industries of the Mormon 
people, but denounced polygamy. This led 
to an important open correspondence be- 
tween Colfax and Apostle John Taylor. 

— A company of 40 Saints from Georgia 
and other States arrived at Ogden, in 
charge of Jesse W. Crosby, jun. 

Wed. 6. —The steamship Minnesota sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 294 Saints, 
in charge of James Needham. Tiie com- 
pany, which was the sixth ship-load of the 
season sailing from Liverpool, arrived at 
New York Oct. 17th, and at Ogden Oct. 
28th. By a collision with an express train, 
at Evanston, Oct. 27th, two of the immi- 
grants were killed and others wounded. 

Thurs. 7. — A mass meeting was held in 
Salt Lake City, with a view of again ap- 
pealing to Congress fortde admission of 
Utah into the Union as a State. 

Fri. 8. — About one hundred and ninety 
missionaries were called at the general 
conference, held at Salt Lake City, to go 
on missions. 

Sat. 9. — The surviving members of ZIon's 
Camp had a party in Salt Lake City, ar- 
ranged by Bishop Edward Hunter and 
Counselors. 

Mon. 18. — John Walker, a survivor of the 
Haun's Mills massacre, died at Farming- 
ton, Davis Co., Utah. 

Wed. 20. — The ground was broken for 
the Coalville and Echo Railway, in Sum- 
mit County. 

Mon. 25.— Ellas L. T. Harrison, Wm. S. 
Godbe and Eli B. Kelsey were excommu- 
nicated from the Church, by the High 
CouQcil, in Salt Lake City, for apostacy. 

Sun. 31. — Indians made a raid on the 
town of Kanarra, Iron Co., Utah,and drove 
off horses. 

November. Sun. 7. — At a conference 
held in St. George, Utah, the settlements 
of the Saints in southern Utah were or- 
ganized into a stake of Zion with Joseph 
W. Young as president, and Robert Gard- 
ner and Jas. G. Bleak as counselors; St. 
George was divided into four wards with 
David Milne, Henry Eyring, Walter 
Granger and Nathaniel Ashby as their re- 
spective bishops. Hebron and Clover 
Valley were organized into a Ward, with 
Geo. H. Crosby as Bishop. 

Mon. 8. — Carpenters began work on the 



82 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1870 



gallery in the New Tabernacle, Salt Lake 
City. 

i>un. 14. — The Saints who had settled on 
Cherry Creek, Malad Valley, Idaho, were 
organized into the Willow Springs branch 
of the Church, with Richard J. Davis as 
president. 

Thurs. IS. — Miss Annie Lockhart, a fav- 
orite actress, died in Salt Lake City. 

JHon. 22. — Ogden was decided upon as the 
junction of the Union Pacific and Central 
Pacific Railways. 

Wed. 24. — Stieet lamps were first used 
in Salt Lake City. 

Jfon. 29. — Emer Harris, brother of Mar- 
tin Harris, died at Logan, Utah. 

December. J/on. 6.— The Utah Cen- 
tral Railway was permanently opened for 
trafic from Ogden to Farmington. 

— Senator Aaron H. Cragin, of New 
Hampshire, introduced an anti-polygamy 
bill in the U. S. Senate. 

Sat. 18. — The Deseret Telegraph Line 
was extended to Franklin, Idaho. 

Sun. 19. — The "Godbeite Movement" be- 
gan to take definite shape. 

Thurs. 30. — Samuel Gould, formerly a 
member of the Mormon Battalion, died at 
Parowan, Iron Co. 



1870. 

The women of Utah were enfranchised. 
The Liberal Party was organized in Salt 
Lake City, and commenced its warfare 
against the "Mormons." The annual 
muster of the Utah militia was forbidden 
by Gov. Schaffer. Judge James B. McKean 
commenced his inglorious career in the 
Territory. Dr. Taggart, assessor of inter- 
nal revenue, made a despicable attempt to 
compel the Church to pay an enormous tax 
on tithing, but failed in his scheme. 

January. — Sat. 1. — The first number of 
the Ogden ./i<«c'</o«, a semi-weekly news- 
paper, was issued at Ogden, by the Ogden 
Junction Publishing Company ; Franklin 
D. Richards, editor. Later it was edited by 
Charles W. Penrose. The paper was con- 
tinued under that name until Feb. 14, 
1881. 

— The first number of the Jformon Tri- 
bune, a weekly paper, was published by 
the Godbeites, in Salt Lake City. 

Sun. 9.— Bishop Chauncey W'. West, of 
Ogden, died at San Francisco, Cal. 

Man. 10.— The last rail of the Utah Cen- 
tral Railway was laid and the last spike 
driven, at Salt Lake City, by Pres. Brig- 
ham Young, in the presence of 15,000 peo- 
ple. 

lues. 11. — The nineteenth annual ses- 
sion of the Utah legislature assembled in 
Salt Lake City, and organized by electing 
Geo. A. Smith president of the Council, 
and Orson Pratt speaker of the House. It 
was an important session. 

Wed. i2.— WoodhuU Bros, shipped the 
first car-load of ore over the Utah Central 
Railway. 

Thurs. 13. — A great mass meeting was 
held by the ladies of Salt Lake City, to 



protest against the passage of the Cullom 
anti- polygamy bill, which had been intro- 
duced in Congress. Similar meetings were 
subsequently held by the ladies in most of 
the settlements in the Territory. 

— The first coal shipped by rail, direct ta 
Salt Lake Citj', arrived there, consisting 
of two carloads from the W^asatch Coal 
Company's mines, consigned to Frederick 
A. H. F. Mitchell. 

February. — The "Liberal Party" of 
Utah was formed by a union of the Gen- 
tiles and Godbeites of Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 10. — A political mass meeting, 
appointed by the "Liberal Party" of Salt 
Lake City and held in Walker's old store, 
was carried by the "People's Party." 

Fri. 12. — An act passed bv the legis- 
lature, conferring the elective franchise 
upon the women of Utah, was approved 
by Acting-Governor S. A. Mann. 

Thurs. 17. — Some soldiers from Camp 
Douglas beat an Indian boy and fired on 
the police, who interfered with and ar- 
rested them. 

Thurs. 24. — Pres. Brigham Young, ac- 
companied by a number of leading men, 
left Salt Lake City on a trip to the south- 
ern settlements. They arrived at the 
Colorado river, at the mouth of the Rio 
Virgen, Arizona, March 16th. 

March. Wed. 2. — Elder Jabez Woodard 
died at Milton, Morgan Co. 

— The first number of the Keepapitchin- 
in, a small semi-weekly periodical, de- 
voted to fun and amusement, was issued in 
Salt Lake City, by Geo. J. Taylor and 
Joseph C. Rich. 

Jfon. 7. — Ole Bull, the great Norwegian 
violinist, arrived in Salt Lake City, on a 
visit. He gave two concerts in the theatre 
and left on the 10th. 

Sun. 20. — Hon. J. Wilson Schaffer, sev- 
enth governor of Utah, arrived in Salt 
Lake City. He proved to be one of the 
most bitter officials that the Territory 
ever had. 

Tree?. 2.3.— Although Delegate Wm. H. 
Hooper made a very able speech in defence 
of religious liberty in Utah, the Cullom 
Bill was passed by the House of Repre- 
sentatives. 

Tues. 29.— A company of 30 Elders re- 
turned to Salt Lake City from missions to 
the States. 

Thurs. .31.—The citizens of Salt Lake 
City held an immense mass meeting to 
protest against the Cullom Bill, which had 
not yet passed the Senate. Afterwards 
mass meetings were held in the settle- 
ments for the same purpose, and a petition 
drafted and forwarded to the Senate. 

April.— Sidney Alvarus Hanks, one of 
the Pioneers of 1847, froze to death in 
Parley's Park, Summit Co.. Utah. 

— The gallery in the large Tabernacle, 
Salt Lake City, was finished. 

— Camp Rawlins, a military post, was 
established near Provo, Utah. 

—An abandoned child was left at the 
door of Mrs. Prescinda L. Kimball— the 
first occurrence of the kind known in Salt 
Lake City. 

FH. 1. — The first number of the Utah 
Pomologist and Gardener, devoted to the 
orchard, vineyard, farm and garden, was 



CHUECH CHROifOLOGY — 1870. 



83 



issued by Joseph E. Johnson, at St. George, 
Utah. 

Thurs. 7. — Elder Edward Stevenson 
oreached in the Kirtland Temple, O. 

Tu^s. 12. — The resolutions adopted by 
the Salt Lake City mass meeting, on March 
31st, were presented to the U. S. Senate 
and referred to the committee on Territo- 
ries. 

Wed. 13. — Elder Moroni Bigelow was 
killed on the steamboat Mary McDonald 
and thrown into the Missouri river, be- 
tween Camden and Wellington, Mo. He 
was returning from a mission to the 
States. 

Sat. 1(>. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
party returned to Salt Lake City, from a 
preaching trip to the southern settle- 
ments. 

Thurs. 21.— The dead body of Sidney 
Al varus Hanks was found near Silver 
Creek, Summit Co. 

Wed. 21. — Patriarch John Young, Pres. 
Brigham Young's eldest brother, died in 
Salt Lake City. 

May. Thurs. 5. — The 40th annual con- 
ference of the Church convened in Salt 
Lake City. It was continued until the 8th. 

Sun. 8. — General Philip Henry Sheridan 
and staff arrived in Salt Sake City, on a 
visit. 

— Rev. Geo. M. Pierce entered his field 
of labor as the first Methodist missionary 
in Salt Lake City. 

Tues. 10. — A land-slide in Bingham Can- 
yon resulted in the death of Charles A. 
Freeman and James Leicester. 

Thurs. 12. — Amasa M. Lyman, once a 
member of the Twelve Apostles, was ex- 
communicated from the Church for apos- 
tacy. 

B'ri. 13. — Geo. Knighton and Henry 
Langford were drowned in the Jordan 
river, northwest of Salt Lake City. 

—Col. M. T. Patrick, U. S. Marshal for 
Utah, arrived in Salt Lake City. 

Sat. i4.— Nathaniel H. Felt and Thos. 
Jackson arrived at Salt Lake Citv, with a 
small company of Saints from New York 
State. 

Fri. 20.— Elder Wm. I. Appleby died in 
Salt Lake City. 

Fri. 27.— James Taylor, Apostle John 
Taylor's father, died in Salt Lake City, 87 
years of age. 

Sat. 28. — The corner stones of the Provo 
Co-operative Woolen Factory were laid. 

June. — The grasshoppers did much dam- 
age in the Territory. 

—Horace S. Eldredge succeeded Albert 
Carrington as president of the European 
Mission. 

Sun. 5. — The first number of the Salt 
Lake Daily Herald was issued; Wm. C. 
Dunbar and Edward L. Sloan, publishers; 
Edward L. Sloan, editor. 

3fon. 13. — Johan C. Christensen was 
killed by lightning,while in the field irriga- 
ting, near Ephraim, Sanpete Co. 

Fi'i. 17. — In the Probate Court at Manti, 
John Steward, of Fairview, Sanpete Co., 
was sentenced to be shot, for the killing of 
Sally Woodward, an Indian girl, some 
time previous. 

Thurs. 23. — Fifteen wagons, loaded with 
machinery for a woolen factory at Beaver, 
*eft Salt Lake City. 



Tues. 28.— A company of 20 Saints sailed 
from Liverpool, England, on the steamship 
Colorado, for the United States. 

July. — Pres. U. S. Grant appointed 
James B. McKean chief justice and Ver- 
non H. Vaughan secretary of Utah. They 
succeeded Judge Charles C. Wilson and 
Secretary S. A. Mann. 

Sun. 3. — Albert Carrington was ordained 
one of the Twelve Apostles, in Salt Lake 
City. 

FH. 8. — James Hendricks, who was crip- 
pled at the Crooked River battle, Oct. 25, 
1838, died at Richmond, Cache Co. 

Tues. 72.— Lady Franklin, widow of Sir 
John Franklin, visited Ogden, on her re- 
turn trip from searching for her lost hus- 
band. She afterwards visited Salt Lake 
City. 

Wed. 13. — The steamship Manhattan 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 269 
British, German and Swiss Saints, in 
charge of Karl G. Maeser. The company 
arrived at New York July 26th, and at Salt 
Lake City Aug. 5th. 

Wed. 20. — The steamship Minnesota 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 357 
Saints, mostly Scandinavians, in charge of 
Jesse N. Smith. The company arrived at 
New York Aug. 1st, and at Salt Lake City 
Aug. 10th. 

Sat. 23.— Geo. Francis Train lectured in 
the Salt Lake Theatre, in defence of Brig- 
ham Young. 

August. Man. 1. — At the general elec- 
tion in Utah, Wra. H. Hooper received over 
twenty thousand votes for delegate to 
Congress, and Geo. R. Maxwell, the 
Liberal candidate, only a few hundred. 

Fri. 12. — A discussion commenced in the 
large Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, between 
Apostle Orson Pratt and Dr. John P. 
Newman, chaplain of the U. S. Senate, 
on the question: "Does the Bible sanction 
Polygamy?" It was continued three days. 

Sat. 13.— S. D. Woodhull, of the firm of 
WoodhuU Bros., the earliest active mining 
operators in Utah, was shot in Little Cot- 
tonwood Canyon, in a difBculty over a 
claim. He died on the 14th. 

Sat. 27.— The establishment of Paul 
Engelbrecht was broken up, and his stock 
of liquors destroyed under authority of 
Salt Lake City, because he sold liquor 
without a license. 

— Pres. Brigham Young and party left 
Salt Lake City for southern Utah, from 
which he returned Sept. 24th. 

Mon. 29. — Alderman Jeter Clinton and 
several police officers were arrested by 
the U. S. marshal for participation in the 
abatement of the Engelbrecht liquor es- 
tablishment. 

Tues. .?r).— Martin Harris,one of the Three 
Witnesses to the Book of Mormon, arrived 
in Salt Lake City. He was 88 years old. 
In the ensuing conference he bore a faith- 
ful testimony to the truth of the Book of 
Mormon. 

— Judge James B. McKean arrived in 
Salt Lake City. 

September. Fri. 2.— The first number 
of the semi -weekly edition of the Salt Lake 
Herald was issued. 

Mon. 5. — Chief Justice James B. McKean 
was assiened to the Third Judicial Dist- 



84 



CHUECH CHKONOLOGY — 1871. 



rict, and forthwith commenced his in- 
famous official career in Utah. 

Wed. 7.— The steamship Idaho sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 186 Saints, 
in charge of Frank H. Hyde. The com- 
pany arrived at New York Sept. 21st, and 
at Ogden Oct. 1st. 

Fri. .9.— Messrs. Jones & Robins began 
the erection of smelting works on the 
State Road, south of Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 10.— A town site was located by 
Pres. Brigham Youag at Kanab, Kane 
Co., and the following day a Ward organ- 
ization was effected, with Levi Stewart as 
Bishop. 

Wed. 14. — A company of Scandina- 
vian Saints (19 souls), in charge of B. N. 
Walter, sailed from Liverpool, England, 
on board the steamship Xevada, bound for 
Utah. 

Thurs. 13.— Gov. J. Wilson Schaffer is- 
sued a proclamation appointing Patrick E. 
Connor major-general of the Utah militia 
(Nauvoo Legion), and Wm. M. Johns as- 
sistant adjutant- general. On the same 
day he issued a proclamation prohibiting 
all drills, musters and militia gatherings, 
except upon his orders,or those of the U.S. 
marshal. He also ordered the delivery of 
all arms belonging to the Territory of Utah, 
or the United States (except those in pos- 
session of U. S. soldiers;, to Col. Wm. M. 
Johns. 

Tues. 20.— The first run of crude bullion 
was made at the first smelting works built 
in Utah, erected six miles south of Salt 
Lake City by WoodhuU Brothers. 

Thurs. 22.— Oa the night of this day a 
party of U. S. troops, stationed near 
Provo, made a raid on some of the citizens 
in that town, some of whom they abused 
shamefully. 

J October. 3fon. 10.— The surviving mem- 
bers of Zion's Camp and the Mormon Bat- 
talion had an enjoyable party at the Social 
Hall, Salt Lake City. Of the members of 
Zion's Camp .32 were present, and 63 of the 
Battalion boys participated. 

Wed. 12. — The old arsenal building in 
Salt Lake City was burned to the ground. 

Fri. 14. — A scientific exploring party 
from Yale College, under direction of 
Prof. Marsh, arrived in Salt Lake City. 

Sun. 23. — The stage from Pioche was 
robbed near Nephi, Juab Co., by three 
men, who were afterwards caught and 
punished. 

Mon. 31. — Gov. J. Wilson Schaffer died 
at his residence in Salt Lake City. Secre- 
tary Vernon H. Vaughan succeeded him as 
acting gov^ernor. 

November. Fri. 4.— Prof. Ferdinand 
V. Hayden, United States geologist, ar- 
rived in Salt Lake City. 

—In the Third District Court the jury 
returned a verdict against Salt Lake City, 
allowing Engelbrecht & Co., $59,063.25 
damages. The case was appealed. 

Tues. 8.— Gen. Chas. A. Washburn, U. 
S. minister to Paraguay, and Hon. Alvin 
Flanders, governor of Washington Ter- 
ritory, visited Salt Lake City. 

Wed. If!.— A coTipany of .59 Saints, in 
charge of Ralph Thompson, sailed from 
Liverpool, England, on the steamship 
Manhattan, which arrived at New York 



Dec. 2nd. The company reached Salt Lake 
City, Dec. 11th. 

2Ion. 21.— The so-called "wooden gun 
rebellion" in the 20th Ward, Salt Lake 
City, occurred. Messrs. Charles R. Sav- 
age, Geo. M. Ottinger, John C. Graham, 
Charles and Archibald Livingstone, Wm. 
G. Phillips and Jas. Fennimore were ar- 
rested on a charge of treason and confined 
at Camp Douglas. 

Wed. 23. — Charles R. Savage and the 
other prisoners were admitted to bail and 
liberated. 

Fri. 25. — Pres. Brigham Young, Geo. A. 
Smith and Brigham Young, jun., left Salt 
Lake City for southern Utah, where they 
spent part of the winter. 

December. Fri. 2.— Richard Soper 
and Anton Valardie (?), guilty of commit- 
ting rape, were killed between Levan and 
Nephi, Juab Co., while trying to escape 
from the officers. 

Wed. i4.— Six members of Levi Stewart's 
family were burned to death in Kanab, 
Kane Co., Utah. 

Sat. 24.— No. 1 of the Footlights, a pro- 
gramme of the entertainments at the 
Theatre, in Salt Lake City, was issued. 

Wed. 28. — Richard Brown was shot and 
killed at Provo by John J. Baum, whose 
niece Brown had seduced. Baum was sub- 
sequently arrested, tried and acquitted, on 
the ground of justifiable homicide. 



1871. 

This year Judge James B. McKean made 
himself obnoxious to the Saints in Utah by 
his absurd rulings and his judicial persecu- 
tions of the "Mormons". The settlements 
of the Saints on the Muddy, in Nevada, 
were vacated because of the excessive tax- 
ation. The people in Utah again sub- 
scribed liberally towards emigrating the 
poor Saints from Europe. The first Utah 
edition of the Book of Mormon was 
printed. Several hundred stands of the 
Italian honey-bee were imparted into the 
Territory. The Utah Southern Railway 
was built to Draper, .Salt Lake Co. 
Latter-day Saint Sunday Schools were 
organized in all the large branches of the 
Church in the Scandinavian mission. 

January. Tues. 17.— The Utah South- 
ern Railwaj' Company was organized, with 
Wm. Jennings as president. 

Thurs. /.9.— Mary Phillips, one of the old 
Herefordshire (England) Saints, died at 
Kaysville, Davis Co. 

February. — Judge McKean made some 
absurd rulings in the naturalization of 
foreigners, making their belief in polygamy 
a test question. 

— Tde settlements of St. Joseph, St. 
Thomas and Overton, on the Muddy, were 
broken up, because of their being set off 
into Nevada, where taxation was oppres- 
sive. 

Thurs. 2. — The nomination of Geo. L. 
Woods, of Oregon, for governor of Utah. 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1871, 



85 



and Geo.A. Black, of Illinois, for secretary, 
was confirmed by the U. S. Senate. 

3fon. 6. — The meeting house, tithing 
office and post office in Pleasant Grove, 
Utah Co., was burned. 

Fri. 10. — Pres. Brigham Young and Geo. 
A. Smith arrived in Salt Lake City from 
their winter visit to St. George. 

Sun. 1.9. — The new governor, Geo. L. 
Woods, arrived in Salt Lake City. 

March. — Geo. R. Maxwell's infamous 
memorial, praying for a seat in Congress, 
as a contestant against Wm. H. Hooper, 
was presented to Congress. 

Thurs. 9. — The Deseret Philharmonic 
Society was organized in Salt Lake City, 
with David O. Calder as president. 

Mon. 13. — Bishop Alfred Cordon died at 
Willard City, Box Elder Co. 

Sat. 18. — Commercial Street, Salt Lake 
City, was opened. 

Mon. 27. — The Salt Lake fire department 
was reorganized. 

Fri. 31.— The Emma mine, in Little Cot- 
tonwood Canyon, was sold for §1,500,000. 

April. — Numerous grasshoppers ap- 
peared in the northern part of Cache 
County. During the summer these in- 
sects again damaged the crops consider- 
ably in various parts of the Territory. 

Mon. 3. — Mary Charaplin, a survivor of 
the Haun's Mill massacre, died in Salt 
Lake City. 

— Gov. Alvin Saunders, of Nebraska, 
visited Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. G. — The 41st annual conference 
of the Church convened in Salt Lake City. 
It was continued until the 9th. 

Sat. 15. — The first number of the Salt 
Lake Daily Tribune was issued instead of 
the Mormon Tribune, suspended. 

Tues, W.— Ralph Waldo Emerson, the 
eminent litterateur, arrived in Salt Lake 
City, on a visit. 

Mon. 24. — Bishop Peter Maughan, one of 
the founders of the Cache Valley settle- 
ments, died 

May. — The Corinne Daily .Tournal, an 
anti-Mormon paper, was first published at 
Corinne, Box Elder Co., Utah. 

Mon. 1. — Gi'ound was first broken for 
the Utah Southern Railway. 

Tf^ed. ,3.— Major J. W. Powell, the Colo- 
rado explorer, and party arrived in Salt 
Lake City. 

Wed. 10. — Elder Joseph Parry with ten 
Saints, sailed from Liverpool on the steam- 
ship Wyoming, bound for Utah. 

June. — Apostle Albert Carrington suc- 
ceeded Horace S. Eldredge as president of 
the European mission. 

Sun. 11. — The first eamp-mseting ever 
held in Utah, took place in Salt Lake City, 
under the auspices of the Methodists. 

Wed. 14. — While shoveling snow in Am- 
erican Fork Canyon, Clark Thompson was 
accidentally killed and a companion 
wounded. 

Wed. 21. — The steamship Wyoming 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 248 
Saints, under the direction of Robert F. 
Neslen and Geo. Lake. The company 
arrived at New York July 3rd, and at Salt 
Lake City July 12th. 

Mon. 2f>. — Pres. Brigham Young. Geo. A. 
Smith and others left Salt Lake City, on a 
trip to the northern settlements, return- 



ing in the latter part of Jul/, after visit- 
ing Soda Springs, Bear Lake Valley, etc. 

Wed. 2S. — The steamship Minnesota 
sailed from Liverpool. England, with 397 
Saints, in charge of Wm. W. Cluff. The 
company landed at New York July 13th, 
and arrived at Ogden July 21st. , 

F'ri. 30. — Geo A. Black, acting-governor 
of Utah, issued a proclamation, forbidding 
the assembling of any of the militia of the 
Territory, to participate in the celebra- 
tion of the 95th anniversary of American 
Independence, in Salt Lake City. 

July. Tucs. 4. — Notwithstanding Act.- 
Gov. Black's proclamation against the as- 
sembling of the Territorial militia, the 
day was celebrated in good style in Salt 
Lake City. 

Mon. 10.— Bon. S. S. Cox, of New York, 
visited Salt Lake City. 

Wed. 12. — The steamship Colorado 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 146 
Saints, under the direction of Hamilton G. 
Park. The company arrived in New York 
July 25th, and at Salt Lake Citj' Aug. 4th. 

Thurs. 20.— The Pioneer Mill, "Ophir 
Mining District (the first stamp mill in 
Utah), commenced running ; Walker Bros., 
proprietors. 

F'ri. 21. — The Lady of the Lake, a little 
steamer bought by John W. Young and in- 
tended for an excursion boat on the Salt 
Lake, arrived in Salt Lake City. It was 
launched in the Jordan on Aug. 2nd. 

Sun. 2.i.— A meeting and dwelling house, 
erected by the Saints in Christiania, Nor- 
way, was dedicated. 

Wed. 26. — The steamship Nevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 93 Saints, 
under the direction of Lot Smith. The 
company aarived at New York Aug. 7th, 
and in Salt Lake City Aug. 16th. 

August. Tues. i.— M. T. Patrick, U. S. 
marshal, took possession of the Utah Pen- 
itentiary, under protest of Albert P. 
Rockwood. 

Fri. 4. — Briant Stringham, one of the 
Pioneers of 1847, died in Salt Lake City. 

Wed. 9. — The steamship Minnesota 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 60 
Saints, under the direction of Wm. Doug- 
lass. The company arrived at New York 
Aug. 21st, and at Ogden Aug. 30th. 

Fri. 11. — Prof. J. D. Runkle, president 
of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, visited Salt Lake City. He was 
engaged in extensive explorations in 
Utah and Nevada. 

Wed. 23. — A company for building the 
Utah and Northern Railway was organ- 
ized, with John W. Young as president and 
general superintendent. 

Sat. 26. — Ground was broken for the 
Utah and Northern Railway, at Brigham 
City. 

Mon. 28. — Wm. Hutchinson was shot and 
killed, in Coalville, Summit Co., in self- 
defence. 

September. — At this time the U. S. of- 
ficals in Utah acted more like bigoted mis- 
sionaries than administrators of the law. 
Absurd rulings, illegal processes and pack- 
ed juries characterized their proceedings. 

Fri. i.— The National Bank of Deseret 
commenced business on the corner of East 
T emple and First South Street, Salt Lake 
City. 



86 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1871. 



Sal. 2. — U. S. Marshal Patrick made a 
demand of Warden Albert P. Rockwoodto 
deliver up the prisoner Kilfoyle to the 
marshal's custody, which was refused on 
legal grounds. 

— The Deseret Telegraph Company ex- 
tended a braach line to Coalville, Summit 
Co. 

Wed. 6".— The steamship Xccada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 263 Saints, 
under the direction of .John I, Hart. The 
company arrived at New York Sept. 18th, 
and at Ogden Sep. ?7th. 

Fri. H. — After several days' preliminary 
examination before Associate .Justice C. 
M. Hawley, Marshal McAllister and War- 
den Rockwood (Salt Lake City) were held 
to bail in $1,000 each to await the action of 
the grand jury. 

3fon. 11. — A detachment of U. S. cavalry 
surrounded the houses of Messrs. John J. 
Baum and H. L. Davis, near Provo, Utah 
Co., and fired several shots at the former. 
A packed grand jury had indicted Baum 
and Davis for murder. 

Tues. i.9.— Caleb Parry, missionary from 
Utah, died at Birmingham, England. He 
was buried in the same grave as James H. 
Flanigan, who died Jan. 29, 1851. 

Fri. 22. — James Hendry was shot and 
fatally wounded at Hooperville, by the 
father and son of a girl, whom he had se- 
duced. 

Sat. 2.'i.— The Utah Southern Railway 
was completed to Sandy. 

Sun. 24. — The corner stones of the new 
Catholic Church, in Salt Lake City, were 
laid, the ceremonies being conducted by 
Rev. Patrick Walsh. 

October. Man. 2. — Pres. Brigham 
Young was arrested by U. S. Mai'shal 
Patrick, on an indictment charging him 
with lascivious cohabitation with his po- 
lygamous wives. The President was 
guarded in his own house for some time 
afterwards. 

Tites. 3. — Daniel H. Wells was arrested 
by U. S. Marshal Patrick, on a charge of 
"lascivious and unlawful cohabitation." 
and placed under ?5,000 bonds. 

Sat. 7. — Geo. Q. Cannon and Henry W. 
Lawrence were arrested on charges of 
lascivious cohabitation; Cannon was 
placed under $5,000 bonds. 

Alon. .9. — Pres. Brigham Young went in- 
to court. After several days' trial, Judge 
McKean (on the 12th) rendered a decision, 
admitting the defendant to bail in $5,000, 
and the case was postponed until the 
prosecution was better prepared for 
action. In delivering his opinion the judge 
said that while the case was called "The 
people versus Brigham Young, its other 
and real title is Federal Authority versus 
Polygamic Theocracy." 

Tkcs. /O.— Hon. O P. Morton, senator 
from Indiana, accompanied by several dis- 
tinguished ladies and gentlemen, arrived 
in Salt Lake City, on a visit. They used 
their influence against the Federal cru- 
sade, then being carried on in Utah. 

Wed. 11.— A mass meeting convened in 
answer to the mayor of Salt Lake City, to 
adopt measures for the relief of the suf- 
ferers by the Chicago fire. 

Thurs. 12. — A terrific wind storm visited 
Salt Lake City and vicinity. 



Sat. 14. — Mayor Daniel H. Wells remit- 
ted $1?,000 for the relief of the sufferers 
by the Chicago fire. He subsequently sent 
another amount. 

Wed. IH. — The steamship Xevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 300 Saints, 
in charge of Geo. H. Peterson. The com- 
pany arrived at New York, Nov. 1st, and 
at Salt Lake City, Nov. 11th. 

Mon. 23. — The Deseret Telegraph line 
was complet ed to Pioche, Nevada. 

Tries. 24. — Pres. Brigham Young left 
Salt Lake City for St. George, with the in- 
tention of spending the winter there. It 
was soon afterwards extensively pub- 
lished that he had fled from justice. 

Sat. 2S.— Mayor Daniel H. Wells, Hosea 
Stout and W. H. Kimball were arrested 
on a trumped up charge of murder, the 
notorious outlaw, "Bill" Hickman, being 
their accuser, and committed to the mili- 
tarj' prison at Camp Douglas. 

— Thomas Hawkins was sentenced by 
Judge McKean to three years' imprison- 
ment and $.500 fiae, for adultery with his 
own wives. He appealed his case to the 
Territorial Supreme Court, but not being 
able to get $20,000 bonds, he was impris- 
oned. 

Jfon. 30.— In the Third Dist rict Court, 
Salt Lake City, Mayor Daniel H. Wells 
was admitted to $50,000 bail, for his ap- 
pearance, when wanted, on the charge of 
murder. 

November. Thurs. 2.— Captain Jacob 
Hamblin met in council with the principal 
chiefs of the Navejo Indians, at Ft. 
Defiance, and concluded a treaty of peace 
with them in behalf of the people of Utah. 

Jfo7i. 6'.— James P. Brown, a mem- 
ber of the Mormon Battalion, died at 
Rockville, Kane Co. 

Thurs 9.— The site for the St. George 
Temple was dedicated. 

—The Deseret Telegraph Company 
opened an office at Paris, Bear Lake Co., 
Idaho. 

Jfon. 20.— Elder Caleb W. Haws, missio- 
nary from Utah, died at Barugh Bridge, 
near Barnsley, Yorkshire, England. 

— The corner stones of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, in Salt Lake City, were 
laid. Rev. Geo. M. Pierce officiating. 

Wed. 22. — Ellen Sanders Kimball, one of 
the three Pioneer women of 1847, died near 
Salt Lake City, Utah. 

— Salt Lake City was entered under the 
"Town site law"'. 

Sun. 2f>. — The Roman Catholic Church in 
Salt Lake City was dedicated. 

Jfon. 27. — Through intense malice, .Judge 
McKean called up the case of Pres. Brig- 
ham Young and thus compelled him to 
travel all the way from St. George to Salt 
Lake City in the dead of winter. The 
judge fixed the trial for Dec. 4th. 

— The Summit County Railway Company 
was organized. 

December.— The Salt Lake City au- 
thorities arrested a number of prostitutes, 
who subsequently were released by the 
Federal officials. 

Wed. i.i.— Alexander Burt, John L. 
Blythe, James Toms and John Brazier 
were arrested in Salt Lake City, accused 
of the murder of Dr. J. King Robinson in 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1872. 



87 



1866. On the 19th Policeman Brigham Y. 
Hampton was arrested on a similar charge. 

J/oH. IS. — An examination of the Robin- 
son murder case was commenced before 
Justice McKean, in chambers; it was con- 
tinued for several days. On the 22nd 
Alexander Burt, one of the accused, was 
discharged from custody. 

Fri. 2:^.— Harriet Page Wheeler Young, 
one of the three Utah Pioneer women of 
1847, died in Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 2.3.— Patriarch John Murdock died 
in Beaver, Utah. 

Tues. 21}.— Pres. Brigham Young arrived 
in Salt Lake City from St. George. 

1872. 

This year a secret society, called the 
"Gentile League of Utah," was organized 
in Salt Lake City, its alleged object being 
to break up "Mormon Theocracy." Court 
proceedings against leading men in the 
Church were continued. The people of 
Utah again petitioned Congress for ad- 
mission into the Union as a State. 

January. — The Salt Lake City Street 
Railway Company was organized. 

— Judge James B. McKean refused to 
have Charles W. Baker arrested for per- 
jury, notwithstanding the proof of his 
guilt. 

J/ou. 1. — Zera Pulsipher, formerly one 
of the seven presidents of the Seventies, 
died at at Hebron, Washington Co., Utah, 
over 82 years of age. 

Tues. 2. — Pres. Brigham Young was in 
the Third District Court, but his case was 
continued until March. Judge McKean re- 
fused ?500,000 bail for him, and the Presi- 
dent was again guarded in his own house 
by U. S. Deputy marshals. 

Wed. 3. — Charles W. Baker, the principal 
witness against Brigham Y. Hampton and 
others, declared under oath that his testi- 
mony in court igainst the accused was ut- 
terly false. 

Mon. 8. — The twentieth session of the 
Utah legislature convened in Salt Lake 
City and organized by electing Lorenzo 
Snow president of the Council, and Orson 
Pratt speaker of the House. 

Mon. i5.— Elder James McGaw died at 
Ogden. 

Sat. 20. — Alexander Burt was again ar- 
rested on the old charge of being con- 
nected with the Robinson murder case. 

Wed. 24. — Charles W. Baker was ar- 
raigned before Justice Jeter Clinton, in 
Salt Lake City, for perjury. In default 
of $3,000 bail, he was sent to prison, await- 
ing the action of the grand jary. 

Wed. 31. — James L. High, Deputy U. S. 
District Attorney, being directed by the 
U. S. Attorney General at Washington, D. 
C, and District Attorney Geo. C. Bates, 
to do so, requested the District Court 
to admit Brigham Young and other prison- 
ers to bail. The court refused the appli- 
cation. 

— A concurrent -resolution was passed 
by the Utah legislature for the election of 
delegates to a convention, to adopt a State 
constitution. 



February. — A "deadlock" existed in the 
Utah Federal courts for want of funds 
to defray expenses. 

Thi(rs. 1. — At the first masquerade ball 
held in Utah (in Faust's Hall, Salt Lake 
City), a fearful row occurred, in which 
Police Officer Andrew Smith was consider- 
ably hurt. 

Sun. J.— The Japanese Embassy arrived 
in Salt Lake City. On the 6th a reception 
was given it in the City Hall. 

Jfon. 5. — Edward Samuels and Wm. 
Hampton were killed by a snowslide in 
Big Cottonwood Canyon. 

Wed 14. — Bishop Abraham Hoagland, of 
the 14th Ward, Salt Lake City, died. 

Fri. IH. — The Utah legislature ad- 
journed. 

Sat. 11. — James G.Blair, of Missouri, de- 
livered a powerful speech in defence of the 
people of Utah, in the House of Represent- 
atives, at Washington D. C. 

Mon. in. — A constitutional convention, 
for the adoption of proper measures for 
the admission of Utah into the Union, met 
in the City Hall, Salt Lake City. 

— John Cradlebaugh, formerly associate 
justice of Utah, died in poverty, at Eureka, 
Lander Co., Nev. 

Thurs. 22.— The Japanese Embassy left 
Salt Lake City for the East. 

Wed. 28.— Patriarch William Cazier, one 
of the first settlers of Juab County, died 
at Nephi. 

March. Sat. 2.— The constitutional 
convention adopted a constitution and 
memorial to Congress, asking for the ad- 
mission of Utah into the Union as a State, 
and then adjourned sine die. 

Wed. 6\— Thos. Fitch, Geo. Q. Cannon 
and Frank Fuller left Salt Lake City for 
Washington, D. C, as delegates from the 
late convention, to present to Congress 
the claims of the proposed State of Des- 

rTiM/'s. 7.-Wm. W. Phelps died in Salt 
Lake City. 

Wed. 20. — A deputation of friends, most- 
ly ladies, paid a visit of condolence to 
Hosea Stout, Brigham Y. Hampton and 
fellow- prisoners, at the City Hall, Salt 
Lake City. 

Fri. 22.— Through malice, the prisoners 
(Hosea Stout, Brigham Y. Hampton, Alex- 
ander Burt, Wm. H. Kimball and John L. 
Blythe) were removed from the City HaU, 
Salt Lake City, to Camp Douglas, by order 
of U. S. Marshal Patrick. 

Mon. 2.5.— Tracklaying was commenced 
on the Utah Northern narrow gauge rail- 
way at Brigham City, Box Elder Co. 

April. Tues. 2.— The new constitution 
of the State of Deseret was presented to 
both houses of Congress, and referred to a 
special committee, who subsequently re- 
ported adversely to Utah's admission as a 
State. 

Thurs. 4. — The members elected to the 
legislature of the State of Deseret met in 
Salt Lake City and proceeded to organize. 
During the session Wm. H. Hooper and 
Thos. Fitch were elected senators to Con- 
gress. 

Sat. 6.— The 42nd annual conference of 
the Church convened in Salt Lake City. 
It was continued daily until the 9th, when 



88 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1872. 



it was adjourned to the 14th, then to the 
21st and closed on the 28th. 

Mf>n. 15. — A decision was rendered by 
the Supreme Court of the United States in 
the Engelbrecht case, overturning the 
judicial proceedings in Utah for the last 
eighteen months, and declaring null in- 
dictments against about one hundred and 
twenty persons, some of whom had been 
imprisoned for some time. 

Thurs. 25. — Pres. Brigham Young was 
released from custody on a writ of habeas 
corpus from Elias Smith, probate judge of 
Salt Lake County. 

Tues. 30. — Hosea Stout, Wm. H. Kimball, 
Brigham Y. Hampton, John L. Blythe, 
Alexander Burt and James Toms were re- 
leased by the Third District Court, on the 
strength of the Supreme Court decision, 
at Washington, D. C. John Brazier had 
previously been released. 

May. Thnrs. :<;. —Thomas Hawkins, of 
Lehi, was admitted to $5,000 bail, pending 
an appeal to the Supreme Court of the 
Territory, and liberated from prison. 

Wed. 8. — Ira Reid was killed by light- 
ning, at West Jordan, Salt Lake Co. 

Fri. 17. — Columbus Delano, Secretary 
of the Interior arrived in Salt Lake 
City, on a visit. 

Afon. 20. — Ground was broken for the 
American Fork (narrow gauge) Railroad, 
to run up American Fork Canyon. 

Sat. 25. — The Salt Lake City Gas Works 
Company was organized. 

June. — The first number of the Wo- 
man's E.cponent was published in Salt 
Lake City, Miss Lulu L. Greene editor. 

Sat. 8. — The first passenger train was 
run on the Utah Northern Railway. 

Wed. 12.— The First Presidency, in a 
general circular, called on the people for 
aid to gather the poor Saints from abroad. 
The sum of $14,000 was donated during the 
year. 

— The steamship Jfanhattan sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 221 Saints, in 
charge of David Briaton. The company 
arrived at New York June 26th, and at 
Salt Lake City July 4th. 

Sun. 16. — A company of about one hun- 
dred journalists from Iowa, arrived in 
Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

—Niels Heiselt, jun., was killed on 
Twelve Mile creek, Sanpete Co., by Shiv- 
erute Indians, who also drove off consider- 
able stock belonging to the settlers. 

Wed. 26". — The steamship Nevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 426 Saints, 
namely, 396 from Scandinavia, 28 from the 
British Isles and two from Holland, in 
charge of Eric Peterson. The company 
arrived at New York July 8th, and at Salt 
Lake City July 17th. 

July. Thurs. j.— Shadrach Roundy, one 
of the Utah Pioneers of 1847. died in Salt 
Lake City. 

-S'«n. 28.— The Saints who had settled on 
Twin Creek, Bear Lake Co., Idaho, were 
organized into a branch of the Church, 
called the Georgetown liranch, with Phile- 
mon C. Merrill as presiding Elder. 

Wed. 31. — The steamship Wisconsin 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 179 
Saints, in charge of Geo. P. Ward. The 
company arrived at New York Aug. 12th, 
and at Salt Lake City Aug. 20th. 



August. Sat. 3. — The "Gentile League 
of Utah", and others, armed to the teeth, 
held a political meeting in front of the Salt 
Lake Hotel, Salt Lake City. 

Mo)t.. 5. — Elder Geo. W. Grant died near 
Bountiful, Davis Co. 

—At a general election in Utah for dele- 
gate to Congress, Geo. Q. Cannon received 
20,969 and Geo. R. Maxwell 1,942 votes. 

Thurs. 8. — The Rocky Mountain Confer- 
ence of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
was organized in Salt Lake City. 

i'Vf. ,9. — The Utah Southern Railway 
commenced to run trains to the Point of 
the Mountain, south of Draper. 

3foti. 12. — Gen. James A. Garfield, after 
a short visit, left Salt Lake City for Mon- 
tana. 

Sat. 17. — Gen. Henry A. Morrow, with a 
body of troops, left Camp Douglas for 
Sanpete Valley, where Indian difficulties of 
a serious nature existed. 

Thurs. 22. — General Morrow made a 
treaty with Ute Indians, at Springville, 
Utah Co. 

Sat. 24.— Gen. Geo. B. McClellan and 
party arrived in Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

Thurs. 2!K — An attempt was made to as- 
sassinate Officers Brigham Y. Hampton 
and Alexander Burt, in Salt Lake City. 

— Two houses of ill fame, kept by Kate 
Flint and Cora Rubodo,were abated in Salt 
Lake City, under municipal authority, the 
furniture and other effects being de- 
molished. 

Sat. 31. — Indians make a raid on Spanish 
Fork, Utah Co., stealing horses. 

September. Man. 2.— The Walker 
House, in Salt Lake City, was formally 
opened. 

Tues. 3. — Ground was broken for the 
Salt Lake City water works, up City 
Creek. 

Wed. 4. — The steamship Minnesota sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 602 Saints, 
in charge of Geo. W. Wilkins. The com- 
pany landed in New York, Sept. 17th, and 
arrived at Salt Lake City, Sept. 26th. 

Sat. 7. — A treaty of peace was con- 
cluded by Gen. Morrow with several In- 
dian chiefs, at Mount Pleasant, Sanpete 
Co. 

Tues. 10. — The Bingham Canyon and 
Camp Floyd Railway Company was or- 
ganized. 

Sat. 21.— Miss Phoebe W. Couzins, of St. 
Louis, and Miss Georfiie Snow, daughter 
of Judge Zerubbabel Snow, of Salt Lake 
City, were admitted to the bar in the Third 
District Court— the first ladies thus admit- 
ted in Utah. 

Mon. 23. — The Utah Southern Railway 
was completed to Lehi, Utah Co. 

Thurs. 26. — Indians killed Daniel 
Miller, near Bernard Snow's mill, in San- 
pete Valley, and wounded his little son, 

October. Fi-i. •^.— Wool was carded at 
the Provo Woolen Factory for the first 
time. 

Mon. 14.— The Wasatch and Jordan Val- 
ley Railway Company was organized. 
Ground was broken for the road, Nov. 4th. 

Tues. 15. — Pres. George A. Smith left 
Salt Lake City on his trip to Palestine. 
He was accompanied by Feramorz Little 
and daughter, and Willis T. Fuller. Af- 
terwards he was joined by others. 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1873. 



89 



Wed. 16.— The steamship JTinnesota 
sailed from Liverpool, England, witb 203 
Saints, in charge of Thos. Dobson. The 
company arrived at New York, Oct. 29th, 
and at Salt Lake City, Nov. 7th. 

Thurs. 17. — A delegation of Ute Indians 
(Wanderodes, Antero, Tabiona and Ka- 
nosh), accompanied by Dr. Dodge, Indian 
agent, and Geo. W. Bean, interpreter, left 
Salt Lake City for Washington, D. C. 
There they had an interview with Presi- 
dent U. S. Grant. 

Sun. 20.— The Saints who had settled on 
the bench northwest of Richmond, Cache 
Co., Utah, were organized into a branch of 
the Church (now Lewiston), with Wm. H. 
Lewis as president. 

November. Wed. 6. — Twenty-six Saints 
sailed from Liverpool, England, on the 
steamship Xevuda, which, after several 
days' rough sailing, was forced to return 
to Liverpool. 

Tues. 19. — The Palestine party, consist- 
ing of Pres. Geo. A. Smith, Apostle Lorenzo 
Snow, Elders Feramorz Little, Paul A. 
Schettler anu Geo. Dunford, Sisters Eliza 
R. Snow and Clara S. Little, arrived in 
Liverpool, England, from New York. 

Tues. 26.— General Thos. L. Kane, of 
Pennsylvania, arrived in Salt Lake City, 
on a visit. 

— The Germania Smelting and Refining 
Works, the first of the kind in Utah, com- 
menced operation on Little Cottonwood 
creek, below the State road. 

— The American Fork Railroad was com- 
pleted to Deer creek, in American Fork 
Canyon. 

December. Tues. :j.—Bengt Swenson, 
of Santaquin, died at Nephi, from the ef- 
fects of bodily injuries, inflicted by M. 
Daley, of Payson, at the coal bed in San- 
pete County, Nov. 30th. 

Wed. 4. — The steamship Jlcmfiattan 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 35 
Saints, including those who had returned 
with the Xerada. The company, which 
was in charge of Daniel Kennedy, arrived 
at New York Dec. 21st. and at Salt Lake 
City a few days later. 

— Pres. Geo. A. Smith and party, having 
left London. Nov. 30th, arrived in Amster- 
dam, Holland, and Dec. 11th they ai'rived 
in Paris, France, after having visited 
Antwerp and Brussels, iii Belgium. 

Sun. 8. -Major J. W. Powell, chief of the 
Colorado Exploring Expedition, arrived 
in Salt Lake City, and reported that the 
exploration of the Grand Canyon of the 
Colorado was completed. 

Tues. i7.— Pres. Geo. A. Smith and party 
visited Versailles and were admitted to 
the hall of the Corps Legislatif. In the 
evening they had an interview with M. 
Thiers, President of the French Republic. 

Wed. iS.— John R. Clawson, a member of 
the Mormon Battalion, died in Salt Lake 
City. 

Thitrs. 19.— The Utah Northern Railway 
was opened to Mendon, Cache Co. 

Jfon. 2.3.— Pres. Brigham Young and 
party, including Gen. Thos. L. Kane, wife 
and two sons, arrived at St. George, to 
spend the winter, having left Salt Lake 
City about December 12th. 

Thurs. 26.— A snowslide at Alta, Little 



Cottonwood Canyon, resulted in the loss 
of several lives. 

Jfri. 27.— Susannah L. Richards, relict 
of the late Willard Richards, died near 
Mill Creek, Salt Lake Co. 

Sat. 2cS.— In the Probate Court, Salt 
Lake City, Charles W. Baker was sen- 
tenced to two years' imprisonment for 
perjury. 



1873. 

This year there was considerable rail- 
road building in Utah. An unsuccessful 
attempt was made by a company of Saints 
to settle Arizona Territory. Pres. Geo. 
A. Smith and party visited Palestine and 
other countries. 

January. Wed.l. — Elder Stephen Win- 
chester died in Salt Lake City. 

FH. 17. — Professor John Tullidge died 
in Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 23. — David R. Allen, a prominent 
citizen, died at Sugar House Ward, Salt 
Lake Co. 

Tues. 28.- Associate Justice C. M. Haw- 
ley liberated a number of criminals held 
by the Box Elder County ofiicers for cattle 
stealing, at Corinne. 

Fri. 31. -The Utah Northern Railway 
was completed to Logan. 

February. — A daily anti-Mormon paper, 
called the Xeiv Endowment, was published 
in Salt Lake City, by W. J. Forbes. 

Thurs. 6\— Pres. Geo. A. Smith and party 
arrived at Alexandria, Egypt. Since leav- 
ing Paris the party had visited Lyons, 
Marseilles, Genoa, Rome, Naples, Corfu 
and other large cities. 

Fri. 2i.— Major Wm. Pitt, the famous 
leader of the Nauvoo brass band, died in 
Salt Lake City. 

Sun. 23. — Wm. W. Player, a respected 
veteran of the Church, died in Salt Lake 
City. 

Tues. 25. — The Frelinghuysen anti Mor- 
mon bill was passed in the U. S. Senate, 
but failed to come up before the House. 

— The Geo. A. Smith Palestine party 
arrived at Jerusalem. 

Thurs. 27. — Pres. Brigham Young re- 
turned to Salt Lake City, from St. George, 
where he had spent the winter. General 
Thos. L. Kane and family also returned 
from a trip to southern Utah. 

Fri. 28. — The Palestine party visited the 
Dead Sea ; they returned to Jerusalem on 
the 1st of March. 

3farch. Sun. 2. — The Palestine party 
held solemn worship on the Mount of Olives. 
After having visited all the noted jilaces in 
Jerusalem and vicinity, the party left that 
city March 5th, and journeyed northward, 
visiting the ancient sites of Shiloh, 
Shechem (now Nablous), Samaria, Naza- 
reth, Cana, Tiberias, by the sea of Galilee, 
Bethsaida, Capernaum, Dan and Cesarea 
Philippi, at the foot of Mount Hermon, 
and arrived in Damascus, Syria, March 
15th. From that city the journey was con- 
tinued over the mountains of Lebanon to 
Bey rout, where they embarked on a 
steamer for Constantinople, Turkey, arriv- 
ing there April 1st. 



■90 



CHURCH CHROSTOLOGY — 1873. 



Wed. 5. — Elder Wm. C. Staines was set 
apart for his mission to attend to the emi- 
gration of the Saints in New York. He 
labored efficiently in that business until 
his death in 1881. 

Thurs. a. — Apostle Erastus Snow and 
others left Salt Lake City for Europe. 
They arrived in Liverpool, England, April 
1st. 

Sat. 8. — Quite a large number having 
been called by the authorities of the 
Church to plant colonies in Arizona, a gen- 
eral meeting was held in the Old Taber- 
nacle, Salt Lake City, where they were 
instructed by Pres. Brigham Young and 
others concerning their mission. 

3Io7i. 10. — The mason work was com- 
menced on the St. George Temple. 

Sat. 15. — Hon. Wm. H. Hooper arrived 
in Utah from Washington, D. C. He had 
served the Territory faithfully for ten 
years, as its delegate to Congress. 

April. Sttn. 6".— The 43rd annual con- 
ference of the Church convened in Salt 
City; it was continued for three days. 
Owing to infirmities incident to old age, 
Pres. Brigham Young resigned several 
minor official positions, and chose five ad- 
ditional Counselors, namely Lorenzo Snow, 
Brigham Young, jun., Albert Carrington, 
John W. Young, and George Q. Cannon. 

Man. 14. — Ground was broken for the 
Salt Lake, Sevier Valley and Pioche Rail- 
road (afterwards the Utah and Nevada) , 
in Salt Lake City. 

Sun. 20. — A society for young men's 
mutual improvement was organized by 
Apostle Franklin D. Richards and others, 
at Ogden. 

Man. 21. Elder Calvin C. Pendleton 
died at Parowan, Iron Co. 

May. Sat. :}. — The Wasatch and Jordan 
Valley Railway was com Dieted to Granite, 
at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Can- 
yon. 

— The Alta Daily JndepeHdent, a news- 
paper, was first published at Alta, Little 
Cottonwood Canyon. It only lived a short 
time. 

—On this and the following day an ad- 
journed session of the 43rd annual confer- 
ence of the Church was held in Salt Lake 
City. 

Wed. 7.— John S. Eldredge, one of the 
Pioneers of 1847, died at Charleston 
Wasatch Co., Utah. 

Sat. iO.— Elder James D. McCullough 
died at Panacea (Nevada). 

Tufs. L3.— James Edwards, a desperado, 
was killed at Sandy, Utah, after threaten- 
ing the lives of several citizens. 

Wed. 14.— The first car-load of coal was 
shipped from Coalville, over the Summit 
County Railway. 

rhiivfi. ;.3.— Apostle Erastus Snow and 
son (Erastus W.) arrived in Copenhagen, 
Denmark, on a visit. 

Sun. W.— Pres. Geo. A. Smith and part 
of the Palestine party arrived in London, 
England. 

Fri. 2.7.— James G. Blaine, speaker of the 
U. S. House of Representatives, arrived in 
Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

—Cyril Call, an aged veteran, died at 
Bountiful, Davis Co. 

Sun. 2.5.— Feramorz Little and daughter, 



of the Palestine party, returned to Salt 
Lake City. 

June. Jfon.2. — Lieut. Geo. M. Wheeler, 
of the U. S. Army, arrived in Ogden, for 
the purpose of erecting a military obser- 
vatory at that place. 

Wed. 4. — The steamship Xevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 246 Saints, 
in charge of Charles H. Wilcken. The com- 
pany arrived at New York June 16ti, and 
at Salt Lake Citj' .Tune 26th. 

Sat. 7. — Elder Joseph W. Young died at 
Harrisburg, Washington Co., Utah. 

Mo)i. ;).—A branch of four miles of the 
Utah Northern Railway was completed to 
Corinne, from Brigham City Junction. 

Wed. IS. — Pres. Geo. A. Smith returned 
to Salt Lake City, from his trip to Pales- 
tine. 

Mon. ,70.— Salt Lake City was first light- 
ed with gas. 

July. Wed. 2. — The steamship Wiscon- 
sin sailed from Liverpool, England, with 
976 Saints, in charge of David O. Calder. 
The company arrived at New York July 
1.5th. and at Salt Lake City July 24th. 

Sat. .5. — Zion's Savings" Bank and Trust 
Company was organized ; Brigham Young, 
president. 

Thurs. 10. — The steamship Xevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 283 Saints, 
in charge of Elijah A. Box. The company 
landed in New York July 23rd, and at Salt 
Lake City Aug. 1st. 

Tues. 22.— The Arizona missionaries 
reached the Little Colorado river. A com- 
pany of explorers, which was sent out, 
brought back a discouraging report of the 
country, whereby the company became 
disheartened, and returned home. 

Wed. 23. — Sylvester H. Earl, one of the 
Pioneers of 1847, died at St. George, Utah. 

Thurs. 24. — Gabriel L. Cotton and his 
two sons were killed by S. M. Butcher, 
near the mouth of Bingham Canyon, Salt 
Lake Co. 

Wed. 30. — Severe shocks of earthquake 
were felt at Beaver. 

Auj^ust. Fri. 1. — The first number of 
the I'roi'o Daily Times was issued at 
Provo, Utah Co. The following year it was 
changed to a tri-weekly publication called 
the UtaJi (Jaunty Times. In 1876 it was 
discontinued, and the Advertiser, a semi- 
weekly paper, published in its place. 

7"ues. ■'). — Nine stores in Ogden, Utah, 
were destroyed by fire. 

Tries. 26'.— A small company of immi- 
grants arrived in Salt Lake City from 
Australia. 

.September. — A military post, after- 
wards known as Fort Cameron, was estab- 
lished near Beaver, Utah. 

Wed. 3. — The steamship Wyoming 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 510 
Saints (291 British and 219 Scandinavian), 
in charge of John B. Fairbanks. The 
company, after barely escaping shipwreck 
near Sable Island, landed in New York, 
Sept. 20th, and arrived at Salt Lake City, 
Sept. 29th. 

Thurs. J.— Sarah Ann Kimball, widow of 
Heber C. Kimball, and daughter of the late 
Bishop Newel K. Whitney, died in Salt 
Lake City. 

Tues. 23. —The Utah Southern Railway 
was opened for traffic to American Fork. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1874. 



9] 



S'wn. 28. — The Wasatch and Jordan Val- 
ley Railway made its terminus at Fairfield 
Flat, in Little Cottonwood Canyon. 

October. — Lester J. Herrick succeeded 
Apostle Albert Carrington as president of 
the European mission. 

Wed. 1. — Zion's Savings Bank and Trust 
Company commenced business in Salt Lake 
City. The sum of §6,000 was deposited the 
first day. 

\V<d. 15. — A. H. Bowen, chief of police 
in Provo, was shot by Harrison Carter, a 
notorious renegade, who escaped, but was 
afterwards caught in Nevada, brought to 
Salt Lake City and imprisoned. 

Thurs. 16. — The Bingham Canyon Rail- 
way was opened for traffic. 

Wed. 22. — The steamship Idaho sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 522 Saints, 
in charge of John I. Hart. The company 
arrived at New York, Nov. 4th, and at Salt 
Lake City, Nov. 14th. 

Fri. 24.— The Clift House in Salt Lake 
City was burned. Estimated loss : §70,000. 

fues. 28. — In the Supreme Court of 
Utah, Judge McKean reversed his former 
decision in the Third District Court 
against Thos. Hawkins. ; l 

F)'i. 31. — Elder Isaac Laney, a respected 
citizen, who was wounded in the Haun's 
Mill massacre, died in the 10th Ward, Salt 
Lake City. 

November. Thurs. 6. — John MuUett, 
of the 16th Ward, Salt Lake City, was 
accidentally shot and killed, while hunting 
ducks on the Jordan river. 

Tues. 25. — A grand celebration was held 
in Provo, on the event of the Utah South- 
ern Railway being completed to that city. 

Wed. 26. — Geo. White Pitkin, a respected 
Church veteran, died at Millville, Cache 
Co., Utah. 

Fri. 28. — Pres. Brigham Young and Geo. 
A. Smith and others left Salt Lake City 
for St. George, where they arrived Dec. 
15th. They spent the winter there. 

Sat. 29. — A man and woman were burned 
to death at Alta, Salt Lake Co. 

December. Mon. 1. — Notwithstanding 
Geo. R. Maxwell's protest, Geo. Q. Can- 
non was permitted to take his seat in Con- 
^I'ess. 

Sat. 20.— The first number of Utah Pos- 
ten, a weekly newspaper in the Danish- 
Norwegian language, was published by 
Peter O. Thomassen, in Salt Lake City. 
This was the first paper published in a 
foreign language in Utah. 



1874. 

The Utah Northern Railway was opened 
from Ogden to Franklin, Idaho. A large 
number of Indians joined the Church. 
Work on the St. George Temple was 
pushed forward with vigor. The United 
Order was introduced among the Saints. 

January. Fri. 2.— Sally W. Phelps, 
relict of the late Judge Wm. W. Phelps, 
was killed by a skylight falling from a 
building near the Townsend House, Salt 
Lake City. 

3fon. i2.— The Utah legislature (21st 



session) convened in Salt Lake City and 
organized by electing Lorenzo Snow presi- 
dent of the Council, and Orson Pratt 
speaker of the House. 

Thurs. 2.9.— Bishop David H. HoUiday.of 
Santaquin, Utah Co., died. 

Februai'y. Thurs. -5.- The Utah North- 
ern Railway was opened for traffic be- 
tween Brigham City and Ogden. 

Thurs. /2.— Bishop John Proctor, of the 
10th Ward, Salt Lake City, died. 

Jfon. 16. — In the House of Representa- 
tives at Washington. D. C, Geo. Q.Can- 
non presented a memorial from the 
Utah legislature, asking Congress to ap- 
point a commission to investigate Utah 
affairs, about which the anti- Mormons had 
made serious complaints. 

Wed. 18. — Peter Van Valkenberg, of 
Union, Salt Lake Co., was shot and killed 
near his residence. The murderers were 
soon afterwards captured. 

March. — Apostle Joseph F. Smith suc- 
ceeded Lester J. Herrick as president of 
the European mission. 

Jlon. 2.— In the U. S. House of Repre- 
sentatives Geo. Q. Cannon introduced a 
bill for admitting Utah into the Union as a 
State. 

Sat. 7. — Mrs. Judson, of Fillmore, was 
burned to death. 

ApriL Wed. 1. — A box, containing valu- 
able records, was deposited in the wall of 
the St. George Temple. 

Sat. 4. — David Martin Perkins, formerly 
a member of the Mormon Battalion, died 
at Pleasant Green, Salt Lake Co. 

Sat. 11. —Robert Lang Campbell, clerk at 
the Historian's Office, died in the 12th 
Ward, Salt Lake City. 

Jlon. 20. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
Geo. A. Smith, and party, arrived in Salt 
Lake City, from St. George, where they 
had spent the winter. 

— A party of representative men from 
Australia visited Salt Lake City, on a tour 
of inspection. 

May. Sat. 2.— The Fairview Coal Mi- 
ning and Coke Company was incorporated. 

Sun. 3. — Geo. D. Watt was excommuni- 
cated from the Church, at Kaysville, Da- 
vis Co., for apostacy. 

Wed. 6. — The steamship yevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 155 Saints, 
in charge of Lester J. Herrick. The com- 
pany arrived at New York May 21st, and 
at Salt Lake City May 30th. 

Thurs. 7. — The 44th annual conference 
of the Church was commenced in Salt 
Lake City. The principal subject dwelt 
upon by the speakers was the "United Or- 
der", which was organized with Brigham 
Young as president. The conference was 
continued until the 10th. 

Thurs. 14. — St. Mark's Cathedral 
(Episcopal) in Salt Lake City was conse- 
crated. 

Fri. i5.— Hon. Cyrus W. Field, origin- 
ator of the Atlantic cable system, and Mr. 
Kingsley, an eminent English gentle- 
man, accompanied by other men of promi- 
nence, arrived at Salt Lake City, on a 
visit. 

F7'i. 22.— General Alexander W. Doni- 
phan, favor ably known in Church History 
during the Missouri persecutions in 1838, 
visited Salt Lake City. 



92 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1874. 



Sun. 24. — The Sevier Stake of Zion was 
partly organized by Apostles John Taylor 
and Orson Pratt, with Joseph A. Young as 
president and Albert K. Thurber as his 
first counselor. 

— Mons. Henri Rochefort, the celebrated 
Communist leader, who had recently 
escaped from imprisonment in the French 
penal settlement. New Caledonia, arrived 
in Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

Fri. 29. — A hurricane did much damage 
at Ogden. 

June. — The Utah Educational Bureau 
was established in Salt Lake City, by Dr. 
John R. Park. 

Tues. 2. — One hundred Goshute Indians 
were baptized by the Indian interpreter 
Wm. Lee in Deep Creek, Tooele Co.. Utah. 
Hundreds of Indians were subsequently 
baptized at other places, and there was a 
general religious movement among the 
Lamanites. 

TrecZ. 10.— Ex- Judge Solomon P. Mc- 
Curdy, an old and inoffensive man, was as- 
saulted and abused by Thomas Hackett, a 
soldier. 

Thurs. 11. — A party of soldiers from 
Camp Douglas, under command of Major 
Gordon, broke into the jail at Salt Lake 
City and rescued their comrade, Thomas 
Hackett, who had been confined there for 
assaulting Solomon P. McCurdy the pre- 
vious day. 

— The steamship Xevada sailed from 
Liverpool. England, with 243 Saints (131 
British, 91 Swiss and German, 10 Dutch 
and 11 Icelandic), in charge of Joseph 
Birch. The company arrived at New York 
June 23rd, and at Salt Lake City July 2nd. 

rues. 2.3.— The so-called Poland biU, "in 
relation to courts and judicial officers in 
the Territory of Utah," was approved, 
having been passed by the U. S. House of 
Representatives and Senate. 

Wed. 24. — The steamship Idaho sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 806 Saints 
(about 700 Scandinavian and 110 British), 
in charge of P. C. Carstensen. The com- 
pany arrived at New York July 6th, and at 
Salt Lake City July 15th. 

July. — This month was remarkable for 
much lightning, thunder and rain storms 
in Utah. 

Wed. 1. — Patriarch Thomas Kington died 
at Wellsville, Cache Co. 

Sat. 4. — General Phil. H. Sheridan and 
party arrived in Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

Wed. 8. — The steamship Mi nnesota sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 81 Saints,in 
charge of John Keller. The company ar- 
rived at New York July 21st, and at Salt 
Lake City, July 30th. 

Fri. 17. — Thomas Williams, treasurer of 
Z. C. M. I., and of the Salt Lake Theatre, 
died suddenly in Salt Lake City. 

Sun. 19. — The Glenwood branch, Sevier 
Co., Utah, was organized as a Ward; 
Archibald T. Oldroyd, Bishop. 

FH. 24. — The anniversary of the en- 
trance of the Pioneers into Salt Lake 
Valley was celebrated by a grand juvenile 
jubilee, in the large Tabenacle, Salt Lake 
City. Four thousand musicians and sing- 
ers participated. 

