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jpamil^ IRccorb 



OF THE 



Name of Dingwall Fordyce, 



IN ABERDEENSHIRE. 



SHOWING DESCENT FROM THE FIRST KNOWN PROGENITOR OF EITHER 
NAME— BOTH DIRECT AND COLLATERAL ; 



oEith ^})pettbtx 



CONTAINING NOTICES OF INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES INCIDENTALLY 

REFERRED TO. 



















V::iW OF BRUCKLAV CASTLK— (new DEER.) 



Sfti: i_.-— - 



COMPILED BY 
ALEXANDER DINGWALL FORDYCE, 

(FERGUS, ONTARIO, CANADA.) ". , 

1885. 



I 

1 1 



TORONTO • 
Printed by C. Blackett Robinson, 

5 JOkDAN STREET. 



m' 



V 



The Compiler to the Reader, 



'^f 



Personal. — It is not easy to account for predilections. Sometimes they 
may be guessed at. A boy delights in looking at the coloured liquids in a 
chemist's shop, and forms the determination to become a physician. So it 
may have been that I was led to take an interest in Genealogy ; for an early 
recollection is that of examining the plates in a folio edition of "Douglas's 
Peerage," which lay invitingly open in the shop window of A. &W. Brown, 
at the corner ot Broad Street and Queen Street, Aberdeen, on my way to 
Marischal College and from it. if the taste was not created then, it was 
gratified and strengthened, and fifty yoars' sojourn in America has not lessened 
it. I remember also subscribing to Brown's Circulating Library and reading 
a book entitled " Observations on Marriages, Baptisms and Burials, as 
preserved in the Parochial Registers — by Ralph Bigland, Somerset Herald " — 
in which he remarks: "It is of importance to every family, not excepting 
the meanest, to pay some regard to their pedigrees ; and consequently, every 
circumstance — whether of a public or private nature — which tends to pres- rve 
or elucidate Genealogical History, should be attended to with the most 
religious care." In my boyish zeal, I considered this sentence worthy of 
being written in letters of gold, and — in the enthusiasm, some might think 
worthy of a better ca.use~Uterally inscribed them in gold on a blank volume 
intended to preserve extracts bearing on Genealogy. Friends were not slow 
to minister to what some of them may have regarded simply as a harmless 
occupation — or amusement — and ready access was obtained to libraries and 
in some cases to public records. I well remember the kind old school-master 
and Session Clerk of the Parish of Monwhitter permitting me to carry off the 
old sheets composing his Baptismal Register for more careful study at my 
own home thirty miles distant, under promise of returning them safely by 
the carrier's cart. This was of course done ; but it is well, I believe, that there 
is not now the opportunity for risking such documents to private care. The 
preparation of such a record as the present has of course been the more 
difficult in consequence of distance from sources of information, while the 
information given must be also less complete. Dates have been given when 
they were known to me, except in respect of the births of those now in life. 
The omission of these is in accordance with the plan pursued in a work of 
recent date and of similar nature. In what follows I have not, however, been 
always able to determine, owing to vagueness in the original record, whether 
it was really the date of the birth or baptism that was meant. I have given the 
one or the other as seemed to me the probable intention. Some insertions 
are wonderfully explicit, others very much the reverse. 



% 



IV. THE COMPILER tO THE READER. 

Plan. — The term Family Record is generally taken as an account of some 
special members of a family. Here, however, it is employed to represent all 
the descendants, however numerous, whether in life or not, from common 
ancestors. I had not the means — in the case of my own forefathers bearing 
the name of Dingwall or of Fordyce— of carrying such a record further back 
than some two hundred and fifty years. I have endeavoured to do my best to 
secure information, and where I have failed I may have been to blame, either 
in not making my desire clearly understood, or in not applying directly to 
individuals, but through some channel that was more accessible and con- 
sidered equally good. The deficient information is partly noticed in Genea- 
logical Table No. V., and in the Record itself where the descendants of Baillie 
Robert Fordyce and Dr. George French are spoken of. I shall be glad even 
yet to get the information, and might give it in a supplement along with more 
of the same kind. 

The form of the Record, that of a Biographical Dictionary, was chosen with 
a view to simplicity and distinctness. It also appeared to afford opportunity 
for accounts of individuals which in similar works I have often thought broke 
the continuity in an inconvenient way. Here, on the other hand, all the 
notices are detached, but the continuity may be said to be maintained by 
means of the Genealogical Tables, which can readily be referred to. 

The general plan was subsequently enlarged so as to include those who 
had married sons or been married to daughters of either of the families 
chiefly spoken of, and where information could be had independently or was 
communicated, the names, with any available particulars regarding the parents 
or grandparents of such connections by marriage, have also been given. These 
were designed to impart additional interest to the work, and, I think, they 
will be found to have done so; although, as it necessarily introduced a greater 
diversity in respect of class or social distinction, it may, for that reason, be less 
acceptable to some readers. Honest industry should always command respect. 
Supposed advantages lead to social d'stinctions being overlooked in many 
cases ; and where moral worth accompanies the individual into a more 
elevated social sphere the gain may be more on the so-called higher side than 
on the lower, and the blessings to future generations may be great. So it has 
often been ; and the juxtaposition in such a record, of those who might not 
have acknowledged one another here, need not be felt as an imperfection. 
Very shortly all such distinctions must ceas, eand moral and spiritual con- 
siderations be paramount. 

With regard to our own country, we may be expected to know more of it 
and to hold it dearer than any other ; and so, it seems to me, it should also be 
with our own relations.whether they are still alive or have passed from among 
us, no matter what their position or circumstances may have been, elevated or 
humble, conspicuous or obscure. They, that is those who have gone, were 
ours, and they are so still in a qualified sense if they have reached the better 
land, and we are on our way to it. Because earthly relationships are not 
continued in that far country as they were here, is there any reason to think 



% 






THE COMPILER TO THE READER. 



i 



that we may not in a special manner be permitted to associate with those with 
whom we have lived and whom we dearly loved on earth, such intercourse 
being of course freed from earthly taint or imperfection ? In the same way, 
may it not be so also with those whose blood ran in our veins, even if we never 
saw them and only knew them through the memories of others or by means 
of letters of their own still remaining, sufficient to give us an insight into their 
outer and, perhd^s, also their inner life ? Some families are much richer than 
others in respect of material for such acquaintance. Mine are scanty enough ; 
but, as a straw may tell how the wind blows, so a word or two may sometimes 
tell as much as a volume and there may be sufficient to excite real interest 
and to seek to treasure what we have for the sake of others. Looking at some 
lives, it is true, we may feel disappointment and even doubt, but we see only in 
part and there we must in such cases be content to rest. ' -. 

Origrin of the Name. — Two opinions have been held as to the origin 
of the name of Dingivall. Sir John Smclair's " Statistical Account of Scot- 
land," 1790, says that the name of the Parish of Dingwall in Ross Shire was 
formerly Dingnaval, or Dingnavallis, and was given " in consequence of the 
richness and fertility of the soil of the lower lands." The great bulk of the 
land is described as being in cultivation, " the whole forming a beautiful inter- 
change of hill and valley, wood and water, cornfields and meadows." Others 
have assigned to the name the same origin as the Icelandic Thingvalla, Ting- 
wal. in Shetland, and Tinwald in the Isle of Man, all coming from the Danish 
Ting, a forum or court of justice, and IVal or Wald, signify mg fenced. We 
cannot presume to decide which may be the real origin of the name. 



In marked contrast to the meaning of the name of Dingwall, as given in 
the " Statistical Account," is that of the name olFordyce, as applied in the same 
work to the Parish so called in Banffshire, the word meaning, in the Gaelic 
language, " the bleak country," the epithet being even then appropriate, and 
much more so, it is said, "before the woods were cut down and the marshes 
drained." , ; ^ ,. : '• .; 

A tradition, however, exists that the name was first assumed by a gentle- 
man of the name of Forbes, who, in one of those feuds common to the times, 
had the misfortune to kill another ol the name of Innes, and found it necessary 
to change his name, taking that of ihe parish he may have belonged to, as was 
done in other cases, as for example, in that of the Drysdales of Vale of Devon 
referred to in the Appendix to this Record. Whatever truth there may be in 
the tradition, there is great similarity in the armorial bearings of the two 
families ; and the motto of the Forbeses of Pitsligo, " Altius ibunt qui ad summa 
nituntur," was also borne by the London physician Sir William Fordyce. 

The first appearance of the Dingwalls in Buchan is attributed in 
" Anderson's Scottish Nation " — to a feud with the Mackenzies, there said to 
be their hereditary enemies. Of this we cannot speak — but one, Arthur 
Dingwall, is mentioned in the Appendix as having been implicated in a feud 
in Ross Shire, shortly before they did appear in Buchan, not however in con- 



VI. THF COMPILER TO THE READER. 

nection with the name of Mackenzie — while Arthur was the Christian name 
of the second individual we know of the name in Buchan. 

Professions and Occupations.— The professions of divinity, law 
and medicine, have all their representatives in these pages — merchandise also, 
whether carried on by the Merchant Burgesses of Aberdeen or followed by 
others elsewhere. 

It may be well, in this connection, to quote the remark made by Kennedy 
in his local history seventy years ago, where he refers to his own town : — 
"The practitioners before the courts of judicature at Aberdeen have, for a 
period of two hundred and fifty years, been distinguished by the title of 
Advocates — which appeared to be sanctioned by many public deeds and by 
judicial proceedings in the courts of record : but by what authority it had 
originally been conferred upon them we are not informed." 

The trades of the City of Aberdeen were for the most part incorporated 
in the beginning of the sixteenth century, but had been recognized long before. 
Several of the members of the incorporated body, deacons and conveners, are 
found in this Record, men of high respectability both in public and private 
life. 

Respecting the stocking manufacture, I may quote what Kennedy says — 
prefacing it however by a list of the principal manufacturers or firms in 1771 — 
found attached to resolutions adopted by them in self-defence. Many of the 
names will be recognized as they occur in this Record. The dates are igth 
and 26th October of the year just mentioned : — " William and James Young, 
Dingwall & Forbes, George Marr, John Donald, Senr., John Donald, Junr., 
Duncan & Clark, James Clark, Andrew Gray, John Abercrombie, Junr., 
Gilbert Moir, James Low, John Dingwall, John Dingwall, Junr, John Annand, 
Alexander Hadden, William Rannie, George Rannie, John Duncan, Junr., 
William Ritchie, John Lendrum, William Middleton, Dyce & Davidson." 
Mr. Kennedy says: "The manufacture of stockings during the greater part 
of the eighteenth century was conducted successfully 'and carried on to a 
considerable extent by many individuals in Aberdeen ; and those who were 
principally engaged in it, by their persevering industry, were enabled to retire 
with competent fortunes. But, independent of this advantage, it was of all 
other branches of manufacture the most beneficial to the community — being 
a never-failing source of employment to the young and to the aged of svery 
description — to the deaf and to the dumb, and even to those who were bed- 
ridden or disabled from every other kind of work. The spinning the wool 
and knitting the stockings were regarded more as a species of amusement by 
the females than as a laborious employment, and gave little interruption to 
their ordinary avocations. The ladies did not think it derogatory to their 
rank and situation in life to exhibit the production of their own labour and to 
receive remuneration for it." 

Obsolete Terms. — A few of these may be found, but for the most part 
easily understood. It may be no harm to remind the reader that one pound 
in Scots money was equivalent to twenty pence sterling, and that the value 



THE COMPILER TO THE READER. 



Vll. 



4" 



of the mcrk was thirteen shillings and four pence. The law terms, sasine and 
infeftment, will not fail to be recognized as referring to the mode of giving 
legal possession of heritable property. The term " apprizing " is less common 
and is said to have been an action by which a creditor carried ofi' the estate of 
his debtor in payment of a debt due to him. " Wadset " was the old name 
for mortgage. 

I have, in conclusion, to return sincere thanks to all friends who have 
kindly procured information for me, and to those who have endeavoured to do 
so ; also for courtesy shown and opportunity afforded for consulting works in 
University College Library, Toronto, to which I could not otherwise have had 
access. As I have been several years in procuring the information, I have no 
doubt events have taken place in families which I am ignorant of. Additions 
and corrections will be gratefully received and given if possible in a supple, 
ment. Allowance, it is hoped, will be made for exceptional reference to the 
worth of those with whom I was best acquainted. How much more might 
have been said of others, with as great truth, by those who knew them best. 

A. DINGWALL FORDYCE. 
Fergus, 27th August, /SSj. 



FAMILY RECORD (DINGWALL FORDYCE). 






The family names composing this Record are 228, representing 1,025 
individuals — of each of whom a notice;, longer or shorter, will be found — the 
whole being alphabetically arranged. 

(Genealogical Tables at end of Appendix.) 





NAMES ON MAIN RECORD. 




Abercrombie. 


Buchanan. 


Fergie. 


Irvine. 


Aberdein. 


Burgess (B). 


Ferricr. 


ack. 


Adamson. 


Cadenhead. 


Foote. 


amieson. 


Alexander. 


Campbell. 


Forbes. 


ohnson. 


Allardyce. 


Carruthers. 


Fordyce. 


ohnston. 


Allen. 


Carthew. 


Fordyce (D). 


'. OPP- 


Alleyne. 


Chalmers. 


Francis 


Keay. 


Anderson. 


Chesnel, De 


Eraser. 


Keefer. 


Apcar. 


Clarke. 


French. 


Ker. 


Arbuthnott. 


Cock. 


Friend. 


Kmnaird. 


Atchi.son. 


Constable. 


P'yffe. 


Kirkby. 


Avietick. 


Cooper. 


Galbraith. 


Lawford. 


Baker. 


Crombie. 


Gale. 


Lawrason. 


Ballantine. 


Cruickshank. 


Gallwev. 


Leith. 


Barclay. 


Camming. 


Gellie. ' 


LeRei. 


Barnes. 


Cunningham. 


Gibson. 


Leslie. 


Barnett. 


Curling. 


Girault. 


Lindsay. 


Baxter. 


Curtis. 


Gordon. 


Lister. 


Bed well. 


Cuvillier. 


Graham. 


Littlejohn. 


Bellew. 


Dalrymple. 


Grant. . 


Lockhart. 


Bentham. 


Danvers. 


Haines. 


Low. 


Bentley. 


Dauney. 


Halkin. 


Lumsden. 


Berghiest. 


Davidson. 


Hamilton. 


Mackie. 


Birch. 


Dickson. 


Hampton. 


Martin. 


Blachrie. 


Dingwall. 


Harper. 


Matthewson. 


Black. 


Doig. 


Harvey. 


Mavor. 


Blackwell 


Douglass. 


Hay. 


Melville. , , 


Blackwood. 


Drew. 


Hird. 


Mercer. 


Blaikie. 


Drysdale. 


Hopper. 


Miller. 


Blyth. 


Duff. 


Horn. 


Milne. 


Bonnar. 


Duncan. 


Horsford. 


Mitchell. 


, Boucaut. 


Dunlop. 


Howell. 


Moir. 


Bower. 


Dyce. 


Huddart. 


Monro. 


Boyd. 


Dymock. 


Huggins. 


Moore. 


Bramwell. 


Eldridge. 


Hughes. 


Morison. 


Brown. 


Ericsen. 


Hunt. 


Murray. 


Bruce. 


Evans. 


Hunter (C). 


McCoy. 


Brunton. 


Falconer. 


Inglis. 


McDougall. 


Brydges. 


Farquhar. 


Innes {T). 


McKay. 



X. 



FAMILY RECORD. 
NAMES ON MAIN RECORD— Co«//HM^d. 



McKenzie. 


Reid. 


Spence. 


Touch. 


Mcintosh. 


Richardson. 


Spittal. 


Towslee. 


McNeill. 


Richman. 


Starey. 


Turing. 


McPherson. 


Ritchie. 


Sterritt. 


Urquhart. 


McQueen. 


Roach. 


Steuart. 


Van Citters. 


Napier. 


Robinson. 


Stewart. 


Wait. 


Newman. 


Robertson. 


Stuart. 


Walker. 


Nickerson. 


Rose. 


Stirling. 


Watt. 


Nottebohm. 


Sceales. 


Syme. 


Weston. 


O'Brien. 


Scott. 


Tarvet. 


White. 


Ogilvie. 


Shade. 


Taylor. 


Wiggens. 


Onnen. 


Shand. 


Templeton. 


Wightman. 


Orrok. 


Shirrefs. 


Tennant. 


Williamson. 


Penn. 


Simpson. 


Thaden. 


Willox. 


Philip. 


Skene. 


Thorn. 


Wilson. 


Pirie. 


Smith. 


Thomson. 


Yates. 


Powell. 


Smyth. 


Toasch. 


Yea. 


Pringle. 


Snowie. 


Topp. 


Young. 



APPENDIX. 



No 




No 






I. 


Anderson (Rev. D.) 


32- 


Fordyce (unconnected). 




2. 


Baxters (Old Aberdeen). 


33- 


Fraser (Rev. John). 




3- 


Bentley Dr. Richd.) 


34- 


" (Lydia). 




4- 


Bisset (Rev. John). 


35. 


Gellies (Aberdeen). 




5- 


Blackwell (Principal). 


36. 


Harvey (Kintore). 




6. 


Browns (Maxton, &c.) 


37- 


Hay (Rannieston). 




7- 


Burnets (Sauchen). 


38. 


Horn (Westhall). 




8. 


Burns (Rev. J. & Br.) 
Cadenheads (Aberdeen). 


39- 


affray (Kingswells). 




9 


40. 


<^eefer (Ontario). 




ID. 


Campvere (past, &c.) 


41. 


T-awrason (Ontario). 




II. 


Chalmers (Dr. Pat.) 


42. 


Lindsay (Culsh). 




12. 


" (printers, &c.) 


43. 


Low (Old Aberdeen). 




13- 


Clark (Rob.) U.E. 


44. 


Lumsden (Corrachrie). 




14. 


Cock (manufacturers). 


45- 


Lunan (Monymusk). 




15. 


Colquhoun (TillyColquhoun). 


46. 


Mairs (New Deer). 




16. 


Dingwall (Kildun). 


47- 


Martin, Rev. Sam. 




17- 


(Cambuscurry). 


48. 


Mercers (Kinnellar). 


.', * ." 


18. 


" (Glengarry). 


49. 


Monros (Anatomists). 




19. 


(unconnected). 


50. 


Morison (-Elsick). 




20. 


Doig (Dundee). 


51- 


McQueen (Braxfield). 




21. 


Douglass (Tilwhilly). 


52. 


Ramsay, J. (Journalist). 




22. 


Douglas (Bishop). 


53- 


Ross. Rev. D. 




23- 


Drysdale (V. of D.) 


54- 


Scott, David. 




24. 


Dyce (Old Aberdeen). 


55- 


Shade, Absalom. 




25- 


Falconers (Phesdo). 


56. 


Shirrefs, Rev. Dr. 




26. 


Fergus and Founders. 


57- 


Skene (Pitmuckston). 




27. 


Ferrier (Kirklands). 


58. 


Thomson (Aberdeen). 




28. 


Forbes (Rev. John). 


59. 


Turing (Foveran). 




29. 


Fordyce (Achorthies). 


60. 


Willox (Old Aberdeen). 




30. 


(Ardo). 
(Ay ton). 


61. 


Young, Provost Wm. 




31- 









FAMILY OF DINGWALL FORDYCE : 

ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED ACCOUNT OF INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS AND CON- 
NECTIONS BY MARRIAGE. 



1. Abercrombie (Janet), daughter of Provost John Aber- 
crombie of Aberdeen and Katharine Forbes his wife, was married 
19th November, 1792, to Alexander Dingwall, afterwards of Ran- 
nieston, merchant and postmaster of Aberdeen. She died in 
March, 1852. They had four sons and eleven daughters. 

2. Abercrombia (John), stocking manufacturer in Aber- 
deen, son of the Rev. Robert Abercrombie, minister of the Parish 
of Leslie, and Margaret Toasch his wife, was born in 1729. He 
was chosen as Provost of Aberdeen in 1787, serving till 1789, 
and again from 1793 till 1795. He was an Elder of the East 
Church of Aberdeen, and died in 1820. In January, 1771 , he was 
married to Katharine Forbes, daughter of William Forbes, 
coppersmith in Aberdeen, and Janet Dyce his wife. They were 
the parents of Janet Abercrombie or Dingwall (i) and of several 
other children, one of whom (Dr. John Abercrombie) is inci- 
dentally mentioned in the Appendix, in account of the family of 
Provost William Young. 

3. Abercrombie (Rev. Robert), minister of Leslie, in 
Aberdeenshire, was born in February, 1694. His father (Robert 
Abercrombie, merchant and baillie of Aberdeen), was born in 
1650, and died 20th November, 1721. His mother (Agnes Blair) 
was born in 1 671, and died 12th October, 1736 ; they had thirteen 
children. Their son Robert was licensed to preach in 1720, and 
from that year until his death in July, 1751, was minister of the 
Parish of Leslie. During the 1745 Rebellion it is stated that 
his dwelling was invaded by a party of armed men who demanded 
£100 sterling, and on being told there was no such sum in 
the house, got hold of the keys and rifled cabinets and presses, 



■"^■■p^ 



IP 



ABERDEIN — ADAMSON. 



carrying off the minister's watch and seven guineas and clothes. 
His wife (Margaret Toasch), to whom he was married in 1723 
(contract dated 30th October), was a daughter of the Rev. Alex- 
ander Toasch, minister of Tarland, and Margaret Gordon his 
wife. They had six sons and five daughters, one of the sons being 
Provost John Abercrombie (2). [The Rev. George Abercrombie, 
one of the ministers of the East Church of Aberdeen, was a 
younger son of the minister of Leslie, and by his second wife was 
father of one well-known and deservedly valued for professional 
skill, literary ability and moral worth, the eminent physician Dr. 
John Abercrombie, F.R.S., author of works on the Intellectual 
Powers and Moral Feelings. The singular statement is made 
that both wives of the minister of the East Church, Aberdeen, 
were baptized by himself in their infancy. Strange as it seems 
it may have been so.] 

4. Aberdein (Thomas), farmer. Hillside, Parish of Echt, 
Aberdeenshire, son of William Aberdein, of the same place, and 
Jean Snowie, his wife, born 1737, died i6th December, 1815. 
He married Grace Harvey, daughter of Mr. John Harvey, 
schoolmaster, Midmar, and Elizabeth McKay his wife. They 
had several children. One of their sons (John Aberdein) succeed- 
ing to a considerable fortune by the will of a maternal uncle, 
took the name and Arms of Harvey, still borne by his descendants. 
A daughter (Jean) married Adam Wilson, of Glasgowego, and 
died, 30th October, 1844, aged seventy-five years. She was the 
mother of George Wilson, of Glasgowego, afterwards of Harvey 
Cottage, near Fergus, Ontario, incidentally mentioned in Appen- 
dix, in notice of Fergus and its Founders. 

5^ Aberdein (William), farmer in Hillside of Echt, Aber- 
deenshire, born in 1707, is said on his tombstone in the church- 
yard of Echt to have "lived and died of honest report." His 
death occurred ist January, 1779. He was buried in the 
churchyard of Echt, where his wife (Jean Snowie) was also laid : 
a daughter Helen, and a son Thomas who succeeded him in the 
farm. 

5'. Adamson (David), schoolmaster in Fettercairn, was 
married to Barbara Harper, daughter of John Harper, school- 



ALEXANDER — ALLARDYCE. 



master, originally at Durris, Aberdeenshire, afterwards at Fetter- 
cairn, and Elizabeth Melville his wife. He died in 1817, and 
'eft two sons, who are believed to have resided subsequently near 
Arbroath. 

6. Alexander (Arthur Gavin), second son of James Alex- 
ander, now of South Australia, and Elizabeth Jessy Sarah 
Harvey his wife. 

7. Alexander (Elizabeth Jane), eldest daughter of James 

Alexander, now of South Australia, and Elizabeth Jessy Sarah 
Harvey his wife ; was engaged in teaching in the Presbyterian 
College, Mount Gambier, South Australia, in 1884. 

8. Alexander (Elsy Patience Jessy), fourth daughter of 

James Alexander, now of South Australia, and Elizabeth Jessy 
Sarah Harvey his wife. 

9. Alexander (Gilbert), tanner and shipowner in Peter- 
head, Aberdeenshire, was born therein 1755, and died nth June, 
1844. His wife's name was Katharine Robertson. Their son 
Thomas was father of James Alexander, formerly of South 
Africa, now of South Australia. 

10. Alexander (James), son of Thomas Alexander, mer- 
chant in Peterhead, and Jane Mackie his wife, was a bank agent 
for some time in Natal, South Africa, afterwards at Mount 
Gambier, South Australia, where he now resides. On nth of 
April, 1865, he was married to Elizabeth Jessy Sarah Harvey, 
third daughter of Arthur Harvey, of D' Urban, South Africa, and 
Elizabeth Young his wife, and has issue. 

11. Alexander (James George), third son of James Alex- 
ander, of South Australia, and Elizabeth Jessy Sarah Harvey, 
his wife. 

12. Alexander (Thomas), a native of Peterhead, Aberdeen, 
shire, merchant there, father of James Alexander, now of South 
Australia, and son of Gilbert Alexander of Peterhead, tanner, 
etc., and Katharine Robertson, his wife ; married Jane Mackie, 
from the Parish of Old Deer. 

13. Allardyce (James), merchant in Aberdeen ; admitted 
a burgess of guild there in 1738 by payment of £100 Scots; 



""'iMm"n 



8 



ALLARDYCE — ALLEYNE. 



I < 



was afterwards a member of the Town Council. He was born 
in 1703, and before coming to Aberdeen was a merchant at 
Insch in Aberdeenshire. He died 26th October, 1778. He 
married Jean Jopp, a sister of James Jopp, Provost of Aberdeen. 
They had several sons and daughters. Of their three sons, 
James, the youngest (14) was Collector of Customs in Aberdeen. 
The eldest, Alexander AUardyce of Dunottar, M.P. for the 
Aberdeen District of Burghs, and Lord Rector of Marischal 
College, acquired a large fortune in the West Indies ; was twice 
married, having a son by his lirst marriage, who died in child- 
hood, and a daughter by the second, who became the wife of 
Archibald Lord Kennedy, afterwards Earl of Cassilis. 

14. AUardyce (James), 'merchant, and for many years Col- 
lector of His Majesty's Customs in Aberdeen, was born in 1754, 
being the third son of James AUardyce, merchant in Aberdeen, 
and Jean Jopp his wife. He died 2nd February, 181 1, having 
married Janet Forbes, daughter of William Forbes, coppersmith, 
Aberdeen, and Janet Dyce his wife. They had besides other 
children, a son William AUardyce (15). 

15. Allardyce (William), merchant, and sometime Treas- 
urer of Aberdeen, was born in 1793. He was the, second son of 
James Allardyce, Collector of Customs there, and Janet Forbes 
his wife. On the 5th December, 1822, he was married to Janet 
Dingwall, fourth daughter of Alexander Dingwall, afterwards of 
Rannieston, and his wife Janet Abercrombie. She only lived a 
few weeks after her marriage, and in December, 1828, her 
husband married Mary Ro.ss, daughter of John Leith Ross of 
Arnage and Bourtie, by whom he had issue. His own death 
took place in March, 1858. 

16. Allen (George), of Ardrea, County Armagh, Ireland, 
father of Ruth Allen or Harvey (17). 

17. Allen (Ruth), daughter of George Allen, of Ardrea, 
County Armagh, Ireland : married 8th April, 1879, Robert Young 
Harvey, now of Palmerston, South Australia, and has issue. 

18. Alleyne (Haynes Gibbes) of the Island of Barbadoes, 
married 21st May, J804, Georgiana Yea, second daughter of 



ALLEYNK — ANDERSON. 9 

William Walter Yea, younger of Pyrland, County Somerset, and 
Mary Newman his wife. They were parents of Maria Louisa 
Alleyne or Fotdyce (ig). 

19. Alleyne (Maria Louisa), daughter of Haynes Gibbes 
Alleyne, of the Island of Barbadoes, and Georgiana Yea his wife ; 
was married, i6th March, 1842 to Captain, afterwards General 
Sir John Fordyce, K.C.B., and died 2nd September, 1845, le?ang 
a daughter. 

20. Anderson (Angelica Patience), fourth daughter of 
William Dunlop Anderson, of London, and Lydia Marianne 
Eraser his wife. 

21. Anderson (Eliza), a native of Pittenweem, in Fife, wife 
of Thomas Hughes, of the Coast Guard Service, was born 2nd 
August, 1774, and died at Anstruther, in Fife, 28th July, 1858. 
Her daughter (Joan Hughes) was wife of John Duncan, latterly of 
South Australia (292). 

22. Anderson (Emily Marianne), eldest daughter of Wil- 
liam Dunlop Anderson, of London, and Lydia Marianne Fraser 
his wife, was married in 1822 to her cousin, James Reddie 
Anderson, residing near Keswick, Cumberland. 

23. Anderson (Rev. George. M.A.), minister of Leochel 
Cushnie, and son of Charles Anderson of Logie Coldstone, 
Aberdeenshire, was born in 1767, graduated at Marischal Col- 
lege, Aberdeen, 23rd March, 1787, and was for some time school- 
master of Tarland. In 1793 he received license to preach, and 
was ordained and settled at Leochel Cushnie, 21st August, 1805. 
He married Margaret Mcintosh or Cattanach, had three sons 
and one daughter, and died 23rd December, 1820. His daughter 
became the wife of George Monro, S.S.C. (731). 

24. Anderson (James), banker in Glasgow, father of Wil- 
liam Dunlop Anderson, colonial broker, London (32). 

25. Anderson (James Reddie), residing at Keswick, Cum- 
berland, married in 1822 Emily Marianne Anderson his cousin, 
eldest daughter of William Dunlop Anderson, of London, and 
Lydia Marianne Fraser his wife. 



lO 



ANDERSON — ARBUTHNOTT. 



26. Anderson (John), of the Bcnj^al Engineers, married 5th 
October, 1837, Elizabeth Dingwall, seventh daughter of Alex- 
ander Dingwall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wife, 
and had issue. 

27. Anderson (Joim James), eldest son of William Dunlop 
Anderson, of London, colonial broker, and Lydia Marianne 
Frasei his wife. 

28. Anderson (Letitia Mary), fifth daughter of William 

Dunlop Anderson, of London, and Lydia Marianne Eraser his 
wife. 

29. Anderson (Lydia), second daughter of William Dunlop 
Anderson, of London, and Lydia Marianne Eraser his wife. 

30. Anderson (Margaret), daughter of the Rev. George 
Anderson, minister of Leochel Cushnie, and his wife Margaret 
Mcintosh or Cattanach ; married George Monro, S.S.C., Edin- 
burgh, and was mother of James Monro (733). 

31. Anderson (Sarah Jane), third daughter of William 
Dunlop Anderson, colonial broker, London, and Lydia Mari- 
anne Eraser his wife. 

32. Anderson (WiUiam Dunlop), colonial broker in Lon- 
don, son of James Anderson, banker in Glasgow, married nth 
August, 1857, Lydia Marianne Eraser, daughter of John 
Mathison Eraser, merchant in Antwerp, latterly residing in 
London, and Emilie Nottebohm his wife. They have issue. 

33. Anderson (WilUam Lome), second son of William 

Dunlop Anderson, of London, and Lydia Marianne Eraser his 
wife, born nth March, 1867, and died on the 3rd of June, same 
year. ;,.,■,■ . "•,;;- 

34. Apcar (Mary Thomas), of Calcutta, wife of John 
Dingwall Eordyce Harvey, also of Calcutta, to whom she was 
married 23rd June, 1870. Has issue. 

35. Arbuthnott (Hon. John), of P'ordoun, Kincardine- 
shire, second son of Robert second Viscount of Arbuthnott and 
Lady Elizabeth Keith his wife, was married nth June, 1695, to 
Margaret Ealconer, eldest daughter of Sir James Ealconer of 
Phesdo, a Lord of Session, and his wife Elizabeth Trent. They 



ARBUTHNOTT — AVIRTICK. 



tx 



had three sons and five daughters. Of the sons, James, the 
eldest, a banker in Edinburgh, died unmarried ; John, the second, 
became in 1756 sixth Viscount of Arhuthnott ; Thomas, the 
youngest, a physician m Montrose, married a Miss Forbes, of 
Thornton, and left issue. Three unmarried daughters (Elizabeth, 
Margaret and Jean) lived in Aberdeen, died and were buried 
there. Of the two married daughters the younger, Katharine, 
married Tames Moir of Invernettie, near Peterhead ; Mary, the 
elder, became in 1736 the wife of John Douglass of Tilwhilly 
and Inchmarlo, and was mother of Elizabeth Douglass or Ding- 
wall (26' \ 

36. Arbuthnott (Katharine), a native of Montrose, was 
married 2nd December, i6go, to Rev. Francis Melville, then 
minister of Arbuthnott, afterwards one of the ministers of 
Aberdeen, and died before April, 1704. She was mother of the 
Rev. Robert Melville, minister of Durris. 

37'. Arbuthnott (Mary), daughter of the Honourable John 
Arbuthnott, of Fordoun in Kincardineshire, and Margaret 
Falconer his wife, and sister german to John sixth Viscount of 
Arbuthnott, was married 17th June, 1736, to John Douglass of 
Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo, and died at Inchmarlo 25th May, 1783; 
a good woman, " universally lamented." She had two sons and 
three daughters, one of the latter being Elizabeth Douglass or 
Dingwall (269). 

♦ 

37*. Atchison (Ann), daughter of Robert Atchison of 
Sydserif in East Lothian, was married 4th February, 1693, to 
the Rev. Mathew Reid, minister of North Berwick, and had two 
sons and one daughter, the second son Hugh becoming proprie- 
tor of SydserfF. [The Atchisons had acquired Sydserff in the 
first half of the seventeenth century from a family whose name 
had been given to the property. In 1624 it belonged to John 
SydserfF, but on 27th July, 1648, Robert Atchison, merchant 
burges of Edi.ibuigh, was served heir to his brother John, a 
physician, in the lands of Sydserff and others.] 

38. Avietick (Aratoon), merchant in Calcutta, father of 
Sarah Avietick or Harvey (39). 



12 



AVIETICK — HARNES. 



39. Avietick (Sarah), daugliter of Aratoon Avietick, mer- 
chant, Calcutta, was married i8th May, 1842, to Johi) Inj^lis 
Harvey, of the H. E. I. Co.'s Civil Service, and of Kinnettles, 
. orfarshire, whom she survives. They had three sons and two 
daughters. 

40. Baker (Sybil), a native of Paulet, in the State of Ver- 
mont, born 15th September, 1787, was married 3rd December, 
1807, to Samuel Towslee, of the same State, and died at Lyons, 
Wisconsin, i8th April, 1880. A daughter (Julia) became wife of 
Samuel Francis (888). 

41. Ballantine (David), engineer and millwright, was a son 
of David Ballantine, of Port Dundas, Scotland (who followed 
the same business), and Mary Hodge his wife, and was born 
loth October, 1803. He was married to Mary Murray, from 
Muirkirk, Ayrshire, 9th March, 1826, and died 27th July, 1861. 
He had emigrated with his family to Canada in 1841, settled 
near Stratford, and afterwards resided at Dundas ; a daughter 
(Mary H. Ballantine) marrying Nelson Keefer (647). 

42. Ballantine (Mary Hodge), daughter of David Ballan- 
tine, of Port Dundas, Scotland, latterly of Dundas, Ontario, 
millwright and engineer, and Mary Murray his wife, was born 
in Glasgow, and married 31st May, 1854, ^° Nelson Keefer, of 
St. George, now of Burlington, Ontario. They are parents of 
Mary M. Keefer or Cadenhead (646). 

43^ Barclay (Barbara), wife of William Dingwall, of Seils- 
crook, in the Parish of Monwhitter, Aberdeenshire, is mentioned 
in the contract of sale of that property, 19th June, 1655, and 
disposition to their son Arthur in 1661. No more is known of 
her. It may be mentioned, however, that in 1673 Mr. John 
Barclay, minister, appears as a witness at the baptism of two 
children of her son, but whether related or not, it is impossible 
to say. 

43^ Barnes (Amantha), born near Brockville, Ontario, of 
parents who came there from the United States ; married Ben- 
jamin Clarke, of Camden East, Ontario, and is mother of Emma 
Josephine Clarke or Cadenhead (137^) 



BARNETT — BENTHAM. 



13 



44. Bamett (- 



-), of the H. E. I. Co.'s Service, 



marr'cd Sophia Clarke, who was subsequently married to Cap- 
tain (aftui wards Lieutenant-General) Sir John Fordyce, K.C.B., 
and who was dautjhter of General Edward Clarke, H. E. I. Co.'s 
Service. 

45. Baxter (Agnes), wife of James Dyce, afterwards of 
Disblair, merchant in Aberdeen, was born in 1685. Her mar- 
riage took place in Old Aberdeen 25th January, 1716, and she 
died 15th December, 1739. Owing to a blank in the records, 
there is nothing positively to phow who were her parents, but 
there does not seem any doubt as to her having been a daughter 
of William Baxter, advocate in Aberdeen, and Baillie of Old 
Aberdeen, and Isabel Brebner, his wife. " William Baxter, late 
Baillie of Old Aberdeen," was her cautioner in marriage contract. 
This is one of the indirect proofs. A few supplementary facts 
will be found in the Appendix. 

46. Bedwell (Elizabeth), wife of Joseph Dingwall, wine 
merchant in London, and to whom she was married in 1849 or 
1850 ; was then widow of the Reverend J. Hird. She survived 
her second husband, and died about 1877. They had no family. 

47^" Bellew (Patrick Francis), appointed Surgeon-Major 
in the Bengal Army 6th September, 1866, retired from the ser- 
vice i6th February, 1883. He married Sophia Elizabeth, only 
daughter of Lieutenant-General Sir John Fordyce, K.C.B., by 
his second wife, Maria Louisa Alleyne. They had no issue. 

47^ Bentham (George), only son of Brigadier-General Sir 
Samuel Bentham and Sophia Fordyce his wife, was the resi- 
duary legatee of his uncle, Jeremy Bentham, who left him all his 
manuscripts relating to logic and nomography, and all his col- 
lections relating to language. He also succeeded to his uncle's 
freehold property and to a share with his sisters in the leasehold 
and other property Jeremy Bentham had owned. 

48. Bentham (Mary Louisa), elder daughter of General 
Sir Samuel Bentham and Sophia Fordyce his wife ; was married 
at Perpignan, near Toulouse, France, 15th September, 1819, to 
the Marquis de Chesnel. Lieutenant-Colonel of the Legion of 
Light Infantry of the Pyrenees Orientales. 



H 



BKNTHAn! — n;<:NTLEY. 



49. Bentham (Jeremiah), solicitor in London, born in 
1712; resided in Red Lion Street, Houndsditch, adjacent to Aid- 
gate Church. He was the son of a solicitor, who was also clerk 
to the Company of Scriveners. About the year 1 765 he purchased 
the house in Queen Square Place, Westminster, where he and 
his son Jeremy both passed the remainder of their lives. He 
was twice married, his second wife, Sarah Farr, being widow of 
the Rev. Dr. John Abbot, and mother of Charles Abbot, Speaker 
of the House of Commons (Lord Colchester). The subject of 
this notice died in 1792. Of the two sons of his first marriage, 
one was General Sir Samuel Bentham. The other, Jeremy 
Bentham, who was born 15th February, 1747-8, was the well- 
known political economist, and derived his name of Jeremy from 
an ancestor, Sir Jeremy Snow, a banker in the reign of Charles 
the Second. The doctrine of utility was the leading principle of 
Jeremy Bentham's ethical and political writings, and, although 
he pressed the doctrine to extremes, and many of his views 
were quite mipracticable, others, it is said, have been realized, 
and others are in course of being so. His works were edited by 
Dr. Bowring and Mr. J. H. Burton, and published in eleven 
volumes. He died unmarried 6th June, 1832. 

50. Bentham (Sir Samuel), of Berry Lodge, Hants, Sur- 
veyor-General of Naval Works, and Brigadier-General, was 
brother of Jeremiah or Jeremy Bentham, the noted political 
economist, and son of Jeremiah Bentham, a wealthy solicitor jn 
London. He was married on the 21st October, 1796, to Sophia 
Fordyce, the elder daughter of Dr. George Fordyce, of Essex 
Street, Strand, London. They had one son and two daughters. 

51. Bentley (James), father of Professor Bentley, of King's 
College, Aberdeen, was born in 171 2, and was son of Joseph 
Bentley, of Selby in Yorkshire, his mother's name being Wait. 
He was in the hosiery trade at Leeds, but removed to Scotland 
about 1770, settling in Aberdeen. He died there about 1776. 
He was a good and pious man, a member of the Church of Eng- 
land. His second wife's name was Ruth Powell. A son of a 
former marriage, Thomas Bentley, author of some papers, pub- 
lished in 1775, on controverted points, such as the lawfulness of 



BENTLEY. 



IJ 



women's teaching anl preacliin<; in public, etc., married the 
daughter of Colonel Finlayson, of Aberdeen, antl had a son, 
Thomas Bentley, of Hermitage, Kent. A ilaughter of the sub- 
j(!Ct of this notice was married to the Rev. Dr. Ronald liaync, 
of Kiltarlity, and was grandmother of Dr. Peter Hayne, well 
known in the literary world, and also of Mrs. Murray Mitchell, 
of the India Mission of the Free Church of Scotland, an able 
writer on the amelioration of the condition of women there, 
socially and religiously. 

52. Bentley (James, A.M.,) Professor of Oriental Lan- 
guages in King's College, Aberdeen, was born in Aberdeen 24th 
November, 1771. His father, James Bentley, a native of the 
North of England, who was a grand-nephew of the eminent 
critic, Dr. Richard Bentley, carried on the hosiery business 
there. His mother's name was Ruth Powell, and on her his 
early training devolved, as he was only four years of age when 
his father died. She was a pious woman, and it is told of her 
son that her prayers for thirty-five years were regarded by him 
as a rich patrimony. He studied at the Grammar School of 
Aberdeen and Marischal College, and for a few years was 
employed as private tutor in several influential families in Aber- 
deenshire. His mind was cultivated, and his reading extensive ; 
but this was little known, as his constitutional timidity caused 
him almost to shrink from notice in society. At one time he 
looked forward to the work of the ministry, and especially to 
working in the Mission field, but weakness of voice and general 
delicacy of constitution caused him to abandon thoughts of 
doing so. In 1798 he was appointed to the Professorship of 
Oriental Languages in King's College, Aberdeen, and held the 
office for forty-eight years. He was remarkable for assiduity in 
the discharge of his duties, and felt a deep and paternal interest 
in the students under his care, whose future well-being he was 
zealous in his efforts to promote. The Professorship previously 
had been almost a sinecure, and his predecessor for some time 
had not been in the habit of even opening classes. This state 
of matters he set himself at once to reform, and did all he could 
to revive a taste for Hebrew and cognate languages. Holding 
strong views on the responsibility and solemnity of the minis- 



i6 



HRNTLKY. 



terial calling, he employed all the influence he had in bringing 
forward and getting into charges young men whom he believed 
to be godly, and called to the work by the Great Head of the 
Church. In this way he helped forward a work which, from the 
circumstances noticed, he was prevented from pursuing in his 
own person. Although neither of his parents were Presbyteri- 
ans, he became early attached to the Church of Scotland, in 
which he was a constant worshipper, and a zealous and faithful 
office-bearer. After his death the publishing committee of the 
Free Church of Scotland issued a tract in which it was remarked 
that " Professor Bentley's venerable and saintly appearance 
would be lo.ig remembered by tliose with whom he worshipped." 
"While remarkably modest and retiring," it was added, "he was 
most unwearied and earnest in doing all within his own sphere 
for advancing the cause of vital Christianity, illustrating in his 
life what could be done for this end by one who lived with a 
view to it ; and who, though not fitted for taking a public and 
prominent part in the religious world, was yet constrained by love 
to Christ and to the souls of men." He spent much time and 
pains in correcting an edition of the French Bible, published by 
the British and Foreign Bible Society, and, in 1809, was made 
one of its honorary members. He was greatly interested in the 
progress of Foreign Missions, and warmly espoused the cause of 
Sabbath Schools when they were not generally popular in his 
own locality. Espousing with all his heart the cause of the Free 
Church of Scotland the number of his students after the Disrup- 
tion was greatly reduced ; and from growing bodily infirmity, an 
arrangement was effected in 1845 by means of which his teach- 
ing could be altogether dispensed with. His last illness was 
very short, and at midnight on the 7th August, 1846, the account 
already referred to says : " He quietly fell asleep in Jesus." " His 
life," it is added, "was a calm and even one, and very lovely in 
the eyes of those who were acquainted with it." Dr. Chalmers, 
m writing to a member of his family after his death, says: "I 
have long esteemed him for his character, and ever since I made 
his acquaintance have loved him for 4:he mild and paternal vir- 
tues which shone forth so conspicuously in his whole manner 
and appearance." He had been married on the 26th October, 



UKNTI.EY — BIRCH. 



I 7 



1809, to Isohell Din^'wall Fordyce, eldest daughter of Dr. Arthur 
Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison, his wife. She 
survived him. They iiad two daughters, Janet Bentley or 
Littlejohn (53), and Kuth Bentley or Dymock (55). 

53. Bentley (Janet), elder of the two daughters of Professor 
James Bentley, of King's College, Aberdeen, and Isobell Ding- 
wall Fordyce his wife, was born 26tii January, 181 1, and married 
25th March, 1830, to William Littlejohn, manager and cashier 
of the Aberdeen Town and County Banking Company. She 
died on the ist October, 1848, leaving six sons and four daughters. 

54. Bentley (Joseph), a native of Oulton, in the parish of 
Rothwell, near Wakefield, Yorkshire, was a younger brother of 
the eminent critic Dr. Richard Bentley, Master of Trinity Col- 
lege, Cambridge, and Archdeacon of Ely, of whom a short notice 
will be found in the Appendix ; and of whom in consequence of 
his prominent position and literary life, more is known than of 
the subject of this notice, whose life was passed in business at 
Selby, in Yorkshire. His parents (Thomas Bentley and Sarah 
Willis) were married in 1661. His own wife's name was Wait. 
Their son James was father of Professor Bentley, of King's 
College, Aberdeen. 

55. Bentley (Ruth), second daughter of I iofessor James 
Bentley of King's College, Aberdeen, and Isobi H Dingwall 
Fordyce his wife, was married 29th October, 1839, to the Rev. 
Thomas Dymock, minister of the Free Church of Scotland at 
Carnoustie, Forfarshire, afterwards of the Free Middle Church, 
Perth, now retired and residing in Edinburgh. They have 
issue. 

56. Berghiest (Sophie), a native of Hamburgh, wife of 
James Dingwall, merchant there. They had no family. 

57. Birch (Samuel), Alderman of London, and Lord Mayor 
in 1815, was married 12th January, 1778, to Mary Fordyce, only 
child of Dr. John Fordyce, of London, and Pleasant Lawford his 
wife. Although Mr. Birch was an educated man, and of some 
literary pretensions, his marriage gave great offence to some of 
the lady's relatives, who, it is said, entered into a rather undig- 
nified newspaper correspondence on the subject, the cause of 



1 8 



BLACHRIE. 



exception being his business, that of a pastry cook. His writ- 
ings were " Consilia," or Thoughts on several subjects, and the 
Abbey of Ambresbury, a Poem. There were some children of 
the marriage, but no account of them has reached us. 

58. Blachrie (Agnes), fourth daughter of William Blachrie, 
merchant in Aberdeen, and Isobell Fordyce his wife; born in 
Aberdeen and baptized 23rd April, 1704. 

59. Blachrie (Alexander), apothecary at Bromley in Kent, 
fifth son of William Blachrie and Isobell Fordyce his wife, was 
baptized 14th June, 1702. He practised at Bromley for more 
than forty years, and died there 2gth May, 1772. He was the 
author of a medical work which combated the vie./s of Dr. Chin- 
neck regarding method of removing certain internal disorders. 

60. Blachrie (Barbara), eldest daughter of Wm. Blachrie, 
merchant in Aberdeen, and Isobell Fordyce his wife ; baptized 
2oth September, 1691. 

61. Blachrie (Christian), fifth daughter of Wm. Blachrie, 
merchant in Aberdeen, and Isobell Fordyce his wife ; baptized 
17th June, 1705. 

62. Blachrie (Elizabeth), sixth daughter of Wm. Blachrie, 
merchant in Aberdeen, and Isobell Fordyce his wife ; baptized 
22nd June, 1707. No more is actually known of her ; but a con- 
jecture is hazarded 'he Appendix in the account given of the 
Blackwell Family. 

63. Blachrie (George), eldest son of William Blachrie, 
merchant in Aberdeen, and Isobell Fordyce his wife ; baptized 
i6th October, 1690. v . , ' - 

64. Blachrie (Isobell), second daughter of William Blachrie, 
merchant in Aberdeen, and Isobell Fordyce his wife ; baptized 
24th June, 1694. 

65. Blachrie (James), second son of William Blachrie, 
merchant in Aberdeen, and Isobell Fordyce his wife ; baptized 
i6th April, 1693. 

66. Blachrie (John), third son of William Blachrie, mer- 
chant in Aberdeen, and Isobell Fordyce his wife ; baptized 8th 
October, 1695. 



BLACHRIE — BLACK. 



1$ 



67. Blachrie (Margaret), third daughter of Wm. Blachrie, 
merchant in Aberdeen, and Isobell Fordyce his wife ; baptized 
14th July, 1700. 

68. Blachrie (William), fourth son of William Blachrie, 
merchant in Aberdeen, and Isobell Fordyce his wife ; baptized 
nth June, 1699; died in childhood. 

69. Blachrie (William), sixth son of William Blachrie, 
merchant in Aberdeen, and Isobell Fordyce his wife ; baptized 
31st October, 1708. 

70. Blachrie (William), merchant in Aberdeen, was mar- 
ried about 1689 or 1690 to Isobell Fordyce, who is believed to 
have been a sister of Provost George Fordyce. This has been 
consequently assumed, although there is no direct proof. They 
had six sons and six daughters. At the baptism of their son 
James, in 1693, ^^^ ^^ ^^^^ witnesses was James Blachrie, in 
Badachash ; and at that of another son (John) in 1695, John 
Blachrie, in the Parish of Rayne, was a v/itness. The Poll Tax 
Book of Aberdeenshire (1696) gives the name of John Blachrie 
as tenant of Badaquhash, in the Parish of Fyvie, with Margaret 
Cruickshank his wife. It may be added that there was then in 
Fyvie a farm called Blachrie on the Laird of Meldrum's land. 
From Rayne or Fyvie William Blachrie may have come. In 
i6g8, he was Master of the Guild Hospi'^al of Aberdeen ; in 
1702, he was Master of Kirk Work ; and 1704, Treasurer of 
Aberdeen. 

71. Black (Agnes), baptized 27th June, 1714, was the fourth 
daughter of James Black, merchant in Aberdeen, and Agnes 
Fordyce his wife. 

72. Black (Alexander), a native of Old Meldrum, mer- 
chant, dyer and Baillie of Aberdeen, was born 1726. He was a 
son of John Black, of Old Meldrum, and Janet Davidson his 
wife. He died 22nd December, 1787, and the notice of his death 
in the Aberdeen jfouriial states that " the world had thus lost a 
worthy man ; the community, an active and upright magistrate ; 
his acquaintances and relatives, a warm and sincere friend." 
" His funeral," it is added, " was conducted with the pomp 
befitting the rank of a magistrate." He married (contract dated 



■HP 



-ppr 



20 



BLACK. 



in May, 1751) Mary Leslie, daughter of Patrick Leslie, merchant 
.in Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Cruickshank his wife. They were 
parents of Elizabeth Black or Young (75) and Lieut. -Colonel 
Patrick Black, H. E. I. Co.'s Bengal Native Cavalry, who died 
in 1818. 

73. Black (Barbara), third daughter of James Black, mer- 
chant and Dean of Guild of Aberdeen, and Agnes Fordyce his 
wife ; baptized 24th September, 171 2, was married in May, 1751, 
to Dr. Thomas Blackwell, Principal of Marischal College. He 
died in 1757. She survived till 23rd October, 1793. ^^ ^^e had 
no family she bequeathed her lands of Pulmoir, near Aberdeen, 
to Marischal College, in order to obtain a Prize Essay, at stated 
intervals on subjects assigned, or to be assigned, and for estab- 
lishing a Professorship of Chemistry in Marischal College, to be 
held in the first instance by her husband's nephew. Dr. George 
French. 

74. Black (Ohristian), fifth daughter of James Black, mer- 
. chant and Dean of Guild of Aberdeen, and Agnes Fordyce 

his wife ; baptized 17th November, 171 7. 

75. Black (Elizabeth), daughter of Baillie Alexander Black 
of Aberdeen and Mary Leslie his wife, was born 13th February, 
1752. She was twice married : first (contract dated 30th Nov- 
ember, 1770) to John Brand, merchant in Aberdeen. They had 
no family ; and she was married, secondly (29th November, 
1773), to James Young, stocking merchant and Dean of Guild, 
Aberdeen. They had five sons and five daughters, their eldest 
son (James) becoming Provost of Aberdeen. She died at her 
house in Golden Square, Aberdeen, 8th May, 1836. 

76. Black (Elspet), second daughter of James Black, Dean 
of Guild, Aberdeen, and Agnes Fordyce his wife ; baptized 7th 
July, 1706. 

77. Black (George), eldest son of James Black, Dean of 
Guild of Aberdeen, and Agnes Fordyce his wife ; baptized 12th 
September, 1708. He was a merchant in Aberdeen; and is 
mentioned 24th December, 1737, as a party with his father and 
William Fordyce of Culsh, in a bond for 1,000 marks to Alex- 
ander Aberdein, merchant in Old Aberdeen. 



BLACK — BLACKWELL. 



21 



ean of 
d 1 2th 
and is 
er and 
Alex- 



78. Black (Isobell), eldest daughter of James Black, Dean 
of Guild of Aberdeen, and Agnes Fordyce his wife; baptized 
24th July, 1704. 

79. Black (James), merchant and Dean of Guild of Aber- 
deen, is probably the same as appears in the Poll Tax Book 
(1696) as " merchant in Aberdeen, having a stock not exceeding 
5,000 merks ; no wife nor child." He was Treasurer of Aberdeen 
in 1710, and Dean of Guild in 1714. There is no clue to his 
parentage ; and the name of Black does not appear among 
witnesses' names at the baptisms of any of his children. He was 
married about 1703 to Agnes Fordyce, one of the daughters of 
Provost George Fordyce of Aberdeen, and Isobell Walker, his 
first wife : portraits of both are in the possession of the compiler 
of this record. They had five sons and five daughters. A refer- 
ence in the notice of his son George shows that he was alive in 
1737, and another in that of William Fordyce of Culsh, indicates 
that he was still alive in 1740 ; further we cannot say. 

80. Black (James), second son of James Black, Dean of 
Guild of Aberdeen, and Agnss Fordyce his wife ; baptized 14th 
May, 1710. 

81. Black (Thomas), fourth son of James Black, Dean of 
Guild of Aberdeen, and Agnes Fordyce his wife ; baptized 20th 
November, 1719. 

82. Black (William), third son of James Black, D.an of 
Guild of Aberdeen, and Agnes Fordyce his wife ; baptized 8th 
February, 1716 ; died in childhood. 

83. Black (William), fifth son of James Black, Dean of 
Guild of Aberdeen, and Agnes Fordyce his wife ; baptized 19th 
January, 1724. 

84^ Blackwell (Thomas, LL.D.), who has been called the 
restorer of Greek Literature in the North of Scotland, was born 
at Aberdeen 4th August, 1701, being the eldest son of the Rev. 
Thomas Blackwell, one of the ministers of Aberdeen, and Prin- 
cipal of Marischal College, and Christian Johnston his wife. 
He was educated at the Grammar School of his native place 
and at Marischal College, in which he was appointed "^o the 
Professorship of Greek in 1723, and made Principa. 748, 



22 



BLACKVVKLL. 



The duties of the Professorship he is said to have tUscharged 
energetically, and, on becoming Principal, to have been even 
more earnest in endeavours for the advancement of learning. He 
opened a class for instructing the students in Ancient History, 
Geography, and Chronology, as an introduction to a new plan 
of teaching in the College, which was carried out successfully. 
He was of a benevolent disposition, and kind and indulgent to 
the students. At the same time he was formal and pompous, 
dressing also after the fashion of Queen Anne's reign. A copy 
has been preserved in his own handwriting of a letter addressed 
in 1 75 1 to Dr. John Johnston, his uncle, who was Professor of 
Medicine in the University of Glasgow, intimating his proposed 
marriage, and eulogizing the lady of his choice. The following 
is an extract : " As my fortune is much mended, and my cir- 
cumstances easy, since the accession of the Principalit}^ I am 
resolved to marry, and the only woman I ever saw that can 
make me happy is Miss Baby Black, I could talk of her like a 
lover, and tell you that, excepting money, she has everything the 
heart of man can desire in a fine woman. But I rather choose 
to tell you, that she is come of the best sort of people in this 
place, being a Dean of Guild's daughter and a Provost's grand- 
child ; that she has been most frugally and virtuously educated, 
accustomed to great economy, and to appear genteel on the least 
expense ; is wise, and worthy and good and, with the greatest 
sweetness of temper, is capable of any business that requires 
spirit and action. Both her years and humour are extremely 
fitted to mine, and her whole conduct and demeanour since ever 
I knew her has been such that I have not only hopes, as in most 
matches, but a certainty of more joy and satisfaction with her, 
than if I married a fortune of £"10,000 sterling. If you but saw 
the sweet, sensible, graceful woman, and knew one-half of the 
proofs of her worth that I do, you would think it the wisest 
action I ever did to single her out for the companion of my life. 
Though my apartment in the College be tolerably furnished, yet 
• I am hastening to rear a dwelling on Deeside, and would there- 
for propose with your and my sister Blair's approval to take 
home my wife some time in May next." The dwelling on Dee- 
side, to which reference is made, was built on Polmuir or 



HI.ACKWM.L. 



33 



.red 

ven 
He 
ory, 
plan 
uUy. 
nt to 
pous, 
copy 
essed 
sor of 
,posed 
owing 
ly cir- 
1 am 
lat can 
r like a 
ling the 
choose 
L in this 
grand- 
lucated, 
:he least 
greatest 
requires 
>:tremely 
,nce ever 
in most 
ith her, 
but saw 
lU of the 
te wisest 
my life, 
ished, yet 
^ild there- 
1 to take 
Ig on Dee- 
olmuir or 



Puhnoir, a part of the lands of Ferryhill, which Dr. Blackwell 
had feued from the Town of Aberdeen. His death occurred at 
Edinburgh on the 6th of March, 1757, and his remains were 
interred in Greyfriar's Churchyard. Barbara Black, to whom 
he was married in 1751, resided latterly at Polmuir, where she 
died after a long widowhood. Her father (James Black) was 
Dean of Guild of Aberdeen. Her mother (Agnes Fordyce) was 
a daughter of Provost George Fordyce. They had no children, 
and on Mrs. Blackwell's death the institution over which her 
husband and his father had presided benefited largely by her 
wise liberality. " No man," the Aberdeen ^ on rna I of the time 
observed, ** ever possessed in a more eminent degree the talent 
of inspiring young minds with a love of learning than did Dr. 
Blackwell ; of begetting among them a generous emulation, and 
forming them to a taste and perception of what was elegant and 
beautiful in the admired productions of antiquity." He was 
author of an " Inquiry into the Life and Writings of Homer," 
"Letters on Mythology," and "Memoirs of the Court of 
Augustus," which were well received. Even Dr. Samuel John- 
son's criticism of the work last mentioned is tempered with 
commendation : " Having freely mentioned our author's faults, 
it remains that we acknowledge his merit, and confess that the 
book is the work of a man of letters, that it is full of events dis- 
played with accuracy and related with vivacity, and though it is 
sufficiently defective to crush the vanity of its author, it is suffi- 
ciently entertaining to invite readers." 

842. Blackwell (Thomas), Professor of Divinity in Maris- 
chal College, Aberdeen, and Principal of the University for the 
last ten years of his life, studied at the University of Glasgow, 
and was licensed to preach the Gospel on the 23rd February, 
1693 ; ordained and placed as minister of Paisley on the 28th 
August, 1694. Here he laboured till he was translated to Aber- 
deen on the 7th February, 1700, as one of the ministers of St. 
Nicholas Church. Elizabeth Brown, wife of Provost George 
Fordyce, Aberdeen, was nearly related to Principal Blackwell. 
Scott, in his " Fasti Ecclesiae Scotticanai," speaking of her 
father, the Rev. David Brown of Neilston, says that his wife's 
name was Blackwell ; but, with no more data than we have, we 



24 



BLACKVVKLI,. 



can say nothing as to the degree of relationship. A statement, 
which is evidently erroneous, is made on the subject in one of 
the biog'-aphical dictionaries. The high estimation in which the 
subject of this notice was held caused him to be selected in the 
year 1711 to accompany Principal Carstairs and the Rev. Mr. 
Baillie to London as a deputation from the Commission of the 
General Assembly of the Church of Scotland to endeavour to 
avert the evils dreaded from the re-introduction of Patronage 
and the proposed Act of Toleration in favour of the Episcopal 
Clergy. One or two extracts from letters written while he was 
in London may be given here. A couple of months of unavail- 
ing hanging-on was felt by the deputation to be very discourag- 
ing. On the 2nd of February, I7i2,he wrote : "Many a thought 
of heart have I had of late what could be in Providence casting 
me here at such a desperate-like juncture when every step grows 
darker than another, but it supports me strongly that I came in 
sincerity to this place to act and appear for God and the mter- 
ests of His Church; and, therefore, though God's steps be in 
the deep waters at present, who knows but the sea may divide 
and Israel yet sing. ' The expense incurred appears also to have 
been a source of some uneasiness as he wrote on ist March : 
" The nature of our business hath been such as necessarily 
obliged us to great expenses ; for, having had upon the matter 
entirely to do with noblemen, I have been obliged to spend sums 
upon their porters and gentlemen that would make one ashamed 
to write it ; neither is there any doing of business without such 
things being punctually minded." Notwithstanding the zeal 
and activity displayed by the members of the deputation, they 
failed in their object. The year that he was employed on the 
mission just spoken of, Mr. Blackwell was appointed to the 
Chair of Divinity in Marischal College, and in the year 171 7 
became Principal. He died in 1728. He had been married 
about 1700 to Christian Johnston, daughter of Dr. John Johnston, 
physician in Glasgow, by Elizabeth Cunningham his wife. She 
died on the 22nd May, 1749. They had twelve children, two of 
whom have places in this record, and two others are particularly 
noticed in the Appendix. The following is an extract from an 
Essay Principal Blackwell published and dedicated to the Gen- 



HLACKVVF.LL. 



2.5 



lent, 

le of 

ithe 

I the 

, Mr. 

[ the 

lur to 

mage 

copal 

3 was 

avail- 

3urag- 

lought 

lasting 
grows 

ime in 

3 inter- 

»s be in 
divide 
ohave 

March : 

essarily 
matter 
d sums 
shamed 
ut such 
[he zeal 
n, they 
on the 
to the 

ar 1717 
married 
hnston, 
Ife. She 
, two of 
ticularly 
from an 
he Gen- 



eral Assembly of the Church of Scotland on Preaching the 
Gospel: " It is highly suitable for all ministers, even after utmost 
diligence in study, so far to submit all their preparations to an 
all-wise God as not to be surprised upon His going contrary to 
their expectation in several things, such as His shining most 
upon some truths in preaching, upon which perhaps He shined 
least in private study ; His bringing some truths and enlarge- 
ments to remembrance which were little meditate upon before ; 
His suffering other truths to be forgotten which possibly were 
particularly intended to be insisted on. For these, and many 
such wonderful things, are with Him, who knows the set time, 
the text, the sermon, and truths appointed for the conversion, 
restoration, and edification of His elect. Considering how abso- 
lutely a minister's judgment, memory, affections, and utterance 
dependeth upon Divine concurrence and influence, it is most 
clear that, even after their most promising preparations in pri- 
vate, they ought as humbly and closely to depend upon the 
Spirit of the Lord Jesus fo" actual assistance as if they had made 
none at all. For though the minister deserveth to be deserted 
of God who is either sinfully slothful and negligent u- prepara- 
tion, or who, like the Quakers, enthusiastically expects extem- 
porary matter and inspiration; yet, on the other hand, it is 
equally certain that he who dependeth on his own preparations, 
as if they were sufficient, greatly provoketh the Lord to cause 
such an one know that he who trusteth to his own understanding 
is a fool. And, therefore, I am bold to say, that were the expe- 
rience of the greatest and most able ministers of Christ in all 
ages questioned concerning the grand direction for right preach- 
ing the Gospel, they would certainly first recommend great dili- 
gence in private study, even as if all were to be done there, and 
next an entire and close dependence upon the Spirit of God 
through Jesus Christ, as if they had made little or no preparation 
at all. This dependence on Christ with respect to preaching I 
take to consist, first, in a minister's believing truly that it is neither 
his best preparations, nor personal gifts, yea, nor habitual grace, 
that are sufficient (without present actual influences of light and 
life) towards his preaching with that knowledge, faith, love, and 
zeal which ought to accompany the dispensation of the Gospel ; 



36 



ni.ACKWKI.I,. 



and, secondly, in his believing a fulness in Christ and thereupon 
having the desire of his soul following hard out after the breath- 
ing of the north and south wind, crying (as it were) in his heart 
through the whole of the sermon : ' O Lord, without Thee I can 
do nothing.' And when this dependence ariseth from a serious, 
deep concern for the glory of Jehovah and the Mediator, and for 
the salvation of souls — so that the minister is not so much crying 
with Saul to be honoured before the people as really to be helped 
to sincerity and liveliness towards the commending Christ and 
religion to their souls and consciences — in this case, I say it is 
certainly one of the most promising tokens for assistance, accept- 
ance and success which can possibly be found amongst men. 
O, dependence, an humble and serious dependence, who can 
sufficiently commend it ? " The following extract may be 
adduced in proof of Principal Blackwell's fidelity and success, 
from a narrative written in 1710 by the future wife of the Rev. 
James Chalmers, Professor of Divinity in Marischal College, and 
mother of James Chalmers, printer and publisher, Aberdeen : 
**In January, 1708, I came to Aberdeen, and by reason of Mr. 
Blackwell's sickness, I heard strangers for the most part. The 
Lord having yet more work for that eminently godly and very 
faithful servant. He was pleased to restore him again, and enabled 
him to enter upon his public work in March, a blessing for which 
I am much in God's debt. I had thoughts of speaking about my 
own state to a minister ; but delayed till the end of November, 
when I was staying in that place of the town that belonged to 
Mr. Blackwell's oversight and charge, and I resolved: 'I'll go to 
him.' I thought he would tell me if I was deceiving myself, or 
if ever there had been anything that was promising like with me, 
and I wanted much that he would pray for me, for I knew his pray- 
ers were heard. Accordingly I went, and after being particular in 
telling him something of what had been with me, I only could 
say I was weary of being without God, and weary of sin, and 
that my desire was to spend the remaining part of my time in 
His service. He told me there was already within me some of 
the qualifications of the smoking flax, which words went to my 
very heart. This was so very contrary to what I was feeling to 
be with me, that I was near to speak rashly and unbecomingly 



BLACKWFM, — HLAIKIK. 



27 



in his very presence; anti althon^^ii when, and before, I saw him 
I thought it was impossible for any advice to be proper for me, 
the very first he was (hrected to was and will be of use to me as 
long as I live, wiiich was that I should aye be content with the 
Lord's way of dealing with me, for I wanted not will to limit 
the Holy One." The monument to Principal Blackwell's 
memory in Saint Nicholas Churchyard, Aberdeen, bears the 
inscription : " S. M. T. Blackwell, S.T.P. Acad. Mar. Gymnasi- 
archae, qui corpore decorus, ingenio acer,;patria} amans, pecuniai 
spretor, eloquens, magnanimus, humanus, legibus, libertati 
patrocinando vixit. T. Blackwell, Acad. Mar. Gymnasiarcha, 
L.G.P. Fil. paterna3 virtuti P. MDCCL.," which may be 
rendered: "Sacred to the memory of Thomas Blackwell, Pro- 
fessor of Divinity and Prmcipal of Marischal College, who was 
comely in person, acute in judgment, patriotic, a despiser of 
worldly gain, eloquent, large-hearted, a defender of the laws and 
liberties of his country. Erected by T. Blackwell, Principal and 
Professor of Greek in Marischal College, as a tribute to his 
father's worth. 1750." 

85. Blackwell (Christian), daughter of Dr. Thomas Black- 
well, Principal of Marischal College, Aberdeen, and Christian 
Johnston his wife, was baptized on the 5th January, 1721. She 
was married to John French, advocate in Aberdeen, whom she 
survived. They had one son and three daughters. 

86. Blackwood (Helen), wife of James Spittal, of Edin- 
burgh, and mother of Sir James Spittal, Kt., Lord Provost of 
that city. 

87. Blaikie (John), plumber and coppersmith, Aberdeen, 
father of Sir Thomas Blaikie, Kt., Provost of Aberdeen. Another 
son (James Blaikie of Craigiebuckler, advocate) was also Chief 
Magistrate of Aberdeen, and was father of the Rev. Dr. William 
G. Blaikie, Edinburgh, widely known by able and valuable 
writings on social and religious subjects. 

88. Blaikie (Sir Thomas), of the firm of John Blaikie & 
Sons, Aberdeen, received the honour of knighthood while hold- 
ing the office of Lord Provost of that city. He was married 13th 



a8 



HLYTH — HOWF.R. 



November, 1828, to Agnes Ditif^vvall, sixth dauKliterof Alexander 
Din^^wall, afterwards of Rannieston, and Janet Abercrombie his 
wife. They had issue. 

8g. Blyth (Janet), only daughter and sole heiress of James 
Blyth, of Kininmonth, in Fife ; owned considerable landed pro- 
perty in different parts of that county ; married David Lister, 
W.S., and had three sons and a daughter, Isabella Lister or 
Shand (665). 

90. Bonnar (Anna), daughter of Andrew Bonnar, parish 
schoolmaster, Nigg, Kincardineshire, born in June, 1755, married 
gth October, 1784, to John Cadenhead, gardener, Aberdeen, and 
died 20th December, 1836. They had two sons and three 
daughters. 

91. Boucaut (Hillary), of the Island of Guernsey, married 
Martha Baugy Le Rei, of the same island. They were parents 
of Captain Ray Boucaut (92). 

92. Boucaut (Ray), Captain in the Maritime Service of the 
H. E. I. Co., son of Hillary Boucaut and Martha Baugy Le 
Rei, of the Island of Guernsey, his wife, was born 23rd March, 
1802, emigrated to South Australia in 1846, and died there in 
1872. He married Winifred Penn, daughter of James Penn, of 
Plymouth, England, latterly of South Australia, and Jane Friend 
his wife. They were parents of Sarah Jane Boucaut or Harvey 
(93). 

93^ Boucaut (Sarah Jane), daughter of Captain Ray 
Boucaut, H. E. I. Co.'s Maritime Service, and Winifred Penn his 
wife, born at Saltash, Cornwall, England, married 15th June, 
1 87 1, Arthur (Young) Harvey of Adelaide, South Australia. 
They have issue. , 

93'. Bower (Rev. John) of Maryculter, was born in 1786. 
He was a son of John Bower, teacher in Aberdeen, and Ann 
Touch his wife. He graduated at Marischal College in 1803, 
and was licensed to preach the Gospel in 1810. He was ordained 
7th May, 1 81 2, and settled as minister of the Parish of Mary- 
culter, in Kincardineshire, where he remained till his death on the 
1 8th December, 1866. The Rev. Dr. Paull of Banchory Dev- 



BOWRR — BOYD. 



29 



enick, in his description of " Aberdeenshire, Past and Present," 
says : " My nearest neighbour for many years, the Rev. Mr. 
Bower, of Maryculter, was one of the simplest ami purest-minded 
men, and one of the best samples of a Christian minister that it 
was ever my good fortune to meet." Scott, in his Fasti Ecclesife 
Scotticana', says : " He was altogether a man to love : gentle, 
kindly, guileless in his nature, who strove to do his duty faith- 
fully and zealously, thinking evil of no man, under an earnest 
sense of his responsibility ; with a singleness of heart and 
purpose which made those who met him like and respect him.'' 
The compiler from personal knowledge in his own early days, 
can fully corroborate these statements. Mr. liower was married 
gth Deceml •-, 1813, to Sarah Christina Wilson, only daughter 
of the Rev. Alexander Wilson of Campvere, in the Netherlands, 
and Sarah French his wife. They had no family. 

93^. Bower (John), teacher of English in Aberdeen, was 
born in 1750, and died 8th November, 1820. His name is asso- 
ciated with that of the talented but wayward Lord Byron, who 
says of him : " I was sent at five years old or earlier to a school 
kept by Mr. Bowers. It was a school for both sexes. I learned 
little there, except to repeat by rote the first lesson of mono- 
syllables, ' God made Man,' ' Let us love Him,' which I could 
repeat with the most rapid fluency without acquiring a letter." 
We have not the opportunity of comparing this with testimony 
from any other source as to Mr. Bower's teaching ability or 
success in his work. Lord Byron's recollection is simply given 
because it is his, and the sole authority we have. The name of 
Mr. Bower's wife was Ann Touch. Of their two sons, Robert 
was a medical man ; John was the much respected minister of 
Maryculter. 

94. Boyd (Adam), born in 1789, resided originally at Clif- 
ton, near Kelso, and latterly at Cherrytrees, in the same neigh- 
bourhood, inherited from an uncle in 1831. He married Jessie 
Brunton, and died 13th September, 1862. They were parents 
of Jessie B. Boyd or Wilson (95). 

95- Boyd (Jessie B.), daughter of Adam Boyd, of Cherry- 
trees, near Kelso, and Jessie Brunton his wife, married Andrew 



30 



novo — BRAMWKI.F,. 



Wilson, merchant in Leith. Their dauf^htcr (Jessie 15. Wilson) 
married the Rev. Joini Dymock, Free Church, Kenniay. 

gC. Boyd (Fanny Montague), (laii},'hter of General Mossom 
lioyd, of the II. E. I. Co.'s Service, was married 24th September, 
1861, to the Rev. John Robert Turing, now Vicar of ICdwin- 
stowe, in the County of Nottinj^liam. They have issue. 

97. Boyd (General Mossom), fatlier of Fanny M. Hoyd 
or Turing ((j6), entered the service of the H. E. I. Co. in 1795, 
and served as Lieutenant under General Sir James Craig in 
1798. In 1803, he marched with the army under General (after- 
wards Lord) Lake, and was at the capture of the F'ortresses of 
Sarsney, Bajeeghan and Cutchwarra. In August of the same 
year he was at the storming of the F'ort of Allighur, the Battle of 
Delhi, storming of the ravelins of the Fort of Agra, and the 
Battle of Souowarro. In 1804, he was appointed to Colonel 
Greslier's brigade, and detached against the Forts of Imlanee 
and Camnionah, being wounded in action against the former 
fort. As Captain he was with the ist Volunteer Battalion, and 
present at the capture of Port Louis, Isle of F'rance, in Nov- 
ember, 1 810, under General Abercrombie. In 181 6, as Major, 
he commanded the ist Battalion 25th Regiment, N. I. In 1823, 
he was promoted to a Lieut. -Colonelcy, and appointed to raise 
the 65th Regiment, N. I., for general service, and sent in com- 
mand of it to Penang. He became a Colonel in 1P26, and was 
Commandant at Barrackpore. In 1827 he was made Brigadier- 
General, and commanded at Delhi. In 1838, he was made a 
Major-General, and in 1839 was appointed to command the 
Sirhind Division. He became a General in 1856. He was 
married, and left a large family. His death took place 8th April, 
1865. ;\..w- ■■•--••;■■■ :■■.■-■■- ■-••■ ■ -'•'■ 

98. Bramwell (Agnes), daughter of John Bramwell, and 
Jane Taylor his wife, married John Bramwell, of the 92nd 
Highlanders, and was mother of John Bramwell, bank manager, 
Australia. 

99. Bramwell (Jessy Bentley), eldest daughter of John 

Bramwell, bank manager, Australia, and Isobell Littlejohn his 
wife. 



UKAMYVKIJ. — HKOVVN. 



3> 



John 
Ihn his 



loo. Bramwell (John), a native of Sanquhar, son of John 
lirannvcli, (j2iu\ I lif^hlaiuhirs, and A^nes IJrainvvcll his wife, 
manaf^er of the l^ondon (Chartered Hank of Austraha, in Mel- 
bourne, and afterwards of tlie Union Hank ot Australia in 
London, was married 25th January, 1H53, to Isohell Littlejoini, 
third daughter of William Littlejohn, manager of the Aberdeen 
Town and County Hank, and Janet Bentley his wife. He died 
at Harrogate, 8th August, 1S76. They had two sons and one 
daughter. 

loi. Bramwell (John), stock-broker in London (of the firm 
of Alexander Littlejohn & Co.) eldest son of John Hramwell, 
bank manager in Australia, etc., and Isobell Littlejohn his wife. 

102. Bramwell (John), 92nd Highlanders (father of John 
Bramwell, bank manager, Australia), was son of John Hramwell 
of the Hreadalbane Fencibles, and Margaret Campbell his wife. 
He married Agnes Hramwell, daughter of John Bramwell and 
Jane Taylor his wife. 

103. Bramwell (John), of the Breadalbane Fencibles, 
married Margaret Campbell. They were parents of John Hram- 
well, 92nd Highlanders. 

104. Bramwell (John), married Jane Taylor, and had a 
daugliter (Agnes Bramwell) who married John Bramwell, 92nd 
Highlanders. 

105. Bramwell (William), studying at Cambridge (1883), 
younger son of John Hramwell, bank manager, Australia, and 
Isobell Littlejohn his wife. ,. 

106. Brown (Agnes), married Alexander Mackie, and was 
mother of Agnes Mackie or Philip (695). 

107'. Brown (Rev. David), minister of Neilston, afterwards 
at Glasgow, was born in 1663, and was son of Mr. David 
Brown, minister of Craigie. He was licensed by the Presbytery 
of Glasgow, 9th November, 1687, and ordained and settled as 
minister of the Parish of Neilston, 12th March, 1688. From 
Neilston he was translated to Blackfriars Church, Glasgow, in 
October, 1700, where he laboured till his death on the i6th Feb- 



32 



BROWN. 



ruary, 1704. His name appears as a witness a year before, at 
the baptism of a child of Principal Blackwell, with whom he 
must have been nearly connected by marriage. His wife (whose 
name is said to have been Blackwell) survived till the 25th 
February, 171 7. The church historian, Wodrow, says that Mr. 
Brown was '• mighty in prayer, was never out of a preaching 
frame of mind, and was the instrument of awakening many." His 
daughter (Elizabeth) was wife of Provost George Fordyce (349). 
The only son of whom any record has come to us was the Rev. 
David Brown of Belhelvie, who was born about 1695, graduated 
at Glasgow in 1715, and was settled as minister of Peterhead in 
1 72 1. He was translated in 1725 to the Parish of Belhelvie, and 
for nearly twenty years appears to have lived free of reproach ; 
but in 1744 the General Assembly found it to be their duty to 
depose him from the ministry. The sentence, however, was 
removed on his giving satisfactory evidence of penitence, and 
declaring his intention to go abroad. He died loth March, 1751. 
His widow (the Hon. Isobel Fraser, daughter of William Lord 
Salton) died 27th April, 1762. They had four children. 

107'^ Brown (Rev. David), father of the Rev. David Brown 
of Neilston ; graduated at the University of Glasgow m 1645 ; 
was licensed to preach the Gospel in June, 1649, and called to 
the Parish of Craigie, ■ in Ayrshire, being admitted there in 
January, 1650. He was deprived by Act of Parliament and of 
the Privy Council, ist October, 1662, but was indulged in 1669. 
Wodrow says: '* He was esteemed a very godly man, a good 
popular preacher, and termed by many ' the poor folks' 
minister.' " 

108. Brown (Elizabeth), daughter of the Rev. David 
Brown, minister ol the Parish of Neilston, near Paisley, was 
born there 23rd July, 1688. Her father was translated to 
Glasgow in 1700. About the year 1707, when scarcely twenty 
years of age, she became the second wife of George Fordyce, 
merchant, and afterwards Provost of Aberdeen, a widower, two 
of whose daughters were already married. Her mother's name 
was Blackwell. She was nearly related to the Rev. Thomas 
Blackwell, who in 1 700 had come from Paisley to Aberdeen as 



HRUCK — URYDGIiS. 



33 



minister of St. Nicholas Church. It is not unHkely that his doing 
so, led to his young relation's marriage to Provost Fordyce. Her 
married life extended to twenty-seven years, and for as many 
more she was a widow, the wise and faithful guide of a large 
family. She died 30th May, 1760, and the character given on 
her tombstone is amply borne out by other evidence : " Sanctity 
of mind, sweetness of manners and simplicity of heart, a temper 
equally composed and affectionate ; a long life free from stain, 
filled with usefulness, and finished with hope ; such are the 
honours that distinguish her memory, such the reflections that 
delight her children." Her son (the Rev. Dr. James Fordyce) 
long afterwards wrote of her : 

I learned from thee, that virtue's sacred ways 

Beginning in the steadfast fear of God, 
Alone could lead to happiness and praise, 

And lift the soul to His sublime abode. 
Sweet, blessed Saint ! In hours of heaviest woe 

Thy soul resigned, would all my wonder raise, 
So soft, so strong — at once to overflow — 

With tenderest grief, and with devoutest praise. 

109. Bruce (George Barclay), civil engineer, London, son 
of John Bruce, and Mary Jack his wife ; married Helen Norah 
Simpson, daughter of Alexander Hugh Simpson and his wife 
Sarah Halkin. They were parents of Mary Bruce or Little- 
john (hi). 

no. Bruce (John) married Mary Jack. Their son (George 
Barclay Bruce) is a civil engineer in London. 

111. Bruce (Mary), daughter of George Barclay Bruce, civil 
engineer, London, and Helen Norah Simpson his wife, was 
married loth January, 1869, to Alexander Littlejohn, stock- 
broker, London, afterwards of Invercharron, Rossshire. They 
had issue. 

112. Brunton (Jessie), wife of Adam B. Boyd, of Cherry- 
trees, and mother of Jessie B. Boyd or Wilson (95) ; resided 
latterly at Cherrytrees, near Kelso, and died in June, 1862. 

113. Bryd^es (Fanny), only daughter of Sir Henry 
Brydges, of Beddington House, Surrey, and granddaughter of 
General William Tombes Dairy mple, was born in 181 5, and 
married 14th September, 1837, to John Duff Dingwall of 



M 



BRYDGES — CADENHEAD. 



Brucklay, Corsindae, etc., in Aberdeenshire. She died at South- 
ampton J jth July, 1840, and was followed to the grave three 
months later by her husband. They left no children. 

114^ Brydges (Sir Henry), of Beddington House, Surrey, 
Knt., married a daughter of General William T. Dalrymple. 
They were the parents of Fanny Brydges or Dingwall (113). 

114'^ Buchanan (Helen Graham), daughter of Robert 
Buchanan, merchant in Glasgow, and Margaret Dunlop his 
wife, was married to Lieutenant-Colonel Edward E. Haines, of 
the g2nd Foot, and died in 1873. They had one son and four 
daughters. 

114^ Buchanan (Robert), merchant in Glasgow, son of 
Thomas Buchanan of Ardoch, in Dunbartonshire, and Helen 
Graham his wife ; married Margaret Dunlop, daughter of Mr. 
Dunlop, of Annanhill, in Ayrshire. They were the parents of 
Helen G. Buchanan or Haines (114''^). [The estate of Ardoch in 
the Parish of Kilmaronock in Dunbartonshire, was acquired in 
1693, by William Buchanan, descended from the family of 
Carbeth. Helen Graham mentioned above was a daughter of 
William Graham of Birdstone]. 

115. Burgess Bland (Sir James, Bart.), of "^eauport, in 
Sussex, son of Geoige Burgess, Comptroller Genaral of Customs 
in Scotland, by a daughter of Lord Somerville, was born 1752. 
He had three wives, the last, to whom he was married 8th Sept- 
ember, 181 2, being Lady Margaret Fordyce, formerly Lindsay. 
They had no children. His character in respect to Lady Margaret 
is presented in a very amiable light. 

116. Oadenhead (Alexander), advocate in Aberdeen, and 
Procurator-Fiscal for forty years, born 4th April, 1786, v/as the 
eldest son of John Cadenhead, gardener in Aberdeen, his 
mother's name being Anna Bonnar. He was married on the 9th 
August, 1 81 7, to Jane Shirrefs, second daughter of the Rev. Dr. 
James Shirrefs, one of the ministers of Aberdeen, and Amelia 
Morison his wife. She died in 1832 ; he survived till 3rd July, 
1854. They were parents of Alexander S. Cadenhead (119), five 
other sons and two daughters. 



'J 



CADENHEAD. 



35 



117. Oadenhead (Alexander), eldest son of Alexander 
Shirrefs Cadenhead and Mary Arbutlmott Dingwall Fordyce his 
wife; had planing works for some years at Larlington, Ontario, 
wliere he was married 19th September, 1877, ^^ Mary Murray 
Keefer, elder daughter of Nelson Keefer of that place, and 
Mary Hodge Ballantine his wife ; removed in 1884 to Midland 
on the Georgian Bay. Has issue. 

118. Oadenhead (Alexander Dingwall Fordyce), eldest 
son of Alexander Cadenhead (117), and Mary Murray Keefer his 
wife. 

119. Oadenhead (Alexander Shirrefs), third son of Alex- 
ander Cadenhead, advocate in Aberdeen, and Jane Shirrefs his 
wife ; born 3rd July, 1823, attended the elementary school 
taught in Aberdeen by Mr. Alexander Smith, the Grammar 
School and Marischal College there. Two brothers having pre- 
ceded him, he became a settler in 1841 in the township of Nichol, 
Upper Canada; and on the 31st May, 1850, was married to 
Mary Arbuthnott, youngest daughter of Alexander Dingv/ail 
Fordyce of Fergus, and Magdalen Dingwall his wife. He re- 
sided for many years at Fergus, where he acted as Division 
Court Clerk for a time ; occupying a similar position for a year 
or two at Ancaster. In 1870, he was appointed Crown Land 
Agent for the County of Wellington; but in 1881, having dis- 
posed of his property in Fergus, he removed to the Parry Sound 
District, where he remained, occupying himself with the improve- 
ment of his bush farm till his sudden death, which took place 
22nd May, 1883, at his residence near Stirling Falls in the 
Township of Strong. Wherever he was known he was highly 
respected as an upright, useful good man. He was for some 
years a member of the School Board and Municipal Council in 
Fergus : his wife survived him ten months. They had nine 
children, the youngest son and daughter residing with them at 
liis death. Three children had died in infancy. He had been 
for many years an elder in the Presbyterian Church. 

120'. Oadenhead (Arthur Dingwall), second son of Alex- 
ander Shirrefs Cadephead, of Fergus, Ontario, and Mary A. 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife, was employed for some years in 



36 



CAUKNHKAD. 



lumbering establishments in Ontario; became afterwards a settler 
in Manitoba, near Morris. He remained three years or so, 
acting during part of the time as a Municipal Councillor, and 
then became manager of the estates of Mr. Alexander Drysdale 
in the Parish of Saint Ann, Jamaica, and while there was mar- 
ried 22nd September, 1883, to Emma Josephine Clarke, younger 
daughter of Benjamin Clarke, J. P., of Camden East, Ontario, 
and Amantha Barnes his wife. The name of Dingwall was not 
given in baptism. 

i2o^ Cadenhead (Edith), second daughter of Alexander 
Cadenhead, and Mary Murray Keefet his wife. 

121. Cadenhead (EHzabeth), elder daughter of Alexander 
Shirrefs Cadenhead and Mary A. Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
returned from the Parry Sound District, where her father lat- 
t'^irly lived, shortly after his death, and has since resided near 
Fergus. 

122. Cadenhead (George Morison), sixth son of Alex- 
ander Shirrefs Cadenhead of Fergus, latterly of Parry Sound 
District, and Mary A. Dingwall Fordyce his wife, took up land 
in the Township of Strong with the view of settling there ; but 
leit that district shortly after his father's death in 1883. 

123. Cadenhead (James Brebner), third son of Alexander 

Shirrefs Cadenhead (119) and Mary A. D. Fordyce his wife, 
born 2ist February, 1862; died 12th February, 1864. 

124. Cadenhead (James Shirrefs), fourth son of Alex- 
ander Shirrefs Cadenhead, and Mary A. D. Fordyce his wife, 
born 1 6th February, 1855; died nth August same year. 

125. Cadenhead (John), gardener in Aberdeen, Scotland, 
born 1 6th September, 1750, was a son of Alexander Cadenhead 
in Westfield, Parish of Peterculter, Aberdeenshire, and his wife, 
whose name was Aitken. He married gth October, 1784, Anna 
Bonnar, daughter of Andrew Bonnar, Schoolmaster, Nigg, Kin- 
cardineshire, and Katharine Low his wife. They were parents 
of Alexander Cadenhead (116), another son and three daughters. 
He died 23rd March, 1829, his widow in 1836. 

126. Cadenhead (John Arbuthnott), fifth son of Alex- 
ander Shirrefs Cadenhead and Mary A. D. Fordyce his wife. 



CADENHEAU — CARTHEW. 



37 



became a settler in Manitoba, near Morris; is a Provincial Land 
Surveyor, and was employed in surveys in the North-West, etc., 
in 1883 and 1884. 

127. Oadenhead (Magdalen Dingwall), second daughter 

of Alexander Shirrefs Cadenhead of Fergus and Mary A. 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born 27th June 1866 ; died 20th 
August, 1867. 

128. Cadenhead (Mary), eldest daughter of Alexander 
Cadenhead, and Mary M. Keefer his wife. 

129. Cadenhead (Nela(||n Keefer), second son of Alexander 
Cadenhead, and Mary M. Keefer his wife. 

130. Campbell (Margaret), wife of John Bramwell, of the 
Breadalbane Fencibles, and paternal grandmother of John 
Bramwell, bank manager (100). 

131. Campbell (Lady Margaret), eldest daughter of James 
second Earl of Loudon, and Lady Margaret Montgomery his 
wife, was married to Colin third Earl of Balcarres, and was 
mother of two successive Earls of Balcarres, and of two daugh- 
ters. Her father suffered much during the persecuting period in 
Scotland, and was obliged to leave his native country, dying in 
exile at Leyden in the year 1684 after having imdergone many 
hardships. Her grandfather, John first Earl of Loudon, who 
died in 1663, had actively opposed King Charles I.'s unconsti- 
tutional attempts to force Episcopacy on Scotland. For ten 
years he held the office of Lord High Treasurer and First Com- 
missioner of the Treasury'. He was an honour to his name and 
an ornament to the nation. 

132*. Carruthers (Richard), Lieutenant-Colonel of the 
2nd or Queen's Royal Regiment and C. B., was married 17th 
May, 1838, to Margaret Dingwall, fifth daughter of Alexander 
Dingwall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wife, and 
had issue. 

132'. Carthew (Dr.), residing near Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T., 
Canada, married 25th May, 1884, to Angelica Caroline EHzabeth 
Harvey, daughter of Alexander Harvey (555), and Matilda Shade 
his wife. 



38 



CHALMRRS. 



133'. Chalmers (James), eldest son of James Chalmers, 
printer and publisher of the Aberdeen journal, and Susannah 
Trail his wife, was born in 1742. On his father's death in 1764 
he took up his business (at first along witi. his mother), carrying 
on the yonrnal while he lived, to which in 1771 was added the 
publication of the ^i6'r^/^e« Almanac. His father had printed 
an almanac almost thirty years before ; but from the latter date 
it was regularly carried on and greatly improved. The journal 
was conducted with ability, and in his own hands and those of 
his son and grandson maintained its respectability. His death 
took place 17th June, 1810. His wife, Margaret Douglas, to 
whom he was married 22nd March, 1769, was a daughter of 
David Douglas, of Panton Street, London, and Katharine 
Forbes his wife, whose father, Sheriff Forbes, was a son of the 
family of Edit. They were parents of Jean Chalmers or Little- 
john (134), and of several other sons and daughters. Among 
their grandsons may be mentioned the earnest evangelist and 
missionary to China Mr. William C. Burns, the Rev. Dr. J. C. 
Burns of Kirkliston, formerly of London Wall (incidentally 
noticed, 400) ; the Rev. Dr. Islay Burns, Professor of Divinity, 
Free Church College, Glasgow; Rev. Dr. D. Brown, Principal, 
Free Church College, Aberdeen, one of the authors of a valu- 
able Commentary on the Scriptures ; and Mr. William Dyce, 
R.A., painter of historical subjects in the British Houses of Par- 
liament. Some further particulars will be found in the 
Appendix. 

133''. Chalmers (James), merchant in Aberdeen, father of 
jean Chalmers or Dingwall (135), died before her marriage, 
which took place in 1721. He would appear to have been a near 
relative of Dr. Patrick Chalmers, of whom some particulars will 
be found in the Appendix. 

134. Chalmers (Jean), daughter of James Chalmers, printer 
?Lnd ^\xh\\s\\ex oi the Aberdeen jfoitrnal, and Margaret Douglas 
his wife, married James Littlejohn, builder, and was mother of 
WiUiam Littlejohn (687). 

135. Chalmers (Jean), second wife of Arthur Diqgwall of 
Brownhill, afterwards of Lescraigie in the Parish of Monwhit- 



'!i;:i' 



Dl-; CHESNEL — CLARK. 



39 



ter, Aberdeenshire, to whom she was married in 1721 (contract 
dated 15th June), was daughter of James Chahners, merchant in 
Aberdeen. Two of the witnesses to the marriage contract were 
Drs. Patrick and George Chalmers ; and at the baptism of a 
child (George Dingwall) next year, Dr. George Chalmers, physi- 
cian in Aberdeen, and Mr. George Chalmers, writer in Edinburgh, 
were witnesses. Jean Chalmers probably died in 1 751, in which 
year her will was recorded. It was presented for registration 
by James Dingwall, perhaps a son ; but, if so, one of whom we 
have no other notice. 

136^ Ohesnel De (Marquis), Lieutenant-Colonel Pyrenees 
Orientales Legion of Light Infantry, married 15th September, 
1819, to Mary Louisa Bentham, eldest daughter of Brigadier- 
General Sir Samuel Bentham, R.S.G., and Sophia Fordyce his 
wife. ,,/ 

136-', Clarke (Benjamin), ninth son of Colonel Matthew 
Clarke of Ernestown, Ontario, and Ann McCoy his wife, resid- 
ing at Camden East, formerly Clarke's Mills, Ontario ; carried 
on mercantile business there at one time — is Postmaster and J. P.; 
married Amantha Barnes. They are parents of Emma Josephine 
Clarke or Cadenhead (137-'.) 

137'. Clarke (General Edward), H. E. I. Co.'s Service, 

father of Sophia Clarke, Barnett or Fordyce (138). 

137-'. Clarke (Emma Josephine), younger daughter of Ben- 
jamin Clarke of Camden East, Ontario, postmaster, and Amantha 
Barnes his wife, was married at Annandale, Jamaica, West 
Indies, 22nd September, 1883, to Arthur (Dingwall) Cadenhead, 
manager of the estates of Bogue and Arthur Seat in the Parish 
of Saint Ann's, Jamaica. 

137^ Clarke (Matthew), a native of Duchess County, State 
of New York, was born there 3rd October, 1771. He was the 
eldest son of Robert Clarke (of whom a brief sketch will be found 
in the Appendix), and his wife Isobel Ketchum. In the year 
1784 he accompanied his mother and her other children to 
Canada, his father's property having been lost through his join- 
ing the Loyalists. He became a Colonel of Militia and Justice 
of the Peace, and by his wife Anne McCoy, stepdaughter of 



40 



CLARK li — CKOMHIK. 



ii 



t i 



Colonel Johnson, had twelve sons, the ninth being Benjamin 
Clarke of Camden East (136-). 

138. Clarke (Sophia), daughter of General E?l ward Clarke, 
of the H. E. I. Co.'s Service, was married on the 12th Septem- 
ber, 1829, to Lieutenant (afterwards General) Sir John Fordyce, 
K.C.B. She died 6th November, 1830. They had no family. 
She had been married previously to Mr. Barnett, of the H. E. I. 
Co.'s Civil Service. 

139. Oock (Margaret), daughter of Robert Cock (140), was 
born in 1745, and was married before 1768 to Robert Doig, 
manufacturer, Dundee. She was the mother of the Rev. Robert 
Doig of Aberdeen. 

I40^ Oock (Robert), father of Margaret Cock or Doig (139) 
was born in 1710. His father, James Cock, was a manufacturer 
who was born in 1676. His mother, Isobel Doig, who was 
born in 1685, was the daughter of the Rev. Mr. Doig, minister 
of Chapelshade, Dundee. 

140". Constable (Helen), born in 1750, was married in 
October, 1776, to the Rev. William Moir, mmister of Fyvie, had 
a daughter (Catharine Jane Moir or Dingwall, 724), and died 
26th February, 181 7. 

141. Cooper (Agnes), niece and sole heiress of James 
Hunter of Darrahill, Middle Ardo and Gateside, Aberdeenshire, 
was married to John Chambers, afterwards John Chambers 
Hunter of Tillery, Auchiries and Coldwells in the same county, 
and was mother of William Chambers Hunter of Tillery, etc. 

142. Crombie (Annabella Forbes), daughter of James 
Crombie, manufacturer in Aberdeen, and Katharine Scott Forbes 
his wife, was married i8th August, 1870, to William Littlejohn, 
bank agent, Stonehaven, who died in 1878. They had four 
children. ■ ; : ■ . : : ;* 

143. Crombie (James), manufacturer at Grandholm Mills, 
Aberdeen, married Katharine Scott Forbes. Their daughters, 
Annabella Forbes and Jane, married respectively William and 
David Littlejohn (688, 669). The subject of this notice was son 
of James Crombie and Katharine Harvey. 



CROMIUR— GUMMING. 



41 



144. Orombie (James), married Katliarine Harvey. They 
were parents of James Crombie, manufacturer, Grandholm Mills. 

145. Orombie (Jane), daughter of James Crombie, manu- 
facturer, Grandholm Mills, Aberdeen, and Katharine Scott 
Forbes his wife, was married 29th August, 1872, to David Little- 
john, now Sheriff Clerk of Aberdeenshire. They have issue. 

