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Full text of "History of St. John's lodge, F. & A.M. of Saint John, New Brunswick [microform] : together with sketches of all masonic bodies in New Brunswick, from A.D. 1784 to A.D. 1894"

FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK, 



3483.'J 




W. Bro. David Waterbuky, P. M. 



HI$TOI^Y 



OF 



St. JOHN'S Lodge, f. & a. m. 



OF 



SaiNT JOHN, NE¥ BRUNSWICK, 



TOGETHER WITH 



SKETCHES OF ALL MASONIC BODIES 



IN 



NEW BRUNSWICK, 
FROM A. D. 1784 TO A. D. 1894. 






WILLIAM FEAyiCL'N B-J ofTlSO, 
Era, Etc., Etc. 



, u„ , 






ILLUSTRATED. 



SAINT JOHN, N. B. 
J. & A. McMillan, 98 & 100 Prince Willlam Street. 

1895. 



Entered according to Act of Parliament of Canada, in the year 1895, 
, By W. F. Bunting, 

In the Office of the Minister of Agriculture at Ottawa. 



> • • • • • 



• •••.* 






• • • • • .! 



.: •• • .••••! 

• ••*• • ••••• • 



: : •.• . ... •.. . ••• 

... 



.. . 






• •.*•• • 
• . « • • « 



[ 



B.Q^R, 



IN MEMORY 

OF THE 

LATE R. W. BRO. W. H. A. KEANS, Esquire, 

DEPUTY C4KAND MASTER, PAST MASTER OP ST. JOHN'S LODGE, ETC. 

MY MASONIC GUIDE AND INSTRUCTOR, 

MY EARLY FRIEND AND COUNSELLOR, 
AND 

IN TESTIMONY* OF HIS STERLING WORTH AS A PUBLIC SPIRITED CITIZEN 
AND A BRIGHT AND ZEALOUS CRAFTSMAN, 

THIS VOLUME 

18 
GRATEFULLY DEDICATED. 



INTRODUCTION. 



The following pages are offered to the masonic fraternity in the hope 
that the various matters embodied in them may be the means of affording 
opportunity to brethren of gathering information relating to the craft in 
New Brunswick heretofore beyond their reach. 

The references to masonic bodies, other than St. John's Lodge, are 
necessarily abbreviated, in order to conform as nearly as possible to the 
design and limit of the compilation. Had I enlarged upon this division 
of my work — and there was much of absorbing interest in connection 
with these bodies which came under my notice — the size of the volume 
would have exceeded prudential limits ; and, notwithstanding my efforts 
to be concise in this and other particulars, the number of pages has 
exceeded my original intention. 

I have been more explicit in transcribing from the early pages of the 
records of St. John's Lodge — the exact wording of the original is given 
— as I felt that they would be more interesting to the reader than 
excerpts of later dates. 

From April 2, 1802, the day on which the lodge was constituted, the 
original chartered name " St. John's " has been continued without change 
or variation ; and, in like manner, there has been no alteration in the 
time of holding the regular communications, i. e., the first Tuesday in 
each calendar month. 

The many serious fires by which large portions of the city of Saint 
John were, from time to time, laid waste, destroyed large accumulations 
of books and documents, public and private, of great value for his- 
toric and other purposes. In consequence of these losses the historian 
and compiler are oftentimes perplexed in their efforts to obtain data to 
enable them to furnish important details. Files of old local newspapers 
are exceedingly rare. 

The reader will no doubt observe the frequent mention of the com- 
piler's name in the excerpts of St. John's Lodge records, since the year 
1852. Having since that year been a regular attendant at the meetings 
and an active participator in all the concerns of the lodge, and having 
had a large share of the work cast upon my shoulders, this obtrusion could 
not be very well avoided. For prudential reasons I have, in many 
instances, suppressed my personality. 

In the prosecution of this work, undertaken as a labor of love and to 
fill up an occasional hour not devoted to official duty (I did not intend 



X INTRODUCTION. 

originally to publiHli it, but have been perhaps overpersuaded by indis- 
creet friends), I have exiierienced a large measure of Hatisfaction in the 
perusal and deciphering of ancient books and documents, particularly 
those stored in the archives of the grand lodge of Nova Scotia. 

Brethren and others to whom I have been obliged to apply, either 
personally or by letter, for information affecting the various umtUin 
embodied in this volume, have rea<lily responded to my calls to the 
extent of their ability. To all who have thus courteously rendered me 
signal aid, I beg respectfully to tender my most grateful ackiiowledg- 
ments. 

I have great pleasure in making special mention of valuable assist- 
ance received from the late R. W. Bvo. Jienjamin (Jurren, grand 
secretary, Halifax, Nova Scotia; the late Joseph W. Lawrence, Escpiire, 
Saint John ; VV. Bro. R. Freke Gould, masonic historian, London, 
England; the late V. W. Bro. Shadwdl H. Gierke, grand secretary, 
London, England ; the late Bro. (iilbert Murdoch, Saint John ; the late 
Bro. Geo. James Chubb, Saint John ; the lata R. W. liro. David Brown, 
St. St<!phen ; George E. P"'enety, Esq., (pieen's printer, Fredericton ; and 
R. W. Jiro. Hon. William Ross, grand secretary, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

In conclusion, I freely acknowledge that I lay no claim to author- 
ship in this work. It is offered to the masonic brotli<!rhood as a compila- 
tion, and from them I fraternally re^juest a charitable criticism. 

W. F. B. 

Saint John, April, 18ii4, 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Introduction, ix 

Eakly Provincial (Jbanu Loixik of Nova Scotia, 1 

HiKAM LoixjE, No. 17 7 

HiSTOUY OF St. John's Loikje, under the U'urrantH lield from Nova Scotia, 

p^ngland and New IJrunKwiek, 19 

PJxcEiu'TS FKOM Kkcouok OF Old Mark Mastek'h LoiKiK 44-48 

Blo<^iRAPHicAL Skktciiks of the KoimderH of St. John'H Lodge, and of the 

Brethren who liave preHided in the Kast, 216 

William Caiiiphell, (Jhapman JiidKon, Jcthn Wolhaupler, William 
Fayerweather, Caleb Merritt, (ieorge Blaekwood, John Scott, W. 
Sanford Olivei. Hon. George Leonard, Andrew Kinnear, John 
Sinnott, Hugh Johnston, Hon. Thomas Wetmore, John Paul, Hon. 
Joshua Upliam, George McCoU, P^lward Sands, (ieorge Smith, 
David Waterbury, George Ironside, Nehemiah Merritt, Francis 
Watson, John Grant, William Durant, Joseph (Jlarke, Jolin iJean, 
Robert Kol)ert8on, Koltcrt Kay, Henry Chubb, Cieorge lionnell, 
Robert (,'. .Mi nette, Holnirt Payne, Benjamin V. Marsh, .\lexander 
Lawrence, Hiram Smith, James Heed, James G. I>t:ster, .John Haws, 
Israel Merritt, John Thomas, (Jharles Johnston, William H. A. 
Keans, Samuel Holman, R. Sands Armstrong, Joseph Mercer, (has. 
E. Potter, William F. Bunting, John H. Sheridan, Hon. William 
Wedderburn, Robert G. Crozier, John I). Short, .James G. Forlies, 
Joseph C. Hatheway, William H. Sinnott, Henry G. Hunt, Thomas 
O. Sandall, William M. Sears, Hiram (i. liettJt, John Buchanan, 
George B. Hegan, Artluir I. Trueman, William H. B. Sadleir, 
Arthur Kverilt, Robert H. B. Tennant, Robert C. Thorne, Frederick 
Sandall, Arthur W. Sharp, William A. Ewing, John J. Forrest, 
Wilson L. Dobbin, Archibald lianer. 

Roll of Mkmhkrh of St. John's Loikie, from A. D. 1802 to A.D. 1894,... 205 

Me.mherh OK THE Loih;e, alphabetically arranged 281 

List OF Memhkrs, April .'{, 1894, 290 

List ok Past Mahteiis, Wcjrhhipfi.l Masters, Senior Wardens, J'juior 

Wardens, Treasurers AND Secretaries 291 

I^>iKjt:s, Etc., in New Brunswick, from 1784 to 1 8'>5, 295 

Hiram Jy'xlge, New Brunswick Lodge, St. (ieorge's Lodge, Sion I^xlge, 
Solomon's Lodge, Hiram York LfKlge, St. John's I^xlge, Midian 
Lodge, Orphan's Friend Ixxige, Eastern Star Lodge, [Jnion L<slge, 
Fortitude Lodge, St. Lawrence Lodge, Morning Star IiO<lge, (i(dden 
Rule Ivodge, Albion Lodge, Military Lotlges, (iretna Green .Asso- 
ciation, A Clandestine Lodge, L'nion Ixdge, (Queen's Ixxige, Bruns- 
wick lM*ige, Hibernian Lodge, Portland L'nion Lodge. 



xii CONTENTS. 

Page 

Lodges Chartered by the Graxd Lodge of New Brunswick, 316 

Albion, No. 1; St. John's, No. 2; Hibernia, No. 3; Sussex, No. 4; St. 
Mark's, No. 5 ; Solomon's, No. 6 ; Hiram, No. 6 ; Sussex, No. 7 ; 
Carleton Union, No. 8; Midian, No. 9; Union of Portland, No. 10; 
Woodstock, No. 11 ; St. George, No. 12 ; Corinthian, No. 13 ; Alley, 
No. 14 ; Howard, No. 15 ; St. Andrew, No. 16 ; Northumberland, 
No. 17; Miramichi, No. 18; Leinster, No. 19; Salisbury, No. 20; 
Zion, No. 21 ; New Brunswick, No, 22 ; Keith, No. 23 ; Zetland, 
No. 24 ; Restigouche, No. 25 ; Victoria, No. 26 ; St. John, No. 27 ; 
Lebanon, No. 28; Saint Andrew's, No. 29; St. Martin's, No. 30; 
Benjamin, No, 31; Campbellton, No. 32; Alexandria, No. 33; 
Albert, No. 34, 

GaAND Lodges and Provincial Grand Lodges, 344 

Early Grand Lodge, Provincial Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, Deputy 
Provincial Grand Lodji-e under England, Provincial Grand Lodge 
under England, Grand Lodge of New Brunswick, Provincial Grand 
Master under Scotland. 

Emulation Lodge of Instruction, 359 

Masonic Board of Keliep 360 

Board op Relief for Fire Sufferers 362 

Royal Arch Masonry 363 

Grand Chapter of New Brunswick, Provincial Grand Chapter under 
England, Provincial Grand Superintendent under Scotland, Deputy 
Grand High Priest under Nova Scotia, Carleton Chapter, Carleton 
Mark Master's Lodge, Hiram Chapter, St. George's Chapter, 
Widow's Friend Chapter, Mount Moriah Chapter, Midian Chapter, 
St. Andrew's Chapter, Hibernian Chapter, Albion Chapter, Sussex 
Chapter, St. Mark's Chapter, Hibernia-New Brunswick Chapter, 
Fredericton Chapter, Union Chapter, Corinthian Chapter, Mount 
Lebanon Chapter, St. Stephen Chapter, Botsford Chapter, Wood- 
stock Chapter. 

Council of Knights of the Red Cross, 380 

Royal Ark Mariners' Lodge, , 381 

Royal and Select Masters 38X 

Grand Council, St. John Council, New Brunswick Council, Carleton 
Council, An Early Council. 

Knights Templars, 884 

Hibernian Encampment, Encampment of Saint John, Union de Molay 
Encampment, St. Stephen Encampment. 

Royal Order of Scotland, " 888 

Provincial Grand Lodge of New Brunswick. 

Order of EIome and Constantine, 389 

McLeod Moore Conclave, No, 13, 



CONTENTS. xiii 

Page 

Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, 390 

Moore Chapter Rose Croix, H. R. D. M., 18°. 
Harington Sovereign Consistory, S2°. 
New Brunswick Chapter Rose Croix, 18°. 
Supreme Council Dominion of Canada, 33°. 
New Brunswick Sovereign Consistory, 32°. 
Harington Sovereign Chapter Rose Croix, 18°. 
Saint John Lodge of Perfection, 14°, 

BmiDiNCis in Saint John Occupied by Masonic Bodies 394 

Kirk's Inn, Mallard Building, The Coffee House, MacPherson House, 
Hitchcock House, Old Masonic Hall, Ritchie's Building, Masonic 
Temple. 

Masonic Periodicals, 408 

The Freemasons' Monthly Monitor and Acadian Craftsman, The 
Masonic Mirror, The Masonic Minor and Pythian Herald. 

Index, 409 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



W. Bro. David Waterbnry, Frontispiece 

Kirk's Inn, " Page 9 

Mallard House 29 

Tlie Coftee House, 45 

Bro. James Hillsgrove's Certificate, 51 

Old Masonic Hall, 61 

Bro. Peter Stewart's Certificate 78 

St. John's Lodge Warrant, A. D. 1836 113 

Ritchie's Building, 139 

St. John's Lodge Warrant, A. D. 1868, 162 

Banner of St. John's Lodge (obverse) 194 

Banner of St, John's Lodge (reverse) 195 

R. W. Bro. William H. A. Keans 237 

R. W. Bro. William F. Bunting, 244 

R. W. Bro. William Wedderburn, 249 

Warrant of Solomon's Lodge, A. D. 1792 298 

Masonic Temple, Saint John, 401 



EfiRLY Provincikl Grhnd Lodge 



OP 

NOVA SCOTIA. 



("^Tl N account of the origin of Freemasonry in New Brunswick, 
(HvC especially in the City of Saint John, would be incomplete 
"^^ \^^ without reference to the body which started the craft here 
into existence. 

Previous to November 22nd, 1781, there w'ere in Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
two lodges holding warrants from the grand lodge in England, known 
as the Ancients, of which Laurence Dermot was the leading spirit. These 
lodges were St. Andrews, No. 155, and St. John, No. 211. 

The Dermot or Ancients Grand Lodge was erected into a governing 
body about the year 1751, by a number of schismatics from the mother 
grand Lodge of England. In order to render it popular and acceptable, 
and to extend its jurisdiction in every possible direction, Dermot was not 
at all scrupulous in granting extraordinary privileges or allowing the 
utmost latitude to the subordinate bodies holding under his grand lodge.* 
Taking advantage of this " free and easy " mode of government, the 
aforementioned lodges, Nos. 155 and 21 1, assumed such unwonted authority 
that, by granting dispensations, they started not less than five other lodges 
into existence. One of these was Hiranij No. 17, the pioneer lodge of 
New Brunswick. 

On the 22nd November, 1781, the three lodges at Halifax addressed 
a petition or memorial to the grand master of the Ancients, of which the 
following is a cojjy : 

To the Eiyld Worshipful and Most Noble John, Duke, Marquis and Earl of Atholl, 

etc.. Grand Master of Ancient Masoivs, and to the Right Worshipful the Wardens 

and Brethren of the Grand Lodge : 

The memorial of all the regular lodges of free and accepted Masons in and 

adjacent to tlie town of Halifax, in tiie province of Nova Scotia; that is to say, the 

lodges No, 155 and No. '211, together with the lodge called Union, in the town of 

Halifax aforesaid, and the lodge called St. George's, in His Majesty's independent 

1 Bro. W. J. Ilugliuu of Kiigland, in a letter to the Canadian Craftsman, remarked — " It is very 
confusing to any one not versed in tlie vagaries of tlie Atlioll Grand Lodge (or Ancients), started as 
a secession from tlie premier grand lodge of ICngland in 175i)-'51, who seeks to unravel the history of 
the origin and growth of Atholl Kreemasonry in North Anjerica or indeed any where. The custom 
was to sell extinct warrants to the higliest l)idders ; new charters being then issued, but preserving 
the original numbers, so that three distinct lodjjes may be represented under the same number," 



2 FREP^MASONrtY IN NP:W BRUNSWICK. 

companies or St. John's Ishuid' (whicli will be here at Halifax in the spring), under 
dispensations from tiie two first regular warranted lodges, in due form assembled, 

Most Hvmijly SninvKTii: That your memorialists see with great concern the 
present unsettled state of the craft in many instances, in and about this town, as well 
as some more remote parts of the province, for the want of a provincial grand lodge 
to be constituted here, without which it is impossible the many evils attending the 
same can be prevented or redressed. We are surrounded with clandestine work 
aUuost on all sides, and no doubt by some who would wish for proper authority or 
lawful constitiition, did they but know tiow, or were they in a situation to make 
prv~per application. And not only this, but your memorialists are also apprehensive 
o'" great danger, particularly of having modern masonry propagated and spread 
through this town and ))rovincc, should the people who are called a lodge here under 
the Dnke of Beaufort obtain a provincial grand warrant from that quarter, which we, 
your memorialists, have no room to doubt they will receive in case they make appli- 
cation for the same. 

That there are many other reasons which miglit be ofllered to enforce the utility 
of a provincial grand lodge being constituted in this place, might be drawn from the 
single consideration of the great distance between us and the grand lodge ; but it is 
needless to enumerate those, because they will be readily conceived by this riglit 
worshipful grand lodge. 

That your memorialists, having sedately and maturely deliberated every circum- 
stance relative to this matter, as well as all those things that might be consequent 
thereupon, have unanimously agreed that the same is of urgent necessity for the 
general as well as particular good of the craft, and more especially so in the present 
situation of affairs. And therefore your memorialists most humbly beg leave to 
recommend to your right worshipful grand lodge, as a person every way qualified to 
fill tlie important office of grand master, our worthy brother past master John George 
Pyke, Esquire ; our worthy brother past master John Cody as senior grand warden ; 
and our worthy brother past master Ephraim Wiston as junior grand warden, they 
having ever approved themselves worthy members of our society, and zealous in the 
<;au8e of masonry. 

Your memorialists therefore most humbly pray that your right worshipful grand 
lodge will be pleased to take their case into consideration, and in humble hopes that 
their prayer will be granted, your memorialists as in duly bound will ever pray. 

Benjamin Smith, M. No. 155. 

John Wkight, S. W. No. 155. 

Henry Wickham, M. Union Lodge. 

Geoege Jones, S. W. Union Lodge. 

James Kelly, J. W. Union Lodge. 

John Fillis, M. No. 211. 

Samuel King, S. W. No. 211. 

John Boyd, J. W. No. 211. 

George Whetmore, i Committee of 

J. Wheaton, j St. George's Lodge. 

Sy order of the Worshipful Mcislers. 

John Rattkie, Secretary 155. 

J. Peters, Secretary 211. 

Wm. Blenkinsop, Secretary Union. 

1 Prince ICdward Island. 



EARLY PROVINCIAL GRAND LODGE. 8 

This memorial was forwarded to the grand secretary at London, Wor- 
shipful Brother Charles Bearblock, No. 53 Old Bailey. 

In consequence of delay in granting the prayer of the petitioners, 
caused, as was surmised, by private lettei-s of an unfriendly nature, ad- 
dressed to the grand lodge, a second memorial was despatched uiider date 
October 24th, 1782, viz.: 

To the Rlglil Wornhipful and Most Noble Prince John [the third), Duke, Marquis and 
Earl oj Alhotl, etc., etc., Grand Master of Ancirnl Ma.fons, and to the Right Wor- 
shipful the Wai'dens aud Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

The memoiial of tlie regular lodges of free and accepted ancient masons in the 
province of Nova Scotia, in America, viz., the lodges No. 155 and No. 21 1, together 
with the lodges called Union, of the inhabitants of the town of Halifax, and St. 
George's in His Majesty's regiment of Loyal Nova Scotia Volunteers, part of which 
were late independent companies on the island of St. John (for which two last men- 
tioned lodges warrants have been applied for but not received), the Virgin Lodge, so 
called here in His Majesty's Royal Artillery, and Thistle Lodge in His Majesty's 
82nd Regiment of Foot, under dispensation from the warranted lodges Nos. 155 and 
211, in this town, in due form assembled. 

Most Humbly She",*'eth, That whereas application hath been made to your 
right worshipful grand lodge, by a memorial under date 22nd of November, 1781, 
setting forth the reasm ; for, and praying that a provincial grand lodge might be 
constituted in this plaoe by a warrant from your right worshipful grand lodge, which 
your memorialists have found from credible information (though notoHicial) could 
not be honored with the wished for attention, by reason of objections having been 
made by a number of private brethren ; but your memorialists are now happy in the 
liberty and freedom of assuring your right worshipful grand lodge that all those 
difficulties and objections are removed ; and still deeply impressed with the sense of 
the utility and great advantage to the craft which must arise from a provincial grand 
warrant here, we think it needless to enumerate the reasons before given, as well as 
many others which might be assigned, and therefore beg leave on this head to refer 
your right worshipful grand lodge to our former memorial. And being fully con- 
vinced that such a constitution will be for the general as well as particular good of 
the craft on this side of the Atlantic ocean, and more especially so in the present 
situation of public aflairs, on which account the same appears to us to be of urgent 
necessity, we beg leave humbly to recommend to your right worshipful grand lodge, 
jis a person every way qualified to fill the important office of provincial grand 
master, our worthy brother past master .John Cieorge Pyke, Escpiire ; for deputy 
grand master, our worthy brother past master Charles Adams; our worthy brother 
George Jones as senior grand warden ; and our worthy brother past master Ephraim 
Whiston as junior grand warden, they having ever approved themselves as worthy 
members of our society, and zealous in the cause of masonry. Your memorialists 
therefore most humbly pray that this right worshipful grand lodge will be pleased 
to take their request into consideration, and as in duty bound will ever pray. 

This memorial was signed by the masters and wardens of the lodges 
aforenamed, viz.: No. 155, No. 211, Union, St. George's, Virgin, and 
Thistle. 



4 FREEIMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Considerable correspondence took place after this document was sent 
forward, necessarily causing delay, all of which was brought about to a great 
extent by a change in the grand secretaryship at London, Brother Bearb- 
lock having been displaced from the office and Brother Robert Leslie 
having been appointed thereto. The long expected and wished for war- 
rant came at last, however, and as it became an important document in 
relation to the craft in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, I have copied 
it in extenso, as follows : 

Grand Mastku — Antrim. 

Deputy Grand Master — Lau. Dermot. 

James Read, Sen. Grand Warden; Peter Feiir, Jun. Grand Warden. 

To all whom it may concern, Greeting : 

Know Ye, That we, the grand lodge of the most ancient and honourable frater- 
nity of free and accepted masons (according to the old constitutions granted by His 
Royal Highness Prince PJdwin at York, anno domini nine hundred and twenty-six, 
by the year of masonry 4926), viz. : the Most Potent and Puissant Lord, the Right 
Honourable William Randall MacDonnell, Earl of Antrim, Lord Viscount Diinluce, 
Knight Companion of tlie Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Governor of the 
County of Antrim, and Right Worsliipful Grand Master of Masons in that part of 
Great Britain called England, and masonical jurisdiction thereunto belonging; the 
Right Worshipful Laurence Dermot, Esquire, Deputy Grand Master; the Right 
Worshipful James Read, Esipiire, Senior Grand Warden; and the Right Worsliip- 
ful Peter Fehr, Esquire, Junior Grand Warden (together with the masters, wardens, 
and past masters of the warranted lodges held within the cities and suburbs of Lon- 
don and Westminster), 

Do hereby authorize and empower our trusty and well beloved brethren, who are 
now or who may hereafter become inhabitants of Halifax, in the province of Nova 
"VT"^-, T "V'TT Scotia, in North America, to congregate, form and Jiold a 
Xi U. 1JJ\- V • Provincial Grand Lodcje in the town of Halifax aforesaid, 
or elsewhere within the masonical jurisdiction of the provincial grand lodge afore- 
said, upon the 24tli day of June and upon the 27th day of December annually, and 
upon all other seasonable times and lawful occasions, independent of any former war- 
rant or constitution granted by us or any of our predecessors former grand masters of 
England, to any mason or masons residing within the masonical jurisdiction aforesaid. 

And we hereby nominate, constitute and appoint our Right Trusty and Well- 
beloved Brother John George Pyke, PZsquire, to be our Provincial Grand 
Master within the masonical jurisdiction of Nova Scotia aforesaid ; our right trusty 
and well-beloved brother Jona. Snelling, Esquire, to be our Senior Provincial Grand 
Warden ; and our right trusty and well-beloved brother Daniel Wood, Junior, 
Esquire, to be our Junior Provincial Grand Warden within the masonical jurisdic- 
ti ^n aforesaid : Who, together with the aforesaid provincial grand master and deputy 
grand master, when appointed and duly installed, and senior and junior provincial 
grand wardens, being also duly installed with their provincial grand master afore- 
said, shall all and every of them be addressed by the title Right Worshipful, accord- 
ing to ancient custom. 



EARLY PROVINCIAL GRAND LODGE. 6 

And we do liereby further iuithorixc iind empower our said trusty and riglit wor- 
shipful i)roviiu'ial grand master, Joiin George Pyke, Esquire, liis (iepnty and grand 
wardens, and his and tiieir hiwful successors, to grant, and they are hereby authoiized 
to grant, dispensations, warrants and constitutions, according to ancient custom, for 
congregating and making freemasons, and forming and holding lodges within the 
jurisdiction aforesaid, ac<'ording to the most ancient and honourable custom of the 
Royal Craft in all ages and well governed nations throughout the known world. 

And we do by these presents further authorize and empower our said trusty and 
right worshipful brethren, John George Pyke, Esquire, Jona. Snelling Esquire, and 
Daniel Wood, Junior, Esruiire, togetlier with their lawful assistants, that is to say, 
the regular masters, wardens and past masters only within their masonical jurisdic- 
tion aforesaid, .n grand lodge didy sunnnoned, assembled and formed, to nominate, 
choose and instal their successors, whom they are hereby empowered to invest with 
the masonical honors, jiowers and dignities, according to ancient custom, etc., etc. 
And such successors shall, in like maimer, nominate, choose and instal their suc- 
cessors, etc., etc. Such installations to be upon or near every St. John the Evan- 
gelist's day, or twenty-seventh day of December, during the continuance of this pro- 
vincial grand lodge forever. 

Provided, that the aforesaid John George Pyke, Esquire, Jona. Snelling, Esquire, 
flnd Daniel Wood, Junior, Esquire, and all their lawful successors, shall and do pay 
all due respect, according to the ancient custom of the craft, to the Right Worship- 
ful (irand Lodge of Ancient Masons, by whom these presents are granted, otherwise 
this warrant to be of no force or virtue. 

Given under our bands and seal of the most ancient grand lodge in London, the 
second day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and 
eighty-four, and in the year of masonry 5784 ; being the second year of the 
grand mastership of the Right Worshipful William Randall MacDonnell, 
r]arl of Antrim, and in tlic twenty-fourth year of the reign of our Sovereign 
Lord George the Third, by the grace of God, of Great Britain, Erance and 
Ireland, King, Defender of the Eaitli, etc., etc. 

ROBERT LESLIE, 

Grand Secretary. 

The foregoing is a most important document to freemasonry in New 
Brunswick, for under its authority St. John's and all other lodges in the 
province were constituted, and under it they worked nearly fifty years. 
Previous to its promulgation, however, Lodges No. 155 and No. 211 at 
Halifax, assumed all the functions of a deputy grand lodge, by issuing 
dispensations for opening and working several lodges at Halifax and one 
in Saint John : the latter being Hiram Lodge, No. 17. 

Up to within a short period very little was known by members of the 
craft in the present day in this locality, of the history or antecedents of 
freemasonry in New Brunswick prior to the organization of St. John's 
Lodge, No. 29, at Saint John, in the year 1802. It was known that there 
liad been a lodge at Maugerville, another at Fredericton, and a third at 
Kingston. The first reliable intimation I had of the existence of any 



6 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

lodge in Saint John at that early period, was obtained from the records 
of the Carleton Royal Arch ('hapter, in which the following entry wna 
made April 10th, 1805: "Brother John Sinnott, past nuister of Lodge 
No. 17, called Hiram, formerly of this city, referred to an old application 
made in writing on the Dth June, 1790, to the grand chapter then held 
in this city, for admission to the degrees of Most Excellent and Royal 
Arch." 

The grand chapter here referred to was, no doubt, a chapter held 
under the warrant of Hiram Lodge, according to the custom prevailing 
in those days. 

At the time I undertook the work of making n compilation of free- 
masonry in the province of New Brunswick, especially in reference to St. 
John's Lodge, I found the materials within my reach so meagre and so 
unsatisfactory that I almost despaired of successfully attaining the object 
in view. Having learned, in a correspondence with R. W. Brother 
Benjamin Curren, grand secretary of the grand lodge of Nova Scotia^ 
that he had in his possession many valuable and im[)()rtant documents, 
comprising records, registers, files of papere, etc., of the old provincial 
grand lodge of Nova Scotia, which would throw light upon the early 
doings of the craft in New Brunswick, at my recjuest he very courteously 
granted me the privilege of examining those ancient documents. Acting 
upon his invitation, I made two trips to Halifax and spent considerable 
time in examining these books and papers, and in making coi)ious ex- 
tracts therefrom bearing upon my compilation. The documents which 
came under my review covered a period of niore than fifty years, say from 
the year 1781 to 1835. They included the records, unbroken and com- 
plete, for that time, the register of members of all the lodges in Nova 
Scotia and New Brunswick up to 1820 — the register of subsequent years 
was not forthcoming and must have been lost — a book containing copies 
of the original warrants issued to all lodges, the files of papers compris- 
ing annual returns, letters of correspondence, copies of dispensations^ 
memorials, etc. Many of these papers bear the impress of cultivated 
minds, finished scholai-ship, and extensive masonic knowledge. R. W. 
Bro. Joseph Peters, who was the first grand secretary, and no doubt " the 
power behind the throne" in the provincial grand lodge, was a most care- 
ful and painstaking officer, and apparently a well educated man. His 
letters of correspondence — of which he kept full copies — exhibit a thor- 
ough knowledge of diplomacy, and establish a reputation for him as a 
graceful and polished letter writer. His papers are neatly folded and 
arranged in files, with such explicit endorsements thereon that one is 
easily enabled to comprehend their contents without the necessity of un- 
folding or reading them. 



HIRAM LODGl-:, 1784 -'96. 7 

This ancient and valuable oolleetlon contains many documents calcu- 
lated to interest and instruct the masonic historian and anti<|uary. Old 
wa'i'ants, (juaint dispensations, curious certificates, interesting lcttei*s of" 
correspondence, etc., some of them authenticated by immense wax seals,, 
and bearing the signatures of royal personages, titled peers, colonial 
governoi-s, distinguished naval and military officers, and others, whose- 
names are identified with the government and progress of freemasonry iiv 
England, Nova Hcotia and New Brunswick during the latter pf)rtion of 
the eighteenth and the commencement of the nineteenth century. The 
old seals are <i|uaint anr ponderous, and the styles of chirography very 
curious, while tlie paper ".sed in the production of the documents is the- 
rough and coarse kind prevalent in those days. There were no steel pens 
in vogue then, the inditing being done with "the old grey goose (|uill," 
and without the guide of feint ruled lines. Among other distinguished 
signatures I saw that of Governor John Parr, in whose honor our good 
city was named previous to receiving, in the year 1785, its chartered title 
of Saint John. It was Parr Town when Hiram Lodge, No. 17, was- 
opened under dispensation. 

HIRAM LODGE, NO. 17, SAINT JOHN. 

The application for authority to organize Hiram Lodge was made at 
Halifax, March Gth, 1784, by Bro. Elias Hardy,' who signed himself a» 
a nmster mason of Lodge No. 169,- in a letter addressed to K. W. Bro. 
John G. Pyke, provincial grand master, of which the following is a copy: 

I am desired by a considerable number of respectable ancient York masons at 
Parr Town, in tliis province,-' to represent to yonr worship that they labor nnder 
many inconveniences from the want of a regularly constituted lodge in that place, 
and that such an eslablislunent would not only confer a very sensible obligation on 
them, but contril)ute, in their opinion, to the benefit of the craft in general. It is 
their recpiest that, until a warrant can be obtained from home, your worship will be 
pleased to f\ivor them with a dispensation, wherein the Kev. John Beardsley shall 
be nominated master, Captain Oliver Bourdett senior warden, and Mr. John Grinley 
junior warden. I shall do myself the honor to wait on your worship this evening, 
and am witli respect, sir, your worship's most obedient servant and brother. 

As the name of Bro. Grinley does not appear in the warrant or on the 
roll of the lodge niembers, some unexplained cause must have arisen 
whereby his name was omitted and that of Bro. John Paul substituted in 

1 Elias Hardy was a barristor who held a seat in the house of assembly, and w.ts cominon clerk, 
of Saint .lohn from 1790 to 1799. 

2 A lodge working in New York, to which some of the old loyalists belonged previou? to ccuing 
to New Brunswick. 

3 New Brunswick was at that time a portion of the province of Nova Scotia, under the designa-^ 
tion of Sunbury County. 



8 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



the office of junior warden, when the lodge was set to work under the 
dispensation. 

In answer to the request of 13 ro. Hardy, a dispensation was granted 
the hitter part of March or the early part of April by the lodges No. 155 
and No. 211, at Halifax, William Hogg being master of No. 155, and 
Jolni George Pyke master of No. 21 1, who reported the circumstance to W. 
Bro. Charles Bearblock, grand secretary, London, in a letter under date 
April 19th, 1784, to the effect that "we take this opjwrtunity of acquaint- 
ing you, for the information of the right worshipful grand lodge, that we 
have granted a dispensation to the Rov. Bro. John Beardsley, late junior 
grand warden of the })rovincial grand lodge of New York, to congregate 
and hold a lodge at the river Saint John, and am in daily expectation of 
a number of simihir api)lications, and hope for the approbation of the 
right worshipful grand lodge therein." 

It will be borne in mind that at this time the warrant for the erection 
of the provincial grand lodge at Halifax had not been issued. 

Under this dispensation the lodge was opened, being the first duly 
authorized assemblage of freemasons in New Brunswick — at that time 
the county of Suiibury — and the officers installed September 1st, 1784, 
by Worshipful Brother Dr. Azor Betts, as set forth in the official report 
made by him to the grand secretary at Haliiiix, as follows: 

A List of Old Masons who First Constituted IIiiiam Lodoe, New Buvns- 
WICK, then called Paku Town, now Saint John's. 



A.M. 

S784. 



8ept. 1 



NaMICS IXSTAI.IKn BY 
HU<). AZOK UHTTS, St'pt. ISt. 



OCCITPATIONS. 



Rev. Joliii lU>anlslcy I Doctor l)ivinity .... 

Olivor nourdt'tt (ieiitleuiuii 

Joliii raiil Artillery Sergeant. 

David Melville Tavern Keeper 

]{ieliar<l Hniisall Mereliant 

I'eler (i. Waldron : Hricklayor 

William Perrino ; Carpenter 

IJicliard I.ightfoot [ Merchant 

.Iiinies MeNealc Taylor 

.lames Hell , Merchant 

William Loraino j .Stone Cutler 

Joseph (ir(H'n ', Taylor 

Edward l^rwine : Carjumter 

William Lewis ! Printer 

Francis Young i Wiitehmaker 



IJksidi'xck, 



St. John's. 



John Doggs Mereliant 

John Kirk Tavern Keeper i. 

David McLurc ' StonoCuttur 



Officers, Ac. 



W. Master. 
S. W. 
J. W. 

Secretary. 
Treasurer. 
S. 1). 
J. D. 
V. M. 

Stewarda. 



The lodge was opened in the honse owned and occupied as an inn or 
tavern by Bro. John Kirk, one of the founders, who.se name appears on 
the foregoing list. This building was located on the north »ide of Brittuin 






&! 

^ 




10 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



street, near the intersection of Germain street, in Sidney ward,' on lot 
No. 1,234, granted to Bro. Kirk, when the allotments were made to the 
loyalists who founded Saint John. 

The foregoing list establishes two important facts ; first, that W. Bro. 
Azor Betis'- was the installing officer, and secondly, that freemasonry was 
inaugurated in New Brunswick, by the formal opening of Hiram Lodge, 
No, 17, on the first day of Sei)tember, A. D. 1784, consequently we have 
reliable authority to fix the starting point of the history of the craft in 
this province. 

Apropos of the formation of this lodge, the following notice is taken 
from a copy of The Royal St. Johns Gazette and Nova. Scotia Intelligencer 
of Thui-sday, September 9th, 1784, "printed at St. John's by Lewis & 
Ryan, at their printing office. No. 59 Prince William street," viz. : 

At a meeting of ii respectable body of Ancient Bretliren, tiie 7th instant, it was 
agreed to give tliis notice to every Ancient Brother Mason on the river Saint John, 
that on Tuesday, the 21st instant, will be held at Bro. Kirk's, a meeting of Ancient 
Masons at his new lodge room. Lower Cove, for the purpose of preparing and in- 
stalling the proper ofHcers for constituting a lodge, when the attendance of every 
Ancient Brother is earnestly rtquested. 
Purr, September Sih, 1784. 

From this notice, which has no name appended to it, I infer that, 
although the foregoing return of W. Bro. Belts states that the brethren 
were installed September 1, the organization of the lodge was not com- 
pleted, and that this meeting was called to finish tiie work. 

The following is a copy of the second return of Hiram Lodge to the 
provincial grand secretary : 
A List of Old Masons admitted as Memhkrs of this Lod(je, with the 

NUMHER AND NamES OF THE DIFFERENT LoDfJES THEY BELONGED TO. 



Datk. 

" 6784" 
Nov. 2 
5785 
Jan. 3 



Namks. 



John Morton. 



OtX^UPATION. 



AsciKNT Lodges uelonoed to. 



Scmuan A. Y. M., No. 210. 



David Prentice Merchant Bathgate, Scotland (no number). 

F.liiis Hiirdy ' Attorney , No. IW, New York. 

" 18 Thomas Jennings Smith No. 2, " 

I Arthur Miulilox ' (ientl<'man St. (U-orgt's Lodge (Military). 

Capt. Wni. Wattl.'worth I Seaman A. Y. M., No. 210. 

Feb. 1 James Cuthliirt j Merchant ! Montrose Lodge, Scotland. 

Capt. Peter Mc"her3ifn (ientlenian No. Hi'.), New York. 

Mar 1 Benjaiuin ]tur;^e8s ' Seaman No. I, Martha's Vineyard. 

I Hicbard Finnc!i\,ore I Tanner I A. Y. M., No. 210. 



A trail lod 10 Old MaaonR, who were duly examineil. 

1 In the original gran the location is named as "St. Andrew's street, in tjueen's ward." The 
change to Urittr.in st ', iUdney Vii;rd was made by the connnon council in 180:1, by a revision of 
the city cb'.iiv.' 

2 nV. Hro. AxorVr,' • .i» a physician and surgwn, formerly of New York. Ho received the 
degree of freemiisoiny .revions to ^omlng to Now Itrunswick with the lovallsts. 'rhe wife of W. 
Bro. (.itoige H. Hegan, i ros'' suastcr of St. John's I.iodge, Is a great-granddaughter of Bro. Betts. 



HIRA^r LODGE, 1784-'96. 11 

This return and the preceding one were forwarded to Halifax, July 
8th, 1785, accompanied by a letter of that date addressed to the worship- 
ful masters of lodges No. 155 and No. 211, signed l)y Oliver Bourdett, 
master; Richard Bonsall, senior warden ; and Peter G. Waldron, junior 
warden. The letter sets forth that "we send our fees by the hands of 
Bro. Bouthe; and we have the strongest confidence in your fidelity and 
friendship to us, that you will not construe our long silence into neglect 
or disrespect. Be assured that the officers and brethren of Hiram Lodge, 
impressed with the warmest gratitude, return the officers and brethren of 
lodges No. 155 and No. 2\l, from whom they hold their dispensation, every 
degree of respect and esteem. Please observe enclosed herewith a letter 
we penned soon after our installation, with returns, which contains an 
account of our proceedings until that time." 

Especial attention is directed to the words italicized in this letter — 
" from whom they hold their dispensation." Freemasons of the present 
day wonder how two lodges could act in concert in such an important 
matter, or by what authority they could be clothed with the prerogative 
appertaining to a grand master or a grand lodge. The doings of private 
lodges in the eai"ly days in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick seem inex- 
plicable to brethren under the government which now prevails in the 
various grand jurisdictions, especially when we scan the acts committed 
at that time under the guise of what was termed masonic constitutional 
authority and usage — acts which would not now be tolerated for a mo- 
ment, and would be done at the risk of forfeiting the warrant or charter. 

Laurence Dermot, the head and front of the AthoU Grand Lodge 
(Ancients), ambitious of holding the reins of government, jealous of the 
mother grand lodge, from which they seceded, and aspiring to extend 
the jurisdiction and increase the authority of his grand lodge as widely 
and as universally as possible, was not particular as to the means em- 
ployed or the measures pronmlgated, so long as the end in view was 
attained. The creation and increase of lodges in every direction, and the 
establishment of his authority in new fields, were his watchwords. In- 
fiuenced by these motives, he granted to the lodges opened by his grand 
lodge in America unlimited powers and privileges in the conduct of their 
afi^airs; or if not actually granted, the exercise of these functions was 
allowed or winked at; hence we find two lodges, as in the case under 
review, issuing a dispensation authorizing the creation of a body co- 
ordinate with themselves. And we also find a provincial grand lodge 
enij)owered, under a written patent or charter, to issue warrants to private 
lodges and to exercise all the prerogatives vested in a sovereign grand 
lodge. We find that the lodges constituted by this provincial grand lodge 
carried on their laboi-s independently of the parent grand body, and 



12 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

never for a moment considered that they wore re(juired to make returns 
and payments, or otherwise to acknowledge allegiance to it. Their 
warrants of constitution were issued, numbered and registered without 
reference to it. Those issued in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick were 
iiumtered from number one upwards, and were designated as in obedience 
to "the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia and the masonical juris- 
diction thereunto belonging." 

Hiram Lodge worked under dispensation upwards of two years, when 
application was made for a warrant. This request was granted, as ap- 
pears by the following minute of the provincial grand lodge: 

At a grand lodge Iield in ample form at the Golden Ball, Halifax, 6th December, 
1786, read a men)orial from a number of brethren at the city of Saint John, New 
Brunswick, for a warrant of const itiition. Said brethren being recommended by 
the R. W. Deputy Grand Master William Campbell, and the same being duly con- 
sidered, it was resolved by a great majority that the prayer of the memorialists be 
granted. 

The warrant was issued in accordance with this resolution under the 
<lesignation of Hiram Lodge, No. 17. It was signed by John Parr, 
grand master; William Campbell, deputy grand master; Ricluird Buck- 
ley, senior grand warden; D. Wood, Jr. (in the absence of George 
DeBlois, Escptire), junior grand warden ; .and Joseph Peters, grand sec- 
retary, authorizing Richard Bonsall as worshipful master, David Melville 
as senior warden, and John Stoddard as junior warden, to form and open 
a lodge of freemasons at the house of Brother John Kirk, or elsewhere 
in the city of Saint John, and to meet upon the first Tuesday in each 
calendar month. It was dated at Halifax, the fith day of December, 
1780. 

Hiram Lodge had an existence of only twelve years, during which 
time, if the sparse population of Saint John be considered, it increased 
quite rapidly in membership, as shown by the returns made to the pro- 
vincial grand lodge. The total additions during that period by initiation 
and affiliation numbered seventy-six. 

The unfortunate troubles which arose in the lodge, and eventually 
caused its extinction, are taken from the provincial grand lodge records 
and files of papers. They had their origin during the time W. Brother 
John Sinnott occupied the East. It appears that he was a clerk in the 
office of Samuel Hake, a brother mason and commissary of stores of war 
and provisions. Hake, unfbitiinately for his reputation as a mason and 
an official of the imperial government, was in the habit of secreting or 
misappropriating the stores and provisions in his department. His per- 
nicious practices were discovered by a coojjcr in the employ of the depart- 
ment and reported to the military authorities. Upon the informatiou 



HIRAM LODGE, 1784-'1)6. 15 

laid by this nism, a court of enquiry was summoned by order of His 
Excellency Brigadier General Carleton, to which Bro. Sinnott, who was 
also cognizant of the embezzlement, was notified to attend and give evi- 
dence. Previous to the hearing. Hake, who was a member of the lodge, 
obtained the appointment of a committee of brethren to bring influence 
to bear upon Sinnott to keep him away from the .,ourt, and, if possible, 
dissuade him from giving his testimony. Sinnott, while acknowledging 
that his personal feelings prompted him not to appear as a witness, .stated 
that it was impossible for him to disobey the summons, as, ^f he did so, 
he would be court-martialled, and eventually lose his situation and be 
deprived of the means of providing for himself and family. 

Upon the hearing of the case, and the finding of the court of enquiry. 
Hake was adjudged guilty of fraud and embezzlement, and dismissed 
from the service. He subsequently brought his case before the lodge, 
under the plea that Bro. Sinnott, as a mason, and especially as master of 
the lodge, was bound by his masonic ties to conceal the acts of a brother 
mason, no matter how flagrant their character; that, instead of acting a 
brotherly part, he had betrayed his (Hake's) secrets, and in this manner 
had done him a grievous wrong. The members of the lodge generally 
sided with Hake. Considerable ill feeling was engendered, eventually 
culminating in the suspension of Sinnott, his deposition from the office of 
worshipful master, and the presentation of a memorial to the })rovincial 
grand lodge asking for his expulsion from freemasonry. 

This high-handed and unmasonic treatment of a brother while occu- 
pying the chair of the lodge was reported to R. W. Brother John Selby, 
grand secretary, by letter signed by the past masters of the lodge under 
date August 1st, 1793, in the following words: 

We are requested by the body of Hiram Lodge, No. 17, to acquaint the right 
worshipful the grand kxlge of tiie suspension of our Bro. John Sinnott from the 
duties of his oflice as master, and that lie is excluded from the benefits of communi- 
cation with any of the members of this, or those of our sister lodges in this province, 
for the most vile and uiqirecedented violation of every masonic duty, which has not 
only been already fatal in its consequenc:es to an aged, inlirm and deserving brother, 
but also tends in every possible degree to become more so to the craft in general. 

Upon this report considerable correspondence ensued between the 
provincial grand lodge, Hiram Lodge, and Bro. Sinnott. The letters of 
the latter were explicit and well written ; he stated his case fiiirly and in 
good temper, and throughout the discussion, which was protracted and 
lengthy, he exhibited a becoming and proper masonic sj)irit. , 

Having heard the statements of each i)arty in the controversy, and 
having made a careful investigation of the whole question, the provincial 
grand lodge; decided, first, that the lodge went beyond its powers iu 



14 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

arraigning and suspending its master; secondly, that even if it possessed 
such authority, there was no just cause why Bro. Sinnott should be sub- 
ject to masonic judgment and discipline for appearing and giving evidence 
in a court of law, under a summons which he was bound to obey, against 
a brother who liad unfortunately betrayed a public trust; and, thirdly, 
had Bro. Sinnott refused to do so, he would have laid himself liable to 
be court-martial led and dismissed from the imperial service, and would 
likewise have violated his masonic engagements, which required him to 
be subject to the higher powers and to cheerfully conform to every lawful 
authority. Grand lodge having so decided, directed the lodge to restore 
him to membership and all other masonic privileges. 

The lodge disobeyed the mandate of grand lodge and declined to re- 
instate him, giving as a reason " that they had just cause to deal with 
Sinnott as they did, because they were unwilling to sit with him in lodge 
or to consider him worthy of the privileges and benefits of masonry." 

For this perverseness the provincial grand lodge, at a communication 
held March 4th, 1795, adoi)ted the following order : 

Resolved, That unless Hiram Lodge, No. 17, do make sucli ample apology to this 
right worshipful body, as may be to the entire satisfiiction thereof, tlieir warrant to 
continue no longer in force, and the same to be reported to all grand lodges in com- 
munication with us." 

The lodge addressed a letter to the provincial grand secretary, of date 
June 2nd, 179.3, setting forth "that in consequence of having come under 
the censure of the grand lodge, Hiram Lodge have unanimously agreed 
to suspend all masonic labors as a body, and deposited' their warrant 
until the right worshipful the grand lodge shall direct the further dis- 
posal of it." 

To this the grand secretary, R. W. Bro. John Selby, replied by letter 
dated January 18th, 1796, addressed to Brothers James Hayt, Robert 
Laidley, William Jennison, Richard Bonsall, George Symmer, Oliver 
Bourdett, and William Simmonds, in which he stated " that the grand 
lodge, at their communication in September, 1795, were unanimously of 
the opiuion that, instead of an ample apology which they expected to 
receive from Hiram Lodge for the impropriety of their former conduct, 
they had in further contempt proceeded to i)ut in execution the threat 
mentioned in their letter under date October 28rd, 1794,^ an act highly 
unconstitutional and in open violation of the laws of masonry ; we mean 
the ceasing to work, and depositing their warrant, etc., in the ark, with- 

1 By the terra " deposited," they meant that the warrant was placed in the ark; i. «., the trunk 
or chest in wliich the movable paraphernalia of the lodge was kept. 

2 The letter hero referred to was not found among the papers on tile in the otfiue of the grand 
secretary at Halifax. 



HIRAM LODGE, 1784-'96. . 15 

out the sanction and approbation of the grand lodge." This letter, in 
continuation, "earnestly recommended the lodge to meet and revoke their 
objectionable acts and words, and by an ample apology save themselves 
from the inevitable consequences;" i.e., expulsion. 

The ruling spirits of the lodge were evidently formed of stern and 
unyielding material ; they believed that, under any and all circumstances, 
a brother mason should screen the acts, no matter how unjustifiable, 
of another brother, and that the peremptory mandates of civil or mili- 
tary tribunals, with even the ulterior alternative of loss of employment 
and dismissal froni the service, should not force him to break through, 
what they considered, a binding obligation. The fraternal remonstrance 
conveyed in the letter of the grand secretary, just quoted, did not pro- 
duce the disired eflect. The members of the lodge had taken a decided, 
though false, stand, and turned a deaf ear to the reasonable request of 
the provincial grand lodge. All fraternal advice and expostulation hav- 
ing failed to impress the recalcitrants with the unjustifiable and unmasonic 
course they were pursuing, the provincial grand lodge, at a communica- 
tion held September 7th, 1796, adopted the following order: 

Resolved unanimomly, That the warrant of Hiram Lodge, No. 17, held at Saint 
John, in the province of New Brunswick, be forthwitli recalled, and that the mem- 
bers thereof, agreeably to the last return transmitted, be expelled for apostasy, and 
the same be reported to all the private lodges in the jurisdiction of Nova Scotia, 
and likewise to all the grand lodges of Ancient York Masons throughout the known 
world, agreeably to the undermentioned form, viz. : 

To all Masters, Wardens, and Members of the Most Ancient and. Honorable Fraternity of 
Free and Accepted Masons, Greeting : 

Be it remembered, that in the iifth year of the grand mastership of the Bight 
"Worshipful and Honorable Jlichard Bulkley, a member of His Majesty's council, 
etc., etc., grand master of the most ancient and honorable fraternity of free and 
accepted masons in Nova Scotia, and the masonical jurisdiction thereunto belonging 
James Hayt, William Jennison, George Symmers, "William Simonds, Oliver Bourdett, 
Robert Laidley, Richard Bonsall, Thomas Jennings, Charles McPherson, William 
Lorraine, David Beveridge, John Tool, Benjamin Burgess, Stephen Boiirdett, Thomas 
Featherby, George Matthew, Titus Knapp, Robert Moore, Samuel Wiggins, Craven 
Calverley, John Ryan, and Thomas Mullin, late members of Hiram Lodge, No. 17, 
held in the city of Saint John, New Brunswick, British North America, were all 
and every one of them expelled for apostasy, and in grand lodge, held the 7th day 
of September, 1796, unanimously declared unworthy of admittance into any regular 
lodge, or holding any masonic conversation with any of the free and accepted 
fraternity. Therefore we commend you, brethren, in the name of the Lord, etc , 
that you will withdraw yourselves from every brother that walketh disorderly, and 
not after the tradition which he hath received from us. 

On the 25th September, 1796, the grand secretary reported the decision 
of the provincial grand lodge to R. W. Bro. William Campbell, deputy 



16 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



grand master at Saint John, ami furnished him with a list of the expelled 
brethren. The report stated that "the members expelled are agreeable 
to the last return made by the lodge, nevertheless, as it is probable that 
some of the persons above named might not have coincided in sentiment 
with those who proceeded to those rash and unjustifiable measures which 
has caused this severe bbiilokic^, und as it would be hard that the innocent 
should be punished with the guilty, the right worshipful grand lodge are 
willing, upon application made, and testifying their disapprobation of 
said conduct, to take off the censure of any brother or brothers who shall 
require it." 

At a communication of the grand lodge,' held at Halifax, March 1st, 
1797, a report was received from R. W. Bro. Campbell, setting forth that 
Bro. James Hayt, late master of the late Hiram Lodge, No. 17, had 
refused to deliver the warrant of the said lodge to him. 

From the record of subsequent meetings of the provincial grand lodge 
it appeared that several of the expelled brethren were, upon their appli- 
cation, restored to their former masonic standing ; and finally the grand 
officers were empowered to consider all further applications for reinstate- 
ment, with authority to deal with each case as they (the officers) " might 
deem just and proper." 

The warrant of the lodge was eventually surrendered to the provincial 
grand lodge, and alj, or nearly all, the members reinstated to masonic 
fellowship. There is no evidence to show that any attempt was afterward 
made to resuscitate Hiram Lodge. The warrant was retained in the 
office of the gi'and secretary at Halifax. 

In the twelve y.'ars of its masonic life, Hiraiu Lodge enrolled on its 
register seventy-four members by initiation and affiliation. Considering 
the sparse population of our infant city, this was a creditable shewing. 
The following is a full list of them, arranged alphabetically : 



Anderson, W lliara 
Barton, Edward 
Beardsley, Rev. John 
Bell, James 
Bennison, George 
Betts, Azor 
Beveridge, David 
Boggs, John 
Bonsall, Richard 
Boiirdett, Oliver 
Bourdett, Stepiien 
Bowden, Tliomas 



Burgess, Benjamin 
Calverley, Craven 
Cole, William 
Cuthbirt, James 
Erwine, Edward 
Fanning, David 
Featherby, Thomas 
Finnemore, Richard 
Goodwin, Lushington 
Graham, John 
Green, Joseph 
Grim, Peter, Junior 



Hake, Saninel 
Hanford, Thomas, Junior 
Hardy, Elias 
Harvey, John 
Hayt, James 
Holmes, Absalom 
Husted, Jabez 
Jennings, Thomas 
Jennison, William 
Keefe, David 
Kirk, John 
Knapp, Titus 



1 The body wits de facto a provincial grand lodge, although repeatedly atyled a grand lodge, and 
the offlcer^s grand ojflcert. 



HIRAM LODGE, 1784 -'96. 



17 



Laid ley, Robert 
Lewis, William 
Lightfoot, Richard 
Lorraine, William 
Jladdiix, Arthur 
Mallery, Joliii X. 
Marshall, John 
Matthew, George 
^[elville, David 
Moore, Robert 
Morton, Alexander 
Morton, John 
Miillin, Tiiomas 



McCUire, David 
McNeale, James 
McPherson, Alexander 
McPherson, Charles 
McPherson, Jiimes 
Mcpherson, Peter 
Oliver, William S. 
Paul, John 
Perrino, William 
Piercey, James 
Prentice, David 
Rodgers, Patrick 
Ryan, John 



Simonds, William 
Sinnott, John' 
Stoddard, John 
Symmers, (ieorge 
Sntor, James 
Toole, John 
Waldron, Peter G. 
Wattleworth, William 
Wells, Henry 
Wiggins, Samuel 
Young, Francis 
Younghusband, George 



Of the foregoing, only about five or six subsequently joined other 
lodges in the province; the great majority of them seemingly preferred 
to remain disassociated with the craft. 

The following notices, gleaned from the Royal Gazette newspaper of the 
period, are interesting as being cotenij)orary with the old Hiram Lodge : 

"GAZETTE" EDITORIAL OF JANUARY 9th, 1787. 

Now in the press, and will be published on Saturday next, " The Pleasures and 
Advantages of Brotherly Lenity," a sermon preached before the right worshipful 
master, wardens and brethren of the 54th Regimental Lodge of free and accepted 
masons, in the Parish Church of Saint John, December 26th, 1786, by George Bissett, 
A. M., rector of Saint John. 

THE ANNIVERSARY OF SAINT JOHN THE BAPTIST, 

Being Sundiiy, the 24th instant, will be observed by the members of Hiram Lodge, 
Ancient Masons, on Monday, the 2oth instant, at Brother McPherson's Coffee House. 
Such brothers who wish to join are requested to make application for tickets before 
the 23rd instant. N. B. — Divine service will begin at one o'clock, and dinner on 
the table precisely at three o'clock. 
June 19th, 1787. 

MASONIC NOTICE. 

The Festival of Saint John tlie Evangelist will be observed in the usual form on 
Tuesday, the 27th instant, at Brother McPherson's Long Room, by Hiram Lodge. 
Such Ancient Masons as will join in the celebration will please leave their names 
at the bar of the Cottee House. 

St. John, December 13th, 1791. 

There were five lodges in New Brunswick contemporaneous with Hiram 
Lodge, viz.: New Brunswick, No. 541, constituted at Fredericton, A. D. 
1789; St. George's, No. 19, at Maugerville, 1789; Sion, No. 21, at 
Kingston, Kings County, 1792 ; Solomon's, No. 22, at Fredericton, 1792 ; 
and Hiram York, No. 23, at Fredericton, 1793. The first of these lodges 



1 John Sinnott was the first brother initi.-vted invo freemasonry in New Brunswick. 
B 



18 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

was chartered by the mother grand lodge of England, and the others by 
the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia. All of them ceased to exist 
many years ago. 

It is not my desire to criticize the doings of the brethren of Hiram 
Lodge in the course they pursued in the unfortunate proceedings which 
finally resulted in the extinction of their lodge. It must be borne in 
mind that the state of society, the condition of the craft, the methods of 
masonic government and discipline, the estimate of masonic obligations, 
the code regulating public and private sentiment, and the scant know- 
ledge of constitutional masonic law, usage and landmarks prevailing in 
the ranks of the craft in those days, were widely different from the con- 
dition of things existing at the present time. Possibly there may have 
been a hidden hand in the original trouble, known and understood by the 
members of the lodge, whose evil machinations did not come to the 
knowledge of the provincial grand lodge. That the brethren were sincere 
in their contention, and that they believed right and justice were on their 
side, would seem to be a fair inference. They surely would not have 
allowed themselves to suffer the severe penalty of a deprivation of the 
rights and privileges of freemasonry if they were not so influenced. I 
have merely acted as a chronicler of the events which led up to the final 
act in the drama, collected from the documents placed at my disposal, 
and shall leave the question to the just discrimination of the reader, 
venturing a suggestion, however, that he exercise the golden virtues of 
silence and charity. Finally, I feel that all will join with me in express- 
ing regret, a sincere sorrow, that the pioneer masonic body of this prov- 
ince should, in so short a space of time, have ceased from its labors, and 
under such regrettable circumstances. 



HISTORY OF SffiINT JOHN'S LODGE, F. & R, M., 

SAINT JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK. 



Extracts kiiom thii Rkcokds, with Notks and Comments thebeon. 



Qhe 



HE founders of St. John's Lodge, with one or two exceptions, came 
to New Brunswick in A. D. 1783, with the Loyalists. They were 
^ actuated, no doubt, by a desire to unite together into an organiza- 
tion for social, friendly, and fraternal intercourse, such as the guarded 
door of a lodge of free and accepted masons offers to all entitled to enter 
therein. Hiram Lodge had ceased its labors in the year 1796, conse- 
quently at the time of the formation of St. John's Lodge six years had 
elapsed during which no masonic altar had been erected in their midst. 
Tiiey had experienced the hardships and privations attending the opening 
up and settlement of a new country, and had been many years deprived 
of the privilege of meeting "in lodge assembled.' With the many ad- 
vantages we i)ossess in our day, Ave can scarcely realize the great pleasure 
they exj)erienced when the lodge was opened and in working order. The 
deprivation of such a pleasure must have been a source of regret to them, 
particularly in the chaotic condition of public and private affaii-s during 
the early years of the city of Saint John ; we may therefore assume that 
the inauguration of the lodge, and the coming together of the brethren 
at the regular or emergent conmmnications, were a source of unalloyed 
enjoyment, and that in their gatherings they fully realized " how good 
and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity." 

The majority of the original members of the lodge were citizens of dis- 
tinction, occui)ying prominent social and public positions in the judicial, 
municipal, professional an J mercantile departments of the community, 
all meeting on the common level of the society, and actuated, we trust, 
by the tenets of brotherly love, relief and truth. Their former lodges 
are not set forth in the records, an omission which unfortunately pre- 
vailed in the case of joining members during all the years the lodge 
remained under the jurisdiction of the provincial grand lodge of Nova 
Scotia. Any particulars which I have been enabled to set forth in this 
respect were gathered from other sources. Some of these brethren re- 
ceived the degrees previous to their arrival in New Brunswick, while 
others were initiated in one or the other of tlie five old lodges established 
in the province previous to the formation of St. John's Lodge. One only 

(19) 



20 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

— Bro. John Sinnott — hailed from Hiram Lodge, No. 17. That other 
brethren of Hiram Lodge, residents of Saint John at the time, did not 
join in the establisiinient of St. John's Lodge, may have emanated from 
a re|)ugnance to affiliate under the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia, 
in conse(juence of receiving from that body what they conceived to be 
harsh and unjust treatment. 

Since commencing the compilation of this work, I have been forcibly 
impressed with the conviction that it should have been started at an 
earlier period — at least previous to the conflagration in Saint John of 
20th June, 1877. That destructive fire swept out of existence in a few 
hours valuable written and printed matter relating to the persons and 
things in connection with masonry in the past, which can never be re- 
placed or supplemented. The loss alone of important books and docu- 
ments in the grand secretary's office was a serious catastrophe. In that 
office was gathered and carefully husbanded, through persevering effort* 
of many years, a valuable collection of works on masonic and kindred 
subjects, which would have been of inestimable worth to the searcher 
after knowledge ; gone, and alas forever, by a decree unfathomable and 
inscrutable. 

During the past few years several old and experienced craftsmen — 
walking masonic encyclopedias — have gone ''to that undiscovered coun- 
try from whose bourne no traveller returns," and with them has passed 
away an important store of the unrecorded sayings and doings of the 
craft of by-gone days. The older membei's of the fraternity in this juris- 
diction remember with feelings of genuine affection the late venerable 
and worshipful brother, William W. Emslie. His name was a household 
word throughout the province ; he belonged to the whole body of the 
craft. His pleasant smile and genial manner gave him a welcome to all 
our masonic circles. In him the Great Giver of all good had centred the 
best attributes of humanity. His life was a continual round of self- 
denial, of benefaction, and good works generally. His pui*se strings were 
always loosened, and the contents freely given to the hungry and the 
suffering ; and when his own limited store fell short of the demand, he 
would lay his numerous and more wealthy friends under tribute. Thus 
he was ever and always a good'Satnaritau. Unpretentious and retiring 
in his manner, possessing but a limited education, and obliged to toil daily 
to supply the needs of himself and family, he was a man of rare natural 
ability, a promoter of various measures for the public good, and an orna- 
ment to the community in which he moved. He was in the widest sense 
one of nature's noblemen. Bro. Emslie was initiated into freemasonry 
in St. John's Lodge, 7th November, 1823, but subsequently withdrew 
therefrom and affiliated in Albion Lodge, retaining his membership in 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 21 

the latter until his death, which occurred 19th June, 1878, in the eiglity- 
second year of his age. His active interest in the society during a long 
nieinbershij) of fifty-five years, an intimate connection with all the degrees 
and grades established in Saint John during his lifetime, and his perse- 
verance and success in gaining a thorough knowledge of the esoteric and 
exoteric portions of the various bodies, combined with an exceptionally 
retentive memory, had stored his mind with an almost inexhaustible fund 
of information, which he freely communicated to the aspirant after 
masonic knowledge. 

R. W. Bro. Robert Gowan, of Fredericton, who died 80th January, 
1875), at the age of seventy -six years, was another craftsman whose loss 
was much felt by the whole fraternity. He received masonic light in 
Solomon's Lodge, No. 22, Fredericton, 14th August, 1821. Grand Master 
Marshall, in his address delivered before grand lodge April, 1879', i)aid a 
merited tribute to the worth of this distinguished brother in the following 
words : 

Bro. Gowan was no ordinary man. When able to do his duty, whetlier civil, 
social or masonic, no man conld do it better. Our grand lodge honored him with 
the highest honorary rank, that of a past grand master, wlien the last iScottish lodges 
over wliich he ruled as provincial grand master, united with us. Long before there 
was a central authority of ;iny kind in the province. Hro. Gowan's views and opinions 
hnil all the force of authority, and what he thought on any particular matter largely 
inlluenced the decision upon that matter. A diligent student, and strong in his own 
individuality, he never failed to have a decided view upon every question that came 
before him, and to any courteously expressed application for information or instruc- 
tion, he never failed to cheerfully respond. Social, kind, charitable and genial; 
honorable in all his dealings, the good that he did will live after him, and the 
remembrance of his many virtues will long linger in the grand lodge. 

In this connection I may mention the names of R. W. Bro. Alexander 
Bulloch, past grand master and past master of Union Lodge of Portland, 
who died 3rd February, 1870, aged seventy years; R. W. Bro. William 
H. A. Keans, deputy grand juaster and pa.st master of St. John's Lodge, 
whose death occurred 30th September, 1876, aged seventy-two years ; and 
Bro. John Boyer (uncle John), the popular and worthy tyler of all the 
bodies in Saint John, who, after a membership of fifty-six years in the 
craft, died 26th February, 1871, at an advanced age. 

These, with other notable brethren, whose deaths have recently taken 
place, were the connecting links between the past and the present. Their 
removal has deprived the craftsnian of the existing generation of many 
things concerning the unwritten and unpublished doings of by-gone years. 

Had the secretaries of former years been more careful in noting the 
transactions of the lodge, and entered in their records a full account of 
all proper to be written, much more interesting matter might have been 



22 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

presented to the reader. These officials seemed to have indited for the 
time being, without any thought of the future. Commencing with the 
first brother who lield the important office of secretary, and following his 
successors through the many changes, for fifty years at least, the idea 
seemed to have possessed each and every one of them, that the perfection 
of secretaryship centred in the ability to commit to writing the most 
meagre synopsis of the lodge doings, and that the secretary who could 
write the most abbreviated record was entitled to the largest share of 
commendation. The first record is searched in vain to ascertain the 
names of the brethren concerned in originating the lodge ; the prelimi- 
nary steps taken in the movement ; who did the corresponding, and with 
whom the correspondence was held ; the grand body which issued the 
warrant, and the grand master who granted the deputation to the brother 
authorized to constitute the lodge ; neither does it set forth whether the 
lodge was started under a warrant or a dispensation. These particulars 
were gathered from the archives of the present grand lodge of Nova 
Scotia, the successor of the provincial grand lodge by whose authority 
the original warrant of the lodge was issued, 18th December, 1801, and 
the custodian of all the books and papers of the old provincial grand 
lodge. 

It would be an interesting addition to this work if the first code of 
by-laws adopted by the lodge could have formed a portion of it. In this 
respect also the record is wanting, and we are left in the dark as to the 
nature of the laws enacted by our predecessors for their government when 
in lodge congregated. The record tersely states that " the committee 
brought forward the by-laws and they were approved of by the lodge." 
No doubt they were divested of unnecessary verbiage, and were as prac- 
tical as the retpiirements of those days would permit. In one respect, 
however, they differed from the regulations of the present day, in that 
they provided liberally, judging from subsequent entries in the minutes, 
for the infliction of fines for any short-coming or oHence recpiiring lodge 
discipline, and the fines were enfi)rced with impartiality and vigor. 

The entries in the records of recent years are more extended. In this 
respect an acknowledged im[)r()vement upon former times. While on 
this subject I venture earnestly to imj)res.s upon secretaries of all our 
masonic bodies the importance of keej)ing full and explicit minutes of all 
transactions proper to be recorded, bearing in mind that loose papers are 
liable to be lost or destroyed, while the record books are more likely to 
be cared for and preserved, and to bear in mind also that the record is 
intended for future reference. During inany years the secretaries omitted 
to nuike mention of the lodges to which joining brethren formerly be- 
longed, or from which they hailed ; the ages and oc^'upations of candidutet^ 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 28 

were also omitted. These failures ia completing their records have pre- 
vented the identification of some of the old members. 

In receiving the petitions of candidates, and in balloting for and con- 
ferring the degrees upon them in the early days of the lodge, an extended 
latitude was exercised, which, to the freemasons of the present time, seems 
strange and incomprehensible. Instances are recorded where a j)etitioa 
was received, the ballot taken, and the three degrees conferred upon an 
aspirant on the same evening. The conferring of two degrees upon a 
candidate at the same communication was a common occurrence. These 
irregularities were, no doubt, the outcome of the lax system of govern- 
ment prevailing among the provincial grand authorities at Halifax, 
winked at, and probably encouraged by the "Dermot" grand lodge in 
London. 

" From labor to refreshment" was a regular entry in the minutes; but 
it was not a mere perfunctory practice or observance. When the lodge 
was " called off," the stewards performed their special functions by sup- 
plying refreshments to the congregated brethren. In times past this 
feature of lodge gatherings abounded everywhere, and was considered an 
important item in its existence. It has not been in vogue for more than 
forty years in the lodges in Saint John, and with no prospect of its resus- 
citation. 

The regular communications Mere invariably opened and the ordinary 
business of the lodge transacted on the entered ai)prentice degree ; and 
although occasionally the master may have departed from that practice 
of late years, it is still quite strictly observed and followed. 

From its foundation uj) to the present time prayer has invariably 
formed a portion of tlie opening ceremonial. " The masonic custom of 
invoking the blessing of the Great Architect of the universe at the open- 
ing of a lodge, or as a preliminary to any of the observances of the craft, 
is a very old one. The lodge of Edinburgh, No. 1, Scotland, [xtssesses 
manuscript prayers bearing date A. D. 1669. Prayer to the Almighty 
formed part of the ancient ceremony oi' fencing^ a lodge preparatory to 
the comnieiicenient of business." • 

Until the year l^^oH it was a uniform practice with the secretaries, at 
the commencement of the record of each meeting, to use the expression 
"After prayer proceeded to business." Since then, for some unexplained 
reason, this jiarticular wording has been omitted. 

The |)eculiar construction of the closing j)ortion of the record of each 
conniiunication varied, seemingly, in accordance with the whim or fancy 
of the respective secretaries. The first incumbent of that office, Bro. 

1 Fencin:/ a lodge: GuMrdiiiK or placing 11 in ii utalo of dufono«\ A tonu Kynusiymous with 

tyliug. 



24 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

AVilliani Fayerweather, who did not append his signature, wrote : "Closed 
in due form." The second, Bro. Francis Watson, neither signed his name 
nor made any minute of the closing of the lodge. The third, Bro. Wm. 
Donaldson, an exceedingly elegant penman, signed his name to the record 
but seldom noted the closing of the lodge. The fourth, Bro. Samuel 
Nichols, finished his record with "Closed," " Closed in form," and "Closed 
in due form." Subsequently the expressions, in addition to the foregoing, 
were: "Closed in friendship and brotherly love" ; "Adjourned"; "Ad- 
journed (or closed) in harmony and brotherly love;" "Closed in due 
form with order, harmony and brotherly love;" "Closed in perfect har- 
mony and brotherly love, combined with the tenderest ties of masonry ; " 
*' Closed after a peaceful and harmonious meeting," etc. 

The history of St. John's Lodge embraces, to a large extent, the his- 
tory of freemasonry in the city of Saint John during the first fifty years 
of the city's existCiice. It is true that two other old lodges were chartered, 
and for a portion of the time met and worked in the city, viz. : Hiram, 
No. 17, and Union, No. 38, both on the roll of the provincial grand lodge 
of Nova Scotia, but as their records and other documents are not forth- 
coming, the information regarding them is (juitc meagre. Carleton Royal 
Arch Chapter, constituted A. D. ]8()o, under authority of St. John's 
Lodge warrant, has been its cotemporary and co-worker during all the 
years until now. To its records, which are complete and in good preser- 
vation, I have been indebted for valuable information, and without which 
.some of my notes would have been incomplete. They enabled me to 
remedy omissions and to make a more complete and better digested narra- 
tive than would otherwise have been attainable. The histories, therefore, 
of this chapter and the lodge are c()ntemporaneous, and embrace almost 
all that is known of freemasonry in Saint John up to the year 1829. 
Let us indulge in the hope that both bodies nuiy continue to prosecute 
their labors for all time to come, and that they may always exemplify, 
through their memberships, the j)ure and exalted tenets of the royal 
craft. 

The abiding places of the lodge possess so nmch interest that a recital 
of their localities, and other particulars connected with them, are deserv- 
ing mention in this compilation. I have been enabled to glean the 
desired information from the records, as follows : The lodge was consti- 
tuted 5th April, 1802, in the Mallard House, situated on the north side 
of King street, a short distance west of Germain street, and continued to 
meet there until May, 1805; from May, 1805, until May, 1808, it met in 
Bro. Jotham Hitchcock's house, which stood on the south side of King 
street, and near the west line of Cross (now Canterbury) street; from 
May, 1808, until March, 1813, the meetings were held in Cody's Coffee 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 25 

House, south-east corner King und Prince William streets; from March, 
1813, until May, l^<14, in the Mallard House a second time — at this period 
kept by a Mrs. Cock; from May, 1814, until May, 1818, in a building 
on the north side of Horsfield street, owned by Bro. Joseph E. Morse ; 
from May, 1818, until May, 1822, on the north-east corner of Union and 
Smyth streets, in a building owned by Bro. Xjevi Lockhart; from May, 
1822, until May, 1824, in Bro. Charles MacPherson's house, corner King 
and Cross (now Canterbury) streets ; from May, 1824, until September, 
1842, in the masonic hall owned by Bro. Israel Lawson, south-west corner 
King and Charlotte streets; from September, 1842, until May. 1846, in 
the union hall, west side of Dock street, a brick building owned by 
Richard Nowlan ; from May, 1846, until February, 1851, in the St. John 
hotel, formerly the masonic hall, corner King and Charlotte .streets; from 
February, 1851, until August, 1856, on the south-west corner Princess 
and Sidney streets, in Bro. David S. Marshall's budding; from August, 
1856, until the fire of 20th June, 1877, in Judge Ritchie's stone building, 
south side Princess street, corner Canterbury street ; through the courtesy 
of Carleton Union Lodge, the comnuinication of 3rd July, 1877, was 
held in the masonic hall, Carleton ; from July, 1877, until January, 1878, 
in Horton's hall, south-west corner Charlotte and Union streets ; from 
January, 1878, until jNIay, 1879, in Magee's hall, east side Germain street, 
a .short distance south of King street; from May, 1879, to the present 
time, in the masonic temple, east side Germain street, where it is hoped 
the lodge will have a permanent abiding place. An extended descrip- 
tion of some of these buildings is given in another portion of this 
volume. 

During the whole ])eriod of its existence, covering a space of ninety- 
two years, the lodge has rarely failed to meet and transact its lawful 
business. Although in its early yt ars ihe records were sometimes lacking 
particulars neces.«<ary for reference and information, they have been kept 
and written up with commendable regularity, and there is only one in- 
stance of an omission in holding the annual or semi-annual elections. 
Such an exhibit of vigor and regularity during so many years is rarely 
to be found in the life of any organized society. 

The privilege of access to the books and documents in the office of 
the grand secretary at Halifax, and the valual)le pnrticulai-s I have been 
enabled to cull from liiem in connection with the preliminaries antecedent 
to the formation of the lodge, aHbrded me a fair start in the compilation 
of this work, undertaken under many misgivings, and bristling at the 
out>»et with an unpromising and formidable front. 

The first document bearing upon the subject is thvj petition for the 
warrant, of which the following is a copy. 



26 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

To the right worshipful grand manfer, worKhipful depntij grand master, grand wardens, 
etc., etc., etc., of the right uorship/ul grand lodge of Nova Scotia: 

The representation of the undersigned citizens of Saint John most hnmbly 
sliewetli : That we, as men and masons, often lament tlie decline of masonry in this 
city, and judging that it might answer valuable purposes to have a lodge once more 
established, do for ourselves and others of undeniable characters most earnestly pray 
that a warrant may be granted to us, under the title of St. John,' to be held in the 
house of Mrs. Ann Mallard, in the city of St. John, on the first Tuesday of every 
month. We trust that this our request, being laid before the right worshipful grand 
lodge at their quarterly communication, it will be approved of, and the resolve in 
our favor made known to us, and all dues, etc., we will most cheerfully pay, and 
every command most promptly obey. That the above may be considered, approved 
of, and granted, is the earnest desire of many. And we, as in duty bound, for the 
honor and prosperity of the right worshipful grand lodge and all its dependencies, 
will ever pray. 

Georgk S.mitit. 

Chapman Judson. 

David Waterhcry. 
St. John, Sept. 22nd, -5801. 

The petition was fortified by certificates of recommendation from the 
three hxlges then workiii<^ in the province, over the signatures of their 
proper officers, as follows : 

The undersigned W. M., Senior and Junior Wardens of Sion Lodge, No. 21, do 
recommend the above memorialists to the right worshipful g ..id master and gran<l 
senior and junior wardens of the grand lodge as worthy of notice. 

Georoe Leonard, W. M. 
C. Howe, S. \V. 
Georoe Pitfiei.d, J. W. 
Samuel Hallett, Secretary. 

The undei-signed W. M., Senior and Junior Wardens of St. (Jeorge's Lodge, No. 
19, do recommend the above memorialists, with sentiments of respect, to the right 
worshi[)ful grand master and grand senior and junior wardens of the grand lodge, 
as worthy of the favor they recpiest. 

Andrew Mehskreau, W. M. 
Thomas Perley, S. W. 
CoRwiN Brown, J. W. 
Shadrack Holi.y, Secretary. 

We, the undersigned worshii)fuI master and wardens of Solomon's Lodge, No. 22, 
at Fredericton, <lo recommend the within memorialists as worthy of notice to the 
right worshipful grand lodge of Nova Scotia. 

CfAHRIEL VanHoRNE, W. M. 

Jacoh I). Hlaichkr, S. W. 
Tno.MA.s Lincoln, J. W. 

1 .\1thotiKh th<> pcHtionor^ mixx'^ted Sl.Juhii as the nniuo of the lodge, the proviiiotal grand 
lodge oHluiulM, in issuing the warriint, made It iSt, John's. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 2T 

The applicants for the warrant transmitted the following letter, hi 
conjunction with tlie petition and recommendations, viz. : 

St. John, Nov. 26tli, 5801. 
Worshipful Sir and Brother : 

We take the liberty to write you and to inclose the within memorial to the right 
worshipful grand lodge, etc., with the approbation of three lodges, for obtaining our 
request. We trust, sir, that it will meet with the full approbation of all, and we 
hope you will send us the earliest notice of the resolve, after the first quarterly com- 
munication. We are already provided with every jewel and working tool from u 
lodge' which ".vas broken up. We have nothing to add but our joint prayers for the 
prosperity and honor of the right worshipful grand master, etc., etc., etc., and every 

member of the right worshipful body. 

George Smith. 

Chapman Judson. 

John Selby, Esq., Grand Sec'y, Halifax. David Watebbuky. 

The petition and accompanying documents were laid before the i^ro- 
vincial grand lodge at a special communication held 18th Decenibcr, 
1801, and received a favorable consideration, as appears by the record of 
that date, viz. : 

Read a memorial from Brothers George Smith, Chapman Judson, and David 
Waterbury, of the city of Saint John, New Brunswick, for themselves and other 
brethren of the same place, praying that this right worshipful grand lodge would 
grant them a warrant for constituting and holding a lodge of free and accepted 
masons in the city of Saint John, under tlie name of "St. John's Lodge," to be held 
at the house of Mrs. .\nn Mallard, upon the first Tuesday of every calendar month. 
Tlie same being taken into mature deliberation, and it appearing that liie said me- 
morial was strongly recommended by the three respective lodges now holden at New 
Brunswick, it was 

Resolved, That the prayer of the said memorial be granted, and that the grand 
secretary is hereby directed to do the needful, so that the warrant may be transmitted 
as early as possible. 

The warrant was issued in due course, and is herewith copied in full,. 

as follows : 

Duncan Clark, Grand Master. 

John Bremneu, Dkittv Grand Master. 

James Clarke, S. Ci. W. ; Charles ^foRRIs, Junr., J. G. W. 

To all uhoiii it may concern : 

In virtue of the powers and authorities given and granted by a warrant under 
the hand and seal of the Most Puissant and Noble Lord, The Right Honorable and 
Right Worshipful WiHiam Randall MacDonnell, Earl of Antrim, Lord Viscount 
I>unluce, Knight Comnmnder of ihe Most Honorable Order of the Bath, Governor 
of the County of Antrim, Grand Master, and the Right Worshipful the other officer* 
of the grand lodge of the most ancient and honorable fraternity of free and accepted 
masons as established on conformity to the ancient constitutions (as granted by Hi* 

1 lllraiii Loilge, No. 17. 



28 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Koyal Highness Prince Edward, at York, anno Domini nine imndred and twenty-six, 
being the year of masonry 4926), in liiat part of Great Britain tailed England, and 
niasonical jnrisdiction thereunto belonging, bearing date at London, the second dijy 
of June, anno Domini one thonsand seven hiuulred and eighty-four, for constituting 
ii grand lodge within tlie niasonical jurisdiction of the province of Nova Scotia, in 
North America: We, the grand officers of the said grand lodge, viz. : The R'^'ht 
"Worshipful Duncan Clark, Esquire, Grand Master; The Right Worshipful John 
Bremner, Esquire, Deputy Grand Master; The Kight Worshipful James Clarke, 
Esquire, Senior Grand Warden ; and The Kight Worshipful ("harles Morris, Esquire, 
Junior Grand W^arden, by and with the consent and approbation of the warranted 
lodges assembled in ample form, at Halifax, within tlie said jurisdiction, do by these 
QT TnTTN'Q presents authorize and empower our trusty and well-beloved 
T nT\nV M on brethren, viz.: The Worshipful George Smith, one of our 
L\jUyj£j, JNO. 4 J. ,j,aster masons; The Worshipful David Waterbury, his 
senior warden; and The Worshipful John Dean, his junior warden, to form and 
hold a lodge of free and accepted masons aforesaid, at the house of Mrs. Ann Mallard 
{or elsewhere), in the city of Saint John, in the said province of New Brunswick, 
upon the first Tuesday in each calendar month, and on all seasonable times and 
lawful occasions, in the said lodge (when duly congregated), to admit and make 
freemasons, according to the most ancient and honorable custom of the Royal Craft 
in all ages and nations throughout the known woj Id ; and we do further authorize 
and empower our said trusty and well-beloved brethren, George Smith, David 
Waterbury and Jolui Dean (with the consent of the members of the lodge) to 
nominate, chuse and instal their successors, to whom they shall deliver this war- 
rant, and invest them with the powers and dignities as freemasons, etc.; and such 
successors shall, in like manner, nominate, chuse and instal their snccessore, etc., 
etc., etc., such installation to be upon or near every St. John's day during the con- 
tinuance of this lodge forever; provided the above named brethren, and all their 
successors, do always pay due respect to this right worshipful grand lodge, otherwise 
this warrant to be of no force or value. 

Given under our hands and the seal of the grand lodge at Halifax aforesaid, the 
eigiiteenth day of December, in the year of our Lord 1801, and in the yerr 
of masonry 5801. 

John Selby, Grand Secretary. [L. S.] 

The name of Bro, Chapman Jiidson, one of the petitioners, does not 
appear in the warrant; instead, that of Bro. John Dean was substituted, 
and there was no pajier on file nor any entry in the records of the pro- 
vincial grand lodge in explanation of the change. In further mystifica- 
tion of the matter, and without any reason being given, Bro. Dean was 
not installed into the office of junior warden at the constitution of the 
lodge; and to render the proceedings more unaccountable, Bro. Chapman 
Judson became the senior warden, Bro. Waterbury junior warden, and 
Bro. Dean senior deacon. 

The warrant and accompanying papers were transmitted by the grand 
secretary to R. W. Bro. William Campbell, P^squire, deputy provincial 
^raud master at Saint John, with instructions to constitute the lodge iu 



80 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

the usual form. The right worshipful brother, who was also one of the 
founders of the lodge, having performed the allotted duty, made a report 
thereafter, which report is noted in the records of the provincial grand I 
lodge of 2nd June, 1802, in the following words: 

Read a letter from R. W. Bro. William Campbell, Esquire, of Saint Jolin, N. B., 
<lated May 18th l:i-^t, transmitting a report of the proceedings of a grand lodge pro 
tern., held at Saint John, New Brunswick, on the oth April last, for the purpose of 
constituting a lodge of free and accepted masons, by the name of " St. John's Lodge, 
No. 29," to be held in said city, and for installing the officers of said lodge; which, 
appearing to be regular and correct, met with tlie approbation of this right worship- 
ful grand lodge. 

Bro. William Fayerweather, the secretary of the lodge at its forma- 
tion, having failed to copy or even allude to these important docun)ents, | 
started his record in an unbusinesslike and unsatisfactory manner. Their 
production here supplies all that is needed to start a foundation for the 

future superstructure. 

A. D. 1802. 

The first record book of the lodge contains about one quire of coarse 
unruled paper, foolscap size, and bound in a stiff paper cover. The ink 
iiud paper are in a good state of preservation. The first record is dated 
5th April, 1802, the day on which the lodge was constituted and conse- ; 
crated. The meeting was held and the ceremonial performed in a build- \ 
ing ownied by Mrs. Ann Mallard, situate on the north side of King street, ; 
Avest of and near Germain street, in the city of 8aint John. The record ' 
states that the lodge was installed by the R. W. Bro. William Campbell, i 
Esquire, grand master, assisted by Bro. William S. Oliver, Escpiire, D. G. i 
M. ; Hor. Bro. Geo. Leonard, S. G. W. ; Bro. Andrew Kiiniear, J. G.W. ; I 
JBro. John Sinnot, G. Sec'y ; Bro. Charles Agar, G. Tyler ; Bros. George I 
♦Smith, Chapman Judson, David Waterbury, John Woolhaupter, William i 
Fayerweather, Joiin Dean, Caleb Merritt, George Blackwood, John Scott, ? 
Nehemiah Merritt,^ Thomas Wetmore, R. A., Hon. Jo:;hua Upham, Hugh I 
Johnston, R. A., John Paul, R. A., George McCoU, and Edward Sands. I 
Also the following visiting brethren : D. Campbell, R. A., Joseph Eccles, | 
R. A., William Robertson, Thomas Jennings, Alexander Umphries, 1 
Joseph Allen, R. A., Peter Blair, and John Tool. | 

The lodge was constituted, and the following officers installed: I 

W. Bro. Cieorge Smitii, Worshipful Master. i 

Bro. Chapman Judson, S. W. Bro. John Woolhaupter, Treas. | 

Bro. David Waterbury, J. W. Bro. John Dean, S. D. I 

Bro. William Fayerweather, Sec'y. Bro. Caleb Merritt, J. D. | 

1 Bro. Ni'heiniah Morritt's uanie does not appear in the original record. At tlie next regular * 
meeting, howover, it is included in the list of nieniluTg then in attendance, and as there is no minute ; 
of his being proposed or balloted for, I assume that he Wiis one of the original members. I 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 81 

The record goes on to state tliat the grand lodge was closed precisely 
at fcven o'clock and a master's lodge opened. The brethren were then 
called to refreshment, and subsequently to labor, after which the lodge 
was closed in due form. 

April 6 — The first regular communication, "when an Y,. A. lodge was 
opened at seven o'clock, and after prayers proceeded to business." Bro. 
Charles Agar was proposed for membership, and " Bro. Francis Watson 
petitioned to be raised to the sublime degree of a master mason, he having 
received the E. A. and F. C. degrees in another lodge." Bro. William 
Rogers was proposed for menibei-ship " by himself in person " Bros. 
(ieorge Blackwood, John Scott and Caleb Merritt " were appointed a 
committee to form a code of by-laws for the body, and also to j)rovide 
implements for the same." 

May 4 — The record of this meeting states that "the committee 
brought forward the by-laws, and they were approved of by the body." 
There is no entry of these by-laws and no way of ascertaining their pro- 
visions.' 

Of five candidates balloted for at this meeting, four were not " ap- 
proved," a discrimination shewing that at this early stage of their 
proceedings the brethren guarded against the admission of improper 
material. 

June 1 — "Bro. George Smith was elected to fill the chair for the 
ensuing six months by the unanimous consent of the brethren," and all 
the other officers were elected to continue in their several stations for the 
same period. This method of electing all the officers of the lodge con- 
tinued up to A. D. 1837, the date of obtaining the warrant from the 
united grand lodge of England. Semi-annual elections were held in 
June and December, 1802 and 1803, and thenceforward annually in 
December. 

Charles Wells was the first candidate initiated in St. John's Lodge. 
His petition was received, the ballot taken, and the E. A. degree con- 
ferred upon him at this meeting, the record setting forth that it was " a 
case of emergency, as he expected to sail before the next lodge night." 

The worehipful master, with Bros. John Dean and Nehemiah Merritt, 

1 The brother who filled the otlice of secretary in 1857, seemingly prompted liy a vandalism the 
outcome of unaccountable ignorance, burned and utterly destroyed all the files of papers, reports, 
by-laws, certificates, and other documents, gathered by the lodge during all the years of its exist- 
ence. When charged with the commission of this flagrant act, he disjilayed his wanton stupidity 
by replying that " thoy were only trash and in the way." Even the old record books were thrown 
aside and scattered here and there, and would probably have been lost beyond recovery, but that 
the writer made diligent search and fortunately secured all except one small volume containing the 
transactions of 1809-1811. 



32 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

were appointed a committee " to wait on Dr. Byles,' and to regulate some 
other business relative to the festival of St. John the Baptist." The 
committee, with commondable alacrity, had so arranged the preliminaries 
of the forthcoming festival that, on the 8th June, a notice was published 
in the Royal Gazette and Neiv Brnnsivick Advertiser, as follows: 

The master, wardens and brethren of St. John's Lodge, No. 29, hitely formed in 
this city, beg leave hereby to rospectfnlly inform the bretlnen who are not members 
of the lodge, that they propose to celebrate the festival of St. John on the 24th in- 
stant. They will meet in the lodge room on said day, at ten o'clock in le morning, 
and from thence attend chnrch for the benefit of prjiyer, after which will be a sermon 
snitable to the occasion. The niembers of the lodge will be happy to see such of 
their brethren as may be dispo.sed to join them, and tliose who conclude to attend 
are requested to send their names, by the IGth instant, to Mrs. Mallard, who is to 
provide the dinner. 

June 24 — The brethren assembled in the lodge room at nine o'clock 
a. m. The lodge was opened on the E. A. degree, and the newly elected 
officers installed, viz. : 

W. Bro. George Smith, W. M. 
Bro. David Waterbury, S. W. Bro. William Fayerweather, Sec'y. 

" John Dean, J. W. " Caleb Merritt, S. D. 

" Nehemiah Merritt, Treas. " Francis Watson, J . D. 

No mention is made of any other officers. 

The following members and visitors were present, and joined in the 
ceremonies of the occasion : 

R. W. Bro. William Campbell, D. G. M. 

Bro. William S. Oliver, Bro. Rev. John Beardsley, 

" Edward Sands, " A. Read, 

" Hugh Johnston, " S. Storm, Sion Lodge, No. 21, 

" John Sinnot, " Hugh McMaster, 

" Joshua Upham, " Alexander I'mphrey, 

" Daniel Bliss, " Linus Seely, 

" Robert Laidley, " J. Vail, 

" Thomas Jennings, " Mitchell, Hiram Lo., No. 7, N. Y. 

'* James Hendricks, " C. Harris, 

" Peter Wade, " Segee, 

" J. Forrester, " Peter Blair, 

" D. Beveridge, " J. Riley, tyler. 

The number present may be considered a good representation of the 
craft, considering the small population of Saint John at that early date. 
After the installation of the officers, "the brethren walked in procession 

1 Rev. Mather Byles, D. D., was one of the early rectors of Trinity church, and chaplain of the 
district of Saint John, lie graduated from Harvard university in the year 1751, and was rector of 
Christ's church, Boston, Massachusetts, prior to the emigration of the Loyalists. His death occurred 
at Saint John, 12th March, 1814, in the 81a4 year of his age. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 88 

to the church, and received the benefit of a sermon delivered by the 
Rev. Bro. Beardsley.' After divine service they returned to the lodge 
room, were called to refreshment, afterward to labor, and then the lodge 
was closed in due form." While at refreshment they no doubt enjoyed 
themselves heartily. Pledged the king, freemasonry, and tlie fair sister- 
hood, and otherwise did honor to their first festive gathering. 

July 6 — "Bros. Francis Watson and John Dean were appointed a 
committee to wait on Mrs. Mallard and, if possible, to agree with her for 
the use of the room, including fire and candles, at a certain sum per night." 

An entry, October H, states that " Bro. David Waterbiiry applied for 
a certificate to go to the royal arch, and obtained a vote of the lodge for 
the same." 

In those days royal arch chapters were attached to and worked under 
the warrant of a craft lodge, and no brother could receive the chapter 
degrees except upon a certificate of recommendation from the lodge to 
which he belonged. As there was no chapter then in Saint John, it is 
probable that the brother intended to apply to the body at Kingston, 
Kings county, working under the warrant of Sion Lodge, No. 21. 

November 2 — " Bro. Jeremiah Pecker produced a certificate from 
Lodge, No. 242, of New Providence, Bahama Island, in which he is 
recommended as a master mason, and, as he wished to become a member 
of this lodge, he was proposed and unanimously admitted." 

" Visiting brethren being all duly sworn, Bros. William Fraser, Daniel 
McAlpine, Oliver Shad, Joseph Prince, and Jacob Blaicker." 

"Members absent — Bros. William Fayerweather, John Woolhaupter, 
Nehcmiah Merritt, Caleb Merritt, Charles Wells, R. Whelpley, George 
Blackwood, and John Scott." I make this extract to shew that the prac- 
tice prevailed at that time of noting in the record the names of members 
absent at regular connnunications. Similar entries were made many 
years subsequently. 

December 7 — W. Bro. George Smith was re-elected worshipful master 
for the next six months. Bros. Watson, Dean and McLeod were ap- 
pointed a committee " to transact business respecting the feast on St. 
John's day." 

December 27 — The record states that " the members of the lodge and 
visiting brethren assembled at the lodge room at eleven o'clock in the 
morning, the entered apprentice lodge was opened at twelve o'clock, 

1 Bro. the Rev, John Beardsley, A. M., who came to New Brunnwick at the close of the Ameri- 
can revolutionary war, was the first Episcopal clergyman to oflSciate in St. John. He was junior 
grand warden of the provincial grand lodge of New York, and, during the early years of free- 
ma^nnrv in this province, took an active interest in its progreis. 

C 



34 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

walked in procession to tho church to receive the benefit of prayers de- 
livered by the Rev. Dr. Byles, from thence returned in order to the lodge 
room, and then called to refreshment. After dinner the lodge was called 
from refreshment to labor by the W. M., and then closed in due form." 

Up to the close of 1802 the lodge held fourteen meetings; five candi- 
dates were initiated, and six brethren became joining members; these, 
with the origimil niend)ers, made a total of thirty-two on the roll. The 
officers elected on the seventh instant for the ensuing six months, and in- 
stalled this day, were : 

W. Bro. (ieorge Smith, W. M. 

Bro. David Waterbnry, S. W. Bro. Francis Watson, Sec'y. 

" John Dean, J. W. " Caleb Merritt, J. D. 

" Neliemiah Merritt, Treas. " .lolin McLeod, S. D. 

The record does not allude to the installation of stewards, tyler, etc. 

In the same volume as the minutes of the craft lodge, and in regular 
sequence, there is a record of two mark master's lodges, held November 
2 and 3, 5802. The meeting of November 2 took place the same evening 
as the craft meeting. From this circumstance it may be inferred that the 
mark degree was given under the authority of the craft warrant, although 
the two bodies were not conducted by the same officers. 

The following is a copy of the record : " Minutes of two mark lodges 
not being in my hands, they were mislaid, and I did not find them to in- 
sert them in their proper place, but by the date you may find them. 
November 2, 1802 — Opened a mark master's lodge and proceeded to 
business. Names of brethren present : Bros. Daniel McAlpine, David 
Waterbury, John Dean, Jeremiah Pecker and Chapman Judson. Marked 
Worshipful Bro. George Smith then closed in due form." 

"St. John, Nov. 3, 5802 — Being a lodge of emergency. A mark 
master's lodge was opened at seven o'clock, then proceeded to business. 
Names of brethren present : Bros. Daniel McAlpine, W'l George Smith, I 
David Waterbury, John Dean and Chapman Judson. Bro. Francis | 
Watson took the fourth step in masonry. Bros. Oliver Shad and Joseph \ 
Prince, both of Eastport lodge, also took the fourth step, Eastport lodge | 
being under the jurisdiction of the grand lodge of Massachusetts.' Lodge •] 
closed in due form." | 

The four brethren who received the mark degree at these meetings 
selected and recorded their marks, as follows : Bro. George Smith, a | 
griffin's head ; Bro. Francis Watson, the same ; Bro. Oliver Shad, a plumb | 
line ; and Bro. Joseph Prince, a bee-hive. 1 

I 

1 At that period the lodges in the State of Maine were on the roll of the grand lodge of Massa- 1 
chusetts, and continued so until the year 1820, when the State of Maine became a separate masonic ft 
Jurisdiction, with an independent grand lodge. | 



i 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 85 

A. D. 1803. 

March 1 — " Notih Disbrow petitioned for degrees, and as he was* going 
to sea, he asked to be admitted this night; when, considering it a case of 
emergen(!y, he was balloted for, admitted, and took the first step." 

March 8 — "An extra lodge called to forward our business, as we had 
more than we could do on the regular night. The W. M. was authorized 
to procure a draft on Halifax for grand lodge fees." 

April 5 — "It was resolved, that the members who were first at the 
expense of installing the lodge should be repaid out of the funds." 

June 7 — "It was proposed and unanimously passed, that we should 
keep St. John's day with the usual solemnity ; and the W. M. and warden? 
were appointed a committee to transact the business of St. John's day.' 

June 24 — The lodge met this day according to resolution, "when 
there was a good attendance of the brethren." No further record was 
made of the proceedings, except that " Bros. Jeremiah Pecker and Nehe- 
niiuh Merritt were appointed a committee to procure a copy of Bro. 
Beardsley's sermon to lay before the body next night." At the regular 
conmiunication held July 5, it was " resolved, that the sermon preached 
by Bro. Beardsley on St. John's day be printed," * 

July 12 — " Extra lodge called to settle the books." Previous to clos- 
ing, it was " resolved to remove the lodge to the Coffee House, and Bros. 
John Woodward, Benjamin Wiggins and John Dean were appointed a 
committee to transact the business of the same." No removal took place 
under this resolution. 

August 2 — " Resolved, that forty shillings be given out of the lodge 

funds to relieve Bro. , as he is in a strange place and has no money 

to carry him home." 

October 4 — A supply of aprons was ordered for the use of the lodge, 
and Bros. Wiggins and Dean were authorized " to lay out twenty shillings 
in necessaries for the family of Bro. , in destitute circumstances." 

November 1 — "It was proposed by the W. M. that a mark master's 
lodge should be called on Tuesday, the eighth instant, for those who desire 
to take that degree." At the appointed meeting the following received 
the degree and selected their marks : John Woodward, I. W. ; James 
Holly, an anchor ; John McLeod, Hope ; James Hendricks, a heart with 

1 W. Bro. Robert B. Humphrey, of Saint John, has in his poiscssiou a copy of the pamphlet con- 
taining the sermon. It was preached in Trinity church by R. W. Bro . the Rev. John Beardsley, M.A., 
from the text Hebrews xiii, 1 : " Let brotherly love continue." The pamphlet was printed at Saint 
John by Jacob 8. Mott. 



36 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

a sword on it ; Benjamin Wiggins, Jacob's ladder ; and David Merritt, a 
heart. 

December 4 — The following brethren were elected to office for the 

ensuing year: 

Bro. George Smith, W. M. 
Bro. David Waterbnry, S. W. Bro. Benjamin Wiggins, S. D. 

" Jolin Dean, J. W. " John McLeod, J. D. 

" Nehemiah Merritt, Treas. " James Hendricks, Ist Steward. 

" William Donaldson, Sec'y. " Peter Blair, 2nd Steward. 

Bro. Peter McCalift; Tyler. 

Up to this date the elections had been held semi-annually, in June 
and December; thenceforward annually, in December. This is the first 
minute of the election of stewards and tyler. It will be observed that 
the former are styled first and second stewards. Bro. Peter McCaliff 
was admitted to membership without payment of fees in consideration of 
his services as tyler. 

Eighteen meetings were held during the year 1803; thirteen candi- 
dates were initiated and seven brethren affiliated. 

This completes the first volume of the records, and the second year of 
the lodge's history. 

A. D. 1804. 

The second volume is a counterpart of the first, and embraces the pro- 
ceedings of the lodge from the beginning of the year 1804 until the end 
of 1808. The minutes of 1804 and 1805 are written in a neat and clerkly 
hand, reflecting much credit upon Bro. William Donaldson, the secretary 
of those years. They are clearly transcribed and more explicit than 
those of his predecessors. 

February 7 — The following fines and penalties were enacted : "Any 
member absent ten minutes after the opening of the lodge, sevenpeuee 
half-penny; and if absent the whole evening, one shilling. Any member 
leaving his seat without permission of the master, sixpence ; and any 
officer leaving his chair, one shilling. Any brother interrupting another 
while addressing the n)Hster, fourpence." 

Subsequent entries in the records prove that the brethren were loyal 
in their submission to the enforcement of these penalties. As the years 
rolled on the feeling in the lodge became opposed to these enactments, 
and eventually they were abolished. At the present day such coercive 
measures could obtain no foothold in the craft, the lodges, as now consti- 
tuted, desiring to fulfil their masonic engagements more by a sense of duty 
than of coercion. Certainly the genius of freenmsonry is now opposed 
to such laws. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 37 

"Bro. John McLeod delivered into the lodj^e a seal, the property of 
the late Bro. William Lorain, to remain in and become the property of the 
lodge until it should be demanded by the relatives of the said Bro. Lorain." 

"The committee appointed at the last regular meeting to inquire into 
the nature of the dispute existing between the W. M. and Bro. John 
Toole having given in their award, the same was read to the body, when, 
Bro. Toole having confessed his fault and made a satisfactory acknow- 
leu;<ment, he was forgiven." "Confessed his fault and was forgiven," are 
expiessions worthy of being recorded in letters of gold. They convey a 
lull measure of true nobility of mind, and embody bright masotjic virtues. 

March 6 — "It was ordered that in future no bread, cheese, etc., shall 
he ijitroduced into the lodge room on a regular night." The cost of re- 
freshments was defrayed by the voluntary contributions of the brethren 
ill attendance, and thus the entries in the records of " contributions to the 
box," " expenses of the evening," and " refresiiments," were quite regu- 
larly nuule up to the year 18.')0. After that date the practice of having 
refreshments in the lodge seems to have been discontinued. 

April 8 — "Bro. David Waterbury, S. W., took the chair till next 
election in December, in room of our late W. M., Bro. George Smith, 
deceased. Bro. John Toole was ai)pointed J. W., in room of Bro. John 
Dean, promoted to the senior warden's chair." 

The late worshipful inaster was in attendance and presided at the 
February meeting, and although not ])resent in March, presumably by 
reason of sickness, no reference is made to his absence or sickness, and 
no minute nuide of his death except what is contained in the foregoing 
paragniph. lie was one of the petitioiiei-s for the warrant of the lodge, 
and WHS named in it as the first master. He continued to rule over the 
body from its formation until his death. His renuiins were no doubt 
buried with nuisonic ceremonial, as the record states that the treasurer 
was authoriy.ed to settle some expen.ses in connection therewith. Tha 
most diligent inquiry has failed to produce any particulars as to his per- 
.^'onal history. 

May 1 — " Bros. John Toole and Nehemiah Merritt were appointed a 
couHuittee to wait upon the K. W. Deputy CJrand Master and request him 
to preside as master of this body until next election." A second grant 
of twenty shillings was voted to liro. " to assist him in his neces- 
sities," and the secretary was ordered "to nuike outiuid forward a certiti- 
le to Bro. John Woolhaupter at New York." 

May 3 — An emergent conununication, over which li.W. Bro. vVilliam 
iiiiipbell, D.G. M., presided. 



38 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

" Bros. Neheniiah Meiritt, James Hendricks and William Donaldson 
were appointed "a standing committee to inquire into the character of 
candidates wishing to become members of the lodge." This was the first 
appointment of such a committee in St. John's Lodge. 

June 5 — " It was put to vote whether Bro. should not be sus- 
pended, in consecjuence of his unmasonic behaviour on last lodge night. 
The voice of the body being against his suspension, it was agreed that he 
should be reprimanded on u future night." 

The lodge decided to dine together on the approaching St. John's day, 
and to that end appointed a committee to make the necessary arrange- 
ments. In consequence of St. John's day falling on Sunday, it was 
agreed, at an emergent communication held June 19th, to attend divine 
service on Sunday, the brethren to meet in the lodge room at ten o'clock 
in the forenoon. On Monday, June 25th, after auditing the accounts and 
transacting other business, " the lodge was called to refreshment, and at 
three o'clock the brethren dined together agreeably to a resolve made the 
fifth instant." 

August 7 — " Bro. Woodward delivered into the lodge a certificate 
granted by St. Clement's Lodge, No. 2()J), at Ricarton, Scotland, 1st May, 
1801, to Bro. David Law.son. Bro. Lawson was lately lost in the Falls." 

"Bro. having transgressed the ninth and tenth rules of our 

bye-laws, it was proposed and agreed upon, that he be fined five shillings 
for breaking the ninth rule and one shilling for the tenth ; and if he 
refuse to pay the same, to be dealt with at the discretion of the body at 
the next meeting. It was further agreed that he stand susi)ended for 
three months from this date." ' 

September 4 — The brother alluded to in the foregoing paragraph \ 
was at this meeting " expelled for contempt of repeated summonses, non- j 
])ayment of dues, and for talking in a disrespectful manner of the frater- | 
nity ; and he was ordered to be re})orted to the grand lodge for their 
concurrence." 

October 2 — "It was ordered that Bro. be allowed a cord of i 

wt)od and a loaf of bread weekly, during the space of six months, com- ) 
mencing from this date. Bro. Wiggins was appointed to issue it to the 1 
distressed brother." \ 



November (> — "Bro. , who was ex|)elled September 4th last, j 

having nuide a satisfactory concession to the body, and having paid the j 
fines inflicted on him August 7th, for his misconduct, was reinstated in | 
this lodge." 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'87. 39 

December 27 — The officers elected at last regular meeting were in- 
stalled, as follows : 

Hio. David Waleibury, W. M. 

Bro. Francis Watson, S. W. Bro. Jolin MoLeod, S. D. 

" Jacob S. Mott, J. W. " Samuel Nichols, J. D. 

" James Hendricks. Treas. " John Woodward, S. iS. 

. " William Donaldson, Sec'y. " David Merritt. J. S. 

Bro. Robert Laidiey, Tyler. 

During the past year the lodge held nineteen meeting.^; three eandi- 
;lates were initiated and one brother affiliated ; seven ceased to be mem- 
bei-s, including one death. 

A. D. 1805. 

January 1 — "Bro. having been notified to attend this even- 

iiiw in order to make a concession to the body for his conduct on the 
evening of the fourth ultimo, but having neglected to attend, he was sent 
for by the worshipful master, and accordingly appeared. The question 
being put to him — whether he would pay his fines and make a satisfac- 
tory acknowledgment to the body — he refused to do so. He was there- 
fore expelled, and ordered to be reported to the grand lodge." 

At the next regular meeting — the brother having in the meantime 
cooled off and allowed his better judgment to assert itself — " came for- 
ward and nuide an apology to the satisfaction of the body and paid his 
tiiK"; when it was unanimously agreed that, in con.si<leralion of his former 
good conduct, he be reinstated and not reported to the grand lodge." 

"Bros. John Dean, Nehemiah Merritt and John Toole were appointed 
a permanent committee to in(juire into and adjust all disputes that may 
occur in this body." 

February 5 — Ai)plicati()n was made by a number of brethren desir- 
ing the formation of a lodge at Kingston, Kings county, to be called 
" Midian Lodge," and asking St. John's Lodge to reconnnend their peti- 
tion to the provincial grand lodge ; " whereupon, it was agreed that if 
the worshipful master and wardens approve of Bros. Silas Raymond, 
Thomas Fairwcather and Joseph Baxter to be the officers of the lodge 
intended to b;' established at Kingston, they shall have liberty from the 
iiiendiei-s of this body to recommend the said brethren to the grand lodge 
for a warrant." 

March 5 — "It was unanimously agreed that Bros. Caleb Merritt, 
John Woodward, John Toole and Thomas Jennings receive a reconunen- 
(hition to the royal arch." 

May 7 — " Bro. Fairfield, a member of the Portland and Saco lodges, 
ill the United States, also of Temple, No. 5, city of Albany, and of the 



40 FREEISIASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Knight Templar Encampment, city of New York, presented the body 
with two books, entitled 'The Vocal Companion' and 'The Masonic 
Register,' for which he received our hearty thanks." 

" Bros. James Hendricks and Robert Menzies applied for a recom- 
mendation to become members of the royal arch, when Bro. Hendricks 
■was rejected and Bro. Menz*3S ordered to be recommended." It would 
appear from this that the h .ge exercised discrimination in granting its 
favors, and, in consequence, the laudable ambition of Bro. Hendricks to 
ascend the masonic ladder in search of further knowledge was summarily 
nipped in the bud. The brother must have received this adverse vote 
with proper masonic submission, for I find that the lodge relented of its 
act at the succeeding communication by granting the required recom- 
mendation, and sent the aspiring brother on his way rejoicing. 

June 7 — "It hiiving been suggested that a room in Bro. Hitchcock's 
house would be a more proper place for holding our meetings than the 
room at present occupied by the body, it was put to vote — whether the 
said room should be engaged or not — when a majority of the body gave 
it in the affirmative. The rent to be twelve pounds per annum, one-sixth 
of which sum is to be <lefrayed by the members of the royal arch lodge,' 
and tlie remainder by the members of this body. The room to be rented 
for three years, and the partition to be taken down at the expense of this 
body. The grand lodge to be informed of the foregoing resolution to re- 
move the lodge." 

June 24 — The record does not set forth the purport of this meeting. 
■Quite a large number of brethren was present, probably with the inten- 
tion of dining together in honor of the festival day of St. John the 
Baptist. The following resolution was proposed and adopted : 

Resolved, That Bro. Samuel Nicliols fnrnisli tlie lodge with liquors and candles 
until next St. John's day, provided it be done as cheap as any other member of the 
body will do it, and the liquors to be of gootl quality. 

"The fourth, or table degree," as it is sometimes facetiously termed, 
■entered largely into the monthly routine of our predecessons. From the 
foregoing resolution we learn that they exhibited a business-like fore- 
thought in preparing for this " degree " ; for, in addition to stipulating 
that they be supplied with licjuors "at a moderate rate," they also en- 
joined that they " he of good quality." 

August 6 — "It waa agreed that when, in future, a certificate shall be 
granted to any member of this body, the brother receiving the same shall 
be charged seven shillings and sixpence, to be put into the general fund 

1 Carletou Kuyal Arch Chapter. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 41 

of the society ; and that when any member of this body shall take the 
step of a mark mason, he shall pay ten shillings for the same, to be put 
into the general fund of the society." 

December 27 — The officers elected at the regular meeting held third 
instant were installed this day, viz. : 

Bro. David Waterbury, W. M. 

Bro. Francis Watson, S. \V, Bro. Jolin Woodward, S. D. 

" Jacob 8. Mott, J. \\. " David Merritt, J. D. 

" James Hendricks, Treas. " Robert Laidley, S. S. 

" Samuel Nichols, Sec'y. " Richard Sands, J. S. 

Bro. Peter McCalift; Tyler. 

The brethren dined together at three o'clock in the afternoon. 



'»^ 



A. D. 1806. 

January 7 — "It was unanimously agreed that the W. M. should call 
upon Bro. Sutherland and apologize for our conduct to him on St. John's 
day." As the " head and front " of the offence is not stated, I am at a 
loss to account for the passage of this resolution. Bro. Sutherland was 
not a member of the lodge; but being probably a stranger, his presence 
may have been overlooked, and no invitation extended to him to join in 
the festivities of the occasion. 

February 4 — "The W. M. moved that, from this time forward, any 
member who shall be absent the whole evening shall pay a fine of two 
shillings to the evening dues ; which motion was put to vote and carried." 

March 4 — "It was on motion ordered that, from this time forward, 
any officer of the lodge who does not attend at the regular hour for open- 
ing the lodge, shall i)ay a fine of one shilling and threej)ence, and if 
absent the whole evening, shall be fined four shillings for the use of the 
body." 

Augusts — "The committee appointed to settle the dispute between 
Bros. Samuel Nichols and Caleb Merritt rejiort and say : That Bro. 
Merritt shall make such an acknowledgment to Bro. Nichols as the lodge 
shall think j)roper, and the same be made to the lodge ; that Bro. Nichols 
shall apologize to the body in consetjuence of its being on Sunday. The 
committee also report that Bro. Nichols shall apologize to Bro. Nehemiah 
Merritt and to the lodge." This committee was appointed at the July 
meeting, but no reference is made to the nature of the offence or the place 
of its occurrence. 

September 2 — " The report of the committee presented last meeting 
being read to Bro. Nichols, he nnide such acknowledgment to the body 



42 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

as they were satisfied with, on tlie first charge of Bro. Caleb Merritt's, for 
transgressing the rule of masonry on Sunday. Bro. Nichols objected to 
the judgment of the committee respecting the business with Bro. Nehe- 
miah Merritt, and stated that he will make an appeal to the body." 

Septen)ber 6 — " The report of the committee being read to Bro. Caleb 
Merritt, he submitted and made an apology to the body such as was satis- 
factory. It was the opinion of the brethren that Bro. Nichols should say 
he was sorry that any words between him and Bro. Neliemiah Merritt 
should have given them so much trouble, which he accordingly did, and 
was reinstated to his office of secretary." 

• November 4 — " Bros. Hendricks and Nichols were appointed a com- 
mittee to call on Bro. for the sum due the body, and if he does 

not make payment or give his note to the treasurer, he is to be expelled 
and reported to the grand lodge." 

The practice of accepting notes on account of indebtedness to the 
lodge prevailed many years after its formation, and led to unpleasant 
complications. The lodge set its face against the evil and stamped it out 
about forty years ago. 

December 27 — Bro. Hendricks was appointed a committee to order a 
jewel for the past master of the lodge, and to procure a new set of ribbons 
for the officers. 

" It was ordered that anv brother who shall in future want a book 
from the lodge must apply to the secretary for the same, who is required 
to make a note of the name of the borrower in the proceedings." Several 
entries of this kind are subsequently noted. 

The officers elected on the second instant were installed, as follows : 

Bro. George Ironside, W. M. 
Bro. Francis Watson, 8. W. Bro. Samuel Nichols, Sec'y. 

" Neheniiah Merritt, .J W. " John Woodward, S. D. 

" .Tames Hendricks, Treas. " John Dean, J. D. 

Bro. I'eter McCaliff, Tyler. 

A. 1). 1807. 

January 6 — "A vote of thanks was unanimously passed to Bro. 
Sutherland for his attendance on all occasions. Bros. Ironside, W. M., 
and Waterbury, P. M., were apiminted to wait on Bro. Sutherland and 
convey to him the sense of tin; lodge." This was the brother to whom 
the lodge apologized 7th January, 1806. 

January 12 — At this special meeting the W. M. reported "that he 
had advertised respecting Bro. Chapnian Judson, and had ofi'ered a re- 
ward of five guineas ; which act of the W. M. was unanimously approved." 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 4» 

The record leaves us in the dark as to the reason for advertising and off'er- 
iii" a reward for the brother. No doubt he was missing and his where- 
abouts unknown to the brethren. He, however, turned up subsequently, 
as he was present in the lodge March 21st. 

" It was put to vote and carried, that there be an altar erected in the 
lodge in place of the desk now in use, and that Bro. Francis Watson be 
authorized to get the same done." 

April 7 — "It M'as unanimously agreed that any working brother be- 
longing to any working body be admitted to visit this lodge by paying 
fur the evening the same expenses as any member." 

June 2 — " Bro. Durant was ordered to print in his newspaper an in- 
vitation to the brethren in town to dine with St. John's Lodge, at the 
Coftee House, on St. John's day (24th instant), for which he is to be paid 
seven shillings and sixpence." Bro. William Durant published at that 
time The Times and True Briton, a weekly newspaper. He afterward* 
printed The City Gazette. 

July 7 — "It was jiroposed that no business be done after being once 
called to refreshment, which was carried, so far as to be recommended to 
all the brethren." 

November 3 — " The widow of our late Bro. made application 

for assistance, when the treasurer was authorized to send her a cord of 
wood." 

December 27 — The officers elected at the regular communication, held 
first instant, were installed, viz. : 

Bro. Nehemiah Merritt, W. M. 
Bro. Francis Watson, S. W. Bro. Jolm Grant, S. D. 

" John Dean, J. W. " Robert Laidley, J. D. 

" James Hendricks, Treas. " Cieorge Hohiies, S. S. 

" William Durant, Sec'y. " Peter Blair, J. S. 

Bro. Peter McCalitr. Tyler. 

The brethren celebrated the festival of St. John the Evangelist by 
(lining together at three o'clock. About thirty brethren w( e present. 

A. D. 1808. 

February 2 — At this communication three officers of His Majesty'* 
ship-of-war "Cleopatra," then in the port of Saint John, were visitors — 
Bros. Reilly, Clarkson and Ballentine. 

It was decided to remove on the first day of May ensuing, and a com- 
nuttee was appointed to secure another place of meeting. In accordance 



44 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

with this decision a removal was made to the Coffee House, corner of 
King street and Market square, kept by William G. Cody. At the June 
meeting the secretary was ordered to inform the grand lodge of the 
change. 

August 2 — The lodge was visited by several brethren holding com- 
missions in the Twenty-sixth (Cameronians ; and the Eighty-ninth regi- 
ments of the line. These visitors hailed principally from lodges under 
the grand lodge of Ireland. 

September 6 — "Bro. being disguised in liquor, and coming 

into the lodge in that state, was reprimanded by the W. M., it being the 
first offence." 

December 6 — The annual election was held, at which the following 
<3hief officers were elected, viz. : 

Bro. Francis Watsou, W. M. 
Bro. John Grant, S. W. Bro. William Dnrant, J. W. 

Portions of the records of this date and of the 27th December are 
missing. 

MARK MASTER'S LODGE. 

As previously stated, a mark master's lodge was held under the war- 
rant of St. John's Lodge, and, as its meetings were convened irregularly, 
and sometimes at long intervals, I have deemed it advisable to dispose of 
the extracts from the minutes of its proceedings in consecutive order. 
From them the names of the brethren upon whom this degree was con- 
ferred will be preserved, and the craftsmen of the present day will have 
& description of the marks chosen at that early date. The record is con- 
tained in the first volume of the I'egular lodge transactions. 

November 7, 1807 — " The following took the fourth step and selected 
the marks against their names : John Dick, an anchor ; Charles Johnston, 
a herring." The record states further that "the lodge was closed on the 
fourth step, and the third or master's lodge opened, when the W. M., Bro. 
George Ironside, took a farewell of this lodge, and the brethren gave him 
their hearty thanks for his administration since he has been in the chair." 

May 9, 1811 — "The following brethren received the fourth degree 
and chose their marks, viz. : George Price, royal artillery, a mortar ; 
Charles Doucett, marlin spike ; Elisha Johnston, Orphans' Friend Lodge, 
fiprig of C. ; Asa Porter, Corinthian Lodge, Mass., urn ; Cornelius Van 
Home, anvil and hammer; James Hetherington, cannon; Henry Tre- 
phager, compasses ; Alexander Lemery, English ensign ; Lot Hosmer 
>vine glass; Andrew Russell, American ensign. 



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81111111111111111 



46 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

January 13, 1812 — Two brethren received the degree and selected 
their marks, viz.: Samuel Dunham, 104th regiment, cross daggers; 
Robert Shaw, royal artillery, shell with a fuse. 

" It was ordered that Bro. McKenzie be paid nine shillings and six- 
pence for cutting a stone for mark degree." 

November 10, 1812 — Three brethren were advanced : Farnim Chick- 
ering, charity; Daniel Pettingall, hope; Robert Collins, faith. 

October 11, 1813 — Four brethren received the degree: James Hen- 
derson, level and square; Levi Ring, Solomon's temple; William Eraser, 
vise ; Solomon Harford, axe. 

October 8, 1816 — " This being a lodge of emergency, the fourth step 
was given to the following nuister masons : Joseph Hamm, royal standard ; 
David S. Marshall, square ; Charles Herring, ink stand and pens ;' Abner 
Smith, cog wheel ; Henry Sawyer, neptune. 

" It being the opinion of the mark masters belonging to St. John's 
Lodge, No. 29, that it is expedient to form a regular mark lodge, working 
under the said warrant, it was moved and carried tliat four meetings be 
held in every year, being on the second Tuesday of this October, and to 
continue to January, April and July, and that all bye-laws which apply 
to masonry in general shall be in force." 

The officers of the mark lodge for the ensuing year were then chosen, 

viz.: 

Bid. William J, Gaynor, W. M. 

Bro. Levi Lockliart, S. W. Bro. Charles Herring, Sec'y. 

" Henry Chubb, J. W. " John Thomas, S. D. 

" David S. Marshall, Treas. " William Huglison, J, D. 

Bro. Joseph Morse, Tyler. 

December 26, 1816 — "An extra lodge," at which Bros. John Wood 
tind Isaac Hobbs received the mark degree, but there is no entry of the 
marks chosen by them. 

January 14, 1817 — "Bro. Benjamin M. Stymest received the fourth 
step in masonry, and selected for his mark the Blazin Star." 

April 8, 1817 — Three brethren were marked, viz.: James Grundy, 
bale of cotton ; John Boyer, currier's knife and steel ; John Farnham, 
compasses and rule. 

1 This mark came into ray jiosswsion some years ago. It is made of solid silver, diamond or 
rhomboidal in shape, with a raised circle in the centre, also of solid silver. On the circle is en- 
graved the mark (inkstand and pens), surrounded by the usual initial letters. The sun, moon, 
square, rule, plumb, and chisel are engraved on the four angles of the rhomboid; and on the re- 
verse, " Charles Herring, St. John's Lodge, No. 29, A. D. 1816." W. F. B. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 47 

" It was resolved that the expenses of the eveninj^ for the mark nrns- 
ter's lodge shall in future be paid out of the fees collected from the candi- 
dates taking the fourth step." The fee was twelve shillings and sixpence. 

The following resolution was also adopted : 

It being the ojiinioii of this hody lliat it is e.\pe(lient to have a fine affixed on 
every mark master belonging thereto, for non-attenchmce ; 

Resolved, Tliat each mark master mason belonging to this body shall pay a line 
of one shilling and tiiree pence in case of non-attendance in fifteen minutes after tlie 
regular liour appointed for the meeting, unless some reasonable excuse can be made 
to clear the said member. 