August. Sun. 2. — Edward L. Sloan, one 
of the founders of the Salt Lake Herald, 
died in Salt Lake City. 



Mon. 3. — At the general election, Geo. 
Q. Cannon was re-elected Utah's dele- 
gate to Congress. He received 22,260 votes,^ 
and Robert N. Baskin, the Liberal candi- 
date, 4,513. 

— An attempt was made by the "Libe- 
ral Party" to get possession of the polls of 
election in Salt Lake City. U. S. Marshal 
Maxwell and a horde of armed assistants 
rendered aid. Mayor Daniel H. WeUs was 
mobbed, and considerable rioting done at 
the City Hall,but the plot proved a failure. 

Thxtrs. 20. — Loptur Johnson, a native of 
Iceland, was accidentally killed, near 
Spanish Fork, Utah Co. 

Thurs. 27. — General John E. Smith, the 
new Camp Douglas commander, arrived in 
Salt Lake City. He succeeded Gen. Henry 
A. Morrow. 

Sat. '>.'y.— John McDonald, sen., fell from 
a haystack and was killed, in Salt Lake 
City. 

September.— Wm. Fotheringham was 
arrested at Beaver on a charge of poly- 
gamy, and placed under §2,000 bonds. 

Wed. 2. — The steamship Wyoming sailed, 
from Liverpool, England, with 558 Saints, 
mostly British, Swiss and German, In 
charge of John C. Graham. The company 
arrived at New York Sept. 14th, and aX 
Salt Lake City Sept. 23rd. 

Fri. 11. — The U. S. marshal seized the 
county clerk's office of Tooele County, 
upon an order issued by Judge McKean. 

Wed. 30. — A terrible fire destroyed con- 
siderable grain and hay, at Huntsville, 
Weber Co. 

October. Sicn. 4. — Jay Gould, accom- 
panied by a distinguished party of wealthy 
railw?y gentlemen, arrived in Salt Lake 
City. 

— Mrs. Elizabeth Adams, of Bountiful, 
Davis Co., was shot and killed by an un- 
known person, while engaged in reading 
in her own house. 

Mon. -5. — Arthur Pratt, Fanny Sten- 
house and others were excommunicated 
from the Church by the High Council, in 
Salt Lake City. On the 8th Andrew 
Cahoon was cut off. All these for apostacy. 

Tues. 6. — Ephraim Green, formerly a 
member of the Mormon Battalion, died at 
Rockport, Summit Co. 

Wed. 7. — Patriarch James Lake died at 
Oxford, Oneida Co , Idaho. 

Sat. 10. — Ann Eliza Webb Young, one of 
Pres. Brigham Young's wives, was excom- 
municated from the Church. 

Sun. 11. — Bishop Andrew H. Scott, of 
Provo (2nd Ward), Utah Co., died. 

— The First Presbyterian Church in Salt 
Lake City was dedicated. 

Wed. i-/. —The steamship Wyoming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 155 Saints, 
under the direction of Wm. N. Fife. The 
companj' arrived at New York Oct. 26th, 
and at Salt Lake City Nov. 5th. 

Thurs. 22.— The first number of the Ftah 
Scandimiv, an anti-Mormon weekly news- 
paper, was issued in Salt Lake City, in 
the Danish-Norwegian language. After 
about three years' run it ceased publica- 
tion. 

Mon. 2IJ. — Geo. Reynolds, who had been 
indicted by the grand jury for polygamy 
appeared in court and was placed under 
$2,.500 bonds, awaiting trial. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1875. 



93 



Tnurs. 29. — Pres Brigham Young, who 
for some time had been unwell, left Salt 
Lake City for the South, accompanied by 
Geo. A. Smith and othei* prominent men. 
They arrived at St. Geerge Nov. 11th. 

November. Thurs. 5. — A frightful 
hurricane did considerable damage in 
Tooele County. 

Jfon 9. — Jolin D. Lee, of Mountain Mead- 
ows celebrity, was arrested at Panguitch, 
Piute Co. 

Thurs. 12. — Geo. Q. Cannon was arrested 
in Salt Lake City, on a charge of polygamy, 
and placed under §5,000 bonds. 

Wed 25. — Phinehas Richards, brother 
of the 'late Pres. Willard Richards, and 
father of Apostle Franklin D. Rich- 
ards, died in Salt Lake City. 

December. Fri. 4. — Wm. Hepworth 
Dixon, a celebrated English author, vis- 
ited Salt Lake City. 

Wed. 9.— Major Edward P. Duzette, cel- 
ebrated drummer of the Nauvoo brass 
band, died at Rockville, Kane Co. 

FW. 25. — The workmen of the St. George 
Temple had a Christmas assembly in the 
St. George Tabernacle. 

Mon. 28.— Gov. Geo. L. Woods left Salt 
Lake City for the East, Samuel B. Axtell 
having been appointed his successor. 

1875. 

Young Men's Mutual Improvement Asso- 
ciation work was made universal through- 
out the settlements of the Saints. Judge 
McKean and supporters became very ag- 
gressive aud caused considerable bitter 
feeling between the Mormon and anti- 
Mormon elements in Utah; the judge, how- 
ever, was superceded by David B. Lowe. 

January. Tues. 5. — An act of the Idaho 
legislature, creating Bear Lake County, 
was approved ; Paris was made the county 
seat. 

F)-i. S. — Wm. Fotheringham, of Beaver, 
was arrested on a charge of "committing 
adultery with his wife," and placed under 
$300 bonds. 

.Sun. 10. — The Utah Western Railway 
(later the Utah and Nevada) was opened 
for traffic to Black Rock, on the shore of 
Great Salt Lake. 

Jfoii. 11. — The explosion of a quantity of 
oil at the Utah Central Railway station, 
at Salt Lake City, did considerable dam- 
age to property. 

— A terrible snowslide, resulting in the 
loss of four lives and much property, oc- 
curred in Little Cottonwood Canyon. 

tiat. 16. — Albert Stickney was killed in 
Summit Canyon, Utah Co., by a snowslide. 

Tues. 19. — Six persons were killed by a 
snowslide, near Alta, Little Cottonwood 
Canyon. 

Wed. 20. — Thomas Broderick, Joseph 
Ferguson and four other men were killed 
by a snowslide in Big Cottonwood Canyon. 
Their bodies were not found until the fol- 
lowing spring. 

Sun. 24. — A delegation from Salt Lake 
City had an interview at Ogden with His 
Majesty Kalakaua, king of the Hawaiian 
Islands. 



February. Tties. 2. — Samuel B. Axtell, 
ninth governor of Utah, arrived in Salt 
Lake City. 

Tues. 16.— The Utah Southern Railway 
was completed to York, Juab Co. 

FH. 19. — Pres. Brigham Young, who 
had spent the winter in St. George, ar- 
rived in Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 25. — In the case of Brigham Young 
vs. Ann Eliza Young, Judge McKean de- 
cided that the defendant, Pres. Brigham 
Young, should pay §9,500 alimony. 

3Iarch. Wed. 3.— W. G. Thomas was 
killed by a snowslide, in Little Cottonwood 
Canyon. 

jSun. 7. — A branch of the Church was or- 
ganized at West Porterville, Morgan Co. 

Mon. S.— Joseph S. Schofield, of Salt 
Lake City, died at Bellevue, southern 
Utah. 

Tves. 9. — The case of Kate Flint, vs. 
Jeter Clinton et al., for the abatement of 
her house of ill fame, by the Salt Lake 
City police officers, was commenced in the 
Third District Court. The jury disagreed. 
Thurs. 11. — Pres. Brigham Young was 
sentenced to confinement in the Peni- 
tentiary, by Judge James B. McKean, 
for alleged contempt of court, in the Ann 
Eliza Young case, 

Fri. 12. — After 24 hours' confinement, 
Pres. Brigham Young was released from 
the Utah Penitentiary. 

Tues. 16. — Richard Fryer shot his wife 
and baby and Thomas Batty, and Fryer 
was killed by the sheriff, who attempted to 
arrest the insane murderer, at Toquer- 
ville, southern Utah. Mrs. Fryer died of 
her wounds the same day. Batty on the 
17th, and the baby on the 18th. 

Wed. i7.— Major Seth M. Blair died at 
Logan. 

Thurs. 18. — Chief Justice James B. Mc- 
Kean, was superceded by the appointment 
of David B. Lowe, of Kansas. 

Sat. 20. — About two hundred Indians 
from the desert were baptized at St. 
George. 

Thurs. 25. — William Kay, the founder of 
Kaysville, Davis Co., died at Ogden. 

Wed. 31. — The trial of George Reynolds, 
for polygamy, was commenced in the Third 
District Court, in Salt Lake City. The 
following day (April 1st) the jury brought 
in a verdict of guilty. 

April. F7-i. 2.— The case of Geo. Q. 
Cannon, indicted for polygamy, was dis- 
missed in the Third District Court. 

Sat. 3. — Wm. H. Dame, indicted on a 
charge of having participated in the Moun- 
tain Meadows massacre in 1857, and who 
had been imprisoned since October, 1874, 
was taken out of the Utah Penitentiary 
and sf-nt to Beaver. 

Tues. 6. — The 45th annual conference of 
the Church was commenced in Salt Lake 
City. It was continued till the 10th. 

Sat. 10. — Geo. Reynolds was sentenced to 
one year's imprisonment and a $300 fine for 
polygamy. The case was appealed, and 
the defendant admitted to bail in bonds of 
§5,000. 

Wed. 14. — John D. Lee, who had been 
confined at Fort Cameron, was brought 
before the Second District Court, at 
Beaver, but the trial was continued for the 
term. 



94 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1875. 



May. HVf/. 12.— The steamship Wyo- 
ming sailed from Liverpool, England, with 
176 Saints, under the direction of Hugh S. 
Gowans and others. The company arrived 
at New York May 24th, [and at Salt Lake 
City .Tune 3rd. 

F7-i. i-/.— Elder John B. Fairbanks died 
at Payson, I'tah Co. 

— ADout two hundred and fifty aged 
people from Salt Lake County had a pleas- 
ant excursion to Dr. Clinton's Hotel, at 
Lake Point, on the Great Salt Lake. This 
was the beginning of the Old Folks' annual 
excursions. 

June.— General James A. Garfield ar- 
rived in Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

.Saf. .3.— Elder Wm. Gibson died at Salt 
Lake City. 

Man, 7.— Elder Ralph Harrison died in 
Salt Lake City, from the effects of an acci- 
dent a few days previous. 

Tues. 8.— Geo. W. Emery, of Tennessee, 
was appointed governor f)f Utah, in place of 
Samuel B. Axtell, who was removed be- 
cause of his friendship to the "Mormons." 

Thurs. iO.— The first Young Men's Mu- 
tual Improvement Association was organ- 
ized in the 13th Ward, Salt Lake City, with 
H. A. Woolley as president, and B. Morris 
Young and Heber J. Grant as counselors. 

Tues. 15. — John Burns, a railroad em- 
ploye, was accidentally killed on the Utah 
Western (now Utah and Nevada) Rail- 
way. 

Wed.lH. — The steamship H/.s-co/2.s-/)i sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 167 Saints, 
under the direction of Robert T. Burton. 
The company arrived at New York June 
27th, and at Salt Lake City July 8th. 

Sat. i.9. — The Territorial Supreme Court 
reversed the decision in the case of George 
Reynolds, owing to the illegality of the 
grand jury that found the bill of indict- 
ment. 

Mon. 2S. — Bishop Culbert King baptized 
8.5 Indians of Kanosh's band, at Kanosh, 
Millard Co. More than two thousand 
Indians had been baptized previous to this 
time. 

Wed. 30. — The steamship Idaho sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 765 Saints, 
under the direction of Christen G. Larsen. 
The company arrived at New York July 
14th. and at Ogden July 22nd. 

July. Sat. .;.— Geo. W. Emery, of Ten- 
nessee, successor to Samuel B. Axtell 
as governor of Utah, arrived in Salt Lake 
City. 

Sat. 10. — Martin Harris,one of the Three 
Witnesses to the Book of Mormon, died in 
Clarkston, Cache Co., 92 years of age. 

F7-i. 16. — Philip Klingensmith, an im- 
portant witness for the prosecution in the 
John D. Lee case, arrived at Beaver, from 
California. 

Sat. 17. — Pres. Brigham Young, his 
Counselors and others renewed their cove- 
nants by baptism at Ephraim, Sanpete Co. 
This example was subsequently followed 
by the Saints generally. 

— Emeline Free Young, wife of Pres. 
Brigham Young, died in Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 22. — Governor Samuel B. Axtell 
left Salt Lake City for New Mexico,where 
he had been appointed chief justice. 

— The trial of John D. Lee, indicted for 
murder, was commenced at Beaver. 



August. Sun. i.— Geo. W. Hill baptized 
over three hundred Indians in Box Elder 
County, Utah, and many of them, who 
were sick, were miraculously healed under 
his administration. 

Thurs. '). — Elder Joseph A. Young died 
at Manti, Sanpete Co., and Amos Fielding 
died in Salt Lake City. 

Sat. ;.— Bishop Wm. Miller, alias "Bogus. 
Brigham," died at Provo, Utah Co., and 
Elder Alphonso Green died at his resi- 
dence, between Lehi and American Fork, 
Utah Co. 

— After a long trial in the case of John. 
D. Lee, at Beaver, the jury disagreed. 

Thur.s. 12. — A band of peaceable Indians 
were driven from their grain fields and 
lodges on Bear river, by U. S. authority. 
This was evidently the result of a con- 
spiracy on the part of the citizens of Co- 
rinne. 

Thurs. 19.— Gen. Philip H. Sheridan and 
wife arrived in Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

Wed. 2-'). — Robert E. Biard, one of the 
Utah Pioneers of 1847, died at Lynne, 
Weber Co., Utah. 

September. — Apostle Albert Carring- 
ton succeeded Apostle Joseph F. Smith as 
president of the European mission. 

Wed. 1. — Geo. A. Smith, first Counselor 
to Pres. Brigham Young, died at his 
home — the Historian's Office — Salt Lake 
City. 

Wed. 13. — The steamship Wj/077iing sailedi 
from Liverpool, England, with 300 Saints, 
in cl arge of Richard V. Morris. The 
company landed in New York, Sept. 27th, 
and arrived at Salt Lake City, Oct. 5. 

Sat. if.j.— Elizabeth Henriod suicided at 
Nephi, Juab Co. 

Mon. 27. — Elder Haden W. Church, who^ 
labored as a missionary in the Southera 
States, died at Shady Grove, Hickman, 
Co., Tenn. He was formerly a member of 
the Mormon Battalion. 

October. Snn. 3. — U. S. Grant, Presi- 
dent of the United States, arrived in Salt 
Lake City, on a visit. He was met by 
Pres. Brigham Young and other prominent 
mea at Ogden. 

Jfon. 4.— Pres. U. S. Grant and party 
left Salt Lake City for Denver, Colo. 

t^at. .9. — At the general conference the 
large Tabernacle, in Salt Lake City, was. 
dedicated. A large number of mission- 
aries were called during the conference. 

Thurs. 14. — The steamship Dakota sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 120 Saints, 
in charge of Bedson Eardley. The com- 
pany arrived at New York Oct. 24th, and 
at Salt Lake City Nov. 3rd. 

Thurs. 28. — Nine buildings in Salt Lake 
City were destroyed by fire. 

Fri. 2fJ. — Pres. Brigham Young was ar- 
rested by U. S. Marshal Geo. R. Maxwell, 
by order of Judge Bo reman, on a charge 
of contempt of court. He had not com- 
plied with the order to pay §9,500 alimony 
to Ann Eliza Young. 

Sat. 3(1. — President Brigham Young 
deeded some valuable real estate for the 
B. Y. Academy, at Provo, to the trustees 
of that institution. 

Sun. 31. — Baron Lionel de Rothschild 
and party arrived in Salt Lake City, on a 
visit. 

November. Mon. i.— The grand jury 



CHUBCH CHRONOLOGY — 1876. 



95- 



having found another indictment against 
George Reynolds for polygamy, he was 
again arrested and placed under $2,500 
bonds. 

Wed. 3. — Prince Fi-ederick, of "Wittgen- 
stein, Count Turenne and Baron Roths- 
child paid a visit to Pres. Brigham Young, 
in Salt Lake City. 

lion. 8. — The Saints who had settled 
near the Sevier river, between Richfield 
and Glen wood, Sevier Co., Utah, were or- 
ganized into the Prattville Ward, with 
Joseph K. Rogers as Bishop. 

Tues. 16. — The First National Bank 
building in Salt Lake City was destroyed 
by fire ; loss about 8200,000. 

Thiirs. IS. — Pres. Brigham Young was 
discharged from the custody of the U. S. 
marshal, by order of Chief Justice J. 
Alexander White. 

December. — The ladies of Utah sent a 
petition having 23,626 signatures to Con- 
gress, praying for the admission of Utah 
into the Union as a State, and the repeal 
of the anti polygamy laws. 

Thurs. 9. — A second trial of George 
Reynolds for polygamy was commenced in 
the Third District Court, Salt Lake City. 

Tues. 14. — A bill was presented to the 
U. S. House of Representatives, to enable 
the people of Utah to form a constitution 
and State government, and for the ad- 
mission into the Union as a State. 

iSun. 19. — Elder John Snider, one of the 
first missionaries to England, died in Salt 
Lake City. 

— James McKnight was excommunicated 
from the Church for apostacy. 

Tues. 21. — Geo. Reynolds was sentenced, 
in the Third District Court, to two years' 
imprisonment and to pay a $500 fine. Pend- 
ing an appeal to the Supreme Couri, at 
Washington, D. C, the defendant was ad- 
mitted to bail in $10,000. 

Sat. 25. — Another fatal snowslide oc- 
curred in Little Cottonwood Canyon. 



1876. 

Settlements of the Saints were founded 
on the Little Colorado river, Arizona. 
About four thousand persons from differ- 
ent parts of the world visited the Temple 
Block during this year. The Utah 3Iusical 
Times was published by Calder & Careless, 
in Salt Lake City. 

January. Fr-i. 7. — Daniel W. Jones 
and company of missionaries crossed the 
Rio Grande from El Paso Texas to Ciudad 
Juarez,Mexico,and commenced their labors 
as the first Latter-day Saint missionaries 
in that country. 

Mori. 10.— The 22nd session of the Utah 
legislature convened in Salt Lake City, 
and organized by electing Lorenzo Snow 
president of the Council, and Orson Pratt 
speaker of the House. 

— Father James Allred, 92 years old, died 
at Spring City, Sanpete Co. 

Wed. i.9.— Elder Isaiah M. Coombs, with 
a company of Saints (about twenty 
souls), sailed from Liverpool, England, on 
the steamship Montana. The company ar- 



rived at New York Jan. 31st, and at Salt 
Lake City Feb. 6th. 

Sun. 30. — Patriarch James Turnbull 
died in Salt Lake City. 

February. Tfiurs. 3. — A number of 
missionaries, who had been called to locate 
settlements in Arizona, left Salt Lake 
City, with teams for that Territory. 

Jfon. 14. — At the municipal election, 
Feramorz Little was elected mayor of Salt 
Lake Citj'. 

FH. IS. — The legislative assembly of 
Utah closed its session. It had labored 
diligently in the interest of the people, 
without compensation. The funds that 
should have paid its expenses had been ap- 
propriated by Congress to pay the ex- 
penses of the Federal courts. 

Tues. 29. — Robert Harris, a member of 
the Mormon Battalion, died suddenly at 
Kaysville, Davis Co. 

3Iarch. Tues. 14. — A fatal snowslide 
occurred at Ophir, Tooele Co. 

— Seven prisoners escaped from the Pen 
itentiary, after having overpowered the 
guards and fatally wounded Captain Berg- 
her, who died on the 16th. The prisoners 
were all recaptured. 

FH. i:.—W. D. Phelps, one of the 
escaped convicts and murderers, was 
wounded with fatal effect by Sheriff John 
D. Holladay, who tried to capture him 
near Santaquin, Utah Co. 

Mon. 20.— Elders Daniel W. Jones, Held- 
man Pratt, James Z. Stewart, Anthony W. 
Ivins and Wiley C. Jones, of the Mexican 
missionaries, left Ciudad Juarez for the 
interior of Mexico ; they arrived at Chi- 
huahua, the capital of Chihuahua, April 
2nd. 

ThKvs 23. — The advance companies of 
Arizona settlers, (called from Utah), ar- 
rived at Sunset Crossing, Little Colorado 
river, Arizona. Others followed, and soon 
afterwards the settlements of Allen (St. 
Joseph), Obed, Sunset and Ballenger 
(Brigham City) were founded by them. 

April. Sat. i.— The new Z. C. M. I. 
building on Main Street, Salt Lake City, 
was opened for business. 

Wed. 5. — Forty tons of powder in maga- 
zines on Arsenal Hill, north of .Salt Lake 
City, exploded, resulting in the loss of four 
lives and great destruction of property. 
The shock was felt for miles around. 

— The Mexican missionaries in the City 
of Chihuahua mailed about five hundred co- 
pies of Tre3o's"Selectos" (extracts from the 
Book of Mormon, translated into Spanish 
by Milton G. Trejo) to prominent men in 
the principal cities of Mexico. 

Thurs. 6". — The 46th annual conference of 
the Church convened in Salt Lake City ; it 
was continued for four days. 

Sat. S. — By permission from Gov. Luis 
Terrazas, the Mexican missionaries held a 
meeting in the city of Chihuahua. About 
five hundred people attended. This was 
the 'first Latter-day Saint meeting ever 
held in the interior of Mexico. 

Wed. i2.^Father Eleazer Miller, one of 
the early members of the Church, died in 
the 12th Ward, Salt Lake City. 

Thto-s. 13. —P. S. Gillmore, the cele- 
brated music leader, gave a concert in the 
large Tabernacle, Salt Lake City. 

Tues. IS. — The Mexican missionaries ar- 



96 



CHURCH CHKONOLOGY— 1876. 



rived at Gerero, at the base of the Sierra 
Madre Mountains. After holding one 
meeting there, they returned to the United 
States. 

Sat. 22. — Dom Pedro, emperor of Brazil, 
and escort, arrived in Salt Lake City, on 
a visit. On the following day the em- 
peror attended the services in the 14th 
Ward Assembly Rooms, after vsfhich he 
continued his journey to California. 

Sun. 30. — A flood did considerable dam- 
age to property in the lower parts of Salt 
Lake City. 

May. ^fon. l.—Pres. Brigham Young, 
accompanied by Daniel H. Wells and 
others, left Salt Lake City for St. George, 
where they arrived May 9th. 

Moa. 8. — A company of immigrants, 27 
souls, from Minnesota, arrived at Salt 
Lake City. 

Thurs. 11. — After a long confinement 
Wm. H. Dame, John D. Lee and Geo. W. 
Adair were admitted to bail in the respect- 
ive sums of $20,000, 815,000 and $10,000. 

Wed. i7.— Daniel H. Wells and other 
Elders started from St. George, on a mis- 
sionary trip to the new settlements in Ari- 
zona. 

Wed. 24. — The steamship Nevada sailed 
from Liverpool, Jilngland, with 131 Saints, 
in charge of John Woodhouse. The com- 
pany arrived at New York June .5th, and 
at Salt Lake City June 14th. 

— Bishop Lorenzo W. Roundy, of Pres. 
Daniel H. Wells' missionary party, was 
drowned by the sinking of the ferry boat 
in the Colorado river, at Lee's ferry, and 
Pres. Wells and others barely escaped 
with their lives. 

Sun. 28.— Michael Schaeffer, the newly 
appointed chief justice for Utah, arrived in 
Salt Lake City. 

Tues. 30. — The mail coach was robbed 
near the Sevier river, in Juab County. 

June. — Much property in Utah was des- 
troyed by floods, caused by the sudden 
melting of snow in the mountains. 

Thurs. 8. -The OlA Folks of Salt Lake 
County had a pleasant excursion to Provo, 
Utah Co. 

Jfon. 12. — Pres. Brigham Young and 
party left St. George for Salt Lake City, 
where they arrived July 1st. 

Tues. 13.— The case of George Reynolds, 
convicted and sentenced to the peniten- 
tiary under the anti-bigamy law, was 
argued before the Supreme Court of the 
Territory, on appeal. 

Sun. 18. — Levi Richards, brother of the 
late Willard Richards, died in the 20th 
Ward, Salt Lake City. 

Wed. 2i.— Mrs. Ann Smart was killed by 
lightning in Franklin, Oneida Co., Idaho. 

Thurs. 22.— The convicts at the Peniten- 
tiary, by a bola venture, took possession of 
the jail, and seven of the prisoners escaped. 

Wed. 28. — The steamship Idaho sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 628 British, 
Scandinavian and .Swiss Saints, in charge 
of Nils C. Flygare. The company arrived 
at New York July 10th, and at Ogden July 
18th. 

July. Thurs. 6.— The Supreme Court 
of Utah confirmed the decision and pro- 
ceedings of the lower court against Geo. 
Reynolds. The case was subsequently ap- 



pealed to the Supreme Court of the United 
States. 

— David WooUey Evans, Church phono- 
graphic reporter, and assistant editor of 
the Deseret Xeivs, died in Salt Lake City. 

Fri. 14. — Sidney Rigdon, formerly prom- 
inent in the Church, died in Alleghany 
County, New York. 

Mon. 17. — Four more convicts escaped 
from the Penitentiary. 

Sun. 23. — Patriarch Levi Jackman, a 
prominent Elder in the Church and one of 
the Pioneers of 1847. died at Salem, Utah 
Co. 

Wed. .?6".— Samuel L. Evans, of the 6th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, having been in- 
dicted by the grand jury for polygamy, 
was arraigned in the Third District Court. 
He pleaded not guiltv and was placed un- 
der S500 bonds. 

Jfon. 31. — In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Judge Michael Schaeffer 
rendered a decision in the case of Brigham 
Young i>s. Ana Eliza Young, in which the 
alimony was reduced from $.500 to 1100 a 
month. 

August. Tties. 1. — The first number of 
Bikuben, a weekly newspaper in the Dan- 
ish language, was published in .Salt Lake 
City, by Anders W. Winberg. 

Tues. 8. — Elder Jonathan Pugmire died 
in Salt Lake City. 

Wed. .<y.— Wm. Diamond, of Richfield, 
Sevier Co., was killed by lightning, near 
that town. 

Wed. IH. — Chauncey Loveland, one of 
the Utah Pioneers of 1847, died at Bounti- 
ful, Davis Co., Utah. 

Mon. 21.— A. band of Navajo Indians ar- 
rived in Salt Lake City on a visit. 

September. Sat. 2. — The order of July 
31st not having been complied with, $4,000 
worth of property, belonging to Pres. 
Brigham Young, was attached to satisfy 
the order for alimony in the Ann Eliza case. 
The property, however, was not sold. 

Sun. 10. — The Saints who had settled on 
Mink Creek, Oneida Co., Idaho, were or- 
ganized into the Mink Creek branch of the 
Church, with Rasmus Rasmussen as presi- 
dent. 

Wed. 13. — The steamship Wyoming 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 322 
Saints, in charge of Wm. L. Binder. The 
company arrived at New York Sep. 23rd, 
and at Salt Lake City Oct. 3rd. 

Th urs. 14. — John D. Lee was again placed 
on trial in Beaver, Beaver County, for par- 
ticipation in the Mountain Meadows mas- 
sacre. On the 20th he was convicted of 
murder in the first degree. 

Wed. 20.— Geo. D. Grant, a brother of 
the late Jedediah M. Grant, died at Boun- 
tiful, Davis Co. 

Fri. 29. — Earl Dufferin, governor-gen- 
eral of Canada, and party arrived in Salt 
Lake City, on a visit. 

October. — Small pox prevailed in Salt 
Lake City and Ogden. 

Tues. 3. — General Wm. T. Sherman and 
party arrived in Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

Sat. 7. — ^At the general conference John 
W. Young, son of President Brigham 
Young, was sustained as First Counselor 
to Pres. Young, in place of the late Geo. 
A. Smith. 

Sun. 8.— Lavina Walker, eldest daughter 



CHUECH CHRONOLOGY — 1877. 



97 



of Hyrum and Jerusha Smith, died at Far- 
mington, Davis Co. 

Tues. 10. — Judge .Jacob S. Boreman sen- 
tenced John D. Lee to be shot on Jan 26. 
1877. 

Mon. 16. — The Brigham Young Academy 
was founded in Prove. 

Wed. 2'). — The steamship Wt/oming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 118 Saints, 
in charge of Peter Barton. The company 
arrived at New York Nov. 4th, and at Salt 
Lake City Nov. 12th. 

November. Wed. 1. — Pres. Brigham 
Young, Wilford Woodruff, Geo. Q. Cannon 
and Brigham Young, jun., accompanied by 
members of their families, left Salt Lake 
City for St. George, where they arrived 
Nov. 9th. 

December. Mt>n. 4. — Archibald T. 
Gardner, son of Bishop Archibald Gard- 
ner, of West Jordan, Salt Lake Co., was 
killed by the explosion of a boiler, at a 
sawmill, in Little Cottonwood Canyon. 

FH. <S'. — A central committe of the Y. 
M. M. I. Associations was organized at the 
Council House, Salt Lake City. Junius F. 
Wells was elected president; Milton H. 
Hardy and Rodney C. Badger were chosen 
counselors: John Nicholson, Richard W. 
Young and Geo. F. Gibbs, secretaries; and 
Mathoni W. Pratt, treasurer. 

Mon. 78.— Elder Wm. S. Phillips, for- 
merly a prominent missionary in Wales, 
died at Brigham City, Box Elder Co. 

F7-i. 29. — Two men were killed by a snow 
.slide in Little Cottonwood Can von. 



1877 

The first Temple built bv the Saints 
in Utah was dedicated at St. George. 
The settlements of the Saints were more 
perfectly organized into Stakes of Zion. 
President Brigham Young died, and the 
Council of Twelve Apostles once more 
took charge of the affairs of the Church. 
Elders Louis Garff and Milton G. Trejo 
opened a mission in Sonoro, Mexico, and 
baptized five in Her mos ilia, the capital of 
Sonoro. The publication of the History 
of Joseph Smith (Joseph Smith's Levnets- 
lob) was commenced in Salt Lake City by 
Elders Andrew Jenson and Joh. A. Bruun. 
This was the first book published in Utah 
in the Danish-Norwegian language. 

January. — The first number of Xord- 
sfjei-uan,ii, semi-monthly Church periodical, 
was published in Goteborg, Sweden: John 
C. Sandberg, editor. After issuing a few 
numbers there, its publication was con- 
tinued in Copenhagen, Denmark. 

— Rich silver mines were discovered near 
Leeds, southern Utah. 

Mon. 1. — The lower part of the St. 
George Temple was dedicated, under the 
direction of Pres. Brigham Young. There 
were present 1,230 persons. 

i'Vi. 5. — Wm. M. Evans, a prominent 
Elder, died at Nephi, Juab Co. 

Tues. .9. — The first ordinance for the 



dead in the St. George Temple was admin- 
istered. 

Fri. 19. — Samuel Holmes was crushed to 
death at the Utah Central Railway depot. 
Salt Lake City. 

February.— Garden City, Rich Co., 
Utah, was 'settled by Wright A. Moore 
and others, and organized as a branch of 
the Church, which became a Bishop's Ward 
in 1879. 

>iaf. .).— Elder Wm. Stevenson died at 
Holden, Millard Co., Utah. 

.S;//i. 4. — Amasa M. Lyman, once a mem- 
ber of the Council of Twelve Apostles, 
died at Fillmore, Millard Co. 

Sat. 24. — The first number of the Silver 
Beef Echo was published at Silver Reef, 
Utah; Joseph E. Johnson, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

Sun. 25.- The Saints who had settled 
Redmond, Sevier Co., Utah, were organ- 
ized intoaWard; John Johnson, Bishop. 

March. Thur^. /.— Thos. Heath was 
accidentally drowned in the Jordan river, 
near Salt Lake City. His body was not 
found until four weeks afterwards. 

Tuei^. 6.— A company of Latter-day 
Saints from Utah, undeV the direction of 
Daniel W. Jones, arrived on Salt river, 
Arizona, and encamped near the present 
site of Lehi. Mai-icopa Co. 

IT>(/. 7.— In the Second District Court, 
at Beaver. John D. Lee was re sentenced 
to be executed March 23rd. 

Sun. n.— .Vlatthew Ingram and Jared 
Pratt were killed by a snowslide, near 
Alta, Little Cottonwood Canyon. 

Mon. 12. — Levi P. Luclcey, who, on Feb. 
13, 1877, had been appointed secretary for 
Utah, arrived in Salt Lake City. 

Sun. IS. — Lyman Leonard, one of the 
early settlers,'died in Salt Lake City. 

Fri. 23. — John D. Lee was executed at 
the Mountain Meadows, southern Dtah. 

Thurn. 2.9.— Wm. P. Tippets, once a mem- 
ber of Zion's Camp, died at Three Mile 
Creek, Box Elder Co., Utah. 

April. F'ri. 6. — The 47th annual confer- 
ence of the Church was commenced in the 
Temple at St. George. Pres. Brigham 
Y oung, his Counsleors , most of the Apostles 
and a number of leading Elders were pres- 
ent, and the Temple was fully dedicated. 
Pres. Daniel H. Wells offered the dedica- 
tory prayer. A more perfect organization of 
the' various Stakes of Zion was commenced, 
and John D. T. McAllister was (on April 
7th) appointed president of the St. George 
Stake, with Thos. J. Jones and Henry Ey- 
ring as his counselors. A nur^er of mis- 
sionaries were called. 

Fri. 13.— The Old Folks of the 20th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, were treated to a 
sumptuous supper at the meeting house. 
There was no general excursion arranged 
for tie old folks this year. 

— Elder Levi W. Riter died in Salt Lake 
City. 

Wed. IS. — At a two days' meeting held 
at Kanab, Kane Co., the Kanab Stake of 
Zion was organized, with L. John Nuttall 
as president, and Howard O. Spencer and 
James L. Bunting as counselors. 

J/b«. 23. — At a two days' meeting held at 
Panguitch, Piute (now Garfield) Co., Utah, 
the Panguitch Stake of Zion was organ- 
ized by Apostles John Taylor, Lorenzo 



98 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1877. 



Snow and Erastus Snow, with James 
Henrie as president, aad Geo.W. Sevy and 
Jesse W. Crosby, jun., as counselors. 

Wed. 25. — The temple site at Manti, San- 
pete Co., was dedicated. Pres. Brigham 
Young offered the dedicatory prayer. 

— The military post recently located 
near Beaver City was named Fort Cam- 
eron, by order of Asst. Adjutant-General 
R. Williams. 

Fri. 27. —Pres. Brigham Young and party 
returned to Salt Lake City from St. 
George. 

—The case of Ann Eliza Young vs. Brig- 
ham Young was finally decided in the 
Third District Court, Salt Lake City, the 
alimony being disallowed. 

3fon. 30 — Ground was broken for the 
Manti Temple. 

May. Wed. 2.— Elder Briant W. Now- 
land was accidentally killed at Mr. Black's 
sawmill, in Butterfield Canyon, Salt Lake 
Co. 

Thvrs. 3. — Elder Miles Romney, a prom - 
inent Elder, died at St. George. Utah. 

iSun. 6. — The Saints who had founded 
Kingston, Circle Valley, Piute Co., were 
organized as a branch of the Chursh; Wm. 
King, presiding Elder. 

Thurs. 10. — Bishop Aaron Johnson died 
at Springville, Utah Co. 

Sun. 13. — At a special conference held in 
Salt Lake City, Angus M. Cannon was 
sustained as president of the Salt Lake 
Stake of Zion, with David O. Calder and 
Joseph E. Taylor as counselors. 

Fri. 18. — The ground for the Logan 
Temple was dedicated. Apostle Orson 
Pratt offered the dedicatory prayer. 

Sun. 20. — The first converts to "Mor- 
monism" among the Pima Indians were 
baptized at Camp Utah, on Salt river, 
Ariz. Among them was the chief Che-eh- 
chum. 

Mon. 21. — At a Priesthood meeting held 
in Logan, the Cache Stake of Zion was 
partly reorganized; Moses Thatcher, pre- 
sident: Wm. B. Preston and Milton D. 
Hammond, counselors. Pres. Brigham 
Young delivered a very important dis- 
course on Priesthood. 

Sun. 21. — At a special conference held at 
Ogden, Utah, the Weber Stake of Zion 
was partly reorganized; with David H. 
Peery, president; Lester J. Herrick and 
Charles F. Middleton, counselors. 

— On this and the following day, Salt 
Lake City and Ogden was visited by an 
editorial excursion from Nevada. 

Mon. 28.—if^he reorganization of the We- 
ber Stake was completed by the appoint- 
ment of Ward officers. Ogden was divided 
into four Wards, instead of three as here- 
tofore, with Francis A. Brown as Bishop of 
the First, Robert McQuarrie of the Sec- 
ond, Winslow Farr of the Third and Nils 
C. Flygare of the Fourth Ward. The sev- 
eral settlements and districts in Weber 
County, which hitherto had existed 
only as branches of the Church, were 
organized, as Bishop's Wards, name- 
ly, Riverdale (Sanford Bingham, Bishop) 
Harrisville (Pleasant G. Taylor, i^ishop) 
North Ogden (Amos Maycock, Bistiop) 
Plain City (Lewis W. Shurtliff, Bishop) 
Slaterville (John A. AUred, Bishop) 
Lynne (Daniel F, Thomas, Bishop) ; Mar 



riott's (Jas. Ritche, Bishop) ; Mound Fort 
(David Moore, Bishop) ; Huntsville (Fran- 
cis A. Hammond, Bishop) ; Eden (Josiah 
M. Ferrin, Bishop) ; West Weber (John I. 
Hart, Bishop) ; and Hooper, (Gilbert Bel- 
nap, Bishop). 

Wed. 30. — Elders Helaman Pratt and 
George Terry commenced a short mission 
among the Yaquis Indians, Sonora,Mexico. 

Thurs. 31. — Jerome B. Stillson, corres- 
pondent of the New York Herald, alleged 
that an attempt on his life had been made 
in Salt Lake City. The affair was investi- 
gated and resulted unsatisfactorilj' to 
Stillson. 

June. — Apostle Joseph F. Smith suc- 
ceeded Apostle Albert Carrington as pre- 
sident of the European mission. 

Wed. a. — The settlement of Santaquin, 
Utah Co., Utah, was organized as a Ward; 
Geo. Halladay, Bishop. 

Thurs. 7.— The Saints at Gunlock, Wash- 
ington Co., Utah, were organized as a 
branch of the Church ; Dudley Leavitt, as 
president. 

Mon. 11. — Alderman Walter Thomson 
died at Ogden. 

Tues. 12.~Dr. Ezekiel Lee died in Salt 
Lake City. 

Wed. 13. — The steamship Wyoming sail- 
ed from Liverpool, England, with 18& 
Saints, in charge of David K. TIdall. The 
company arrived at New York June 23rd, 
and at Salt Lake City July 3rd. 

Thurs. 14. — Benson Ward, Cache Co.^ 
was organized; Alma Harris, Bishop. 

Sun. 17. — At a special conference, held at 
Farmington, a Stake of Zion was organ- 
ized in Davis County, with Wm. R. Smithy 
of Centreville, as president, and Christo- 
pher Layton, of Kaysville, and Anson Call, 
of Bountiful, as counselors. 

— At a special meeting held at West Jor- 
dan, Salt Lake Co., that Ward was divided 
into four Wards, namely: North Jordan, 
with Samuel Bennion as Bishop, West 
Jordan,with Archibald Gardner as Bishop, 
Fort Herriman, with James Crane as 
Bishop, and South Jordan, with Wm. A. 
Bills as Bishop. 

Mon. 18.— The Pinto settlement, Wash- 
ington Co., was organized as a Ward; 
Robert Knell, Bishop, 

Wed. 20. — At a special meeting, held at 
Bountiful, that Ward was divided into 
three parts, namely: East Bountiful, West 
Bountiful and South Bountiful, with 
Chester Call, Wm. T. Muir and William 
Brown as their respective Bishops. 

Sun. 24. — At a special meeting held at 
Tooele, Tooele Co., the Tooele Stake of 
Zion was organized, with Francis M. 
Lyman as president, and James Ure and 
Wm. Jeffries as counselors. Three new 
Wards were partly organized, namely, E. 
T. City (Wm. F. Moss, Bishop) ; Lake 
View (Moses Martin, Bishop), and Vernon 
(John C. Sharp, Bishop). 

Turs. 2S. —South Hooper, Davis Co., 
which formerly constituted a part of the 
Kaysville Ward, was organized as a 
separate Ward; Henry B. G Williams, 
Bishop. 

Wed. 27. — The steamship Wisconsin 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 714 
Saints, in charge of John Rowberry. The 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1877. 



99 



company arrived at New York July 7th, 
and at Salt Lake City July 14th. 

Fri. 2.9.— South Weber,which had former- 
ly belonged to the Weber Stake of Zion, 
was organized as a Ward, with David S. 
Cook as Bishop, and attached to the Davis 
Stake of Zion. 

July. — Elder John Jaques, who for six 
years past had occupied the position as as- 
sistant editor of the Deseret Xeu-s, was 
appointed to take temporary charge of the 
Historian's office, during the absence of 
Historian Orson Pratt on a special mission 
to England. Elder Charles W. Penrose 
was appointed assistant editor of the 
Deseret Xeirs. 

i^un. 1. — Tiie Saints residing in Morgan 
County were organized as the Moreran Stake 
of Zion, with Willard G. Smith, as presi- 
dent, and Richard Fi\v and Samuel Fran- 
cis, counselors. The following Wards were 
also organized : North Morgan, Wyman 
M. Parker, Bishop; South Morgan, Char- 
les Turner, Bishop; Riehville, Albert D. 
Dickson, Bishop; East Porterville, Joseph 
R. Porter, Bishop; Milton, Eli Whitear, 
Bishop; Enterprise, John K. Hall, Bishop; 
Croyden, John Hopkins, Bishop; and 
Weber (Peterson), Charles S. Peterson, 
Bishop. 

—At a special conference held at Nephi, 
Juab Co., Utah, the Saints residing in 
Juab County were organized as the Juab 
Stake of Zion with George Teasdale as 
president. (This organization was a con- 
tinuation of the Nephi Stake of Zion or- 
ganized in 1868. ) Nephi wasjdivided into 
two Wards, with Joel Grover as Bishop 
of the South and Charles Sperry as 
Bishop of the North Ward. Levan 
and Mona, which previously had ex- 
isted as branches of the Church, were 
organized into Wards, the former with 
Niels Aagaard and the latter with John 
M. Hawes as Bishop. 

— South Cottonwood, Salt Lake Co., was 
divided into three Wards, namely. South 
Cottonwood, Union and Granite, with 
JosepVi S. Rawlins, Ishmael Phillips and 
Solomon J. Despain^as Bishops, respec- 
tively. 

Wed. 4. — The Sanpete Stake of Zion was 
reorganized with Canute Peterson as presi- 
dent and Henry Beal and John B.Maibenas 
counselors. Eleven new Wards were partly 
organized, namely, Chester, Reddick N. 
Allred, Bishop; Fayette, John Birtholo- 
mew, Bishop; Thistle Valley (Indianola), 
Jefferson Tidwell, Bishop; Mayfleld, O. C. 
Olsen, Bishop; Manti South Ward, Hans 
Jensen, Bishop; Manti North Ward, Wm. 
T. Reid, Bishop; Ephraim North Ward, 
Lars S. Andersen, Bishop ; Ephraim South 
Ward, Carl C. N. Dorius, Bishop; Mt. 
Pleasant North Ward, Orange Seelev, 
Bishop; Mt. Pleasant South Ward, Wm. S. 
Seeley, Bishop; Petty ville (Sterling), Wm. 
G. Petty, Bishop, and Wales, John E. 
Reese, Bishop. Gunnison, Mayfield and 
Fayette, which formerly belonged to the 
Sevier Stake organization, were made a 
part ot the Sanpete Stake. 

Thurs. 5. — The eastern part of the 
Twentieth Ward, Salt Lake City, was or- 
ganized as the Twenty- first Ward; An- 
drew Burt, Bishop. 

Mon. 9. — The Saints residing in Summit 



County, Utah, were organized by Apostles 
John Taylor, Lorenzo Snow and Franklin 
D. Richards as the Summit Stake of Zion; 
Wm. W.Cluff, president; Geo. G. Snyder 
and Alma Eldredge, counselors. The or- 
ganization of six new Wards was also pro- 
vided for, namely: Echo (Elias Asper, 
Bishop) ; Henefer (Charles Richens, Bish- 
op) ; Hoytsville (Andrew Hobson, Bishop) ; 
Parley's Park (Joseph H. Black, Bishop) ; 
Upton (Charles Staley, Bishop), and Rock- 
port (Edward Bryant, Bishop. 

Tues. 10. — Preston Thomas, sen., a prom- 
inent Elder was accidentally killed at 
Franklin, Oneida Co., Idaho. 

Sun. i.5.— East Mill Creek Ward (Salt 
Lake Co. ) , formerly the north part of Big 
Cottonwood Ward, was organized as a sep- 
arate Ward ; John Neff , Bishop. 

— At a special conference held at Heber, 
Wasatch Co., Utah, the Wasatch Stake of 
Zion was organized by Apostles John Tay- 
lor and Franklin D. Richards, with Abram 
Hatch as president and Thomas H. Giles 
and Henry S. Alexander as counselors. Six 
new Wards were organized, namely. Cen- 
tre (Benjamin Cluff, Bishop) ; Charleston 
(Nymphus C. Mirdock, Bishop); Heber 
West Ward (Wm. Foreonan, Bishop); 
Heber East Ward (Thos. Rasband, Bish- 
op) ; Midway (David Van Wagener, Bish- 
op, and Wallsburg (Wm. E. Nuttall, 
Bishop). 

— At a special conference held at Rich- 
field, Sevier Co., the Sevier Stake of Zion 
was reorganized by Apostles Orson Hyde 
and Erastus Snow, with Franklin Spencer 
as president; Albert K. Thurber and Wm. 
H. Seegmiller, counselors. Several new 
Wards were organized, namely, Richfield 
First Ward, Paul Poulsen Bishop; Rich- 
field Second Ward, Tarleton Lewis, Bishop; 
Elsinore, Joshua W. Sylvester, Bishop: 
Central (Inverury), Wm. A. Steward, 
Bishop; Vermillion, Peter Gotfredsen, 
Bishop ; Grass Valley, Joseph H. Wright, 
Bishop, and Joseph City, Gideon A Mur- 
dock. Bishop. 

Thurs. 19. — Dr. Jeter Clinton was r- 
rested at Tooele, on a trumped up charge 
of murdering John Banks in 1862. He was 
brought to Salt Lake City and imprisoned 
in the Penitentiary. 

.Sun. 22. — At a special conference held at 
Fillmore, Millard Co., Utah, the Millard 
Stake of Zion was reorganized,with Ira N. 
Hinckley as president, and Edward Par- 
tridge and Joseph V. Robison as counsel- 
ors. Fillmore was divided into two Wards 
called the North and South Ward, 
with Alexander Melville as Bishop of the 
South and Joseph D. Smith as Bisliop of 
the North Ward. Meadow Creek, Holden 
and Oak Creek, which hitherto had existed 
as branches, were organized into Wards 
with Hyrum B. Bennett, David R. Stevens 
and Platte D. Lyman as their respective 
Bishops. Joseph S. Black was appointed 
Bishop of Deseret, which place had been 
resettled. 

3{on. 23. — Farmers Ward, Salt Lake Co., 
was organized; Lewis H. Mousley, Bishop. 

Tues. 24. — President Brigham Young 
deeded 9,642 acres of land in Cache Valley 
to the B. Y. College, at Logan. 

Thurs. 26. — At a special conference held 
at Beaver, the Beaver Stake of Zion was 



100 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1877, 



organized: John R. Murdock, president; 
John Ashworth and Marcus L. Shepherd, 
counselors. 

Tues. .;7.— The first cremation in Salt 
Lake City took place, Dr. Chas. F. Wins- 
low, who had died July 7th, having made 
provision for this disposition of his body, 
in his will. 

August.— Geo. Q. Cannon and Brigham 
Young, jun., succeeded David O. Calder as 
editors and publishers of Xhe Deseret Xeiva. 

After the death of Willard Richards, 
the first editor of the Jhacrrt Xews, in 
March, 1854, Albert Carrington occupied 
the position as editor of the paper till 
March, 1859, when he was succeeded by 
Elias Smith, whose name appeared as editor 
and proprietor until September, 1863,when 
Albert Carrington again became editor. 
In November, 1867, he was succeeded by 
Geo. Q. Cannon, whose name appeared as 
editor and publisher till August, 1873, 
when David O, Calder became editor and 
publisher, continuing thus till 1877. 

Sat. 4. — After severe sufferings at the 
Penitentiary, Dr. Jeter Clinton was re- 
moved to the county jail. Salt Lake City. 
Some time afterwards he was set at 
liberty. 

— Glendale, Kane Co., was organized as 
a Ward ; James Leathead, Bishop. 

Sun. '). — At a Stake conference held at 
Panguitch, Piute Co., Kingston, Hillsdale, 
Clinton (afterwards named Cannonville), 
and Escalante were organized as Wards, 
with Wm. King, Seth Johnson, Jonathan 
T. Packer and Andrew P. Schow as their 
respective Bishops. 

Tues. 7. — Johnson, Kane Co., was organ- 
ized as a Ward; Sixtus K. Johnson, 
Bishop. 

Thurs. .9.— Apostle Orson Pratt arrived 
at Liverpool England, to superintend, the 
republication of the Book of Mormon and 
the Doctrine and Covenants, but soon 
afterwards he was called home, on account 
of the death of Pres. Brigham Young. 

Sun. 12. — Spring Lake branch, Utah Co., 
was organized as a Ward; Benjamin F. 
Johnson, Bishop. 

Sun. 1'.). — At a special conference held at 
Brigham City, Utah, the Box Elder Stake 
of Zion was oTganized,with Oliver G. Snow 
as president, and Elijah A.. Box and Isaac 
Smith as counselors. Brigham City was 
divided into four Wards, with Henry 
Tingey as Bishop of the First Ward, 
Alvin Nichols of the Second, John D. Burt 
of the Third, and John Welch of the 
Fourth. Bishops were also appointed for 
the smaller settlements, namely : Alonzo 
Perry, for Three Mile Creek ; Geo. W. 
Ward, for Willard; Peder C. Jensen, for 
Mantua; Thos. Harper, for North Ward; 
Abraham Hunsaker, for Honeyville ; John 
C. Dewey, for Deweyville ; H. J. Faust 
for Corinne; Wm. Neeley, for Bear River 
City; Arnold Goodliffe, for Curlew (now 
Snowville) ; Samuel Kimball, for Grouse 
Creek; Oliver C. Hoskins, for Portage; 
Geo. Dunford, for Malad City, and Samuel 
Williams, for Samaria. The three last 
named Wards were in Malau Valley, 
Idaho; all the others in Box Elder Co., 
Utah. 

Fri. 24. — A delegation of fifteen Navajo 
Indians, among whom was the principal 



chief of the tribe, arrived in Salt Lake 
City. 

Sat. 2o. — At a special conference held at 
Paris, Bear Lake Co., Idaho, the Bear 
Lake Stake of Zion was reorganized, with 
Wm. Budge as president, and James H. 
Hart and Geo. Osmond as counselors. 
Bishops for the different settlements in 
the Stake were also appointed, as follows : 
Henry J. Home, Paris Fii-st Ward; Robt. 
Price, Paris Second Ward; Henry Lewis, 
Georgetown ; Joseph Moore, Bennington; 
Henry H. Dalrymple, Preston; Peter 
Jensen, Ovid; Edwin N. Austin, Liberty: 
John A. Hunt. St. Charles, and Charles 
E. Robison Montpelier. At the continua- 
tion of the conference the following day 
(Sun. 26th), Wm. Hulme was sustained as 
Bishop of Bloomington, Robert Pope of 
Fish Haven, Ira Nebeker of Laketown, 
Joseph Kimball of Meadowville, Randolph 
S. Stewart of Randolph, and Wm. H. Lee 
of Woodruff. 

Wed. ?.9.— Pres. Brigham Young died at 
his residence, in Salt Lake City. 

September. Sat. 1. — Elder John Ben- 
nion died at North Jordan, Salt Lake Co. 

Sun. 2.— The funeral of Pres. Brig- 
ham Young took place from the large 
Tabernacle, Salt Lake City. 

Tues. J.— The Twelve Apostles publicly 
assumed their position as the head of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints. 

Wed. 5. — The first number of the TerH- 
torial E)iquirer was issued at Provo, Utah 
Co. ; John C. Graham, editor. 

Wed. 12. — Apostles Orson Pratt and 
Joseph F.Smith (and family) and Franklin 
S. Richards sailed from Liverpool, Eng- 
land, bound for Utah. The affairs of the 
European mission were left in the tempo- 
rary charge of Elder Henry W. Naisbitt. 

—Elder John Hubbard,^>f Willard, Box 
Elder Co., Utah, died at the Wichita 
reservation, Kan. 

Mon. 17. — The corner stones of the 
Logan Temple were laid. 

Wed. W. — The steamship Wisconsin 
sailed from Liverpool, England, with 482 
Saints, in charge of Hamilton G. Park. 
The company landed at New York Sept. 
30th, and arrived at Salt Lake City Oct. 
6th. 

Thurs. 27. — Apostles Orson Pratt and 
Joseph F. Smith arrived at Salt Lake City, 
from their missions to Europe. 

Fri. 2S. —The corner stones of the Salt 
Lake Assembly Hall were laid near the 
southwest corner of the Temple Block, 
Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 29. — Hannah Fielding, widow of 
Joseph Fielding and one of the first who 
embraced the gospel in England, died at 
Ogden. 

— O. Porter Rockwell was arrested and 
imprisoned in Salt Lake City, being 
charged with murder, said to have been 
committed about twenty years before. 
Oct. 5th, he was admitted to bail in the 
sum of ?lo,000. 

October. ,Srt/. 6'.— On this and the fol- 
lowing day, the semi-annual conference of 
the Church was held in Salt Lake City ; 
John Taylor, presiding. John W. Young 
and Daniel H. Wells, formerly Counselors 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1878. 



101 



to Pres. Brighara Young, were sustained 
as Counselors to the Twelve Apostles. 

Tues. .9. — Elder James T. Lisonbee, of 
Monroe, Sevier Co., died at Springville, 
Utah Co., on his way home from a mission 
to the Southern States. 

Sat. 13.— The Utah Stake of Zion, (ori- 
ginally known as the Provo Stake), em- 
bracing the Saints residing in Utah County, 
Utah, was reorganized by Apostles John 
Taylor, Wilford Woodruff and Erastus 
Snow, with Abraham O. Smoot as presi- 
dent and David John and Harvey H. Clufif 
as counselors. Two new Wards were or- 
ganized, namely : Provo Fifth Ward (Lake 
View), with Peter Madsen as Bishop, and 
Salem, with Robert H. Davis as Bishop. 

Wed. 17. — The steamship Idaho sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 1.50 Saints, 
in charge of Wm. Paxman. The company 
arrived at New Y^ork Oct. 29th, and at 
Salt Lake City Nov. 7th. 

Tues. 23.— The Saints at Portage, Box 
Elder Co., were organized as a Ward of 
the Box Elder Stake of Zion ; Oliver C. 
Hoskins, Bishop. 

November. Thio-s. 1. — Elder John S. 
Higbee, one of the Pioneers of 1847, died at 
Toquerville, Washington Co. 

Wed. 7. — The first number of the Ama- 
teur was published by the Y'. M. M. I. As- 
sociation of Ogden ; Joseph A. West, edi- 
tor. 

Tues. 13. — Patriarch Philip B. Lewis 
died at Kanab, Kane Co. 

Sun. 18. — The Saints residing on the 
Weber river, below the mouth of Weber 
Canyon, Weber Co., were organized as the 
EastonWard; Ira N. Spaulding, Bishop. 

Thurs. 2.9. — A company of Latter-day 
Saint settlers from Utah arrived on the 
San Pedro river, Arizona. They became 
the founders of St. David. 

December. ,Suu. !J. — The Saints who 
had settled at Almy, principally as coal 
miners, were organized as the Almy Ward ; 
James Bowns, Bishop. 

Hun. 16. — The Saints who had settled in 
Rabbit Valley (now. Wayne Co.), Utah, 
were organized as a branch of the Church, 
called the Rabbit Valley branch; Jere- 
miah Stringham, president; the branch 
was organized as a Ward in 1878,with Geo. 
S. Rust as Bishop: still later it was named 
Loa. 

FH. 21.— Samuel Pitchforth, the first 
person baptized on the Isle of Man, died 
at Nephi, Juab Co, 

— The woolen factory at Brigham City, 
Box Elder Co., was destroyed by fire. 

Mon. 31. — The Saints at Dingle Dell, 
Bear Lake Co., Idaho, were organized as a 
branch of the Bear Lake Stake of Zion ; 
Wm. Passey, presiding Elder 

18T8. 

Settlements of the Saints were located in 
Castle Valley, Utah ; San Luis Valley, Colo. ; 
and on Salt river, Ariz. Two Stakes of 
Zion were organized in Arizona. The 
Book of Mormon was translated into the 
Swedish language by August W. Carlson, 
and published at Copenhagen, Denmark, by 
Nils C. Flygare. 



January. — The first Latter-day Saint 
settlers at Mesa, Maricopa Co., Ariz., 
located. 

Wed. 2. — The first number of the Salt 
Lake Independent was issued in Salt Lake 
City. It onlj"^ continued its Jcareer about 
two months. 

3Ion. 14. — The 23rd session of the Utah 
legislature convened in Salt Lake City, 
and organized by appointing Lorenzo 
Snow president of the Council, and Orson 
Pratt speaker of the House. 

Sun. 20. — Elder Llewellyn Harris arrived 
at a village of the Zuni Indians, in New 
Mexico. About four hundred of these 
Indians, who were suffering with small 
pox, were said to have been healed under 
his administration. 

Fri. 25. — Ebenezer Brown, member of 
the Mormon Battalion, died at Draper, 
Salt Lake Co. 

Su)i. 27. — The Saints who had settled on 
the Little Colorado river, Apache Co., 
Arizona, wei'e organized as a Stake of 
Zion, with Lot Smith as president, and 
Jacob Hamblin and Lorenzo H. Hatch as 
counselors. Geo. Lake was ordained 
Bishop of Brigham City (formerly Ballin- 
ger) : Levi M. Savage, Bishop of Sunset. 
John Kartchner was appointed presiding 
Elder of Taylor, and John Bushman, act- 
ing Bishop of St. Joseph (formerly Allen;. 
This was the first Stake of Zion organ- 
ized in Arizona. 

February. Sat. .9. — Capt. John Robin- 
son died at Birch Creek, Weber Co. 

March. F)-l. t3.— Philip T. Van Zile 
took the oath of office as district attorney 
for Utah. 

Sat. 16. — Major Howard Egan and Burr 
Frost, both Pioneers of 1847. died in Salt 
Lake City. 

Sun. i7.— Col. Stephen Markham died at 
Spanish Fork, Utah Co. 

Wed. 20. — Elder James Z. Stewart, of 
Draper, left Salt Lake City on a special 
mission to explore for a location, upon 
which the Saints, who emigrated from the 
Southern States, could settle. This mis- 
sion led to the purchase of Mexican claims 
in Conejos County, Colorado, where set- 
tlements subsequently were made. 

Sun. 24. — Adamsville, Beaver Co., was 
organized as a Ward of the Beaver Stake 
of Zion ; Joseph Henry Joseph, Bishop. 

April. Wed. 3.— The Utah Northern 
Railway was sold at auction in Salt Lake 
City, the Union Pacific Railroad Company 
being the purchaser. The name of the 
road was changed to the Utah and North- 
ern. 

Sat. 6. — The 48th annual conference of 
the Church was commenced in Salt Lake 
City. It was continued till the 8th. 

FH. i2.— Elder E. W. Street, a young 
missionary from Utah, died at Breach - 
wood, Green Heath, Herts, England. 

May. Fri. 17. — Bishop David Brinton 
died suddenly at Big Cottonwood, Salt 
Lake Co. 

— Hon. E. B.Washburn and party arrived 
in Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

Sun. 19. — Daniel R. Sellers and Mary A. 
Kirtland, with their respective families, 
arrived at a place near Los Cerritos, Cone- 
jos Co., Colo., as the first Saints from the 



loa 



CHURCH CHEONOLOGY — 1878. 



Southern States to settle in San Luis Val- 
ley, which had been selected by the autho- 
rities of the Church as a gathering place 
for the Saints from the Southern States. 
Other families soon followed. 

Sat. 25. — The steamship Ncvfida sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 354 Saints, 
under the direction of Thos. Judd. The 
company arrived at New York June 5th, 
and at Salt Lake City June 13th. 

June. — A small four-page paper called 
the St. George iTnion was first published 
at that place by J. W. Carpenter. 

— Grasshoppers did considerable damage 
in Utah. 

Sat. 1. — Berne, Bear Lake Co., Idaho, 
Tva« organized as a branch of the Church, 
with John Kunz, sen., as president. The 
branch was organized into a Ward in 1890. 

Man. 3. — Isaiah Huntsman, a member of 
the Mormon Battalion, died at Annabella, 
Sevier Co. 

Thurs. 6.— Richmond, Ray Co., Mo., 
was partly destroyed by a cyclone, in 
which a number of the old anti- Mormon 
mobocrats were injured and others killed. 

Sat. S. — Lydia Partridge, relict of the 
late presiding Bishop Edward Partridge, 
died at Oak City, Millard Co. 

Sica. 9. — O. Porter Rockwell died in Salt 
Lake City. 

Tups. 11. — About five hundred and fifty 
persons participated in the Salt Lake 
County Old Folks' excursion to Ogden, 
"Where the aged people had a splendid time. 

Sat. 15. — The steamship Montana sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 221 Saints, 
in charge of Theodore Brandley. The 
company arrived at New York June 25th, 
and at Salt Lake City July 3rd. 

Wed. 19. — Wm. V. Morris, a painter of 
ability, died in Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 22. — A party of eleven persons were 
accidently drowned in Funk's Lake, near 
Manli, Sanpete Co., while boat-riding. 

Thurs. 27.— Elder Daniel S. Thomas died 
at Lehi, Utah Co. 

Sat. 29. — The steamship Xcvada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 569 Saints, 
in charge of John Cook. The company ar- 
rived at New York July 10th, and at Salt 
Lake City July 18th. 

July. Tues. 2.— In a horse race, at St. 
Charles, Bear Lake Co., Idaho. Thomas G. 
Rich, son of Apostle Charles C. Rich, was 
a.ccidentally killed. 

Fri. .5.— Elder Joseph E. Hyde, who was 
returning from a mission to England, died 
■on board the steamship Xevada. 

Sat. H. — William Budge, of Paris, 
Idaho, arrived in Liverpool, England, as 
successor to Apostle Joseph F. Smith in 
the presidency of the European mission. 

Thurs. n.— John Whitmer, one of the 
Eight Witnesses to the Book of Mormon, 
died at Far West, Caldwell Co., Mo. 

August. Thurs 1. — A fire broke out in 
Alta, Little Cottonwood Canyon, destroy- 
ing nearly the whole camp, except a few 
•cabins. Loss : $100,000. 

Fri. W.— The tower of the St. George 
Temple was struck by lightning and slight- 
ly damaged. 

September. Ttirs. 3. — Apostles Orson 
Pratt and Joseph F. Smith, accompanied 
by other Elders, left Salt Lake City on a 
special mission to the States. 



Fri. 6. — Two small boys, sons of Joshua 
Terry, of Draper, Salt Lake Co., were 
buried in a sandbank and killed. 

Man. 9. — Apostles Orson Pratt aud Jo- 
seph F. Smith visited Far West, Mo., after 
previously visiting David Whitmer at 
Richmond. They afterwards visited Kirt- 
land. O., and the hill Cumorah, N. Y. 

Sat. 14. — The steamship Wj/oininq sailed 
from Liverpool, Englanr , with 609 Saints, 
in charge of Henry W. Naisbitt. The 
company arrived at New York, Sept. 25th, 
and at Salt Lake City, Oct. 3rd. 

Sat, 21. — A small company of Saints 
sailed from Liverpool, England, on the 
steamship Xevada, in charge of J. C. 
Christensen. 

Tues. 24.— The Saints who were settling 
on Silver Creek, Apache Co., Ariz., were 
organized by Apostle Erastus Snow as a 
Ward; John Hunt, Bishop. The next day 
(Sept. 25th) Apostle Snow located the 
townsite, which was named Snowflake, in 
honor of Erastus Snow and Wm. J. Flake. 

Wed. 25. — Joseph Farnsworth was acci- 
dentally killed, while working in a coal 
mine at Coalville, Summit Co. 

Fri. 21. — Sam Kaealoi, a native of the 
Marquesas Islands, was accidentally killed 
on the Temple Block, Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 28. — The Saints who had settled 
near the top of the Mogollon Mountains, 
Arizona were organized by Apostle Eras- 
tas Snow as the Forest Dale Ward ; Oscar 
Mann, Bishop. 

