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Full text of "The Jarvis family, or, The descendants of the first settlers of the name in Massachusetts and Long Island [microform] : and those who have more recently settled in other parts of the United States and British America"

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JAR VIS FAMILY; 



OR, 



The Descendants 



OK 



THE FirST SETTLEKS OP THE NAME IN MASSACHUSETTS 

AND LON(} ISLAND. 



AND 



THOSK WHO HAVK MOltE KEOENTLY SETTLED IN OTHER I'AJtTS OF 
THE UNITED STATES AND BKITI8H AMERICA. 



HAltTFOHD ; 
P«ES8 OF The Case, Lockvvood & Bkainard Company. 

1 H 7 9 . 



i/»ir(p 



OOLLECTKD AND COMl'IhKI) BY 



GEORGE A. .IARV18, ok New York; 

GEORGE MURRAY JAR VIS, of Ottawa, Canada; 

WILLIAM JARVIS WETMORK, of New York; 

ASHISTED nV 

ALFRED HARDING, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 



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I'KEFACE. 



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Auoi T livo y<'Hrs liavo now olapsod since! vvd (ivHt coTiceived the 
project of tj'tu'ing the genealogy of the Jarvis Family in this 
country. Letters were writtt^n to prominent men of the name in 
different parts of the United States and Mritisii America, from 
many of wiiom favorable responses were received. Stn'eral in 
Ciiniida, Nova Scotia, and Ncnv IJruiiswick wen! highly intere.sted, 
olfering their valuable collections to aid tin; ent«'rprise. Many, 
also, in the United States were equally interested, and oflFered their 
collections .irid any aid within their power. Tlie addresses of 
different ni<>mbers of families w(M'e sought out and solicited, and 
hundreds of letter; written for any records, sk(>tclu!s, steel and 
lithograph engravings, or any items of history connected with the 
name, worthy of being transmitted to posterity. Many responded 
promptly; some, ))y indifference, delayed the work; while others 
neglected altogether to notice our applications. From these causes 
then! will be found some* fragmentary and skeleton records, which 
nuLst cause n'gret to those whust; remissness has made it impossible 
for tlie C'ompilers to give more perfect accoiuit of their families. 

We have adopted a tabular form of exhibiting the records, 
believing that it will l)e more (>asily understood than the plan 
usually followed in works of the kind. We have, also, aimed to 
present, not only the dates of births, but also, wlum they could be 
procured, the marriages and deaths, something which is often 
neglected in gtniealogies. Many of our friends who have favored 
us with sketches, have granted us the privilege of revising them. 
We have assumed this prerogatives in regard to all, but hav(> 
endeavored not to change the nu>aning, or leav<> out any import- 
ant item. For this act we ask the indulgence of our friends. 

In a work like this, receiving records from various sources, 
many of them written in an obscure hand, th(> chirography not 
[)lain, and sometimes almost illegible, and figures and dates being 
very numerous, it would not be strange if, with all our vigilance, 



1? . 



IV 



J'HKFACK. 



HoiiU! errors cn^pt. in. It. wuiiM wioiii almost a iniiiiclc it' tlit'V tlitl 
not. 

'IMic (niforoiit s[)»>llings, too, of some ruiiiu^s has given us nmcli 
trouble, Imt we liav(^ taken tlie utmost care tt) get the proper sp«!ll- 
ing, and make tlic work in tliat n^sptutt as tiorrect as possil)le. 

In tlie Appcndi.x will Ik- found many int<M-esting liistorical and 
other documents in eoinuiction with the name, and espirially in 
relation to those members of the Kamily who MvcmI during the 
jioriod of the Revolution. TIk; lists of births, marriages, and 
deatlis, it has been deemed important to preserve as aids to those 
families wliose ro(^ords an; imperfect, and as h(*lj)s to subsequent 
researches. 

All genealogies that we have mot with liave been more or less 
fragmentary in their beginning. Ours is peculiarly so. We have 
found many important branches, but have been unable to trace 
them to one root, lumce we liave biunt obliged to take the evidences 
of the desc(>ndants of each branch for the oi'igin of their forefathers, 
and leave it to some more successful aspirant to (inish what we 
have been unable to accomplish. 

Our book commences with a chart entitled the "Genealogy of 
Gothic Nations," taken from a work called "The Norman Peo- 
ple ; " not that we claim that the Jarvis Family dates back to the 
period from which this (ihart traces the origin of tlies(> luitions, 
but insert it as a document which may be of interest and informa- 
tion to onr readers. 

At the end of our volume will be found a Family Register for 
the records of births, nuirriages, deaths, or any facts or incidents 
that may be worthy of note. This, if made wav. of, will bo a 
convenience to every family, and a great desideratum in case another 
genealogy should be determined on hereafter. 

In collecting the materials for this genealogy 'rom so wide a 
field of inquiry, much labor and expense has been incurred, and, 
as we have already said, some errors will undoubtedly be found, 
for which the indulgent (tonsi deration of those for whom it has 
been prepared is respectfully solicited. 

In conclusion, the hearty thanks of the Authors are most grate- 
fully given to the many friends and relatives who have tendered 
their valuable contributions and services in aid of this enterprise, 
without which its progress would have been greatly retarded, if 
not wholly abandoned. Among the many, permit us to name the 
following: Dr. Edward Jarvis, Dorchester, Mass.; the late Hon. 



I 



PHKKAOE. V 

Kent .liirviH, MasKillori, Oiiio; ("upl,. V.C. JurviH, HiiiiMiiKtoii, L. f.; 
Mr. CharloH F. Oshorn, Norwalk, Conn.; Mrs. Mary 1'. S. Outts, 
Hrattleboro, Vt.; Hon. .loliii |{. .lorvw, [{onxi, N. Y.; Dr. Milton 
li .JarviH, (^mastota, N. V.; Mr. John FT<wl .larvis, Hanj^'or, Me.; 
li((V. Ilorlxn-f. M. .larviw. Nova Scot.ia. 

Nkw Youk, .laniinry i;{, 1879. 



] 

I 



OONTEISMV. 



I'UKKACIO, . . • • 

(lENEAIAXJY OF GOTHIC NATIONS 

INTKODUtTlON, 

J'ARIIAMKNTAHY VVIMTH. 

EXTKACTS KKOM liHUKK'S I.ANDKD OKNTUY. ... 
DKSCKNDANTB OF STBIMIKN JAUVIH OF IIUNTINOTON, L 1.. 
\VII,I,IAM -lAUVIS " 

THOMAS J ARMS 
.JONATHAN .IAKVI8 
NATHANIKI- .IAHVI8 
.. MOSKS JAUVIS 

NATHANIKI, .lAKVIS uF UOSTON, MASS.. . 
JOHN .TAUVIS " " • • 

FBAOMKNTAKY KKOOUDS 

APPENDIX: 

A. TOWN OUDKU 

H. I,A\V SUITS, ASSAULT AND HATTKUV. ANO THl-; WED KAK 

KISSING, . • • • 

C. NAMKSAND INCIDENTS, FUUNISHED W DK. KDW AHI) JAUVIS 

OF MASSAClirsKTTS, 

D. EXTKACTS FROM THE RKCORDS OP THE TOWN OF HUN- 

TINGTON, T,. I 

K TAX LIST l-'ROM STATK D«»CUMKNTS, UUNTINlil'ON, I-. I.. \m. 
V CONTRACT BETWKEN .lOSKPIl WOOD AND WIUUIAM JAUVIS, 
G. LIST OP lURl'HS Alijl) MARRIA(;KS, FURNISHED HV DR. 

EDWARD JARVIS OF MASSACHUSI-.TTS 

H DEED OF .lOSKl'll WOOD TO WM.LIAM .lARVIS. . 

1. LIST OF MARUIAGKS AND HAl'TISMS. 1>RKSHVTERL\N CHURCH, 

HUNTINGTON, L. I 

J. LISTS OF MKMHERS OF I'RESBYTERIAN CHUliCII, HUNM'INCi 

TON, L. I., 

K. CONTRACT OF SAMUEL STRATTON AND WILLIAM JARVIS, 

L. EXTRACT FROM LETTER OF REV. DR. REARDSLEY, . 

M FROM "NEW YORK ROOK OF MARRIAGES," 

N. EXTRACTS FROM "OLD TIMES IN HUNTINGTON," BY HON. 

HENRY C. PLATT, 

O. LIST OF PERSONS WHO TOOK THE OATH OF LOYALTY AND 

PEACEABLE BEHAVIOR 



I'AOK. 
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275 
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OONTKNTH. 



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1'. CONKIHCATION I)HKI> OK I'llOPKUTV OK liKN.lAMIN .JAUVIS, 
q. T'KTITION OK TIIK INIIAllir ANTS OK III NTINOTON, I,. I., TO 

UoltK.KT DKIIIV. UKAK ADMIKAI, OK 'lilK UKh, 
H. I'KTITION TO (iOV. (JKO. ("MNTON, .... 
S I.K/ITKH KltOM IlKV. AIIKAM .lAilVlH TO KKA'. SAMKRI, J'KTKUS 

LONDON, 

T. Till-: LOYALISTS. KXTI<A<!T KUOM " LOSSINU'S KIKLI) llOOK 

OK TIIK KKVOLUTION," 

I). SKKTt'll OK .lllhOK NKLSON .IA|{\ IS WATKItlUlltY, 
VALKI)l(!TOKV, .... 

INDKX: 

I. i)ks(M<:ni)Ants namki) .iauvih 

II. NAMKS OK l'KU.HON,s Wll(» IIA\ K MAHHIKO INTO TIIK .lAUVIS 

K.\M1LY, AND NA.V.KS OK l>KS(!KNI)ANTS HKAUINO OTIIKU 
SURNAMRS, 

EKKATA 

FAMILY KKCOKD. 



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I'OHTRMTS AND OTHER ILLUSTRATIONS. 



D.D. 



I'AOB. 

Froiilispieee. 

a 

19 



COAT OF AKMS (Modbhn), 
COAT OF AKMS (Ancient), . 
POKTUAIT RT. REV. ABLAIIAM JARVIS 

IIEZEKIAH .) \UV1S, 
"JAKVIS HOUSE," NOKWALK, cr., 
HYMN AND MUSIC BY JOHN JAKVIS AM) DK. W ILMAM .lAKVlS 

WETMt)RE, .... 
PORTRAIT REV. SAMUEL F. JARVIS, S.T.D., LL.D., 

NOAH JARVIS, 

REV. WM. JARVIS, 

GEO. A. JARVIS, 

COL. SAMUE)i COLT, . 

GEO. C. JARVIS, M.D., . 

THOS. NEWTON JARVIS, 

MILTON B. JARVIS, M.D., 
" NELSON J. WATERBUKY, 

HON. KENT JARVIS, . 

HON. JOHN B. JERVIS, LL.D., 

HON. WILLIAM JARVIS (Consul), 
•' RESIDENCE OF SAMUEL G. JARVIS, M.D.," CLAREMONT, N. II 
"JAKVIS HOUSE" (CoL. RUSSELL JARVIS), CLAKEMONT, N. H., 
RECEPTION OF THE AMERICAN LOYALISTS IN ENGLAND, APPENDIX T 



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INTRODUCTION. 






"J(!rvis, Jcrvics, .TcrvoyH, Jcryoise, Jarvcis, Gervuis*!, Gervnys, (Jcrvt'is, 
Garv(!ys, (}arvi(!S, Jarvis, Jcrvics, Jarvic, Jarvicc, Gcrvtisc, Gcrvais, Gcr 
vasiiis, Gcrvys, arc supposed to be oueaiul llic same name." — Patroiiyiiiifa 
BritannieM. 

Until witliiii II bi'ief poiiod, the people of this country have 
manifested but little interest in their genealogies. This has, in a 
great nieasui'e, resulted from tlu^ character of our institutions, 
under which every citizen is mainly the architect of his own for- 
tune, and is too much occupied with his own pursuits to devote 
much time to the character and history of his ancestors. 

Having no law of primogeniture or hereditary titles of honor, 
the children in this country, of the same family, all start iii the 
race of life upon the same plane, and are severally intent upon 
the acquisition of wealth and influence, social and political, for 
themselves and their families. 

Of late, however, more attention has been paid to this subject, 
and as the country increases in population, wealth, and refinement, 
a still deeper interest will be manifested in genealogical reseai'ches, 
as there are few families amoHg us who do not number within 
their circles some members, who, by their unaided efforts, have 
attained honorable distinction in private or public life. 

Such examples have a silent but potent influence in the forma- 
tion of character. Even the delineation of th'^ foibles, as well as 
of the virtues of our immediate ancestors, may be turned to good 
account, by exciting an emulation of their good qualities and a 
desire to avoid the dangers which proved disastrous to them. 

Besides the gratification wiiich every intelligent man has in a 
knowledge of his ancestry, this subject assumes a growing import- 
ance to those who are to come after us, as furnishing reliable 
materials for the future historian. 

Though our country is still in its infancy, the descendants of tlie 
founders of our government, who were mainly of English origin, 
1 



INTKOnUCTION. 



I 



li 



and who have but just passed from the first stage of their iioble 
achievements, find it extremely difficult, in many cases, to trace 
with certainty their doscent from those; who first emigrated from 
Great liritain to the Colonies. Those difficulties are due, in a 
great measure, to the upheaval of society, to llie disruption of 
families, whose members took different sides in the fierce struggles 
of the Revolution, and to the destruction of public records which 
occurred during that eventful period. 

Within the last half century, the general spirit of enterprise of 
the people of the Eastern and Middle States, and their disjjosition 
to better their condition by emigi'ating to the great West, have 
had the effect, for the time being, to sunder family ties, and, by 
forming new relationships, to weaken and, in a measure, obliterate 
their early associations of home. 

These causes, while they increase the difficulties of obtaining 
proper materials necessary for the conipilatiou of full and correct 
genealogies, make it more important to collect and preserve such 
as remain from further obliteration, and, perhaps, entire loss. 

These general remarks apply with peculiar force to the widely 
extended and influential Jarvis families and their descendants, 
who are found in almost every State of the Union, and, by the 
unfortunate division of the family during the Revolution, in the 
British Provinces of North America. In every branch of these 
families are found men of talent and exalted worth. 

That a full and comprehensive genealogy has not already been 
prepared is much to be regretted, and it is hoped the present 
attempt, if it have no other effect, will induce others to carry for- 
ward this object to a successful completion. 

It is generally conceded that the Jarvis families of the United 
States and of British America are of English extraction, though 
originally from Normandy, whence they emigrated into England. 

The name of Jakvis, according to the " Dictionaire de la Noblesse 
de France," par De la Cherraye, Desbois et Badier, Troisieme 
Edition, is French, the original name being GERVAIS. Their 
seat was at Bretagne, and the first name found is Jean Gervais, 
who lived about the year 1400. In a work entitled "The Norman 
People, and their existing Descendants in the British Dominions 
and the United States of America," appears the name Richard 
Gervasius of Normandy, who lived as early as the year 1180. 
The arms of the Gervais family of Bretagne was a shield "D' or, a 
une pomme de pin, placee au canton dextre du chef; et un chouette 




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■he destrncfcioii ; 
duiiug Uittl <;vuutful pQriod. 
'•e last lialf conUiry, tlic gentn-ai spiri.;, oj; eiJiof). 



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INTKODUCTION. 



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placoA au canton senestre accompagneo en pointe d'un crapaud, le 
tout de sable." 

Wo have had an engraving made of this old coat of arms, the 
most ancient we have found to have been used by the Jarvis 
family, and present it tt) our renders as of interest on that account. 
We have, also, had an engraving made of one of the coats of arms 
used by the Jai'vises in this country, and publish it as the frontis- 
piece to this work. The motto, "Adveksih Major, Par Secunpis" 
(Strong in I'rosperity, Stronger in Adversity), has been nobly 
liv(!d up to by many of those whose records are contained in the 
follov/ing pages. 

The clianges of the name from Gekvasius to Gervais, Jervis, 
Jarvio, and so on to Jarvis, have by no means clouded or in any 
way obscured the original patronymic. The name is strikingly 
the same through all its variations, as well as the features and the 
peculiar characteristics of the people. Through the long lapse of 
years, indeed centuries, amid confusion and strife, political wran- 
gling, oppressive wars, and unholy crusades, their escutcheon has 
never been tarnished. 

By the kindness of a member of the family who has taken an 
active interest in this woi'k, we are enabled to publish the follow- 
ing summary of Parliamentary Writs, and some extracts from 
'• Burke's Ijanded Gentry," in which the name of Jarvis, in some 
of its various spellings, occurs. This will serve to show the hon- 
orable records that some of the Jarvises have made, and, also, the 
antiquity of the family in England, since most of these writs are 
dated in the early part of the 14th century. 



I 



A.D. 
1315. 



1318. 

1319. 
1820. 



Parliamentary Writs, etc., Vol. II, Part 3. 

Gervam, John (Johauups Gcrvays), Manucaptor of Thomas Croiil, 

Burgess, returned for Portsniouth. — 8 Edward II. 
Oervam, John (J(jh!iuues Gereves, Gerves, Oervc3's). 

Qereves, Johauues, Burgess, returned for He'ston-Parlianient 
at York, in tln-ce weeks of St. Michael, 30th October.— 12 
Edward II. 
Germs, Johannes, Burgess, returned for Helston-Parliaineiit at 

York, in one month from Easier, 6th May.— 12 Edward II. 
Oerveys, Johauncs, Burgess, returned for Ilelston-Parlianient at 
Westminster, in eight days of St. Michael, Gth Ocitober. — 14 
Edward II. 



INTRODIK'TION. 



AD. 

1333. 



1310. 



1311). 
1330. 
1320. 



1319. 
1330. 



1311. 



1315. 



Genm, .TohanticH, Riiri^cMH, returned for llclston Piirliainent at 

York, ill tlii(M' weeks of Knsler, 3(1 .May, — 15 KdwartI II. 
Otn'PtiH, Joiiamies, Maiuieaptor of Joliamio.s dn 'I'leluu, Hurjje.ts, 
returned for Ilelslon. — 17 Kdward II. 

Oerntim', Peter (PetruH (tcrveis, (Jerveyse). 

Oeroei/m, Potrii.H, Citizen, returned for Worcester, olilain.s liis 
writ de cxpeiisin for iittendunco at Parliiinicnt at Lineoln. in 
fifteen dayw of St. Hilary, 3Tlli January, unlil Friday iie.vt 
after tlie feast (^f St. Valentine, 3()tli l^Vbruary; tested at Lin- 
coln, 30(li Feliniary.— () Kdward II. 
GerreiK. Petnis, Maiiiieai)tor of .Joliannes liaeon, (Mlizen, re- 
turned for Worcester.— 13 Edward II. 

Germke, Itkhurd (Rieardus (1crv(!S, (tcrvttys). 

Genu's, Hicardiis, Munueaptor of Johannes Gcrves, Unrge.sH, 

returned for llelston. — 13 Edward II. 
Gerrei/s, Uieardu.s, Maimeiii)lor of Joliannos Gerveys, Hurgess, 
returned for Ilelslon. — 14 Edward II. 

Gerrdine, liobert (Uolierlus (Jerveys), of the Townsliip of Franiliiiir- 
liani, attend the .array and muster of (he 100 of looxe in the 
County of Siitt'olk on Thursday next after the feast of St. 
George, 34tli April.— 10 Edward II. 

Gervaise, Hirhurd {\i\v\vM-i\ (Jervays), oik- of the inquest impanelled 
for the County of Bucks in execution of the commission of 
array; tested at York, 31st Oeloher. — 10 Edward II. 

Germue, ifoier^ (Uobortiis (lerves, Gorvey.s). 

Gevve», Robiirtns, Maimcaptor of Johannes Gcrvoa, Burgess, 
returned for llelston.— 13 Edward II. 

Gerrei/s, Hoberlus, iMaiiucaptor of Joliaiines Gerveys, Hurgess, re- 
turiuid for llelston. — 14 Edwiird II. 

Gervdlxc, Roijer (Rogerus Gervcy.'^), Hurgess, returned for Ilertl'ord- 
Parliament at Westminster, in eight days of St. iMichael, Otli 
October.— 14 Edward II. 

Gcrimse Thomas (Th()nia.s Gorvcis, Gerveys). 

Gerreis, Thomas, ("iti/en, returned for Exeter, obtains his writ 
de expeiisis for attendance at the Parliament al Westminster. 
from the moiiow of St. Martin, 13th November, to Saturday 
next after tiie feast of St. Lucia the Virgin, 18th December; 
tested at Westminster, IHth December.— 5 Edward II. 
Gerveys, Thomas, Citizen, returned for Exeter-Parliament al 
Westminster, on Sunday next after the feast of St. Matthew 
the Apostle, 33d September. — 7 Edward II. 

Gerciiis, Thomas (Thomas Gervcsj's), Manuciiptor of Thomas de 
Burgh, Knight of \\w Shire, returned for Cambridge. — 5 
Edward II. 

Gereaise, William (Willielnuis Gervays), Burgess, returned for Hert- 
ford-Parliament at Westminster, in eight days of St. Hilary, 
30th Junuarv. — 8 Edward 11. 



INT»()|)II(!TI()N, 

A.I). 

iaa5. OermiHf, William (Williclnuis QcrvoyH), Miinii(:ii|>t()r of Simon do 
Diiiytonc, Kiiijjlil of tlic Sliirc. rcliimcd for Nor(liiiiii|iloii. 
— li> Kdwanl II. 



i 



Paiim.vmknt.miy Wkith. V<»i.. I, Kdw.xkd I. 

OcrvaHiiiH, Arcliidiacomis t'yfi'str. 

GcrviLsius, tilliis Onvy. 

Ocrviius, Alil)!is (Ic. 

Gcrvcys. .loliiiiincs. 

(Jcrvi'ys, Tlion\tis. 

Gcrvcy.s, Williclnuis. 

GcrvyH, 'riioitiiis. 

Huukk'w L.vnoro Gentuy. 

JarriH—Vxvin-'^i' KnolliHof Doddiii-rton Hull, b. 22 Sept., 1803, son of Colo- 
nel (k'oigi! Hulpli Payne Jarvis, J. P., 1). L., who was born 13th May, 
1774. 

Armx — Sa. on a clievron enurailed between three martlets arg. ; as many 
cincpie foils, pierced, of the first on a chief, of the second a Jieur-de- 
lis between two escallops of the field. 

Crent — An nnicorn's head. Ari^. gorged with a collar, charged with 
three cinque foils. 

JervoiM of ''erriard — Ellis.Tervoise. Francis .Tervoise, Esq., ,T.P. and D.L., 
b. 18 Mardi, IHO!), Iligli Siierill' of Hants, IH'ri. Descended from Rich- 
ard Jerveyx, Esq., of Northfield and Wioly Parlv, who died 23d Dec, 
lUiyl, — was succeeded l)y Ids son. Tiiomas Jeriri/s, Esq., h. 28th Dec. 
1532, wlio left a .son, Sir Thomas Jcrmsc, Knt.. 1). litli June, 1587, 
who also left a son, Thomas .Tervoise, Escf., b. l(5th iMarch, 1016, who 
left as(m and lieir, Thomas Jervoise, Esq., of Herriard, borntith Sept., 
10()7, wiio left a son, Ricliard Jervoise, Esc)., b. 5th January. 1703-4. 
.who left two sons, died 1794, viz. : Thomas Hiedlcstone Jervoise, Esq., 
b. 1st June, 173(5, Hev. (ieorge Iliedlestone Jervoise Purefoy Jervoise. 

Arms — Quarterly 1 and 4, Sa. ache\ron Ix'twecn three eaglets, close. Arg. 
for Jervoise. 2 and 3. Threi' eels. Sa. for Ellis. 

Crent — An heraldic tiger's head Sa., for Gervoise, a plume tA' Jiee ostrich 

feathers. Arg. for Ellis. 
Motto — Virtutis premium laus. 

Oeoi-ge Jarcis, Esq., of Islington. 

Sir Ilinnphrey Jcrris, Lord Mayor of Dublin in 1681-3. 

John Jercis, Esc]., of Ollerton Co.. Saloi), who, descendant through a jimior 

branch, Admiral Sir John Jervis, was created Earl St. Vincent in 

IKOI. 



6 



INTRODUCTION. 



Amu — Qimrtcrly. 1 mid 4, Sii. a oliovron liotweon threo cii/ijhttfl cIomp, ar. 

for .TiTvis. 2 and 3, n\i., a fhnvron, valr, hctwiu'U thrcn Uohh rampant, 

or for Wliil(!. 
Crest— U\, an ca^'lt't, clows m"- 8»l, tlii't'f urrowH, ono in pale, and two In 

saltis cnwreallu'd. 
Motto — Venali! Net; Auro, 

,/t rroim'— ThouuiH, Km(|., of Ili-rriard Hants, Hon of Tlioma.s JcrvoiHe, Kh(1., 

M. P. for Soiillminpton. 
AnnH — Quarterly, 1 iiiid 4, Ha. a chcv. bclwccn tlircio oafflets, cIohc, ar. fen* 

.Icrvoisc. 3 and !J, thrci! cscalopH in pale, or ln'lwcen two tianclics, 

erm, each charged with a cro»M, palti'is Htcihee, {ju. for Clarke. 
Orfnfi> — .Tervoisc. An licraldic lifr<'r'.'* head Sa. Cliirkc witliin a fj;old rin^ 

set with a diamond, ppr. a roundlc, per pale, j;u. or charged with a 

pheon, ar. 

Jerria — John (Earl St. Vincent). 

Armt — Sa. a chev. between three nnirtletH, ar. 

Cirxf — Out of a naval crown or, •■iiwnii»i)ed by a wreath of laurel, vert, a 
denii pe^asus, ar., nianed and hoofed, of the first, winded ar. charged 
on the winii witii a lleur-de-liH, jiold. Suiiportcrs; dexter, an eaicle. 
winiiM elevated, and endorsed, holding in the sinister claw a thunder- 
bolt, all i>pr. ; sinister, a pegaaus ar. 



Roth in tliis country and Eixrope, tho namo of Jarvis has btuMi 
onroUod in almost all the learned profes.sions and pursuits in life. 
It has given dignity to the bench and bar; it has graced the pi-o- 
fc^ssions of medicine and surgery; it has adorned the pulpit and 
the stage; it has entwined its garlands of poetry with music and 
painting, and it has thundered its deeds of daring over the ocean 
wave, and among the distant islands of the sea. 

And here wc may be permitted to speak briefly of some of those 
wlio, in the various walks of life, have made the name illustrious. 

Eakl St. Vincknt, Sir John Jervis, the renowned British admiral, 
was a noble type of the hero and English sailor. In judgment pro- 
found, with a stem will and inflexible integrity, he was the favorite 
of his government. His battles were models of naval tactics, and 
when won were complete. His good name, fame, and unspotted 
character gave him a place in Westminster Abbey. The following 
anecdote in regard to the United States and Commodore Bainbridge 
is quite interesting. It is from "Allison's History of Europe." 

"A New York gentleman being in London at the time when the 



INTKOItlK'TlON. 7 

news of till! rupluri! i)f the Jiiva arriv«'(l, liappcnod on tlm next day 
to be ill company with Admiral iIorviH. Tho vctoraii niiiiarkod 
tliat lio had pansod a Hl«!Oplc88 ?iij;ht. It was not ocoasionod by tho 
loss of tho frigatt! Java, but by tht! dignidcd maiuuM' in which tho 
American coniniiindiT liad treated hiH vaiupiished enemy, lie 
observed that tli(^ dc^portment of Uaiid)ridgt,' mon* rosombled th«) 
proud bearing of a Spaidnli grandtu) to liin prisoners, during tho 
dayH of ancient diivalry, tlian uf a young num of a young mition, 
yot in tlio gristh; of manhood. lie added that this trait of national 
character, whicli indicated bo niu<!h of future greatness, had given 
to liim, as an Kngiisliman, much uneasiness and api)rehension." 

During the Kevolutionary struggle betvviten the mother country 
and the colonies, a Rritish brig lay olT the harbor of Norwalk, 
blockading the port. A resident, desirous of " turning a honest 
penny," took a boat-load of fresh vegetables, with other provisions, 
to the vessel, where he was (uost cordially receive<l by both ollicers 
and men. (^n incpiiry, he found the vessid was command(Ml by a 
young ollicer, whose name was Jervis. lie was very atTablo, and 
made many inquiries about Norwalk and its inhabitants, lie 
inquired, particularly, about the Jarvises in Norwalk and vicinity, 
and as his guest was about leaving, he said: " Give my compliments 
to them, and tell them their cousin, John Jervis, would be happy 
to see them and make their acquaintance. 

This young officer afterwards became John, the Earl St. Vincent. 

The late Bishop Jarvis and his son, the Rev. Samuel F^armar 
Jarvis, DD., LL.D., were among the most prominent divines of the 
Episcopal pulpit, and wherever tho doctrines of tlie church are 
preached and taught, tluar names will be (!V(!r held sacred and 
dear; nor will it bo forgotten how the healing art and the science 
and practice of surgery have been ennobled by the skill, experience, 
and judgment of such members of the profession as the late Dr. 
Charles, Dr. Leonard, and Dr. Gc'orge Ogilvie Jarvis. 

In the province of painting, under the brush of a Jarvis, the can- 
vas has almost glowed with life, as the pictures of Perry, Decatur, 
and Bainbridge will attest. John Wesley Jarvis ' was one of the 

1 " John Wcsloy Jarvis, portrait-painter, wa.s l)orn at South Shields on 
Tyne, England, 1780, and died January 13, 1840. He was a neplicw of John 
Wesley, came to Philiidelphiii in 1785; at tlic age of ten was an iipprentiee 
to Savage, the engraver; ut tweuty-one began that business for liimself, in 
New York city, and soon commenced portrait-painting, with great .success. 
He was a man of genius, but of irregular habits, and excelled as a humor- 



^. 



8 



INTRODUCTION. 



most accomplislH^d artists of his time. He was the teacher of the 
late John Inman, who was no unworthy pupil of such u master. 

The account of his painting the port rait of Commodore Bain- 
bridge is an amusing incident of this favorite old painter: 

When Bainbridge sat to him, the old weather-beaten seaman 
invariably fell asleep. This annoyed Jarvis, and, for the first time 
in his life, he found his wit and humor were of no avail in rousing 
his sitter to proper wakefulness; wherenj)on, when Jarvis reached 
that point in the exemition of his [)ainting that tlie expression was 
to te caught, he commenced a tirade against th3 !Uivy, qixestioned 
the heroism of its offi(!ers and men, and kept \i\) his banter until 
Bainbridge's eyes liashed as they were wont on the quarter-deck. 
Jarvis talked on. and rapidly painted, until the old Connnodore 
started from his chair, and, approaching Jarvis, shook liis list in 
his face, and thundered out he would not " allow a face- 
maker to speak against his profession " Another instant, and a 
personal assault might have ensued, when Jarvis sprung aside, 
burst into a hearty laugh, and told the Commodore he had to wake 
him up somehow, else the picture would have no more expression 
than a gunner's swab. His liead of Bainbridge is one of the best 
pictures Jarvis ever painted. 

As an "Antiquarian," the name of Andrew Jervise stands pre- 
eminent. He was born in the town of Brechin, in Forfar, Scot- 
land, and was one of the most prominent members of the Anti- 
quarian Society of the British Kingdom. Among his contributions 
to Antiquarian lore are "Land of the Lindsays," and "Epitaphs 
and Inscriptions from Burial Grounds in the North-east of Scot- 
land." Mr. Jervise willed a large portion of his property to his 
native town, to be spent in the development of educational pursuits. 

It is a pleasing task, thus to look back over the flight of years, 
and be able to record the varied excellences, the intelligence and 
virtues of an honored ancestry. In short, wherever we turn, wo 
find the name of Jarvis associated with men of letters, with the 
learned professions, and the nobler efforts that go to make up an 
advanced civilization. 



ist. During one of his trips to New Orleans he earned, in six months, six 
thousand dollars, but his profuse and convivial hablis kept him couslautly 
poor. 

He painted heads of Bishop Moore, Jolm Ran(U)iph, DeWitt CHiilon, 
Halltck, O. H. Perry, Stephen Van Renselaer, Baluhridge, Decatur, Gen. 
John Armstrong (now in jiossession of his daughter, Mrs. Wni. B. Astor), 
and many other national celebrities." — Droh-'s American Bioyvaphy, p. 482. 



INTRODUCTION. 



9 



It may be impossible to determine, with certainty, when and 
where the first Jarviacs settled in this coiintry. The earliest men- 
tion of the name, we have found, is in " Hutton's Early Emigrants 
to America," which speaks of John Jarvice as living in Virginia, 
Feb. 16, 1623. And we find the name of Francis Jarvice among 
138 names, to be transported to Virginia, in th( Primrose, Capt. 
Douglass, per Certificate July 27, 1625, which reads as follows: — 
''Under ye Minister's hand of Gravesend, being examined by 
him touching their conformitie to the Church Discipline ol Eng- 
land. The men have taken their oatties of Alegiance e Su- 
premacie." 

Boston was settled in 1630, by a portion of the company v.'hich 
came from England with John Winthrop. The only person resid- 
ing there at that time was William Blackstone or Blaxton, supposed 
to have been an Episcopal clergyman, and to have arrived about 
1623. See '-Appleton's Cyclopedia." 

In the records of Boston, the earliest mention found of the 
name, is that of John Jabvis, who was one of a Coroner's Jury, 
Sept. 28, 1630. 

John Jarvis is also mentioned as being a merchant of Bi; .ston, 
who died Sept. 29, 1(148. Of this John Jarvis, Savage, in his 
"Genealogical Dictionary," remarks that "perhaps he may have 
been only a transient visitor." 

John Jarvis is again on record in 1651, as connected with the 
estate of John Mills. 

We have found no evidence inconsistent with Savage's remark 
that tlie second John Jarvis was a transient visitor, and then; is 
nothing to controvert the idea that the two John Jarvises first 
above named were one and the same person. 

He died in 1648, and, eighteen years before (when the coroner's 
jury was held), might have been a man of middle age, and accom- 
panied the Rev. Wm. Blaxton from England in 1623. 

In reference to the third John above mentioned, we quote from 
a letter of Dr. Edward Jarvis, now Hving in Dorchester, Mass. 
He says: "On the 18th Sept., 1661, we find the marriage of John 
Jarvis to Rebecca Parkman, by Richard Belingham, Deputy Gov- 
ernor. He may have been the son of the other John, who died 
in 1648. 

The family have been in Boston from that time until now, and 
in some families their lines are traceable." 

The Town of Huntington, which was one of the earliest settle- 
2 



.r> 



10 



INTKOUUCTIDN. 



I 



,! i 



I ! 



:li 



meiits of the Jarvia family in this country, was first settled by 
Englishmen in 1053 — 226 years ago. 

The pioneers, who formed the settlement, consisted originally of 
eleven families, who either may have found their way thither from 
Massachusetts through the Connecticut Valley, or may have come 
directly from the Connecticut Colony, which was founded in 
Hartford in 1639. 

Some of these settlers made purchases of land of the Indians, 
and the following is an account of two of these transactions, 
showing the unique currency which they used in bartering with 
them, and which, in those primitive times, was found to be the 
most serviceable in dealing with the " untutored " wild man. 

The first purchase of land within the territory of Huntington 
was made of the Matinnecock tribe of Indians, in 1653, compris- 
ing nearly six miles sauare. " The consideration paid to the 
Indians was six coats, six bottles, six hatchets, six shovels, ten 
knives, six fathoms of wampum, thirty muxes (brad awls), and 
thirty needles." 

The first purchase of East Hampton embraced 30,720 acres, 
and the articles giv^n in payment consisted of "twenty coats, 
twenty-four looking-glasses, twenty-four hoes, twenty-four hatch- 
ets, twenty-four knives, and one hundred muxes," 

These and other purchases were made of the Indians and held 
by trustees for the public benefit, and were afterward, from time 
to time, granted, for a valuable consideration, by the authorities of 
the town to individual purchasers. The "Old Purchase" of "six 
miles square " is often mentioned in the real estate transactions of 
Huntington, and the most prominent and enterprising citizens are 
on record as grantees of portions of it, among whom the names of 
Stephen Jarvis, and his son Stephen, William Jarvis, Thomas 
Jarvis, Jonathan Jarvis, and others, frequent! v occur. (See Ap- 
pendix D.) 

The following extract from an Historical Address delivered at 
the Centennial Celebration at Huntington, by Hon. Henry C. 
Piatt, is inserted here, as it gi.ves, in a few words, a graphic de- 
scription of the pioneers of the town, 

"The first settlers of Huntington were a body of men equally 
distinguished for the soundness of their morals and the purity of 
their lives. They w^re characterized by peculiar sternness of 
principle, and singular exactness in the discharge of every duty. 
They regarded every species of vice with a kind of instinctive 



X 



INTRODUCTION. 



II 



abhorrence. Prodigality and licentiousness they branded with 
infamy, and often punished with severity." 

The spirit with which the people of Huntington entered the 
great conflict for American liberty, is shown by a series of reso- 
lutions passed at a general town meeting, held June 21, 1774. 
These resolutions breathe the spirit of independence, and do' honor 
to the intelligence and patriotism of the people of Huntington, 
and rank that ancient town among the first assertors of American 
liberty. (See Appendix N.) 

We now proceed to give, in tabular form, the records of Stephen 
Jarvis and his sons, and, after these, the records of the descend- 
ants of William, Thomas, and Jonathan, who, we liave seen, were 
among the earliest settlers of the name in Huntington. 

Following these, are inserted the records of the descendants of 
Nathaniel and Moses Jarvis, both of whom were Huntington men, 
but whose connection with the other fainilies of that town we have 
not been able to ascertain. 

Then we take up the Massachusetts branch of the family, giving 
the records of the descendants of Nathaniel and John Jarvis. At 
the close of the Genealogy, will be found a few fragmentary records 
which wo have not been al)le to connect with any of the other 
families. 



Il I' 



I 



.^ 






I 



y 



GENEALOGY. 



DESCENDANTS OF STEPHEN. 

1st Genp:hation. 



No. Name. 

1 Stephen Jarvis, 

Child. 

2 Stephen, Jr., 



Bom. 



Died. 



Stephen Jarvis, Jr. , 
2 Children. 

3 Stephen, June 2, 1683 

4 Abraham, Apr. 26, 1685 



2d Generation. 



Married or Remarks. 
See Api)endices A, B, 
D, and F. 



See Appendices D, F. 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM. 

1st Geneuation. 

^^^w.,,.^"™^; . ^™- ^'«'l- Married or Remarks. 

5 William Jarvis, About 1740 

6 Esther, 

5 children. 

7 William, 1696 

8 Samuel, Oct. 5,169b Sept. 27, 1779 Lived and died in Nor- 

walk,» Conn. 
^ ^^^P''^"' 1700 Lived and ,lied iu 

Huntington, L. I, 



' Norwalk was purchased of the Indians in 1640. by Roger Ludlow 
As described iu the ancient, records, the purchase was " from Norwalk 
river to Sawhatuck (Saugatuck) river, from Sea, Indian om- day's walk 
in the country,— that is, one day's luyrth walk into the country hence the 
name Norwalk. The articles given to the Indians for tlie tract were ' 'eight 
fathoms wampum, six coats, ten liatchets, ten hoes, ten knives fen seiz- 
ors, ten jusharps, ten fathom tobaco, three kettles of si.v hands about 
and ten looking-glasses." ' 



14 



r)E8CENDANT8 OP WILLIAM — FIRST GENERATION. 



No. Namo. 

10 AbmUiim, 

11 Mary, 



Born. Died. Married or UcmarkB. 

1702 Lived and died in 

Iluntiujjiou, L. 1. 

1704 ' Marriod a Mr. Sey- 

mour. 



AViLL OK William Jarvis of Huntington, L. I., Nov. 13, 1737. 

In thk name of God Amen, the twelfth daj of November one 
thousand Seven liundred and thirty seven. 1 William Jarvis of 
Huntington in the County of Suffolke, on the Island of Nassau in 
the province! of New York, Farmer, Being under the Decays & 
labouring under the Infirmities of Old age, But of Perfect mind 
and memory, Thanks be Given unto God. Therefore Calling 
unto mind the mortality of my Body, and knowing that it is 
appointed for all men once to dye, do make, and Ordain, this my 
Last Will and Testament. Tliat is to say Principally and first of 
all 1 give and Recommend my Soul into the hands of God that 
Gave it, and my Body I Recommend to the Earth, to be buried in 
Decent Christian Burial at the Discretion of my Executor, nothing 
Doubting but at the General Resurrection I shall Receive the 
same again by the Mighty I'ower of God. And as touching such 
Worldly Estate wherewith it hath pleased God to Bless me in this 
life T give Demise and Dispose of the same in the following man- 
ner and form — 

Imprimis. I give and bequeath unto my well beloved wife 
Esther Jarvis the use and benefit of all my Lands and Moveable 
Estate My Debts and Legacies hereafter nentioned being first 
paid, Excepting my Tools, Utensills, and Tackling for Husbandry, 
during her widdowhood, and also my Negro-girl Jenny, during her 
natural Life. 

Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Son William Jarvis of 
Norwalk in Connecticut Twenty pounds Current Money of New 
York, to be paid by my Son Abraham out of his Dividend of my 
Estate as is hereafter mentioned, and also my wearing apparell 
and Great Bible. 

Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Son Samuel Jarvis of 
Norwalk in Connecticut Ten Pounds cur' money of New York, to 
be paid by my Son Stephen out of his Dividend of my Estate here 
after mentioned. 

Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Son Stephen Jarvis now of 
Huntington, to him and to his Heirs and Assigns forever, all my 
Lauds on the South side of the Long Hollow in the East Neck, and 



DKSOENDANTa OF WILLIAM KIU8T GKNKRATION. 



15 



also my liold commonly called the Orchard field, and Likewise my 
Negro boy called George, He being oblidged liereby to pay to my 
Son Samuel Jarvis of Norwalk &c Ten Pounds Chir' Money of 
New York, Before mentioned as the Condition of this Bequest. 

Item. I give and Bocjueatli unto my Son Abraham Jarvis now 
of Huntington all the Kiiinaining part of my Land that I bouglit 
of Fjl)(Mie/er Blachly and of Benjamin Boyls with the buildings 
thereon erected &c And also all the Lands I had a Riglit to before 
those purchases on the North Side of the Long Hollow afores'' As 
Likewise my Negro Boy named Dick These and every of these 
Particulars I Give and Bequeath to my Son Abraham and to his 
Heirs and assigns for ever, He being obliged to pay to my Son 
William Jarvis of Norwalk &c twenty Pounds Cur' Money of New 
York before mentioned as the Condition of this Bequest And also 
upon the same Condition 1 give and Bequeath unto my Son Abra- 
ham my Team, Tooles, Utensills and Tackling for Hnsljandry. 

Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Sons StepluMi and Abra- 
ham Before Mentioned to them and to their heirs and assigns for- 
ever all my Meadow and right of Meadow at South and all my 
Right in y undivided Tjands in y'' Townsliip of Himtington to be 
equally divided between them, And to my Son Stei)hen to his 
heirs and assigns for ever five and twenty acres of Land Laid out 
in the New I'urchase. 

Item. I give and Bequeath to my daughter Mary Seymour of 
Norwalk in Connecticut Ten Pounds Current Money of New York 
to be made and paid out of my Moveable Estate, And also my 
Negro Girl Jenny, Only it is my Will and Pleasure that my 
Beloved Wife should have her so Long as my Wifc^ Lives. And 
if my Daughter Mliry should Dye before my Wife, Then and in 
such case 1 give and Bequeath s'' Negro Girl Jenny to my Son 
William afores' to him and his heirs and assigns for ever. And 
that this my Last Will and Testament might be duly Executed 
and Performed 1 hereby Constitute make and ordain my Beloved 
Esther Jarvis and my Son Abraham Jarvis Execut.ois of this my 
Last Will and Testament And I do hereby utterly Disallowe, 
Revoke and Disanul all and every other Former Testaments, Wills, 
Legacies bequests and Executors by me in any ways before named, 
Willed and bequeathed, Ratifying and confirming this and no 
other to be my Last Will and Testament. In witness whereof I 
have hereunto sett my hand and Seal the day and year first above 
written. William Jarvis (SS) 



m 



16 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM SECOND OENKKATTON. 



Signed, Sealed, Published, pronounced and Declared by the 
S"" William .larvis as liis Last Will and Testament in presence of 
the Subscrib rs; 

Daniel Kolley. 

Hezekiah Smith. 

E. Fume. 







2d Generation. 










8. 




No. Name. 


1 


Born. 


Died. 


Married or Ueinarltiii. 


Ciii)t.Siini.Jiirvis, Oc^t. 


5, l(i!»8 


Sept. 27, 1779 


From lIuntington,L.I. 


12 Naomi Bru.sli, 


Mch 


1!), 1701 


May 3, 1750 


Of Cold Spring, L. I. 


11 children. 










13 Samuel,' 


D(H'. 


27. 1720 


Feb. 35, 1783 


Dec. 18, 1741. Buried 
inTrin.ch.-yd.,N.Y. 


14 Elizabeth, 


Dec. 


37, 1722 


1730 




15 John, 


Jan. 


23, 1725 


Aug. 17, 1778 




16 Esther, 


Aug. 


18, 1727 




Nathan WillHon. 


17 Stephen, 


Dec. 


25, 1721) 


July 30, 1830 


Feb. 6, 1756. 


18 Isaac, 


Feb. 


10, 1733 






19 Naomi, 


Mch. 


15, 1730 




N. Willson, Norwalk. 


30 Naliian, 


Feb. 


2, 1737 


April 15, 1820 


Jan. 2, 1757. 


21 Abraham, 


May 


5, 1739 


May 3, 1813 


May 25, 1766. 


22 Polly, 


May 


3, 1742 


April 4, 1740 




23 Hezekiah, 


July 


17, 1740 


April 4, 1838 


Oct. 9, 1767. 



f 



o. 



Stephen Jarvis, 
24 Susannah. 

11 children. 

35 Deborah, 

36 Isaac, 

27 Esther, 

28 Louisa, 



1700 



Mch. 27, 1726 
Sept. 34, 1727 
Feb. 6, 1731 
April 29, 1733 



Feb. 4, 1755, Hezekiah 
Weeks. 



> Samuel Jarvis bought homestead, barn, and shed, Jan. 11, 1744-5, of 
Nathan Finch. He and three sons (Munson, William, and John) were 
Loyalists, and were seized at the commencement of the Revolutionary 
War by British soldiers, in the month of August, on a clear night, and 
taken to Long Island in an open boat, to a family named Coles, where 
they were treated kindly. 



I 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM— THIRD (JENEHATrON. 



17 



No. Nnme. 

39 Surah, 
30 at('i)Iien. 
ai Thomas. 
32 Austin, 
«;{ John, 
U Ruth, 
35 f 'ary. 



Born. 
Feb. 34. 1784 
Oct. 10, 1735 
.Iiuu; 4, 1730 
Sept. 35, 1737 
1741 
Aug. 14, 1748 
Feb. 27, 1757 



Died. 



Married or Remark!). 



IHOV 



lO. 



Abraham .larvis, 
30 Laviiiia Holers, 
«;hil(hcn. 

37 Lavinia, 

38 MilLson, 

39 Elizrbotli, 

40 Samuel, 

41 Al)raham, 
43 Ichabod, 

3(1 wife. 
43 Hannah Conklin, 



1703 



May 9, 1730 
1738 
1740 
1748 
1740 
1748 July 30, 1801 



Feb. 30, 1734. 



July 81, 1760. 



3d Geneuation. 



, 



No. Name. 

Samuel Jarvi,s, i Dec. 

44 Martha Seymour, 

11 children. 

45 Munson,- Oct. 

46 Samuel, 3 jyiy 

47 Polly, Feb. 

48 Martha, Dec. 



Bom. 
37, 1730 
1736 

11, 1743 

4, 1745 

21, 1747 

37, 1748 



13. 

Died, 
Feb. 35, 1783 
Dec. 1, 1803 



Oct. 
Oct. 
May, 



7, 1835 

9, 1838 

1826 

1784 



49 Saiah, 

50 John,* 

51 Seymour, 
53 William, 



Nov. 38. 1750 Au.i>-. 14, 1807 

Oct. 11, 1753 Feb. U, 1845 

Sept. 8, 1754 May 36, 1761 

Sept. 11, 1756 Aug. 13, 1817 



Married or Keinarkc. 
Dec. 18, 1741. 
Of Norwalk. 



Oct. 81, 1771. 
June 18, 1763. 
Mr. King died in Hali 

fa.x. 
Mr. Munday. 



Died in York, U. C;. 



^Town Clerk of Stamfor.1. Co,,,,., f,-om7r60 f.^ 1775 
Went to St. John. New Hrun.swiek, 1783, and died the,-e Was 

John. N. B., Nov., 1874. 
3 



Had one child, Hariiet, who died in St. 



i 



18 



DKSCKNDANTS OK WII.MAM — TIIIKI) (IKNERATION. 



No Name. 

C}',] lliiiiiiali, 

54 Liiviiiiii, 
CJ Seymour, 



Horn. 



I>l(>(l. 



Marrli'il or HciimrkH. 



8(M)t. 27 1758 April 'Hi, 182U Dr. Jolui liiKcrHoll. 

' I)i«'(l in Now Yorit, 

Oct. 5. 17«1 Oct. 20, 1841 

Dih: 22, 17«r) Oct. 4, 184U 



"Tho Jarvis family, for sovoral y<!arH, wa.s quito nuiiu^rous. and 
has always and in all rcspecrfs been liighly roHj)octal)le; but as thoir 
affections were with their king, rather than with his r(>belliou8 sub- 
jects, it seemed necessary tliat they should bo sent over tlie lines. 
Capt. Samuel fjockwood of Greenwi(^h, was appointed to execute 
tlie ord(^r, which he did with tlu* ready zeal of a n^volutionary 
patriot, and of course his ofFiciousness alienated the two families, 
as no loyal Jarvis could endure thenceforth one of the notoriously 
rel>ellious Lockwood tribe." — IlHntiii;ftov\i History of Stamford. 



IS. 

.Tolin Jarvis, Jan. 2iJ, 1725 Aujj;. 

50 ("atii. Itayinond, Apr. 1!J, 1737 Jan. 
11 cliildrrn. 



57 Jolin, 


June 


18, 175;{ 


July 


58 Samuel, 


Dee. 


28, 1754 


Dec. 


5!» SlcpluMi, 


Apr. 


4, 1758 


Ai)r. 


00 Esther. 


Sept 


4, 175» 




01 Catharine,* 


Oct. 


15, 1700 


Jan. 


02 Heiny, 


Ai)r. 


10, 1703 




0^ James, 


Jan. 


8, 1704 


Nov. 


04 William. 


May 


IS., 1700 


Meh 


05 Hunnah, 


Feb. 


28, 170H 




00 Sands. 


Pel). 


31, 1770 


Apr. 


07 .Tesse, 


. Nov. 


8, 1772 


Jan. 



17, 1778 Oct. 10, 1751. 

2:J, 1811 Died in I'ounilridtre 

N. Y. 
24, 1824 

11, 1705 Se|)t,. 4, 1774. 1785. 
31, 1822 May 23, 1704. 

Stei)h. Whitney. 
2:5. 1811 

178;{ iiOStatsea. Com. 
British Army. 
10, 175(0 Com. Brit. Aniiy 
Dr. Selli Miller. 
1, 1844 
(J, 1833 



Stephen Jarvis, Dee. 25, 173!) July 30. 1830 Y\h. 0, 1750. 



08 Rachel Starr, 
8 (Children, 
00 Stei)hen, 

70 Samuel, 

71 Mary, 

72 Rachel, 
7!J Abigail, 

74 Betsey. 

75 Eli, 

70 Hannah, 



173;j 



1824 



Nov. 0, 1750 Apr. 13, 1840 May 33, 178:{. 

lit. Cavalry So. Car. 

Oct, 20, 1758 May 23, 1839 Dec. 7. 1780. Died 

in Toronto, U. C. 
Nov. 30, 1700 Sept. 30, 1845 

Oct. 13, 1703 Feb. 37, 1840 

Aug. 10, 1704 Jan. 33, 1810 Jan. 7. 1783. 

Aug. 11, 1700 May 30, 1813 1791. 

May 23, 1708 May 14, 1854 

Jime 14, 1774 Died in inf'cy 



^ Married Jo.s. Fayerweather. 3 sons, Philander, Stephen, and Henry. 



h 



\^m- 




^2-Ay/^',:.i.ai^/i 



-///f-^' 




/. 



0-^.ncc 





I 



whki) 



I" 




\ 



-</ 



\ 



¥ 






DKSrKNPANTS OF WILLIAM— THIRD aKNERATIOl, 



19 



«o. 



No 



77 Ann Kelloitt?, 



Died. 



Married or Itcmiirks. 
1757. 



Name. »<"''• , ^^ , 

Nathan Jarvis.' F.l.. 2.1787 Aprilir,, 830 .an. 

17;{H .Inly 31, 1H03 Hnncd in M. Pauls 
clinrchyard, N. Y. 



8 Chihircn, 

78 Ann, 

79 Betsey, 

80 Mary, 

81 Samuel. 
H3 William, 
815 Nathan, 
84 Esther. 
8.") Hannah. 



Oct. 5, 1758 
Sept. 10, 17<!1 
.fan. U, 17(i5 
Sei)t. Ki. 17(58 
.Ian. Vi, 1771 
,lan. 19, 177;^ 
Au,i--.27, 1775 
Feb. 25, 1780 



Oct. 




1827 


.Tesse Bctls. 


.Tune 


10. 


1852 


1798. 


Apr. 


2, 


1847 




Aug. 


10, 


1862 


1802. 
Samuel WhiK 



«1. 



AlmihamJarvis, May .^17;^ May 3,1813 May 25, 17«.>. 

86 Ann Farmar," Nov. 4, 1801 

,,,,.,, See Appeudi.x h. 

2 Children. _^ ' ' 

87 Sanuiel Farmnr, Sept. M, 1779 1779 
88Sam'lFarmar2<l,.Jan. 20, 1786 Mar, 26. 18..1 

2d wife. ^ . 

, . ., .lulv 4, 1806 

laicy Ii(^wis,' 

Abraham ,)arvi8. 

[The loUowini.- sk<"t,eh of the life ..f Uislmp .larvis was written for this 
work l.y 1h;" Ht.' Hev. .lohn Williams, D.l).. Bishoi» of (Jonneetient.] 

Abraham .larvis was born at Norwalk, Conn., May 5 (O.S.), 1739. 
His father, wlio conforniea to the C;hurch of Knghmd, had removed 
thither from Huntington, L. L, some two years before the future 
bishop's birth. He was, therefore, from the beginning, tramod 
under the influences of that Churcli to the highest office in whicli 
he was, in time, to be cal!(>d. 

His early studies were pursued at Stamford, under the charge 
of the Rev. Noah Welles, the Congregational minister of tbe town, 
who was a noted instructor in his day. B^rom Stamford he passed 
to Yale College, where he was graduated in 1761. 