146. Oruickshank (Rachel), elder daughter of Gavin 
Cruickshank, shipmaster in Aberdeen, and Elspet Milne his wife, 
was baptized 12th March, 1706, and married in December, 1735, 
to James Young, stocking merchant in Aberdeen. .She died on 
the 1 6th February, 1784. They had three sons and three 
daugliters, of whom William the eldest became Provost of Aber- 
deen, and is more particularly referred to in the Appendix; 
James the youngest (in 953). Captain Gavin Cruickshank, the 
father of Rachel Cruickshank or Young, is believed to have been 
lost with his vessel previous to 1 718. It is said that for twelve 
months from the time his ship was expected to return his wife 
went every day to the Castle Hill (from which an extensive view 
of the bay can be had) to watch for his return. She died in 

1734- 

147'. Oummingf (Henrietta), wife of the Rev. Dr. James 
Fordyce, was born in 1734. Her parents both died when she 
was young. Little is left on record regarding her father beyond 
the statement that by undue indulgence of his tastes and inclina- 
tions, his widow and their two children were left at his death 
with very limited means of support. The son appears to have 
got a Herald's place in the Lyon office. Good principles are 
said to have been instilled into the daughter's mind by her 
mother, and the judicious training given during her life was 
subsequently carried on by Mrs. Baron Muir (who was a relative) 
from the time she was ten years old. It is said that she excelled 
in music and fancy-work ; had a decided taste for drawing, and 
wrote poetry with ease and intelligence. Besides these, a pub- 
lished sketch of her life says that her piety was unostentatious 
and practical. On Mrs. Muir's death she was invited to reside 
with the Countess of Balcarres. Lady Anne Barnard, one of the 
Countess's daughters, gives a lively description of the family 



42 



CUMMINC. 



circle at Halcarres at the time, and of Henrietta Gumming when 
she became an inmate there. The younger sister, Lady Mar- 
garet, became greatly endeared to her. The clever Lady Anne 
in the sketch she gives makes the most of some features of char- 
acter, which were particularly observable then in Miss Gumming. 
To use her own words : " There was a young woman, or rather 
a young lady, to whom I dare hardly, even at this moment give 
the title of governess. So perfectly fantastic was she ; so unlike 
the others, and wild, that ' when nature made her, sure she 
broke the mould.' My mother had found her weeping and 
painting butterflies in the garret of a house where she lodged for 
a few days in Edmburgh, the mistress of which, who was her 
aunt, treating her with a severity which she said was good for 
her proud little ridiculous niece. Henrietta, indifferent about her 
good or bad treatment, wept because she was not placed, she 
said, in the sphere of life for which she was formed. She boasted 
that in her veins descended the blood of some old Highland 
Chief. Pride had sailed down with the stream, and she reckoned 
herself more highly born than if she had been one of the House 
of Austria. She sang sweetly, and wrote and worked well. My 
mother (Lady Anne continues) was amused with the variety of 
her uncultivated talents, and formed the plan of carrying her to 
Balcarres, in a sort of nondescript situation. At first she had 
her meals with my mother's maid, tears flowed, she starved her- 
self, and, in order to make her happy she was permitted to dine 
with the family. In return she taught us such things for her 
own amusement, as Maigaret and I were then capable of 
learning. By degrees she rendered herself of use, maintaining 
at the same time her independence. She was fantastic in her 
dress, and naive in her manner, beyond what was natural at her 
time of life. Her countenance was pretty, and her shape neat ; 
but in that casket were lodged powers of every kind, good as 
well as bad, powers of attaching, powers of injuring, powers of 
generous magnanimity, obstinacy, prejudice, romance, and 
occasionally of enthusiastic devotion." Such is Lady Anne Bar- 
nard's account of Miss Gumming, for which we are indebted to 
Lord Lindsay, in his account of the family. It appears that a 
school acquaintance had sprung up between Miss Gumming and 



CUNNIN<;il AM. 



43 



a sister of Dr. James Fordyce, Tins led to his seeiii}.,' her letters 
and to a stronj^ desire to get further accjuainted. They cor- 
responded by letter, but did not meet for two years. When they 
did, favourable prepossessions we are told were confirmed on 
both sides. From some unexplained motive, iiowevt^r, Miss Gum- 
ming managed to protract the time for their iniion, which at last 
was brought about by a little stratagem on the part of Lady 
Balcarres, when they were on a visit to the Doctor's brother, 
Mr. Alexander Fordyce, who had been married the year before 
to Lady Margaret Lindsay, Miss Cumming's former pupil. The 
marriage took place 2nd May, 1771, and it seems to have called 
into action the finer traits of what must have been a strangely 
mixed charac_3r; considering the accounts given by different 
individuals. Her husband's loss of fortune through the deplor- 
able bankruptcy of his brother even strengthened the bond of 
attachment, and for a quarter of a century tiiey lived happily 
together. They had no family. In a volume of miscellaneous 
poems published in 1786 an Elegy to a tame Red-breast picking 
crumbs from the table while Mrs. Fordyce was confined to bed, 
contains these lines by her husband : 

What are thy looks to hers, where reason beams, 

Where sentiment and truth and virtue meet ? 

What is thy sprightliest sport to hers who seems 

The very child of unaffected wit ? 

Thy song indeed is lively, through the ear 

With sweetest notes it thrills — but then, my friend, 

Thou canst not touch the inward soul like her — 

Nor sweetness with expression finely blend : 

Nor canst thou join with me in social talk, 

Thou canst not speak the feelings of the heart, 

Nor mark the beauties of the rural walk 

And tender thoughts and pleasing smiles impart. 

A female relative of her husband's with a daughter resided witii 
Mrs. Fordyce during her widowhood. She died loth January, 
1823. 

14 f. Cunningham (Anne), second wife of Sir Robert 
Dalrymple, of Castleton, Kt., and mother of Anne, Countess 
of Balcarres, was the eldest daughter of Sir William Cunning- 
ham of Caprington, Bart., and his wife Dame Janet Dick, 
heiress of Prestonf^eld. 



44 



CURLING — CIIVII.LIKR. 



14H. Ourling (Henry), Lieutenant, 52n(l Rej^amcnt of Foot, 
married in January, 1832, Sarah Dingwall, tenth daughter of 
Alexander Dingwall, afterwards of Rannieston, and Janet Aber- 
crombie his wife ; and had issue. 

149. Curtis (Joseph), of St. John's, Wapping, London, son 
of James Curtis of the same place and his first wife, Sarah 
Clouden, of Croydon, in Surrey, married Mary Tennant, and died 
in 1771, leaving several sons, and a daughter Mary Curtis or 
Yates (150). 

150. Ourtis (Mary), only daughter of Joseph Curtis, of St. 
John's, VVapping, Middlesex, and Mary Tennant his wife, 
married John Yates, of St. Sepulchre's, London, and was mother 
of Harriet Yates or Dingwall (937''). She was a sister of Sir 
William Curtis, of Culland's Grove, Middlesex, Bart., Alderman 
of London. 

151. Ouvillier (Austin), merchant in Montreal, residing 
latterly in London, England, where he died in February, 1872, 
was son of the Hon. Austin Cuvillier, Speaker of the Legislative 
Assembly of Lower Canada, and his wife whose name was Per- 
rault. He married Charlotte Ericsen, sister of John Eric 
Ericsen, F.R.S., Surgeon Extraordinary to Queen Victoria. 
They were the parents of Charlotte Agnes Claire Cuvillier or 
Eraser (153). 

152. Ouvillier (Hon. Austin), a well-known merchant in 
Montreal, was born in Quebec, married Mademoiselle Perrault 
of Montreal, and died there of cholera nth July, 1849. His son 
Austin Cuvillier, was father of Charlotte Agnes Claire Cuvillier 
or F'raser (153). From Morgan's Sketches of Celebrated Charac- 
ters (1862) we learn that "In 1815 Mr. Cuvillier was returned 
to the Provincial Legislature as member for the County of Hunt- 
ingdon, and there his eminent financial abilities displayed 
themselves. In 1828 he was delegated along with the Hon. D. 
B.Viger and Hon. John Neilson, to lay before the Imperial Par- 
liament the petition of 87,000 inhabitants of Lower Canada, 
complaining of the privation of political rights. He sat as member 
for Huntingdon till 1834. 1" ^^41 ^^ ^^^ first election of members 
of Parliament for United Canada, he was again returned for 



CUVII.LIKR — DANVKKS. 



45 



Hun j?Hon, and was elected Speaker of the Lej^'islative 
Assembly, filling the office with great dignity and impartiality 
during the first Parliament. As a merchant he conducted 
perhaps the most extensive commercial establishment in Canada. 
In whatever country he had been born, or in whatever sphere he 
might have moved, his talents would have appeared, and he 
could scarcely have failed to rise to eminence." 

153. Ouvillier (Charlotte Agnes Olaire), daughter of 
Austin Cuvillier, merchant in Montreal, ami Charlotte Ericsen 
his wife, was married 28th May, 1870, to Arthur Abraham 
Fraser (467), and has issue. 

154. Dalrymple (Anne), wife of James fifth Earl of Bal- 
carres, was born 25th December, 1727. At the age of twenty- 
two she was married, her husband being fifty-eight years of age. 
They had a large family. Her father. Sir Robert Dalrymple of 
Castleton, Kt., was son of Sir Hugh Dalrymple of North Berwick 
Lord President of the Court of Session. Her mother, Anne 
Cunningham, was daughter of Sir William Cunningham of Cap- 
rington by Janet Dick, heiress of Prestonfield. 

155'. Dalrymple (Sir Robert), of Castleton, Kt., eldest 
son of Sir Hew Dalrymple, of North Berwick, Bart., Lord Pre- 
sident of the Court of Session, by Maria Hamilton his wife, 
died before his father. He was twice married, his first wife 
being Johanna Hamilton, only child of John, Master of Bargeny ; 
his second (the mother of his family) Anne Cunningham, daugh- 
ter of Sir William Cunningham of Caprington, by his wife Dame 
Janet Dick of Prestonfield. 

155^. Dalrymple ( ), daughter of General Wil- 
liam Tombes Dalrymple, and wife of Sir Henry Brydges, of 
Beddington House, Surrey, Kt. (114). 

155^ Dalrymple (General William Tombes), father of 

Lady Brydges (wife of Sir Henry Brydges, Kt., of Beddington 
House, Surrey) died before 1840. ^ 

156. Danvers (Prances Kathleen), daughter of Juland 

Danvers, and wife of Charles Arthur Dingwall, wine merchant 
in London, to whom she was married 12th November, 1879, and 
has issue. 



46 



DAN VERS — DINGWALL. 



I 






157. Danvers (Juland), father of Frances Kathleen Dan- 
vers or Dingwall (156). 

158. Dauney (Mary), believed to have been the daughter 
of a farmer at Kirktown of Newmachar, was born in 1738, mar- 
ried to William Littlejohn, builder and Baillie, Aberdeen, had 
issue and died 28th May, 1797. 

159. Davidson (Duncan), of Tillychetly, Aberdeenshire, 
and of Inchmarlo, Kincardineshire, the latter property being 
acquired by purchase, was for many years an advocate in Aber- 
deen. He married Fanny Pirie, daughter of Patrick Pirie, 
merchant in Aberdeen, and Margaret Smith his wife, and had 
issue. 

160. Davidson (Margaret Jane), daughter of Duncan 

Davidson, of Inchmarlo, Kincardineshire, and Fanny Pirie his 
wife ; was married 6th August, 1850, to Arthur Fraser, merchant 
in Java (466), who died in 1881. They had three sons and two 
daughters. Resides in London. 

161. Dickson (Jane), wife of John Topp of the Parish of 
Bourtie, Aberdeenshire, and mother of Rachel Topp or White 

(887). 

162. Dingwall (Adam), fourth son of Arthur Dingwall of 
Brownhill, in the Parish of Monwhitter, and Lucretia Irvine his 
wife; baptized i April, 1683. 

163. Dingwall (Agnes), fourth daughter of Baillie John 
Dingwall of Rannieston, and Mary Lumsden his wife ; baptized 
23rd July, 1764; married i6th July, 1794, to George Thomson of 
Fairley and Ythan Lodge, Aberdeenshire, formerly a captain in 
the Merchant Service, had issue, and died 25th January, 1850. 

164. Dingwall (Agnes), third daughter of Alexander Ding- 
wall, stocking manufacturer, Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Douglass 
his wife ; born -♦^h February, 1785; married nth November, 
1819, the Rev. Robert Doig, one of the ministers of St. Nicholas, 
Aberdeen. They had no family. Her husband died in 1824. 
She resided latterly in Edinburgh and died gth April, 1854. 
Warm hearted and kindly disposed, a humble-minded Christian. 



DINGWALL. 



47 



165. Dingwall (Agnes), sixth daughter of Alexander 
Dingwall of Rannieston, postmaster of Aberdeen, and Janet 
Abercrombie his wife, was married 13th November, 1828, to 
Thomas Blaikie (of the firm of John Blaikie and Sons, Aber- 
deen), afterwards Sir Thomas Blaikie, Kt., and Provost of 
Aberdeen, and had issue. She survived her husband and resides 
in London. 

166. Dingwall (Agnes Maud), second daughter of Charles 
Dingwall, wine merchant in London, and Julia Blanche Drew 
his wife, was married 23rd October, 1878, to Charles Lang 
Huggins, stockbroker, London. They have issue. 

167. Dingwall (Alexander), baptized 8th March, 171 5, 
third son of Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill, and Sarah Murray 
his wife. » ' 

168. Dingwall (Alexander), fourth son of William Ding- 
wall of Brucklay in Aberdeenshire and Anna Gordon his wife, 
was a cabinet maker at Charing Cross, London. He appears to 
have died in the end of 1779. 

169. Dingwall (Alexander), the second surviving son of 
William Dingwall and Jean Fordyce of Culsh his second wife, 
was born 25th November, 1748, and served an apprenticeship m 
the hosiery business to his uncle, John Dingwall of Rannieston. 
In the year 1769 he entered into partnership with William 
Forbes, afterwards of Echt. The partnership was for nineteen 
years, but must have been dissolved much earlier ; as in 1776 he 
was again associated with his uncle and former master as a 
partner. When this partnership expired he carried on business 
on his own account, travelling frequently abroad in connection 
with it, having customers and correspondents in Amsterdam, 
Rotterdam, Brussels, etc. The following entry was made by 
him on the 14th of June, 1770, the day his brother was married, 
and when he had been a very short time out of his apprentice- 
ship : "My mother, Mrs. Jean Fordyce, having granted to my 
brother, Arthur Dingwall Fordyce, a factory during her lifetime 
of the lands and estate of Culsh, wherein she burthened him in 
the payment to me yearly of the sum of £'344 Scots, on account 
of the provision left me otherways by my father being but small ; 



0^. 



n 



-^ 



48 



DINGWALL. 



I 1 



and now, seeing that I am tolerably well provided, however, and 
that I .hink it rather too heavy a burthen on my brother to pay 
the whole of the ;^344, I have agreed to give up ;^i75 of said 
;^344, restricting myself to £168, commencing first six months 
payment at the term of Martinmas." His mother resided with 
him while she lived — in 1773 in the Backwynd, probably there 
till her death in 1778. About that time he purchased the pro- 
perty in the Gallowgate, where he subsequently resided. On 
the 28th September, 1780, he was married at Inchmarlo to Eli- 
zabeth Douglass, youngest daughter of John Douglass of 
Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo and Mary Arbuthnott his wife. In the 
year 1786 he had the honour of an informal introduction to His 
Majesty King George III. when on a visit to Dr. John Douglass, 
Dean of Windsor, afterwards Bishop of Salisbury, to whom his 
wife was related. In a letter to her on the 20th September of 
that year, he says: "I spent Sabbath at Dr. Douglass's, was at 
church, where the King sits, twice ; and in the morning, coming 
down from church. His Majesty spoke to Dr. Douglass and asked 
who I was. He told him I was a merchant from Scotland, 
returning from abroad. I made a bow as he passed, which he 
retnrned." Although of a contented disposition^ and having no 
reason to complain of want of success in business, desirous even 
that should his two sons live till sufficiently grown up, they 
should follow it also ; he did at one time make application for a 
position which would have allowed him to be more with his 
family, to whom he was much attached. The postmaster of 
Aberdeen, Mr. William Murray, having resigned, application 
was made on his behalf by Dr. Douglass, who had been just 
appointed Bishop of Carlisle. The issue was so singular that it 
may be given in the Bishop's words in a letter dated 25th 
October, 1787: "When you mentioned your views toward the 
place of postmaster of j^our town, I very honestly expressed my 
ideas of my inability to assist them. The moment that I was so 
unexpectedly called from my obscurity and promoted to a station 
that was to give me a seat in the House of Peers, I thought of 
you, and having called upon Mr. Todd, I mentioned my inten- 
tions of applying to the Postmaster-General for the postmaster's 
place of a town in Scotland. Mr. Todd, asking me what town. 



DINGWALL 



49 



I mentioned Aberdeen. Upon this he told me that he was sorry 
to tell me I was too late, for that the old postmaster had lately 
retired, and a new one been appointed by the interest of Mr. 
Dundas, the Solicitor-General for Scotland. My curiosity 
having led me to ask who was appointed, he sent for his clerk, 
and on turning to the book I heard the name of Mr. Alexander 
Dingwall. I could not avoid expressing my joy, crying out that 
Mr. Alexander Dingwall was the very person for whom I inter- 
ested myself. I am heartily glad that you have gained your 
object." After all, the appointment had not been in favour of 
the subject of this notice, but of his cousin, Mr. Alexander 
Dingwall (170), afterwards of Rannieston. He was naturally of 
a delicate constitution, compelled for years to visit goat whey 
quarters, then in great repute. In the circumstances, exposure 
such as is described in a " Narrative of his own Life," by an 
octogenarian of the name of John D. Tough, must have been 
exceedingly trying. That individual had been in his employ- 
ment for a year or two before his death, and after describing 
various changes, says : " I then went to Mr. Alexander Ding- 
wall to the hosier business (being accustomed when at school to 
go to his warehouse in my spare hours and stitch hose), I tra- 
velled with him and for him till his death. In 1795 we set out 
on the 8th of January, and reached Brechin same evening, a 
heavy fall of snow took place. We next morning started by 
four o'clock, and rode to Mr. John Niven's at Peebles, about 
four miles above Arbroath. The storm continuing, we stopped 
there some days, the roads being blocked up. On hearing that 
Colonel Leith was getting the road cut for him on his way to 
Edinburgh, Mr. Dingwall got it cut between Peebles and 
Arbroath; the storm increasing, we stopped in Arbroath until 
the Marquis of Huntly came up three days after, having got the 
road cut for him. We then proceeded to Edinburgh in his rear, 
where we arrived 17th current. We stopped there until the 28th. 
The frost setting in, we proceeded to Glasgow where we were 
storm-staid six days. We lodged in the Star Inn. The Duke 
of Argyle arrived there the same evening, likewise storm-staid. 
On the seventh day we rode to Balfron, and next day returned to 
Glasgow. On our way betwixt Paisley and Glasgow we observed 



li 



I ! 



I :l 



50 



DINGWALL. 



a man sitting on his cart, seemingly asleep. My master asked 
me to turn and awake him. Being near the toll by the time I 
returned, the horse and cart had stopped at the toll-house : the 
people coming out found the man was dead by the intensity of 
the frost. We then went to Irvine, Ayr, Kilmarnock, and some 
other small places ; then returning to Glasgow, we came by 
Cumbernauld to Stirling, from whence to Edinburgh where we 
stopped, setting out for Aberdeen on the 23rd April, and arrived 
on the 26th current without seeing within two feet of the earth. 
It was the longest and most severe storm in the memory of any 
man." He adds: "Mr. Dingwall's death was my great loss. 
He was a very kind and indulgent master to me." His compa- 
ratively early death, however, was not the effect of exposure or 
of a weak constitution, but the result of a fall from a ladder 
while improvements were being made on his house. His leg 
was broken, and notwithstanding most careful and skilful treat- 
ment, lock-jaw coming on, death ensued on the 3rd of July, 1796. 
The year before his death he and his brother had purchased the 
lands of Annochie and Elrick in the Parish of Old Deer, his half 
of which by settlement he made just before his death was left in 
trust for behalf of his family; but the heritable title being incom- 
plete, the property was not actually enjoyed. He was of a quiet, 
composed disposition ; a good son, a warm-hearted husband 
and father ; a kind friend and a considerate master, so that his 
death was much and very justly mourned. He was moderately 
successful in business, and being of inexpensive habits his family 
were comfortably provided for. One child had died in his life- 
time. At his death, besides his widow, six others were left, two 
sons and four daughters. When his widow died in 181 3 only 
three survived. The son died unmarried. The elder daughter, 
Agnes, married the Rev. Robert Doig, of Aberdeen. She had 
no family. The younger, Magdalen, was married to her cousin, 
Alexander Dingwall Fordyce, latterly of Fergus, Upper Canada, 
where she died in 1846, being the mother of the compiler of this 
record and other children. 

170. Dingwall (Alexander), merchant and postmaster o 
Aberdeen, who succeeded to the estate of Rannieston on the death 
of his elder brother in 1836, was born 17th March, 1767. He 



DINGWALI.. 



51 



, two 
only 

filter, 
had 



was the sixth son of Bailhe John Dingwall of Rannieston and 
Mary Lumsden his wife ; and by a reference in the notice of 
Alexander Dingwall (169), his appointment as postmaster must 
have been as early as 1787. On the 19th of November, 1792, he 
was married to Janet Abercrombie, daughter of Provost John 
Abercrombie of Aberdeen and Katharine Forbes his wife. They 
had a large family. He resided at Spring Garden, Aberdeen, 
and died i8th May, 1840. 

171. Dingwall (Alexander), sixth son of Baillie John Ding- 
wall, jun'r, and Magdalen Duff his wife, was born in 1771. He 
is said to have gone to the West Indies, and to have died there. 

172. Dingwall (Alexander), second but oldest surviving 
son of Alexander Dingwall of Rannieston and Janet Aber- 
crombie his wife was born 2nd November, 1795. He was 
postmaster of Aberdeen, but died before his father (who had 
held the same situation) leaving two children by his wife, Isabella 
Matthewson, to whom he had been married 22nd March, 1817, 
and who was a daughter of Lieutenant William Matthewson of 
the 44th Regiment of Foot. His death took place at Spring 
Garden, Aberdeen, 3rd March, 1834. 

173. Dingwall (Alexander), only son of Alexander Ding- 
wall, younger of Rannieston, and Isabella Matthewson his wife, 
adopted a seafaring life, and was lost sight of before 1841. 

174. Dingwall (Alexander Harvey), stock-broker in Lon- 
don, third son of Charles Dingwall, wine merchant there, and 
Julia Blanche Drew his wife. 

175. Ding\^''all (Anna), eldest daughter of Arthur Dingwall 
of Brownhill and Sarah Murray his first wife (and twin sister of 
Magdalen Dingwall or Taylor, 236) baptized 8th February, 1718. 

176. DingT? 11 (Anna), third daughter of William Ding- 
wall of Brucklay and Anna Gordon his wife, was born in 1731, 
married to William Murray, merchant in Aberdeen, and died 
28th January, 1815. She bequeathed ;^2o to the Poor's Hospital, 
/^20 to the Infirmary, and ^20 to the Lunatic Asylum. 

177. Dingwall (Anna), eighth daughter of Alexander Ding- 
wall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wife, was married 



52 



DINGWALL. 



4th February, 1830, to her cousin, Captain George Thomson of 
Fairley, Aberdeenshire, H.E.I.Co.'s b. i vice afterwards C.B., and 
Colonel, residing in Cork, Ireland. They have issue. 

178. Dingwall (Arthur) of Brownhill, in the Parish of 
Monwhitter, Aberdeenshire, eldest son of William Dingwall of 
Seilscrook in the same parish, and Barbara Barclay his wile ; had 
originally the designation " in Macktery," probably a farm of the 
name in the neighbouring parish of Fyvie. In 1675, he acquired 
half of the lands of Brownhill. i^.bout the same time he was 
married to Lucretia or Lucres Irvine, a daughter of John Irvine 
of Brucklay, in the Parish of New Deer. In 1706, thej' settled 
their property on their sons William and Arthur. He is said to 
have died the year after ; his wife survived. They had four sons 
and three daughters, none of whom are mentioned in the Poll 
Tax Book, 1696, which gives his own and his wife's assessment 
in these words : " Arthur Dinguell of Over Brownhill, valuation 
of his said lands in Monwhitter (laboured only be himself) 
;^55 IIS. 2d., and Lucres Irvine his wife." Two servants are 
mentioned, one male, the other female, and two cottars on the 
place. 

179. Dingwall (Arthur), of Brownhill, afterwards of Les- 
craigie, both in the parish of Monwhitter, Aberdeenshire, was 
the second surviving son of Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill, and 
Lucretia Irvine his wife. He was baptized 9th July, 1678, and 
by his father and mother's deed of settlement in 1706 obtained a 
third of their property, and by subsequent agreement with his 
brother, Brownhill became solely his. From whatever cause, 
it passed into other hands, and about 1720 he came to be desig- 
nated "of Lescraigie." About this time also he seems to have 
acted as factor on the estate of Ballogie on Deeside. His name 
appears in the year 1722 in connection with an account of the 
factors' intromissions with the crop of that year, and its dis- 
charge by Mr. James Graham of Airth, advocate, " oversman in 
the submission between Ballogie and his creditors." He was at 
another time " Commissioner " for the estate of Garniestown, 
King Edward. In his latter days he resided at Millof Jackston, 
afterwards called Back Mill of Balquholiy, in Monwhitter, 



DINGWALL. 



53 



and as his will is recorded in 1729, he may have died then. His 
first wife, Sarah Murray, was a daiij,diter of Mr. WiUiam Murray, 
minister of Inverury, and Magdalen (iellie his wife. They had 
five sons and four daughters. In 1721 he was married to Jean 
Chalmers, daugiiter of James Chalmers, merchant in Aberdeen ; 
she survived him ; they had at least one son. In a description 
of the Parish of Monwhitter m 1724, by Mr. William Ogilvy, it 
is said : " There is a dwelling place called Brownhill, and 
another, Lescraigie, belonging to the name of Dingwall, lying two 
miles south from the church." 

180. Dingwall (Arthur), fiftii son of Arthur Dingwall of 
Brownhill and Sarah Murray his wife, is called third son in the 
inventory of his property in the Sheriff or Commissary Court 
Books, 24th July, 1735, and i8th December, 1738. His baptism 
is not found in the Parish Register. 

181. Dingwall (Arthur), second son of William Dingwall 
of Brucklay and Anna Gordon his wife, was a jeweller in 
London, and afterwards in Edinburgh. He died unmarried 
22nd August, 1786. 

182. Dingwall (Arthur) of Rannieston, eldest son of Baillie 
John Dingwall of Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his wife, was 
born 25th February, 1752. He was originally a merchant in 
New York, and afterwards in St. John, New Brunswick ; 
married Mrs. Evans, a widow, whose maiden name was Elizabeth 
Stuart. Having no family his next brother, on his death, 
succeeded to Rannieston. 

183. Dingwall (Arthur) third son of Baillie John Ding- 
wall, junior, of Aberdeen, and Magdalen Duff his wife, was 
baptized 5th AJDril, 1767. He probably died early, as he appears 
in the year 1777 to have been subject to attacks of catalepsy. 

184. Dingwall (Arthur), fourth son of Alexander Dingwall 
of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wife, was born i6th 
September, 1798, and married Charlotte Roach in December, 
1854, 1^6 resided for some time in Edinburgh (having been 
admitted to the Bar there in 1827) but latterly in London, where 
he died 13th March, 1879, having had four sons and one 
daughter. 



Il 



54 



DINGWAI.I.. 



in 



HI I 



185. Dingwall (Arthur), eldest son of Arthur Dingwall, 
advocate in Edinburgh, and Charlotte Roach his wife, born 13th 
December, 1855, died 3rd April, 1879, 

186. Dingwall (Barbara), eldest daughter of Arthur Ding- 
wall of Brownhill and Lucrctia Irvine his wife ; baptized 9th 
August, 1672. 

187. Dingwall (Oatharine), only daughter of Baillie John 
Dingwall and Magdalen DnfF his wife, married (contract dated 
23rd September, 1797) William Stewart, latterly of the Royal 
Navy, succeeded to the Estate of Corsindae, and took the name 
of Duff on the death of her nephew, John Duff Dingwall of 
Brucklay. She died in 1844, leaving two daughters, one of 
whom, Patience, succeeded to Corsindae. 

188. Dingwall (Oharles), of the firm of J. and C. Dingwall, 
wine merchants, London, third son of Patrick Dingwall, mer- 
chant in London, and Harriet Yates his wife, was married 4th 
September, 1 851, to Julia Blanche Drew, daughter of Mr. George 
Drew, and had four sons and five daughters. 

189. Dingwall (Oharles Arthur), wine merchant in Lon- 
don, eldest son of Charles Dingwall, and Julia Blanche Drew 
his wife, married 12th November, 1879, Frances Kathleen 
Danvers, daughter of Mr. Juland Danvers, and has issue. 

190. Dingwall (David), ninth son of Baillie John Dingwall 
of Rannieston, and Mary Lumsden his wife, born 2nd February, 
1774, died unmarried. 

191. Dingwall (Elizabeth), second daughter of William 
Dingwall of Brucklay, and Anna Gordon his wife. 

192. Dingwall (Elizabeth), sixth daughter of Baillie John 
Dingwall of Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his wife, baptized 
loth November, 1771, died unmarried at Montrose, 3rd October, 
1842. 

193. Dingwall (Elizabeth), fifth daughter of Alexander 
Dingwall, stocking manufacturer, Aberdeen, and Elizabeth 
Douglass his wife, born in August, 1788, died in 1789. 



dlL 



OINGWAM, 



55 



194. Dingwall (Elizabeth), seventh daughter of Alexander 
Dingwall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wife, 
married 5th October, 1837, to John Anderson, of the Bengal 
Engineers. 

195. Dingwall (Ella Margaret), fifth daughter of Charles 
Dingwall, wine merchant, London, and Julia Blanche Drew his 
wife. 

196. Dingwall (Evelyn Agnes), only daughter of Arthur 
Dingwall, advocate in Edinburgh, and Charlotte Roach his wife, 
was married 24th April, 1879, to Alexander Monro, of the Edu- 
cational Department, India. 

197. Dingwall (Frederick Abercrombie), third son of 
Arthur Dingwall, advocate, Edinburgh, and Charlotte Roach his 
wife. 

198. Dingwall (George), second son of William Dingwall 
of Seilscrook and Barbara Barclay his wife, was living on the 
20th September, 1679, at Biffie, in the parish of Old Deer. At 
that time he made an assignation to his elder brother Arthur 
Dingwall of Brownhill and Lucretia Irvine his wife. Between 
1697 and 1700 he appears to have resided at Pitscow in Lonmay. 
The following facts are given without assuming that the George 
Dingwall mentioned is, in all the cases, one and the same ; that 
he was twice married, and is to be considered as identical with 
the subject of this notice, the son of William Dingwall and 
Barbara Barclay. It may have been so, but cannot be estab- 
lished with certainty from the facts presented, which are these : 
(1) In the Poll Tax Book (1696), George Dingwall is rated for 
proportion of tax on Easter Pitscow, in Lonmay, with Mary 
Forbes his wife. (2) On the 15th July, 1697, George Dingwall 
in the Parish of Lor nay, was married to Jean Chalmers, in the 
Parish of New Deer. . ; - > 

199. Dingwall (George), baptized 28th January, 1677, was 
the second son of Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill and Lucretia 
Irvine his wife. 

200. Dingwall (George), baptized 26th November, 1722, 
son of Arthur Dingwall of Lescraigie, formerly of Brownhill, and 
Jean Chalmers his second wife. 



56 



DlNtlWAI.I.. 



201. Dingwall (George), fourth son of Patrick Dingwall, 
merchant in London, and Harriet Yates his wife, horn 25th 
August, 1811, died I2th January, 1812. 

202. Dingwall (Grace Katharine), eldest daughter of 
Charles Dingwall, wine merchant, London, and Julia Blanche 
Drew his wife, married 23rd May, 1882, to John Helps Starey, 
of the Island of Ceylon. 

203. Dingwall (Harriet), second daughter of Patrick Ding- 
wall, merchant in London, and Harriet Yates his wife, born 15th 
January, 1817, died young. 

204. Dingwall (Helen), twin daughter of Arthur Dingwall 
of Brownhill, and Lucres Irvine his wife, baptized 12th July, 
1673. 

205. Dingwall (Herbert Alexander), second son of Arthur 
Dingwall, advocate in Edinburgh, and Charlotte Roach his wife, 
went to Manitoba in 1884. 

206. Dingwall (Hilda Rochfort), daughter of Charles 
Arthur Dmgwall, and Frances Kathleen Danvers his wife. 

207. Dingwall (Isobel), daughter of Arthur Dingwall of 
Brownhill, and Lucres Irvine his wife (twin with Helen), baptized 
i2th July, 1673. 

208. Dingwall (James), second son of Baillie John Ding- 
wall of Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his wife, baptized 26th 
January, 1755, died young. 

209. Dingwall (James), seventh son of Baillie John Ding- 
■■.vall, junior, of Aberdeen, and Magdalen Duff his wife, baptized 
loth September, 1773, died in infancy. 

210. Dingwall (James), merchant in Hamburgh, tenth son 
of Baillie John Dingwall of Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his 
wife, baptized 17th January, 1776, married Sophie Berghiest of 
Hamburgh, and died 12th February, 1848. They had no family. 

211. Dingwall (Jane), ninth daughter of Alexander Ding- 
wall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wife, born 19th 
September, 1810, married on ist August, 1834, to Andrew George 



DINGWALL. 



57 



Stuarl of Iiichhrcck, M.D. They had no family. She married 
secondly in July, 1H45, her cousin Charles Thomson, merchant in 
Liverpool, had issue, and dieil there in r(S84. 

212. Dingwall (Janet), fourth daughter of Alexander Ding- 
wall of Rannieston and Janet Ahercrombie his wife, born 31st 
May, 1802, married 5th December, 1822, to William Allardyce, 
wine merchant in Aberdeen, and died within seven weeks, viz., 
20th January, 1823. 

213. Dinjfwall (Janet), only daughter of Alexander Ding- 
wall, younger, of I'fannieston and Isabella Matthewson his wife, 
married a Mr. Kirkby, and died in October, 1880, leaving one son. 

214. Dingwall (Jean), fourth daughter of Arthur Dingwall 
of Brownhill and Sarah Murray his wife, baptized in November, 
1719. 

215. Dingwall (Jean), second daughter of Alexander Ding- 
wall, stocking manufacturer in Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Douglass 
his wife, born 28th December, 1783, died unmarried nth Sep- 
tember, 1 801. 

216. Dingwall (Jessy), third daughter of Alexander Ding- 
wall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wife, born i6th 
December, 1800, died 9th August, 1801. 

217. Dingwall (John), third son of William Dingwall of 
Seilscrook in the Parish of Monwhitter and Barbara Barclay 
his wife, must have been alive in 1728, as at that time his nephew 
Arthur Dingwall, formerly of Brownhill, bequeathed to him a boll 
of meal yearly. (In the Appendix will be found a notice of 
" Unconnected Dingwalls." John Dingwall, the son of William 
Dingwall and Barbara Barclay, may be one of these, but there 
is no means of identification.) 

218. Dingwall (John), of Rannieston, in the Parish of 
Logie Buchan, stocking manufacturer in Aberdeen, was baptized 
in May, 17 16. He was the fourth son of Arthur Dingwall of 
Brownhill and Sarah Murray his first wife. The Aberdeen 
jfoiinial, when he died said that " Early in life he established the 
manufacture knit stockings there on the same plan as in Eng- 
land, and carried it to an extent and perfection never known 



5« 



DINGWAF.!.. 



before his time." He was successful in business, purchased tlie 
estate of Rannieston al)out 1757, and had liis armorial bearitigs 
enrolled at the Lyon Office, with the appropriate and significant 
distinction of a "golden fleece," and the devout acknowledgment, 
" Deo favente," as a motto. He was Dean v,*" Guild of Aberdeen 
in 1750, and a Baillie onwards from 1755. He was twice married, 
first to Mary Lumsden, daughter of the Rev. James Lumsden of 
Corrachrie, minister of Towie. They had ten sons and six 
daughters. He married secondly 15th June, 1786, Mary Syine, 
daughter of the Rev. Walter Syme, minister of Tullynessle ; 
they had no children. His death occurred on the 13th May, 
1793. The notice of the event already cited adds : " He was a 
gentleman of the strictest integrity and punctuality in business, 
of a clear understanding, and a sincere friend, a worthy and 
useful citizen, and in every respect a valuable member of 
society." 

2x9. Dingwall (John), of Hrucklay in Aberdeenshire, of 
Croydon in Surrey, and of St. James's Street, London, was 
baptized 22nd January, 1724. He was third son of William 
Dingwall of Brucklay and Anna Gordon his wife, who died in 
1733, so that he was only nine years of age when deprived of 
both parents. He worked his way up perseveringly, and for 
many years carried on the business of a jeweller in London, 
securing thereby an ample fortune, independent of the family 
estate to which he succeeded on the death of his elder brother in 
1803. H^ w^s married but had no family. His wife's name 
was Patience Huddart. For the last ten years of his life which 
terminated on the 28th May, 1812, the widow of his cousin Mr. 
Alexander Dingwall (i6g) with her two daughters, resided with 
him at Croydon, adding much to his comfort. He had a large 
and varied acquaintance, among whom were the well-known Jane 
Duchess of Gordon, General Gordon of Fyvie, Mr. James Perry 
of the Morning Chronicle^ who was a cousin (his mother having 
been a Miss Gordon of Nethermuir), Professor Porson, who was 
Mr. Perry's brother-in-law, besides other ornaments of the 
literary and fashionable world who were frequent visitors. He 
was an intelligent kind-hearted man. His personal property 
amounted to £250,000 stg., and was left in trust and invested in 



DINGWAIJ.. 



59 



landed properly, which was settled on the saim; series of heirs 
as his estates of lirucklay and Artaniford, John Dingwall the 
grandson of his sister Lucretia, being his immediate successor. 

220. Dingwall (John), junior, stocking manufacturer and 
liaillie of Aberdeen, the only child of William Dingwall (258) by 
Lucretia Dingwall his first wife, was baptized in June, 1738, and 
was married (contract dated 15th September, 1763) to Magdalen 
Duff, eldest daughter of William DufF of Corsindae, Aberdeen- 
shire. They had seven sons and one daughter. His death 
occurred on the loth June, 1788, his wife having died five weeks 
before (6th May) after the birth of twins, all three laid in one 
coffin. He was Dean of Guild of Aberdeen in 1771, and one of 
the Baillies at various times, and is spoken of in the notice of 
his death as a man of remarkable probity and worth. The estate 
of Corsindae afterwards fell to his daughter, whose descendants 
still enjoy it, his only surviving son succeeding in i8i2tothe 
estate of Brucklay. [In the Recollections of an Octogenarian 
Aberdonian, 1848, John Dingwall Tough, the following reference 
occurs : " My father soon after coming to Aberdeen, where I 
was born in 1772, learned the wool-combing trade with young 
Baillie Dingwall and took charge of a stable and lime shed 
belonging to Mr. Duff of Corsindae. He took in shell lime and 
had it slacked ; the tenants got it measured by my father, and 
carried it to Corsindae, in proportion to their rentals, which was 
called bondage. The death of Baillie Dingwall and his wife was 
a great loss to me, as arrangements were made that 1 was to be 
educated along with their own family (1 bGing the Baillie's name- 
sake by her desire), but their deaths prevented carrying it out."] 

221. Dingwall (John) of Rannieston, in the Parish of Logie 
Buchan and of Ardo, fourth son of Baillie John Dingwall of 
Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his first wife, was born 22nd 
September, 1761, and succeeded to Rannieston on the death of 
his elder brother Arthur. He was Provost of Aberdeen from 
1799 to 1801. He died on the 29th March, 1836, leaving no 
children to inherit the landed property, which fell to his brother 
Alexander. His first wife was the widow of a Captain Pringle, 
and daughter of Baillie George Willox of Old Aberdeen. The 



f-o 



DlNGWALr,. 



second, Catharine Jane Moir, to whom he was married 20th 
March, 1800, was daughter of the Rev. WiUiam Moir, mmister 
of the Parish of Fyvie. The third, Ann Taylor, survived him. 

222. Dingwall (John), of Brucklay and Aberdour, Aber- 
deenshire, and Woodston in Kincardineshire, was the fifth son 
of Baillie John Dingwall, junior, of Aberdeen, and Magdalen Duff 
his wife. He was baptized on the 13th August, 1770, and was 
brought up to his granduncie's business of a jeweller, which he 
carried on for some time in London, in partnership with another 
as "Dingwall and Baillieu." He succeeded to the Brucklay 
Estates in 1812, and was married 6th November, 1813, to Mary 
Gordon, eldest daughter of William Gordon of Aberdour. They 
had one son, who succeeded to Brucklay, etc., and a daughter 
who, as well as her mother, died before him. His death took 
place on the 21st January, 1833. . 

223. Dingwall (John), second son of Baillie John Dingv/all, 
junior, of Aberdeen, and Magdalen Duff his wife, baptized 14th 
November, 1765. died in infancy. 

224. Dingwall (John), second son of Alexander Dingwall, 
stocking manufacturer in Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Douglass his 
wife, born loth January, 1787, died nth April, 1798. 

225. Dingwall (John), eldest son of Alexander Dingwall, 
afterwards of Rannieston, and J met Abercrombie his wife, bap- 
tized 24th August, 1794, died 31 d January, 1800. 

226. Dingwall (John), solicitor-at-law in London, eldest 
son of Patrick Dingwall, merchant there, and Harriet Yates 
his wife. 

227. Dingwall (John Duff), of Brucklay, Corsindae; etc., 
only son of John Dingwall of Brucklay and Mary Gordon his 
wife, was born nth October, 1815. He assumed the name of 
Duff in conjunction with ihat of Dingwall on succeeding to the 
estate of Corsindae in Aberdeenshire, entailed on him by his 
granduncle, William Duff of Corsindae. He was married 14th 
September, 1837, to Fanny Brydges, daughter of Sir Henry 
Brydges, of Beddington House in Surrey, Kt., and died at 
Carlisle, 26th October, 1840. Having no family, the greater 
part of the landed property fell in terms of the entail to the 



IMNGWALI. 



6l 



descendants of Jean Fordyce, the second wife of his great-grand- 
father, Wilham Dingwall. The estate of Corsindae devolved on 
his aunt, Mrs. Stewart, and the acquired property of Federate 
on the relatives of his wife, to whom it had been destined. She 
had died three months before her husband. 

228. Dingwall (John Patrick), second son of Charles 
Dingwall and Julia Blanche Drew his wife, was born 23rd 
November, 1856, and died 14th December, 1865. 

229. Dingwall (Joseph), wine merchant in London, second 
son of Patrick Dingwall and Harriet Yates his wife, was born in 
August, 1806. He was married about 1849 to Elizabeth Bed well, 
widow of the Rev. J. Hird. They had no family, and he died in 
Turkey on the 17th January, 1873. 

230. Dingwall (Julia Blanche), third daughter of Charles 
Dingwall and Julia Blanche Drew his wife, was married loth 
April, 1883, to Alexander George John Stewart, younger of Ardes, 
County Donegal, Ireland. 

231. Dingwall (Katharine), eldest daughter of Alexander 
Dingwall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wife, born 
2gth August, 1793, died unmarried 22nd June, 1826. 

232. Dingwall (Kathleen Mary Danvers), daughter of 
Charles Arthur Dingwall, wine merchant in London, and Frances 
Kathleen Danvers his wife. 

233. Dingwall (Kenneth), fifth son of Charles Dingwall 
and Julia Blanche Drew his wife. 

234. Dingwall (Lucretia), daughter of William Dingwall of 
Brucklay and Anna Gordon his wife, was married to her cousin, 
William Dingwall, afterwards of Culsh,then factor on the estate 
of Brucklay, and died early, leaving one son, whose descendants 
succeeded to Brucklay in 1812. 

235. Dingwall (Lucretia), third daughter of Arthur Ding- 
wall of Brownhill and Sarah Murray his wife, baptized 22nd 
November, 1718. ^ / 

236. Dingwall (Magdalen), daughter of Arthur Dingwall 
of Brownhill and Sarah Murray his wife (twin with Anna), was 
baptized 8th February, 171 8. She was twice married, but had 
no children of either marriage. Her first husband was John 



\\ 



62 



DINGWALL. 



Taylor, carpenter or builder in Peterhead, a very worthy man. 
They were married probably in 1753, ^^^^ he died before Febru- 
ary, 1757, leaving her comfortably provided for. Her second 
marriage (which is understood to have been much less satisfac- 
tory) was to Thomas Fraser, a younger son of Francis Fraser of 
Findrack, Aberdeenshire. She died in January, 1804. 

237. Dingwall (Magdalene), third daughter of Baillie John 
Dingwall of Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his wife, baptized 
2nd July, 1760, died unmarried. 

238. Dingwall (Magdalene), fourth daughter of Alexander 
Dingwall, stocking manufacturer in Aberdeen, and Elizabeth 
Douglass his wife, was born 15th February, 1786, and married 
gth September, 1813, to her cousin, Alexander Dingwall For- 
dyce, then of London. They removed to Aberdeen in 1816, and 
with their family to Upper Canada in 1836. She died at 
Belsyde, near Fergus, 24th February, 1846, having had ten 
childr 1. Of a weakly constitution, she had yet a vigorous, well 
furnished and gifted mind. vShe was much and deservedly 
beloved, 

239. Dingwall (Magdalen), eleventh daughter of Alexander 
Dingwall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wife, born 
15th April, 1 814, died in 1876 unmarried. 

240. Dingwall (Margaret), fifth daughter of Baillie John 
Dingwall of Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his wife, baptized 
28th February, 1766. 

241. Dingwall (Margaret), fifth daughter of Alexander 
Dingwall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wife, born 
17th December, 1804, was married 17th May, 1838, to Major, 
afterwards Colonel, R. Carruthers, C.B., had issue, and died in 
January, 1880. > -.:.,; 

242. Dingwall (Mary), eldest daughter of BailHe John 
Dingwall of Rannieston and Mary Lnmsden his wife, baptized 
1 8th June, 1756, died unmarried 15th February, 1777. 

243. Dingwall (Mary), eldest daughter of Alexander Ding- 
wall, stocking manufacturer in Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Dou- 
glass his wife, born ist August, 1781, died unmarried 9th May, 

1799- 



-J 



DINGWALL. 



63 



Ding- 

Dou- 

h May, 



244. Dingwall (Mary), second daughter of Alexander 
Dingwall of Rannieston and Janet Al)ercrombie his wife, born 
7th September, 1799, died unmarried. 14th September, 1851. 

245 . Dingwall (Mary), eldest daughter of Patrick Dingwall, 
merchant in London, and Harriet Yates his wife, residii g for 
the most part in London. 

246. Dingwall (Mary), only daughter of John Dingwall of 
Brucklay and Mary Gordon his wife, died 27th May, 1826. 

247. Dingwall (Mary Geraldine), fourth daughter of 
Charles Dingwall, wine merchant in London, and Julia Blanche 
Drew his wife. 

248. Dingwall (Patrick), fifth son of William Dingwall of 
Brucklay and Anna Gordon his wife. 

249. (Dingwall (Patrick), eighth son of Baillie John Ding- 
wall of Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his wife, was baptized 
2nd May, 1770. He was a merchant in London, and latterly 
had an appointment in the Customs. His death took place on 
the 19th March, 1848. He had been married 9th July, 1801, to 
Harriet Yates, daughter of John Yates of St. Sepulchre's, London, 
and Mary Curtis his wife. They had four sons and three 
daughters. 

250. Dingwall (Robert), fifth son of Baillie John Dingwall 
of Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his wife, baptized 3rd January, 
1763, died unmarried in 1785. 

251. Dingwall (Samuel), second son of Arthur Dingwall 
of Brownhill and Sarah Murray his wife, baptized ist Septem- 
ber, 1 71 3. Sir Samuel Forbes of Foveran was one of the 
witnesses. 

252. Dingwall (Sara), second daughter of Baillie John 
Dingwall of Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his wife, was bap- 
tized 30th September, 1758, and married in September, 1780, to 
John Orrok of Orrok, formerly a captain in the Merchant Service, 
had issue, and died in 1784. 

I ' 253. Dingwall (Sarah), tenth daughter of Alexander Ding- 
wall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wile, was married 
n January, 1832, to Henry Curling, Lieutenant 52nd Regiment 
of Foot, had issue, and died in 1884. 



64 



DINGWALL. 



254. Dingwall (Sophia), third daughter of Patrick Dingwall, 
merchant in London, and Harriet Yates his wife, born 3rd May, 
1820, died unmarried in June, 1854. 

255. Dingwall (Walter Molyneux), fourth son of Charles 
Dingwall, wine merchant in London, and Julia Blanche Drew 
his wife, studying at Cambridge in 1884. 

256. Dingwall (William) of Seilscruick, in the Parish of 
Monwhitter, Aberdeenshire, was ancestor of the families of 
Brucklay, Culsh, and Rannieston, and the first of the family of 
whom any knowledge has with certainty been preserved. Before 
acquiring Seilscruick he appears to have resided at Little Auchry 
in the same parish, as mentioned in the contract of sale dated 
19th June, 1655. It was burdened with an annual feu duty of 
two hundred merks. The former proprietor was John Urquhart 
of Craigfintray, and the traditionary belief has been that the 
Dingwalls came from Ross Shire along with the Ur:]uharts. The 
name of Dingwall appears in Aberdeenshire, however, at least 
fifty years before Seilscrook was acquired. A legend, called 
"The Cross of Seilscrook," was given about fifty years since, in 
a short lived magazine, from which an extract is subjoined, des- 
criptive also of the characteristic features of the place. A young 
man, a native of the locality, is represented as leaving home 
hastily, enlisting as a soldier ; returning after some years to his 
native district on the last night of the year : " Passing through a 
rugged and moorland part of the country," the narrative says, 
"he approached the spot of his nativity, which, with all the 
sternness of its soil and climate, awakened in his bosom a sym- 
pathy which the gay sunn}^ valleys of other lands had failed to 
excite." Travelling along he overtook a countryman, who 
appeared to be in great haste, which, when addressed, he 
accounted for by saying: "It's time o' the nicht for a' dacent 
fouk to be in their beds, and mair than that, I wad like as weel 
to win by the Cross o' Seilscrook afore twal o'clock comes." 
" And why," said the other, " should you be so anxious to get 
past the Cross before that time?" "1 was just thinkin'," was 
the reply, "ye cud never hae heard o' the Cross o' Seilscrook, 
for its said through the haill countra, although some fouk in 



D1N(.\VAI,I. 



65 



these days o' learning pretend to deny it, an' I mysel' wadna 
think muckle about it an' I war at liame, an' no i' the midst o' 
this wuU how, an' in sic an eerie nicht as this ; but its generally 
believed tiiat ilka Hogmanay (31st December) Death comes to 
the Cross o' Seilscrook, that's a pairt whare twa roads cross ane 
anither on the top o' the hill afore's, just at twal o'clock, ridin' 
on a pale horse sic as he's described wi' i' the Revelations, an' 
just reads o'er the names o' a' them that's till dee within three 
miles roun' i' the coorse o' the neist year." In the Appendix 
under the head of " Unconnected Dingwalls" there is reference 
to an Arthur Dingwall in Bray, Ross Shire, (possibly a relative) 
about 1595. Barbara Barclay, wife of William Dingwall, is 
mentioned in the disposition of Seilscrook in 1661 to their son 
Arthur. It did not remain long in the family. Two other sons, 
John and George, are incidentally mentioned. 

257. Dingwall (William) of Brucklay, the first owner of 
that property of the name of Dingwall, was the eldest son of 
Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill, in the Parish of Monwhitter, and 
Lucretia Irvine his wife. He was probably born in 1676, but 
his baptism is not found in the Parish Register, which contains 
the names of others of the family, the next of whom was born in 
1677. He was educated at Marischal College, Aberdeen, and in 
i6g6 was in the employment of Mr., afterwards Sir, Samuel 
Forbes of Foveran, receiving for his services a yearly fee of ^60 
Scots, and acting with him in taking up a list of " pollable per- 
sons in the Parish of Foveran." The designation of Mr. shows 
that he had taken the degree of A.M. before that time. How 
the interval was spent does not appear, but in 1706, his father 
and mother having settled their whole heritable and personal 
property on the subject of this notice and his brother Arthur, 
the proportion the former received was two-thirds. By mutual 
agreement the brothers relieved each other of their respective 
proportions of 5,000 merks owing to Alexander Irvine of Drum on 
his granting a charter to William on the lands of Brucklay and 
Ironside, the superiority of which had been vested in him, and 
by another agreement the brothers made over to each other the 
shares of Brucklay and Brownhill they had become entitled to 
by their parents' deed of settlement, William becoming sole pro- 



66 



DINGWAI.L 



prietor of Brucklay in consequence, while his younger brother 
had Brownhill. The subject of this notice, as recorded on his 
tombstone, was in his character of Justice of the Peace, " a 
zealous protector of his neij^hbours and the poor from every 
species of fraud and oppression." He was married on the 25th 
October, 171 1, to Anna Gordon, daughter of John Gordon of 
Nethermuir, in the Parish of New Deer. Of this marriage there 
appear to have been six sons and three daughters. Of one of 
the sons we have no account. The whole had soon to push their 
way by their own exertions. The circumstances in which they 
were left orphans are thus noticed on the gravestone in the 
churchyard of New Deer, already referred to: "Wilham Ding- 
wall of Brucklay, Esq., and his lady, Anna Gordon of Nether- 
muir, died in one week in Maj', 1733, leaving six sons and three 
daughters, all under age." 

258, Dingwall (William), afterwards of Culsh, the eldest 
son of Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill and Sarah Murray his first 
wife, was baptized gth May, 1712. He was educated at Maris- 
chal College, Aberdeen, and is believed to have been designed 
for the legal profession. The sudden death of his uncle and 
aunt in 1733, leaving a young family unprotected, may have pre- 
vented this, and occasioned his residing at Brucklay Castle, as 
their guardian and as factor on the property. He was married 
probably in 1737 to Lucretia Dingwall, one of the daughters of 
his uncle, William Dingwall of Brucklay and Anna Gordon his 
wife. They had one son, whose descendants in 1812 came into 
possession of Brucklay. On the 13th April, 1744, he was married 
to his second wife, Jean Fordyce, daughter of John Fordyce of 
Gask and Isobel Lindsay his wife, through whom the property 
of Culsh, in the Parish of New Deer, came into the family and 
is still held by their descendants. For a long time he was an 
invalid, and an account is extant, amounting to ^179 17s. Scots, 
for drugs furnished by Drs. James and John Gregorie between 
June, 1751, and June, 1752. He may have died shortly after 
1760, leaving, besides his widow, three sons, all under age, the 
second of whom ultimately succeeded to the estate of Culsh. 

259. Dingwall (William) of Brucklay (popularly known as 
•' the Miser") was the eldest son of William Dingwall of Bruck- 



OINGWAI.I.. 



67 



lay and Anna Gordon his wife, and was born in the year 17 19, 
being fourteen years of age when his parents died. He studied 
medicine, and became a surgeon in the army. It has been said 
that a disappointment in love led to his contracting habits which, 
notwithstanding polite manners and general information, kept 
him for the most part secluded for many years at Brucklay 
Castle. He was ready to do a friendly service, however, on 
occasion to relatives at least, as evidenced by prescriptions for 
his cousin, Mr. Alexander Dingwall (No. 169), on his meeting 
with the accident which terminated his life. He never married, 
and on his death, 27th March, 1803, was succeeded by his 
brother John, a jeweller in London. 

260. Dingwall (William), eldest son of William Dingwall 
and Jean Fordyce of Culsh his second wife, baptized 12th Janu- 
ary, 1745, and died under age. 

261. Dingwall (William), third son of John Dingwall of 
Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his first wife, baptized 8th 
April, 1757; died young. 

262. Dinerwall (William), eldest son of John Dingwall, 
junior, stocking manufacturer and Baillie of Aberdeen, and 
Magdalen Duff his wife, baptized 25th July, 1764; died in 
infancy. 

263. Dingwall (William), seventh son of John Dingwall of 
Rannieston and Mary Lumsden his wife, baptized 12th March, 
1769; died in May, 1773. 

264. Dingwall (William), fourth son of John Dingwall, 
junior, Baillie of Aberdeen, and Magdalen Duff, baptized 17th 
January, 1769; was alive at the close of 1780, residmg then at 
his grandfather's at Corsindae, and receiving his education there. 

265. Dingwall (William), eldest son of Alexander Dingwall, 
stocking manufacturer, Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Douglass his 
wife, born nth November, 1782; was educated at the Gram- 
mar School and Marischal College. At the age of fourteen his 
father died, and at a suitable age he entered the mercantile house 
of Thomsoi. & Still in Greenock. He attempted business on his 
ow^ account, but being of a peculiarly nervous temperament 
ano exceedingly sensitive disposition, wi fitted to push his 



M^ 



6.S 



DINGWAI.r,. 



way. At the same time his health was indiflFerent and his desires 
moderate, so that he chiefly occupied himself in visiting the seats 
of various branches of industry in the United Kingdom and the 
Continent, taking much mterest in the processes employed. He 
resided in Glasgow, his sister Mrs. Doig in her widowhood doing 
her best to infuse a little sunshine into a life which was far more 
gloomy than joyous. He was an upright, conscientious man, 
warmly attached to his nearest relatives. His death occurred 
at Glasgow, i8th January, 1837, and his remains were conveyed 
to Aberdeen. He never married. 

2t)i3. Dingwall (William), third son of Alexander Dingwall 
of Rannieston, postmaster of Aberdeen, and Janet Abercrombie 
his wife, baptized 5th March, 1797; died 17th January, 1825. 

267. Doig (Rev. Robert), one of the ministers of Aberdeen, 
a native of Dundee; born there 30th September, 1768 ; was son 
of Robert Doig, manufacturer in Dundee, and Margaret Cock 
his wife. Having studied for the ministry he received Hcense 
12th November, 1788, was ordained 3rd March, 1791, and for 
three years was assistant minister in Arbroath. On the 23rd 
October, 1794, he was placed over the newly-formed congregation 
of Trinit}^ Chapel, Aberdeen, and in 1812 was appointed to one 
of the city charges — St. Nicholas, East Church. He was a 
faithful and acceptable preacher of the Gospel, of the Evangelical 
school or party, of a genial disposition and deservedly beloved. 
While attending the meeting of the General Assembly in Edin- 
burgh in 1824, and lodging in the family of his friend, the well- 
known physician. Dr. John Abercrombie, a small matter, as it 
seemed, led by degrees to the amputation of a limb, and notwith- 
standing the best skill, the utmost attention, and his cheerful 
temperament, his death was the result on the 26th of July. His 
remains were taken to Aberdeen and laid by those of his first 
wife and children, the inscription on his tombstone recording that 
" He preached the unsearchable riches of Christ and shunned 
not, to declare the whole counsel of God." Much sorrow was 
felt and sympathy shown on the occasion of his death. His 
widow, Agnes Dingwall, daughter of Alexander Dingwall, hosier 
in Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Douglass his wife, to whom he had 



DOIG. 



69 



been married nth November, 1819, survived him thirty years. 
They had no family. He had been twice married before. 
Euphemia Mavor his first wife, was a daughter of Robert Mavor, 
shipmaster in Dundee, and Ehzabeth Wardroper his wife, and 
was born 25th December, 1764. Of their six children only one 
grew fully up. A daughter had been cut off in early woman- 
hood. Mrs. Doig died 31st January, 1807, and on the 22nd 
December, 1808, her husband was married to Isabel Hadden, 
sister to James and Gavin Hadden, both chief magistrates of 
Aberdeen, and daughter of Baillie Alexander Hadden, manu- 
facturer, and Elspet Young his wife. They had no family, and 
on the i6th of March, 181 8, Mr. Doig was again a widower. 
One son, it has been observed, survived. The Rev. Thomas 
Doig, the only surviving son of the subject of this notice and 
Euphemia Mavor, his first wife, was educated at Marischal 
College, Aberdeen, where he graduated in 181 2. He was 
licensed to preach on the 9th of May, 1816, and for some years 
was assistant and successor to the parish minister of Arbroath, 
the same charge his father had filled. In 1832 he was translated 
to Torryburn in Fife, joined the Free Church at the Disruption, 
and continued to labour in the ministry at Torryburn till his 
death on 26th December, 1866. He was a man of cultured 
mind, fine taste, ability and earnestness as a preacher. By his 
wife, Ann Andson, daughter of John Andson, Provost of 
Arbroath, to whom he was married 5th November, 1822, he had 
four sons and eight daughters, most of whom survive. His 
widow died at Shoreside House, Torryburn, on the 6th of March, 
1878. Several members of his family have evinced literary 
talent and written works of merit. His eldest son John, a 
medical practitioner at Bathgate, and the second, Thomas, an 
engineer, now residing in Glasgow, are married and have 
families. The only other son who survived, Robert Fleming 
Doig, was a captain in the Army and holding staff appointments 
in India, whose premature and sad death — the consequence of 
wounds inflicted by a tiger — was greatly lamented. He was a 
young man of much promise, not only beloved by his own rela- 
tions, but by his brother officers and men, the former of whom 
showed this by a testimonial to commemorate his sad death. 



70 



DOIG — DODCM.ASS. 



26S. Doig (Robert), manufacturer in Dundee, was married 
to Margaret Cock, daugliter of Robert Cock of the same place, 
and died at an advanced age in March, 1808. Besides their 
son the Rev. Robert Doig (267), they had a daughter — a Mrs. 
Fleming. [A few particulars respecting the name of Doig will 
be found in the Appendix.] ' 

269. Douglass (Elizabeth), youngest daughter of John 
Douglass of Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo, in Kincardineshire, and 
Mary Arbuthnott his wife, was born at Inchmarlo and baptized 
14th August, 1746. In 1750, when only four years of age, she 
was one of the defenders in a lawsuit for the reduction of the 
^will of her great-grandmother, Elizabeth Trent, widow of Sir 
James Falconer of Phesdo, who had made a will when she was 
in her ninety-fourth year, which was disputed by her eldest son 
on the alleged ground of her incapacity. One of the provisions 
of the will was a legacy of one thousand merks to the subject of 
this notice, who was probably her name daughter. She did not 
benefit, however, by the old lady's intentions. On the 28th of 
September, 1780, she was married to Alexander Dingwall, 
hosier or stocking manufacturer in Aberdeen, to whom she was 
a true helpmeet. She attended to his business interests in his 
frequent absence from home, and reported faithfully on them. 
At one time, on the unsuccessful issue of a lawsuit he had been 
a party to, we find her consoling him by recalling her own early 
experience : " I feel your disappointment," she' wrote. " For 
myself I was never sanguine. Law and war are doubtful points, 
being at the former before I could speak, and cast when it was 
thought I had right on my side, learned me early how to think 
of law^." . . " Time and attention, however," she added, revert- 
ing to the present disappointment, " make up any loss almost." 
On another occasion, only fifteen months before his sudden 
death, she wrote to him while he was abroad : " 3rd February, 
1795. — No order as trade is dull. I want nor will have anything. 
Bring yourself — well, happy and contented, and I dread no evil 
in life." By his death on the 3rd of July, 1796, she was bereft 
of a most affectionate husband, and her young family of a wise 
and tender father. For seven years she continued to reside 
with them in Aberdeen, and during that time had to mourn over 



I 



i 



UOIJGLASS. 



71 



the early removal of three children a boy of eleven years and 
two daughters almost arrived at womanhood. She was a good 
woman, and bore her trials in the unmurmuring spirit of a 
Christian. In 1803 she was invited by her husband's cousin, 
John Dingwall of Brucklay, to take up her abode with him at 
Croydon in Surrey. He was eighty years of age, a widower and 
childless ; her only son was doing business on his own account, 
and she consented, probably in good measure with a view to the 
advantage it offered to her two surviving daughters. For nine 
years they resided at Croydon. Mr. Dingwall died on the 28th 
May, 1 81 2, and they then removed to Glasgow ; but she scarcely 
lived a year longer, her death taking place on the yth May, 1813. 
Her remains were laid by those of her husband in St. Nicholas 
Churchyard, Aberdeen. Her portrait, painted by Miller of 
Edinburgh in 773, shows her to have been as lovely in coun- 
tenance as she is known to have been in disposition and 
character. 

270. Douglass (John) of Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo in Kin- 
cardineshire was born in 1709. He was the only son of John 
Douglass of Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo and Agnes Horn his wife, 
who was the only daughter of Mr. James Horn of Westhall, 
sometime minister of Elgin, and his wife Isobell Leslie. On the 
17th June, 1736, he was married to Mary Arbuthnott, daughter 
of the Hon. John Arbuthnott of Fordoun, and Margaret Falconer 
his wife. He succeeded his father in 1749. In 1757, on the 
death of Gilbert Douglass, M.P., he succeeded to the representa- 
tion of the Tilwhilly family, the property having been recovered 
by his grandfather. Inchmarlo had been acquired by his grand- 
father, and now has passed from the family while Tilwhilly has 
been recovered a second time. He greatly improved his pro- 
perty, planting from 400 to 500 acres on otherwise almost worth- 
less land. He was greatly respected in life, and his memory is 
cherished by his surviving children, to whom he had been an 
affectionate father. His wife died eight years before himself, his 
death occurring on the 18th January, 1791. They had two sons 
and three daughters. The death of the elder son, John, a 
promising lawyer, was a very heavy trial. The younger, 
James, died earlier. The eldest daughter, Margaret, became the 



72 



DOUGLASS. 






wife of Provost William Young of Ahenleen, of whom and his 
family some account will be found in the Appendix. The second, 
Agnes, died unmarried at an advanced age. The youngest, 
Elizabeth, was married to Alexander Dingwall, stocking manu- 
facturer in Aberdeen, and was maternal grandmother of the 
compiler of this Record. 

271. Douglass (John) of Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo in Kin- 
cardineshire, baptized i6th May, 1676, was the second but only 
surviving son of John Douglass of Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo and 
his second wife Grizel Forbes, sister to Sir John Forbes of 
Waterton. His father had recovered the estate of Tilwhilly 
(the ancient inheritance of the family) from the creditors of an 
uncle. Sir Robert Douglass, who had spent his fortune in the 
service of King Charles I., and been obliged to part with it. He 
succeeded his father in 1723 and died in 1749. He had 
been married in 1700 to Agnes Horn, only daughter of Mr. 
James Horn of Westhall, formerly minister of Elgin, and Isobell 
Leslie his wife. They had one son, John, his father's successor, 
and three daughters. The eldest, Isobell, was married to James 
McKenzie of Dalmoir in 1728, and was mother of Agnes 
McKenzie or Forbes, referred to in the Appendix in notice of the 
family of Provost William Young. The second, Ann, was mar- 
ried to the Rev. James Chalmers, minister of Daviot ; and the 
youngest, Euphemia, became in 1733 the wife of Charles Irvine of 
Cults, whose daughter is also referred to in the Appendix in notice 
of Fordyce of Ardo. Additional particulars respecting the Doug- 
lasses of Tilwhilly will be found in the Appendix. It is most 
probably the subject of this notice who is alluded to in the 
following extract from the Rev. Dr. PauU's account of " Aber- 
deerishire Past and Present," viz. : " Mr. Martin Shanks, 
minister of Banchory Ternan last century (from 1699 to 1747), 
was a great friend of the laird of Tilwhilly, who was one of his 
heritors. Mr. Shanks' sermons were usually very long, and 
were measured by a half-hour's sand-glass which stood on the 
precentor's desk, and was turned by him every time it ran out. 
The long continuance of the preaching was called insisting. 
When he was getting old Mr. Shanks' sermons became shorter, 
which gave Tilwhilly occasion to suggest in private the necessity 



DOUGLASS — DRYSDAI.E. 



73 



of his ^ettinj,' an assistant, as he was not able to insist as for- 
merly. The m'"\ister let this pass at the time, but next Sunday 
he preached a sermon of unusual length, so that the precentor 
had to turn the glass till every one was wearied out. At last, 
addressing his friend, he inquired : ' Is that eneuch, Tilwhilly ? ' 
• Aye, is't, minister,' said the laird. ' Well then,' he rejoined, 
' dinna ye be sayin' again that I canna insist.' " 

272. Douglass (Margaret), daughter of David Douglass, of 
Panton Street, London, and Katharine Forbes his wife, was 
born in 1749. She was married 22nd March, 1769, to James 
Chalmers, printer in Aberdeen, and died on the 14th August, 
1 81 8. Her father is believed to have been a descendant of the 
family of Tilwhilly. Her mother was a daughter of William 
Forbes, sheriff-depute of Aberdeenshire, who was third son of 
Arthur Forbes ot Echt. 

273. Drew (George), father of Julia Blanche Drew or 
Dingwall (No. 274). 

274. Drew (Julia Blanche), daughter of Mr. George Drew, 
was married 4th September, 1851, to Charles Dingwall, wine 
merchant in London. They had four sons and five daughters. 

275. Drysdale (Alexander), formerly of Jessiefield, upper 
Canada, now of Castellau House, Dunbar, Scotland, eldest son 
of John Drysdale of Viewfield, Lasswade, Edinburgh, and Jessie 
Sceales his wife, settled in 1835 in the Township of Garafraxa, 
Upper Canada, near the recently formed Village of Fergus. W^hile 
resident on his farm, and occupied with its improvement, he 
acted as a magistrate, a member of the municipal councils 
of township and county, and Lieut. -Colonel of 3rd Wellington 
Militia. He removed to Scotland in 1864, ^^ compliance with 
the wish of his relative Mr. W. C. Drysdale of London, on 
whose death he sucr leded to the property oi Torrington, in 
Lincolnshire, and Castellau House, Dunbar, which became there- 
after the permanent residence of his family. He is on the com- 
mission of the peace for East Lothian, and is an elder of the 
Church of Scotland. He was married ist October, 1840, to 
Janet Dingwall Fordyce, second daughter of Alexander Ding- 
wall Fordyce, then of Lescraigie in Upper Canada, and Mag- 



u 



74 



DRYSDAl.E. 



■ ii 

Ml 



dalen Dingwall his wife. She died at Castellan House, ist 
October, 1873. They had two sons and five daughters, all 
noticed in this Record. The property of Castellau House (so 
named from the mother of Mr. W. C. Drysdale, the former 
owner) lies within the town of Dunbar, and is consequently 
circumscribed, but has a special and historic interest. One of 
the fields goes by the name of the " Friars' Croft," and with its 
associations is alluded to by Miller in his History of Dunbar, in 
the following passage : " The Monastery of Red Friars was 
founded in 1218, and suppressed previous to the Reformation. 
It is supposed to have stood in a field called ' The Friars' 
Croft.' Part of the belfry still remai'^ s, which is converted into 
a pigeon-house, and the ground where it stands has obtained 
the rural and less classical appellation of the Doo-cot Park." 

276. Drysdale (Alexander), of Chesterfield, tenant of 
Lennel Hill, Berwickshire and Manor Hill, Roxburghshire, was 
son of Alexander Drysdale and Isobel Halyburton, and was 
baptized 3rd October, 1727. He married Helen Fergie, elder 
daughter of Thomas Fergie, portioner of Paxton, and Jean 
Wilson his wife. His wife was co-heiress with her sister Jean 
(Mrs. Smith) of Chesterfield in the Parish of Hutton. He died 
15th November, 1798. They had a large family ; a younger son, 
John, being father of Alexander Drysdale of Castellau House, 
Dunbar. Be ides the notice of himself and his wife the grave- 
stone in Lennel Hill Churchyard gives the following particulars, 
(all that is known) regarding his parents, viz. : " Alexander 
Drysdale, tenant and Baillie in iwkslaw (born 1692) died 2nd 
May, 1755, Isobel Halyburton his wife (born 1700) died 15th 
March, 1756." '' ~ : •" '. : > 

277. Drysdale (Alexander Adolphus Edward), second 
son of Alexander Drysdale of Castellau House, Dunbar, Scotland, 
and Janet Dingwall For^yce his wife, was born at Jessiefield, 
near Fergus, Upper Canada, 21st March, 1852. The family 
removing to Scotland, he was educated chiefly at Craigmount 
School, Edinburgh. Having been some time in a merchant's 
office in Glasgow, he went to Jamaica in 1874, residing latterly 
on his father's property in the Parish of St. Ann's (the Bogue 



iii 



ORYSOALF,. 



75 



and Arthur Seat). His health faihng he returned to Britain in 
the end of 1877, remaining there about a year. His deatli took 
place at Pan, in the South of France, on the 20th March. 1879. 
He died unmarried, much loved and sincerely i.iourned. 

278. Drysdale (Elizabeth Agnes), third daughter of Alex- 
ander Drysdale, now of Castellan House, Scotland, and Janet 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born 12th January, 1848, at Jessie- 
field, Upper Canada, died 13th August, same year. 

279. Drysdale (Elizabeth Sceales), sixth daughter of 

Alexander Drysdale of Castellau House, Dunbar, and Janet 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born at Jessieficld, Upper Canada. 

280. Drysdale (Helen), daughter of Alexander Drysdale of 
Chesterfield, Berwickshire and Helen Fergie his wife, married 
John Wilson, merchant in Leith, and was grandmother of Jessie 
B. Wilson or Dymock (935). 

281. Drysdale (Janet Castellau), fourth daughter of Alex- 
ander Drysdale, then of Je[ \efield, Upper Canada, and Janet 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife, was born at Jessiefield, rj8th May, 
1850, and died at Castellau House, Dunbar, 28th June, 1868. 

282. Drysdale (Jessie Gordon), second daughter of Alex- 
ander Drysdale, now of Castellau House, Dunbar, and Janet 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born at Jessiefield, Upper Canada. 

283. Drysdale (John), of Viewfield, Lass>,'ade, Edinburgh, 
born 1 6th March, 1765, was son of Alexander Drysdale of 
C'hesterfield, Berwickshire, and Helen Fergie iiis wife. He was 
married 13th March, 1812, to Jessie Sceales, only daughter of 
Adolphus Sceales, merchant, Leith, antl his wife Janet Stewart. 
He died 27th November, 181 7, leaving two sons. His wife sur- 
vived and was married in 1829, to Major John Gordon, 2nd 
or Queen's Royal Regiment. 

284. Drysdale (John), of the Bogue and Arthur Seat, in 
the Island of Jamaica, eldest son of Alexander Drysdale now of 
Castellau House, Scotland, and Janet Dingwall Fordyce his 
wife, born at Jessiefield, Upper Canada, for a short t'me in ner- 
cantile business in London, married at Pau, Lower Pyrenees, 
Fiance, 30th April, 1884, to Henrietta Emma Buchanan Haines, 



:i 



76 



DRYSDALE — DUFF. 



daughter of Lieut. -Colonel Edward Eldridge Haines (92nd Regi- 
ment of Foot, Gordon Highlanders) and Helen Graham Buch- 
anan his wife, and has issue. 

285. Diysdale (Magdalen Dingwall Pordyce), eldest 

daughter of Alexander Drysdale, now of Castellan House, and 
Janet Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born at Jessiefield, Upper 
Canada, 29th June, 1843, died vmmarried at Castcilau House, 
Dunbar, 30th May, 1881. 

286^ Drysdale (Mary Arbuthnott), Castellan House, 

Dunbar, fifth daughter of Alexander Drysdale of Castellan and 
Janet Dingwall Fordyce his wife. 

286^ Drysdale (Mona Janet), daughter of John Drysdale 
of the Bogue and Arthur Seat, Jamaica, and Henrietta E. B. 
Haynes his wife, born at Fan. 

287. Duff (Catharine Elizabeth Mary), daughter of Lieu- 
tenant James Reid, R.N., and Mrs. Patience Huddart Stewart, 
afterwards *^territt, latterly Duff of Corsindae, married William 
Johnston Fyffe, M.D., holding the rank of Deputy Surgeon 
General, and died in 1859, leaving a d; aghter who succeeded to 
Corsindae. 

. 288. Duff (Magdalen), eldest daughter of William Duff of 
Corsindae, was married (contract dated 15th September, 1763) 
to John Dingwall, junior, merchant and Baillie of Aberdeen. 
Among other provisions contained in the contract was one by 
her father of £"500 to be received as in full of all she could claim 
on account of two deeds, one made 8th June, 1755, by the 
. deceased James Duff of Corsindae, the other 2nd February, 
1756, by Magdalen Duff, wife of the said James Duff. Exe- 
cution on the contract was appointed to pass at the instance 
of William Duff of Corsindae, or of James, Arthur and William 
Duff his sons. Of this marriage there were seven sons and one 
daughter, independent of twins, who were laid in one coffin with 
their mother, whose death took place 6th May, 1778, her husband 
surviving her only five weeks. 

289. Duff (William) of Corsindae in the Parish of Midmar, 
Aberdeenshire (father of Magdalen Duff or Dingwall, 288) was 
born in 1714, and died 15th January, 1797. [Without direct 



DUFF — DUNCAN. 



77 



information on the subject, the following gathered in a detached 
form otherwise, it is thought will be found substantially correct, 
viz.: that the subject.of this notice was son of James Duff of Cor- 
sindae, who died at his house in Banff, in August, 1762, and of 
Magdalene Duff his wife, who also died in Banff, in July, 1756, 
and who was a daughter of William Duff of Culbin, Provost of 
Inverness. Katharine Gordon, wife of the subject of this notice, 
and daughter to Arthur Gordon of Carnousie, died at Corsindae 
1 8th April, 1753 ; but the terms of a sasine dated only a month 
before would lead to the conclusion that she was probably a 
second wife, and not the mother of Magdalen Duff or Dingwall. 
Of the three sons mentioned in their sister's marriage contract 
(referred to, 288), William, the youngest, eventually succeeded to 
Corsindae, married a Miss Innes of Clerkseat, but, having no 
family entailed Corsindae on his sistei*"s descendants in 1826. In 
terms of this entail it is now enjoyed by Miss Catharine (Fyffe) 
Duff, the grand-daughter of his niece Catharine Dingwall or 
Stewart (187). The Duffs of Corsindae are descended from 
John Duff, second son of Adam Duff of Clunybeg ; another son 
being ancestor of the Earls of Fife.J 

290. Duflf (Oatharine FyflFe) of Corsindae, Aberdeenshire, 
daughter of William Johnstone Fyffe, M.D., Deputy-Surgeon 
General in the army, and Catharine Elizabeth Mary Reid (after- 
ware's Duff) of Corsindae his wife, succeeded her mother in the 
estate of Corsindae. 

291. Duncan (Agneta), bom 171 3, was the wife of Robert 
French, Litster in Aberdeen, who died previous to the birth of 
their only child in 1733. She survived her husband for the long 
period of fifty-eight years, her death taking place nth October, 
1791. 

292. Duncan (John), a native of Anstruther, Fife, was 
born ist May, 1818, followed a seafaring life, but latterly emi- 
grated to South Australia, where he engaged in sheep-farming. 
He died at Parkside, near Adelaide, 9th April, 1880, his wife, 
Joan Hughes, daughter of Thomas Hughes and Ehza Anderson 
his wife, having died a number of years before. They were the 
parents of John James Duncan (293). He was himself a son of 
James Duncan, merchant in Anstruther, and Betsy Keay his wife. 



>ili| 



Uii 



78 



DUNCAN — DYCE. 



293. Duncan (John James), a member of the Legislature 
in South Austraha, residing at Hughes' Park near Adelaide, 
is the son of John Duncan, latterly of the same Colony, and Joan 
Hughes his wife. He married 5th November, 1873, J^n^ Mori- 
son Harvey, daughter of Arthur Harvey, latterly of Durban, 
South Africa, and Elizabeth Young his wife. She died within a 
year, without surviving issue. He has married again. 

294'. Duncan (James), merchant in Anstruther, Pife, born 
at Caplie Farm in the same county, married Betsy Keay of the 
same place, and died there. Their son John was father of John 
James Duncan (293). 

294^ Dunlop (Margaret), daughter of Mr. Dunlop, of 
Annanhill in Ayrshire, married Robert Buchanan, merchant, 
Glasgow, a son of the family of Ardoch, and was mother of 
Helen Graham Buchanan (5r Haines (114'^). 

295' Dyce (Isobell), eldest daughter of James Dyce of Dis- 
blair, merchant in Aberdeen, and Agnes Baxter his wife, was 
married in 1735 to James Morison of Elsick merchant and Pro- 
vost of Aberdeen. They had a large family. There is no record 
of the date either of her birth or death. 

296. Dyce (James) of Disblair, merchant in Aberdeen,' was 
born in 1689. He was the eldest son of Andrew Dyce, merchant 
in Old Aberdeen and Janet Gray his wife, and acquired the estate 
of Disblair in Aberdeenshire in 1744, by purchase. His deatii 
which took place on the loth January, 1751, was noticed in the 
Aberdeen Journal at the time, with the following tribute to his 
memory : " He was an eminent merchant, who acquired a hand- 
some fortune, with a fair character, and his death is very justly 
regretted, as he was possessed of every social virtue that made 
his life agreeable and useful." On the 25th January, 1716, he 
was married to Agnes Baxter in Old Aberdeen (fully believed to 
have been a daughter of William Baxter, Baillie there, and Isobell 
Brebner his wife). They had three daughters, the eldest, Isobell, 
married to James Morison of Elsick, merchant and Provost of 
Aberdeen ; the second, Janet, married to George Burnet of 
Ktnmay, in Aberdeenshire. Agnes, the youngest, succeeded to 
Disblair, and died unmarried 22nd January, 1813, in her eighty- 
sixth year ; the inscription on the tombstone in St. Nicholas 



DYCE — DYMOCK. 



79 



Churchyard, Aberdeen, stating that " she Uved highly respected, 
and left the world deeply regretted. " Her property of Disblair 
fell to her nephew Dr. Thomas Morison of Elsick. 

297. Dyce (Janet), only surviving daughter of Mr. William 
Dyce, minister of Belhelvie, and Katharine Anderson his wife, 
was born in 1723. Her father (a younger brother of James Dyce 
of Disblair, 296) was born in 1689, settled at Belhelvie, March, 
1 716, and died 23rd July, 1724 — the year after this daughter's 
birth. Her mother, who died in 1773, ^^ the age of seventy- 
two, was a daughter of the Rev. David Anderson, Professor of 
Divinity in King's College. Aberdeen, of whom some additional 
particulars will be found in the Appendix. The minister of Bel- 
helvie had also a son Andrew, and a daughter Katharme, who 
both died before July, 1745, when an inventory of their effects 
was recorded. In 1747, the subject of this notice, who was then 
wife of William Forbes, coppersmith in Aberdeen, was infeft in 
a tenement and ground in Old Aberdeen, as heir to her brother, 
and two months later she and her husband made over to her 
mother the life-rent of some lands in Old Aberdeen. They had 
a large family. She herself died 26th November, 1803. She 
was mother of Janet Forbes or AUardyce (329), and of Katha- 
rine Forbes or Abeic:ombie (320). Her son, William Forbes 
of Callander, is particularly referred to in the notice of her hus- 
band, and another son, George, in the account of the Lumsdens 
of Corrachrie in the Appendix. 

298. Dymook (Arthur), second son of the Rev. John 
Dymock, Kemnay, Aberdeenshire, and Jessie B. Wilson his wife. 

299- Dymock (Edith), eldest daughter of Rev. John 
Dymock, Free Church, Kemnay, and Jessie B. Wilson his wife. 

300'. Dymock (Eva), second daughter of Rev. John Dymock 
of Kemnay, Aberdeenshire, and Jessie B. vVilson his wife. 

300'-. Dymock (Frances), third daughter of Rev. John 
Dymock, Kemnay, Aberdeenshire, and Jessie B. Wilson his wife. 

301. Dymock (Isobell Bentley), eldest daughter of the 
Rev. Thomas Dymock of the Free Middle Church, Perth, and 
Ruth Bentley his wife, born 8th October, 1842; died ^t Perth, 
unmarried, i^th February, 1879. 



8o 



DYMOCK. 



302. Dymock (James Bentley), second son of the Rev. 

Thomas Dymock, Free Middle Church, Perth, and Ruth Bentley 
his wife, born 21st October, 1844; died, unmarried, 28th July, 
1874. 

303. Dymock (John), LL.D., Rector of the High School, 
Glasgow, an eminent scholar, author of valuable classical works, 
was born in 1766. His father, John Dymock, resided at Cartland, 
near Lanark. His mother's name was Margaret Tarvet. He 
died in Glasgow in 1838, having been twice married, first to 
Jean Lockhart who died in 1805. They had three sons and six 
daughters, the only survivor being the Rev. Th6mas Dymock 
(308). Dr. Dymock's second wife, Margaret Addie, to whom he 
was married in 181 1, was a daughter of the Rev. James Addie, 
minister of the parish of Kilmaronock in Dumbartonshire. She 
survived him. They had no family. 

304. Dymock (John), father of John Dymock, LL.D., lived 
and died at Cartland, near Lanark, where he and his father 
had a small holding as farmers. His wife's name was Margaret 
Tarvet. 

305. Dymock (Rev. John), minister of the Free Church of 
Scotland aj: Kemnay, Aberdeenshire, is eldest son of the Rev. 
Thomas Dymock, formerly of the Free Middle Church, Perth, 
and Ruth Bentley his wife. He was ordained in 1869, and mar- 
ried 14th September same year to Jessie B. Wilson, daughter of 
Andrew Wilson, merchant, Leith, and Jessie B. Boyd his wife. 
They have issue. 

306. Dymock (Margaret Addie), second daughter of the 
Rev. Thomas Dymock, formerly of the Free Middle Church, 
Perth, now residing in Edinburgh, and Ruth Bentley his wife. 

307. Dymock (Ruth), third daughter of the Rev. Thomas 
Dymock, latterly of the Free Middle Church, Perth, now residing 
in Edinburgh, and Ruth Bentley his wife. 

308. Dymock (Rev. Thomas), son of John Dymock, LL.D., 
Rector of the High School, Glasgow, and Jean Lockhart his 
first wife, was educated at Glasgow, graduated there, and 
licensed to preach the Gospel 4th December, 1833. He laboured 
for a time at Gilmerton, and was ordained as assistant at 



DYMOCK — FALCONKR. 



8x 



Arbroath in 1837. In November, 1838, he became minister of 
the "quo ad sacra" Church, Carnoustie. He joined the Free 
Church at the Disruption and was admitted minister of the Free 
Middle Church, Perth, in 1845, as colleague of the Rev. Dr. 
William Thomson. He became subsequently sole pastor, min- 
istering in that charge for thirty-six years, when increasing bodily 
infirmity caused him to retire. He removed with his family to 
Edinburgh, where he has since resided. He was married 29th 
October, 1839, to Ruth Bentley, the younger daughter of Pro- 
fessor James Bentley of King's College, Aberdeen, and Isobell 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife. They had four sons and three 
daughters, of whom there survive three sons and two daughters. 

309. Dymock (Thomas), a chartered accountant in Edin- 
burgh, and Secretary to the Scottish American Mortgage Co. ; 
third son of the Rev. Thomas Dymock, formerly minister of the 
Free Middle Church, Perth, and Ruth Bentley his wife. 

310. Dymock (Thomas Frederick), eldest son of the Rev. 
John Dymock, minister of the Free Church of Scotland, Kemnay, 
and Jessie B. Wilson his wife. 

3 1 1 ^ Dymock (Rev. William), minister of the Free Church 
of Scotland, Aberdour, Aberdeenshire, fourth son of the Rev. 
Thomas Dymock, formerly minister of the Free Middle Church, 
Perth, and Ruth Bentley his wife. 

311*. Eldridge (Harriet), wife of Commissary-General 
Gregory Haines, C.B., and mother of Lieutenant-Colonel Edward 
Eldridge Haines (547^). 

312. Ericsen (Charlotte), sister of John EricEricsen,F.R.S., 
LL.D., Surgeon Extraordinary to Her Majesty Queen Victoria, 
married Austin Cuvillier, merchant, Montreal, afterwards of 
London, England, and is mother of Charlotte Agnes Claire 
Cuvillier or Eraser (153). ,- 

313. Evans ( ), husband of Elizabeth Stuart, who was 

afterwards married to Arthur Dingwall of Rannieston, merchant, 
New York and St. John, New Brunswick. 

314. Falconer (Margaret), eldest daughter of Sir James 
Falconer of Phesdo in Kincardineshire, a Lord of Session, and 
Elizabeth Trent his wife, was married iith June, 1695, to the 



S2 



l-AKyl'IlAU. 



Hon. John Arbiithnott of Fordoun, second son of Robert 
second Viscount of Arbuthnott. They had several sons and 
daughters, one of the latter, Mary, married to John Douglass of 
Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo (270). [Some additional particulars 
respecting the Falconers of Phesdo will be found in the Appen- 
dix, and fragmentary notices of individuals of the name of Trent, 
who may have been relatives of Elizabeth Trent or Falconer, 
" Lady Phesdo."] 

315. Farquhar (Arthur), W. S., second and twin son of 
James Farquhar, Surgeon R.N., and Barbara Dingwall Fordyce 
his wife, was for some years in partnership as a writer to the 
signet witli John Shand, W. S. He succeeded to the estate of 
Elsick on his eider brother's death in 1846, but subsequently 
disposed of it, residing since in Aberdeen, and now at Loirston 
Cottage, in the Parish of Nigg. 

316. Farquhar (James), third and twin son of James Far- 
quhar, Surgeon, R.N., and Barbara Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
born 15th March, 181 3, entered on the study of medicine, but 
died on the 20th June, 1831, at Arthur Seat, near Aberdeen. 

317. Farquhar (James), Surgeon in the Royal Navy, son 
of Robert Farquhar of Newhall and Agnes Morison his wife, 
was born 7th December, 1759. After retiring from His Majesty's 
service he resided at Tullos in the Parish of Nigg, and at Aber- 
deen. He was married i8th January, 1810, to Barbara Dingwall 
Fordyce, his cousin, fourth daughter of Dr. Arthur Dingwall 
Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife. They had four 
sons. His death took place at Aberdeen, 26th March, 1819. 
His widow survived many years. / : . 

318. Farquhar (Margaret), daughter of Baillie Alexander 
Farquhar of Kintore, Aberdeenshire, and Elizabeth Harvey or 
Rae his wife, was married 15th November, 1798, to the Rev. 
James Shand of Grey Friars Church, Aberdeen ; latterly minis- 
ter of the parish of Mary Kirk, Kincardineshire. She died on 
the 1 2th January, 1840. Three of her sons are referred to in the 
notice of her husband, and one specially in that of John Harvey 
(586), where also reference will be found to her half-brother John 
Rae Harvey of Castle Semple, and his descendants. Her father 



. 



l-AKylUIAK. 



83 



ider 



and mother (liaillie and Mrs. Farquhar) both died in 1M07 within 
a few days of each other, after liaving lived together upwards of 
fifty years. Her brother, Robert Farquhar of Portland Place, 
London, and of Newark in Renfrewshire, married, and had an 
only child, a dauf^hter, Eliza Mary Farquhar, wife of Sir Michael 
Shaw Stewart of Greenock and Blackball, Bart. 

319. Farquhar (Robert), of Newhall, merchant and sta- 
tioner in Aberdeen, was a native of Banchory Ternan. He was 
probably son of William Farquhar and Mary Ross, who were 
married 22nd August, 1721, and whose eldest son Robert was 
born 3rd September, 1723. F'rom the Latin inscription on the 
gravestone in St. Nicholas Churchyard, Aberdeen, we learn that 
he was a nephew of Mr. Robert Farquhar, bookseller, who died 
unmarried 22nd April, 1753, at the age of sixty-one. The name 
of Mr. Robert Farquhar, schoolmaster at Banchory Ternan, is 
found in 1701 in lists kept to record visits paid to Marischal 
College, Aberdeen. The schoolmaster was most probably grand- 
father of the subject of this notice and the same as " Mr. Robert 
Farquhar in Crathes," whose son William was born in 1693. 
Robert Farquhar of Newhall had feued various portions of land 
in the parish of Fetteresso. Among these, in an old valuation 
of Kincardineshire, he is assessed as feuar of " Wedderhill, 
Quoties and Bellcraigs, Netherton and Jelly Brands, Auchlie, 
Mill of Elsick and Sketrawhead." He was twice marri'id. His 
first wife, Margaret Rose, died in her twenty-second year, on 21st 
April, 1750. On the 17th June, 1754, he was married to Agnes 
Morison, eldest daughter of James Morison of Elsick, Provost 
of Aberdeen. She is described in the notice of the marriage in 
the Aberdeen Journal as a " beautiful and most agreeable young 
lady." She died before her husband. His death took place in 
May, 1783. They had a large family. Of one of the sons, James, 
a surgeon in the Navy, a short notice is given (317). Two others, 
from their special services to their country, merit- incidental 
notice — William and Arthur. Of these, Major-General William 
Farquhar, of the Madras Engineer Corps, was for many years 
Resident and Commandant of Malacca, and was employed in 
the formation of the new settlement of Singapore, the chief local 
authority of which (civil and military) he exercised during the 



«4 



lARgUHAK -KKUGIK, 



first four years of its existence. Returning to his native land, 
he married and resided at Early Bank Cottage, Perth. Of his 
family, a daughter, Amelia, married Mr. Robert Lumsden, man- 
ager of the North of Scotland Hank, Aberdeen, and resides at 
Ferry Hill House, Aberdeen. Rear Admiral Sir Arthur Far- 
quhar, the other brother, was the sixth son of the subject of this 
notice and Agnes Morison his wife and was born in 1772. He 
was actively employed for many years, and particularly distin- 
guished himself by his gallant defence of his vessel, the Acheron, 
in 1805 against an enemy of overwhelming superiority. His last 
important service was in the reduction of Gluckstadt, 5th Janu- 
ary, 1814. He died at Carlogie Cottage, Aberdeenshire, 25th 
September, 1843. He was married and had a son Rear Admiral 
Arthur Farquhar, and a daughter who was married to John 
Michell of Forcett Hall, Yorkshire, and of Glassel, Kincardine- 
shire, incidentally noticed in the account of the family of Provost 
William Young in the Appendix. 

320. Farquhar (Robert), of Elsick, in Kincardineshire, 
Captain 28th reg't Madras Native Infantry, eldest son of James 
Farquhar, Surgeon, R.N., and Barbara Dingwall Fordyce his 
wife, was born 8th April, 181 1. On the death of his granduncle, 
the Rev. Dr. George Morison, he succeeded to the estate of 
Elsick, which, on his own death, as he was unmarried, fell to his 
only surviving brother. He died at sea 3rd September, 1846, on 
his passage from India to the Cape of Good Hope. 

321. Farquhar (Thomas Morison), youngest son of James 
Farquhar, Surgeon, R.N., and Barbara Dingwall Fordyce his 
wife; born 26th December, 1817 ; died 6th February, 1831. 

322. Fergie (Helen), eldest daughter of Thomas Fergie, 
portioner of Paxton, and Jean Wilson his wife, was baptized 
28th January, 1735. She inherited Chesterfield, in the Parish of 
Hutton (she and her sister Jean, afterwards Mrs. Smith, being 
co-heiresses). It is still in the possession of descendants. She 
was married to Alexander Drysdale, tenant of Lennel Hill in 
Berwickshire. They had a large family, one of their sons, John, 
being father of Alexander Drysdale of Castellau House, Dunbar 
(275)- 



IKKUIKR. 



«5 



323. Perrier (Alexander David), of Thistlebank, near 
Fcrf^us, Ontario (formerly of Helsyde, adjoininf^^, is the second 
son of Louis Henry Ferrier of Belsyde, Lnilithgowshire, and 
Charlotte Monro liis wife. He was educated at the Edinburgh 
Academy and University, and was for some time in a merchant's 
office in Quebec, where his father was latterly Collector of Customs. 
He became a settler in the Township of Nichol, near Fergus, 
Upper Canada, in 1H35. For several years he was Clerk to the 
Municipal Council of the County of Wellington, and represented 
the Centre Riding in the first Parliament of Ontario after the 
Confederation of the Provinces, acting at one time as a magis- 
trate, and latterly as a member of the Municipal Council and 
School Board, Fergus. He is also an elder of the Presbyterian 
Church. He was married 22nd March, 1850, to Magdalen 
Dingwall Fordyce, third daughter of Alexander Dingwall 
Fordyce, then of F'ergus, and Magdalen Dingwall his wife. 
They had no family. She died 13th September, 1872. 

324. Ferrier (Hay), Major-General, and Lieutenant-Gover- 
nor of Dunbarton Castle, was born in 1747. He was the 
youngest son of John Ferrier of Kirklands, Renfrewshire (a family 
of which some additional particulars will be found in the Appen- 
dix), and Grizel Hamilton his wife. General Ferrier purchased 
the estate of Belsyde, near Linlithgow, from his eldest brother 
and settled it on his only surviving son on his marriage. He 
died 6th April, 1824, and was buried at Dunbarton. He had 
been twice married; first to Jane McQueen, only child of John 
McQueen, younger brother of the well known Judge, Lord 
Braxfield. They had three sons and five daughters. His second 
wife, Agnes Cutlar, was the widow of William Lawrie of Red 
Castle, and only child of Roger Cutlar of Orroland in Galloway. 
They had no family. Of the five daughters of General Ferrier 
and Jane McQueen, Esther Wallace was the wife of William 
H. Finnie, H. E. L Co.'s Service, her cousin ; Helen Margaret 
married Thomas Lister, writer; Catharine Jane married W. J. 
Kemmingson of Woodbury Lodge, Devonshire, and Eliza Ann 
married J. Mclntyre, merchant, Liverpool. Mary died unmar- 
ried. Of the three sons the eldest, Louis Henry, as has been 
mentioned, had Belsyde settled on him by his father ; the other 
two, John McQueen and William Hamilton, died young. 




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86 



FRRRIER — FOOTK. 



11 II 

!l i; 



ill 



325. Ferrier (Louis Henry) of Belsyde, advocate, eldest 
son of Major-General Hay Ferrier and Jane McQueen his first 
wife, was born 5th August, 1776. He was admitted to tiie Scot- 
tish Bar in 1798, and was afterwards a Commissioner of Customs 
and latterly Collector of Customs at Quebec, where he died 28th 
January, 1833. He had been at one time a Lieutenant in the 
Scotch Brigade (94th Foot), a. id was Lieutenant-Colonel of the 
Linlithgowshire Yeomanry. He was married on the loth Nov- 
ember, 1808, to Charlotte Monro, daughter of Dr. Alexander 
Monro (Secundus), Professor of Anatomy in the University of 
Edinburgh, and Catharine Inglis his wife. They had four sons 
and three daughters. The eldest daughter, Katharine, married 
her cousin-german Robert M. Binning, Madras Civil Service. 
Jane married the Rev. George C. Hall, Vicar of Churcham, 
Gloucestershire, and the youngest, Charlotte, was twice married ; 
first to Sir John E. Campbell of Kildalloig, Bart., representative 
of the Campbells of Auchinbreck, and afterwards to James Gar- 
diner, advocate, Sheriff-Substitute of Argyllshire. The eldest son. 
Hay, was a Captain and Brevet-Major, 48th Madras N. I., and by 
his wife, Catharine Maria de Wind of Malacca, had four sons 
and two daughters. The eldest of the sons, Captain Louis J. G. 
Ferrier, R.E., perished in the ill-fated Eiirydice, and was suc- 
ceeded in Bels3'de by his next brother, Alexander Walter, Major, 
R.A. Of the two other sons of the subject of this notice, Alex- 
ander David (323) settled in Canada ; George Abercrombie, 
Captain, 24th Foot, died unmarried. 

326. Foote (Alexander Leith Ross), D.D., minister of the 
Second Charge in Brechin, and after the Disruption, of the Free 
Church of Scotland there, was born in 1804. He was the 
youngest of the eleven children of the Rev. Robert Foote, mini- 
ster of the Parish of Fettercairn, and Jane Smith his wife. He 
studied for the Church, and was licensed to preach ♦^he Gospel. 
In 1833 he was appointed assistant and successor to the Rev. Mr- 
Whitson at Brechin, and from 1837 had as his colleague till 
shortly after the Disruption Dr. James McCosh, the able theolo- 
gical writer, and President subsequently of Princeton College, 
New Jersey. On the 20th April, 1870, in recognition of his 
abilities as a preacher and deep and original thinker, the Uni- 



FOOTE. 