July 8, 1817 — The mark degree was conferred on Bros. John Mc- 
Clure, William Joyce aiul William Roberts. One only of these chose a 
mark — Bro. William Roberts, lamb with a shining blaze. 

Bros. Henry Chubb and Charles Herring were appointed a committee 
" to amend such sections of the bye-laws that regulate and govern the 
master's body which they may think necessary, so that they shall more 
particularly apply to this mark master's body." 

In September and October, 1817, the following received the degree 
and selected marks : Robert Payne, moon ; Benjamin Wade, the sign of 
Mercury; William Branscombe, schooner; John Mount, sickle. James 
Wat^^t.n also received the degree but did not choose a mark. 

October 14, 1817 — The following officers were elected for the incom- 
ing year, viz. : 

Bro. Levi Lockliart, W. M. 

Bro. Henry Chubb, S. W. Bro. John Thomas, S. D. 

" Warren Bibber, J. W. " John Boyer, J. D. 

" David S. Marshall, Treas. " James Grundy, S. S. 

" Charles Herring, Sec'y. " Robert Payne, J. S. 

Bro. Joseph Morse, Tyler. 

January 13, 1818 — Bro. William Pecker received the degree, but did 
not select a mark. 

" It was resolved that the time of meeting of St. John's Mark Master's 
Lodge, No. 29, be published in one of the city newspapers, provided the 
expense does not exceed two shillings and sixpence each time." 

April 14, 1818 — "Bro. Henry Long received the sublime degree of 
mark master, and selected as his mark square, compass, crown and star." 

In July, August and October, 1818, Bros. Jeremiah Gove, John 
Harrison, Alexander Morrison, James Dimsdale, James Reed and Robert 
Welch received the degree, but did not select marks. 

October 13, 1818 — " It was ordered that a statement be presented to 
the master's body of our funds, which are subject to their order." 



48 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The date of the regular meetings was changed from the second to the 
third Tuesday in each quarter. 

Officers for the ensuing year were elected, viz. : 

liro. John Dean, W. M. 

Bro. Richard Mott, S. W. Bro. Jeremiah Gove, S. D. 

" Davids. Marsliall, J. VV. " Joseph Morse, J. D. 

" Charles Herring, Treas. " Henry Long, S. S. 

" John McClure, Sec'y. " Robert Welch, J. S. 

Bro. John Boyer, Tyler. 

January 9, 1819 — Bros. Timothy La Frisbee, Paul Giles, David 
Perse and Thomas Whittier received the degree, but did not select their 
marks. 

January 19, 1819 — Three brethren, whose christian names are not 
given, were marked, as follows : Bro. Silsby, figure of liberty and the caj) ; 
Bro. Seymour, hand grasping a trowel ; Bro. Bentley, harp and crown. 

April 20, 1819 — The degree was conferred on Bros, Samuel Garrison, 
Thomas Leavitt, James Fowler, James Godsoe, Peter Yeomans, and 
Daniel McLean, of whom three chose marks, viz.: Thomas Leavitt, two 
cross darts ; James Godsoe, square and compass ; and Daniel McLean, 
flag and crown. 

July 2, 1819 — The following received the degree, viz.: Bros. John 
Haws, three lesser lights ; Robert C. Minette, shamrock, with the initials 
of faith, hope and charity in the leaves ; Lewis Carvill and William 
Hoyt. The two latter did not select marks. 

August 7, 1819 — Bros. Alexander Lawrence, Thomas Bell and Syl- 
vester Hughes were admitted to the degree without choosing marks. 

The foregoing minutes of the mark master's lodge are entered in the 
first volume of the records of St. John's Lodge. There is at the end of 
the volume a list of the brethren who received the degree, in which three 
names appear which are not found in the regular minutes, viz. : Bros. 
Henry Chubb, James Oman and John Campbell, of whom Bro. Chubb 
only selected a mark, "hand in hand grasping the sprig." 

Six lines of poetry are written on the last page of the volume, the 
production of the secretary or some other brother, whose muse seems to 
have deserted him at a critical point : 

" In history we read of a freemason king, 
The monarch of Israel, whose praises we sing ; 
He built a fine fabric, as we understand, 
On the Mount Moriali, near to Jerusalem. 
Says David to Solomon, with his heart full of love, 
Since we are appointed by the Powers above — " 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 49 

It was really too bad on the part of the poet or the transcriber to 
leave us in the dark as to the particular results of the appointment of 
David and Solomon " by the Powers above." 

In resuming the history of the craft lodge, I regret that I am unable 
to furnish a continuous narrative of its transactions, on account of the 
loss of the volume of the records embracing the years 1809, 1810 and 
1811. Search and inquiry in every possible direction failed to bring it 
to light. I am therefore obliged to take up the fourth volume, a book 
similar in every respect to volumes one and two. 

From the files of papers in the office of the grand secretary at Hali- 
fax, containing reports of the initiations, passings, raisings and joinings 
in the lodge during these years, I have been enabled to niuke up a com- 
plete roll of members from the commencement, so that the information 
gathered from these reports compensate, in a measure, the loss of the 
minute book. 

A. D. 1812. 

The volume opens with the minute of the regular communication held 
January 7th, containing a report of the audit committee on the accounts 
of the past year. The committee say that they " had examined the books 
and accounts of the lodge and found them correct; that there remained 
in the treasurer's hands the sum of £9 19s. 4kl. ; in the hands of Bro. 
Durant, £2 5s. Od. ; and that the total funds of the lodge amounted to 
£58 14s. 4H., including moneys at interest." 

February 5 — Among the items of receipts this evening was one of 
"twenty-five shillings for a late mark master's lodge." 

March 3 — "It was resolved that the moneys now out at interest be 
paid into the hands of the treasurer on or before the twenty-fourth day 
of June next, and that Bros. William Durant and John Dean be a com- 
mittee, in conjunction with the Bro. Treasurer, to collect the same." 

April 7 — "This evening Bro. Durant presented a letter from the 
grand lodge respecting a new lodge to be installed in the town of St. 
Andrews, doubting the eligibility of the applicants to constitute one, and 
requesting our opinion on the subject ; when it was ordered that the secre- 
tary send forward our opinions in the affirmative." 

It appears that upon the request of the brethren desirous of opening 
this lodge at St. Andrews — Eastern Star, No. 37 — a recommendation 
had been previously forwarded to the provincial grand secretary at Hali- 
fax favoring the issue of a warrant to them, but the provincial grand 
lodge hesitated granting it until further explanation WiS had from St. 
John's Lodge ; hence the vote of the lodge above recited. This vote of 
D 



50 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

St. Jolin's Lodge was deemed satisfactory, and on June 3, 1812, an order 
passed in provincial grand lodge to grant the warrant to the applicants. 
In conse(|uence, however, of the war then waging between England and 
the United States, the warrant was not issued until August 29, 1814, 
under which Eastern Star Lodge, No. 37, was forinally constituted at St. 
Andrews, November 22nd of the same year. 

^[ay 5 — "Bros. Dunham, Hillsgrove and Lemery, belonging to the 
104th regiment of foot, quartered at this place, and Bros. Hetherington, 
Price and Shaw, of the royal artillery, quartered here likewise, wishing 
certificates, it wps agreed by this body to execute them, to be kept with 
the secretary for their reception." 

Bro. Hillsgrove's certificate came into the hands of Bro. j\Iyshrall, of 
Fredericton, and by him handed to me. 

June 2 — "Bro. came forward for the purpose of taking the 

third degree this evening, but on account of some report with regard to 
his character, it was ordered that he stand over till some furtiier in<iuiry 
should be made, and that Bros. Grant, Durant and Clark be a committee 
to investigate the same." 

"Bro. William Durant, who was appointed last regular night to fur- 
nish candlesticks for this body, brought forward six complete ouet:' thi^ 
evening." 

June 5 — "The committee appointed the second instant to inquire 

into the character of Bro. , reported that they could find nothing 

against him." The brother was then "admitted to the sublime degree of 
a master mason." 

June 24 — According to their usual custom, the brethren celebrated 
the festival of St. John the Baptist by dining together. 

A postoript appended to the regular record states that " the arch 
masons belonging to this body were ordered to asseml)le on Saturday 
evening next for business." 

August 4 — The beneficence of freemasonry is contained in the fol- 
lowing extract: " Resolved, That Bros. William Durant, John Dean and 
James Holly be a committee to wait on the American prisoners now con- 
fined in our gaol, and if any of them belong to our ancient order, to see 
if we can render them any assistance." 

Although there were no freemasons among the prisoners, and thus the 
charitable impulses of the brethren were not then practically brought 
forth, the intention was illustrative of freemasonry in its humane and 
universal characteristics ; and it became specially marked in this instance, 
as the three l)reth'(>n appointed to visit the gaol had, a few years previ- 





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iiN;f.' Aii.» r/uriny /if\t Cftau atnofuijt 7/4, t^iavcti 
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Fac-similk of Ckrtificatk. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 63 

ously, bf:en driven forth from their homes, to seek shelter in New Bruns- 
wick, by the inexorable outcome of the American revolutionary war. 
The feelings of humanity and of brotherhood overtopped all others under 
tlie benign sway of " brotherly love, relief and truth." 

Scarcely a meeting was held without an entry in the record shewing 
that money, provisions or fuel were granted to some deserving brother, 
widow or orphan. 

Decrniber 1 — This being the annual communication, the officers for 
the ensuing year were elected, viz. : 

Bio. William D.inint, W. M. 
Uro. Joseph Clarke, 8. W. I'>ro. William Haddon, Sec'y. 

" Cornelius Van Home, J. W. " William Kraser, S. D. 

" Robert McKenzie, Treas. " .James fletherington, J. D. 

Bro. Peter McCaliflf, Tyler. 

They were installed the following St. John's day. 
The bye-laws of the lodge provided that no brother should be entitled 
to vote in the election of officers whose dues were unpaid. 

A. D. 1813. 

January o — The committee aj)pointcd to audit the accounts of the 
treasurer and secretary reported that the balance on hand amounted to 
£75 10s. Id., of which £04 15s. Id. were due by members who had bor- 
rowed different sunis and given their notes in security. 

March 2 — During the past month the lodge removed from the Coffee 
House to the building on King street, formerly the lallard House, occu- 
pied by a Mrs. Cock. There was a goodly attendance, and several 
<'aiididates initiated. The rent of the premises was fixed at ten pounds 
for one year. 

April () — It was reported that a copy of " The Freemasons' Monitor" 
was i)urchuscd at a cost of six shillings and three pence, and "Harris* 
Masonic Lectures" for fifteen shillings. 

The lodge was visited by an officer of His Majesty's ship-of-war 
" Rattler," then lying in port. 

May 11 — A new code of bye-laws was adopted, and Bro. Durant 
uuthorized to print two hundred copies. The laws were not copied into 
the record. 

June 2' — The secretary was allowed three pounds for his services for 
the pa.st year; the first entry of any such payment. 



54 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

December 27 — The following officers were installed, viz. : 

Bro. Joseph Clarke, W. M. 
Bro. Cornelius Van Home, S. W. Bro. William Haddon, See'y. 

" William Fraser, J. W. " Alexander Kirk, 8. D. 

" Robert McKenzie, Treas. " Solomon Hopkins, J. D. 

Bro. Peter McCaliff; Tyler. 

At five o'clock in the afternoon the brethren and guests celebrated the 
festival of St. John the Evangelist by dining together in the lodge room. 

A. D. 1814. 

February 1 — Bros. Grant, Clarke and Durant were authorized " to 
look out for a lodge room for the ensuing year." At the next regular 
communication they recommended the pre nises of Bro. Joseph E. Morse, 
Horsfield street. The recommendation was accepted, and on the first day 
of May ensuing the lodge was removed to Bro. Morse's, where it con- 
tinued until May, 1818. 

February 25 — The lodge assembled and buried with masonic cere- 
mony the remains of W. Bro. Richard Bonsall, who died on the 22nd 
instant, aged seventy-four years. Bro. Bonsall received the degrees of 
fresmasonry in New York previous to coming to New Brunswick with the 
loyalists. He was one of tlie charter members and a worshipful master 
of old Hiram Lodw, No. 17, and one of the founders of Carleton Royal 
Arch Chapter. Bro. James Sydney Kaye, a great grandson, is now a 
member and past senioi warden of St. John's Lodge. 

April 5 — A letter was received from Midian Lodge, No. 31, Kingston, 
complaining that a member of Midian Lodge had been refused to join 
in the procession and take part in the funeral obsecpiies of the late Bro. 
Richard Bonsall. An explanation was requested, with the " wish that 
the mistake may be amicably adjusted." 

The secretary of St. John's Lodge was directed to state, in his reply, 
that the brother in question should never have been made a mason, as 
some time previou^jly he had been " implicated in a crime of the most 
heinous character, and warded ofi' the penalty by turning evidence for 
the crown. Upon these grounds he was rejected, they think very justly. 
They, however, join their hearty wishes with yours, that it may be ami- 
cably adjusted to the honor and credit of the society." 

The record does lot shew any further correspondence in the matter. 
The case, however, illustrates the evil arising from admitting candidates 
without strict inquiry into their antecedents. 

June 7 — The lodge gave its consent to the erection of a new lodge in 
the city of Saint John, under the name of " Union Lodge," and authorized 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 55 

the master and wardens to forward a certificate of recommendation to the 
provincial grand lodge at Halifax. 

The provincial grand lodge, having issned a warrant for the erection 
of Union Lodge, No. 38, it was formally constituted September 27»1814, 
in the lodge room of St. John's Lodge. W. Bro. William Durant, P.M. 
of St. John's Lodge, conducted the installation ceremonies under a special 
authority issued by the provincial grand master of Nova Scotia. W. 
Bro. David Waterbury was the first master, Bro. William Charlton the 
first senior warden, and Bro. James Hay. Jr., the first junior warden of 
the new lodge. 

July 5 — "The conmiittee appointed to investigate the charge made 

by Bro. Akerley against Bro. , reported that the said brother is 

clear of injuring Bro. Akerley by any report to his prejudice." The 
lodge deeming the charge " to be inconsiderate," cited Bro. Akerley before 
it and admonished him. Bro. Akerley was not a member of the lodge. 

July 25 — The lodge assembled and buried, with masonic ceremony, 
the remains of Bro. Peter Lugrin, who was not a member. 

August 2 — It was ordered that the lodge room be rented to Bro. 
Jonathan Mitchell, of Virgin Lodge, No. 2, Halifax, Nova Scotia, for a 
dancing school. 

Bro. William Durant was authorized to print twenty-five certificates 
on parchment. 

August 13 — By direction of the W. M., the secretary addressed a 
letter to the provincial grand mah:ter, as follows : " As several modern 
masons have lately presented themwlves to this lodge fi)r admittance, 
claiming that privilege upon the principle of the consolidation of the 
ancient and modern masons, which is said to have recently taken place 
at London, they jmiy the right worshipful grand lodge to advise them, as 
soon as convenient, how and in what manner they are to treat these 
brethren, as without sufiicient authority they do not consider themselves 
at liberty to comnmne with them." 

The provincial grand secretary replied, in effect, " that until other 
regulations arrive from England, modern masons are to be admitted, after 
first taking before the master in the chair the usual obligation, and 
receiving the signs and grips according to the ancient custom." 

The tenor of this correspondence reveals to us the almost impas.sable 
harrier which separated the brethren of that day hailing from the rival 
grand lodges, termed the moderns and ancients. The latter body, from 
which St. John's Lodge held its original warrant, were schismatics from 
the parent graml body. They were undoubtedly aggressive and in some 



50 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

respects unscrupulous. They assumed the title of ancients, to which they 
had not a shadow of a claim, hoping thereby to occupy in the eyes of the 
masonic world a pre-eminence over the lawful and old established grand 
lodge. Having, by the formation of a large number of lodges, obtained 
a strong foothold in America, they attempted the role of autocrats, and 
treated the brethren of the regular grand body in the light of masonic 
pariahs, evidently for the purpose of preventing the erection or growth of 
any rivals on this side of the Atlantic. This contention is confirmed by 
the practice prevailing in the ancient lodges of requiring all brethren 
hailing from the moderns to be healed before being allowed to take part 
in their assead)lies, and it is further confirmed by the closing portion of 
the foregoing letter of the lodge secretary — " they do not consider them- 
selves at liberty to connnune with them." 

While my s'^rictures may seem to bear heavily on the early members 
of my lodge, I feel that they were not responsible for the objectionable 
custom then prevailing in the lodge. They were merely the inheritors of 
a system inaugurated by Laurence Dermot and his confreres, a system 
handed down, in regular succession, with all the force and authority of 
masonic custom and usage. 

These letters also reveal to us that although the rival grand lodges 
had joined hands, and had more than a year been united into one har- 
monious_ governing body, under the title of " The United Grand Lodge 
of Engls'iid," the brethren of St. John s Lodge had not been officially 
informed of the auspicious circumstance, but were still working as though 
their parent grand lodge held the reins of government. This was prob- 
ably the fault of the provincial grand lodge authorities at Halifax. 

December 6 — At this annual communication the following were 
elected to office for the incoming year : 

Bro. William Diirant, W. M. 

Bro. John Doun, S. W. JJro. William Fraser, Sec'y. 

" William Iladdon, J. W. " vSolomon Hopkins, S. D. 

" Kobert Robertson, Treas. " Alexander Kirk, J. D. 

Bro. Joseph E. Morse, Tyler. 

A. D. 1815. 

January 8 — Sunday. The lodge, conjointly with Union Lodge, at- 
tended in a body and buried the remains of Bro. Benjamin Wiggins with J 

masonic ceremony. The funeral took place at half-past two o'clock. t 

I 
February 7 — " The W. M. reported that he had relieved an indigent i 

and untbr lunate brother, a shipwrecked mariner belonging to the brig | 

" Mary Auu Richards," when it was ordered that he continue to relieve I 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 57 

the said brother from time to time, as he in his discretion shall think 
proper." 

The case of another distressed brother, a member of a sister lodge in 
the province, was ordered to be attended to. 

March 7 — A committee, consisting of Bros. Joseph Clarke, Robert 
Ray and William Fraser, was appointed "to visit Union Lodge for three 
months from this night." 

April 10 — "The lodge was visited by a Rro. Stephano Arratall, a 
gentleman who formerly resided in Russia, humbly requesting to be re- 
lieved under the following circumstances: He stated that he, with five 
relatives, two of whom were females, had been taken in 1812 and carried 
into captivity by an Algerine corsair and detained in slavery at Tripoli, 
for the release of whom the enormous sum of twelve thousand ducats had 
been demanded as a ransom ; that he, the said Bro. Arratall, accompanied 
by Bro. Lazarato Rebalo, having been furnished with the most respect- 
able and incontestable reconnnendations from gentlemen in London, as 
well as from several ma.sonic bodies in the United States and England, 
and this lodge having taken their ca.se in mature consideration, unani- 
mously voted them the sum of three pounds, to be paid them by the 
treasurer." 

July 12 — The remains of the late Bro. Robert McKenzie were b iried 
by the lodge with masonic ceremonial. The deceased brother, who was 
fifty-four years of age, joined the lodge October 2, LSIO, and filled the 
office of treasurer three years, 1812-1814. 

August 1 — " Bro. John Downey having appeared at this lodge as a 
modern mason, was healed by the W. M. according to the direction of ihe 
grand lodge of Nova Scotia, and admitted a visiting brother." 

"Ordered, that a mark lodge, under the warrant of St. John's Lodge, 
be held on Thursday evening next, for the marking of such brethren as 
may appear for that purpo.se." 

Se[)tember 1 — " Bro. John Downey personally proposed himself to 
become a mend)er of this lodge." Similar proj)()sitions were made on 
several other occasions, previous to and after this date. 

The lodge assembled to-day, formed in funeral procession, and pro- 
ceeded to the burial ground near King's sijuare, where the remains of 
Bro. Peter McCalitt" were interred, with the ceremonies usual to the craft. 
The decea.sed brother joined the lodge December 4, 1803, and at the time 
of his death was very aged. He was tyler of the lodge several years. 

December r)_"The initiation fee was increased from £3 15s. Od. to 
£5 Os. Od., with five shillings extra to the tyler; and the joining fee re- 
duced from twelve shillings and sixpence to seven shillinga and sixpence. 



58 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

0(ficers for the ensuing year were elected, as follows : 

Bro. John Deiin, W, M. 

Bro. Robert Ray, S. W. Bro. Solomon Hopkins, S. D. 

" Robert Robertson, J. W. " 'William Gaynor, J. D. 

" Joseph Clarke, Treas. " Thomas Parker, S. S. 

" Henry Chubb, Sec'y- " Israel Decker, J. S. 

Bro. Joseph E. Mome, Tyler. 

A. D. 1816. 

January 2 — "The following brethren were recommended to the 
higher degrees: Bros. Henry Chubb, William Gaynor, Levi Lockhart, 

Joseph E. Morse and Martin Stennicks." 

April 2 — "The lodge agreed to subscribe for two shares of stock in 
the masonic hall, contemplated to be built on the corner of King and 
Stud holm' streets. 

Apri 8 — "It was resolved that the W. M. and wardens for the time 
being be a committee to attend as stockholders in the name of this lodge 
in the contemplated masonic hall ; and further resolved, that the sum of 
ten pounds be paid as the first instalment towards the said building." 

A further sum of twenty pounds was ordered to be paid the following 
October. 

William Rob.son, paymaster, and John Campbell, quartermaster of the 
102nd regiment of foot, were initiated. 

May H — " Bro. William Taylor, attended as a dej)utation from Union 
Lodge, No. 38, and conveyed the thanks of that body for the use of the 
jewels and paraphernalia of St. John's Lodge." 

September 3 — "Bro. Morse's bill, for providing the ark with three 
locks, was ordered to be paid." This ark remained in the possession of 
the lodge up to the fire of June 20, 1877. 

Bros. Robert Ray, Levi Lockhart and William Haddon were ap- 
pointed to act in conjunction with a committee of Union Lodge, No. 38, 
in arranging details in connection with the ceremonial of laying the cor- 
ner stone of the proposed masonic hall. 

In the record, and in regular order, the following entry is made: 
" Wednesday evening, 18th September, 1816. Extra lodge. Past Mas- 
ter's Lodge was opened with the following brethren present: William 
Haddon, W. M. ; Robert Ray, S. W. ; William Gaynor, J. W. ; Thomas 
Hunter, Joseph Clark, Levi Lockhart and Joseph E. Morse. Bros. 
Robert Robertson, Caleb Haskill and Richard Mott received the degree 
of past master. Past Master's Lodge was closed, and Most Excellent 

1 Now Charlotte street. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 69 

Master's Lodge opened, wlien Bros. Robertson, Haskill and Mott received 
the degree of most excellent master. The lodge was closed in harmony. 
Levi Lockhart, secretary pro tern." 

The brethren who officiated as master and junior warden at this com- 
iminication were not the regular officers of the craft lodge, although all 
m-esent were members of it. One finds it difficult to account for this 
mode of conferring these degrees, except upon the supposition that tiie 
brethren assumed the prerogative, and, as there was no resident authority 
to take exception to it, they simply did it, as some other things were done, 
under the wide latitude allowed lodges chartered by the ancients. 

MASONIC HALL. 

As the first early attem})t to erect a building for purely masonic pur- 
poses in Saint John must possess historic interest, I venture no a})ology 
for making extended remarks in connection with its inception and pro- 
gress. I am enabled to do this from information gleaned from the records 
of the provincial grand lodge and from the columns of the Courier news- 
paper of contemporary date. Tiie records of St. John's Lodge are devoid 
of details of the matter. 

The first item is an advertisement in the Courier of February 24, 
1816, viz. : " AFasonic Notice. It being contemplated by the members of 
the masonic fraternity in this city, to erect a building for the accommoda- 
tion of the society, a general meeting of all the brethren in Saint John 
and vicinity, as well transient as resident, is particularly recjuested at 
Mrs. Cock's, on Wednesday evening next, the 28th instant, at seven 
o'clock, for the purpose of taking into consideration tiie most efficient 
measures for carrying the same into efiect." This notice had no name 
appended to it. 

At the meeting held at the time and place specified, it was decided to 
proceed with the work, and a committee of six brethren, three from St. 
John's and three from Union Lodge, was appointed to obtain information, 
and report at a subsequent meeting. The committee entered so promptly 
into the work, that on the 30th March the following notice was published 
in the Courier: "The members of the fraternity of free and accepted 
masons within this city and vicinity, are requested to attend at Mrs. 
Cock's on Monday evening next, precisely at seven o'clock, to receive the 
report of the connnittee appointed at the meeting of February 28th 
rchitive to the erection of a masonic liall." 

The result of this meeting is alluded to in the editorial columns of the 
Courier, as follows : " Pursuant to advertisement, a meeting of the members 
of the fraternity of F. &, A. M. was held at Mrs. Cock's, April 1st, for the 
purpose of receiving the report of a committee appointed on the 28th 



•30 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

February last, relative to building a masonic hall. Ncheniiah Merritt, Es(j., 
being called to the chair, the report of the committee was read as follows: 
'The committee appcinted 28th February hist to ascertain where a .site 
could be procured for the j)urj)ose of erecting thereon a building for a 
masonic hall, report, that a lot of ground at the head of King street, now 
under lease to Mr. John Currie, ai)pears in their opinion to be the most 
eligible situation. The lot situated as above, containing fifty feet on 
King street and running one hundred feet on Studholm ' street, with the 
exception of 28 x 80 feet in the rear, whereon the stable of Mr. John 
Currie now stands, can be leased for the sum of twenty-five pounds per 
annum. That the building contemplated to be erected thereon will, in 
the estimation of the committee, cost about two thousand pounds. That 
it is the opinion of the conunittee that the most advisable plan for rais- 
ing the sum reijuired will be to invest it in a joint stock concern, to consist 
of eighty shares at twenty-five pounds each share. That each share be 
made transferrable ; and should more money be re(iuired than the above 
mentioned sum, that the number of shares be increased. That it is the 
opinion of the committee that every lodge of master masons, say St. 
John's Lodge, No. 21), and Union Lodge, No. 38, or any other that may 
hereafter occupy the said hall, shall pay the sum of twenty pounds each 
as rent annually; and that the sum of ten pounds be paid annually by 
each royal arch chapter holding communications within the same.' " The 
report was signed by Nehemiah Merritt, chairman, Robert Robertson and 
William Durant on behalf of St. John's Lodge, and Benjamin L. Peters, 
John Currie and James Hendricks on behalf of Union Lodge. 

" The foregoing report being read, it was resolved that the said report 
be received, and that a committee of three persons be apjminted to receive 
subscriptions for shares, and that Nehemiah Merritt, Es(|., Mr. James 
Hendricks and Mr. B. L. Peters be the said committee. That all sub- 
scribers pay into the hands of persons hereafter to be appointed by the 
stockholders the sum of five pounds in part payment of each share the 
first day of May next; the sum often pounds on the first day of Septem- 
ber; and the remaining sum of ten pounds on the first day of January 
following. That, provided subscriptions sufficient be obtained to carry these 
resolutions into effect, any person not paying the amount of his subscrip- 
tion in one month after either of the said days of payment, the amount 
he may have paid shall be forfeited. That the proceedings of this meeting 
be published in the different public prints in this city. 

" William Taylor, Secretary to the meeting." 

" Persons wishing to subscribe will apply to Messrs. Merritt, Hendricks 
and Peters." 

1 Now Charlotte street. 



62 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The building (•oiiiiiiittec, consisting of* Bros. Iloiulricks, Peters and 
Taylor, advertised in the Courier of July 24th " for tenders for excavat- 
ing the cellar of the building according to plan and specification to 
be seen at the store of Bro. Hendricks." 

The same committee advertised in the Courier of July 31st for tenders 
*'for furnishing framing materials, and for raising the frame of the hall, 
€0 X 50 feet, with posts 51 feet in length, to be raised on the foundation 
wall by November 1st. Payment to be made in cash." 

The work had so far progressed that, on September 21st, the following 
notice appeared in the Courier: 

MASONIC NOTICE. 

The fraternity of free and accepted masons are liereby informed that, on Saturdiiy 
next, the foundation stone of the masonic liall, in this city, will be laid inform. Ail 
tlie brethren tliroughoiit the province, who can make it convenient to attend at the 
ceremony, are hereby particuhirly re(inested to meet at the lodge room, in Mr. 
Morse's house, Horsiield street, on Saturday, tlie 28th instant, precisely at 12 o'clock 
noon. 

The particulars of the ceremonial of laying the corner stone are copied 
from the records of the provincial grand lodge at a quarterly communi- 
cation held in Halifax, March 5, 1817, as follows: 

The grand secretary laid before grand lodge the minutes of a temporary grand 
lodge held at Saint John, N. B., which wiis read, viz. : 

By virtue of a wanant under tlie liand and seal of the R. W. John George Pyke, 
grand muster of the ancient society of freemasons in Nova Scotia and the masonical 
jurisdiction thereunto belonging, dated at Halifax the 14th day of September, in the 
year of our Lord 1816, and of masonry 5816, a grand lodge assembled at the Ex- 
change Coffee House, in the city of Saint John, in New Brunswick, on the 28th day 
of September, in the same year, for the purpose mentioned in the warrant. 

Pbesknt : 

The R. W. Thomas Wetmore, Esquire, Grand Master. 

" CJarret Clopper, Esquire, Deputy Grand Master. 

" David Waterbury, Senior Grand Warden. 

" William Wykely, Junior Grand Warden. 

" James Hendricks, Grand Secretary. 

Together with a number of other brethren, some of whom were appointed to the 
following offices, viz. : 

Bro. William Durant, Grand Treasurer. 
" Thomas L. Nicholson, Senior Grand Deacon. 
" Cliarles Whitney, Junior Grand Deacon. 
" Peter Hatfield, Grand Sword Bearer. 
" Robert Ray, Grand Marshal. 
" John Wood, Grand Standard Bearer. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'87. 6S 

The lodge was opened in due form and soloninity, being attended by St. John's 
and Ui)i 111 Lodges, and moved in procession to the foundation of the masonic hall, 
corner of King and Charlotte streets, in the following order: 

Two Bugles. 
I'nion Lodge, No. 38, two and two. 
St. John's Lodge, No. 29, two and two. 
Band of Music. 
The Grand Lodge, as follows: 
The Tyler. 
Two Stewards. 
Two Deacons. 
Bro. Jiidson, with the golden square. Bro. Edmond, with the gold level. 
Bro. Merritt, with the gold phirnb. Bro. Paddock, with the gold mallet. 

Bro. Rawleigh, with wine. Bro. Clark, with oil. 
Bro. Pagan, cornucopia with corn. 
Secretary and Treasurer. 
Two Wardens. 
The Bible, borne by Bro. Paul, supported by two Stewards. 
The Grand Master, suj)ported by the I). G. M. and Bro. Sinnot. 
The Grand Sword Bearer. 
The Society of Carpenters, in their proper dress, with standard, closed the procession. 

When the head of the procession reached the place, the whole halted ; tlie grand 
lodge moved through the line formed in front, and took its station in the theatre 
erected for the occasion in the east of the foundation, and the grand master having 
taken his seat, the ceremony of laying the stone commenced. 

The stone was let down by direction of the D. G. M., the music playi.ig an 
anthem, when the grand master and liis deputy proceeded to the stone, and the 
deputy, having deposited in the stone some coins of the present reign, and medals 
prepared for the purpose, they were covered by a plate bearing the following inscrip- 
tion: "This stone of the masonic hall was laid on the 28th September, A. D. 1816, 
of the era of masonry .5,S1(), and of the reign of George the Third, King of the 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, the fifty-sixth ; in the mayoralty of 
John Robinson, Esquire, by Thomas Wetmore, Esquire, attorney-general for this 
province, as granM master substitute of John George Pyke, Esquire, grand master 
of the society of masons in Nova Scotia and the masonic jurisdiction thereunto 
belonging." 

The dei)iity grand master having retired, the grand master was then attended by 
two operative masons, who assisted in laying the stone. The golden square, plumb, 
level and mallet were handed in succession to the grand master, and, after being 
used, were returned to the respective officers. Upon using the mallet, the grand 
master said : " In the name of the R. W. John George Pyke, Esquire, grand master 
ot miisons in Nova Scotia and the masonical jurisdiction thereunto belonging, I now- 
lay this stone, and may the Great Architect of the Universe, of His Kind Provi- 
dence, grant a blessing on this foundation, and enable us to carry on and finish what 
we have now begun." Upon which three huzzas were given and an anthem played. 

The corn, wine and oil were then brought and delivered to the deputy grand 
master, who poured them on the stone, saying : " May the bountiful hand of Heaven 
bless this city with an abundance of corn, '•'. e and oil, and with all the necessary 



64 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

conveniences and comforts of life, and preserve it from ruin Jinil decay to tlie latest 
posterity." I'pon which three huzzas wore again given and an anthem played. 

The procession then formed again and returned in the same onler to the jjlace 
■wliere the grand lodge was opened, wlien it was closed in solemn form. 

By order of the grand master. 

Jamks Hkndricks, Grand Secretary. 

The Courier, in its issue of October oth, iniidc the following comment 
upon the demonstration : 

On Saturday last, the corner stone of the spacious and elegant building intended 
to be erected at the iiead of King street for a masonic hall, was laid with the usual 
formalities on such occasions, by the society of freemasons in this city. A grand 
loilge pro tempore was formed by dispensation from the grand lodge of Nova Scotia, 
Tiiomas Wetmore, Esquire, His Majesty's attorney -general, acting as grand master. 
They were joined by the St. John's and I'uion Lodges, and many respectable brethren 
from the adjacent counties, etc., which, together with the carpenter's society (a 
respectable body recently instituted in this city), formed a handsome procession, 
The day was uncommonly line, and the number of people gathered together on the 
occasion were innumerable. 

As R. W. Bro. Williiun Campbell, was deputy grand master in New 
Brunswick, and officially entitled to conduct the ceremonial of laying the 
<;orner stone, the cause of his sibsence is explained in a letter written by 
a committee of St. John's and U^nion Lodges to the provincial grand 
secretary, viz.: " R. W. Bro. William Campbell, I). G. .., in consefiuencc 
of his advanced years, is unable to conduct the ceremony of laying tlie 
corner stone of the contemplated masonic hall, we therefore ask that Bro. 
Thomas Wetmore, Pa.st High Priest of Carlet n R. A. Chapter, be 
iiiithorized to open a deputy grand lodge, and act on the occasion." 

R, W. Bro. Campbc;!!, stated in a note appended to this letter, that lie 
*' heartily concurred with the brethren in their laudable design, and sanc- 
tioned their petition." 

At the conclusion of the ceremonial a hand.-^ome collection was made 
and placed upon the stone by the fraternity, which was sidj.secjuently 
handed to a committee " to be dispensed anu)ng proper objects f»f relief" 

Further details of this building, together with a sketch of its sub,<c- 
(juent history, are given in another |)()rtion of this volume. 

October 1 — " Bros. John Dean, Wn.. Durant and Levi Lockhart were 
appointed a committee, to act with a committee of Union Lodge, to settle 
the expense attending the recent procession in form, for laying the founda- 
tion stone of the masonic hall." 

The secretary lupplemented this evening's record by the following 
entry: "The business of the evening was concluded by an luldress to the 
Throne of Crac", and we are hajipy to .say that our meeting was pleasant, 
that the highest degree of harmony and brotherly love prevailed among 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-37. 65 

the brethren, and that such was our parting, we think we are warranted 
to say that the best wine was kept until the last." 

October 6 — The remains of Bro. Micah Yeamans, of St. George's 
Lodge, No. 19, Maugerville, were buried by the lodge with masonic 
eorcniony. The deceased was thirty-seven yeare of age, and n)aster of a 
vessel then in port. 

November 5 — The following is a copy of a j)etition presented fo the 
lodge, which is produced to sliow the conciseness of such documents in the 
earlv days, viz.: "To the master and wardens of Lodge, No. 21): Wish- 
ing to become a mendx'r of your honorable society of F. & A. M., I there- 
fore offer myself a candidate. " S. T. Burrows. 

"Saint John, NovendnT 4th, 1816." 

The petitioner was balloted for and accepted at the next conmiunica- 
tion, but never came forward for initiation. 

December 3 — Officers were elected as follows: 

Bro. Robert Robertson, W. M. 

Bro. Robert Riiy, S. W. Bro. Caleb Ilaskill, S. D. 

" Williiim J. (hiynor, J. VV. " Warren Bibber, J. D. 

" Josepli (Jiark, Treas. " Kii-hard Mott, S. S. 

" Henry Clitibb, Sec'y. " CliarJes Herring, J. S. 

Bro. Joseph E. Morse, Tyler. 

A. D. 1817. 
July 1 — " W. liro. Biigbee favored the lodge with a lecture." 
August 5 — " Bros. Robertson, Durant and Mott were ap[)ointe(l a 
standing connnittee to relieve <listressed brethren who may make applica- 
tion, and they finding them worthy." 

September 1(5 — " Bros. Charles Herring and John Thomas, having 
been unanimously reconunended to the royal arch, regularly passed the 
chair for that purpose." This was an emergency meeting, and the degree 
was conferred in a master's lodge. 

October 20 — "The lodge attended in a body and i)aid the last tribute 
of respect to the memory of the late Bro. Robert Laidley, by consigning 
his mortal remains to the tomb with masonic honors." Bro. Laidley died 
October Kith, aged seventy-three years. He joined the lodge December 
27th, 1804, and was tyler one year. 

December 27 — Officers were installed, as follows: 

Bro. Robert Ray, W. M. 
Bro. Henry (.luibb, S. W. Bro. Warren Bibber, S. D. 

" Levi Loekbart, J. VV. " Davi.l K. Marshall, J. D. 

" Robert Robertson, Treas. " John McCliire, S. H. 

" Charles Herring, See'y. " James Grundy, J. S. 

Bro. Joseiili E. Morse, Tyler. 



66 rRP:EMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

" The lodge, in connection with Union Lodge, dined together at the 
Coffee House at 5 o'clock, when the usual toasts pertinent to such an 
occasion were severally proposed and answered. There was a good 
gathering of the brethren, who spent a few hours in a brotherly and 
social manner. The tickets, including wines, were twenty shillings." 

A. D. 1S18. 

March 8 — The treasurer was directed to hand sixty-five shillings to 
a brother to enable him to return to his home in New York, and a com- 
mittee was appointed to administer to the wants of another brother, a 
shipwrecked mariner. 

A committee appointed at the February meeting to make incjuiry for 
premises suitable for louge purposes, reported that Bro. Levi Lockhart 
offered a commodious hall, with two preparation rooms adjoining, together 
with the use of sufficient stoves and fuel, for £12 10s. Od. per year, when 
it was agreed to accept Bro. Lockhart's offfer, and to remove thereto 
May firet ensuing. 

July 7 — "It was ordered that there be an elevation in the East for 
the chaii*s of past masters, placing them one step lower than the worship- 
ful master." 

December 1 — Officers were elected, as follows: 

Bro. Henry Chubb, W. M. 
Bro. William Diirant, S. VV. Bro. David S. Marshall, S. D. 

" Richard Mott, J. W. " .Jeremiah Gove, J. D. 

" Robert Robertson, Treas. " Henry Long, S. S. 

" Ciiarles Herring, Sec'y. " William Joice, J. S, 

Bro. Solomon Hoi)kins, Tyler. 

A. D. 1819. 

March 2 — The secretary was directed to acknowledge the reception 
of a circular from the grand lodge of Canada containing a list of grand 
lodge officers and a roll of lodges in Canada. 

June 2 — "A passed ma.stcr's lodge was opened, when Bros. Henry 
Long and Jeremiaii Gove received the sublime degree of a nnister in the 
chair." This entry is copied verbatim. 

June 8 — An emergent comnmnication " for the purpose of ])aying the 
last tril)ute of respect to, and burying with masonic honors, the remains 
of the late Bro. Alexander McPherson, who died on the fifth instant, 
aged sixty four years." Bro. M(!Pherson joined the lodge August 1, 1815. 

August 31 — The hulgf buried tht> rcniiiins of the l iUc Bro. Peters 
"KterriU" wnV)' (Iit'irTlugust *ii«lli,'TgeTTwentjnrvryoars. Hewasiiiitiatcd 
December 23, 1817. 



d 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 67 

September 7 — The following bye-law was adopted: "Every person 
previous to being admitted into this lodge shall pay the sum of £'o 5s. Od. 
in the box,^ which shall entitle him to the three degrees." 

October o — A letter was received from the provincial grand secretary, 
.stating that a book of constitutions had been published, and the lodge 
was called upon to jjrocure a copy. 

December 7 — At the annual election the following officers were 

chosen : 

Bro. William Din-ant, W. M. 

Bro. Robert Ray, 8. W. Bro. Jeremiah (iove, S. D. 

" John McClure, J. W. " Henry Long, J. D. 

" Henry Chnbh, Treas. " Robert C. Mlnette, S. S. 

" Thomas Leavitt, Seo'y. " Phare.s Martin, J. S. 

Bro. Levi Lockhart, Tyler. 

December 27 —" After the installation of officers, and agreeably to 
arrangements made on our last meeting, the body in conjunction with 
our sister lodge, Union No. 38, proceeded in regular form from the lodge 
rooms in Bro. Lockhart's house to St. Andrew's church, where a sermon 
adapted to the occasion was preached by the Rev, Dr. Burns, '^ from 
2 Peter, l.st chapter, 5-7 verses : ' Giving all diligence ; add to godliness 
brotherly kindness, and to brotherly kindness charity.' They then 
returned to their respective lodge rooms, and afterwards to Cody's Coftee 
House, where they sat down to a sumptuous dinner, and spent the re- 
mainder of tiie day in the greatest hilarity and brotherly love. Subse- 
(juently they returned to their lodge room, where, after voting that the sum 
of five pounds be added to the collection made in the churcl this day 
(£41 3s. 9(1.}, the lodge was closed in peace, social harmony and brotherly 
love." 

A. D. 1820. 

January 4 — "Bros. McClure, Minette and Martin were appointed a 
connuittee to procure a new outfit of furniture, etc., for the lodge." 

The audit committee, in a report submitted to the lodge, exposed an 
unbusinesslike method of conducting its financial afiiiirs, a method wliich 
iippoai-s to have commenced in its early days, and to have continued 
with increased volume as the year.«< advanced. T allude to the vicious 
practice of loaning the funds to sundry mcnd)ers, and the retention of 
moneys by some of the officers. The connuittee shewed that the sum of 

1 Kfiuivak'iit to paying it into tlio funds of the lodgs. 
i riu! Utv. (KS)rgo Uiirii,'*, I), D., wit'* pastor oi" St. Aiulrow's v'uircli (rresbytcriau), in Saiut 
.' ■'Im.alHuit foiirtccii ycurw, c nmnHMicing Mafj^lSH. Ho wits a nativv. of SuoMand, to "'■'■'■ -ir" ••■-]• 
■■■••''WWfWFIHIWRlPST'wTirTiiTHwioic, and died tliero I'ebruary, .'"'*< aged 85 years. Uc was 
Hut u iiu-iiilxT of the luasouic fraloniiiy. 

E 



68 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

£155 7s. 8(1. was due to the lodge, of which amount £84 Os. Od. was in 
the hands of nine members. Vigorous si,^/S were taken to enforce pay- 
ment from these delinciuents. 

April 4 — " Bros. Dean, Lockhart and Minette were appointed a com- 
mittee, to act in conjunction with a committee of Union Lodge, to investi- 
gate the legality of a lodge held in the parish of Portland." 

May 2 — " On motion made and seconded, it was resolved unanimously 
that, in consequence of the death of his late Royal Highness the Duke 
of Ken*^^, past grand master of the united grand lodge of England, this 
lodge fro into decent mourning."' 

July 4 — "Read a ])etition from Corporal Gibson, of the 74th regi- 
ment of foot, who was entered, passed and raised in a self-created lodge 
held in the parish of Portland, by a Mr. Campbell and othei's, praying 
that he be accepted by and receive a certificate from this body. Ordered, 
that Bros. Townsend, Payne and j\[artin be a committee to call on Cor- 
poral Gibson and inform him that he cannot be acknowledged by or 
receive a certificate from this body without first obtaining a vote for his 
admission and afterwards going through all the regular forms and cere- 
monies of being healed over, and i)aying such fees as the body may think 
proper." At a meeting held July 7th, it was decided, on the ballot, that 
Gibson be accepted and healed over. 

July 28 — "This special lodge having been convened for the purpose 
of taking into consideration a circular letter from the grand lodge of 
Nova Scotia, dated tiie 21st February last, transmitting a copy of com- 
munication from the grand lodge of England of March ol, 1819, when a 
series of resolutions were read, which liad been previously drawn up by 
a committee from this lodge and our sister lodge, Union, No. 88. On 
motion made and seconded, it was resolved that the said resolutions do 
pass, and the s-^nie be transmitted to the grand lodge of Nova Scotia, with 
such amendments in form as a committee consisting of Bros. Durant, Kay 
and Leavitt may think meet." 

The following is a copy of the resolutions above mentioned : 

1. That it in the umiualitied opinion of this assembly that they owe implicit obedi- 
ence to the orders of the R. W. trrand h)dge, from whom they have received their 
privileges, while the.-e is an apparent possibility of complying with them. 

1 H. R. H. PrintT Kilward Augustus, Duke of Ki'iit and Strnthcarii, and Karl of DiiWin, thi' 
fourth son o<" Xing (iwrgf tin; Third, was lioru Novenilieri, l"(i7, and diwl .January 2:!, 1820. He 
vrai^ the father of Her M;.jeNty Queen Victoria. Initiated into freenjasonry at (ieneva, Switzerland, 
A. 1). 17911, and elected grand nia.ster of the Athol grand lodge, A. 0. 1813. Through his exertions, 
Hecontied by liiB brother the I)uke of Su.ssex, grand master of the mother grand lodge, the recon- 
ciliation of these two branelu« of the Knglinh masonic family was aeeompliKliid, and their iininn 
clTected December, 181!?, under the title of " The I'nited (irand Lodge of Ancient Fri-e and Aeci'pt;"^ 
MaHoiis of Kngland." Ilia Koyal IlighneKS paid a hurrie<i visit to Saint John in the month of .Innc 
17U4. lie come from Halifax l)y way of Aunapulis. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 69 

2. That from the great distance between tliis place and Halifax, these lodges find 
it next to an impossibility to be regularly represented in the grand lodge of Nova 
Scotia, in conseiiuence of which they are deprived of ar^ voice there, and in a great 
measure prevented from making it acquainted with , particular necessity arising 
from their particular situation. 

3. That the local situation of the lodges, established, as they are, in the seaport 
town of this i)rovince, subjects them to the necessity of making very considerable 
contributions to poor and distressed brethren, who are continually arriving here 
from all jiarts of the world, under circumstances which, in many cases, render it 
necessary for these lodges to be at tlieir entire expense for affording them relief; the 
general fimd of the grand lodge of Nova Scotia being at too great a distance tc be 
called upon for transient objects of masonic benevolence in this province, and the 
other lodges of this province being so remote, preclude the possibility of any assist- 
ance from them without a tedious and uncertain correspondence. 

4. That from the facts wliicli appear in the foregoing resolution, the funds of 
these two bodies have, on many occasions, been wholly inadequate to answer the 

i demands of charity made upon them ; in consequence of which, it has been necessary, 
[ in order toatVord tiie desired assistance, to resort to voluntarv contributions from the 
. bretiiren, which have often been of considerable amomit and always extremely 
burdensome. 

5. That the more to enable them to meet these demands, these lodges have in- 
creased their fees of initiation and have also abstained from all refreshments at their 
meetings, and appropriated tiie money heretofore paid for this purpose to the use of 
the fundof ciiarity, wiiich arrangements, tiiougii of great benefit, have not yet enabled 
diem to meet all the pressing expenses that occur, 

(5. That there is every reason to believe, the number of distressed brethren from 
all parts of tiie British empire who are relieved by these lodges, is beyond compari- 
son greater than the number of members belonging to these bodies, who have 
received assistance from the funds of the lodges in England or elsewhere. 

7. That tiie large sums before alluded to, disbursed by these lodges to alleviate 
the distress of transient members of our fraternity, have in a great measure incapaci- 
tated them from paying due attention to the necessities of their own indigent 
brethren, thereby oiiliging them to resign one of the most essential local advantages 
of the instituiion. 

«. That from all the foregoing considerations, it is evident that a compliance with 
the present orders of the grand lodge, or any augmentation of the fees of the masonic 
institution in this place, would have an injurious tendency to the establishment here 
altogether, as it must not only prevent any new candidates from being initiated, (Ut 
also compel nwny valuable members to declare off from the working bodies the 
present burdens of which they are but ill able to bear. 

!>. Thai it is the anxious hope of the brethren of these lodges, that the grand 
lodge will be kindly pleased to take their case into serious consideration, and that 
snaie arrangement may (if possible) be nuule to remoi'e the serious dillicidty they 
must laiior under if these are to be rigorously enforced. 

1(». That the associated brethren now convened trost their cause entirely to the 

<lecision of the grand lodge and await its determination, which, if unfavorable, and 

a strict compliance with its regulations be still insisted upon, with all deference and 

liuniilily they will abide by the order of the grand lodge, and return their warrants 

^ to be disposed of as it may think proper, considering it better for the general char- 



70 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

acter of the fraternity in this part of the world that these lodges should at once 
honorably close their flourishing career before they become involved by these new 
and increased charges, than linger a few years under such accumulated burdens as 
must inevitably reduce them to an unhappy termination. 

11. That these resolutions be signed by the masters and wardens of these lodges, 
and countersigned by the secretaries, and a copy of them transmitted through the 
K. W. deputy grand master of this province to the grand secretary of the K. W, 
grand lodge in Nova Scotia, together with the united and sincere thanks of the 
brethren now assembled for the many favors it has lieretofore conferred upon them, 
which they are as grateful to acknowledge as they have been happy to receive. 

<SY. John's Lou'j'i, No. 29 : Union Lodge, No. o8 : 

\Vm, DuRArx, W. M. Bkn.i. L. Petkrs, W. M. 

KoiJERT R/Y, S. W. Alex. Edmond, 8. W. 

John McCi.uhe J. W. Thos. L. Nicholson, J. W. 

Tnos. Leavitt, Sec'y. Lionel Anderson, Sec'y. 

As no entry is made of these letters from Nova Scotia and England, 
it can only be surmised, from the purport of the foregoing resolutions, 
that an order l.ad passed to increase the fees exacted from the respective 
lodges in New Brunswick. 

The provincial grand secretary reported that he had received the 
resolutions, and had, by command of the provincial grand master, trans- 
mitted them to the grand lodge of England. Subsequent extracts from 
the records will shew that further and important action was taken by the 
local lodges in regard to this demand of the grand lodge. 

September 8 — "The members of the lodge, with brethren of Union 
Lodge and transient masons, met at the lodge room at half-past three 
o'clock, to pay the last tribute of respect to the remains of the late Bro. 
David Webb." The deceased was initiated in St. Joiin's Lodge, July 7, 
1818, and was thirty years of age. 

Octobers — " It was resolved unanimously, that Bro. John Clark, a 
sufferer by a recent fire in Nova Scotia, receive £9 Is. Od. from the funds 
of the lodge." • 

November 7 — "It was resolved that Bro. be suspended from 

this lodge for six months from this date, in consequence of his late mis- 
conduct in being frecjuently in a state of intoxication ; and further, that 
the secretary furnish him with a copy of this resolution." 

"Agreeably to summons (see entry April 4th last), the officers presid- 
ing under warrant No. 977 from the grand lodge of Ireland, viz. : Samuel 
Campbell, master; Charles Campbell, S. W. ; Robert Foivyth, J. W.; 
and William Brown, secretary, were admitted, when a letter from the 
grand secretary of the grand lodge of Nova Scotia, transmitting a letter 
from the grand secretary of the grand lodge of Ireland, together with an 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 71 

extract from the minutes, were read to them, dechiriiig said warrant No. 
D77 to be null and void and of no efi'ect, the same being clandestine in 
having been taken from the town in Ireland where it was granted to be 
held, and that Samuel Campbell, the master, be expelled from the rights 
and privileges of freemasonry. The above mentioned officers of the 
aforesaid warrant No. 977 then withdrew. Whereupon it was ordered 
that the secretary furnish Samuel Campbell with copies of the above 
mentioned documents." 

Further particulars of this body will be found under the head of "A 
Clandestine Lodge." 

A letter was received from the provincial grand secretary informing 
the lodge that Corporal Gibson might be " healed according to the ancient 
custom of the craft," and at the succeeding communication he was healed 
accordingly. 

Decend)er 27 — St. John's and Union Lodges celebrated the festival of 

St. John the Evangelist by attending divine service and dining together. 

The brethren assembled at their respective lodge rooms at half-past nine 

o'clock a. m., when a procession was formed, and, after moving through 

several of the principal streets, reached Trinity church at eleven o'clock. 

A large number of the fraternity and many prominent citizens attended 

the church, where they listened to an instructive and appropriate sermon 

on "Brotherly Love," delivered by the Rev. Bro. James Cookson.' A 

collection was taken up for the benefit of the poor of the city, which 

amounted to £20 Os. Od. In the afternoon, at four o'clock, the brethren 

sat down to a dinner provided at Cody's Coffee House. After the usual 

loyal, masonic and sentimental toasts, and the enjoyment of rational and 

fraternal sentiment, they separated at an early hour in the evening. 

By vote of the lodge, the sum of £5 Os. Od. was taken from the funds 
and added to the church collection. 

A. D. 1821. 
The officers for 1821, elected and installed in December, were : 

Bro. Robert Ray, W. M. 

Bro. John McChire, S. W. Bro. Robert C. Minette, S. D. 

" Cliarles Herring, .J. W. " Natlian Goilsoe, J. D. 

" Henry Cluibb, Treas. " William McDonald, S. S. 

" Thonuus Leavitt, Sec'y. " H. N. H. Liigrin, J. S. 

Bro. William Hoyt, Junr., Tyler. 

April 26 — "It was resolved that the W. M. be authorized to dis- 
tribute a sum not exceeding twenty shillings to any one object of charity 
ill' may think proper, without calling the lodge together." 

I Uov. Bro. .rallies Cookson was rector of Hampton, Kings county, from A. I). 1810 to 1820. He 
rwiiivwl the degrees of freemasonry in St. John's liodgo, his initiation taking place August 1, 1820. 



72 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

" It was further resolved that Bros. Ray, MeClure and Herring be a 
standing coniniittee to distribute a sum not exceeding forty sliillings to 
any one object of charity that they may think proper." 

October 4 — Sunday. The bretliren assembled under the authority 
of the lodge and buried the remains of the late Bro. Thomas Miller with 
masonic ceremony. Tlie deceased, who was not a member of St. John's 
Lodge, was a native of North Britain. He died October 12th, in the 
thirty-flfth year of his age. 

A. D. 1822. 

The officers of the current year were : 

Bro. George Bonnell, \V. M. 
Bro. Riclianl Mott, S. W. Bro. Xatlian Godsoe, S. D. 

" Robert C. Minette, .1. W. " James Crispni, J. D. 

" Henry Cluibl., Treas. " David Arinstrong, S. S. 

" Robert Payne, See'y. '' William Ilut-jlunson, J. S. 

Bro. Lewis Carvill, Tyler. 

February 11 — The lodge decided to remove on the first day of jNIay 
from the present (puirters in Bro. Levi Lockhart's buihling to rooms on 
King street owned by Bro. Charles Macplierson, agreeing to pay him the 
annual rent of £18 Os. Od., " to include two stoves and fuel for the saaie, 
and exclusive of candle light." The removal took place accordingly. 

March 5 — "The committee aj)i -minted to regulate the time and place 
in which the members of this lodge, and the brethren in general, may 
convene for further instruction in the mysteries of freemasonry, reported 
that they had arranged to hold meetings in the lodge room each Monday 
evening, which report and arrangement received the sanction of the 
lodge." This is the first mention of the establishment of a lodge of in- 
struction in Saint John. 

April 2 — "Received a committee from Carleton R. A. Chapter 
requesting that they may have the use of our warrant for the better con- 
vening of their body, which request was granted by the lodge." 

Carleton Chapter continued from the date of its organization — Janu- 
ary 19, 1805 — up to October 2, 1815, to work under authority of .St, 
John's Lodge warrant. At the latter date, without any known reason, 
it came under the warrant of Union Lodge, No. 38, and continued under 
such warrant until the above application. 

The following is copied from the record of Carleton Chapter of April 
17, 1822: "At a regular convocation held this day at the chapter hall, 
Bro. Levi Lockhart's building, it was resolved that a vote of thanks be 
passed to St. John's Lodge, No. 29, for allowing the chapter to work 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-37. 73 

under its warnint up to tlie present date ; tl»e chapter, liavinj,' now re- 
ceived a regular charter from the sup'-eme grand royal arch chapter of 
Scotland, has no farther need of the warrant of St. John's Lodge," 

June 14 — "On motion of the \V. M., it was resolved that Bros. 
DuKint, Chubb, Mott, Ray and Marshall be a coniniittee to wait upon- 
Union Lodge, and likewise to correspond with the sister lodges through- 
nut the province, as to the expediency of establishing a grand lodge in 
the province." 

The bald motion is entered in the njinutes without any reason assigned 
for the movement. 

June 27 — The lodge interred the remains of the late Bro. Alexander 
Crookshank with the ceremonial of the craft. The deceased, who was 
not a member of the lodge, was a non-connnissioned officer in the royal 
artillery, aged forty years, who died on the passage from Halifax to Saint 
Jolm. The funeral took place at half-past one o'clock from the artillery 
l)arracks, Lower Cove, to the burial ground near King's square. 

October 1 — The lodge having by resolution expressed dissatisfaction 
at the non-attention of the committee appointed June 14 preceding, in 
regard to the expedience of establishing a grand lodge for the province, 
dismissed the committee and appointed another, consisting of Bros. Bon- 
nell, Townsend, Ray and Leavitt. 

November 5 — The above committee reported in favor of the forma- 
tion of a grand lodge, and, upon the unanimous acceptance of the recom- 
mendation, Bros. Townsend, Ray, Mott and Lugrin " were appointed a 
committee to ascertain the ways and means of carrying the same into 
etiect as soon as possible." 

As the committee of "ways and means" never submitted a report, 
and as no farther mention is made of this movement, it is probable that 
the craft at that time did not possess sufficient energy or did not receive 
encouragement enough to make it a success. 

December 27 — The officers for the ensuing year were installed as 
follows : 

Bro. Kobert Kay, W. M. 
Bro. Kobert C. Minette, S. W. Bro. William Jlutchinson, S. D. 

" Thomas Leavitt, J. \V. " Samuel Cobb, J. D. 

" Henry CImbb, Treas. " David .Armstrong, S. S. 

" II. N. H. Lugrin, Sec'y. " Solomon Knight, J. S. 

Bro. George Moore, Tyler. 

After the installatio^i, which took place in the morning, the lodge, 
with Union Lodge and Carleton R. A. Chapter, formed a procession and 



74 FKEK.ArASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

luarcliod to Trinity cliurcli, whore an n]i])r()j)riate sermon was preached 
by Rev. Robert Willi:^, rector/ from the 18th chapter of St. John, 34th 
verse — "A new commandment I give you, that ye love one another. As 
I have loved you, that ye also love one another," At the close of the 
service u collection was taken up for the benefit of the poor of the city. 

At five o'clock the brethren of the lodge, with invited guests, dined 
together in Cody's Coffee House, " spending the evening in the usual 
pleasant and brotherly manner." 

A. D. 1823. 

January 7 — An order passed "to procure suitable banners for a 
master's lodge." 

February 8 — The lodge formed a procession and attended the funeral 

C/f the late Bro. Cornelius Van Home, over whose remains the masonic 

burial service was read. The deceased, who was thirty-five years of age, 

■was initiated in St. John's Lodge March 5, 1811, and filled the chairs of 

junior and senior wardens 

February 14 — The rite of masonic sepulture w-as conducted by the 
lodge, assisted by the members of Union Lodge and Carleton R. A. Chap- 
ter, over the remains of the late R. W. Bro. William Campbell, Esquire. 
There was a large attendance of the craft to manifest the great respect 
4\nd esteem in which the memory of the deceased was held. The cortege 
was headed by a band of music, a display quite unusual at funerals in 
those days. Bro. Campbell was deputy grand master, one of the founder?- 
of and constituted the lodge under its warrant from the provincial grand 
lodge of Nova Scotia. A memoir of this distinguished craftsman will be 
found in another part of this volume. 

March 4 — " The committee appointed at the February meeting to 
provide a suitable room for .he convening of the lodge for the ensuing 
year, reported that Bro. Charles Macpherson, the present landlord; would 
provide one for twenty pounds, and Bro. Israel Lawson one for twenty- 
five pounds a year. The lodge decided to remain in Bro. Macpherson's 
building, although at an advance of two pounds over the present rental." 

April 1 — The secretary acknowledged the reception of a list of the 
officers of the grand lodge of Quebec for 1823, and of the lodges under 
its jurisdiction. 

1 The Rev. Robert Willis, D. D., succeeded to the rectorship of Trinity church, Saint John, 
November, 1818; continuing in charge of the parish until A. I). 182.5, when he removed to Halifax. 
N. S. His death occurred at the latter place April 21, 1865, at the age of 80 years. He was a native 
of Durham, England. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 75 

The following resolution was adopted : 

BrHolred That Robert \V. Nowlin im.l Laurenoe Stivers, residents of tl.is city, 
who hiive heen initiated into the mysteries of freeiunsonry in Midiiui Lodge, lield at 
Kin.'ston, he not alh.we.l to visit this lodge until otherwise resolved ; that the lodge 
li.s U in view by adopting this measure, however unconstitutional it may appear, to 
oievent persons 'residing in this city, and wliose characters are better known here 
than elsewhere, from beiug initiated iuto the mysteries of masonry in other parts of 
this province, and then recoiling on us to the great disparagement of the fraternity 
at large and the lodges in this city in particular ; that this lodge will take the earliest 
method of communicating the circumstance to the grand lodge at Halifax, and petition 
them to prevent a recurrence of these evils, in which we sincerely hope Union Lodge 
will join, as the brethren of St. John's Lodge humbly conceive it will tend to ad- 
vance the credit and respectability of the masonic institution. 

The secretary was directed to furni.sh Midian and Union Lodges with 
a copy of the foregoing re.solution. 

" It was ordered that special sununonses be sent to those members of 
the lodge who have neglected to pay their dues, with the injunction that 
unless the same be paid on or before the next regular night, they will be 
reported to the grand lodge for expulsion." 

jyiav 12 — A letter was received from Union Lodge "to the effect that 
they will join this body in a remonstrance against the late proceedings of 
Midian Lodge in initiating re.sidents of this city." 

A resolution was adopted by which Bro. Levi Lockhart — who, it ap- 
pears, was present in Midian Lodge when Bros. Nowlin and Stivers were 
accepted and initiated — received a reprimand from the W. M. "for 
conniving at their admission, knowing, as he did, that they had been 
rejected in St. John's Lodge." 

In view of the passage of the foregoing stringent measures, one is at 
a loss to account for the adoption of the following resolution, at all events 
until instructions should be received from the provincial grand lodge: 
"On motion made and seconded, it was ordered that the resolution pi'o- 
hibiting Bros. Nowlin and Stivers from visiting this lodge be rescinded." 
June 3 — " On motion made and seconded, it was resolved that a letter 
be sent to Midian Lodge, held at Kingston, reinon.strating against their 
recent proceedings, and reipiesting them in future to desist initiating into 
their lodge any individuals from this city, unless they be strongly and 
respectably recommended." 

According to the custom in lodges under the grand lodge of England, 
even up to the present time, persons were and are eligible to admission 
into any lodge without limitation of residence. The limitation of resi- 
dence, or "territorial jurisdiction," whereby candidates are obliged to 
])etition lodges nearest their places of residence, is purely of American 
origin. Possibly, if St. John's Lodge had notified Midian and the other 



76 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

lodges in the province of the rejection of these candidates, the unpleas- 
antness here recorded might have been obviated. 

The minutes do not shew that any instructions or orders bearing on 
the case ever came from the provincial grand lodge. 

July 9 — The remains of the late Bro. Charles Macpherson were ac- 
companied to the grave and buried with the usual masonic ritual, there 
being a large and respectable attendance. The deceased was seventy 
years of age, and one of the early settlers of the city of Saint John. At 
the apportionment of lots to the loyalists, under the first survey of the 
city, he was granted Lot 402, corner of King street and Market square, 
upon which he erected the building celebrated as " The Coffee House," 
where St. John's Lodge held its meetings from May, 1808, until March, 
1813. He was also the owner of the "Arnold House," corner of King 
and Cross streets, in which the lodge assembled from May, 1822, until 
May, 1824. Bro. Macpherson received the degrees of freemasonry in 
New York previous to the evacuation of that city by the British troops 
and the departure of the loyalists in 1783. He was a member of Hiram 
Lodge, No. 17, and affiliated in St. John's Lodge April 2, 1823. 

October 6 — Bro. James White, an officer of His Majfc.-«ty's 52nd regi- 
ment of foot, then stationed in Sairt Tohn, is recorded a* t, visitor. 

A. D. 1824. 

The officers of the current year were : 

Uro. Robert C. Minette, W. M. 
Bro. Robert Payne, S. W. Bro. George Day, S. D. 

" William Hutchinson, J. W. " Patrick Fuller, J. D. 

" Benjamin F. Marsli, Treas. " Solomon Knight, S. S. 

" David Armstrong, Sec'y. " Jacob Noyes, .J, S. 

Bro. Charles Whiting, Tyler. 

February 4 — A committee, previously appointed, reported that " they 
had procured a conveni-^nt room in the masonic hall for twenty pounds 
per year from the first day of May next." 

The auc it committee stated that they had been unable to perform their 
duty, " because the secretary's books were withheld from them." This 
committee was empowered to demand payment of sundry notes of hand 
held by the lodge, and the secretary was directed " to summon all delin- 
(pient brethren to pa. Iieir dues before the next regular night, otherwise 
they would be reported to the grand lodge for expulsion." 

The lodge was evident'" awakening to the necessity of enforcing 
stringent measures for secm.ng payments of debts du' it. • ^ . . 

May 1 — The lodge was removed to the masonic .lall, corner of King 
and (Charlotte streets. 




Fac-simii,k of Certificate. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 7& 

June 7— The W. M. was authorized to purchase a bible for the use of 
the lodge, " the present one being scarcely suited to our requirements." 

August 19 — The lodge assembled and buried with masonic ceremony 
the ren'iains of the late Bro. Paul Prince, aged thirty-three years. He 
joined the lodge March 7, 1815. 

A. D. 1825. 

The officers of the current year were : 

Bro. Robert Payne, W. M. 

Bro. William Hutchinson, S. W. Bro. Patrick Fuller, S. D. 

" Solomon Knight, J. W. " John F. Payne, J. D. 

" Benjamin F. Marsh, Treas. " William W. Emslie, S. S. 

" James P. Payne, Sec'y. " James G. Lester, J. S. 

Bro. Henry Long, Tyler. 

January 4 — "Bro. , who was expelled from this lodge for non- 
payment of dues, on the 24th June, 1817, and reported to the grand 
lodge, humbly solicited the lodge to report his case to that right worship- 
ful body, that he may obtain the favor of being restored to the privileges 
of masonry by paying his arrearages, as his default was consequent upon 
having met losses which reduced him to extreme indigence." 

There is no mention of what was done with this application. 

January 6 — "Captain William Gray, a candidate for initiation, did 
not come forward this night, in consequence of his ship having broken 
adrift." 

January 17 — "The lodge met for the purpose of paying the last 
token of respect and interring with masonic honors the remains of our 
late Bro. George Moore, who died on the 15th instant, aged thirty-four 
years." He joined the lodge May 1, 1821. The body was buried in the 
north-east angle of the burial ground, near King's square. A wooden 
tablet was placed at the head of the grave, and is still standing in a good 
state of preservation. 

January 25 — "The renmins of the late Bro. Peter Stewart, who died 
on the 23rd instant, aged 32 years, were buried with the usual cert.aonial 
of the craft." He was initiated in St. John's Lodge January 4, 1820. 

May 2 — Bros. Robert Payne, Marsh, Minette and Hutchin.son were 
appointed a committee to revise the bye-laws of the lodge. 

June 24 — A committee, consisting of Bros. Hutchinson, Payne, Marsh, 
Emslie and Condle, having been appointed at the meeting in May, "to 
wait on Union Lodge and Carleton R. A. Chapter to advise with them and 



m FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

ascertain wliether it will be expedient for the three bodies to. meet and 
celebrate St. John's day," the joint eomniittee made arrangements "for a 
procession, divine service and dinner. The record states that " the three 
bodies formed in procession at the masonic hall, and, moving through 
some of the principal streets, reached Trinity church at 12 o'clock, noon, 
where a sermon was delivered by the Rev. Bro. Oliver Arnold, and a 
substantial collection made for distribution among the poor of the city." 

The services of the day are alluded to in eloquent terms in the 
columns of the Courier of June 25th, as follows : 

After the churcli service the body returned to tlieir lodge room, in a style pleas- 
ing to the numerous spectators assembled to witness the glorious display. The 
necessary arrangements being made, the bretliren sat down at six o'clock to a most 
splendid dinner. The wines were exquisite, and the brotherly affection of all pres- 
ent added, if possible, to the innocent tranquility naturally pertaining lo so mo- 
mentous a day. Very many appropriate and sentimental toasts were given, and '* 
affords us heartfelt satisfaction to say that our worthy brother, the Rev. O. Arnold, 
expressed himself highly delighted by the steady demeanour of his brethren in 
general. 

July 5 — The lodge voted to procure "a new certificate stamp." 
This must have been a seal. 

November 29 — Expediency and haste. At an emergency communi- 
cation this evening, a petition was received from John Anderson, who 
was balloted for, accepted, and had the three degrees conferred upon him, 
the record stating, as a reason for this haste, " that we could not have 
another meeting before the brother would sail for Great Britain." The 
brother's knowledge of freemasonry must have been exceedingly limited 
before he sailed, and his recollection of the ceremonies too much confused 
to be of practical utility to him.^ 

1 When, as grand secretary, I had frefjuent calls for assistance, information, etc., the case of ii 
brother who had been hurried through the degrees eaiue under my notice. A young man who had 
received the three degrees in one evening, in a lodge at Dundee, Scotland, left the following day for 
America. Arriving iu the I'nited States at the time of the war between the North and South, he 
enlisted in the federal army, was wounded and sent into hospital. When convalescent he deserted 
and eventually made his way to Saint John in straitened circumstances. Announcing himself a 
freemason and in want, he was referred to me. Upon attempting to test him, I found he bad not 
the slightest recollection of any of the points necessary to establish his masonic standing ; he could 
not answer, with the slightest approach to intelligence, the most simple question. Although his 
honest and ingenuous countenance led me to believe his story was true, I was reluctantly debarred 
from assisting him as a frecma.son. After giving him a small sum in a friendly way, to minister to 
his immediate ncce^'ciities, I handed him a note addressed to the president of the St. Andrew's 
Friendly Society, .lirough whom he was enabled to secure help and employment. The lodge which 
jritiated this young man took, no doubt, his hard earned money in payment of fees, hurried him 
through the degrees at railroad speed, and turned him adrift utterly ignorant and helpless. He 
might as well have never entered the portals of a lodge, for everything of a masonic nature was a 
terra incognita to him. W. F. B. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 81 

December 27 — Officers for the incoming year were installed, viz.: 

Bro. Robert Payne, VV. M. 
Bro. Benjamin F. Marsh, S. W. Bro. John F. Payne, S. D. 

" Francis B. Perley, J. W. " James G. Lester, J. D. 

" William Hutchinson, Treas. " Joseph Lingley, S. 8. 

" James P. Payne, Sec'7. " William McArthur, J. S. 

Bro. Hugh McDermott, Tyler. 

" Bros. Minette, Payne and Marsh were appointed a committee ta 
regulate and furnish the lodge with a complete set of banners." 

" It was resolved unanimously that this lodge do way with the former 
nsnner of refreshments, and each member pay eight pence toward,.! the 
lodge funds each night of his attendance." Formerly the refreshments 
were paid for out of the ordinary lodge fund. 

The members of the lodge, with brethren of Union Lodge and Carle- 
ton R. A. Chapter, celebrated the anniversary of St. John the Evangelist 
by dining together in the masonic hall, W. Bro. Nehemiah Merritt pre- 
siding. " A number of patriotic, masonic and other toasts were offered. 
There were some good speeches and excellent songs by several prominent 
craftsmen, and the evening was spent in the utmost cordiality and social 
pleasure." 

A. D. 1826. 

January 23 — The lodge assisted in the consecration and constitution 
of Albion Lodge, No. 52, of Saint John, under warrant of the provincial 
grand lodge of Nova Scotia. The ceremonies were presided over by R. 
W. Bro. Benjamin L. Peters, acting ais grand master. 

March 8 — Dr. Kendall, a visiting brother, "favored the lodge with 
a lecture for the good of freemasonry." 

May 6 — " At a meeting held this day of the masters and wardens of 
St. John's Lodge, No. 29, Union Lodge, No. 38, and Albion Lodge, No. 
52, R. W. Bro. Benjamin L. Peters was chosen to be recommended to the 
grand lodge at Halifax for appointment to the office of district deputy 
grand master for Saint John and Saint Andrews." The recommendation, 
approved by R. W. Bro. Thomas Wetmore, D. G. M. for the province, 
whose residence at Fredericton prevented him from giving full attention 
to the wants of the craft in distant places, was forwarded to Halifax for 
the sanction of the provincial grand lodge. 

At the quarterly communication of the provincial grand lodge, held 
at Halifax June 7th, the recommendation was agreed to, and R. W. Bro. 
Peters duly appointed to the office. R. W. Bro. Edmund Ward, D. G. M. 
of the provincial grand lodge, was authorized to proceed to Saint John 



«2 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

to instal Bro. Peters, and to inspect and report upon the state of the 
lodges in any locality he might visit. 

May 18 — " Bro. B. F. Marsh proposed that the lodge should be fur- 
nished with branch candlesticks, observing that they could be purchased 
jvt a low rate. It was unanimously agreed to, and Bros. Marsh and 
Hutchinson were appointed a committee to view them and make report 
accordingly." This pair of candlesticks purchased by the lodge were 
sliver-plated, and each had three branches for as many candles. They 
remained in the ^o^- ■. ssion of the lodge up to the fire of June 20, 1877. 

June 20 — "An emergency, called for the purpose of receiving a visit 
from R. W. Bro. Edmund Ward, Esquire, D. G. M., made by command 
of the R. W. Grand Master, to examine the records and inspect the mode 
of working. The R. W. Brother, upon his entry, was received in due 
form and took the chair. Immediately after, the records from last St. 
John's day up to the present time were read in his hearing, when he was 
pleased to express himself highly gratified with the state in which he 
found the lodge, and gave his approval of the proceedings.", 

June 24 — "The worshipful master, wardens and brethren of St. 
John's Lodge, No. 29, having assembled at the masonic hall, the R. W. 
Bro. Edmund Ward, Esquire, D. G. M., was received in due form and 
assumed the chair, when a grand lodge was opened, with the following 
acting grand officers : 

Bro. Robert Payne, S. G. W. Bro. Jacob Townsend, S. G. T). 

" James Robertson, J. G. W. " Francis B. Perley, J. G. D. 

" Rev. Benj. G. Gray, G. Chap. " Thomas Whitlock, G. Marshal. 

" James P. Payne, G. Sec'y. " Thomas Sraitli, G. Pursuivant. 

Bro. Hugh McDermott, G. Tyler. 

" There were also present the masters, wardens and brethren of Union 
Lodge, No. 38, and Albion Lodge, No. 52, under their respective ban- 
ners; each lodge having been notified to attend the installation of W. 
Past Master, Benjamin L. Peters, Esquire." 

" Read a circular communication from R. W. Bro. Thomas Wet- 
more, Esq., D. P. G. M., to the masters and wardens of St. John's Lodge, 
No. 29, Union Lodge, No. 38, and Albion Lodge, No. 52, requesting them 
to assemble at the masonic hall, in the city of Saint John, on Saturday, 
the 4th day of May, then and there, under the presidency of the W. M. 
of St. John's Lodge, to nominate and recommend a proper and fit person, 
being a past master and a resident of this city, to preside over the lodges 
in this district as deputy grand master." 

" Read the proceedings of a convention in pursuance of the above 
order, wherein the W. Past Master, Bro. Benjamin L. Peters, Esquire, 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-37. 83 

had been chosen and recommended to the deputy provincial grand 
master as a proper and fit person to fill that important position." 

" Read also a circular letter from the grand lodge, confirming and 
supporting \V. Bro. Peters as district deputy grand master for Saint 
John and St. Andrews." 

" The warrant appointing him having been read by the acting grand 
secretary, the ceremony of installation then took place according to the 
ancient usages of the fraternity." 

" The brethren then moved in procession to Trinity church, where an 
appropriate and impressive sermon was preached by the acting grand 
chaplain, Rev. Bro. Benjamin Gerrish Gray, rector of Saint John, from 
1st John, chap. 5, verse 2 : 'By this we know that we love the children 
of God, when wo love God and keep Hi- commandrnents.' " 

"Afterward the brethren returned to tlie masonic hall, when the R.W. 
Deputy Grand Master delivered an impressive address suitable to the 
occasion. He then took an affectionate farewell of the brethren, and 
committed the care of the craft into the hands of the newly installed 
deputy for the district." 

" The grand lodge was then closed, and the brethren repaired under 
their respective banners to their lodge rooms." 

The proceedings of this communication are given verbatim from the 
records. It was an important event to the craft, as it gave them, which 
they no doubt had heretofore needed, a semi-independent position, and 
placed the control of masonic matters in the district in charge of an 
esteemed and distinguished craftsman. R. W. Bro. Benjamin L. Peters, 
Dt. D. G. M., was a member of Union Lodge, No. 38. 

July 4 — "Bro. Thomas Smith, by leave, handed to the lodge, to be 
deposited in the ark, the grand lod j;e certificate of our late Bro. William 
Smith." ' 

" R. W. Bro. B. L. Peters, Esq., D. D. G. M., having honored us this 
evening with his presence, ordered that the constitution issued by the 
grand lodge of Nova Scotia be read, which was accordingly done. The 
R. W. Bro. then delivered a few observations relative to the constitution, 
and requested the attention of the brethren to several particular points." 

August 15 — A new code of bye-laws was adopted and ordered to be 
printed. 

" It was ordered that the lodge have aprons provided for the office- 
bearers, and that the emblems of their office be painted on each sev- 
erally." 

1 It appears to have been a common practice in those days to place the certificates of deceased 
brethren in charge of the lodge. In my early maaonic days I rememl}er to have seen quite a num- 
ber of them in the lodge ark. W. F. B. 



84 FREExMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

September 25 — " Bro. Laurence Warren's bill for lettering and 
cleaning the sword was ordered to be paid." 

" Bro. Fitzgerald, a visiting brother, delivered a lecture for the good 
of masonry." 

October 16 — "Lodge of Emergency called for the purpose of inter- 
ring the remains of our late highly respected junior warden, Bro. Francis 
B. Perley, who was removed from this transitory scene by the will of the 
Most High, on the 13th instant, in the 32nd year of his age. In the 
death of Bro. Perley, the members of the fraternity, this lodge particul- 
arly, sympathize with the family and friends of the deceased. As a 
mason, if it had been the will of the Host High to have spared hira a 
few months longer, he would have been a candidate for the honor of hav- 
ing the highest badge to wear in this lodge." 

" The emergency was also summoned to pay the last offices to the re- 
mains of the late Bro. Edward Hall, of Lodge No. 79* on the registry of 
the grand lodge of England, as per his certificate bearing date 8th May, 
1811. He was master of the ship ' Deodalus,' and died at sea about the 
first instant." 

" The procession was numerously and respectably attended ; R. W. 
Bro. B. L. Peters, Esq., D. D. G. M., took an active part in directing 
the proceedings of the day." 

November 7— "Read a letter from R. W. Bro. B. L. Peters, D. D. 
G. M,, stating that the grand lodge of Nova Scotia had been pleased to 
reinstate Bro. Samuel Campbell to his former good standing among 
masons." The record of this brother's expulsion will be found in the 
minute of November 7, 1820. 

At this meeting the lodge elected a master, treasurer and tyler for the 
ensuing year. In all previous years, except 1802 and 1803, when they 
took place semi-annually, the elections were held at the regular com- 
munication in December, and all the officers were elected. Although 
there is no reason given for the change, it probably arose from the new 
condition of things, consequent upon the appointment of a resident dis- 
trict deputy grand master, who no doubt required a strict observance of 
the grand lodge laws. Heretofore an occasional looseness characterized 
the business transactions and work of the lodge; many things being done 
which would not have been sanctioned if there had been a resident offi- 
cial clothed with proper authority. The isolation of the lodge, the dis- 
tance from headquarters, the absence of a resident authority, and the 
extreme difficulty of transmitting mails between Saint John and Halifax 
led to these irregularities. 

1 Prince George Lodge of Plymouth, England. 



• ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 85 

The announcement was made at this communication that Bro. Samuel 
Kidder, a lecturer from the United States, was expected to visit Saint 
.John shortly, when it was decided to engage him to lecture and instruct 
the brethren. For that purpose a committee of arrangements was ap- 
pointed, consisting of Bros. Marsh, Hutchinson and Lawrence. 

December 5 — There was a very large attendance of members and 
visitors, including the R. W. District Deputy Grand Master, to meet Bro. 
Kidder, and receive instruction from him in the work and lectures of 
craft masonry. 

I have heard several of the older brethren, particularly the late W. 
Bro. Wm. W. Emslie, speak in the highest terms of the knowledge and 
proficiency of Bro. Kidder, and the great benefit the members of the 
lodge received from his able tuition. Bro. Emslie informed me that the 
work and lectures were identical with the system recognized by the craft 
in New Brunswick at the present time. 

December 27 — The following resolutions, adopted by the provincial 
grand lodge at a quarterly communication held on the sixth instant, 
were directed to the lodge for its guidance, viz. : 

Resolved, That if the lodges at Saint John, N. B., should at any time hereafter 
wish to celebrate either of the festivals of the Saints John, tliey shall apply to the 
district deputy grand master for his approbation ; and that no lodge at said place 
shall form any procession or celebrate a festival without his permission. 

Resolved, That in the absence of the district deputy grand master at Saint John, 
the master of the oldest lodge shall preside at all masonic festivals and processions. 

Resolved, That the application of any individual to be admitted into the fraternity 
in Saint John, N. B., sliail be presented to the district deputy grand master for his 
approbation, and no person shall be admitted in any lodge in that city without such 
sanction. 

The latter was a most high-handed, arbitrary and unmasonic piece of 
legislation. No such enactment would be proposed in any grand lodge 
at the present day. 

The officers for the ensuing year were installed as follows : 

Bro. Benjamin F. Marsh, W. M. 
Bro. Alexander Lawrence, S. W. Bro. William W. Emslie, S. D. 

" James P. Payne, J. W. " James G. Lester, J. D. 

" Rev. James Cookson, Chaplain.* " Joseph Lingley, S. S. 

" William Hutchinson, Treas. " Laurence Warren, J. 8. 

" George A. Garrison, Sec'y. " Patrick Fuller, Marshal.* 

Bro. Hugh McDermott, Tyler. 

A standing committee of five was appointed " for the investigation of 
candidates and the relief of distressed masons." 

1 The first mention of chaplain or marshal in the lodge. 



86 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

" The master and wardens were authorized to act as a visiting com- 
mittee upon all occasions of intercourse with sister lodges." 

" It was ordered that those brethren who, for some time past, have 
neglected attending the lodge, be sent a special summons requesting them 
to appear at our first regular night, and shew cause, if any they have* 
why they do not attend when regularly summoned." 

" The thanks of the meeting were given to W. Bro. Robert Payne, 
P. M., for the able and satisfactory manner in which he has filled the 
chair for the two last years." 

" It was proposed and carried that Mr. Cunningham receive the 
thanks of the lodge for the assistance rendered in completing the pillars." 

These columns were about seven feet six inches high, representing the 
Ionic and Corinthian orders, made of mahogany, and elegantly carved, 
fluted, etc. They stood on nmssive pedestals, and were surmounted by 
the celestial and terrestrial globes. The capitals Mere ornamented in 
regular style " with lily work, net work and pomegranates." They con- 
tinued in the possession of the lodge up to June 20, 1877, when they were 
consumed with the other paraphernalia in the destructive conflagration 

of that day. 

A. D. 1827. 

January 2 — " Bros. Warren and Lingley were appointed a committee 
to collect dues from the brethren in arrears, and as a remuneration for 
their trouble to receive at the rate of six per cent on all moneys collected." 

" It was ordered that the standing committee be authorized to present 
our R. W. Bro. B. L. Peters, Esq., D. D. G. M., with a mallet, as a mark 
of respect from the master, wardens and brethren of St. John's Lodge, 
No. 29." 

February 20 — The secretary concludes his record with the following 
entry ; " The business of the lodge having ended, it was closed in peace 
and harmony. Finally, be ye all of one mind, having compassion one of 
another ; love as brethren ; be pitiful, be courteous, knowing that ye are 
thereunto called, that ye should inherit a blessing." 

March 5 — Under a resolution of the lodge, Bros. Marsh, Lawrence, 
Garrick and Garrison were appointed a committee " to petition the grand 
lodge of Nova Scotia for a remission of our grand lodge dues for the la.«t 
year, in consequence of the extreme distress of the times and the low 
state of our funds." 

The following suggestive and significant resolution was also adopted: 
" Unanimously resolved, That Bros. Marsh, Chubb, Garrick, Lawrence 
and Garrison be appointed a committee to consult with our sister lodges 
throughout the province in respect to petitioning the grand lodge of Nova 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-37. 87 

Scotia as to the propriety as well as to solicit their assistance iu further- 
ing our object of forming a grand lodge in this city." 

The steps taken under this resolution and the result thereon will be 
found in the chapter headed, " Early Grand Lodge in New Brunswick." 

j^Iay I — Bro. John Boyer was elected tyler of the lodge. 

June — " A petition was received from Bro. craving assist- 
ance from this body. In consequence, however, of an unfavorable report 
as to his character, it was proposed he receive five shillings from the 
funds of the lodge to provide him with bread, and that our worthy 
brother, the Rev. Mr. Johnston, be requested to send him the bread and 
with it a word of admonition, as may best suit his circumstances, hoping 
that it may have the desired effect of producing a reformation in his 
moral character, and bring him to reflect upon his duty to God and to 
l)is neighbor," 

July 3 — "It was unanimously resolved, that in consequence of the 
little oj)portunity our respected Bro. John Ferguson has of being in our 
province, and of his paying dues to a lodge in Great Britain, he be con- 
sidered an honorary member." This is the first election of an honorary 
member in the lodge. 

" It was ordered that Bro. Lawrence be paid his account for his fur- 
nishing the lodge with candlesticks and colored candles." 

September 22 — An emergency communication summoned by request 
of R. W. Bro. B. L. Peters, D. D. G. M., for the purpose of laying before 
the lodge certain letters of correspondence relating to the suspension of 
Albion Lodge, No 52, as follows ; 

The first was a note dated September 4, 1827, from R. W. Bro. Peters 
to the W. M. of St. John's Lodge, viz. : 

I have to acquaint you, for the information of St. John's Lodge, No. 29, tiiat I 
have been under the necessity of suspending Albion Lodge, No, 52, for gross un- 
niasonic conduct, and have reported their proceedings to the grand lodge of Nova 
Scotia; you are, therefore, required to hold no further communication with them as 
masons until the pleasure of the grand lodge be known. 

The next is a letter dated at Halifax, September 11, from the pro- 
vincial grand secretary to R. W. Bro. Peters, as follows : 

1 hasten to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 2iHh ultimo, and to com- 
municate to you the proceedings of the grand lodge on the snbject of the improper 

conduct of Albion Lodge and Bro. , which you will have the goodness to 

make known to all concerned, 

" Extract of grand lo<lge minutes, held in ample form at Halifax, 
September 11, 1827 : The grand lodge, viewing with regret and concern 
the recent proceedings at Saint John, in New Brunswick, whereby a 



88 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

brother violated the constitution of freemasonry by making a complaint 
adduced against him a subject of public investigation, and thereby be- 
trayed the secret proceedings of the lodge to which he belonged, and 
bringing great discredit and scandal on the craft, have unanimously come 
to the following resolutions, viz. : 

Resolved, That the conduct of- , a member of Albion Lodge, No. 52, held 

in Saint John, in New Brunswick, in refusing to comply witli the customs and 
usages of the fraternity, as directed by the book of constitutions in all cases when 
complaints are brought by one mason against another, was an act highly disrespect- 
ful and improper in itself; but his subsequent act of bringing the proceedings of the 
lodge before the public, thus betraying that which has always been held secret 
among masons, is one which calls for the marked displeasure of the grand lodge. 

Resolved, That any mason who refuses to comply with these ancient rules and 
charges, which have been laid down for the benefit of the craft and to promote the 
honor and welfare thereof, is not worthy to be considered as a mason, nor entitled 
to any masonic privilege or advantage, and therefore to visit with proper chastise- 
ment the offender who has thus violated his masonic obligation, this grand lodge 

hereby expels the said from the masonic fraternity, and the grand secretary 

is hereby directed to notify the same accordingly, in order that the said 

shall not be received into any lodge in correspondence with this grand lodge. 

" The grand lodge have also attentively considered the statement of 
the R. W. District Deputy Grand Master at Saint John in reference to 
the proceedings of Albion Lodge on the evening when they were visited 
by the said deputy ; and as the offering an insult to a grand officer of his 
rank is one of rare occurrence, and hitherto unknown in these colonies; 
and further, as it has a tendency to destroy the harmony of the craft and 
to reduce it in the public estimation, they have come to the following 
determination : 

Resolved, That the suspension of Albion Lodge, No. 52, by D. D. G. M. Peters, is 

confirmed by this grand lodge, and that Bro. , ni.aster of the said lodge, and 

Bros. , members of said lodge, who were present on that night aiding and 

abetting the master in his unlawful coiu'se, be also suspended from all masonic privi- 
leges and advantages, and that the said master and members of the aforesaid lodge 
be required to transmit immediately to the grand secretary, for the information of 
this grand lodge, good and suflicient testimony or reasons why the warrant of the 
said lodge should not be cancelled and returned, and the members so olJending be 
expelled from the masonic fraternity. 

The third is a letter dated at Halifax, September 14, from Provincial 
Grand Secretary Vieth to the D. D. G. M., confirming and ratifying the 
foregoing expulsion and suspensions. 

Further correspondence on this question was placed before the lodge 
at the regular communication of December 4, 1827, which, from the 
peculiar nature of the case, I give in full, viz. : 



ST, JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 89 

(Copy of letter from Bro. Vieth to R. W. Bro. Peters, dated November 11, 1827). 
In reply to tlie several comrnunieations received from you respecting the trans- 
action of Albion Lodge, I liave the honor of enclosing herewith the proceedings 
and decision of the grand lodge on that subject, which I liope will be satisfactory to 
you. The decision is mild, but the grand lodge, actuated by feelings of forbearance, 
considered mildness more likely to recall brethren to that straight path of masonry 
from which they have strayed than vigorous measures, althougii deservedly inflicted. 
The committee have minutely investigated and given their opinion on every point of 
the transaction, which must prove satisfactory to all parties. I shall feel greatly 
obliged to you to communicate these proceedings to St. John's Lrdge, No. 29, and 
Inion Lodge, No. .SS. I should recommend to have them read at their next regular 
meetings, as they contain several explanations on articles of the constitution. Albion 
Lodge has this day been supplied with a copy of the documents. 

In grand lodge November 7, 1827: Report of the committee appointed by the 
grand lodge to investigate and report upon the proceedings of Albion Lodge, No. 52, 
lieUl at Saint John, N. B. 

The committee to whom were referred the proceedings of Albion Lodge, No. 52, 
have perused the papers relating to the same, and beg leave to submit the following 
report: The committee do not consider themselves called upon to allude to the 

merits of the dispute between Messrs. , which led to those unpleasant results 

tiiat called for the marked disapprobation of the grand lodge, any further than to 
observe th:it the cause of the complaint of the former was of the nature rather to call 
for the interference of the judges of the law than of a body of masons, necessarily 
ignorant of the forms and niceties of law, in whicli the simplest proceedings are 
often involved; nor ought Albion Lodge to have received any written communica- 
tion on the subject, as the constitution only permits charges that may be adduced by 
one brother against another, to be committed in writing, when the diflerence cannot 
be .settled in a private lodge ; and then it must be done solely for the purpose of 
being transmitted to the grand secretary for the information of the grand lodge. 
Besides, the charges in this instance were of an unnecessary and improper length, 
and the reply which they elicited contained many harsh and intemperate expressions, 
and was framed in a slyle and manner wliich the principles of masonry do not incul- 
cate. With respect to the statement transmitted by to the grand secretary, 

the committee will merely observe that, having submitted to the decision of his 
lodge, and that decision being in his favor, he ought to have been satisfied with it. 

And had-he subsequently iuscertained that made public the proceedings of a 

lodge, either as they related to himself or any other person, a complaint to that 
effect would have produced an investigation, and had he been found guilty, he must 
have met with the punishment which so flagrant an oflence deserves. 

With reference to the complaint of , that he ought to have been lieard in 

his defence previous to grand lodge having come to any decision upon his case, it 
appears to your committee that such a course would have been pursued, could no 
doubt have existed, whether he had carried the proceedings into an open court and 
made them the subject of public investigation. Nor does it appear that the grand 
lodge, in coming to the decision consequent thereon, for a moment entered into the 
merits of the dispute between the parties, but confined itself to a subsequem transac- 
tion on the part of , at once unprecedented and destructive of the masonic 

institution if suffered to pass unpunished, and which therefore required the most 
prompt and vigorous visitation. 



90 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Yor.r committee have also had under consideration the letter from the master of 
Albion Lodge, and in reporting thereon feel the utmost sorrow ; first, that a lodge 
comprised of respectable individuals and highly respectable as a body, should have 
shewn that disrespect towards a grand officer, which was in iiself a breach of that 
decorum which as a gentleman he luul a right to expect, and was moreover a viola- 
tion of that order and good conduct which ought ever to prevail among masons. 
A very slight acquaintance with the constitution ought to have informed the master 
and members of Albion Lodge that, when a deputy grand master takes the chair, 
he may either retain the wardens of the lodge or appoint others; and R. W. Bro. 
Peters might have appointed either of the brethren who accompanied him to fill 
these stations during his presiding over the lodge. His refraining from doing so 
and continuing the wardens in their chairs was not only complimentary, but proves 
that his object in visiting Albion Lodge, if a doubt could arise on the subject, was 
purely conciliatory and ought to have been met by a similar feeling. 

Your committee also report that the master of Albion Lodge was boinid by the 
constitution to furnish the district deputy grand master, who is the representative 
of the grand master, with any books or papers he might require, nor can your com- 
mittee see any reason for refusing to comply with such a request, unless it was 
foundeti in a desire to retain them with a view to their subsequent production in a 
court of justice. The proceedings of Albion Lodge on the night they were visited 
by the district deputy grand master require a most minute and comprehensive re- 
view. It appears that that officer, on entering the lodge, very properly took the 
chair, and while so situated had the entire control of the lodge, the master's author- 
ity being for the time merged in his. And it is in vain to allege that a resolve had 
been entered into before his arrival which precluded the admission of visitors. The 
lodge was called by the express command of the district deputy grand master, and 
common coiutesy, and regard to which is constitutional, should have prevented 
its members from entering any such resolution on the books of the lodge. Nor, 
indeed, should they have proceeded to any business after opening, previous to his 
arrival ; nor even afterwards could any have been transacted than that which wa» 
contemplated in the lodge summons. The conduct of the master of Albion Lodge in 
interfering with the government of it while the D. D. G. M, was in the chair, is so 
destructive of harmony and subordination that your committee cannot but report his 
conduct as requiring the serious consideration of the grand lodge. His consultation 
with the officers of the lodge as to what course should be pursued while a grand 
officer was in the chair, and his subsequently closing the lodge without the sanction 
or permission of that officer, were acts highly insulting and disrespectful, not only to 
the officer then present, but to the grand master whom he represented. And with 
respect to what took place after the lodgo was closed, your committee only express 
their regret that the brethren did not immediately separate ; as, after such scenes 
as had previously occurred, no friendly feeling could be expected to exist. 

Although there is nothing in the statement of the master of Albion Lodge which 
difilers materially from that which was transmitted by the D. D. G. M., and although 
the conduct of the lodge has been marked with impropriety already referred to, still 
in consideration for these errors and defects, to all of which we are liable, and par- 
ticularly as the members of said lodge, through their master, have expressed their 
contrition for the occurrence, and promise in future to avoid any line of conduct 
which might disturb the harmony which ought to exist among masons, your com- 
mittee recommend that the temporary suspension with which Albion Lodge has 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'3.7. 91 

justly been visited may be deemed a sufficient punishment for tlieir fault, and that 
tiie members be restored to their masonic privileges, with the exception of those 
officers who, instead of violating, ought to have set an example of subordination to 
those over whom they were originally placed. Your committee, therefore, recom- 

uiend that Bro. be suspended from all masonic rights and privileges for the 

space of twelve calendar months, and that Bro. be suspended from his masonic 

privileges and rights for the space of six calendar months, such periods of time to 
commence from the 11th day of September last past, when the grand lodge was con- 
vened to investigate the charges alleged against Albion Lodge. And further, that 
the remaining members, upon the receipt of the decision of the grand lodge upon 
this subject, be directed to assemble at their lodge room and then and there choose a 
master, who shall be installed by Past Master Durant on or p-evious to St. John'a 
dav next ensuing; which said master shall afterwards choose his officers in the man- 
ner prescribed in the book of constitutions. And also that, at the said meeting, a 
resolution shall be entere<l on the books of Albion Lodge expressive of regret at the 
insult offered to D. D. G. M. Peters, and apologizing for the same. A copy of which 
resolution must be transmitted to the grand secretary, with a return of the members- 
of Albion Lodge, previous to next St. John's day. 

With regard to , however, motives of a kindlier nature, arising from per- 
sonal knowledge on the part of any member of this committee, might urge them to 
a more lenient course, still his carrying the proceedings of a lodge before the bar of 
the public, and more especially when these proceedings had terminated favorably as 
respects himself, require, as has already been observed, a rigorous visitation ; your 
committee, therefore, regret that they cannot recommend any remission of the pen- 
alty •wliieii has l)een imposed. 

Finally, your committee hope that the mixture of raercy with severity will ex- 
tend among the members of the fraternity in Saint .John those feelings of brotherly 
attachment and mutual forbearance, which not only form the brighest characters in 
the mtusonic edifice, but which cheer and sweeten life. The occurrences to which 
this report alludes are deeply to be deplored, not only by every member of the insti- 
tution, but also by the well-meaning part of mankind, and the only cause of satis- 
faction which your committee can conceive, arises from the reflection that all the 
difficulties which have arisen in Saint John are to be attributed to a deviation from 
the excellent rules which the constitutions prescribe. Had they been attended to, 
confusion and disorder could not have arisen. 

The report was received, and the recommendations of the committee 
udopted by grand lodge. 

In connection with the foregoing, St. John's Lodge adopted the fol- 
lowing resolution, December 18, 1827 : 

AfMlred, That one- half of the costs imi)osed upon Bro. Samuel Steplien, a mem- 
ber of Union Lodge, No. 38, in consequence of an improper suit having been 
brought against him by H. N. H. Lugrin, tiien a member of Albion Lodge, No. 52» 
be paid out of the funds of this lodge. 

The outcome of this resolution, which appears to have been joined in 
by Union Lodge, is found in the subjoined letters published in the Cittf 
Gazette,^ by request of a committee of St. John's and Union Lodges, and 

1 The Cilij GazeHe was n weekly newspaper publiBhed in Saint John by W. Bro. William 
Durant, a member and paat master of St. Juhn'a I^dge. 



92 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

whlcli I reproduce as the finale of this peculiar and unfortunate occur- 
rence, viz. : 

St. John, N. B., 19tli December, 1827. 
Mu. Samuel Stkphen : 

Sir: The nienibers of St. .John's Lodge, No. 29, and Union Lodge, No. 38, as well 
as otiier masonic brethren, view with regret the occnrrence of the late misnnder- 
istanding which took plat-e between yourself and one of the members of Albion 
Lodge, No. 52. Being aware of its nature, they feel convinced that the matter 
ought to have been settled within the walls of the lodge room. Finding, however, 
that you have been forced into a public court of justice — contrary to the spirit 
and constitution of freemasonry — in which the jury awarded damages against you, 
the above mentioned lodges have appointed us a joint committee to present you with 
the sum of £57 7s. 7d., being the amount of expenses incurred by you in defending 
the action. The members of St. John's and Union Lodges wish it to be understood 
that their interference in this matter arises from their regard to the regulations of 
masonry, whicli they conceive to be, when properly attended to, fully competent to 
<lirect the fraternity in deciding such disputes as may occur between individual 
members. We have to beg, therefore, your acceptance of the above amount, to be 
iijiplied for the purposes referred to. 

We are, sir, your most obedient servants, 

Benjamin F. Marsh, 
James Rohehtson, Jr. 

St. John, N. B., December 24, 1827. 

Genlhmen: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note dated tlie, 
19th insiant, enclosing the sum of £57 7s. 7d. To receive from so numerous and 
respectable n 1 ody of my fellow-citizens such a marked proof of tlieir approval of 
my conduct iii the case to which it refers is very gratifying. I request that they 
Avill receive my sincere thanks, and believe that while I live and have the honor to 
belong to such a venerable institution, it will ever aflbrd me pleasure to aid its 
benevolent designs and to know that its members keep within the line so clearly 
prescribed by its rules. May harmony ever prevail and every virtue cement tiieni. 
It may not be improper on this occasion to state that, inunediately after the case to 
which you refer had been tried, a committee of the special jury waited upon me, 
stating that that body had unanimously resolved to present me with the amount 
(three pounds) of their fees as jurors. They at the same time expressed their regret 
that the law, in its definition of this and similar cases, prevented them from award- 
ing the costs of the court to be paid by the plaintiff. The following is a statement 
of the costs and consequent expenses incurred in the case, viz. : 

H. N. H. LuoRiN versm Samuel Stephen. 

Costs of court as per bill, £32 Is. 7d. 

Retaining and other fees, 14 

Expenses procuring evidence, etc 10 o 

Costs of defence, 4 11 ^ 

Damages claimed, £1,000 ; damages awarded 1 

£60 78. 7d. 
Cash received from the jury, 3 

£57 78. 7d. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 98 

To you, gentlemen of tlie committee, I tender my best wishes, and, with senti- 
ments of respect, subscribe myself, 

Your very obedient servant, 

SAMUEii Stephen. 
To Messrs. B. F. Marsh and Jas. Robertson, Jr. 

December 27 — The officers, including the roaster, treasurer and 
tvler, elected at the November meeting, were installed as follows: 

Bro. Benjamin F. Marsh, W. M. 
Bro. Alexander Lawrence, S. W. Bro. Jesse M. Stymest, S. D. 

" George A. Garrison, J. W. " William Stout, J. D. 

" Rev. James Cookson, Chap. " Laurence Warren, S. S. 

" Daniel Smith, Treas. " James Rankine, J. S. 

" Iliram Smith, Sec'y. " James G. Lester, Marshal. 

Bro, John Boyer, Tyler. 

" After the installation the lodge, with sister lodges and the royal arch 
chapter, formed in procession, and, after marching through some of the 
principal streets, proceeded to Trinity church at eleven o'clock, when 
our R. W. Bro. Rev. Benjamin G. Gray, grand chaplain, delivered a very 
appropriate discourse, much to the comfort and satisfaction of the brethren, 
from Genesis, 45th chap., 24th verse: 'So he sent his brethren away and 
they departed ; and he said unto them, see that ye fall not out by the way. 
After the sermon a collection was taken up for the benefit of the poor of 
the city." 

" On returning to the lodge room, it was unanimously resolved that 
Bros. Lawrence and Stephen be a committee to wait on the Rev. Bro. 
Gray and respectfully solicit him to furnish us with a coj)y of his sermon 
preached this day, to be published for the benefit of freemasonry, the ex. 
penses attending the same to be paid from the funds of the lodge." 

At five o'clock in the afternoon the brethren sat down to a dinner 
furnished by Bro. Robert Welch, at his hostelry on Church street. 

A. D. 1828. 

February 19 — The lodge received an official visit from R. W. Bro. 
Benjamin L. Peters, D. D. G. M., at whose request the records of the pre- 
ceding year were read. " They were approved by him in terms very 

gratifying." 

August 5 — "Bros. Benjamin Smith, Thomas L. Nicholson, Jesse M. 
Stymest, Alexander Lawrence, Nathan Godsoe and Samuel Watts, com- 
mittee appointed at the July meeting to consider the expediency of pro- 
viding appropriate robes or dresses for the three chief officers of the 
lodge, and also a seat ior the master and past masters, reported that they 
estimated the cost of the robes at about fourteen pounds, and the seat for 



94 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

th<i master and past masters at eighteen pounds; ard, although they 
were of opinion that such furniture would be an ornament which would 
add much to the appearance of the lodge, still from the low state of the 
funds tliey thou>^ht it not expedient to withdraw so large a sum at the 
present time, and recommended that it be postponed ; which recommenda- 
tion was agreed to." 

August 15 — " Bro. Louis Montano, formerly of Mediterranean Lodge, 
No. 22, held at Valencia in Spain, and lately from the United States, 
presented a petition craving assistance from this body. The circum- 
stances that gave rise to his travelling from lodge to lodge for assistance 
was owing to his being obliged to flee from Spain in consequence of the 
persecution towards freemasonry, and he being what is termed *a con- 
stitutionalist.' He left behind a wife, two children, a father and mother, 
all of whom he was anxious to have with him in America, and to this 
end was obtaining means from the brotherhood to enable him to defray 
the expenses of their passage to the land of liberty. From the respectable 
documents, letters of recommendation, etc., relating to his case, and 
necessary on such occasions of charity, the lodge took his peculiar case 
into consideration ; and, notwithstanding the low state of the funds, 
voted him the sum of three pounds to assist him in accomplishing his 
object." 

August 21 — The following correspondence, found in the record of 
this date, contains so much of historical interest that I have transcribed 
it in full. 

The first is a letter written by the provincial grand secretary at Hali- 
fax to the W. M. of St. John's Lodge, under date July 26, 1828, viz. : 

I have it in command to transmit to you a copy of a communication received 
from the M. W. Grand Master of England, together with the resohition of the pro- 
vincial grand lodge' of Nova Scotia relative thereto, which you will be pleased to 
lay before your lodge with the earliest convenience, and report to me their proceed- 
ings thereon for the information of the grand lodge. I have also to call your atten- 
tion to the sixth article of the enclosed communication and request you to inform 
me when these despatches were received. All letters from the lodges to the grand 
secretary must be sent post-paid,'^ as otherwise they will not be received; and lodges 
in arrears for grand lodge dues must settle them before they will be recommended 
for new warrants. 

Circular addressed to R. W. Bro. John Albro, provincial grand master of Nova 
Scotia, by V. W. Bro. H. R. Lewis, president of the board of general purposes of the 
united grand lodge of England, dated at London, March 31, 1828, viz. : 

1 In aU the correspondence and other intercourse between the masonic authorities at Halifax 
and the craft in Saint John, this is the first instance in which the grand body in Nova Scotia is 
designated the "provincial grand lodge." It was invariably styled " the grand lodge." 

2 In those days it was optional whether or not postage on a letter should be prepaid. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. . M 

First. I liftve received the commpr.ds of H. R. H. tlie Duke of Sussex, the M. W, 
grand master, to acknowledge the receipt of a memorial with its enclosures from the 
provincial granH lodge of Nova Scotia, and to make the following communicatioD 

to yon. 

Second. In consequence of the re-union of masons in England in 1813, a code of 
laws was, after matnre and solemn delioeration, established for the general regulation 
of the craft. In the formation, the old laws existing before the separation were 
assumed as the basis, it being impossilde to continue many regulations which had 
been made by the separate grand lodges, to answer particular objects, suited only to 
a state of disunion. And although the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia, acting 
under warrant, a copy of which is annexed to the memorial, had by that document 
the power to elect its own provincial grand master, yet from the period when the 
new constitutions were promulgated, the appointment of a provincial grand master 
was a prerogative of the M. W. G, M. alone; nor does he possess the authority to 
delegate the nomination to any other person or body of masons. This was the law 
from the first institution of tiie office f/f provincial grand master in the year 1726 
until the separation above mentioned, xnd had so continued under one of tlie grand 
lodges without variation ; but, in theither, some warrants were granted similar to 
that held by the P. G. L. of Nova Scctia. Under these circumstances, you will at 
once perceive that it is impossible for His Royal Highness to grant that part of the 
prayer of the memorial which requests " adherence to the method heretofore 
adopted" in the election of a provincial grand master, especially as the appointment 
is not annual, but exists during the pleasure of the grand master of England. 

Third. Provincial grand lodges have, under the sanction of His Royal Highness, 
been established with considerable benefit and advantage to the craft, not only i» 
North America, but also in the East and VVest Indies, as well as on the continent of 
Europe and in the Mediterranean ; and, with a view to prevent any inconvenience 
arising from the distance of foreign district grand lodges and the consequent delay 
in their communicating with the authorities in England, the powers granted them 
are more extensive than those given to provincial grand lodges here. 

Fourth. In regard to the fees payable by provincial grand lodge officers, Hi» 
Royal Highness observes that the memorialists are under mistake, as those quoted 
are applicable (with the exception of the provincial grand master) to persons ap- 
pointed to hold offices in the grand lodge of England ; and as a power is given to 
eacli provincial grand lodge to regulate the payments to be made by their pro- 
vincial grand officers (the restriction as to the sum being applicable only to the pay- 
ment to be made by the individual members of the private lodges), it is apprehended 
tliat no difficulty will be found in selecting eventually proper persons to fill the 
subordinate but important situations, the nomination to which, excepting that of the 
treasurer, rests with tiie provincial grand master. 

Fifth. In the memorial it is stated that, with the single exception of electing a 
provincial grand master, the provincial grand lodge has universally adopted the new 
constitution as their guide. His Royal Highness, however, observes that, notwith- 
standing a period of fourteen vears has elapsed since the union, and of eleven year* 
since the receipt at Nova Scotia of the book of constitutions, no account has yet been 
received of their proceedings, nor any return made from the lodges to whom warrant* 
have been granted by the provincial grand lodge, though a very considerable number 
are reported to be in existence ; nor have any of their membei-s been registered a» 
required in the books of the grand lodge of England. 



96 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Sixth. It is absolutely necessary that every lodge should possess a warrant, for 
which five guineas are de'nanded, and every member must be registered here, for 
which ten shillings and sixpence must be paid. Adverting to the peculiar circum- 
stances of the case, and in order to evince his paternal regard and affection for the 
lodges in Nova Scotia, H. R. H. intends to recommend to the grand lodge, that the 
lodges that have received warrants from the grand lodge of Nova Scotia shall have 
new ones from England and their present members registered free of all charge. 
This indulgence to be granted only to such lodges as shall, within a period of three 
months from the date of this being made known to them, express in writing their 
ilesire to be enrolled on the register of the grand lodge of England. 

Seventh. His itoyal Highness will also relieve them from the annual contribution 
of two shillings for each subscril)ing member without at all affecting their claim to 
the lodge of benovolence; and he has likewise determined that the registering fee 
shall eventually be, for a mason made in any lodge, the sum of ten shillings current 
money of your province, or two Spanish milled dollars; and for a mason previously 
registered in one lodge joining anotlier lodge, the sum of five shillings current 
money or one such milled dollar, such fees to entitle masons to the benefit of registry 
-in the books of the grand lodge. But these payments shall not entitle the brethren 
to receive grand lodge certificates without an additional payment from each brother 
requiring such certificate the sum of six shillings and sixpence sterling. 

Eighth. His Royal Highness has never for a moment conceived that the pro- 
vincial grand lodge would question the powers nor the authority of the grand master 
of England, and he regrets extremely the delay that, from peculiar circumstances, 
has taken place in making the necessary communications to them ; but, firmly rely- 
ing on their zeal, fidelity and attachment to the grand master. His Royal Highness 
proposes, at an early opportunity, to select a proper person for the high and import- 
*int office of provincial grand master of Nova Scotia, etc. In the meantime I have 
received his commands to request that you will, as soon as possible, assemble the 
provincial grand lodge and place before them this despatch, and will also without 
<lelay transmit a copy of it to the several lodges for their information and guidance. 

Ninth. A revised edition of the book of constitutions has been recently published 
under the sanction of H. R. H., which may be had at the office of the grand secre- 
taries at the low price of three shillings. No master can perforin his duties properly 
without being fully acquainted with the laws and regulations of the craft, a knowl- 
edge of which can only be acquired by a frequent perusal of them; and no lodge 
should proceed to business without having a copy of the constitutions before them, 
not only for reference but for the general information of the brethren. 

Tenth. His Royal Highness regrets extremely that any difference should have 
taken place between the grand lodge and Bro. Ward, but H. R. H. observes that, as 
the circumstances which obliged him in the year 1822 to remove the suspension of 
St. John Lodge, No. 265, still exist, it is quite impossible for him to enter into an 
investigation of the case, or to pass any order in regard to it. 

Eleventh. His Royal Highness desires that you will acknowledge this letter at 
jour earliest convenience, and that with the least possible delay you will forward to 
me in detail for his information an account of your proceedings. 

Extract of the proceedings of tiie provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia, held at 
Halifax July 23, 1828 : 

Resolved, That the provincial grand lodge feels grateful to H. R. H. the M. W. 
<irand Master of England for his early attention to the subject of their memorial, 



' ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'87. 97 

• ml altliongli H. R. H. clii' "'»t think himself authorized to assent to all the proposi- 
tions transmitted to him, yet as it is most desirable tiiat the fraternity within this 
jurisdiction should be placed under the protection of the parent grand lodge, whose 
authority they always have acknowledged and conceived themselves to have acted 
under this provincial grand lodge will take immediate measures for carrying into 
fffett the wishes and commands of His ftoyal Highness. 

Resolved, That a copy of the letter received from the grand lodge of England, 
dated March 31, 1828, be immediately transmitted to each lodge witliin the jurisdic- 
tion of this provincial grand lodge. 

There is no entry in the minutes of this or any subsequent communi- 
cation of the lodge to show that the brethren of St. John's Lodge ex- 
ijre^sed any opinion upon the contents of this letter from the grand lodge 
of England. Possibly the movement towards the erection of an independ- 
ent grand lodge in the Province of New Brunswick, in the year 1829^ 
may have originated from it. 

A. D. 1829. 
The officers for this year were : 

Bro. Alexander Lawrence, W. M. 

Bro. George A. Garrison, S. W. Bro. Jesse M. Stymest, S. D. 

" Hiram Smiti., J. W. ^ " William Stout, J. D. 

" Daniel Smith, Treas. " Andrew Garrison, S. S. 

" Samuel Watts, Sec'y. " Stinson Patten, J. S. 

Bro. John Boyer, Tyler. 

January 28 — St. John's Lodge, assisted by Union Lodge, No. 38, 
gave a ball in the masonic hall, corner of King and Charlotte streets. 
It was the first entertainment of the kind given under the banners of the 
lodge, and was reported to be a very successful affair, " largely and res- 
pectably patronized." 

March .S— "On motion of W. Bro. Robert Payne, it was resolved 
that the lodge, deeply lamenting the melancholy death of their late worthy 
and much respected Bro. Jesse M. Stymest, who was lost on his passage 
from this city to Liverpool, England, in the ship "Jane," do go into- 
mourning for the space of three months." " ■ 

May 19 — "It was moved by W. Bro. Alex. Lawrence, and resolved, 
that the sutn of five pounds be given to Bro. George Keith to assist him 
in defraying the expenses of recovering his two daughters, supposed to 
be amongst the Indians." 

These girls were taken by the Indians (Micmacs) to the eastern part 
of the province, where they remained in captivity many years. They 
grew to womanhood, and became so much attached to the tribe of their 
captors that they married among them and raised families. After the 



98 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

lapse of a number of years tlieir whereabouts was discovered, and one of 
them was induced to return to the home of her childhood ; but Indian 
life and ways had become so attractive to her that civilization had lost its 
charms, and she went back to the forest and the wigwam. 

July 7 — "Read a communication from the provincial grand lodge of 
Nova Scotia, bearing date May 29, 1829, accompanying despatches from 
the grand lodge of England, dated at fmeniason's hall, London, March 
10, 1829, and April 2, 1829, copies of which are as follows: 

Halifax, May 29, 1829. 

W. Jirolhtr: I liave the pleasure to announce to you, for the information of your 
lo<lge, tliat H. R. H. the M. W. (irand Master of England, lias heen graciously 
{)leuHed to appoint the R. W. John Alhro, Esquire, provincial ^rand master for Nova 
Scotia, and that he has accordingly taken charge of tlie fraternity in this country 
from the 25th instant. All communications of a masonic nature are in future to be 
made to the provincial grand secretary, and to be sent postage paid. Agreeably to 
the directions of the R. W. provincial grand master, copies of several despatches 
which have been received from the grand secretaries of the grand lodge of England 
are herewith subjoined, and I have to request that, in obedience to the M. W. grand 
master's directions, contained in the despatch of March 31, 1828, your lodge will 
immediately provide itself with the new book of constitutions, and in future strictly 
conform to the rules laid down therein. 

I am, etc., etc., Adolphus Vikth, P. G.S. 

J'o the Munter of St. John'8 Lodye, No* 29, ' \ 

at Saint John, N. B. . ■. 

[Copy.] 

FnEKMASONs' Hall, London, March 10,1821). 
jB, W. Brother: It has long afforded H. R. H. the Duke of Sussex the greatest 
satisfaction to learn, l)y several conununipations which have been recently received 
from the lodges at Nova Scotia, that the brethren there truly appreciate the fraternal 
regard and affection which II. R. II. have ever borne towards the craft in general, 
and which in a particular degree dictate the sentiments conveyed in the despatch of 
March 31, 1828 ; and we are now commanded to acquaint you that warrants have 
been granted by H. R. II. to a number of lodges, and that the brethren, according to 
the lists received from Nova Scotia, have been registered in the grand lodge books 
here. The absence of H. R. H. from London for some time past on account of his 
health, and the important public business which now naturally occupies his time, 
liave prevented him from selecting a proper pei-son for the situation of provincial 
grand master; but H. R. H. will direct his attention to this point at the earliest 
possible period. As, however, considerable apprehension appears to be entertained 
at Nova Scotia from delay, we are directed to observe that any of the past provin- 
cial grand masters are fully competent to preside at provincial grand lodge. As 
regularity of proceeding is essential in the craft, we are directed to acquaint you 
that a list of the brethren requiring a warrant for a new lodge must accompany 
€very petition, specifying the lodges in which the brethren were initiated, etc.; 
and the registering fee must at the same time be forwarded to us, viz. : for each 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 99 

brother not already registered in tlie books of the grand lodge, ten Hliillings current 
nionev of your province, or two Spanish milled dollars; for u mason previously 
reKlstered, the sum of two shillings and sixpence current money, or half a Spanish 
milled dollar. Yod will of course be careful that the sum of five guineas be rt- 
inilted with every such petition. Enclosed you will receive a copy of a letter which 
lias this day been addresse»l to each of the several lodges at Nova Scotia recently 
acknowledged by the grand lodge of England. 

With every sentiment of fraternal regard we remain, R. W. Brother, 
Your obedient servants and brothers, 

Wir.r.iAM II. White,! ,, „ 
ElMVAUDH Habi'er, / '• ' • 

To V. W. Adolpkuit Vielh, Provincial O. . 

Secretary, Nova Scoliu. 

[Copy.] 

Fkeemasons' II all, London, March 10, 1H29. 

W. Master: In transmitting to you the accompanying warrant for your lodge, we 
are commanded by II. R. H. the M. W. Grand master, to call to your notice that 
part of the book of constitutions which directs that no lodge shall, on any pretence 
whatever, give more than one degree to a brother on the same day, nor shall a higher 
<legree in masonry be conferred on any brother at a less interval than one month 
t'roni his receiving a j)reviou8 degree. A strict observance of this rule being of the 
utmost importance to the credit and interest of the craft, you will perceive that it is 
enjoined under the severest penalty, namely, that of the forfeiture of the warrant, as 
no emergency can justify a violation of it. Your particular attention is likewise 
required to .\rt. 22, page G5, and Art. 2, page 72. 

Enclosed you will receive a copy of the form in which the returns are to be an- 
nually made to the grand lodge and to your provincial grand lodge respectively. 
You will, of course, understand that for any brother made in or joining your Idge 
since the return received from yoU vi.*h vhe appKctaion <"or the varnjnt which is 
now granted, the fees noticed in th^,s.evtntji para^rrap). of t^\e dosii-itch cf March 31, 

1828, ' ' ' ' ■ ■ ^^- ' ' 

cations 




your lodge in future will be such as to shew that the consideration which H. K. H. 

hiis evinced in so particular a manner towards the brethren at Nova Scotia has not 

been improperly bestowed, and is duly appreciated by the craft. 
We are, W. M., your obedient servants, 

William H. White, I 
Edwards Harper, J 

To the W. Master of Lodye. 

[Copy.] 

Freemasons' Hall, London, April 2, 1829. 

V. W. Brother : I have received the commands of the M. W. grand master, the 

Duke of Sussex, to acquaint, for the information of the R. W. Bro. John Albro, 

Esquire, and of the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia, that H. R. H. having 

taken into consideration the memorial of the provincial grand lodge, under date the 



100 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

3rd December last, and from the infjiiiries made, being fully satisfied of the high 
character and masonic zeal of the K. W. Bro. Albro, H. R. II. has much pleasure in 
appointing him to the important office of provincial grand master for Nova Scotia, 
relying with confidence upon his continued exertions to promote the interests and 
uphold the principles of the order, and the regularity of the lodges committed to his 
charge. In the Iftter of the tenth ultimo you were informed of the lodges for which 
the M. W. grand master had directed warrants to be prepared. By yesterday's post 
some other applications arrived ; these I shall have the honor to lay before H. R. H. 
in the course of a few days, and the warrants of all shall be forwarded by the very 
first opportunity, as well as the grand n:aster's patent for the R. W. Bro. Albro, the 
fees payable upon which will be twenty-three guineas sterling. 

I beg to subscribe myself, V. W. Brother, your obediant servant and faithful 
brother, for mvself and Bro. Harper. 

William H. White, G. S. 
V. W. Bro. Adolphus Vielh, Provincial 
O. Secretary, Nova Scotia. 

At this meeting the "sub-committee of correspondence" for establish- 
ing a grand lodge in the province of New Brunswick submitted a circular 
letter, copies of which had been addressed to all lodges in the province, 

as follows: 

[Copy.] 

Saint John, N. B., July 2, 1829. 