TTTj^l April. A committee of four, appointed under an Act of 
General Assembly, and the Seh.tn.en of Norwalk, found twenty-four men 
inimical to the country; amon- them, Thomas llauford, Nathan Jarvis, 
^^U./'—IIairx Ifixfori/ of Norwalk. _ 

» Ann. b.nie<l in B. Peck's vault in Trinity Ch.Yd., N. \. 
» Lucy, buried in Burlington, New .lersey. 



I 



20 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM THIRD r.ENKHATlON. 



Just at this time the parish at Middletowii was vacant by the 
removal of the Rev. Ichabod Camp, and Mr. Jarvis was invited to 
officiate as a lay reader. He is spoken of liy Dr. Jolmson, in a 
letter to the Venerable Society, as " a promising candidate." Li 
those days the small-pox was regarded with a terror which it is 
diff.cult for us, to-day, to comprehend, and it strikers us strangely 
to learn that Mr. Jarvis went to BlizalK^thtown, N. J., to be inocu- 
lated. The step led, however, to his residing for some time in the 
family of the distinguished Dr. rhandltM". Dr. (Chandler's home 
could hardly fail to be a marked center of (-hnrch life and move- 
ment, and the advantages to the young candidate of his sojourn 
there must have been very great. 

In the autumn of 176.S, in company with Bela HuV)bard, who 
had studied under Dr. Johnson, he sailed for England, to obtain 
Holy Orders. This companionship laid the foundation of an 
intimacy which ended only when Dr. Hubbard was called to his 
recst in 1812, whither, in about five months, his life-long friend 
followed him. "Together," says Dr. Heardsley, "they went forth 
on the voyage to England for Holy Ordei's; together they had 
walked in the House of God as brothers, and in death they were 
scarcely divided." Mr. Jarvis' reached London in January, 17(i4; 
but "the Bishop of London being very infirm, he received Deacon'o 
Orders from Dr. Keppel, Bishop of Exeter, February 5, 17<U, 
and Priest's Orders from Dr. Lyttleton, Bishop of Cai'lisle, in 
St. James's, Westminster, on the lOth of the same month. He 
left England on the '20th of April, arrived at Boston in June, and 
on the 1st of August following was settled as rector of Chi'Lst 
Church, Middletown, on a salary of seventy pounds sterling per 
annum.'''' No ad lition was made to this stipend liy the \'enerablt 
Society for many years; not, indeed, until, in ITTii, the Rev. Dr. 
Tjeaming, in behalf of the Conventi<m in Connecticut, wrote to the 
authorities desiring them " to (jrder one-half of the salary foi-nunly 
given the late Mr. Lamson, at Fairfield, to Mr. Jarvis, at Middle- 
town." The outbreak of the Revohition must have soon interfered 
with the payment of this well-earned stipend, and made his other 
means of subsistence fearfully precarious. 

Meantime, cm the 25th of May, 1700, the young prie.st had 
married Ann, the eldest daughter of Samuel Farmai", a merchant 
of New York. Two childi'en were the issue of this mari'iage. 
One died in infancy. The other was the Rev. Samuel P^armar 
Jarvis, who was truly "a doctor of the Church." 






nESrKNDANTS OK \V1I,I,IAM THIRD OENKRATION. 



21 



f. 



How long, or in what precise form, Mr. Jarvis continued to 
officiate pul)licly in his clmrch after the war broke out, it is difficult 
to say. After July 4, 1776, the clergy could not use the ordered 
service without incurring the extremest danger. Accordingly, on 
the 23d of that month, in a Convention at New Haven, where 
Mr. Jarvis presided, it "was resolved to suspend the puljlic e.xer- 
cise of ministerial functions." Aft^" this, no churches were kept 
open in Connecticut for some time, except those within the cure of 
the Rev. John Boach of Newtown. It is certain, however, that 
before April, 17Si, Mr. Jarvis had begun public services at Middle- 
town, and that the prayers for tlie King and Royal Family were 
not read by him. For, in April of that year, St, James's pai'ish 
in New Londf ii (which several y<'ars before had ejected its min- 
ister fur refusing to pray for Congress and the States of America), 
voted to authorize the wardens " to call on some Rev. gentleman 
to officiate in the Church of St. James, as Rev. Mr. Jarvis or 
Mr. Hubbai'd does." In 1780, Mr. Jarvis was invited to the 
charge of St. John's, Providence, R. T., but he preferred to remain 
with his people, and declined the offer. 

At the meeting of the clergy of Connecticut held in Woodbury, 
in the last week in March, 1 7S;}, when U^n clergymen undertook 
the ''venture of faith" involved in the attempt to secure the 
Episcopate for this western wf>rld, Mr. Jarvis acted as Secretary; 
and to him was entrusted the charge of preparing the 'various 
documents which the occasion required. Many of those still 
remain to attest the ability of their writer; and they, with others 
of a like character, confirm the testimony of the venerable pres- 
byter who lived to be the last link tliat connected the clergy of 
Connecticut with its first Bislioj) — the Rev. Dr. Hurh.ans — that 
"he had an uncrmmon tact at pulilic business, and in a talent at 
drafting petitions, memorials, etc., had few, it' any, superiors." 
With Mr. Jarvis, also, Bishop Seabury put himself in communica- 
tion as soon as he had reached this counti'v in 1785; and the 
admirable addn'ss with which the clergy of the diocese welcouKnl 
their Bishop at Middlctown, in August of that year, was mainly, 
if not entirely, the work of their secretary. 

In 1787 it seemed so doubtful to the clergy of Connecticut 
whether a separation between the Clnurh in New England and in 
the other States could be averted, that steps were taken to secure 
for New England a "canonical number of Bishops of the Scottish 
line " At a Convention held in WalUngford on the 27th of Feb- 



22 



nKSCENDANTR OF WILLIAM THIRD fiKNKRATION. 



ruary in that yoar, Mr. , I arvis wa.s appointed to procoecl to Scotliind 
for consecration. Ilap[>ily, the necessity was averted, and the 
proposed measure never passed beyond its incipient stajro. 

In 1796 Bishop Seabury died, and at the Convention of the 
Diocese in May, Mr. Jarvis was elected his successor. This elec- 
tion he declined. When, liowever, at the adjourned .Annual 
Convention in 17J>7, the election was renewed, with a unanimous 
vote of both clergy and laity, it was accepted, and Dr. Jarvis (the 
Doctorate having been conferred on him by Yale College, at the 
previous Commencement) was consecrated in Trinity Church, New 
Haven, October 18, 17!»7, by Bi.^liop White, assisted ])y Bishops 
Provost and Bass. A special convention ha,d been summoned foi 
the occasion, at which, immeiliately after the act of consecration 
was completed, the new Bishop received and replied to an address 
of recognition, and afterwards delivered his first charge. 

The Bishop remained in Middletown till the autumn of 1 71)0, 
when he removed to (,'heshire (where he had already placed his 
son in the academy), and built himself a hou -e. Here the shadow 
of death fell upon his home in the loss of his excellent and amial)lo 
wife, who died November 4, 1801. So that when his son was 
ready to begin his collegiate course in 1803, he removed to New 
Hav( n, where his home continued to be for the remainder of liis 
life. "On the 4th of July, 1800, he was married in Trinity 
Chuix'h, New York, to Mi's. Lucy Lewis, widow of Nathaniel 
Lewis of Bhiladelphia, a lady of great excellence, who contributed 
much to the comfort of his declining years." 

Bishop Jarvis's Episcopate covered a period of a little less than 
sixt(^en years, and extende<l through the time when the Church 
was experiencing the trials of her deepest tlepression. Her extreme 
depression did not immediately follow the war of the Revolution, 
but is to be looked for in the earlier years of the present century, 
when the generation which had clung to her in and after the revo- 
lutionary troubles were passing away, and few came to take their 
places. To administer the Episcopate amid such discouragements 
must have been no small trial. Mon^over, the disturbances 
fomented Ijy an unworthy and unscrupulous clergyman embar- 
rassed Bishop Jarvis's administration, alienated some of his clergy, 
and embittered his life. His address to his Convention, in 1807, 
emphasizes his just sense of wrong, and shows how deeply " tlu^ 
iron had entered into his soul.'' Physical inlirmity, also, rendered 
the labor of visitation a burden, and sometimes entirely shut him 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM THIRD GENERATION. 



23 



out from undertaking it. Under God, liowever, he carried his 
Diocese safely through the period of discouragement and trial, 
though he lived only to see the first beams of that brighter day 
which, after 1811, began to dawn upon the Church. The accurate 
historian of the Diocese of Connecticut says of him, "Thoroughly 
versed in the history of the Cliurch, her constitution and govern- 
ment, her doctrines and liturgy, he was so far forth fitted to lie a 
wise counselor and guide; and his few published writings bear 
marks not only of Jiis opposition to all needless innovations, but of 
his undeviating advocacy of apostt)lic ord(!r and primitive usage." 

Though this is not the place for a history of the Episcopate of 
Bishop Jarvis, it may not be improper to say that he ordained 
tliirty-tlinje deacons and twenty-eight priests; consecrated eleven 
churches; and confirmed, at least, three thousand and sixty-eight 
persons. 

At the Convention in June, 1812, the Bishop spoke of his death 
as an event that could not be "far distant," and of "the increasing 
uncertainty of meeting" them again, as he met them then. His 
woj'ds were prophetic, and he nevei- presided in Convention again. 
On the 3d of May, 1813, at his residence in New Haven, after a 
shoi't but severe illness, he rested from his labors, having nearly 
completed his seventy-fourth year. "The day previous to his 
death, he received the Lord's Supper with great apparent devotion, 
and his departure was marked by the utmost tranquility, like 
gently falling asleep." 

"He was buried," says Dr. Beardsley, ■• in tli(> public cemetery, 
then lecently opened; but upon the erection of the present Trinity 
Church in that city, his remains were disinteri'ed. and deposited 
beneath the chancel of this edifice which he had hoped t(» see 
erected. His son, and only surviving child — the Kev. Sanniel 
Farmar Jarvis — whom iu; had advanced to the priesthood about 
two years before his death, was permitted to honor his memory 
by placing over his dust a mural monument of chaste <h'sign and 
exquisite workmanship, with a Latin inscription recitmg his in-cle- 
siastical dignity and position, ;nid his own filial and aft'ectionate 
sorrow." 

This inscription may properly conclude this brief biographical 
sketch. 



11 



24 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM- 



-THfRD GENEKATION. 



SVB. ALTARI. 8ITAE. SVNT 
,T.„ MORTALES. EXVVIAE 

ADMODVM. IN. DEO. REVEREND! PATRIS 

ABRAIIAMI. lARVIS STD 
ECCLESIAE. CONNECTICVTENSTH 
EPISCOPI. SECVNDI 
QVI. NATVS. 
III. NON. MAIL EX. KAL IVL 
ANN. OIOIOCC. XXXIX 
ANNOS. LXXriI. PROPE 
VIXIT. 
QVOR. XV. MENS. VI. DIEB. Xinl 
EX. CATHEDRA. EPISCOPALI 
GREGEM. CIIRISTI. PAVIT 
OBIIT. 
V NON. MAIL EX. KAL. UREG 
ANN. SALVTIS. ClOlOCCC. kuI 
PARIETI. FIVIVaCE. TEMPLI 

EHEV. NON. OCVLIS. MORTALIBVS 

MAGNOPERE. SPERABAT 

IN. MEMORIAM 

PRAESVLIS. VENERATISSIMI 

I^ATRISQVE. OPTIML ET. B D s M ■ 

HOC. MARMOR. ADPIGEND. CVRAV 

FILIVS. LVGENS.=^ 



'[BENE. DE. SE. MERITI] 

' The inscription may be freely tran^luted thus: 
Under the altar are placed 
the mortal reniain.s of the 
Right Reverentl Father in God 
Abraham Jarvis, Doctor of Divinity 
Second Bisho,, of the Clmrch in Connectuut 
who being born th(; 5th of May, 17;^9 
lived nearly seventy-four years • 
ot which, fifteen years, seven months and 
htteen days, he fed the (lock of Christ 
from the Episcopal chair. 
He died the IM of May, 1818. 
On the wall of this church 
which he earnestly hoped to see erected 
alas not with mortal eyes, 
a mourning son 
has cau.sed this marble to be atll.xed 
in memory 
of the most revered prelate, and of the 
iimst excellent father who merits his gratitude. 



)N. 



/. 




^l i "i ^^A t /'^ ^ <>v<. 



<^i^'^<;^.i^ 




'.>•> y 



1 




nKSCENr)ANTS (IK WIl.MAM THIKIl (IKNKKATION. 



25 



XSH. 



No. NiniK'. 


Bom 






Died 




Mnrri 


t(! or RnmnrkH 


Hc/,«^kialiJiirvif 


•.'July 17. 


17l(» 


Apr. 


4, 


18:18 


Oct. 


». n«7. 


81» Mary Nasli, 


.luiic, 


1718 


Mdi. 


2(1. 


1778 






5 Cliildrrn. 
















»(> Nonh, 


.Inly 23, 


17«8 


A UK. 


11. 


1842 


Mch. 


17. 171M. 


iM Aliniliani. 


Mcii. 20. 


1770 


Dec. 


I.'{, 


177« 






m Klijah. 


Mcli. IH. 


1772 


Oct. 


.'), 


1801 






();{ Hlephen, 


Nov. 13. 


1774 


Oct. 


2(5, 


1825 


Oct. 


20, 1803. 


1)4 Jaincs, 


Sopl. 10, 


177« 


Nov. 


2;i, 


1777 






2(1 wife. 
















*Xi Sarali Nasli ««/ 


Whiliicy. 














8 (niildrtMi. 
















m\ Samunl, 


Oct. !». 


1771» 


Oct. 


2», 


1857 


Sept 


2, 1804. 


1>7 A brain, 


Aug-. 2;j. 


17H1 


Oct. 


15, 


1801 






JIH Sarali, 


Apr. 18. 


178;$ 


•Inly 


-i, 


1858 






iM» ("liarlcs. 


Mill. 28, 


1 78", 


Nov 


5, 


1840 


.\pr. 


12. 1808, 


too fjavinia, 


()(!l. ;ii. 


17H8 


Apr. 


11 


1870 






101 Amelia, 


Nov. 27, 


17i)0 


Oct. 


12. 


1874 






103 Mary, 


May l;{. 


17!i:i 












lOa Wiliiaui, 


Feb. 2i). 


17i)0 


Oct. 


3, 


1871 


Dec. 


22, 1825. 



Hezekiah Jauvis. 

Was a firotlior of Bishop Abraham Jarvis, and possossed, in an 
eminent (icgree, the traits of this distinguish*^! man. In (^very 
relation of life, he was the sincere and devoted (Christian gentle- 
man. He liad a fine and discriminating mind and an excellent 
memory; a man of much reading, he was a ready reasoner, a 
pleasant and cheerful companion. He lived to a patriarchal age, 
seeing the children of the third, and even the fourth, generation. 

One of his great-grandchildren thus describes her first visit to 
him. She was in her fourteenth year, and she expected to see 
the old gentleman feeble and decrepit, sitting in the corner in a 
comfortable easy chair, when, on passing into the house, she saw. 
instead, an elderly man descending a ladder from a peach tre(} in 
the front yard, with basket in hand, coming to greet her, which 
he did with the greatest coriliality. 

Her next visit to him was when she was a mother, taking her 
own child with her. This was his great-great-grandson, and she 



1 Hezekiah Jarvis bought from John Betts, Samuel Gibbs, and Wm. 
St. John, on the 10th Dec. 1794, for t250, two acres of land, dwelling- 
house and barn, situate in Norwalk, on the east side of the road, near the 
Episcopal Church. Hounded westerly and northerly by highway; easterly 
by Hezekiah Jarvis's land, and southerly by John lietts's land. 



26 



DKSCKNDANTS oK WILMAM — THIRD OENKKATION 



found tlu^ samci Hiinplc-iniiuhMl, (Iiu;iulic(l old gciitloiimii jih on lior 
lii'Ht vmt. 

Tho following incident is (|uitfi intnrasting. Tlin next rncjrninjj;, 
as the venerable man entered the parlor, he saw, Heated in his own 
chair, the little child, with his own spoctacloH on his nose, with 
newspaper in hand, niaintaining a gravity that seemed to appre- 
ciate the allecteil dignity of his position. The godil old inaii 
approached tho little one, and putting his hands upon his head, 
invoked a blessing whic' its fervor and l)oauty, touched all 

present. It was a beneo .)n that has ever se»>med tf) remain 
with the child as a sainted cliiirni, as on leaving, the old geiitleirian 
gave the child a l'ray(M' Mook in wliich he wrote; his naiiut, lieing, 
at the time, in his ninety-second year. This was tlieir final meeting. 

Another incident, relatt I by a grandson, shows tlie influence of 
the piety and simple dignity of this venerable man upon his youth- 
ful mind. On a visit to his grandfiitluT, in his early ("hildhood, 
he knelt for tli<! (irst time at evening prayer with his aged kinsman, 
and was deeply imi)ressed with the fervor and solemnity of thai 
family devotion; and again, at the breakfast table, when the Divine 
blessing was invoked upon the nioiiiing repa.st, so vivid was the 
impression upon the mind of the grandson that both the family 
prayer and tlu! very word -f the nioiiiing grace liave been the 
models of his own (Uivot Urougli his lattir life. 

Of his life and inlluenci^ ... the Church, Dr. Mead, hi.s personal 
friend and pastor, thus speaks: "He was a devoted and Ixmored 
member of the Church, having been elected to office in the same, 
April 6, 1781, and continued to be so elected for a period of fifty- 
four years, thirty of whicli he was elected and served as warden. 
At Piaster, 183.'5, lie declined a re-election, on accov .it of liis 
advanced age, and thus ended his long term of usefulness as an 
officer of the Church." 

"Mr. Jarvis was well-informed in history, the doctrines and 
usages of the Holy Catholic (-luirch, and brought up his family 
tlio roughly instructed in, and devoutly attached to it. One of his 
sons, the Rev. William Jarvis, a graduate of ITnion College, entered 
the ministry of the Church, and was a useful and exemplary clergy- 
man, Mr. Jarvis was genial in manners, hospitable in practice, 
and inflexible in principle. He was a man wlio supported, through 
a long life, a high reputation for humility, integrity, and that 
Christian amiability which is the noblest ornament of redeemed 
humanity." 



.f 




4> 







Si . . // 



>\ 






*. 



:^. 




L r „.«-, _ 

i 


1 

( 1. 



,v* 



!M'1U\ 



> 

U) 
O 

a 

Ul 

o 

I 

a 
o 
2; 
2; 




> 

< 

I — I 

U) 

o 
a 

CD 

O 

I 

Q 
O 

•z 

2; 




No. 



DESCENDANTS OP WILLIAM— THIKD OENKRATION. 



27 



Miss Mary Jarvis, 
The only surviving daughter of the late Hezekiah Jarvis of Nor- 
walk, Oonnecticut, is now in the eighty-fifth year of her age. She is 
petHe in stature, gracefully formed, with an expressive and beauti- 
ful face, and is, in short, a sort of diamond edition of a volume 
containing all the virtues of the better class of her sex. Unfortu- 
nately, she has been blind for the last nine or ten years, but not- 
withstanding all that, she has never been idle. Busily employed 
with her needle, she has, during those years of optical eclipse, pieced, 
fashioned, and finished over 150 bedquilts for the poor and needy, 
and still, at this advanced age, her hands are constantly employed 
in well doing. She is pleasant, cheeerful, and interesting m con- 
versation, and her heart ever turns to the sunny side of human 
nature, and she is never so happy as when she feels that she has done 
something to alleviate human suffering. It may be well and truly 
said of her : " She stretcheth out her hand to the poor, yea, she 
reacheth forth her hands to the needy." 



3a. 



No. Name. Born. 

Austin Jiirvis, Sept. 25, 1737 
5 Cliildrt'n. 



Died. 



104 Mary, 

105 Danid, 
100 Isiiuc, 

107 Nostrand, 

108 Deborah, 



May 28, 1758 
Mch. 29, 1760 
May aO, 1702 
July 2, 1765 
Oct. 9. 1768 



Married or Remarks. 



John Jarvis, 

109 Naomi Hunce, 

H C'liildren. 

110 John, 

lU Stephen, 
112 Hannah, 



Abraliani Jarvis, 
Ist wife. 

113 Jer'a Chicbester, 

2d wife. 

114 Margaret, 

8 Children. 



33. 

1741 

1781 
1783 

41. 

1746 



1807 



May 21, 1772. 



1875 Get. 22, 1803. Kelurali 
Oaks of CowiIarl)()r. 
1818 



June 10, 1768. 
Meli. 6, 1770. 



^" 



28 



DESCENDANTS OF WfLMAM — FOURTH GENERATION. 



No. Name. 

115 Laviniii, 
110 Jacob, 
117EIi/!i))(.|h. 

118 JCHHO, 

119 El)"iiezer, 
180 Koziah, 

131 Sarah, 
123 Mar^^arot. 

Ichaliod Jarvis, 
133 Plu'bi" Bunoc, 
10 Cliildren. 
1S4 Israel, 

125 Bcnjaiiiiii, 

126 Abigail, 

127 Charlotti', 

128 Ketiirah, 

129 Ilaimali, 

130 Mcliilabcl. 

131 Sarali, 

132 Levinah. 

133 Kuth. 



Born. 
Doc. 23, 1772 
Sept. 18, 1774 
Apr. 2, 1777 
Mch. 17, 1779 
May. l(i, 1782 



Died. 



Married or Reinarke. 
Elkanab Bmicc. 



1830 

1858 
1859 
1S33 



4.2. 

1748 Julv 



;«), 1801 



Dec. 33, 1810. 
belt Fleet. 



(Jil- 



Died ill Connecticut. 



May 1. 1813, to 
Enoch Smith. 

Jan. 15, 1792. to 
Elkanah Bunce. 

Feb. 10, 1814 to 
Jarvis Dennis. 



4th rtRNRJlATTON. 

^"■^^'"""•r . ^°'""- "'«'1- Married or Ho„mrl<s. 

Munson Jarvis, Oct. 11, 1742 Oct. 7. 1835 See Appendix T 

134 Mary Arnold, " 

4 Children. 

135 Ralph Munson, Dec. 27. 1776 Nov. 3, 1853 

136 Mary. 

137 William, 1787 Apr. 30. 1856 

138 Edward. 17H8 May 9, 1852 

Munson Jakvis 
Was born in Stamford, ( 'onncjotiout, and died at St. John, N. B.; 
he was an influential citizen, and was a Member of the Provincial 
Assembly. He removed to New Brunswick in 1783, the' same 
year that his fathei-, Samuel Jarvis, died in New York. He was 
persecuted for his loyalty, and was one of the three sons, who, with 



ItESCKNDANTS OF WILLIAM — FOUKTH GENERATION. 



29 



their father, were sent ovei the lines by tlie patriots of Stamford. 
It is difficult at this distance of time, to realize the sufferings and 
hardships of our ancestoi-s, who, with conscientious zeal, espoused 
different sides in the fearful struggles of the Revolution. He was 
a grantee of real estate of the city of St. John in 179*2, and was a 
vestryman of the Episcopal C'hurch of that city. 

Tiie following is an extract from a letter of Munson Jarvis, dated 
at St. John, N. }i., July 3, 1788, to Dr. Samuel Peters, London 

... I made one i>rcat ini.stake in iiolitics. for wliioli reason, I never 
intend to make so great a blunder again. . . . Altliougli we i)oor tories 
(as they were pleased to call us), moiuu our sad fate, and undoul'.edly 
sliall during this generation, and look upon it, tlie latc^ rehcHjon, as one (>f 
the blackest scenes of initjuily that ever was transacted. We inive fought 
a good fight (temporal), if we have not overcome the thirteen United States, 
yet we overcome one of tlie great (1 won't say good) allies, the devil and all 
his works. Henceforth there is laid up a crown of righteousness for us 
which will not fade, and our last end shall be j)eace for ev(U'iuore. 

I am. Reverend Sir, 

Your most obedient humble servant. 

40. 

No. Name. Born. Dii'd. Married or ReinarkH. 

SamuelJarvis, July 4,1745 Oct. 9, 1H;J8 Oct. 21,1771. 
l;5!» Kliza'th Marvin, Juiie 13, 1843 
3 Children. 

140 Polly Martha 

Marvin, Dee. 29, 1772 May 7, 1790. 

Hirdsey PettTS. 

141 Sally llnrrill, Nov. 4,1774 Sept. Hi,' 179'?, 

Albert Kikerman. 

142 Ileur'taDobson, A|)r. 28, 1785 

PJxtract from a letter of Harriet Dohson Jarvis, to the Rev. Dr. 
Samuel Peters of London, England, dated Stamford, Conn., Feb. 
28, 1802. 

. . . ■■ Sister Patty (Polly), has had the good fortune of drawing two tluiu 
sand dollars in the Kpi.scopal Academy Lottery, of this State. I do not 
know whether she has yet heard the pleasing intelligence." 



Polly Jarvis,' Feb. 21, 1747 May 
143 Tyler Dibble, 
4 Children. 



182() June IS, 17(53, 



' Polly Jarvis died in New Brunswick. Her husband, ('ai)t. Dibble, was 
anattoruey-at-law in Stamford, when the war opened, and he espoused the 



30 



DKSCENDANTfl OF WIM-IAM — POUIITH OENERATION. 



No Name. 

144 Walter D., 

145 William. 
140 Pt'gfjy, 
147 Hali)ii, 



Born. 

Feb. 7, 17«4 
Jan. 14, 17(i(! 
Nov. 38, 17(i7 
Oct. 23, 1705) 



Died. 



Married or RomarliH. 



r5*^. 



148 



149 
150 
151 
153 
153 
154 
155 



WUliain Jarvis.'Hci)!. 11, 175r. Aui?. V.i. 1817 Dec. 13, 1785, at Hi. 

(4eoi\!;e's. llannver 
Square, LoikIum. 
Sept. 30. 1845 



Ilunnnh Owen 
Petcr.s,« 
7('liildren. 

Samuel Peters. Jan. 

Maria Lavinia. Dee. 

Augusta, Oet. 

Samuel Peters, Nov, 

Wm. Munson, Aug. 

Ilainnli Owen. Sept 

Ann Eli/.alteth, Aug. 



24. 1787 when yoimg. 

;U, 1788 May VS, lH2(i Aug. 2, 1811. 

11, 1790 Mar. 21. 1848 JVFay 5. 1812. 

15, 1792 Sept. (t, 1857 Oct. 1, 1818. 

12,179;} June 25. 18(17 Nov. 2, 182(i. 



25, 1797 



Jan. 25, 1816. 



;. 1801 Feb. 20, 18(15 lion. W. li. Robinson. 



Lavinia Jarvis, Oct. 
150 ]{ev. Ambrose Todd, 
2 Children. 



5, 1761 Oct. 20, 1841 



Koyal cause. He was Captain of the tst Militia Comi)auy of Stamford, 
in 1775. He went to Long Island, and entered the service of the TJritisli. 
He Avas made a captain in 1778. His prt)perty in Stamford v.as confls- 
cuted. In 1788 he was a deputy agent in transporting loyalist.s from New 
Yin-k to Nova Scotia. In April. 178;!, he went with his wife, children, and 
two servants, to St. John, when;, in 1784, he was granted two city lots, 
and where, some years afterwards, he put an end to his own life. His 
father, Rev. Ebenezer Dibble, was rector of St. John's Church, Stamfoid. 
for over 51 years. See Appendix N. 

' William Jarvis, whose commission bears date 1782, was ii Cornet intlie 
Ist American Regiment, or Queen's Rangers, commanded l)y Lt. Col. John 
Graves Simc^oe. and was engaged during the Revolutionary war. In 1789, 
he was <'ominissioned as a Lieutenant in the West(!rn Regiment of militia 
of the county of Middlesex, Nicholas Bayley, Colonel, and on 1st January, 
1791, he was commissioned to be (Captain in the .same regiment, andon9lh 
July, 1793, he was appointed Secretary and Registi'ar of therecoi-ds of the 
Province of Upper Canada. 

- Hannah Peters, daughter of Samuel Peters, D.D., an Episcopal cler- 
gyman. She was born at Hi'bron, Conn. 



S 1 

f 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM FOUUTH (JKNERATION. 



31 






No. Name. Born. Died. Married or Remark*.. 

157 Anib'c S. Todd. 'Dec 0, 17!»H .Miiic 22, l8(il 

158 CharleH.I.Todd, 185!) Miss Can non. 

Died ill I'olo, 111. 

as. 

Sfymoinjiuvi,'*, Dec. '22, 1705 Oct. 4, 1H4;5 Wiis Town Clerk In. m 

IHli) lo lM4;j, 
151) IsalH'llii Odcll. Dec. 7, 1778 .Ian. 2, 1871 

7 Children. 

KiO Samuel Odell, ,Ian. 2(1,1806 

161 Martha Miiru't, May 21, 1807 

162 Mary Ilaiinah, Jan. 6, 180!> 
16;{ Hart Elizabeth, May 16, 1810 

164 Lavinia Todd, Nov. 27, 1811 

165 AlherliniaS., Feb. 11, 1814 

166 Sarah Peters M., Apr. !), 1817 



.lohn Jarvis, June 18, 1T5;J July 24, 1824 

167 Sally Slawson, Sept. lT5;i 

2"children. 

168 Anna,- July 25, 1774 

169 Polly, Dec. 24, 1778 



2d wife. 

170 Elizabeth Boulte, May 5, 1753 Apr. 

5 Children. 

171 John, ' 

172 Elizabeth, 
17:5 Charlotte, 

174 Charles James 

Anson, 

175 Geo. Oglevic, 

3d wife. 

176 Sally Ells. 



Jacob Houton. 
Steph. Houtoii. 2 Ch., 
Anna and Jarvis. 



7, 17!)!) Aug. 23, 1779. 



Mch. 30, 178(» Aui;-. 14, 1834 

Oct. 25. 1785 May 7, 1844 Dec. 25. 1804. 

July 30, 1787 Feb. 20, 1861 Dec. 12, 1810. 

Apr. 5, 17!»2 Dec. 28. 1836 

July 14. 1795 Feb. 3, 1875 Nov. 1!), 1819. 



1 Rev. Ambrose S. Todd. D.D., was born in Huntiniyton, Conn., 
ordained deacon. July 15, 1820, and priest, June 30, 1823. by Bishop 
Mrownell, iuid in.stituted rector of St. John's Parish, Stamford, Conn., 
which otiice he held nearly fo .y yenrs. He married Elizabeth Hull, 
daui^hter of Gen. Hull of (!he,shi , Conn. 

- Anna and Polly married cousins. Anna died, having two sons. Sanuiel 
and Waters. Samuel married a Mi-ss Muiison of New Haven. Conn., and 
Waters a Miss Raymond of New Canaan. 

•' John Jarvis married Laura Thompson. They had three children, 
John, Elizabeth, who married a Mr. Ableman, and Geo. Oglevie. 



f 



Ml. 



:i2 



DESCKNUANTH OK WILLIAM KiHTHth (iENKKATION. 



.)OHN .IaKVIS 

Was l)orn June 18, 175;{. Ho was the son of Jolin .Tarvis. wlio 
WHS horn January 2'A, 1725, and who died Aug. 17, 1778. 

Both fatlipr and Hon were horn under the Hritisli flag, iind 
retained thcdr love and allogif-nce for the mother country while 
they lived. The son held the position of ('onnnissary-General in 
the British army during tlie Revolution, and was, for a long period, 
stationed on OoverrK r's Island, in the Bay of New York. In stat- 
ure he was largt! and portlv, his manners courteous, and his nature 
kindly and genial. He was a fine scholar, his language fluent and 
easy, and his compositions in proseand verse interesting. His pen- 
manship was the round old English hand, and almost equal to cop- 
per-plate engi'aviiig. 

In the year 1777, when the Royalists were sorely pressed by the 
Insurgents, being insulted daily, and reviled by both neighbors 
and friends, Mr. Jarvis resorted to verse to calm his disturbed 
heart and feelings. An original hymn of his composition, which 
has been set to music by his grandson. Dr. William Jarvis Wet- 
more, will be found on the following page. 

After the Revolution, he was sent to Nova Scotia, where he 
remained three years, and was then, by an edict from the first 
President, returned to the United Cl^ates, and to his home in Nor- 
walk, Conn., where he died. 

He was twice married, his second wife being Klizabeth Boulte. 
She wiis a shrewd woman, full of energy and mother wit, as the 
following anecdote will show. Mr. Jarvis was granted a short fur- 
lough to visit his wife at Norwalk, and he liad carefully and cau- 
tiously made his way from his boat to the door of his dwelling, 
when he was seen by some straggling soldiers, and made prisoner. 
He was so near his house, he begged to be permitted to see his 
wife, and get a changes of linen before being taken into the Amer- 
ican lines. It was granted, and the wife, apparently overcome with 
grief, requested them to let her see him privately for a few mo- 
ments before his departure. Tluiy entered a room, and she no 
sooner closed the door, than she fell to berating him with all 
sorts of abuse for his allegiance to the King, which was music to the 
ears of his captors. After a time, and feeling that the husband had 
been lashed long enough by the wife, they rapped at the door, 
asking for their prisoner. They only found a quiet woman and 
an open window, through which the bird had flown, and. by that 
time, was well out of harm's way. In speaking of his two wives, 



Iffy Soul 






*!> 



;.. if & 



«. 



;li,(v 



!(>;;i'-|i ;, is:i 



UM 



iud iii*-i 



i/liin/, ivUiS Weix wU. 



i 



Be Calm, My Soul! 



[Wnrda by 

[John Jarvis. firrs) 
AiKlaiite cantabile. 



[lUunir by 

I Wmi. tjARvis Wrtuorr, M. D. 

asm) 




Be rnim, my sntil, »io nutre la-mint At fttr • tune's nd • ft rsi- 

When Hinv'nthis nifiHuitf inrtli rit-forniH, And tloiids oh- srinf the- 






v4\i ^t WfvJf M^ 



^isH^mH^^^m^ 



gate; Van sighs »>r tint's ri-stnrt conttntr Cangfitfo'tf ills pfe- tail? 

f sleiis: The fi.v'd ftnindaliitn btytieslhestorm,Ilsboist't'<ms fnyt de-fits. 



■iH'sm- Willi 



ul. bv that 



3. 

y ffiilh, s(t fi.vtd the virttinus mind 
Ofsarrtd stnris possissfd; 

fqf«»ffiin^.s hurt not talm, fisigntd, 

Jtopi' chtirs Ihf patiint hnast. 



\ 



5. 



», hhall I in alfliftifin's srhoni 
'ilh rat'i- larli Itsstni gain: 
Xruvttd, liarn larli painful full', 
piarh pruipt sound ft lain. 



A. 

By hitpe inspit'td, still tnay I viiw 

F.arh Joyltss day rttite: 
Iflay fortune's frowns my pridt subdue. 

And damp each u<firm desire. 

6. 

Then slutll no guilty, impious deed, 

31 y innocence destroy; 
But wisdom teach, and virtue lead 

To happiness and joy. 



ho Hnid til 
wife wan I 
lie had hv 



WiiH tho 1 
IHTJ. A 
of liridgc 
soldior, a 
room. 

Whon 
their hon 
Oil liiH w 
lived Di 
He tliert 
Winches 
of tlie o 
the old 1 
together 
again. 

Th(! ( 

answere 

There v 

hardy t 

blasphe 

with mi 

gentleii 

numibe; 

grave, i 

He loo] 

The 

hair-br 

ever bi 

war-\)a 

on tht 

Indian 

ored t 

Coe, f( 

ing hi: 

seeme 

ixnobs 




DKSrKNDANTfl <)V WILLIAM — FOrHTII OKNRRATION. 



33 



he Hiiid i\wy wore both j^ood piiou^li for uny man, but. liiB Jioulte 
wifti was tlH) most ingonioiiH tactician and strategist, as by her wit 
he had boon saved from iiiiprisoninent, and, ihtIuijjs, death. 

Chaulks .Iamks Anson Jahvis 

Was the 8((i;ond son of John Jurvis, and a Holdier in the war of 
ISl'i. y\s Lieutenant .larvis, lie (igured prominently in tho battU?8 
of Mridgewater, fjundy's Lane, and Chippewa. He was a thorough 
sohb'er, and, as he used to say, enjoyed a battle as he did a ball- 
room. 

When the war wuh ovej", and the soldiers were returning to 
their homes, Lieut. .larvi.s took up his line of mareh with the rest. 
On his way, and almost in a direct line towards his father's home, 
lived Dr. T. S. Wetmore, who had married his sister Elizabeth. 
He therefore decid(!d to make her tlu^ first visit. Tn the town of 
WinchcHter, ( 'onnecticut, where she dwelt, were a great number 
of the old Revolutionary heroes. No soonc^r had he arriv(!d than 
the old fellows got wind of it, and th(iy were desirous of gathering 
together on a certain evening and fighting their old battles over 
again. 

Th(! doctor gave out a general invitation, and the old fellows 
answerecl to the call us if a trumpet had summoned them to arms. 
There was old Unch; Mo.ses Hatch, tough as a maple knot and 
hardy as an oak; old tlnde Richard Coit, as brave as he was 
blas])hemous; old Mr. Cone, one of the heroes of Bunker Hill, 
with many others of aV)Out the same stripe. Among them was a 
g(>ntlenuin by the name of Coe, one of the very few surviving 
nuanbers of St. Clair's defeat, during the French war. He was a 
grave, solemn-looking man, but with an iron will and constitution. 
He looked like an old Roman in his stern dignity. 

Th(! hours flew by as the olil soldiers told over their battles and 
hairbreadth escapes, when Coe suddenly asked Jarvis if he had 
ever been engaged with the Indians — if he had ever seen tluun in 
war-paint and feathers, or had ever heard the terrible- war whoo[) 
on the (l(^ld of battle. Jarvis, knowing of the cruelty of the 
Indian, and having been an eye-witness of his barbarism, endeav- 
ored to avoid talking of the red devils, as he called them, until 
C'oe, feelmg somewhat annoyed at his silence, rallied him by tell- 
ing him " he didn't believe he had overseen a,n Indian." Jarvis 
seemed to take it good-naturedly, when, after a time, he rose 
iiiiobservedly, and walking quietly around behind Coe, sounded, 
5 



I f 



•31 



PESCEXD.WTS ()!<' W'l.MAM FOl'UTII OKNKKATIOX. 



with iill his force, the terrible war-whoop in his ear, when Coe 
sprang from his cliair, and, but for Jarvis catcliing him in his 
arms, would have fainted and fallen to the floor. Coe soon recov- 
ered, gave Jarvis his hand, and said: "Ah, Jarvis, you /mve been 
among the Indians!" 

Lieut. Jarvis subsequently went to the South, and on the visit 
of La Fayette to this country, was leader of a military band. He 
composed a Quick Step in honor of the general, and it was exten- 
sively and universally popular throughout the Southern St:;tes. 

He wa.-i a splendid figure of a man, tall, largi, and portly, wiih a 
militarv bearing and manner; one of the most genial of men, and 
prince of good fellows. 

No. Name. Born. Diftl- Married or Rcmnrks. 

Samufl Jarvis, Doc. 28, il'A Dec. 11. 17U5 Sept. 4. 1774. 

177 FJi/iibeth Swift, Oct. 19,17(50 May 10.1825 

2 cliiklrcn. 

l^H Launcclot, Fob. IS), 1775 Dec. 2«, 1853 June 23, 1803. 

179 Rebocca. 

2d wife. 

180 Liuly FraiKca 

Sophia Ligoii- 
ier Sprattin, 

3 children. 

181 Sir Sariucl Uav- 

luoiKl, Feb. 26. 178G 

182 Wm. Paxton, June 2(). 1788 



Dec. 17, 1790 Doc. 13. 1785. 



Dec. 7, 1868 



Samuel Jakvis 
Was born December 28, 1754. At the time of the R(>volutionary 
War, he was a thorough Loyalist, and was evidently a man of 
inlluence and imjiortance. His power must have been felt through- 
out the town and county where he resided, or he would not have 
been so hunted and persecuted. He was arrested and thrown into 
jail in Foughkeepsie, Dutchess County, where he suffered all sorts 
of indignities and privations. While in prison, he wrote a poem 
which describes his experience during these troublesome times. 

He (inally broke jail, but although out of his confinement, he 
was hunted" bk. a outlaw, and obliged co hide in a cave to avoid 
his pursuers au'i persecutors. 

Mr. Jarvis was twice married, his lirst wife being Aliss Elizabeth 

Swift. 



DKSOKXnANTS ,.F WII.I, AM-FOtTRTH OKNKRAT.ON. 35 

with his brother, they were both shot at by parties opposed to 

rmv It ''.'"'^ '''' '°^ "^'^^ ^"^•^' ^"^ -*--^ «- British 
tZ;/;;" T- '""'"""'^^•^- '-^ '^--'^' "ndor Sir Patterson. 
Dr von f,om hus ho,„o and family, ho naturally drifted with the 
Hntish artny. At the close of the war, lie went to England as 

On his arrival in England, his interests being identified with the 
-other country, h. looked upon it as his future hon.e. uZZ 
marned Lady Frances Sophia l.ig.„,er Sprattin. The eeren ony 
ook place in St. Luke's Parish, Chelsea, December I,, "/ 
1 homas R,pl,>y, Curate, officiating. ' 

Mr .rarvis died in Lond,>n, December II, 1795, and was buried 
m All Saints Church, Fulham, by the side of the Duke of York- 

No. Nn.no. Born. n;,,,, „ . , 

^^ophen Jarvis. Apr. 4.1758 Apr. ^ 1H2» ^y't^^Z''''''- 

m^rZ ""''■'''''' ^^"^ ^•lS^^.^an.2,1820. 
woathcr, ().,. 4,17!iy M.-h. :i, 1826 Aug. ^o, ,so;j. 



«1S 



Henry .larvis. Aj)!-. 10, 1703 

186 Ann. larvis, (),.(. 5 l;^,J^ 

8 cliikhrii. 

187 i'hilo, 

188 Sally, 

189 r-ucntiu, 
15)0 Alfred. 
191 ilcnrictta, 
193 II((tty, 

193 ,j..incs, 

194 U,Muv, 



1H40 Of I{i(lo-,.(i,.|,|. 



1850 

1851 

F«'b. 2, 1784 May 34, 1870 

00. 



1807. 



195s!;;!l'p"'■'^^ Feb. 31,1770 Apr. 1, 1H44 

8 children. 
1»« Deiaiurey, 

1»H Scloc(„. ^i^.l J.' .': ^"■'•- 2.,, 18;i0. 

^^'"•^''^''*' Sept. 25, 1814. 



36 



DKBCKNDANTS OF WILLIAM FOI'KTH GKNKKATION. 



No. Name. 


E 


orn 




Died. 




Married or RcnmrliB 


li)!) JjiliU'.s Oniill, 


Dee. 


4, 


1799 








Jan. 22, 1821. 


200 C'atliiiiine, 














Newiiian. 


201 William, 














Milan, Ohio. 


202 Seth, 


Oct. 


11. 


1805 


Sept. 


23, 


1859 


Dee. 4, 1828. 


20;{ Steplien, 














Pittshurirh, Pa. 








er. 








Jesse Jiirvis, 


Nov. 


8, 


1772 


.Tan. 


6, 


1822 


Merchant. 


204 Mara;i!rct P. 
















JUissf'lI, 


May 


1, 


1770 


Meh. 


9. 


1849 




5 cliiklron. 
















205 Julia, 


June 


80, 


1799 










306 Jay. 


Sept. 


2. 


1801 


June 


23, 


1860 




207 Jane, 


Feb. 


6, 


180-1 


Apr. 


8, 


1875 


• 


208 Jeaiu'lte, 


June 


13. 


1807 


Sept. 


30, 


1875 




209 Catharine, 


Jan. 


26, 


1813 











tl 



Stephen Jarvis. Nov. (i, 17.56 Apr. 12, 1810 

210 Amelia ({lover, Aug. 28, 1756 Dec. 2, 1819 

(i children. 

211 Eli/.ab'h Han'h, May 9.1784 

212 Freder'k Starr, Aug. 4, 1786 

213 P'ranc's Amelia, Mar. 22, 1787 

214 Rachel Isabella. Oct. 27. 1794 

215 George Stephen 

Benjamin, Apr. 21, 1797 



Appendices L ami T. 



1874 Itev. Dr. Phillips. 
1852 
.Tan. 23, 1867 July 16, 1809. 



Apr. 15, 1878 Dec. 6, 1821. 



216 Will, lioisford, May 4. 1799 July 26, 1864 



Colonel STEriiEN Jarvih. 

The subject of this memoir was born November 6, 1750, in Dan- 
bury, Conn. His father, Stei^hen Jarvis, was a faiTaer whose fam- 
ily was among the first in town. Young .'^tejjhen, in his early 
youth, was ambitious to obtain a classical education, but was opposed 
in this by his father, who limited him to tlu; rudinumts of an 
English education, acquired in a common school. At twelve years 
of age, he was taken from school and put to work on the farm. 
He continued thus employed until the Revolution. His fatlier and 
family were loyalists, and subject to great annoyance from the 
patriots. About this time, young Stephen became much attached 
to a young lady whose name was Glover, and whom he afterwards 
married. This engagement was violently opposed by his father, 
and led to an open rupture between the father and son. Immedi- 
ately after the battle of Bunker Hill, 1775, a draft of militia was 



1 



d 

.s 

i- 
as 



DKWCKNDANTS OF WILLIAM FOVHTTl OKXKHATIOX. 



37 



made to garrison New York. Young Jarvis was drafted, and 
though a true h)yalist, he determined to join the company to avoid 
the harsh treatment of liis father. The resolve caused liis father 
to relent somewhat, and he tried in vain to induce his son to allow 
a substitute, but finding him indexible, he gave hini some money 
and a hoi-se upon his leaving for New York. 

The company was detained in New York but a short time, and 
Stephen returned home, when a partial reconciliation ^wk place 
between him and his father involving a breaking oIT his engagement 
with Miss Olover. 

The condition was soon violated, and the attachment between hira 
and the object of his affections was only strengthened by parental 
oppression. 

Soon after the capture of New York, another draft was made, 
and young Jai'vis, though drafted, refused to join the company, 
and to avoid the ill treatment of his fatluu-, iind tlie persecutions 
which resulted from his loyalty, he made his esca{)e from Dan bury, 
and fled across the Sound in a canoe, to Long Island, and went on 
board a British sloop lying at Huntington. Before heaving home 
on this occasion, he had signalized his loyalty in company with 
another tory, by conveying a band of tr(K)ps under command of 
Gov. Tryon, to destroy a large quantity of the supplies in Danbury, 
valued at $80,000.' He soon found his way to New York, and 
joined the British army as a Sergeant, with the promise of a com- 
mission. In this subordinate position he distinguished himself, 
and took an active part in many skirmishes, perilous e.Ki'ursions 
and battles in and around New York, New Ji>rsey, and Pennsylva- 
nia. He was and)itiou8 to deserve by his gallant conduct, the prom- 
ised commission, which was delayed, for a long time, to his great 
vexation. His company was quartered at Richmond, S. I., during 
the winter of 1780. and he was one of the expedition fitted out to 
capture CJeneral Washington at his head(|uarters on the Hudson. 
Failing in this, the party returned to Bull's Head, and thence to 
Stateu Island. Soon afterwards the regiment embarked for 
Charleston, S. C, and, after the surnmiliM- of Charleston, in May, 
1780, the regiment returmnl to New York, and again took up quar- 
ters at Richmond, Staten Island. 

Soon afterwards, an expedition was fitted ou*^ for Virginia, under 
the command of General Leslie, and Jarvis was detailed as Quarter- 
master in a troop of the 1 7th Light Dragoons, Th(>y put in at Nor- 



1 See Sketch 355. 



38 



DESCENDANTS OF Wll.I.lAAI FdlHTII OKNKRATKiN. 



folk, but soon sailed to Charleston. While at Charleston, he was 
made a Lieutenant of a company of Dragoons, und(M- the cojnmand 
of Colonel Campbell. During this campaign, ho was in many 
perilous adventures and battles, and always deported himself with 
signal gallantry and bravery. Towards the (uul of 1782, t\w r(>gi- 
ment was ordered to St. Augustine, Florida, to gaiTison that place, 
and remained there till peace was declared in 178;^. In April, of 
that year, he obtained leave of absence to visit New York, where 
he anived in May. Obtaining permission from Lord Howe, he 
went to Danbury, where he arrived on 20th May, and was heartily 
received by his friends and I'elatives. His father now became rec- 
onciled to his marriage with the lady of his clioice, and arrange- 
ments were soon made for the wedding, but the prejudice against 
him as a loyalist ran so high that he was again subjected to great 
annoyance, and threatened with personal violence, in ct)nsequence 
of which, his marriage was cele])rated in private, in the presence 
of a few friends. He was compelled to leave for New York, where 
his wife shortly after joined him. His pre-eminence sis a loyalist ren- 
dered his stay in New York uncomfortable, and he soon resolved 
to join his regiment. His father came to N(nv York and returned 
home with his wife, and he soon set sail for St. Augustine, wh((re 
his stay was short, for the British troops, under the treaty of peace, 
soon evacuated that place, and in October. 1783, sailecl foi- Halifax. 
His regiment was soon disbanded, and he returned to New Y'ork, 
where he arrived on the day the Britisli army left that city. Tjicu- 
tenant Jarvis made up his mind to return to Halifax to reside, and 
immediately applied to General Washington for a permit to go into 
the coimtry to visit his friends. General Washington received 
him kindly, but could not give him the permit, as he had n^signed 
his commission; he however gave the young officer directions how 
to accomplish his object. After a few days delay in New Yoi'k, ht; 
supplied himself with a stock of tea and sugar for the winter, and 
left for Reading, Conn., where he met his wife in the family of his 
brother, and with her proceeded to Danbury, whei*e they spent the 
winter in quiet. Early in the spring of 1 7 84, he was again sub- 
jected to personal annoyance, and threatened with violence. He 
remained in Danhuiy, however, till liis wife recoverc^l from her 
confnifment. Leaving his wife and infant daughter with his father, 
he sailed for St. John, and thence to Fredericton, when^ he pur- 
chased some land, and made arrangements for building a house 
for his future residence in the coming spring. He soon returned 



I 



DKSCENDANT8 OP WILLIAM FOURTH GKNERATION. 



39 



1 



to St. John, and spent some time with his uncle (Munson Jarvis), 
who was engajyed in business as a hardware merchant. He not 
long afterwards .«^ailed for Connecticut in a vessel belonging to his 
uncle, and liuuling at Stamfoi'd, immediately hired ahorse, and the 
same day set olf to join his wife; and child, whom he found at 
Newtown. iVfter a short visit with his relatives and friends at 
Danbury, he went with his family to Reading and took up his win- 
ter quarters witli his brother. 

Early in the spring of 178."), he loft Reading, and on 1.5th June, 
with liis family, landed at Fredericton with only one-half guinea in 
liis pui-se, and one year's half pay to draw for his current expenses. 
At St. John, he purchased a sir.all stock of goods from his uncle, 
which lu; took to Fi-edericton. His house was not yet built, and 
himself, wife, and child suffered great privations till October, when 
he got into his new house. He resided in this place from 178") to 
1800, and during this long residence he held successively the com- 
mission of Captain, Major of Brigade, Deputy Adjutant-Genei-al, 
and Lieutenant Colonel, besides the office of Post-master. He was 
prosperous in his business, and acquired considerable real estate, 
Init met with some heavy losses. In 1807 an engagement took place 
betw(H'n a British vessel and theXInit(Hl States ship "Chesapeake." 
which threatened a rupture between the two governments. Colo- 
nel Jarvis immediately tendered his services in case of necessity, 
which were thankfully received and accepted, but when the militia 
was (tailed out, another officer was placed in com nand. This slight 
so exasp(>rated (\jl()nel Jarvis, that he determined to leave the 
Province and move to [ -pper Canada. For this purpose he visited 
that Province, and decided to .settle at York. He at once returned 
to New Brunswick, and commenced arranging his business prepar- 
atory to removal. His friends at first were opposed to this step, 
but, finally, consinitiul, and, leaving Fredericton on .TOth June, 1809. 
after a long and weary journey, stopping at Quebec and Montreal, 
arrived at York on the 28th August. On his way, he left his 
youngest daughter at Quebec, where she married Major Maule, of 
the 104th regiment. At Montreal he purchased supplies for house- 
keeping. A t York he engaged in a public office at £ 1 00 per annum, 
utitil he could got a location of 1,200 acres of Government lands 
for himself, and four hundred acres for his oldest son. The pur- 
chase of his house and furniture, and fees for locating his lands 
exhausted all his ready money, and his half pay and small salary 
of £100 were all the means of support until the war of 1812, when 



40 



DK8CENDANT8 OF WII-UAM FOUHTIl OKNKIUTION. 



the AiiuM'icans invaded Canada. During the war he supported his 
family upon these sources of income, and some commissioi's which 
he rec(nved for the management of estates of non-residents. 

He was again appointed Adjutant-General of the militia, and 
served until York was captured by the United States troops and 
he V. as tak(Mi prisoner. After the capture of York, he retired from 
his military duty, and engaged in business as a commission broker, 
and was successful in his new avocaticm. Having acquired a 
capital of iiaOO, he purchased goods in Montreal and commenced 
business in Toronto as a merchant; but the peace of 1815 found 
him in possession of a large stock, upon which the depreciation 
was so great that he was bligc^d to sell all his real estate to pay 
off his debts, and he wa.s again reduced to his half-pay for the 
support of his family.- Upon the I'etirement of Governor Gore, 
Colonel Smith succeeded him as Administrator of the Government, 
who gave his old friend, Colonel Jarvis, the Registry Office of the 
Home District, with C150 per annum; which, with the salary of 
his youngest son (£150) made his annual incimie £300, and 
enabled him to ])rovide a (comfortable house and lot, and he and 
his son lived together till 181!5, when, at the age of 69, his health 
failed him, and it became necessary that he should change his 
mode of life. He thei'efore offered to resign his office in favor of 
his son. This was objected to, but with the consent of the govern- 
ment, his son (effected an exchange of offices with the High Sheriff, 
to whom Colonel Jarvis resigned his office as Registrar, and his 
son, William Botsford Jarvis, became High Sheriff. At the 
advanced age of 70, Colonel Jarvis retired from active life, and, in 
the enjoynuMit of good health, lived among his children till his 
death at Toronto in 1840, aged 84 years. 

Colonel Jarvis was possessed of a noble nature, genial disposi- 
tion, and elegant manners. True to his convictions, he was firm 
and decided in his intercourse among men. As a soldier he was 
generous and brave, and in all the thi'illing incidents of his long 
and eventful life, h(> never stooped to evasive or dishonoi'able con- 
duct. Thougli sometimes impulsive, his religious convictions were 
firmly settled, and exerted a controlling influence over all his 
actions.— [See Sketch 90.] 

TO. 

No. Name. Born. Died. Married or RemarlvS. 

SaniuolJarvis, Oct.^20, 1758 May 23, 1839 Dec. 7. 1780. 
217 Al)if?iiil Saiiford. " 
8 children. 



■m 



RIHHM 



DKS0KNDANT8 OP WILLIAM— FOUHTH GENERATION. 