87 



versily of Edinburgh conferred on Mr. Foote the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity, and on the 22nd December of the same year 
he was presented by the members of his congregation and other 
friends with his portrait. At the meeting at which the presen- 
tation was made, the Earl of Dalhousie presided, and in his reply 
to the chairman's address, Dr. Foote observed in a characteristic 
speech, that he never said hard things on brethren who took 
opposite sides from him on the Voluntary Controversy, and he 
still hoped to see the scattered fragments of Presbyterianism 
united in one grand Church. He wished a place in the people's 
hearts — that had always been his ambition. " The kind of 
memory for me," he eloquently and touchingly observed, " is to 
be enshrined in the innermost recesses of the hearts of my peo- 
ple. Loved by all, feared by none, I would lay my bones in the 
auld kirkyard." "Lay me," he added, "in my mother earth, 
cover me with the green sward, let the hand of affection plant 
flowers on my grave. There let me lie, side by side with my 
parishioners, till the light of the morning breaks, the trumpet 
sounds, and the dead arise." Dr. Foote was three times married. 
By his first wife, Margaret Dingwall Fordyce, youngest daughter 
of William Dingwall Fordyce of Techmuiry, he had no family. 
She died in 1842. His second wife, Jessie Murray, died 9th 
October, 1855 ; the third, Alison Keir Cunningham, died on the 
4th of April, 1862. The following estimate of his character is 
taken from the local paper at the time of his death in September, 
1878, and the sermons preached on the occasion in Brechin : 
" His mind was not only naturally richly gifted, and of a high 
order and uncommon type ; it was also thoroughly cultivated 
and well furnished. He was always in revolt against small and 
one-sided views of large questions, or indeed of any question 
whatever. Never was any man less in danger of becoming fana- 
ticized about any pre:>ent day question, and the deliverance from 
the danger of fanaticism was always secured to him by that 
characteristic mental attitude, which might be called aloofness, 
and which in the first instance he habitually assumed in relation 
to every question that presented itself to him. He seemed to 
hold off from it until he should have time to see all round it, 
and know every side and aspect of it, just as he would hold off 



88 



i<<)()ri-:. 



i ill 11 



from a stranger for a time, looking at him and all over him with 
a critical, questioning eye, before he would enter into cordial 
relations with him. Of keen susceptibilities, he would not com- 
mit himself <^o all men, and strangers often misunderstood him ; 
but those who saw beneath the surface found out his many 
admirable qualities. He had a good, loving, noble, and generous 
heart ; there was no malice in him, nothing mean or low, but 
everything high and true and pure. God had blessed him, and 
conferred on him the- means of doing good, and, as a faithful 
steward, he did not abuse the trust of God. His preaching w^as 
analytic ; it was distinguished by a keen insight into, and thorough 
knowledge of, human nature ; it was richly illustrative, rousing, 
appealing, affectionately persuasive, and, above all, Scriptural 
and evangelical. His style and manner of preaching, although 
somewhat peculiar to the modern taste, was exceedingly attrac- 
tive. His moods were at times changeable. He would break 
out into the broadest Doric, and on such occasions, outraging all 
orthodox elocutionary laws, he gave out his thoughts, slowly and 
laboriously ; buv suddenly, as if recollecting himself, or moved 
by the impetuous promptings of his spirit, he rushed on with 
lightning speed to the goal he had set up, convincing the doubter, 
softening the obdurate, and making manifest to all, the reason- 
ableness and wisdom of the truth of which he was so eminent an 
example and so distinguished a teacher. He was earnest, loving 
and untiring in seeking to win souls to Jesus Christ, which, after 
all, was the grand aim of his life, the one work he delighted in 
above all others, the one thing on which he had set his heart. 

He tried each art, reproved each dull delay, 
Allured to brighter worlds, and led the way. 

He published "Closing Scenes in the Life of Christ," " Views of 
Faith," "Aspects of Christianity," and " Incidents in the Life of 
Our Saviour." An extract is subjoined as a specimen of Dr. 
Foote's style and of his method in presenting truth. It is taken 
from his " Incidents in the Life of Our Saviour " : "It is a hard 
task any one has undertaken to enlighten and teach an ignorant 
soul. But when once a faint glimmering of light begins to break 
in upon the mind, a great victory has been gained. The light 
will grow and render other additions more easy. Some are 



FOOTE. 



Sg 



possessed of a wonderful aptness and ingenuity in presenting the 
truth under simple and engaging forms. Our Saviour excelletl 
in this above all other teachers. How simply, yet beautifully 
is salvation set before the woman of Samaria, in its nature, under 
tiie emblem of water that cleanses, refreshes, and is the very life 
of all things ; in its freencss, as the gift of God, and to be had for 
the asking ; in its fulness, as a well of water springing up to 
everlasting life. Hard words, abstract terms, and deep and 
mystical phrases would have been quite out of place on such an 
occasion. The poor learner needs to be fed with the very milk 
of the Word ; strong meat she may relish by-and-by. Let us 
take a lesson from the Great Teacher in this respect. When 
we set ourselves to the truly noble and Christ-like work of 
' instructing the ignorant and them that are out of the way,' let us 
labour to be simple ; let us strive to present religion in as invit- 
ing a garb as we can, consistently with its high and holy char- 
acter ; let us be determined to be understood. There is a 
language, a phraseology, peculiar to a few of the most highly 
advanced in religious knowledge and experience ; such language 
we must lay aside. But there is an universal language common 
to all ; let us learn this, and clothe our ideas in this. Let us 
come down to their level, and by-and-by we will bring them up 
to ours. There is a conscience in every man ; let us address 
ourselves in the first instance mainly to this. There are certain 
great conceptions and convictions in every mind, of God, duty, 
judgment to come ; let us take these for granted, and not waste 
time proving them. T^liere are certain wants and necessities in 
every heart, a certain longing after happiness which the world 
cannot satisfy; let us seize upon this, and show how Jesus alone 
can fill the soul and make it glad. There are certain fundamen- 
tal truths that lie at the foundation of the Gospel system, and 
constitute what may be called essential, universal Christianity; 
let us give prominence to these : 'God so loved the world, that 
He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in 
Him should not perish, but have everlasting life.' ' It is a faithful 
saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Jesus Christ came 
into the world to save sinners.' 'As Moses lifted up the serpent 
in the wilderness, even so must the Son of Man be lifted up, 



90 



•OOTF. 



I ill 



m ;i 



M V 



that whosoever beheveth in Him should not perish, but have 
everlasting hfe.' All our success, under God, lies in the sunpli- 
city and in the adaptation of our instructions to the case of such 
persons as we now contemplate ; and it is for want of this that 
so little good is done." 

327. Foote (Charles), A.M., graduated at the University of 
St. Andrew's, gth May, 1722. He was hcensed in 1729, and 
settled in March, 1732, as minister of the Parish of Kinfauns in 
Perthshire. He was born about 1702, and continued at Kin- 
fauns till his death, 21st October, 1758. By his wife, Barbara 
Stewart, he had a son, Robert (No. 328). 

328. Foote (Rev. Robert), son of the Rev. Charles Foote, 
minister of Kinfauns, and Barbara Stewart his wife, was born 
6th March, 1742. He was educated at the Grammar School of 
Perth, and studied at the University of St. Andrew's. He was 
licensed to preach the Gospel, and by the interest of a relative, 
John Craigie, Esq., obtained a presentation to the Parish of 
Eskdalemuir, in Dumfriesshire, where he was settled in 1768. 
He remained there till 6th August, 1773, when he was translated 
to Fettercairn. In the earlier part of his ministry there, he had 
to overcome the prepossessions of the greater part of the parish- 
oners for the assistant of the former minister— a good man, but 
one whose settlement over a congregation of the Church of 
Scotland was impossible, as, both by word and writings, he had 
violently abused her teachers and opposed her standards. This 
was Mr. John Barclay, who afterwards 'formed the denomina- 
tion of Christians called " Bereans." By the excellence of his 
pulpit ministrations, his winning conduct, his complete forgive- 
ness of his opponents, and his readiness to serve all who stood 
in need of temporal or spiritual aid, the people became attached 
to Mr. Foote. To a mean, selftsh spirit he was a stranger. He 
was remarkable for frankness of manner. Free from deceit, he 
suspected none in others — " an Israelite indeed, in whom was 
no guile." His eldest son and biographer observes: 'He 
preached the true doctrines of the grace of God, as clearly 
revealed m His Word." A volume of his sermons with memoir, 
was published the year after his death. He was married in 



i 



FORDKS. 



91 



1778 to Jean Smith, daughter of the Rev. James Smith, minister 
of Garvock, and Mary Napier his wife. She survived till 19th 
December, 1841, when she died in her eighty-third year. His own 
death took place ist July, 1809. Of eleven children five died 
before their father. Two sons became ministers of the Gospel. 
Of the youngest, the Rev. Dr. A. L. R. Foote, of Brechin, a 
more particular account will be found in this Record (No. 326.) 
The eldest, the Rev. Dr. James Foote, was for some time 
minister at Logic Pert. He was translated to the East Church 
of Aberdeen in 1824, and after the Disruption v/as minister of the 
Free Church (East). He was a pious, able and highly esteemed 
minister, author of " Lectures on the Gospel of Luke," in six vol- 
umes, and of a treatise on " Effectual Calling." He got the degree 
of D.D. from Marischal College in 1850, and died 24th May, 1856, 
in his 74th year. He was married but had no children. Dr. Islay 
Burns, in his memoir of his father, " The Pastor of Kilsyth," 
speaks of Dr. James Foote when he was a young man as one of 
the minister of Dun's nearest brethren in the ministry — " a 
young minister of great promise and eminent acceptance," 
distinguished ei>en then, b}' all those qualities of sterling worth, 
excellent gifts, and genuine warmth of heart " which character- 
ized him through life," and which the compiler of this Record 
had personal acquaintance with and witli their possessor. 

329'. Forbes (Janet), third daughter of William P'orbes, 
coppersmith in Aberdeen, and Janet D3^ce his wife, baptized 
7th June, 1758, was married 8th March, 1784, to James Allar- 
dyce, Collector of Customs there, and died 13th June 1829. She 
was mother of William Allardyce (15). 

329-. Forbes (Jean), daughter of Sir William Forbes, of 
Monymusk, Bart., was married 13th January, 1719, to the Rev. 
George Moir, minister of Kintore. She is believed to have been 
mother of the Rev. William Moir of Fyvie. 

330. Forbes (Katharine), eldest daughter of William Forbes, 
coppersmith in Aberdeen, and Janet Dyce his wife, was born in 
1747, and married in January, 1 771, to John Abercrombie, manu- 
facturer and Provost of Aberdeen. She was mother of Janet 
Abercrombie or Dingwall (i), and died in September, 1785. 



1± 



92 



FORBRS — FORDYCF.. 



I 



331. Forbes (Katharine Scott), wife of James Cromhie, 
manufacturer, Grandholm Mills, Aberdeen, and mother of 
Annabella F. Crombie or Littlejohn (142) and Jane Crombie or 
Littlejohn (145). 

332. Forbes (William), coppersmith, in Aberdeen, who 
was born in 1708 and died 24th May, 1762, was a son of George 
Forbes, whose father lived in Colquhony, Strathdon, Aberdeen- 
shire. He was married about the year 1740 to Janet Dyce, 
daughter of the Rev. William Dyce, minister of Belhelvie, and 
Katharine Anderson his wife. Of their large family two sons 
may be noticed here. Two of the daughters are especially 
mentioned (329, 330). George Forbes, the eldest son, followed 
his father's business in Aberdeen. He died in 1791, and is 
referred to in the Appendix, in the notice of the family of Lumsden 
of Corrachrie. William Forbes, another son, carried on the 
business his father and brother did, in London. The large 
fortune he acquired was due to an early hint he had got of its 
being the intention of Government to use copper sheathing for 
ships of war in place of the coal tar coating previously employed. 
With native shrewdness he bought up all the copper he could 
find, and obtaining the contract from Government acquired a 
large fortune. This enabled him to purchase the forfeited 
estates of Callander and Almond, in Stirlingshire, which his 
descendants still enjoy. He was twice married, and died in 
1 81 5. His son and successor married Lady Louisa Antonietta 
Wemyss, second daughter of the Earl of Wemyss and March, 
and represented the County of Stirling in Parliament. 

333. Forbes (Agnes), daughter of George Forbes of 
Skellater, in the Parish of Cushnie, Aberdeenshire, married 
Robert Lumsden of Corrachrie, probably about 1700. They 
were parents of the Rev. James Lumsden of Corrachrie. [The 
Forbeses of Skellater are descended from a younger son of the 
first Laird of Brux, who branched off about 1400.] 

334. Fordyce (Agnes), daughter of Provost George Fordyce 
of Aberdeen and Isobell Walker his first wife, was married 
about 1703, to James Black, merchant and Dean of Guild of 
Aberdeen. They had five sons and five daughters, the youngest 
born in 1724. 



FORnVCF.. 



93 



335. Fordyce (Alexander), banker in London, the younj^'est 
son of Provost George Fordyce of Aberdeen and Elizabeth 
Brown his second wife, was born at Eggie in the Parish of* 
Belhelvie, and baptized there on the 7th August, 1729. His 
father died when he was Httle more that^. four years of age, and 
his mother did not hve to suffer as other near relatives did, from 
the consequences of his reckless transactions. He was appren- 
ticed to Baillie John Dingwall, but the stocking manufacture 
appeared to him far too narrow a sphere, and was soon relin- 
quished ; and he proceeded to London to push his way. The 
public prints of the time must suffice for an account of his short- 
lived success, which unhappily drew him into rash and increased 
speculation and unjustifiable means for advancement ; and 
latterly for ave'-'ing the consequences of his infatuation. The 
following statement appeared at the time (1772) in the Scots 
Magazine, under the title of " Memoirs of a late celebrated 
Banker " : " Mr. Fordyce was bred a hosier at Aberdeen, but 
soon quitted the business and repaired to the metropolis, where 
he obtained employment as an out-door clerk to Mr. Boldero the 
banker. His uncommon attention to business led to his being 
admitted as a partner in the firm of Messrs. R. N. & Co. 
Scarcely, however, had he been thus established when he began 
to speculate in the Stock Alley with great success, especially 
when the preliminaries of peace were signed, of which he gained 
earlier intelligence than most others ; but chiefly on the great 
rise of India Stock about the year 1765. Unfortunately for him 
this success led to an increase in the sphere of his speculations. 
Still he was apparently favoured. He purchased a large estate, 
and had a most elegant villa at Roehampton. He became a can- 
didate for a certain burgh, upon which, though he was unsuc- 
cessful, he spent nearly £14,000 ; and to render him the popular 
candidate at the first vacancy, erected an hospital, and estab- 
lished other charities. Failing in this, he sought advancement 
through another channel ; married a lady of quality whose por- 
trait was displayed at the Exhibition, and her picture in every 
print-shop. The reverse, however, soon came. Fluctuation of 
stocks, owing to the Falkland Island affair, gave a shock to his 
finances. To make up deficiencies through speculation, he 



11 :| 




94 



I'OKDYCE. 



employed a consi(leral)le sum of the Company's stock. His 
partners hecamt; alarmed and remonstrated ; but were contemp- 
tuously unheeded. He threatenetl to dissolve the partnership, 
and leave them to manage a business they were unequal to if 
they resisted his operations, and he is said to have deceived 
them as to the real state of matters, by artifice. But the tide 
had turned against him, and so considerable were his engage- 
ments, which he tound himself unable to fulfil, that he absented 
himself from the business ; in consequence of which there was a 
stoppage of payment by the firm, and an advertisement that his 
partners were not privy to his proceedings. The Company 
subsequently became bankrupt, affecting many other houses 
which were concerned witli them." The foregoing is only slightly 
abbreviated from the account wliich appeared. The stoppage 
of payment by " Neale, James, Fordyce and Down " took place 
on the loth June, 1772 ; and, notwithstanding the generally slow 
communication then, news of the disaster reached Edinburgh 
in forty-three hours. Most of the banks there had considerable 
dealings with the firm, or with others which had, so that 
stoppage was the consequence on the part of Fordyce, Malcolm 
& Co., Arbuthnott and Guthrie, William Alexander and Sons, 
and Gibson and Balfour. The consequences of the failure were 
widespread, and a strong feeling of indignation was excited by 
the conduct of the unhappy man through whom they had arisen. 
The Rev. Mr. Toller, his brother's former colleague, animadverted 
three years after, on the transactions just noticed, and on the 
subject of this article in " Sermons to Tradesmen," in the follow- 
ing terms : " Mr. Fordyce had a mind not ill-formed for com- 
merce, and from his early success in it was enabled to live 
respectably. If his views had extended no further it would have 
been well, but his ambition was unbounded. The revenue of a 
kingdom could hardly have sufficed to have executed his 
schemes. Large sums were borrowed of one and of another. 
His friends advanced liberally, and so high was his reputation, 
that they had no doubt of their effects being secured. But the 
event proved that they were wretchedly deceived. His affairs 
were embarrassed, his difficulties increased, and at length grew 
inextricable. A total stoppage ensued. The issue of a com- 



lounvcK. 



95 



mission of bankruptcy by some chicanery was prevented ; and 
l)ut a small part of his enormous debts have been paid to this 
very hour. His fall was like the fall of a towering structure 
which overwhelms numbers with its ruins." While faithfully 
recording what has been said to the discredit of the subject of 
this notice, for very much of which there must nave been too 
much foundation, it is gratifying to be able to present any 
extenuating observation. The following remarks on the subject 
are from Chambers' Biographical Dictionary : " Mr. Fordyce, 
through the patronage of his brother Sir William, who had 
acquired wealth, high reputation and extensive practice, was 
enabled to enter upon an unusually extensive series of transac- 
tions, which though sound in themselves exposed him to a male- 
volent combination of his brethren in trade ; and hence the great 
bankruptcy of Fordyce & Co., which may be termed one of the 
most important domestic events in Britain during the latter part 
of the eighteenth century." The sad stain that nad fallen on the 
character of the unhappy defaulter was of course keenly felt by 
near relatives. One of these, his sister Mrs. Spence, in reply to 
a letter of sympathy from a cousin, Mr. Alexander Dingwall of 
Aberdeen, grandfather of the compiler of this Record, says (loth 
November, 1772) : " I can only thank you, and submit with all 
the patience and humility I can to the sorrow that has involved 
so many friends and others in distress. Heaven knows what is 
best for all of us, and let us not charge the Judge of all the earth 
foolishly, though in wisdom He casts down as well as lifts up. I 
am not able to give you an account of any of my brother's affairs, 
not being acquainted with particulars ; but trust they will turn 
out better for the creditors and for his own character than has 
been expected by many. I pray God they may. " This natural 
desire would not appear to have been gratified ^ and respecting 
the years which passed between Mr. Fordyce's failure and his 
death we are in the dark. He had been married on the 20th 
June, 1770, to Lady Margaret Lindsay, second daughter of 
James fifth Earl of Balcarres and his Countess, Anne Dalrymple. 
They had one child if not more, but none survived long. Of his 
wife's tender concern for him and sympathy in their mutual 
trouble, touching evidence remains in her own words as given 



i: 






if' 

ill 'i 

n ii 



i 



96 



pokpycj:. 



hy Lord Lindsay in his •' Lives of the Lindr.ays," and trans- 
cribed in this Record (661). Mr. Fordyce uas a freeholder of 
Aberdeenshire, havinf; (luahhed on the lands of North Coli)na 
in his native Parish of Helhelvie, and shortly after his marriage 
was elected Lord Kector of Marischal College. His death took 
place at Hammersmith, near London, after a long illness, on 8th 
Septemoer, 17H9. 

336. Fordyce (Alexander), third son of John Fordyce of 
Gask and Barbara (iordon his wife, was baptized 9th Febrnary, 
1734. He was lost sight of by his relatives, and in 1769 it was 
concluded that he was dead. 

337. Fordyce (Anne), second daughter of John Fordyce of 
Gask and I^arbara Ciordon his wife, baptized 6th July, 1723, 
died in childhood. 

338. Fordyce (Anne , sixth daughter of John Fordyce of 
Gask and Barbara Gordon his wife, baptized 20th April, 1731, 
died unmarried. 

, 339" Fordyce (Anne), eldest daughter of Baillie Robert 
Fordyce of Aberdeen and Anne Reid his wife, was baptized 3rd 
February, 1757, and married in March, 1776, to David Steuart, 
merchant and Lord Provost of Edinburgh. They had issue. 

340. Fordyce (Barbara), daughter of Provost George For- 
dyce of Aberdeen and Isobell Walker his first wife, was married 
(probably about 1705) to George French, litster or dyer in Aber- 
deen, had issue, and died before 1727. 

341. Fordyce (Barbara), third daughter of John Fordyce 
of Gask and Barbara Gordon his wife, was baptized 26th Jan- 
uary, 1726, and married in October, 1749, to James Mackie in 
Castleton, Parish of King Edward, who subsequently purchased 
the estate of Gask, which he held for a short time ; no account 
has come to us of any children of the marriage. She died before 
her husband, who afterwards married a widow lady, Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Forbes or Phillips, daughter of Mr. Forbes of Boyndlie. 
She had two sons of her first marriage, John and Alexander 
Phillips. The former, a Major in the Army, left ;^6oo to the 
Parish of Forgue. 



lOKDVi.)'. 



97 



342. Fordyce (Barbara), fifth dauf^lUer of Provost George 
Fordyce of Aberdeen and Elizabeth Brown his second wife, was 
l)aptizetl ijtli November 1727 (receiving the same name as her 
lialf-sisler Mrs. French, who had ched sliortly l^efore her birth). 
Slie was married ist June, 1752, to Lieutenanf Robert Hay, 
R.N., who was bitterly one of the magistrates of Old Aberdeen- 
They had issue. 

343. Fordyce (David), Professor of Philosophy in Marischai 
College, Aberdeen, was the second son of Provost George F'or- 
dyce of Aberdeen and F^lizabeth Hrown his second wife. He 
was born ist April, 171 1, received his earlier education at the 
Grammar School of Aberdeen, and entered Marischai College 
in 1724. Having taken the degree ot M.A. in 1728, and then 
studied Theology, he was licensed to preach the Gospel, but was 
never settled as pastor over a congregation. For a short time 
he was domestic chaplain in the family of a Mr. Hopkins in 
Essex, and in 1742 was appointed to a Professorship in 
Marischai College. The range of subjects embraced in the 
course was much more extensive then^ and his satisfactory dis- 
charge of his duties showed that he had a well furnisiied mind. 
High expectations were also received from the publication 
anonymously in 1745 of " Dialogues on Education," and of a 
" Treatise on Moral Philosophy," 1748. His sudden death towards 
the close of 1751 speedily extinguished such expectations. The 
Hopewell, of Leith in which he had embarked at Rotterdam on 
his return from a tour in F'rance and Italy, and other parts of 
Europe, encountered a storm on the coast of Holland, and was 
lost with ten passengers, of whom he was one. The sad event 
is alluded to by his brother James in " Addresses to the Deity," 
and also in a volume of " Miscellaneous Poems." In the former he 
says : " At length the morning of the Resurrection will dawn, 
when the sea shall give up its prey, and the dead shall rise incor- 
ruptible. Then shall I meet in perfect glory a much loved and 
long lamented brother, the stay of his father's house, the comfort 
of his widowed mother, my councillor and example in youth, of 
whom the devouring waves were permitted to bereave us at the 
instant that we vvere rejoicing in hope to welcome his return 
from foreign lands, full of honour, and rich in accumulated 



98 



FORDYCE. 



i H 



treasures of learniiif^, eloquence and wisdom." ..." With 

what congratulations would his venerable ancestors and a bright 

circle of seraphic spirits hail him in gaining so early the shores 

of immortality!" The other reference is contained in an Ode 

on the recent death of men — distinguished by their talents, viz. : 

And oh ! that brother most endeared 
To youth, by him in virtue reared 

But most of all to me. 
Yet, while I mourn the direful night 
That robbed us of our souls' delight. 

Great God, I bend to Thee. 

« 

He appears to have submitted the manuscript of his work on 
Education to the younger Principal Blackwell, whose critical 
observations on returning part have been preserved : " I cannot," 
he says, " digest the form of the Treatise. As it now stands it is 
neither letters nor conversations, but a faint unnecessary medley • 
of both (as to form 1 mean, not the materials). If they be letters, 
make them really such, which, indeed your subject forbids, and 
the beautiful characters and incidents with which you have 
already enriched the work must be effaced on that model. If 
they be conversations, as they are and must be, be you at some 
pains to make them truly so. Well may they be related, and 
history and narrative interwoven, but you may call them novels, 
essays, estimates, etc., with as much propriety as letters of 
which they contain little more than ' Sir ' at the head and ' your 
humble servant ' at the foot." Anticipating the possibility of 
what actually occurred he had entrusted to his brother James in 
finished manuscript the Avork entitled " Theodorus or the Art of 
Preaching," to be given to the public by him " should Providence 
not permit him to return in life." This was accordingly done in the 
following year, and an extract is subjoined : *' Be master of your 
subject," he says, " and as it were inspired with ix., and light and 
order will naturally dawn upon it. Everything will fall into the , 
place v/hich becomes it best ; one part will introduce another just 
at the time that the minds of the audience are prepared to receive 
it, and what follows will support and fortify that which went 
before ; the more plain and simple truths will pave the way to 
the more abstruse and complex ones ; and the proofs or illustra- 
tions will still rise one above the other in a regular and easy 
gradation till the whole force of conviction breaks upon the 



FORDYCR. 



99 



niiiul, and allows you full scope to play upoM twery tender and 
passionate string that" belongs to the heart of man. Then be 
sure to feel every sentiment yourself, and to enter first into every 
passion you want to communicate to others, and unless your 
imagination plays its part ver}' ill, the boldest figures, the 
strongest images, and the most moving expressions will pour in 
upon you and animate 3'our whole discourse and manner with 
such life and spirit as cannot fail of winding up the hearer's mind 
to its utmost pitch of attention and of passion. If you are 
thoroughly touched with the importance and dignity of the great 
subjects of religion and virtue, you will not be ambitious of the 
reputation of a fine speaker, nor study the little ornaments of a 
gaudy eloquence. That man who has ranged every thought, 
measured every sentence, transition and circumstance of his dis- 
course, and settled rhe whole method of his delivery in his closet 
may be indeed an elegant and correct speaker; but I will venture 
to say he can never be a popular and powerful orator. He will 
fall into a cold phlegmatic manner of speaking, or if he throw 
himself into a forced heat, it will appear artificial, or else evapo- 
rate in a tedious insipid sameness of voice and action, either of 
which are the dead weights of genuine eloquence — -whereas, if 
the speaker be thoroughly enlightened and warmed with his 
subject, and feels himself the passion he means to inspire, nature 
in that case will suggest the most becoming ornaments and 
significant phrases, will vary the tone of the voice according to 
the rises and falls and different turns of the passion, and in fine, 
will animate with the most expressive air, look and action accord- 
ing to the several feelings and movements of the mind, for 
nature and passion are more able prompters than the most 
eminent masters of elocution. Such a speaker with all his 
repetitions, breaks, inaccuracies and chasms in discourse, will 
force his way through all opposition into the bowels and soul of 
the hearer, and will kindle and set on fire his whole frame, whilst 
your smooth and studied declaimer will send him away, as cool 
and unmoved as he found him." Professor 'Fordyce was never 
married. 

344. Fordyce (Elizabeth), third daughtei of Provost 
George Fordyce of Aberdeen and Elizabeth Brown his second 



.\' 



lOO 



FORDYCK. 






wife, was baptized roth August, 171 8 ; died at Eggie, in the 
Parish of Belhelvie, and was buried 22nd November, 1729. 

345. Fordyce (Elizabeth), youngest daughter of Provost 
George Fordyce of Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Brown his wife, was 
baptized 17th January, 1731, and married 15th December, 1766, 
to Dr. James Spence, ph3^sician in Dunkeld, afterwards of Dur- 
ham. She died Sth June, 1777, leaving a daughter Ehzabeth 
Isabella (824). Mrs. Spence was distinguished through hfe, the 
Aberdeen Journal observed, "by the goodness of her heart, the 
warmth of her friendship, and the sincerity and steadiness of her 
attachments." 

346. Fordyce (Elizabeth), seventh daughter of John For- 
dyce of Gask, and Barbara Gordon his wife, baptized in May, 
1732, died unmarried. 

347. Fordyce (Elizabeth), second daughter of Baillie 
Robert Fordyce of Aberdeen and Anne Reid his wife, baptized 
1 8th September, 1759, was married 22nd June, 1781, to James 
Miller, formerly of Jamaica, afterwards of Glasgow. TheY had 
one daughter, Anne Miller or Garthshore Stirling (710). 

348. Fordyce (George), the first of the family, chiefly re- 
ferred to in this Record, of whom any account has reached us, 
was -buried in the churchyard of Turriff, Aberdeenshire. The 
tombstone over his remains bears the inscription : " Here lyes an 
honest man called George Fordyce in Haughes of Ashogle, who 
departeu this life May 6, anno 1681. As also Barbara Thom- 
son his spouse, who died 9th January, 1695." A ratification of 
the Regality of Slains given in 1701, to John, Earl of Erroll, in- 
cludes " All those two plough-gate of land of Ashogill, sometime 
possessed by George Fordyce, and which were wadset to John 
Ogston." The old form of the name of the farm was probably 
Auchinshogle. In 1378, John Eraser obtained from his brother 
Alexander Eraser, Lord of the Barony of Cowy, a charter of the 
lands of " Plaidy, Delgaty and Achynschogyll, all in the Parish 
of Turriff." From 1681, when the subject of this notice died, 
till the death of his widow in 1695, the farm may have been 
carried on by his younger son, afterwards Provost George For- 
dyce of Aberdeen, who is known at all events, to have been there 



nil 



I'ORUYCE. 



lot 



in 1690. John Ogilvy was the tenant in i6g6when the Poll Tax 
Book was prepared. Besides Provost George Fordyce and his 
elder brother John Fordyce of Gask, Isobell Fordyce, wife of 
William Blachrie, merchant in Aberdeen, was probably also a 
child of George Fordyce and Barbara Thomson. There is 
ground for believing that the subject of this notice was related 
to the family which afterwards owned the estate of Ayton in 
Berwickshire, of which some particulars will be found in the 
Appendix. 

349. Fordyce (George) of Broadford, merchant and Provost 
of Aberdeen, was born in 1663. He was a younger son of George 
Fordyce in Hauglis of Ashogle, Parish of Turriff, Aberdeenshire, 
and Barbara Thomson his wife. He was eighteen years of age 
when his father died (i68i) and from his name appearing in i6go 
as " George Fordyce in Haughs of Ashogle " at the baptism of 
a relative's child in Aberdeen, it may be supposed that he carried 
on his father's farm, perhaps till his mother's death. He must 
have been married while there to Isobell Walker his first wife, 
as in 1696 when the Poll Tax Bool: shows that he was residing 
at Mill of Bruxie, in the Parish of Old Deer, and carrying on a 
mercantile business on a stock of 5,000 merks, he had '*a wife 
and fyve children." He was still there in the end of 1699, but 
before his wife's death in 1705, he had moved to Aberdeen, 
where she was buried, and where two of their daughters were 
already married. On coming to Aberdeen he commenced busi- 
ness, and his name soon occurs as a member of the Town 
Council. In 1710 he was one of the Baillies ; and between 
1 7 18 and 1728, he was chosen Provost six times. For a few 
years before his death, he had a sub-lease of the forfeited lands 
of the Panmure family (belonging to the York Building Com- 
pany) in Belhelvie, and resided at Eigie in that parish. If the 
relationship to the Ayton family existed, which is alluded to in 
the notice of his father, it may have partly led to this lease, 
Thomas Fordyce of Ayton being the company's factor, while the 
laird of Ayton's brothers-in-law Sir Archibald Grant of Mony- 
must, and Mr. Alexander Garden of Troup, were two of the 
original lessees. In 1724, a power of attorney was given to 
Provost Fordyce by the Company to present a minister to the 



102 



FORDYCE. 



Kirk of Belhelvie, and on this it no doubt was that his brother- 
in-law the Rev. David Brown got the appointment in 1725, which 
he held nearly twenty years. In January 1726, Provost Fordyce 
was living at Eigie, and in August 1729, is styled " tacksman of 
the lands of Belhelvie. He died on the 13th May, 1733, and his 
eldest son, George, succeeded him in Broadford, and also in the 
lease of the lands in Belhelvie. Gregory Sharpe's *' East Prospect 
of Aberdeen, 1732," represents " Provost Fordyce's summer 
house" at the right hand of the picture. This was probably on 
Broadford. Douglas in his "East Coast of Scotland" 1780, 
speaking of the improvement of moorland, north-west of Aber- 
deen, says: "A piece of low, swampy ground called the Pro- 
vost's Mire, because formerly the property of Provost George 
Fordyce, has been accurately drained, intersected with sunk 
stone fences, and has liberally repaid the expense laid out on it." 
The inscription on Provost Fordyce's tombstone says : " By his 
integrity in public and goodness in private life he left a better 
monument in the memory of the good than could be raised to 
him by his posterity." Besides the five children of his first 
marriage, sixteen of the second will be found on these pages, 
several of whom became distinguished. 

350. Fordyce (George), second son of John Fordyce of 
Gask,in the Parish of Turriff, and Isobell Lindsay his wife, died 
5th December, 1715, and was buried in Turriff Churchyard, as 
appears from the tombstone covering the remains of his grand- 
parents. 

351. Fordyce (George) of Broadford, merchant in Aber- 
deen, eldest son of Provost George Fordyce and Elizabeth 
Brown his wife, was born 5th June, 1709. He succeeded to the 
lease of the Belhelvie lands on his father's death. He married 
Marjory Stuart, but died nth September, 1736, two months 
before the birth of their only child. His widow, it is believed, 
was afterwards married to Thomas Wilson, advocate in 
Aberdeen. :•.■:,/,.■■, 

352. Fordyce (George), eldest son of John Fordyce of Gask 
and Barbara Gordon his wife, baptized 28th November, 1721, 
died unmarried. 



i!ll 



If'i ' 



FORDYClv. 



103 



353. Fordyce (George), M.D. and F.R.S., was born in 
Aberdeen i8th November, 1736. He was the only and 
posthumous son of George Fordyce of Broadford, merchant, in 
Aberdeen, and Marjory Stuart his wife. In consequence of his 
mother's marrying again (it is beHeved to Thomas Wilson, advo- 
cate in Aberdeen), he was taken from under her care, and sent 
to a school at Foveran, where the teacher had an exceptional 
celebrity. It has been said that he received the degree of M.A. 
at Marischal College, Aberdeen, at the early age of fourteen, but 
the statement has been questioned. Taking delight as a child 
in looking at the coloured liquids in an apothecary's shop he 
formed an early desire to study medicine, and the desire was 
strengthened by acquaintance with one who subsequently dis- 
tinguished himself, Dr. Alexander Garden of Charleston, South 
Carolina, then apprentice to a surgeon and apothecary. In 1751 
he was apprenticed to his uncle. Dr. John Fordyce, at Upping- 
ham in Rutlandshire, and in 1758 took the degree of M.D. at 
Edinburgh. While studying there, he attracted the notice of 
the well known Dr. Cullen by his diligence and ingenuity. From 
Edinburgh he went to London, and thence to Leyden, where he 
studied Anatomy under x\lbinus. In 1759 he returned to Eng- 
land, and contrary to the wishes of his relatives (his whole patri- 
mony having been expended on his education), he resolved to 
settle in London as a teacher and practitioner. As a Lecturer 
he acquired an unrivalled reputation. Commencing with no 
more than nine pupils, his reputation was soon established. The 
oubjects were Chemistry, Materia Medica, and the Practice of 
Physic. On these he lectured for nearly thirty years from 7 a.m. 
till 10, each subject immediately following the other and the 
course lasting four months. There were three courses of lec- 
tures on each of the subjects every year. He used no notes in 
lecturing, having a remarkable memory ; but relying fully much 
on this, his style in composition is said to have been inelegant, 
and sometimes obscure and ungrammatical ; yet in conversation 
his language was no less correct than that of most well educated 
persons. His delivery was slow and hesitating, and frequently 
interrupted by unnecessary pauses, not proceeding, however, 
from embarrassment. Notwithstanding all these drawbacks, 



I04 



FORDYCK. 




however, his popularity was maintained. At the election of an 
.'issistant physician to Saint Thomas' Hospital, 17th January, 
1759, Dr. Fordyce was an unsuccessful candidate, having 32 
votes, while Dr. Russel had 67 and Dr. Akenside (author of the 
"Pleasures of Imagination") 116; but whether the subject of this 
notice is referred to, or one or other of his uncles, John or Wil- 
liam, it is not easy to determine. In 1765 he was admitted a 
licentiate of the College of Physicians, and in 1770 was chosen 
Physician of Saint Thomas' Hospital after a contest in which he 
obtained log votes, while Dr., afterwards Sir William, Watson 
had 106. In 1774 he was admitted as a member of the Literary 
Club founded by Sir Joshua Reynolds, Dr. Samuel Johnson and 
other eminent men. and in 1776 was elected a Fellow of the 
Royal Society. In 177^^ he was chosen a Fellow of the College 
of Physicians. He had a respectable share of private practice, 
but probably less, it has been said, than he would have had if 
his manners had boen more refined and his dress more studied. 
His fondness for society r'nd indulgence in good living and late 
hours would have told sooner on him had he not been originally 
gifted with a vigorous constitution. At length, however, he was 
attacked by gout, and from this and other maladies he was lat- 
terly a great sufferer. In youth his person is said to have been 
handsome, but latterly his countenance was dull and heavy, and 
little expressive of his mental powers. His death took place at 
his house in Essex Street in the Strand, 25th May, 1802. He 
had been married 14th March, 1764, to a widow lady, Mrs. 
Weston, daughter of Charles Stewart, Conservator of Scots 
Privileges at Campvere in the Netherlands, who survived him. 
They had two sons and two daughters. One of the latter died 
unmarried, the other married General Sir Samuel Bentham. 

354. Fordyce (George), eldest son of Robert Fordyce, mer- 
chant and Baillie of Aberdeen, and Anne Reid his wife, was bap- 
tized 2ist December, 1757, and died young. 

355. Fordyce (Hugh), second son of Baillie Robert Fordyce 
of Aberdeen and Anne Reid his wife, was baptized 25th Novem- 
ber, 1763, and died young. ' 

356. Fordyce (Isobell), wife of William Blachrie, merchant 
in Aberdeen, to whom she was probably married in 1689, is 



FOKDYCK 



105 



believed to have been a daughter of George Fordyce in Haughs 
of Ashogle, Turriff, and Barbara Thomson his wife. They had 
a large family. The first time she is mentioned is in connection 
with the baptism of her eldest son, George, in October, 1690, 
the last, at that of her youngest, William, in 1708. 

357. Fordyce (Isobell), daughter of Provost George For- 
dyce of Aberdeen and Isobell Walker his first wife, was born in 
1692. She was married to the Rev. Robert Melville, minister 
of the Parish of Durris, had issue, and died 5th September, 1719, 
her husband surviving her and marrying agani. Two daughters 
are mentioned in this Record. 

358. Fordyce (Isobell), eldest daughter of John Fordyce of 
Gask and Isobell Lindsay his wife, was baptized 12th November, 
1698, and died in infancy. 

359. Fordyce (Isobell), second daughter of John Fordyce 
of Gask and Isobell Lindsay his wife, baptized 28th October, 
1700, died unmarried. 

360. Fordyce (Isobell), eldest daughter of John Fordyce of 
Gask anr* Barbara Gordon his wife, was baptized 28th July, 
1720, and died unmarried 9th February, 1798. She resided in 
Turriff, her mother at one time living with her. She had severe 
trials, both of mind and body. 

361. Fordyce (Isobell), fourth daughter of Provost George 
Fordyce of Aberdeen and Elizabeth Brown his second wife, was 
baptized 25th October, 1721. 

362. Fordyce (James), D.D., the sixth and fourth surviving 
son of Provost George Fordyce and Elizabeth Brown his second 
wife, was born in Aberdeen 5th June, 1720. When he was 
thirteen years of age his father died ; and his subsequent obliga- 
tions for wise counsel and guidance on the part of his mother 
and his brother, David, who was thirteen years older, he never 
forgot. He was educated at the grammar school of Aberdeen 
and Marischal College, and was licensed to preach the Gospel, 
23rd February, 1743. His first appointment was to the Second 
Charge in Brechin, where he laboured from 1744 till 29th August, 
1752, when he was translated to Alloa. The people there were 
strongly attached to one they had greater opportunity of know- 



io6 



FORDYCK. 



ing; still by his zeal, added to the impressive character of his 
pulpit ministrations, and the laborious discharge of pastoral 
and catechetical duties, prejudice was overcome, and the love, 
esteem, and admiration of his people secured. From Alloa he 
was called to London in 1760 as colleague to Dr. Lawrence, the 
aged and infirm pastor of the Presbyterian Congregation in 
Monkwell Street, on whose death the Sc»me year he became 
associated with the Rev. Mr. Toller, Dr. Lawrence's son-in-law. 
liefore leaving Scotland there had been indications of his pos- 
sessing pecuhar gifts and abilities ; but it was in London that 
these became conspicuous, and there he soon attracted hearers 
. all ranks, classes and persuasions. His action and eloquence 
were original and striking. He had besides, a tall figure, a 
dignified presence and features capable of displaying great 
variety of expression. To a cultured understanding were added 
a warm heart and great liberality of sentiment ; indeed, it has 
been said that from his printed works it would be easier to prove 
that he belonged to no sect, than that he had the principles of 
any. He does not appear, however, to have been well fitted for 
working harmoniously with another in one ministerial charge. 
Even at Brechin a lack of cordiality in his relations with his 
colleague made a change acceptable to both. In London some 
omission it has been said of ceremonial politeness, with want of 
mutual concession, led to an actual and irreparable breach, to 
the removal of his colleague, the alienation of many of his 
hearers, and ultimately to his own resignation and retirement 
from ministerial work. He received the degree of D.D. from the 
University of Glasgow. As a member of the well known Literary 
Club founded by Sir Joshua Reynolds and others, an acquaint- 
ance with Dr. Samuel Johnson was formed, which ripened into 
personal friendship, anu one of Dr. Fordyce's " Addresses to the 
Deity " is based on his friend's death. In private life he is said 
to have been amiable with the manners of a gentleman. He was 
warmly attached to his relations. He was married on the 2nd 
May, 1771, to Miss Henrietta Cumming, and romantic as were 
the circumstances attending their union (and which are noticed 
in 147), that connection during its twenty-four years' duration was 
a source of mutual satisfaction. On resigning his charge in 



FORDYCK. 



107 



Monkwell Street in 1782 and leaving London, Dr. Fordyce was 
attracted to Hampshire by his intimacy with Lord Bute. Resid- 
ing near him he had easy access at all times to his valuable 
library. The following lines were addressed to his Lordship on 
receiving from him a valuable telescope : 

Whene'er my aided sight surveys the sky, 
And all its golden splendours ranged on high, 
My raptur'd thoughts I'll lift to yonder throne. 
And pray for happiness your life to crown ; 
A Glass than yours yet nobler then apply, 
Through fair Religion's medium stretch my eye; 
Superior heights, and brighter glories scan, . 
Than now can be attained by mortal man ; 
With ardent zeal for future worlds prepare 
A ad hope, at last, my Lord, to meet you there. 

Latterly, Dr. Fordyce removed to Bath, where his death occurred 
on the I st October, 1796, in his seventy-seventh year. As a writer he 
first came before the public in a sermon on " The Eloquence of the 
Pulpit," preached 25th July, 1751, at the ordination of a co- 
presbyter, the Rev. D. Ferguson of Farnell, near Brechin. 
Another sermon, preached before the General Assembly of the 
Church of Scotland, 25th May, 1760, made a great impression 
throughout the country. It was on •' The folly, infamy, and 
misery of unlawful pleasures." His "Sermons to Young 
Women," and "Addresses to Young Men," were published in 
1776 and 1777. From his first published discourse the following 
extract may be taken as a specimen : "It is allo.ved that the per- 
fection of art lies in concealing art, and making the whole appear 
the pure expression as well as effect of nature. May vv^e not say 
that the perfection of the pulpit art lies in the preacher's so 
involving himself in the grandeur of his subject, so hiding his 
address under the veil of simplicity, as to turn off the attention 
of the audience from the lustre of his talents and the excellences 
of his performance to the truths which he delivers ; in fixing 
their eyes upon these with a kind of severe delight ; in filling 
their minds with conviction, and their hearts with resolution, and 
in sending them away at last, silent, grave, and thoughtful, 
instead of smiling to one another and applauding him ? To do 
this successfully is a preacher's highest glory ; to aim at it faith- 
fully is the next degree of praise. Having imbiSed the meek and 
lowly spirit of his Master, he will ijot be ambitious of saying fine 



loH 



l-OKDYCK. 



things to win applause, but of sayinf,' useful things to win souls." 
" Jiut can any height of eloquence he alone sufficient to secure 
success in concerns of a sacretl nature ? We do not pretend it. 
We are persuaded that how fairly soever we subordinate teach- 
ers may aim at success, there is only one supreme and efficacious 
Teacher who can command it. What follows from thence? 
Because the most enticing words of man's wisdom will not pre- 
vail unless they are seconded by th'j demonstration of the Spirit 
and the power of God, does it follow that the demonstration of 
reason, and the power of human art and language, are therefore 
to be laid aside ? How far these may go in tiieir effects upon 
the hearers, and what those boundaries are beyond which they 
cannot go, it is impossible, I apprehend, for us to determine. 
But one thing is clear, and there we may rest. He whom we 
serve is not unrighteous to forget our work and labour of love, 
and although Israel should not be gathered, yet we shall be glorious 
in the eyes of the Lord, and our God shall be our strength." 
The Rev. Messrs. Bogue and Bennet give the following estimate 
of the results of Dr. Fordyce's pulpit ministrations in London, 
in their "History of Dissenters." It cannot be denied that the 
position of one greatly admired is dangerous to the very best 
men. Unconsciously less prominence may have been given by 
the subject of this notice to what should be first and last, and 
which should pervade the whole. " In his public services," the 
writers referred to say, "Dr. Fordyce was, for years, greatly 
admired and followed. Still he was by no means one of the most 
successful preachers, The radical defect consisted in his not 
bringing forward habitually and abundantly the peculiar prin- 
ciples of the Gospel of Christ." In addition to the lines addressed 
to Lord Bute, the following may be given as a favourable sample 
of Dr. Fordyce's poetic vein : 

' THE BLACK EAGLE. 

Hark ! yonder Eagle lonely wails. 

His faithful bosom grief assails. 

Last night I heard him in my dream 

When death and woe were all the theme. 

Like that poor bird I make my moan ; > • • 

I ^ieve for dearest Delia gone ; 

With him to gloomy rocks I fly; 

He mourns for love — and so do L 



J 



FOKDYCK. 109 

Tvvas mighty love that tamed his breast, . • 

» "Pis tender grief that breaks his rest ; 

He drops his wings, he hangs his head, 
Since she, he funilly loved, was dead, 
With Delia's death my joy expired, 
'Twas Delia's smiles my fancy fired ; 
Like that poor bird, I pine and prove 
Nought can supply the place of love. 

Dark as his leathers was the fate 
That robbed him of his darling mate; 
Dimmed is the lustre of his eye 
That wont to gaze the sun-bright sky. 
To him is now forever lost 
The heart-felt bliss he once could boast ; 
Thy sorrows, hapless bird, display 
An image of my soul's dismay. 

363. Pordyce (James), third son of Baillie Robert Fordyce 
of Aberdeen and Anne Reid his wife, baptized 24th March, 
1765 ; died young. 

364. Fordyce (Janet), second daughter of Provost George 
Fordyce of Aberdeen and Ehzabeth Brown his wife, was bap- 
tized 20th June, 1 71 5. She died unmarried. 

365. Fordyce (Janet), third and youngest daughter of 
Baillie Robert Fordyce of Aberdeen and Anne Reid his wife, was 
baptized 2nd February, 1761. She latterly resided at Newing- 
ton, Edinburgh, dying unmarried at an advanced ag«. 

366. Fordyce (Jean), third and longest surviving daughter 
of John Fordyce of Gask in the parish of Turriff, Aberdeenshire, 
and Isobell Lindsay his wife, was baptized 8th March, 1704. 
She resided with her brother, William Fordyce of Culsh, while 
he lived, and on his death she became possessed for herself and 
her male heirs of that property which, dying unmarried, he had 
entailed on them. Before this her hand had been sought by 
William Dingwall, who was then factor on the neighbouring 
estate of Brucklay. She was in middle life ; but felt, to use her 
own words in a letter to the widow of her uncle. Provost George 
Fordyce, that ahe " would stand in need of some one to assist in 
the management of her affairs." She had entire confidence in 
her aunt's Christian spirit, warm affection and sound judgment. 
She accordingly resolved to abide by her opinion, as there had 
not been wanting those who would have dissuaded her from the 
engagement. That opinion seems to have coincided with the 



no 



J-OKDYCE. 



leaning of her own mind, and on the ijth April, 1744, ^^^^ ^^^ 
married to William Dingwall, and, despite forebodings of some, 
there is no reason for concluding that her married life was other- 
wise than happy. Mer husband was a widower with one child, 
a boy six years of age. They had three sons, and although the 
date of her husband's death does not appear, her married life 
was probably short. Her husband was a great invalid, and 
their eldest son probably inherited a weakly constitution. He 
died early. She was affectionately cared for by her remaining 
two sons, with the younger of whom, who remained unmarried 
while she was in life, she resided in Aberdeen. Her death took 
place on the 4th of March, 1778, and the character given in the 
notice of the event in the Aberdeen Journal was that "she was 
a true and sincere Christian, a loving and dutiful wife, an affec- 
tionate and tender-hearted parent, and a warm friend." Her 
elder surviving son, Arthur, succeeded to Culsh, and took the 
name of Fordyce along with that of Dingwall in terms of the 
entail ; the younger, Alexander, a stocking manufacturer in 
Aberdeen, continued to bear the name of Dingwall. 

367. Fordyce (Jean), fifth daughter of John Fordyce of 
Gask and Barbara Gordon his wife, baptized 22nd May, 1730; 
died unmarried. 

368. Fordyce (John), eldest son of George Fordyce in 
Haughs of Ashogle and Barbara Thomson his wife, was a 
merchant in Turriff, Aberdeenshire. He was married 7th March, 
1693, *° Isobell Lindsay, daughter of William Lindsay of Culsh, 
in the Parish of New Deer, and Barbara Leith his first wife, and on 
the 28th of January, 171 2, is designed of Craigietocher. On the 
25th March, 1714, he was infeft in the whole estate of Gask in the 
Parish of Turriff (of which Craigietocher formed a part), and died 
in 1729 or 1730, having settled Gask in his lifetime on his son John, 
and Culsh in New Deer (which he had also purchased) on his 
younger son William. The Poll Tax Book of Aberdeenshire, 
1696, gives his assessment : " John Fordyce, tennant, merchant 
in Turriff, woodsetier ; of stock 5,000 merks ; valuation of his 
half of lands of Gask, ;^i5o. Isobell Lindsay his spouse, his 
son and three sisters to the said Isobell in familia." John For- 
dyce and Isobell Lindsay had three sons and three daughters. 



li 



I'OKDYCF. 



Ill 



369. Fordyce (John) of Gask, eldest son of John l'\)i(lyce 
of Oask and Isohell Lindsay his wife, was baptized on ist March, 
1697. Me married IJarbara (iordon, daughter of Alexander 
(jordon at Mill of Aberdour and Anna Lindsay his wife, and 
had the estate of Gask settled on him by his father, in which he 
was infeft 7th February, 1733. He died 27th May, 1762, leaving 
his affairs involved, so that the lands of Gask were adjudged from 
his surviving daughters for behoof of his creditors. His wife 
survived him. They had four sons and eight daughters. 

370. Fordyce (John), fifth son of Provost George Fonlyce 
of Aberdeen and Eli/.abetii Brown his second wife, was baptized 
loth February, 1717. He was a surgeon in the Guards; but 
settled as a physician at Uppingham, Rutlandshire. In 1755 
he was infeft in an annuity out of the lands of Tillyfour in 
Aberdeenshire, proceeding on a precept granted by Sir Archibald 
Grant of Monymusk for infefting him as heir to his father. In 1756 
his practice at Uppingham was taken up by Dr. Maxwell 
Garthshore, and he removed to London, where he practised till 
his death. He was married i6th November, 1759, to Pleasant 
Lawford by whom he had a posthumous child, Mary. His 
death occurred at Hampstead, 25th May, 1760. 

371. Fordyce (John), second son of John Fordyce of Gask 
and Barbara Gordon his wife, born 26th December, 1724; died 
unmarried. 

372. Fordyce (Katharine 1, eldest daughter of Provost 
George Fordyce of Aberdeen and Elizabeth Brown his second 
wife, was baptized 25th August, 1708, and died unmarried. An 
inventory of her estate was registered in the Sheriff-Clerk's 
books, i6th April, 1742. , 

373. Fordyce (Lilias), eighth daughter of John Fordyce of 
Gask and Barbara Gordon his wife, baptizec 17th March, 1735 ; 
died unmarried. 

374. Fordyce (Magdalen), fourth daughter of John For- 
dyce of Gask and Barbara Gordon his wife, was baptized 21st 
June, 1728, and married in January, 1763, to Thomas Mavor, 
merchant in Turriff. Bridgend and Bridgefoot of Gask were 
conveyed to her and her unmarried sister Isobell, 17th December, 



I 12 



FORDYCE. 



1773, by their brother-in-law, James Mackie, and reconveyed by 
them to Thomas Mavor, 24th November, 1778. 

375. Pordyce (Margaret), fourth daughter of Baillie Robert 
Fordyce of Aberdeen and Anne Reid his wife, baptized 30th 
May, 1762 ; died young. 

376. Pordyce (Margaret), daughter of Dr. George Fordyce 
of London and — Stewart or Weston his wife; died unmarried. 

377'. Pordyce (Mary), beheved to have been a daughter of 
Provost George Fordyce of Aberdeen and Isobell Walker his 
first wife, from the following entry in the Guildry Accounts for 
the City of Aberdeen : " 1747 — Paid from the Infeftments Fund 
to Mary Fordyce, daughter to Provost Fordyce, ;^40." She 
appears to have received the same amount, from the same Fund, 
in the following year, but nothing further is known respecting 
her. 

377 ^ Pordyce (Mary), only child of Dr. John Fordyce of 
Uppingham in Rutlandshire, and Pleasant Lavvford his wife, 
was born December, 1760 (six months after her father's death), 
and married to Samuel Birch, Alderman and fterwards Lord 
Mayor of London. She died April, 1799, leaving issue. 

378. Pordyce (Robert), the sixth surviving son of Provost 
George Fordyce of Aberdeen and Elizabeth Brown his second 
wife, was born at Eggie in the Parish of Belhelvie, and baptized 
26th June, 1726. He was bred to the hosiery business. He was 
not actuated, however, by the ambitious aims which were the 
means of raising his youngest brother in the social scale, but of 
detracting wofuUy from the substantial pleasure he might have 
had, and v/hich was enjoyed by the subject of this notice in his 
home life, and in the esteem of the entire community. He was 
Dean of Guild of Aberdeen in 1752, and from 1755 onwards, was 
frequently chosen as one of the Baillies. He was married in 
1756 to Anne Reid, daughter of Hugh Reid of Sydserff in East 
Lothian, M.D., and Anne Richardson his wife. She survived 
him. They had three sons and four daughters. It seems pro- 
bable that in 1760 Baillie Fordyce was in partnership with John 
Dingwall of Rannieston, and in 1765 with Anthony Ferguson, 
afterwards of the Customs in Dublin, his brother-in-law, another 



FORDYCF,. 



113 



son-in-law of Dr. Keid of Sydserff. He died 25th November, 
1765. The Aberdeen Journal, in recording the event, says : " A 
hfe spent in useful industry, conducted by integrity, adorned with 
every religious and social virtue, and uniformly expressive of the 
warmest sensibility of heart, causes his early death to be deeply 
regretted by his friends, and makes it to be considered as a public 
loss, by all who knew him." The inscription on his tombstone in 
St. Nicholas Churchyard, Aberdeen, is evidently composed by his 
brother, the Rev. Dr. James Fordyce, and while it may have the 
appearance of flattery, there is good reason for believing that it 
expresses no more than the simple truth : " Robert Fordyce was 
one, who even in those days of prevailing degeneracy and polite 
dissimulation, had the fortitude to approve himself an Israelite 
in whom there was no guile. With a warm heart he possessed 
a good understanding. To sufficient sensibility of temper he 
joined an entire command of it. His integrity no temptation 
could corrupt ; his composure no calamity could conquer. 
While other men talked of philosopiiy, he was satisfied to prac- 
tise it. Cheerful, but temperate ; active, yet calm ; candid to 
others, to himself severe ; in every relation conscientious. Of 
so much excellence the foundation was laid in piety — a piety 
steadfast because profound ; strict and amiable at the same time. 
Having fixed his eye upon another world he passed through this 
with innocence, and although young, prosperous and happy in 
his family, left it with resignation. In his life he was blessed by 
the poor, valued by his friends, and honoured by all. In his 
death by all lamented — by none more than by him who writes 
these lines, who writes them not as a trial of skill, but as the 
language of truth — not to excite the applause of his readers, but 
to soothe the sadness of his soul." 

379. Fordyce (Sophia), daughter of Dr. George Fordyce 
of London and — Stewart or Weston nis wife, was married 
26th October, 1796, to Brigadier-General Sir Samuel Bentham, 
Surveyor-General of Naval Works, who was a brother of the 
well-known political economist, Jeremy Bentham. They had 
one son and two daughters, 

380. Fordyce (Thomas), third son of Provost George For- 
dyce of Aberdeen and Elizabeth Brown his second wife, was 



114 



FORDYCE. 



I 



baptized 6th July, 1712, and died in infancy. Two other 
brothers successively bore the name of Thomas, probably from 
their relationship to the two Principals Blackwell of Marischal 
College. 

381. Fordyce (Thomas), fourth son of Provost George 
Fordyce of Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Brown his second wife, was 
baptized 21st November, 1713, and died young. 

382. Fordyce (Thomas), seventh son of Provost George 
Fordyce of Aberdeen and Elizabeth Brown his second wife, was 
baptized 13th June, 1723, and died in January, 1726, at Eggie in 
the Parish of Belhelvie. 

383. Fordyce (William) of Culsh, the second surviving son 
of John Fordyce of Gask and Isobell Lindsay his wife, was bap- 
tized on the 19th October, 1702. The estate of Culsh, the prop- 
erty of the Lindsays, had been acquired by John Fordyce from 
his brother-in-law, and settled in his own lifetime on his son 
William, who may at one time have been intended for the legal 
profession, if a manuscript of legal forms in his hand-writing 
may be taken as presumptive proof. He appears to have had 
very indifferent health, to have been of a kindly disposition, and 
methodical in his arrangements. One or two journals remain in 
which were noted his expenses when he was away from home. 
On one occasion, in the year 1737, he had gone to Moffat for the 
benefit of the waters, accompanied by a man-servant. They 
probablv travelled on horseback, disposing of the horses which 
they had taken from home, on reaching Lanark, where a brown 
and a grey mare were purchased for £57 12s. 6d. and £"46 185. 
(Scots money of course.) One item of expenditure noted, is for 
" glueing his cane," which his attendant had " broken upon the 
brown mare." His resting places were generally at friends' 
houses. Of these were Nethermuir, Mr. Gordon's; Kelly, Lord 
Aberdeen's; Corstorphine, Rev. Mr. Fordyce's ; Lamington, 
Rev. Mr. Blinshall's ; and Kirkcaldy, Mr. Finlason's. On 
leaving Kelly he gave twenty-four shillings to the groom and nurse, 
and at Edinburgh he provided himself with half-a-pound of con- 
fections for Lord Aberdeen's youngest daughter. Lady Henrietta. 
"Willy Black in Aberdeen,'' the "boys at Eggie," and other 



FORDYCE. 



115 



young friends were remembered in the same way. During this 

trip he visited Hamihon Palace, Glasgow Cathedral and College, 

the Church and Palace at Scone, Linlithgow Palace and Stirling 

Castle. There is no note of money lost at cards ; but " bowls " 

seem to have been a pastime he indulged in, as he lost nine 

shillings at the Bowling Green, Edinburgh, paying even more 

for " dues " as they are called. He left home on the 28th of 

June, and returned on the gth of August — gave his sister on 

leaving £"5 to be accounted for on his return, and brought 

her then •' a stoned ring and a case," paying £'] i6s. for 

the one and 12s. 6</. for the other. His medical outlay was not 

inconsiderable. To Dr. Gavinlock at Moffat, £"6 185. for advice 

and medicine ; Dr. Clerk in Edinburgh, £\^ 125. for advice, and 

to Mr. Aikenhead, chirurgeon, £^ 14s. for pills prescribed by Dr. 

Clerk. Another trip was in 1740, and at this time advantage 

had been taken of his absence to commit a robbery at Culsh. 

The thieves appear to have been apprehended and lodged in the 

Tolbooth of Aberdeen between the 13th and 21st of August. 

Some of the expenses arising out of this robbery are noted, such 

as : " Spent with Theodore Forbes in Kelly, when he told me the 

unlucky story of my closets being broke and papers destroyed " ; 

•* Paid the officer of the goldsmiths for going about amongst 

them, getting the silver buttons, etc., stolen from Culsh, marked 

in their books in case the rogue that did it offer them " ; " Spent 

with Andrew Thomson, John Clerk, William Murdoch, Provost 

Cruickshank and James Black, in Mrs. Leslie's, after coming out 

of the Tolbooth from examining Holland and Ferguson." The 

six bottles of wine and bread on this occasion cost him £"] 185. 

In the year 1743 his health was such that it became evident his 

end was not far distant. In order to give legal effect to the 

arrangements he had made for disposal of his property, he 

" went to Kirke and market unsupported " on the 12th and 14th 

of August. He survived, however, till the end of x^'ebruary, 

1744. By entail, dated 12th August, previous, the estate of 

\\ Culsh had heen left to his sister, Jean Fordyce, and her 

descendants. 

384. Fordyce (Sir William), M.D. and F.R.S., the fifth 
surviving son of Provost George Fordyce of Aberdeen and 



ii6 



lORDYCE, 



Elizabeth Brown his wife, was born at Aberdeen, and baptized 
24th August, 1724. He was educated at Marischal College, 
where he shewed great proficiency in Greek and mathematics. 
After studying medicine under a native practitioner, he joined 
the army as a volunteer. In 1751 he was appointed Surgeon to 
the 3rd Regiment of Guards, and served in the wars ix], 
(iermany. He subsequently settled in London, got into a very 
extensive practice, and received larger fees than almost any 
physician of his time. Generosity in his case, it is said, 
amounted to a kind of enthusiasm, and was probably exercised 
without much discrimination, as one writer observes that " his 
expenditure for benevolent objects was the means of very much 
good and some harm." He suffered severely through his brother 
Alexander, whom he had assisted largely ; notwithstanding, with 
characteristic generosity, he repaid to their brother James the 
loss he had sustained from the same cause. His good offices to 
young Scotsmen, who came to London seeking employment, 
were unwearied. His brother, the Rev. Dr. James Fordyce, in 
the following lines gratefully acknowledges efforts successfully 
employed on his own behalf when his life appears to have been 
in danger : — 

When worn with study, and with toil o'er spent ; 
When gone the little strength that had been lent ; 
You saw me tottering on the verge of life, — 
You flew, to snatch me from th' unequal strife ; 
Repelled with skill the inroads of disease, 
And laid me gently on the lap of ease. 
May Heaven, my brother, your dear life prolong — 
Too oft exposed amid the sickly throng. 

He was enrolled as a freeholder of Aberdeenshire in 1771 on the 
lands of Elrick, and in 1782 received the honour of knighthood. 
The degree of Doctor of Physic was conferred on him by the 
University of Cambridge. He was also elected a Fellow of the 
Royal Society, and in 1790 was Lord Rector of Marischal 
College, Aberdeen. Besides various medical works, he was the 
author of a treatise on the importance and proper method of 
cultivating and curing rhubarb in Britain for medical purposes ; 
and for this he received a gold medal from the Society for 
Encouragement of the Arts. He died unmarried on the 4th 
December, 1792, To Marischal College, Aberdeen, he left a 



I'OKDYCE DINGWALL. 



117 



for 
4th 
Ift a 



thousand pounds to found a Lectureship on Agricultural Chem- 
istry and Natural History, after the death of his sister-in-law, 
Mrs. Robert Fordyce, and her unmarried daughter, to whom the 
life rent of the amount so destined was secured. 

385. Fordyce (William), fourth son of John Fordyce of 
Gask and Barbara Gordon his wife, was baptized 6th June, 
1737. No further particulars are known. 

386. Fordyce Dingwall (Agnes), sixth daughter of Dr. 
Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife, 
was born 31st May, 1781 ; married on the 31st May, 1798, to 
Alexander Fraser, merchant, afterwards Provost of Aberdeen, 
and died in Aberdeen on the 6th of March, 1834, vShe had five 
sons and seven daughters. 

387. Fordyce Dingwall (Agnes), fourth daughter of Alex- 
ander Dingwall Fordyce, merchant in Aberdeen, and Magdalen 
Dingwall his wife, was born at Mill Burn Cottage, Aberdeen, on 
25th December, 1824- died there 24th March, 1830. 

388. Fordyce Dingwall (Alexander), fourth son of Dr. 
Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife, 
was born 7th February, 1786. He attended the parish school of 
Nigg under a teacher of the name of Paterson, and was after- 
wards sent to the grammar school of Aberdeen. He likewise 
studied at Marischal College, his greatest interest being in the 
natural philosophy class under Professor Copland. Having 
resolved on a mercantile calling, he commenced his business 
training with Fraser & Molle in Aberdeen, the senior partner 
being his brother-in-law ; and as early as the year 1804 he tran- 
sacted some business on his own account. He soon proceeded 
to London and obtained a situation in the extensive mercantile 
house of Reid, Irving & Co. By strict attention to his duties, 
and a kindly and obliging disposition, he became a great favour- 
ite with the heads of the establishment, Sir Thomas Reid, Bart., 
and Mr. John Irving, M.P,, as well as with the subordinates. 
In after years he sometimes alluded to the fact of his having 
lodged with a lady whose nephew attained to great eminence at 
the Bar. His landlady was a Mrs. Williams, her nephew. 



iiS 



h(;RUYCK DINGWALL. 



Frederick Thesiger, then a law student, afterwards Lord Chelms- 
ford and Lord High Chancellor of England. On the 9th Sep- 
tember, 1813, he was married to his cousin, Magdalen Dingwall, 
fourth daughter of Alexander Dingwall, stocking manufacturer 
in Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Douglass his wife. In the end of 
1 81 6 he removed to Aberdeen and commenced business as a 
merchant in which, however, he was at no period particularly 
successful. For a short time, further on, his nephew who had 
been in business m Havre, and subsequently went to Charleston, 
South Carolina, was in partnership with him, as A. & W. D. 
Fordyce of Abchurch Lane, London. Relinquishing mercantile 
business, and feeling the necessity, from regard to his family, for 
quiet summer quarters, he took the management for his father of 
the stake-net fishing he had on his property of Eggie in the 
Parish of Belhelvie. In 1824 he took up his residence at Mill 
Burn Cottage, then in the outskirts of Aberdeen, which some 
years later he purchased along with the neighbouring small pro- 
perty known as " Dee Village." Induced perhaps chiefly by the 
example set by his second son, who had gone to Upper Canada 
as a settler in 1835, he joined him there the following year with 
most of his family. Tiieir home was in the Township of Nichol, 
three miles north of Fergus, and here six years were passed. 
The property during that time was greatly improved. It got the 
name of Lescraigie, and after passing into the hands of those 
able to do justice to its capabilities, became one of the finest 
farms in the section of country. When held by the subject of 
this notice no adequate v?turn was secured. The name which 
had been given to it ivas that of a small property in the Parish 
of Monwhitter, Aberdeenshire, which in the beginning of the 
eighteenth century was owned by Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill, 
and which had formerly belonged to an ancient family, the Mowats 
of Balquholly, one of whom, Patricius de Montealto, had a 
charter of " Loscragy " from King Robert Bruce. Returning to 
the pursuits of earlier years, the subject of this notice in the year 
1842 entered into partnership in a mercantile business in the 
Village of Fergus with Mr. James Webster, who with Mr. Fer- 
guson of Woodhill, had commenced the settlement in 1833. Five 
years' experience of the business with necessary anxieties and 



FORUYCE DINGWALL. 



119 



difficulties, with whicli advancing years made it harder to cope, 
led him to retire in 1847, although while he lived he continued 
to give a certain amount of assistance and the benefit' of his 
experience to those he had been associated with. He acted as 
a magistrate from the time of his coming to Canada, as Com- 
missioner of the Court of Requests, and as Chairman of the 
Quarter Sessions. He was also the first Warden of the County 
of Wellington, having received a Crown appointment in 1842 to 
the office. Its duties he discharged efficiently while on the foot- 
ing it originally had. When the office became elective, he gave 
place to others. Before leaving Scotland he was for many years 
an elder of Saint Nicholas Church (East Parish), Aberdeen, 
and on removing to Canada he took a no less active interest in 
Church matters. He was opposed to the Disruption of the 
Canadian branch of the Presbyterian Church, not as a natural 
consequence of his being a Conservative in politics, but from the 
firm belief that no grievance existed in Canada to justify the 
separation, and from a conviction that however others might 
regard it, there were obligations resting on him which he could 
not free himself of.' When the Separation took place in 1844, 
and he was left the sole office-bearer at Fergus with a small 
minority of the congregation, he readily acceded to the desire of 
the Presbytery that he would endeavour, till a pastor could be 
obtained, to hold together those wlio thought with him by keep- 
ing up public worship. This he did tor three years, and towards 
the close of 1847 he was gratified by the settlement of an able 
and earnest minister of the Gospel, much to his own comfort and 
the good of the cause he had so much at heart. Business anxie- 
ties and severe family bereavements had latterly Srrne hard 
on a naturally vigorous constitution, notwithstanding a gener- 
ally hopeful spirit and uncomplaining submission to the will of 
God, and on the 23rd February, 1852, six years after his wife's 
death, he peacefully departed at Belsyde, near Fergus, where he 
had resided since 1842. Often children, five survived him. 

389. Fordyce Dingwall (Alexander) of Culsh and Bruck- 

lay, R.N. and M.P., was born 4th March, 1800. He was the 
third son of William Dingwall Fordyce of Techmuiry in Aber- 
deenshire and Margaret Richie his wife. At the age of twelve 



I20 



FORDYCE DINGWALL. 






he entered the Navy, serving in the Desirk, commanded by his 
cousin, Captain Arthur Farquhar. The force to which he 
belonged blockaded Hamburgh with the rivers Elbe and Weser ; 
he was present at the capture of the batteries of Cuxhaven and 
the bombardment and surrender of Gluckstadt, and in May, 
1814, he was appointed to the Liverpool. She was paid off in 
1816, and from that time till 31st March, 1819, he served on 
board the Albion, 74 guns, and was present at the Battle of 
Algiers, in which she bore a conspicuous part. For his conduct 
in these services, he obtained a medal with two clasps. He 
was next appointed to the Rochefort, and in January, 1824, joined 
the Revenge, and was present at the settlement of the second 
Algerian war. In December, 1825, he was appointed Acting- 
Lieutenant of the Weazel. She was paid off in 1827, when he 
returned home and remained with his family till May, 1829. He 
was then appointed First Lieutenant of the Algerine, a ten gun 
sloop, and served in her for five years on the Brazil Station. 
On leaving this vessel he was presented with a sword by her 
Commander, Captain De Ros, and with a silver snuff box by the 
warrant and petty officers "in grateful acknowledgment of 
unceasing efforts to promote their happiness and comfort." He 
returned home on his father's death in 1831, and remained on 
half-pay from 1833 to 1839. His last term of service was from 
1839 till May, 1841, as First Lieutenant of the Cleopatra on the 
North American and West Indian Stations. His health failing, 
he was invalided and returned home. In September, 1841, he 
got the rank of Commander, and in 1855 was promoted to the 
rank of Post Captain. He had succeeded to the estates of Culsh 
and Brucklay on the death of his brother in 1843, and thereafter 
took an active part in local affairs. In 1847 he was returned to 
Parliament as member for the City of Aberdeen by a majority of 
418. In politics he was a Liberal ; but retired from political life 
in 1852. While in Parliament he was most attentive to the 
interests of his constituents. As a landlord he made himself 
thoroughly acquainted with his duties, and secured the comfort 
and well-being and lasting attachment of a numerous tenantry. 
In his last illness he was sustained by a humble, yet unfailing. 
Christian hope. His death took place at his residence, Albyn 



FORDYCK niNGWAFX. 



121 



sh 

ter 

to 

of 

ife 

he 

Iself 

ort 



Place, Aberdeen, i6th July, 1864. He had been married 14th 
July, 1835,10 Barbara Thorn, daughter of James Thom, formerly 
of Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Rachel Smith his wife. She died 
the year before him. They had four sons and four daughters. 
He was author of a work on " Naval Routine." 

390. Fordyce Dingwall (Alexander), second son of Alex- 
ander Dingwall Fordyce, latterly of Fergus, Ontario, and 
Magdalen Dingwall his wife, was born in London, England ; 
attended the elementary school of Mr. Gilbert Falconer in 
Aberdeen, the grammar school there and Marischal College. 
Emigrating to Upper Canada in 1835,116 became a settler in the 
Township of Nichol, near Fergus, and in 1856 was appointed 
Local Superintendent of Common Schools for the Northern 
Division of the County of Wellington. In 1871, on an alteration 
of the School Law, he became Inspector of the same School 
District, and retired in 1878 on new arrangements being made ; 
resides in Fergus, and is a Distributor of Marriage Licenses and 
Commissioner for taking Affidavits. Besides compiling this 
Family Record, edited in 1856 a selection of sermons by the Rev. 
Dr. Mair of Fergus, with short biographical sketch, and in 
1879, a second selection with enlarged memoir, and in 1881 pre- 
pared for relatives a short memoir of his elder brother. 

391. Fordyce Dingwall (Alexander), third son of Captain 
Alexander Dingwall Fordyce of Brucklay, R.N. and M.P., and 
Barbara Thom his wife, was born in Aberdeen, and entered the 
army in 1858 as Ensign, became Lieutenant in 1859, and Cap- 
tain in 1865. He served in the 49th Regiment and the 72nd 
Foot or Duke of Albany's Own Highlanders. He retired from 
the service, but subsequently became Lieutenant-Colonel of the 
Buchan Volunteers. 

392. Fordyce Dingwall (Alexander), fifth son of Lieut- 

enant-General Sir John Fordyce, K.C.B., and Phoebe Graham 
his wife, an officer in the Bombay Staff Corps. 

393. Fordyce Dingwall (Alexander), eldest son of Wil- 
liam Dingwall Fordyce of Brucklay, M.P., and Christina Horn 
his wife. 



122 



FORDYCK DINGWAM.. 



394. Fordyce Dingwall (Alexander), eldest son of James 

Dingwall Fordyce of Cnlsh, advocate, and Penelope Miller his 
wife. 

395. Fordyce Dingwall (Angelica), the fifth daughter f)f 

Arthur Ding\\ dl Fordyce of C'ulsh, LL.I)., and Janet Morison 
his wife, was born 29th January, 1780. The name she received 
at her baptism was given cut of compliment to relatives, who were 
great admirers of the distinguished foreign artist Angelica Kauff- 
man, one of whose paintings, designed to portray " Religion," 
was suggested by a poem composed by the Rev. Dr. James For- 
dyce, and entitled the " Temple of Virtue." In some verses 
addressed to the artist Dr. Fordyce paid a tribute to her elevated 
character and genuine worth : 

'Twas thy fixed purpose Virtue still to draw 
As angels pure, in robes celestial drest ; 
A bold, licentious age to strike with awe, 
Yet move, in strong desire, the modest breast. 

The subject of this notice was married on the 12th March, 1800, 
to John Harvey of Guildford Street, London, and of Kinnettles 
in Forfarshire, to whom she had a large family. She survived 
her husband about thirty years, residing at one time in Aber- 
deen, then in Edinburgh, but latterly at Kinnettles, where she 
died on the 27th November, i860. She possessed keen feelings, 
entered warmly into the Disruption Controversy, espousing very 
decidedly the interests of the Free Church of Scotland. She 
was small of stature, erect even in old age, of a cheerful dispo- 
sition, and beloved by all who knew her. She bore with Chris- 
tian resignation, successive bereavements endured throughout a 
long life. ' 

396. Fordyce Dingwall (Arthur) of Culsh, LL.D., born 
at Brucklay Castle, Aberdeenshire, 28th December, 1745, was 
the second but elder surviving son of William Dingwall of 
Culsh and Jean Fordyce his second wife. Shortly before his 
birth his mother is said to have stumbled and fallen down the 
stone stair of the castle, on the unwelcome arrival of some of 
the rebel party, but happily without any serious consequences. 
By the death of his elder brother William, he succeeded when 
he came of age to the estate of Culsh, in the Parish of New 



FOKDYCH DINr.VVALL. 



'^3 



Deer, as heir of entail of liis uncle William I'ordyee, assinning 
the surname and armorial bearings of his mother's family with 
those of his father. He is understood to have studied law with 
Mr. Alexander Lumsden, advocate, Aberdeen, completing his 
professional education in the office of Mr. Alexander Keith of 
Ravelston in Edinburgh, having Mr. Walter Scott, the father of 
the future novelist and poet, as a fellow student. His commis- 
sion as notary is dated 24th January, 1767, and writing to his 
brother on the 25th, he tells him that the evening before he had 
entertained " Mr. Keith, Mr. Scott, Mr. Gordon, Mr. John 
Dingwall, and the Clerk to the Admission of Notaries, in honour 
of the occasion." On the 14th April following he was enrolled as 
a freeholder of Aberdeenshire, and in 1769, he was admitted as 
an advocate in Aberdeen. He commen,ced practice there, and 
in 1788 was appointed Commissary or Judge of the Consistorial 
Court for the County. The Commissary's duties were the decid- 
ing on actions of scandal, and actions for recovery of small debts, 
and confirming testaments. His remuneration was derived from 
fees paid by litigants and rates on funds given up to be admin- 
istered on. In 1790 he received the honorary degree of Doctor 
of Laws from Marischal College, and University of Aberdeen. 
In the year 1784 he purchased the lands of Eggie and Balmedie, 
on the sea ast, eight miles from Aberdeen. They had formed 
part of the forfeited estate of the Earl of Panmure in the Parish 
of Belhelvie, and Eggie at one time had been held in lease from 
the York Building Company by his grand uncle Provost For- 
dyce. He never, however, resided on the property, which was 
sold after his death. His first residence was in Castle Street, 
Aberdeen, afterwards his permanent abode was at Arthur Seat, 
a mile out of the town, originally intended as a summer residence, 
noticed by Douglas in 1780, in his " Description of the East Coast 
of Scotland," where he says : " Twenty years since the lands of 
Ferryhill, lying on the bank of the Dee, were feued out by the 
Town of Aberdeen. Dr. Blackwell, Principal of Marischal 
College, purchased a lot ; but, except planting a few pines, made 
no inprovement. His widow refeued a part to two gentlemen ; 
one of these, Mr. Fordyce, has already made out a small villa. 
The other, Mr. Ewen, has begun one, which, when the plan is 



i«4 



I'OUDYCK 1)1 NOW AI, I.. 



finislKul, will he very plcasanl." Mr. ICwcn was a prominent 
citi/en of Aberdeen, noted at the time for his hheral pohlioal 
sentiments, known also as a man of taste, and as the .'inthor of 
that f,'em of Scottish poetry : " The Hoatie Rows." Mis plan for 
the improvement of his part of tiie lands of l-'erryhill was pro- 
bably never completed ; but lonj,' after he was fj^one, traces of his 
desif^n were to be seen : snnnner houses reuuiined in *' ICwens 
Wood," as it was called, built of run brick, and tastefully fur- 
nished ; paths threaded the wood, with here and there an obelisk 
or a pillar bearing inscription on a marble slab, commemorative 
of some event or individual counted worthy of honour by Mr. 
Kwen whose sympathies are believed to have lain with the pro- 
moters of the French Revolution in its earlier stages. Periodical 
gatherings of the descendants of the subject of this notice were 
held at Arthur Seat, anil on such occasions ICwen's dark fir- 
woods and the adjoining cowslip-covered banks were favourite 
resorts and resting places. The public now enjoy in a different 
form what then afforded pleasure, mainly to one family and its 
friends. The north bank of the River Dee has always been a 
favourite walk. The citizens of Aberdeen had certain privileges 
granted them in connection with it by the original charter, but 
Principal Blackwell found it necessary to seek some restriction 
to prevent injury to his planting and grounds. The liberty was 
continued but provision was made against its being abused. In 
connection with the business life of the subject of this notice, 
the " Comishar" as he was frequently called, it is interesting to 
notice that one of his apprentices, a young man of the name of 
James Perry who had to discontinue his study of law owing to 
his father's failing in business, left Aberdeen, and after some 
time found employment in London which afforded scope for the 
development of previously unsuspected talents, and ultimately 
led to his attaining fame and fortune. He became the well 
known editor and proprietor of the London Morning Chronicle, 
the intimate friend of Charles James Fox and other leading 
statesmen, and was father of Sir Thomas Erskine Perry, Chief 
Justice of Bombay. The subject of this notice was married on 
14th June, 1770, to Janet Morison, sixth daughter of James 
Morison of Elsick (who had been Provost of Aberdeen) and 



lOUDVCK DINGWALI.. 



»25 



mes 
and 



lsol)eIl Dyce his wife. Their tiiiion lasted very happily for 
almost sixty-four years, or till three years before his own death, 
which took place at Arthur Seat on the 21st April, 1H34. An 
unmarried dauf^hter, however, resideil with him while he lived. 
Althouf^di conhned to the house from gout for the last ten years 
of his life, his faculties continued unimpaired, and his interest in 
passinj; events unabated. I"or many years he had acted as an 
elder in the West (>hurch congregation of Aberdeen, and his name 
was associated with various religious and benevolent and educa- 
tional institutions. During his long life he was respected for 
integrity in his business transactions, and relied on as a wise 
and honest adviser. In his own family and among most intimate 
friends he was revered and beloved. The lands of ICggie and 
Halmedie were sold after his death. Culsh descended in terms 
of the entail to his eldest grandson, and for some time the house 
and grounds of Arthur Seat \vere enjoyed by a grand-daughter. 
More recently they were acquired by MissDuthieof Ruthrieston 
who generously devoted them to the enjoyment and recreation 
of the public. The grounds have been enlarged, ornamented 
and tastefully laid out, the old Mansion House of Arthur Seat 
serving for a museum, and affording other conveniences. On 
the 27th September, 1883, the " Duthie Park" as it is called, was 
formally given over for the purpose designed, and opened by Her 
Royal Highness the Princess Beatrice. Of the family of the 
subject of this notice, sixteen in number, he was survived by two 
sons and five daughters. A married daughter died only gix 
weeks before himself. 

397. Fordyce Dingwall (Arthur), the third son of Dr. 

Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife, 
was born on 29th June, 1783. Having resolved on entering the 
Army, he received the requisite education at the Royal Academy, 
Woolwich, as an engineer in connection with the Honourable 
East India Company, in which he served from 1800 to 1812. 
He was employed in the subjugation of the Provinces of Oude, 
Delhi, and Agra, under Lord Lake, and in the taking of Java in 
1810. After its reduction he was employed there as Chief Engi- 
neer, and was subsequently appointed in the same capacity to 
Prince of Wales Island. Here his health failed, and quitting it 



126 



FORDYCE DINGWALL. 



I 






for Europe, he died on the passage, off the Cape of Good Hope, 
19th December, 1812. He had gained a high character in his 
profession, and risen to the rank of Captain both in the King's 
Service and that of the H. E. India Company. Short as his hfe 
was, he had made considerable prize money, which enabled him 
to purchase the house and grounds of Arthur Seat with the adjoin- 
ing lands of Polmuir ; his father, however, retaining the liferent 
of Arthur Seat and occupying the house till his death in 1834. 
These properties subsequently came into the possession of Cap- 
tain Fordyce's two daughters, whom on his death he had com- 
mitted to his eldest brother's care. They were brought up with 
his own family, and the elder who succeeded to Arthur Seat 
became in 1822 tlie wife of her cousin, who eventually succeeded 
to Culsh and Brucklay. 

398. Fordyce Dingwall (Arthur) of Culsh and Brucklay, 
the eldest son of William Dmgwall Fordyce of Techmuiry and 
Margaret Ritchie his wife, was born 19th June, 1797. He studied 
law, and was admitted a member of the Society of Advocates in 
Aberdeen in 1821. On the 17th October, 1822, he was married 
to his cousin, Jessy Stewart Dingwall Fordyce, elder daughter of 
Captain Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of the Bengal Engineers. He 
succeeded to the estate of Culsh on the death of his grandfather 
in 1834, and to those of Brucklay, Aberdour, etc., on the death 
of John Duff Dingwall of Brucklay, 26th October, 1840. He was 
of a more retiring disposition than his yo'-nger brothers, but a 
good and upright man. He rendered valuable assistance to the 
cause of the Free Church of Scotland at the Disruption. His 
death took place on the 30th December, 1843, and, having no 
family, he was succeeded by his next surviving brother. Captain 
Alexander Dingwall Fordyce, R.N. 

399. Fordyce Dingwall (Arthur), eldest son of James 
Dingwall Fordyce of London and Charlotte McDougall his wife, 
was born 2nd June, 1800, entered the Navy in 1812, but died of 
sunstroke at the age of twenty-one. 

400. Fordyce Dingwall (Arthur), merchant in Calcutta, 
eldest son of Alexander Dingwall Fordyce, latterly of Fergus, 
Upper Canada, and Magdalen Dingwall his wife, was born in 



FORDYCE DINGWALL. 



127 



tta, 

US, 

in 



London on the 5th of November, 1814. Two years after his 
parents removed to Aberdeen, and at an early age he was placed 
in the elementary school of Mr. Gilbert Falconer. From this 
he proceeded to the grammar school and Marischal College, 
graduating there in 1832. He served an apprenticeship to 
Messrs. Blaikie and Smitii, advocates in Aberdeen, but did not 
enter on the practice of the profession. A very friendly 
offer having been made by Messrs. J. & C. Dingwall, wine mer- 
chants in London, he joined them in 1838; but soon found him- 
self unsuited to the business. Shortly afterwards an opening 
was found in the mercantile house of Reid, Irving & Co., with 
which his father and uncle had been connected. He remained 
there till the end of 1843 when he went to Calcutta as a junior 
partner in a mercantile house recently established. He had been 
little more than twelve months, however, there, when an attack of 
cholera suddenly terminated his life, after twenty-four hours' 
illness. His death occurred 17th January, 1845. The firm to which 
he belonged (Saunders, May, Fordyce & Co.) had done well while 
he had been in Calcutta, and he had been laying plans for assist- 
ing his father in his business engagements; but soon after his own 
death the hope of this was dissipated owing to business relations 
between the Calcutta firm and that of Reid, Irving & Co., which 
had been obliged most unexpectedly to suspend payment. His 
remains were laid to rest in the Scotch Burying Ground in Cal- 
cutta, and from the address on the occasion by his pastor, the 
Rev. J. Macdonald, the following extract is taken : " It has 
pleased God suddenly and quickly to remove one of our most 
esteemed youthful members. Our departed friend, Arthur Ding- 
wall Fordyce, had not been many months in this country ; but 
even that short period had been sufficient to attest the reality 
and prove the efficacy of his Christian character. Ingenuous, 
amiable, benevolent, he was also active and zealous and devoted 
in the cause ol our common Lord and Saviour ; and there was 
so peculiar a transparency of demeanour attending all his fellow- 
ship, that to see him was almost at once to know him. He was 
much loved in the little Christian circle that knew him ; and it 
was fondly hoped that, as he advanced in years, in grace and in 
social influence, he would become as much an ornament as a 



128 



FOKDYCE DINGWALL. 



support to the cause of truth and righteousness in this city." 
We may add that he considered himself highly favoured in hav- 
ing as his pastor in Calcutta the Rev. John Macdonald, son of 
the well known " Apostle of the North," the Rev. Dr. Macdon- 
ald of Urquhart, and previously in London Wall Church, Lon- 
don, the Rev. James C. Burns, now of Kirkliston, to whose 
ministry he attributed, under God, the great change in his 
religious life which made him the earnest, active Christian he 
latterly was. 

401. Pordyce Dingwall (Arthur), fourth son of Captain 
Alexander Dingwall Fordyce of Brucklay, R.N., M.P., and 
Barbara Thom his wife, was born 14th January, 1845. He 
entered the army 13th July, 1867, as" Ensign in the 78th High- 
landers (Rossshire Buffs), was appointed Adjutant 2i5t August, 
1872, having obtained his Lieutenancy i6th March, 1870. He 
was w'th his regiment in Gibraltar and Canada, and on duty at 
Montreal on the occasion of the funeral of Mr. D'Arcy McGee. 
His regiment was stationed in Edinburgh when his last illness 
(diphtheria) commenced, which ended in his death, 25th July, 
1877. His remains were taken to Aberdeen for interment. The 
newspaper notice of his death spoke of him as one of the most 
respected officers on the staff, and adds : " The manner in which 
officers and men alike spoke of him, proved convincingly their 
strong attachment to and devotion for him. He was a general 
favourite. He had a kindly way of speaking to the men, which 
won for him their affection and, as one man said, all his conduct 
was founded on the principle that ' a soft answer turneth away 
wrath.' " In his own family he was much beloved. His imme- 
diate relatives presented ;£'30o to the Governors of the Royal 
Caledonian Asylum to commemorate his memory, that sum secur- 
ing the maintenance and education of an orphan c^ild of a non- 
commissioned officer or private of the 78th, or other High- 
land regiment, by the Asylum, in all time coming. He died 
unmarried. 

402. Fordyce Dingwall (Arthur Lawrence), third son of 

Lieutenant-General Sir John Fordyce, K.C.B., and Phoebe 
Graham his wife, a Lieutenant in the Bombay Staff Corps, mar- 
ried Mary Moore, and has issue. 



FORDYCK DINGWALL. 



129 



403. Fordyce Dingwall (Arthur Thomas), only and 

posthumous child of Lieutenant Thomas Dingwall Fordyce of 
the Bengal Artillery and Margaret Templeton (formerly Hopper) 
his wife, was entrusted to his grandfather's care, and resided at 
Arthur Seat and in Aberdeen while at school. He was born in 
1820, entered into Holy Orders, and died on the loth December, 
i860. 

404. Fordyce Dingwall (Barbara), fourth daughter of Dr. 

Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife, 
was born 17th December, 1774; married i8th January, 1810, to 
James Farquhar, Surgeon, R.N., her cousin-german, and sur- 
vived him many years. They resided for some time at Tullos in 
the Parish of Nigg, Aberdeenshire. Her abode latterly was in 
Edinburgh and at Elsick with her only surviving son. She died 
1 6th January, 1861. ^ 

405. Fordyce Dingwall (Barbara Ann), second daughter 
of Captain Alexander Dingwall Fordyce of Brucklay, R.N., 
M.P., and Barbara Thom his wife. 

406. Fordyce Dingwall (Barbara Ethel), second daughter 
of James Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh, advocate, and Penelope 
Miiier his wife. 

407. Fordyce Dingwall (Barbara Rachel), second daugh- 
ter of William Dingwall Fordyce of Brucklay, M.P., and Chris- 
tina Horn his wife. 

408. Fordyce Dingwall (Charles Graham), an officer in 
the Indian Forest Department, fourth son of Lieutenant-General 
Sir John B'ordyce, K.C.B., and Phcjebe Graham his wife. 

409. Fordyce Dingwall (Charlotte), second daughter of 
James Dingwall Fordyce (No. 416) and Charlotte McDougall his 
wife, was married i6th September, 1830, to Theodore Girault, 
stock-broker in Paris. They had one son. She died at her 
father's house in London 26th July, 1847, and was buned in 
Kensal Green Cemetery. . 

410. Fordyce Dingwall (Charlotte), third daughter of 
Alexander Dingwall Fordyce, merchant in Aberdeen, and Mag- 
dalen Dingwall his wife, born 31st May, 1822 ; died 29th March, 
1823. 



130 



rORDYCE DINGWALL. 



Si \i. 



411. Pordyce Dingwall (Elizabeth), Fergus, Ontario, 

Canada, eldest daughter of Alexander Dingwall Fordyce, latterly 
of Fergus, and Magdalen Dingwall his wife. 

412. Pordyce Dingwall (Elspet), eldest daughter of William 
Dingwall Fordyce of Techmuiry and Margaret Ritchie his wife, 
born in 1801 ; died in 1802. 

413. Pordyce Dingwall (George), advocate, sixth son of 
William Dingwall Fordyce of Techmuiry and Margaret Ritchie 
his wife, was born i6th June, 1809, and called to the Bar in 
1837. In 1851, he was appointed Advocate-Depute; Sheriff of 
Sutherland and Caithness in 1857, and on the re-arrangement 
of the sheriffships became Sheriff of Ross, Cromarty and Suther- 
land. Failing health caused him to retire some months before 
his death, which took place at Edinburgh, 7th September, 1875. 
He was married 27th October, 1836, to Sophia Thom, daughter 
of James Thom of Aberdeen, formerly merchant in Halifax, and 
Rachel Smith his wife. They had no family. 

414. Pordyce Dingwall (Henry Lawrence), sixth son of 
Lieut. -General Sir John Fordyce, K.C.B., and Phoebe Graham 
his wife, studying at Wellington College, 1883. 

415. Pordyce Dingwall (Isobell), eldest daughter of Dr. 
Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and James Morison his wife, 
was born 4th March, 1771 ; married 26th October, 1809, James 
Bentley, A.M., Professor of Oriental Languages in King's Col- 
lege, Aberdeen, whom she survived. They had two daughters. 
Her death took place on the i6th July, 1852 ; an active, energetic, 
warm-hearted good woman. 

416. Pordyce Dingwall (James), the second son of Dr. 
Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife, 
was born 19th August, 1778, and died in London on the 2nd 
March, 1850, having for many years been connected with the 
well-known mercantile house of Reid, Irving & Co. In the 
year 1793, his name appears as a third year's student at Mari- 
schal College, Aberdeen. When he went to London does not 
appear, nor how he was employed ; but at the early age of nine- 
teen he was married there 23rd July, 1797, to Charlotte Mac- 
dougall, daughter of Mr. Alexander Macdougall of the Ex- 



FORDYCK DINGWALL. 



131 



chequer, Edinburgh, and of Inveresk House. They had two 
sons and two daughters, and the meritorious conduct of his only 
surviving son, and its recognition in high quarters, was to him a 
source of extreme satisfaction. The trying iUness and death of 
his only remaining daughter was one of the most painful events 
in his latter years ; but he bowed in submission to the Divine 
will. His life was greatly chequered, the dark side largely pre- 
ponderating. He was possessed of strong, warm affections 
accompanied by a more than ordinarily sensitive disposition. 
He was high-spirited and strictly honourable, and scrupulously 
faithful in respect of whatever he recognized as duty. By those 
who knew him well, he was tenderly beloved. 

417. Fordyce Dingwall (James) of Culsh in Aberdeen- 
shire, second and twin son of Captain Alexander Dingwall I'or- 
dyce of Brucklay, R.N., M.P, and Barbara Thorn his wife, was 
educated along with his elder brother at Dr. Dale's Academy, 
Blackheath, and at the University of Edinburgh. Having studied 
law, he passed as an advocate in i860, and by family arrange- 
ment became proprietor of the estate of Culsh in the Parish of 
New Deer, residing, however, chiefly in Edinburgh. On the 20th 
March, 1874, he was married to Penelope Miller, daughter of 
Dr. James Miller, Professor of Surgery in the University of Edin- 
burgh, and his wife Penelope Garden Campbell Gordon. They 
have issue. 

418^ Fordyce Dingwall (James), eldest son of Lieut. - 
General Sir John Fordyce, K.C.B., and Phoebe Graham his 
wife, was born 22nd February, 1848, and admitted a barrister of 
the Middle Temple, 30th April, 1872. On the death of his father 
in 1877, he took an appointment on a coffee estate in Ceylon, but 
his life was terminated prematurely there, 31st July, 1883, the 
horse he was driving having taken fright at a railway train. He 
was unmarried. 

418^ Fordyce Dingwall (James), third son of James 
, Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh, advocate, and Penelope Miller his 

wife. ,;• _..'..,..,••-;.-.-,-- -r,., -■„-,-■.-; -.--,- .--T^v:;. 

419. Fordyce Dingwall (James Morison), fourth and 
youngest son of Alexander Dingwall Fordyce, latterly of Fergus, 



L 



132 



FORDYCE DINGWALL. 



Ontario, and Magdalen Dingwall his wife, was born in Aberdeen, 
5th February, 1828. When he was eight years of age the family 
went to Canada, and there he remained until 1845, gaining such 
education as the common school in Fergus afforded, with rudi- 
mentary instruction in Latin under the respected and energetic 
teacher Mr. James McQueen. Being desirous to obtain a col- 
legiate education, arrangements were made for his doing so in 
Aberdeen. He entered the grammar school there and had the 
benefit of the able instruction of the Rector, Dr. James Melvin. 
At Marischal College, while studying the different subjects of 
the curriculum he took especial pleasure in the instruction of 
Professor John Stuart Blackie. As time passed, a great desire 
arose in his mind to enter the ministry of u.e Free Church of 
Scotland. With this view he proceeded to Canada in 1847, and 
gained his father's consent to his studies being pursued in 
another branch of the Church than that which had been origin- 
ally contemplated. On his return in the ship Stephen Whitney, 
from New York to Liverpool, the vessel was dashed on the 
rocks near Skibbereen, on the Irish Coast, on a dark night, 
the captain having been deceived by a light. Almost all on 
board were lost. The sad catastrophe which thus terminated 
the earthly prospects of the subject of this notice took place loth 
November, 1847. He was amiable in disposition, earnest in 
study, earnest also in his religious life, and enthusiastic in view 
of his contemplated life-calling. 

420. Pordyce Dingwall (Jane), eldest daughter of William 
Dingwall Fordyce of Brucklay, M.P., and Christina Horn his 
wife. 

421. Fordyce Dingwall (Janet), third daughter of Dr. 
Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh, and Janet Morison his wife, 
was born 7th September, 1773. For many years she resided 
with her uncle. Dr. Thomas Morison of Elsick, and after his 
death, owing to the long continued illness of another sister, 
became indispensable to her aged parents, residing with them at 
Arthur Seat. After their death the remaining years of her life 
were spent in Aberdeen, where she died on the 7th of April, 
1854. She was exceedingly warm-hearted, tall in person, and 
possessing a vigorous mind. She was warmly attached to the 



FORDYCE DINGWALL. 



133 



r. 

k, 
id 
lis 

it 

Ife 

il, 
id 
le 



Church of Scotland, while the majority of her relatives in Scot- 
land had espoused the cause of the Free Church, a trying 
position which was npt suffered, however, to prevent kindly 
intercourse. 

422. Fordyce Dingwall (Janet), second daughter of 
William Dingwall Fordyce of Techmuiry, and Margaret 
Ritchie his wife, born 29th May, 1806, an invalid for many years. 
She died unmarried, 13th January, 1863. 

423. Fordyce Dingwall (Janet), second daughter of 
Alexander Dingwall Fordyce (388) and Magdalen Dingwall his 
wife, was born 18th January, i8ig, at Pulmore near Aberdeen, 
accompanied her father's family to Canada in 1836, and on the 
ist October, 1840, was married at Lescraigie near Fergus, to 
Alexander Drysdale of Jessiefield, in the Township of Garafraxa, 
remaining there till 1864, when with her husband and family she 
removed to Scotland. She died at their residence, Castellan 
House, Dunbar, on the ist October, 1873, much beloved, and 
deeply mourned. Of eight children, six survived her. 

424. Fordyce Dingwall (Jean), second daughter of Dr. 
Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife ; 
born 26th April, 1772; died in 1773. 

425. Fordyce Dingwall (Jean), seventh daughter of Dr. 
Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife, 
was born 6th July, 1782. Amiable and gentle in disposition, her 
mind was permanently weakened by an overdose of medicine. 
She lived many years after, her death taking place at Nairn, i6th 
February, 1869. 

426. Fordyce Dingwall (Jessy), eldest daughter of James 
Dingwall Fordyce of London and Charlotte McDougall his 
wife, died unmarried. 

427. Fordyce Dingwall (Jessy), third daughter of Captain 
Alexander Dingwall Fordyce of Brucklay, R.N., and M.P., and 
Barbara Thorn his wife, was born 3rd October, 1848, and 
married 2nd August, 1871 , to Dr. Alexander G. Miller, F.R.C.S.E., 
Lecturer on Surgery. She died on 25th December, 1884, leaving 
six children. .. ,. 



134 



FORDYCE DINGWALL. 



428. Fordyce Dingwall (Jessy Stewart), now residing 

at Hillside House, Blairgowrie, elder daughter of Captain Arthur 
Dingwall Fordyce of the Bengal Engineers (397), was brought 
up by her uncle, William Dingwall Fordyce of Techmuiry, 
and on 17th October, 1822, was married to his eldest son 
Arthur Dingwall Fordyce, who afterwards succeeded to the 
estates of Culsh andBrucklay, and who died in 1843 without issue. 
Taking a lively interest in the advancement and progress of the 
Free Church of Scotland, she became an early, liberal and 
generous benefactress. On her grandfather's death, his resid- 
ence, Arthur Seat, near Aberdeen, came into her possession, but 
was parted with. It now constitutes the main portion of the 
*' Duthie Park," devoted to the enjoyment of the citizens of 
Aberdeen. 