Worshipful Brother: We are directed by the committee appointed to manage the 
arrangements for having a grand lodge established in this province to acquaint you 
that they have taken into serious consideration the circular of the grand lodge of 
Nova Scotia, dated the 29th May last, together with the despatches which it had 
received from the grand lodge of England, under dates March 10 and April 2 last, 
of all of which we suppose you have received Copies. * 

In refene-Hce ts) 'heae }v$ l,'ave,.'in^ddilionjtii€ireJ^o, received a communication from 
the provincii'Ugra.id8e6r3tary,r6Sfjevting*Jw.triaMer above referred to, from which, 
when taken into consideration^ \vith ,t|)e pthp,r docjinaents, it appears evident that if 
the fraternj.y heie> a/e tq tf ust to« th<3 r^comjn{>,n{laf^ion of the grand lodge of Nova 
Scotia for obtaining the early appointment ol a grand master for this province, they 
will be disappointed ; for there appears to be on its part a reluctance to grant the 
said recommendation i»n;il the lodges shall I;ave paid up their arrears, and this, it is 
well known, would be at the present moment, in the present state of the country and 
from other circumstances, next to an impossibility. 

But another, and, in point of principle, a stronger objection presents itself. Ac- 
cording to the constitutions under which all the lodges in the [irovince work, and 
which was sent them by the grand lodge of Nova Scotia, from whom they hold their 
warrants, eleven shillings and sixpence was to be paid at the making of every new 
mason. Now it is clearly pointed out in one of the letters of March 10 last that tlie 
master of every lodge must, on his applying to the grand lodge of England for a 
warrant, forward with his petition live guineas for the warrant itself, and two dollars 
for every member of his lodge whose name has not been previously registered in its 
books, and he must also remit two dollars hereafter for every new made brother. 

If these charges and rules are to be enforced by the grand lodge of England and 
submitted to by the lodges here, who remain still accountable to the grand lodge of 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. tOI 

Nova Scotia for the payment of their regular dues, to say the least of their situation, 
it would surely be considered a hard one; for it is a well known fact that the grand 
lodge of Nova bcotia has not made any return to the grand lodge of England since 
the vear 1813, so that, of course, no masons in this province since that date have 
obtained their registration. 

Let a calculation on these principes be made of the unioimt of money which each 
lodge would be ie<inired to remit (including the expense of a patent for a provincial 
grand master), and it will be found that nearly five hundred pounds would go out of 
the province at once in order to place the craft upon the footing which has been 
contemplated. 

Freemasonry we all acknowledge to be a charitable institution, expressly founded 
on the principles of benevolence, and every worthy brother cheerfully submits to its 
precepts and injunctions, for the purpose of promoting its designs by aiding its funds 
when regularly called upon to do so. One question, then, arises on this broad basis: 
Have the dues of our lodges to the grand lodge of Nova Scotia been applied to 
charitable purposes? This has never been made known to us. ]t can, however, it 
is believed, be asserted with truth that few, if any of them, were ever expended in 
this country. But !i new question now exists, and pretty much on the same grounds, 
in consequence of the demands of the grand lodge of England. If the lodges here 
should go to the expense of obtaining new warrants, and the paying of initiation fees 
for those meraberg whose names now stand on their books, as of those also who may 
in futin-e be admitted, what is to become of all thai money? Can they ever expect 
to receive an account of its expenditure from the grand lodge of England ? 

It is not urged that in part it may not be applied to charitable purposes; buf> 
from the difficulty which would exist in corresponding with the grand lodge of Eng- 
land, it is natural to think that they could not, through it, have it in their power to 
assist objects of charity coming under their own notice from the funds of the lodges, 
a very great proi»ortion of them being swallowed up in grand lodge dues, over which 
they can never have any control. 

From these and many other considerations which might be brought into notice, 
a new feeling not only among members of the committee, but also among many 
members of the craft here, has been excited on the subject, and it is now very gener- 
ally considered that the establishment of a provincial grand lodge, under the regula- 
tions laid down by the grand lodge of England, would operate as a detriment rather 
than as an advantage to the general interests of the fraternity. It would not possess 
the power of granting warrants to private lodges; while, at the same time, private 
lodges would be under the necessity of making returns to it and also to the grand 
lodge of England, the expense of which, together with the payment of fees for new 
masons, would tend to depress the masonic funds of charity in this country to such a 
degree that the main object of the institution would in a great measure be defeated. 

The committee, therefore, under these impressions and after having weighed to 
the best of their ability all the matters connected with the circumstances of the case, 
have directed us to inform you that, as a measure both of propriety and necessity, 
they would recommend to the officers and members of the different lodges of this 
province the returning of their warrants to the grand lodge of Nova Scotia, and to 
form themselves into a Grand Lodge entirely unconnected with that of England or 
any other place. 

As to the right of the lodges to do so there can be no question. They have the 
example of England, Scotland and Ireland before them as precedents. In each of 
a 



102 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

these coiintrits there existed at no very remote date two grand lodges, separate and 
distinct from eacl> otiier in their operation and authority.' In England and Scot- 
land a union lias taken place between them, but it was by mutual consent; not by 
either claiming jurisdiction over the other, or by the useof any compulsory measures 
to etlect it. 

Witli regard to the utility of such a step, what has been stated respecting the 
control and expenditure of fimds must be conclusive, it is believed, in the breast of 
eveiy man who, upon benevolent principles, becomes a mason. 

The committee have, in conclusion, to request that, if not inconvenient, you will 
take the earliest opportunity of bringing this subject before a meeting of your lodge, 
in order that as little delay as possible may take place in bringing the afl'air to a 
close. Have the goodness, then, to send an early answer, as it is the intention of the 
committee, should the general feeling be favorable to the above mentioned proposi- 
tion, to call a meeting of the delegates of the diflerent lodges, to elect office-bearers 
for the proposed grand lodge, to frame a constitution for its government, and to 
attend to the concerns of the business generally. 

We remain, W. Brother, yours fraternally, 

James Rouertson, Jr., 
Henrv CHonu, 
Sub-committee of Correspondence. 
To the W. Master of St. John's Lodge, No. 29. 

" It was moved by Bro. Wni. W. Enislie, seconded by Bro. Hiram 
Smith, and carried : That the sentiments expressed in the circular letter 
of the sub-committee of correspondence be adopted as the sentiments of 
this lodge; and further resolved, that the worshipful master intimate the 
same to the sub-committee as early as possible." 

August 4 — The lodge haviug at a previous communication agreed to 
present an honorary certificate to W. Bro. Benjamin F. Marsh, the formal 
presentation took place this evening, the scope and purport of which are 
contained in the address of W. Bro. Alex. Lawrence, W. M. of the 
lodge, and the reply of Bro. Marsh. The W. M. said : 

In presenting you with this certificate in behalf of the officers and members of 
St. John's Lodge, No. 29, as a memorial of their grateful feelings for your long, 
zealous and useful services in the same, it atlbrds me much pleasure to say that, in 
the discharge of the duties of the various offices which you have been called on to 
fill, they feel satisfied that your sole aim has been to raise the lodge to the high 
standing to which it has arrived. I am happy to have the opportunity of present- 
ing you with this diploma, more especially a« I am confident you have the wannest 
wishes of every member of this lodge for your future happiness and welfare. 

• To which Bro. Marsh replied : 

Your very affectionate address, and thejionorary testimony of your regard which 
accompanies it, call forth my grateful acknowledgments. Were I capable of doing 
justice to the feelings excited by your approbation of my past services, and your 
fraternal wishes for my future happiness, I would endeavour to thank you ; but to 

1 The committee were evidently unncquHintcd with the hiitory of masonry in all of these 
countrief. 



.' ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 103 

minds disposed as yours are, it will suffice to observe that your address meets a most 
grateful reception, and is reciprocated in all its wishes with unfeigned sincerity. 
That St. John's Lodge may continue in its present highly respected state is my 
ardent wish. . 

September 1 — A letter was received from the provincial grand secre- 
tary of Nova Scotia summoning the master, past masters and wardens of 
the lodge " to attend a provincial grand lodge at Halifax, on the first 
Wednesday in November ensuing, to instal the R. W. provincial grand 
master, and frame such bye-laws and legulations as may be necessary for 
the future government of the craft in the masonic district, in conformity 
to the new constitutions published by authority of the united grand lodge 
of England in the year 1827." 

December 28 — The lodge met at five o'clock in the afternoon and in- 
stalled the ofiicers for the ensuing year, viz. : 

Hro. Benjamin F. Marsh, W. M. 
Bro. Hiram Smith, S. W. Bro. Joseph Lingley, S. D. 

" Samuel Watts, J. W. " David Hogg, J. D. 

" Daniel Smith, Treas. " Silas DeForest, S. S. 

" Andrew (Jarrison, Sec'y. " George Broadbrook, J. S. 

Bro. John Boyer, Tyler. 

A letter was received from W, Bro. James Robertson, Junr., grand 
secretary, informing the lodge that, on the 4th day of November ultimo, 
at a convention of delegates representing several lodges in the province, 
a grand lodge in and for the province of New Brunswick had been 
formally constituted, and the following brethren chosen office bearers 
thereof, viz. : 

M. W. Bro. The Rev. Benjamin G. Gray, D. D., Grand Master. 

K. W. Bro. David B. Wetmore, Esq., Senior Grand Warden. 

R. W. Bro. Samuel Frye, M. D., Junior Grand Warden. 

R. W. and Kev. Bro. Oliver Arnold, ) ,, ,,,,,. 
„ ... , ^ ,, - All r ♦jrand C haplauis. 

R. >V. and Rev. Bro. Jerome Alley, I 

R. W. Bro. Henry Chubb, (irand Treasurer. 

R. VV. Bro. James Robertson, Junr., (irand Secretary. 

VV. Bro. Th<.mas L. Nicholson, Grand Marshal. 

W. Bro. Alexander Lawrence, Senior Grand Deacon. 

W. Bro. Thomas Nisbet, Junior Grand Deacon. 

Bro, Archibald Dougherty, (irand Pursuivant. 

Bro. John Boyer, Grand Tyler. 

The full particulars of this grand lodge will be found under the head- 
ing " Early Grand Lodge." 

By recjuest of the grand secretary, conveyed in the letter announcing 
the formation of this grand lodge, " it was ordered that the sum of five 
pounds be aj)propriai.?d to assist in defraying the expanses in promoting 
the object in view, of forming a grand lodge in New Brunswick." 



J04 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

A. D. 1830. 

March 2 — A committee appointed at the previous meeting of the 
lodge to call upon the landlord for a reduction in the rent of the hall, 
and, in the event of his refusal, to engage another place of meeting, " re- 
ported that they had agreed with Bro. Lawson, the landlord, to continue 
in the present premises at the sum of twenty shillings per night." 

December 27 — The following officers were installed : 

Bro. Hiram Smith, W. M. 
Bro. Benjamin F. Marsh, S. W. Bro. Samuel Watts, Sec'y. 

" Andrew Garrison, J. W. " Joseph Lingley, S. D. 

" Daniel Smith, Treas. " George Broadbrook, J. D. 

Bro. John Boyer, Tyler. 

,.i. I). 1831. 

January 4 — Bros. Hiram Smith, Benj. F, Marsh and Wm. Hutchin- 
son were appointed a committee " to obtain information as to the prob- 
able expense of erecting a tomb for the reception of deceased masons 
and their families." 

March 1 — A committee was appointed "to arrange and file the 
papei-s of the lodge." 

There was no meeting of the lodge held between March 1 and Novem- 
ber 2 of this year. 

December 6 — Seven widows and two brethren received assistance 
from the lodge funds in sums ranging from three pounds to five pounds 
each. 

December 27 — The following officers were installed: 

Bro. Robert Payne, W. M. 
Bro. John Haws, S. W. Bro. Israel Merritt, Sec'y. 

" Joseph Lingley, J. W. " James G. Lester, S. D. 

" Nathan Godsoe, Treas. " Robert Cunard, J. D. 

Bro. John Boy ;r, Tyler. 

A. D. 1S32. 

May 1 — The initiation fee was reduced from five pounds five shil- 
lings to three pounds ten shillings, " fs that was the amount established 
by Albion Lodge." 

December 27 — Officers were installed as follows : 

Bro. James Reed, W. M. 

Bro. John Haws, S. W. Bro. James G. Lester, 8. D. 

" Joseph Lingley, J. W. " Robert Cunard, J. D. 

" Nathan Godsoe, Treas, >, " John Murray, S. S. 

Israel Merritt, Spf^'j . " Israel Lawson, J. S. 

Bro. JoL;i lUJ/er, Tyler. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 105 

The members of the lodge dined together this day, but no particulars 
of the affair are given in the records. 

The meetings of the lodge were held regularly this year ; they were 
sparsely attended, and no business of special importance transacted. 

A. D. 1833. 

The meetings of this year and the business transacted were devoid of 
interest. 

October 3 — The lodge attended the funeral of the late Bro. James 
Grundy, aged 46 years, who was initiated January 7, 1817. " The im- 
pressive ritual in honor of the dead was impressively performed by the 
W. M., assisted by a large assemblage of the craft, who testified their 
sorrow in the most marked manner." 

And on December 1, according to the record," the brethren assembled 
at the lodge room, formed in procession and proceeded to the old burial 
ground east of King square, and buried the remains of the late W. Bro. 
David Waterbury with the usual masonic honors. The brethren turned 
out in large numbers and exhibited profound sorrow and respect for the 
memory of the deceased, v;ho had filled the chair of the lodge and was 
an honored and active member for many years." 

The biography of Bro. Waterbury is included in this volume among 
other past masters of the lodge. 

December 27 — The following were installed into ofiice, viz. : 

Bro. James Reed, W. M. 
Bro. Joseph Lingley, S. W. Bro. Robert Cunard, S. D., 

" Israel Merritt, J. W. " John Murray, J. D. 

" Nathan Godsoe, Treas. " Israel Lawson, S. S. 

" James G. Lester, Sec'y. " Joshua B. Williams, J. S. 

Bro. John Boyer, Tyler. 

A. D. 1834. 

January 7 — The affiliation fee was reduced from fifteen shillings to 
ten shillings, " that being the sum charged by Albion Lodge." 

June 24 — "The lodge was convened, according to resolution of the 
joint committee of this and Albion Lodge, for the purpose of celebrating 
St. John's day. The brethren attended divine service at Trinity church, 
and listened to a most excellent and appropriate discourse delivered by 
the Kev. Bro. Benjamin G. Gray, rector, from 25th chapter of Matthew, 
3oth and part of 40th verses, viz. : ' For I was an hungered and ye gave 
me uieat ; I was thirsty and ye gave me drink ; I was a stranger and ye 
took me in.' * ♦ * « Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the 



106 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.' The reverend 
brother was pleased to return his thanks to the craft generally for their 
orderly and serious conduct during the services." 

A collection was taken up for the benefit of the poor of the city. 

October 25 — " The lodge was convened at one o'clock for the purpose 
of attending the funeral of our late worthy Bro. Edward Lockhart, which 
duty was duly performed by the brethren, together with a number of the 
members of our sister lodges. Union and Albion, for which kind attention 
the oflUcers and members of this lodge returned their grateful thanks." 
Bro. Lockhart joined the lodge May 1, 1832. 

November 18 — "In consequence of our W. M., Bro. James Reed, 
being about to leave this province for England, the lodge was convened 
for the purpose of petitioning the grand lodge of England to take into 
consideration the present state of our warrant (some doubt having arisen 
as to the regularity of the same), and abide by their decision ; whether 
to grant us leave to obtain a new warrant or to allow us to serve under 
our present one. It being unanimously decided to petition the grand 
lodge of England on the subject, the following committee was appointed 
to draw up the petition, to wit : Bros. Thomas L. Nicholson, Henry Chubb, 
Nathan Godsoe, James Reed, and James G. Lester." 

December 9 — The lodge having failed to choose officers at the regular 
communication in November, elected the following at this meeting : 

Bro. Rotxjrt Payne, W. M. 

Bro. Joseph Lingley, S. W. Bro. Robert Cunard, S. D. 

" Israel Merritt, J. W. " John Murray, J. D. 

" Nathan Go<lsoe, Treas. " Israel Lawson, S. S. 

" James G. Lester, Sec'y. " James Hinds, J. S. 

Bro. John Boyer, Tyler. 

There is no record of any installation ceremony December 27. 

A. D. 1835. 

Sepf^mber 25 — "The lodge assembled at one o'clock, when a funeral 
procession was formed and marched to the grave, where the remains of 
the late W. Bro. James Reed, })ast master of the lodge, were buried with 
the customary ceremonial of the craft." 

December 1 — Only nine brethren, including the tyler, were present 
at this meeting. The following resolution was adcipted : 

Retolred, That Bros. Robert Payne, Israel Merritt and William Hutchinson be a 
committee to communicate forthwith with the grand lodge of England, requesting 
that body to grant us a new warrant (if the present warrant be not renewed), and 
that they embody a petition in due form to that effect. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 107 

An election of officers for the ensuing year was held, with the follow- 
ing result : 

Bro. James G. Lester, W. M. 
Bro. Israel Merritt, S. W. Bro. Francis McKenna, Seo'y. 

" James Hinds. J. W. " Jolin Murray, S. D. 

" William Hutchinson, Treas. " John Boyer, Tyler. 

The reason for failing to elect a full complement is not stated. Evi- 
dently there was a lack of interest on the part of the members . nd a 
strong tendency to cease working the lodge. During the year 1835 only 
two regular and two emergent communications were held, at each of 
which there was only a limited attendance. 

From the year 1826, the date of the appointment of a district deputy 
grand master in Saint John, up to the year 1835, the election of officer* 
had been held at the regular communication in November, and the in- 
stallation on the 27th December following. 

The grand lodge, formed November 4, 1829, had no doubt ceased to- 
exist on the day of its inauguration or very shortly afterward, as no 
record or other document appeared to show that it fulfilled any of the 
functions of its organization. Union Lodge ceased working about the 
year 1831. Albion Lodge had surrendered the warrant held from the 
provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia and received a substitute from the 
united grand lodge of England, and now St. John's Lodge was seeking 
to obtain one from the same body. ' 

A marked falling off had taken place in the attendance at the stated 
meetings of the lodge ; but few candidates presented themselves for initia- 
tion, and there appeared to be a want of zeal and interest in its welfare 
and prosperity. This unfortunate state of affairs seemed to arise from 
two sources. In the first place, the united grand lodge of England had 
made a demand upon the lodge for a i*eturn of all the members on the 
roll and the payment of registration fees for all, a demand impossible for 
the lodge to meet. And in the second place, the " Morgan " excitement 
had created such a bitter anti-masonic feeling in the community, especially 
in church circles, that many brethren were compelled or induced to with- 
draw. Under these circumstances the membership of the lodge became 
very much reduced, rendering it difficult to hold meetings or to obtain 
sufficient support to carry on the work and meet ordinary expenses. 

A. D. 1836. 
January 14 — This was an emergent communication, with the follow- 
ing members in attendance : James G. Lester, W. M. ; Israel Merritt, 
S. W. ; James Hinds, J. W. ; William Hutchinson, Treas. ; Francis Mc- 
Kenaa, Sec'y ; John Murray ; Angus McAfee ; Israel Lawson ; Joseph 
Linglej'; John Richardson ; and John Boyer, Tyler. 



108 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

" The W. M. presented a petition for the consideration of the mem- 
bers present, under the title of ' the collection petition of St. John's 
Lodge,' which was accepted by a show of hands." 

" It was proposed by the W. M., and accepted, that all members in 
good standing, and also all members in arrears of dues to the lodge, who 
shall sign their names to the petition for a new warrant, shall continue 
their membership under the new warrant." 

These entries are written on a slip of paper found lying loose in the 
record book, and are vague and indefinite. The collection petition would 
seem to refer to a petition or agreement to raise funds among the members 
to liquidate the indebtedness of the lodge and provide means to procure 
a warrant from the united grand lodge of England. 

There is no record or memorandum of any meeting being held between 
January 14, 1836, and May 19, 1837. From this it may be reasonably 
surmised that the lodge failed for the first time in its history to hold an 
election of office bearers. 

Although seemingly unable to obtain sufficient attendance to carry on 
the regular work of the lodge, the members did not debar themselves the 
pleasures of the table, as appears from tiie following extract taken from 
a local newspaper: 

St. John's Lodge and guests, to the number of forty, celebrated the anniversary 
of St. John the Kvungelist (December 27, 1836), by dining together at Bro. James 
2sethery's, Clnircli street. W. Bro. Nehemiah Merritt presided, assisted by W. Bro. 
James G. Lester, \V. M., and Bro. Wm. Ilutcliinson, treasurer. A full list of toasts 
was honored, followed by music, in addition to which a number of songs added 
greatly to the pleasures of tbe evening. Among the toasts were: 

1. The memory of St John the Evangelist, the eminent patron of freemasonry, 
whose anniversary we celebrate. 

2. His Majesty the King, grand patron of the society. 

3. His Royal Highness the D\ike of Sussex, grand master of England, and the 
other members of the royal family who are members of the craft. 

4. The Queen, and the female branches of the royal family. 

5. The United Grand Lodge of England, and the grand lodges of Ireland and 
Scotland. 

6. The Clergy: all workmen at the same temple. May the sound of axe, ham- 
mer, or other iron tool of sectarian animosity never disturb the harmony of their 
operations. 

7. The Royal Arch Chapter of Saint John, New Brunswick.' 

8. The Albion Lmlge of Saint John, New Brunswick. Tune — Should auld 
acquaintance be forgot t 

9. Our Fair Sisters : may they always keep their hearts securely tyled by virtue, 
10. The Third Degree: the grave in which we should bury the corruption of our 

nature, and the womb from which springs the best tenets of our society. 

11. Masonic Charity: the sons and daughters of affliction know best how to ap- 
preciate it. 

1 Cark'ton Boyal Arch Chapter, No. 47. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. 109 

12. The memory of Robert Burns, the bard and the mason. Tune — Burns' 
Farewell. 

Vohinteered by Bro. Haws — The Masonic Ship, laden with virtue, benevolence 
and charity; may she wave her banners on the broad sea of creation and find a 
hearty welcome in every port. 

These toasts afford a good idea of the sentiments prevailing at masonic 
dinners fifty-seven years ago. 

A. D. 1837. 

May 19 — The final entry in the record of the lodge as St. John's 
Lodge, No. 29, on the roll of the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia, 
is dated May 19, 1837. It was an emergency communication, at which 
the following brethren were present: James G. Lester, \V. M. ; John 
Haws, P. M. ; Nathan Godsoe as S. ^y. ; James Hinds, J, W. ; Israel 
Lawson as treasurer ; Edmund A. Price as secretary ; John Richardson 
as S. D. ; Angus McAfee as J. D. ; and John Boyer, tyler. 

The following is a full transcript of the record : 

The lodge having by resolution carried on December 1, 183'), resolved to petition 
the grand lodge of England for a new warrant, and the grand master. His Royal 
Highness the Duke of Sussex, having been pleased to comply with the request, and 
tlie warrant having been received as St. John's Lodge, No. G32, tliis communica- 
tion was siunmoned for the purpose of closing the books of the old lodge and dis- 
posing of the paraphernalia belonging thereto. 

Proposed by Bro. Nathan Godsoe, and seconded by Bro. Israel Lawson, that the 
property and paraphernalia belonging to St. John's Lodge, No. 29, on the registry of 
Nova Scotia, be transferred to St. John's Lodge, No. 632, under the registry of Eng- 
'and, for the use of the latter, in consideration that the lodge under the new warrant 
sliall pay all the debts due by the lodge under the old warrant. Which resolution 
was carried unanimously. 

Resolved unanimously, That the W. M. enclose the old warrant forthwith to the 

grand or deputy grand master of Nova Scotia, by some good private conveyance, and 

inform him that we have no further use for it, owing to our lodge having received a 

new warrant from the grand lodge of England. 

We agree to the foregoing resolutions. 

Jamks Ct. Lester, W^ M. ■ 

Nathan Godsoe, S. W. pro tern. ♦ 

James Hinds, J. W. 

Edmund A. Price, Secretary pro tern. 

Nothing further offering for the good of masonry, the lodge was closed in due 
form and with solemn prayer, forever, under the present warrant. 

Edmund A. Price, Secretary pro (em. 

A copy of the first resolution carried this evening was handed by the secretary 

to W. Bro. John Haws. t, inc.. 

Edmund A. Price, Secretary pro tern. 

This close's the first era in the history of the lodge, a period extending 
over a space t/ thirty -five years. The number and names of members at 



110 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

the time of surrendering the Nova Scotia warrant cannot be given, as I 
failed to find any book or entry to afford such information. The total 
number added to the roll during those thirty-five years was three hun- 
dred and thirty -five — one hundred and eighteen by affiliation and two 
hundred and seventeen by initiation. This gives an average of nearly 
ten each year; a very fair showing for a town containing a circumscribed 
number of adult inhabitants, and proving that the lodge had a good share 
of work. The total number of meetings held in the whole period was five 
hundred and ninety-six. From 1802 to 1831 inclusive the average each 
year was nineteen, and from 1832 to 1837 inclusive, the small number of 
seven. The cause of this falling off has already been explained. Up t(» 
1831, however, the communications were held with remarkable regular- 
ity and with a good attendance of members and visitors. 

The masonic contemporaries of St. John's Lodge, in the city of Saint 
John, were Union Lodge, No. 38, constituted in the year 1814, and 
Albion Lodge, No. 52, constituted A. D. 1825. It seems unaccountable 
that no reference is made in the records of the lodge to the formation of 
these lodges, especially as both of them swarmed from St. John's Lodge. 
One would readily suppose that such important occurrences would have 
received at least a passing notice. 

Carleton Chapter, another and the oldest contemporary, was organized 
A. D. 1805, under authority of the warrant of St. John's Lodge. The 
history and labors of this body are closely interwoven with those of the 
lodge. Union Lodge apparently ceased operations about the year 1831. 
Albion Lodge exchanged the warrant it received from the provincial 
grand lodge of Nova Scotia for one issued by the united grand lodge of 
England, some eight years prior to a similar exchange on the part of St. 
John's Lodge, and Carleton Chapter, having in the year 1822 obtained a 
warrant from the supreme grand royal arch chapter of Scotland, had 
under such warrant a contiimous career until 1887, when it came under 
the jurisdiction of the grand chapter of New Brunswick. 

The provincial grand lo ge of Nova Scotia, under the unlimited 
authority granted to it by the Alholl Grand Lodge, issued in all fifteen 
warrants for the erection of lodges in New Brunswick, as follows : 

Hiram, No. 17, Saint John, opened under dispensation, 1784, 
and under warrant, 1786. 

St. George's, No. 19, Maugerville, warrant dated 1789. 

Sion, No. 21, Kingston " 1792. 

Solomon's, No. 22, Fredericton " 1792. 

Hiram York, No. 23, Frederiction " 1793. 

St. John's, No. 29, Saint John " 1801. 

Midian, No. 31, Kingston, " 1805. 

Orphans' Friend, No. 34, St. Stephen,.. " 1809. 



8T. JOHN'S LODGE, 1802-'37. Ill 

Eastern Star, No. 37, St. Andrew's, warrant dated 1814. 

Union, No. 38, Saint John, " 1814. 

Fortitude, No. 42, Miraraiclii, " 1819. 

St. Lawrence, No. 43, Richibucto, " 1820. 

Morning Star, No. 46, Woodstock, " 1822. 

Golden Rule, No. 50, Hopewell, " 1824. 

Albion, No. 52, Saint John " 1825. : 

In addition to these. New Brunswick, No. 541, was constituted at 
Frederiction, A. D. 1789, under a warrant from the mother grand lodge 
of England. 

At this date (1837) only three of these lodges were in existence — St. 
John's, Midian ' and Albion. In nearly every case their extinction was 
caused by the "Morgan" excitement, and inability or unwillingness to 
meet the demand made by the united grand lodge for payment for a new 
warrant and also registration fees for all members on the rolls. 

We learn from the records that during this period an attempt wa» 
made to erect New Brunswick into a separate masonic jurisdiction by the 
formation of an independent grand lodge; but through circumstances 
which remain unexplained, it had only an ephemeral existence, and the 
province remained as heretofore, subordinate to Nova Scotia. 

The provincial grand lodge, chartered by the ancients, and exercising 
jurisdiction over Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, came into existence 
in the year 1784. After an imperious sway of forty-five yeare, during 
which it issued about fifty-six warrants for the creation of as many lodges 
in the two provinces, its independent career was brought to a close by 
mandate of the united grand lodge of England. Shorn of its illegally 
conferred and improperly assumed functions, it then descended from its 
high estate to the more modest plane of a provincial grand lodge pure 
and simple, and from that time forward exercised a delegated and cir- 
cumscribed authority, regulated from time to time by the laws of the 
united grand lodge. 

Although St. John's Lodge retained its Nova Scotia warrant, and 
continued to meet and work under it nearly eight years after the unsuc- 
cessful attempt to form an independent grand lodge, very little business 
was transacted, and at times there were long intervals between the meet- 
ings. Only one candidate was initiated and seven brethren affiliated. 

Notwithstanding these adverse circumstances, the few remaining mem- 
bers, inspired seemingly by a determined and hopeful spirit, resolved to 
stand by the ship and navigate her to safe and secure mooring grounds ; 
and despite the many obstacles, rendered doubly formidable by the 
uitense anti-masonic crusade then swaying the community, they succeeded 

1 Midian Lodge ceased operations four years later (A. D. 184!). 



112 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

in accomplishing their undertaking. The reception of the new warrant 
from England infused them with renewed life and fresh vigor, and, under 
the changed order of things, they commenced the second era of the lodge's 
existence with increased zeal and hopefulness. The progress of the lodge 
from 1837 to the present year (1894) has been characterized by steiulv 
advancement, and has realized the most sanguine expectations. 

Copy of the Warrant issued by the United Grand Lodge of England. 
under which St. John's Lodge commenced and continued the second 
period of its existence : 

[L.8.] SussKx, P.: G. M. 

To All itnd Every our Hu/ht- Worshipful, Worshipful and Lovinf/ Brethren; 

We, Prince Augustus Frederick of Brunswick liUnenburgh, Duke of Sussex, Ei\r\ of 
Inverness, Baron of Arklow, Knight of the Most Noble Order of tlie Garter, 
K. T., Ac. Ac, Ac, Grand Master of the Most Antient and Honorable Fra- 
ternity of Free and Accepted Masons of England 

Send GiiEKTixit: 

Know ye, that we, by the autliority and under the sanction of the United Gram! 
Lodge of England vested in us for that purpose, and at the humble petition of oiir 
Right Trusty and well-beloved Brethren, John Haws, Joseph Lingley, James G. 
Lester, James P. Payne, John McCready, Robert Payne, Eliot Dyer, James Hinds, 
John Richardson and others. Do liereby Constitute the said Brethren into a Lodge 
of Free and Accepted Masons, under the title or denomination of The St. John's 
Lodge, No. 632, the said Lodge to be held in the City of Saint John in the Province 
of New Brunswick, and empowering them in the said Lodge when duly congregated, 
to make, pass and raise Freemasons according to the Antient Custom of the Craft in 
all ages and nations throughout the known world; And Further, at their said peti- 
tion and of the great trust and confidence reposed in ICvery of the above-named 
brethren. We do Appoint the said John Haws to be the First Master, the said Joseph 
Lingley to be the Senior Warden and James G. Lester to be the Junior Warden for 
opening and holding the said Lodge, and until such time as another Master shall be 
regularly elected and installed; strictly charging that Every member who shall be 
elected to preside over the said Lodge shall be installed in Antient Form and accord- 
ing to the Laws of the (irand Lodge, that he may thereby be fully invested with the 
dignities and powers of his office ; And we do require you, the said John Haws, to take 
special care that all and Every the said Brethren are or have been regularly made 
Masons, and that you and they and all other the mombtrs of the said Lodge do 
observe, perform and keep the laws, rules and orders contained in the Book of Con- 
stitutions and all others which may from time to time be made by our Grand Lodge 
or transmitted by us or our Successors, Grand Masters, or by our Deputy Grand 
Master for the time being; And we do enjoin you to make such Bylaws for the gov- 
ernment of your Lodge as shall to the majority of the Members appear proper and 
necessary, the same not being contrary to or inconsistent with the General Laws and 
Regulations of the Craft, a copy whereof you are to transmit to us ; And we do re- 
<|uire you to cause all such By-laws and Regulations and also an account of the pro- 
ceedings in your Lodge to be entered in a book to be kept for that purpose ; And 
you are in no wise to omit to send to us or our successors. Grand Masters, or to the 










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Fac-simile of St. John's Lodge Warrant, English Registrv. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'r>7. 115 

Riglit Honorable Lord Henry John Spencer Cluircliill, onr Deputy Grand Ma8ter, 
or to the Deputy Grand Master for tlie time licing, at least onoe in every year, a list 
oi" the Members of your Lodge and the names and descriptions of all Masons initiated 
therein, and of Brethren who shall have joined the same, with the fees and moneys 
payable thereon. It being our will and intention that this our Warrant of Constitu- 
tion shall continue in force so long only as you shall conform to the laws and regula- 
tions of our Grand Lodge ; And you, the said John Haws, are further required, aS' 
soon as conveniently may be, to send us an account in writing of what shall be done 
by virtue of these presents. 

Given under our hands and the Seal of the Grand Lodge at London, this 23rd 
April A. L. 58HG, A. D. 188(5. 

By command of the M. W. Grand Master, 

H. John Spencer Chuuchili., 
William H. White, "I (^ g D. G. M. 

Edwabiw Harpp^k, J 

The following brethren formed the membership of the lodge at the 
time of starting nnder the foregoing warrant : John Haws, Jo.seph Ling- 
ley, James G. Lester, William Hutchinson, Israel Merritt, Jobn Murray, 
John Beyer, Henry Chubb, Israel Lawson, James Hinds, David Hogg^ 
William Bookwood, William Ross, Angus McAfee, Joseph Bell, John 
Richardson, James A. Parnell, William J. Corbitt, Joseph Wetmore, 
Lewis Fairweather, Nehemiah Merritt, William Hughson, William War- 
wick, James Bell, John McCready, Henry Swymmer, Hugh McPherson, 
Hugh McDermott, Robert Barbour, William P. Scott, A. D. McKenzie^ 
Natiiaii Godsoe, Robert Payne, James P. Payne, John Sinclair, Joha 
Reed, Robert Foulis, and Elliot Dyer. 



A. D. 1837. ■•:„ 

May 23 — The first communication under the new warrant was held 
this evening in the lodge room, St. John Hotel, with the following mem- 
bers present : John Haws, W. M. ; Joseph Lingley, S. W. ; Jas. G. Lester,. 
J. W. ; William Hutchinson, treas. ; Israel Merritt, sec'y ; John Beyer,. 
tyler; Henry Chubb, P. M. ; Israel Lawson, James Hinds, David Hogg, 
William Bookwood, AVilliam Ross, Angus McAfee, Joseph Bell, John 
Richardson, Joseph Wetmore, William J. Corbitt and J. S. Parnell, to- 
gether \vith a large number of visiting brethren. 

The record states : " The members of this lodge having petitioned the 
grand lodge of England to grant a warrant under its registry, and H. R.H. 
the Duke of Sussex, grand master, having been pleased to issue the same 
as No. 632, the membei'S met this evening for the first time under such 
warrant, W. Bro. John Haws in the chair. 



116 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

" The warrant having been read, the lodge was opened in due form as 
St. John's Lodge, No. 632. 

" It was unanimously resolved that Bros. Henry Chubb, John Haws, 
Joseph Lingley and William Hutchinson be a committee to form a code 
of bye-laws for the government of this lodge, and submit the same for 
consideration as soon as practicable ; and also that they be a committee 
to get a frame for the protection of the warrant, books for the use of the 
lodge, and to ascertain where a room can be obtained to hold our 
meetings." 

A copy of the resolution adopted May 19, proposing the transfer of 
the property of the lodge from the old to the new registry upon pay- 
ment of outstanding debts, was received and " unanimously adopted with 
thanks." 

The lodge proceeded to the election and appointment of the officers, 
other than those named in the warrant, after which all wei*e installed, as 

follows : 

Bro. John Haws, W. M. 
Bro. Joseph Lingley, S. W. Bro. Joseph Bell, S. D. 

" James G. Lester, J. W. " John Murray, J. D. 

" William Hutchinson, Treas. " William Bookwood, S. S. 

" Israel Merritt, Sec'y. " Angus McAfee, J. S. 

Bro. John Boyer, Tyler. 

" It was resolved that this lodge celebrate St. John's da^ next by at- 
tending divine service, and that a committee consisting of the worshipful 
master and wardens do wait upon Albion Lodge to request them to cele- 
brate the day with us, and to appoint a committee to join this lodge 
committee, whose duty it shall be to wait upon the Rev. Bro. B. G. Gray, 
soliciting him to preach a .sermon for charitable purposes." 

The initiation fee was fixed at four pounds, and the joining fee at 
one pound. 

June 6 — Upon report of the conmiittee appointed at the previous 
comnmnication, a code of laws was adopted and a copy ordered to be 
transtnitted to the grand secretaries at London for approval. 

A standing committee of three was appointed to make in<juiry into 
the character of persons petitioning to be initiated and of brethren wish- 
ing to join. 

• 

July 4 — Richard Calvert, initiated this evening, was the first candidate 
received under the new warrant. 

Novembers — The W. M. reported that he had called the attention 
of the grand secretaries at London to the article in the book of constitu- 
tions headed public processions, and had stated to them that " as the lodge 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 117 

was situated in a remote part of Her Majesty's' dominions where there is 
no provincial grand master, he requested to know if the lodge could be 
allowed to attend funerals and hold public processions without a dispen- 
fiation, as he believed it would redound much to the respectability of the 
craft should such a favor be granted, and that he had pledged himself 
that, as good masons, they would never in any way abuse the privilege." 
As no further reference was made to their request, it could not have 
been granted. 

December 5 — "It was unanimously resolved that all visiting breth- 
ren, not known to be masons, must attest that they have been regularly 
entered, passed and raised," 

A committee was ai)pointed to make arrangements for a dinner on St. 
John's day ensuing, " with power to engage music for the occasion." At 
the January meeting two pounds ten shillings was ordered to be paid for 
the music. 

The dinner took place at six o'clodi, in the lodge room at the St. 
John hotel, and the record says " the evening was spent in the usual good 
fellowship and brotherly love." 

December 27 — A register book, in which visiting brethren were re- 
quired to inscribe their signatures, was first introduced at this communi- 
cation. 

A. D. 1838. 

The officers for this year were : 

Bro. John Haws, W. M. 
Bro. Joseph Lingley, S. W. Bro. Jose[)h Bell, S. D. 

" James G. Lester, J. W. " William Koss, J D. 

" Wm. Hutchinson, Treas. " David Ed^ar, 8. S. 

" Wm. Milligan, Sec'y. ' " John J. Hogjin, J. S. 

Bro. John Boyer, Tyler. 

March 6 — Upon proceeding to ballot for a candidate, it was found 
that beans heretofore used were not in conformity with the grand lodge 
laws ; it was, therefore, ordered to postpone the ballot. At the succeed- 
ing meeting it was reported that one hundred and sixty-three white and 
black balls had been procured. 

jMay 11 — The record states : " It having pleased Almighty God to re- 
move by death our brother, Josej)h Bell; at the recjuestof the deceased, 
the lodge assembled to inter his remains with niasonic honors. A large 
number respon led to the summons of the W. M., likewise several breth- 
ren of Albion, Hibernia and other lodges. The lodge set out in full pro- 

1 Queen Victoria asceuded the throne June 20, 1887. 



118 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

cession, and, after consigning the body to the grave with proper masonic 
respect and ritual, returned to the lodge room in a circumspect and 
solemn manner." 

June 5 — " Bros. Wm. H. Swymmer, Robert Payne and Robert Foulis 
were appointed a committee to draw uj) an address to be presented to the 
Earl of Durham' on his arrival into the province of Lower Canada." 

July 18 — The lodge assisted in the cdemonial of laying the corner 
stone of the Commercial Bank.'' Albion Lodge had charge of the 
arrangements. The other bodies taking part were Hibernia Lodge and 
Carleton R. A. Chapter. The masonic bodies assembled in the common 
council chamber, county court house. King's square, which Avas placed at 
their disposal for the occasion by the city corporation. The day was re- 
markably fine, which, with the unusual spectacle in those times of a 
masonic parade, called out a large concourse of citizens to witness the 
proceedings. After marching through some of the principal streets, 
headed by the splendid band of the 11th regiment of foot, the bodies 
halted at the site of the building, when the corner stone was laid with tlie 
customary masonic ceremonial by W. Bro. Oliver Goldsmith,'^ W. M. of 
Albion Lodge, followed by an oration suitable to the occasion delivered 
by the Rev. Bro. Benjamin G. Gray, D. D. The report states that " all 
the arrangements were admirably prepared and were carried out with 
regularity and satisfaction." 

Copy of masonic document placed in the stone : 

City of Saint Jolin, New Brunswick, 18th July, A. L. 5838. 

The corner stone of this building was laid on the north-east, with the usual 
masonic ceremonies, by Albion Lodge, No. 841, under tiie registry of the grand lodge 
of freemasons of England, assisted by the several lodges of the city above meu- 

*''^"^^' Oi.ivEH (ioLDSMiTH, Worsliipful Master. 

Thomas B. Millidge, Senior Warden. 
Alexander Ballocu, Junior Warden. 
Thomas Nisbet, Jr., Secretary. 

1 The Earl of I>urham was appointed by the Brit'sh government governor general of all the 
North Amerifun provinces, and high commissioner for the adjust nuMit of ((uestions arising out of 
the Canadian re(>elliun of 1S;!7-';!S. He did not remain many months in Canada. Some of lila 
measnres having been disapproved of by the home government, he resigned and returned to Kiig- 
land before the elose of the year. 

2 The Commercial hank building was situattnl on the ,south-ea.st corner of I'rinco William ami 
Princess streets, and was the first granite structure erected in Saint John. Through imprudent 
ivnd unb'.isiiicsslike management, the bank collapsed in November, 1.S68, and closed its dooih In 
1S71 the building lieeamo the property of the city corporation, and wiis occupied by the prim.'iml 
civic officers up to June 20, 1877, when it was destroyed in the great tire of that date, 

3 Oliver (ioldsmith belonged to a branch of the f.imlly of the author of " The Deserted Vil- 
lage." He was a commissary general in Her Mi\)osty's service during his sojourn in New Brunswick. 
A popular and much esteemed gentleman, and an enthusiastic and zealous mason. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 119 

Copy of bank document deposited in the cavity of the stone : 

Banking lioiise erected by the Commercial Bank of New Brunswick. 
This corner stone was laid on the 18th daj' of July, A. D. 1838, in the second 
vear of the reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen Victoria. 

Charlks Ward, President. 

John Hammond, Ralph M. Jarvis, William Leavitt, Daniel J. McLaughlin, 
Ambrose S. Perkins, Robert Rankin, Charles Simonds, William O. Smith, Stephen 
Wiggins, James Whitney, John M. Wilmot, and John Wishart, Directors. 

Alexander Balloch, Cashier. 
Moses H. Peuley, Solicitor. 
George C. Partei.ow, Paying TeUer. 
George Murray, Receiving Teller. 
Thomas B. Millidge, Accountant. 
William McArthur, Messenger. 

Charles Ward, William Leavitt, and Daniel J. McLaughlin, 

Pnilding Committee. 

John Cunningham, Architect. 

John Fisher, Contractor and Builder. 

October 2 — "It was resolved that no brother be allowed to visit this 
lodge who has received two degrees at a less interval than one month, 
within this province, according to the constitution, page 92." 

This resolution was adopted to prevent the visit of a brother who had 
been rejected by the lodge, and who had subsequently received the degrees 
in a very short space of time in a lodge under Ireland. 

Tiie evil of conferring degrees at short periods by Irish and Scotch 
lodges in the colonies so militated against the English lodges, by the 
facilities offered to candidates to become full-fledged masons in a rapid 
manner, that the grand lodge of England, upon the representation of 
colonial lodges, relaxed the rule requiring at least one month to elapse 
between the degrees, and gave authority to provincial grand mastere in 
the colonies to grant dispensations, in cases of emergency, to confer the 
fellow craft and master's degrees respectively at intervals of not less than 
seven days from the date of the preceding degree. 

November 6 — "A letter was received from the grand lodge, dated at 
London, March 7th last, setting forth that the Lodge of Concord, No. 
2;}1, and St. Cuthbert's Lodge, No. 530, were erased from the roll of 
lodges and their warrants declared forfeited." 

December 27 — At the installation of officers at this meeting, the 
worshipful master was installed by proxy. In this, as in other matters, 
our predecessors seemed to possess a ready faculty for circumventing con- 
stitutional enactments, or surmounting unexi)ected exigencies. 
H 



120 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

A. D. 1839. :^: ".'■■ 

The officers for this year were: 

Bro, Israel Merritt, W. M. 
Bro. George Johnston, S. W. Bro. William Milligan, Sec'y. 

•' John McCready, J. W. " Alexander Johnston, S. D. 

" William Hutchinson, Treas. " William B. Pigeon, J. D. 

There is no mention of stewards or tyler. 

January 22 — From the record of this communication, it would appear 
that an infraction of masonic law or usage had taken place, the particu- 
lars of which are not given, resulting in the appointment of a committee 
" to enquire into certain charges made by some members of the lodge 
against other members, including the immediate past master." 

At the regular communication of February, the committee submitted 
a report, the purport of which is not set forth in the minutes. It appears, 
however, that several brethren had been guilty of publishing some of the 
proceedings of the lodge, and had also advised the secretary to withhold 
the books in order to prevent the returns being made to the grand lodge. 
For these grave breaches of masonic faith several members were sus- 
pended. 

At the March meeting a resolution was adopted exonerating the im- 
mediate past master (W. Bro. John Haws) from the imputations made 
against him at the meeting held January 22nd, and expressing the utmost 
confidence in him at that time and during the year he occupied the East. 

From the entries in the record of July 19th, it appears that the dis- 
affected brethren above alluded to had made certain complaints or rep 
sentations (not specified) to grand lodge, and that grand lodge had adjudi- 
cated upon these ex parte statements to the prejudice of the lodge and W. 
Bro. Haws; whereupon the lodge adopted the following resolutions: 

Resolved unnnimoxLsly, That the members of St. John's Lodge have learned, with 
extreme regret, that the grand lodge has occupied its time in entertaining a petition 
containing charges unsupported by any proof, and without furnishing the accused 
with a copy of the same; 

And further reiolved, That this lodge is humbly of the opinion that if such un- 
constitutional proceedings are countenanced by the grand lodge, the evil-disposed 
members of the fraternity will soon gain the ascendancy in this community, to the 
prejudice of the best interests of freemasonry ; 

And further resolved, That a co[)y of these resolutions be forwarded by the wor- 
shipful master to the grand lodge at London. 

December 27 — "After the installation service the members of the 
lodge, with a number of guests, sat down to dinner in the lodge room. 
There was a goodly atter.'lance of the brotherhood, who spent the evening 
in discussing a capital bill of fare, followed by toasts, sentiments, songs, 
etc. ; the whole seasoned with the utmost good-tellowship." 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 121 

A. D. 1840. 

The officers for this year were : 

Bro. John Haws, W. M. 
Bro. Angus McAfee, S. W. Bro. Wiliiam Hutchinson, Treas. 

" William Koss, J. W. " John Thomas, Sec'y. 

Bro. William Bookwood, Tyler. 

Deacons and stewards are not mentioned. 

March 3 — The thanks of the lodge were voted to the worshipful 
master " for the independent spirit he had displayed in refusing to accept 
two complimentary tickets, tendered to him by the managers of the recent 
masonic ball, inviting him and his partner to attend, while no invitation 
was extended to the body at large." 

March 25 — A ball in honor of the marriage of Queen Victoria to 
Prince Albert was given under the banners of St. John's Lodge in the 
long room of the "friary" building, Horsfield street, the company con- 
sisting wholly of masons, their wives, daughters and sisters. The report 
states that " at eight o'clock the sets were formed and the dancing kept up 
with great spirit until twelve o'clock, when the brethren formed a circle 
and drank 'The Queen and Prince Albert' with honors and three times 
three, after which the new version of the national anthem was sung in 
full chorus. In the course of the evening a substantial collation was 
supplemented by fruit and queens cake} Harmony and good feeling and 
the pleasures of the evening so wholly absorbed the large company that 
it was not until the 'rosy goddess' had unbarred the portals of the east 
that they discovered the hour for separation was at hand. The caterer, 
James Sorlie, was on hand and at home, as usual, in serving up the best 
solids and liquids that the city afforded." 

A. D. 1841. 

The officers for this year were : 

Bro. John Haws, W. M. 
Bro. John Thomas, S. W. Bro. Wm. H. A. Keans, Sec'y. 

" George Johnston, J. W. " John Hooper, S. D. 

" Wni. Hutchinson, Treas. " John S. Hawksworth, J. D. 

Bro. John McCionrty, Tyler. 

December 7 — A letter was received from the grand secretary enclos- 
ing a series of resolutions of gnuul lodge, as follows : 

At a quarterly commuiiiciition of the united grand lodge, held at freemasons' 

1 Queen's cake wiis a maiiiniotli atl'iiir supported on a platform on wheels. At the hour of twelve 
it was rolled into the hull room aud cut up and diKlrihute<l to the a.s8emhled guests. At thut data 
such an alfair was in advance of the usual ceremonials at balls. 



122 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

hall, London, on Wednesday, the 3rd March, 1841, H. R. H. the Duke of Sussex, 
M. W. Grand Master, on the throne, it was 

Resolved — First. That it is the primary duty of grand lodge to view with the 
greatest jealousy any breach of the privileges secured to the masonic body by the 
legislature. 

Second. That one of the most valuable of those privileges, and that which con- 
stitutes the very essence and spirit of the order, is the secrecy with respect to the 
proceedings and concerns of masonry, which is enjoined in the ancient charges, in- 
culcated by the strongest obligations in every stage of masonic degree, and rigidly 
laid down by the laws and constitutions. 

Third. That the publication by masons of the proceedings and concerns of 
masonry, or furnishing the materials for such publication, are traitorous violations 
of the most important privileges, and deserving of the highest punishment de- 
nounced against such offences by the laws and constitutions; as such publications, if 
not discouraged and suppressed, must ultimately destroy the respectability and may 
even hazard the existence of the craft. 

Fourth. That, with a view of checking this evil, the grand lodge calls on all 
masonic authorities and masters of lodges, on their masonic allegiar^ce, to use their 
utmost endeavors to cause all brethren who may violate the privilege by engaging 
in any such publication as the late Freemasons' Quarterly Review, or by furnishing 
materials for such publication by any disclosure, without due sanction, of the pro- 
ceedings or concerns of masonry, to be brought before the proper tribunal to be dealt 
with according to the laws and constitutions of the order. 

Fifth. Th.at these resolutions be forthwith transmitted by the grand secretary to 
all the constituted authorities of the order and the masters of all lodges under the 
jurisdiction of the united grand lodge of England. 

Sixth. That the M. W. grand master be requested to communicate the same, in 
whatever manner he may deem fit, to the grand masters of masonry in Scotland and 
Ireland and of other grand lodges. 

Seventh. That the masters of every lodge under the jurisdiction of the united 
grand lodge of England shall cause these resolutions to be read in open lodge at the 
next meeting after the receipt thereof, and to be entered on the minutes of such 
lodge, and that he shall immediately after such meeting report to the grand secre- 
tary the compliance with this resolution. 

Extracted from the minutes, 

William H White, G. S. 

The foregoing resolutions, with the following letter of the grand secre- 
tary accompanying them, were ordered to be entered in full on the 
records, viz. : 

Freemasons' Hall, London, 8th March, 1841. 
W. Master : 

I am commanded by the M. W. grand master to forward for your instruction and 
guidance certain resolutions which, on the proposition of the R. W. deputy grand 
master, were passed nearly unanimously ; and I am particularly enjoined to call your 
attention to the directions contained in those resolutions, that they be read in open 
lodge at your first meeting after the receipt of this communication, and then entered 
upon your minutes ; and, this having been done, that you forthwith make a report 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 123 

of the fact to the grand secretary for the satisfaction of the grand lodge and the in- 
formiition of tiie grand master. 

The M. W. grand master further commands me to refer you to the book of con- 
stitutionF, page 78, sec. 3, and page 84, sec. 6. By the first of these you will see that 
the roaster of the lodge s solemnly pledged to observe the laws and regulations of 
the craft and the ancient charges and regulations to be found at the commencement 
of the book of constitutions. By these, as well as by the laws referred to at page 84,^ 
you will perceive how careful the grand lodge and the ancient craft have at all times 
been to guard against the interior concerns of the lodge being betrayed or disclosed 
out of doors, or even circulated amongst its members by means of printed publica- 
tions, except by vote of the grand lodge, or by permission of the grand master in the 
discharge of his duty. 

Every candidate at his initiation promises to abide by the ancient usages and 
established customs of the order, and the master on his installation solemnly pledges 
on the Book of the Sacred Law to observe and enforce them ; hence it is not only 
desirable, but essentially necessary 'that all should be conversant with them; conse- 
quently it becomes the duty of the master to cause a portion of the ancient charges 
and regulations to be read at eacli meeting of the lodge, and to be explained to the 
brethren, that they may not be ignorant of matters so important to be known and 
observed by them, that the integrity and honor of the ancient craft may be upheld 

and gecured.'' 

By command of the M. W. grand master, 

William H. White, G. S, 

December 27 — The lodge, as was its custom from the beginning, cele- 
brated the festival day of St. John the Evangelist by dining together. 
The report states that "the members of the lodge, with a number of visit- 
ing brethren, surrounded a well-appointed table in the St, John hotel, 
and enjoyed themselves in the usual manner on such occasions.", 

A. D. 1842. 

The officers for 1842, elected, appointed and installed in December, 

were: 

Bro. John Thomas, W. M. 
Bro. Charles Johnston, S. W. , Bro. Samuel Holman, Sec'y. 

" William Ross, J. W. " Benjamin Herrington, S. D. 

" William Hutchinson, Treas. " John S. Clarke, J. D. 

Bro. John McGourty, Tyler. 

May 3 — The brethren present made a voluntary subscription of money 
"to defray the passage of the family of a brother to the West Indies. 

1 The law here referred to was substantialljr as follows : " No brotlur shall presume to print or 
publish, or cause to be printed aud published, the proceedings of any lodge, or any part thereof, or 
the iianiea of the persons present at iuch lodge, without the consent of the grand master, or provin- 
cial grand master, under pain of being suspended or expelled from the order." 

2 I'nder the laws of the present grand lodge of New Brunswick every candidate is presented 
with a copy of the constitutions, in addition to a copy of the lodge bye-laws. 



124 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

September 6 — The master and wardens were authorized " to loan the 
paraphernalia of the lodge to the Mark Lodge." 

September 14 — The brethren decided to remove the lodge from the 
St. John hotel, where the meetings had been held since May, 1824, " in 
consequence of a feeling of insecurity of the place, the want of courtesy 
on the part of the proprietors of the house, and their inattention to the 
comfort of the body." 

Quarters were secured in a brick building known as " the union hall," 
situate west side of Dock street, and owned by Bro. Richard Nowlan. 
The regular communication in October ensuing was held there. 

October 4 — Carleton R. A. Chapter was allowed the use of the new 
hall for holding lectures, and a committee was appointed to ascertain if 
Hibernia Lodge would be willing to become occupants of the new 
quarters. 

December 27 — The brethren dined together in the union hall. Dock 
street, at seven o'clock. "A large company of members and guests 
gathered around the tables and spent a few hours pleasantly and fra- 
ternally." 

A. D. 1843. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. Cliarles Jolinston, W. M. 

Bro. William Ross, S. W. Bro. Samuel Holman, Sec'y. 

" John Cassidy, J. W. " John Clarke, Jr., S. D. 

" William Hutchinson, Treas. " William Causey, J. D. 

Bro. John McGourty, Tyler. 

March 7 — "Bro. Edward W. Greenwood, on behalf of the officers 
and members of Albion Lodgg, returned thanks to St. John's Lodge for 
the use of the paraphernalia at the ball held in the St. John hotel, Feb- 
ruary 14th ultimo." 

June 6 — "On motion it was unanimously resolved that the lodge be 
placed in mourning one year, in consequence of the death of our late 
grand master, H. R. H. the Duke of Sussex."' 

1 Prince Augustus Fredorick, the sixth son of Oeorge the Third, was born January 27, 1773. 
lie wa.s Initiated in 1798 at a lodge in Berlin. In 1805 the honorary rank of past grand <aaster was 
conferred on him by the grand lodge of England. May 111, 1812, he was appointed deputy grand 
master ; and April 13, 1813, the Prince Regent, afterwards King George the Fouvth, having declined 
n re-election to the otlice of grand master, the Duko of Sussex was unanimously chosen. He was 
instrumental, aided by his brother, the Duke of Kent, in cementing the divided grand lodges in 
Kngland, by their union into one Imdy, in December, 1813, under the title of "The United (Jrand 
Ix)dge of Kngland," over which His Royal Highness was called to preside. He continued to rule 
!he craft until his death, April 21, 1843, in the 7l8t year of his age, after an administration of up- 
wards of thirty years. The Earl of Zetland succeeded the Duke of Sussex as grand master. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 125 

" Resolved, that Bros. Charles Johnston, W. M., John Haws, P. M., 
and William Huichinson, treas., be a committee to wait upon Bro. George 
Bond and offer the syn)pathetic condolence of this lodge on the event of 
the late severe accident, from which he so narrowly escaped with life." 

Se^itember 5 — The Carleton Mark Master's Lodge was a sub-tenant 
in the premises occupied by St. John's Lodge, the record containing aa 
entry of the payment of five pounds for one year's rent due by the Mark 

lodge. ; ,\ . , 

A. D. 1844. 
The officers for the current year were : ' 

Bro. John Tliomas, W. M. 

Bro. Wra. H. A. Keans, S. W. Bro. Daniel W. Clark. S. D. 

" John Clark, Jr., J. W. " Richard Nowlan, J. D. 

" Wni. Hutchinson, Treas. " Rohert Wylie, S. S. 

" John Hooper, Sec'y. " John J, Hogan, J. S. 

Bro. John McCxourty, Tyler, 

March 5 — An order passed to loan the banners of the lodge to Bro. 
Michael Thompson to assist him in painting a pair for the Portland 
Union Lodge. 

May 7 — The master and wardens were authorized "to draw up and 
present an address to W. Bro. Oliver Goldsmith on his departure from 
this province." . • 

December 3 — It appears from the record that Carleton R. A. Chapter 
was a tenant of the lodge at this time. 

December 27 — A vote of thanks was recorded to W. Bro. W. H. A. 
Keans " for the pains taken by him in fitting up the lodge room for the 
services of this day." 

The services consisted of the installation of officers at high twelve and 
a dinner in the evening. 

A. D. 1845. 

Tiie officers for this year were : 

Bro. Wm. H. A. Keans, W. M. 

Bro. John Cassidy, S. W. Bro. Daniel W. Clark, S. D. 

" John Clarke, Jr., J. W. " William Causey, J. D. 

" Wm. Hutchinson, Treas. , " Vernon Hanson, S. S. -. 

" Andrew McKenna, Sec'y. " Samuel Holman, J. 8. 

Bro. John McGourty, Tyler. 

March 4 — A committee was appointed "to make arrangements for a 
ball to be given under the banners of the lodge, after the close of the 



126 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

lenten season." Another committee was appointed " to wait upon the 
sister lodges and request their co-oi)eration in the contemplated ball."^ 

This ball was held as announced, but no particulars are given in the 
minutes. 

The transactions of the lodge for the year 1845 were confined to 
ordinary routine and contain nothing worth transcribing. 

A. D. 1846. 

The officers recorded for this year were : 

Bro. Whi. II. A. Keans, W. M. 
Bro. James G. Lester, S. W. Bro. J. Boyd Qiiinton, Sec'y. 

" John Qninton, J. W. " James Stockford, S. D. 

" VVm. Hutcliinson, Treas. " Hartwell B. Crosby, J. D. 

Bro. John McGourty, Tyler. ^ 

May !) — Agreeably to resolution adopted at a meeting held January 
27, the lodge removed from union hall, Dock street, and met this even- 
ing in their old quarters in the St. John hotel, where rooms had been 
rented from Messrs. J. & W. Scammell, the new proprietors. 

A deputation from Hibernia Lodge, consisting of Bros. John Mc- 
Lardy, Peter Stubbs and AVilliam H. Needham, waited upon the lodge 
"for the purpose of soliciting their co-operation in the formation of a 
lodge of instruction." . . , • 

" Whereupon it was ordered that the lodge unite with Hibernia Lodge 
in the organization of such lodge of instruction." 

December 1 — "Bro. Samuel Holman's bill for painting a master's 
carpet, amounting to forty shillings, was ordered to be paid." 

"On motion of W. Bro. Haws, it was resolved that St. John's Lodge 
do not join in any festivity on St. John's day, in consequence of the 
execution which is to take place on the 29th instant." ^ 

The lodge, by vote, expressed its " warmest thanks to W. Bro. W. H. 
A. Keans for the zeal and ability with which he discharged the duties of 
worshipful master of the lodge during the past two years." 

December 28 — The installation services were held this day, in conse- 
quence of the 27th falling on Sunday. 

1 The sister lodges in St. John at that time were Albion, registry of England, and Hibernia and 
Portland Union, under Ireland. 

2 Charles Redburn, a Swedish seaman, was hung in the county jail yard on the morning of 
December 29, 1846, for the murder of a shipmate named Patrick Kerley. The weather oc the moru- 
ing of the execution was bitterly cold. • 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-67. 127 

A. D. 1847. 
The officers for this year were : ' 

Bro. John Thomas, W. M. 

Bro. John Qninton, S. W. Bro. Cliristopher Smiler, Sec'y. 

" James Stock fonl, J. W. " Josepli W. Roberts, S. D. 

" AV'illiam Hutchinson, Trens. " Daniel Green, Jr., J. D. 

Bro. John McGourty, Tyler. 

February 2 — A committee was appointed "to wait upon the sister 
lodges for their co-operation in getting up a general masonic ball, to raise 
a fund to assist in relieving the poor of Ireland and Scotland." 

" Bro. George Bond presented the lodge with a copy of a poem, of 
which he was the author, entitled " Solomon's Temple Rebuilt," together 
with a number of elegies on the death of the Rev. John Hawker, vicar 
of Plymouth, England, for which he received the thanks of the lodge." 

March 2 — A committee was appointed to procure a full set of jewels 
for the officers of the lodge. 

April 6 — "A letter was received from V. W. Bro. A. G. Blair, pro- 
vincial grand secretary at Halifax, announcing the appointment of R. W. 
Bro. the Hon. Alexander Keith of Halifax, N. S., to the position of pro- 
vincial grand master of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick ; also a letter 
dated at London, February 1, 1847, from V. W. Bro. Wni. H. White in 
confirmation of the same." ^ 

June 24 — The corner stone of the Provincial Lunatic Asylum, situ- 
ated on the west side of the river St. John, near the Falls, was laid with 
masonic ceremony, in which the brethren of St. John's and other lodges 
ill the city and vicinity took part. 

A provincial grand lodge was opened in the lodge room, St. John 
hotel, under the presidency of the Hon. and R. W. Bro. Alexander 
Keith, P. G. M., who came from Plalifax, N. S., for the special purpose. 

The masonic bodies proceeded to King square, where they were joined 
by the provincial and civic authorities, and then all were formed in order 
of procession as follows : 

New Brunswick Regiment of Artillery. 

Two Tylers with Drawn Swords. 

Midian Lodge, No. 770, E. R., Kingston, King's County. 

Carleton Union Lodge, No. 767, E. R., Carleton, Saint John. 

Hibernia Lodge, No. 301, L R., Saint John. 

City Amateur Band. i. 

St. John's Lodge, No. 632, E. R., Saint John. 

Albion Lodge, No. 570, E. R., Saint John. 

Carleton Royal Arch Chapter. 

1 R. W. Bro. Keith succeeded R. W. Bro. John Albro as provincial grand master. 



128 FKEEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

ComnMBsioners for building the Asylum. 

City Marsluil. 

High Slierifl' and Coroner. ' 

Mayor iind Recorder. 

Common C'lerk and Chamberlain. 

Aldermen and Assistant Aldermen. 

County Magistrates. 

Provincial Treasurer, Collector of Customs, and Postmaster General. 

Members of the House of .Assembly. 

Members of Her Majesty's Council. 

Band of the Queen's New Brunswick Rangers. 

Architect, with plans. 

Steward, with white rod. l „ ^'''!;"' ,Y'"*^',r"f w "'. 1 Steward, with white rod. 
' ( Borne by three Past Masters, j ' 

Grand Secretary, with Book of (Constitutions. 

Grand Treasurer, with Bag. ' 

Grand Superintendent of Works. 

Corinthian Light, borne by a Past Master. 

Column of Junior Grand Warden, borne by a Past Master. 

Junior Grand Warden, with Plumb and Rule. 

The Banner of Grand Lodge, supported on either side by a Grand Steward. 

Doric Light, borne by a Past Master. 

Column of Senior Grand Warden, borne by a Past Master. 

Senior Cirand Warden, with Level. 

Holy Bible on a cushion, borne by a Past Master. 

Granil Chaplain and Grand Orator. 

Past Deputy Grand Master. 

Deputy (Jrand Master, with Scjuare. 

.1 Ionic Light, borne by a Past Master. 

Grand Sword Bearer. 

Staff' of His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor. 

His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor. 

The R. W. Provincial Grand Master, supported on either side by a Grand Steward. 

Grand Deacons, with Rotls. 

Grand Tyler. 

The procession went by way of the liarbor ferry, through Carleton, 
and thence to the site of the building on the Carleton Heights, in the 
parish of Lancaster. The bodies halted and opened right and left to 
allow the Lieutenant Governor and Provincial Grand Master to pass 
through to the platform erected for the purpose, when, having taken their 
positions, the New Brunswick artillery fired a royal salute, and the band 
played the national anthem. 

After prayer by the grand chaplain, the Rev. Bro. B. G. Gray, D. D., 
the corner stone was laid with masonic ceremonial. 

The following inscription was engraved on the plate in the stone : 

This Stone, the corner stone of a building to be erected at the public expense for 
a Provincial Lunatic Asylum, was, on the twenty -fourth day of June, in the year of 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 12^ 

our Lord one tlionsand eiulit liiindred and forty-seven, in the eloventli year of tlie 
reign of our Sovereign Lady Victoria, by the (Jrace of (Jod, of the United Kingdom 
of (ireut Hritain and Ireland, Queen, and in tiie Hcventli year of the administration 
of His Kxcellenoy Sir William MacBean (Jeorge Colehrooke, K. II., Lieutenant 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Province of New Hninswicli, laid with 
(hie solemnity by his excellency, asuisted hy the Right Worshipful the Provincial 
Grand Master, the Honorable Alexander Keith, and the Albion and other masonic 
lodges. Commissioners : (Jeorge P. Peters, Esquire, M. I). ; William Jack, Esquire; 
John Ward, Esqnire; John U. Partelow, Esquire, M. P. P., Mayor of the City of 
Saint John ; Architect, Matthew Stead ; Builder, Otis Small. 

This inscription, with some coins and local newspapers, and also the 
Now Brunswick Almanac for 1847, were deposited in the stone by the 
provincial grand master. 

The silver trowel used at laying the stone, and presented to the ])ro- 
vincial grand master by Dr. Geo. P. Peters, chairman of the commission- 
er:*, bore the following inscription : 

Presented by the commissioners for building the Provincial Lunatic Asylum to 
tiie Right Worshipful the Honorable Alexander Keith, Provincial Grand Master, 
on the occasion of laying the Foundation Stone of that institution, the 24th June, 
being St. John's day, A. D. 1847, and A. L. 5847. 

At the close of the ceremonies His Excellency the Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor favored the immense assemblage with an address, after which an 
elo(|Ucnt and appropriate oration was delivered by the Rev. and \V. Bro. 
Jerome Alley, D. D. ; the whole concluding with prayer by the grand 
chaplain. 

A collation, provided by the commissioners and served up on the 
grounds, was partaken by the Lt. Governor, Prov. Grand Master and a 
number of other guests. 

The bodies subsequently re-formed in procession and returned to the 
city. The masonic portion re})aired to the lodge room, where, after an 
address by the R. AV. Provincial Grand Master, the provincial grand 
lodge was closed " in due and ample form." The masters of the several 
lodges, the mayor, the commissioners and others were entertained at din- 
ner by the provincial grand master, in the St. John hotel at seven 
o'clock. 

A report in a local newspaper concluded as follows : 

The assemblage of the brethren of the mystic tie on this important occasion was- 
greater than was ever before collected in this city. Tlie day was delightfully line, 
and the proceedings were witnessed by a vast concourse of people, who availed 
themselves of the opportunity of visiting the most agreeable and interesting portion 
of the western side of the river St. John contiguous to the city. 

June 28 — "The lodge was visited by the R. W, provincial grand 
master, who was received with the usual masonic honors. After exarain- 



130 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

ing the records and hearing a report of the condition of the h)dge, he 
addressed the brethren in suitable terms, and concluded by assuring the 
master that, at this his first visit in an official capacity, he felt gratified 
in learning that the affairs of the lodge were so prosperous and satis- 
factory." 

Augusts — The following letter, addressed to the master under date 
Xiondon, May 17, 1847, explains itself: 

I have tlie honor to acknowledge tlie receipt of yonr letter of Febrnary 27, with 
a bill for fifty pounds, to be applied towards the relief of our suffering brethren in 
Ireland and Scotland. I am most happy in being the medium of communicatinn 
with our sister grand lodges in those countries, of the truly fraternal and liberal 
manifestations thus evinced by the brethren of St. John's Lodge, No. 632. Our M. 
W. grand master, the Earl of Zetland, commands me to convey to the brethren of 
your lodge the expression of his gratification at thei** generous conduct. 

I have the honor to be, with fraternal regard, worshipful master. 

Your obedient servant and brother, 

William H. White, G. S. 
"Patrick Cuff, on behalf of the city amateur band, acknowledged the 
receipt f a gift by the lodge of a splendid clarionet." 

A. D. 1848. 

The officers for this year were : 

Bro. John Thomas, W. M. 
Bro. Samuel ITolman, S. W. Bro. Hezekiah S. Scribner, Sec'y. 

" Jolin Murray, J. W. " Ciiarles E. Potter, S. D. 

" Wm. Hutchinson, Treas. " William Craig, J. D. 

Bro. Johii McGourty, Tyler. 

July 21 — The master mason's degree was conferred upon a candidate 
under a dispensation dated at Halifax, N. S., July loth, addressed to the 
W. M. by V. W. Bro. Adam G. Blair, provincial grand secretary, as fol- 
lows: "As business of importance will prevent the R. W. the P. G. M. 
from proceeding to New Brunswick until next week, I am directed to 
convey to you his authority for conferring, under the peculiar circum- 
stances of the case, the degrees of F. C. and M. M. upon Bro. Sophian 
Neustadter, an interval of one week to elapse between the several degreeti 
respectively." 

I have copied this dispensation in full, as it is the first of which any 
entry or reference is made in the records. The reader is referred to the 
entry under date October 2, 1838. " , 

August 1 — The W. M. and wardens were authorized " to confer witli 
the other lodges in the city on the subject of renting a lodge room in the 
custom house." This projected movement came to naught. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. j«l 

A. D. 1849. 

The officers for this year were : 

Bro. Stinmel Holinan, W. M. 
Bro. R. Sands Armstrong, S. W. Bro. Hezekiah S. Scribner, Sec'y. 

" Henry P. Sancton, J W. " John Murray, S. D. 

" William Hutchinson, Treas. " Daniel Jones, Jr., J. D. 

Bro. John McGourty, Tyler. 

January 2 — Two hundred and fifty copies of the bye-laws of the 
lodge were ordered to be printed. 

February 6 — T'ae provincial grand secretary stated in a note to the 
W. M. that "honorj>ry members should pay dues of some description. 
In Nova Scotia they pay one shilling per month, but the lodge can make 
it sixpence a month, if the members think that sum sufficient. Some 
monthly dues, however, must be paid to entitle the honorary member to 
have his name kept on the lodge books." 

A. D. 1850, 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. J'lin Thomas, W. M. 

Bro. James Stocklbrd, S. W. Bro. Jacob D. McDonald, Sec'y. 

" Charles E. Potter, J. W. " Daniel Jones, Jr., S. D. 

" William Hutchinson, Treas. " Patrick Comerford, J. D. 

Bro. John McGourty, Tyler. 

A. D. 1851. 

The officers for 1851 were: 

Bro. R. Sands Armstrong, W. M. 
Bro. Charles E. Potter, S. W J>ro. Christopher Smiler, Sec'y. 

•' William Hutchinson, Jr., J. W. " Daniel Jones, Jr., S. D. 
" William Hutchinson, Treas. " John Purvis, J. D. 

Bro. John Mc(iourty, Tyler. 

January 17 — The lodge decided to remove to Bro. D. S. MarshaH'fi 
hall, and a conmuttee, consisting of Bros. Potter, Murray, Smiler, Thomas 
and McGourty, was appointed to have the paraphernalia removed. 

February 4 — The lodge met this evening in the new quarters in Bio, 
Marshall's building, southwest corner Princess and Sidney streets. 

"The brethren were requested to visit Bro. Henry P. Sancton, eon- 
tined to his house through severe illness." 

March 4 — "Bro. James Robertson, of Albion Lodge, thanked the 
brethren of St. John's Lodge for the donation in aid of a distressed 
widow." 



132 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The following charge was remitted to a committee of five members for 
investigation : " I, John Murray, do charge Bro. John Hooper, a member 
of St. John's Lodge, with vilifying brethren of the said lodge, in the 
Chronicle newspaper, under the signature of " Punch," he being the writer 
of said article." , 

At the regular communication in April the committee reported "the 
charge against Bro. Hooper not substantiated, and they considered the 
said charge frivolous and vexatious, and ought not to have been brought 
before the lodge." And this ended the matter. 

May 6 — A committee appointed at the April meeting to confer with 
a committee of the Carleton R. A. Chapter, relative to the use of the pil- 
lars and other paraphernalia of the lodge, reported that they had agreed 
to allow the chapter the use of these articles for the sum of one pound 
per year ; which report and agreement were adopted, 

June 3 — An invitation received from New Caledonia Lodge, Pictou, 

N. S., to unite in celebrating the anniversary of St. John the Baptist, wa? 

<leclined. 

A. D. 1852. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. Wm. H. A. Keans, W. M. 

Bro. Charles E, Potter, S. VV. Bro. Christoplier Siniler, Sec'y. 

" Joseph Mercer, J. W. " John Murray, S. D. 

" Win. Hutchinson, Treas. " John B. Andrews, J. D. 

Bro. John McGourty, Tyler. 

The election and installation of W. Bro. Keans to the government of 
the lodge inaugurated a brighter and more prosperous era in its existence. 
For several years the attendance had been small, the members having in 
a great measure lost heart and interest in its well-being. The accessions 
to its roll had been exceedingly limited, the funds in the treasury were 
quite low, and the very life of the lodge appeared to have been im- 
perilled. The earnestness and zeal so characteristic of Bro. Keaiis, to- 
gether with his incumbency in the chair for three successive years, resulted 
in placing the lodge on a solid foundation and starting it on a prosperous 
career. 

February 3 — William Franklin Bunting, whose petition was pio- 
.sonted at the January communication, was balloted for, accepted and 
initiated. He was the first candidate received since August, 1850. 

During the year 1852 the lodge had a large number of additions to 
its meniil)ershi[), and a corresponding increase in the treasury. Tlie 
transactions consisted wholly of routine business and the conferring of 
<l('grecs on candidates. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 133 

A. D. 1853. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. Wm. H. A. Keans, W. M. 

Bro. Charles E. Potter, S. W. Bro. John B. Andrews, S. D. 

" Joseph Mercer, J. W. " Wm. C. Leonard, J. D. 

" Wm. Hutchinson, Treas. " Charles Eagles, S. S. 

" Wm. F. Bunting, Sec'y. " George Lynam, J. S. 

Bro. John McGourty, Tyler. 

March 1 — The state of the funds enahled the lodge to determine on 
procuring a new pair of banners, and to that end a committee was ap- 
pointed to procure them at a cost not to exceed thirty pounds sterling. 

June 7 — A committee was appointed to order a new set of jewels, 
collars and aprons for the officers of the lodge. 

Septembei- 6 — The lodge accepted an invitation from the directors of 
the European and North American Railway Company to join in the 
ceremony of turning the first sod and laying the foundation stone of the 
projected line oi' railway from Saint John to Shediac. 

September 14 — The celebration attending the turning of the first sod 
of the European and North American railway, and in which the masonic 
bodies throughout the province occupied a prominent position and took 
an important part, was one of the most imposing public pageants ever 
witnessed in Saint John. All classes of citizens and all descriptions of 
societies, including trades, civic, county and provincial bodies, fire depart- 
ment, freemasons, etc., were represented in tha display. The masonic 
portion, numbering about four hundred, with banners, regalia, badges, 
f.nd other paraphernalia, closed the procession. R. W. and Hon. Bro. 
Alexander Keith, provincial grand master, had charge, assisted by his 
provincial grand officers. In the line of procession, and under their res- 
pective banners, were Albion, St. John's, Hibernia, and Union of Port- 
land Lodges, of Saint John ; C'arleton Union Lodge, of Carleton ; Midian 
Lodge, of Kingston; Corinthian Lodge, of Hampton; (Jarleton R. A. 
Chapter, of Saint John, and the Provincial Grand Lodge. Chandler's 
brMf.s band, of Portland, Maine, a celebrated musical organization, headed 
the masonic contingent. 

The first sod was turned by Lady H»>ad, and the second by His 
Excellency Sir Edmund Head, Lieutenant Governor of the province. 
Afterward the foundation stone was laid with masonic ceremony by the 
provincial grand master. 

During the masonic ceremonial Chandler's band rendered the Dox- 
ology in a niar.ner that fairly electrified the immense assemblage. 



134 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

A. D. 1854. 

The officers elected at the regular comiminication in December and 
installed on St. John's day, were : 

Bro. Wm. H. A. Keans, W. M. 
Bro. Joseph Mercer, S. W. Bro. Charles E. Potter, S. D. 

" Wm. C. Leonard, J. W. " George Lynaru, J. D. 

" Wm. Hutchinson, Treas. " James Gerow, S. S. 

" Wm. F. Bunting, Sec'y. " Robert G. Crozier, J. S. 

Bro. John McGourty, T ler. 

Under the then laws of the grand lodge of England, a brother was 
permitted to occupy the chair of a lodge not more than two consecutive 
years, unless by special authority. The lodge had prospered so greatly 
during the years 1852 and 1853, under the mastership of W. Bro. Keans, 
that application was made to and a dispensation received from the pro- 
vincial grand master, authorizing the lodge to elect him for a third year. 

February 7 — " It was ordered that the members of St. John's Lodge 
pay a fraternal visit to Albion Lodge on the first Friday in March next, 
and that the secretary give due notice." 

A committee, consisting of Bros. W. H. A. Keans, W. F. Bunting and 
Wm. Hutchinson, jr., was appointed " to communicate with sister lodges 
in the province on the roll of the grand lodge of England, upon the 
desirability of presenting a memorial to the R. W. provincial grand mas- 
ter, praying for the establishment of a provincial grand lodge in New 
Brunswick." 

March 7 — " Received a fraternal visit from the officers and members 
of Albion Lodge, No. 570, who were welcomed with due honors. After 
an interchange of friendly and masonic sentiment, with remarks by Bros. 
Robertson, Drake and Jarvis of Albion Lodge, and Bro. Keans and 
others of St. John's lodge, the visiting brethren withdrew." 

At that time Albion Lodge held its meetings in St. Stephen hall, 
north side of King square. This visit was a return to one made by St. 
John's Lodge to Albi(m Lodge on the third day of March. 

March 14 — The W. M. and niembereof St. John's Lodge, as per reso- 
lution, paid a fraternal visit to Hibernia Lodge, No. 301, registry of 
Ireland, and in return the brethren of Hibernia Lodge visited St. John's 
Lodge at the regular conmiunication in April following. 

April 6 — St. John's Lodge paid a fraternal visit to Union Lodge of 
Portland, No. 780. 

June 5 — "An invitation was received from Eastern Lodge, No. 7, 
Eastport, Maine, asking St. John's Lodge to join in the celebration of 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 185 

their anniversary on June 24th instant ; which invitation was accepted 
and the secretary directed to make a suitable reply." Several members 
joined in this celebration, but the lodge did not attend as a body. 

October 3 — " The W. M. and wardens were authorized to ccmfer with 
the other lodges in the city on the propriety of having masonic lectures 
delivered during the ensuing winter." 

December 5 — At the annual election, this evening, Bro. William 
Hutchinson declined re-election to the office of treasurer, in consequence 
of his advanced age. He had filled the position almost uninterruptedly 
from the year 1826, A vote of thanks was tendered him " for his long 
and faithful services, and for the great interest he had continuously 
evinced in the welfare of the lodge." 

December 27 — The following address and presentation were made to 
W. Bro. Keans on retiring from the chair of the lodge : 

To the Worshipful Brother WiLLiAM H. A. Keans, EstiUiRE, Past Master of St. 
John's Lodge, No. 632, on the registry of the Grand Lodge of England : 

Worshipful Sir and Brother, — The brethren of St. John's Lodge have 
great cause for congratulation when contemplating its present position and prospects. 
At a time when its horizon was dark and unpromising, when threatening clouds 
hung over and around it, and when its future seemed in a hopeless condition, you 
were induced to accept the responsibility of guiding its affairs. By your zealous and 
persevering efforts, as worshipful master, a radical and happy change followed your 
induction ; fresh life and renewed vigor were infused, and the lodge became once 
more the St. John's Lodge of former days. During the three years you have occu- 
pied the East, the ancient usages and landmarks of the craft have been maintained 
and enforced ; good judgment and propriety iiave guided you in the exercise of your 
prerogative; unanimity and fraternity have prevailed in all our doings, and peace 
and harmony have been the characteristics of our gatherings. The bretliren of the 
lodge, conscious of their deep indebtedness to you for its present prosperous and 
promising condition, and desirous of marking in some degree the occasion of your 
retirement from the chair of the lodge and placing the gavel in other hands, here- 
with present you with a past master's apron, collar and jewels, as a testimonial of 
their gratitude and esteem, and with them their earnest hope that your life may long 
be spared to enjoy fresh laurels and worthy honors, and that the Great Architect of 
the Universe may vouchsafe to you uninterrupted health, happiness and prosperity. 

Bro. Keaus made a suitable and feeling reply to this address. 

A. D. 1855. 
The officers for this year were : 

Bro. Joseph Mercor, W. M. 
Bro. William F. Bunting, S. W. Bro. Charles E. Potter, S. D. 

" William C. Leonard, J. W. " Joseph Sullivan, J. D. 

" James Gerow, Treas. " John Hastings, S. S. 

" Robert G. Crozier, Sec'y. " James W. Montgomery, J. 8. 

Bro. David S. Marshall, Tyler. 



136 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

January 2 — W. Bro. Robert Payne, P. M., was elected an honorary 
member of the h)dge " in token of their esteein, and fraternal acknow- 
ledgment for his long masonic services and general worth." 

January 25 — This was a special communication "to consider the 
advisability of opening a subscription list among the members of the 
lodge in aid of the patriotic fund for the benefit of freemasons disabled 
and the widows and orphans of freemasons killed in the Crimea." The 
lodge agreed unanimously to contribute and appointed a committee to 
open a list and receive subscriptions. The sum of ninety-one pounds, 
thirteen shillings and four pence was raised and placed in the hands of 
the lieutenant governor of the province, who forwarded the amount to 
the proper authority in England. 

The following is a list of subscribing members : 

Joseph Mercer, W. M £4 James Olson £3 

John Haws, P. M 20 William Brown 15 

John Thomas, P. M 3 10 Christopher Srailer 15 

Wm. H. A. Keans, P. M 3 10 Jacob D. McDonald 10 

Israel Merritt, P. M 2 Wm. E. Stronach 10 

R, Sands Armstrong, P. M. ... 3 10 James Stockford 5 

Henry Chubb, P. M 10 Patrick Gallagher 10 

Wm."F. Bunting, S. VV 2 10 Tlios. H. Ellison 1 

Wm. C. Leonard, J. W 2 Robert Scott 10 

James Gerow, Treas 5 J. Boyd Quinton 10 

Robt. G. Crozier, Sec'y 2 10 John Quinton 2 

Chas. E. Potter, S. D 2 10 William Causey 1 

Jwseph Sullivan, J. D 2 Charles Eagles , 10 

John Hastings, S. S 2 10 John Purvis 10 

Jas. W. Montgomery, J. S 15 John Coleman 10 

Wm.H. Hooper. 15 John McGourty 10 

James Portmore 3 10 George Lynam 13 4 

John B. Andrews 15 

David Johnston 2 Total £9113 4 

Francis E. Ketchum 16 

June 24 — Upon invitation of St. Mark's Lodge, No. 759, of St. 
Andrews, a deputation from the lodge took part in a celebration of the 
festival of St. John the Baptist at that town. R. W. Bro. the Hon. 
Alexander Keith, provincial grand master, was present and in charge of 
the proceedings. The lodges in Saint John chartered the steamer 
" Creole " for the occasion and took a band of music with them. There 
were also lodges from Fredericton, Woodstock, Eastport, Calais, St. Ste- 
phen, Milltown, Lubec and St. George, numbering about four hundred 
masons. The assembled brethren formed a procession, and, after march- 
ing through the town, repaired to All Saints church and listened to an 
appropriate sermon preached by W. Bro. the Rev. Jerome Alley, D. D. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 187 

They afterward proceeded to a spacious hall and sat down to dinner, 
which was enlivened by toasts, songs, speeches and general good-fellow- 
ship. The day passed off pleasantly, and was considered one of the most 
enjoyable re-unions of the fraternity ever held in New Brunswick. W. 
Bro. Dr. Samuel T. Gove, P. M. of St. Mark's Lodge, acted as grand 
marshal on the occasion. 

DEPUTY PROVINCIAL GRAND MASTER. 

At the regular communication held March 6, 1855, the committee 
appointed February 7, 1854, in reference to the formation of a provincial 
grand lodge in the province, were authorized to communicate direct to 
the provincial grand master at Halifax on the subject. In furtherance 
of this application a special provincial grand lodge was convened at Saint 
John, July 3, 1855, at which representatives of Albion, St. John's, Carle- 
ton Union and Union of Portland Lodges were present, with the R. W. 
Bro. the Hon. Alex. Keith, P. G. M., in the chair, who introduced the 
question of establishing a deputy provincial grand lodge in New Bruns- 
wick. 

After hearing the views of the assembled delegates (all of whom fav- 
ored the creation of a provincial grand lodge), the provincial grand 
master authorized the worshipful master of Albion Lodge to communi- 
cate with all the lodges in the province holding of the grand lodge 
of England, and summon a committee of each lodge to meet at an early 
day to take the matter into consideration, and, if deemed desirable, to 
.select and recommend to him for his approval some worthy brother to be 
appointed deputy provincial grand master for the province of New 
Brunswick. 

In conformity with this authorization, a meeting of representatives 
was held in Saint John, August 15, 1855, at which R. W, Bro. Alexander 
Balloch, P. M.j of Union Lodge of Portland, No. 780, was nominated to 
the office. The provincial grand master confirmed this nomination and 
subsequently installed Bro. Balloch, who apprised the lodge of his ap- 
pointment and installation in a letter addressed to the W. M., October 18, 
1855, as follows : 

I beg lejive to acquaint you that the R. W. P. G. M., the Hon. Alexander Keith, 
having been pleased to approve of my unanimous election by lelegates from ten 
lodges' in this province, assembled in this city (Saint John), on the fifteenth day of 
August last, has, by patent dated September (i, 1855, appointed me deputy j)rovincial 

1 Tliirteeii English lodges were working in New Brunswick at that time, viz.: Albion, No. 570, 
St. John; 8t. John's, No. 632, St. John ; Su.ssex, No. 70.5, Dorchester; St. Mark'.f, No. 759, St. An- 
drews; .Solomon's, No. 7(>4, Frodericton ; Carleton Union, No. 7fi7, Carleton ; Midian, No. 770, King- 
ston ; Union of Portland, No. 780, .St. John ; Wood.stock, No. 811, Woodstock ; I'nion, No. 866, .St. 
Stephen; St. George, No. 912, St. George; Corinthian, No. 918, Hampton; and Keith, No. 927, 
Miini'ton. 



138 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

grand master for the province of New Brunswick, into which office I was duly in- 
stalled on the tenth instant. I have therefore to request that j'ou will in future 
address to me through my secretary, Bro. Robert Stubs, all your communications re- 
lating to the craft, excepting the annual returns of your lodge, and such other matters 
AS are specially directed by the book of constitutions, to be made to the grand 
secretary in London. 

I have further to request that you will, at the close of the current year, furnish 
me with a list of the members of your lodge, and of the officers elected and installed 
for the ensuing year. 

With an assurance of my warmest wishes for the prosperity of your lodge, I am, 
worshipful master, with fraternal regard. 

Your obedient servant and brother, 

A. Balloch, 
Deputy Provincial Grand Master. 

December 4 — A committee, consisting of Bros. James Gerow, W. H. 
A. Keans and Charles E. Potter, was appointed " to confer with com- 
mittees of the other lodges in the city, for the purpose of selecting a suit- 
able room for the future." 

A. D. 1856. 

The officers for the current year were : 

Bro. Charles E. Potter, W. M. 
Bro. Wm. F. Bunting, S. W. Bro. Joseph Sullivan, S. D. 

" Wm. C. Leonard, J. W. " Jas. W. Montgomery, J. D. 

" James Gerow, Treas. " Geo. T. Leonard, S. S. 

" Robert G. Crozier, Sec'y. " John Hastings, J. S. 

Bro. David S. Marshall, Tyler. 

During the months of February and March, the master, wardens and 
members made fraternal visits to Albion, Hibernia, Carleton Union and 
Union of Portland Lodges ; by this means promoting a true masonic 
feeling, and cementing a stronger bond of union, the results of which 
produced increased activity in the membership of the lodge and awak- 
ened renewed zeal in the masonic body generally. 

August 5 — Under resolution passed at the July communication, the 
lodge removed from Bro. David S. Marshall's hall, where the meetings 
had been held since February, 1851, to new quarters specially fitted and 
furnished for the accommodation of all the masonic bodies, in Judge 
Ritchie's building, south side of Princess street. 

September 2 — A fraternal visit was received from the officers and 
members of Hibernia Lodge, No. 301, registry of Ireland. 

September 24 — Large deputations from the lodges in the province, 
under English authority, assembled in the new hall in Ritchie's building, 
at nine o'clock, a. m., to assist in the consecration of the deputy provin- 
cial grand lodge of New Brunswick, and the dedication of the hall to 




JUDGK Ritchie's Buii<ding. 



140 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

masonic purposes. The R. W. Deputy Provincial Grand Master presid- 
ing, opened a lodge of E. A. Immediately thereafter a deputation, ap- 
pointed for the purpose, escorted the R. W. Bro. the Hon. Alexander 
Keith, P. G. M., and staff of officers, into the lodge, who were received 
with proper masonic ceremonial. On being seated in the East, the pro- 
vincial grand master addres.sed the assembled brethren, and expressed to 
them his gratification in being present on such an important occasion. 
He congratulated them upon the respectable appearance of the hall and 
its appointments, and commended the zeal and enterprise manifested in 
the successful accomplishment of their designs. 

A provincial grand lodge having been opened, the hall was dedicated 
to freemasonry. Subsequently the patent of appointment of R. W. Bro. 
Alexander Balloch as deputy provincial grand master was read, and he 
and his staff of officers were formallv installed, as follows : 

R. W. Alexander Balloch, D. P. G. M. 
R. W. Joel Reading, S. G. W. 
R. W. Charles Ketclium, J. G. W. 
V. W. Rev. Jerome Alley, D. D., Grand Chaplain. 
V. W. Rev. Edmund A. Warneford, Asst. G. Cliaplain. 
V. W. Charles V. Forster, G. Treasurer. 
V. W. Robert Stubs, G. Secretary. 
W. Charles E. Potter, S. G. D. 
W. Douglas B. Stevens, J. G. D. 
W. Robert T. Clinch, G. D. C. 
W. William F. Bunting, (i. Sword Bearer. 
W. William H. A. Keans, G. Pursuivant. 
W. Tliomas F. Raymond, G. Steward. 
W. William Magee, 
W. Robert G. Crozier, " 

W. William C. Leonard, 
W. Samuel L. Brittain, " 

W. James Rosborough, " 

Bro. John Boyer, G. Tyler. 
At the conclusion of these ceremonies the brethien formed in order of 
procession and moved to Trinity church in the following order: 
St. Andrew's Lodge, No. 364, S. R., Fredericton. 
Corinthian Lodge, No. 918, E. R., Hampton. 
Union Lodge of Portland, No. 780, E. R, Saint John. 
Carleton Union Lodge, No. 767, E. R., Carleton. 
St. John's Lodge, No. 632, E. R., Saint John. 
Albion Lodge, No. 570, E. R., Saint .John. 
Hibernia Lodge, No. 301, L R., Saint John. 

_ _ /, Carleton R. A. Chapter, No. 47, S. R., Saint John. . 

Encampment of St. John, K. T. & K. M., Saint John. 
Officers and members of the Provincial Grand Lodge. 
R. W. Alexander Balloch, Esquire, D. P. G. M. 
R. W. and Hon. Alexander Keith, P. G. M. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 141 

The choir of the church sang an anthem while the craft were entering 
and taking their seats, after which an impressive sern)on was preached 
by the grand chaplain, Rev. Jerome Alley, D. D., from the text " Be 
kindly affectionate one to another in brotherly love," Romans, 12th chap., 
10th verse. Rev. Bro. E. A. Warneford, assistant grand chaplain, and 
Rev. Bro, Charles P. Bliss, assisted in the church service. 

At the close the several bodies again formed in procession and marched 
through some of the principal streets to the masonic hall, where the pro- 
vincial grand lodge resumed its deliberations. After the adoption of 
resolutions conveying the thanks of the newly-formed body to the pro- 
vincial grand master and his officers, and to the reverend brethren for 
their eminent services, the jjrovincial grand lodge was closed. 

At five o'clock in the afternoon the brethren of the city lodges, with 
the visiting brethren, dined together. 

The interesting proceedings were closed by a grand masonic ball in 
the evening under the banners of all the city lodges. The Lieutenant 
Governor, His Excellency the Hon. H. T. Manners-Sutton, who honored 
the brethren with his presence during the evening, was received into the 
ball-room under an arch of steel, formed by the Knights Templars of the 
Encampment of Saint John. 

The stewards of the ball were : 

R. W. Alexander Bulloch, D. P. G. M. 
Cliaries V. burster, E. C, ") 
John Willis, Lt. C, >■ Encampment of St. John. 



John Frost, H., ) 

I 



Charles E. Raymond, Z., 

William II. A. Keans, H., |- Carleton R. A. Chapter. 

Thomas Brass, J., j 

James McNichol, Sr., W. M., ") 

Abraham Magee, S. W., y Hibernia Lodge. 

Alpbonzo G. Troop, J. W. j 

Joel Reading, W. M., ^ 

Thomas F. Raymond, S. W., [■ Albion Lodge. 

Robert T. Clinch, J. W., J 

Charles E. Potter, W. M., 

William F. Bunting, S. W., [ St. John's Lodge. 

William C. Leonard, J. W., 

Charles Ketchum, W. M. 

Edwin J. Wetmore, S. W., \- Carleton Union Lodge. 

Sargent S. Littlehale, J. W., 

Douglas B. Stevens, W. M., '\ 

James Roshoroiigh, S. W., v Union Lodge of Portland. 

WilliamH. Tuck, J.W., \ 



142 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The parade and procession in the forenoon were marred by a down- 
pour of rain acconiimnied by high wind, and many brethren were on that 
account prevented from taking part. The band of the seventy-sixth 
regiment came down from Fredericton and, with Price and Aitkius' local 
band, furnished music. Bro. Robert T. Clinch filled the position of 
grand marshal of the line of procession, while Bro. James Gerow was 
sub-marshal in charge of St. John's Lodge. A newspaper report states 
that " had the weather been fine there would have been a much more 
imposing display ; there was, however, much enthusiasm on the occasion, 
and no doubt many strangers who visited the city returned to their homes 
pleased with their visit." 

October 10 — A new code of bye-laws was adopted by the lodge. 

November 4 — "The jewels were loaned to the brethren about forming 
New Brunswick Lodge, to be opened at Moncton under dispensation." 

December 27 — The R. W. Bro. Balloch, D. P. G. M., made an oflicial 
visit this evening and installed the worshipful master, Bro. Charles E. 
Potter. 

The year just closed was an important era in the history of the craft 
in Saint John, and a busy one in the annals of St. John's Lodge. The 
various bodies had removed from their old quarters to a commodious hall, 
expensively and elegantly furnished, in the stone edifice owned by Judge 
Ritchie, where, with extensive apartments suitably arranged and fitted, 
they were better enabled to perform the rites appertaining to the several 
grades, and to discharge all the duties devolving upon them. 

The inauguration of a deputy provincial grand lodge, with a resident 
presiding officer, gave to the craft a local head for the regulation of many 
matters which had been previously relegated to the provincial grand 
master at Halifax, whereby delays, misundei-standings and vexations 
occurred, at times exceedingly annoying. It infused into the lodges 
throughout the province, on the roll of the grand lodge of England, addi- 
tional zeal and activity, and, as under their changed condition, they were 
entitled to send delegates to the quarterly meetings of the new body, they 
had through these representatives a share in the business matters aflTect- 
ing their interests. 

St. John's Lodge assumed a renewed lease of existence ; the members 
were more regular and prompt in attending to their masonic duties ; a 
largely increased number of candidates sought initiation ; the regular 
and emergent communications were more frequent and better attended, 
and the general concerns of the lodge more prosjierous than had been 
previously known in its history. A new and valuable pair of banners 
were ordered, a new code of bye-laws adopted, and other things procured 
to facilitate its business and labors. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGP; 1837-'67. ' 143 

A. D. 1857. ■ 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. Charles E. Potter, W. M. 
Bro. Wm. C. Leonard, S. W. Bro, Robert Collins, J. D. 

" Robert G. Crozier, J. W. " Jas. S. Partelow, S. S. 

" Thomas Marter, Treas. " Fredk. A. Nagel, J. S. 

" Wm. H. Tliain, Sec'y. " Peter Dearness, I. G.^ 

" Joseph Sullivan, S. D. •' Henry Brown, Tyler. 

January 6 — A letter was received from Albion Lodge recommending 
the formation of a lodge of instruction, and requesting St. John's Lodge 
to unite with the other city lodges in arranging the details. The lodge 
concurred in the movement and instructed the secretary to reply accord- 

iugiy- 

" Bro. Samuel T. Gove, Scribe E., Saint Andrews, in a circular ad- 
dressed to the lodge, reported the organization of a provincial grand 
chapter of royal arch masons, English constitution, at Saint Andrews, 
together with a list of the officers." 

" R. W. Bro. Alexander Balloch, D. P. G. M., accompanied by the 
officers of the provincial grand lodge, made an official visit." 

It was decided to give a ball under the banners of the lodge, and a 
committee was appointed to make the necessary arrangements. At the 
March communication the committee reported the ball a success. It was 
held at the Stubbs hotel on Wednesday evening, February 4th, under the 
patronage of R. W. Bro. Balloch, D. P. G. M. 

February 7 — "The sum of ten pounds was donated to Bro. , 

whose residence was lately destroyed by fire." 

The lodge decided to procure a new outfit of jewels, collars and aprons, 
and appointed a committee to order them and also to dispose of those 
then in use. 

April 7 — A committee was appointed to act in conjunction with com- 
mittees of sister lodges meeting in the hall to purchase an organ. 

June 24 — Upon invitation of Hibernia Lodge, No. 301, I. R., the 
lodge joined with sister lodges and other masonic bodies in Saint John in 
celebrating the festival of St. John the Baptist. A procession was formed 
at ten o'clock a. ra., and after marching through some of the principal 
streets, proceeded to the Baptist church at Carleton, where they listened 
to an address upon freemasonry by the Rev. Bro. Edwin Clay, M. D. ; 
after which they returned to the city and dispersed at the masonic hall. 

1 This is the first record of the appointment of an Inner Guard in the lodge. 



144 FREEMA.SONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

At nine o'clock in the evening the brethren sat down to dinner in the 
Stubbs hotel. 

August 6 — The lodge paid a fraternal visit to Carleton Union Lodge. 

A. D. 1858. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. William F. Bunting, W. M. 
Bro. Robert G. Crozier, S. W, Bro. William Wedderburn, J. D. 

" John H. Sheridan, J. W. " William H. Austin, S. S. 

" Thomas Marter, Treas. " William B. Sancton. J. S. 

" William H. Thain, Sec'y. " Charles Pearce, I. G. 

" James W. Montgomery, S, D. " Henry Brown, Tyler. 

January 5 — W. Bro. Charles E. Potter, I. P.M., presented the lodge 
with an ivory gavel, an apron for the W. M., and a set of working tools. 

The sum of ten pounds was voted to the secretary as a recompense for 
his services for the past year. Since then the secretary for the time being 
has been paid regularly for his services. 

January 14 — A ball was given under the banners of the lodge at the 
Stubbs hotel. 

April 6 — An official visit was received from R. W. Bro. Alex. Bal- 
loch, I). P. G. ]M., accompanied by a staff of officers. 

May 7 — "The lodge paid the last tribute of respect to the remains 
of W. Bro. Charles Johnston, P. M. of St. John's Lodge, and late high 
sheriff of the city and county of Saint John. The funeral cortege, which 
was very large and respectable, proceeded to the rural cemetery, where 
the solemn service of the masonic ritual was held at the grave." 

June 1 — The secretary reported the destruction of the lodge seal by 
fire in February last, and that he had ))rocured a new one. 

During the month of July of this year the lodges in Saint John were 
favored with a course of instruction in the work a'.id lectures of the 
three degrees, by W. Bro. Caleb Rand, P. M., a resident of Charlestown, 
Massachu.setts. Bro. Rand, who was engaged by a committee of the pro- 
vincial grand hxlge, upon recommendation of M. W. Bro. John T. Hurtl, 
grand master of Massachusetts, came to St. John previous to the first of 
July, accompanied by Bro. Daniel Crant, Jr., as an assistant. He re- 
mained four neeks, and during that time held three sessions each day in 
communicating the work authorized by the grand lodge of Massachusetts. 
For the better securing a thorough and correct knowledge of the infor- 
mation imparted by W. Bro. Rand, the worshipful masters of the three 
senior lodges of the city were detailed for that purpose: W. Bro. W. F. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 145 

Bunting, W. M. St. John's Lodge, being appointed to the work of the E. 
A. degree ; W. Bro. Abraham Magee, W. M. Hibernia Lodge, to that of 
the F. C. degree ; and W. Bro. Robert T. Clinch, W. M. Albion Lodge, to 
that of the M. M. degree. Each of these three brethren devoted special 
attention to the working and details of the degree assigned to him during 
Bro. Rand's stay in Saint John, and after his departure they imparted 
the information thus gained, each to the others, and in this manner all 
three secured a correct knowledge of the whole work. 

The advent of Bro. Rand, together with his admirable working, and 
the great interest created thereby, gave a fresh impetus to freemasonry in 
our midst, and left such an impress upon the brethren of the city lodges 
and of the province generally, that its beneficial eftects are felt even to 
the present day. The survivors of the brethren who attended the lec- 
tures of W. Bro. Rand and received inbiruction from him, cherish pleas- 
ant memories of his acceptable visit, of his extended masonic knowledge, 
and of the admirable manner in which his labors were conducted. He 
was a bright ritualist, a competent instructor, a genial gentleman and an 
accomplished mason.' 

September 1 — St. John's Lodge, with other masonic bodies in Saiut 
John, took part in the procession and demonstration in honor of the suc- 
cessful laying of the first electric telegraph cable across the Atlantic 
ocean — starting from Valcntia Bay in Ireland and terminating at Trin- 
ity Bay, Newfoundland. The vessels engaged in the important work 
were the " Agamenmon " (English) and the " Niagara " (United States), 
assisted by four smaller British steamers. 

The occasion was observed as a general holiday in all the i)rincipal 
cities and towns in British North America and the United States. In 
Saint John the day was ushered in with a salvo of artillery ; at eleven 
o'clock a procession was formed on the breakwater grounds at the south 
of the city and marched tli rough the principal streets. It consisted of 
the masonic fraternity, civic bodies, volunteer fire department, trades, 
etc. In the evening public buildings and private residences in the city 
generally were illuminated, the whole terminating with a ball, fire- 
works, etc. 

The masonic bodies taking part in the procession were : 

Union Lodge of Porthinil, No. 780, K. R. 
Cnrleton Union Lodge, No. 767, E. R. 
Hi»)crniii Lodge, No. 301, L R. 
St. Jolin's Lodge, No. 632, E. R. 

1 W. Bro, the Hon. Cali'l) Rniul died at his rosideiice, Charlestowii, Nfassachimetts, Septenilwr, 
1887, at the ngu of 72 yeare. Ho was a printer and publisher, held a iteat in the city couucil, aad 
was H repreBentativc in the legislature and senate of Masgauhusett*. 



146 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Albion Lodge, No. 570, E. R. 
Carleton Royal Arch Chapter. 
Encampment of Saint John, K. T. and K M. 
Deputy Provincial Grand Lodge, E. R., 
Under the control of W. Bro. R. T. Clinch, as grand marshal. 

October 5 — "The W. M. acknowledged reception of a copy of the 
bye-lavvis of King Solomon Lodge, of Charlestown, Massachusetts, pre- 
sented by W. Bro. Caleb Rand, a past master of the lodge, for which a 
vote of thanks was passed." 

A. D. 1859. 

The officers of this year wera : 

Bro. William F. Bunting, W. M. 
Bro, John H. Sheridan, S. W. Bro. William H. Austin, J. D. 

" George T. Leonard, J. W. " Andrew Johnston, S. S. 

" Thomas Marter, Treas. " Isaac Campbell, J. S. 

" William S. Berton, Sec'y. " Hugh Hutchinson, I. G. 

" William Wedderburn, S. D. " Henry Brown, Tyler, 

March 1 — An order passed to deposit the funds of the lodge in the 
bank of New Brunswick. 

May 3 — A circular was received from the deputy provincial grand 
lodge asking the acquiescence of the lodge in a memorial to the united 
grand lodge of England, praying for the erection of the English lodges 
in New Brunswick into a provincial grand lodge, with a resident pro- 
vincial grand master. The lodge voted in favor of the movement. 

June 7 — "The grateful acknowledgment of the lodge was ordered to 
be conveyed to W. Bro. Caleb Rand, P. M., for the gift of a volume, 
compiled by him, containing the monitorial portion of the craft degrees." 

September 6 — " In a letter received from the grand secretary at Lon- 
don, notice was given of the formation of three irregular lodges at Smyrna, 
and of the subsecjuent erection of these lodges into a bogus grand lodge. 
The lodges under England were warned against holding masonic inter- 
course with persons hailing from these lodges." 

A committee appointed some time previously to procure a pair of 
banners for the lodge, reported that they had fulfilled their trust, and 
were pleased to hand to the lodge a pair of banners e(iual to any in the 
province, and a credit to Mr. James Holman, the artist. 

Some time in the year 1859 a slight ripple occurred in the craft in 
Saint John by the publication of a work entitled " The Craftsman's 
Guide," comj)iled by Bro. Robert Stubs. In the opinion of R. W. Bro. 
Balloch, D. P. G, M., the compiler had exceeded the limits of propriety in 
his publication, and, having brought the matter to the notice of the pro- 
vincial grand lodge, it was adjudged an innovation and ordered to be 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 147 

suppressed. Under the direction of a committee appointed by the deputy 
provincial grand master, all the unsold copies of the work were called in 
and destroyed. 

A. D. 1860. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. John H. Sheridan, W. M. 
Bro. William Wedderburn, S. W. Bro. John D. Short, J. D. 

" Joseph Sullivan, J. W. '' Isaac Campbell, S. S. 

" Thomas Marter, Treas. " George Bingham, J. S. 

" M. Plummer Dob, Sec'y. " Thomas D. Gard I. G. 

" Albert Hartt, S. D. " Henry Brown, Tyler. 

January 3 — The funds of the lodge, over and above amount required 
for current expenses, were ordered to be deposited in the savings bank on 

interest. 

February 7 — A new bye-law was adopted providing for the payment 
to the secretary for his services of the sum of seven pounds ten sliillings 
annually, and five per centum on all dues collected. 

The W. M. reported that he had effected insurance on the property of 
the lodge to the amount of one hundred pounds at one per cent. 

August 7 — The lodge was closed at an early hour on account of a 
public demonstration, including torchlight procession, illumination, fire- 
works, etc., taking place in honor of the visit of His Royal Highness- 
Albert Edward, Prince of Wales. 

August 17 — The East was occupied this evening and the F. C. <iegree 
conferred by \V. Bro. Caleb Rand, who imparted instruction to the craft 
in this city in July, 1858. 

October 2 — The lodge received a fraternal visit from the W. >x and 
brethren of Albion Lodge. Upon invitation, the W. M. and officers of 
Albion Lodge occupied the several stations and conferred the M. M. 
degree upon a candidate. 

A. D. 1861. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. John H. Sheridan, W. M. 
Bro. George T. Leonard, S. W. Bro. George Bighara, J. D. 

" Wra. S. Berton, J. W. " Robert R. Allan, S. S. 

" Thomas Marter, Trea*. " Ebenezer McNichol, J. 8. 

" M. Plummer Dole, Sec'y. " Jared Hepburn, I. G. 

" Albert Hartt, S. D. " Henry Brown, Tyler. 

February 7— R. W. Bro. Alex. Balloch, P. G. M., and officers of the 
provincial grand lodge, nitde an official visit to the lodge. 



148 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The secretary and treasurer were authorized to procure new books, to 
enable them to keep their accounts in the new decimal system of cur- 
rency lately introduced into New Brunswick, whereby the old method of 
<;omputation by pounds, shillings and pence was changed to dollars and 
cents. 

November 5 — A committee was appointed to act in conjunction with 
committees of sister lodges in Saint John, to report upon the advisability 
of organizing a general lodge of instruction. 

Nothing practical resulted from the appointment of this committee on 
account of a want of unanimity among the lodges in furthering the object 
in view. 

December 3 — A new bye-law was adopted, having for its object the 
appointment annually of a standing committee of charity. It was deemed 
that this change would inaugurate a better system of dispensing aid to 
distressed brethren, their widows and orphans, and prevent delays and 
irregularities heretofore occurring and inimical to the lodge and to those 
who, through misfortune, became its wards. 

Under this new regulation the first committee, consisting of Bros. 
W. F. Bunting, Wm. Wedderburn and Albert Hartt, was appointed 
January 2, 1862. From that time to the present a charity committee has 
been appointed annually, upon which Bro. Bunting has served uninter- 
ruptedly — a period of more than thirty-two years. 

" The widow's tear, the orphan's cry ; 
All wants our ready hands supply, 

As far as power is given. 
The naked clotlied, the prisoner free ; 
These are thy works, sweet Charity, 

Revealed to ua from Heaven." 

A. D. 1862. 
The officers of this year were : 

Bro. William Wedderburn, W. M. 
Bro. Henry F. Perley, S, \V. Bro. Charles H. Tucker, J. D. 

" William P. Dole, J. W. " John R. Smith, S. 8. 

" Thomas Marter, Treas. " Guilford S. Reed, J. S. 

" M. Pluminer Dole, Sec'y. " George Lord, I. G. 

" John D. Short, S. D. " Henry Brown, Tyler. 

February 4 — The lodge was favored with an ofllcial visit from the 
provincial grand master and other oflicers. 

March 11 — The lodge formed a funeral procession and paid the last 
tribute of respect to the remains of the late Bro. George T. Leonard, 
past senior warden. Bro. Leonard was initiated in St. John's Lodge, 
April 3, 1855. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 149 

April 7 — A new code of bye-laws was adopted, and five hundred 
copies ordered to be printed. 

The worshipful master, with his officers and other members, made 
fraternal visits to the several sister lodges in the city in the months of 
November and December. 

December 27 — The festival of St. John the Evangelist was celebrated 
by a dinner, under the banner of the provincial grand lodge, at the Stubbs 
hotel, Prince William street, at which about sixty brethren, representing 
the provincial grand lodge and the various city lodges, sat down. R. W. 
Bro. Alexander Balloch, P. G. M., presided, supported on the right by 
W. Bro. William Wedderburn, W. M., St. John's Lodge, and on the left 
hy W. Bro. Edward Willis, P. M., Leinster Lodge. R. W. Bro. B. 
Lester Peters, Prov'l S. G. W^., occupied the West, and R. W. Bro. Edwin 
J. Wetmore, Prov'l J. G. W., the South. After removal of the cloth a 
full complement of toasts was given, interspersed with speeches and songs. 
A band of music was in attendance and added much to the evening's 
enjoyment. 

A. D. 1863. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. William Wedderburn, W. M. 
Bro. William S. Berton, S. W. Bro. George A. L Forest, J. D. 

" John D. Short, J. W. " Thomas Curtis, S. S. 

" Charles E. Potter, Treas. " William W. Ansley, J. S. 

" M. Plummer Dole, Sec'y. " Charles E. Burnham, I. G. 

" J. Gordon Forbes, 8. D. " Henry Brown, Tyler. 

April 11 — The remains of the late Bro. William W. Ansley, junior 
steward of the lodge, were buried witii masonic ceremony. Bro. Ansley 
was initiated in St. John's Lodge, May 16, 1862. 

June 24 — Upon invitation of the mayor and corporation of the city 
of Saint John, the corner stone of the city hull in Carleton was laid with 
the ceremonial usual on such occasions, by R. W. Bro. Alexander Bal- 
loch, P. G. M., assisted by the officers of the provincial grand lodge, and 
the members of the various lodges and other niasonic bodies in the city. 
The weather was charming, and there was a largo gathering of the craft. 
Isaac Woodward, Esquire, mayor, with other civic dignitaries, occupied 
a prominent place in the procession. An elegant silver trowel, having an 
appropriate inscription thereon, used at the ceremonial, was presented by 
the city corporation to the provincial grand master. 

Heptember 1 — The lodge was informed by a letter from V. W. Bro. 
Wm. Gray Clarke, grand secretary, London, that " in consequence of the 
vacancies which have occurred in the numbers of lodges on the registry 



160 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

of the grant! lodge of England, by voluntary surrender of warrants, and 
by the erasure of lodges, the numbers on the register had been re- 
arranged. The number of St. John's Lodge, heretofore 632, would hence- 
forth stand on the register as No. 436." 

To p' ovide for this change, a committee was appointed to have the 
number on the warrant made to correspond with the new number, and 
also to procure a new seal. 

Another committee was appointed to ascertain the cost of a new set of 
regalia. 

The following is a list of the English lodges in New Brunswick at 
this time (eighteen in all), together with their old and new numbers, viz.: 

Albion Saint John, changed from 570 to 400 

Saint John's do « 682 " 436 

Sussex Dorchester, " 705 " 480 

St. Mark's St. Andrews, " 759 " 518 

Solomon's Fredericton, " 764 "522 

Carleton Union Carleton, " 767 " 524 

Midian Clifton, « 770 " 527 

Union of Portland Saint John, " 780 " 535 

Woodstock Woodstock, " 811 " 553 

St. George St. George, « 912 " 629 

Corinthian Hampton, " 918 " 63i> 

Keith Moncton, " 927 " 644 

Alley Upper Mills, " 962 " 664 

Howard Hillsborough, " 966 " 668 

Northumberland Newcastle, " 1003 " 701 

Miramichi Chatham, « 1077 " 775 

Salisbury Salisbury, . " 1110 " 808 

Zetland Shediac, " 1188 " 886 

These changes were made at the quarterly communication of the 
grand lodge, held 3rd Deceniber, 1862. 

A. D. 1864. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. Robert G. Crozier, W. M. 
Bro. John D. Short, S. W. Bro. Jacob D. Underbill, J. D. 

" Tiiomas Marter, J. W. " Richard Crumble, S. S. 

" Charles E. Potter, Treas. " Thos. O. Sandall, J. S. 

" J. Gordon Forbes, Sec'y. " Henry Houle, I. G. 

" Geo. A. DeForest, S. D. " Henry Brown, Tyler. 

April 5 — A letter from the provincial grand secretary announced 
that, at a quarterly communication of the provincial grand lodge held 
March 2, " a committee was appointed to enquire into the practicability 
of the erection of a masonic temple in this city, and report at the next 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 1.51 

ouarterly communication such information as to locality, description of 
building, ways and means of raising funds, etc., as said committee may 
deem desirable to carry out the object in view." 

The letter contained a request for the appointment, by the lodge, of a 
committee to co-operate with the provincial grand lodge committee; and 
in compliance therewith Bros. Potter, Marter and Crozier were appointed. 

Nothing practical resulted from the labors of this committee, arising 
principally from the unsettled condition of masonic affairs in the prov- 
ince from this date until the erection of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick in October, 1867. 

June 7 — The committee appointed September 1, 1863, reported that 
they had procured a new set of aprons and collars for the use of the lodge. 

December 6 — R. W. Bro. Alexander Balloch, P. G. M. and officers 
visited the lodge. 

A. D. 1865. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. John D. Short, W. M. 
Bio. J. Gordon Forbes, S. W. Bro. Jos. C. Hatlieway, J. D. 

" Jacob D. Underbill, J. W. " Tbos. O. Sandall, S. S. 

" Robert G. Crozier, Treas. " Henry Hjule, J. S. 

" Wni. K. Bunting, Seo'y. " John White, I. G. 

" Chas. n. Tucker, S. D. " Henry Brown, Tyler. 

January 3 — The general hall committee submitted a report, in which 
it was stated that " they had had under consideration the })ropriety of 
making provision for the future wants of Bro. John Boyer, who had 
always been an exemplary and zealous mason, and during many years 
the tyler of the various masonic bodies in this city, but whose advanced 
age and enfeebled health unfitted him for the performance of further 
duty. In view of these facts the committee had unanimously agreed to 
lay Bro. Boyer's case before the lodges, etc., and to request each to con- 
tribute an annual amount as a retiring allowance to him, as follows : 
Albion Lodge, $50; St. John's Lodge, $25; Union Lodge of Portland, 
S25 ; Hibernia Lodge, $25 ; and Carleton R. A. Chapter, $25 ; making a 
total of $150 annually." 

The lodge adopted the reconunendation of the hall committee, and 
agreed to pay twenty-five dollars annually towards the retiring allowance 
of their aged and faithful tyler. 

February 7 — A marshal or director of ceremonies was appointed and 
installed for the first time in St. John's Lodge, in the person of Bro. 
Samuel F. Matthews. 
K 



152 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The lodge took the initiative in the formation of a general board of 
relief by the appointment of a committee to consider and report upon the 
question, and by directing the secretary to request sister lodges iu Saint 
John to join in the movement. 

As all the lodges were not favorable to the formation of such aboard, 
the matter dropped for the time being. 

October 3 — W. Bro. William Wedderburn, P. M., gave notice that at 
the next regular conimunication he would move resolutions in favor of 
the erection of an Independent Grand Lodge, as follows : 

Wliercdn, It is expedient iind evidently calculated to increase the efficiency and 
general usefulness of the ancient and iionorable fraternity of free and accepted 
masons in the provime of New Brunswick to erect in this province a grand lodge of 
independent jurisdiction, and as far as possible gather in the difierent lodges holding 
charters or warrants from the grand lodges respectively of England, Scotland and 
Ireland, under the jurisdiction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick ; and 

Whereas, In pursuance of this object, it is highly desirable that all steps tending 
thereto should be judiciously adopted, and governed by the fullest masonic love to 
the grand lodge of England, and every feeling of respect for it and the grand lodges 
of Scotland and Ireland; and 

Whereas, Subject to the approval hereafter referred to, it is proper that the feel- 
ings of the craft in New Brunswick siiould be consulted ; 

Therefore, resolrecl, That the members of St. John's Lodge, No. 436, E. R., are 
duly impressed with the conviction that the erection of a grand lodge of independ- 
ent jurisdiction, for the province of New Brunswick, would greatly promote the 
interest, efficiency and general usefulness of the craft in this province, and is an 
object very desirable ; and 

Farther resolved, That in' the prosecution of this object, they desire in the most 
proper spirit to consult the feelings and obtain the approval of the grand lodge of 
England, and of their masonic brethren in New Brunswick, to the end that any 
separation from the jurisdiction of the grand lodge of England may be ettected with 
the most sincere feelings of love and veneration on our own and their part, and con- 
fidence and afiection on the part of the grand lodge; and 

Further resolved, That all action in reference to lodges under the jurisdiction re- 
spectively of Scotland and Ireland, of right belongs, in the opinion of this lodge, 
exclusively to those grand and subordinate lodges, and on our part is left entirely to 
their wisdom and discretion ; and 

Further resolved, That in the event of the grand lodge of England graciously 
approving of this object, then in such case the M. W. the grand master of England 
be and he is hereby respectfully requested to authorize and require the R. W. pro- 
vincial grand master, or his deputy, or some other eligible person it) masonry, to 
summon a general convention of delegates from the subordinate lodges of New 
Bnmswick to consider the wisdom and expediency of erecting such grand lodge of 
New Brunswick under the approval of the grand lodge of England ; and 

Further resolved, That these resolutions, in due form authenticated, be trans- 
mitted by the secretary to the grand lodge of England for its consideration, with a 
desire to learn therefrom how far the proposed object will secure its countenance, 
and for such suggestions in the premises as may seem wise. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 153 

At the regular communication in December following the worshipful 
master refused to allow these resolutions to be entertained or discussed by 
the lodge, for the reason " that any movement contemplating a severance 
from a grand lodge could not be legally introduced or discussed in a lodge 
holding its warrant from such grand lodge." 

November 7 — A letter was received from the provincial grand secre- 
tary setting forth that, in consequence of the protracted and distressing 
illness of K. W. Bro. Alexander Balloch, P. G. M., it was decided at the 
annual communication held September last to request the respective lodges 
in the province, under the grand lodge of Engh iid, to nominate a tit and 
proper brother to be recommended to the ]M. W., the grand master of 
England, for appointment to the office of provincial grand master. 

The lodge, however, by a majority vote, declined to proceed to the 
nomination as requested, but expressed approval of the holding of a 
special communication of the provincial grand lodge to consider the 
matter, and declared that in the meantime it would " take the subject 
into its most serious consideration, and instruct its representatives to such 
special communication fully as to its wishes and views in the premises." 

A. D. 18G6. 
The officers of this year were : 

Bro John D. Shoit, W. M. 

Bro. J.ncob D. Undorhill, S. W. Bro. Tliomas O. Sandall, J. D. 
" Charles H. Tucker, J. W. " John White, S. S. 

" Rev. George J. Caie, Chap.' " Robert Moore, J. S. 

" William H. A. Keans, Treas. " Samuel F. Matthews, D, C. 

" William F. Burning, Sec'y. " S. Wright (iolding, I. G.. 

" Joseph C. Ilatheway, S. D. " Henry Brown, Tyler. 

January 2 — When the usual order for payment to the secretary of 
his salary and fees for the past year, amounting to forty-two dollars and 
eighty-five cents, had i)asscd, the secretary stated that his intention had 
always been not to accept compensation for any service rendered by him 
to the lodge, and, in pursuance of such intention, he begged to be allowed 
to hand the amount just vott-d him to the charity committee of the lodge. 
Whereupon the donation was accepted and the thanks of the lodge ten- 
dered him. 