October. Sun. 6. — Bishop Hans Jensen 
and other brethren from Manti, Utah, 
arrived at Los Cerritos,- Conejos Co., Colo., 
on a special mission to help locate the 
Saints from the Southern States in the 
San Luis Valley. 

Tues. 8.— The trial of Sylvanus Collett 
for the murder of the Aiken party in 1857 
commenced at Provo. On the 16th, after a 
long trial, the jury returned a verdict of 
not guilty. 

Sat. 12.— The Saints who were settling 
in the San Luis Valley, Colo., were organ- 
ized as a branch of the Church with Bishop 
Hans Jensen as president, and John Allen 
and Soren E. Berthelsen as counselors. 
This was the commencement of settle- 
ments which afterwards became the San 
Luis Stake of Zion. 

Fri. 18.— A destructive fire at the Onta- 
rio mine, near Park City, caused a loss of 
$100,000, and heavy consequential damage. 

Sat. 19.— The steamship Wyoming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 145 Saints, 
in charge of Aurelius Miner. The com- 
pany arrived at New York Oct. 29th, and 
at Salt Lake City Nov. 6th. 

Fri. 25. — John Miles was arrested for 
bigamy or polygamy, CarolineOwen,claim- 
ing to be his first wife, being the principal 
witness. The defendant was admitted to 
bail in 11,500. 

Thurs. .7^^— After several days' prelimi- 
nary examination before Commissioner 
Sprague, John Miles, accused of polygamy, 
was again placed under $1,.500 bonds, to 
await the action of the grand jury. 

November. Thurs. 14.— On this and 
the following day the case of Geo. Rey- 
nolds was argued before the Supreme 
Court of the United States. 

Sat. 16. — A woman's mass meeting was 



CHUKCH CHKONOLOGY — 1819. 



103 



held in the Salt Lake Theater, numerously 
attended and addressed by prominent 
ladies. Resolutions were adopted with 
unanimity, in which the "Mormon" women 
claimed ability and the right to represent 
themselves. 

Wed. 20.^ James Fielding, a Church vet- 
eran, died in Salt Lake City. 

Wed. 27. — A letter was sent by Pres. 
John Taylor, directing the division of the 
settlements of the Saints in Arizona into 
two Stakes, making Berardoes (now Hol- 
brook) the dividing point between the Lit- 
tle Colorado Stake, on the West, and the 
Eastern Arizona Stake, on the East. 

Thitrs. 28. — Apostle Orson fiyde died at 
Spring City, Sanpete Co. 

Hat. 30. — Washington Phipps was mur- 
dered by John H. Boynton, near Esca- 
lante. Iron Co. 

December. Mon. 9. — Annie White and 
Mercy Robinson were burned to death at 
the Insane Asylum, near Salt Lake City. 

Sai. 21. — Apostle Orson Pratt, accom- 
panied by Elder Brigham S. Young, again 
-arrived in Liverpool, England. 

Tues. 24. — Isaac Sampson, one of the 
-early members of the Church, died at Glen- 
wood, Seyier Co.. Utah. 



1879. 

Settlements of the Saints were located 
on the San Juan river; in Ashley Val- 
ley, Utah; and in eastern Arizona. A 
branch of the Church was organized in 
Mexico. 

January. — The Saints who had settled 
on Cottonwood, Ferron and Huntington 
creeks. Castle Valley, were organized into 
branches of the Church. 

iSat, 4. — Elder Hugh Findlay arrived at 
Lerwich, to open the gospel door on the 
Shetland Islands. After encountering a 
number of difficulties, he succeeded, on 
March 31st, in baptizing two persons, as 
the first fruits of preaching the gospel on 
these islands. 

Sun. 5. — Ex- Judge James B. McKean 
died in Salt City, of typhoid fever. 

Mon. e.— The Supreme Court of the Uni- 
ted States unanimously confiimed the con- 
stitutionality of the anti- bigamy law of 
1862, and confirmed the sentence of the 
lower courts upoa George Reynolds. 

Sat. 11. — A Ward organization was ef- 
fected at Bunkerville, Lincoln Co., Nev., 
with Edward Bunker as Bishop. 

Sat. is.— Price Ward, near St. George, 
Utah, was organized, with Robert 
Gardner as Bishop. 

Thurs. 30. — Norton Jacob, one of the 
Pioneers of 1847, died at Glenwood, Se- 
vier Co. 

February. Sat. 1. — Dimick B. Hun- 
tington, Indian interpreter, and formerly a 
member of the Mormon Battalion, died in 
Salt Lake City. 

Mon. 3.— Elder Thomas R. King died at 
Kingston, Piute Co. 

— At a meeting of the Saints in San Luis 
Valley, Colo., it was decided to locate a 
settlement there to be called Manassa. 



The townsite was surveyed the following 
spring. 

Mon. 10. — Henry Wadman, jun., was 
killed by Joseph Dudley, at Plain City, We- 
ber Co. 

Sun. 16. — Gunlock branch, Washington 
Co., Utah, was organized as a Ward; Jo- 
seph S. Huntsman, Bishop. 

Thurs. 20.— The trial of Robert T. 
Burton, on a charge of murder during the 
Morrisite difficulty in 1862, was commenced 
in the Third District Court, Salt Lake 
City. On March 7th a verdict of not 
guilty was rendered. 

March. — Joseph C. Fisher located with 
his family on Poole's Island, north of Eagle 
Rock, as the flrst Latter-day Saint settler 
in Snake River Valley, Idaho. 

Sun. 23. — At a meeting held in Ogden, 
Utah, Lester J. Herrick and Chas. F. Mid- 
dletcm, of the Weber Stake presidency, 
organzed a company of Saints to settle on 
Snake river, Idaho, with John R. Pool as 
president. 

Fri. 28. — A company of Saints from 
Georgia and Alabama, in charge of Elder 
John Morgan, arrived at Alamosa, the end 
of the railroad track, and proceeded 
by wagons to the camp of the Saints, near 
Los Cerritos, Conejos Co., Colo., where 
they arrived the next day. 

April. Sun. i>. — The 49th annual con- 
ference of the Church, which was con- 
tinued three daj^s, commenced in Salt Lake 
City. A number of Elders were called on 
foreign missions. Moses Thatcher was 
chosen as one of the Twelve Apostles to 
fill the vacancy in the Council of the 
Apostles caused by the death of Orson 
Hyde. He was ordained on the 7th. 

Mon. 14. — The corner stones of the 
Manti Temple were laid. 

Sat. 19. — The steamship Wyoming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 170 Saints, 
in charge of Chas. W. Nibley. The com- 
pany arrived at New York April 30th, and 
at Salt Lake City May 8th. 

Thurs. 24.— The first Utah wheat was 
shipped by ocean to Liverpool, England, 
from San Francisco, in the sailing vessel 
Ivy, by S. W. Sears. 

Sun. 27.— Father Hezekiah Thatcher died 
in Logan, Cache Co. 

Wed. 30. — Emma Smith, formerly the 
wife of Joseph Smith, the Prophet, died 
at Nauvoo, 111. 

May. Thurs. 1. — After several days' 
exertion in getting a jury suitable for the 
prosecution, the trial of John Miles for 
polygamy began in the Third District 
Court, Judge Emerson presiding. 

Sat. 3.— Daniel H. Wells was sentenced 
by Judge Emerson to two days' imprison- 
ment in the Territorial Penitentiary, for 
alleged contempt of court, in refusing to 
describe the endowment clothing. 

Tues. e.— Daniel H. Wells was released 
from prison, and there was a grand dem- 
onstration in his honor. 

— John Miles was convicted of polygamy. 

Fri. is.— Wallace Wilkerson, a murderer, 
was executed in Prove. 

Sat. 24. — The steamship Wyoming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 170 Saints, in 
charge of Alexander F. Macdonald. The 
company arrived at New York June 3rd, 
and at Salt Lake City June 11th. 



104 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 187 'J. 



Sat. :si. — Silas S. Smith and company of 
explorers and settlers arrived on the San 
Juan river, in southeastern Utah, vpith a 
view to locating a settlement of the Saints 
there. 

June. Sun. 1. — At a special conference 
held in Ashley Valley, Qtah, the Saints, 
VFho had settled on the Ashley fork of 
Green river, were organized into three dis- 
tricts, named Incline, Ashley Centre and 
Mountain Dell, with Fred. G. Williams, 
Jeremiah Hatch and Thos. Bingham as 
their respective presidents. 

— Panguitch, Iron Co., was divided into 
two Wards, with Joseph C. Davis as Bishop 
of the First and Geo. W. Sevey as Bishop 
of the Second Ward. 

Thurs. 5. — Elder Fi-ederick Walter Cox, 
sen., died at Manti, Sanpete Co. 

Fri. IS.— The Utah Southern Railway 
was opened to Juab. Juab Co. 

— Suit was commenced in the Third Dis- 
trict Court by a few of Pres. Brigham 
Young's heirs against the executors of the 
estate. 

Sat. 14. — George Reynolds was re- sen- 
tenced in the Third District Court of Utah, 
and on the 16th he left Salt Lake City for 
Lincoln, Nebraska, to be confined there in 
the State Penitentiary. 

.Sat. 21. — Elder Jonathan Browning died 
at Ogden, Utah. 

Tues. 24.— The Old Folks of Salt Lake 
County had a grand excursion to Ameri- 
can Fork, Utah Co. Of the six hundred 
participants, 405 were over seventy years 
of age. 

Sat. 28. — ^The steamship Wi/oming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 622 Saints, 
in charge of William N. Williams. They 
arrived at New York July 8th, and at Salt 
Lake City, July 16th. 

July. Weci. 2. — John A. Hunter, of 
Missouri, was appointed chief justice of 
the Supreme Court of Utah. He arrived 
in Salt Lake City Aug. 4th, following. 

Thurs. 10.— The Deseret Sunday School 
Reader was issued from the press. It was 
the first effort of the Deseret Sunday 
School Union toward supplying the child- 
ren of the Latter-day Saints with desir- 
able and appropriate readers. 

Sat. 12. — John Taylor, Geo. Q. Cannon, 
Brigham Young and Albert Carrington 
were arrested on an order issued by Judge 
Jacob S. Boreman, for contempt, in not 
having delivered certain Church property 
to Receiver Wm. S. McCornick. 

Jfoji. 14. — The Saints in Park Valley, 
Box Elder Co., were organized as a Ward; 
Erastus D. Mecham, Bishop. 

Thurs. 17.— Geo. Reynolds was returned 
to Utah, to be confined in the Territorial 
Penitentiary. 

Jfon. 21. — Joseph Standing was shot and 
killed by a mob, near Varnell's Station, 
Whitfield Co., Georgia, where he had 
labored as a missionary. 

Thurs. :il.—Thb body of the martyred 
Joseph Standing arrived in Salt Lake City, 
in charge of Rudger Clawson. 

August. Sat. .?.— Timothy Saben Hoyt, 
a member of the Mormon Battalion, died 
at Nephi, Juab Co. 

Sun. :j. — The funeral services of Elder 
Joseph Standing were held in the large 
Tabernacle, Salt Lake City. 



3fon. 4. — Geo. Q. Cannon, Albert Car- 
rington and Brigham Young, executors 
of the estate of Pres. Brigham Young, 
were confined in the Utah Penitentiary, 
for alleged contempt of court. 

T2i€S. .3.— The Trustee-in -Trust of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
.Saints commenced suit against the heirs^ 
executors and receivers of the estate of 
Brigham Young, deceased. 

Sat. .V. — Wm. M. Evarts, Secretary of 
State, issued his noted letter of instruc- 
tions to diplomatic officers of the United 
States in various countries against "Mor- 
mon" emigration. 

Sun. 10. — "Apostle George Q. Cannon 
preached in the Penitentiary. 

Sat. If!. — Apostle Orson Pratt left Liver- 
pool, England, for Utah, having accom- 
plished the work assigned him in procuring 
electrotype plates for new editions of the 
Book of Mormon and Doctrine and Cove- 
nants. He had been ably assisted in his- 
labors by Joseph Bull, John Nicholson and 
others. 

Thurs. 2S. — The order of Judge Bore- 
man, committing Geo. Q Cannon, Brigham 
Young and Albert Carrington to the Peni- 
tentiary for alleged contempt, was re- 
versed by the Supreme Court of Utah and 
set aside ; the prisoners were released. 

September. — The first number of the 
Logan Leader was issued at Logan, Cache 
Co. 

Mon. 1. — Bishop Daniel Daniels died at 
Malad, Oneida Co., Idaho. 

Sat. 6. — Six men were suffocated in the 
Lavinia Mine, near Alta, Little Cotton- 
wood Canyon. 

— The steamship Wyoming sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 336 Saints, in 
charge of Nils C. Flygare. The company 
arrived at New York Sept. 16th, and at 
Salt Lake City Sept. 24th, 

Tues. 9. — Elder Elijah Fordham died in 
Wellsville, Cache Co.. over 81 years of 
age. 

Thurs. 2-j. — John T. Hilton was run over 
by railroad cars and killed, at Sandy, Salt 
Lake Co. 

Sat. 21. — Martha Howell, relict of the 
late Wm. Howell (first Latter-day Saint 
missionary to France) , died at Wellsville, 
Cache Co. 

Sun. 28. — Major Chas. H. Hempstead died 
in Salt Lake City. 

October. Sat. 4. — The first number of 
the (Contributor v^a^s issued in Salt Lake 
City ; Junius F. Wells, editor. 

— The suit of the heirs of the late Pres. 
Brigham Young rs. the administrators of 
the estate was settled by the Church pay- 
ing the heirs $75,000. 

Tues. 7. — Canute Peterson, Pres. of 
the Sanpete Stake of Zion, organized the 
Saints who had settled on Huntington 
creek, Castle V'alley. Utah, as Huntington ; 
Ward Elias Cox, Bishop. On the same day^ 
the Saints who had settledon Cottonwood 
creek, in the same valley, were organized 
by Pres. Peterson as Castle Dale Ward ; 
Jasper Petersen. Bishop. 

Wed. 8. — Ernest I. Young, son of Pres. 
Brigham Young, died suddenly in Salt 
Lake City. 

Thurs. 9.— The Saints who had settled ore 
Ferron creek. Castle Valley, were organ- 



CHUJICH CHRONOLOGY — 1880 



103 



ized as Ferron Ward, by Pres. Canute 
Peterson; Wm. Taylor, Bishop. 

Fr-i. 10. — Phineas H. Young, brother of 
the late Pres. Brigham Young, and one of 
the Pioneers of 1847, died in Salt Lake 
City. 

Sat. IS. — The steamship Arizona sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 224 Saints, 
in chai-ge of Wm. Bramall. The company 
arrived at New York Oct. 27th, and at Salt 
Lake City Nov. 5th. 

Mon. 20.— The Saints who had settled on 
Bear river, northeast of Preston, Oneida 
Co., Idaho, were organized as the River- 
dale branch of the Church ; Abraham Peter 
Davis, president. 

Tues.21.— The Saints who had settled on 
Worm Creek, Oneida Co., Idaho, were or- 
ganized as the Worm Creek Ward ; Nahum 
Porter, Bishop. This settlement was sub- 
sequently named Preston, in honor of Pre- 
siding Bishop Wm. B. Preston. 

Wed 22. — The murderers of Elder Joseph 
Standing were acquitted by the Circuit 
Court of Whitfield County, Georgia, after 
a short trial. 

November. Fi-i. 7.— The steamship 
Arizona, en route from New York to Liver- 
pool, and having four Utah Elders on 
board, collided with an iceberg and was 
greatly damaged, in consequence of which 
it had to seek shelter in St. Johns, New- 
foundland, and lie up for repairs. 

Tues. 11. — Job Rowland, one of the first 
Latter-day Saints who emigrated from 
Wales, died at Logan, Cache Co. 

Sat. 15. — Apostle Moses Thatcher and 
Elders James Z. Stewart and Meliton G. 
Trejo arrived in the city of Mexico, as 
Latter-day Saint missionaries. 

Sun. 16. — The Saints who had settled in 
Marsh Valley, Bingham Co.. Idaho, were or- 
ganized as Marsh Valley Ward; Melvin L. 
Gruce, Bishop. 

Wed. 19.— The first Young Men's Mutual 
Improvement Association in Scandinavia 
was organized in Copenhagen, Denmark, 
with Andrew Jenson as president. 

Thurs. 20.— The first Female Relief So- 
ciety in Scandinavia was organized in Co- 
penhagen, Denmark, with Johanne Chris- 
tine Nordstr0m as president. 

— Apostle Moses Thatcher baptized 
and confirmed Plotino Constantino Rho- 
dacanaty and Silviano Artiago in the city 
of Mexico, as the first fruits of preach- 
ing the gospel in the interior of Mexico. 

Sun. 2.3.— Elder Meliton G. Trejo baptized 
six persons in the city of Mexico, who to- 
gether with the two previously baptized 
were organized into the first branch of the 
Church in Mexico, by Apostle Moses 
Thatcher and fellow-missionaries, with 
Plotino C. Rhodacanaty as president, and 
Silviano Artiago and Jose Ybarola as 
counselors. These three brethren were 
also ordained Elders. 

Mon. 24. — Ammon M. Tenney was ap- 
pointed by Apostle Wilford WoodruiS to 
preside over the Saints who were settling 
at St. Johns, Apache Co., Ariz. 

— Wm. Dykes, one of the Pioneers of 
1847, died in Nebraska. 

Tues. 25. — The city council of Salt Lake 

City adopted a resolution for constructing 

the Jordan River and Salt Lake City Canal. 

Wed. 26. — Elder Albert P. Rockwood, 



one of the First Seven Presidents of the 
Seventies, died in Sugar House Ward, 
near Salt Lake City. 

December. Thiers. 4. — Elder Wm. 
Clayton died in Salt Lake City. 

fliwrs. 11. — Henry Hoskins, a member of 
the Mormon Battalion, died in Salt Lake 
City. 

1880. 

A number of settlements in Utah, Idaho » 
Arizona and Nevada were organized as 
Bishops' Wards. Three new counties were 
created by the Utah legislature. The 
Church celebrated its fiftieth anniversary 
with a grand jubilee, and successful mis- 
sionary work was carried on by the Elders 
in foreign lands. 

January. Wed. 7.— The first number of 
Ungdommens I'aadgirer, a small monthly 
periodical, published in the interest of the 
young Latter-day Saints in Scandinavia, 
was issued in Copenhagen, Denmark; An- 
drew Jenson, editor. 

2[on. 12.— The 24th session of the Utali 
legislature convened in Salt Lake City, 
and organized by appointing Lorenzo Snow 
president of the Council, and Orson Pratt 
speaker of the House. 

February. — An act was passed by tie 
Utah legislature, authorizing the city 
council of Salt Lake City to borrow 
money for the completion of the Jordan 
River and Salt Lake City Canal. Emery, 
San Juan and Uintah Counties were 
created by legislative acts. 

Sun. S. — The Saints who had settled on 
Otter creek, or the East Fork (of the 
Sevier river), Piute Co., Utah, were or- 
ganized as a branch of the Church called 
Wilmot; John D. Wilcox, presiding Elder. 

Man. .9.— The trial of parties charged 
with the murder of Dr. J. King Robinson, 
in 1866, was called, and, on motion of the 
prosecuting attorney, dismissed, notwith- 
standing the defendants demanded a trial. 

Sun. 22.— The Saints who had settled on 
the Mesquite Flat, near Bunkerville, Nev., 
were organized as the Mesquite Ward; 
Wm. H. Branch, Bishop. 

Sun. 2.9.— Eli H. Murray, the 11th gov- 
ernor of Utah, and successor of Gov. Geo. 
W. Emery, arrived in Salt Lake City. 

March. Wed. ,3.— James Whittaker, 
.sen., died in Cedar City, Iron Co. 

Thurs. .^.— The Salt Lake weekly Herald 
was first issued. 

Sun. 14.— The Saints who had settled 
at Concho, Apache Co., Ariz., were organ- 
ized as a branch of the Church with B. H. 
Wilhelm as presiding Elder. 

Fri. 19. — John D. Rees, one of the first 
settlers of Brighum City, died at Malad, 
Idaho. 

April. Fri. 2.— Col. Peter Litz, the 
first member of the Church in Virginia, 
died in Burke's Garden, Tazewell Co., Va. 

Sun. 4. — Public meetings were held in 
the Salt Lake Assembly Hall for the 
first time. 

Mon. 0.— Salt Lake City decided by 
vote, to build the Salt Lake and Jordan 
Canal. 



106 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1880 



— The co-operative store at Monroe, 
Sevier Co., was destroyed by fire. 

— Bluff City, on the San Juan river, was 
settled by a company of Latter-day Saints 
from IroQ County. 

Tues. 6.— At a conference of the Y. M. 
M. I. Associations, held in the Salt Lake 
Assembly Hall, Wilford Woodruff was ap- 
pointed general superintendent of all the 
associations in the Church, with Joseph 
F. Smith and Moses Thatcher as his coun- 
selors. Junius F. Wells, Milton H. Hardy 
and R. C. Badger were sustained as assist- 
ants to the general superintendency, 
Heber J. Grant as secretary, and Wm. S. 
Burton as treasurer. 

—On this and three following days the 50th 
annual conference of the Church was held 
in Salt Lake City. It was voted to re- 
mit S802,000 of the indebtedness to the P. 
E. Fund, in favor of the worthy poor, and 
to distribute 1,000 cows and .5,000 sheep 
among the needy. The Saints were ad- 
vised to be charitable and liberal toward 
one another, and make this a jubilee year 
by forgiving the worthy poor their debts, 
and thus relieve them from bondage. Wm. 
W. Taylor was sustained as one of the 
seven presidents of the Seventies,to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of Albert P. 
Rockwood. 

iSat. 10. — The steamship Wyoming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 120 Saints, 
in charge of James L. Bunting. The com- 
pany arrived at New York April 21st, and 
at Ogden and Salt Lake City April 30th. 

Tues. 13. — The Utah Central Railway 
depot and adjoining hotel, at Sandy, Salt 
Lake Co., was destroyed by fire. 

i'iun. i8.— Elder Wm. C. Martindale was 
appointed to preside over the Saints who 
had settled in Goose Creek Valley and vi- 
cinity. Cassia Co., Idaho. 

FH. 23. — Mary Parker, an aged lady, 
was outraged and cruelly murdered, near 
Rockville, Kane Co. .fared Dalton was 
subsequently arrested, suspected of the 
crime. 

May. Mon. 3. — The corner stone of St. 
Paul's Chapel (Episcopal), Salt Lake 
City, was laid by^the Masonic fraternity. 

Tties. 4. — Rosewell Stevens, one of the 
Pioneers of 1847, died at Bluff, San Juan 
Co., Utah. 

Su7i. 9. — A branch of the Church was 
organized in Spring Basin, Cassia Co., 
Idaho, where a few families of Saints had 
located. 

Sat. 15. — The Utah Southern Railway 
was opened to Milford, Beaver Co. 

Mon. 24. — John Y. Greene, one of the 
Pioneers of 1847, died in Salt Lake City. 

June. Sat. 5. — The steamship Wiscon- 
sin s^ileA from Liverpool, England, with 
332 Saints, in charge of John G. Jones. 
The company arrived at New York June 
I5th, and at Salt Lake City June 25th. 

Wed. 2.:;.— The Utah Southern Railway 
was opened to Frisco. 

Sat. 26". — A small company of Saints 
from Iceland sailed from Liverpool, Eng- 
land, boucd for Utah. 

July. Sat. 3. — John F. Turner, son of 
Sheriff John Turner, of Provo, was killed 
by Fred. Hopt (Welcome), at Park City, 
Summit Co. The body, which the murderer 



conveyed to Echo Canyon, was found there 
July 10th. 

Thurs. 8.— The Old Folks of Salt Lake 
County had a grand excursion to Black 
Rock, on the shore of Great Salt Lake. 

Sat. 10. — The steamship Wisconsin sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 727 Saints, 
in charge of Niels P. Rasmussen. The 
company landed at New York July 21st, 
and arrived at Salt Lake City July 29th. 

Tues, 20.— According to the census re- 
turn, Utah had a population of 143,690, 
showing an increase of 56,904 since 1870. 

Sun. 25.— Fred. Hopt (Welcome), the 
murderer, arrived in Salt Lake City, in 
custody of Sheriff John Turner, who had 
arrested him at Cheyenne, Wyo., on the 
23rd. 

August. — Apostles Erastus Snow and 
Brigham Young and other prominent men 
visited Castle Valley, Emery Co., Utah, 
and appointed Christen G. Larsen to pre- 
side over the Saints who were locating in 
that part of the country. 

Thurs. 5.— Under the administration of 
the Elders, Eliza Robinson, of the Birm- 
ingham branch, England, was instantly 
healed of ulcers, after fifteen years suf- 
fering. 

Tues. 17. — A stately monument was 
erected on the grave of the martyred 
Joseph Standing, in the Salt Lake City 
cemetery. 

Wed. 18.— Jonathan H. Holmes, a mem- 
ber of the Mormon Battalion, died at Farm- 
ington, Davis Co. 

Thurs. i,9.— Elders Serge L. Ballif, Mor- 
ris D. Rosenbaum and John Kienke were 
arrested and imprisoned at Berlin. Ger- 
many, and on the following day ordered 
out of the country for preaching the gos- 
pel. 

September.— The Saints who had set- 
tled on the San Juan river, southeastern 
Utah, were organized as Bluff Ward, 
by Apostles Erastus Snow and Brigham 
Young, Jens Nielsen, Bishop. 

Sat. 4. — The steamship Xevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 337 Saints, 
in charge of John Rider. The company 
arrived at New York Sept. 15th, and at 
Salt Lake City Sept. 25th. 

Sun. 5.— Rutherford B. Hayes, Presi- 
dent of the United States, Mrs. Hayes and 
party, visited Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 11. — An electric light exhibition 
was given in Salt Lake City, in front of Z. 
C. M. I. 

Sat. iS,— Bishop Jonathan Pugmire, a 
prominent Elder, died at St. Charles, Bear 
Lake Co., Idaho. 

Tues. 2i.— John Orson Angus, a prom- 
inent Elder, died at St. George, Utah. 

Sun, 26'.— Dr. Thos. De Witt Talmage, 
in a sermon at the "Brooklyn Tabernacle," 
N. Y., suggested the annihilation of the 
"Mormons" by the Ft. Douglas artillery. 

— At a priesthood meeting held at 
Snowflake, Ariz., the Saints who had 
settled on the Gila river were organized 
as Smith ville Ward; Joseph K. Rogers, 
Bishop. 

— At a Stake conference held at Snow- 
flake, Apache Co., Ariz., Bush Valley 
branch was organized as Alpine Ward; 
Edward A. Noble, Bishop. The Saints 
who had located in Round VaUey, Apache 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY 1881. 



107 



Co., Ariz., were organized as a Wird; 
Peter C. Christoffersen, Bishop. The 
Saints composing the Concho branch, 
Apache Co., Ariz., were organized as the 
Erastus Ward;Sixtus E. Johnson, Bishop. 
The Saints constituting the settlement of 
Woodruff, Apache Co., Ariz., were or- 
ganized as the Woodruff Ward, with 
James C. Ov^ens as Bishop; and the Saints 
who had settled above Snowflake were or- 
ganized as the Walker (now Taylor) Ward ; 
Henry Standifird, Bishop. 

October. Stni. 10. — At the general con- 
ference held in Salt Lake City, the First 
Presidency of the Church was reorganized, 
with John Taylor as President, and Geo. 
Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith as Coun- 
selors. The vacancies thereby occurring 
in the Council of the Twelve Apostles were 
partly filled by the calling of Francis M. 
Lyman and John Henry Smith to the 
Apostleship. These two brethren were 
ordained Apostles Oct. 7th. 

Sat. 23. — The first number of the Bear 
Lake Democrat was issued at Paris, Bear 
Lake Co., Ic'aho. 

— The steamship Wisconsin sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 258 Saints, in 
charge of John Nicholson. The company 
arrived at New York Nov. 2nd, and at Salt 
Lake City Nov. 11th. 

Fri. 29. — At a special meeting held at 
Milford, Beaver Co., Utah, the Saints resi- 
ding at that place were organized as 
Milford Ward, of the Beaver Stake of 
Zion; Wm. McMillan, Bishop. 

Sat. 811. — Gordon S. Bills and another 
Elder were mobbed in Lawrence County, 
Ky. 

Sun. 31. — The Willow Springs branch, 
Malad Valley, Idaho, was organized as the 
Cherry Creek Ward; John D. Jones, 
Bishop. 

November. Tues. 2. — At the general 
election in Utah for delegate to Congress, 
Geo. Q, Cannon, the Peoples' Party candi- 
date, received 18, .568 votes ; and Allen G. 
Campbell, the Liberal Party candidate, 
1,357 votes. 

Sat. 6. — Apostle Albert Carrington 
succeeded Wm. Budge as president of the 
European mission. 

S7<n. 7.- The mining town of Bingham, 
Bingham Canyon, Salt Lake Co. , was part- 
ly destroyed by fire. 

Mo7i. 8. — Hon. Jonathan C. Wright died 
at Brigham City. 

December. Man. 6.— Geo. H. Luke and 
Hans C. Madsen, of Manti, Sanpete Co., 
were accidentally killed, while working on 
the Denver and Rio Grande Railway, in 
Colorado. 

Sat. 11.— The Utah Eastern Railway 
was completed from Coaville to Park City. 
Tues. iJ.— Elder Geo. Lamb died in St. 
George. 

1881. 

A number of prominent Elders in the 
Church died. Several new settlements 
were founded by the Saints, and there was 
general prosperity throughout the Church. 

January. Sat. 8. — Notwithstanding the 
fact that Geo. Q. Cannon was elected 



delegate to Congress with 17,211 majority. 
Gov. Eli H. Murray issued a certificate of 
election to the minority candidate, Allen 
G. Campbell. 

Sun. .9. — A branch of the Church was 
organized at Beaver Bottom, Millard Co., 
with Thos. Naylor as presiding Elder. 

Wed,. 12. — Between this date and the 
17th fifteen lives were lost through snow- 
slides in Little Cottonwood and American 
Fork canyons ; $60,000 worth of property 
was also destroyed. 

Sat. 15. — The Wasatch Hour Mill, on the 
State Road, Salt Lake Co., was destroyed 
by fire . 

— The dead body of Charles Jensen, of 
Rush Valley, Tooele Co., was found. He 
had been murdered. 

Thtirs. 20.— Geo. Reynolds was released 
from the Penitentiary, his term of impri- 
sonment having expired. 

Sun. 23. — Freeborn Demill, one of the 
early members of the Church, died at 
Manti, Sanpete Co. 

February. Fri. 4.—Z. C. M. I. store at 
Ogden was dedicated. 

Tues. lo. — The Saints who had settled in 
Grand Valley, Utah, were organized as the 
Moab Ward, by Apostles Francis M. 
Lyman and Heber J. Grant; Randolph H. 
Stewart, Bishop. 

Wed. 16.— The trial of Fred. Hopt (Wel- 
come) , for the murder of John F. Turner, 
was commenced in the Third District 
Court, Salt Lake City. On the 19th the jury 
returned a verdict of guilty. 

Sim. 21. — Aurora Ward, Sevier Co., was 
organized; Jabez Durfee, Bishop. 

March. Thurs. 3. — A number of men 
were killed by an explosion in a coal mine, 
at Almy, near Evanston, Wyoming. 

Sat. i2.— Elder Samuel L. Evans died 
in Salt Lake City. 

April. Sun. 3.— On this and the follow- 
ing three days the 51st annual conference 
of the Church was held in Salt Lake City. 
A number of missionaries were called to 
go abroad and others to settle in Arizona. 

Mon. 4. — Fred. Hopt, alias Welcome, 
the murderer, was sentenced to be shot on 
May 20th. The case was appealed. 

—The U. S. Supreme Court reversed the 
decision of the Utah courts in the John 
Miles polygamy case, and a new trial was 
ordered. 

Sun. 17. — James Drysdale was shot and 
killed by Peter Moore, at Hooperville, 
Weber Co. 

— The steamship Wyoming sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 186 Saints, in 
charge of David C. Dunbar. The company 
arrived at New York April 26th, and at 
Salt Lake City May 5th. 

May. Mon. 2. — The first issue of the 
Ogden Herald was published in Ogden, 
Utah ; John Nicholson, editor ; Edward H. 
Anderson, business manager. 

Sat. 21. — The steamship Wyoming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 278 Saints, 
in charge of Joseph R. Matthews. The 
company arrived at New York June 1st, 
and at Salt Lake City June 10th. 

Jlon. 23.— A company of 27 Saints from 
New Zealand arrived in Salt Lake City, in 
charge of George Batt. 

Wed. 25.— The Old Mill, or Locust Farm, 



108 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1882. 



containing 110 acres, was purchased by 
Salt Lake City, for a public park. 

Tliurs. 20. — The Union Pacific and Cent- 
ral Pacific transfer depot and twenty ears 
of merchandise, at Ogden, were destroyed 
l)y lire. 

June. — Three i-ailroads, namely, the 
Utah Central, Utah Southern and Utah 
Southern Extension, were consolidated as 
one corporation under the name of the 
Utah Central Railway, with a capital of 
$4,325,000. The new corporation com- 
menced business July 1st. 

Sat. 4. — Elder Henry Emery died in the 
16th Ward. Salt Lake City. 

■Sat. 11. — Patriarch John Stoker died at 
Bountiful, Davis Co. 

Sun. 12. — The Saints who had settled in 
the Tonto Basin and vicinity, Ariz., were 
organized as a Ward; Kiel Allen, Bishop. 

Wed. 22.~T\\e, Old Folks of Salt Lake 
County had a pleasant excursion to Ogden. 

Sai. 25. — The steamship Wyoming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 775 Saints, 
in charge of Samuel Roskelley. The com- 
pany arrived at New York July 7th, and at 
Ogden July 15th. 

Mon. 21. — The Saints residing at Frisco, 
Beaver Co., were organized as a branch of 
the Church ; Benjamin Bennett, presiding 
Elder. 

July. Sat. If,. — Joseph Young, sen., 
brother of the late Pres. Brigham Young, 
and senior president of all the Seventies, 
died in Salt Lake City. 

— Twenty-two Saints from Iceland, in 
charge of John Eyvindson, sailed from 
Liverpool, England, bound for Utah. 

Mon. i,v.— Two little girls, daughters of 
John C. Harper, were killed by lightning 
at Payson, Utah Co. 

Sun. 24. — The Saints who had settled on 
the Provo river, noi'theast of Heber City, 
Wasatch Co, were organized as the 
Woodland Ward ; Henry Moon, Bishop. 

Wed. 27. — Senator John Sherman, of 
Ohio, General Benjamin Harrison, of In- 
diana, Judge Strong and Albert Bierstadt, 
the landscape painter, visited Salt Lake 
City. 

Sat. 30. -Architect Obed Taylor died at 
Salt Lake City. 

August jlfon. i.^Elder Niels Wilhelm- 
sen, president of the Scandinavian mis- 
sion, died at Copenhagen, Denmark. He 
was the first Elder from America who died 
in Scandinavia.. 

Wed. .?.— Elder Wm. C. Staines died in 
Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 4,— The corner stone of the 
Walker Opera House, Salt Lake City, was 
laid. 

Tues. Id. — A Ward was organized at 
Clinton, Utah Co. ; John Spencer, Bisuop. 

September. Sat. ,'i.— The steamship 
Wi/oniing sailed from Liverpool, England, 
with G44 Saints, in charge of James Fin- 
layson. The company arrived at New 
York, Sept. 13th, and at Salt Lake City, 
Sept. 21st. 

Sun. 11. —The Saints in Ashley Valley, 
Uintah Co., were organized into two 
Wards, namely, Ashley and Mountain Dell, 
with Jeremiah Hatch and 'J'hos. Bingham 
as Bishops, respectively. 

Sun. i8.— Apostle Orson Pratt delivered 



his last public discourse, in the Tabernacle, 
.Salt Lake City. 

Tues. :;^0.— Elder Solomon Angell died at 
Leeds, Washington Co. 

Tues. i?7.— Feramorz L. Young died of 
typhoid fever and was buried at sea, about 
one hundred miles from Havana, while re- 
turning from a mission to Mexico. 

Wed. 28.— Hon. John M. Bernhisel died 
at his residence in Salt Lake City. 

October. Jfon. 3. — Apostle Orson Pratt 
died in Salt Lake City. 

Mon. 10. — Geo. J. Belliston was killed by 
lightning at Nephi, Juab Co. 

Fri. iJ.— Bishop Edwin D. Woolley died 
in Salt Lake City. 

Saf. 22.— The steamship Wt/omi/n;/ sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 396 Saints, 
in charge of Lyman R. Martineau. The 
company landed in New York Nov. 2nd, 
and arrived at Ogden and Salt Lake City 
Nov. 11th. 

Mon. 24.— George D. Watt, the first man 
baptized in the British mission, died at 
Kaysville, Davis Co. 

Tues. ?.">. — After a lengthy trial in the 
Third District Court, Jack Emerson was 
adjudged guilty of the murder of John F. 
Turner, as an accomplice of Fred. Hopt. 

Thurs. 27. — Joel Hinckley, railroad agent 
at Franklin, Oneida Co., Idaho, was mur- 
dered by two masked men. who subsequent- 
ly were arrested. 

Fri. 28. — Stephen Hales, an old member 
of the Church, died in the 16th Ward, Salt 
Lake City. 

November. Thurs. 10. — Wm. Falcon- 
bridge, a centenarian, died in Salt Lake 
City. He was born Oct. 24, 1780. 

Fri. 11. — David D. Morgan, of Salt 
Lake City, was accidentally killed, while 
working in a coal mine, in Pleasant Valley. 

Wed. 23. — Robert Pixton. a member of 
the Mormon Battalion, died at Taylors- 
ville. Salt Lake Co. 

Fri. 25. — The Saints who had settled on 
Poole's Island, Snake River Valley, Idaho, 
were organized as a branch of the Church, 
by Marriner W. Merrill, of the Cache 
.Stake presidency, with John R. Poole as 
presiding Elder. 

Sat: 26. — Jacob M. Truman, a member 
of the Mormon Battalion, died at Ham- 
blin, Washington Co. 

3fon. 28. — Geo. Beebe died at Provo. 

December. Sun. 4. — Elder Daniel A. 
Miller, of Farmington, Davis Co., died at 
Providence, Cache Co. 

Thurs. 8. — Albert R. Carrington, conduc- 
tor on the Utah Central Railway, was fa- 
tally hurt at the depot,* in Salt Lake City. 
He died the following day. 

Tues. 20.- Evan Morgan, one of the first 
who joined the Church at Swansea, Wales, 
died in the 21st Ward, Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 22. — The Saints who had settled 
in Pleasant Valley, Emery Co., were or- 
ganized as a branch of the Church ; David 
Williams, president. 

1882. 

The Edmunds anti-polygamy law was 
passed by Congress, which later intro- 
duced legal proceedings of an extra- 
ordinary character in Utah. New Stakes 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1882. 



109 



of Zion were organized in Castle Valley, 
Utaft, and in Salt river, Ariz. The first 
brandies of the Church were arganized in 
Cassia County, Idaho. 

January. Mon. 2. — Pres. .lohn Taylor 
moved into the Gardo House, Salt Lake 
City. A public reception was given, in 
which over two thousand people parti- 
cipated. 

Sun. S. — The Salt Lake Assembly Hall 
was dedicated. 

Jfon. 9. — The Utah legislature (2.5th ses- 
sion) met in Salt Lake City, and organized 
by electing Joseph F. Smith presiaent of 
the Council, and Francis M. Lj'man speaker 
of the House. 

— Hans F. Petersen, the first Latter-day 
Saint missionary to Norway, died at Eph- 
raim, Sanpete Co. 

Tues. 10. — The Utah election case was 
argued in the I'. S. House of Represent- 
atives, and, after a hot debate, deferred to 
the Committee on Elections. 

Wed. :?.3.— Elizabeth Hoagland Cannon, 
wife of Geo. Q. Cannon, died in Salt Lake 
City, while her husband was attending to 
his public duties in Washington, D. C. 

February. — The Latter-day Saint mis- 
sionaries in the Southern States were sub 
ject to much persecution. 

J^fon. 13. — Wm. Jennings was elected 
mayor of Salt Lake City. 

Tree?. 15. — Elizabeth A. Whitney, widow 
of Bishop Newel K. Whitney, died in Salt 
Lake City, aged 81 years. 

Thurs. 16, — The Edmnnds anti-polygamy 
bill was passed by the U. S. Senate. As 
soon as this became known in Utah, three 
petitions, asking Congress to send a dep- 
utation to investigate affairs in the 
Territory, before undertaking any hostile 
legislation against the people, were pre- 
pared and received about 75,000 signatures. 
They were treated with indifference. 

Fri. 17. — A family of seven, named 
Teckett, was killed by an avalanche in Big 
Cottonwood Canyon. 

F)'i. 24. — Elder William Henry Butler, 
of Kaysville, Davis Co., Utah, died at 
Birmingham, England, where he labored as 
a missionary. 

Sat. 23. — After four hours' investigation, 
the U. S. Committee on Elections decided 
that neither Cannon nor Campbell was en- 
titled to a seat in Congress. 

March. Tiies. 7.— Thos. B. H. Sten- 
house, formerly prominent in the Church, 
died at San Francisco, Cal. 

Fri. 10. — The Utah legislature adjourned 
after 60 days' session ; 72 acts were passed, 
of which 16 were vetoed by Gov. Murray. 
Among the latter was one tliat appropri- 
ated §40,000 for the completion of the 
Deseret University. Garfitld County was 
organized during this session. 

Sun. 12. — Richard V. Morris, Bishop of 
the 19th Ward, died in Salt Lake City. 

Txcs. 14. — Tlie Edmunds anti-polygamy 
bill was passed by the United States 
House of Representatives. A few days 
later it was signed by Pres. Chester A. 
Arthur, and thus became law. 

Thui'f!. W. — The first number of Morgen- 
sljcrucn, afterwards the HiKtorical Sec- 
ord, was issued in Salt Lake City ; Andrew 
Jenson, editor. 



April. Thurs. 6'.— The .52ad annual con- 
ference was commenced in Salt Lake City ; 
it was continued four days ; 127 mission- 
aries were called. 

Jfon. 10. — A constitutional convention, 
consisting of delegates from all the coun- 
ties of Utah and authorized by the late 
legislature, met in Salt Lake City for the 
purpose of framing a State Constitution 
and again petitioning Congress to admit 
Utah into the Union as a State. Regular 
meetings were held until the 27th, when the 
"Constitution for the State of Utah" was 
adopted by unanimous vote. 

Turs. 11. — A large company of mission- 
aries left Salt Lake City, for the United 
States and Europe. •• 

Wed. 12. — The steamship Xevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 343 Saints, 
including 11 returning missionaries, under 
the direction of John Donaldson. The 
company arrived in New York, April 24th, 
and at Ogden and Salt Lake City, May 
1st. 

Wed. 19. — Hon. Geo. Q. Cannon delivered 
a powerful speech in the U. S. House of 
Representatives, in vindication of the peo- 
ple of Utah. 

— On this and the following day the Utah 
election case was argued in the U. S. 
House of Representatives, and Geo. Q. 
Cannon was denied his seat in Congress on 
account of polygamy. 

Sun. 23. — Professor James L. Barfoot, 
curator of the Deseret Museum, died in 
Salt Lake City. 

May. Thurs. 4. — Ande)i'S Christensen a 
prominent Elder, died at Brigham City, 
Box Elder Co. 

Wed. 17. — The steamship Xevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 392 Saints, 
including a number of returning Elders, 
under the direction of Wm. R. Webb. 
They arrived in New York Maj* 27th, and 
in Salt Lake City .Tune 4th. 

Jlon. 22. — The constitution adopted by 
the constitutional convention was ratified 
by a general vote of the people of Utah 
Territory. 

June. — Thurber Ward, Rabbit Valley, 
Utah, was organized by Apostles Francis 
M. Lyman and John H. Smith; Geo. 
Brinkerhoff, Bishop. 

Sun 4. — The Saints at Burrville, Sevier 
Co., were organized as a Ward, by Ap- 
ostles Francis M. Lyman and John Henry 
Smith : Wm. H. Cloward, Bishop. 

Mon. 5. — The Walker -Opera House, 
Salt Lake City, was opened with a concert 
by the Careless Orchestra. 

Tues. (). — The State convention again 
met in Salt Lake City and prepared a 
petition to Congress for Utah's admission 
into the Union. Wm. H. Hooper, John T. 
Caine, James Sharp, Wm. W. Riter, 
Franklin S. Richards, David H. Peery 
and Wm. D. Johnson, jun., were chosen as 
delegates to present the same to Con- 
gress. 

Sat. 10. — Levi W. Hancock, one of the 
First Seven Presidents of the Seventies, 
died at Washington, Washington Co. 

Sun. 11. — Dingle Dell branch. Bear 
Lake Co., Idaho, was organized as Cot- 
tonwood (later Dingle) Ward; Samuel A. 
Wilcox, Bishop. 

Fri. 16. — Pres. Chester A. Arthur nonii- 



110 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY— 1882. 



nated Alex. Ramsey, of Minnesota, A. S. 
Paddock, of Nebraska, G. L. Godfrey, of 
Iowa, A. B. Carlton, of Indiana, and James 
R. Pettigrew, of Arkansas, as members of 
the Utah Commission, provided for in the 
Edmunds law. 

Sat. i7.— Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, 
was formally opened to the public. 

Wed. 21.— The steamship Xecada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 932 souls, in 
charge of Robert R. Irvine. They arrived 
at New York July 2nd, and at Ogden July 
9th. 

.Sat. 24. — Nathan E. Tenney was shot 
and killed by Mexicans at St. Johns,Apache 
Co., Ariz., while endeavoring to act as 
peacemaker between contending parties. 

2 lies. 27. — Mary Angell Young, widow of 
Pres. Brigham Young, died in Salt Lake 
City. 

Wed. 28.— The Old Folks from Salt Lake, 
Utah, Juab, Tooele, Davis and Weber 
Counties enjoyed a grand feast in Salt 
Lake City. The festivities were continued 
the following day. 

July. .Sun. .9. — The Saints who had set- 
tled on the bench lands west of North Og- 
den, Weber Co., Utah, were detached from 
the North Ogden Ward, and organized as 
Pleasant View Ward; Edward W. Wade, 
Bishop. 

.Sun. 16. — The Saints residing in Wilson 
school district, Weber Co., were separated 
from West Weber and organized as Wilson 
Ward; Brigham H. Bingham, Bishop. 

Man. 17. — The Deseret Hospital, Salt 
Lake City, was dedicated and opened for 
business in the 12th Ward. 

— Harriet Whittaker Taylor, wife of 
Pres. John Taylor, died in Salt Lake City. 

Wed. 19. — Elder Jacob Samuel Ferrin 
was killed by Indians, near San Carlos, 
Ariz. 

Fri. 21.— The Clover Ward, Tooele Co., 
was organized ; Francis De St Jeor, Bishop. 

,Sat. 22. — A company of Saints, com- 
prising 13 Icelanders and 5 British, sailed 
from Liverpool, England, on the steamship 
Arizona, bound for Utah. 

August. Tues. 1. — The first number of 
the Utah Journal was issued in Logan, 
Cache Co., Utah, in place of the Logan 
Leader, suspended. 

Sun. 6. — J. D. Farmer, a merchant of 
Salt Lake City, was lost in the Great Salt 
Lake, while bathing ; the body could not be 
found. 

Tues 8. — Edward Martin, a member of 
the Mormon Battalion, died in the 14th 
Ward, Salt Lake City. 

—The U. S. Congress adjourned; the 
Senate amendment to the civil appropri- 
ation bill (commonly known as the Hoar 
amendment), authorizing the governor of 
Utah to fill offices, supposed to be vacant 
in that Territory, was one of the last acts 
passed. 

.Sun. 13. — At a special conference held at 
Castle Dale, Emery Co., attended by 
Apostles Erastus Snow and John H. Smith, 
the Emery Stake of Zion was more fully 
organized, with Christen G. Larsen as pre- 
sident and Orange Seeley and Rasmus Jus- 
tesen counselors. Orange ville Ward was 
organized; Jasper Robertson, Bishop; 
Henning Olsen was ordained Bishop of the 
Castle Dale Ward. 



Wed. 16. — David G. Bigler, a brak^man 
on the Utah Central Railway, was acci- 
dentally killed, near River Side Station. 

Fri. 18. — The Utah Commission, consist- 
ing of five men, appointed bj- the Presi- 
dent of the United States, arrived in Salt 
Lake City. They went to work almost im- 
mediately, preparing for the November 
election. 

— Bishop Geo. W. Ward died at Willard, 
Box Elder Co. 

.Sun. 20. — The Saints residing in Parley's 
Canyon, Salt Lake Co., were organized as 
Mountain Dell Ward; Wm. B. Hardy, 
Bishop. 

Wed. 23. — A large company of mission- 
aries left Salt Lake City for the United 
States and Europe. 

Tue.<i 2.9.— The Presidency of the Church 
issued an epistle to the Saints, advising all 
who could legally register and vote under 
the Edmunds law, to do so. 

September. — Branches of the Church 
were organized by Francis M. Lyman, 
president of the .Tooele Stake of Zion, at 
Oakley, Little Basin, Albion, Cassia and 
Almo, Cassia County, Idaho, where a 
number of Saints h4d recently located. 
The several branches were organized as 
the Cassia Ward ; Wm. C. Martindale, 
Bishop. 

.Sat. 2. — The steamship Wyominy sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 662 Saints, 
including 16 returning missionaries, under 
the direction of William Cooper. The com- 
pany arrived in New York Sept. 12th, and 
in Salt Lake City Sept. 21st. 

,Sun. 3.— Sandy Ward, Salt Lake Co., 
was organized out of a part of Union 
Ward; EzekielHolman, Bishop. 

Sat. 16.— Gov. Eli H. Murray, on the 
strength of the Hoar amendment, issued a 
proclamation appointing a great number 
of men to fill local ofiices, claimed to be 
vacant on account of the August election 
not being held. The incumbents, who 
held over under the statute, however, re- 
fused to recognize the governor's appoint- 
ees as their successors, and the case was 
taken into the courts. 

October. — Sun. 1. — The west part of 
Brighton Ward, Salt Lake Co., was organ- 
ized as Pleasant Green Ward; Lehi N. 
Hardnran, Bishop. 

Fri. 6. — The semi-annual conference of 
the Church, which continued three days, 
was held in Salt Lake City; 78 mission- 
aries were called. 

3fon. 9. — Abraham Hoagland Cannon 
was ordained one of the First Seven Presi- 
dents of Seventies. 

Fri. 13. — George Teasdale and Heber J. 
Grant were chosen by revelation to fill the 
vacancies in the Council of Twelve 
Apostles, caused by the death of Orson 
Pratt and the recent re-organization of the 
First Presidency. Seymour B. Young 
was chosen by the same revelation as one 
of the First Seveu Presidents of the Seven- 
ties. These three brethren were ordained 
on the 16th. 

Tues. 17. — About sixty missionaries bound 
for the United States and Europe, left Salt 
Lake City. 

Sat. 21. — The steamship Abyssinia sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 416 Saints, 
including 28 returning missionaries, unde 



CHURCH CHIIONOLOGT — 1883. 



Ill 



the direction of Geo. Stringfellow. They 
landed in New York Nov. 3rd, and arrived 
in Salt Lake City Nov. 10th. 

Tues. 24. — Melvina H. SnovF, widow of 
Willard Snow, died in Salt Lake City. 

Sun. 29. — Francis M. Pomeroy, one of 
the Utah Pioneers of 1847, died at Mesa, 
Maricopa Co., Ariz. 

November. Sat. 4. — An important 
political ratification meeting was held by 
the People's Party in the Salt Lake Thea- 
ter. 

Tues. 7. — A general election was held in 
Utah, in wliich the People's Party candi- 
date, John T. Caine, received 23,039 votes, 
and the "Liberal" candidate, Philip T. 
Van Zile, only 4,884 votes. 

Mon. IS. — The Utah Commission submit- 
ted their first report to the government on 
the situation in Utah. 

Sat. 25. — Apostle John Henry Smith suc- 
ceeded Apostle Albert Carrington as presi- 
dent of the European mission. 

Tues. 28. — Gen. Phil. H. Sheridan arrived 
in Salt Lake City, on an inspection tour 
to the military posts in the Territory. 

— The Coveville branch, near Richmond, 
Cache Co., was organized as Coveville 
Ward; John C. Larsen, Bishop. 

— Riverdale branch, Oneida County, 
Idaho, was organized as a Ward; Peter 
Preece, Bishop. 

December. Wed. 6. — The first Latter- 
day Saint meeting house in Snake River 
Valley, Idaho, was completed at Egin 
(Parker) . 

Sun. 10. — The Saints who had located on 
Salt river, Maricopa Co., Ariz., were or- 
ganized as the Maricopa Stake of Zion, by 
Apostles Erastus Snow and Moses That- 
cher, with Alexander F. Macdonaldas pre- 
sident, and Henry C. Rogers and Charles 
I. Robsoa as counselors. Jonesville (now 
Lehi),Mesa,andthe Tempe branch were or- 
ganized as Wards, with Thos. E. Jones, 
Elijah Pomeroy and David T. LeBaron as 
their respective Bishops. 

Mon. 18.— Thos. E. Ricks,of Logan,Utah, 
was called to preside as Bishop over the 
Saints in Snake River Valley, Idaho. Soon 
afterwards they were organized as Ban- 
nock Ward. 

Thurs. 21. — Artemesia Snow, wife of 
Apostle Erastus Snow, died in St. George. 

Sat. .30. — Hon. Wm. H. Hooper died in 
Salt Lake City. 

Sun. 31. — The Saints who had set- 
tled on the San Pedro river, Ariz., were 
organized by Apostle Erastus Snow and 
Moses Thatcher as St. David Ward ; David 
P. Kimball, Bishop. 



1883. 

The Saints who had settled on the Gila 
river, Arizona, and vicinity, were organ- 
ized as a Stake of Zion ; and a Stake of 
Zion was organized in San Luis Valley, 
Colo. A number of settlements were 
founded by the Saints in Snake River Val- 
ley, Idaho. A successful missionary work 
was commenced' among the Maoris in New 
Zealand. 



January. Tues. .9. — The Saints at 
Leamington, Millard Co., Utah, were or- 
ganized as a Ward; Lars N. Christiansen, 
Bishop. 

Wed. i 7.— Notwithstanding bitter op- 
position, John T. Caine was permitted to 
take a seat in Congress, to fill the unex- 
pired term of the 47th Congress. 

Fri. 19.— The thermometer stood about 
35 degrees F. below zero, in Salt Lake 
City. 

February. Thut's. 1. — Judge Jeremiah 
S. Black delivered a powerful speech be- 
fore the Committee on the Judiciary, at 
Washington, D. C, pleading for Utah's 
constitutional rights. 

Sat. 17. — Bishop Wm. Bringhurst, of 
Springville, died. 

Sun. 18. — John VanCott, one of the First 
Seven Presidents of the Seventies, died at 
his residence, near Salt Lake City. 

— A number of Saints who had founded 
a new settlement (north of Manassa, Co- 
nejos Co., Colo.), were organized as a 
branch of the Church, named Richfield, 
with Thos. N. Petersen as presiding Elder. 
Sun. 25. — The Saints at St. David, Ariz , 
by their vote, accepted of Christopher 
Layton as president of the St. Joseph 
Stake of Zion (which had just been organ- 
ized by the First Presidency) with David 
P. Kimball and James H. Martmeau as 
counselors. 

Mon. 26. — Phil Robinson, the noted 
litterateur, and Mr. Sergeant Ballantyne, 
the eminent English barrister, visited 
Salt Lake City. 

March. Sun. 4. — The Saints who had 
settled on Price river, Emery Co., were 
organized as a Ward; Geo. Frandsen, 
Bishop. 

Sun. 11. — A townsite was selected in 
Snake River Valley, Idaho, and named 
Rexburg, in honor of Thos. E. Ricks. 

Tues. 20.— Wm. Holt and David Barney, 
two loggers, sleeping under an overhang- 
ing rock, near Parowan, Iron Co., were 
killed by the rock falling on them. 

Fri. 30. — The Denver and Rio Grande 
Western Railway was completed, and 
communication established between Salt 
Lake City and Denver by this route. 

April. Mon. 2. — A Ward organization 
was effected at Meadows, near St. Johns, 
Ariz. ; Peter Isaacson, Bishop. 

Tues. 3. — About fifty "Mormon" immi- 
grants arrived in Salt Lake City from the 
Southern States. 

Fri. 6. — The 53rd annual conference of 
the Church, which was continued three 
days, commenced in Salt Lake City. 

Sun. 8.— The Saints who had settled 
near Savoia, Valencia Co., New Mexico, 
were organized as the Navajo (now 
Ramah) Ward; Ernest A. Tietjen, Bishop. 
Tues. 10. — About ninety missionaries 
left Salt Lake City for the United States 
and Europe. 

— The constitutional convention met in 
Salt Lake City and received the report of 
the committee appointed to present the 
memorial and constitution, upon which 
was based Utah's application for admis- 
sion as a State. 

Wed. 11. — The steamship Nevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 352 Saints, 
including 13 returning missionaries, un- 



112 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1883. 



der the direction of David McKay. The 
company arrived at New York April 22nd, 
and Salt Lake City April 30th. 

Sun. 15. — A branch of the Church was 
organized at Marysvale, Piute Co., Utah, 
with Hugh D. Lisentaee as jiresiding 
Elder. 

3Ion. 23. — A terrible wind storm did 
much da^mage in Utah. 

Tues. 24.— Wm. E. McLellin, formerly 
one of the Twelve Apostles, died at Inde- 
pendence, Jackson Co., Mo, 

Hon. 30. — Fort Cameron Military Res- 
ervation buildings, near Beaver, were 
sold and the fort was abandoned as a milita- 
rv station. 
"May. Tues. i.—O. F. Due, of Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of 
bigamy and placed under $2,500 bonds. 

Sun. 13. — At a two days' meeting, held 
at Pima, Graham Co., Ariz., the Saints 
who had settled on the Gila river, Gra- 
ham Co., Ariz., were organized into four 
Wards, nameljs Pima, Thatcher, Graham, 
and Curtis, with Joseph K. Rogers, John 
M. Moody, Jorgen Jore-ensen and Moses 
M. Curtis as their respective Bishops. 

Wed. 16. — The steamship Nevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 427 Saints, 
including 14 returning missionaries, un- 
der the direction of Ben. E. Rich. The 
■company arrived in New York May 27th, 
and in Salt Lake City June 3rd. 

Fri. 18. — Belle Harris was committed to 
the Utah Penitentiary for contempt of 
court, in refusing to answer questions be- 
fore the grand jury of the Second District 
Court, at Beaver, in a supposed polygamy 
investigation. 

Saf. i.9.— James W. Cummings, a promin- 
ent Elder, died in Salt Lake City. 

Tues. 22. — The Empire grist mill, up City 
creek, near Salt Lake City, was burned 
to the ground. Loss ; $23,.'500. 

Sun. 21. — Bishop Calvin Bingham was 
accidentally killed near St. David, Cochise 
Co., Ariz. 

Mon. 28. — Richard Fowler was shot and 
fatally wounded by David Gallifant, in 
Salt Lake City. Fowler died May 30th, 
and the murderer was held under |5,000 
bonds. 

Tues. 29. — Elder Hans Peter Jensen, 
one of the early converts to "Mormonism" 
in Scandinavia, died in Brigham City. 

— Bishops Wm.B. Preston and Leonard 
W. Hardy arrived at Rexburg, Snake 
River Valley, Idaho. During the few fol- 
lowing days they located the townsites of 
Teton, Wilford. Lyman, Burton and 
Parker. 

Thurs. 31. — John T. Alexander, of Salt 
'Lake City, who labored as a missionary in 
Georgia, was shot and severely wounded 
by three masked men, near Plainville, 
Gordon Co.. Ga. 

June, fliurs. 7. — Dr. J. B. Carrington, 
a non- Mormon, arrested for bigamy, was 
discharged by Commissioner Gilchrist, at 
Salt Lake City, notwithstanding the proof 
•of his guilt. 

Sun. 10. — Five young persons, ranging 
from 12 to 23 years of age, were accident- 
ally drowned, while boating on Utah lake, 
near Benjamin. 

—The Saints who had settled in San Luis 
Valley, Colo., were organized as the San 



Luis Stake of Zion, with Silas S. Smith as 
president and Richard C. Camp and Wm. 
M. Christensen as counselors. The settle- 
ments of Manassa and Richfield were or- 
ganized as Wards, with John C. Dalton 
and Thos. N. Petersen as their respective 
Bishops. 

Fri. 15. — Theodore Thomas, the cele- 
brated orchestral leader, gave a concert 
in the Tabernacle, Salt Lake City. 

Wed. 20. — The steamship Nevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 697 Saints, 
including 22 returning missionaries, under 
the direction of Hans O. Magleby. The 
company arrived in New York July 1st, 
and at Ogden July 7th. 

— Mary B. Newell was miraculously 
healed under the administration of the 
Elders, at Johnsonville, Warren Co., Ind. 

Thurs. 21.— The Council House and adja- 
cent buildings, in Salt Lake City, were des- 
troyed by fire and the explosion of powder. 
Loss : about $100,000. 

— Bishop Leonard E. Harrington died at 
his residence, at American Fork, Utah Co. 

Sat. 23. — David Evans, formerly Bishop 
of Lehi, Utah Co., died at Lehi. 

Sun. 24. —Elder Shadrach Jones, of Wil- 
lard City, Box Elder Co., died at Swansea, 
Wales, where he labored as a missionary. 

July. Wed. 4.— Robert Ritter and Wil- 
liam Ayers were drowned in Silyer lake, 
Big Cottonwood Canyon, while boating. 

Fri. 6". — A fatal powder magazine explo- 
sion occurred in Ogden Canyon. 

— Joseph Toronto, once a missionary 
to Italy, died at Salt Lake City. 

Tues. 10. — Gov. Thomas A. Hendricks, of 
Indiana, visited Salt Lake City. 

— D. C. Rich and Rudolph Smith made 
an unsuccessful attemjjt to rob Zion's 
Savings Bank, in Salt Lake City, assault- 
ing B. H. Schettler,the assistant treasurer. 
They were both arrested. 

Wed. 11.— The Old Folks of Salt Lake 
City were treated to their annual ex- 
cursion, this time going to Provo. 

Sat. 14. — A company of Icelandic Saints 
sailed from Liverpool, England, on the 
steamship Wisconsin, in charge of John A. 
Sutton. The company arrived in Salt Lake 
City July 30th, and subsequently located 
at Spanish Fork, Utah Co. 

Sat. 28. — R. S. W. Andrew, a street car 
driver, was accidentally shot and killed in 
Salt Lake City. 

Sun. 20. — A terrific flood at Kanab, 
Kane Co., removed masses of earth, trees, 
etc., which it carried down stream, and 
partly destroyed the settlement. 

August. Thurs. 2. — The Salt Lake 
City Council decided that all houses with- 
in the city should be numbered, as a pre- 
paratory step toward the anticipated free 
mail delivery. 

Sun. 19. — Jeremiah S. Black, the cele- 
brated statesman and lawyer, who defend- 
ed the people of Utah so ably a few months 
previously, died in Washington, D.C. 

Mon. 20. — Ellen G. Lewis, a young lady, 
was accidentally shot and killed in Provo, 
by a policeman on duty. 

Tues. 21.— The notorious "Bill" Hick- 
man died in Lander City, Sweetwater Co., 
Wyoming. 

Sat. 25. — Bishop Andrew Burt, captain 
of the Salt Lake City police force, was 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — ISSi. 



118 



killed by a negro, whom he was trying to 
arrest. Half an hour later the negro was 
lynched by a mob, in the jail yard. 

iSun. 26'.^Alvin Henson was accidentally 
shot and killed by his comrades, while 
hunting, near Tooele, Utah. 

— Jack Murphy was taken out of the jail 
at Coalville and lynched at Park City, 
Summit Co., for the murder of M. Bren- 
nan, a few days previously. 

— The first permanent branch of the 
Church among the Maoris was organized 
by Ira N. Hinkley, jun., at Papawai, Wai- 
rarapa Valley, North Island, New Zealand ; 
Manihera, a native chief, was ordained a 
Priest and appointed president. This was 
the beginning of a great work among the 
Maoris. 

The first Maori who joined the Church 
was a sailor, baptized by Elder Richard G. 
Lambert, near Honolulu, Hawaiian Is- 
lands, early in 1874. Oct. 18, 1881, Elder 
Wm. John McDonald, baptized Ngataki, 
at Auckland. He was the first Maori to 
join the Church in New Zealand. Toward 
the close of 1883, and in the beginning of 
1884, a number of Maoris were baptized in 
the Waikato district through the instru- 
mentality of Pres. Wm. M. Bromley, Wm. 
J. McDonald and Thos. L. Cox. These 
were organized as the Wautu branch by 
Elder Thos. L. Cox, Feb. 25, 1S83. with 
Hare Te Katere as president. This was 
the first Maori branch of the Church or- 
ganized ; but most of its members proved 
unfaithful to the cause. 