429. Fordyce Dingwall (John), fourth son of William 

Dingwall Fordyce of Techmuiry, and Margaret Ritchie his wife, 
born in 1802, died next year. 

430. Fordyce (Sir John), Lieut. -General and K.C.B., was 
the youngest son of James Dingwall Fordyce and Charlotte 
Macdougall his wife. He was born in London on the 14th of 
April, 1806. He received his education at Udny, in Aberdeen- 
shire, at Bishop's Waltham, Hampshire, and the Military 
Academy, Addiscombe. On the loth May, 1822, he was 
appointed Second Lieutenant, Bengal (now Royal) Artillery, and 
served in the attack on Arracan in 1824 and 1825, and its cap- 
ture, receiving Indian medal. On the 25th March, 1826, he 
obtained the rank of First Lieutenant, and was employed in the 
Revenue Survey from 1832 to 1835 and 1840, getting the rank of 
Brevet-Captain, loth May, 1837, and of Captain, 29th April, 
1840. He served in ,the Sutlej campaign in 1845-6, command- 
ing a battery of artillery in the actions of Ferozeshah and 
Sobraon, advance on and occupation of Lahore. In 1846, he 
received medals, bars and Brevet-Majority on the 19th of June. 
He served in the Punjaub campaign, commanding the 9th 
Troop of Horse Artillery at the actions of Chillianwallah and 
Goojerat, and commanded the Bengal Artillery, sent with a 
force under General Gilbert, in pursuit of the Sikh army. He 
was present at the surrender of that army at Rawul Pindee ; at 



FUKDYCI'. DlNGWALl,. 



135 



the passage and attack and further pursuit of the Sikhs and 
Afghans, and occupation and garrisoning of the Peshawur 
Valley. On the 7th June, 1849, he received medal, bar, with 
Brevet Lieutenant-Colonelcy. He commanded the artillery with 
the force sent into the Enzufzai country in November and 
December of the latter year, under Colonel Bradshaw, and com- 
manded the artillery with the force under Sir Charles Napier, 
in the Kohat Pass, in February, 1850. In 1853 he was 
appointed Gun-carriage Agent, holding the appointment till 
1856. On the 8th of June of that year, he received the Regi- 
mental Lieutenant-Colonelcy, and on 28th November, 1854, the 
rank of Brevet-Colonel. In i860, he was appointed to the 
brigade staff of the army and command of the Allahabad 
Brigade. The same year he was appointed Commandant of 
the Bengal Artillery, and had the command of the Meerut 
Brigade with Regimental Colonelcy, i8th February, 1861, and 
rank of Major-General, 29th April of same year. In 1865 he 
received good service pension, and in 1867 was appointed to the 
temporary command of the Presidency Division, and perman- 
ently in January, 1868. In March, 1870, he was appointed to 
the command of the Sirhind Division, leaving India in 1871. He 
obtained the rank of Lieutenant-General, 17th February, 1872, 
and was made Knight Commander of the Bath, 24th May, 1873. 
He died at Colne House, Earl's Colne, Essex, 26th February, 1877, 
having nearly completed fifty-five years' service. His first wife, 
Sophia Clarke (Mrs. Barnett) to whom he was married 12th 
September, 1829, died without issue, 6th November, 1830. He 
married, secondly, i6th March, 1842, Maria Louisa AUeyne, who 
died 2nd September, 1845, leaving one daughter, and on the 
14th April, 1847, he was married to Phoebe Graham, who 
survives, and by whom he had six sons and two daughters. 

431. Fordyce Dingwall (John Fraser), Captain in the 
Bengal Army StafT Corps, second son of Lieutenant-General Sir 
John Fordyce, K.C.B., and Phoebe Graham his wife, married 
Alice Margaret O'Brien, daughter of Mr. James O'Brien. 

432. Fordyce Dingwall (John Lionel), son of Lieutenant 
Arthur Lawrence Dingwall Fordyce and Mary Moore his wife, 

died in infancy. (u^a^^f^'^^^'^^^*^ 



136 



lOKDYCIi DIN(;\VALL. 



433. Fordyce Dingwall (Magdalene), fiftli dauKliter of 
Alexander Dinf,'wall Fordyce, latterly of Fergus, Ontario, and 
Magdalene Dingwall his wife, was born at Millburn Cottage, 
Aberdeen, 17th June, 1826, and at the age often years, accom- 
panied her father's family to Canada. On the 22nd March, 1850, 
she was married to Alexander David Ferrier of lielsyde, Fergus, 
and after a long period of cheerfully borne bodily weakness and 
pain, died there on 13th September, 1872, greatly beloved and 
sincerely mourned. Her husband survived. They had no 
family. 

434. Fordyce Dingwall (Margaret), ninth daughter of 
Dr. Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Monson his 
wife, was born in 1796, and died 5th March, 1802. 

435. Fordyce Dingwall (Margaret), third daughter of 
William Dingwall Fordyce of Techmuiry and Margaret Ritchie 
his wife, was born in 181 1, and died in the following year. 

436. Fordyce Dingwall (Margaret), fourth daughter of 
William Dingwall Fordyce of Techmuiry and Margaret Ritchie 
his wife, was born 6th January, 1813, and married 26th August, 
1835, to the Rev. Alexander Leith Ross Foote, one of the minis- 
ters of Brechin. They had no family. She was amiable and 
justly dear to all who knew her. Her death occurred after a 
lingering illness, 2gth April, 1842. 

437. Fordyce Dingwall (Margaret), daughter of Captain 
Alexander Dingwall Fordyce of Brucklay, R.N., M.P., and 
Barbara Thorn his wife, born 22nd April, 1842 ; died ist July, 
same year. 

438. Fordyce Dingwall (Maria Louisa), daughter of 
Lieut. -General Sir John Fordyce, K.C.B., and Phoebe Graham 
his wife, born 5th October, 1853 ; died 9th September, 1854. 

439. Fordyce Dingwall (Mary), daughter of Lieutenant 
Arthur Lawrence Dingwall Fordyce and Mary Moore his wife. 

440. Fordyce Dingwall (Mary Arbuthnott), sixth and 
youngest daughter of Alexander Dingwall Fordyce and Mag- 
dalen Dingwall his wife, was born at Millburn Cottage, Aber- 
deen, ist April, 1 83 1, and accompanied her father's family to 
Canada at the age of five years, where her after-life was passed. 



KORDYCK DINGWAI.r.. 



137 



On the 31st of May, 1H50, she was married at Belsyde, Fer^^us, 
Ontario, to Alexander Shirrefs Cadenhead, of the Township of 
Nicnol, subsequently residinf( at Ferj^us, and finally in the Parry 
Sound District, Township of Stron;,'. They had eight children, 
three of whom died before their mother. For several years 
before her death (which took place in Ferj^'us, 31st January, 
1884) she was weak in body, but active almost to the last. 
Gentle and lovinf( at all times. 

441. Fordyce Dingwall (Palmer), fifth son of Dr. Arthur 
Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife, born 
4th August, 1788; died 13th April, 1789. 

442. Fordyce Dingwall (Patience), eightli daughter of Dr. 
Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife, 
was born 29th January, 1787, and married 27th November, 1806, 
to James Young, merchant, and Provost of Aberdeen from 181 1 
to 1813. She removed with her husband *ind family to Rotter- 
dam in 18 14, where she died 21st March, 1827, her husband 
surviving her. They had a large family. 

443. Fordyce Dingwall (Penelope Rose), eldest daughter 
of James Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh, advocate, and Penelope 
Miller his wife. 

444. Fordyce Dingwall (Rachel), Edinburgh, eldest 
daughter of Captain Alexander Dingwall Fordyce of Brucklay, 
R.N., M.P., and Barbara Thom his wife. 

445. Fordyce Dingwall (Robert), second son of William 
Dingwall Fordyce of Brucklay, M.P., and Christina Horn his 
wife. 

446. Fordyce Dingwall (Sidney Agnes), daughter of 
Lieut. -General Sir John Fordyce, K.C.B., and Phoebe Graham 
his wife. 

447. Fordyce Dingwall (Sophia), fourth daughter of Cap- 
tain Alexander Dingwall Fordyce of Brucklay, R.N., M.P., and 
Barbara Thom his wife, was born loth October, 1850, and 
married at Brucklay Castle i8th August, 1880, to Alexander 
Taylor Innes, advocate. They had one child who died in 
infancy, three weeks after the mother's death, which took place 
17th July, 1 88 1. .- 



138 



FORDYCE DINGWALL. 



,♦.1 



448. Pordyce Dingwall (Sophia Elizabeth), only child 

of Lieut. -General Sir John Fordyce, K.C.B., and Maria Louisa 
Alleyne his second wife, married Patrick Francis I^ellew, 
Surgeon- Major, H. E. I. Co.'s Service, and died in 1885. They 
had no family. 

449. Fordyce Dingwall (Thomas), the sixth son of Dr. 

Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Monson his wife, 
was born on the 7th April, 1791. Entering into the Service of 
the H. E. I. Co., he served with credit at the capture of the 
Mauritius in 1810, and afterwards in the upper provinces of 
Bengal as a Lieutenant in the Bengal Artillery. He was also 
acting Adjutant and Quarter-Master. His career was cut short 
by death, on the 7th December, 1819. He had been married at 
Dum-Dum, near Calcutta, on the i6th May previous, to Mar- 
garet Hopper, daughter of Lieut. -Colonel William Hopper, also 
of the Bengal Artillery. He had a posthumous son. His widow 
was afterwards the wife of a Mr, Templeton, of the Civil Service 
of the East India Company. 

450. Fordyce Dinerwall (Thomas), fifth son ot William 

Dingwall Fordyce of Techmuiry and Margaret Ritchie his wife, 
born in 1805, died the same year. 

451. Fordyce Dingwall (William) of Techmuiry in the 
Parish of Fraserburgh, Aberdeenshire, eldest son of Dr. Arthur 
Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife, was born 
9th April, 1776. He was an advocate in Aberdeen, and married 
1st September, 1796, to Margaret Ritchie, only daughter and 
heiress of William Ritchie of Techmuiry, manufacturer in Aber- 
deen and one of the Baillies there, and Elspet McKenzie his wife. 
The}' had six sons and three daughters. Dying before his father 
on the ist March, i83i,the representation of the family devolved 
in the first instance on his eldest son. He adopted liberal poli- 
tical sentiments, which were adhered to by his descendants. He 
was very highly respected. He resided for many years in the 
School Hill, Aberdeen, and occasionally at the house at Pul- 
muir where Principal Biackwell's widow passed her last days. 

452. Fordyce Dingwall (William), second son of William 

Dingwall Fordyce of Techmuiry and Margaret Ritchie his wife, 



FORDYCK DINOWAl.L. 



'39 



born 22nd September, 1798, was in business as a merchant for 
some years in Havre, for a short time in Aberdeen and London 
in company with his uncle, Alexander Dinj^wall Fordyce (3HS), 
and latterly in Charleston, South ('arolina, where he dieil unmar- 
ried 13th April, 1839, justly and sincerely regretted. 

453. Fordyce Dingwall (William), third son of Alexander 
Dingwall Fordyce, merchant in Aberdeen, and Magdalen Ding- 
wall his wife, born nth December, 1820; died 4th May, 1821. 

454. Fordyce Dingwall (William) of Bmcklay, M.P., the 
el(''"'t and twin son of Captain Alexander Dingwall Fordyce of 
Bt>.cklay, R.N., M.P., and Barbara Thom his wife, was born at 
Rubislaw Cottage, Aberdeen, 31st March, 1836, and received 
his early education partly at Bellevue Academy, Aberdeen, partly 
under the Rev. Dr. Dale, at Blackheath, Surrey, and sui)se- 
quently at the University of Edinburgh, where he took the degree 
of M.A. with distinction. His early and lamented death on the 
26th of November, 1875, elicited various tributes to his manly 
worth and elevated Christian character. The jfoiirnal of juris- 
prudence contained the following observations: •' It is our pain- 
ful duty to record the death, at the early age of thirty-nine, of 
Willliam Dingwall Fordyce, M.P., at his residence of Brucklay 
Castle. Born in 1836, the deceased gentleman was a member of 
the Faculty of Advocates, having passed the Bar in 1861. On 
a vacancy occurring in the year 1866 in the representation of tiie 
County of Aberdeen in Parliament, the choice of the Liberal 
Party wr j, ultimately fixed upon the young Laird of Brucklay, 
at that time only thirty years of age. The respect entertained 
for the father's memory was the son's surest and best introduc- 
tion to public life. His own sensible public appearances, youth- 
ful modesty and unmistakable sincerity of character confirmed 
this favourable impression, and the result was that Mr. Fordyce 
was elected by an overwhelming majority. As a contemporary 
has said of his parliamentary life : ' During the time he sat in 
the House of Commons, no young Scotch member has gained 
such a reputation for honest integrity of political character, 
courageous expression of opinion, and untiring devotion to duty. 
His inherent modesty of disposition often kept him silent and in 






140 



FORDYCE DINGWALL. 



the background, when others of a more noisy temperament 
crowded to the front ; but when he spoke he did so with the 
authority of one who beheved what he said, and so thoroughly 
in earnest that he would rather have lost his seat than voted 
contrary to his opinions.'" Equally favourable are the words of a 
writer in the Daily Review: "Those who remember him in 
Edinburgh remember few things more beautiful than the way in 
which William Dingwall Fordyce, distinguished at first perhaps 
more by retiringness than aught else, came gradually to disclose 
qualities of mind and heart, which have ever since expanded 
steadily in a more public sphere. His was not the modesty 
which consists in a self-depreciatory comparison with others, 
and so is often mere egotism turned outside in. It arose from a 
simple minded appreciation of great objects and large ideas out- 
side of him, and from a resolute devotion to the task of mastering 
them in preparation for future public usefulness." His character, 
alike as a man and a Christian, is described in these words by 
his pastor, the Rev. Archibald Gardner : " By his death the 
legislature of the land has been deprived of one of its most intel- 
ligent and conscientious members ; the tenantry on his estates of 
one whom they justly esteemed as a model proprietor ; this parish 
of one who was the moving spring as well as, humanly speaking, 
the controlling power in all its numerous interests, and whose 
heart was ever devising some scheme for the good of the com- 
munity, or of some individual old or young ; and this congrega- 
tion (Free Church of Scotland, New Deer) of a liberal and 
attached member, and one of the most earnest ' hearers and doers ' 
of the Word amongst us. I have known him well for many 
years. He favoured me with a large measure of his confidence. 
From his intimate fellowship when at home, and his correspond- 
ence when absent, I had come to know his genuine worth, and I 
can with all honesty say that I believe it was ever his sincere 
desire to spend his life and his means in such a way as to pro- 
mote the good of men and the glory of God. It will be to the 
end of my days a satisfaction that I was called at his own request 
to attend his deathbed, and heard him in such simple terms 
express his trust in Jesus, and saw him pass away from the weep- 
ing ones, who would fain have detained him a little longer, to 



FORDYCE DINGWALL — FRANCIS. 



141 



mingle in the joyous scenes of the Paradise of God." He took 
a special delight in the young, and interested himself in their 
religious instruction. Although a member of the Free Church 
of Scotland he showed the utmost friendliness to the Establish- 
ment. In political life, it may be added, he regarded himself as 
specially sent to Parliament to procure the amelioration of all 
laws bearing hard on tenant farmers, closely identifying him- 
self at all times with their interests. The Game Laws received 
much of his attention, and he also introduced Bills regarding 
farm buildings and labourers' cottages with the view of elevating 
the condition of the workers of the soil. As a landlord it may 
be believed he was beloved and respected in no ordinary degree. 
He entered heartily into the Volunteer movement and gave it 
effective support in his own district. He was Captain of the 
New Deer Company or 5th Aberdeenshire Rifles. He distin- 
guished himself as a marksman in the contests between the Peers 
and the Lower House of Parliament, and for several years was 
one of the House of Commons team. He welcomed the Educa- 
tion Act, and was Chairman of the New Deer School Board. 
He was married 8th April, 1870, to Christina Horn, daughter of 
Robert Horn, advocate and Dean of Faculty, and Jane Miller 
Galbraith his wife, who survived him with four children, two 
sons and two daughters. 

455. Fordyce Dingwall (William), second son of James 
Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh, advocate, and Penelope Miller his 
wife. 

456. Francis (Anna Maria), daughter of Samuel Francis, 
latterly of Kenosha, Wisconsin, U.S., and Julia A. Towslee his 
wife, was born there, and married at St. James' Episcopal Church, 
Chicago, 25th July, 1871, to Sebastian Alexander Harvey, of 
Chicago, Illinois (603). They have issue. 

457. Francis (Samuel), son of Samuel Francis and Clarissa 
F. Johnson, was a native of Rutland, Vermont, and born there 
29th October, 1804. He resided latterly at Kenosha, Wisconsin, 
joined the Second Wisconsin Regiment during the War ; died 
in the service, and was buried at Alexandria, Virginia, ist Sep- 
tember, 1862. He was married at Kenosha 12th May, 1846, to 






■it: 












142 



FRANCIS — FRASER. 



Julia A. Towslee, daughter of Samuel Towslee, of Lyons, Wis- 
consin, and Sybil Baker his wife. She survived him. They 
left issue. 

458. Francis (Samuel), born in Fairhaven, Vermont, 21st 
March, 1772, was married to Clarissa F.Johnson, and died 26th 
January, 1865, at Skaneateles, in the State of New York. They 
were the grandparents of Anna Maria Francis or Harvey (456). 

459. Fraser (Agnes Dyce), third daughter of Alexander 
Fraser, merchant and Provost of Aberdeen, and Agnes Dingwall 
Fordyce his wife, was born 22nd March, 1807, resided latterly in 
Edinburgh, and died unmarried 24th May, 1873. 

460. Fraser (Alexander), merchant and Provost of Aber- 
deen, was a native of Inverness, having been born there on the 
2ist of November, 1775. His father, William Fraser, was factor 
on some of Lord Lovat's properties in that district. His 
mother's name was Jean Steuart, daughter of Alexander Steuart, 
merchant in Inverness, and Jean Scott his wife. His business 
life was passed in Aberdeen as a merchant, cornfactor, and ship- 
owner ; and its nature subjected him and his family to no small 
share of anxiety and danger, at a time when popular riots were 
resorted to in consequence of the high price of bread, while it 
was not attended by the success enjoyed by his descendants in 
other parts of the world. Their prosperity was to him a great 
source of satisfaction. He was Provost of Aberdeen in the years 
1815 and 1816. He was warm-hearted and genial in disposition* 
and possessed a great fund of humour. He was married 31st 
May, 1798, to Agnes Dingwall Fordyce, sixth daughter of Dr. 
Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife. 
She died in 1834. He survived till 21st May, 1840. They had 
five sons and seven daughters. 

461. Fraser (Alexander), merchant in Java, now residing 
in London, fifth son of Alexander Fraser, merchant and Provost 
of Aberdeen, and Agnes Dingwall Fordyce his wife, married first 
on 25th December, 1849, Julia Hermina Van Citters, only 
daughter of J. F. W. Van Citters, Chief Superintendent of the 
Netherlands Trade in Japan. She died i6th February, 1879, 
without issue. He married secondly in 1880 Emma A. Nickerson. 



FRASER. 



H3 



it 



>on. 



462. Praser (Alexander Caspar), merchant, Rotterdam, 
now residing in London, England, eldest son of John Mathison 
Fraser, formerly merchant in Antwerp, and Emilie Nottebohm 
his wife, married 7th May, 1856, Mary Johanna Thaden, only 
daughter oi Bernard Antoine Louis Thaden, merchant in Rotter- 
dam. They have issue, 

463. Fraser (Alexander Christian), second son of Alex- 
ander Caspar Fraser, formerly merchant in Rotterdam, and 
Mary Johanna Thaden his wife. 

464. Fraser (Alister Gilian), in mercantile busmess, second 
son of Arthur Fraser, merchant in Java, and Margaret Jane 
Davidson his wife. 

465. Fraser (Angelica Patience), seventh daughter of 
Alexander Fraser, merchant and Provost of Aberdeen, and 
Agnes Dingwall Fordyce his wife, residing for some time in Edin- 
burgh, Scotland, now in London, England. 

466. Fraser (Arthur), merchant in Java, fourth son of Alex- 
ander Fraser, merchant and Provost of Aberdeen, and Agnes 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born 22nd July, 181 1, married 6th 
August, 1850, Margaret Jane Davidson, daughter of Duncan 
Davidson of Inchmarlo, Kincardineshire, and Fanny Pirie his 
wife, and died at Torquay in Devonshire, 3rd May, 1881, havmg 
retired from business, and resided for some years in Edinburgh, 
and latterly in London. 

467. Fraser (Arthur Abraham), merchant, third son of 
John Mathison Fraser, merchant in Antwerp, and Emilie Notte- 
bohm his wife, married 28th May, 1870, Charlotte Agnes Claire 
Cuvillier, only daughter of Austin Cuvillier of Montreal, latterly 
of London, merchant, and Charlotte Ericsen his wife. They 
have issue. 

468. Fraser (Arthur Mathison), barrister-at-law, eldest 
son of Arthur Fraser, formerly merchant in Java, and Margaret 
Jane Davidson his wife, married igth March, 1878, Mary Gordon, 
and has issue. 

469. Fraser (Arthur Ton), son of Arthur Mathison Fraser, 
barrister, and Mary Gordon his wife. 



144 



FRASER. 



470. Fraser (Barbara), sixth daughter of Alexander Fraser, 
merchant and Provost of Aberdeen, and Agnes Dingwall For- 
dyce his wife, married 25th January, 1841, Charles Frederick 
Gibson of Holybourne, Hants, then Lieutenant 70th Foot, 
afterwards Major, who died in 1870. They had two daughters, 
the younger of whom died unmarried. 

471. Fraser (Bernard Norman), third son of Alexander 
Caspar Fraser, merchant in Rotterdam, and Mary Johanna 
Thaden his wife. , 

472. Fraser (Catherine de NuUy), daughter of Arthur 
Mathison Fraser, barrister, and Mary Gordon his wife. 

473. Fraser (Donald), farmer at Bunchrew, on the estate 
of Culloden, near Inverness, died in March, 1766, his wife 
Isobel Fraser, surviving him ten years. They were pious 
persons, members of the Established Church. They had three 
sons and two daughters. Of these, one son died in childhood ; of 
the two remaining sons, William, the elder, was father of Alex- 
ander Fraser, merchant and Provost of Aberdeen ; John became 
a minister of the Secession Church, of whom and his sister Lydia, 
some particulars will be found in the Appendix. The younger 
daughter, Margaret, was twice married, and left a family. 

474. Fraser (Duncan Davidson), in mercantile business, 

third son of Arthur Fraser, formerly of Java, and Margaret Jane 
Davidson his wife. 

475. Fraser (Edward Seymour), merchant, now residing 
at Woodford Wells, Essex, England, fourth son of John Mathi- 
son Fraser, formerly merchant, Antwerp, and Emilie Nottebohm 
his wife, married 23rd July, 1867, Margaret Ann Fraser, daughter 
of James Fraser, merchant, Singapore. They have issue. 

476. Fraser (Elizabeth Louisa), second daughter of Alex- 
ander Caspar Fraser, formerly merchant in Rotterdam, and 
Mary Johanna Thaden his wife. 

477. Fraser (Emily), eldest daughter of Alexander Caspar 
Fraser, merchant in Rotterdam, and Mary Johanna Thaden his 
wife, born 4th February, 1857; died i6th March, 1871, 



FRASER. 



145 



478. Fraser (Eric Alexander Vernon), son of Arthur 
Abraham Fraser of London and Charlotte Agnes Claire Cuvil- 
her his wife. 

479. Fraser (Ethel Marguerite), second daughter of 

Edward Seymour leaser of Woodford Wells, Essex, and Mar- 
garet Ann Fraser his wife. 

480. Fraser (Evelyn Eleonora), eldest daughter of Arthur 
Abraham Fraser (467) and Charlotte Agnes Claire Cuvilher his 
wife. 

481. Eraser (Frances Mary), eldest daughter of Arthur 

Fraser, formerly merchant in Java, and Margaret Davidson his 
wife. 

482. Eraser (Francis) of Fmdrack in Aberdeenshire, father- 
in-law of Magdalen Dingwall or Fraser (No. 236). 

483. Eraser ((Jertrude Ann), eldest daughter of Edward 
Seymour Fraser of Woodford Wells, in Essex, and Margaret 
Ann Fraser his wife. 

484. Eraser (Henrietta Jane), daughter of Wm. Thomson 
Fraser, merchant in Java, latterly of London, and Anna Onnen 
his wife. 

485. Eraser (Isabella), fourth daughter of Alexander 
Fraser, merchant and Provost of Aberdeen, and Agnes Dingwall 
Fordyce his wife, born 29th August, 1808, died 30th November, 
1815. 

486. Eraser (Isobell), wife of Donald Fraser, farmer at 
Bunchrew, near Inverness, and paternal grandmother of Provost 
Alexander Fraser of Aberdeen, died 25th December, 1776. Her 
husband had died ten years before. They had three sons and 
three daughters. 

487. Eraser (James), merchant in Singapore, father of 
Margaret Ann Fraser (497). 

488. Eraser (Janet), eldest daughter of Alexander Fraser, 
Provost of Aberdeen, and Agnes Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
born 14th February, 1799, married 14th February, 1825, Alex- 
ander Thomson of Banchory, advocate, whom she survived. 
They had no family. She died 8th August, 1870. 






146 



FRASER. 



489. Fraser (Jean Steuart), second daughter of Alex- 
ander Fraser, Provost of Aberdeen, and Agnes Dingwall For- 
dyce his wife, born 22nd January, 1804, married at St. Michael's, 
Cornhill, London, 22nd January, 1822, John Robert Turing, 
merchant in Rotterdam, and afterwards of the Island of Java. 
They had two children. She survived her husband, and died 21st 
February, 1870. 

490. Fraser (Jessy Agnes), fourth daughter of Alexander 
Caspar Fraser, merchant in Rotterdam, and Mary Johanna 
Thaden his wife, born 5th March, 1866; died 7th March, 1867. 

491. Fraser (John Christian), fifth son of John Mathison 
Fraser, formerly merchant, Antwerp, and Emilie Nottebohm 
his wife, educated at Westminster School and at Oxford, resident 
in London. 

492. Fraser (John Mathison), second son of Alexander 
Fraser, merchant and Provost of Aberdeen, and Agnes Dingwall 
Fordyce his wife, born 21st November, 1805, brought up as a 
merchant, and in 1823 left Aberdeen for Rotterdam, carried on 
business in Antwerp, married 23rd September, 1833, Emilie 
Nottebohm, only daughter of the Baron and Baroness Nottebohm 
of that place, retired from business, resided latterly in London, 
and at Mongewell Park, Berkshire, and died 13th January, 1885. 
He was buried at Kensall Green Cemetery on the 17th. His 
wife survived him. They had five sons and one daughter. A 
very interesting commemoration of his golden wedding had been 
held at Mongewell Park, 23rd September, 1883. He was warmly 
loved by relatives, and regarded with affection by very many 
who knew personally of his generous disposition. His end was 
peace. 

493. Fraser (John Mathison), eldest son of Alexander 
Caspar Fraser, formerly merchant in Rotterdam, and Mary 
Johanna Thaden his wife. 

494. Fraser (John Thomson), son of William Thomson 

Fraser, formerly merchant in Java and Anna Onnen his wife. 

495. Fraser (LydiaMarianna), daughter of John Mathison 
Fraser, formerly merchant in Antwerp and Emilie Nottebohm his 



FRASER. 



H7 



wife, liiarried nth August, 1857, William Dunlop Anderson, 
colonial broker, London. They have issue. 

496. Fraser (Margaret Angelica), second daughter of 
Arthur Fraser, formerly merchant in Java and Margaret Jane 
Davidson his wife. 

497. Fraser (Margaret Ann), daughter of James Phraser, 
merchant in Singapore, married 23rd July, 1867, Edward Sey- 
mour Fraser, merchant, now of Woodford Wells, Essex. They 
have issue. 

498. Fraser (Margaret Harries Helen), fifth daughter of 
Alexander Fraser, merchant and Provost of Aberdeen, and Agnes 
Dingwall F^ordyce his wife, born i8th July, 1813 ; died unmarried 
29th September, 1831. Her brother-in-law, Mr. Thomson of 
Banchory, in his journal, quoted by his biographer Dr. Smeaton, 
says : " At 7 p.m. of Thursday, 29th September, the spirit of our 
dear sister M. H. H. returned to God who gave it, so gently we 
hardly knew the moment. The last words were : ' Good, very 
good.' Death had almost no terror, all was peace within." 

499. Fraser (Mary Lydia), third daughter of Alexander 
Caspar Fraser, formerly merchant in Rotterdam, and Mary 
Johanna Thaden his wife. 

500. Fraser (Thomas) of Whitemyres, a younger son of 
Francis Fraser of Findrack, was married to Magdalen Dingwall, 
daughter of Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill and Sarah Murray 
his wife, and widow of John Taylor, ship-builder in Peterhead. 
They had no children. He died in 1794 or 1795. From the 
Session Papers, 1775, we find that in 1760 Lord Gardenston 
pronounced a decreet arbitral in a process brought by Thomas 
Fraser of W^hitemyres against his elder brother, Francis Fraser 
of Findrack. By this judgment the elder brother had to pay the 
younger £300; but subsequently brought an action for reduction 
of the decreet, one of the grounds being the alleged discovery 
of a declaration made by his father " that he had paid his son 
Thomas 6,000 merks as his full and complete patrimony." What 
was the issue we cannot say, any more than whether it was this 
Thomas Fraser, who on 9th July, 1746, was elected Treasurer of 
Aberdeen. 



I 



148 



FKASER. 



501. Fraser (William), eldest son of Donald Fraser, farmer 
in Bunchrew on the estate of Culloden in Invernessshire, and 
Isobell Fraser his wife, was born in 1736. He was factor on the 
forfeited estates of Lovat in the Aird, and was much consulted 
and referred to, as one of the most scientific agriculturists then 
in the North of Scotland. He aided his younger brother, after- 
wards the Rev. John Fraser of Auchtermuchty, in the prosecu- 
tion of his studies, and by loving constraint would have prevented 
if he could his joining the Secession Church, "in a time when 
the Mother Church had most need of Gospel preachers," closing 
his appeal, however, in the words : " May the Lord direct you 
to what will be most for His glory." There does not appear to 
have been any cessation of brotherly affection and friendly inter- 
course when his own desires were not attained in the matter. 
His death occurred at Inverness 5th June, 1800. He had been 
married to Jean Steuart, who survived him, daughter of Alex- 
ander Steuart, merchant in Inverness, and Jean Scott his wife. 
They had two sons and one daughter. The daughter, Mathison 
Fraser, born in 1774, "^^^ remarkably restored late in life from 
long continued debility. She died unmarried 2nd July, 1856. 
Her elder brother (Alexander, No. 460) became Provost of Aber- 
deen. The younger, John, died unmarried, i8th December, 1803, 
at the age of twenty-six. 

502. Fraser (William), eldest son of Alexander Fraser, 
Provost of Aberdeen, and Agnes Dingwall Fordycehis wife, was 
born 28th January, 1801, and died in May, 1805. 

503. Fraser (William), third son of Provost Alexander 
Fraser of Aberdeen and Agnes Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born 
28th October, 1809, died 17th January, 1823. 

504. Fraser (William Augustus Gumming), eldest son 

of Edward Seymour Fraser, Woodford Wells, Essex, and Mar- 
garet Ann Fraser his wife. 

: 505. Fraser (William Thomson), merchant in Java, lat- 
terly residing in London, second son of John Mathison Fraser, 
merchant in Antwerp, and Emilie Nottebohm his wife, born 14th 
October, 1841, married loth March, 1865, Anna Onnen, daughter 



I-RASKU FKKN'CH. 



149 



lat- 
Lser, 
[4th 
hter 



of Dr. P. L. Onnen, of Sourabaya, Java, and died suddenly, 31st 
May, 1880. They had two children. 

506. Fraser (Winifred Mary Lydia), second daughter 
of Arthur Aiiraham Fraser of London and Charlotte Agnes 
Claire Cuviller his wife. 

507. French (Barbara), third daughter of John French, 
advocate in Aberdeen, and Christian Blackwell his wife, baptized 
23rd March, 1759, married gth June, 1796, Peter Jamieson of 
Kingston in Jamaica, and died in June, 1801. 

508. French (Christian), second daughter of John French, 
advocate in Aberdeen, and Christian Blackwell his wife, baptized 
6th May, 1755. 

509. French (Bhzabeth), second daughter of George 
French, litster in Aberdeen, and Barbara Fordyce his wife, 
baptized 30th November, 1714. 

510. French (George), litster in Aberdeen, (designated in 

1707, 1708, and 1709, master of the Woollen Manufactory), mar- 
ried about 1705 Barbara Fordyce, daughter of Provost George 
Fordyce of Aberdeen and Isobell \\ alker his first wife. They 
had five sons and two daughters. His death must have occurred 
between 8th February, 1716, and igth December same year. 
Whether he was a native of Aberdeen is not known, nor his 
parentage ; but in 1720 and 1722 Archibald French (possibly a 
brother), a litster, also in Aberdeen, whose wife's name was 
Helen Strachan, had children baptized. 

511. French (George), eldest son of George French, litster 
in Aberdeen, and Barbara Fordyce his wife, baptized 28th March, 

1708, died in childhood. 

512. French (George), fifth son of George French, litster in 
Aberdeen, and Barbara Fordyce his wife, was baptized 19th 
December, 1716 (a posthumous child). 

513. French (George); son of Robert French, litster in 
Aberdeen, and Agneta Duncan his wife, was baptized ist May, 
1733. 

514. French (George, M.D.), first Lecturer on Chemistry in 
Marischal College, Aberdeen, by appointment of the founder, 
Mrs. Blackwell (73), was son of John French, advocate in Aber- 



I50 



FKKNCH. 






deen, and Christian Blackwell his wife. He was baptized 23rd 
March, 1752, was married and had a daughter, who became the 
wife of Mr. Charles Ross, manufacturer in Aberdeen, a brother 
of the Rev. James Ross, D.D., one of the ministers of Saint 
Nicholas Church there. Mrs. Ross had a family, but inability 
to furnish full details prevents further notice. Dr. French was a 
much respected, simple-minded good man. 

515. French (Isobell), eldest daughter of George French, 
litster in Aberdeen, and Barbara Fordyce his wife, baptized 5th 
May, 1706. • 

516. French (James), third son of George French, litster in 
Aberdeen, and Barbara Fordyce his wife, baptized gth Septem- 
ber, 171 1 ; died in 1732. 

517. French (John), advocate in Aberdeen, fourth son of 
George French, htster there, and Barbara Fordyce his wife, 
baptized ist March, 171 3, married Christian Blackwell, daughter 
of Rev. Thomas Blackwell, Principal of Marischal Col- 
lege, and Christian Johnston his wife, and died 2nd January, 
1759' They had one son and three daughters. His death 
resulted from apoplexy. A correspondent of the Aberdeen 
jfournal, at the time he died, writes of him in these terms : " If 
clearness of judgment and integrity of conduct, accompanied 
with unaffected piety and benevolence of heart — if the most 
steady and disinterested friendship, adorned with the most engag- 
ing affability, meekness and simplicity of manners — can give a 
claim to the appellation of a worthy man, such truly was Mr. 
French. These virtues made him shine in the different stations 
he filled both of social and domestic life, and gained him the 
esteem and love of every one." He was Procurator-Fiscal to 
the Sheriff Court of Aberdeenshire. 

518. French (Robert), litster in Aberdeen, second son of 
George French, also litster there, and Barbara Fordyce his wife, 
baptized 15th May, 1710, married Agneta Duncan, who sur- 
vived him. He must have died before ist May, 1733, as 
a posthumous son, George, was baptized then. [It has been 
assumed that Robert French, son of George French and Barbara 
Fordyce, is the same with the husband of Agneta Duncan.] 



FKliNCH — CiALLVVKY 



151 



519. French (Sarah), eldest daughter of John French, advo- 
cate in Aberdeen, and Christian Bhickwell his wife, was bap- 
tized 6th October, 1753. She was married 17th August, 17.85, to 
the Rev. Alexander Wilson, minister of the Scotch Church in 
Campvere, Holland, and died 15th March, 1793, leaving one 
daughter, Sarah Christian Wilson or Bower (937). 

520. Friend (Jane), mother of Winifred Penn or Boucaut 
(775) and wife of James Penn of the Victualling Department, 
Plymouth, England, latterly of South Australia. 

521. Fyffe (William Johnstone, M.D.), retired Surgeon- 
Major (Army Medical Department) with honorary rank of 
Deputy Surgeon-General, married Catherine Elizabeth Mary 
DufF or Reid, daughter of Lieutenant James Reid, R.N., and 
Patience Huddart Stewart (Sterritt), afterwards DufF. They 
were parents of Miss (Catharine) Duff Fyffe of Corsindae, 
Aberdeenshire. 

522. Qalbraith (Jane Miller), daughter of John Galbraith, 
junior, of Glasgow, married 23rd September, 1846, to Robert 
Horn, advocate. Dean of Faculty ; mother of Christina Horn or 
Dingwall Fordyce (620). 

523. Galbraith (John), junior, of Glasgow, father of Jane 
Miller Galbraith or Horn (522). 

524. Q-ale (Samuel), from the United States, but latterly 
residing in Hamilton, Upper Canada (son of Samuel Gale and 
Christian McKay), married Rebecca Howell. They were parents 
of Sarah Gale or Milne (525), 

525. Gale (Sarah), daughter of Samuel Gale of Hamilton, 
Upper Canada, and Rebecca Howell his wife, oorn in 1810, 
married Alexander Stover Milne, barrister-at-law, Ancaster; had 
issue, and died 26th December, 1882. 

526. Qallwey (Johanna), daughter of Henry Gallwey, 
banker in Lisbon (and descended from Mary Campbell, who 
escaped with her child from that city at the great earthquake, 
by going into the open field), born 30th November, 1777, mar- 
ried at St. James' Church, Westminster, to Lieutenant William 
Milne, R.N. ; latterly resided with her husband in Ancaster, 



152 



C.IU.I.IK — (ilHSON. 



Upper Canada, and died there, 12th March, i^^34. She was 
{;ran(hnother of James Gallwey Mihie (721), now of Qu-Appelle, 
N.-\Y.T. 

527. Gellie (Magdalen), wife of Mr. WilHam Murray, minis- 
ter of Inveriiry, was probably a sister of Mr. Alexander Gellie, 
a native of Aberdeen, minister or parson of Deskford, and after- 
wards of Fordyce, as he was witness with her husband in 1710 
to an agreement made and executed between their son-in-law, 
Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill and his brother, William Ding- 
wall of Brucklay. Two others of the name who are incidentally 
mentioned were also in all probability near relatives, Peter and 
Robert Gellie, both merchants in Aberdeen. Execution was 
appointed to pass at their instance, in conjunction with her hus- 
band and son-in-law, on the marriage contract of her third 
daughter, Katharine Murray in 171 6 \v"^h Alexander Hay, 
younger of Rannieston. She was herself witness in November, 
1719, at the baptism of a grandchild, Jean Dingwall. She had 
at least five children. Some particulars regarding Mr. Gellie of 
Fordyce and others of the name will be found in the Appendix. 

528. Gibson (Oharles Frederick) of Holybourne in Hamp- 
shire, was son of the Rev. John George Gibson, rector of Holy- 
bourne, and Alicia Maria Horsford his wife. He was a Lieuten- 
ant in the 70th Regiment of Foot at the time he was married, 
25th January, 1841, to Barbara Fraser, sixth daughter of Provost 
Alexander Fraser of Aberdeen and Agnes Dingwall Fordyce his 
wife. He was also at one time Aide-de-Camp to General Sir 
Jeremiah Dickson in Nova Scotia, and subsequently held the 
rank of Major. After retiring from the Army he resided for some 
years with his family at Drumduan Cottage, Nether Banchory, 
and was an earnest, unassuming Christian worker. His death 
took place in 1870, his wife surviving him with two daughters, 
Jessy Maria Gibson or Williamson (530) and Christina Jane 
Charlotte, who died unmarried. 

529. Gibson (Christina Jane Charlotte), younger daugh- 
ter of Major Charles Frederick Gibson, 70th Foot, and Barbara 
Fraser his wife, born 13th February, i860; died unmarried at 
Bournemouth, 31st January, 1885. 



r.mSON — GORDON. 



153 



530. Gibson (Jessy Maria), elder dau^^'hter of Major 
Charles Frederick Gibson, yuth [""oot, and Barbara Fraser his 
wife, married 31st January, i86r), i^ev. H. Mcllrce Williamson, 
minister of the Free Church of Scotland, Huntly, Aberdeenshire, 
afterwards of Belfast, Ireland, and has issue. 

531. Gibson (Rev. John George), Rector of Holybourne, 
Hampshire, lingland, for twenty-two years, married Alicia Maria 
Horsford. They were the parents of Major Charles Fred. 
Gibson (528). 

532. Girault (James Theodore), only child of Theodore 

Girault, stock-broker, Paris, and Charlotte Dingwall Fordyce his 
wife. 

533. Girault (Theodore), stock-broker, Paris, married 
1 6th September, 1830, Charlotte Dingwall Fordyce, only surviving 
daughter of James Dingwall I'ordyce (416), and Charlotte Mac- 
dougall his wife. They had one son. 

534. Gordon (Alexander), of the family of Nethermuir, 
resided i6go to 1692 in Artamford ; from that date to 1696 in 
Brucklay, then in Culsh, afterwards in Old Made, all in the 
Parish of New Deer, subsequently at Mill of Aberdour. He 
married Anna Lindsay, daughter of William Lindsay of Culsh, 
and Barbara Leith his first wife. She died in May, 1699. They 
had at least three sons and three daughters. Alexander Gordon 
of Aberdour was one of the sons, Barbara Gordon or Fordyce 
(53'/) 0"<2 of the daughters. 

535. Gordon (Alexander) of Rosiburn, near Banff, at one 
time a Captain in the 6oth Rifles, born 6th November, 1781, was 
married 13th July, 1805, to Elizabeth Robinson. They were the 
parents of Penelope Garden Campbell Gordon or Miller (543). 
Captain Gordon's parents were James Gordon of Rosiburn, 
second son of Alexander Gordon of Cairnfield in Banffshire aad 
Janet Mercer who survived her husband, and died at Nairn 24th 
May, 1842, and was daughter of Alexander Mercer of Hoop, mer- 
chant in Edinburgh. 

536. Gordon (Anna), daughter of John Gordon of Nether- 
muir and Elizabeth Gordon his wife, was baptized 28th May, 
1689 (Anna Countess of Aberdeen and the Lady Christy Grant 






154 



GORDON'. 



being godmothers) and was married 25tli October, 1 711, to William 
Dingwall of Briicklay. They died in one week, in May, 1733, 
leaving five sons and three daughters. 

537'. Gordon (Barbara), daughter of Alexander Gordon, 
latterly at Mill of Aberdour, and Anna Lindsay his wife, was 
baptized 27th September, 1692, and married about 1720 to her 
cousin-german, John Fordyce of Gask in the Parish of Turriff. 
She died in January, 1779. They had three sons and eight 
daughters. 

537'. Gordon (Elizabeth), wife of John Gordon of Nether- 
muir and mother of Anna Gordon or Dingwall (536) ; died in 
February, 1699. 

538. Gordon (Helen), elder daughter of Lieutenant Francis 
Gordon, at Mill of Lumphart, of the 88th Regiment of Foot, was 
born in 1769, and married 20th October, 1799, to James Monro, 
cabinet-maker in Inverness, afterwards of Pictou, Nova Scotia, 
and died there in September, 1841. [Her younger sister, Anne 
Gordon, married nth September, 1796, Alexander Shirrefs, 
advocate in Aberdeen. Her descendants succeeded to and now 
enjoy the estate of Craig in Aberdeenshire. Their father, Lieu- 
tenant Francis Gordon, died at Mill of Lumphart, 7th October, 
1788.] The subject of this notice was mother of George Monro, 
S.S.C. (No. 731.) 

539. Gordon (John) of Nethermuir in the Parish of New 
Deer, Aberdeenshire, married Elizabeth Gordon, who died in 

1699. Anna Gordon or Dingwall (536) was a daughter. He 
appears to have married Mary Gumming as hir. second wife in 

1700. The estate of Nethermuir at that time would seem to 
have been divided between Patrick Gordon, elder, probably his 
father, and himself. Patrick Gordon's wife, Anna Strachan, died 
in 1699. [The family is descended from David. Gordon of 
Knaven and Nethermuir, four h son of James Gordon of Methlick 
and Haddo, who died in 1582.] 

540. Gordon (John), Major in the 2nd or Queen's Royal 
Regiment, was married in 1829 to Jessie Scales or Drysdale (802). 
They had no family. His wife survived him. A son of a former 
marriage, Edward Strathearn Gordon, distinguished himself at 



GORDON — GRANT. 



155 



the Scottish Bar, became Lord Advocate, and latterly one of the 
Judges of the Court of Appeal, by the title of Lord Gordon of 
Dri mearn in the County of Stirling. 

541. Gordon (Mary), daughter of William Gordon of Aber- 
dour in Aberdeenshire (her mother being a daughter of William 
Rose of Bellivat) was married 6th November, 1813, to John 
Dingwall of Brucklay. They had one son and one daughter. 
She died i8th November, 1828. 

542. Gordon (Mary), daughter of — Gordon, of Manar in 
Aberdeenshire, was married 19th March, 1878, to Arthur Mathi- 
son Fraser (468). They have issue. 

543. Gordon (Penelope Garden Campbell), daughter of 
Captain Alexander Gordon of the Goth Rifles, and of Rosiburn, 
near Banff, and Elizabeth Robinson his wife, born 4th March, 
1813, was married nth July, 1836, to James Miller, M.D., Pro- 
fessor of Surgery in the University of Edinburgh. She was 
mother of Dr. A. G. Miller (709) and Penelope Miller or Ding- 
wall Fordyce (716), 

544. Gordon (William) of Aberdour, Aberdeenshire, born 
in 1772, married 27th January, 1794, the eldest daughter of 
William Rose of Bellivat. He died nth November, 1839. His 
property of Aberdour had been purchased by the trustees of 
John Dingwall of Brucklay and of Croydon, to whose grand- 
nephew and heir, John Dingwall of Brucklay, his daughter, Mary 
Gordon, was married in 1813. 

545. Graham (James, M.D.), of the H. E. I. Co.'s Service, 
father of Phoebe Graham o. Fordyce (546). 

546. Graham (Phoebe), daughter of Dr. James Graham, 
H. E. I. Co.'s Service, was married 14th April, 1847, to Major, 
afterwards Lieut. -General Sir John Fordyce, K.C.B., whom she 
survived. They had six sons and two daughters. 

547^ Grant (Mary), wife of the Rev. James Lumsden of 

Corrachrie, minister of Strathdon and afterwards of Towie, was 

, born in i/oi, and is said to have been niece of Grant of Ballin- 

dalloch. In 1735 she was infeft in the lands of Rippachie, 

which she may have inherited, as at one time they were held by 



156 



HAINES — HAMILTON. 



a family of the name of '"rant. She died on the 13th January, 
1778. Her children are referred to in the notice of her husband 

(693). 

547". Haines (Henrietta Emma Buchanan), youngest 
daughter of Lieut. -Colonel Edward Eldridge Haines, formerly 
of the 92nd Foot, and Helen Graham Buchanan his wife, was 
married 30th April, 1884, to John Drysdale of the Bogue and 
Arthur Seat, Jamaica (284). They have issue. 

547^ Haines (Edward Eldridge), Lieut. -Colonel 92nd 
Foot, son of Gregory Haines, C.B., Commissary General, and 
Harriet Eldridge his wife, entered the Army as Ensign, 26th 
June, 1835, became Lieutenant in 1839, and Captain in 1846, 
Major in 1861, and retired from the Army as Lieut. -Colonel in 
1865, residing latterly in great measure at Pau, in the South of 
France. He was married to Helen Graham Buchanan, daughter 
of Robert Buchanan, merchant, Glasgow, and Margaret Dunlop 
his wife, and had one son and four daughters, the youngest being 
Henrietta Emma Buchanan Haines or Drysdale (547"0- 

547*. Haines (Gregory), Commissary General and C.B., of 
a Sussex family, married Harriet Eldridge. Their son, Lieut, - 
Colonel E. E. Haines, 92nd Foot, was father of Henrietta Emma 
B. Haines or Drysdale (547''^). Another son of Gregory Haines 
and Harriet Eldridge (General Sir F. P. Haines) distinguished 
himself in the service, and is G.C.B., G.C.S. and C.J.E. 

548. Halkin (Sarah), wife of Alexander Hugh Simpson 
(8 ■)) and mother of Helen Norah Simpson or Bruce (816). 

549. Hamilton (Helen), elder daughter of Dr. Robert 
Hamilton, Professor of Mathematics in Marischal College, Aber- 
deen, and Anne Mitchell his first wife, was married 17th May, 
1797, to Andrew Thomson of Banchory and Rainnieshill, who 
died early, leaving her with one son. Her own death took place 
19th August, 1 85 1, at Drumduan Cottage, on the estate of 
Banchory. 

550. Hamilton (Robert, LL.D.), Professor of Mathematics 
in Marischal College, A.berdeen, was born on the nth June, 
1743. He was the eighth son of Gavin Hamilton, bookseller in 
Edinburgh. His mother was a Miss Balfour of Pilrig. His 



HAMILTON. 



157 



His 



grandfather, Dr. William Hamilton, was Professor of Divinity 
and latterly Principal of the University of Edinburgh, of the 
family of Airdrie, the same which at a later date the eminent 
metaphysician Sir William Hamilton sprung from. The subject 
of this notice showed an early and remarkable predilection for 
mathematics ; but for some time his energies were otherwise 
directed. He was first employed in the banking establishment 
of William Hogg & Sons, and afterwards became partner in a 
paper mill established by his father. In 1766 he was an unsuc- 
cessful candidate for the Mathematical Chair in Marischal Col- 
lege, and in 1769 was made Rector of Perth Academy. In 1775 
he was presented to the chair of Natural Philosophy in Marischal 
College, which, however, he next year exchanged for that of 
Mathematics, which accorded more with his inclination. He 
was first known as an author by his works on arithmetic, book- 
keeping and merchandise, and it was not till he had reached his 
seventieth year that his great work on the " National Debt " was 
published. His principles were sanctioned by the most eminent 
political economists, and have been gradually adopted by the Gov- 
ernment. He was an enthusiastic, yet a judicious philanthropist. 
While his talents were great his moral qualities were even more 
deserving of commemoration. An Essay which he published 
anonymously in 1790, entitled " Peace and War," was written 
with the view of inculcating doctrines favourable to universal 
peace. His outward demeanour was marked by certain unaffected 
peculiarities, which, it is said, " only invested him with a charm 
of endearing naivete to those who rightly knew him." His 
personal appearance is graphically described in a short-lived perio- 
dical called the Letter of Marque, published in Aberdeen in 1834, 
four years after his death. " W^e still delight to conjure up," 
the writer says, " before the eye of fancy, his long remembered 
form, the childish, guileless expression of his countenance, the 
bustling diligence of his shuffling gait, impeded as much as aided 
by his staff, now planted before him in careless haste, and, anon 
trailing at length behind, the left arm generally resting tiiere; his 
eyes in which intelligence twinkled through the dimness of age, 
sometimes fixed on the ground, and again peering straight for- 
ward from beneath his grey eyebrows. His memory is associated 



158 HAMILTON. 

in our mind with all that is great in talent, excellent in morals, 
and amiable in private character." In 1771 he was married to 
Anne Mitchell of the family of Ladath, who died in 1779, leaving 
three daughters. In 1783 he was married to Jean Morison, 
fifth daughter of James Morison of Elsick, formerly Provost of 
Aberdeen. They had no children. His wife died four years 
before him; his own death taking place on the 4th July, 1829. 
His grandson, ivir. Thomson of Banchory (871) on : hearing of 
his death while he was abroad wrote : " I do not believe there 
ever liv^-J a more sincerely pious Christian or a man of a purer 
mind. His talents were known and appreciated by his country, 
and even far beyond its bounds. He applied them diligently to 
the good both of his neighbours and his country." His eldest 
daughter was married to Andrew Thomson of Banchory ; the 
youngest, Marion, to the Rev. Robert Swan, minister of St. 
Monance and Abercrombie in Fife, to whose memory the follow- 
ing touching tribute was paid a few years since by the Rev. Dr. 
William Milligan when he was chosen to fill the honourable 
position of Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of 
Scotland. " In the manses of many of our country parishes, he 
said, are to be found great talents and many noble qualities both 
of mind and heart. Men who could occupy positions most pro- 
minent in the public eye are spending their lives there, and 
rejoice in so spending them among the poor, the unlettered and 
the unknown. Apart from the struggles, and what are commonly 
considered the rewards of this world, they find their reward in 
sweetening the hard lot of the toiling labourer ; in administering 
solace to the afflicted, and in both by precept and example allur- 
ing to that better world which waits the believer at the end of 
what we know, alas! is too often a dark and dreary pilgrimage." 
" Will the General Assembly," Dr. Milligan continued, " excuse 
me for a moment, if under the impulse of this thought, I venture 
to quote to them a very few lines from an unpublished poem 
upon the Sabbath, written before Graham's was written, by one 
of the gentlest and purest spirits that ever occupied a place in 
the Church of Scotland, and to whom it was my fortunate lot to 
be assistant for a few months when I first received license — I 
mean the Rev. Robert Swan, minister of the united parishes of 



HAMPTON — HAUVRY. 



159 



Abercrombie and St. Monance in Fifeshire. 
poem upon the subject in these words : 



He conchided his 



of 



Then grant, O Lord, mine: earliest, latest prayer. 
That some sequestered hamlet be my care ; 
Where from all pride and all ambition free, 
Save that of winning many souls to Thee. 
I may, unnoticed, pass my tranquil days, 
And lead my flock in wisdom's pleasant ways. 
And meet in bliss, when every trial's o'er, 
The little flock I loved so well before." 

551^ Hampton (Emily), born in 1808, married to John 
Henry Richman of Lymington, Hampshire, England; removed 
to South Austraha in 1839 with her husband and family, one 
of her daughters, Frances, born in that Colony, becoming wife of 
Gavin David Young (946). 

55 1^ Harper (John), schoolmaster in the Parishes of Durris 
and Fettercairn, Kincardineshire (having removed to the latter 
in 1755), was married at Durris to Elizabeth Melville, daughter 
of the Rev. Robert Melville, minister of that parish, and Isobell 
Fordyce his first wife, and died in 1790. They had at least two 
daughters. In connection with Mr. Harper and his father-in- 
law it is recorded that in the month of May, 1748, one James 
Davidson was sentenced to be hanged in Aberdeen, having been 
found guilty of several robberies, two of which were by breaking 
into the houses of Mr. Melville and Mr. Harper, the minister and 
schoolmaster of Durris. 

551^ Harper (Barbara), daughter of John Harper, school- 
master of Durris, etc., and Elizabeth Melville his wife, was 
married to David Adamson, schoolmaster at Fettercairn. She 
was in life loth March, 1794. 

551*. Harper (Katharine), daughter of John Harper, school- 
master at Fettercairn and Elizabeth Melville his wife, was 
married to John Mathews, wright in Aberdeen, and with her 
sister Barbara participated in 1793 in a small legacy left by 
Barbara Black, a cousin of their mother, and widow of Principal 
Blackwell of Marischal College, Aberdeen. 

552. Harvey (Absalom Inglis Edward), second son of 
Alexander Harvey, now of Qu'Appelle in the North-West Terri- 
tory, Canada, and Matilda Shade his wife, employed for some 



i6o 



HARVEY. 



time in connection with the Gre}', WelHngton and Bruce Rail- 
way, residing at Pahnerston, Ontario; similarly engaged more 
recently in Manitoba, etc. 

553. Harvey (Agnes), seventh daughter of John Harvey of 
Kinnettles, Forfarshire, and Angelica Dingwall Fordyce his 
wife, born loth August, 1814; died at Kinnettles, 14th March, 
1828, four days after the death of her brother Thomas. 

554. Harvey (Alan Keith), third son of Arthur (Young) 
Harvey of Adelaide, South Australia, and Sarah Jane Boucaut 
his wife. 

555. Harvey (Alexander), seventh son of John Harvey of 
Kinnettles, Forfarshire, and Angelica Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
left Scotland at an early age for Canada; purchased land in the 
neighbourhood of Fergus, Ontario ; and was also for some time 
a partner in the firm of Webster, Fordyce & Harvey, merchants 
there. He acted as a magistrate and as a member of the Municipal 
Council for the County of Wellington. His property (Kinnettles) 
near Fergus, being disposed of, he resided for some time at 
Palmerston, Ontario ; and subsequently removed with his elder 
daughter and her family to Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T. He was mar- 
ried 15th August, 1839, to Matilda Shade, daughter of Sebastian 
Shade of Mobile, Alabama. U.S., and Hannah Hunt his wife, 
and niece of Mr. Absalom Shade of Gait, Ontario, with whom 
she then resided. They had three sons and four daughters. 

556. Harvey (Angelica), fourth daughter of John Harvey 
of Kinnettles and Angelica Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born 
i8th March, 1806; died unmarried 15th July, 1828. 

557. Harvey (Angelica), second daughter of Arthur Har- 
vey, latterly of D'Urban, Natal, South Africa, and Elizabeth 
Young his wife, born at Tillygreig, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, now 
residing in Adelaide, South Australia. 

558. Harvey (Angelica Caroline Elizabeth), third 
daughter of Alexander Harvey, now of Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T., 
and Matilda Shade his wife, married 25th May, 1884, to Dr. 
Carthew of the same place. 

559. Harvey (Angelica Elizabeth), eldest daughter of 

Alexander Harvey, now of Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T., and Matilda 



HARVKY 



l6l 



Shade his wife, born at Kinnettles House, Forfarshire, 26th 
April, 1843; (lied at Kinnettles, Fergus, Ontario, loth May, 1855. 

560. Harvey (Angelica Manning), eldest daughter of John 
Inglis Harvey of Kinnettles, Forfarshire, H. E. I. Co.'s Civil 
Service, and Sara Aratoon Avietick his wife, born in Calcutta ; 
married 23rd July, 1873, to David Lister Shand of Edinburgh, 
W.S. They have issue. 

561. Harvey (Arthur), second son of John Harvey of Kin- 
nettles, Forfarshire, and Angelica Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
born 2ist March, i8og ; received a mercantile training, and was 
in Grenada, West Indies, from 1828 to 1831 ; returned to Scot- 
land and served apprenticeship to a writer to the Signet, but did 
not enter on the profession. He purchased from his father's 
trustees the estate of Tillygreig in the Parish of Newmachar, 
Aberdeenshire, which he farmed intelligently and energetically. 
He sold Tillygreig, and in 1861 removed with his wife and family 
to South Africa, residing at D'Urban, Natal, till his death there 
on the 19th June, 1872. He was an elder in the Free Church of 
Scotland, and took much interest in church matters, affording 
efficient assistance. He had been married at TuUos, near Aber- 
deen, 25th August, 1835, to his cousin Elizabeth Young, daugh- 
ter of James Young, merchant in Rotterdam, and Patience 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife. They had five sons and four 
daughters. 

562. Harvey (Arthur Dingwall Fordyce), third son of 
John Dingwall Fordyce Harvey of Calcutta and Mary Thomas 
Apcar his wife. 

563. Harvey (Arthur Kenneth Le Rai), eldest son of 
Arthur (Young) Harvey of Adelaide, South Australia, and Sarah 
Jane Boucaut his wife, born at Parkside, Adelaide. 

564. Harvey (Arthur Lowis), second son of John Inglis 
Harvey of Kinnettles, H. E. I. Co.'s Service, and Sara Aratoon 
Avietick his wife, brought up to a mercantile life ; now, in 1885, 
organizing a company for manufacture of sugar at Meerut in 
India. . 

565. Harvey (Arthur Young), the name of Young being 
adopted under legal authority in 1872 for the sake of distinction, 



1 62 HAKVIiY. 

fourth son of Arthur Harvey, latterly of D'Urban, Natal, South 
Africa, and Elizabeth Young his wife ; born at Tillygreig in 
Aberdeenshire ; resides in Adelaide, South Australia, and is 
Auditor of the Adelaide Savings Bank ; married 15th June, 1871. 
Sarah Jane Boucaut, daughter of Captain Ray Boucaut and 
Winifred Penn his wife. They have issue. 

566. Harvey (Barbara;, fifth daughter of John Harvey of 
Kinnettles, Forfarshire, and Angelica Dingwall Fordyce his 
wife, born 28th October, 1807 ; died at Kinnettles, gth April, 
1824. 

567. Harvey (Edwin Francis), son of Sebastian Alexander 
Harvey of Chicago, Illinois, and Anna Maria Francis his wife. 

568. Harvey (Elizabeth Jessy Sarah), third daughter of 
Arthur Harvey, latterly of D'Urban, Natal, South Africa, and 
Elizabeth Young his wife, born at Tillygreig, Aberdeenshire, 
Scotland; married at D'Urban nth April, 1865, to James Alex- 
ander, bank manager there. They afterwards removed to South 
Australia, and reside now at Mount Gambler in that Colony. 
They have issue. 

;)69. Harvey (Elizabeth Sarah), second daughter of John 
IngHs Harvey of Kinnettles, H. E. I. Co.'s Service, and Sarah 
Aratoon Avietick his wife, born 3rd August, 1845 ; died in Cal- 
cutta 2oth August, 1848. 

570. Harvey (Eric Oharles), second son of Arthur Young 
Harvey of Adelaide, South Australia, and Sarah Jane Boucaut 
his wife, born at Norwood, near Adelaide. 

571'. Harvey (Frances Chalmers), tenth daughter of John 

Harvey of Kinnettles, Forfarshire, and Angelica Dingwall For- 
dyce his wife, born 7th May, 1826; died in December, 1832. 

571'^ Harvey (Frances), third daughter of Arthur (Young) 
Harvey of Adelaide, South Australia, and Sarah Jane Boucaut 
his wife. 

572. Harvey (Qeorgiana Morison) ninth daughter of John 

Harvey of Kinnettles, Forfarshire, and Angelica Dingwall 
Fordyce his wife, born 6th September, 1820 ; died in June, 1832. 



IIARVIiY. 



163 



573. Harvey (Grace or Grizel), dau^^hter oi John Harvey, 
schoolmaster, Midmar, Aberdeenshire, and EHzabeth Mackay 
his wife, born i8th April, 1735, was married to Thomas Aber- 
dein in Hillside of Echt, Aberdeenshire, had issue, and died 12th 
August, 1825. Three of her brothers having amassed wealth in 
the West Indies, of which her son, John Aberdein, of London, 
received a considerable share, he assumed the name of Harvey, 
and purchased the estate of Kinnettles in Forfarshire. 

574. Harvey (Grace), third daughter of John Harvey of 
Kinnettles and Angelica Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born 20th 
May, 1803; died 19th March, 1809; two other sisters dying 
within a month, all buried m Saiut Nicholas Churchyard, 
Aberdeen. 

575. Harvey (Grace Alexa), second daughter of Arthur 
(Young) Harvey of Adelaide, South Australia, and Sarah Jane 
Boucaut his wife, born at Pairkside, Adelaide. 

576. Harvey (Hannah Jane), fourth daughter of Alex- 
ander Harvey, now of Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T., and Matilda Shade 
his wife, born loth March, 1865 ; died 12th February, 1871. 

577. Harvey (Isabella), eldest daughter of Sebastian Alex- 
ander Harvey of Chicfago, Illinois, and Anna Maria Francis his 
wife, born 26th September, 1875 ; died 2nd October same year. 

578. Harvey (Isabella Matilda), second daughter of Alex- 
ander Harvey, now of Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T., and Matilda Shade 
his wife, married 19th December, 1876, to James Gallwey Milne, 
barrister-at-law, and resided for some time at Palmerston, Onta- 
rio ; removed afterwards to Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T. They have 
issue. 

579. Harvey (Isobell), sixth daughter of John Harvey of 
Kinnettles, Forfarshire, and Angelica Dingwall Fordyce his 
wife, born 30th December, 181 1, died ist January, 1813. 

580. Harvey (Isobel Robina Young), daughter of Robert 
Young Harvey of South Australia and Ruth Allen his wife, born 
at MilHcent, South Australia. 

^ 581. Harvey (Isoline Matilda), daughter of John Ding- 
wall Fordyce Harvey of Calcutta and Mary Thomas Apcar his 
wife. 



164 HAKVllY, 

582. Harvey (James), born in AlH;nleen, Scotland, second 
son of Arthur Harvey, latterly of D' Urban, Natal, South Africa, 
and Elizabeth Youn;^ his wife, went to Australia in 1H55, resides 
now in Adelaide, being a director of the bank there, and of 
Wallaroo Smelting Works and Moonta Mines. He was married 
in Adelaide, 4th September, 1884, to Mauri Roe, grand-daughter 
of the Rev. Mr. Haining, the first Presbyterian minister in 
Adelaide. 

583. Harvey (Jane), second daughter of John Harvey of 
Kinrettles, Forfarshire, Scotland, and Angelica Dingwall For- 
dyce his wife, born 28th January, 1802 ; died 4th March, 1809. 

584. Ha* 7ey (Jane Morison), born at Tillygreig in Aber- 
deenshire, fourth daughter of Arthur Harvey, latterly of D' Urban, 
Natal, South Africa, and Elizabeth Young his wife. She was 
born 24th August, 1854, married 5th November, 1873, to John 
James Duncan, M.P., South Australia, and died ist November, 
1874, at Hughes Park, Watervale, her infant being interred with 
her. 

585. Harvey (Janet), eldest daughter of John Harvey of 
Kinnettles, Forfarshire, and Angelica Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
born 13th December, 1800, died 24th Feb'ruary, 1809, being the 
first of three sisters cut off in a month. 

586. Harvey (John), schoolmaster at Midmar in Aberdeen- 
shire for the long period of fifty-seven years, was born in Kintore 
in 1690, being the youngest son of " Mr. Alexander Harvie " of 
that burgh, m whose grave his remains were laid on his death 
9th February, 1767. His wife, Elizabeth MacKay, survived him 
for nine years. They had several sons and daughters. Three 
of the former, Alexander, John and Robert, acquired large 
fortunes in the West Indies, chiefly in Antigua and Grenada. 
Alexander returned to Aberdeen, and left a son who purchased 
the estate of Broadland. John died in London in 1770 ; Robert 
at Exeter in 1791. These two were unmarried. Robert had 
been educated for the medical profession. The sisters' families 
benefited more or less by their brothers' remarkable success. 
One of them, Elizabeth, was twice married. Her first husband's 
name was Rae. She was subsequently wife of Baillie Alexander 



HAKVKY. 



165 



les 
;ss. 
d's 
der 



Farqiihar of Kintorc. A son of the first marriapc, John Rae, 
took the name of Harvey, in addition to his fatlier's name, and 
lK!sides his property in Grenada, owned the estate of Castle 
Semple, Renfrewshire, acquired by purcliase. He died in 1820, 
leavinf,' two daughters, the elder of whom, Margaret, married 
Colonel James Lee of the 92nd Foot (afterwards Colonel Lee 
Harvey of Castle Semple) ; the younger, Elizabeth, became 
Countess of Buchan. A daughter of Colonel and Mrs. Lee 
Harvey, married Sir Charles Shand, Chief Justice of the Mauri- 
tius, and their eldest son, James Widdrington Shand Harvey, 
succeeded to Q>stle Semple "in 1883, his uncle, Mr. Henry Lee 
Harvey, who was married to his cousin Lady Elizabeth Erskine, 
having left no family. Another daughter of John Harvey and 
Elizabeth Mackay, Jean, married David Urquhart in Kincraigie 
Tough, and was mother of the Rev. Alexander UrquLart, 
minister of Tough, incidenta,]ly noticed m the Appendix in the 
account given of the Lumsdensof Corrachrie. Another daughter, 
Barbara, married Robert Donald in Burnside, Midmar, and was 
mother of William Donald of Broomhill, and of Dr. Robert 
Harvey of Braco, whose son, Dr. Alexander Harvey, became 
Professor of Materia Medica in Mar. College, Aberdeen. Another 
daughter, Grizel or Grace, married Thomas Al)erdein in Hillside 
of Edit, their son John Aberdein, assuming the name of Harvey, 
purchasing the estate of Kinnettles, and leaving many descend- 
ants, all of whom are mentioned in this Record. One of the 
daughters of John Harvey and his wife Elizabeth Mackay, 
Janet, died unmarried. Of the subject of this notice, the school- 
master of Midmar, and the aged partner of his long life little can 
be mentioned. Probably if all were known it would be just the 
simple record of a well-spent, quiet life, often more satisfactory 
than that of one passed in a much more conspicuous sphere. 

587. Harvey (John), of Kinnettles, Forfarshire, born in May, 
1767, was a son of Thomas Aberdein in Hillside in the Parish of 
Echt, Aberdeenshire, and Grace Harvey his wife. He was for some 
time in business in London as an underwriter at Lloyd's ; but on 
succeeding to an uncle, in terms of whose will he assumed the 
name and armorial bearings of Harvey, he retired from business 
and purchased the estate of Kinnettles, on which he resided for 



1 66 



HAKVEY, 



over thirty years. The uncle, Dr. Robert Harvey, of the Island 
of Grenada, who died at Exeter 20'h July, 1791, is stated in the 
public prints at the time to have left his nephew " estates in the 
West Indies amounting' to £"8,000 per annum, and besides this 
to h.ive left ample legacies to other relatives in Scotland." 
Kinnettles is beautifully situated. There was then a commodious 
mansion house, the Hill of Kinnettles risin^^ behind, the view 
being extensive and varied. Mr. Harvey took an active part in 
all that affected the general good of the county and of the 
neighbourhood. He was married 12th March, 1800, to Angelica 
Dingwall Fordyce, fifth daughter of Dr. Arthur Dlhgvvall Fordyce 
of Culsh and Janet Morison his wife. They had seven sons and 
ten daughters, several of whom died ni childhood, and several 
approaching manhood or womanhood. Mrs. Harvey survived 
her husband. His death took place 26th December, 1830. 

588. Harvey (John), eldest son of Arthur Harvey, latterly 
of D'Urban, South Africa, and Elizabeth Young his wife ; born at 
Edinburgh, 20th June, 1836 ; died at Tillygreig, Aberdeenshire, 
gth June, 1847. 

589. Harvey (John), son of William Harvey (Rothmaise) 
and Rachel Chambers Hunter his wife ; born 3rd July, 1844 ; 
died in Calcutta in 1864. 

590- Harvey (John Dingwall Fordyce) of Calcutta, eldest 

son of John Inglis Harvey of Kinnettles, H. E. I. Co.'s Service 
and Sarah Aratoon Avietick his wife ; married 23rd June, 1870, 
Mary Thomas Apcar, also of Calcutta. They have issue. 

591. Harvey (John Inglis), eldest son of John Dingwall 
Fordyce Harvey of Calcutta and Mary Thomas Apcar his wife. 

592. Harvey (John Inglis) of Kinnettles, Forfarshire, the 
eldest son of John Harvey of Kinnettles and Angelica Dingwall 
Fordyce his wife, was born at Kinnettles 3rd November, 1804. 
He received a classical education at home, and in general litera- 
ture, etc., in England, fitting him for the important positions he 
was destined to fill. In 1823 he entered the service of the 
H. E. I. Co., and after holding minor appointments, was appointed 
in 1834 Magistrate and Collector at Chittagong, Bengal. He 
was afterwards made Commissioner of Revenue for that district. 



HARVKY. 



167 



He was afterwards transferred to ('alciitta, and held successively 
the offices of Postmaster-General, Commissioner of Customs, 
Treasurer and Accountant-Cieneral. His death occurred 17th 
February, 18G9. He had been twice married. His first wife 
Mlizabeth Eleanor Wig^'en, ilau},diter of William Wiggen, died 
without issue at Chittagong, 22nd February, 1832. Her remains 
were brought to Scotland, a handsome tomb erected over them, 
and they now lie in the family burial ground in the church-yard 
of Kinnettles. His second wife, Sarah Aratoon Avietick, 
daugiiter of Aratoon Avietick of Calcutta, to whom he was 
married i8th May, 1842, survives. They had three sons and two 
daug! ters. The fine property of Kinnettles has now passed into 
other hands. After Mr. Harvey's death, the first proprietor was 
Mr. Paterson, manufacturer, Dundee, who erected a magnificent 
mansion, and made other improvements, and in 1884 it became 
the property of another Dundee manufacturer, Mi. Joseph 
Grimond, who purchased it at public sale. 

593. Harvey (Katharine), wife of James Crombie, and 
mother of James Crombie, manufacturer, Grandholm Mills, 
Aberdeen (143). 

594. Harvey (May Lillian), daughter of Sebastian Alex- 
ander Harvey of Chicago, Illinois, and Anna Maria Francis his 
wife. 

595. Harvey (Omar Frederick Hildebrand), a railway 

employee in the North-West (Canada), third son of Alexander 
Harvey, now of Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T., and Matilda Shade his 
wife. 

596. Harvey (Patience), eighth daughter of John Harvey 
of Kinnettles and Angelica Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born 
3rd December, 1815 ; died 21st February, 181 7. 

597. Harvey (Patience), born at Tillygreig, Aberdeenshire, 
eldest daughter of Arthur Harvey, latterly of D'Urban, South 
Africa, and Elizabeth Young his wife, now residing at Parkside, 
Adelaide, South Australia. 

598. Harvey (Rachel), daughter of William Harvey (Roth- 
maise) and Rachel Chambers Hunter his wife ; married 25th 
August, 1864, to Charles Gray, Spittal, advocate. They have 



issue. 



i6S 



HAKVEV. 



! ■ I 



599. Harvey (Robert), fifth son of John Harvey of Kinnct- 
tles, Forfarshire, and An^eHca Dingwall Fordyce liis wife, born 
r9th July, 1S17; died 26th October, 1H34. 

600. Harvey (Robert Inglis), third son of Jcnn In^lis 
Harvey of Kinnettles, H. E. I. Co.'s Service, and Sara Aratoon 
Avietick his wife, bank clerk in Adelaide, South Australia. 

601. Harvey (Robert Shand), fourth son of John Dinj;- 
wall Fordyce Harvey of Calcutta and Mary Thomas Apcar his 
wife. 

602. Harvey (Robert Young), fifth son of Arthur Harvey, 
latterly of D' Urban, South Africa, and Elizabeth Younj; his 
wife, born at Tillygreig, Aberdeenshire ; accompanied his mother 
to South Australia after his father's death; was bank manager in 
1 88 1 at Millicent, and in 1882 went in the same capacity to 
Palmerston, also in that colony. He was married 8tli April, 
1879, to Ruth Allen, and nas issue. 

603. Harvey (Sebastian Alexander), eldest son of Alex- 
ander Harvey, now of Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T,, and Matilda Sluule 
his wife, in mercantile business in Ciiicago, Illinois ; married 
there 25th July, 1871, to Ai.na Maria Francis, daughter of 
Samuel Francis of Kenosha, Wisconsin, and Julia A. Towslee 
his wife. They have issue. 

604. Harvey (Thomas), third son of John Harvey of Kin- 
nettles, Forfarshire, and Angelica Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
born 7th July, i8io; died loth March, 1828. 

805. Harvey (Thomas), third son of Arthur Harvey, latterly 
of D'Urban, South Africa, and Elizabeth Young his wife, born 
at Tillygreig, Aberdeenshire ; has been engaged chiefly in con- 
nection with banking establishments ; at present residing in Ade- 
laide, South Australia. 

606 Harvey (Thomas Apcar), second son of John Ding- 
wall Fordyce Harvey of Calcutta and Mary Thomas Apcar his 
wife. 

607. Harvey (Wilfl ' Yoimg), born at Melbourne, Aus- 
tralia, son of Robert Young Harvey of South Australia, and Ruth 
Allen his wife. , 



HARVEY — HAY. 



lOy 



608. Harvey (William), fourth son of John Harvey of Kin- 
nettles, Forfarshire, and Anj^ehca Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
born gth June, 1813, died same day. 

60CJ. Harvey (William), sixth son of John Harvey of Kin- 
nettles, I'orfarshire, and Anj^elica Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
farmed the property of Rothmaise, Aberdeenshire, for sometime; 
has since resided in Melbourne, Australia, and in London, Eng- 
land. Having studied the subject of ship-form and propulsion 
he patented two inventions in 1884, designed to diminish the 
consumption of fuel, increase the stowage capacity, and yet not 
lessen the speed. Ke was married ist February, 1842, to Rachel 
Chambers Hunter, daughter of William Chambers Hunter of 
Tillery, Aberdeenshire, and Ractiel Thorn his wife. They had 
one son and one daughter. 

610. Harvey (Winifred Elizabeth), eldest daughter of 
Arthur Young Harvey of Adelaide, South Australia, and Sarah 
Jane Boucaut his wife. 

611. Hay (Edward Legge), eldest son of Lieutenant 
Robert Hay, R.N., and Barbara Fordyce his, wife ; baptized 30th 
October, 1755. He appears to nave gone abtoad in 1774, antl to 
have been married, but further particulars are wanting. 

612. Hay (Elizabeth), daughter of Lieutenant Robert Hay, 
R.N., and Barbara Fordyce his wife, baptized 2nd April, 1753, 
was alive in August, 1786, residing in Old Aberdeen. 

613. Hay (James), second son of Lieutenant Robert Hay, 
R.N., and Barl ..la Fordyce his wife, baptizdd 21st March 1758. 

614. Hay (Robe***"-), Lieutenant in the Royal Navy (generally 
known as Captain Hay), may have been a son of the family of 
Rannieston in Logic Buchan, as Miss Hay of Rannieston was 
a witness at the baptism of his eldest child. He probably served 
during the war under the Hon. Captain Edward Legge, who 
died in 1747. On the ist June, 1752, he was married to Barbara 
Fordyce, fifth daughter of Provost George Fordyce of Aberdeen 
and Elizabeth Brown his second wife. They had at least three 
sons and one daughter, but it is very little that can be said 
respecting them in this Record. Captain Hay resided in Old 
Aberdeen, and acted as one of the Baillies from 1765 to 1770, 



lyo 



HAY — Morn. 



perhaps longer. At one time he had a lease of the farm of 
Eggie, in the Parish of Belhelvie, where his father-in-law had 
also resided while tacksman or lessee of the York Building Com- 
pany's lands there. Siberian wheat grown on his farm of Eggie, 
is advertised for sale in the Aberdeen jfournal of October, 1776. 
He died in Old Aberdeen, " much and justly regretted " 30th 
December, 1789. He appears to have contracted a second 
marriage in 1783. 

615. Hay (William Alexander), third son of Lieutenant 
Robert Hay, R.N., and Barbara Fordyce his wife, was baptized 
19th June, 1762. He may have been brought up to the medical 
profession, as his uncle. Sir William Fordyce, by his will in 1790, 
bequeathed to him all his English Books on Medicine and 
Surgery, but he is believed to have had latterly an appoint- 
ment in the Treasury. 

616. Hird (Rev. J.), husband of Elizabeth Bedwell, who was 
subsequently married to Joseph Dingwall, wine merchant in 
London (229), died before 1850. 

617. Hopper (Margaret), daughter of Major-General Wil- 
liam Hopper of the H. E. I. Co.'s Artillery, was married (first) i6th 
May, 1 819, to Thomas Dingwall Fordyce, Lieutenant and 
Adjutant Bengal Artillery, who died before the birth of their son 
Arthur Thomas Dingwall Fordyce (403). She married (secondly) 
Mr. Templeton of the Civil Service of the H. E. L Co. 

618. Hopper (William), Major-General Bengal Artillery, 
father of Margaret Hopper [Dingwall Fordyce or Templeton 

(6i7)J. 

619. Horn (Agnes), grandmother of Elizabeth Douglas or 
Dingwall (269), was the only daughter of Mr. James Horn of 
Westhall in Aberdeenshire, at one time minister of Elgin, and 
was married in 1700 to John Douglas of Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo 
in Kincardineshire. Her mother's name was probably Isobell 
Leslie. Some particulars respecting the Horns of Westhall 
will be found in the Appendix. A locket in the shape of a heart, 
with the initials J. D. and A. H., came into the possession of the 
mother of the compiler of this Record, the great grand-daughter 
of Agnes Horn. 



HORN — HUGHES. 



171 



620. Horn (Christina), dauj^hter of Robert Horn, advocate 
and Dean of Faculty, and Jane Miller Galbraith his wife, 
was married 8th April, 1870, to William Dinfj^wall Fordyce of 
Brucklay, M.P., whom she survives w'th four ciiildren (two sons 
and two daughters). 

621*. Horn (Robert), advocate and Dean of Faculty, was 
married 23rd September, 1846, to Jane Miller Galbraith, daughter 
of John Galbraith, junior, of Glasgow. They were the parents 
of Christina Horn or Dingwall Fordyce (620). 

62 1-. Horsford (Alicia Maria), wife of the Rev. John George 
Gibson, Rector of Holybourne, Hants, and mqther of Major 
Charles Frederick Gibson (528). 

622. Howell (Rebecca), wife of Samuel Gale, latterly of 
Hamilton, Upper Canada, and mother of Sarah Gale or Milne 

(525). 

623. Hucldart (Patience) of a Quaker family, wife of John 
Dingwall of St. James's Street, London, of Croydon in Surrey, 
and of Brucklay, Aberdeenshire, died previous to 1803, leaving 
no children. A sister was wife of Sir Richard Hotham of Merton, 
Knt. Sheriff of Surrey. They were nearly related to Captain 
Huddartof the Trinity House, F.R.S. 

624. Huggins (Charles Gilbert Dingwall), son of Charles 
Lang Huggins of London, stock-broker, and Agnes Maud Ding- 
wall his wife. 

625. Huggins (Charles Lang), stock-broker in London, 
married 23rd October, 1878, to Agnes Maud Dingwall, second 
daughter of Charles Dingwall, wine merchant in London, and 
Julia Blanche Drew his wife, and has issue. 

626. Huggins (Elsie Maud Lang), daughter of Charles 
Lang Huggins, stock-broker in London, and Agnes Maud Ding- 
wall his wife. 

627. Hughes (Joan), daughter of Thomas Hughes of the 
Coast Guard Service, and Eliza Anderson his wife ; born in 
Cellardyke, Fife, Scotland, 2otli July, 1818 ; married John 
Duncan, latterly sheep farmer in South Australia, had issue, and 
died at Wallaroo, gth December, 1856. She was mother of 
John James Duncan of Hughes Park, South Australia, M.P. 



ty± 



HUGHES — IMGLIS. 



628. Hughes (Thomas), born in Pittinweem, Fife, 22nd 
April, 1773 ; died at Anstruther, in October, 1861. In early life 
he fought as a sailor at the Battle of Copenhagen, but the greater 
part of his life was spent in the Coast Guard Service. He 
married Eliza Anderson. Their daughter was mother of John 
James Duncan of Hughes Park, South Australia, M.P. (293). v\ 
son, Walter, emigrated to South Australia, discovered the Wal- 
laroo and Moonta copper mines, and received the honour of 
knighthood. He is incidentally noticed (794). 

629. Hunt (Hannah), wife of Sebastian S'nade of Mobile, 
Alabama, and another of Matilda Shade or Harvey (804). 

630. Hunter Chambers (John) of Tillcry, Auchiries and 
Coldwells, Aberdeenshire, assumed the name of Hunter on 
succeeding to an uncle of his wife. Her name was Agnes Cooper. 
Their son, William Chambers Hunter (632), succeeded to the 
property. 

631. Hunter Chambers (Rachel), daughter of William 

Chambers Hunter of Tillery, Aberdeenshire, and Rachel Thom 
his wife, married 4th February, 1842, to WiUiam Harvey, then 
residing at Rothmaise, Aberdeenshire. They had two children. 
She was afterwards married to Dr. Keith Jopp, Aberdeen. 

632. Hunter Chambers (WiUiam) of Tillery and Auchiries, 
Aberdeenshire, son of John Chambers Hunter of Tillery, and 
Agnes Cooper his wife, married to Rachel Tliom, daughter of 
James Thom, formerly merchant in Halifax, Nova Scotia, (868') 
and Rachel Smith his wife. They were parents of Rachel 
Chambers Hunter or Harvey (631). 

633. Inghs (Catharine) wife of Dr. Alexander Monro 
(Secundus), Professor of Anatomy in the University of Edin- 
burgh, was daughter of David Inglis of Auchindinny, afterwards 
of Redhall, Treasurer to the Bank of Scotland. Her mother, 
Catharine Binning, who died on the 14th December, 1769, had 
survived her husband. She was daughter of William Binning, 
who is believed to have been the last direct representative of the 
old Binnings of Wallyford and Carlowrie Hall. They were 
descended from the brave peasant, who in 1307, by a daring 



INNES — IRVINH 



•173 



stratagem, gained possession for Robert Bruce of Linlithgow 
Castle, which was then garrisoned by Edward, and who was 
rewarded by a grant of the lands of East Binny in Linlithgow- 
shire. Auchindinny (the property of the father of Catharine 
Inglis or Monro) lies on the north side of the Esk, a few miles 
from Edinburgh, and is alluded to by Sir Walter Scott, in his 
ballad of "The Gray Brothers" : "From that fair dome, where 
suit is plied, by blast and bugle free, to Auchendinny's hazel 
shade, and haunted Woodhouselee." David Monro Binning, a 
son of the subject of this notice, succeeded to Auchindinny and 
assumed the name and armorial bearings of Binning. One of 
his sons, Robert Monro Binning, formerly of the Madras Civil 
Service, is referred to in the notice of L. H. Ferrier of Belsyde 
(325), and a grandson, David Monro Binning, is now Master of 
Oriel College, Oxford. 

634. Innes (Alexander Taylor), advocate, admitted to the 
Bar in 1870, was married i8th September, 1880, to Sophia Ding- 
wall Fordyce, youngest daughter of Captain Alexander Dingwall 
Fordyce of Brucklay, R.N., M.P. She died shortly after the 
birth of their only child. 

635. Innes (Alexander Dingwall Fordyce Taylor). 

(^nly child of Alexander Taylor Innes, advocate, and Sophia 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born at 17 Albany Street, Edinburgh, 
i2th July, 1881 ; died there on the 6th August following. 

636. Irvine (Elizabeth), married about the year 1700 to 
Alexander Mackenzie, baker in Aberdeen, had a daughter, Elspet 
Mackenzie or Ritchie (754). It is said that the grandmothey of 
$ir G. H. Rose of the Treasury was a sister of Elizabeth Irvine 
orMackenzie'smother,but the name of either of these ladies is not 
stated. Th<„ Right Hon. Sir George Henry Rose's forefathers were 
from the Parish of Birse, in which there were Irvines of Easter 
Clune, while a family of the name owned Glas^idl in the neigh- 
bouring Parish of Banchory Ternan, [Sir George was Presi- 
dent of the Board of Trade and Secretary to the Treasury during 
Mr. Pitt's Administration, and rendered him important service 
in his financial operations. James Irvine of Glassell was witness 
to the baptism of a sister of the subject of this notice.] 



"I 



1 



el 



174- 



luvmn:. 



637. Irvine (James) of limcklaw in the Parish of New 
Deer, was third son of Alexa: ^r Irvane of Drum by Lady Ehza- 
beth Keith his wife, who was second daughter of WilHam Earl 
Marischal. In 1622 he was infeft in half the lands of Honssahill 
which were disponed in 1636 by his son to Alexander Fraser of 
Philorth. He married Lucretia Irvine, daughter of his uncle, 
Gilbert Irvine of Colairly, and had two sons whose male line is 
now extinct — John, who succeeded to Brucklay, and Gilbert 
Irvine of Altrie, who was ancestor of Irvine of Saphock. James 
Irvine of Brucklay, died before 1635. 

638. Irvine (John) of Brucklay in the Parish of New Deer, 
was the eldest son of James Irvine of Brucklay by Lucretia Irvine 
his wife. He was at least twice married. By the former of 
these marriag'^.s he had two daughters, Christian, married to 
Alexander Forbes of Auchredie, and Lucretia, married to Arthur 
Dingwall of Brownhill. By a subsequent marriage with Jean 
Johnston, daughter of Sir George Johnston of that Ilk, Bart., 
he had a daughter, Marion or Marjorie Irvine, who was married 
to Mr. Robert Keith of Federate, a Regent in Marischal College, 
Aberdeen. On the 25th April, 1635, John Irvine was infeft in 
the lands of Altries. Of the same date Margaret Urquhart, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Urquhart of Cromarty, was infeft in 
Brucklay, Aucheoch, and Altries. From this we conclude that 
she was his wife and mother of Christian and Lucretia Irvine. 
From a sasine recorded in 1640 it might be surmised that the 
subject of this notice had been three times married. We find 
that in the year just named : " Alexander Irvine, son to John 
Irvine of Brucklaw, was infeft in the lands of Over and Netlier 
Ironside." In the year 1698 the Poll Tax Book of Aberdeen- 
shire represents the lands of Brucklay and Ironside as belonging 
to the Factor of Drum, but the name of the Factor is not given, 
and in 1701 we find Adam Irvine was Laird of Brucklay ; he is 
designated son of Mr. Robert Irvine, minister or parson of 
Towie. In 1707 Lucretia Irvine and her husband, Arthur Ding- 
•\^all, made over to their sons, William and Arthur, the whole of 
their property heritable and movable. By subsequent arrange- 
ment between the brothers, William got Brucklay, Arthur, 
Brownhill. It would therefore seem that by that date Lucretia 



IRVlNE^ — JACK. 



175 



Irvine had come into possession of Brucklay, though how the 
son of the minister of Towie had possessed it for a time we are 
unable to say. A <Tfrand-daughter of the subject of tliis notice, 
Marjory Forbes, appears to have been married under pecuhar 
circumstances to Alexander Irvine of Drum, as we find from 
" Fountainhall's Decisions." The marriage, it appears, was 
arranged by Mr. Robert Keith oi Lentush and Federate, her 
aunt's husband, who in 1688, as Drum was fickle, supplied the 
place of a minister, and celebrated the marriage himself; but, 
dreading the loss of his position as Regent in Marischal College, 
which actually followed, took a bond for ^10,000 from the lady 
the day before the marriage. She afterwards, when Lady 
Dowager of Drum, raised a reduction of the bond on three 
grounds, one of them being, that as she was niece of his wife, 
Mr. Robert Keith was her uncle-in-law, and so acted ''contra 
bonos mores'' in making merchandise of her, as both by duty 
and relationship, he was bound to promote her marriage without 
a bribe. 

639. Irvine (Lucretia), wife of James Irvine of Brucklay 
(637), her cousin-german, was daughter of Gilbert Irvine of 
Colairly, a younger son of Alexander Irvine, Younger of Drum, 
who fell at the JJattle of Pinkie in 1547. Her mother's name has 
not reached us. 

640. Irvine (Lucretia), the younger of the two daughters 
of John Irvine of Brucklay in the Parish of New Deer, by his 
first marriage (it is believed with Margaret Urquhart), was mar- 
ried to Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill in the Parish of Monwhit- 
ter, probably in 1675, as they were jointly infelt in Brownhill, 
22nd December of that year. In her widowhood she lived with her 
son Arthur, who by her will executed at Back Mill of Balquholly 
on the 20th June, 1717, was constituted her sole executor; 
everything she had, and whatever was due to her, being left to 
him; "my second lawful son," the will states, "having for the 
most part alimented me since my husband's decease." Arthur 
Dingwall and Lucretia Irvine had four sons and three daughters. 

641. Jack (Mary), wife of John Bruce, and mother of George 
Barclay Bruce, civil engineer, London (109). 



176 



JAMIKSON — KKAY. 



!ii 



642. Jamieson (Peter) of Kinf^ston, Jamaica, married gth 
June, 1796, to Barbara P'rench, third danj^hlcr of John French, 
advocate in Aberdeen, and Christian Blackwell his wife. He 
died 17th July, 1797. 

643'. Johnson (Clarissa F.), wife of Samuel Francis of 
Skaneateles, State of New York, and mother of Samuel Francis 
of Kenosha, Wisconsin (457). 

643'^ Johnston (Christian), wife of the Rev. Thomas 
Blackwell, Professor of Divinity and Principal of Marischal Col- 
lege, Aberdeen, was born probably about 1676-80, judging from 
the date of her parents' marriage contract and the birth of her 
own eldest child ; the former being 2(Sth June, 1675, the latter 
I2th August, 1701. Her father, John Johnston, Doctor of Medi- 
cine, was son of John Johnston, njerchant in Glasgow by Agnes 
Robe his wife. Her mother, Elizabeth Cunningham, was 
daughter of Mr. John Cunningham of Dargavell in Dumfries- 
shire ; and, from the terms of the marriage contract already 
referred to, apparently inherited that property. The subject of 
this notice lived nearly tv/enty years after her husband, and long 
enough to mourn the sad end of her son. Dr. Alexander Black- 
well, to which allusion will be found in the Appendix. The 
Aberdeen jfoiinml, in noticing her death, which took place on the 
22nd May, 1749, says of her : "She was an approved good woman 
in all the relations of life." 

644. Jopp (Jean), understood to have been a native of the 
District of Garioch in Aberdeenshire, was born in 1714, married 
James AUardyce, merchant in Aberdeen, had issue, and died 
25th March, 1795. Her brother, James Jopp, merchant in Aber- 
deen, was chosen to be Provost of that city on five different occa- 
sions between 1768 and 1 786, and from Boswell's" Life of Johnson" 
we learn that he occupied that position when the great lexico- 
grapher received the freedom of the city, 23rd August, 1773, 
which his biographer says was presented by Provost Jopp " with 
a very good grace." 

645. Keay (Betsy), wife of James Duncan, merchant in 
Anstruther, Fife, was born 18th May, 1790, and died i8th 



KEliFKR — KINNAIRU. 



177 



December, 1872. She was grandmother of John James Duncan 
of Hughes Park, South Australia (293), and was a native of 
Anstruther, where her hfe was passed. 

646. Keefer (Mary Murray), daughter of Nelson Keefer, 
now of Burlington, Ontario, and Mary Hodge Ballantine his wife, 
was married igth September, 1877, to Alexander Cadenhead, 
then of Burlington, now of Midland, Ontario (117). They have 
issue. 

647. Keefer (Nelson), son of Robert Keefer (648) and 
Lavinia Lawrason his wife (who both died while he was a child), 
was engaged for some time in mercantile business in the village 
of Saint George, Dumfries, with an uncle. He afterwards 
removed to Butlington, Ontario, where he now resides. He was 
married 31st May, 1854, to Mary Hodge Ballantine, daughter of 
David Ballantine of Dundas and Mary Murray his wife. They 
had two sons, Robert and Alexander (the former married and 
residing in Hamilton), and two daughters, the younger at 
school, the elder Mary Murray Keefer or Cadenhead (646). 

648. Keefer (Robert), farmer and saw-miller in South Dum- 
fries, Ontario, son of Jacob Keefer of Oakland, County of Oxford, 
and Jerusha Vannattar his wife, was born 12th December, 1808, 
and married 26th December, 1826, to Lavinia Lawrason, daughter 
of Miller Lawrason of South Dumfries and Elizabeth Purves his 
wife. His death from an attack of cholera, 31st July, 1834, was 
sudden. His wife survived him two years. They had two sons. 
Nelson Keefer (647) and Jacob wiiO went to Manitoba. 

649. Ker (James), married Elizabeth Wightman and was 
father of Mary Wightman Ker or Spittal (650). 

650^ Ker (Mary Wightman), daughter of James Ker and 
Elizabeth Wightman his wife, born 1799, married Sir James 
Spittal, Kt., Loid Provost of Edinburgh ; had issue, and died 
2oth June, 1862. 

650 "^ Kinnaird (Margaret), daughter of Colonel Kinnaird 
(650^*), married Andrew Wilson, latterly merchant in Leith, and 
died 9th February, 1843, at the birth of a child which did not 
survive. 



ri 



178 



KlNNAlkD — LINDSAY. 



650-'. Kinnaird (Colonel), one of the guard over the ex- 
limperor Napoleon at St. Helena ; father of Margaret Kinnaird 
or Wilson (650"^). 

651. Kirkby (Arthur Dingwall), son of Mr. Kirkby and 
Janet Dingwall his wife (213). 

652. Kirkby ( ) married Janet Dingwall, daughter of 

Alexander Dingwall, junior, postmaster of Aberdeen, and Isabella 
Matthewson his wife, and had a son (651). 

653. Lawford (Pleasant), wife of Dr. John Fordyce of 
Clement's Lane, London, to whom she was married 15th 
November, 1759, was described in the notice of her marriage as 
"an agreeable young lady with a handsome fortune." She was 
mother of Mary Fordyce or Birch (377'"'), a posthumous child. 

654'. Lawrason (Lavinia), daughter of Miller Lawrason of 
South Dumfries (Ontario) and Elizabeth Piirvcj, his wife, was 
born 13th March, 1804, and married to Robert Keefer, farmer 
and saw-miller, of South Dumfries, who died suddenly from 
cholera in 1834. They had two sons, Nelson (647) and Jacob 
Lawrason. She survived her husband only two years, her death 
occurring 24th June, 1836. 

654 '^ Leith (Barbara), the first wife of William Lindsay of 
Culsh in the Parish of New Deer, Aberdeenshire, was infeft 20th 
May, 1674, "in the middle plough of the lands of Culsh." She 
had three daughters — Jean, Ann, and Isobell — noticed parti- 
cularly in the account of their father (662). She must have 
died before 1678. 

655. Le Rei (Martha Baugy), wife of Hilary Boucaut of 
the Island of Guernsey and mother of Captain Ray Boucaut of 
the H. E. I. Co.'s Marine Service (92). 

656. Leslie (Mary), daughter of Patrick Leslie, merchant 
in Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Cruickshank his wife, born 1714; 
married in 1751 to Alexander Black, dyer and Baillie of Aberdeen, 
and died 31st August, 1777. She was mother of Elizabeth 
Black or Young (75). ■• 

657. Lindsay (Ann), second daughter of William Lindsay 
of Culsh and Barbara Leith his first wife, was married about 
1689 to Alexander Gordon of the family of Nethermuir, who 



L.WDSAY. 



179 



P. 



resided for some time after his marriaj^e in the Parish of New 
Deer but latterly removed to Mill of Aberdour. She died in 
May, 1699, besides other children leaving a daughter, Barbara 
Gordon or Fordyce (537'). 

658. Lindsay (Oolin), third Earl of Balcarras, was born in 
1650. His father Alexander (first Earl) obtained a high place 
in the estimation of his country for ability, wisdom, virtue and 
piety. He died when this son was only ten years of age. His 
mother, Lady Anne Mackenzie, daughter of Colin, Earl of 
Seaforth, was no ordinary woman. She was the intimate and 
devoted friend of the eminent Nonconformist divine, Richard 
Baxter, who wrote of her : " Her great wisdom, modesty, piety 
and sincerity made her accounted the saint at court — of solid 
understanding in religion for her sex, and of prudence much 
more than ordinary, of great integrity and constancy in her 
religion, a great hater of hypocrisy, and faithful to Christ in an 
unfaithful world." Later in life she became the wife of the 
unfortunate Archibald, Earl of Argyll, who was beheaded in 
1685. Her son Colin, succeeding his brother the former Earl, 
who died at the age of twelve years, was with the Duke of York 
at the Battle of Solbay in 1672. After the Prince of Orange 
landed, he suffered a long imprisonment, his sympathy with the 
Stuarts having laid him open to suspicion. After regaining his 
freedom he did engage in a plot with a view to their restora- 
tion, and on its discovery in 1690 retired to the Continent ; but 
was allowed to return to Scotland in 1700 through the clemency 
of William. He supported the Treaty of Union, but joined the 
Stuart standard on the breaking out of the 1715 Rebellion. 
When it had been suppresed, and till the Act of Indemnity was 
passed, he was confined to his own house with a dragoon to 
attend him. His later years were spent in retirement at Bal- 
carras. He was fond of books and had a literary taste. Thence- 
forward there was no room for trouble through the imprudence 
that had frequently led to it. His excellent mother's advice on 
his first marriage had opportunity to be followed. " Your good 
grandfather. Lord David," she had said, " thought that day 
misspent he knew not some new thing. He was a very 
studious and diligent man in his affairs. You that have such a 







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LINDSAY. 



closet (library), such gardens, and so much to do within doors 
and without, need not think the time tedious nor be idle. It is 
the hand of the diligent maketh rich. The good man orders his 
affairs with discretion." The Earl was four times married. His 
death took place in 1722 when he was in his 73rd year. His 
first wife, Mauritia de Nassau, a cousin of the Prince of Orange, 
died about a year after her marriage. The second was Lady 
Jean Carnegie ; the third, Lady Jean Ker ; the fourth. Lady 
Margaret Campbell, daughter of James second Earl of Loudon, 
was mother of his successor (660). 