A committee, consisting of Bros. John D Short, W. H. A. Keans, 
William Wedderburn and J. D. Underbill, was appointed, under resolu- 
tion, " to procure a testimonial to be presented to past master William F. 
Bunting, in acknowledgment of the valuable services rendered by him 
to the lodge during all the years of his membership." 

1 Rev. Bro. Caie was the first regularly aiipointed and installed chaplain in the lodge. 



154 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

February 6 — The mental and physical prostration of the R. W. pro- 
vincial grand master having remained in the same condition as reported 
to the lodge at the regular communication in November last, brought 
about the adoption of the following resolutions : 

Whereas, In consequence of the severe illness, mental as well as bodily, of the 
R. W. Bro. Alexander Balioch, P. G. M., he has during the past year been unable to 
attend to his ordinary business, while his person and estate have been placed under 
the control and management of trustees, appointed by the lieutenant governor of 
the province, on commission of lunacy, issued under the great seal in June last, 
which commission is still in force, and no application has been made to revoke it; 

Therefore re.'^olved, That while recording its deep regret at the aflliction with which 
the R. W. provincial grand master has been visited, and knowing that he is not res- 
ponsible or ac( oun'able for himself, this lodge cannot recognize any act claimed to 
have been done by him or in his name as binding or authoritative, and cannot re- 
ceive any communication bearing his signature. 

The following resolution was also adopted : 

That in the opinion of this lodge it is expedient that the present condition of the 
R. W. provincial grand master should be communicated to the M. W. the grand 
master of England, that he may take such steps for the relief of the craft in this 
province as he in his wisdom may deem proper, and that the W. M., wardens and 
secretary of the lodge be authorized to address him by memorial, with a view to re- 
voke the patent granted to the R. W. Bro. Alexander Balioch as provincial grand 
master of New Brunswick. 

Subsequently the lodge proceeded under resolution " to nominate a fit 
and proper brother to be recommended to the M. W., the grand master, 
for appointment to the distinguished position of provincial grand master," 
when, with but one dissentient, W. Bro. Robert Thomson Clinch, past 
master of Albion Lodge, No. 400, and deputy provincial grand master, 
was nominated. 

The decision of the lodge in relation to the office of provincial grand 
mastfci was precipitated by the unmasonic conduct of a few members of 
the fraternity, who, influenced by unworthy motives, and determined, if 
possible, to obtain control of the craft in the province, took advantage 
of the mentally weak condition of the provincial grand master, and, 
through improper influences, prevailed upon him to sign documents and 
do other acts which in his sane moments he would have spurned doing. 
They induced him^to attempt the displacement of the deputy provincial 
grand master and provincial grand secretary, by revoking the appoint- 
ment of these officers and ordering them to hand to their successors, whom 
he named, the books, papers, seals, etc., of the provincial grand lodge. 
By getting these two brethren out of the way, who were stumbling blocks 
to their unmasonic purposes, the malcontents hoped to accomplish their 
designs. In this, however, they were thwarted, for these officers paid no 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. 155 

Attention to the orders and manifestoes issued to them. They retained their 
positions and lil<e\vise the hooks, jiapers, etc., toj^ether witii the loyal sup- 
port of the lodges throughout the province. 

Many years have elapsed since these misguided hrethren entered into 
this conspiracy. With the lapse of time their motives were hrought to 
light. It is to be hoped it produced reflection and repentance. The 
writer, who was cognizant of every act and movement in the disgraceful 
drama, actuated by that charity which hideth a multitude of sins, has 
suppressed the names of those who took part in it. 

April 3 — The lodge donated thirty dollars to Northumberland Lodge, 
of the town of Newcastle, to aid in rebuilding their hall destroyed by 
fire in September last. 

May 2 — The remains of the late Bro. John Murray, Jr., were in- 
terred, with masonic ceremony by the lodge, in the rural cemetery. There 
was a large attendance of the craft, headed by the band of tiie fifteenth 
regiment. Rev. Bro. William Donald, D. D., officiated at the grave in 
both the church and masonic rituals. The pall-bearers were Bros. B. L. 
Peters, W. F. Bunting, James Kirk, John McAllister, G. J. Chubb and 
Robert Shives. Bro. Murray was initiated in St. John's Lodge December 
1, 1846, and filled the offices of senior deacon and junior warden. 

July 3 — Bro. John P. Bell, deputy provincial grand master of the 
North and East Ridings of Yorkshire, England, addressed a letter to the 
lodge recjucsting subscriptions to a work recently published by him, en- 
titled " Tlie Stream of English Freemasonry." 

September 6 — A procession under the banners of the provincial 
grand lodge, in which St. John's and sister lodges joined, was formed at 
ten o'clock in the forenoon, thence marched to St. Andrew's Kirk, where 
the brethren were favored witii an instructive and appropriate sermon by 
the Rev. Bro. William Donald. D. D., provincial grand chaplain. In the 
evening the brethren sat down to dinner in the Park hotel, King square. 
The divine service and dinner were the outcome of the annual communi- 
cation of the provincial grand lodge, presided over by the recently ap- 
pointed provincial grand master, R. W. Bro. Robert T. Clinch. 

October 6 — A committee, previously appointed, reported the purchase 
of an apron, jewel and collar for the chaplain o?' the lodge. 

V. W. Bro. William Gray Clarke, grand secretary, London, informed 
the lodge by letter that the grand master had been pleased to appoint 
R. W. Bro. Robert T. Clinch district grand master' for New Brunswick, 

1 By an order of the grand lodge, passed December, 1865, the title " provincial grand master " 
was changed to " district grand master in the colonies and foreign parts." 



156 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

"to whom all future communications relating to the craft are to be ad- 
dressed, excepting the returns of the lodge, applications for certificates, 
and other matters specially directed by the book of constitutions to be 
made to the grand secretary." 

November 6 — "The lodge voted twenty -five dollars to Bro. , 

of Solomon's Lodge, Fredericton, who had recently lost all his property 
by fire, on which there was no insurance." 

R. W. Bro. Robert T. Clinch, district grand master, accompanied by 
a staff of officers, made his first official visit. The warrant and books of 
the lodge were inspected, and friendly and fraternal sentiments exchanged. 
The district grand niaster and his officers occupied the respective stations 
in the lod^e and initiated two candidates. 



o 



A. D. 1867. 

The officers of this year, installed as usual December 27, were : 

Bro. James Gordon Forbes, W. M. 

Bro, Jos. C. Hatlieway, S. W. Bro. Robt. Thomson, Jr., J. D. 

" Rev. Geo. J. Caie, J. W. " Jos. L. Bnnling, S. S. 

" Rev. Neil McKay, Chap. " Jolin Sweet, J. S. 

" Wm. H. A. Keans, Treas, " Robert Finlay, D. C. 

" Wm. F. Bunting, Sec'y. " Robert Burns, I. G. 

" John White, S. D. " Henry Brown, Tyler. 

January 1 — An application was received from a brother residing at 
Grand Cay, Turk's Island, " for assistance to enable him to rebuild and 
replace his property destroyed by a hurricane September, 1866." The 
committee to whom this application was referred, subsequently reported 
against entertaining the petition, for the following reasons: "A large 
number of the fraternity were sufferers by the hurricane. An appeal on 
behalf of all the sufferers is now before the grand lodges of the mother 
country, and possibly this lodge may be called upon to join in the general 
contribution ; therefore an application from a single individual among a 
comnmnity of sufferers should be bucked by strong and urgent reasons 
to merit a separate consideration." 

A new bye-law was adopted which provided for the ap})ointment of a 
"property committee." The special duty of this committee was "to 
make annually an inventory of the property of the lodge; to compare it 
with the report of the preceding year ; to note additions or losses, and to 
make a report in full at the regular communication in January." 

" The secretary reported that Mr. , a petitioner for degrees, 

who was balloted for and accepted at the regular communication in July 
last, declined to come forward for initiation, on religious scruples, he 
being a Roman catholic." 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'07. 157 

An occurrence pleasantly renicinbcred by the compiler took place in 
the lodge this evening, by the presentation to hinj of an address engrossed 
and illuminated on Marchment, accompanied by a gold watch and chain. 
The address, reply, etc., are copied from the minutes, as follows : 

To WiLiiiAM Franklin Bunting, Escjuire, pant madcr of St John's L'^ihje, No. 
430, F. & A. M., on the registry of the grand lodge of England ; 

Worshipful Hrothkr : 

For the period of nearly lifteen years, during wliicii you liave been a member of 
St. John's Lodge, No. 430, Free and Aoceitted Masons, you have not only filled 
iiiiiny of its most important offices, including that of worshipful nia.ster, but you have 
endeared yourself to the lodge and, we believe, to the fraternity, by the frankness of 
your character and the sincerity of your actions, and by the ready performance of 
offices of attention and affection far beyond those of a merely official or routine 
nature. At all times and often at great personal sacrifice and inconvenience to 
yourself, you have been not only ready but anxious to afford cheerfully your valuable 
co-operution in all masonic " ways <ind works;" to assist in the deliberations, par- 
ticipate in the labors, perform the charities, and interchange the loftiest friendships 
of our lodge and institution — a faithful brother, a zealous mason, a judicious coun- 
sellor, a true man. Neces.sarily, therefore, you have contributed largely to the 
prosperity of this your mother lodge, and to the conmion well-being of our hon- 
orable and ancient fraternity. Stirred by memories of this characte>", the lodge ex- 
pects us to convey to you some testimonial of their esteem and :.rtection, not as an 
eqi ivalent for your labors, but as a very triffing testimonial lo your worth. 

In the name, therefore, of St. John's Lodge, No. 430, and on behalf of the 
committee, we present you with this watch and chain, and add that which, after all, 
will be of more value than any intrinsic worth of any mere work of art — the assur- 
ance of the love and confidence of your brethren, and their prayer for your "health, 
wealth and prosperity" here, and for your perpetual happiness hereafter. 

Fraternally and affectionately yours, 

W. IL A. Keans, p. M., "J 
Wsf. Wedderburn, p. M., > Committee. 
John D. Short, P. M., ) 
[L. S.] J. Gordon Forbes, 

Worshipful Master. 

Reply. 

Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Kest assured that the proceedings of this evening will always be held in remem- 
brance as one of the briglitest and most cheering incidents in my masonic career, 
and that my heart will ever beat responsive to the fraternal sentiments so warmly 
expressed in the valuable address just read — according me more credit for what 
yoii are pleased to say I have done, than for what I would desire to have done. 

It is difficult for me to find words to adequately express my grateful feelings to 
you for this valuable and handsome gift, and for the kind and affectionate address 
accompanying it, the remembrance of which will inspire me with renewed energy 
to follow out the grand principles of our society, which, when faithfully pursued, 
make masons better men, and men better members of society. 



158 . FKEE^rASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Since my iiKluctioii into the fraternity it lias been my endeavor, as far as lay in 
my power, to show that freemasonry, in its tenets and teachings, is of a more exalted 
nature than a mere plaything, and that its duties and claims as a charitable, moral 
and law-abiding institution are of paramount importance; and the flattering terms 
in wliich you have seen fit to allude to my exertions in its "ways and works.'Mead 
Tue to believe that you, my brethren, deem those eiibrts worthy of recognition. 

I thank you sincerely, worsliipful sir and brethren, for the assurance of your 
favor and confidence, and for the kind wishes for my health, j)rosperity and future 
happiness ; and, in conclusion, allow me to express the hope that when our several 
journeys "on the level of time" shall liave terminated, it may be our happiness to 
be reunited in the Grand Lodge above, where the world's "Great Architect lives 
and reigns supreme." ^, p ^^^^^^^ 

February 5 — "The t^eneral hall committee reported the adoption of 
a rule to prevent smoking in the ante-rooms; which rule was, by vote 
of the lodge, sustained." 

A committee was detailed to instruct; and prepare candidates for ad- 
vancement to the F. C. and M. M. degrees. 

An order passed by which every candidate hereafter should be pre- 
sented at his initiation with a cojjy of the book of constitutions and a 
copy of Rand's Masonic Companion. 

The W. M. rei)orted the purchase, by the general hall committee, of 
a new organ for the use of the respective bodies, when the lodge voted 
payment of its share of the cost. 

The secretary donated the amount of his salary and fees for the pa 
year to the charity fund of the lodge, and received a vote of thanks 
therefor. 

March 5 — The W. M. reported that the general hall committee had 
engaged Bro. Henry Card to ofHciate as organist to the bodies meeting in 
the hall at a salary of one hundred and fifty dollars for regular meetings', 
and one dollar each for emergent meetings ; whereupon the lodge ratified 
the act of the committee, and agreed to pay its proportion of the salary — 
twenty dollars. 

July 2-") — The lodge took jnirt in the ceremonial of laying the corner 
stone of the St. Stephen Presbyterian Church, sitimte near the corner of 
Garden and Pond streets. R. W, Bro. Robert T. Clinch, di.strict grand 
master, officiated, with the assistance of the district grand lodge and 
deputations of lodges, chapters and encampments from various sections 
of the province, numbe/ing about three hundred and fifty brethren. 

August 6 — R. W. Bro. William B. Simpson, past grand master of the 
grand lodge of Canada, lionored the lodge with a visit. 

September 3 — A circular letter was received from the chairman and 
secretary of a meeting of masters and past masters of city lodges, held 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1837-'67. loi) 

August 16th ultimo, "for consultation upon the present position of free- 
masonry in this province, and for such action thereon as might be deemed 
necessary." 

The letter stated that at such meeting it was decided to ask all the 
lodges in the province, under English, Irish and Scotch registries, to ap- 
point their masters, past masters and wardens, delegates to a convention 
to be held in the city of Saint John on the second Wednesday in October 
next, to consider: "First, whether the exclusive right of constituting 
lodges in this province can, in the altered political position of the prov- 
ince as a part of the dominion of Canada, be preserved to the grand 
lodges of England, Ireland and Scotland ; and, second, whether in the 
opinion of the lodges in this province, the interests of the fraternity and 
the general advancement and prosperity of our order would be best 
served by uniting in a jicneral grand lodge for the whole dominion of 
Canada, or in the establishment of an independent grand lodge for the 
province of New Brunswick." 

Thereupon the following resolution was unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That the worshipful master, past masters and wardens of St. Jolin's 
Lodge, No. 430, E. K., be and are hereby appointed representatives of the k)dge at 
such convention, and tliey are hereby authorized to act as may be deemed most ex- 
pedient for the interests of the craft in tiiis province.' 

November 5 — By the unanimous adoption of the following resolu- 
tions the lodge confirmed the decision of the convention, viz. : 

Whereaii, At a convention of delegates, representing this and seventeen other 
lodges in this province, holding warrants from the grand lodges of England, Ireland 
and Scotland, held on tlie ninth day of October ultimo, such delegates did, with a 
nearly unanimous voice, decide tliat the time had arrivetl when a grand lodge in and 
for the jirovince of New Brunswick was imperatively demanded ; and 

Wlwrenx, Sixteen of the lodges represented as above at such convention did 
solemnly erect themselves into an Independent (irand Lo<lge, under the name of 
"The (Irand Lodge of Ancient Free and .Vccepted MasOns of New Hrunswick" ; 

Therefore resuhrd, That this bulge, believing the act nf such delegates to be just 
and proper, and also believing that the time and circumstances demanded the erec- 
tion of such grand lodge, do now surrender tlie warrant under which it has been 
working for the past thirty-one years to the M. \V. (irand Master of England, and 

1 At thecoiiTontion held in Saint .Tohn, OctotH-r ninth and tenth, at which the Kmnd lodge of 
Xc'w iiriiii.swicli WHS forninlly crt'ctcd, St. Jolin's Lodge wns fully i(|iresenl('d liy the niH.sli'r, wardens 
iiiil piiNl ruiusters, wild t( ok n prominent part in the inipnrtant i|Uestions liroiiglit forward for con- 
^itk'ration. They acted in liarMumy witli llie duleKHles from the sister lodges in the province talcing 
I'url ill the convention, sixteen in nnniher mil of the total of twenty-four in St'xv Hrunswick hall- 
ii'g from the grand lo<lges of Kngland, Seollnntl and Ireland, and voted in favor of the formation of 
llic grand lodge. < )f the seven principal otiicers electeil and appointed, memhers of St..Iiilin's I.<>dge 
llleil three of them, viz., those of the deputy grand master, grand treiismcr, and grand secretary. 
Tlif (list grand master was M. W. Mro. Iloiijumin Lester Peters, who held the distiiigriislied position 
until S( pti'niher, 1S70. 'I he grand secretary continued ,o olllee until April, 188J, when he resigned. 
Twii nit'inbers of 'it. John's Lodge have tilled the ottiee of grand master. 



160 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

that it be placed in the hands of the II. W. District Grand Master, that he may trans- 
mit it to the V. W. Grand Secretary ; and 

Further resolved, Tliat in thus severing the fraternal tie which has so long bound 
St. John's Lodge to the mother grand lodge, we, its members, do most cordially ex- 
press our gratitude for the kind care and attention which have ever been extended 
to us by our mother grand lodge, and to assiiic the M. W. Grand Master that the 
name of the grand lodge of England will always be revered by us. 

Ill accordance with the foregoing resolutions, St. John's Lodge, No. 
43G, on the registry of the grand lodge of England, ceased to work and 
act as such, and was thereupon closed in form. 

St. John's Lodge was immediately opened again under authority of 
the following 

DISPENSATION. 
To All Whom it May Conckiin : 

The Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons in and for the province of New 
Brunswick having been this day duly organized, and having elected me, Benjamin 
Lester Peters, of tiie city of Saint John, a past master on the registry of England, 
to the distinguished position of (irand Master for New Brunswick, and the masonic 
jurisdiction thereunto belonging, 1 do, by virtue of tl' powers in me vested, give 
and grant hereby unto the worshipful master, wardens and brethren of the lodge 
heretofore known as "St. John's Lodge, No. 436, on the registry of tiie united grand 
lodge of free and accepted masons of England," full power and authority to continue 
to hold their masonic meetings and to pursue tlieir masonic work, until formal 
warrant be granted under the seal of the grand lodge of New Brunswick ; and, until 
such formal warrant be granted, this dispensation shall lie their sufficient authority. 
Ail things to be done in order, according to tiie constitutions of the united grand 
lodge of ancient free and ac('epte<l masons of England, the same so far as applicable 
having been adojjted by the grand lodge of New Brunswick for the present govern- 
ment of the lodges under liiis Juwsdiction. 

(tiven under my !ian<l at tlie city of Saint Jolin, in the province of New Bruns- 
wick, the tontii day of October, A. L. 5807, A. D. 1867. 

B. Lester Peters, 

(irand Mauler for New lirunsivicf:. 

Under this interim uarrnnt the lodge commenced the third era in its 
history. The fii*st covered a period of thirty-Hve yeai*s, from 1802 to 
1837, under warrant from the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia; 
and the second extending over a jieriod of upwards of thirty years, from 
1837 to 18(57, under warrant of the united gnind lodge of England. 

During the latter period two hundred and ninety-three candidates 
were initiated and thirty-eight brethren received as joining members, 
making a total of three hundred and thirty-one added to the roll in 
thirty years, an average of eleven each year. The last initiate under 
the English warrant was Bro. Edgar C. Baker, and the first under the 
New Brunswick authoritv, Bro. John Sandall, Jr. 



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Kac-simii.k of vSt. John's 'LoDdK Warrant, Nkw Brunswick Registry. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 163 

A. D. 18^8. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. Joseph C. Hatheway, W. M. 
Bro. Rev. George J. Caie, S. W. Bro. Win. J. ':uvi(lson, J. D. 

" John White, J. W. " Henrj H. Giirdner, S. S. 

" Wm. H. A. Keans, Treas. " Henry G. Hunt, J. S. 

" Wm. F. Bnnting, Sec'y. " Rol)ert D. Davis, D. C. 

" Wm. H. Sinnott, S. D. " James H. Robinson, I. G. 

Bro, John Boyer, Tyler. 

January 7 — The secretary donated the amount of his salary and fees 
for 1867 to the lodge charity fund, and received the thanks of the h)dge 
therefor. 

May 15 — M. W. Bro. B. Lester Peters, grand master, accompanied 
by the officers of the grand h)dge, made an official visit this evening. 

"The grand master having assumed the East, stated that his first 
official visit to the lodge had a two-fold object : first, to meet the brethren 
of St. John's Lodge in lodge assembled ; and second, to commit to the 
charge of the lodge the new warrant of constitution issued under author- 
ity of the grand lodge of New Brunswick. The warrant was thereupon 
read by the grand secretary, and then formally placed in the hands of 
the worshipful n)aster." 

COPY OF THE WARR.WT. 
B. Lbstek Petkrs, G. M. 

[l. s.] To All and Everij oar Right-Womhipful, Worshipful and Loving Brethren. 

We, Benjamin Lester. Peters, of the city of Saint John, in the province of New 
Brunswick, in British North America, Esquire, Deputy .Judge of tlie Court of 
Vice-Admiralty of New Brunswick, etc., Grand Master of the Ancient and 
Honorable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of New Bnmswick, 

Send Greetinc; : 

Whereas, The Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Honorable Fraternity of Free 
and Accepted ^^asons of New Brunswick hath been duly erected upon the ancient 
chilrgcs and constitutions of Freemasonry, by the unanimous consent of the requisite 
number of duly warranted lodges ; and 

Whereas, One of such lodges, called the "St. John's Lodge," did hold warrant, 
granted the twenty-ninth day of April, A. D. ]83(), by Pr.nce Augustus Frederick of 
Brunswick Linienburgh, Duke of Sussex, Earl of Inverne; s, Baron of Arklow, Knight 
of the Most Noble Order of the (iarter, K. T., etc., Grand Master of the Mo.st 
Ancient and Honorable Frateriiity of Free and Accepted Masons of England, 
under the authority and sanction of the United Grand Lodge of L]ngland, to the 
right trusty and well-beloved JJretliren, John Haws, Joseph Linglcy, James G. 
Lester, James P. Payne, John McCready, Robert Payne, l']lliot Dyer, James Hinds, 
John Richardson and others, constituting the said Brethren into a lodge of I'ree and 
Accepted Mason.s, under tbe title of "The St. John's Lodge," to be liolden in the 



164 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

city of Saint John, in the province, of New Brnnswick; whioli lodge continiml 
under such warrant from tliat date up to and at tlie time of their acting with other 
lodges in the formation of the Grand Lodge of New Brunswick. The St. John's 
Lodge aforesaid, at tlie time of tiie erection of the Grand Lodge of New Brunswick, 
had for master the worshipful brother, James Gordon Forbes; for senior warden, 
brother Josepli Canby Hatheway ; for junior warden, brother the Keverend George 
Johnstone Caie, and brethren to the number of one iiundred on the roll of members 
of the said lodge, and the (J rand Lodge of New Brunswick doth continue to said 
brethren tlieir privileges as a lodge. 

Now know ye, That we, by the authority and under the sanction of the Most 
Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Ancient aid Flonorable Fraternity of Free and Ac- 
•cepted Masons of New ' mswick, and for said grand lodge, do hereby constitute oiu- 
right trusty and well beloved brethren, James Gordon Forbes, Joseph Canby Hathe- 
way, and the Reverend George Jolinstone Caie, aforementioned, into a lodge of free 
and accepted masons, under the title or denomination of St. John's Lod(je, No. 2, 
tlie said lodge to meet in the city of Saint John, in New Brunswick, on the first 
Tuesday in every month; empowering them in the said lodge, when duly congre- 
gated, to make, {)ass and raise freemasons according to the ancient custom of the 
craft in all ages and nations throughout the known world; and further, of the great 
trust and confidence reposed in every of the above named brethren, we do authorize 
the said James Gordon Forbes, so being master, the said Joseph Canby Hatheway, so 
being senior warden, and the said Reverend George Johnstone Caie, so being junior 
warden, at the time of the erection of such grand lodge, to open and hold St. John's 
Lodge aforesaid, luitil such time as another master sliall be duly elected and installed, 
and other wardens regularly appointed and installed; strictly charging that every 
member who sliall be elected to preside over the said lodge, and wlio must previously 
have duly served as warden in a warranted lodge, shall be installed in ancient form 
and according to the laws of the grand lodge, that he may thereby be fully invested 
with the dignities and powers of his office. And we do recjuire you, the said James 
Gordon Forbes, to take special care that all and every the said brethren are or have 
been regularly made masons, and that you and they, and all other the members of 
the .said lodge, do observe, perform and keep the laws, rules and orders contained in 
the book of constitutions, and all others which may from time to time l)e made by 
our grand lodge, or transmitted by us or our succes.sors grand ma,sters, or by our 
<leputy grand master for the time being; and we do enjoin ymi to make such bye- 
laws for the govt'rnment of your lodge as shall to the majority of the members 
appear prop«i mil necessary, the same not being contrary to or inconsistent with the 
general laws and regulations of the craft, a copy of which you are to transmit to us; 
and we do refpiire you to cause all such bye-laws and regulations, and also an account 
of the pioitedings in your lodge, to be entered in a book to be kept for that pur- 
pose. And you are in no wise to omit to send to us or our successors grand masters, 
or to the Right Worshipful William Wedderburn.of the city of Saint John, Esquire, 
Barrister-at-Law, etc., our Deputy Grand Miuster, or to the deputy grand master for 
the time being, at least once in each year, a list of the members of your lodge, and 
the names and descriptions of all miusons initiated therein, and brethren wiio sIimII 
have joined the same,, with tlie fees and moneys payable thereon. It being our will 
and intention that this, our Warrant of Constitution, shall continue in force so 
long as you shall conform to the laws and regulations of our grand lodge. And you, 



ST, JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 165 

the said James Gordon Forties, are fiirtljer required, so soon as conveniently may be,. 

to send us an account in writing of what shall be done by virtue of these presents. 

Given under our hands and the seal of the grand lodge at Saint John, N. B., tlie 

twenty-ninth day of April, A, L. 5868, A. D. 18(58. 

Wm. Wkdderburn, 

Wm. F. Bunting, G. S. D. G. M. 

" The M. W. the grand piaster directed the attention of the W. M. to 
the necessity of having the bye-laws of the lodge revi.scd at an early day, 
to make them conformable to the constitutions of the grand lodge, and 
the changed conditions of the lodge." 

At the succeeding communication a committee was appointed to carry 
out the above suggestion. 

September 24 — The lodge joined with the sister lodges in the city in 
a dinner at the Waverley House, King street, on the occasion of the firet 
annual communication of the grand lodge. It was tendered by them as 
a compliment to the members of the grand lodge. 

December 1 — "Bros. Forbes, Estey and White were appointed a 
committee to procure a suitable testimonial to be presented to past 
master, W. Bro, John D. Short, as a mark of the regard in which he is 
held by the lodge, and in appreciation of the valuable services rendered 
by him during the time he filled the office of worshipful master, and at 
all times as a private member and past master." 

December 28 — The installation services were held this day on account 
of the 27th falling on Sunday. The M. W. the Grand Master honored 
the lodge with a visit. He occupfed the East, and installed W. Bro. 
Joseph C. Hatheway, worshipful master-elect into the oriental chair. 

A. D. 1869. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. J()sei»h C. Hatheway, W. M. 

Bro. W. Herbert Sinnott, S. W. Bro. Canby Hatheway, J. D. 
" Samuel F. Matthews, J. W. " Charles A. Estey, S. S. 

" Rev. George J. Caie, Chap. " Edwd. L. Berteaux, J. S. 

" Wm. H. A. Kcum, Treas. " John Sandall, Jr., D. C. 

" Wm. J. Davidson, Sec'y. " Fred. M. Berry man, I. G. 

" Henry G. Hunt, S. D. " " John Boyer, Tyler. 

February 2 — The audit committee reported the funds of the lodge at 
the close of 1868 as follows: In the hands of the treasurer, S435.17; in 
the savings bank, 8823.54; total, $1258.71 ; and indebtedness of the mem- 
bers for dues, $141.80. 

April 29 — Under a resolution passed April 15th instant, the lodge 
had a supper at the White House, Prince William street, Bro. Charles 



166 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Watts, proprietor, it being the first anniversary of the date of the war- 
rant held from the grand lodge of New Brunswick. The brethren at- 
tended in regalia, under a dispensation issued by the grand master. The 
supper was restricted to the members of the lodge and a few guests, in- 
cluding the grand master and the masters of sister city lodges. 

May 4 — The lodge adopted a new code of bye-laws under a report of 
the committee appointed June last. 

July 30 — The corner stone of a masonic hall in course of erection by 
<Jarleton Union Lodge, No. 8, Carleton, was laid with masonic ceremony 
by M. W. Bro. B. Lester Peters, G. M., assisted by a full deputation of 
grand lodge officers and the various masonic bodies in 8t. John. St. 
John's Lodge, under its worshipful master, Bro. Joseph C. Hathewav, 
occupied its proper i)lace in the procession and took part in the ceremony. 
The procession was formed at two o'clock in the afternoon, on Canterbury 
street, under Bro. James A. Harding, high sheriff of the city and county 
of Saint John, as grand director of ceremonies. The united body crossed 
the harbor by the ferry, :uk1 marched through the principal streets of 
Carleton to the site of the contemplated hall, where the grand lodge and 
other bodies formed in and about the foundation of the building. The 
corner stone was then laid with the customary masonic ceremonial, after 
which the brethren proceeded to the Carleton city hall and partook of a 
luncheon [)r()vided by the Carleton Union Lodge. At the conclusion of 
the lunch the several bodies formed again in order of procession and re- 
turned across the ferry to their quarters. 

December 7 —An official visit was received from the M. W. the 
grand master and officers of the grand lodge. During their visit the 
lecture of the E. A. degree was rehearsed. 

December 27 — Another official visit was made by the grand master, 
who installed the worshipful master-elect, W. Bro. W. Herbert Sinnott. 

A. D. 1870. 
The officers of this year were : 

Bro. William Herbert Sinnolt, W. M. 

Bro. \Vm. J. Davidson, S. W. Bro. Cliiirles A. Estey, J. D. 

" Henry G. Hunt, .1. W. " Joseph Head, 8. S. 

" Rev. George J. Caie, Chap. " Nathan Green, J. S. 

" \Vm. H. A. Keans, Treas. " Abijah H. Eaton, D. C. 

" Edward Manning, Sec'y. " J. Newton Wilson, I. G. 

" Canby Hatheway, S. D. " .John Boyer, Tyler. 

March 1 — "The trustees of the lodge funds reported that the sum of 
twelve hundred dollars was now in the Savings bank to the credit of the 



. ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-94. 167 

lodge ; and that, in consequence of the change in the register of the 
lodge, this amount had been re-deposited in the name of 'St. John's 
Lodge, No. 2, registry of New Brunswick.' " 

" The connnittee appointed December 1, 1868, to procure a testimonial 
for presentation to W. Bro. John Davis Short, P. M„ reported that they 
had ordered and received a past master's jewel of gold and enclosed in a 
morocco case. W. Bro. Short was then presented by the worshipful 
master with the jewel, accompanied by an appropriate address, to which 
tlie recipient returned a suitable reply." 

Ai)ril 5 — A grant of one hundred dollars was voted to Carleton 
Union Lodge in aid of the building fund of their new hall. 

August 2 — At the request of New Brunswick Lodge, No. 22, a com- 
mittee was appointed to act iu conjunction with committees of sister 
lodges in the city, to consider the feasibility of organizing a general 
board of charity. 

September 28 — St. John's Lodge, by invitation, joined the grand 
lodge and sister lodges in dedicating the new masonic hall erected in 
Carleton by the Carleton Union Lodge, No. 8. M. W. Bro. B. Lester 
Peters, G. M., officiated. 

October 4 — " W. Bro. W, F. Bunting stated that he had received a 
dispensation from the grand master, authorizing him to open and con- 
duct a lodge of instruction under the name of the ' Emulation Lodge of 
Instruction,' and that such lodge would be organized on Saturday even- 
ing, the fifteenth day of the present month." 

November 1 — A circular letter was received from the grand secretary, 
setting forth that the Grand Orient of France had solicited contributions 
to an "International masonic subscription to be em[)loytd in the aid and 
relief of all freemasons of the army and navy of France, now engaged in 
the war with Prussia, and their families;" that the board of general pur- 
poses felt desirous of raising not less than one thousand francs (about two 
hundred dollars) for that purpose, and requested the lodge to assist in a 
movement so humane and fraternal. Whereupon the lodge voted unani- 
mously to contribute thirty dollars. 

Another circular was received from the grand secretary, requiring all 
lodges to forward to him impressions of their seals, and copies of their 
bye-laws and warrants of constitution. 

The circular stated also that the board of general purposes, upon ap- 
plication of any lodge, would delegate a competent brother to give them 
instruction in the work and ritual, upon terms set forth in the letter. 

" W. Bro. J. C. Hatheway, past master of the lodge, stated that he 
had received authority and would shortly publish a masonic manual for 



168 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

the use of the craft in New Briiuswick. The lodge agreed to subscribe 
for one hundred copies." 

The committee appointed August 2n(l last, to consider the advisability 
of establishing a nuvsonic board of relief, submitted an exhaustive report 
recommending the formation of such a board in connection with the city 
lodges on the east side of the harbor, the fund to be raised by an annual 
capita assessment of sixty cents for each member on the lodge roll ; the 
board to be composed of two representatives from each lodge; such repre- 
sentatives to be empowered to elect semi-annually a president, vice- 
president and sub-committee, and annually a secretary-treasurer. Rule* 
for the government of the board were embodied in the report, and a 
tabular statement to prove that under the new organization a saving would 
be effected by a systematic and judicious granting of relief. 

A full discussion was had upon this report, and the following resolu- 
tions adopted in relation ihereto : 

Resolved, That St. John's Lodge approves of the formation of a masonic board 
of relief, to be composed of two representatives from each lodge in the city of Saint 
John, east side of the harbor, and agrees to the proposed plan for the organization 
and government of siicii board, and for providing it with funds, as embodied in the 
report of the committee appointed to take the subject into consideration ; and 

Further resolved, That the board of relief, when duly organized, shall have 
authority to adopt rules and regulations for the government thereof, a copy of which, 
iis well as of all amendments and additions thereto, shall be furnished the lodge for 
its information and guidance. 

W. Bros. W. F. liunting and John D. Short, who were appointed to 
represent the lodge at the now board of charity, have continued in that 
capacity without cessation up to the present date, April, 1894. 

December 27 — M. W. Bro. William Wedderburn, grand master, 
made an official visit and installed the worshipful master-elect, W. Bro. 
Heury G. Hunt. 

A. D. 1871. 

The officers of this year were : 

Bro. Henry Gilbert Hunt, W. M. 

Bro. Charles A. Estev, S. W. Bro. Jas. H. Robinson, J. D. 
" Thos. O. Sandali, J. W. " Hiram G. Betts, S. S. 

" Rev. Geo. J. Caie, Chap. " Thomas H. Lynn, J. S. 

" Wm. H. A. Keans, Treas. " J. Newton Wilson, D. C. 

" Jos. C. Hatheway, Sec'y. " Geo. W. Fletcher, L G. 

" Augustus P. Rolph, S. D. " Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

January 3 — Consequent upon the formation of the board of relief, 
the following addition to the bye-laws was adopted : 

At the regular communication in January of each year there shall be appointed 
two members of the lodge to act as representatives to the masonic board of relief. 
Such representatives shall, when required by the lodge or the worshipful master, 
make a report of the doings of said board of relief. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 169 

April 4 — "Thirty tloUai's were contributed to Corinthian Lodge, No. 
13, Hampton, to assist in rebuikling their hall destroyed wiiile being re- 
moved from Hampton village to Hampton station." 

August 29 — A letter was received from the board of general purposes 
of grand lodge to the effect, that negotiations were in progress for the 
purchase of a site for a masonic temple in Saint John, and the lodge was 
requested to take stock in the proposed company. In reply to this 
request the following resolution was unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That St. Jolin's Lodge become a subscriber in tlie caj)ital stock to the 
extent of two thousand dollars; that one thousand dollars of this amount be jiaid 
npon the call of the board of general jiurposcs, and payment of the remaining one 
thousand dollars be extended over a term of three years from the time of opening 
the stock subscription list. 

The New Brunswick Masonic Hall Company, incorporated by act of 
assembly, was the outcome of this movement. The company purchased 
the site on Germain street whereon the present masonic temple now 
stands. 

September 28 — At the request of the grand master and by special 
arrangement, this communication was convened to exenjplify the work of 
the fellow-craft degree before grand lodge at its annual session, and for 
the inspection of the officers and n embers thereof. The candidate — Bro. 
John J. Forrest — was advanced to the fellow-craft degree in due form. 
Upon the conclusion of the work, the officers of the lodge were compli- 
mented by the grand muster ujion the correct and impressive manner in 
which the ceremonies had been conducted. 

Novend)er 7 — In consequence of the death of Bro. John Boyer, and 
the cessation of the annuity of one hundred and fifty dollars paid him ))y 
the several lodges in Saint John, since January, 1865, and in considera- 
tion that an aged and helpless widow survived liim, the lodge agreed to 
contribute its jjroportion of an allowance of one hundred dollars per 
annum to her during the remainder of her life. 

A new bye-law was adopted authorizing a change in the time of in- 
stalling officers, as follows; " The master shall be installed according to 
ancient usage at the regular communication in January of each year; 
he shall then a])j)oint his wardens and other officers, who, with the 
treasurer and tylcr, shall be installed into their respective offices." 

Up to this date all the lodges in the city had held their installation 
services on St, John's day (December 27th), but so much time was taken 
up that when the junior lodge was enabled to commence operations, the 
day (or night) was far advanced and but few remained to witness the 
ceremony. To obviate this difficulty the lodges mutually agreed, at the 
L 



170 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

suggestion of the grand master, that all except Albion Lodge should 

hold their installations at their regular communications in January, and 

that Albion should continue to install on the festival day of St. John the 

Evangelist. That arrangement has been continued up to the present 

time. 

A. D. 1872. 

January 2 — The officers installed under the new law, for the current 

year were : 

Bro. Henry Gilbert Hunt, W. M. 

tfro. Thomas O. Sandall, S. W. Bro. John R. Armstrong, J. D. 

" Augustus P. Rolph,. I. \V. " James Holly, S. S. 

" William H. A. Keans, Treas. " George W. Fletcher, J. S. 

" Hiram G. Betts, Sec'y. " William M. 8ears, D. C. 

" Charles A. Estey, S. D. " George 11. Clark, I. G. 

Bro. Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

At this date the lodge had to its credit the sum of twelve hundred 
dollars in the dominion savings bank, bearing five pe^- cent interest. A 
change having been made by the government, whereby the interest on 
deposits was reduced to four per cent, the lodge voted to transfer the ac- 
count to the bank of New Brunswick, the latter institution allowing five 
per cent on special deposits. The lodge also voted to increase the amount 
to fifteen hundred d( '.s and to be deposited in the names of Bros. 
Keans, Bunting and Wedderburn as trustees. 

October 6 — The remains of the late Bro. George H. Vlieland were 
buried with masonic ceremony by the lodge in the Episcopal church yard, 
near the head of (Jourtenay bay. Bro. Vlieland was initiated in St. 
John's Lodge, June 4, 1872. 

November 5 — The hall committee having notified the lodge that they 
had terminated the agreement with Bro. Henry Card as organist to the 
res|)ective bodies, the W. M. was authorized to make arrangements where- 
by the lodge should continue to have the services of an organist. The 
W. M. reported at the next regular communication that he had engaged 
Bro. Card to furnish the lodge with music as usual. 

A. D. 1873. 
January 7 — The officers were installed for this year as follows: 

Bro. Thomas Overton Sandall, W. M. 

Bro. Augustus P. Rolph, y. W. Bro. Charles Inches, J. D. 

" William M. Sears, J. W. " William C. Allan, S. S. 

" Rev. rge J. Caie, Chap. •' Robert J. Moir, J. 8. 

" William H. A. Keans, Treas. - " John J. Forrest, D. C. 

" John R. Armstrong, Hec'y. " Fred. 8. Williams, I. O. 

" John 8. MacLaren, 8. D. " L)ingee Scribner, Tyler. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 171 

February 4 — The members of the lodge, with invited guests, dined 
fit the International hotel, Prince William street. It was the occasion of 
the completion of twenty-one years' membership of W. Bro. William F. 
Bunting, a past master of the lodge. A large number of the craft sur- 
rounded the tables, including the grand muster and other officers of the 
grand lodge, also the masters of the city lodges. The brethren appeared 
in masonic regalia, under a dispensation of the grand master, and spent 
a pleasant evening in the routine usually observed at masonic festivals. 

March 10 — The remains of the late Bro. John King were buried by 
the lodge with masonic ce.cmony in the burial ground at Carleton. In 
consequence of a heavy snow storm prevailing, the brethren had great 
difficulty in reaching the place of interment and conducting the burial 
service. After the ceremony at the grave they returned as best they 
could, the immense drifts of snow making it impossible to march in order. 
The volunteer artillery, to which the deceased brother belonged, formed 
an escort to the grave. Bro. King was initiated in St. John's Lodge 
April 5, 1870. 

April 1 — A vote of thanks was passed to Bro. Bunting for presenting 
the lodge with an outfit for candidates. 

jMay 6 — The W. M. called the attention of the lodge to a practice 
pursued by lodges in Saint John, in summoning their members to attend 
masonic funerals by lengthy advertisements in the daily newspapers and 
by placards posted in the public streets ; he stated that a meeting of the 
mastere of the lodges had been called to discuss this matter, at which the 
practice had been condemned. 

"Thereupon, it was moved and resolved, that when St. John's Lodge 
has charge of the funeral of a deceased brother, then in such case only 
shall an advertisement be inserted in the public newspapers, calling out 
the lodge and requesting sister lodges and transient brethren to join ; 
provided, that in all cases sealed summonses be issued when the lodge is 
recjuired to attend a funeral ; 

" And further resolved, that when the master of a sister lodge requests 
the attendance of the members of St. John's Lodge at the funeral of a 
deceased brother not a member of St. John's Lodge, then the members of 
the lodge shall be notified by a sealed sununons and not by a public 
iidvertisement. 

A. D. 1874. 

The officers of the lodge for this year were not installed until the 
regular ccnumunication in March, on account of an irregularity in the 
election of the W. M., as hereafter explained. The officers were : 



172 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Bro. William Macara Sears. W. M. 

Bro. Hiram G, Betts, S, W. Bro. Fred. S. Williams, J. D. 
" Charles Inches, J. W. " George B. Hegan, S. S. 

" Rev. George J. Caie, Chap. " John P. Eetts, J. S. 

" Wra. H. A, Keans, Treas. " Wm. C. Allan, D. C. 

" Thomas Stothart, Sec'y. " Charles J. Wills, I. G. 

" John Buchanan, S. D. " Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

January 6 — "When the minutes of the last regular communication 
were placed before the lodge for confirmation, the foUowmg resolution* 
were offered : 

Whereas, The grand lodge and the craft generally liave declared that canvassing 
and other improper methods to secure the election of a brother to office in any 
lodge, are highly improper and unmasonic, and calculated to destroy the welfare 
and harmony of the lodge where such practices are pursued ; 

And whereas, There is reason to believe that previous to the election of the 
master of St. John's Lodge at the last regular communication, an unmasonic canvass 
was iiiade and improper influences were brought to bear upon the members oi the 
lodge to secure the election of Bro. William M. Sears to the office of worshipful 
master ; 

And whereas, There is reason io believe that an unjust, improper and unmasonic 
canvass was carried on to prevent the election of Bro. Augustus P. Rolph to the 
office of worshipful master, such canvass being coupled with unfounded statements 
calculated to injure his character and standing in the lodge ; 

And whereas, It is the opinion of this lodge that under such circumstances the 
election of the said Bro. Sears to the office of W. M. is not an expression of the free 
and unbiased opinion and wishes of the membership of this lodge ; 

Therefore resolved, That the portion of the minutes of the last regular communi- 
cation, relating to the election of Bro. William M. Sears to the office of worshipful 
master, be not confirmed. 

"The motion being seconded, a full discussion was had, and upon the 
question being submitted to the lodge, it was decided in the affirmative 
and the said election declared void." 

Februarys — "Read a communication from the masonic board of 
relief, stating that the board had purchased a plot of ground comprising 
twelve lota, in the rural cemetery, at a cost of two hundred and eighty- 
nine dollars, to be set apart for the burial of strange and destitute 
brethren ; that about eight hundred dollars would be required to place 
the ground in proper shape, and asking it an assessment of one dollar 
per member be made to assist in meeting the expense." 

"Whereupon it was ordered that the matter be deferred for future 
consideration." 

The lodge did not take any subsequent action upon this question, but 
allowed the board of relief to deal with it. 

The lodge proceeded, under the constitutions, to the election of a 
worshipful master for the current year, when Bro. William M. Sears was 
again elected. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 173 

March 3 — The grand master, accompanied by a staff of grand lodge 
officers, made an official visit and installed the W. M. elect, W. Bro. 
William M. Sears, after which the other officers of the lodge were in- 
stalled. 

May 15 — Rev. Bro. George J. Caie, whose early removal from Saint 
John necessitated the withdrawal of his membership, was presented with 
the following address : 

"Brotherly Love, Relief, and Truth." 

To Bro. George Johnstone Caie, Chaplain and Past Junior Warden of St. John^a 
Lodge, No. 2, on the registry of the Grand Lodge of F. & A. M. oj New Brunswick : 
Reverend and Dear Brother : 

On the eve of your departure from New Brunswick your brethren cannot permit 
you to retire from membership without an earnest assurance of the great respect 
entertained for you by every member of the lodge, and the high esteem in which 
you are lield by the craft generally. During the uiar; years of your membership in 
the lodge, up to the present period, you liave at all times, when permitted by the 
higher and more important duties of your sacred calling, earnestly labored for the 
welfare of the lodge, and in the elevation and refinement of those who came within 
its portals. Your brethren desire to express the sincere regret they experieu^e in 
the severance of your fraternal intercourse with them, and their sorrow that this 
severance is occasioned by a desire to seek health in a more genial climate, and rest 
in a less laborious sphere. They fervently pray tliat the Gre;it Architect of ilie 
Universe will see tit to restore you ere long to such health as will enable you to re- 
sume the active duties of life, and to discharge those high and responsible offices you 
are so worthily fitted to fill. Your brethren beg of you to convey to Mrs. Caie the 
expression of their highest respect and esteem, and they earnestly hope that wherever 
Providence may cast your futura let, both of you may live long in the enjoyment of 
the choicest gifts of a beneficent Creator. 

Given under our hands and the seal of our lodge, in lodge assembled, at the city 

of Saint .John, in the province of New Brunswick, dominion of Canada, this 15th 

day of May, A. D. 1874, A. L. 5874. 

William M. Sears, W. M. 

f T g \ Hiram G. Betts, S. W. 

^v,^,^_,^ Charles Inches, J. W. 

Thomas Stothart, Sec'y. 

To the foregoing address Bro. Caie made an eloquent and feeling 
reply. 

June 2 — A letter was received from the grand secretary, in which he 
informed the lodge that all matters of dispute betwc..n the grand lodges 
of Canada and Quebec had been happily settled, and a formal recognition 
of the latter had been extended by the former. He further stated that, 
in consequence of the settlement of these diffareuces, all brethren hailing 
from lodges under the grand lodge of Quebec are hereafter to be received 
and welcomed as visitors by the lodges in New Brunswick. 



174 . FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

July n — The lodge joined in the funeral obsequies of the late W. 
Bro. John Willis, a venerable and distinguished member of the fraternity 
.and a past officer of the grand lodge. The burial took place at the rural 
cemetery under the direction of the grand master and grand lodge, as- 
sisted by all the lodges in Saint John. 

' August 6 — An official visit was received from the grand master and 
officers of the grand lodge. At the conclusion of the advancement of a 
candidate to the F. C. degree, the officers of the lodge were complimented 
by the grand master for the correct and creditable manner of their 
working, 

October 6 — The grand secretary notified the lodge that the following 
regulations were adopted at the recent annual comnmnication of grand 
lodge, viz. : 

First, That petitions of candidates must be read in full in open lodge, then 
handed to the committee of investigation, wlio must append their report thereto. 

Second, Tliat wlien more than one lodge holds concurrent jurisdiction in a city 
or town, the lodge in such citj' or town rejecting a candidate must send a notice of 
the rejection to the other lodge or lodges witiiin such jurisdiction. 

Third, That visitors from a jurisdiction beyond New Brunswick, who cannot be 
vouched for, must produce a certificate from the grand lodge from which he hails 
before any examination can take place. ^ 

• A. D. 1875. 
The officers of this year were : 

Bro. William Macara Sears, W. M. 

Bro. Charles Inches, S. W. Bro. Fred. S. Williams, J. D. 
" Hiram G. Betts, J. W. " George B. Hegan, S. S. 

" Rev. Donald Macrae, Chap. " Arthur I. Trueman, J. S. 

" Wm. H. A. Keans, Treas. " Alban Thomas, D. C. 

" Thomas Stotliart, Scc'y. " Charles J. Wills, I. G. 

" John Buchanan, S. D. " Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

February 2 — The singing of appropriate odes, in connection with the 
opening and closing ceremonies, was introduced in the lodge for the first 
time. 

October 5 — The sum of twenty dollars was voted to Northumberland 
Lodge, No. 17, Newcastle, to assist the lodge in rebuilding their hull de- 
stroyed by a hurricane recently. This was a second destruction of their 
hall, the first being by fire in the year 1866. 

1 Tliis (third) regulation waa subsequently abrogated by the grand lodge, as it was found im- 
practicable to carry it out. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-94. 175 

A. D. 1876. 

January 4 — The grand master, accompanied by officerri of the grand 
lodge, paid an official visit and installed the worshipful master. The 
officers of tiie lodge for this year were ; 

Bro. Hiram Gabriel Beits, W. M. 

Bro. John Buchanan, S. W. Bro. Alban Tiinm:is, .T. D. 
" George B. Hegan, J. W. " John McAllister, S. S. 

" Kev. Donald Macrae, (hap. " Jolin T. C. McKean, J. S. 

" Wm. H. A. Keans. Treas. " Robert Robertson, D. C. 

" Thomas Stothart, Sec'y. " (Jeorge Corn\ac'k, I. G. 

" Artliiir I. Tnieman, S. D. " Dingee Soribner, Tyler. 

March 7 — "The grand secretary favored the lodge with an address, 
including an account of a visit recently made by him to California, 
British Columbia, etc." 

September 28 — An emergent meeting was held at the request of the 
grand master, to exemj)lify the work of the M. M. degree before grand 
lodge at its annual communication. The M. M. degree was conferred on 
Bro. Arthur W. Sharp by the officers of the lodge. There was a large at- 
tendance of the craft. The grand master, in reviewing the work, expressed 
gratification at the correct and creditable rendering of the ceremonial. 

October 3 — "The W. M. having announced the decease of the ven- 
erable and worshipful Bro. William H. A. Keans, past master and 
treasurer of the lodge, and having paid a just tribute to the memory and 
virtues of the deceased brother, the following resolutions were unani- 
mou.sly adopted " : 

Besoh'ed, That the members of St. .lohn's Lodge, No. 2, F. & A. M., receive with 
tlie utmost sorrow the announcement made by the W. M. of the death, on Saturday 
last, tlie thirtietii day of September, of our esteemed and venerated R. W. Bro. 
William H. A. Keans, 1). G. M., tlie senior member and senior past master of our 
lodge, whose untiring efforts, extending over a period of nearly forty years, in 
promoting the well-being and best interests of this his mother lodge and of free- 
masonry generally, are fully recognized and universally appreciated ; 

And further resolrcd, That his brethren bear testimony to the fact that he was 
ever an ardent and entluisiastic worker in all stations occupied by him, as worshipful 
master, treasurer, private member or other capacity; and to his initirirg efforts in 
years gone by may, in a great measure, be attributed the present prosperous and 
satisfactory condition of the lodge. Beloved, respected and venerated, he has gone 
to "the narrow iiouse appointed for all living," full of years and honors; 

And further resolved, That in token of fraternal respect lo the memory of our 
departed brother, the lodge be draped in mourning for the space of three months ; 

And further rexohrd, Tliat the members of his lodge desire most respectfully to 
convey to tiie widow and family of our deceived brother, their heartfelt and sincere 
sympathy in their hour of sorrow and mourning; 

And further resolved, Tliat a copy of these resolutions be transmitted by the 
secretary, under the seal of the lodge, to the widow of our deceased brother. 



176 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

In deference to the wishes of the widow, the craft did not appear in 
regalia at the funeral, and there was no masonic ceremonial. The mem- 
bers of the lodge attended as mourners, with crape on the left arm. Bro. 
Keans was initiated in St. John's Lodge, January 7, 1840. 

December 27 — At the suggestion of the V. W. and Rev. 3ro. Francis 
Partridge, grand chaplain, with the object of making a special collection 
In aid of the fund of benevolence, divine service was held in St. Paul's 
■church (Episcopal) at half-past seven o'clock this evening, under the 
Auspices of tho grand master and grand lodge. About two hundred 
brethren were present clothed in the regalia of the several degrees and 
grades of freemasonry. 

An eloquent and earnest sermon was preached by the grand chaplain 
from the text, " Behold how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to 
•dwell together in unity. It is like the precious ointment upon the head, 
that ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard, that went down to 
the skirts of his garments. As the dew of Hermon, and as the dew that 
<lescended upon the mountains of Zion, for there the Lord commanded 
ihe blessing, even life for evermore." (133rd Psalm). 

The following Episcopal clergymen, members of the craft, were pres- 
■ent: Rev. Canon Medley of Sussex, Rev. H. S. Wainwright of Kingston, 
Rev. Mr. Campbell of St. Martins, Rev. E. A. Warneford of Norton, 
and Rev. Richard Mathers of Saint John ; and the following who were 
aiot freemasons : Rev. Canon DeVeber, rector of St. Paul's church (who 
•considerately placed his church at the service of the grand chaplain), Rev. 
George Schofield of Simonds, and Rev. Charles C. Coster of Saint John. 

The brethren first assembled in the school house attached to the 
church, where they were marshalled in order of procession, thence re- 
paired to the church, which was filled to its utmost capacity by the craft 
and other worshippers. 

The contribution taken at the close of the sermon amounted to $371.46 
iu'aid of the fund of benevolence. 

A. D. ]^77. 

January 2 — The officei-s of the current year were installed this even- 
ing. The grand master, who was present, installed the W. M. The 
following is the full list, viz. : 

Bro. John BuchaDan, W. M. 

Bro. George B. Hegan, S. W. Bro. John T. C. McKean, J. D. 
" Arthur I. Trueman, J. W. " William H. B. Sadleir, S. 3. 

" Rev. Donald Macrae, Chap. " George Cormack, J. S. 

" William F. Bunting, Treas. " Craven L. Betts, D. C. 

" Hiram G. Belts, Sec'y. " Charles H. S. Johnston, I. G. 

'* John McAllister, 8. D. " Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 177 

March 5 — The remains of the late W. Bro. Richard Sands Armstrong, 
a past master of the lodge, were buried in the rural cemetery. The lodge, 
assisted by sister lodges, attended in a body and consigned the remains to 
the grave with the ceremonial appointed by the masonic burial service. 
Tiie deceased brother was initiated in St. John's Lodge, September 7, 
1847. 

March 6 — By vote of the lodge, W. Bro. \V. F. Bunting was ap- 
pointed custodian of the old records and other old books, " in order to 
insure their safe keeping." 

April 3 — "Under resolution, the lodge agreed to he governed by 
regulations adopted at a meeting of the masters, past masters and wardens 
of the city lodges held March 26th ultimo, of which the following is a 
copy": 

First — The lodge burying a deceased brother, and no other, shall advertise the 
funeral. Such advertisement sliall request the attendance of the members of the 
particular lodge, and shall invite members of sister lodges and transient brethren to 
join. 

Second — All the lodges of the city shall issue and enclose notices or summonses 
to their members. 

Third — All brethren, irrespective of lodges, attending a funeral, shall be formed 
under tiie banners of the lodge burying the deceased, according to their lodge rank. 

Fourth — In case of a funeral to the rural cemetery, the body of the procession 
shall proceed as far as the Marsh bridge and halt; then open ranks and allow the 
liearse, mourners, etc., to pass through, and afterward shall return to the lodge 
room in charge of a brother appointed by the ^V. M. of tlie lodge burying the de- 
ceased, and disperse. 

Fifth — The W. M. of the lodge burying the deceased, with as many brethren as 
lie shall select to accompany him, shall proceed to the grave in vehicles or other- 
wise, and, after having performed the masonic funeral service, shall return and 
close the lodge. 

Sixth — It shall be optional with tiie lodge burying the decea»sed, whether or not 
music shall be allowed at tlie funeral. 

May 1 — A grant of fifty dollars was voted to the fund of benevol- 
ence of grand lodge. 

DESTRUCTIVE CONFLAGRATION IN SAINT JOHN, JUNE 20, 1877. 

The present generation of the inhabitants of the city of Saint John, 
including especially the members of the masonic fraternity, will never 
forget the dissastrous conflagration of June 20, 1877, by which the largest 
portion of the city was reduced to ashes, and a majority of the citizens 
made homeless. The fire broke out about half-past two o'clock in the 
afternoon, and continued through the day and nearly the whole of the 
succeeding night. 



178 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The masonic hall, in Judge Ritchie's building, and the office of the 
grand secretary, in the city hall, in both of* which places the parapher- 
nalia and other property of the fraternity were kept, were included iu 
the general ruin. All the charters, jewels, regalia, banners, furniture, 
and all other property of every degree and grade, were destroyed. Some 
lost their records and other books. 

St. John's Lodge lost its warrant, jewels, clothing, banners, and other 
articles, upon which there was no insurance. Fortunately the records 
and other books were saved. 

I am indebted to one of our local newspapers for the following inter- 
esting particulars of losses sustained by the masonic fraternity:' 

The masonic fraternity occupied tlie front portion of the upper story of Ritchie's 
building, Princess street, where there were two lodge rooms and several ante-rooms, 
wliile the encampments of Knights Templars and bodies of tiie A. & A. rite had 
their ante-rooms, armories, etc., on the story helow. For nearly twenty-one years 
this building was the headquarters of freemasonry in New Hrunswick. The walls of 
the room were adorned with the warrants of the different bodies wliich met in the hall 
— some of them dating back to the early days of the present century ; that of Carlelon 
R. A. Chapter, whose origin goes back to 1805, being the oldest — with choice en- 
gravings and paintings, including many masonic pictures of interest, and an oil 
painting of the Ascension of considerable merit, a portrait of the late Mr. Balloch, 
and Mr. Furlong's gift to the grand lodge, of tJie Prince of Wales in his masonic 
clothing. To everything that hung on the walls some special interest attached. 
One bore the signature of some eminent man, another commemorated some great 
event, another was the work of a departed brother, another recalled struggles 
and trials of which nothing now but happy memories survive. Each body had 
its own silver jewels, banners, furniture, regalia and cabinets. In the armory of 
the Encampment of Saint .John, Knights Templars, was probably the finest set of 
uniforms in the Dominion of Canada, and the loss falls not only on the organiza- 
tion itself but upon individual members, whose private property was there. The 
Union do Molay p]ncaniiAnent also had a large lot of fine regalia. Albion Lodge 
had, among other treasures, one set of silver j->wels, the gift of the late Assistant Com- 
missary (Jeneral Oliver Goldsmith, a descendant of the poet. Indeed it would not 
do to undertake to recount the trea.sures which the masonic bodies possessed — all 
swept away. Not a thing in the rooms was saved, and no amount of money can 
replace the losses. 

The bodies burned out were: Albion Lodge ; St. John's Lodge ; Hibernia Lodge; 
Union Lodge of Portland ; New Brunswick Lodge ; Leinster Lodge ; Carleton R. A. 
Chapter; New Brunswick R. A. Chapter; St. .John's Council R. & S. Masters; New 
Brunswick Council R. & S. Masters; Moore Conclave Knights R. C. of Rome and 
Constantine; Encampment of Saint John, ICnights Templars; Union de Molay 
Encampment, Knights Templai-s; Harrington Lodge of Perfection, A. & A. 
Rite; Harrington Chapter Rose Croix, A. & A. Rite; The Royal Order of 
Scotland ; New Brunswick Consistory S. P. R. S., 32°. The Grand Lodge of 
New Brunswick is also a heavy Icser, though it had very little property in the 

, 1 The St. John Globe. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-94. 179 

masonic biiilding. Its lil)rary ami valuables were chiefly kept in the office of the 
gnuid secretary in tlie city bnildinp. Ail of the books, and there were many riire 
and curious ones, arc destroyed. Indeed so cc'uplete was the destruction, that not 
even a coj)y of the proceediuj^s of the jjrand lodge was to be found. A portion of the 
regalia was preserved. Tiiis is but a drop of water, however, from an ocean of 
waste. 

July 3 — Through the fraternal courtesy of Carleton Union Lodge, 
No. 8, the regular conununication this evening wa.s held in their hall at 
Ciirleton, for which privilege they received the thanks of St. John's 
Lodge. 

The loss of the lodge warrant was sui)i)lied by an interim dispensa- 
tion, as follows : 

Office of Guand Secrp:tary, F. & A. M., 
Siiint John, N. B., July 2nd, 1877. 

W. Bro. John Buchanav, W. M. Si. John's Lodge, No. 2 : 

In consequence of the destruction of the masonic hail by fire on the 20th day of 
June ultimo, and the loss of the lodge warrant, I am directed by the M. W., the 
grand master, to grant iiermission in his name to St. John's Lodge to meet in free- 
masons' hall, Carleton, until a suitable room can be secured on this side of the 
liarbor; and further, you are authorized to transact all the business and perform all 
the functions of a lodge of free and accei)ted masons, in the same manner and with 
the like authority as if in possession of the original warrant. This working letter 
is to remain in full force until the issue of a more complete and formal authority. 

By command of the M.W. the Grand Master. 

WlLTJAM F. BUNTINfi, G. S. 

August 7 — The general hall committee having rented apartments in 
Horton's building, corner Charlotte and Union sti-eets, the regular com- 
munication was held there this evening. 

The following letter was received from the grand secretary: 

As an evidence of warm-hearted interest in the craft in this city, and in token 
of deep sympathy for their recent misfortune, R. W. Bro. Henry M. Alexander, of 
Montreal, grand treasurer of the grand lodge of Quebec, and representative of the 
grand lodge of New Brunswick at the grand lodge of Quebec, has commissioned me 
to hand to the lodges in Saint John, viz.: Albion, No. 1 ; St. John's, No. 2; Hiber- 
nia, No. 3; Union of Portland, No. 10; Leinster, No. 19; and New Brunswick, No. 
22, for their use in common, the following articles: Fifteen silk-trinuned collars and 
fifteen solid silver jewels for lodge officers; silver square and compasses for altar, 
and a large ballot-box and balls. The jewels, square and compas.ses, each having a 
suitable inscription engraved thereon, are the gift of W. Bro. John Street, jeweller, 
of Montreal, and the collars and ballot-box are presented by R. W. Bro. Alex.inder. 
All the articles are new, and were manufactured for the special use of the lodges 
named. 

A eonnnittee was appointed to consider the best way of making suit- 
able acknowledgment to Bros. Alexander and Street for the handsome 



180 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

gift. This committee subsequently reported that all the lodges had dele- 
gated the grand secretary to perform that duty on their behalf. 

The lodge was placed in possession of a new warrant to supjily the 
loss occasioned by the recent fire. It was a duplicate of the original, with 
the addition of the following memo: 

This warrant is a duplicate of the original destroyed by fire June 20, 1877, issued 
by order of Robert Thomson Clinch, Esquire, M. W. Grand Master, this 18th day 
of July, A. D. 1877, A. L. 5877. ^^^^^^^ P Bunting. G. S. 

By direction of the lodge, the secretary made the following minute in 
the records : * 

That on the twentieth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eiglit 
hundred and seventy-seven, Judge Ritchie's building, Princess street. Saint John, 
New Brunswick, was destroyed by fire during the great conilagration of tliat date; 
that the building contained the paraphernalia of the different masonic bodies in the 
<;ity of Saint John, and also the banners of Carleton Union Lodge, No. 8, of Carle- 
ton ; that no portion of the property of the fraternity then in the building y/?s 
saved from the destroying element; that St. John's Lodge lost its entire parapher- 
nalia and its register of visiting brethren. The files of papers of recent date and 
the records of the lodge were saved, they being in the possession of the secretary at 
the time. The secretary regrets to state there was no insurance on the lodge property. 

An order passed authorizing the regalia committee to procure articles 
necessary for the full equipment of the lodge. 

" Bro. Alfred F. Chapman, a distinguished member of the craft from 
Boston, Massachusetts, and editor and proprietor of the Liberal Free- 
mason, a monthly masonic periodical published at Boston, was a visitor 
ill the lodge this evening, who, on being introduced by the W. M., con- 
veyed in an eloquent and feeling address his fraternal sympathy and also 
the sympathy of the craft in his locality, for the severe and overwhelm- 
ing calamity with which the fraternity in Saint John and the citizens at 
large had been vi.sited." 

September 4 — "The masonic hall company having asked if the lodge 
could make payment of the whole or part of the seven hundred dollars 
<lue on account of subscription to the capital stock of the company, the 
trustees of the lodge funds were directed to furnish a financial statement 
of the lodge affairs at an early day." 

The lodge originally subscribed two thousand dollars toward the 
capital stock of the company, and had paid thirteen hundred dollars on 
account. 

October 2 — "Upon recommendation of a committee appointed for 
the purpose, Bro. Edward Sheldon, of Carleton Union Lodge, No. 8, was 
appointed to preside at the organ, in the place of Bro. Henry Card, 
deceased." 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 181 

The regalia committee eubmitted a report to the following effect : 

After the fire the jewels of the secretary, two deacons, two sfCAvards and director 
of ceremonies, more or less damaged, were dug out of tiie ruins and were placed in 
a jeweller's hands for repairs. Tiiey ordered new jewels for tlic master, immediate 
past master, two wardens, chaplain, treasurer, organist, inner guard and tyler. 
Tliey received from London, Enghind, materials for collars and aprons, also trim- 
mings for a pair of banners. These articles were ordered previous to the fire and 
were brought from Liverpool, free of ex|>ense, by Ciipt. Greenback, a brother mason. 
Tlie banner trimmings were intended for the banners destroyed in the fire. Thev 
have ordered .solid silver emblems for the aprons, instead of embroidered emblejus 
as heretofore used, knowing that they will be more durable and cost less in the end. 
They have also ordered a silver trowel from Ilro. Street of Montreal, who so g( ri- 
erously presented the lodges here with the valuable set of jewels now used in com- 
mon. The committee do not deem it advisable to order any more paraphernalia, 
unless it may be something absolutely necessary, until the lodge gets permanently 
Beltled in the new ball about to be erected, there being no facilities in the present 
apartments for the proper care and keeping of such articles. 

The trustees, who were rccjuired by an order of September 4th, to 
report upon the finances of the lodge, rendered a statement, in which they 
set forth, that in August, 1871, the lodge subscribed for two thousand 
dollars stock in the New Brunswick Masonic Hall Company, on which 
the sum of thirteen hundred "dollars was paid September, 1872, and since 
that time no further call, until now, had been made on accu'int of tlie 
seven hundred dollars due; that the loss by the fire of June 20th, and 
the amount required to replace this loss, will preclude any payn)ent for 
the present on account of the unpaid stock subscription ; that not less 
than eight hundred dollai"s will enable the lodge to complete its equip- 
ment, to meet which there is the sum of seven hundred dcV'^rs in the 
treasury. 

Whereupon, it was voted "that the present state of the fund.s of the 
kuire will not permit any further advances at the present time to the 
New Brunswick Masonic Hall Company, on account of the stock sub- 
scribed by the lodge ; but that the lodge will meet its engagements in 
this matter whenever the funds will allow." 

A. D. 1878. 
January 1 — The officers elected, jvppoiuted and installed for the cur- 
rent year were : 

B/o. George Black liegan, W. M. 
Bro. Arthur I. Trueman, S. \V. Pro. John W. Daniel, J. D. 

" John McAllister, J. W. " Arthur Everitt, S. S. 

" Rev. Donald Macrae, Chap. " William H. Parlee, J. S. 

" William F. Bunting, Treas. ^ " Lewis Green, D. C, 

" Hiram G. Belts, Sec'y. " Arthur W. Sharp, I. G. 

" William IL B. Sadleir, S. D. " Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 



182 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The regalia committee reported that they had procured a full set of 
solid silver emblems for officers' aprons, and a silver trowel with ivory 
handle ; that they had repairs made on the six collar jewels saved from 
the fire, and had purchased eight new jewels to comj)lete the sei ; which 
report was received and the bills ordered to be paid. 

February 5 — The lodge having vacated the premises known as 
Horton's hall, met this evening in Magee's building, on the east side of 
Germain street, a few doors south of King street. All other masonic 
bodies in the city removed at the same time and to the same hall. 

The grand secretary notified the lodge that the grand lodge had issued 
a reprint of its transactions from the date of organization (A. D. 1867) 
up to A. 1). 1876, copies of which were to be had at his office at two 
dollars each. 

A further payment of three hundred dollars was ordered on account 
of subscription to the capital stock of the New Brunswick Masonic Hall 
Company. 

May 29 — At the request of the mayor and corporation of the city of 
Saint John, the corner stone of the new city hall was laid this day at 
three o'clock in the afternoon, at which St. John's Lodge was largely 
represented. 

The ceremonial was conducted ly the M. W. Bro. Robert T. Clinch, 
G. M., assisted by the grand lodge and all the masonic bodies in Saint 
John, together with several lodges from other parts of the province. 
After being arranged in order of procession, the bodies moved to the 
court house, where they were joined by the corporation and other civic 
officials, headed by the mayor ; all then proceeded to the site of the 
building, corner of Prince William and Princess streets, whcic the gn:ud 
master, with the assistanceof his officers, laid the stone in due and ancient 
form. 

A drenching fall of rain during the ceremonies, and the consequent 
unpleasant condition of the atmosphere and streets, materially interfered 
with the pleasure of the proceedings. 

July 1 — The corner stone of the new masonic temple in Saint John 
wjis laid to-day at three o'clock in the afternoon, with imposing cere- 
monies. St. John's Lodge, under the charge of W. Bro. George B. 
Hegan, W. M., occupied its proper station in the procession and gave its 
quota of assistance to the interesting and important event. Deputations 
of the craft came from all sections of the province and formed an assem- 
blage of larger proportions and more imposing character than had here- 
tofore been witnessed in Saint John upon any similar occasion. The 
various bodies congregated on Queen square, where they were marshalled 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 183 

in order of proceesion, with several bands of music, together with a good 
<iisplay of regalia, banners and other paraphernalia, the whole under M 
AV. Bro. Robert T. Clinch, G. M. They then marched to the s'te of the 
contemplated edifice, east side of Germain street, adjoining Trinity church, 
where the grand master laid the foundation stone with the customary 
masonic ceremonies. At the close an oration was delivered by R. W. 
Brc. William Wedderburn, P. G. M. 

Previous to closing grand lodge (a special communication had been 
convened to lay the corner stone), the grand master "congratulated 
grand lodge uj)on the very large number of masons who had taken part 
in the interesting ceremonies just completed ; upon the exceedingly credit- 
able display made by the respective bodies ; and upon the bright and 
genial day a kind Providence had vouchsafed to them. He thanked the 
various bodies for the hearty manner in which they had responded to his 
invitation, and expressed himself especially grateful to the brethren who 
had come long distances to fill up the ranks and take their share in the 
work of the day." 

July 2 — Bro. Thomas H. Lynn, who had presented the lodge with 
a director of ceremonies' baton, received a vote of thanks for his gift, 
" and for his able assistance in decorating the site of the hall for the 
ceremonial of laying the corner stone." 

August 6 — " The treasurer annouuced that he had effected insurance, 
in the Imperial Insurance Company, on the property of the lodge, in the 
amount of four hundred dollars." 

October 1 — The grand secretary notified the lodge by letter that the 
Grand Orient of France had expunged from its constitutions a section 
providing that " freemasonry holds as its first principles the existence of 
God and the immortality of the soul," and had substituted in lieu thereof 
— "it holds as principles, absolute freedom of conscience and human 
solidarity ; it considers liberty of conscience as a right belonging to every 
Mian, and excludes no one for his belief." And in consequence of this 
change in the constitutions of the Grand Orient, the grand lodge of New 
Brunswick had ordered that "all lodges within this jurisdiction be 
directed not to admit as a visitor any brother hailing from a lodge under 
the Grand Orient of France; unless, firet, he proves that he has been 
initiated according to the ancient rites and ceremonies in a lodge pro- 
feijsing a belief in the Great Architect of the Universe ; and secondly, 
unless he himself shall acknowledge that this belief is an essential land- 
mark of freemasonry." 

December 8 — The lodge was informed that the grand secretary had 
just published, for the use of the fraternity in New Brunswick, a small 
manual containing the monitorial portion of the crafl degrees. 



184 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

A. D. 1879. . 

January 7 — The following were installed into office for the present 

year : 

Bro. Arthur Isaac Trueman, W. M. 
Bro. John McAllister, S. W. Bro. Arthur Everitt, J. D. 

" Wm. H. B. Sadleir, J. W. " Arthur W. Sharp, S. S. 

" Rev. Geo. Armstrong, Chap. " Geo. H. Fulton, J. S. 

" Wm. F. Bunting, Treas. " Fred. Sandall, Orgt. 

" Hiram G. Betts, Scc'y. " Henry S. Bridges, D. C. 

" Rev. Donald Macrae, S. D. " Jos. E. Arrowsraith, I. G. 

Bro. Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

The W. M. acknowledged the presentation to the lodge by the grand 
lodge of a copy of the reprint of its proceedings. 

February 4 — The directors of the Masonic Hall Company, in a letter 
addressed to the lodge, stated that they intended holding a masonic fair 
and bazaar some time during the current year, and requested the appoint- 
ment of a committee to represent the lodge on the general committee of 
management. In compliance with this request, W. Bro. A. I. Trueman, 
W. M., and Bro. Arthur Everitt, J. D., were appointed such committee. 

The lodge voted a further payment of two hundred dollars to the sub- 
scribed stock in the New Brunswick Masonic Hall Company, making a 
total of eighteen hundred dollars paid to date. 

March 4 — The lodge decided to take and furnish a table at the pro- 
posed masonic fair and bazaar, and on April 1st a committee of ways and 
means, in connection with this table, was appointed, as follows: Bros. A, 
I. Trueman, W. F. Bunting, Wm. Wedderburn, Jos. C. Hatheway, Wm. 
H. Sinnott, Hiram G. Betts, Geo. B. Hegan, John McAllister, W. H. B. 
Sadleir, Donald Macrae, Arthur Everitt, Jas. Holly, Geo. E. Barnhill, 
E. S. Baker and P. A. Melville. 

May 6 — The lodge changed its quarters and met this evening for the 
first time in the new masonic temple, Germain street. 

The craft in Portland, Maine, extended an invitation to the lodge to 
join in a masonic celebration to be held in that city on the 24th June 
proximo. It was decided that, as it would be impossible for the lodge to 
attend in a body, such members as could make it convenient might do so 
in their individual capacity. An answer to that effect was directed to be 
returned, with the thanks of the lodge for the courteous invitation. 

July 2 — "The W. M. spoke of the success of the sewing circle of 
ladles in connection with the lodge, for the purposes of the fair and 
bazar to be held in September next, and aeked the brethren to contribute 
to the fund for the purchase of articles, and also to attend the evening 
meetings of the circle, as it is necessary that the ladies have escort alter 
the closing." 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 185 

August 5 — " Bro. Everitt iuforraed the lodge that Bro. Geo. Ken- 
ning, publisher of The i^rgemason, London, England, had in a letter to 
liira expressed good wishes for the success of the projected fair and 
bazaar, and would insert a notice of it in his periodical, and would call 
ihe attention of his readers to it from time to time." 

September — The fair and bazaar for the benefit of the masonic 
temple fund was held in the new building, Germain street, according to 
announcement. It was formally opened Monday evening, September 
loth, and closed Thursday, September 25th, having in the ten days 
of its duration realized, both in its financial and popular aspects, a 
success far beyond reasonable anticipation. Each lodge in the city 
furnished a table or booth for the sale of useful and fancy articles. 
The combined efibrts of all the bodies formed a display reflect- 
ing credit upon the various committees, and in an especial man- 
ner upon the ladies of the sewing circles, wh se untiring exertions 
placed the bazaar at the head and front of any similar affair in 
8aint John. Tables and booths were furnished by Albion Lodge, St. 
John's Lodge, Hibernia Lodge, Union Lodge of Portland, Leinster 
Lodge, New Brunswick Lodge, New Brunswick Consistory A. & A. 
Rite, and the general committee of the hall company. Besides the gen- 
eral sales room containing the tables and booths, there were a refresh- 
ment room, an art gallery, a drawing room, a room for the display of 
Indian work, a room devoted to Terpischore, a confectionery stand, a 
cigar stand, etc. 

It-was estinmted that upwards of twenty thousand persons visited the 
bazoiir, who at times so thronged the halls and entrances that the greatest 
difficulty was experienced in making headway through the various de- 
partments. 

After the jiayment of all expenses, the sum of five thousand and nine 
hundred dollars was realized as the net proceeds, and paid into the 
treasury of the hall company. 

The committee of ladies of the sewing circle and booth of St. John's 

Lodge were : 

Presiilent — Mrs. George 8. DeForest. 
Vice-Presidents — Mrs. Arthur Everitt, Mrs. Wm. H. Sinnott, Mrs. David McLellan, 
Mrs. George B. Hegan and Miss Longley. 
Treasurer — Mrs. W. H. B. Sadleir, Secretary — Miss M. Melville. 

Committee : 

Mrs. Dr. J. C. Hatheway, Mrs. Cliarles Ketchum, Mrs. Ileiiry G. Hunt, 
" Artliur \V. Sharp, " Arthur Stevens, " Robinson, 

" N. VV. Brenan, " Fletcher, " T. Finlay, 

" Howard, " Vickery, " A. Lordly, 

" M. G. Haney, " Clarke, " Fairweatlier, 

M 



186 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



Mrs. 


Howard, 


Mrs. 


Sharp, 


Miss 


i Alice Longley, 


Miss 


Eliza Ilegan, 


Miss 


Maggie Hegan, 


1) 


M. Parks, 




M. Hall, 


4( 


Annie Longley, 


<< 


Hastings, 




Hatheway, 


« 


Lizzie Hatheway, 


<( 


Armstrong, 




Stead, 


li 


Ketch urn, 


<( 


Peters, 




Brown, 


K 


Paterson, 


« 


Warren, 




H. Brown, 


«l 


Kenney, 


t( 


Cumming, 




Brundage, 


(( 


Carpenter, 


u 


Arrowsmith, 




Katie Hunt, 


« 


Bessie Hunt, 


« 


Bent, 




Anderson, 


li 


Gorliam, 


(t 


McMackin, 




Hennigar, 


« 


De Forest, 


<t 


Robinson, 




Nannie Longley, 


•( 


Philips, 


II 


Clark. 



Members of the lodge, at home and abroad, and friends of the lodge, 
made valuable contributions in saleable articles and cash to the rich dis- 
play on the table of St. John's Lodge, the proceeds of which netted the 
sum of about seven hundred dollars. 

November 4 — "A committee was appointed to consider suitable 
means of showing the appreciation of the lodge of the services rendered 
by the ladies' sewing circle in connection with St. John's Lodge table, at 
the recent masonic fair ; such committee to report back to the lodge." 

December 2 — " In consideration of valuable services rendered to the 
craft," R. W. Bro. Benjamin Lester Peters, past grand master and past 
master of Albion Lodge, and R. W. Bro. William Franklin Bunting, 
grand secretary and past master of St. John's Lodge, were elected hon- 
orary members of the lodge, and a committee was appointed to order the 
engrossing of suitable certificates for presentation to the two brethren. 
The certificates, duly signed and sealed, were presented to them at the 
regular communication of January, 1880. 

An electrotype seal, a fac-simile of the regular seal, was ordered to be 
procured for the use of the lodge. 



A. D. 1880. 

January B — The grand master made an official visit and installed the 
W. M. elect, who afterward installed the remaining officers. The follow- 
ing is the full list: 

Bro. William Henry Brooke Sadleir, W. M. 

Bro. Rev. Donald Macrae, S. W. Bro. Arthur W. Sharp, J. D. 

" Arthur Everitt, J. W. " Frederick Sandall, S. S. 

" Wm. F. Bunting, Treas. " Park A. Melville, J. 8. 

" Hiram G. Betts, Sec'y. « C. O. Wickenden, D. C. 

Henry 8. Bridges, S. D. " Wilson L. Dobbin, I. G. 

Bro. Dingee Scrlbner, Tyler. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 187 

The committee appointed November 4th last to prepare a testimonial 
to the ladies of the sewing circle of St. John's Lodge, submitted the fol- 
lowing draft of a card of thanks : 

To the ladies of the Sewing Circle of St. John's Lodge, No. 2, F. & A. M., organized to 
furnish the lodge table at the bazaar and fair held in the masonic temple in the month 
of Seplewher last : 

The worshipful master, wardens and naembers of St. John's Lodge, No. 2, F. & 
A. M., in lodge assembled, take pleasure in tendering to you their warmest and most 
grateful thanks for the time, zeal and perseverance given by you to the work of fur- 
nishing the table under your care and supervision ; for the large and splendid display 
of useful and fancy articles which your handiwork presented to the patrons of the 
fair; and for the great success which crowned your gratuitous and untiring efforts. 

Given under our hands and the seal of our lodge at the city of Saint John, in 
the province of New Brunswick, this sixth day of January, A. D. 1880. 

This address was lithographed on cards, signed by the master and 
secretary, and a copy presented to each lady member of the lodge sewing 
circle. 

And, in addition, a valuable gold locket was presented to the presi- 
dent of the circle, Mrs. DeForest. 

April 6 — " Rev. Bro. Donald Macrae, D. D., S.W., favored the lodge 
with a highly interesting, instructive and eloquent address, entitled 'The 
Rough Ashlar and the Evergreen, or Freemasonry in its bearing on the 
culture and diffusion of knowledge.' The learned lecturer held the 
attention of the lodge throughout the reading, and at its close members 
and visitors expressed in warm terms the pleasure they derived in listen- 
ing to it." 

June 1 — The initiation fee was increased from twenty dollars to 
twenty -five dollars. 

November 2—" R. \V. Bro. John V. Ellis, P. G. M., read an able, in- 
structive and interesting addresc, and received the thanks of the lodge at 
its conclusion." 

A. D. 1881. 

January 4 — The officers of the current year, installed this evening, 

were : 

Bro. William Henry Brooke Sadleir, V7. M. 
Bro. Henry S. Bridges, 8. W. Bro. Park A. Melville, J. D, 

'• Arthur W. Sharp, J. W. " Wilson L. Dobbin, 8. 8. 

" Rev. Donald Macrae, Chap. " Thomas H. Lynn, J. 8. 

" Wm. F. Bunting, Treas. _ ^ " Max M. Sterne, Orgt. 

" Hir:im G. Bett,-, Sec'y. " Robt. H. B. Tennant, D. C. 

" Arthur Everitt, S. D. " George Price, L G. 

Bro. Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 



188 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

June 24 — Pursuant to the call of the grand master, St. John's Lodge 
united with the sister lodges in this city in a visit to St. Stephen, Char- 
lotte county, and took part in the procession and ceremonial connected 
with Inving the foundation stone of St. Croix Cotton Mills at Milltown. 
The several bodies left Saint John on the morning of the twenty-fourth, 
accompanied by a band of music, and returned the same evening. A 
large and respectable assemblage of the craft from all parts of New 
Brunswick wnd the neighboring state of Maine assisted in the interesting 

proceedings. 

A. D. 1882. 

January 3 — The lodge was honored with an official visit from M. W. 
Bro. Benjamin R. Stevenson, G. M., who installed the worshipful master 
elect. The full staff of officers for this year was: 

Bro. William Franklin Bunting, W. M, 
Bro. Arthur Everitt, S. W. Bro. R. H. B. Tennant, J. D. 

" Thomas Stothart, J. W " Thomas II. Lynn, S. S. 

" Rev. Donald Macrae, Chap. " Robert Leonard, J. S. 

" George B. Ilegan, Treas. " Fred. Sandall, Orgt. 

" Arthur W.. Sharp, Sec'y. " Wilson L. Dobbin, D. C. 

" Henry M. Hamilton, S. D. " John Buchanan, I. G. 

Bro. Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

After the close of the lodge, the members, with the grand master and 
other invited guests, inclu<'ing the masters of sister lodges, adjourned to 
the Park Hotel, King square, and sat down to a supper provided in 
superior style by the proprietor, Bro. Fred. A. Jones. The usual loyal 
and masonic toasts were honored, and were interspersed with appropriate 
songs by several of the brethren. The pleasant re-union was brought to 
a close at half-past twelve o'clock by all the company singing "Auld 
Lang Syne." 

February 3 — The lodge made a fraternal visit to Albion Lodge. 

February 7 —Rev. Bro. Donald Macrae, D. D., chaplain, favored 
the lodge with an instructive address on " Freemasonry in its bearing on 
order and education." 

Februarv 10 — An official visit was received from R. W. Bro. Heuiy 
Duffell, D. G. M. Although an unusually severe snow storm prevailed 
— the severest for many years — and the immense drifts rendered the 
streets almost impassable, there was a large attendance of the craft at this 
emergent con)munication. 

March 1 — The lodge attended the funeral of the late Bro. Edward 
L. Berteaux, M. D., from his father's residence, Wentworth street. He 
died in the United States, and the body was brought to Saint John for 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 189 

interment. There was no masonic ceremonial at the grave, and no 
regalia worn by the brethren. 

The deceased was initiated in St. John's Lodge, June 2, 1868. 

March 7 — A now code of bye-laws was adopted. 
The worshipful master read a paper entitled " The Early History of 
Freemasonry in England," which was favorably received by the brethren. 

March 14 — The lodge paid a fraternal visit to Hibernia Lodge, No. 3. 
At the invitation of the W. M. of Hibernia Lodge, the officers of St. 
John's Lodge occupied the various stations and conferred the fellow-craft 
degree on three candidates. Afterward a call to refreshments was ex- 
tended, when a pleasant interchange of fraternal fellowship prevailed. 

April 4 — W. Bro. Archibald Rowan, P. M. Albion Lodge, No. 1, 
favored the lodge with an interesting lecture on " The general scope of 
Freemasonry," which was listened to with marked attention, and was 
highly appreciated by the large number of brethren in attendance. 

April 13 — The officers and members made a fraternal visit to New 
Brunswick Lodge, No. 22, at its regular communication. They were 
cordially received by the sister lodge, and spent a pleasant hour in speech 
and sentiment. 

May 2 — The lodge was placed in possession of its original warrant 
held under the grand lodge of England, and returned to that body when 
the grand lodge of New Brunswick was constituted. The document was 
accompanied by a note from the grand secretary, as follows : 

H. R. H. the Prince of Wales, grand master ojJ,tlie nnited grand lodge of Eng- 
land, liavlng graciously directed the return of the warrants of lodges formerly held 
on I'^nglish registry, I, by direction of tlie giand lodge, return the old warrant of 
your lodge, to be letained as a memento of its former masonic connection. 

The lodge thereupon directed that this old warrant be suitably framed 
and hung on the walls of the lodge room. 

Notice was received from the grand secretary that the grand lodge 
had, at its recent annual communication, increased the annual dues from 
forty cents to one dollar and forty cents, to meet the additional engage- 
ments of grand lodge caused by a further subscription of ten thousand 
dollars in aid of the masonic temple in Saint John. 

June 6 — The dues payable by members of the lodge were increased 
from twenty-five cents to thirty-five cents per month. This change was 
caused by the increase in the dues payable to grand lodge. 

June 29 — Upon invitation received at the regular communication of 
the sixth instant, from Carleton Union Lodge, the officers and members 
of St. John's Lodge attended divine service this evening at St. George's 



190 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

church, Carleton, in commemoration of the thirty-sixth anniversary of 
the organization of Carleton Union Lodge, at which deputations attended 
from all the city lodges. The brethren met in the city hall, Carleton, and 
formed in order of procession under the banners of Carleton Union 
Lodge, then marched to St. George's (Episcopal) church, where they 
listened to an impressive sermon, suitable to the occasion, preached by 
Bro, the Rev. Richard Mathers, grand cha{)lain. The Rev. Theodore E. 
Dowling, rector of the parish, assisted in the service. 

September 28 — The worshipful master, officers and members attended 
the fi'.neral of the late W. Bro. William M. Sears, a past master of the 
lodge. The interment took place at the rural cemetery. Regalia was 
was not worn, neither was there any masonic ceremonial. W. Bro. Sears 
was initiated in St. John's Lodge July 4, 187L 

November 7 — W. Bro. James Gordon Forbes, past master of the 
lodge, delivered an eloquent and instructive address on " Freemasonry as 
I saw it in the West," which was highly appreciated by the large number 
of brethren present. 

December 5 — The worshipful master read a paper before the lodge, 
entitled "Sketches of the early history of St. John's Lodge, with par- 
ticulars of its founders." 

A. D. 1883. 

January 2 — The officers installed this evening were: 

Bro. Arthur Everitt, W. M. 

Bro. Thomas Stothart, S. W. Bro. Wilson L. Dobbin, J. D. 

" Henry M. Hamilton, J. W. " Alex. W. Paterson, S. S. 

" Rev. Donald Macrae, Chap. " Robert McLeod, J. S. 

" George B. Hegan, Treas. " Jos. C. Hatheway, Orgt. 

" Artlmr W. Sharp, Sec'y. " David H. Waterbury,' D. C. 

" R. H. B. Tennant, S. D. " \Vm. H. B. Sadleir, I. G. 

Bro. Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

W^ Bro. Arthur Everitt, W. M., presented the lodge with four hand- 
some rods for the use of the deacons and stewards. They were ornamented 
with plated white metal emblematical tops, and were acknowledged by a 
vote of thanks to the donor. 

The proceedings of the evening were terminated by the brethren din- 
ing at the Hotel Dufferin, corner King square and Charlotte street. The 
usual loyal and masonic toasts, interspersed with speeches and singing, 
filled up a pleasant and harmonious gathering ; ending by the brethren 
singing " Auld Lang Syne " and " God Save the Queen." 

1 A great-grandson of David Waterbury, one of the original nienibera and flrst junior warden 
of St. John's Lodge. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 191 

February 6 — A committee of the directors of the masonic hall com- 
pany, in a letter addressed to the lodge, announced that an effort wafr 
being made to finish and furnish the large room in the temple, and for 
that purpose contemplated holding a grand masonic fair and bazaar in 
the city. They requested the lodge to share in the undertaking, and to- 
appoint a committee of three brethren to act on the general executive 
committee in the management of the fair. 

The lodge concurred in the project and appointed \V. Bros. Arthur 
Everltt, W. M., Jos. C. Hatheway, P. M., and Geo. B. Ilegan, P. M., 
to act on the general executive committee. 

In addition the lodge agreed to take charge of and furnish a table, 
and appointed a large committee of management. 

August 7 — The secretary of the dominion and centennial exhibition* 
to be held in the city of Saint John the current year, addressed a letter 
to the lodge stating that they had in contemplation the opening of the 
exhibition by a public procession, etc., in which the several societies 
would be invited to participate. The lodge was asked to appoint two 
representatives to aid in giving effect to the proposed display. 

The lodge decided that they could not entertain the proposal, it being 
a matter entirely within the province of the grand lodge. 

A. D. 1884. 

January 1 — The officers of the current year were installed this even- 
ing ; the W. M. by the grand master, who visited the lodge officially, and 
the other officers by the W. M., as follows : 

Bro. Artliur Everitt, W. M. 
Bro. Thomas Stothart, S. W. Bro. David H. Waterbury, J. D. 

" R. II. B. Tennant, J. W. " Robert McLeod, S. S. 

" Rev. Donald Macrae, Chap. " John Lawson, J. S. 

" George B. Hegan, Treas. " Jos. C. Hatheway, Organist. 

" Arlliur W. Sharp, Sec'y. " Nathaniel W. Brenan, D. C. 

" Henry M. Hamilton, S. D. " J. Newton Wilson, I. G. 

Bro. Dingce Scribner, Tyler. 

At the request of Albion Lodge, Bros. Donald Macrae, Arthur Everitt 
and Hiram G. Betts were appointed a committee to confer with com- 
mittees of sister lodges in Saint John upon the advisability of celebrating 
the centennial of the introduction of freemasonry into New Brunswick. 

After the lodge was closed the brethren repaired to the Clarendon 
hotel, Princess street, and partook of a supper, over which the W. M. 
presided, and at which the grand master and other officers of the grand 

1 The exhibition was opened October 1, 1833, but the masonic fraternity did not take part in it. 



192 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

lodge, and the masters of the city lodges, were invited guests. A pleasant 
hour was spent in the enjoyment of an excellent menu, and in toasts, 
sentiments, speeches and songs. 

March 4 — The secretary of the general executive committee in charge 
of the arrangements of the proposed centennial celehration, reported that 
a grand masonic procession would be one of the features of the day 
(July 1st), in which the lodge was invited to join. It was thereupon 
unanimously decided to accept the invitation, and to use strenuous exer- 
tion to promote the success of the undertaking. 

April 7 — The lodge joined with the other masonic bodies in Saint 
John in paying the last tribute of respect to the remains of the late R.W. 
Ero. Lt. Col. Charles Crewe-Read, Past D. D. G. M. of Nova Scotia. The 
craft moved in procession and escorted the remains from the residence of 
W. Bro. James Adam, Elliot Row, to the station of the Intercolonial 
railroad, Mill street. The body was then taken in charge by a depu- 
tation of fratres of the Encampment of Saint John, K. T., of which Bro. 
Crewe-Read was a member, who accompanied it to the home of the 
deceased in Cape Breton. 

April 22 — At a special communication of the grand lodge opened at 
ten o'clock in the forenoon, the grand master, with the assistance of the 
craft, dedicated the new lodge room recently fitted up and furnished in 
the temple. An elaborate and impressive ceremonial, specially prepared 
for the occasion, was effectually rendered, and in which an excellent choir 
with organ accompaniment performed an important part. The grand 
master closed the services with a short address on the origin and design 
of the dedication of edifices, in ancient and modern times, among Chris- 
tians, Freemasons, Jews and Pagans; and described the various imple- 
ments used in dedicatory ceremonials, with remarks touching their opera- 
tive uses and symbolic meanings. 

He alluded to the energy and perseverance displayed in the erection 
of the splendid temple in which they were then assembled, and had no 
doubt that the craft felt delighted in enjoying the privilege of meeting 
together, on such an important occasion, in a hall owned by themselves, 
and of such magnificent proportions. 

April 28 — Under arrangements made by the ladies of St. John's Lodge 
sewing circle and for the purpose of raising funds in furtherance of their 
work, a successful entertainment, comprising music and readings, was 
given this evening in the parlor of the temple. The room was filled to 
overflowing and a good sum realized. 

May 6 — A letter was received from the brethren of St. Andrew's 
Lodge, No. 7, Sydney, Cape Breton, conveying " their sincere thanks for 




St. John's Lodge Banner. 

(Obverse). 




St. John's Lodge Banner. 

(Reversed 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 197 

the great kindness extended to their late Bro. Lt. Col. Charles Crewe- 
Read, during his illness in Saint John, and for the honor conferred on 
his remains." - 

June 3 — The secretary of the general executive committee furnished 
the lodge with a programme of the celebration appointed to take place on 
the first day of July next, of the centennial of the introduction of free- 
masonry into New Brunswick, as follows : A special communication of 
grand lodge at half-past twelve o'clock ; at half-past one, a procession of 
all the masonic bodies through the principal streets to the mechanics' 
institute. The exercises at the institute to consist of selections of music 
by the bands ; singing by members of the fraternity ; an invocation ; an 
address and history of the craft in New Brunswick ; an address by the 
mayor of the city ; and an oration. At the conclusion of the exercises in 
the institute, the procession to be re-organized and niarch through the 
principal streets to the masonic tem{)le and disperse. At seven o'clock in 
the evening, a grand masonic fair and bazaar to be opened in freemasons' 
hall. It was also announced that a masonic medal in bronze would be 
struck in commemoration of the centennial. 

June 17 — At an emergent communication this evening the lodge was 
the recipient of an elegant banner, the combined gift of W. Bro. Arthur 
Everitt, W. M., and W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, P. M. The banner was 
manufactured at the masonic outfitting establishment of Bro. George Ken- 
ning, London, England, is painted on silk and elaborately trimmed in 
gold bullion, and furnished with requisite trappings for the standard 
bearer. 

A large number of brethren assembled to witness the interesting 
ceremonies of presenting and dedicating this valuable addition to the 
lodge property, in which a select choir performed an important part. 

As worthy of note, it may be mentioned tliat the standard bearer of 
the occasion was Bro. Samuel Morrison, a young member of the lodge, 
of the unusual height of G feet Ti inches. 

July 1 — Celebration of the centennial of the introduction of free- 
masonry into New Brunswick. 

On the fii-st day of September, A. D. 1784, freemasonry obtained a 
foothold in this province l)y the erection at Saint John, of Hiram Lodge, 
No. 17, under a dispensation granted by two lodges at Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, holding warrants from the Atholl grand lodge of England. As 
special attent'on is paid to centennial observances at the present day, the 
craft in this jurisdiction felt that the occasion of the one hundredth year 
of their life and history was worthy of notice. In view of this feeling, 
preparations had been progressing a length of time under the 8U{H;rvision 



198 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

of an excellent committee representing all the masonic bodies in Saint 
^obn. After due consideration tbis committee selected the first day of 
July for the observance of the centennial, and mapped out a programme 
of events for the day, a synopsis of which is entered in the record of June 
third last. 

Grand Lodge met according to announcement, and, after a short 
session, closed. Ac half past one o'clock a proces.sion was formed on 
Queen square of the following bodies: Grand Lodge; Albion Lodge, No. 
1, Saint John ; St. John's Lodge, No. 2, Saint John ; Hibernia Lodge, 
No. 3, Saint John ; Sussex Lodge, No. 4, Dorchester ; Hinim Lodge, No. 
6, Fredericton : Carleton Union Lodge, No. 8, Carleton ; Union Lodge of 
Portland, No. 10, Saint John ; Carleton R. A. Chapter, Saint John ; 
Union R. A. Chapter, Carleton ; New Brunswick R. A. (Jhapter, Saint 
John ; Encampment of Saint John, Saint John ; St. Stephen Encamp- 
ment, St. Stephen ; and Union de Molay Preceptory, Saint John. 

About five hundred freemasons, accompanied by seven bands of music, 
appeared in the ranks. This large gathering, with banners, regalia and 
other equipments, made a magnificent display. After moving through 
the principal streets, they filed into the hall of the mechanics' institute, 
where interesting services were held, consisting of music, addresses, oration, 
etc., the hall being filled to its utmost capacity by members of the frater- 
nity and others. At the conclusion of these services the procession re- 
organized and marched to the masonic temple. The weather was pleasant, 
and nearly all portions of the province were represented by delegations 
from the several lodges, chapters, encampments, etc. 

.The fair and bazaar was opened at seven o'clock in the evening, in the 
temple, and had a rich and varied display of articles on the tables fur- 
nished by the city lodges. It was conducted on a plan similar to, and 
was almost a repetition of, the successful bazaar held by the craft in 1879. 
During the ten days of its continuance large numbers patronized the 
tables, booths, etc., and although the proceeds did not net the large amount 
realized by the former the very handsome sura of $4,278.48 was handed 
over to the directors o' the hall company. 

The table furnished and superintended by the ladies of St. John's 
Lodge sewing circle had an excellent and valuable assortment of fancy 
and useful articles, o i which the sum of seven hundred and seventy dol- 
lars Avas netted, anc, paid into the general fund. The following ladies 
formed the executive of S*^. John's Lodge sewing circle : 

President: Mrs. D""id vuLellan. 

Vice-Presidents: Mx.\ <.<io. S. DeForest, Mrs. Arthur W. Sharp, Mrs. Henry G. 
Hunt, Mrs. Arth ir Fvc-iti, Mrs. J. C. Hatlieway, Mrs. Geo. B. Hegan, Mrs. W. H. 
B. Sadleir, Mrs. C. l{ibii"?on. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 199 

Secretary: Miss M. E. Melville. 

Treasurer: Miss Bella Hatlieway. 

Committee : Mrs. A. W. Paterson, Mrs. James Fleming, Mrs. David Smith, Mrs, 
Jas. G. Barnes, Mrs. C. H. Barbour, Miss Fleming, Miss Lizzie Hatheway, Miss 
Stead, Miss Julia Elliott, Miss Smith, Miss Brundage, Misses Peters, Miss Robinson, 
Miss Robertson. 

Many contributions to the table were sent in by brethren and friend& 
from distant places. 

A centennial medal was issued, by authority of the grand lodge, in 
bronze and white metal. On the obverse is a representation of the seal 
of grand lodge, encircled by the legend — " Centennial of Freemasonry in 
New Brunswick." The reverse contains the coat of arms of the city of 
Saint John, and the dates 1784-1884 in Roman numerals above and below* 

October 7 — The lodge was notified that the general hall committee 
had been dissolved, for the reason that the directors of the hall company 
had assumed direct control and supervision of the hall and the expenses 
in connection therewith. In consequence of which it was deemed un- 
necessary to continue the labors of the committee. 

Joseph W. Lawrence, Esquire, presented the lodge with an old cer- 
tificate formerly in the possession of his father, the late W. Bro. Alex- 
ander Lawrence, an a.ctive member and past master of St. John's Lodge. 
The certificate, which is engrossed on parchment, was presented to the 
late W. Bro. Lawrence by the lodge, April 6, 1830. It is authenticated 
by the lodge seal, and signed by Benj F. Marsh, W. M. ; Hiram Smith, 
S. W. ; Samuel Watts, J. W., and Andrew Garrison, Secretary. It is 
now hanging on the walls of the lodge. 

November 4 — Notice was received from the masonic hall company 
that the lodge and ante-rooms would be rented to the lodge at the rate of 
one hundred dollars per annum fbr twelve regular meetings, payable 
quarterly; the company to furni.sh light and fuel, to keep the rooms in 
good order, and to take care of the furniture and equipments. An extra 
charge to be made of two dollars for each emergency meeting, and one 
dollar for a rehearsal. All the other bodies occupying the hall became 
subject to the same terms. 

, December 2 — The lodge was the recipient of an organist's jewel, the 
gift of W. Bro. E. B. A. G. Blakslee, formerly a member of the lodge, 
but now a resident of New York, U. S. The jewel is a fine piece of 
workmanship, of solid silver, and enclosed in a morocco case. It has 
the following inscription engraved thereon : " Presented to St. John's 
Lodge, No. 2, by W. Bro. E. B. A. G. Blakslee, P. M., 1884." 

This fraternal remembrance of his mother lodge by one who received 
masonic light in it nearly forty years ago, was sensibly appreciated by 
the brethren, and received their cordial thanks. 



200 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

As a concluding paragraph of this year's record, it may not be out ot 
place to state that there are only five brethren living who received masonic 
light in St. John's Lodge when working under the original warrant held 
irom the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia. Their names are : Isaac 
W. Doane, George A. Garrison, Robert Cunard, Edward T. Knowles, and 
John Murray. Bro. Doane was initiated June 12, 1815 ; he was born 
June 19, 1794, and was therefore under the age of twenty-one years when 
made a mason. Although in his ninety-first year, he is unusually hale 
and active, and will rank among the oldest living members of the frater- 
nity. Bro. Garrison was born March 3, 1803, and initiated February 6, 
1826, and is very active and well preserved for his advanced years. Bro. 
Ounard, who was born December 12, 1802, and initiated February 6, 
1826, sustains his age and vigor remarkably well. Bros. Garrison and 
Cunard received the E. A. and M. M. degrees simultaneously. Bro. 
Knowles was born January 5, 1804, and initiated January 1, 1828, but 
is not now in the enjoyment of such sound health and activity as his 
brethren heartily desire. Bro. Murray was born March 16, 1808, and is 
therefore the youngest of the five. He received the E. A. degree July 3, 
1832, being the last brother initiated under the Nova Scotia warrant. 
Bro. Doane resides in Nova Scotia ; Bros. Garrison, Knowles and Murray 
are residents of Saint John ; and Bro. Cunard, of Indiantown. 

Bro. Doane withdrew from membership April 8, 1816, because of his 
removal from the province ; Bro. Garrison took his clearance January 2, 
1829, during the time of the "Morgan" excitement, as the church in 
•which he held membership took sides with the anti-masons in the sense- 
less and vindictive crusade against the craft; Bro. Knowles withdrew 
August 4, 182*J, in consequence of becoming a resident of Nova Scotia; 
Bro. Cunard dissolved his connection when the lodge came under the 
jurisdiction of the united grand lodge of England ; and Bro. Murray 
regularly declared off June 6, 1865.^ 

A. D. 1885. 
January 6 — The officers of the current year, installed this evening, 

'^^^^ ' Bro. Robert U. B. Tennant, W. M. 

Bro. Henry M. Hamihon, S. W. Bro. J. Sidney Kaye, J. D. , 

" Robert C. Thome, J. W. " W. Robert May, S. S. 

" George B. Hegan, Treas. " Moses C. Barbour, J. S. 

" Arthur W. Sharp, Sec'y. " Samuel Morrison, D. C. 

" Fred Sandall, S. D. ' " " William A. Ewing, I. G. 

. Bro. Dingfc*. Scribner, Tyler. 



1 since this paragraph was written, all of these aged brethren have departed this life, viz. ; Bro. 
Doane died August 28, ISSl ; Hro. Murray, October 10, 1885; Bro. Knowles, February 23, 1887; Bro. 
Oarrison, March 6, 1867; and Bro. Cunard, January 29, 1891. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 201 

February 3 — The grand secretary notified the lodge that "the body 
calling itself the grand lodge of Ontario, in the province of Ontario, and 
the association known as the Prince Hall grand lodge and its affiliation* 
in the United States of America, are not bodies of regular masons." The 
lodge was cautioned against receiving any one as a visitor hailing from 
either of these bodies. 

April 16 — The lodge assembled at half-past one o'clock and, proceed- 
ing in regular order to the rural cemetery, buried the r'^mains of the late 
Bro. Joseph E. Arrowsmith with masonic ceremony. The deceased was 
initiated in St. John's Lodge January 2, 1872. 

November 23 — An intere?ung occurrence took place this evening in 
the presentation of an address and jewel to an esteemed and worthy 
meniber of the lodge. The particulars are set forth in the address and 
reply, as follows : 

To Worshipful Brother Georok Black Heoan, past master and present treasurer of 
St. John^s Lodge, No. 2, on the roll of the grand lodge of the ancient and horiorable 
fraternity of free and accepted masons of Netv Brunswick ; 

Worshipful and Dear Brother : 

On the eve of your departure to your adopted home on the Pacific coast, the 
members of St. John's Lodge embrace tbe opportunity to express to you tlie feel- 
ings of regret they experience in tlie separation about to take place. They desire to 
bear testimony to the upright and lionorable character you liave always sustained 
as a member of the m.isonic fraternity and as a citizen of tliis your native place. 
Tliey lieariily join in conveying to you their gratitude for your continuous and 
unwearied lal)ors in tlie interests and for the prosperity of your mother lodge — 
labors heartily given from tlie day of your initiation up to the present time. In 
token of tlieir fraternal feelings they iisk your acceptance of the accompanying past 
iiiasici V Je,\el, ami with It tlieir best wishes that yuu and your estimable wife and 
children may enjoy the richest blessings this world can bestow, together with their 
heartfelt prayers that the Great Architect of the Universe may have you and them 
in His holy keeping. 

In reply, Bro. Hegan stated — 

That this evidence of the fraternal regard of his brethren was a pleasant and 
unexpected surprise. Coming to liitn a free-will and spontaneous ottering, in token 
of his humble ettbrts on behalf of the lodge, it awakened within his breast feelings 
of the deepest gratitude. Although he would in a few days be far away among 
strangers and moving in new and strange scenes, his thoughts would stray back to 
the beloved friends left behind, to the many pleasant hours enjoyed within the walla 
of his mother lodge, and to the fond and fraternal a.ssociations formed there. Me 
begged the brethren to accept his heartfelt acknowledgments for such a manifestation 
of their fraternal goodness and for the kind words c )nveyed, in the address, to Mrs. 
Hegan and their little ones. In saying farewell, he hoped that prosperity might 
attend the lodge, and happiness be the share of every brother. 



202 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

" The jewel is a past master's, of eighteen carat gold, handsomely 
ohased, with the following inscription engraved thereon : ' Presented to 
W. Bro. George Black Hegan, P. M., by the members of St. John's 
Lodge, No. 2, F. & A. M., Saint John, N. B., November 23rd, 1885.' " 



A. D. 1886. ■ 

January 5 — At the installation of officers, the following were in- 

<lucted into office: 

Bro. John D. Short, W. M. 

Bro. Robert C. Thome, S. VV. Bro. Moses C. Barbour, S. S. 

" Frederick Samlall, .1. W. " Robert Leonard, J, S. 

" Wm. F. Bunting, Treas. " Alex. \V. Paterson, D. C. 

" Artlnir W. Sharp, Sec'y. " Jos. C. Hatheway, Oigt. 

" J. Sidney Kaye, S. D. " Joiin J. Forrest, I. G. 

" Wiliam A. Ewing, J. D. " Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

The record of this year contains very little of note beyond the regular 
business transactions and the initiation and advancement of candidates. 
Upon request of the library committee, a sum was voted from the funds 
in furtherance of the grand lodge library, and the lodge was notified by 
the grand secretary that, by an order of the grand lodge, the province 
had been divided into five masonic districts, with a district deputy grand 
master to supervise each division. The usual harmony and good feeling 
prevailed and the duties of the officers and other members fulfilled in a 
becoming masonic spirit. 

A. D. 1887. 
January 4 — The officers for 1 887 were : 

Bro. Robert C. Thome, W. M. 

Bro. Frederick Sandall, S. W. Bro. John J. Forrest, S. S. 
" J. Sidney Kaye, J. W. " Robert Leonard, J. S. 

" Wm. F. Bunting, Treas. " John R. Gillis, D. C. 

•* Arthur W. Sharp, Sec'y. " Jos. C. Hatheway, Orgt. 

" Wm. A. Ewing, S. D. " Chas. H. S. Johnston, L G. 

" Moses C. Barbour, J. D. " Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

February 1 — In a letter addressed to the lodge by the grand secre- 
tary, attention was directed to the large numl)er of members of the 
various lodges suspended for non-payment of dues. He said : " The 
names of brethren suspended are read out in every lodge in the province, 
and it creates a painful impression to hear that men, who often fill im- 
portant stations in society, perhaps professional men, men occupying 
public trusts, men of means and otherwise good reputations, neglect the 
plain duty of fulfilling, or apparently trying to fulfil, their just financial 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 203 

obligations." * * * "Is there a sufficiently rigid system of financial 
morality impressed upon brethren who get in arrears, and who, being able 
to pay, do not pay ? Are we sufficiently careful in looking deep enough 
into the character of our candidates, when we find so many who join us 
failing to pay their just debts? Can you do anything to arrest what is a 
very great evil morally as well as financially ?" 

The lodge voted to authorize the forn)ation of a lodge of instruction 
under its warrant, to be open to members of the lodge and the officers of 
sirfter lodges. The membership fee was fixed at one dollar, and W. Bro. 
W. F. Bunting was chosen to take the charge and superintendence of it 
as preceptor. This lodge of instruction commenced operations February 
14, and continued to hold weekly meetings until April 4, when its labors 
terminated. Some twenty-five brethren became members, and no doubt 
were benefited by the instruction received. At the final meeting the 
members presented the instructor with a valuable gold-headed cane in 
token of their fraternal regard. 

May 3 — It was announced that the board of relief had recently 
placed an Almoner's box in one of the waiting rooms " for the reception 
of such voluntary contributions as might from time to time be deposited 
therein." It was also announced that " the board intended, some time 
during the Christmas season in each year, to make judicious disposal of 
the yearly receipts of the box among worthy and needy brethren, their 
widows and orphans." The W. M. impressed upon the brethren the duty 
of remembering, in a substantial manner, the worthiness of this move- 
ment of the board of relief 

The lodge was the recipient this evening of a valuable ebony gavel, 
silver nionnted, the gift of Bro. Dingee Scribner, the tyler ; and of a 
director of ceremonies* baton, silver mounted, presented by W. Bro.W. F. 
Bunting, for which they received the thanks of the lodge. 

December 18 — Sunday. Upon invitation, the lodge joined the sister 
lodges in the city in celebrating the semi-centennial of the formation of 
Hibernia Lodge, No. 3. The craft assembled at the masonic temple at 
three o'clock and proceeded to Calvin (Presbyterian) church, Carleton 
street, where they listened to a sermon from the text 1st Corinthians viii., 
6 : " But to us there is but one God the Father, of whom are all things, 
and we in Him ; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things done 
by Him." A concise historical sketch of the lodge was also given. The 
sermon and sketch were delivered by Bro. the Rev. Archibald Macdougall, 
chaplain of Hibernia Lodge. At the conclusion of the services in the 
church the brethren again formed in procession and returned to the 
temple. Two aged brethren, Bros. Charles K. Rpymond and Joseph 



204 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



Frizzell, the only surviving charter members of Hibernia Lodge, were 
present and took part in the proceedings. • • 



A. D. 1888. 

January 3 — The grand master, with a deputation of grand lodge 
officers, made an official visit and installed the W. M. elect. The full 
staff of officers for this year were : 

Bro. Frederick Sandal 1, W. M. 



Bro. J. Sidney Kaye, S. W. 
" William A. Ewinj,', J. W. 
" William F. Bunting, Treas. 
" Arthur W. Sharp, Sec'y. 
" John J. Forrest. S. D. 
" Wilson L. Dobbin, J. D. 



Bro. John R. Gillis, S. S. 
" F. Miles Hancock, J. S. 
" Charles H. S. Johnston, D. C. 
" Joseph C. Hatheway, Orgt. 
" Richard Heans, I. G. 
" Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 



May 1 — The following re^wrt was received and ordered to be re- 
corded in full : 

At the regular comnninication of the lodge held November 1, 1887, a committee 
was appointed with authority to procure a new monument at the grave in the old 
burial ground in this city, of the late R. W. Bro. William Campbell, Esquire, deputy 
grand master of the old provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia, who was one of the 
founders of St. John's Lodge, and the second mayor of the city of Saint John, in 
consequence of the destruction of the original monument, and there being no rela- 
tives or immediate friends of the deceased brother who could be called upon to per- 
form this sacred duty. In pursuance of the instructions of the lodge, the committee 
entered into a contract with Bro. John S. Seaton, who, in fulfilment of his contract, 
erected a new monument, a fac-simile as near as possible of the original, over the 
grave, on a secure and lasting foundation. The inscription on the original was 
doselv copied, as follows: "Sacred to the memory of William Campbell, Esquire, 
a native of Argyleshire, Scotland, for a term of twenty years Mayor of the City of 
Saint John, who died February 10, 1823, aged 81 years. Universally and deeply 
lamented. Also Elizabeth, his relict, who died February 11, 1824, aged 84 yeare." 
In addition to the original inscription, and for the purpose of shewing the part taken 
by the lodge in erecting the new monument, the following postscript was cut on the 
stone : " St. John's ' odge. No. 2, F. & A. M., in token of brotherly love for one of its 
founders, erected this stone to replace the original, November 30, 1887." The monu- 
ment was placed on its foundation on the above-mentioned date, being the anniver- 
sary of St. Andrew, the patron saint of our deceased brother's native Scotland. All 
the expenses incurred were defrayed by the voluntary contributions of the brethren. 

October 2 — "A letter was received from the grand secretary, ad- 
dressed to the W. M., asking him to be a committee to solicit a subscrip- 
tion of one dollar from each member of the lodge towards liquidating the 
floating debt on the masonic temple in Saint John. The sul)ject of the 
letter was ordered to be laid over for future consideration." 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 205 

A. D. 1889. 
January 1 — The officers for the current year were : 

Bro. Arthur W. Sharp, W. M. 
Bro. William A. Ewing, S. W. Bro. Moses C. Barbour, J. D. 

" John J. Forrest, J. W. " John R. Gillis, S. S. 

" A.I. Truenian, P. M., Chap. " Richard Heans, J. 8. 

" John D. Short, P. M., Treas. " J. C. Hatlieway, P. M.,Orgt. 

" W. F. Bunting, P. M., Sec'y. " F. Miles Hancock, D. C. 

" Wilson L. Dobbin, S. D. " Charles H. Wilson, I. G. 

Bro. Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

An official visit was received from the grand master, M.W. .Iro. James 
McNichol, who was accompanied by a number of grand lodge officers. 
The grand master installed the new worshipful master, and subsequently 
favored the brethren with a fraternal address. 

W. Bro. Fred. Sandall, the retiring W. M., presented the lodge with 
a gong, for which suitable acknowledgment was tendered him. 

March 5 — The lodge adopted the following standing order: "Re- 
solved, that in balloting for candidates in future, the ballot box be placed 
upon the altar and the ballots deposited there." 

The W. M. announced that W. Bro. Bunting is preparing for publi- 
cation, by subscription, a volume under the title of " Freemasonry in New 
Brunswick, including a complete history of St. John's Lodge," and he 
called upon the brethren to embrace the earliest opportunity to become 
subscribers. 

July 2 — " Bro. William A. Ewing, S. W., having recently taken a 
wife to himself, the lodge, by resolution, extended to him and his bride 
their congratulations upon the auspicious event, with fraternal wishes for 
a long life of conjugal happiness to both." 

October 1 — The M. W. the grand master, accompanied by a number 

of actual and acting grand officers, paid an official visit to the lodge. la 

an address to the brethren, the grand master stated that he received with 

gratification the report of the W. M. on the prosperous and harmonious 

condition of the lodge. 

A. D. 1890. 

January 7 — The following were the officers of this year : 

Bro. William A. Ewing, W. M. 
Bro. John J. Forrest, S. W. Bro. Moses C. Barbour, J. D. 

. " Wilson L. Dobbin. J. W. " Richard Heans, S. S. 

" J. C. Hatheway, P. M., Chap. " William J. McClaverty, J. S. 

" John D. Short, P. M., Treas. " Fred. Sandall, P. M., Orgt. 

" Robert C. Thome, P. M., Sec'y. " F. Miles Hancock, D. C. - 

" Archibald Bauer, S. D. " Arthur W. McMackin, I. G. 

Bro. Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 
If 



206 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

"Announcement was made of the death, on the 21st December ultimo, 
of W. Bro. Charles E. Potter, the second oldest member on the roll of the 
lodge, and the senior past master ; whereupon it was ordered that the lodge 
be placed in mourning for the space of three months." 

"W. Bro. Bunting stated that, although he was nominally secretary 
of the lodge for the past year, the actual work of the office was performed 
by the worshipful master; when it was unanimously resolved that the 
thanks of the lodge be recorded to W. Bro. Sharp for the acceptable 
manner in which he discharged the duties of the East, and for his atten- 
tion to the work of the secretaryship. A vote of thanks was likewise 
passed to Bros. Bunting and Sharp for donating the amount of the secre- 
tary's salary to the charity fund of the lodge." 

At the close of the lodge, the newly-installed master entertained the 
brethren, visitors and members to a well-appointed supper in the ban- 
quetting hall, where a few hours were pleasantly spent in feast, toast, 
speech, song, sentiment and fraternal good feeling. 

June 3 — "Report was made of the death on Monday, 12th May 
ultimo, of Bro. William B. Pidgeou, initiated in St. John's Lodge, 11th 
May, 1838 ; who was, therefore, at the time of his decease, a freemason of 
fifty-two years' standing." 

" By a circular letter from the grand secretary, the lodge was notified 
of the intention of the grand master to call out the craft on the evening 
of June 24 instant, the annivei-sary of St. John the Baptist, for the pur- 
pose of attending divine service at St. Paul's church (Episcopal) in this 
city. A full attendance of the brethren was requested." 

September 2 — " An invitation, dated 22nd August ultimo, under the 
hand of the grand secretary, was extended to the lodge to join the grand 
lodge and sister lodges in laying the corner stone of a hall now in 
course of erection at Moncton, by the young men's christian association 
of that town. The assemblage, with procession and ceremonial, is in- 
tended to take place at two o'clock in the afternoon of the third instant." 

November 6 — An emergency comunication was held to pay the last 
tribute of respect to the remains of Bro. James Philps, who died at his 
residence, Waterloo street, on the third instant. The funeral proceeded 
to the rural cemetery, where the body was interred according to the 
burial services of the Presbyterian church and of freemasonry. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. • 207 

A. D. 1891. 

January 6 — The officers of this year were : 

Bro. John J. Forrest, W. M. 

Bro. Wilson L. Dobbin, S. W. Bro. Arthur W. McMackin, J. D. 

» Arcliibald Raiier. J. W. " Wra. J. McClaveily, S. 8. 

" J. C;. llatlieway, P. M., Chap. " Wm. N. DeWitt, J. 8. 

" Jolui D. Short, P. M., Treas. " Fred. Sandall, P. M., Orgt. 

" Robt. C. Thome, P. M., Sec'y. " F. Miles Hjincock, D. C. 

" Geo. A. Hetherington, S. D. " William H. Horn, I. G. 

Bro. Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

At the invitation of the newly-installed master, the brethren enjoyed 
a pleasant hour at supper, ending with the usual loyal and masonic 
toasts, etc. 

February 2 — "At the conclusion of routine business, the W. M. 
called the attention of the lodge to the condition of freemasonry in New 
Brunswick at the present time, with special reference to the lodges in 
Saint John. He regretted that there seemed to be a lack of interest 
among the brethren, particularly manifested in the meagre attendance at 
lodge meetings, which he thought might be attributed to a dearth of 
attraction outside of the usual business transactions and the conferring of 
degrees. To meet this difficulty, he suggested the preparation and read- 
ing of papers upon topics calculated to instruct the brethren ; an oc- 
casional call from labor to refreshment ; the introduction of vocal and 
instrumental music ; a more frequent rehearsal of the lectures of the de- 
grees; and the employment of other means to attract the attention and 
gather in the members. These suggestions were favorably received by 
the brethren, several of whom pledged themselves to aid him in further- 
ing the projwsed plan. Subsequently a committee, consisting of Bros. 
W. A. Ewing, Archibald Bauer and Fred. Sandall, was appointed to 
arrange a musical programme." 

March 3 — The office of secretary was rendered vacant by the resig- 
nation of Bro. R. C. Thorne, about to remove from Saint John. The 
vacancy was filled by the appointment and installation of Bro. Alex. W. 
Macrae. 

The lodge was favored whh a reading by \V. Bro Bunting, on mat- 
ters appertaining to the early history of St. John's Lodge, for which he 
received a vote of thanks. . 

April 7 — Under supervision of the committee appointed at the 
February communication, a programme of music and readings was given 
by Bros. Henry DuffijU, W. F. Bunting, W. A. Ewing, W. H. Horn and 
Archibald Bauer. 