Wed. 2.9.— The steamship yevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 682 Saints, 
including 29 returning missionaries, in 
chargeof Peter F. Goss. The companyar- 
rived at New York Sept. 7th, and at Salt 
Lake City Sept. 17th. 

F'7'i. 31. — Belle Harris was released from 
custody, having been imprisoned since 
May 18th. 

September. Sun. 2. —Muddy branch, 
Emery Co., Utah, was organized as a Ward, 
with Casper Christensen as Bishop. The 
name of the settlement was afterwards 
changed to Emery. 

UMon.S. — Washakie, a little Indian town 
in Box Elder Co., was visited by a fire, 
which destroyed grain to the value of 
13,000. 

Thurs. 6. — Wm. G. Phillips was appoint- 
ed marshal of Salt Lake City, in place of 
the late Andrew Burt. 

— Feramorz Little transferred a two 
story brick building, which he had erected 
by the 13th Ward Assembly Rooms for the 
benefit of the poor, to Bishop Miilen At- 
wood. 

Tiie.s. 11. — The celebrated Henry Ward 
Beecher lectured in the Salt Lake City 
Theatre. 

Wed. 12.— About midnight Elders Ste- 
phen R. Marks and David Franklin Davis, 
of Salt Lake City, were cruelly mobbed, 
near Laurel, Franklin Co., Indiana, where 
they labored as missionaries. 

jSat. 22. — General William T. Sherman 
arrived in Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

Sun. 23. — At a conference held at Bluff, 

San Juan Co., Utah, the Saints who had 

located at Fruitland, near Farmington, 

San Juan Co., New Mexico, were organ- 

9 



ized as a Ward, named Burnham, with 
Lutlier C. Burnham as Bishop. 

— The Saints constituting the Wilmot 
branch, Piute Co., Utah, were organized 
as the Marion Ward; Culbert King, Bishop. 

Wed. 26. — Bishop Charles E. Robison, 
of Montpelier, Bear Lake Co., Idaho, died 
at Whittaker, South Carolina, where he 
labored as a missionary. 

October. Fii. .3. — The semi-annual con- 
ference of the Church was commenced in 
Salt Lake City; it was continued three 
days ; 92 missionaries were called ; Apostle 
Wilford Woodruff was sustained as Church 
Historian. 

Sat. 6. — King David Kalakaua visited the 
plantation of Laie, on the Hawaiian Is- 
lands, and addressed a conference of as- 
sembled Saints there. 

Jfon. S. — John S. Fullmer, a prominent 
Elder in the Church, died in Springville, 
Utah Co., and Elder Henry Maiben died in 
Salt Lake City. 

Tites. 16. — Presiding Bishop Edward 
Hunter died in Salt Lake City. 

Saf. 27. — A fire destroyed Causey, Har- 
kins & Co's. skating rink on West Temple 
Street, Salt Lake City. Loss: ?10,000. 

— The steamsliip Wisconsin sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 369 Saints, in- 
cluding 20 returning missionaries, in 
charge of John Pickett The company 
arrived at New York, Nov. 7th, and at 
Ogden, Nov. 14th. 

Sun. 28. — The Neeleyville Ward, Oneida 
County, Idaho, was organized; Wm. 
Neeley, Bishop. 

November. Thurs. 1. — Lewis Robison, 
prominent in the early history of Utah, 
died in Salt Lake City, 67 years of age. 

Sat. 17. — Apostle Charles C. Rich died at 
Paris, Bear Lake Co., Idaho, 7J years of 
age. 

Sun. 18. — The Saints who had settled in 
Luna Valley, Socorro Co., N. M., were or- 
ganized as a Ward, with Geo. C. Williams 
as Bishop. 

Wed. 21. — David Patten Kimball, coun- 
selor to Pres. Christopher Layton, of 
the St. Joseph Stake of Zion, Ariz., died. 

Thurs. 22. — Bishop Wm. Davis died at 
Brigham City, Utah. 

Wed. 28. — The Saints who had located on 
Portneuf creek, Bingham Co., Idaho, were 
organized as a branch of the Church; 
Judson A. Tolman, presiding Elder. 

December. Thurs. i.?.- Marshal Wm. 
G. Phillips, of Salt Lake City, reported to 
the postmaster that all the public streets 
in the city had been named and all the 
houses numbered. 

F)i. 21. — Elder Lorenzo M. Richards died 
in Ogden. 

Mon. 24. — A monument was raised on the 
grave of the late Pres. Niels Wilhelmsen, 
on "Assistents Kirkegaard," Copenhagen, 
Dermark. 

Wed. 26. — Gen. Thos. L. Kane, favorably 
known in Church history, died at his home, 
in Philadelphia, Pa. 

1884. 

Two Stakes of Zion were organized in 
Idaho. The Logan Temple was dedicated. 
Several new Quorums of Seventy were or- 



114 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1S84. 



ganized. The prosecutions under the Ed- 
munds law were commenced. 

January. Tues. 1. — A fire broke out in 
the Utah Central coal mines, at Pleasant 
Valley, Emery Co., whereby John McLean 
and his son were suffocated. 

Mon. 14. — The 26th session of the Utah 
legislature convened in Salt Lake City, 
and organized by electing Wm. W. Cluff 
president of the council, and James Sharp 
speaker of the house. 

Fri. 'J.J. — Elders Wm. H. Crandall and 
John W. Galley were mobbed in Jasper 
County, Mississippi. 

Sun. 27.— The Brigham Young Academy 
in Provo was destroyed by fire. 

—Plymouth Ward, Box Elder Co., 
Utah, was organized; Myron J. Rich- 
ards, Bishop. 

Jfon. 2.S.— Senator Hoar introduced an- 
other anti- Mormon bill in the U. S. Sen- 
ate, which was passed June 18th. 

February. Jfon. J— The Bannock Ward, 
Snake River Valley, Idaho, was organized 
as the Bannock Stake of Zion; Thos. 
E. Ricks, president. 

Wed. 6. — Peter Carlson and son were 
killed in a snowslide, near Logan. 

Mon. 11. — At the municipal election in 
Salt Lake City, James Sharp was elected 
mayor. 

Wed. 13. — The members of the Wyoming 
legislature and a number of others from 
that Territory arrived in Salt Lake City, 
on a visit. They remained two days, du- 
ring which they visited the Utah legisla- 
ture then in session; speeches were made 
by both bodies. 

Mon. j(8.— Elders Wm. H. Crandall and 
Thomas Davis were shot at by a mob in 
Jones County, Miss. 

Sun. 24.— Portions of the North Jordan 
and Brighton Wards, Salt Lake Stake, 
were organized as Granger Ward ; Daniel 
McRae, Bishop. 

Mon. 23. — Elder Henry C. Fowler died 
in Salt Lake City. 

March. Sun. 2. — The Saints who had 
settled near Safiford, Graham Co., Ariz , 
were organized as Lay ton branch; John 
Walker, presiding Elder. 

Fri. 7. — Ten men and two women were 
killed in a snowslide, at the Emma mine, 
Little Cottonwood Canyon. 

J^ ri. 14. — The Utah legislature adjourned. 

Mon. 17. — Bishop Silas Richards died at 
Union, Salt Lake Co. 

Sat. 22. — Daniel Mathison died at Paro- 
wan, Iron Co. 

Sun. 30. — Elder Thomas Biesinger was 
arrested and imprisoned at Prague, 
Bohemia, for preaching the gospel. 

April. Tnes. 1. — The world-renowned 
Adelina Patti, assisted by an excellent 
company, sang in the Tabernacle, in Salt 
Lake City. 

F7-i. 4. — Ebenezer Hanks, a member of 
the iMormon Battalion, died at Graves' 
Village, Piute Co. 

— Patriarch John Rowberry died at 
Tooele, Tooele Co. 

—On this and the three following days 
the 54th annual conference of the Church 
was held in Salt Lake City. 

Wed. 9. — The steamship Xcvada sailed 



from Liverpool, England, with 319 Saints, 
including 17 returning missionaries, in 
charge of Christian D. Fjeldsted. It ar- 
rived in New York harbor April 19th, and 
the company reached Ogden, Utah, April 
27th. 

Tues. 15. — A large company of mission- 
aries left Salt Lake City for the United 
States and Europe. 

Thurs. 17. — Presidents John Taylor and 
Geo. Q. Cannon, accompanied by a number 
of others, left Salt Lake City, to visit the 
Iron Works in southern Utah. 

Sun. 20. — The 77th quorum of Seventy 
was organized by Wm. W. Taylor at Ogden, 
with John Crawford, Louis F. Monch, 
Fred. Foulger, Chas. C. Brown and Henry 
W. Gwilliams as presidents. LudvigEhrn- 
str0m and Ephraim H. Nye were after- 
wards added to the council. 

Thurs. 2-/.— Rudger Clawson was ar- 
rested in Salt Lake City, on a charge of 
polygamy, and placed under S3, 000 bonds. 

Sun. 27. — At the first quarterly confer- 
ence of the Bannock Stake of Zion, held at 
Rexburg, Idaho, the Saints at Rexburg 
were organized as a Ward; Thos. E. Ricks, 
jun., Bishop. 

— The 78th quorum of Seventy was or- 
ganized by Wm. W. Taylor, at Oakley, 
Cassia Co., Idaho; Robert Wilson, John 
Alexander, Moroni F. Fairchilds, George 
S. Grant, John J. Millard, Thomas Taylor 
and Edward D. Hoagland, presidents. The 
two last named were ordained a day or 
two later. 

— Pere Hyacinthe, renowned French 
orator, who was in Salt Lake City on a 
visit, attended the services in the Taber- 
nacle. 

— A branch of the Church was organ- 
ized at Eureka, Juab Co. ; John Beck, 
president. 

Mon. 28. — Christian D. Fjeldsted, of Lo- 
gan, was ordained one of the First Seven 
Presidents of Seventies, to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of John Van Cott. 

Tues. 29. — A third trial of the murderer 
Fred Hopt was commenced in the Third 
District Court, Salt Lake City. He was 
convicted May 5th, and sentenced on the 
9th to be shot June 13th. 

May. Mon. 12. — The 79th quorum of 
Seventy was organized by Abraham H. 
Cannon, in Bear Lake County, Idaho; 
Charles H. Bridges, John Bunney, Chris- 
tian Hogansen, Carl F. Hellstrom, Her- 
bert Horsley, Charles R. Clark and Brig- 
ham L. Tippetts, presidents. 

Tues. 13. — David Gallifant, of Salt Lake 
City, was sentenced to five years' imprison- 
ment for killing Richard Fowler on May 
28, 1883. 

— Ole U. C. Monster, the first person 
baptized by Erastus Snow, in Denmark, 
died at Pettyville, Sanpete Co. 

Sat. 17.— The Logan Temple was dedi- 
cated, under the direction of Pres. John 
Taylor. 

— The steamship Arizona sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 287 Saints, in- 
cluding 13 returning missionaries, in 
charge of Ephraim H. Williams. On the 
26th they arrived in New York, and 
reached Salt Lake City June 1st. 

Wed. 21. — The first marriages in the 
Logan Temple were solemnized. E. Y. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY 1884. 



115 



Taylor and Rida Colebrook, Frank 
Y. Taylor and Elizabeth Campbell, Mat- 
thias F. Cowley and Abbie Hyde were 
the contracting parties. 

— Ground was broken for a new building 
for theB. Y. Academy at Provo. 

Th urs. 22.— Nellie White, who refused to 
answer certain questions in the Third 
District Court, was sent to the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Thurs. 29. — Edward Wallace East, a 
prominent Elder, died at Pima, Arizona. 

— Elders Wm. C. A. Smoot, jun., and 
James E. Jennings, who labored as mis- 
sionaries in Bavaria, were expelled from 
that country. 

Fri. 30. — In Christiania, Norway, Elders 
N. C. Skaugaard and Peter Olsen were 
sentenced to pay a fine of 40 "Kroner" 
and costs of suit, each, for performing the 
ordinance of baptism. 

June. — A missionary field was opened 
in Ireland by Elders Robert Marshall and 
Geo. Wilson. At the end of the year 47 
had been baptized. 

fSun. i.— The Oneida Stake of Zion was 
organized by Apostle Moses Thatcher; 
Wm. D. Hendricks, president; Solomon H. 
Hale and Geo. C. Parkinson, counselors. 
The Wards and branches embraced in the 
new organization had formerly belonged to 
Cache and Box Elder Stakes. 

Thurs. 5. — The Chesterfield branch 
Bingham Co., Idaho, was organized as a 
Ward; Parley P. Willey, Bishop. 

— The Saints at Lyman, Snake River 
Valley, Idaho, were organized as a Ward ; 
Sidney Weeks, Bishop. 

—The Logan 6th and 7th Wards, Cache 
Co., were organized; Anthon L. Skanchey 
and Isaac Smith, Bishops. 

Sun. S. — Eldrr Christian H. Steffensen 
was released from prison in Drammen, 
Norway, where he had been confined five 
days for administering the Sacrament. 

3fon. ,9.— The Saints at Wilford, Snake 
River Valley, Idaho, were organized as a 
branch of the Church. 

— The building known as the "Cock nt," 
at Preston, England, in which the first 
"Mormon" missionaries to England held 
meetings in 1837, tumbled down. 

Tues. 10. — The Saints at Teton, Snake 
River Valley, Idaho, were organized as a 
Ward; John Donaldson, Bishop. 

— Elders Wm. Willes, Henry F. McCune, 
Milson R. Pratt and Geo. H. Booth, left 
Salt Lake City, on a mission to India. 

Wed. 11.— The Saints at Parker, Snake 
River Valley, Idaho, were organized as a 
Ward; Wyman M. Parker, Bishop. 

Fri. 13.— By a reprieve, issued by Act- 
ing-Governor Arthur L. Thomas, the ex- 
ecution of the murderer Fred Hopt (Wel- 
come) was postponed. 

Sat. 14. — The steamship Arizona sailed 
from Liverpool, with 531 Saints, including 
25 returning missionaries, in charge of 
Ephraim H. Nye. They arrived in New 
York June 23rd and at Ogden June 29th. 

Sun. 15. — At a Stake conference held at 
Mesa, Maricopa Co., Ariz., Tempe branch 
was organized as a Ward, Samuel Open- 
shaw Bishop ; and Alma Ward was organ- 
ized, with Oscar M. Stewart as Bishop. 

Tues. ir.— Martin H. Peck died in Salt 
Lake City. 



Sun. 29. — Nicholas Groesbeck died in 
Salt Lake City. 

July. Thurs 5.— David O. Calder, Coun- 
in the Salt Lake Stake presidency, died at 
Lake Point, Tooele Co. 

Sun. 6. — A fearful tornado visited Sum- 
mit County, Utah, doing much damage 
and causing the death of a little girl. 

Jfon. 7. — Nellie White, who had been 
confined in the Penitentiary since May 
22nd, was restored to liberty. 

Thurs. 17. — The Deseret Hospital was 
removed from the 12th to the 17th Ward, 
Salt Lake City. 

Hun. 20. — The Fairview branch of the 
Church, near Franklin, Idaho., was organ- 
ized as a Ward; Heman Hyde, Bishop. 

Tues. 22. — About five hundred of the Old 
Folks of Salt Lake County had their an- 
nual excursion, going to American Fork, 
Utah Co. 

Thurs. 31. — Leonard W. Hardy, first 
Counselor to the Presiding Bishop of the 
Church, died in Sugar House Ward, Salt 
Lake Co., and Orson K. W^hitney, one 
of the Pioneers of 1847, died in Salt Lake 
City. 

August. Fri. 1. — Wm. W. Taylor, son 
of Pres. John Taylor, and one of the First 
Seven Presidents of the Seventies, died in 
Salt Lake City. 

—Elders Wm. Willes, Henry F. Mc- 
Cune, Milson R. Pratt and Geo. H. Booth, 
arrived, as missionaries, in Calcutta, In- 
dia. 

Sat. 2. — Fourteen Saints sailed from 
Liverpool, England, in charge of H. W. 
Attley, on the steamship ^'erada. They 
landed in New York Aug. 13th, and ar- 
rived at Salt Lake City Aug. 13th. 

Thurs. 7. — The 80th quorum of Seventj 
was organized by Seymour B. Young, at 
Spring City, Sanpete Co.; Thos. B. Allred, 
Jos. F. Ellis, John Larsen, James Chris- 
tensen. Mad? Nielsen, Lauritz Rasmussen 
and Joseph Downard, presidents. 

Fri. 8.— James Roskelley, who labored 
as a missionary in the Southern States, was 
shot and wounded in the arm by a negro, 
in Lee Valley, Tenn. 

Sat. 9. — J. R. Henson and family, be- 
cause of their being "Mormons," were 
fired upon by a mob in Decatur County, 
Tennessee, and shortly after compelled 
to leave their homes, to escape mob vio- 
lence. 

Sun. iO.— Elders Wm. S. Berry, of Ka- 
narra and John H. Gibbs, of Paradise, and 
Martin Condor and John Riley Hudson, of 
Tennessee, were murdered by a mob on 
Cane Creek, Lewis Co., Tenn., while hold- 
ing religious services. 

B^ri. 15. — The first number of the Seiner 
Valley Echo, a weekly newspaper, was 
published in Richfield, Sevier Co., by James 
T. Jakeman. It was continued until May 
1, 1885, when it was superseded by the 
JTome Sentinel, published in Manti, San- 
pete Co. 

— Joseph H. Coult, of Salt Lake City, 
was drowned at Calder's Farm. 

Sat. 16. — Bishop Wm. H. Dame died sud- 
denly at Faragoonah, Iron Co. 

Sun. 17. — At a quarterly conference held 
at Rexburg, Idaho, the Menan (Cedar 
Buttes) and Louisville Wards were partly 
organized, the former with Robert L. 



116 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY— 1884. 



Bybee and the latter with Richard F. 
Jardine as Bishop. 

— Elder Jesse J. Fuller, an elderly mis- 
sionary, was whipped by a mob in Lauder- 
dale County, Ala. 

Fri. 22.— The remains of Elders Wm. S. 
Berry and Geo. H. Gibbs arrived in Salt 
Lake City from Tennessee. 

.S'ai. 23. — Under the direction of the Old 
Folks' Committee, the orphan children of 
Salt Lake County had a free excursion to 
Black Rock. 

Wed. 2r.— The St. John Ward (formerly 
a part of the Malad Ward), Oneida Co., 
Idaho, was organized; James Harrison, 
Bishop. 

'iat. 30. — The steamship Wijoming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 496 Saints, 
including 31 returning missionaries, under 
the direction of Benjamin Bennett. They 
arrived at New York Sept. 9th, and at 
Ogden Sept. 16th. 

Sun. 31. — The Saints residing on Ferron 
creek, east of Ferron, Emery Co., were 
separated from Ferron Ward and organ- 
ized as Molen Ward; Lyman s. Beach, 
Bishop. 

September.— The 81st quorum or Seven- 
ty was organized by Seymour B. Young in 
Emery County; Noah T. Guyman, Wm. H. 
Branch, J. P." Wimmer, Peter R. Petersen, 
Abner Buckley and James C. Jensen, 
presidents. 

J/o/i. 1. — Margaret T. Smoot, wife of 
Abraham O. Smoot, died in Provo, Utah, 
Co. 

— Charles S. Zane, recently appointed 
chief justice of Utah, took the oath of 
oflSce and was assigned, bj'^ proclamation 
of Gov. Eli H. Murray, to the Third Dis- 
trict Court. 

Tues. 2. Piute County, Utah, was visited 
by a fearful hail storm, 
f"- Wed. 3. — The Saints who had settled on 
Rock Creek, Oneida Co., Idaho, were or- 
ganized as Rockland Ward, of the Box 
Elder Stake ; Isaac Thorn, Bishop. 

Sat. 6. — Wilford branch. Snake River 
Valley, Idaho, was organized as a Ward ; 
Thos. S. Smith, Bishop. 

2 ue.s. 9. — The Saints who had settled on 
the Mancos river, Colo., were organized 
as a branch; James H. Duncan, presi- 
ding Elder. 

jTon. 15. — Ashley Ward, Uintah Co., 
was divided, and two new districts, Mer- 
rill and Glines, organized, with Geo. A. 
Davis and James H. Glines as their re- 
spective acting Bishops. 

— Wm. C. A. Smoot, jun., missionary in 
Germany, was arrested in Kiel, for bap- 
tising a woman. He was held a prisoner 
until Oct. 7th, when he was acquitted, but 
nevertheless banished from the city. 

3fon. 22. — Elder John Nicholson de- 
livered a lecture in the Salt Lake Theatre 
on the subject : The Tennessee massacre 
audits causes; showing that it was the re- 
sult of imflamatory articles in the Salt 
Lake 7'WfeM7«p,circulated by sectarian min- 
isters in Tennessee. 

Sat. 21. — The first open venire grand 
jury in Salt Lake City was impanneled by 
Judge Zane. 

October. — Severe persecutions contin- 
ued against the Elders in the Southern 



States, and also in Indiana, Michigan and 
other places. 

Wed. 1. — The 82nd quorum of Seventy 
was organized in Grass Valley, Piute Co., 
Utah, by Seymour B. Young; Geo. A. 
Burr and Ole E. Olsen, presidents. Chap- 
man Duncan, Wm. E. Stringham and 
Geo. A. Hatch were set apart as presidents 
afterwards. 

Tues. 7. — John Morgan was ordained 
one of the First Seven Presidents of the 
Seventies, to fill the vacancy caused by 
the death of Wm. W. Taylor. 

Tues. 14. — Bishop Marius Ensign died at 
Santa Clara, Washington Co. 

Wed. to.— The trial of Rudger Clawson 
for polygamy was commenced in the 
Third District Court, Salt Lake City, and 
continued several days, during which 
Presidents John Taylor, Geo. Q. Cannon 
and other prominent men were subpoenaed 
as witnesses. 

Tues. 21. — The jury, which could not 
agree on a verdict in Rudger Clawson's 
case, was discharged, and preparations 
were made for a new trial. 

"^hurs. 23. — The steamship City of Ber- 
lin sailed from Liverpool, England, with 
93 Saints, including nine returning Elders 
in charge of Carl August Ek. The com- 
pany arrived at New York Nov. 2nd, and 
at Salt Lake City Nov. 9th. 

Fri. 24. — Lydia Spencer, Rudger Claw- 
son's alleged second wife, having been ar- 
rested , a new trial was commenced, and 
Lydia Spencer, who refused to testify, 
was sent to the Penitentiary. 

Sat. 2.5.— In the Third District Court, 
Lydia Speneer, by her husband's consent, 
acknowledged that she was Rudger Claw- 
son's wife, and the jury, after 17 minutes' 
consultation, returned a verdict of guilty 
against Clawson. 

Fri. 31.— After several days' trial in the 
Third District Court, John Connelly was 
acquitted on the charge of polygamy, his 
case being barred by the statute of limi- 
tations. 

November. Sat. f.— The steamship 
Arizona sailed from Liverpool, England, 
with 163 Saints, including 20 returning 
missionaries, in charge of Joseph Alma 
Smith. The company arrived at New 
York Nov. 11th, and at Salt Lake City 
Nov. 19th. 

Jfon. 3. — Hans Ottesen was murdered in 
Manti, Sanpete Co. 

— In the Third District Court (Judge 
Zane), Rudger Clawson was sentenced to 
four years' imprisonment and $800 fine for 
polygamy and unlawful cohabitation. The 
case was appealed, but bail was refused 
and Clawson taken to the Penitentiary. 

— Paul A. Schettler, treasurer of Salt 
Lake City, died. 

Tues. 4. — At the general election, John 
T. Caine, the People's Party candidate for 
delegate to Congress, received 22,120 votes 
and Ransford Smith, the Liberal Party 
candidate, 2,21.5. 

— Layton branch, Graham Co., Ariz., 
was organized as a Ward ; John Welker, 
Bishop. 

Wed. .5.— The trial of Joseph H. Evans, 
indicted for polygamy and unlawful cohab- 
itation, was commenced in the Third Dis- 



CHUECH CHllONOLOGY — 1885. 



117 



trict Court, and the following day the 
jury returned a verdict of guilty. 

Sat. 8. — The news of the Democratic 
victory in the election of Grover Cleve- 
land for president of the United States 
having reached Salt Lake City, a grand 
jolification meeting was held by the Salt 
Lake City Democrats, in front of the City 
Hall. 

— In the Third District Court (Judge 
Zane), Joseph H. Evans was sentenced to 
three and a half years' imprisonment in 
the Penitentiarv and $250 fine. 

Thurs. i,3.— Eighty Latter-day Saint 
emigrants from the Southern States 
mission, and nine returning Elders, left 
Chattanooga, Tenn., bound for Colorado 
and Utah. 

Fri. 14. — Rudger Clawson was brought 
before the Supreme Court of Utah on a 
writ of habeas corpus, and on the follow- 
ing day the decision of the lower court, in 
refusing him and Joseph H. Evans bail, 
pending an appeal to the higher courts, 
was affirmed. 

Wed. 19. — Frederick W. Schoenfeld and 
Rudolph Hochstrasser, in the District 
Court of Zofingen, Canton Aargau, Swit- 
zerland, were sentenced to pay a fine of 
100 francs each, and banished from the 
canton, for preaching the gospel in Nie- 
derwyl. 

Sat. 22. — Horace Kimball Whitney, one 
of the Pioneers of 1847, died in Salt Lake 
City. 

Sun. 23. — At a Stake conference held in 
Rexburg, Idaho, the Saints who had set- 
tled on the Teton island, near Rexburg, 
were organized as Salem Ward; Geo. H. 
B. Harris, Bishop. 

Tties. 25.— John Aird, jun., of Salt Lake 
City, was arrested on a charge of unlaw- 
ful cohabitation. The following day he 
was placed under $3,000 bonds, to await 
action of the grand jury. 

December. Thurs. 4. — Ole L. Hansen, 
of Brighton, Salt Lake Co., was arraigned 
before U. S. Commissioner Wm. McKay, 
Salt Lake City, charged with polygamy. 

Fri. 5.— Ammon M. Tenney, Peter J. 
Christoffersen. and Christopher J. Kempe, 
tried and convicted ot polygamy , were each 
sentenced by Judge Howard, at Pres- 
cott, Ariz., to three years, and six months' 
imprisonment in the House of Correction 
at Detroit, Mich., and $5.00 fine. Their 
offence was unlawful cohabitation, but this 
was construed by the court as polygamy. 
Wm. J. Flake and Jens N. Skousen, who 
plead guilty to u. c. (unlawful cohabita- 
tion) , were each sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment at Yuma, Ariz., and $500 
fine. 

Sun. 7. — Ammon M. Tenney, Peter J. 
Christoffersen and Christopher J. Kempe 
left Prescott, Ariz., for the prison at De- 
troit, Mich., and Wm. J. Flake and Jens. 
N. Skousen for Yuma prison. 

Sat. 13. — John Olsen, of Salt Lake City, 
was arrested on a charge of u. c. and 
placed under $1,000 bonds. 

Sun. 14. — The 83rd quorum of Seventy 
was partly organized by Seymour B. 
Young, at St. Johns, Apache Co., Ariz. 

Wed. 31. — Elder Jacob Spori arrived as 
a Latter-day Saint missionary at Constan- 
tinople, Turkey. 



1885. 

The prosecutions under the Edmunds 
anti-polygamy law were carried on with 
great hostility by the Federal officials and 
courts in Utah and Idaho. A large num- 
ber of polygamists were imprisoned and 
many others went into exile, some going 
into Mexico. 

January. — The Saints who had settled 
at different points on the Fremont river 
(Dirty Devil), east of Rabbit Valley, were 
organized as Blue Valley Ward ; Henry 
Giles, Bishop. 

— Peter Olsen, missionary in Norway, 
was imprisoned five days on bread and 
water, for preaching the gospel. 

Tues. 6. — After several days' examina- 
tion, the Seventh School District lawsuit 
(Salt Lake City) was submitted to Judge 
Charles S. Zane, who two days later gave 
his decision in favor of the district trus- 
tees. 

Thurs. 8. — Alexander F. Macdonald, 
Christopher Layton and John W. Camp- 
bell arrived at Corralitos, Chihuahua, 
Mexico, to rent or buy land, on which to 
locate such families of Saints as were be- 
ing driven into exile, because of their fam- 
ily relations in the United States. 

Sat. 10. — Bingham County, Idaho, was 
created out of a small part of Oneida 
County, by an act of the Idaho legislature. 

Mon. 12. — Addison Everett, a prominent 
Elder of the Church and a Pioneer of 1847, 
died at St. George. 

— Mary Ann Fielding, widow of Joseph 
Fielding, died in Salt Lake City. 

— Elders Ferdinand F. Hintze and Anton 
Lauritzen were mobbed at Ribe, Den- 
mark. 

Tues. i3.— George S. Grant, son of the 
late Pres. Jedediah M. Grant, was acci- 
dentally shot and killed in Oakley, Cassia 
Co., Idaho. 

Fri. 16. — The Morgan smelter, situated a 
few miles south of Salt Lake City, was 
destroyed by fire. 

Sun. iS.— The Saints who had settled on 
the lower Muddy, Lincoln Co., Nev., were 
organized as Overton Ward ; Isaiah Cox, 
Bishop. 

Mun. 19.— The. U. S. Supreme Court con- 
firmed the action of the Utah courts in re- 
fusing to admit Rudger Clawson to bail. 

Txies. 20. — Pres. Angus M. Cannon was 
arrested in Salt Lake City, on a charge 
of u. e. 

—Alexander F. McDonald and compan- 
ions': returned to Corralitos, Chihuahua, 
Mexico, from an exploring tour to some 
of the valleys lying on the east slope of the 
Sierra Madre Mountains,and found several 
families of exiles who had arrived from the 
United States. 

Fri. 23. — Rudger Clawson's sentence for 
polygamy was confirmed by the Supreme 
Court of Utah. The case was appealed to 
the United States Supreme Court. 

— Jacob S. Boreman qualified as associ- 
ate justice, in place of Stephen P. Twiss, 
resigned. 

Sat. 24.— After several days' examina- 
tion before Commissioner McKav, Pres. 



118 



CHUECH CHBONOLOGY — 1885 



Angus M. Cannon was placed under $1,500 
bonds. 

— Daniel H. Wells succeeded Apostle 
John H. Smith as president of the Euro- 
pean mission, the latter sailing for 
America. 

Wed. 28.— Royal B. Young, of Salt Lake 
City, was arrested on a charge of polyg- 
amy and u. c. 

fluirs. 2.9.— Royal B.Young was placed 
under S2,000 bonds, after his preliminary 
examination before Com. McKay. 

Fri. .30.— Acrnes McMurrin, Royal B. 
Young's alleged plural wife, was on trial 
in the Third District Court, on a charge of 
perjury. 

Sat. 31. — Jacob S. Boreman was appoint- 
ed judge of the Second Judicial District 
of Utah. 

February. — A difficulty between the 
land owners in Utah County and the sev- 
eral canal companies of Salt Lake County, 
caused by the overflow of Utah lake, was 
settled by arbitration. 

Sun. i.— Pres. John Taylor delivered his 
last public discourse in the Tabernacle, 
Salt Lake City. In the evening, he and 
Pres. Geo. Q. Cannon secreted themselves, 
in order to avoid the Federal officials, who 
were carrying on their high handed judicial 
proceedings in the Territory. Elder L. John 
Nuttall accompanied them as private sec- 
retary, Charles H. Wilcken as driver, and 
Charles H. Barrell as general aid. 

Tues. ,?.- A law passed by the Idaho 
legislature, prohibiting all ''Mormons" 
from voting, was approved by Gov. Bunn. 

Sun. 8.— Col. Heber P. Kimball died in 
Salt Lake City. 

—Elders Matts S. Mattson and H. Pers- 
son were mobbed in Aabyholm, Sweden. 

3fon. 9.— Ogden experienced a hot po- 
litical contest at the election, but the Peo- 
ples' Party succeeded in getting a ma- 
jority of votes for their candidates. 

—The Trenton branch. Cache Co., was 
organized as a Ward; James B. Jardine, 
Bishop. 

—A number of Saints going into exile 
because of their family relations, left 
Snowflake, Ariz., for Mexico. On their ar- 
rival at Luna Valley, New Mexico, on the 
1.5th, they were organized into a traveling 
company, with E. A. Noble as captain. 
The company had increased to about 
seventy soals. 

Tues. W.— Thomas Bullock, one of the 
Pioneers of 1847, and formerly Pres. Brig- 
ham Young's secretary, died at Coalville, 
Summit Co. 

Wed. 11. — Pres. Angus M. Cannon was 
arraigned before the Third District Court 
and allowed until the following Friday to 
plead. He then plead not guilty. 

Thurs. 12. — Klder William Willes re- 
turned to Salt Lake City, from his mission 
to India. 

—Elders Niels W. Petersen and Mads P. 
Madsen were mobbed, while holding a 
meeting in Kallundborg, Denmark. 

Fri. i.3.— Alta, Little Cottonwood Can- 
yon, was almost entirely destroyed by a 
snowslide, and about fifteen persons were 
killed. 

Tues. 17.— Br. John D. M. Crockwell died 
in Salt Lake City. 

Fri. 20.— Ferdinand F. Hintze's case was 



called in the Third District Court, and the 
prosecutors discovered that the absent 
defendant was not under bonds. 

Wed. 25. — Elder Francis M. Lyman, jun., 
who was arrested the day previous, was 
arraigned before the court at Weinhem, 
Germany, accused of holding a meeting 
and preaching "Mormonism," and sen- 
tenced to one day's imprisonment, after 
suffering which he was banished from the 
country. 

March. — The impossibility of securing 
a fair trial in the Utah Federal courts 
caused a number of leading men to vol- 
untarily go into exile. 

— Wm. Fotheringham, of Beaver, was 
indicted by the grand jury, arrested and 
placed under bonds, being charged with 
u. c. 

Sun. 1. — Apostle Moses Thatcher and 
other prominent men arrived at the camp 
of the Saints on the Casas Grandes river, 
Chihuahua, Mexico. Soon afterwards ex- 
plorations were made in the surround- 
ing country. 

lion. 2.— Parley P. Pratt, son of the late 
Apostle Parley P. Pratt, was arrested in 
Salt Lake City, charged with u.c. 

— The free mail delivery system was in- 
troduced in Salt Lake City. 

— The first number of the Salt Lake 
Evening Democrat, a daily anti- Mormon 
newspaper, was published in Salt Lake 
City, by the Salt Lake Democrat Com- 
pany. 

— Elders Wm. F. Garner and Christian 
F. Christensen had a narrow escape from 
being lynched by a mob in Mitchell County, 
North Carolina, where they labored as 
missionaries. 

Wed. 4. — Ole L. Hansen, of Brighton, 
Salt Lake Co., charged with u.c, was ar- 
raigned before the Third District Court 
and plead not guilty. 

F7-i. f>.—Wm. H. Pitts, of the firm of 
Godbe, Pitts & Co., died in Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 7. — Captain Noble's company of 
Arizona exiles, arrived at a point on the 
Casas Grandes river, near Ascencion, 
Chihuahua, Mexico, where they formed a 
temporary encampment. 

Sun. 8. — Elders Charles W. Penrose, 
Lorenzo Waldram, jun., and Wm. W. Bur- 
ton arrived at Liverpool, England, as mis- 
sionaries from Utah. 

— Bishop John Hunt's wife was burned 
to death at Snowflake, Ariz. 

— The first Latter-day Saint Sunday 
School in Mexico was commenced at Cor- 
ralitos. Chihuahua; James Gale, supt. 

Wed. 11. — The Church blacksmith shop 
at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon, 
was burned. 

Thurs. 12. — The jury returned a verdict 
of guilty against Thos. Simpson for poly- 
gamy. 

Fri. 13.— The Gardo House, Salt Lake 
City, was searched by U. S. deputy mar- 
shals, who subpoenaed a number of wit- 
nesses. 

Sat. 14.— In the Third District Court, 
Thos. Simpson was sentenced to two years' 
imprisonment for polygamy and taken to 
the Penitentiary. 

— The case against Laban Morrill,of Circle 
V^alley, Utah, for u. c, was dismissed in 
the Second District Court, at Beaver. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1885. 



1]9 



3fon. 16. — Thomas Holland was drowned 
at Baker's Spring, near Utah Lake. 

Tues. 17. — John Nicholson, associate 
editor of the Beseret Xeivs, was arrested, 
charged with u. c, and placed under $1,500 
bonds, to answer before the grand jury. 

Thurs. 19. — U. S. deputy marshals raided 
the houses of Geo. Q. Cannon, Geo. Dun- 
ford and Mrs. J. C. Little, in an unsuccess- 
ful search for witnesses in polygamy cases. 

Sun. 22. — The U. S. Supreme Court ren- 
dered a decision annulling the test oath 
formulated by the Utah Commission. By 
this ruling a number of persons were re- 
stored to the elective franchise. 

Tues. 2.J.— Parley P. Pratt was arrested 
in Salt Lake City on a charge of polygamy 
and u. c. 

— The jury in the Second District Court 
(Beaver) rendered a verdict of not guilty 
in the case of Mr. Pace, who had been 
charged withu. c. 

— Joseph Pidcock, of Ogden, was found 
dead near Montpelier, Bear Lake Co., 
Idaho. 

Wed. 25. — A grand musical concert, un- 
der the direction of Prof. Geo. Careless, 
was given in the Salt Lake Theatre. 

F7-i. 27.- Eli B. Kelsey died in Salt Lake 
City. 

Hat. 28. — Elder Abraham Coon died in 
Salt Lake City. 

3fon. 30. — Orson P. Arnold, of Salt Lake 
City, was arrested on a charge of u. c. 
and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

April.— A number of flowing artesian 
wells were made in Salt Lake City and vi- 
cinity. 

— A. Milton Musser was arrested in Salt 
Lake City, on a charge of u. c, and placed 
under $1,000 bonds. 

Thurs. 2. — The Utah Commission made a 
verbal report to President Cleveland at 
Washington, D. C, on their work in Utah. 

Fri. 3. — Jacob S. Boreman was appointed 
judge of the First Judicial District of 
Utah, the second time. 

Sat. 4. — John Pack, one of the Pioneers 
of 1847, died in Salt Lake City. 

— Wm. W. Roundy was appointed to 
preside in the camp of the Saints, located 
north of the town of Casas Grandes, Chi- 
huahua, Mexico. 

— The 55th annual conference of the 
Church convened in Logan, Utah, Frank- 
lin D. Richards presiding. It was con- 
tinued three days. On the second day 
(April 5th), an epistle from the First 
Presidency was read, and a committee was 
appointed to draft a petition to the Presi- 
dent of the United States, praying for 
protection against the tyrannical acts of 
the Federal oiflcials in Utah. 

Tues. 7. — Charles I. Robson, counselor 
to the president of the Maricopa Stake, 
and Bishop Oscar M. Stewart, of Alma, 
were each sentenced to ninety days' im- 
prisonment, at Yuma, Ariz., for u. c. 

Thurs. .9.— The Saints encamped on the 
Casas Grandes river, Mexico, were or- 
dered to leaye the State of Chihuahua, in 
fifteen days. 

— The Tennessee legislature passed a 
law, forbidding the teaching of polygamy 
in that State. 

Fri. 10. — In the District Court at 
Phoenix, Ariz., the jury returned a verdict 



of guilty against A. P, Spilsbury, indicted 
for u. c. 

Sat. 11. — At Phoenix, Ariz., A. P. Spils- 
bury and Geo. T. Wilson were each sen- 
tenced to six months' imprisonment, and 
Chas. I. Robson, Hyrum S. Phelps, Oscar 
M. Stewart and James Wilson to three 
months' imprisonment each for u. c. The 
following day (April 12th), they were taken 
to Yuma prison. 

— The steamship Wisconsin, sailed from 
Liverpool with 187 "Mormon" passengers, 
including 19 returning missionaries, in 
charge of Louis P. Lund ; it arrived in 
New York April 32nd, and the company 
reached Salt Lake City, on the 28th. 

Mon. 13. — Orson P. Arnold, of Salt Lake 
City, plead guilty to the charge of unlaw- 
ful cohabitation, in the Third District 
Court, and, promising to obey the law in the 
future, was discharged on paying $300 fine. 

—Elders Wm.F. Garner, of North Ogden, 
and Christian F. Christensen, of Kanosh, 
were arrested in Carter County, Tenn., 
accused of preaching polygamy. 

Tues. iJ.— James Tnompson,of Salt Lake 
City, was arrested on a charge of u. c. 

— Elders Wm. F. Garner and Christian 
F. Christensen were imprisoned at Eliza- 
bethtown, Tenn. 

Wed. i5.— Edward Brain, of the 20th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u.c, and placed under $2,000 
bonds. 

— Apostle George Teasdale and other 
Elders arrived at the City of Chihuahua, 
Mexico, to plead the cause of the Saints 
encamped on the Casas Grandes river. 
The next day (16th) they had an interview 
with the governor, who referred the ques- 
tion of ejectment to the Federal govern- 
ment. 

Thurs. 16. — Judge Zane rendered a de- 
cision declaring the Territorial liquor law 
valid and sustaining the action of the 
county court against certain liquor deal- 
ers. 

Fri. 17.— Clara D. Young, wife of John 
W. Young, died in Salt Lake City. 

— Emil O. Olsen, of Salt Lake City, was 
arrested on a charge of u.c. and placed 
under $1,000 bonds. 

Sun. i.9.— Pres. Wm. D.Hendricks, of the 
Oneida Stake, Idaho, was arrested in Lo- 
gan, Utah, on a charge of u.c. 

Jfon. 20.— Wm. A. Rossiter, of Salt Lake 
City, was arrested on a charge of u.c. and 
placed under $1,000 bonds. 

—The U. S. Supreme Court sustained 
the decision of the Utah courts, in 
Rudger Clawson's polygamy case, but de- 
cided in favor of giving the murderer 
Fred Hopt a fourth trial. 

Tues.21.—'Da.Yid E. Davis, of Clover, 
Tooele Co., was arrested on a charge of 
u. c, and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Wed. 22.— Samuel H. B. Smith, of Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of u. 
c, and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Fri. 24.— v. S. deputy marshals searched 
the Temple Block for the purpose of mak- 
ing arrests, but found no one they wanted. 

—Bishop Hiram B. Clawson, of Salt Lake 
City, was arrested on a charge of u. c, and 
placed under $1,500 bonds. 

—The first number of the ffonie Sentinel, 
a weekly newspaper, was published by 



120 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1885. 



Jakeman & Harrington, at-Manti, Sanpete 
Co. 

3fon. 27.— The trial of Pres. Angus M. 
Cannon was commenced in the Third Dis- 
trict Court, Salt Lake City. 

Tues. 28. — Abraham H. Cannon, of Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of u. 
c, and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— The jury returned a verdict of guilty 
against Pres. Angus M. Cannon, for u. c. 

—Bishop James C. Hamilton, of Mill 
Creek, Salt Lake Co., was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. and polygamy, brought to 
Salt Lake City, and placed under $1,500 
bonds. 

Thurs. 30.— The trial of A. Milton Mus- 
ser was commenced in the Third District 
Court. 

— John Aird, who plead guilty to the 
charge of u. c, promised to obey the law 
and was sentenced to §300 fine ; in default 
of payment he was sent to the Peniten- 
tiary. 

May. — The 84th quorum of Seventy was 
organized by Seymour B. Young in the 
Bannock Stake. Idaho; Swen Jacobs, sen., 
Walter Paul, Arvis C. Dille, Joseph H. 
Brown, L. E. Shurtliff, Walter G. Paul and 
Wm. H. Walker, presidents. 

— Marcus L. Shepherd and David Levi 
were arrested at Beaver, Utah, on a 
charge of u. c. 

— Apostles Brigham Toung and Moses 
Thatcher visited the City of Mexico, and 
obtained permission from the Federal gov- 
ernment for the Saints to remain in Chi- 
huahua. 

— Elder Niels Hansen, who labored as a 
missionary in Frederikshavn, Denmark, 
was ordered out of the country. 

Fri. i.— Claudius V. Spencer, who had 
been indicted for u. c, plead guilty in 
the Third District Court, and, promising 
to live within the law, Judge Zane sus- 
pended sentence. 

Sat. 2. — A grand mass meeting was held 
in the Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, to pro- 
test against the oppressive course of the 
Federal officials in the Territory. A dec- 
laration of grievances and protest, ad- 
dressed to the President and people of the 
United States, were adopted, and John T. 
Caine, John W. Taylor and John Q. Can- 
non were chosen as a delegation to pro- 
ceed to Washington with the documents. 
Similar mass meetings were held in the 
various cities and towns of the 'J'erritory. 

—The jury in the Third District Court 
returned a verdict of guilty against A. 
Milton Musser, James C. Watson and Par- 
ley P. Pratt. The latter, who had been 
indicted for u. c, plead guilty to the 
charge and was sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment and $500 fine, and taken to 
the Penitentiary. 

Jfon. 4.—0. L. Hansen, of Brighton, in- 
dicted for u. c, was acquitted in the Third 
District Court. 

Fri. S.— Wm, D. Newsom, of the 11th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of polygamy, and the preliminary 
examination commenced before Com. Mc- 
Kay. Lucy Devereau, defendants' plural 
wife, one of the witnesses in the case, was 
taken to the Penitentiary for refusing to 
testify. 

Hat. .9. — Pres. Angus M. Cannon, A. 



Milton Musser and James C. Watson were 
each sentenced to six months' imprison- 
ment and $300 fine for u. c, and taken ta 
the Penitentiary. 

— Samuel Humphreys was arrested at 
Nounnan Valley and Chas. Simpson at 
another place in Bear Lake Co., Idaho, on 
a charge of polygamy. They were both 
taken to Blackfoot for examination. 

— Wm.D. Newsom was admitted to $3,000 
bail, and Lucy Devereau released from 
custody, being placed under $200 bonds. 

Sun. 10. — Eight armed deputy marshals 
arrested Wm. D. Pratt, of Wilford, and 
John L. Roberts, of Rexburg, Bingham 
Co., Idaho, in the night, on a charge of u. 
c, or polygamy, and started for Blackfoot 
the following day. Both plead guilty and 
were sentenced to imprisonment May 23rd 
following. 

3Io)i. 11.— v. S. Marshal Fred. T. Du- 
bois, of Idaho, and five assistants, armed 
to the teeth, visited Paris, Bear Lake Co. 
Idaho, in search of polygamists. 

Wed. 13.— The Utah delegation (Caine, 
Cannon and Taylor) had an interview 
with President Cleveland, at Washington, 
D. C. 

— Isaac Groo, of Salt Lake City, was ar- 
rested on a charge of u. c, and placed un- 
der $1,500 bonds, after pleading guilty to 
the charge before Com. McKay. 

— J. D. Jones, of Idaho, was sentenced 
to $300 fine for u. c, and promised to obey 
the law in the future. 

TJiurs. 14. — After several days' trial, the 
jury in the Third District Court returned 
a verdict of not guilty in the case against 
Officer Thomas F. Thomas, who had been 
accused of assaulting the negro, who killed 
Capt. Andrew Burt, Aug. 25, 1883. 

—James Taylor, of Ogden, was arrested 
on a charge of u. c, and placed under 
$1,500. 

Fri. 15. — Moroni Brown and Francis A. 
Brown, of Ogden, were ari-ested on the 
charge of u. c, and each placed under 
$i,500 bonds. 

Sat. 16. — Job Pingree, of Ogden, was ar- 
rested on a charge of u. c. and placed un- 
der $1,500 bonds. 

— Wm. Fotheringham was adjudged 
guilty of u. c. by the jury in the Seconds 
District Court, Beaver, after a lengthy 
trial, although no proof of his guilt had 
been produced, except for "holding out." 

— The steamship Wisconsin sailed from 
Liverpool, with 174 Saints, including 15 re- 
turning missionaries, under the direction 
of N. M. Hodges. On the 27th it arrived in 
New York, and the company ai'rived in 
Salt Lake City, June 2nd. 

Tues, 19. — Lucy Devereau was again 
sent to the Penitentiary for refusing to 
answer certain questions before the grand 
jury in the Third District Court. 

— Joseph M. Phelps, of Montpelier, Bear 
Lake Co., Idaho, was arrested in Salt Lake 
City, on a charge of u. c. 

Wed. 20.— In the Second District Court 
(Judge Boreman), Wm. Fotheringham was 
sentenced to three months' imprisonment 
and $300 fine, and taken to the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Thurs. 2i.— Aurelius Miner, of Salt Lake 
City was arrested on a charge of u. c. 

— Hiram B. Clawson, Bishop of the 12th, 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1885. 



121 



Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, and placed under $1,500 
bonds. 

— David Lee, who plead guilty to the 
charge of u. c, was discharged on paying 
a fine of $300. 

— Elder John P. Ibsen, while preaching 
the gospel in a private house on Bornholm, 
Denmark, was arrested and brought to 
Renne, where he was tried and imprisoned 
three days for preaching. Soon after- 
wards he was sent as a prisoner to 
Copenhagen. 

FH. 22. — The grand jury having found 
an indictment against Isaac Groo, of Salt 
Lake City, for u. c, he was re- arrested 
and placed under $1,500 bonds, to await 
trial. 

Sat. 23. — In the District Court at Black- 
foot, Idaho, Judge Morgan sentenced 
Bishop George Stuart, of Malad, Wm. J. 
Pratt, of Wilford, and John T. Roberts, of 
Rexburg, each to four months' imprison- 
ment in the Boise Penitentiary and $300 
fine; John Winn, an old man, of Battle 
Creek, Oneida Co., and Charles W. Simp- 
son, of Montpelier, each to a fine of $300, 
and Samuel Humphreys to six months' im- 
prisonment and $300 fine. 

— Elder August Valentine, who labored 
as a missionary on Bornholm, Denmark, 
was arrested for preaching the gospel. 
He was brought to Copenhagen, and there 
imprisoned for five days, after which he 
was banished from the country. 

fiun. 24. — Joseph S. Staker was ordained 
the first Bishop of Annabella Ward, Sevier 
Co., Utah. 

Mo7i. 25. — Apostle Franklin D. Richards 
returned from a trip to the East, during 
which he visited Pueblo, Independence, 
Richmond (Mo.), Carthage, Nauvoo (111.) 
and other places known in Church his- 
tory. 

— Peter Nebeker died at Willard, Box 
Elder Co., Utah. 

- Elders Wiley G. Cragun and Franklin 
A. Fraughton were mobbed in South Car- 
olina; Fraughton received forty lashes 
with a whip and Cragun was shot in the 
chin. 

Wed. 27.— Charles Seal, of the 16th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, and placed under $1,000 
bonds. 

— The case of James Taylor, of Ogden, 
was dismissed for the time being, because 
of an error in the indictment. 

Thurs. 28. — After a preliminary exam- 
ination before Com. McKay, Charles Seal 
was arraigned on two charges of polygamy 
and bound over in $3,000 bonds, to await 
the action of the grand jury. 

— Alfred Best, of Mill Creek, was ar- 
rested in Salt Lake City, on a charge of u. 
c. and placed under $1,000 bonds. 

— Elder Aug. Valentine left Copenhagen 
for England, being the first Elder banished 
from Denmark for preaching the gospel. 

cS'm/i. 31. — Elder John P. Ibsen was im- 
prisoned in Copenhagen, Denmark, await- 
ing his banishment from the country. 

June. — Diphtheria was raging in Salt 
Lake City and vicinity. 

— Edmund Ellsworth, of Arizona, was 
sentenced to $300 fine, for u.c, and, not 



being able to pay it, was imprisoned at 
Yuma. 

— Wm. J. Flake, having served his sen- 
tence in the Yuma prison, Ariz., was re- 
leased. 

— Elders Ferdinand F. Hintze, Christian 
N. Lundsten, Jens Nielsen and Neils Han- 
sen, missionaries from Utah, were banish- 
ed from Jutland, Denmark, for preaching 
the gospel. 

Tues. 2. — James H. Nelson was arrested 
in Ogden, on a charge of u.c. Deputy Mar- 
shals I erkins and Brown, who attempted 
to enter Nelson's house, without a search 
warrant, received rough treatment from 
Mrs. Nelson. 

Thurs. 4. — The first number of Svenska 
Haroldcn (a weekly), the first Swedish 
newspaper in Utah, was issued in Salt 
Lake City, by the Swedish Publishing 
Companj', recently organized. 

— The grand jury having found an in- 
dictment against Alfred Best, of Mill 
Creek, he was re-arrested and placed un- 
der $1,000 bonds. 

— Elder John P. Ibsen was brought on 
board the steamer Milo, at Copenhagen, 
Denmark, by the police-officers, having 
been banished from the country for 
preaching the gospel. 

Sat. 6.— Wm. Wilding died in the 17th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, 102 years of age. 

—Bishop Dennison L. Harris, died at 
Monroe, Sevier Co. 

Tues. ,9.— N. P, Jeppesen, of Logan, and 
two otherSjWere drowned in Salmon river, 
Idaho, by being carried over the falls. 

Wed. 10.— The 85th quorum of Seventy 
was partly organized by Jacob Gates and 
Edward Stevenson at Kanab, Kane Co., 
Utah; Reuben Broadbent, Chas. S. Cram, 
William J. Jolly. Svend M. Anderson and 
William H. Clayton, presidents. 

Thurs. 11.— The motion for new trials in 
in the cases of Pres. Angus M. Cannon and 
A. Milton Musser was argued in the Su- 
preme Court of Utah. 

Fri. 12. — Brett's Circus performed in 
Salt Lake City. 

— Isaac B. Nash, of Franklin, Oneida Co., 
Idaho, was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
and, after a preliminary examination before 
Commissioner House, at Oxford, placed 
under §1,500 bonds. 

Sat. 13.— The Supreme Court of Utah 
affirmed the decision of the court below, 
against Thomas Simpson for polygamy. 

—Andrew W. Cooley, of Brighton, Salt 
Lake Co., who had been indicted for u. c, 
gave himself up to the marshal and was 
put under $1,000 bonds. 

—The 86th quorum of Seventy was part- 
ly organized by Jacob Gates and Edward 
Stevenson, at Panguitch, Garfield Co. ; 
John W. Norton, Albert W. Norton, Albert 
H. Riding and S. A. Johnson, presidents. 

Thurs. i8.— Policeman Andrew Smith, of 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u.c. and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Sat. 20.— Charles L. White, of the 19th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u.c. Elizabeth Ann Starkey, 
one of the witnesses, was fined $50 and 
sentenced to one day's imprisonment for 
refusing to answer certain questions be- 
fore the Commissioner. 

—The steamship Wisconsin sailed from 



122 



CHUKCH CHEONOLOGY — 1885. 



Liverpool, with 541 Saints, including 30 re- 
turning missionaries, under the direction 
of J0rgen Hansen. They arrived at New 
York July 1st, and at Salt Lake City July 
7th. 

Sun. 21. — In the Parowan Stake quarter- 
ly conference, the two Parowan Wards 
were united into one Ward, with Charles 
Adams as Bishop. 

—The 87th quorum of Seventy was or- 
ganized by Abraham H. Cannon, at Plain 
City, Weber Co. ; Wm. Geddes, J. P.Folk- 
mann, Alonzo Knight, Charles Feather- 
stone, William S. Geddes and Hans Poul- 
sen, presidents. 

Mon. 22. — The examination of Charles 
L. White's case was continued before 
Commissioner McKay ; the defendant was 
placed under $2,000 bonds, and Miss Star- 
key, who still refused to answer, taken 
back to the Penitentiary. 

— Benjamin F. Steward, presiding Elder 
-at Benjamin, Utah Co., was killed by light- 
ning, while sitting in his carriage near 
his residence. 

Tues. 23. — Under the management of 
the Old Folks Committee, the aged people 
of Salt Lake County had an excursion to 
Garfield, on the southern shore of the 
Great Salt Lake. 

Wed. 24. — Samuel Ensign, an eighty 
year old veteran, fell from the Temple 
walls, in Salt Lake City, and was instantly 
killed. 

— The polygamy case against Charles L. 
White was dismissed, and he was held 
under S500 bonds to answer to the charge 
of u.c. Miss Starkey was brought before 
the grand jury and Judge Zane, but as 
she still refused to answer certain ques- 
tions, she was taken back to the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Thurs. 25. — Frederik H. Hansen, of 
Pleasant Green, Salt Lake Co., was ar- 
rested on a charge of u. c. and placed 
under $.500 bonds. 

— Septimus W. Sears, of Salt Lake City, 
was arrested in Chicago, 111., on a charge 
of u.c. He was released on $3,000 bonds. 

jSat. 27.— John Nicholson, Andrew Smith, 
Geo. Romney and John Connelly, all of 
Salt Lake City, were arrested, charged 
with u.c. They each gave bonds in $1,500, 
to appear for trial in September. 

— The Supreme Court of Utah affirmed 
the decision of the Third District Court 
against Pres. Angus M. Cannon. 
^_Su)i.28. — Wm. W. Drummond, once as- 
sociate justice of Utah, was sentenced to 
the House of Correction for stealing pos- 
tage stamps, in Chicago, 111. 

Mon. 2.9.— Joseph W. McMurrin, of Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of 
■u.c. and gave bonds in $1,500, to await 
trial. 

—In the Third District Court, Wm. D. 
Newsom, John Connelly, John Daynes, 
Geo. Romney and Andrew Smith plead not 
guilty to the charges against them, while 
John Nicholson refused to plead. 

Tues. 30.— In the First District Court, 
at Ogden, Francis A. Brown, being on 
trial for u. c, read an able plea in his own 
■defence. 

July.— A number of artesian wells were 
•obtained in Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 2. — Apostle John Henry Smith 



was arrested in Salt Lake City, charged 
with u. c, but after the preliminary exam- 
ination before Com. McKay, he was re- 
leased for lack of evidence. 

— Gov. Wm. M. Bunn, of Idaho, a bitter 
anti-Mormon, resigned his office. 

Hat. 4.— The flag on the City Hall, County 
Court House and Z. C. M. L, Salt Lake 
City, was placed at half mast, in token of 
mourning over the condition of affairs in 
Utah. Great excitement ensued, and 
threats of violence by anti- Mormons were 
made. 

— Edward Brain, of Salt Lake City, was 
arrested a second time, taken to the Peni- 
tentiary and later in the day placed under 
$2,500 bonds, to await the action of 
the grand jury, being charged with the 
crime of resisting the officers. 

Tues. 7. — In the First District Court at 
Ogden, Job Pingree, of Ogden, was con- 
victed of u. c. 

Sat, 11. — Francis A. Brown and Moroni 
Brown, of Ogden, were each sentenced 
to six months' imprisonment and $300 fine, 
for u. c, and taken to the Utah Peniten- 
tiary. 

— A "Liberal" mass meeting, held in Salt 
Lake City, for the purpose of condemning 
the half mast affair, proved unsuccessful to 
its instigators. 

Mon. 13. — In the First District Court at 
Ogden, Job Pingree, was sentenced to five 
months in the Penitentiary and a fine of 
$300, for u. c. 

— N. Porter of Preston, Idaho, was ar- 
rested, charged with u. c, taken to Oxford 
and placed under bonds. 

Tues. 14. — The election for school trust- 
ees in the various school districts in Utah 
resulted in victory to the Peoples' Party. 

Wed. 15. — The Insane Asylum at Prove 
was opened. 

Thurs. 16. — Lovinia Careless, wife of 
Professor Geo. Careless, and one of the 
finest singers in the Territory, died from 
the effects of poison, in Salt Lake City. 

— Charles F. Middleton, of the presidency 
of the Weber Stake, was arraigned before 
the District Court in Ogden, charged with 
u. c. 

— Sarah A. Nelson, of Ogden, was ar- 
rested, charged with having resisted the 
officers on June 2nd. 

— Pres. Hugh S. Gowans, of the Tooele 
Stake, and John Bowen, of Tooele, were 
arrested and brought to Salt Lake City, 
charged with polygamy and u. e. 

Fri. i7.— Pres. Hugh. S. Gowans and 
John Bowen, of Tooele, were each placed 
under $1,.500 bonds, to await the action 
of the grand jury, 

— Thomas Burningham, of Bountiful, 
Davis Co., was arrested on a trumped up 
charge of threatening -to kill, brought to 
Salt Lake City and acquitted, but placed 
under $1,500 bonds, charged with u. c. 

— Acting on the suggestion of General 
O. O. Howard, Pres. Cleveland ordered U. 
S. troops ready for action, in case of an 
outbreak in Salt Lake City on the coming 
24th of July. 

Sun. 19. — The Improvement Associations 
of the Sevier Stake held a large confer- 
ence at Fish lake. 

Mon. 20. — A monster mass meeting was 
held in Paris, Bear Lake Co., remonstrat- 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1885. 



123 



ing against the political oppression in that 
county, and petitioning Pres. Cleveland 
for redress. 

Tues. 2i.— Thomas Porcher, of the 21st 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. After the preliminary 
examination, he was admitted to bail in 
11,000 bonds. 

Wed. 22. — Truman O. Angell,jun., assist- 
ant Church architect, was arrested, 
charged with u. c, and placed under §1,500 
bonds. 

Thurs. 2.3.— Thomas Walton, of Bounti- 
ful, Davis Co., Utah, was arrested, 
charged with violating the Edmunds law, 
brought to Salt Lake City, tried before 
Com. McKay and discharged. 

— John Penman, of Bountiful, was also 
arrested on a charge of u. c, but escaped 
from the officers, by strategy, on the way 
to Salt Lake City. 

i^?-j. 2J.— Although the rabid anti-Mor- 
mons were so enraged because the 
Mormons of Salt Lake City raised 
the flag on half mast on July 4th, 
and threatened direful consequences, if 
the act was repeated on the 24th, yet on 
this eventful day, all the citizens, anti- 
Mormons as well as Mormons, put the flag 
at half mast in token of mourning over the 
demise of Ex-President U. S. Grant, who 
died at Mt. McGregor, N. Y., the day 
before (July 23rd). 

Sat. 25. — Florence A. Clawson, daughter 
of Henry Dinwoodey, sued for and obtained 
a divorce from her husband, Rudger Claw- 
son, who was confined in the Penitentiary. 

August. — Seventeen emigrants from 
New Zealand arrived in Box Elder County, 
Utah. 

— Gas wells were bored in Salt Lake 
City, and the driving for flowing artesian 
wells was continued successfully. 

— Elder Thomas Biesinger was again ex- 
pelled from Bavaria. 

Sun. 2. — Joseph Weatherell, of Santa- 
quin, Utah Co., was di'owned in the Jordan 
river, near Salt Lake City ; the body was 
found on the 5th. 

f^Mon. 3. — The general election in Utah 
for members to the legislative assembly 
resulted in victory to the People's Party, 
except in Summit County, which was car- 
ried by the Liberals. 

Tues. 4. — Wm. Fotheringham was re- 
leased from the Penitentiary. 

—Joseph M. Weiler, of the 3rd Ward, 
Salt Lake City, died. 

Fri. 7.— John W. Snell,of Salt Lake City, 
was arrested on a charge of u. c. 

Sat. 8. — Morris D. Rosenbaum, of Brig- 
ham City, died suddenly at Franklin, 
Idaho. 

Stin. 16. — The notorious apostate Wm. 
Jarman made an unsuccessful attempt to 
break up a conference meeting of Saints 
in Sheffield, England. A mob numbering 
several thousands followed the Elders, 
hooting and yelling. The police, however, 
protected the brethi'en from assault. 

Mon. 17. — Eliza Shafer was sentenced to 
24 hours in the Penitentiary and a $25 fine 
by Commissioner McKay for alleged con- 
tempt of court. 

Wed. 19. — Judge Zane having sustained 
McKay's decision, Eliza Shafer was sent 
to the Penitentiary. 



Thurs. 20.— The Utah Commission re- 
fused to investigate the election frauds in 
Summit County, and to count the votes 
cast for Orson F. Whitney as Territorial 
Superintendent of District Schools. 

— Wm. R. Judd, a prominent citizen of 
Tooele County, died at Grantsville. 

Fri. 2i.— Elizabeth Ann Starkey, the al- 
leged second wife of Chas. L. White, was 
released from the Penitentiary, after two 
months' imprisonment for contempt of 
court. 

— Eliza Shafer, who had been released 
from the Penitentiarj'^ after one day's im- 
prisonment, was again arrested and put 
under $700 bonds to appear before the 
grand jury in September. 

Sun. 23. — The Saints who had settled on 
and near Green river, Uintah Co., Utah, 
were organized as the Riverdale district ; 
Nathan Hunting, acting Bishop. 

Wed. 26. — U. S. deputy marshals made a 
raid upon the settlement of Oakley, Cassia 
Co., Idaho. 

Fri. 2S. — About four hundred orphan 
children, from Silt Lake City, were treat- 
ed to a free excursion to Garfield, under 
the auspices of the Old Folks Committee. 

— Miss Elizabeth Ann Starkey was again 
arrested and sentenced by Commissioner 
McKay to another term of imprisonment, 
but a writ of habeas corpus and a hearing 
by Judge Zane procured her release. 

Sat. 29. — Of four applicants John W. 
Snell, jun., was chosen as the Utah candi- 
date to West Point. 