659. Lindsay (Isobell), daughter of William Lindsay of 
Culsh in the Parish of New Deer, Aberdeenshire, was married 7th 
March, 1693, ^^ John Fordyce, afterwards of Gask, then merchant 
in Turriff. She appears at one time to have been designated 
" Lady Craigietocher," from a part of the estate of Gask her 
husband had obtained before acquiring the whole. There can 
be no doubt that she was daughter of her father's first marriage 
to Barbara Leith. She had at least three sons and three 
daughters. 

660. Lindsay (James), fifth Earl of Balcarras, was the 
second son of Colin third Earl and Lady Margaret Camp, 
bell his wife. He was born 14th November, i6gi ; commanded 
one of the squadrons at the Battle of Dettingen in 1743, ^^^ 
would have received promotion then, but for his having formerly 
joined the Pretender's standard. This George the Second had 
not forgot and did not overlook. He had been opposed to his 
father's views and conduct, but ultimately joined him in his 
efforts on behalf of the Stuarts. After the Battle of Fontenoy he 
left the Army. In his old age he was very deaf. He had been 
deprived of the sense of hearing through nervous excitement? 
consequent upon the death of his brother the former Earl, to 
whom he was much attached. When nearly sixty years of age 
he was married to Anne Dalrymple, daughter of Sir Robert 
Dalrymple of Castleton. They had a large family. His death 
took place 20th February, 1768. He was distinguished for the 
benevolence of his heart, the liberality of his sentiments, and his 
knowledge of history and agriculture. 



LINDSAY. 



i8i 



66i. Lindsay (Lady Margaret), second daughter of James 
fifth Earl of Balcarras and his Countess, Anne Dalrymple, was 
born 14th February, 1753. She appears at a very early age to 
have been known for the truthfulness of her character, and she 
possessed a warm, loving heart. On the authority of her sister, 
afterwards Lady Anne Barnard, Lord Lindsay relates an inci- 
dent of an uncommon kind, which illustrates the trait referred 
to. On one occasion, when she was not much more than six 
years of age, having committed some childish offence, Miss 
Gumming, their governess, exclaimed in the emphatic and not 
over-refined language which at that time was not unknown even 
in good society : " De'il tak me. Lady Margaret, if I don't whip 
you severely if you do that again." The injunction had been 
forgotten and some time after the offence was repeated. This 
brought a repetition of the threat, with the promise to let it pass 
then if it was avoided in future. This, however, did not satisfy 
the little culprit. " No, Miss Gumming, you said, ' De'il tak me 
if I don't whip you.' Will God let you pass if you don't ? You 
must whip me ; " and the poor governess, who was strongly 
attached to the child, much against her will had to yield to the 
persistent solicitation of the conscientious little maiden. The 
governess afterwards became the wife of the Rev. Dr. James 
Fordyce, brother of Lady Margaret's husband. On the 20th 
June, 1770, when she was little over seventeen years of age, 
Lady Margaret was married at Balcarras in Fife to Alexander 
Fordyce, a banker in London (335), and within two years his 
failure in business took place, a catastrophe which created a 
general feeling of indignation against him, his ambition and wild 
speculation having led to results disastrous to very many. Lord 
Lindsay gives the copy, in the " Lives of the Lindsays," of a 
letter from Lady Margaret to her husband shortly after his failure, 
remarking : "It would be treason to womankind to suppress 
such a witness to its heroism, and all of that name have passed 
away and are forgotten." This Family Record, however, aims at 
preserving in well-merited remembrance the names of some of 
those who have passed away. Regarding others of the name, 
such as the husband of Lady Margaret Lindsay, we can only 
see a part, and it is not our province to lift the veil from the 



laa 



LINDSAY. 



future. We cannot but deplore the sad consequences of many a 
wrong step, which nevertheless may have been sincerely repented 
of. From the letter referred to some extracts are subjoined : 
" For the sake of Heaven " (Lady Margaret writes), " your 
own and my repose, my dear husband, let not this unhappy 
aifair affect your mind too much. I have heard all — even the 
worst — and I have borne it with a fortitude which nothing but a 
thorough conviction of our sole dependence on Him who 
gives and takes away could give me. Do you think in the same 
manner ; and, by calming your troubled mind, ease me ot the 
greatest part of the misfortune — the idea of your unliappiness. 
I hope you know me well enough to be convinced that I can 
live with as much content on a small fortune as on a large. I 
think I could look even poverty in the face without shrinking, 
if it was necessary, which, thank Heaven, it is not ; and who 
knows but, when this unfortunate aifair is in some measure past, 
we may live in a more happy manner than we have yet expe- 
rienced, trusting more to each other and to our minds for that 
content, which, if not found there, will fly us in every situation ? 
Perhaps we may not be able to live in this country. Well then, 
my dear husband, we will go to another. We cannot go where 
an all-protecting Providence will not sustain and comfort us, if 
we submit with resignation to His will. The dread tongue of 
malice, and the triumph of those who are not our friends, I own, 
is very hard to bear ; but while you know and are convinced of 
the rectitude of your intentions in those plans which have 
turned out so unfortunately, the lenient hand of time and, I may 
add, the soothing attentions of a wife, will get the better of all 
those misfortunes, and we shall yet be happy. I have some- 
times told you I was a philosopher, and, if necessary, could be 
an economist. I come now to the test, and I am too proud to 
be caught shrinking back like a coward, when I have affirmed 
I could face the foe. Yet we have all a vulnerable part, 
my dear husband ; mine is the thought of your unhappiness. 
Let me find you composed and comforted. Let me, if possible, 
see you that I may pour the balm of consolation into your 
wounded mind ; and I shall then hope the time may not be 
far distant when I may sign myself your happy, as well as affec- 



LINDSAY. 



183 



tionate, while M. Fordyce." Seventeen years passed after Mr. 
Fordyce's failure before his death took place. After his death, 
Lady Margaret and her talented sister, Lady Anne Barnard, 
authoress of the plaintive ballad, " Auld Robin Gray," lived 
together. Their house for fifteen or twenty years was in 
Berkeley Square, London, and on 8th September, 181 2, Lady 
Margaret Fordyce became the wife of Sir James Bland Burgess, 
Bart., a "worthy and cultivated gentleman" who had been 
attached to her, he acknowledged, from infancy, although for so 
many years their lives had run in different channels. It is 
said that in these latter years Lady Margaret was happier than 
her friends had ever known her, but that she was worn out even 
in the midst of her happiness, and was in devout readiness for 
the Master's call. Her death took place in December, 1814. 
One child, if not more, of her first marriage, had died in infancy. 
None survived. Of her personal charms and mental accomplish- 
ments Lord Lindsay says : " Beauty and grace formed her 
figure — feminine mildness and dignity her manner." Her youth- 
ful beauty inspired Sheridan with the following well-known 

lines : 

Marked you her cheek of rosy hue ? 
That eye in liquid circles roving — 
That ; heek abashed at man's approving ; 
The one — Love's arrows darting round, 
The other — blushing at the wound. • 

Her character Lord Lindsay regards as answering to that given 
by Haller in his monody on his wife, as translated by Lady 
Margaret herself: 

One who ne'er felt the pride of human will, 
But meekly bent beneath the will of God ; 
Cheerful, sedate, zealous — yet calm and still — 
The patient victim of misfortune's rod. 

662. Lindsay (William) of Culsh in the Parish of New 
Deer, Aberdeenshire (whu acquired that estate), was son of Wil- 
liam Lindsay at Mill of ToUie, and grandson of Mr. James Lind- 
say of Cushnie, both in the Parish of Auchterless. The matricu- 
lation of his armorial bearings at the Lyon office shows that he 
was descended from the family of Dowhill in Fife. He was a 
writer in Edinburgh, and in 1659 had advanced between 5,000 
and 6,000 merks to John Irvine of Kincausie on the security of 



184 LINDSAY. 

Culsh, which Irvine possessed as the husband of Ehzabeth 
Ramsay, daughter of the former owner. In 1663, on the payment 
of 3,000 merks additional, he acquired all the Irvines' interest in 
the property, and in 1673 became uncontrolled proprietor of 
Culsh by the resignation of the teinds which, till then, had been 
held by the Earl Marischal. He died in November, 1694, having 
been three times married : first to Barbara Leith, then about 
1677 to Agnes Mercer, and then in 1693 to Barbara Guthrie. 
By the first marriage there were three daughters, Jean, Anna, 
and Isobell. Jean became the wife of John Gordon of Myres- 
town and of Coynach, Old Deer. She was alive and a widow 
in 1719. Anna married Alexander Gordon, a son of the family 
of Nethermuir, who occupied successively Culsh, Brucklay, and 
Mill of Aberdour. She died in 1699. Isobell was married in 
1693 to John Fordyce of Gask, merchant in Turriff. The 
parentage of Barbara Leith is not known, nor that of Agnes 
Mercer, although a conjecture is hazarded in the Appendix 
(Mercer) regarding it. She was the widow of Mr. Alexander 
Youngson, son of the minister of Durris, when she was married 
to William Lindsay. She died ist March, 1690 or 1691. They 
had a son, William Lindsay, who succeeded to Culsh, and three 
daughters, Christian, Margaret and Lilias, who in 1696 resided 
with their sister Isobell in Turriff. Christian married John 
Byth in Glassley, and at one time resided with her nephew, Mr. 
William Mair, Secession minister at Muckhart, near Kinross. 
Margaret was married i8th April, 1723, to Mr. George Mair, 
minister of New Deer, and had one son, of whom and other rela- 
tives some particulars will be found in the Appendix. Lilias 
Lindsay, the youngest, died unmarried 13th April, 1740. Her 
well-worn, oil-stained folio Bible is in the possession of the 
compiler of this Record. By her last will, faihng other legatees, 
she destined one thousand merks to the Society for Propagating 
Christian Knowledge. Barbara Guthrie, the third wife of the 
subject of this notice, was a daughter of Sir Henry Guthrie of 
King Edward. Their marriage contract was dated 12th July, 
1693. Their child, Barbara Lindsay, was married in 1718 to 
Roderick Dingwall of Cambuscurry, near Tain in Rossshire, 
the contract being dated 12th July of that year. Her mother 



LINDSAY — LITTLEJOHM. 



185 



was then wife of James Sutherland of Evlock. Some particulars 
regarding the last William Lindsay of Culsh will be found in the 
Appendix (Lindsays of Culsh). 

663. Lindsay (William), at Mill of ToUie in the Parish of 
Auchterless, Aberdeenshire (of the family of Dowhill in Fife), 
was son of Mr. James Lindsay of Cushnie in the same parish. 
Besides his son, William Lindsay, writer in Edinburgh, who 
acquired the estate of Culsh, he had a younger son and daugh- 
ter, John and Anna, to whom on the 29th of August, 1673, their 
brother, William Lindsay, was served nearest of kin on the 
father's side. Regarding the subject of this notice nothing 
further is certainly known, but the Appendix, along with some 
particulars respecting his grandson, the last William Lindsay 
of Culsh, will be found to contain a few factt:>, which may have a 
bearing on the earlier history of the family. 

664. Lister (David) of Kininmonth in Fife, W.S., married 
Janet Blyth, only daughter and sole heiress of James Blyth of 
Kininmonth. Isabella Lister or Shand (665) was their daughter. 

665. Lister (Isabella), daughter of David Lister of Kinin- 
month, W.S., and Janet Blyth his wife, married John Shand, 
W.S., of Mornefendue in the Island of Grenada, and h^d issue. 

666. Littlejohn (Alexander) of Invercharron in Rossshire, 
stock-broker in London, fourth son of William Littlejohn, bank 
manager, Aberdeen, and Janet Bentley his first wife, was married 
loth January, 1869, to Mary Bruce, daughter of George Barclay 
Bruce, civil engineer, London, and Helen Norah Simpson his 
wife They have issue. 

667. Littlejohn (Anna Isobell), second daughter of James 
Bentley Littlejohn, bank manager, latterly in New Zealand, and 
Caroline Trimble McNeill his wife. 

6^.8. Littlejohn (Charles Peter), sixth son of William 
Littlejohn, bank manager, Aberdeen, and Janet Bentley his first 
wife, for some time a stock-broker in London (along with his 
brother Alexander), now studying for the Church of England at 
the University of Cambridge. ; .,, 

669. Littlejohn (David), third son of William Littlejohn, 
bank manager in Aberdeen, and Janet Bentley his wife, served in 



186 



LITTLEJOHN. 



the Royal Navy from 1854 to 1856, and received Baltic Medal; 
afterwards studied law and practised as an advocate in Aber- 
deen. He was appointed Sheriff Clerk of Aberdeenshire and 
admitted 26th December, 1884, and is Major in the ist Aber- 
deen Rifle Volunteers. He has been twice married, iirst on i6th 
October, 1867, to Ellen Maria Taylor, eldest daughter of Joseph 
Henry Taylor of Groigue, County Tipperary, Ireland, who died 
15th August, 1869, leaving two daughters ; second, 29th August, 
1872, to Jane Crombie, daughter of James Crombie, manufac- 
turer, Grandholm Mills, Aberdeen, and Katharine Scott Forbes 
his wife. They have issue. 

670. Littlejohn (Helen Mary) daughter ot Alexander 
Littlejohn of Invercharron, Rossshire, and Mary Bruce his wife. 

671. Littlejohn (Isobell), third daughter of William Little- 
john, bank manager, Aberdeen, and Janet Bentley his first wife, 
married 25th January, 1853, John Bramwell, bank manager, 
Melbourne, Australia, afterwards of London, England. He died 
in 1876. They had two sons and one daughter. 

672. Littlejohn (James), architect in Aberdeen, son of 
William Littlejohn, builder and Baillie there, and Mary Dauney 
his wife, married Jean Chalmers, daughter of James Chalmers, 
printer in Aberdeen, and Margaret Douglas his wife. They were 
parents of William Littlejohn (687). 

673. Littlejohn (James Bentley), eldest son of William 
Littlejohn, bank manager, Aberdeen, and Janet Bentley his wife, 
for some time bank manager at Ararat, Victoria, Australia, more 
recently of the Colonial Bank of New Zealand's Branch at 
Napier, New Zealand, married 21st March, 1870, Caroline 
Trimble McNeill, daughter of Hugh McNeill of Annaville, County 
Antrim, Ireland, They have issue. 

674. Littlejohn (James Orombie), second son of William 
Littlejohn, bank agent, Stonehaven (who died in 1878), and Anna- 
bella Forbes Crombie his wife. . , 

675. Littlejohn (Jane), now residing in Edinburgh, second 
daughter of William Littlejohn, bank manager, Aberdeen, and 
Janet Bentley his first wife, was married 5th December, 1855, to 



LITTMiJOHN. 



187 



Rev. Adam White, Missionary of the Free Church of Scotland 
to India, who died in 1864. They had four sons and one 
daughter. 

676. Littlejohn (Janet Bentley), second daughter of David 
Littlejohn, Sheriff Clerk c^ Aberdeenshire, and Ellen Maria 
Taylor, his first wife. 

677. Littlejohn (Janet Bentley), second daughter of Wil- 
liam Littlejohn, bank agent, Stonehaven (deceased), and Anna- 
bella Forbes Crombie his wife. 

678. Littlejohn (Janet Morison), eldest daughter of Wil- 
liam Littlejohn, bank manager, Aberdeen, and Janet Bentley 
his first wife, married 9th March, 1853, Rev. John Philip, 
minister of the Free Church of Scotland, Fordoun. The}' have 
issue. 

679. Littlejohn (Jessy Bentley), eldest daughter of James 
Bentley Littlejohn, bank manager in New Zealand, and Caroline 
Trimble McNeill his wife. 

680. Littlejohn (Katharine Forbes), eldest daughter of 
William Littlejohn (deceased), bank agent, Stonehaven, and 
Annabella Forbes Crombie his wife, born 13th June, 1871 ; died 
7th October, 1878. 

681. Littlejohn (Katharine Forbes), eldest daughter of 

David Littlejohn, Sheriff Clerk of Aberdeenshire, and Jane Crom- 
bie his wife. 

682. Littlejohn (Margaret), eldest daughter of David 
Littlejohn, Sheriff Clerk of Aberdeenshire, and Ellen Maria 
Taylor his first wife. 

683. Littlejohn (Ruth), fourth daughter of William Little- 
john, bank manager, Aberdeen, and Janet Bentley his first wife, 
married in December, 1863, James Monro, H. E. I. Co.'s Civil 
Service, now of London Police Force. They have issue. 

684. Littlejohn (Ruth), second daughter of David Little- 
john, Sheriff Clerk of Aberdeenshire and Jane Crombie his wife. 

685. Littlejohn (Thomas), tea planter in India, fifth son of 
William Littlejohn (687) and Janet Bentley his wife. 



l88 t.;\TLEjOHM. 

686. Littlejohn (William), builder and Baillie of Aberdeen, 
born 1731, son of Patrick Littlejohn, merchant in OldMeldruni. 
His mother's name was Black, also of Old Meldrum, In 1754 
he was infeft in some property which had belonged to a younger 
brother, and on 8th October, 1761, in a tenement in Old Meldrum 
which hi? father and previously his grandfather, Patrick Little- 
john, had owned. He married Mary Dauney, daughter of a 
farmer in Newmachar, and died 13th June, 1806. One son, 
James, was father of William Littlejohn (687) ; another, Peter, 
was a Colonel in the H. E. I. Co.'s Service. Jein Littlejohn, 
sister of the subject of this notice, was wife of James Masson, 
manufacturer, Aberdeen, of the firm of Leys, Masson & Co. 

687. Liittlejohn (William), for many years manager and 
cashier of the Aberdeen Town and County Banking Company, 
now retired and residing in Aberdeen, eldest son of James Little- 
john, architect in Aberdeen, and Jean Chalmers his wile, mar- 
ried first on 25th March, 1830, Janet Bentley (elder daughter of 
Professor James Bentley of King's College, Aberdeen, and Isobell 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife), who died ist October, 1848, leaving 
six sons and four daughters ; and secondly, Margaret J. Urquhart, 
daughter of the Rev. Alexander Urquhart, minister of Tough, 
and Margaret Forbes his wife (incidentally noticed in account 
of Lumsden of Corrachrie in the Appendix). They had issue. 

688. Littlejohn (William), second son of William Little- 
john, manager of the Aberdeen Town and County Banking Com- 
pany, and Janet Bentley his first wife, was born 26th April, 1839, 
and died 29th September, 1878. He was for some time agent 
for the Aberdeen Town and County Bank at Stonehaven, and 
subsequently Inspector of Branch Banks. He had married on 
the i8th of August, 1870, Annabella Forbes Crombie, daughter 
of James Crombie, manufacturer, Grandholm Mills, Aberdeen. 
They had two sons and two daughters. 

689. Littlejohn (William), eldest son of William Littlejohn, 
bank agent, Stonehaven (now deceased), and Annabella Forbes 
Crombie his wife, born 20th October, 1873; died 22nd August, 

1874- 



I >i 



LITTLEJOHN— I UMSDEN. 



189 



6go. Littlejohn (William), son of David Littlcjohn, Slicriflf 
Clerk of Aberdeenshire, and Jane Cronibic liis second wife. 

691 . Lockhart (Jean), mother of the Rev. Tliomas Dyniock, 
formerly minister of the Free Middle Church, Perth, and wife of 
Joim Dymock, LL.D., Rector of the High School, Glasgow, 
died in 1805. Her husband married again. 

692. Low (Anna), in Old Aberdeen, was married then 19th 
March, 1692,10 James Morison, merchant in Aberdeen, who was 
Provost of that city in 1731-2. The name of the cautioner or 
surety for her in the marriage contract was Robert Low. In all 
probability this was her father, and the same with Robert Low, 
merchant in Old Aberdeen, who with his wife. Christian Forbes, 
was infeft in some tenements there in 1665. Some farther par- 
ticulars will be found in the Appendix respecting the name of 
Low. 

693. Lumsden (Rev. James) of Corrachrie, on Donside, 
in Aberdeenshire, was born in 1704. He was son of Robert 
Lumsden of Corrachrie and Agnes Forbes his wife. He was 
licensed to preach the Gospel 25th June, 1729, and called to the 
parochial charge of Strathdon 4tli December 1730. In the year 
1735 he was infeft in the lands of Kilbatach, and Mary Grant 
his wife, in the lands of Rippachy. In 1740 he resigned his 
original charge, and undertook that of the Parish of Towie, 
where he remained till his death on the 15th February, 1777. 
Besides three daughters, Mary, Margaret and Elizabeth, married 
respectively to John Dingwall of Rannieston, Rev. James Gordon 
of Bellie or Fochabers, and Captain John Grant of Duthil, he had 
a son, Robert, who studied law with Dr. Arthur Dingwall Fordyce, 
succeeded to Corrachrie, and was the author of some clever 
satirical productions, one of which is noticed in the Appendix. 

694^ Lumsden (Mary) daughter of the Rev. James Lums- 
den of Corrachrie, minister of Towie, and Mary Grant his wife, 
was married (probably in 1 751), to John Dingwall, of Rannieston, 
stocking manufacturer and Baillie of Aberdeen. They had ten 
sons and six daughters. 

694^ Lumsden (Robert) of Corrachrie, Aberdeenshire, was 
son of James Lumsden of Corrachrie, formerly in Strathmoir, 



igo 



MACKIK. 



It 



his mother being a daughter of Chahiiers of Balnacraig. On 
the 28th June, 1703, he was in fe ft inan annuityoutof Corrachrie, 
and it was probably then that he was married to Agnes Forbes, 
daughter of George Forbes of Skellater. Tlieir son James 
succeeded to Corrachrie, and was minister of Strathdon and 
afterwards of Towie. The subject of this notice (bed 20th April, 
1 710, and was interred in the churchy- rd of Cushnie. 

695. Mackie (Agnes), wife of John Phihp, bookbinder in 
Aberdeen, was daugliter of Alexander Mackie and Agnes Brown 
his wife, and mother of the Rev. John Philip (780), F'ordoun, 
Kincardineshire. 

696. Mackie (Alexander), father of Agnes Mackie or 
Philip (695), married Agnes Brown. 

697. Mackie (James) of Fetterangus in the Parish of Old 
Deer, and afterwards of Gask in the Parish of Turriff, Aberdeen- 
shire, was married in October, 1749, to Barbara Fordyce, third 
daughter of John Fordyce of Gask and Barbara Gordon his 
wife, at which time he resided at Castletown in the Parish of 
King Edward. He was proprietor of F'etterangus in 1764 and 
afterwards lived at Darra, by Gask. In 1770, his father-in-law's 
affairs having got involved, he acquired the estate of Gask. 
While he held it, it was broken up and sold in separate portions, 
though re-united subsequently. The date of his death has not been 
learned, nor particulars of any family; but he was alive in 1781, 
before which, his wife having died, he had been married to 
Elizabeth Forbes, daughter of the Laird of Boyndlie and widow 
of a Mr. Phillips. [It may be mentioned that John Mackie in 
Castletown, King Edward, afterwards at Mill of Balmade, who 
was born in 1693 ^"^ died in 1745, married Jean Ross, who 
survived him and died i6th April, 1786 at the age of ninety-one. 
She with her husband's elder brother James Mackie, was infeft in 
1752 in the lands of Hairmoss in the Parish of Monwhitter as 
heirs severally of Barbara Panton, wife of James Ross in Bal- 
green, and Jean Panton, wife of Andrew Mackie at Mill of 
Balmade. John Mackie and Jean Ross may have been the 
parents of the subject of this notice ; but with no direct proof on 
the subject it cannot be affirmed.] 



MACKIK — MAVOR. 



191 



698. Mackie (Jane), dau^' liter of John Mackie, farmer, Old 
Town of Coynach, Old Deer, and A{,'nes Watt his wife, was 
born 5th March, 1H03. She married Thomas Alexander, mer- 
chant and farmer, Peterhead, and was mother of James Alex- 
ander (10). She died 28th January, 1879. 

699. Mackie (John), farmer at Old Town of Coynach in 
the Parish of Old Deer, was born at Rora in the Parish of Long- 
side, Aberdeenshire, 4th January, 1761. He married Agnes 
Watt, from the Parish of Gamrie in BanfTshire, and died 12th 
May, 1829. They wtre the parents of Jane Mackie or Alex- 
ander (698). 

700J. Martin (Barbara), daughter of the Rev. Samuel 
Martin, of Monimail, D.D., and Elizabeth Lawson his wife^ 
married 17th April, 1806, the Rev. James Miller of Monikie in 
Forfarshire, and was mother of Professor James Miller of Edin- 
burgh (712). Some particulars respecting her father will be 
found in the Appendix. 

700-. Martin (Isobel), wife of Rev. John Mercer of Tyrie in 
Aberdeenshire (707^), died on the 21st of March, 1765. Their 
daughter Elizabeth became wife of the Rev. James Wilson, of 
Gamrie (934'"). 

701. Matthewson (Isabella), daughter of Lieutenant 
William Mathewson of the 44th Regiment of Foot, was married 
22nd March, 181 7, to Alexander Dingwall, younger of Rannieston, 
postmaster of Aberdeen. They had a son and a daughter. 

702. Matthewson (Lieutenant William), of the 44th 
Regiment ot Foot, father of Isabella Matthewson or Dingwall 
(701). 

703. Mavor (Thomas), merchant in Turriff, was married in 
1763 (proclaimed 23rd January), to Magdalen Fordyce, fourth 
daughter of John Fordyce of Gask in the Parish of Turriff and 
Barbara Gordon his wife. He appears to have failed in business 
and to have made a composition with his creditors, 20th January, 
1 768. Ini 778 his wife and her unmarried sister Isobell conveyed to 
him their portions of Gask called Bridgend and Bridgefoot, which 
on the 2gth December, 1784, he disposed of to George Robinson, 
merchant, in Banff. No information hasbeen got as to descendants 



192 



MELVILLK. 



of Thomas Mavor and Barbara Fordyce, if there were any. With 
better means at command he might very possibly have been 
identified with Thomas Mavor, baptized 20th August, 1733, son 
of WiUiam Mavor, merchant in Turriff, and as son of Mrs. Mavor, 
senior, whose death at Turriff, 3rd February, 1781, at the age of 
seventy-nine, is noticed in the Aberdeen jfounial of the time. 

704. Melville (Ann), daughter of the Rev. Robert Melville, 
minister of Durris, and Isobell Fordyce his wife, was baptized 
19th May, 1718, and died unmarried 15th March, 1737. She 
was buried at Durris. 

705. Melville (EliZ9.beth), daughter of the Rev. Robert Mel- 
ville, minister of Durris, and Isobell Fordyce his first wife, was 
baptized 2nd July, 1719 ; and was married to John Harper, who 
was schoolmaster there, and afterwards at Fettercairn. She 
probably died between May, 1784, and March, 1790, as her 
cousin, Mrs. Barbara Black, widow of Principal Thomas Black- 
well, of Marischal College, Aberdeen, by a codicil to her will qf 
the latter date, left to Mrs. Harper's two daughters a small 
legacy, designed at the former date for their mother. These 
two daughters, Barbara and Katharine (551'' and 551*), are all 
the children she is known to have had. 

706. Melville (Rev. Francis), minister of the Parish of 
Arbuthnott, in Kincardineshire, was translated to Aberdeen ui 
171 1, and died December, 1723, in the thirty-fourth year of his 
ministry. He was twice married, first on 2nd December, 1690, 
to Katharine Arbuthnott, and on 2nd April, 1704, to Mrs. 
Margaret TurnbuU, both of Montrose. He was father of the 
Rev. Robert Melville of Durris (707'). Two unmarried daughters, 
Janet and Ehzabeth, were buried at Durris, having died in 
1755 and 1770 at the ages of forty-eight and seventy respectively. 

707^ Melville (Rev. Robert), minister of the Parish of 
Durris, was son of the Rev. Francis Melville, one of the 
ministers of Aberdeen. As his father was married to his second 
wife only twelve years before this son was licensed to preach, 
which was 20th June, 1716, it is evident that his mother was 
Katharine Arbuthnott, first wife of the Rev. Francis Melville, 



MERCER — MILLER. 



193 



He was ordained on the 31st January, 171 7, and settled as minister 
of Diirris. In common with otlicrs he suffered to some extent 
owing to the unsettled times consequent on the 1745 Rebellion, 
his house being invaded by five armed men, 28th February, 1747, 
his cabinets broken into, and his most valuable effects carried 
off. He died 29th May, 1758, having been twice married. His 
first wife, Isobell Fordyce, was a daughter of Provost George 
Fordyce of Aberdeen and Isobell Walker his first wife. They 
had two daughters, if no more. She died two months after the 
birth of the younger, Elizabeth (705). He married secondly Janet 
Greig, who also died before himself, 1752. The founders of the 
great mercantile house of Melville & Co. of Amsterdam, or Melville 
& DeWolff, were sons of the second marriage. The tomb in 
the burying ground at Durris shows that it was repaired in 1806 
by desire of his sons Francis and John Melville of Amsterdam. 

707'^. Mercer (Elizabeth), daughter of the Rev. John Mercer, 
of Tyrie, Aberdeenshire, and Isobel Martin his wife, was 
married to the Rev. James Wilson of Gamrie, and had ten 
children. One of the sons was the Rev. Alexander Wilson of 
Campvere (933). 

707^. Mercer (Rev. John), minister of Tyrie in Aberdeen- 
shire, was the eldest son of Thomas Mercer of Todlaw in 
Banffshire andof Smiddyburn in Aberdeenshire and Isobel Smith 
i.-s wife. A brother, William, was minister of Pitsligo, of whom, 
as well as of some other members of the family, some account 
will be found in the Appendix. The subject of this notice was 
licensed to preach 30th May, 1710, ordained and settled at Tyrie, 
30th November same year. He died on the 31st of March, 1761, 
having ministered over fifty years to his people to whom (the 
Aberdeen ^ on run/ observes in noticing his death), he had endeared 
himself by a conscientious discharge of the duties of his pastoral 
office, adding, " he was a pious, solid and judicious preacher." 
He married Isobel Martin, a daughter Elizabeth (707-) marry- 
ing Mr. James Wilson, minister of Gamrie. 

708. Miller (Alexander), second son of Alexander G. 
Miller, F.R.C.S.E., Lecturer on Surgery, and Jessie Dingwall 
Fordyce his wife. 



194 



MILLER. 



709. Miller (Alexander Gordon), F.R.C.S.E. aiK'* M.D., 

Lecturer on Surgery and one of the ordinary surgeons of the 
Edinburgh Royal Infirmary, son of James Miller, M.D., Professor 
of Surgery in the University of Edinburgh, and Penelope Garden 
Campbell Gordon his wife, was married 2nd August, 1871, to 
Jessie Dingwall Fordyce (who died 25th December, 1884), third 
daughter of Captain Alexander Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and 
Brucklay, R.N., M.P., and Barbara Thorn his wife. They had 
two sons and three daughters. 

7io\ Miller (Anne), only child of James Miller of Glasgow, 
formerly of the Island of Jamaica, and Elizabeth Fordyce his 
wife, was married on the 24th February, 1806, to Alexander 
Garthshore Stirling of Craigbarnet in the County of Stirling. 
The following lines would seem to indicate that she inherited a 
portion of the literary ability which was so conspicuous on the 
part of several of her mother's brothers : 

My God ! Mv Saviour ! What should 'be t 

My thoughts and feelings unto Thee, 

Who hast my Guide and Guardian been, 

Throughout life's ever-shifting scene ? 

My thoughts on Thee should love to dwell ; 

My heart with grateful feelings swell. 

Ah ! Thou hast aye remembered me, 

Tho' little did I think on Thee ! 

How many years have passed away, 

How many heads are silvered gray. 

Since I was in my youthful prime 

Reckless and laughing at ' Old Time ' ? 

Still, still Thou didst remember me, 

Tho' transient were my thoughts of Thee, 

Yes — many a year hath sped away 

More or less checkered, grave with gay ; 

And when death-sorrowing seasons came ; 

So tenderly — (true to His name) 

" The Comforter " supported me. 

Why thought I not much more more on Thee ? 

710^ Miller (Dorothy Rachel), fourth and youngest 
daughter of Dr. Alexander G. Miller, F.R.C.S.E., and Jessie 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife. 

711. Miller (James), formerly of the Island of Jamaica, 
West Indies, returned to Scotland, and was married 22nd June, 
1 781, to Elizabeth Fordyce, second daughter of Baillie Robert 



MILLER. 



195 



Fordyce of Aberdeen and Anne Reid his wife : resided latterly 
in Glasgow. They had one daughter, Anne Miller or Garth- 
shore Stirling ^710). 

712. Miller (James), F R.S.E., and Professor of Surgery in 
the University of Edinburgh from 1842 to 1864, was born 2nd 
April, 1812. He was a son of the Rev. James Miller, minister of 
the Parish of Monikie in Forfarshire, latterly of the Free Church 
of Scotland, and Barbara Martin his wife. The following 
particulars in Sir Alexander Grant's " History of the University 
of Edinburgh" (H. 454), are gathered from an obituary notice 
in the proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh for 1864, 
and a communication from Professor Christison : " James Miller, 
who was appointed to succeed Sir Charles Bell as Professor of 
Surgery in 1842, had been a pupil of Liston's, and his private 
assistant, and had subsequently been selected by Professor 
Monro Tertius, as his demonstrator of Anatomy. He was dis- 
tinguished as an operator, and especially as a lithotomist. He 
was only thirty years old when he succeeded to the chair of Sur- 
gery. He excelled as a lecturer, interesting his students while he 
instructed them. Many of his pupils still retain a vivid recol- 
lection of the manly form, the handsome countenance, the power- 
ful voice, the unaffected, because natural eloquence, of their 
much-respected and loved teacher. He was the author of "The 
Principles and Practice of Surgery " ; but his writings were by 
no means confined to professional subjects, his warm interest 
and zeal in social and religious questions leading him to spend 
much time in giving support to views which, on conviction, he 
espoused. He was a frequent and powerful speaker at meetings 
for religious or philanthropic objects ; and he was universally 
respected as a man of high Christian life and character. He 
died unexpectedly, after a short illness, in his fifty-second year, 
17th June, 1864. He had been married nth July, 1836, to 
Penelope Garden Campbell Gordon, daughter of Captain Alex- 
ander Gordon of the Goth Rifles. Two of tlieir children have 
separate places in this Record. The following is an extract from 
a small work by Professor Miller, entitled " Nephalism, its Place 
and Power." Combating objections urged by opponents, he says : 
" Many say, ' I mean to keep my liberty,' but what is liberty in 



196 



MILLER. 



this case ? Look at man's view of it first, then at God's. Am I 
constrained to continue the use of this kixury, especially when 
in society, in deference to public opinion ? Is that liberty, or is 
it subjection to the will of another ? Do I continue the use of 
this thing, quite m moderation it is supposed, whether in society 
or not, because I like it, and cannot abandon it without a good 
deal of trouble and inconvenience, which I have not made up my 
mind to undergo ? Is that liberty, or is it enslavement to 
appetite and custom ? Is not true liberty, on the contrary, 
freedom from subjection lo the opinions, customs, prejudices of 
the world around, freedom also from all compulsion or even 
solicitation of appetite, freedom to obey our own will, and that of 
no mortal man besides, bound only by the suggestions and com- 
mand of conscience ? Is not this true liberty ? I make up my 
mind to follow a certain course of conduct for my own sake, and 
that of my fellow men. I am free to act that out so long as I 
remain of that opinion. So soon as my conviction alters — if it 
alters — I am free to change my conduct accordingly. Is not 
that true liberty ? Our greatest tyrants are Satan and self, and 
if we would be free from one of these, w^e must be free from 
both. ' He is the freeman whom the truth makes free, and all 
are slaves besides.' There is a fancied liberty against which we 
do well to take heed ; imagining that we are free to do in all 
things precisely as we like, provided we avoid the commission of 
overt sin in the acts themselves. The liberty of the true Chris- 
tian is the power to deny himself for the sake of others, even as 
his Master did, for his sake." 

713. Miller (James), eldest son of Alexander G. Miller, 
F.R.C.S.E., and Jessie Dingwall Fordyce his wife. 

714. Miller (Rev. James), minister, latterly at Monikie, 
Forfarshire, was born in 1778. He was Hcensed to preach the 
Gospel 4th September, 1799; presented to the Parish of Essie 
and Nevay, in the Presbytery of Meigle in October, 1802, and 
ordained in March following. On the 8th August, 1827, he was 
translated to the Parish of Monikie. In 1843 he bscame a min- 
ister of the Free Church of Scotland, adhering to the Protest and 
Declaration which had been agreed to, and died 25th May, i860. 



MILLER — MILNE. 



197 



He was author of a "Catechism on the Gospel of Matthew," which 
was pubhshed in 181 8. On the 17th April, 1806, he was married 
to Barbara Martin, daughter of the Rev. Dr. Samuel Martin of 
Monimail and Elizabeth Lawson his wife, one of their sons, 
James (712) becoming Professor of Surgery in the University of 
Edinburgh. 

715. Miller (Jessie), third daughter of Alexander G. Miller, 
F.R.C.S.E., Lecturer on Surgery, Edinburgh, and Jessie Ding- 
wall Fordyce his wife. 

716. Miller (Penelope), daughter of James Miller, Pro- 
fessor of Surgery in the University of Edinburgh, and Penelope 
Garden Campbell Gordon his wife, was married 20th March, 
1874, to James Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh, advocate, and has 
issue. 

717. Miller (Penelope), second daughter of Alexander G. 
Miller, M.D., and F.R.C.S.E., Lecturer on Surgery, and Jessie 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife. 

718. Miller (Sophia), eldest daughter of Alexander G. 
Miller, M.D., and F.R.C.S.E., Lecturer on Surgery, and Jessie 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife. 

719^ Milne (Alexander Stover), barrister-at-law, Ancaster, 
Upper Canada, born at Soberton, Hants, England in 1809, and 
died at Ancaster 14th July, 1864. He was son of Lieutenant 
WilHam Milne, R. N., and Johanna Gallwey his wife. He 
married Sarah Gale, daughter of Samuel Gale of Hamilton, 
Upper Canada, and his wife Rebecca Howell. They had issue. 

719^ Milne (Alexander Gallwey), second son of James 
Gallwey Milne, now of Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T., Canada, and 
Isabella Matilda Harvey his wife. 

719^ Milne (OliflEbrd), third son of James Gallwey Milne of 
Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T., Canada, barrister, and Isabella Matilda 
Harvey his wife. 

720. Milne (Harvey Gale), eldest son of James Gallwey 
Milne of Qu'Appelle, N.-W.T., Canada, and Isabella Matilda 
Harvey his wife, 



1 98 



MILNE — MOIR. 



721. Milne (James Gallwey), barrister-at-law, son of Alex- 
ander Stover Milne of Ancaster, Upper Canada, barrister, and 
Sarah Gale his wife, rej-ided for some time at Palmerston, Ont., 
subsequently removed to Qu'/Vppelle in the North-West Terri- 
tory. He was married igth December, 187G, to Isabella Matilda 
Harvey, daughter of Alexander Harvey, formerly of Kinnettles, 
Ontario (now residing near Qu'Appelle), and Matilda Shade his 
wife. They have issue. 

722. Milne (William), Lieutenant R.N., son of Alexander 
Milne, W.S., and Sarah Swan his wife; born at Falkirk, Scot- 
land, was at the storming of Monte Video, and at the Siege of 
Alexandria, receiving for services on the latter occasion a gold 
medal, now in the possession of his grandson, James G. Milne 
(721). He was married at St. James' Church, Westminster, to 
Johanna Gallwey, daughter of Henry Gallwey, banker in 
Lisbon, and died at Ancaster, Upper Canada, 27th February, 
1825. They had issue. 

723. Mitchell (Ann) of the family of Ladath jn Fife, was 
married in 1771 to Robert Hamilton, LL.D., afterwards Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics in Marischal College, Aberdeen, and 
died 1778-9. They were the parents of Helen Hamilton or 
Thomson (549). 

724^ Moir (Catharine Jane), daughter of Rev. William 
Moir, minister of Fyvie, and Helen Constable his wife, was 
married 20th March, 1800, to John Dingwall of Rannieston and 
Ardo, Provost of Aberdeen. They had no issue. 

724^ Moir (Rev. George), minister of Kintore, grandfather 
(following Scott's " Fasti ")of Catharine Jane Moir or Dmgwail 
(724') was son of Andrew Moir at Mill of Foveran, of the family 
of Stonywood, burgess of Aberdeen. He was licensed to preach 
the Gospel 31st October, 1705, and had successively the paro- 
chial charges of Towie, Cluny and Kintore, being placed there 
in 1708, 1 71 7 and 1727. He was admitted an honorary burgess 
of Aberdeen, 17th August, 1736, and died gth April, 1737. He 
had been married 13th January, 1719, to Jean Forbes, daughter 
of Sir William Forbes of Monymusk, the mother it is presumed 



MOIK — MONRO. 



199 



of a son William (725) and of a daughter Jean, who was married 
in 1751, to James Jopp, Provost of Aberdeen. 

725. Moir (Rev. William), minister of Fyvie, was born in 
1727, son of the Rev. George Moir 01 Kiiitore, and probably of 
Jean Forbes his wife (aL. no other marriage of the minister of 
Kintore is known of) was licensed by the Presbytery 4th October, 
1748, and ordained as minister of the Parish of Fyvie, on the 
27th April following. He remained in that charge till his death, 
which occurred 19th March, 1794. He had been married in 
October, 1776, to Helen Constable, who survived him. Their 
daughter, Catharine Jane Moir, was married to Provost John 
Dingwall of Rannies.aii and Ardo. 

726. Monro (Dr. Alexander), Secundus, Professor of Ana- 
tomy, in the University of Edinburgh, was born in Edinburgh in 
1732. His father, Dr. Alexander Monro, Primus, was also an 
eminent physician and anatomist. His mother, Isabella Mac- 
donald, was a daughter of Sir Donald Macdonald of Sleat, 
Bart. When only twenty-two years of age he was appointed 
assistant and successor to his father in the chair of Anatomy, 
his father's petition to the Town Council saying that his 
youngest son had appeared to him for some years " to have the 
qualifications necessary for a teacher," and to be then " already 
equal to the office." Dr. Monro's eminence was not only as a 
physician and an operative surgeon but as a demonstrative 
lecturer. One writer, speaking from personal knowledge, says : 
" By all who heard them the value of his lectures will be long 
remembered. His eloquence was of that uncommon sort, that, 
while apparently it aimed at nothing, it accomplished every- 
thing. Perspicuous, impressive and convincing, it had a touch- 
ing simplicity and air of antiquity about it, which rendered it 
venerable and completely exemplified what St. James, with 
singular felicity of expression, has called the " meekness of 
wisdom." " From this elcqutnce, the driest and most uninter- 
esting parts of his anatomical course caught a glow and an 
interest almost beyond belief." " The novelty of his manner," it 
has been said, " combined with the clearness of his style, acted 
like an electric shock on the audience. His style was lively, argu- 



200 



MONRO. 



mentative and modern, compared with that of his more vener- 
able colleague ; and from the beginning onwards for half-a- 
century, his ^'reer was one of easy and triumphant success." 
For a period of forty years, the average annual number of his 
pupils amounted to three hundred and fifty, and never did a 
physician deserve or enjoy to a gieater extent, it is said, the con- 
fidence of the public. In 1798 his son was associated with him 
in the chair of Anatomy and Surgery ; but he still continued to 
give the greater part of the course till 1808, when he delivered 
his last lecture, and retired from work, to the enjoyment of a 
peaceful old age. In 1779 he had purchased the beautiful pro- 
perty of Craiglockhart, near Edinburgh, which he took great 
pleasure in planting and ornamenting, getting thereby the relax- 
ation and invigoration required by the arduous labours of his 
profession. He did not however reside on the property, the 
house not being built till 1835. " In temper he was remarkably 
serene " (the Georgian Era tells us), " in conversation lively, 
agreeable and free from the slightest pedantry ; and as a 
husband, landlord and friend, distinguished for affection, tender- 
ness, kindness and generosity. Horticulture appears to have 
been his favourite amusement." He is said to have possessed 
great anecdotal powers, and to have been an enthusiastic 
admirer of the theatre. He married Catharine Inglis, daughter 
of David Inglis of Auchindinny and Catharine Binning his wife, 
and had a numerous family, and died 2nd October, 1817, ofa 
painful disease, from which he had suffered greatly for many 
years. He was father of Charlotte Monro or Ferrier (730). 

727. Monro (Dr. Alexander), Tertius, Professor of Ana- 
tomy and Surgery in the University of Edinburgh, was born 5th 
November, 1773. He was son of Dr. Alexander Monro, Secundus, 
whom he succeeded in 1808 in the chair of Anatomy, his 
mother's"name being Catharine Inglis. He took the degree of 
M.D. in 1799, and in 1828 was President of the Royal College 
of Physicians in Scotland. He retired in 1847, and died at his 
seat of Craiglockhart, near Edinburgh, loth March, 1859. Sir 
Robert Christison in his " Recollections," alludes to the trying 
nature of his position as the successor of two such men as his 
father and grandfather, observing, however, that whatever else 



MONRO. 



201 



he might be wanting^ in, he gave a very clear, and precise and com- 
plete jc urse of lecttires on Anatomy, adding : " Certainly I 
learned Anatomy well under liim." His writings were voluminous. 
He spoke Latin well, v;as fv.id of painting. He also practised 
as a physician. He married Maria, the eldest daughter of the 
distinguished physician Dr. Jaines Carmichiiel Smyth, and had 
twelve children. His eldest son, Alexander, was a Lieutenant in 
the Rifle Brigade ; the second, James, Assistant Surgeon to the 
Scots Greys ; the third, Henry, is noticed in this Record (732) ; 
the fourth, David, a physician, went to New Zealand, and was 
knighted ; the fifth, William, was a Lieutenant in the 79th High- 
landers. The eldest daughter married John Inglis of Auchin- 
dinny ; the second. Sir James Stewart of Allanbank ; the third, 
George Skene of Rubislaw ; and the fourth, Alexander Monro of 
Auchinbowie. For the latter particulars we are indebted to 
Kay's " Portraits." 

728. Monro (Alexander) of the Education Department in 
India, son of Henry Monro (732) and grandson of Dr. Alexander 
Monro, Tertius, Professor of Anatomy in the University of Edin- 
burgh, married 24th April, 1879, Evelyn Agnes Dingwall, 
daughter of Arthur Dingwall, advocate, and Charlotte Roach his 
wife. 

729. Monro (Charles Gteorge), second son of James Monro, 
lately of the H. E. I. Co.'s Service, and Ruth Littlejohn his 
wife. 

730. Monro (Charlotte), daughter of Dr. Alexander Monro, 
Secundus, Professor of Anatomy in the University of Edinburgh 
and Catharine Inglis his wife, was born in 1780, and married 
loth November, 1808, to Louis Henry Ferrier of Belsyde, Linlith- 
gowshire, latterly Collector of Customs, Quebec. She died 26th 
April, 1822, leaving several sons and daughters, and was buried 
in the Greyfriars Churchyard, Edinburgh. 

• 731. Monro (George), solicitor of Supreme Courts, Edin- 
burgh, son of James Monro, latterly of Pictou, Nova Scotia, 
cabinet-maker, and Helen Gordon his wife, was married to 
Margaret Anderson, daughter of Rev. George Anderson, min- 
ister of Leochel Cushnie, Aberdeenshire, and Margaret Catta- 



202 



MONRO. 



nach or Mcintosh his wife. They were parents of James Monro 
(733), H. E. I. Co.'s Service. 

732. Monro (Henry), third son of Dr. Alexander Monro, 
Tertius, Professor of Anatomy in the University of Edinburgh, 
and Maria Smyth his wife, at one time a settler in Australia 
father of Alexander Monro, of the Education Department, India, 
(728). 

733. Monro (James), son of George Monro, S.S.C., and 
Margaret Anderson his wife, for a number of years in the Bengal 
Civil Service ; head of the Revenue and Criminal Administration 
of the Calcutta, Nuddea, Jessore and Moorshedabad Districts, 
now Assistant-Commissioner of Police in London, married in 
December, 1863, Ruth Littlejohn, fourth daughter of William 
Littlejohn, bank manager, Aberdeen, and Janet Bentley his wife. 
They have issue. 

734. Monro (James), son of the Rev. James Monro, min- 
ister of Cormarty, and Mary Stark his wife, was born in 1771. 
He was educated for the Church ; but having a strong inclination 
for mechanical pursuits, became a cabinet-maker, following that 
occupation in Inverness, and subsequently in Pictou, Nova 
Scotia, where he died in September, 1843. He was married 20th 
October, 1799, to Helen Gordon, younger daughter of Lieu- 
tenant Francis Gordon of Mill of Lumphart, Aberdeenshire. 
Their son George has a place in this Record (731) ; another son, 
James, lost his life through an accident in 1841 ; one daughter 
died unmarried in 1853 ; and another was mother of the Rev. G. 
M. Grant, D.D., Principal of Queen's College, Kingston, the 
able and accomplished author of a well-known work " From 
Ocean to Ocean." It may be added that the subject of this 
notice presented the church in Pictou with a pulpit of his own 
manufacture, remarking that " although no son of his own might 
occupy it, a grandson might do so," and so it turned out. [The 
Rev. James Monro of Cromarty was born in 1716. He was 
minister of that charge from 1755 till his death, which took 
place 6th September, 1879. He had been originally master of 
the Grammar School of Elgin. He was married 25th January, 
1763, to Mary Stark, who died in 1822. Besides the subject of 



MO>JRO — MORISOK. 



ao3 



this notice, they had two other sons, Geor|:]fe Ross Monro, min- 
ister of Huntly, and John Spens Monro, merchant in London.] 

735. Monro (James), eldest son of James Monro, formerly 
of H. E. I. Co.'s (^ivil Service, and Rnlh Littlejohn his wife, horn 
ist October, 1866, (hcd same day. 

736. Monro (Jessy Bentley), eldest danj^hter of James 
Monro, late of H. E, I. Co.'s Civil Service, and Ruth Littlejohn 
his wife. 

737- Monro (Margaret Penelope), second daughter of 
James Monro, late of H. E. L Co.'s Civil Service, and Ruth 
Littlejohn his wife. 

738. Monro (William Douglas), third son of James Monro, 
late of H. E. I. Co.'s Service, and Ruth Littlejohn his wife. 

739. Moore (Mary), daughter of William Moore and wife 
of Arthur Lawrence Dingwall Fordyce, Lieutenant in Bombay 
Staff Corps. 

740. Moore (William), father of Mary Moore or Dingwall 
Fordyce (739). 

741. Morison (Agnes), daughter of James Morison of 
Elsick, Provost of Aberdeen, and Isobel Dyce his wife, baptised 
i6th June, 1736, married 17th June, 1754, to Robert Farquhar, 
afterwards of Newhall (then merchant and stationer, Aberdeen), 
and described in the notice of her marriage in the Aberdeen 
journal as "a beautiful and most agreeable young lady." She 
died in 1782. Some notice of several of her sons is given in this 
Record (319). 

742. Morison (Amelia), daughter of James Morison of 
Elsick, Provost of Aberdeen, and Isobell Dyce his wife, w^as 
baptized 21st January, 1756, and married 28th September, 
1790, to Rev. James Shirrefs, D.D., one of the ministers of Saint 
Nicholas Church, Aberdeen. They had three sons ana two 
daughters. She died at Friendville, near Aberdeen, 21st May, 
1818, and was mother of Jane Shirrefs or Cadenhead (814). 

743. Morison (James) of Elsick, Kincardineshire, mer- 
chant in Aberdeen, Provost in 1745-6 and in 1752-3, was 
born in 1708. His father, James Morison, merchant in Aber- 



2o4 



MORISON. 



deen, was also Provost of the City in 1730 and 1731. His 
motlier's name was Anna Low, and he was their fifth son. As 
Chief Magistrate during tlie eventful years 1745 and 1746 his 
loyalty was put to the test. The rebels had taken possession of the 
Town on the very day of the annual election of the magistrates ; 
the new council had been nominated, but the Provost and other 
members had not been elected. Proceedings were suspended. 
Of the treatment he himself received Provost Morison wrote on 
the loth October to the Lord President Forbes : — " On the 25th 
past I was seized upon by an armed party of Highlandmen, 
violently forced down to the Cross, and there, with some broad- 
swords over my head, wps obliged to stand till their proclamation 
was read ; and because I refused to drink a health they proposed, 
I had a glass of wine spilt down my breast — In so far they got 
what they aimed at, but sure it was no advantage to their cause. 
I hope I shall ever esteem it my greatest honour as Providence 
shall give me opportunity to be equally faithful in the discharge 
of my duty in my station under the present happy establish- 
ment." The Lord President in his reply, dated igth October, 
says : — " The usage you met with at your Cross and your 
resolute behaviour I had formerly heard ; nor need you doubt 
that it shall be properly represented in due time. The discontiu- 
ance of your election is what you could not help under the then 
circumstances. The good people must at present live in the 
most neighbourly way they can, as none, I believe, would choose 
to act." When the Duke of Cumberland arrived with the Royal 
Army he put the civil government of the Town under the 
administration of twelve citizens; Provost Morison's name being 
the first on the list. The Aberdeen journal in 1756 mentions his 
having removed to Pitfoddel's new house in the Castlegate. 
The date of his acquiring the estate of Elsick does not appear. 
It was sold after his death, but repurchased by one ot his sons 
and remained in the possession of members of his family till a 
comparati^oly recent date. While Provost Morison lived there he 
was in the habit of attending with his family at the Sod Kirk, as it 
was called, which was the Chapel of Ease for Portlethen, and was 
near the house of Elsick. The peculiar name it went by was given 
to distinguish it from the Parish or Red Kirk, the one being roofed 



MORISON. 



205 



with turf or sod, and the other with tiles. Dr. Paull in his 
" Aberdeenshire Past and Present " relates, in connection with 
the Sod Kirk, that in Provost Morison's time, the minister (a 
Mr. Wilkie) preached very long sermons ; that the Provost who 
sat opposite him, on getting tired, would occasionally fasten his 
watch on the top of his walking-stick to warn him that he ought 
to stop ; a hint which the minister, it is added, seldom heeded ; 
as, though poor, he had a very independent spirit. In 1754 
Provost Morison's name appears as the representative elder to 
the General Assembly from the Presbytery of Aberdeen. He 
died on the 5th January, 1786. He had been married, probably 
in 1740, to Isobell Dyce, eldest daughter of James Dyce of 
Disblair, merchant in Aberdeen, and Agnes Baxter his wife. 
They had five sons and eleven daughters. Six children died 
unmarried, probably most of them in infancy. At the baptism of 
one of these, WiUiam Augustus, in 1746, we find the name of Lord 
Sempill as a witness. He was at the time Commander of the 
Forces on the East Coast. A daughter, Helen, lived to the age 
of eighty or thereabouts. Two sons survived the others, Thomas 
and George. The elder of these, Dr. Thomas Morison, a surgeon 
in the Army and surgeon to His Majesty's hospitals in the West 
Indies, served in the American War, and died unmarried. He 
had resided mostly in London ; occasionally in Buie a^nd 
Rothsay. He also brought into repute the medicinal spring , at 
Strathpeffer in Rossshire. He succeeded to his aunt Miss Dyce's 
property of Disblair in the Parish of Newmachar, Aberdeen- 
shire, and bought back his father's property of Elsick ; entailing 
both in the year 1826 on a series of heirs. In terms of this the 
Reverend George Morison, the youngest son of Provost Morison 
and Isobell Dyce, succeeded to Elsick and Disblair. After gradu- 
ating at Marischal College, he had studied law for a time with 
his brother-in-law, Dr. Arthur D. Fordyce, but eventually 
entered the Church. He ,was licensed to preach 3rd January, 
1782, and settled as minister of the Parish of Oyne next year. 
He was translated to Banchory Devenick 26th October, 1785, 
I and remained there till his death 13th July, 1845, when he had 
been sixty-three years in the ministry, and was " Father of the 
Church of Scotland." He had received the degree of D.D. 



2o6 



MORISON. 



from King's College, Aberdeen, in 1824. He was married in 
1780 to Margaret Jaffray who died in 1837, and whose father, 
Gilbert Jaffray, was a younger son of the family of Kingswells of 
which some account is given in the Appendix. From 1826 
onward, Dr. Morison was aided in parish work by a grand- 
nephew who ultimately was his successor as minister of Ban- 
chory, the Rev. William Paull, whose graphic " Description 
of Aberdeenshire Past and Present," supplies the following 
notice of his aged relative: — " Dr. Morison was a man of bland 
and courteous manners, and of a large and benevolent heart ; 
possessed, moreover, of a sound understanding and good business 
habits. During the latter period of his ministry he inherited a 
good fortune which enabled him to do what few of his profess jn 
could, and what fewer probably would do if they had the means. 
He erected a school house with a school master's house attached 
to it, entirely with his own means, at Portlethen, a remote dis- 
trict in his parish, containing 1,800 souls. He erected and 
partially endowed two other schools to supply educational wants 
in Fetteresso and Fintray, the parishes in which his properties 
were situated. He introduced vaccination into his parish at a 
time when it was scarcely known elsewhere, through the advice 
and direction of his brother Dr. Thomas Morison ; taking the 
whole work on himself as there was at first great prejudice 
against it. When he was getting old, and his hand getting 
tremulous he devolved on his assistant and successor the duty 
of vaccination. During what was all but a famine in 1800, he 
bought meal from other quarters ; lodged it in a granary near by, 
doling it out with his own hand from time to time, saving many 
thereby from actual starvation. He contributed liberally to the 
funds raised for the endowment of the Church of Portlethen 
and for erecting a new church and manse there. In 1837 he 
erected a suspension bridge over the Dee at a cost of ;^i,4.oo so 
as to allow of communication between the two sides of the river, 
his parish lying partly on either side ; while on Sundays the 
parish boat could not always be depended on owing to ice and 
heavy floods rendering the river impassable. He also bequeathed 
a sum of money for keeping the bridge in repair. Such were 
some of the good deeds of this philanthropic, generous Christian- 



MORISON. 



207 



minded man." Of the eiglit married daughters of Provost James 
Morison and Isobell Dyce, four are specially noticed in this 
Record : Agnes, married to Robert Farquhar of Newhall, mer- 
chant in Aberdeen ; Jean, to Dr. Robert Hamilton, Professor of 
Mathematics in Marischal College ; Janet, married to Dr. 
Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh ; and Amelia, to the Rev. Dr. 
James Shirrefs, one of the ministers of Aberdeen. Of the other 
four — Anne was twice married, first, to the Rev. John Farquhar, 
minister of Nigg, a brother to the eminent London physician 
Sir Walter Farquhar, Bart., and secondly, to the Rev. Alexander 
Mearns of Towie and Cluny ; Isobell was married to James 
Abercrombie of Bellfield near Stonehaven ; Mary, to the Rev. 
John Hutcheon, minister of Fetteresso ; and Katharine, to the 
Rev. David Forbes of Laurencekirk. A daughter of the 
minister of Fetteresso and grand -daughter of Provost James 
Morison and Isobell Dyce was mother of the Rev. Dr. William 
Paull of Banchory, author of several critical theological works 
and of the interesting little volume on Aberdeenshire already 
referred to. It may be added that the Rev. Duncan Mearns, 
minister of Tarves, and afterwards for many years the able Pro- 
fessor of Divinity in King's College, Aberdeen, was a grandson 
of Provost Morison and Isobell Dyce. His son, the Rev. Dr. 
William Mearns of Kinneff, was Moderator of the General 
Assembly of the Church of Scotland in 1883; and a grandson, 
the Rev. Duncan McPherson, an earnest and devoted minister 
and missionary from the Church of Scotland to India (one of her 
chaplains), died there very greatly lamented. 

744. Morison (James), merchant and Provost of Aberdeen, 
was born in 1665, but no information has reached us as to his 
parentage or birth-place. It seems, however, that in i6go when 
he was admitted a burgess of guild, it v;as on payment of £50* 
showing that he was not a native of the town. His name 
at that time was spelt Mooriesone, but underwent change 
into Moon on and latterly Morison. On the 29th March, 1692, 
he was married to Anna Low in Old Aberdeen, and in 1696 the 
Poll Tax Book gives his stock as 5,000 merks, tax being also 
paid for his wife and two children, Robert and John. The 
name of the former does not appear in the Baptismal Register 



2o8 



MORISON. 



which contains those of his other five sons and three daughters. 
He became a member of the Town Council in 1713, when he was 
elected Baillie, and continued in that capacity with little excep- 
tion till he was elected Provost in 1730, serving also in 1731. His 
death took place in 1748, and the Aberdeen J^ournal of the time 
records it in these words : — " March 8th. — Last week was 
interred here James Morison, senior, late Provost of this City, 
in the eighty-fourth year of his age, with an unblemisl ed 
character. He behaved himself in every station of life in such 
a fair, straight way as procured him the universal love and 
approbation of his fellow citizens, and his relations have by his 
death lost a most affectionate parent and sincere friend." The 
sons, whose names appear on the Baptismal Register, are John, 
James, Thomas, Alexander and James. Besides the youngest, 
James (afterwards also Provost of Aberdeen), the only one of 
whom we have any account is Thomas, baptized 20th April, 1699. 
He was a merchant in London, married a lady from Inverness, 
and is said to have been unfortunate in business and to have 
died shortly afterwards, leaving three sons, one of whom, a 
calico printer, was married and had a family. The three 
daughters of Provost James Morison and Anna Low, were 
named Anna, Christian and Katharine. The two last were twins. 
The only one known to have been married was Katharine, who on 
the loth March, 1748, became the wife of the Rev. John King, 
minister of the Parish of Dyce. She died on 3rd November, 
1 76 1. As observed already no particulars have been preserved 
respecting the parents of Provost Morison or siiowing where he 
was born. A few items of additional information will be found 
in the Appendix respecting the family. 

745. Morison (Janet), sixth daughter of James Morison of 
Elsick, Provost of Aberdeen, and Isobell Dyce his wife, was born 
23rd November, 1747, and married 14th June, 1770, to Arthur 
Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh, advocate in Aberdeen. A portrait 
painted by Sir George Chalmers, who had considerable celebrity 
at the time in the Scottish Capital, is with that of her husband 
in the collection at Brucklay Castle and represents her with her 
eldest child in her arms. She was dignified and courteous, and 
was exemplary in the discharge of all relative duties during a 



MURRAY. 



209 



long life. She had a strong will, but was affectionate withal. 
She had a head to plan, even if she had not always a hand to 
execute, a faculty which would seem to have been transmitted 
to members of her family, who excelled in both qualifications. 
Like many, perhaps most, ladies of her day, her political feelings 
were keen. Hers were strongly Conservative. It may conse- 
quently be imagined that her eldest son's attaching himself to 
the Liberal Party was to her a source of not a little disquietude 
at the time. It did not, however, affect the kindliness of fre- 
quent intercourse. She died at Arthur Seat, near Aberdeen, 
15th July, 1 83 1. 

746. Murray (Mary), daughter of Thomas Murray and 
Janet Ferguson, residing at Muirkirk in Ayrshire, was born there 
25th December, 1804, and was married 9th March, 1827, to 
David Ballantine, millwright and engineer. About 1841 she 
accompanied her husband and family to Canada, and resided 
latterly in Hamilton, where she died 23rd August, 1853. She 
was mother of Mary Hodge Ballantine or Keefer (42). Mr. 
Alexander Murray, brother of the subject of this notice, who 
died in Toronto on 22nd September, 1883, at the age of seventy- 
three, is said to have been a man of marked ability and great 
originality. Before coming to Canada he had been for twenty- 
five years an elder and for fifteen years Session Clerk of the United 
Presbyterian Church in Cambridge Street, Glasgow, under the 
pastorate of the Rev. Dr. Eadie and of his successor, and on 
coming to Toronto from Dundas, where he had resided for a 
short time, identified himself from the time it was opened with 
the Central Church, of which for the last seven years of his life 
he was an elder and Session Clerk. A writer in The Canada 
Presbyterian at the time of his death observed that "his exposi- 
tions of the Word of God and prayers on his quarterly visits as 
an elder would be treasured during life in the memory of those 
who were accustomed to hear them." 

747. Murray (Sarah), daughter of Mr. William Murray, 
minister of Inverury, and Magdalen Gellie his wife, was married 
before 1712 to Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill in the Parish of 
Monwhitter. They had at least five sons and three daughterr 



2IO 



MURRAY. 



She probably died in 1720, as she had a daughter born in 1719, 
and her husband was married to his second wife, Jean Chalmers, 
before September, 1721. 

748. Murray (William), merchant and postmaster of Aber- 
deen, who was born in 1716, and died 6th July, 1 791, is fully 
believed to have been son of Mr. William Murray, Episcopal 
minister in Old Aberdeen, and grandson of Mr. William Murray, 
minister of Inverury (749). He was twice married, his first wife's 
name being Isobel Irvine, that of the second, Anna Dingwall. 
She was daughter of William Dingwall of Brucklay and Anna 
Gordon his wife. She survived her husband. There were no 
children of the second marriage. A son of the first, John Mur- 
ray of St. Kitts, died on his passage to Philadelphia in the end 
of 1794, leaving two children, a boy and girl, the former of whom 
was sent to Aberdeen for his education and put under the charge 
of his father's stepmother. In 1804 he was in the counting 
house of Messrs. George and Robert Denniston, Glasgow, but 
we cannot follow him any further. It may be mentioned that in 
1752, the Aberdeen journal, being then a strong Whig organ, a 
newspaper called the Aberdeen Intelligencer was established "in 
the interest of the crushed-out Jacobite Party," and conducted 
by the publishers, Francis Douglas and William Murray, the 
former of whom was the author of a " Description of the East 
Coast of Scotland," the latter a druggist in Aberdeen with whom 
Mr. Douglas had entered into partnership in 1750 as printers 
and publishers. The father of the subject of this notice having 
been a minister of the Scotch Episcopal Church suggests the 
possibility that the future postmaster was Douglas' partner in 
the undertaking, merely a supposition, however, which may be 
quite unfounded. 

749'. Murray (Rev. William), minister of Inverury, was 
probably born about 1645, as he took the degree of A.M., 2nd 
July, 1667, at King's College, Aberdeen. About that time there 
was a family in the Parish of Forgue to which he might have 
belonged, holding Cowbairdie, Blairfindie, Auchmull, and the 
Davach of Auchinbo,but there is nothing to establish connection 
with that or any other family of the name. We learn from Scott 



MURRAY. 



21 I 



was 



(" Fasti Eccl. Scott.") that he took the oath prescribed by the civil 
authorities at the Revolution, and in 1688-9 '^^s name appears as 
a benefactor to Marischal College, probably on the occasion of 
visiting the college. In 1696 his family is represented in the 
Poll Tax Book as consisting of his wife, Magdalen Gellie, and 
five children. On the nth June, 1699, he was a witness at the 
baptism of a child of William Blachrie and Isobell Fordyce his 
wife in Aberdeen, and on 8th September, 1810, to an agreement 
between Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill and his brother, William 
Dingwall of Brucklay, the former being his son-in-law. On the 
2nd of February, 1714, he was infeft in an annuity of 550 merks 
out of the lands of Dubstone in the Parish of Inverury ; and in 
1716 execution is appointed to pass at his instance and that of 
another, on the marriage contract of his third daughter. Scott's 
"Fasti" informs us that he was deposed for joining in the 1715 
rebellion. The date of his death does not appear. There must 
have been at least six children of his marriage with Magdalen 
Gellie, who was probably a sister of Mr. Alexander Gellie, min- 
ister of Fordyce, although the Poll Tax Book only mentions five. 
We know of only two daughters by name, but one of these is 
called the tJiird, Sarah was married to Arthur Dingwall of 
Brownhill, and Katharine, the third, to Alexander Hay, Younger 
of Rannieston, in 1716. The sons we hear of are Mr. WilHam 
(749'''), Mr. Alexander, Episcopal minister at Banff, and Peter. 
They were all witnesses to their sister Katharine's marriage con- 
tract. In 1754 Mr. William Murray, merchant in Aberdeen, 
was served heir in special with Mrs. Ann Irvine, the deceased's 
widow to* Mr. Alexander Murray, late Episcopal minister at 
Banff. 

749'^ Murray (Rev. William), son of the Reverend Wil- 
liam Murr&y of Inverury and Magdalen Gellie his wife, was an 
Episcopalian minister. From an allusion in the " Life of the Rev. 
John Skinner" he seems to have had a chapel in Old Aberdeen. 
Hir remains lie in the churchyard there with those of his v/ife, 
Elizabeth Irvine, who died in 1725, aged forty-six. He was 
born in 1685, ^^^ ^^^^ 28th January, 1754. He was probably 
father of William Murray, merchant in Aberdeen (748), on 
which supposition these particulars (all that are known) are 
given. :, , 



212 



M'COY — M'DOUGALL. 



749". McOoy (Anne), wife of Colonel Matthew Clark, and 
grandmother of Emma Josephine Clark or Cadenhead (137'"'), 
was step-daughter of Colonel Johnston. No other particulars 
have been furnished. 

750. McDougall (Alexander) of Inveresk House, Edinburgh, 
and Deputy Remembrancer, it is believed, in the Court of Exche- 
quer, died on the 14th March, 1792. He appears to have held the 
office at one time of Grand Secretary to the Mason Lodges of 
Scotland: as an order was issued 25th December, 1759, by the 
Right Hon. David Earl of Leven, Grand Master Mason of Scot- 
land, that names of each of the lodges, times of meeting, with 
names of the respective masters and wardens, should be sent 
before the following St. John's Day to " Mr. Alexander McDou- 
gall, Grand Secretary, at the Exchequer Office, Edinburgh." 
What his parentage was we cannot say ; but it seems not unlikely 
that Mr. John McDougall, Auditor's Clerk in Exchequer, was a 
near relative (if not his father), in whose name communications 
relative to the Fiars of Caithness are found in the Session 
Papers, of date 26th June and 22nd September, 1749. The 
name of Mr. McDougall's wife has not reached us ; but his 
family must have been left in reduced circumstances, from the 
fact that two daughters, Misses Helen and Susan McDougall, for 
years creditably supported themselves, the former in the family 
of Mr, James Walker, an eminent civil engineer in London ; 
the latter as governess in the family of the Marquis of North- 
ampton. A son, John McDougall, died at Kingston, Jamaica, in 
1810; another daughter, Charlotte (751), has a place in this 
Record, the mother of Lieutenant General Sir John Fordyce, 
K.C.B. ; and another was married in 1802 to Mr. Keddieof Duke 
Street, London. 

751. McDougall (Charlotte), daughter of Alexander 
McDougall of Inveresk House, Edinburgh, and of the Court of 
Exchequer, Scotland, was married in July, 1797, to James Ding- 
wall Fordyce of London (416), and was mother of Sir John 
Fordyce, a General Officer and K.C.B. , and of a married 
daughter, who resided with her mother chiefly in France, and 
was married there. 



MACKAY — M'gUEEN. 



213 



752. Mackay (Elizabeth), wife of Mr. John Harvey (or 
Harvie as the name appears on their gravestone in the church- 
yard of Kintore, where both lie buried), was born in 1691 and 
died 5th April, 1776. They had a large family particularly 
mentioned in the notice of her husband who was for fifty-seven 
years schoolmaster at Midmar. 

753. McKenzie (Alexander), baker in Aberdeen, nearly 
related to the family of Dalmore, Braemar, was born 1701 and 
died 3rd April, 1783. His wife, Elizabeth Irvine, was probably 
from the Parish of Birse, and of the same family as the Irvines 
of Glassel, in Banchory. They had several children besides 
Elspet McKenzie or Ritchie (754). 

754. McKenzie (Elspet), daughter of Alexander McKenzie, 
baker in Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Irvine his wife, married 
William Ritchie of Techmuiry, manufacturer and Baillie of 
Aberdeen, and was mother of Margaret Ritchie or Dingwall 
Fordyce (796). 

755. Mcintosh or Oattanach (Margaret), wife of the Rev. 
George Anderson, minister of Leochel Cushnie, Aberdeenshire, 
was born in 1769 and died 23rd April, 1847. She was mother of 
Margaret Anderson or Monro (30). ; 

756. McNeill (Caroline Trimble), daughter of Hugh 
McNeill of Annaville, County Antrim, was married 21st March, 
1870, to James Bentley Littlejohn, bank manager in Australia 
and New Zealand, and has issue. 

757. McNeill (Hugh) of Annaville, County Antrim, Ireland, 
father of Caroline Trimble McNeill or Littlejohn (756). 

758. McPhersOn (James), merchant in Rotterdam, was 
married 28th September, 1838, to Jessy Young, eldest daughter 
of Provost James Young, latterly of Rotterdam, and Patience 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife. Embarking with his wife and infant 
child on board a vessel bound for China, they were all lost 12th 
October, 1839, by shipwreck off the Island of Hainan in the 
China Seas. ■[■■':?.,.'::">■' .:-'.K-'-':^,^'.'r:, 

759. McQueen (Jane), only daughter of John McQueen, a 
younger brother of the well-known Scotch judge, Lord Brax- 



214 ^ QEEN — OGILVIE. 

field, was married to Major General Hay Ferrier of Belsyde, 
Linlithgowshire, and was mother of Louis Henry Ferrier of 
Belsyde, advocate (325). [It seems possible that John McQueen, 
the father of the subject of this notice, was the same ar is referred 
to in the following intimation in the Scots Magazine : " Died at 
Edinburgh 6th January, 1771, Mrs. McQuin, widow of Captain 
John McQuin and daughter of Sir Donald McDonald, Bart., 
deceased." A further notice respecting the McQueen Family 
will be found in the Appendix.] 

760. Napier (Mary), daughter of Mr. Archibald Napier, 
minister of Maryculter, and Jean White his wife, married 6th 
July, 1752, Mr. James Smith, minister of Garvock in Kincar- 
dineshire, and was mother of Jean Smith or Foote (818). 

761. Newman (Jane), daughter of Francis Newman of 
Cadbury House, Somersetshire, England, married ist May, 
1783, to WiUiam Walter Yea, Younger of Pyrland, in same 
county, and was mother of Georgiana Yea or AUeyne (939). 

762. Nickerson (Emma A.), wife of Alexander Eraser, 
formerly of the Island of Java, to whom she was married in 
July, 1880. 

763. Nottebohm (Emilie), only daughter of the Baron 
William Nottebohm, merchant in Antwerp, and the Baroness 
Nottebohm, married 23rd September, 1833, to John Mathison 
Eraser, formerly merchant in Antwerp, latterly residing in 
London. They had five sons and one daughter. 

764. Nottebohm (Baron William), merchant in Antwerp, 
father of Emilie Nottebohm or Eraser (763). 

765. 0'Brien(AliceM.),daughterof JamesO'BrienEsq.,and 
wife of John Eraser Dingwall Eordyce, Captain in the Bengal 
Staff Corps (431). 

766. O'Brien (James), father of Alice Margaret O'Brien or 
Dingwall Eordyce (765). 

767. Ogilvie (Margaret), daughter of James Ogilvie, Baillie 
of Banff, and Margaret Greig his wife, was born 4th February, 
1 701, and married to Alexander Ritchie, Town Clerk of Eraser- 
burgh. She was his second wife and was mother of William 
Ritchie of Techmuiry (797). [A private memorandum gives 



ONNEN — PHILIP. 



215 



syde, 
er of 
ueen, 
erred 
ed at 
Lptain 
Bart., 
amily 



[apier, 
3d 6th 
Lincar- 



lan of 

May, 

1 same 

9)-' 

Fraser, 
ried in 

Baron 
aroness 
athison 
ling in 

ntwerp, 

^sq.,and 
Bengal 

Brien or 

, Baillie 
ebruary, 
f Fraser- 

William 
xm gives 



Elizabeth Greig as the wife of Baillie James Ogilvie of Banff. 
However, as James Ogilvie, sometime merchant in Fraserburgh, 
and Margaret Greig his wife were infeft in some lands in 1699, it 
is assumed here, for that and other reasons, that the latter is 
correct.] 

768. Onnen (Anna), eldest daughter of Dr. P. L. Onnen of 
Sourabaya, Java, was married loth March, 1865, to William 
Thomson Fraser, merchant there, and latterly of London, whom 
she survives with a son and daughter. 

769. Onnen (Dr. P. L.), physician in the Island of Java, 
father of Anna Onnen or Fraser (768). 

770. Crrok (John) of Orrok (formerly called Colpna) in 
the Parish of Belhelvie, Aberdeenshire, and at one time a 
captain, it is believed, in the merchant service, married Sara 
Dingwall, second daughter of John Dingwall of Rannieston, 
Baillie of Aberdeen, and Mary Lumsden his wife, had issue and 
died 1 6th October, 1796. 

771. Orrok (John), son of Captain John Orrok of Orrok in 
Aberdeenshire, and Sara Dingwall his wife. 

772. Orrok (Robert), son of Captain John Orrok of Orrok 
in Aberdeenshire and Sara Dingwall his wife. 

773. Orrok (Walter), son of John Orrok of Orrok in 
Aberdeenshire, and Sara Dingwall his wife. 

774. Penn (James), father of Winifred Penn or Boucaut 
(775), was born near Plymouth, England, in 1765. He was 
Superintendent of the Victualling Department at Mylor (Fal- 
mouth Harbour), and died in South Australia in 1847. His wife's 
name was Jane Friend. His father, Thomas Penn, is said to 
have been of the family of William Penn, the founder of 
Pennsylvania. 

775. Penn (Winifred), daughter of James Penn of the 
Victualling Department, Falmouth, England, latterly of South 
Australia,, and Jane Friend his wife, married Ray Boucaut, 
Captain in the H. E. I. Co.'s Marine Service, and was mother of 
Sarah Jane Boucaut or Harvey (93). 

776. PhiUp (Alexander Adam) of the Town and County 
Bank, Aberdeen, third son of the Rev. John Philip of the Free 



2l6 



PHILIP. 



Church of Scotland, Fordoun, and Janet Morison Littlejohn his 
wife. 

777. Philip (James Charles), fifth son of the Rev. John 
PhiHp, Fordoun, and Janet Morison Littlejohn his wife. 

778. Philip (John), bookbinder, Aberdeen, son of John 
Philip of the Parish of Clatt, Aberdeenshire, and Elizabeth 
Barbara Taylor his wife, married Agnes Mackie, daughter of 
Alexander Mackie and Agnes Brown. Four sons became 
ministers of the Free Church of Scotland, Alexander, latterly at 
Dunfermline and Portobello, Robert at Ellon and latterly of 
McCrie Church, Edinburgh, George in Glasgow and now in St. 
John's, Fdinburgh, and John (780) at Fordoun, Kincardineshire, 
all in life except Alexander who died greatly regretted in 1861, 
"remarkable for amazing force and fulness of vital energy ; honest, 
outspoken and fearless in reproof," as mentioned in Scott's 
" Ecclesiae Scotticanae Fasti." 

779. Philip (John) of the Parish of Clatt, Aberdeenshire, 
married Elizabeth Barbara Taylor. They were the grand- 
parents of the Rev. John Philip of the Free Church, Fordoun, 
Kincardineshire. 

780. Philip (Rev. John), minister of the Free Church of 
Scotland, Fordoun, Kincardineshire, son of John Philip, book- 
binder in Aberdeen, and Agnes Mackie his wife, was ordained 
1844, and married gth March, 1853, to Janet Morison Littlejohn, 
eldest daughter of William Littlejohn, manager of the Aberdeen 
Town and County Bank, and Janet Bentley his first wife. They 
have five sons. 

781. Philip (John Bentley), engaged in teaching, eldest son 
of the Rev. John Philip of the Free Church of Scotland, Fordoun, 
and Janet Morison Littlejohn his wife. 

782. Philip (Robert George), fourth son of the Rev. John 
Philip of the Free Church of Scotland, Fordoun, and Janet 
Morrison Littlejohn his wife. 

783. Philip (William Littlejohn), studying engineering, 
second son of the Rev. John Philip of the Free Church of Scot- 
land, Fordoun, Kincardineshire, and Janet Morison Littlejohn 
his wife. 



plRiR — kkift. 



217 



1 his 

John 

John 
abeth 
er of 
icame 
;rly at 
rly of 
in St. 
ishire, 
I 1861, 
lonest, 
Scott's 

nshire, 
grand- 
rdoun, 

irch of 
book- 
rdained 
tlejohn, 
3erdeen 
They 

dest son 
ordoun, 

jv. John 
d Janet 

neering, 
of Scot- 
ittlejohn 



784. Pirie (Fanny), daughter of Patrick Pirie, merchant in 
Aberdeen and Margaret Smith his wife, married Duncan David- 
son of Tillychetly and Inchmarlo advocate in Aberdeen. They 
were the parents of Margaret Jane Davidson or Eraser (160). 

785. Pirie (Patrick), merchant in Aberdeen, born in 1742, 
married Margaret Smith, daughter of Alexander Smith, paper 
manufacturer, Stonywood, i6th March, 1778, and died 13th 
March, 1787. Their daughter Fanny was mother of Margaret 
Jane Davidson or Fraser (160). 

786. Powell (Richard), residing in England, married Ruth 
Walker. They were the parentsof Ruth Powell or Bentley (787). 

787. Powell (RutL born in 1736, was a native of England, 
daughter of Richard Powell and Ruth Walker, and wife of James 
Bentley of Leeds, afterwards of Aberdeen, Scotland, where the 
latter half of her life was passed, and where she died about the 
year 1808. She was a second wife and must have been married 
young, as one of her sons, Richard, who resided in London, and 
died in 1 831, is understood to have been t\;enty years older than 
his brother, Piofessor Bentley. Her memory was cherished 
after she was gone as that of a godly woman, a faithful mother, 
an experienced and active Christian. She was a follower of 
John Wesley, but too good a woman to be illiberal towards such 
as differed from her conscientiously in religious belief or prac- 
tice. V/e consequently hear of her worshipping part of the 
Lord's Day with her husband, who was a member of the Church 
of England, when the Wesleyans were not numerous enough to 
allow of their having two services. She survived her husband 
many years. 

788. Pringle (Captain), married a daughter of George 
Willox, merchant and Baillie of Old Aberdeen, who afterwards 
married Provost John Dingwall of Rannieston and Ardo (221). 

789. Reid (Anne), daughter of Hugh Reid of Sydserff, East 
Lothian, M.D., and Ann Richardson his wife, was married in 
April, 1756, to Baillie Robert Fordyce of Aberdeen, whom she 
survived many years. They had three sons and four daughters. 
She resided for a number of years in Saint David's Street, Edin- 
burgh, with her unmarried daughter, Janet or Jessy Fordyce. 



2l8 



KRID. 



For their joint benefit during life and that of the survivor, her 
brother-in-law, Sir William Fordyce, M.D., left the interest of a 
thousand pounds sterling, to be applied afterwards towards 
founding a Lectureship on Chemistry and Agriculture in Maris- 
chal College, Aberdeen. In the account given in Marshall's 
"Naval Biography" of her grandson, Captain Hew Stewart, R.N. , 
his mother is said to have been the sole surviving descendant of 
John Knox, the Scottish Reformer, who had any issue. 

790. Reid (Catharine Elizabeth Mary). Entry can- 
celled, being same as Catharine Elizabeth Mary Duff (287). 

791. Reid (Hugh) of Sydserff, East Lothian, M.D., born in 
1698, was son of the Rev. Matthew Reid, minister of North 
Berwick, and Ann Atchison his wife. He married Ann Rich- 
ardson, daughter and heir portioner of Richard Richardson of 
Muirfield, East Lothian; had three daughters, Ann Reid or For- 
dyce (789), Janet, who was served heir of provision to her father 
22nd January, 1783, and Margaret, who married Anthony Fer- 
guson of the Customs, Dublin, and died at Bristol Hotwells 29th 
September, 1791. Dr. Reid died at Sydserff, 15th November, 

1773- 

792^ Reid (Lieutenant James, R.N.), married Patience 
Huddart Stewart, elder daughter of William Stewart, Master, 
R.N., and Catharine Dingwall his wife, afterwards Duff of 
Corsindae, Aberdeenshire. Lieutenant Reid died suddenly 17th 
January, 1836, leaving one daughter, and his widow afterwards 
married J. R. Sterrit, Surgeon R.N. 

792'. Reid (Rev. Matthew, A.M.), minister of North Ber- 
wick, was born in 1668. He was second son of the Rev. Mat- 
thew Reid, who died in 1681, and who was minister successively 
of Staplegorton (now Langholm), and of Hoddam in the Presby- 
tery of Annan, and respecting whom the following lines have been 
preserved: 

His name he from St. Matthew took, his skill in physic from St. Luke, 
; One of John the Baptist kind, not wavering with every wind ; 
Ever a tried Nathaniel, he preached, lived, and died well. 

The minister of Hoddam married Margaret Crichton in 1665. 
Their second son, Matthew, was ordained 13th January, 1692 ; 
married 24th February, 1693, -^"^ Atchison, daughter of Rpbert 



RRID — kICHMAN. 



219 



Atchison of SydserfT, East Lothian, and died gth January, 1730. 
He is said to have been a man of (j[ood sense and frank, agree- 
al)le temper, who could talk to j^ood purpose, and was very use- 
ful "in the hounds." He had two sons and one daughter; Hugh 
Reid of SydserfT, M.D. (791), and Matthew, minister of Preston- 
pans, "a shy, retiring, yet earnest-minded man," who was horn 
1707 and died 1770. The daughter, Annie, married the Rev. 
George Murray, her father's colleague and successor at North 
Berwick. The Rev. Dr. Alexander Carlyle of Inveresk, who 
visited them in 1744, ^^Y^ of this lady: " She was as swift to 
speak as her husband was slow, and as he never interrupted her, 
she kept up the conversation, such as it was, without ceasing." 
One of her grandsons was Hugh Murray, F.R.S.E., who died 
in 1843. 

792^. Richardson (Ann), daughter of Richard Richardson 
of Muirfield, East Lothian, was served heir portioner of her 
father 21st December, 1730, and 20th December, 1748. She was 
married to Hugh Reid of SydserfT, East Lothian, M.D., and died 
there 29th October, 1781. They had three daughters, one of 
them Ann Reid or Fordyce (789). 

792*. Richardson (Richard) of Muirfield in- the Parish of 
Dirleton, East Lothian, father of Ann Richardson or Reid (792^). 
[A family of the name owned the property of Pencaitland and 
Smeaton, East Lothian, in the seventeenth century. Sir Robert 
Richardson of Pencaitland, whose father, also Sir Robert, was 
created a Baronet of Nova Scotia, 1630, sold Pencaitland, and 
died without issue in 1640, when the baronetcy devolved on 
his cousin, Sir James Richardson of Smeaton, who died in 1680.] 

793. Richman (Frances), daughter of John Henry Richman, 
latterly of South Australia, and Emily Hampton his wite, was 
married in October, 1861, to Gavin David Young of Adelaide, 
South Australia, whom she survived, residing in England. They 
haa one son and two daughters. . 

794. Richman (John Henry) of Lymington, Hampshire, 
emigrated to South Australia in 1839, where he died. He mar- 
ried Emily Hampton. They had three sons and four daughters, 
one of the latter, Fanny, marrying Gavin David Young of Ade- 



226 



RICHMAN — ROACH. 



laide (946). Of the other three, Emily married George Gooch 
of Victoria, Austraha; Sophia married Sir Walter Hughes, 
discoverer of Wallaroo and Moonta copper mines. South Austra- 
lia ; and Olive married Sir James Ferguson of Kilkerran, Bart., 
Governor successively of South Australia, New Zealand, and 
Bombay. 

795. Ritchie (Alexander) of Forrest, writer and Town 
Clerk of Fraserburgh, was twice married, first to Marion Irvine, 
daughter of Robert Irvine of Fedderate in the Parish of New 
Deer, and secondly to Margaret Ogilvie, daughter of Baillie 
James Ogilvie of Banff and Margaret Greig his wife. His second 
wife was mother of William Ritchie of Techmuiry, merchant and 
one of the Baillies of Aberdeen. 

796. Ritchie (Margaret), only daughter of William Ritchie 
of Techmuiry, Aberdeenshire, and Elspet Mackenzie his wife, 
and eventually heiress of Techmuiry, was born in 1777, and mar- 
ried ist September, 1796, to William Dingwall Fordyce, younger 
of Culsh, advocate in Aberdeen, and through her proprietor of 
Techmuiry. She survived her husband, and died nth August, 
1844. She was a good woman, one who prized religious privi- 
leges. Although belonging to the Church of Scotland, she sat 
for some time with much satisfaction under the ministry of the 
Rev. Dr. John Philip of Cape Town, South Africa, while he had 
a ministerial charge in Aberdeen. She had six sons and three 
daughters. 

797. Ritchie (William), merchant or manufacturer and 
Baillie of Aberdeen, who acquired the estate of Techmuiry, near 
Strichen, Aberdeenshire, was born in 1739. He was son of Alex- 
ander Ritchie of Forrest, Town Clerk of Fraserburgh, and 
Margaret Ogilvie his wife ; married Elspet Mackenzie, daughter 
of Alexander Mackenzie, baker in Aberdeen, and Elizabeth 
Irvine his wife. He died 7th April, 181 5, leaving one daughter, 
Margaret (796). . 

798. Roach (Charlotte), wife of Arthur Dingwall, advocate 
(184), to whom she was married in December, 1854, survived her 
husband, and now resides in London. They had four sons and 
one daughter. 



ROBINSON — SCEALES. 



^21 



799. Robinson (Elizabeth), married 13th July, 1805, to 
Alexander Gordon of Kosiburn, near Banff, at one time a Cap- 
tain in the 60th Rifles, and died 28th July, 1849. They were 
the paicnts of Penelope Garden Campbell Gordon 6r Miller 

(543)- 

8oo^ Robertson (Katharine), a native of Peterhead, where 
she was born in 1761, was married to Gilbert Alexander, ship- 
owner and tanner there, and died in Peterhead 19th July, 1843. 
She was mother of Thomas Alexander of Peterhead (12). 

800'-^. Rose (WiUiam) of Ballivat, at one time residing at 
Mountcoffer, grandfather of Mary Gordon or Dingwall (541), his 
eldest daughter having married William Gordon of Aberdour 
in 1794. 

801. Sceales (Adolphus), merchant in Leith, was born in 
1740, and died in 1824. He was son of Adolphus Sceales, also 
of Leith, and Janet Andreich his wife. He married Janet 
Stewart, daughter of James Stewart of Stewartfield, merchant 
and Baillie of Edinburgh, and his wife, Janet Gardner. She 
had died the year before himself. Besides a daughter, Jessie 
Sceales or Drysdale (802) they had four sons, Adolphus, James, 
Andrew and Stewart, who, with the exception of the first named, 
all left issue. [Adolphus Sceales, the father of the subject of this 
notice, was born in 1715, and died 7th April, 1763. His wife, 
Janet Andreich, was born in 1706, and died 5th May, 1767. The 
remains of both lie in South Leith burying-ground, with those 
of a son Thomas, who was born in 1736, and died 15th May, 
1764. They had besides Adolphus and Thomas, another son 
Andrew. The family is believed to have come from England, 
but when is not known.] 

802. Sceales (Jessie), only daughter of Adolphus Sceales, 
merchant in Leith, and Janet Stewart his wife, was born in 1783, 
and married first, 13th March, 1812, to John Drysdale of View- 
field, Lasswade, Edinburgh, who died in 1817. She was married 
secondly, in 1829, to Major John Gordon, of the 2nd or Queen's 
Royals. They had no children. Of her first marriage there 
were two sons, Alexander (275), and Adolphus Sceales Drys- 
dale of the firm of Lindsay & Co., Canton, who was born 31st 



222 



SCEALES — SHAND. 



March, 1816, and died unmarried at Lasswade, 23rd September, 
1844. A fine full-length portrait in the possession of her surviv- 
ing son represents Mrs. Gordon as a tall, handsome woman, 
with her two boys of ten or twelve years of age. Her death took 
place at her residence in Edinburgh in November, 1852. 

803. Scott (Jean), daughter of. David Scott, one of Oliver 
Cromwell's principal engineers, and Elizabeth Mackenzie his 
wife, was married to Alexander Steuart, merchant in Inverness, 
and was mother of Jean Steuart or Eraser (837). Some addi- 
tional particulars will be found in the Appendix. 

804. Shade (Matilda), daughter of Sebastian Shade ot 
Mobile, Alabama, U.S., and Hannah Hunt his wife, born nth 
July, 1 82 1, was married to Alexander Harvey of Kinnettles, 
near Fergus (555) 15th August, 1839, at which time she resided 
with her uncle Mr. Absalom Shade of Gait, of whom a notice 
will be found in the Appendix. She had three sons and four 
daughters. Her death took place 20th December, 1872. 

805. Shade (Sebastian), a native of Pennsylvania, U.S., 
and latterly a resident of Mobile, Alabama, married Hannah 
Hunt. They were parents of Matilda Shade or Harvey (804)^ 
Another daughter, Mrs. Caroline Shade, resided for a time on 
the Kinnettles property near Eergus, and died there. 

806. Shand (AngeUca Sarah Harvey), eldest daughter of 

David Lister Shand, W.S., and Angelica Manning Harvey his 
wife. 

807. Shand (David Lister, W.S.), son of John Shand of 

Mornefendue, Grenada, W.S., and Isabella Lister his wife, was 
admitted a writer to the Signet in 1869. On the 23rd July, 1873, 
he was married to Angelica Manning Harvey, only surviving 
daughter of John Inglis Harvey of Kinnettles, Eorfarshire, of 
H. E. I. Co.'s Civil Service, and Sarah Avietick his wife. They 
have issue. 

808. Shand (David Lister), second son of David Lister 
Shand, W.S., and Angelica Manning Harvey his wife. 

809. Shand (Isabella Lister), second daughter of David 
Lister Shand, W.S., and Angelica Manning Harvey his wife. 



SHAND — SHIRREFS. 



223 



810. Shand (Rev. James), a native of Aberdeen, born in 
1758, graduated at Marischal College there in 1777, was elected 
to the College or Greyfriaia Church, Aberdeen, in 1787, and 
was ordained in 1791. He was presented to the Parish of Mary- 
kirk in Kincardineshire in 1805, and remained there till his 
death, 5th January, 1837. He was married 15th November, 
1798, to Margaret Farquhar, daughter of Baillie Alexander Far- 
quhar of Kintore, and Mrs. Elizabeth Harvey, formerly Rae, his 
wife. John Shand, W.S. (811), was one of their sons; another, 
Sir Charles Farquhar Shand, Chief Justice of the Mauritius, is 
incidentally noticed (586) ; and another son, George, entered the 
Church of England, and became Rector of Heyden. A daughter 
of the subject of this notice, Jane Shand, was married to the Rev. 
Alexander Wnyte of Fettercairn. 

811. Shand (John) of Mornefendue in the Island of Grenada, 
writer to the Signet, born 6th January, 1801, was son of the Rev. 
James Shand, minister of the Parish of Marykirk, and Margaret 
Farquhar his wife. He married Isabella Lister, daughter of 
David Lister of Kininmonth in Fife, W.S., and grand-daughter 
of James Blyth of Kininmonth, and died 25th October, 1876. 
One of his sons, John Harvey Shand, W.S., died of yellow 
fever in the Island of Grenada, in 1857 ; another, John Andrew 
Shand, Barrister of the Middle Temple, died in 1875 ; another. 
George Octavius, died in 1867, the remaining son bemg David 
Lister Shand, W.S. (807). Of the two daughters of the subject 
of this notice, Janet Margaret and Isabella Helen, the former is 
widow of the Rev. Dr. James Russell, minister of Yarrow, and 
Chaplain to the Lord High Commissioner to the Church of 
Scotland, a well-known and highly esteemed clergyman. 

81 2^ Shand (John Harvey), eldest son of David Lister 
Shand, W.S., and Angelica M. Harvey his wife. 

8i2^ Shand (Margaret Janet Blyth), third daughter of 
David Lister Shand, W.S., and Angelica Manning Harvey his 
wife. 

813. Shirrefs (James, D.D.), one of the ministers of St. 
Nicholas, Aberdeen, was born in the year 1751. His father 
David Shirrefs, builder in Aberdeen, was Convener of the Incor- 



224 SHIRREFS. 

porated Trades there. His mother, Jean Lunan, was a grand- 
daughter of Robert Burnet of Sauchen, and to this relationship 
he was indebted in the year 1766 for presentation to one of the 
Philosophy and Divinity Bursaries in Marischal College, in the 
gift of Sir Thomas Burnet of Leys, Bart., and founded by Dr. 
Gilbert Burnet, Bishop of Salisbury, and author of the " History 
of the Reformation." . There was probably a limitation in the 
bequest, securing a preference to relatives of the founder. Such 
relationship in this case was remote, the presentee's great grand- 
father having been great grandson of an uncle of the founder ; 
but a worthier selection could not have been made. When Dr. 
Shirrefs had been many years in the ministry, an additional 
proof of the relationship being still borne in mind, and of the 
esteem in which he was personally held, was given by Sir 
Thomas Burnett, asking him in the year 1807 to take charge of 
his son William, and superintend his education. Having passed 
through the classical curriculum at Marischal College, he 
obtained the degree of M.A. in 1770 and on 27th March, 1776, 
was licensed to preach the Gospel. In 1778, he was chosen to 
fill one of the parochial charges in Aberdeen, that of the West 
Church Congregation, and in 1795, obtained the degree of D.D. 
from King's College and University. Next year he was appointed 
under the Royal Sign-manual, Chaplain to the Aberdeen Volun- 
teers ; and in 1807 was chosen as Moderator of the General 
Assembly of the Church of Scotland. He resigned his charge 
in the year 1814, but lived till 26th March, 1830. He was highly 
respected for his Christian character and worth by all who 
knew him. He had been married on the 28th September, 1790, 
to Amelia Morison, youngest daughter of James Morison of 
Elsick, formerly Provost of Aberdeen. She died some years 
before her husband. Their two daughters survived, both married. 
Three sons had all been removed by death before rheir parents. 
The eldest, David, a very talented and promising youth of 
eighteen years of age, died on the 15th December, 1809, and for 
relatives and friends, his father published a brief memoir with 
specimens of literary efforts, the Latin dedication to which 
shows how deeply the loss was felt, yet with what Christian 
equanimity it was borne : " Ah ! my son David, dearly loved and 



SHIRREFS. 



225 



deeply mourned lad ! Thine intelligence so great, thy learning 
beyond thy years : thy manners so gentle : thy heart so tender ! 
Never shall I forget thee, yet from my heart would I say ' God's 
will be done'"; or, in the bereaved father's words, so much 
more elegantly expressed as written in Latin : " M. S. Davidis 
Shirrefs, filiorum natu maximi Jacobi, V.D.M., Eccles. Abred. 
Pastoris : Ah ! David ! mi fili, multum deflete ! juvenis caris- 
sime ! ingenio quam praestanti, eruditione pro annis maxima, 
moribus permansuetis ac corde admodum benevolo, praedite ; 
morte, eheu ! quoad nos praematura, abducte ; nunquam tui 
obliviscar, at ex animo tamen dicam, * Fiat voluntas Dei.' " 
Dr. Shirrefs published in 1795 a sermon entitled " The fear of 
God reasonable in itself and beneficial in its consequences," and 
in 1798, " An Inquiry into the Life, Writings and Character of 
the Rev. Dr. William Guild," who had founded an hospital in 
Aberdeen in 1633 for indigent artificers, and had been Patron of 
the Incorporated Trades, as his biographer also was. " The 
Inquiry " was at the same time a vindication of a good, able and 
generous man from the aspersions of a virulent partisan writer. 
Dr. Shirrefs also published an Anniversary Sermon in 182 1. A 
few of the concluding sentences of the first of these publications 
is subjoined : " In the lamentable circumstances of a country 
not far distant we see, dreadfully exemplified, that it is an evil 
thing and bitter, to forsake the Lord. There we behold a 
people, once numbered among the wise and polished of the 
earth, whose reprobate mind disclaims the authority of the 
Supreme Ruler ! We behold that people ruled, or rather 
oppressed and massacred by men, who having no sense of 
religion or virtue themselves, are unwilling that others should 
aspire to so noble a distinction ! We behold them renouncing, 
by a solemn act, the faith of Christians, abandoning those prin- 
ciples which are essential, not to the welfare only, but to the 
very existence of society, surrounded by armies of different 
nations combined against them as common enemies of mankind, 
and exhibited in circumstances of awful warning to all the 
nations of the earth. It is not for us to conjecture how all these 
things may end. But of this we may be certain, that the issue 
will be to the glory of that God Supreme, so wickedly dis- 



226 SHIRREFS — SKENE. 

honoured, and so madly defied. To oppose that dangerous 
spirit of hcentiousness, infidehty and blasphemy, which has 
threatened to extend its destructive and cruel empire, let every 
friend to human happiness exert his best endeavours, ^'^ou (the 
volunteers) have adopted cheerfully those measures which 
appeared most likely to be useful, and you now look up to 
Heaven for success. To proceed thus is to act upon the surest 
grounds ; it is to combine the maxims of Human Prudence with 
those of Religion, and from the union of these two it is, and only 
from this, that we can hope to prosper in any undertaking. 
Vain is that help of man, which would tempt us to forget that 
we depend on God." 