41 



No. Name. 

818 Saimiol 



:f 



Born. Died. 

July 28, 1783 June 22, IS.")! 

219 Abisiiil, ) July 28, 1782 Mch. 12, 1808 

220 Beiij. Sturi,'c.s, April 13, 1784 Dec. 24, 1840 

221 p]li Starr, Jan. 23, 1780 

223 Henry, April 30, 1788 Mch. 19, 1842 

223 Sarah, Aug. 24, 1791 

224 Win. Augustus, Dec. 19, 1793 
22.') Amelia, Mch. 3. 1790 



Married or Remarkp. 
Twias. 



Mch. 11, 1811. 



Nov. 6, 1871 



Mary Jarvia, 
230 John Uidcr, 
9 children. 

227 John, 

228 Mary (Polly), 
239 Stephen, 

830 Haehel, 
331 Ralph, 

232 George, 

233 Wni. JFarvey, 
834 Hannah, 

235 Cliarlcs, 



Nov. 20, 1700 Sept. 20, 1843 
Mch. 38, 1701 Jan. 15, 1833 



Dec. 2, 1784 
Sept. 31, 1780 
Nov. 1, 1788 
Sept. 11, 1790 
July 11, 1793 
June 9, 1790 
i Aug. 4, 1798 
> Aug. 4, 1798 
Jan. 24, 1801 



Sept. 20, 1849 
Feb. 5, 1801 
Sept. 1804 
June 14, 1865 
Aug. 37, 1841 
Oct. 1843 
Oct. 11, 1854 Twins. 
June 1868 
Nov. 1870 



•y^. 



Rachel Jarvis, Oct. 12, 1703 Feb. 37 1840 
830 Sol. Hitchcock,! Sept. 14, 1877 Buried Sharon, Ct. 

0.7 f "^"!' ?■''''' ^"- ^^' ^^^^ J*^"- -3' 1810 January, 1783. 
-37 Francis Knapp, 1765 Jan. 11, 1834 

10 children. 

238 William Jarvis. Oct. 5, 1783 Dec. 10, 1831 Lydia Davey, Gt. Bar- 

239 Fanny, Sept. 7, 1785 Oc't. 37 1807 ""^''''"' ^^^"''• 

240 Comfort Starr, Oct. 18,1787 July 37. 1805 Dec. 25, 1810; Oct. 23. 

1810. 

Oct. 20. 1789 Feb. 19, 1814 Cook Taylor 

April 0, 1793 isi2. 

Aug. 11, 1794 Jan. 30. 1819 Pynchon of Great Bar- 

rington, Mass.t 
June 11,1797 July 25, 1829 Quigley of Clevland, 

Aug. 30, 1800 ^'^'"• 



241 Emma, 
342 Amelia, 

243 Rebecca, 

244 Evelina, 
345 AbigallJ.,*! 



' Hadastep daughter (Sarah), who married Rev. Geo. B. Andrews, D.D. 
an Episcopal clergyman. He died at AVappinger Falls 

fnlit'T'^ "^"^r'f ^'''- "'''*^' ""^ ^°'"» ^'"^'""^' d«P«t "ff«"t at Housa- 
tonic, Mass. Had two children, Stephen Starr and Sarah Maria 

6 



Il ! 



42 



UKHOKNDANTS OF WILMAM — KOUKTy OKNKltATION. 



•/ i 



■ 8"' 



No. Name. Born. Died. 

240 Goorgc F., Jan. 34, 1003 Jan. 14, 1875 

247 Harriet Lowndes, Aug. 27, 1805 

Betsey .lurvis,'' Aug. 11, 1700 May 80,1813 

248 Jc(l.Welluiau,.Tr.,='l)ee.ll,1702 Feb. 3. 1858 

5 chiklniu. 

249 Wm. Watson, Aug. 5, 1703 July 23, 1870 

350 Caroline, 1795 1835 

351 Betsey Ann, 1799 

253 Twin brother, ) 1804 In infancy. 

353 Frederieli, ) 1804 1835 



'S. 



Married or Kumarks. 

AprillO, 1834, toA.A. 
C!urtis. » 

(Mias. Lewis of No. Ca- 
naan. Mociiildrcn. 



1791 

Born Danvers, Mass. 

April 13, 1817. 

Nov. 3, 1833. 

Drowned inCJidf Mex- 
iii), otr Bio Grande. 



May 33. 1708 May 14, 1854 
Hept. 13, 1771 Dee. 15, 1838 



Eli Jarvis, 

354 Polly Bull, 

9 (children. 

355 Adaline Ursula, 'Feb. 9,1800 

350 Mary Amelia, June 30, 1801 May 4, 1843 

357 William Bull, Oet. 13, 1803 Oct. 31, 1871 

358 Julia Ann, Mch. 30, 1803 Sept. 8, 1804 

359 Jidia Ann 3d, April 13, 1800 



Sarah Lawson of Po'- 
kcepsie. One dau. 

John Barlow. Had 3 
sons, William Henry 
and Geo. Jarvis. 



1 Had two sons, T. S. and Geo. Fraiuus. 

'■^ Betsey died in New York, and was buried in St. Paul's churchyard 
near the northwest corner of the church. 

* He married for his S(!cond wif<^ the widovvof Wooster Camiiof Ib'ook- 
field, Conn. She died in 1839. He died at his dauiiliter's (Mrs. Camp) at 
Marietta, Jackson Co., Michigan, Feb. 3, 1858, aged 95 years, 1 month, and 
30 days. 

■• Adaline niarri>'d Zachariaii Da}' Ftdler of l\ent. Her second iiushand 
was Frederick Mesick. Has one daughter, .Mary Ingraham Fuller. 

We extract the following interesting anecdote of Revolutionary times, 
from a letter written by Mrs. Mesick, who says that she has often heaid 
her Jather relate it: "On the day before tiie British came into Danl)ury, 
my father, who was then but ten years old, yoked the oxen before the 
carl and look the family and all Vidual)les to a place called the Boggs, 
Ave miles out on a small farm belonging to nij- grandfather, and thereby 
escaped the horrors which tho.^e who renuxined witnessed. There were a 
numlier of houses binned, but they did not disturb my grandfallier, except 
to steal his saddle and break a looking-gla.ss. They called him a Tory. 
The Ei)iscopul church was tilled with pork and provisions, and set on fire, 
and the grease ran in the street like water." [See sketch 69.] 



If!| 



DKPOKNDANTH OF WII.I,IAM — POIRTII OKNKHATION. 43 

>»"• Niimc. norii. Dlp.i. M.nii.Ml or Honmilo.. 

2(iO f'liirrWoliinson.'Ocf. ;il, 1808 

SOI Sl<|)licii iSlarr. Dec, 2r,, 1811 Nov. 24, 18a/5. 

363 Hamh IFifclioook, Jan. H, 181 J} 

203 InfanI, Dpc. 17, 1810 



Betsey Jarvis, 
364 Jacdl) f)Hl)oni, 

8 cliildreii. 
205 Lewis, 
300 Frederick, 
20T .Maria, 

268 William, 

300 Cliarles, 

370 Geo. Oglevie, 

371 ({eoriTc, 
272 Kli/.a Ann, 



Hept. 10, 1701 Oet. 1837 

Sept. 30, 1757 Oct. IH. 1814 

■Ian. 30, 1788 

Sept,. 13, 1785 Aufi;. 80, 180,'} 

May 20, 1788 Mcli. 28. 1807 Meli.24.1811.t,) Eseek 

Kelioo-n;. 
•f'""' 'M7!)0 1807 April8. 18l4,to.Iemi- 

Ina I\('l]o!::<^, 
Aug. 17, ]71»2 Meh. 18, 180!) Mav, 1810; Apr 1H2» 
Feb. 28, 1795 Meh. 8, 17i)0 
Nov. 21. 1707 Jan. 10, 1708 
April 20, 1802 Jarol) Daueliy. 



SI 



278 

374 
375 
376 



278 
270 
280 
381 



Samuel Jarvis, Sept. 10, 1704 
Pereey IJauny, 

8 children. 
Julia Ann, 
lliiiuiah, 
Ann Eliza, 



Mary, 
Aniieliiia, 
Auirusta, 
VVillet, 
Harriet Amelia, 



June 10, 1852 1708. 
Dec. 8, 1800 • 

1800 In infancy. 

1803 Meh. 27, 1855 1887. Dr. Wriijlit. 

l*^""^ Meh. 2!». 1850,?o Dud- 

ley ("hapinan. 

1800 I),.,.. 12^ jrt88. 

1808 Meh. 18, 1800 1844. 

1^11 1888. 

18l:i Anna Miles. 

1818 Auu. 37, 180!) 1841, to Dr. S. Han 

iiahs. 



282 

288 
284 
285 
380 
287 



William Jarvis, Jan. 12, 1771 April 2, 1«47 
Mara-. HI Mot Amos, Apr. 2, 1708 June 20, 1808 

7 children. 
Jiine Mercer, Feb. 25.1818 Feb. 10,1840 
Geo. William, July 17. 1810 
Charles Mercer, June 14, 1821 Sept. 20. 1822 
Mary Elizabeth, Dec. 32, 1834 
Walter Scott, Meh. 14, 1837 



' Married Maria B- 



Had OIK! son, Homer Sturtcvant. His .second 



Wife was Kbza Crosley. Had one datighler, Maria Eliza 



44 



DK«CKN'I)ANT« OF WIM.IAM — FOt7|ITTI OKNKHATION. 

Died. Married or UumnrkM. 



No. Name. Born. 

2H8 Miirgiiret Kmmn.Fol). 7, 1831» 

28i> Annii. Dec. 0, 18;»2 Mfli. 14. iHSii 

Niithnn Jiirvi.s, Jim. 11), 1778 Aiig, 10. 18«2 1802. 
2fl0 nclsySiindford, Nov. 25, 1782 Sept 18«4 

1 1 cliildrcn. 
2fll Fml'kSaiuUord.Nov. 25, 180;j 



21)2 Mary Ann, 
21)3 Elizabeth, 



Oet. «, 1805 
Sept. 11. 1807 



Sept., 1885, to Nancy 

llubltard. 
Nov. 2. 18U0. toSani'l 

(!lnir('h. 
Apr. 20. 18:}2. to Sol. 

C. Taylor. 



204 Jane Maria, Nov. 28. 1808 Oct. 10, 1807 

205 William Henry, June 0. 1810 Aug. 12, 181!? 

200 E.sther liUn-etia, Feb. 4, 18i:j Deo. 30, 1838, to Wm. 

St. John. 
21)7 Rachel, Jan. 20,1815 Junc2!),1840.to Hrad- 

ley (). Hanks. 
208 William Oliver. Nov. 28, 1810 April25, 1847 April. 1840, to Sarah 

Mitehell. 
200 Catharine, Sept. 12. 1818 

300 John Henry, -Mch. 18, 1821 

301 Charles, Aug. 10, 1820 To Margaret Baker. 



n 



•III! ■: 



88. 

Samuel Farmar 
Jarvis,' Jan. 20,1780 Meh. 20, 1851 July 3, 1810. 

302 Sarah McCurdy 

Hart,' " 1787 Dec. 28, 1803 

children. 

303 John Abram. Mch. 5. 1814 June 2, 1834 Midship. U, S. N. 

d. in Marseilles. 

304 Jeanette Hart, Aug. 10. 1810 

305 Ann Christina 

Farmar. Meh. 18, 1810 

300 Samuel Farmar, Aug. 0, 1823 Dec. 1823 

307 Samuel Farmar, 

2d, Aug. 3, 1825 

808 Sarah Elizabeth 
Marie Antoi- 
nette, June 2, 1827 



m. O. H. I.,oomis. 
Dec. 1845. 

Aug. 25, ia58. 

June 5, 1840. 



' Interred in vault in Trinity church-yard, New York. 
•Interred in Hart plat, Saybrook, Conn. 



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DKSCENDANTR OF WILLIAM — FOUKTIl GENERATION. 



45 



Samuel Farmar Jarvis. 

[Tlic following skefcL of llic life of tbc Rev. Dr. Ssimuel Parmer Jarvis, 
was written for his work '>y tiic Ut. itov. .Tolni Williams, D.I)., IJishopof 
(/'onncclicut, who was the pn])il in lhook"/v of Dr. Jarvis, afterwards iiis 
assistant in the church at Midd'etown, anil his most intimate, loved, and 
trusted friend.] 

Samuel Farmar Jarvis was horn at Middlctown, Connecticut, 
Jan. 20, 1786. He was the second and only surviving son — the 
youngest child — of the Rt. Rev. AVjraharn Jsirvis, the second Bishop 
of Connecticut. At .he time of his birth his father was rector of 
Christ Church, Miildlctowr a position which he held from 1764 to 
179<). 

The early studies of Mr. Jarvis wen^ under his fatlujc's roof and 
instruction. But in 1798 he was put under tlu; care of that distin- 
guished scholar and instructor, Dr. John Bowden, at Cheshire Acad- 
emy. He entered Yale College in 1802, becoming a member of 
the sophomore class, and was graduated with honors in 1805. 

The late Professor nilliman says of him: "I was alisent in Kng- 
land during most of the year (hat he graduat(!d, but I have a dis- 
tinct recollection of him as .\ superior scholar, especial!}' in classical 
literature." And a classmate, Dr. J. M. Whiton, bears similar testi- 
mony. " In all tin departments of learning he was highly respect- 
able, but excelled most in belles-lettres. Tn strength of intellect 
he was p<)8sibly cx-'eeded by sonu; in the c'''ss; in deliciacyof taste, 
in incessant diligence, and patience, of investigation, i»y none." 
Most truly and entirely was " the boy the father of the man." 

He was oi'dained to 'he diaconate l)y his father, in Trinity 
Church, New Haven, Mtv'ch «, 1810, and advanced to the priest- 
hood in the same chu.ch, April f), 181 1. His earliest pai'ochial 
charge was St. Michael's, Bloomingdale, in tlu; diocese of New 
York; this chai'ge was assumed by iiin in the same year in which 
he was ordained to the priesthood, s^nd he held if in conjunction 
with the rectorshii) of St. James's Church — which ho took in 1813 
till May 1810. He resigned this double cure in ordtM- to accept a 
professorship in theCeneral TlHM)logical Seminary, then established 
in the city of New V'ork. Of his occupancy (.1 this professorship 
one has well said, " This jvost he occupied but a short time, but 
those who sat under his instructions at that day, still bear lively 
witness to his ripe scholarship, his entire devotion to the duties of 
his profession, ^ ' • warm sympathies with his ptipils. the dignity 
nn»l gracefulius. of manners which marked his intercourse with 



I A't-i' * 



46 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM FOURTH GENERATION. 



!|ii{ 



all, and which, we may add, he never laid aside, but carried with 
him to the close of his life." 

In 1820 he was called to be the first rector of St. Paul's Church, 
Boston, and here he remained till 1826. Up to the time of his 
going to Boston, the most important of his pvi})li('ations were, a 
sermon on the unity of the church, 1816; a letter to the chiefs of 
the Onondaga Indians, 1817; and a di'^course on the religion of the 
Indian tril)es of North America, 1819. During his residence in 
Boston, he was one of the editors of the Gospel Advocate, established 
in 1821. Among liis many valuable contributions to this periodi- 
cal, liis review of Mi". Wel)ster's oration at I'lymouth deserves 
especial notice. It was one of the earliest attempts to confront tlie 
ruritan romance with the facts of i -.ory. He also published, in 
1822, a sermon on regeneration, which is worthy to rank with 
Waterland's Treatise on that subject. 

In 1826 he resigned his rectorship, and went, witli his fimily, to 
Europe, where he remaincMl nine years, till 1835. It was during 
these years that he collected that noble library which so markedly 
exhibited his exter.sive learning, and thorough knowledge of books, 
'i'lie writer of this sketch well remembers the eager delight with 
which the late (chancellor Kent, (m one occasion, lookel over its 
stores, and the pleasure he oxiiressed on taking into his hands the 
copy of the Theodosian (?ode, used by (iibbou in writing his great 
history. 

Dr. Jarvis — f(jr that title had been deservedly ct)nl'erred on him 
bv the University of Pennsylvania in 1819 — gave most of his time 
in Europe to' study "with a view of qualifying himself more per- 
fectly for works which he had projected for the beiu'dt of the 
C^hurch." 

This did noc, however, withdraw him from ministerial duty when 
the opportunity for it came. He officiated in public services an- 1 
pastoral work in dilTenmt [)laces. And from one congregation, 
esiK>cially, he receivcni as a testimony to his faithful care, a beauti- 
fully wrought paten and chalice, which are now in the possession 
of his son. 

Six years of his stay abroad were sjjent in Italy; and from his 
habits of careful and systematic observation, and the opportunities 
of acquaintance and intercourse with scholars and ecclesiastics, they 
led to a thoiougli and intelligent comprehension of the social and 
religious condition of the continent of Europe. No man of his own 
time was, few men of any time have been, better informed than 




DESCENDANTS OF WlLl.IAM — FOUKTH GENERATION. 



47 



he was in all matters relating to the practical working of the Eiomon 
Church. 

Returning to his native country in 1 835, he at once assunried the 
position of professor of Oriental Ijiterature in Trinity College; padd- 
ing to tlie duties of his professorship the care of two or three stu- 
dents in theology. A sermon on Christian Unity, preached before 
the Board of Missions in 183('), and an address to tlie citizens of 
Hartford on Birthday of Linnieus, in the same year, were liis prin- 
cipal pul)lications during his tenure of office in 'I'rinity t'oUege. 
He was, however, especially in the r(«earchos connected with the 
elaborate and valuable notes Vi the sermon abovc^ numtioned, con- 
tinuing his careful and thorough preparation for his pi'oposcd his- 
torical work. 

In 1837, he resigned his professorshij/, and beiiaine rector of 
Christ Church in his nativ(j town, and in tlie same year received 
from Trinity College the degree of LTi.!). In 1838, iie was 
appointed by the GeniMjd ( 'onvention, liist<iriogra|.,her of the Church, 
and began to bring his previous and |)rcparaiory labors into actual 
shape. lie was, however, so thoroughly conscic^itioas, and enter- 
tained so high a sense of what an author owes to his readers, that 
he could not work rapidly. One who knew him intimately says: 
" I once ventured to e.vpostulate with him on the iinmense hd)or he 
went tiirough with in revei'ifying refen nces. But his reply was, 
that a writer was l)ound, at whatever expense of time and exertion, 
not only to avoid second-hand references, but also to insure abso- 
lute correctness. It was a ccmscience with him ' Sucli pains- 
taking honesty, which spai'es no labor ami shrinks from no burden, 
is not, perhaps, populai'ly esteemed in our day, but it will always 
receive the rev(U'ent honor of the " fit audience though few."' 

"Dr. Jarvis felt that in writing T.k* history of the Church, two 
points demanded his first attention: one, to trace the development 
of the Plan of Redemption previous to the Nativity of Christ- and 
then to ascertain the e.xact dates of His Birth and J)eath." He 
turned his attention first to the second of these topics, and his labors 
resulted in A Chronological Introduction to the History of the 
Church, publishefl in 1845. Wh(>ther the conclusions of this work 
are or are not accepted, no one can fail to rtn-ognisce the amount of 
laborious research and the exten<hMl learning which it exhibits. 
It has been said that when, on its reception in the mother country, 
the question was asked, at O.'iford, " Who shall review it? " one 
who had been examining it replied, '■ There are but two men in 
England who are capable of reviewing it." 




48 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM FOUHTir GENERATION. 



y 1 'ii 



Several years before the publication of this volume — in 1842 — 
Dr. Jarvis had resigned the rectorship of the parish in Middletown. 

He spoke of "domestic calamities"' as the chief cause of his 
resignation. Of these no more nee' here be said — though so 
much could be said — than that in the investigation which grew 
out of them, the truly high-minded and honorable chairman of the 
investigating committee declared that ''lie had never known a 
public man pass through such an onh^al so perfectly unscathed." 

His release from pniochial charge did not, however, leave 
Dr. Jarvis free to proseiiute his liistori(;al lal'ors without interrup- 
tion. There were calls made upon him in various directions, and 
. tliose calls involved loss of time in answering them. 

He was a trustee of Trinity College, and of the General Theo- 
logical Seminary; secretary and treasurer of the Christian Knowl- 
edge Society; a member and seci'etary of the Standing Com- 
mittee of Conuecticiu; and a deputy from ^hai. Diocese to the 
General Conventions of 1844, 1847, and 1850. 

Then, his easiness of access, and tlui leadiness with which he 
responded to all calls upon his time and pen, led to man}- other 
interruptions of his labors. '' Now he was called ofF to write a 
book or a pamphlet on the Roman controversy; now to prepare a 
sermon on some specially important topic; and con', inually to reply 
to letters asking advice or information, in doing which he was 
obliged to enter on laborious researches, and to ^am up results in 
an elaborate way." During the }i(U'iod now und(>r review, besides 
sermons printed in this country and in l^higland, . he published 
Discoui'ses on Prophecy, with an Appendix, being a refutation of 
Millerism, 1843; No Union with Rome, 1843; an edition of 
Dr. Hartwell Home's Mariolatry, 1844; A Synoptical Table of 
Egyptian and Sacred History^ 1846; The Colonies of Heaven, a 
Convention Sermon, 1846; A Reply to Miluer's End of Contro- 
versy, 1847; and A Voice from Connecticut, occasioned by the 
late Pastoral Letter of the Bishop of North Carolina, 1849. And 
all this while his great work was going on, so that Vol. 1 of Ids 
proposed History — The Church of the Redeemed — was published 
in 1850. 

Nor was this all. Scarcely " had he resigned his charge m 
Middletown when he began to do missionary duty at a small sta- 
tion which he himself established in the neighborhood. This he 
continued to serve, with only interruptions occasioned by his neces- 
sary absences, till withiu a few months of his death. For some 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM — FOURTH GENERATION. 



49 



I US 



Ista- 
he 

l)ine 



years, he usually walked the distance between his liome and this 
station — several miles — undeterred by weather or any other cause." 

This life of untiring industry and conscientious labor went on, 
with no continuous interruption but that of a visit to England in 
1844, until 1850. In the autumn of that year, symptoms of dis- 
ease began to manifest themselves. No treatment succeeded in 
removing them, and he died at Middletown, March 26, 18.^)1. 

One who was his pupil, and who was honored with his friend- 
ship, has written words whi(;h shall close this brief sketcli of a 
useful, faitliful, and lionored life. 

"As a preacher, Dr. Jarvis was remarkable for tlie clear and 
elegant style in which he set forth weighty truths. Few men ever 
wrote purer English. None ever put more matter into their ser- 
mons. Ilis manner in the pulpit was grave and dignificHl. He 
used but little gesture, though tlie tones of his voice were earnest 
and solemn. 

"Any one meeting Di-. Jarvis, in any comj)any, would mark him 
at once as an ecclesiastic and a scholar, and would be attractiKl l)y 
his courteous and even courtly bearing. Intercourse and famil- 
iarity 2>resen((!d hiiu as one of tlu* most transparent and guileless 
of men. And notwithstanding the bitter trials through wluch he 
passed, and the harsh lessons which he learned of the danger of 
relying on anything human, he retained these characteristics to the 
last. ' I would rather,' he once said in a letter to me, 'be deceived 
cv(!ry hou)- of every day, than to live in such a state of suspicion 

and distrust of everybody as does.' It was honest sincerity of 

I'eart and purpose, anticipating that in othei's of which it was con- 
scious in itself, and this was accompanied with a most complete 
submission to and faith in tlio will and wisdom of God. T had 
once written to him to the effect that he seemed to have attained 
entire trust in God's overruHng care. ' Not entire,' was his reply, 
' for then I should not only be submissive, but should not even feel 
anxious: this I have ni')t reached.' 

"It wa? I'ly privilege to l)e with him almost constantly during 
the clovsing scenes of his life, and they have left with me a memory 
wh.ich can never [lass an'ay. Sucli details are too sacred to be 
lightly touched for tver)' e}e, or s))oken in every (^ar. The last 
Communion, when his children and his pupils knelt around liis 
bed, and when every word uf prayer and praise came full from 
his wasted lips, was a service froin which it seemed hard to come 
back to the ordinary things of life. And it. was easy here, as at 



50 



DESCENDANTS OP WILLIAM — FOURTH GENERATION. 



all other times, to see his hopes and comforts were found only in 
the Merits and the Blood of Him whose servan. and minister he 



was. 



Dr. Jarvis was married, July 3, 1810, to Sarah McCurdy, 
daughter of Elisha Hart, Esq., of Saybrook. Six children were 
the issue of this marriage. 

OO. 



No. Name. 




Born. 


Died. 


Married or ReranrkB 


Noiih Jurvis, ' 


July 


32, 1708 


Auf?. 11, 1843 


Mch. 17, 1791. 


310 Elizabeth White, Dec. 


13, 1770 


July 15, 1840 




9 chihlron. 










311 Kli/.ab(!i,h. 


Mch. 


8, 17C3 




Mch. 28. 1811. 


313 lluklah, 


Apr. 


9, 1794 


Sept. 18, 1837 


May 18, 181(i. 


313 James, 


Apr. 


31, 1796 


Feb. 3, 1844 




314 Le(}nui(l, 


June 


17, 1797 


Apr. 9, 1835 




315 Julia Ann, 


Dee. 


14, 1799 


Mch. 19, 1878 

• 


Mcli. " 1869. 
Thomas B(!sant 


316 Mary Estlier, 


Sei)t. 


3, 1803 


Jan. 34, 1861 




317 Elijah AHuirt, 


Oct. 


6, 1804 


Juno 5, 18(i4 




318 Gcorjfc, 


8ept. 


n, 1808 


Jan. 7, 1835 




319 Chas. Ahrahani 


.Oct. 


36. 1810 


Nov. 33, 1866 








NoAii Jarvis 





Was born in Norwalk, Conn., July 22, 1768. 

His noble qualities of mind and heart, conspicuous in his domes- 
tic relations, could only be realized by an inmate of his family. 
In that charmed circle ho was ever the kind and tlevoted husband, 
the alfectionate father, the guide and protector of his children, 
beloved and venerated by them all. Of a cheerful and genial dis- 
position, the youngest child could approach him, as.sured of his 
parental kindness and sympathy, wliile his pure example and 
unaffcjcted dignity of dt^portment su{)i)ressed all undue familiarity. 

Gifted with line; conversational powers, he had a keen accuse of 
wit and humor, and was the very soul of that inno(!ent conviviality 
that sheds such a cheerful influence and lustre over the endear- 
ments of home. Although dignilied in his manner, affable and 
courteous to an eminent degree, he enjoyed a joke immensely. 
He was a true-hearted American, and loved the land of his birtli, 
the glorious land of Washington. His cousin. Colonel Stephc^i 
Jarvis, was a staunch Royalist, and after seven years' service in the 
King's army, had taken up his x'esidence in Canada. They f re- 



1 See Sketch No. 69. 



tnes- 

iiily. 

aiui, 

.Iren, 

,1 dis- 

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and 
u-ity. 
si^ of 
iahty 
ulcar- 

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l)irth, 

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DESCKNDANTB OK WILLIAM — FOUKTH OENKHATION. 



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quontly mot, but novor without an interchango of Htmtimont in 
regard to country and political pniforcnce. Thoir criminationH and 
recriininatioim wore aH good-natured as they wore oarneat, and the 
laug]i around the doinostic circle was loud and hearty at the 
rattling roniarks and jokes made at the oxponso of oacli other. 

About tli(i year 1H2(), the Colonel visited his "rebel" cousin, 
Noali, iind Miey had a very inten;ating time; but notwithstanding 
all this happiness at again meeting i^ach other, the old 8u])ject was 
revived and the wordy feud went on with the same earnestness 
and good nature as ever. 

It was in the <!ai'ly morning, the old topic in the ascf^ndant, when 
Noah, anticipating the I'iiig <>( the breakfast-bell, askcMl the Cohjiiel 
if he ever took a morning bitter. Tim (-olonel replied that he did 
occasionally, but not as a regular thing, lie would, however, on 
this particular occasi(jii be gratified to join his cousin in a friendly 
lilmtion. Noah led him into his parlor, where he had, hanging 
between the. windows, (ilcgantly framed and in large, bold type, 
"The Dkci.ahation ok Indki-kndkncik,." lie pcnnti.'d it out to the 
Colonel, saying as he ilid so, "Then*, my royal (tousiii, I think, is 
a dram bitter enough for you.'" The Coloiiel looked at it, retorting 
good-naturedly, ''llii! ha! that's it, is it, you rebel?" The dram 
was, indeed, hi/In- enough for the palate of his royal cousin. 

Again, in the summer of IS24. the ("olonel, still alive to his old 
and darling subject, wrote to his " n^bel " cousin a letter, in which 
he said in a bold hand, "'i'his is the birthday of my royal master. 
King (reoi'ge the Third," giving tin* date, also, of the reign of his 
rcigal majesty, and adding some very laudatory remarks of the 
ruling monarch. Noah waitcid to reply until the following 25th of 
November, when he wrote to his rovalist cousin as follows: "This 
is the return of that glorious day when the infernal lobster-backs 
left this city and country, thank (iod, never to return!" And 
thus went on this pleasant warfan* until 1840, when the good old 
Colonel "was gathered to his fathers." 

It is indeed pleasant to review the character of ^uv\\ a man as 
the subject of our present memoir, a man so universally beloved 
and respected, one who, through the changing scenes of a busy 
life, and fluctuations of trade and commercial interests, never 
varied from the strictest ruU^s of honesty and integrity. He was 
a man of fine literary attainments and cultivated taste, and enjoyed 
the society of men of culture and refinement. He was a sincere 
and faithful friend, over ready to help the deserving. 




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Soon after he became a resident of New York, he was the 
trustee, friend, and adviser of the Patroon of Albany, General 
Stephen Van Rensselaer, and managed his large estate, scattered 
throughout the different wards of the city. He also took charge 
of other estates, among which were those of Gov. Morgan Lewis, 
and the Hon. Robert Kennedy of England. 

About the year 1811 he received the appointment of Collector 
of Assessments, and held the office 1 7 years. He collected milhons 
of money with such fidelity that, on the resignation of his office 
and final adjustment of his accounts, the Board of Aldermen, 
through an appointed committee, resolved to cancel the bonds that 
had been given from time to time by Mr. Jarvis, stating "that 
having been debited with the whole amount of every assessment 
placed in his hands, he has jjO'id over and accounted for every cent of 
the samej'^ They did this to show their perfect satisfaction with his 
management of public affairs and as an indorsement of his unwav- 
ering integrity. 

The following extract from a letter of a relative of Mr. Jarvis 
is a graceful tribute of respect to his uncle: "1 well remember 
uncle Noah, whom I have always considered as my second father, 
the best friend I ever had, and how gratified he was with the act 
of the corporation regarding his bonds. 1 cherish a grateful 
remembrance of his partial adoption of me, his starting me in 
business, his judicious advice and his continued assistance until I 
was able to take care of myself." 

In this connection, it is pleasant to recall the sterling honesty 
and integrity of his son, Charles A. Jarvis, who, in his business 
relations, strongly resembled his father. Left sole executor through 
the death of the two seniors, he carried out the spirit of his father's 
will to the letter, never deviating through all the fluctuations of 
his own business, nor touching a dollar through all the commercial 
crises that were so often trying the merchant and the trader. 
Indeed, by his careful management investments were more than 
doubled in amount and value. 

Mr. Noah Jarvis died in 1842, bequeathing to his relatives the 
richest of all legacies, a good name and an unsullied reputation. 



Ai 



No. Name. Born. 

Elijah Jarvis, Mch. 18, 1772 
320 Betsy Chapman, Mch. 24, 1772 
2 children. 



OS. 

Died. Married or Keraurka. 

Oct. 5, 1801 ^ Buried in Poplar 
Oct. 12, 1801 ( Plains, Westport, Ct. 



>-..'i w i a a & iai i » « ^rf „; 



B 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM FOURTH GENERATION. 63 

No. Name. Born. Bied. Married or Remarks. 

321 Elizabeth, 1798 

332 Nelson Jarvis, Aug. 15, 1800 Jan. 8, 1863 Sept. 8, 1823. 

Nov. 25, 1835. 
03. 

Stephen Jarvis, Nov. 13, 1774 Oct. 26, 1825 Oct. 20, 1803 

323 Mary Ann 

Atwater, July 14, 1779 Aug. 29, 1858 

11 children. 

324 George Atwater, Oct. 20, 1804 Oct. 10, 1805 

325 Geo. Atwater,2d,Mch. 9, 1806 

326 Mary Ann, Sept. 4, 1809 

327 Hezekiali Nasli, Mch. 9, 1811 Oct. 19, 1814 

328 Benj. Atwater, Feb. 11,1813 ' Dec. 7,1847 

329 Caroline Eliz'h, Dec. 28, 1814 Jan. 19, 1840 

330 Sarah Maria, Feb. 3, 1817 .Jan. 14 1841 

331 Eunice Amelia, Jan. 24, 1819 
333 Harriet Augusta, Jan. 21,1821 

333 Hez. Nash, 2d, Mch. 24, 1833 Nov. 16, 1852 

• Dec. 28, 1872. 

334 Stephen, Jan. 18, 182(5 Aug. 18, 1836 

Stephen Jarvis, 

Son of Hezekiah Jarvis. was born in Norwalk, Connecticut 
November 13, J 774. 

Early in life he removed to Cheshire, where he worked at his 
trade, which was that of a carpenter and cabinet-maker. 

On the 20th October, 1803, he married Mary Ann Atwater, with 
whom he lived most liappily daring the remainder of his life and 
who bore him a numerous family of children. He was a worthy 
and prominent man in the town, and was often chosen to places of 
trust, which he filled successfully, and with unwavering fidelity. 

In 1813, he purchased of the Rev. Samuel Fannar Jarvis, D D 
LL.D., the dwelling of the late Bishop Jarvis. In this house were 
passed many pleasant years a.nong his children, cheerful relatives 
and friends, and in this venerable dwelling the good man sank to 
rest, believing and trusting in a higher and a better life. To those 
who survive, there is not only a sad, but pleasing satisfaction in 
recalhng the memories that cluster around this cherished old 1 ome- 
.3tead. 

Mr. Jarvis was devoted to the doctrines and services of the Epis- 
copal Church, in which he was educated. 

He was often a delegate to the Diocesan Convention, and was 



^ ■ 







64 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM FOURTH GENERATION. 



for many years, Warden and Treasurer of St. Peter's Church,. 
Cheshire. A kind and affectionate husband and father, a firm and 
steadfast friend, a wise counselor, and an honorable man, he 
trul} exemplified the saying, "An honest man's the noblest work 
of God." 



oo. 



No. Name. 

Samuel Jarvi.s, 
835 Huldah White, 
8 children. 

336 Sarah Ann, 

337 Mary, 



Born. 
Oct. 9, 1779 
July 6, 1785 

June 21, 1805 
Sept. 14, 1808 



Oct. 
Feb. 



Died. Married or Remarks. 

29, 1857 Sept. 2, 1804. 



338 Elizabeth, Nov. 15, 1811 

339 Catharine Amel.Apr. 1813 

340 James White, 1817 

341 Frances Iluldah.Sept. 27, 1819 

342 Harriet Rebec'a, Dec. 1. 1823 

343 Maria, Apr. 14, 1826 



Jan. 23, 1854 



July 28, 1834 
July, 1819 
May, 1832 
Dec. 15,'l835 
June 21, 1826 



May 17, 1825. 

Apr. 5, 1831, to Henry 

J, Sanford. 
Nov. 29, 1838. 
Sept. 1, 1833. 



Samuel Jarvis, 

Son of the late Hezekiah Jarvis, was born Oct. 9, 1779, and died 
Oct. 29, IS.'iY. He was a man of quiet and retiring habits, but 
with excellent business capacity. He was a merchant tailor, and 
his store was, for many years, on the ground on which the Custom 
House now stands, in Wall street, New York. 

Ml'. Jarvis was most exemplary in his domestic duties, a good 
husband, a kind father, and a pleasant neighbor. He was a thor- 
ough Episcopalian, and, for many years, a member, communicant, 
and vestryman oi Zion Church, New York. 



Charles Jarvis, Mcli. 28, 1785 Nov. 5, 1846 Apr. 12, 1808. 
344 Sarah Ann Whit- 



lock, 

6 children. 
345 Abraham, 

846 Henry W., 

847 Henriettas., 

348 William, 

349 Sarah A, 

350 Samuel, 



May 30, 1790 July 1, 1859 

Jan. 28, 1809 
I Dec. 9, 1811 Twins. 

) Dec. 9, 1811 Feb. 22, 1877 Apr. 18, 1830. 

Jan. 30, 1813 May 26, 1846. 

Nov. 1, 1814 Nov. 14, 1814 

June 12, 1818 May 2, 1833 



If 



•ch, 

md 

he 

3rk 



nry 



led 

)Ut 

nd 



)m 



od 

or- 
nt, 



? 



f > 



I 



-Hl^l^^j^^ 




hu/krC /^^//^^-^^ ' 




/ 1 (ca n ^ j^ /-^^ 



■ 



■■I 






.ell. 



i^Dfl. 




I J 



i : 



*i I 



! 




/y /////////. Y^ 








■l/l^rt^^^ 



DESCENDANTS OP WILL.AM-POURTH OENEKAT.ON. 55 

103. 

No. Name. ^-. _, , 

Bcv.Wn,.J„vi.,F„„. .9, ,™a 0«. Tw7I Z'^^'SX 

351 Elizabeth Miller "'^''**'P Brownell. 

Hart, j„„e 22, 1798 

9 children. 

352 Elizabeth Hart, Oet. 5 1826 

353 Hetty Hart, Feb. as', 1838 

354 Richard Win. 

^'"■'■'^' Nov. 30, 1839 

3ooFramcH Amelia, July 30, 1831 Mch. 1,1843 
ooo i< rederica 

'?57-'^"T'''"' ^^'- "^'^^^3 ^^t- 2.1841 

307 iii.;'i-v Loui.sa. Jan. 8, 1835 

358 John Samuel. May «. 1837 July 37, 1866 
^CO^in r*'"'' t""- ''^'^'^ June 11. 1842 



J'Jne 5, 1850. 
Dec. 5, 1807. 



Sept. 30, 1855. 



Rkv. William Jakvis 
Was b„,-„ at Ncrwalk, C'onnectict, on 0,e 2iltl, of February 1796 

Hb birMulay be,„« on tl,o 2!)tl, of February, and it being lean Sc 

Mr.Jarv,, was eight years old before he h*l one of ftcse faWi 

ays, and had bnt seventeen in all. He died on the 3d of olbt 

18V1, aged >5 yoai-s and seven months -"-looc, 

".'"wStrf'lf""" "7T """" «^l'""<'y. "d-ghter of 

™on.rthLp:^„r^"^ 

15a~wHi ,^.'«';"°"«"-'" M'J-vis was, at the tin,e of her 
•w.^re,:;'';;;;,!''"- ■■-'''- ^"■*'"'" »» — iOower 

moTheTorM*"""; '"'"•»""« '^'•'» i" --egard to Mrs. Whitney the 
gTndchM^'-f'r': I"f "" ""■»"'" ^^ "-■ -ly^-vi ing 

Wndne s and refpeTr^ *"""? 'T'"' '"' """ '"" ''™'-' 
.., a dManee ^r-^^^^^^^ '" ^'™- 



rsae 



b6 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM — FOURTH GENERATION. 





\ ; 


I 


I 1 








i 


' 






m 


^^^^^^^J| 



the energetic old lady would declare her intention to walk, 
saying whore duty dictated, the Lord would provide a way. And 
so it often {)roved, for slie would hardly get started before some 
neighbor or friendly traveler would a-ssist her to the place in which 
her soul delighted. 

Bishop Jarvis and Mr. Hezekiah Jarvis were brothers, and tlie 
Bishop's son, the Rev. Dr. Samuel Farinar Jarvis, offered to fit his 
young cousin, "William, for college, who was, for some time, an 
inmate of the Doctor's family, and who had decided to devote him- 
self, as soon as his studies were completed, to the ministry of the 
Church. 

The friendship between these two cousins was deep, true, and 
lasting, and when sorrow and embarrassment overtook the Doctor 
in tiie latter part of his liffi, the love of his cousin William proved 
a precious boon to his wounded spirit. 

Mr. Jarvis was graduated at Union Collcsge, and afterwards pur- 
sued his theological studies at New Haven, Conn. In August, 
1822, he was ordained deacon at Norwalk, by the late Bishop 
Brownell, and, (m the .')th of November of the following year, was 
ordained priest, also by him, at East Haddam, at which place, and 
Hebron, he ministered for some time. 

While at Hebnm'he won the affection and friendship of Dr. 
Peters, who was also Governor of the State, and this friendship 
continued uiuibated until death sei)arated them. 

During Mr. Jarvis's ministry at Hebron, a church was erected, 
which was then considered one of the handsomest rural churches in 
the diocese. This church was altered and repaired only a few 
months before his death, and it was a great pleasure to him to 
prove to his old parishioners that he still remembered them with 
affection, by presenting to the i^arish a font of Ohio stone, com- 
memorative of his rectorship from 1821 to 1826. 

Mr. Jarvis was married by the Rt. Rev. Bishop Brownell, in 
December, J 825, to Miss Elizabeth Miller Hart, eldest daughter of 
Major Richard William and Mrs. Elizabeth Hart of Saybrook, 
Connecticut, a marriage which resulted in great and lifelong happi- 
ness. 

From Hebron, Mr. Jarvis removed to Chatham, now Portland, 
Conn., where he continued rector of Trinity Church until disabled 
by a severe bronchitis, induced by undue exercise of his voice wliile 
suffering from whooping cough. For months he couhl only speak 
in a whisper, and for years suffered great pain and discomfort. He 



DKHCKNDANTS OK WILMAM — FOUUTII (»KNEKATION. 



i7 



was at last reluctantly coinpolUid to give up all hope of doing ofTicial 
work again, and resigned lii.s parish. 

IIo was succeeded by the Elev. Samuel Emory, who was, for some 
time, a memljor of his family. 

Mr. Jarvis retin^d from tlio ministry, soro as was the trial, and 
devot(Hl hiniHclf to his home and family. Ho was surrounded l)y 
fritiuds, and tliose, with an iuUiresting domestic circle, made his life 
cheerful and hajjjiy. 'I'hcro were (ivo daughters and four sons, and 
as in every picture there uuist bo shadows, so in this beautiful and 
sunny group the dark shadow of death entered, and cast a gloom 
around tlio happv fin'side. Four of these cliildren were swept 
away almost siinulttiiieously by that terrible scourge, scarhit fever. 

Mr. Jarvis continued to reside in Portland until ISfj'i, when he 
removed to Middhitown, where he remained until after the marriage 
of his eldest daughter to ('ol. Samuel Colt of Hartford, Connecti- 
cut, when he made; that city his homo. 

" As a preacher, Mr. .larvis was ftu-vent and impn^ssive, both liis 
voice and dc^livery being good; as a pastor, he was distinguished 
for (idelity ami devotion; as a friend, ho was faithful and generous, 
and as a husband, kind, wise, and affectionate." 

In July, 18G(5, the family of Mr. Jarvis were again alTlictcid by the 
death of his youngest son, John Sanuml, named after his tried 
friend, (Jov. Peters. He had just completed his '2!)th year, leaving 
a widow and two young daugliters. 

But Mr. Jarvis's life was drawing to a chise. Afflicted with a 
painful disease, he often suffered intensely, but, with a trusting 
faith, lie resigned himself to the will of his Heavenly B'ather, await- 
ing the hour when he should be with his loved ones who had gone 
before. Conscious that his (md was approaching, he bade farewell 
to his beloved wife, his children and grandchildren, aiid to his 
cherished friends, whom he had loved so long and well, And tlum 
his spirit passed away to a bright and glorious immortality. 

"So He giveth His beloved sleep." E. II. C. 



io*->. 



No. Name. Bom. 

Daniel Jarvis, Mch. 29, 1760 
301 Deborah Rogers. 

7 children. 
3C2 Zophar. 

363 Henrietta, 

364 Piatt. 

8 



Died. 



Married or R(«iuark». 
Jan. 31. 1781. 



Daniel Secard. 



: t 



S8 

No. 

nm 

307 



Name. 
Htcphcn. 
IUkhIii, 
Mftry. 



nEBORNDANTH OK WIM.IAM — KIKTII (IKNKUATION. 

Morn. Diud. Marriod or KumarkH. 

17»() 



308 llunniili, 



Hteplien JiirviH, 
5 children. 
800 Mobitiibcl. 
370 Henry. 

871 Etlinnml, 

872 Iliuniiih. 
373 Abiithii. 



1 1 1 



1783 



1800 



1 11>. 



874 
375 
370 

377 
878 
379 



Ebeucz'r .Iiirvis, May 10, 1782 

c'hiUlrcn. 
Mos(«8, Oct. 1(), 1800 

Sarah, Aug. 18, 1810 

Ebcnezer, Dec. 12, 1813 



lantha, 

Marietta, 

Jerusha, 



1815 
Feb. 14, 1819 
Oct. 14, 1832 



IK3(I iHaiah Hcutlder. 

Dfc. 31. 1817. .lanit'H 

Smith. 
Doc. 80, 1819, Tred 

well Oarl. 



18i:i 



1870 



1833 



Frances Hannah A. 
Kehsey. lch.,Kuth. 



Israel Jarvis, 

380 Bethsheba Rogers, 

Children. 

381 Benjanun. 

382 Mary. 
883 Ichabod. 

384 Israel. 

385 Cynthia. 
380 Jane. 



l«-4. 



Oet. 11, 1800. 



; 



( 



5th Generation. 

13S. 

No. Name. Born. Died. 

Ralph Munson 
Jarvis, Dec. 27, 1770 Nov. 3, 1853 



Married or Remarks. 




DR8CENDANTS OF WTLMAM FIFTH OENKRATION. 



69 



No. Name. 
887 CaroHiio Leon- 
ard, ' 
18 children. 

Ooo. Soyniour, Juno 

R(\\v. Lutwich, Aug. 

Froderick, Apr. 

(■Imrlcs Hiilph, Dec. 

Iloniy .Ijinios, 

Caroline, 

Mary, 

(JiiHt. Hat<liford,Sopt 

Surali Maria, Mch. 

Amelia Jane, Jan. 

Matilda, Dec. 

Anno, Sept. 

Elizal). Arnold, Oct. 



888 
880 
800 
801 
802 
808 
804 

•.m 
imi 

807 
808 
800 

4m 



^"- I»od. Married or Rumarke. 

Oct. 24, 1782 Oct. 8, 1854 

Sept. IS, 1820. 



Aug. 
May 
Oct. 



2, tHOO 

10, 1H07 

8, 1810 

27, 1811 

7, 1812 

18, 1818 

4, 1815 

.12, 181(1 

14, 1818 

1, 1820 

7, 1821 

27, 182;j 

20, 1824 



Sept. 8, 1878 
July 28. I8ia 

Cecilia Martin. 
Aug. 80, 180;{ 

Oct. 2, 1H55 Sei)t. 1830 
Oct. 4, 1815 



Feb. 22, 1807 
Sept. 10, 1H88 
Sept. 27, 1828 



June 28, 1840. 



Mary Jarvis, 
401 Robert llazeh, 
1 child. 



130. 



403 Robert Fraser, Apr. 10, 1803 Apr. 25, 1874 



Ool. commanding II. 
M. GOth Rifle Reg't. 



.no ?"'"!'"" •'"'■''''' ^ ''^^ ^P""- =59, 1856 

403 Carolme Boyd. 

1 child. 

404 Wm. Munson, Oct. 0, \8m 

SnsSx Vale w'^n ^^"^ '^''^ '^-^''^--f the Uon. G^org^L;;;;^ of 
Sussex \ ale. New Rrunsvvick. <;,.prge Leonar.l was a direct descendant 
of IIon,T Leonard, eldest son of Riel.anl Leonard, Lord D . • e H^ " 
Leonard ,.,une to An.erica in 1020. Not returning befor 1 is f", "s 
cath, the t.tle desoen.led to his brother Franeis. Thtn.as, son of F a • L 
^ ho succeeded to the titl.-. was afterwards created Earl of Surrey A^. 

d ^nd w.'" T T- 'r''' ^"'"^•' ^^'"'^'^^ '•" New nrun.swK,k • 
178.3, and was nnu'l, employed in public affairs. The year of his arrivn 
he ...s ...pointed one of the Agents of the Governnn.n t l^^C^ 
gnmtcd to Loyalists, and was, soon after. n.a,lc a Men.ber of the Co, ud 

1826 at an old age. ILs consort, Sarah. ,n-eceded him one year asred 81 
H M lufh. •!■ \ "'' ^""' ^'"'""'^l R^^l'cn Leonard of 




J 




60 



DESCENDANTS OF WILt.IAM — FIFTH GENERATION. 



13«. 



Born. 



1788 



No. Name. 

Edward Jarvis.i 

405 Anua Maria 

Boyd, 

8 children. 

406 Edward, Mcli. 15, 1819 

407 Edw. W. Boyd, Apr. 25, 1880 

408 Mary Jane, Sopt. 8, 1831 

409 Munson, May 15, 183:3 

410 H. Fitz Gerald, May 20, 1825 

411 W.G.Townscnd.May 20, 1837 

413 Anna Maria, Aug. 30, 1829 
4U Caro. Amelia, Feb. 22, 1831 

2d wife. 

414 Elizabeth Gray, 

3 children. 

415 Edw'd Worrell, Jan. 20, 1840 

416 Eliz. Harriett, Sept. 6, 1847 



Died. 

May 9, 1853 



Married or Rcmiirk?. 



Aug. 28, 1841 Apr. 20, 1817. 



Apr. 20, 1819 
July SO, 1821 
Meh. 34, 1848 



Nov. 2, 1808 
Aug. 21, 1830 



Sept. 6, 1847 



Sept. 5, 1843. 
Sept. 80, 1858, 

Sept. 10, 1853. 



140. 



i 



I' P 



Polly M. M. Jar- 
vis, 

417 John B. P.ters 

9 children. 

418 Mary Elizabeth, 

419 Harriet Emma 

Albert ina, 

420 Samu(!l Jarvis, 

421 Mary Elizabeth, 

422 Sally Hannah, 

423 Wm. Birdsy, 

424 Albert Jarvis, 

425 Harr't Augusta, 

426 Hugh Albert, 



Dec. 29, 1772 



June 26, 1791 



May 7, 1796. 



1801 Died York, U. C. 



Feb. 11, 1799 


Born in U. C. 


.July 3i. 1801 




Aug. 22, 1803 




1805 




June 22. 1807 


Died in New Orleans 


Dec. 1, 180i. 


1811 In U. Canada. 


Aug. 35, 1810 




1813 





ir;o. 



Ma.ia Lavinia 
Jarvis, Dec. 31, 1788 May 13, 1826 Aug. 3, 1811. 

437 Geo. Hamilton. 

8 children. 
428 Robert Tarvis, May 18, 1813 Nov. 19, 1838. 

Apr. 15, 1851. 



* Edward Jarvis was formerly a member of the Council of New Bruns- 
wick; was Chief Justice of Prince p]dward's Island; he died ut Spring 
Park in tliat Province, in 1853, aged sixty five years, universally respected 
for his upright character as a jurist, and for the urbanity of his manners. 



I 



. 1 u 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM — FIFTH GENERATION. 

?«; ., ';^T^\ ■^°™' ^'«^- Married or ReinarkB. 

429 Oath ine Han'h, May 23, 1814 Sept. 25, 1815 

430 Samuel Askin, Aug. 17, 1817 

431 Maria Lavinia, Sept. 15, 1818 May 21, 1840. 

432 George, Feb. 9, 1822 1841 

433 Augusta Han'h, July 17, 1824 Sept. 28, 1827 

434 Catharine, Mch. 15, 1826 1842. 

435 Augusta Caro.. junc 17, 1857. 

Augusta Jarvis, Oct. 11, 1790 Mc;h. 21, 1848 May 5 1812 

436 Thomas JlcCor- 

mick. , . 
9 (children. 

437 Thomas David, Feb. 14, 1813 1855 Mary Read. 

438 Chas. William, Dec. 30, 1814 

439 Marg. Augusta, Nov. 10, 1816 Feb. 21, 1872 

440 Hannah, Nov. 28, 1818 

441 Mary Elizab'th, Oct. 19, 1821 Jan. 14, 1848. 

442 William, May 24, 1823 Nov. 25, 1835 

443 T. Frances, Aug. G, 1825 1875 Sept. 17, 1855, 

William Griffln. 

444 Samuel Peters, Apr. 15, 1828 

445 George Diehl, Oct. 4, 1836 



61 



Samuel Pet(a's 

Jarvis, Nov. 15, 1792 Sept. 6, 1857 Oct. ], 1818 

446 Mary Boyles 

Powell. 
9 children. 

447 Samuel Peters, Aug. 23, 1820 Feb. 18, 1850. Rene6 

448 William Dum- Wilson. 

mer Powell, Dec. 17, 1821 Jan. 15, 1859 

449 George Murray, Apr. 13, 1824 Ju,u, 23, I84(j, Eliza- 
.^^ . l»(;tli Arnold Jarvis. 
4o0 Ann E:ien, Oct. 30. 1«35 Oct. 12, 1802 Aug. 25, 1846 

451 Emily Elizab'h, Apr. 13, 1837 June 24, 1854, Sidney 

B. Fan\;i, R. Eng. 

452 Charles EdwM, Oct. 25, 1838 Sept. 32, 1839 

453 Charlotte Aug., Apr. 1,1830 May 3,1841 

454 Mary Caroline, Mch. 27, 1833 

455 Charles Fred'k, June 11, 1834 Mch. 17, 1871 Mary Ann Graham. 

Samuel Peteks Jabvis 

Was educated at Cornwall, Upper Canada, by the late Dr. Stra- 
chari, afterwards Bishop of Toronto. H(! .studied law and practiced 



'! 



gjggg 



62 



DESCENDANTS OB" WILLIAM — FIFTH GENERATION. 






his profession for many years; he afterwards performed the duties 
of his father's office as Secretary of the Province; was Clerk of 
the Crown in Chancery, and Chief Superintendent of Indian 
Affairs (an Imperial appointment). Ho served during the war of 
1812-13-14; was present at the battles of Queenstown Heights, 
Lundy's Lane, Stony Creek, and Detroit, for which latter he 
received a medal and clasp; was present at the death of General 
Brock, and commanded the guard who escorted the late General 
Winfield Scott as a prisoner of war from Queenstown to Fort 
Niagara. During the rebellion of 1837-8 he raised and com- 
manded the regiment known as the Queen's Rangers; was present 
at the cutting out of the steamer Caroline at Schlosser; was Com- 
mandant of the garrison at Toronto, and Judge-Advocate of the 
court-martial assembled to try the American prisoner. General 
Sutherland, who attempted to commit suicide while confined in the 
old fort at Toronto. 

Mrs. Samuel Peters Jarvis was the daughter of the late Hon. 
William Dunimer Powell, Chief Justice of Upper Canada, and 
Speaker of the Legislative Council. 