— The steamship Wisconsin sailed from 
Liverpool with 329 Saints, including 16 re- 
turning Elders, under the direction of 
John W. Tliornley. The companv arrived 
in New York Sept. 8th, and at Salt Lake 
City Sept. 14th. 

September. — Diphtheria raged in Gun- 
nison, Sanpete Co. 

T/!i<?-s. .3.— Wm. H. Lee, of Tooele, was 
arrested for u. c, taken to Salt Lake City 
and, after examination before Com. Mc- 
Kay, placed under §1,500 bonds. 

Sat. 5.— Wm. W. Willey, of Bountiful, 
Davis Co., was arrested on a charge of 
u. c. 

AToyi. 7. — Twenty-two participants in the 
Rock Springs massacre were arrested and 
jailed at Green river. 

— Wm. W. Willey had an examination 
before Com. McKay and was placed under 
Sl,500 bonds. 

Wed. 9. — Deputy marshals made a raid 
on Heber, Wasatch Co., and arrested Jo- 
seph Moulton, John W. Witt and John 
Duke, charged with u. c. The prisoners 
were brought to Salt Lake City with sub- 
poenaed witnesses. 

Thurs. iO.— John W.Witt and John Duke, 
after preliminary examination before Com. 
McKay, were each placed under $1,500 
bonds to await the action of the grand 
jury. 

Fri. 11. — Joseph Moulton was discharg- 
ed, after the usual examination before 
Com. McKay, there being no testimony to 
hold him. 

Tues. 15. — Miss Elizabeth Ann Starkey 
and Miss Eliza Shafer were sent to the 
Penitentiary by Judge Zane, of the Third 
District Court, for refusing to answer cer- 
tain questions before the grand jury. 



124 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1885. 



Wed. 16. — Judge Zane, in his instructions 
to the grand jury, interpreted the law in 
such a way, that persons found guilty of 
u. c. could be imprisoned for life. This 
was the commencement of the segregation 
policy. 

TJiurs. 17. — The annual Primary Fair 
opened in the Social Hall, Salt Lake City, 
and was continued three days. 

i'Vi. 18. — Bishop John Sharp plead 
guilty to the charge of u. c. and promised 
to obey the law; he was fined $300 and 
costs. 

Sat. i,9.— Edward Thomas, of Beaver, 
was arrested for u. c. and placed under 
$1,500 bonds. 

iSun. 20. — Marvin Allred, of St. Charles, 
Bear Lake Co., Idaho, was arrested at 
Montpelier, on a charge of u. c. 

Mon. 2L— The fourth trial of Fred. Hopt 
(Welcome) for the murder of John F. Tur- 
ner was commenced in the Third District 
Court. 

Tues. 22. — Wm. Pickett, of Tooele, was 
discharged, the grand jury not being able 
to get testimony against him for u. c. 

Wed. 23. — Judge Orlando W. Powers, in 
his charge to the grand jury of the First 
District Court, stated that an indictment 
could be found against a man guilty of co- 
habitation for every day. 

—Elders Wm. F. Rigby and Alexander 
Leatham were arrested at Rexburg, Idaho, 
for u. e. and taken to Eagle Rock. 

3fon. 28.— The jury of the Third District 
Court returned a verdict of guilty of mur- 
der in the first degree against Fred. Hopt 
(Welcome). 

Tues. 2.9.— In the Third District Court 
(Judge Zane), Bishop Hiram B. Clawson 
was sentenced to six months' imprison- 
ment and ;t'300 fine, for u. c. 

—Septimus W. Sears and Truman O. 
Angell, jun., charged with u. c, promised 
to live within the law, and were let off 
with fines, the former $300, and the latter 
$1.50. 

—In the Second District Court (Judge 
Boreman), Beaver, John Lang, of Beaver, 
was sentenced to three months' imprison- 
ment and $200 fine for u. c. 

October. — Alonzo Johnson and Samuel 
Moody, two "Mormon" missionaries, were 
mobbed in Tolono, Champaign Co., Ill- 
inois. 

TMir.s. l.—ln the Third District Court 
(Judge Zanej, John Daynes plead guilty 
to the charge of u. c, and promising to 
obey the law. Judge Zane discharged him 
on paying a $150 fine. The jury also re- 
turned a verdict of guilty against Wm. A. 
Rossiter for u. c. 

Fri. 2.— Edward Brain of the 21st Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was found guilty of u. c. 
and sentenced to six months' imprisonment 
and $300 fine ; he was taken to the Peni- 
tentiary. 

Sat. ,3.— Elder John Nicholson, assistant 
editor of the Deaeret Xetvs, waived his 
right as a defendant and testified for the 
prosecution, which resulted in the jury 
bringing in a verdict of guilty against him 
foru. c. Aurelius Miner entered a plea 
of not guilty to the charge of u. c. Alfred 
Best, of Mill Creek, and Emil O. Olsen, of 
Salt Lake City, testified against them- 



selves and were found guilty of u. c. by 
the jury. 

Mon. 5.— In the Third District Court 
(Judge Zane), Isaac Groo and Charles 
Seal, of Salt Lake City, Alfred Best, of 
Mill Creek, David E. Davis, of Clover, 
Tooele Co., and Andrew W. Cooley, of 
Brighton, were each sentenced to six 
months' imprisonment and $'iOO fine. The 
prisoners were taken to the Penitentiary 
the same day. 

Tues. 6. — The general conference of the 
Church was commenced at Logan, Cache 
Co. It was continued until Friday 9th. 

— Charles L. White plead guilty to a 
charge of u. c. and was sentenced to six 
months' imprisonment and a fine of $300. 
This caused the release of his alleged wife, 
Miss Elisabeth Ann Sharkey, who had been 
confined in the Penitentiary since Sept. 
15th. John Connelly plead guilty to the 
chargeof u. c. and was sentenced by Judge 
Zane to six months' imprisonment and $300 
fine. 

Wed. 7. — Aurelius Miner, of Salt Lake 
City, was found guilty of u. c. by the jury, 
after a two days' trial. The jury also re- 
turned! a verdict of guilty against Andrew 
Smith for u. c. 

Thurs, 8. — Wm. D. Newsom was found 
guilty, by the jury in the Third District 
Court, of polygamy and u. c. Frederik 
H. Hansen was declared guilty of u. c. 

— A. L. Blackburn was arrested at Rex- 
burg, Idaho, charged with u. c. 

Fri. .9. — Three jurymen (Moritz, Davis 
and Clayton) were discharged from the 
grand jury, in the Third District Court, 
because they refused to find indictments 
for u. c. against A. Milton Musser and 
others, who were then serving sentences 
for the same offense. 

Sat. 10.— In the Third District Court 
(Judge Zane), Salt Lake City, Wm. A. 
Rossiter and Geo. Romney were each 
sentenced to six months' imprisonmentand 
$300 fine for u.c. Thos.Porcher andRobt.H. 
Swain plead guilty to the same charge,but 
sentence was deferred because of the de- 
fendants being poor. 

Man. 12. — A. Milton Musser and James 
C. Watson were released from the Peni- 
tentiary, having served their term of im- 
prisonment. 

Tues. 13. — John Nicholson, Andrew 
Smith and Emil O. Olsen were each sen- 
tenced to six months' imprisonment and 
$300 fine, and taken to the Penitentiary. 

Tfiurs. 15. — John Penman, of Bountiful, 
was re- arrested in Parley's Canyon, on a 
charge of u. c. (See July 23rd.) 

— Parley P. Pratt was released from the 
Penitentiary. 

Sat. 17.— In the Third District Court 
(Judge Zane), Wm. D. Newsom was sen- 
tenced to three years' and six months' im- 
prisonment and $800 fine, for polygamy 
and u.c, and Aurelius Miner to six months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine for u.c. Both 
were taken to the Penitentiary ; but, pre- 
vious to their confinement there, New- 
som was brutally treated by deputy mar- 
shals. 

— Gov. Eli H. Murray, in his annual re- 
port to the Secretary of the Interior, 
grossly misrepresented the situation in 
Utah. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1885. 



125 



Mon. t9.— Bishop W. A. Follett died at 
Smithville, Graham Co., Ariz. 

Tues. 20. — Thomas Simpson, a non-Mor- 
mon, who seven months' previous was sen- 
tenced to two years' imprisonment for 
polygamy, was pardoned by President 
Cleveland and released from the Peniten- 
tiary,. 

— John Penman and his alleged plural 
wife, Mary E. Hodgson, obtained bail and 
were released from prison. 

— The Utah Commission submitted an 
unfavorable and partly untrue report to 
the Secretary of the Interior. 

Wed. 21. — ^Isaac B. Nash, Andrew A. 
Bi0rn and Arthur Peck were on trial be- 
fore Judge Hayes, at Blackfoot* Idaho, 
charged with u.c. The jury returned a 
verdict of guilty, as charged. 

Thurs. 22. — U. S. deputy marshals made 
an unsuccessful raid on the Forest Farm, 
near Salt Lake City. 

Fri. 23. — The 88th quorum of Seventy 
was partly organized by Seymour B. Young 
and Christian D. Fjeldsted, at Oxford, 
Oneida Co., Idaho; John H. Clark, Henry 
Dixon and B. H. Hunt, presidents. 

— The first number of the Southern 
Idaho Independent was issued in Paris, 
Bear Lake Co., Idaho, instead of The Bear 
Lake Democrat, suspended. 

Sat. 24. — Joseph H. Sissom, of Sandy, 
Salt Lake Co., was arrested on a charge 
of u. c. 

— The steamship JVevada. sailed from 
Liverpool with 313 Saints (162 British, 119 
Scandinavian, 6 Swiss and German and 26 
returning missionaries) in charge of 
Anthon H. Lund. They arrived at New 
York Nov. Ith and at Salt Lake City Nov. 
10th. 

Mon. 26. — Henry Grow was arrested on 
the Temple Block, Salt Lake City, on a 
charge of u. c. 

— A fire destroyed 100 tons of tithi ng hay 
in Monroe, Sevier Co. 

Tues. 27.— Price Ward, Emery Stake, 
was reorganized; Geo. Frandsen, Bishop. 

Wed. 28.— In the Third District Court, 
Judge Zane made a decision in favor of U. 
J. Wenner, one of the governor's appoint- 
ees, for the position of probate judge of 
Salt Lake County. The case was ap- 
pealed. 

Thurs. 29.— Gen. John B. Clark, the 
notorious Mormon persecutor of 1838, died 
at Fayette, Howard Co., Mo. 

Sat. .31. — Herbert J. Foulger, of the 21st 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. 

^Aurelius Miner was brought from the 
Penitentiary to the Third District Court, 
and was requested to promise to live with- 
in the law, which he declined. 

November. — Apostle Albert Carrington 
was excommunicated from the Church for 
lewd and lascivious conduct and adultery. 

Mon. 2. — Robert H. Swain was sentenced 
to six months' imprisonment and .'f300 fine 
for u. c, and taken to the Penitentiary. 

— The "Millard Stake Academy" was 
formally opened in Fillmore, Millard Co., 
Utah. 

Thurs. 5. — Frederik H. Hansen, found 
guilty of u. c, was sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine, and forthwith 
sent to the Penitentiary. 



—John W. Keddington, of the 10th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u. c. 

Fri. e.— Thos. C. Jones, of the 10th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u. e. 

Sat. 7. — Henry Gi'ow, John W. Kedding- 
ton and H. J. Foulger were arraigned be- 
fore the Third District Court, the grand 
jury having found indictments against 
them for u. c. Grow plead not guilty and 
was put under §1,500 bonds, Keddington 
plead guilty and was kept on §1.500 se- 
curity, formerly given, and Foulger, against 
whom three indictments had been found, 
plead not guilty and was put under $3,.500 
bonds. 

—John P. Ball, of the 3rd Ward, Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of u. 
c, and put under bonds. 

— By Judge Hayes, at Blackfoot, Idaho, 
Jos. M. Phelps, of Montpelier, Bear Lake 
Co., Alexander Leatham, of Rexburg, 
Bingham Co., Andrew A. Biorn and 
Arthur Peck, of Gentile Valley, Oneida 
Co., were each sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment, S300 fine and §100 costs of 
court; A. L. Blackburn (who pleaded 
guilty) to six months' imprisonment and 
$300 fine; Isaac B. Nash, of Franklin, 
Oneida Co., to three months' imprison- 
ment; N. Porter, of Preston, Oneida Co., 
to three months' imprisonment and §150 
fine — all for u. c. Geo. C. Parkinson, of 
Oxford, Bingham Co., was sentenced to one 
year's imprisonment, §300 fine and $100 
costs of court, for being accused of se- 
creting a friend from deputy marshals. 
The charge was false. The prisoners were 
started towards Boise City the same even- 
ing. 

Svn. 8. — The Saints who had settled on 
the Provo bench, north of Provo,Utah Co.. 
were organized as the Timpanogas Ward ; 
Peter M. Wentz, Bishop. 

Mon. 9. — William Cowan, of the 8th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. 

— The case against Elder Christian F. 
Christensen, for preaching in Tennessee, 
was dismissed. 

Ttces. iO.— Phoebe W. Woodruff, wife of 
Apostle Wilford Woodruff, died in Salt 
Lake City. 

—Martha Taylor, of the 20th Ward, Salt 
Lake City, was accidentally burned to 
death. 

— Deputy Sheriff Andrew Burt and De- 
puty Marshal H. F. Colin had an alterca- 
tion on Main Street, Salt Lake City, 
for which Burt the following day was fined 
$25 in the police court. 

Wed. 11. — Bj' the explosion of gas in the 
Salt Lake Brewery, 10th Ward, Louis Bo- 
ersig was instantly killed, and Jacob 
Kraut (who died November 18th) fatally 
injured. 

Thurs. 12.— John P. Ball, of the 10th 
Ward, and Thomas C. Jones, of the 3rd 
Ward, Salt Lake City, plead not guilty to 
indictments for u. c. brought against them 
by the Third District grand jury. 

— James Moyle, of the 15th Ward, Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of u. 
c. The foUowing day he gave bonds in 
$1,500, to await the action of the grand 
jury. 



126 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 188f. 



Fri. i.?.— Charles W. Nibley, of Logan, 
Utah, was arrested at Pocatello, Idaho, on 
a charge of u. c, and brought to Salt Lake 
City the following day. 

fiat. 14. — Judge Zane, in the Third Dis- 
trict Court, rendered a decision disbarring 
Aurelius Miner, and sentenced Andrew 
Burt to five days' imprisonment and $150 
fine for bis collision with Deputy Mar- 
shal Collin on the 10th inst. 

Tins. i7.— Charles W. Nibley was dis- 
charged in Com. McKay's court, Salt Lake 
City, his arrest being illegal. 

— Job Pingree, of Ogden, was released 
from the Penitentiary. 

Wed. 18.— James Moyle, of Salt Lake 
City, was re- arrested, the grand jury hav- 
ing found three indictments against him 
for u. c. ; a plea of not guilty was entered 
and bail given in the sum of $3,200. 

Thiirs. If) — A number of U. S. deputy 
marshals came in collision with a number 
of young men, in Franklin, Oneida Co., 
Idaho. 

Fyi. W. — Apostle Lorenzo Snow was ar- 
rested by seven deputies at his residence 
in Brigham City, on a charge of u. c, and 
brought to Ogden. 

Sat. 21. — John W. Keddington and 
Thomas Porcher were sentenced to six 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine, each, 
for u. c. and forthwith taken to the Peni- 
tentiary. 

— Deputy Marshal Oscar C. Vandercook 
and U. S. Commis^sioner Charles E. Pear- 
son was arrested by the Salt Lake City 
police officers, on charges of lewd and 
lascivious conduct, and taken to the City 
Hall ; each gave bonds in the sum of $500. 

— Lorenzo Snow plead not guilty in the 
First District Court, in Ogden, and was 
admitted to bail. 

Man. 23. — Assistant District Attorney 
Sam. H. Lewis and W. H. Yearian, anti- 
Mormon merchant in Salt Lake City, were 
rrrested by the city police, on charges of 
lewd and lascivious conduct ; $500 bail was 
given by each. 

— Bishop David M. Stuart, of Ogden, was 
arrested on a charge of u. c, taken before 
Com. Black and placed under bonds. 

— Deputy Marshal Vandercook was 
taken from the police officers to the Third 
District Court on a writ of habeas corjjus. 

Fri. 27. — In the habeas corpus case of 
Oscar C. Vandercook, Judge Zane decided 
in his favor and set the prisoner free. 

Sat. 2ft. — Joseph W. McMurrin was shot 
and dangerously wounded by Deputy Mar- 
shal Collin, back of the Social Hall, Salt 
Lake City. The Federal officers refused 
to give up the would-be assassin to the 
city officers. 

Sioi. 2;i. — U. S. deputy marshals visited 
Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah, in search of 
polygamists. 

3fo)i. .:;o.— Because of Judge Zane's de- 
cision, the cases against Sam. H. Lewis, 
Charles E. Pearson and W. H. Yearian for 
lewd and lascivious conduct was dismissed 
in the police court. 

December. — Some of the Saints who 
had been encamped on the Casas Grandes 
river. Chihuahua, Mexico, located on the 
Peadres Verdes river, near the present 
site of Juarez, where lands had been pur- 
chased by the Church for a settlement. 



Ttces. i.— Lorenzo and Seth Wright were 
killed by Indians, near Layton, Graham 
Co., Arizona, in their attempt to rescue 
stolen horses. 

—Elders S. C. Nilson, M. P. Madsen and 
Thos. C. Schroder were arrested in Aal- 
borg, Denmark, for preaching the gospel. 

-f^rt. j.—U. S. Deputy Marshal Oscar C. 
Vandercook, Attorney Sam. H. Lewis and 
Charles E. Pearson were again arrested 
iu Salt Lake City for immoral conduct. 

3fon. 7. — A provost guard, consisting of 
about forty-five U. S. soldiers, was estab- 
lished in Salt Lake City. 

— A company of artillery arrived at Fort 
Douglas,, Utah, from Fort Omaha, Neb. 

— Brigham Y. Hampton, one of the Salt 
Lake City officers,who had aided in detect- 
ing anti- Mormons guilty of immoral con- 
duct, was arrested, charged with conspiracy 
etc., the grand jury having found four in- 
dictments against him. 

— The City Council of Salt Lake City, 
alter a thorough investigation, found that 
there was not the least danger of a "Mor- 
mon " uprising, and that telegraphic dis- 
patches, sent to Washington, D. C, by 
Federal officials, were entirely false. 

— Hon. John T. Caine had an interview 
with Pres. Cleveland, in Washington, D. 
C, explaining to him the true situation in 
Utah. 

Tites. S.— Brigham Y. Hampton plead 
not guilty in the Third District Court and 
was placed under $3,600 bonds. 

—Oscar C. Vandercook was again taken 
from the Salt Lake City officers on a writ 
of habeas corpus. 

—Geo. H. Taylor, of the 14th Ward, Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on three indict- 
ments, found against him by the grand 
jury, for u. c. 

— Senator Edmunds introduced another 
anti-polygamy bill in the U. S. Senate. 

Thurs. 10. — Judge Zane gave, as his de- 
cision, that the city had jurisdiction in 
cases for immoral conduct, wliich re- 
manded Vandercook back to the city 
authorities. 

Fri. 11. — In the Salt Lake City police 
court. Attorney Sam H. Lewis was sen- 
tenced to three months' imprisonment and 
$299 fi ae f or immoral condu ct ; an appeal was 
taken. 

Sat. 12. — In the police court, Salt Lake 
City, Com. Charles E. Pearson and Joe 
Bush were each sentenced to three 
months' imprisonment and $299 fine for 
immoral conduct. Appeals were taken. 
Vandercook was released a third time on 
writ of habeas corpus. 

— Emily Crane, Delilah Clark and Sarah 
Hulet, of Parowan, Iron Co., were sub- 
poenaed as witnesses and taken to Beaver 
in the night. 

Man. 14. — The appealed case against 
Sam. H. Lewis was dismissed in the Third 
District Court. 

— Ed. L. Butterfield, a land agent, was 
arrested by the police officers in Salt Lake 
City for lewd and lascivions cohabitation. 

— Pres. Angus M. Cannon, who had been 
imprisoned some two months longer than 
his sentence called for, awaiting the court 
decision from Washington, D. C, in his ap- 
peal case, was released from the Utah Pen- 
itentiary. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1! 



127' 



— Francis Piatt, counselor to Bishop 
Atwood of the 13th Ward, died in Salt 
Lake City. 

— The Supreme Court of the United 
States affirmed the judgment of the Su- 
preme Court of Utah, against Pres. Angus 
M. Cannon. 

Tues. 15. — Father Henry Gale, of Beaver, 
was sentenced by Judge Boreman, in the 
Second District Court, to six months' im- 
prisonment and $300 fine for u. c. He was 
placed in the Penitentiary on the 17th. 

Wed. ie.— Deputy Marshal H. F. Collin, 
who had been guarded in Ft. Douglas 
most of the time since shooting .Joseph 
W. McMurrin, was admitted to bail. 

'Ihurs. 17. — Mary A. T. Reynolds, wife 
of George Reynolds, died in Salt Lake City. 

— Susanna W. Hunter, relict of Bishop 
E. Hunter, died in Salt Lake City. 

— Bishop David K. Udall, of St. Johns, 
Ariz., who on a trumped up charge of per- 
jury had been sentenced to imprisonment 
in Detroit, Michigan, was pardoned by 
Pres. Cleveland and immediately released. 

J^ri. IS, — Frank Foote was found guilty 
in the police court of immoral conduct 
and sentenced to three months' imprison- 
ment and $299 tine. The case was appealed. 

— D. J. Griffith was arrested by the 
police officers of Salt Lake City, for im- 
moral conduct. 

Sat. 19. — Eliza Shafer, who had been im- 
prisoned since Sept. 15th for refusing to 
answer certain questions, was admitted 
to bail and released from custody. 

— S. B. Guion, founder of the Guion 
Steamship Line, died in Liverpool, Eng- 
land. 

Ifon. 21. — Nicholas H. Groesbeck, of 
Springville, Utah Co., was arrested on a 
charge of u.c, brought to Salt Lake City, 
where he plead guilty before Com. Mc- 
Kay, and was placed under $1,.500 bonds. 

Tues. 22.— In the Second District Court 
(Judge Boreman), Beaver, Bishop Culbert 
King, of Marion Ward, Garfield Co., and 
James E.Twichel, of Indian Creek, Beaver 
Co., were each sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine. They were 
both placed in the Penitentiary on the 
25th. 

Thurs. 24. — After three days' trial the 
jury in the Third District Court brought 
in a verdict of guilty against Brigham Y. 
Hampton for conspiracy. 

Wed. ,30.— In the Third District Court, 
Judge Zane sentenced Brigham Y. Hamp- 
ton to one year's imprisonment in the 
Salt Lake County jail. 

Thurs. 31. — After two days' trial in the 
First District Court, at Ogden, the jury 
returned a verdict of guilty against 
Lorenzo Snow for u.c. in 1885, notwith- 
standing the evidence introduced had 
proven him innocent. 



18S6. 

The prosecutions under the Edmunds 
law for polygamy and unlawful cohabita- 
tion were continued, and nearly every set- 
tlement of the Saints were raided by U. 
S. deputy marshals, in search of polyga- 



mists. Fearing the impossibility of a fair 
trial, hundreds of the brethren and many 
families went into exile, some of whom 
sought refuge in Mexico and others in 
Canada. Nearly all the leaders of the 
Church were in hiding, and the situation 
thoroughout Utah was truly critical. 

January. — The new Herald Company 
was incorporated, the capital stock of the 
company being $100,000, divided into $1,000 
shares. 

— ^The Logan Electric Light and Power 
Company was incorporated. 

Mon. 4. — In the Second District Court, 
Ogden, Bishop David M. Stuart, of Ogden, 
was sentenced to six months' imprison- 
ment, $300 fine and costs of suit, for u. c. 

Tues. 5. — Pres. Grover Cleveland nomi- 
nated Wm. C. Br owe postmaster of Salt 
Lake City. 

— In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
the jury brought in another verdict of 
guilty against Lorenzo Snow for u. c. in 
1884: and part of 18^3, in conformity with 
the segregating policy. 

Wed. 6. — Samuel F. Ball, of the 19th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. 

— James Taylor, of Ogden, was convicted 
of u. c, in the First District Court, Ogden. 

I^'ri. 8. — A bill, known as the new Ed- 
munds bill, was passed by the U. S. Senate. 

— Paris, Bear Lake Co., Idaho, was 
raided by U. S. marshals, who arrested J. 
Lewis, sen., C. H. Wright and H. Duffin, 
charged with u. c. Peter Jacobson, of 
Bloomington, was arrested on a similar 
charge. 

3Ion. 11. — The twenty-seventh session of 
the Utah legislature convened in the City 
Hall, Salt Lake City, and organized by 
electing Elias A. Smith president of the 
Council, and Wm. W. Riter speaker of the 
House. 

— Bishop Wm. M. Bromley and Wm. 
Grant, of American Fork, Utah Co., were 
arrested by U. S. marshals on charges of 
u. c, and taken to Salt Lake City. 

Tiies. 12. — Isaac Langton, of Salt Lake 
City, was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
taken before Com. McKay, and placed 
under $1,000 bonds. 

— Bishop Wm. M. Bromley and Wm. 
Grant, of American Fork, waived exami- 
nation before Com. McKay, and each were 
placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— Gov. Murray's insulting message to 
the legislature was read in joint session. 

—Henry Cummock, Wm. Horsley, Frank 
Mason, Enoch Thomas, Robert Murdock, 
John H. Hood, Joseph Evans, William 
Evans, John Peak, Ellis Gridgeman, John 
Hunter and two boys lost their lives by a 
disastrous explosion in a mine, at Almy, 
Wyoming. 

Wed. 13. — Francis A. Brown and Moroni 
Brown, of Ogden, were liberated from the 
Penitentiary. 

— Wm. J. Jenkins, F. A. Cooper, Hyrum 
Goff and James O. Poulson, of West Jor- 
dan, were arrested, charged with u. c.,and 
taken to Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 14. — Charles Livingston, of Salt 



128 



OHUKCH CHKONOLOGY — 1886. 



Lake City, was arrested on a charge of u. 
c, and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Fri. Ih. — Hon. Wm. Jennings died at his 
residence in Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 1(1. — In the First District Court, 
Ogden, Apostle Lorenzo Snow was sen- 
tenced to eighteen months' imprisonment, 
$900 fine and costs, for u. c. James H. Nel- 
son was sentenced to six months' impri- 
sonment and $300 fine for the same offense, 
while James Taylor, who promised to obey 
the law in the future, was let off with $300 
fine. Nelson was taken to the Peniten- 
tiary, but Lorenzo Snow was given ten 
days in which to prepare his appeal, being 
placed under $15,000 bonds. 

— Elder James Standing died in Box 
Elder County, Utah. 

Tues. 1!K — In search of polygaraists, the 
17th Ward meeting house was raided by U. 
S. deputy marshals ; but no arrests were 
made. 

Wed. 20. — The first number of the His- 
torical liecord was published by Andrew 
Jenson, Salt Lake City, as a continuation 
of Morgcnutjernen. 

— The tent of John E. Forsgren, on the 
10th Ward bench. Salt Lake City, was 
burned. 

— Bishop Alonzo Winters, of Hoytsville, 
Summit Co., died. 

Thurs. 21. — John Lang was released from 
the Penitentiary. 

— A. O. Patterson and wife and a miner 
named Thornstr0m were killed by snow- 
slides, near Park City, Utah. 

Fri. 22. — County Collector Nathaniel V. 
Jones, of Salt Lake City, and Frank M. 
Treseder were arrested on a charge of 
bribery. 

Sun. 24. — John JoUey, of Franklin, 
Oneida Co., Idaho, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. 

Mon. 25. — After several days examina- 
tion before Com. McKay, in Salt Lake 
City, Deputy Marshal Collin, who at- 
tempted to kill Joseph W. McMurrin some 
time previous, was discharged. 

Tucs. 26 — After two days' examination 
before Com. McKay, Nathaniel V. Jones 
was placed under $10,000 and Frank M. 
Treseder under $3,000 bonds, to appear be- 
fore the grand jury. 

— General David R. Atchison, who 
treated the Saints with consideration dur- 
ing the Missouri persecutions, died in 
Clinton County, Mo. 

Sun. 31. — The first meeting was held in 
the new meeting house erected by the 
Latter-day Saint settlers on the Feadres 
Verdes river (Juares) Chihuahua, Mexico. 
This was the first house of worship built 
by the Saints on Mexican soil. 

Februrary. Mon. 1. — The Saints who 
had located in the upper end of Rabbit 
Valley, Utah, were organized as Spencer 
branch ; James A. Taylor, president. 

—Hannah Cooper, wife of Fred A. 
Cooper, died in West Jordan, Salt Lake 
Co., in childbed, as a victim of the un- 
holy crusade, her husband being under 
bonds on a charge of u. c. 

Tucs. 2.- The Saints who had settled on 
Bulberry creek and other streams, near 
the Fremont river, east of Rabbit Valley, 
Utah, were organized as Teasdale Ward ; 
George Coleman, Bishop. 



Wed. ,3.— A grand jury was packed for 
the Third District Court February term, 
the special venire system being renewed. 

Fri. .5.— Gov. Eli H. Murray vetoed the 
new jury bill passed by the legislature. 

Sat. f>. — The Utah Supreme Court sus- 
tained Judge Powers' decision against 
Apostle Lorenzo Snow, but granted the 
defendant twenty days in which to perfect 
an appeal to the Supreme Court of the 
United States. It also sustained the de- 
cision of the Third District Court against 
Brigham "i . Hampton. 

Sun. 7. — Deputy marshals made a raid on 
the Cannon Farm, near Salt Lake City. 

— Nephi Stewart, of Payson, Utah Co., 
was accidentally killed, near Tintic. Juab 
Co. 

Mon. 8. — The biennial Salt Lake City 
municipal election resulted in a great ma- 
jority for the People's Party, Francis 
Armstrong being elected mayor. 

— W. G. Saunders, of Uintah, Weber Co., 
was arrested, charged with u. c, and taken 
to Ogden. 

— Marshal Ireland offered a reward of $500 
for the apprehension of Pres. Geo. Q. 
Cannon. 

— About twenty deputy marshals raided 
the Gardo House, Church Offices, Tithing 
Yards and the Historian's Office, search- 
ing for Prests. John Taylor and Geo. Q. 
Cannon, but did not find them. 

Tucs. .9. — Andrew L. Gibbons, one of 
the Pioneers of 1847, died at St. Johns, 
Apache Co., Ariz. 

— Samuel H.B. Smith was adjudged guilty 
by the jury in the Third District Court, 
although he, in every respect, according 
to the testimony given, had compiled with 
the Edmunds law since its passage. 

— Desdemona Wadsworth Fullmer Smith, 
a widow of Joseph Smith, the Prophet, 
died in the 6th Ward, Salt Lake City. 

—Joseph W. McMurrin, of Salt Lake 
City, and Wm. H. Lee, of Tooele County, 
waived their rights as defendants and 
testified against themselves. The jury re- 
turned a verdict of guilty. 

\Ved. 10.— In the Third District Court, 
Robert Morris plead guilty to a charge of 
u. c. Wm. W. Willey, of East Bountiful, 
Davis Co., acknowledged his wives, was 
found guilty and sentenced to five months' 
imprisonment in the Penitentiary and $200 
fine. Thomas Burningham, of East Boun- 
tiful, acknowledged his relationship with 
his wives, and was pronounced guilty. 
John Penman, of Bountiful, indicted for 
polygamy, was declared guilty and sen- 
tenced to two years in the Penitentiary 
and $125 fine. He and Willey were taken 
to the Penitentiary the same day. 

— Deputy marshals visited the old Church 
Farm, south of Salt Lake City, search- 
ing for Pres. Geo. Q. Cannon. 

Thurs. 11. — Pres. Hugh S. Gowans, of 
Tooele, and Herbert J. Foulger, of the 2lst 
Ward, Salt Lake City, who waived their 
rights as defendants, were pronounced 
guilty of u. c, in 1883. Two other and 
similar indictments against each of them 
were continued for the term. 

Fri. 12.— Iw the Third District Court, 
the jury returned a verdict of guilty 
against John P. Ball and John Y. Smith, of 
Salt Lake City, for u. c. They both testi- 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1886. 



129 



fied in their own cases. Thomas C. Jones, 
gainst whom three indictments had been 
found, also testified in his own case and 
was pronounced guilty of u.c. for 1883, two 
other indictments against him being con- 
tinued for the term. 

Sat., 13.— in the Third District Court the 
jury returned a verdict of guilty against 
James Moyle and Geo. H. Taylor for u. c. ; 
they both testified in their own cases, and 
two other indictments against each of 
them were continued for the term. 

— Utah's Supreme Court sustained the 
decision of Judge Powers, in the Lorenzo 
Snow case. 

— Pres. Geo. Q. Cannon was arrested at 
Humboldt, forty miles west of Winnemuc- 
ca, Nevada. On the way to Salt Lake City 
he fell irom the car platform and was 
considerably bruised. 

Sun. 14. — Elder Zera Cole died in Salt 
Lake City. 

Mon. 15. — In the Third District Court, 
Samuel F. Ball, and James O. Poulson, 
charged with u.c, testified in their own 
cases, and were each adjudged guilty by 
the jury. Two other indictments against 
each of them were continued for the term. 
After trial, in which Eliza Shafer was 
forced to testify, the jury returned a ver- 
dict of guilty against John W. Snell. 
Robert Morris was sentenced by Judge 
Zane to six months' imprisonment and 
$150 fine, and taken to the Penitentiary. 
Martha T. Cannon, wife of Pres. Geo. Q. 
Cannon, was insulted in court. 

Tues. 16.— In the Third District Court 
Hyrum Golf and Wm. J. Jenkins, of West 
Jordan, testified in their own cases, and 
were adjudged guilty by the jury. An- 
other indictment against Jenkins, and 
two against GofE, were continued for the 
term. In the case of Isaac Langton. after 
trial, the jury returned a verdict of not 
guilty. 

—In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
W. G. Saunders was sentenced to six 
months' imprisonment and $250 fine, for 
u.c. He was taken to the Penitentiary 
on the 18th. 

Wed. 17.— In the Third District Court 
(Judge Zane) , Thos. Burningham, of Boun- 
tiful, and John Bo wen, of Tooele, were 
each sentenced to six months in the 
Penitentiary and $300 fine. They were 
both taken to the Penitentiary in the af- 
ternoon. 

— Pres. fieo. Q. Cannon arrived in Salt 
Lake City as a prisoner, under guard of a 
company of soldiers. He was immediately 
taken to the marshal's office and placed 
under $45,000 bonds. 

Thuvs. 18. — The jury gave a verdict of 
guilty against Oluf F. Due for u. c, the 
charge of polygamy being dismissed. Jo- 
seph H. Sissom, who promised to obey the 
law, was fined $200, but not being able to 
pay this amount he was taken to the Peni- 
tentiary. 

F7-i. i.9.— Against Charles F. Middleton, 
of Ogden, who was arraigned in the Sec- 
ond District Court on a charge of u. c, the 
jury returned a verdiet of not guilty. 

.S'«/. 20.- In the Third District Court, 

Judge Zane seatenced Samuel H. B. Smith 

to six months' imprisonment and S300 fine, 

foru. c. In the case of Isaac Langton, 

10 



who finally was acquitted, the legal wife 
was compelled, contrary to law, to testify. 
— Elder Thomas Grover, one of the Pio- 
neers of 1847, died in Farmington, Davis 
Co. 

— Solomon Edwards, of American Fork, 
who had been arrested at Eagle Rock, 
Idaho, on a charge of polygamy, was in- 
carcerated in the Penitentiary. 

Jlon. 22. — In front of the Continental 
Hotel, Salt Lake City, District Attorney 
Wm. H. Dickson was attacked and hit one 
or two blows by young Hugh J. Cannon, 
whose mother Dickson had insulted in 
court. The boy and two others who were 
with him were arrested. 

Tues. 23. — Henry Dinwoodey and Joseph 
W. McMurrin, of Salt Lake City, were 
each sentenced to six months' imprison- 
ment and §300 fine, by Judge Zane, in the 
Third District Court. They were both 
taken to the Penitentiary. 

— In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
Amos Maycock, of North Ogden, and W. 
G. Childs, of Ogden, were sentenced by 
Judge Powers, the former to five months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine, and the latter 
to §300 fine. 

— U.S. Deputy Marshals John G. Gleason 
and Wm. Thompson, jun., made a night raid 
at Greenville, Beaver Co., where they acted 
shamefully towards several ladies. 

Thurs. 25. — In the First District Court 
(Ogden), Judge Powers sentenced Charles 
H. Greenwell, of Ogden, to six months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine, and Helon H. 
Tracy, of Marriott's Ward, to six months' 
imprisonment, both for u. c. They were 
incarcerated in the Penitentiary the fol- 
lowing day. 

Fri. 26. — Pres. Hugh S. Gowans and 
Wm. H. Lee, of Tooele, and Herbert J. 
Foulger, of Salt Lake City, were each 
sentenced by Judge Zane to six months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine, for u. c, and 
taken to t*ie Penitentiary. 

— The glass factory, lately erected near 
the Warm Springs, Salt Lake City, com- 
menced operations. 

Sat. 27.— In the Third District Court, 
Judge Zane sentenced John P. Ball, Thos. 
C. Jones and John Y. Smith each to six 
months' imprisonment and §300 fine for 
u. c. 

March. Mon. l.—In the Third District 
Court, Judge Zane sentenced James Moyle, 
Geo. H. Taylor, Samuel F. Ball, James O. 
Poulson and O. F. Due each to six months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine, for u. c. They 
were taken to the Penitentiary the same 
day. 'I«he jury returned a verdict of guilty 
against Fred. A. Cooper, of West Jordan, 
for the same offence. 

— Mr. Woodburn, of Nevada, introduced 
another anti- Mormon bill in the U. S. 
House of Representatives. 

Tues. 2.— In the Third District Court, 
the jury gave a verdict of guilty against 
Solomon Edwards, indicted for u. c. 

— Bishop Hiram B. Clawson was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

— Haldah A. Winters was arrested at 
Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., as a witness 
against Pres. Geo. Q. Cannon, brought to 
Salt Lake City and placed under §5,000 
bonds. 

Wed. 3.— In the Third District Court, 



130 



CHURCH CHRON'OLOGY — 1886. 



Judge Zane sentenced Hyrum Goff and 
Wm. J. Jenkins, both of West Jordan, to 
six months' imprisonment and $300 fine 
each, for u. c. ; both were taken to the 
Penitentiary. 

Fri. 5.— In the Third District Court,sen- 
tence was suspended against Solomon Ed- 
wards, who promised to live with his first 
wife. 

— Edward Brain was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

— Senator CoUum, of Illinois, offered a 
resolution in the U. S. Senate to deprive 
the Utah legislature of its pay. 

— Elder Chester Loveland died at Call's 
Fort, Box Elder Co. 

— Sat. 6".— The ladies of Salt Lake City 
held a large mass meeting in the Theatre, 
to protest against the abuse heaped upon 
their sex in the Federal Courts. 

Mon. 8.— Alfred Best was discharged 
from the Utah Penitentiary. 

— In the Third District Court, Fred A. 
Cooper, of West Jordan, was sentenced 
to six months' imprisonment and $300 fine, 
for u.c. 

Tues. .9.— Martin Garn, of the Sugar 
House Ward, was arrested for u.c, taken 
before Com. Critchlow, in Salt Lake City, 
and placed under ?1,500 bonds. 

— In the Third District Court, John W. 
Snell was sentenced by Judge Zane to six 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine, for u.c. 

Wed. 10. — Almira Covey, who for many 
years was regarded as the oldest living 
member of the Chur'3h, died in the 12th 
Ward, Salt Lake City. 

Fri. i2.— Apostle Lorenzo Snow volun- 
tarily went to prison, in order to have his 
case brought before the U. S. Supreme 
Court speedily. 

— The Utah legislature adjourned after 
a sixty days' session, during which 46 
bills were presented in the Council, and 88 
in the House. Of these 7'3 were not passed, 
62 were sent to the governor, 37 were 
signed, 15 vetoed and 10 ignored by him. 

Sat. 13.— John Nicholson, George Rom- 
ney and Wm. A. Rossiter were discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

— Gov. Murray issued a proclamation 
appointing Arthur Pratt to be Territorial 
Auditor of Public Accounts, and Terri- 
torial Librarian and Recorder of Marks 
and Brands; Bolivar Roberts, Territorial 
treasurer; Parley L. Williams, superin- 
tendent of district schools. 

Man. 15.— Geo. C. Lambert, of Salt Lake 
City, was arrested on a charge of u. c. and 
placed under bonds in the sum of $1,500. 

— Bv telegram from the Secretary of the 
Interior, Gov. Eli H. Murray was asked to 
resign his position as governor of Utah. 

Wed. 17.— In the Third District Court 
the case of Pres. Geo. Q. Cannon was 
called, but as the defendant did not ap- 
pear, his bail was declared forfeited. 

—In the Thii'd District Court (Judge 
Zane), Abraham H. Cannon was sentenced 
to six months' imprisonment and $300 fine, 
for u. c, and taken to the Penitentiary. 

— After several days' trial, in the Second 
District Court, at Beaver, Marcus L. 
Shepherd, charged with u. c, was ac- 
quitted. 

Thurs. 18.— In the Third District Court, 
Judge Zane sentenced Robert M. McKen- 



drick, of Tooele, to six months' imprison- 
ment and $300 fine for u. c. He was taken 
to the Penitentiary. 

— In the First District Court (Prove), 
John Duke, of Wasatch County, indicted 
for u. c, testified in his own case, and was 
adjudged guilty. 

— J. J. Williams, Charles Josephson and 
Joseph Harris were arrested in Malad 
Valley, Idaho, charged with u. c. 

Fri. U). — Suit was commenced in the 
Third District Court, by Arthur Pratt and 
others, for possession of the offices as- 
signed them by the proclamation of Gov. 
Murray. 

— Henry W. Naisbitt, of Salt Lake City, 
was arrested on a charge of u. c, and 
placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— In the Second District Court (Beaver), 
Marcus L. Shepherd was held on another 
indictment and put under $1,500 bonds. 

—Lorenzo D. Watson, of Parowan, 
against whom three indictments had been 
issued, testified in his own case, and the 
jury returned a verdict of guilty on one 
indictment, two other indictments being 
dismissed. 

Sat. 20. — Aurelius Miner was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Sun. 21. — The 89th quorum of Seventy 
was organized by Seymour B. Young, at 
Pima, Graham Co., Ariz. .John M. Moody, 
James R. Welker, Patrick C. Thanie,. 
James M. Larson, Frank Tyler, Joseph 
East and Oliver C. Wilson, presidents. 

— The Saints settling on the Peadres 
Verdes river, Chihuahua, Mexico, held a 
grand celebration, raised a flag pole, 
cheered the Mexican flag and named their 
townsite .Juarez. 

Mon. 22. — The grand jury having found 
three indictments against Henry W. Nais- 
bitt, for u.c. he was re arrested and placed 
under $3,000 bonds. Five witnesses were 
also placed under heavy bonds. 

Tues. ^V.— Stanley Taylor, of the 16th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested for u. 
c, and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Wed. 24.— Thoi. E. Taylor, of the 14th 
Ward, was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— Marinda N. Hyde, relict of Apostle 
Orson Hyde, died in Salt Lake City. 

— Bishop John Parker, of Virgin City, 
Washington Co., died. 

Thurs. 25. — Robert Easton, arrested on 
a charge of u. c, was placed under $1,500 
bonds. 

— In the Second District Court (Judge 
Boreman), Lorenzo D. Watson was 
sentenced to six months' imprisonment 
and $300 fine. He was imprisoned in the 
Penitentiary on the 27th. 

Fri. 26'.— Joseph H. Dean, of the 19th 
Ward, and John Bergen, of the 13th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, were arrested, charged 
with u. c, and placed under bonds. 

Sat. 27. — The grand jury having found 
four indictments against each, Stanley 
Taylor and John Bergen were re-arrested 
and placed under heavy bonds. 

Sun. 2H. — The 90th quorum of Seventy was 
organized by Seymour B. Young, at Mesa, 
Maricopa Co., Ariz. ; Geo. Passey, Solo- 
mon F. Kimljall, George F. Ellsworth, 
Talma E. Pomerey, Joseph E. Johnson 
and Wm. S. Johnson, presidents. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1886. 



131 



Mon. 29. — After several days' prelimin- 
ary examination before Com. McKay, Jos. 
H. Dean was placed under $3,000 bonds, 
although there was no evidence against 
him. 

— Territorial Treasurer James Jack and 
Auditor Nephi W. Clayton filed their an- 
swers to the complaints of Bolivar Rob- 
erts and Arthur Pratt. 

Wed. 31. — Patriarch John Boice died at 
Oxford, Idaho. 

— Elders Joseph M. Tanner and 
Francis M. Lyman, jun., arrived at 
Yafifa (Joppa), Palestine, on a visit to 
the Holy Land. 

April. — Bishop Chistopher Gardner, of 
Cherry Creek, Malad Valley, Idaho, was 
arrested on a charge of u. c, and placed 
under bonds. 

— Wm. J. Cox, George Hales, James 
Farrer and a Mr. Jones of Adamsville, 
Beaver Co., were arrested, charged with 
u. c, and placed under bonds. 

T?iurs. 7.— Geo. C. Wood of South Boun- 
tiful, Davis Co., was arrested on a charge 
of polygamy, brought before Com. Mc- 
Kay and placed under $3,000 bonds. 

— L. Loveridge, of Provo, who had been 
subpoenaed to Salt Lake City as a witness 
in a polygamy case, was himself arrested 
in the marshal's office on a charge of u. c, 
and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— Elders Joseph M. Tanner and Francis 
M. Lyman, jun., missionaries from Utah, 
visited Jerusalem, Palestine. 

J/'ri. 2. — James Townsend, of Salt Lake 
hotel fame, died at the Warm Springs, Salt 
Lake City. 

Sat. 3.— Thomas £. Taylor, of the 14th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on 
three indictments, charging him with u.c, 
and placed under $3,000 bonds. Joseph H. 
Dean, of the 19th Ward, was arx-ested on a 
similar charge (two indictments) and put 
under bonds. 

Sun. 4. — The fifty-sixth annual confer- 
ence of the Church convened at Provo, 
Utah Co.; it was continued until the 7th. 
On the 6th an important epistle from the 
First Presidency was read. 

Mon. 5. — John P. Wright, one of the first 
settlers of Cache Valley, Utah, died at 
Paradise. 

Tliurs. 8. — Martin Garn, of the Sugar 
House Ward, Salt Lake Co., was re-arrest- 
ed on a charge of u. c. and placed under 
$1,500 bonds. 

— David E. Davis, Chas. Seal, Andrew 
W. Cooley and Isaac Groo were discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Fri. 9. — Chas L. White was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

— Geo. B. Bailey, Jens Hansen and An- 
drew Jensen, of Mill Creek, Salt Lake Co., 
were ari-ested, cliarged with u. c, brought 
to Salt Lake City and each placed under 
$1,000 bonds. 

Mon. 12. — The habeas corpus case of 
John Connelly was argued in the Third 
District Court, and he was ordered back to 
prison until his fine was paid. 

— Elias Morris, of Salt Lake City, was 
arrested on a charge of u. c, taken before 
Com. McKay, and placed under $1,000 
bonds. 

Tues. i3.— Ludvig H. Berg, of the 11th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 



charge of u. c, taken before Com. McKay, 
and placed under $1,000 bonds. 

—In the First District Court, at Provo, 
Bishop Wm. M. Bromley, of American 
Fork, was sentenced to ten months' im- 
prisonment and $300 fine ; Nephi J.Bates, 
of Monroe, to three months' imprisonment 
and $100 fine; Wm. Gi-ant, of American 
Fork, to four months' imprisonment, and 
John Duke, of Heber City, to $300 fine 
— all for u. c. Brothers Grant and Bates 
were taken to the Penitentiary, but Bishop 
Bromley took an appeal and was released 
on $7,000 bonds. 

Fri. 16. -Andrew Smith and Emil O. Ol- 
sen were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

— Emma Rawlins Young, a witness in 
Royal B. Young's case, was arrested and 
placed under $2,500 bonds. 

—Elder Edwin Spencer died at Ran- 
dolph, Rich Co. 

Sat. 17. — David W. Leaker and Charles 
Denney, both of the 11th Ward, Salt Lake 
City, were arrested, charged with u. c, 
taken before Com. McKay and eaeh placed 
under $1,000 bonds. 

— John Bergen, who was already under 
bonds charged with u. c, was arrested in 
the 13th Ward, Salt Lake City, on a charge 
of polygamy. 

— Elder Reuben Kirkham died at Logan. 

— The steamship Nevada sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 179 Saints, under 
the direction of Elder E. T. Woolley. The 
company arrived at New York on the 27th, 
and at Salt Lake City, May 4th. 

Sun. 18. — Timothy B. Foote, one of the 
first settlers of Juab County, died at 
Nephi. 

Jlon, 19. — Charles Denney had a pre- 
liminary examination before Com. McKay, 
Salt Lake City, and was still kept under 
bonds. 

Tues. 20. — Several houses at American 
Fork, Utah Co.. were raided by U. S. 
deputy marshals, who arrested Wm. 
Wagstaflf, Wm. R. Webb, John P. Kelly 
and John Durrant, and subpoenaed a 
number of witnesses. All were brought 
to Salt Lake City, where the defendants 
were each placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Wed. 2i.— Royal B. Young, of Salt Lake 
City, was again arrested on a charge of u. 
c, three new indictments having been 
found against him. He was released on 
§;5,000 bonds. 

Sat. 24— Elder August F. Thomstorff 
died in Salt Lake City. 

— The Supreme Court of Utah rendered 
a decision which practically endorsed lewd 
and lascivious conduct and set Wm. H. 
H. Yearian and others free. 

Mon. 26. — Some houses at Payson, Utah 
Co., were raided by U. S. deputy marshals. 

— After trial in the Third District Court, 
John Bergen was sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine for u. c, and 
taken to the Penitentiary. 

Tties. 27.— After trial in the Third Dis- 
trict Court, Geo. C. Wood, of Bountiful, 
Davis Co., was adjudged guilty of u. c. 

— The Kanesville Ward, Weber Co., was 
organized ; Peter B. Petersen, Bishop. 

— Pres. Ihaia Te Whakamairu. a promi- 
nent native Elder, died at Mainaia, Waira- 
rapa, New Zealand. 



132 



CHURCH CHKONOLOGY — 1886. 



Wed. 28.— In the Third District Court, 
the jury disagi-eed in the case of Joseph 
H. Dean, who was on trial for u. c. Lud- 
vig H. Berg was convicted of u.c. 

Thurs. 29. — Frank J. Cannon was ar- 
raigned before the Third District Court, 
charged with battery on District Attorney 
Wm. H. Dickson. On May Ist, he plead 
guilty to the charge. 

— The case of Lorenzo Snow was ar- 
gued in the U. S. Supreme Court. 

/'Vi. .30.— After trial in the Third District 
Court, Henry W. Naisbitt was convicted 
of u. c. 

—In Bristol, England, William Ratcliff 
was fined 40 shillings for disturbing a 
"Mormon" meeting. 

May. Sat. i.— Ueo. C. Lambert, who 
testified in his own case, Geo. B. Bailey, 
Jens Hansen and Andrew Jensen were 
adjudged iruilty of u. c. 

— Joshua Thomas Willis, formerly Bishop 
of Toquerville, died in Arizona. 

Sun. 2.— Thomas Alfred Judd died in 
Salt Lake City. 

Tues. 4.— After a trial in the Third Dis • 
trict Court, Edward Brain was adjudged 
guilty of resistin<? a U. S. deputy marshal. 

Wed. .5.— Utah's new governor, Caleb 
Walton West, arrived in Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 6'.— Robert H. Swain was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

—Orson P. Arnold, of Salt Lake City, 
was arrested on a charge of u.c. and 
placed under bonds. 

Fri. 7. — The municipal government of 
Salt Lake City tendered Governor West a 
brilliant reception in the Theatre. 

—In the Third District Court, after trial, 
Royal B. Young was adjudged guilty of 
u.c. The charge of polygamy against 
him was dismissed. 

Sat. S.— In the Third District Court, the 
perjury case against Agnes McMurrin, of 
the 8th Ward, Salt Lake City, was dis- 
missed. 

Sun. .9. — Agnes McMurrin, a witness in 
Royal B. Young's case, was arrested by 
deputy marshals and placed under bonds. 

Afon. 10.— la the Third District Court 
Stanley Taylor, Andrew Jensen and Geo. 
B. Bailey were each senterced by Judge 
Zane to six months' imprisonment and 
$300 fine. for u.c. and taken to the Peniten- 
tiary. Frank J. Cannon was sentenced to 
three months' imprisonment iu the county 
jail and ?1.50 fine, for bs ctery. 

—The Supreme Court of the United 
States dismissed thethi-ee Snow polygamy 
cases for "want of jurisdiction," and also 
set aside its former judgment in the An- 
gus M. Cannon polygamy case. This left 
the polygamists to the mercy of the Utah 
Federal courts, with all the horrors of the 
segregating policy, 

Tues. 11.— In the Third District Court 
Geo. C. Lambert and Henry W. Naisbitt 
were each sentenced to six months' im- 
prisonmenl and $300 fine, forn.c. 

Thurs. /.i.— Wellsville, Cache Co., was 
raided by U. S. Deputy marshals, who ar- 
rested Levi Minnerly and Reuben C.Smith 
on charge of u.c. 

— Pres. Joel Grover died at Nephi,Juab, 
Co. 

— Gov. West, accompaniea oy Secretary 
Arthur L. Thomas and others, visited the 



Penitentiary and offered amnesty to all 
the "brethren" imprisoned there for viola- 
tion of the P:]dmunds law, on condition 
that they would "promise to obey the law 
as interpreted by the courts." 

Fri. i4.— Joseph Matthews, one of the 
Utah Pioneers of 1847, died near Pima, 
Ariz. 

Sat. 7.5.— Wm. G. Bickley was arrested, 
at Beaver, on a charge of u. c. 

—At Logan, the United Order Foundry 
machine shops were destroyed by fire. 

— Elders Isaac C. Gadd and Richard R. 
Fry sailed from Liverpool, England, in 
charge of fifteen Icelandic Saints, bound 
for Utah. 

Siin. W.—A. J. Kershaw, of Ogden, and 
John C. Thompson, of Riverdale, Weber 
Co., were arrested for u. c. and placed 
under bonds. 

Tues. i8. — Amos Maycock, Helon H. 
Tracy and John Bergen were taken from 
the Penitentiary to Ogden for ari-aign- 
ment. Joseph H. Dean and Geo. C. Wood, 
were re- arrested. 

—John A. Flowers, of the 11th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, shot and fatally wounded 
his wife and mother-in-law (Annie L. 
Decker) , after which he shot and killed 
himself. 

Wed. 19.— Annie L. Decker, shot the day 
before by her son-in-law, died. 

—In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
W. G. Saunders, Helon H.Tracy and Amos 
Maycock, who were serving one term of 
imprisonment, were sentenced to six 
months' imprisonment each on additional 
indictments for u. c, and taken back to 
the Penitentiary. 

—The Saints who had settled northwest 
of Parker Ward, Snake River Valley, 
Idaho, were organized as Brighton 
Ward ; Reuben Hiatt, Bishop. 

Fri. 21.— In the Second District Court, 
at Beaver, a packed jury brought in a ver 
diet of guilty against Geo. Hales, for 
libel. On the 27th he was fined $100 and 
costs. 

—The Saints who had settled on the east 
end of Poole's Island, Snake River Valley, 
were organized as Cleveland (later La 
Belle) Ward; Winslow F. Walker, Bishop. 

Sat. 22. — In the First District Court, at 
Provo, Nicholas H. Groesbeck was sen- 
tencjed by .ludge Powers to nine months' 
imprisonment and 14.50 fine. Pending an 
appeal to the Territorial Supreme Court 
the defendant was admitted to i{i.5,000 bail. 

— The Saints who had settled southeast 
of Louisville, Snake River Valley, Idaho, 
were organized as the Rigby Ward; 
Geo. A. Cordon, Bishop. 

—The steamship Nevada sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 279 emigrating 
Saints on board, under the direction of 
Moroni L. Pratt. They arrived at New 
York June 2nd, and at Salt Lake City on 
the 8th by the D. & R. G. Ry. 

.S««. 2.3.— Franklin Thursten was killed 
by Indians near Pima, Graham Co., Ariz. 

—The Saints who had settled on Sand 
creek. Snake River Valley, Idaho, were 
organized as lona Ward, of the Bannook 
Stake James E. Steele, Bishop. 

Mon. 24. — The brethren imprisoned in 
the Utah Penitentiary framed a respect- 



OHUECH CHTIONOLOGY — 1886. 



133 



ful reply to Gov. West, showing their reas- 
ons for not accepting his offer. 

— In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
Levi Minnerly and Reuben C. Smith, of 
Wellsville, were sentenced to imprison- 
ment for u. c, the former to five months 
and the latter to six months. They 
were taken to the Penitentiary the fol- 
lowing day. 

^In the District Court at Blackfoot, 
Idaho, the following brethren were sent- 
enced to imprisonment at Detroit, Mich., 
for u. c. : Andrew Jacobsen, of Blooming- 
ton, Bear Lake Co.; John J. Williams of 
Malad,Oneida Co. ; Christopher Gardner,of 
Cherry Creek, Oneida Co. ;Niels J. Jargen- 
sen, of Crentile Valley, Bingham Co. ; Ras- 
mus Nielsen, of Weston, OneidaCo. ; Thos. 
H. Wilde, Hans Rasmussen and Niels Gra- 
ham, of Mink Creek, Oneida Co., John 
Jolley, of Franklin, Oneida Co.; and Wm. 
Handy, of Whitney, Oneida Co. They all 
left Blackfoot as prisoners on the 26th, 
and arrived at Detroit the following Sat- 
urday (Maj 28th). 

Tues, 25. — Thomas Porcher and John W. 
Keddington were discharged from the Pen- 
itentiary. 

Wed. 26. — In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Ambrose Greenwell, sen., of West 
Weber, was sentenced by Judge Powers 
to one year's imprisonment and §300 fine 
for u. c, and taken to the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. 21. — In the Second District 
Court, at Beaver, Marcus L. Shepherd, 
Wm. J. Cox and Wm. G. Bickley, of Bea- 
ver, and Peter Wimmer, of Parowan, were 
each sentenced to six months' imprison- 
ment and $300 fine, for u.c. 

Fri. 28.— Wm. Y. Jeffs, of the 16th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, brought before Cora. McKay, and 
placed under $1,000 bonds. 

Sat. 29. — Willard L. Snow, of Farmers 
Ward, Salt Lake Co., was arrested for u. 
c, taken before Com. McKay and placed 
under $1,000 bonds. 

— In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
Geo. C. Wood, who plead guilty to the 
charge of polygamy, was sentenced to five 
years' imprisonment and $500 fine and 
taken to the Penitentiary. 

June. Tues. i.— In the Third District 
Court, Royal B. Young, agreeable to the 
segregation policy, was sentenced by 
Judge Zane to one and a half years' im- 
prisonment and $900 fine, and Charles Den- 
ney and Ludvig H. Berg to six months' 
imprisonment and §300 fine each, all for u. 
c. They were taken to the Penitentiary. 

Wed. 2.— In the Third District Court. 
Jens Hansen, of Mill Creek, was sentenced 
by Judge Zane to six months' imprison- 
ment and $300 fine, for u. c, and impris- 
oned. Geo. C. Wood was brought in from 
the Penitentiary and sentenced to three 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine, for 
u. c. 

— Hyrum P. Folsom, of the 19th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, brought before Com. McKay, 
and placed under §1,000 bonds. 

Thurs. 3. — Homer Duncan, of the 11th 
Ward, was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
taken before Com. McKay and placed un- 
der $1,000. 

Fri. 4. — U. S. deputy marshals raided 



Hooperville, Davis Co., and arrested Wm. 
W. Galbraith on a charge of u. c. He was 
taken to Salt Lake City and placed under 
bonds. 

Sat. 5. — In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Wm. Stimpson, of Riverdale, was 
sentenced by Judge Powers to eight 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine, for u. 
c, and taken to the Penitentiary. 

Sun. 6. — The 91st quorum of Seventy 
was organized by Christian D. Fjeldsted, 
at Orangeville, Emery Co. ; Erastus Cur- 
tis, P. R. Petersen, Abner Buckley, Boie 
P. Petersen, Frederick Andersen, Parker 
A. Childs and Svend Larsen, presidents. 

Mon. 7. — Andrew Hansen and Carl Jan- 
son, of West Jordan, Salt Lake Co., were 
arrested, charged with u. c, taken before 
Com. McKay in Salt Lake Citj% and 
placed under $1,000 bonds each. 

Tues. 8. — Some reidences at Brigham 
City, Box Elder Co., were raided by U. S. 
deputy marshals, who arrested James 
May on suspicion and took him to Ogden. 

Wed. 9.— Wm. Felstead,of the 1st Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u. c. and polygamy, brought before 
Com. McKay and placed under bonds. 

—A powder mill, at the mouth of Ogden 
Canyon, Weber Co., was destroyed by the 
explosion of powder, and James Hoxer 
fatally injured. 

Thurs. iO.— Elder John H. Berry died at 
Cottonwood, Bear Lake Co., Idaho. 

— The Edmunds new anti polygamy bill 
was reported to the House from the Ju- 
diciary Committee, greatly modified and 
amended. 

Fri. 11. — Seymour B. Young, of the 12th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, but escaped from the 
ofiicer. 

Sat. 12. — Pres. David John and Edward 
Peay, of Provo, were arrested, charged 
with u. c, taken to Salt Lake City, ar- 
raigned before Com. McKay and placed 
under bonds. 

—Albert Gray, of the 16th Ward, Salt 
Lake City, was accidentally killed at 
Ogden. 

— The Saints who had settled northeast 
of Payson and northwest of Spanish Fork, 
Utah County, were organtzed into two 
Wards, namely, Benjamin, Andrew J. B. 
Stewart, Bishop, and Lake Shore, Lo- 
renzo Argyle, Bishop. 

Man. iJ.— Some houses at Tooele, Tooele 
Co.," were raided by U. S. deputy mar- 
shals, who arrested Richard Warburton, 
James Dunn and Jonas E. Lindberg, for 
u. c. : also residences at Pleasant Grove, 
Utah Co., were raided by U. S. deputy mar- 
shals, who arrested Orlando F. Herron, 
Wm. Wadley and Victor Sandgren,charged 
with u. c. The defendants from both 
places were taken to Salt Lake City and 
arraigned before Com. McKay, with a num- 
ber of witnesses, and after preliminary ex- 
amination placed under bonds. 

Tues. i.5.— Charles M. Bergstrom, of the 
11th Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested 
for u. c. and placed under $1,000 bonds. 

Thurs. i7.— Frank H. Dyer assumed the 
position of U. S. marshal for Utah, in place 
of Elwin A. Ireland, retired. 

— Patriarch Abraham Washburn died at 
Monroe, Sevier Co. 



134 



CHUECH CHKOT!fOLOGY — 1886. 



Fri. 18. — Louisa F. Wells, wife of Daniel 
H. Wells, died in Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 10. — The Supreme Court of Utah 
rendered a decision in favor of the gov- 
ernor's appointees for Territorial trea- 
surer and auditor. The case was appealed. 

Sun. 20. — The first Latter-day Saint Y. 
L. M. I. A. in Mexico was organized in the 
camp of the Saints near Ascencion, Chi- 
huahua, with Virona Whiting as presi- 
dent. 

3£on. 21. — Henry Gale, of Beaver, was 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Wed. 23. — Rebecca Van Zante Miller, re- 
lict of Eleazer Miller, died at Coalville, 
Summit Co. 

Thurs. 24. — In the First District Court, 
at Ogden, Wm. H. Pidcock plead guilty to 
the charge of u. c. 

Fri. 25. — Lorin Farr, of Ogden, was ar- 
rested on a five-count indictment, charging 
him with u. c, and placed under bonds. 

—On this and the following day, the 92nd 
quorum of Seventy was organized by John 
Morgan in the San Luis Stake of Zion, 
Conejos Co., Col., with Christen Jensen as 
senior president. The members of the 
quorum were mostly young Elders from 
the Southern States. 

Sat. 26. — The steamship Nevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 426 emigra- 
ting Saints on board, in charge of Elder 
Christian F. Olsen. The company arrived 
at New York, July 7th, and at Ogden on 
the 12th. The emigrants were subjected 
to the most rigid questioning and exami- 
nation by the officers at Castle Garden, 
because they were "Mormons." 

Mon. 28. — Culbert King and James E. 
Twichel were discharged from the Peni- 
tentiary. 

— Elder Wm. A. Cowan and another mis- 
sionary were abused by an armed mob, 
consisting of about one hundred men, in 

Tues. 2f).— The Old Folks of Salt Lake 
County were treated to a free excursion 
to American Fork, Utah Co. 

—James Eardley, of the 3rd Ward, Salt 
Lake City, and Thos. F. H. Morton, of 
Farmers Ward, Salt Salt Co., were ar- 
rested for u.c, taken before Com. 
McKay and each placed under $1,000 bonds. 