814. Shirrefs (Jane), younger of the two daughters of the 
Rev. Dr. James Shirrefs, minister of St. Nicholas Church, Aber- 
deen, and Amelia Morison his wife, was born 17th December, 
1797, and married 9th August, 1817, to Alexander Cadenhead, 
advocate and Procurator Fiscal of Aberdeen. She died before 
her husband 22nd April, 1832, leaving six sons and two 
daughters, one of the former being Alexander S. Cadenhead of 
Fergus, Ontario (119). 

815. Simpson (Alexander Hugh), married Sarah Halkin. 
They were parents of Helen Norah Simpson or Bruce (816). 

816. Simpson (Helen Norah), daughter of Alexander Hugh 
Simpson and Sarah Halkin his wife, married George Barclay 
Bruce, civil engineer, London. They were parents of Mary 
Bruce or Littlejohn (m). 

817. Skene (Mary), daughter of Dr. Andrew Skene, physi- 
cian in Aberdeen, and Margaret Lumsden his wife, married 
Andrew Thomson of Banchory in Kincardineshire, whom she 
survived, and died ist April, 1800. Her paternal grandfather, 
Andrew Skene, was also a physician in Aberdeen, who married 
Margaret Kirkton, said to have been a great grand-daughter of 
John Knox the Scottish Reformer (a daughter of Knox marrying 
a Mr. Baillie of the Jerviswood Family, and their daughter 
marrying Mr. Kirkton of Edinburgh). As other accounts of the 
family of the Reformer have no notice of a daughter of his 
marrying a Mr. Baillie, Dr. McCrie suggests the possibility of 



SMITH. 



227 



Mr. Baillie having been the second husband of one of the 
daughters. The statement as given is made on the authority of 
the late Alexander Thomson of Banchory (871), the grandson of 
Mary Skene, the subject of this notice — in whose possession the 
Reformer's watch of peculiar construction was — a cherished heir- 
loom. A few additional particulars relating to this branch of 
the Skene family will be found in the Appendix. 

818. Smith (Jane), only daughter of the Rev. James Smith, 
minister of the Parish of Garvock in Kincardineshire, and Mary 
Napier his wife, was born in 1759, and married in 1778, to the 
Rev. Robert Foote, minister of Fettercairn. They had issue, 
one of the sons being the Rev. Dr. Alexander L. R.- Foote of 
Brechin (326). Her death occurred on the 19th December, 1841. 

819. Smith (Rev. James, A.M.), minister of Garvock in 
Kincardineshire, was born in 1702. He graduated at King's 
College, Aberdeen, 7th April, 1727, being then schoolmaster of 
St. Cyrus. He was appointed as assistant and successor to the 
minister of Garvock in 1743, and in January 1746, was carried 
off prisoner by the Jacobite party in arms, and was in attend- 
ance on H.R.H. William Duke of Cumberland. On the uth 
July, 1752, he was married to Mary Napier, daughter of the Rev. 
Archibald Napier, minister of the Parish of Maryculter, and 
Jean White his wife. Besides a son James, who succeeded to 
the charge, a daughter Jean was married to the Rev. Robert 
Foote, minister of Fettercairn. Mr. Smith died 6th November, 
1780. 

820. Smith (Margaret), daughter of Alexander Smith, paper 
manufacturer, Stony wood, Aberdeen, born 1757, married i6th 
March, 1778, Patrick Pirie, merchant in Aberdeen, and died 
1 6th February, 1825. She was mother of Fanny Pirie or 
Davidson (784). 

821. Smith (Rachel), a native of Aberdeen, and sister of 
William and Alexander Smith, merchants, Liverpool, was born 
1770, married James Thom, merchant, Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
afterwards of Aberde^en, and died 5th December, 1845. She was 
mother of Barbara and Sophia Thom or Dingwall Fordyce 
(867, 869). 



228 SMYTH — SPENCE. 

822. Smyth (Maria), eldest daughter of Dr. James Car- 
michael Smyth, a distinguished physician, and Mary Holyland 
his wife, married Dr. Alexander Monro, Tertius, Professor of 
Anatomy, University of Edinburgh (727), and had issue. 

823. Snowie (Jean), wife of William Aberdein, farmer, 
Hillside of Echt, Aberdeenshire, and grandmother of John 
Harvey of Kinnettles (587) ; died at the age of eighty years, and 
was buried at Echt. 

824. Spence (Elizabeth Isabella) was born 12th January, 

1 768, at Dunkeld, Perthshire, Scotland,where her father, Dr. James 
Spence, was then a physician. Her mother, Elizabeth Fordyce, 
who died when she was only nine years of age, was a daughter of 
Provost George Fordyce of Aberdeen and Elizabeth Brown his 
wife. From what is known of her father, it is not probable that he 
had much to leave to his only child ; but some literary ability, and 
the fact of her being a welcome guest for lengthened periods in 
the families of the Countess Dowager of Winterton and the 
widow of Sir Roger Gresley, enabled her to lead the sort of life 
that suited her, and to maintain her independence. She travelled 
occasionally in various parts of the United Kingdom, giving to 
the public afterwards the result of her observations. Her writings 
were voluminous — lively and pleasing, if not characterized by 
much depth. Among them were " The Curate and his Daughter," 
" Nobility of the Heart," " Helen Sinclair," " The Wedding 
Day," and others of a similar description. She also wrote 
" Sketches of the Manners of Scotland," " Letters from the 
North Highlands," " Tales of Welsh Society," and " Summer 
Excursions." She died 27th July, 1832. The following extract 
from her "Caledonian Excursions," written in 1810, may serve 
as a specimen of her style in that species of composition. Having 
r.eached the place of her birth, she wrote on the 21st of August : 
" I had long entertained a wish to visit Dunkeld and find in my 
native place a melancholy pleasure in viewing scenes hitherto 
unknown to me. The village is encircled in lofty hills crowned to 
their summits with dark woods of the myst luxuriant growth, 
sweeping into the pellucid and lovely Tay. In every mind there 
is a local attachment to the place of one's birth. The mingled 



SPENCE. 



229 



association of ideas, the awakened power of early impressions, 

with the unavoidable reflections of the moment, all pressed upon 

my mind as I walked over the ground for the first time, where all 

my father's family during more than a century had lived, highly 

respected and beloved. When I wandered to the pretty white 

house of my venerable grandfather, and entered the paternal 

roof under which I first drew breath, and knew that all those 

in whose bosoms I was fondly cherished have long slept in their 

peaceful graves, then did 

Remembrance wake with all her busy train, 
Swell at my breast, and turn the past to pain : 

yet in this little town I did see a few who met me with ' recol- 
lected love.' " 

825. Spence (Dr. James) of Dunkeld was practising as a 
physician there in 1766 when he was married. He was son of 
William Spence, surgeon. He afterwards removed to Durham, 
where he resided in '1772, but seems afterwards to have chosen 
another field, as the notice of his wife's death in the Aberdeen 
y^ournal of 1777 describes her as wife of Dr. James Spence, 
physician, in Derby. Some of the notices of the daughter 
allude to the father. In one of these it is said that " he was a 
physician by profession, but of more general literary ability 
than medical skill ; so that he lived chiefly the life of a man of 
letters — the star of an elegant circle of taste, learning, and 
genius." He was married on the 15th December, 1766, to 
Elizabeth Fordyce, youngest daughter of Provost George For- 
dyce of Aberdeen and Elizabeth Brown his wife. The date of 
his death we have not learned. He left one daughter, of whom 
a notice precedes this. 

826. Spence (William), surgeon in Dunkeld, who died 
there on the 8th December, 1771, is said, in a notice of his 
grand-daughter in the Annual Biography and Obituary of 1833, 
to have been nearly related to " Classic Spence, the well-known 
author of ' Polymetis.' " As the latter was a native of Hamp- 
shire, it would lead us to conclude that the subject of this notice 
was himself of English origin. As we do not know the name of his 
wife, it may have been that his residence in Dunkeld and connec- 
tion with Scotland were due to his marriage. His grand-daughter, 



230 SPENCE — STAREY. 

Miss E. I. Spence, in her *' Caledonian Excursions," writes from 
Stirling in 1810: " Clackmannan. Tower has been spoken of by 
more than one tourist, not only from its being the property and 
residence of a venerable old lady whose husband was himself 
descended lineally from Robert Bruce, but from containing the 
sword and helmet worn by him at the Battle of Bannockburn." 
" This old lady," Miss Spence adds, *' I well remember. She 
was a near relative of my father, and in the days of my youth I 
spent three weeks in this romantic old castle." Catharine Bruce, 
the lady referred to, the last of the direct line from the hero of 
Bannockburn, died in November, 1790, in her ninety-fifth year. 
The subject of this notice had one son (825) ; of himself we know 
no more than has been stated. 

827. Spittal (Charles Grey), admitted advocate in i860, 
now Sheriff Substitute of Selkirk, son of Sir James Spittal, Kt., 
and Lord Provost of Edinburgh, and Mary Wightman Ker his 
wife, married 25th August, 1864, Rachel Harvey, only daughter 
of William Harvey (609) and Rachel Chambers Hunter his wife, 
and has issue. 

828. Spittal (Charles James), son of Charles Grey Spittal, 
advocate, and Rachel Harvey his wife. 

829. Spittal (Sir James, Kt.), mercer in Edinburgh, and 
Lord Provost from 1833 to 1837, was son of James Spittal and 
Helen Blackwood his wife. He was born in 1769, and was twice 
married. His first wife, Maria Brown, died 28th December, 
1824 5 the second, Mary Wightman Ker (mother of Charles Grey 
Spittal, advocate), was daughter of James Ker and Elizabeth 
Wightman his wife. She survived him, his death taking place 
25th September, 1842. 

830. Spittal (James), father of Sir James Spittal, Kt. (829), 
married Helen Blackwood. 

831. Spittal (Marion Chambers Hunter), daughter of 

Charles Grey Spittal, advocate, etc., and Rachel Harvey his wife. 

832. Starey (John Eric), son of John Helps Starey of 
Colombo, Ceylon, and Grace Katharine Dingwall his wife. 



STAKEY — STEUART. 



231 



833. Starey (John Helps), manager of Ceylon Co. Com- 
pany, Colombo, married 23rcl May, 1882, to Grace Katharine 
Dingwall, eldest daughter of Charles Dingwall, wine merchant 
in London, and Julia Blanche Drew his wife : they have issue. 

834. Sterrit (Joseph Rolleston), Surgeon, R.N., married 
in 1840 Patience Huddart Stewart or Duff, elder daughter of 
WiUiam Stewart, Master, R.N., and Katharine Dingwall or Duff 
his wife, and widow of James Reid, Lieutenant, R.N. 

835. Steuart (Alexander), merchant in Inverness (grand- 
father of Provost Alexander Eraser (460), married Jean Scott, 
daughter of David Scott, said to have been one of Oliver Crom- 
well's chief engineers, and Elizabeth Mackenzie his wife. 

836. Steuart (DaVid), Lord Provost of Edinburgh in 1781 
and 1782, the youngest son of John Steuart of Dalguise in Perth- 
shire, commenced business as a banker in Edinburgh, with Robert 
Allan, Esq., as his partner. He was afterwards in business in Leith 
as a merchant, and latterly as a wine merchant in Edinburgh. 
He was a very handsome man, as shown in a contrasted light in 
Kay's " Portraits." H( had fine literary taste, but was not very 
successful in business. On the 29th March, 1776, he was married 
to Anne Fordyce, eldest daughter of Baillie Robert Fordyce of 
Aberdeen and Anne Reid his wife. They had sixteen children. 
One of their sons, Thomas David, was a Major in the Bengal 
Cavalry. Two others distinguished themselves in the naval ser- 
vice of their country — Hew and James — the latter dying from an 
attack of spasmodic cholera at Calcutta 12th April, 1820, in his 
twenty-seventh year, after twelve hours' illness. He was wounded 
in 1813, was present at the Capture of Naples in 1815, and took 
part in the Battle of Algiers in the following year. Captain Hew 
Stewart was present at the defeat of the Dutch fleet near Cam- 
perdown in 1797, and served in the Venerable and Kent under 
Lord Duncan, and had charge of one of the principal explosive 
vessels attached to the Catamaran Expedition in 1804. He was 
a knight of the Imperial Russian order of St. Wladimir. Provost 
Steuart left Edinburgh in 1815, and resided with a married 
daughter till his death, which occurred at Gretna Hall, near 
Annan, 17th May, 1824. In the latter part of his life he was a 






232 



STKUAKT — STKWAKT. 



great sufferer from f^out. From inability to give a full account 
of his family, it must suffice, in addition to what has already 
been mentioned, to state that there were at least three married 
daughters — Mrs. Mair, Mrs. Anderson, and Mrs. Robertson. Of 
Mrs. Mair it is said (in Kay's " Portraits") that she was remark- 
able for the beauty of her face and the graceful elegance of her 
figure ; but that the sweetness of her manner was still more 
remarkable than either. 

837. Steuart (Jean), daughter of Alexander Steuart, mer- 
chant in Inverness, and Jean Scott his wife, was born 8th Sep- 
tember, 1739, and married to William Fraser, factor on the 
forfeited estates of the Lovat family in Inverness Shire. She 
resided in her widowhood in Aberdeen, and died there on the 
23rd May, 1819. 

838. Steuart (John), of Dalguise in Perthshire, father of 
David Steuart, Lord Provost of Edinburgh (836). 

839. Stewart (Alexander George John), younger of 

Ards, County Donegal. Ireland, married loth April, 1883, Juha 
Blanche, second daughter of Charles Dingwall, wine merchant, 
London, and Julia Blanche Drew his wife. 

840. Stewart (Ann), younger daughter of William Stewart, 
Master in the Royal Navy, and Catharine Dingwall, afterwards 
Duff of Corsindae, his wife (187). 

841. Stewart (Barbara), wife of the Rev. Charles Foote, 
minister of Kinfauns, Perthshire, to whom she may have been 
married about 1740, belonged to one of the old Perthshire 
families of the name, and survived her husband who died in 1758. 
They had a son, Robert, minister of Fettercairn (328). 

842. Stewart (Charles), Conservator of Scotch Privileges 
at Campvere in the Netherlands, to which office he was 
appointed in January, 1761, died in November of same year. 
He had formerly been Deputy-Conservator. We have no infor- 
mation respecting him further than that his daughter, Mrs. 
Weston, was married in 1764 to Dr. George Fordyce of London 
(353) and died in 1805. Some particulars respectmg Campvere 
will be found in the Appendix. 



stf:wart. 



233 



of 



843. Stewart (Janet), danf^'liter of James Stewart of Stew- 
artfield, nier ,ant and Baillie of lulinburgh, and Ann Gardner 
his wife, was horn 2Hth March, 174H. Her father was the oldest 
son of Patrick Stewart of KiUiehassie, in Perthshire, her mother, 
Ann Whitson, heinpf a dauf^hter of Thomas Whitson of Parkhill. 
In Grant's " Old and New Edinburgh," her father's property near 
Edinburgh is referred to : " The mansion house of Stewartfield 
lies westward of Bounington ; the house being a square edifice 
with one enormous chimney rising through a pointed-shaped 
roof. Stewartfield is one of several little properties, some of 
them situated where the Water of Leith winds under wooded 
banks and past little nooks that are almost sylvan still." The 
subject of this notice was married to Adolphus Sceales, merchant 
in Leith, and died in 1823. They had one daughter, Jessie 
Sceales or Drysdale (802). Mrs. Sceales had several brothers 
and sisters; of one, Patrick, who died in 1759, the family Bible 
contains a touching notice by his father, which describes him as 
" one of the most loving and lovely, strapping, virtuous youths 
ever sinful parents had the happiness and pleasure of having for 
a son." He was sixteen years of age and was buried in " Andrew 
Gardner's burying place, New Greyfriars." This Andrew 
Gardner (his grandfather) was a merchant in Edinburgh, who 
in 1727 projected the Orphans' Hospital, which now maintains 
one hundred and twenty boys and girls, giving them " a godly 
upbringing, good education and comfortable home." 

844. Stewart (Patience Huddart), elder daughter of 

William Stewart, Master in the Royal Navy, and Catharine Ding- 
wall his wife, married first James Reid, Lieutenant, Royal Navy ; 
secondly, Joseph R. Sterrit, Surgeon, Royal Navy. She was 
served heiress of entail to her mother in the lands of Corsindae, 
Aberdeenshire ; in 1844 assumed the name and arms of Duff of 
Corsindae, and was succeeded in that property by a daughter of 
her first marriage (790). 

845. Stewart (William), Master in the Royal Navy, who 
is said to have been a Connection of Admiral Duncan's (J. D. 
Tough's " Recollections"), was married (contract dated 23rd Sep- 
tember, 1797) to Catharine Dingwall, daughter of John Ding- 



234 



STFAVART — STIRLING. 



wall, Junior, merchant and Baillie of Aberdeen, and Magdalen 
Duff his wife. She survived him and succeeded to the estate of 
Corsindae. They had two daughters. 



846. Stewart (- 



-), daughter of Charles Stewart, Con- 



servator of Scots Privileges at Campvere in the Netherlands, 
was born in 1727. After the death of her first husband (whose 
name was Weston), she was married 14th March, 1764, to Dr. 
George Fordyce of London (353). They had two daughters. She 
survived her husband, and died at Chelsea gth November, 1805. 

847. Stuart (Andrew George) of Inchbreck, Kincardine- 
shire, M.D. and F.R.S.E., was born in 1793, and was the eldest 
son of John Stuart of Inchbreck, Professor of Greek in Marischal 
College, Aberdeen, and Margaret Mowat his wife. He was 
married ist August, 1834, to Jane Dingwall, ninth daughter of 
Alexander Dingwall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his 
wife. They had no family. He died i6th June, 1844, and in 
1845 his widow was married to Charles Thomson, merchant, 
Liverpool, her cousin-german. 

848. Stuart (Elizabeth), who had been married to a Mr. 
Evans, became the wife of Arthur Dingwall of Rannieston, 
merchant in New York, and afterwards of St. John, New Bruns- 
wick. They had no family. 

849. Stuart (Marjorie) was married, first (in 1736 most 
probably, as her only child was born 8th November of that year) 
to George Fordyce of Broadford, merchant in Aberdeen. There 
is reason to believe that she was married in 1738 to Thomas 
Wilson, advocate, Aberdeen, when her child (afterwards Dr. 
George Fordyce) was taken from her care. At the baptism of a 
brother of her first husband, Robert Stuart of Bridgefoord, 
Provost of Aberdeen, was a witness. He may possibly have 
been a relative but nothing is actually known. 

850. Stirling (Alexander Garthshore) of Craigbarnet, in 
the County of Stirling, was oon of James Garthshore of Alderston 
and Charlotte Stirling his wife, and succeeded his uncle, John 
Stirling of Craigbarnet, in that property. His maternal grand- 
father, James Stirling of Craigbarnet, who was engaged in the 



STlKr.lNG - TARVRT. 






1745 Rebellion, and was one of those a/:(ainst whom true bills 
were found for participation in it, was married to Catharine 
Monteith. She was a grand-daughter of Sir Thomas Dalyell of 
Binns, who was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia in 1685, and 
who was the only son of the persecuting cavalier officer, General 
Tom Dalyell of Binns. The subject of this notice was married 
24th February, 1806, to Anne Miller, only child of James Miller, 
formerly of Jamaica and Elizabeth Fordyce his wife. They had 
no family. 

851. Syme (Rev. Walter), minister of the Parish of Tully- 
nessle, was a native of Banff, where he was born in 1692. He 
took his degree at King's College, Aberdeen, 6th May, 1712, and 
became school master of Alford 20th August, 1717. He was 
called to Tullynessle 13th December, 1721, and married 3rd 
August, 1722, to Elizabeth Gordon his first wife. The name of 
the second, to whom he was married 29th May, 1746, was 
Barbara Calder. One or other of these, we cannot say which, 
was mother of his family. Probably it was the first. His death 
took place 27th July, 1758. Scott in " Fasti Ecclesia^ Scotti- 
canae " says he possessed good talents. He was father of the 
Rev. Dr. James Syme, minister of Alloa, who married a sister of 
Dr. Robertson, the historian, and had a daughter, an only child, 
who was mother of the well-known and able Henry Lord 
Brougham and Vaux, Lord Chancellor of England. The minister 
of Tullynessle had a second son, William, and three daughters, 
one of whom, Mary, became the second wife of John Dingwall of 
Rannieston (218), while another, Isabella, who married the Rev. 
James Forsyth, minister of Belhelvie, was mother of the 
Rev. Alexander J. Forsyth, also minister of that parish, and 
inventor of the percussion lock. 

852. Syme (Mary), daughter of the Rev. Walter Syme, 
minister of Tullynessle, was married 15th June, 1786, to John 
Dingwall of Rannieston, Baillie of Aberdeen. They had no 
family. Her death occurred in November, 1802. 

853. Tarvet (Margaret), wife cf John Dymock, Cartland, 
Lanarkshire, and mother of John Dymock, LL.D., Rector of the 
High School, Glasgow (No. 303). 



236 TAYLOR. 

854. Taylor (Anna), third wife of John Dingwall of Ran- 
nieston and Ardo, Provost of Aberdeen, survived her husband. 
They had no family. 

855- Taylor (Arthur Saunders), of the 8ist and 94th 
Regiments of Foot, father of Joseph Henry Taylor (860) and 
grandfather of Ellen Maria Taylor or Littlejohn (857). 

856. Taylor (Elizabeth Barbara), wife of John Philip of 
the Parish of Clatt, Aberdeenshire, and mother of John Philip, 
bookbinder, Aberdeen (778). . . 

857. Taylor (Ellen Maria), daughter of Joseph Henry 
Taylor o jroigue, County Tipperary, born in 1841, i6th Decem- 
ber ; married i6th October, 1867, David Littlejohn, now Sheriff 
Clerk of Aberdeenshire, and died 15th August, 1869, leaving 
two children. 

858. Taylor (Jane), wife of John Bramwell and maternal 
grandmother of John Bramwell, bank manager, Australia, 
etc. (100). 

859. Taylor (John), shipbuilder in Peterhead, married 
(contract dated ist May, 1753) Magdalen Dingwall, second and 
twin daughter of Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill and Sarah 
Murray his first wife. She survived him, and married again. 
They had no family. The Aberdeen journal of 1756 states 
that on the 6th of October, at a wreck near Peterhead, various 
things were saved " by the vigilance of John Taylor, shipbuilder, 
Admiral Substitute." He must have died before 25th January, 
1757, as his property in Peterhead was advertised then to be 
exposed to public roup on 25th April thereafter, consisting of 
the houses and gardens in Keith Inch possessed by his widow, 
and his houses and gardens in the Broadgate of Peterhead, 
besides household furniture and wood fit for shipbuilding. He 
is understood to have been not only a substantial, thriving man 
in his business, and much respected in it, but to have been an 
affectionate, kind-hearted husband. 

860. Taylor (Joseph Henry) of Groigue, County Tipperary, 
Ireland, and sometime of the 9th Regiment of Foot, father of 
Ellen Maria Taylor or Littlejohn (857). 



TEMPLETON — THADEN. 



237 



861. Templeton (- 



-) of the H. E. I. Co.'s Civil Service, 



married Margaret Hopper, widow of Lieutenant and Adjutant 
Thomas Dingwall Fordyce, Bengal Artillery (449). 

862. Tennant (Margaret), daughter of Smart Tennant, 
Provost of Musselburgh, married John Turing, merchant in 
Middleburgh, Holland, and was mother of John Robert Turing 
of Rotterdam (901). 

863. Tennant (Mary), daughter of Timothy Tennant of 
Wapping, Middlesex, married Joseph Curtis of Saint John's, 
Wapping, and was mother of Alderman Sir William Curtis, 
Bart., and of Mary Curtis or Yates (150). 

864. Tennant (Smart), Provost of Musselburgh, father of 
Margaret Tennant or Turing (862). A few particulars are sub- 
joined respecting Musselburgh and its social condition as they 
appeared to a contemporary, as nothing further has been learned 
regarding Provost Tennant or his family than is given above. Dr. 
Alexander Carlyle, the noted minister of Inveresk, the parish in 
which Musselburgh is situated, a charge which he held from 
1748 to 1805, was a shrewd observer of men and things as they 
appeared to him. Speaking of Musselburgh when he was placed 
over the congregatfon there he says : — " The magistrates and 
town council were less respectable than they had been, for the 
Whigs in 1745 had turned out the Jacobites, who were more 
gentleman-like than their successors. The new magistrates 
were of very low manners and habits, but good Whigs and Pres- 
byterians. All of the burghers except two of the old magistrates. 
Smart and Vernon, still preserved the old custom at their family 
feasts of making the company pay for their drink. There were 
few or no shops in the town, and but one in each of the streets of 
Musselburgh and Fisherrow where even a pound of sugar could 
be bought, and that always one penny dearer than at Edinburgh, 
so that they had very little sale at a time when a woman would 
have run to Edinburgh with her basket and brought half a 
hundred-weight for a groat, which did not rise to above sixpence 
till after 1760." 

865. Thaden (Bernard A.ntoine Louis), merchant in 
Rotterdam, father of Mary Johanna Thaden or Eraser (866). 



238 THADRN — THOMSON. 

866. Thaden (Mary Johanna), daught»^r of Bernard 
Antoine Louis Thaden, merchant, Rotterdam, (narried 7th May, 
1856, Alexander Caspar Fraser, merchant in Rotterdam, now 
residing in London. They have issue. 

867. Thorn (Barbara), daughter of James Thom, merchant, 
HaHfax, Nova Scotia, latterly residing in Aberdeen, and Rachel 
Smith his wife, born 28th January, 1812, married 14th July, 1835, 
Lieutenant, afterwards Captain, Alexander Dingwall Fordyce 
(of Brucklay) R.N., and died 12th May, 1863. They had four 
sons and four daughters. 

868^ Thorn (James), merchant in Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
afterwards residing in Albyn Place, Aberdeen, born in 1763, in 
the Parish of Belhelvie, married Rachel Smith, and died in 1834. 
Two daughters are noticed (867, 869) ; another married Wm. C. 
Hunter of Tillery, and another Mr. Hutchison of Peterhead. 
Besides these there v/ere two sons who married and left issue. 

868^ Thorn ,(John), farmer in the parish of Belhelvie, Aber- 
deenshire, father of James Thom of Halifax (868*), had at least 
two sons. His widow removed to Aberdeen for their education. 
The elder of these, Alexander, born in 1758, was for a long time 
Master of Gordon's Hospital, Aberdeen. He had graduated at 
Marischal College in 1779, and at the time of his death, nth 
July, 1843, was minister of the Parish of Nigg, near Aberdeen, 
having acted as assistant to the Rev. Dr. Cruden from 1826. 
He was married ist May, 1827, to Mary Bryce, daughter of the 
Rev. John Bryce, South Parish of Aberdeen, and great grand- 
daughter of the Rev. John Bisset, who is particularly noticed in 
the Appendix. They had no family. 

869. Thom (Sophia), daughter of James Thom, merchant, 
Halifax, and Rachel Smith his wife, married 27th October, 1836, 
George Dingwall Fordyce, advocate, afterwards Sheriff of Ross, 
Cromarty and Sutherland. She survived her husband, and died 
1 2th November, 1884. They had no family. 

870. Thomson (Alexander), eldest son of George Thomson 
of Fairley, and Agnes Dingwall his wife, born in 1795. 

871. Thomson (Alexander), of Banchory and Rainnieshill, 
Aberdeenshire, advocate, was born on the 21st of June, 1798. 



THOMSON. 



239 



1798. 



He was the only child of Andrew Thomson of Banchory and 
Helen Hamilton his wife, and through his paternal grandmother 
Mary Skene, traced his descent from the great Scottish Reformer, 
John Knox, whose spirit animated him. His life was spent in 
works of faith and labours of love, in endeavours to remove 
abuses, and to ameliorate the condition of the sad and suffering. 
He lost his father when he was only eight years of age ; but in 
his mother and grandfather, Dr. Robert Hamilton of Marischal 
College, Aberdeen, he had wise and faithful guardians. His 
studies were pursued at Marischal College and at the University 
of Edinburgh. He studied law, passed the Bar, but never prac- 
tised. The following remarks were made m his diary on his 
coming of age : " The character, which, of all others, I hope 
and trust by God's grace to maintain through good report and 
bad report, is that of a humble but sincere Christian, not chur- 
lishly refusing to enjoy the good things of the world in order to 
gain a character for sanctity from men, but never overstepping 
the strict bounds of propriety prescribed by God; nor ever join- 
ing in one sinful or even disapproved folly, because it is in 
fashion, doing my duty as far as in me lies to all around me, 
especially to those placed under me ; allotting my income so as 
to be always able to assist my tenants in hard times, securing a 
due share to the wants of the poor." By judicious management 
the estate of Banchory, during his lifetime, doubled its value. 
Having no children to provide for, he had the more ability to 
assist others during life, and more to leave to philanthropic 
objects at his death. His attention was early given to reclaim- 
ing waste lands by settlement of crofters, and everything con- 
nected with agricultural improvement was of interest to him, 
and thoughtfully considered. Various important social ques- 
tions occupied much of his time and efforts almost to the last : 
Criminal Law, Penal Servitude, Prison Discipline, Juvenile 
Delinquency and ^dustrial Schools — while Education and 
Church Extension found in him at all times a warm friend. He 
did not all at once fall in with the Free Church movement ; but 
after much and serious thought, examination and correspondence 
he felt it to be his duty to do so, and no less than £"30,000 
was devoted at his death to the endowment of the Divinity 



240 THOMSON. 

Hall in the Free Church College, Aberdeen. By length- 
ened visits to the Continent he not only enriched his own mind, 
but added to the valuable stores in the museum at Banchory 
House. He took a lively interest in the state of the struggling 
Protestant churches abroad, and gained a deeper insight into 
the evils resulting from a corrupt system of religious belief. His 
biographer, Dr. Smeaton, records two special instances of his 
being gladdened by the results of an ever-prevailing desire to 
render others happy, or in some way to contribute to their infor- 
mation, advantage or pleasure. One of these vas after the Dis- 
ruption, when Dr. Chalmers preached to an audience of five 
thousand on the lawn at Banchory House ; another, when 
H.R.H. the Prince Consort graciously accepted of the offer of 
Banchory House for the accommodation of himself and suite 
while he was presiding at a meeting of the Social Science Asso- 
ciation at Aberdeen in 1859. Every year thereafter during .his 
own and Mrs. Thomson's life, who was presented with a gold 
bracelet besides, some token was received of Her Majesty's 
appreciation of what was done then for His Royal Highness's 
comfort and enjoyment. Mr. Thomson was a Deputy- Lieuten- 
ant of Aberdeenshire and Convener of the County for several 
years, being also for several years Dean of Faculty of Marischal 
College. He was an enthusiastic advocate for its union with 
King's College in one University, and this he saw happily accom- 
plished. On the 14th February, 1825, he was married to Jessy 
Fraser, eldest daughter of Alexander Fraser, merchant and 
Provost of Aberdeen, who survived him, and on his own death 
which took place on the 20th of May, 1868, the handsome Eliza- 
bethan mansion which he had erected at Banchory, passed with 
the property into the hands of strangers. His health had been 
declining for some years previous to his death. He was pos- 
sessed of much and varied information. He was a considerate 
landlord, a kind master, an active and useful county gentleman, 
and a warm friend. His character is summed up by Dr. Smea- 
ton in the words of Dr. Duff, the eminent missionary : "Of Mr. 
Thomson it might be said as of one of the worthies of a bygone 
generation, that he was 'even made up of light and love.' "Such 
was the clearness and simplicity of his spirit, his constant 



THOMSON. 



241 



uprightness and integrity, so little clouded by an evil conscience, 
and indeed little even clouded by melancholy fumes, that he 
seemed to live in the constant sense of God's favour and accept- 
ance, and had nothing to do, but to serve Him with his might." 

872. Thomson (Andrew) of Banchory in Kincardineshire, 
son of Andrew Thomson of Banchory and Mary Skene his wife, 
was born in 1773, and married 17th May, 1797, to Helen Hamil- 
ton, eldest daughter of Dr. Robert Hamilton, Professor of 
Mathematics in Marischal College, Aberdeen, and Anne Mitchell 
his wife. He left her a widow early with a son, who succeeded 
to Banchory. 

873. Thomson (Andrew) of Banchory in Kincardineshire, 
was born in 1750, married Mary Skene, daughter of Dr. Andrew 
Skene, physician in Aberdeen, and Margaret Lumsden his wife, 
and died 21st October, 1781, leaving a son who succeeded him 
in the property. 

874. Thomson (Anna), daughter of George Thomson of 
Fairley and Agnes Dingwall his wife, born in 1798 ; died in 
infancy. 

875. Thomson (Anna), daughter of George Thomson of 
Fairley and Agnes Dingwall his wife, born in 1802, married 
George Taylor of DubHn, Ireland, and died before March, 1840, 
leaving issue. 

876. Thomson (Barbara), wife of George Fordyce in 
Haughs of Ashogle, in the Parish of Turriff, was buried in Tur- 
riff Churchyard by the side of her husband, 9th January, 1695. 
He had died in 1681, and it may be supposed as suggested in the 
notice of her son. Provost George Fordyce, that during her 
widowhood the family continued to occupy the farm her husband 
had held. No more is known, however, respecting her than the 
gravestone records, and which is given above. In the Appendix 
will be found notices of some families of the name of Thomson, 
with one or other of which she may have been connected, some 
of these being in the Parish of Turriff, where in the year 1698 
(when the Poll Tax Book was prepared) John Thomson was the 
nameiof the occupant of Mill of Ashogle, not however known to 
have been a relative. 



242 



THOMSON — TOASCH. 



877. Thomson (Charles), son of George Thomson of Fair- 
ley, Aberdeenshire, and Agnes Dingwall his wife, born in 1807, 
merchant in Liverpool, married in July, 1845, Jane Dingwall 
his cousin, ninth daughter of Alexander Dingwall of Rannieston 
and Janet Abercrombie his wife, and widow of Andrew George 
Stuart of Inchbreck, Kincardineshire, M.D. They had issue. 

878. Thomson (George) of Fairley, Aberdeenshire, mer- 
chant in Aberdeen, and at one time Captain in the Merchant 
Service, was married i6th July, 1794, to Agnes Dingwall, fourth 
daughter of John Dingwall of Rannieston and Mary Lumsden 
his wife. They had issue. 

879. Thomson (George) of Fairley, son of George Thomson 
of Fairley and Agnes Dingwall his wife, residing latterly in Dublin , 
Ireland, rose to the rank of Colonel in the Service of the H. E. I. 
Co., and received the distinction of C.B., having specially 
acquired honour in connection with services rendered in blowing 
up the {^ es of Ghazee. He was married 4th February, 1830, to 
his cousin, Anna Dingwall, eighth daughter of Alexander Ding- 
wall of Rannieston and Janet Abercrombie his wife. They had 
issue. 

880. Thomson (James), born in 1805, son of George 
Thomson of Fairley and Agnes Dingwall his wife. 

881. Thomson (John), son of George Thomson of Fairley 
and Agnes Dingwall his wife, born in 1801, a Captain in the 
Bengal Engineers in 1842. 

882. Thomson (John), son of George Thomson of Fairley 
and Agnes Dingwall his wife, born in 1797 ; died young. 

883. Thomson (Mary), daughter of George Thomson of 
Fairley and Agnes Dingwall his wife, born in 1796. 

884. Thomson (WilHam), son of George Thomson of Fair- 
ley and Agnes Dingwall his wife, born in 1804. 

885. Toasch (Margaret), daughter of Rev. Alexander 
Toasch, minister of Tarland, and Margaret Gordon his wife, 
was married 30th October, 1723, to the Rev. Robert Abercrom- 
bie, minister of Leslie, and was mother of Provost John Aber- 
crombie (2). She died in September, 1751. 



TOFF — TURING. 



243 



886. Topp (John) of the Parish of Bourtie, Aberdeenshire, 
married Jane Dickson. They were parents of Rachel Topp, who 
married Adam White (912). 

887^ Topp (Rachel), daughter of John Topp and Jane 
Dickson his wife, was a native of the Parish of Bourtie, and 
married Adam White, merchant, Aberdeen (912). 

887"^ Touch (Ann), married John Bower, master of the 
English School, Aberdeen, and was mother of the Rev. John 
Bower, minister of Maryculter (93''). 

888. Towslee (Julia A.), daughter of Samuel Towslee of the 
State of Vermont and Sybil Baker his wife, born in Rutland, 
Vermont, 28th February, 181 7, married 12th May, 1846, Samuel 
Francis, latterly of Wisconsin, U.S., whom she survived, and 
died at Chicago, lUinois, 24th February, 1883. She was mother 
of Anna Maria Francis or Harvey (456). 

88g. Towslee (Samuel), born in Dorset in the State of 
Vermont, U.S., 25th February, 1782, married Sybil Baker of the 
same State, 3rd December, 1807, and died 28th December, 1856, 
at Lyons in the State of Wisconsin. They were parents of Julia 
A. Towslee or Francis (888). 

890. Turing (Agnes Margaret), only daughter of John 
Robert Turing, merchant, Rotterdam, and Jean Steuart Fraser 
his wife, now residing at Crieff, Perthshire, Scotland. 

891. Turing (Agnes Mary), third daughter of the Rev. 
John Robert Turing and Fanny Montague Boyd his wife, born 
5th January, 1867 ; died next day. 

892. Turing (Alexander Robert), fifth son of Rev. John 
Robert Turing, Vicar of Edwinstowe, Notts, England, and Fanny 
Montague Boyd his wife. 

893. Turing (ArthU' Henry), second son of Rev. John 
Robert Turing, Vicar of Edwinstowe, and Fanny Montague 
Boyd his wife. 

894. Turing (Charlotte Jessy), second daughter of Rev. 
John Robert Turing, Vicar of Edwinstowe, and Fanny Montague 
Boyd his wife. 



244 



TURING. 



895. Turing (Fanny Jane), eldest daughter of the Rev. 
John Robert Turing, Vicar of Edwinstowe, and Fanny Montague 
Boyd his wife. 

896. Turing (Harvey Doria), fourth son of Rev. John 
Robert Turing, Vicar of Edwinstowe, and Fanny Montague Boyd 
his wife. 

897. Turing (Helen Margaret), fourth daughter of Rev. 
John Robert Turing, Vicar of Edwinstowe, and Fanny Montague 
Boyd his wife. 

898. Turing (James), son of the Rev. Waher Turing, min- 
ister of Rayne, Aberdeenshire, and Ann Ogilvie his wife, was 
born in 1714. He was a merchant in Holland, factor of the 
Scotch Staple Port of Middleburgh, where he died 19th Decem- 
ber, 1788. His son, John, is the subject of another notice. In 
the Appendix some particulars will be found regarding this family 
and the Turings of Foveran represented by them. 

899. Turing (John), merchant at Middleburgh in Zealand, 
son of James Turing, also merchant there (898), married Mar- 
garet Tennant, daughter of Smart Tennant, Provost of Mussel- 
burgh, and died in London 5th July, 1798. They had issue. 

900. Turing (John Henry), eldest son of Rev. John Robert 
Turing, Vicar of Edwinstowe, and Fanny Montague Boyd his 
wife, was born 30th November, 1863, and died 22nd January, 
1864. 

901. Turing (John Robert), merchant in Rotterdam, and 
afterwards in Batavia (Java), son of John Turing, merchant in 
Middleburgh, and Margaret Tennant his wife, married 22nd 
January, 1822, Jean Steuart Eraser, daughter of Alexander 
Eraser, merchant and Provost of Aberdeen, and Agnes Dingwall 
Fordyce his wife. He died in 1826 or 1827, leaving two children. 

902. Turi.-lg (Rev. John Robert), Vicar of Edwinstowe, 
Notts, England, only son ot John Robert Turing, merchant in 
the Island of Java and also in Rotterdam, and Jean Steuart 
Eraser his wife, was married 24th September, 1861, to Fanny 
Montague Boyd, daughter of General Mossom Boyd, H. E. I. 
Co.'s Service. They have issue. The elder brother of his father, 



^v 



TURING — VAN CITTERS. 



245 



a merchant in Rotterdam, succeeded to the representation of 
the family and to the Baronetcy as Sir James Henry Turing of 
Foveran. 

903. Turing (Julius Mathison), third son of the Rev. John 
Robert Turing, Vicar of Edwin^towe, and Fanny Montague Boyd 
his wife. 

904'. Turing (Sybil Montague), fifth daughter of the Rev. 
John Robert Turing, Vicar of Edwinstowe, and Fanny Montague 
Boyd his wife. 

904^ Urquhrt (Margaret), daughter of Sir Thomas Urqu- 
hart of Cromarty, was infeft in the lands of Altrie, and also in 
the lands of Aucheoch, Brucklay, etc., 25th x\pril, 1635, and on 
the same day John Irvine of Brucklay was infeft in the lands of 
Over and Nether Altries. The natural presumption is that Mar- 
garet Urquhart was the wife of John Irvine and this the date of 
their marriage, especially as the name of his second wife is 
known, but not otherwise of the first, while he is known to have 
had two daughters by a former marriage, one of whom was 
Lucretia Irvine or Dingwall (640). 

904^ Urquhart (Sir Thomas) of Cromarty, was the f.ither 
of Margaret Urquhart who, from facts stated (904^), is believed 
to have been married to John Irvine of Brucklay, but whether 
this Sir Thomas was the eccentric yet able writer and devoted 
loyalist, means of ascertaining have not been within reach. 

905. VanOitters (Julia Hermina), only daughter of J. F. 
W. VanCitters, Chief Superintendent of the Netherlands Trade in 
Japan, married 25th December, 1849, Alexander Eraser, mer- 
chant, Java (461), now residing in London. They had no family. 
She died i6th February, 1879. 

906. Van Citters (J. F. W.), Chief Superintendent of the 
Netherlands Trade in Japan, father of Julia Hermina Van 
Citters or Eraser (905) was the last lineal descendant of Arnout 
Van Citters, Ambassador to the Court of England, and after- 
wards to that of Spain, who was born at Middleburg loth 
December, 1633, died at Madrid 12th October, 1696, and was 
buried at Middlebv •, 17th January, 1698. 



246 



WAIT — WHITK. 



907. Wait ( ), wife of Joseph Bentley of Sell)y, in York- 
shire, England, and grandmother of Professor Bentley of King's 
College, Aberdeen (52). 

908. Walker (Isobell), first wife of Provost George For- 
dyce, Aberdeen, to whom she had been married between 1680 
and 1690, was in life in 1698, when her husband was in business 
at Mill of Bruxie, in the Parish of Old Deer. Shj died 24th 
March, 1705, and was buried in St. Nicholas Churchyard, 
Aberdeen. It is not known who her parentr. were, but at the 
baptisms of five of her grand-children between 1704 and 1708, 
and of the two elder children of her husband's second marriage 
in 1708 and 1709, George Walker Goldsmith and Silversmith 
was a witness. She had five children who will be found specified 
in this Record, with the descendants so far as ascertained of the 
three who were married, Agnes, Barbara, and Isobell. 

909. Walker (Ruth), wife of Richard Powell (786) and 
maternal grandmother of Professor Bentley of King's College, 
Aberdeen. 

910. Watt (Agnes), daughter oi a farmer at Pennan, in the 
Parish of Gamrie, Banffshire, born in 1777, married John Mackie, 
farmer at Old Town of Coynach, Old Deer, and died at Peter- 
head, 1 6th February, i860, maternal grandmother of James 
Alexander (10). 

911. Weston ( ), married a daughter of Charles Stewart, 

Conservator of Scotch Privileges at Campvere, Holland. She 
was afterwards married to Dr. George Fordyce of London. 
Nothing is known of her first husband but his surname. 

912. White (Adam), merchant in Aberdeen, married Rachel 
Topp, daughter of John Topp and Jane Dickson of the Parish 
of Bourtie, Aberdeenshire. Besides the Rev. Adam White (913) 
another son, John Forbes White, is a merchant in Aberdeen, 
and in 1883 was a member of the University Court. 

913. White (Rev. Adam) of the Free Church of Scotland, 
son of Adam White, merchant, Aberdeen, and Rachel Topp his 
wife, was born 19th May, 1829. He became a missionary from 
the Free Church to India, and spent eight years there ; stationed 



WHITE — WILLIAMSON. 



247 



Lachel 
'arish 

(913) 
rdeen, 

Itland, 

5p his 

from 

tioned 



at Bombay and Nagpoor, and latterly at Poorindhiir, near which 
place he died, i6th May, 1864. He was married 5th December, 
^^55y to Jane Littlejohn, second daughter of William Littlejohn, 
bank manager, Aberdeen, and Janet Bentley his wife. They 
had four sons and one daughter, who all with their mother 
survive. 

914. White (Adam George), eldest son of the Rev. Adam 
White, missionary to India, and Jane Littlejohn his wife, 
engineer, Chicago, Illinois, U.S. 

915- White (Jessy Bentley), Edinburgh, only daughter 
of the Rev. Adam White, missionary to India, and Jane Little- 
john his wife. 

916. White (John P. Robertson), third son of the Rev. 
Adam White, missionary to India, and Jane Littlejohn his wife, 
studying law in Edinburgh, 1883. 

917. White (Philip Jacob), student of medicine in 1883, 
fourth son of Rev. Adam White, missionary to India, and Jane 
Littlejohn his wife. 

918. White (William Ebenezer), studying at Cambridge, 
second son of Rev. Adam White, missionary to India, and Jane 
Littlejohn his wife. 

919. Wiggen (Elizabeth Eleonora), born 7th November, 
1807, daughter of William Wiggen, — first wife of John Inghs 
Harvey of Kinnettles, Forfarshire, H. E. I. Co.'s Service. They 
had no family. She died at Chittagong, Bengal, 21st February, 
1832, and by her husband's desire her remains were taken to 
Scotland, and interred at Kinnettles. 

920. Wiggen (WiUiam), father of Elizabeth Eleanora Wig- 
gens or Harvey (919). 

921. Wightman (Elizabeth), wife of James Ker, and 
mother of Mary Wightman Ker or Spittal (650). 

922^ Williamson (Albany Gibson), fourth son of the Rev. 
H. Mcllree Williamson, now of Belfast, Ireland, and Jessy 
Maria Gibson his wife. 



248 



WILLIAMSON — WILLOX. 



922-. Williamson (Arthur Christian), fifth son of the 
Rev. H. Ivicllree Williamson, now of Belfast, Ireland, and Jessy 
Maria Gibson his wife. 

923. Williamson (Barbara), eldest daughter of the Rev. 
H. Mcllree Williamson of Belfast, Ireland, and Jessy Maria 
Gibson his wife. 

924. Williamson (Charles Frederick), eldest son of Rev. 
H. Mcllree Williamson of Belfast, Ireland, and Jessy Maria 
Gibson his wife. 

925. Williamson (David Brainerd), second son of the 
Rev. H. Mcllree Williamson of Belfast, Ireland, and Jessy 
Maria Gibson his wife. 

926. Williamson (Grace), second daughter of the Rev. H. 
Mcllree Williamson of Belfast, Ireland, and Jessy Maria Gibson 
his wife. 

927. Williamson (Fanny), fourth daughter of the Rev. H. 
Mcllree Williamson of Belfast, Ireland, and Jessy Maria Gibson 
his wife, born 2nd April, 1878 ; died 27th May same year. 

928. Williamson (Rev. H. Mcllree), minister of the Pres- 
byterian Church of Ireland in Belfast, formerly of the Free 
Church of Scotland, Huntly, Aberdeenshire, married 31st 
January, 1866, Jessy Maria Gibson, elder daughter of Major 
Charles Frederick Gibson, and Barbara Fraser his wife. They 
have issue. . 

929. Williamson (Jessy Maria), third daughter of Rev. 

H. Mcllree Williamson of Belfast, Ireland, and Jessy Maria 
Gibson his wife. 

930- Williamson (John Fraser), third son of Rev. H. 
Mcllree Williamson of Belfast, Ireland, and Jessy Maria Gibson 
his wife. ' 

931. Willox (George), merchant and Baillie of Old Aber- 
deen, father-in-law of Provost John Dingwall of Rannieston 
(221) ; died 27th December, 1795. It is probable that his wife's 
naniv. was Rachel Aberdein, the reason for the supposition will 
be found in the Appendix. 



VVILLOX — WILSON. 



249 



932. WiUox ( ), daughter of Baillie George Willox of 

Old Aberdeen, was married first to Captain Pringle, and after- 
wards to Provost John Dingwall of Rannieston and Ardo. She 
died at Aberdeen 31st May, 1789, without issue of second 
marriage. 

933- Wilson (Elev. Alexander), son of Rev. James Wilson, 
minister of Gamrie, and Elizabeth Mercer his wife, is said in 
Scott's " Ecclesiae Scoticanae Fasti " to have studied and taken 
his degree at the University of St. Andrew's in 1770. He was 
called to the pastoral charge of the congregation at Campvere in 
Holland, and admitted there 7th November, 1784. He was 
married in Aberdeen, 17th August, 1785, to Sarah French, 
elder daughter of John French, advocate in Aberdeen, and 
Christian Blackwell his wife. He died at Campvere 3rd May, 
1789, " much regretted," as mentioned in the Aberdeen journal 
of the time, his wife surviving him with one child, Sarah Chris- 
tina Wilson or Bower (No. 937). [Campvere was established in 
1528, as the only staple port in the United Provinces for the 
whole of Scotland, and for many years a minister of the Church 
of Scotland was stationed there.] 

934^ Wilson (Andrew), for someti'ne at Macclesfield, then 
merchant in Leith, and agent there for the Edinburgh and 
Glasgow Bank, was son of John Wilson, merchant in Leith, and 
Helen Drysdale his wife. He was born in 1804, and died 17th 
February, 1882. He was married, first, to Margaret Kinnaird, 
d. ighter of Colonel Kinnaird. She died in 1843 without surviv- 
in issue. He married, secondly, Jessie B. Boyd, daughter of 
Adam Boyd, latterly of Cherrytrees, near Kelso, and Jessie 
Brunton his wife. Tney were parents of Jessie B. Wilson 
or Dymock (935). 

934''. Wilson (Rev. James), a native of Huntly, Aberdeen- 
shire, was born in 1694, studied medicine at Leyden, and was a 
pupil of the celebrated Boerhaave. He was settled as minister 
of the Parish of Gamrie in 1732, and died much respected, 7th 
August, 1 791. He married Elizabeth Mercer, daughter of Mr. 
John Mercer, minister of Tyrie, and Isobel Martin his wife. 
They had five sons and five daughers. One of the sons was the 



250 



WILSON. 



Rev. Alexander Wilson of Campvere (933), another, the Rev. 
Thomas Wilson, succeeded his father as minister of Gamrie, 
and was in turn succeeded there also by his son, another Thomas 
Wilson, who died in 1855. The last-named was succeeded as 
minister of Gamrie by the Rev. James Cruden, great-grandson 
of the subject of this notice. 

934'. Wilson (Jean), designated " in Fishwick," was married 
on 28th December, 1733, in the Parish of Hutton, in Berwick- 
shire, to Thomas Fergie, portioner of Paxton, They were the 
parents of Helen Fergie or Drysdale (322). 

935- Wilson (Jessie B.), daughter of Andrew Wilson, mer- 
chant in Leith, and Jessie B. Boyd his wife, was married 14th 
September, 1869, to the Rev. John Dymock, minister of the Free 
Church of Scotland, Kemnay, Aberdeenshire. They have issue- 

936. Wilson (John), merchant in Leith, married Helen 
Drysdale, daughter of Alexander Drysdale of Chesterfield, Ber- 
wickshire, and Helen Fergie his wife. They were the parents 
of Andrew Wilson, merchant, Leith (934). [James Wilson, a 
brother of the subject of this notice, was married to another 
daughter of Alexander Drysdale and Helen Fergie] . 

937^- Wilson (Sarah Christina), daughter of the Rev. 
Alexander Wilson of Campvere, and Sarah French his wife, was 
married 9th December, 181 3, to the Rev. John Bower, minister 
of the Parish of Maryculter, and died 3rd January, 1848. They 
left no family. 

937*. Wilson (Thoma-S), advocate in Aberdeen, and son of 
George Wilson of Finzeauch, was born in 1700, and died 7th 
July, 1747. He was a witness on the 3rd February, 1740, at the 
baptism of Elizabeth Brown, daughter of the Rev. David Brown 
of Belhelvie, and niece of the wife of Provost George Fordyce. 
His will was recorded in the Commissary Court Books of Aber- 
deen, i6th June, 1748, and an eik or additional inventory was 
recorded on the i6th May, 1758. His remains were interred in 
the burying ground of the Wilsons of Finzeauch in St. Nicholas 
Churchyard, Aberdeen. No mention is made there of wife or 
child, but there is reason to believe that he was married in 1738 



WILSON — YOUNG. 



251 



to Marjorie Stuart, widow of George Fordyce of Broadford (the 
eldest son of Provost George Fordyce) and mother of the 
eminent London physician, Dr. George Fordyce. 

937'. Yates (Harriet), daughter of John Yates of St. Sepul- 
chre's, London, and Mary Curtis his wife, and niece of Alderman 
Sir William Curtis, Bart., was married 9th July, 1801, to Patrick 
Dingwall, merchant in London, and died 14th January, 1854. 
They had four sons and three daughters. 

938. Yates (John) of St. Sepulchre's, London, married Mary 
Curtis, daughter of Joseph Curtis of Wapping and Mary 
Tennant his wife. They were parents of Harriet Yates or 
Dingwall (937'). 

939. Yea (Georgiana), second daughter of William Walter 
Yea, Younger of Pyrland, County of Somerset, and Jane New- 
man his wife, was born 2nd September, 1786, and married 21st 
May, 1804, to Haynes Gibbes Alleyne, of the Island of Barba- 
does. They were parents of Mary Louisa Alleyne or Fordyce (19). 

940. Yea (William Walter), eldest son of Sir William Yea 
of Pyrland, County Somerset, Bart., and Julia Trevelyan his 
wife, was born in 1756, married ist May, 1783, Jane Newman, 
daughter of Francis Newman of Cadburv House, County of 
Somerset, and died 27th December, 1804. They were parents of 
Ceorgiana Yea or Alleyne (939). 

941. Younff (Angelica), seventh daughter of Provost James 
Young, latterly of Rotterdam, and Patience Dingwall Fordyce 
his wife, born November, 1820; died in infancy. 

942. Young (Arthur), second son of Provost James Young, 
latterly of Rotterdam, and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
had at one time a nominal connection in mercantile business in 
Antwerp, but no more. Fourier's theory of " Social Industrial 
Attraction," as noticed by French newspapers at the time of his 
death, falling in with certain prior speculations of his own on 
social industry, led him to purchase four thousand acres of land 
in South Australia when that Colony was founded, the condition 
of purchase being that the Government should give free passage 
to one married couple for every eighty acre section paid for. 
The Home Government, however, failing in the fulfilment of its 



252 



YOUNG. 



part of the contract, this colonization plan was frustrated. He 
subsequently undertook the superintendence of a "Domestic 
Agricultural Association" at Citeaux, near Dijon in France, 
which was commenced in 1842, but from various causes (partially 
the uneasiness preceding the French Revolution of 1848), but 
altogether of a financial character, had to be abandoned ; has 
resided latterly at Worthing in Essex, engaged in the preparation 
of a "Systematization of Fundamental Word Ideas in the Eng- 
lish Language," with deductions therefrom. 

943- Young (Catharine Leslie), third daughter of Provost 
James Young of Aberdeen, latterly of Rotterdam, and Patience 
Dingwall Fordyce his wife, was born in i8i2,anddiedin infancy. 

944. Young (Edith Emily), second daughter of Gavin 
David Young of Adelaide, South Australia, and Frances Rich- 
man his wife, died in infancy. 

945. Young (Elizabeth), second daughter of James Young, 
merchant and Provost of Aberdeen, and Patience Dingwall For- 
dyce his wife, was married 25th August, 1835, to Arthur Harvey 
of Tillygreig, Aberdeenshire, emigrated to South Africa with her 
husband and family, and resided at D'Urban, Natal ; after her 
husband's death removed to South Australia, and now resides 
at Parkside, near Adelaide; had five sons and four daughters. 

946. Young (Gavin David), tenth son of Provost James 
Young of Aberdeen, latterly of Rotterdam, and Patience Ding- 
wall Fordyce his wife, born 5th January, 1825, emigrated to 
South Australia in 1848 with his brothers, taking up land at first 
in that Colony at Mintaro, afterwards engaging in business at 
Watervale. He became Superintendent of the Wallaroo mines 
when they were opened, and resided afterwards in Adelaide, 
acting as a Director of the Mercantile Marine Insurance Com- 
pany, the Bank of South Australia, and the Wallaroo and 
Moonta Mining Company. He returned to England, and died 
on the 26th February, 1881, at Pau in the South of France. He 
had been married in October, i86i,to Frances Richman, daugh- 
ter of John Henry Richman of South Australia and Emily 
Hampton his wife, and sister-in-law of Sir James Ferguson, 
Bart., Governor of South Austrctlia. They had one son and two 



YOUNG. 



253 



daughters, one of whom died in infancy. The others, with their 
mother, survive. 

947. Toung (George), ninth son of Provost James Young 
of Aberdeen and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born 22nd 
December, 1822, emigrated to South Australia, and died there 
unmarried 29th April, 1869. 

948. Young (George Gordon), sixth son of Provost James 
Young of Aberdeen and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his wife 
(twin with James Hadden Young, 955), was born 31st March, 
1 81 6, and died a few days after. 

949. Young (George James), son of Gavin David Young 
of Adelaide, South Australia, and Frances Richman his wife. 

950. Young (Isabella), fifth daughter of Provost James 
Young of Aberdeen and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
born 25th May, 1817; died in 1819. 

951. Young (James), merchant and Provost of Aberdeen, 
latterly of Rotterdam, eldest son of James Young, merchant and 
Dean of Guild of Aberdeen, and Elizabeth Black his wife, was 
born 30th April, 1776. He was in partnership with his uncle, 
Provost William Young and his Gons, in the stocking manufac- 
ture in Aberdeen, but the business declining after the commence- 
ment of the French Revolution, he removed to Holland at the 
Peace of 181 4 and carried on business successfully as a general 
merchant in Rotterdam. He had been chosen as Provost of 
Aberdeen in 181 1, and filled the office till 181 3. On the 27th 
November, 1806, he was married to Patience Dingwall Fordyce, 
eighth daughter of Dr. Arthur Dingwall Fordyce of Culsh and 
Janet Morison his wife. They had eight sons and eight daugh- 
ters. Besides suffering in bodily health from the not uncommon 
effects of residence intheLowCountries, Provost Young sustained 
varied family afflictions. Fifteen months after he had lost his 
wife, a daughter fifteen years of age was cut off by an accidental 
death, another died at the age of sixteen only two days before 
his own death, which took place on the 17th of May, 1834. That 
event prevented his having to mourn over the removal by ship- 
wreck of his eldest daughter with her husband and infant child 
five years later. 



254 



YOUNG. 



952. Young (James), eldest son of Provost James Young of 
Aberdeen and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born in 1808; 
died in childhood. 

953. Young (James), third son of James Young, stocking 
manufacturer in Aberdeen, and Rachel Cruickshank his wife, 
was born 5th December, 1745. He followed his father's business, 
and was for some time Dean of Guild of Aberdeen. On 29th 
November, 1773, he was married to Elizabeth Black, daughter 
of Baillie Alexander Black and Mary Leslie his wife, and widow 
of John Brand, merchant in Aberdeen. She survived her hus- 
band many years, residing in Golden Square, Aberdeen. His 
death took place on the 24th of February, 1794. They had five 
sons and five daughters, one of the former being Provost James 
Young (951). Another, Alexander, a merchant, died unmarried. 
The other three sons, Gavin, Peter and David, were in the H. E. I. 
Co.'s Service, married and left families, Gavin being Major and 
Judge Advocate General of the Bengal Army; Peter, a Captain 
in the 12th Bengal Native Infantry, and David, a Chaplain in 
the Service. Three of the daughters, Mary, Isobell and Elsy, 
died unmarried ; the other two were married to cousins, Eliza- 
beth to Mr. George Hadden, merchant, London, Ann to Mr. 
Robert Morice, advocate, Aberdeen. Both left families. 

954. Young (James), stocking manufacturer in Aberdeen, 
son of William Young, burgess and weaver there, and Jean 
Stiven his wife, was born in March, 1697. In early life he was 
a sailor, but had no doubt left the sea when he was admitted a 
burgess of Guild of Aberdeen in 1730. Two years later he was 
married to Helen Christie his first wife. She died in December, 
1733, leaving no family, and in December, 1735, he married 
Rachel Cruickshank, daughter of Gavin Cruickshank, shipmaster, 
and Elspet Milne his wife. He was for some time a member 
of the Town Council of Aberdeen. The following information 
respecting the business he carried on is given by the late Mr. 
Alexander Johnston, W.S., in his account of the descendants ot 
James Young and Rachel Cruickshank : "The business consisted 
in the manufacturing or collecting woollen hose from the pea- 
santry of the surrounding country, after the same had been 



YOUNG. 



255 



knitted by the females of their families, the stockings after being 
assorted and packed by the Aberdeen merchants, being exported 
in large quantities to Holland and elsewhere. Many citizens of 
Aberdeen embarked in the stocking trade, the primitive mode of 
conducting which about the middle and during the last half of 
the eighteenth century strikingly contrasted with the large manu- 
factories of textile fabrics, which one or two generations subse- 
quently were conducted at Aberdeen far less successfully, as the 
results proved, by some of the descendants of the hose merchants 
of 1750 to 1800." James Young and Rachel Cruickshank lived 
together for more than fifty years. He survived her for six years 
and died i8th June, 1790, at the age of ninety-three years and 
three months. His son. Provost William Young, apprizing his 
own sons of the event, wrote : " He is very dearly remembered 
by us all. He was totally void of that sordid disposition which 
too frequently accompanies age, that of massing up the goods of 
this world, for he gave liberally as his circumstances did afford 
in his lifetime, to those who would have attained it after. He 
had thence the comfort of seeing all his family prospering." Of 
the family of James Young and Rachel Cruickshank (three sons 
and three daughters) the eldest son, Provost William Young, is 
particularly noticed in the Appendix ; the second, Gavin, was a 
merchant in London, and died in 1802, his widow, Mrs. Jean 
Jopp, surviving till 1836. From the youngest, James (953), most 
of the name, who are noticed in this Record, are descended. Of 
the daughters the eldest, Elspet, was married to Alexander 
Hadden, stocking merchant, and was mothtr of Provosts James 
and Gavin Hadden and other children. An anecdote is told of 
her husband, Alexander Hadden, to the effect that having served 
an apprenticeship in the wood and iron trade, he was on his way 
south to look out for a situation, when he thought of the old 
practice of being guided by the "throwing of the staff." As it 
fell towards Aberdeen he returned there, and was advised by 
James Young, who then lived at the Bulwarks, to try the hosiery 
business in which he was doing a little. Acting on this advice, 
he borrowed £5 or £6 from an old neighbour and commenced 
his successful business career. Rachel, the second daughter of 
James Young an ' Rachel Cruickshank, was twice married, her 



256 YOUNG. 

first husband, John Farquhar, being partner in business of Alex- 
ander Hadden, her brotlier-in-law. Her second husband, David 
Morice of Tullos, was an advocate in Aberdeen and Sheriff Sub- 
stitute of Kincardineshire. vShe was mother of James Farquhar 
of Johnston, M.P. for Aberdeen and United Burghs, a Proctor 
in Doctors' Commons. Isobel, the third daughter, with whom 
her father lived after his wife's death, was married to William 
Gibbon, shipmaster in Aberdeen. With the exception of Mrs. 
Gibbon and her brother, Gavin, all left numerous descendants. 

955. Young (James Hadden), sixth and twin son (with 
George Gordon Young, 948) of Provost James Young, latterly of 
Rotterdam, and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his wife, was born 
31st March, 181 6, and was the inventor of a type composing and 
distributing machine, which is now used by the London Times 
newspaper. He died unmarried in 1861. His invention was a 
pecuniary loss to himself and those associated with him. 

956. Young (Jane), fourth daughter of Provost James Young 
of Aberdeen and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his wife, born 19th 
December, 1813; lost her life in June, 1828, by slipping from the 
rocks on the coast near Aberdeen. 

957. Young (Jessy), eldest daughter of Provost James 
Young of Aberdeen and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
born 7th October, 1807, was married 28th September, 1838, to 
James McPherson, merchant, Rotterdam, and perished by 
shipwreck with her husband and child in the China Seas, 12th 
October, 1839. 

958. Young (Jessie Prances), eldest daughter of Gavin 
David Young of Adelaide, South Australia, and Frances Rich- 
man his wife. 

959. Young (Mary Ann), eighth daughter of Provost James 
Young of Aberdeen and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his wife, 
born in 1821 ; died in infancy. 

960. Young (Patience Mary), sixth daughter of Provost 
James Young of Aberdeen and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his 
wife, born 23rd July, 1818 ; died at Rotterdam, 15th May, 1834. 

961. Young (Thomas Morison), eighth son of Provost 



ties 



to 



vin 



nes 



ost 



34- 
ost 



YOUNG. 



257 



James Young of Aberdeen and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his 
wife, born 13th October, 1819 ; died in 1824. 

962. Young (William), third son of Provost James Young 
of Aberdeen and Patience Dingwall Fordyce his vife, born 9th 
June, 1 81 5, was for a time engaged in mercantile business in 
Antwerp, and was afterwards associated with his brother in the 
Citeaux Domestic Agricultural Institution. He resided latterly 
in London, and after his brother James' death in 1861, took 
charge of his type composing and distributing machine. He 
patented some inventions of his own, and died in London 
unmarried 4th February, 1883. 




W^^ 




Hi 



APPENDIX. 



APPENDIX. 



I. Anderson (Rev. David). 

The Rev. David Anderson, who is incidentally referred to 
(297), was born in 1673. He was settled as minister of the 
Parish of Foveran in 1699, and in 171 1 was appointed Pro- 
fessor of Divinity in King's College, Aberdeen. He was 
the second Presbyterian who held the office. Orem, in his 
" History of Old Aberdeen," supplies the following particu- 
lars : — " He got an allowance from the Synod of Aberdeen in 
1 71 8, to take 2,000 merks from the money belonging to his office 
to repair his lodging in the Chaplain's Court, which he did, and 
made a convenient lodging house. He also built a house where 
the Chaplain's kitchen stood. He hath also a little garden in 
the close, opposite to the entry of his lodging well diked, and 
an outer gate." In 1727 he was made one of the King's 
Chaplains, with a salary of £50 sterling. He died in February, 
1733. His wife's name was Catharine Mitchell. They had one 
daughter, Catharine, who married the Rev. William Dyce, 
minister of Belhelvie, and died in 1773. 

2. Baxters (Old Aberdeen). 

There were three families of the name of Baxter, of whom 
we have information, all resident in Old Aberdeen, in the second 
half of the seventeenth century. 

(i) William Baxter, who is believed to have been the father 
of Agnes Baxter or Dyce (45), was an advocate in Aberdeen, 
indweller in Old Aberdeen of which he was one of the Baillies. 
He was infeft in some tenements there in 1690, with Isobell 
Brebner his wife, and their son William Baxter. The Poll Tax 
Book (1696), has the following notice of the family: — " William 
Baxter, indweller in Old Aberdeen, free stock above 500 merks ; 
Isobell Bremer his spouse ; William, John, James, Janet, Agnes, 



11. 



BAXTERS — BENTLEY. 



Rachel and Isobell Baxters, his children, and George Baxter 
alimented in the family." A relationship is known to have 
existed between Provost Morison's family (descendants of Agnes 
Baxter) and the Brebners of Learney, probably through her 
mother Isobell Brebner or Bremer. 

(2) Andrew Baxter, a merchant in Old Aberdeen, was born 
in 1662, and died in 1700. His wife, Esther Irvine, was born in 
1665 and died in 1747. Alexander Baxter of Glassell, their son, 
was born in 1691, and was infeft in Glassell in 1741. The sasine 
proceeded on a charter of resignation in favour of himself and 
his heirs ; but although his mother's name was Irvine, and a 
family of that name were proprietors of Glassell in the end of 
the seventeenth and beginning of Ine eighteenth century, 
we have no knowledge of their having bee.i related : indeed, a 
family of the name of Reid had been proprietors of Glassell 
between the Irvines and the Baxters. 

(3) Andrew Baxter, a metaphysical writer of the eighteenth 
century, born in 1686, was a native of Old Aberdeen, where his 
father was a merchant. His mother's name was Elizabeth 
Eraser, so that he could neither have been a son of William 
Baxter, advocate, nor of Andrew Baxter, merchant, mentioned 
above. He died in 1750, at Whittingham, in East Lothian, the 
seat of Mr. Hay of Drumelzier, to whom he had been tutor. Of 
his chief work. Bishop Warburton said that " it contained the 
justest and precisest notions of God and the soul." He is said to 
have been a man of " a cheerful social disposition, of extensive 
learning and sincere piety." 

Relationship between these three families, if it existed, we 
have been unable to trace. 



3. Dr. Richard Bentley. 

This eminent critic was an elder brother of Joseph Bentley 
(54), and granduncle of Professor Bentley of King's College, 
Aberdeen (52). From his public life more is known of him 
than of his humbler relatives. Though amiable in private life, 
and of a benevolent disposition, his character in public is said 
to have been haughty and overbearing, *• detracting much 
from the esteem he merited, and the respect which his talents 



BENTLEY — BISSET. 



111. 



entitled him to." He died 14th July, 1742, aged eighty. Dr. 
Parr says of him : *' He was one of those rare and exalted 
personages, who, whether right or wrong in detailed instances, 
always excite attention and reward il, always inform where they 
do not f Jivince, always send away their hearers with enlarged 
knc" ledge, with animated curiosity, and with wholei^ome exercise 
in those habits of thinking, which enable them upon mature 
reflection to discover and avoid the errors of their illustrious 
guide." He married a daughter of Sir John Bernard, and had 
two sons and two daughters. Besides being Master of Trinity 
College, Cambridge, he was Regius Professor of Divinity, and 
Archdeacon of Ely, and acted as Chaplain, both to King William 
and Queen Anne. 

4. Rev. John Bisset. 

The Rev. John Bisset of Newmachar, afterwards of Aberdeen, 
is thought to have been a nephew of Provost Georj^e Fordyce 
of Aberdeen, but positive information on the point is wanting. 
Such of his descendants as have been communicated with, can- 
not give the names of either of nis parents, nor tell where he 
was born. The inscription on the ton.' stone in Saint Nicholas 
Churchyard, Aberdeen, gives the date of his birth, as 29th 
August, 1692. He was licensed by the Presbytery, 20th June, 
1716, called to the Parish of Newmachar and ordained 13th 
March, 1717 ; translated to Aberdeen, and admitted nth 
November, 1728, and died 2nd November, 175C In Scott's 
" Fasti Ecclesiae Scotticanae," he is said to hp.ve been of 
a choleric disposition, and to have been neither " a seceder 
from the establishment, nor a true Kirkman, as he found 
fault with both : a zealous Presbyterian and a warm declaimer 
against Popery, Prelacy, Whitefieldism and Jacobinism." His 
wife, Agnes Pirie, to whom he was married, October, 171 7, 
survived him, dying on the 21st September, 1773. They had 
a large family, one of the sons be'^oming minister of Culsamond 
and latterly of Brechin. 

Southey's " Life of Wesley," contains a characteristic notice 
of Mr. Bisset. From this we learn that on the Rev. George 
Whitefield's visit to Aberdeen in 174- , the magistrates refused 



IV. 



BISSET. 



permission for him to preach in the Kirkyard, being prepossessed 
against him by the Rev. Mr. Bisset, whose colleague (the Rev. 
James Ogilvie) had invited him. Mr. Bisset, notwithstanding, 
attended when Mr. Whitefield occupied the pulpit. In the 
afternoon, when it was his own turn to preach, he began as 
usual ; but in the middle of his prayer alluded to Mr. Whitefield 
by name (knowing him to be present), " entreating the Lord 
to forgive the dishonour that had been put upon Him, when that 
man was permitted to enter the pulpit." Mr. Whitefield nim- 
self says : " Most of the congregation seemed surprised and 
chagrined, and especially Mr. Bisset's good-natured colleague, 
who, immediately, after the sermon, without consulting me in 
the least, stood up and gave notice that Mr. Whitefield would 
preach in about half-an-hour. At the time appointed I went up, 
and took no other notice of the good man's ill-timed zeal, than 
to prove in some part of my discourse, that if he had seen some 
of my later writings, wherein I had corrected several of my 
former mistakes, he would not have expressed himself in such 
strong terms. The people being thus diverted from controversy 
with man, were deeply impressed with what they heard from 
the Word of God." 

The Scots Magazine, for October, 1742, advertises a pamphlet 
by Mr. Bisset, entitled, " Remarks on the Apology for the Pres- 
byterians of Scotland, who are hearers of Mr. Whitefield." In 
a diary Mr. Bisset kept during the 1745 Rebellion, under date 
23rd December, while the Town of Aberdeen was occupied by 
the rebel army, he writes : " I passed through them and looked 
as narrowly as I could, both to their men, and the position of 
their cannon, but met with no incivility. They knew I fight 
with other weapons," — and again on the loth February, 1746: 
"This day two Life Guardsmen were billeted upon me. They got 
a share of our dinner. It seems that one of them was not pleased 
with the expressions of loyalty he observed with old and young 
in my house, so that, after dinner I saw him no more, but the 
other came in at tea time, and stayed in all that night, and 
would have been a guard to my house, if any attack had been 
made upon it. I was never more moved with compassion to 
any one than to this sweet youth, a gentleman's son near 



bisset. 



V. 



Dumfries, I believe, drawn into this measure by bad influence. 
At night, at parting I protest we were both nigh shedding tears ; 
and he took in such good part whatever I spoke and said he 
would never forget it. He was my hearer on the Sabbath, and 
was settled in another quarter, but was resolved to have a billet 
on me, whatever his accommodation should be." 

The inscription on Mr. Bisset's tomb gives his character in 
terms, perhaps, as reliable as any less favourable account, agree- 
ing as they do with the notice given in the local papers at the 
time of his death. The inscription is as follows : — " He was 
an able and faithful minister of the New Testament ; a clear, 
distinct, copious and experimental preacher, zealously attached 
to the doctrine, discipline, worship and government of the 
Church of Scotland ; from the most thorough persuasion that 
they were in every respect agreeable to, and founded on the 
Word of God. For this reason no worldly consideration could 
ever make him deviate from them in any instance. An impar- 
tial and undaunted reprover of the vices of the age anci place in 
which he lived. Through the whole course of his ministry, 
particularly in the latter part of it, he encountered many diffi- 
culties and the most violent opposition. But he was remarkably 
supported under the severest trials, and his character and estima- 
tion seemed to increase in proportion to the opposition he 
met with. He was an instrument in the hands of God of doing 
good to the souls of many in the different places where he 
had laboured as a minister, to whom on that account, his 
memory is and must be precious. He died justly and deeply 
regretted by all who wish well to the interests of religion. 
Mark the perfect man, for the end of that man is peace." 
The notice of Mr. Bisset's death in the Aberdeen jfournal of the 
period is in these terms: — " Died on the 2nd November, 1756, 
in the sixty-fifth year of his age, and fortieth of his ministry, that 
eminent and faithful servant of Jesus Christ, the Very Reverend 
and Worthy Mr. John Bisset, eldest minister of this city, a 
gentleman for piety and learning distinguished ; in church 
matters expert; a strenuous asserter of the Reformation principles, 
doctrine, discipline, worship and government of the Church of 
Scotland ; in the public exercise of his office, grave, awful and 



Vi. BISSET. 



serious ; in conversation, agreeable and facetious ; zealous in 
testifying against the defections of the times ; in his conduct as a 
Protestant and Presbyterian, firm and unshaken ; in his minis- 
terial work, indefatigable ; conscientious in discharging the 
whole of his duty, and whose life was an uniform transcript of 
his doctrine, so that his death is to this place justly reckoned a 
general, and to many an irreparable loss." A writer in the Scots 
Magazine at the time of Mr. Bisset's death, observed that *' his 
principles seemed to be nearly the same with those of the 
Secession Ministers, and that he h^d absented himself from 
Church Judicatories ever since the year 1737, when many of the 
ministers of the Church of Scotland read the Act of Parliament 
relative to Captain Porteous, which was felt to be so obnoxious 
by the Secession Ministers." Making allowance for some degree 
of bigotry in the subject of this notice, and occasional hasty 
conclusions, he was assuredly a thoroughly conscientious, 
earnest and faithful minister of the Gospel. 

A few facts are added which may amount to no more than 
evidence of intimacy, and which after all may have a bearing on 
relationship also : Provost George Fordyce, on the occasion of 
Mr. Bisset's marriage, was cautioner or security for him. This 
was in 171 7 while Mr. Bisset was minister at Newmachar. He 
was also one of the witnesses at the baptism of three of Mr. 
Bisset's children in 1719, 1727 and 1728. In the last-mentioned 
year Mr. Bisset was translated to Aberdeen, and, as it was the 
last year of Provost Fordyce's occupying the position of Chief 
Magistrate, before retiring he may have been instrumental in 
the change. 

In accordance with the practice of the times, it is not unlikely 
that as Patrick was the name he gave to his eldest son, it may 
have been that of his own father. The Poll Tax Book (1696) 
conveys the information that one Patrick Bisset, messenger in 
Tyrie, collected the tax in that parish, and that he paid the tax for 
himself, his wife, and their children, William, John, Barbara, 
Isobell and Jean. At that time the subject of this notice was 
four years of age, but confirmation of the connection cannot be 
had, as the Baptismal Register of Tyrie goes no farther back 
than the year 1710. 



BISSET — BLACKWELL. 



Vll. 



Agnes Pirie, the widow of Mr. Bisset, lived till 1773. She 
was one of the two children of John Pirie, shipmaster in Aber- 
deen (who had a stock on which tax was paid of at least 10,000 
merks). Margaret Pirie, Mrs. Bisset's sister, it is probable was 
married to Alexander Aberdein, elder of Cairnbulg, whose 
widow (Margaret Pirie) was infeft in 1757 in an annuity out of 
Cairnbulg. At the baptism of a child of Mr. Bisset's, in 1727, 
Alexander Aberdein, merchant in Aberdeen, was a witness. 

5. Blackwell (Principal). 

A supposition may be formed regarding the parents of the 
first Principal Blackwell (84^). A general reference is made by 
himself on his being sent to London in 171 1 as member of 
a deputation on matters affecting the Church of Scotland. 
Alluding to his first interview with the Lord High Treasurer 
(Harley, Earl of Oxford), he observes : " He received me very 
courteously, and was pleased to give a description of all my 
father's relations, which I knew little of before." This would 
incline us to think his forefathers were from England, which 
might be the case, while he was himself a native of Scotland. 
He studied at Glasgow College, and about the same time we 
find from Wodrow's "Account of the religious troubles of the 
times," that amongst those who were involved in them was 
Thomas Blackwell, who had carried on a "flourishing business " 
in Glasgow as a " callender." This Thomas Blackwell was 
imprisoned in 1676 for attending conventicles, made bis escape 
on occasion of a fire in his place of confinement, was re-cap- 
tured, heavily fined, and lay two years in prison suffering 
severely from an internal disorder, of which he died. His 
widow, Janet Knox, presented a petition to the High Commis- 
sioner on the gth of June, 1693, "for redress and relief" for 
herself and her seven children on account of the hardships her 
husband had sustained, and which hastened on his death. 
Whatever benefit may have resulted directly from her appeal, 
Wodrow adds : " Providence hath well provided for the family 
smce the Revolution." We find that in the year 1681 " Isaac 
Blackwell, son to Thomas Blackwell in Glasgow," was taken 
prisoner at the rising at Bothwell Bridge. He may have been 



Vlii. BLACKWRLL. 

the eldest son of Thomas Black well and Janet Knox, but no 
further particulars are given. 

Of the family of Principal Blackwell and his wife, Christian 
Johnston, besides two daughters (Janet, who was married and 
had a daughter, Christian Hay — and Christian Blackwell or 
French, 85), three sons deserve more special notice : Thomas 
(84), who became in 1748 Prmcipal of Marischal College, Aber- 
deen ; Alexander, who was born in 1709, and George in 1710. 
The last named, the Rev. George Blackwell, was minister of 
the Parish of Bathgate from 1735 till his death, 7th April, 1749, 
"in the height of his usefulness." His brother, the Principal, 
considered him " the best scholar and most spirited speaker he 
had ever known." His widow, Janet Alexander, died at Glasgow 
29th June, 1788. Robert Blackwell of Ramoth, born in 1747, 
who died at Glasgow 21st September, 1800, was probably their 
son, and may have been father of George Blackwell of Ramoth, 
who died at Inverary on 19th of February, 1803. 

Alexander Blackwell, the fourth son of the first Principal 
Blackwell and Christian Johnston, was born in 1709, and is said 
to have studied medicine under the celebrated Boerhaave, to 
have obtained the degree of M.D. at Leyden, and to have been 
" a man of great classical attainments, of good abilities, but 
somewhat flighty and a little conceited." Not succeeding in 
his profession he turned corrector of the press, then printer on 
his own account in London ; was imprisoned for debt, and 
liberated through the exertions of his devoted wife. He aided 
her in the preparation of a " Herbal," by giving the Latin 
names of the plants described and their uses. The drawings, the 
engraving on copper and the colouring of the plates were her 
sole work. The " Herbal " appeared in two folio volumes in 1737 
and 1739. It contained cuts of five hundred plants used in 
medicine. In 1740 Dr. Blackwell went to Sweden on an invita- 
tion by the Swedish Ambassador. He got into high favour at 
court, and carried out successfully a plan he had contrive 1 for 
draining the marshes. He became very successful in his pro- 
fession, and is said to have remitted large sums of money to his 
wife, who was on the point of joining him with their child, 
when he was charged with complicity in an attempt to alter the 



BLACKWF.LL BROWNS. 



IX. 



succession to the throne. He was tried, put to the torture and 
condemned to be broken on the wheel, but was finally beheaded, 
protesting innocence to the last. Some writers have thought 
that the charges might not have been altogether groundless, 
supposing a man of his temperament to have been like his 
brother, the Principal, an ardent lover of liberty. His execution 
took place on the 9th of August, 1748. 

His talented wife is said, in some biographical dictionaries, to 
have been the daughter of a stocking manufacturer in Aberdeen 
of liis own name. It may be remarked, however, that Principal 
Blackwell was originally from Glasgow, and that if relatives of 
his own name had resided in Aberdeen it is reasonable to think 
that some one bearing it would have appeared as witness at the 
baptism of one or other of his twelve children. Such, however, 
is not the case. There was, however, a family then residing in 
Aberbeen, and connected, as we believe, with the Blackwells, 
whose name, that of Blachrie, was not unlike theirs. The 
names of the children of this family are given on these pages, 
but no particulars are known of any except one of the sons, 
Alexander (59). One of the daughters, Elizabeth, was born in 
1707, and it seems just possible she might have been the wife of 
Dr. Blackwell. He is said to have eloped with the lady, and if 
he had given early indications of the flighty disposition which 
has been referred to, her parents might naturally enough have 
questioned the wisdom of her life being linked with his. Of 
Elizabeth Blackwell we hear nothing after her unfortunate 
husband's sad end. 



6. Browns (Maxton, etc.). 

The following notices will be found to have a bearing on 
individuals of the name of Brown referred to in this Record, 
some specially, others incidentally : 

(i) The Rev. William Brown of Maxton wpc g*-?.ndfather 
of William Brown, F.R.C.S.E., mentioned in the Appendix in 
the account of the Douglasses of Tilwhilly as the husband of 
Ann Douglass, a daughter of the family. He was son of the 
Rev. David Brown of Selkirk, was licensed to preach in 1737, 
settled as minister of Maxton, in the Presbytery of Selkirk, in 



X. 



BROWNS — BURNET. 



1751, and continued there till his death on 22nd January, 1770. 
He married Isobell Kirkwood, from the Parish of Lessudden. 
They had five sons and one daughter. One of the sons,William 
Brown, M.D., F.R.C.S., who was born 14th November, 1757, 
died 28th November, 181 8. By his wife, Hamilton Walker, 
daughter of Robert Walker, M.D., F.R.C.S., a friend and cor- 
respondent of the Rev. George Whitefield, he had several 
sons and daughters, one of the former being the husband of Ann 
Douglas mentioned above. 

(2) The Rev. David Brown (father of No. i), graduated at 
Edinburgh University in 1698, and was settled as minister of 
Greenlaw in 1706, of Gordon in 1708, and translated to Selkirk 
in 1726, where he died, 12th March, 1753. He was the intimate 
friend of the Rev. Thomas Boston of Ettrick (author of " The 
Fourfold State," etc.), whose wife was a relative. His wife's name 
was Janet Scott ; their son, William, was minister of Maxton. 

(3) The Rev. William Brown of Craigdam, was grandfather 
of the Rev. Dr. David Brown, Principal of the Free Church 
College, Aberdeen, mentioned (133) as a grandson of James 
Chalmers, printer there. He was born in 1729, entered the 
Divinity Hall of the Associate (Secession) Church in 1748, and 
was settled at Craigdam, in Aberdeenshire, in 1752, on a 
stipend of ;^i 5. He had come from the North Church, Perth. 
He was occupied, in addition to the oversight of his own 
charge, with Evangelical work in the North, ministering to 
many who were afterwards organized into congregations. He 
died in 1801. One of his sons, Mr. William Brown, a journalist 
of his day, who died in 1809, was the reputed author of the 
song •' The Kail Brose o' Auld Scotland." Another son, Alex- 
ander, was a bookseller in Aberdeen, and Provost of that city ; 
father of the Rev. Dr. David Brown referred to above, and of 
the Rev. Charles James Brown, of the Free New North Church, 
Edinburgh. - 

7. Burnet of Sauchen. 

In the notice of the Rev. Dr. James Shirrefs (813) it has been 
seen that he was in some measure indebted to his relationship 
to Bishop Burnet for some assistance in the commencement of 



BURNET — BURNS. 



XI. 



his academical course, and that this relationship was through 
the Burnets of Sauchen, and was remote : some particulars 
regarding that family are subjoined. 

Mr. William Burnet, minister of the Parish of Kinairnie iii 
Aberdeenshire, to which he was admitted before 3rd December, 
1607, acquired the lands of Sauchen in the Parish of Cluny by 
what is technically called apprizing. His wife, Catharine Reid, 
was daughter of Mr. James Reid, the first minister of the Parish 
of Banchory Ternan after the Reformation, who was a younger 
son of the Laird of Pitfoddels. Two of her brothers, Thomas 
and Alexander Reid, distinguished themselves ; the former as a 
philosopher and poet and as Latin Secretary to King James VL, 
the latter as a medical writer and as Physician to King Charles L 
Both were benefactors to Marischal College, Aberdeen. Their 
sister Cathsirine had two daughters. One of these, Bessie Bur- 
net, was heiress of Sauchen, which, by his marriage, became the 
property of her husband, Thomas Burnet, a son of the second 
marriage of Sir Thomas Burnet of Leys. While they were 
children it had been arranged by their parents that the minister's 
daughter, Bessie, should be married to the third son of Sir 
Thomas ; or, failing him, to the fourth son ; failing him, to the 
fifth. Thomas Burnet, to whom she was married, was the third 
son. Their eldest son, Mr. Robert Burnet of Sauchen, was born 
in 1648 and died in 1701. He was minister of Banchory Ternan 
from 1682 to 1699, and thereafter of the Parish of Fintray. He 
was married before 1681 to Jane Reid, daughter of Mr. Robert 
Reid, the former minister of Banchory, and was served heir to 
his father in the lands of Sauchen in 1699. His wife, who was 
born in 1660, died 2nd April, 1742. Robert Burnet of Sauchen, 
their eldest son, was married and had two sons and two 
daughters. The younger daughter, Mary Burnet, married John 
Lunan. They had five children — their eldest daughter, Jean 
Lunan, becoming the wife of David Shirrefs, Convener of the 
Incorporated Trades of Aberdeen, and mother of the Rev. Dr. 
James Shirrefs (813). 

8. Rev. J. Bums and Brothers. 

The family of Grizel Ferrier, one of the sisters of Major- 
General Hay Ferrier (324), deserves particular notice. 



Xll. 



BURNS. 



Her husband, John Burns, a linen manufacturer in Falkirk, 
afterwards Surveyor of Customs at Borrowstownness, and Fac- 
tor for the Duke of Hamilton on his estate of Kinneil, died in 
T817 at the age of eighty-eight. His whole life " was marked by 
simplicity, godly sincerity, high-toned and warm piety, and 
singularly disinterested benevolence. He was one of the many 
in Scotland whose religious character was formed under the 
ministrations of the celebrated Whitefield, who occasionally 
resided under his father's roof." The father, a writer in Falkirk, 
is testified by the inscription on his tombstone to have been 
" an upright and truly Christian man." He died m 1774 at the 
age of eighty. 

John Burns and Grizel Ferrier had eight sons, four of whom 
became ministers of the Gospel, the four others embracing the 
legal profession. The former were James, William, Robert 
and George. Regarding their predilection for the ministry. Dr. 
Robert Burns says : " It is not easy to account for the inclina- 
tions and tendencies that run in families and determine the future 
of its several members. Among the male members of ours, there 
did appear at early periods, and m pretty regular succession, a 
somewhat uncommonly strong leaning towards the ministerial 
profession, showing itself in a singular love of pulpit occupancy 
and somewhat premature pulpit oratory." 

James, the eldest of the brothers, afterwards the Rev. James 
Burns of Brechin, at the early age of thirteen, devoted his little 
pocket money towards purchasing a wooden pulpit which was 
set up in a vacant room in his father's house, thereafter called 
the " Kirk," and from it the brothers " exercised their gifts in a 
friendly congregation of servants and neighbours. James was 
a preacher from childhood, and apparently not altogether from 
mere childish imitation, but out of real love for God's house 
and service." His ministry at Brechin lasted over forty years. 
He and his brother William married sisters, daughtersof Mr. James 
Chalmers, publisher of the Aberdeen Journal (133). A daughter 
of the former became wife of the eloquent and warm-hearted 
minister. Dr. Thomas Guthrie of Free Saint John's, Edinburgh, 
formerly of Arbirlot, Forfarshire. A son, the Rev. James Chalmers 
Burns, D.D., incidentally noticed (400), was for some time min- 



BURNS. 



Xlll. 



ister of the Presbyterian Congregation, London Wall, afterwards 
at Kirkliston, near Edinburgh, and was Moderator of the General 
Assembly of the Free Church in 1883. 

William Hamilton, the fifth son of John Burns and Grizel 
Ferrier, afterwards the Rev. Dr. Burns of Kilsyth, was settled 
first at Dun, " a lovely but small parish," in which he laboured 
over twenty years " with a painstaking piety and earnestness, 
rarely equalled, never excelled." He was then translated to 
Kilsyth, where in 1839 he was gladdened by a remarkable revival 
of religion. '• Of the value of his ministrations," it has been said, 
" it would be hardly possible to give an exaggerated estimate." 
" His venerated form, his pleased and placid countenance, his 
staid gait, his deep bass voice, with its almost oracular utter- 
ances — terse, sententious, quaint and curious — and an atmosphere 
of holiness and happiness encompassing him, and ever revealing 
a ' conversation in Heaven,' " are dwelt on with warmth by his 
nephew. He married a Miss Chalmers of Aberdeen. Of their 
large family, the most remarkable was the saintly and apostolic 
missionary, the Rev. William C. Burns, who shortly after receiving 
license was the instrument of a great religious awakening at 
Dundee, followed by a similar one in his father's parish, and 
who, after twenty years' devoted missionary labour in China, 
died there in 1868. His life and labours, as well as those of their 
venerated father, are faithfully depicted by a younger son of the 
minister of Kilsyth, Dr. Islay Burns of Free Saint Peter's, Dun- 
dee, afterwards Professor of Divinity in the Free Church College, 
Glasgow. 

Robert Burns, D.D., another son of John Burns and Grizel 
Ferrier, was one of the ministers of Paisley for more than thirty 
years, when he was induced to remove to Canada as minister of 
Knox Church, Toronto, where for a time he also acted as Prin- 
cipal of Knox College and Professor of Divinity, for which he 
was well fitted. The brothers had all cast in their lot with the 
Free Church party in the course of the controversy preceding 
the Disruption. From 1856 onwards Dr. Burns was chiefly 
engaged in missionary labour in Canada, and in 1869, only four 
months before his death, he appeared before the General Assembly 
of the Free Church of Scotland as a delegate from his adopted 




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XIV. BURNS — CADENHEAD. 

country. He was warmly received, ard his words listened to 
with intense interest. The Moderator, Sir Henry Moncrieff, 
Bart., alluded to his being "the same man who thirty years before 
had attracted the notice of his younger brethren in the ministry 
as one of their most earnest and eloquent seniors, now come 
among them with a still richer eloquence, with the matured 
wisdom of his venerable age, to increase the spiritual force and 
fervour which had always attached to his character." Dr. Burns' 
literary as well as his ministerial labours were alike abundant 
and valuable, his chief permanent work being that of editing th'j 
Wodrow Papers. He was twice married. One of his sons, Dr. 
Robert F. Burns, has occupied important spheres of usefulness, 
and has now a ministerial charge in Halifax, N.S. 

George Burns, D.D., the youngest son of John Burns and 
Grizel Ferrier, who survived all the rest, already mentioned, 
commenced his ministerial life in St. John, New Brunswick, 
subsequently occupying charges in Tweedsmuir, and in Corstor- 
phine, near Edinburgh. 

9. Oadenhead (Aberdeen). 

It appears probable that the name of Cadenhead, as the 
orthography has been for a century or two past, is identical with 
that found in the end of the fifteenth century, when one Dominus 
Willelmus de Caldenhead is mentioned in the chartulary of New- 
battle Abbey (between 1467 and i486). About the same time, 
in a charter by James Stuart, Earl of Buchan, Willelmus de 
Cauldenheid, scutifer, is a witness in 1494 ; and in 1505 his name 
appears on a jury at an inquest held by the Sheriff of Banff. 
The earliest notice we have of the name in or near Aberdeen 
is in 1563, when one William Cadenhead was a fisher (piscator) 
at Futtie, and in 1594 Elizabeth Cadenheid was wife of John 
Fiddes, who followed the same calling at the same place 

Andrew Cadenhead, who died 27th December, 1634, had a 
tombstone erected to his memory in the churchyard of Drumcak 
and about the same time the Laird of Drum is said to have been 
indebted to one Magnus Cadenhead in a considerable amount, 
equivalent to one hundred cows. 

When the Poll Tax Book of Aberdeenshire was compiled in 



CADENHEAD — CAMPVERE. 



XV. 



1696, Alexander Caddenhead with his wife and female servant 
are. mentioned as residing at Westertown of Pitfoddels in the 
Parish of Banchory Devenick ; but we are not in a position to 
say that he was of the same family as those of the name who 
appear in this Record. 

Alexander Cadenhead in Stanegavel, in the Parish of Peter- 
culter, may have been born about the time the Poll Tax Book 
was prepared, which however makes no mention in Peterculter 
of Stanegavel, or of any one of the name of Cadenhead. 

Alexander Cadenhead in Westfield of Pitfoddels, the son of 
Alexander Cadenhead in Stanegavel, was father of John Caden- 
head (125). His wife's name was Aitken. The Parishes of 
Banchory Devenick, Drumoak and Peterculter are all adjoining. 

10. Oampvere (Past and Present). 

As Campvere is now little known and seldom heard of, and 
as it is mentioned in this Record (842 and 933), the following par- 
ticulars may be acceptable : — 

" Campvere is a small fortified town in the Netherlands, in 
the Province of Zealand, on Walcheren Island, four miles N.N.E. 
of Middleburgh, now deplorably decayed and called Vere, or 
Veere, still possessing, however, a town house of white freestone, 
remarkable for its elegant tower, and for its cathedral. 

" The numerous Scotch living at Vere were under the rule of 
a ' Conservator of the Scotch Nation,' and had many privileges 
conceded to them, including the right to be governed by the law 
of Scotland. The Scotch staple right consisted in the privilege 
of having all goods destined from Scotland to the Netherlands 
brought to that city, and they could not be transferred to another 
place before they had been sold there. The last treaty respect- 
ing these rights was in 1741, after which time the increasing 
prosperity of Scotland rendered the renewal of such partial 
arrangements unimportant ; but the Conservatorship was held 
as a sinecure long after the necessity for the office had ceased. 
After 1847 the office seems to have been abohshed. The Scotch 
formed a separate religious community, which, from 1613 until 
the French Revolution, had a minister of their own. In 1809 it 
ceased to exist." 

The foregoing is taken from " Chambers's Cyclopaedia." 



XVI. 



CHALMERS. 



II. Dr. Patrick Chalmers. 

Dr. Patrick Chalmers, an eminent physician in Aberdeen, 
has been mentioned as probably nearly related to James 
Chalmers (133^), whose daughter, Jean Chalmers, was the 
second wife of Arthur Dingwall (179). 

Of Dr. Patrick Chalmers' family some particulars may be 
given, premising that there is mention in 1674 of a brother 
James, whoever he may have been. 

Mr. William Chalmers, minister of Skene, is mentioned in 
1645 as having his house plundered by Montrose's Army. He 
acquired the lands of Hazelhead, Smiddyhill and Fedderate, to 
which his eldest son Patrick succeeded. He had studied medi- 
cine at Leyden, Paris and Padua, and was Professor of Medicine 
in Marischal College, Aberdeen, from 1700 to 1717. About the 
latter year the loss of an expensive lawsuit obliged him to part 
with his landed property. In 172/, his son and executor. Dr. 
George Chalmers, made a payment to Marischal College on 
account of his deceased father's estate. Dr. Patrick had been 
married in 1681 to Rachel Forbes, eldest daughter of Mr. Alex- 
ander Forbes of Foveran, and sister of Sir Samuel Forbes, Bart. 
They had thirteen children, nine being named in the Poll Tax 
Book (1696) with his wife and Janet Ferguson, his mother, — 
Alexander, Samuel, Patrick, George, John, Janet, Margaret, 
Elizabeth and Rachel. 

Dr. George Chalmers married Janet Elphinston, who died 
21 st November, 1788, aged 87. The youngest son of Dr. Patrick 
Chalmers and Rachel Forbes, William, may have been born 
after 1696. He was a merchant in Gibraltar ; also Paymaster, 
Commissary-General, and Judge of the Admiralty Court. He 
re-purchased Hazelhead, and in 1753 purchased the Barony of 
Auldbar in Forfarshire, now possessed by his great grandson. 
He was married to a cousin-german, a daughter of John Elphin- 
stone of Glack in the Parish of Daviot. 

If presence as a witness at signing the marriage contract, or 
at baptism, may be taken as indicating relationship, as has been 
supposed in the case of Dr. Patrick Chalmers, the same rule 
may be applied also to George Chalmers, writer in Edinburgh, 



CHALMERS. 