208 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

May 5 — " W. Bro. W. A. Ewing stated to the lodge that R. W. Bro. 
Henry Duffell, a past master of Union Lodge of Portland, who was pres- 
ent this evening as a visitor, had recently completed the fiftieth year of 
his induction into freemasonry, and, in recognition of such an auspicious 
event, he proposed tiiat the hearty congratulations of St. John's Lodge 
be extended to the venerable and esteemed brother, together with the 
prayer that his life may be prolonged many years in vigorous health, 
to favor the brethren with his presence, countenance and wisdom ; which 
resolution was adopted by a standing vote, and accompanied by masonic 
honors. Bro. Duffell returned his warm acknowledgments to the lodge 
for this mark of their fraternal regard, and expressed the hope that he 
might always be worthy of the esteem and good fellowship of the craft." 

June 2 — An invitation was extended to the lodge by the grand secre- 
tary to join the grand master and sister lodges in laying the foundation 
stone of a church now in course of erection at Moncton, b_^ the Methodist 
denomination, the ceremonial to take place June 16th instant, at 2 o'clock 
in the afternoon. 

Another circular letter from the grand secretary gave notice of the 
intention of the grand master to call out the craft on St. John's day 
(24th June instant) to form a procession and attend divine service at the 
Centenary church (Methodist) in this city ; the various bodies to assemble 
at the masonic temple, Germain street, and form in order of procession at 
7 o'clock in the evening. In furtherance of this call, the secretary was 
directed to issue notices to the members of the lodge to attend at the 
place and time designated. 

W. Bro. Bunting read a paper containing biographical sketches of the 
founders of St. John's Lodge; particular of the early membership 
and growth of the lodge, together with an account and description of the 
various halls, hotels and other buildings in which the lodge, from time to 
time, held its meetings. 

December 1 — The lodge was favored with the reading of an obituary 
of three members, whose deaths had occurred since the last regular com- 
munication, viz. : Bro. Charles A. Harris, who died November 11, sud- 
denly of heart failure, on board of a steamer between Fall River and 
New York ; he was thirty years of age, Bro. Joseph Sullivan, whose 
death took place November 16, at the age of fifty -seven years ; and Bro. 
Frederick McLellan, who died November 17, aged thirty-four years. 
There were no masonic obsequies in either case. It was ordered that the 
lodge be draped in mourning during the space of three months, as a 
tribute to the memory of the deceased. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 209 

A. D. 1892. 
January 5 — The following were the officers of this year: 

Bro. Wilson L. Dobbin, W. M. 

Bro. Archibald Bauer, S. W. Bro. William N. DeWitt, S. S. 
" Geo. A. Iletheringlon, .J. W. " William H. Horn, J. S. 

" John D. Short, P. M., Treaa. " Fred. Sandull, P. M., Orgt. 

" Alex. W. Macrae, Sec'y. " W. Robert May, D. C. 

" Arthur W. McMackin, S. D. " Jas. W. Montgomery, I. G. 

" Wm. J. McClaverty, J. D. " Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

The grand master visited the lodge officially and installed the wor- 
shipful master. 

Fehruary 2 — R. W. Bro. George B. Hegan, D. D. G. M., made an 
official visit to the lodge. During his stay the usual masonic courtesies 
were exchanged. 

The following resolution was adopted by the unanimous voice of the 
lodge : 

Resolved, That we, the members of St. John's Lodge, in regular communication 
assembled, receive, with feelings of fraternal regret, the announcement of the death, 
which occurred on the fourteenth day of January ultimo, of our W^orshipful Brother 
Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence and Avondale, &c., &c., aged twenty-four 
years, the eldest son of His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, and heir in regular 
succession to the throne of (Jreat Britain ; 

And furlher resolved, That we hereby place on record our unfeigned sorrow oc- 
casioned by this great calamity, partaking as it does of a national and masonic 
character. And we also make record and extend our respectful sympathy and 
fraternal condolence to our Most Worshipful Brother, His Royal Highness tlie 
Prince of Wales, Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of England, and Her 
Royal Highness the Princess of Wales, the sorrowing parents of the Prince, whose 
death in his early manhood the craft in general deplore. 

March 1 — " Feeling reference was made to the recent death of R. W. 
Bro. James McNichol, past grand master of this jurisdiction, deeply and 
frat'jrnally mourned by the whole craft. He died February 28th ultimo, 
at the age of sixty years." 

October 4 — "A copy of resolution passed at the regular meeting 
of Union Lodge of Portland, held August 18, 1892, was laid before the 
lodge, as follows : 

Resolved, That a committee be appointed to take into consideration the advisable- 
ness of amending the bye-laws, so as to dispense with the regular monthly meetings 
during the months of June, July and August; and that sister lodges in the city be 
asked to appoint committees to meet with the committee of this lodge, to confer on 
the matter, and that the committee to be appointed report to the lodge. 

" Which document was received, and Bros. Geo. A. Hetherington and 



210 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Arthur AV. Sharp were appointed to represent St. Jolin's Lodge on the 
general committee." 

(Note — There is no record of any report having been made by this 
committee). 

December 6 — After the election of master, treasurer and tyler this 
evening, Bro. Archibald Bauer, worshipful master elect, made a present 
to the lodge of a valuable and artistic silver chain to be worn by the 
muster of the lodge. This elegant and much-prized addition to the 
j)araphernalia of the lodge is of solid silver, attached to a sky blue 
watered silk ribbon, and is the handiwork of the generous donor. 

The hearty thanks of the lodge were extended to Bro. Bauer for his 
valuable gift. 

A. D. 1893. 

January 3 — Officers for the current year: 

Bro. Arcliibald Bauer, W. M. 

Bro. Geo. A. Hetherington, S. W. Bro. William II. Horn, J. D. 

" Artluir W. McMackin, J. W. " W. Robert May, S. S. 

" VV. F. Bunting, P. M., Chap. " R. Duncan Smith, J. S. 

" John D. Short, P. M., Treas. " Fred. Sandall, P. M., Orgt. 

" Arthur W. Sharp, P. .M., Sec'y. " Walter BabbiU, D. C. 

" Alex. W. Macrae, S. D. " William J. Dean, I. G. 
Bro. Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

" After the close of the lodge, at the invitation of the W. M., the 
brethren — visitors and members — adjourned to the refreshment hall and 
partook of a supper provided by the officers of the lodge. On the re- 
moval of the cloth, speeches were made by past grand masters Wedder- 
burn and Bunting, past deputy grand nuister Dulfell, and several other 
brethren. The usual loyal and masonic toasts were proposed and re- 
sponded to. Songs by Bros. Bunting and Horn were enthusiastically re- 
ceived, and, after singing ' Auld Lang Syne,' by the full company, a 
most enjoyable re-union terminated." 

February 7 — "R. W. Bro. the Hon. Wm. Wedderburn, past grand 
master and past master of St. John's Lodge, was then introduced ; who 
delivered an eloquent and ornate address, in which he lucidly portrayed 
the masonic tenets of brotherly love, relief and truth, including a special 
reference to the masonic meaning of ' light.' The address was received 
with hearty applause by the large as.send)lage of brethren present. After 
remarks, in commendation of the address, by the worshipful master and 
others, a vote of thanks was passed to the right worshipful brother for 
the rich treat afforded by his appropriate and instructive paper." 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 211 

"The lodge was favored with a choice selection of vocal and instru- 
luontal music by a choir consistin*^ of Bros. .]. Twining Hartt, George B, 
Hegan, Fred. Sandall and William H. Horn, with Bro. Win. A. Pawing 
presiding at the organ." 

March 7 — " W. Bro. Geo. E. Day, W. M. of New Brunswick Lodge,, 
accompanied by his officers, visited the lodge this evening, and were 
accorded a hearty welcome. During their stay masonic courtesies usual 
on such occasions were interchanged between visitors and members." 

May 2 — " Bros. McMackin, Sharp and May, a committee appointed 

at the April comnnmication to solicit subscriptions in aid of Bro. , 

confined to his bed by a protracted sickness, reported that the sum of one 
hundred dollars had been raised and handed to the distressed brother, 
who expressed sincere gratitude for the timely assistance." 

September 5 — A circular letter was received from the grand secre- 
tary announcing the following executive officers of the grand lodge for 
the current year : 

M. W. Bro. Thoma-s Walker, Grand Master. 

V. W. Hro. T. Nisbet liobertson, (irand Secretary. 

October 3 — The lodge adopted the following resolution by acclama- 
tion : 

Remixed, That the congratulations of St. John's Lodge be extended to W. Bro. 
Joseph ('. Ilatheway, P. M., upon the fiftieth anniversary of his married life just 
completed; that the secretary communicate the purport of this resolution to Bro. 
Hatheway, under the seal of the lodge, coupled with the wish of his brethren, in 
lodge a-ssenibled, that he and Mrs. Hatheway may live many more years in the en- 
joyment of health, plenty and contentment. 

(Note — A letter was received from Bro. Hatheway, at the regular 
communication in November, returning his warm acknowledgments to 
the lodge for this congratulatory address.) 

November 7 — " R. W. Bro Henry Leonard, D. D. G. M., accom- 
panied l)y the grand secretary, made an official visit to the lodge this 
t'vening. After an exchange of customary courtesies, an examination of 
the secretary's books was made by the grand secretary, who reported that 
he found the books to be neatly aud systematically kept — the records 
particularly being full and explicit — reflecting the highest credit upon 
the care and correctness of the secretary. This information, the D. D. 
G. M. stated, he would take pleasure in conveying to the grand master, 
together with the efficient and prosperous condition in which he found 
the lodge." 



212 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

A. D. 1894. 
January 1 — Officei's for the current year: 

Bro. Archibald Bauer, W. M. 
Bro. Arthur W. McMackin, S. W, Bro. Joseph H. Morrison, J. D. 

" Alex. W. Macrae, J. W. " K. Duncan Smith, S. S. 

" Rev. Donald Macrae, Chap. " William J. Dean, J. S. 

" John D. Short, P. M., Trcas. " Fred. Sandall, P. M., Orgt. 

'' Fred. E. Flewwelling, Sec'y. " Thomas Finlay, D. C. 

♦' Wm. Robt. May, S. D. " Albert Edward Prince, I. G. 

Bro. Dingee Scribner, Tyler. 

" W. Bro. Arthur W. Sharp, P. M., on retiring from the office of 
secretary, very generously donated hi.s salary for the past year to the 
charity fund of the lodge, and received a hearty vote of thanks for his 
liberality." 

" In consideration of the valuable and efficient services rendered the 
lodge by W. Bro. Arthur W. Sharp, past master and past secretary, it 
was, on motion, unanimously ordered, that the master and wardens be 
deputed to procure a suitable masonic testimonial for presentation to Bro. 
Sharp." 

February 6 — "The committee appointed at the January communi- 
cation reported that they had ordered a past master's jewel for presenta- 
tion to Bro. Sharp, which they had pleasure in handing to the worshipful 
master." 

" W. Bro. Sharp was thereupon conducted to the dais and took position 
on the right of the chair. The lodge being called up, he was addressed 
by the worshipful master, who alluded to the distinguished services ren- 
dered the lodge by Bro. Sharp during his membership of seventeen 
years in many capacities, especially in the important office of secretary. 
At all times courteous, kind-hearted and efficient, not only in the dis- 
charge of official duty, but in a willing response to every call upon him 
for the good of the lodge ; honored, esteemed and beloved by his brethren 
of St. John's Lodge, and by the craft generally, it was consequently 
iitting that a proper recognition should be made of these services and of 
these feelings. He therefore took great pleasure in making the presenta- 
tion and in attaching the jewel to Bro. Sharp's breast, and hoped that his 
life might be prolonged many years to wear it. 

" Bro. Sharp, in reply, desired that the master, wardens, officers and 
members of the lodge should accept his heartfelt ackuowledgmenta for 
honoring him with so valuable a gift, and for the flattering terms in which 
the presentation was made by the worshipful master. He felt at a loss to 
give proper expression to the pleasurable emotions stirred within him by 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-94. ' 213 

this evening's occurrence ; he would, however, assure the brethren that it 
would always recall a gratifying incident in his masonic career.*' 

The jewel is made of fine gold, enclosed in a morocco case, and has 
the following inscription engraved on it : " Presented to W. Bro. Arthur 
W. Sharp, P. M., as a niaik of fraternal regard, by St. John's Lodge, 
No. 2, F. & A. M., January, 1894." 

April 3 — Ninety-two years and one day since the lodge was originally 
constituted under warrant from the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia. 

" The worshipful master announced that Bro. Barth(/lomew Coxetter, 
an old and respected member of the lodge, departed this life Marcb 20th 
ultimo, in the seventy-eighth year of his age. There was no masonic 
ceremonial, the brethren having attended the funerp] without regalia." 

" "Whereupon it was ordered that the lodge be draped in mourning for 
the space of three months, in token of respect to the memory of the 
deceased." 

"A letter was received from New Brunswick Lodge, No. 22, request- 
ing the appoitment of a committee to act in conjunction with committees 
of sister lodges in Saint John, with the object of applying to the board 
of general purposes for a reduction in the annual dues now payable to 
the grand lodge by private lodges. In accordance with this request, a 
committee of three was appointed, with power to act in the matter." 

The foregoing paragraph brings the history of St. John's Lodge down 
to April, 1894, and concludes the ninety-second year of its existence. 

From A. D. 1867 to the above date, covering a space of twenty- 
seven years, the lodge entered upon and continued the third era of its 
history. 

As heretofore noted, the first era embraced a period of thirty-five 
years under the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia; the second, a 
period of thirty years under the united grand lodge of England ; and the 
third, a period of twenty-seven years under the grand lodge of New 
Brunswick. 

During the time it was under the rule of Nova Scotia, the accessions 
to the roll of raembershij) were three hundred and thirty-five, viz. : two 
hundred and seventeen by initiation and one hundred and eighteen by 
affiliation ; under England, the additions were three hundred and thirty- 
one, viz. : two hundred and ninety-three initiates and thirty-eight affili- 
ates ; and under New Brunswick, the numbers were one hundred and 
ninety-six, viz. : one hundred and fifty-two by initiation and thirty-four 
by afl^liation, nuiking a total of eight hundred and fifty-two (852) during 
the whole period of ninety-two yeara. . 

The original warrant granted by Nova Scctia was ordered to be 
transmitted to the provincial grand master at Halifax, but whether sent 



214 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

there or retained by some brother in Saint John, cannot now be ascer- 
tained. The warrants issued by the grand lodges of England and New 
Brunswick remain in the possession of the lodge and are now hanging on 
its walls. 

The centennial of St. John's Lodge will occur April 2, 1902. This 
important event to the body is even now being anticipated by the breth- 
ren with considerable interest. In the eight years to elapse previous to 
its occurrence, important changes, in the natural course of things, will 
take place. Many individuals now on the world's stage of action " will 
be gathered into the land wliere their fathers have gone before." Never- 
theless, the hope is cherished that the existence of the lodge will be pro- 
longed until then ; that in the intermediary years it will be favored with 
increased prosperity, numerically and financially ; that its mission as an 
integral of the vast masonic brotherhood will be faithfully discharged; 
and that when it shall have arrived at the venerable age alluded to, the 
great occasion will be hailed with acclamation, and its advent celebrated 
with fitting observances. 

As a finale to this chapter and as a record for future reference, a list 

of the various masonic bodies in active operation in Saint John, April 2, 

1894, together with their presiding officers, is herewith appended, as 

follows : 

CRAFT MASONRY. 

Grand Lodge — Thomas Walker, M. W. G. M. 
Albion Lodoe — Tliomas W. Peters, W. M. 
St. John's Lodge — Archibald Bauer, W. M. 
HiBERNiA Lodge — Joseph A. Magiiton, W. M. 
Carleton Union Lodge — William A. Dougherty, W. M. 
Union Lodge of Portland — J. T. Twining Hartt, VV. M. 
New Brunswick Lodge — George Thompson, W. M. 

ROYAL ARCH MASONRY. 

Grand Chapter — T. Nisbet Robertson, G. H. P. 
Council of High Priesthood — Robert Marshall, President. 
Carleton Chapter — William B. Wallace, H. P. 
New Brunswick Chapter — Hedley V. Cooper, H. P. 
Union Chapter — Augustus W. Reed, H. P. 

ROYAL AND SELECT MASTERS. 

Grand Council— John V. Ellis, M. P. G. M. 

St. John Council— William A. Ewing, T. L M. • _, J _ 

Carleton Council — John V. Ellis, T. L M. 

KNIGHTS TEMPLARS. 

Encampment of Saint John — Jolin A. Watson, E. C. 

Cari-eton Council Kts. of the Red Cross — John A. Watson, King. 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 1867-'94. 215 

ROYAL ORDER OF SCOTLAND. 

Pbovincial Grand Lodge— T. Nisbet Robertson, P. G. M. 

KNIGHTS OF POME AND RED CROSS OF CONSTANTINE. 

Intendant General — Robert Marshall. 

MacLeod Moore Conclave — John A. Watson, M. P. S. 

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED SCOTTISH RITE. 

St. John Lodge of Perfection, 14°— Frank L. Tufts, T. P. G. M. 

Harrington Chapter Sovereign Princes op Rose Croix, H. R. D. M.^ 
18° — John V. Ellis, M. W. S. 

New Brunswick Sovereign Consistory, S. P. R. S., 32° — T. Nisbet Robert- 
gon, Commander-in-Chief. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

OF THE 

FOUNDERS OF SflINT JOHN'S LODGE, 

AND OF THE BRETHREN WHO HAVE PRESIDED IN THE EAST. 



WILLIAM CAMPBELL. 

One of the founders of the lodge and a distingiU8hed freemason and member of 
society in his time. Born in Argyleshire, Scotland, A. D. 1742; when quite a young 
man he came to America and became a resident of Worcester, Massachusetts, Avhere 
he engaged in meii-antile pursuits; subsequently removing to New York. When the 
American revolution broke out he espoused the cause of the loyalists, and became 
actively engaged on their side. At the evacuation of New York, in 1783, he went 
with other loyalists to Halifax, Nova Scotia, and, after remaining there a short time, 
came to Saint Jolin, where he continued to reside tmtil the time of his death. The 
freedom of the city was conferred upon him in the year 1795. In the same year he 
was appointed mayor of the city, which office he filled uninterruptedly until 1816, 
when he sent in his resignation. After his retirement the common council granted 
him a pension of one hundred pounds for his lionorable and efficient discharge of 
duty. Took an active part in the organization of Saint Andrew's Society of Saint 
John in 1798, and was the first vice-president; one of the pioneers of St. Andrew's 
Kirk and one of its first elders ; post master of Saint John several years ; a commis- 
sioner for taking bail and affidavits in the supreme court ; an honorary member of 
the old friendly fire club; alderman of Sidney ward during a number of years; 
under the act of .^cmbly, March 5th, 1805, incorporating the Saint John Cirammar 
School, he became one of its first directors. 

It is not known whether he received light in freemasonry previous to leaving his 
native land or after taking up a residence in America. The records of the grand 
lodge of New York show that he was present at a (juarterly communication held 
December 5th, 1782, as senior warden of Lodge No. 1G9, Ancient York Masons, and 
at a subsequent meeting he attended as worshipful master of that lodge. During his 
sojourn in Nova Scotia he was W. M. of Temple Lodge, Chedabucto (Guysborough). 
Under patent dated February 11, 178(5, granted by His Excellency John Parr, gover- 
nor and commander-in-chief, and right worshipful grand master of Nova Scotia, he 
was appointed " deputy grand master for Nova Scotia and New Brunswick and the 
masonical jurisdiction thereunto belonging," which important station he held until 
October 1, 1817, when he resigned "in consquence of old age and inability to attend 
to the duties of the office," and, at his suggestion, R. W. Bro. Thomas Wetmore was 
appointed in his stead. 

The warrant of St. John's Lodge, issued upon his recommendation, was trans- 
mitted to him as D. G. M., and under it he constituted the lodge in due form, April 
6, 1802. 

He wiis a Royal Arch Mason, altliough the chapter in which he received the 
tlegrees could not be ascertained. When the Carleton B. A. Chapter was organized 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 217 

at Saint John, A. D. 1805, he was solicited to join, but declined "on account of hi» 
advanced years." 

The death of this distingtiished craftsman and citizen occurred at Saint John, 
February 10, 1823, in the eighty-second year of his age. The remains were interred 
in the old burial ground, near King square, with masonic ceremonial, by St. John's 
Lodge, at which there was a band of music, an unusual thing at that time. The 
whole community mourned his death ; his niiisonic brethren testifying their feelings 
of profound grief in a marked degree. 

The following expressive tribute to his memory is gleaned from a local news- 
paper of the period: "On Monday evening, February 10th, between the hours of six 
and seven o'clock, after a long and painful illness, which he bore with Christian 
patience and resignation, William Campbell, Esquire, one of the commissioners for 
taking bail in the supreme court and formerly mayor of this city, in his 82nd year. 
He was a native of Argyleshire, Scotland, and in the prime of his life emigrated to 
the colony of Massachusetts, in the then British provinces of Nortli America, where 
he settled for some years in a mercantile capacity. He afterwards removed to New 
York, and at the evacuation of that place by the British, went with other loyalists to 
Halifax, N. S., from which place he came to St. John. In the transaction of busi- 
ness he was uniformly distinguished for honesty of intention and integrity of con- 
duct. In the domestic relations of husband and father he was indulgent, kind and 
affectionate, and during the long period of more than twenty years in which he dis- 
charged the important duties of chief magistrate of this city, he displayed an in- 
dependence and impartiality of purpose, a firmness and energy of character, together 
with an assiduous attention to the best interests of the community, which secured 
for him a large portion of respect, and will be long remembered by the inhabitants 
of this place. His funeral took place on the 14th February, from his late residence, 
Prince William street, which was largely and respectably attended. The worshipful 
master and brethren of St. John's Lodge assembled in a body and preceded the re- 
mains to the place of interment, where the beautiful and impressive service of the 
society was rehearsed after the ceremonial of the church." 

In November, 1887, St. John's Lodge, through a committee specially appointed, 
placed a new monument over the grave of the deceased, to replace the original, 
which, through lapse of time and the absence of relatives, had become defaced, 
broken and scattered. 

CHAPMAN JUDSON. 

An original member and one of the three brethren who, on the 25th day of Sep- 
tember, 1801, petitioned the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia for the warrant 
to establish the lodge. For some unexplained reason, his name was omitted froDi 
the warrant and Bro. John Dean's substituted ; nevertheless, when the lodge was 
constituted, he was installed into the office of senior warden and Bro. Dean into that 
of junior warden. He held the office one term only (six months), and does not 
appear to have filled any other. Came to Saint John in 1783 with the loyalists and 
drew a city lot No. 1114, situate on the north side of St. James street, corner of 
Prince William street, now owned by the estate of the late Thomas M. Reed. 
Freeman of the city, 1785; master carpenter to His Majesty's ordnance department, 
and a surveyor of boards, shingles and lumber, by appointment of the city council 
in 1802. 



218 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Keceived the craft degrees in St. George's Lodge, No. 19, Maugerville, and the 
Royal Arclj degrees in the chapter attached to that lodge. One of the original 
members and first royal arch captain of the Carleton R. A. Chapter. 

Died at Saint John, January 28, 1817, in the G6th year of his age, leaving behind 
liim a name above reproach. His remains were buried by the lodge witli masonic 
lionors, in the-old burial ground, near King square. 

JOHN WOLHAUPTER. 

One of the original members and first treasurer of the lodge. The date and 
place of his birth could not be ascertained, although there is reason to believe that 
he came to New Brunswick with the loyalists. A freeman of the city, 1799, as a 
watchmaker and jeweller. July 12, 1810, he advertised the house and shop occupied 
by him on the Market Square for sale, Jis he " intended to discontinue watch repair- 
ing and commence in the jewelry line." Afterward left Saint John and removed to 
Fredericton, wliere he continued the watchmaking business. Died at Richmond, 
Carleton county, January 10, 1839, aged 68 years. 

The lodge record does not shew w^here he was initiated into freemasonry, and is 
also silent as to the date of the withdrawal of his membership. He filled the office 
of treasurer one terra only. 

WILLIAM FAYERWEATHER. 

One of the original members of the lodge, and secretary during the first year of 
its existence. The inaugural record, in his handwriting, has been singularly well 
preserved through all the mutations and vicissitudes of ninety-two years, bridging, 
as it were, the distant past with the present. In imagination this worthy brother 
and scribe may be brought before the mental vision, sitting at his secretary's desk or 
table in the loilge, watching and listening to tiie resolutions, debates and other pro- 
ceedings, and jotting them down in his own way and in the manner of the com- 
mencement of tiie nineteenth century, his record affording the brethren and scribes 
of its closing years tlie privilege "to read, mark, learn and inwardly digest" the 
masonic transactions of our ancient brethren. No doubt, when he wrote, he little 
thought his transcript would be made available at this distant day and for such a 
purpose. 

Brother Fayerweather (or Fairweather, as the name is now spelled), was born in 
the province of New York, and at the age of eleven years was brought to this city 
by his parents, who were loyalists. When a young man he carried on a mercantile 
business in the parish of Portland, contracts for supplying the troops then stationed 
here forming a part of his transactions. Afterward he removed to Kings county 
and engaged in farming. Was a magistrate and captain of militia in that county, 
and a freeman of the city of Saint John. When the regular troops were taken from 
this province to Canada, at the time of the American war of 1812-14, he proceeded 
to Fredericton with his company and did garrison daij there. 

Received the craft degrees A. D. 1796, in Sion Lodge, No. 21, Kingston, King's 
county, and the R. A. degrees in Widow's Friend Chapter, working under the war- 
rant of that lodge. 

Departed this life November 7, 1842, aged 70 years, at his residence, Charlotte 
street, Saint John, opposite the building owned by Dr. Thomas Paddock — the 
present Hotel Duflferin. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 219 

Attachment to and love of tlie masonic fraternity were strong within him. He was 
a reguhtr attendant at the meetings of tlie lodge, and promoted its interesls in vari- 
ous ways. Even at the last moment Ills tlutughts and words were in tlie direction of 
the craft. He was an excellent vocalist, possessing a full and melodious tenor voice. 
In his repertoire he had a numher of masonic songs, which he was fond of singing, 
and with which, on festive and other occasions, he enlivened the hrotherhood. 

CALEB MERRITT. 

One of the original members of the lodge and the first junior deacon. Born A. 
D. 1763 in the then province of New York ; allied himself with the loyalists in the 
revolutionary struggle, and came with them to Saint John at its close. Grantee of 
lot No. 263, Carleton; took out his fieedom [)apers in 1785 as a tailor. 

Made a mason in 179G in Sion Lodge, Kingston, and never appears to have 
advanced to further degrees or held any other olllie tiian the above named. 

Died August 3, 1821, aged 58 years, at his residence, south side of King street, 
between Prince William and Cross (now Canterbury) streets. His body was interred 
in the old burial ground, near King square. 

• GEORGE BLACKWOOD. 

One of the original members of the lodge, who never )>eld office or, seemingly, 
took active part in its concerns. He evidently did not continue his membership or 
attendance very long, as his name soon disappeared from the record. 

Formerly a member of Solomon's Lodge, No. 22, Fredericton, having joined that 
lodge February 6, 1798, from Lodge No. 7, registry of England — no doubt Hiram 
Lodge, No. 7, of New York. Held the office of Treasurer in Solonxm's Lodge, and 
withdrew from membership in it October 15, 1799. A non-commissioned officer in 
the King's New Brunswick regiment. 

JOHN SCOTT. 

Was W. M. of Moriah Lodge, No. 133, registry of Scotland, held in the 22nd 
Regiment of infantry when the regiment was quartered at Staten Island, A. D. 1783, 
just before the evacuation of New Y'^ork by the British troops. He was also captain 
general of the Encampment of Knights Templars held in the same regiment. Came 
to Saint John with the contingent of the loyalists which arrived in the autumn of 
1783; thence proceeded to Fredericton, called at that time Saint Ann's, and while 
there joined the King's New Brunswick regiment, holding in that corps the position 
of quarter-master sergeant. When the regiment moved to Saint John he came with 
it. Became an affiliant in Solomon's Lodge, No. 22, Fredericton, February 6, 1798, 
and withdrew October 15, 1799. During his membership, Solomon's Lodge voted 
him "a certificate of good conduct to enable him to obtain advancement in free- 
masonry." ^ 

1 No doubt this certificate was granted to enable Bro. Scott to receive the R. A. degree. That 
he was a knight templar in i7ii^, is proved by an authentic document which came under my notice. 
It may, therefore, be inferrctl that it was not obligatory, as a general regulation at that time, to be in 
possession of the R. A. degree previous to being created a knight templar; at all events, it was not 
10 in Bro. Scott's case. 



220 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

He was a promoter in the establishment of St. John's Lodge and one of its 
original members, but his membership was of short duration, for in the following 
year he died at his quarters in the parish of Portland, leaving a widow (Martha 
Scott), who administered to his estate, A. D. 1803. 

WILLIAM SANFORD OLIVER. 

One of the founders of the lodge and a royal arch mason ; formerly a member of 
Hiram Lodge, No. 17. Came to this country with the loyalists. First high sheriff 
of the city and county of Saint John, which office he held from 1785 to 1792, and 
again from 1797 until his decease. Grantee of lot No. 27, situate west side of Prince 
William street, south of the present custom house ; freeman of the city A. D. 1785 
as an esquire; treasurer of tlie province several years; marshal of the coi . of vict- 
admiralty, and a member of the old friendly fire club. 

Died February 22, 1813, aged 62 years, at liis residence, south side of Union 
street, a short distance east of Dock street. 

Bro. Oliver was descended from an old New England family which occupied a 
high social standing, his father, Andrew Oliver, having filled the distinguished office 
of lieutenant governor of Massachusetts when it was a colony of England. 

In commenting upon the death of our honored brother, the local ne" ^■'ners 
alluded to him as " a man of the highest integrity and worth, who discharged his 
public trusts with the utmost fidelity and satisfaction ; respected, esteemed and deeply 
lamented by the whole community, verifying in his public and private life the truism 
' an honest man is the noblest work of God.' " 

A freestone tablet marks the place of his interment in the old burial ground, 
near King square. 

HON. GEORGE LEONARD. 

One of the founders of St. John's Lodge ; formerly a member of Sion Lodge, No. 
21, Kingston, and also a royal arch mason. Born in the town of Plymouth, New 
England, November 28, 1742. When a portion of the colonists took up arms against 
the mother country he remained loyal to the crown, and distinguished himself in the 
war of independence. So great was his interest in tlie king's cause, that he fitted 
out several armed cruisers at his private expense. For the prominent part assumed 
he received the thanks of the commander-in-chief and also of the imperial treasury 
department. At the close of the war he was appointed an agent to settle loyalists 
on the crown lands of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Among the first contin- 
gent of loyalists who came to this province, and grantee of lot No. 39, S. E. cornei 
of Union and Dock streets, where he erected a fine mansion, and where he resided 
while in St. John. The first city treasurer, and one of the first aldermen named in 
the charter of the city. Received the freedom of Saint John A. D. 1785. In 1787 
appointed to a seat in the legislative council of the province ; quarter-master- 
general of the militia forces in New Brunswick ; a judge of the court of common 
pleas, and a lieutenant-colonel of militia in Kings county. By the act of 1805, in- 
corporating the Saint John grammar school, he was named one of the first directors ; 
and, as senior member of His Majesty's council, he was called to the administration 
of the government of the province on two occjisions. 

When age and infirmity approached, he withdrew from active life and retired to 
his country seat at Sussex Vale, where death ended his career April 1, 1826, at the 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 221 

advanced age of 84 years. Thus passed away a distinguislied public servant, res- 
|)pctpd nnd venerated by I be wbnle community, and an lionored freemason, beloved 
and esteemed by the " household of the faithful." 

ANDREW KINNEAR. 

A native of Newtown Limavady, Londonderry county, Ireland, who, during tlie 
latter part of the last century, came to America with the Britisli army. Occupied n 
prominent position in the commissariat department, first at Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
and subsequently at Saint Andrews, Saint John, and Fort Cumberland, in New 
Brunswick; his full service covering a period of more than thirty years, in all of 
which time he maintained the character of a faithful and efficient officer. Repre- 
i-ented tlie county of Westmorland in the first house of assembly elected in New 
Brunswick. 

Received the craft and royal arch degrees in Ireland previous to his departure 
therefrom, and when St. John's Lodge was erected, became one of its founders, l>iit 
never took an active part in its proceedings. 

Departed this life at his residence, Westmorland county, May 13. 1818, at the age 
of 68 years. P^our sons survived him: John, Francis A., William B., and Harrison 
(r., two of whom were leading merchants and the other two prominent barristers in 
Saint John. 

JOHN SINNOTT. 

Born at Rallybrennan, county Wexford, Ireland ; educated in Dublin. When 
(luite a young man he left Ireland for Halifax, Nova Scotia, and from thence came to 
Saint John (then Parr town), about the year of the landing of the loyalists. When 
a garrison was formed in this city he obtained employment as a clerk in the commis- 
sariat department, but previously opened a scliool for instructing the youth of the 
town, an institution no doubt very much needed at that time. In the year 1810 he 
was temporarily stationed at Saint Andrews to adjust some irregularity in the com- 
missariat at that place. From 1817, when he was unfortunately struck with 
paralysis, up to the time of his death, he was retired from the service and placed oni 
tlie half-pay list. 

Bro. Sinnott, who was one of the founders of St. John's Lodge, received masonic 
light in Hiram Lodge, No. 17, being the first candidate initiated into freemasony in 
New Brunswick. He filled the office of secretary and afterwards that of worshipful 
master in Hiram Lodge. The R. A. degree was conferred upon him April 10, 1805, 
"... Carleton Chapter, then working under the warrant of St. John's Lodge. 

During the visit of the Duke of Kent to this province in May, 1794, when he 
was commander-in-chief of the forces, Bro. Sinnott formed one of the party to accom- 
pany him to Fredericton. The journey was made partly by water in open boats and 
partly by land. 

He departed this life June 12, 1828, aged 69 years, at the residence of his son, 
Stephen Sinnott, Union street, opposite the Chipman grounds. His remains were 
interred in the old burial ground, near King square. 

HUGH JOHNSTON. 

A native of Morayshire, Scotland, from which place he came to Saint John^about 
the year 1784, in a vessel owned by himself and laden with the merchandise witii 
which he commenced business here. 
O 



222 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

One of the founders of St. John's Lodge ; formerly a member of St. George's 
Lodge, No. 19, Mungerville, and one of the original members of Carleton Royal 
Arch Chapter. In the latter body he was the first Scribe, or Principal J. 

Represented the city and connty of Saint John in the provincial legislature for 
the long term of seventeen years; one of the founders of St. Andrew's church and 
one of the first elders thereof; an incorporator an»l one of the first directors of the 
bank of New IJriinswick; a member of the old friendly lire club; a port warden 
of the city from 181(5 to 1830; i.n alderman of the city for 1808 and many succeeding 
years; a joint owner of the steamer General Smyth — the first to ply on the river 
Saint John. Johnston's wharf and slip, west side of Water street, received their 
names from him as the owner. 

He carried on a large importing and mercantile business, in which he was very 
successful ; always sustaining a higii character for integrity and correct business 
liabits. It was said of him that he was a faithful friend and an enterprising and 
useful member of the community. His son Charles was also a member of St. John's 
Lodge, and \V. M. A. D. 184;^. 

The subject of this sketch died at Saint John, November 29, 1829, at the age of 
73 years. His remains were first interred in the old burial ground, near King 
Square, and afterward removed to the rural cemetery. A grandson, W. Bro. Charles 
H. L. Johnston, M. D., is at the present time a member of St. John's Lodge. 

HON. THOMAS WETMORE. 

Son of Timothy Wetmore and a descendant of Thomas Whetmore who immi- 
grated to America from England in the year 1635 Born at Kye, Westchester 
county, New York, September 20, 1767, and in 1783 came to Saint John with the 
loyalists. Studied law under the late Hon. Ward Chipraan, and admitted to the bar 
of the province in regular course ; clerk of the crown in the supreme court of the 
province from 179G to 1S04; recorder of the city of Saint John A. D. 1808; deputy 
surrogate ; master and examiner in chancery ; registrar of deeds and wills in 
Queen's county; member of the legislative council of the province; an honorary 
member of the old friendly fire club; attorney general of New Brunswick from 
July 26, 1809, until his death, and a director of the Saint John grammar school. 

One of the founders of St. John's Lodge, and one of the original members and 
first High Priest (first principal) of Carleton R. A. Chapter. The records of the 
chapter for tiie first year are in his hand-writing. Received special authority, 
under date September 14, 1816, from the provincial grand master at Halifax, to 
preside as grand master at a temporary grand lodge held in Saint John September 
28, 1816, at the ceremony of laying the corner stone of the old masonic hall, corner 
of King and Charlotte streets. Appointed deputy grand master of New Bruns- 
wick by warrant of the R. W. John George Pyke, Esciuire, provincial grand master, 
dated at Halifax, Nova Scotia, October 1, 1817, as successor to R. W. Bro. William 
Campbell, which important office he tilled up to the time of his death. R. W. Bro. 
Wetmore was initiated in St. George's Lodge, No. 19, at Maugervillc. 

His death occurred at his residence, Kiiigsclear, York county, March 22, 1828, 
in the 61st year of his age, deeply lamented by his brethren and the community 
generally. Earnest and indefatigable in forwarding the best interests of the fra- 
ternity, which he loved; eminently distinguislied for his benevolence, kindness and 
hospitality ; possessing legal attainments of the highest order ; governed in all Ids 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 223 

acts by the strictest integrity ; a geninl and popular gentleman, he passed away to 
the higiier reward, enjoying iiniversul respect and esteem, and sincerely mourned by 
all classes in the province. 

yole — The following entry is found in the records of Carleton R. A. Chapter, of 
date January 9, 1828: " M. E. Companion, Hon. Thomas Wetmore, His Majesty's 
attorney general, visited the chapter, when a few bottles of miuleira were intro- 
duced, and some toasts given. He slated that he had not attended the meetings of 
late years in conHcqutnce of being a resident of Fredericton." This visit took place 
less than three months previous to his death. 

JOHN PAUL. 

This brother Wiis one of the original members and first junior warden of Hiram 
Lodge, No. 17 ; also one of the founders of St. John's Lodge, but never held otlice 
therein. E-xalted to the R. A. degree in Chapter No. 213, New York, previous to 
the close of the revolutionary war, and one of tiie original members and first master 
of the veil of Carleton R. A. Chapter in .Saint John. A native of Lanark, Scotland, 
where he probably was made a mason previous to his embarkation for America, 
Held a commission in the royal artillery during the war of independence; foug . at 
the battles of Lexington, IJunker Hill, Brandywine, Long Island, Germantown, etc. ; 
fired the first gun on the British side at the battle of Le-xington, and in the engage- 
ment received a severe wound. 

Coming to Saint John at the termination of hostilities, he received an appoint- 
ment on the stafl" of the ordnance department in this city. Grantee of lot No. 1201, 
situate on the north side of Brittain street, midway between Carmarthen and Went- 
worth streets. A freeman of the city, and one of the first elders of St. Andrew's 
Kirk. 

Died at Saint John, April 29, 1833, at the ripe old age of 82 years, enjoying the 
respect and esteem of the community. His remains were interred with military 
lionors in the old burial ground near King square. 

HON. JOSHUA UPHAM. 

One of the founders of St. John's Lodge; formerly a member of Sion Lodge, No. 
21, Kings county, although it is probable he was initiated into the fraternity previ- 
ous to coming to New Brunswick. 

He came from Brookiield, Massachusetts. Was a graduate of Harvard University 
of the 1763 class, and of Yale College in 1765. When the war broke out between 
the colonists and Great Britain he espoused the royal cause, and was actively en- 
gaged during all the struggle. He held a commission as major in the King's 
American dragoons; was an aide-de-camp to the commander-in chief ; deputy in- 
sjjector general of the loyalists, and an agent to superintend their interests after 
their arrival in New Brunswick. Appointed one of the judges of the supreme court 
November 25, 1784, and a legislative councillor of the province June 2, 1786. He 
(lied in England, while on a visit to that country, November 1, 1808, at the age of 
65 years. Sabine says of him: "Of all the loyalists who went to New Brunswick 
few performed greater services, and of few is their memory more deeply cherished." 

A grandson, Charles W. Weldon, Esij., an ex-representative of the city and 
county of Saint John in the dominion parliament, and a leading member of the 
legal profession, is a resident of this city and a member of the masonic fraternity. 



224 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

GEORGE McCOLL. 

Took an active part in the formation of tlie lodge, but does not appear to liave 
continued this interest subsequently. He was a native of Dumfriesshire, Scotland, 
where he received the craft degrees previous to coming to America. When the 
revolutionary war commenced in tlie then British North American colonies, lie 
espoused the side of the crown and was an active participator in the struggle. After 
the declaration of peace he came to Saint John with the other loyalists; was grantee 
of lot No. 605, situate on the corner of Princess and Prince William streets, the site 
of the present city hall ; became a freeman in 1786 as a merchant; and conducted a 
mercantile business for many years, a portion of the time as u member of the firm of 
McCoU t% Henderson. 

Departed this life at Saint John, March 23, 1812, in the 78th year of his age, 
" lamented and regretted by his numerous friends and acquaintances as a man of the 
strictest honor and integrity through life." His grave is in the old burial ground 
east of King square. 

EDWARD SANDS. 

This brother, who was one of the founders of the lodge, and a former member of 
the old Hiram York Lodge, No. 23, Fredericton, was born A. D. 17(50, in the prov- 
ince af New York, of a parentage on the male side related to the peerage of the 
United Kingdom. During the war of American Independence he held a commission 
in the colonial army as quarler-nuister of the King's American dragoons. At its 
close in 1783 he came to Saint John with the loyalists and engaged in mercantile 
business. In 1786 he took out his freedom as a merchant. He advertised in the 
Gazette of November 6, 1787, that " he had just imported an assortment of dry goods 
from London, for sale at his store near the upper public landing." Major of militia 
in the county of Saint John, an alderman of the city and a coroner of the city and 
county. His death occurred at Saint John December 18, 1803, in the 44th year of 
his age. The place of interment in the old burial ground near King square is 
marked by a plain tablet. 

GEORGE SMITH. 

(First Worshipful Master). 

Bros. George Smith, Chapman Judson and David Waterbnry were the petitioners 
for the warrant of the lodge, Bro. Smith being named as the first worshipful master. 
The petition and the letter accompanying it are evidently in tie handwriting of Bro. 
Smith, clearly proving that the original promoter of the lodge was an excellent pen- 
man and a person of good education. There is nothing to show where or when he 
was received into freemasonry. No d»)ubt he was a brother of prominence and abil- 
ity, to be selected to make application for the warrant and to i)re.>ide in the East, in 
preference to the many other distinguished craftsmen and citizens, who were the 
original founders and org .oizers of the lodge. He came to Saint John with the 
loyalists of 1783 and wps grantee of lot No. 591, north side of Princess street, between 
Germain and Charlotte streets. His name appears on the register of freemen A. D. 
1795 as a contractor and builder, and on the original roll of the artillery company 
organized in Saint John, May 4, 1793. He continued to till the otlice of W. M. in 
the lodge up to the time of his death, which oc<'urred in the month of March, 1804. 
The lodge attended the funeral and consigned the remains to the grave with masonic 
ceremonial. The record subsequently shews that he left a widow. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 225 

DAVID WATERBURY. 

(Second Worshipful Master). 

Born in Stamford, Connecticut, A. D. 1758, of one of the oldest families in 
America, their advent dating back to 1628. When the revolutionary war broke out 
]ie was studying medicine, but he " threw physic to the dogs," and espoused the 
British cause. At the close of the troubles he, with the other loyalists, came to 
Saint John and commenced a successful business as merchant, contractor, etc., taking 
a foremost interest, however, in the general welfare of the place. In 1795 he became 
a freeman of the city. An early alderman and one of a committee to superintend 
the erection of the first beacon light in the harbor; an overseer of the poor; an 
examiner and inspector of fish; active in organizing the militia of the city and 
tounty; held a commission as captain of artillery for a number of years, retiring 
V ith the rank of major; took a prominent part in forming the old fire department, 
ill which he held the ofliceof chief engineer ; he was also a leader in church matters, 
being one of the founders of Trinity church, and for a long time a vestryman of the 
<'imrch. 

Bro. Waterbury received the craft degrees in the old Sion Lodge, No. 21, King's 
county. lie was one of the three brethren who were petitioners for the original 
warrant of St. John's Lodge ; and, although named in the warrant as the first senior 
warden, he, at the organization and for three months afterward, filled that of junior 
warden ; S. W. part of 1802, also 1808 and 1804; W. M. 1805 and 1806. ' alted to 
tlie R. A. degree March 11, 1799, in Widow's Friend Chapter, held under the war- 
rant of Sion Lodge, and was one of the original members and the first King (second 
principal) of Carleton R. A. Chapter. 

The deatli of our distinguished brother took place at his residence, Saint John, 
November 28, 1838, at the age of 75 years. The funeral cortege, which was one of 
the largest seen in this city at that time, WJis comprised of the various civic bodies, 
the militia and citizens generally, headed by the masonic fraternity under the banners 
of St. Jolin's Lodge. At the grave, which is located in the eiist part of the old 
burial ground, the impressive service of the fraternity was conducted by the W. M. of 
the lodge. 

It may be tnily snid of our brother that he discharged all his duties, public and 
private, faithfully and discreetly, and is remembered by the few old surviving friends 
as a man of sterling integrity and benevolent instincts. 

GEORGE IRONSIDE. 

(Third Worshipful Master). 
Came to Saint John during the year 1804 from Windsor, Nova Scotia. Previous 
to his removal from Windsor he held the position of .second master in the collegiate 
school of that place. The directors of the grammar school in Saint John appointed 
him, October 1, 1805, to the office of head master, but in consecpience of an inter- 
vening difficulty he did not fill the position. He advertised in the Gazette of Sep- 
tember 15, 1806, that he was prepared to attend to the teaching of geography, the 
use of the globes, the Latin language, etc. Received the free<lom of the city A. D. 
1807 as a school teacher, and in the same year was commissioned by the city council 
to erect a public sun dial in front of the market house, Market square, for which 
service he was paid £2 os. 0«l. After a residence in .Saint John of less than four 
yearg, he went to the United States, but of his after movements nothing is known, 



226 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

except that a notice appeared in the public prints of the death of his wife at New- 
York, June 13, 1815. 

Affiliated in St. John's Lodge, August 5, 1806; his former lodge not noted in the 
record ; W. M. 1807. Exalted to the R. A. degree March 19, 1800, in the Carleton 
Chapter. At an emergencv meeting of the lodge, held Noyember 7, 1807, it in 
recorded that " Bro. George Ironside took a farewell of the lodge, when they gave 
him their hearty thanks for his administration during the time he was in the chair." 

NEHEMIAH MERRITT. 

(Fourth Worshipful Master). 

One of the original members of the lodge, and a zealous participator in its labors. 
Born December 1, 1770, in the township of Rye, Westchester county, province of 
New York. The son of Tliomas Merritt, whose ancestors settled in Rye about tiie 
middle of the seventeenth century, and who became large land owners and occupied 
prominent positions in that locality. He came to this province in 1783, at the e.Triy 
age of 13 years — a youtiiful and ardent loyalist. Obtained the freedom of the city 
in 1795 as a iisherman, but subsequently became a merchant and importer, carrying 
on a large and lucrative business in that direction, and also in the shipbuilding line. 
A justice of the peace for the city and county; an assessor of rates; a port warden; 
one of the first directors of the bank of New Brunswick ; a projector of the Saint 
John Water Company ; an incorporator of the Saint John Bridge Company ; a 
stockholder or director in other corporate companies, and generally active and 
prominent in all public movements of his time. Alerritt's wharf, on the west side 
of Water street, was built by him, and continues to be known by his name. 

There is no record to show where or when he received the craft degrees. Treas- 
urer of the lodge 1802 to 1804; J. W. 1807, and W. M. 1808. Received the R. \. 
degree in Carleton Chapter, May 20, 1805; elected Principal Z., September 23, 1827, 
continuing in the office many years. 

Died at his residence. Prince William street, St. John, May 25, 1842, in the 72nd 
year of his age, reputed to be the wealthiest man of his time in the city, his wealth 
having been accumulated by persevering industry, energy and integrity. The high 
esteem in which he was held l>y his fellow citizens made his loss deeply felt by tlie 
entire community. St. Joim's Lodge, with sister lodges and Carleton R. A Chapter, 
formed a portion of the funeral cortege, and assisted in conveying the remains to 
their earthly resting place. An immense grey granite obelisk marks the place of 
interment in the Episcopal church yard, north of Coiirtenay Bay, 

FRANCIS WATSON. 

(Fiftti Worsliipful MiiMtor;. 

Very few particulars can be gathered of this brother outside of his masonic 
record, except that he became a freeman of the city in the year 1785 as a carpenter. 
From this it may be assumed that he came with the loyalists. ,\n assessor of rates 
in 1801, and a svirveyor of linnber, etc., 1803. 

He was the first brother admitted to membership in the lodge, having affiliatoil 
May 4, 1802. Secretary 1S03 and 1804; S. W. 1S05 to 1808; and W. M. 1809 and 
1810. Exalted in Carleton Cliajiter, Jtme 10, 1807. His death took place Novem- 
ber 13, 1810, while occupying the chair of the lodge, and tlie second out of the five 
masters of the lodge up to that date who died during their encumbency. It is 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 227 

worthy of note that during the first eight years of the existence of St. .John's Lodge 
there were two worslitpful masters who died while oocupyiiig the chair, and since 
then — a period of eighty-four years — no similar occurrence has taken phice. His 
widow, Elizabeth Watson, and Bro. the Hon. George Leonard, administered to his 
estate. 

JOHN GRANT. 

(Sixth Worshipful Master). 

From the :neagre information gleaned in regard to this brother, I find that he 
was a native of Scotland, that he became a freeman of the city in 1S06 as a cooper,, 
that he was engaged in pickling and exporting fish, and that in 1806 he was ap- 
pointed an inspector of barrels and examiner offish. Initiated April 7, 1807 ; S. W. 
1809 and 1810, and W. M. 1811 and 1812. Reported that he became much reduced 
in his circumstances and died at Saint John about the year 1840. 

WILLIAM DURANT. 

(Seventh Worshipful Master). 

The subject of this sketch was an infant when he came to Saint John with his 
parents, who were loyalists. After serving an apprenticeship at the printing busi- 
ness he became a freeman in 1801. As a member of the firm of William Durant & 
Co., he commenced, in 1808, the publication of The Timen and True Briton, and in 
1811, the City Gazette, both weekly newspapers. In 1818 he was arraigned before 
the provincial legishiture at Fredericton for pubiisiiing an article in the City Gazette 
reflecting uprm tiie members of that body. In answei to the summons he appeared 
at the bar of the house, when, it having come to light that the libellous article 
was written by a mend)er of the legislature, he was discharged. Held a seat at the 
city council board several years as an alderman and assistant alderman ; an assessor 
of rates, and captain in the local militia. 

Received the craft degrees in Sion Lodge, No. 21, Sussex Vale, and afl[iliated in 
St. John's Lodge April 7, 1807. Secretary 1808; J. W 1809; S. W. 1811 and 1812, 
and W. M. 1813, 1815 and 1820. The R. A. degree was conferred upon him in 
Midian Chapter, King's county. 

His death occurred at Saint John, January 28, 18.S2, in tlie .^SrJ year of his age, 
and the remains were interred in the old burial ground near King square. During 
tiie whole course of his life, and in all the public duties he was called upon to ad- 
minister, he maintained the character of an independent, zealous and honorable man. 

JOSEPIi CLARKE. 

(Eltjhtii Worshipful Master). 

I5urn at Yarmouth, N. S., and educated there. Served an apprenticeship at 
cabinet making with a Mr. Huestis o." Yarmouth. After completing his apprentice- 
ship he removed to Saint John, where he turned his attention to building operations. 
In 1809 he became a freeman of the city as a carpenter. During a period of .some 
ten years he erected many buildings in Saint John and its vicinity. At the time of 
the American war, A. D. 1812-'14, he built tlie old Block house which years ago 
stood on the Carleton heights, and about the same period erected, under contract 
with the imperial government, a large building for storing military supplies. He 
also, in 1818, built the old Baptist church, a woodeu structure which for many years 



228 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

«tood on the corner of Germain and Queen streets, the site of the present brick 
building, lie erected a private residence for liimself on Wellington row, a building 
in after years occupied by the Rev. Bro. 15. G. Gray, where, in November, 1833, Mrs. 
■Gray was unfortunately burned to death. About tlie year 1820 Bro. Clarke removed 
to Digby county, N. S., and carried on farming until 1825, when he returned to 
Saint John and became a resident of Carleton, where he died April 30, 1826, in the 
-42iid year of his age. 

He received the E. A. degree July 12, 1808, and the F. C. and M. M. degrees 
September 20, 1808, in Midian Ledge, Kingston. Joined St. John's Lodge, Janu- 
ary 1, 1811 ; S. W. 1813; W. M. 814, and Treasurer 1810 and 1817. His remains 
were interred in the Carleton buiial ground. 

JOHN DEAN. 

(Ninth Worshipful Master). 

Born at Jamaica, Long Island, and came to Saint John in 1783, at the age of 
fourteen years, with his parents, who were loyalists. Made a freeman of Saint 
John in 171)0; alderman and assistant alderman of the city six years, 1799-1804. 
His business of butcher and victualler called him occasionally to the Ignited States 
ixnd West Indies. During one of these visits he received the craft degeees in Hiram 
Lodge, No. 7, of the city of New York. 

One of the original members of St. John's Lodge, and the first senior deacon. 
Although his name appears on the warrant as the first junior warden, for some un- 
explained reason he was not installed into tliat oflice at the formation. J. W. 1802, 
1803, 1804 and 1808; S. W. 1815; W. M. 1816. Received the R. A. degree in 
Widow's Friend Chapter, Kingston, King's county. 

Died at Saint Jolm, July 21, 1835, aged 67 years. The lodge attended the 
funeral in a body and held the masonic service at the grave in the old burial 
ground, near King sfpare. One of liis sons, John Dean, is now a resident of Saint 
John. 

ROBERT ROBERTSON. 

(Tenth Worshipful Master). 

Blair Athol, Perthshire, Scotland, claims to be the place of his nativity, from 
■whence he, in the year 1799, emigrated to Saint John. Soon after his arrival here 
he went to Grand Lake, Queens county, and, afier remaining there a short time, re- 
turned to Saint John, wintered into co-partnership with Robert Robertson, of the 
parish of Portland, in the lime and shipbuilding business. Subsequently started a 
mercantile eftablishmont in Saint John on his own account. He was instrumental 
in bringing a large number of his fellow countrymen to this province in his vessels, 
<'aring for them on their arrival here, procuring farms for some, and providing vari- 
ous means of employment for others. An early elder of Saint Andrew's Kirk; a 
freeman of the city ; a magistrate of the city and county ; an alderman ; director of 
the fisheries ; a fireward and captain of the old night watch. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge, March 1, 1814; Treasurer 1815, 1818 and 1819; 
J. W. 1816; W. M. 1817. Exalted, September 14, 1816, in Carleton R. A. Chapter. 

In the year 1856, being then 85 years of age, he made a journey to Hamilton, 
Upper Canada, to see a jjarticular friend before death intervened. Considering his 
Advanced years, and the inconvenience of travel in those days, this journey was a 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 229 

formidable undertaking. He, liowever, accomplislied the desire of his lieart, but. 
during his sojourn, death came to him suddenly while sitting in a chair. On account 
of the great distance, his remains were buried at Hamilton. 

Bro. Kobertson was a man of robust health, of a kindly nature and strong att.ich- 
nients; public spirited and enterprising in all his undertakings. 



ROBERT RAY. 

(Eleventh Worshipful Master). 

His father, Robert Ray, a native of the county Donegal, Ireland, went to New 
York before the commencement of the American revolution and engaged in mercan- 
tile business there. When tlie colonists took up arms against the crown, he left New 
York and went to Digby, Nova Scotia, where the subject of our sketch was born A.D. 
1787, who, when a youth, went to Halifax and there learned the sail-making trade 
in His Majesty's dockyard. In 1813 he took passage in a vessel from Halifax to 
Saint John. England and the United States being then at war, many American 
cruisers and privateers were hovering about these coasts. The vessel in which Bro. 
Ray was a passenger was intercepted by one of these cruisers, captured, and all on 
board made prisoners of war and their effects confiscated. The captain of the 
cruiser, supposed to be a freemason, finding that Bro. Ray was a member of the fra- 
ternity, restored his property to him and allowed him to go free. On his arrival in 
Saint John he commenced business in the sail-making line, prosecuting it extensively 
and profitably up to the time of his death. Became a freeman in 1816; was an 
ai^sistant alderman of Queen's ward ; lieutenant in the city militia ; a port warden ; 
a fireward ; president of the Irish benevolent society. Any undertaking having for 
its object the commercial or other material advantage of the community, received 
from him voluntary and substantial support. Possessed of a large and benevolent 
heart, the poor and suffering — particularly the African settlers at Loch Lomond — 
were never permitted to go away empty-handed. As a practical joker his fame was 
known far and near. 

He affiliated in St. John's Lodge, May 3, 1814, from Virgin Lodge, No. 2, Halifax, 
having been initiated in the latter body A. D. 1812. S. W. 1816 and 1817 ; W. M. 
1818, 1821 and 1823. Joined Carleton R. A. Chapter March 11, 1818. His mother 
chapter was not specified. Withdrew from the lodge A. D. 1825, to become a 
petitioner for the warrant of Albion Lodge of this city, being named therein as the 
first senior warden. 

Died at Saint John, January 29, 1848, at the age of 61 years. His remains were 
interred in tiie nual cemetery. 

HENRY CHUBB. 

(Twelfth Worshipful Master). 

His father, John Chubb, who was of English extract, came to Saint John from 
rennHvlvania with the loyalists in May, 1783, and was gntntee of lot No. 1151, south 
side of Saint James street, between Sidney and Carmarthen streets. Bro. Henry 
Chubb, who was born in Saint John, learned the printer's trade in the office of Jacob 
Mott, King's printer. He established The Netv Brunswick Courier, and commenced 
its publit'utiou May 2, 1811, under the co-pHrtnership name of Henry Chubb & Co. 



230 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

It was issued weekly, and continued its publication regularly, under the same title, 
and firm-name until the year 1865, when it became defunct. In connection with his 
printing trade, he carried on the stationery business on the corner of Prince William 
and Princess streets, familiarly known as Chubb's Corner — a well known resort of 
merchants, auctioneers, politicians, speculators, etc. He was a freeman of the city; 
justice of the peace; captain and quarter-master of the Saint John rifle battalion; 
assessor of rates; conimissicmer of the alms house; fi reward ; director of the Saint 
John grammar school, and otherwise largely interested in public and private enter- 
prises for the general good. Appointed A. D. 1850 to the responsible and hon- 
orable position of mayor of the city — the last appointee to the civic chair by the 
governor and council.' 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge, April 4, 1815; Secretary 1815 to 1817 ; S. W. 1818; 
W. M. 1819; Treasurer 1820 to 1823. Received the R. A. degrees in Carleton 
Chapter, Marcli 1'), IS 1(5. 

Died at Saint Jolm, May 20, 1855, aged 68 years. The remains rest in the family 
ground in the rural cemetery. 

A local contemporary alluded to his demise in the following language: "Few 
men enjoyed to a greater degree the esteem and respect of their fellow-citizens than 
Henry Chubb, the fatlier of the New Brunswick press. Many years ago, when party 
politics were not dreamt of, he published the Courier, now the most profitable as well 
as one of the most respectable and influential papers in the province. The success 
of Mr. Chubb as a publisher and newspaper proprietor were unprecedented in the 
province, and yet none enried him, for kind, obliging and unobtrusive, he made 
many friends and no enemies. He mingled little personally in political contests, but 
he was ever a lover of fair play, and ready to defend the wronged and the oppressed. 
He was in all respects a good citizen and estimable man, and when the executive of 
the province, tlie last lime they exercised the right of appointing a mayor of Saint 
John, selected him to fill the highest office in the city in which he had spent his 
youth and mature years, the choice received universal approbation " 



GEORGE BONNELL. 

(Thirteenth Worshipful Master). 

A' native of the United States, who came to St. John in the early part of tiie 
century and entered into the grocery business, at one time occupying a store on 
Smyth street. He became a freeman of the city in 1818 as a grocer. After re- 
maining in St. John several years, he returned to his native land. He received the 
craft degrees in Portland Lodge of Portland, State of Maine, A. D. 1804, and the 
R. A. degrees in Mount Vernon Chapter, of the same place, October 21, 1805. 
Joined St. John's Lodge June "24, 1818, and Carleton R. A. Chapter December 19, 
1819; W. M. 1822. As he did nut serve as a warden of the lodge previous to being 
elected to the chair, it is prob;d)le he was a past warden or a past master of his 
mother lodge. He was High Priest (Principal Z.I of Carleton Chapter, A. D. 1820. 
I could not gather any tidings of him after his departure from the province. 

1 From 178) to 1850, incliinivc, the mayor of Saint John was ap|K>inted by the cxecullve govern- 
luent of the province; from ISll (o IH.'i:), ineliisive, he was chosen hy vote of the coiunion council; 
and from \AH to the present tin)e, elected by the citixcns. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 231 

ROBERT CARDEN MINETTE, 

(Fourteenth Worshipful Master). 

Born A. D. 1795 in Ireland, on Lord Farnliam's estate. When 23 years of age 
he removed to Dublin and took nnto liiniself a wife in that city. On May 14, 1818, 
about five weeks after liis marriage, lie sailed for America in the good brig 
"Barrassie," Captain Barr, and landed in St. John June 15 following. He was 
made a freeman of the city in the year 1819, as a civil engineer. Filled the office 
of city surveyor nearly fifty years, during wliicli time he established division lines of 
property and drew up many plans, the latter being used as authoritative public docu- 
ments. In 1823 he was appointed one of the commissioners for laying out the great 
road from the Saint John Marsh to Hampton, Kings county. In conjunction with a 
Mr. Johnston, in 1822, he made a survey of the route for a projected Bale Verte 
canal — an undertaking which attracted public attention at that early day. He was 
an assistant alderman of the city, and held a captain's commission in the militia. 
Minette street, in Carleton, is named after him. 

Our brother received the craft and R. A. degrees at Cavan, Ireland, and joined 
St. John's Lodge, June 15, 1819; J. W. 1822; S. W. 1823; and VV. M. 1824; affili- 
ated in Carleton Chapter December 18, 1822. 

Departed this life at Saint John, January 10, 1868, in the 73rd year of his age.^ 
His remains lie buried in the Episcopal churchyard near Courtenay Bay. 



ROBERT PAYNE. 

(Fifteenth Worshipful Master). 

John B. Payne, the father of Bro. Robert Payne, was a native of Clonmel, Ire- 
land, who came to the then provinces of British North America with the 17th regiment 
of Light Dragoons, previous to tiie commencement of hostilities. At the close of 
the war he came to New Brunswick with a portion of that regiment and settled at 
Fredericton, where the subject of this sketch was born March 17, 1795, and where he 
was educated and served an apprenticeship at tiie trade of carpenter. Married 
( )ctober 24, 1816, a daughter of Samuel Grosvenor ; removed from Fredericton to 
the parish of Portland in the year 1817, where he entered into the lumber and 
surveying business. Held a commission as captain in the county militia; a trustee of 
schools in the parish ; an overseer of the poor; a member of the board of health ; an 
active worker in the temperance society ; vice-president of St. Patrick's Society ; 
gazetted a magistrate of the city and county of Saint .lohn, A. D. 1841; elected 
.fanuary, 1843, to represent the county of Saint John in the provincial assembly ; a 
conniiissioner of the alms house; appointed October, 1853, stipendiary magistrate of 
Portland, continuing in the office up to the time of his death, and discharging at all 
limes its important duties with dignity, go d judgment and impartiality. 

Bro. Payne was initiated in old Solomon's Lodge, No. 22, P'redericton, January 
7, 1817, receiving in due course the F. C. and M. M. degrees, lie joined St. John's 
Lodge April 7, 1818; Secretary 1822; S. W. 1824; and VV. M. 182.5, 182(5, 1832 and 
1835. Exalted in Carleton R. A. Chapter December 18, 1822, and filled therein the 
office of Principal Z. 1842 and 1843. In consideration of bis attachment to the 
lodge and of the important services rendered to the craft by him, he was elected an 
honorary member of St. John's Lodge, September 5, 1864. 



232 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Departed tliis life at his residence, Taradise Row, Portland, May 3, 1864, in tlie 
70th year of his age. His body \v;is buried in the Episcopal churcliyard, near 
Conrtenuy Bay. 

Of an afliible and gentlemanly manner, and of dignified appearance, lie com- 
manded the esteem and respect of all classes of the community. His ability as a 
presiding oflicer was so sp-ecialiy a marked character, that it won from those priv- 
ileged to sit under him the most implicit obedience and support; he was literally a 
gentleman of the old school. Althougli, during the latter years of his life, he did 
not attend the stated meetings of the lodge, his warm feelings towards the body and 
his interest in its prosperity and of the craft generally, were strong and unabated. 
His fatiier and brothers were members of the masonic fraternity. 

BENJAMIN F. MARSH. 

(Sixteenth Worshipful Mpjter). 

A native of the state of Vermont, from whence he removed when a youth to Xew 
Brunswick and became a resident of Hampton Kings's county, where he engaged in 
business, first as a blacksmith and afterward as a merchant and trader. At Hampton 
he married August 8, 1813, a daughter of Caleb Wetmore. Coming to Saint John 
subsequently, he carried on an extensive mercantile business until about A. D. 1832, 
•when he retired with a snug competency. After this he returned to the United 
States and settled in the state of Illinois, investing his funds in large tracts of land 
bordering on the Mississippi river. 

Received the craft degrees in Sion Lodge, No. 21, Sussex Vale, A. D. 1815. 
Joined St. John's Lodge June 5, 1821; Treasurer 1824 and 1825; S. W. 1826 and 
1831 ; and W. M. 1827, 1828 and 1830. He was a Royal Arch mason and member 
of Carleton Chapter of Saint John, but the record does not shew whether he joined 
or was exalied therein, neither are there any dates specified. 

Judging by the record, he was a prominent and popular member of the lodge, 
and exercised a controlling infiuence and a leading part in its concerns. Old breth- 
ren describe him as being affable and gentlemanly in his manner, of splendid 
phisique, tall and portly. His intimate friends gave him the soubriquet of Big Fat 
Marsh, an outcome of the initials of his name and his physical proportions. 
He died at Warsaw, Illinois, November 1864, at the age of 70 years. 

ALEXANDER LAWRENCE. 

(Seventeenth Worshipful Master). 

Bom at Methlick, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, April 8, 1788. He served an ap- 
prenticeship of seven years at the cabinet making and upholstering business — the 
period generally allotted in those days to acquiring a thorough knowledge of any 
mechanical pursuit. The new world — the El Dorado of many of the youth of the 
mother coimtry — had so much attraction for him that he resolved to try his fortune 
in this direction, and, with that object in view, took passage in the ship " Protector " 
for Saint John, arriving here May 16, 1817. In this, his new home, he started the 
cabinet making and upholstering business, which lie continued to prosecute with 
success until within a short time of his death. 

Of an active temperament, and desirous of identifying himself with movements 
tending to advance the material interests of his adopted home, he was soon found 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 235 

taking a prominent part in church, musical and literary circles. The Sacred Music- 
Sociely, of Saint John, owed its foundation to him, and in iiim it had its most 
strenuous and valued promoter. He was its first president, and continued to preside 
over its affairs until his death. Intimately connected with the Mechanics' Institute 
from its inception, and one of the original incorporators, he successfully emulated 
his associates in establishing that popular institution upon a firm basis. This was 
demonstrated l»y its increasing popularity and the great good the community derived 
from its lectures, library, reading room, etc. Bro. Lawrence always occupied a 
prominent place in the directorate, and was one of its vice-presidents. As in the 
bodies I have named, so in the arcana of freemasonry did our good brother prove, 
by his "ways and works," the abundant zeal he possessed for tiie society, and, by iiis^ 
example and leaciiing, shewed " how good and how plesisant a thing it is for brethrer* 
to dwell together in unity." From that " memorable period," when he first obtained 
lic/h(, and through the intervening years up to the time when "the silver cord was 
loosed and the golden bowl broken," his interest in the welfare of the lodge and tlie 
fraternity generally was ardent and unabated. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge, April 7, 1818, and in due course advanced to the 
F. C. and M. M. degrees; S. W. 1827 and 1828, and W. M. 1829. The royal arch 
degrees were conferred upon him January 17, 1820, in Carleton Chapter. In appre- 
ciation of the invaluable services rendered by him to the lodge, and in token of the 
warm affection entertained for him by his brethren, they presented liim, April, 1820, 
with an address engrossed on parchment, under the seal of the lodge and the signa- 
tures of the master, wardens and secretary. This document is now hanging on the 
walls of the lodge room, having, through the thoughtful kindness of his two surviv- 
ing sons, Joseph W. and Alexander W. Lawrence, been presented to the lodge as a 
memento of their wortliy father. 

He departed this life October 28, 1843, in the 56th j'ear of his age. The remains, 
were buried in the Episcopal churchyard, near Courtenay Bay, and afterward re- 
moved to the rural cemetery. 



HIRAM SMITH. 

(Eighteenth Worshipful Master). . 

A native of Hantsport, Nova Scotia, who, in the early part of this century, came 
to St. John and engaged in mercantile pursuits. His places of business were on the 
Xorth Market wharf and at the corner of South Market wharf and Water street — 
tlie latter familiarly known as "Tisdale's Corner;" a portion of the time in co- 
l>artnership with the late John W. M. Irish. He was made a freeman of the city in 
the year 1819. ^ 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge January 6, 1825; Secretary 1828; J. W. 1829; 
•S.W. 1830; and W. M. 1831. 

He died at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, May 15, 1884, at the ripe age of 94 years. 
At the time of his death he, with five other brethren, were the sole survivors of the 
membership of the lodge when it was St. John's Lodge, No. 29, on the roll of tiie 
provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia. The others being Isaac W. Doane, initinted 
June, 1815; Geoi2:e A. Garrison, initiated February, 182G ; Eobert Cunard, initiated 
February, 1826; Edward T. Knowks, initiated January, 1828, and John Murray^ 
initiated July, 1832. 



*2U FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

JAMES REED. 

(Nineteenth Worshipful Master). 

Born in Saint John, A. D. 1784, of Engliuli extract, his parents liiiving come 
liere from North Shiels previous to the advent of tlie loyalists. In early life he took 
to the sea and eventually became a captain, sailing principally between Saint John 
iind ports in Great Ikitain. During the war of 1812-14, between England and the 
United States, he was employed in the capacity of King's pilot, and after its close 
became a branch pilot of the port of Saint John. For a number of years previous to 
his death he lield a government position as light-house keeper on Partridge Island. 
He was a freeman of the city, and a captain in the corps of sea fencibles — a serai- 
iiaval body forming part of the old militia organization in Saint John. 

During his visits to England, in his seafaring days, he received the craft and 
royal arch degrees in Liverpool. Aftiiliated in St. John's Lodge January 2, 1821, 
iuid in Carleton Chapter December 12, 1821. W. M. of the lodge 1883 and 1834. 

His death took place Sunday, September oO, 1835, in the olst \ear of his age, 
•caused by falling from a precipice on Partridge Island. The remains were accom- 
panied to their last resting place in the Episcopal churchyard, near Courtentiy 
Bay, by the VV. M. and brethren of St. John's Lodge, and buried with the funeral 
service of the craft. The cortege was preceded by the band of the Portland rifle com- 
pany and followed by the officers of the sea fencibles. 

JAMES GILBERT LESTER. 

(Twentieth Worshipful Master). 

He was born, and served his apprenticeship at the tailoring trade, in Saint John. 
After becoming a freeman of the city, he started business as a tailor, and continued 
it until the date of his death. 

Initiate<l in St. John's Lodge May 4, 1824; Sec'y 1834 and 1835; J. W. 1837 and 
1838; S. \V. 1846, and W. M. from January, 1836, to May, 1837, when the lodge 
<.'eased work under the Nova Scotia warrant. Bro. Lester was, therefore, the last to 
fill the chair under that registration. There is no entry in the record to shew that 
he served in the office of warden previous to his induction into the chair. By refer- 
ence to the dates above given, it will be seen that he filled the junior and senior 
wardens' chairs after retiring from the East. In the absence of any explanation one 
is at a loss to account for such an anomaly. Possibly a dispensation may have been 
granted and no minute made of it. 

His death, at the age of 07 years, took place at his residence, Charlotte street, 
Saint John, 21st December, 1867, his body being interred in the Episcopal church- 
yard near Courtenay Bay. 

Three gertferaticms of this family were initiated in and members of St. John's 
Lodge, viz.: Gilbert Lester, the father of James G., initiated 7th November, 181o; 
James G. Lester, initiated 4th May, 1824; William 11. Lester, initiated 18th March, 
1862; and Edward H. Lester, initiated 1st March, 1892. The two latter were sons 
of James G. Lester. 

JOHN HAWS. 

(Twenty-first Worshipful Master). 

Was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, of English parentage, and after spending 
eeveral years in the West Indies, he, about the year 1819, removed to New Bruns- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 235 

wick and became a resident of the then parish of Portland. On October 18, 1832, lie 
married Calista, youngest daughter of tlie I;ite Richard Calvert, senior. 

He engaged extensively in sliipbiiilding in Porthuid, employing a large number 
of workmen and contributing materially to the prosperity of the place. Tiie vessels 
launched from his shipyard were celebrated for tlieir sailing qualities and for the ex- 
<illence of their model and workmanship. Occupying a foremost place in the public 
alHiirs of Portland, his advice and coimsel wore sought after in advancing its inter- 
ests. He was a magistrate of the county of Saint .John and a lireward of Portland. 
His liberal benefactions alleviated the want and distress of many poverty-stricken 
families. The clock which chimed the hours in the steeple of St. Luke's church, 
previous to the burning of that edifice, 28th iMay, 1875, was a gift from him. 

When on a visit to England, he died of paralysis, at Liverpool, 11th December, 
1858, aged 01 years. 

Bro. Haws received masonic li}j;ht in Virgin Lodge, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and 
became a joining member of St. .John's Lodge, March o, 1827 ; S. \V. 18;)2 and 1833, 
and W. M. 1837, 1638, 1840 and 1841, being the first to occupy the chair under the 
English warrant. He was exalted to the K. A. degree in a chapter at Kingston, 
Jamaica, and affiliated in Carleton Chapter, Saint John, October 15, 1823. During 
his membership in the lodge he was zealous in promoting its welfare, and contributed 
largely to its charities. From the record it appears that he last visited the lodge 
3rd November, 1857. 

ISRAEL MERRITT. 

(Twenty-second Worshipful Master). 

Born at Hampstead, Queens county. New Brunswick, 3rd May, 1803, of loyalist 
l)arentage. When a young man he removed with his parents to Indiautown, parish 
tif Portland, where he continued to reside until the date of his death. He carried 
on a trading business, and for many years was proprietor and manager of steamboats 
plying on the river Saint John, between Indiantown and P'redericton. He held a 
commission as captain in the militia of the county of Saint John. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge 3rd January, 1826 ; Secretary 1832, 1833 and 1837 ; 
J.W. 1834 and 1835, and W. M. 1839. 

Died at Indiantown, 2nd May, 1882, at the age of 71) years. 

JOHN THOMAS. 

(Twenty-third Worshipful Master). 

A native of Falmouth, Cornwall, England, at which place he was born in the 
year 1810. Having had the misfortune to lose his parents at a very early age, he 
was placed in the care of his grandmother, who brought him to Sijint John when 
only ten years of age. After receiving an education at the Saint John grammar 
school, he was a})prenticed to his uncle, Richard DuflJ to learn the trade of a carpen- 
ter. At the termination of his apprenticeslii[) he commenced business on his own 
accoimt. Not long after he removed from the city, for we find him teaching school 
at White's Cove, Grand Lake, in the year 1835, and occasionally supplementing his 
professional duties by reading the church service on Sundays as an assistant to the 
Rev. Abraham Wood, rector of the parish. Returning to Saint John, he became a 
freeman of the city A. D. 183!^. For a number of years he filled the situation of 
engineer and superintendent of the old water company, when the water supply of the 



236 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

city was l)r()uglit from Lily Liiliu, conveyed by pipes to a lai'Kc liniltling near the 
Marsh bridge, thence forced by Kfeani power from tliis "tank building," so called at 
the time, to a reservoir on Leinster street. A member of the old Albion society 
and one of its originators; a member and the first secretary of the society of house 
carpenters, started in 1837. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge (ith August, 1839; Secretary 1840; S. W. 1841 ; and 
W. M. 1842, 1844, 1847, 1848 and 1850. Received the K. A. degree in Carleton 
Chapter, 14th November 184fi. 

Died at Saint John, of congestion of the lungs, 23rd August, 1871, in the ()2i)d 
year of his age, and was buried in the Kpiscopal churchyard, near Courtenay Bay. 

CHARLES JOHNSTON. 

(Twenty-fourth Worshipful Miister). 

The ninth son of Hugh .Johnston, Kscj., one of the founders of St. John's Lodge, 
Horn in this city 2nd October, 1811 ; educated at the grammar school ; studied law 
in the office of the Hon. Neville Parker, master of the rolls; admitted an attorney 
•••th May, 183.5; enrolled a barrister of the supreme court of New Brunswick l.")th 
.lune, 1837 ; received the freedom of Saint Jolui in the year 1839 ; appointed, A. I). 
1847, high slieriff of the city and county of Saint John, and continuing in that im- 
portant office imtil his death. A captain in the old militia and a Hreward. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge .">th May, 1840; S. W. 1842; and W. M. 184.3. 
Exalted to the R. A. degree 27th October, 1845, in Carleton Chapter. 

He had the misfortune to iiaveone of his legs broken at Carleton, 6th May, 1852, 
at a fire in the steam saw mills of the late Hon. John Robertson. 

His death occurred at Saint John, 4th May, 1858, in the 47th year of his age, and the 
funeral, three days afterward, was attended by the W. M. and brethren of the lodge, 
the companions of the chapter and many members of sister lodges. At the grave, 
after the service of the Church of England, the impressive ritual of the fraternity 
was repeated by the compiler of this history, who was then VV. M. of the lodge. 

Bro. Johnston was a man of commanding appearance, splendid physique, genial 
disposition and spirited manner, who, from the outset of life's pilgrimage, gained 
friends and admirers. In his official capacity he acted with promptitude and 
energy, and in all his business transactions never allowed stern routine to set aside 
the genial courtesies of life. In the lodge and chapter he illustrated the pure prin- 
<'iples of the fraternity by a conscientious fulfilment of his masonic obligations. His 
remains were interred in the Episcopal elmrchyard near Courtenay Bay. 

WILLIAM HENRY ALONZO KEANS. 

(Tweiity-tifth Worshipful Master). 

Born lltii March, 1804, at Ryde, Isle of Wight. John Keans, his father, was a 
captain and quarter-master in the 60th regiment of rifles. During his father's con- 
nection with this corps, they were stationed at several of the West India Islands and 
linally at Halifax, Nova .Scotia, where the regiment was disbanded. In his youth 
Bro. Keans was a midshipman on l)oard the frigate " Rifleman," but did not remain 
long in the naval service. He arrived in Saint John from Halifax in the year 1825, 
and took up his residence in the parish of Portland, in which place he engaged in 
the lumber and surveying business, and also held the office of town clerk. He 




R. W. Bro. W. H. a. Kkans. p. D. G. M. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 239 

eventually became an inhabitant of Saint Jolin, where he continued witliout inter- 
mission until the final summons came. His life was an active and varied one. 
Brought up and educated in the army, imbibing therefrom strict military ideas and 
methods, they so governed him in the transiictions of life that order and despatch, 
neatness and punctuality were his governing tenets. On the 29th September, 1827, 
he married Lucy Ann, daugliter of Mr. John Robinson, by wiiom he had three 
(laughters and one son. He became a freeman of the city in the year 1884 ; gazetted 
25th February, 1859, a magistrate of the county; took a leading part in the county 
sessions as chairman of the committee of accounts and as member of many other im- 
portant committees; on his appointment to the office of coimty treasurer, which he 
tilled until his death, he resigned from the commission of tiie j)eac(' ; a representa- 
tive of the city of Saint .Joiin in the provincial legislature two terms, commencing 
18(57 and 1874, a portion of which he was deputy speaker. As a zealous worker in 
the cause of temperance he occupied prominent positions in the various organiza- 
tions, filling the offices of grand scribe and grand worthy patriarch of tlie grand 
division of New Brunh..'ick, and most worthy treasurer of the national division of 
the United States and Canada. A member of the old .\lbion society of Saint John, 
composed of Englishmen ; strongly attached to his native land, he was always proud 
to acknowledge himself a native of England. Took a prominent part in the Saint 
John histrionic society, made up of local talent, which afforded the citizens of forty 
years ago theatrical representations in the old Hopley theatre at the golden ball 
corner. Occupied a seat at the civic board as assistant alderman of Queen's ward 
and alderman of Wellington ward. He was the first alderman elected by Welling- 
ton ward when it was erected into a separate civic district. For many years a 
ve.stryman of Saint John's Episcopal church; vice-president of the geneial public 
hospital commission ; a colonel in the coimty militia ; chairman of the trustees of 
public schools; a lireward of the city; an engineer of the volunteer fire department, 
and a foreman of the old fire department ; superintendent of flour inspectors and 
toal measurers; ii commissioner for the relief of sufferers by the disastrous fire at 
Indiantown, 9lh December, 1864 ; a director of the St. John mechanics' institute 
and president of the society two years, 1867-18(59. Frequently called upon to act as 
an arbitrator in important cases, his ripe ju Igment, impartiality and acuteness were 
brought into reipiisition, almost invariably resulting in a satisfactory solution of the 
disputed points. 

Bro. Keuns was initiated in St. John's Lodge 7tli January, 1840; Secretary 1841 ; 
S.W\ 1844; Treasurer 18(;0 to 1870; and W. M. 1845, 1846, 1852, 1853 and 1854. 
Exalted to the R. .\. degree 11th Marcli, 1S46, in Carleton Chapter; Principal Z. 
1858 and 1867. Created a Knight Templar in tiie Encampment of Saint John 22nd 
May, 1856. Held offices in the old provincial grand lodge under the R. W. Bro. 
Alex. Hallocii, P.O. M. Was a representative of St. John's Lodge in the convention 
which, in October, 1867, erected the present grand lodge, and at its organization was 
elected grand trta-surer, holding that office continuously up to 27th September, 1876, 
when he was unanimously elected deputy grand master. On the evening of the fol- 
lowing day, being only two days prior to his death, he was present in grand lodge 
and installed into the new otfice, when he received the spontaneous ami hearty con- 
gratulations of the brethren, replying to the.se fraternal manifestations in his usual 
felicitous manner. 

The distinguished brother departed this life 30th September, 1876, at the age of 
72 years ; and, *'uur days thereafter, the remains were interred in the rural cemetery. 
P 



240 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Although there was no masonic ceremonial at the grave, the craft testified their re- 
spect to the memory of the deceased hy a large attendance at the funeral obsequies, 
and the general public also manifested their appreciation of his public services and 
personal worth by a full gathering. 

A sjjecial comumnication of the grand lodge was convened 17th November, 1876, 
at which M. W. Bro. R. T. Clinch, grand master, addressed the assembled brethren 
in the following words: 

Officers and Members of Grand Lodge. 

My Bkothkks: In the short interval (hat has elapsed since we assembled in grand lodge, we 
have been forcibly reminded of the uncertainty of human life. The solemn notes that betoken the 
dissolution of this earthly tal)ernacle have again sounded their awful warning, and another spirit 
has been gumnione<' to the land where our fathers have gone before us. Our honorcil and distin- 
guished brother, the U. W. William 11. A. Keans, elected at the last nnnual communication to the 
high ollice of deputy grand master, has passed from labor in the terrestrial lodge and entered into 
rest. The masonic record of our eminent brother is inseparably connected with the history of our 
ancient craft in this jurisdiction. From his early manhood an active member of tlie fraternity, he 
was soon advanced to the responsil)Ic position of master of the lodge, ruling with tirmness and 
courtesy. In the provincial and district grand lodge under England he held, during many successive 
years, rei^jmnsible positions. At the organization of the grand lodge of New Brunswick he took an 
active i)art, giving t)ie convention of the lodges the benefit of his mature judgment, conservative 
sagacity and great masonic experience. Chosen as the first treasurer of grand lodge, he was annually 
re-elected by acclamation, and continued in that important office until the last annual communica- 
tion, when he was unanimously advanced to the distinguished position of deputy grand master. I 
need not recall to your memories the thuuglitful, earnest words with which, in grand lodge at the 
time of installation, on the 2bth September last, he acknowledged the honor conferred upon him by 
his brethren. While then referring to his failing health, he a.ssured the craft that during so long as 
it pleased the (ireat Architect of the universe to prolong his life, his best services would be as ever 
devoted to the fraternity. These were his last words among us. Within two days thereafter he 
closed a long, active and distinguished masonic life, and, full of years and honors, passsed to his 
place in "the temple not made with hands." My brothers, we mourn his loss from our councils ; 
we cherish his memory in our hearts. His example lives for our imitation. 1 have summoned thin 
special communication of grand lodge that suitable record may be made in memory of our deceased 
brother, and that the vacancy which we mourn, in the office of deputy grand master, may be sup- 
plied as provided by our constitution. 

A special committee submitted the following resolutions, which were imanimously 
adopted : 

Resolved, That this grand lodge receives with deep and sincere sorrow the announcement of the 
death of U. W. Hro. W. II. A. Keans, deputy grand miister; and 

f\irther resolved, That in the death of U. W. Bro. Keans the craft in this jurisdiction mourns the 
loss of a distinguished member of the fraternity, who, during a long life of active and zealous 
masonic service, by precept and example, ever maintained and exhibited the tenets of his masouiu 
profe.ssion ; and, as a citizen, discharged the varied duties of responsible public poKitions with 
acknowle<lged integrity, ability and zeal ; and 

Further rrsolreit, That !i suilalilc memorial page be publislud with the proceedings of grand 
lodge, in allectionate renienibranie of our deceased brother; and 

Furlher resolved, That a cojiy of these resolutions be transniillcd undn- the seal of grniid lodge, 
as an expression of respectful sympathy with the widow and family of our beloved lirother in their 
sad bereavement. 

In adding my testimony to the woi li of Uro. Kenns, I can truly say thiil he was 
eminent in all the relations of public and private life; active and influenlial in the 
community as in the ma.sonic fraternity which he so greatly l()Ve<l ; zealous, methodi- 
cal and punctual in all his undertakings; a warm and generous friend and a wise 
and discreet counsellor; decided and firm in his opinions; opposed to humbugs and 
shams; the work which his hands and brains found to do was done readily and 
energetically. Iliu long and active life was expressed in a wide sphere of public and 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKP:TCHES. 241 

private activities, and in all he was faithful to every trust committed to his keeping. 
When the final summons came he departed iu peace, leaving a good name and a 
cherished memory. My knowledge of Bro. Keans commenced with my early boy- 
hood. He was my Sunday-school teacher and was master of the lodge when I re- 
ceived masonic liglit, and for twenty-three years — from 1848 to 1871 — we occupied 
desks in the same oflice. Thus out of my personal knowledge I can testify to his 
worth and ability, and, with this testimony, gratefully acknowledge the unrecom- 
pensed debt I owe hiiu for advice and instruction so readily given. I also knew him 
as a veteran craftsman familiar with and devotedly attached to the principles and 
precepts of freemasonry, in the work and interests of which he labored with inde- 
fatigable zeal during a period of nearly thirty-seven years. 



SAMUEL HOLM AN. 

(Twenty-sixth Worshipful Master). 

A native of Devonshire, England, who came to Saint John about the year 1828. 
He was a painter by trade, having served an apprenticeship and learned the business 
previous to leaving his native land. On his arrival here he, by public advertise- 
ment, offered his services to the citizens as "a hou«e, sign and ornamental painter." 
As a decorative workman he had few superiors in this community, while in the 
more refined branolies of his profession he dis[)layed considerable artistic skill and 
ta te. It is said that he introduced into Saint John the peculiar style of graining in 
imitation of certain kinds of wood, known as ilistevper, i. e., graining in water colors. 
He became .i freeman of the city of Saint John A. I). 1828, and, at the organization 
of the Albion Union society, was a prominent v.orker in the movement, and was 
president of it several years. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge Sth January, lfs41 ; Secretary 1842 and 1843; S. W. 
184S, and W. M. 1849. His death took place at Saint John, 28th July, 1859, at the 
age of 03 years, and his remains were buried in tho rural cemetery, His son James 
is an artist of more tlian ordinary merit, especially in portrait painting, who ex- 
ecuted a pair of banners for St. John's Lodge in the year 1859. 

RICHARD SANDS ARMSTRONG. 

(Twenty-seventh Worsliipful Master). 

Born at Wilmot, Nova Scotia, A. D. 1822, and took up a residence in Saint John 
at the early age of six years. Received his preliminary education at the Saint 
John grammar school under the tutelnge of the late Dr. James Paterscm, and finished 
at the provincial university, Fredericton. Studied liw in the office of the late Hon. 
Robert L. Hazen; admitted an attorney June 12, 84."); and enrolled a barrister 
June 10, 1847. Elected to represent the city and county of Saint John in the pro- 
vincial legislature \. D. 1855, to till the vacancy created by the elevation of the 
then fuciunbent, Hon. William J. Ritchie, to (he bench of the province. In his 
y(iiinj,'er days he was an excellent horseman and fond of the saddle. At the annual 
subscription races on the jlala at Courtenay Bay, which were patronized by many of 
<»ur leading citizens and the officers of the garrison stationcil here, he was a 'promi- 
nent character and took an active part. Became a freeman of Saint John in thii 
yea, 187U. Was county auditor and clerk in the mayor's oflice several years, filling 



242 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

both with acceptance up to the time of his death, which occurred March 7, 1877, in 
the 55th j'ear of his age. 

Initiated in St. Jolin's Lodge, September 7, 1847; S. W. 1841), and W. M. 1851. 
Exalted to the R. A. degree September 13, 1848, in Carleton Chapter. 

Several years previous to his death he suftered ranch from ill-health, bearing his 
affliction, however, with gentleness and fortitude. Strong in his attachments; of a 
genial and pleasing manner ; respected and esteemed by his many friends. He loved 
freemasonry, and held its ceremonials and tenets in great regard. His remains 
were buried in the rural cemetery with masonic ceremony. 



JOSEPH MERCER. 

(Twenty-eighth Worshipful Master). 

The subject of this sketch, who came of loyalist parentage, was born in Saint 
John, 14th February, 1804. His grandfatlier, Joseph Mercer, who held a captain's 
commission and took a leading part in tiie American revolutionary war, came to New 
Brunswick at its close and settled in this city. At an early age Bro. Mercer com- 
menced to learn the brick making business with his father, Joshua Mercer, but, as 
that trade was not congenial to his tastes, he abandoned it and became an apprentice 
to Thomas Hay, a well known painter in St. John at that day. At the expiration of 
his apprenticeship with Hay he commenced business on his own account, and con- 
tinued it without intermission until a short period previous to his death. He 
married, 17th August, 1825, Hannah, eldest daughter of Isaac Golding. Was a free- 
man and fireward of Saint John; an officer in the old fire department; held a com- 
mission in the militia ; a commissioner of streets ; and a representative at the civic 
board as assistant alderman of Wellington ward and alderman of Prince ward. His 
health failing him, he retired from business and removed to the United States, 
where he remained several years. Finding no improvernent, he came back to Saint 
John, and shortly afterward — 7th December, 1867 — breathed his last, being then in 
the 64th year of his age. His remains were buried in tiie rural cemetery. 

Bro. Mercer possessed rare artistic ability, excelling more particularly in the 
execution of landscape sketches ; a fluent speaker and a keen and incisive debater ; 
enjoyed an extensive and matured knowledge of metaphysics and kindred subjects ; 
♦lisplayed unusual energy and activity in his movements, and possessed a ready per- 
ception of dilHcult and abstruse questions rarely found in the average of men ; quick 
and impetuous in temperament; a firm friend and a generous opponent. He re- 
ceived masonic light in St. John's Lodge, April 6, 1847 ; J. W. 1852 and 1853 ; S. W. 
1854, and W. M. 1855. 

CHARLES EDWARD POTTER. 

(Twenty-ninth Worshipful Master). 

Was born at Fredcricton, New Brunswick, (Ith September, 1822, and received his 
education there. His parents were of loyalist stock ; his grandfather Coombs being 
a major on the Jritish side in the revohitionary struggle of 177(i-1783. In his youth 
lie came to Saint John and served an apprenticeship to Francis McDermott, at the 
sign painting, gilding and picture frame business. At the expiration of Iiis term he 
became a freeman of the city. Suhseiiuently entered into co-partnership with 
Williuui II. Venning and cunied on u large business on Prince William street and 




R. \V. Hro. \V. F. Bunting, P. G. M. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 245 

Germain street, their warehouses and stores being tlie nucleus of treasures in paint- 
ing, engraving, statuary, etc. — emphatically the then art depots of Saint John. As 
iionorary secretary for many years of the London Art union, he possessed unusual 
facilities for enlarging and creating an artistic taste in the conimimity, and in this 
way performed good service in a refined branch of intellectual life. During the 
time of the volunteer tire department in Saint Jolin, he was a leading spirit in the 
movement and a prominent member of number six company. He took great inter- 
est in boating and was a liberal supporter of the racing crews which, from time to 
time, had their headquarters in Saint John. 

Bro. Potter was initiated in St. John's Lodge 6th December, 1846 ; J. W. 1850; 
S. W. 1851, 1852 and 1853 ; Treasurer, 1SC3 and 1864 ; and W. M. 1856 and 1857. 
During the two years he filled the chair the additions to the membership of the 
lodge numbered fifty-eight, being the largest accession of any other two years in its 
history. Exalted to the R. A. degree 19th May, 1852, in Carleton Chapter; created 
a Knight Templar 5th November, 1868, in Do Molay Encampment; constituted a 
Prince Kose Croix of IL R. D. M. 4th April, 1870, in Moore chapter; and a Knight 
of the Red Cross of Rome and Constantine, 21st May, 1869, in McLeod Moore con- 
clave. He died December 21, 1889, aged 67 years, being at that date the senior past 
master of the lodge. 



WILLIAM FR VNKLIN BUNTING. 

(Thirtieth Worshipful Master). 

Third son of the Rev. Joshua Bunting and Elizabeth Giraud. His ancestors on 
his father's side belonged to Bristol, England, His mother's ancestors were French 
Huguenofs from Rochelle, France. Both families came to America in the latter part 
of the seventeenth century, the former settling in New Jersey and the latter in New 
York. His grandfathers, Roland 15-^nting and Daniel Giraud, espoused the royalist 
cause at the commencement of the revolutionary war, and fought through the whole 
of that struggle. At the close they and their families came to New Brunswick in 
May, 1783, the former becoming a resident of Saint John and the latter of Queen's 
county. Roland Bunting was a man of extraordinary vigor and strength, who died 
ill the year 1839, at the advanced age of 105 years. 

The subject of this sketch was born in Saint John, 25th Ma' , 1825. After a full 
course of tuition in the commercial and mathematical school of William Mills, he 
finished his education at the high school, of which Jarvis W. Hartt was principal, 
in the study of the Greek, Latin and French languages. In July, 1846, he was ap- 
pointed clerk in the office of the collector of taxes, where he remained until A. D. 
i859, when, upon the adoption of the Saint John assessment act of that year, he w«s 
transferred to tl:e office of clerk to the board of assessors. Under the new assess- 
ment law of 1882 a permanent chairmanship to the board of assessois was created, 
to which, in recognition of his long services, Bro. Bunting was appointed by the 
city council. 

From early boyhood he took an active part in athletic sports and out-door exer- 
cises generally. The gun and fishing rod have always had a special attraction to 
him. With one or both he has traversed nearly all the lakes, streams and covers of 
New Brunswick, and also portions of Nova Scotia, Quebec and Maine, and is a recog- 
nized authority on the habits, haunts and modes of capture of salmon, trout, etc., and 



246 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

in the art of fly fishing. He became a freeman of Saint John in tlie year 1847 ; was a 
director of the fishery draft under the old fisheries act ; recording secretary of tlie 
Saint John Meclianics' institute from May, 1858, to May, 1804, and afterwards a 
director for two years. On retiring from the secretaryship the hoard of directors 
tendered him a vote of thanlcs for his services. Chief of Proteus camp of the Poly- 
morphian tribe, a society of young men existing in Saint John A. D. 1852 to 1857, 
well known for its public parades and private entertainments, especially the public 
display, October, 1855, in oelehralion of the fall of Sebastopol, acknowledged to be 
the finest pageant of emblematical tableaux, historic costumes, etc., ever witnessed in 
the city. One of the prominent members of the volunteer fire department from its 
formation up to the time of its disbandment, being foreman in command of number 
six company fourteen years — from 1850 to 1864. In appreciation of his interest in 
the welfare of the company, the members presented him with a gold watch chain 
and medallion. Tiie originator and principal organiser of the Victoria skating club 
and rink ; secretary-treasurer of the club from its inception to the year 1871, when 
he was elected president ; and, on his declining a re-election, the stockholders elected 
him an honorary member, a distinction accorded to him only, (jazetted a magis- 
trate of the city and county of Saint John, September, 1874. A member of the 
Natural History Society of New Brunswick, and an lionorary member of The Saint 
John Oratorio Society. 

From the date of his admission into the masonic fraternity, covering a period of 
forty-two years, his labors in the lodge, the chapter, the encampment and tlie grand 
lodge have been continuous. He has had a large share in dispensing the charities 
of the craft; from him many young craftsmen have received advice and instruction, 
and to him the brethren of the jurisdiction generally have looked as a safe exponent 
of masonic law and usage. He was initiated in St. John's Lodge, 3rd February, 
1852; Secretary 1853, 1854, 18G5 to 1868 and 1889; Treasurer 1877 to 1881 and 1886 
to 1888; S. \r. 1855 and 1856; and W. M. 1858, 1859 and 1882. Received the Mark 
Master's degree llth September, 1854, and the Royal Arch 2nd October, 1854, in the 
Carleton Ciiapter, No. 47, registry of Scotland, and after serving as scribe E. several 
years and filling other offices, he was elected Principal Z. and presided over the 
chapter two years. The Knight Templar and Knight of Malta grades were con- 
ferred upon him 15th May, 1856, under a special dispensation of the Grand Prior of 
Scotland, to enable him to become a petitioner for the warrant of the Encampment 
of Saint John, over which he subsequently ruled during two years as commander, 
commencing 14th September, 1866, and is now the senior member of the encamp- 
ment and the only member whose name appears on the warrant. Was one of tlie 
original members of Carleton Council of Ked Cross Knights and Carleton Royal Ark 
Mariner's Lodge, having had the degrees of these bodies communicated to him 27th 
November, 1857, and having presided over both ; appointed and installed 27th 
December, 1860, Jr. G. W. of the provincial grand lodge under England ; appointed 
and installed 27th December, 1861, provincial grand secretary, which latter office he 
continued to fill until October, 1867, when lie was appointed grand secretary of the 
newly organized grand lodge of New Brunswick. After a continuous service of 
nearly twenty-one years, he retired Arril, 1882, from the office of grand secretary. 
Grand lodge thereupon elected him deputy grand master, and in April, 1883, elevated 
him to the honorable station of grand master. In September, 1875, during his 
grand secretaryship, grand lodge conferred on him the honorary rank of a past senior 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 247 

grand warden, and, wlien he retired from the office of grand secretary, expressed it» 
thanks in the following resolutions: 

Wliereax, U. W. Bro. Win. F. Bunting, gran'd secretary of the grand lotlge, voluntarily retires 
from that office, whicli he has tilled since the formation of grand lodge, after several years priivious 
service as grand secretary of the iirovincial grand lodge under Knglish registry, his whole term in 
(jtfice covering the period Ironi 1861 until the present time; 

liesoleed, That grand lodge desires to express, in the heartiest terms, its high sense of the 
efficient and effective way in which that right worshipful brother hius discharged all the duties per- 
taining to the office of grand secretary, by which the affairs of the craft in this jurisdiction are in a 
condition entirely satisfactory to grand lodge; declaring by all his niasonie works, by his counsel 
and advice,by his knowledge of masonic law and ritual, by his patient and unwearied etfoits for the 
good of the craft, and his uniform courtesy to brothers of every degree, he has won for himself an 
enduring i)lace in the hearts of the frceniiisons of New Brunswick ; 

Ile.solred, That while expressing its sense of the loss it has sustained by his retirement from the 
position he has so long and so worthily filled, grand lodge is nevertheless glad to be able to con- 
gratulate the right worshipful brother that his retirement is due largely to a personal cause of much 
interest to his friends —his advancement to the head of an important public department of the city 
of Saint John, that of chairman of the board of assessors, with which he has had official connection 
for a number of years, and to express the hope that he may be long spared to discharge the duties of 
that honorable position ; 

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be engrossed on vellum and transmitted to 
Bro. Bunting. 

By special authority of the Grand Principal Z. of Scotland, he constituted Alex- 
andria R. A. Chapter, No. 100, at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, iSrd Nov- 
ember, 18(53; Mount Lebanon Chapter, No. 101, at Chatham, New Hrunswick, 15th 
September, 1864 , and St. Stephen Chapter, No. 125, at St. Stei)hen, New Bruns- 
wick, 19th October, 18()8. Under a dispensation of the R. W. District Grand Master, 
dated November, 18(56, he organized Emidalion Lodge of Instruction, and continued 
to conduct it under renewed authority from successive grand masters until the great 
tire of June, 1877, after which, in consecpience of the want of a proper place of meet- 
ing, its operations were suspended, until the year 1887, when it was resuscitated. 
Elected 10th April, 1879, an honorary member of New Bnmswick Lodge, No. 22, 
and 2iid December, 1879, an honorary member of St. .John's Lodge, his mother 
lodge, A charier member of Fredericton Royal Arch CJhapter, No. 77, of Fred- 
ericttm, under tlie warrant granted December 17, 18o6, by the Supreme Grand Royal 
Arch Chapter of Scotland; a delegate frotn St. John's Lodge to the convention 
which erected the (irand Lodge of New Brunswick, October, 18(57 ; a member of the 
Correspondence Circle of the Lodge Qiiatuor Coronati, No, 2076, London, England. 

Presented by St. .John's Lodge, 1st January, 18(57, with a valuabh; gold watch, 
together with an address engro.ssed and illuminated on parchment; by Carleton R. 
A. Chapter, loth April, 1S6S, with a solid gold jewel, set with brilliants, of a Past 
Principal Z. ; by Emulation Lodge of rnstruction, 1st April, 1871, with a complete 
edition of DickenV works ; Ity Carleton Union Lodge, September, 1871, with a past 
master's apron ; by Emulation Lodge, 3rd April, 1872, with a full set of Hugh Mil- 
ler's works; and by the same body, 4th April, 1887, with a gold-mounted ebony cane. 
The lodges, cliapters, etc., in the province have, from time to time, been the re- 
cipients of many favors from him, one of which was to St. John's Lodge, 17th June, 
1884, when he and W. Bro. ,\rthur Everitt, W. M., presented it with a painted silk 
banner, with gold bullion trimmings. 

A member of the charity committee of St. John's Lodge, without intentiission, 
from January, 18C2; director and president of the New Brunswick Masonic Hall 
company ; published .\. D. 1878, a manual for the use of lodges in this jurisdiction ; 



248 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

<'ollalf(l .111(1 edited a voliimo of pp. OKI, of the transaotioiis of tlie grand lodge from 
its inaugiiiatioii to tiie year 187(5 ; representative of tlie grand lodges of Missouri, 
Ore^'oii and I tali in tlic grand lodge of New Brunswick ; expended much time and 
labor in starting and hiiilding up the grand lodge library; since A. D. 1858, has 
been tiie recognized autiioiily of the work and ritual of the craft degrees, and from 
his first induction into the fraternity has been (;ontinually in active work. At this 
<late (1894) he is the senior past master of St. John's Lodge, all his predecessors 
iiavlng taken tlieir place "in the narrow huusi- a[)iiuinted for all living." 

JOHN H. SHERIDAN. 

(Thirty-tirst \Vorshiipt'ul Master). 

Affiliated in St. John's Lodge 8th February, 18-50, from Rising Sun Lodge, No. 
39, State of New Hampshire; J. W. ISoS; S. \V. 1859; and W. M. 1800 and 1801. 
Exalted to the R. A. degree IGth January, 1850, in Carleton Ciuiuter, and on 17th 
July, 1856, created a Knight Templar in the Encampment of Saint John. 

liro. Sheridan, who was a mechanical engineer, came to Saint John A. D, 1855, 
from Niushua, New Hamjishire, under an engagement with Mes;-irs. Harris & Allan, 
founders, to fit up and put in operation a steam trip hammer in their extensive 
establishment in Portland. Becoming overheated while working at his business, 
iind exposing himself to a cold draft of air, he contracted a severe cold, which 
afiected his lungs so seriously tiiat he was obliged to relincpiish his situation. After 
remaining in Saint John in the endeavor to regain health, he eventually returned to 
Jiis home in New Hampshire, where he breathed his last, 2nd June, 1862, in the 
.'^4lli year of his age. Through his genial and pleasing manner he became quite 
popular in the communiiv, and when the announcement of his death reached here 
his loss was sincerely mourned. 

In the work of the lodge, and in all that concerned the best interests of the craft 
generally, he was an active, zealous, intelligent and bright worker. 

HON. WILLIAM WEDDERBURN. 

(Thirty-second Worshipful Ma.ster). 

Son of the late Alexander Wedderburn, Es(|., of Aberdeen, Scotland, imperial 
immigration agent in New Brunswick, and .Tane Heavyside, of London, England. 
Born in Saint .John, 12th October, 1834 ; educated at the Saint .John grammar school ; 
married, 29th April, 1858, Jennie, daujihter of the late C. C. Vaughan, Esq , of Saint 
John ; studied law in the office of Hon. John H. Gray ; called to tiie bar .June, 1858 ; 
created a Queen's counsel in 1S78, and, until he engaged in politics, enjoyed an ex- 
tensive legal practice. Elected to the provincial legislature in 1870; re-elected 
1874, and elected a third time in 1878; chosen speaker of the legislature 18th Feb- 
ruary, 1870; entered the then provincial government 4th .June, 1878, with the 
portfolio of provincial secretary, etc.; appointed, A. D, 1873, a commissioner to con- 
solidate the provincial statutes, which appointment he however declined ; served on 
several government delegations to Ottawa, notably on the "better terms" question. 
He retired from political life in 1882 to accept a county judgeship, which honorable 
position he now enjoys, with judicial jurisdiction over the counties of Kings an<l 
Albert. 

Prominently identified with the temperance movement. Among other positions, 
he presided two years over the grand division of the Sons of Temperance as grand 




R. W. Hon. Wm. Wedderburn, P. G. M. 



\. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 8KETCHI<:S. 251 

worthy patrinrcli. President of the Saint John Arcclianics' institute tliree years; 
iirst president of the provincial hoard of aRrieiiltiire, in which capacity lie delivered 
tlic opening suldreas, which was puhlislied in the English and French languages 
thronghout the dominion ; intimately connected with the newspaper press as editor 
and contrihntor for many years. 

As speaker, orator and lecturer on many pnhlio and private occasions, he has 
commanded the close attention of his auditors by eloquent and ornate deliverances. 
Among other edurls in trhis direction niuy he nieiuioia-d his orations at the memorial 
services in Saint John for President Lincoln and President Garfield of the United 
States; at the laying the corner stone of the masonic temple in Faint Joiin ; and at 
the ceremonial in celebration of the centennial of freemasonry in New Brunswick; 
also his lecture on "Colin Campbell," in the Mechanics' institute, on behalf of the 
volunteers during the Fenian troubles ; and that on "The Union of the Colonies," 
in the Poitland course of lectures in 1857. 

Bro. Wedderburn was initiated in St. John's Lodge, I'Jth June, 1857 ; was S. W. 
I860 and W. M. 18()2 and 1803. Exalted to the R. A. degree 20th November, 1870, 
in New Brunswick I'hapter. When the erection of an independent grand lodge in 
New Brunswick was mooted, he entered warmly into the movement, both by his 
voice and pen, especially as editor of The Mirror, the organ of the undertaking. At 
the formation of the grand lodge he was unanimously elected deputy grand master, 
and continuing in that office up to September, 1870, he was then chosen grand 
master, which latter position he occupied two years. He is the representative of the 
grand lodge of Nebraska in the grand lodge of New Brunswick. 

The removal of his residence to his villa at Hampton, and the i)rosecution of his 
judicial functions beyond the limits of Saint John, have drawn him away from active 
participation in the work of the lodge; nevertheless he continues to hold his mem- 
bership therein, and to preserve a warm interest in the prosperity of the craft. 

ROBERT GRAHAM CROZIER. 

(Thirty-third Worshipful Ma-ster). 

His father, Thomas Crozier, was a native of Ireland, who, when young, came to 
New Brunswick and entered into the dry goods business, in which he acquired a 
handsome competency. His mother's nniiden name was Nancy Anderson, a native 
of Nova Scotia. Bro. Crozier was born in Saint John, received his education at the 
grammar school there, and learned the dry goods business in his father's store. 
After his father had retired from business in Saint John, our brother removed, with 
his family, to Alma, Albert county, and carried on a general trading concern. He 
was made a freeman of Saint John in 1853. An active member of the volunteer lire 
department, and for a year or two engineer of number six company. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge, (ith December, 1853 ; secretary 1855 and 1856; 
treasurer 1865; J. W. 1857; S. VV. 1858, and W. M. 1864. Received the R. A. 
degree 18th July, 1855, in Carlelon Chapter, and created a Xnight Templar 15th 
May, 1856, in the Encampment of Saint John. He died at Alma, 29th April, 1881, 
at the age of 48 years, leaving a widow and quite a large family to mourn their great 
loss. The remains were brought to Saint John and buried in the rural cemetery. 
Our brother was a man strong in his friendships and of a genial and kind hearted 
nature; possessed of good business talent and an active and impulsive temperament; 
detested shams and humbugs, and never hesitated to express an opinion upon 



252 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

familiar questions. He was generous to a fiuilt, and ever ready to assist a brother in 
distress or a friend in need to the extent of liis ability. For these luimane qualities 
many have cause to remember him with gratitude. 

JOHN DAVIS SHORT. 

(Thirty-fourth Worshipful Master). 

Born in Saint .John, 2n(l November, 1828, of loyalist parentage. His school-boy 
days, ills apprenticeship, and, in fact, the whole of his life have been spent in .Saint 
John. After leaving school he w:us apprenticed to tlie tailoring business with John 
Eagles, and subsecjuently went into liusiness on his own account, following it up, 
however, but a short lime. In the year 1849 he entered the tailoring establislinient 
of Andrew (Jilmour as a cutter, and lias continued in the same establishment in that 
capacity up to the present lime. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge, 6th March, 18,50; J. W. 1863; S. W. 1S64; W. M. 
1865, 1866 and 18S6. In the grand lodge be held the oHices of grand director of 
ceremonies, senior grand warden and district deputy grand niaster. Exalted to the 
R. A. degree 26lh .\pril, 1866, in New Brunswick Chapter, in which body he tilled 
the chair of first principal from October, 1866, to October, 1868. Created a Knight 
Templar I50tb October, 1867, in the Encami)ment of Saint John. In the cryptic 
rite he held the oHice of thrice Illustrious master of Saint .John Council three years, 
1867-'70, and was deputy gnuid master and afterward right i»uissaut grand master of 
the grand council New Brunswick. 

In appreciati(jii of his valuable services, St. John's Lodge presented him with a 
past master's jewel and cast', 1st Marcli, 1S70, and New IJrunswick Chapter, for 
similar services, gave him a handsome past principal's jewel. 

He has represented the lodge at the masonic board of relii Irom its organization, 
1st November, 1870, to tiie present time, and for a number of years previously was 
on the relief committee of the lodge, when each lodge dispensed its own charity. He 
is proficient in the work and lectures of the craft degree' . was a memlier of the ritual 
committee of grand lod^e, and on many occasions has taken part in the exemplifica- 
tions of the lectures before the brethren of the lodges. He is the present treasurer 
of the lodge, having been tirst elected to that office December, 1888. 

JAMES GORDON FORBES. 

(Tliirty-liftli Worsliipful .Master). 

Youngest son of the late Captain John Forbes, of the i);?ril Highlanders, a scion 
of u distingiiisheil Highland Scotch family. His father, who served with distinction 
in the peninsular war luider the Duke of Wellington, received from the crown, in 
recognition of his services, a grant of land in Nova Scotia, to which he immigrated 
in the year 18;>2. 

Bro. Forbes was born 10th .May, 181^7, in I'ictou county. Nova Scotia ; ediicaled 
at the free church school, Halifax ; a teacher in the superior school at Kouchiboii- 
guac. New Brunswick, from 18.)7 to 1860. In the latter year he entered the law 
ottice of Judge Wediierburn, where he studied live years, ami afterward finished his 
legal studies at th" law siho )l of Harvard university. Admitted to the bar 13th 
April, 18(t5, he, during the succeeding ten years, conducted an extensive law business 
with the lute William H. Simiott, under the ju'ofessional firm of Forlies iS: Sinnolt. 
A dissolution of co-partnersliip occurring, he removed, in 1876, to Des Moines, 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 253 

Iowa, where lie carried on a law, loan and inHiirance btisiness. On the death of Mr. 
Sinnott, in Novenjber, 1S79, he returned to 8aiiit John and resumed the practice of 
the law. He is an effective Jury lawyer, having, by his energy and eloquence, gained 
some important suits. In the defence of the prisoner Edie, in the Queen vs. Edie, 
for murder, he won from Ciiiof Justice Allen, the presiding judge, the flattering 
testimony that "the defence was one of the most able and eloquent edbrts within hi» 
experience." 

For important services rendered in the confederation of the provinces of British 
North America into tlie Dominion of Canada, bis political friends presented hin» 
with a valuable gold watch and chain. In 1870 he unsuccessfully contested the 
county of Saint John for a seat in the looal legislature, although the large vote he 
secured testified to his popularity. As alderman of Duke's ward for two years, be 
rendered the city valuable services by his energy and industry, lie has always taken 
an active part in church matters, especially in his connection, for many years, with 
St. Andrew's church, of which he is an elder. 

On the 17th Septemlier, 1S71, he was married to Mary J. Homer of Blooming- 
ton, Illinois, by whom he has a daughter and a son. 

Initialed 7th January, 18(')2, in St. John's Lodge; secretary 1864; S. VV. ISC'"); 

and W. M. 1867 ; grand steward of the grand lodge 1S75-'7G. Exalted to the H. A. 

degree 27tli June, 18(i7, in Carleton Chapter, and occupied the chair of Princij)al J, 

Created a Knight Tenqdar 2Sth August, 1867, in the Encampment of Saint John, 

and presided over that body one year as commander. In the grand council of Royal 

and Select Masters he filled the oflice of most puissant grand master, 1807-'68. 

Bro. Eorbes is now a resident of Saint John, and actively engaged in the duties 
of his profession. 

JOSEPH CANBY HATH EW AY. 

(Tliirty-sixtli Worshipful Master). 

Born Jidy 31, 1820, at Burton, Sunbury county, New Brunswick. He came to 
Saint John when very yoting and received his preliminary education there, conqdel- 
ing it, however, at the Baptist seminary, Eredericton. .\fier carrying on a mercantile 
business in Saint John several years, he, in the year 1847, removed to Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania; studied medicine (here and graduated in 1S.")0 in the Phila- 
delphia, college of medicine. Subsetpicntly be perfected himself in the i)rofe.ssion of 
dentistry in the Philadelphia dental college. Ketnrning to Saint John in 1852, he 
started the practice of dentistry and continued in the prosecution of it to within a 
few years pa^t. At the provincial (exhibition held at Eredericton, A. D. 1852, he 
was awarded a prize and diploma for excellence in the manufacture of artificial 
teeth. The Philadelphia college of dentistry confi-rred the honorary degree of doctor 
of dental surgery upon him in 1854. In 1857 he became a freeman of the city of 
Saint John. 

Our brother lins occupied a prominent position in freemasonry, and has, since his 
induction into (he craft taken a warm interest in all the bodies with whi<h he is 
identified. He received masonic light in St. John's Lodge, Ist December, 186;{, and 
in due course was advanced to the E. C. and M. M. degrees. Was S. \V. 18(17 ; \V. 
M. 1868 and 186U; secretary 1871, and subsetpiently filled the ollices of chaplain and 
organist Keverul years. Eor eminent servic-CH rendered he enjoys the privilege of 
honorary niembershi, in Ilibernia Lodge, and occupied a like position in the late 
Leinster Lodge. In grand lodge he was appointed grand pursuivant in 1872, grand 



254 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

organist ]882-'85, and elected junior grand warden 1888. Exalted to the R. A. 
degree 26th September, 1867, in New Brunswick Chapter, and occupied the chair of 
Principal Z, 1872-73. Appointed A. D. 1873, by the Grand Chapter of Canada, 
grand superintendent of Koyal Arch masonry for the province of New Brunswick, 
and re-appointed five succeeding years. He received the cryptic degrees in New 
Brunswick Council R. A S. M • ncrnpipd the chair of Tiirico Tllnstrioiis Master 
therein, and filled the position of Most Puissant Grand Master of the grand council 
of iNe»v Brunswick. On the oUth October, 1868, he was created a Knight Templar 
in the Union de Molay Preceptory, received the degree of Red Cross of Rome and 
Constantine 9th February, 1869; a Knight of Malta 3rd June, 1869; a Red Cross 
Knight 3rd November, 1870; and was elected Eminent Preceptor of the Command- 
ery A. D. 1877. Apjminted Assistant (Jrand Chamberlain of the Great Priory of 
Canada 7th August, 1877, and elected a member of the grand council 11th October, 
1878. Our eminent brother was created a Sovereign Prince of the Rose Croix 18°, 
28th October, 1870, and received the 32nd degree of the A. & A. Rite, in the 
Harrington Consistory, 3rd November, 1873. 

lie compiled and published a pocket manual of the craft degrees, under authority 
of the board of general purposes of grand lodge, and in consequence of his intimate 
knowledge of the ritual was appointed instructor of the work, and in this capacity 
visited various sections of the jurisdiction, imi)arting instruction to the several 
lodges. 

He is now a resident of Westfield, King's county, and, although debarred by 
reason of his removal from the city from attendance at the meetings, his interest in 
the well-being of the lodge continues unabated. At the regular communication held 
October 3, 1893, resolutions were lulopted congratulatory to Bro. Hatheway and his 
wife upon the attainment of the fiftieth anniversary of their wedded life. 

WILLIAM HERBERT SINNOTT. 

(Thirty-sevonth Worshipful Ma.«tcr). 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge oth March, 1867 ; S. W. 1869, and W. M. 1870. 
He never received any further degrees. 

Born at Stiulholm, Kings coiuily, New Brunswick, and, after receiving a rudi- 
mental education at home, entered the Wesleyan academy at Sackvillc, where he 
graduated in due time. Subsequently he taught school in his native place. Coming 
to Saint John, he studied law in the office of Charles W. Stockton, and eventually 
formed a professional co-partnership with Bro. James G. Forbes, under the title of 
Forbes & Sinnott. He was erne of the promoters of the Victoria Hotel Company, 
iind filled iheofiice of secretary to the boanl of directors; a director and presid*nt 
of the Victoria Skating Club. 

He died at Saint .John, 21st November, 1879, at the age of thirty-six years. Tiie 
remains were conveyed to his native place and buried there. 

Bro. Sinnott possessed a rich store of genuine wit and humor, quick at repartee, 
and happy in the deliverance of an after-dinner speech, his sallies frequently con- 
xulsing the company with laughter. At the time he taught school his leisure hours 
were employed, in conjunction with other young n>en of the place, in editing and 
publishing a small sheet, for circulation in the inunetliate neighborhood, containing 
racy and pungent coutril)ution8, principally aimed at local persons and things. 
During his riper yearc, he occasionally contributed articles to the columns of our 
local perioiHcals. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 255 

HENRY GILBERT HUNT. 

(Thirty-eighth Worshipful Master). 

His grandfather came from Jersey City with the loyalists in 1788, and settled in 
Nova Scotia. The snbject of this sketch was born in Saint John, 7th April, 1830^ 
was educated there, and learned the trade of honse joiner with his father, Elijaij 
Hunt. At the completion of his apprenticeship he went to Boston, Massachusetts, 
and carried on business tiiere for two years — IS-jI and 1852 — and then returned to 
Saint John, where he has continued to reside up to the present time. In 1860 he 
became a freeman of the city ; appointed, A. D. 1864, to office in the customs depart- 
ment as a tide waiter, subsequently as a locker, and more recently as invoice c'erk; 
joined the volunteer tire department at its organization in 1849 as a member of 
number two engine company, in which he continued uj) to 1864, when the volunteer 
department was disbanded ; a director of the St. John Mechanics' institute several 
years. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge 7th May, 1867; J. W. 1870, and W, M. 1871 and 
1872. Exalted to tiie R. A. degree 17th July, 1868, in New Brunswick Chapter;, 
and created a Knight Templar 'Jth March, 1870, in the Encampment of Saint John, 
Appointed Grand Steward, September, 1871, and again September, 1874. 

THOxMAS OVERTON SANDALL. 

(Thirty-ninth Worshipful Master). 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge, 4th March, 1862; J. W. 1871 ; S. W. 1872; W. M. 
1873; and a Grand Steward lS73-'74. 

Born at Saint John, U9th August, 1834, of loyalist parentage. His great-grand- 
t'alher, Thomas Sandall, who was an officer in the 22nd regiment of foot during the 
American revolutionary war, was a member of the lodge, chajjter and encampment 
attaclied to tiiat regiment, the certificates of such membership being now in the 
possession of auotlier great-grandson, W. Bro. Frederick Sandall. 

Bro. T. (). Sandall was educated in Saint John, liccame a freeman of the city iri' 
1860, and in the same year was appointed a tide waiter in the customs department, 
a position he held until recently, when he was promoted to tie office of waiter and 
searcher. 

WILLIAM MACARA SEARS. 

(Fortieth Worshipful Master). 

Bro. Sears was born in Saint John, 21st June, 1850; a grandson of Thatcher 
Sears, a well-known loyalist and prominent citizen. Received his educati(m at 
private schools in the city, and learned the druggist and apothecary business in the 
establishment of the late Bro. John M. Walker. He subseipiently succeeded to the 
business on the retirement of Bro. Walker, and carried it on for several years on his 
own account. He occupied n seat at the civic board as alderman of King's ward, 
and gave a strong proof of his public spirit and benevolent heart in the erection, at 
his private cost, of a public drinking fountain on the Market sipiare. 

He was initiated in St. John's Lodge, 4th July, 1871 ; J. \V. 1873; and W. M. 
1S74 and 1875. 

In the midst of his usefulness and after a short illness, he departed this life at 
Saint John, 24tli September, 1882. The lodge attended the finieral in a body, with- 
out regalin, and followed the remains to their last resting place in the rural cenie- 



256 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

tery. His early and much regretted death cut short a life which gave promise of 
high attainment in pnhlic and private affairs. Had he lived he would, without 
doubt, have been admitted to the higher branchps of the fraternity, where he would 
have proved a valuable auxiliary in all masonic " ways and works." 