IMt 



ii 






S*MUEL Peters Jarvis, Jr., 

Was educated at Upper Canada College, Toronto. He studied 
law in 1845, and entered the army as an Ensign in the Royal 
Canadian Rifle Regiment, soon after which he exchanged into the 
8'2d Regiment, then stationed at Halifax, N. S. I le served in the 
82d during the Indian Mutiny, 1857-9; was in temporary com- 
mand of three companies of his regiment during the relief of Lu(;k- 
now by Lord Clyde; was present at the defeat of the Gwalior 
Contingent at Cawnpore on 6th December, action of "Khoda- 
gurge," and occupation of " Fultihghur," capture of "Bareiliy," 
relief of •'Shahjehanpoor" Jail, and action of " Khankeor." For 
this service, he received brevet rank of Major, medal and clasps. 
He was, for several years after his return to England, Adjutant of the 
Staff College at Sandhurst. He retired fi'om the service as Major 
of the 82d regiment to accept tl:e appointment as Assistant Adju- 
tant-General of Militia in Canada, with the rank of Lieut.-Coionc^l 
in the British Army. When the troubles broke out in the new 
province of Manitol)a, he was a])pointed to the v^omma'id of the 
Ontario Battalion, which, with the Quebec Battalion and a portion 
of the Rifle Brigade, proceeded to Fort Garry, the whole force 



DE8CKNDANT8 OF \VI 1,1,1 AM — FIFTH OENKJIATION. 



63 



under tlie command of Colonel (now Gencsral) Sir Garnet Wolseley. 
Soon after the return of the rcguhii" troops, Lieut.-Colonel Jarvis 
was made Commandant of the garrison at Fort Garry, where 
he remained until the withdrawal by the Canadian Government of 
the troops from that province. ?'or this service, ho was created, by 
Her Majesty the Queon, a Companion of the Order of St. Michael 
and St. George. On 4th June, 187."), he was gazetted to the rank 
of Colonel in the British Army, and at present (1878) is on special 
service in South Africa connected with the Kaffir war. 



1^53. 



Married or Hemarks. 



No. Na^l(^ Born. Died. 

William Muuson 

Jarvis, 1 Aii,u;. 13, 17}»;{ June 25, 18«7 Nov. 3, 1836. 

45(J Anne Itacy. 

4(liildren. 

457 Jan.! Hannah, Au■,^ 10, 1837 

458 Henry William, Aug. 3, 182!) 

459 Chas. Ilorborl, Auj;-. 25, 1831 Sept. 7,1859 Dec, 1856. 
400 John Hacy, July . 1834 lu infancy. 



Hannah Owen 
Jarvis, , Sept. 25, 1797 
461 Alex. Ilanilltou. 

11 children. 
463 Cath. Maria, Mch. 33, 1817 

463 Han'h neiidersou, Nov. 3, 1818 

464 Jcf^se Augusta, Mch. 18. 1831 

465 JIary ^ ue, June 1, 1824 Aug. 15, 1825 

466 Elizabeth, Aug. 6, 1826 

467 Helen, July 12, 1838 

468 Jos. Alexander, July 18, 1830 
409 William Jarvis, April 35, 1833 

470 Caroline Emily, Jan. 4, 1835 

471 Emma Harriett, June 18, 1837 
473 Aug. Owen nerb't,Oet.21,1839 



Jan. 25, 1816. 

Jan. 13, 1847. 
Nov. 24, 1842. 
March 15, 1855. 



Sept. 5, 1869. 
Jan. 8, 1807. 

S(!ptemher, 1877, Kate 
C. McCallum. 



* William Munson Jarvis served through the American war, 1812-14; 
was present at Uio, l)altles of Queenstown Heights and Stony Creek; was, 
for many years, Sherill of the Gore District, and resided and died in 
Hamilton. 



J 



- 



.\^, : 



64 



DK80KNDANT8 OF WILLIAM — FIFTH OENEUATION. 



irs. 



Died. Married or Remarks. 

May 7, 1844 Dec. 35. 1804. 



All.!;:. 10. 1874 
Au.ir. 80. IHW 



No. Name. Horn. 

Elizabeth Jarvis, 001.25, 1785 

473 Tniinaii 8. Wtftinore. 

5 cliiUlicn. 

474 Sylvia Elizab'li, Oct. 20, 1805 

475 Darwin W()(){lw'(l,Sopt.2,1807 
470 William Jarvis, June BO, 1809 

477 Geo. Whitfield, Oct. 11, 1813 

478 Charles Kitch, Aiiff. 21, 1815 



Elizahktii Jakvis Wktmoue 

Was the eldest dauglitor of John Jarvis, of Norwalk, Conn., 
her mother, whose maiden name Wfis Elizabeth Boulte, being his 
second wife. Mrs. Wetmore was a very beautiful woman, and lier 
loveliness of character wa.s the charm of the family circle, and the 
esteem and admiration of her neighbors and friends. She was 
devoted to the care and duties of her household, and her home 
was the ne phis ultra of neatness and good order. She gave to the 
poor and needy with a willing and lavish hand, and, in her noble 
deeds of charity, she was aided by her no less willing husband, who 
was ever known and recognized as tlur poor man's doctor and 
friend. Mrs. Wetmore was an Episcopalian, and was baptized and 
confirmed in the church by her uncle, the late Rt. Rev. Abraham 
Jarvis, the second Bishop of Connecticut. She died at the age of 
58, and an obituary notice written by her pastor was published 
at the time in the columns of the ChurcJiman. 

As a reminiscence of her home, the following may not prove 
uninteresting: The house owned by her husband, and occupied 
by the family for many years, stood back from the street, sur- 
rounded by a spacious lawn, with an ample courtyard in front, 
and a walk leading from the door, through a gateway, to the 
street . The courtyard was overshadowed by elmg and maples, and 
ornamented with abundant flowers of rare beauty. On each side 
of the large door that opened into the hall were two large and 
very beautiful lilac trees, whose tops reached to the eaves of the 
house, and, in their blooming season, these trees were covered with 
purple flowers which exhaled a pleasant perfume, even to the 
senses of the travellers who passed that way. The robins built 
their nests and reared their young among the branches, and they 
were so frequently fed by the mistress of the house that they 
would, as she was sitting alone, fly into the room, hop about, 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM— FIFTH GENEKATION. 



65 



pick up the crumbs on the floor, and then return again to their 
nests. In the midst of all tliis pleasure and domestic peace. Mrs. 
Wetmore sickened and died, and, as though in sympathy with her 
decease, the robins deserted the lilacs, and they too began to decay, 
until in a year or two they were utterly withered and dead. 

It was at this particular time that her son, William Jarvis Wet- 
more, visited his old home, the home of his youth and love, and 
saw how thQ spirit of desolation had swept over the once happy 
spot. It was, indeed, a melancholy sight. He retired to the room 
he once used to occupy when the family were all together, and 
coinposed the following lines, writing original music for the words 
which he subsequently publisJied, dedicating it to his father. 

THE LILAC AT THE DOOR. 

Sweet home of youfli, I fondly turn 

My wandering .steps to thee; 
I know no .spot on earth so dear. 

No hearts so frank and free. 
The ehn, the niaplo, anil the birch, 

The sumach on the moor, 
r see with joy, hiU dearer far 

Tlu! h'lae at tlic door. 

I've roamed o'er many a pleasant land, 

I've sailed o'er many a sea; 
I've roamed o'er mountain, hill, and plain. 

But Home! thou'rt all to me! 
I've heard the wild birds in the grove. 

Their songs on many a shore ; 
But sweeter was the robin's note 

Id the lilac at the door. 

Here friends have met beneath the shade, 

III life's enchanted Spring; 
And, whilt; they told their pleasures o'er, 

Love plumed his airy wing. 
The friends liave gone, and nusic now, 

Alas! is heard no more! 
The robin's tlown, and withered, dead, 

The lilac at the door! • 



No. Name. Born. Died, Manie.l or UomarU.. 

UiarlotteJarvi.s,July30, 1787 Feb. 2.0, 1861 Dec. 12, 1810 
479 John Seymour, Nov. 20, 1786 Dec. 11, 1859 
5 children. 
9 






A6 



I 



i ! > 



^l!' 



i 


i 

1 
1 


1 

1 

; 


i 

i ; 

! , 

! ■ 



DKSCKNDANTS OF WILLIAM FIFTH OKNKKATION. 

Died. 



No. Name. Born. Died. Marrlud or KemarkB. 

480 Sarah Elizabeth, May 1:5, 1812 Aug. 13, 1837. 

481 Charles Jarvis, Feb. 25, 1815 Mch. 13, 1840 May 10, 1837. 

482 Alvah, May 5, 1817 July 22, 1848 April 13. 1848, Mary 

A. Partridge. 

483 Charlotte Fitch, Aug. 4,1819 May 25, 1863 May 11, 1847. 



484 Samuel John, Mch. 9, 1822 

IT'S. 

George Oglevie 
Jarvis, July 14, 1795 Feb. 3, 1875 

485 Philamela Marshall, May 12, 1875 

6 children. 

486 Phil. Elizab'h, Feb. 19, 1822 Mch. 18, 1835 

487 Charl.Miiria l8t,July 30, 1824 Dec. 15, 1824 

488 Charlotte Maria. May 6,1826 April 28, 1853 

489 Chas. Alpheus, F(tb. 2, 1828 

490 Louisa Sophia, Meh. 14, 1831 

491 Geo.Cyp'n.M.IX, Ai)r.34,1834 



Feb. 17. 1850. 



Nov. 19, 1819. 

Died, Portland, Conn. 

D. Colebrook, Conn. 
D. Colebrook, Conn. 
Oct. 8, 1851, to Gi^o. 

G ilium, Jr. 
Jan. 17, 1854. 

Feb. 8, 1S66, to Mar- 
thii Gillum. 



Dr. (ieokoe Oglevie Jakvis 

Son of the late John Jarvis, was born in New Canaan, C'onnecticut, 
July 14, 1795. 

Dr. Jarvis was a thorough English scholar, and an educator of 
youth during his earlier manliood and scholastic life. He studied 
his profession vyith Ids hrother-in-law, Dr. Truman Spencer Wet- 
more of Winchester, Connecticut, and was a painstaking and 
persevering student. lie was licensed to practice medicine and 
surgery in 1817, and first settled in Torrington. After the expira- 
tion of two years, he removed to Colebrook, where lie remained 
until 1840, when he left for Portland, ♦a beautiful village on the 
Connecticut river opposite Middletown. There he practiced his 
profession with increasing jjatronago and success until he died at 
tlie age of eighty, a victim to erysipelas and diphtheria. He 
received the degree of M.D. from Yale College in 1816. 

Dr. Jarvis was of an inventive turn of mind, and his genius and 
skill were largely exercised in that direction. His "Ad.iustek," 
an instrument for the more ready and easy manner of reducing 
and replacing fractures and dislocations, pi-oved a success, and 
gave him an enviable notoriety. At one time, he visited Europe, 
where he remained several months. In London they recognized 



DKBCENDANTS OF WILIJAM — FIFTH GKNKrJATION. 



67 



of 



and 



his genius and ability, and, by special invitation, he delivered a 
course of lectures on " Fractures and Dislocations," l)pfore the 
learned magnates of that ancient and intellectual city. These 
were published at the time in the " London Lancet." As a mark of 
respec^t for the man, and as an acknowledgment of his genius, 
learning, and skill, the "Society for the Promotion of Arts and 
Commerce " presented him the largest gold medal ever received 
by an American. Prince Albert was president of th(^ society, and 
the doctor had th(^ distinguished honor of receiving it at tlie hand 
of the prince himself. 

During the last days of the doctor's life, he prepareil a work on 
Electricity and Ozone. It was carefully written, and showed that 
the author was not only an accom])lished scholar, but a profound 
thinker and scientist. 

Dr. Jarvis was a model husband and father, and a genial friend 
and companion. He was the soul of hospitality and honor, and 
was never more happy than when surrounded by a rhvAe of his 
neighboi's and friends. Like all of the name, he had a love for 
th(! humorous, and was ever ready at Itdn mot and repartee. With 
a keen and ai)preciative musical ear, his whole life seemed rounded 
as with pleasant harmonies. 

Dr. Jarvis married a very estimable lady, a Miss Mar«hall, 
in the town where he hrst settled. They had an interesting 
family of childiHui, who were devoted to their parents, and who 
loved to meet with them around the domestic hearth. Firm in 
the doctrines of the Episcopal Church, their Christmas and other 
holidays were the occasions of the most happy and interesting 
annual re-unions, and of the renewal of delightful associations. 
These two, who lived such a consistent Christian life, and were so 
much endeared to each other and their children, have passed 
away, and now sleep side by side in the little church yard across 
the way from their once happy home, awaiting the glorious morn- 
ing of the Re8urre(!tion Day. 



ITS. 

No. Name. Born. Died. Married or Remarks. 

Launc't Jarvis, Feb. 19, 1775 Dec. 26, 185;^ June 2'A, 1803. 

493 Lydia Barlow, Apr. 10, 1789 May 17, 1866 

7 children. 

498 Thos. Newton, June 22, 1805 June 14, 1834. 

494 Milton Barlow, 

M.D.. Aug. 5, 1807 Feb. 26, 1836. 



; 



iSi-: 



1 




_, 


1 


68 DKHOKNDANTS OF WILLIAM FIFTH OKNKRATION. 




I No. Name. Bom. Died. 


Married or HcinnrkH. 




41)5 Clmrles, Sept. 8. 1801) Nov. li}, 1811 


Drowned. 




490 Elizabeth. Dec. 31, 1811 May, 184U 


Wm. II. Kinney. 
1 child, Charles. 




497 Clarissa, Juno 5, 1814 Aug. 1, 1840 


Lucian P. Robe. 2 ch. , 
Emily and llarr'tC. 




408 Harriet, Dec. 25, 1817 Dec. 20. 1h:{0 






400 Samuel, Apr. 11, 18J0 Apr. 20, l8r)0 


Jan. 0. 1853. 




1W4. 






Nancy Jarvis, Mch. ;}, 1705 Aug. 1, 1877 


Jan. 33, 1830. 




500 James ir. Weed, Mch. 7,1705 May 0,1822 






2 children. 






501 JanicH Jarvis, Jan. 13, 1821 


Dead. 




502 Wm. Harvey, Jan. 13, 1821 


Dead. 


1 


18S. 




1 1 


Fau'y F. Jarvis, Oct. 4, 1790 Mch. 3, 1820 


Aug. 20. 1823. 


• 1 


503 Alvah Weed, F<!b. 8, 1800 Atig. 15. 1833 


■' 


1 


2 children. 




* 


504 Robert, Nov. 17, 1824 Aug. 10. 1825 






505 Frances Marion, July 14,. 1820 


Thomas A. Brown. 


1 


1 03. 




, 


James Jarvis, Feb. 2, 1784 May 24, 1870 


1807. 




500 Lucy Piatt, Feb. 23, 1785 May 24, 1800 




'l 


6 children. 




1 

i 


507 David Haiulf rd, Feb. 1808 


1883. 




508 Levis., Feb. 1810 Sept. 1820 






509 Mariettc, Dec. 4, 1814 


Feb. 22. 1835. 




510 Jane. Jan. 14. 1818 


Nov. 17. 1840. 


'! 511 Charles. Mch. 4. 1821 


Jan. 20, 1845. 


. If 


512 John Jay, Dec. 4, 1828 


1850. 




Rodney Jarvis, J\dy 1, 170G 






Feb. 35, 1830. 


i 


513 Mary Bower- 




! 


man, Apr. 18, 1803 
2 children. 
1 514 Brice W., Apr. 18, 1831 
515 Benjamin L., June 0, 1835 






108. 






Selecta Jarvis, Mch. 17, 1797 


Sept. 25, 1814, 




516 Jothan Crawford, June 7. 1792 July 23. 1873 






12 children. 

i : 





OKPOENDANTS OF WIM.TAM FIFTH OKNKUATrON. 



69 



^^iy T„.,^fT; , ^°"" "'o*- Married or Romarks. 

517 Lhjuh Hudson, June 20, 1815 May 4,1870 0(!t. 31. 1888. P^liza 

both R. Hweet. 
618 Chauncpy HofT- 

uiiiu, Jan. 10, 1817 Aug. 5, 1819 

519 .lolui Bomus, Nov. 11, 1818 July 20, 1858 

520 Catharine Ray- 

mond, Oct. 18, 1820 

521 James Rodman , Sept. ;J0, 1822 

522 Wm. Norman, ' June 18, 1824 Nov. 19, 1874 

523 Margaret Ann, Nov. 22, 1820 
624 Daniel, Sept. 14, 1828 

. 525 Car'lin(! Loui.sc, Feb. 7, 1830 
520 Alv. (^irpenter, Apr. 30, 1833 Mch. 24, 1834 
527 Warren Smith, Feb. 9, 1835 



Apr. 20, 1848. 
Henrietta Ladd. 



528 Martlia Jeau'te, May 14, 1837 



Mch., 1871, Eunice 
Tanner. 



James Grant 
Jarvi.s, Dee. 4, 1799 

529 Tempe Frisbie. 

4 children. 

530 Wm. Oscar, July 1, 1822 

531 Laura Ann, 



lOO. 



532 Lueinda Frisbie, 

533 Maria Frisbie, 



Seth Jarvis, 

534 Nancy Qreer, 

3 children, 

535 Wellington, 

536 Sarah Jane, 

537 Stephen, 



SOS. 



.Ian. 32, 1821. 



Antony E. Hurt. 

Ich., Mary Prances. 
Ed. Smith. 
Wm. 8. Murray. 



()(a. 11, 1805 Sept. 23, 1859 lOec. 4, 1828. 
Jan. 6, 1805 

Aug. 20 1829 

Mch. 19 1834 May 14, 18G3 

June 5, 1837 1865. No issue. 



Jay Jarvis, 

538 Sarah Ridgeway 

2 children. 

539 Jay. 

540 Judson. 



«oe. 

Sept. 2, 1801 June 23, 1860 



Jay Jakvis 



Was born Sept. 2, 1801, and died June 23, I860. He was for 
many years a merchant, and, by persistent effort and strict business 



' Married Samantha Andrews, Sept. 22, 1853. 1 child, Frances S. 



— ri 



' 



m 



70 DKHCENDANTH OK WILLIAM — FIFTH OKNKRATION. 

management, amassed a very respectable amount of wealtli. He 
was a man of honest purposes, and strict integrity, and was, for 
several years, the President of the Citizens' Bank, wliich was situa- 
ted on the corner of the Bowery and Canal street, N. Y. 

Mr. Jarvis married the "beautiful" Mi*s. Sarali Ri<lgoway, n^e 
Leycraft, by whom he had three children. 

Mr. Jarvis was an Episcopalian, and a regular attendant at 
church. Ilia sickiiess was not of long duration, i»ut knowing that 
his days were numbered, he quietly resigned himself to the will of 
his Maker, awaiting the hour when death should call him hence. 

His widow still survives him, and is cheerful and companionable, 
making life happy with her cliildfim and friends around her. 



%£W. 



Died. 

Apr. 8. 1875 



May 17, 1H58 



1803 



Married or KeniurkH. 



E. T. Hariiioii. 

1 child, Iliiny. 
Ch. II. Watorhury. 

1 child, Blaiiciic. 
Miss Abcndioth. 

4 children. 
J. Fnirbank. 1 child, 

Jessie. 



No. Name. Bom. 

Jam' Jiirvis, Fol). (t, 1804 

541 Jouiilhan White. 

4 childri'u. 

542 Harriet, 

543 Su.san Jarvis, 

544 Charles Jay, 

545 Maigar(4 Jarvis, ' 

2d luisband. 

546 Abram Voorhees. 

1 child. 

547 WillurdP. Voorhees. 



Jane Jakvih Whitk, 

Daughter of Jesse Jarvis, was horn at South Salem, village of Cross 
River, Westchester Co., N. Y., February 6, 1804. After -her fath- 
er's death, she met Jonathan White, who afterward became her 
husband, in the village of Rye, N. Y., where she had been living 
since 1817. 

He was born in Ireland, Oct. 28, 1799, and was the son of par- 
ents, both of whom had lived romantic lives. His father, Joseph 
White, was an Englishman, and an officer in the Royal Navy, and 
his mother was Mary, daughter of an Irish Baronet, Sir Darby 
O'Kennedy. Joseph White commenced life by eloping with this 
lady, who is said to have been both beautiful and accomplished. 
Afterwards, for challenging a brother officer to mortal combat, he 



I)K80KNDANT8 OF WIM-IAM — FIFTH GKNKRATION. 



71 



was (JismiHsed the sorvico, a circumstance! wliich aeoum to have 
embittered him against the British Government, and, finally, 
espousing the cause of Ireland, he joined with Emmet and McNevon 
in the Uehelli(m of 1T!)H. The result was that he, with his wife and 
family, eventually fled to this country, where he settled in the iieigh- 
borhood of Shrewsbury, N. J. He namcfd the place Harnsville, as a 
barn was the only building visible, and it still retains that name. 

His oldest sons had been edu(!at(d in Dublin University, but 
Jonathan, the youngest, had to take sucli chances as New Jersey 
offered in those times. 

He however proved more American and enterprising, and kept 
the business which his father left him, of the manufacture of carveil 
tortoise-shell and ivory combs. 

Jonathan Whit(! was, as his father had been, a man of high 
honor and int(!grity, hating all shams and hollow j)retences, always 
aiming ti> he rather than li> scon. His manner was reserved, keen, 
ami sarcastic, an<l commanded respect rather than love. Ho 
provided generously for his family, and was very hospitabh; to his 
numerous friends. 

He died in New Brunswick, N. .J., in 18.3r», at .T6 years of age, 
and was buried in Christ Church graveyard. In 1810, his wifci's 
motluM-, Marganit I'armah^ .larvis, widow of Jesse Jarvis, was 
buried by his side. 

Seven years after the death of Jonathan White, on Sept. 19, 
1842, liis widow married .'Xbrahani Voorhees, a man fourteen years 
young<n' than h<>rself. Ho was infatuated with lier Ixiauty, which 
she retained to the last of her life. She was intelligent, with spark- 
ling wit, (juick at I'epartee, of dignificid denKsanor, and, yet, seemiMl 
uttei'ly uncons(!ious of her personal advantages. Thirty-four years 
after her second marriage, she died very suddenly, while her maid 
was combing her hair, now changed from its glo.ssy black to iron- 
gray. She fell with scarcely a warning to the Moor, and, in a few 
moments, expired without any apparent suffering. She was buried, 
not beside her mother and Hrst husband, in Christ churchyard, but 
in the Presbyterian cemetery at New Brunswick. 

Of her four children by her first husband. Harriet White, a girl 
of beauty and refinement of manners, was married at Christ 
Church, New Brunswick, Dec. 4, 18,56, to Kzekiol Fargo Harmon, 
of Buffalo, N. Y. She died May 11, 18.58, and was buried ui For- 
est Lawn cemetery, leaving one son, who, at his mother's request, 
was baptized with her name, dir-ectly after her funeral. 



•1 



72 



DKHOKNDANTH OP WIM-IAM — Fimi OKNKUATIoN. 



i !! 



'Ill 



Susan Jarvis Whito WRH marriod April 22, 1850, in St. Hartholo- 
niow's Ohurch, N. Y., toChas. Ih^nry Watorbury, son of John Water- 
bury and Sarali W»H>d, of Darinii, Conn. Tho Watorl»ury8 aro 
(jf Knj.(li.sli do8C(Uit, and tho Woods of I'uritan ancestry, lion- 
jam in, fathor of Sarah Wood, was an oHicor in the Revolutionary 
war of 177(5. Blanche Watorbury is the only survivinj^ child of 
this marriage. 

('harles Jay White is a wholesale merchant of N. Y., and was mar- 
ried at rortchester, N. Y., Oct. 10, ISS.'i, to Mary A. Ahendroth, 
a beautiful young lady of German [janaitage, but born in tliis 
country. Her parents were ironmongors, in Darmstailt, (iermany, 
and came to the United States to avoid the conscription of their 
thr(!0 sons into the German army, thus sacrificing tluur interest in 
tho fatherland for the sake of their S(ms. 

Margaret Jarvis White, who possessed the same propossijssing 
qualities as her sister Harriet, was married Nov. 19, IH57, to Jere- 
miah R.' Fairbank, of Klizabeth, N. J. After about six years of 
hHp|)y weddtjd life, she died of hasty consumption at Oakham, 
Mass., on June 22, 18G4. She left one daughter, Jessie Fairbank. 

Willard 1*. Voorhoes is a lawyer of good standing in New 
Brunswick. He was married on the l.')th March, 1877, to Sarah 
Rutgers Noilson. 

soo. 

Died. Married or Remarks. 



N<». Nmno. Born. 

Catliar'c Jiirvis, Jan. 20, 1813 
rAH .Imls'n llariMoii, Mcli. 33, 1811 Jan. 38, 1857 

3 (children. 
549 Jeamstle, Juliette, Murgaretta. 



Livinj^ in Elizabeth- 
port, N. J. 



' 



SIS. 

F"'rcdorick Htarr 

Jarvis,' Aui^. 4, 1786 

550 Susan Mcrrigold. 

12 children. 

551 Fr(!dcri(;k Wni.. Feb. 7, 1818 
553 Amelia, May 24, 1819 

553 (George Thomas, Nov. 30, 1830 

554 Stephen jVIaule, Nov. 32, 1833 

555 Peter Ilobinson,2Aug. lO, 1834 



1853 



Oct. 5, 1857. 
1830. 
Jan. 4, ia')3. 
Sept. 10, 1850. 
Feb. 12, 1849. 



iFreilerick Starr Jarvis was on service with the militia in the war of 1812- 
14, and during the Rebellion in Upper Canada, in 1837, was (Tcntleman 
Usher of the Black Rod. 

■* Resides at Stratford, Ont. Was, formerly. Mayor of that town. 



DHXJKNKANTH (>K Wll, 1,1AM — KIKTII UKNKIIATION. 7.S 

S'«/u ^"T . ., "'"" "'"" Marrl«l or Hm,„rk.. 
.>n«(;hiiM. Hovorlcy, Nov. 10, |83(i 

557 Miiry, Doc. 3, 1838 Kcl.. 87. |8«1 (),tt. JIO, 1851. 

.W8 Arthur Murmy. (hit. 37.18:10 .<<><'• 3«», 1R58. 

55» II..nryAugU8lH.T)(T. 1M8;J3 Junr 7. WMI ' '''"'*' "*' '^'"^ 

500 Kdgiir. Jim. 38,18)15 (),.t. n, 180;( 

501 Julia, Nov. 37. I8;I0 

503 HcsKiiIOliziibUi, 1H!I8 Jan. 11, ia.5H 



%i 1 S3. 



FrniK'OH Ainrlia 

Jurvi.s, Mc'li. 
50;j John Miiiilr, 
14 children. 

504 KliziilKith, .luiio 

505 Williiiru, May 
500 (Jcorgc, 

507 KriiMccs Aniolia, ()(!t. 

508 Klizalicth. July 
500 Carol ino, July 

570 lOlhui, Juno 

571 (Jcorgc! Fri'd'k, Fob. 
573 Isaholla, July 
57y Charlotto, Junes 



33. 1787 


Jan. 


2li, 


1807 


July 10, IHO». 


31), 1810 


July 


14. 


1818 




JIO. 1811 


Apr. 


1. 


I8:t8 


Diod in India. 


18i;i 








1). in infancy. 


38, 1811 


Doc. 


;i. 


1848 


Aug. 18;{5. 


3, 1810 








I), in infancy. 


38, iHir 








('apt. Ilunihly, K. N 


87, 1811) 










30, 1831 










31, 1833 










30. 1834 


July 


30, 


1804 


Juni! ;{(». 1H03 



1880 



574 Arthur Dillon, Sept. 

575 Mary (.'ntharine, 

570 Robert, Aug. 80, 1831 

577 Henry Hudgon, July 1), 18;{4 



D. in India. 



Jim. 8, I80;j. 
1860 Killed in battle ia 
China. 



a IS. 



Apr. 31, 1797 Aju-. 15, 1878 Dec. fl, 1881. 
Mch. 3, 1843 



George Stejihon 

Bonj. Jarvis, 
578 JidiaHlusrwood, 

10 children. 
570 Julia Eliza, a 

580 Francos Amelia, 

581 Mary Sophia, 

583 Mary Sophia, 
58;^ Isabel Maria, 

584 Caroline, 

585 (loo. Sherwood, 
580 Ellon Maria, 

' Drowned in river Avon, trying to save a friend; both drowned. 
- Married, Ist, Aug. 5, 1840, Geo. Ilauiilton. 3d, Dec. 3, 1801 llonrv 
McKay. , ' • 

10 



Aug. 


4, 1833 








Jan. 
Apr. 


30, 1830 
33, 1838 


Mch. 7, 183!) 


May 


5. 1843. 


Nov. 
Aug. 
Aug. 


13, 183!) 

4, 1831 

15, 18:53 


Aug. 80, 1837 


June 


19, 1850. 


Nov. 
Nov. 


8, 18:54 
10, 18:55 


Doc. 5. 18:55 


Sept. 


1!), 1805. 



l—*n 



74 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM — FIFTH GENEHATION. 



l-i 



i^^ 



No. Name. Born. Died. 

587 Adiel, Ai)r. 13, 1830 Feb. 7, 1847 

588 Anne Decima, Feb. 17, 1843 

3tl wife. 
58& Anne Maria Mountain. 
8 children. 

590 Salter Mountain, Dec. 5, 1844 

591 John Lindsay, Au,;,^ 29, 1840 Aug. 10, 1847 
593 Arthur, M.y 38, 1849 



Married or Remiirkp. 



Rev. W. H. Vool. 



In Holy Orders. 



George Stephkn B. Jarvis. 

[The followinc: sketch is al)bn:viated from an arficle wliich appeared in 
the Montrml Qazette of 16th April, 1878.] 

"Probably the old(>.st Judge in the Douiinion, and perhaps the 
widest Icnowu, died yesterduy at C«^rn\vall, Ontario, (leo. Stepiien 
Benjamin Jarvis, Judge of tiie united counties of Storniont, Dundas, 
and < jlengarry, for many y( ars a familiar figure at Diocesan and Pro- 
vincial Synods of the .\nglican Church, one of the oldest remain- 
ing of the York Pioneers, and conspicuous throughout Ontario for 
the interest taken by him during over half a centuiy in the devel- 
opment of a Canadian military spirit, was born at Fredericton, 
New Brunswick, on the 21st April, \1S)1 . His father, Stephen 
Jarvis, served as a Lieutenant of Cavalry in the South Carolina 
Royalists during the Revolutionary War." 

For an extended account of his eventful life we refer our read- 
ers to our sketch of Tiim which appears in its proper place in 
anotlK'r part of this work. 

" The late Judge's military education commenced at a very early 
age. When the war of 1812 broke out and his father's regiment 
was ordered to the Upper Province, we find he had passed through 
all the non-commissioned grades and had become a volunteer 
attached to the 49th King's Regiment. With this corps he first 
smelt powder at Queenstown Heights, and in his later days never 
tired of recounting his experiences on that occasion. 

"At Queenstown yoting Jarvis, then 15 years old, was taken 
prisoner, and for some days he was retained in the camp of Gen- 
eral Van Rensselaer. He soon, however, gained his release and 
rejoined the 49th, in wldch ha henceforth seems to have occupied 
the position of a gentleman cadet, passing all his time with the 
officers, and admitted to the privileges of their mess. Soon after, 
the regiment retired into Fort George for the winter. Early in 
the spring of 181.3, young Jarvis was sent to Hamilton with a 
brigade of boats, and thence to York, with orders to bring back a 



DKSCKNDANTS OF WIl.MAM — FIFTH OKNEKATION. 



75 



party of grenadiers belonging to the 8th regiment. He failed in 
his mission for the excellent reason that he found York invested 
by the Americans, and, on the 27th April, he took pfut in the battle 
which, as all know, ended by the ictreat of fhe British and 
Canadian forces to Kingston. En route, he was appointed an 
Assistant ("Commissary, and on arrival at Kingston was selected to 
fill an appointment on the sialT of Sir K. Sheaffe. In this position 
he remained imtil, York being evacuated by the enemy, he was 
ordered to rejoin his regiment on the Niagara frontier, when, to 
his utter disgust, he found Fort George in the hai'ds of the enemy, 
and the British in full retreat upon Hamilton. Thouce young 
Jarvis was speedily dispatched oh a rcconnoitcring expedition in the 
direction of Stony Creek. Four da} s afterwards, he fell in with 
the enemy's advanced guard, and after a coanci] of war, the 49th, 
seven hundred strong, marched out to encounter the Americans — 
the Light Company, to which Mr. Jarvis was attached, leading the 
advance. The Americans were defeated by a force less than one- 
fifth of their iiumber, and, through the intervention of the fleet, 
were shut up until the winter in Fort (Jeorge. On the 28th June, 
Jarvis was engaged at the. capture of the Beaver dam, and subse- 
quently in the affairs of Fort Schlosser and Black Rock. 

"On the 30th, he was present at the capture of Fort Niagara, 
which was retained during the remainder of the war. "While , 
stationed here, he was notified of his appointment to aTi ensigncy 
in the Hth (King's) Regiment, which he immediately joined, and 
with it he was present at the capture of Fort Erie, and the subse- 
quent disa.strous battle of ('hippewa, where tJie 8th covered the 
retreat of tlu; British forces. Next came Lundy's Lane, the most 
terrible action of the war, when Jarvis, who had then attained the 
age of 17 years and 3 months, commanded a company of his 
battalion, and acted throughout with singular intrepidity. The 
storming of Fort Erie, perhaps the bloodiest strife of the war, 
again found Jarvis at the front, and here, again, on the 17th of 
September, he was taken jirisoiier, escaping after a .'series of singu- 
lar adventurers. Tlur evacuation of the fort by the Anu^ricans 
shortly afterwards brought to a close the war on the Niagara 
frontier, and the 8th received orders to march to Montreal, from 
which they embarked for England. The deceased's military career 
was thus cut short. In tht' spring of 1815 Mr. Jarvis was stationed 
at Windsor Castle, but shortly afterwards he was i)laced on half- 
pay or reduction. Through the intercession of Sir R. Sheaffe he 



T' 



76 



DKSCKNnANTS OP WILMAM — PrFTH ORNKRATION. 



! |:l 



1 I 



was, however, reappointed — this time to the 1 04th regiment, sta- 
tioned in Canada, but hardly had he arrived ont, when the 1 04th 
was disbanded, and he was again placed on the retired list." 

"In 1817, Mr. Jarvis commenced the study of the law, and in the 
succeeding year he was attached to the firu) of the late Hon. Jonas 
Jones of Brockville, in which he became a partner in 1820. In 
January, 1823, he was called to the Bar, being then sixty-ninth on 
the roll. Of all his contemporaries, Mr. Norton Buell of Toronto, 
is now the only survivor, in 1834, Mr. Jarvis was named a 
Bencher of the Law Socdety of Upper Canada; in I8,'i5, County 
Judge of Prescott and Russell; iji 1837. of Leeds and (xrenville; 
ana iv 1842, of Stormont, Duudas, and Glengarry. The latter 
appointment he held to the day of his death, though for the past 
year his duties have been performed by the Junior Judg<\ The 
Judge's career on the Bench, extending over 51 years, has through- 
out been marked by tlie same zeal and unswerving devotion to 
duty which signalized his brief but active service as a soldiei'. 
During his judicial career, notwithstanding the immense amount 
of work he performed, it is on record that only four cases of those 
decided by him were appealed, and two of these were upheld by 
the Supreme Courts." 

"In 1836, the deceased Judge was elected to represent the 
town of Cornwall in the Provincial Parlianujut, and, in 1850, 
was appointed Lieut. -Colonel of the 1st Stormont Militia. 'I'lie 
last time he displaced an active interest in inilitaiy matters was 
during tlu Trent affair, when ho, was instrunuuital in raising a 
company /or Captain ( )liver. a service r(!cognized by the presenta- 
tion to him of an address and a sword of honor by the officers 
and men he had called into activity. 

"Throughout his long life Judge Jarvis was an uncompromising 
churchnum. As he was a contempoi-ary, so he was a steadfast 
friend and adniirer of the late Bishop Strachan, long the header of 
the ('hurch militant in Upper (Canada, and the moving spirit of that 
much-abused family compact which at one time ruled the politics of 
the Province. Of late years the Judge has taken a very active inter- 
est in the building of the Strachan Memorial Church at Cornwall, 
and on several occasions has lectured on the War of 1812 in order to 
help in providing funds for that ol)ject. As illustrative of the late 
Judge's devotion to the church, it nmy be sfid that he invariably 
set apart one-tcuith of his income for church puii)Oses, and at 
Synod and Vestry he lost no opportunity of proclaiming this to be 
the first duty of every churchman." 



DRSCKNDANTS OP WILTJAM — FIFTH OKNKRATroN. 



77 



a 1 «. 

No. Name. Born. Died. 

Wm. Botsforil 

Jarvis," May 4, 17))!) July ^fi. lH(i4 

rm Mary Boyles Powell. =-' 

5 children. 
594 Ann Frances, May 4, tSIJO 
mry Louisa, Deo. 10, 18^] 

nOd Wni. Duninier, Au!,^ 4, 1834 
r)97 Sarah, May 4, 1880 

rm Robert Kdward 

Col borne,'' Mch. 4, 1842 

SIS. 

Samuel Jarvis, July 28, 1783 Jiuie 22, IHrA 

599 Sarah Gould. 

4 <hildreu. 

600 Mary Ann, Henry Starr, Cornelia, Minerva. 



Married or Rmnnrke. 



• 



Benj. S. Jarvis, April l;), 17:54 Dec. 24. 1840 
. E. W. Carr. 
2 children. 
001 Autoinelle Augusta and Renjaiuin. 



EliStarr Jarvis, Jan. 21), 178(; 

603 Louise CiiapniMn, Sejil. 13, 1820 

2 children. 
60a Eli/,.i, 

604 lliuriette. 

2d wife. 
005 Prudence White. 



Mr. Gidiui--. Reside in 
Miehinau. 



' William Botsford Jarvis, for many years Sheriff of the Home District, 
comman(h'<l a re.uiment during the Itebellion, 18!{7-8. 

-Mrs. William B. Jarvis was a granddaughter, of the bile Hon. William 
Dunuuer Powell, Ciiii^f Justice of Tpper Canada, and Spe,il«-r of the 
Legislative Council. 

•'Robert Colborne Jiirvis entered If. M. service in the 100th regiment. 
1857; be afterwards exchanged into the 07th regiment, in which regiment 
be now is n (!upliiin, and attached to the Stall College iit Sandhurst. 
The French Society ])re.sented him with a lironze cross for his services 
during the Franco-Prussian War. 



1 1 


flB 



III 



I 



78 



DE8CENDANTH (>F WILLIAM — FIFTlf OKNKRATION. 

Bom. Died. Married or Remarks. 



No. Name. 

Henry Jarvis, Apr. 36, 1788 Mch. 19, 1843 Oct. liJ, 1817. 
600 Marietta Sanford, July 14, 1843 

5 dilldren. 

607 Henry Sanford, Aug. 8, 1818 Dec. 2, 1849. 

608 Mari'ta Bradley, July 1,1820 Aug. 20, 1839. 

609 Sarah Maria, \ Apr. 7, 1836 Mch. 15, 1853. 

[• Twins. 

610 Francis C, ) Apr. 7,1826 Dec. 37, 1854. 

611 Eliza Ann, Apr. 22, 1828 Feb. 15, 1856. 



Sarah Jarvis, 
613 J. P. Reynolds, 
'S children. 

613 Jane Eliza, 

614 Abhy Amelia, 

615 Harriet P., 



Wm. A. JarvLs, 

616 Julia Parsons, 

4 children. 

617 Enieline ('. , 

618 Charles A., 

619 Joseph W., 
630 Sarah J., 



Aug. 24, 1791 

Nov. 1, 1786 Feb. 3, 1870 

Dec. 25, 1812 

Oct. 7, 1813 

May 28, 1837 Feb. 5, 1863 

Dec. 19, 1793 

Feb. 30, 1804 Nov. 13, 1878 

Dec. 30, 1827 Jan. 3, 1S.53 

Oct. 13, 1830 

July 17, 1832 

Mch. 3, 1834 



S40. 

Comfort S.Knapp, Oct. 18, 1787 Julv 27, 1805 
621 Mary Peck, 

1 child. 
638 Francis. 

2d wife. 
623 Harriet Warner, 

1 child. 
634 William Starr, 



Mch. 11, 1811. 



Oct. 13, 1830, to W. S. 
Bartlctt. 

June 6, 1833, to War- 
ren Case. 

8ept.l4, 1853, to David 
Randall. 



Oct. 4, 1835. 

Nov. 16, 1848, to 
DwightA. NviVTton. 

Dec. 34, 1863, to Mary 
A. Barber. 

June 24, 1858, to Han- 
nah L. Finch. 

June 24, 1855, to John 
Severson. 



Dec. 25, 1810. 



Oct. 23, 1810. 

Died aged 40 
leaving 1 son. 



DESCENDANTS OK WILLIAM — FIFTH (JENEKATION. 



79 







S4S. 






No. Name. 


Born. 




Died 


] 


Vlarried or Hemarkf 


Amelia Jar vis 












Knapp, 


Apr. 6, 


1703 






1812. 


«35 Jolin Barnett, ' 


Feb. 4, 


1787 


Dec. 25, 


1874 




8 children. 












(52fi Tryphena, 


Jnne 2(», 


1814 








637 Fran's Knai)p, 


Sept. 13, 


1816 


Sept. 33, 


1837 




028 Frederick, 


Sept. 13, 


1816 


June 2, 


1849 


- Twin.'^. 


029 George, 


Oct. 20, 


1820 






Twins. 


630 Jeannette, 


Oct. 20, 


1830 






631 James, 


Dec. 16. 


1837 


Dec. 3. 


1860 




632 Jane Evelina, 


Dec. 16, 


1827 






- Twins. 


633 John, 


Mch. 17, 


1834 









Mb8. Amelia Jakvis Barnktt 

Was born in the year 1792, and now (1879) resides in Lakeville. 
Connecticut. Slio was married in ISl'.J, and had lived witli her 
husband 62 years until his decease. Mrs. Barnett's mother was 
the daughter of Stephen Jarvis of Danbury, Conn., And her father 
was Francis Knapp. 

Mrs. Barnett, at the present writing, is nearly 87 years old, and 
from her chirography she shows that age has dealt very leniently 
with her. Her sentences are clear, and her knowledge and state- 
ment of facts and incidents in relation to her family, show that her 
mind is still unimpaired and reliable. 

She lives with one of her sons, and her life is evidently one of 
tranquillity and peace, as her mind seems so cheerful under her 
weight of yeai's. She says the world still looks beautif\il to her, 
and that she enjoys the varying seasons in their endless variety of 
sunshine and shade, out that with the unalteral)lp truth before her 
that her life is nearing its end, she looks forward with unfaltering 
trust to a glorious future, awaiting with Christian resignation that 
great and certain change that must sooner or later conie to all. 



W- 



«40. 

William W. 

Wellman, Aug. 5, 1793 July 32, 1870 Apr. 13, 1817. . 
634 Sally Maria Hub- 
boll, 
5 children. 

' The father of John Barnett was Chaplain in the l^evohitionarv army. 
His mother's name was Trypheua Spencer, sister of the late .ludge Ambrose 
Spencer of Albany. 



80 



DESOENIMNTO OF WII.I.IAM- 






II! 



m 









% 






No. Name. Horn, 

(inr) (}po. Fmlorick. Apr. l:i, 1818 
(i;{6 Win. A If ml, July 11, 1830 

037 Menilt ITul)l.cll..Tiin. 15, 183:5 
«;{8 llemy HoiiKM-, \ Sept. ;}(), 1836 

[ Twins. 
0:59 Homer Hciiiy, ) Sept,. ;5(>, 1836 



-FIFTH OFNEIJATION. 
Died. 



Married or KiMiiarkf . 
Junr 33, 1846. 
Apr. 37. 1871, to Mrs. 

Hally II. Brewster. 
Oct. 17, 1854. 
July 3:3, 1856. 



1836 


Oct.. 


7, 1851. 


asi. 






1799 


Nov. 


a, 1833. 



Betsey Ann 
Wellnian, 

640 SiliLs Camp, 

9 children. 

641 P'refVk Worst er, Nov. 3, 183:5 Apr. 17, 1853 

643 Carolines., July ;3, 1835 Se|>t. 35, 1845. 
64:5 (diaries Edwin, Feb. 35, 1837 Feb. 8, 1839 

644 Elizabeth A., Oct. 1:5,1838 Jan., 1854. 
645{!harlesn., July 7,18:50 Nov. 1,1834 

(i4(i Geo. William, Apr. 10, 18:58 Apr. 34; 1874 Jan. 16, 1856. 

647 Helen Maria, June 8, 18:54 June 7, 1853 

648 Frances Isadora, Jime 3, 1836 Apr. 10, 1839 



649 Theodre Edson, July 30, 1839 



Dec. 15, 1869. 



Stephen Starr 












Jarvis, 


Dec. 


35, 


1811 




Nov. 34, 1835. 


650 Ami Jjouisa 












Lyon, 


Mar. 


84, 


1813 






3 children. 












651 Josephine, 


Oct. 


18, 


1838 


, 


June 5, 18()0, to C. Bald- 
win, one son, died. 


653 Wm. Henry. 












Stuart,! 


June 


1, 


1846 






653 Belle, 


Nov. 


18, 


1840 












arr. 




Mary Jarvis, 






1806 




Dec. 13, 1833. 


654 G. M. Foster, 












5 children. 












655 Sarah C, 






18:^4 




1871, Dr. S. Hannahs 


656 Gl'ori^e, 






1836 




1859. 


657 Mary Jarvis, 






1838 




1848. 


658 Charley, 






1840 




1846. 


659 Henry, 






1848 


In infancy. 





1 Married Feb. 15, 1871, to Tryphena Ferris of Norwalk. One daugh- 
ter, Susan, b., June 10, 1875. 



; 1 ■ 

m 




v^:^ 



DESCENDANTS OP WILLIAM — FIFTH OENERATION. 81 

No. Name. Bom. Died. Married or Remarks. 

Angelina Jarvis, 1808 Mch. 13, 1866 1844. 

660 Reuben Knapp, 

4 children. 

661 Mary, Aug. 17, 1845 Mch. 5, 1859 

662 Marg. Augusta, July 28, 1847 

663 Alice Miller, Dec, 23, 1848 Apr. 19, 1874 1871. 

664 Delia Anne, July 9, 1850 1874. 



Augusta Jarvis, 1811 

665 Harrison Miller, 

3 children. 

666 Samuel Jarvis, Sept. 1, 1830 Dec. 26, 1863 

667 Henry Harrison, Apr. 12, 1841 Sept. 21, 1843 



1838. 



Willett Ranny 

Jarvis, 1813 

668 Anna Hiles. of Wisconsin. 

5 children. 

669 Nellie, Charles, Prank, William, and Harriet Augusta. 

30S. 

Ann Christina 
FarmarJarvis.Mch. 18, 1819 Dec, 1845 

670 Theodore Mau- 

noiAM.D., 1806 Apr. 26, 1869 of Geneva, Switzerl'd. 

3 children. 

671 Leon David 

Albert, M.D., Oct. 26, 1848 Nov. 3. 1878 Died at Southampton, 

England. 

672 Louise Ann 

Winton, Nov. 28, 1852 

673 Christine Eliz'h, 

(called) Albertine, Nov. 5, 1856 



3or. 

Rev. Samuel 
Fermor Jarvis, Aug. 3, 1825 

674 Lucy Gushing, Dec. 15, 1830 

3 children. 

675 Lucy Gushing, Dec. 23, 1864 

676 Samuel Fermor, Nov. 19, 1866 

677 Ellen Anderson, Feb. 26, 1873 

11 



Aug. 25, 1858. 
dau. Silas llolman, 
M.D., of Gardiner, Me. 



82 



DK80KNDANTS OF WILMAM FIFTH GENERATION. 

30S. 



Born. 



Died. 



Married or RemnrkB. 

June 5, 1849. 
Born in Paris. 



No. Name. 

Sarah E. M. A. 

Jarvis, June 2, 1837, 

678 Edward S. Hall. 1816 

6 children. 

679 Edward Farmar, June 8, 1850 

680 Theodore Mau- 

noir, Jan. 24, 1854 

681 Fr'k DePeyster, Aug. 10, 1855 
68a Christina, Nov. 4, 1858 

683 Mary. Mch. 15. 1861 Mch. 15, 1861 

684 Arthur Cleve- 

land, Oct. 1865 

31 1. 

Elizabeth Jarvis.Meh. 8, 1793 Mch. 28, 1811. 

685 John II. Mc- 

Alpine, Feb. 1. 1783 Apr. 15, 1865 
8 children. 

686 William Jarvis, Apr. 30, 1813 Feb. 84, 1841. 
087 Amelia Anna, Oct. 6,1816 Nov. 9,1833. 

688 Eliz'h Gertrude, Apr. 5, 1819 May 19, 1820 

689 Charles Osboni, Mch. 4, 1821 Oct. 10, 1821 

690 Elizabeth Mary, ' Aug. 31, 1 823 Aug. 16, 1847. 

691 George, Feb. 7, 1836 Feb. 38, 1830 

693Cha.s.Le Grand, Feb. 10, 1838 Dec. 7,1871. Stella 

Avery Farrington. 

693 George, Feb. 3, 1833 Sept. 37, 1844 

31«. 

Huldah Jarvis, Apr. 9, 1794 Sept. 18, 1837 May 18, 1816. ' 

^5^ l-Chas. Osborn,«Aug. 17, 1793 Mch. 18. 1869 

694 ) 

6 children. 

696 Elizabeth,'' Mch. 7,1817 Nov. 15,1868 June, 1838. 

697 Charles F., Sept. 38, 1818 Mch. 33, 1841. 

Apr. 19, 1865. 

698 Maria F., Mch. 18, 1820 Aug. 8,1822 

699 Julia Esther, Oct. 28, 1831 May 9, 1833 

700 Frances ]\[iu-ia, Apr. 36, 1823 May, 1843, to Chas, FI. 

Jennings. 



1 Married James L. McGregor. Had Mary Stuart and John Alpine. 
* Born and died in Norwalk. He was the son of Jacob and Betsey 
Osborn. 
» Married Aaron Hardman. He died Dec. 12, 1878. 






DESCENDANTS OK WIT.MAM — FIFTH GENERATION. 



83 



No. Namn, Horn. DIod. Married or ltuiniirk». 

701 Upor.ne L., Feb. 1«, 1825 Oct. 13, 187«{ Mcli. 2(1 1853, Snnili 

E. Todd. 
2d wife. 
703 MiiiyAiinWhite.Det'. 14, 180« 
<1 children. 

703 Stephen W., Aug. 14, 1830 Fel). 17, 1872 

704 William .r., Mch. <, 1833 Apr. 24. 1835 

705 William J., 2d, Mch. 27, 1886 

706 Lewis, Mch 5, 1842 Mch. 7, 1843 

707 Henry, May 16, 1844 May 9, 1840 

708 Mary E., Aug, 6,1846 



April. 1829. 
Louisa John.s. 



Chark'H Brown. 



Charles Osborn. 

The subject of this brief .sketch was a native of Connecticut, hav- 
ing been born in the town of Norwalk, August 17, 1792. He was 
r<^lated by birth, and also by marriage, to the .larvis family, (.apt. 
Samuel Jarvis l)eing his great grandfather. 

In early life, about the year 1807, he went to New York, in 
which city, a few years later, he established himself as a watch- 
maker and jeweler, on the corner of Broadway and V^esey street, 
and continued in this business until 1820. From that year until 
1841, he devoted his attention to the care and management of real 
e.state, enjoying the confidence of, and l>eing employed by, such 
men as Gen. S. V^an Rensselaer, Gen. Morgan Lewis, John J. Astor. 
and other well-known, eminent citizens of New York. 

Mr. Osborn was twice married. At the age of 23 years he 
married Miss Huldah Jarvis, daughter of Noah Jarvis; they had 
six children. After her decease, in 18^7, ho married Miss Mary 
A. White of New York. By this second marriage they had six 
children. In the year 1841, he retired from active business and 
removed to Norwalk, his native town, where he resided until his 
death, in 1869. He lived to a good old age, and died in his 77th 
year, respected and lamented by all who knew him. 

Mr. Osborn was an affectionate husband and father, and a kind 
and steadfast friend. 





3S1. 


Elizabeth Jarvis, 


1798 


709 Jonathan Water- 




bury. 




3 children. 




710 Nelson Jarvis. 




711 Chas. Augustus, 


Mch. f 



8, 1877 Mary J. Voley, who died 
July 80, 1877. 



84 



DKBOKN'DANTH OK Wfl.t.lAM — KIKTII OKNKRATION. 



No. Nnmo. 

718 Klizuhctli (Icr- 
tnido. 



iiurn. 



Died. 



Mnrrli'd (ir Huninrku 



Nelson Jurvis, Aug. 15, 1H0() .Inn. H, IHOIJ Hcpt. H, IH'i'i. 

7i:j F<:i().si!i(}niy, Soj)!. 18, 1K()2 .lunc 31. 1833 

I cliild. 

714 Klosia L..' Juhp 17. 1883 

8(1 wife. 

.715 Mary Hayiiioiid, Feb. 1. 1H(>;{ July 13,18(57 
4 children. 

7i(i Francis. Au.u. 33. 188(i Ft-h. H, 183(i 

717 Kilza Rowland, Mcii. !>, 1838 

718,lulia Htiyniond, Oct. 15. 1830 

710 Mar'a Chapujan.July 16. 1831 

Nklson Jauvih 



Nov. 35. 1835. 



Nov. 38, 1840. 
Feb. 0, 1870, 



Was born on Friday ,tAiig. 15, 1800, in tho old homestt^ad of his 
grandfather, Doctor Joseph Chapman, at Poplar riains, late Nor- 
walk, now Westport, C;onn. 

His father and mother died of yellow fever during the preva- 
lence of that disease in New York in 1801. He and his sister 
?]lizal)(!t]i were, consequently, for several years, in the care of their 
grandfatlier Chapman's family. When Nelson was a))out five 
years old, he was placed in cliarge of his grandfather, Hezekiah Jar- 
vis, who resided in the old homestead of the Jarvis family in Nor- 
walk, Coryi., and this he was accustomed to call his home. He 
attended school at the academy in Norwalk, afterwards at the acad- 
emy in Greenfield, and at (Cheshire, ("!onn. Like David, he loved to 
throw stones. The weathercock of St. Paul's church, Norwalk, fell 
by his hands. The boarding-house at (Ireenfield Academy was 
incidentally supplied from their own barnyard by his unerring 
aim, when the scholars sought a/oiol diet. 