— Nephi J. Bates was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Wed. 30.— In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Wm. H. Pidcock, was sentenced to 
thirteen months' iniprisonment,foru.c-and 
taken to the Penitentiary. 

— Francis A. Brown, of Ogden, was ar- 
rested an a new charge of u.c, and placed 
under $2,000 bonds. 

— Amanda Smith, of Haun's Mill massa- 
cre fame, died at Richmond. Cache Co. 

—John Irving, of West Jordan, was ar- 
rested for u. c, taken to Salt Lake City, 
examined before Com. McKay and dis- 
charged, there being no evidence against 
him. Geo. C. Watts was arrested on the same 
charge, taken before Com. McKay, plead 
guilty and was placed under $1,000 bonds. 

July. Thur.'i. i.— The Supreme Court of 
Utah reversed the action of the First 
District Court, by refusing a new trial in 
Barnard White's u.c. case. 

—James May, of Call's Fort, Box Elder 
Co., who had been held to await the action 



of the grand jury, was arrested on an in- 
dictment containing five counts alleging 
u.c. He was released on $3,000 bonds. 

B'ri. 2.— Amos H. Neff, of East Mill 
Creek, who had been arrested on a charge 
of u.c, was placed under $1,500 bonds, af- 
ter preliminary examination before Com. 
McKay. 

Sat. ,:?.— John W. Tate, sen., of 'J'ooele, 
who had been arrested the day previous, 
charged with u.c, had an examination be- 
fore Com. McKay, in Salt Lake City, and 
was placed under bonds. 

Sivn. 4. — The prisoners in the Peniten- 
tiary were permitted to 'o celebrate Inde- 
pendence day. 

Tues. 6. — Bishop James Crane died at 
Herriman, Salt Lake Co. 

Wed. 7.— Fred W. Ellis, of North Ogden, 
Weber Co., who had been arrested on a 
charge of u.c, testified before the grand 
jury, at Ogden. 

Thurs. 8. — Bishop James W. Loveless, of 
Provo, was arrested on a Utah Central 
Ry. train, charged with u.c. 

— David M. Stuart was discharged from 
the Penitentiary, but was immediately -re 
arrested on a new charge for u.c. and 
placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Fri. .9.— Alonzo E. Hyde, of the 17th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested for 
u.c. 

— Elijah A. Box, of Brigham City, was 
arrested on a charge of u.c, taken to 
Ogden and placed under $1,.500 bonds. 

Sat. 10.— The Y. M. M. I. A. of the 
Sevier Stake held an interesting confer- 
ence at Fish Lake. 

— A small company of Icelandic Saints, 
bound for Utah, sailed from Liverpool, 
England. They arrived at New York 
July 18th. 

Mon. i2.— Elder E. T. Mumford died at 
Pleasant Grove, Utah Co. 

Fri. 16. — Gov. West issued a proclama- 
tion, warning the "Mormons" against dis- 
obeying the Edmunds law. 

— Richard Jones, telegraph operator at 
Provo, was accidentally killed by the dis- 
charge of a gun, in Provo Canyon, Utah 
Co. 

— Sister Clarinda Stanton died at Pa- 
nacea, Nev., 92 years of age. She was one 
of the oldest members in the Church, hav- 
ing been baptized by Oliver Cowdery, Nov. 
3, 1830. 

Sat. 17. — Bishop Alexander McRae, of 
the 11th Ward, was arrested on a charge 
of u. c and placed under $1,000 bonds by 
Com. McKay. 

Stin. 18. — Robert Morris was discharged 
from the Penitentiarv. 

Jlon. 19.— Wm. W. Willey, of Bountiful, 
was discharged from the Penitentiary. 

— Isaac R. Pierce was arrested in Com- 
missioner McKay's office, in Salt Lake 
City, on a charge of u. c 

Tues. 20. — James H. Nelson was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

— After preliminary examination before 
Com. McKay, Bishop Alexander McRae 
and John Gillespie (of Tooele), accused of 
u. c, were discharged. 

— Pres. Cleveland nominated Henry P. 
Henderson, of Michigan, to be associate 
justice of the Supreme Court of Utah. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1886. 



135 



FH. 23.— Samuel H. B. Smith was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

— Wm. Clifton was accidentally killed at 
Big Cottonwood, Salt Lake Co. 

Hat. 24. — A solemn assembly was held in 
Salt Lake City, in commemoration of the 
entrance of the Pioneers into Salt Lake 
Valley. 

— Mark Lindsay was arrested at Ogden, 
on a charge of u. c, and placed under 
$1,500 bonds. 

— Wm. Grant, of American Fork, was 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

—The G. A. R. (Grand Army of the Re- 
public) commenced a series of meetings in 
the Skating Rink, Salt Lake City. 

Mon. 26. — Charles O. Card was arrested 
at Logan, charged with u. c, but escaped 
from the officers by jumping from the 
train. 

— Henry Dinwoodey was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Wed. 2S.— Wm. Geddes, of Plain City, 
was arrested on a charge of u. c, taken 
to Ogden and placed under $2,000 bonds. 

— John D. Jones, of Cherry Creek, 
Oneida Co., Idaho, was arrested for v c, 
taken to Malad City and placed under 
fl,500 bonds. Erik M. Larsen, of Malad 
City, was arrested on the same charge and 
put under bonds. 

Thurs. 29.— At the G. A. R. meeting 
held at the Skating Rink, Salt Lake City, 
the crowd was treated to a series of bitter 
anti- Mormon harangues. 

— Charles H. Greenwell was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Fri. 30. — James G. Burton, of Nephi, 
Juab Co., was accidentally kicked to death 
by a horse in Grantsville, Tooele Co. 

— General John A. Logan and others 
spoke at the G. A. R. Camp meeting in 
Salt Lake City. 

—The rock work on the Manti Temple 
was completed. 

Sat. 31.— The last of the G. A. R. camp 
meetings was held in the Skating Rink. 
In these meetings the most abominable 
falsehoods were uttered against the 
"Mormon" people. 

August. — Elder Jacob Spori arrived at 
Haifa, Palestine, as a Latter-day Saint 
missionary to that country. He came 
from Constantinople. 

Sun. 1. — Rhoda Maria Carrington, wife 
of Albert Carrington, of Salt Lake City, 
died at Georgetown, Idaho. 

3fon. 2. — The general election in Utah 
resulted in victory to the People's Party 
in all the counties. 

— Nicholas H. Groesbeck, of Springville, 
was taken to the Penitentiary to serve 
nine months' imprisonment for u. c. 

Tues. 3. — Bishop Wm. M. Bromley, of 
American Fork, Utah Co., commenced his 
term of imprisonment, for u.c.,in the Pen- 
itentiary. 

Wed. 4. — Geo. H. Taylor and James 
Moyle were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Fri. 6. — John Douglas was arrested at 
West Weber, Weber Co.. on a charge of 
u. c, taken before Com. Duane W. Fel- 
shaw and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Sat. 7. — S0ren L. Petersen was arrested 
at Ogden, on a chargesof u. c, and gave 
bonds in the sum of $2,000. 



Sun. S. — Thomas Jackson was drowned 
in the Jordan river, at Salt Lake City. 

— New Wards of the Church were or- 
ganized at Bluff Dale and Riverton, Salt 
Lake Co. ; Lewis H. Mousley and Orrin 
P. Miller, Bishops. 

Tues. 10. — Bishop John C. Dewey, of 
Dewey ville, Box Elder Co., was arrested 
for u. c. He was taken to Ogden the next 
day and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— Clyde Cranney was accidentally 
drowned in the Logan river. Cache Co. 

Wed. 11. — Samuel M. Parkinson, of 
Franklin, Idaho, was taken prisoner by 
deputy marshals, near Ogden. 

Thurs. 12. — James Higgins was arrested 
at West Jordan, Salt Lake Co., on a 
charge of u. c. After spending the night 
in the Penitentiary, he was admitted to 
$2,500 bail the following day. 

Fri. 13.— The grand jury in the Third 
District Court reported that they had 
found 45 indictments for polygamy and 
u. c. 

Sat. 14.— The first Latter- day Saint 
Primary Association in Mexico was or- 
ganized in the camp of the Saints, near 
Casas Grandes, Chihuahua; Hannah H. 
Romney, president. 

3fon. 16. — Dr. Samuel L. Sprague died in 
Salt Lake City, of old age. 

Tues. i;.— Apostle John W. Taylor was 
arrested at Pocatello, Idaho, on a charge 
of treason. 

— Mrs. Elizabeth James was killed and 
Mrs. Walter Williams an^ child hurt by a 
runaway team in Salt Lake City. 

— Mary Foreman Higgins, the alleged 
plural wife of James Higgins, was arrested 
at West Jordan, Salt Lake Co. 

— Pres. Abraham H. Canuon was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

Wed. 18. — An excursion party, consist- 
ing of journalists from Nebraska, arrived 
in Salt Lake City, on a visit. 

—Apostle John W. Taylor appeared be- 
fore U. S. Commissioner J. C. House, at 
Oxford, Idaho, and gave bonds in the sum 
of $5,000. 

-Elder Oliver L. Robinson died at 
Farmington, Davis Co. 

—Peter Petersen, of Morgan County, 
was arrested on a charge of u. c, taken to 
Ogden and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Thurs. 19.— John Gillespie, of Tooele 
County, was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
taken to Salt Lake City the next day and 
placed under $1,.500 bonds. 

Fi-i. 20.— John Bowen and Thomas Bur- 
ningham were discharged from the Peni- 
tentiary. 

Sat. 21.— The steamship Wyoming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 301 emi- 
grating Saints on board, in charge of 
David Kunz. The company arrived in 
New York on the 31st. Forty-five of the 
emigrants were detained there by Com. 
Stephenson on pretended charges of 
pauperism. Finally all were permitted to 
continue their journey, except a woman 
and three children, who were sent back to 
England. The remainder of the company 
arrived in Salt Lake City Sept. 7th. 

Tues. 2-/.— Henry Reiser, of the 6th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested for 
u. c. and placed under $1,000 bonds by 
Com. McKay. 



136 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY— 1886. 



— Wm. D. Johnson, jun., commenced to 
survey a town site (Diaz) on land which 
had been purchased of P. G. del Campe, 
north of La Ascencion, Chihuahua, 
Mexico. 

Wed. 23.— Bishop Wm. Thorn, of the 7th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. and placed under $1,000 
bonds. 

Thurs. 26.— U. S. deputy marshals 
raided some of the settlements west of the 
Jordan river, Salt Lake Co., and arrested 
Rasmus Nielsen, of Hunter, on a charge 
of u. c. 

— Joseph W. McMurrin, of the 8th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Fri. 27.— Elder Samuel R. Jewkes died 
from the effects of an accident, at Orange- 
ville, Emery Co. 

Hat. 2S.— Herman F. F. Thorup, of the 
1st Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested for 
u. c, taken before Com. McKay, and 
placed under §1,000 bonds. 

— Henry P. Henderson, recently ap- 
pointed assistant justice of the Territory, 
arrived in Salt Lake City, and took the 
oath of office. 

Sun. 29. — Elder Jacob Spori baptized 
Johan Geo. Grau, a German, at Haifa. 
Palestine. This is believed to have been 
the first baptism by divine authority in 
that country in this dispensation. 

Man. 50.— Wm. H. Foster and Bedson 
Eardley, of the 7th Ward, Salt Lake City, 
were arrested, 'charged with u. c, and 
placed under $1,000 bonds each by Com. 
McKay. 

— John Y. Smith, Hugh S. Gowans, and 
Thos. C. Jones were discharged from the 
Penitentiary, but Com. McKay refused to 
discharge Herbert J. Foulger, Wm. H. 
Lee, and John P. Ball without paying their 
fines, which they declined to do. 

— Richard Henry Sudweeks, of Kingston. 
Piute Co., charged with u. c, and Maria 
Elder, his supposed wife, were both ar- 
rested and brought to Beaver, where they 
on the following daj' were arraigned be- 
fore Com. J. W. Wilkins and placed under 
bonds. 

Tu^s. 31. — Isaac Brockbank, of the 8th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested for 
u. c, and placed under $1,000 bonds. 

September. Wed. 1. — Ezra T. Clark, 
Wm. H. Watson and Leonard G. Rice, of 
Farmington, Davis Co., were arrested on 
charges of u. c, taken to Salt Lake City 
and placed under bonds. 

— Willard S. Hansen, who was under ar- 
rest for u. c, escaped from Deputy Mar- 
shal Steele, while waiting for the train at 
Collinston, Box Elder Co. 

— Forty-four Latter-day Saint emi- 
grants just arrived from Europe on the 
steamship Wyoming, were detained by 
Commissioners Starr and Stephenson, at 
New York, by a strained application of the 
statute in relation to foreign paupers. 

Thurs. 2. — Mark Bigler was arrested at 
Collinston, Box Elder Co., for u. c, taken 
to Ogden and placed under fl,000 bonds. 

— Herbert J. Foulger, John P. Ball and 

Wm. H. Lee were discharged from the 

Penitentiary, only the first named paying 

his fine. 

Fri. 3. — Harvey Murdock, of Harrisville, 



Weber Co., was arrested on a charge of 
polygamy, brought before Com. Black, at 
Ogden, and j>laced under $4,000 bonds. 

Sat. 4.— Samuel F. Ball was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

— Abraham Chadwick, of North Ogden, 
and Thomas Bennett Helm, of Pleasant 
View, Weber Co., were arrested for u. c, 
brought to Ogden and placed under bonds. 
2Ion. 6. — Oluf F. Due was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

— Most of the "Mormon" emigrants de- 
tained at New York were released on writs 
of habeas corpus by Judge Andrews of 
the Supreme Court of the State of New 
York, and started for Utah. 

Tucs. 7. — Hyrum Goff, Wm. J. Jenkins 
and James O. Poulson. who had served 
their terms in the Penitentiary, were 
brought before Com. McKay, in Salt Lake 
City. Jenkins and Poulson were libera- 
ted, but Goff was returned to the Peni- 
tentiary, not being allowed to take the 
oath required, in order to avoid paying fine 
and costs of suit. 

— Peter Anderson and N. C. Mortensen, 
of Hunts ville, Weber Co., were arrested 
for u. c, brought to Ogden and placed un- 
der bonds. 

Wed. 8. — Deputy marshals raided houses 
in the 8th Ward, the Church Farm and 
other places, in quest of victims for the 
anti-polygamy crusade. 

— Henry Tribe was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, taken before Com. Black, at Ogden, 
and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— John Waters, of Springville, Utah Co., 
was arrested on a charge of u. c, taken 
to Salt Lake City, with four witnesses, 
and placed under $1,000 bonds. 

— Elder Isaac C. Haight died at That- 
cher, Graham Co., Ariz. 

Thurs. 9. — After a hearing before Judge 
Zane, in the Third District Court, on a 
writ of habeas corpus, Hyrum Goff was 
released from imprisonment, by paying his 
fine. 

Fri. 10. — Henry Saunders, sen., of Provo, 
was arrested on a charge of u. c, brought 
to Salt Lake City, arraigned before Com. 
McKay and placed under $500 bonds. 

—James McFarland, of West Weber, 
Weber Co., was arrested for u. c, taken 
before Com. Black, at Ogden, and placed 
under $1,000 bonds. 

Sat. 11. — Frederick A. Cooper, of West 
Jordan, was discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. Immediately afterwards he was 
arrested on another indictment charging 
him with u. c. and placed under |1,500 
bonds. 

— Myron W. Butler was arrested at 
Trenton, Cache Co..and Willai-d Bingham, 
at Wilson, Weber Co., charged with u. c. 
They were brought to Ogden and placed 
under bonds. 

Mon. i.?.— Peter S. Barkdull,of Farming- 
ton, Davis Co., was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, brought to S-ilt Lake City, ar- 
raigned before Com. McKay, and placed 
under $1,.500 bonds. 

— Elder Leonard G. Rice died suddenly 
at Farmington, Davis Co. He was under 
bonds for u. c. 

Tues. 14.— In the Third District Court, 
William Felstead, .of the 1st Ward, Salt 
Lake City, who had plead guilty to a 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY 1886. 



137 



charge of polygamy and u. c, was sent- 
enced by Judge Zane to three years and 
six months' imprisonment, and $300 fine, 
and tajkeu to the Penitentiary. Brother 
Felstead was seventy-two years old. 

Wed. 15.— Bernhard H. Schettler, of Salt 
Lake City, wa.s arrested on a charge of u. 
c, taken before Com. McKay, and placed 
under $1,500 bonds. 

— Laura Nebeker Smith died in the 17th 
Ward, Salt Lake City. 

— Hon. Morrison R. Waite, Chief Justice 
of the Supreme Court of the United States, 
who was on a visit to Salt Lake City, was 
given a reception at the governor's man- 
sion, after which the distinguished judge 
visited Fort Douglas and the Penitentiary. 
At the latter place he had a conversation 
with Apostle Lorenzo Snow. 

Thurs. 16. — Henry B. Gwilliam, of South 
Hooper, Davis Co., was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, taken before Com. Black, at Ogden, 
and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— John Cartwright, of the 8th Ward, Salt 
Lake City, was arrested for u. c, taken 
before Com. McKay, and placed u ider 
$1,000 bonds. 

Sat. 18.— The First District Cou :t, at 
Ogden, was opened with the recently ap- 
pointed judge, Henry P. Henderson, on 
the bench. 

—John B. Forster, of the 13th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u.c. and placed under $1,000 bonds by 
Com. McKay. 

— Robert M.McKendrick was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

— Richard H. Sudweeks, arrested some 
time previously on three indictments, was 
again arrested on another charge of u. c, 
at Beaver. 

Mon. 20.— In the Third District Court, 
Richard Warburton, of Tooele, was sen- 
tenced by Judge Zane to six months' im- 
prisonment and $300 fine, and Jonas E. 
Lindberg, also of Tooele, to eighteen 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine, both 
for u.c, and taken to the Penitentiary. 
They both plead guilty. 

— Elder Andrew N. Macfarlane died in 
the 21st Ward, Salt Lake City. 

— Charles Jameson, who was wounded 
at the Haun's Mill massacre with four 
balls, and also served in the Mormon Bat- 
talion, died at Minersville, Beaver Co. 

Tues. 21. — Maria Sudweeks was arrested 
in Beaver, on a charge of having resisted 
the officers, when they arrested her hus- 
band. She was released on giving a $250 
bond. 

— After trial, in the Third District 
Court, the jury returned a verdict of 
guilty against C. M. Bergstr0m, charged 
with u. c. 

Wed. 22. — W. J. Hooper was arrested in 
Salt Lake City for u.c. and placed under 
$1,000 bonds. 

—In the Third District Court, Wm. W. 
Galbraith, of South Hooper, charged with 
u.c, plead guilty, and was sentenced by 
Judge Zane to six months' imprisonment 
and $300 fine. Wm.Y.Jefls,charged with the 
same offense, who also plead guilty, was 
sentenced to eighteen months' imprison - 
ment and $300 fine. After trial, the jury 
returned a verdict of guilty against James 
Higgins and Carl Janson, of West Jordan, 



for u. c. Hyrum P. Folsom plead guilty to 
the same charge. 

Thurs. 23. — The Gardo House was raid- 
ed by U. S. deputy marshals, in search of 
Pres. John Taylor. 

— In the Third District Court, James 
Dunn, of Tooele, charged with u.c, plead 
guilty and was sentenced by Judge Zane 
to one year's imprisonment and $300 fine ; 
Thomas F. H. Morton plead guilty to the 
same charge. After trial, James Eardley, 
also accused of u.c, was acquitted. Fred. 
A. Cooper, of West Jordan, who had 
served six months in the Penitentiary for 
u.c, promised to obey the Edmunds law 
in the future, and thus escaped going to 
prison a second time. 

Jf^ri. 24. — After a two days' trial in the 
Third District Court, Joseph H. Dean was 
convicted of u.c. Willard L. Snow, of 
Farmers Ward, plead guilty to the same 
charge. 

— James I. Steele, of Lake View, Tooele 
Co., was arrested for u.c, brought to 
Salt Lake City and placed under $1,000 
bonds. 

— The Utah Commission made their an- 
nual report of Utah affairs to the Secre- 
tary of the Interior. 

Saf. 25.— Hannah Tapsfleld King died in 
Salt Lake City, 

—In the Third District Court, Salt Lake 
City, Hyrum P. Folsom was sentenced by 
Judge Zane to six months' imprisonment 
and $300 fine for u. c In the case of C. 
M. Bergstrom, who promised to obey the 
law, sentence was suspended. The trial of 
Nathaniel V. Jones and Frark M. Tre- 
seder, charged with bribery, was com- 
menced. 

— In the Second District Court, at 
Beaver, Wm. Robinson, who plead guilty 
to u. c, was sentenced to four months' im- 
prisonment and $100 fine; Geo. Hales, 
Thomas Scofield and James Farrer were 
each sentenced to four months and $300 
fine; Richard H. Sudweeks to eight 
months and $600 fine. These brethren 
were imprisoned in the Penitentiary the 
following day. 

Ifon. 27.— la the Third District Court, 
Joseph H. Dean, of Salt Lake City, was 
sentenced by Judge Zane to six months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine, and Anders 
Hansen, of West Jordan, to eighteen 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine, for 
u. c 

— Ground was broken for the new Union 
Depot building at Ogden. 

Tues. 2,S— After trial in the First Dis- 
trict Court, at Provo, the jury i-eturned a 
verdict of guilty against Robert C. Kirk- 
wood, charged with u. c A motion for a 
new trial was made. The case against 
L. Loveridge was dismissed. 

—After a lengthy trial tne jury returned 
a verdict of guilty against Nathaniel V. 
Jones and Frank M. Treseder for bribery, 
contrary to the evidence given. 

Wed. 29.— After a trial in the Third Dis- 
trict Court, David W. Leaker, of the 11th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was adjudged 
guilty of u. c. W. H. Watson and Ezra 
T. Clark, of Farmington, plead not guilty 
to the same charge. 

— A.fter trial in the First District Court, 
at Provo, the jury returned a verdict of 



138 



CHURCH CHKOIfOLOGY — 1886 



guilty against Bishop James W. Loveless, 
for u. c. 

— Lorenzo D. Watson, of Parowan, and 
Levi Minnerly, of Wellsville, were dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

— Joseph M. Phelps, of Montpelier, 
Idaho, was accidentally shot and killed 
near Cokeville, Uintah Co., Wyo. 

Thurs. 30.— In the Third District Court, 
after trial, John Gillespie was sentenced 
by Judge Zane to six months' imprison- 
ment and $300 fine, and James Higgins and 
Carl Janson, both of West Jordan, to 
eighteen months' imprisonment and $400 
fine each. After trial, the jury also re- 
turned a verdict of guilty against Amos 
H.Nefif-allfor u. c. 

— The Home Fire Insurance Company 
was incorporated in Salt Lake City, with 
Heber J. Grant as president. 

— Elder August Wilcken died in Salt 
Lake City. 

October. — The "Manuscript Found," a 
romance written by Rev. Solomon Spauld- 
ing, and which gave rise to the ridiculous 
Spaulding Story in connection with the 
origin of the Book of Mormon, was pub- 
lished by the Deseret News Company, Salt 
Lake City. 

— Gov. Caleb W. West, in his report on 
Utah affairs to the Secretary of the Inte- 
rior, suggested quite drastic measures 
against the Mormons 

— Bishop Niels Hansen, of Providence, 
and Thomas W. Kirby, of Hyde Park, 
Cache Co., were arrested for u. c. and 
placed under bonds. 

— Charles O. Card and a company of ex- 
plorers, acting under instructions from 
Pres. John Taylor, visited British Col- 
umbia and Alberta, Canada, for the pur- 
pose of selecting a tract of land on which 
to locate a colony of Saints. 

Fri. l.—ln the Third District Court, 
after trial, the u. c. case against Thomas 
Lee, of Tooele County, was dismissed, 
there being no evidence against the de- 
fendant. A verdict of guilty was render- 
ed against Homer Duncan for u. c. John 
B. Farster.of Salt Lake City, and Thos. F. 
H. Morton, of Farmers Ward, were sen- 
tenced by Judge Zane to six months' im- 
I-"isonment and $300 fine each, and Willard 
L. Snow, of Farmers Ward, to eighteen 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine, all for 
u. c. They were taken to the Penitentiary. 

— Bishop Geo. D. Snell and Sylvester 
Bradford, of Spanish Fork, were arrested 
on charges of u. c. 

Sat. 2. — O. L. Brown succeeded G. N. 
Dow as warden of the Utah Penitentiary. 

— In the Third District Court, after a 
long trial, the jury returned a verdict of 
guilty against Orson P. Arnold for u. c. 

2fon. 4.— In the Third District Court, 
Rasmus Nielsen plead guilty to a charge 
of u. c. 

Tues. 5.— In the Third District Court, 
Wm. J. Hooper plead not guilty to a 
charge of u. c. 

Wed.6.— In the Third District Court, Da- 
vid W. Leaker was sentenced by Judge 
Zane to six months' imprisonment and $300 
fine for u. c. 

—Thos. B. Cardon was arrested at Lo- 
gan, Cache Co., on a charge of u. card 
placed under bonds. 



— The semi-annual conference of the 
Church was commenced in Coalville, Sum- 
mit Co., Apostle Franklin D. Richards 
presiding. It continued until the 8th. 

Thiers. 7.— John Q. Cannon was arrested 
near Salt Lake City, on a charge of poly- 
gamy, and placed under bonds. 

— Geo. C. Parkinson, having served his 
term of imprisonment in the Boise City 
Penitentiary, Idaho, was released from 
prison. 

Sat. ,9.— In the Third District Court, 
Isaac R. Pierce, of Salt Lake City, was 
sentenced to fifteen months' imprison- 
ment and $100 fine, the indictment against 
him being divided into five counts. 

— John P. Mortensen, of the 8th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested for u. c, and 
placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Mon. 11. — In the Third District Court, 
Amos H. Nefl was sentenced by Judge 
Zane to six months' imprisonment and $300 
fine, and taken to the Penitentiary. Sen- 
tence was suspended in the case of Homer 
Duncan. 

— James C. Watson, of Salt Lake City, 
who had served one term in the Peniten- 
tiary for living with his wives, was again 
arrested on a charge of u. c, but after a 
rigid examination before Com. McKay, he 
was acquitted. 

— The body of J. D. Farmer, who was 
drowned Aug. 6, 1882, was found on the 
shores of Great Salt Lake, eight miles 
west of Garfield, Tooele Co. 

Tues. 12.— John W. Hoffman, of the 21st 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, and, after spending the 
night in prison, brought before Com. Mc- 
Kay the following day and placed under 
$1,000 bonds. 

Wed. VJ.-In the Third District Court, 
suit was commenced against Horace S. 
Eldredge and Francis Armstrong for the 
payment of $20,000 bonds, forfeited in the 
case of Pres. Geo. Q. Cannon. 

— Chas. Franks, of Logan, Cache Co., 
was arrested on a charge of u. c, brought 
before Com. Goodwin, and placed under 
$1,000 bonds. 

— The steamship British King sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with a company of 
Saints, in charge of Joshua Greenwood. 
The company arrived at Philadelphia, Oct. 
27th, and at Salt Lake City, Nov. 1st. 

— Christopher J. Kempe, Peter J. Chris- 
toffersen and Ammon M. Tenney who had 
been wrongfully imprisoned at Detroit, 
Mich., since December, 1884, received the 
pardon of Pres. Cleveland and were set 
free. 

Thurs. 14.— In the Third District Court, 
James I. Steel, of Pine Canyon, Tooele Co., 
convicted of u con a two-count indict- 
ment, was sentenced by Judge Zane to 
one year's imprisonment in the Peniten- 
tiary and $600 fine. 

Fri. 1.5.— Bishop Wm. E. Bassett, of the 
20th Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested 
for u. c. and placed undei §1,500 bonds. 

— Prince Louis Napoleon, grand nephew 
of Napoleon Bonaparte, arrived in Salt 
Lake City on a visit from Ihe West. He 
left for the East the following day. 

Sat, 16.— \\. H. Haigh, of West Jordan, 
was arrested on a charge of u. c, brought 
before Com. McKay, in Salt Lake City, 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1886. 



139 



and placed under bonds. On the same day 
Geo. W. Thatcher and Wra. Palmer, of 
Logan, and John C. Gray were arrested 
for u. c, and put under bonds. 

Sun. 17. — The first Latter-day Saint Y. 
M. M. I. A. in Mexico was organized at 
•Juarez, Chihuahua; Joseph Cordon, pres- 
ident. 

— Hon. John R. Pettigrew, a member 
•of the Utah Commission, died at Waco, 
Texas. 

Mon. 18.— Bishop Wm. E. Bassett had 
■a,n examination before Com. McKay, after 
which he was placed under $15,000 bonds, 
being charged also with polygamy. 

Tjies. i9.— Stephen R. Marks was ar- 
rested in Salt Lake City, for u. c. 

Wed. 20.— Herman Grether, of the 10th 
Ward, iSalt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of a. c, and, after examination be- 
fore Com. McKay, placed under $3,000 
bonds. 

—Bishop Lewis H. Mousley, of Bluff 
Dale, Salt Lake Co., was arrested, for u. 
c, taken to Salt Lake City, and placed un- 
der $1,500 bonds, by Com. McKay. 

Thnrs. 21. — The motion for a n^w trial 
in the Third District Court being over- 
ruled, Orson P. Arnold was sentenced by 
Judge Zane to fifteen months' imprison- 
ment and $450 fine and sent to the Pen- 
itentiary. 

— After preliminary examination before 
•Com. McKay, Stephen R. Marks was put 
under $3,000 bonds. 

—Bishop James W. Loveless (sentenced 
in the First District Court, at Provo, to 
six months' imprisonment and $300 fine), 
and John Durrant and Hans Jensen (sen- 
tenced to six months' imprisonment and 
$100 fine, each) were taken to the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Fri. 22.— In the Third District Court, a 
writ of habeas corpus was applied for in 
the case of Apostle Lorenzo Snow, who 
was confined in the Penitentiary. The ap- 
plication was refused and the case taken 
before the U. S. Supreme Court. 

— Charles Haidy,of Provo, who had been 
convicted in the First District Court, at 
Provo, for resisting Deputy Marshal 
Redfield, was sentenced to im^jrisonment 
for one day in the Penitentiary. 

Sat. 23.— The new political party of 
Idaho, consisting mainly of "Mormon" 
citizens and known as the Independent 
Party, held a Territorial convention at 
Franklin, Oneida Co., where a platform 
and resolutions were adopted. 

— Enoch, Iron Co., was raided by U. S. 
•deputy marshals and John P. Jones ar- 
rested for u. e. John L. Jones, his eldest 
son, and an alleged plural wife were also 
arrested. 

Siin. 24.— Reuben C. Smith was discharg- 
ed from the Penitentiary. 

Mon. 25. — Elder John Nebeker, a pro- 
minent Elder, of Salt Lake City, died at 
Lake Town, Rich Co. 

Tues. 26. — Geo. B. Wallace, of Granger, 
Salt Lake Co., was arrested on a charge 
of u.c, taken before Com. McKay and 
placed under $1,000 bonds. 

—After a new trial in the First District 
Court, the jury returned a verdict of 
guilty against Robert C. Kirk wood, for 



— Pres. Cleveland appointed Abner B. 
Williams, of Arkansas, a member of the 
Utah Commission, in place of John R. 
Pettigrew, deceased. 

Wed. 27.— Marcus L. Shepherd, of Bea- 
ver, was discharged from the Penitentiary. 

—Thomas Butler, of the 14th Ward, Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of 
u.c. and placed under $1,000 bonds. 

— Five "Mormon" emigrants, who were 
sent back to England by the bigoted 
action of the emigrating commissioners 
at New York, arrived at Salt Lake City. 
Having arrived at Liverpool they were 
placed on another steamer bound for New 
York, and their religious belief not being 
suspected, they were landed in New York 
without further trouble. 

Thurs. 28. — Apostle John W. Taylor was 
indicted at Blackfoot, Idaho, on a charge 
of inciting to acts of lawlessness in a ser- 
mon delivered by him at Oxford, Oneida 
Co., Idaho, Aug. 1, 1886. 

Sat. 30.— In the Third District Court, 
John C. Gray, of Salt Lake City, who 
plead guilty to the charge of u.c, was 
sentenced by Judge Zane to six months' 
imprisonment and $50 fine, and taken to 
the Penitentiary. Herman Grether, John 
P. Mortensen, Geo. B. Wallace and Bishop 
Lewis H. Mousley plead not guilty to 
the same charge. 

— Elder John H. Evans, of the 15th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, died. 

— A small company of Saints sailed from 
Liverpool, England, bound for Utah. 

Sun. .3i.— Elder Wm. M. Palmer, by 
permission, held a meeting with and ad- 
ministered the Sacrament to the brethren 
incarcerated in the Detroit House of Cor- 
rection, Mich. 

November.— The Saints who had been 
encamped on the Casas Grandes river,near 
Ascencion, Chihuahua, moved to the new 
townsite (Diaz). 

J/ort. i.— Wad El Ward, a Jew, lectured 
in the Salt Lake Theatre. 

—Hon. Geo. T. Curtis addressed an able 
letter to Hon. L. Q. C, Lamar, Secretary 
of the Interior, on Utah affairs, polygamy 
and cohabitation. 

Tues. 2. — Geo. F. Gibbs, of the 20th 
Ward, Salt Lake Cit>' , was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, examined before Com. Mc- 
Kay and discharged for want of evidence. 

— At the general election in Utah, John 
T. Caine, the People's Party nominee, was 
re-elected delegate to Congress, receiving 
19,605 votes, while the Liberal candidate, 
William M. Ferry, only received 2,810 
votes. 

Wed. 5.— Wm. A. Morrow, an ex-Mor- 
mon, of Granger, Salt Lake Co., was ar- 
rested for u. c, and imprisoned in the Pen- 
itentiary for the night. The following 
day he was placed under $1,500 bonds by 
Com. McKay. 

—Timothy Parkinson, of Wellsville, 
Cache Co., was arrested at Piedmont, 
Wyo., charged with u. c, taken to Ogden 
and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

—Thomas Richardson, a member of the 
Mormon Battalion, died at Richmond, 
Cache Co. 

Thurs. 4.— Thomas Jenkins, of the 4th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 



140 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1886. 



charge of u. c, and placed under $1,500 
bonds, by Com. vIcKay. 

— The Historian's Office, Salt Lake City, 
was raided by U. S. deputy marshals, 
searching for Prests. Taylor and Cannon. 

— John Aird died in Salt Lake City. 

— Andrew J. Kershaw, who had been 
arrested in Evanstnn, Wyo., was placed 
under $3,000 bonds to answer to a charge of 
u. c. 

Fri. 5. — Centreville, Davis Co., was 
raided by U. S. deputy marshals, who ar- 
rested John Adams, on the charge of u. c, 
and took him to Salt Lake City. The next 
morning he was arraigned before Com. 
McKay, who put him under $1,000 bonds. 

Sat. II. — James Newton, of the 10th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, brought before Com. Mc- 
Kay and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— Lorenzo Stutz, of Mill Creek, Salt Lake 
Co., was arrested on a charge of u. c. 

Sun. 7. — Panguitch, Garfield Co., was 
raided by U. S. deputy marshals, who ar- 
rested a supposed plural wife and brought 

lion. 8.— Gideon M. Mumford, of Mill 
Creek, was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
brought before Com. McKay, in Salt Lake 
City, and placed under $1,.500 bonds. Lo- 
renzo Stutz, of Mill Creek, was placed un- 
der $1,.500 bonds. 

— U. S. deputy marshals made an unsuc- 
cessful raid on houses at Paragoonah, Iron 
Co. 

— Rasmus C. Rasmussen, of Mink Creek, 
Oneida Co., Idaho, who had served his term 
of imprisonment in the Boise Penitentiary, 
arrived home. 

Tues. 9. — Jos. H. Thurber, accused of 
polygamy, who had been confined in the 
Beaver jail, secured bonds and was liber- 
ated. 

— Wm. Fry, of the Morgan Stake presi- 
dency, was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
taken to Ogden, and placed under $1,500 
bonds. 

— Wm. D. Johnson was set apart to pre- 
side as Bishop at Diaz, Chihuahua, Mexico. 

Wed. 10. — Stanley Taylor, Andrew Jen- 
sen and George B. Bailey were discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

— George Crismon, of Sugar House 
Ward, and Andrew W. Cooley (imprisoned 
before), of Brighton, were arrested for 
u. c, taken before Com. McKay and each 
placed under $1,000 bonds. Crismon plead 
guilty, Cooley waived examination. 

Thurs. ii.— Edward Schoenfeld, of 
Brighton, was arrested in Salt Lake City, 
on a charge of u. c, brought before Com. 
McKay and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— Geo. C. Lambert and Henry W. Nais- 
bitt were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

—Matthew Pickett, of Tooele, Bishop 
Ishmael Phillips, of Union, and Thomas 
AUsop, of Sandy, were arrested, charged 
with u. c, brought to Salt Lake City and 
placed under bonds. 

Sat. 13.— In the Third District Court, 
Nathaniel V. Jones and Frank M. Tre 
seder were each sentenced by Judge Zane 
to three years' imprisonment, for alleged 
bribery, and taken to the Penitentiary, 
the motion for a new trial having been 
overruled. 



— After a lengthy trial iu the First Dis- 
trict Court, at Provo, the jury returned a 
verdict of guilty of voluntary man- 
slaughter, against H. H. Pearson, who 
killed Forest Green at Nephi, Jan 10, 1886. 

Tues. 16. — Patriarch Wm. G. Perkins 
died in St. George. 

Wed. 17. — John H.Rumel, sen., was ar- 
rested in Salt Lake City, on a charge of u. 
c, taken before Com. McKay and placed 
under $1,000 bonds. 

Thurs. 18. — The Saints residing at Eagle 
Rock, Idaho, were organized as the Eagle 
Rock Ward, of the Bannock Stake ; James 
Thomas, Bishop. 

— Joseph Hogan, of Bountiful, was ar- 
rested for u. c, taken before Com. McKay 
and placed under $1,000 bonds. 

—In the Third District Court, after trial, 
the jury returned a verdict of guilty 
against Henry H. Hawthorne, a "Gentile"' 
polygamist. 

— In the District Court, at Blackfoot, 
Idaho, Samuel R. Parkinson was sen- 
tenced to six months' imprisonment in the 
Boise Penitentiary and $300 fine for u. c. 

Sat. 20. — Bishop Appollos G. Driggs, of 
Sugar House Ward, was arrested on a 
charge of polygamy. He was brought to 
Salt Lake City and finally discharged, after 
an examination before Com. McKay. 

Mon. 22. — In the First District Court, in 
Ogden, Timothy Parkinson, who plead 
guilty to a charge of u. c, was sentenced 
to six months' imprisonment and $100 
fine. 

Tues. 23. — John W. Snell was liberated 
from the Penitentiary, having served two 
months and thirteen days more than his 
time. 

—Thomas Fenton, of the 6th Ward, Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of u. 
c, taken before Com. McKay and placed 
under $1,000 bonds. 

—In the Third District Court, H. H. 
Hiwthorne, the "Gentile" polygamist, 
was sentenced to four years' imprisonment 
and $100 fine, and taken to the Penitentiary. 

— Phillip Pugsley was arrested in Salt 
Lake City on a charge of u. c. After ex- 
amination before Com. McKay, he was 
discharged. 

Wed. 24.— George Dunford, of Salt Lake 
City, charged with u. c, gave himself up 
to the officers, plead guilty, and was sent- 
enced by Judge Zane to six months' im- 
prisonment and $150 fine. He was taken to 
the Penitentiary. 

— Anders W. Winberg, of the 19th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, taken before Com. McKay and 
placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— Pres. Angus M. Cannon was arrested 
near Salt Lake City, on a charge of u. c, 
taken before Com. McKay and placed un- 
der $10,000 bonds. 

— Jonathan Campbell, a member of the 
Mormon Battalion, died at North Ogden, 
Weber Co. 

Thurs. 25. — After a lengthy trial in the 
First District Court, at Oden, the jury re- 
turned a verdict of not guilty in the case 
of Lorin Farr, charged with u. c. 

— Christian P. Christiansen, of Monroe, 
Sevier Co., was arrested on a charge of u. 
c. Subsequently he was taken to Beaver 
and placed under bonds. 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1886. 



141 



Fri. 26.— In the Third District Court, 
Lorenzo Stutz, of Mill Creek, plead 
guilty to a charge of u. c. Thos. Jenkins 
promised to obey the law, and sentence 
in his case was suspended. 

-Wm. H. Tovey, of the 20th Ward, Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of u. 
c, brought before Com. McKay and placed 
under $1,000 bonds. Joseph Blunt, of the 
21st Ward, was arrested and placed under 
bonds, charged with the same offense. 

Sat. 2;.— In the Third District Court, 
Wm. A. Morrow, a non-Mormon, charged 
with u. c, promised to obey the law, and 
sentence was suspended. 

—In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
the jury returned a verdict of guilty 
against Wm. Geddes, of Plain City, for 
u, c. 

Sun. 28.— Wilford H. Halliday shot and 
killed Joseph Dobson, the seducer of the 
former's wife, at Kanab, Kane Co. 

Mon. 2.9.— Wm. J. Cox and Wm. G. Bick- 
ley, of Beaver, and Peter Wimmer, of 
Parowan, were discharged from the Pen- 
itentiary. 

—In the Third District Court, Lorenzo 
Stutz was sentenced by Judge Zane to one 
year's imprisonment, and $100 fine, for 
u. c. 

— In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
John Stoddard was sentenced by Judge 
Henderson to six months' imprisonment 
and $300 fine. Francis A. Brown, charged 
again with u. c, was acquitted. 

— Walter M. Craner, of Tooele, was ar- 
rested on a charge of u. c, taken to Salt 
Lake City, examined before Com. McKay 
and discharged. 

Tues. 30.— In the Third District Court, 
John H. Rumal, sen., promised to obey the 
law, and sentence was susoended. 

— In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
sentence was suspended in the case of 
Susan Parry, wife of Joseph Parry; she 
was charged with perjury. 

— George Naylor, of Kamas,was arrested 
on a charge of u. c. The following day he 
was brought to Salt Lake City. Charles 
Burgess, of Salt Lake City, was also ar- 
rested on the same charge and placed un- 
der $1,500 bonds. 

December. — The "Loyal League" of 
Utah was organized, its object being the 
destruction of "Mormonism." 

Wed. I. — George Nebeker, a prominent 
Elder, died in Salt Lake City. 

—Myron W. Butler, of Ogden, and Thos. 
H. Bullock, of Salt Creek, Weber Co., 
were imprisoned in the Penitentiary, for 
n.c. 

— Charles Denney and Amos Maycock 
were discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. 2. — Ludvig H. Berg and Jens 
Hansen were discharged from the Peni ■ 
tentiary. 

— Brigham H. Roberts, of the Salt Lake 
Herald editorial staff, was arrested on a 
charge of u.c. and placed under $1,000 
bonds. When called for examination the 
next day, the defendant did not appear, 
and his bonds were declared forfeited. 

Fri. 3. — In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Geo. Naylor plead guilty 
to a charge of u.c, and was sentenced by 
Judge Zane to six months' imprisonment 



and $.300 fine, and taken to the Peniten- 
tiary. 

— Philo Farnsworth, sen., of Pine Creek, 
Beaver Co., was arrested od the charge 
of u.c, taken to Beaver and placed under 
bonds. 

Jfon. 6. — Wm. Geddes, of Plain City, was 
imprisoned in the Penitentiary for u.c. 

Tues. 7. — Geo. Chandler, of Ogden, was 
imprisoned in the Penitentiary for u.c. 

— Wm. L. Binder, of the 15th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u.c, and placed under §1,000 bonds. Af- 
ter examination the next day bafore Com. 
McKay, he was discharged. 

— Chas. Harmon, jun., of the 16th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u.c, taken before Com. McKay, ex- 
amined and discharged. 

—Several houses at Lehi, Utah Co , were 
raided by U. S. deputy marshals, who ar- 
rested Bishop Thos. R. Cutler, Edwin 
Standring, James Kirkham, George Kirk- 
ham, Johu L. Gibb, Samuel James, John 
Hart and William Fates, for u.c. 

Wed. S. — Secretary Arthur L. Thomas 
was nominated a member of the Utah Com- 
mission by Pres, Cleveland. 

— The Lehi prisoners (except Wm. 
Yates, who was sick) were brought to 
Salt Lake City and placed under bonds, 
after examination before Com. McKay. 

Thurs. 9. — John England, of Tooele, was 
arrested for u. c, tafeen to Salt Lake City 
and placed under $1,500 bonds, after ex- 
amination before Com. McKay. 

Sat. 11. — Daniel Corbett, of the 2nd Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested for u.c, and 
placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Mon. 13. — Pres. Angus M. Cannon was 
arraigned in the Third District Court, 
where he was arrested again on three 
more charges, two for u. c and one tor 
polygamy. 

— John P. Sorensen, of Salt Lake City, 
was arrested, charged with polygamy, 
brought before Com. McKay and placed 
under bonds 

— In the First District Court (Judge 
Henderson), at Ogden, James May, of 
Calls' Fort, Box Elder Co. ; Fred. W. EUis, 
of Pleasant View, Weber Co. ; Thomas B. 
Helm and Henry B. Gwilliam, of South 
Hooper, were, each, sentenced to six 
months' imprisonment in the Penitentiary 
and $100 fine 

7 ues. 14.— In the Third District Court, 
Thomas AUsop, of Sandy, who plead guilty 
to a three count indictment for u. c, was 
sentenced by Judge Zane to fifteen months' 
imprisonment and $50 fine, and sent to the 
Penitentiary. 

Wed. 15. — After a lengthy examination 
before Com. McKay, all the charges 
against Pres. Angus M. Cannon were dis- 
missed, and he was discharged. 

Thurs. iff. — Edward M. Dalton was 
fouUy murdered by U. S. Deputy Marshal 
Wm. Thompson, jun., at Parowan, Iron 
Co. The murderer was arrested. 

— Matthew Pickett, of Tooele, was ar- 
raigned in the Third District Court, charg- 
ing him with u. c He plead not guilty. 

— Thomas Jeremy and Peter Gillespie, of 
the 16th Ward, Salt* Lake City were ar 
rested, charged with u.c. and placed under 
bonds. 



142 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1887. 



ii^W. i7.— Under the auspicies of the Old 
Folk's Committee, the "Old Folks," wid- 
ows and orphans, of Salt Lake County, 
were treated to a free entertainment in 
the Theatre, Salt Lake City, the Home 
Dramatic Club playing "Confusion." 

Hat. 18. — After examination before Com. 
McKay, the polygamy case against John P. 
S0rensen was dismissed for lack of evi- 
dence. 

Mon. 20. — After the usual examina- 
tion before Com. McKay, the u. c. case 
against Peter Gillespie, of Tooele, was 
dismissed, and the defendant discharged. 

Tues. 21.— In the Second District Court, 
at Beaver, the grand jury indicted the 
murderer, Wm. Thompson, jun., for man- 
slaughter. 

— tJishop Wm. E. Bassett, of the 20th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested and 
placed under $10,000 bonds, being indicted 
by the grand jury for polygamy. 

Fri. 24. — Elder John Horspool died at 
Ogden. 

Sun. 26. — Elder John Hindley died at 
American Fork, Utah Co. 

Mon. 21. — John P. Jones and John Lee 
Jones, of Enoch, Iron Co., and Joseph H. 
Thurber, of Greenwich, Piute Co., were 
imprisoned inthePenitentiary,the two for- 
mer for u. c, and the latter for polygamy 
and u. c, all having been sentenced by 
Judge Boreman in the Second District 
Court, at Beaver. 

—The 18th Ward (Salt Lake City) In- 
dependent School House was formally 
opened. 

Tues. 28.— In the First District Court, 
at Ogden, after trial, the jury returned a 
verdict of guilty against Abraham Chad- 
wick, of Ogden, and N. C. Mortensen, of 
Huntsville, for u. c. 

Wed. 2.9. — Helon H. Tracy, of Ogden, was 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

— Brigham Y. Hampton, having served 
his term of imprisonment for alleged con- 
spiracy, was released from the county 
jail. 

Thurs. 50.— Mary M. D. Nebeker, relict 
of Peter Nebeker, died at Willard City, 
Box Elder Co. 

— Peter Petersen, of Richville, Morgan 
Co., was imprisoned in the Penitentiary, 
having been sentenced by Judge Hender- 
son, in the First District Court at Ogden, 
to six months' imprisonment and $100 fine 
for u. c. 



1887. 

During this year nearly two hundred of 
the brethren were imprisoned in the Utah 
Penitentiary, besides a number in Idaho, 
for infractions of the provisions of the 
anti polygamy laws. The settlements of 
the Saints in Mexico and Canada were 
grratly strengthened by "Mormon" exiles 
from the United States. Under the pro- 
visions of the Edmunds- Tucker law the 
government, through its receiver, took 
possession of the Church offices, and a 
wholesale confiscation of Church pro- 



perty was threatened. President John 
Taylor died in exile, and the Council of 
Twelve Apostles was sustained as the 
Presidency of the Church. 

January. — The Saints who had settled 
at Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, moved to 
a new townsite which had been surveyed 
two miles west of the first location. The 
first townsite was found to be outside of 
the land purchased by the Saints. 

3fon. 3. — In the First District Court 
(Judge Henderson), at Ogden,Wm. Palmer, 
Hugh Adams and Thomas McNeill, of 
Logan, who had plead guilty to a two- 
count indictment, each; Peter Andersen, 
of Huntsville, who had plead guilty to a 
three count indictment; and Robert Hen- 
derson, of Logan, who had plead guilty to 
a one- count indictment, were each sen- 
tenced to six months' imprisonment in the 
Penitentiary and a fine of $100 for u. c. 
Harvey Murdock, of Huntsville, who three 
weeks previous plead guilty to an indict- 
ment charging him with polygamy, was 
sentenced to five years' imprisonment and 
$500 fine. 

— William Crackles, of Salt Lake City, 
was arrested on a charge of u. c, brought 
before Com. McKay and placed under $500 
bonds. 

— Soren C. Petersen, of Elsinore, Sevier 
Co., was arrested on a charge of u. c. 
He was subsequently taken to Beaver, and 
placed under bonds. 

— Mary Jenson, wife of Andrew Jenson, 
died in Salt Lake City. 

Tties. 4. — Levi North and Hyrum B. 
North, of Provo Valley, Wasatch Co., 
were arrested at Mill Creek, Salt Lake 
Co., charged with u. c, taken before Com. 
McKay, and each placed under $1,000 
bonds. 

Thurs. (>. — After a two days' trial in the 
First District Court, at Ogden, Bishop 
Wm. E. Bassett, of Salt Lake City, was 
adjudged guilty of polygamy and sen- 
tenced to five years' imprisonment and 
$.500 fine. An appeal was taken to the 
Territorial Supreme Court. 

Ft-i. 7. — After a two-days' trial, the 
anti-Mormon jury, in the First District 
Court (Beaver), gave a verdict of "not 
guilty" in the case of Wm. Thompson, 
jun., who murdered Edward M. Dalton at 
Farowan, Dec. 16, 1886. 

Sat. 8. — In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Thos. W. Kirby, of Hyde Park, 
Cache Co., who plead guilty to a three- 
count indictment charging u. c, was sen- 
tenced by Judge Henderson to six months' 
imprisonment and $100 fine. John Mar- 
riott, of Marriott, and Charles Franks, of 
Logan, received similar sentences. Niels 
C. Mortensen, of Huntsville, Abraham 
Chadwick and Joseph Parry, of Ogden, 
were sentenced to six motths' imprison- 
ment and $300 fine, each. The prisoners 
were all taken to the Penitentiary the 
same evening. 

Mon. 10.— V. S. Deputy Marshal Wm. 
Hopson and posse raided Poole Island, 
Idaho, and arrested Charles Shipping, on a 
charge of u. c. 

Wed. 12.— The Edmunds-Tucker bill was 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1887. 



143 



passed by the U. S. House of Representa- 
tives. 

Ihurs. 13. — A bill repealing the anti- 
Mormon test oath in Arizona was passed 
by the Council branch of the Arizona 
legislature. The House passed it the fol- 
lowing day, and the governor signed it on 
the 15th. 

— The Edmunds- Tucker bill was referred 
to a conference committee by the U. S. 
Senate. 

— Wm. Yates, of Lehi, Utah Co., who was 
arrested about a month previous for u. c, 
appeared before Com. McKay, in Salt Lake 
City, and was placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Fri. i4.— Ex Gov. Eli H. Murray was ad- 
mitted to the bar of the Territorial Su- 
preme Court, as an attorney, while Lieut. 
Richard W. Young, a prominent lawyer of 
extensive practice in the East, was refused 
admittance because he was a "Mormon." 

— Hong Hop, a Chinese merchant, mar- 
ried Nellie Adlard, a white woman, in Salt 
Lake City. This peculiar matrimonial in- 
cident was said to be the first of its kind in 
Utah. 

Tues. 18. — Hans J. Petersen, of Kanes- 
ville, Weber Co., was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, taken to Ogden and placed under 
bonds. 

Wed. 19. — Elder Wm. Ringwood, over 
ninety years old, died in the 20th Ward, 
Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 20.^The Lorenzo Snow habeas 
corpus case was argued before the Su- 
preme Court of the United States, where 
Hon. Franklin S. Richards, of Utah, made 
an able argument against the segregation 
policy instituted by the Utah courts. 

Sat. 22.— Elder Wm. A. McMaster died 
in the 11th Ward, Salt Lake City. 

—George Saville, of the 18th Ward, Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of u. 
c, taken before Com. McKay and placed 
under $1,500 bonds. 

Sun. 2,3.— A. P. Anderson, of Chester- 
field, Idaho, was arrested on a charge of u. 
c, brought to Blackfoot and placed under 
*2,000 bonds. 

Mon. 24. — Houses at Farmington, Davis 
Co., and Brigham City, Box Elder Co., 
were raided by deputy marshals. 

—Peter Madsen, of Willard, Box Elder 
Co., was arrested for u. c. and placed un- 
der $1,500 bonds. 

Tues. 25. — Richard CoUett and Edwin 
Rawlins, of the 19th Ward, Salt Lake 
City, and Eric Hogan, of Bountiful, Davis 
Co., were arrested on a charge of u. c, 
brought before Com. McKay and placed 
under $1,500 bonds, each. After a pre- 
liminary examination in the evening, 
Hogan was discharged. 

Wed. 26.- John D. Lang, of the 15th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested for u. 
c. After a preliminary examination be- 
fore Com. McKay, he' was found "inno- 
cent" and consequently discharged. 

— Andrew J. Kershaw was arrested by 
deputy marshals at Randolph, Rich Co., 
for u. c. 

Thurs. 27.— Elder Nathaniel H. Felt, of 
the 17th Ward, Salt Lake City, died. 

— T. B. Lewis, of Ogden, was arrested, 
accused of u. c, and placed under $1,500 
bonds. 

Fri. 28. — Houses at Deseret, Millard Co. 



were raided by deputy marshals, in search 
of polygamists. 

— R. G. Slater and Alexander Edwards, 
of Salt Lake City, were arrested, charged 
with u. c, brought before Com. McKay 
and placed under $1,500 bonds, each. 

—Jens P. C. Winter and John Petersen, 
of Huntsville, Weber Co., were arrested 
on a charge of u. c, brought to Ogden and 
placed under bonds. 

Sat. 2,9.— Thomas Drunker, of the 11th 
Ward, Salt Lake, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, arraigned • before Com. 
McKay and discharged. 

Jfon. .3/.— Charles Edler, of Tooele, was 
arrested on a charge of u. c, brought to 
Salt Lake City, arraigned before Com. 
McKay and finally discharged for lack 
of evidence. 

—Houses at Kanosh, Millard Co., were 
raided by deputy marshals, who arrested 
Bishop Abram A. Kimball on a charge 
of u. c. 

February. — Apostle George Teasdale 
succeeded Daniel H. Wells in the presi- 
dency of the European mission. 

Tues. 1. — Allen Hunsaker was arrested 
for u. c, and shot at by deputy marshals, 
at his ranche on the Malad river. Box Elder 
Co. James Woods, of Tooele, was arrest- 
ed on the same charge, brought to Salt 
Lake City, with part of his family, and 
placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— George E. Steele, a member of the 
Mormon Battalion, died at Lehi, Maricopa 
Co., Ariz. 

Th tirs, .3.— Mrs. Sarah Rawlins Grow, a 
witness in an u. c. case against Henry 
Grow, was arrested in Salt Lake City, and 
placed under §750 bonds. 

— Wm. Poole, an old gentleman, of Ogden 
was arrested on a charge of u. c, and 
placed under bonds. 

Fri. J.— Elder John E. Metcalf, sen., 
died at Fayette, Sanpete Co. 

Sat. 5.— Mary Bishop, of the 10th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, died of old age, being in 
her 101st year. Stie was born in Crew- 
kerne, Somersetshire, England, Sept. 24, 
1786. 

Jfon. 7. — Bishop James C. Hamilton, of 
Mill Creek, was arrested on a charge of 
u.c, brought to Salt Lake City, and placed 
under $1,500 bonds. After a preliminary 
examination before Com. McKay, the fol- 
lowing day, he was discharged. 

— The U. S. Supreme Court reversed the 
decision of the Utah courts in Apostle 
Lorenzo Snow's habeas corpus case, and 
declared the "segregation policy" illegal. 

Tues. 8. — Apostle Lorenzo Snow and 
Nicholas H. Groesbeck, agreeable to 
the decision of the U. S. Supreme Court, 
were released from the Penitentiary. 
They had served considerably longer than 
their term, awaiting the decision of the 
court. 

— Bishop Harrison Sperry, of the 4th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested for 
u.c, taken before Com. McKay and placed 
under $1,500 bonds. 

— Josiah Richardson was arrested near 
Malad City, Oneida Co., Idaho, for u.c. 

Wed. ,9. — As a further result of the U. S. 
Supreme Court decision, Wm. H. Pidcock, 
Ambrose Greenwell, Wm. M. Bromley, 
and Isaac R. Pierce were released from 
the Penitentiary. 



u-t 



CHURCH CHEONOLOaY — 1887. 



Thurs. 10.— Royal B. Young, having 
served one term of imprisonment, was re- 
leased from the Penitentiary, in accord- 
ance with the Supreme Court decision. 

Fri. ii.— Marshal Frank H. Dyer, as- 
sisted by Deputies John W. Greenman, 
Oscar C. Vandercook, Arthur Pratt, Bow- 
man Cannon, Samuel L. Sprague, John 
G. Gleason, C. H. M. y Agramonte and 
W. B. Parker, Detectives E. A. Franks, 
Sam. H. Gilson and many others made a 
raid on the Church buildings (Tithing Of- 
fice, Historian's Office and Gardo House), 
searching for Prests. John Taylor and 
Geo. Q. Cannon and others; none of them 
were found. 

— James Hansen, of Brigham City, Box 
Elder Co., was shot at by Deputy Marshal 
Whetstone, who tried to arrest him, but he 
escaped into the hills. 

—David B. Ward, an aged man of Beaver 
Co., was arrested for u. c. 

Man. :/J.— Notwithstanding the strenu- 
ous efforts of the "Liberals," the "Peo- 
ple's Party" gained a handsome majority 
at the municipal election at Ogden. 

—In the Third District Court, Salt Lake 
City, Bishop Ishmael Phillips, of Union, 
and Henry Reiser, of Salt Lake City, were 
each sentenced by Judge Zane to six 
months' imprisonment and 1300 fine, for u. 
c. The cases against Wm. H. Haigh, of 
West Jordan, and John Tate, of Tooele, 
were continued for the term. Wm. J. 
Hooper plead guilty by saying, "If it is a 
crime to support my family, I am guilty 
of u. c." Joseph Blunt also plead guilty. 

Tues. 15.— In the Third District Court, 
Isaac Brockbank, of Salt Lake City, was 
sentenced to six months' imprisonment 
and 8300 fine, for u. c. 

Wed. 18.— In the Third District Court, 
Wm. H. Foster and Bedson Eardley, of 
Salt Lake City, and Wm. H. Watson, of 
Farmington, plead guilty to u. c. 

Thurs. 17.— \.n the Third District Court, 
the case against John Cartwright for u. c. 
was dismissed. The jury returned ver- 
dicts of guilty against Henry Grow and 
Ezra T. Clark, for u. c. 

— In search of Presidents John Taylor 
and Geo. Q. Cannon the Gardo House and 
Pres. Taylor's residences, in the 14th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, were raided by 
Marshal Dyer and his assistants. 

— The report of the Conference Commit- 
tee on the Edmunds-Tucker bill was 
adopted by the U. S. House of Represen- 
tatives, by 202 votes against 39. On the 
18th it was adopted, also, in the Senate by 
37 votes against 13. The act became law 
without the signature of President Cleve- 
land. 

Fri. 18.— In the Third District Court, 
James Wood, of Tooele, plead not guilty; 
Herman Grether.of Salt Lake City, Bishop 
Lewis H. Mousley, of Blutf Dale, and An- 
drew W. Cooley, of Brighton, plead not 
guilty to the charge of u. c. After trial for 
u. c, Geo. B. Wallace, of Granger, was ac- 
quitted. The grand jury ignored the cases 
against Alonzo H. Raleigh, Thos. Jeremy 
and Daniel Corbett, who were charged 
with u. c. 

Sat. 19. — By Judge Zane in the Third 
District Court, Bishop Lewis H. Mousley, 
of Bluff Dale, Rasmus Nielsen, of Hunter, 



John P. Mortensen, of Salt Lake City. 
Bishop Apollos G. Driggs, of the Sugar 
House Ward, and Henry Whittaker, of 
Salt Lake City, were each sentenced to 
six months' imprisonment and 300 fine, for 
u. c. and sent to the Penitentiary. 
The jury returned a verdict of guilty 
against John Adams, of Centreville, Davis 
Co., for u. c. 

—Thos. H. Morrison, of the 17th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested for u. c, 
taken before Com. McKay, and placed un- 
der U,5()0 bonds. 

Sun. 20. — At a special meeting held at 
Draper, Salt Lake Co., the Seventies re- 
siding in Sandy, Union and Granite were 
organized, by Abraham H. Cannon, as the 
93rd quorum of Seventy; Thos. Hewlett, 
Thos. H. Smart, Wm. Thompson and Wm. 
R. Scott, presidents. 

Mon. 21.— In the Third District Court, 
Judge Zane sentenced to six months' im- 
prisonment and $300 fine each: Wm. H. 
Foster and Bedson Eardley, of the 7th 
Ward, Salt Lake City; Wm. H. Watson, 
Ezra T. Clark, and Peter S. Barkdull, of 
Farmington, Davis Co. ; Herman Grether, 
of the 10th Ward, Salt Lake City ; John 
Adams, of Centreville, Davis Co. ; Joseph 
Hogan, of Bountiful, Davis Co., (who plead 
guilty the same day) ; and Jos. Blunt, of 
the 21st Ward, Salt Lake City. They were 
taken to the Penitentiary. Wm. H. 
Tovey, of the 20th Ward, Salt Lake 
City, was found guilty of u. c^ 

— Wm. Y. Jeffs was discharged from the 
Penitentiary, 

Tues. 22. — Houses at Kaysville, Davis Co., 
were raided by U. S. deputy marshals, who 
arrested John R. Barnes and Wm. Blood. 
The prisoners were taken to Salt Lake 
City, brought before Com. McKay, and 
placed under $1,.500 bonds, each. 
• Wed. 23.— In tlie Third District Court 
(Judge Zanej.Wm. J. Hooper, of Salt 
Lake City, Matthew Pickett, of Tooele, 
and Levi North, of Mill Creek, Salt Lake 
Co., were each sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine for u. c, and 
taken to the Penitentiary. After trial, 
the jury returned a verdict of guilty 
against Anders W. Winberg and Thomas 
Butler, of Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 2i. — Joseph Booth, of the 1st 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of U.C., brought before Com. Mc- 
Kay, and discharged after examination. 

— In the Third District Court, Hyrum 
B. North, of Midway, Wasatch Co., was 
sentenced by Judge Zane to six months' 
imprisonment and §300 fine, and sent to 
the Penitentiary. 

— The murderer, Wm. Thompson, jun., 
who, after his acquittal at the Beaver 
trial, again had been appointed a U. S. 
deputy marshal, commenced suit against 
the Deseret News Company for damages 
($25,000), because of certain articles re- 
flecting upon his character, published in 
that paper. 

—Geo. Taylor and G. H. Peterson, of 
Almy, Uinta Co., Wyo., were arrested for 
U.C., and, after a preliminary examination 
before Judge Corn, of Evanston, admitted 
to bail in the sum of §300 each. These 
were the first cases under the Edmunds 
law in Wyoming. 



CHURCH CHEONOLOGY 1887. 



145 



Fri. 25.— The Tithing Olfice and several 
residences in the 17th Ward, Salt Lake 
City, were raided by deputy marshals, 
searching for polygamists. 