HIRAM GABRIEL BETTS. 

(Kortj'-first Worshipful Master). 

A native of Nova Scotia, who came to 8aint John when quite young and re- 
ceived his education at the grammar school. He was a clerk in the mayor's ofHce, 
and for a time carried on a commission and brokerage business. After passing a 
<()Urst as a student at law, he became an attorney, and, on 25th October, 1881, was 
enrolled a barrister. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge Tith January, 1869; S. W. 18V4; J. W. 1875; 
•secretary 1872, and from 1877 to 1881; W. M. 1876; and grand steward 1876-'77. 
Received the R. A. degree 2.'{rd September, 1875 in Carleton Chapter; created a 
Knight Templar 20th March, 1878, in the Encampment of Saint John. He occu- 
pied the chair of Principal Z. in the ciiapter one year, commencing September, 1880. 

JOHN BUCHANAN. 

(Forty-8t»cond Worshipful Master). 

Born in Portland, county of Saint John, 3rd January, 1842. Apprenticed and 
served his time in the foundry and machine works of James Harris & Co. At the 
completion of his apprenticeship he went to the United States and remained there 
about five years. I'pon his return to his native place he secured employment in the 
fomidry of (Jeorge Fleming tt Sons, in which he continued until failing health com- 
pelled his retirement. In the meantime, by assiduity and becoming deportment, he 
worked his way gradually upward, unt'' he became foreman and manager of the 
moulding department. 

He received the craft degrees in Hibernia Lodge, No. 3, of Saint John, and be- 
came an alKliated member in St. .Itihn's Lodge, 1st .lanuary, 1873. He was S. W. 
1876, and W. M. 1877. of the latter lodge. Exalted to the R. A. degree 15th May, 
1878, in Carlelon Chapter. 

After an illness of lengthy duration, of cancer in the stomach, he died 4lh 
March, 1885, at the age of 43 years. His remains were interred in the rural ceme- 
tery without masonic ceremony. 

GEORGE BLACK HEGAN. 

(Forty-third Worshipful Master), 

Was born ii the city of Suint John; 27th July, 1850, of Irish and Scotch parent- 
age. At the proper age he became a pupil in the high school of the late Jarvis \V. 
Hartt, and finished his education at the Saint John grammar school. On leaving 
ecliool ..e received an appointment in the oHice of the (^ueeu insurance company, 
where he remained live yeiirs, and in 1871 entered the dry goods and carpet ware- 
house of J. & J. Hegun, the cenior partner of this firm being his father and the 
junior his uncle. In 1877 he was admitted to partnersliip, and continued therein 
until subsequently he, in company with his cousin, James VV. Hegan, opened u 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHEvS. 257 

carpet and furnisliing warehouse on King street. Married 22nd November, 1876, to 
Annie Lonisc, daughter of the late Captain Albert Betts, and great-grand-daughter 
of W Bro. Dr. Azor Betts. ' 

In the latter part of the year 1885 he, with his family, removed to Portland, 
Oregon ; but, after a limited sojourn there, came back to Saint John, wher- he now 
resides, and occupies a lucrative position in extensive and well-know:i dry goods 
house of Manchester, Robertson & Allison. Previous to his departure for Orepon — 
November 23rd, 1885 — the brethren of St. John's Lodge manifested their good 
wishes and fraternal regard by presenting him with an address, accompanied by a 
valuable past master's jewel suitably engraved. 

His masonic record may be summed up as follows : Initiated in St. John's Lodge, 
October 1st, 1872; exalted to the Royal Arch, April 1st, 1875, in Carleton Chapter; 
and at subsequent periods received the degrees of the Red Cross, Knight Tenplar, 
and Knight of Malta, in the Encampment of Saint John ; the Royal and Select 
Master in the St. John CounoU ; the grades of the Royal Order of Scotland, in the 
provincial grand lodge of New Brunswick; the several orders of the Knights of 
Rome and Constantine in the Mf Leod Moore Conclave ; and has had conferred upon 
him all the degrees up to the 32° in the bodies of the A. & A. Scottish Rite. That 
he has not been a drone in the masonic hive is verified by his official career, as fol- 
lows: in the lodge, J. W. 1876, S. W. 1877, W. M. 1878, and Treasurer 1882-'85; 
in the grand lodge, Grand Sword Bearer 1878-79, District Deputy Grand Master 
1891 -'92, and J. G. W. 1893-94; High Priest and other offices in the royal arch 
chapter; Right Illustrious Master in the council of R. & S. M.; and Herald in the 
conclave of Rome and Constantine. He is representative in grand lodge of the 
grand lodge of New Zealand, and in grand chapter of the grand royal arch chapter 
of Oregon. Gifted with musical attainments of a high order, he has on many occa- 
sions, public and private — especially in masonic circles — taken a prominent part 
and rendered eflective aid. 

In addition to his masonic record, he has been a director of the masonic hall 
company, a lieutenant in the corps of New Brnnswick engineers, and a director and 
president of the Victoria skating club. At an amateur competition in 1876, in the 
latter institution, he won the champion gold medal for graceful and proficient 
skating. 

In the various positions occupied by him, and in the community generally, where 
the years of his youth and manhood have been spent, his courteous demeanour, zeal 
and integrity have commanded tiie esteem and confidence of his fellows. 

ARTHUR ISAAC TRUEMAN. 

(Forty-fourth Worshipful Master). 

Born at J'oint de Bute, Westmorland county, New Brunswick, 19th July, 1850, 
of English parentage on his father's side, and Scotch on that of hi mother. After 
receiving a preliminary education, he became a student in the Amherst academy, in 

1 Dr. A/or lietts, who was a I'nitcd Krapire Loyalist of 1783, occupied a proniiiipiit i))ace in liis 
profession and in the masonic fraternity in his day lie was taken prisoner during tlio revolution- 
ary war; hut, on account of his meuiliership in the craft, was discharged by (ieneral Washington, 
wiio was also a freemason. He ofliciatcd at the organization of tlie first lodge in New Itrunswick 
(Hiram Lodge), and was in other resjiccts proniincntl> idenlitied with the early growth of free- 
masonry ill the province. 



258 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Nova Scotia, remaining tliere two years. From thence lie entered Dalhonsie college 
at Halifax, where he graduated as bachelor of arts in 1872. (This college, in 1878, 
conferred ui)on him the further degree of M. A.). After leaving college lie engaged 
in teaching in Nova Scotia. In 1873 he removed to the adjoining city of Portland, 
where he continued his duties as teaciier under a grammar school license, and from 
1876 to 1879 occupied the important position of superintendent of the public schools 
in that city. 

Studied law in the oflice of Pugsley, Crawford & Pugsley, of St. John; admitted 
an attorney 17th June, 1880 ; enrolled a barrister 20th June, 1881 ; and on 1st July, 

1880, became a partner in the business of the above firm. Married, 2Gth October, 

1881, Maggie E., daughter of the late Hon. John MacMillan, post office inspector of 
New Brunswick. I't-ld a commission as captain in the G2nd Battalion Saint John 
F iliers; chaiinian of trustees of Saint Stephen's Presbyterian ciiurch ; and, since 
4th April, 188o, icporter of the supreme court of the province. 

Received mat;onic light in St. Joiin's Lodge, oth May, 1874; J W. 1877; S. W. 
1878, and W. M. 1879. Exalted to the R. A. degree loth May, 1878, in Carleto;i 
Chapter, over which body he presided as high priest 1892 -'93, and is now its trea- 
surey. Received the grades of Red Cross, Knight Templar, and Knight of Malta, in 
the Encampment of Saint John, and filled therein the office of hospitaller A. D. 
1890, and that cf lieutenant commander from 1891 to the present time. He has 
also taken the several grades and degrees in the St. John Council R. & S. M. ; in tiie 
McLeod Moore Conclave of Knights of Rome and Constantine; and in the bodies 
i.f the A. & A. Scottish Rite up to the 18°. 



WILLIAM HENRY BROOKE SADLEIR. 

(Forty-hfth Worshipful Master). 

The son of a clergyman of the Established church. Born in Dublin, Ireland, 
19th February, 1851 ; partly educated in the royal academy, (Josport, England, and, 
after passing a very satisfactory examination, entered as a naval cadet on board 
II. M. warship "Britannia." He subsequently retired from the naval service and 
ucccptcd a situation in the v.'holosalc dry goods house of John Wike it Co,, Man- 
chester. Having had suitable inducements offered him, he came to Saint John in 
1869, and went into the employ of Daniel it Boyd ; subsequently he made an engage- 
ment with Manchester, Robertson & Allison, where he at the present time holds a 
responsible position. 

Bro. Sadleir has received all tiie degrees of lodge, chapter and encampment. He 
was initiated in St. John's Lodge, 3rd September, 1872; J. W. 1879; \V. M. 1880 
and 1881; Assistant tirand Director of Ceremonies 1880-'81; received the R. A. 
degree 17th January, 1873, in New Brunswick Chapter, holding in that body the 
office of Principal Z. one year from July, 1882; created a Knight Templar in the 
Encampment of Saint Joiin, 14th April, 1880, and presided over that body an 
eminent commander 1889-90. He has also received the degrees of Royal and 
Select Master in tiie St. John Council ; has l)een advanced lo the 18° of the A.& A. 
Scottisii Rite; and is the representative of tiie grand royal arch chapter of Florida 
in the grand chapter of New Brunswick. He is an earnest worker in the several 
grades, has filled various offices, and served on many important committees, in all 
of which he has gained the esteem and confidence of his brethren. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 259 

ARTHUR EVERITT. 

(Forty-sixth Worshipful Master). 

A native of England, and son of William Everitt, of Brightwell Hall, county of 
Suffolk. Learned the dry goods business in London, and when a young man came 
to Saint John under an engagement to fill a situation here. He arrived in Saint 
John A. D. 1852 on board the ship "Sir Harry Smith," and entered the wholesale 
and retail dry goods house of J. Armstrong & Co., in which he filled various depart- 
ments until he became the manager. Subsequently he commenced business in co- 
partnership with R. P. Butler, under the title of Everitt & Butler. At the time of 
the great fire in Saint John of 20th June, 1877, the firm occupied warehouses on 
Canterbury street, which were involved in the general destruction, whereby they lost 
all their large stock of merchandise. The partnership of Everitt & Butler was 
afterward dissolved, when Bro. Everitt continued the business on his own account, 
and is now carrying on :i wholesale dry goods business in the masonic temple, Ger- 
main street. 

In the prosecution of his business engagements he lias crossed the Atlantic Ocean, 
by steamship and sailing vessel, upwards of eighty times. In 1854 he married Annie 
M., eldest daughter of the late R. W. Bro. W. H. A. Keans. A freeman of the city 
of Saint John A. D. 1806; an active member of the Saint John board of trade; was 
president of the St. George's society A. D. 1891 ; and many years a director of the 
St. John Protestant Orphan asylum. 

He was initiated in St. John's Lodge, 3rd April, 1877 ; J. W. 1880 ; S. W. 1882 ; 
W. M. 1883 and 1884 ; grand steward 1880-'81; and grand sword bearer 1884-'85. 
Presented to the lodge 2nd January, 1883, a set if rods for the deacons and stewards, 
with emblematical heads of white metal, cliasto and ornamental. At the masonic 
bazaar held in St. John, July, 1884, he was chairman of the committee representi» St. 
John's Lodge thereat, and the successful competitor in the voting, on that occasion, 
for a past master's jewel, awarded to the W. M. or P. M. of a city lodge receiving 
the largest number of votes. In conjunction with W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, he pre- 
sented, at an emergency communication held 17th June, 1884, a valuable silk banner 
with gold trimmings and the necessary outfit, to Saint John's Lodge. 

ROBERT H. B. TENNANT. 

(Forty-seventh Worshipful Master). 

A native oi Scotland, who for several years past has been a resident of Saint 
John, engaged in business as a shirt manufacturer and dealer in gentlemen's fur- 
Lishing goods. 

Received the E. A. degree in St. John's Lodge 6th July, 1880 ; F. C. 3rd August, 
1880, and M. M. 7th September, 1880. D. of C. 1881 ; J..D. 1882 ; S. D. 1883 ; J. W. 
1884, and W. M. 1885. 

He is not now a member of the lodge. 

ROBERT CHESTNUT THORNE. 

(Forty-eighth Worshipful Master). 

Born in Fredericton, New Brunswick, 22nd November, 1847, His father, Henry 
J. Thome, a native of Plymouth, England, was a member of the masonic 'raternity, 

Q 



260 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

having received the craft degrees A. D. 1842, in Hibernia Lodge of this citj. His 
mother was born in Scothmd. 

Bro. Thorne received his education at the collegiate school, Fredericton, at that 
time in charge of the late Dr. Roberts. His early days were spent in his native 
town, and it was there that he started in life as a clerk in the hardware store of his 
cousin, Robert Chestnut. At the age of twenty years he removed to Saint John and 
entered, as a clerk and salesman, in the wholesale and retail house of I. &F. Burpee 
& Co., in whicli capacity he continued until January, 1875, when he became a part- 
ner in this well-known and prosperous firm. 

After the great fire in St. John of 20th June, 1877, the firm of I. & F. Burpee & 
Co. went out of business, and was succeeded by Clarke, Kerr & Thome. Bro. Thome 
continued a partner in this firm until July, 1885, when he withdrew and associated 
himself in the wholesale hardware business with Bro. William Wheeler, under the 
title of Wheeler, Thorne & Co. He subsequently dissolved co-partneraiiip with Mr. 
Wheeler and opened a retail hardware store on King street on his own account. 

The E. A. degree was conferred upon liim 10th February, 1871, in Leinster Lodge, 
Saint John, and in due time the degrees of F. C. and M. M. In Leinster Lodge he 
filled the office of Secretary in 1873; J. W. 1874, and S. W. 1875. He affiliated in 
St. John's Lodge 21st October, 1884; was appointed J. W. 1885; S. W. 1886, and 
filled the office of W. M. 1887. Grand Steward 1886-7 and 1087-'8. His connec- 
tion with the fraternity has been confined to the craft degrees alone. 

He was a y)rominent member of the St. John Cricket and Athletic Club, a mem- 
ber of St. George's Society, and is now in Chicago, Illinois, in the employ of the 
Armour Packing Company. 

FREDERICK SANDALL. 

(Forty-ninth Worshipful Master). 

Bro. Sand all has received the t,/^eral degrees and grades of the lodge, chapter 
and encampment. The E. A. degree was conferred upon him in St. John's Lodge, 
1st April, 1873; the royal arch, in New Brunswick Chapter, 11th September, 1885; 
and the knight templar, in the Encampment of Saint John, 10th August, 1887 ; like- 
wise the Royal and Select Master in St. John Council ; Knight of Rome and Con- 
stantine, in ilcLeod Moore Conclave; Royal Order of Scotland, in the provincial 
grand lodge of New Brunswick ; and the 32° of the A. & A. Scottish Rite, in the 
bodies of that rite working in Saint John, The various offices heretofore held and 
now filled by him, are — in the lodge: organist, 1879 and 1882 ; S. S. 1880 ; S. D. 
1885 ; J. W. 1886 ; S. W. 1887 ; and W. M. 1888 ; in grand lodge : grand steward 
1888; in the royal arch chapter: organist, Principal H. and High Priest; in the 
grand royal arch chapter : grand organist ; in the council of R. & S. M. : recorder 
and treasurer ; in the encampment : chamberlain, chancellor and organist: in the 
Royal Order of Scotland : provincial grand mareschal. 

He was born in Saint John, DecerRber 29th, 1845 ; is the seventh sen of the late 
John Sandall, Esq., and a great-grandson of Thomas Sandail, Tlie latter a promin- 
ent loyalist who served through the war of the American revolution, 1776-'83, as an 
officer in the 22nd regiment of foot, and who was a member of the lodge, chapter and 
encampment attached to that corps. The certificates of his chapter and encampment, 
dated at Staten Island, the first day of June, A, D. 1783, are now in the possession of 
his great-grandson. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 261 

Having completed his education at the Saint John grammar scliool, Bro. Sandall, 
at an early age, entered the offices of the New Brunswick electric telegraph com- 
pany, and subsequently filled positions in local mercantile houses as accountant 
and book-keeper. In 1878 he was appointed assistant to his brother, the late William 
Sandall, Esq., chamberlain of the city of Saint John, and continued in that capacity 
up to the death of his brother — December, J 880 — when he succeeded to the oiFice 
by appointment of the city corporation. He is a freeman of the city of Saint John, 
a member of the St. George's society, and a muscian of acknowledged ability. 

Systematic and prompt in the discharge of the important duties entrusted to him 
as the custodian and dispenser of the public funds, enjoying the confidence of the 
civic authorities and the citizens generally, and the inaugurator of an admirable 
system of keeping the books and account-^, an<l cnnilucting the general afl^airs of his 
office, he has proved himself a capable financier and a worthy successor of the most 
able custodians of the chamberlain's office who have preceded him. 

ARTHUR WELLINGTON SHARP. 

(Fiftieth Worshipful Master). 

Was born in Saint John, October 7th, 1853. He received his education in Saint 
John, and has been a resident of the city without intermission. 

In June, 1869, being nearly sixteen years of age, he received an appointment as 
an assistant in the assessors' office, and has, from that time up to the present, been 
continuously connected with tiie office, enjoying the confidence and esteem of our 
civic fathers and citizens generally. He is now chief clerk in the office, and is also 
clerk to the board of revisors. In the latter capacity he has charge of and compiles 
the lists of voters for provincial and civic elections. 

He was initiated in St. John's Lodge June 7, 1876; F. C. July 4, 1876; and 
M. M. September 28, 1876, tiie latter degree being conferred upon him at the annual 
communication of the grand lodge held at the above-named date, on which occasion, 
by special arrangement, the officers of St. John's Lodge had charge of the ceremo- 
nial, and Bro. Sharp enjoyed the distinguished and unusual honor of being the 
candidate. The offices filled by him from time to time were : I. G. 1878 ; S. S. 1879; 
J. D. 1880; J. W. 1881 ; Secretary lS82-'88, also 1893; and W. M. 1889; and in 
grand lodge a grand steward for the year 1889-90. 

His inclination has not prompted him to pass beyond the arcana of the craft 
degrees. In thus circumscribing his masonic sphere, the lodge has had the full 
benefit of his labors, and has thereby been the gainer. The welfare of his mother 
lodge, the prosperity of all the lodges, and the maintenance of the principles and 
precepts of freemasonry, have been iiis shibboleth on all occasions. There has been 
no shirking of duty and no unfulfilled pledges on his part. The work thrown upon 
his shoulders has been faithfully executed, particularly as secretary of the lodge, the 
duties of which, during the many years he filled the office, were discharged punctu- 
ally and efficiently. He possesses in an eminent degree the confidence and affection 
of his brethren, and by the public generally is held in high esteem. 

In recognition of his valuable services, the lodge, at the regular communication 
of February, 1894, presented him with a past iiiaster's jewel, in gold, suitably in- 
scribed, and enclosed in a morocco case. 

Bro. Sharp is an enthusiastic curler. He holds membership in the Thistle Curl- 
ing Club, whose rink is located near Waterloo street. 



262 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER EWING. 

(Fifty-first Worsljipful Master). 

Son of William and Annie Ewing. The family on the father's side hails from 
the north of Ireland, and on the mother's from Aberdeen, Scotland. Bro. Ewing 
was born in Saint John, June 24, 1860 — the anniversary of St. John the Baptist. 
He received his education at the Saint John grammar school, in which institution, 
in the year 1876, he was the winner of the city corporation gold medal for attain- 
ment in the classics, and likewise the Dnfferin silver medal for proficiency in general 
studies. He studied law in the office of Hon. Ezekiel McLeod, was admitted an 
attorney April 16, 1883, enrolled a barrister April 24, 1884, and is now a member 
of the law firm of E. <k R. McLeod & Ewing, In musical circles he occupies a 
leading position ; is a thorough master of the organ, piano and double bass ; was 
organist of St. David's church (Presbyterian) 1878-'84, and of St. James' church 
(Episcopal) 1885-'92; is a leading member of the Saint John Oratorio society, 
president of the Philharmonic orchestra, and has taken a prominent part in many 
musical concerts and festivals in Saint John. 

Although scarcely ten years have elapsed since his induction into freemasonry, 
his popularity and laudable ambition have enabled him to gain admission into the 
various bodies working in Saint John, and to occupy important offices in all of 
them. He received the E. A. degree in St. John's Lodge August 5, 1884, F. C. 
Septembr 2, 1884, and M. M.October 2, 1884; the R. A. in New Brunswick Chapter, 
September 11, 1885; K. T. in St. John Encampment, August 10, 1887 ; R. & S. M. 
in St. John Council, February 17, 1892; 32° of the A.A.Scottish Rite in New 
Brunswick Consistory, May 28, 1891 ; Red Cross of Rome and Constanline in 
McLeod Moore Conclave, April 10,1893; and the Royal Order of Scotland, April 
13, 1893. That he has not been a drone in the masonic hive is amply demonstrated 
by the following enumeration of the offices he has been called upon to fill, in all of 
which he proved himself to be an able, proficient and correct custodian, viz. — In the 
lodge: I. G. 1885, J. D. 188G, S. D. 1887, J. W. 1888, S. W. 1889, and W. M. 1890 ; 
in grand lodge: grand organist, 1888-'94; in the chapter: Principal Z. 1891 ; in the 
grand chapter : grand organist 1889-'92, and grand secretary 1892-'94 ; in the council 
of R. & S. M.: R. I. M. 1892-'93, and T. I. M. 1893-'94; in the council of High 
Priesthood: recorder from April, 1893; in the conclave of Knights of Rome and 
Constantine: recorder 1893-'94; in the encampment of K. T. : organist 1893-'94; 
and in the Royal Order of Scotland : provincial grand secretary 1893-'94. 

JOHN JACKSON FORREST. 

(Fifty-second Worshipful Master). 

The story of his masonic life is soon told, for the reason that his inclination has 
not induced him to ascend the mystic ladder beyond the first three rounds. St. 
John's Lodge has, consequently, had the advantage of enjoying liis undivided devo- 
tion, labor and counsel. 

The E. A. degree was conferred ujjon him in St. John's Lodge, September 5, 
1871 ; the F. C, September 28, 1871, and the M. M., November, 7, 1871 ; and he 
occupied official position as follows: D. of C. 1873; I. G. 1886; S. S. 1887 ; S. D. 
1888; J. W. 1889; S. W. 1890; and W. M. 1891. 

His native place is Chatham, New Brunswick, where he was born February 23, 
1840, of Scotch parentage, and where the years of his youth and early manhood 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 263 

were spent in gaining a sound English education and in serving an apprenticeship 
at tlie stone-cutting business in his father's workship. At the age of twenty-three 
years lie abandoned the mallet and chisel and removed to Fredericton, where he 
pursued a course of study in the Baptist seminary of that town. From thence lie 
entered Acadia college, Nova Scotia, in which he took a partial course but did not 
graduate. 

In 1870 he came to Saint John, and for six years or more carried on business as 
a commission merchant. The legal profession having an attraction for him, he 
relinquished trade and commerce and commenced studying law in the oftice of 
Montesquieu McDonald, Esquire, in the year 1877. He was admitted an attorney 
April 23, 1881, enrolled a barrister June 15, 1882, and, opening an office in Saint 
John, pursued the practice of his profession until the autumn of 1892, since when> 
in consequence of severe illness, he has been confined to his house, and, a large por' 
tion of the time, to his bed. 

Possessed of a sturdy and vigorous frame, which was probably injured by over- 
exertion, he, in his younger days, took a leading part in local athletic tournaments 
and competitions in his native town. He is an excellent elocutionist, possesses rare 
merit as a raconteur, and has often enlivened select circles by a choice selection of 
"auld Scotia's" songs, rendered in inimitable style He is a member of and has 
taken an active interest in the Saint Andrew's Society, the Clan Mackenzie of the 
order of Scottish clams, the ancient order of Foresters, and the order of United 
Workmen. Previous to the union of the city of Portland with Saint John he repre- 
sented Victoria ward at the board of aldermen of that city, and afterward in the 
common council of the united city, his incumbency at the two boards extending 
from 1877 to 1880. 

WILSON LOWRY DOBBIN. 

(Fifty-third Worshipful Master). 

The ancestors of Bro. Dobbin, originally English, settled many years ago in the 
county of Londonderry, Ireland. His father, Wilson Dobbin, who received the craft 
degrees of freemasonry in Curran Lodge at Belfast, came to New Brunswick A. D. 
1836, and became a resident of Saint John, where the subject of this sketch was 
born February 15, 1851. Bro. Dobbin, at the age of sixteen years, was appointed to 
a position in the imperial customs of Saint John, and up to the present time — a 
period of twenty-seven years — has held office continuously in that department, dis- 
charging his duties in a discreet and efficient manner. 

In September, 1883, he was united in matrimony to Miss Maggie M. Fawcett, of 
Westmorland county, New Brunswick, by whom he has issue, one son and two 
daughters. 

He is a man of large stature and powerful frame — a characteristic of the male 
members of his family — and is also an excellent swimmer. By his daring and 
expertness in the water lie has been the means of saving several persons from drown- 
ing, notably in the case of a seaman who fell over a wharf near Charlotte street 
extension, in the harbor of Saint John, and whose life was saved by the bravery of 
Bro. Dobbin, who plunged into the water and brought the drowning sailor safely 
to land. 

He was initiated in St. John's Lodge June 4, 1878; cra/<ec/ July 2, 1878; and 
raised August 6, 1878 ; and has filled the following offices in the lodge : I. G. 1880, 
S. S. 1881, D. of C. 1882, J. D. 1883 and 1888, S. D. 1889, J. W. 1890, S. W. 1891, and 
W. M. 1892. He also served as a grand steward in the grand lodge, 1892-'93. 



264 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

ARCHIBALD BAUER. 

(Fifty-fourth Worshipful Master) 

In 1879 Bro. Bauer received the three degrees of symholic freemasonry in 
Hibernia Lodge, No. 3, Saint John, New Brunswick, viz. : E. A. August 12, F. C. 
October 14, and M. M. November 11, and in 1881 held the office of inner guard in 
tliat lodge. 

He affiliated in St. John's Lodge, April 2, 1889, and, although but five years a 
member, is now presiding in the East a second term, having in those five years filled 
offices as follows: S. D. 1890, J. W. 1891, S. W. 1892, and W. M. 1893-'94. So far, 
he has not travelled beyond the third degree; evidently content to confine his labor 
and his interest solely to the work of the lodge. It may be justly said of him that, 
as a member and an officer of the lodge, he has evidenced promptness and intel- 
ligence, and proved himself to be a bright and correct ritualist. 

He was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, February 10, 1853, and in that city 
received his education and learned the watch-making business. On his father's side 
he possesses German blood, and Irish from his mother, who was a descendant of the 
once famous Rev. Cotton Mather. 

Desirous of perfecting himself in his trade calling, he went to Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, A. D. 1870, where he paid special attention to the branch of a manufactur- 
ing jeweller, and, having thovoughly accomplished his purpose, has since then 
devoted himself altogether to tliat special line of business. Under an engagement 
with tiie firm of Page, Smalley & Ferguson, he came to Saint John in the year 1878, 
to take charge of the manufacturing department of their jewellery establishment on 
King street. From that year to the present he has remained in the same employ 
(the firm name has since been "hanged to Ferguson & Page), proving himself a 
cunning artificer — a veritable ' brl Cain — by the many exquisite specimens of 
artistic work from his hands, especially in the line of masonic presentation jewels. 

A proof of his warm feeling for the lodge over which he now presides is con- 
tained in the following paragraph copied from the record of December G, 1892, viz.: 
"After the election of master, treasurer and tyler, Bro. Archibald Bauer, worshipful 
master elect, made a present to tiie lodge of a valuable and artistic silver chain to 
be worn by the master of the lodge. This elegant and much-prized addition to the 
paraphernalia of the lodge is of stolid silver, attached to sky-blue watered silk rib- 
bon, and is the handiwork of the generous donor. The hearty thanks of the lodge 
were extended to Bro. Bauer for his valuable gift." 

This sketch closes the biogranhies of the long line of brethren who, by 
the sufrrngcs of their fellows, have been called upon to fill what is tech- 
nically termed the chair of King Solomon, the great mtijority of whom 
now sleep " tho sleep that shall ne'er know waking." Let us fondly hope 
that they and all who survive were impressed with the importance of the 
trust committed to their keeping, and discharged the responsibilities of 
that trvist wi.. a single eye to the welfare of the lodge and the honor and 
good name of the craft. 



MEMBERS OF ST, JOHN'S LODGE, No, 29, 

Fbom its Organization under Warrant from R. W. Duncan Claukk, Pro. 
viNciAL Grand Master of Nova Scotia, dated DECEMBf:R 18th, 1801. 



No. 



Name. 



Entebkd. 



Passed. 



Raised. 



Joined. 



1 
3 
8 
4 
5 

e 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
47 
18 
19 
20 
31 



22 
23 
24 
26 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 
31 
82 
33 
34 
86 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
48 
44 
46 
46 
47 
48 



George Smith, W. M., 

Chapman Judsoii, S. W., 

David Waterbiiry, J. W., 

John Wolhaupter, Treas., 

William Fayerweather, Sec'y,.. 

John Dean, S. D., 

Caleb Merritt, J. D. , 

George Blackwood 

John .'^cott, 

Nehemiah Merritt, 

William Campbell, 

William Sanford Oliver, 

Hon. George Leonard, 

Andrew Kinnear, 

John Sinnott, 

Hugh Johnston, 

Hon. Thomas Wetmore, 

John Paul, 

Hon. Joshua Upham, 

George McCoU, 

Edward Sands, 



The furegoing were original membcri. 



Francis Watson 

Charles Wells, 

Thomas Jennings, 

Richard Whelpley, 

John McLeod, 

John Donaldson, 

Laurence Hartwick, 

Jeremiah I'ecker, 

Samuel .Storms, 

Oliver Roui'dett, 

Henry Patterson, 

ThoiUHB IJ. Wentworih,.. 

Benjamin Wiggins, 

Alexander Hei)burn, 

Richard Sands, 

William Donaldson, 

Jolin Toole, 

James Holly, .. 

Noah Disbrow, 

John Woodward, 

Peter lilair 

Thomas Uobson, 

James Hendricks, 

Samuel Nichols, 

David Merrill, 

Thomas Kawleigb, 

John Mogridge 



June 1, 1801 

Aug. 3, 1802 
Sept. 7, " 
Oct. 6, " 



Dec. 16, 1802 
Feb. 1, 1803 



March 1,1803 



April 6, 1803 
May 3, " 
June?, " 



July 16, 1803 

Sept. 7, 1802 
Oct. 6, " 
Not. 2, " 



Feb, 3, 1803 
Mar. 3, " 
April 7, 1807 
Mar. 3, 1803 
Mar. 3, " 

April 6, 1803 
June 7, " 



June 7, 1803 
June 7, " 
June 18, " 



May 4, 1802 
July 15, " 

Oct. 6, 1802 
Nov, 2, " 
Dec. 7, " 



Feb. 2, 1803 
May 3, " 

May 3, 1803 
Mays, " 

May S, 1803 
Sept. 6, " 



Dec. 4, 1808 
Aug. 2, " 
June 10, " 



April B, 1802 

April 5, " 

April 5, " 

April 6, " 

April 6, " 

April 5, " 

April 5, " 

April a, " 

April 5, " 

April 5, " 

April 5, " 

April 6, " 

April 5, " 

April 6, " 

April 5, " 

April 5, " 

April 5, » 

April 5, " 

April 5, " 

April 5, "■ 

April 6, " 



May 4, 1802 
July 6, 1802 



Oct. 6,1802 
Oct. 6, " 
Dec. 7, " 
Dec. 7, " 



Feb. 1, 1803 



Mar. 1,1808 
Mar.l, " 
M»r.l, " 
Aprils, " 



Jun«1»,180S 



266 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



Ko. 



Name. 



Entered. 



Passed. 



Raised. 



Joined. 



JncobS. Mott, 

Chillies Swan, 

David Johnston, 

Peter McCalitr, 

Duncan McLeod, 

Robert Mcnzics, 

Jot ham Hitchcock, 

Robert Laidley, 

David Cronk, 

George Ironside, 

Charles Johnston 

Robert Hiltz, 

John Currie, 

John Grant, 

William Durant, 

John Dick, 

George Holmes, 

William Abrains, 

John ^fount, 

Thomas White 

Linus Seely, 

John Saunders Clarke, 

John Poole, 

Robert Clarke, 

John McDowell 

George Campbell, 

Alexander Stewart, 

John Downing, 

Thomas Hunter, 

Daniel Pettingell, 

Francis Dunlop, 

Richard Lawrence, 

Robert McKenzie 

Charles Doucett, 

Gilbert Jordan, 

John H. Schlarhorst,..., 

Joseph Clarke 

John Edson, 

Henry Trapagher, 

John Godfrey, 

James Hetherington,... 
Cornelius VanHorne,... 

William Barr, 

George Price, 

Alexander Leraercy,.... 

James Hillggrove, 

Abner Smith, 

David Perry, 

Henry Carnes 

Jacob Scgec 

Robert Shaw 

Samuel Dunham, 

Rol>ert Collins, 

John VanHorne, 

William Frazer 

William Haddon 

Bolomon Harford, 



Aug. 2, 1803 ! Oct. 4, 1803 
Sept. 6, " [Oct. 1, " 
Oct. 4, " I Nov. 1, " 



Feb. 3, 1804 i June 19. 1804 



Fel). ?, 
April 3, 



April 3, 
Jfay 3, 



March 8, 1806 June 17, 1806 



Aug. 5, 18CG Aug. 8, 1806 

Dec 2, " Dec. G, " 

Mar. 21, 1807. Mar. 21,1807 

April 7, " [ May 5, " 



Dec. 4, 1803 
Oct. 1, " 
Nov. 1, " 



June 19, 1804 
May 3, " 
June 19, " 



June 17, 1806 



Aug. 8, 1S06 
Dec. fi, " 
Mar. 21, 1807 
May 5, " 



May 5, 1807 
July 27, " 
Oct 8, " 
Dec. 1, " 



May 5, 1807 
Aug. 4, " 
Oct. 8, " 
Jan. 7, 1808 



Mar. 1, 1808 
Juiie 10, " 
Dec. 8, " 
Feb. 7, 18C9 
Mar. 7, " 
Oct. 23, " 



Ai)ril 5, 1808 
June!6, " 
Dee. 8, " 
Feb. 10, 1809 
Mar. 10, " 
Dec. 5, " 



Jan. 2, 1810 Feb. 6, 1810 



May 5, 1807 
Aug. 4, " 
Oct. 10, " 
Jan. 7, 1808 



May 3,1808 
June 16, " 
Dec. 8, " 
Feb. 10, 1809 
Mar. 10, " 
Dec. 5, " 



April 3, 1810 



Oct. 2, 1810 



Nov. 10, 1810 



Jan. 7, 1811 
Jan. 7, " 
Feb. 5, " 
Mar. 5, " 
Mar. 5, " 
April 2, " 
May 7, " 
July 2, " 
July 2, " 
Sept. 8, " 
Sept. 3, " 
Nov. 5, " 
Nov. 6, " 
Nov. )?, " 
Nov. 8j " 
Dec, 3, " 
Feb. 5, 1812 



Nov. 21, 1810 



Aug. 22, 1812 



Feb. 6, 1811 
Jan. 11, " 
Mar. 5, " 
April 2, " 
April?, " 
May 7, " 
May 23, " 
Aug. 6, " 
Aug. 6, " 
Oct. 1. " 
Oct. 1, ' 
Nov. 

Nov. , •• 
Nov. 8, " 
Mar. 12, 1812 
Dec. 8, 1811 
Mar. 3, 1812 



Sept. 1, 1812 



Nov. 21, 1810 



Mar. 5, 1811 
Jan. 11, " 
April 2, " 
April 25," 
April 25," 
May 7, " 
May 23, " 
Aug. 6, " 
Oct. 1. " 
Oct. 2, " 
Oct. 2, " 
June 5, 1812 
D< c. 3, 1811 
Dec. 3, " 
Mar. 12, 1812 
Dec. 8, 1811 
April 7, 1812 



Dec. 4, 1803 

Dec. 27, 1804 
Aug. 5, 1806 



April 7, 1807 



Dec. 27, 1807 
Jan. 5, 1808 
Jan. 5, " 



Sept. 1, 1812 



Nov. 7, 1809 

April 3, 1810 
May 1, " 
Oct. 2, " 

Dec. 4, 1810 

Jan. 1,1811 
Jan. 1, " 



4 



May 5, 1812 



MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



267 



Name. 



Entered. 



Passed. 



Raised. 



Joined, 



Dauicl Smith, 

Abner Hamiu, 

Levi King, 

Alexander Kirk, 

Griffith Jenkins, 

Solomon Hopkins 

James Henderson, 

Samuel Schofield, 

Robert Patterson 

William Grant 

Robert Robertson, 

James Willemherst, 

Martin Stennicks, 

William Ryder, 

Robert Ray, 

James Pearce, 

Joseph Morse, 

Joseph Hamm, 

Charles Ray 

Thomas Parker, 

Israel Decker, 

Paul Prince, 

Henry Chubb, 

William Bradbury, , 

John Barr, , 

John Williams, 

Isaac Doane 

Alexander McPherson,., 

William Branscomb, 

John McKenzie, 

John Downie, 

Levi Lockhart 

William J. Gaynor, 

Gilbert Lester 

Nathan Reed, 

John Farnham, 

Jeremiah Townshend,... 

William Hughson, 

Warren Bibber, 

William Robson, 

John Campbdl 

John Thomas 

George Stakiton 

Davids. Marshall 

Charles Herring, 

Henry Sawyer, 

Richard Mott 

Caleb Haskell, 

Dexter Brown, 

John Bowyer 

James (iruiidy 

William Farrant 

William Joice, 

R()l)ert Welch 

Johu MoClure, 

Henry lA»ng, 

Peters Merritt 



Oct. 6, 1812 
Dec. 1, " 
Jan. 5, 1813 
Mar. 2, " 
Mar. 2, " 
Mar. 2, " 
June 1, " 
JulyG, " 
Oct. 5, " 
Jan. 4, 1814 
Mar. 1, " 
Mar. 21, " 
April 5, " 
April 13," 



Nov. 3, 1812 
Dec. 9, " 
Feb. 2, 1813 
April 6, " 
April (i, " 
May 4, " 
July 6, " 
Aug. 3, " 



Feb. 1,1814 
Aprils, " 
July 13, " 
April 11," 
April 15, " 



Aug. 18, 1814 I Aug. 20, 1814 



Feb. 7, 1815 
Mar. 7, " 
Mar. 7, " 
Mar. 7, " 



April 4, 1816 
June 12, " 
Junefi, " 
June 12, " 
June 12, " 



Sept. 5, 1815 
Oct. 3, " 



Nov. 7, 1815 
Nov. 7, " 
Feb. fi, 1816 
Feb, (!, " 
Feh. 0, " 
Mar. 5, " 
April », " 
April 8, " 
May r., " 



Feb. 10, 1815 
April 4, " 
ApriU, " 
April 4, " 



May 2, 1815 
July 4, " 
June 12, " 
July 4, " 
July 4, " 



Nov. 7, 1815 
Dec. 5, " 



June 24, 1816 
June 24, " 



Nov. 6, 1816 
Jan 7,1817 
Jan. 7, " 
Jan. 7, " 



Deo. 2S, 1817 
Dec. 23, " 



Dec. 5, 1815 
Dec. 5, " 
June 4, 1816 
Mar. 5, " 
Mar. 5, " 
April 2, " 
May 6, " 
May 6, " 
June 4, " 



July 2, 1816 
Oct 1, « 



Dec. 8, 1816 
Feb. 4, 1317 
Feb. 4, " 
Feb. 4, " 



Jan. 6, 1818 
Feb. 3, " 



Nov. 3, 1812 
Dec. 9, " 
Mar. 2, 1813 
May 4, " 
May 4, " 
May 11, " 
Aug. 3, " 
Sept. 7, " 



Feb. 10, 1818 
April 4, " 
May 2, " 
May 2, " 



June 6, 1815 
Nov. 7, " 
July 4, " 
Aug. 1, " 
Aug. 1, " 



Nov. 7, 1815 
April 8, 1816 



Dec 9, 1815 
Dec. 9, " 
June 4, 1816 
April 2, " 
April 2, " 
April 2, " 
June 4, " 
June 4, " 
July 2, " 



Aug. 6, 1816 
Oct. 1, " 



Mar. 4, 1817 
Mar. 11, " 
Mar. " 
Mar. 11, " 



Feb. 3, 1818 
ApriU, " 



Feb. 1, 1814 
May 3, " 
July 13, " 
April 11, " 
April 15, " 

Aug. 20, 1814 



May 3, 1814 
Oct. 3, 1814 

Mar. 7, 1815 



Aug. 1, 1815 



Oct. 3, 1815 
Oct. 3, " 
Oct. 3, " 



June 4, 1816 
June 4, " 



July 2, 1816 
Aug. 5, " 
Oct. 1, " 



Feb. 4, 1817 
Juno 3, " 



268 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



Ko. 



Name. 



Entered. 



Passed. 



Raised. 



Joined. 



163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
186 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
19o 
196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
218 
217 
218 
219 



WillUm Pecker, 

Jeremiah Gove, 

Alexander Lawrence,.. 

Robert Tayne, 

George Bonnell, 

Asa Jones, 

David Webb 

James Wat«on, , 

James Dimsdale, 

John Campbell, 

William R. Cock, 

Samuel Garrison, 

Timothy La Frisbee,... 

Thomas Leavitt, 

Robert C. Minette, 

George McLean, 

William Hoyt, Junr.,.. 

John Swanson, 

Samuel Reynolds 

John Murphy 

Phares Martin, 

James Godsoe, 

William Cameron, 

Robert Paine Stewart,. 
Sylvester C. Hughes,... 

Robert Shced, 

Jacob Townsond, 

William Duncan, 

John A. Dallas 

Lewis Carvill, 

Alexander Milne, 

Nathan Godsoe, 

Pike, 

Charles L. Whiting,.... 

Robert Wallace, 

Thomas Rates, 

Peter Stewart, 

George Thompson; 

Solomon Woodworth,.. 

James Crispan 

Hugh Trulan, 

Horatio N. H. Liigrin, 
William McDonald,.... 

John Herrington, 

George -MausoU, 

Henry King, 

James W. Trnthen, 

Arthur D. Garden, 

Rev. James ("ookson,... 

David Armstrong, 

Robert Keating, 

David Brown 

Samuel Ci.bb, 

Alexander JoLustone,. 

James Rwd, 

Patrick Deerlng, 

Joseph Warhurton 



Dec. 23, 1817 
April 7, 1818 



July 7, 1818 



Oct. 6, 1818 
Nov. 9, 1818 



Jan. 6, 1819 



Jan. 11,181'J 
Feb. 2, " 
Feb. 8, " 
May 4, " 
June 1, " 
June 1, " 



Aug. 3, 1819 
Aug. 6, •' 



Sept. 16, " 
Sept. 16, " 
Oct. 20, " 
Oct. 20, " 



Nov. 10, 1819 
Dec. 11, 1819 



Jan. 4, 1820 



Feb. 1,1820 
April, 4, " 



May 2, 1820 



Jan. 6, 1818 



May 5, 1818 



Aug. 4, 1818 



Oct. 7, 1818 
Nov. 16, 1818 



Feb. 2, 1819 



Jan. 6, 1818 



June 2, 1818 



Sept. 1, 1818 



Oct. 7, 1818 
Nov. 16, 1818 



Mar. 2, 1819 



Jan. 18, 1819 
Mar. 2, " 
Feb. 15, " 
July 6, " 
Aug. 3, " 
July 6, " 



Sept. 7, 1819 
Aug. 12, " 



Oct. 5, 1819 
Oct. 5, " 
Nov. 2, " 
Nov. 10, " 



Nov. 15, 1819 



Jan. 4, 1820 



Feb. 1,18 JO Mar. 7, 1820 



Jan. 18, 1819 
April 6, " 
Feb. 15, " 
Aug. 6, " 
Nov. 2, " 
Aug. 6, " 



Nov. 2, 1819 
Aug. 12, " 



Mar. 7, 1820 
Nov. 15, 1819 
Dec. 11, " 
Nov. 10, " 



Nov. 15, 1819 
Nov. 20, " 
Mar. 7, 1820 



Mar. 10, 1820 
June 0, " 



June 6, 1820 



May 6, 1829 
Oct. 3, " 



July 4, 1820 



July 7, 1820 I July 11, 1820 i July 11, 1820 
July 11, " I Aug. 1, " Dec. 11, " 
Aug. 1, •' I Dec. 19, " I Dec. 19, " 



Sept. 9, 1820 



Oct. 3, 1820 
Dec. 22, " 



Dec. 11,1820 Dec. 11,1820 
Jan. 2, 1821 Jan. 2, 1821 



Mar. 3, 1818 

April 7, 1818 
June 24, 1818 



Aug. 4, 1818 
Nov. 8, 1818 



Dec. 1, 1818 
Jan. 5, 1819 
«••■ 

July 1, 1819 
Sept. 7, 1819 



I 



I 



Feb. 8, 1821 I Feb. 11, 1821 1 Feb. 11, 1821 



Oct. 6, 1819 

u 

Jan. 4, 1820 

Feb. 1, 1820 

April 4, 1820 

June 6, 1820 
July 4, " 

Sept. 5, 1820 
Oct. :<. 1820 



Jan. 2. 1821 



MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



269 



No.' Name. 1 Enterbd. 


Passed. 


Raised. 


Joined. 


2?fl 


William Ifutchinson, 

John Jordan, 

Andrew Gibson, 








Mar. 6. 1821 


??1 


April 3, 1821 


May 1, 1821 


Junes, 1821 




■>?? 


April 3, 1821 
May 1. " 
May 1, " 


??3 


Henry W. Pitts, 

George Moore 








2?4 








7?ri 


Israel Lawson, 

Benjamin F. Marsh 


May 1,1821 


July 3, 1821 


Aug. 7, 1821 


??6 


June 5, 18JI 


ri 


Joseph 8. Daglisb, 








Aug. 7, " 


7?« 


Thomas Dunham, 

Ezekiel Dyer 

Solomon Knight, 

Robert Peterson, 


Dec. 11,1821 
Feb. 5, 1822 
Mar. 5, " 


Feb. 5, 1822 
May 7, " 
April 2, " 


May 13, 1822 
June 6, " 
May 13, " 


770 




730 




?31 


Mar. 5, 1822 


?3',' 


Charles McPherson, 








April 2, " 


?33 


George Day, 

William Charlton 


Jan. 7, 1823 


Feb. 4, 1823 


Mar. 4, 1823 


?S4 


Jan. 7. 1823 


VS.") 


Patrick Fuller, 


Mar. 4, 1823 


April 1. 1823 


May 12, 182.1 




?afi 


April 1. 1823 


?.37 


Jacob Noyes 

William W. Emslie, 

James P Payne 

John F. Payne, 

James G. Lester, 


Oct. 6, 1823 
Nov. 7, " 
Mar. 7, 1824 
May 4, " 
May 4, " 


Nov. 7, 1823 
Dec. m, " 
May 4, 1824 
June 1, " 
Junel, " 


Dec. 10, 1823 
Jan. 6, 1824 
July 6, " 
July 12, " 
July 12, " 


?38 




231) 




240 




241 




?4? 


John McCready, 


June 1. 1824 


243 


Charles Campljell, 









July 6, " 
July 6, " 
Oct 5, " 


244 









'?ilS 


Joseph Lingley, 

Francis P. I'erley, 








?4fi 








Nov. ?, " 


?47 


James Campbell, 

Hugh McPherson, 








Nov. 2, " 


248 


Nov. 2, 1824 
Dec. 9, " 


Dec. 9, 1824 
Jan 4, 1825 


Jan. 4, 182.5 
Jan. 6, •' 




249 


William McArthur, 

Andrew .Smiley 

James R. Webster 




2.10 


Jan. 4. 1825 


251 


Jan. 4, 1825 
Jan. 6, " 
Jan. 18, " 


Jan. 6, 1825 
Feb. 1 " 
Jan. 18, " 


Feb. 1,1825 
Feb. 1, " 
Jan. 27, " 




252 Hiram Smith, 




253 William Giav 




254 


William Edmonds, 


Feb. 1. 1825 


25.') 


Hugh McDermott, 

Elijah Spragg, 

John Johnston, 

Silas DeForest, 








Feb. 1, " 


25r. 


Feb. 1,1825 
Feb. 1, " 


Mar. 1,1825 
Mar. 1, " 


April 5, 1825 
April 5, " 




257 
258 


Mar. 1, 1825 


259 


Robert Walsh, 








Mar. 1, " 


260 


John Ferguson, 








May 2, " 
Mav 2, " 


2fil 


Thomas .Smith, 








2B2 


James Condle, 








May 2, " 
May 2, " 


2fi3 


William W'yer, 

George Cheveley, 








264 


June 20, 182.5 
June 20, " 


Juno 22, 1825 
June 22, " 


June 22, 1825 
June 22, " 


265 


O. P. Rrotherson, 

Lewis Fairweather, 




26C, 


July 5, 1825 


267 


Benjamin Thomp.son, 

Richard Lawrence, Junr., 

John Anderson, 


Aug 2, 1825 


Rpiit. fi IR2.1 


Nov. 1, 1826 
Nov. 3, " 
Nov. 29, " 
Jan. 8, 18.'6 
Feb. 21. " 
Mar. 28, " 
Feb. 21, " 


268 


Nov.], " Nov. 3, " 
Nov. 29, " Niiv. ''9. " 




269 




27* 


William Harland, 

Israel Merritt, 


Dec. 20, " 
Jan. 3 1826 
Jan. 3, " 
Jan. 3, " 


Dec. 20, " 
Feb. fi, 1826 
Mar. 7, " 
Feb. 6, " 




271 




272 


Georire L. Carvill 




273 Lawrence Warren 




274 


John King, 


Feb. 6, 1826 
Feb. 6, " 


275 


Israel Armstrong, 

George A. Garrison, 








276 


Feb. 6, 1826 
Feb. 6, " 


Mar. 7, 1826 
Feb. 21, " 


Mar. 28, 1826 
War. 28, " 




277 


Robert Canard 






270 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



No. Name. 

■278 John Cole, 

1279 John McCardle, 

280 George Clark 

281 Howard Smith, 

282 Samuel Joyce, 

283 Thomas Boyd, 

284 Simeon Bradbury, 

285 John M. Campbell, 

286 Hector Mclntyre, 

287 Patrick Devereaux, 

288 William Chew, 

289 William Bookwood, 

293 Francis McKinney, 

291 Robert Wallace, 

292 Justus 3. Wetmore, 

293 Joseph Wilson, 

294 Robert Garrick 

"296 Jacob Townsend, 

296 Alexander Mills, 

297 John Clark, 

298 James Patterson, 

299 John Haws, 

300 Peter McLaren, 

301 .John Howe, 

302 William Stout, 

303 Robert Foulis, 

304 David Hogg 

305 Daniel Smith, 

306 James Rankine, 

307 William Greeuo, 

308 Lewis True, 

309 Jesse M. Sty mest, 

310 Samuel Watts 

311 Jerry D. Hughson 

312 Aaron Leveuseller, 

313 Stinson Patten, 

314 Benjamin ^mith, 

315 Hugh Johnston, 

316 Edward T. Kuowles, 

317 Andrew Garrison, 

318 Isaac Fleweliing 

319 Joshua B. Williams, 

320 Thomas L. Nicholson, 

321 Anthony Lockwood, Jr., 

322 Charles Brown, 

323 George Broadbrook, 

324 John Beverley, 

325 James Rccd, 

326 William Fairweather, 

327 James Atchison, 

328 George Thompson, 

329 John Potter, 

330 Edward Lockhart 

331 John Murray, 

332 Joseph McMaiigh 

383 Angus McAfee 

334 James Hinds, 

386 Oliver Byram 



Entered. 



Passed. 



Raised. 



Joined. 



Feb. 6, 1826 
Mar. 7, " 
Mar. 7, " 
Mar. 8, " 
April 5, " 
April 5, " 
April 25, " 



July 4, 1826 
July 4, " 



Mar. 7, 1S26 I Mar. 28, 1826 



April 5, 
April 5, 
July 24, 
May 2, 
May 2, 
April 27, 



May 18, 
May 18, 
Aug. 1, 
June 6, 
June 6, 
April 27, 



Aug. 1, 1826 
July 24, " 



Aug. 1, 1826 
July 24, " 



Dec. 5, 1826 
Dec. 6, " 



Jan. 2, 1827 
Jan. 2, " 



Feb. 6, 1827 
Feb. 6, " 



Feb. 22, 1827 < Feb. 24, 1827 



Mar. 5, 1827 
Mar. 5, " 
Aprils, " 
April 3, " 
Apnl3, " 
Aprils, " 



April 17, 1827 
April 17, " 
I May 1, " 
May 1, " 
May 1, " 
May 1, " 



Feb. 27, 1827 



May 15, 1827 
May 15, " 
June 5, " 
June 5, " 
June 19, " 
June 19, " 



Aug. 7, 1827 i Sept. 4, 1827 \ Oct. 2, 1827 



Nov. 13, 1827 I Dec. 18, 1827 Jan. 15, 1828 



Nov. 13, " 
Dec. 4, " 



Jan. 1, 1828 
Jan 1, " 
April 1, " 
June 3, " 



Aug 15, 1828 
May 5, 1829 



July 8, 1832 



Dec. 18, " 
Jan. 1, 1828 



Jan. 15, " 
Feb. 5, " 



Feb. 5, 1828 
Feb. 5, " 
May 6, " 
Junes, " 



Aug. 21. 1828 



Mar. 4, 1828 
Mar. 4, " 
May 23, " 
June 5, " 



Aug. 21, 1828 



May 19, 1829 May 19, 1829 



Aug. 3, 1830 



Aug. 7, 1832 



Aug. 5, 1830 



Sept. 4, 1832 



June 6, 1826 
June 6, " 



Aug. 1,1820 
Sept. 5, " 
Nov. 7, 1826 



Dec. 5, 1826 
Jan. 2, 1827 
Jan. 2, " 
Jan. 2, " 

Mar. 5, 1827 
Mar. 5, " 



July 3, 1827 
Julys, " 

Nov. 6, 1827 



Jan. 1, 1828 
Jan. 1, " 



June 3, 1828 
June 3, " 

May 5, 1829 

June 2, 1829 
June 2, " 

Mar. 6, 1832 
Aprils, " 
Mayl. " 

Jan. 7, 1834 
Jan. 7, " 
Jan. 7, " 
Feb. 4, " 



MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



271 



CONTINUED ROIL OF MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE, 

Under Warrant No. 632 from the United Grand Lodge of England, Hi» 
Royal Highness the Duke of Sussex, Grand Master. 



No. 



33C 
337 
338 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
345 
346 
347 
848 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
354 
355 
356 
357 
358 
359 
360 
361 
362 
363 
364 

363 ; 

S66 i 
367 ' 
368 
369 

370 i 

371 ' 
372 
373 
374 

375 i 

376 I 
377 
378 
379 
380 

381 I 

382 ' 
3S3 i 
384 

385 : 

386 I 

387 i 

388 i 



Name. 

William Ross 

Joseph Bell, 

Johu Richardson, 

James A. Parnell, 

Wm. James Corbitt, 

Joseph Wetmore 

William Warwick, 

James Bell, 

Richard Calvert, 

William II. (Jardner,... 

Henry Swyinmer, 

Robert Barbour, 

William Pitt Scott, 

John Sinclair, 

John Reed, 

Richard Goodwin, 

David McLaren, 

David Edgar 

John J. Ilogan, 

George Bainbridge 

John Hooper, 

William .Milligan, 

Ambrose D. McKenzie, 

Matthew Barbour 

John Coleman, 

William Mainland, 

David Johnston 

George H. Robertson, .. 

Robert Wylle, 

William B. Pigeon, 

William Purdy, 

Josei)h C. Kizard, 

George Johnston, 

Alexander Johnston,.... 
Frederick D. S. Jones,.. 

Charles Brown, 

John C. Chipman, 

John Fisher, 

John L. Hawkswort h,.. 

John Cassidy, 

William Paul, 

John Thomas 

John Irvine, 

George Clark. 

David Donnelly, 

Henry Jones, 

John S. Brown, 

Thomas Swinford, 

William H. A. Keans, .. 

James Howard 

James S. Lindsay, 

Charles Johnston, 

WilUam S. Whitelaw, .. 



Entrrkd. 



Passed. 



Raised. 



July 4, 1837 
July 4, " 



Aug. 1, 1837 
Aug. 1, " 



Aug. 1, 1837 
Aug. 1, " 
Aug. 1, " 
Aug. 1, " 
Aug. 7, " 
Sept. 5, " 



Dec. 5, 1837 
Dec. 5, " 
Dec. 27, " 
Jan. 2, 1838 
Jan. 2, " 
Aprils, " 
May 11, " 
June 5, " 
June 15, " 



Sept. 5, 1837 
Sept. 5, " 
Oct. 3, " 
Nov. 21, " 
Oct. 3, " 
Oct. 3, " 



Sept. 5, 1837 
Sept. 5, " 



July 3, 1838 



Sept. 4, 1838 
Sept. 4, " 
Oct. 2, " 
Nov. 6, " 



Aug 6, 1839 



Jan. 7, 1840 
Jan. 7, " 



May 5, 1840 
May 6, " 
Oct. 6, " 



Jan. 2, 1838 

Feb. 6, " 

June 5, " 

Feb. 6, " 

Feb. 6, " 

May 1, " 

July 3, " 

July 3, " 

Nov. 6. " 



Aug. 7, 1838 



Oct. 2, 1S38 
Oct. 2, " 
Nov. 6, " 
Dec. 4, " 



Sept. 8, 1839 



June 1, 1841 
Feb. 4, 1840 



June 2, 1840 
June 2, " 
Dec. 1, " 



Oct. 3, 1837 
Oct. 3, " 
Nov. 8, " 
July S, 1838 
Nov. 8, 1837 
Nov. 21, " 

Feb. 6, 1838 
Mar. 6, " 



Mar. 6, 1838 
Mar. 6, " 
Dec. 4, " 
Aug. 7, " 
Aug. 7, " 



Nov. 6, 1838 
Dec. 4, " 
Dec. 4, " 
Jan. 1, 1839 



Oct. 1, 1839 



Aug. 10, 1840 
July 7, " 
July 7, 1841 



'• Joined. 

j July 4, 1837 

I July 4, " 

i July 4, " 

i July 4, " 

I July 4, " 

I July 4, " 

July 4, " 

July 4, " 



July 4, 183/ 
July 4, " 
July 4, " 
July 4, " 
July 4, " 
July 4, " 



Oct. 3, 1837 



Sept. 4, 1838 



July 6, 1841 
Mar. 3, 1840 



July 3, 1838 
July 3, " 

Aug. 7, 1838 



July 2, 1839 

Nov. 5, 1839 
Nov. 5, " 
Nov. 5, " 
Dec. 4, " 
Dec. 4, " 



April 7, 1840 



272 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



No. 



Namb. 



Enterkd. 



Passed. 



Raised. 



Joined. 



889 John McGourly, 

390 Samuel Holnian 

891 William Causey 

892 John Clarke, J r 

393 Frederick Kiiisinan, 

394 Benjamin Ilorrington, 

39.) Benjamin Wishart, 

39ti John B. Andrews, 

.'197 George Bond, 

398 David rowcll, 

399 Uobert Kirsop, 

400 Richard Nowlan, 

401 Daniel W. Clarke, 

402 George N. Colborne, 

403 Andrew McKenna 

404 Vornon Hanson, 

405 John Boyd Quinton, 

406 John Quinton, 

407 Hartwell B.Crosby, 

408 Daniel Jones, Jr. 

409 James Stockford, 

410 Conrad J. Hendricks, 

411 Andrew C. Otty, 

412 John Purvis 

413 Charles Robertson, 

414 Christopher Smiler, 

415 Daniel Green, Jr., 

416 Patrick Comerford, 

417 John Alexander Pope, 

418 Alexander P. Bradley , 

419 (ieorge Price, 

420 Joseph Win. Roberts, 

421 Jacob Day McDonald, 

422 William Craig, 

423 John iMurruy, 

424 Charles E. Potter,... 

425 Andrew J. Wellington 

426 Ilezekiah S. Scrlbner, 

427 James Olson, 

428 John W. Perry, 

429 Joseph Mercer, 

430 Henry P. Sancton, 

431 Gilbert R. Tucker, 

432 Richard Sands Armstrong,.. 

433 David Porter, 

434 Robert Kimpson, 

435 Louis Le Chaudelec, 

436 John P.Dunn, 

437 Sophian Neusladter, 

438 Ebenezer B. A. (j. Blakslee,. 

439 George Creighton, 

440 I William Hutchinson, Jr 

441 Charlea A.Belyea, 

412 Edward Crossland, 

443 John Harvey, 

444 Wni. Raymond Belyea, 

446 Wra. Franklin Bunting, 

446 Charles Eagles, 



Jan. 5, 1841 
Jan. 5, " 
Feb. 2, " 
Mar. 2, " 
May 4, 1841 
Sept. 7, " 
April 5, 1842 
April .5, " 



Feb. 2, 1841 
Feb. 2, " 
Mar. 2 " 
April 6, " 
June], 1841 
July 5, 1842 
May 3, " 
May 3, " 



Mar. 2, 1841 
Mar. 2, " 
I April 6, " 
July 6, " 
Aug. 2, 1841 



Nov. 1, 1842 
Dec. 6, " 
Mar. 7, 1843 
Aug. 1, " 
June 4, 1844 
Aug. (), " 
Mar. 4, 1845 
Mar. 4, " 
Mar. 4. " 
April 1, " 
May 6, " 
May 6, " 
May 0, " 
May 6, " 
Aug. 5, " 
Dec. 2, " 
Feb. 3, 1846 
Feb. 3, " 
Feb. 3, " 
Feb. 3, " 
Mar. 3, " 
May 5, " 
Sept. 1, " 
Nov. 3, " 
Dec. 1, " 
Dec. 1, " 
Jan. 5, 1817 
Feb. 2, " 
Mai- 2, " 
April 6, " 
April 6, " 
May 3, " 
Sept, 7, " 
Sept. 7, " 
Sept. 7, " 
Oct. 5, " 



April 4, 1848 
June 16, " 
Dec. 5, " 
Nov. 9, 1849 
Mar. 5, 1850 
April 2, " 



Aug. 6, 1850 
Aug. 6, " 
Feb. 3, 1852 
Junel, " 



Dec. 6, 1842 
Feb 7, 18J3 
June 6, " 
Sept. 5, " 
July 2, 1844 
Sept. 3, " 
April 1,1815 
June 3, " 
Aug. 5, " 
May 29, " 
July 1, " 
July 1, " 
Aug. 6, " 
Nov. 4, " 
Sept. 2, " 
Feb. 3, 1846 
April 7, " 
Mar. 3, " 
April 7, " 
Mar. 3, " 
April 7, " 
June 2, " 
Oct. 6, " 
Jan. 5, 1847 
Jan. 5, " 
Jan. 5, " 
Jan. 4, 1848 
Mar. 2, 1847 
April 6, " 
Aug. 27, " 
May 3, " 
July 6, " 
Nov. 2, " 
Oct. 5, " 
Dec. 7, " 
Nov. 2, " 



May 2, 1848 
July 14, " 
Jan. 2, 1819 
Dec. 9, " 
April 2, 1860 
May 7, " 



June 7, 1842 
June 7, " 



Sept. £, 1850 
Sept. 7, " 
Mar. 2, 1852 
July 6, " 



Feb. 7, 1843 
April 4, " 
Aug. 1, " 
Nov. 7, " 
Aug. 6, 1M44 
Oct. 1, " 
May 29, 1845 
Aug. 19, " 
Oct. 7, " 
July I, " 
Aug. 19, " 
Oct. 7, " 
Oct. 7, 
Dec. 2, " 
Oct. 7, " 
Mar. 19, 1846 
Oct. 6, " 
April 7, " 
Oct. 20, " 
June 1, 1847 
May 5, 1846 
Aug. 4, " 
April 6, 1817 
Feb. 2, " 
Feb. 2, " 
Feb. 2, " 
Mar. 7, 18t8 
April 6, 1847 
May. a, " 



July 6, 1847 
Aug. 27, " 
Dec. 7, " 
Nov. 2, " 
Jan. 4, 1848 
Dec. 7, 1847 
Jan. 4, 1848 
June 6, " 
July 21, " 
April 3, 1849 



May 7, 1850 
July 2, " 



Nov. 5, 1850 
Nov. 5, " 
April 12, 1852 
Aug. 17, " 



Oct. 6. - -40 



Nov. 1, 1842 



April 2, 1850 



MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



273 



Namr. 



Enterkd. 



Passed. 



Raised. 



William C. Leonard, „. 

George Lynani 

William Bell 

James Cicrow, 

.1 ami's JuhiiBon, 

William E. .Stronach, 

Thomas H. Ellison 

Patrick Gallagher, 

Henry W. Baldwin, 

Bobert Graham Crozier, 

James Portmore, 

Henry F. Perley, 

Thomas Cameron, 

Robert Scott, 

William Brown, 

Joseph Sullivan, 

James W. Montgomery,.... 

John Hastings , 

William H. Hooper 

Francis E. Ketchum 

Samuel Brown, 

John D. Short, 

George T. Leonard, 

Frederick A. Nagel, 

Gilbert M. Robinson, 

Bobert D. Robertson, 

Richard Calvert 

William J. Howard, 

John H. Sheridan 

John WilsoB, 

Bobert A. Moore, 

Jared Hepburn 

Charles E, Durkee 

William Henry Thain, 

James S. Partelow, 

Bartholomew Coxetter, 

William P. Dole 

James Knox, 

Charles F. Venning 

George B. Partelow 

Frederick Godfrey, , 

Robert Collins, 

Henry E. Bagley 

Thomas P. (jard , 

Humphrey Peel, , 

Peter Deerness 

Wm. Henry Venning 

Thomas Marter, , 

Hugh Hutchinson, 

Mark Plummcr Dole 

John Robinson, 

Thomas A. Paddock, 

Thomas A. Williams, 

Michael Langan 

Henry Brown, 

George Crofton Pottinger, 

Samuel Crocker, 

Charles Watts 



July 6, 1862 
July 6, " 
Dec. 7, " 
Dec. 28, " 
Dec. 28, " 
June?, 1853 
Sept. n, " 
Oct. 4, " 
Nov. 17, " 
Dec. 6, '' 
April 4, 1854 



April 14,1854 

April 14, " 

April 14, " 
May 2, 
July 4, 

Aug. 4, " 

Aug. 4, " 

Dec. 5, " 
Dec. 6, 

Mar. 6, 1855 

April 3, " 

April 3, " 

Junes, " 

July 12, " 

Sept. 4, " 

Oct. 10, " 



Feb. 6, 1856 
Feb. 6, " 
Feb. 5, " 
Mar. 12, " 
June 5, " 
Aug. 5, " 
Sept. 2, " 
Sept. 2, " 
Sept. 11, " 
Sept. 11, " 
Sept. 11, " 
Sept. 11, " 
Sept. 11, " 
Sept. 18, " 
Sept. 18, " 
Sept. 18, " 
Sept. 18, " 
Sept. 18, " 
Sept. 18, " 
Sept. 20, " 
Oct. 7, " 
Oct. 7, " 
Oct. 7, " 
Oct. 7, " 
Oct. 7, " 
Oct. 17, " 

Nov. 4, isae 

Nov. 20, " 



Sept. 7, 1862 
Sept. 7, " 
Jan. 4, 1853 
Feb. 1, " 



Dec. 6, 1863 



Nov. 1, 1863 
Sept. 5, 1854 

Junes, " 

May 2, " 

April 4, " 

July 4, " 

Nov. 7, " 

May 3, " 

Junes, " 

Sept. 21, " 

Sept. 5, " 

Sept. 5, " 
Jan. 2, 1856 

July 20, " 

May 1, " 

May 1, " 

May 1, " 

Aug. 7, " 

July 20, " 

Oct. 2, " 

Oct. 17, " 



Nov. 16, 1862 
Nov. 16, " 
Feb. 1, 1853 
Nov. 17, " 



Joined. 



Jan. 3, 1854 



Dec. 6, 185:! 
Nov. 19, 1855 
Jan. 14, 1864 
June 5, " 
May 3, " 
Oct. 30, " 
Jan. 15, 1866 
Sept. 6, 1854 
July 5, " 
Oct. 30, " 
Nov. 7, " 
Oct. 3, " 
Feb. 5, 1866 
Sept. 4, " 
June 6, " 
June 6, " 
June 6, " 
Oct. 2, " 
July 31, " 
Nov. 6, " 
Oct. 24, " 



Mar. 5, 1856 

Mar. 6, " 

Mar. 5, " 

Mar. 20, " 

July 1, " 

Sept. 2, " 

Nov. 20, " 

Nov. 6, " 

Oct. 17, " 

Oct. 16, " 

Oct. 16, " 

Oct. 27, " 

Oct. 17, " 
July 7, 1857 
Oct. 27, 1856 

Nov 6, " 

Oct. 17, " 

Oct. 16, " 

Oct. 16, " 

Nov. 14, " 

Nov..'>, " 

Oct. 28, " 

Nov. 13, " 



Aug. 5, 1856 
April 1, " 
April 1, " 
Mar. 27, " 
Aug. 5, " 
Oct. 1, " 
Feb. 7, 1857 
Dec. 8, 1856 
Nov. 25, " 
Nov. 14, " 
Nov. 13, " 
Deo. 2, " 
Not. 25, " 
Oct. 26, 1858 
Dec. 2, 1856 
Dec. 8, " 
Nov. 20, " 
Nov. 14, " 
Nov. 14, " 
Dec. 23, " 
Dec. .", " 
Nov. 13, " 
May 4, 1858 



Feb. 5, 1850 



Jan. 16, 1857 
Nov. 20, 1856 
Oct. 17, " 
Nov. 13, " 
Jan. 6, 1857 



Jan. 23, 1857 
Dec. 23, 1856 
Oct. 27, " 
Nov. 20, " 
Feb. 7, 1857 



274 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



No. 



Nahb. 



Entrrkd, 



Passed. 



Raised. 



Joined. 



SOS 

S06 

607 

608 

609 

610 

.•ill 

612 

613 

614 

615 

61G 

617 

618 

619 

620 

621 

622 

623 

624 

625 

626 

627 

628 

629 

680 

631 

632 

633 

634 

635 

636 

537 

638 

639 

640 

641 

642 

643 

644 

645 

646 

647 

648 

649 

650 

651 

652 

653 

654 

665 

656 

657 

658 

559 

660 

661 

662 



William Scott, Dec. 8, 1856 



John Lovitt 

George W. Williams 

Charles Pearce, 

Willlnni Lynniii 

Thoniius Uilniour, 

Thomas Giuerson 

Lynain Cann 

Wm. Brunswick Sancton,. 

Jared (ireen, 

David Shank Kerr, 

George V. Perkins 

Willimu Wc'ildurburn 

James Lupton, 

William fl. Austin, 

Frederick T. C. Burpee,.... 

Isaac Campbell, 

Joseph C. Wallace, 

George F. Tyrell, 

Edmund B. Holmes, 

John John.ston, 

Andrew Johnston, 

William R. Neptune, 

Charles K. Luckie, 

William B.White, 

James Hunter, 

James Melville, 

William H. Suli.s, 

John J. Joslin 

James F. Nlcholls 

William Hetherington, 

James Israel Fellows, 

Stephen Gerow Bunting,.... 

William B. Spiller, 

William Street Berton, 

John Stone, 

Albert Hartt, 

Fraser Olson Luckie, 

John R. Smith, 

Frederick E. Fuge, 

Frederick James, 

Jas. McGregor Grant, 

Henry Fletcher, 

William Hartshorne 

George Lord, 

Guilford S. Reed, 

Albert Armstrong, 

William Lunn, 

George Bingham , 

Robert Baxter, 

Ebenezer McNichol, 

,Iohn Middleton, 

Joseph Thomp.son, 

Mo.ses W. Fiske, 

William F. Cutter, 

Charles Moore, 

Th'Muas Curtis, 

George A. DeForest, 



Dec. 23, " 
Jan. 6, 18 7 
Jan. 6, " 
Jan. 6, " 
Feb. 3, 1857 
Feb. 7, " 
Feb. 21, " 
Mar. 3, " 
Mar. 3, " 



June 2, 18.57 
June 16, " 
June !6, " 
June 16, " 
June 16, " 
July 7, " 
July 7, " 
July 15, " 
July 15, " 
July 15, " 
July 15, " 
Aug. 4, " 
Aug 8, " 
Sept. 1, " 
Oct. 6, " 
Oct. 6, " 
Dec. 15, " 
May 4, 1858 
May 4, " 
May 18, " 
May 18, " 
June 1, " 
Juuel, " 
July 6, " 
Aug. 5, " 
Aug. 5, " 
Sept. 10, " 
Sept. 17, " 
Oct. 5, " 
Oct. 22, " 



Dec. 15, 1836 
Jan. 16, 1857 
Jan. 16, " 
Feb. 3, " 
Feb. 3, " 
Aug. 18, 1865 
Feb. 14, 1857 



April 7, 18.57 
April 7, " 



Nov. 2, 1858 
Nov. 2, " 
Nov. 2, " 
Deo. 7, " 
Jan. 4, 1859 



Mar. 1, 1859 

Mar. 16, " 

July 5, " 

July 5, " 

Aug. 2, " 

Aug. 12, " 

Aug. 12, " 

Sept. 6, " 

Oct. 4. " 

Nov. 1, " 



July 7, 1857 

July 15, " 

July 15, " 

July 15, " 

July 15, " 

Aug. 4, " 

Aug. 4, " 

Aug. 24, " 

Aug. 24, " 

Aug. 24, " 

Aug. 24, " 

Sept. 1, " 

Aug. 17, " 

Nov. 3, " 

Dec. 1, " 

Nov. 3, " 

Dec. 22, " 
May 18, 1858 

June 1, " 

May 25, " 

May 25, " 

July 6, " 

July 6, " 

Aug, 3, " 

Sept. 7, " 

Sept. 7, " 

Sept. 17, " 

Oct. 22, " 

Nov. 12, " 
April 5, 1859 



Jan. 23, 1857 
Jan. 23, " 
April 7, " 
April 7, " 
Aug 25, 1865 
Feb 21,1857 



May 5, 1867 
May 6, 1857 



Dec. 7, 1858 
Mar. 1, 1859 
Dec. 7, 1858 
Jan. 4, 1859 
Jan. 14, " 



April 5, 1859 
Mar. 23, " 
Aug. 2, " 
Aug. 2, " 
Sept. 6, " 
Aug 19, " 
Aug. 19, " 
Feb. 17, 1860 
Nov. 1, 1859 
Dec, 6. " 



Aug. 8, 1857 
Aug. 17, " 
Aug 17, " 
Aug. 17, " 
Aug. 8, " 
Sei)t. 1, " 
Sept.], " 
Sept 1, " 
Sept. . " 
Oct. 6, " 
Oct. 6, " 
Oct. 6, " 
Aug. 24, " 
Dec. 1, 
Jan. 5, 1858 
Nov. 14, 1857 
Jan. 5, 1858 
May 25, " 
July 6, " 
June 1, " 
Junel, " 
Aug. 3, " 
Aug. 3, " 
Sept. 10, " 
Oct. 26, " 
Oct. 8, " 
Sept. 24, " 
Dec. 23, " 
Dec. 23, " 



April 7, 1857 



Jan. 14, 1859 
April 5, " 
Jan 14, " 
Feb. 1, " 



May 3, 18.59 
April 5, " 
Oct. 4, " 
Jan. 3, 1860 
Oct. 4, 1859 



Nov. 2, 1868 



Mar. 1, 1859 



Feb. 24, 1860 
Dec. 23, 1859 
Dec. 23, " 



MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



275 



No. 



Name. 



Entered, 



Passed. 



Raised. 



Joined. 



Albert Dow Roop 

Samuel Woodbury, 

Henry IToulc, 

Adam Ni.v, 

Robert K. Allan, 

John Gilmour Sharp,.... 

John Thomas, Jr 

Charles H. Tucker 

Henry M. Pavis, 

Ross Woodrow, 

George J. Sulis 

John Price, 

Edward P. Furlong, 

Richard Crumble, 

Frederick Leavltt, 

James Gordon Forbes,... 

Bartlett Covill, 

Rev. Neil .McKay 

Jacob D. Underbill, 

Richard H. Atkinson,.... 

Robert Moore, 

James S. Hopkins, 

Thomas Hustiu 

James S. May, 

Charles K. Burnham, 

Thomas O. Sandall 

William H. Lester, 

John Baxter, 

Alfred M. Dinsmore, 

Patrick M. Parkinson, 

Edward E. Lockhart,.... 

Joshuas. Turner 

William W. Ansley, 

Francis W. Clear, 

Alfred W. Savary, 

Frederick P. Robinson, .. 

George Stewart, 

James Higgins, 

David W. Turner, 

John J. Dyer, 

James M. Smith, 

George T. Flewelling, 

Samuel F. Matthews, 

Augustus O. W. Routch, . 

William H. Whalley 

Robert Flnlay, 



Nov. 1,1859 
Dec. 6, " 
Feb. 7, 1860 
Mar. 6, " 
May 1, " 
Junes, " 
Julys, " 
Aug. 17, " 
Sept. 17, " 
Sept. 17, " 
Oct. 30, " 
Nov. 6, " 



Jan. 3, 1860 
Feb. 7, " 
Mar. 6, " 
May 1, " 
June 6, " 



Sept. 3, 1861 
Oct. 1, " 
Jan. 7, 1862 
Jan. 7, " 
Feb. 4, '• 
Feb. 4, " 
Feb. 4, " 
Feb. 24, " 
Feb. 24, " 
Mar. 4, " 
Mar. 4, " 
Mar. 4, " 
Mar, 4, " 
Mar. 18, " 
Mar. 18, " 
Mar. 18, " 
April 1, " 
April 14," 
May 6, " 
May 6, " 
May 6, " 
June 3, " 
Jan. 6, 1863 
Jan. 6, " 
Mar. 3, " 
June 2, " 
July 7, " 
July 7, " 
July 7, " 



Aug. 4, 1863 
Aug. 4, " 
Aug.4, " 



Aug 17, 1860 
Sept. 17, " 
Sept. 25, " 
Nov. 6, " 
Nov. 6, " 
Dec. 4, " 



Oct, 1, 1801 
Nov. 5, " 
Feb. U, 1862 
Nov. 4, " 
Mar. 4, " 
Mar. 18, " 
Mar. 4, " 
Jan. 6, 18G3 
Mgr. 4, 1862 
April 14, " 
Sept. 2, " 
April 1, « 
April 1, " 
Nov. 4, " 
Nov. 4, " 
Oct. 2, " 
Junes, " 
May 3, 1864 
Aug. 5, 1862 
June 3, " 
June 3, " 



Feb. 7, 1860 
Jan. 1, 1861 
April 3, 1860 
July 3, " 
July 3, " 



Sept. 26, 1860 
Oct. 30, " 
Oct. 2, " 
April 2, 1861 
Nov. 13, 1860 
Feb. 6, 1861 



Feb. 13, 1862 
Dec. 3, 1861 
April 7, 1862 



April 7, 1862 
Nov, 4, " 
April 7, " 
Feb. 12, 1863 



Feb. 12, 1862 

Nov. 4, " 

May 16, " 

May 16, " 

Dec. 2, " 

Dec. 2, " 

Nov. 4, " 

July 1, " 



May 7, 1861 



Feb. 3, 1863 
Feb. 3, " 
April 7, " 
July 14, " 
July 14, " 
July 14, " 
Aug. 15, " 



Aug. 15, 1863 
Aug. 15, " 
Oct. 6, " 



reb. 12, 1863 
Aug. 5, 1862 
July 1, " 



Mar. 3, 1863 
Mar. 3, " 
Ap.il .=;, 1867 
Aug. 22. 1S6.> 
July 21, •' 
Sept. 1, " 



Aug. 22, 1863 
Aug. 22, " 
Dec. 15, " 



Aug. 4, 1863 



B 



276 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



CONTINUED ROLL OF MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE, No. 436, 
ON THE REGISTRY OF ENGLAND, 

From August 4th, 1863, when the Number was Changed by 
Order op the Grand Lodge. 



No. 



609 
610 
611 
612 
613 
614 
615 
616 
617 
618 
fM19 
620 
621 
622 
623 
624 
626 
626 
627 
628 
629 
630 
631 
632 
633 
634 
635 
636 
637 
638 
639 
040 
641 
642 
64S 
644 
645 
646 
647 
643 
649 
650 
661 
662 
653 
654 
669 
656 
657 



Name. 



Enterkd. 



Passed. 



Raised. 



Joined. 



Samuel Austin, 

John White, 

.Joseph C. Hatheway, 

Abraham E. Mundce, 

William Dunlavy, 

George Nice, 

(5eorge Francis Preble, 

Robert Burns, 

Alexander W. Paterson, 

John G. Parker, 

Rev. Thos. Geo. Johnstone,. 

Henry Lynn, 

Oscar E. Doolittlc, 

John Koss, 

Rev. Thomas Powers, 

Rev. Geo. Johnstone Caie,., 

Rol)ert Thomson, Jr., 

John Livingston, 

James Philps, 

Samuel Wright Golding 

John Sweet, 

Charles H. Chandler, 

Alfred Lordly, 

John Soper, 

George W. Fletcher, 

William H.Gilliatt, 

William P. Hutchinson,.... 
James W. Montgomery,.... 
Joseph Lordly Bunting,.... 
James Philip Scott, 

Robert Leonard, 

John W. Mooro, 

George E. R. Burpee, 

James Alexander, 

William Hazlehurst 

Robert E. Ferguson 

Benbow B. Ferguson, 

David Mcl^ellan, 

Robert 1). Davis 

Thomas Henry I/ynn, 

Frederick Miles Hancock,. 

Charles A. Estey 

John F. Taylor, 

Samuel A. Dixon, 

William Herbert SInnott, . 

George E. Barnhill 

William J. Davidson 

James H, Robinson, 

Nathan Green, 



Oct. 6, 1863 
Oct. 6, " 
Dec.], " 
Jan. 5, 1804 
Mar. 1, " 
Mar. 1, " 
Sept. C, " 
Jan. 3, 1863 
Feb. 7, " 



Jan. 27, 1866 

July 4, " 

July 21, " 

Aug. 1, " 

Oct. 3, " 

Oct. 3, " 

Oct. 3, " 

Oct. 3, " 

Nov. 7, " 

Nov. 7, " 

Dec. 5, " 

Dec. 6, " 

Dec. 5, " 

Dec. 5, " 



Nov. 3, 1863 
Nov. 3, " 
Jan. 5, 1S64 
Mar. 1, " 
April 5, " 
Aprils, " 
Nov. ,1 " 
Feb. 7, 18G5 
May 2, " 



Dec. 22, 1865 
Dec. 22, " 
Jan. 2, 1866 
Aprils, " 
Aprils, " 
Aprils, " 



M8yl,18G6 
June 26, " 
Aug. 7, " 
Aug. 7, " 
Aug. 7, " 
Sept. 4, " 
Oct. 2, " 
Nov. 6, " 
Nov. G, " 
Dec. 4, " 
Dec. 4, " 
Dec. 4, " 
Mar.5, 18G7 
Mar. 5, " 
Mar.5, " 
Mar.5, " 
Mar. 5. " 



June 26, 1866 
Aug. 18, 18G5 
Aug. 18, " 
Sept. 6, " 
Nov. 28, " 
Oct. 13. " 
Oct. 13, " 
Nov. 28, " 
Dec. 15, " 
Nov. 28, " 
Jan. 16, 1866 
.Tan. 2, " 
'an. 2, " 
Dec. 15, 1865 



April 22, 1864 
Dec. 15, 1863 
Feb. 2, 1864 
April 22, " 
May 3, " 
May.% " 
Dec. G, " 
Mar. 7, 18G5 
April 17, 1866 



April 17, 1866 
Jan. 2, " 
Jan. 16, " 
May 15, " 
June 5, " 
May 15, " 



June 26, 1866 
Julys, " 
Oct. 30, " 
Sept. 25, " 
Sept. 26, " 
Dec. 18, " 
Oct. 30, " 
.Ian. 1, 18G7 
De<!. 18, 1KG6 
Jan. 1, 18G7 
Feb. 5, " 
Jan. 1, " 
April 2, " 
April 2, " 
April 2, " 
April 2, " 
April 2, " 



July 3, 1866 
Oct. 13, 1865 
Aug. 25, " 
Oct. 13, " 
Jan. 16, 18G6 
Oct. 20, 18G5 
Oct. 20, " 
May 15, 1866 
Jan. 16, " 
Dec. 15, 1865 
Mar. 6, 1866 
Feb. 6, " 
April 17, " 
Dec. 22, 1865 



July 3, 1866 
Jan. 16, " 
April 17, " 
July 17, " 
Sept. 25, " 
July 17, " 



Oct. 30, 1866 

Dec. 18, 1SG8 
Oct. SO, " 
Oct. 30, " 
Feb. 6, 1867 
Dec. 18, 1866 
Feb 5, 1867 
Feb. -., " 
Feb. 5, " 
Mar. 19, " 
Feb. 6, " 
April. 30," 
April 30," 
April 30," 
May 7, " 
April 30," 



Mar. 7, 1865 



Dec. 15, 1866 



April S, 1866 



MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



m 



No. 


Name. 


Entered. 


Passed. 


Raised. 


JOINKD. 


658 
659 
660 
661 
662 
663 
664 
665 
666 


Henry G. Hunt, 

Joseph Read, 

Thomas Hutchinson, 

Frederick M, Berryman, 

Henry H. Gardner, 

Thomas IJennett, 

Horatio N. H. Lugrin, 

.TiiIph O T... AIorn./n.iii 


May 7, 1867 
June 4, " 
June 4, " 
July 2, " 
July 9, " 
July 23, " 
July 23, " 


June 4, 18f)7 
July 2, " 
July 2, " 
July 9, ' 
July 30, " 
July 30, " 
July 30, " 


July 16, 1867 
Aug. fi, •' 
Aug. fi, " 
July 16, " 
Aug. fi, " 
Aug. fi, " 
Aug. 6, " 
















Aug. 6, 1867 


Edgar C. Baker 


Oct. 1,1867 


Oct. 29, 1857 


Nov. 5, 1807 



CONTINUED ROLL OF MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE, No, 2, 
REGISTRY OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 



No. I 

667 
668 
669 
670 
671 
672 
673 
674 
675 
676 
677 
678 
679 
680 
681 
682 
683 
684 
685 
686 
687 
688 
689 
690 
691 
692 
693 
694 
695 
696 
697 
698 
699 
700 
701 
702 
703 
704 
705 
706 
707 



Naub. 



Entered. 



John Sandall, Jr., 

William O. Treadwell, 

Bela U. Lawrence, 

Abijah H. Eaton, 

James Maxwell, 

Canby Ilatheway, 

Edward L. Berteaux, 

John Brewing, 

David M. Vaughan, 

Robert Moftat, 

Edward Manning 

Hiram G. Betts 

Edward J Jfoss, 

Benjamin Hunt 

George P. Johnston, 

Melbourne W. Sinnott, 

Percival L. Lewin, 

Alex. Miles Seely, 

Charles H. Bass, 

John Newtoi< Wilson, 

Thomas (iilltert Hunt 

William Hartt Crozier, 

Matthew Wilson, 

Augustus P. Kolph, 

Edward L. Goodrich, 

John King, , 

Moses V. Barbour, 

Samuel A. Kinne, 

Frank W. White, 

JamcH Holly 

Frederick G. .S. Fiti!|)atrick, 

Arthur Paget Owen, 

Frederick C. Wakefield 

Frederick A. Borteaux, 

John Kussell Armstrong,... 

John T. C. McKean, 

Thoma."* Kinlay, 

John Allingham, 

William I). Weribner, 

Charles W. (Jodsoe, 

Samuel J. Golding, 



Nor. 5, 18';7 
Dec. 3, " 



April 7, 1868 
May 5, " 
June 2, " 
June 2, " 
Aug. 4, " 
Nov. 3, " 
Dec. 1, " 
Jan. 5, 1869 
Jan. 6, " 
Feb. 2, 1869 
Mar. 2, " 
Mar. 2, " 
Mar. 2, " 
Mar. 19, " 
June 11, " 
June 21, " 
Aug. 3, " 
Oct. 5, " 



Passed 

Jan. 7, 1868 
Jan. 6, " 



Jan. 4, 1870 
Mar. 1, " 
Mar. 1, " 
Aprils, " 



May 15, 1868 
May 1.5, " 
July 7, " 
July 7, " 
Dec. 1, " 
Dec. 1, " 
Dec. 7, 1869 
Feb. 2, " 
Feb. 2, " 
Feb. 3, 1875 
Mar. 12, 1869 
Mar. 12, " 
Mar. 12, " 
Mar. 30, " 
June 21, " 
Oct. 5, " 
Oct. 5, " 
Jan. 4, 1870 
Dec. 7, 1809 
Feb. 1, 1870 
Aprils, " 
Aprils, " 
May 3, " 



May 16, 1870 
June 7, " 
June 7, " 
Aug. 2, " 
Aug. 2, " 
Dee. 6, " 
Dee. 0, " 
Jan. 3, 1871 
Mar. 7, " 
April 4, " 
April I, " 
April 4, " 
April 4, " 
May 2, " 



April 4,1871 
July 5, 1870 
Julys, " 
Nov 1, " 
Aug. 23, " 
Feb. G, 1872 
Sept. 7, 1875 
Keb. 7, 1871 
April 4, " 
May 2, " 
May 2, " 
May 2, " 
May 2, " 
Feb. 6, 1872 



Raised 

Feb 4, 1868 
Feb. 4, " 



July 7, 18G8 
May 20, " 
Aug. 4, " 
Aug. 4, " 
Mar. 2, 1869 
Feb. 2, " 
May 3^1870 
Mar. 2, 181)9 
Mar. 2, " 
Mar. 16, 1875 
Mar. 19, 1S69 
Mar. 19, " 
Mar. 19, " 
April 6, " 
Oct. 19, " 
Oct. 19, " 
Nov. 2, " 
Mar. 2, 1870 
.Mar. 2, " 
Mar. 2, " 
May 3, " 
May 3, " 
Julys, " 



April t2, 1871 
Aug. 2, 1870 
Aug. 2, " 
Mar. 7, 1871 
Sept. 0, 1870 



.Sept. 15, 1876 
Mar. 7, 1871 
May 30, " 
May 30, " 
May 30, " 
May 30. " 
May 30, " 
Mar. S, 1872 



Joined. 



Dec. 3, 1867 



Dec. 7, 1869 



Jun« 7, 1870 



278 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



No. 



Name. 



Entered. 



Passed. 



Raised. 



Joined. 



708 George Henry Clark, 

709 i George L. McKean, 

710 I William Maeara Sears, .... 

711 William R. Melville 

712 John J. Forrest, 

713 Charles Inches, 

714 James Sidney Kay e, 

715 Joseph E. Arrowsmith,.... 

716 John Alexander, 

717 Frederick S. Williams, .... 

718 John S. McLaren, 

719 George H. Vlieland, 

720 Alexander Pat erson, 

721 William C. Allen 

722 Inglesby Wickins, , 

723 William H. B. Sadleir 

724 Thomas W. Lacey, 

725 Charles McAlpine, 

726 George Black Hegan 

727 Robert N. Moir, 

728 John Purdy Belts, 

729 Frederick Sandall, 

730 Thomas Stothart, 

731 Albert Harrison, 

732 George Wiu. Shamper 

733 1 John Buchanan, 

734 ; Daniel Morrisow, 

735 ! James McArthur, 

736 I Charles John VVilln, 

737 j John B. Sears, 

738 LeBaron Botsford, 

739 Robert Dhu MacDonald, ., 

740 Walter Weir Welsh, 

741 Edward O'Brien 

742 Arthur Isaac Trueraan, ... 

743 John Henry Wickett 

744 John Wilson, 

745 Charles W. Starkey, 

746 John W. Daniel , 

747 Alban Thomas, 

748 Alfred J. Champion 

749 Rev. Donald Macrae, 

750 Henry Brockington, 

751 George Cormack, 

752 John McAllister, 

758 William J. Ross 

764 Louis Green, 

755 James A. McKeen, 

766 Alexander McCausland,.., 

767 Charles U. S. Johnston, ... 

768 Rol)ert Robertson, Jr., 

769 Matthew Wallace 

760 Joseph Cox, 

761 Richard J. Foxwell, 

762 Craven L. BetU, 

763 Arthur Wellington Sharp, 

764 Edwin Sears, 

766 Rev George Armatrong,... 



June 6, 1871 
July 4, " 
July 4, " 
Aug.l, " 
Sept. 5, " 
Oct. 3, " 
Dec. 5, " 
Jan. 2, 1872 
Feb. G, " 
.Mar. 6, " 



June 4, 1872 
June 4, " 



Sept 3, 1872 
Sept 3, " 
Sept. 3, " 
Sept. 3, " 
Oct. 1, " 



April 1,1873 
April 1, " 
April 1, " 
May 6, " 
Junes, " 



Oct. 1, 1873 
Nov. 4, " 
Nov. 4, " 
Feb. 3, 1874 
Feb. 3, " 
Mar. 3, " 
Mar. 3, " 
Mar. 3, " 
May 6, « 



July 7, 1874 
July 7, " 



Sept. 1, 1874 
Sept. 1,. " 



Nov. 3, 1874 
Nov. 3, » 



Feb. 2, 1875 
Feb. 2, " 
Mar. 2, " 
Mar. 2, " 



April 6, 1876 
Aug. 3, " 
Jan. 4, 1876 
Jan. 4, " 
Mar. 7, " 
June 6, " 
June 6, " 



Aug. 1, 1871 
Nov. 7, " 
Aug.l, " 
Sept. 5, " 
Sept. 28, " 
Nov. 7, " 
Feb 6, 1872 
Feb. 6, " 
May 7, " 
April 2, " 



July 2, 1872 
July 2, " 



Sept. 12, 1872 
Nov. 5, " 
Nov. 5, " 
Sept. 12, " 
Aug. 5, 1873 



Mar. 6, 1873 
May H, " 
Junes, " 
June 3, " 
July 1, " 



Nov. 4, 1873 
Dec. 2, " 
Dec. 2, " 
Feb. 17, 1874 
Mar. 3, " 
April 7, " 
May 5, " 
Sept. 2, 1879 
June 2, 1874 



Aug. 4, 1874 
Mar. 16, 1875 



Oct. 6, 1874 
Nov. S, " 



Dec. 1, 1874 
Dec. 1, " 



Mar. 16, 1875 
Mar. 16, " 
April 6, " 
April 6, " 



May 4, 1876 
Dec. 7, " 
Mar. 7, 1876 
Mar. 7, " 
April 4, " 
July 4, " 
July 4, " 



Aug. 29, 1871 
April 15, 1873 
Aug. 29, 1871 
Oct. 3, " 
Nov. 7, " 
Dec. 5, " 
Mar. 5, 1872 
Mar. 6, " 
Aug. 6, " 
May 7, " 



Sept. 20, 1872 
Aug. 6, " 



Sept. 20, 1872 
Dec 3, " 
Dec. 3, " 
Sept. 20, " 
Sept. 2, 1873 



July 1, 1873 
.luly 1, " 
July 1, " 
July 1, " 
Nov. 18, " 



Jan. 20, 1874 

Jan. 20, " 

Jan. 20, " 

Feb. 24, " 
Mar. 10, " 

.May 15, " 

June 2, " 



July 7, 1874 



Oct. 6, 1874 



Nov. 17, 1874 
Dec. 15, " 



Feb. 16, 1878 
Feb. 16, " 



Nov. 2, 1875 
May 18, " 
May 18, " 
Sept. 6, " 



Junel, 1875 
Feb. 1,1876 
April 4, " 
April 4, " 
May 2, " 
Sept. 22, " 
Aug.l, " 



May 7, 1872 
July 2, 1872 



Dec. 3, 1872 



July 1, 1873 



July 7, 1874 



Sept. 1, 1874 



Oct. 6, 1874 
Feb. 2, 1876 



Mar. 2, 1875 



June 11, 1876 



MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



m 



No. 



Name. 



Entered, 



Isaac M. McDowall 

James Aberd Bailey, 

Arthur Everitt, 

William H. Parlee, 

Nathaniel W. Brenaii, 

Mathias Mathieson, 

George A. Henderson, 

John Thomas, 

George Herbert Fulton 

Henry IjOuis Green, 

Park Allan Melville, 

Wilson Lowry Dobbin, 

Henry S Bridges, 

Benson M. Dixon, 

George B. B. Ketchum, 

George F. Burpee, 

Charles O. Wickenden, 

William Robert May, 

Maximillian M. Sterne 

Frederick Uobinson, 

Benjamin Lester Peters, , 

Robert H. B. Tennant, 

George Price, 

Henry M. Hamilton, 

Neil McKellar, 

John Young McDermott,.... 

Peter W. Snider, 

John Lawson, 

Martin Bodes 

Rev. William M. Weeks, 

Robert McLeod, 

Mitchell J. Cameron, 

William L. Penney, , 

David H. Waterbury 

Jamas Guilford Barnes, 

Samuel Morrison 

Herv.an Robert Melville, .... 

James Jackson Dugard 

Thomas Newton Vincent, .. 

Andrew F. Kenney, 

William Alexander Ewing,. 

James Sutherland, 

Charles Augustus Harris,.. 

Rol)ert C. Thome, 

James Wra. Fitzpatrick, 

George A. Hetherington,.... 

George M. D. Barnes, 

Joseph (traves Bond, 

George Arrowsmith 

John Rowlandson Gillis,... 

Frederick McLellan, 

Richard Ward Thome, 

Joseph Herlwrt Wright, 

Richard Heans, 

Solomon Green, 

Ezekiel Mallory Sipprell,.... 

Solomon Rubin, 

Charles Henry Wilson, 



Passed. 



Raised. 



Joined. 



Oct. 3,187fi 
Mar. 6, 1877 
Mar. 6, " 



Sept. 4, 1877 
Jan. 22, 1878 
Feb. 5, " 
Feb. 5, " 
Feb. 5, " 
Mar. 5, " 
Mar. 5, " 
June 4, " 
Oct. 1, " 
Oct. 1, " 
Dec. 3, " 
Dec. 17, " 
Jan. 4, 1879 
Feb. 18, " 
Feb. 18, " 
Aug. 5, " 



July 6, 1880 
July 6, " 



July 5, 1881 



Jan. 24, 1882 
Feb. 10, " 
May 2, " 



Aug. 1,1882 
Sept. 4, 1883 
Nov. 6, " 
Dec. 31, " 
May G, 1884 
May 6, " 
June 3, " 
Aug.,% " 
Sept. 19, " 
Oct. 7, " 



Feb. 3, 1885 
May 2, " 
April 6, 1886 



Nov. •->, 1886 



Fob. 1,1887 
Mar, 1, " 
Oct, 4, " 
Oct. 4, " 
Feb. 7, 1888 
Aug. 7, " 



Nov. 7, 1876 
April 3, 1877 
April 3, " 



Oct. 2, 1,S77 
Feb. 15, 1878 
April 2, " 
Feb. 15, " 
April 2, " 
April 2, " 
.rtpril2, " 
July 2, " 
Nov. 5, " 
Nov. 5, " 
Feb. 4, 1879 



May 6, 1879 
Feb. 3, 1880 
Apri 1, 1879 



Aug. 3, 1880 
Aug. 3, " 



Jan. 24, 1882 



Jan. 31,1882 
Feb. 17, " 
July 4, " 



Sept. 5, 1882 
Nov 6, 1883 
Dec. 18, " 
Jan. 3, 1888 
June 17, 1884 
April 6, 1886 
June 24, 1884 
Sept. 2, " 
April 24, 1885 
Nov. 4, 1884 



Mar. 3, 1885 
May 9, " 
May 4, 1886 



Doc. 7, 1886 



April 5, 1887 
Aug. 2, " 
Nov. 1, " 
Mnr. 6, 1888 
Feb. 15, " 
Sept. 4, " 



Dec. 5, 1876 
Junes, 1877 
June 5, " 



Dec. 4, 1877 
Feb. 26, 1878 
May 7, " 
Feb. 26, " 
May 7, " 
May 7, " 
May 7, " 
Aug. 6, " 
Dec. 17, " 
.Mar. 4, 1879 
Mar. 4, " 



June 3, 1879 
Mar. 2, 1880 
May 6, 1879 



Sept. 7, 1880 
Sept. 7, " 



Feb. 10, 1882 



Feb. 10, 1882 
Mar. 17, " 
Oct. 3, " 



Oct. 3, 18S2 
Mar. 4, 1884 
Feb. 5, " 
Jan. 11, 1888 
July 22, 1884 
June 7, 1880 
May 5, 1885 
Oct. 21, 1884 
Oct. 5, 1886 
Dec. 2, 1884 



April 7, 1885 
May 8, 1886 
May 14, " 



May 3, 1887 



May 3, 1887 
Sept. 6, " 
Dec. 6, " 
Nov. 6, 1888 
Aug. 21, " 
Oct. 2, " 



July 3, 1877 



Dec. 2, 1879 



Mar. 1, 1881 

Aug. 2, 1881 
Dec. 6, " 
Dec. 6, " 



June 6, 1851'f 
July 4, " 



Oct. 21, 1884 
Oct. 21, " 
Jan. 6, 1885 



May 4, 1886 
Feb. 1, 1887 



280 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



No. 


Name. 


Entered. 


Passed. 


Raised. 


Joined. 


824 

825 

826 

827 

828 

829 

830 

831 

8H2 

833 

834 

835 

836^ 

937* 

838 

830 

840 

841 

842 

843 

R44 


Charles A. Hardy, 


Feb. 5, 1889 
April 2, " 
April 2, " 


April 2, 1889 
May 7, " 
May 7, " 


June 4, 18S9 
Juno 4, " 
June 4, " 


Mar. 5, 1889 


William Norman PeWitt, 

William James McClaverty, 






April 2, 1889 


Charles H. L. Johnston, 

Arthur Wni. McMackin 

AVilliani Alex. Gathers 

William Henry Horn, 

Alexander Wni. Macrae 

Tnmp^ W \fmif coinorv 


Oct. 1,1889 
July 28, 1890 
Aug. 5, " 
Oct. 20, " 


Nov. 5, 1889 
Oct. 20, 1890 
Sept. 2, " 
Dec, 2, " 


Dec. 3, 1889 
Dec. 30, 1890 
Nov. 4, " 
Dec. 30, " 


June 4, " 








Nov. 4, 1890 


David Faulkner Douglas 

Frederick Oliver Harvey, 

Edward Hammond Lester 

William Dunlavy 


Aug. 18, 1891 
Dec. 1, " 
Mar. 1, 1892 


Aug. 25, 1891 
May 3, 1892 
Aprils, " 






Sept 6, 1892 
Nov. 1, " 






May 3, 1892 


May 3, 1892 
June?, " 
Julys, " 
Julys, " 
Aug. 16, " 








William J. Dean, 

Arthur Ttnrrpll rwilmmir 


Julys, 1892 
Aug. 3, " 
Aug. 3, " 
Aug. 23. " 


Sept. 6, 1892 
Nov. 1, " 
Nov. 1, " 
Aug. 30, " 






Robert Duncan Smith, 

Christopher John Weldon, 

Waller Babbitt 




Jan. 3, 1893 


84.5 
846 
817 
848 
819 


Rainsford Henry Wetmore 


Mar. 7, 1893 
Mar. 7, " 
April 4, " 


Feb. 6, 1894 
May 2, 1893 
May 2, " 


Mar. 6, 1894 
June 6, 1893 
July 4, " 










PharlpQ W Rf nrkov 


April 4, 1893 










April 4, " 


ft>iQ 










May 2, " 


851 
852 


Louis Alphonse Griffiths, 

' Fred'k Ernest Flew welling, 


Aug. 1,1893 
Nov. 7, " 


Sept. 5, 1893 
Dec. 5, " 


Nov.?, 1893 
' Jan. 2, 1894 




"••V 



LIST OF MEMBERS OF ST, JOHN'S LODGE, 

From its Oboanizatiok, April 5th, 1802, to April 3rd, 1894, Alphabeti- 
cally Arranged. 

(The numbers correspond with the nuribers in the foregoing list). 



66 Abrams, William 

642 Alexander, James ' 

716 Alexander, John 

567 Allan, Robert R. 

721 Allen, William C. 

704 Allingham, John 

269 Anderson, John 

396 Andrews, John B. 

595 Ansley, William W. 

551 Armstrong, Albert 

211 Armstrong, David 

275 Armstrong, Israel 

701 Armstrong, John R. 

765 Armstrong, Rev. George 

432 Armstrong, R. Sands 

814 Arrowsmith, Cieorge 

715 Arrowsmith, Joseph E. 

327 Atchison, James 

582 Atkinson, Richard H. 

609 Austin, Samuel 

519 Austin. William H. 

844 Babbitt, Walter 

489 Bagley, Henry E. 

767 Bailey, James A. 

355 Bainbridge, George 

666 Baker, Edgar C. 

455 Baldwin, Henry W. 

359 Barbour, Matthew 

693 Barbour, Moses C. 

347 Barbour, Robert 

812 Barnes, George M. D. 

800 Barnes, James G. 

654 Barnhili, George E. 

130 Barr, John 

91 Barr, William 

685 Bass, Charles H. 

198 Bates, Thomas 

828 Bauer, Archibald 

590 Baxter, John 

554 Baxter, Robert 



794 Bedes, Martin 

343 Bell, James 

337 Bell, Joseoh 

449 Bell, William 

441 Relyea, Charles A. 

444 Belyea, William Raymond 

663 Bennett, Thomas 

661 Berryman, Frederick M. 

673 Berteaux, Edward L. 
700 Berteaux, Frederick A. 
539 Berton, William Street 
762 Betts, Craven L. 

678 Betts, Hiram G. 

728 Betts, John Purdy 

324 Beverley, John 

144 Bibber, Warren 

553 Bingham, Geo^'ge 

8 Blackwood, George 

42 Blair, Peter 

438 Blakslee, Eben. B. A. G. 

397 Bond, George 

813 Bond, Joseph G. 

167 Bonnell, George 

289 Bookwood, William 

738 Botsford, LeBaron 

31 Bourdett, Oliver 

155 Bowyer, John 

283 Boyd, Thomas 

284 Bradbury, Simeon 
129 Bradbury, William 
418 Bradley, Alexander P. 
134 Branscomb, William 
770 Brenan, Nathaniel W. 

674 Brewing, John 
778 Bridges, Henry S. 
323 Broadbrook, George 
750 Brockington, Henry 
265 Brotherson, G. P. 
322 Brown, Charles 

371 Brown, Charlea 



282 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



214 Brown, David 

154 Brown, Dexter 

601 Brown, Henry 

382 Brown, John S. 

467 I5rown, Samuel 

461 Brown, William 

733 Buclian;ni, John 

637 Bunting, Jos. Lordly 

537 Bunting, Stephen G. 

445 Bunting, Wra. Franklin 

687 Burnham, Charles E. 

616 Burns, Robert 

620 Burpee, Frederick T. C. 

641 Burpee, George E. R. 

781 Burpee, George F. 

685 Bustin, Thomas 

335 Byrani, Oliver 

624 Caie, Rev. George J. 

344 Calvert, Richard 

473 Calvert, Richard 

243 Campbell, Charles 
74 Campbell, George 

521 Campbell, Isaac 

247 Campbell, James 

146 Campbell, John 

172 Campbell, John 

285 Campbell, John M. 

244 Campbell, Samuel 
11 Campbell, William 

797 Cameron, Mitchell 

459 Cameron, Thomas 

185 Cameron, William 

512 Cann, Lyman 

97 Carnes, Henry 

272 Carvill, George L. 

192 Carvill, Lewis 

375 Cassidy, John 

831 Cathers, William A. 

391 Causey, William 
748 Champion, Alfred J. 
630 Chandler, Charles H. 
234 Charlton, William 
264 Chevely, George 
288 Chew, William 

372 Chipman, John C. 

128 Chubb, Henry 

401 Clarke, Daniel W. 

392 Clarke, John, Jr. 
70 Clarke, John S. 



85 Clarke, Joseph 

72 Clarke, Robert 

280 Clark, George 

379 Clark, George 

708 Clark, George H. 

297 Ciark, Jolin 

596 Clear, Francis W. 

215 Cobb, Samuel 

173 Cock, William R. 

402 Colborne, George N. 

278 Cole, John 

360 Coleman, John 

101 Collins, Robert 

488 Collins, Robert 

416 Comerford, Patrick 

262 Condi e, James 

21 1 Cookson, Rev. James 

340 Corbitt, William James 

751 Cormack, George 

579 Covin, Bartlett 

482 Coxetter, Bartholomew 

760 Cox, Joseph 

422 Craig, William 

439 Creigliton, George 

202 Crispan, James 

603 Crocker, Samuel 

57 Cronk, David 

407 Crosby, Hartwell B. 

442 Crossland, Edward 

456 Crozier, Robert G. 

688 Crozier, William Hartt 

576 Crumbie, Richard 

277 Cunard, Robert 

61 Currie, John 

561 Curtis, Thomas 

559 Cutter, William F. 

227 Daglish, Joseph S. 

191 Dallas, John A. 

825 Damery, Charles 

746 Daniel, John W. 

655 Davidson, William J. 

671 Davis, Henry M. 

647 Davis, Robert D. 

233 Day, George 

6 Dean, John 

840 Dean, William J. 

126 Decker, Israel 

218 Deering, Patrick 

492 Deerncss, Peter 



MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



283 



662 DeForest, George A. 

268 DeForest, Silas 

287 Devereux, Patrick 

839 DeVine, Frederick 

826 DeWitt, William N. 

64 Dick, John 

171 Dimsdale, JoMes 

69^ Dinsraore, Alfred M. 

40 Disbrow, Noah 

779 Dixon, Benson M. 

652 Dixon, Samuel A. ' 

132 Doane, Isaac 

777 Dobbin, Wilson L. 

496 Dole, Mark Plummer 

483 Dole, William P. 

27 Donaldson, John 

37 Donaldson, William 

380 Donnelly, David 

621 Doolittle, Oscar E. 

82 Doucett, Charles 

835 Douglas, David F. 

136 Downie, John 

76 Downing, John 

803 Dugard, James Jackson 

190 Duncan, William 

100 Dunham, Sanmel 

228 Dunham, Thomas 
613 Dunlavy, William 
838 Dunlavy, William 

79 Dunlop, Francis 

436 Dunn, John P. 

63 Durant, William 

479 Durkee, Charles E. 

229 Dyer, Ezekiel 
602 Dyer, John J. 
446 Eagles, Charles 
670 Eaton, Abijah H, 
353 Etlgar, David 

254 Edmonds, William 

86 Edson, John 

453 Ellison, Thoaias H. 

511 Emerson, Thomas 

238 Emslie, William W. 

650 Estey, Charles A. 

768 Everitt, Arthur 

806 Ewing, William Alexander 

266 Fairweather, Lewis 

326 Fairweather, William 

141 Farnham, John 



157 Farrant, William 

5 Fayerweather, William 

636 Fellows, James Israel 

645 Ferguson, Benbow B. 

260 Ferguson, John 

644 Ferguson, Robert E. 

008 Finlay, Robert 

703 Finlay, Thomas 

849 Finlay, Thomas 

373 Fisher, John 

658 Fiske, Moses W. 

697 Fitzpatrick, Frederick G. S. 

810 Fitzpatrick, James William 

367 Fizard, Joseph C. 

633 Fletcher, George W. 
547 Fletcher, Henry 

852 Flewwelling, Frederick E. 

604 Flewelling, George T. 

318 Flewelling, Isaac 

578 Forbes, James Gordon 

712 Forrest, John J. 

303 Foul is, Robert 

761 Foxwell, Richard J. 

103 Eraser, William 

544 Fnge, Frederick E. 

235 Fuller, Patrick 

774 Fulton, George Herbert 

575 Furlong, Edward P. 

454 Gallagher, Patrick 

210 Garden, Arthur D. 

662 Gardner, Henry H. 

345 Gardner, William H. 

490 Gard, Thomas D. 

294 Garrick, Robert 

317 Garrison, Andrew 

276 Garrison, George A. 

174 Garrison, Samuel 

138 Gaynor, William J. 

450 Gerow, James 

222 Gibson, Andrew 

634 Gilliatt, William H. 
815 Gillis, John R. 

841 Gilmour, Arthur B. 

510 Gilmour, Thomas 

487 Godfrey, Frederick 

88 Godfrey, John 

706 Godsoe, Charles W. 

184 Godsoe, James 

194 Godsoe, Nathan 



284 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



707 Golding, Samuel J. 

628 Golding, Samuel Wright 

691 Goodrich, Edward L. 

35] Goodwin, Ricliard 

164 Gove, Jeremiiih 

546 Grant, James Macgregor 

62 Grant, John 

115 Grant, William 

253 Gray, William 

415 Green, Daniel, Jr. 

775 Green, Henry Louis 

514 Green, Jared 

754 Gre»'n, Louis 

667 Gieen, Nathan 

820 Grten, Solomon 

307 Grecno, William 

851 Grifliths, Louis A. 

156 Grundy, James 

104 Haddon, William 
789 Hamilton, Henry M. 
107 Hamm, Abner 

123 Hamm, Joseph 

649 Hancock, Frederick Miles 

404 Hanson, Vernon 

824 Hardy, Charles A. 

105 Harford, Solomon 
270 Harland, William 

808 Harris, Charles Augustus 

731 Harrison, Albert 

548 Hartshorne, William 

541 Hartt, Albert 

28 Hartwick, Laurence 

836 Harvey, Frederick O. 

443 Harvey, John 

153 Haskill, Caleb 

464 Hastings, John 

672 Hatheway, Canby 

611 Hatheway, Joseph C. 

374 Hawksworth, John L. 

299 Haws, John 

643 Hazlehurst, William 

819 Heans, Richard 

726 Hegan, George Black 

772 Henderson, George A. 

112 Henderson, James 

410 Hendricks, Conrad J. 

44 Hendricks, James 

35 Hepburn, Alexander 

478 Hepburn, Jared 



150 Herring, Charles 

394 Herrington, Benjamin 

206 Herrington, John 

811 Hetherington, George A. 

89 Hetherington, James 

535 Hetherington, William 

600 Higgins, James 

94 Hillsgrove, James 

334 Hinds, James 

60 Hiltz, Robert 

65 Hitchcock, Jotham 

S54 Hogan, John J. 

304 Hogg, David 

39 Holly, James 

696 Holly, James 

390 Holman, Samuel 

524 Holmes, Edmund B, 

65 Holmes, George 

356 Hooper, John 

465 Hooper, William H. 

584 Hopkins, James S. 

Ill Hopkins, Solomon 

832 Horn, William H. 

565 Houle, Henry 

385 Howard, James 

474 Howard, William J. 

301 Howe, John 

179 Hoyt, William, Jr. 

187 Hughes, Sylvester C. 

311 Hughson, Jerry D. 

143 Hughson, William 

530 Hunter, James 

77 Hunter, Thomas 

680 Hunt, Benjamin 

658 Hunt, Henry G. 

687 Hunt, Thomas G. 

495 Hutchinson, Hugh 

660 Hutchinson, Thomas 

220 Hutchinson, William 

440 Hutchinson, William, Jr. 

635 Hutchinson, William P. 

713 Inches, Charles 

58 Ironside, George 

378 Irvine, John 

545 James, Frederick 

110 Jenkins, Griffith 

24 Jennings, Thomas 

451 Johnson, James 

369 Johnston, Alexander 



MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



285 



526 Johnston, Andrew 

59 Johnston, Charles 

387 Johnston, Charles 

829 Johnston, Charles H. L. 

757 Johnston, Charles H. S. 

51 Johnston, David 

362 Johnston, David 

216 Johnstone, Alexander 

619 Johnstone, Rev. Thos. George 

368 Johnston, George j 

681 Johnston, George P. 

16 Johnston, Hugh 

315 Johnston, Hugh 
257 Johnston, John 
525 Johnston, John 
158 Joice, William 
168 Jones, Asjv 

408 Jones, Daniel, Jr. 

370 Jones, Frederick D. S. 

381 Jones, Henry 

83 Jordan, Gilbert 

221 Jordan, John 

533 Joslin, John J. 

282 Joyce, Sainncl 

2 Judson, Chapman 

714 K 7e, James Sidney 

384 Keans, William H. A. 

213 Keating, Robert 

805 Kenney, Andrew F. 

515 Kerr, David Shank 

780 Ketchum, George B. B. 

466 Ketchum, Francis E. 

109 Kirk, Alexander 

399 Kirsop, Robert 

434 Kimpson, Robert 

208 King, Henry 

274 King, John 

692 King, John 

694 Kinne, Samuel A. 

14 Kinnear, Andrew 

393 Kinsman, Frederick 

230 Knight, Solomon 

316 Knowles, Edward T. 
484 Knox, James 

724 Lacey, Thomas W. 

175 La Frisbee, Timothy 

56 Laidley, Robert 

500 Langan, Michael 

165 Lawrence, Alexander 



669 Lawrence, Rela R. 

80 Lawrence, Richard 

268 Lawrence, Richard, Jr. 

225 Lawson, Israel 
793 Lawson, John 
577 Leavilt, Frederick 
176 Leavitt, Thomas 
435 La Chaudelec, Louis 

93 Lemery, Alexander 

469 Leonard, George T. 

13 Leonard, Hon. George 

639 Leonard, Robert 

447 Leonard, William C. 
837 Lester, Edward H. 
139 Lester, Gilbert 

241 Lester, James G, 

589 Lester, William H. 

312 Levensellar, Aaron 

683 Lewin, Percival L. 

386 Lindsay, James 8. 

245 Lingley, Joseph 

626 Livingston, John 

330 Lockhart, Edward 

593 Lockhart, Edward E. 

137 Lockhart, Levi 

321 Lockwood, Anthony, Jr. 

161 Long, Henry 

549 Lord, George 

631 Lordly, Alfred 

506 Lovitt, John 

528 Luckie, Charles E. 

542 Luckie, Fraser Olson 

204 Lugrin, Horatio N. H. 

664 Lugrin, H. N. H., Jr. 

552 Lunn, William 

518 Lupton, James 

448 Lynam, George 
509 Lynam, William 
620 Lynn, Henry 

648 Lynn, Thomas Henry 

361 Mainland, William 

677 Manning, Edward 

207 Mansell, George 

149 Marshall, David S. - — 

226 Marsh, Benjamin F. 
494 Marter, Thomas 
183 Martin, Phares 

771 Mathieson, Muthias 

605 Matthews, Samuel F. 



286 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



671 Maxwell, James 

586 May, James S. 

783 May, William Robert 

802 Melville, Herman R. 

531 Melville, James 

776 Melville, Park Allan 

711 Melville, William R. 

54 Menzies, Robert 

429 Mercer, Joseph 

7 Merritt, Caleb 

46 Merritt, David 

271 Merritt, Israel 

10 Merritt, Nehemiah 

162 Merritt, Peters 

556 Middleton, John 

357 Milligan, William 

296 Mills, Alexander 

193 Milne, Alexander 

177 Minette, Robert C. 

676 Moffat, Robert 

48 Mogridge, John 
727 Moir, Robert N. 

463 Montgomery, James W. 

636 Montgomery, James W. 

834 Montgomery, James W. 

660 Moore, Charles 

224 Moore, George 

640 Moore, John W. 

583 Moore, Robert 

477 Moore, Robert A. 

665 Morazain, Jules C. L. 

850 Morrison, Rev. Daniel 

734 Morrison, Daniel 
847 Morrison, Joseph H. 
SOI Morrison, Samuel 
122 Morse, Jo9ef»h 

49 Mott, Jacob S. 
152 Mott, Richard 

67 Mount, John 

612 Mundee, Abraham E. 

182 Murphy, John 

331 Murray, John 

423 Murray, John 

749 MacRae, Rev. Donald 

833 MacRae, Alexander W, 

333 McAfee, Angus 

752 McAllister, John 

725 Mc Alpine, Charles 

735 McArthur, James 



249 McArthur, William 

52 McCaliff, Peter 
279 McCardle, John 

756 McCnusland, Alexander 

827 McClaverty, William J. 

160 MoClnre, John 

20 McColl, George 

242 McCready, John 

255 McDermott, Hugh 

791 McDermott, John Y. 

421 McDonald, Jacob D. 

739 McDonald, Robert Dhu 

205 McDonald, William 

766 McDowall, Isaac M. 

73 McDowell, John 

389 McGourty, John 

286 Mclntyre, Hector 

580 McKay, Rev. Neil 

709 McKean, George L 

702 McKean, John T. C. 

755 McKean, James A. 

790 McKellar, Neil 

358 McKenzie, Ambrose D. 

135 McKenzie, John 

81 McKenzie, Robert 

403 McKenna, Andrew 

290 McKinney, Francis 

352 McLaren, David 

718 McLaren, John S. 

300 McLaren, Peter 

178 McLean, George 

646 McLellan, David ^ 

816 McLellan, Frederick 

53 McLeod, Duncan 
26 McLeod, John 

796 McLeod, Robert 

830 McMackin, Arthur W. 

332 McMaugh, Joseph 

555 McNichol, Ebenezer 

133 McPherson, Alexander 

232 McPherson, Charles 

248 McPherson, Hugh 

470 Nagel, Frederick A. 

527 Neptune, William R. 

437 Newstadter, Sophian 

614 Nice, George 

534 Nicholls, James F. 

320 Nicholson, Thomas L. 

45 Nichols, Samuel 



MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



2«7 



566 Nix, Adam 

400 Nowlan, Rieliard 

237 Noyes, Jacob 

741 O'Brien, Edward 

12 Oliver, William Sanford 

427 Olson, James 
411 Otty, Andrew C. 
698 Owen, Arthur Paget 
498 Paddock, Thomas A. 
618 Parker, John G. 
125 Parker, Thomas 

592 Parkinson, Patrick M. 

709 Parlee, William H. 

339 Parnell, James A. 

486 Partelow, George B. 

481 Partelow, James S. 

720 Patcrson, Alexander 

617 Paterson, Alexander W. 

313 Patten, Stinson 

32 Patterson, Henry 

298 Patterson, James 

114 Patterson, Robert 

18 Paul, John 

376 Paul, William 

2o9 Payne, James P. 