XVll. 



who was a witness, in 1722, at the baptism of Jean Chalmers' 
child, George Dingwall. This George Chalmers may possibly 
be the same as George Chalmers who was admitted as a writer 
to the Signet in 1723, and who was known in Edinburgh as 
•' Honest George Chalmers." He died in 1758. His daughter 
Veronica was married to a well-known Edinburgh surgeon, 
familiarly known as " Lang Sandy Wood." It may be added 
that another Veronica Chalmers, daughter of Provost William 
Chalmers of Aberdeen, was married to James Cuming of Breda. 
Provost Chalmers was a son of William Chalmers, merchant, 
Aberdeen, who was born in 1654, and who was consequently 
contemporaneous with and about the same age, so far as we can 
judge, of Dr. Patrick Chalmers. 

12. Chalmers (Printer and Publisher). 

James Chalmers, the first publisher of a weekly newspaper 
north of the Frith of Forth, was considered one of the literary 
printers of his day. He learned his business at Watts' 
establishment, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, where, in 1725, 
he had, as a fellow apprentice, Benjamin Franklin, the future 
American statesman. In 1736 he was appointed printer to the 
Town of Aberdeen. Owing to the state of political matters, the 
publication of the Aberdeen y^ournal was delayed till January, 
1748. It originated in an account of the Battle of CuUoden, 
printed in 1746. The Rev. John Bisset, in his Diary, wrote in 
October, 1745 : "James Chalmers is fled for it, refusing to print 
any more of their Declarations. I am afraid we shall have no 
more of his News Schedules " — and again, " November 22 : 
Poor Chalmers, the printer, is from home ; not yet able to walk 
on his strained leg, got by jumping a window to escape the 
ruffians Saturday was eight days " ; and, " December 14 : Last 
night an armed force have obliged Mr. Chalmers' boys (himself 
being in hiding) to print the papers." He was employed for 
some time as an Assistant Commissary to the Royal Army. 
His wife, Susannah Trail, who died i8th May, I79i,in her seventy- 
second year, was a daughter of the Rev. James Trail, minister of 
Montrose, whose grandfather, Mr. Robert Trail, minister of Grey- 
friar's Church, Edinburgh, attended the Marquis of Montrose 
on the scaffold. 



XVlll. 



CHALMERS — CLARK. 



Besides their son James (133^), another son was well known 
in literary circles by his valuable " Biographical Dictionary," 
Alexander Chalmers. Their grandfather, great-grandfather and 
great great-grandfather had all been ministers of the Church of 
Scotland. The last mentioned, Mr. George Chalmers, minister 
of Rhynie, graduated in 1620 at King's College, Aberdeen. He 
married Jean Gordon of Thomastown, 1646, and died after 3rd 
November, 1660. Their eldest son, Mr. Hugh Chalmers, 
minister of Marnoch, died 5th June, 1707. He married Eliza- 
beth Innes. Mr. James Chalmers, their second son, was 
minister of Dyke in Morayshire from 1709 till 1725, when he was 
appointed Professor of Divinity in Marischal College, Aberdeen. 
He died 6th October, 1744, aged 58. He was a learned, able 
and pious man. His wife, Jean Chalmers, to whom lie was 
married in 1710, was his cousin-german, daughter of Mr. George 
Chalmers, minister of Drumblade, and granddaughter of Mr. 
James Gordon, parson of Rothiemay, a well-known geographer 
and topographer. She is incidentally noticed in the account of 
the first Principal Blackwell. They were the parents of James 
Chalmers, the first printer of the family. 

13. Robert Clark (U. E.L.). 
Robert Clark, the father of Matthew Clark (137'), was born in 
Quaker Hill, Duchess County, in what is now the State of New 
York, 1 6th March, 1744. He owned two farms in that county. 
These were confiscated on the success of the Revolutionary 
Party in the American War. He joined General Burgoyne's 
standard, and, at his request, at companied other Provincial 
Volunteers to Canada. The day after he left, Burgoyne sur- 
rendered. Having served two years in H.M. Provincial Regi- 
ment (the Loyal Rangers), he was discharged on the 24th 
September, 1783, and next year, having learned the business of 
millwright, he was employed by Government to erect the mills 
at Kingston, and subsequently those at Napanee. In 1785 he 
was joined by his family, and moved with them to Lot 74 in the 
ist Concession of the Township of Ernestown, which had been 
recently surveyed and allotted to the 2nd Battalion of the 84th 
Regiment. In July, 1788, he was appointed a Justice of the 



CLARK — COCK. 



XIX. 



Peace for the County of Mecklenburgh, and Captain of Militia 
in 1809. He died 17th December, 1823. His wife, Isobel 
Ketchum, was a native of Long Island in the State of New 
York. They had five sons and one daughter. 

14. Oock (Manufacturers). 

The linen manufacture has been carried on by a family of 
the name of Cock, some of whom have a place in this Record, 
ever since the beginning of the eighteenth century. In a 
description of the Parish of LifF and Benvie, contained in the 
*' Statistical Account of Scotland," published in 1793, the follow- 
ing passage occurs : " There is a family of merchant weavers or 
linen manufacturers in Lochee, of the name of Cock, who, 
without any change of circumstance unless what has necessa- 
rily been produced by the gradual and slow operation of time, 
now inherit the same spot cultivated by their forefathers prior 
to the era of the Reformation." 

David Cock, a brother of Robert Cock (140) and son of 
James Cock and Isobel Doig, was grandfather of Mr. James 
Cox of Cardean and Baikie, who has been three times Provost 
of Dundee. He is the senior partner of one of the largest 
manufacturing firms there (Cox Brothers), employing in their 
extensive works about 5,000 hands. In 1878 he purchased the 
estate of Cardean in the Parish of Meigle, and, in 1879, the 
adjoining property of Baikie in the Parish of Airlie in Forfar- 
shire. The following graphic description of the scenery on the 
form.er property is given by Mr. A. J. Warden in " Forfarshire," 
Vol. II., p. 388 : " The Dean, through the greater part of its 
course, is a sluggish stream, gliding rather than running through 
the bottom of the Vale of Strathmore between low, muddy 
banks. As if ashamed of its indolence, a little before it loses 
its individuality and its name, by being absorbed in the clear, 
sparkling Isla, it suddenly starts into active life, and runs 
rapidly down a shingly ravine, hemmed in by cliffs richly clad 
with leafy foliage and surmounted with thriving plantations. 
Here trim walks have been formed on both sides of the river, 
from which the beauty of the picturesque scenery may be sur- 
veyed in safety." The present proprietor of Cardean and 
Baikie adopted the modern orthography of the family name. 



XX. 



COLQUHOUN — DINGWALL. 



15. Colquhoun of TillyOolqiihoun. 

Sir George Colquhoun, Bart., a Colonel in the Dutch service, 
was representative of the family v>f Tillycolquhoun, now Tilly- 
hewan, Dumbartonshire. He was twice married. His first wife's 
name was Rebecca Jones, that of the second, Charlotte Barclay. 
Of the first marriage there were three daughters. The eldest, 
Hannah Colquhoun or Douglass, was sister-in-law of Elizabeth 
Douglass or Dingwall (269). Elizabeth, the youngest, married 
James Williamson, merchant in Leith. Agnes, the second, was 
twice married, first to Maurice Trent of PitcuUo, in Fife, and 
after his death to Niel Fergusson, advocate. Sheriff of Fife, to 
whom she brought the estate of Pitcullo, bequeathed to her by 
her first husband, the last of his family. Of Adam Fergusson of 
Woodhill, the eldest son of Niel Fergusson and Agnes Colqu- 
houn or Trent, a particular notice will be found in another place, 
in connection with the settlement he founded in Canada. Two 
of his brothers, John and James, died unmarried ; also two sisters. 
Misses Rebecca and Harriet Fergusson, who resided in Edin- 
burgh, and were well-known and highly valued for benevolence 
of character and active Christian usefulness. Another sister, 
Amelia, married John Eraser of Farraline in Inverness Shire, 
advocate. Sheriff- Substitute of Stirhngshire, and was mother of 
the Misses Eraser, Farraline Villa, North Berwick. Of the family 
of the second marriage of Sir George Colquhoun, one son and 
three daughters, the son. Sir Robert David Colquhoun, suc- 
ceeded to the title and marrit.d a Miss Colvin ; one of Sir Robert's 
sisters died unmarried, another married Major-General J. A. Far- 
quharson of Oakley, in Fife, and was mother of William Mac- 
donald Macdonald of Saint Martin's, in Perthshire ; a third 
married Mr. Thomas Hamilton, of the family of Bardowie, and 
was mother of George C. Hamilton of Bardowie, near Fergus, 
Ontario, who died in 1879, leaving a widow and two sons, the 
elder of whom, Thomas J. Hamilton of Fergus, is married and 
has issue. 

16. Dingwall of Kildun. 

The lands of Kildun, adjoining the Burgh of Dingwall, formed 
a distinct lordship in the time Dmgwalls were proprietors. In 



DINGWALL OF KILDUN. 



XXI. 



early times these lands were described as " lying in the regality 
of Dunfermlyn, earldom of Ross and sheriffdom of Inverness." 
The first notice we find regarding the Dingwalls of Kildun 
is their connection with the battle fought between the Earl 
of Ross and his adherents on the one side and several Highland 
clans on the other, at Beallagh-na-Broig. In that battle the 
Laird of Kildun is said to have been slain with seven score of 
the name of Dingwall, and valuable grants of land were made to 
the Dingwalls by the Earl of Ross in recognition of tHeir services. 
The date given by Sir Robert Gordon to this engagement in his 
history of the Earldom of Sutherland is 1299, while in his 
account of the Monros of Fowlis, several of whom fell in the 
conflict, it is placed at 1452. Another reference to the family is 
made by Mr. James Eraser, minister of Kirkhill, in his MS. his- 
tory of the Erasers, written 1666 : " Simon Eraser, Lord Lovat," 
he says, "who was executed at London for his efforts to free his 
country, in 1306, had a son, Hugh, who was fostered with the 
Baron of Eoyers, and afterwards taken to the custody of the 
Earl of Ross, who matched him with Eupham Dingwall, the 
Baron of Kildin's only daughter, and got him a good interest 
near himself, about Thane." 

Immediately prior to the year 1460 we find that Andrew Denone, 
WiUiam Cryne, and William Clyne had been lords respectively 
of the half, the sixth and the third parts of Kildun. At that 
date they resigned their interest in these lands, and the Prior of 
Pluscarden and Urquhart granted Kildun to Thomas of Ding- 
vaille, younger, and his heirs, with remainder to his brother- 
german John of Dingwalle and "to the nearest, better, and more 
worthy successor of the surname of Dingvaille" (the frank tene- 
ment being reserved to Sir Thomas of Dingvaille, Sub-Dean of 
Ross). In the year 1463, John, Earl of Ross and Lord of the 
Isles, granted other lands to the same parties, the frank tene- 
ment, as in the former case, being reserved to Sir Thomas Ding- 
valle, styled then " the Earl's Chamberlain." 

Thomas Dingwall of Kildun, who got the charters in 1460 and 
1463, resigned Kildun in 1506 into the hands of John, Abbot of 
Dunfermline, who granted it the same year to William Dingwall, 
the son and apparent heir of Thomas. In 1527 other lands 



XXll. 



DINGWALL OF KILDUN. 



were granted to William Dingwall of Kildun by King James V., 
and in the same king's reign the Laird of Kildun was slain by 
Roderick McLeod of Lewis, son-in-law to the Baron of Kintail, 
a man of extraordinary strength. McLeod, who was confined 
in the *• Bass " on account of this outrage, is said to have 
obtained his freedom as a reward for overcoming an Italian 
who had challenged any one in the nation to single combat. 
Such is the account of the matter given in the Aberdeen Fi'ee Press, 
quoting the " History of the Clan McKenzie," but in Alexander 
McKenzie's " History of the Clan McKenzie " (p. 76) the " exceed- 
ingly powerful man" who killed Dingwall of Kildun and was in 
consequence* imprisoned in the " Bass," is said to have been 
Roderick McKenzie, who was killed at Flodden, fourth son of 
Sir Kenneth McKenzie of Kintail, not Roderick McLeod of 
Lewis, son-in-law to the Baron of Kintail. 

William Dingwall of Kildun (probably the laird slain by 
McLeod) was succeeded by his son, Sir Thomas Dingwall, who 
with Janet Hay his spouse, had a charter of Kildun in 1538, and 
of other lands in 1543. The " History of the Clan McKenzie " 
mentions (p. 122) that in " 1554 the Laird of Kildun sold to 
Kenneth McKenzie of Kintail some lands he had inherited 
through his mother, one of the two co-heiresses of Sir Donald 
McDonald of Lochalsh, Loch Carron, and Loch Broom. Sir 
Donald's other sister had married Macdonnell of Glengarry. 

John Dingwall of Kildun, the son of Sir Thomas, is mentioned 
in 1575. In 1583 he sold to Colin McKenzie of Kintail some of 
the lands granted by the Earl of Ross in 1463 to Thomas, the 
Younger of Dingvaille. In 1589-91 the Register of the Privy 
Council contains a complaint by Alexander Bain of TuUoch 
against John Dingwall of Kildun, and in the same record Rory 
Dingwall of Kildun is mentioned in 1597 to 1600, as giving 
security for some of his dependants to answer complaints at the 
instance of John Dunbar of Avoch. He was also bound over 
not to injure Dunbar, and security given for him by John Irwyn 
of Kynnok. This was probably the last Laird of Kildun of the 
name of Dingwall. We have no means of knowing whether it 
was the same family which appears in the seventeenth century 
as Lairds of Cambuscurry near Tain, 



DINGWALL OF KILDUN. 



XXlll. 



NOTE. 

Sir John Dingwall, Provost of Trinity College, Edinburgh, 
was appointed a Senator of the College of Justice when it was 
instituted in 1532. The building called Dingwall's Castle, which 
stood on the site of the General Post Office, Edinburgh, is sup- 
posed to have been named after him. He was probably a 
brother of William Dingwall of Kildun in the reign of King 
James v., whom we take to have been the laird slai i by McLeod of 
Lewis. The Provost of Trinity College got the ward in 1527 of all 
the lands and rents of the " deceased William Dingwall of Kil- 
dun," and in 1528 of the lands of the deceased McKenzie of 
Gairloch. He may have been the same Sir John Dingwall who 
was Prothonotary and Archdeacon of Caithness and Vicar of 
St. Nicholas Church, Aberdeen, in 15 19 — the same as owned 
the lands of Western Strabroke in 1524 — and the same Sir 
John who was Vicar of Petty in 1505. 

17. Dingwall of Oambuscurry. 

Cambuscurrie, a property held for some time by a family of 
the name of Dingwall (sometimes designed of " Upper or Over 
Cambuscurrie"), lies in the vicinity of the Burgh of Tain, in 
Ross Shire. 

In 1618, Cambuscurrie had been held by a family of the 
name of Ross — through whom it came to the Macleods of 
Assynt, ancestors of Macleod of Cadboll. In the Macleods' 
time it may have been held jointly by them and the Dingwalls 
as " Over and Nether Cambuscurry." 

David Ross of Pitcalnie in the year just mentioned was 
served heir to his uncle Malcolm Ross of Cambuscurrie in ** the 
halves of these lands." 

A charter of the town and lands of Cambuscurrie was 
granted 12th March, 1659, to Alexander Ross of Balnagowan 
by Mr. Alexander Dingwall, Presbyter, Prebend and Chaplain 
of the Chaplainrie or Prebendarie called Cambuscurrie, founded 
within the Collegiate Church of St. Duthac of Tayne, "to be 
held of the said Chaplain in feu ferme for ever." 

The first laird of the name of Dingwall who is mentioned is 
Roderick Dingwall, Elder oi Cambuscurry, who in 1684 obtained 



XXIV. 



DINGWALLS. 



by disposition an apprizing of the lands of Balnagowan from 
Rose of Kilravock. In 1693 he conveyed the debt and apprizing 
to Roderick Dingwall, younger, his son ; and in 1702 the Laird 
of Balnagowan and Mr. Francis Stewart redeemed the apprizing. 
In 1686 we find Rory Dingwall of Cambuscurry Upper, and 
Rory McLeod of Cambuscurry Nether, both appointed Commis- 
sioners of Supply for Rossshire. 

In 1693 Roderick Dir ,'wall of Over Cambuscurrie executed 
an entail in favour of Roderick Dingwall his second son, " whom 
failing, his heirs male or eldest son ; whom failing, John Ding- 
wall, the entailer's eldest son ; whom failing, the heirs male of 
Rorie and John respectively ; whom faihng, to his three daugh- 
ters, and any of them who should marry a man bearing the 
name and surname and arms of Dingwall ; whom failing, to any 
man of the name of Dingwall who should marry Rorie's eldest 
daughter, and bear the arms ; whom failing, to any such man 
who should marry John's eldest daughter ; and whom failing, 
her heirs and assigns whomsoever." In 1700 Roderick Ding- 
wall of Cambuscurry was served heir in special to Roderick 
Dingwall of Cambuscurry, his father, in the lands of Over Cam- 
buscurrie in the Parish of Tain, and also in Hilton of Tarbet 
in the Parish of Tarbet and in other lands. In 1704 Rorie 
Dingwall of Cambuscurrie was a Commissioner of Supply for 
Ross Shire. 

In 1 71 8 Roderick Dingwall of Cambuscurry was married 
(contract dated 12th July) to Barbara Lindsay, only child of 
William Lindsay of Culsh (662) by Barbara Guthrie his third 
wife, and on the nth February, 1742, John Dingwall, son of 
Roderick Dingwall of Cambuscurry, was appointed keeper of the 
Minute Book of the Court of Session. 



18. Dingwalls (of Glengarry, Ontario). 
The families of the name of Dingwall resident in Glengarry 
are the descendants of two brothers, John and James Dingwall, 
natives of the Parish of Duthil, Speyside, Morayshire, who left 
their home in Scotland, came to America, and settled in one of 
the British Colonies previous to the Revolutionary War. Owing 
to his brother James jc'ning the Loyalists in that struggle, John 



DINGWALLS. 



XXV. 



the 



Dingwall was involved in heavy loss, including that of his prop- 
erty, and had to seek a home elsewhere. This he found in Canada, 
on the Black River, or, as the name really is, Riviere aux Raisins, 
in what forms now the County of Glengarry, where both brothers 
settled close to the site of Williamstown. Their descendants 
have been well known in that locality for worth and respect- 
ability, and several have occupied important and influential 
positions in the community. John Dingwall was born in 1745, 
and died in December, 1819. His two daughters, Ann and 
Sophia, joined him after the year 1783. The former married 
William McKay, and was maternal grandmother of George A. 
Drew, Esq., the present County Judge in Wellington. Sophia 
married Richard McBain, and was mother of Messrs. John D. 
McBain and James C. McBain of Williamstown. Among the 
descendants of James Dingwall, the younger of the two brothers, 
whose family consisted of five sons and five daughters, is Mr. 
James Ding\vall, the present Clerk of the Peace and County 
Attorney for Dundas, Stormont and Glengarry. 

Alexander Dingwall, residing at Knock-el-Granish, the father 
of the two brothers, by his will in the year 1783, of which a 
brother-in-law, Donald Grant of the same place, was one of the 
executors, made a bequest to John an J James, conditional on 
their returning to Scotland within ten years. The condition 
never being fulfilled, they lost the benefit he had designed for 
them. He had two other sons, Alexander and Donald, who 
remained in Scotland. The latter had died before his father's 
will was made, leaving two sons and a daughter. 

19. DiD.gwalls (Unconnected). 

(i) Hary Dingwall got a charter under the Great Seal in 1526 
of the lands of Petfure and Denmilne in Invernessshire, and his 
son, Patrick Dingwall, got a charter also under the Great Seal 
in 1537 of Petfure, Pitlundy and Mill of Denmilne. 

(2) John Dingwall, servitor to John MacKiesen, clerk of 
Crail, is mentioned in the Register of the Privy Council, 1597 to 
1600, and John Dingwall (probably the same) got a charter 
under the Great Seal (with three others) of the lands of Tarni- 
katers or Nakedfield in 161 7, most likely " Tornakidders " near 
Crail in Fife, 



XXVI. 



DINGWALLS (UNCONNECTED). 



(3) Roderick Dingwall was served heir 14th January, 1631, 
to Celestine McConnell, the grandfather of his great-grandmother 
(heir portioner). 

(4) William Dingwall, whose death took place in 1679, and 
who was one of the murderers of Archbishop Sharpe, has the 
following epitaph in Straven Churchyard, as given in the 
" Cloud of Witnesses." The name, however, is spelt indiscrim- 
inately, Danziel and Dingwall : 

This Hero brave, who here doth ly, 
Was persecute by tyranny, 
Yet to the Truth he firmly stood, 
'Gainst foes resisting to the blood ; 
Himself and the Gospel did defend, 
Till, for Christ's cause, his life did end. 

(5) Arthur Dingwall in Bray was one of eighty indivi- 
duals against whom a complaint was laid before the Privy 
Council, 1594 to 1598, b}^ John Dunbar of Avoch and Donald 
Rid his servant, for '* coming to the Kirk of Avoch, and there 
uttering many injurious and despiteful speeches " with threats* 
The complainant at the same time preferred a charge of assault 
against Alexander Miller, who had given him " many bloody and 
deadly wounds " as he was passing peaceably upon Dunbar's 
land in Avoch. Dunbar appeared personally in support of his 
complaint. The parties complained of failing to appear, were 
all declared rebels. It would seem that the Laird of Kildun had 
espoused the cause of Miller and those implicated with him ; as, 
about the same time, John Irving of Kynnok became surety for 
Rory Dingwall of Kildun's not hurtmg John Dunbar of Avoch, 
the penalty being 500 merks. As there is no farm now bearing 
the name of Bray in the Parish of Avoch, it may have been one 
called Brae in the neighbouring Parish of Resolis, belonging to 
Mr. Shaw McKenzie of Newhall. This farm was at one time a 
separate estate, the property of a family of the name of Fraser. 
From the contiguity to Avoch this seems most likely, otherwise 
it might be a farm of the same nama in the Parish of Fodderty 
and neighbourhood of Dingwall, belonging to Mr. Davidson of 
Tulloch. 

(6) William Dingwall, servant to the Laird of Balquhain 
(called sometimes Mr. William Leslie of Sevilie or Civilie), is 



N 



DINGWALLS (UNCONNECTED). 



XXVll. 



mentionevi in the Privy Council Register between 1587 and 1592 
as a witnei.s in different suits, and between the latter year and 
1595 in cautionary bonds. In one of these Sir Walter Ogilvy 
of Findlater became surety for William Leslie, with his servants, 
William Dingwall and John Erskine, "that they would not harm 
Mr. Thomas Gairden of Blairtoune " ; and again, Mr. Thomas 
Leslie and Walter Leslie, burgesses of Aberdeen, were sureties 
for Mr. William Leslie ir» ;4'i,ooo, and for William Dingwall and 
John DonaldsoL his servants in 500 merks each. About the 
same time Mr. William Leslie of Civilie, Thomas Dempter of 
Auchterless, and IMr. Thomas Leslie, burgess of Aberdeen, were 
cautioners for seventeen individuals, among whom were William 
Dingwall, Mr. Strauchan, minister, and Mr. Strauchan, reader, 
not to harm Wm. Forbes of Logyfintray. 

(7) William Dingwall, residing in the Parish of Forglen, 
presented a son for baptism in 1648 who was called Robert. 
The witnesses were Mr. Robert Blaire and Mr. Robert Browne- 

(8) The Rev. James Dingwall, minister of the Parish of 
Farr in Sutherlandshire, was born 26th May, 1743. He was a 
native of the Parish of Tarbet, of which he became school- 
master. He was a son of Alexander Dingwall, tenant in Seafield- 
He graduated at King's College, Aberdeen, in 1766, was licensed 
to preach in 1769, ordained as missionary to Achness and settled 
as minister of Farr in March, 1780, where he laboured till his 
death on 6th September, 1814. In the pulpit he is said to have 
been earnest and faithful, judicious and clear. Considering his 
means he was charitable to an extreme. He took a paternal 
interest in the welfare of his flock, and prosecuted his labours 
under the disadvantage of a weak bodily constitution ; yet he 
was never absent from preaching till the last Sabbath of his life. 
He was the author of " Lectures on the Twenty-third Psalm," and 
of sermons on various subjects. If the following notice refers to 
him it cannot have fallen under the notice of Dr. Scott from 
whose " Fasti " the foregoing particulars are gathered. The 
Aberdeen journal of 24th June, 1765, says that the "Rev. 
Mr. Dingwall, an eminent mathematician, has invented a set of 
astronomical tables calculated for discovering the variation of 



XXVlll. 



DINGWALLS (UNCONNECTED). 



the compass in any latitude, without having recourse to the old 
method of observing by azimuth, etc." 

(9 a) Alexander Dingwall in Seilscruick had a daughter, 
Janet, baptized 25th November, 1673. 

(96) John Dingwall (designated in Little Auchry) had a 
son, William, baptized 5th January, 1685 : (in Netherton of 
Auchry) had a son, Adam, baptized 3rd January, 1689, and 
a son, Arthur, baptized 23rd February, 1691 : — (in Overhill) had a 
daughter, Marjory, baptized i8th April, 1696. [Appears in the 
Poll Tax Book, 1696, as tenant in Overhill, his own tax given 
and that of his wife, and of John Mitchell his servant and his 
wife.] 

(9 c) Alexander Dingwall in Over Brounhill had twins, 
Arthur and Lucres, baptized 9th July, 1704, and Margaret, 
baptized 26th October, 1707. 

(9^) Arthur Dingwall (designated in Over Brownhill) had 
a daughter, Anna, baptized 4th February, 1719: — (in Brounhill) 
had a daughter, Jean, baptized 20th September, 1721 (one witness 
being Jean 'Chalmers, Lady Lescraigie, another, John Dingwall 
in Cairnbanno) : — (in Nether Brounhill) had Barbara baptized 1 7th 
October, 1725, one of the witnesses being Barbara Dingwall in 
Forglen. 

[Mem. — ga,b,c,d are extracted from the Register of Bap- 
tisms for the Parish of Monwhitter.] 

(10) The Rev. William Dingwall, minister of the Parish of 
Forgue, born in 1745, was a graduate of Marischal College, 
Aberdeen ; settled at Forgue in 1780, and remained there till his 
death 29th December, 1801. His widow lived till 1829. 

(11) The Rev. George Dingwall, minister of the Parish of 
Auchterless, was born in 1786 at Smallburn, near Turriff in Aber- 
deenshire. He graduated at Marischal College, Aberdeen, in 
1806, and was ordained as minister of Auchterless in 181 1. He died 
at Upper Mill 15th January, 1862, while engaged in pastoral 
duty, and in the act of making some remarks on the uncertainty 
of life with special reference to many recent and sudden deaths in 
the neighbourhood. Scott's '• Fasti " adds : " His deep but unob- 
trubive piety, profound Christian humility and transparent integ- 



DINGWALL — DOIG — DOUGLASS. 



XXIX. 



Bap- 



rity, marked him out as a character of rare excellence." He 
founded two bursaries at the school of Auchterless and one at the 
University of Aberdeen. The following inscription from the 
Turriff burying-ground gives a few particulars regarding his 
relatives: •* Geore-e Dingwall, farmer in Smallburn, born 1696, 
died 13th January, 1763 ; Ann Cuthbert, wife of John Dingwall, 
dyer in Turriff, born in 1746, died 17th March, 1774 ; Alexander 
Dingwall, feuar in Turriff, born in 1772, died 2nd September, 
1826." 

(12) John Dingwall, senior, writer in Edinburgh, died there 
14th Octcbisr, 1775. 

20. Doig (Dundee). 

The ancestry of the Rev. Robert Doig (No. 267 of this 
Record) cannot be traced back farther than his own parents 
(that is to say, on the father's side), nor can it be stated whether 
in that connection there was any relationship to Isobel Doig 
who was married to James Cock, his great grandfather. She 
was born in 1685, and was daughter of the Rev. Mr. Doig, 
minister of Chapelshade, Dundee, a congregation originally in 
connection with the Relief Church, but erected into a Chapel 
of Ease of the Establishment in 1791. The name of Doig is, 
however, of old standing in Dundee, as appears from the Burgh 
Laws. From these we find that in 1475 Thomas Doig was 
witness to a charter of the Weaver Trade ; and in 15 14 and 
1527 mention is made of WiUiam Doig, burgess of Dundee, who 
in the latter year was witness to the ratification by King James 
V. of a charter he had himself given in the former year to the 
walker trade. In these Burgh Laws Thomas Doig, alitster or 
dyer, is spoken of in 1693, while, in 1746, Archibald Doig was 
elected one of the Assessors to the Dean of Guild. 

Several others of the name of Doig, but whom we cannot 
connect with the Rev. Robert Doig, have their names on tomb- 
stones in the " Howff," an old burying-ground of Dundee. 

21. Douglass of Tilwhilly. 

The property of Tilwhilly, with the exception of a brief 
interval in the early part of the present century, has been for 



XXX. 



DOUGLASS (of TILWHILLY). 



four hundred years in the possession of the Douglasses. It came 
into their hands by marriage. In the year 1479 Janet Ogston, 
daughter and co-heiress of Walter Ogston of Ogston, Fetter- 
cairn and Tilwhilly, was married to David Douglass, a nephew 
of the first Earl of Morton. EHzabeth Ogston, her elder sister, 
married Sir Adam Hepburn of Craigs, brother of Patrick, Earl 
of Bothwell, bringing several other valuable properties into that 
family. 

Arthur Douglass of Tilwhilly, grandson of David Douglass 
and Janet Ogston, rebelliously absented himself and his followers 
from the Queen's Army at Gladsmuir, for which he obtained 
remission in 1548. His wife's name was Janet Auchinleck. 
Their son, John Douglass of Tilwnilly, was married in 1576 to 
Giles or Egidia Erskine, granddaughter of John Erskine of 
Dun, who was one of the chief promoters of the Reformation in 
Scotland, and Superintendent of Angus and Mearns. At the 
time they were married the Castle of Tilwhilly was built. It 
stands on the south bank of the River Dee, near the village of 
Upper Banchory, and had been a place of considerable strength. 
Additions were made to it in 1631. During their time, also, the 
unfortunate Regent Earl of Morton, lived for some tim ..x 
disguise at Tilwhilly, passing under the name of "James the 
Grieve." 

As this John Douglass of Tilwhilly had a brother Archibald, 
who was Constable of the Castle of Edinburgh, it scenes not 
unlikely that he was the individual referred to in the following 
extract from a " Diurnal ol Occurrents in Scotland," quoted by 
the Rev. T. McCrie, in an article in the Scottish Christian 
Herald of i6th March, 1839. The "Diurnal" says: "Upon 
the 2nd day of October, 1561, Archibald Douglas, Provost of 
Edinburgh, with the Baillies and Counsele, causit ane procla- 
mation be proclaimit at the Croce, commanding and charging all 
and sundry monks, freris, priestis and all utheris papists and 
profane persons to pas furth of Edinburgh within twenty-four 
hours next after following, under the pain of burnyng of disobey- 
aris upon the cheik, and hurling of thame throw the toun in ane 
cart : — at the quhilk proclamation the queenis grace was very 
commovit. And the samyn day, Mr. Thomas Macalyean was 



DOUGLASS (of TILWHILLY). 



XXXI. 



chosin Provost of Edinburgh, and Archibald Douglas dis- 
chargit for making of the proclamation forsaid, without the 
queenis avyise, togidder with all the baillies." 

John Douglass of Tilwhilly, son of John Douglass and Giles 
Erskine, was married to Mary Young, one of the Maids of 
Honour to the Queen of James VI., and daughter of Sir Peter 
Young ot Seaton, the King's Almoner, and, with George 
Buchanan, co-preceptor to His Majesty. 

John Douglass of Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo (No. 271 of this 
Record) was great grandson of John Douglass and Mary Young, 
and, in 1700, married Agnes Horn. Their grandson, John 
Douglass, younger of Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo, brother of Eliza- 
beth Douglass or Dingwall (No. 269), was pursuing a successful 
career as an advocate, with every prospect of reaching the 
judicial bench, when he was removed by sudden death in 1773, 
at the age of thirty-one. The sad event is deplored in the 
following lines, which appeared in the Scots Magazine, at the 

time, over the signature G. W n. The "genius" of the 

place is supposed to say : — 

This day my darling child, my best loved son, 

The joy, the comfort of yon silvan seat, 
The all-assisting Douglass, now is gone. 

Let fall a tear to his too early fate ! 
But late I saw him midst the learned throng 

Of Nestors sage, the guardians of our Isle, 
Plead Truth's fair cause with eloquence so strong 

As baffled wrong and did oppression foil. 
He, generous stood, the friend of hoary years; 

The injured widow's right he warmly pled ; 
He dried the helpless orphan's falling tears. 

And Falsehood spurned by whomsoever led. 
The dear remembrance, Douglass ! on record 

Shall stand to Time's last verge, deep cut in fame. 
And after ages gladly shall accord 

To sing thy eulogies and bless, thy name. 

He had been married to Hannah Colquhoun, daughter of Sir 
George Colquhoun of Tilly Colquhoun, Bart. They had two 
sons, the elder of whom, in the year 1791, succeeded to the family 
property. The younger, who was not born till after his father's 
death (George Louis Augustus Douglass), was for many years 
Sheriff of Kincardineshire. His brother, John Douglass of Til- 
whilly and Inchmarlo, was enterprising, public-spirited and 
unselfish. His personal interest was less regarded in conse- 



XXXU. DOUGLASS — DOUGLASSES. 

quence, and after his death it was found necessary to dispose of 
the landed property. He had been married to Penuel McKenzie, 
daughter of Dr. John McKenzie of Woodstock or Stricathro, and 
left one son and one daughter. The latter, Ann Douglass, was 
married in 1842 to William Brown, F.R.C.S., Edinburgh. The 
son, John Douglass, followed the business of a manufacturer in 
the Tyrol, and succeeded so well that he was able to re-purchase 
Tilwhilly, the old inheriiance of the family. He lived and died 
much respected. He married jane Kennedy, daughter of James 
Kennedy of Manchester, a son of the family of Knocknalling in 
Galloway. They had two sons and one daughter. The latter 
died early, as did her brother Archibald, a Captain in the Army. 
Within eighteen months of his death, John Sholto Douglass of 
Tilwhilly, the elder brother, lost his life by a fall from a precipice 
in the Tyrol. He had been married in 1863 to Vanda de Poellnitz, 
daughter of the Baron Ernest de Poellnitz and granddaughter 
of the seventeenth Lord Forbes, Premier Baron of Scotland. Of 
this marriage there were two sons and a daughter, who all survive. 

22. Bishop Douglass. 

Considering the brief incidental reference to this distin- 
guished prelate (169), a short notice of himself and of his con- 
nection with the family of Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo, may not be 
out of place. 

His grandfather, Mr. Archibald Douglass, minister of Salton 
in East Lothian, was an uncle of John Douglass of Tilwhilly and 
Inchmarlo (271). He was born about 1641, and graduated at 
the University of Edinburgh in 1661. He was successively 
minister of the Parishes of Douglas, Cavers, Newton and New- 
battle, and in 1681, while holding the last named charge, was 
deprived for refusing the test. In 1684 he was placed at Salton, 
where not long before, the future historian of the Reformation 
and Bishop of Salisbury had laboured. In 1694 he was married 
to Janet Carmichael, and died in 1696. Their son, Archibald 
Douglass, father of the Bishop, was a merchant in Pittenweem in 
Fife ; but at the time of his death in 1743 was Waggon-Master 
General to the British Forces with Captain's rank, and Master 
of the British Coffee House, Cockspur Street, London, a position 



(bishop) DOUGLASS. 



XXXUl. 



which could not have been regarded as inconsistent with his 
social standing. His wife, Isobel Melvill, was a daughter of 
Robert Melvill of Carskierdo, who represented the Burgh of 
Cupar in the Scottish Parliament at the Revolution. Their 
second son, John Douglass, was born at Pittenweem, 14th July, 
1 72 1, educated at the Grammar School of Dunbar, and entered 
St. Mary's College, Oxford, in 1736. He took his Bachelor's 
Degree in 1741, and in 1744 was appointed Chaplain to the 
3rd Foot Guards. He was present at the Battle of Fontenoy. 
He returned to College in 1745 and was elected an Exhibitioner 
on Snell's Foundation. His first charge was the curacy of Tile- 
hurst, near Reading. In 1762 he was appointed Canon of 
Windsor; in 1778 elected Fellow of the Royal and Antiquarian 
Societies ; nr le Bishop of Carlisle in 1787, Dean of Windsor in 
1788, and was translated to the See of Salisbury in 1792. He 
was also a member of the Literary Club, founded by Dr. Samuel 
Johnson and others, and died i8th May, 1807. He was twice 
married. The name of his first wife was Dorothea Pershouse ; 
that of the second, Elizabeth Rooke. She was the mother of 
his son and daughter. Her father, Brudenell Rice Rooke, Esq., 
was a nephew of the gallant Admiral Sir George Rooke, who, in 
William and Mary's reign, commanded several expeditions with 
skill and courage, and who could say on his deathbed to friends 
who wondered that he had not more wealth: " I do not leave 
much, it is true, but what I do leave was honestly gotten. It 
never cost a seaman a tear, nor the nation a farthing." The 
Bishop's works were numerous. One account of them says: 
" Besides these he was concerned in many others, the credit of 
which he suffered their nominal and reputed authors exclusively 
to enjoy." Those he is best known by are : " A Defence of 
Milton against the charge of Plagiarism," and " A refutation of 
Hume's attack on the Credibility of our Lord's Miracles, as 
recorded in the New Testament." The latter closes in the 
following words, addre3sed to Mr. Hume : " I should not have 
undertaken this task, had not the importance of the subject 
made me forget my inability to do it justice, and the silence of 
others better able to defend Christianity, secured this weak 
attempt of mine from a charge of presumption. And if, after all 



XXXIV. DOUGLASS — DRYSDALES. 

that I have offered, you still continue unconvinced, you must 
impute to the unskilfulness of the champion what certainly ought 
not to be imputed to the weakness of his cause. My weapons 
were good if I could have used them effectively. But, though 
' may have failed in my attempt to convince you, my labour has 
at least been crowned with this happy effect : it has strengthened 
my own faith. For, by being obliged to consider, with more 
attention than perhaps I had done before, the nature of your 
objections, their insufficiency has appeared in a stronger light, 
and the closest scrutiny and most impartial examination of the 
evidences which support these miracles on the credibility of 
which the truth of the revelation in the New Testament is built, 
have served only to satisfy me that Christianity is founded upon 
a rock, and that every attempt to sap its foundations tends to 
discover their strength the more. This conviction — a conviction 
not the effect of blind prejudice, but the result of honest enquiry — 
has filled my mind with a satisfaction that can be felt by those 
alone who are sincere believers of a religion which every one 
would wish to be true, who would wish to attain to that glorious 
immortality which it has brought to light and promised to 
mankind." 

The Bishop's son, the Rev. William Douglas, was Canon Resi- 
dentiary of Salisbury, a Prebendary of Westminster, and Vicar of 
Gillingham. He was born in 1769 and died 19th March, 181 9. 
In recording his death the Salisbury and Winchester yoiimal 
observed : " He was eloquent and energetic as a preacher ; his 
information was various and extensive ; his understanding sound 
and manly ; he was frank, sincere, hospitable, liberal in his 
opinions, generous in all his dealings, zealous in serving others. 
He had a heart ever ready and a hand ever open to relieve 
distress." 

He married a daughter of the Baron and Baroness de Brackel 
of Yverdun in Switzerland, and had two sons and three daugh- 
ters. The only surviving son is William Douglas, of Lansdowne 
House, Bath, who has been twice married, and has three sons 
and four daughters. . , _ 

23. Drysdales (Vale of Devon). 
The River Dryfe, on which the Town of Lockerby in Dum- 



drysdai.es. 



XXXV. 



friesshire is situated, helps to water the Parish of Drysdale, and 
this is probably the region from which Drysdales scattered over 
other parts have originally come. For a number of years they 
have been well known in Fife and in Kinross and Clackmannan, 
although the name is not given by Sir Robert Sibbald among 
the heritors of the two former counties in his time. The enter- 
prising manufacturers of the name in Tillycoultry, etc., trace 
their descent, however, lo a family of Douglases from the Parish 
of Drysdale, who kept the assumed name after the necessity for 
concealment passed away. The story, which they believe to be 
genuine, is given in a document preserved and handed down, 
copied first by Symon Drysdale of the Haugh of Dollar in 1620; 
then by Robert Drysdale of Tillycoultry in 1708, and since then 
renewed at different times. It runs thus : '* On the twentieth 
day of May, one thousand five hundred and three years, we, 
Thomas, William and James Douglas, sons of the departed 
Thomas Douglas of Brushwood Haugh in the Parish of Drysdale 
and Shire of Dumfries, left our native place for the reason h'^re 
assigned, viz. : defending our just and lawful rights against our 
unjust neighbour Johnstone of Greenstone Hill, who being 
determined to bring water to his mill through our property, and 
having obtained leave of his friend the King, began his opera- 
tions on the sixteenth of May. We prevented him by force. 
The next day he brought twenty of his vassals to carry on the 
work. We with two friends and three servants (eight in all) 
attacked Johnstone with his twenty ; and in the contest fourteen 
of his men were killed along with their base leader. A report 
of these proceedings was carried to the King and we were 
obliged to fly (the tocsin being sounded). We took shelter 
under the shadow of the Ochil Hills in a lonely valley, on the 
River Devon. After having lived there two full years we returned 
home in disguise, but found all our property in the possession 
of Johnstone's friends, and a great reward offered for our lives. 
We, having purchased a small spot called the Haugh of Dollar 
and changed our names to the name of our native parish, are 
clearly in mind to spend the residue of our days under the ope 
of the Ochils, and wish the name of Drysdale to flourish in the 
lonely valley. The King passed through this with his court on 



XXX VI. 



DRYSDALE — DYCE — FALCONER. 



the 1 2th of June, fifteen hundred and six, going from Stirhng to 
Falkland, and dined at Halliday's Green (an eastern neighbour), 
but we were not known." Alexander Drysdale, the first of the 
family mentioned on these pages of whom we have heard, was 
born in 1692 and died in 1755, but whether he belonged to the 
neighbourhood of Hawkslaw, near Coldstream, where he and 
his wife, Isobel Halyburton, originally resided, has not been 
ascertained. 

24. Dyce (Old Aberdben). 

We have no means of knowing who were the parents of 
Andrew Dyce, merchant, and at one time Treasurer of Old 
Aberdeen (the father of James Dyce of Disblair, No. 296), nor 
where they resided. He was born in 1657 and died 25th April, 
1731. His wife, Janet Gray, was born in 1658 and died 6th 
February, 1725. Of her parentage we are equally ignorant. 
In January, 1698, they were together infeft in Mr. Alexander 
Fraser's rigg or croft in Old Aberdeen ; and in December, 1712, 
the husband was infeft in another rigg there. The eldest son of 
Andrew Dyce and Janet Gray, as has been seen, was James 
Dyce of Disblair; the second, William, was minister of Belhelvie, 
and is incidentally noticed (No. 297). The fourth son, Andrew, 
was a shipmaster, and was married to Jean Brebner. He died 
27th May, 1745, at the age of forty-nine. His widow was infeft 
in 1751 in an annuity out of some lands in Kemnay on a life rent 
obligation granted by George Burnet of Kemnay, with consent 
of his wife, who was a niece of Captain Andrew Dyce. Robert 
and Alexander, the third and fifth sons of Andrew Dyce and 
Janet Gray, died respectively at the ages of twenty-six and 
twenty-three. , 

25. Falconers of Phesdo. 

A few particulars may be given here respecting the parents 
of Margaret Falconer or Arbuthnott (314) and her paternal 
grandfather, John Falconer of Phesdo, who held the office of 
Warden of the Mint. In the year 1682, while he was Warden, 
malversations in the office had been discovered, and prosecutions 
had been instituted. When word reached him that he was to 



FALCONER — FF.RGUS. 



XXXVll. 



be inchuled in the prosecution, he is said to have been so 
affected by the intimation that lie died of a broken heart. At all 
events he died very suddenly. His son, afterwards Sir James 
Falconer of Phesdo, was born i6th August, 1648, admitted an 
advocate in 1674, and took his seat on the Bench as Lord 
Phesdo in 1689, and was made a Lord of Justiciary in the 
following year. He represented Kincardineshire in the Parliament 
of 1703-4, and took a prominent part in the negotiations for 
Union. He was also one of the Lords of the Exchequer and 
one of the Privy Councillors to King William and Queen Anne. 
He died loth June, 1706, and was buried in Grey Friars' Church- 
yard, Edinburgh. With his wife, Elizabeth Trent, to whom he 
was married in September, 1673, he got a portion of £20,000 
Scots. They had a large family. Their eldest son, John 
Falconer, afterwards of Phesdo, was included with his father 
and mother in 1695 i" ^ ratification granted to them of the lands 
of Lauriston in Kincardineshire, proceeding on the resignation 
of Alexander Straiton of that Ilk. After his mother's death he 
disputed various provisions she had made by will on the plea 
that from old age she was mentally incapacitated to make them. 
From the proceedings in the case we find it stated on the part 
of the defendants that " his mother, by long widowhood and 
good management, had acquired the lands and Barony of 
Balnakettle, and settled the property on him in such a way as to 
put it out of his power to spend his estate as he had well-nigh 
done by his father's, till she redeemed and restored it." He died 
in 1764 at the age of ninety-one. Her death had taken place on 
the 25th July, 1748, when she was in her ninety-fourth year. There 
is nothing to show who her parents were, but it seems almost cer- 
tain that she was of the same family as the Trentsof Pitcullo in Fife. 
One of her sons bore the name of Maurice which was the Chris- 
tain name of the last Trent of Pitcullo, who died in 1781. A 
few fragmentary notices of others of the name of Trent will be 
be found in the Appendix. The Falconers of Phesdo were 
descended from Archibald Falconer, second son of Sir Alexander 
Falconer of Halkerton, in the reign of James V. 

26. Fergus and its Founders. 

(i) As various individuals mentioned in these pages have 



XXXVlli. FliUGUS, KTC. 

been or are residents of Fergus and the neighbourhood, the 
following particulars may be acceptable: Mr. Fergusson of 
Woodhill, after visiting Canada in 1831 and 1833, concluded his 
notes of travel addressed to the Directors of the Highland 
Society, in these words : " The land in the Township of 
Nichol is of the best description, and I was altogether so 
entirely satisfied with soil, situation and other advantages, that 
since this visit I have purchased a block of 7,000 acres. Upon 
this, with the aid and co-operation of some friends, ere many 
years pass away, I hope to see a thriving community established. 
There are some fine falls upon the river, which is clear as 
crystal, flowing over a limestone bed, full of delicious trout, and 
the forest abounds in a variety of game. It may be said that I 
am partial to the Province, and I readily admit the fact. I liked 
it at first, and I feel satisfied that I shall continue to like it 
better the longer I know it. It wants what the mother country 
can well spare — capital and people. Let these continue to flow 
in as they have done for two years past, and the wilderness will 
assume an aspect which can hardly be anticipated or described." 
Mr. Fergusson's expectations were not disappointed, although 
some of his calculations may have fallen short of accomplish- 
ment. 

Fergus lies on the Grand River, between Lakes Huron 
and Ontario ; about sixty miles from the latter, eighty from the 
former, both now readily accessible by railway communication. 
It has a population of about 2,000 and a good market ; is well 
provided with churches and schools and has every facility for carry- 
ing on business — the country round being well cultivated — the 
population in general enterprising and industrious. 

(2) The Hon. Adam Fergusson of Woodhill, the chief founder 
of the Fergus Settlement, was descended from the family of 
Bellechandy in Perthshire, of which his grandfather, the Rev. 
Adam Fergusson, minister of Moulin, was a son. His grand- 
mother, Emily Menzies, was a daughter of the family of Castle 
Menzies ; their son, Neil Fergusson of Pitcullo, Sheriff of Fife, 
as mentioned in another place, married Agnes Colquhoun, 
daughter of Sir George Colquhoun of Tilly Colquhoun, Bart., and 
widow of Maurice Trent of Pitcullo ; thet'r eldest son, Adam 



FERGUS, ETC. 



XXXIX. 



Fergusson, succeeded to Woodhill. He was a zealous agricul- 
turist, and his visit to America in 1831 was hailed with satis- 
faction by the Directors of the Highland Society who on his 
leaving Scotland testified to the valuable assistance the Society 
had received from him. He was twice married, and on proceed- 
ing to Amf;rica was accompanied by his second wife and the 
seven sons of 'his first marriage. He resided at Woodhill, his pro- 
perty on Lake Ontario, near the Village of Waterdown ; but in the 
early days of the Fergus Settlement was frequently there along 
with his family taking a lively interest in the prosperity of the 
place and of the settlers. Mr. Fergusson, who was then a 
Member of the Legislative Council of Canada, died in the year 
1862. Of this once numerous family only one son survives. 
Three were married but left no descendants. These were Niel 
James Blair of Balthayock, James Scott Fergusson of Port 
Dover and Robert Colquhoun Fergusson, latterly of London. 
Three never married — the Hon. Adam Johnston Fergusson 
Blair, David Blair Fergusson and John Fergusson — all gone. 
The Hon. Mr. Fergusson Blair originally practised as a barrister 
in Guelph, and was County Court Judge. He became Attorney- 
General and at his death in the year 1867 was President of the 
Council. The sole survivor, George Douglass Fergusson, resides 
in Fergus, is married and has a family, some of them married. 
The estate of Balthayock in Perthshire, ff- four centuries the 
property of the Blairs, was acquired through the Hon. Adam 
Fergusson's first wife, the only daughter of Majoi James Johnston, 
H. E. L Co.'s Service, who had married the heiress, Miss Blair 
of Balthayock. The property has now passed into other hands. 
Influenced by Mr. Fergusson's high character, representations 
and example, several individuals mentioned in these pages 
joined the settlement. Among these were Messrs. Alexander 
D. Ferrier (323), Alexander Drysdale (275), the compiler of this 
Record and his father, and George C. Hamilton, referred to in 
the Appendix. 

(3) While reference has necessarily been made mainly to Mr. 
Fergusson in connection with the settlement, it would be unpar- 
donable to omit notice of Mr. James Webster, who from the first 
was associated in the undertaking, resided for many years per- 



xl. 



FERGUS — FERRIER. 



manently in Fergus, and did much to further its progress, as he 
was enterprising, enthusiastic and genial. He also engaged in 
mercantile business, in which others mentioned in this Record 
were for a time connected with him. He acted as a magistrate 
and was for some years in Parliament. Latterly he was appointed 
Registrar for the County of Wellington, resided in Guelph from 
1859, and died there in 1869. He was a younger son of Mr. 
Webster of Balruddery, near Dundee, and grandson of Mr. 
Hunter of Seaside. He was married to the eldest daughter of 
George Wilson of Harvey Cottage, near Fergus, who was a 
nephew of John Harvey of Kinnettles (587), while her mother, a 
daughter of Dr. William Dyce of Aberdeen, was grand-daughter 
of James Chalmers, publisher of the Aberdeen jfojirnal (133). 
Mr. Webster's widow and surviving members of Is family, not 
resident elsewhere, remain in Guelph. 

27. Ferrier of Kirklands, etc 

A family of the name of Ferrier, using the device of three 
horse-shoes, is said to have lived in Tranent in East Lothian, in 
the reign of Alexander H. Those of the name in this Record 
were for some generations proprietors of Kirklands in Renfrew- 
shire, now merged in the lands of Blantyre. The armorial bear- 
ings are the same as those already mentioned. William Ferrier 
of Kirklands and Fosmachen, the first we hear of, married a 
Miss Campbell of Garscube. Their son, another William 
Ferrier of Kirklands, was married about 1710 to Agnes Ewing, 
a daughter of the Laird of Keppoch ; and their son John Ferrier, 
a writer in Linlithgow, who had a legal appointment in the 
Customs there, was married about 1735 to Grizel Hamilton, 
daughter and heiress of Sir Walter Sandilands Hamilton, Bart., 
of Westport. They had six sons and seven daughters. Two of 
the sons died young. Of the others, the eldest, Wdliam Ferrier 
Hamilton of Westport, a Lieutenant in the Navy, commmanded 
the sailors who dragged a cannon up the Heights of Abraham 
at the capture of Quebec. He was married but had no family. 
Walter Ferrier of Somerford, Stirlingshire, the next brother, 
commanded a ship in the H. E. L Co.'s Service. He married 
Lilias Wallace, heiress of Cairnhill, Their son, John Ferrier 



FERRIER — FORBES. 



Xli. 



Hamilton of Westport and Cairnhill, a Captain in the 3rd 
Dragoon Guards, married a daughter of Viscount Gort, and left 
issue. Of the other two sons of John Ferrier and Grizel 
Hamilton, Hay, a Major-General in the Army, has a place in 
this Record (324). His immediately elder brother, James Ferrier, 
one of the principal Clerks of Session, married a Miss Coutts, 
and had a large family, one of their daughters. Miss Susan 
Edmondstone Ferrier, being the authoress of three standard 
works of fiction, " Marriage," *' Inheritance " and " Destiny," 
characterized, if has been justly observed, by *' a piquant 
humour and naive appreciation of the ludicrous." She was an 
intimate and much valued friend of the great novelist. Sir 
Waltor Scott. One of her nephews, Professor James Frederick 
Ferrier, attained eminence as a metaphysician, and married a 
daughter of Professor Wilson, better known as " Christopher 
North." Of the seven daughters of John Ferrier and Grizel 
Hamilton, three died young. The others were married to 
Lieutenant Adamson, Mr. Finnie, Mr. Burns of the Customs and 
Dr. Glen. An account of some of the members of Mrs. Burns' 
family will be found in the Appendix. 



28. Rev. John Forbes (Pitnacaddell). 
The Rev. John Forbes of Pitnacaddell, minister of Pitsligo 
and of Old Deer, where he died 29th April, 1769, was born in 1688, 
and was son of James Forbes of Pitnacadell in the Parish of 
Aberdour. Scott, in his " Fasti," says that " he was a fearless 
and uncompromising character, viewing matters generally with 
the popular eye ; adding to a manly figure the literature of an 
evangelical preacher and the accomplishments of a gentleman, 
and distinguished as a pastor by piety, virtue and entire devotion 
to the cause of his Master and Lord." McKelvie, in his 
*• Annals of the Secession Church," represents him as one of 
forty ministers who protested against the Act of Assembly, 1732, 
making certain restrictions in regard to settlements, and says : 
" He continued to inveigh from the pulpit against the corruptions 
of the Established Church, producing disaffection in many 
towards it, and leading to secession from it." Hogg's " Jacobite 
Relics" (H., No. 66) contains some verses on Mr, Forbes, 



xlii. 



FORBES — FORDYCE. 



attributed to the well-known John Skinner, which we should be 
loath to regard as a fair representation of the minister of Old 
Deer. The character given above from Scott, corresponds more 
with what we have heard of the man, on whose ministrations 
the great-grandmother of the compiler of this Record (Jean 
Fordyce of Culsh) was wont to attend while residing in the 
neighbouring parish. Mr. Forbes's wife, Margaret Hay, daughter 
of Mr. George Hay, lessee of Gavill, Old Deer, died at Cullen 
22nd April, 1796,. She is believed to have been a near relative 
of the family of Fordyce of Ay ton, as noticed more fully in the 
Appendix. 

29. Fordyce of Achorthies. 

William Fordyce of Achorthies, merchant in Aberdeen and 
factor to the Laird of Gight, was Treasurer of Aberdeen in 1736, 
and one of the Baillies in 1740. His parentage is not mentioned 
where he is spoken of; but the time his name first appears, 
renders it not unlikely that (as he must have had the degree of 
M.A., being always styled" Mr.") he may have been the William 
Fordyce, who, in 1725, held a bursary for fifty merks in Marischal 
College, on Alexander Galloway's Mortification or Endowment. 
Baillie Fordyce's name is unhappily associated with a disgrace- 
ful system of kidnapping, which was carried on in Aberdeen, 
between the years 1740 and 1746. The system was exposed by 
one of the victims who returned home, and after much delay 
secured the conviction of Baillie Fordyce and others impUcated, 
several of whom were of respectable standing in the community, 
and his own connections by marriage. He died in 1766, having 
been twice married. His first wife, by the Latin inscription on 
her tombstone in Saint Nicholas Churchyard, Aberdeen, appears 
to have been of an honourable family, •' stirpis generosae," very 
probably the Davidsons of Newton, who became by marriage 
Gordons of Gight, as her name was Isabella Davidson, and as 
her husband was factor on Gight, and Sir Alexander Gordon of 
Gight, a witness at several baptisms of the children. She was 
born in 1705, and died 24th October, 1737. Two years later 
Baillie Fordyce had been married to his second wife, Margaret 
Cochran, who was probably a daughter of Walter Cochran, Town 



FORDYCES. 



xliii. 



Clerk Depute. They had four daughters, Christian, married to 
John Donald, and Mary, married to William Mitchell, junior, 
both merchants in Aberdeen; Jean, married to James Dyce, 
barber or " peruke maker " ; and Isobell, married to George 
Walker, dyer, also of Aberdeen. A son of Baillie Fordyce's first 
marriage, William Fordyce, younger of Achorthies, was a 
graduate of Marischal College. We know nothing further 
respecting him, but that he must have been married while very 
young to a lady whose name was Elizabeth Fraser, as he was 
born in May, 1734, and they had a child named Thomas, born in 
1 753. This lady's name, coupled with the knowledge that Captain 
William Fordyce of the Marines, who got his Lieutenancy in that 
corps in 1755, married a niece of Alexander Fraser Lord Strichen, 
might, to those like ourselves without further information — sug- 
gest the enquiry whether the Captain of Marines and the young 
Laird of Achorthies might not be one and the same individual. 

30. Fordyce of Ardo. 

John Fordyce, a warrant officer in Anson's fleet, who accom- 
panied the great navigator in his voyage round the world, shortly 
after returning to his native country acquired the estate of Ardo 
(or Ardoch) in the Parish of Banchory Devenick by purchase. 
The Rev. Dr. PauU of Banchory in his " Aberdeenshire Past 
and Present" (1881) — says that he travelled from London to 
Aberdeen on horseback with all his prize money in specie in his 
saddle bags, and bought Ardo for ;^500. Dr. Paul! adds that 
so greatly had the value of land risen that " the property was 
sold recently for £40,000." When Mr. Fordyce was infeft in 
Ardo in 1748, he is designated merchant in Huntly. He may 
have been a native of Huntly. He married a daughter of Charles 
Irvine of Cults, a neighbouring proprietor, a niece of John 
Douglass of Tillwhilly and Inchmarlo (270), and died 4th June, 
1794. For many years the property was enjoyed by his daughter 
who never married. At her death it passed into the hands of rela- 
tives of the name of Watson, her successor, who assumed the name 
of Fordyce in addition, being a son of the Rev. Andrew Watson 
who was minister of Tarland from 1799 to 1845. Another con- 
nection of the family, the Rev. James McLean, minister of Keith, 



xliv. 



FORDYCES. 



and afterwards of Urquhart, is said in Scott's, "Fasti," to have 
been a pious and highly esteemed divine. Hewasminister of Keith 
from 1795 to 1825, and of Urquhart from the latter date till his 
death in 1840. He was father of Mr. George McLean, Governor 
of Cape Coast Castle, who was married 7th June, 1838, to the 
gifted poetess Letitia Elizabeth Landon (L. E. L.). 

The Aberdeen journal of 1797 contains the advertisement of 
some property in the Town of Huntly, belonging to Elizabeth and 
Ann Fordyce, application regarding sale to be made to them or 
to the Rev. Mr. McLean, minister of Keith. 

31. Fordyce of Ayton. 

Mr. Alexander Fordyce, minister of the Parish of RafFord, 
may have been born about 1643, as he matriculated at King's 
College, Aberdeen, in 1659. He was probably a native of Moray- 
shire, being designated " Moraviensis," at his matriculation. He 
graduated 30th April, 1663, was presented to the Parish of Raf- 
ford in 1668, and settled there 15th July. It was his only charge and 
he died there in September 1715. His wife's name was Anna 
Meldrum, and under date i6th October, 1671, the Laird 
of Brodie writes in his Diary, " Mr. Al""- Fordice and his 
wyf Anna Meldrum cam here. I read a lyn from Mr. George Mel- 
drum, desiring that the Lord's work in that place might be remem- 
bered." They had at least two sons, Thomas and George, and 
a daughter, Sarah, who married Sir Francis Grant of CuUen, a 
Lord of Session, ancestor of the Monymusk family, a good 
man, an upright judge, and a man of great ability, regarding 
whom Wodrow the Church historian records, that when the near 
approach of death was communicated to him by his brother- 
in-law, Mr. Fordyce ofAyton,he took his hand, saying: " Brother, 
you have brought me the best news ever I heard." Even in the 
selection of a motto when his armorial bearings were matricu- 
lated, the tendency of his mind was shown ; " jfehovah jfireh " — 
" the Lord will provide," with two angels as supporters, and 
another motto ; " Suum cuiqiie.'' He died in 1726, leaving three 
sons and three daughters. Thomas Fordyce, afterwards of Ayton 
in Berwickshire, the elder son of the minister of Rafford, may 
have been born about 1680. He was a writer in Edinburgh ^ 



FORDYCE (of AYTON). 



xlv. 



and factor for the York Building Co., which had purchased 
several of the estates forfeited by the nobility and gentry who 
had taken part in the 171 5 Rebellion. He is believed to have 
resided in Covenant Close, Edinburgh, but till 1742 owned a 
large dwelling house with garden in the " Town " of Corstorphine, 
which he sold in that year to Dame Janet Dick, Lady Cunning- 
ham. He died in Edinburgh, loth May, 1755, in an advanced 
age. He had been twice married: first, 17th August, 1714, to 
Janet Scott, daughter and heiress of John Scott, junior, of 
Gillesbie, in the Parish of Eskdalemuir, Annandale, afterwards to 
a daughter of Sir Adam Whitefoord of Blairquhan in Ayrshire, 
Bart. His son, John Fordyce of Ayton, born in 1735, was at one 
time a merchant in Edinburgh, a Merchant Councillor of Edin- 
burgh in 1759, and in 1761 an unsuccessful candidate for its 
representation in Parliament. In 1766 he succeeded his uncle 
Allan Whitefoord of Ballochmyle as Receiver-General of the 
Land Tax for Scotland. In 1772 he was a partner in the bank- 
ing house of Fordyce, Malcolm & Co, of Edinburgh, which was 
involved in the disastrous failure of Mr. Alexander Fordyce of 
London. In 1793 he was appointed Surveyor-General of Crown 
Lands, an office he held till his death, ist July, 1809. He had 
been married in 1767 to Catharine Maxwell, eldest daughter of 
Sir William Maxwell of Monreith, in Wigtownshire, Bart., and 
sister of the well known Jane, Duchess of Gordon. Of their 
family, one daughter married Mr. Blair of Blair ; another married 
her cousin, the eldest son of Sir William Maxwell ; another was 
married to Lieut. -Colonel Balfour of Balbirnie, and another to 
Captain Alexander Skene, R.N. 

Thomas John Fordyce of Ayton (the eldest son) was married 
in 1806 to Ann Buchan, daughter of George Buchan of Kello, 
and died at Frankfort in 1839. ^ : i m 

Lieut. Colonel John Fordyce {their eldest son), commanding 
the 74th Highlanders, was killed in action with the enemy on 
the heights above Waterkloof, Cape of Good Hope, 6th Novem- 
ber, 1 85 1, deeply lamented. 

Another son, a Colonel in the Army, took the name of Buchan 
in addition to that of Fordyce, on succeeding to the estate of 
Kello. The estate of Ayton is now the property of Mr. Mitchell 
Innes. 



-*" 



xlvi. 



FORDYCES. 



The Rev. George Fordyce, younger son of the minister of 
RafFord, was bor.> in 1683, hcensed by the Presbytery 22nd 
April, 1708, and settled as minister of Corstorphine, i8th October, 
1709, continuing there till his death, 30th August, 1767. He was 
married 9th July, 171 3, to Jean Douglas, daughter of Henry Doug- 
lasof Friarshaw in the Parish of Corstorphine. They had two sons 
and five daughters. The names of the sons were George and 
Henry, of the daughters, Anna, Sarah, Jean, Martha and Eliza- 
beth. Anna was married in 1741 to John Dickie, junior, of 
Corstorphine Hill, writer in Edinburgh. She died in 1791. 
Sarah was married in 1743 to the Rev. David Moubrie of Currie. 

There is reason to believe that Mrs. Forbes, wife of the Rev. 
John Forbes of Pitnacaddel, minister of Old Deer, was nearly 
related to the Ayton family. Her maiden name was Margaret 
Hay. She was married 29th January, 1740, and latterly removed 
to Cullen, where she died 22nd April, 1796. Her father, Mr. 
George Hay, had a lease of the forfeited lands of Gavell in the 
Parish of Old Deer, but we have no means of knowing what his 
wife's name was. It may be noticed, however, that the baptis- 
mal register of RafFord (t.'ic parish of which the father of the 
first Fordyce of Aytcn v/as minister) has the following entry : 
'* On the 28th March, 1709, Ann, daughter of George Hay and 
Barbara Fordyce, was baptized." The omission of the prefix 
" Mr." would tend to indicate that the future lessee of Gavell 
was not this George Hay, otherwise dates would answer, and a 
sister of Mrs. Forbes be the child baptized in RafFord. On the 
24th December, 1737, Alexander Hay, son to Mr. George Hay in 
Gavill, was witness to a bond by William Fordyce of Culsh and 
others. 

Some particulars respecting the minister of Old Deer will 
be found in the Appendix, and in this Record (348), it is intimated 
that there is also reason to believe in relationship of the 
Fordyces of Gask and Culsh to the Ayton family. 

32. Fordyces (Unconnected). 

(i) William Fordyce ("Willielmus Fordise"), formerly " ser- 
vitor to William, Lord Salton," referred to 8th April, 1544, in a 
cause between the Laird of Innes and Lord Salton. 



FORDYCES (unconnected). 



xlvii. 



(2) Robert Fordyce in Reneiss (Renneiss or Rayndeiss), on 
assize for trial of Andrew Man for witchcraft, 1598. 

(3) George Fordyce in Quhytfield, renounced the lands of 
Over and Nether Craigiebie, 8th April, i6i9,to James Ogilvy, in 
Boyne (Banifshire). 

(4) John Fordyce was infeft in 1623 in half the lands of 
Meikle Drunie of Keith (Banifshire), and in 1624 granted rever- 
sion of them to Lord Deskford. 

(5) Alexander Fordyce, •• servitor to Nathaniel Keith of 
Cocklaw," included with others in criminal letters in 1622 
against Sir William Keith of Ludquharn, Kt. (nephew of the 
Laird of Cocklaw), for slaughter of Andrew Fraser, an infant, 
son to Andrew Fraser, younger of Muchalls. 

(6) Francis Fordyce, A.M., graduated gth July, 1672, at King's 
College, Aberdeen, minister of Old Cumnock, " forced by ninety 
armed men into the churchyard, discharged to preach, and had 
his gown torn, 1688." — Scott. 

(7) George Fordyce, gentleman, tenant in Milne of Charle- 
toune Aboyne, 1696, paying poll tax for himself, his wife and 
three daughters. 

(8) Alexander Fordyce, post horse hirer in Aberdeen, and 
Elizabeth Irving his wife had a son, James, baptized 6th Octo- 
ber, 1700, by Dr. William Blair. 

(9) George Fordyce, " sone and heir to the deceased George 
Fordyce in Muirraik," infeft February, 1713, in an annuity out 
of the lands of Techmuiry and Parcock, proceeding on a bond 
granted by James Gordon of Techmuiry. 

(10) Thomas Fordyce, notary in 1712 and 1716, on sasines 
given to James Urquhart of Byth — to Elizabeth Abercrombie, 
spouse to William Baird of Auchmedden, and Mrs. Jean Porter- 
field, spouse to Mr. James Urquhart of Byth. 

(11) James Fordyce, merchant in Aberdeen, and his wife 
Elspet Garden had a daughter, Katharine, baptized nth 
December, 1740 (Robert Fordyce, shipmaster, being witness). 
[In the Appendix a notice will be found of a descendant, John 
Ramsay, sub-editor of the Aberdeen journal.] 

(12) William Fordyce — who was appointed, 26th April, 1755, 
Second Lieutenant 31st Company of Marines ; 3rd September, 



.■wrtSWWWB** 



xlviii. 



FORDYCE. 



1756, First Lieutenant, 38th Company, and May, 1761, Cap- 
tain in the 112th Company — is probably the same as William 
Fordyce who was Groom of the Privy Chamber, Carver and 
Cup-bearer to King George III., and whose wife, a niece of 
Alexander Fraser of Strichen, a Lord of Session, died in Lon- 
don in January, 1785. They appear to have had three 
daughters, Margaret Jemima, Amelia Elizabeth and Isobell. 
Of these, the first-named was married in March, 1782, at 
Haddington, to Sir Richard Perrot, Bart. ; the next was mar- 
ried gth February, 1797, to Major-General William Souter, of 
the Marines ; the last-named, Isobell, was married in December, 
1789, to James Kelly, Esq., son of Colonel Kelly, of the Madras 
Establishment. She wrote several novels which were popular 
in their day, and is said to have been accustomed to boast that 
•• she was born in a castle (that of Cairnbro'), nursed in a cottage 
by one of the family cottars, and bred at Court." She married, 
in her widowhood, a wealthy merchant of the name of Hedgeland, 
and was alive in 1849 at the age of ninety. She was mother of 
the distinguished lawyer, Sir Fitzroy Kelly, Lord Chief Baron 
of the Exchequer, of whom, one account speaks, as " in early 
life a grocer's assistant, and enabled to join the Bar through his 
own industry, resolution and perseverence." [Cairnburgh Castle, 
or " Cassteall-Carn-na-Barra " was the ancient name of the seat 
of the Grants of Glenmorriston, but whether the castle referred 
to by Mrs. Kelly we have no means of knowing.] 

(13) Alexander Fordyce, appointed in 1761 a Lieutenant in 
the Royal Navy, died at Nairn, 23rd August, 1781. His widow 
died 27th March, 1800, at her house in St. David's Street, 
Edinburgh. A daughter, Eliza M. Fordyce, died at her 
mother's house in Edinburgh 29th November, 1798, and another 
daughter, Emilia Fordyce, was married at Edinburgh in March, 
1791, to John Stennett, M.D., of St. James's, Jamaica, where she 
died in March, 1803. 

(14) Rev. WilHam Fordyce, M.A., was appointed in July, 
1758, Chaplain of H.M.S. Union, ninety guns. 

(15) James Fordyce, Sheriff-Substitute of the Upper District 
of Banffshire, was appointed in May, 1760, a Lieutenant in 
Colonel Morris' regiment. 



FOKDYCE. 



xlix. 



iCt 

in 



(i6) James Fordyce, Lieutenant in the 89th Regiment (possi- 
bly the same as No. 15), died at London, 12th May, 1766, a few 
days after his return from a voyage undertaken for the recovery 
of his health, which had been greatly impaired in the service of 
his country in the East Indies. The Aberdeen yournal, in 
noticing his death, observed : " The wit and humour which 
this gentleman eminently possessed, and which rendered him an 
agreeable companion, was not more conspicuous than the 
benevolence of his heart in which the real friend shone with 
lustre." 

(17) Miss Fordyce of New Broad Street, London, was 
married in 1764 to Charles Ferguson, merchant in London, 
seventh son of Sir fames Ferguson (Lord Kilkerran). » 

(18) James Fordyce, Esq., died at London, 30th Septem- 
ber, 1769. 

(19) Charles Fordyce, Captain, 14th Regiment of Foot, died 
in St. Vincent's, November, 1772, in a skirmish with the Caribs. 

(20) Jacobina Fordyce, spouse of Mr. Charles Mackell, lately 
of Jamaica, died at Edinburgh, nth September, 1789. 

(21) Alexander Fordyce, Major, 81 st Regiment, fell at the 
Battle of Talavera, 26th July, 1809. His mother, Helen Munro, 
died at Garmouth, 20th May, 1813. 

(22) George Fordyce, writer in Edinburgh, died there ist 
August, 1818. 

The Poll Tax Book of Aberdeenshire (i6g6) has the follow- 
ing entries of individuals of the name of Fordyce, viz. : 

Alexander (i) in BuggelhoU (Dunbennan) and his wife ; (2) 
cottar and cordiner in Maynes of Fyvie (Fyvie) and Issobell 
Milne his spouse ; (3) in Kinnermit (Turriff), Isobell Hall, his 
wife and two children ; (4) smith in Aschallach (Forgue), his 
wife and son and daughter. 

Anna, servant (receiving no fee) in the family of John Forbes 
younger of Balfluig (Alford). 

Barbara, wife of John Smith, cottar and tayleor in Maynes 
of Fyvie (Fyvie). 

Bessie, a cottar wife in the Parish of Dunbennan. 

George (i), tenant in Seggiedin (Kinethmond) and his wife; 
(2) herd on the lands of Gight (Fyvie), his fee, sixteen merks, 



1. 



FORDYCRS — FRASRR. 



^ ann. ; (3) servant to John Fordyce, tenant and wadsetter 
(Turriff). 

Isobell (i), wife of George Chalmer, tenant and carpenter in 
Kirktoune of Tillynessel ; (2) servant to John Mitchelson in 
Manor Place of Sheills (Belhelvie), fee, £^ js. ^d. 

James (i), servant to William Mortimer, yeoman, tenant 
in Luesk (Rayne), his fee, £16 in the year for all ; (2) miller in 
Cleatt (Clatt). 

Janet (i), servant to Marjorie Webster, tenant in Old Leslie 
(Leslie), her fee, £8 ; (2) servant to John Allan, tenant in Corse 
of Monelly (Forgue), fee, etc. 

John (i), servant to James Couper, tenant in Cleatt, fee £8, 
^ ailn. ; (2) servant to Thomas Skene in W. CoUonach (Dunben- 
nan), fee per annum, £16. 

Peter (i), sub-tenant in Cottown of Fyvie (Fyvie) and 
Barbara Johnston his spouse ; (2) a young boy in the service of 
Normand Anderson in Glen of Arclach (Dumbennan), his 
yearly fee, £"4. 

Margaret (i), wife of Patrick Panton, tennant in Middlethird 
Monwhitter ; (2) servant to William Mitchell, tenant in Well- 
heads (Dumbennan), her fee per annum, £^. 

Robert, tenant in Conzie (Forgue) and Elspet Cruickshank, 
his wife. 

William (i), tenant in Knightsmilne (Drumblade), his wife, 
and James, George and Francis Fordyce, his sons ; (2) shoe- 
maker in Backiehill (Auchterless) and his wife ; (3) couper in 
Corse of Monelly (Forgue), and his wife ; (4) tenant in Wester 
Fintray (Fintray), and his wife. 

[Besides these, two others rated higher, viz. : George Fordyce, 
in Milne of Charleston, Aboyne, No. 7 of Unconnected Fordyces, 
and John Fordyce, afterwards of Gask, merchant in Turriff, 
368 of General Record.] 

33. Rev. John Eraser (Auchtermuchty). 

This respected clergyman was a younger son of Donald 
Fraser, farmer at Bunchrew, near Inverness, and Isobel Fraser, 
his wife (473 and 486). He received a religious training at 
home, and at an early age felt a strong desire to preach the 



FRASKR. 



li. 



Gospel. With this view he studied at the Grammar School 
of Inverness and King's College, Aberdeen, which he entered 
in 1760. For reasons satisfactory to his own mind he was led 
to unite with the Secession Church ; a step which his relatives 
were greatly averse to ; but, believing it to be the path of duty, 
he perrcvered ; was ordained 7th July, 1768, and placed over 
the Secession Congregation at Auchtermuchty in Fife. He was 
married 27th February, 1770, to Magdalene Erskine, eldest 
daughter of the Rev. Henry Erskine of Falkirk, and grand- 
daughter of Ralph Erskine of Dunfermline, so well known as 
one of the founders of the Secession Church. They had six 
sons and six daughters. Three of the sons died in infancy, the 
other three became ministers of the Gospel, although Henry, 
the eldest, retired from the ministry and studied medicine. He 
succeede- through his grandmother, to the estate of Lassodie, 
in Fife, and took the name of Dewar. Of the other two sons, 
Donald was for many years Associate • Minister at Kennoway 
in Fife, a man of considerable ability, editor of the '* Life and 
Diary of Ebenezer and Ralph Erskine," and of a selection from 
his father's sermons. He died in 1841. William was over 
forty years Associate Minister at Alloa, and died in 1853. Of 
tue daughters their father gave the following account, 23rd 
April, 1801, to his widowed sister: "My eldest daughter, 
Nanny, is married at Edinburgh to Mr. Robert Simpson, printer, 
a decent, sensible, well-inclined lad. The second, Isobel, is liv- 
ing with her brother at Kennoway ; she has been but delicate for 
many years. The third, Mady, has been a blessing to me and 
the younger children, whom she has brought up with all the 
care and tenderness of a mother as well as a sister. Your name- 
daughter, Lydia, much resembles her dear mother both in wis- 
dom and in the ornament of a meek and quiet spirit." His wife 
had died 9th April, 1792. He lived till i8th December, 1818, 
altho' he had resigned his charge in May, 1814. " He was a man 
of retiring habits, close application, with classical attainments of 
a superior order, and pre-eminently a man of prayer. His ser- 
mons were plain and simple in style ; their sentiments highly 
evangelical, and from beginning to end pervaded by a tone of 
unaffected piety." A grandson, the Rev. Dr. John Skinner, 



Hi. 



FRASKR. 



Secession Minister at Partick, Glasgow, emigrated to America, 
and became, latterly, a minister in Ontario in connection with 
the Church of Scotland, at London, and afterwards at Water- 
down, where he died in 1864. He was a man of scholarly 
habits — translator and annotator of " Witsiiis on the Creed." 
He had also considerable taste for the fine arts. 

34. Lydia Fraser (Nova Scotia). 
The following particulars are added regarding Lydia Fraser 
and her descendants referred to in the notice of her father (473). 
She was the elder daughter of Donald Fraser, farmer, Bunchrt v, 
near Inverness, and Isobel Fraser his wife, and was born in 1739. 
She married Simon Fraser, who was an Elder of the church at 
Kirkhill, in which Parish, as stated in the certificate of church 
membership given in 1784 on their leavmg for America, they had 
both lived from infancy, ' soberly, honestly and inoffensively.' 
Four sons and one daughter accompanied them to the New 
World. They settled at East River, Pictou, Nova Scotia, 
where in three years the husband and father died in June, 1787. 
His widow survived till 1805, being then sixty-six years of age. 
Of their sons, Thomas died 1802, and John in 1812. Both were 
married and left descendants in and around Pictou. Donald 
died unmarried in 1813. William, the youngest son, had been 
left at school in Halifax when the family arrived from Scotland, 
but on his father's death, when he was fourteen years of age, he 
returned home and managed his mother's affairs. He lived till 
May, 1859, when he died at the age of eighty-six. To use the 
words of the Rev. Dr. William Fraser of Barrie, Ontario : " He 
was one of the excellent of the earth, a living epistle known and 
read of all men. He was for more than fifty years an Elder of 
the Church, and when his work was done, as a shock of corn 
fully ripe, he was gathered into the Master's garner above." 
Dr. Fraser adds : " He was a frequent visitor at my father's 
house, one whose beaming countenance I delighted to see, and 
whose interesting and instructive conversation I delighted to 
hear." His wife's name was Mary McGregor. They had eight 
children, Simon, Donald. James, Lydia, Isobel, Rebecca, Jane 
and Mary ; only two survive. One of the sons married Catha- 



FRASER — GRLLIKS. 



liii. 



rine Fraser, sister of the Rev. Dr. Fraser of Barrie, and from 
this lady, a widow, and residing at McLellan's Brook, Nova 
Scotia, the foregoing particulars have been obtained. The only 
daughter of Simon and Lydia Fraser, whose husband's name 
was Thomas McKenzie, was mother of a zealous and devoted 
minister of the Gospel, who came to Upper Canada in 1834, but 
whose ministry was very brief, the Rev. Alexander McKenzie 
ol McKiilop. 

35. Gellies (Aberdeen). 

It has been observed that Magdalen Gellie (527), wife of the 
Rev. William Murray of Inverury, was probably a sister of the 
Rev. Alexander Gellie, minister of Fordyce, for the reason that 
in 1710 he was witness to an agreement made by Arthur Ding- 
wall, her son-in-law. Mr. Alexander Gellie is said in Scott's 
" Fasti Ecclesiaj " to have been a native of Aberdeen, and born 
about 1652. He graduated at King's College, Aberdeen, in 
1672, and in 1685, while minister of Deskford, is mentioned as 
giving £10 to Marischal College. On 5th January, 1694, ^* ^ 
meeting in King's College of the Episcopal ministers of Aberdeen, 
with delegates from the Dioceses of Murray, Ross, Caithness 
and Orkney, he, with seven other ministers, was appointed to 
appear before a Committee of the late General Assembly and 
submit certain queries regarding Church interests. It is related 
that he effected Jhe reformation of an existing abuse — that of 
holding a public market in the churchyard on the Lord's day — 
by tossing a bag of snufF, the last article ever offered there for 
sale, out of the church-yard. It is added that he recompensed 
the owner for his loss. He died nth May, 1715. His wife's 
name was Jean Urquhart, and they had six children, James, 
John, Alexander, Patrick, Anne and May. 

The Records of Infeftments in Aberdeenshire mention one 
Magdalen Gellie as the wife of Arthur Forbes of Achorie in 1656. 
In 1671 she is designated mother of William Forbes of Ban- 
dodle, and before 1683 she appears to have been married a 
second time, her husband then being Charles Farc^uharson. 

Arthur Dingwall of Brownhill was factor on the estate of 
Ballogie in 1722, and among the executor creditors of that estate, 



hv. GELLIES — HARVEY. 

when it was exposed to sale early in the eighteenth century, we 
find the names of Robert Gellie, Elizabeth Gellie and Elizabeth 
Forbes (Bandodle), leading to the conclusion that they were in 
all probability relatives of Magdalen Gellie, his mother- in-law. 
There were several families of the name resident in Aberdeen 
about the time, but the connection of one with another does not 
appear. It may, however, be noticed that besides the minister 
of Fordyce, there was another clergyman of the name, rather 
earlier : Mr. John Gellie, minister of Monymusk, who was infeft 
in the lands of Blackford in 1635 and died in 1652. Some of the 
family attached themselves to the Society of Friends, whose 
peace-loving spirit and the troubles they passed through may be 
referred to in the armorial bearings of Alexander Gellie of 
Blackford, as registered in the Lyon Office, an ark in the waters — 
a dove bearing an olive branch, a man trampling on a serpent, 
and the motto, Divino rohore. Helen Gellie in 171 7 was 
widow of Alexander Forbes of Blackford. Robert Gellie (pro- 
bably the same as is mentioned in connection with the marriage 
of Katharine Murray, 527), was a merchanL in Aberdeen, born 
1663, who died 7th November, 1737, Jean Douglas his wife 
being born 1671, and surviving till i6th October, 1741. 

36. Harvey (Kintore). 

The family of Harveys, specially noticed in this Record, is 
said to be descended from James Harvey in Ward of Kinmundy, 
in the Parish of Newmachar, Aberdeenshire, who was married 
ist December, 1618, to Margaret Baird, daughter of Gilbert 
Baird, of Auchmedden, by his wife, the heiress of Ordinhwas. 
This is mentioned in an account of the " sirname of Baird " by the 
last laird of the old family, who repeats " Thomas the Rhymer's 
prophecy that there should be an eagle in the crags while there 
was a Baird in Auchmedden." It is said to have been noticed 
that the eagles disappeared when the Bairds sold the property 
to Lord Aberdeen ; that they returned when Lord Haddo was 
married to Miss Baird of Newbyth ; took flight again when 
Auchmedden fell to the Hon. William Gordon, and returned 
once more when it was purchased in 1854 by Mr. Robert Baird, 
the eminent ironmas*^er. , , 



HARVEY — HAY. 



Iv. 



We find that James Harvey was infeft in 1624 in the Ward 
of Kinmundy. Taking it as estahhshed that the schoohnaster 
of Midmar (586) was a descendant, his father, Alexander Harvey 
of Kintore, might in point of time have been a grandson of James 
Harvey and Margaret Baird. 

Apparently Alexander Harvey, the father of the school- 
master, was not the first of the name who resided at Kintore. 
" Notes respecting Inverury and the Earldom of Garioch," 
which appeared some years since, refer to a Baillie of Inverury 
of the name in 1613 ; but earlier still, Margaret Leslie, spouse to 
Alexander Hervie in Kintore, was witness in 1597 at the trial of 
Isobell Collie for witchcraft, as noticed in the " Miscellany of the 
Spalding Club." The notes referred to state that in 1613 and 
1614, Mr. Alexander Hervie, a Baillie of Inverury, was adminis- 
trator of his wife's life-rent in the large burgh property of her 
former husband, Norman Leslie, and by this means came into 
temporary consequence there. 

The name of Harvey, Harvie, or Hervie, is found frequently 
in the seventeenth century, both among proprietors and tenants in 
Newmachar, the parish in which Ward of Kinmundy is situated. 
In 1632 Alexander Harvey in Waterton and Janet Leslie his 
spouse got a bond for 4,000 merks from Alexander Gordon of 
Cairnburrow as principal — secured on Tillygreig in Newmachar. 
This bond they made over in 1635 to Sir Alexander Irvine of 
Drum. In 1664 John Forbes, who had come into possession, 
sold Tillygreig with consent of Margaret Hervie his wife, Mr. 
James Hervie of Mameulay, and Mr. Robert Hervie his son, to 
Andrew Mitchell, burgess of Aberdeen, his wife and son. 

In 1696 when the Poll Tax Book was compiled, neither 
Kinmundy nor Mameulay were held by Harveys, but another 
property in Newmachar, Strypes, belonged to Mr. Alexander 
Hervie, and Upper Rennieshill to Mr. Patrick Harvey, minister 
of Forgue. 

The name of Harvey appears at the same time in the Poll 
Tax Book among the tenantry of Newmachar. 

37. Hay of Rannieston. 

In the notice of Captain Robert Hay (614) it has been said 
that, as the name of Miss Hay of Rannieston appears as a 



Ivi. 



HAY — HORN. 



witness at the baptism of one of his children, he migh.t have 
belonged to the family which owned that property during the first 
half of the eighteenth century. John Gordon, younger of Fechell, 
was the owner in 1696, and paid the poll tax on it ; but in 1706 
it was sold to Alexander Hay of Knockandie and Margaret 
Brodie his wife, by Charles, Earl of Erroll, in life-rent, and to 
Alexander Hay, their eldest son, in fee. The second Alexander 
Hay married in 1716 Katharine Murray, third daughter of Mr. 
William Murray, minister of Inverury, and in 1756 the property 
was sold 10 John Dingwall, stocking manufacturer in Aberdeen, 
whose mother, Sarah Murray, was a sister of Katharine Murray 
or Hay of Rannieston. In 1780 a ratification was given by 
Richard Hay, only son of Alexander Hay and Katharine 
Murray. This is all we know of Richard Hay. His father 
married again. In 1736 James Hay, brother-german of the 
Laird of Rannieston, was a merchant at Shiells or Colpna Shiells 
in Belhelvie, the parish in which the farm of Eggie is situated, 
which was leased by Captain Robert Hay. The Laird of 
Rannieston, probably the one who married Margaret Brodie, 
had a daughter, Elizabeth, married to John Lumsden, a brother 
of Robert Lumsden of Corrachrie (694'''). This is all we know 
of the Hays of Rannieston. 

38. Horn of Westhall. 

Nisbet, in his " Heraldry," observes that in his time, "John 
Horn of that Ilk and Westhall, as representing the family, bears 
the paternal coat armorial, and hath in some measure retrieved 
the breaches made by his predecessors ; for in the late Civil Wars, 
John and Andrew Horn, his two uncles, raised all they could for 
the service of King Charles II., their Royal Master, whom they 
attended to Worcester (leaving nothing to James, their younger 
brother, his father, then a child, than some small reversions), 
where John, who commanded a troop of horse, was killed, and 
Andrew obliged to flee to Sweden, where he was kindly received 
and advanced by Count Henry Horn, the Swedish General." 

James Horn, the child referred to, in course of time studied 
at the University of Aberdeen, became schoolmaster of the 
Parish of Grange, was licensed by the Presbytery of Garioch, 



HORN — JAFFRAY. 



Ivii. 



called to the Parish of Bellie, and ordained as minister there in 
1656. He was translated to the second charge in Elgin 12th 
July, 1659, and continued there till 1682, when he demitted on 
account of the Test. It is recorded that in October, 1672, 
Alexander Cuming, minister of Dollas, complained to the Pres- 
bytery that, " notwithstanding the legal annexation of Killess, 
Mr. James Home, minister of Elgin, had, without warrant from 
Bishop or Synod, intermeddled with and carried off a consider- 
able part of the stipend." 

Fountainhall's " Decisions " show that in 1686 there were libels 
and complaints between " Mr. James Horn ot Westhall, minister, 
and Mr. James Elphinston, writer to the Signet." The families 
were afterwards to be closely united. The Poll Tax Book of Aber- 
deenshire, 1696, shows that the minister and his son had each a 
valuation of ;f40o in Oyne. " Mr. James Horn of Westh?ll, 
Isobell Lesly his wife, and Agnes Home his daughter " (who, 
four years later, became the wife of John Douglass of Tilwhilly, 
271). "John Horn, younger of Westhall, Anna Arbuthnott his 
wife, and Anna Horn his daughter " (who became the wife of 
Hugh Dalrymple of Drummore, a Lord of Session, and whose 
son, General Robert Dalrymple, not only succeeded to Westhaii, 
but also to Logic Elphinston, through his mother, and took the 
name of Horn Elphinstone along with his paternal name of 
Dalrymple). 

Anna Arbuthnott, sister-in-law of Agnes Home or Douglass, 
and wife of John Horn of Westhall, was a daughter of Robert, 
second Viscount of Arbuthnott and sister-german of the Hon. 
John Arbuthnott of Fordoun (35). 

39. Jaflfray of Kingswells. 

In the notice of Provost James Morison (743) it is mentioned 
that his youngest son, the Rev. Dr. George Morison of Elsick 
and Disblair, minister of Banchory Devenick, married Margaret 
Jaffray of the family of Kingswells. A few particulars regarding 
this family which, Uke several others mentioned in this Record, 
has passed away, may not be found uninteresting : 

The small estate of Kingswells near Aberdeen was purchased 
in 1587 by Alexander Jaffray, one of the Baillies, who married 



Iviii. JAFFRAY (of KINGSWELLS). 

Christian Burnet, daughter of the Laird of Leys. Their son, 
Alexander Jaffray of Kingswells, was Provost of Aberdeen in 
1635, and died in 1645 ; and the historian of the Troubles 
(Spalding) relates a gross insult which was put on him as Pro- 
vost, on account of his origin, being the oy or grandson of a 
haxter, or bakfer, " and not of the old blood of the town." It was 
repeated several times, but in his peace-loving spirit the good 
man " misken'd" or overlooked all. His wife, Magdalen Erskine, 
was a daughter of the Laird of Pittodrie, and their son, Alex- 
ander Jaffray of Kingswells, was also Provost of Aberdeen. He 
was born in 1614, signed the Covenant in 1638, represented 
Aberdeen in Parliament, and in 1649 was one of the Commis- 
sioners appointed to negotiate with Charles respecting his 
restoration. His share in this he afterwards deeply regretted, 
making him " sign and swear a Covenant which we knew he 
hated in his heart." He accompanied Charles to Dunbar, was 
wounded and made prisoner. He was well treated while in 
confinement, and was led to the conviction that the Royalists 
were in the wrong. In 1652 Cromwell made him Director of 
the Chancery of Scotland. He was imprisoned after the Restor- 
ation, and attached himself to the Quakers or Friends in 1662. 
He worked for them and suffered with them, being imprisoned 
for ten months in the gaol of Banff. His death took place in 
1673. Sarah Cant, his second wife, and the mother of his family, 
was a daughter of the well-known Andrew Cant, one of the 
ministers of Aberdeen. She professed the faith of the Friends 
three months after her husband's death and one month before 
her own. Their son, Andrew Jaffray of Kingswells, was born in 
1650 and died in 1726. He married Christian Skene, a daughter 
of Alexander Skene of Newtyle, Baillie of Aberdeen, and of 
Lilias Gillespie his wife, a noted " Friend." 

Alexander Jaffray of Kingswells, their son, was married in 
1700 to Christian Barclay, a daughter of Robert Barclay of Ury, 
the Apologist for the Quakers. She lived till 175 1. Their sixth 
child, Gilbert Jaffray, was born in 1709, designed of Kingswells 
in 1780 in the marriage contract of his daughter Margaret 
Jaffray, with the Rev. George Morison. Dr. and Mrs. Morison 
had no family and she died in 1837. The family is believed to 



JAFFRAY (of KINGSWELLS). 



lix. 



be extinct. Before closing this notice, a few particulars may be 
added respecting the father of " the Apologist for the Quakers," 
whose grand-daughter, as has been seen, was the grandmollier of 
Margaret J affray or Morison. 

David Barclay of Ury was a Colonel under Gustavus Adol- 
phus,and latterly became a Quaker. Douglas, in his " Description 
of the East Coast of Scotland," observes thai '* when Colonel 
Barclay embraced Quakerism, he did it in the simplicity of his 
spirit, and from a real regard to religion." He also relates the 
following anecdote, showing that in doing so he yet held with 
the great apostle that there were times when standing out for 
one's rights was a Christian duty. A neighbouring proprietor 
had refused to remove a hut or shieling he had erected across 
the march or division line of their properties, and came with 
followers, prepared to resist, as he said, to the death any attempt 
to remove it. •' Friend," said Colonel Barclay, " the time was 
when thou wouldst not have dared to speak to me in this style, 
but though I am only the withered remains of what I once was, 
thou hadst better not stir up the old man within me ; if thou 
dost he will soon be too much for thee. Be thy threats unto 
thyself, I shall throw down the first stone, and do you, my people, 
level this unjust encroachment of my neighbour." The hut 
was thrown down without the least opposition, and both parties 
returned in peace to their respective places of abode. 

The following is an extract from " R. B.'s Testimony" con- 
cerning his father, dated Urie, the 20th of the 8th month, 1686: 
"David Barclay of Urie, in the Kingdom of Scotland, received 
the Truth in the year 1666 and abode in it, suffering the spoiling 
of his goods cheerfully, and many other indignities he was 
formerly unaccustomed to bear. In the latter end of the 7th 
month, 1686, he took a fever which continued for two weeks, 
during which time he signified a quiet, contented mind, freely 
resigned up to the will of God. Upon the nth day of the 
8th month, between two and three in the morning, I drew nigh 
to him. He said: * Is this my son?' I said: 'Yea,' and 
spake a few words signifying my travel, that He that loved him 
might be near him to the end. He answered : ' The Lord is 
nigh ' — repeating it — ' You are my witnesses in the presence of 



Ix. JAFFRAY — KP:EFER. 

God that the Lord is nigh.' He took my eldest son to him 
and blessed him, saying he prayed God he might never depart 
from the Truth, and when my eldest daughter came near, he 
said, * Is this Patience ? Let patience have its perfect work in 
thee,' and after kissing the other four he laid hands upon them 
and blessed them ; and so, a little after ii .e in the morning, the 
1 2th day of the 8th month, he fell asleep like a lamb in remarkable 
quietness and calmness." 

40. Keefer (Ontario). 
In the States of Pennsylvania and Ohio there are various 
families of the name of Keefer related to each other — whose 
ancestors emigrated from the Fatherland in 1748 and in 1773. 
These families maintain an interest in each other and in a 
common ancestry, by annual re-unions. At the last of these a 
Historical address was given by D. L. Kieffer, of Smithville, 
from which it appears that about the year 1563 their ancestor? 
known as De Wald TonneUies, gave up rank, ease and heritage 
in France on account of impending persecution of the Huguenots. 
He came to Germany where he followed the occupation of a 
blacksmith at Kettenheim. When surnames came into use, that 
of TonneUies was assumed from an ancestor who had inherited 
a property on which an extensive cooperage had long been 
carried on ; and on removing from France to Germany the name 
Kieffer was substituted, having the same signification (Cooper) 
in the language of their adopted country. The orthography has 
occasionally varied, as Kieffer, Keifer, Keefer are all found, and 
in the case of some who returned to France, Kevere. Many of 
the family have filled positions of consequence in the United 
States — among others the Speaker of the House of Representa- 
tives in Washington. W^hether there was any relationship 
between the Keefers of Pennsylvania and Ohio and the Canadian 
family specially mentioned in this Record has not been ascer- 
tained ; but it is quite possible. The first of the latter family of 
whom we have heard, George Kieffer, was an Alsatian Huguenot, 
born in 1739, near Strasburg, on the French side of the Rhine. 
His mother's name was Pauline Saurrien. He emigrated to 
America in 1765, and settled at Paulinskill, Sussex County, 



KEEPER. 



Ixi. 



New Jersey. On the revolt of the Colonies he took part with 
the Loyalists and joined the Rangers, serving under Sir William 
Howe, died of army fever, and was buried at Staten Island ; his 
property (two farms, a distillery, and a female slave) being 
confiscated by Congress. His widow, whose name was Ann 
Waldrof, was left with two sons, George and Jacob. She 
accompanied her son George to Canada in 1792 on horseback 
from the Susquehanna to Lake Erie, on an Indian trail through 
an unbroken forest. She was twice married, but whether to her 
second husband before coming to Canada is not knowh. George 
Kieffer, the elder of the two sons, was born in 1773, and in 1790 
proceeded to Canada with the view of living under British rule. 
The Government granted him three hundred acres of land, most 
of which is now within the corporation of Thorold, in the 
Niagara District. He returned two years later to New Jersey 
for his mother. He was by trade a carpenter. He subse- 
quently became a merchant in Thorold, when the place was in 
its infancy, and carried on business there for many years. He 
was also a magistrate ; held the rank of Captain in the War of 
1812-14, and took part in the Battles of Lundy's Lane and 
Chippewa. He was twice married, first to Catharine Lampman, 
who died in 1813, and secondly to a sister of Edward McBride, 
who at one time represented Niagara in the Provincial Parlia- 
ment. (The McBride family had come to Canada in 1776 from 
Tralee, Ireland, with General Carleton.) One of their sons, 
Samuel Keefer, was Engineer to the Board of Works, afterwards 
Inspector of Railways and Deputy-Commissioner of Public 
Works. Another son, Thomas Coltrin Keefer, was educated at 
Upper Canada College, and has risen to eminence in his pro- 
fession as a civil engineer. He has been employed by Govern- 
ment in various surveys, and constructed the Montreal, Ottawa 
and Hamilton waterworks. He is a member of the Institute of 
Civil Engineers of London, and of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers of New York, and was one of the Canadian 
Commissioners to the first International Exhibition at London 
in 1851. He is known as an author by "The Philosophy of 
Railroads," and a prize essay on the " Canals of Canada." He 
was married in 1848 to Mrs. Eliza McKinnon, a daughter of the 



Ixii. 



KEEPER — LAWRASON. 



Hon. Thomas McKay, of Rideau Hall, Ottawa, and has a 
family. A son of George Keefer by his first wife, Catharine 
Lampman, also George Keefer, a civil engineer, born in 1799, 
afterwards engaged in the milling business at Thorold, where for 
many years he was a magistrate and Clerk of the Division 
Court. He married Mrs. Margaret McGregor, of Amherstburg, 
and one of their ooiis, George A. Keefer, is also a civil engineer. 
Jacob Keefer, the younger son of the Alsatian Huguenot emi- 
grant and Loyalist, settled in Oakland, County Oxford, Upper 
Canada, and married Jerusha Vannattar. Of their sons, Robert, 
Jacob, John and Joseph Nelson — the first mentioned has a place 
in this Record (648) ; the second was a farmer near Owen Sound, 
who died about 1880 leaving a family ; the third was also a farmer 
and died about 1873 ; he left no children. The last mentioned, 
Joseph Nelson Keefer, a merchant and farmer at St. George, 
South Dumfries, Ontario, died about 1878, leaving a son, Charles 
P. Keefer, and several daughters. The son is a merchant in St. 
George and also postmaster of the place. 