Mr. Jarvis was apprenticed to a Mr. Bull of Danbury, Conn., to 
be taught the trade of draper and tailor, and remained with him 
until he was nearly twenty-one years of age. Not being in vigor- 
ous health, he went South to recu{)erate, and, on his return, renewed 
his early attachment for Elosia, only daughter of Capt. John Gray 
of Poplar Plains. The young man, flush with the style, dress, and 
gentility of city life, was forbidden the privilege by the stern old 
farmer. Nevertheless, he inarried Elosia on Sunday, September 






» Married Oct. 29, 1840, toE. 8. Landers; April. 1865, Geo. B. Bates. 



DKHCKNOANTS (>K WIM.IAM — FIFTH aKNKKATlt)N. 



85 



8, 1822. AtU'.Y inoro intiinato acquaintaiico with his son-in-law, 
Captain (Iray amply apoloj^i/od for having a(ito(l upon iniprcHsions, 
which a fine form, ologant dress, and city manners had wrongly 
led him to suppose covered evils of fact, but which lie afterwards 
learned (existed only in his own imaginRtion. ?ilosia died Satur- 
day, June 21, i82;{, leaving a daughter four days old. In the 
following autumn, Mr. .Tarvis visited the South again in the interests 
of his brother-in-law, Mr. Jonathan Waterbury, with whont he 
continued in business connection for several years. 

On the 2r)th November, 1825, h(wnarried Mary, (>ld(^st dauglitor 
of Lewis Raymond, a prominent citizen of Saugatu<;k, now West- 
port, Conn. Of this marriages tluM'e were born one .son, who died 
when about ton years of agc^ and three daughters, still living. 

About 1829, he entered into partnership with his uncle, Samuel 
Jarvis, under the style of S. & N. Jarvis, and so continued until 
1837, when Samuel retired, and Nelson assumed the debts of the 
firm, and, by untiring industry, paid them in full. The burden ho 
assiuned, and so nol)ly carried, prevented the ac'quirement of the 
wealth that otherwise would have resulted from his industry and 
perseverance. 

About 1817, Mr. Jarvis, having a large aciiuaiiitanco a.iiong the 
clergy of the Episcopal ('hurch in the United States and Canada — 
at the request of his friends among the clergy, prominent among 
them the late Rev. J)r. Muhlenb(n-g — was induced to special efi'orts 
to obtain uniformity in the " cut of the cloth" for the clei'gy, more in 
character with the habit and di*ess of the ministers of the English 
('hurch, and with regard to clerietal comfort and convenience. 
Soon the notoriety of a lai-g(!ly increased business in this special 
branch led him to adopt the title (first of the name) of " Clerical 
Tailor," whi(;h has now become common to those who serve the 
clergy in that business. 

A Christian and Churchman of firm though uiodest character, 
early led by a working faith to loving duties in the church, he was 
prominent in the parish, where he worshiped, not only as a con- 
stant observer, but as a doer of church work. For many years he 
was Superintendent of St. Paul's Sunday-school in Trinity Parish, 
New York. His children, hand in hand with him, wiMided their 
way thither, ami were known and observed of all. In the front 
pew of old St. Paul's, in his latter days, his gray head was seen as 
he stood, and kneeled, and prayed in the parish where he wor- 
shiped in his youth. 



86 



nEHf'KNDANTS OF WII.IJAM — FIFTH nENFRATtON. 



In .Inly, 1M")0, h«^ wa» olorterl to fill a vacancy in flic vcHtry of 
Trinity pariHli, and by rcvclection, continuofi to be a voHtrynian in 
that corporation until removed by death. 

In hifi family, with hiw wife and children, Mr. .Inrvi« waH kind, 
indulgent, and loving, always attentive to those dntiew, which the 
church had taught him were the strength of the houHchold and 
the Huh of God. 

Karly in tl»e summer of I8fi2, because of his'declining health, he 
was induced to visit his native town, at the residence of his daugh- 
ter, Klosia. Durijig the sfimmor he gradually failed in strength; 
at the H(!tting in of wijiter was unabh; to leave his room, and tm 
the Hth Janiiary, 186.'?, (juietly breathed his last. 

The funeral service was read in the Memorial Church of the 
Holy 'J'rinity, Westport, by the Rev. Doctors Morgan Dix, Benj. 1. 
Jlaight, and Win. ('oopi^r Mead. An address was given in the 
coui-se of the services, y)y the Rev. Dr. Dix. who said " .Although 
the custom of delivering addresses on occasions such as that which 
brings us here to-day is comparatively unknown in th(! church, 
yet are there moments when siu'h an addition to the solemn ser- 
vice of hurial appears not to be ill-timed. I knew him, and may 
with propriety speak thus at his burial. Our departed brother 
.seemed to fill tlie 'dea of a good man; when thinking of him, tho.se 
words of the Psalmist come to the mind as though (!8pe(;ially appro- 
priate, Psalm XV. — Let him who willeth read." 

Mr. Jarvis was buried on Saturday, the lOtli of January, ISfi.'}, 
in the consecrated g' 'und of Christ Church, VVestport, ('onn., 
committed by the Rev. Benjamin 1. Haight, D.D., and awaits the 
coming of the Lord, W. T. M. 



3«."5. 



No. Name. Born. 

Geo. A. Jarvis 2d,Mch. 9, 1800 



Died. Married or Remarks. 

Sept. 1, 1833, by Rev. 
Dr. Antbon. 

720 Cath. Amelia 

Jarvis, April, 1813 July 28, 1834 

2d wife. 

721 Mary McLean, Jan. 16, 1813 Nov. 27, 1854 Feb. 8, 1836, by Rev. 

Mr. Btrobel. 
5 children. 

722 Chas, Augustus, Jan. 5,1837 Sept. 28, 1838 

723 Mary Caroline, Nov. 15, 1838 Oct. 20, 1839 

724 MaryCaroline2d,Sept.l9.1840 June 20, 1871. 

725 Chas. Aug, 2d, Sept. 23, 1842 May 13, 1862 




i 



jf. 



li 



Uli 



' Hi 

111 
t'i 



Sfi 



pCaniPXTrv t %TrT*r< ^r» 



'7 'tiUjc summer of 1802, -.ecftus^i oi: ia/ ■ 
. .Ji ■■..,1 f,. . ;. ', 1,:,. Tiafivo town, at Hionr 

'■ f^tajimer h<i gradui.'llv 

•:• !■<•- string )n o*" wfnt^ir was nurhli f,, ■:,■.;;,', 
the «U.! Jam; 
V The {rr 






'1 of (loUvpring 



( .iiifmifteii 



J«?^;», 



■N'.'- >;ttJUt;. 



Horn. ( 

Geo.A.Jarvis2<l,M(-h. y, imi 



ViU 



A m; 



•solini!, .■" 



'\t 



""'N. 



votttryiji^n 



' i.'K'L I, 



I i >"• . 



ills (fli*-! 

1' \r 






if 










/ 



c 



/ 





(L/VrZ/vy, 



1 



DKSCKNDA'NTS OF WILLIAM — FIFTH GENERATION. 



87 



' 



No. Name. Born. Died. Married or Reniarlis. 

726 George, Dec. 7. 1844 June 11, 1864 

3d wife. 

727 Miu-ia P. Jenkins, > Aug.23, 1829 July 10, 1857. 

GEORaE A. Jarvis 

Was born in Cheshire, Conn., on the 9th of March, 18GC. His 
father held civil and ecclesiastical offices of trast and influence 
for many years, while his mother watched tenderly for the welfare 
of the children, and impressed upon them the necessity of honesty 
and industry, a high respect for religion, and a regular attendance 
upon the services of the church. 

The subject of this sketch received a fair education at the 
Episcopal Academy in Cheshire, then under the care of the Rev. 
Dr. Tillotson Bronson; but, at the age of eighteen, preferring a 
mercantile to a professional life, he went to New York, and by the 
aid of his uncle, Noah Jarvis, obtained a clerkship for one year, 
without salary. His home, during this time, was with his uncle, 
and his clerkship, though an agreeable one, was useful only, as it 
proved, in the way of education, for his employers failed at the 
end of the second year, and he was left without a situation. 

The general depression in all circles of business after 1826, made 
it exceedingly difficult to obtain another place suited to his ntind. 
His uncle, therefore, having confidence in his ability and persever- 
ance, kindly assisted him to open a grocery store, and, after ten 
years' hard labor and assiduous attention to the business, he had 
accumulated enough to enter upon the wholesale trade. In 1854, 
he withdrew from the firm of Stanton & Jarvis with a ci'edit and 
character untarnished by failure or compromise, and that, too, after 
an active business life of 26 years — many of tliem y»mrs of disaster 
and ruin to old and establislunl houses. This stop was in accord- 
ance with a resolution early formed that he would retire when it 
should be convenient after he had accumulated a moderate com- 
petency. 

In 1860, he was unanimously elected President of the Jjcnox 
Fire Insurance Company, New York, an offici' which he still holds 
(1879), and under whose oversight it has attained a good .standuig 
among the reliable institutions of the city. 

In 1840, he moved to Brooklyn, and, in 1844, built the house 
which he now occupies, having identified himself in many ways 



' Married in Buffalo, by Rev. Ed. Ingersoll, D.D. 



88 



DESCENDANTS OP WILLIAM FIFTJI GENERATION. 



witli the city of his adoption. He was among the Corporators of 
the Brooklyn Atlieneum, tlie South Brooklyn Savings Bank (of 
which for twenty-iive years he has been Vice-President), the Atlan- 
tic Fire Insurance (>)., the Home Life Insui'ance Co., a Director of 
the Atlantic Dock Co., and he is connected with several educational 
and benevolent institutions. He served his time in the New York 
Seventh Regiment, and is now a member of the Veteran Corps. 
While working actively in New York and Brooklyn, he has never 
lost his interest in his native village. He visits it annually, and 
thus shows that his heart fondly turns to the home and scenes of his 
youth. 

In 1865, he suggesteti a soldiers' inunument in Cheshire, and was 
the chief contributor towards its erection — a monument Ijelieved 
to have been the first of the kind in the country, and commemorat- 
ing, among otluu-s, the name of his friend and .schoolmate, Admiral 
Andrew H. Foote. He gave libei-ally towards the enlargement of 
the church in that place, and towards the erection of Bronson Hall, 
one <jf the buildings of the Episcopal Academy. H(^ aided Bishop 
Randall in the building of Jarvis Hall at Golden, Colorado, and 
als(^ to rebuild it after its destruction by a tornado in 1869. He 
has estalilished scholarships in the Bei-keley Divinity School at 
Middletown, Conn., and assisted several young men in their collegi- 
ate and theological education. 

Mr. Jarvis has been three times married. His first wife was 
Catharine, daughter of Samuc^l Jarvis, New York, a lady endowed 
with many charms of person and character, wlio died suddenly 
within a year after their marriage. 

His second wife was Mary, the only daughter of Cornelius 
McLean, New York, a (christian woman and a })erfect exemplifica- 
tion of that charity which is "kind in thought, word, and deed," 
— qualities that rendered her an affectionate mother and a stead- 
fast friend. 

The third wife of Mr. Jarvis is a daughter of the late Lewis 
Jenkins of Buffalo, who, like himself and his former companions, 
is a communicant of the Episcopal Church, and being of a cheer- 
ful and happy disposition, makes his home ever welcome to his 
friends. 

Of his five children (all by his second wife), two died in infancy, 
two arrived to manhood, and one daughter only survives — Mary, 
the wife of P. J. Bancroft, M.D., Denver, Colorado. 

Charles Augustus, tlu; eldest of his sons, possessed a good mind 



i 



DKSCKNDANTH OF WII.MAM FIFTH OKNKUATKtN. 



89 



lis 



y 



y. 
lid 



and high intolligcnco. Ho had rare wit and keen peiroptinns. 
His resolution and courage never left him, as the following inci- 
dent will sh' ••• I.. iooO, he wont to Texas for the recovery of his 
health, and spent the winter near San Antonio, fn the ensuing 
spring, his father, becoming fearful from the signs of the times 
that Galveston and New Orleans would bo blot^kaded and com- 
munication cut off, wrote to his friend, the Hon. (Tideon Welles, 
then Secretary of the Navy, stating his son's condition, and asking 
whether he would advise him to return immediately or to remain 
until the warm weather. Mr. Welles In'ieHy replied, " In view of 
existing difficulties, 1 should, were my son like yours, take measures 
for his immediate return." Mr. Jarvis wrote to his son at once, 
and on receipt of the letter he started by coach, in company with a 
gentleman, his wife, and child. Night overtook them before the 
journey of 75 miles had been completed, and the driver, for some 
reason, lay down on the coach and refused to go farther. Young 
Jarvis knew that l)y dehty they might lose the steamer, and he 
therefore mounted the bo.x himself and drove the horses the long 
night over a strang«> road. He could not ask the gentleman within 
to relieve him, as his attention was given to " the comfort of wife 
and baby." They reached Columbus in tim<; for the train, a?id 
upon arriving in Galveston, Jarvis went directly to the steanun*, 
which sailed at midnight; but his companions, by seeking rest at a 
hotel, missed their passage, and as the l)lockade was declareil 
immediately after this, they were forced to return to San Antonio. 
The weary invalid travelled without rest until he reached Buffalo. 
The fatigue and excitement of the long journey quite overbalanced 
any benefit which his sojourn in Texas might have gained for lujn, 
and he died after lingering on through another year and shedding 
brightness upon all who came within his influence. 

George, the other son, was a young man of promise, with a mind 
active and well-developed by study and general reading, but his 
strength and health failed him, and two years after the decease of 
his brother he was laid beside him in the beautiful cemetery of 
Greenwood. Both became communii^auts of the 'Episcopal Church 
in their boyhood, and to the end were consistent in their char- 
acters and faithful in their religious duties. The inscription on 
the chancel window which parental affection has erected in the 
Parish Church at Cheshire, fitly expresses the well-groimded hope 
of their eternal life, " Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall 
see God," • 

12 



■-i- 




v 



90 



DEHCKNUANT8 OF WILMAM KIFTII OKNKKATION. 

3SO. 

Died. 



No. Name. Born. Died. Married or Remarks. 

Mary Aim Jarvis, Sept. 4, 1809 May 6, 1829. 

728 David Basset t, Oct. 8, 1805 June 30, 1861 

a ehiUlren. 

729 John E., Mch. 31, 1830 June 11, 18(i0. 

730 Elizah'li Caroline, Apr.24,1833 Feb. 20,1839 

731 Harriet Aug'ta, July 7, 1842 June 1, 1844 



^S-*^^CJ» 



Dc( . 7. 1847. 



Benj.A.Jarvis.iFeb. 11, 1813 

732 Frances A.Taylor, Dec.3, 1815 

2 children. 

733 Ann Augusta, Feb. 14, 1849 April 12, 1877 July 8, 1873. 

734 Car'lineAmelia.Dec. 9, 1850 



M i 



330. 

Sarah Maria 
Jarvis, Feb. 3,1817 

735 Orchard Warner, May 5, 1812 

5 children. 
730 Dudley Jarvis, Mch. 13, 1842 

737 Elani, Sept. 5, 1843 April 4, 1845 

738 Frank Eugene, Oct. 4, 1845 

739 Elani 2d,» May 17, 1850 

740 (^eo. Holland, Oct. 1, 1855 Mch. 6, 1801 



Jan. 14, 1841. by Hev. 

E.E.Beard,^ley,D.D. 

Farmer, Haniden, Ct. 

Engineer, N. Y. 

Stock grower. Col. 
Oct. 17, 1877. 



11 i 



ii 



333. 

Hez'h N. J arvis, Mch. 24, 1823 Nov. 16, 1852. Farmer, 

near Denver, (!ol. 

741 Mary S.Winther,Dec. 15, 1827 May 1,1853 

2d wife. 

742 Jane Pomeroy 

Emery, =» Sept. 24, 1839 Dec. 28, 1872. 

1 child. 

743 (^has. Edward, July 29, 1873 



1 Benjamin A. Jarvis, farmer, was married Dec; 7, 1847, by Hev. E. E. 
Beardsley, D.D., of Cheshire, Conn, lie has been Vestryman of St. 
Peter's Church in Cheshire, Conn., from 1837; many times Selectman, and 
served m the Legislature seven terms; is now Treasurer of the Episcopal 
Academy and Judge of Probate (1879). 

2 Farmer, Ilamden, Conn.; married by Hov. John Haugh, to Antoinette 
Dor man, b. Feb. 7, 1853. 
• 3 Jtlarried by Bishop Handall, in Denver, Col. 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM — FIFTH GENERATION. 



91 



Sarah Anil 
Jiirvis, June 31, 1H05 

744 Jas. W. Piiickncy, 

10 childirn. 

745 Emily AuguHta.Mrh. 11, 1820 Aiiy. «i, 1827 

746 Louisa Jarvis, Nov. 15, 1827 

747 Sannu'I Jarvis, Oct. 0, 1829 

748 Micajali, Oct.. 0, 1831 

749 FmnccsM.. .Inly (i, 1834 



750 IIo;)arl, 

751 JaincH W., 

752 Jennie A., 

753 Ei,.;iy, 

754 Edward A., 



Aug. 28, 183(5 
June 8, 1837 
Dec. 10, 1838 

Nov. 15, 1843 
Nov. C, 1845 



May 17. 1825. 

Late merchant in N. Y. 



Oct. 17, 1849, to Capt. 

Henry A. Welmore. 
April 24, 185G. 
Mary R. Nichol,'^. 
Dec. 27, 1855, to Jos. 

C. Itandle. 



Oct. 24. 18C0, to Sic 
phen II. Ilolme.'^. 



33 S. 



Nov. 29, 1836. 



Eiizab'h JarvLs. Nov. 15. 1811 

755 Jno. A. McLean, 

M.D., June 34, 1798 

1 child. 

756 John Wilson 

McLean. M.D., Oct. 4, 1837 



34 r. 

Henrietta S. 

Jarvis, Dec. 9, 1811 Feb. 32, 1877 Apr. 18, 1830. 

757 Jahez B. Peck, Dec. 10, 1804 

7 children. 

758 Charles A., Mch. 3,1831 

759 Nelson A., July 22, 1832 Mch. 1833 

760 Nelson .Tarvis, Feb. 5, 1834 Ai)r. 1835 

761 Albert William, Feb. 7, 1838 

762 Eiizab'h Jarvis, Apr. 24, 183(i 

763 NelsnJarvis,2d,'Mch.24,1839 June 6, 1863 

764 Cornel. Frances, July, 1841 Jan. 4, 1843 



34S. 

Win. Jarvis, 3 Jan. 30, 1813 

765 Lucy A. Rogers. May 8, 1832 

2 children. 

766 William Hart, Dec. 1, 1850 Mch. ^6, 1853 

767 Lucy, Oct. 1, 1854 



May 26, 1846. 



» Drowned at Bayou Bceuf, La., Company C, 23d Conn. Volunteers 
« Married by Bp. M(-Ilvain, at St. Peter's, Rome. Ohio. 



i: 









'■l 



I 






92 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM — KIFTII OENEHATION. 



William Jarvis 



Moved from Connecticut to Hart's Grove, Ohio, in the spring of 
1836, where he became the owner of one Imndred acres of land, 
and the agent of the heirs of the late Major Richard W. Hart of 
Saybrook, Conn.,- who were the owners of large tracts of land in 
several of the snrroixnding townships. 

Mr. Jarvis was post-master of the town for about twenty-three 
years, and served as an officer in the State militia some fifteen 
years, retiring with the rank of Colonel. He was elected and 
served as one of the direc^tors of the Ashtabula A qjricultiiral 
Society about fifteen .years, during the last two as president. He 
has also been director of the P"'irst National Bank at Geneva, 0., 
and, at various times, has held other minor offices of the town. 

Mr. Jarvis is a worthy, exemplary, and high-minded citizen, and 
an estimable gentleman. 



Married or Remarks. 

Juno 5, lSr.fi, l)y Bp. 
Biowiu'll. 



3«S. 

No. Name. Born. Died. 

Elizabeth Hart 
Jarvis, Oct. 5, 1830 

7«8 Col. SamM Colt, July 19, 1814 .hm. 10, 1862 
4 cliildrcn. 

769 Saiimel Jarvi.><, Feb. 24. 1857 Dm: 24, 1858 

770 Caldwell Hart, Nov. 24, 1858 

771 Elizab'h .Inrvis, Feb. 23, 1860 Oct. 15, 1861 

772 HenrttaSoldeu.May 23, 1801 Jan. 20, 1803 



Samuel C^olt 

Was born at Hartford, Connecticut, July 19, 1814, and was the 
third son of Christopher and Sarah Colt. His mother was a 
daughter of Major John Caldwell, who was one of the prominent 
citizens of Hartford at that period. 

From his mother and maternal grandfather he inherited some 
of his most marked chaiacteristics, and if we may judge from the 
miniatui'e of his mother, he inherited, in a great measure, her 
beautiful features. His mother, around whom circled so many 
gentle and tender memories, and whom he loved so fondly, died 
before he had completed his seventh year. It was but a little 
while, however, after his mother's death, that the young man's 
life-work began. 

Before her death, his father's business affairs became enibar- 



a 



,r- 




92 



DKSOENPANTS OF WILLIAM — FIFTH OENKKATION. 



f 



(/,'!■. 




^' 



~7-^y.^ 




'l-^l. 



.^<y<^6^ j^^ 



«^-t < -"^-^y 



II 



!"l 



(■ / 



<^ 



DKKOKNDANTH OF WII.MAM — KITPII OKNKHATION. 



93 



rassod, and ovontually ho lost tho hulk of his fortuiu". At ton 
yours of a^o, Samuel was sent to Iuh fnthor'H fa<:tory, at Ware, 
Mass., whero, with intervals at srhool and on a farm, he remained 
until he was sent to Amherst to extend his education. With little 
taste for study, he yet learned rapidly all practical brandies of 
knowledf^e within liis reach, and was, oven in those days, a leader 
anion^ the hoys, eitlier in work or i)lay. 

Among tlu* traditions of his boyhood, one is given by a neighl)or 
on the Hill, showing at how early an age his attention was directed 
to tho A KM .with which his name was to be so intimately coniieeted, 
and so well known the world over. When about seveti years of 
ago, lie was one day missing for some time, and when at last he 
was discovered, he was seated undcu- a tree, with a pistol taken 
entirely to pieces, and tlie different parts carefully arranged around 
him, and which ho was beginning to reconstruct — a feat whicth, to 
his great delight, he soon accomplished. 

A relative remembers, one morning, when crossing on the 
bridge to East Hartford, being startled by the sharp n^port of a 
pistol ringing out on the clear air. Looking onward, he discov- 
ered young Colt, who had stopped, on his way back to the farm 
where he was then working, after enjoying a lioliday in Hartford, 
to indulge in th(! delight of filing his pistol into the river. These 
trifling incidents serve to show the bent of his youthful mind, and 
how early in life he evinced a taste for lire-arms. 

While at school at Amherst, his father had arrangcnl for sending 
him to sea, but, before the ship was ready to sail, he concluded he 
would not wait to be stMit for, and left school without leave from 
any one, after some patriotic demonstrations on tlie 4tli of July, 
which did not meet the appi'oval of the school authorities. Arriv- 
ing at home unexpectedly, he told his father he thought it must 
be time for the ship to sail, and had come to see about it. " Have 
you brought all your things ?" asked his father. "All but my 
bills," he promptly answered. 

He sailed from Moston, before the mast, on the 2d of August, 
1830, for India, iiis outiit having been attended to by Mr. Samuel 
Laurence of Boston. His hard life on shipboard most thoroughly 
cured the young man of being a sailor, yet lie loved the sea, and 
his frequent voyages to Europe, which, in after years, his business 
compelled him to mak(!, were almost the only intervals of relaxa- 
tion, with the ex(!eption of a few liours, during his short and l)usy 
life. 



m 



94 



DESCENDANTS OF WltUAM FIFTH GENERATION. 



On this voyage to Calcutta, lie first conceived the idea of the 
now well-known "Colt's Revolver," and he made, on shipboard, 
a little wooden model of the pistol, which is still pi'eserved as a 
precious relic in the cabinet at Armsniear. On his return from 
sea, he was for a time again in his father's factory at Ware, where 
he learned much valuable and practical chemical information frotr 
Mr. William Smith, who was in charge of the dyeing aw] bleach- 
ing department. W^ith the knowledge thus gained as his chief 
capital, he began, in 1832; to give (diemical lectures, and admin- 

* 

istered laughing or nitrous oxide gas, going into eveiy town of 
two thousand iiduibitants in the United States, Canada, and Nova 
Scotia. E.\ce{)tmg in his own State, he went uiu'er the as.-^umed 
name of Dr. Coult. Ilis lectiu'es met with vaiying pecuniary 
success, but as a general thing were popular. From the proceeds, 
he not only managed to support himself, but to begin his cherished 
scheme of liaving the fabrication of his arms commenced at Balti- 
more. In 1835, he went to England, and there secured his first 
patents, returning in January, 1836. He was, at this time, .six 
feet in height, slender, with a soldierly presence and beai'ing. 
His face was of uncommon beauty, with very perfect features, 
clear, honest eyes of light ha/el, with a wealth of the finest hair, 
covering his head in clear, cri,sp curls. As he grew older, his 
figure developed into more massive proportions, seeming to keep 
pace with the ever-expanding, active brain. As the years went 
on, he began to feel the responsibilities of the position to which 
he had raised himself. His opinion was asked by the wise and 
great, and even monarclis sought the benefit of his wide experience 
and inventive genius in their own national works. The endearing 
ties of homo and children had brought out into strong lire all the 
gentlent'ss and tenderness of his nature, when a soul-beauty grew 
upon the noble face which made it more charming than it was in 
all the glory of youth, even though threads of silver were stealing 
in among the )irown and clustering locks. 

Soon ahcr his return from Europe, he took out his American 
patents, and before the close of 1836, a company was organized' 
for the manufacture of his arms at Paterson, New Jersey. 

He was in Florida in the winter of 1837, during the Indian war, 
and made some life-long friends among the officers of the army 
there. He had hoped to get the Government to adopt his arm, 
but failed to accomplish iiis object, an(i was obliged, to meet his 
liabilities, ;o sell his p. itent to the Paterson Company. 



DKSCKNDANTS OB" WILLFAM FIFTH GENEHATION. 



95 



In 1840, a board of oflScers reported unanimously in favor of 
the pistols. 

In 1842 tlie Paterson Company failed, and all manufacture of 
the arms was suspended. 

The Submarine Battery was another of his inventions, and he 
made with it some most successful experiments, both in New York 
Harbor, and on the Potomac, at Washington. At the same time, 
he was engaged in the offmg telegraph, and he laid successfully, 
and used, the first submarine telograi)h from tlie city to Coney 
Island and Fire Island Liglit. He used asphaltum and wax as 
in. alators, the whole being inclosed in a leaden pipe. As a pecun- 
iary speculation, the offing telegraph, both at New York and 
Boston, failed. 

At the commencement of the Mexican war, he received from 
the (jrovernmeut, at the instance of Gen. Taylor, an order fur one 
thousand pistols, and althougli large numbers had been manufac- 
tured at Paterson, it was not, at this time, possible to procure a 
single arm in the market. 

In 1847, he commenced manufacturing his arm; at Wliitney- 
ville, near New Haven, ha'.'ing bought back his patent rights, and 
the so-called "Texan Model,'' the " Rangers" soon were a terror 
to the Mexicans and to all enemies, and were of world-wide renown. 
For years he had bravely worked on, in spite of obstacles and 
disappointments, and now his labor and perseverance were to meet 
their full fruition, and a success achieved by few was his, from 
this time onward. Fortune brought him wealth and honor, but 
he never relaxed his labors, and when, at length, he could retui'n 
to his native town to reside, it was his pride to build there the 
largest private armory in the world. 

In 1854, he began to build a dyke along the bank of tlu; (\)n- 
necticut, thus reclaiming a portion of beautiful mi^adow land which 
w;«s overflowed by the river freshets. Within this embankment 
he built the armory, and a village of brick houses for the workmen 
and their families. The armory was completed in the fall of 1855. 

in June, 1856, he was married, at Middletown, to Elizabeth 
Hart Jarvis, daught(U' of the lic^v. William and Mrs. Elizal)eth M. 
Jarvis, the venerable Bishop Browuell performing the marriage 
ceremony. 

They sailed for Liverpool on the 7th of June, and spent the 
sunnner and autumn in Europe, being present at the coronation of 
the Emperor Alexander II. of Russia, and also at the frteii and 



96 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM FIFTH OENERATION. 



balls given upon the occasion of that brilliant ceremony. Return- 
ing homc! just before the winter, in February, 1857, lie moved into 
the home which he had built and where he delighted to gather 
everything to make home attractive and pleasant. 

The first sorrow that came to that ha2:)py household was in the 
loss of their first chihl, an infant son of just ten months old. This 
seemed to be the beginning of the loss of the strong man's hold 
on life. His darling had been taken away. Another son was 
born in November, 1858, the only child who outlived infancy. 
Two daughters lived just long enough to make all love them, when 
they followed their little brother to Paradise. 

Frequent attacks of gout and rheumatism were telling visil)ly 
upon Col. Colt's strengtli, but while the body was suli'ering so 
inexpressibly, the mind and will were strong as ever. On his 
sick-bed, he managed and directed the affairs of the armory with 
almost the minuteness and all the clearness of health, and the 
business steadily increased and prt)spered. 

In Februar}-, 18fil, he went to Cuba, hoping, in tlie more genial 
climate of the tropics, to throw off the blighting disease, but while 
this hope was partially realized, firm health had gone for ever, and 
on the 10th of January, 1862, the summons came, and the home 
he had made so lovely, and where he had known so great hai)pi- 
ness and sorrow, was desolate indeed. His funeral was attended 
on the 14th, at his late residence. P'ifteen hundred men, who 
were in his employ at the time of his death, came to look upon his 
face for the last time, and then forming in two lines between the 
house and the grave, the body was carried to its last resting place, 
amid the men for whom, in life, he had done so much, and in 
whose well-being he had taken so deep an interest. The flags of 
the city were at half-mast on the day he died, and in many a home 
made happy by his prosperity there were mourning hearts. Thus 
passed away in his prime a man who combined, in an unusual 
degree, strength, the power to control men, executive and invent- 
ive ability and genius, with great gentleness. Ho was universally 
just, his tastes refined and elegant, his judgment correct and critical. 
With hypocrisy he had no patience, no dealing; and his scorn of 
it, and love of truth, were very prominent traits of his character. 
His wit was quick and ready, and rarely failed him. For the aged 
and little children, he had always a kind word, and the first fruits 
of his green-houses and orchards were for the sick and afflicted. 
Though he was thus early called to rest from his laboi-s, he yet 



•DESCKM^ANTS OF WrLUAM-F.PTn OENKRAT.ON. <,7 

lives in the great work, the monument whidi his own f«itT, , 
energy built, and in the true hearts that mtrrsoTdJv or th 
breakmg of the strong staff of the beautiful rod "^ 

"A sense of loss on all around, 

A sijrh of j^rrief and pain ; 
The like of liim we lose lo-day, 
We nuiy not see again. " 



No. Name. 

Hetty Hart 
Jarvis, 



3S3. 



Born. 
Feb. 28, 1828 



Died. 



773 Cyprian Nicho- 

las Beach. 
1 child. 

774 Elizabeth H. 

Jarvis, Nov. 3, 186& 



E. H. C. 



Married or Remarks. 

Dec. 5, 18(57, by Up. 
Williams. 



357". 

Maria Louisa 
Jarvis,! Jan q loorr 

775 Fred.Fitz Gerald ' ' i«t . ,, , S^^t- 30, 1855. 

r> children. ^"^' ^^' ^^'^^ ««'•" ^»"'^on, Eng. 

776 Elizii))'h Jarvis, Julv 5, 185() 

777 Mary Collins, July 7' 1858 

778 John, May 14, 1861 Ja„. 24, i«63 
<79 Anna Greeno'h, July 21. 1803 

780 Frederick, Dec. 7, 1866 

3SS. 

John Samuel 

781 Eltboliunr. *" "•''"' ^"'y ^7, ■««« .*1«. 3,, ,859. 

vis Hall. 
3 children. 

782 Elizabeth Colt, July oj^ jygQ 

783 HcttieFred'rica.July l, 1864 

^ Married by Bp. Williams andDrTG^i^id^ 



13 





1, 



!»8 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM SIXTH GENEHATION. 



♦iTIl CtHNKUATION. 



ass. 



^larricd or Hoinarks. 
Sept. 15, 1829. 



No. Name. Horn. Died. 

Gi'orgc Sc^nunir 
.larvis, June 2, 180fi 

784 Marlliii Sliricvt', i 1870 

5 children. 

785 Goorjcc Hoirers, June 18, 18i$2 Feb. 10,1854 A divinity .student. 

786 Ceciliii Sopliia, Au.uj. 12, 18;{;5 

787 lleib't Muuson, Dec. 10, 18;54 Enieline Thmft. 

In Holy Orders. 

788 Mary Shrieve, July 24, 18R0 

789 Amelia Sarah. April 12, 1849 Mch. 7, 1856 



^MS" 



Rev. Geokge vSeymoi^b Jauvis, D.D., 

Is at present (1878) Rector of Shediac and Coverdale, and part of 
the secular parishes of Dorchester, N. B., and Rural Dean of the 
Coitnties of Westmoreland, Albert, and part of Kent. He matricu- 
lated at Windsor, N. S., May 15, 1822; admitted to the degree of 
B.A. in 182(5, to M.A. in 1829. lie received many clerical appoint- 
ments and honors, and was unremitting in his duties in promoting 
the welfare of the Church in different places. In January, 1840, 
he received the degree of D.D. at Windsor, and at the same time, 
ad eundem at Fredericton, N. B. In 184.">, he was elected to the 
first of the seven Deaneries into whicli the Bishop of Fred- 
ericton divided his Diocese, where he has been unanimously re- 
elected every three years for the tenth time. In 1874, the Diocese 
of Fredericton consented to join the Provincial Synod of Montreal, 
and Dr. Jarvis was elected by tlie Diocesan Synod as one of the 
Clerical Delegates. Dr. Jarvis was elected Li]»rarian of the Uni- 
vei'sity of Windsor, an honor usually conferred on a prof(;ssor. 
The Doctor, when he came to Shediac, found 30 comimuiicants, 
which under his charge have increased to 420. The baptisms 
during his ministry have been 1,840; communicants, 580, besides 
those registered; burials, 920; candidates for confirmation, 1,410; 
marriages, 3G8; miles travelled on missionary duty, 147,000. 



1 Mr.s. Martha JarvLs's father was a son of Wi^h Sheriff Shriiive of New 
York, whose widow married Paul Day, Capt. of the 52d re,>j;iineiit. Capt. 
Day's father, the Earl of Temple, and Ivui of Clmthani, niarricd three 
sisters, the Misses Granville. The maiden name of Sheriil Shrieve'a 
wife was Seymour. 



V ... 



DESCENDANTS OF WILIJAM — SIXTH fiKNERATION. 



99 



3S1>. 



No. Name. lioru . 

Edward Liitwich 

Jarvis, Aug. 10, 1807 

790 Ellen Leonard. 

4 children. 
7!»1 Isabel McLean, Anj,-. ;{, IHHO 
7!t2 ('has. Edward 

lieonard, July 17, 1840 

7!);j Ellen Caroline, Mcli. 12, 1843 
704 Mary Nutting, Sept. 30. 1844 



Died. 



Married or HeinarkH, 



Sept. 8, 1878 



\V. II. Howring. 



Edward Lutwicii Jarvis 

Died at St. John, Ncwfoiuulland, Sept. 8, 1878, at the advanced 
age of seventy-one years. Tlie decoasi'd gentleinan was for a long 
time well-known in that city, not alone in connection with the high 
positions he occupied, but also for his remarkable urbanity and 
gentlemanly deportment, no matter with what classes of society he 
came in contact. Mr. Jarvis was, for several years, Aide-de-camp 
to the Governor of Newfoundland, and in his commercial capacity 
as Ag(>nt of the Marine Insurance Company of North America and 
other companies, has won golden opinions tor tact, promptitude, 
and general efiiciency. — Newfoundland Chronicle. 



1h 



31>3. 

CarolinoJarvis, May 13. 181;{ Oct. 3,1855 September, 1839. 

795 Geo. Wheeler, August, 1855 

1 child. 

796 Georgina Caro- 

line, Nov. 3, 1840 



3«M5. 

Sarah Maria 
Jarvis, Mch. 14, 1818 

797 Alexander Stewart. ' 

7 children. 

798 Alex. John,'' Mch. 32, 1843 

799 Marg't Maria, Sept. 13, 1844 



1 The Rev. Alexander Stewart, M.A., was Assistant Minister of Triiuly 
Church, St. John, N. B., for some years; afterwards Assistant Minister of 
St. George's Church, Kingston, and St. James's Cathedral, Toronto; at 
present (1878) is liecttor and Rural Dean at Orillia, Ont. 

* Alexander John Stewart took his degree as 31. D. at the Queen's Uni- 
versitj", Kingston. 



100 



DESCENDANTS OP WILLIAM — SIXTH GENERATION. 



No. Name. Bom. Died. Married or Reinark«i 

800 Ali(;e Elizabeth, April 38, 1847 

801 Wra. Tliatcher, July 17, 1849 June 18, 1860 Drowned at Kingston. 
803 Mary Lon-r, June 31, 1853 Nov. 34, 1853 

803 Chas. Edward, July 30, 1854 Mcb. 9. 1858 

804 Frederick, April 3, 1859 July 30, 1859 

805 Car'line Matilda, Dec. 17, 1856 



3or. 



Amelia Jane 










Jarvi.s, 


Jan. 1 


. 1830 


Feb. 


33. 1867 


806 Rev. Tbo.s. McGhee. 








8 children. 










807 Agnes, 


June, 


1845 






808 Murray, 


Marcli, 


1847 


Feb.. 


1873 


809 Annie Ellen 










Leonard, 


July. 


1848 






810 William, 


Dec, 


1850 


Nov. 


1873 


811 Mary, 


July, 


1853 


Sept. 


1808 


813 (Caroline, 


Nov., 


1853 






813 Malcolm, 


May, 


1855 






814 Leonard, 


Oct.. 


1857 







William Harrison. 



Chas. Leonard Jarvis. 



■i- 



400. 

Elizab'b Arnold 
Jarvis, Oct. 30. 1834 

449 I Geo. Murray 

815 \ . Jarvis. April 13, 1834 

10 children. 

816 Herb't Murray, May 18, 1848 

817 Annie Elizabeth 

Stewart, July • 4, 1849 

818 Arthur Leonard • 

Fitzgerald, June 17, 1853 

819 Geo. Wm. Hope, Sept. 17. 1853 Nov. 14. 1854 

830 Sidney Berdoe, Nov. 6, 1854 Feb. 8, 1868 

831 Mary Royles, Aug. 31, 1857 
833 Emily Caroline, Dec. 37,1858 

833 Laura IMatilda, Oct. 8, 1800 

834 Edmund Owen 

Meredith. Nov. 35, 1803 Nov. 3. 1864 

835 Fred'k Arnold, July 36, 1807 



June 33, 1840. 

Finance department, 

Ottawa. 
Dec. 33, 1875. 



40S. 

Robt. F. Hazen, April 19, 1803 Ai)ril 35, 1874 
836 Joanna Robinson, June 16, 1853 

children. 



aiBUal^^jl^Hfc a WS^KU^j^JIt , - 



DRROKNDANTS OP WILLTAM-grXTTI OKNKRATrON. 



101 



No. Name. Uorn. 

8«7 Robert Morris, > Sept. 37 1829 

838 William. « 

839 Susan. 
880 Eli/.abctl'. 
831 Miirg't Ann, 
838 Joanna, 



July 4, 1831 
Aug. 11, 1830 

McJj. 18, 184S 



May 



Diiid. 
0, 1803 



404. 



Married or Remarke. 
April, 1854. 
Marcli 9, 1865. 
Oct. 8, 1801. 

Oct. 35, 1800. 
William Ritchie, who 
died. « 



William Mnn.son 

Jarvi.s, * Oct. 9, 1838 

833 Jane Hope Beer. 

3 children. 

834 Edvv'd William, Sept. 11, 1803 

835 Lucy Caroline, Jan. 2(1, 1804 ' 
830 Frank Hope, Feb. 8, 1808 

3d wife. 

837 Mary Lucrelia 

Scovel. 
3 children. 

838 Mary Elizabeth, Mcli. 20, 1809 

839 Helen Mary, Apr. 37, 1871 

40S. 

Mary Jane 

mFXlwn. ''''■ "■"'' "^•"•H'S^S So,,,. .,,„«. 

Starr. 

1 child. 
841 Maria Gore, Aug. 13, 1844 





1 




i 


' 




i 


.' 


1, , 




,1 i 


II 

! 



410. 

Henry Fitz Ger- 
ald Jarvis, May 80, 1885 



^ Robert Morris Hazen, a Captain in H \T~^u^^^ ^- 7~~~ 

Corps, fonnerly ,.o,„,„,„„,, ,^b ', .'^f^, '^.l'" iT ''"'"' ''''" 
136). He died at H,„.,„ah in Tmb-a "'■"""■'""'• ^"'•""'' '^">^"' («oo No. 

ChiJ^^Lo t;Z:X"' T ''7. ^'"""'" '^^^'•'■'•■.■^-nerlv 
supreme Onrt ^2j^Z::::;7cZ:^l''''' '^"^ ^' ^'"' •'""^- <"' '"'■ 

■* Wdham Munson Jarvis is a lawve.- i»r ,...^f • 
in the New Brunswick Militia n^ ^ T fr'"' "/^'r^^-'-'^Colon..! 
1863. Is Vice-President of /; j!.''"'*^" '^^V^^^- J"''": admitted („ the Bar 



?f r 



102 



DK80KNDANTH OP WILI-IAM — SIXTH OKNKUATION. 



No. Namo. Born. Died. Marrlod or Runiarks. 

843 Friincos Slcwart 

Walker. Sept. 38, 1850 

1 child. 
843 Anna Mary, .Tnly 0, 1850 Aug. ;50, 1850 

2(1 wilV. 
• 844 Lucy D.I larding, Sept. 80, 1858. 

5 cliildrcn. 
845 Edward Clifton, July 11, 1859 
84« Ar. Ilen'yBoyd, Oct. 39, 1860 

847 ErncHt FrcdU, S('i)t. 1«, 18(53 

848 lIcl.Ani.Margt, Apr. .'50, 1804 

849 Charles William, Mch. 18, 1860 

41.1. 

Geo. Wni. Town- 
send .larvis. May 30, 1837 Nov. 3, 18(58 

850 Sarah Smith. 

5 children. all of whom are dead. 

8d wife. 

851 Christina Jane Ilill. 

1 child. 
858 Mary, May, 1860 in infancy. 



413. 

Caroline Amelia 

Jarvis, Feb. 33, 1831 

853 Charles Palmer, i 

7 children. 

854 Mary Anna, ]VIch. 31, 1856 

855 Ada Millicent, Feb. 9, 1858 
850 Louise Caroline, Mch. 9, 1859 

857 Ethel Maria, May 30, 1860 

858 Helen Amelia 

Boyd, Oct. 36, 1861 

859 Robert Edward, Dec. 16, 1805 

860 Charles William 

Jarvis, Mch. 31, 1808 



Sept. 10, 1853. 



4S8. 



Robert Jarvis 

Hamilton, May 18, 1818 
801 Catharine Rob- 
ertson. 
5 children. 



Nov. 19, 1836. 



1 Hon. Charles Palmer is Chief- Justice of Prince Edward's Island. 



' 



nKSOENDANTH OF WIM,,AM-8IXTH (.KXKHATION. 



I o;i 



^"- Name. Born. . 

863 VVilliiim, May 38, 1849 

86!{ Calh'iu! I.avinia.Sepf,. 2, 

804 Agnes riannaJi, Nov. 30, 



Died. 



Sept. 3, 
Aug. 2, 



H(ir) Roltfrt Henry, 
8«(i Je.s8ie, 

3tl wife. 

867 Mary Jano 

Wriglit, 
7 cliildren. 

868 George Edward, July 13, 1853 
861) Maria Isabel, (let. 10, 1865 

870 Caroline Mal)((l, Dec. 3, 1857 

871 John Harvey, Apr. 26, 1859 
873 Jane Chalmer,< June 15, 1862 

873 Aiigu.sta Mary, Mch. 3. 1804 

874 Mary, jjay 15, 1860 



Apr., 1867 



Married or RemarkH, 
Sept., 1873, MaryMlle-s. 
Ai)r. 30, 1871, Dr. 
Cluw. Donnelly. 
Dec. 31, 1874, Chas. 
Lemon. 

I. W. Aiway. 



Apr. 15, 1851. 



Jan. 3, 1860 



Maria Lavinia 

o.. ,^/''™"t'>". Sept. 15. 1818 
8<5 VVilliani Harvey 

Fitz Gerald, 

3 children. 

876 Duncan. May 31, 1843 

877 Harvey, Mch. 25, 1844 



431. 



May 21, 1840. 
H. M. 73d liegt. 



1. 



Catharine Ham- 
ilton, Mch, 

878 8iinuiel B. Free- 

man. 

9 children. 

879 Geo. Orniaud, i Sept, 
8H0 Clarence, May 
881 Ida, Maria, Feb. 
883 Arth'r Hamilt'n.Jan. 

883 Alice Maud, Mch. 

884 Chai-les Edgar, Dec. 

885 Frank. Mch. 

886 Manfred, July 

887 Christahelle, Nov, 



434. 



15, 1836 



19. 1844 
30, 1846 
13, 1849 
30, 1853 

15, 1855 
SI, 1850 

16, I860 
15, 1864 
25, 1866 



1843. 



Nov. 9, 18()8. 
Dec. 35, 1871. 



' ^^I'»-"ed Margaret Douglas Hamilton McLean. 



ill 



14 H 1 



104 



PKHflKNOANTH OK WIl, 1,1AM StXTII OKNKHATrON. 



Dlod. 



Miirrl(!«l or RumiirkH. 

June 17, 1H57. 
M. v. 



No. Naiiui. Born. 

Auj^ii.staCuroliiio 
Iluiniltoii, 
888 Allied Hoiillbt'c. 

') (liildnm. 
mi) l{cj,Miial(l, July ({, 1858 

8!K) Frank, Dov. ;J0, 18<il 

8!»1 AlI'mlErnest, Mcli. 2(i, 18(;4 
8i>2 Horatio (Mar'w, .luiie 2-1, 18(K> 
89;} Constance Mary, Aug. 13, 1868 



'I'hoHuis D. Mc- 
cormick, Feb. 14, 1813 1865 

894 Mary Itcad. 

T) children. 

895 JanctleAugusta,June. 18:15 Dec. 35,1835 

8!)G Emma Augusta, Jan. «, 1838 Sept. 17, 1856. 

897 William Jarvis, Sei)t. 13, 1839 

898 Esther Mary, Sept. 34. 1841 June 31, 1870. 

899 Harriet Frances 

Louise, Feb. 17, 1844 

430. 

Miirgaret A. Mc- 

Cormick, Nov. 16, 1816 Feb. 31, 1873 June 8, 1887. 

900 James Eraser, June 8, 1804 

5 (!hi!dren. . 

901 Augusta, May 17, 1839 



903 William B. 

903 (diaries T., 

904 Maria, 

905 Frederick, 



June 11, 1843 
Aug. 37, 1843 
Jan. 4, 1849 
Aug. 13, 1853 



Sept., 1868, Miles 
O'Keilly. 



440. 



Hannah McCor- 

mick, Nov. 38, 1818 

906 Archibald Gil- 

kinson, 1812 

7 children. 

907 Grant, June 5, 1837 

908 Isabella Grant, Apr. 38, 1839 

909 Thomas G. B. 

Grant, Aug. 14, 1841 



1875 



Feb. 4, 1864, James C. 
Geddes. 



niCSOKNDAJfTS op WiM.rAM— , 
Born 



»'•» ^'-Ko Grunt. Way 33. 1854 July „. is,^ 



+''XTI| OKNKUATION. [ 

Manieil or RomarlcB. 



'>'fti-V Klizuhptli 

Mt(?on«ick. Oot. to. 1831 
"14 Jus/XT T. (Jii- 
kinMOM. 
4 cliildrcn • 

Of. rury W. J.„„. ,•> lHr,0 

»!' ^^Ilcn Piiillis. Fcl, II iH-\ 

Oc. 4.185a Oct. 7,1854 



Jan. 14. 184H. 



Roborl C. Smitli. 



■444. 

•^l.> Grace (.'amitJiers. 
2 f'Jiildron. 

930 Napier ami George. 



George Diehl 

921 Barbara \Va<IdJe. 

<-JiiJdren 
933 TJiomas, 

923 Charles. 

924 William, 

925 Jasper, 
930 A daugliter. 



4415. 



4, 18,'«) 



Aug. , 


18G0 


Fel). , 


1863 


Nov., 


18G;{ 


Sej)t. , 


186G 


Aug., 


18C8 



I 



449 

Willijini D. P. 

Jarvis, n-.,, i-- 10a, , 

927 Diana rrvi„.r "'• 1'' 1«2I Jau. 15, 18.^9 (),t.. 



4 cliildren. 

928 Mary yEn.eiia, Sept. 17, I85i 

929 Willia,,, Irving, Au.r of. .0,^3 
fOAug-taLavini^ j..u;l''^;^' 



1850. 



14 



I>«'c. 27, 1877,toAr. 
thur Piers. 



t f 



_ J,. 



106 



DKHOKNDANTH OF WIM.IAM — SIXTH UKNKUATION. 






II 



No. Name. ' Born. Dlod. Married or I<Kmark8. 

AnnElU-n.Tiiivis.Ocl. aO. IH'jr. Oct. 13, 1S(K Auj?. 2r», 1840. 
mi Ii\ik(! Fit/, (Jcr- 



II. M. 83d Kcgl. 
1870. 

Nov. n, 1875. 



iiUI HcTiiiinl, 

(t children. 
»;W Miiry KiiiiiU'cu. May 0, 1849 
»;14 (Icriild Luko 

FitzOcnild, Sept. 8(J, 1850 
9!{5 KlltMi Miiudo.' Nov. 88. 185« 
030 AixiU's Ciiroliiio 

(Jmcc. Jiin. 23, 1857 

mi llcncc lliiriict 

Hiinl)iiry, .Tunc 10, IHC.O 
OaS Edward Henry, Oct. 5. 1803 



inn, 

Chiis. Fredcriclt 

.Jiirvis, .!iinc 11. 18;M Mcli. 17, 1871 

039 Mary Ann (Ira- 

liani. 

5 children. 

040 Isabel (! race. Sei)t. 8,18(14 

041 Emily Miiiide, Mch. 8, 1800 
943 C'has. i,.eonard, Sept. 0, h^<^l 
04;! Siiniuel Fet<'rs, Feh. 0, IHOi) 

044 William (}eor'-c,.lan. 37, 1871 

Charles Herbert 

■larvis, Ang'. 25, 18:51 Sept. 7, 18.W Dee., 18.50. 

045 Emma O'Ueilly. 

1 child. 
»*(} Mdes O'Uei-lly, Sept.. 1857 





•'^C'- 


JO«. 






> 


Ciilharine Maria 












llamillon, 


Mch 


' 


Jan. 


13, 1847. 




947 Fre<lk Tench, 






4 






3 children. 










1 


048 Mary, 


( 


, 181.^ 








940 Frederica, 


■.. 


1, 1851 


* 







> Married to liirdmoi Doig, at Kiurachee, India. 






I»KHCKNI)ANTS OK WIIIUM uiv^„ „,. 

Hii.i.iAM — wrXTir OKNKIJATION. 

'KM. 

M/irrlud or Uoinntk*. 
Nov. 24, \H\'i. 



107 



Horn. 



N". NiiiiKv 

Il.unil.on, M.I,. 18, 1881 
OAO Ak',\aii(I.T Diiir 



DIrd. 



~ fliiMrcii. 
yfllAuKUsia. H..,,.. II. i8,;j 

IWa Win. Ah'.vHn.lcr ' 

ll.iriiiKnn, Apr. 17, |H|(( 



^I'ly 11, 1810 



-10<l. 



lili/iihotli lliimil- 

'**"' Any. (t iM'Vt 

»'^>.l .1. Thos. T„w„- 

send. 

•i fliildrt'ii. 
"•"•-l Nxinl H.nnilt,,,,. H..p(. » ih*,,; 
|'-MCI..-irl,.s.J,.,rvi.s. Nov. -'(I, |h5h 

itnit /'Ml...- 

Mch. (i, iHfl.j 



il 



I'.'idiJiilK.ii 



Mi'ii. ir), i8r)rj. 



.Jmi(",'8, KMOr) 



Wmiiiin .JjirviH 

ll.imilioi,, A|)r. 25, 18.*}:! 
O-W .Sanili Clnrk, 

•> <liil(iicii. 
'•>'>S Caroline, 
!»•'">!* VyvuH Jurvis, 

»«<)TI,onuis Clark, An^. -j] iisiw 
:3<I wiiv. 

»<il iMaiM't llonslon 

'^^^"I'H', Oct,. 2,187a 

.'W Minn<.t(a, Fob. 7. 1875 



.hinc 2.S, |8(ji 



1873 



Oarolino Emily 

ilamillon, Jan. 1, is.'JS 
9()5 (ioorgi'Diuaiui. 

5 children. 
9(i« Car. Aug. Owcu,Mcl,. 10 1808 
1>«7 llannah Scpt. 17,' 1800 Fob. 10, 1870 

008 Mary (.^athariue, June 37, 1871 
900 Josse, Feb. 6, 1873 

070 Eliza Beatrice, Oct. 23, 1874 



•'iin. 8, 1807. 



fil 1 L 



« B' 



* « 4- 



mm 






108 



DESCKNUANTS OK WIl-MAM — SIXTH GKNKKATIOK. 



■4='y4=. 



liorn. 



Died. 



Married ur UemarkH. 



No. Name. 

Sylviii Kli/.abeth 

AVelinoii-, Oct. 20, 1805 Aug. 10, 1874 Oct. 32. 1834. 
»71 Lcoii.n.Hurllmt. 

2 cliildrcn. 
97'^ Sylviii Kli/nl>'li, 8cpt. 20, 1840 
073 Cli'lnttf Jiirvis, IScpt. 13, 1845 

Darwin W. Wet 

more, Sei)t. 2, 1807 Aug. 20, 1853 .Ian. 10, 1830. 

974 Ellen Dyer. 

1 chiltl. 

975 Eli/.'thAdaline, Oct. 4,1831 Mch. 20, 1853 

William J. Wet- 
more, M.D., June .'{O, 1809 Jan. 4, 1844. 

976 Elizal)eth Jane 

Campbell, Aug. 24, 1815 June 1», 1870 
I child. 

977 Emma Jarvis. Aug. 7, 1840 

Dh. W II. mam Jakvis Wktmoke 

Is a native of Winchester, in the State A Connecticut. His mother 
was Elizaljeth Jarvis, daiightvT of tlio late John Jarvis of N()r\valk, 
in the same State. His father was Dr. Tnuiian Spencer Wt^tmore, 
whose anci stor left Kngland in ltV25 ard settled in Middletc.wn, 
piirclmsing a ver^ large tract of land along the pleasant banks of 
die Connecticut river, \vher<^ many of the name are now located. 