240 Payne, John F. 

166 Payne, Robert 

508 Pearce, Charles 

121 Pearce, James 

29 Pecker, Jeremiah 

163 Pecker, William 

491 Peel, Humphrey 

798 Penney, William L. 

516 Perkins, George F. 

246 Perley. Francis P. 

458 Perley, Henry F. 

96 Perry, David 

428 Perry, John W. 

786 Peters, Benjamin Lester 

231 Peterson, Robert 

78 Pettingell, Daniel ' 

627 Philps, James 

365 Pigeon, William B. 

195 Pike 

223 Pitts, Henry W. 

71 Poole, John 

417 Pope, John Alexander 

433 Porter, David 

457 Portmore, James 



424 Potter, Charles E. 

329 Potter, John 

602 Pottinger, George Crofton 

398 Poneil, David 

623 J'owers, Rev. Thomas 

615 Preble, George F. 

92 Price, George 

419 Price, George 
788 Price, George 
574 Price, John 

846 Prince, Albert Edward 

127 Prince, Paul 

366 Pnrdy, William 

412 Purvis, John 
406 Quinton, John 

405 Quinton, John Boyd 

306 Rankine, James 

124 Ray, Charles 

120 Ray, Robert 

47 Rawleigh, Thomas 

659 Read, Joseph 

550 Reed, Guilford S. 

217 Reed, James 

325 Reed, James 

350 Reed, John 

140 Reed, Nathan 

181 Reynolds, Samuel 

338 Richardson, John 

108 Ring, Levi 

420 Roberts, Joseph William 

413 Robertson, Charles 
363 Robertson, George H. 
116 Robertson, Robert 
472 Robertson, Robert D. 
758 Robertson, Robert, Jr. 
785 Robinson, Frederick 
598 Robinson, Fretlerick P. 
471 Robinson, Gilbert M. 
656 Robinson, James H, 
497 Robinson, John 

43 Robson, Thomas 

145 Robson, William 

690 Rolph, Augustus P. 

563 Roop, Albert Dow 

679 Ross, Edward J. 

622 Ross, John 

336 Ross, William 

753 Ross, William J. 

606 Routch, Augustus O. W. 



288 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



822 Rubin, Solomon 

119 Ryder, William 

723 Sadleir, William H. B. 

430 Sancton, Henry P. 

618 Sancton, William Brunswick 

729 Sandall, Frederick 

667 Sandall, John, Jr. 

688 Sandall, Thomas Overton 

21 Sands, Edward 

36 Sands, Richard 

697 Savary, Alfred W. 

151 Sawyer, Henry 

236 Scammell, William 

84 Schlarliorst, John H. 

113 Schofield, Samuel 

638 Scott, James Philip 

9 Scott, John 

460 Scott, Robert 

605 Scott, William 

348 Scott, William Pitt. 
426 Scribner, Ilezekiah S. 
705 Scribner, William D. 
764 Sears, Edwin 

737 Sears, John B. 

710 Sears, William Macara 

684 Seely, Alexander M. 

69 Seely, liinus 

98 Segee, Jacob 

732 Sharaper, George William 

763 Sharp, Arthur Wellington 

568 Sharp, John Gilmour 

99 Shaw, Robert 
188 Sheed, Robert 
475 Sheridan, John H. 
468 Short, John Davis 

349 Sinclair, John 
15 Sinnott, John 

682 Sinnott, Melbourne W. 

653 Sinnott, William Herbert 

821 Sipprell, Ezekiel M. 

414 Smiler, Christopher 

250 Smiley, Andrew 

95 Smith, Abner 

314 Smith, Benjamin 

106 Smith, Daniel 

305 Smith, Daniel 

1 Smith, George 

252 Smith, Hiram 

281 Smith, Howard 



603 Smith, James M. 

543 Smith, John R. 

842 Smith, Robert Duncan 

261 Smith, Thomas 

792 Snider, P. Wellington 

632 Soper, John 

538 Spliler, William B. 

256 Spragg, Elijah 

148 Stanton, George 

745 Starkey, Charles W. 

848 Starkey, Charles W. 

118 Stennicks, Martin 

784 Sterne, Maximillian M. 

75 Stewart, Alexander 

699 Stewart, (Jeorge 

199 Stewart, Peter 

186 Stewart, Robert Payne 

409 Stockford, James 

540 Stone, John 

30 Storms, Samuel 

730 Stothart, Thomas '' 

302 Stout, William 

452 Stronach, William E. 

309 Styinest, Jesse M. 

573 Siilis, George J. 

532 Sulis, William H. 

462 Sullivan, Joseph 

807 Sutherland, James 

50 Swan, Charles 

180 Swanson, John 

629 Sweet, John , 

383 Swinford, Thomas 

346 Swymmer, Henry . 

651 Taylor, John F. 

787 Tennant, Robert H. B. 

480 Thain, William Henry 

747 Thomas, Alban 

147 Thomas, John 

377 Thomas, John 

773 Thomas, John 

569 Thomas, John, Jr. 

267 Thompson, Benjamin 

200 Thompson, George 
328 Thompson, George 
557 Thompson, Joseph 
625 Thomson, Robert, Jr. 
809 Thorne, Robert C. 
817 Thorne, R. Ward 

38 Toole, John 



MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



289 



189 Townsend, Jacob 

295 Townsend, Jacob 

142 Townshend, Jeremiah 

87 Trapagher, Henry 

209 Trathen. James W. 

668 Treadwell, William C. 

308 True, Lewia 

742 Trneman, Arthur Isaac 

203 Trulan, Hugh 

570 Tucker, Charles H. 

431 Tucker, Gilbert R. ^ 

601 Turner, David W. 

594 Turner, Josluia S. 

523 Tyrell, George F. 

581 Underbill, Jacob D. 

19 Upham, Hon. Joshua 

90 VanHorne, Cornelius 

102 VanHorne, John 

675 Vaughan, David i\I. 

485 Venning, Charles F. 

493 Venning, William Plenry 

804 Vincent, Thomas Newton 

719 Vlieland, George H. 

699 Wakefield, Frederick C. 

622 Wallace, Joseph C. 

759 Wallace, Matthew 

197 Wallace, Robert 

291 Wallace, Robert 

259 Walsh, Robert 

219 Warburton, Joseph 

273 Warren, Laurence 

342 Warwick, William 

3 Waterbury, David 

799 Waterbury, David H. 

22 Watson, Francis 

170 Watson, James 

604 Watts, Charles 

310 Watts, Samuel 

169 Webb, David 

251 Webster, James R. 

617 Wedderburn, William 

795 Weeks, Rev. Wm. Marston 

159 Welch, Robert 



843 Weldon, Christopher J. 

426 Wellington, Andrew J. 

23 Wells, Charles 

740 Welsh, Walter Weir 

33 Wentworth, Thomas H. 
17 Wetniore, Hon. Thomas 

341 Wetmore, Joseph 

292 Wetmore, Justus S, 
845 Wetniore, Rainsford H. 
607 Whalley, William H. 

26 Whelpley, Richard 

695 White, Frank W. 

610 White, John 

388 Whitelaw, William S. 

68 White, Thomas 

529 White, William B. 

196 Whiting, Charles L. 

782 Wickenden, Charles O. 

743 Wickett, John H. 
722 Wick ins, Inglesby 

34 Wiggins, Benjamin 
117 Willemherst, James 
717* Williams, Frederick S. 
507 Williams, George W. 
131 Williams, John 

319 Williams, Joshua B. 

499 Williams, Thomas A. 

736 Wills, Charles John 

823 Wilson, Charles H. 

476 Wilson, John 

744 Wilson, John 

686 Wilson, John Newton 

293 Wilson, Joseph 
689 Wilson, Matthew 
395 Wishart, Benjamin 

4 Wolhaupter, John 

564 Woodbury, Samuel 

672 Wood row, Ross 

41 Woodward, John 

201 Woodworth, Solomon 

818 Wright, J. Herbert 

263 Wyer, W^illiam 

364 Wylie, Robert 



ROLL OF MEMBERS 



OP 



ST. JOHN'S LODGE, APRIL, 1894, 



ACCORDING TO SENIORITY. 



William Cansey. 
William F. Bunting.' 
John D. Short. 
Bartholomew Coxetter. 
William Wedderburn. 
John R. Smith. 
John Thomas. 
Richard Crumble. 
Charles E. Burnham. 
James S. May. 
Joshua S. Turner. 
John White. 
Joseph C. Hatheway. 
Henry Lynn. 
Alfred Lordly. 
Robert Leonard. 
David McLellan. 
Samuel A. Dixon. 
George E. Barnhill. 
Henry G. Hunt. 
John Brewing. 
Hiram G. Betts. 
Edgar C. Baker. 
Moses C. Barbour. 
Fred. G. S. Fitzpatrick. 
John R. Armstrong, 
John Allingham. 
John J. Forrest. 
J. Sidney Kaye. 
William H. B. Sadleir. 
George B. Hegan. 
Frederick Sandall. 
Thomas Stothart. 
George W. Shamper. 
Arthur L Trueman. 
Louis Green. 
Richard J. Foxwell. 
Arthur W. Sharp. 



Artliur Everitt. 
George A. Henderson. 
Wilson L. Dobbin. 
W. Robert May. 
B. Lester Peters. * 
J. Gordon Forbes. 
George Price. 
P. Wellington Snider. 
Neil McKellar. 
J. MacGregor Grant. 
Robert McLeod. 
William L. Penney. 
Arthur P. Owen. 
James G. Barnes. 
Robert C. Thome. 
William A. Ewing. 
George A. Hetherington. 
Andrew F. Kenney. 
Joseph G. Bond. 
R. Ward Thome. 
T. Newton Vincent. 
Richard Heans. 
Charles H. L. Johnston. 
Ezekiel M. Sipprell. 
Archibald Bauer. 
Charles Damery. 
William J. McClaverty. 
Arthur W. MoMackin. 
James W. Montgomery. 
William H. Horn. 
William A. Cathers. 
Alexander VV. MacRae. 
Frederick O. Harvey. 
William J. Dean. 
William Dnnlavy. 
Arthur B. Gilmour. 
R. Duncan Smith. 
Christopher J. Weldon. 



1 Honoruf Members. 



OFFICERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



291 



Walter Babbitt. 
Albert Edward Prince. 
Joseph H. AEorrison. 
Thomas Finlay. 
Rev. Daniel Morrison. 



Louis A. Griffiths. 
Frederick E. Eiewwelling. 
Kev. Donald MacRae. 
Rainsford IT. Wetmore. 



PAST MASTERS, ACCORDING TO SENIORITY, 

Mkmheks of tuk Lodoe Apkil, 1894. 



William F. Bunting, P. G. M. 

William Wedderburn, P. G. M. 

John D. Short. 

Joseph C. Platheway. 

Henry G. Hunt. 

Hiram G. Betts. 

George B. Hegan. 

Arthur I. Trueman. 

B. Lester Peters, P. G. M. 

William H. B. Sadleir. 



J. Gordon Forbes. 
Arthur Everitt. 
Robert C. Thome. 
Frederick Sandal 1. 
Charles H. L. Johnston. 
Arthur W. Sharp. 
William A. Ewing. 
John J. ^^)rrest. 
Wilson L. Dobbin. 



WORSHIPFUL MASTERS 

George Smith, 1802, '3, '4. 

David Waterbury, 1805, '6. 

George Ironside, 1807. 

Neiiemiah Merritt, 1808. 

Francis Watson, 1809, '10. 

.John Grant, 1811, '12. 

William Durant, 1813, '15, '20. 

Joseph Clarke, 1814. 

Jolin Dean, 1816. 

Kobert Robertson, 1817. 

Robert Ray, 1818, '21, '23. 

Henry Chubb, 1819. 

George Bunnell, 1822. 

Rol)ert C. Minette, 1824. 

RolMjrt Payne, 1825, '26, '32, '35. 

Benjamin F. Marsh, 1827, '28, '30. 

Alexander Lawrence, 1829. 

Hiram Smith, 1831. 

James Reed, 1833, '34. 

James G. Lester, 1836. 

John Haws, 1837, '38, '40, '41. 

Israel Merritt, 1839. 

John Thomas, 1842, '44, '47, '48, '50. 

Charles Johnston, 1843. 

Wm. H. A. Keans, 1845, '40, '52, '53, '54. 

Samuel Hoi man, 1849. 

R. Sands Armstrong, 1851. 



OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 

Joseph Mercer, 1856. 
Charles E. Potter, 1856, '57. 
William F. Bunting, 1858, '59, '82. 
John H. Sheridan, 1860, '61. 
William Wedderburn, 1862, '63. 
Robert C}. Crozier, 1H64. 
John D. Short, 1865, '66, '86. 
J. Gordon Forbes, 1867. 
Joseph C. Hatheway, 1868, '69. 
W. Herbert Sinnott, 1870. 
Henry G. Hunt, 1871, '72. 
Thomas O. Sandall, 1873. 
Wm. Macara Sears, 1874, '75. 
Hiram G. Betts, 1876. 
John Buchanan, l877. 
George B. Hegan, 1878. 
Arthur I. Trueman, 1879. 
William H. B. Sadleir, 1880, '81. 
Arthur Everitt, 1883, '84. 
Robert H. B. Tennant, 1886. 
Robert C. Thome, 1887. 
Fre«lerick Sandall, 1888. 

Artlnir W. Sharp, 1889. 

William A. Ewing, 1890. 
John J. PWrest, 1891. 
Wilson L. Dobbin, 1892. 
Archibald Bauer, 1893, '94. 



292 



FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 



SENIOR WARDENS OF ST. 

Chapman Jiidson, 1802. 
David \V!iterl)ury, 1802, '3, '4. 
Fir ' -s Wataon, 1805, '6, 7, '8. 
John virant, 1809, '10. 
William Diirant, 1811, '12, '19. 
Joseph Clarke, 1813. 
Cornelius Van Home, 1814, 
John Dean, 1815. 
Eohert Ray, 1816, '17, '20. 
Henry Chubb, 1818. 
John McClure, 1821. 
Kichanl Mott, 1822. 
Robert C. Minette, 1823. 
Robert Payne, 1824. 
William Hutchinson, 1825. 
Benjamin F. Marsh, 1826, '31. 
Alexander Lawrence, 1827, '28. 
George A. Garrison, 1829. 
Hiram Smitii, 1830. 
John Haws, 1832, '33. 
Joseph Lingley, 1834, '35, '37, '38. 
Israel Merritt, 1836. 
Georue Johnston, 1839. 
Angus McAfee, 1840. - 
John Thomas, 1841. 
Chailes Johnston, 1842. 
William Ross, 1843. 
William H. A. Keans, 1844. 
John Cassidy, 1845. 
James G. Lester, 1846. 
John Quinton, 1847. 
Samuel Holman, 1848. 
R. Sands Armstrong, 1849. 
James Stockford, 1850. 
Charles E. Potter, 1851, '52, '53. 
Joseph Mercer, 1854. 
William F. Bunting, 1855, '56. 



JOHN'S LODGE 

William C. Leonard, 1857. 
Robert G. Crozier, 1858. 
John H. Sheridan, 1859. 
William Wedderburn, 1860. 
George T. Leonard, 1861. 
Henry F. Perley, 1862. 
William S. Berton, 1863. 
John D. Short, 1864. 
J. Gordon Forbes, 1865. 
Jacob D. Underbill, 1866. 
Joseph C. Hatheway, 1867. 
Rev. George J. Caie, 1868. 
W. Herbert Sinnott, 1869. 
William J. Davidson, 1870. 
Charles A. Estey, 1871. 
Thomas O. Sandall, 1872. 
Augustus P. Rolph, 1873. 
Hiram G. Betts, 1874. 
Charles Inches, 1875. 
John Buchanan, 1876. 
George B. Hegan, 1877. 
Arthur I. Trueman, 1878. 
John McAllister, 1879. 
Rev. Donald MacKae, 1880. 
Henry S. Bridges, 1881. 
Arthur Everitt, 1882. 
Thomas Stothart, 1883, '84. 
Henry M. Hamilton, 1885. 
Robert C. Thome, 1886. 
Frederick Sandall, 1887. 
J. Sidney Kaye, 1888. 
William A. Ewing, 1889. 
John J. Forrest, 1890. 
Wilson L. Dobbin, 1891. 
Archibald Bauer, 1892. 
George A. Hetherington, 1893. 
Arthur W. McMackin, 1894. 



JUNIOR WARDENS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 



David Waterlmry, 1802. 
John Dean, 1802, '3, '4, '8. 
Jacob S. Mott, 1805' '6. 
Nehemiah Merritt, 1807. 
William Durant, 1809. 
John S. Clarke, 1810. 
Francis Dunlop, 1811, 'I'l 



Cornelius Van Home, 1813. 
William Eraser, 1814. 
William Haddon, 1815. - 
Robert Robertson, 1816. 
William J. Gaynor, 1817. 
Levi Lockhart, 1818. 
Richard Moll, 1819. 



OFFICERS OF ST. JOH^^'S LODGE. 



John McClure, 1820. 
Charles Herring, 1821. 
Eobert C. Minette, 1822. 
Thomas Leavitt. 1823. 
William Hutchinson, 1824. 
Solomon Knight, 1825. 
Francis B. Tcrlcy, 1826. 
James P. Payne, 1827. 
Georg3 A. Garrison, 1828. 
Hiram Smith, 1829. 
Samuel Watts, 1880. 
Andrew Garrison, 1831. 
Joseph Lingley, 1832, '33. 
Israel Merritt, 1834, '35. 
James Hinds, 183G. 
James G. Lester, 1837, '38. 
John McCready, 183i). 
William Ross, 1840, '42. 
George Johnston, 1841. 
John Cassidy, 1843. 
John Clarke, Jr., 1844, '45. 
John Quinton, 1846. 
James Stock ford, 1847. 
Jolui Murray, 1848. 
Henry P. Sancton, 1849. 
Cliarles E. Potter, 1850. 
William Hutchinson, Jr., 1851. 
Joseph Mercer, 1852. 
Christopher Smiler, 1853. 
William C. Leonard, 1854, '55, '56. 
Robert G. Crozier, 1857. 
John H. Slicridan, 1858. 
George T. Leonard, 1S59. 
Joseph Sullivan, 1S60. 



William S. Berton, 1861. 
William P. Dole, 1862. 
John D. Short, 1863. 
Thomas Marter, 1864. 
Jacob D. Uuderhill, 1865. 
Charles H. Tucker, 1866. 
Rev. George J. Caie, 1867. 
John White, 1868. 
Samuel F. Matthews, 1869. 
Henry G. Hunt, 1870. 
Thomas O. Sandall, 1871. 
Augustus P. Rolph, 1872. 
William M. Scars, 1873. 
Charles Inches, 1874. 
Hiram G. Betts, 1875. 
George B. Hegan, 1876. 
Arthur I. Trueman, 1877. 
John McAllister, 1878 
William H. B. Sadleir, 1879. 
Arthur Everitt, 1880. 
Arthur W. Sharp, 1881. 
Thomas Stothart, 1882. 
Henry M. Hamilton, 1S83. 
Robert H. B. Tennant, 1884. 
Robert C. Thorne, 1885. 
Frederick Sandall, 1886. 
J. Sidney Kaye, 1887. 
William A. Ewing, 1888. 
Jolin J. Forrest, 1889. 
Wilson L. Dobbin, 1890. 
Archibald Bauer, 1891. 
George A. Hetiierington, 1892, 
Artimr VV. McMackin, 1893. 
Alexander W. MacRae, 1894. 



John Wolliaupter, 1802. 

Nehemiah Merritt, 1802, '3, '4. 

James Hendricks, 1805, '6, '7, '8. 

Robert McKenzie, 1812, '13, '14. 

Robert Robertson, 1815, '18, '19. 

Joseph Clarke, 1816, '17. 

Henry Chubb, 1820, '21, '22, '23. 

Benjamin F. Marsh, 1824, '25. 

William Hutcliinson, 1826, '27, '36, 
'38, '39, '40, '41, '42, '43, '44, '45, 
'47, '48, '49, '50. '51, '52, '53, '54. 

Daniel Smitli, 1828, '29, '30, '31. 



TREASURERS OF ST. JOHN'S LODGE. 

Nathan Godsoe, 1832, '33, '34, '36. 



'37, 
'46, 



James Gerow, 1855, '56. 

Thos. Marter, 1857, '58, '59, '60, '61, '62. 

Charles E. Potter, 1863, '64. 

Robert G. Crozier, 1865. 

William H. A Keans, 1866, '67, '68, '69, 

'70, '71, '72, 73, '74, '75, '76. 
William F. Bunting, 1877, '78, '79, '80, 

'81, '86, '87, '88. 
George B. Hegan, 1882, '83, '84, '85. 
John D. Short, 1889, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94. 



294 



freemasonhy in new Brunswick. 



SECRETARIES OF ST. 



William Fayerweather, 1802. 
Francis Watson, 1803, '4. 
William Donaldson, 1804, '5. 
Samuel Nichols, 1806, 7. 
William Durant, 1808. 
Cornelius Van Home, 1812. 
William Haddon, 1813, '14. 
William Fraser, 1815. 
Henry Chubb, 1815, '16, '17. 
Charles Herring, 1818, '19. 
Thomas Leavitt, 1820, '21. 
Robert Payne, 1822. 
Horatio N. H. Lugrin, 1823. 
David Armstrong, 1824. 
James P. Payne, 1825, '26. 
George A. Garrison, 1827. 
Hiram Smith, 1828. 
Samuel Watts, 1829/31. 
Andrew Garrison, 1830. 
Israel Merritt, 1832, '33, '37. 
James G. Lester, 1834, '35. 
Francis McKinney, 1836. 
William Milligan, 1838, '39. 
John Thomas, 1840. 
William H. A. Keans, 1841. 
Samuel Holman, 1842, '43. 



JOHN'S LODGE. 

John Hooper, 1844. 
Andrew McKenna, 1845. 
John Boyd Quinton, 1846. 
Christopher Smiler, 1847, '51, '52. 
Hezekiah S. Scribner, 1848, '49. 
Jacob D. McDonald, 1850. 
William F. Bunting, 1853, '54, '65, 

'66, '67, '68, '89. 
Robert G. Crozier, 1855, '56. 
William H. Thain, 1857, '58. 
William S. Berton, 1859. 
M. Plumraer Dole, 1860, '61, '62, '63. 
J. Gordon Forbes, 1864. 
William J. Davidson, 1869. 
Edward Manning, 1870. 
Joseph C. Hatheway, 1871. 
Hiram G. Betts, 1872, '77, '78, '79, 

'80, '81. 
John E Armstrong, 1873. 
Thomas Stothart, 1874, '75, '76. 
Arthur W. Sharp, 1882, '83, '84, '85, 

'86, '87, '88, '93. 
Robert C. Thome, 1890, '91. 
Alexander W. MacRae, 1892. 
Frederick E. Flewwelling, 1894. 



BRIEF SKETCHES 

« 

OF ALL 

The Masonic Bodies in New Brunswick 

SINCE THE YEAR 1784. 



HIRAM LODGE, No. 17, SAINT JOHN. 

The premier masonic body in New Brunswick ; opened 1st Septem- 
ber, 1784, under a dispensation issued by lodges Nos. 155 and 211 of 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. SubsequenLly the provincial grand lodge of Nova 
Scotia granted a warrant in due form to " Richard Bonsall, W. M., David 
Melville, S. W., and John Stoddard, J. W., to form a lodge of freemasons 
at the house of Bro. John Kirk, or elsewhere in the city of Saint John, 
upon the first Tuesday in each calendar month." This warrant was 
dated at Halifax, 6th December, 1786, and signed by the following: 

John Parr, Grand Master. 

William Carnp})ell, Deputy Grand Master. 

Richard Bulkeley, Senior Grand Warden. 

D. Wood, Jr. (in the absence of Geo, DeBlois, Esq.), J. G. W. pro tern. 

Joseph Peters, Grand Secretary. 

It was formally constituted under this warrant, and continued to meet 
and work until, by an order of the provincial grand lodge of 7th 
September, 1796, the warrant was revoked and its members expelled from 
freemasonry, the details of which are given elsewhere. 

This lodge had a royal arch cliapter attached to it and working under 
its warrant. 

NEW BRUNSWICK LODGE, No. 541, FREDERICTON. 

The second lodge constituted in New Brunswick, and, up to the year 
1829, the only one in the province on the roll of the regular or mother 
grand lodge of England. The warrant was granted April 2nd, 1789, 
H. R. H. the Duke of Cumberland being Grand Master, Sir Peter 
Parker, Deputy Grand Master, and William White, Grand Secretary ; to 
the Hon. Daniel Bliss, Master; George Sproule, Esq., S. W. ; Beverly 
Robinson, Jr., Esij., J. W., and John Murray, Jr., Esq., Secretary. The 
lodge was regularly constituted at Fredericton during the year 1789 oy 
the provi'if'ial grand lodge of Quebec, and the particulars reported to the 
grand secretary at London by John Jones, Esq., provincial grand secre- 
tary of Quebec. A re-numbering of the lodges on the grand lodge roll 



296 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

was made 18th April, 1792, when the number of this lodge was changed 
from No. 541 to No. 450. Its name continued on the roll of the grand 
lodge up to the date of the union in 1813, when it disappeared. 

All the office-bearers named in the warrant of this lodge took a 
prominent part on the royal side in the American revolutionary war, and 
occupied important public positions in the early government of the 
province. Hon. Daniel Bliss was a member of the provincial council, 
and chief justice of the court of common pleas; George Sproule, Esq., 
was surveyor general of the province and a member of the council ; 
Beverly Robinson, Jr., Esq., was a lieutenant colonel in the loyal 
American regiment commanded by his father, Col. Beverly Robinson, Sr., 
and John Murray, Jr., Esq., was a captain in the King's American 
dragoons during the war, and, after he came to New Brunswick, held a 
commission in the 54th regiment of foot. 

I am of the opinion that this lodge did not continue its labors any 
length of time, as I have been unable to glean any further particulars 
than is contained in the report of the opening, which I obtained from W. 
Bro. R. F. Gould, of London, England, who very kindly copied it from 
the grand lodge records. 

ST. GEORGE'S LODGE, No. 19, MAUGERVILLE. 

Held under a warrant granted by the provincial grand lodge of Kova 
Scotia, to " Samuel Ryerse, W. M., Abraham DePeyster, S. W., raid 
Caleb Mallery, J. W., to meet at the house of Brother Nathaniel Under- 
bill, or elsewhere in the town of Maugerville, on the second Tuesday in 
each calendar month." It was dated at Halifax, 7th August, 1789, and 
signed by John Parr, G. M., Duncan Clark, D. G. M., John Solomon, S. 
G. W., John Allen, J. G. W., and Joseph Petcj-s, grand secretary. 

This lodge continued to work up to 1827, as the returns were made 
to the provincial grand lodge for that year, but how much longer I have 
been unable to ascertain. Nearly all its old record books were in the 
grand secretary's office at the time of the great fire of 20th June, 1877, 
and were des'.royed. They were sent to the grand secretary by the late 
R. W. Bro. Robert Gowan, of Fredericton. A stray volume, covering 
the transactions of the lodge from 13th March, 1804, to 12th December, 
1809, late/y came into my hands, from which I learned that the masters 
of the lodge during those years were William Simpson, Amos Perley and 
Andrew Mersereau, and that the lodge conferred the mark master's 
degree with the same officers officiating as in the craft degrees. A 
brother having expressed a desire to be marked, the next regular com- 
munication was generally appointed for that purpose. After the cere- 
mony the record stated that " I^ro. William Simpson was marked — the 



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Fac-simile of Solomon's Lodge Wakkant. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 299 

square:" "the square" meaning tliat the brother selected it as his mark. 
The following entry, under date 16th September, 1809, should be taken 
as a convincing proof that the brethren of eighty-five years past paid 
strict attention to the duties of labor and refreshment : " Ajirreeable to- 
the voice of the body, we met at one o'clock and continued diligently till 
ten, before we were able to bring up the books to our satisfaction ; bring- 
ing up every member's account, whether present or absent, and likewise 
theii- quarterly communications up to 12th September, 1809. When the 
night was so far advanced, that we were unable to take the account of 
the money that was in the box and settle with the treasurer, N. B. — 
The expense of the committee for refreshment CO 11 0." The following 
signatures were appended to the minute — Andrew Mersereau, John 
McNeall, Asa Perley, Ephraim Treadwell, committee. 

This lodge had a Royal Arch Chapter working under its warrant, by 
the name of " St. George's Chapter." — 

SION LODGE, No. 21, KINGSTON AND SUSSEX. 

Under a warrant granted by the provincial grand lodge of Nova 
Scotia, "to Christopher Sower, W. M., Samuel Ketchum, S. W., and 
William Hutchinson, J. W., to meet at Mason's Hall (now kept by Mr. 
Ebenezer Sj^icer), or elsewhere in the township of Kingston, King's county, 
New Brunswick, lipon the first Monday after the full moon." It was 
dated at Halifiix, 15th August, 1792, and signed by Richard Bulkeley, 
G. ]\r. ; Duncan Clark, D. G. M. ; James Clarke, S. G. W. ; Jonathan 
Sterns, J. G. W., and Joseph Peters, grand secretary. 

This lodge was removed from Kingston to Sussex Vale in King's 
county, at the house of Bro. Ebenezer Spicer, by authority of the provin- 
cial grand lodge, issued 6th March, 1799, and remained there until it 
ceased operations. The last returns were made to the provincial grand 
lodge, A. D. 1823, although there is strong probability of its having con- 
tinued to meet and work after that year. The records and papers are 
reported as having been destroyed, consequently no authentic information 
can be given of its movements. 

AVidows' Friend Royal Arch Chapter was worked under the warrant 
of Sion Lodge. 

SOLOMON'S LODGE, No. 22, FREDERICTON. 

Was held under a warrant granted to " Ephraim Betts, W. M., John 
Gibson, S. W., and George Everitt, J. W., to meet at the house of 
Brother Ephraim Betts, or elsewhere in the township of Fredericton, 
province of New Brunswick, on the first Tuesday after the full moon in 
each calendar month." It was dated at Halifax 15th August, 1792, and 



800 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

signed by Richard Bulkeley, G. M., Duncan Clark, D, G. M., James 
Clarke, S. G. W., Jonathan Sterns, J. G. W., and Joseph Peters, G. 8. 
It was formally constituted and its officers installed 3rd October, 1792. 
The mark master and past master's degrees were conferred by this lodge 
at its ordinary meetings, and Mount Moriah, Royal Arch Chapter, was 
held under the authority of its warrant. 

The last record of the lodge is dated 25th November, 1828, although 
there were one or two meetings held subsequently and the minutes taken 
by the secretary upon loose sheets, which were lost however before being 
transcribed. The business at these meetings was unimportant, and as 
"the warrant was pronounced insufficient" by the United Grand Lodge 
of England, the lodge ceased its labors in the early part of A. D 1829. 
An abbreviated transcript of the records, in the handwriting of the late 
R. W. Bro. Robert Gowan, a past master of the lodge, was kindly loaned 
me for perusal, from which I learned that the meetings were held 
regularly during its existence, and a large number of brethren initiated 
under the warrant. The original warrant of the lodge is now in the 
possession of the grand lodge of New Brunswick. 

Solomon's lodge, under warrant No. 759, granted 1st January, 1846, 
by the United Grand Lodge of England, was the outcome of the member- 
ship of this old lodge. 

HIRAM YORK LODGE, No. 23, FREDERICTON. 

Worked under a warrant granted to " Rev. Walter Price, W. M., 
William Fowler, S. W., and Stephen Jarvis, J. W., to meet at the house 
of Cornelius Ackerman or elsewhere in the township of Fredericton, New 
Brunswick, on the second Thursday in each calendar month." It was 
dated at Halifax 6th March, 1793, and signed by Richard Bulkeley, 
G. M., Duncan Clark, D. G. M., James Clarke, S. G. W., Jonathan 
Sterns, J. G. W., and Joseph Peters, G. S. ' 

The petition for the warrant was recommended by Lodge No. 643, 
registry of the grand lodge of Ireland, held in His Majesty's Sixth 
regiment of foot, then stationed at Fredericton. 

The lodge was regularly constituted " under a deputation " issued by 
the provincial grand master at Halifax, and the proceedings reported to 
the provincial grand lodge at a communication held at Halifax 9th 
February, 1794. It had a short career, however, judged by a report 
under date 9th August, 1800, addressed to the provincial grand secre- 
tary, setting forth that "there were not sufficient members remaining to 
work the lodge in consequence of the removal of the New Brunswick 
regiment to Saint John," and he added that " they had not elected 
officers for that year." From these statements it is reasonable to suppose 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 301 

that the lodge ceased to exist at that time, i. e. A. D. 1800. Althougli 
not strictly a military lodge, its membership was almost wholly drawn 
from the military ranks. 

ST. JOHN'S LODGE, No. 29, SAINT JOHN. 

The sixth lodge ccnstituted in New Brunswick and the second in 
Saint John, under a warrant from the provincial grand lodge of Nova 
Scotia, the full history of which is set forth in these pages. 

It has had a continuous existence from its original organization, 5th 
April, 1802, to the present time, under three separate warrants, Tiie first 
from the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia, dated 18th December, 
1801 ; the second from the united grand lodge of England, under date 23rd 
April, 1830; and the third from grand lodge of New Brunswick, dated 
29th April, 18G8. 

In the minds of many brethren it seems inexplicable that Albion 
Lodge of Saint John, whose original constitution dates upwards of 
twenty-three years subsequent to that of St. John's Lodge, should have 
stood the senior on the roll of the united grand lodge of England. After 
the union, A. D. 1813, of the rival grand lodges, the united body issued 
a decree, declaring the warrants granted by the provincial grand lodge 
insufficient under the new order of things, and at the same time called 
upon the lodges holding such warrants to relinquish them and obtain 
substitutes from the united gi*and lodge. These lodges were likewise re- 
quired to pay five guineas for a new warrant, and registration fees for all 
brethren initiated and affiliated therein from the date of the union. This 
manifesto was issued A. D. 1825, the year in which Albion was organ- 
ized and twelve after the union. St. John's Lodge was unable to meet 
such a large demand upon its treasury. With the exception of Albion 
Lodge, all the lodges in New Brunswick refused to accede to the proposd 
terras. After a lengthy correspondence, and a material modification in 
the demands of the united grand lodge, St. John's Lodge, at its regular 
communication in December, 1835, decided to petition for a new warrant. 
Six years prior to this date Albion had applied for and received a war- 
rant, and thus became the senior lodge in the province on the roll of the 
united grand lodge. 

While these negotiation.-^ between the grand lodge and the several 
lodges in New Brunswick were being conducted, the lodges, one by one, 
ceased to meet, and eventually closed their doors, and thus, of the fifteen 
lodges constituted in the province by authority of the provincial grand 
lodge of Nova Scotia, only two — Albion and St. John's — survived, and 
for the foregoing reason Albion became the senior lodge. This explana- 
tion is given in order that the craft may understand why a lodge so 



302 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

many years the juuior in organization should stand at the head of the 
grand lodge roll. ^ 

Carleton Royal Arch Chapter was originally worked under the war- 
rant of St. John's Lodge. 

MIDIAN LODGE, No. 31, KINGSTON, KING'S COUNTY. 

Under a warrant granted to " Silas Raymond, W. M., Thomas Fair- 
weather, S. W., and Joseph Baxter, J. W., to form and hold a lodge of 
Free and Accepted Masons at the house of Bro. Silas Raymond, or 
elsewhere in the town of Kingston, in the province of Now Brunswick, 
upon the second Tuesday in each calendar month." It was dated at 
Halifax 27th May, 1805, and subscribed by John Wentworth, G. M., 
Duncan Clark, D. G. M., John Albro, S. G. W., Robert Lyon, J. G. W., 
and Thomas Bennett, G. S. 

The lodge was constituted under its warrant 12th September, 1805, 
by R. W. Bro, Rev. Oliver Arnold, acting as grand master. For some 
unexplained reason Bro. Rulof Rulofson was installed senior warden in 
the place of Bro. Thomas Fairweather named in the warrant. lu 
March, 1822, the lodge was removed to the house of Bro. Abel English, 
in the upper part of the parish ; in February, 1828, to the house of Bro. 
Constant L. Perkins, and on the 13th February, 1837, to the house of 
Bro. David Wetmore, Jr., where it continued to meet until it ceased 
operations. 

The last record is dated 2nd November, 1841, and contains the 
following entry as the finale of its existence: " ResoH'ed, that the 
furniture of this lodge be disposed of; that the minimum price of that 
portion made by Mr. Lawrence and C. Wetmore, Jr., be fifteen pounds, 
and that Bros. Justus S. Wetmore and James Flewelling be a committee 
to sell the same." And thus this old lodge closed its labors. 

The records and files of papers, which are quite full and complete, 
are held by the present Midian Lodge, No. 9. registry of New Brunswick. 

A chapter of Royal Arch Masons, called Midian Chapter, was held 
under authority of the warrant of this lodge. 

The brethren of this lodge subsequently petitioned the United Grand 
Lodge of England, and received from that body a warrant under date 
1st May, 1846, as Midian Lodge, No. 770. 

ORPHAN'S FRIEND LODGE, No. 34, ST. STEPHEN. 

The warrant was granted to " Samuel Darling, W. M., Ebenezer 
Bugbee, S. W., and Thaddeus Ames, J. W., to form and hold a lodge of 
Free and Accepted Masons in the town of St. Stephen's, in the province 
of New Brunswick, upon the first Wednesday after the full moon in each 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 303 

calendar month." It was dated at Halifax 26th October, 1809, and 
signed by John Wentworth, (). M., John George Pyke, D. G. M , Andrew 
Belcher, S. G. W., Hibbert A. Binney, J. G. W., and Thomas Bennett, 
G.S. 

The lodge was constituted 14th December, 1809, "by R. W. Bro. 
Oliver Shead, Esqnire, deputy grand muster for the district of Maine, in 
Massachusetts, under special written authority from Sir John Wentworth, 
the grand master of Nova Scotia." 

"A procession was formed under the care of Worshipful Bro. 
Ebenezer Steel as grand marshal, and, accompanied with solemn music, 
proceeded to the Methodist chapel, where a serious and well adopted 
discourse was delivered by Rev. Bro. Duncan McColl from the words, 
' Follow peace and holiness, without which no man shall see the Lord.' " 

" Afterwards the brethren repaired to Bro. Jonathan Robinson's and, 
in company with a number of respectable gentlemen of the parish, 
partook of an excellent rejinst, and closed with love and friendship." 

The record book, which is in good preservation, was in the possession 
of late R. W. Bro. David Brown, of St. Stephen, and the old warrant is 
hanging on the walls of the lodge room of Sussex Lodge, No. 7, St. 
Stephen. The last record is dated 31st August, 1825, but gives no 
explanation of the cessation of the work of the lodge. 

EASTERN STAR LODGE, No. 37, ST. ANDREWS. 

The warrant of this lodge was granted to " Ebenezer Bugbee, W. M., 
Aaron Robinson, S. W., and Amos Ordway, J. W., to form and hold a 
lodge of Free and Accepted Masons at St. Andrews, in the province of 
New Brunswick, on the Wednesday before the full of the moon in each 
and every month." It was dated at Halifax 29th August, 1814, and was 
subscribed to by John George Pyke, G. M., John Albro, D. G. M., 
William Forsyth, S. G. W., Alexander McDougall, J. G. W., and 
Adolphus Vieth, G. S. 

A previous application had been made for a warrant for this lodge, 
but its issue was delayed on account of a letter received from Bro. Bugbee, 
W. M., under date 2nd September, 1812, wherein he stated, "that on 
account of the war with the United States, a number of brethren had 
removed from St. Andrews, and they therefore declined for the present 
to take out a warrant for holding a lodge at that place." 

This lodge was regularly constituted 22nd November, 1814, by R. W. 
Bro. Jonathan D. Weston, D. G. M., specially appointed for the purpose 
by the provincial grand master of Nova Scotia. The record states that 
" a grand lodge having been opened at the house of Bro. John Merrill, 
they marched, at half-past three o'clock, with solemn music, to the house 



304 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

of Bro. John Lanneii, where they were received with the honors of 
masonry by the new lodge, No. 37, when the grand h)dge resuming their 
several stations, the ceremony of installation took ])lace. Both lodges 
then formed procession and mafehed to the parish church, where solemn 
prayers were read by the Rev. Samuel Andrews, and an ode pei'formed, 
•etc. Procession being again formed, the grand lodge was closed at their 
lodge room, and the brethren, to the number of about forty, partook of a 
dinner at Bi'o. John Lannen's. A number of excellent toasts and senti- 
ments were drank, and universal harmony prevailed throughout the 
evening." 

The meetings of this lodge were held very regular up to 23rd Octo- 
ber, 1833, when the record ceases without assignable reason. 

A commodious hall, erected by this lodge, was destroyed by fire on 
the night of 29th June, 1829, with the furniture and other property, 
except the warrant, jewels and records. The minutes are contained in 
two well preserved volumes, now in the possession of the grand lodge of 
New Brunswick. 

St. Andrew's Royal Arch Chapter was held under the sanction and 
iiuthority of Eastern Star Lodge. 

UNION LODGE, No. 38, SAINT JOHN. 

This lodge, the eleventh constituted in the province, and the third in 
Saint John, held a warrant granted " to David Waterbury, W. M., 
William Charlton, S. W., and James Hay, Jr., J. W., to form and hold 
a lodge of Free and Accepted Masons in the city of Saint John, in the 
province of New Brunswick, on the third Tuesday in every month." 
The document was dated at Halifax 7th September, 1814, and was signed 
by John George Pyke, G. M., John Albro, D. G. M., William Forsyth, 
S. G. W., Alexander McDougall, J. G. W.. and Adolphus Vieth, G. S. 

The following certificates accompanied the petition for the warrant: 

We, the master, wardens and brethren of St. John's Lodge, No. 29, humbly 
conceiving timt the constituting of iuiother lodge in this city will be beneficial to the 
craft in general, the officers of tlie said lodge have accordingly signed the same on 
belialf of the brethren, recommending Bro. David Waterbury to be the first master, 
Bro. William Charlton to be the first senior warden, and Bro. James Hay to be the 
first junior warden of the sai-' lodge, to be called Union. 

Passed in St. John's Lodge, No. 29, Joseph Clark, Master, 

St. John, N. B., 1th June, 1814. Cornelius Vas Hokne, S. W., 

William Fraser, J. W. 
William Haddon, Secretary. 

Right Worshipful Brethren: 

Conceiving that liie erection of a new lodge in this city will be beneficial to 
masonry, 1 have subscribed ray name hereto on behalf of the same. As some 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 305 

brother will necessarily have to be appointed to install the officers of the new lodge 
(my present health and infirmity preventing my attendance), should it meet your 
concurrence, I recommend to your notice the W. Bro. William Durant, past master 
of St. John's Lodge, No. 29, as a person qualified to take upon himself that office. 

St. John, 29</i June, 1814. \Vm. Campbpxl, 

Deputy Grand Master for New Brunswick. 

The lodge was constituted under the warrant, 27th September, 1814, 
the particulars of which are set forth in a report to the provincial grand 
tecretaiy at Halifax, as follows: 

Rt. W. Sib and Bro. : 

Yesterday being the day set apart for the installation of a new lodge, to be called 
Union, and in pursance of a deputation from the grand lodge of Nova Scotia, a grand 
lodge pro tern, met in the lodge room of St. John's Lodge, No. 29, at 4 o'clock, p. m., 
when the lodge was opened in the third degree of masonry, and, after prayers, pro- 
ceeded to business. The undermentioned brethren were installed according to 
ancient rites and ceremonies in form. The bretliren composing the grand lodge pro 
tern, were: W. Bro. William Durant, as R.W.Grand Master; W^ Bro. Joseph 
Clark, D. G. M. ; W. Bro. John Toole, D. S. G. W. ; W. Bro. Nehemiah Merritt, D. 
J. G. W. ; W. Bro. John Dean, I). G. Secretary ; W. Bro. John Grant, D. G. 
Treasurer; Bro. Cornelius Van Home, S. G. D. ; W. Bro. Robert Ray, J. G. D. ; 
W. Bro. Thomas Hunter, G. Pursuivant; and Bro. Joseph Morse, G. Tyler. 

The following are the names of the brethren installed as officers of Union Lodge, 
No. 38, as also a list of its present members: W. Bro. David Waterbury, Master; 
W. Bro. William Charlton, S. W. ; W. Bro. James Hay, Jr., J. W. ; Bros. William 
Donaldson, Secretary ; James Hendricks, Treasurer ; John Sinnott and John Paul, 
Deacons. 

Members — Bros. Richard Lawrence, John Mount, Henry Traphager and 
Alexander Edmond. 

Visiting brethren — Bros. Chapman Judson, David Merritt, Jas. Scgee, Jonathan 

Mifchell, Sayre, Oliver Haskell, Benj. Wiggins, Wrii. Grant, Wm. Fraser, 

Solomon Hopkins, Alex. Kirk, Wm. Rogers, Robert McKenzie, James Wood, Jas. 
Taylor and James Henderson. 

The installation having been performed before the aforementioned R. W. Bro. 
Wm. Durant, assisted by the other officers of the grand lodge pro tern., the lodge was 
then closed in the name of the R, W. John George Pyke, Esquire, G. M.of the G. L. 
of N. S., inform, in harmony and brotherly love. 

By order of the grand master, 

John Dkan, 

R. W, Grand Secretary pro tern. 
To the B. W. Adolphm Vielh, Esq., 

Grand Secretary of the G. L. of N. S, 

This lodge ceased to exist A. D. 1831,' the outcome, no doubt, of the 
demand made by the united grand lodge of Enghmd (as in tlie case of 

1 In the rpcord of St. John's Lodge, No. 29, of date 2Sth October, 1834, it is noted that sevurnl 
raenilwrs of I'nion Lodge wore present at a funeral. It ina7 be reasonablj mirmljed that they were 
recognized aa brethren of the defunct lodge. 



306 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

St. John's and other lodges in New Brunswick), for the payment of back 
dues on the whole membership from the date of organization, supple- 
mented, possibly, by the Morgan crusade against freemasonry, which 
swept over the United States and British provinces, between the years 
1826 and 1836. 

It had a large and influential membership, and was a powerful rival, 
for masonic supremacy in Saint John, to St. John's Lodge, with which, 
however, it worked in good-will and generous rivalry. All its members 
had passed away previous to the commencement of this work, and there 
were no other old masons in the community from whom I was able to 
obtain reliable information of its doings ; neither have I been fortunate 
enougli to come across any books or papers belonging to it. 

FORTITUDE LODGE, No. 42, MIRAMICHI. 

Organized and worked under a warrant from the provincial grand 
lodge of Nova Scotia, issued " to Alexander Davidson, W. M., James 
Wilson, S. W., and John Young, J. W., to meet at Russell's rooms or 
elsewhere at Miramichi, in the province of New Brunswick, upon the first 
Tuesday in each calendar month." It was dated at Halifax, 27th August, 
1819, and signed by John Geo. Pyke, G. M. ; John Albro, D. G. M.; 
David Shaw Clarke, S. G. W. ; James Fullerton, J. G. W., and Adolphus 
Vieth, G. S. 

Enquiry in different directions failed to furnish any particulars relat- 
ing to this lodge. 

ST. LAWRENCE LODGE. No. 43, RICHIBUCTO. 

Constituted under a warrant granted "to Sylvester C. Howes 
(Hughes V), W. M., George Carruthers, S. W., and Richard Leech, J. 
W., to meet at the house of Bro. Thomas Graham, or elsewhere in the 
parish of Carleton, county of Northumberland, in tlie province of New 
Brunswick, upon the first Tuesday in each calendar month." It was 
dated at Halifax 1st August, 1820, and signed by John Albro, G. M., 
John Geo. Pyke, D. G. M., David S. Clarke, S. G. W., James Fullerton, 
J. G. W., and Adolphus Vieth, G. S. 

I have not been able to obtain any inform.xtion about tiiis lodge 
further than that the returns were made to Halifax up to A. D. 1826. 

MORNING STAR LODGE, No. 46, WOODSTOCK. 

The warrant of this h)dge was issued " to Samuel Rice, W. M., Thos. 
Phillips, S. W., and Josiah S. Brown, J. W., to meet at Woodstock, in 
the province of New Brunswick, upon the Tuesday at or preceding the 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 307 

full moon of every month." It was dated at Halifax 29th May, 1822, 
and signed by John Albro, G. M., William Forsyth, D. G. M., Alexander 
McDougall, S. G. W. pro tern, James Thompson, J. G. W., and Adolphus 
Vieth, G. S. 

Many residents of the state of Maine contiguous to Woodstock were 
made masons in this lodge, and it is stated that it met occasionally at 
Houlton, in that state. When Monument Lodge was constituted at 
Houltou, it had the effect of drawing a large number of the members 
away from Morning Star Lodge. The weakening from this and other 
causes obliged it to cease working about the year 1830. 

GOLDEN RULE LODGE, No. 50, HOPEWELL. 

This lodge was constituted under a warrant issued " to William Read, 
W. M., Samuel Clarke, S. W., and Daniel Moore, J. W., to meet in the 
township of Hopewell, in the county of Westmorland, and province of 
New BrunP'vick, on the first Wednesday on or after the full moon in 
every month." It was dated at Halifax 29th June, 1824, and signed by 
John Albro, G. M., William Forsyth, D. G. M., James Thompson, S. G. 
W., Edmund Ward, J. G. W., and Adolphus Vieth, G. S. 

Golden Rule Lodge, in a letter addressed to the provincial grand 
secretary under date 24th September, 1828, declined to accept a warrant 
from England. It continued to work, howevei', until A. D. 1833, when 
it was forced to succumb. At the time it ceased operations the following 
were on the roll of members: Bros. William Read, Samuel Clarke, 
Robert Wright, William Slater, J. Libbey, F. Hilton, David Coffin, 
William Rogers, William Wilson, Alexander McRae, John McRae, 
Frederick Lavine and James Turnbull. 

ALBION LODGE, No. 52, SAINT JOHN. 

The fifteenth and last lodge established in New Brunswick, and the 
fourth in the city of Saint John, by the provincial grand lodge of Nova 
Scotia. The petition for the warnint was dated 23rd July, 1825, and 
signed by the following applicants : 

H. N. H. Lugrin, St. John's Lodge, No. 29, Saint John. 

Thomas Leavitt, " " 

Hiram Smith, " 

James Condle, " 

Robert Welch, 

Charles Raymond, Union Lodge, No, 38, Saint John. 



« 



Samuel Stephen, 
Thomas McL. Abell, 
Alexander Simpson, 
Robert Godsoe, 



M 11 



308 FRP:EMAS0NRY in new BRUNSWICK. 

William Austen, Union Lodge, No. 1, Halifax. 

Edward Cliamberluin, Solomon's Lodge, No. 22, Fredericton. ^ 

Jacob Sneden, St. Andrew's Lodge, No. 287, Scotland. 

The applicants asked that W. Bro. William Durant be appointed the 
first master, W. Bro. Robert Ray, the first S. W., and Bro. Charles G. 
Brownsword, the first J, W. of the new lodge. These officers' names do 
not appear on the list of petitioners. Bros. Durant and Ray were former 
members of St. John's Lodge, and Bro. Brownsword of Union Lodge. 
The prayer of the petition was recommended by R. W. Bro. Thomas 
Wetmore, Esq., D. G. M. of New Brunswick, by certificate dated at 
Frederictoii, 23rd July, 1825. The petition was accompanied by a letter 
dated 1st August, 1825, addressed to the provincial grand secretary at 
Halifax, by Bro. H. N. H. Lugrin, who was the principal promoter in 
the inauguration of the lodge. He stated in this letter that "the petition 
was not formally recommended by the masters of St. John's and Union 
Lodges, as they were absent from the city," which he hoped " would be a 
sufficient apology for their signatures not ap[)earing thereto." The pro- 
vincial grand master issued a dispensation 20th August, 1825, under 
which the lodge was opened and commenced work 5th September follow- 
ing, at the house of Bro. Robert Welch on Church street. 

In due course the warrant was granted to William Durant, W. M., 
Robert Ray, S. W., and Charles Gloyne Brownsword, J. W., to meet at 
the city of Saint John, in the province of New Brunswick, on the first 
Monday in each calendar month. It was dated at Halifax, 30th Novem- 
ber, 1825, and subscribed to by John Albro, G. M. ; William Forsyth, 
D. G. M. ; James' Thompson, S. G. W. ; Edmund Wai, , J. G. W., and 
Adolphus Vieth, G. S. The lodge was formally constituted under its 
warrant, 23rd January, 1826, by R. W. Bro. Benjamin L. Peters, district 
deputy grand master, under special authority of R. W. Bro. Thomas 
Wetmore, D. G. M. of New Brunswick, who " could not travel from his 
residence at Fredericton in the winter season." 

The following is a copy of a report of the opening, made to the pro- 
vincial grand lodge : 

Minutea of proceedings of a temporary grand lodge, holden at Saint John, on 
Monday, the 23rd day of January, 1826, under and by virtue of a dispensation from 
the R. W. John Albro, Esq., grand master of t'le most ancient and honorable fra- 
ternity of free and accepted masons in Nova Scotia, and the inasonical jurisdiction 
thereunto belonging, for the purpose of installing the officers of .\lbion Lodge, No. 
52, to be holden at Saint John, New Brunswick. Present: R. W. Benjamin L. 
Peters, G. M. ; K. W. James Robertson, D. G. M. ; R. W. Robert Payne, S. G. W.; 
R. W. Henry Chubb. J. G. W. ; W. John V. Thurgar, G. Secretary ; W. Lionel An- 
derson, S. G. D. ; W. Samuel Stephen, J. G. D. ; W. John Gallagher and Thos Abell, 
G. Stewards ; R. W. Rev. Benjamin G. Gray, G. Chaplain ; W. Thomas Whitlock, 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 309 

G. Marshal, and Bro. Dogherty, G. Tyler; also Bros. Alex. Lawrence, Thomas 
Nisbet, James Wood, David Waterbury, John C. Waterbnry, Tumes Hendricks, 
James Hutchinson, David Browne, John McCIure Nehemiah Merritt, Alexander 
Simpson, Israel Armstrong and Saraiipl Tlieall. After prayei-s proceeded to business. 

The secretary, by orders from tl.e chair, read alo id to the brethren assembled, 
the warrant received from the M. W. Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, to congregate, 
hold and form a grand lodge pro tem. at the city of Saint John, in the province of 
New Brunswick, for the purpose of installing and constituting the officers of Albion 
Lodge, No. 52, to be holden at the city of Saint John aforesaid. A communication 
was then received from the officers and brethren of Albion Lodge, No. 52, intimating 
that they had received a warrant from the M. W. Grand Lodge of N. S., authorizing 
them to form and open a lodge of F. & A. M., and being desirous that their lodge 
should be constituted and their officers installed, agreeably to the ancient usages and 
customs of the fraternity, and that they were then assembled at their lodge room in 
the masonic hall, where they awaited the pleasure of the R. W. Grand Master. 

A procession was then formed by the grand lodge, and moved to the hall of the 
new lodge; and, on being admitted, were received with the usual honors, the officers 
resigning their seats to tlie grand officers. The deputy grand master informed the 
grand master that the brethren then present had been working under a dispensation 
for some time past, and that the M. W. grand lodge had been pleased to grant them 
a warrant of constitution, and they prayed to be constituted with the usual for- 
malities. 

The grand secretary then reatl the dispensation and warrant of constitution 
granted by the M. VV. grand lodge of Nova Scotia, as also the proceedings of the 
lodge under dispensation, which being approved, W. Bro. William Durant, after 
having been duly examined and vouched for as being well skilled in our rites, was 
presented to the grand master as the master-elect of the new lodge, in front of the 
grand master, and the ceremonies of constituting commenced with solemn music; 
after which an elegant and appropriate oration was delivered by the R. W. Brother 
Rev. B. G. Gray, grand chaplain, who consecrated and then dedicated the new lodge 
with the usual formalities; after which the grand master proceeded to constitute the 
lodge and install the officers, viz. : Bro. William Durant, having given his assent to 
all the ancient charges, was duly installed into the oriental chair of Solomon ; Bro. 
Robert Ray was presented by Bro. Durant as senior warden, and Bro. Charles G. 
Brownsword as junior warden, who were regularly installed and appropriate 
charges deliverei by the grand master severally to each of the officers. The 
remaining officers were then installed, viz.: Bros. Thomas Leavitt, treasurer; 
Horatio N. H. Lugrin, secretary ; Jacol) R. Sneden, S. D. ; John Pr()88er, J. D. ; 
Robert Welch and James Condle, stewards, and John Vallely, tyler. 

The grand master then, in the name of the M. W. grand lodge of Nova Scotia, 
proclaimed the new lodge thrice by the name of " Albion Lodge, No. 52," to be duly 
constituted with all the rights and privileges of our ancient and honorable fraternity. 
The grand miister then directed W. Bro. William Durant to close his lodge in due 
form, when a procession was again formed and the grand lodge returned to their 
lodge room, accompanied by All)ion Lodge, No. 52, and a number of visiting 
brethren, when the grand lodge' was solemnly closed in peace and harmony, in 
form, at half past two o'clock p. m. 

1 The provincial grand lodge at Halifax took exception to tbia title "grand lodge" by the 
Adoption of the following resolution 7th June, 1820: "KesoWed, that the proceedlnga of a temporary 
T 



310 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The foregoing report was dated 23rd January, A. L. 5826, A. D. 
182B, and signed " Benj. L. Peters, deputy grand master, and John V. 
Thurgar, grand secretary pro tem." 

"After closing, the brethren were invited by the members of Albion 
Lodge to partake of a cold collation. A few appropriate toasts and sen- 
timents were given, after which the brethren retired, highly gratified 
with the imposing and interesting exercises of the day." 

Albion Lodge has had a continuous existence from the date of its 
formation, A. D. 1825, under dispensation, up to the present time. It 
has worked under three separate warrants of constitution, viz. : first, from 
the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia, dated 30th November, 1825 ; 
second, from the grand lodge of England, ander date 10th March, 1829; 
and third, from the grand lodge of Nev Brunswick, dated 31st March, 
1868. 

Note. — It has been stated that another lodge was created in New 
Brunswick, by the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia, viz. : Regent 
Lodge, No. 41, at Dorchester, in the county of Westmorland. The lodge 
in question, which received a warrant under date 6th August, 1816, was 
located at the then village of Dorchester, Antigonish county. Nova 
Scotia. The similarity in the two names (Dorchester) no doubt led to 
the error. W. F. B. 

MILITARY LODGES. 

Military corps stationed in New Brunswick from time to time, in the 
early days of the province, have had lodges attached to them. But few 
of these bodies have come under my notice. If there were others than 
the three hereafter named, public and private sources have faTled to 
bring them into notice. 

In the Gazette of 9th January, 1787, there appeared in the editorial 
columns the following paragraph : "Now in the press, and will be pub- 
lished on Saturday next, ' The Pleasures and Advantages of Brotherly 
Unity,' a sermon preached before the right worshipful master, wardens 
and brethren of the 54th Regimental Lodge of Free and Accepted 
Masons, in the parish church, Saint John, 26th December, 1786, by 
George Bissett, A. M., rector of Saint Joiin." Although the 54th 
Regiment was stationed in Saint John seven yeare at least (from 1785 to 

grand lodge, held at St. John, N. 15., are Irregular in so far as Bro. B. L. Peters has exceedal the 
power in him by styling himself and acting as grand master Instead of D. G M ; but as the grand 
lodge feels convinced that it was not designedly done, they therefore confirm the installation of 
Lodge No. 5a." 

Ab/«.— This stricture, passed on what was termed the " irregularity " of Bro. Peters in styling 
himself " grand master," came with a very bad grace from a provincial grand lodge which had on 
all occaaiona arrogated to itself the title of " the most worshipful grand lodge." 



BRIEF -SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 3ll 

1791), I have not seen any other notice of the lodge, and am therefore in 
the dark as to its name, number and registry. 

Another regimental lodge is brought to notice in a letter addressed, 
24th September, 1788, to the provincial grand secretary at Halifax by 
the pf^cretary of Hiram Lodge, No. 17, to wit: 

" That contrary to one of the resolves of grand lodge of 19th 
January, 1785, which says ' that no military lodge shall make a citizen a 
mason,' notwithstanding, Lodge No. 230 of the First Battalion of Royal 
Artillery, stationed at the post of Fort Howe, near Saint John, have 
initiated into the first degree of masonry a Mr. Harry Jackson, one of our 
citizens." The provincial grand lodge took such prompt steps to put a 
stop to this interference with the civic lodge rights that no further com- 
plaint was heard. Lodge No. 230, mentioned in the letter, held a 
warrant from the Dermot or Athol Grand Lodge. 

Another military lodge was held in the Sixth Regiment of Foot 
stationed at Fredericton in the year 1793. It was Lodge No. 643 on the 
register of the grand lodge of Ireland. Through the recommendation of 
this lodge, Hiram York Lodge, No. 23, Fredericton, was granted a 
vrarraut by the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia. 



An Irregular body. 



GRETNA GREEN ASSOCIATION. 

This was a bogus body which purported to confer the craft degrees of 
freemasonry upon unsuspecting victims for the modest fee of twenty- 
seven shillings and sixpence. It held its meetings at Miramichi in the 
year 1826, being conducted by several individuals hailing from lodges in 
Scotland, viz. : 

Andrew Brown, St. John's Lodge, No. 160, New Abbey, Dumfriesshire. 

Christopher Mullins, " " 

David Steele, " " 

William Kerr, St. Cuthbeit's Lodge. 

John Wise, Caledonia Lodge, No. 310, Stirlingshire. 

The report of tlie doings of these persons, under the designation of 
" Gretna Green Association," was made to the provincial grand secretary 
at Halifax, 14th February, 1826, by Bro. A. D. Sherriff, who in his letter 
stated "that they had initiated, passed and raised William Dickson, 
Robert McEwan, John Edgar and Daniel Cossland." He concluded his 
report by stating to the provincial grand secretary that " the cold was so 
intense that the ink would with difficulty adhere to the paper." As 
might be reasonably expected this association had a short existence, as 
no further reference to it appears in the provincial grand lodge archives. 



312 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

A CLANDESTINE LODGE. 

During the year 1820 considerable excitement was caused in masonic 
circles in Saint John by the establishment and working of an illegal 
lodge in the parish of Portland, county of Saint John. Three 
individuals, named Samuel Campbell, Charles Campbell and Robert 
Forsyth, recently from Ireland, had purloined the warrant of Lodge No. 
977, issued by the grand lodge of Ireland, to be held at Crankenny, 
county Tyrone, Ireland, and brought it to Saint John with them. With 
this warrant in their possession they had opened a lodge at Portland, 
held meetings and conferred degrees upon several individuals. These 
high-handed acts coming to the notice of the craft in Saint John, a 
committee of St. John's and Union lodges, in conjunction with R. W. 
Bro. Thomas Wetmore, D. G. M. of New Brunswick, made a report to 
the authorities at Halifax, in which they stated that, " having remon- 
strated with these persons for their irregular and unconstitutional acts, 
and having requested them to desist until the pleasure of the grand lodge 
should be known, they replied that ' they wished to be on good terms 
with the fraternity of this country, but that they should not desist from 
holding their meetings, nor acknowledge the authority of the provincial 
grand lodge of Nova Scotia over them, until an order was received from 
the grand lodge of Ireland.' " 

The holders of the stolen warrant likewise addressed a letter to 
Halifax, stating that " they held a lawful warrant from the grand lodge 
of Ireland ; that on the removal to this country of a greater part of the 
members of their lodge they had brought the warrant over with them, 
which they thought enabled them to hold a lodge in any part o^ His 
Majesty's dominions; that they had reported the circumstance to the 
grand lodge of Ireland and awaited their decision ; but if the provincial 
grand lodge v ould acknowledge them by their signature and seal, they 
would cheerfully submit to the regulations of, and pay dues to the 
provincial grand lodge." 

In consequence of these representations, the provincial grand secre- 
tary was directed "to report the circumstance to the grand lodge of 
Ireland, with a request that they give information whether the warrant 
referred to was legally obtained and retained by the aforesaid persons." 

The grand lodge of Ireland dealt with the matter vigorously and 
passed the following order : " That in consequence of the warrant of 
Lodge No. 977 having been stolen and taken from the country, it be 
cancelled and of no effect, and that Samuel Campbell, late master of the 
said lodge, be expelled from all the rights, benefits and privileges of 
masons." 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 313 

Campbell may or may not have been aware of the flagrant act he had 
committed by removing the warrant from Ireland ; at all events he pro- 
fessed ignorance of any wrong doing, and denied any ulterior intention. 
Finding himself deprived of intercourse with the fraternity, and shorn of 
all his masonic rights, he, in time, returned the warrant to the grand 
secretary at Dublin with a humble apology and a professed acknowledg- 
ment of ignorance of intentional wrong, together with a prayer for 
forgiveness and for the restoration of his masonic privileges. There 
were no documents to shew whether or not the grand lodge of Ireland 
revoked the sentence of Campbell's expulsion, but it appears from the 
records of the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia, that on the 11th 
October, 1826, "the expulsion of Samuel Campbell, late master of Lodge 
No. 977, under Ireland, was, upon the recommendation and petition of 
R. W. Bro. B. L. Peters, District D. G. M., removed, and he was restored 
to the rights and privileges of freemasonry." This order having placed 
him en accord with the lodges in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, he 
afterwards became an affiliated member of St. John's Lodge, and the 
ruffled masonic circles in and about Saint John became again quiet and 
peaceful. 

LODGES CHARTERED BY THE GRAND LODGES OF ENGLAND AND 

IRELAND, WHICH HAVE BECOME EXTINCT OR 

WERE NEVER CONSTITUTED. 



UNION LODGE, No. 866, MILLTOVVN, ST. STEPHE^i, 
ENGLISH REGISTRY. 

The petitioners for the warrant were Bros. George Hiltz, Patrick 
Curran, William H. Smith, James Carnaby, Nathaniel Swift, Alexander 
Smith and Otis H. Johnson. Of the foregoing, Bro. George Hiltz was 
appointed the first W. M., Bro. Patrick Curran the first S. W., and Bro. 
William H. Smith the first J. W. in the warrant, and they were author- 
ized to meet as a lodge at St. Stephen, in the county of Charlotte, on the 
first Tuesday of every month. The warrant was dated at London, 
England, 29th August, 1851, and signed by the Earl of Zetland, G. M., 
the Earl of Yarborough, D. G. M., and William H. White, G. S. 

The records of the lodge, which were placed at my disposal, are 
contained in two well preserved volumes. They set forth that the first 
meeting was held 7th May, 1850, in the temperance hall, Milltown, St. 
Stephen, Charlotte county, where the lodge was opened and set to work 
under a dispensation issued by R. W. Bro. the Hon. Alexander Keith, 
provincial grand master. On the Slst July, 1852, it was constituted and 
consecrated under its warrant and the ofl5ccrs installed by W. Bro. Rev 
Jerome Alley, D. D., acting as deputy provincial grand master. 



814 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. ^ 

Union Lodge ceased operations by surrendering its warrant 15th 
July, 1861, after a short career of a little more than eleven years. This 
unfortunate event was brought about by a misunderstanding respecting 
territorial rights with the St. Croix L(jdge at Calais, in the state of 
Maine. Union Lodge, in ignorance of what in the United States was 
designated jurisdictional or territorial rights, was in the practice of 
receiving petitions from and initiating residents of Maine, and in this 
way, upon complaint of the St. Croix Lodge, became subject to the ban 
of the grand lodge of Maine, and although committees were appointed by 
the two lodges, conferences held, and resolutions adopted, having a 
settlement of the difficulty in view, no practical solution of the ispute 
could be agreed upon. 

Under date 3rd August, 1858, the record contains a copy of a letter 
from William Gray Clarke, grand secretary of England, written in reply 
to a report sent to him about the dispute between the two lodges, in 
which he advised that "a fraternal feeling should be cultivated ; that any 
compact entered into by the lodges, as to residence and reception of 
candidates, should be faithfully carried out." He concluded his letter 
with the statement that " the grand lodge of England does not recognize 
what is termed 'territorial jurisdiction,' but permits her lodges to receive 
candidates irrespective of their place of residence." Possibly, the infor- 
mation contained in the last sentence of this letter had the effect of 
shaping the course of the brethren of Union Lodge, and of preventing 
their acceptance of the full i)roposal3 of the St. Croix Lodge. Be that as 
it may, reconciliation was not effected, and the unfortunate ending came, 
as set forth in the following extracts from the records. Under date 25th 
June, 1861, it was "voted, that the W. M. direct the secretary to notify 
all members belonging to Union Lodge to appear at the next regular 
communication, to act on business connected with the surrender of our 
charter and such other business as may legally cojne before the lodge." 
The final meeting was held 15th July, 1861, when it was " voted, that an 
order be drawn on the treasurer for the amount of all demands against 
the lodge; that the furniture, etc , belonging to Union Lodge be placed 
in the possession of Bro. S. S. Cilley, treasurer, with the design that it be 
presented to Sussex Lodge' ; that the bible of this lodge be presented to 
past master George Hiltz ; that the secretary give each member of Union 
Lodge a certificate of membership, and that the master return the charter 
to the grand lodge." " There being no further business, the W. M. duly 
closed the lodge /orever." 

The warrant was sent to R. W. Bro. Alexander Balloch, D. P. G. M.^ 
who transmitted it to England 17th December, 1862. 

1 Sussex Lodge, No. 327, registry of Ireland, St. Stephen, 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 315 

QUEEN'S LODGE, No. 932, ENGLISH REGISTRY, 

GAGETOWN. 

This warrant was granted to John McLiss, master, Samuel White, 
S. \V., Thomas Cox, J. W., Jolin Earle, William Lamont, Thomas M. 
Tilley and Daniel S. Keir, authorizing them to meet at Gagetown, in the 
county of Queens, on the first Tuesday of every month. 

It was dated at London, England, the 23rd day of April, A. D. 1855, 
and signed by the Earl of Zetland, G. M., the Earl of Yarborough, 
D. G. M., and William H. White, G. S. 

This warrant was never made available, nor the lodge constituted 
under it, in consequence of the sickness and death of the brother named 
for its first master. As there was no other brother among the petitioners 
willing or competent to assume the duties of the chair, the warrant was 
placed in the hands of R. W. Bro. Balloch, D. P. G. M., and by him sent 
back to London 17th December, 1862. 

BRUNSWICK LODGE, UNDER DISPENSATION, MONCTON. 

The dispensation for this lodge was issued 20th October, 1856, by 
R. W. Bro. Alexander Balloch, D. P. G. M., under England, to W. Bro. 
James Robertson as worshipful master, with authority to meet at 
Moncton, Westmorland county. Meetings were held under this dispen- 
sation, degrees conferred upon a number of candidates, and the general 
business of a lodge transacted, but for some unexplained reason a wari'ant 
was never issued. The dispensation was surrendered 1st December, 1858, 
to the deputy provincial grand master and the work brought to a close. 

The books and documents, surrendered as above, were in the office of 
the grand secretary at the time of the great fire of 20th June, 1877, and 
were destroyed. 

HIBERNIAN LODGE, No. 318, REGISTRY OF IRELAND, 

. ST. ANDREWS. 

This lodge was the first in New Brunswick organized under authority 
of the grand lodge of Ireland. The warrant, issued 10th March, 1830, 
was granted to Bros. Samuel Barclay, William Finlay and Samuel 
Brown, as master and wardens. The body was designated as " a lodge of 
F. and A. M., Number 318^ on the registry of the grand masonic lodge 
of Ireland, to be holden in the town of Saint Andrews, and province of 
New Brunswick." The document was signed by the Duke of Leinster, 
grand master, and John Fowler, deputy grand secretary. 

1 Lodges under the Grand Lodge of Ireland were designated in the warrants by numbers only. 



816 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

After an honorable course of more than thirty years its labors came 
to a close. It appears, from information received from the grand secre- 
tary's office in Dublin, that the last brother initiated was Benjamin 
Bradford, in November, 1859, and the last election of officers took place 
in December, 1861, when William Doak was elected W. M., and William 
Milligan secretary. 

W. Bro. Adam W. Smith, the mainstay of the lodge for many years, 
paid up all dues to the grand lodge and transmitted the warrant to 
Dublin in the year 1863, " feeling convinced that any further prolonga- 
tion of its life was impracticable." This unpleasant step was forced upon 
him by reason of the great reduction in the membership (only three, 
himself included, remaining), and the impossibility of holding meetings, 
or continuing the work. 

PORTLAND UNION LODGE, No. 324, REGISTRY OF 
IRELAND, PORTLAND. 

This warrant was issued in May, 1842, by the grand lodge of Ireland, 
to Joseph Lingley, W. M., William Purdy, S. W., and John McCready, 
J. W., to meet in the parish of Portland, Saint John, New Brunswick. 
The meetings were held on the first Thursday of every month in Bro. 
John McCready's house. 

In the year 1846, after a short career of only four years, it ceased to 
work, but the warrant was not transmitted to the grand secretary's office 
in Dublin until 1850. The report accompanying its transmission con- 
tained a list of some twenty admissions to membership, but assigned no 
reason for the surrender. 

The brethren named in the warrant were previously members of St. 
John's Lodge of Saint John. 

It was the sixth lodge constituted in the city and county of Saint 
John, the former lodges being Hiram, No. 17, St. John's, No. 29, Union, 
No. 38, Albion, No. 52, under Nova Scotia, and Hiberuia, No. 301, 
under Ireland. 

The present Union Lodge of Portland is not the successor or outcome 
of this lodge. 

Lodges on the roll of the Grand Lodge of new Brunswick. 



ALBION LODGE, No. 1, SAINT JOHN. 

Originally constituted under a warrant from the provincial grand 
lodge of Nova Scotia, dated 30th November, 1825, for particulars of 
which see page 307. 

Wiien the lodges holding warrants from the old provincial grand 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 317 

lodge of Nova Scotia were obliged to relinquish them and accept sub- 
stitutes from the United Grand Lodge of England, Albion was the first 
to obey the mandate, and consequently became the senior lodge in New 
Brunswick on the roll of the united grand lodge, and has since then 
maintained that position among the sister lodges in the province. 

The English warrant was granted 10th March, 1829, by Prince 
Augustus Frederick of Brunswick Lunenburgh, Duke of Sussex, Earl of 
Inverness, Baron of Arklow, Knight of the Most Noble Order of the 
Garlor, etc., etc., grand master of the Ancient and Honorable Fraternity 
of F. & A. M. of England, to the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, Thomas Leavitt, William Durant, Robert Ray, William Scam- 
mell, James Condle, Robert Welch, Josiah Brownsword, and others, 
under the title of " Albion Lodge, No. 841 "; Thomas Leavitt to be the 
first master, William Durant to be the first senior warden, and Robert 
Ray to be the first junior warden ; the lodge to be holden at Saint J hn, 
in the province of New Brunswick, on the first Friday in each cah idar 
month. The other grand lodge officers whose names were appended to 
the warrant were Lord Dundas, D. G. M., and William H. White and 
Edward Harper, grand secretarie??.' 

The lodge was constituted under this warrant 18th December, 1829, 
without any ceremony beyond the reading and reception of the warrant. 

A re-numbering of the lodges under England took place in 1838, 
when tbe number of Albion was changed from 841 to 570, and at a 
subsequent re-numbering in 1862, it was altered to No. 400, which 
number it held up to the date of surrendering its warrant to the United 
Grand Lodge of England. 

Albion Lodge, by its delegates, acted in concert with the other lodges 
in the province in the forn)ation of the Grand Lodge of New Brunswick, 
and in consequence of such action surrendered its warrant to England 
1st November, 1867. Its working was continued by an interim warrant 
issued by the grand master of the newly formed Grand Lodge of New 
Brunswick. 

On the 31st day of March, A. D. 1868, a new warrant was granted 
under the authority and sanction of the Grand Lodge of New Brunswick 
by Most Worshipful Brother Benjamin Lester Peters, Esquire, Queen's 
Counsel, Deputy Judge of the (^ourt of Vice-Admiralty, etc., etc., Grand 

1 At the union, A. D. 1813, of the two English grand lodges (Ancients and Moderns), William 
H. AVhite was grand secretary of the latter, and Kdward Harper of the former. An agreement was 
entered into that they should become joint grand secretaries of the united grand lodge, and remain 
in that capacity until the death of one of them, when the survivor should continue, and thereafter 
but one grand secretary should fill the office. Bro. Harper died A. D. 1829, and Bro. White retired 
in 18.57. The latter was first appointed A. D. 1810, and was therefore forty-seven years in office at 
the time of his resignation. He died 5th April, 1866, after an extraordinary prolonged membership 
in the craft of sixty-seven years. 



318 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Master of the Ancient and Honorable Fraternity of F. & A. M. of 
New Brunswick, constituting the lodge as " Albion Lodge, No. 1," on 
the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren Christopher Murray as W. M, Charles D. Thomson as S. W., 
and George Byron Cushing as J. W., continuing to them and all other 
the brethren on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a 
lodge of F. & A. M. to meet at the city of Saint John on the first 
Friday in each and every month. This warrant was countersigned by 
R. W. Bro, William Wedderburn, deputy grand master, and V. W. Bro. 
William F. Bunting, grand secretary, and was formally placed in posses- 
sion of the lodge by Grand Master Peters at a communication held 8th 
May, 1868. 

In consequence of the destruction of this warrant by fire 20th June, 
1877, a duplicate was issued under date 18th July, 1877. In addition to 
the loss of the warrant, the jewels, banners and all other property of the 
lodge, except the records, were also lost in that fire. 

The lodge continues to meet in the Masonic Temple, Germain street, 
city of Saint John. 

ST. JOHN'S LODGE, No. 2, SAINT JOHN. 

Originally constituted 5th April, 1802, under a warrant dated 18th 
December, 1801, granted by the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia. 
As these pages contain a full history of the lodge, any recapitulation here 
would be a work of supererogation. It is suflUcient to state that it has 
had a continuous existence from its first organization up to the present 
time, and is therefci'e the oldest lodge in New Brunswick, although it 
does not hold the senior number. This seeming anomaly is explained on 
page 301. 

HIBERNIA LODGE, No. 3, SAINT JOHN. 

Originally constituted under warrant No. 301, grantod 10th April, 
1837, by the grand masonic lodge of In^land, the M. W. His Grace 
Augustus Frederic, Duke of Leinster, etc., etc., being grand master, unto 
the trusty and well beloved brethren, James Hinds, John Murray and 
Angus McAfee, constituting and appointing the said brethren to bo 
master and wardens of a 1 .dge of F. & A. M., No. 301, on the registry 
of the grand masonic lodge of Ireland, to be holden in the city of Saint 
John, in New Brunswick. 

Warrant No. 301 was originally issued August 3, 1758, to a lodge 
held at Carrickmacross, county Monaghan, Ireland, and cancelled by the 
grand lodge February 7, 1833. The same number was granted to 
Hibernia of Saint John. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 319 

Hibernia lodge, by its representatives, united with the other lodges in 
the province in the formation of the Grand Lodge of New Brunswick. 
The warrant was surrendered to the Grand Lodge of Ireland 12th 
November, 1867, and an interim warrant received from the grand master 
of New Brunswick. 

A new warrant was granted 30th April, 1868, under the a\ithority 
and sanction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick by M. W. Bro. 
Benjamin Lester Peters, Esquire, etc, etc., G. M., constituting the lodge 
as " Hibernia Lodge, No. 3," on the roll of the grand lodge of New 
Brunswick, with the right trusty and well beloved brethren, John 
Mullin as W. M., Matthew Henderson as S. W., and Frankland L. Lewin 
as J. W., continuing to them and all other tlie brethren on the roll of the 
lodge, their rights and privileges as a lodge of F. & A. M. to meet at 
the city of Saint John on the second Tuesday of every month. This 
warrant was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William Wedderhurii, D. G. 
M., and V. \V. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., and was formally placed in 
the possession of the lodge by Grand Master Peters at a comnmuicatiou 
held 19th May, 1868. 

The warrant, jewels, banners, records, and nil other property of the 
lodge were destroyed by fire 20th June, 1877. A duplicate warrant, 
now held by the lodge, was issued 18th July, 1877. 

There were four other brethren who joined in the original formation 
of the lodge whose names do not appear on the warrant, viz. : Bros. 
James Nethery, Joseph McMaugh, William PjiuI and James McMullin. 

SUSSEX LODGE, No. 4, DORCHESTER. 
Originally No. 705, Reoistry of Enoland; Changed A. D. 18G2 to No. 480. 

Sussex Lodge was first opened under a dispensation issued at Halifax, 
N. S., 1st April, 1840, by R. W. Bro. the Hon. Alexander Keith, provin- 
cial grand master, to Bros. James S. McElmen, John Weldon and Thomas 
Cochran, as master and wardens. In tliis disi)cnsation the lodge was 
named " The Younger Brother of the Cuml)erlarid Harmony Lodge," 
but was subsequently changed to "Sussex Lodge" in the application for 
the warrant. As the early records of the lodge were lost or destroyed, 
the tUite of opening under the disjjensation and the date of consecration 
under the warrant cannot be given. 

The formal warrant, dated 5th March, 1842, was granted by Prince 
Augustus Frederick of Brunswick Lunenburgh, Duke of Sussex, etc., 
etc.. Grand Master, under the sanction and authority of the united grand 
lodge of England, to the right trusty and well beloved l)rpthren, James S. 
McElmen, John Weldon, Thomas Cochran, William B. Weldon, William 
Hunter, N. W. Foster and John Cu minings, constituting the said brethreu 



320 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

into a lodge of F. & A. M. under the title of " The Sussex Lodge, No. 
705," to be holden at Dorchester, in New Brunswick, on or after the full 
moon of every month, with Bro. James McElmen as the first W. M., 
Bro. John Weldon first S. W., and Bro. Thomas Cochran first J. W. 
The other signatories to the warrant were the R. W. and Rt. Hon, James 
Brownton William Gascoyne Cecil, Marquis and Earl of Salisbury, 
D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. William H. White, G. S. 

Sussex Lodge did not join with the other lodges in the ftymation of 
the grand lodge of New Brunswick, but came within its jurisdiction by 
surrender of warrant 30th April, 1868, to the grand lodge of England. 

On the 1st day of May, 1868, a new warrant under the authority and 
sanction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick was granted by M. W. 
Bro. B. L. Peters, Esq., etc., etc., G. M., constituting the lodge as " The 
Sussex Lodge, No. 4," on the roll of the said grand lodged with the right 
trusty and well beloved brethren, Amos S. Wilson as W. M., William 
Morrice as S. W., and Robert Hallett as J. W., continuing to them aud 
all other the brethren on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges 
as a lodge of F. & A. M., to meet at Dorchester, in the county of 
Westmorland, on the Thursday on or after the full moon of every month. 
This warrant was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William Wedderburu, 
D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S. 

SAINT MARK'S LODGE, No. 5, ST. ANDREWS. 
Originally No. 759 Under England; Changed A. D. 1862 to No. 518. 

Constituted 5th November, 1845, under a warrant granted 9th 
August, 1845, by Thomas Dundas, Earl of Zetland, Baron Dundas of 
Aske, in the county of York, etc., etc., grand master, under the authority 
and sanction of the united grand lodge of England, to the right trusty 
and well beloved brethren. Rev. Jerome Alley, D. D., Charles Vaughan 
Forster, William Ashweek Jarvis, Thomas Wyer, Robert Edward Law, 
Samuel Tilley Gove and Samuel Frye, constituting the said brethren into 
a lodge of F. & A. M. under the title of "Saint Mark's Lodge, No. 
759," to be holden in the town of St. Andrews, in New Brunswick, on the 
first Wednesday in every month ; the Rev. Jerome Alley to be first 
master, Charles Vaughan Forster the first S. W., and William A. Jarvis 
the first J. W. It was also signed by the R. W. and Rt. Hon. Richard 
William Penn Curzon Howe, Earl Howe, etc., etc., D. G. M., and V. W. 
Bro. William H. White, G. S. 

This warrant was surrendered to the grand lodge of England 5th 
March, 1868, and a new one granted 2nd May, 1868, under the authority 
and sanction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, Esquire, etc., etc., G. M., constituting the lodge as " Saint Mark's 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 321 

Lodge, No. 5," on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty 
and well beloved brethren, Benjamin R, Stevenson as W. M., Jame& 
McKinney as S. W., and John Dolby as J. W., continuing to them and 
all other the brethren on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges 
as a lodge of F. & A. M., to meet at St. Andrews on the first Thursday 
in each and every month. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William 
Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., and was 
formally piaced in the jiossession of the lodge by Grand Master Peters at 
a communication held 28th August, 1868. 

Saint Mark's Lodge did not take part in the erection of the grand 
lodge of New Brunswick. 

SOLOMON'S LODGE, No. 6, FREDERICTON. 

Originally No. 764, Registry of England; Changed A. D. 1862 to No. 522. 

Constituted under warrant dated 1st January, 1846, granted by Earl 
Zetland, etc., etc., grand master, under the authority and sanction of the 
united grand lodge of England, to the right trusty and well beloved breth- 
ren, John Stephens, John Grant, William Jaffrey, Robert Wylie, John B. 

Mjrrell, Andrews, Edward W. Greenwood and John MacKay,^ 

constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. M., under the 
title of " Solomon's Lodge, No. 764," to be holden at Fredericton, in New 
Brunswick, on the first Tuesday after each full moon, Bro. John 
Stephens to be the first master, Bro. John Grant the first S. W., and Bro. 
William Jaffrey the first J. W. The other signatories to this warrant 
were R. W. and Rt. Hon. Earle Howe, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. H. 
White, G. S. 

Solomon's Lodge, by its representatives, united with the other lodges 
in the province in the erection of the grand lodge of New Brunswick,, 
and followed up its act in this respect by surrendering its warrant to the 
grand lodge of England. 

A new warrant was granted 4th May, 1868, under authority and 
sanction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, Esquire, etc., etc., G. M., constituting the lodge as "Solomon's 
Lodge, No. 6," on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty 
and well beloved brethren, Harris Allan as W. M., John Hewitson as 
S. W., and James H. Hasey as J. W., continuing to them and all other 
the brethren on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a 
lodge of F. A A. M., to meet at Fredericton, on the Tuesday after the 
full of the moon in every calendar month. It was countersigned by R. 
W. Bro. William Wedderburu, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunt- 
ing, G. S. 

The latter warrant was surrendered 13th May, 1879, for the purpose 



322 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

of joining with St. Andrew's Lodge, No. 29, of Fredericton, in the forma- 
tion of Hiram Lodge, No. 6. 

The particular reasons for the union are set forth in a report of a 
joint committee of the two lodges, viz. : " They (the committee) have 
considered the matter submitted to them, and are of opinion the amalga- 
mation of the two lodges wouhl materially conduce to the prosperity of 
freemasonry in Fredericton and the surrounding jurisdiction, and they 
would therefore strongly recommend such amalgamation. In order to 
avoid difficulty which might a *i?e by either lodge surrendering its 
charter, and to secure to every m mber of each lodge, in good standing, 
admission to the lodge as amalgamated, your committee suggest that 
arrangements be made with the grand lodge by which the chartei's of the 
respective lodges may be surrendered and a new charter issued to a new 
lodge, the lodge to be called by and registered under a new name, the 
charter members of the new lodge to be all members of the old lodges in 
good standing in their respective lodges at the time of surrendering their 
charters, the numerical rank of the new lodge to be that of Solomon's 
Lodge, and all funds and property of the lodges so surrendering their 
charters to be given up by the grand lodge to the new lodge, and to be 
its property." 

In the petition to grand lodge, signed by the members of both lodges, 
they asked that the new lodge be named " Hiram Lodge, No. 6," which 
request was acceded to by grand lodge, and a new warrant issued in the 
terms set forth in the petition. 

HIRAM LODGE, No. 6, FREDERICTON. 

The successor of Solomon's Lodge, No. 6, and St. Andrew's Lodge, 
No. 29, was formally constituted 5th June, 1879, by M. W. Bro. Robert 
Marshall, grand master, assisted by a staff of grand lodge officei"s, under 
a warrant dated 4th May, 1879, granted under the authority and sanction 
of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, by M. W. Bro. Robert Mai-shall, 
G. M., to the right trusty and well beloved brethren, Alfred F. Street as 
W. M., Samuel Kee, Junior, as S. W., and Richard M. Finder as J. W., 
constituting them and all other the brethren on the rolls of the late 
Solomon's Lodge, No. 6, and St. Andrew's Lodge, No. 29, into a lodge of 
F. & A. M., under the title or denomination of " Hiram Lodge, No. 6," 
on the roll of the said grand lodge, to meet at Fredericton, in the county 
of York, on the first Thursday of every month. It was countersigned by 
R. W. Benjamin R. Stevenson, D. G. M.,and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S. 
At the request of Hiram Lodge the warrants of the late Solomon's 
and St. Andrew's Lodges were, by vote of grand lodge, placed in its 
possession for future keeping. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 323 

SUSSEX LODGE, No. 7, ST. STEPHEN. 

Was originally constituted 29th April, 1846, Bro. James Kyle 
officiiiting as installing officer, under a warrant granted 17th March, 
1846, by the grand masonic lodge of Ireland, the M. W. His Grace 
Augustus Frederic, Duke of Leinster, etc., etc., G. M., unto the trusty 
and much beloved brethren, Dugald Blair, M. D., Thomas W. Rogers 
and James Friiik, constituting and appointing the said brethren to be 
master and wardens of a lodge of F. and A, M., No. 327, on the registry 
of the grand masonic lodge of Ireland, to be holden at St. Stephen, in 
New Brunswick, on the first Wednesday of every month. Under the 
supposition that a change of locality would be a benefit, the lodge 
removed to Milltown in July, 1861. After remaining in the latter place 
three years and five months, it returned to its old quarters in St. Stephen 
in the month of December, 1864. 

Sussex Lodge, having by its delegates united in the erection of the 
grand lodge of New Brunswick, surrendered its warrant to the grand 
lodge of Ireland, 30th October, 1867, and received an interim warrant 
from the grand master of New Brunswick. 

On the 5tli day of May, 1868, a new warrant, under the authority 
and sanction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, was granted by M. 
W. Bro. B. L, Peters, Esquire, G. M., constituting the lodge as " Sussex 
Lodge, No. 7," on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty 
and well beloved brethren, Moses McGowan as W. M., David Main as 
S. W., and William H. Stevens as J. W., continuing to them and all 
other the brethren on the roll of the lodge, their i-ights and privileges as 
a lodge of F. & A. M., to meet at St. Stephen, Charlotte county, on the 
first AVednesday in each and every month. It was countersigned by R. 
W. Bro. William Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, 
G. S., and was formally placed in the possession of the lodge by Grand 
Master Peters at a communication held 31st August, 1868. 

CARLETON UNION LODGE, No. 8, CARLETON, SAINT JOHN. 

Oeiqinally No. 767, Registry of England ; Changed A. D. 18G2 to No. 524. 

The warrant was granted 21st March, 1846, under the authority and 
sanction of the united grand lodge of England, The Rt. Hon. Thomas 
Dundas, Earl Zetland, being G. M. ; Earl Howe, D. G. M., and W. 
H. White, G. S., to the right trusty and well beloved brethren, John 
Saunders Clarke, George Bond, Thomas Coram, George H. Robertson, 
Joseph Beatteay, Joseph Coram, George W. Smith, John Clarke, Jr., 
Charles M. Gardner, Daniel W. Clark and William L. Avery, of whom 
John Saunders Clark was the first master; George Bond, first S. AV., and 



324 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Thomas Coram, first J. W., constituting the said brethren into a lodge of 
F. & A. M., under the title of " The Carleton Union Lodge, No. 767," to 
be holden at Carleton, in the city of Saint John, in the province of New 
Brunswick, on the first Thursday in every month. It was constituted 
under this warrant 24th June, 1846, by W. Bro. Alexander Robertson, 
W. M. of Albion Lodge, on which occasion the brethren went in pro- 
cession to the Episcopal church, Carleton, where a sermon was preached 
by Bro. the Rev. Benjamin G. Gray, D. D. 

Carleton Union Lodge, by its delegates, united in the erection of the 
grand lodge of New Brunswick, and i)i consequence surrendered its 
English warrant 14th November, 1867, receiving an interim warrant 
from the grand master of I^ew Brunswick. 

A new warrant was granted 6th May, 1868, under the sanction and 
authority of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as " The Carleton Union Lodge, 
No. 8," on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well 
beloved brethren, Henry Leonard as W. M., Henry Littlehale as S. W., 
and Isaac J. Olive, Jr., as J. W., continuing to them and all other the 
brethren on the roll of the lodge, their privileges as a lodge of F. & A. M., 
to meet at Carleton, in the city of Saint John, on the first Thursday in 
every month. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William Wedder- 
burn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., and was formally 
placed in the possession of the body, by Grand Master Peters, at a com- 
munication held 24th June, 1868. 

The banners of this lodge, which happened to be in the masonic hall, 
Saint John, 20th June, 1877, were burned in the disastrous fire of that 
date. 

MIDIAN LODGE, No. 9, CLIFTON, KINGS COUNTY. 

Originally No. 770, Registry of England; Changed A. D. 1862 to No. 527. 

Midian Lodge was constituted 26th January, 1847, by W. Bro. John 
Thomas, W. M. St. John's Lodge of Saint John, under a warrant granted 
18th May, 1846, by the united grand lodge of England, Rt. Hon. Earl 
Zetland being G. M., Rt. Hon. Earl of Yarborough D. G. M., and W. H. 
White G. S., to the right trusty and well beloved brethren Justus Sher- 
wood Wetinore, Andrew Cruikshank Otty, David Wetmore, Jr., James 
Wetmore Puddington, James Flewelling, Samuel Foster, Benjamin 
Darling, Robert Townsend, Thomas W. H. Melowney, John Barbarie, 
and Cimrad John Hendricks, constituting the said brethren^ Justus S. 
Wetmore being the first master, Andrew C. Otty the first S. W., and 
David Wetmore, Jr., the first J. W., into a lodge of F. & A. M., under 
the title of " Midian Lodge, No. 770," to be holden at Kingston, in the 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 325 

parish of Kingston, King's county, New Brunswick, on the second Tues- 
day of every month. 

The majority of the brethren whose names appear in this warrant 
were formerly members of Midian Lodge, No. 31, registry of Nova Scotia, 
which ceased working A. IX 1841. Under its English warrant it held 
its meetings at Kingston until 8th February, 1859, when it removed to 
Clifton, and has remained there up to the present time. 

Midian Lodge, by its delegates, united with the other lodges in the 
erection of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, and, in consequence, sur- 
rendered its English warrant 12th November, 1867, receiving at the same 
time an interim warrant from the grand master of New Brunswick. 

On the 7th day of May, 1868, a new warrant, under the authority 
and sanction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, was granted by 
M. W. Bro. B. L. Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as " The Midian 
Lodge, No. 9," on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty 
and well beloved brethren G. Hudson Flewelling as W. M., William W. 
Wetmore as S. W., and Thaddeus Scott as J. W., continuing to them and 
all other the brethren on the roll of the lodge their rights and privileges 
as a lodge of F. & A. M., to meet at Clifton, in the parish of Kingston, 
King's county, on the second Tuesday of every month. It was counter- 
signed by R. W. Bro. William Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. 
W. F. Bunting, G. S., and committed to the charge of the lodge by Grand 
Master Peters at a communication held 9th June, 1868. 

UNION LODGE OF PORTLAND, No. 10, SAINT JOHN. 
Ori(jinax,ly No. 780, English Registry; Changed A. D. 1862 to No. 635. 

Constituted under a warrant granted 3rd November, 1846, under the 
authority and sanction of the united grand lodge of England, Earl Zet- 
land being G. M., Earl of Yarborough D. G. M., and W. H. White G.8., 
to the trusty and well beloved brethren Alexander Balloch, George Young, 
George Kirsop, Robert Mitchell, James Love, James Rosborough, Robert 
A. Gregory and others, constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. 
& A. M., under the title of " Union Lodge of Portland, No. 780," to be 
holden at the village of Portland, in the immediate vicinity of the city 
of Saint John, in New Brunswick, on the first Thursday in every month. 
Alexander Balloch was the first mast* , George Young the first S. W., 
and Robert Kirsop the first J. W. This lodge continued to meet in Port- 
land until 5th March, 1853, when it removed to Saint Joliii. 

Union Lodge of Portland, by its representatives, united with the 
other lodges in the erection of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, and 
to this end surrendered its English warrant 19th October, 1867, receiving 
an interim warrant from the grand master of New Brunswick. 



326 FREP:MAS0NRY in new BRUNSWICK. 

On the 8th day of May, 1868, a new warrant, under the authority and 
sanction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, was granted by M. W. 
Bro. B. L. Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as " The Union Lodge of 
Portland, No. 10," on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty 
and well beloved brethren David Ransom Munro as W. M., Robert M. 
Stevens as S. W., and Archibald McLean as J. W., continuing to them 
and all other the brethren on the roll of the lodge their rights and privi- 
leges as a lodge of F. & A. M., to meet at the city of Saint John on the 
third Thursday of every month. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. 
William Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. ]3ro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., 
and formally entrusted to the lodge by Grand Master Peters, 20th 
August, 1868. 

The latter warrant, with the records, jewels, banners, seal, and all 
paraphernalia, was destroyed by fire 20th June, 1877. A duplicate of 
the warrant was issued 18th July, 1877, and is now in the possession of 
the lodge. 

WOODSTOCK LODGE, No. 11, WOODSTOCK. 

Originally No. 811, Reoistry of England ; Changed to No. 553 A. D. 1862. 

Originally opened August, 1847, by virtue of a dispensation from R. 
W. Bro. Hon. Alexander Keith, provincial grand master, and subse- 
quently, in the month of August, 1848, constituted under a warrant 
granted 18th April, 1848, under authority and sanction of the united 
grand lodge of England, the Rt. Hon. Earl of Zetland, G. M., the Rt. 
Hon. Earl of Yarborough, D. G. M., and W. H. White, G. S., unto the 
trusty and well beloved brethren Charles Perley, Asa Upton, Amos C. 
Tolford, Leonard R. Coombes, Henry Jones, James R. Tupper and 
William Connell, constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. 
M., under the title of " Woodstock Lodge, No. 811," with Charles Perley 
as first master, Asa Upton, the first S. W., and Amos C. Tolford, the first 
J. W., to be holden at Woodstock, in the county of Carleton and province 
of New Brunswick, on the first Wednesday in each month. 

Woodstock Lodge, by its representatives, united with the other lodges 
in the formation of the grand lodge of New Brunswick ; subsequently 
surrendering its English warrant and receiving an interim warrant from 
the grand master of New Brunswick. 

Under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick, a new warrant was issued 9th May, 1868, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as " Woodstock Lodge, No. 11," on 
the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren Robert A. Hay as W. M., Isaiah J. McCoy as S. W., and 
Stephen B. Appleby as J. W., continuing to them and all other the 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 827 

brethren, on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a lodge of 

F. & A. M., to meet at Woodstock on the first Wednesday of every month. 
It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William Wedderburn, D. G. M., and 
V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., and placed in the possession of the 
lodge at the regular communication in September, 1868. 

A duplicate of the latter warrant was issued 2nd June, 1877, in con- 
sequence of the destruction by fire of the hall belonging to the lodge, 
together with the records and all other property, 17th May, 1877. 

SAINT GEORGE LODGE, No. 12, ST. GEORGE, CHARLOTTE 

COUNTY. 

Originally No. 912, English Registry ; Changed to No. 629 A. D. 1862. 

Constituted 27th February, 1855, under warrant granted 7th 
February, 1854, by the united grand lodge of England, Earl Zetland, 

G. M., Earl of Yarborough, D. G. M., and W. H. White, G. S., unto the 
right trusty and well beloved brethren, Kilburn G. Robinson, Benjamin 
Chadburn, Samuel Elliott; Levi W. Young, Edwin R. Russell, John F. 
Rogers and James W. Rogers, constituting the said brethren into a 
lodge of F. & A. M., under the title of "Saint George Lodge, No. 912," 
with Kilburn Gardiner Robinson as the first n)aster, Benjamin Chadburn 
the first S. W., and Samuel Elliot the first J. W., to be holdeu at Saint 
George, in the county of Charlotte, in the province of New Brunswick, 
on the first Tuesday in every month. A delay having occurred in the 
issue of the warrant, the lodge was opened 15th June, 1854, under a dis- 
pensation issued at Halifax, Nova Scotia, 6th June, 1854, by R. W. Bro. 
James Forman, "deputy provincial grand master of Nova Scotia, New 
Brunswick, Newfoundland, and Prince Edward Island." 

Saint George Lodge, by its delegates, united with the other lodges in 
the province in the erection of the grand lodge of New Brunswick. This 
warrant was surrendered to the grand lodge of England 4th February, 
1868, in lieu of which an interim warrant was received from the grand 
master of New Brunswick. 

Under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick, a new warrant was granted 11th May, 1868, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as "Saint George Lodge, No, 12," 
on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well 
beloved brethren, Hugh A. McKenzie as W. M., Charles McGee, Junior, 
as S. W., and George Helms as J. W., continuing to them and all other 
the brethren on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a 
lodge of F. & A M., to rie;.it at St. George, in the county of Charlotte, 
on the first Tuesday of every month. It was countersigned by R. W. 



328 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Bro. William Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, 
G. S., and formally placed in the possession of the lodge by Grand 
Master Peters at a communication of the lodge held 12th September, 
1868. 

CORINTHIAN LODGE, No. 13, HAMPTON. 

Originally No. 918, Registry of Enciland ; Changed to No. 635 A. D. 1862. 

Constituted 11th November, 1854, under warrant granted 11th July, 
1854, by the united grand lodge of England, Earl Zetland, G. M., Earl 
of Yarborough, D. G. M., and W. H. White, G. S., to the right trusty 
and well beloved brethren, Henry Phipps Otty, John Barbarie, Conrad 
John Hendricks, Abel English, Sylvester Z. Earle, Jr., Andrew C. Otty, 
Oliver Byram, Joseph H. Littlehale, Justus Earle, Allen C. Otty, George 
Byram, George M. Fairweather and James Wetmore, of whom Henry P. 
Otty was the first master, John Barbarie the first S. W., and Conrad J. 
Hendricks the first J. W., constituting the said brethren into a lodge of 
F. & A. M., under the title of "Corinthian Lodge, No. 918," to be 
holden in the parish of Norton, Kings county' in New Brunswick, on the 
Wednesday after each full moon. Preliminary to the organization of 
the lodge under its warrant, a dispensation was issued by R. W. Bro. the 
Hon. Alexander Keith, provincial grand master of Nova Scotia, New 
Brunswick, etc., etc., and by authority of this dispensation the lodge was 
opened 23rd June, 1853, by W. Bro. James Robertson, W. M. of Albion 
Lodge of Saint John. 

This lodge first met at Norton, as set forth in the warrant, and con- 
tinued to meet there until October, 1857, when a removal was made to 
the village of Hampton ; and again in September, 1872, it changed its 
quarters to Hampton Station, where it continues to meet. 

Corinthian Lodge did not join with the other lodges in the formation 
of the grand lodge of New Brunswick. It came in subsequently by 
surrendering its English warrant 17th November, 1867, and accepting 
au interim warrant from the grand master of New Brunswick. 

Under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge of !New Bruns- 
wick, a new warrant was granted 12th May, 1868, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as "Corinthian Lodge, No. 13," on 
the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, Henry Hallett as W. M., George Otty as S. W., and John 
Darling as J. W., continuing to them and all other the brethren on the 
roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a lodge of F. & A. M., 
to meet at Hampton, Kings county, on the Wednesday on or after each 
full moon.. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William Wedderburn, 
D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., and entrusted to tlie 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 329 

lodge by R. W. Bro. Wedderburn, D. G. M., at a communication of the 
lodge held 30th December, 1868. 

ALLEY LODGE, No. 14, UPPER MILLS, ST. STEPHEN. 
Originally No. 9G2, REmsTiiv of England ; Changed to No. 664, A. D. 1862. 

Alley Lodge was first opened 5th August, 1855, under a dispensation 
issued by R. W. Bro. the Hon. Alexander Keith, P. G. M. It was for- 
mally constituted 10th July, 1856, by W. Bro. William H. Smith, P. M. 
Union Lodge, No. 866, E. R., of Milltown, under a warrant dated 26th 
February, 1856, granted under the sanction and authority of the united 
grand lodge of England, p]arl of Zetland, G. M., Earl of Yarborough, 
D. G. M., and W. H. White, G. S., to the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, Rex M. King, John Prescott, Edward Towers, Washington 
Nodding, Loring Q. Lane, Ambrose Abbott and Robert Minard, con- 
stituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. M., with Rex M. 
King as the first master, John Prescott, the first S. W., and Edward 
Towers, the first J. W., under the title of "The Alley Lodge, No. 962," 
to be holden at Upper Mills, Saint Stephen, New Brunswick, on the first 
Thursday of each month. 

Alley Lodge, by its delegates, united in the erection of the grand 
lodge of New Brunswick, and surrendered its warrant to England 15th 
October, 1867, in lieu of which it received an interim warrant from the 
grand ninster of New Brunswick. 

Under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick, a new warrant was granted 13th May, 1868, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M., constituting the hxlge as "Tiie Alley Lodge, No. 14," on 
the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, James V. Hanson as W. M., James Dickie as S. W., and Charles 
Lamson as J. W., continuing to them and all other the brethren on the 
roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a lodge of F. <fe A. M., to 
meet at Upper Mills, Saint Stephen, in the county of Charlotte, on the 
first Thursday of every month. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. 
William Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., 
and formally placed in the possession of the lodge by Grand Master 
Peters, at a communication held 29th August, 1868. 

HOWARD LODGE, No. 15, HILLSBOROUGH. 

Originally No. 966, Registry of England; Changed to No. 668, A. D. 1862. 

Howard Lodge was first opened 12th April, 1855, by virtue of a dis- 
pensation issued 31st March, 1855, by R. W. Bro. Alexander Keith, P. G. 
M., and afterward formally constituted by W. Bro. James Robertson, P. M. 



330 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

of Keith Lodge, No. 927, E. R., of Moncton, under a warrant granted 
4th April, 1856, under the sanction and authority of the united grand 
lodge of England, the Rt. Hon. Earl of Zetland, G. M., the Rt. Hon. 
Earl of Yarborough, D. G. M., and W. H. White, G. S., to the right 
trusty and well beloved brethren, Samuel P. Fowler, Heniy Bothwiek, 
John McAuley Gallacher, Samuel Kenan, Samuel Clark, Samuel Shaw, 
John A. Reed and Alex. McRae, constituting the said brethren into a 
lodge of F. & A. M., under the title of " Howard Lodge, No. 966," to be 
holden at Hillsborough, in New Brunswick, on the first Tuesday in each 
month ; Samuel P. Fowler to be the first master, Henry Bothwick the 
first S. W., and John McA. Gallacher the first J. W. 

This lodge did not join in the formation of the grand lodge of New 
Brunswick, but came in subsequently by surrendering its warrant 14th 
January, 1868, to the grand lodge of England, and receiving an interim 
warrant from the grand master of New Brunswick. 

Under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick, a new warrant was granted 14th May, 1868, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as " Howard Lodge, No. 15," on *he 
roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, Dennis A. Duffy as W. M., Charles W. Colter as S. W., and 
Henry T. Stevens as J. W., continuing to them and all other the brethren 
on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a lodge of F. & 
A. M., to meet at Hillsborough, Albert county, on the first Tuesday of 
every month. This warrant was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William 
Wedderburn, D. G. M , and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., and en- 
trusted to the lodge 2nd March, 1869. 

LODGE ST. ANDREW, No. 16, RICHIBUCTO. 

Originally No. 376, Registry of Scotland. 

Lodge St. Andrew was first opened 7th February, 1856, by virtue of 
a dispensation issued by R. W. Bro, the Hon. Alexander Keith, provincial 
grand master under Scotland.^ It was formally constituted 4th March, 
1858, by W. Bro. Charles Brown, P. M., under a warrant dated 2nd 
February, 1857, granted by authority and sanction of the grand lodge of 
Scotland, the Most Noble John, Duke of Athole, etc., etc., Grand Master 
Mason, and the R. W. Bro. William A. Laurie, G. S., to the right trusty 
and well beloved brethren Robert Ross as the first right worshipful 
master, Alexander Girvan the first S. W., and Morden S. Levy the first 

1 Previous to the appointment of a provincial grand master in and over New Brunswick, and 
the erection of an independent grand lodge in Nova Scotia, B. W. Bro. Keith held the dual position 
of provincial grand master under the grand lodges of England and Scotland. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 831- 

J. W., and others, constituting tlicni into a lodge of F. & A. M., under 
the style of " Lodge St. Andrew, No. 376," to be holden at Richibucto, 
in New Brunswick. 

Lodge St. Andrew, by its delegates, joined the other lodges in the 
province in the erection of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, and sur- 
rendered its warrant 31st October, 1867, to the grand lodge of Scotland, 
receiving in lieu thereof an interim warrant from the grand master of 
New Brunswick. 

Under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick a new warrant was granted 15th May, 1868, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M,, constituting the lodge as " Lodge St. Andrew, No, 16," on 
the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, James McDougall as W. M., Isaac W. Doherty as S. W., and 
Thomas W. Dibblee as J. W., continuing to them and all other the mem- 
bers on the roll of the lodge their rights and privileges as a lodge of 
F. & A. M., to meet at Richibucto, Kent county, on the first Tuesday in 
each and every month. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William 
Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. \V. F. Bunting, G. S., and was 
entrusted to the lodge 2nd July, 1868. 

NORTHUMBERLAND LODGE, No. 17, NEWCASTLE. 

Originally No. 1003, Rkcustry op England; Changed to No. 701, A. D. 1862. 

This lodge was opened 10th March, 1857, by virtue of a dispensation 
issued by R. W. Bro. Alexander Balloch, Esquire, deputy provincial grand 
master of New Brunswick. It was formally constituted 11th August, 
1857, under a warrant granted 16th April, 1857, by the united grand 
lodge of England, the Rt. Hon. Earl of Zetland, G. M., the Rt. Hon. 
Earl of Yarborough, D. G. M., and W. H. White, G. S., to the right 
trusty and well beloved brethren, John Haws, Jr., John Wyse, Caleb B. 
Templeman, W. Salter, George Johnstone, William Letson and C. 
Cameron, constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. M. 
under the title of "The Northumberland Lodge, No. 1003," to be holden 
at Newcastle, in the province of New Brunswick, on the second Tuesday 
in each month, John Haws, Jr., to be the first master, John Wyse the 
first S. W., and Caleb B. Templeman the first J. W. 

Northumberland Lodge, by its delegates, joined in the erection of the 
grand lodge of New Brunswick, and surrendered its warrant 29th 
October, 1867, to England, receiving in lieu thereof an interim warrant 
from the grand master of New Brunswick. 

Under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick, a new warrant was granted 16th May, 1868, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 



332 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as "Northumberland Lodge, No. 
17," on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well 
beloved brethren, Robert R. Call as W. M., William C. Harley as S. W., 
and Alexander R. Ramsay as J. W., continuing to them and all other 
the brethren on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a 
lodge of F. & A. M,, to meet at Newcastle on the second Tuesday of 
every month. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William Wedder- 
burn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., and committed to 
the charge of the lodge IGth June, 1868. 

MIRAMICHI lODGE, No. 18, CHATHAM. 
Originally No. 1077, Registky op England; Changed to No. 775, A. D. 1862. 

Miramichi Lodge was first opened 18th January, 1859, by virtue of 
a dispensation issued by R. W. Bro. Alexander Balloch, D. P. G. M., 
and was formally constituted 6th July, 1859, by W. Bro. John Haws, 
Jr., P. M,, Northumberland Lodge, No. 1003, under a warrant granted 
23rd January, 1859, by and with the sanction and authority of the 
united grand lodge of England, Rt. Hon. Earl of Zetland, G. M., Rt. 
Hon. Baron Panmure, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. William Gray Clarke, 
O. 8., to the right trusty and well beloved brethren, George Hunter 
Russell, Richard Blackstock Haddow, William Albro Letson, Sdomon 
Samuel, William E. Samuel, William Seaton and Jedediah S. Car/ill, 
of whom George H. Russell was the first master, Richard B. Haddow the 
first S. W., and William A. Letson the first J. W., constituting the said 
brethren into a lodge of F. & A. M., under the title of "The jMiramichi 
Lodge, No. 1077," to be holden at Chatham, in the province of New 
Brunswick, on the third Tuesday of every month. 

Miramichi Lodge, by its delegates, joined in the erection of the grand 
lodge of New Brunswick, for which purpose its warrant was surrendered 
15th October, 1867, to the grand lodge of England, and an interim 
warrant obtained from the grand master of New Brunswick. 

Under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick, a new warrant was granted 18th May, 1868, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as " The Miramichi Lodge, No. 18," 
on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well 
beloved brethren, John Havilland as W. M., Henry C. Williston as S. 
W., and Hugh Bain as J. W., continuing to them and all other the 
brethren on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a lodge of 
F. & A. M., to meet at Chatham on the third Tuesday in each and every 
month. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William Wedderburn, 
D, G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., and committed to the 
charge of the lodge 16th June, 1868. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 333 

LEINSTER LODGE, No. 19, SAINT JOHN. 
Originally No, 347 on the Rkgistuy op Ireland. 

The warrant of this lodge was granted 7th October, 1859, by the 
grand masonic h)dge of Irehind, the Duke of Loinster being G. M., John 
Fitz Henry Townshend, Esquire, D, G. M., and Lucius H. Deering, D. 
G. S., unto the right trusty and much beh)ved brethren, John Willis, 
Edward Willis and Charles Ramsay, constituting and appointing the 
said brethren to be master and wardens of a lodge of F. & A. M., No. 
347, on the register of the grand masonic lodge of Ireland, to be holden 
at Carleton, Saint John, in New Brunswick, on the first Monday in every 
month. The lodge was constituted under this warrant 14th November, 
1859, at a house in Carleton owned by William Browne, by W. Bro. 
Robert Stubs, W. ]\f. of Hibernia Lodge, No. 301, registry of Ireland. 
The meetings continued in Carleton until December, 1862, when the 
lodge removed to Judge Ritchie's building in Saint John. 

Leinster Lodge, by its representatives, joined in the erection of the 
grand lodge of New Brunswick, for which purpose it surrendered, 21st 
October, 1867, the warrant to the grand lodge of ireland, and received 
an interim warrant from the grand master of New Brunswick. 

A new warrant, dated 19th May, 1868, was granted, under the author- 
ity and sanction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, by M. W. Bro. B. 
L. Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as " Leinster Lodge, No. 19," on 
the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, Alfred Augustus Stockton as W. M., Silas Alward as S. W., 
and Asaph G. Blakslce as J, W., continuing to them and all other the 
brethren on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a lodge of 
F. & A. M., to meet in the city of Saint John on the first ^Monday of 
every month. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William Wedderburn, 
D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., and formally entrusted 
to the lodge by Grand Master Peters, at a communication held 24th 
August, 1868. 

In the general destruction attending the great fire of 20th June, 1877, 
in the city of Saint John, Leinster Lodge shared in the fate of the other 
masonic l)odies, by losing its warrant, jewels, banners and all other prop- 
erty except the records an«l other books. The loss of the warrant was 
supplied by a duplicate issued 18th July, 1877. 

The first and only lodge, iiolding a warrant from the grand lodge of 
New Brunswick, which, up to the present time, has surrendered its war- 
rant and ceased to exist, is Leinster Lodge. Tliis unfortunate occurrence 
took place 29th June, 1881, and was brought about by a diminution in 
the membership, a lack of /eal and interest on the i)art of many of the 



334 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

brethren, and the consequent inability to meet ordinary expenses. The 
warrant, books, papers, etc., were handed over to the grand lodge and are 
now in the custody of the grand secretary. The number (nineteen) held 
by this lodge remains vacant on the roll of the grand lodge. 

SALISBURY LODGE, No. 20, SALISBURY. 

Originally No. 1110, Registry of England; Changed to No. 808 A. D. 1862. 

Opened 3rd August, 1858, under a dispensation issued by R. W. Bro. 
Alexander Balloch, D. P. G. M. of New Brunswick, and formally con- 
stituted 5th June, 1860, by virtue of a warrant granted 7th February, 
1860, under the sanction and authority of the united grand lodge of 
England, Rt. Hon. Earl of Zetland, G. M. Rt. Hon. Lord Panmure, 
D. G. M., and William Gray Clarke, G. S., to the trusty and well beloved 
brethren William Jones Croasdale, James Robertson, Edward B. Chand- 
ler, Junior, Daniel B. Campbell, Christian A. Robertson, John Howard 
Beattey, William Lunn, and others, constituting the said brethren into a 
lodge of F. & A. M., under the title of " Salisbury Lodge, No. 1110," to 
be holden at Salisbury, in the province of New Brunswick, on the first 
Tuesday in each month, William J. Croasdale to be the first master, James 
Robertson the first S. W., and Edward B. Chandler, Jr., the first J. W. 

Salisbury Lodge was not represented in the convention which formed 
the grand lodge of New Brunswick. It came within the jurisdiction of 
the new grand lodge by surrender of its warrant, 7th January, 1868, to 
the grand lodge of England, receiving in lieu thereof an interim warrant 
from the grand master of New Brunswick. 

Under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick, a new warrant was granted 20th May, 1868, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as " Salisbury Lodge, No. 20," on 
the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, Elias W. Elliott as W. M., Edward Clossian as S. W., and John 
Sherman Colpitis as J. W., continuing to them and all other the brethren 
on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a lodge of F. & A. 
M., to meet at Salisbury, in the county of Westmorland, on the first 
Tuesday of every month. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William 
Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. ^V. F. Bunting, G. S. 

ZION LODGE, No. 21, SUSSEX, KINGS COUNTY. 

Orkjinally No. 965, Registry of England. 

Zion Lodge was first opened 10th April, 1863, by virtue of a dispen- 
sation issued by R. W. Bro. Alexander Balloch, P. G. M. of New 
Brunswick, and formally constituted 25th November, 1863, by R. W. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 335 

Bro. Robert Thomson Clinch, D. P. G. M., under a warrant granted 
30th April, 1863, by the authority and sanction of the united grand 
lodge of England, Rt. Hon. Earl of Zetland, G. M., Rt. Hon. Earl de 
Grey and Ripon, D. G. M., and Wm. Gray Clarke, G. S., to the trusty 
and well beloved brethren, Joseph H. Littlehale, George Ryan, William 
D. Aiiken, Charles P. Bliss, Sargeant S. Littlehale, Stephen P. Wetraore 
and Clarence Ward, constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & 
A. M., under the title of " Zion Lodge, No. 965," to be holden at Sussex, 
Kings county, in the province of New Brunswick, on the Wednesday 
preceding the full moon of every month, Joseph H. Littlehale to be the 
first master, George Ryan the first S. W., and William D. Aitken the 
first J. W. 

This lodge did not take part in the convention which joined in the 
erection of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, but came in subsequently 
by surrendering its warrant 5th December, 1837, to the grand lodge of 
England and receiving an interim warrant from the grand master of 
New Brunswick. 

A new warrant was granted 21st May, 1868, under the authority and 
sanction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as " The Zion Lodge, No. 21 ," on 
the roll of the said grand lodge, with the righ!, trusty and well beloved 
brethren, John McPherson as W. M., Alfred Markham as S. W., and 
Charles Rowe as J. W., continuing to them and all other the brethren on 
the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges iits a lodge of F. & A. M.^ 
to meet at Sussex, Kings county, on the Wednesday preceding the full of 
the moon of every month. It was countersigned to R. W. Bro. William 
Wedderbiirn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F, Bunting, G. S., and 
formally placed in the possession of the lodge b;, Grand Master Petens at 
a communication held 29th July, 1868. 

NEW BRUNSWICK LODGE, No. 22, ST. JOHN. 

Originally No. 1084 on the Registry of England. 

It was formally constituted 8th February, 186<'«, by R. W. Bro. Robert 
T. Clinch, D. P. G. M., under a warrant granted 5th December, 1865, by 
the sanction and authority of the united grand lodge of England, Rt. 
Hon. Earl of Zetland, G. M., Rt. Hon. Earl de Grey and Ripon, D. G. M., 
and William Gray Clarke, G. S., to the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, James McNichol, Jr., James MuUin, Isaac V. Worden, George 
A. Barker, William R. Russell, James William McCallum, and James R. 
Scribner, constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. M., under 
the title of " New Brunswick Lodge, No. 1084," to be holden at Saint 



336 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

John, in the province of New Brunswick, on the second Thursday of 
every month, James McNichol, Jr., to be the first master, James MuUiu 
the first S. W., and Isaac V. Worden the first J. W. This was the last 
warrant issued in New Brunswick by the grand lodge of England or any 
other grand lodge outside of the province. 

New Brunswick Lodge, by its delegates, acted with the other lodges 
in the province in the erection of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, 
and in consequence surrendered its English warrant 10th October, 1867, 
receiving in lieu thereof an interim warrant from the grand master of 
New Brunswick. 

A new warrant, under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge 
of New Brunswick, was granted 22nd May, 1868, by M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as " The New Brunswick Lodge, 
No. 22," on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and 
"well beloved brethren, James McNichol, Jr., as W. M., William Robert 
Russell as S. W., and James William McCallum as J. W., continuing to 
them and all other the brethren on the roll of the lodge their rights and 
privileges as a lodge of F. & A. M., to meet at the city of Saint John on 
the second Thursday of every month. It was countersigned by R. W. 
Bro. William Wodderburn, I). G. I^I., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, 
G. S., and formally placed in the possession of the lodge by Grand Master 
Peters at a communication held 2nd September, 1868. 

By the fire of 20th June, 1877, which destroyed the masonic hall in 
Saint John, this lodge lost its warrant, jewels, clothing, banners, a portion 
of the records, and all other property. On the 18th July, 1867, a dupli- 
cate of the latter warrant was issued, which is still held by the lodge. 

KEITH LODGE, No. 23, MONCTON. 

Originally No. 927, Registry of England ; Changed to No. 644 A. D. 1862. 

This lodge was first opened 27th January, 1853, by virtue of a dis- 
pensation issued by the R. W. Bro. Hon. Alexander Keith, provincial 
grand master of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, etc., and formally con- 
stituted 26th June, 1855, under a warrant granted February, 1855, 

by the sanction and authority of the united grand lodge of England, Rt. 
Hon. Earl of Zetland, G. M., Rt. Hon. Earl of Yarborough, D. G. M., 
and Wm. H. White, G. S., to the right trusty and well beloved brethren, 
Stephen Binney, D-^nicl B Campbell, Joseph J. Duggan, James Robert- 
son, John Shaw, Edward B. Chandler, Jr., F]zekiel Taylor and John 
Howard Beatteay, constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & 
A. M., under the title of " Keith Lodge, No. 927," to be holden at 
Moncton, New Brunswick, on the Thursday after the new moon in each 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 337 

month ; Stephen Binney to be the first master, Daniel B, Campbell the 
first S. W., and Joseph J. Duggan the first J. W. 

At the formation of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, Keith Lodge 
was opposed to the movement; but, having reconsidered the question, 
concluded to join its fortunes with the other lodges, and on the 3rd July, 
1868, surrendered its warrant to the grand lodge of England. 

A new warrant was granted 3rd July, 1868, under the authority and 
sanction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, by M. W. Bro. B. L, 
Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as "Keith Lodge, No. 23," on the 
roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, Charles A. Holstead as W. M,, John McKenzie as S. W., and 
John L. Harris as J. W., continuing to them and all other the brethren 
on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges as a lodge of F. & A. 
M., to meet at Moncton, in the county of Westmorland, on the Thursday 
on or after each new moon. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. William 
Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., and 
formally placed in the possession of the lodge by R. W. Bro. William 
Wedderburn, D. G. M., at a communication held 2nd October, 1868. 

ZETLAND LODGE, No. 24, SHEDIAC. 