41. Lawrason (Ontario). 

Miller Lawrason, a native of New Jersey, and born there 8th 
December, 1767, may have come to Canada along with a brother 
and two sisters, of whom some particulars follow this notice. 
He settled at first in the Township of Flamborough, but subse- 
quently removed to South Dumfries where he died loth February, 
1847. His wife, Elizabeth Purvis, daughter of John Purvis, of 
New Jersey, a native of Roxburghshire, Scotland, and niece 
of Admiral James Purvis of the British Navy, was born in 1770, 
died 17th August, 1834, and with her husband lies buried at St. 
George in Dumfries. They had six sons and three daughters : 
John, Thomas, Robert, James, Lawrence Purvis and Joseph, 
se^'eral of whom married and had families ; Mary, who died 
unmarried ; Ann, who married a Mr. Babcock ; and Lavinia 
Lawrason or Keefer (654^). Lawrence Lawrason, brother of 
Miller Lawrason, was born in New Jersey in 1760, and came to 
Canada in 1788 accompanied by his wife and her father, Judge 
Nathanael Pettit, a member of the first Upper Canada Parlia- 
ment which met* in 1792 in Newark or Niagara, then the capital 



LAWRASON — LINDSAY. 



Ixiii. 



of the Province. Lawrence Lawrason settled originally in the 
Township of Ancaster, took part in the War of 1812 with two 
of his sons — his son Thomas receiving a medal for services 
rendered at the taking of Detroit. In 1822 he removed to the 
Township of London, farmed and carried on a distillery. His 
son Lawrence, born at Ancaster loth August, 1803, joined Mr. 
G. J. Goodhue in a mercantile business in London ; represented 
that city in the first Parliament after the confederation of the 
Provinces. In 1866 he was appointed Police magistrate of 
London, and held the position till his death occurred. He was 
married 21st May, 1827, to Abigail Lee, daughter of Dr. W. H. 
Lee of Thorold, and left a son, William Lawrence, residing in 
Muskoka, and two daughters, Louisa, widow of Lionel Ridout, 
and M. A. Phoebe, wife of Edward Baynes Reed, barrister in 
London. Mercy and Elizabeth Lawrason, the two sisters of 
Miller and Lawrence Lawrason, who came to Canada with their 
brothers from New Jersey, were married respectively to a Mr. 
Hamill and a Mr. Coleman ; both left families. The Lawrason 
family came to New Jersey from Wales. 

42. Lindsays of Oulsh. 

William Lindsay, the last proprietor of Culsh of the name, 
succeeded to the property on coming of age. He was the onlj' 
son of William Lindsay of Culsh (662) and Agnes Mercer his 
second wife. Shortly after he came into possession a court of 
the " lands and barony of Culsh " was held (2nd March, 1698), 
ot which the record is preserved. John Thomson of Haremoss 
acted as baillie, John Turner, notary public, as clerk, and John 
Henderson as chancellor of the jury in the case. The facts 
were these : Complaints had been made that the tenants had 
lost sheep and other goods. In consequence individuals were 
appointed by the proprietor " to dacker impartially for all kinds 
of stolen goods." On this, a wedder's carcase was discovered in 
the house of James Wisely, living in Commontie of Culsh. 
Isabel Steivin, his wife, confessed that " she did steal the wedder, 
did bring him home, did bleed him, and flae his skin off in 
presence of her husband." A jury was impanelled ; the Wiselys 
were unanimously found guilty of theft, and sentenced by the 



Ixiv. 



LINDSAY (of CULSH). 



baillie to '* escheat or forfeiture of their whole moveable goods 
and geir," and banishment within forty-eight hours from the 
lands of Culsh, under pain of death if they should ever be found 
there again. The jurymen's names were: "James Crichton, 
George Gummack, John Forbes, Wm. Simpson, John Hender- 
son, William Low, George Madders, John Watt, John Madders, 
Walter Moss, Andrew Sangster, Alex. Wobster, Alexander Watt, 
William Whyte, Alex. Mavor, all in Culsh." It is worthy of 
notice in connection with the last name on this hst that an 
individual of considerable literary repute last century, William 
Fordyce Mavor, LL.D., Rector of Woodstock and Stonefield, 
was a native of the lands of Culsh, and in all probability 
received the name of Fordyce as a mark of respect to William 
Fordyce of Culsh, nephew of the last William Lindsay. As the 
author of *' Mavor's Spelling Book" and compiler of "Voyages and 
Travels " Dr. Mavor was widely known. In 1719 William Lind- 
say made a disposition of Culsh " for love and favour " to 
Thomas Mercer of Westbinning, Commissary Clerk of Edin- 
burgh, in life-rent, and to Thomas Mercer, his son, in fee. By 
this disposition he debarred the descendants of his two half- 
sisters, Jean and Anna, from purchasing Culsh from the disponee, 
believing that certain claims they professed to have, were founded 
on pretended settlements by his father. Suits at law were 
entered, but eventually passed from, and in 1722 John Fordyce 
of Gask, husband of the surviving daughter of William Lindsay 
of Culsh, and Barbara Leith his first wife, became purchaser of 
the property, discharging the liabilities on it, and assuming the 
burdens included in the disposition to the Mercers, who were 
probably relatives of the disponer. In the same year (1722) 
William Lindsay had had the vicarage teinds of Culsh valued, 
showing that his lands would only maintain nineteen cows and 
two hundred and thirty head of sheep ; " that the cows yielded 
half-a-merk, the ewes and lambs, forty pennies, and the yuld 
sheep, twelve pennies, amounting, after deducting one-fifth for 
• the kmg's ease,' to nineteen pounds, nine shillmgs and eleven 
pence Scots." The time of his death does not appear. He was 
married, but had no family, his wife's name being Elizabeth 
Leslie. To what family she belonged is not known ; but her 



LINDSAY (of CULSH). 



Ixv. 



name is found in 1703 as witness to a baptism in Montwhitter 
in whicii parish there were at the time Leslies of Byth, but 
whether relatives or not cannot be said. The following facts 
appear worthy of consideration in connection with the notice of 
William Lindsay (663) : 

On the 8th November, 1618, one William Lindsay, with 
Marjory Crawford his mother, and George Barclay, then her 
husband, renounced the sunny half of the lands of Inverkeithnie 
to Crichton of Frendraucht, and on the 8th June, 1622, William 
Lindsay (who may reasonably be supposed to be the son of 
Marjory Crawford), designed " son of Mr. James Lindsay," was 
infeft in the Kirktown of Inverkeithnie. It is possible that this 
was William Lindsay, Mill of ToUie (663). 

Some years ago might be seen (and possibly may still) on 
part remai.iing of the wall of the old church of Turriff, a stone 
in excellent preservation with inscription and armorial bearings, 
viz. : " Quarterly ist and 4th a lion rampant ; 2nd and 3rd a 
fesse checqy." The same coat of arms in all particulars was at 
one time to be seen on the back of the Culsh pew in the church 
of New Deer, with the letters W. L. and date 1663. It is notice- 
able that *^he fesse checqy alone, with star and border, was the 
form in wiiich his arms were matriculated by William Lindsay 
of Culsh, leading to the belief that the lion rampant in the coat of 
arms at New Deer indicates relationship between the Lind- 
says of Culsh and those commemorated at Turriff, who might 
have introduced the lion rampant in connection with the name 
of Mowat. The inscription on the Turriff monument is : — 

Monumentu. Gul. Lindsay Et Bar. Mowat. 
Eivs Sposae. Qvi Obiere. Haec. 3*^ Maii 1558. Ille. 23^ Martii 
1579. Positu. A. V. L. Eoru. Filio. Anno 1583. 

In point of time, the father of Mr. James Lindsay of Cushnie 
might have been the W. Lindsay who erected the monument to 
tiie memory of his father and mother. Besides Cushnie, other 
lands in Auchterless were held by Lindsays one way or other 
between 1605 and 1670 ; among these were Burreldales and Bogs 
of Darley. 



i 



Ixvi. 



LOW. 



43. Low (Old Aberdeen). 

The following fragmentary particulars relating to individuals 
of the name of Low are submitted in connection with the notice 
of Anna Low or Morison (692). Robert Low, merchant in Old 
Aberdeen, his wife and three children, are mentioned in the Poll 
Tax Book (i6g6). This was probably the same Robert Low as 
was cautioner or surety for Anna Low or Morison when her 
marriage was contracted in 1692, and the same with Robert Low, 
merchant (of Old Aberdeen), who witnessed the baptism of one 
of her children in 1696, but whether her father or brother we do 
presume to decide. Robert Low, merchant in Dantzick, is 
mentioned as a donor of ^290 to Marischal College, Aberdeen, 
in 1700, and as having his portrait painted at the expense of 
the college for £17 i8s. by Charles White. Robert Low, 
merchant in Cracow, in the Kingdom of Poland, was infett in a 
tenement of land, etc., in Old Aberdeen in 1717. He may be the 
same as the Dantzick merchant, and probably the same as had 
his armorial bearings matriculated, and which are given in 
Robson's British Herald as those of Low, Poland, viz. : " Three 
green leaves on a white field within a red wavy border, with a 
leaf as crest between two thistles stalked and leaved, all of the 
natural colours, the motto being: ^ Aspera me jiivant,' or 
• Difficulties help me.' " It may be observed that the descend- 
ants of Anna Low or Morison had a tradition that she had a 
brother who went to Poland and married a princess there, and 
assumed the name of Lowinski. Janet Low, wife of James 
Knight, merchant and Baillie in Old Aberdeen, is shown by her 
tombstone in Old Machar churchyard to have been born in 
1664, and to have died in 1732. Her husband died as early as 
1702. He is frequently mentioned in Orem's " Old Aberdeen,'' 
and is mentioned in the Poll Tax Book (1696) with his wife and 
nine children. He was cautioner for James Morison in 1692 in 
contracting marriage with Anna Low, who was probably his 
sister-in-law, while Isobell Low, who, with William Troup her 
husband was infeft in 1669 in a tenement in Old Aberdeen, 
may have been an aunt. There can be little doubt that Robert 
Low, merchant in Old Aberdeen, and Christian Forbes his wife, 
who were infeft in 1665 in a tenement in Old Aberdeen, were 
the father and mother of Anna Low or Morison. 



LUMSDENS. 



Ixvii. 



44. Lumsden of Oorrachrie. 

The Poll Tax Book of Aberdeenshire (1696) contains the 
i. ime of James Lumsdell, tenant of Strathmoir in the Parish of 
CouU, his wife and six ciiildren, and at the same time mention is 
made in the Parish of Auchindore of John Lumsden of Cor- 
rachrie. In the year 1703, however, we find James Lumsden 
getting infeftment in the lands of Corrachrie, and his eldest son 
Robert in an annuity out of them. James married a daughter 
of Chalmers of Balnacraig and had two sons, the elder of whom 
was Robert Lumsden of Corrachrie (694''') ; the younger, John 
Lumsden, married a daughter of Hay of '^annieston. Their 
son, David Lumsden m Strathmoir, married Jean Lumsden and 
had two daughters, the one married to George Still of Millden, 
while the other, Jean Lumsden, was the subject of the humorous 
production, " Jeaii and the Young Men," the last chapter of 
which is subjoined, from its bearing on individuals, while the 
phraseology need not be regarded as indicative of irreverence on 
the part of the author. It was written by Robert Lumsden of 
Corrachrie, a rejected suitor, son of the minister of Towie. 
Jean Lumsden was married in 1776 to George Forbes, copper- 
smith in Aberdeen, elder brother of William Forbes of Callander, 
and son of William Forbes and Janet Dyce. One of their 
daughters, Margaret Forbes, was married in 1826 to the Rev. 
Alexander Urquhart, minister of Tough, and tlieir only child 
became the second wife in 1853 ^^ William Littlejohn of the 
Aberdeen Town and County Bank (687). 

" Of Jean and the Coppersmith. 

(i) "And a certain young man named George, of the tribe 
of Forbes, by trade a coppersmith, strengthened himself, and 
girded on his boots and spurs, and took a whip in his hand, and 
saddled his beast, and came to the house of the damsel's mother. 

(2) And while he was yet afar off, her mother spied him, 
and went forth to meet him, and said unto him : 

(3) ' Thou art come a far journey, and art wearied ; come 
therefore under my roof that my servants may take the boots 
from off thy legs, and when thou art warmed thou shalt eat 
bread.' 



Ixviii. 



LUMSDENS. 



(4) And the young man did so, and the mother of the 
damsel commanded that the roost should be plundered of its 
fattest hens ; and when they were roasted, they were set before 
him, and he did eat and was refreshed. 

(5) And when he had eaten and was refreshed, he spake 
unto the good v/oman of the house, saying : 

(6) ' I am a young man in the flower of my youth, and am 
possessed of great store of silver and gold, and copper and tin, 
and lead also. 

(7) • Moreover, I loathe the young women of the City of 
Aberdeen because they are waxed wanton, and take delight 
in ornaments of jewels and precious stones and plaited hair ; 
and they neglect their own household, neither is their portion 
anything in mine eyes. 

(8) ' And now am I come to lay myself and my great pos- 
sessions at the feet of your fair daughter, hoping that they may 
find acceptance in her sight.' 

(9) And the good woman answered and said, * My daughter 
is just now at the house of a kinsman, but I shall send and bring 
her to thee presently, and shall impart unto her the things that 
thou hast said unto me.' So she constrained the damsel to 
come home. 

(10) And when the young woman came into the presence 
of the coppersmith, they made obeisance, and saluted one an- 
other, and her mother related unto her the pleasant things which 
were said by the young man. 

(11) And many more also did he say for himself, which are 
all written in the book of the remembrance of the damsel's 
grandmother. He that hath patience to hear them, let him hear 
them. 

(12) And the young woman hearkened unto his words and 
said : ' Many young men have I seen, but thou equallest them 
all.' 

(13) And there was a great company of the kindred and 
friends of the damsel gathered together by the pool of Bogmore ; 
and the young wo.^ien adorned the damsel in a garment of white, 
and put a girdle of silk about her ; howbeit the scribe was not 
bidden to the wedding. 



LUMSDEN— LUNAN. 



Ixix. 



(14) And upon that day was she given to the coppersmith, 
and became his wife. 

(15) And when they had feasted certain days in the prov- 
ince of Cromar, she departed and went with him to the City of 
Aberdeen, and they live there even unto this day. 

(16) Hath not the sound of his hammers been heard afar ? 
Have not his kettles and whiskey pots been seen m the streets ? 
and his sons and his daughters are they not recorded in the 
Book of the Chronicles kept by the Clerk to the Kirk Session of 
Aberdeen ? 

(17) Tell it not in Imlay's; publish it not in the streets of 
Banchory, lest they say : ' The fairest of the land is gone with a 
Tinker.' " 

45. Lunan (Monymusk, etc.). 

As there were two families of the name of Lunan not far 
apart, living at the same time, and liable to be confounded, it 
may be well to notice that the Rev. Dr. James Shirrefs was not 
a descendant of the Rev. Alexander Lunan of Daviot, but of the 
Rev. Alf^xander Lunan of Kintore. The former, the Rev. 
Alexander Lunan of Daviot, graduated in 1664 at King's Col- 
lege, Aberdeen (being son of Mr. William Lunan, who had also 
been minister of Daviot), was admitted to the charge of Daviot 
in 1672, and deposed according to Scott {'* Fasti," etc.) in 1716 for 
engaging in the Rebellion. The Rev. Mr. Walker, in his " Life 
and Times of the Rev. John Skinner," says " he was not evicted 
without much difficulty : that he removed to Wartle and minis- 
tered to a large congregation which afterwards removed to 
Meikle Folia or Folia Rule, where it still meets." He was 
author of several Theological works — " Office of Holy Commu- 
nion," 171 1 ; " Mystery of Man's Redemption," etc. His wife's 
name was Janet Elphinstone, and his children, given in the Poll 
Tax Book (i6g6), James, Patrick, Robert, Margaret, Elizabeth, 
Cecilia and Anna. His son Patrick was probably the same as 
" Mr. Patrick Lunan, Presbyter at Wartle," mentioned in the 
" Diary of the Rev. Alexander Lunan " (Blairdaff) in 1729. The 
Rev. Alexander Lunan (Dr. Shirrefs' ancestor) was appointed 
in 1622 a Regent of King's College, Aberdeen. In 1625 he was 



Ixx. 



LUNAN — MAIRS. 



presented to the Parish of Monymusk, and in 1628 translated to 
Kintore. In 1632 he married Jean Forbes, eldest daughter of 
Sir William Forbes of Monymusk, Bart., and had a son, William 
Lunan, who was born in 1633, lived at Dallob, and died in April, 
1681. He was served heir to his father 20th June, 1665. His 
wife was Barbara Gordon, daughter of Alexander Gordon of 
Merdrom. They had one son and one daughter. The former, 
William Lunan, was born 1664, and died at Kirktown of 
Monymusk, 8th January, 1735. His wife, Isobel Thain, daugh- 
ter of William Thain of Blackball, to whom he was married 4th 
October, 1691, died at BlairdafF in 1739. They hr.d ten chil- 
dren. Of these, two may be mentioned, viz. : John, the fourth, 
nd Alexander, the seventh. The latter was born in 1703, and 
died at Inglismady, where he was an Episcopal minister. The 
foimer, John Lunan, was born in 1698, and married Mary 
Burnet, daughter of Robert Burnet of Sauchen (a family men- 
tioned specially in another place). Jane Lunan, their second 
child, born 25th July, 1727, was married in 1748 to David 
Shirrefs, Convener of the Incorporated Trades of Aberdeen, and 
was mother of the Rev. Dr. Shirrefs. 

[The Rev. Mr. Walker mentions that the Rev. Alex. Lunan 
was minister at BlairdafF from 1729 to 1744; then at Northwater 
Bridge or Inglismady till his death on 29th September, 1769, at 
the age of sixty-six years.] 

46. Mairs (New Deer, etc.). 

As several near relatives of the Rev. George Mair of New 
Deer, who married a daughter of William Lindsay of Culsh 
(662), were characterized as ministers of the Gospel by literary 
and theological attainments, piety and Christian earnestness 
it may not be out of place to give the following particulars : 

The Rev. George Mair,- a son of the Rev. George Mair of 
Culross,'afterwards of Tulliallan, was called by the Presbytery to 
the ministerial charge of the Parish of New Deer (jure devoluto) 
in 1722. On the i8th April, 1723, he was married to Margaret 
Lindsay, daughter of William Lindsay of Culsh and Agnes 
Mercer his wife, and died 13th April, 1736, leaving a son 
WiUiam. From McKelvie's " History of the U. P. Church " we 



MAIRS. 



Ixxi. 



learn that the Rev. Mr. Mair of New Deer was one of the min- 
isters " who protested against the Act of Assembly, 1732, which 
restricted the election of ministers in vacant parishes to a certain 
class," and otherwise took part with the " four brethren " who 
seceded, but did not himself secede. Many of his parishioners 
took offence, and this led to the formation of the Secession 
congregation at Craigdam, and ultimately to that at Clola and 
Whitehill (New Deer). ■ . 

The Rev. William Mair, only son of the Rev. George Mair ot 
New Deer and Margaret Lindsay his wife, was born in 1724. 
While to a certain extent his father had sympathized with the 
movers in the Secession, he had not felt it to be his duty to 
secede ; the son actually did so. A legacy of 4,000 merks from 
an unmarried aunt, Lilias Lindsay, made provision for his educa- 
tion. He studied theology under the Rev. Mr. Moncreifi of 
Abernethy, and appears to have been an acceptable preacher, as 
he received calls to Stirling, Dalkeith, Mearns, Jedburgh and 
Muckhart. He accepted the last, and was ordained 5th June, 
1745, when he was scarcely twenty-one years of age. He con- 
tinued there till his death in February, 1780. He was author of 
" Lectures on the First Four Chapters of Matthew," and of some 
single sermons — " Mercy the darhng attribute of God," 
'* Jehovah Shammah," and remarks on Ralph Erskine's " Fancy 
no Faith." He was probably married in 1746, as he took up 
house then ; but the stone which covers his remains, only bears 
his name and that of a successor. McKelvie's " History " men- 
tions a son, Thomas, who studied theology in 1770, but relin- 
quished it for medicine, became surgeon of a merchant ship, and 
died at sea. 

The Rev. George Mair (father of the Rev. George Mair of 
New Deer) was called to the second charge in Culross in May, 
1698, translated to Tulliallan in 1714, and died in 1716. He is 
said to have been a man who " had a good gift of preaching," 
and was reckoned by Boston " one of the happy instruments of 
the breaking forth of a more clear discovery of the doctrines of 
the Gospel in the Church of Scotland." He married Jacobina 
Maria Simpson, and had two sons, Thomas and Mr. George of 
New Deer, and a daughter, Anna. 



Ixxii. 



MAIRS. 



The Rev. Thomas Mair of Orweil (a coadjutor of the 

Erskines in the formation of the Secession Church) was a son of 

William Mair, manufacturer and portioner of Strathmiglo, who 

was a brother of the Rev. George Mair of Culross. He was 

born about 1700, was licensed by the Presbytery of Kincardine 

O'Neill, 4th October, 1722, called to the ministerial charge of 

Orwell 27th September, 1725, joined the Secession in 1737, and 

was consequently deposed 15th May, 1740. He adhered to the 

Antiburgher Synod in 1747, dissented from an Act of the 

General Associate Synod on a doctrinal point and was deposed 

in 1757. He petitioned to be re-admitted in 1767; but holding 

his views with great tenacity, he would not submit to terms 

proposed. He died from paralysis next year, 14th February, 

1768. His congregation occupied the parish church till 1740; 

worshipped in the open air till 1742, when they took possession 

of a church they had erected, styled the " Muckle Kirk " which 

could accommodate 2,000. The Rev. Ralph Erskine in his 

Diary records on 6th August, 1738, that he was present at the 

Sacrament at Orwell, where a vast multitude was gathered, 

upwards of 5,000 communicants. The Statistical account of the 

parish says : " The primary cause of there being seceders in this 

parish was, that Mr. Mair, a minister of the Establishment, who 

changed his opinions, preached up the erroneous doctrine of 

universal redemption." We have not the testimony of friends 

to offer except as given in the epitaph on his tombstone in the 

Churchyard of Orwell : 

Sacred to the memory of the Rev. Thomas Mair, minister of the Parish of 
Orwell. Ordained 21st September, 1725 ; died 14th February, 1768. 

Muse, passenger, as you this stone walk by, 
And gravely think that underneath it ly 
Some relics of a much-enlightened Seer, 
Triumphant now among the heavenly Quire, 
Elijah-like — for zeal, on earth opprest — 
,'.,[ Removed from strife, he dwells serene in rest. 

Twice twenty years he preached to numbers round ; 

How glad were all who heard the joyful sound! '' 

Orwell, with tears, your guide withdrawn deplore; 

Mourn for your loss— this Prophet mourns no more. 

A soul Physician, skilled with hearts to deal. 

Sores to np up, and bleeding wounds to heal. 

Many have felt his doctrine drop as balm. 

And blessed the man God sent their minds to calm. 

I end my plaint — Mair sings (where praises flow) 

Redeeming Love — his darling theme below. 



MAIRS. 



Ixxiii. 



He was married gth January, 1726, to Ann Christie of the 
Parish of Aberdour in Fife. One son was a Colonel in the Rifle 
Brigade; another a Judge on the circuit in England; and Scott, 
in his " Fasti " includes James, Associate minister at West 
Linton ; but it appears doubtful if he was a son. 

Mr. John Mair, a brother of the minister of Orwell, master 
of Perth Academy, and a writer on book-keeping, arithmetic 
and the classics, was born in 1705 and died loth February, 1760. 

The Rev. Alexander Mair, another brother of the minister 
Orwell, was born in 1708, graduated at St. Andrew's in 1726, 
studied divinity and received license. He would have been 
settled as minister of the Parish of Dron, but for several heritors 
protesting on the ground that he " associated with certain per- 
sons who had seceded from the Church." He was ordained and 
settled at Forteviot 4th May, 1736, and died 15th May, 1751, of 
nervous fever contracted by anxiety respecting a settlement he 
regarded as unwise. He was much grieved by the agitation 
which divided the Church. He was distinguished by a mild 
disposition, an affectionate address, and by fidelity and diligence 
in his ministerial calling, and was highly esteemed by his parish- 
ioners. He catechised the young of his church every Sabbath 
afternoon, and drew up an explanation of the Shorter Catechism 
which is still used in the district. His wife, whose name was 
Jean Orr, died in December, 1787. 

The Rev. James Mair is said by Scott in his " Fasti" to have 
been a son of the minister of Orwell. McKelvie's " History," 
however, represents him as from Aberdeenshire, licensed in the 
Church of Scotland, acting as assistant to the parish minister of 
Ardrossan, and being received in 1739 into connection with the 
Associate Presbytery as a probationer, called to Kinross and 
West Linton where he remained till his death 8th January, 1774. 
As he was born about 1700 he could not have been a son of the 
minister of rwell ; but from the fact that the latter was licensed 
by the Presbytery of Kincardine O'Neill, in which at the time 
there were ministers of the name, it is possible that Aberdeen- 
shire may have been the quarter from which the minister of 
Culross and his brother, the father of the minister of Orwell, had 
originally come. 



Ixxiv. 



MARTIN MERCERS. 



47. Martin (Rev. Samuel). 

The Rev. Samuel Martin, D.D., father of Barbara Martin, or 
Miller (700^), was born 7th July, i/ fO, his father, John Martin, 
being school-master of Anstruther Easter. He was licensed by 
the Presbytery of Dalkeith, ordained 29th September, 1768, 
settled as minster of Balmaghie in the Presbytery of Kirkcud- 
bright, and translated to Monimail in Fife, 24th September, 
1776. Here he continued till his death on the 12th September, 
1829, when he was in the ninetieth year of his age and sixty-first 
of his ministry. He was author of a work on " Religious 
Division, "and of another on "The preservation and transmission 
of the Scriptures." For a long time he officiated as Chaplain to 
the Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly. In Dr. 
'Scott's " Fasti Ecclesiae Scotticanae " he is spoken of as a 
• sincerely pious and highly respected man, whose life reflected 
in an eminent degree the doctrines which he taught." On the 
31st October, 1768, he was married to Elizabeth Lawson, who 
died 8th March, 1818, aged seventy-nine. They had several 
sons and daughters, one of whom was the mother of Professor 
Miller of Edinburgh (No. 712). Another was the Rev. Dr. John 
Martin of Kirkcaldy, whose daughter, Isabella, was married to 
Edward Irving, the well-known orator and divine. 

48. Mercers (Kinnellar, etc.). 

Certain facts might lead us to conclude that Agnes Mercer, 
the second wife of William Lindsay of Culsh (662), was a daugh- 
ter of Mr. John Mercer, minister of Kinellar, and Lilias Row 
his wife. She had a daughter, Lilias Lindsay, and at the 
baptism of another of her children in 1688 one of the witnesses 
was Mr. Alexander Robertson, minister of Longside. Mr. 
Robertson's wife, Christian Mercer, was a daughter of the 
minister of Kinellar and Lilias Row, who after her husband's 
death resided at Longside with her son-in-law and his family, 
being there in 1696. It would lead to no anachronism if we 
were to regard Mrs. Lindsay and Mrs. Robertson as sisters. 
Agnes Mercer had as her first husband Mr. Alexander Young- 
son, son to the minister of Durris. She was married to William 
Lindsay probably in 1677, and her death took place in 1690 



MERCERS — MONRO. 



Ixxv. 



or i6gi. Mr. John Mercer was admitted, before 21st October, 
1 65 1, to the parochial charge of Kinellar. In consequence of 
bodily infirmity he was authorized in 1675 to get an assistant or 
helper, and removing to Aberdeen he died there on the 7th 
August, 1679. His wife, Lilias Row, was a daughter of Mr. 
John Row, Principal of King's College, Aberdeen, eminent both 
for literary accomplishments and zeal in Church matters, and a 
determined opponent of Episcopacy and of innovations in worship 
such as were introduced in 1618. After the Restoration he was 
deprived of his office as some of his works contained severe 
reflections on the Royal Family. Principal' Row was at one 
time master of the Grammar School at Perth, and while there, 
in the dedication of a Hebrew Grammar to the Earl oi Kin- 
noull, he said, " My grandfather was sent into Scotland by the 
Sovereign Pontiff to oppose the dawnings of Gospel light and 
endeavour to suppress them, but the messenger was caught in 
the Gospel net, allured by the pure, godly preaching^of Knox, 
and happily delivered from the miry clay and corruption of 
Popery. He went no more to Rome, but with entire approval 
governed the Church in that city in the school of which I now 
preside. He there grew old, dear both .to God and man." 
Thomas Mercer of Todlay in Banffshire, and of Smiddyburn in 
Aberdeenshire, was the elder son of the minister of Kinnellar, 
and grandson of Principal Row. He had two sons ministers ; 
John, who was minister of Tyrie (707^), and William, minis- 
ter of Pitsligo, who is mentioned by Dr. McKelvie in his 
"Annals of the Secession Church" in connection with the intro- 
duction of dissent there : ** The theological views of Mr. 
Mercer's successor at Pitsligo producing great dissatisfaction in 
the minds of several fishermen at Rosehearty who had acquired 
a knowledge and rehsh for evangelical truth by his preaching." 
Mr. Mercer of Pitsligo died in 1767. As early as 1343 one 
Thomas Mercer was Provost of Aberdeen. The family had 
come from Perthshire, being descended from the Mercers of Aldie. 

49. Monro (Anatomists). 

The immediate ancestor of the eminent anatomists of this 
name was a Colonel in Charles the First's army at the Battle of 



Ixxvi. 



MONRO. 



Worcester, of the family of Milton, Sir Alexander Monro of 
Bearcrofts (probably a property of that name in the Parish of 
Falkirk which in 1665 belonged to John Hamilton of Grange). 
Retiring from the army he was latterly one of the principal 
clerks of the Court of Session. His son, John Munro, was for 
several years a surgeon in King William's army in Flanders, and 
settled in Edinburgh early in the eighteenth century, where he 
acquired an extensive practice, and in 171 2 was President of the 
College of Surgeons. Dr. Alexander Monro (Primus), his son, 
was born 8th September, 1697. In 1719 he settled in Edinburgh 
and became Demonstrator in Anatomy. Next year he began a 
regular course of lectures on Anatomy and Surgery, and in 1721 
was elected Professor of Anatomy in the University of Edin- 
burgh. It is related of him that "having learned his first dis- 
course by heart he was thrown into confusion by the sight of the 
distinguished audience assembled to hear it, and forgot the 
words which he had committed to memory. Having brought no 
notes he was compelled to lecture extemporaneously and con- 
tinued to do so ever after." His course embraced Surgery 
as well as Anatomy, extended from October to May and was 
carried on uninterruptedly for thirty-eight years. His character, 
as drawn by Lavater simply from the inspection of his portrait 
by Allan Ramsay, is given by Hutchinson in his '• Biographia 
Medica," viz. : — " This man is incapable of giving offence to any 
one ; and who could ever suffer himself designedly to offend 
him ? He loves tranquillity, order and simple elegance ; he 
takes a clear view of the objects he examines ; he thinks accu- 
rately ; his ideas and his reasonings are always equally well fol- 
lowed up ; his mind rejects all that is false or obscure ; he gives 
with a liberal hand ; he forgives with a generous heart, and 
takes delight in serving his fellow creatures. You may safely 
depend^on what he says or what he promises. His sensibility 
never degenerates into weakness ; he esteems worth, find it 
where he may. He is not indifferent to the pleasures of life, but 
suffers not himself to be enervated by them. This is not what 
is usually denominated a great man but he possesses a much 
more exalted character, he is the honour of humanity and of his 
jrank in life." He died on the loth July, 1767, having married in 



MONRO — MORISON. 



Ixxvii. 



1725 Isabella Macdonald, a daughter of Sir Donald Macdonald 
of Sleat, Bart. They had several sons, one of whom, Dr. Donald 
Monro, was an eminent physician in London ; another being 
his successor in office. Dr. Alexander Monro, Secundus (No. 727 
of this Record). 

50. Morison of Elsick. 

It has been remarked in the notice of Provost James Morison, 
Senior (744), that there is nothing to show where he was born 
nor who were his parents, simply that he appears not to have 
been a native of Aberdeen. There is a reference, however, in 
the Session Papers of the year 1772 to relatives he had on Don- 
side of the name of Wattie. Duncan Anderson of Candacraig 
it appears had given a bond of 250 merks to one Duncan Wattie. 
For payment of this bond Provost Morison at one time had 
thoughts of pursuing Candacraig. The matter, however, seems 
to have lain over more than thirty years, and in 1772 James 
Wattie, at Mill of New (Duncan's son), instituted proceedings 
against Charles Anderson of Candacraig, the grandson of 
Duncan Anderson the grantor \^ho had died in 1714. In the 
course of the suit a letter was put in evidence written in 1740 by 
Lachlan Forbes of Edinglassie to Provost Morison, expressing 
his belief of the justice of the claim, and urging Provost Morison's 
advocacy, on the additional ground that " Duncan Wattie's sons 
are your relatives." This might imply that the relationship was 
through Duncan Wattie's wife, whose name we are ignorant of. 
Mill of New, where James. Wattie lived, is in the Parish of 
Invernochtie (Donside), and in that parish in i6g6 the Poll Tax 
Book refers to various individuals of the name of Wattie, and also 
to a John Muriesone, tenant in Ledmacoy, unmarried, paying tax 
for himself and his mother. It is possible that this might have 
been a rel'^^^ive of Provost Morison who had then been a few 
years in business in Aberdeen. James Wattie, the pursuer in 
the process referred to, was cousin-german to Charles Anderson 
the defendant. It has been understood that a relationship 
existed on the part of the Morisons to Mrs. Amelia Forbes, wife 
of the Rev. Bavid Beatson, minister of Dunbarney in Perthshire. 
There was, at all events, a close intimacy, the result, it may be, 



Ixxviii. 



MORISON — M QUF.ENS. 



of distant relationship. One of the daughters of Provost James 
Morison, Junior, also bore the name of Amelia. On Mrs. 
Beatson's part the name probably came from her maternal 
grandmother Amelia Dunbar, daughter of Sir Robert Dunbar of 
Grangehill, Morayshire, Bart., and wife of John Gordon of Car- 
buie near Keith. 

• Mrs. Beatson's father, the Rev. Alexander Forbes, was born 
in 1690, and was minister of the Parish of Forgue from 1716 till 
his death in 1758. Besides his daughter he had a son, Alexander 
Forbes who died unmarried, his landed property of Kirkpottie 
being inherited in succession by several nephews, sons of the 
minister of Dunbarney. Their only sister married the Rev. 
Andrew Bell of Crail. 

If the relationship alluded to really existed, it may have come 
through Anna Low, wife of Provost James Morison, Senior, as 
her mother's name is believed to have been Christian Forbes. 

t 

51. McQueens of Braxfleldi 
1 John McQueen, the father of Jane McQueen or Ferrier (759), 
was a younger brother of the well-known Judge, Lord Braxfield, 
and son of John McQueen of Braxfield who was born in 
1687 and died 20th November, 1771. The lands of Braxfield 
belonged in 1602 to James Hamilton of Stanehouse, and the 
grandmother of Mrs. Ferrier had been of another family of that 
name, Catharine Hamilton, sixth daughter of James Hamilton 
of Westport, and wife of John Hamilton of Gilkerscleugh. She 
was in the practice of attending conventicles, and on account of 
her presence at one her husband was fined 2,000 merks on the 
8th of February, 1683. He was one of the chief mourners at 
the funeral of John, Duke of Rothes, in 1681. Their younger 
daughter, Helen Hamilton, was married to John McQueen of 
^iraxfield, Sheriff-Substitute of the Upper Ward of Lanarkshire. 
He was by no means a wealthy man, and it is said " that no 
extravagant views of future advancement seem to have entered 
into his mind respecting his children." The elder son, Robert, 
was born in 1722 and became an eminent lawyer at the Scottish 
Bar, and afterwards a Judge by the title of Lord Braxfield. He 
was considered the first feudal lawyer of his time in Scotland. 



M yUEENS — RAMSAY — ROSS. 



Ixxix. 



He presided at the trials of the political prisoners Muir, Skirving 
and others with great finnness and intrepidity, but was con- 
sidered to have treated them with unnecessary harshness. His 
younger brother, as has been seen, was the father of the first wife 
of Major-General Hay Ferrior (324). 

52. John Ramsay, Journalist. 

Katharine Fordyce is mentioned in the list of Unconnected 
Fordyces as a daughter of James Fordyce, merchant in Aber- 
deen, and Elspet Garden. She was baptized nth December, 
1740, and in course of time was married to a Mr. Ramsay of 
Old Meldrum. Their grandson, John Ramsay, seems to merit 
remembrance in such a Record as this : — 

He was born i8th September, 1799, and died at Aberdeen 
4th June, 1870. He commenced life as a tutor in different fami- 
lies, became one of the masters of Gordon's Hospital, Aberdeen, 
and thereafter conducted two local periodicals. The opening 
words of one of these may give some idea of the man : " Devo- 
tion to a party," he observes, "we consider as a sure indication 
of a weak intellect and a worthless heart. The enlightened 
philanthropist spurns the fetters of party a*".a walks abroad in 
his honest zeal to promote the best interests of his kind." For 
the last fourteen years of his life Mr. Ramsay was sub-editor of 
the Aberdeen journal. He was at one time an unsuccessful 
candidate for the Mathematical Chair in Marischal College, and 
acted for a short time as private secretary to Joseph Hume. 
He left £"100 to provide a gold medal annually in Marischal 
College, made bequests to local charities, and left the residue of 
his fortune to a Fund for Aged and Indigent Gentlewomen. 

53. Rev. Jas. Ross, D.D. 

In the notice of Dr. George French (514), it has been men- 
tioned that, although he was married and had a daughter who 
became the wife of Mr. Charles Ross of Aberdeen, want of full 
information prevented details being given. So far it may be 
said that, of Mrs. Ross's family, one son, George, went to the 
West Indies, was a stipendiary magistrate in Demerara, married 
and ' ed there, and one daughter, Sarah, was also married and 



Ixxx. 



ROSS. 



had a family ; her husband being a respected citizen and member 
of the Town Council of Aberdeen, William Ross, advocate 
and Baillie. 

Mr. Charles Ross, the son-in-law of Dr. French, was a 
merchant in Aberdeen, an unobtrusive, good man, who died on 
the loth March, 1831, at the age of sixtv-six. His elder brother, 
the Rev. Dr. James Ross, was a highly esteemed clergyman, 
under whose ministry the compiler of this Record sat in his early 
days in the East Church of Aberdeen, when Dr. Ross was 
colleague of the Rev. Robert Doig. A few particulars regarding 
this good man's life and work may be given after premising that 
his father, Mr. James Ross, was a teacher in Aberdeen, born 
23rd February, 1730, who died 15th April, 1804, and whose wife 
Janet Smith, as recorded on the tombstone, in St. Nicholas 
Churchyard, was born loth June, 1738, and died 5th July, 1800. 

The Rev. Dr. James Ross was educated at the Grammar 
School and Marischal College, of his native place, graduating at 
the latter in 1780. He was engaged for a while in private tuition, 
and at one time had the gifted Lord Byron under his care, who 
describes him as '* a very devout, clever little clergyman, under 
whom I made astonishing progress." " I recollect to this day," 
he adds, " his mild manners and good-natured painstaking." 
He was also private tutor to two of Lord Forbes's sons, and 
afterwards for nine years carried on a private school at Borrow- 
stounness. In 1 794 he was licensed to preach the Gospel, and next 
year was appointed to one of the parochial charges of Saint 
Nicholas, Aberdeen. The University of Aberdeen conferred on 
him the degree of D.D. in 1809. He died 17th October, 1824, in 
his sixty-fourth year, only three months after the death of his col- 
league, Mr. Doig. Scott in his *• Fasti Ecclesiae Scotticanae,'' 
says of Dr. Ross : " The whole bent of his mind was directed 
towards improving the opportunities which his ministerial voca- 
tion afforded of promoting the spiritual benefit of his hearers. In 
pulpit addresses, he was gentle, affectionate and winning, with 
a powerful and melodious voice, while his compositions were 
marked by simplicity and good taste." The loss by early death 
of an amiable and highly promising son, Mr. Alexander Leith 
Ross, was a severe affliction. His wife, to whom he had been 



ROSS — SCOTT. 



Ixxxi. 



married, 23rd May, 1796, only lived six years afterwards, havin;; 
died 20th April, 1802, at the aj^e of forty. She was a daughter of 
Patrick Leith of Allathan, of the family of Freefield, and left two 
daughters besides the son who has been referred to ; they died 
in infancy. 

54. David Scott, etc. 

In the notice given of Jean Scott (803), daughter of David 
Scott and Elizabeth MacKenzie, it was mentioned that her 
father accompanied Oliver Cromwell to Inverness. This state- 
ment, along with what else is known of her ancestry, rests on the 
authority of a memorandum on Elizabeth MacKenzie's Bible, 
which came into possession of a descendant, Mr. J. M. Eraser. 
In one respect it has the appearance of an anachronism. The 
authority, however, is undoubted, and difficulty may be removed 
by the consideration that David Scott may have been quite 
young when he was with Cromwell, and that he or his daughter 
or both, may not have been young when they were married. 
His wife's father, Mr. Hector MacKenzie, was born about 1645, 
graduated at King's College, Aberdeen, 22nd July, 1665, and 
was settled as minister of Kingussie in 1670. In 1688, he was 
translated to Inverness, and on the accession of WilHam and 
May, took the oath of allegiance. He remained at Inverness 
till his death, 14th June, 1719. 

His wife's name was Margaret Strachan. Her father. Sir 
James Strachan of Thornton, Bart., was born about 1640, so 
that he was not much older than his son-in-law, Mr. MacKenzie. 
He was only son of the previous Baronet, and studying for the 
Church, was settled as minister of Keith in 1665. He was 
deprived by the Privy Council 7th November, 1689, for not read- 
ing the Proclamation of Estates, nor praying for King William 
and Queen Mary, and praying for the restoration of King James. 
He set up a meeting-house in his parish, succeeded to the title 
and estate, and died at Inverness in 1715. He was twice married. 
His first wife, Katharine Rose, died in 1680. The second was 
a daughter of Forbes of Watertown. His eldest son, James, 
was killed in the rebellion. Two others succeeded to the title, John , 
and Francis, who was a Jesuit in Paris. A fourth son was also 
a priest of the Roman Catholic Church. 



Ixxxii. 



SHADE. 



55. Absalom Shade of Gait. 

A brother of Sebastian Shade (No. 805 of this Record) was 
born in Wyoming County, Pennsylvania, U. S., in 1793. His 
father was a farmer, and he was the youngest son of a large family. 
In the year 1816, when he was engaged in his calling as a builder 
in Buffalo, he put in a tender for the erection of a court-house 
and gaol in the village of Niagara, Upper Canada. He failed 
in securing the contract, but as Mr. Young remarks in his inter- 
esting " Reminiscences of the Village or Town of Gait," " it proved 
a fortunate failure." The fact was that Mr. Dickson, the Chair- 
man of the Niagara District Quarter Sessions, who had just 
purchased the block of land which comprised the Township of 
Dumfries, was so attracted by Mr. Shade's appearance and enter- 
prising spirit, that he induced him to accompany him to the 
spot, with the view of securing his services as general agent. 
His appearance, as Mr. Young describes it, was striking: '* tall 
and wiry, straight as an arrow, with regular and sharp features, 
more particularly the nose, the whole face lit up with the sharpest 
of bluish gray-eyes. In short, he possessed a temperament and 
formation of body and head, rarely dissociated from mental and 
physical strength and acuteness." After looking well about, 
satisfactory terms were arranged, and having visited Niagara 
and Buffalo, Absalom Shade, we are told, " returned to make 
his home in the wilderness, all his possessions, as used to be 
the common report, con.iisting of $100 and a chest of 
carpenter's tools, and to begin what was destined to become the 
important town of Gait, in the centre of one of the richest 
agricultural districts of Ontario." Mr. Shade was for many 
years the sole merchant in the village. Prior to retiring from 
business he had firmly laid the foundation of the large fortune 
which he subsequently amassed. This he acquired largely by 
speculations in property and judicious investments in farms; 
but in no small degret , also by his various business enterprises 
— more particularly his store. In 1830 he was returned to the 
Legislative Assembly for the County of Halton. He lived till 
the 15th of March, 1862 ; but after acting as Reeve of Gait in 
1852, his long and active connection with public affairs mainly 
ceased. "Till within a few days of his death, however, he 



SHADE — SHIRREFS. 



Ixxxiii. 



continued tc have the same erect form and elastic step, the same 
eagle glance and incisive speech — continued in short, except for 
the tell-tale presence of gray hairs, the same shrewd, far-sighted 
energetic, industrious man he was when, in 1816, he had taken 
his first view of the wilderness valley which Gait now adorns. 
He was like other men, not without his faults and foibles, and, 
like others also he did not escape criticism ; but his career 
furnished," as the historian of Gait continues, "a striking illus- 
tration of what an intelligent, enterprising industrious man can 
achieve in Canada, both in building up a fortune, and in securing 
the confidence and respect of his fellow-men." 

56. Rev. Dr. Shirrefs' Forefathers. 

Donside, in Aberdeenshire, was the localit}' in which the first 
of the ancestors of the Rev. Dr. Shirrefs (813), of whom any 
knowledge has come to us, resided. Some of the particulars 
regarding them which follow rest on the authority of Peter 
Anderson of the Parish of Keig, a travelling bookseller or pack- 
man, who died about the year 1812 at the age of one hundred 
and fifteen. 

William Shirrefs, the first of the family who is mentioned, 
was a farmer at Balfour of Putachie, in Keig, in the seventeenth 
century. His son, James Shirrefs, occupied the farm of Little 
Miln belonging to Lord Forbes, with whom he is said to have 
been a favourite, on account of musical taste, and superiority 
in hunting and fishing and other rural sports. A romantic 
story is told connected with his marriage to Christina Blair 
living at Cjrnabo (probably a farm of that name in the Parish 
of Monymusk). It appears that she was greatly admired by 
Lord Forbes, and that he resolved to get her educated in a 
fitting manner and marry her ; and that with this view James 
Shirrefs was commissioned to bring her to Edinburgh, but that 
in place of doing so, he married her himself with the full consent 
of her parents. 

Alexander Shirrefs, son of James Shirrefs and Christina 
Blair, was a farmer in Mains of C'ova, then in Mid Clova and 
latterly in Drumnagour, all in the Parish of Kildrummy. He 
took the side of the Stewarts in the 1715 Rebellion ; was taken 



■....■*■.■■ . . «w »< y^»*»-<trrtUftiMMiWiBF^ 



Ixxxiv. 



SHIRREFS. 



prisoner at Shirrefmuir and confined in Carlisle Gaol, but 
released after four months' imprisonment through the interest of 
the Earl of Mar. He was three times married, but only the 
name of his second wife, Agnes Ferrier, has reached us. By 
his first wife, however, he had four sons who all left descend- 
ants. By the second he had a married daughter and two sons. 
David Shirrefs, the younger of the two, a builder in Aberdeen 
and Convener of the Incorporated Trades, was married 21st 
December, 1748, to Jean Lunan. Of their eleven children, several 
died young. Of the survivors, five may be mentioned here, viz. : 
The Rev. Dr. James Shirrefs (813) ; David, a planter in Jamaica ; 
Alexander, an advocate in Aberdeen ; Andrew, a bookseller and 
publisher there ; and Jane, who married James Brebner, ship- 
master and Baillie of Aberdeen. It may be added that the 
descendants of Alexander now enjoy the estate of Craig in 
Aberdeenshire through his marriage to Ann Gordon, a daughter 
of Lieutenant Francis Gordon, Mill of Lumphart, and sister 
of Helen Gordon or Monro (538) ; and that Andrew, who pub- 
li' ^ ed a volume of poems in the Scottish Dialect, was no mean 
poet. He was proprietor, editor and publisher of a periodical 
called the Caledonian Magazine and Aberdeen Repository, and 
had some complimentary verses addressed to him by the well- 
known John Skinner, commencing : " Dear cripple votary of 
Parnassus, and favourite of the Nine sweet lasses." 

One of the name of Shirreff (Alexander Shirreff, Master of 
Arts) took part with two other students of Divinity of the Uni- 
versity of Aberdeen on the 14th April, 1675, in a public dispute 
with George Keith, a leading Quaker, and Robert Barclay the 
Apologist. He appears to have been a ready speaker at all events. 
At the beginning of the discussion, Barclay had observed : " As 
we are not afraid to meet with the greatest and ablest of the 
preachers themselves, so the iVuth leads us not to despise any,'' 
to which Shirreff replied : ** The preachers and ministers of the 
Word not finding themselves concerned, we, young men and but 
students, have offered to dispute. We have concluded that, being 
young men, in case the Quakers should have any advantage it 
will not be of great consequence, and if we have advantage, we 
hope it may be useful, because these are the great prophets and 



SHIRREFS — SKENE. 



Ixxxv. 



preachers of the Quakers." The other students who took part 
in the dispute were Jchn Lesly and Paul Gellie. The presi- 
dent on their part was Andrew Thomson, advocate, and on the 
Quakers' part Alexander Skein, sometime a Magistrate of the 
city ; no doubt Alexander Skene of Newtyle referred to in the 
notice of the Jaffrays of Kingswells. Of Alexander S'^irrefF we 
have no further information. 

The Poll Tax Book of Aberdeenshire, in 1696, gives the names 
of several farmers on Donside of the name of Shirreff. Compar- 
ing this with the account of the ancestry of the Rev. Dr. Shirrefs, 
it does not seem as if individuals mentioned in the one could be 
identified as appearing in the other. They are : — 

William Shirreff, tenant in Muire, in the Parish of Alford, 
and Margaret Reid his wife — 

John Shirreff, tenant in Balfour, in the Parish of Forbes, and 
Anna Anderson his wife — 

Alexander Shirreff and his spouse in Newbigging (Keig) — 

William Shirreff, tenant on John Gordon of Knockespock's 
lands, in the Parish of Cleatt, and Helen Thomsone his wife — 

Thomas Shirreff, merchant, also in Cleatt. 

57. Skene of Pitmuxton. 

The family from which Mary Skene or Thomson (817) de- 
scended was that of Ruthrieston, near Aberdeen. 

Andrew Skene of Ruthrieston was Conservator of Scotch 
Privileges at Campvere, in Holland, where he acquired a fortune 
and died in 1667. 

His son, Andrew Skene, called " younger of Pitmuckston," 
was a factor in Campvere, married Isobell Donaldson, and died 
before 1691. His widow was infeft in that year in an annuity 
out of Pitmuckston. She was then wife of Mr. Matthew 
McKell or McKaill, apothecary and chirurgeon in Aberdeen, 
and had in 1696 a son Matthew, and also a daughter of her first 
marriage, Mary Skene, living with her. The Poll Tax Book, 
which imparts the information, also mentions two servants (pro- 
bably apprentices) Mr. Matthew then had, one of whom was 
Andrew Skene, no doubt his step son and the same as married 
Margaret Kirkton, and as Andrew Skene, apothecary, who with 



Ixxxvi. 



SKENE — THOMSONS. 



Andrew Skene, Junr., his son, was infeft in 171 7 (the one in 
life-renv, the other in fee) in the lands of Pitmuckston with manor 
place, fishings, etc. 

The last mentioned Andrew Skene, in that case, was Dr. 
Andrew Skene, who was born in 1703, married Mary Lumsden, 
and died 24th August, 1767, and whose wife, the mother of 
Mary Skene or Thomson, was a daughter of David Lumsden of 
Cushnie, and died i6th July, 1755, in her forty-sixth year. 

58. Thomsons (Aberdeenshire). 

There is no clue to the parentage of Barbara Thomson or 
Fordyce (876). In the notice of her, it has been said that in 
1696 John Thomson was the occupant of Mill of Ashogle, but 
there is nothing to show any relationship to him or any other of 
the name. Notwithstanding, a few particulars may be given 
respecting families of Thomsons in Aberdeenshire about the 
time she lived. 

(i) John Thomson of Haremoss, in the Parish of Montwhitter, 
resided in i6g6 with his wife Jean Forbes and his son Gilbert 
Thomson in the Town of Turriff. In 1698 he acted as Baron 
Baillie at a court held on the lands ot Culsh, belonging to 
William Lindsay. 

(2) Mr. William Thomson, "preacher of God's Word," was 
infeft in 1667 in the lands of Faichfield in the Parish of Long- 
side. He appears to have died before 1687, and was possibly 
the same as Mr. William Thomson, who, with Christian Mercer 
his wife, was infeft in 1658 in the lands of Swelend in Old 
Machar. Thomas Thomson of Faichfield, his only son, was 
served heir in 1689 to George Thomson of Mains in Lanark- 
shire, the immediate younger brother of his father, in lands in 
the Parish of Kilbryde. In i6g6 the Poll Tax Book for Aber- 
deenshire gives Thomas Thomson's assessment with that of Janet 
Gregory his wife, and his daughters Isobell, Janet and Margaret 
Thomsons, and shows that he was liable as tenant for part of the 
assessment of Cocklaw in the Parish of Peterhead, belonging to 
Mr. Thomas Thomson, minister of Forres ; but that he was 
exempt there on account of his beinj assessed in a higher capa- 
city for his lands of Faichfield. He would seem to have been 



J&i 



THOMSONS. 



Ixxxvii. 



twice married, as in 1722 Ann Gordon, relict of Thomas 
Thomson of Faichfield, was infeft in the lands of Faichfield. A 
provisional arrangement referred to in the sasine indicates that 
there may have been a posthumous child of the marriage. 

Alexander Thomson of Faichfield was infeft in 1724 in an 
annual rent out of the lands of Artamford. In the Aberdeen 
jfonrftal for the year 1778, the death of Captain John Thomson, 
Faichfield, is given. 

[As Thomas Thomson, burgess of Aberdeen, and his wife 
were infeft in 1635 in half of the lands of BoghoU in the Parish 
of Newmachar ; and, as William Thomson his son was also 
infeft in BoghoU in 1645, it seems possible that this William 
Thomson was the same as Mr. William Thomson of Swelend 
already referred to, since BoghoU and Swelend were both 
included in 1696 in the property of Hilton, then owned by Henry 
Panton.] 

(3) Mr. Thomas Thomson of Cocklaw was a graduate of 
Glasgow University, taking his degree there in 1654. Whether 
he was a native of that part of Scotland does not appear — but he 
appears for many years to have had more connection with the 
North. He was settled as minister of Parton in Kirkcudbright- 
shire, but deprived by Act of Parhament in 1662. On the 24th 
February following he was accused before the Privy Council of 
" still labouring to keep the hearts of the people from the present 
Government in Church and State," and was stated to have 
lectured in the house of Gordon of Earlston on a Sabbath fore- 
noon in March, 1664. He had been married 21st September, 
1659, to Isobell Mercer, daughter of Thomas Mercer, advocate 
in Aberdeen. In 1663 he was infeft in the lands of Tririvaill 
in Aberdeenshire; in 1666 (while still designed minister of Par- 
ton) in the lands of Little Creichie in the Parish of Deer ; and in 
1667 with his wife in the lands of Easter Auquhitrie (Longside). 
In 1670 and 1676 he had infeftments in Cocklaw, and in 1689 
his wife was infeft in the manor house there. After the Revolu- 
tion he seems to have resumed ministerial work. In 1690 he 
was called to the Parish of Carstairs, and " continued " in 1691, 
implying that he had been liable to removal in terms of ecclesi- 
astical arrangements then. In 1693 he was translated to Forres 



Ixxxviii. 



THOMSONS — TURING. 



and remained there till 1697, when he was removed to Turriff. 
From this charge he was translated in 1699 to Old Machar, 
where he ministered till his "death, which took place in October, 
1704, his wife having died in March of the same year. No chil- 
dren are mentioned by Scott in his " Fasti," and the Poll Tax 
Book being drawn up when he was minister at Forres in 
another county, that for Aberdeenshire does not give his family's 
assessment. Whether the Faichfield and Cocklaw families were 
related we have had no means of ascertaining. 

(4) Of the Thomsons of Banchory (including those of Cults, 
Crawton and Portlethen) it would be rash to give any account 
without greater certainty as to the relationship one bore to another. 
From the beginning of the seventeeth century or thereabouts 
downward, they were to be found in the town of Aberdeen as 
Advocates, Procurators, Consultors or Town Clerks — occupying 
thus influential positions and acquiring valuable properties. 
They are now scarcely, if at all, to be found, unless in the 
person of descendants of females bearing the name. The particu- 
lars that are to be found in 871, 872 and 873 are all we can give. 

59. Turing (Foveran, etc.). 

One account of the Turings of Foveran in Aberdeenshire is 
that they came from Tour d'Auvergne in France with King 
David II. and got the estate from him. On the roll of that King 
is a Charter " to William Toryn of the Barony of Foverne, in 
the County of Aberdeen, by recognition from Henry Strabrock." 
Another account says that : ** The Barony of Foveran belonged 
anciently to the Earls of Buchan, on whose forfeiture it was 
given by King Robert Bruce to WiUiam Strathbrock ; the Earl 
of Mar thrust himself into possession and disponed it to William 
Toryn, burgess of Aberdeen, and his wife Mary Skeen." In 
1639 the Laird of Foveran was raised to the dignity of a Baronet 
by King Charles I. On the 27th May of that year, Spalding the 
historian of the troubles, says in his Annals : " The place of 
Foveran pertaining to Sir John Turing, Kt., an anti-covenanter, 
was taken by the Lairds of Delgatie and Ludquhairn." Sir 
John Turing suffered much by his loyalty to King Charles II., 
and fought bravely at Worcester ; but in 1657 Mr. Alexander 



-I ,' 



TURING. 



Ixxxix. 



Forbes, merchant in Aberdeen, acquired Ardo and Aikinshill, 
part of the property, and before 1681 he became possessed of the 
whole Barony of Foveran. The proprietor of Savoch in the 
Parish of Foveran, Mr. John Turing, appears to have been a 
son of Archibald Turing in Kinknockie, but whether the family 
specially noticed in this Record are his descendants does not 
appear. In 1642 he is designated schoolmaster in the. Parish of 
St. Martyne, and in 1653 schoolmaster at Gardyne near London. 
At least, this Mr. John Turing, schoolmaster, is presumably the 
same as Mr. John Turing, proprietor of Savoch. Available 
information does not carry us farther back with certainty than 
to the grandfather of Mr. James Turing of Middleburgh (898), — 
John Turing, about the middle of the seventeenth century, who 
had three sons, Mr. John, Henry and Mr. Walter. Henry was 
a merchant in Cupar-Fife, the other two were Presbyterian 
ministers. Mr. John Turing, the oldest brother, was born about 
1659. He graduated at King's College, Aberdeen, 3rd July, 
1679, and was settled as minister at Cummertrees in the Presby- 
tery of Annan. Scott in his " Fasti Ecclesiae " says he deserted 
his charge at the Revolution and went to Insch in Aberdeen- 
shire to which he was called 2nd October, 1692, and intruded. 
He demitted or resigned in 1701 and was called to Drumblade 
22nd January, 1703, where he died in January, 1743. His son, 
Mr. Alexander Turing, minister of the Parish of Oyne, was born 
in 1702 and died in 1782. Jlis son, Robert, assumed the 
Baronetcy which had lain dormant since the reverses of the 
Civil War. A sister of the minister of Oyne married the Rev. 
David Bannerman of St. Martin's, and from her Professor 
Bannerman of the Free Church College, Edinburgh, descended. 
Mr. Walter Turing (brother of the minister of Insch, etc.) was 
reader at the Kirk of Logiedurno in 1696 when he acted as Clerk 
in taking the poll there. He was afterwards minister of the 
Parish of Rayne, and married Ann Ogilvie, daughter of James 
Ogilvie of Badintoul. Her mother, Catharine Punbar (who 
had been twice married before) was a daughter of Sir Robert 
Dunbar of Grangehill and Grizel Brodie (of Brodie), his wife, 
"atharine Turing, a daughter of the minister of Rayne, was 
married tc Mr. Robert Farquhar, minister of Chapel of Garioch, 



I 



xc. 



TURING — WILLOX. 



and was mother of the distinguished London physician, Sir 
Walter Farquhar, Bart., and of Mr. John Farquhar, minister of 
Nigg, Aberdeenshire, incidentally noticed in the account of 
Provost James Morison (743), to one of whose daughters he was 
married. 

The line in which the Baronetcy had been revived in 1792 
having failed it was taken up by the nearest representative, Mr. 
James Henry Turing of Rotterdam, in whose family it continues. 
He was a grandson of James Turing of Middleburgh (898), and 
brother of John Robert Turing of the Island of Java (901). 

60. Willox (Old Aberdeen). 

Rachel Aberdein, spouse to George Willox, merchant in Old 
Aberdeen, was infeft in two tenements and a yard there, i6th 
February, 1757. She may very probably have been the mother 
of Mrs. Dingwall (932). In the Aberdeen jfournal of 13th Janu- 
ary, 1777, is an enigmatical list of thirteen Aberdeen toasts, two 
of whom, no doubt, were daughters of Rachel Aberdein or 
Willox. The one enigma is " The reward of seven years' ser- 
vice, a law deed, and a quadruped "; the other, " Half a place 
of confinement, a snare, part of the emblem of despair, and a 
cross," evidently corresponding to the names of Rachel and 
Janet Willox. 

The Aberdeen jfournal notices the death on the 20th Febru- 
ary, 1787, in her eighteenth year, of Miss Susan Willox, 
daughter of Mr. George Willox, merchant in Old Aberdeen ; and 
there also on the 29th October, 1788, of Mrs. Campbell, wife of 
Captain John Campbell of the 72nd Regiment, and daughter of 
Mr. Willox, merchant in Old Aberdeen, in whom, it is added, 
" the most uncommon elegance of form w.* ; united with that 
mildness of temper, that soft affability of manner, and that 
unaffected goodness of heart which are the true ornaments of a 
female character." 

The Poll Tax Book (1696) gives the following entry in the 
Town of Aberdeen: " Barbra Ross, spouse to George Willox, 
who is out of the Kingdom — no stock, child or servant." None 
of the name are given in the Town of Old Aberdeen. 

The Rev. Robert Willox, who was minister of the Parish of 



WILLOX — YOUNG. 



XCl. 



Echt in Aberdeenshire, died 5th April, 1763, of whom a high 
character is given in the Aberdeen Journal in the notice of his 
death in the eighty-first year of his age and fiftieth of his 
ministry. His widow, Henrietta Rymer, died at Aberdeen on 
the 7th November, 1775, in her eighty-sixth year; and another 
of the name, the Rev. James Wiliox, is mentioned by Scott in his 
" Fasti Ecclesiae Scotticanae " as having been originally a Chap- 
lain in the Army, preaching in Old Aberdeen, 8th November, 
1640, and being minister of the Parish of Kemnay from 1654 ^^^^ 
his death on 15th February, 1695. His wife's name is given as 
Anna Lindsay — and their children, Mr. James, George, Alex- 
ander, John, John and Isobell — but whether either of these clergy- 
men was related to Baillie George Wiliox has not been learned. 
When the Poll Tax Book was compiled in 1696, Anna Lindsay, 
widow, with Elizabeth and Isobell Wiliox, her daughters, paid 
Tax in the Parish of Kemnay. 

61. Provost William Young, etc. 

William Young of Sheddocksley, merchant and stocking 
manufacturer in Aberdeen, eldest son of James Young (954) and 
Rachel Cruickshank his wife, was born 25th September, 1736. 
He was bred to his father's business and became his partner in 
1758; the capital stock of the firm (James & William Young) 
being fixed at £"2,000 sterling. He was chosen as Provost of 
Aberdeen in 1778 and again in 1782, serving two years each 
time. He was also a Director of the Aberdeen Banking Com- 
pany (the Commercial Banking Company of Aberdeen) as long 
as it was in existence (1788 to 1833). 1* is noticeable that the 
large profits of the Bank (equal to twenty-eight and a-half per 
cent, per annum for the whole time it lasted) were realized not 
from speculation but from what are deemed legitimate banking 
openftions. 

Provost Young was three times married ; first on 17th Sep- 
tember, 1767, to Margaret Douglass; she died on 27th August, 
1772 ; — secondly, on 22nd July, i78i,to Mary Anderson, who died 
14th January, 1794. His third wife, Catharine Leslie, to whom 
he was married 6th August, 1795, survived till 14th March, 1831, 
residing with her step-son, Baillie John Young, in Correction 
Wynd. 



XCll. 



YOUNG. 



Provost Young's death took place 28th November, 1814. Of 
his first marriage there were two sons, James, a merchant in 
London, who married and died in 1846, and John, who was born 
the day h.s mother died, and who was for many years one of 
the BaiUies of Aberdeen ; he died unmarried on the 12th 
August, 1837. Of his second marriage there were five daughters : 
the eldest, Elizabeth, wife of John Leith Ross of Arnage in 
Aberdeenshire, succeeded afterwards through her mother to the 
estate of Bourtie ; the second, Rachel, acquired her father's 
estate of Sheddocksley and married George Gordon of Buxburn ; 
the third, Jane, married Lieutenant-Colonel Patrick Black, 
H.E. L Co.'s Bengal Native Cavalry, only brother of Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Black or Young {75) ; the fifth daughter, Williamina, who 
died in 1883 at the age of ninety-three, was married to John 
Abercrombie, Surgeon m the Dragoon Guards, a son of Provost 
John Abercrombie (No. 2) and Catharine Forbes, his wife. 
Mary Young, the remaining daughter of Provost William Young, 
died unmarried. All his married daughters, except Mrs. Gordon, 
left descendants. Two of his grandsons, James and Arthur 
Ross, emigrated to Upper Canada. The former, a graduate of 
Marischal College, Aberdeen, was at one time a Member of the 
Dominion Parliament. He now resides in Toronto, — the latter 
residing in Port Elgin, Ontario. Both are married and have 
families. 

A somewhat extended notice of Provost Young's three wives 
and some of their relatives is added : 

Margaret Douglass, the first wife of Provost Young, was a 
daughter of John Douglass of Tilwhilly and Inchmarlo in Kin- 
cardineshire and Mary Arbuthnott his wife, and sister of Mrs. 
Elizabeth Douglass or Dingwall (269). A singular entry 
appears in the Burgh Records of Bervie, viz.: "At Inverb^pfie, 
the 13th day of January, 1762, Mrs. Peggy Douglass was 
admitted burger and brother of Guild with the haill immunities 
of the burgh, and that gratis for former services." The entry is 
signed by her uncle. Lord Arbuthnott, as Provost, and Thomas 
Christie as Baillie. A notice of the Douglasses of Tilwhilly will 
be found in another place. 

Mary Anderson, the second wife of Provost Young, was the 



YOUNG. 



XCIU. 



only daughter of Patrick Anderson of Bourtie in Aberdeenshire 
and Elizabeth Ogilvie his wife, who was a daughter of Sir 
David Ogilvie of Barras, Bart. The estate of Bourtie afterwards 
fell to Mrs. Young's descendants, her only brother dying unmar- 
ried in 1825. It had been purchased in 1663 by John Anderson, 
shipmaster in Aberdeen. Hir brother, Alexander Anderson, 
married a sister of Sir Patrick Dun, an eminent medical man of 
his day, Physician-General in Ireland and a Member of Parlia- 
ment there. Their son, Patrick Anderson of Bourtie, was the 
father of Provost Young's wife. 

Catharine Leslie, third wife of Provost Young, was the 
eldest of four married daughters of George Leslie, merchant in 
Aberdeen, and Katharine Irvine his wife. The others were 
married respectively to John Niven of Thornton, John Gordon 
of Craigmyle, and John Henderson of Caskieben. Their mother, 
Katharine Irvine, was a daughter of Mr. Arthur Irvine, Miltoun 
of Drum, and his wife Cecilia Barclay ; her eldest daughter, 
Mrs. Young, succeeding through her to the estate of Glassell on 
Deeside, which after her death fell to John Michell of Forcet 
Hall, Yorkshire, a grandson of her sister Mrs. Niven. Reference 
to the Baxters of Glassell, relatives of Mrs. Young, will be found 
at another part of this Record. 

The following particulars refer to another family of the name 
of Leslie who were nearly related to Mrs. Young, but in what 
degree cannot be positively said : 

In the early part of the eighteenth century two brothers (as 
they are stated to have been in Scott's " Fasti Eccl."), Mr. 
William and Mr. James Leslie, were parish ministers in Aber- 
deenshire. The former studied divinity at Glasgow, and was 
chaplain to John Lord Tullibardine. From 1699 till 1729 he 
was minister successively of the Parishes of Kemnay, Chapel of 
Garioch and Saint Fergus. In 1699 he was married to Ann 
Gordon, daughter of the Laird of Terpersie, and had several 
children. The other brother, Mr. James Leslie, was minister of 
Crimond and afterwards of Saint Fergus. He was settled in 
the former parish in 1709 and died at Saint Fergus in 1745. He 
was married to Jean Forbes, sister of a greatly-esteemed clergy- 
man, Mr. Thomas Forbes of the East Church, Aberdeen, whose 



XCIV. 



YOUNG. 



widow, Agnes Mackenzie, was niece of John Douglass of Til- 
whilly (270). The Rev. James Leslie and Jean Forbes had, it is 
believed, two sons : Alexander, who became minister of Durris 
and afterwards of Fordoun, and James, who was a Captain in the 
Army. The elder brother, the Rev. Alexander Leslie, latterly of 
Fordoun, married Grace Reid, half-sister of the eminent meta- 
physician, Dr. Thomas Reid of Glasgow, and had a son James, 
who succeeded him in the parochial charge of Fordoun, and 
another who married a daughter of Sir William Seton of Pit- 
medden, Bart., one daughter who married Mr. William Lindsay, 
writer in Glasgow and lived latterly in Aberdeen, and two others 
who died unmarried. Captain James Leslie of the 15th Foot, 
the younger son of the Rev. Alexander Leslie of Fordoun and 
Grace Reid, was Assistant Quartermaster-General to the British 
Army before Quebec under Wolfe, and in his latter years farmed 
the estate of Kair in Kincardineshire. He married a Miss 
Stewart of Inchbreck, and had several children. One of these, 
the Hon. James Leslie, was an eminent merchant of Montreal, 
a partner in the firm of Leslie, Starnes & Co. He entered 
Parliament in 1834, acted at one time as Provincial Secretary, 
and was ultimately a Senator of the Dominion. Through his 
wife, the daughter of a British officer of the name of Langan, 
he owned the seigniories of Bouchemin and De Ramsey, and died 
in 1873. His son, Mr. Patrick Leslie, said to be the last 
remaining member of the family, died 25th October, 1882. Mrs. 
Nairn, a daughter of the Hon. James Leslie, was owner or 
seignioress of Murray Bay. 

Mr. George Leslie, the father of Mrs. Provost Young, may 
have been a son of Mr. William Leslie, minister of Saint Fergus, 
and Anna Gordon his wife. 




f ." i 



!" 



i 



p 



^w 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



■ I 



I- General Abstract: (Dingwalls.) 

"• * ditto (Fordyces.) 

III. (A^ William Dingwall, First of Brucklay: & children. 
.. (B) Arthur Dingwall, Second of Brbwnhill; & children. " 
(C) Alexander Dingwall, Hosier in Aberdeen; & children. 

(A) John Fordyce, Second of Gask; & children. 

( B) Isobell Fordyce or Blachrie: & children. 

(C) Barbara D. Fordyce or Farquhar; & children. 
John Dingwai! of Rant..3ston: & descendants. 
Dr Arthur D. Fordyce of Culsh: & descendants of sons. 

VII. (A) Isobell D. Fordyce or Bentley; &. descendants. 
. . ( B) Patience D. Fordyce or Young; & descendants. 

VIII. Angelica D. Fordyce or Harvey: & d^^endants. 

IX. Agnes D. Fordyce or Fraser: &. descendants. 



IV 



V. 
VI. 



^ 



Correction:— Table VI, instead of X in lines a and 3, read VH. 






. .33JaA r JAOIDOJA3\130 ^ 

* 

■ — ».*H»4*Mh.p»<i»H<i 'm) i III . iiiil «> ii| iH i j u ' i I _-,.,— —-.- M l — _ ii> ^ mm «».»..^ — 

.-»9ib:; • J A ;''iHnwv;>8 )o bnoDsS JJewgrHQ uti\hA (8 ; 

.f©ibliiiD A JisO ^0 bndjsS ,«>o'^bio*^ndol (A) Vl 

aJfifib idD29b j$ ; .ij«aiirHi<fvH \a ilaw^o.Q nHoL V 

,t> o.i }o etnfihn^Di^b A.;H^luO >o aibyh ■-'^ r! luHhA. ^O • ! V 

2tnfib'i9^^^b >b ,j^nuoY iO sr^y^'K*''^ Q tiofiorfc" "' 



" — >'^« -— ^'1 



*'V t><>'^^ X !>nB £ i9Mtl ni XTo biiatam ,iV i^icii^.*"-.'-. i.uJiijQiioD 



k 



I. GENEPAL ABSTRACT (DINGWALLS.) 



m 



V} 



V 



!V 
XI 



William Dingwall of Seilscrook, m Barbara Barclay: ycirca 1640-50) 3 ch. 
Arthur ofBrownhill, m Lucretia Irvine; (7 'children.) 

William of Bruckhiy. m AnnaGordon: (6 children.) 

Lucretia m William Dingwall (/^adPor — below.) 

Arthur of Brownhiir, m 1 Sa. Murray, ^ J. Chalmers; (9& i ch.) 

Wm (Fadtor) m i L Dingwall, 2 J. Fordyce ( 1 &3 ch.) 

John, Jun. yBaillie) m Magdal Duff: (8 ch. ) 

John of Blue. ;// M. Gordon: ( 2 ch. ) 

John (Duff) of Brucklay: 

m Franc Brydges ; [s.p.) 

Cath: ( Duff) m Wm. Stewart ( 2 ch.) 

Patience H. (Duff ), «r /*/ 

Lit;utJ.Reid:.?J.RS:errit 

Ca.E.M.R.(Duff) 

wDrW.J.Fyffe 

CFDuff 

Arthur D. (Fordyce) ;// Jan.Morison, ( 15 ch.) 

Wm D.F. m Mcr. Ritchie (loch.) 

Capt. A. D.F. of Brucklay 

1 m Barb.Thom: ( io£h.) 

WilImD.F;ofB. 

»/ C.Horn (4 ch) 

^A.D.F. 

J.D.Fw P. Miller 

A. D.F. 

J. D.F. m Ch. McDougall (4childn) 

Gen. Sir John »!/ S.Clark ^ 

I M.L.AIieyne jP. Graham. 

Cap. JohnF.D.F. 

Alex. D. F. m M. Dingwall: ( 10 ch.) 

A!ex. D.F. (Compiler F.R.) 

Lt Thos D. F. w M. Hopper; ( i ch.) 

Arthur Thos D.F. (rfunm.) 

Alex. D. ( T-1 osier i w Elizab. Douglass; ( 7 ch.) 

John, Sen. ( Baillic) of Rannieston: ni i M. Lumsden: 

>Mary Syme : ( i6childrenof ist marria}i;e.) 

Alex. D. ofRanii. w J. Abercrombie (i5ch.) 
Alex. D. w Isab. Matthewson(2ch.) 
Alex. D. (Sailor) HIsapp. 
Patrick D. m Harriet Yates (7 children. 

Charles, m Julia Bl. Drew: (loch.) 

. Ch. Arthur m F.K. Danvers 

' Chas Gilbert D. 

(George. Adam, Barbara, Isobel. Helen.) 
George (in Bifllie,) John. 



.aiJAWDWIQi TDART.?8A JA?nM3D .! 



>>. 



'.9 6ifidiBB'v« ,3to<iiuii{r'ii^'io.lt6wg/wCI (nfiiliiW 
\.\tmiAbi 'vilRit«tr>t«.) vvt ,HiJfiif|v/<nffV) TjrliiA 

hohtoOGr ; t'lfnfiilNVy 

(.lb oi ) sifbiiR .1 M N« .i^g m^vy 

I. - ' ^ I ) : moHT /d isS m 
{rb^)rftoHkDA^" 

v. >j-?eID,c^ \\« nfi.o[ v8 .n ^D 

'.fboi);il*wgn(0 .M w , i .0 V..A • 

: .th n -isqrjoH .M w ."^ .0 toAT JJ . 

uitrnuVi.l.asoHT-njHtTiA* 

i -.'b t * :2«'^'3'J<^Q -diafiS w < rj/Mj^ fi .a j(->!A 

( ..gj^ftt'llSf »> t *}<#:-,. ; M f (b d I ) ; am^<i Y''«'^ '- * . 

( .^i" ?,,! ) 9i«i^o.i:>T«»cfA .f w .nutiH'Ui .(I xgfA 
^ . fb i 1 noew^HWisM (hi\ v.%. .y .xalA 
.tfrf«eifr:"'<o!i.(;^) .CI .x!j!A 

( .fboi ):wmC! .'la ft.iut frt ,,v>h6n0 
^isvrteCl . Ml fniuHh A . fO 



Ge 



»Ti6il(iV. 



11. GENERAL ABSTRACT (FORDYCES.) 



George Fordyce (HaughitofAshoglejm Barbara Thomson: circa 1660: (3ch.) 
John, of Gask, tn Isobell Lindsay; (6 children.) 

John, of Gask, m Barbara Gordon: ( 1 2 children.) 

William, of Culsh: </Mnf//. 

Jean, of Culsh {h. of her brother:) wi Wm Dingwall (Table 4) 

George (Provost) m ist Isobell Walker, 2nd Elizab. Brown: (4 & i6ch. ) 
Agnes, m James Black \_Dean of Guild t"] \ 10 children.) 

Barbara, m T. Blackwell, L L.D. [Principal"] {s.p.) 
Barbara, m George French : (7 children ;) 

John, ;;/ Christian Blackwell ; (3 children) 
George, [M.O.] »/( I daughter.) 
, ^ Robert, m Agneta Duncan : (had one child) 

' George. ^ 

Isobell, m Rev. Robert Melville : (2 children) 
• , , Elizabeth m John Harper : (2 children) 

Barbara, m D. Adamson. 
Katharine, w J. Matthews. 
Mary, (with 3 sisters preceding, — of ist marriage.) 
George, of Broadford : m Marjory Stuart : ione son: ) 
George, ( M.D ) m Mrs Weston ( 2 children) 
Sophia, m Sir Sam. Bentham (2 ch.) 
John, [M.D.) m Pleasant Lawford : (a posthumous daughter) 

Mary, m Samuel Birch (Alderptan. ) 
Robert, [Baillie^ ) m Anne Reid : ( 7 children . 'i 
Barbara, m Lieut. Robert Hay: (4 children. ) 
Elizabeth, m Dr James Spence: ( 1 child : ) 
Elizabeth Isabella; {authoress.) 
\ ( }) Isobell, m William Blachrie merchant, Aberdeen: ( 12 children. ) 



(.230YaH01) T0AHT28A JAR3i110 .11 ^ 

.n'rtUVttl'jti ) :nob"ioD ^.icdi^hB \y\ ,Anr.t)\. nt^ol 

.i«wmS> (l»jIij'->'ti>,meiiliW • 
t f. •>M«Tt l!i;vv§niQ mW \« (it^v'tord •i-)inr> .^) rlwIu'Jlo .ncaL 

»! >Ai j8 |^);nwoi8 d6si!3 \>«v.i9)IIbW ibdoal \>a vw (*?,o'.t.)W ) agioioO 

I .\.v.) r \'a\\AwW\ ]> Q J J ,Il9w><r>eta T \w ,6Tt>i(6a 
^ (; rf'Jifdlfb X^ ■• rl.ineil 031 >aO w .siediea 

in^tbliiio f ) ; Ibw))j6l8 aBitaiiHOsw nf^-f 

(.i9jfl;}<i/Hb I ) »•» r.Q.Mj ,egioiO 
(hlUh ttna hntl) : nBonDQ ttvifgA •'^ <ti:?doH 

(fioiMido Si : laq.nH M<io[ w H.+9d«si)3 ."■■'■' 

.(WP.rncbA .0 w ,fiifidi«a 

I .oj^eiKfUfj l«ilo — .^niI>)D'*t(j Rfjt.'i^ £ djiw) y^fiM 

( .Wds I fnA-,rt^nda ./T.eS ii8 w .fiiricjo5 
( o1tl'^i)i;b «iioaindJ'':oq n) : bio^wsJ tn6?fce!l w ( .<\.V- 1 .nrlo^ 

I .ffmblifb ^ J : bi&f^ s.HiA wi ( f's\\\\.)''S, i .nf»do?1 
( .fiaiblffb f 1 .^bH J^adofl iusiJ m ^fiisdiea 
( : bl'ub I > :QDni«q2 earnB(^ iQ m ,dJd'1e \'I3 
(.'<,tVNO^\vit)) ;i.t!9dBi«l HtsdesilJ 
» ii»>ib!iib n I .o-wfytydA ,}ii»;fbi9m soHdbIS mEJIIiW m .Ibdo-^ • 



I 



■-tuio; 



III. 



(A) WILLIAM DINGWALL (FIRST OF BRUCKLAV) & CHILDREN. 

Mr William Dingwall [1676-1733] m Anna Gordon (Nethemnuir:) 
William of Brudklay {the Mistr^) d unmarried. 
John {ike yewelier^) m Patiance Huddart {s,p.) 
(Arthur, ^rweZ/rr, Alexander, Ca^/if^Z-maitfr, Patrick, Elizabeth.) 
Lucretia, m William Dingwall {the JFador^) her cousin-german. 
Anna, m William Murray merchant in Aberdeen ( j./.) 



(B) ARTHUR DINGWALL (SECOND OF BROWNHILL) & CHILDREN. 

Arthur Dingwall [1678-1728] m ist Sara Mun«y. ;in(/ Jean Chalmers. 
William, {JFa&or^) m 1st Lucretia Dingwall, 2nd Jean Fordyce. 
John, of Rannieston, twice married : [5tf(r V.] 
Magdalen, m 1st John Taylor, ind Thomas Fraser, {s.p. ) 
(Samuel, Alexander, Arthur, Anna, Lucretia, Jean.) 
George, (only child of A D. & J.C. certainly known.) . 

(C) ALEXANDER DINGWALL (HOSIER, ABERDEEN) & CHILDREN. 

Alexander Dingwall, [ 1 748-96:] m Elizabeth Douglass, (Tilwhilly:) 
(William, Mary, Jean, John, Elizabeth.) 
Agnes, m (Rev. Robert boig: {s.p.) 
Magdalene, M Alexander Dingwall Fordyce, her cousin-german. 



.Ill 



MI'ROJIHO A (YXJXOUfla "^0 Tefln) JjAWOMia MAUJIW (k) 
(■iiufrn9'it«Minobioit)iSfinA w [tf,*?'-^"*^'] HfiwjniOfiifcii'iWiM 



-i^aWOJ.tHO A tJJ'.HHWOHa 10 aH0032^ IJAWDMIG qUHiriA [8) 

\ "*"i"^ ■■■. ".■^■'.. ■•:-", ■-■ 

(mbi^ .RtTsiouJ ,6nnA ,ioHtiA ^ift^nftxalA ,!»umfr2> 



—»«*-»•.— *■» .» F- II ■ I iifW liiitiiwii It m ^ 



(.iit»<J«xii3 fftHol .nfti^L ,\ifeM ,fneiiliWj 

('.\.i,- 'S^oO h^oR v-aflj t« .idftjjA 

.Linai t^^'^-iimtoj toii fSDyb"";?^ IlfiwrgniO "ijbnfi^^ftlA «* ,9n«»lfeby6M 



\ 



(3) 



■ ^ 
1 



lY. 



(A) JOHN FORDYCE (SECOND OF GASK) & CHILDREN. 
John Fordyce, [1697-1762] »» Barbara Gordon: * 

(Isobell, George, John, Anne, Alexander, Jean, Anne, Elizabeth, Lilias, Willianfi. 

Barbara, m James Mackie of Gask. 

Magdalen, m Thomas Mavor. merchant in Turriff. 



(B) ISOBELL FORDYCE OR BLACHRIE, & CHILDREN. 

Isobell Fordyce (See II) m William Blachrie, merchant in Aberdeen : 
(George, Barbara, James, Isobell, John, William, Margaret, Alexander, 
Agnes, Christian, Elizabeth, William.) 



(C) BARBARA D. FORDYCE, OR FARQUHAR & CHILDREN. 
Barbara Dingwall Fordyce, m James Farquhar, Surgeon R.N. : 
Robert of Elsick .'Captain H.E.I. C.S. (</»ni:wamW.) > 
(James, Thomas Morison — d young.) . /^ 

Arthur, W.S. (formerly of Elsick.) ^ * 



..N' 



•Y'' ■■' 



I '■ 



Vf 



,/. .. -,- ,'.•,;. ;v,~?, 



i 



^ 



>\ ,.■,- 



.yi 



M3y\<^^\\0 h (X2A£>10 aH033C, 33YaH01 HHOl \k\ 

* 

/3l?p.r)V>'»!>lr)iiMai>ff«)&l w .6:fi-iiB8 

; .M3fla iih:.) a jirmdajs yio 3^YO?lO'^ jJ3apal (Si 

' \ . . ■ , - 

. ;^bn6^•■>iA .tyisgifiM ,of»c;'hW .nciol ,l!!Kivf;l ,<<i*m«L .buscIimB ,M§iooft)} 
• ,/> , (.meilliW,i<JtK!-X)l3,rtiKi%BJ'M0.eoriigA 

v-:.-^- ' ■ : \ ^ ' ' _ __ 






sr -v. 



sB 



V. JOHN DINGWALL DF RANNIESTON, di DESCENDANTS. 

John 0. of Rannteston: [ 1 716-93) m ist Mary Lumsden : 2nd {s.p.) Mary Syme: 
Arthur, of Rannieston, m Mrs Evans : [s.p. ) 

(James, Mary, William, Magdalen. Robert, Margt, William, Elizab., David) 
Sara, m Joh n Orrok : 

(John, Robert. Walter. ) .'* 

John, of Artio (P) m {s.p. ) js/ Mrs Pringle, 2nd, C J Moir, J</A. Taylor. 
Agnes, m George Thomson : 

( Alexandei', Anna, Anna. James, John, John, M;iry, William.) 
. George, ( Li Co/one/, ) tii Anna Dingwall : ( Issue; — inf. def. \ 

Charles, m Jane Dingwall, afterw. Stuart : [ditto ditto) 

Alexander, of Rannieston: ( Post-master] m Janet Abercrombie : 
(Katharine, John, Wjlliam, Mary. Jessy, Magdalen.) 
Alexander, Jurr (/Vj^Z-w/aj/c/;) w Isabella Matthewsqn : 
< .\ Alexander, (disappeared.) . „ , . 

^ Janet m Mr Kirkby: I ^ 

. \ Arthur D. ' ^ "'. * ' 

Arthur, (w4</roctf/<') w Charlotte Roach : 
i. , ", (Arthur, Herbert Alexander, Frederick Abercrombie ) 

Evelyn Agnes, ;;/ Alexander Monro. 
Janet, w William Allardyce (jr./.) 
Margaret, m Lt Col. Richard Carruthers [Issue — in/", def. ) 

Agnes, w Sir Thos Blaikie Knt Provost: ( ditto ditto ) 

Elizabeth, m John Anderson, H.E.VCS. (ditto ditto) 

> Anna, m Lt Col. George Thomson, C.B. (ditto ditto) 

' ■' Jane, ni isi A. G. Stuart, M.D. .? C. Thomson: {ditto) 
Sarah, m Lieutenant Henry Curling: (ditto) 

Patrick, m Harriet Yates : 

(Mary, John, George, Harriet, Sophia :) 
Joseph, m Elizabeth Bedwel I or Hi rd. (.y./.) 
Charles, m Julia Blanche Drew : 

Charles Arthur, ;// Frances Kathleen Danvers : 
'" ' ( Kathleen M. Danvers, Hilda Rochfort. ) 

Grace Katherine, w John Helps Starey : 
John Eric . 

(John P. Alex H. WalterM. MaryG. EllaM. Kenneth) 
Agnes Maud, m Charles Lang^ Huggins : 

(Elsie Maud Lang, Charles Gilbert D,) 
Julia Blanche, m Alex. George John Stewart. 
James, m Sophie Berghiest : (s.p. ) 




IMAGF EVALUATION 
TEST TARGET (MT-3) 




1.0 



I.I 



1.25 



1^ 

^ Hi 



2.0 



U III 1.6 



V] 



^^l<' 

^J^ 



V 



/w 







V 






/A 




L. 



% 






vV 



' -:, 



:3i(yriOnflotwc4Jife2 ^ 

i.mfiiiitW.xrf^M ,f^rfoL.':Hl',,<9rn«L',erfiiA ,.;(\nA,if5b(i5?ijiAv • Ij 

if,\»\i .■\\«\ — ;->\if A ; . 'JKWr,:-'>0 t?anA' w ( ,\«»\\<;AvO \JV ? .SX|-!090 • ' , ^' 'f/' 

(..-'^ili.b^fM ,yae'^[ .Yi*::M .rnfiiliiVv .arlof^ .ynni»itft>-t , 

i b">R^)qt.jfi3itK!;>b.nsxs!A '■■.[. 

< SfcJmo-j^H^dA ;4nit!^bm"-Kiybiij.K^*!A';9di-H ,iuHhAi ' . ; V 

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VI. ARTHUR DINGWALL FORDYCE OF CULSH, L.L.D. 
(His children, di descendants of his sons.) 

Arthur D. F. ofCulsli, LLD. (1745-1834) w Janet Morison : 

Isobell, m Professor J. B^^ntley (v 1 1 ) Barbara, m J Farquhar R.N. ( x ) 
Ang. m \. Harvey (VI 1 1 ) Agnes m A. Fraser( ix) Patience, w J. Youngixi 
(Jean, Jariet, Jean, Arthur, Palmer, Margaret.) >. 

William, of Techmuiry, m Margaret Ritchie: 

Arthur, of Culsli & Biucklay , in Jessy S. D. Fordyce (s./.) 
Alexander, of Culsh & Brucklay R.N. & MP. m Barbara Thorn: 
/ William, of Brucklay MP. w Christina Horn: 

; ' . • ' ■ > (Jane, Barbara Rachel, Alexander, Robert. ) 

James, af Culsh, w Penelope Miller: 
; ' Mn^i' (Alex, William, Pen. Rose, Bar. Ethel, James.) 

Jessie, /« Alex G. Miller, M.D&F.R.C.S.E. 
" • (Sophia, Penel., Jas, Jessie, Alex., Dor. R. I 

^ ' ' ^ Sophia. ///Alexander Tay'orlnnes; (s.s.p.) 

. , .• (Marg., Alex. [Lt Col.] Arthur [Lt] Rachel, Bar. Ann) 

, . (William, Elspet, John, Thomas. Janet, Margaret.) 

. - George, (Sheriff) ///Sophia Thorn; (5./.) 

Margaret, /w Rev. Alex. L. R. Foote D.D. (.s./.) 
^^ James, ///Charlotte McDougall: '' 

(Arthur. Jessy.) 
V / Charlotte, ///Theodore Girault: . ^ :' i- . 

James Theodore. ' ■ • >- ' ■ 

>■ ■ ~' John, ( LtGen) /// / Mrs Barnett, 2 M.L. Alleyne, j P. Gr.jham: 
... ■P-.itfy. f. (Alex. CharlesG. Henry L. James, Maria L. Sydn. A. ) 

Arthur Lawrence (Lieut. ) /// Mary Moon^: 
. .■ r , (John Lionel, Mary.) 

^ John Fra.ser (Captain, )/// Alice Margaret O'Brien. 

Sophia Elizabeth ( 2nd marriage;) /// Dr P. F. Bellew. 
Alexander, (of Fergus) /w Magdalen Dingwall: 

(Arthur, Alex. Elizab. Charlotte, Willm, Agres.JamesMorison) 
Janet, m Alexander Drysdale: 

John, /// Henrietta Emma Buchanan Haines : 

Monajanet. 
(M.D.F. JessyG. E.Ag. J.Cas. A.A.E. MaryA. E.Sc.) 
Mary Arbuthnott, /// Alexander Shirrefs Cadenhead : 
Alexander, /// Mary Murray Keefer : 

(Alex. D. F., Mary. Nelson Keefer, Edith.) 
Arthur, m Emmajosephiiie Clarke. 
(James S.; John A.; Eliz.; James B.; Geo.M.; M.D.) 
Magdalene, m Alexander David Ferrier. 
/ Thomas, (Lieut.) m Margaret Hopper, afterwards Templeton. 
Arthur Thomas. 






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(A) ISOBELL D. FORDYCE OR BENTLEY. & DESCENDANTS. 
Isobell Dingwall Fordyce, [1771-1852] m {Professor) James Bentley: 
Janet, m William Littlejohn; 

Janet Morison, m (Rev.) John Philip: 

(John B.^ William L, Alex. Adam, RobertG.i Jam^sC. ) 
Jane, «« (Rev. ) Adam White; 
" ' ' ( Jessy B.,AdamG.^ William Eben., John P. R., Philip J.) 
. "^ . Isobell, »i John Bramwell: ..--.. 
:;^ :,, (Jessy Bentley, John, William ) ^i ; 

James Bentley, w Caroline Trimble McNeill: 

\^"'::i(^\-:. : (Jessy Bentley, Anna Isobell.) 

^/ . ; '. William, m A.inabella Forbes Crombie: 

, . ' (Katharine F, William, Janet Bentley, Jannes Crombie.) 

David, ;// 1st Ellen Maria Taylor; 2«</ Jane Crombie: 

• ! ( Margaret, Janet B. : — Katharine F., William, Ruth,.) 

,' >. Ruth, w/ James Monro; ,/ • ; • ^ 

(Jessy B., James, CharlesG, MargaretP, William D 
Alexander, m Mary Bruce: - ■? < . ' ' - '^ 

Helen Mary. * . 

(Thomas, Charles Peter.) ..'•':> 

Ruth, «?( Rev.) Thomas Dymock: ■ ' 

(Rev.) John, w Jessie B.Wilson; 

(Thomas Frederick, Edith, Arthur, Eva, Frances. ) 
(Isobell Bentley, James Be. tley: both d unmarried.) 
(Margaret Addis, Rev. William, Thomas, Ruth.) 



^\; 



(B) PATIENCE D. FORDYCE OR YOUNG, & DESCENDANTS. 
Patience Dingwall Fordyce, [1787-1827] w (/Vat'oj/ James Young: 
Jessy, wJamesMcPherson: {s.s.p.) 

(James, Arthur, Catharine Leslie, Jane, William, George Gordon,) 
(James Hadden, Isabella, Patience Mary, Thomas Morison,) 
(Angelica, Mary Ann, George.) ' 

Elizabeth, m Arthur Harvey : {^See Table Vill.ybr descendants.) 
Gavin David, m Frances Richman : 

(Jessie Frances, Edith Emily, George James.) 



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Vlll. ANGELICA DINGWALL FORDYCE OR HARVEY; & DES. 



:.::1 



Angelica Dingwall Fordyce, [1780-1860] m John Harvey (formerly Aberdein:) 
(Janet, Jane, Grace, Angelica, Barbara, Thomas. Isobell, William: ) 
John Inglis, m. Jst {s.p.) Eiizab. E. Wiggen: 2nel Sarah Aratoon Avietick: 
Angelica Manning, W7 David Lister Shand: 

(AngelicaS.H.,lsab.LS,JohnH.,Dav.L,Marg.J.B.) 
John Dingwall Fordyce. m Mary Thomas Apcar: 

(John I., Thomas A., Isoline M.-, Arthur D. F., Robert S.) 
(Elizabeth Sarah, Arthur Lowis, Robert Inglis.) 
Arthur, m Elizabeth Young: 

(John, Patience, Angelica, Thomas) ^ 

James, m Maud Roe. 

Arthur (Young) m Sarah Jane Boucaut; 

(Winifred Eiizab , Arthur Kenneth LeRai, Grace Alexa, . 
Eric Charles, Alan Keith, Frances.) 
Elizabeth Jessy Sarah, ;// James Alexander; 

(Elizabeth jane, ArthurGavin, JamesGeo., Elsy Pa. J.) 
Robert Young, w Ruth Allen; 

( Isobel Robina Young, Wilfred Young.) 
Jane Morison, w Johnjames Duncan, {s.s.p.) 
(Agnes, Patience, Robert, Georgiana Morison, Frances Chalmers.) ^ 
William, m Rachel Chambers Hunter: ' 
Jo^n, {d untnarried.) . 
Rachel, rn Charles Gray Spittal; 

( Marion Chambers Hunter, Charles James.) 
Alexander, m Matilda Shade : 

(Angelica Elizabeth, Hannah Jane, {both d young) 
(Absalom Ingl s Edward, Omar Frederick Hildebrand) 
Sebastian Alexander, m Anna Maria Francis : 

(Isabella d; Edwin Francis, May Lilliaii.) 
Isabella Matilda, m James Gallwey Milne': 

( Harvey Gale, Alexander Gallwey, Clifford.) 
Angelica Caroline Elizabeth, m Dr Carthew. 



,230 A ;Y"JV??AH HO 33YaH01 JJAWO^IO AOUIOMA .IIIV 

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;»i.rtuoY flt^dfisHi M,\ .lurJtiA 
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• ■ { esonfiiT .d^itjXcijJA fZohfiflD Dn3 

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t ■!, ,rRx?^3 ^oaDftoaifil, ,nivBc)iuiUiA ^0ns[ilt£dE\ IBs , 

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{ pnuoY bai^liW .gnuoY jifiidoH bdaal) 

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{ atjmfiT ' -iii«rlD /"*tm'H ?,-t«icf;ffif 'O ftohBMv 

. : obiul2 HblitfiM w ,'ieb{i){X5»!A 
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: yfiilM Y'j/k IIbc) g'^JinKJ^ w .nblitiiM itibdisal 
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IX. AGNES D. FORDYCE OR FRASER; & DESCENDANTS. ' 

Agnes Dingwall Fordyce, [1781 -1834] *" (J^rovost) Alexander Fraser. 
Janet, m Alexander Thomson {s.p. ) 
Jean Steuart, w/ John Robert Turing: 

(Rev.)John Robert, w Fanny Montague Boyd: 

(Fanny J, John H. , Charlotte J, Agnes M, Helen Marg 
■■'' ' ArthurH.,JulianM.,SybilM., Harvey D, Alexander R.) 

Agnes Margaret. 
JohnMathison, w EmilieNottebohm: 

Alexander Caspar, m Maria Johanna Thaden: 

(Emily, Elizabeth Louisa, Mary Lydia, Jessy Agnes, 
^ JohnMathison,AlexanderChris, Bernard Normah) 

' V Lydia Marianne, ;;/ William Dunlop Anderson: 

. ^ EmilyMar a nne w James Reddie Anderson: 

(Lydia, John J, Sara J .Willm Lome. Ang. Pat , Let. M.) 
William Thomson, ». Anna Onnen: 

(Henrietta Jane, John Thomson.) 
Arthur Abraham, m Charlotte Agnes Claire Cuvillier. 
- .. (Evelyn Eleonora, Winifred Mary Lyd , Eric A.Vernon.) 
f Edward Seymour, ;« Margaret Ann Fraser: ' 

* • I^Willm A. Cumming, Gertrude A., Ethel Marguerite. ) 

John Christian. 
(Wilim, Agnes Dyce, Isabella, Willm, Margaret HenitsH., Angelica P.) 
Arthur, m Margaret Jane Davidson: 

ArthurMathison, w Mary Gordon: 

(Catharine de Nully, Aiihur Ion. ) 
(AlisterGilian, FrancesM., Dun. Davidson, Marg. Angelica.) 
Barbara, m (Major) Charles Frederick Gibson : 

Jessy Maria, w (Rev.) H. Mc I Iree Williamson : 
' (Barbara, Grace, Ch. Fred., D.Brainerd, Jessy Mar. 

John Fraser, Albany Gib., Fanny, Aiihur Christian.) 
: Christina Jane Charlotte. 
Alexander, m /j/ Julia H. VanCitters {s.p :) 2nd, Emma A. Nickerson.