— James C. Watson and H. H. Evans, of 
the 6th Ward, and Edwin Rushton, of the 
5th Ward, Salt Lake City, were arrested 
for U.C., taken before Com. McKay and 
placed under bonds. 

Sat. 26. — The Supreme Court of Utah 
sustained the decision of the District 
Court against Bishop Wm. E. Bassett. 

fitin. 27. — Sophia Whittaker Taylor, wife 
ofPres. John Taylor, died ia Salt Lake 
City. 

Mon. 28.— In the Third District Court, 
Anders W. Winberg, Thomas Butler and 
Harrison Sperry, all of Salt Lake City, 
were sentenced by Judge Zane to six 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine each, 
for u. c. AH three were taken to the 
Penitentiai'y. 

March, ^ues. l.—In the Third District 
Court, Edward Schoenfeld, Wm. H. Tovey 
and Thos. H. Morrison, of Salt Lake City, 
and Andrew W. Cooley, of Brighton Ward, 
were each sentenced by Judge Zane to six 
months" imprisonment in the Penitentiary, 
and fines, for u. c. 

— Houses at Bountiful,- Davis Co., were 
raided by U. S. deputy marshals, who sub- 
poenaed a number of witnesses. In search 
of Pres. Taylor, the Deseret Paper Mill, at 
the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon, was 
raided. 

Wed. 2. — William Douglas, of Smith- 
field, Cache Co., was arrested at Logan, 
for u. c, and placed under §1,500 bonds. 

Thurs. 3. — N. P. Peterson, of Logan, 
was arrested for u. c. and placed under 
bonds. 

J'H. 4. — Peter Olsen was arrested for 
u. c, and, not being able to raise 1500 se- 
curity, was sent to the Penitentiary. 

Sun. f>. — The first marriage under the 
provisions of the Edmunds-Tucker law 
was celebrated in Salt Lake City, Wm. T. 
Pike, of Mill Creek, and Miss Hannah 
Christine Wallen, of Salt Lake City, be- 
ing united in matrimony by Chief Justice 
Charles S. Zane. 

Mon. 7. — In the Third District Court, 
George Crismon, of Sugar House Ward, 
was sentenced to six months' imprison- 
ment and §50 fine, for u. c. The new test 
oath was administered to the petit jurors 
serving in the Third District Court. 
Several "Mormons" refused to take the 
oath and were excused from serving. 

— Carl Janson was discharged from the 
Penitentiary. 

— David John and Robert C. Kirkwood, 
of Provo, and William R. Webb, of Ameri- 
can Fork, each sentenced in the First Dis- 
trict Court, at Provo, to six months' im- 
prisonment and a fine of $300, and Edward 
Peay, of Provo, Christian P. Christiansen, 
of Monroe, and S0ren C. Petersen, of El- 
sinore, each sentenced to six months' im- 
prisonment, were incarcerated in the 
Penitentiary. 

—The first election in Utah under the 
new Edmunds Tucker law was held in 
Brigham City, Box Elder Co. Much to the 
disappointment of the anti-Mormons, the 
brethren subscribed to the test oath, 
polled their votes and carried the election. 
11 



— Jens Hansen, of Brigham City, was ar- 
rested at Three Mile Creek, Box Elder Co., 
on a charge of u. c, brought to Ogden and 
placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Tttes. S.— After trial in the Third District 
Court, John England, of Tooele, was con- 
victed of u. c. 

—Peter Olsen, having raised the $.500 
bonds required of him, was released from 
the Penitentiary. 

— P. A. Nielsen, of Logan, was arrested 
on a charge of u. c. and placed under .$1,000 
bonds. 

Tied. 9.— Frederik Petersen, of the 2nd 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, brought before Com. Mc- 
Kay, and placed under $1,000 bonds. 

Thurs. 10. — Samuel Anderson, of Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of u. 
c, brought before Com. McKay, and 
placed under $1,000 bonds. 

— After examination before Com. Mc- 
Kay, at Salt Lake City, Cyrus Rawson, of 
Kaysville, Davis Co., who had been ar- 
rested on a charge of u. c, was acquitted. 

Fri. ii.— Bountiful, Davis Co., was again 
raided by U. S. deputy marshals, but no 
polygamists were found. 

Sat. 12.— At the Davis Stake quarterly 
conference, held at Bountiful. U. S. ceputy 
marshals put in their appearance, searched 
the meeting house, but found nobody they 
wanted. 

— Daniel Johnson, of Logan, was arrest- 
ed for u. c. and placed under $1,000 bonds. 

Mon. 14.— In the Third District Court, 
Herman F. F. Thorup was sentenced by 
Judge Zane to six months' imprisonment 
and §25 fine, for u. c. 

— Solomon A. Wixom, of Granite, Salt 
Lake Co., was arrested on a charge of u, 
c, imprisoned in the Penitentiary for the 
night and the next day brought before 
Com. McKay. Wixom plead guilty and was 
placed under $1,000 bonds. 

—Ralph Smith, of Logan, Cache Co., was 
arrested for u. c, and placed under §2,500 
bonds. 

Tues. 15. — John Connelly, who had pre- 
viously served a term in the Penitentiary 
for u. c, was again arrested on the same 
charge, and placed under $1,500 bonds, 
after a preliminary examination before 
Com. McKay. 

— Wm. C. Browe, postmaster of Salt 
Lake City, died. 

— Joseph H. Evans, who had been par- 
doned by Pres. Cleveland, was released 
from the Penitentiary. He had been im- 
prisoned there since Nov. 8, 1884. 

Thurs. i7.— Archibald N. Hill, of the 19th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, but slipped away from the 
ofiicers. 

Sat. 19.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Henry Grow, of Salt Lake 
City, was sentenced to five months' im- 
prisonment and $50 fine by Judge Zane, 
for u. c. 

— Andrew Jacobson, John J. Williams, 
Christopher Gardner, Niels J. Jergensen, 
Rasmus Nielsen, Thos. H. Wilde, Hans 
Rasmussen, Niels Graham, John JoUey 
and Wm. Handy were released from their 
imprisonment at Detroit, Mich., and 
started for home. They were liberated, 
five days before their sentence expired. 



146 



CHUECH CHEONOLOGY — 1887. 



through the decision of the U. S. Supreme 
Court. 

Sun. 20.— At a meeting held at South 
Jordan, the Seventies residing in River- 
ton, Bluff Dale and Herriman were 
separated from the 33rd quorum of Seven- 
ty, and organized by Abraham H. Cannon 
as the 94th quorum; Wm. H. Freeman, 
Geo. Miller, Timothy Gilbert, John M. 
BovFen, Alexander B.'Kidd and Charles M. 
Nokes, presidents. On the same occasion 
the 95th quorum was organized with Edwin 
D. Holt, James Oliver, Isaac J. Wardle, 
Albert Holt, Andrew Amundsen, Henry B. 
Beckstead and Alexander Bills as presi- 
dents. The members of this quorum 
resided in South Jordan Ward. 

— James W. Loveless. Hans Jensen, Or- 
son P. Arnold and John Durrant were dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

Mon. 21.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, John England, of Tooele, 
was sentenced by Judge Zane to six 
months' imprisonment and $1.50 fine, for 
u. c. 

— Richard Warburton was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

— Ebenezer Woodford, of the 12th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
o( adultery with his plural wife. He was 
finally placed under bonds for u. c. 

— Wm. Harrison and Albert Singleton, 
of Provo, Geo. Kirkham and James Kirk- 
ham, of Lehi, R. M. Rogers, of Pleasant 
Grove, Wm. Unthank, of Cedar City, and 
Wm. Dally and James Dally, of Summit, 
Iron Co., were incarcerated in the Pen- 
itentiary, the five first having been sen- 
tenced in the First District Court ^Judge 
Henderson^ , at, Provo, and the three last 
in the Second District Court (Judge Bore- 
man), at Beaver, to six months' imprison- 
ment each and various fines, for u. c. 

— The Mancos branch, Montezuma Co., 
Colo., was organized as a Ward; Geo. 
Halls, Bishop. 

Tues. ^?.— Jonas E. Lindberg was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

Wed. 23. — James Dunn was released 
from the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. 2-l.—3ohr\ Bergen was discharged 
from the Penitentiary, but was placed 
under f8,000 bonds, to await the result of 
the polygamy charge pending against 
him. 

Sat. 26. — Geo. Hales, James Farrer,Wm. 
Robinson, Thos. Schofield and Richard H. 
Sudweeks were discharged from the Pen- 
itentiary. 

— Wm. S. Muir, of Bountiful, Davis Co., 
and Lars Hansen, of Logan, Cache Co., 
were arrested on the charge of u. c, and 
placed under bonds. 

Sttn. 27.— The two Wards formerly ex- 
isting in Panguitch, Garfield Co., were 
united ; Allen Miller, Bishop. 

— Paragoonah. Iron Co., was raided by 
U. S. deputy marshals. who arrested Bishop 
Wm. Jones on a charge of u. c. 

Jfon. 28.— Joseph H. Dean, of Salt Lake 
City, and Andrew Hanson, of West Jor- 
dan, were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

— In the First District Court, at Provo, 
the jury returned a verdict of guilty 
against six of the men who lynched Joseph 
Fisher at Tintic, Juab Co., July 7, 1886. 



—The Latter day Saint meeting house 
at Hoytsville, Summit Co., was burned. 

Tues. 29. — John C. Gray was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

—Kingston Ward, Piute Co., was dis- 
organized, and two new Wards were orga- 
nized in its place, namely, Circleville Ward, 
with James £. Peterson as Bishop, and 
Junction Ward, with Rufus C. Allen as 
Bishop. 

Thurs. 31. — John Gillespie, of Tooele, 
was released from the Penitentiary. 

April. J^ri. 1. — Herriman, Salt Lake 
Co., was raided by U. S. deputy marshals; 
nearly every house in the village was 
searched, but no arrests were made. 

Sat. 2.— Elder John A. Halverson, of the 
4th Ward, Salt Lake City, died. 

— South Jordan, Salt Lake Co., was 
raided by U. S. deputy marshals, who ar- 
rested Alexander Bills and Henry Beck- 
stead for u. c. 

Jfon. -l.— 0\e Hansen, of Logan, was ar- 
rested for u. c. and placed under $1,.500 
bonds. 

Tues. 5. — Karl G. Maeser, of Provo, was 
arrested on a charge of u. c. Lars Niel- 
sen and John Felt, of Huntsville, Weber 
Co., were arrested on the same charge, 
taken to Ogden and placed under bonds. 

Wed. 6'.- Knud Emmertsen, of Hunts- 
ville, was arrested for u. c. 

—David W. Leaker was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

— Spring ville, Utah Co., was raided by 
U. S. deputy marshals, who arrested 
Jacob Houtz and Jesse Gardner for u. c. 

— The 57th annual conference of the 
Church was commenced in the new Taber- 
nacle, at Provo, Utah Co., Lorenzo Snow, 
presiding. It was continued until the 
10th. 

Sun. 10.— Elder Daniel Carter died at 
Bountiful, Davis Co. 

Tues. 12. — Edwin Booth, the renowned 
actor, appeared in the Salt Lake Theater, 
for the first time. 

—In the First District Court, at Provo, 
Don Carlos Snow and J. T. Arrowsmith, 
of Provo, John L. Gibb, of Lehi, and San- 
ford Fuller, of Springville, were sentenced 
by Judge Henderson to six months' im- 
prisonment and a fine of ?100 each ; Edwin 
Standring, of Lehi, and Geo. D. Snell, of 
Spanish Fork, to six months' imprisonment 
and $200 fine each, and Edwin Lucius 
Whiting, of Springville, to six months' 
imprisonment and $.50 fine — all for u. c. 

Wed. 13.— Amos H. Neff was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

— Samuel Ridout, of Hooper, was ar- 
rested on a charge of u. c. 

— Ira Judd, of Panguitch, arrived at 
Beaver, in charge of a U. S. deputy mar- 
shal, having been arrested on a charge of 
u. c. 

Thurs. 14.— James I. Steel was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

F7-i. 15.— Jens P. Holm, oi Salt Lake 
City, was arrested on a charge ofu. c, 
but, after a preliminary hearing before 
Com. McKay, was acquitted. 

— Thos. Harding, of Provo, was arrested 
on a charge of u. c. 

— Wm. H. Dickson, prosecuting attorney 
for Utah, resigned his office, by request of 
the Attorney General, and his successor 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1887. 



147 



Geo. S. Peters, of Ohio, was appointed the 
day following. 

tSat. 16. — John Needham, of the 11th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. After a hearing before 
Com. McKay, he was acquitted. 

— Geo. H. Peterson was tried at Evans- 
ton, Wyo., on a charge of u. c, and dis- 
charged. 

— The steamship Nevada sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 194 Saints, in- 
cluding 13 returning missionaries, in 
charge of Daniel Porter Callister. The 
company arrived at New York April 29th 
and at Salt Lake City May 4th. 

Stin. 17.— Alex. Perry, of Willard, Box 
Elder Co., was arrested on a charge of 
u. c, and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Mon. IS.— The Zion's Board of Trade 
buildings, at Logan, Cache Co., were de- 
stroyed by fire. 

Tues. i9.— Bishop Samuel Carter, of Por- 
terville, Morgan Co., was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, taken to Ogden and placed 
under f 1,500 bonds. 

— U. S. deputy marshals made an unsuc- 
cessful raid at Salem, Utah Co., in search 
of polygamists. 

Wed. 20. — Peter Jacob Lammers, of 
Ogden, was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
and placed under |l,500 bonds. 

— The first Latter-day Saint settlers ar- 
rived at Corralles Basin, Chihuahua, Mex- 
ico, where Colonia Pacheco subsequently 
was founded. 

Fri. 22. — Timothy Parkinson was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

— John T. Gerber, of Granger, was ar- 
rested by U. S. deputy marshals, on a 
charge of of u. c, but ran away from the 
officers. He, however, gave himself up 
the following day. 

Sat. 23. — Amos Howe, of Salt Lake City, 
was arrested on a charge of u. c, and 
placed under $1,500 bonds. He was sub- 
sequently acquitted. 

—Charles Richers and John Harris, of 
Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., were arrested 
on a charge of u. c. 

— Geo. Dunford was discharged from the 
Penitentiary. 

Wed. 27.— H. C. Hansen, of Plain City, 
Weber Co., was arrested for u. c, taken 
to Ogden and placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— Charles O. Card and three companions 
selected a place for a settlement on Lee's 
creek, Alberta, Canada — the present 
Cardston — where other "Mormon" settlers 
from Cache County, Utah, arrived a few 
days later. Plowing was commenced 
May 3rd. 

Thurs. 28.— In the Third District Court, 
Solomon A. Wixom, of Butler Precinct, 
Salt Lake Co., was sentenced by Judge 
Zane to six months' imprisonment and 
1300 tine,for u.c. 

— Joseph Parry was arrested at Brigh- 
ton, Salt Lake Co., on a charge of u. c, 
imprisoned in the Penitentiary for the 
night and the following day put under 
$1,000 bonds. 

Fri. 2S.— Queen Kapiolani, of the Sand- 
wich Islands, and company, passed through 
Salt Lake City, going east over the D.& R. 
G. Ry. 

— Charles McCarthy, of American Fork, 
Utah Co., was arrested on a charge of u.c. 



Sat. 30.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Richard CoUett and Alex- 
ander Edward, of Salt Lake City, were 
each sentenced by Judge Zane to six 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine for 
u.c. and taken to the Penitentiary. 

— In the First District Court, Provo, 
Geo. T. Peay, of Provo, was sentenced by 
Judge Henderson to six months' imprison- 
ment and $100 fine, for u.c. 

—Harvey H. Cluff, of Provo, was ar- 
rested on a charge of u. c. and placed 
under $1,500 bonds. Rodney C. Badger, 
of Salt Lake City, and George Harmon, of 
Taylorsville, Salt Lake Co., were arrested 
on a similar charge. 

— Prince Leopold, of Prussia, visited 
Salt Lake City. 

May. Sun. 1. — The Seventies residing 
in Midway, Charleston and Wallsburg, 
Wasatch Co., were separated from the 20th 
quorum of Seventy and organized by 
Abraham H. Cannon as the 96th quorum. 
Elijah Alder, Emanuel Richman, Robert 
Cook, George Wilson, James Price, Ulrich 
Probst and John Morton, presidents. 

Mon. 2. — George Naylor was released 
from the Penitentiary. 

—Miles Williams, of North Point, Salt 
Lake Co., was arrested for u. c, and the 
following day placed under $1,500 bonds. 

— In the District Court, at Blackfoot, 
Idaho, the trumped up charge of treason 
against Apostle John W. Taylor was 
dismissed. 

Tues. 3. — Hans Madsen, of Salt Lake 
City, was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
and placed under $2,.500 bonds. 

— Thomas Colburn, a Church veteran, of 
Peterson, Morgan Co., died in Salt Lake 
City. 

Wed. 4. —Andrew Hammer, of Union, 
Salt Lake Co., was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, and after a hearing before Com. 
McKay, discharged. 

— Andrew Homer, of Mill Creek, was 
arrested on a charge of u. c, and placed 
under bonds. 

Thurs. 5. — William Geddes, of Weber 
County, was released from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

— George S. Peters, the newly appointed 
District- Attorney for Utah, arrived in 
Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 7. — James Bishop, of the 16th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, and placed under $1,000 bonds. 

Mon. 9.— The Saints in Ashley Valley, 
Uintah Co., were organized by Apostles 
John Henry Smith and John W. Taylor, as 
the Uintah Stake of Zion; Samuel R. 
Bennion, president; and Reuben S. Collett 
and James Hacking, counselors. At the 
time of the organization, the Stake con- 
sisted of six Wards, namely, Ashley, 
(Vernal), Merrill's, Mill, Glines, Riverdale 
(Jensen), and Mountain Dell, with the 
following named Bishops: Geo. Free- 
stone, Thos. J. Caldwell, Wm. Shaffer, 
Peter Abplanalp, Nathan Hunting and 
Silas Jerome Merrill. 

— In the Third District Court, Judge 
Henry P. Henderson refused to grant 
papers of citizenship to several persons 
because of their belief in polygamy. 

Tues. iO.— Elder Miner G. Atwood died 
in Salt Lake City. 



148 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1887 



Wed. 1/.— Monroe, Sevier Co., was raided 
by U. S. deputy marshals, who arrested 
Bendt Larsen, Christian Anderson and C. 
C. Brown, for u. c. 

— Peoa, Summit Co., was visited by U. 
S. deputy marshals, who arrested James 
Welsh and John A. Marchant, for u. c. 

Thiirs. i:^— Geo. Wardell, of Peoa, was 
arrested for u. c. 

—.Tames May, of Call's Fort, Box Elder 
Co.,VFas discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Fri. i.i.— Thos. AUsop was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Sat. 14.— After a lengthy trial in the 
Third District Court, Salt Lake City, the 
jury returned a verdict of not guilty in 
the case of Joseph H. Dean, charged with 
polygamy. 

—Alexander Brown, of the 16th Ward, 
R. J. Caffall, of the 21st Ward, and Thos. 
C. Griggs, of the 15th Ward, Salt Lake 
City, were arrested, chai'ged with u. c, 
and placed under bonds. Hans Hansen 
and Gustav Anderson, of Hyrum, Cache 
Co., were arrested on a similar charge. 

Man. W.—J&mes M. Fisher, of East 
Mill Creek, and Jesse R. Turpin, of South 
Cottonwood, Salt Lake Co., were arrested 
for u. c. 

Tues. i7.— Fred. W. Ellis, of North 
Ogden, Weber Co., was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Wed. i,S'.— James Lawson, of the 16th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, and placed under bonds. 

Fri. 20.— Wm. S. Lewis, of Ogden, had 
an examination on the charge of u. c, and 
was placed under $1,000 bonds. 

Sat. 21.— In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Allen Hunsaker, of Bear River 
City, was sentenced by Judge Henderson 
to six months' imprisonment and $200 fine, 
and Jatnes W. Burton, of Marriott, to six 
months' imprisonment and ;tlOO fine, for 
u. c. 

— The steamship Xevada sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with the second com- 
pany of this season's emigration from 
Europe, consisting of 187 souls, including 
8 returning Elders, in charge of Edward 
Davis. The company arrived in New York 
June 1st. From that city the emigration 
route this year was by the Old Dominion 
Steamship Line to Norfolk, Virginia, 
thence by the Norfolk «& Western Ky. to 
Bristol, thence via Chattanooga, Memphis 
and Kansas City to Salt Lake City, where 
Elder Davis' company arrived June 8th. 

Man. 23. — John Swenson fell from a 
load of hay in Salt Lake City, and was 
killed. 

— Carl C. N. Dorius of Ephraim, Sanpete 
Co., was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
taken before Com. Jacob Johnson, at 
Spring City, and placed under bonds. 

Tues. 24. — Manti, Sanpete Co., was raided 
by U. S. deputy marshals, who also ran- 
sacked the Temple, in search of polyga- 
mists, but no arrests were made. 

Wed. ?•>.— Bishop Wm. E. Jones and Jos. 
P. Barton, of Paragoonah, Iron Co., 
Samuel Worthen, of Panguitch, Piute Co., 
and Alex Orton, of Parowan, Iron Co., 
were imprisoaed in the Penitentiary, hav- 
ing each been sentenced by Judge Bore- 
man in the Second District Court, at 



Beaver, the day previous, to six months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine, for u. c. 

—William Openshaw, of the 16th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was accidentally killed 
and his body frightfully mangled on the 
Utah & Nevada Railway, at Brighton. 

Thurs. 26".— Jeremiah H. Kimball, of the 
17th Ward, Salt Lake City, fell off the 
railway train and was killed, while travel- 
ing through Missouri, en route for Europe, 
whither he had been called on a mission. 
His body was brought back to Salt Lake 
City, and buried there June 1st. 

—Thos. H. Smart, of Union, Salt Lake 
Co., was arrested on a charge of u. c, and 
placed under $1,500 bonds. 

Fri. i;;.— James Lattimer was arrested at 
Nephi, Juab Co., on a charge of u. c, and 
the following day he started in custody of 
the officers for Beaver. 

Sat. 28.— Edward Brain, of the 20th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, and Thomas A. 
Wheeler, of South Cottonwood, were ar- 
rested for u. c, and placed under bonds. 

—In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
Hans C. H0gsted, Daniel B. Rawson and 
Levi J. Taylor, of Harrisville, Willard 
Bingham, of Wilson, and John J. Dunn, of 
Three Mile Creek, were each sentenced by 
Judge Henderson to six months' imprison- 
ment and $100 fine; and Joseph W. Wads- 
worth, of Hooper, and Ralph Douglas, of 
Ogden, to six months' imprisonment 
each— all for u. c. They were all taken 
to the Penitentiary the same day. 

Sun. 29.— The Fourth Ward, Ogden, 
Utah, was divided into two Bishops' Wards, 
and the new Ward, named Ogden Fifth 
Ward, organized ;Thos. J. Stevens, Bishop. 

Twfs. 3i.— Lorenzo Stutz, of Mill Creek, 
and John Stoddard, of Ogden, were dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

— Frank Stanley was arrested at Woods 
Cross, Davis Co., on a charge of u. c, 
taken to Salt Lake City, and placed under 
bonds. After a preliuiinary examination, 
June 3rd, he was discharged. 

June. Wed. 1. — John Cottam, of the 
16th Ward, S-ilt Lake City, was arrested 
on a charge of u. c, and placed under $1,500 
bonds. 

Thurs. 2. — Wm. Palmer, of Logan, 
Cache Co., was discharged from the Pen- 
itentiary. 

— Pres. Wm. Budge, of Bear Lake Coun- 
ty, Idaho, was arrested at Ogden, without 
a warrant, and held in custody. ctjntrary to 
law, until he was finally released on $3,000 
bonds. 

(*?■«<. J.— In the First District Court, at 
Ogden (Judge Henderson), Wm. L. Walt- 
ers,- of Wells ville, was sentenced to six 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine; Jens 
P. Jensen, of Logan, to six months' im- 
prisonment and $200 tine ;and Peter Vladsen, 
of Willard, to six months' imprisonment 
and $100 fine, all for u. c. 

— The steamship Wyoming sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with the third company 
of this season's emigratioa from Europe, 
consisting of 159 souls, including 14 return- 
ing missionaries, in charge of J. C. Niel- 
sen. The company arrived in New York 
on the 15th, and in Salt Lake City on the 
23rd. 

A'mw. 5.— Graham Ward, Kane Co., Utah 
was organized; Franklin B. Snow, Bishop' 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY 1887. 



149 



— The Saints at Juarez, Chihuahua, 
Mexico, were organized as a Ward by 
Apostle Erastus Snow; Geo. W, Sevey, 
Bishop. 

— The Saints who were settling on Lee's 
creek, Alberta, Canada, held their first 
meeting on the site of Cardston ; the meet- 
ing was held in a tent. 

Man. 6". — Huntsville, Weber Co., was 
raided by U. S. deputy marshals, who ar- 
rested Andrew C. Berlin. Christian Peter- 
sen and Andrew J. Stremberg on charges 
of u. c. and adultery. The prisoners were 
taken to Ogden and placed under bonds. 

Tues. 7. — Zion's Choral Union rendered 
the popular cantata, "Belshazzar," in the 
Tabernacle, Salt Lake City. 

Wed. S. — U. S. deputy marshals made an 
unsuccessful raid on Spring City. Sanpete 
Co., in search of polygamists. 

Thurs. I). — Amasa M. Barton was shot 
and fatally wounded by a Navajo Indian, 
at Bluff City, San Juan Co. He died on 
the 16th. 

FiH. 10. — The first number of the yepfii 
Ensign, a weekly newspaper, was issued 
at Nephi, Juab Co. ; James T. Jakeman, 
publisher. 

Sat. i;.— John P. Wright, of Mill Creek, 
was arrested on a charge of u. c, taken to 
Salt Lake City, and placed under $2,000 
bonds. 

Sun. 12.— The first Latter-day Saint 
Sunday School in Alberta, Canada, was 
organized on I-ee's creek ; Jonathan E. 
Layrel, superintendent. 

Mon. 13. — Henry B. Gwilliam and Thomas 
Bennett Helm were discharged from the 
Penitentiary. 

— Isaac Farley, of Mount Fort, Weber 
Co., was arrested on a charge of u. c, and 
placed under bonds. 

Tues. 14. — The Spencer branch. Rabbit 
Valley. Utah, was organized as the Fre- 
mont Ward ; James A. Taylor. Bishop. 

— John Farrell, of Eden, Weber Co., was 
arrested for u. c, and placed under 
bonds. 

Wed. 15. — Bishop James Hansen, of 
Brigham City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, brought to Ogden and 
placed under bonds. 

Thurs. 16.— A. Milton Musser, of Salt 
Lake City, was again arrested on a charge 
of u. c, and placed under bonds. After a 
preliminary examination, Julj' 5th, he was 
discharged. 

Fri. 17. — Levan, Juab Co., was raided by 
U. S. deputy marshals, who arrested H. A. 
Petersen on a charge of u. e. 

Sat. IS. — The steamship Xevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 111 Saints, 
in charge of Elder Quincv B. Nichols. 
The company arrived in New York on the 
28th, and in .Salt Lake City July 7th. 

Sun. 19. — Elder Alma L. Smith died at 
Coalville, Summit Co. 

Mon. 20.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Geo. Wardell, of Peoa, 
was sentenced by Judge Zane to a fine of 
$50 and cosls,for u. c. He promised to obey 
the law. 

— Bishop Henry Hughes, of Mendon, 
Cache Co., was arrested on a charge of u. 
c, brought to Ogden and placed under 
bonds. 

Tues. 21. — In the First District Court, at 



Ogden, Knud Emmertsen, of Huntsville, 
and Hans J. Petersen, of Kanesville, were 
sentenced by Judge Henderson to six 
months' imprisonment and $200 fine each; 
Jens P. C. Winter, of Huntsville, and Wm. 
Butler, of Marriott, to six months' im- 
prisonment, and $300 fine ; Jens Frandsen, 
of Huntsville, Peter J. Laramers, of Ogden, 
Wm. Douglas, of Smithfield, Lars C. 
Petersen, of Hyde Park, Hans Jensen, 
of Hyrum, and Lars Nielsen, of Hunts- 
ville, were each sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment and $100 fine; Albert G. 
Slater, of Huntsville, Elisher Campbell, of 
Hyrum, and Gustav Anderson, of Hyrum, 
to six months' imprisonment and $50 fine, 
each, and Samuel Carter, of Porterville, 
to four months' imprisonment and §100 fine 
— all for u. c. 

Wed. 22.— The Old Folks of Salt Lake 
County had their annual excursion, this 
year going to Ogden, where they spent a 
very pleasant day. 

— Manti, Sanpete Co., was raided by U. 
S. deputy marshals, who arrested John 
Buchannan and Richard Hall on the charge 
of u. c. 

Thurs. 23. — Elder Jesper Petersen, of 
Castle Dale, Emery Co., died at Odense, 
Denmark, where he labored as a mission- 
ary. He was the second missionary from 
Utah who died in Scandinavia. 

FH. 24.— In the Third District Court, 
the murderer, Fred. Hopt,was sentenced to 
be shot on the 11th of August next. 

— Bishop Critchlow and James H. Nel- 
son, of Ogden, were arrested on the charge 
of u. c. and placed under bonds. 

Sat. 25. — A large and enthusiastic meet- 
ing was held in the Theater, Salt Lake 
City, in favor of Utah's Statehood. 

Sun. 26. — Elder Samuel W. Musser died 
in the 1st Ward, Salt Lake City. 

JTon. 27. — John P. Jones and John Lee 
Jones, of Iron County, were discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Tues. 28. — Aaron Hardy, of Moroni, 
Sanpete Co., was arrested on a charge of 
u. c, taken to Spring City and placed 
under bonds. 

Thurs. 30. — The State constitutional 
convention met in Salt Lake City and 
continued its labors until July 7th, when a 
constitution was adopted. 

July. — The Salt Lake Democrat, an 
anti- Mormon newspaper published in Salt 
Lake City, succumbed for the want of sup- 
port, after struggling for existence a little 
over two years. 

— James' Ipsen, of Mantua, G. F. Hamp- 
son and James Bywater, of Brigham City, 
and Peter L0Vgren, of Huntsville, were 
arrested on the charge of u. c. 

Fri. 1. — James Lloynd, of Farmington, 
Davis Co., was arrested on a charge of u. 
c. The following day he had a hearing 
and was bound over in the sum of $1,000. 

— Pres. Joseph F. Smith and wife, ac- 
companied by Elder Wm. W. Cluff, sailed 
from Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, per 
steamship Mari2}osa,\)onnd for Utah. They 
arrived at San Francisco, Cal., July 9th. 
Pres. Smith had spent nearly two years 
and five months in Hawaii, as an exile. 

Mon. 4. — The Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, 
took fire from the alighting of a toy bal- 
loon, from the fire works, on the roof, but 



150 



CHUECH CHROlfOLOGY — 1887. 



the flames were promptly put out by the 
fire brigade before doing much damage. 

Tues. r,. — The State Convention adopted 
an anti-polygamy clause, to be inserted in 
the new couilitution. 

— Thomas McNeil and Hugh Adams, of 
Logan, were discharged from the Pen- 
itentiary. 

Wed. 6-.— Geo. Morris, of the 17th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, and placed under .'$1,500 bonds. 

Thurs, 7.— The first Latter-day Saint 
Relief Society in Mexico was organized at 
Juarez, Chihuahua; Elizabeth Hawkins, 
president. 

— Wm. C. Brown and Andrew .T. Ker- 
shaw, of Ogden, were arrested for u. c. and 
placed under bonds. 

Fri. 8.— Hyrum H. Barton, arrested the 
previous day on a charge of u. c, had a 
hearing before Com. Norrell and was 
placed under .51..500 bonds. 

—Thomas W. Kirby and Abraham Chad- 
wick were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Mon. ii.— Edward Brain, of the 20th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of polygamy and placed under 
bonds. 

— In the election of school trustees in 
Salt Lake City, the non- Mormons elected 
a trustee in each of the following districts : 
the 7th, 8th, 12th, 13th and 14th. 

Vi'ed. 13. — Thomas Henderson, a resident 
of Emigration Canyon, and Charles Balm- 
forth, of Salt Lake City, were arrested on 
the charge of u. c, and placed nnder bonds. 
The latter was discharged the following 
day. 

— Henry Reiser was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. 14. — The 97th quorum of Seventy 
was organized by Abraham H. Cannon at 
Ashley, Uintah Co., Utah; Matthew Cald- 
well, Joseph H. Gardner, David Bingham 
and Geo. Hislop were set apart as presi- 
dents. 

— Isaac Brockbank was released from 
the Penitentiary. 

— Richard M. Humphreys, of Salina, 
Sevier Co., was arrested on a charge of 
u. c. 

Fri. 15. — Pres. Joseph F. Smith and 
party arrived at American Falls, Idaho, 
where they were met by a conveyance in 
charge of Elder Albert W. Davis, and 
started for Utah by team. 

Sat. 16. — William Henry Walker, of Wa- 
satch County, was arrested on a charge of 
u. c, taken to Park City and placed under 
bonds. 

.Sun. 17. — The Petersboro branch, Cache 
Co., was organized as a Ward; Willard D. 
Cranney, Bishop. 

Jfon. 18. — ApoUos G. Driggs, Lewis H. 
Mousley and John P. Mortensen were dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

—John T. Lambert, of Spring City, San- 
pete Co., was arrested for u. c. 

— Pres. .Joseph F. Smith and party ar- 
rived at Kaysville. Davis Co., tvhere they 
met Prests. John Taylor and Geo. Q. Can- 
non and others, who were faithful watch- 
ers at the bedside of Pres. Taylor. He 
was very sick. 

Wed. 20.— Ezra T. Clark, Joseph Hogan 



and William H. Foster were discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

— Brigham Willard Young, of Salt Lake 
City, died of fever, at Nubaka, New 
Zealand, where he labored as a mission- 
ary. 

Thurs. 2L— James W. Ure, of the 15th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. His case was dismissed on 
the 23rd. 

— Patriarch Zebedee Coltrin, once a mem- 
ber of Zion's Camp, died at Spanish Fork, 
Utah Co. 

— After a thorough examination before 
Com. Rogers.at Ogden,the u.c. case against 
James H. Nelson was dismissed. 

Fri. 22.— Bishoj.* Wm. T. Reid was ar- 
rested at Manti, Sanpete Co., on a charge 
of u. c. 

Sat. 23. — Seymour B. Young, against 
whom there was a charge of u. c, sur- 
rendered himself to Marshal Dyer and was 
placed under bonds. His case was sub- 
sequently dismissed. 

— The St. Johns Stake of Zion, Ariz., 
was organized out of the eastern part of 
Eastern Arizona Stake, by Apostles Fran- 
cis M. Lyman and John Henry Smith; 
with David K. UdaU as president, and 
Elijah N. Freeman and Wm. H. Gibbons 
as counselors. At the time of its organi- 
zation the St. Johns Stake consisted of 
seven Wards, namely, Ramah, Erastus, 
St. Johns, Union, Nutrioso, Alpine and 
Heber (Luna Valley). 

Sun. 24. — Henry Grow was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

3fon. 2-5. — Pres. John Taylor died as an 
exile at the house of Thos. H. Rouche, at 
Kaysville, Davis Co., in the presence of 
Geo. Q. Cannon, Joseph F. Smith, L. John 
Nuttall, Samuel Bateman, James Malin, 
H. C. Barren and others. 

Wed. 27.— Wm. R. Smith, president of 
the Davis Stake of Zion, was arrested at 
Centreville, on a charge of u. c, taken to 
Salt Lake City, and placed under bonds. 

— Bishop Harrison Sperry was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. 28.— John Oborn, of Union, Salt 
Lake Co., was arrested on a charge of u.c, 
taken to Salt Lake City, and placed under 
|1,000 bonds. 

Fri. 2.9. -The funeral of Pres. John 
Taylor took place in Salt Lake City. Af- 
ter the funeral services, Geo. Q. Cannon, 
Joseph F. Smith, Wilford Woodruff, Lo- 
renzo Snow, Franklin D. Richards, Moses 
Thatcher, Heber J. Grant and Daniel H. 
Wells (just returned from England) met 
in council in Salt Lake City, and decioed 
that the Counselors to the late Pres. John 
Taylor should preside until the members 
of the Council of the Twelve Apostles got 
together. 

—Joseph A. Taylor, of Harrisville,Weber 
Co., was arrested on a charge of u. c. and 
placed under $1,000 bonds. 

Sat. 30.— In the Supreme Court of Utah, 
suit was commenced against the Church 
and the Perpetual Emigrating Fund Com- 
pany, according to the provisions of the 
Edmunds Tucker law. 

Sun. 31.— Edward Schoenfeld, Thos H. 
Morrison and Andrew W. Cooley were dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1887. 



151 



Augxist. — General Alexander W. Doni- 
phan, favorably known in early Church 
historj', died in Missouri. 

2fon. 1. — Pres. Joseph F. Smith met with 
his family for the first time since Septem- 
ber, 1884, when he went into exile. 

— Olaus Johnson, of South Cottonwood, 
Salt Lake Co., was arrested on a charge of 
u. c, taken to Salt Lake City, and placed 
under bonds. 

— By the general election in Utah, 10 of 
the 12 members of the Council branch, and 
21 of the 24 members of the House branch 
of the Utah legislature, were elected by 
the "People's Party." This result was 
very satisfactory to the Saints, as the 
Utah Commission, aided by the governor, 
had redistricted the Territory without 
proper consideration of geographical con- 
sistency, and arranged the legislative dis- 
tricts so as to place all the anti- Mormon 
strongholds together. The new constitu- 
tion of the State of Utah, voted upon at 
the same time, received over 13,000 affirm- 
ative votes ; the negatives numbered less 
than 500. 

Wed. 3. — Counselors Geo. Q. Cannon and 
Joseph P. Smith, eight of the Council of 
Twelve Apostles (Wilford Woodruff, Lo- 
renzo Snow, Franklin D. Richards, Moses 
Thatcher, Francis M. Lyman, John Henry 
Smith, Ileber J. Grant and John W. 
Taylor) , and Counselor Daniel H. Wells, 
met in council in Salt Lake City. Geo. Q. 
Cannon and Joseph F. Smith were re- 
instated in their former positions in the 
Council of the Twelve and an epistle, writ- 
ten by Fres. Wilford Woodruff to the 
Church, was approved. 

— Bishop Wm. Brown, of South Boun- 
tiful, Davis Co., was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, brought to Salt Lake City and 
placed under bonds. Francis Greenwell 
was arrested at Ogden on the same charge. 

Sat. 6. — Walter M. Gibson, the deposed 
prime minister of the Hawaiian Kingdom, 
arrived in San Francisco. 

— Pres. David John, Edward Peay, S0ren 
C. Petersen and Christian P. Christiansen 
were discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. 11. — The murderer Fred. Hopt 
was executed in the Penitentiary, by 
shooting. 

Sat. 13. — Herman F. F. Thorup was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

^John E. Page was arrested at St. 
George on a charge of u. c. 

— Pres. Canute Petersen, of the Sanpete 
Stake, was arrested at Ephraim, Sanpete 
Co., on a charge of u. c, but, after a hear- 
ing before Com. Johnson, in Spring City, 
the following Saturday, he was discharged. 

Sun. 14. — Ex- Mayor Feramorz Little 
died in Salt Lake City. 

Mon. 15. — Bishop Ishmael Phillips was 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Tues. IG.—Wni. G. Baker, of Richfield, 
was arrested at Monroe, Sevier Co., on a 
charge of u. c. He was taken to Beaver 
for examination. 

Thurs. iS.— Byron W. King, of East 
Bountiful, Davis Co., was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, taken to Salt Lake City 
and placed under bonds. 

Pri. 19. — John A. Carlson, of Salt Lake 
City, was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
but after examination was discharged. 



—Elder Brigham W. Young, of Salt Lake 
City, died in New Zealand, where he la- 
bored as a missionary. His remains were 
sent home. 

— Elder John Bullock, from Utah, died 
in England, whither he had gone to visit 
relatives. 

Sat. 20. — The remains of Pres. John Tay- 
lor were transferred to a granite sepulchre 
in the Salt Lake City cemetery. 

— Nathan Hanson, of North Point, was 
arrested on a charge of u. c. and placed 
under $1,500 bonds. 

Sun. 21.— At a Stake conference held at 
Rexburg, Idaho, that town was divided 
into three Wards, with Thos. E. Ricks, 
jun., as Bishop of the First, and Casper 
Steiner as Bishop of the Second Ward; 
Timothy J. Winter was chosen as Bishop 
of the Third Ward. On the same occasion 
the Lyman Ward was divided, and the 
north part organized as the Burton Ward ; 
Geo. U. Smith, Bishop. 

Mon. 22. — Bedson Eardley, Joseph Blunt, 
Herman Grether, Wm. H. Watson, Peter 
S. Barkdull and John Adams were dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

Tuesf. 23.- Matthew Pickett, Levi North 
and Wm. J. Hooper were discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Wed. 24. — Toquerville, Washington Co., 
was raided by U. S. deputy marshals, who 
arrested Levi Savage on a charge of u. c. 

— Hyrum B. North was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

— Joseph H. Ridges, of the 19th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, was arrested on a charge 
of u. c. and placed under bonds. 

lhurs.23. — Alexander Burt, of the 6th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. and placed under bonds. 

PH. 26. — Isaac Riddle, of Beaver, was 
arrested on a charge of u. c. 

Sat. 27. — The steamship Wisconsin sa.i\ed 
from Liverpool, England, with over four 
hundred Saints, in charge of John I. Hart. 
The company arrived in New York Aug. 
27th and in Salt Lake City Sept. 15th. 

— By an explosion at a saw mill on Lake 
creek, Wasatch County, J. M. Alexander 
was killed and two others wounded. 

Mon. 2y.— Anders W. Winberg and Thos. 
Butler were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Tues. 30.— Elder Edward Hanham died 
in the 17th Ward, Salt Lake City. 

September.— Wm. Severn, of Mont- 
pelier, Bishop Dalrymple, of Preston, and 
John Johnson, of Ovid, were arrested for 
u. c. 

Thurs. 1. — Charles H. Bassett, of the 2nd 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, and placed under $1,500 
bonds. 

—Elder Joseph M. Tanner was surprised 
and robbed by a band of eight Bedouins, 
near "Y affa, Palestine. 

Wed. 7.— William R. Webb was dis- 
chai-ged from the Penitentiary. 

Stm. 11. — J. T. Arrowsmith, Edwin 
Standring, Sanford Fuller, Bishop Geo. D. 
Snell, Don C. Snow and John L. Gibb were 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

—The Seventies residing in Marriott, 
Lynne and Mound Ford Wards, Weber 
Co., were organized by Seymour B. Young 
and Abraham H. Cannon as the 98th 



152 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY— 1887. 



quorum of Seventy, with Simon F. Halver- 
SOD, Walter W. Crane, Samuel P. Rich- 
ards, Wm. Barker, Alonzo O. Perry, Hans 
Madsen and John Maddock as presidents. 

Mon. 12. — David B. Bybee, of Hooper, 
was arrested at Taylor's Mill, Weber Co., 
on a charge of u. c. Sam. M. Butcher, 
who resided near Bingham Canyon, Salt 
Lake Co., was arrested on a similar 
charge. 

Wed. 14.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, John Connelly was fined 
$100 and George Harmon $50 for u. c, 
both promising to obey the law in the 
future. 

Thurs. 15. — Nicholas Sommer, who had 
just returned with an immigrant company 
from a mission to Switzerland, was ar- 
rested at Ogden on a charge of u. c. and 
placed under bonds. He was subsequently 
discharged. 

S((t. i7.— Phoebe Soper Pratt, widow of 
Apostle Parley P. Pratt, died at Provo, 
Utah Co. 

Mon. lU.—ln the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Thomas H. Smart, of 
Union, was tried and convicted,on a charge 
of u. c, and sentenced by Judge Zane to 
six months' imprisonment and §300 fine. 
James A. Woods, of Tooele, for the same 
"offence," was sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment and ^JlOO fine. The jury re- 
turned a verdict of guilty in the case of 
Miles L, Williams, for u.'c. 

Tt>es. 20.— After trial, in the Third Dist- 
rict Court, the jury returned verdicts of 
guilty in the cases of Andrew Homer and 
James M. Fisher, for u.c. Alexander Bills, 
of South .Jordan, was sentenced by Judge 
Zane to six months' imi^risonment and $100 
tine, for u. c. 

— Christian Hansen, of Box Elder Coun- 
ty, was arrested on a charge of u. c. 

Wed. 21.— In the Third District Court, 
George Wilding, sen., was sentenced by 
Judge Zane to six months' imprisonment 
and a fine of .|100. for u. c. 

— Joseph Clark, of Provo. was im- 
prisoned in the Penitentiary, having been 
sentenced by Judge Henderson, at Provo, 
to six months' imprisonment and $300 fine, 
for u. c. 

-John England, James Dalley, William 
Dalley and William Unthank were dis- 
charged from the Penitentiarj'. 

— M. D. Pierson, of Plymouth, was ar- 
rested on a charge of u. c, taken to Logan 
and placed under bonds. 

—The Saints who had settled on Swift 
creek. Star Valley. Wyo., were organized 
as the Afton Ward; Charles D. Cazier, 
Bishop. 

Thurs. 22.— In the Third District Court, 
the jury returned a verdict of guilty in the 
u. c. case of Frederik Petersen, notwith- 
standing the testimony introduced proving 
that the defendant had lived strictly with- 
in the law. 

— James Smith was imprisoned in the 
Penitentiary for u. c, having been sen- 
tenced to six months' imprisonment and 
$300 fine. 

—John Warwood, of Nephi, Juab Co., 
was arrested on a charge of u. c. and 
placed under bonds. 

— In the Second District Court, at 



Beaver, the jury returned a verdict of not 
guilty in the case of David Ward, charged 
with u. c. 

— Bishop Hans Funk, of Newton, and 
Perrigrine Sessions, of Bountiful, were ar- 
rested for u, c. 

Fri. 23.— In the Third District Court, 
after trial, the jury returned a verdict of 
not guilty in the case of James Bishop, of 
Salt Lake City, and Wm. H. Hague, of 
Taylorsville. 

— Elder John Roylance, a member of the 
Mormon Battalion, died at Springvillc, 
Utah. 

— Elder John P. S0rensen, of Salt Lake 
City, was banished from the Island of Als, 
Schleswig, where he labored as a mission- 
ary. 

Mon. 26.— In the Third District Court, 
Henry Beckstead, of South Jordan, was 
sentenced to six months' imprisonment 
and $100 fine ; and Joseph H. Ridges, of 
Salt Lake City, to six months' imijrison- 
ment and $25 fine, for u.c. After trial, the 
case against Elias Morris for a similar 
'■offense" was dismissed. 

Tues. 27. — After a lengthy trial in the 
Third District Court, the jury returned a 
verdict of guilty in the case of Thomas F. 
Harris, a non-Mormon, for polygamy. 

— Frangott Stumph, of Mendon, was 
arrested on a charge of u. e. 

Wed. 2.S'.— In the Third District Court, 
Ebenezer Woodford, who promised to obey 
the law, was fined $150 for u.c. 

— In the Second District Court, at Bea- 
ver. Charles Wilkinson, charged with u.c, 
was acquitted. 

— J. C. Gasberg was arrested at Rich- 
mond, Cache Co., on a charge of u.c. About 
the same time Paul Poulsen was arrested 
on a similar charge. 

Thtirs. 2fi.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, John Cottam. of the 16th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, James M. Fisher, 
of East Mill Creek, and Daniel Harvey, of 
Kaysville, were each sentenced by Judge 
Zane to six months' imprisonment, for 
u.c. Fines were also imposed. John Tate, 
of Tooele, who promised to obey the law, 
was fined $50 for a similar "offense." 

— Alexander Edwards, Richard CoUett 
and Geo. T. Peay were discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

—Jacob Miller, of Providence, Cache Co., 
was arrested on a charge of u. c. 

— In the Second District Court, at Bea- 
ver, Levi Savage, of Toquerville, and 
Isaac Riddle, of Marion, were sentenced 
by Judge Boreman to six months' imprison- 
ment and $300 fine each, for u.c. Wm. 
Lefevre was fined $100 for a similar "of- 
fense." 

Fri. 30. — B'shop Samuel Carter was re- 
leased from the Penitentiary. 

— In the Third District Court, William 
Blood, of Kaysville, was sentenced by 
Judge Zane to six Uionths' imprisonment 
and a fine of $1.50,and John A. Marchant, of 
Peoa, to six months' imprisonment and 
$100 flee, and John P. Wright, of Mill 
Creek, and Joseph C. Perry, of Brighton, 
to six months' imprisonment and $.50 fine, 
each, for u.c. These four brethren, together 
with Levi Savage and Isaac Riddle,just ar- 
rived from Beaver, were taken to the 
Penitentiary. 



CHUKCH CHRONOLOGY — 1887. 



153 



October. — The tirst number of the 
Palanfic, a monthly journal devoted to the 
interests of the Saints, was published in 
Salt Lake City ; A. Milton Musser, editor 
and proprietor. One volume of twelve 
numbers was published. 

Sat.l. — Elder John Preece died in the 
4th Ward, Salt Lake City. 

— Robert Parker, of Washington, Wash- 
ington Co., was arrested on a charge of 
polygamy, but the prisoner made his es- 
cape by getting through a window. 

—Sine Madsen, of Washington, Wash- 
ington Co., was arrested in Salt Lake City, 
being wanted in a polygamy case. 

Mon. 3.-1x1 the Third District Court 
(Judge Zane), Edwin Rushton, of the 5th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was sentenced to 
four months' imprisonment and §50 fine, 
and Hyrum Henry Evans, of the 6th Ward, 
Salt Lake City, to six months' im- 
prisonment and $50 fine, both for u. c. 
'J'he jury retui'ned a verdict of guilty 
against Rodney C. Badger; Thomas C. 
Griggs was acquitted. The charges in 
all these cases were u.c. 

Tiies. J.— In the Third District Court, 
Frederik Petersen, of the 2nd Ward, Salt 
Lake City, was sentenced by Judge Zane 
to six months' imprisonment and $100 fine, 
for u.c. After trial, Edward Brain, also 
charged with u.c, was acquitted. 

— Mrs. Hodson and daughter, the latter 
the alleged plural wife of John Penman, 
were imprisoned in the Penitentiary in 
default of bail. 

Wed. .5.— In the Third District Court, 
Thomas G. Labrum, of Union, was sen- 
tenced by Judge Zane to three months' 
imprisonment and $25 fine,for u.c. 

Thurs. 6. — John C. Graham, of Provo, 
was arrested on a charge of u.c. 

— The general semi-annual conference 
of the Church was commenced in Salt Lake 
City: it was continued until the 9th. 

—Charles Rondquist, of Hooper, who 
had been arrested on a charge of u.c, had 
a hearing before Com. Rogers, at Ogden, 
and was discharged. 

Fri. 7.— In the Third District Court, 
John Oborn, of Union, was sentenced by 
Judge Zane to six months' imprisonment 
and to pay a fine of $.50, for u.c. 

Sat. S. — The State constitutional con - 
vention, which had re assembled in Salt 
Lake City, adopted a memorial prepared 
by a special committee. 

— The steamship Xcvada sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with the sixth and 
last company of this season's emigration 
from Europe, numbering 278 souls, includ- 
ing 23 returning missionaries, in charge of 
Joseph S. Wells. The company arrived 
at New York on the 18th, and in Salt 
Lake City on the 25th. 

Tues. n.—ln the Third District Court, 
John T. Gerber, of Granger, was sen- 
tenced by Judge Zane to six months' im- 
prisonment and §100 fine; James C. Wat- 
son, of Salt Lake City, to six months' im- 
prisonment and $300 fine, and Charles 
Burgess, of Salt Lake City, to six months' 
imprisonment and $25 fine, for u.c. Miles 
L. Williams, of North Point, who prom- 
ised to obey the law, was fined $50. 

— Elder Andrew W. Cooley died at 
Brighton, Salt Lake Co. 



— John Squires, of Salt Lake City, was 
arrested on a charge of u.c. 

Wed. 12.— In the Third District Court, 
Samuel Anderson, of Salt Lake City, was 
sentenced by Judge Zane to six months' 
imprisonment and $50 fine ; Wm. S. Muir, 
of Bountiful, to six months' imprisonment 
and $100 tine; John Penman, of Bountiful, 
to three months' imprisonment and $25 
fine; James Loynd, of Farmington, to six 
months' imprisonment and $50 fine, and 
Nathan Hanson, of North Point, to six 
months' imprisonment and $100 fine, all 
for u.c. 

Thurs. 13. — In the First District Court, 
at Provo, William Yates, of Lehi, and 
Lars Jaeobsen, of Provo, were sentenced 
by Judge Henderson to six months' im- 
prisonment and $.50 fine, each; Victor 
Sandgren, of Pleasant Grove, was sen- 
tenced to six months' imprisonment and 
$100 tine, and Charles McCarthy, of Ameri- 
can Fork, to six months' imprisonment 
and a fine of $300, all for u.c. 

FH. 14.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Jesse R. Turpin, of South 
Cottonwood, and Charles Livingston, of 
the 11th Ward, Salt Lake City, were each 
sentenced by Judge Zane to six months' 
imprisonment and $100 fine, and Andrew 
Homer, of Mill Creek, to five months' im- 
prisonment and a fine of $100, all for u.c. 

— In the First District Court, at Provo, 
Aaron Hardy, of Moroni, and John T. 
Lambert, of Spring City, were sentenced 
by Judge Henderson to six months' im- 
prisonment each, for u.c. ; Niels P. Mad- 
sen and Edward Cliff, of Mt. Pleasant, 
were sentenced to six months' imprison- 
ment and a fine of $200, each, for similar 
"offenses." 

Sat. i5.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, James Welsh, of Coal- 
ville, Summit Co., was sentenced by Judge 
Zane to six months' imprisonment and $50 
fine, for u.c. 

Sun. iff.— Elder Truman O. AngeJl, sen.. 
Church architect and one of the Utah 
Pioneers, died at his residence in Salt 
Lake City. 

—The first Latter-day Saints Y. M. M.I. 
A. in Canada was organized on Lee's 
creek, Alberta; O. L. Robinson, presi- 
dent. 

Mon. 17. — In the Supreme Court of Utah, 
arguments were commenced in the suits of 
the United States vs. the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

Tues. /8.— John Winnell, an aged resi- 
dent of Kaysville, Davis Co., who had been 
arrested on a charge of u. c, had a hear- 
ing in Salt Lake City, and was placed 
under bonds. 

— Daniel L. Macfarlane was arrested at 
Cedar City, Iron Co., on a charge of u. c. 

Wed. i.9.— Payson, Utah Co., was raided 
by U. S. deputy marshals, who arrested 
Henry G. Boyle, Joseph Jones, Germand 
Ellswoith, John Staehle, C. C. Schramm, 
Samuel Francom and Ferdinand Ober- 
hansle, for u. c 

T?iu)-s. 20.— In the Utah Supreme Court, 
Hon. James O. Broad head presented a 
masterly argument in opposition to the ap- 
pointment by the court of a Receiver, in 
the suit of the United States vs. the 
Church, etc. 



154 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1887. 



Fri. 21. — Pres. Jesse W. Crosby, jun., of 
Panguitch, Piute Co., was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. About the same time 
Elijah M. Steers, of Washington, Wash- 
ington Co., was arrested on the same 
charge. 

Sat, 22. — In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Byron W. King, of Boun- 
tiful, was sentenced by Judge Zane to six 
months' imprisonment and $50 fine, for u.c. 

3Ion. 24.— In the Third District Court, 
Perrigrine Sessions, a pioneer settler of 
Davis County, was fined IflSO for u. c. 

— In the First District Court, at Provo, 
Heni-y Beal, of Ephraim, Sanpete Co., was 
sentenced by Judge Henderson to im- 
prisonment for three months' and a fine of 
|300; Peter M. Petersen, of Ephraim, to 
three montts' imprisonment, and Peter C. 
Hansen, of Gunnison, who promised to 
obey the law, to two months' imprison- 
ment. 

Tues. 25.— In the Third District Court, 
David B. Bybee, of South Hooper, Davis 
Co., was sentenced by Judge Zane to six 
months' imprisonment and 150 fine for u. c. 

— In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
Andrew C. Berlin, of Huntsville, was sen- 
tenced by Judge Boreman to six months' 
imprisonment and $200 tine, and Christian 
Petersen, of Huntsville, to six months' 
imprisonment and $300 fine, for u. c. They 
were taken to the Penitentiary the same 
day. 

Thu7-s. 27. — In the First District Court, 
at Proyo, Orlando F. Herron, of Pleasant 
Grove, was sentenced by Judge Hender- 
son to six months' imprisonment and a fine 
of $50, for u. c. In Ogden, Christian Han- 
sen, of Brigham City, was sentenced to six 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine, and 
Andrew G. Stromberg, of Huntsville, to 
six months' imprisonment and $50 fine for 
similar "offences." The latter was also 
accused of adultery with his plural wife 
and sentenced to six months' additional on 
that account. 

Sun. 30.— Geo. Holyoak was arrested on 
his farm, near Parowan, Iron Co., on a 
charge of u. c, and taken to Beaver the 
following day for examination. 

Man. 31. — Nils J.Gyllenscogwas arrested 
at Smithfield, Cache Co., on a charge of 
u. c. 

November. Tnes. 1. — Bishop Daniel F. 
Thomas, of Lynne,was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, taken to Ogden and bound over in 
the sum of $2,000. 

Wed. 2.— Elder Brigham H. Roberts met 
the apostate Wm. Jarman in public dis- 
cussion in London, England. 

Thu7-s. 3. — In the First District Court at 
Provo, Hans Christian Hansen, of Gun- 
nison, Sanpete Co., was sentenced by 
Judge Henderson to six months' imprison- 
ment, and John Harwood, of Nephi, to six 
months' imprisonment, for u. c. 

Sai. 5.— The Supreme Court of Utah 
rendered a decision in favor of appointing 
a Receiver to take charge of Church 
property. 

— F. A. Petersen, of Levan, was im- 
prisoned in the Penitentiary, to serve 18 
months for "adultery." 

Sun. 6. — The Saints residing in Spring - 
dale, Washington Co,, were organized as 



the Spring dale Ward; Wm. R. Crawford 
Bishop. 

— The Saints who had located on Garden 
creek and vicinity, in Marsh Valley, Bing- 
ham Co., Idaho, were organized as the 
Garden Creek Ward; Joseph E. Capell, 
Bishop. 

3Ion. 7. — Marshal Frank H. Dyer was 
appointed Receiver, to take charge of 
Church property, by the Supreme Court 
of Utah. 

— Henry Jones, of Bountiful, fell down 
an embankment near the Warm Springs, 
Salt Lake City, and was killed. His body 
was found the next day. 

Tiics. «.— James G. Brown, of the 17th 
Ward, Salt Lake City, was arrested on a 
charge of u. c, and placed under $1,500 
bonds. 

— The Utah Supreme Court issued a 
decree giving Receiver Dyer extraordi- 
nary powers in handling Church property. 
He was required to give $250,000 bonds. 

Wed. .9.— In the Utah Supreme Court, a 
demurrer introduced by the defence in the 
Church suits, was overruled. 

— Isaac Farley, of Ogden, who had been 
sentenced by Judge Boreman in the First 
District Court, at Ogden, to six months' 
imprisonment and ^300 fine, was taken to 
the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. iO.— Receiver Dyer filed his bond 
of $250,000 with the clerk of the Supreme 
Court. His bondsmen were Wm. S. Mc- 
Cornick, John E. Dooley, Boyd Psrk, 
Louis Martin, John J. Daly, Horace S. 
Eldredge, John Sharp, Andrew Brixen, 
Matthew Cullen, Jacob Moritz, Charles 
Beal, J. C. Glenfield and Wm. L. Pickard. 

Fri. n.— Receiver Dyer took possession 
of the Tithing Office, Salt Lake City, but 
did not interfere with the regular bus- 
iness. 

Sat. 12.— Levi Curtis,an aged gentleman, 
of Springville, Utah Co., was arrested 
on a charge of u. c. 

- Isaac Bullock, of Prove, who had been 
sentenced in the First District Court 
(Judge Hendei'son), at Provo, to two 
months' imprisonment and $300, for u. c, 
was incarcerated in the Penitentiary. 

3fon. 14.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Thomas Henderson was 
sentenced by Judge Zane to six months" 
imprisonment and $100 fine, for u. c. 

Tues. 15. — Receiver Dyer took possession 
of the Historian's Office and the Gardo 
House. The Tithing Office and Historian's 
Office were leased to the Church. The 
marshal demanded the President's Office 
delivered to him. 

— Henry H. Petersen, of Hyrum, Cache 
Co., was "arrested on a charge of u. c. 

Wed. 76'.— Jens Petersen, of Petersboro, 
Cache Co., was arrested for u. c, taken 
to Logan and bound over in the sum of 
$1,000. 

Thur.<i. 77.— Marshal Dyer filed his bond 
of $50,000 as Receiver in the suit of the 
United States against the Perpetual Emi- 
grating Fund Company. 

—In the First District Court (Judge 
Henderson), at Provo, Ferdinand Ober- 
hansle, and Germand Ellsworth, of Pay- 
son, were each sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment, for u. c. Fines were also 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1887. 



15J 



imposed. They were taken to the Pen- 
itentiary the same day. 

FH. 18. — Receiver Dyer took posession 
of the property belonging to the Perpetual 
Emigrating Fund Company. 

—After a lengthy trial in the Third Dis- 
trict Court, the jury returned a verdict of 
not guilty in the case against Alfred H. Mar- 
tin for the killing of John H. Burton, May 
29, 1887. 

—In the District Court at Blackfoot, 
Idaho, Judge Hays on the bench, Josiah 
Richardson, of Malad, Austin G. Green 
and Sidney Weeks, of Bingham County, 
and Wm. Severn, of Montpelier, Bear Lake 
Co., were sentenced to six months' im- 
prisonment in the Sioux Falls (Dakota) 
Penitentiary, for u. c, and three years ad- 
ditional for alleged adultery with their 
wives. Charles Shippen, A. P. Anderson, 
Elijah Wilson, Alexander N. Stephens, of 
Menan, Wm. Woodward and J. H. Denning 
were each sentenced to six months' im- 
prisonment in the Boise City Penitentiary, 
for u. c. Milo Andrus, for a similar 
"offence," was fined $300. 

Sat. 19. — In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, John Jenkins and Hans Funk, of 
Newton, and Richard Fry, of Morgan, 
were sentenced to six months' imprison- 
ment and $300 fine each, for u. c. ; Oluf 
Hansen, of Logan,to five months' imprison- 
ment and a $100 fine. 

— At a special conference held at Oakley 
Cassia Co., Idaho, Cassia Ward, embracing 
the Saints who had settled in Goose Creek 
Valley and vicinity, were organized as the 
Cassia Stake of Zion; Horton D. Haight, 
president. 

Sun. 20. — Apostle John W. Taylor and 
Elder Seymour B. Young organized the 
Saints constituting the Oakley branch, 
Cassia Co., Idaho, as a Ward; John L. 
Smith, Bishop. 

— The first Relief Society and the first 
Primary Association, inaugurated by Lat- 
ter-day Saints in Canada, was organized 
at Lee's creek. Alberta, with Mary L. 
Woolf and Sarah B. Daines as their re- 
spective presidents. 

Mon. 21. — James W. Burton, of Marriott, 
was discharged from the Penitentiary. 

— In the Third District Court (Judge 
Zane), Rodney C. Badger, of Salt Lake 
City, was sentenced to six months' im- 
prisonment and a fine of $100, for u. c. 

— In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
(Judge Boreman), John Martin was sen- 
tenced to pay a fine of $100 for u. c. ; 
Peter Barton, of Clarkston, and Ralph 
Smith, of Logan, were sentenced to six 
months' imprisonment and a fine of $100 
each, also for u. c. 

— The Saints residing northwest of Oak- 
ley, Cassia Co., Idaho, were organized as 
the Marion Ward; Adam G. Smith, 
Bishop. 

Tues. 22.— Thomas A. Harris, of Salt 
Lake City, was arrested on a charge of 
u. c, but was acquitted after a hearing 
before Com. Norrell. 

— James Hardy, of Provo, was arrested 
on a charge of u. c. and placed under 
bonds. After a preliminary trial the fol- 
lowing Saturday, he was acquitted. 

— R. Hochstrasser, of Providence, who 
had been sentenced by Judge Boreman in 



the First District Court, at Ogden, to six 
months' imprisonment and $100 fine, was 
incarcerated in the Penitentiary. 

— At a special meeting held at Spring 
Basin, Cassia Co., Idaho, the branch of the 
Church previously established there was 
organized as a Ward; Enoch R. Dayley. 
Bishop. 

—The first Latter-day Saint Y. L. M. I. 
A. in Canada was organized on Lee's 
creek. Alberta; Zina Y. Card, president. 

Wed. 23. — Wm. Felstead, who was serv- 
ing a long term of imprisonment for poly- 
gamy, was released from the Peniten- 
tiary, having been pardoned by Pres. 
Cleveland. 

— Receiver Dyer took formal possession 
of the President's ofiice, leaving two depu- 
ties in charge. 