William Jarvis commenced the study of the classics under the 
tuition of the la,e Rev. Frederick Marsh, m his native; town, and 
after ilie conclusion of his acadcinic course, i)ros(!cuted the study 
of medicine and sui'gery under the instruction of his father, and 
also his uncle, the late Dr. (leorge U. Jarvis. He was afterward 
graduated as a Doctor of Medicine aud Surgery at Yele College, 
liis Alma Mater. During his studies he was a poetical contributor 
to the New I'hnjIdiKl Weekly Reviev), which was for some time; under 
the editorial charge of the late Geo. D I'rentice, 

On his return from college to hi.: ^/aternal home, he passed the 
first three or four years in teaching music, after which he removed 
to New York city, and engaged in the sale of drugs and chemicals 
in connection with h's profession, at the same time teaching the 



I 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM SIXTH (iENKUATION. 

piano-forto and conipoi^ing and pul)li8hing songs aiul liallads. He 
wrote and puMished many songs of which ho was the author of 
both the words and music. 

In addition to his knowledge of the Latin and Greek poets, he 
was acquainted with tlio French, (jornian, Spanish, and Itahan lan- 
guages, and being a smooth versifier, he was frefpiently employed to 
translate into English text the songs of foreign authors, lie was, 
in the first instance, engaged by the celebrated hnffu canfante, 
Signer De Hegnis, to translate the early songs of Donizetti, which 
were written by him for the accomplished vocalist, Ronzi, the wife 
of De Begnis, and introduced by her in the operas of "Agiiese," 
" 11 Uarbiei'e di Siviglia," and " 11 Turco in Italia." lie also wrote 
several lyrics for De Hegnis, who coniposeil the music, all of which 
were subsequently published with English and Italian text. 

In the same year (1842), he was associated with the late John 
Graham, the blind Scottish bard, in arranging and publishing in 
book form, with music, the songs which tlu^ poet had written for 
the St. .Vntlrew's Society, which, in connection with his fugitive 
pieces, made a vt'iime of 1 10 pages royal octavo. 

In 1840, the Doctor issued a musical annual (entitled " L'isola 
Incantata,' or '-The Fairy Isle." It was founded on an Eastern 
superstition, and for this pleasant snuvimir he wrote both the 
poetry and music. He was, dufing the same y(>ar, the author 
of various sketches entitled "Sketches of the Past," or " I'ictures 
from Life," which were published in the various magazines through- 
out the country. He has also translated into English verse the 
songs of the various operas as they appeared successively! fi-om 
Gounod, Donizetti, Mc^yerheer, Offeidmch, Lecocq, and others, until 
his original songs and ballad translations are very numerous. 

For Antliony Philip Ileinrich, more familiarly known as " Father 
Heinrich," he wrote the libretto for an oratorio, which Ileinrich 
dedicated to the Emperor of Austria. This was translated into 
(Jerman V(M'se, ar'"ang \ with nuisic for the oichestia and piano- 
forte, and perfornuHl in I'l-ague before the Emj)eror and royal 
family, the orchestra being conducted by Ileinrich himself. He 
also furnished him with several original songs, for which Heinrich 
wrote the music. They were also translated into German verse, 
atid very beautifully gotten up with pictun; titles in Vienna. 

In 1800, he published a satire in verse entitled "(lotliam .\m- 
brotypes." In 1865 he translated from the French, Pauseron's 
A, R, C of Music, and the following year edited Hamilton's Musical 
Dictionary. 



110 



DESCENDANTS OF WIIXIAM SIXTH (JKNKKATION 



In 18(5!), lie was tlu^ Editor of a Musical Magazino, in which 
he furnished raany of tlie stories and miscellaneous articles that 
filled its pages, as well as the music in that department of the 
paper. 

In 1871, he wrote a hundred original lyrics for the Poly 
technic and ,\thona3uin, two musical publications, and, in the same 
year, he dt'livcrod a ])oem at the celebration of tlu? cenw/.nial 
of his native villages which has been since published in the 
"Annals" of the town ))y the Hon. John Hoyd. He also fur 
nished an original ode, words and music, for the same occasion, 
entitled " Beautiful Pays of the Past." 

In LS'?-*, he [)ublished a volume of music entiiled "The Ori- 
ental," a collection of traditional and ancient Jewish melodies, 
adapting them to ('hristian service, the dates of many of them 
running back to the days of Moses and the Proi)hets. Many of 
the hynms are original. He is now engiiged on a S(!cond series 
of these ancient mi'lodies, most of which, if not secured within 
the next few yc^irs, nnist be lost to the musical world for.evi*r. 

Dr. Wetmore's love for his mother, and his many eulogistic 
lines to her memory, tlie hajjpy fireside, and the pleasant scenes 
of his childhood and youth, make pleasing episodes of his early 
life. The following original poem, written but a few years ago, 
shows how fondly he recalls those golden days: 



A DREAM. 

I dreamed last night of my early days, 

When life had not a care; 
The friends now sleeiiiui;- in the tomb, 

I fancied all were there. 
We talked of scenes long past and gone, 

Scenes liial were once so dear; 
It seemed there had bi'i'u lio decay, 

'Twas chililhood's happy j^ear. 

The merry laugliler of the young, 

Each joyous sport and game, 
The lively joke, the sweet old song, 

And each familiar name; 
The grand old tree before the door, 

With broad and ample shade, 
Waved its strong branches to the breeze, 

The same, still uudecayed. 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM SIXTH GKNKBATION. 



Ill 



And down upon the placid lake, 

Rocked lightly Pleasure's boat; 
Around it many a ripple played, 

And hark! the rohin's note! 
The souii; birds whistled in the trees, 

I heard the cooing dove; 
The breezes kissed my boyish brow, — 

'Twas YOUTU, and home, and love. 

M}' father's voice was still as kind. 

As earnest as of yore ; 
My mother sang the same sweet songs 

I'd heard so oft before; 
And sister, brothers, all were there; 

Our hearts beat high with mirth; 
And there we sat and talked, as when 

'Round boyhood's happy hearth. 

Dr. Wetmore married, in tlie year 1844, a Miss Elizabeth Jane 
Campbell. Her parents wore from Scotlaml, her mother being 
born in the city of Edinburgli. The daugliter was intellectual, 
refined, and cultivated. In addition to a sound English education, 
she was an excellent Erench scholai-; and she not only play(;d tlie 
piano very acceptably, but sang tlu^ songs of liurns and Moore 
with fine taste and feeling. As friend, companion, wife, and 
mother, she was unexceptional )le. We give below a little poem 
wliich her husband wrote and sent to her on her birthday, while 
he was making a brief visit to his daughtei', who resides, with her 
husband, on the banks of the Delaware, 'i'hc lines are as follows: 






% 






m. 



TO MY WTFE. 

WlilTTKN ON niOU mUTlIU.VY. 

O, beautiful river! how tnuKjuil it glides, 

To mingle its waters with old Ocean's tides; 

While the l)r<'(/.es thai i>lay round my temples so free. 

Seem to bring, my dear wite, some fond message from thee. 

The flowers on its banks blossom lirighlly and fair, 
And evhale a perfume both deligiitful and rare; 
While my young love ' and 1 tloat in glaiUies.s along, 
To the dip of the oar and the magic of song. 



My daughter, Mrs. Euuna Jarvis Wilson. 



112 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM — SIXTH GENERATION. 

O, beautiful river! beloved Delaware! 
Can tempest e'er ruffle your bosoui ao fair? 
^[ay it lloat on in beauty to blend with the 8oa, 
While my heart travels back, dear companion, to thee. 

Like the beautiful river that bears me alonjj 

On its bosom, so sacred to beauty and song. 

Is another that winds to a beautiful home, 

Where love never dies, and where cares never coiue. 

May we tloat down that river so peaceful and brii^^ht, 
Undisturbed by a (tare, to the City of JjKUIT, 
Where life's voyage shall end, and our souls shall find rest. 
In a H AVKN of Pi'.ACK, in the Home of the Blest! ' 



Married or Remarks. 



Nov. 28, 1848. 



No. Name. Bom. Died. 

Geo. W. Wet- 
more, M.D., Oct. 11, 1813 

978 Sarah Ann Thompson. Dec. 37, 1871 

3 children. 

979 Geo. Thompson, Feb. 9, 1845 

980 Eli/.th .larvi.^ April 6, 184(5 

981 Mary Fitch, .A])ril 10, 1855 



George Whitfield Wetmore 

Was born October 11, 1812, and received the same early and 
careful educational training as tliJit of his brothers. He began 
teaching when quit(> young, and for sonic years taught, during the 
winter season, several select .schools in many parts of Connecticut. 
This he continued to do until he determined to study the profes- 
sion of medicine. His studies were prosecuted under the tuition 
of his father, and also of his uncle, Dr. George (). Jarvis. After 
the requisite preparation, lie attended, during the winters of 18.'^ 
and 1838, the niedicitl h^ctures at Williams College, Mass., graduat- 
ing an M.I), (in Dccemlter, 1S.'?8,) from that institution. 

He settled at Amenia, City, Dutchess Co., New York, February 
19, 18.39, where he practiced his profession with acknowledged 
skill and ability. He; subsequently became acquainted with, and 
afterwards married. MLss Sarah Ann Thomjison, a very lovely and 
amiabli -ijirl of the village, ])y whom he has three children. 

The (ijctor still enjoys fair health, but since the death of his 
wife, has given up practice, and returned to the home of his 
youth. 

> Mrs. Wetmore died June 9, 1876. 



DKSCENOANTa OF WIMJAM SIXTH GENERATION. 



113 



47' 8. 



Married or Koiimrkp. 
April 11, 1850. 



No. Name. Dom. Died. 

Charles F. Wet- 

iiiorc. Auir. 31, 1815 

982 Sarah Asl or IJrydcii, June 7,1855 

I child. 
083 Marj' .Tarvis, Sept. 14, 1853 

Charles Fitch Wetmork 

Was boin on tho 'J 1st of August, 1815, and was tlie youngest son 
of Dr. Truuian S. and Eiizahetli .Farvis Wetmoro. 

His rudimental education was obtained in the schools of his 
native village, which were excellent, and after careful training in 
tliese, ho was placed under the privati; instruction of the llev. Mr. 
Jones, an Kpisco[)al clergyman, located in Hitchcocksville, now 
Riverton. Her(>, thougli liis advancement was entirely satisfactory, 
still, as it was preparatory to a collegiate education, he was sent to 
Clieshin^, Conn., under the care and instruction of the Rev. Dr. 
Morgan. 

He entered Trinity (,'ollege, Hartford, in the year 1837, and was 
graduated fi-om that institution in 1841. In 1844, he received 
the degree of }i\.A. from the same institution. He studied law 
with tlie late Hon. liiv. Livingston of New York, and was 
admitted as an attorney, solicitor, and counsellor to the courts of 
that State in 184."). 

He was an excellent (ire(>k and Latin .scholar, and while In 
college occasionally cociuetted with the muses. He was the authoi' 
of several pieces of fugitive poetry of considerable merit. He 
delivered, by ap])ointment, a poem entitled " Venice," before the 
Athenipum Literary Society, in 1840, and accepted, also, a .second 
appointment to deliver th(; annual poem before that Society the 
following y<>ar. This poem was entitled "Scro." The first was 
published in a hel/cs leltrcs paper edited by his brother William. 

At commencement, the year of his graduation, he delivered an 
essay on Saracen Literature, which was subsequently published in 
his brother's [)aper. 

A SO. 

oarah E. Sey- 
mour, May 1:3, 1813 Auj?. 1:5, 1837. 
984 Dr. Anuuon ('. 

Tabcr, Dec. 30, 1807 

8 cliiklren. 
15 






114 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM SIXTH GENERATION. 



No. Name. Born. Died. 

985 CliJirl'to Loiiisa, May 10, 1838 Feb. 1), 1845 
98(5 Ciuoliiie Moore, July 3, 1840 

987 Clmrles Jiirvis, Aug. 14, 1843 Aug. 17, I85a 

988 Alviili Seymour, Nov. 24, 1844 

989 Eugene Dewitl, .Tun. 9, 1848 Aug. 29, 1849 

990 Miiry Hradley, Feb. 14, 1850 

991 Edw'd Maurice, .June 15, 185;i 

992 Helen lleuri'la, May 18, I85(i Nov. ;{, 1857 



Marrliid or Romurks. 



Sept. 20, 1866. 



F(!b. 28, 1872. 



Charles J. Sey- 
mour, J'eb. 

993 Nancy Woods, .July 

1 child. 

994 Wm. Woods, May 



Charlotte Fitch 
Seymour, Aug. 

995 Thco. C. King, Aug. 

3 children. 

996 Eugenia Seym'r,Sept. 

997 Eugenia nask'll.Fcb. 

998 Eva Scn'mour, . Sept. 



35, 1815 Mch. 13, 1840 

14, 1819 ,Iune, 1867 May 10, 1837. 

29, 18:'.9 Jan. 9, 1840 

483. 

4, 1819 May 35, 1863 May 11, 1847. 

30, 1809 Apr. 1, 1858 

23, 1849 Sept. 24, 1849 

15, 1853 Apr. 13, 1873 
34, 1854 Apr. 38, 1863 






-184. 



999 



1000 
1001 
1003 
1003 
1004 
1005 
lOOG 
1007 
1008 
1009 



Samuel J. Sey- 
mour, Mch. 

Mary A, Seym'r 
nee Patridge, May 
10 children. 

Charl'tte Jarvis, Oct. 

M'tha Patridge, Oct., 

Charl'tte Jarvis, Oct. 

Kate Rowland. 

Mary Ann, Mch. 

Carrit! Taber. 

Samuel John, Jr. 

Jennie Wilson. 

George Lee. 

Wm. Patiidge. 



9, 


1833 


18, 


1837 


38, 


1850 




1853 


15, 


1854 



3, 1858 



Chas. A. Jarvis, Feb. 
1010 Statira Gilder- 
sleeve, Sept. 
3 children. 



Feb. 17, 1850. 



481>. 

3, 1838 

1, 1829 Nov. 7, 1864 



' 



Jan. 17, 1854. 



f 



imi 






v^i&\. 





CiA/*^^fyi - 



ir Ilemwk- 



MP 



~1 

-is 



. 



,-• ? 





10 


, 


10 


i 


Is 




ar 




8C 




w 




ai 


! 




' 


J" 




cl 




ac 




w 




ti 




y< 




il 




u 




ci 




in 




at 




h] 




7t 




ai 




1( 




w 




Pl 



DESCKNnANTH nV WIM.IAM — SIXTH (IKNKUATKiN. 116 

No. Name. Hdi-ii. Died. Miirrli'il or RoniarkH. 

1011 Com Kliziilictli, Oct. l;l, iS.Vt 

1012 (;ii!is.riiiviill»'Uf,Muy 17, IH.-)? 

2(1 wife. 
l()i;j Ellen J. Smith. June II, ls;r. Ort. 7, IH(IH. 

:i children. 
1014 .Janet McNiiry, Felt. 1,1872 Aug. 15, 1873 
lOir, (U'o. ();j:l(!vie, Jiin. 15,187;$ 
lUlO Eihv. Wlnslow, Nov. 20. 1877 



Geo. Cypriiin 

Jarvis. Apr. 21, IKII Feb. 8, I8«(i. 

1017 Martha <iilliim. 

I ehild. 

1018 Martha Louisa, Feb. 20. 1808 

Gkok(je C. Jakvih, M.D., 

Is the son of Dr. George (). Jarvis and Philoniola Marshall Jarvis, 
and was born in the town of Colebrook, C/onn., April 24, IS.'U. 

Tlic early cdncation of Doctor Jarvis was received at the district 
school, which he attended until he was (ifteeii years of age, after 
which he spent a year at the Military Academy at Norwich, \'t., 
and a year with tlie Hev. S. M. Kniery of Portland, Conn. 

He entered Trinity ('oUege in 1851, and remained through the 
junior year, leaving in 1S5,'}. lie spent the next three years as 
cleik in a drug store in Middletown, thereby accjuiring a j)ractical 
acquaintance with the materia medica. 

Doctor Jarvis coniinenced the study of medicine with his father, 
whose extensive surgical practice gave unusual facilities for illustra- 
tions in this branch of the profi^ssion. He studied also a])out a 
year with the distinguished gynecologist, Dr. J. Marion Sims. 
He attended lectures at the Medical Department of the New ^'ork 
University, from which he received the degr-ee of Doctor of Medi- 
cine, March, 1861. He connnenced the practice of his profession 
in Stamford, but remained only a few months, entering the army 
as Assistant Surgeon, 1st Battalion Connecticut Cavalry, receiving 
his commission December, 18G1. He was promoted as Surgeon of 
7th Connecticut Volunteers, October, 18()2, and served honorably 
and with distinction through the war, being mustered out July 20, 
18G."). His armj^ record was noted for bravery and gallantry, as 
well as that of a skillful and reliable surgeon, as is shown in many 
places of trust and responsibility. 



# 






1 »j- 



P 



I Hi 



DKHCKNDANTH OK WIt.MAM KlXTIl OKNKHATION. 



All nriiiy life oxtomling over so loii^ ft period of time, and 
tlirougli HO many portions of the country, with such (liv(!r8i(ied 
Horvic*' in tlif field during and aft<T hattlc, in tlie honpitnl, in camp, 
on sea and land, al)()unds luiturully with intonwting incidents and 
advontnroH, which would justly fiiul place in u more (extended 
biography. ( )ne incidetit, however, deserves espcicial nmntion. 
When the midnight boat attack was planncid on Kort (Jregg, the 
regidar detail shrank from the exposure of taking surgical charge 
of what was regarded and justly, as almost a forlorn hope. Dr. 
.larvis volunteered foi- this nervice, and was placeil in charge, 
receiving an oflicial indors(>ment of his action from th<< (Jeneial in 
command. The following is also u characteristic incident: After 
the battle of Olnstee, when a retreat was ordorcMl, and the wounded 
had t(j be hastily removed, the Doctor sun (Midered his horse to a' 
wounded soldier, who would otherwise have been left on tln^ held, 
and after a hard service as optwating surgeon, nnirched on foot for 
thirty nules. 

Doctor Jarvis was appointed jus operating surgeon for the brigade 
after the first battle, and contiimed as such of each division with 
which lie was connected during his field .><ei'vice. At Fort Fisher 
he was <.)n (.Jen. Terry's stall in the Himw (;a])acity. lie had charge 
of the post hospitals at Fernandiiui, Florida, from February to 
April, 18G.'!, and at St. Augustine from April to July, 18G.-5, after 
which he went to Morris Island, lie superintended the reception 
and feeding of the returned Union prisoners under (!en. Ilawley 
at North-Kast, near Wibningtoii, North Carolina; and was, after- 
ward, in charge of the general hospital at Wibningion, \vher(> n<'arly 
8,000 were congregated from Andersonville an(i other prison pens 
of the South. 

Tt was found necessar)' to surround the cook-tents with a strong 
guard, and even then it was iniprs8il)le to prevent the eager rush 
for food, to which a bayonet was but a slight, obstruction. Scores 
perished with the food convulsively grasped in tludr clenched 
hands. A fearful epidemic- of ty[)hus and typhoid fevers followed, 
with over a hundrenl cases of gangrene of different parts of tlie 
body, all resulting from the want and exposure to which the 
prisoners liad been subjected. Out of thirteen surgeons and assist- 
ant surgeons, nine were sick and seven died, while the mortality 
in the hospitals was necessarily veiy great. 

The following is an epitome of his field service as operating 
surgeon: He served throughout Fremont's campaign in West 



> 



i 



= 



,^r 



I 





^^^'-^^-^^,/-^,.^. 



ngagenient.' 












«i as one o! 

Jarg«v ^pnerai m4 consultation 

> and 
■ot>femng degroen 



^ki 



tfenj 






Mi^V. 



usfii. 







I 



i f 



e«r^ 



^. 



^-^ . 



.# 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM — SIXTH GENERATION. 



117 



Virginia, during which the following engagements occurred: 
McDowell, Franklin, Strasbnrg, Harrisonburg, Cross Keys. Fort 
Republic Bridge; through the fifteen days retreat under Pope from 
the Rapidan, ending with the second battle of Bull Run; in the 
Department of the South, at Morris Island, P^ort "Wagner, and 
Olustee; in Virginia, with the Army of the James in the siege 
around Petersburg and Richmond, during wliich the following 
engagements occurred: Chester Station, Bermuda Humired, Deep 
Bottom, Deep Run, Chapin's Farm, New Richmond, New Market 
Road, Darby Town Road, Charles City Road, and at Fort Fisher. 

On the return of Dr. Jarvis from the war, he settled in Hartford, 
Conn., and soon won a position as one of the leading surgeons in 
the State, thereby rec»Mving a large general and consultation 
])ractice. 

In 1869, he was appointed examining surgeon for pensions, and 
on the organization of the Board in Hartford, was appointed its 
President, which position he still holds. F\)r six years Jie was a 
member of the examining committee lor conferring degrees at the 
Medical Institution of Yale College, and relinquished the position 
through ill healtii. 

In 1871, he was appointed attending surgeon to the Hartford 
Hospital, a position which he still occupies. 



403. 



Married or Remarks. 
June 14, 1834. 



No. Name. Born. Died. 

Thos. Ni'Wton 

Jarvis, June 33, 1805 

1015) Cordelia IT()l>art,Fi'b. 4. 1818 Sept. 2;?, 1845 

4 children. 
1030 CJliarles, Dec. 13, 1835 Jiuie 17, 1860 

1021 IIowiiiiidR, M:iy 27, 1837 Ulay, 1801 

1033 IIciHT Clay. Oct. lit, 1841 July 8, LSd!) 

1033 Clarissji, " Sept. 31, 1843 Dec. 1». 1875 W. Uuilfoid. 

3(1 wife. 

1034 Emily Wilitiu. Doc. 13, 1835 Aiij,'. 5. 184'J 

3 cliihh'cii. 

1035 llan-ict E., July 33, 1850 Jan. 32,1874 
103(5 Florence, July 30, 1854 



ill 



404. 



Miltou Barlow 
.larvis, M.D., Aug. 5, 1807 



Born in New Hart f(M(l, 
Conu. 



' j 9 Ji. m aj r^ 



118 



DKSCKNDANTH OF WtLUAM SIXTH GENKRATION. 



n 



No. Name. Born. Died. Marriod or RcmarkB. 

1027 Jeiin'teJ.Butler.Oct. 0,1813 April 24, 1838 Feb. 2(5,1830. 
1 child. 



1028 Lou. Jcanctte, Jan. 10, 1837 

2(1 wife. 

1029 Helen M. Ray- 

mond, Aug. 1, 1810 

children. 

1030 Geor!i:("Mil!',)n,.Tune2fl, 1849 

1031 Tames Lorenzo, Oct. 24. 1850 

1032 Frank, Sept. 23, 1852 

1033 Lizzie Ida. Dee. 29. 1855 

1034 Nellie .May, May 13, 1800 

1035 Josi(! Kinyon, Sept. 30, 1857 



Dec. 13, 1857 



Meh. 



Oct. 29, 1800. 



1874 Adoi)ted. 



i 






Milton Barlow Jarvis, M.D., 

Was born August .'>, 1807, in tlio town of Ainenia, Dutchess county, 
N. Y., in a small village, then called Jarvis Corners. 

In the spring of 1820, his father sold the old homestead, and 
after a temporary rjssidence in the village, removed, with his 
family, in 1821, to Canastoke, town of Lenox, in Madison county. 
The farm on which he located was part of the tract known as the 
Indian Reservation, and is situated on tlie Erie Canal, about mid- 
way between the city of Utica and Syracuse. 

Until the year 1825, Dr. Jarvis worked on the farm during the 
pleasant months of summer, and in the winter attended the district 
school. He then went to an adjoining town, engaging with a 
Mr. James Beebe to learn the trade of a tanner and currier. In 
the year 1828, from the depression of business, hi? left Mr. Beebe 
and his tannery, to seek a more profitable calling. 

In the winter of 1S30, he visited his uncle, Dr. Hammond of 
Dover, Dutchess Co., who proposed that he should study medicine. 
The proposition was accepted, and, in the spring of 1832, he 
entered his uncle's office, whei'c^ he applied ]iims(>lf closely to his 
books. .After the necessary lapse of time, and after lie had gained 
the prescribtid amount of knowledge, he was graduated, with all 
due honors, in the winter of 1834 and 1835, from the old Univer- 
sity in Barclay street, New York, under Professors Mott, lihine- 
lander, and others of like celebrity. He then returned to Dover, 
and entered into partnership with his uncle. 

The following winter, 1^'ebrnary 20, 1836, he married Miss Jean- 
nette J. Butler, daughter of Mr. William Butler of New Hartford, 
Connecticut. Miss Butler was j)rinoipal of a young ladies' seni'- 



ot-^tH.^^ jf 



n 



--^MMMUMMha 



Ml 



118 



DKHOKNDANTK nW urn t » . 



M 



In 



i^li 



'■i. 





t^t-^L-tA-C^ , 



DKHCKNDANTH OF WII,I,1AM SIXTH (IKNKKATION. 



lit) 



I 
IP 



, 



iiary. a talented and very lovely woman. The fniit of this happy 
union was the birth of a daugliter, Louise Jeannette, now Mrs. L. 
P. Kay, who was born January 10, 18;{7. 

In the autumn of the same year, Mrs. Jarvis took a 8;^vore cold, 
whicii settled on her lungs, finally developing into phthisis, wliieti 
resulted in her d(>ath, April 24, \H',]H. From a broken and now 
desolate household, the daughter was sent to the hoint> and ean; of 
the doctor's mother, where, after a brief period, \w followed her. 

In the year 1840, ho began, as it were, anew the business of 
life. Among the Tiiompsoiuaus, Eclectics, and the innumerable 
medical pretenders that swarm over the country like noisy and 
hungry locusts, he set up his practice, and notwithstanding his 
surroundings, jirosecuted his profession with succes.s and pfolit. 

It was only after ten years anil much deliberation, that hv again 
conclu<led to enter the matrimonial ])aradise, and enjoy the feli- 
cities t)f a home ami domestic peace ani' happiness. This decided 
upon, it was not long before he had wooed and won the accom- 
plished Miss Helen M. Raymond, daughtcM- of A. Raymond, Esij. 
The marriage of the happy pair took place September 7, I HIS. 
With a new home, new hopes, and rencMved ambition, the future 
now looked bright and prosperous. With his eldest daughter 
mairied (the second (lying at two years of age), and with three 
sons (th(^ two eldest at Cornell ITniversity), the doctor is cheerful 
and happy in his family surroundings. 

In the year \^.TA, the doctor and his lady visited Europe, where 
they spent five months in most delightful travel and sight-seeing. 
Although reared and educated as an Episcopalian, he has left the 
Church for the Unitarian faith. 

The doctor is, at the present writing, seventy yi>ars of age, and 
still his eye is as l)right, his step as firm and elastic, as when at 
forty. Like his nonagenarian grandfather, he may live on, growing 
in grace, and reserving his strength, until, in the fulness of time, 
he may be numbered with his centenarian progenitors. 



No. Name. Born. Died. 

Ellzali'h Jarvis, Dec. 31, 1811 May, 1840 
103(J Wni. H. Kinney, 

1 child. 
1037 Charles, 1837 1862 



Married or Kciiiarkt>. 



120 



l»K«OKNI)A\TH OK WII.MAM — SIXTH (IKNKUATION. 



Ni>. Nniiic. Horn. Died. Mnrrlod or KtMnarki*. 

Clfirissa .larvis, .Iiiiio T), IHlt \u^. 1, IHIO 
1();{8 Liiciim P. l{ohc. 

10:{i» Kmily. July 14, WM Sept., tH48 

1010 lliiirict. May 4, lH;m iMdi. 5, tH(ir) 






Suniurl .larviH. Apr. II.IHI!) Apr. 39, 18.59 Jan. 9,185;}. 

1041 Klsic Per hro, Dec. 2(\. \H'i{i 

2 children. 

1043 Per Lee, Oct. 0, 1855 July IT, 185!) 

1()4;{ Alice, Jwuc 13, 1859 Apr. 15, 1804 



r>or. 



David S. Jarvin 


Vi'h.. 


1808 


1044 Eli/a Browor, 


Nov.. 


1814 


4 childicn. 






Abraiii. 






1045 (Jliarlus, 


A pr. . 


1840 


I04(i Howard, 




184.'! 


1047 Florence, 


Dec. 


184!» 



1833. 



Sept., 1863. 



r 
..?»"■ 



'J 



David S. .Tarvis. 

It is a pleasing task to he able to record the virtues and e.Ki-el- 
len(!es of the brave men ajid loyal women who have borne the 
name of Jarvis, and to find the .same strong and striking charao 
teristics in the present as in past generations, therel)y giving to the 
family the same distinctive qualities through all its history, of 
integrity, honor, and love of country. In no member of it have 
these featnres shoni^ brighter than in the subject who heads our 
brief sket(di. We make the t'oUowing extract from a letter recently 
received from Mr. Jarvi.s, which explains itself: 

"On the breaking out of the Hebeliion, I was on a visit to my 
parents, whom I never failed to visit once a year. I told them it 
was a critical time for our country (this was in 1862), when both 
of them became much excited; they hoped T c(mld give them 
some good news, but 1 could not. My motlusr exclaimed, 'David, 
you have three good boys, Abram, Charles, and Howard. Go 
yourself, with them, to the war, and T will go, as 1 can take care 
of the sick, or make lint for the wounded; this Government must 
be preserved. Your forefather was of Revolutionary stock, and 
the country must live.' My father also added that he hoped to 
live long enough to see tlie Rebellion crushed, when he would be 



DKSCKNDANTH OF WII,I,IAM — SIXTH OKNKHATION. 



121 



willinj? to die. Ho wanted to feol that h« had loft a country 
imtorii by civil war, and as it was designed by the fouiulers of 
the republic. A brain went into the war as private secretary to 
Gen. Gilmore, and died in Cliarleston, of yellow fever. Charley 
wa ■ in both battles of Tiull Run, and Howard sent a substitute." 

This is a wortliy record of a patriotic, family, and shows the true 
spirit that animated the herotw of Seventy-six. 



1^ 



r»<M». 



No. Name. Born. 

MarycttciJarvia, Dec. 4, 1814 

1048 Edwin Soars, Jan. 10, 1808 

;{ childnm. 

1041) Clara M., Feb. 4. l8;i« 

1050 James E., Apr. 29, ISiJS 

1051 Mary A., Jan. 85,1841 



Died. 



June, 



1808 



Marrhul or RoiniirkH. 



Fil 



1H:»5. 



Feb., 1888. 
Sept. 19, 1858. 









r»io. 






Jaiio JarvLs, 


Jan. 


14, 


1818 




Nov. 


17, 1840. 


1052 John Calvhi 














Jackson, 


June 


3, 


1813 




Live 


in Sharon, Conn. 


7 children. 














1053 Helen, 


Doc. 


31, 


1841 




Mch. 


28, 1808. 


1054 Julia, 


Nov. 


27, 


1843 




Dec. 


8, 1804. 


1055 Jolin Calvin, 


Sept. 


30, 


1846 








105flFriin(es,> 


Jan. 


24, 


1849 








1057 Florence, 


Mch. 


11. 


1851 








1058 Ann Eliza, 


Jan. 


26, 


1853 


Mch. 


T, 1857 




1059 Charles, 


Feb. 


2, 


1859 














m 1. 






Charles Jarvis, 


Mch. 


4, 


1821 




Jan. 


26, 184.-). 


lOfiO Betsey A. Hoyt, Apr. 


3. 


1826 








;{ children. 








* 






1061 C. Willis, 


Oct. 


29, 


1845 


. 


Jidy 


14, 1800. 



1062 Mellville, . July 11, 1849 

1063 Jenny, Apr. 28, 1808 





SIS. 


John Jay Jarvis.Dec. 


4, 1828 


1064 Susan Forbes, 




2 children. 




1065 Foster, 


1852 


1006 Ella, 


1857 



1850. 



1 Married Levy Blydenburg. Had Martha, b. December 17, 1871, and 
Jane, b. April 17, 1874. Live in ^ew Haven, Conu. 
16 




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23 WEST MAIN S iREET 

W?BSTER,N.Y. 14580 

(716) 872-4503 




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122 DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM SIXTH GENERATION. 



No. Name. Born. , 

BriceW. Jarvis,Apr. 18,1831 

1067 Adah L. Wood, Sept. 4, 1835 

3 children. 

1068 Alice B., Jan. 4,1856 

1069 John W., Jan. 23, 1862 

1070 Mary E., Oct. 22, 1869 



Died. 



SIS. 



Benj. L. Jarvis, June 6, 1835 

1071 Mary Over- 

baugh, 
1 child. 

1072 Ella P., 



Feb. 3, 1835 
Oct. 15, 1860 

s«o. 

Oct. 18, 1820 



Married or Remarks. 
Sept. 5, 1854. 



Jan. 4, 1859. 



Apr. 20, 1848. 



i- Twins. 



Jan. 1, 1862. 



Catherine R. 
Crawford, 

1073 Jos. B. Brown. 

3 children. 

1074 Alice Crawford, Jan. 26, 1852 

1075 Margar't Louise, Jan. 26, 1852 

1076 "W arren Crawf d.Apr. 4, 1854 

Martha Jeanette 
Crawford, May 14, 1837 

1077 Tunis Quackenbush. 

2 children. 

1078 Jeanette, 1863 

1079 Wm. N., Dec. 25, 1864 



S30. 

Rev. Wm. Oscar 
Jarvis. 1 July 1. 1822 

1080 Mary Frances Burt,« June 23, 1851 April 25, 1850. 

2d wife. 

1081 Ellen Douglass," June, 1871 Jan. 5. 1854. 

4 children. 

1082 Douglass, July 8. 1855 

1083 Hen'y Douglass, Mch. 9, 1858 



1 Ordained Deacon Sept. 19, 1849; Priest Nov. 34, 1850— by Bishop 
Brownell. 

- Daughter of Rev. Mo.ses Burt. 

i* Daughter Major D. B. Do\iglass, LL.D. 



r 



DESCENDANTS OF W1LI,IAM — SIXTH OENKUATION. 



123 



No. Name. Born. 

1084 Ann Eliza, May 2, 1860 

1085 Wm. Oscar, Aug. 9, 1865 



Died. 



Married o.- Remarks. 



S3S. 

W(;llington Jar- 
vis, Aug. 20. 1829 
1085i Isabella L. Stone. 
6 clilldren. 

1086 Henry Stone, April 18, 1856 Oct. 31,1871 

1087 Addie Stone, PY'h. 7, 1860 

1088 Louise Heath, July 22, 1863 

1089 Julia Conklin, July 13, 1861 

1090 Clara, July 31, 1873 Aug. 7. 1876 

1091 Jennie, May 22, 1875 June 19. 1875 



June 20, 1855. 



SSI. 

Fred'Ic Wm. 
Jarvis,' Feb. 7, 1818 

1092 Caroline Sl<ynner. 

5 children. 

1093 Fred'k Aug., Aug. 30, 1858 Sept. 8,1859 

1094 Geo.Hauiilton,Mch. 14, 1859 

1095 Flor. Caroline, Jan. 5, 1860 

1096 Fred.Clarenco,Aug. 10, 1862 

1097 Edm. Meredith, Jan. 27, 1867 



Oct. 5, 1857. 



£5SS 

Amelia Jarvis, May 24, 1819 

1098 Alex. Proudfoot. 

7 children. 

1099 Wm. Stephen, 

1100 Frederick, 

1101 Mary, 

1102 Elizabeth, 

1103 Amelia, 

1104 Alexander, M.D., 

1105 Thomas, 



1836. 



1837 

1839 

1841 Sept. 8, 1862 

1843 1874 

1845 March, 1868 

1847 

1849 Oct. 5, 1867 



Lives in Montreal. 



SS3. 



Geo. Thomas 
Jarvis, Nov. 30, 1820 

1106 Eliza Hovenden. 
5 children. 



Jan. 4, 1852. 



' Frederick William Jarvis succeeded his luicle as High Sheriff of Tor- 
onto, which position he at present (1878) holds. 




^k 



124 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM — SIXTH GENERATION. 






No. .Name. Born. Died. 

1107 Sarah Isabel, Pec. 23, 1855 

1108 Julia Eliza, Sept. 17, 1857 

1109 Wm. Maule, Juno 6, 1859 

1110 Goo. Robinson, Oct. 7, 1863 

1111 Charlotte Mary.May 15, 1867 

Stephen Maulc 
Jarvis, Nov. 2, 1822 

1112 Mary Stinson. 

5 children. 

1113 Marg. Is. Maule, Jan. 28, 1851 

1114 Thos. Stinson,' May 31, 1854 

1115 Steph. Jervis 

White, May 3, 1861 

1116 Mary Catharine, Feb., 1863 July 31, 1863 

1117 Edward, Feb. 28, 1873 



Married or Remarks. 



Sept. 10, 1850. 



Dec. 3, 1871, Benjamin 
Read Clarkson. 



Peter Robinson 
Jarvis," Aug. 16, 1824 Feb. 12, 1849. 

1118 Marion Neilson, 

11 children. 

1119 Fred'k Starr.s Sept. 27, 1850 Sept. 20, 1877. 

1120 Marg. Annabella, Aug. 1, 1852 . 

1121 Thos. Neilson, May 22, 1854 

1122 Marion Zeta,* Oct. 23, 1856 Oct. 22, 1878. 



* Thomas Stinson Jarvis is a law student at Toronto. In 1873-4, made a 
tour through P^gj'pt and the Holy Land, and afterwards wrote a book of 
travels, entitled "Letters from East Longitudes," dedicated by special 
permission to the Earl of Dufferin, Governor-General of Canada. This Is 
a most interesting work, and reflects great cndit on the young author. It 
will compare favorably with the best works of travel in the Holy Land. 
The style is neat and graphic, and the numerous scene?' and incidents are 
portrayed so vividly that we catch the inspiration of his pen, and seem 
transported to the spot, and share with him the interest felt at the moment 
of writing. As was said of the works of Oliver Goldsmith, " This excellent 
book is only open to one criticism — of being too brief." 

•Peter R. Jarvis sailed for Canton, China, in 1845, in ship "Achbar," 
thence to Singapore and Calcutta. Remaining here a few months, he took 
passage in the ship "Grotius," bound for Boston mA Isle of France and 
St. Helena. On his return he settled at Stratford, Ontario, and was for 
several years Mayor of that town. He still resides there. 

'Married Miss Brooks; one child born Dec. 6, 1878. 

* Married Peter Woods, at Brunswick Lodge, Stratford, Ontario, Canada. 



I 

9 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM — SIXTH GENERATION. 



125 



No. Name. Born. 

1123 Juliii, Sept. 20, 1858 

1124 Edmund Head, Mch. 6, 1860 

1125 Mary Beatrice, Nov. 20, 18G1 

1126 PeterRobinson, Nov.37, 1864 

1127 Ada. Dagma, Dec. 3, 1866 

1128 Chas. Brydger,Feb. 1, 1869 
1139 Edgar Ralph, Feb. 14, 1872 



Died. 



Married or Remarks. 



Chas. Beverley 
Jarvis, Nov. 16, 1836 

1130 Elizabeth Mead. 

1 child. 

1131 Fauny, June 19, 1854 




2, 1828 Feb. 27, 1861 Oct. 30, 1851. 



Mary Jarvis, Dec. 
1133 Henry Skynner. 
5 children. 

1133 Francis Louis, Sept. 28, 1853 

1134 Eleanor Isabella, Aug. 4, 1854 

1135 Emily Mary, Oct. 8, 1856 

1136 Henry John, Feb. 21, 1858 

1137 Wm. Jarvis, Feb. 31, 1861 

Arthur Murray 
Jarvis, Oct. 37, 1830 

1138 Martha Matilfia Ratclifle, Nov. 15, 1858 

1 child. 

1139 Steph. Murray, Mch. 4, 1854 

2d wife. 

1140 Annie Stein Maclear, 

7 children. 

1141 Harry Aug., Dec. 31, 1860 

1142 Arthur Murray, Apr. 6, 1862 

1143 Thos. Henry, March, 1864 

1144 Isabella Maule, Oct. 32, 1865 1873 

1145 Fred'k Starr, June 15, 1867 

1146 Wm. Morley, Aug. 39, 1870 • 

1147 Constance Kings- 

mill, Mch. 38, 1872 



Oct. 26, 1853. 



Feb. 8. 1860. 



soo. 



Edgar John 
Jarvis, 



Jan. 28, 1835 



Oct. 17, 1863. 



126 



DKSCKNDANTS OF WILLIAM — SIXTH OKNEUATION. 



Born. 



Died. 



■^^^^^^^K' No. Name. 

;^^HHp 1148 Charlotte Beau- 

J^^^K^ mont. 

^^^H| 10 children. 

^^^B 1149 Edgar Beaum't,. July 7, 1804 

1150 Paul, Sept. 27. 1865 

1151 Ernest. Oct. 12, 1806 

1152 Harold, Oct. 4. 1867 
1158 Francis Proud- 
foot. Oct. 27. 1861) 

1154 Herbert Cherri- 

man, Oct. 17, 1871 

1155 LouisRaymond.May 19. 1874 

1156 Percy and Eva. Jan. 16. 1877 
Q^ti**^ fHiufJt^o^ Bern, Jan. 17, 1879 ^ 

Frances Amelia 
Maule, Oct. 28, 1814 Dec. 3, 1848 

1157 Major-General 

Budgen. 
8 children. 

1158 John, July 6, 1836 

1159 William Thos., June 11, 1838 

1160 Fanny Lydia, Oct. 2. 1840 

1161 Caroline Maria,! June 30, 1343 

1162 Ellen Isabel, Mch. 12, 1845 

1163 Alice Charlotte,Mch. 12, 1846 

1164 George, Mch. 23, 1848 1 

Twins. \ 

1165 Mary, Mch. 23, 1848 J Dec. 10, 1848 



Married or Remarks. 



■ 



Twins 



Mot yBt.biii>tiwiTljL*.^tA^,^^<' 



Capt. H. M. 96th Regt. 
Maj. Royal Artillery. 
Capt. Cary, R. A. 

Aug. 21, 1867, Dr. 
Morert. 

A Lieut, in H. M. 
98th Regt. 



Charl'te Maule. June 26, 1824 July 26, 1864 Jime 30, 1862. 

1166 Capt. M. Gillies. 8 H. M. 55th Regt. 

1 child. 

1167 Fanny, Mch., 1864 



1 



Mary Catharine 
Maule. 

1168 Jonathan Hard- 

ing. 

1169 A daughter, Oct. 12, 1853 



1 Married Edwin Frederick Temple, Capt. H. M. 55th Regt. 
* Capt. Gillies served on the Bhootan expeditir>"., in 1865. 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM— SIXTH GENERATION. 



127 



" 



vy;f 



'^''" P u^TxT , , . ""T ^""' Married or Remarks. 

Robert Maule.i Aug. 26. 1831 Jau 8 1863 

1170 Henrietta Lou- 

isa Luke. 

4 children. 

1171 Edith Blogden, July 25, 1865 

1172 Lilian Beatrice, Dec. 11, 1867 

1173 Percy Sidney, Aug. 7, 1870 

1174 Fr. Jarvis Fox, Fob. 12. 1873 July 28, 1873 

Julia Eliza Jar- 

117o Geo. Hamilton, May 21, 1858 

5 children. 

1176 Geo. Wellesley, June 22, 1847 Miss Sicotte. 

1177 Robert Craigie, July 1,1848 July 18,1848 

1178 Julia, Nov. 26, 1849 Dead 

1179 Chas. Chetwood. Jan. 9. 1851 i873. Kate Parker. 

1180 Robert Craigie, 8 July 6,1852 Apr. 28, 1875. 

Frances Amelia 
Jarvis, Jan. 26, 1826 

1181 John Robert 

Taylor. * 
4 children. 

1182 Frances Amelia.Feb. 22, 1843 

1183 Seatou Frank, July 24, 1844 

1184 Cyrel, Sept. 2, 1846 

1185 Mowbray, Aug. 5. 1862 



Mary Sophia 
Jarvis, Nov. 12, 1829 

1186 J. Briggs Miller, 

Lewis, 
1 child. 

1187 John (George 

Stephen, Oct. 3, 1^57 



June 19, 1856. 
Surgeon-Major, R. A. 



> Robert Maule was a Captain in PI. M. 82d Rogt. ; retired fronuhe ser- 
vice after having served during the Indian Mutiny, and is now (1878) 
residing in Toronto. ^ ' 

« Married second husband, Henry McKay, Dec. 3, 1861. 

« Married Charlotte Lewis, eldest daughter of the Rt. Rev J Travers 
Lewis. D.D., LL.D., Lord Bishop of the Diocese of Ontario 

^Surgeon 11 M. 29th Regt. Served in Affghan war, 1843; Crimean 
war, 1854; and Indian Mutiny, 



y^r 



128 



DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM— SIXTH GENERATION. 



Married or Remark*. 
Sept. 19, 1805. 
Died in infancy. 



18f>2 
1863 



No. Name. Bom. Died. 

Geo. Sherwood 
Jarvls, Nov. 8, 1834 

1188 Annie Mclntyre. 

1 cliild. 

Ann Frances . 
Jarvis, May 4, 1830 

1189 Edmund A.Mer- 

editli, 1817 

8 cliildren. 

1190 Mary Elizabetli.Oct. 20, 1856 

1191 Alice Louisa, Jan. 10, 1859 
1193 Harriet Maule, Sept. 3, 1860 

1193 Edm. Ar. Jarvis, 1864 

1194 Clarence Graves, Jan. 8, 1867 

1195 Ethel Colborne, Apr. 26, 1868 

1196 Morna Irvine, July 13, 1871 

1197 ColbornePo well, Sept. 13, 1874 

Edmund Allen Meredith, LL.D., sch. T.C.D., 

Was graduated at the University of Dublin, 1837. Received hon- 
orary degree of M.A. from Bishop's College, Lennox ville, and that 
of LL.D. from McGill University; was called to the Irish Bar 1844, 
to the Bar of U. C. the same year, and to the Bar of L. C. 1845. 
Was principal of McGill College, 1846-7 ; appointed Assistant Secre- 
tary U. C, 20th May, 1847 ; Inspector of Prisons and Asylums, 1859 ; 
Chairman of Board of Inspectors of Prisons and Asylums, 1864; 
Under Secretary of State for Provinces, 1st July, 1807; Chairman 
of Civil Service Board, 1869. Is an Hon. Member of the Ameri- 
can Association for the Advancement of Social Science, and a Cor- 
responding Member of the New York Prison Association. 



S&S. 



Louisa Jarvis, Dec. 16, 1831 

1198 Augustus Nan- 

ton. 

7 children. 

1199 Harry William, Mcb 

1200 Mary Rosalee, May 

1201 John George, Jan. 

1202 Augustus Mere- 
. dith. May 



8. 1856 
6, 1857 

6. 1859 

7, 1860 



June, 1859 



DESCENDANTS OF WIM.IAM—SIXTH OKNERATION. 



129 



No Name. Born, 

laoailorl). Colborne, July 31, 18«;J 
1304 Lilian Caroline, Dec. !{1, 18«5 
1805 Edward, July 80, 1867 



Died. 



Married or Reinarkn. 



•Inly ;!1, lHfi7 



Wm. D. Jarvis.'Aug 

1206 Marg't Uaniiey. 

5 cliililreu. 

1207 Mary Louisa. Apr. 

1208 Wm. HefTJiiald, Au;^-. 
120!) ColborneDennis.Fel). 
1210 Harry St. John, Api 



4, 18^4 



14. 



1861 
1H62 
19, 1864 
14. 1H66 



Jan. 23, 1864 



i^n Maria Mabel, Nov. m, 1807 Aug. 15, 1860 



I 



1212 

12 IS 
1214 
1215 
1216 
1217 

1218 
1210 
1220 



Sarah Jarvi.s, May 4, 
Lewis W. Ord. » 

8 (;hildren. 
Arthur B., Apr. 6, 

Lewis Kednian, Oct. 17, 
Craven R. Ord, June 2;^ 
Violet Isabel, Oct. 21,' 
William Hots- 
ford Jarvis, May 
FIorenceAu^'ta.July 
Edni'dTlieod'c, Aug> 
Louisa, 



18;{6 



1855 
1856 
1858 
I860 



25, 

9, 
30, 



Henry Sanford 
Jarvis, Aui 



8, 



1865 
1867 
1874 

eor. 

1818 



Died in iiifan(-y. 



December 2, 1849, at 
Deposit, N. Y. 



1221 Rachel Peters. 

3 children. 

1222 Harrie, Nov. 14, 1853 

1223 Charles Maples, Apr. 1(!, 1856 

1224 Frederick, Nov. 6. 1860 

» William Dummer Jarvis was LieuiTiini^r 1'^thlZZ~^ 7. 

17 



mmmmmmmww^im* 



130 DESOKNDANTS OK WILLIAM— SIXTH OENKUATION 



. 



No. Name. Born. Died. 

MiiriiM 111 Bradley 
Jarvis. Jul.V 1, 1830 

1225 Win. Kly. Feb. 0.1873 

.') chiltlrcn. 
122« Henry Oliver, Nov. i;J, 1841 

1227 Lo'isaarlswold.Mune 19, 1850 
122H Marietta IMatt, July 3, 1857 
122i)(}eo. Mather, Mch. 4,18(10 
1230 Cbus. Piatt. Aug. 14, 1803 

ooi>. 



Married or RomarkB. 
Au};. 30, 18:«). 

November 10, 1870, to 

Kate White. 
Nov. 2, 1871. 



Sarah M. Jarvis, Apr. 7, 182G 
12;{1 Solomon F. Gary. 

;? children. 
13:53 Wm. Ely, Dec. 17, 1853 

13;}3 Mariette Jarvis, Apr. 30,1855 
1334 Sarah Flagler, Nov, 3, 18(5« 

OlO. 

Francis V. Jar 
vis, Apr. 7, 1826 

1235 John P. Dean. 
3 children. 

1336 Fannie, Sept. 13, 1858 •;""• 2^' ^f^ 

1337 Minnie, Feb. 10,1863 Apr. 18,1863 

1338 Ida Sanford, Dec. 15, 1863 



Mch. 15, 1853. 



Dec. 37, 1854. 



Eliza Ann Jar- 
vis, 

1339 Jos(!pb B. Mc- 

Kean, 

5 children. 

1340 Franklin B., 

1341 Anna B. , 
1343 Henry J., 
1343 Katbarine, 
1244 Marietta B., 



<51 1. 

Apr. 33, 1838 Feb. 15. 1856. 

Oct. 8, 1871 

May 14, 1857 July 4. 1858 
July 38, 1859 
Mch. 1, 1861 
Mch. 36, 1864 
Aug. 0, 1866 



03S. 



(Jeorge F. Well- 
man, Apr. 13, 1818 



June 33, 1846. 



I Married to Robert M. Hagerman. 1 child. 



DK80KNDANTH OF VVIIJ.IAM— SIXTH OKNKKATION. 1 .{ | 

?9Arr "T^M """'■ »'""• M,.rrl...l.,rR.,„«rkH. 

1245 Carol I III' M. 

ProHcotl. 

8 childnMi. 

l240Geo. iroiiHT. Apr. 4, 1H47 May 28 1H70 

IMS UuiH. llcrhert, May 5, 1853 Mch. 4, 1855 



«3r. 

Merritt H. W , il- 

"»»". Jan. 15, 1823 

1249 Cath. Ann Coles. 

4 children. 

1250 Edward .lunicH. Aug. 11, 1855 Ool,. 35, 1856 
1351 Theodore Coles, Aug. ;}0, 185(1 Meh. 13,' 1859 
1353 Maria Watson, Mdi. 3, 18,5}) 

1353 Tliomas Coles, Oct. 5, 18(11 



Oct. 17. 1854. 






«3>st. 

Henry II. Well- 
man, Sept. 30, 1826 

1254 Mary Elizabeth 

Northrojx 
4 childn^n. 

1255 Julia H('becca, Ai)r. 28, 1858 May Hi, 1858 
125(5 Charles ITeniy, July 1,1800 

1257 Annie Amelia, Meli. 8, 18(53 
1358 Mary Northroi), Feb. 15, 186!) 



July 23, 1856. 



030. 

Homer H. Well- 
man, Sept. 30, 1826 

1259 Marian J. Harri- 

son. 

2 children. 

1260 Edwin Homer, Aug. 25, 1857 

1261 Herbert James, Feb. 9, 1865 



Oct. 7, 1851. Living in 
New York. 



Graduate of Theolog- 
ical Seminary, Va. 



Caroline S. 
Camp, 
1262 Pethuel Mills- 
paugh. 
4 children. 



July 3, 1825 



Sept. 25, 1845. 



» Married to Chaa. J. Sewall. 2 (-hildren-Henry Foster b Dec 15 
1875, Edith Prescott, b. Feb. 15, 1878. " ' ' 



|r r 




\:vi 



DKHnKNpANTH, OK Wll.M AM—MIXTII (IKNKHATION. 

""'■" '"'••l. Marilod or HomarkH. 



No. Naino. 

12(i:{ Fniiic(!s lOIi/.u 

'"'•li. Nov. 24. 1840 

12(14 Siliis Ciiinp, Nov. 28, 1848 Nov. 22. 18.')1 
12(15 Kird'k Woisl<.r,.Imu! 8, 1851 Dec. lo" imr, 
Vim William W.. Mch. 14. 1858 

2(1 Imshiind. 
12(t7 Win. W. Jones, 

Elizalx'Mi A. 

Ciinii), Oct. i;{. 1828 

1208 Hcv. Win. F. 

Hrviinl,. • 

1 ("hild. 
1200 Mary E.. |),,o. ;J0, 1855 



July 5. 1862. 



Jan.. 1854. 



1868 



Gco.Wui.Can.p.Apr. 10, 18;J2 Apr. 24. 1874 Jan. 10 1850 

1270 Sarah J. Uey- 

nolds. 

3 cliildrcn. 

1271 Elsie E., Mch. 5, 1801 

1272 Frank B.. May, 1803 Au^r.. 

1273 Geo. K., Juno 10, 1807 



1809 



« lO. 

Theodore Edson 
Camp, July 20^ iggj) 

1274 Sarah J. E. Jones. 

2 children. 

1275 Silas William, Oct. 15, 1870 
1270 Elizabeth Aiin,Nov. 8, 1871 



Dec. 15, 1809. 



Geo. Foster, 

1277 Mary Fanoher. 

2 children. 

1278 Mary l.ouise, 

1279 Charley, 



1830 



1801 
1803 



1859. 



o<ir*. 



AliceM.Knapp,Dec.23. 1848 April 10, 1874 1871 

1280 Robt. Mclvni-ht. 

2 children. 

1281 Harry, igcG Feb. 22, 1871 

1282 Walter Miller, 1372 



' Rev. M,-. Bryant was an Epi.scopal clergyman, and died'^iidd^nly at 

«4f, "'"' T.f. ""''' '" *I»^'''^^""' 1«58 or 9. Mrs. Bryant is now 
(18(0) hvuig m Chicago. 