Originally No. 1188, on the Registry op England; Changed to No. 88& 

A. D. 1862. 

Zetland Lodge was first set to work 29th January, 1861, by virtue of 
a dispensation issued by R. W. Bro. Alexander Balloch, P. G. M., and 
formally constituted 20th March, 1862, by R. W. Bro. Douglas B. Stevens, 
Provincial S. G. W., under a warrant granted 30th October, 1861, by the 
sanction and authority of the united grand lodge of England, the Rt. 
Hon. Earl of Zetland, G. M., the Rt. Hon. Earl de Grey and Ripon, D. G. 
M., and Wm. Gray Clarke, G. S., to the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, Thomas Irving, Samuel McKean, Henry W. Baldwin, Frederick 
W. Miles, James Robertson, Daniel P. McLaren and Daniel B. Campbell, 
constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. M., under the title 
of "Zetland Lodge, No. 1188," to be holden at Shediac, in New Bruns- 
wick, on the third Wednesday of every month ; Thomas Irving to be 
the first master, Samuel McKean, the first S. W., and Henry W. Baldwin, 
the first J. W. 

This lodge declined at first to separate from the mother grand 
lodge and join in the erection of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick ; but, after considerable negotiation, was induced to reconsider its 
earlier decision, and, on the 16th September, 1868, surrendered ita war- 
rant, being the last lodge in the province, working under the grand lodge 
of England, to do so. 



338 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick, a new warrant was granted 16th September, 1868, by M. W. Bro. 
B. L. Peters, G. M., constituting the lodge as " Zetland Lodge, No. 24," 
on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, Alexander Stronach as W. M., Chipman W. Smith as S, W., 
and William Bannister Deacon as J. W., continuing to them and all 
other the brethren on the roll of the lodge, their rights and privileges 
as a lodge of F. & A. M., to meet at Shediac, in the county of Westmor- 
land, on the third Wednesday of every month. It was countersigned by 
R. W. Bro. William Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunt- 
ing, G. S., and committed to the charge of the lodge, 18th November, 
1868. The latter warrant was destroyed, together with the hall and 
other property of the lodge, by fire, 13th October, 1879. A duplicate of 
the warrant was issued 5th January, 1880. 

RESTIGOUCHE LODGE, No. 25, DALHOUSIE. 

Was formally constituted 10th November, 1868, by the M. W. the 
O. M. in person, assisted by a staflT of grand lodge officers, by virtue of a 
warrant dated 24th September, 1868, granted under the sanction and 
authority of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, M. W. Bro. B. L. 
Peters, G. M., R. W. Bro. William Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. 
Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S., to the right trusty and well beloved brethren, 
William Draper, Robert W. Good, Robert Moffat, William Montgomery, 
William G. Disbrow, Alexander Hamilton and Samuel Shaw, constitut- 
ing the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. M., under the title or 
denomination of " Rostigouche Lodge, No. 25," to meet at Diilhousie, in 
the county of Resiigouche, on the Tuesday on or after each new moon, 
Bro. William Draper to be the first master, Bro. Robert W. Good the 
first S. W., and Bro. Robert Moffat the first J. W. 

This was the first lodge constituted under an original warrant issued 
by the grand lodge of New Brunswick. 

VICTORIA LODGE, No. 26, MILLTOWN, ST. STEPHEN. 

Constituted 18th January, 1870, by R. W. Bro. David Brown, Past 
J. G. W. and P. M. of Sussex Lodge, No. 7, by virtue of a warrant dated 
23rd September, 1869, and granted under the sanction and authority of 
the grand lodge of New Brunswick, M. W. Bro. B. L. Peters, G. M., R. 
W. Bro. William Wedderburn, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunt- 
ing, G. S., to the right trusty and well beloved brethren, Robert Pool, 
James H. Smith, George H. Farnham, Stillman Towers, John C. Lamb, 
Frank Smith, John H. Haley, Daniel W. Moore, John L. Ray, Robert 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 339 

A. Williams, John E. Parkin, John Connor, James S. Murchie and 
Samuel G. Graves, constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. 
M., under the title or denomination of" Victoria Lodge, No. 26," to meet 
at Millto\Tn, St. Stephen, on the second Thursday of every month, Bro. 
Robert Pool to be the first master, Bro. James H. Smith the first S. W., 
and Bro. George H. Farnham the first J. W. 

Bro. Robert Pool, named as the first master in the warrant, died 
before the lodge was constituted. The vacancy thus created was filled 
by W. Bro. David Main, P. M. of Sussex Lodge, No. 7, who was installed 
W. M. of the lodge under a dispensation issued by the grand master for 
the special purpose. 

SAINT JOHN LODGE, No. 27, BATHURST. 
Originally No. 412, Registry of Scotland. 

This lodge was constituted under a warrant dated 5th February, 1861, 
granted by the Most Noble George Augustus Frederick John, Duke of 
Athole, etc., etc., grand master mason of Scotland and the most worship- 
ful the grand lodge of Scotland, to the right trusty and well beloved 
brethren, Benjamin Wilson Weldon as master, Matthew Carruthers as 
S. W., Theophilus DesBrisay as J. W., and John Robert Doran, James 
Dick, Murdock Smith, John Kerr, and othere, constituting the said 
brethren into a lodge of F. & A. M., under the title of " Saint John 
Lodge, No. 41 2," to be holden in the town of Bathurst, province of New 
Brunswick. 

Saint John Lodge did not unite with the other lodges in the formation 
of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, but kept from the movement until 
19th December, 1870, when it surrendered the warrant held from Scotland. 

A new warrant was granted 19th December, 1870, under the authority 
and sanction of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, by M. W. Bro. 
William Wedderburn, Esquire, G. M., constituting the lodge as " Saint 
John Lodge, No. 27," on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right 
trusty and well beloved brethren William Wallace Gordon as W. M., 
William Napier as S. W, and Allan McKenzie Ross as J. W., continuing 
to them and all other the brethren on the roll of the lodge their rights 
and privileges as a lodge of F. & A. M., to meet at Bathurst, in the 
county of Gloucester, on the firet Thursday after each full moon. It was 
countersigned by R. W. Bro. John V. Ellis, D. G. M., a;id V. W. Bro. 
W. F. Bunting, G. S., and placed in the possession of the lodge by R. W. 
Bro. Ellis, D. G. M., at a communication held 16th July, 1871. 

LEBANON LODGE, No. 28, SACKVILLE. 

Was first oi)ened under a dispensation issued 19th May, 1871, by 
M. W. Bro. William Wedderburn, G. M., and formally constituted 28th 



340 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

November, 1871, by the grand master, assisted by a staff of grand lodge 
officers, by virtue of a warrant granted 27th September, 1871, under the 
sanction and authority of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, by M. W. 
Bro. William Wedderburn, Esquire, G. M., to the right trusty and well 
beloved brethren Robert Hallett, Josiah Wood, Willard Hutchinson^ 
Richard A. Bulmer, Rufus Outhouse, Alexander McQuarrie, John Alonzo 
Bowes, William Morrice, Charles William Cole, James Purdy, Charles 
M. Anderson, Charles G. Palmer, Thomas Ansley Bowser, and Edward 
B. Dixon, constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. M., 
under the title or denomination of " Lebanon Lodge, No. 28," to meet at 
Sackville, in the county of Westmorland, on the Tuesday on or after each 
full moon ; Bro. Robert Hallett to be the first master, Bro. Josiah Wood 
the first S. W., and Bro. Willard Hutchinson the first J. W. It was 
countersigned by R. W. Bro. John V. Ellis, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. 
W. F. Bunting, G. S. 

SAINT ANDREW'S LODGE, No. 29, FREDERICTON. 
Originally No. 364 on the Eegistry of Scotland. 

Constituted 14th July, 1853, by W Bro. William H. Needham, P. M. 
of Hiberuia Lodge, No. 301, Saint John, under a warrant granted 8th 
November, 1852, by the Most Noble Duke of Athole, grand master 
mason, and the M. W. the grand lodge of Scotland, to the right trusty 
and well beloved brethren, Robert Gowan as R. W. M., Walter L. 
Winter as depute master, Samuel D. McPherson as S. W., John 
Richards as J. W., Edward W, Miller as secretary, John Fleming as 
S. D., and Alexander N. Block as J. D., constituting the said brethren 
into a lodge of F. & A. M., under the title of " Saint Andrew's Lodge, 
No. 364," to meet at Fredericton, in the province of New Brunswick, on 
the second Thursday in each month. The other signatories to this 
warrant were R. W. Bro. John Whyte Melville of Bennochy and 
Strathkinness, Depute G. M.. and R. W. Bro. William A. Laurie, G. S. 

Saint Andrew's Lodge refused to join with the other lodges in the 
erection of the grand lodge of New Brunswick. Subsequently, however, 
it reversed this decision and surrendered, 14th June, 1872, the above 
warrant to the grand lodge of Scotland. With the submission of this 
lodge all opposition to the newly created grand lodge ceased, and 
thenceforward it held undisputed authority over every craft 'odge in the 
province. The work of gathering the lagging lodges into the new 
masonic fold was performed with the utmost consideration and brotherly 
kindness ; hence, in good time and under favoring circumstances, the 
grand lodge of New Brunswick secured an undivided jurisdiction, all 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 341 

these happy results being coiisuniraated without the issue of fierce and 
threatening manifestoes — a questionable recourse in too many cases. 

Under the authority and sanction of the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick, a new warrant was granted 2nd September, 1872, by M. W. Bro. 
William Wedderburn, G. M., constituting the lodge as "Saint Andrew's 
Lodge, No. 29," on the roll of the said grand lodge, with the right trusty 
and well beloved brethren, Alexander Burchill as W. M., William 
Cameron as S. W., and William Lockhart as J. W., continuing to them 
and all other the brethren on the roll of the lodge, their rights and 
privileges as a lodge of F. & A. M., to meet at Fredericton, in the county 
of York, on the second Thursday in each and every niorith. It was 
countersigned by R. W. Bro. John V. Ellis, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. 
W. F. Bunting, G. S., and formally placed in the possession of the lodge 
by Grand Master Wedderburn at a communication held 20th September, 
1872. 

The last named warrant was surrendered loth May, 1879, as the 
result of the union of the members of the lodge with the brethren of 
Solomon's Lodge, No. 6, in the formation of Hiram Lodge, No. 6 ; for 
particulars of which the reader is referred to the paragraph headed 
" Solomon's Lodge, No. 6." 

The number (twenty-nine) held by Saint Andrew's Lodge remains 
vacant on the roll of lodges. 

SAINT MARTIN'S LODGE, No. 30, ST. MARTINS. 

This lodge was opened 5th February, 1872, by virtue of a dispensation 
issued by M. W. Bro. William Wedderburn, G. M., and continued under 
such authority until 6th January, 1873, when it was formally constituted 
by the grand master, assisted by a staff of officers, under a warrant 
granted 25th September, 1872, by the sanction and authority of the grand 
lodge of New Brunswick, M. W. Bro. John Valentine Ellis, Esquire, G. 
M., to the right trusty and well beloved brethren, James Rourke, Jacob 
Henry Mosher, William Henry Rourke, William Wilson, Edward V. 
Rourke, Robert Gilmour, Hugh McQuiston, Hugh McQuiston, Jr., 
Samuel Taylor, William R. Burton, James McComb, Joseph Carson and 
William Osborne, constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. 
M., under the title or denomination of " Saint Martin's Lodge, No. 30," 
to meet at St. Martins, in the county of Saint John, on the first Monday 
in each and every month ; Bro. James Rourke to be the first master, Bro. 
Jacob H. Mosher, the first S. W., and Bro Wm. H. Rourke, the first J. 
W, It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. Edward Willis, D. G. M., and 
V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S. 
V 



342 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

BENJAMIN LODGE, No. 31, ANDOVER. 

Commenced its work 7th September, 1876, by virtue of a dispensation 
issued by M, W. Bro. R. T. Clinch, G. M., and continued under dispensa- 
tion until 19th September, 1877, when it was formally constituted by W. 
Bro. Geo. E. Fairweather, P. M. of Albion Lodge, Saint John, acting 
deputy of the grand master, under a warrant dated 9th August, 1877, 
granted by M. W. Bro. Robert Thomson Clinch, Esquire, G. M., under the 
sanction and authority of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, to the right 
trusty and well beloved brethren, Thomas T. Beveridge, Samuel A. 
Cameron, Frank L. Tibbitts, Benjamin Beveridge, Jr., William B. 
Beveridge, Richard W. L. Tibbits, John Allen Perley, Adam J. Bev- 
eridge, Frederick W. Brown, Albert D. Olmstead, James A. Armstrong, 
Benjamin Beveridge, Sr., Robert Kertson, Henry Douglas Beveridge, 
Samuel J. Baker and Daniel B. Hopkins, constituting the ?aid brethren 
into a lodge of F. & A. M., under the title or denomination of " Benjamin 
Lodge, No. 31," to meet at Andover, in the county of Victoria, on the 
first Tuesday in each and every mouth ; Bro. Thomas T. Beveridge to be 
the first master, Bro. Samuel A. Cameron the first S. W., and Bro. 
Frank L. Tibbits the first J. W. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. 
Edwin J. Wetmore, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S. 

CAMPBELLTON LODGE, No. 32, CAMPBELLTON. 

Commenced working 15th September, 1876, under a dispensation 
issued by M. W. Bro. Robert T. Clinch, G. M. It was formally consti- 
tuted 21st September, 1877, by V. W. Bro. James McNichol, Jr., grand 
treasurer, special deputy of the grand master, by virtue of a warrant 
dated 10th August, 1877, granted by M. W. Bro. Robert T. Clinch, 
G. M., under the sanction and authority of the grand lodge of New 
Brunswick, to the right trusty and well beloved brethren, Malcolm 
Patterson, John Jardine, Thomas Ritchie, William W. Doherty, James 
D. Murray, John Mair, Dougal C. Firth, George Duncan, George A. 
Balcom, John McKendric, Donald Kerr, James B. McKenzie, Hugh 
Jackson, Robert J. Mair, Edward Ellons, John P. Mowatt, Robert 
Chalmers and George P. Phillips, constituting the said brethren into a 
lodge of F. & A. M., under the title or denomination of " Campbellton 
Lodg v\ No. 32," to meet at Campbellton, in the county of Restigouche, 
on the second Thursday of every month ; Bro. Malcolm Patterson to be 
the first master, Bro. John Jardine the first S. W., and Bro. Thomas 
Ritchie the first J. W. It was countersigned by R. W. Bro. Edwin J. 
Wetmore, D. G. M., and V. W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 343 

ALEXANDRIA LODGE, No. 33, ST. MARY'S, YORK CO. 

This lodge was first opened 4th April, 1877, under a dispensation 
issued by M. NV. Bro. R. T. Clinch, G. M., and formally constituted 
28th February, 1878, by the grand master, assisted by a staff of grand 
lodge officers, by virtue of a warrant dated 14th February, 1878, granted 
by M. W. Bro. Robert T. Clinch, G. M., under the sanction and authority 
of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, to the right trusty and well 
beloved brethren, Alexander Gibson, James Boone, Benjamin Close, 
John V. C. Wetmore, Edgar Hanson, Daniel McQueen, John T. Gibson, 
Whitman Hains, Roderick Hains, Jared Boone, Albert Boone, Alfred 
Hains, Alexander Sinclair, Daniel S. Dougherty, Robert G. McFee, 
Austin Dunphy, Frank N. Risteen, Horatio N. Fradsham and Richard 
W. Weddall, constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. M., 
under the title or denomination of "Alexandria Lodge, No. 33," to meet 
at St. Mary's, in the county of York, on the first Tuesday of every 
month ; Bro. James Boone to be the first master, Bro. Benjamin Close 
the first S. W., and Bro. John V. C. Wetmore the first J. W. It was 
countersigned by R. W. Bro. Edwin J. Wetmore, D. G. M., and V. W. 
Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S. 

ALBERT LODGE, No. 34, ALBERT, ALBERT CO. 

Opened 23rd January, 1879, under a dispensation issued by M. W. 
Bro. Robert Marshall, G. M., and formally constituted 17th June, 1879, 
by the grand master, assisted by a staff of grand lodge officers, by virtue 
of a warrant dated oOth April, 1879, granted by M. W. Bro. Robert 
Marshall, Esquire, G. M., by the sanction and authority of the grand 
lodge of New Brunswick, to the right trusty and well beloved brethren 
AVilliam King, Robert C. Bacon, John E. Montgomery, David Stiles, 
Freeman B. Ritchie, Frederic W. Watson, Sampson B. Oulton, Thomas 
R.Hamilton, John Moore, Gaius S. Turner, Charles Stevens and AVilliam 
Sutherland, constituting the said brethren into a lodge of F. & A. M., 
under the title or denomination of " Albert Lodge, No. 34," to meet at 
Hopewell Corner, in the county of Albert, on the third Tuesday of every 
month ; Bro. William King to be the first master, Bro. Robert C. Bacon, 
the first S. W., and Bro. John E. Montgomery, the first J. W. It was 
countersigned by R. W. Bro. Benjamin R. Stevenson, D. G. M., and V. 
W. Bro. W. F. Bunting, G. S. 

The name of the locality of the lodge was changed from " Hopewell 
^"">rner " to " Albert," by an act of the jjrovincial legislature 

Having been the last constituted, it is therefore the junior lodge of 
the jurisdictiou. 



344 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

EARLY GRAND LODGE IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Our predecessors of sixty-five years ago, in their laudable desire to 
erect themselves into a grand lodge in and for the province of New 
Brunswick, seemed to have built neither wisely nor well. Their failure, 
no doubt, resulted from a combination of circumstances — over-confidence, 
omission to count the cost, and the want of one or two prominent crafts- 
men versed in the usages, precedents and laws of the society. 

Masonically considered, everything favored the erection of such a 
body between the years 1820 and 1828. From the fact that all the lodges 
at that time held their warrants under the authority delegated to the pro- 
vincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia, by the Atholl Grand Lodge of 
England, there was no divided jurisdiction. The latter had, in the year 
1813, become extinct as a separate governing body, by its union with the 
" moderns," in the formation of the United Grand Lodge. Up to 1828 
the united grand lodge had taken no steps, further than the promulgation 
of the book of constitutions, to bring these lodges within its fold. Prob- 
ably its attention was so much engrossed in straightening difficulties and 
smoothing over differences in the lodges in England, that it had com- 
paratively little time to look into colonial matters. The lodges in New 
Brunswick had never been called upon to make returns of their members ; 
the payment of fees and dues had not been exacted, nor had they beon 
required to either surrender their original warrants, or to accept new ones 
from it as the reigning and sole autliority. From A. D. 1813 the lodges 
had continued, as a matter of form, to recognize the provincial grand 
lodge of Nova Scotia as the governing head, by making their annual 
returns and payments to it, although, occasionally, suspicions arose in 
some of the lodges as to the legal right of this body to claim and exact 
this obedience. In this connection, it must be borne in mind that mail 
communication between Saint John and Halifax was slow and uncertain 
at that period, and the lodges, particularly those in the country districts, 
received no instructions or other personal attentions from provincial 
grand lodge authorities. 

Taking these things into consideration, it would appear that, had the 
movement been inaugurated and pressed forward in the right way and 
with a spirit of determination, a grand lodge would have been established 
in New Brunswick more than sixty years ago, upon a solid and permanent 
foundation. The attempt was certainly made, aui that it failed was per- 
haps no fault of the projectors, when the reasons, heretofore named, are 
considered. 

The idea of the erection of a grand lodge may have had its origin iu 
St. John's Lodge, or it may have emanated simultaneously by conference 
of the three lodges then working in Saint John. Be this as it may, there 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF iMASONIC BODIES. 345 

can be no doubt of a mutual understanding between them before the 
movement took shape. As the reeords of that period, of Union and 
Albiim Lodges, are not known to be in existence, my sole reliance for 
particulars in this connection has been upon the records of St. John's 
Lodge. 

At a regular communication of St. John's Lodge, held 5th jNIarch, 
1827, the following resolution was unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, Tliat a committee be appointed to consult witli our sister lodges 
throughout the province, in respect to petitioning the grand lodge of Nova Scotia, 
as to the propriety of, as well "s to solicit tlieir assistance in, furthering the object of 
forming a grand lodge in this city; and that Iho. Benjamin F. Marsh, W. M., Bro. 
Henry Chubb, Bro. Robert Garrick, Bro. .Vle.Kander Lawrence and Bro. George A. 
Garrison, secretary, be a committee to act upon the same. 

Apparently no time was lost in acting upon this resolution, for on the 
16th day of the succeeding month a printed circular signed by the 
worshipful masters of the three city lodges was addressed to the master, 
wardens and brethren of each lodge in the province, setting forth that a 
desire for a grand lodge in New Brunswick had lately manifested itself 
among the craft; that tiie attainment of this object would secure impor- 
tant advantages as regards the interests and success of masonry in the 
province ; that they disclaimed any intention of exhibiting a feeling of 
disrespect to the grand lodge of Nova Scotia, from whom they held their 
warrants; that among other benefits to arise from the formation of a 
grand lodge in the province would be the establishment of a charity 
fund ; that those having claims to masonic charity in New Brunswick 
had never been relieved from the grand lodge funds ; that the twelve 
lodges in the province contributed nearly two hundred pounds annually 
to the grand lodge of Nova Scotia, which amount should be expended in 
the place whence the contribution originated, instead of being expended 
in Nova Scotia ; and that by the erection of a local grand lodge, greater 
facilities would be afforded the respective lodges in applying for and 
receiving advice, instruction, etc. The circular was signed by Bro. 
Benjamin F. Marsh, W. M., St. John's Lodge, No. 29, Bro. James 
Robertson, Jr., W. M., Union Lodge, No. 88, and Bro. Thomas Leavitt, 
W. M., Albion Lodge, No. 52, who requested the careful consideration of 
the brethren to the matters therein set forth, and the favor of an early 
reply. 

A letter under date 20th August, 1828, was addressed to the provin- 
cial grand master of Nova Scotia by Bros. James Robertson, Jr., Henry 
Chubb and Samuel Stephen, sub-committee of correspondence, enclosing 
a copy of the above referred to circular. The committee stated that the 
lodges in New Brunswick, having expressed themselves favorably towards 



34(3 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

the movement, a meeting of delegates was held at Saint John in 
February, 1828, when it was decided to form a grand lodge for New 
Brunswick ; that His Excellency Sir Howard Douglas, Lieut. Governor 
of the province, was nominated to the office of grand master, but his 
e.Kcellency declined the nomination ; tht^t the position was then offered to 
the Hon. Samuel P. Hurd,' who also declined ; and that subsequently it 
was tendered to the Rev. Benjamin Gcrrish Gray, D. D., rector of 
Trinity church, who very kindly consented to accept the nomination. 
The letter concluded by asking the approval of the grand lodge of Nova 
Scotia to this step, in order to prevent any suspicion being harbored that 
the movement for a separate grand lodge arose from dissatisfaction 
toward the grand lodge of Nova Scotia. 

The provincial grand lodge by resolution expres^sed a willingness to 
give consent and approval to the formation of a grand lodge in New 
Brunswick if proper documents should be produced to shew that such 
was the wish of the fraternity in New Brunswick, upon condition, 
however, that the lodges in New Brunswick in arrears of dues to the 
grand lodge of Nova Scotia discharge their indebtedness before a 
separation from the latter should take place. 

No further progress appears to have been made at this time to 
accon)plish the object in view. On the 2nd July, 1829, however (two 
years and four months sulj.scijuont to the initiation of the movement), 
another circular letter signed by Bros. James Robertson, ., and Henry 
Chubb, sub-connnittee of correspondence, was addressed to the various 
lodges in New Brunswick, advocating the erection of an independent 
grand lodge, free from the control and authority of England and Nova 
Scotia. The reasons for this fresh and bolder movement were set forth 
in the letter, and were substantially a reiteration of those contained in 
the circular of lOth Aj)ril, 1827. The lodges must have responded to 
this aj)peal without delay, for on the 4th November, 1829, so raj)idly had 
matters progressed, that the Grand Lodge of F. & A. INI. of New Bruns- 
wick was Ibrnuvlly erected and constituted. 

The following is a full transcript of the proceedings thereat, copied 
from the records of St. John's Lodge: 

Ptii'siiaiit to n regular notilioation sent to the Keveral masonic lodgen in tliis 
province by the committee of correspondence, a meeting wns held at the masonic 
hall, in the city of Saint Jolin, at noon, on tlie fourth tlay of November, 182'.*, con- 
sisting of delegates from live of the said lodges, iis follows, to wit: Alexander 
Lawrence, VV. M., Hiram Smith, 8. W., Snnuiel Watts, J. W., and Henry Clinlii), 
P. M., St. John's Lo<lge; Thomas Nisbet, \V. M., John Smyth, 8. W., and Janieii 

1 Hon. Sanniel I'roudfoot lliird wum Htirveyor general of New KrunsTrlck. He bad furmtrly 
held a couiinission in tlic arm j, and fought nt the battle of Waterloo. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIPX 347 

Kobertson, Jr., P. M., Union Lodge; David K Wetmore, W. M., Justus S. Wetniore, 
S. W., John Y. Townsend, P. M., and James Wettnore, Jr., P.M., Midian Lodge; 
Thomas Corey, P. M., Sion Lodge; Benjamin F. Marsh, P.M., proxy for Golden 
Rule Lodge. 

W. Bro. Marsh, P. M., was called to the chair, who stated that the meeting had 
been called to form a grand lodge; wheroipon it was unuiiimously resolved that the 
masonic brethren now present do form themselves into a grand lodge pro tempore. 

Upon nomination, the R. W. Bro. Rev. Benjamin Gerrish (iray' was unani- 
mously elected grand master of the proposed erro.id lodge. 

A committee was thereupon appointed to wait upon the grand master elect and' 
inform him of the unanimous decision of the meeting, and ropiest his acceptance of 
the office, which committee, upon their return, reported tliat the R. W. and Rev. 
Brother desired them to say that he felt n.ucli pleasure in accepting the office assigned 
him, and wished the brethren to meet him at the masonic ball this evening at seven 
o'clock. Upon which tiie meeting was adjourned »ill that hour. 

At seven o'clock the brethren assembled according to adjournment, when the 
Most Worshipful Brother, the Rev. B. G. Gray, took the chair as grand master of 
the contemplated grand lodge and delivered an imi)ressive address, after which he 
nominated those grind officers who, by the ancient constitutions, receive their ap- 
pointments directly from the grand master; and the brethren afterwards balloted 
for those they are authorized by the same authority to elect. The following were 
the officers appointed and elected : 

M. W. Tiie Rev. B. G. Gray, I). D., (irand Master. 

R. W. , Deputy (Jrand Master. 

R. W. David B. Wetmore, Senior Grand Warden, 

R. W. Samuel Fry, M. D., Junior (Jrand Warden. 

R. W. and Rev. Oliver Arnold, ) ,, , ,,, , . 

4 11 rw r» r Grand Chaplains. 
R. W. and Rev. Jerome Alley, D. D., ) 

R. W. Henry Chubb, (Jrand Treasurer. 

R. W. James Robertson, Jr., (Jrand Secretary. 

W. Tiiomas L. Nicholson, (Jrand Marshal. 

W. Alexander Lawrence, Senior (Jrand Deacon. 

W. Thomas Nisbet, Junior (Jrand Deacon. 

Bro. .lohu Hover, Grand Tyler and Grand Sword Bearer. 

Bro. Archil)al<l Dougherty, (Jrand Pursuivant. 

The folli)wliig resolutions were then carried ununiniou.sly : 

Bcsolveif, That the grand secretary be directed to transmit to the diflerent lodges 
in this province a ropy of the minute of proceedings of this day's meeting, and to 
request each of them to lodge in the hands of the grand treasurer the sum of five 
pounds for the purpose of defraying such small expenses as have already been in- 
curred, as well as those which will further be necessary for forwarding in the mean- 
(;me the nuiin object in view. 

Remlred, That tlie grand secretary !)e directed !o conirumicate, for the informa- 
tion of the fraternity, that no time shall now be lost in applying to the gran<l lodge 

1 Rev. U. (i. (irny, I). D., was rector of Trinity rlinrch, Snliit John, from A. D. 1S25 to A. D. 
18ti). Ho rt'ct'lvfil tlu'ilrxrirN ()'' friTiniisoiiiy In lliilifax, Nnvn Scdtlii, prcviouM to hiu removal to 
N< *• Brunswick, lie Uled at Saint John, 18th February, 1M4, oged 8(1 ycari. 



348 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

of England for a warrant to be granted to the grand lodge here, on the conditions 
which have this day been adopted by its n)enibers. 

(Signed) JiMES Eobertson, Jr., 

Grand Secretary. 

According to the foregoing report, there was no deputy grand master 
appointed, nor were the Mfiicers installed, neither was a constitution 
adopted. 

That the brethren prominently concerned in this movement were 
rather confused in their estimate of what constituted an independent 
grand lodge, is proved by the written minute. They started with the 
idea of forming " an independent grand lodge free from the control and 
authority of England and Nova Scotia," and they conclude the proceed- 
ings attending their organization by resolving " that no time shall now 
be lost in applying to the grand lodge of England for a warrant." They, 
of course, had the example of Nova Scotia before them. That province 
possessed a body which, although a provincial grand lodge, was invariably 
considered to be and styled " the grand lodge of Nova Scotia," a title 
assumed and i)romr.igated by it from its foundation, and a title impressed 
upon all lodges chartered by it, ' no were made to understand that they 
were subject to no other controlling power. As these lodges never 
questioned this arbitrary assumption, and as the grand lodge in England 
(the Ancients) never, so fur as has come to my knowledge, took the 
trouble to dis[)ute it or to instruct them to the contrary, they were 
excusable in looking to it as a supreme and independent body. 

With this exan)ple before them, it is reasonable to suppose that, when 
our brethren in Saint John sought to establish what they deemed an 
independent grand lodge, their object would be attained by organizing a 
body similar to that possessed by their Nova Scotia brethren, and this 
■was no doubt the rock upon which they split. 

As no further report appeared, and as no subsequent mention was 
made of the embryo grand lodge in any record or document coming under 
my notice, we may reasonably suppose that its existence was of short 
duration. Probably no other meeting was held than that afore- 
mentioned. 

This attempt at grand lodge making was not the first in which the 
brethren in the city of Saint John were involved, as an effort in this 
direction was made some seven years previously. The records of Saint 
John's Lodge shew that, at a communicatiini held 14th June, 1822, on a 
motion made by the worshipful master (Bro. George Bonnell), it wa.s 
resolved " that a committee be ap|)ointed to wait upon Union Lodge, and 
likewise to correspond with the sister lodges throughout the province, as 
to the expediency of establishing a grand lodge in the province." Upon 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 349 

the strength of this resolution, Bros. William Durant, Henry Chubb, 
Richard Mott, Robert Kay and David S. ^Marshall were appointed such 
committee. 

This resolution was moved and adopted without any preface or 
assignable reason, the record of that meeting and all previous minutes 
being silent on the subject. 

It appears that the committee appointed under this resolution were so 
negligent of their duty that, at the regular meeting held October follow- 
ing, they were dismissed and others appointed in their stead, viz. : Bros, 
George Bonnell, Jacob Townsend, Robert Ray and Thomas Leavitt. 
The latter appointment, in view of the summary manner in which the 
lodge dealt with their predecessor, acted more promptly, for at the next 
meeting they reported in favor of the formation of a grand lodge, and tl)e 
lodge having accepted the report appointed Bros. Jacob Townsend, 
Robert Ray, Richard Mott and H. N. H. Lugrin a conunittee "to 
ascertain the ways and means of carrying the same into effect as soon as 
possible." 

The appointment of this committee appeared to be the last of it at 
that time, as the record does not shew that any report was submitted or 
any further steps taken to consummate the scheme. After a rest of five 
years it was again brought to the front ; j)erhaps with a more vigorous 
shewing, but with no better results. 

PROVINCIAL GRAND LODGE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 

This body was constituted at Halifax 24th September, 1784, by W. 
Bro. Thomas Alexander by virtue of a written authority from R. W, 
Bro. Laurence Derraott, deputy grand master of the " Atholl " grand 
lodge of England, commonly designated "The Ancientf." The officers 
installed under this deputation were R. W. John George Pyke, grand 
master; William Cam})bell, D. G. M. ; Jonathan Snelling, S. G. W. ; 
Daniel Wood, J. G. W. ; Joseph Peters, grand secretary ; John Fillis, 
grand treasurer; Rev. J. AV. Weeks, grand chaplain; William Hall, 
deputy grand secretary ; John Lewes, grand pursuivant, and William 
Stewart, grand tyler. The powers and prerogatives with which it was 
clothed were contained in a written charter or warrant granted by the 
" Atholl '" grand lodge, dated at London, England, 2nd June, 1784. 

Although a provincial grand lodge, and therefore subordinate to the 
grand lodge whence its authority was derived, it possessed all the rights 
and privileges of a supreme grand body. It issued warrants and created 
subordinate lodges, from whom it exacted fees and dues, and, when 
eircumstancts called for the exercise of extreme disciplinary powers, 
erased them from its roll. During all th» years of its continuance, it 



350 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

never paid tribute to the parent grand lodge, and never, as far as ascer- 
tained, made a report of its proceedings. All these conferred and 
assumed functions were exercised from the date of its organization up to 
the year 1829, at which time the Duke of Sussex, as grand master of the 
united grand lodge of England, changed its constitution by appointing its 
then grand master, R. W. Bro. John Albro, to the position of provincial 
grand master of Nova Scotia, "and the masonic jurisdiction thereunto 
belonging," which included the province of New Brunswick ; and from 
that date it was known and designated as a provincial grand lodge. 
• Notwithstanding the union of the two rival grand lodges in England, 
A. D. 1813, by which union this provincial grand lodge was shorn of 
the unlimited powers conferred upon it by the " Atholl " grand lodge, it 
continued to exercise all its granted and assumed prerogatives by 
chartering lodges and pursuing other work as heretofore. From 1813 to 
1826 it chartered and constituted no lees than seven lodges in New 
Brunswick, viz. : Eastern Star, No. 37; Union, No. 38; Fortitude, No. 
42 ; St. Lawrence, No. 43 ; Morning Star, No. 46 ; Golden Rule, No. 
50, and Albion, No. 52. 

The following is a list of the grand masters who presided over the 
provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia from 1784 to 1829, viz. : 

R. W, John George Pyke, Esq., from 24tli September, 1784, to 27tli December, 
1785. 

His Excellency R. W. John Parr, governor of Nova Scotia, etc., etc., from 27th 
December, 1785, to 27th December, 1791. 

The Hon. and F. W. Richard Bulkley, from 27th December, 1791, to 27th De- 
cember, 1800. 

R. W. Duncan Clarke, Esq., from 27th December, 1800, to 27th December, 1801. 

His Excellency R. W. Sir Joiin Wentworth, governor, etc., etc., from 27th De- 
cember, 1801, to 27th December, 1810. 

R. W. John George Pyke, Esq., from 27th December, 1810, to 27th December, 
1819. 

His Excellency R. W. Sir James Kempt, governor, etc., etc., from 27th December^ 
1819, to 27th Decen. .er, 1820. 

R. W. John Albro, Esq., from 27th December, 1820, to Ith November, 1829. 

The grand secretaries during the same period were : 

W. Bro. Joseph Peters, from September, 1784, to December, 1792. 
W. Bro. John Selby, from December, 1792, to December, 1804. 
W. Bro. Thomas Bennett, from December, 1804, to December, 1812. 
W. Bro. Adolphus Vieth, from December, 1812, to November, 1829. 

The lodges in New Brunswick were superintended by resident deputy 
grand mastcs as follows: 

R. W. Bro. William Campbell, Esq.. from 11th February, 1786, to Ist October, 
1817; and 

R. W. Bro. the Hon. Thoraas^ Wetmore, from 1st October, 1817, to the date of hi» 
death, 22nd Marcli, 1828. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 351 

There was also a resident district deputy grand master, R. W. Bro. 
Benjamin L. Peters, Esq., who held office from 7th June, 1826, to No- 
vember, 1829. 

A more extended account of this grand body is set forth in another 
portion of this volume. 

The brethren who officiated subsequent to the extinction of the so- 
called grand lodge of Nova Scotia were : R. W. Bro. John Albro, who 
continued in office as provincial grand master until the date of his deaths 
A. D. 1839 ; and R. W. Bro. the Hon. Alexander Keith, who succeeded 
Bro. Albro, and who continued to hold the office up to the year 1859^ 
when New Brunswick was accorded a separate jurisdiction, with R. W. 
Bro. Alexander Balloch, Esq., as provincial grand master. 

The provincial grand secretaries were : 

V. W. Adolphus Vietli, from November, 1829. to A. D. 1832. 
V. W. Daniel Sutherland, from A. D. 1832, to June, 1837. 
V. W. Adam G. Blair, from June, 1837, to June, 1851. 
V. W. Henry C. D. Twining, from June, 1851, to July, 1859. 

DEPUTY PROVINCIAL GRAND LODGE, 

Undeb England. 

From 1829 to 1855 there was no resident authority in New Bruns- 
wick to whom the lodges under the English constitution could apply for 
information, or from whom they could receive advice or instruction. All 
business of this nature had to be done by correspondence with the pro- 
vincial grand master at Halifax. The origin of the movement set on 
foot to remedy this inconvenience arose from a suggestion of R. W. Bro. 
Alexander Keith, provincial grand master, at a provincial grand lodge 
held in the masonic hall, Saint John, 3rd July, 1855, who, at the time, 
authorized the W. M. of Albion Lodge " to communicate with each lodge 
in the province under England, with a request to appoint a committee, to 
meet at an early day, to take the matter into consideration, and, if deemed 
desirable, to select and recommend to him some worthy brother to be ap- 
pointed deputy provincial grand master for the province of New Bruns- 
wick." In conformity with this authorization, the several lodges were 
requested by circular to appoint delegates to meet in St. J</hn "for the 
purpose of consulting as to the best mode of procedure in tl e premises." 

Delegates representing ten out of the thirteen English lodges' in the 

1 Tbe English lodges in (he province at that date vera: Albion, No. 570,Saiiit .John; St. John's, 
No. 6.32, Saint John; Sussex, No. "0.5, Dorcbester; St. Mark'8, No. 759, St. Andrews; Solomon's, 
No. "M, Fredericton; Carleton Union, No. 767, Carkton ; Mldian, No. 770, Kingston; Union of 
Portland, No. 780, Saint John; Woodstock, No. Pit, Woodsto'.k ; Inion, No. RilO, Milltown; St. 
George, No. 1)12, St. George ; (.'oriuthian. No. 918, Hauiptou ; and Kti'.h, No. 927, Mouutou. 



352 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

province met in the masonic hall, Saint John, 15th August, 1855, who, 
after a full discussion of the question, expressed the opinion "that a 
deputy provincial grand master, a resident of the province, should be 
appointed." They then proceeded to take a ballot for the choice of a 
brother, when W. Bro. Alexander Balloch, P. M. Union Lodge of Port- 
land, No. 780, was unanimously selected to be recommended to the pro- 
vincial grand master for appointment. 

In accordance with this nomination, the provincial grand master 
issued a patent, dated 6th September, 1855, appointing R. W. Bro. 
Alexander Balloch, D. P. G. M. of the province of New Brunswick, who 
was duly installed into offi-^e, at Halifax, 10th October, 1855. 

A dc" "ty provincial grand lodge was regularly organized in due 
course of time, a staff of officers elected and appointed, and a code of rules 
and regulations adopted for its government. Quarterly communications 
were held on the first Wednesday of March, June, September and Decem- 
ber in each year, at which such matters as came within the jurisdiction 
of a deputy provincial grand lodge were transacted. 

Scarcely four years had expired in the life of this subordinate body 
€re the brethren began to feel a desire to occupy a higher masonic plane, 
and to be co-equal at least with the craft in the neighboring province. 
At our present standpoint, one is at a loss to comprehend why the lodges 
in New Brunswick, containing on their rolls at that time many of the 
leading men in the community, were content, during so many years, to 
remain subordinate to Nova Scotia, and to suffer the inconveniences of 
having the central authority located so far distant, especially as the 
telegraph wires were not generally extended and postal communication 
was comparatively slow. 

The desire to remove this anomalous condition took shape at the 
quarterly communication of the deputy provincial grand lodge of 1st 
June, 1859, by the adoption of the following resolution : 

Whereon, From the number of private lodges in tlie province and the great 
increase in their members, as also from the extent and importance of New Bruns- 
wick, it is due to the craft in this province to be placed on an equality with their 
brethren in the neighboring province, and therefore it is incumbent on this deputy 
provincial grand lodge to move in tlie matter; therefore be it 

Resolved, That a memorial be addressed to the most worshipful the grand master 
of the fraternity of free and accepted masons of England, praying that he will be 
pleased to appoint, by patent, a resident provincial grand master for this particular 
district. 

After the adoption of this resolution a ballot was taken and R. W. 
Bro. Alexander Balloch, D. P. G. M., chosen to be recommended for 
appointment to the office. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 353 

During the existence of the deputy provincial grand lodge the follow- 
ing brethren filled the office of grand secretary : 

W. l?ro. Robert Stubs, from its inception until 27th December, 1858. 
"VV. Bro. Edward B. Peters, from December, 1858, up to the formation of th& 
provincial grand lodge. 

PROVINCIAL GRAND LODGE, 

LJndek England. 

The foregoing resolution and nomination were submitted to and 
received the approval of R. W. Bro. Alexander Keith, P. G. M., Halifax, 
N. S. A report of tlx' proceedings of the deputy provincial grand lodge, 
at which the nomination took place, together with a memorial of the 
craft in New Brunswick, strengthened by the recommendation of R. W. 
Bro. Keith, were forwarded to the Rt. Hon. the Earl of Zetland, G. M, 
of the united grand lodge of England, who was pleased to accede to the 
prayer of the memorial, and by patent bearing date 4th July, 1859, 
appointed R. W. Bro. Alexander Balloch provincial grand master of 
New Brunswick. 

R. W. Bro. Balloch was installed intj his honorable office, in the 
masonic hall, city of Saint John, at an emergency communication 3rd 
October, 1859, specially convened for that purpose and presided over ^y 
R. W. Bro. Alexander Keith, who, on retiring from the charge of tne 
craft ill New Brunswick, " gave expression in the warmest language to 
the anxious desire he felt for the prosperity oi the newly erected provin- 
cial grand lodge." 

During the tenure of the deputy provincial grand lodge, five lodges 
were added to the roll of lodges under England, in the province, viz. : 
Alley, No. 9G2, Upper Alills, St. Stephen; Howard, No. 966, Hills- 
borough ; Northumberland, No. 1003, Newcastle ; Miramichi, No. 1077, 
Chatham, and Salisbury, No. 1110, Salisbury, In addition to these, 
Brunswick Lodge, Moncton, worked two years under a dispensation, and 
a warrant was issued for Queen's Lodge, No. 932, Gagetown, but the 
lodge was never constituted under it. 

A new law, adopted 6th December, 1865, by the grand lodge of Eng- 
land, effected a change in the nomenclature of provincial grand lodges 
outside of England, whereby they became known and distinguished by 
the title of" District Grand Lodges in the colonies and foreign parts." 
From that date the provincial grand lodge became the district grand 
lodge, and the presiding officer the district grand master. 

The health of R. W. Bro. Balloch failed to such an extent, that in 



354 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

A. D. 1865 he was unable to attend to any business, either of a public or 
private nature, and was consequently debarred from exercising a proper 
supervision of the craft. The prospect of his restoration to health, or 
even a partial improvement in his condition, was considered so improbable 
that the fraternity deemed it imperative to move for the appointment of 
an active and competent brother in his stead. Eventually the choice fell 
upon R. W. Bro. Robert Thomson Clinch, D. D. G. M. and P. M. of 
Albion Lodge, No. 400 (formerly No, 570), who, by patent granted 4th 
June, 1866, by the Earl of Zetland, G. M., became the district grand 
master of New Brunswick. 

R. W. Bro. Clinch was installed 5th September, 1866, in the masonic 
hall, Saint John, by R. W. Bro. the Hon. Alexander Keith, provincial 
grand master of Nova Scotia. 

The changed position of freemasonry in New Brunswick consequent 
upon the formation of the grand lodge in October, 1867, and the ultimate 
adhesion of all the English lodges in the province to the new organization 
left the district grand master without a following. The prerogatives 
conferred upon him by his pj^Jent did not, however, entirely cease until 
2nd March, 1870, the date when the grand lodge of England recognized 
and entered into fraternal relations with the grand lodge of New Bruns- 
wick. Subsequently, the grand master of England appointed the past 
district grand master, R. W. Bro. Clinch, the representative of England 
at the grand lodge of New Brunswick, thus cementing, it is to be hoped 
indissolubly and for all time to corae, the strongest fraternal relations 
between the mother grand lodge and tu^ aspiring daughter. 

The brethren who filled the office of grand secretary in the provincial 
and district grand lodge, were : 

V. W. Bro. Edward B. Peters, from its erection until 27th December, 18(31. 
V. W. Bro. William F. Bunting, from December, 1861, to the end of its career. 

This body met (quarterly, in March, June, September and December, 
and was otherwise governed by laws similar to those in force in the 
deputy provincial grand lodge, except that in the latter days of the 
former the meetings were held semi-annually — March and December — 
instead of quarterly. 

The movement for the erection of New Brunswick into an inde- 
pendent masonic jurisdiction was started during the closing, years oi R. 
W. Bro. Balloch's incumbency as district grand master, the majority of 
the craft feeling that the time was opportune for asserting their inde- 
pendence and assuming the mauagemeni of their own aftairs. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 355 

GRAND LODGE OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The preliminary step in the formation of an independent grand lodge 
in and over the province of New Brunswick was had at a meeting of 
masters and past masters of lodges in the city of Saint John, held at the 
masonic hall, 16th August, 1867, W. Bro. B. Lester Peters filling the 
chair, and W. Bro. William Wedderburn acting as secretary. At this 
meeting it w'as decided to call a convention of representatives of all the 
lodges in the province "to consider the present position of masonic affairs 
in the province, and to take such action thereon as may be deemed 
necessary." 

Pursuant to this call, a meeting was held in the masonic hall, Saint 
John, 9th and 10th October, 1867, attended by representatives of nine- 
teen out of the twenty-six lodges in the province. After a lengthy and 
harmonious discussion anent the important matters involved in the call of 
the convention, a large majority of the delegates voted in favor of the 
following resolution : 

Whereas, The existence of lodges of free and accepted masons in this province 
hailing from their several grand lodges, with tl^e prospect of the introduction of 
other jurisdictions at an early day, creates a diversity of interests and allegiance, an 
absence of harmony in working and action, perpetuates local and national feelings, 
and thus estranging the aftections of brethren " whose order knows no country and is 
confined to no race" ; therefore be it 

Resolved, That in order to apply a remedy to tliese evils, to form perfect fraternal 
union and harmony, to establish order and to ensure tranquility, to provide for and 
promote the general welfare of the craft, and to secure to the fraternity of New 
Brunswick all the blessings of masonic privileges, it is expedient and right, and our 
bounden duty, to form a grand lodge in and for the province of New Brunswick. 

The sentiments so strongly expressed in this resolution clearly defined 
the temper of the craft on the question of an independent jurisdiction, 
and settled such doubts as may have remained in the minds of the 
assembled delegates as to the certainty of its accomplishment. 

Having thus agreed upon the advisability of the movement, the 
adoption of the following resolution by the unanimous voice of all present 
became a natural sequence : 

Resolved, That the representatives now in convention assembled, on behalf of the 
lodges represented by them, do hereby declare themselves to be "The Most Wor- 
shipful (trand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of New- 
Brunswick." 

The constitutions and laws, mutatis mutandis, of the grand lodge of 
England were chosen for the government of the new body until a formal 
code could be enacted. 



356 FREE^IASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

An election of officers n'as then held, with the following result: 

M. W. B. Lester Peters, Grand Master. 

R. W. William Wedderburn, Deputy Grand Master. 

R. W. Wiillara P. Flewelling, Senior Grand Warden, 

R. W. David Brown, Junior Grand Warden. 

V. W. and Rev. William Donald, D. D., Grand Chaplain. 

V, W. William H. A. Keans, Grand Treasurer. 

After the transaction of other business contingent upon the new 
organization, the convention adjourned, subject to the call of the grand 
master elect. 

The next meeting was held 22nd, 23rd and 24th January, 1868, when 
the grand lodge of New Bruswick was formally constituted and conse- 
crated, a constitution and general regulations for the government of the 
craft adopted, and the grand master and other officers, elected and ap- 
pointed, duly in.stalled into their respective offices. The installation of 
the grand master was conducted by the senior past master present, W. 
Bro. John Willis, of Leinster Lodge. 

At the time of the erection of the grand lodge — October, 1867 — 
there were twenty-six chartered lodges working in the province. Twenty 
of these held warrants from the grand lodge of England, three from the 
grand lodge of Ireland, and three from the grand lodge of Scotland. 
Sixteen of these lodges — twelve English, three Irish and one Scotch — 
voted in favor and took part in the formation of the grand lodge, viz. : 
Albion, Saint John ; St. John's, Saint John ; Hibernia, Saint John ; 
Saint Mark's, St. Andrews ; Solomon's, Fredericton ; Sussex, St. Stephen ; 
Carleton Union, Carleton ; Midian, Clifton; Union of Portland, Saint 
John; Woodstock, Woodstock; Alley, Upper Mills; Howard, Hills- 
borough ; Leinster, Saint John ; Northumberland, Newcastle ; Miramichi, 
Chatham ; and New Brunswick, Saint John. 

Within a few months subsequent to the erection of the grand lodge, 
six additional lodges surrendered their warrants to their mother grand 
lodges and were placed on th . roll of the new grand lodge ; and eventu- 
ally the remainder followed suit. Thus, within a comparatively short 
space of time and without a resort to coercive measures, the grand lodge 
of New Brunswick gained undisputed authority over the whole body of 
the craft in the province, a consummation attributable to the wisdom 
and tact of the distinguished brother first elected to rule over the craft. 

Subjoined is a roll of the lodges in New Brunswick at the time of the 
formation of the grand lodge, and the grand lodges under which they 
held their warrants : 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 



357 



Name. 



No. 



IX>CATION. 



Grand 

LOUOK. 



Albion, 

St. John's, 

Sussex, 

St. Mark's, 

Solomon's 

Carleton Union, .... 

Midlan, 

Union of Portland,., 

Woodstock, 

Saint George, 

Corinthian, 

Keith, 

Alley, 

Howard , 

Northumberland, ... 

Miramichi, 

Salisbury, 

Zetland, 

Zion, 

New Brunswick, 

Hibernia, 

Sussex, 

Leinster, 

St. Andrew's, 

St. Andrew 

Saint John, 



400 
48« 
480 
518 
522 
524 
527 
535 
S53 
629 
635 
644 
664 
C68 
701 
775 
808 
886 
9G5 
1084 
301 
327 
347 
364 
376 
412 



Saint John, . 



Dorchester, .... 
St. Andrews, . 
Fredericton, .. 

Carleton 

Clifton 

Saint John, .... 
Woodstock, .... 

St. George 

Hampton, 

Moncton, 

Upper Mills. .. 
Hillsborough,. 

Newcastle, 

Chatham 

Salisbury 

Shediac, 

Sussex 

Saint John, 



England. 



St Stephen,.. 
Saint John,.. 
Fredericton, . 
Richibucto, .. 
Bathurst, 



Ireland. 



Scotland. 



The following brethren have held the office of grand master up to the 

present time : 

M. W. Bro. B. Lester Peters, from October, 1867, to September, 1870. 

" William Wedderburn, from September, 1870, to September, 1872. 

" John V. Ellis, from September, 1872, to September, 1875. 

" 1 Robert T. Clinch, from September, 1875, to September, 1878. 

" Robert Marshall, from September, 1878, to April, 1881. 

" '^Benjamin R. Stevenson, from April, 1881, to April, 1883. 

« William F. Bunting, from April, 1883, to April, 1884. 

" John V. Ellis, from April, 1884, to April, 1887. 

" 'James McNichol, from April, 1887, to April, 1889. 

" Thomas Walker, from April, 1889, . 

Grand Secretaries : 

V. W. Bro. William F. Bunting, from October, 1867, to April, 1882. 
" Edwin J. Wetmore, from April, 1882, to August, 1893. 
" T. Nisbet Robertson, from August, 1893, . 

The grand lodge had on its roll at the date of the last returns 
(December 27th, 1893) thirty-two lodges, comprising a membership of 
one thousand eight hundred and four, and is in official and fraternal 

1 M. W. Bro. Clinch, died at Saint John, Jnne 24th, 1892. 

2 M. W. Bro. Stevenson, died at St. Andrews, June 16th, 1890. 

S M. W. Bro. McNichol, died at Saint John, February 28th, 1892. 

W 



358 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

communication with every legitimately constituted grand lodge in the 
world. 

> PROVINCIAL GRAND MASTER, 
Under Scotland. 

Althoufifh there were only three lodges in New Brunswick hailing 
from the grand lodge of Scotland, it was deemed advisable, in the 
interests of the portion of the masonic fraternity which they represented, 
to create a central authority to whom they could apply for advice and 
instruction, and under whom they could act in matters appertaining to 
their welfare. The most prominent, as well as the best informed and 
most suitable brother in their ranks for such a position, was the late R. 
W. Bro. Robert Gowan, of Fredericton," whose intimate knowledge of 
freemasonry placed him at the head of the masonic circle of his day in 
New Brunswick. He was thoroughly versed in the history, laws and 
rituals of the fraternity, a graceful and incisive writer, a man of sound 
judgment and pratical experience, and well qualified for the position of a 
ruler in the craft. 

Upon application of the Scottish lodges, Bro. Gowan was appointed 
by patent issued 4th February, 1867, by the grand master mason of 
Scotland, to the exalted and honorable office of provincial grand master 
of New Brunswick. 

Hitherto tb ■ dges in this province, holding under the grand lodge 
of Scotland, had been ruled by the provincial grand master of Nova 
Scotia, who, as in the case of the English lodges, had masonic jurisdiction 
over the two provinces. The erection, however; of an independent grand 
lodge in and over Nova Scotia in the year 1866, had brought about a 
separation of the two provinces in this respect, and resulted in the 
appointment of a resident provincial grand master for New Brunswick. 

In consequence of the erection of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, 
and the withdrawal of the authority held by the grand lodge of Sr<itland 
over the lodges of its obedience in the province, the honor conferred upon 
R. W. Bro. Gowan continued only for a short time. Upon the recog- 
nition of the grand lodge of New Brunswick by the grand lodge of 
Scotland, wiiich occurred in May, 1872, the authority of Bro. Gowan as 
provincial grand master ceased, but on the recoiiimendation of the grand 
master of New Brunswick he was appointed the representative of the 
j^rand lodge of Scotland at the grand lodge of New Brunswick, and as a 
iM ther mark of the esteem in which he was held, and in recognition of 
his eminent masonic services, he was at the annual communication of the 
grand V 'ge of Nca' Brunswick, held September, 1872, constituted a per- 
manent member of the grand lodge with the rank and title of past grand 
master. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 359 

Ripe in years and in the fulness of his honors, Bro. Gowan died at 
Frederieton, 30th January, 1879, at the age of seventy-nine years. 

He was initiated into freemasonry in the old Solomon's Lodge at 
Frederieton, 14th August, 1821. He was worshipful master of that lodge 
on several occasions, and occupied the chair when it ceased operations 
A. D. 1829. 

Bro. Gowan had collected quite an extensive masonic library, a por- 
tion of which after his death came into the possession of the grand lodge 
of New Brunswick. 

The craft in Frederieton as a token of their esteem and brotherly 
love, presented him, September, 1859, with a valuable service of plate. 
He was also the recipient at various times, from masonic bodies in other 
portions of New Brunswick, of mementoes of the high regard in which he 
was held. 

EMULATION LODGE OF INSTRUCTION. 

Organized and opened 5th December, 1866, under a dispensation 
granted by R. W. Bro. Robert T. Clinch, district grand master under 
England, to V. W. Bro. William F. Bunting, district grand secretary and 
past master of St. John's Lodge, by which he was authorized to open and 
conduct a lodge of instruction as the master or preceptor. The brethren 
of the several lodges in Saint John, both of the English and Irish con- 
stitutions, became very much interested in its working, and attended it 
in large numbers. This lodge kept up its work with regularity, opening 
late in the autumn and continuing through the winter season until the 
month of April in each year during its continuance. 

Upon the erection of the grand lodge of New Brunswick, the dispen- 
sation under which the lodge had worked up to that time, necessarily 
became null and void. Application was therefore made to the grand 
master of the new grand lodge, who was pleased to grant a fresh dispen- 
sation authorizing Bro. Bunting to continue the lodge under the same 
regulations as heretofore governed it. A circular issued by the preceptor 
to the craft, giving notice of the continuance of the lodge, announced its 
aims and objects to be "a full exemplification of the work and lectures of 
the craft degrees, and the reading of short essays, with discussions on the 
ancient charges, landmarks, symbols, usages, constitutions, traditions, 
history, jurisprudence, etc., of frcenuisonry." 

This lodge held its meetings weekly in the masonic hall, Saint John, 
and kept a recoitl of its transactions. It adopted a code of bye-laws for 
its government, and was an excellent school for young and aspiring 
craftsmen. Many of it.«i members who filled offices in the various lodges, 
and who jjroved themselves bright workmen, attributed their proficiency 
to the knowledge gained in the Emulation Lodge of Instruction. 



360 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

At each recurring season the lodge was regularly opened and worked 

until the destruction of the masonic hall by the disastrous fire of 20th 

June, 1877, when, for want of proper accommodation, its labors were 
held in abeyance. 

MASONIC BOARD OF RELIEF, SAINT JOHN. 

Although a preliminary meeting was held 21st October, 1870, this 
body was not regularly organized until 21st February, 1871. The 
following excerpts from its rules set forth the scope and object of its 
formation : 

The style and title shall be The Masonic Board of Relief , 

The funds shall be for the relief of poor and destitute brethren, their widows and 
orphans. 

The fund shall be raised by a capita tax based on the membership of each lodge 
according to the annual returns made to the grand secretary. 

The amount so assessed shall be sixty cents per annum per member. 

The board shall be composed of two representatives from each of the city lodges. 

At the semi-annual meetings in January and July, a president, vice-president, 
and three almoners shall be elected by ballot. 

The secretary-treasurer shall be elected annually in January, and be eligible for 
re-election. 

The almoners shall have power to grant relief, and to draw upon the secretary- 
treasurer for such sum or sums (not CAceeding twenty-five dollars in any one case) 
for the eflTective carrying out of the object of the board. 

The board shall have power in special cases to make grants not to exceed forty 
dollars in any one case. 

At the organization of the board the respective lodges were repres- 
ented by the following delegates : 

Albion Lodge — Geo. E. Fairweather and Christopher Murray. 

St. John's Lodge — Wm. F. Bunting and John D. Short. 

Hibernia Lodge — Mark N. Powers and James Saunders. 

Union Lodge of Portland — David R. Munro and Thos. H. Keohan. 

Leinster Lodge — Alfred A. Stockton and Henry J. Thome. 

New Brunswick Lodge — James McNichol, Jr., and John S. Jordan. 

The first officers elected were, David R. Munro, president ; Mark N. 
Powers, vice-president ; James McNichol, Jr., secretary-treasurer ; and 
George E. Fairweather, Johu D. Short and Henry J. Thorne, almoners. 

Several years ago the board r><' t-chased a large plot of ground in the 
rural cemetery for the iutermen the indigent deceased. It is held by 
trustees and superintended by a special committee. The board is in cor- 
respondence with similar boards in the United States and Dominion of 
Canada. It has held its meetings, elected officers and transacted its gen- 
eral business regularly from the outset, and has never failed, by its 
almoners, to give immediate attention to all calls upon the charity fund. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 361 

Has the establishment of a board of relief been a benefit or an injury, 
in a masonic point of view, to the membership of the lodges? 

Have not the practical feeling and spirit of charity gone from among 
the craft generally, by divesting the lodges of the power of dispensing the 
charitable fund, and placing it in the hands of the few composing the 
board of relief? 

In the hands of a circumscribed body does it not become a mere 
matter of business, a perfunctory act? 

We must concede that the organization and systematic work of a 
regularly constituted board will, to a great extent, counteract the fraudu- 
lent attempts of dead beats and imposters of every description, and will 
prevent cunning applicants from getting more than a fair proportion of 
relief. On the other hand, the disposal of the charitable fund is removed 
from the actual and personal control of the craft, represented by the 
assembled lodge, and thus charity, which is the foundation and cope 
stone of our institution, is not a prominent or immediate portion of lodge 
life — is not brought closely home to the fraternal feelings of the brethren 
at large. In fact, it is disassociated from them by being delegated to a 
limited few. 

In former years the applications for relief were made in open lodge, 
the brethren heard these appeals, with their surrounding circumstances, 
and practically engaged in their disposal ; thus they had opportunity, 
time and again, of having their hearts moved, their finer feelings worked 
upon, and the spirit of charity evoked, by being brought into actual 
contact with the subjects and objects of charitable regard. 

In ray early masonic years, previous to the establishment of charity 
committees or boards of relief in Saint John, I have repeatedly witnessed 
how ready and anxious the brethren were, at a lodge meeting, to share in 
and help forward this important and exalted tenet of our honored fra- 
ternity. How often have I witnessed a stranger brother, from a distant 
portion of the earth, possibly from the antipodes, arise in open lodge and 
make an appeal for assistance ; and how often have I heard a lodge 
member do the same thing for the stray waif. The hearts of all the 
brethren would go out towards these objects of their fraternal regard and 
commiseration ; they would be brought into actual contact and acquaint- 
ance with the sufferings and privations of their unfortunate brethren, 
their widows and orphans, and they would i 1 and experience the pleas- 
ure which conies to the charitable heart iu giving. I have oftentimes 
heard a member of the lodge arise in his place and bring before the 
notice of the master and brethren, a worthy case for their masonic sym- 
pathy and aid. And I have seen the brother, with box or hat in hand, 
pass around the lodge and gather voluntary contributions, according to 



362 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

the nature of the case and the dimensions of each individual purse. No 
worthy application received the cold shoulder and no hand refused to 
deposit a quota in the box or hat. 

No doubt fraud and imposture, under the present system, are reduced 
to a minimum ; but has the gain in this respect counterbalanced the 
blessedness of the former? The craft generally know little of the actu- 
alities of charity. They hear a semi-annual report of the board of 
relief, vote in a businesslike way in favor of its reception, and pass an 
order for the payment of the capita assessment; that is all. 

With the present increased membership of the craft, covering every 
portion of the civilized world, and the extended facilities for travel by 
land and water, whereby many waifs of humanity are moving to and fro, 
a regularly organized board of rt'ief is required to deal with cases of 
deserving strange brethren and to checkmate the cunning devices of the 
imposter. Let the board of relief deal with these classes, and these alone, 
and let each lodge care for its own members and the widows and orphans 
of its members whom misfortune may havo rendered subjects of masonic 
charity. As such a course would necessitate a divided disposition of the 
charitable fund, and would narrow down the work of the board of relief, 
the amount of money required by the board would, as a matter of course, 
be considerably lessened. 

TEMPORARY BOARD OF RELIEF FOR FIRE SUFFERERS. 

On the 30th day of June, 1877, a board of relief was organized to 
extend aid and comfort to membere of the masonic fraternity and their 
widows and orphans who were burned out and rendered destitute by the 
disastrous fire which destroyed the larger portion of the city of Saint 
John on the memorable 20th June, 1877. 

The board consisted of the city members of the board of general pur- 
poses of grand lodge, and the presiding officers of all lodges, chapters and 
encampments in Saint John. 

The officers chi^sen to conduct its afl^airs were : 

M. VV. Bro. Robert T. Clinch, G. M., President. 
V. W. Bro. James McNicliol, Jr., G. T., Treasurer. 
V. W. Bro. William F. Bunting, G. S., Secretary. 
R. W. Bro. Edwin J. Wetmore, D. G. M., Clerk. 

The board issued a circular on the 7th day of July to the grand 
lodges of the United States, Canada, England, Ireland and Scotland, and 
to the private lodges in New Brunswick, conveying to them the unpleas- 
ant tidings of the great losses sustained and distress prevailing in the 
craft in Saint John, and making known to them the organization of the 
board of relief, its object and aims. Although no direct appeal was made 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 363 

for assistance, it conveyed the information that any voluntary contribu- 
tion sent in would be gratefully accepted. The board continued its 
operations up to the annual communication of grand lodge of April, 
1879, when a full report of its proceedings was laid before that body. 
The contributions amounted to the munificent sum of eight thousand four 
hundred and thirty-one dollars and thirty-five cents, which, according ta 
the report, *' was disbursed with the utmost care, after strict inquiry into- 
each case presented for the consideration of the board, the relief being 
granted according to the loss sustained and the circumstances of the 
sufferer." 

THE GRAND R. A. CHAPTER OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

This body was organized in the masonic temple, Saint John, on Tues- 
day, March 22nd, 1887, at a convention of delegates representing a. 
majority of royal arch chapters in New Brunswick, convened by printed 
circular, dated March 1, 1887, as follows: 

A convention of chapters of royal arch masons in the province of New Bruns- 
wick will be held at the masonic temple, in the city of Saint John, on Tuesday, the 
twenty-second day of the present month of March, for the purpose of acting together 
in the erection of an independent and supreme grand royal arcii chapter in and for 
the province of New Brunswick. This convention is called in accordance with 
resolutions adopted by a majority cf the regular royal arch chapters working in this 
province. The delegates representing chapters will assemble in the lodge room at 
the masonic temple, in the city of Saint John, on said Tuesday, the twenty-second 
day of March instant, at three o'clock in the afternoon. 

This circular was signed by the first principals of five chapters, viz. : 
Stephen K. F, James, Carleton Chapter; Alexander R. Campbell, New 
Brunswick Chapter ; Alexander Burchill, Fredericton Chapter ; Augustus 
W. Reed, Union Chapter, and George M. Jarvis, Botsford Chapter. 

Seven chapters were represented by their delegates at the convention, 
viz.: Carleton, of Saint John; Fredericton, of Fredericton; Union, of 
Carleton ; St. Stephen, of St. Stephen ; New Brunswick, of Saint John j 
Botsford, of Moncton, and Woodstock, of Woodstock. E. Comp. B. 
Lester Peters was called to the chair, and E. Comp. T. Nisbet Robertson 
acted as secretary. 

After the preliminaries usually observed on such occasions, the 
assembled delegates adopted the following resolution by the unanimous 
voice of all present: 

Resolved, That the chapters of royal arcli masons now represented in this conven- 
tion hereby declare themselves to be, and do liereby erect and establish, the supreme 
governing body for royal arch masonry in New Brunswick, by the title of "The 
Grand Royal Arch Chapter of New Brunswick." 



364 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Having thus erected the grand chapter by the unanimous concurrence 
of all the delegates present, representing seven chapters out of the nine in 
the province, and having disposed of some routine matters necessary to 
the completion of the organization, an election of office-bearers was held, 
resulting in the choice of a full staff, as follows : 

M. E. B. Lester Peters, first grand principal. 

R. E. Alfred F. Street, deputy first grand principal. 

R. E. James McNicliol, second grand principal. 

R. E. George M. Jarvis, third grand principal. 

R. E. T. Nisbet Robertson, grand scribe E. 

R. E. George F. Finder, grand scribe N. 

R. E. J. Henry Leonard, grand treasurer. 

V. E David F, Merritt, first grand sojourner. 

V. E. William H. Stevens, second grand sojourner. 

V. E. Nelson Campbell, third grand sojourner. 

V. E. Samuel McKean, grand sword bearer. 

V. £. Augustus W. Reed, grand standard bearer. 

V. E. Alexander R. Campbell, grand director of ceremonies. 

V E. Williim B. Wallace, grand organist. 

V. E. G. Gordon Boyne, grand janitor. 

After the installation of the officers, proclamation was made '* that the 
grand royal arch chapter of New Brunswick was duly erected, opened 
and solemnly dedicated in the name of The Most High, and the officers 
regularly installed according to ancient usage." 

The work of organization was subsequently perfected by the adoption 
of the following resolutions, regulations and orders : That the grar.d 
chapter have authority over the degrees of mark master, past master, 
excellent master, the royal arch, and the chair or installation degrees; 
that the number and status of chapters acting in the erection of the 
grand chapter be in accordance with the dates of their warrants or 
charters respectively; that until new warrants be issued or endorsement 
made on the present, the first grand principal be authorized to issue an 
interim warrant; that until a constitution and general regulations be 
adopted, discretionary power be given the first grand principal to 
govern the jurisdiction, subject to hr general usages of capitular masonry. 
A committee was appointed to draw up and submit a constitution and 
general regulations ; provision was made for the promulgation of an uni- 
form ritual in all the chapters ; the chapters were authorized to continue 
the use of their present regalia until the grand chapter should order 
otherwise; a diploma, seal, books, etc., were ordered to be procured, and 
the necessary steps were authorized to be taken to secure recognition 
from the various grand chapters throughout the world. After which the 
grand chapter was closed in due form. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 365 

The following is a list of the chapters represented in the convention, 
and, at the present, forming the full roll under the new grand chapter. 
They are named in their order of precedence : 



Namk. 


Location. 


Former Grand Chapter. 


Oarleton 


Saint John 


Scotland 


Fredericton, 

New Brunswick, 


Fredericton, 

Saint John 


Scotland 

Canada 


Union, 


Carleton 


.Smtlnnd 


Saint Stei)ben 


St. Steplien ! Scotland 


Botsford 


Moncton, 


Canada 

Canada 


Woodstock, 


Woodstock, 



There are two other chapters in the province which were not repre- 
sented in the convention : Saint Marks of St. Andrews, under Canada, 
and Mount Lebanon of Chatham, under Scotland. The former may be 
considered defunct, as a sufficient number of members cannot be convened 
to hold a convocation ; and the latter declines, so far, to come within the 
jurisdiction of the grand chapter of New Brunswick. 

Under the provisions of amendments to the constitutions, adopted at 
the annual convocation held April 29, 1891, the title of the presiding 
officer of the grand chapter was changed from First Grand Principal to 
Grand High Priest, and of subordinate chapters, from Principal Z. to 
High Priest. At the same time the date of holding the annual convoca- 
tion was changed from the mouth of April to the month of August. 

All the chapters on the roll of the grand chapter were empowered to 
continue to hold their meetings and i)rosecute their work under the new 
order of things by an interim warrant issued by the first grand principal 
under date, March 22, 1887. Subsequently, on the 17th day of Decem- 
ber, A. D. 1891, their orginal warrants were ratified and confirmed, as of 
the grand chapter of New Brunswick, by an authorization and endorse- 
ment on each. 

The conn»anions who presided over the grand chapter up to April, 
1894, were : 

M. E. Comp. B. Lester Peters, from its organization until April, 1892. 
M E. Comp, T Nisbet Kobertson, from April, 1892, . 

The grand secretaries were : 

R. E. Comp, T. Nisbet Robertson, from its organization until April, 1892. 
R. E, Comp, William A. Ewing, from April, 1892, . 

ORDER OF HIGH PRIESTHOOD. 

This branch of freemasonry was inaugurated in New Brunswick by 
the formation of a council in the city of Saint John in the year 1864, 
under an authorization issued by the grand royal arch chapter of Ireland 



366 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

to the late M. E. Comp. John Willis, Past Principal Z., who was the first 
president chosen to rule over the council. It was inslitutfd under the 
auspices of Hibernia Royal Arch Chapter of Saint John, holding of the 
grand chapter of Ireland, and in the interests of the companions who, 
from time to time, filled the chief presiding chair in that chapter. It 
first assumed the name of Hibernia Council, which, in a few months, was 
changed to New Brunswick Council, consequent upon a like change in 
the nomenclature of the chapter. 

From the year 1868 until 1892 it neither met nor worked, and was 
consequently a dormant body. On the 11th day of June, 1892, upon a 
call issued to duly installed present and past high priests of constituent 
chapters, a meeting was held in the masonic temple at Saint John, when 
the surviving members of the old council reorganized and re-established 
it under the designation of " The Grand Council of the Order of High 
Priesthood of the Province of New Brunswick." A large number of 
present and past high priests of subordinate chapters holding of the 
grand chapter of New Brunswick were elected to membership ; a consti- 
tution was adopted ; a staff" of ofl[icers elected, with M. E. Comp. Robert 
Marshall at their head as president; and other matters tending to the 
perfection and permanence of the re-organized body disposed of. 

This order is conferred upon royal arch masons elected to preside as 
high priests over a regular chapter, and may be bestowed in the presence 
of at least three duly qualified high priests. Very little is known of the 
date and circumstance of its origin. One authority, however, asserts 
that it originated in the prolific masonic brain of Thomas Smith Webb 
in the year 1799. Companions who have received this order are entitled 
to wear a distinctive jewel prescribed by the constitution. 

Presidents op the eouNCiL. 

M. E. Comp. John Willis, 1864 -'66. 
M. E. Comp. Edward Willis, ]86G-'68. 
M. E. Comp. Robert Marshall, 1892 

PROVINC^IAL GRAND ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER, 

Under England. 

M. E. Comp. the Rev. Jerome Alley, D. D., who resided at St. 
Andrews, and held the position of provincial grand superintendent of 
English royal arch masonry, under a patent dated 5th June, 1850, 
formed a provincial grand chapter, under his patent, at St. Andrews 
some time during the year 1856. All the information obtainable of its 
existence and working is contained in a printed circular sent me by E. 
Comp. Samuel T. Gove, Scribe E., of which the following is a copy : 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 367 

At the annual convocation of tlie provincial grand royal arch chapter, English 
registry, the M. E. grand superintendent, the Kev. Jerome Alley, D. D., was pleased 
to appoint the following provincial grand ofRcers for the ensuing year, viz,: M. E. 
Conip. A. W. Smith, H. ; M. E. Comp. John Aymar, J.; E. Comp. C. Kennedy, 
C. H.; E. Comp. James Clark, R. A. C; E. Comp. W. Doak, P. S. ; E. Comp. C. 
A. Thompson, T. ; E. Comp. S. T. Gove, E. ; Comp. C. Morrison, janitor. The 
grand superintendent has autiiority to grant disijcnsutions for the opening of new 
chapters, and also, in case of necessity, for tiie exaltation of a brother to the royal 
arch at the expiration of four weeks from the period of his having received the 
degree of master mason. S. T. Gove, Scribe E, 

The time of holding this annual convocation is not set forth, neitner 
is the date of the issue of the circular given, although I am informed that 
it was sent out in the latter part of the year 1856, and appears to have 
been the first and last promulgated. This provincial grand chapter had 
an ephemeral existence, as at the death of Comp. Alley, 5th August,. 
1861, the patent creating the office of provincial grand superintendent 
became null and void and was returned to the supreme grand chapter at 
London. The jurisdiction created by this patent was of limited extent,, 
as there was only one chapter (Saint Mark's of St. Andrews) opened in 
New Brunswick under the English constitution. A warrant was granted 
for Albion Chapter at Saint John, but it was never constituted under it. 

PROVINCIAL GRAND SUPERINTENDENT, 
Under Scotland. 

M. E. Comp. Alexander Balloch, a member and a past first prin- 
cipal of Carleton Royal Arch Chapter, No. 47, of Saint John, was 
appointed 9th November, 1849, by the supreme grand royal arch chapter 
of Scotland, to the })osition of provincial grand superintendent of Scottish 
royal arch masonry in New Brunswick. He continued to hold his 
patent and exercise the authority conferred by it until March, 1859. At 
this time, in consequence of complications having arisen, it was deemed 
inexpedient, in the interests of Scottish royal arch masonry as it then 
existed in the province, to continue the office of grand superintendent, 
and in view of representations made by the chapters, the supreme chapter 
declined to niake a re-appointment ; thus the office, from March, 1859, 
ceased to exist. 

Comp. Balloch was exalted to the royal arch degree in the Carleton 
Chapter, July 10, 1844, and exercised for many years an active mcmber- 
fihip in the chapter. He never organized a provincial grand chapter,, 
under the authority given him by the laws of the supreme grand chapter, 
preferring to assume and bear all the responsibility incident to his office. 
During a limited period, however, he appointed a provincial grand scribe 
E. to attend to clerical work. 



368 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Comp. Balloch was deputy provincial grand master and provincial 
grand master of craft masonry, under England, from September, 1855, 
until June, 186G. At the communication of the grand lodge of New 
Brunswick, held 23rd January, 1868, he was created a permanent mem- 
ber of the grand lodge with the rank of past grand master, " in considera- 
tion of his zeal and ability, and for the eminent services rendered by him 
to the craft." He died at Saint John, 3rd February, 1870, aged seventy 
years. 

DEPUTY GRAND HIGH PRIEST, 
Under Nova Scotia. 

M. E. Comp. Benjamin L. Peters, a member and past high priest of 
Carleton Chapter of Saint John, was appointed by warrant dated at 
Halifax, Nova Scotia, 8th May, 1827, to be deputy grand high priest of 
royal arch masonry in New Brunswick. The appointment was made and 
the patent issued under the hand and seal of R. W. Bro. John Albro, 
grand master of the provincial grand lodge of Nova Scotia. This patent 
continued in force, and M_. E. Comp. Peters exercised the authority 
created by it until the year 1829, at which time the old provincial grand 
lodge of Nova Scotia became defunct.' 

Comp. Peters received the royal arch degree in the Carleton Chapter, 
December 15, 1815. The craft degrees were conferred upon him in Union 
Lodge, No. 38. He died at Saint John, May 12, 1852, aged sixty-two 
years. 

CARLETON ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER, SAINT JOHN. 

This chapter, originally named " The Carleton Chapter in Saint John, 
New Brunswick," was constituted January 19, 1805, at the lodge room 
of St. John's Lodge, No. 29, in Cody's tavern (commonly known as "The 
Coffee House " ), under the authority of the warrant of St. John's Lodge, 
sanctioned by the master and wardens of the lodge. 

The original members were Thomas Wetmore, high priest ; David 
Waterbury, king ; Hugh Johnston, scribe ; Chapman Judson, royal arch 
captain ; John Paul, lirst grand master ; Richard Lawrence, second grand 
master; Jeremiah Pecker, third grandmaster; Richard Bonsai), Zero- 
babel and treasurer, and Robert Laidley, tyler. 

Under the first code of bye-laws and rules, which were adopted March 
13, 1805, it was provided that the regular meetings be held on the second 
Wednesday of March, June, September and December, and the election 
of officers annually on the second Wednesday in March. 

1 The reader has already learned by reference to previous pages of this volume that, under the 
peculiar system allowed by the "Athol" grand lodge, royal arch chapters were opened and held 
under authority of and attached to its constituent lodges, and in like mannw, under this system, 
the patent of M. E. Comp. Peters was issued by the provincial grand master of craft freemasonry. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 369 

The chapter continued under the warrant of St. John's Lodge until 
October 2, 1815, when it changed its allegiance and became subject to 
the authority and warrant of Union Lodge, No. 38, without any assign- 
able reason for the change. At the meeting held December 13, 1820^ 
the chapter decided "to apply for a royal arch warrant independent of 
the master's warrant," and a committee was appointed " to make applica- 
tion to some warranted grand royal arch chapter in the United King- 
dom for that purpose." This committee reported at a meeting held 
April 17, 1822, that a warrant had been received from the grand royal 
arch chapter of Scotland, when the chapter passed a vote of thanks to 
the grand lodge at Halifax, and also to St. John's and Union Lodges in 
Saint John, " for granting the use of their respective warrants for the 
time past." 

A resolution was adopted July 8, 1822, "that (^arleton Chapter, 
formerly held under the warrants of St, John's and Union Lodges, be 
closed, and stand closed without date." It WwS then opened under the 
warrant received from the grand chapter of Scotland, and a new record 
bock was ordered to be procured. Up to that date the annual elections 
were hell in March, and the three principal officers styled high priest 
king and scribe. Thenceforward and up to the present the elections 
have iakeri place in September, while the three chief officers were desig- 
nated Principal Z., Principal H., and Principal J. until April, 1891,^ 
when, under the laws of the present grand chapter, they are entitled, as 
of old, high priest, king, and scribe. 

The warrant granted by the supreme grand royal arch chapter of 
Scotland was issued at Edinburgh, December 10, 1821, by the M. E. 
grand principals and remanent office-bearers, to William Charlton,^ 
Nehemiah Merritt, Robert Robertson, George Bonsall, John Paul, David 
Waterbury, Richard Lawrence, James Hendricks, Thomas Rawleigh, 
Charles Herring, Henry Chubb, Benjamin Stanton, Robert Ray, Charles- 
Raymond, George Pagan, Thomas Paddock, Thomas Nisbet, David S. 
Marshall, John MacLure, William Hughson, Robert Welch, William 
Leavitt, Charles Whitney, James Wood and Joe Brand, with the follow- 
ing office-bearers : Comp. William Charlton, M. E. Principal Z. ; Comp. 
Nehemiah Merritt, M. E. Principal H. ; Comp. Robert Robertson, M. E. 
Principal J. ; Charles Herring, Scribe E. ; John Paul, Scribe N. ; John 
MacLure, David Waterbury and Charles Raymond, Sojourners, and 
Henry Chubb, Treasurer, authorizing them to open and hold a chapter 
under the name of " Carletou Royal A'-ch Chapter, No. 47," in the city 
of Saint John, New Brunswick, upon the second Wednesday^ of each 

1 The third Wednesday is now chosen for the regular meeting. 



370 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

month. It provided that all candidates for exaltation to the royal arch 
degree, must previously have been raised to the sublime degree of a 
master mason, have been regularly passed to the chair of a lodge, and 
also have been admitted to the excellent and super excellent degrees. 
The warrant was signed by His Grace the Duke of A thole, M. E. Z. ; 
Sir Patrick Walker of Coats, Knight, M. E. H. ; Rt. Hon. George, Earl 
of Aboyne, M. E. J. ; William Crauford, Depute Grand Principal ; Mark 
Sprot, E. ; P. Deuchar, N. ; Robert Wright, Grand Treasurer ; George 
Atcheson, Grand Chancellor; M. Pringle, Grand Recorder. 

The first meeting under this warrant was held September 11, 1822, 
and the chapter continued to meet and work under its authority until the 
grand chapter of New Brunswick was erected. This warrant, with the 
jewels, clothing, seal, banners, and all other property, except the records, 
were destroyed in the masonic hall by the fire of 20th June, 1877. A 
duplicate of the warrant was subsequently received from the supreme 
grand chapter of Scotland, which is now hanging on the walls of the 
chapter room in the masonic temple, Saint John. The degrees conferred 
in the chapter are mark master, past master, excellent master, and the 
royal arch. 

Carleton Chapter, by its delegates, united in the erection of the grand 
chapter of New Brunswick, and stands at the head of the roll of that 
grand body. It is the second oldest masonic body in New Brunswick 
(its senior being St. John's Lodge of Saint John), and possesses its 
records complete from the date < f its first organization. 

CARLETON MARK MASTER'S LODGE, SAINT JOHN. 

The " mark" degree was conferred in this body separate and distinct 
from the chapter. It was under the immediate control of the chapter, 
' and elected its staff of officers annually from among its own members, 
with the reservation, however, that the master and wuidens should be 
royal arch masons and members of the Carleton chai)ter. The authority 
for its existence was contained in a written dispensation or warrant issued 
by M. E. Com. Alexander Balloch, provincial grand superintendent, the 
date and other particulars of which are not forthcoming, as the docu- 
ment disappeared and its whereabouts could not be ascertained. In 
former yeare the degrees of nuirk and past master were conferred in 
Scotland in a lodge of craft masonry, and not under authority of the 
supreme chapter. When the grand lodge of Scotland withdrew permis- 
sion to its daughter lodges to confer these degrees, the diflUculty which 
then arose was remedied by the supreme chapter enacting a law authoriz- 
ing the issue by it of special warrants, at a cost of twenty shillings, con- 
stituting lodges for these degrees. These " chair nujster lodges " were not 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 371 

required to register their members on the roll of the supreme chapter, but 
were expected to keep a minute book and register, and were authorized 
to grant certificates for the mark degree. 

The Carleton Mark Lodge established and collected initiation fees, 
kept a record of its proceedings, and defrayed from its treasury all ex- 
penses of its working. It did not exact monthly or annual dues from its 
members, its expenses being met by the amount received in initiation fees. 
It possessed its own jewels, clothing, working tools and other parapher- 
nalia. It maintained a quasi-independent existence up to the year 1858, 
when, by a manifesto of the supreme grand chapter of Scotland, its work- 
ing was estopped, and thereafter the mark degree was conferred in the 
Carleton chapter. 

There is a record book extant of this lodge, commencing 8th March, 
1847, and ending 6th September, 1858. The chief officers of the first 
year were : Bros. William H. A. Keans, R. W. M. ; George Sutherland, 
S. W. ; Francis Clerke, J. W. ; William Scammell, treasurer; and 
William D. French, secretary ; and those of the latter year were : Bros. 
William M. Smith, R. W. M. ; Robert T. Clinch, S. W. ; Edward Allison, 
J. W. ; William S. Marven, treasurer ; and George M. Jack, secretary. 

HIRAM R. A. CHAPTER, SAINT JOHN. 

Held under the warrant of Hiram Lodge, No. 17, and the first royal 
arch chapter established in New Brunswick. The only evidence or inti- 
mation of its existence is taken from an entry in the records of Carleton 
chapter of April 10, 1805, viz.: " Bro. John Sinnott, P. M. of the lodge 
No. 17, called Hiram, formerly of this city, referred to an old application 
made in writing on the 9th June, A. D. 1790, to the general chapter then 
held in. this city, for admission to the degrees of most exellent and royal 
arch." As Hiram was the only lodge held in Saint John at that early 
period, the chapter referred to must have been held under its warrant. 
There is no other evidence of its existence, so far as I know, beyond the 
foregoing extract. 

SAINT GEORGE'S R. A. CHAPTER, MAUGERVILLE. 

This body was held under the warrant of Saint George's Lodge, No. 
19, of Maugerville. Beyond an occasional reference to it in the records 
of Carleton chapter, I have not been able to gather any particulars 
regarding it. -. 

WIDOWS' FRIEND R. A. CHAPTER, KINGSTON AND SUSSEX. 
Held under tlie authority of the warrant of Sion Lodge, No. 21, meet- 
ing first at Kingston and afterward at Sussex, King's county. The same 
remarks apply to this body as to Saint George's chapter. 



372 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

MOUNT MORI AH R. A. CHAPTER, FREDERICTON. 

On the 16th February, 1819, a meeting of royal arch masons residing 
in Fredericton was held in the hall of Solomon's Lodge, at which a 
committee was appointed to select an evening and place of meeting to con- 
sider the expediency of constituting a royal arch chapter. Another meet- 
ing was held the twenty-seventh '.ay of the same month, when a resolution 
was adopted favoring the formation of a chapter. On the 8th March, 
1819, Mount Moriah Chapter was duly organized under the warrant of 
Solomon's Lodge, No. 22, by and with the consent of the master and 
wardens of that lodge. The fee for conferring the mark degree was fixed 
at twenty shillings, beside two shillings and sixpence to the tyler, and 
the high priest was authorized " to report the proceedings to the R. W. 
Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia." The memorandum from which the fore- 
going was taken contained no other particulars. It did not even mention 
the names of the companions present, or of those chosen for office-bearers. 

MIDI AN R. A. CHAPTER, KINGSTON. 

This body was held under the warrant of Midiau Lodge, No. 31, 
Kingston, King's county. 

ST. ANDREW'S R. A. CHAPTER, ST. ANDREWS. 

The meagre information I have gleaned in regard to this chapter is 
taken from the records of Eastern Star Lodge, No. 37, of St. Andrews. 
The record states that, at a regular comnmnication of the lodge held 
August 4, 1819, " it was voted that authority be granted to Bro. James 
Boyd to hold a lodge of royal arch under the charter of the lodge." 

Nearly ten years afterward (on the night of June 29, 1829), a fire 
consumed the hall owned by the lodge, with all the furniture, jewels, 
regalia, books, records, etc., of St. Andrew's royal arch chapter, and 
everything else in the building except the warrant, jewels and records of 
Eastern Star Lodge. St. Andrew's chapter did not hold any meetings 
after this diastrous event. 

HIBERNIAN R. A. CHAPTER. ST. ANDREWS. 

This chapter was organized March 3, 18'M, under a warrant granted 
by the grand royal arch chapter of Ireland to companions James Kyle, 
Isaac Kennedy, John Commac, Matthew Burnside, James Fleming, 
William Milligan, James Finley, Matthew Murray and Andrew Gilli- 
land. The regular convocations were held on the second Wednesday in 
the months of January, April, July and October. It ceased to work 
December 30, 1862, owing to the death of some members and the removal 
of others from the district. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 373 

ALBION R. A. CHAPTER, No. 570, SAINT JOHN. 

The warrant for this chapter was granted by the grand royal arch 
chapter of England to Companions Gustavus R. Jarvis, Thomas L. 
Nicholson, Charles V. Forster, George Sutherland, William D. French, 
James R. Crane, John Mackay, James Howard and Charles Johnston, to 
meet at Saint John, in the province of New Brunswick. It was dated at 
London, February 2, 1848, and signed by the following chief officers of 
the grand chapter: The Earl of Zetland, Z. ; The Earl of Yarborough, 
H. ; Rowland Alston, J. ; William H. White, E. ; and J. C. McMuUen, 
N. This chapter was never constituted. In a letter from the late R. W. 
Bro. Alexander Balloch, P. G. M., to the grand scribe E. of England, 
under data December 20, 1862, he stated : " I return the warrant of 
Albion Chapter, No. 570, handed to nie by the widow of the late Com- 
panion Charles V. Forster, in whose charge it was left when it was 
ascertained that the work could not be carried on." At the time the 
warrant was returned all the petitioners except Companion John Mackay 
were dead. 

SUSSEX R. A. CHAPTER, No. 327, ST. STEPHEN. 

Was constituted at the town of St. Stephen, Charlotte county, June 
13, 1851, under a warrant from the grand royal arch chapter of Ireland, 
issued the 11th day of July, A. D. 1849, to Companions and Brethren 
Dugald Blair, M. D., Thomas W. Rogers, Archibald Thompson, and 
others. By vote of the chapter, 15th March, 1864, the warrant was sur- 
rendered, and thereupon returned to the grand body which issiied it. 

SAINT MARK'S R. A. CHAPTER, ST. ANDREWS. 

This chapter was originally constituted under a warrant dated August 
5, 1846, issued by the grand royal arch chapter of England, the Earl of 
Zetland being Grand Z., Lord Worsley, M. P., Grand H., Rowland 
Alston, Grand J,, William H. White, Grand E., and «lohn McMullen, 
Grand N., to the Rev. Jerome Alley as first Z., Thomas Wyer as first 
H., Samuel McCurdy as first J., and Companions Samuel Tilley Gove, 
Charles Kennedy, Charles A. Robrock, Donald D. Morrison, James 
McMaster and John Ayraar, authorizing them to opeu and work a chap- 
ter of royal arch masons at St. Andrews, in the province of New Bruns- 
wick. In accordance with the law and practice of Englvsh royal arch 
masonry, this chapter was attached to St. Mark's Lodge, No. 570. It 
met quarterly, on the third Tuesday in March, June, September and 
December, and continued to work under the English warrant up to No- 
vember 3, 1876, when, by resolution, it was affirmed that, " in the opinion 



374 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

of the chapter, the interests of royal arch masonry in this community 
would be very considerably promoted by securing connection with the 
grand chapter of royal arch masons of Canada." Acting upon this 
resolution, the English warrant was formally surrendered January 8, 
1877, and application thereafter made to the grand chapter of Canada, 
which latter body issued a dispensation dated February 3, 1877, empower- 
ing the chapter to continue its work until the issue of a regular warrant. 
On the 8th August, 1877, the grand royal arch chapter of Canada granted 
a warrant under the signatures of Frederick J. Menet, Grand Z., Thomas 
C. Macnab, Grand H., Donald Ross, Grand J., and Daniel Spry, Grand 
S. E., to Companions George E. Elliott, Robert Glenn, Benjamin R. 
Stevenson, William D. Forster, William D. Hartt, James Vroom, Francis 
G. Stoop, Thomas Armstrong, John Dolby, Edward Lorrimer, Alexander 
Campbell, Samuel T. Gove, Sidney Balkam, E. Lee Street, and Andrew 
Nice, continuing to them authority to assemble and hold a chapter under 
the title of "St. Mark's Chapter, No. 11," at St. Andrews, on the second 
Thursday of each month, and to confer the degrees of mark master, past 
master, most excellent master, and the holy royal arch. E. Comp. George 
E. Elliott was named in this warrant First Principal Z. ; E. Comp. Robert 
Glenn, Second Principal H. ; and E. Comp. Benjamin R. Stevenson, 
Third Principal J. 

This body has not held any meetings for several years past, and in 
consequence did not take part in the convention which erected the grand 
chapter of this province. 

FREDERICTON R. A. CHAPTER, FREDERICTON. 

Constituted at Fredericton 29th July, 1857, by M. E. Comp. Alexan- 
der Balloch, grand superintendent of New Brunswick, under a charter 
or warrant, dated at Edinburgh, December 17, 1856, granted under the 
sanction and authority of the supreme grand royal arch chapter of 
Scotland, by the most excellent grand principals and remanent office- 
bearers, upon the petition of brethren, companions of the royal arch 
degree resident at or about Fredericton, in the province of New Bruns- 
wick, North America, viz.: Companions Robert Gowan, Hiram Dow, 
George C. Hunt, AVilliam H. Smithson, Isaac Naish, Jacob McKeen, 
Robert T. Clinch, William F. Bunting, Joseph Mysiirall and John 
Balloch, for a chapter of royal arch freemasons, to stand upon tlie roll of 
the supreme royal arch chapter by tiie name and appellation of " Freder- 
icton Royal Arch Chapter, New Brunswick, No. 77," with the following 
companions as office-bearers thereof: Robert Gowan, Z. ; Hiram Dow, 
H. ; George C. Hunt, J.; William H. Smithson, E. ; Isaac Naish, N. ; 
Joseph Myshrall, Treas. ; Jacob McKeen, First Sojourner; Robert T. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 375 

Clinch, Second Sojourner, and William F. Bunting, Third Sojourner ; 
who were empowered to convene and open the said chapter under the 
designation aforesaid, in the city of Fredericton, province of New Bruns- 
wick, on the third Wednesday of each month. The warrant set forth 
that the election of office-beavers should take place annually on the 23rd 
September, being the festival of the autumnal equinox, and if the twenty- 
third fall on Sunday, then on the Monday following, and it also gave 
authority to admit and exalt brethren to the excellent, super excellent 
and royal arch degrees. It was signed by the following most excellent 
principals and remanent office-bearers of the supreme grand chapter : 
P. Deuchar, acting Grand Z. ; Arthur Douglas, acting Grand H. ; 
Hector Gavin, acting Grand J. • Robert Ramage, Grand Scribe E. ; 
William Gaylor, Grand Scribe N. ; John Henry, Grand Treasurer, and 
Thomas Boag, Grand Recorder. 

Fredericton Chapter, by its delegates, joined in the erection of the 
grand chapter of New Brunswick, and stands number Lwo on its roll. 

HIBERNIA R. A. CHAPTER, SAINT JOHN, 

Now New Brunswick R. A. Chapter. 

This chapter was constituted June 5, 1858, in the masonic hall. Saint 
John, by M. E. Comp. Adam W. Smith, of St. Andrews, under a warrant 
dated 24th February, 1858, granted by the f-raud chiefs of the grand 
royal arch chapter of Ireland, to M. E. Comp. John Willis as first prin- 
cipal, M. E. Comp. James McNichol, Sr., as second principal, M, E. Comp. 
Abraham Magee as third principal, and Companions George Wilson, 
Angus McAfee, John Creighton, James Bennett, John Frost and Thomas 
L. Keymes, authorizing them and their successors to open and hold a 
chapter at the city of Saint John, New Brunswick, to be attached to and 
held with the warrant from the united grand lodge of Ireland to the 
Hibernia Lodge, No. 301. In the latter part of the year 1864 the com- 
panions decided to relinquish the name under which the chapter had 
heretofore worked, and, by resolution, adopted the title of " New Bruns- 
wick Chapter" for the future. The lodges and chapters holding under 
the grand bodies of Ireland arc not distinguished by names in the war- 
rants issued to them ; they are merely designated by numbers ; hence a 
lodge or chapter could adopt a name and alter it without reference to the 
parent body. 

The chapter continued its work as New Brunswick Chapter, No. 301, 
until A. D. 1868, when the warrant issued by the grand chapter of Ireland 
was surrendered and a substitute obtained from the grand chapter of 
Canada. According to the laws of the grand chapter of Ireland, the 



376 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

chapters of its obedience are attached to some lodge, and are known by 
the number of that lodge. Hibernia Lodge, to which New Brunswick 
Chapter was attached, having surrendered its warrant to the grand lodge 
of Ireland in 1867, the chapter ceased de facto to exist, and under the 
changed circumstances was obliged to seek some other jurisdiction to 
prevent its extinction. 

The warrant granted by the grand chapter of Canada was dated June 
22, 1868, under the signatures of T. Douglas Harington, Grand Z. ; D. 
Curtis, Grand H. ; James Seymour, Grand J,, and Thomas B. Harris, 
Grand Scribe E., and issued to Companions John Willis, James Mc- 
Nichol, Sr., Edward Willis, John Frost, William W. Emslie, George 
James Chubb, Robert Marshall, John D. Short, David R. Munro, John 
Mullin, George H. Whiting, Robert Shives and James McNichol, Jr., 
authorizing them to continue to assemble and hold a chapter under the 
title of " New Brunswick Chapter, No. 10," at the city of Saint John, 
on the second Monday ' of each mouth, to confer the degrees of mark 
master, past master, most excellent master and the holy royal arch. The 
following companions were appointed to the chief offices by the warrant : 
John D. Short, first principal Z., George H. Whiting, second principal 
H., and Robert Marshall, third principal J. 

By the fire of 20th June, 1877, in the city of Saint John, this chapter 
lost its warrant, jewels, clothing, banners, some of the record books and 
all other paraphernalia. A duplicate of the warrant was issued by the 
grand chapter of Canada, November 15, 1880. 

New Brunswick C'lapter, by its delegates, united in the erection of 
the grand chapter of New Brunswick, and stands number three on the 
roll of that grand body. 

UNION R. A. CFI AFTER, CARLETON. 

Constituted at Carleton February 20, 1860, by M. E. Comp. Robert 
Thomson Clinch, Principal Z. of Carleton Chapter, No. 47, under a 
charter or warrant dated at Edinburgh, September 21, 1859, granted by 
the most excellent grand principals and remanent officers of the supreme 
grand royal arch chapter of Scotland, upon the petition of brethren, 
companions of the royal arch degree resident in and about Carleton, 
Saint John, New Brunswick, North America, viz.: Charles Ketjhura, 
Joseph H. Littlehale, Jacob Dykeman White, John V. Ellis, Henry 
Littlehale, William H. Craft, John Craft, Edward Allison, Jr., and John 
S. Clarke, for a chapter of royal arch freemasons, to stand upon the roll 
of the supreme grand royal arch chapter by the name and appellation of 

1 The regular convocation is now held on the first Thuraday of each month. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 377 

*'The Union Royal Arch Chapter, St. John, New Brunswick, No. 84," 
with the following companions as officers thereof: Charles Ketchura, Z. ; 
Joseph H. Littlehale, H. ; Jacob D. White, J. ; John V. Ellis, E. ; Henry 
Littlehale, N. ; William H. Craft, First Sojourner ; John Craft, Second 
Sojourner ; Edward Allison, Jr., Third Sojourner, and John S. Clarke, 
Treasurer, and authorizing the said companions to convene, open and 
hold a chapter under the aforementioned designation in Carleton, Saint 
John, upon the first Wednesday' of each month. The grand officers 
subscribing their names to the warrant are James G. Murray, Grand Z. ; 
John Deuchar, Grand H. ; Donald Campbell, Grand J.; William Gay lor, 
Grand Scribe E. ; Edward Main, Grand Scribe N., and John Henry, 
Grand Treasurer. 

Union Chapter, by its delegates, united in the erection of the grand 
chapter of New Brunswick, and stands number four on its roll. 

CORINTHIAN R. A. CHAPTER, HAMPTON. 

The petitioners for the warrant of this chapter were Companions 
William Otty, John Darling, William H. Rankin, Edward B. Peters, 
William Divan, John McGill Otty, Robert W. Crookshank, Charles 
Vaughan Forster and Charles E. Raymond. The warrant was granted 
by the most excellent grand principals and remanent office-bearers of the 
supreme grand royal arch chapter of Scotland, viz. : John Deuchar 
(Grand H.), acting Grand Z. ; Donald Campbell (Grand J.), acting 
Grand H. ; Alexander Downie, acting Grand J. ; William Gaylor, Grand 
Scribe E : Edward Main, Grand Scribe N., and .Tohn Henry, Grand 
Treasurer. It was dated at Edinburgh, December 21, 1859, and 
appointed Companions William Otty, Z. ; John Darling, H. ; William 
Humfrey Rankin, J. ; Edward Baker Peters, E. ; William Divan, N. ; 
John McG. Otty, First Sojourner; Robert W. Crookshank, Second 
Sojourner; Charles V. Forster, Third Sojourner, and Charles Edward 
Raymond, Treasurer, to be erected into a chapter of royal arch masons 
by the name and appellation of " The Corinthian Royal Arch Chapter, 
No. 85," to meet at Hampton, Kings county, province of New Brunswick, 
on the first Thursday of each month. The chapter was constituted 
March 3, 1860, by M. E. Comp. Robert T. Clinch, Principal Z. of 
Carleton Chapter, Saint John, who was assisted in the ceremonial by 
Companions B. Lester Peters, William F. Bunting, William M. Smith 
and Edward B. Peters, also of Carleton Chapter. 

At the time of the formation of Corinthian Chapter there were a large 
number of persons residing at Hampton and its immediate vicinity, 

1 The regular convocation is now held on the fourth Tuesday iu each month. 



378 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

engaged in the construction and nianagenient of the European and North 
American railroad. Many of these persons were members of the craft, 
and formed ample materials for building up and working an efficient 
chapter. When +'.ie railroad was completed the great majority of these 
individuals removed to other parts. This caused a cessation in the 
applications for degrees in the chapter and a material diminution in the 
membership. The chapter languished, and eventually, about the year 
1863, ceased to meet and work. The warrant was placed in the possession 
of M. E. Companion B. Lester Peters, Past Z. of Carleton Chapter, who 
retains it in the hope that the chapter may in the near future be 
resuscitated. 



MOUNT LEBANON R. A. CHAPTER, CHATHAM. 

This chapter was regularly coustituied at the masonic hall, Chatham, 
September 15, 1864, by M. E. Companion Robert Gowan, Past Z. of 
Fredericton Royal Arch Chapter, No. 77, under authority of a warrant 
dated at Edinburgh, June 15, 1864, granted by the supreme grand royal 
arch chapter of Scotland, to Companions George H. Russell, Z. ; Richard 
Hocken, H. ; William Muirhead, J. ; Thomas F. Gillespie, E. ; Arthur 
Wright, N. ; Edwin J. Everett, Treasurer ; John Havilland, First 
Sojourner ; John V. Ellis, Second Sojourner ; and William J, Johnson, 
Third Sojourner. It was signed by Samuel Somerville, Depute Grand 
Z. ; T. D. McGowau, acting Grand H. ; Henry Finlay, Grand J. ; Lindsay 
Mackersy, Grand E. ; William Mann, Grand N. ; Alexander J. Stewart, 
Grand Treasurer; Richard Gray, Grand Chancellor; and Alexander 
Hay, Grand Recorder. 

M. E. Companion Gowan was assisted in the ceremonial of constitut- 
ing the chapter by Companions Robert T. Clinch, William F. Bunting, 
John V. Ellis, Thomas M. Reed, Charles E. Potter and Alexander 
Rankin, of Carleton Chapter, Saint John, and Companion Rev. Charles 
P. Bliss, of Corinthian Chapter, Hampton. Fn the evening the members 
of the new chapter, with the visiting companions, sat down to a supper 
served in excellent style, at which there was a round of speeches, songs, 
toasts, etc. 

Mount Lebanon Chapter started under favorable circumstances, with 
an energetic and influential membership and an excellent outfit for the 
proper performance of the ceremonies. 

It did not have any act or part in the formation of the grand chapter 
of New Brunswick, no mention of its name appearing in the record of 
that event, and up to the present day has declined to come within its 
jurisdiction. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 379 

ST. STEPHEN R. A. CHAPTER, SAINT STEPHEN. 

The warrant was granted by the supreme grand royal arcli chapter of 
Scotland to Companions Samuel Wright Golding, David Main, William 
Waterbury, David Brown, William Vaughan, Samuel Thomas Connick, 
William Henry Stevens, Moses McGowan, and David Wetmore Gedney,. 
petitioners for a chapter of royal arch freemasons, to stand upon the roll 
of the supreme grand chapter by the name and appellation of "Saint 
Stephen Royal Arch Chapter, No. 125," with the following office-bearers • 
Samuel W. Golding, Z ; David Main, H. ; William "Waterbury, J. ; 
David Brown, E. ; William Vaughan, N. ; William H. Stevens, First 
Sojourner; Moses McGowan, Second Sojourner; David W. Gedney, 
Third Sojourner; and Samuel T. Connick, Treasurer, who were em- 
powered to convene, open and hold a chapter as aforesaid upon the second 
Wednesday of each month, in the town of St. Stephen, Charlotte county ^^ 
New Brunswick. The warrant was sealed at Edinburgh, September 16, 
1868, and signed by Samuel Somerville, Depute Grand Z. ; David Forsyth, 
acting Grand H. ; William Ramsay, acting Grand J. ; Lindsay Mackersy, 
Grand Scribe E. ; William Mann, Grand Scribe N. ; Alex. J. Stewart^ 
Grand Treasurer ; and Henry Tighe, Grand Chancellor. 

The chapter was constituted under its warrant at St. Stephen, October 
19, 1868, by M. E. Corap. William F. Bunting, Past Z. of Car^eton 
Chapter, No. 47, Saint John, under a special authority from the Grand 
Z. of Scotland. 

Saint Stephen Chapter, by its delegates, joined in the erection of the 
grand chapter of New Brunswick, and stands number five on its roll. 

BOTSFORD R. A. CHAPTER, MONCTON. 

Opened May 16, 1870, by Rt. E. Comp. Robert Marshall, grand 
superintendent of Canadian royal arch masonry in New Brunswick, 
under a dispensation issued by M. E. Comp. T. Douglas Harington^ 
Grand Z. of the Grand Chapter of Canada. On the 10th day of August, 
A. D. 1870, a warrant was issued under the sanction and authority of the 
grand royal arch chapter of Canada, upon the petition of Companions 
Bliss Botsford, John Leonard Harris, Amos Henry Chandler, Henry 
Thaddeus Stevens, Christopher Prince Harris, William S. Torrie, Duncan 
Small Harper, Duncan C. King and Irwin Whitley Binney, constituting 
the said companions into a chapter of royal arch masons, under the title 
or denomination of " Botsford Royal Arch Chapter, No. 39," to meet at 
Moncton, county of Westmorland, province of New Brunswick, on the 
third Monday in 3ach month, with Comp. Bliss Botsford as First 
Principal Z., Comp. John L. Harris as Second Principal H., and Comp. 



380 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Amos H. Chandler as Third Principal J. The warrant was signed by 
the following officers of the grand chapter : T. Douglas Harington, 
Grand Z. ; James Seymour, Grand II. ; Henry Robert, Grand J., and 
Thomas B. Harris, Grand Scribe E. 

Botsford Chapter, by its delegates, united in the erection of the grand 
chapter of New Brunswick, and at present stands sixth on its roll. 

WOODSTOCK R. A. CHAPTER, WOODSTOCK. 

The warrant of this chapter was dated at Hamilton, Ontario, July 
13, 1883, and was granted by the grand chapter of royal arch masons of 
Ganada, at the humble petition of the trusty Companions, Ananias 
McFarlane, David F. Merritt, Donald Munro, Allison B. Couuell, 
George A. Murchie, J. Alonzo Hale, John W. Mclnch, John Graham, 
Josiah R. Murphy, John P. Johnson and others, constituting them into a 
chapter of royal arch masons under the title or denomination of " Wood- 
stock Royal Arch Chapter, No. 89," to meet at Woodstock, in the county 
of Carleton, and province of New Brunswick, on the third Thursday in 
each month, with Comp. Ananias McFarlane as the First Principal Z., 
Comp. David F. Merritt as the Second Principal H., and Comp. Donald 
Munro as the Third Principal J. The warrant was signed by the 
following officers of the grand chapter : Donald Ross, Grand Z. ; Henry 
MacPherson, Grand H. ; Thomas Sargaut, Grand J., and David 
McLellan, Grand Scribe E. The chapter was first instituted by Rt. E. 
Comp. Henry Duffell of Saint John, grand superintendent of Canadian 
royal arch masonry in New Brunswick, under a dispensation issued by 
the grand principal Z. of Canada, April 12, 1882, and continued under 
such dispensation until the reception of the warrant. 

Woodstock Chapter, by its authorized delegates, joined in the erection 
of the grand chapter of New Brunswick, and stands number seven on 
its roll. 

COUNCIL OF KNIGHTS OF THE RED CROSS. 

Carleton Council of Knights of the Sword, Knights of the East, and 
Knights of the East and West, or Babylonish Pass — commonly called 
Knights of the Red Cross — was constituted in the masonic hall, Saint 
John, November 25, 1857, by M. E. Companion Charles Vaughan 
Forster, under authority of a working dispensation issued at Glasgow, 
Scotland, November 6, 1857, by M. E. Companion George Arnott Walker 
Arnott, Grand Principal Z. of the supreme grand royal arch chapter of 
Scotland, in the terms following, viz. : " It having been represented to 
me by several companions of the Carleton Royal Arch Chapter, No. 47, 
that it is expedient to open at Saint John, New Brunswick, and in 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 381 

connection with it, a council of Red Cross Knights — known by the 
name of the Babylonish Pass, and composed of three parts, termed 
Knights of the Sword, Knights of the East, and Knights of the East and 
West. * * * J iiereby authorize M. E. Companion Charles Vaughau 
Forster to administer the obligations necessary to Companions Robert 
Stubs, John H. Sheridan, William F. Bunting, Robert G. Crozier, John 
Frost, John Murray and Andrew Hastings, and immediately after to 
pronounce the said council duly constituted, and thereafter to admit such 
companions of the Carleton Chapter as they may consider worthy ; pro- 
vided they are in possession of a royal arch diploma from the supreme 
chapter of Scotland ; that thereafter the meeting shall proceed to elect 
office-bearers, pass regulations as to the calling of regular meetings iu 
future on some night not set apart for royal arch business or ark 
mariner's degree, fix the fees, and order minute books to be procured." 

The princpal officers of a council are styled the King (Cyrus), the 
Senior General, and the Junior General. This body has continued its 
work up to the present time, and is still in a healthy condition. During 
latter years, however, it has closely identified itself with the Encampment 
of Saint John, K. T., by holding its meetijigs and conducting its work to 
suit the interests and convenience of that body. 

LODGE OF ROYAL ARK MARINERS. 

The Carleton Lodge of Royal Ark Mariners was constituted at the 
same time and under the same authority as the Carleton Red Cross 
Council. The three principal officers of this body are styled Noah, 
Shem and Japhet. As the degree conferred in it is very little known on 
this side of the Atlantic, and as its utility is practically of small conse- 
quence, its labors were not very long continued. 

At the time the Carleton Council of Red Cross Knights and Carleton 
Royal Ark Mariner's Lodge were instituted, the laws of the supreme 
grand royal arch chapter of Scotland, then in force, provided that special 
authority might be given to royal arch chapters to confer, in addition to 
the degrees authorized to be given in such chapters, those of the Royal 
Ark Mariners and Babylonish Pass, commonly called the Red Cross. 
Each individual companion admitted to these degrees was entitled to 
receive from the chapter a certificate or diploma of the same. At least 
three are required to form and open a Royal Ark Mariner's Lodge, and 
seven for a council of Red Cross Knights. 



•B' 



GRAND COUNCIL ROYAL AND SELECT MASTERS. 

The grand council of royal and select masters of the province of New 
Brunswick was formally erected in the masonic hall, city of Saint John, 



382 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

August 15, 1867, by delegates representing Saint John Council, No. 1, 
New Brunswick Council, No. 2, and Carleton Council, No. 3, being all 
the councils of this rite at that time in New Brunswick. The following 
chief officers were chosen : Thrice 111. Conip. Robert Marshall, most 
puissant grand master ; 111. Corap. John V. Ellis, deputy puissant grand 
master ; Comp. Edward Willis, right puissant grand master ; Right 111. 
Comp. James G. Forbes, puissant grand master ; and Right 111. Comp. 
David R., Munro, grand recorder, who were subsequently installed into 
their respective offices by Past Most Puissant Grand Master Gordon R. 
Garden, of the grand council of the state of Maine, who was present and 
assisted in all the proceedings as the representative of the grand master 
of Maine. The transactions of this body were published in pamphlet 
form each year, from the date of organization up to and including the 
annual assembly of October, 1871. A meeting was held in October, 1872, 
but the minutes were not published. In addition to the charters issued 
to councils in New Brunswick, others were granted by this body for the 
erection of councils in Nova Scotia and Ontario. The books, papers and 
other property belonging to it were destroyed by the fire of June 20, 1877. 
From October, 1872, until January 5, 1892, it ceased to meet, and 
consequently no elections of officers were held or other business trans- 
acted. On the last named date a special convocation was convened, at 
which this grand council was reorganized and rehabilitated. Bro. John 
V. Ellis was elected most puissant grand master, and Bro. Robert 
Marshall grand secretary, who continue to hold office. 

SAINT JOHN COUNCIL, No. 1, R. & S. MASTERS. 

This council was constituted in the masonic hall, Saint John, August 
12, 1867, under a charter dated at Portland, Maine, May 8, 1867, granted 
by the grand council of royal and select masters within the state of 
Maine to the Worthy Companions William Donald, D. D., thrice illus- 
trious master ; John Davis Short, right illustrious master ; John Mullin, 
illustrious master ; James Gordon Forbes, Robert Shives, John Bruns- 
wick Hammond, John Frost, David Smith Stewart, William James 
Logan, Moses S. Hall, William W. Emslie and Thomas H. Keohan, em- 
powering them to form and open a council of royal and select masters in 
the city of Saint John, county of Saint John, and province of New 
Brunswick, to be known and distinguished by the name and style of 
"Saint John Council, No. 1," with full power and authority to confer 
the degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, and Super Excellent Master. 
It was signed by Edward P. Buruham, most puissant grand master, and 
Ira Berry, grand recorder. 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 383 

Immediately after the erection of the grand council in New Bruns- 
wick an endorsement was made on its charter whereby the powers and 
privileges conceded to it by the grand council of Maine were confirmed 
and continued by the newly constituted grand body. 

The charter, books and paraphernalia were wiped out of existence by 
the destructive fire of June 20, 1877, and from that day forward up to 
February 12, 1892, it ceased to meet. At the latter date, upon a special 
call, the surviving members held a meeting, at which the council was 
resuscitated, an election held, and Bro. William B. Wallace elected and 
installed thrice illustrious master. ' - 

A substitute charter, to replace the original destroyed as aforenamed,, 
was issued June 24, 1892, by the grand council, unto William Bedell 
Wallace, thrice illustrious master ; William Alexander Ewing, right 
illustrious master; and Charles McLauchlan, illustrious master, and 
signed by John V. Ellis, grand master, and Robert Marshall, grand 
secretary. 

NEW BRUNSWICK COUNCIL, No. 2, R. & S. MASTERS. 

Constituted August 12, 1867, in the masonic hall. Saint John, under a. 
charter dated at Portland, Maine, May 8, 1867, granted by the grand 
council of royal and select masters within the state of Maine, to the 
worthy companions, Robert Marshall, thrice illustrious master, David 
Ransom Munro, right illustrious master, George Johnstone Caie, illus- 
trious master, Dugald Kelly, Frank L. Lewin, George H. Whiting, 
David Main, Archibald McLean, Thomas A. Peters, Matthew Henderson 
and Howard Douglas McLeod, empowering them to form and open a 
council of royal and select masters in the city of Saint John, county of 
Saint John, and province of New Brunswick, to be known and distin- 
guished by the name and style of" New Brunswick Council, No. 2," with 
full power and authority to confer the degrees of Royal Master, Select 
Master and Super Excellent master. It was signed by Edward P. Burn- 
ham, most puissant grand master, and Ira Berry, grand recorder. 

All the property of this council, including the records, was destroyed 
in the great fire in Saint John, June 20, 1877, from which time it ceased 
to hold meetings. 



'O^ 



CARLETON COUNCIL, No. 3, R. & S. MASTERS. 

Constituted in the masonic hall, Carleton, under a charter dated at 
Portland, Maine, May 8, 1867, granted by the grand council of royal 
and select masters within the state of Maine to the worthy companions, 
John V. Ellis, Henry Card, Edwin J. Wetmore, Charles Ketchum, 
Henry Leonard, John Rice, Andrew F. Andrews, Stephen P. Wetmore, 



384 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

William Dunbar, Henry Littlehale, James H. Eagles and William 
Dunlavy, empowering them to form and open a council of royal and 
select masters in the city of Saint John, county of Saint John, and 
province of New Brunswick, to be known and distinguished by the name 
and style of " Carleton Council, No. 3," with full power and authority to 
confer the degrees of Royal Master,* Select Master, and Super Excellent 
Master. It was signed by Edward P. Burnham, most puissant grand 
master, and Ira Berry, grand recorder. The three principal officers at 
its organization were Comp. John V. Ellis, thrice illustrious master, 
CJomp. Edwin J. Wetmore, right illustrious master, and Comp. Charles 
Ketchum, illustrious master. This council is still in existence and holds 
•occasional meetings in the masonic hall, Carleton. 

AN EARLY COUNCIL OF ROYAL AND SELECT MASTERS. 

The City Gazette, published in the city of Saint John, in the number 
issued Wednesday, February 13, 1828, contained the following notice: 
^' A quarterly meeting of the council of Royal and Select Masters will be 
held at mason hall, on Thursday evening, at seven o'clock." There was 
no name appended to the document and no reference to the meeting in 
the columns of the newspaper other than the advertisement copied above 
in full. It was a new revelation to me, as I had never heard any refer- 
ence to such a body by any of the old-time masons, and when the news- 
paper came into my hands all these old brethren had passed away. 
During the latter part of the year 1826 a Bro. Samuel Kidder, represented 
as a masonic lecturer and ritualist from the state of Massachusetts, 
visited Saint John, at the invitation of St. John's Lodge, No. 29, to 
impart instruction in the work of the craft degrees. Bro. Kidder may 
have had authority from the grand master of a grand council (the grand 
council of Massachusetts was establislied about the time of Kidder's visit) 
to organize a council of this rite, and under such commission the council 
in Saint John may have been instituted by him. This is merely a con- 
jecture on my part and may be accepted for what it is worth. There can 
be no doubt, however, of the existence of such a body in Saint John at 
the date above mentioned. 

HIBERNIAN ENCAMPMENT, No. 318, K. T., ST. ANDREWS. 

This, the oldest body of Knights Templars in the province of New 
Brunswick, was constituted at St. Andrews, Charlotte county, April 5, 
1840, under a warrant from the supreme grand encampment of Ireland, 
Knighta Templar and Knights of Malta. The petitioners were Sir 
Knights James Kyle, John McCoubry, John Coraraac, James Tufts, 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF MASONIC BODIES. 385 

James Clarke, James Brown, Alexander Cochran, John Kerr, James 
McFarlane and William Gray. The regular assemblies were held on 
the second Monday in March, June, September and December. It 
ceased to meet May, 1860, owing to deaths and removals, and the limited 
number of royal arch masons in the neighborhood, but during the twenty 
years of its existence its work was peformed in a true knightly manner, 
Frater Adam W. Smith, so well and favorably known to the masonic 
fraternity far and near, was the second intrant within its portals, and 
was its most earnest and active supporter. 

ENCAMPMENT OF SAINT JOHN, No. 48, SAINT JOHN. 

Previous to the organization of this encampment the number of 
fratres in Saint John and vicinity, in possession of the temple degrees,. 
was insufficient to petition for a warrant or charter. As a preliminary 
step to this end, a dispensation, dated at Edinburgh, April 22, 1866, wa* 
issued under the hand and seal of Frater George Arnot Walker Arnot, 
grand registrar, by authority of the grand priory and chapter general of 
Scotland, to Fratres Charles Vaughan Forster, John Willis, John 
Edwards, John Frost, George Wilson, Angus McAfee, Robert Gray,. 
William Ross and John Creighton, empowering them to confer the 
degrees upon such royal arch masons as they saw fit to receive into the 
order of the temple, preliminary to the issue of a formal charter. Under 
this special authority a meeting was held May 15, 1856, at which Com- 
panions Alexander Balloch, Charles E. Raymond, William F. Bunting 
and Robert Stubs were created knights templars to enable them ta 
become petitioners. In due time a petition was forwarded to Edinburgh,, 
which resulted in the issue of a charter, dated October 4, 1856, granted 
under the sanction and authority of the chapter general of the religious 
and military order of the temple and holy sepulchre of Scotland, by the 
very eminent John Whyte Melville of Bennochy and Strathkinness^ 
master and grand prior, unto the following fratres, viz. : Charles Vaughan 
Forster, commander ; John Willis, lieutenant-commander ; Alexander 
Balloch, mareschal or senior captain and master of ceremonies ; Charlea 
E. Raymond, hospitaller or junior captain ; John Frost, chancellor and 
keeper of the seals; Robert Stubs, treasurer; William Franklin Bunting,, 
secretary ; John Edwards, chaplain or instructor ; Angus McAfee,^ 
baucennifer ; John Creighton, bearer of the vexillum belli ; and George 
Wilson, chamberlain and keeper of the encampment property, author- 
izing thena to open and hold an encampment of knights templars, 
under the name and designation of " The Encampment of Saint John, of 
New Brunswick, No. 48," upon the registry of the grand priory of Scot- 
laud, to meet at the city of Saint Johu, iu that part of North America 



386 FREEMASONRY IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

called New Brunswick, upon such day of the week and in such month of 
the year as might be fixed upon ; and when in encampment assembled 
they and their successors were empowered to instal knights templars 
and to create esquires of the order ; also to confer the degree of Knight 
of Saint John of Jerusalem, usually styled Knight of Malta, with the 
preceding step known by the name of the Mediterranean Pass or Knight 
of Saint Paul ; also the Knight of the Red Cross of Constantine ; and 
likewise of the Priestly Order of the Temple. The election of office- 
bearers was appointed to take place annually on the fourteenth day of 
September, the festival of the Holy Cross, unless that day should fall 
upon Saturday or Sunday, in which case the election should be held on 
the preceding Friday or following Monday, to be decided by the vote of 
the encampment. The signatories to the charter were John Whyte 
Melville, master and grand prior; G. A. "Walker Arnot, sub-grand 
prior ; Samuel Somerville, grand baucennifer ; William A. Laurie, 
acting grand treasurer ; and Hector Gavin, acting grand chancellor. 

The encampment was constituted under