— Robert Hazen, of Brighton, Salt Lake 
Co., was arrested on a charge of u. c. and 
placed under $1,000 bonds. 

— The Saints at Albion, Cassia Co., 
Idaho, were organized as a Ward of the 
Cassia Stake : Wm. T. Harper, Bishop. 

Thurs. 2J.— The Elba branch of the 
Church, Cassia Co., Idaho, was organized 
as a Ward; Thos. Taylor, Bishop. 

Fri. 25. — Bishop Wm. Jones, Joseph P. 
Barton, Samuel Worthen and Alexander 
Orton were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

—Elder Richard T. Booth, of Alpine. 
Utah Co., died in Kansas City, Mo., while 
laboring as a missionary in the States. 

— The Almo branch. Cassia Co., Idaho, 
was organized as a Ward; Thos. O. King, 
Bishop. 

Sat. 26.— Henry Hughes, of Mendon, 
Cache Co., was imprisoned in the ir-eniten- 
tiary, having been sentenced by Judge 
Henderson, in the First District Court, 
to six months' imprisonment and $100 fine, 
for u.c. 

— In the Third District Court, Samuel 
M. Butcher, of Herriman Precinct, who 
promised to obey the law in the future, 
was fined $50 for u. c. 

Mon. 28. — John J. Dunn and Hans C-. 
H0gsted were released from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

— Joseph B. Forbes and S. Glenwood, of 
American Fork, Utah Co., were arrested 
for u.c. 

Tues. 29.— William H. Tovey, who had 
already served one term of imprisonment 
in the Penitentiary for u.c, was again 
arrested on a charge of u. c. and placed 
under $1,500 bonds. , 

Wed. 30. — Judge E. T. Sprague was ap- 
pointed examiner in the forfeiture suits 
against the Church. 

— Thomas F. Harris, a non-Mormon, was 
sentenced to six months' imprisonment for 
polygamy, in the Third District Court. An 
appeal was taken and the defendant re- 
leased on $1,000 bail. 

December. Thurs. 1. — Joseph H. By- 
ington and Austin G. Green, of Menan, 
Sidney Weeks, of Lyman, and W. Severn, 
of Montpelier, Idaho, who had been sen- 
tenced to three years and six months' im- 
prisonment, each, (except Elder Weeks 
who got three years) for u.c, left Idaho, in 
charge of Marshal Baird, for Sioux Falls 
Penitentiary. 

jyfon. 5. — Eliza R. Snow, president of all 



156 



CHCECH CHKONOLOGY — 1887. 



the Latter-day Saint Relief Societies, 
died in Salt Lake City. 

— Ephraim Briggs was arrested at Boun- 
tiful on a charge of u. c, taken to Salt 
Lake City, and placed under bonds. 

— Receiver Dyer demanded the Weber 
Stake property delivered over to him, but 
was refused. 

— In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
Joseph A. Taylor, who promised to obey 
the law, was fined §50 for u.c. In the case 
against James C. Petersen, of Logan, sen- 
tence was suspended by his promising to 
obey the law in the future. 

Tu€s. H. — A church building in Pleasant 
VaUey, Union Co., 111., in which Latter- 
day Saint Elders were holding meetings, 
was burned by a mob. 

Wed. 7. — Receiver Dyer seized the Presi- 
dent's office and carried off books, some of 
which never belonged to the Church. 

TJuirs. 8.— Bishop David UdaU, of Nephi, 
Juab Co., was arrested on a charge of u.c. 

—Elder William W. McGuire died in 
Plain City, Weber Co. 

Ffi. .9. — In the First District Court, 
Thomas Young, of Brigham City, was sen- 
tenced to six months' imprisonment and §50 
fine, for u. c. Herman D. Pearson con- 
victed for a similar •'offence," but who 
promised to obey the law was sentenced 
to pay costs of prosecution. 

Hat. 10. — In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, for u. c, Jens Hansen, of Brigham 
City, was sentenced by Judge Henderson 
to six months' imprisonment and .'f>300 fine; 
Charles O. Dunn, of Millville, John Lewis 
Jones, of Calls Fort, Jens Petersen, of 
Huntsville, and Wm. Wheeler, of Mendon, 
to six months' imprisonment and $1.50 fine, 
each; Frederick Jensen, of Logan, to six 
months' imprisonment and a fine of $100, 
and Nils .1. Gyllenscog, of Smithfield, 
who promised to obey the law, to sixty 
days' imprisonment. These brethren were 
taken to the Penitentiary the same day. 

Sun. 11. — A Ward organization was ef- 
fected at North Point. Salt Lake County, 
with Levi W. Reid as Bishop. 

JfoH. 12. — Rudger Clawson,who had been 
pardoned by Pres. Cleveland, was released 
from the Penitentiary, where he had been 
imprisoned since Nov. 3, 1884. 

— Wm. F. Rigby, of Idaho, was ar- 
rested on a charge of u. c. 

— Several anti-polygamic measures were 
introduced in the U. S Senate 

Tues. i.3.— Elder William K. Barton died 
in Manti, Sanpete Co. 

— James Kemp, of Lewiston, who had 
been sentenced by Judge Henderson in the 
First District Court, at Ogden, to six 
months' imprisonment and $200 fine, was 
incarcerated in the Penitentiary. 

Wrd. 14. — Harrison Severe, of Grants - 
ville, was arrested on a charge of u. c, 
taken to Salt Lake City and placed under 
bonds. Jonathan Gledhill was arrested 
at the Deseret Woollen Mills, Salt Lake 
Co., on a similar charge. 

Thurs. 15. — Charles Livingston was 
released from the Penitentiary, having 
been pardoned by Pres. Cleveland. 

— In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
H. R. Mc Bride, charged with u. c, prom- 
ised to obey the law, and sentence in his 
case was suspended. 



Sat. 17. — Wm. J. Lewis was arrested in 
Provo, on a charge of u. c, and placed 
under bonds. 

— In the First District Court (Ogden), 
H. N. Petersen and \I. C. Jensen were 
sentenced by Judge Henderson to pay a 
fine of §100, each; Gustaf Thomson, of 
Logan, and Andrew Madsen, of Brigham 
City, to six months' imprisonment and a 
fine of §100, each; Wm. Chugg, of Prov- 
idence, to six months' imprisonment and a 
fine of $200; Lars Mortensen, of Brigham 
City, to four months' imprisonment, and $150 
fine; M. P. Mortensen, of Brigham City, 
to four months' imprisonment and to pay 
a fine of $100, and Jacob Miller, of Prov- 
idence, to two months' imprisonment. 
Frangott Stumph, of Mendon, was sen- 
tenced to two years' imprisonment for 
polygamy. 

Sin. IS. — Showlow, Taylor, Snowflake 
and Woodruff Wards, which former- 
ly belonged to the Eastern Arizona Stake, 
and St. Joseph, Moan Coppy and Tonto 
Wards, constituting the remnant of the 
defunct Little Colorado Stake, were or- 
ganized by Apostle John H. Smith as the 
Snowflake Stake of Zion; Jesse N. Smith, 
president ; Lorenzo H. Hatch and Joseph 
H. Richards, counselors. The so called 
Snowflake Camp, located near the top of 
the Mogollon Mountains, was organized as 
the Pinedale Ward; Niels Petersen, 
Bishop. 

Jfon. 19. — The new constitution of Utah, 
with accompanying memorial, was pre- 
sented in the U. S. Senate. 

Tues. 20. — Andrew Anderson, of Hyrum, 
against wnom an indictment was out for 
u. c, gave himself up to the officers of the 
law. 

Wed. 21. — Peter J. Lammers. Jens 
Frandsen, Albert G. .Slater, Wm. Butler, 
Hans Jensen, Knud Emmertson and 
Jens P. C. Winter were discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

— Wm. Williams, of Logan, was arrested 
on a charge of u. c. 

Thurs. ^2.— Hans J. Petersen, of Kanes- 
ville, Weber Co., was discharged from the 
Penitentiary. 

— In the Second District Court (Judge 
Boremani, Stephen S. Barton of Para- 
goonah,David Chidester,of Leeds, Elijah M. 
Steers, of Washington, George Holyoak,of 
Parowin, and Daniel L. Macfarlane, of 
Cedar City, were sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment and a flne of §300 and costs, 
each, for u. c. The next day they were 
imprisoned in the Penitentiary. 

—In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
Ferdinand F. Hansen of Brigham City, 
was sentenced by Judge Henderson to four 
months" imprisonment and to pay a fine of 
§100, for u. c. 

— John B. Johnson was arrested at East 
Mill Creek, Salt Lake Co., on a charge of 
u. c. John Burt, of Clarkston, Cache Co., 
was arrested at Logan, and Fred. Theurer 
at Providence on the same charge. 

Fri. 2'3.~ln the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Wm. F. Rigby, of Newton, was 
sentenced by Judge Henderson to six 
months' imprisonment; John L. Andersen, 
of Brigham City, to three months' im- 
prisonment ; James Christensen,of Newton, 
to six months' imprisonment and f300 fine; 



CHURCH CHBONOLOGY — li<i 



157 



Andrew W. Stratford, of Brigham City, to 
six months' imprisonment and to pay a 
fine of $100; Francillo Durfee, of Dewey- 
ville, to six months' imprisonment and 
$300 fine; Lars C. Larsen, of Brigham 
City, to six months' imprisonment and |50 
fine, and Peter Bensen, of Newton, to six 
months' imprisonment and a fine of $100, 
all for u. c. 

—John Bergen, of Salt Lake City, com- 
menced to serve a sentence of three years 
for polygamy, in the Penitentiary. 

Sat. 2'4.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake Citv. Walter C. Brown, of the 
16th Ward, Salt Lake City, indicted for 
u.c, plead guilty, promised to obey the 
law and was sentenced to pay a fine of $50. 

3 ues. 27. — The company of soldiers, which 
had been stationed in Salt Lake City as a 
provost guard for some time, was removed 
to Fort Douglas. 

Sat. 31. — Because of the persecution and 
legal proceedings against the Church, all 
the workmen on the Temple Block, Salt 
Lake City, were discharged, and work on 
the building was suspended. 



1888. 

The year, generally speaking, was a 
prosperous one for the Saints in Utah and 
surrounoing Territories, although more 
arrests and imprisonments for conscience 
sake took place this year than during any 
previous season since the prosecutions 
under the Edmunds law commenced. A 
good harvest was gathered in nearly all 
the settlements of the Saints, although 
water was somewhat scarce in many 
places. The missionaries abroad were 
quite successful in their labors, especially 
on "the islands of the sea," including 
Samoa, where the fulness of the gospel 
was introduced in 1888. 

January. Sun. i.— Isaac Bullock was 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Mon. 2. — Hans Christian Hansen was ar- 
rested at Logan for u.c. and placed under 
$1,000 bonds. 

Wed. 4. — Elder Lewis Brunson died in 
Millard County, Utah. 

Thurs. 5. — George Taylor was arrested 
at Provo, for u.c. 

Sun. 8. — Henry Beal and Peter M. Peter- 
sen were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Mon. ,9.— The 28th session of the Utah 
legislature met in Salt Lake City and 
organized by electing Elias A. Smith 
president of the Council and Wm.W. Riter 
speaker of the Ho'ise. 

Tiies. iO.— James H. Clinger, of Lake 
View, Utah Co., was arrested for u.c. 

— Delegate John T. Caine presented the 
constituti»n of the proposed State of 
Utah, with a memorial asking for admis ■ 
sioninto the Union, in the U. S. Congress. 
The measure met with much opposition in 
the House, and was bitterly opposed by 
Geo. F. Edaionds in the Senate. 

Wed. 11. — Bishop James A. AUred, of 



Spring City, Sanpete Co., was arrested for 
u. c. After examination before Com. John- 
son he was discharged on the 12th. Frede- 
rick Yeates,of Millville,Cache Co., was also 
arrested for u. c. 

Thurs. 12.— Joseph Dover, of the 21st 
Ward, Salt Lake City, and Lorenzo Argyle, 
of Lake Shore, Utah Co, were arrested for 
u. c. and placed under bonds. 

— Edwin Rushton was discharged from 
the Penitentiary 

J^ri. 13. Speaker Wm. W. Riter intro- 
duced a bill in the Utah legislature, provid- 
ing a penalty for polygamy. 

— Thomas Piei'pont, of the Fifteenth 
Ward, Salt Cake City, and George B. 
Bailey, of Mill Creek, Salt Lake Co., were 
ari'ested for u. c. and placed under bonds. 
Bailey was discharged after examination 
before Com. Norrell on the 19th. 

Sat. yj.— Bishop Wm. H. Hickenlooper, 
of the Sixth Ward, Salt Lake City, died. 

— Fred. A. Newberger, of Logan, Cache 
Co., and William Gallup, of Springville, 
Utah Co., were arrested for u. c. 

JJon. 16.— Carl Capson, of Mill Creek, 
Salt Lake Co., was arrested for u. c. 

Tves. 17.— George Davis, of Three Mile 
Creek, Box Elder Co., was arrested on a 
charge of u. c. and placed under $1,000 
bonds. 

Wed. IS.— Wm. Shin Wardsworth, one of 
the Pioneers of 1847, died at Springville, 
Utah Co. 

— The Supreme Court of Utah denied an 
appeal to the U. S. Supreme Court, in the 
case of appointing a Receiver for Church 
property. 

— Samuel Smith and Henry Tingey, of 
Brigham City, and Gibson A. Condie, of 
Springville, Utah Co., were arrested for 
u. c. 

Thurs, 19. — Bishop Peder C. Jensen, 
Jens Keller Jens Christeusen and — Brad- 
shaw were arrested at Mantua, Box Elder 
Co., for u. c. 

— Caroline Harris, widow of the late 
Martin Harris (one of the Three Witnesses 
to the Book of Mormon) died at LewisviUe, 
Bingham Co., Idaho. 

— Hans C. Hansen was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Sat. 21. — Walter M. Gibson, once a mem- 
ber of the Church, and ex Premier of the 
Hawaiian Islands, died in San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Wed. 25. — David Whitmer, the last sur- 
vivor of the Three Witnesses to the 
Book of Mormon, died at Richmond, 
Ray Co., Mo. 

Thurs. 26'.- The Supreme Court of Utah 
rendered a decision, which restricted the 
jurisdiction of U. S. Commissioners, in 
civil cases, to that of justices of the peace. 

Jf'ri. 21. — Andrew Hansen was arrested 
at Newton, Cache Co., for u. c. 

Sat. 28.— George C. Watts, of South 
Cottonwood, was arrested for u. c. 

Sun. 29. — The first meeting house built 
by Latter-day Saints in Canada, was de- 
dicated on Lee's creek. Alberta. 

Mon. 30.— John H. Butler, of Spring 
Lake, Utah Co., was arrested on a charge 
of u. c, and placed under bonds. 

— Niels P. Madsen was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 



158 



CHURCH Gfl:E0KOL0GY — 1888. 



—Arthur Pratt succeeded O. S. L. Brown 
as warden of the Penitentiary. 

Tues. .3i. — Peter Svendsen, of Hyde 
Park, Cache Co., was arrested on a charge 
of u. c. 

— Nils J. Gyllens30g was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Ifebriiary. Sun. 5. — Ole A. Jensen and 
Alfred Atkinson, of Clarkston, Cache Co., 
were arrested for u. c. 

— Capt. John Douglas, commander of 
the Guion Line steamship Xevada, who 
had brought many companies of Saints 
across the sea, died at New York. 

Mon. 6. — The People's Party convention, 
in Salt Lake City, tendered four places 
on the municipal ticket to the Liberals, 
which were accepted by the more con- 
servative Liberal element. 

— Hans Sorensen and J. H. Barker, of 
Newton, and James Archibald, of Clarks- 
ton, Cache Co., were arrested for u. c. 

— Jacob Miller was discharged from the 
Penitentiary. 

Tues. 7. — A. D. Rogers, of Ogden, John 
Marriott, of Marriott, Weber Co., and 
Charles A. Andersen, of Hyrum, Cache 
Co., were arrested for u. c. About the 
samp, time Hans P. Hansen, of Hyrum, 
was arrested on the same charge. 

Wed. 8. — Bishop William H. Warner, of 
Nephi, Juab Co., was arrested for u. c. 

Fri. 10. — The anti- fusion Gentiles, in a 
disorderly meeting, held in Salt Lake City, 
opposed the municipal fusion ticket adopt- 
ed by the People's Party, and the more 
radical Liberals nominated a full city 
ticket of their own. Gov. West and others, 
favoring the fusion movement, were 
grossly insulted. 

— John Squires, William H. Tovey, Joseph 
Dover and Alexander Burt, of Salt Lake 
City, were arrested, charged with u. c. 
When arraigned next day Joseph Dover 
promised to obey the law. The others 
plead not guiltv. 

Sat. 11. — Apostle Joseph F. Smith, who 
had been appointed to preside over the 
affairs of the Church in the East, left Salt 
Lake City, for Washington, D. C. He was 
joined by Charles W. Penrose at Spanish 
Fork. They arrived at Washington on 
the 17th. For several months they la- 
bored there in the interest of Statehood, 
assisted by John W. Young and Franklin 
S. Richards. L. John Nuttall, as secre- 
tary to Delegate John T. Caine, and Geo. 
F. Gibbs, as stenographer, also rendered 
efficient aid. 

Sun. 12. — At a special conference held 
at West Portage, Box Elder Co., the Malad 
Stake of Zion was organized out of portions 
of the Box Elder and Cache Stakes, with 
Oliver C. Hoskins as president. The new 
Stake, at the time of its organization, con- 
sisted of the following named Wards: 
Plymouth, Washakie, Portage, Cherry 
Creek, Samaria, Malad, St. John, Rock- 
land and Neelyville. 

Mon. 13. — At the biennial municipal elec- 
tion in Salt Lake City, the fusion ticket, 
containing four Liberals, was elected; 
Francis Armstrong, mayor. 

— In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
the following brethren were sentenced by 
Judge Henderson for breaking the Ed- 
munds law : Alvin Crocket of Logan, to 



four months' imprisonment; Wm. Will- 
iams, of Hyrum, to six months' and $100 
fine ; Mads Christensen, of Farmington, to 
eight months; Carl M. Borgstrom, of 
Brigham City, to four months and $100 
fine; Wm. H. Griffin, of Newton, to three 
years and six months and |300 fine ; Mar- 
riner W. Merrill, jun., of Richmond, to five 
months; Gehart Jensen to $50 fine; James 
Hansen, of Brigham City, to six months 
and $100 fine; Charles A. Andersen, of 
Hyrum, to two months; Ira Allen, of 
Hyrum, to six months and $300 fine; Hans 
Peter Hansen, of Hyrum, to six months 
and $200 fine, and Ulrick Stauffer, of Wil- 
lard, to six months. 

— Thos. Henderson was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Tues. 14. — Bishop Wm. A. Bringhurst, of 
Toquerville, Washington Co., was arrested 
for u. c. 

Wed. 15. — After trial in the Third Dis- 
trict Court, Salt Lake City, George Mor- 
ris, charged with u. c, was acquitted. 

— Francis A. Berg, of Logan, was ar- 
rested on a charge of adultery. 

Thurs. 16.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, John Weinel, of Kaysville, 
74 years old, was sentenced by Judge 
Zane to pay a fine of $200 for u. c. 

— John H. Linck, a real "estate speculator 
form Colorado, Alma H. Winn, of Salt 
Lake City, and other land jumpers, 
who, on the previous Monday and follow- 
ing days, had attempted to jump and steal 
the lands belonging to Salt Lake City, 
on Arsenal Hill, were forcibly ejectedfrom 
their pretended claims by the city marshal 
and police. 

Sat. 18. — Andrew Homer, of Mill Creek, 
was discharged from the Penitentiary. 

— The question of Utah's admission into 
the Union as a State was argued before 
the Senate committee on Territories; John 
T. Caine and Franklin S. Richards de- 
livered excellent speeches in favor of ad- 
mission. 

Jlon. 20. — The Seventies residing in 
Price, Wellington and Spring Glen Wards, 
Emery Co., Utah, were organized as the 
101st quorum of Seventy, with Wm. H. 
Branch as senior president. On the 21st, 
Laurentius M. Olson, George W.Eldredge, 
Albert Bryner, Samuel Cox, Wm. J. Hill 
and John D. Lee were set apart as presi- 
dents, and 26 members were ordained. 

— Abraham H.Cannon, of Salt Lake City, 
and Chester V. Call, of Bountiful, were 
arrested for u.c. After examination be- 
fore Com. Norrell on the 24;th, Elder Can- 
non was discharged. 

— Alexander Bills was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. 23. — Isabella Adamson, of Ameri- 
can Fork, Utah Co., who refused to testify 
in a case under the Edmunds law, was 
imprisoned in the Penitentiary, for con- 
tempt of court. 

Fri. 24.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, John B. Johnson of East 
Mill Creek, was sentenced by Judge Zane 
to six months' imprisonment and a fine of 
$150,for u.c. 

Sat. 25. — John Andrews, of Logan, and 
Niels C. Andersen, of Hyrum, were ar- 
rested for u.c. 

— George Parker Dykes, once a pro- 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1888. 



15Q 



minent Elder in the Church and a member 
of the Mormon Battalion, died at Zenos, 
Maricopa Co., Ariz. 

Sun. 26. — Judge Zane decided against 
the land jumpers in Salt Lake City. 

— Charles Allen Burke, one of the Pio- 
neers of 1847, died at Minersville, Beaver 
Co. 

—Henry Beckstead was released from 
the Penitentiary. 

— DanielJones, of Salt Lake Co., Marcus 
Funk and John Tanner, of Washington, 
Washington Co., and Dr. Silas G. Higgins, 
of St. George, were arrested on the charge 
of u.c. 

Mo7i. 27.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Edward Cox, of the Six- 
teenth Ward, was sentenced by Judge 
Zane to six months' imprisonment and a 
fine of $50 for u. c. 

— John Thorp, of Logan, was arrested 
for breaking the Edmunds law. 

Tues. 2S. — At a meeting held at East 
Bountiful, Davis Co., the 100th quorum of 
Seventy was organized by Seymour B. 
Young, with Joseph L. Holbrook as senior 
president. 

—The city council of Salt Lake City, 
decided to present a portion of the cor- 
poration lands on Arsenal Hill to the Ter • 
ritory for State Buildings. 

Wed. 29 — Gov. West, Mayor Armstrong 
and a committee from the legislature and 
city council selected a site for the erection 
of State Buildings on Arsenal Hill, to be 
known in future as Capitol Hill. 

—In the Third District Court, Salt Lake 
City, Olaus Johnson, of South Cottonwood, 
was sentenced by Judge Zane to six 
months' imprisonment and $50 fine, and 
Bernhard H. Schettler to six months' im- 
prisonment and $300 fine, for u.c. 

— In the First District Court, at Provo, 
S0ren N. Sorensen, of Ephraim, was sen 
tenced by Judge Henderson to four months' 
imprisonment and $50 fine, and Chr. L. 
Thorp, of Ephraim, to four months and $100 
fine, for u.c. 

— John A. Marchant, Isaac Riddle, Wm. 
Blood and James M. Fisher were dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

March. Thurs.l. — Thomas Pierpont, of 
Salt Like City, was sentenced by Judge 
Zane, in the Third District Court, to six 
months' imprisonment and a fine of $300, 
for u. c. 

Hat. 3. — William J. Jenkins, of West Jor- 
dan, was arrested on a charge of u. c. and 
placed under $1,000 bonds. 

— Hyrum H. Evans and John Harwood 
were discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Sun. 4. — Aaron Hardy was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Mon. 5. — Elder John B. Johnson died in 
the Penitentiary, where he was confined 
for conscience sake. 

— In the Third District Court, Salt Lake 
City, Charles H. Bassett, who promised to 
live with his legal wife, was sentenced 
to pay a fine of $50, for u. c. 

Tues. 6. — The city council of Salt Lake 
City decided to offer the Tenth Ward 
Square to the Territory for fair grounds. 
The Territory accepted of it on the 9th. 

— In the First District Court, at Provo, 
Samuel Allred, of Ephraim, was sentenced 
by Judge Henderson to six months' im- 



prisonment and Wilson M. Allred, of 
Ephraim, to six months' imprisonment and 
$100 fine, for u. c. 

— John Penman was discharged from the 
Penitentiary, having served out a sentence 
of two years for polygamy and three 
months for u. c. 

Wed. 7.— John Oborn was discharged 
from the Penitentiarj . 

Thurs. 8.— John L. Andersen was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

Sat. iO.— The Utah legislature closed its 
session. The most important bills which 
became law were those providing for the 
bonding of the Territory to the amount of 
$150,000; for the establishment of a Reform 
School, in Weber County, and an Agri- 
cultural College in Cache County; uni- 
formity in county and municipal govern- 
ments, and appropriating means for the 
completion of the Deseret University, in- 
cluding a department for the deaf mutes. 
The municipal authorities of Salt Lake 
City, having given to the Territory a 
beautiful site for capitol grounds, on Ar- 
senal Hill, an appropriation was made for 
its improvement. To erect permanent fair 
buildings on the Tenth Ward Square (also 
tendered the Territory by Salt Lake City), 
an appropriation of $20,000 was made by the 
legislature. 

—In the First District Court, at Provo, 
Carl C. N. Dorius, of Ephraim, was sen- 
tenced by Judge Henderson to six months' 
imprisonment and $100 fine; Wm. T. Reid, 
of Manti, to three months and $300 fine ; 
Joseph S. Jones, of Payson, to six months 
and $100 fine, and John J. Walser, of Pay- 
son, to six months, all for u. c. 

Sun. ii.— James C. Watson and Charles 
Burgess were discharged from the Peni- 
tentiary. 

Jfon. 12.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, James S. Brown, of tLe 
Seventeenth Ward, was sentenced by 
Judge Zane to three months' imprisonment 
and $100 fine, for u. c. 

—Nathan Hanson and James Loyndwere 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Tues. 13.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Thomas Allsop, of Sandy, 
was sentenced by Judge Zane to three 
months' imprisonment and $50 fine, for u.c. 

— Lars Jacobsen and Wm. Yates were 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Wed. i4.— Alonzo Norton and E. Wright, 
of Brigham City, Box Elder Co., were ar- 
rested on the charge of u. c. 

— John T. Lambert, of Spring City, was 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. 15.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Ephraim Briggs, of Boun- 
tiful, was sentenced by Judge Zane to six 
months' imprisonment and to pay a fine of 
$25, for u. c. 

— John W. Hess, of Farmington, was ar- 
rested on a charge of u. c. 

Fri. 16.— In the First District Court, at 
Pro 70, Bendt Larsen, of Monroe, was sen- 
tenced by Judge Henderson to six months' 
imprisonment and $50 fine, for u. c. 

Jfon. 19.— rohn Woods and Thomas H. 
Smart were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Tues. 20.— Elder Erastus W. Snow, son 
of Apostle Erastus Snow, died in Salt 
Lake City. 



160 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1888. 



— D. Spillsbury, of Toquerville, was ar- 
rested at Silver lieef , for u. c. 

Wed. 27.— Albert K. Thurber, president 
of the Sevier Stake, died at Ephraim, 
Sanpete Co. 

—Joseph Clark and George Wilding were 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. 22. — James Smith was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Fri. 23. — The Driving Park grounds at 
Ogden were granted to the Reform School. 

— John Bergen was discharged from the 
Penitentiary. 

bai. 2J.— In the First District Court, at 
Provo, Thomas Harding, of Provo, was 
sentenced by Judge Henderson to six 
months' imprisonment; Robert T. King, 
of American Fork, to six months; George 
Farnsworth to pay a tine of 5^200; Henry 
Hamilton, of Span sh Fork, to six months 
and $100 line ; L. Loveridge, of Provo, to 
six months and $50 tine; James Lattimer, 
of Nephi, to six months and !t.300 fine ; Levi 
Curtis, of Springville, to six months and 
$100 fine; James G. Higginson, of Spanish 
Fork, to SIX months; Joseph Lunceford, 
of Lake View, to six months and $50 fine ; 
Joshua Adams, of American Fork, to six 
months and $100 fine ; Karl G. Maeser to 
pay a tine of §300; Henry G. Boyle, of Pay- 
son, to six months and $100 fine, and 
Thomas R. Cutler (in whose case a new 
trial was granted and he admitted to bail), 
of Lehi, to six months, and $300 fine; 
all for breaking the Edmunds law. 

— James Hendrickson, a membi r of the 
Mormon Battalion, died in Star Valley, 
Wyo., aged 65 years and four mouths. 

Hun. 25.— William A. Bfinghurst, of 
Toquerville, Dr. Silas G. Higgins, of St. 
George, Marcus Funk and John Tanner, of 
Washington, and Hs rum S. Church, of 
Panguitch, who had been sentenced by 
Judge Boremin. in tlie Second District 
Court, ar. Beaver, to six months' imprison- 
ment and $300 fine, each, the day previous, 
for transgression of the Edmunds law, were 
imprisoned in the Penitentiary. 

Man. 21!.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Altxander Burt was sen- 
tenced by Judge Zane to six months' im- 
prisonment, for u c. 

—Joseph H. Ridges was discharged 
from the Peditentiary. 

—The U. S. Senate Committee on Ter ■ 
ritories, to whom was referred the Utah 
State constitution and accompanying 
memorials, reported unfavorably for Utah's 
admission into the Union, and was dis- 
charged from its further consideration. 

Tites. 27.— James E. Mitchel.of Riverdale, 
Weber Co., was ari'ested for u.c. 

— Orlando F. Herron was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Wed. 28.— Levi Savage and John Cot- 
tam were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Fri. 30.— Joseph C. Perry and John P. 
Wiightwere discharged from the Peni- 
tentiary. 

Sat. 31.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, William R. Smith, pres. of 
the Davis Stake, was sentenced by Judge 
Zane to six months' imprisonment and 
$300 fine, for u.c. 

ApriL Mon. 2.— Moroni F. Sheets, a 
witness in the Church suits before the 



Territorial Supreme Court, was adjudged 
guilty of contempt of court for refusing to 
answer certain questions in relation to 
Church property, and imprisoned in the 
Penitentiary. He app saled his case to 
the Supreme Court of the United States. 

— Peter Andersen, of Huntsville, Weber 
Co., was arrested on a charge of u.c. 

Ferdinand F. Hansen was released from 
the Penitentiary. 

Tues. 3. — John Durrant, of American 
Fork, and Soren Jacobsen, of Bountiful, 
Davis Co , were arrested for u.c. 

— Charles A. Andersen and Isabella 
Adamson were discharged from the Peni- 
tentiary. 

Wed. -/.—John Harwood, Prederik Pet- 
ersen, Wm. D. iVews )m, Peter S. Barton 
and Daniel Harvey were discharged from 
the Penitentiary. Newsom and Barton 
had been pardoned by President Cleve- 
land. 

Thurs. 5. —The Fifty-eight annual con- 
ference convened in Salt Lake City. It 
was continued on the 6th and it was very 
well attended. A general board of educa- 
tion to superintend Church schools was 
sustained, consisting of Wilford Wood- 
ruff, Lorenzo Snow, George Q. Cannon, 
Karl G. Maeser, Horace S. Eldredge, 
Willard Young, George W. Thatcher, 
Anthon H. Lund and Amos Howe. 

Fr-i. 6".— Jens P. Holm, of Salt Lake 
City, was arrested for u. c, and placed 
under bonds. After examination on the 
9th he was discharged. 

Tues. 10.— The city council committee in 
Salt Lake City reported favorably on 
sewerage. 

— S0ren^ Christophersen was arrested at 
Manti, Sanpete Co., for u. c. 

Wed. 11.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Daniel Jones, of Salt Lake 
County, was sentenced by Judge Zane to 
six months' imprisonment and $300 fide 
for u. c. 

— John T. Gerber was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. i2.— William S. Muir and Samuel 
Anderson were discharged from the Peni- 
tentiary. 

Fri. i,3.— Charles McCarthy and Victor 
Sandgren were discharged from the Peni- 
tentiary. 

Sat. 14.— In the First District Court, at 
Provo, Harvey H. Cluff, of the Utah Stake 
presidency, was sentenced by Judge Hen- 
derson to six months' imprisonment and$300 
fine, and Charles Monk, of Spanish Fork, 
to four months, both for u. c. 

— Jesse R. Turpin and Edward Cliff 
were discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Mon. iff.— James Welsh was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Tues. i7.— William J. Parkin was ar- 
rested at Bountiful, and R. Bird at Sprinar- 
ville, for u. c. 

— Germand Ellsworth was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Wed. is.— Hans 01sen,of Millville, Cache 
Co., was arrested at Marsh Valley, Idaho, 
on a charge of polygany, and Lars C. Chris- 
tiansen at Hyde Park, and Niels P. Olsen 
and Ole Olsen at Smithfield, Cache Co., 
charged with u. c. 

TAitrs. i.9.— Richard Fry, John Jenkins 



UHUECH CHRONOLOGY 1888. 



161 



and Ferdinand Oberhansle were dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

Sat. 21.— In the Third District r Court 
Salt Lake City,Williams J. Jenkins,of West 
Jordan, and William H. Tovey,of Salt Lake 
City, were sentenced by Judge Zane to a 
second term of six months in the Peniten- 
tiary, and to pay a fine of $50; Geo. C. 
Watts, of South Cottonwood, to three 
months' imprisonment and $50 fine — all for 
u. c. 

— Rodney C. Badger and Ralph Smith 
were discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Sun. 22. — R.Hochstrasser was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Mon. 23. — John Harris and Byron W. 
King were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Wed. 25.— Andrew C. Berlin, Christian 
Petersen, Oluf Hansen and David B. 
By bee were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

Thurs. 26.— Hans E. Nielsen, of Hyrum, 
Cache Co., was arrested for u.c. 

— Henry Hughes was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

FH. 21. — Christian Hansen and Andrew 
J . Stremberg were discharged from the 
Penitentiary, but Stremberg was imme- 
diately sent back to serve another term. 

— Jens Hansea, of Mill Creek, and David 
West, of Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., were 
arrested for u.c. 

Sat. 28.— The Matthews Ward, Graham 
Co., Ariz., was organized; David H. Mat- 
thews, Bishop. 

— Lars Mortensen and M.P. Mortensen 
were discharged from the Penitentiary. 

— The steamship Wyoming sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 7J Saints, under 
the direction of Franklin S. Bramwell. 
The company reached New York May 10th, 
and arrived in Salt Lake City May 17th. 

Mon. .30.— In the Third District Court, 
John R. Barnes, of Kaysville, was sen- 
tenced by Judge Zane to three mouths' im- 
prisonment and $300 fine, for u.c. 

May. Wed. 2.— The Utah Supreme 
Court ruled that the Tithing Office and 
certain personal Church property should 
be turned over to the Receiver. Chief 
Justice Zane dissented from this opinion. 

—Moroni AI. Sheets was brought into 
court from the Penitentiary, where he had 
been imprisoned for a month, for refusing 
to answer questions in regard to Church 
suits. He now answered the questions 
and was released. 

—Hans C. H. Beck, of Chester, Sanpete 
Co., was arrested on a charge of u. c. 

Thurs. .3.— Bernhard H. Schettler, hav- 
ing been pardoned by Pres. Cleveland, 
was liberated from the^Penitentiary. 

— Nathaniel V. Jones in whose case the 
Supreme Court of Utah had ordered 
a new trial, was released from the 
Penitentiary. 

Sat. 5. — "Mormons" were excluded from 
the Democratic Territorial convention at 
Ogden. 

Wed. .9.— Isaac Farley, of Ogden, was 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

— Friedrick Hirth, a prominent Chinese 
doctor, visited Salt Lake City. 

Thurs. 10.— Wm. Wheeler was discharg- 
ed from the Penitentiary. 

Fri. 11.— W. H. Kelsey and Lorin Har- 
12 



mer, of Springville, Utah Co., were ar- 
rested for u. c. Charles W. Nibley was 
arrested at Logan, on the same charge. 
After examination, he was discharged, a 
few days later. 

—Simon Webb, of Richmond, Cache Co., 
who had been sentenced to six months' im- 
prisonment and $50 fine for u. c, was im- 
prisoned in the Penitentiary. 

Sat. 12.— In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Edwin R. Miles, of Smithfield, was 
sentenced by Judge Henderson to six 
months' imprisonment and $50 fine, for u. c. 

Mon. 14. — Deputy marshals demanded 
the Latter-day Saint tabernacle at Logan 
as Church property, but were refused. 

Tues. 15. — William Kelly, of American 
Fork, Utah Co., was arrested for u. c. 

Wed. iff.- Christian P. Nielsen, of Mo- 
charge of u. c. Albert Haws, of Provo, 
and John Walton, of Alpine, Utah Co., 
roni, Sanpete Co., was arrested on a 
were arrested on the same charge, in 
Provo Valley. 

Thurs. 17. — Andrew Madsen was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

FiH. 18.— In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Fred. Yeates, of Millville,was sen- 
tenced by J udge Henderson to six months' 
imprisonment and a fine of $100, for u. c. 

i>at. 19. — Bishop Ezekiel Holman, of 
Sandy, was arrested on a charge of u. c. — 

— Hans Funk,of Newton,was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

— The steamship Wt/ominr/ sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 137 Saints, in 
charge of William Wood. The company 
arrived at New York May 30th, and at Salt 
Lake City June 6th. 

Mon. 21.— The Temple at Manti, Sanpete 
Co., was dedicated. This was the third 
Temple completed in Utah, and with its 
surroundings is the finest structure erect- 
ed in the Rocky Mountains. Its entire 
cost, including the terraces, when finished, 
is estimated at §1,000,000. 

— Bishop William West, of Paris, Bear 
Lake Co., Idaho, was arrested for u. c. 

Wed. 2,3.— Wm. F. Rigby and Lars C. 
Larsen (of Brigham City) were discharged 
from the Penitentiarj'. 

Thio-s. 2J.— Peter Bensen and Alvin 
Crocket were discharged from the Peni- 
tentiary. 

Fri. 25.— In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Christopher S. Winge, of Hyrum, 
and Elijah Seamons, of Hyde Park, were 
each sentenced by Judge Henderson, to 
six months' imprisonment and $.50 fine, for 
u. c. Both men were taken to the Peni- 
tentiary. 

— Geo. L. Graehl, of Brigham City, who 
the day previous had been sentenced by 
by Judge c Henderson to pay $10 fine, 
was incarcerated in the Penitentiary 
for u. c, in default of payment. He 
promised to obey the law. 

— Edward Davis, of South Cottonwood, 
Salt Lake Co., having been ari-ested on a 
charge of u. c, was placed under bonds. 
His wife lost her reason because of the 
prosecution. 

— A. C. Nielsen, Engebregt Poulsen and 
John F. F. Dorius were arrested at Eph- 
raim, Sanpete Co., for u. c. 

Sat. 26.— In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Jens Christensen, of Hyde Park, 



162 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1888. 



was seEtenced by Judge Henderson to six 
months' imprisonment and $50 fine; Lo- 
renzo Waldron, of North Ogden, to six 
months' imprisonment and §300 fine, and 
Winslow Farr, jun., of Ogden, to six 
months" imprisonment and $300 fine; all 
for u. c. 

—Bishop Wm. T. Raid, of Manti, was 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Sun. 27.— Apostle Erastus Snow died in 
Salt Lake City. 

2fon. 28.— James S. Brown, of Salt Lake 
City, was discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

—Amos W. Haws fell a distance of thirty 
eet from the Woollen factory at Provo, 
Utah Co., and was killed. 

—In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
James Bywater, of Brigham City, was 
sentenced by Judge Henderson to six 
months' imprisonment and $50 fine; Sam- 
uel Taylor, of Ogden, to three months, 
Thomas Harper, of Calls Fort, and Niels 
C. Andersen, of Hyrum, to six months and 
$300 fine each ; for u. c. 

— Thomas E. Ricks, president of the 
Bannock Stake, Idaho, was arrested at 
Logan, for u. c. After preliminary exam- 
ination he was discharged. 

Tues. 25.— Thomas Allsop, of Sandy, was 
discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Wed. 30.— In the Manti Temple, which 
had just been opened for ordinance work, 
a number of marriages were solemnized. 
Janne M. Sjodahl and Christine Christof- 
fersen were the first couple married in the 
building; Apostle Francis M. Lyman 
ofiiciated. 

—The new buildings of the Utah Peni- 
tentiary were opened for the accommoda- 
tion of the prisoners. 

Thurs. PA. — In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, John Squires, of Salt Lake 
City, was sentenced by Judge Zane to six 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine, for 
u. c. 

—In the First District Court, at Ogden, 
Daniel F. Thomas, of Lynne, was sen- 
tenced by Judge Henderson to three 
months' imprisonment and $300 fine, for 
u. c. 

— James B. Hayes, chief justice of Idaho, 
and a bitter anti- Mormon, died at Boise 
City. 

June. Fri. I.— In the Second District 
Court, at Beaver, Wm. Carter, Warren 
Hardy , Walter Granger and Casper Bryner, 
of St. George, Jacob Bastion, of Wash- 
ington, and Mark Burgess, of Panguitch, 
were each sentenced by Judge Boreman 
to six months' imprisonment and $300 fine, 
for u. c. 

—The Salt Lake and Fort Douglas Rail- 
way was opened. 

Sat. 2.— In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Thos. B. Helm, of Pleasant View, 
Weber Co., and John Jardine, of Clark- 
ston. Cache Co., were each sentenced to 
six months' imprisonment and $300 fine, for 
u. c, and taken to the Penitentiary. 

— Alma Fairfield, of Eureka, Juab Co., 
was arrested for u. c. 

— The steamship Wisconsin sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with a company of 
Saints, in charge of Charles R. Dorius. 
The company arrived at New York June 



13th, and part of the emigrants in Salt 
Lake City June 19th. 

Sun. .3.— Bishop Hans Jensen and Wil- 
liam Braithwait, of Manti, and J. C. 
Frost, of Ephraim, were arrested for u. c. 
Mon. 4. — Andrew Anderson, of Union, 
was arrested on a charge of u. c. D. A. 
Sanders, of Farmington, Davis Co., in- 
dicted for polygamy, was arrested, but 
succeeded in getting away from the officer 
during the following night. 

Wed. 6.— A railway car, loaded with pro- 
ducts of Utah, left Salt Lake City, on an 
advertising tour through the country. It 
bore the following inscription: " Utah 
Palace Exposition Car; the Resources of 
Salt Lake City, the Gem of the Rocky 
Mountains. Free Exhibit sent out under 
the auspices of the Salt Lake Chamber of 
Commerce." 

Thurs. 7. — P. J. Rasmussen and Wil- 
liam Roundy, of Milton, Morgan Co., were 
arrested for u. c. 

Fri. 8. — James Turner, of West Jordan, 
Salt Lake Co., was arrested for u. c. 

Sat. .9. — The steamship Xevada sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with a company 
of Saints, in charge of Elder Charles H. 
Haderli. The company arrived in New York 
on the 20th. and part of them in Salt Lake 
City about the 27th. 

— Thomas Young and S0ren N. S0rensen 
were discharged from the Penitentiary. 

2£on. 11. — John Irving, of North Jordan, 
Salt Lake Co., was arrested for u. c. 

— Fred. Jensen, Jens Hansen, Charles 
O. Dunn, Jens Petersen and John R. 
Jones were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

t Tues. 12. — Christian L. Thorp was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

— Two million government shad, import- 
ed from Lake Superior, were put into 
Utah Lake. 

Wed. i.3.— The dead body of Lewis Bish- 
op, who was drowned the previous April in 
the Sevier River, near Deseret, was found 
three miles below where he fell in. 

— WiUiam H. Griffin and James Kemp 
were discharged from the Utah Peniten- 
tiary. 

Thurs. i4. — John C. Ostler, of Nephi, 
Juab Co., was arrested for u. c. 

Fri. 15. — Father Graves, of Provo, was 
arrested for u. c. 

Sun. 17.— A fire on East Temple Street, 
Salt Lake City, destroyed property worth 
$50,000. 

—Pleasant Valley Ward, Emery Coun- 
ty, Utah, was divided into two Wards, 
namely. Winter Quarters and Sco- 
field, "^with John T. Ballantyne and 
Thos. J. Parmley as their respective 
Bishops. 

Jfon. i8.— Gustaf Thomassen, Marriner 
W. Merrill, jun., and William Chugg were 
discharged from tVie Penitentiary. 

—Dr. Milford B. Shipp surrendered him- 
self to the officers at Salt Lake City, to 
answer to a charge of u. c, 

—Elder Joseph H. Dean (with wife and 
child) arrived on the Samoan Islands, to 
open up a new missionary field among the 
natives of that group. 

Wed. 20.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City, Alexander Brown was 



CHUECH CHROJSrOLOGT — 1888. 



163 



sentenced to one month's imprisonment 
for alleged adultery. 

— James Loynd, of Farmington, Davis 
Co., was arrested on a charge of u. c. He 
had already served one term for living 
with his wives. 

Fri. 22. — Daniel S. Macfarlane, George 
Holyoak, Stephen S. Barton, David Chi- 
dester, Elijah Steers, and John R. Barnes 
were discharged from the Penitentiary, 
having served terms for u. c. The latter 
was pardoned by Pres. Cleveland. 

Sat. 23.— In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, John Henry Bott, of Brigham 
City, was sentenced by Judge Henderson 
to six months' imprisonment and $100 fine ; 
Alexander Balrd, of Deweyville, to six 
months and $50 fine ; Christian H. Monson, 
of Richmond, to six months' imprisonment 
and S200 fine; Henry W. Manning, of 
Hooper, Weber Co., to four months and 
1300 line; Axel Christensen, of Brigham 
City, to four months and $100 fine; Hans 
C. Hansen, of Logan, to six months and 
$100 fine, and C. F. Schade, of Huntsville, 
to ?300 fine ; all for u. c. 

— Andrew W. Stratford, James Chris- 
tensen and Francillo Durfee were dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

— John Alma Pace was arrested at 
Thistle Station, and N. P. Nielsen at Hy- 
rum, Cache Co., for u. c. 

—The steamship Wyoming sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 118 Saints, in 
charge of Henry E. Bowring. The 
company arrived at New York July 3rd, 
and at Salt Lake City July 11th. 

Sun. 24. — Judge Elias Smith died in 
Salt Lake City. 

Mon. 25. — Joseph Brundish was arrested 
near Thistle Station, Utah Co., for u.c. 

— C.M.Borgstr0m and George L.Graehl 
were discharged from the Penitentiary. 

— Elder Joseph H. Dean baptized his 
first convert in Samoa, on the little island 
of Aunuu. By the 1st of July thirteen 
souls had been baptized. 

Wed. 27.— James Howard, of South 
Bountiful, was arrested for u. c. 

Sat. 30.— In the First District Court, at 
Ogden, Frank Greenwell, of Ogden, was 
sentenced by Judge Henderson to five 
months' imprisonment for u.c. 

July. Wed. 4.— Elder Orville S. Cox, 
died in Fairview, Sanpete Co. 

Thurs. 5.— Houses at Kanosh, Millard 
Co., were raided by U. S. marshals, who 
arrested Bishop Abram A. Kimball, Bald- 
win H. Watts, John T. Prows and Albert 
Nadauld, for u.c. 

Fri. 6".— Andrew Amundsen, of South 
Jordan, and William B. Bennett, of West 
Jordan, Salt Lake Co., were arrested for 
u.c. 

—The Church farm,in Salt Lake County 
was turned over to Receiver Dyer. 

Sat. 7.— Seventy-five school teachers 
from Colorado and Indiana visited Salt 
Lake City. 

— A small company of Icelandic Saints 
sailed from Liverpool, England, in charge 
of Robert Lindsay, bound for Utah. 

J/b«. 9.— Receiver Frank H.Dyer peti- 
tioned the Supreme Court of Utah to have 
$157,666.15 worth of Church property de- 
livered to him. 



— The election for school trustees in 
Salt Lake City resulted in victory for the 
Liberals in the Eighth, Ninth, Twelfth, 
Thirteenth and Fourteenth districts. 

—Henry Arnold, of Salt Lake City, was 
arrested on a charge of u.c. 

— President Cleveland nominated Elliott 
Sandford, of New York, to be chief justice 
of the Supreme Court of Utah, and John 
W. Judd, of Tennessee, to be the fourth 
associate justice. These nominations were 
confirmed by the Senate July 20th. 

Tues. iO.— Considerable Church property 
was turned over to Receiver Dyer on com- 
promise, pending appeal to the U. S. Su- 
preme Court. 

— The city council of Salt Lake City, 
provided for the issuance of five per cent 
bonds for corporate purposes. 

Thurs. 12.— The Old Folks of Salt Lake 
County had their anuual excursion, this 
time going to Lehi, Utah Co. 

Fri. 13. — Ira Allen and H. P. Hansen, of 
Hyrum, Cache Co., and Ulrich Stauffer, of 
Willard, Box Elder Co., were discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Sat. 14.— The Iowa Press Association, 
numbering about two hundred persons, 
visited Salt Lake City. 

Mon. 16. — Lorenzo D. Watson, of Paro- 
wan, Iron Co., was arrested for u. c, but 
got away from the officer on the road to 
Beaver. 

Tues. 17. — Patriarch John Andrews died 
at Nephi, Juab Co., from injuries received 
the day before. 

— U.S. deputy marshals raided a number 
of houses at Richfield, Sevier Co., and ar- 
rested Ole P. Borg and Niels M. Petersen 
for u. c. 

— Frangott Stumph was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Fri. 20. — U. S. deputy marshals raided 
places at Spring City, Sanpete Co., and 
arrested N. C. Jenson for u. c. 

— Alexander Brown was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Sat. 21.— Pres. William R. Smith, of 
Davis Co., was released from the Peniten- 
tiary, having been pardoned by Pres. 
Cleveland. 

Wed. 25. — Charles Monk was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Fri. 27. — Seymour B. Young was ar- 
rested in Salt Lake City, and Charles 
Sperry, at Nephi, Juab Co., for u. c. 

— Edward Cox was discharged from the 
Penitentiary. 

Sat. 28. — The steamship Wyoming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 136 Saints, 
under the direction of Hans J. Christian- 
sen. The company landed in New York, 
Aug. 8th, and arrived in Salt Lake City, 
Aug. 15th. 

August. — Elder Alma P. Richards, of 
Morgan County, Utah, who labored as a 
missionary in the Southern States, was 
murdered, near Russell Station, on the A. 
G. S. Ry., Miss. His body, which was 
found June 3, 1889, was shipped to Utah. 

— A very large number of arrests under 
the Edmunds law were made in Utah, du- 
ring this month. 

Wed. 1. — Thomas Pierpontwas discharg- 
ed from the Penitentiary. 

— James P. Freeze was arrested in Salt 
Lake City, on a charge of u. c, but dis- 



164 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1888. 



charged the following day, after examina- 
tion before Com. Norrell. 

Thurs. 2. — Howard O. Spencer was ar- 
rested in Salt Lake City, for u. c. 

Fri. 3.— George Godfrey, of Clarkston, 
Cache Co., was arrested for u. c. 

Mon. 6. — Samuel Allred and Geo. C. 
Watts were discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary. 

— The election for county officers in 
Utah resulted in victory to the People's 
party, except in Summit County, which 
was carried by the Liberals. 

Tues. 7. — Howard O. Spencer (already 
under arrest for u. c.) was arrested for 
murder, being accused of killing Ralph 
Pike, Aug. 11, 1859. 

Wed. 8. — Samuel Cluff, of Provo, was 
arrested for u. c. 

J'^ri. iO.— Carl C. N. Dorius, John J. Wal- 
ser and Joseph S. Jones were discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Sat. 11. — The steamship Wisconsin sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 155 Saints, 
in charge of Levi Naylor. The emigrants 
landed in New York, August 24th, and ar- 
rived in Salt Lake City, Sep. 1st. 

Sun. 12. — James H. Hart was arrested at 
Bloomington, Idaho, for u. c. 

— A Latter-day Saint meeting was dis- 
turbed and broken up by the apostate Wm. 
Jarman, at Swansea, Wales. 

Mon. 13. — William Williams, James Han- 
sen and Samuel Taylor completed their 
term in the Penitentiary and were dis- 
chaiged. 

—Elder Edmund Z. Taylor, of Ogden, 
died near Loch Laird, Rockbridge Co., 
Virginia, where he labored as a missionary. 
His body was sent to Utah for burial. 

Wed. 15. — After a lengthy examination 
before Com. Norrell, Howard O. Spencer, 
accused of killing Ralph Pike, was admit- 
ted to bail in the sum of $6,000. 

— Ephraim Briggs was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

—Erik Eliasen, of Millville, Cache Co., 
was arrested for u. c. 

Thurs. If!. — Samuel Obray was arrested 
at Paradise, Cache Co., for u. c. 

— Daniel F. Thomas was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

Fri. 17.— The Territorial Reform School 
Commissioners located the site for the 
buildings on the Driving Park grounds, 
Ogden, which had been donated for the 
purpose. 

Sun. 1!). — At a Stake conference held at 
Lewisville, Snake River Valley, Idaho, 
three new Wards were organized in the 
Bannock Stake, namely, the Taylor Ward, 
with Wm. Priest as Bishop; Willow Creek 
Ward, Alfonso B. Simmons, Bishop; and 
Basalt Ward, Andrew O. Ingelstram, 
Bishop. 

Mon. 20. — John D. Jones was arrested 
at Cherry Creek, Idaho, for u. c. 

Tues. 2/.— Rasmus Nielsen, of Hunter, 
Salt Lake Co., was arrested for u. c. 

—The Saints who had settled on the 
bench, south of Springville,Utah Co., were 
organized as a Ward called Mapleton; 
Edwin L. Whiting, Bishop. 

Thurs. 23. — John W. Judd, of Tennessee, 
Utah's new associate justice, arrived at 
Ogden. 

Jbri. 24.— Thomas Harding, Robert T. 



King, Joshua Adams, James G. Higginson 
and L. Loveridge were discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

— Bishop John Kienke, of Mona, Juab 
Co., was arrested for u, c. 

— A Democratic political club was or- 
ganized in Salt Lake City. 

Sat. 25. — A Republican political club was 
organized in Salt Lake City. 

Sun. 26. — The Hunter branch, Salt Lake 
Co., was organized into a Ward; William 
Miller, Bishop. 

— Elliot Sanford, recently appointed 
chief justice for Utah, arrived in Salt Lake 
City. On the 27th he took the oath of 
office and superseded Judge Charles S. 
Zane. 

Mon.27. — Alexander Burt was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Wed, 29.— Olaus Johnson and Levi Curtis 
were discharged from the Penitentiary. 

Thurs. 30.— The court house at Beaver, 
Beaver Co., was burned. Loss 115,000. 

Fri. 31. — Bishop James C. Hamilton, of 
Mill Creek, Salt Lake Co., was arrested 
for u. c. 

September. Sat. 1. — Bishop John 
Spencer, of Indianola, Sanpete Co., was 
arrested for u.c. 

— The steamship Wyoming sailed from 
Liverpool, England, with 83 Saints, in 
charge of Abraham Johnson. The com- 
pany arrived in New York Sept. 11th, and 
at Salt Lake City the 19th and 20th. 

Sun. 2.-Elders Elias S. Wright, Thos. 
Holt, Azahel L. Fuller and two others 
were dragged from their befis and fear- 
fully beaten by a masked mob, near Bell's 
Station, Tennessee, for preaching the 
gospel. 

Mo7i. 3. — Bishop Archibald McKinnon, 
of Randolph, Rich Co., was arrested for 
u. c. 

— Mads Christensen was discharged from 
the Penitentiary. 

— Elder Henry Beckstead died at South 
Jordan, Salt Lake Co. 

Tues. 4. — Apostle Moses Thatcher was 
arrested at Logan. On the 7th, after ex- 
amination, he was discharged for lack of 
evidence. 

Thurs. 6. — Wilson M. Allred was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

— Horace S. Eldredge, one of the First 
Seven Presidents of the Seventies, died in 
Salt Lake City. 

— Elders Andrew Jenson, Edward 
Stevenson and Joseph S. Black left Salt 
Lake City for the East, to visit the "waste 
places of Zion," in the interest of Church 
history. 

Fri. 7. — After examination before Com. 
Norrell, Seymour B. Young was discharg- 
ed for lack of evidence. 

Tues. 11. — An excursion party of Dakota 
editors visited Salt Lake City. 

— Daniel Jones was discharged from the 
Penitentiary. 

Fri. i4.— Harvey H. Cluff was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Sat. 15. — The steamship Wiseonsinsa.iled 
from Liverpool, England, with 145 Saints, 
in charge of William G. Phillips. The 
company arrived at New York Sept. 25th, 
where twenty of the emigrants were 
arbitrarily detained by the officers, on the 
pretence that they were paupers. The 



CHUBCH CHRONOLOGY — 1888. 



165 



rest of the company arrived in Salt Lake 
City Oct. 2nd. 

Sun. 16. — Bendt Larsen was discharged 
from the Penitentiary. 

Mon. 17. — Apostle George Q. Cannon, 
who had been hiding for some time, sur- 
rendered himself to U. S. Marshal Dyer, 
plead guilty to two indictments charging 
him with u.c, and was sentenced by Judge 
Sanford in the Third District Court to 175 
days' imprisonment and to pay a fine of 
§450. On the same occasion. Archibald N. 
HiU, of Salt Lake City, and Wm. J. Parkin, 
of Bountiful, were sentenced to .50 days' 
imprisonment and $50 fine, each, and 
Samuel H. Hill, of Salt Lake City, to 60 
days and ?75 fine ; all for u.c. 

— In the Swansea police court, Wales, 
William Jarman.who had incited the popu- 
lace to riot against the Mormons, was 
placed under £100 bonds, to keep the peace 
for three months. 

Tues. 18.— In the Third District Court, 
Salt Lake City (Judge Sanford) , James 
Turner, of West Jordan, was sentenced 
to 50 days' imprisonment and §50 fine; 
Daniel Lewis, of Kamas, to 60 days and 
^60 fine;Milford B.Shipp,of Salt Lake City, 
to 75 days and |65 fine, and Edwin L. 
Davis, of South Cottonwood, to 75 days 
and $70 fine ; all for u.c, 

— Bishop George Coleman, of Teasdale, 
Sevier Co., was arrested for u.c. ' 

Wed. 19.— In the First District Court, 
at Provo, Francis C. Boyer, of Spring- 
ville, was sentenced by Judge Judd to two 
months' imprisonment and $200 fine, and 
Jesse Gardner, of Springville, to three 
months' imprisonment, for u.c. 

— Benjamin Perkins was arrested on 
Carcass Creek, near Teasdale (now Wayne 
Co.), foru.c. 

F7t. 21.— In the First District Court, 
at Provo, Niels L. Petersen, of Ephraim, 
was sentenced by Judge Judd to five 
months' imprisonment, for u.c. 

Sat. 22.— In the First District Court, at 
Provo, Thomas Barrett, of American 
Fork, was sentenced to four months im- 
prisonment; Joseph B. Forbes, of Ameri- 
can Fork, to four months' and $100 fine ; 
Elijah Bourne, of American Fork, to five 
months; Christian P. Nielsen, of Moroni, 
to three months ; Wm. J. Lewis, of Provo, 
to five months; Ebenezer Hunter, of Am- 
erican Fork, to two months and Richard 
Bird, of Springville, to pay a fine of $100; 
all for u. c. 

— John M. Dunning, of Cannonville, 
Garfield Co., was sentenced by Judge 
Boreman, in the Second District Court, 
Beaver, to six months' imprisonment and 
$300 fine, for u. c. He was taken to the 
Penitentiary on the 26th. 

Sitn. 23. — The Nephi Ward, Maricopa 
Co., Arizona, was organized; Samuel Open- 
shaw. Bishop. 

3Ion. 24. — Elder Henry Arnold died in 
Salt Lake City. 

— In the Third District Court, Salt Lake 
City, James Woolstenhulme, of Kamas, 
Summit Co., was sentenced by Judge San- 
ford to 65 days imprisonment and $65 fine ; 
and Edwin Rawlins, of Salt Lake City, to 
75 days and $75 fine ; both for u. c. 

— In the First District Court, at Provo, 
Lewis Olsen, of Ephraim, and Paul Poul- 



son, of Richfield, were sentenced by Judge 
Judd to four months' imprisonment and 
$200 fine each; Lars Larsen, of Spanish 
Fork to three months and $100 fine ; and 
Daniel King, of Spanish Fork, Samuel 
Wagstaff, of American Fork, and Reddick 
N. Allred, of Chester, Sanpete Co., to 60 
days and $50 fine each ; all for u. c. Lars 
Frandsen, of Piute County, was sentenced 
to six months' imprisonment for alleged 
bigamy. 

— Henry Hamilton, Joseph Lunceford, 
Silas G. Higgins,Wm. H. Bringhurst,Mar- 
cus Funk, John Tanner and Hyrum S. 
Church were discharged from the Peni- 
tentiar J . 

Wed. 26. — In the First District Court, at 
Provo, James Butler, of Spring Lake, 
Utah Co., was sentenced by Judge Judd to 
five months' imprisonment, and Mons Nil- 
son, of Ephraim, to four months and f200 
fine, both for u. c. ; and Baldwin H. Watts, 
of Kanosh, to one- year's imprisonment, for 
alleged adultery. 

Thurs. 27.— Judge Zerubbabel Snow died 
in Salt Lake City. 

— A. G. Str0mberg, of Huntsville, We- 
ber Co., was discharged from the Peniten- 
tiary, having served two sentences for 
breaking the Edmunds law. 

— David A. Sanders was arrested at Far- 
mington, Davis Co., for u. c. 

— In the First District Court, Parley R. 
Young, of Fairview, was sentenced by 
Judge Judd to six months' imprisonment 
and f 150 fine, and Hans Jensen, of Manti, 
to five months' imprisonment; both for 
u. c. 

— David H. Cannon, of St. George, gave 
himself up to a U. S. deputy marshal, be- 
ing charged with u. c. After examination 
the following dav, before Com. Julius Jor- 
dan, at Silver Reef, he was discharged. 

Fri. 28. — Sarah Ann Down, an alleged 
plural wife from Davis County, was ar- 
rested for ''fornication.'" 

— John Homer, of Marion, Cassia Co., 
Idaho, was accidentally shot by his hunt- 
ing companions, being mistaken for a 
deer. 

Sat. 29.— In the First District Court, at 
Provo, Lorenzo D. Argyle, of Lake Shore, 
Utah Co., was sentenced by Judge Judd 
to six months' imprisonment and $150 fine ; 
John W. Gardner, of Pleasant Grove, to 
five months' imprisonment; Christian 
S0rensen, of Mt.Pleasant,to 90 days; Wm. 
Beeston, of Fillmore, to four months and 
$200 fine; Christian Borregaard, of Fill- 
more, to 60 days and $50 fine; Niels M. 
Petersen, of Richfield, and David Broad- 
head to $150 fine, each ; all for u.c. Ole P. 
Borg, of Richfield, was sentenced to nine 
months, and John Durrant, of American 
Fork, to 18 months" imprisonment, for 
alleged adultery. 

October. Mon. i.— John Squires, im- 
prisoned in the Penitentiary for u.c, was 
pardoned by President Cleveland. 

— Twenty emigrants detained by the 
officers at New York, through malice, 
were released, and continued their jour- 
ney to Utah. 

—Thirteen Utah probate judges were 
confirmed by the U. S. Senate. 

Tties. 2.— In the First District Court, at 
Provo, S0ren C. Christensen, of Mt. 



166 



CHURCH CHRONOLOGY — 1888. 



Pleasant, was sentenced by Judge Juddto 
60 days' imprisonment for u.c. 

Wed. 3. — Henry W. Manning was dis- 
charged from the Penitentiary. 

Thtirs. 4.— Samuel C. Pratt, of Salt Lake 
City, fell into the Hot Springs, at Wads - 
worth, Nev., and was scalded to death. 

Fi'i. 5. — The Fifty- ninth semi-annual 
conference of the Church commenced in 
Salt Lake City. It was continued until 
the 7th. on which day Brigham H. Roberts 
was sustained as one of the First Seven 
Presidents of the Seventies, Horace S. 
Eldredge being deceased. 

— John Squires was discharged from the 
Penitentiary. 

iSaf. 6. — The steamship Wyoming sailed 
from Liverpool, England, with 123 Saints 
in charge of Niels P. Lindelof. The com- 
pany arrived in New York Oct. 15th, and 
in Salt Lake City Oct. 23rd. 

Hun. 7. — At the first conference held by 
Latter-day Saints in Alberta, Canada, the 
Saints, who had located on Lee's creek, 
were organized by Apostles Francis M. 
Lyman and John W. Taylor as a Ward, 
which was named Cardston, in honor of 
Charles O. Card, the president of the 
colony ; Anthony Woolf , Bishop. 

Man. 8. — Statement of facts in Church 
confiscation case was agreed upon and 
submitted in the Utah Supreme Court ; 
decree was entered and notice of appeal 
given. 

Tues. .9.— In the First District Court, 
at Provo, Gibson Condie, of Spvingville, 
was sentenced by Judge Judd to four 
months' imprisonment and to pay a fine of 
$200; Rasmus Nielsen, of Spanish Fork, to 
four months and $200 f