DUHCKNDANTH OK Wtl.UAM HIXTil (IKNKRATION. 



133 



No. Naino. Bora. |)u„|. 

Dtliii Anil 

Kiiiipp, .iiiiy ".», inno 

liKi Kzra Hiclmnlson. 
1 cliild. 

1284 Au/,'nstii. Jk-c. 'i'.i, 1874 

Wm. J. Mc- 

Alpino. April :{{), 1813 

1285 Sarah K. Lariied. 

7 cliildrcM. 
1380 Klizaln'th.Iuiie, Dec. 38, 1841 

1287 Miiry Amelia, Mcli. 1.1, 1844 

1288 Julia Jarvis, Nov. la, 184(5 

138« Wni. Donald 

McCJregor, Feb. 3«, 184» Dee. 30, 1858 
1390 Sarah .loso- 

phine, June 18, 1858 

1801 Catharine L.. 185({ 

1893 Anna Gertrude, June 39, 1855) 



Mnrrled or Rtimiirkti. 
1874. 



FeJj. 34, 1841. 



Charles F. Jolnmon. 
One Hon. 

Euir. I.eut/e, IT. S. N. 
(^ne daughter. 



Amelia Anna 
McAlpine, Oet. 0, 181(5 
1898 Chas. Tyng-, Au--. 34, 1801 
5 children. 

1394 Chas. Dudley, May 3, l8;Mi 

1395 Anita Eli/ahetli, Feb. 4, 1888 
1390 .Iulia(Jertrude, Oct. 8,1840 Jan. 0,1848 

1397 George, May 13, 1842 July i.^, i8«9 

1398 Julia Gertrude,May, 1844 May. 1840 



j Nov. 9, 1838. Living 
( in Providence, li. I. 

Living in Arizona. 



Miris Anita ELtzABETii Tyno 

Is the second cliikl of Charles Tyng and Anita A. McAlpine, and 
was born Feb. 4, 1838. 8he was named for her grandmother and 
great-grandmother, both being descended from the family of 
Jarvis. 

From childhood Miss Tyng has been an earnest, energetic 
fa.'ident. Fond of scientific reading and research, she turned her 
attention to the study of medicine and surgery. She entered the 
Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, from which she gradu- 
ated in 1864. After her graduation, she went to New York, where 
she was introduced into Bellevue Hospital by Dr. James R. Wood. 



r 



134 



DESCENDANTS OF VnILLIAM — SIXTH OENEHATION. 



She afterwards became Assistant Surgeon to Dr. H. R. Storor 
of Boston, who was Surgeon to the New Enghind Hospital for 
Women and ('liihiren. 

In the year 18G8, she removed to Providence, where she is highly 
esteemed as a woman and physician. 

In 1872, she was elected member of the fihode Island Medical 
Socaety, and subsequently a member of tlu; Providence Medical 
Association. 

Soon after thesQ honors had been bestowed upon Jier, she read 
'">efore the State Society a paper on ' Eclampsia I'uerporalis," a 
disease which slu; liad treated sixccessfully. This paper, whose 
merits were respectfully discussed at tha^, time by J)rs. C'lapp, 
Capron, Stanley, and others, has since been published. 

Miss Tyng has lately received the appointment of Delegate to the 
American Medical Association, which meets in Chicago. She has 
also received other and later honors at the hands of the profession, 
and it is very evident that Miss Tyng will, eventually, take her 
place among the representative women of this progressive age. 



<M)0. 



No. Name. Bom. 

Elizabeth Mary 

McAlpine, Aug. 31, 1833 
1399 Jas. I.. MrrGrcgor. 

3 children. 

1300 Mary Stuart, Mch. 39, 1849 

1301 John Alpine. June 33, 1853 

Chas.F.Osborn, Scpt.38, '818 
1303 Caroline Kellogg, 
3d wife. 

1303 Harriet Smith.' 

Child. 

1304 Clarence P., June 13. 1860 



Piad. Miirrieil or Remarks. 

Aug. IC, 1847. 



Mch. 33, 1841. 
Ap.-ii 1, 1864 Dan. Eweck Kellogg. 

April 19, 1805. 



Nelson Jarvi.s 
Wat(irl)Ui.) . 
1305 Nancy D. M. Gibson. 

4 children. 
1300 Lucy Sutford. 

1307 Eliz. Jarvis. 

1308 Maria (Jibsoii. 

1309 Nelson Jarvis, Jr. 



Tlf>. 



See Appendix U. 



'Daughter of Stephen Smith, Norwalk. 



w 





t ^ 



( 



4. 



fT^ 



mmmmmmm 



134 



DKS0ENDANT8 OF WILLIAM— SIXTH GENERATION. 



C 



" IJ >l. StOTOT 

• I" h biirhlv 



i a 



■ • iiftd' iif;f-.M 'ff'stn-y,- : 

' ''!f>^pt»rf^H^ "' a 

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)'lncr- an-. 



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If: 



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11 






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136 



DE8CKNDANT8 OF WILLIAM — SIXTH GENEKATION. 



to take medical direction of the forces at Pinckney Island, Sea- 
brook's, and Elliott's IMantatioiis, S. C^. 

In Septemb(ir, 1862, the yellow fever which destroyed General 
Ormsby Mitchell and other prominent officers in the Department 
of the South, laifl low also many of the 7th New Hampshire Vol- 
unteers, and he was sent to New York city in chai'jjje of a detach- 
ment of this re}i;imeiit, on the steamer " Delaware." Tie then pro- 
ceeded to Phihulclphia, where he remained as Examining Surgeon 
of recruits until the early spring of 18G.'{, when he was ordered to 
fit up a hospital for the accommodation of Confederate prisoners 
at Fort Delaware, Delaware Ray; after which he rejoined his regi- 
ment, the Hd Pennsylvania Artillery, at Camp Hamilton, Va., 
May, 1863. 

In June, he was assigned to duty as Post Surgeon of Fortress 
Monroe, where he reni.ined until December, 1865, when, the war 
having closed, he left the U. S. military service. In the autumn, 
before leaving the army, lie, with two other commissioned officers, 
was detailed by the Secretary of War, to investigate the manage- 
ment of all hospitals, past and present, near Fortress Monroe. 

After returning to Philadelphia, lie attended lectures at the 
University of Pennsylvania in 1865-66, and June 1, 1866, he 
settled in Denver, Col. His practice is general, though a large 
portion is surgical. Among his notable cases is that of a girl ten 
years of age, run over by a locomotive engine; in which case he 
removed the left arm two inches below the elbow, tht right arm 
three inches below the shoulder-Joint, and the left lower leg at the 
junction of the middle and upper third of the tibia, with the 
result of a rapid recovery. 

He is a member of the Denver Medical Society, of which he 
was President in 18G8; also a member of the Colorado Medical 
Society; and President of the State Board of Health for 1876-7-8. 

Since 1868, he has held the office of Examining Surgeon for 
Pensions; was City Physician of Denver from 1872 to 1876, and 
again in 1876-9; from 187-4 to 1876 was President of the Board 
of Education of Denver. 

He has been Vice-President of the Board of Trustees of "Wolfe 
Hall," Denver, since 1875; member of the Standing Committee of 
Colorado for 1878. 

From 1870 to 1876, he was Surgeon of the Kansas Pacific and 
Denver Pacific Railroads, and again, since 1877, of the Donver 
Pacific; he has been Surgeon of the Denver & Rio Grande Rail- 
road since its construction in 1870. 



DKSCENDANTS OF WILLIAM SIXTH GKNKUATION. 



137 



He is Medical Referee for the " Mutixal Benefit Life Ins. Co." of 
New Jersey, and for the " New York Life Ins. Co."'; also Medical 
Examiner for the "New York Mutual Life Ins. Co."; the "Con- 
necticut Mutual Life Ins. Co."; the '-New York Home Life Ins. 
Co.," and others. 

He lias been President of the Agricultural Ditch Co. since 1875. 

His medical writings relate chiefly to the climate of Colorado, 
and to matters of hygiere. 



•rsio. 




No. Name. Born. Died. 


Married or Reinarks 


Jno.E.liiissftt.' Mch. 81, 1830 


June 11, 1860. 


1333 Sarah B. Pratt. 




4 chrulren. 




1333 Mary Lindcr- 




grc'on, May 27, 1805 




1334 Geo. Jarvis, Nov. 23. 1860 




1335 Annie Louise, June 14, 1873 




1336 Sarah Isabelle, Oct. 16, 1875 





Ann Augusta 

Jarvis, Pel). 14, 1849 Apr. 13, 1877 July 8, 1873, by Rev. 

S. J. Horfon, D.D. 
1337 E.D.Woo(llmry,-^May 30, 1837 

3 children. 

1328 Roger Atwater, Jan. 10, 1875 Born at Denver. 

1329 Sanford Jarvis, Aug. 30, 1870 Born at Denver. 



E. D. Woodbury 

Was the son-in-law of Benjamin A. Jarvis of Cheshire, Conn. 
His wife's name was Ann Augusta Jarvis; and tlie following is an 
abbreviated statement of the services of this diistinguished soldier 
in the Union army during the Rebellion. 

On the 14th of Decemlier, 1863, while principal of the academy 
at Derby, Vermont, he enlisted for three years, as a })rivate, in 
Company E, First Vermont Cavalry. 

On January 21, 1SG4, lie joined his regiment in camp at Stevens- 
burg, Virginia, where he found, among tlio officers, scn'cral of his 
old college friends and classmates, but as lie had a disabled liaud, 
from a felon, he was prevented from joining (Jeneral Kilpatrick 
in his famous raid around Richmond. 



' Hardware merchant. New Haven, Conn. 
* Was graduated, 1863, from Dartmouth College. 
18 



138 



DK8CENDANTS OF WILLIAM — SIXTH OKNKRATION. 



On the niglit of the 3d of May, at 12 midnight, the regiment 
broke camp and started upon what proved to be the longest and 
most obstinately contested campaign of the war. General Grant 
had recently joined the armv of the Potomac, though General 
Meade remained in immediate command. At sunrise, on the 4th 
of May, 18G4, the army forded tlie Bapidan, and at 2 p.m. were 
fired upon by the scouts and pickets of the enemy, who were soon 
driven back to " Mine Run." 'Jliis ended the first day of this 
campaign. 

On the following day, at 3 a.m., the terrible "Battle of the 
Wilderness " began, and during the carnages of that fierce conflict, 
he was in the hottest of the fight, while his comrades were falling 
around him. The cavalry were often dismounted, and obliged to 
fight on foot, like the infantry. Near " Mine Run " the enemy 
cliarged suddenly and in foi'ce upon the Union army, which some- 
what disordered and scattered the Union troops, but quickly rally- 
ing, the cavalry were dismounted, and went into the fight on foot. 
During this engagement, and as Private Woodbury was kneeling 
behind a fence, a riflivball struck the rail, piercing it so far as to 
be partly seen, and throwing dust and small splinters into his face. 
He partially moved to oiu; side to give a comrade i)la(!e, who, in a 
moment, was shot in the left temple, and fell dead at liis side. On 
another occasion, standing behind a small tree about six inches in 
diameter, a rifle-ball struck it breast high, when he hastily sought 
a safer shelter. About 2 p.m. th(! cavalry nMuounted, charging 
upon the enemy, when th(!y fell back. Woodbury's horse was 
shot under him, and in falling, plimged ht^adlong, throwing his 
rider over his neck into the bushes. He immediately (extricated 
himself from his perilous condition, and made his way to one of 
the Union batteries. On his way, he stooped t(j drink from a small 
]»r()()k, when a shell, falling within eight feet of him, quickened 
his flight, without quencliing his thirst. On reaching the battery, 
which was just moving oif, he fortunately mounted another hoi'se, 
whose rider had been killed, and, as he expressed it, " Richard 
was himself again." In this day's fight, the division to which he 
belonged was worsted. At 9 p.m. he lay down upon the ground, 
behind his horse, thankful that he was spai-ed from the perils of 
the battle. 

In the morning of the 9th of May, 1864, his regiment cut loose 
from the main army, and went on a raid, under the lead of Gen- 
eral Sheridan. They passed Fredericksburg about 10 a.m., and 



DESCENDANta OF WILLIAM — SIXTH GENEUATION. 



130 



'7. 



Il'll- 
aiul 



without halting for diTiner or supper, camped about midnight, and 
were ofT again at lialf-past .'5 a.m. On the 10th, th(\y crossed 
the Nortli Anna, and cainpetl near tlio Soutli Anna. Their rations 
being exhausted, fioin tliat time till the 14th they subsisted on 
bacon and corn, either raw or roasted. 

At noon on the 11th, they reached A^shland Station, and spent 
the day mostly in destroying the Uichmond & Potomac raili'oad, 
and, towai'ds evening, they encount<red the Rebel cavalry undcsr 
General ,1. E. H.Stuart. General Gustev's " Michigan Hrigade" 
was fornnng for a charge, when the General shouted to ( .olonel 
Chapman, commanding the Second Brigade, that he wanted the 
First Vermont Regiment to lead the charge. The enemy's bat- 
tery was partly hidden from sight by a narrow strip of pine woods. 

As the colunm swept around the wood, the Rebels, not relishing 
a charge led by Guster, their battery was discovered dashing cn'cr 
the crest of a hill, leaving a few of their guns behind. The result 
of the battle was the complete rout of the Rebels, General Stuart 
being among the killed. Soon another Rebel battery opened up(m 
the Union troops. They were at once answered by rifled guns, 
but their cavalry came sweeping down upon the l^nion raiMers, 
not having yet fully recovered from the confusion of their former 
charge. 

To add to the horrors of this bloody fight, the southwestern 
horizon assumed a leaden hue, and soon the dark clouds came 
rolling one upon another, imtil the whoh> heavens were shrouded 
in darkness. The dull, murky atmosphere hung like a funereal 
pall overhead, when suddenly the vivid lightnings flashed inces- 
santly, and the earth seemed to tremble beneath the terrific peals 
of thunder. From cloud to cloud the forked lightning flashed 
and leaped, and the reverberating thunder echoed from height to 
height, and from mountain to mountain, until the storm died away 
in the distant hills. The rain fell in torrents, while in the thick 
darkness of the tempest the flashes of the rifles were dim,ly seen 
but for a moment, and the booming of the cannon was scarcely 
audible amid the louder roar of the dread artillery of heaven. 
The storm was of short duration, as in half an hour not a cloud 
obscured the glories of the setting sun, as he sank from beholding 
the carnage of the battle-field. 

At 4 A.M., June 1st, the Union tiroops left camp on the Pamua- 
key, and a battalion of four companies rode eight miles, to the 
South Anna, and burned the bridges of the Richmond & Potomac 



u. 



140 



DKHCKNDANTS OK WILLIAM — SIXTH OKNKUATION. 



il 



I 



railroad, and also thowe of the \ irginiu Central. lieturning, 
(hey found tlu> l)rif/;ado was gcttinu; batily used up by a strong 
fort'A! of infantry ut Asliland Station. Coloju^l (^Iiapinan at onco 
sout his men out, disnioiintcd. Tlicy wore getting worsted, when 
a body of troops were seen approaching on their right and rear. 
Supposing theni to lu' Hcbels, the men were for leaving the field, 
but Colonel Chapnuui ordered them baek, deelaring the coming 
troops were friends. The eniMiiy in front charged, l)iit were checked 
by the Union troops, who were "about iiuiking u counter clinrge, 
when the balls from the advancing troops, on their right and rear, 
came vvhi/zing among them. Colonel Cliapman now h(;aded the 
retreat, anti the men, remounting their horses in haste, fled from 
the scene. Lieutenant Stone, ( /ompany F, with a large part of his 
company, were taken prisoiKTs. 

At 8 A.M., Jun(( 2d, the raiilers left llimover, and at half:past 
three the following morning, the 3d, camped about five miles 
from Riclimond. At 11 a.m., the battle opened with the Rebel 
cavalry and infantry, and the struggle was fierce and long. 
Captain Cushman, Company E, and C'olonel Preston were killed, 
and their deaths cast a gloom over the whole regiment. 'I'his 
action was known as the battle of '• 11a we's Shop." Worn with 
fatigue, Private Woodbury slept well through the night on a board, 
with a Poncho ovier him, with his head in a " hard-tack " box, to 
keep off the rain. 

On the 'Jlst of June, 1864, he wen! upon another raid, under 
(iiMieral Wilson, known as " Wilson's Raid," to ilestroy the I'eters- 
burg & Lynchburg railroad, also tlie Richmond & Danville road, 
with its iron bridge across the river Staunton. The object was 
partly accomplished, but proved well-nigh fatal to the troops 
engaged. 

At noon on the 2'2d of June, they met the enemy, and from 
that time till they were again within the Cnion picket lines, oi. the 
1st of July, they were completely surrounded by the Rebel troops. 

At Nottoway, they fought the enemy in strong force for the 
possession of the Petersburg & Lynchburg railroad, and drove 
them three-fourths of a mile, into the woods, when they came in 
sight of the Rebel battery that had been shelling them. Their 
ammunition giving out, they retreated, with the Rebels at their 
heels. 

They remained in possession of the road until morning, destroy- 
ing it, effectually, for miles. During that night, Private Wood- 



DKSCKNDANTS OV WII.MAM SIXTH (IKNKUATION. 



Ul 



in 
eir 
.eir 

oy- 
od- 



hury, sitting on the ground, slept an hour or two, Imlding tlio n^ins 
ol' his horse's Itridlc, and loaning against his fore legs. In this 
fight ('otn))any H] again lost its (Captain, Hiram H. Hall. 

Karly in tlu- altfrnoon of tlie 2Uh ol' June, tlicy cainc upon the 
Richmond & Danville road, which they followed tlnrty six hours, 
destroying it to the iron bridge at the junction of the Little Roa- 
noke and the Htuunton rivers. Tlie hridgt' was only partially 
destroyed, with the loss of LMK) men. The attempt was almndoned, 
and at midnight, the raiders began their homeward march. 

Having driven the TTnion tnjops from the briilge, the K(!bel8 
were more courageous and determined in their assaults, while the 
raiders were cmnberful with numy negroes who followed iti their 
train, consisting of old men, women, and childi'eii. (Jen. Fitzhugh 
Lee, with a body of cavalry, hmsely estimated at 1 2,000, endeav- 
ored to cut oil' their retreat, and from 3 v. M. on the IHith, till!> i' M. 
on the 27th of June, they were harassed by the Rebels, constantly 
fighting on the defensive, so that their progress was sh)W. Just 
before noon, on the '28th June, the LTnion raiders cro.ssed the Not- 
toway, and at night they were attacked by the Keliels. The 1st 
Vt. ('avalry, and other troops:, were out on the line. Dismounting, 
they drove the enemy back half a mile, the evening being so dark 
that the enemy could not be seen. Privates Woodbury and Mc- 
Neil, his messmate, made a breast-work of two rails, and lying on 
their faces, directed their fire by the flash of the Rebel gnns. It 
was a terrible storm of iron and lead, and NcNeil was badly 
wounded, and soon after died. 

About 3 A. M., tlie Union troops wei'e ordered back to their 
horses, but were almost immediately ordered back again. Scarcely 
had they reached the line of battle when there was a lull in the 
firing, but it soon broke out again with redoubled fury all along 
the line, while a body of cavalry from another quarter charged 
upon the horses which had been left in the charge of a few soldiers, 
each of whom rode one, holding three others by the bridles, as was 
usual when the cavalry dismounted and fought on foot. The road 
was crowded with wagons, amlnilances, led horses, loose horses, 
and contrabands, and the Rebels pressed on, confident of completely 
destroying them. In this pell-mell, private Woodbury saw his 
comrades shot down on all sides of him. Of all the men of Co. 
"E," who were dismounted, only four or five came in; the rest 
were captured, and among them, C'apt. Chandler, who soon made his 
escape, and in a few days came into camp. As soon as the com- 



142 



DKHCKNDANTH (IK WII, 1,1AM — KIXTII (IKNKUATION. 



iiiHiul coiilil Ih> (U)llfct('(l, they I'dl liack to tlic pliicc I'roni whence 
theystartod tho previous oveiiiiig. 

At noon they again moved to the scene of the morning's disas- 
ter upon Stony (^reek, near tlio Weldon Hailroad, and were com- 
pletely hemmed in by the Rebels, who were drawing tluur lines 
closer alK)Ut them, in this dilemma, they burned their wagons, 
pitch(!d the artillery into tht! creek, and lol't tlu' and)ulances with 
the wounded in charge of surgeons, all of whom that day became 
prisoners. The command marched and fought, cutting their way 
out at midnight, when they rested two hours, and then pushed on 
again. The ne.xt day, tlie 1st of July, fortunately not being mo- 
lested, they halted at Cabin I'oiiit, just within Ueneral (irant's 
lines. 

At evening roll, on July 4th, private Woodbury was promoted 
fifth Sergeant of ('o. "E," 1st Vermont Cavalry, and acting 
Orderly Sei'geant. While lying at City Point, S(M'gennt Woodbury 
narrowly escaped death from being thrown down a stee]) l)ank, 
heels over liead, with his horse tumbhng after him. He was l)adly 
bruised in his head and hands, and landed in the mud of a small 
creek. No serious injury, however, resulted from this mishap, and 
early in August, he, with the army, went into the valley of the 
Shenandoah with Cc^neral Slieridan. 

The army crossed the Blue Ridge at Snicker's Cap, and forded 
the Shenandoah on the Kith of August. At 1 a. m., Sept. 10th, the 
command broke camp for Winchester. During the day the 1st 
Vermont was in the hottest of the fight. This was the first gen- 
eral engagement since Sheridan's arrival in the valley, and both he 
and Early pushed forward every available man. The tide of bat- 
tle swayed to and fro till night, wlien the Union forces succeeded 
in driving the enemy through and beyond the town, capturing sev- 
eral tliousand prisoners, and a few guns. This has been officially 
known as the " Battle of the Opequan," to distinguish it from a 
fighter engagement at Winchester on the 17th of August. 

Two days after entering Winchester, Sept. '20th, the cavalry were 
off scouting, and the infantry fought and won tlie battle of " Fisli- 
er's Hill." On the 22d of September, 1864. the third division, 
under Gen. Wilson, in which the Ist Vt. belonged, marched from 
Winchester towards the Shenandoah at 1 a. m. Before night they 
were in fine on the bank of the river, and as the head of the col- 
umn advanced to the ford, they were suddenly attacked by the 
Rebels, whose bullets flew thick and fast among them. Early in 



i 

y 



DE80KNDANTR OF WILLIAM SIXTH aKNKRATtON. 



43 



the morninjf tfio division charged across the river, and advanced to 
Front Royal. 

On the 'J7th, tho division marclied from Staunton to Waynos- 
boro, whon^ thoy took a few [)risoner8. At sundown, thoncxt day, 
they were driven out pell-mell, and spent the whole night retreat- 
ing under Gen. Wilson's guidance, and at 7 a. m. on tlie morning 
of the '29th, tliey went on picket at liridgewater, about forty miles 
from the scene of the evening's rout. 

On the 30th G(!n. Wilson was relieved of his command, and 
Gen. Custer appointed in his place. 

Having driven Early across the mountains, the army fell back 
down tlie valley, driving horses, mules, cattle, sheep, and hogs, aiul 
destroying everything which could supply the enemy. 

Oct. (Jth, Co. '> E " was sent t>n th(f left flank, and was engaged 
in destroying the property of the Rebels, during wliich raid many 
exciting incidents occurred. On tlie 7th, at noon, they crossed a 
small stream with 2,000 cattle and sheep, when they were attacked 
by the enemy, under General Rosser. After some skirmishing, 
the heef and mutton were lost, and a few men. On the following 
day, C'o. " E " was again simt out to burn and destroy the propeity 
of tlie Rebels. On the 9th, the enemy occupied Mount Olive, and 
one of their shells burst near Sergeant Woodbury, covering him 
with dirt. 

Gen. Sheridan had been called to Washington, and returned to, 
and spent the night of the 18th of October at, Winchester, nearly 
twenty miles from his army. Meantime, Gen. Early having 
returned into the valley, favored by heavy fogs, surprised the army 
on the morning of the 19th, at 3 o'clock. He captured the Union 
pickets, and sweeping down into their camps, took some twenty- 
five guns, and turned them upon the Union troops, driving them 
down the valley. At this critical moment, Shm-idaii arrived, and 
checking and re-forming the retreating army, charged back upon 
the Rebels, and sent them Hying up the valley in a perfect rout 
toward Strasburg. During this hot pursuit of the Rebel army 
under Gen. Early, Sergejuit Woodbury captured the battle-flag 
of the 12th N. C. Infantry. 

Two days afterward, he, with fifteen others of the 3d division, 
who hr.d captured flags from the enemy, reported at (ren. Custer's 
headquarters, and thence at Gen. Sheridan's. The next day they 
took the cars for Washington to present their trophies to the war 
department. Secretary Stanton received them cordially, and gave 



"■Ii 



j-t ^1 



"-^■"fthTiiaTriiiiTr'.: ..L 



144 



D«C8nKNI)ANT8 OK WILLIAM — HIXTII OENKRATION. 



I 



i III 



to each twenty (luyn' I'lirlough, transportntiuu lu uiid i'ruiii their 
homes, ami a bronzo iiuulal. 

Upon ri'tuniing to the n'giinont, Nov. 18, 1804, Sorgoant Wood- 
bury recoi veil his coniniiHsion as '2d Lioutonant of Co. "E,"aiid 
on the Dtli February, 18(>r), that of 1st LioiitcMiant of Co. " H." 

On the nioriiinfi; of tlu; Ist of April, 18()H, the battle opcaied 
early. In iho, middle of the afternoon. Gen. ('lUster formed liis 
division under the constant shelling of the enemy. He had his 
band in full view, playing patriotic airs. The charge sounded, and 
they emerged from tlu; wood, under a heavy fire. A lifh^ ball 
struck and disabled Lieutenant Woodbury's horse, l)ut mounting 
another, h(^, with some lU'ty otlnus, cliargc^d on what they took to 
be a small squad of infantry, when th(*y found themselves sur 
rounded by a greatly superior force of tlio enemy. In this nirlee, 
Lieut. Woodbury was captured, but, aft(M" riding a few rods, he 
suddenly put spurs to his horse, and dashed forward, hotly pursued 
by his captors. His hor.se was shot through the hea<l, and fell 
npon Woodbury's leg, holding him fust. The Rebels, doubtless 
thinking both horse and rider were dead, passed on. He extri- 
cated himself, made for the real", mounted another horse, and rejoined 
his command. Late at night, the Union troops eiiciunped, and the 
battle of the K'ive Forks hud been fought and wim. 

At 5 p. M. on the 8th of April, tlu; enemy were met at Appoma- 
tox Station. While halting a few minutes, a ball, two inches in 
diameter, from a charge of canister, struck a tree a few feet above 
his head and fell at his feet. 

The 'Ad Division was massed in a field to charge upon about 40 
pieces of artillery a short distance away, covennl ])y a piece; of 
woods. The loth N. Y., Col. Coppinger commiuidiug, had the 
advance, but the movement not being made m the si)irited manner 
that Gen. Custer wished, he, out of all patience, cried out, " Let 
the 1st Vermont follow me!" and himself led the charge. The 
whole of the Rebel artillery ojiened fire u|»on the advancing column, 
and it seemed impossible that a man could survive. It soon 
became dark, when Lieut. Woodbury was struck by a fragment of 
shell, which tore off a part-of his right hand, crossed his breast, 
tore open his jacket and shirt, and went through his left arm near 
the shoulder. He was thi-own from his horse into the bushes. He 
ran ])a('k to an old shanty, and from thence was taken to "^he hos- 
pital, about a mile distant, where his wounus were dressed. The 
whole of the Rebel guns were captured, and the last fight of the 



)i t 



nEBrr.NDANTS OF WII.MAM — SIXTH (JK.NF.RATION. 



145 



rebellion ended, except a few minutes' skirnishinj? the next morn- 

inff. 

At about 10 A. M. the next day, April !tth, (i<mi. I itu' surrendered, 
and on the 2 1 st June, 1865, Lieut. W«)()dhury, with his regiment, 
WHS nnistered out of the service at BiirliiiKtoii, Vt., having;; received 
his " cnrnniission as Captain Ity Brevet for ^'■allant and moritorioiis 
services in the Held." 

During his stTvice in the army, Iroiii Dec. I J, ISfJ.'t, till the sur- 
render of lifie, April !•, IHfi.'i, he was in 'M) skirmishes and battles, 
many of which were among the most bloody and terrible of the 
war. 

His excellent charac'ter, noble conduct, and cool courage in tti(> 
midst of danger won for him the esteem of his superior oflicers 
and comrades, and justly entitle him to the lasting gratitude of his 
country. 

Since his retirement from the army he has been the Head Master 
of the Episcopal Academy of Cheshire, (^onn. 



m 



40 

of 

Ithe 

iicr 

uOt 

lie 

|nn, 

)on 

of 

ist, 

[car 

He 

lios- 

rhe 

Ithe 



r^r. 



No. Nftino. 

Hamud J. 

I'inckncy, 
mm hii/. .1. Peck. 

4 cliildrcn. 
i;};U .Icnnie E., 
1333 Henry W., 



Born. 



Ui(!(l. 



Oct. H, 1829 
April 24, 183») 

Mch. 8, 1857 
Dec. 14, 1859 



Marrioil or l{nmarki» 

\ April 24, 1H.*)(!. 

/ Live in Br'klyn, N. Y. 



1333 liiliim M.. July 6, 1868 Feb. 8. 1870 

1334 Elizalu-thT., April 6, 1871 



•yse. 



John WilHon 

McLean,M.D.,Oct. 4, 1837 
1335 H arietta Lavinia 

Gounian, Mch. 34, 1844 

6 children. 
1330 John Sterling, Feb. 19, 18(i4 

1337 Charles Jarvis, July 26, 1865 

1338 Annie Langdoii, Aug. 11,1 8»i6 

1339 Langtlon Rice, Nov. 5, 1867 

1340 Lillie Uicc, Mch. 23, 1870 

1341 Fred. Ohappei, May 16, 1873 



19 



Resides Norwalk, Ot. 



Sept. 3, 1866 
Dec. 11, 1867 
Dec. 11. 1873 



i 



• m 






.•-:•:(, 



Ml 

1 i 

'. ■'! 

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146 descendants of william — seventh generation. 

7th Generation. 



No. Name. Born. 

Mary Shrievp 

Jarvia, July 24, 1836 

1343 Wm. J. Gilbert. 

3 children. 

1343 Sarah Hatch, April 9, 1864 

1344 Robt. .larvis, May 10, 1866 

1345 Wm. Jarvis, Mch. 30, 1868 



Died. 



Married or Remiarlts. 






C. E. Leonard 






Jarvis,^ July 1 


7, 1840 




1346 Annie McOhee. 






5 children. 






1347 Ernest Leonard, 


1868 


In infancy 


1348 Isabel Helen, 


1869 




1349 Florence Annie, 


1873 




1350 Ethel Hazen, 


1874 




1351 A son. 


1876 





Ellen Ciiroline 
Jarvis, McU. 12, 1842 

1352 Chas. Mesham.^ 

2 children. 

1353 Chas. Edward. 

1354 Marg't Barrett. 

sor. 



Agnes McGhee, June, 


1845 




1355 Wm. Harrison. 






5 children. 






1356 Murray, 


1866 


1867 


1357 Herbert Gray, Nov. 7, 


1867 




1358 Agnes Eliza 






liiirns, Dec. 5, 


1869 




1359 L<H)n'd Jarvis, Sept. 12, 


1871 




1360 Frank McGhee, Aug. 15, 


1874 


1876 



' C. E. Leonard Jarvis resides in St. John, "New Brunswick, and is 
Agent of the Queen's Fire Insurance Company. 
• Charles Mesham served in Canada with his regimenl, II. M. 62d Fool. 



DESORNDANTS OF WILLIAM— -HEVENTH GENERATION. 147 



8ie. 



No, Name. Bom. 

K(u-b't Murray 

Jarvls, Miiv 18, 1848 

1361 Allie Yielding. 

3 children. 
1868 Elma Muriel 

Mun-ay, Dto. 1, 1876 
laea Mildred Blen- 

nerhassett, Nov. 11, 1878 



Diea. 



Married or Remarks. 
Dec. 22, 1875. 



Hept. 27, 1829 



Koh't Morris 
Hazen, ' 

1364 Mary V*'oodhou.sc' Grant 

5 children. 

1365 Rob'l Morris 

Robinson,- Feb. 19, 1855 

1366 Sophia Frances.Dec. 12, land 

1367 Maria Arburthnot, 1859 

1368 Lilian, Aug. 30, 1861 

1369 Ethel." 



May 6. 1863 April 0, 1854. 



1858 



Born at Walmor, Kent . 
Born at Wiiichesltr. 
Born in India. 



4^ 



SSS. 



Wm. Hazen,'' July 4, 1831 

1370 Annette Swyninitn-, 

2 children. 

1371 William, May 24, 1857 

1372 Cecilia Eliz'th, Oct. 24, 1858 

2d wife. 

1373 Eliz'th Bartlett, 

4 children. 

1374 Robert Parker, Dec. . 1865 

1375 Harriett Su.san, May, 1867 

1376 Arth. Prissick.Sept. 26, 1868 

1377 An infant, I870 



Mch. 23, 1860 
1857 



March 9, 1865. 



'Robert Morris Ilazen was a Captain in H. M. 60th or King's Royal 
R.He Corps, formerly conunanded by his grandfather. Col. Hazen He 
died at Burniah, in India. 

■ Born at St. John, N. B. ; died at Winchester, England 

■^ Born at sea on board the "Golden Fleece," off St. Vincent 

' William Hazen is a Civil Engineer, and resides in St John N B 






1 






r 



146 DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM — SEVENTH GENERATION. 



7th Generation. 



No 



Bom. 



Died. 



Name. 
Mary Shrieve 
Jarvis, July 24, 1836 

1343 Wm. J. Gilbert. 
3 children. 

1343 Sarah Hatch, April 9, 18«4 

1344 Robt. Jarvis, May 10, 1866 

1345 Wm. Jarvis, Mch. 30, 1868 

C. E. Leonard 
Jarvis,! July 17, 1840 

1346 Annie McGhee. 

5 children. 

1347 Ernest Leonard, 1868 in infancy. 

1348 Isabel Helen, 1869 

1349 Florence Annie, 1872 

1350 Ethel Hazen, 1874 

1351 A son. 1876 



T03. 

Ellen Caroline 
Jarvis, McU- 12, 1842 

1352 Chas. Mesham.'^ 

2 children. 

1353 Chas. Edward. 

1354 Marg't Barrett. 

sor. 

Agnes McGhee, June, 1845 

1355 Wm. Harrison. 

5 children. 

1356 Murray, 

1357 Herbert Gray, Nov. 7, 1867 

1358 Agnes Eliza 

Burns, Dec. 5, 

1359 Leon'd Jarvis, Sept. 12, 1871 

1360 Frank McGhee.Aug. 15, 1874 



Married or Remarks. 



1866 



1869 



1867 



1875 



< C. E. Leonard Jarvis resides in St. John, New Brunswick, and is 
Agent of the Queen's Fire Insurance Company. 
'' Charles Mesham served in Canada with his regiment, H. M. 62d Foot. 



-^ -.I 



DESORNDANTS OP WrUJAM— SEVENTH GENERATION. 147 



sie. 



No. Name. Bom. 

Herb't MuiTay 
JarvLs, May 18, 1848 

1361 Allie Yielding. 

2 children. 

1362 Elma Muriel 

Murray, Dee. 1, 1876 

1363 Mildred Blen- 

nerbassett, Nov. 11, 1878 



Died. Married or Remarks. 

Dec. 22, 1875. 



Rob't Morris 
Hazeu.i Sept. 27, 1829 

1364 Mary Woodliou.sc Grant. 

5 children, 

1365 Roh't Morri.s 

Robinson,-' Feb. 19, 1855 

1366 Sophia Franees.Dec. 12, 1856 

1367 Maria Arburthnot, 1859 

1368 Lilian, Aug. 30, 1861 

1369 Ethel. 3 



May 6, 1863 April (i, 1854. 



1858 



Born at Walmer, Kent . 
Born at Winchester. 
Born in India. 



Wm.Hazen,'' July 4, 1831 

1370 Annette Swymmer, 

2 children. 

1371 William, May 24, 1857 

1372 Cecilia Eliz'th, Oct. 24, 1858 

2d wife. 

1373 Eliz'th Bartlett, 

4 children. 

1374 Robert Parker, Dec. , 1 865 

1375 Harriett Susan, May, 1867 

1376 Arth. Prissick.Sept. 26, 1868 

1377 An infant, I870 



Mch. 23, 1860 



1857 



March 9, 186.1 



• Robert Morris Ifnzen was a Captain in H. M. 60th or King's Royal 
R.«e Corps, formerly couunanded by his grandfather, Ccl Haxen ll 
died at Burmah, in India. 

■Born at St. John, N. B. : died at Winchester, England 
Born at sea on board the "Golden Fleece," oflf St Vincent 

* Wdham Hazeu is a Civil Engineer, and resides in St. John N B 



i 






.J!f 






it 









: J 



f 



f: 



1^ 



N 

! 



148 



DE8UKNDANT8 OF WIIJJAM SEVENTH GENERATION. 



Died. 



No. Name. Born. 

Bu.siin llazoii, Aug. 11. 1830 

1378 TI10.S. Butterwortli Prissirk.' 

5 chlldroii. 

1379 Chas. Duulop, Aug. 28, 1803 

1380 Francos IIiizon.ApriilS. ISm 

1381 Marg.Joluuina, Feb. 13, 1807 

1382 Tlios. lla/.cn, Sept. 25, 1808 

1383 Robert Morris 

ilazeii, Nov. 5. 1809 

Marg't Ilazon, Mc-b. 18. 1843 

1384 Artli. C. Haii.sanl.- 

3 (tbildreii. 

1385 Ri( li'd Ma.ssoy.Sept. 10, 1807 
1380 Jobn St.Leger.Sf'iit. 29, 1868 
1387 Hugh Hazoi), Oct. 0. 1809 



Morrled or T innrkf>. 
Oct. 8, 1861. 



B. at Pembroke Dock, 

Soutb Wales. 
B. at Pembroke Dock, 

South Wales. 
Born at Montreal. 
Born at Quebec. 

Born at Quebec. 



Oct. 25, 1860. 



B. at ( 'olombo,Ce3'lon. 
B. atColonibo.Ceylou. 
B. at Colombo, Ceylon. 



I 



CJlarence Free- 
man, May 20, 1846 



1388 Harriett Ellen Carter. 

2 children. 

1389 George, Sept., 

1390 Lottie Maude. 



1872 



S&tl. 



E.A.McCorniick, Jan.O, 1838 

1391 Martin Dunsford. 

2 children. 

1392 William. 

1393 Augusta. 



so-y. 



William Jarvis 
McCormick, Sept. 12, 1839 

1394 Marg't F. Mc 

Lellan, July 13, 1843 

2 children. 

1395 Mary Sterns, Jan. 31, 1869 

1396 Paul Jarvis, April 12, 1871 



Dec. 25, 1871. 



Sept. 17, 1850. 



Dec. 26, 1867. 



In California. 



' Thomas Butterworth Prissick is a Commissary (with the rank of 
Major) in the Commissariat and Transport Department of tlie British 
Army. 

' Arthur Clifton Hansard is a Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery. 



nKSOKNDANTS OF WIIJJAM— SKVENTH GENERATION. l49 



SOS. 

No. Name. Born. Died. 

Esther Mary 
McCorinick, Sci)t. 24, 1841 

1397 Geo. Denni.son. 

2 children. 

1398 Wm. Claud, June 1, 1871 

1399 Ada Maria, Aug. 21. 1874 



Married or Remarks. 
June 21, 1870. 



SO». 

M. F. L. Mccor- 
mick, Feb. 17, 1844 

1400 Geo. Alex. Stewart. 

3 children. 

1401 Frances Mary 

Alexandria, April 19, 1868 
140? Fred. William, Jan. 3, 1870 

1403 Grace Croft, Oct. 18, 1875 

M. K. Bernard. 

1404 Capt. C. McMurdoc. 

3 children. 

1405 Aston Edward, June 15, 1873 

1406 Kathleen, Mcli. 16, 1876 

1407 A. Keith, Fel). 17, 1878 

W. A. H. Duff, April 17, 1846 

1408 Barbara Alu.ira Brown. 

4 children. 

1409 Almira Helen, July 28, 1872 

1410 Jesse Owen, J.-in. 21, 1874 

1411 Cath. Hamilton, .Fan. 8, 1876 

1412 William Alex., April 20, 1877 



June 25, 1867. 



;tl 



.1:1 ■ 



'I IP I 

j i 






ose. 

Caroline M. 
Taber, July s, 1840 

1413 Walter G. 

Duckett, Sept. 20, 1841 
3 children. 

1414 Willard Sey- 

mour, July 20, 1868 

1415 Fred'k Walter, Dec. 7, 1872 Aug. 10, 1874 

1416 Alva Jarvis, Dec. 29, 1874 



Sept. 20, 1866. 



; '5! 



\m 



,1 



■S 



ml 



160 DESCENDANTS OS" WILLIAM— SEVENTH OENERATION. 



No. Name. Born. 

Mary B.Taber, Feb. 14, 1850 

1417 Wm.H.Hayard.Dec. m. 1841 

1 diild. 

1418 E\igeiie Jaivis, Df^c. 2, 1872 



Died. 



Married or Remarks. 
Feb. 28, 1872. 



lOSSO. 



ChavlesJarvis.Dec. 12, 1835 

1419 Julia E.Sayles, Dec. 8, 1833 

2 children. 

1420 (}raceLatbrop,Feb. 24, 18«2 

1421 Blanche K., Feb. 20.1873 

1 <>«5 1 . 

Howlaud B. 
Jurvis. May 27, 1837 

1422 Laura Frances 

Hughey, June 11, 1839 May 31. 187r. 
2 children. 

1423 Walter Bourn, Aug. 10. 1803 

1424 Rob rt Jones, July 8, 1807 

1 o««. 

Henry (^ay 
Jarvis, Oct. 19, 1841 

1425 SameldaF. 

Haldemau, Sept. 25, 1845 
4 children. 

1426 L. H. Jarvis, April 30, 1870 July 18, 1870 

1427 Maud Marin, Aug. 3, 1871 Oct. 15, 1871 

1428 Harry Newton, Nov. 10, 1875 Jan. 15, 1876 

1429 Arthur Clay, Jau. 7, 1877 

Louise Jeannette 
Jarvis, Jan. 10, 1837 

1430 Louis P. Fay. 

2 children. 
1481 Louie Jarvis, May 31, 1865 
1432 Estelle Louise. Sept. 16. 1874 , 



June 17, 18H0. 



Mav, 1861. 



July 8. 1869. 



Oct. 29, 1860. 



Howard Jarvis, 
1433 Ida Shannon. 
3 children. 



1040. 

1843 



Sept., 1862. 



No Name 

1484 John, 
1435 Rachel, 
1486 David, 



DESCENI>ANTB OF WILLIAM— SEVENTH GENERATION. 1.51 

Died, Married or Remarks. 



Born. 

June, 1863 

1864 

1870 



1 040. 

Clara M. Sears, Feb. 4, 1836 
1487 John Canfleld. 
5 children. 

1438 Edwin, Mch., 1854 

1439 Charles, 1357 

1440 Carrie, ig^i 

1441 Wilfred, 1864 

1442 Canfield, i87i 

lOSl. 

Mary A. Sears, Jan. 35, 1841 

1443 Hiram Black- 

man. 

2 children. 

1444 Jennie, iggg 

1445 Charles, i869 



1 OS3. 



Helen Jackson, Dec. 31, 1841 

1446 Harra:i.n Pair- 

child. 

4 (hill Iron. 

1447 John, July 8, 1869 

1448 Henry, Peb. 13, 1871 

1449 Marsh, Aug. 17, 1872 

1450 Albert, Sept. 17, 1874 

1451 Julia. 



I OS4. 



Julia Jackson, Nov. 27, 1843 

1452 Martin L ilun- 

gcrford. 
3 children. 

1453 Robert, 

1454 Edwin, 

1455 Arthur, 



John Calvin 
Jackson, 
4 children, 



Nov. 7, 1866 
Feb. 22, 1869 
June 20, 1872 

Sept. 30, 1846 



1853. 



Sept. 19. 1858. 



Mch. 28, 1868. 



Dec. 8, 1864 



fu 



'V9 



¥ h 







.'4 





.J: 



S 






sm 



■■•'^vf^}.mm"im 



I'i 






162 D'f.SOENDANTS DF WILLIAM — SEVENTH GENERATION. 

No. Name. Born. Died. Married or Romarke. 

1456 Nelson, Aug. 3. 1871 

1457 Raymond, Oct. 20.1872 

1458 Mary Landou. 1875 

1459 Jane Jarvis, 1877 

10«1. 

C. Willis Jarvis, Oct. 29, 1845 July 14, 1866. 

1460 Harriet A. Wil- 

bur, Jan. 4, 1846 

3 children. 

1461 Annie, June 15, 1867 

1462 Lucy Josephine.Nov. 4,1870 

1463 Lucretia, Apr. 5, 1874 

1 ISO. 

Robert Craigie 
Hamilton, 1 July 6.1852 April 28, 1875. 

1464 Charlotte Lewis. 

2 children. 

1470 Ethel Maud. Apr. 7, 1876 

1471 Eva May. Sept. 7, 1877 

Geo. Tyng, May 12, 1842 

1472 Elena Anita Car- 

illo Thompson, 1844 . / 

3 children. 

1473 Charles, May 18, 1870 

1474 George, Jan. 13, 1872 

1475 Dudley Atkins, Dec. 16, 1875 May 26, 1876 

1476 Dudley Atkins 2d, May, 1878 Aug. 1878 

1»1 1. . 

Marv Placettc 
Ma'rvin, xVug. 27, 1850 Apr. 27, 1871. 

1477 JamesMontgom- 

ery Coburn,Jr. Jan. 30, 1877 

2 children. 

1478 Robert Hewitt, Feb. 11,1872 

1479 Lamont Din- 

woodie, Sept. 1, 1874 



July 15, 1869. Living 
in Arizona. 



1 Married at St. Alban's Church, Ottawa. The wedding was attended 
by their Excellencies the Earl and Countess of Dufferin. Charlotte Lewis 
is eldest daughter of the Rt. Rev. J. Travers Lewis, Bishop of Ontario. 



DKSCKNDANTS OF WFIXtAM— 8KVKNTH QKNKKATIOM. IT,;} 

No. Name. 



131 «. 

Bom. Died. 

Julia J. Miirvin,.Jiily 30, la'iS 

1480 Edward Jouner 

Swords. 
2 cliildron. 

1481 Edward Jouuer, Oct. 18, 1873 

1482 Win. V'oorhcfH, [)ct'. 20, 1P74 



Married or Ri'iimrks. 
Sept. 11, 1872. 



20 



- m^ 



5=9 



t I 



154 



DKSCKNDANT8 OF THOMAS. 



ai 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS JARVIS. 

At the commoiicotnent of tlio present enterprise, we met with 
the fact that several faniihes kiuiW but little about their early 
ancestors. Very many expressed a desire to know more, and 
to offer their aid to furnish such information as was in their power. 

Tlie late Hon. Kent Jarvis had succeeded in collecting quite a 
full r(!('ord of his family, but had not l>een able to trace it back 
beyond William Jarvis, who was born in 1727, and who died at 
Brainard's Bridge, Rensselaer CJounty, New York, in 177'2. 

This William Jarvis was an officer in the French war. He had 
a son Kent, who was a major in the Revolution, and who was 
killed by t*ie Indians, near Saratoga. Great efforts have been 
made, but in vain, to learn more of the active lives of these j)romi- 
nent and patriotic men. 

As we said before, neither Mr. Kent Jarvis nor any of his family 
have been able to trace their branch back any further than we have 
mentioned, but many of them tell us they have heard "old people," 
their "grandparents" and "ancestors," say that they came from 
different towns in Connecticut, nairnng Stamford, Norwalk, Dan- 
bury, Poundridge, etc. Some of them went farther, claiming that 
they were related to the late Bishop Jarvis of Connecticut. 

Another tradition that Mr. Kent Jarvis, and many others referred 
to, is, that William Jarvis, the officer in the French war, had a 
brother Benjamin, who was a loyalist, and in consequence, was 
obliged to leave the country, and go to Nova Scotia. Mr. Kent 
Jarvis, under date of January 18, 1875, writes: "I well remember 
a tradition in our family from my earliest childhood (I am nearly 
74 years old), that my grandfather was a cousin of Bishop Jarvis 
of Connecticut, also, that a great uncle, Benjamin Jarvis, a brother 
of my grandfather, at the time of the Revolution, espoused the 
cause of the King, and removed from New England to Nova 
Scotia, where, it was said, he died several years after, leaving a 
large estate, and never married." 

Again, on the 17th of December, 1876, he writes: "In looking 
over an old English prayer-book, which was my grandfather's, on 
one of the blank leaves I find in my father's handwriting, that he 
was born in Poundridge, Feb. 15, 1768, and that he began to work 



DKHCKN!)ANTM OK THOMAS. 



155 



rred 

acl a 
was 
mit 
bor 
arly 
I'vis 

other 
the 

Sova 
nga 

)kitig 
•'s, on 
lat he 
work 



with Mr. Eli Hristol, Jan. 13, 1775, in thti 17th year of hJH ago." 
roiuulridge is near the Connoctic.nt hne, in Westchester Co., ten 
or fifteen miles north of Norwalk. 

The late Rev. Asahel H. Jervis wrote to Hon. Kent Jarvis, his 
eonsin, under date of March 23, 1876 (he died Dec. 16, 1877, 
aged 84 years): " T think you are correct in regard to the commis- 
sion of uncle Kent, and his being killed by the Indians. The 
commission of my grandfather Wi'lliom was among my papers, 
and was highly prized by me on accoimt of its being a parchment. 
I well remember the strong remarks vvliich were ma(h> by gentle- 
men of distinction, when they examined it. It was among papers 
which my sister, Polly Williams, took, after she was mariied to 
Capt. Hilly "Williams. I doubt not but it is still in existence, but is 
loO miles from hero. One thing more 1 will mention before T close. 
Uncle Benjamin, the old Tory, is the man, with others, to whom 
General Washington said in his sympathy: ' Gcnthmen, I wish you 
all well. 1 wish you may all go to f leaven, hut you must all go there 
hy the way of Nova Scotia.^ i Now, he is dead, and I have written 
to inquire as to his property, said to be ' worth aguii.iia an hour.' 
He was never married. We are his legal heirs." 

Some of the family have written us that they liave seen letters 
from this Benjamin, the " rich old bachelor," as he was called, in 
which he desired some of his young relatives to come and Hve with 
him in Nova 8cotia, so as to inherit his property. The reply in 
on«! instance was, " My father used to say he did not want the 
money, as uncle Ben was a Tory." 

We make the following extract from a letter written by Mrs. 
Electa Jarvis Scarrett (now in her ninety-first year), dated Decem- 
ber 10, 1878: 

" M^ grandfather's brother, Benjamin Jai'vis, in the early part 
of the revolutionary struggle, took advantage of the offer of the 
English Government to give a large tract of land to any one who 
would adhere to the crown, and emigrated to Nova Scotia, where 
he amassed a large fortune. He lived to be very aged, and, I 

* After the evacuation of the British troops, under the command of Sir 
Guj' Carleton, on the 25th Nov., 1783, great numbers of loyalists were 
waiting for trausports to convey them to Nova Scotia. It is supposed that 
a number of them called upon Gen. Washington after his entrance into 
New York, and solicited his iufluence to let them remain, when they 
received the above characteristic answer. — See Lossing, p. 633, Vol. 2, 
"Loyalists." 






.1,1 

4 



} ir, 

■ ■-■!• 






i) 



J 



,<^ 



158 



DIMBNDANTH of TIIOMAH. 






think, adopted a distant coiiiK'ction of thr .larviH family, wiio 
luHianic liiH heir. He had none of liin own. 

"My fatln^r, Doctor JoHoph .Jarviw, was, I think, a nativo of 
Panbury, (Jonnecticut. Ho studied inodicint' in liancshoroujjfh. 
Horkwliin^ Co., Mass. He ?ervod as Hur^eon in tho American 
Revohitionary War over threo years, after which he retiirne<l to 
Laiiesb')rough, and practiced iiis profession there until November. 
1805, when ho removed to New Haltimoro, on th(^ banks of the 
Hudson river, wliere lie closed his useful and honorable life, aged 
fifty-four. I have only to say of my father, he was a man I wos 
proud to call father. My dear parents had fourteen children. Of 
that large family, I am the only one left in this world of tears. 

"1 have written this poor letter with my own hand, without 
glasses." 

On the records of the Court of Probate of Fairfield, October 3. 
1707, we find that nenjnmin Jarvis of Norwalk, was administrator 
(»f the estate of William .larvis, late of Norwalk. .Mso on th(^ 
records of the same court, July 'H), llU'y, that Jonathan Knight 
was appointed administrator on tlu; estate of William Jarvis, late 
of Norwalk, 

Of Benjamin Jarvis we find that, on November It, 17*iO, he was 
witness to a deed; also deeds of land to him, dated y\[)ril 21, 1764, 
February 10, 177.'); and niortgage from him, April Hi, 1776; and 
October 30, 1783, a deed which st{;,tes that tin; said Benjamin Jar- 
vis had joined tho enemies of the United States, and that by order 
of the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut all his prop- 
erty was confiscated and sold. (See Appendix P.) 

On the records at Norwalk, we find a deed to William Jarvis of 
Huntington, Island of Nassau, County of Sulfolk, dated October 18, 
1714, and others in 1743 and 174C>. In 1751, he is described as 
of Norwalk. In April 2, 1750, we find on a deed to John Sanders 
the names of William Jarvis and William Jarvis, Jr., as witnesses, 
and on other deeds down to and including the year 1760, but not 
afterwards. 

Leaving the above traditions, we now turn back to some of the 
first settlers of Huntington, L. I. H(!i'e we find, in 1679, many 
real estate records in the names of William Jarvis, Thomas Jarvis, 
and Jonathan Jarvis, supposed to have been brothers, and who may 
have been brothers of the Jarvises among the early settlers of Mas- 
sachusetts, but we have found none but traditional evidence of it. 

Of the above three brothers, William is established by his will 



KKKCKNDANTS OK TIIOMAM — TIIIUli (IKNKKATION. 



ir>i 



a8 tho proffonitor of n portion of fho (^onin'ctK ut hranrli. .lotin- 
tliaii huH Ix't'ii claiiiKMl hy Captain I'. ('. .Farvirt, and otlicns of 
lliinliii|L;ton, L. I., as thu anceHtor uf tho tiuinorouH faniilica now 
livinj^ in tliat. town. 

Tliis U'av(^s TlionuiH without any diHcovorod (h'sc(>ndantHon Long 
Inland, and it iw ht>liev»'(i that lie rcniovod from th(>ro to Connecti- 
cut, wlierc he sctth'd, and lu'canic lh«' progenitor of that l»ranch 
of the family whose traditions ahuve mentioned point to Norwalk 
and vicinity as their placo of origin. 

Wo have colK^cted all the information we could o))tain about tliis 
ThoinaH Jarvis, and those believed to b(> Iuh immediati! deHcendaiitH, 
and j)resent it to our readers, in tabular form, as th(> best r(>sult 
at which we have been able to arrive. 



No. Name. 

148;{ Thomas .larvis, 

Child. 
1484 Thomas. .Ir.. 



DESCKNOANTH OF THOMAS 

IhT (tKNRUATION. 
Horn. Died. 



1(1(10 



17«3 



Mnrrluil or K<'«Hrk». 
Sc(! Apjicntti >D, N. 






2n Gknkh.^tion. 
1 4JS»^I . 



No, Name. Born. 

Thos. Jarvis,.Ir.. 10(t!t 

1485 Holda. 

2d wife. 
148« Abigail Smilii, 

Child. 
1487 William, Mch. 30, 1737 June 15, 1772 



Piod. Mnrriofl or UcmHrks. 

17153 Dates ou lojnb sloni'. 



June 14, 173G. 



;! 



> "i 



3d Geneuation. 

No. Name. Born. Died. Married or Ucmiirlvt*. 

William Jarvis.iMt^i. 39. 1727 June 15, 1772 

1488 Mary Wriglit, Mch. 11. 17;{0 Dec. 23, 1804 I). atFlyCreek, N. Y. 
11 children. 

1 Died at Brainard's Bridge, Columbia Co., New York; was an offlcer 
in the French War ; by trade a weaver. 



I 



--t«-- 



(I 



158 



No. Name. 


148'J Joseph, 


Um Bill, 


1401 Elijah, 


141)2 Kent. 1 


141)3 Elizabeth, 


1494 IMary, 


1495 Chloe, 


1490 Asahel, 


1497 Asahel 2d, 


1498 Chloe 2d, 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FOt RTH OKNKHATION. 



Born. Died. Married or Ucnrnrkc. 

May 14, IT^S Oct. 17, 180(i Jan. 12, 178:5. 
Dec. 30, 1753 Feb. 14, 1830 Aug. 30, 1780. 

Died at the age of 18. 



Nov. 10, 1760 

May 12, 1702 Feb., 



1499 Sally, 



Jan. 29, 1783. 
1835 June 15, 1780. 
Died young. 
Died young. 
Feb. 15, 1708 Sept. 10, 1823 Mar. 18, 1790. 
Aug. 15, 1770 About 1840 Feb. 19, 1790, 

Miles. 
Aug. 19. 1772 Dec. 10, 1831 Feb. 14, 1793. 



John 



4th CJknekation. 






H 









14 SO. 






No. Name. 


IJorn 




Died 




Married or Remarl<H. 


Joseph Jarvis, 














M.I)., a 


May 


14, 


1752 


Oct. 17, 


1800 


Jan. 12, 1783. 


1500 Abigail Church, Jan. 


25, 


1703 








14 children. 














1501 Tully Church 


Oct. 




1783 






Physician and Surgn. 


1502 Horace, 


Mch. 


8, 


1785 


Mch. 14, 


1808 


Julianna Belts. I), at 
Albany, N. Y. 


1503 Electa, 


Oct. 


3, 


178(i 


May 7, 


1787 


D.al Lanesboro, JIass. 


1504 Electa 2d, 


Feb. 


2, 


1788 






Sept. 19, 1813. 


1505 Owen, 


Sept. 


13, 


1789 


June 23. 


1808 


I), at Lanesboro, Mass. 


1500 Alvah, 


Dec. 


22, 


1790 


Feb. 22, 


1H72 


Sept. 22, 1813. 


1507 Harriet, 


Sept. 


33, 


1792 


Nov. 15, 


1853 


Oct. 9, 1817. 


1508 Ilaller, 


May 


30, 


1794 


June 24, 


1794 




1509 Adolphus, 


Apr. 


18, 


1795 


Aug. 5, 


1874 


Feb. 27, 1822. 


1510 I'anthea, 


Jan. 


30, 


1797 


Sept. 7, 


1801 


D.at Lauesboro,Mass. 


1511 Cxui^tavus, 


Dec. 


30, 


1798 


Jan.. 37, 


1804 


1 


1512 Sophia, 


I Aug. 


4, 


1801 


M(^h. 24, 


1872 


June 3, 1823. 




< Twins. 










1513 Sophronia, 


( Aug. 


4, 


1801 




1875 




1514 Gustavua 2d, 


Apr. 


13, 


1804 


Apr. 13, 


1804 





' An otticer in the Continental army; was massacred, near Saratoga, l)y 
Indians, in the War of the Kcvolution. ' 

-Joseph Jarvis was a physician and surgeon; marrieil at Danbury, 
Conn. ; died in New Baltimore, N. Y. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS — ForRTH GENERATION. 



159 



No. Name. 

Bill .Iiu'vis, 1 

1515 Mary White, 

7 children. 

1516 Alfred, 

1517 Polly, 

1518 Willinm Cooiicr 

1519 James White, 

1520 Griethene, 

1521 Asahel Hatch, 

1522 Polly 2d, 



Born. Died. Married or BTjarltB. 

Dec. 30, 1753 Feb. 14, 1830 Aug. 30, 1780. 

Dec. 25, 1701 July 0, 1820 

Sept. 15, 1781 Aug. 20, 1798 • 

Mch. 17, 1784 June 12, 1792 Daphany Taylor. 

,Aug. 25, 1787 Feb. 25, 1813. 

Jan. 35, 1790 July 30, 1853 Sept. 13, 1812. 
Nov. 27. 1792 

May 30, 1793 Dec. 16, 1877 Dec. 25, 1821. 

May 28, 1797 March 23, 1817. 



1403. 

Elizab'h Jarvis, Nov. 10, 1760 Jan. 29. 1783. 

1523 Malatiah Hatch, Juue 22, 1764 July 28, 1812 
8 children. 



1524 John, 


Dec. 25, 1784 


May 


30, 


1843 


Jan. 8, 1807, I 
McElvain. 


1525 Polly, 


Aug. 24, 1786 


Jan. 


33, 


1804 




1526 Solomon, 


Feb. 6, 1789 








S. McElvain. 


1527 Ira. 


July 25, 1791 








C. Smith. 


1528 William, 


Oct. 17, 1793 


Aug. 


31, 


1869 




1529 Amelia, 


Jidy 7, 1795 








E. Taylor. 


1530 Maleuda, 

- 


July 3, 1797 
Twins. 








A. Brown. 


1531 Matilda, 


July 3. 1797 








F. Bingham. 




1404 








Mary Jarvis, 


May 12, 1762 


Feb. 




1835 


June 15, 1780. 


1532 Thomas Edson 


Jan. 3, 1753 






1836 




9 children. 


• 










1533 Polly, 


Mch. 29, 1781 








I. Ma'vin. 


1534 Willy, 


July 13, 1783 


Mch. 


33. 


1785 




1535 William Jarvis 


, Feb. 23, 1786 








Polly Fairchild 


1536 Asahel. 


Aug. 7, 1788 








F. Stetson. 


1537 A (hiUKliter, 


Feb. 13. 1791 


Veh. 


13, 


1791 




1538 Orciicll, 


Sepl. ;.. 1792 








Lydia Wells. 


1539 Sally. 


Jan. 4, 1795 


Jan. 


4, 


1803 




1540 Theodoras, 


July 7, 1798 








Lawyer. 


1541 Kli/.abefh, 


Sept. 15, 1801 








J. Price. 



-iff 

■'■'fi 



'I -1 



\ u 



1 iOT. 

Asahel Jarvis, Feb. 15, 1768 Sept. 10, 1823 Mch. 18, 1790. 

Merchant. 



1 Dr. Bill Jarvis came into Otsego Co. with Judge W^illiam Cooper, iu 
the year 1790. Was physician, surgeon, and land surveyor. 



mm 



•n^ppiapnn 



ii 



160 DK8CKNDANTS OB' THOMAS — FIFTH GKNKRATION. 

No. Name. Born. Died. Married or Remarks. 

1542 Abig'l GriHWokl, June 2, 1770 Hept. 20, 1802 

13 cliildren. 

1543 Chester. Dec. 9, 1792 Aug. 10, 1870 OtI. 15. 1818. 

1544 Dwight, May 27, 1797 Jan. 28, 180;} Jan. 27, 1887. 

1545 Alma, Apr. 3, 1799 June 20, 1803 



1540 Kent, 



June 13, 1801 Jan. 15, 1877- 



\ May 17, 1821. 



/ April 4, 180(i. 

1547 Edwin, May 4, 1803 Sept. 10, 1872 Feb. 19, 1829. 

1548 ^[ary Ann. May 11. 1805 Feb. 14. 1832 April 5, 1829. 

1549 Jcrta Maria, May 30, 1800 

lo'-iO Joseph Sidney, Oct. 23, 1H07 Sept. 15, 1855 Feb. 27, 1839. 

1551 Iloraco iJenj., Sept. 11, 1809 

1552 Harriet, Mch. 8, 1812 Sept. 30, 1878 Sept. 20, 1831. I), at 

Massillon, O. 
One son and two dauglitors died in infancy. 

1 400. 

Sally Jarvis. Aug. 19. 1772 Dec. 10, 1831 Feb. 14, 1793. 

1553 Eln'th'nOsborn.June 12, 1709 

7 children. 

Dec. 31, 1793 W. Wilson. 

Aug. 10, 1790 C. E. Barnard. 

Feb. 13, 1799 Apr. 10, 1818 
Nov. 13, 1800 Mch. 30. 1835 J. S. Avery. 



1554 Aurelia, 

1555 Lucinda, 
1550 Julia Ann, 

1557 Caroline E., 

1558 Prosp'rHosmer, Oct. 24. 1803 

1559 IIosnierBeadell.Aug. 0. 1806 

1560 Wni. Wright, Mcli. 18, 1808 



S. Johnston. 
C. Robertson. 



No. Name. 

Tidly C. Jarvis, 
M.D., Oct. 

1561 Margaret Scher- 

nierhorn. Dec. 
children. 

1562 Jacob S.. 
1503 Abigail (\. 

1564 lljichel 11.. 

1565 Joseph A., 



1566 Anne E., 

1567 Eliza E., 



5th Generation. 
ISOl. 

Boru. Died. 

2, 1783 

8, 1787 



Married or Remarl(8. 



Feb. 9, 1806. 



Jan. 22. 1809 

Aug. 13. 1813 May 5, 1831 

April 18. 1815 July 17. 1838 May 6,1830. 
Sept. 21, 1817 Nov. 14, 1844. Liv- 

ing in Ithaca, N. Y. 
Feb. 10, 1831 
Oct. 10, 1828 June 0, 1854 



' kl 

DESCKNDANTS OP THOMAS FIFTH OENEKATION. IGl 


1S04. 




No. Name. born. 


Died. 


Married or Beinarks. 


Electa Jarvis, Feb. 2, 1788 




Sept. 19, 1813. 


1568 Ricb'd Srarritt,Dec. 15, 1787 


April 27, 1854 




9 cbildri'ii. 






1569 Nancy Aurelia.July 12, 1814 


April 27, 1815 




1570 Nancy Aur. 2d, June 30, 1815 




1 


1571 Gust. Adolpb.,. July 20, 1816 


May 12, 1839 




1572 Electa Eu^renia,Nov. 14, 1817 


Nov. 14, 1839 




1573 Sarali Abi-,rail, Nov. 21, 1818 


Feb. 5, 1819 




1574 Sarab Ab. 2d., Mcb. 18, 1820 






1575 James Jarvis, Feb. 5, 1822 




Mary M. Turner. 


1576 George Hall. April 18, 1825 




Eliza Blodget. 


1577 Edgar Alon/.o. May 20, 1826 


July 12, 1826 




1^ 


50€f. 




Alvab Jarvis,' Dec. 22, 1790 


Feb. 22, 1872 


Sept. 22, 1813. 


1578 Racb.lJradley, Nov. 25, 1793 


Aug. 15, 1828 




6 cbildren. 






1579 Horace 15., Aug. 15, 1814 


Sept. 25, 1815 




1580 Horace A., Jan. 14, 1818 




Sept., 1837. 


1581 Mary M., Aug. 27, 1820 


Mcb. 4, 1837 




1582 JaredT?., Jan. 1,1823 


Feb. 2, 1825 




1583 Jared H. 2d, April 11, 1825 


Mcb. 21, 1868 


Mary Jane Hallet. 


1584 Harriet E., Sept. 13, 1827 


Aug. 4, 1828 




2d wife. 






1585 Louisa Gillet, July 31, 1788 




Feb. 22, 1829. 


ISOT. 




Harriet Jarvis, Sept. 23, 1792 


Nov. 15, 1853 


Oct. 9, 1817. 


1586 Joel Hradley. Mcb. 22, 1793 


Nov. 3, 1853 


Farmer. 


B 6 cbildren. 






1 1587 Henry, Oct. 5, 1818 




• 


I 1588 Josepb Jarvis, Mcb. 20, 1820 


April 3, 1821 




I 1589 Josi-pb W.,-' Mcb. IS, 1821 






I 1590 Maria Cburcb, April 18, 1822 




Cbarles V. Heatb. 


■ 1591 Harv.Slieppard, Sep. 4, 1825 






■ 1592 Cyrus Yale, Nov. 7, 1827 







('• 



Adol. Jarvis, April 18, 1795 Aug. 5,1874 Feb. 27, 1822. Car|)en- 

ter and joiner. 
1593 Amelia Fuller, June 14, 1800 May 13, 1869 
3 cbildren. 



' Justice of Peace; dealer in real estate; postmaster. 
* Married Anna Maria Scbermerhoru ; 2 cbildren, Alexander A. and 
Auuu Josepbine Jarvis. 
21 



..f^ 



162 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS — FIFTH GENERATION. 



No. Name. Born. Died. Married or RemnrkK. 

ir)})4 JosepliChurfh.Jaii. 10, 1S33 July 0,1873 Scpl. (t. lH,-.(). 
irm Fninces E., Aii^^. 24, 1834 

1596 HeniyA.,' Doc. 16, 1830 Dec. 4, 1872 .Tun. 20, \nr,-A. 



1 .'5 1 S. 

Sophia Jarvis, Auj?. 4. 1801 Mch. 34, 1878 
1597 Nathan Ishdl, Jan. 33, 1801 

7 children. 
15G8 Betsey Jane, May 21, 1824 July 27, 1845 

1599 Horace Smith. May 18, 1825 

1600 Oliver Church, Nov. 12, 1837 

1601 Celia Abigail,- Sept. 13, 1830 Sept. 30, 1833 
1003 Sophr. Elvina, Nov. 16, 1834 

1603 Fi'licia Minerva, May 29, 1836 

1604 Geo. Thompson, Oct'. 18, 1839 . 



June 3, 1823. 
Fanner. 



Olive Jane Fisher. 



IS 13. 

Sophi'. Jarvis, Auj;;. 4, 1801 1875 

1605 Elishalhadley.May 26, 1798 Mch. 11, 1854 Farmer 

9 children. 
1000 Khoda Jane, Dec. 23, 1820 

1607 Julia W., June 26, 1823 

1608 Lyd. Cordelia, Xug. 4, 1824 

1009 Abigail Cook, Mch. 27, 1837 

1010 Harriet Curtiss, Oct 28, 1829 

1011 George Henry. Oct. 33,1831 
1013 Wm. Smith, Mch. 11, 1834 
1013 Maria Louisa, Sept. 12, 1830 
1614 Aug'ta Sophia, April 14, 1840 



Sep.. 14, 1835 
Dec. 13, 1848 

June 27. 1846 



Jan. 8, 1854 
June 27, 1842 



A. G. Isbell. 

Joseph Hubbard. 
D. Hubbard. 



William Cooper 

Jarvis, Aug. 25, 1787 Feb. 25, 1813. 

1615 Daphany Taylor. 

2 children. 
1016 Lorcn. Taylor, Mch. 22, 1815 Oct. 3, 1841. 

1617 Erastus, " Sept. 4, 1820 Feb. 14, 1827 

1 S 1 f>. 

James White 

Jarvis, Jan. 38, 1790 July 30, 1853 Sept. 13, 1813. 

1618 Clarissa Clark, Dec. 15, 1794 

11 children. 



'Married Lydia Boyingtou; 1 ch., Charles. 

* Married Joseph Story; 3 cli.. Abner Grove and Gleu Adolphus. 



DK8CENDANT8 OF THOMAS — FIFTH GF^NEKATION. 



163 



No. Name. 

1619 Em"M- 



Born. 
April 16, 1810 



1620 Hester A.. June 18, 1818 



1621 Susan, 

1622 Asuhel. 

1623 Joel S., 

1624 James, 

1625 Mary, 

1626 Philander, 

1627 Julia, 

1628 Charles W. 

1629 AureliaB.. 



Died. Married or Remarket. 

Oct. 7, 1830, Solomon 

Budd. 
Dec. 27, 183.5, AVni. 11. 
Criddle. 
May 30, 1820 Nov. 20, 1826 
Sept. 17, 1822 Nov. 23, 1826 
Aug. 17, 1824 / . 

Aug. 17, 1824 May 18, 1828 f "''"'"• 
Aug. 30, 1826 

June 4, 1828 Sept. 1,5, 1829 
Nov. 30, 1830 

Feb. 21, 1833 July 30, 1853 
Mch. 1, 1836 



Rev. Asahel II. 

Jervis, May 30, 1793 Dec. 16. 1877 Dec. 25, 1821 

1630 Mary Cooley, Oct. 16.1852 D. inOvid; inter'dMt. 

, , .. , Hope, Koch'r, N.Y. 
4 children. 

]^^' "'^J^". D. in infancy. 

1632 Mary M., D. in infancy. 

1633 KasinniR. Jan. 9,1825 Jan. 25, 1852. 

1634 Myron A., Jan. !), 1829 



; "M 



i-f 



%. 



Mch. 23, 1817. 



1 SSS. 

Polly Jarvis, May 28, 1797 
1635 Capt. William 

Williams, June 13, 1793 

5 children. 
1630 Nancy, Jan. 13, 1818 

1037 Daniel, July 14, 1820 

1638 Mary Maria, June 27, 1822 Aug. 21, 1848 
1639. Silas R, Aug. 3, 1829 

1640 And'w Jackson, Aug. 20, 1832 Julia A. Taylor 



Jannette Keeley. 



' '* 



1^-43. 

Chester JarvLs, Dec. 9, 1792 Aug. 10, 1870 Oct. 15, 1818. Merch't 

1641 Content Morris, July 3, 1797 May 27, 1830 

4 children. 

1642 Fran. Griswold, June 19, 1819 Sept.. 19, 1828 

1643 Fred. Tiffany, Sept. 22, 1822 Nov. 10, 1843. 

1644 Henry Kent, Sept. 7, 1824 .p\,h. i;}, 1846. 

1645 Aurel. Content, July 7,1827 , ' Mch. 27, 1845. 



I 



^^ 



i 



r^' 



II 



,iit 



tt 



■|iv:ii!'^ 



«:i!!" 



164 
No. 



DESCENDANTS OK THOMAS FIFTH OENF.KATION. 

Born. Died. Married or Hcmnrks. 



Name. 

2d wife. 
1«4() Miirin Bownc, -Inly 1, 1700 Dec. 17, 1848 Doc. 0. 18:^0. 

1 child. 
1047 Asiihcl Amos, Mcli. 20, 1834 Nov.. 1802. 

lid wife. 
1648 Ann Brown, April HO, 1801 Nov. 80, 1853. 

DwightJarvis.'May 27,1797 Jan. 28,1803 Jan. 27, 1837. 
1049 FrancesUpliain,Dec., 1812 July 7, 1806 

1 ^4e. 

Kent Jarvis, June 13, 1801 Jan. \r>, 1877 May 17, 1821. 

1650 Eurotta M. Wil- 
liams, Apr. 9, 1802 Feb. 8, 1804 
1 child. 

1051 Anna Spraguc. Dec. 19, 1825 Mch. 29, 1855 Adopted. 
2d wife. 

1652 Mr«. Julia M. 

Dunn. June 23, 1833 Apr. 4, 1800. 

5 children. 

1653 Cora Eager 

Dunn, May 19, 1854 

1654 James Randall 

Dunn. Nov. 21, 1857 

1655 Mary Alida 

Dimn, Feb. 25, 1860 

1056 JuliaKateDunu, Dec. 24, 1801 
1657 Kent .larvis, Jr., Dec. 21,1869 

Hon. Kent Jarvis. 

[The following sketch is from the pen of the Rev. Dr. E. E. neardsicy, 
of New Haven, author of tiie "History of the F^piscopal Church in Con- 
necticut. "] 

Kent Jarvis was born at Fly Creek, Otsego County, N. Y., 
about three miles west of the village of (/ooperstown, on the 13th 
day of June, 1801. His father, William Jarvis, removed thither 
early in life from his native place, Lanesboro, Ma^s., and was one 
of the pioneer settlers in Otsego County — at that time regarded by 
New England people as "The West." His uncle, Kent Jarvis, was 
a Major in the Continental army during the Revolutionary war, 
and was massacred by the Indians near Saratoga, N. Y. He 



* Mr. Jarvis was by profession a lawyer. He was also Major-Geueral. 
He was a very prominent man in public oftices, both Fe leral and State. 



.pi' i" 



Y., 

:5th 

her 
one 

by 

was 

war, 

He 



icral. 
,ie. 



f 



/J ii ' 



:l 



1. 



' « ' 



-_..„,...r<j oT» T'l'*"'--' t'lVTli OF.VF.HATfON. 



I 



I 



MM- 



ill i -,>han»,f-><'i . ' 

1 i%^H. 



ii;50Eun'ltaM. Wil- 



-(U 



; 



«a 



IT. 



I -ill. 




mm 



m 



DEfiOKNnANTH Of TlloMAH riFTII GKNKRATION. 



1 65 



receivod the Cliristian namoof his uiu'l«\ which wan of Kiijj;h8h 
origin, ami (iuc to the fact of his grandmother liaviiig an intiinatti 
lady friend, a native of Kent County, Knghmd, who had t-allod her 
young son Kent, in honor of her birthplace. This lady persuadcHl 
the grandmother to name one of her Hons after her own child, and 
thus Major Jarvis was christened, and the name introduced into 
the family. 

The subject of this sketch received a limited education, such as 
the straitened circumstances of his parents would permit, and it 
was not beyond the elementary branches taught in the common 
schools of those days. The few thousand dollars which his fathei- 
had accumulated was lost in the general crash that ruined so 
many business men after the close of the war with England, in 
1815, and young Kent was therefore thrown upon his own resources, 
and forced to seek some employment that would prepare him for 
usefulness in life, and, at the samt? time, yield a competent support. 
At the age of fourteen, with an outfit which was " tied uj) in a 
small handkerchief," and with his father's good advict;, he started 
on foot to begin a seven years' apprenticeship in a woolen factory 
at Burlington, in the same county. He became an inmate of the 
household of his employer, who was an old-fashioned I'reshyterian, 
beginning the Lord's day on Saturday at stinset, and ending it at 
the same hour on Sunday. He soon learned to manage a carding- 
machine, and was earning a little money by extra work, besides 
extending his knowledge of the trade to which he had become very 
much attached, when the company owning the factory succumbed 
to financial embarrassments, and the business was closed. 

lie returned to his father's house, and continued to i)ursue with 
different employers in the vicinity the occupation upon which he 
had entered, imtil 1821. In that year, considering himself master 
of the business of wool-carding and dyeing, and cloth-dressing, he 
rented the establishment formerly occupied by one of his employers 
in Fly Creek, then belonging to the estate of P^liplialet Williams, 
and set up for himself. Though he had not attained his majority, 
yet on the 17th day of May, 1821, he married Miss Euretta M. 
Williams, daughter of Eliphalet Williams, above-named, and to 
use his own words— " Depending solely upon our own efforts for sue 
cess, we adopted as our motto, — ' Industry, Frugality, and Honesty,' 
and we were contented and happy." His health became seriously 
impaired through exposure to the wet and cold incident to his 
business, and under medical advice he relinquished it at the end 
of two years, and retired with a few hundred dollars of profits. 



t I 



II 



I 



1 (>r> 



DKHCKNDANTK OK TIIOMA 



Kirrit (IKNKKATION. 



In the autimiM of IH'22, his olilc^r bn)thor, Dwij^lit, wlio had b(«m 
in partnerflhip with his father and anoth«»r brother numod (')i('Htor. 
in manufacturing cotton and woolen factory nuichinery at Kly 
Creek, chose for himself a iww jiath in life, and reMulvecl to corn- 
inonce th<» Htu<iy of law. K<^nt was pcrHuatlcMl to tiike liis place in 
the (irm, and was admitted a partner in tlie spriiij; of IH'.'.'i, being 
entrusted with the out-door dutiew — such as purchaHing tlu* mate- 
rial for the business, contractinf machinery, inakiHg .sal<!s, and 
collecting bills. The getu^ral .ession of all business in that 
part of tlie country led him to dispose of his interest in the spring 
of 1H28, and on the 2(1 of July lu^ n^moved to Lowvillo, Lewis 
County, N. Y., and undertook to gratify a wish, wliicrh he had 
cherishetl from boyhood, to i)e a merchant. Kor twenty years, 
with alternate success and misfortune, he engaged in mercaiitile 
pursuits at Lowvillo, and Massillon, ( )lii(). At th(^ end of this period, 
he said: " My inercantile career of tw(^nty years' hard struggling 
with a singleness of purpose that should havt^ won success, left me 
almost penniless. 1 had the consolation of knowing tliau whatever 1 
had acdiieved was always the result of my own judgment and efforts, 
and that my manifold misfortunes were clearly chargeal)le to the bad 
faith and dishonesty of those as,' '"ated with nu^ in business." 

His settlement in Massilki >ms to have been accidental. 

After lie had failed in efforts . trieve his fortune at Lowville 
and at oth(>r ])laces, Ik; determined upon a bold venture; and, 
borrowing fifty ilollars, he started on the last day of February, 
1844, for Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he lioped to engage in 
the hardware business, with which he had Ixu-ome somewhat 
familiar. On bis way he made a visit to his brother Dw' ,'ht, 
whom he had not seen for several years, and who was then living 
in the meridian of his influence and usefulness at Massillon. His 
brother advised him to abandon the Grand Rapids scheme, and to 
try his luck in that place. 

Here again he was unsuccessful until 1848, wiu-n an entirely 
new field of enterprise was opened out to him in the purchase and 
sale, with two other gentlemen, of certain real estate consisting of 
farming lands and village property in and around Massillon. His 
share of the profits from this purchase at tlu; end of live years 
amounted to over $50,000; and sub.^equently by various agencies, 
trusteeships, and executorships (which were all faithfully per- 
formed), and by judicious investments in railroads and other cor- 
porations, he amassed a fortune which, according to his own state- 



DIOSrKNDANTH OK THOMAS SIXTH OKNKHATION. 



167 



Lis 

to 



of 

lis 

ars 

ios, 

)t!r- 

;or- 

ate- 



m«nt, amounted on tho 1st day of .Januiiry, IH7'2, to nearly $'250,- 
000, exclusive of his donations to relatives and friends and to 
benevolent and cliiiritiiMe olijects. which were on ii munificent 
Boale nnd measured i)y his Hcciimulations. 

For two years from April 1, 18(57, h»> was Collector of Internal 
Revomie for tlu^ Seventi'«>ntli District of Ohio, and gave his ImhiiI, 
with other sureties, to the United States for the sum of $100,000 
that he wouki faithfully fulfil the duties of the office. P^xactness 
in this as in other res|)onsil»le situations, iiiark(>d hia course and 
add(>d stj'enjrtli to his odicial character. 

His jjulilic lif(( was lu'gun in tlu" military organization. From 
boyhood it had charnis for him, and at the age of eighteen he was 
enrolled in a military company, and henceforward up to the out* 
bre"k of the civil war, he advanced in the regular ord(T of promo- 
tion, and o(;cupied every successive rank except that of Colonel. 
He was made a Rrigadier-OencM-al by the (Jovernor of Ohio when 
the war commeiK^ed, and thus olitaiwovl 'he military title by which 
he WHS known and addressed in the latter years of liis life. 

Following th(> example of Ins father, he connected himself with 
the Masonic order, and became a member of a Lodge in Coopers- 
town on reaching his majority. Tie was a conspicuous ornament 
of tin Fraternity, attained to its highest honors, and pa-ssed also 
tlirougli all the grades of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Eite. 
Six years before his death a writer of the Order said of him: 
"His coimection with Freemasonry has not been a merely nominal 
matter, nor for the purpost^ of private gain or personal jjopularity; 
he has been an artive, worklnij, faithful Mason. For more than a 
quarter of a century, we have been accustomed to meet him at the 
annual meetings of the Grand Bodies; and he was therft for work, 
not a mere idler." 

He was a warm friend of the benevolent institutions of the 
State, being for many years a Trustee of the Dijaf and Dumb 
Asylum at Cohnnbus, and a zealous advocate for an improved 
system of publico education, wliich he lived to see adopted in Ohio, 
and recognized as the bulwark of true liberty and independence. 

But his noblest record is in the .tmnals of the Church. Blessed 
with godly parents, he was baptized by Father Nash, the early 
and well-known Episcopal missioiiarv in Otsego and adjoining 
counties, and confirmed in his youth. While at Lowville he was 
one of those who joined in organizing an Episjiopal parish there, 
and was chosen its first Junior Warden. He represented that 



% 





1 



168 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS — FIFTH OENERATION. 



parish in the Diocesan Convention held in the city of New York 
in 1838, when measures were adopted for the original division of 
the Dioces(>; and Western New York was erected into a see, and 
elected at its Primary Convention in November of that year for 
Bishop, the Eev. Dr. DeLancey of Philadelphia. On lixing his 
residence in Massillon, Mr. Jarvis was made a Warden of St. 
Timotl'.y's Church in that place, a,nd continued so to the day of his 
death. He evinced a large and lively interest in all that concerned 
the welfare of the Church, especially in Ohio. He was a Trustee 
of Kenyon College and the Theological Seminary at Gambler, and 
"ever guided and sustained the policy which he believed honestly 
proposed and wisely calculated to secure success." For many 
years he was a member of the Ohio Convention, and took a promi- 
nent part in the revision and codification of the ecclesiastical law 
of the Diocese. He was three times chosen a Ijay Deputy from 
Ohio to the General Convention of the I'rotestant Episcopal Church 
in the United States, first in ISaO and again in 18(12 and 180'). 

His marriage with Miss Williams has been already mentioned. 
After a hapi)y union of almost forty-three years, she died on the 
8th of February, ISfil, and in a memorandum of her death and 
virtues he said: "Though never blessed with children of our own, 
we were never without from one to three orphan children in our 
family." They were not only supported by him, but educated at 
his expense. 

On the 4th day of April, 1866, he married Mrs. Julia M. Dunn, 
a widow lady of Elniira, N. Y., with four children, all of whom 
were taken to his spacious mansion at Edgewater, in Massillon. 
That mansion, we are told, was "one of taste, beauty, and even 
magnificence. In external appearance it was surpassed by few, 
and within was hardly equalled anywhere for genial, generous 
hospitality." 

The birth of a son on the '21st day of December, 1869, — bap- 
tized Kknt, — was an event which added new j(-)y to the happy 
househt)ld. It was the father's earnest prayer that he might be 
" spared to a hfe of usefulness, be an honoi-ed rejjresentative of his 
name and family, a patriotic citizen, and a sincere Christian." 

Mr. Jarvis obtained possession of the old homestead in Fly 
Creek, and had a gatln!ring of relatives and friends to the number 
of about seventy to celebrate in the very house where he was 
born the sixty-third anniversary of his birth. Nine years after- 
wards a similar but larger a'seniblage met in the same hallowed 



DESCKNDANT8 OP THOMAS FIFTH OKNKRATION. 



169 



spot to celebi'ate the seventy-second anniversary of his birth, and 
on this, as on the previous occasion, he read a poem written for 
him by a friend in Washinjjton City, and beginning, — 

I come witli years upon my bead, 

My cbildhc'^'i's home to see; 
T come o'er youthful scenes to trend, 

Ouce joyous scen*;s to me. 

The last public act of Mr. Jarvis was to plead the cause of 
Mi nons. At a Convoca,tion in Canton, on Wednesday evening, 
January 11, 1877, he stood by his Hishop and rehearsed some of 
his early niissioiiary e.xperiences in the hearing of a large co.igre- 
gation with such earnestness and eloquence as to be particularly 
noticeable. The disease (paralysis of the heart) of which he 
appears to have had a great dread, and of which his brothers 
Dwight and Edwin had died, struck him without premonition on 
the Monday following his ufldress in Canton. The circumstances 
are briefly related by his pastor in a letter to Bishop Bedell: " He 
attended divine service twice on Sunday, and was unusually hearty 
in the responses and singing. At home throughout tlie day he 
was cheorfid ahnost to gayety, and, after returning from church in 
the evening, sang with the family until quite late." Monday morn- 
ing he arose in a[)parent health, and with characteristic precision 
he detailed his pkas and work for the day, consulting Mrs. Jarvis 
with regard to the preparations for an anticipated trip to which he 
was looking forward with great pleasure, l^ut very soon he com- 
plained of some distress about the heart, whicii, though it neither 
alarmed liis family nor tlu^ physician, who was quickly called, yet 
impressed him strongly with the belief that the end had come. 
With perfect composure and resignation he met the final summons. 
"Thy will be done," he said witli euiphasis; and bidding farewell 
to tlie loved ones about him, he quietly passed to the rest that 
remaineth for the people of God. 

it was an evidence of the high esteem in which he was held in 
the city of Massillon that during the funeral services on Thursday 
afternoon 8ubse(pient to his decease, places of business, storrs, 
shops, banks, and schools were closed out of respect to bis memory. 

Bishop Bedell, in his address to the Annual Convention of the 

Diocese of Ohio, June, 1877, thus spoke of his decease and summed 

up his character: " We have mourned the death of some devoted 

lavm_cn during the past year: among them, Kent Jarvis, Esq., of 

22 



i 



•"■pp 



170 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS — FIFTH GENERATION. 



Massillon, who has been prominent in the councils of our Church. 
He has been one of the main-stays of our Diocese, and of our 
Diocesan institutions; a man who was remarked for keen judg- 
ment, grave discretion, patient attention to details, and a prevailing 
devotion to the Church. He was always prompt and active in dis- 
charge of duty; and could always be depended on to fulfil, to tlie 
extent of his ability, responsibilities committed to him. He has 
represented the Diocese in the General Convention. He was a 
member of the Committee on Canons. He was a member of the 
Legal Committee. He has been a Trustee of our institutions, and 
an efficient member of the Executive Committee since its inaugura- 
tion. We regret the loss of so faithful a counsellor and so true a 
friend. He passed away in the comfort of a reasonable hope in 
Christ, and with remarkable tranquility! Scarcely fifteen minutes' 
notice was given him; but all his affairs were in order, and he 
'addressed himself to the crossing' (as Bunyan would say), and 
passed out of mortal into immortal life, with confident com- 
posure." 



1S4T'. 



No 



Niiiuo. Born. 

Edwiu Jarvis, ' May 4, 1803 

1658 Lydia E. Gross, May 5, 1807 

5 children. 

1659 Celina North, 

1660 Mary Jane, 

1661 Dwight, 
1663 Anna Maria, 



Died. 
Sept. 10, 1873 
Nov. 38, 1871 



June 17, 1830 
Hept. 9, 1833 
()(!t. 8, 1835 
Feb. 10, 1841 



Married or Remarks. 
Feb. 19, 1839. 



April 14, 1869. 
Mch. 1, lH(»(i. 
Mcli. 31, 1864. 



1663 Charles Edwin, Oct. 33, 1843 



1S48. 

Mary Ann Jar- 
vis, Mch. 11, 1805 Feb. 14, 1833 Apr. 5, 1839. 

1664 Leon'd Harding, June 5, 1800 

1 child. 

1665 Frances LouIsa.June 6, 1831 



'I 



i. 

I. 



Josephs. Jarvis, Oct. 33.1807 Sept. 15, 1855 Feb. 37, 1839. Copper 

Tin & Iron Works 
1666 CcyHnda Nea- 

ving, Mch. 34, 1817 

3 children. 

* Had tin and copper works; sash and blind factory. Was justice of 
the peace. 



. i 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS SIXTH GENERATION. 



171 



No. Name. Bon:. Died. Married or Remarks. 

1667 Julia Maria, May 8, 1840 Dec. 5, 1870 1864, David N. Rus- 

sell. 

1668 Chester, Oct. 24, 1843 Dec. 10. 1850 

1669 Mary Abigail, June 26, 1846 

Harriet Jarvis, Mch. 8, 1812 Sept. 30, 1878 Sept. 20, 1831. 
1C70 Wm. A. Chase, July 20, 1806 Juue 26, 1862 Druggist and Grocer. 
3 children. 

1671 Mary Aun, Jan. 30, 1833 

1672 Kent Jarvis, Aug. 29, 1837 

1673 Edward A., Mar. 9, 1845 



6th Generation. 

No. Name. Bom. Died. 

Jacob S. Jarvis, Jan. 22, 1809 

1674 Jane M. Curtiss, Dec. 25, 1814 

7 children. 

1675 Francis H., July 15, 1836 Oct. 8,1846 

1676 Albert F., Oct. 25, 1838 

1677 Jane Josephine, Oct. 20, 1842 Nov. 30, 1842 

1678 Helen liOuisa, Nov. 17, 1843 Oct. 20, 1846 
1079 Francis H. 2d, Apr. 28, 1846 Apr. 9, 1853 

1680 Helen A., Dec. 19, 1848 

1681 Flor'uce Isidore, Aug. 30, 1853 



Married or Kemarlts. 
Dec. 25. 1833. 



15503. 



Abig'l C. Jarvis.Aug. 13, 181b 

1682 Asa Borden. 

4 childi'cn. 

1683 George F., 



1684Cliarle8M., 

1685 Abigail M., 

1686 Joseph A., 



Jan. 21. 1834 

Feb. 16, 1836 

Aug. 31, 1838 
Oct. 29, 1844 



May 5. 1831. 



July 9, 1854, Angelina 
N. Hiininiond. 

May 11, 1854. Harriot 
B. Clark. 



ise4. 

RochelH.Jarvis.Apr. 18. 1815 July 17. 1838 May 6. 1836. 

1687 Robert Hilaon. 

1 child. 

1688 Eliza Jane. Jan. 30, 1838 



m 



172 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS — SIXTH GENERATION. 



1 ^OS. 

No. Name. Born. Died. 

Jos. A. Jarvis, Sept. 21, 1817 

1689 Mary O. Daniel, Apr. 21, 1821 Feb. 27, 1852 

2 children. 

1690 Charles J., Jan. 23,1846 Jan. 31.1847 

1691 Edward W., July 17, 1848 

1S80. 

Horace A. Jarvis, Jan. 14, 1818 

1692 Lucy Jane El- 

dridge, Nov. 11, 1818 

4 children. 

1693 Mary Minerva. 

1694 Joseph Albert, 1841 Jan. 9, 1879. 

1695 Julia F., 

1696 Grace Gillet. 



Married or Remarli?. 
Nov. 14, 1844. 



Sept., 1837. Merch't. 



W. H. Twiss. 



1 S04. 

Joseph Church 
Jarvis, Jan. 19, 1823 July 6, 1872 Sept. 6, 1850. Died, 

Sycamore, 111. 

1697 Maria Seaver, May 10, 1830 

1 child. 

1698 Frank Adolph's, May 8,1851 



loie. 

Lorenzo Taylor 
Jarvis, Mch. 22, 1815 

1699 Abigail Preston, Nov. 28, 1815 

3 children. 
nOORufusR, Nov. 6,1842 
1701 Emma. Nov. 22, 1845 
11)2 MaryW., Oct. 22, 1848 

1033. 

Rev. Kasinni P. 
Jervis, i Jan. 9, 1825 

1703 Martha H. Long. 

4 children. 
1704MaryTheodora,«May 30, 1854 

1705 Sarah Jessica, July 9, 1858 

1706 Charles Myron 

Samuel, May 22, 1860 

1707 Arthur Harold 

Kivsinni, Feb. 19, 1863 



Oct. 3, 1841. Parmer. 



Jan. 25. 1852. 



Oct. 11. 1877 



» Graduate of Union College. Minister M. E. Church. 
* Married James G. Lindsay. Living in Columbia, S. C. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS— SIXTH GENERATION. 



173 



No. Name. Born. 

Fred'kT.Jarvi8,Sept. 22, 1822 

1708 MonisaT.Steeve, Oct. 7,1826 

2 children. 

1709 Fran's Griswold, July 14, 1845 

1710 Charles H., Sept. 21, 1848 



ie43. 

Died. 



Married or Remarks. 
Nov. 16, 1843. 



1044. 



Henry K.Jarvis. Sept. 7,1824 
1711 Harriet J. BlLss, Feb. 13, 1826 
2 children. 



Feb. 13, 1846. 



1712 Kent, 

1713 Willard, 



Jan. 2. 1847 Apr. 12. 187G Oct., 1872, Emma 

Clark. Druggist. 
May 2, 1853 

1 04S. 



Aurelia C. 
Jarvis, July 7, 1827 

1714 David C. Breaee.Sept. 30, 1820 

8 children. 

1715 Geo. L. Bowne, Mch. 20, 1847 May 5 1847 

1716 Ella C, Aug. 7,1849 

1717 Emma, Sept. 8, 1851 

1718 William Jarvis, May 7, 1855 

1719 Chester Jarvis, Mch. 27, 1857 

1720 Asahel Amos, Apr. 7, 1860 

1721 Chas. Harmon, Mch. 2, 1866 

1732 Carl Adelbert, Sept. 2, 1869 Oct. 21. 1869 

Asahel A. Jarvis.Mch. 29, 1834 

1723 Ella H. Hanna. 

3 children. 

1724 Emma Bowne. 

1725 George L. Bowne. 

1726 William Hamilton. 

1 ooo. 

Mary J. Jarvis, Sept. 9, 1833 

1727 Gilbert O. Fay. » 

2 children. 

1728 Elizabeth. May 21, 1870 

1729 Charles Jarvis, Aug. 26, 1871 



Mch. 27. 1845. 



Adelbert Dye. 
Willis T. Thorpe. 
1 ch., Jarvis Loomis. 



Nov., 1862. 



Apr. 14, 1869. 



» Professor of Theology. Graduated from Yale College, and is now 
Supermtendeut of the Institute of D. aud D. of the State of Ohio. 



Jt' f 

' ■ % 

'4 

■ij if. 



•i 






I 









. K 



fmtmBm. 



it^^^ 



174 



DK8CKNDANT8 OF THOMAS — SIXTH GENERATION. 



No. Name. Born. 

Dwight .Iiirvia, i Oct. 8, 1835 

1730 Miiry L. Kodgers. 

2 children. 

1731 Edwiu Rodgcrs, June 19, 1868 
1733 Anna Louisa, Aug. 26, 1871 



leoi. 

Died. 



Marritul or Remarks. 
Mch. 1, 1866. 



ioo«. 



Ann M. Jarvis, Feb. 10, 1841 
1733 Thos.B. George, »Feb. 21. 1836 



Mch. 31, 1864. 



1 Civil Engineer, and Colonel 13th Regiment O. V. T., in the War of 
the Rebellion, and is now Brigadier-General of Volunteer.s. 

« First Lieutenant and Adjutant 13th Regiment O. V. T. Also Captain 
and Adjutant-General iu the War of the Rebellion. 



DKHCENDANTH OF JONATHAN. 



ITfi 



DESCENDANTS OF JONATHAN JARVIS. 

P'or over five years, we, in connection with Captain P. C. 
Jarvis and others of the name in Huntington, on Long Island, 
have been laboring assiduously to discover, if possible, the 
origin of the Jarvis family in that region. We have searched 
thi'ough the records of the town, examined old wills, deeds, family 
bibles, and the lists of births, marriages, and deaths, preserved by 
the different churches, noting down traditions, and exploring all 
sources of information that might lead to satisfactory results. 
(See Appendices A, B, D, G, and N.) 

We have found, by these researches, that about the year 16G1 
occurs the name of Stephen Jarvis, and in the year 1(579, the 
names of William Jarvis, Thomas Jarvis, and Jonathan Jarvis, all 
prominent men in their several callings, and all evidently of mature 
age, as their names frequently appear in the early records of real 
estate transactions. 

One tradition is that the three last-mentioned were brother's, 
and they nuiy all have been brothers or near relatives of John 
Jarvis, who is mentioned as being one of a coroner's jury in Bos- 
ton, on the 28th of September, 1 630. 

We have discovered a tradition among the descendants of the 
early settlers of Jarvises in Massachusetts, that one or more of 
the name went to Hartford, Conn., and was the ancestor of the 
Huntington and Connecticut branch. This tradition may be true, 
as from history we learn that the Connecticut Colony originated 
in Hartford about the year 1639, and that Huntington, L. I., was 
peopled from the Connecticut Colony about 1653. Thus, in the 
absence of any stronger evidence, we are led to think that our 
ancestors in Huntington may have come from Boston by the way 
of Hartford, Conn. 

As we have already stated in another place, we have found that 
Stephen Jarvis had a son Stephen, and that that son, Stephen, Jr., 
had two sons: Stephen, Jr., born June 2, 1683, Abraham, born 
April 26, 1685; but after diligent search we have found no further 
descendants of them. 

By the will of William Jarvis, the testator, we learn that he was 
the father of Captain Samuel Jarvis of Norwalk, Conn. ; by tradi- 



l ■ i 



99 



ITH 



DESCENDANTS (IF JONATHAN SECOND OENKRATION. 



i lA. 



tionary and other evidence, that Thomas was the ancostor of the 
IlonorabUi Kent Jarvis branch; and lastly, that it is believed by 
Captain P. C. Jarvis and others in Huntington, taat Jonathan 
Jarvis had a son William, who was the father of se' eral children, 
the eldest of whom was Isaiah. This Isaiah married Hannah 
Whitman, July 4, 1721), and, as it appears, died about 1737, as he 
is spoken of as deceased in land grants of that ilate. He had a 
son Robert, born 1735, who was the father of Simon Jarvis, the 
father of Captain P. C. Jarvis. Robert's mother, Hannah Jarvis, 
married a second husband, Elnathan Smith, in 1739. She had a 
son, Joel Smith, and one of his granddaughters states that Joel 
and Robert were step- brothers, thus corroborating the record as 
above given. This record agrees with other traditions of the 
numerous families in and around Huntington, and is further con- 
firmed by the recurrence of cei'tain Christian names, as Jonathan, 
etc., which are not found in the other branches. 

In this way we venture to establish the following record: 



No. Name. 

1734 Jonatlian Jarvis, 

1 child. 

1735 William. 



DESCENDANTS OF JONATHAN 
IsT Geneuation. 

Born. Died. 



Married or Remarks. 
See Appendices D. N. 



No. Name. 

William Jarvis, 

7 children. 

1736 Isaiah, 

1737 Benajah, 

1738 William, 

1739 Henry, 

1740 Jonathan, 

1741 Augustine, 
1743 Eliphalet. 



2d Generation. 
1 T'S^. 

Bom Died. 



1705 1737 

1710 1766 

1713 Jan. 16, 1743 

1714 1774 
1718 July 25, 1705 
1737 1756 



Married or RemarliB. 
Gives land to his son 
Jonathan, in 1760. 

July 4, 1739. 
May 5, 1731. 
Zervlah Rogers. 



Jan. 20, 1746. 



DK8CENDANT8 OF JONATHAN — THIKD QKNKHATION. 



177 



No. Name. 

Isaiah Jarvis, 

174a Hannah Whit- 
man,' 
1 child. 

1744I{<)b(Ml. 



Benajah Jarvis, 
1745 Jciininia Smith, 

1 child. 
1748 Hannah, 

8d wife. 

1747 Annio Sammis, 

2 cliildrcn. 

1748 Milerson, 



3d Genehation. 
1 ^30. 

,'*°'''- Died. Married or Remarks. 

1705 1737 July 4, 1729. 



1735 



1T'3T'. 



1710 
1704 



1710 



1749 Mary, 

3d wifo. 

1750 Zerviah Jarvi.s, widow of William. 

3 children. 

1751 Milerson, 

1752 Mary, 



Henry Jarvis, 
3 children. 

1753 William,* 

1754 Samuel D., 

1755 Elkanah. 



IT30. 

1714 



May 20, 1739. 
1833 1760. 



1766 May 5, 1731. 
1742 

Went to Nova Scotia 
after Revolution. 

1754 Jan. 27, 1747. 

May 2, 1764, Abra- 
ham Camp. 
1777, toZach. Rogers. 

May 7, 1755. 

May2, 1764, A.Camp. 
May 18. 1777. Z. Rog- 
ers.' 



1774 



Nov. 11, 1769 Jan. 17, 1838 Nov. 23, 1789 
Dec. 28, 1746 ngo. Mary Ruscoe, 

1 child, Phebc. 



1^40. 

1718 July 25, 1795. Jan. 20, 1746. 



Jonathan Jarvis, 

1756 Annie Brewster, 

1 child. 

1757 Isaiah Jarvis, May 30, 1760 

2d wife. 

1758 Charity White, 1725 Mch. 17, 1800 Dec. 1, 1765 

1 child. 

1759 Timothy Jarvis, Oct. 22, 1766 Feb. 3, 1843 Mch. 14, 1795. 



» Married 2d husband, Elnathan Smith; had a .son, Joel Smith 
"Married Anna Smith, b. 1767. died Jan. 10; 1834; no children 
23 



<t' 






f> 



', . 1 

» ! 



I 
S 



i,V 1 



1.^ 



I" "-f 



r 



178 desokndanth of jonathan kiftii (jenehatton. 

4tii Gknkkation. 
17^44. 

Died. 



Mnrriert or Hi'iiinikH. 
1888 17(i(). 



No. Name. Born. 

HoluTt Jarvia.' 1735 

1700 Siirtili Ireliinil, Ist wife. 
17«1 M!ir-,mrt't Hnisli, 2(1 wife. 
!) children. 

1702 Joseph Iroliind. Oct. 28, 1704 

1703 Isiiiuh, Feb. (i, 17<i3 July 31. 1833 Dec. 31, 1780. ChriH- 

tinna (Soiild. 



1704 Simon Lossee, Feb. 17, 1707 
17(ir) Jonatlian, Aug. 83, 1772 



1854 171)1. 

Feb. 1(1, 1793. 



1700 I.'^aac. 












1707 Thomas, 


Sept. 


28. 


1781 


1828 


Nov. (t, 1H02. 


1708 Hannah, 






1777 




Oliver Smith. 


1709 PlK'be, 






1789 




Platf Rollers. 


1770 Sally, 






1794 

iTr>o. 




J. Duryea. 



Timothy Jarvis.^Oct. 22, 1700 Feb. 3, 1843 Mch. 14, 1795. 

1771 Phebc Bloom- 

fleld, Oct. 23, 1774 Mch. 14. 1850 Woodbridj^e, N. J. 
7 children. 

1772 Jno.Bloomficld, Dec. 14, 1795 June 3. 1834. 

1773 Ann Eliza, Dec. 11, 1797 Sept. 12. 1843, Kobt. 

C. Vail of Hahway. 

1774 Susannah Maria, July 18, IHOO May 21.1828 Jime 24, 1817. 

1775 Elizabeth. Feb. 22. 1804 Sept. 25, 1845. to Rev. 

Wm. Bryant Barton. 
1770 Timothy Brew- 
ster, Feb. 20, 1809 May 30, 1837. 

1777 William, Nov. 24, 1811 June 8, 1841. 

1778 Benj. Franklin, July 2,1816 Oct. 19, 1840. 



5Tn (Iknkuation. 
Born. Died. 



No. Name. 

Joseph Ireland 

Jarvis, Oct. 28, 1704 

1779 Phebc Carll, 1st wife, 

1 child. 



Married or Keinarks. 



1 Robert Jarvis was badly injured and cut on the head to make him tell 
where his money was bid. The wound left a scar for life. 

- Timotliy Jarvis sold his place in the village of Huntinjiton, L. I., to 
Dr. Benjamin Kissam, in 1797. — From RtBerhead Records. 



■'h-iiir-i-ir'rifi' 



DRSCKNDANT8 OF JONATHAN— KIFT.I OKNKHATION. 179 



Horn. 



Died. 



Vo, Nnini). 

1780 Joel. 

2(1 wife. 
({ oliildroii. 

1781 Rol)(.r(. 

1782 William. 

1783 ilendrickson. 

1784 Keturiih. 

1785 Eliza. 
1786Muritt, 



1 r«^. 

Simon Lossec 

Jarvis, Feb. 17, 1767 1854 

1787Keturah(V)nkIi.i. 1775 Aug. 16, 1850 
13 cliiklreu. 

1788 Robert, Dec. 10, 1792 

1789 David Coiiklin, Feb. ;i, 1795 

1790 Thos. IIi<rbv ) . . 

1791 Elizabeth: ^' \ '^"'y ^0, 1797 

1792 Esther. Feb. 15, 1800 July 13, 1878 
1<9,^ Jonathan, Apr. 1, 1802 

1794 Phebe, June 22. 1804 

1795PhiletusConklin,Dee. 1, 1806 

179* Almira, Nov. 20, 1812 

1798 Emulus, Sept. 20, 1815 

1799 Wm. llaviland. Sept. 25, 1818 

1800 John Bunce, June 16, 1821 Apr. 16 1864 



Marrlod or KcnmiUH. 



Nov. 30, 1816, Stephen 
Riche. 



1791. 



No children. 

Mary Wright. 3 ohil- 

dren. 
Abigail Scndder. 
Capt. Dean. 



May 28, 1829. 



1845. 



iros. 



Jonathan Jarvis, Aug. 23, 1772 
1801 Deborah Whlt- 



Feb. 16, 1793. 



man, 
8 children. 

1803 David, 

1804 Sarah, 

1805 Mary Ann, 
1800 Whitman, 

1807 Aaron, 

1808 John, 
1H09 William, 
1810 Charles, 



1776 



Dec. 8, 1794 Nov. 22, 1867 1815 
1797 

1799 1875 

1804 

]^^^ Peunsall, 2 children. 

1810 

1813 ' 3 children. 

• 1819 Died young. 



II 



I 



,1 



n 




ti 


1 , , 


:| 





180 



OKSrKNDANTH OF JONATHAN — FIFTH OKNKKATION. 



No. Nnmo. Born. Died. 

'nutmas .rarviH, Hcpt. 28, 1781 
1811 IMiclic Itrmp. 

4 cliildn'ii. 
1813 C iuiton, Mch. 17, 1805 .Fiily 7, 1878 

1813 Anim, 1808 

181 1 Woodlmll, Apr. 25, 1811 



MarrlMl or ItciiiHrkii. 
1838 Nov. «. 1802. 



1815 Kli/,iil)cth, 



irr«. 



I). Woodlmll Conklin. 



June 8, 1884. 



John B. Jervis, Di'c. 14, 1705 

1816 Cynthia Brny- 

toii, 1808 May 14, 1839 

1 child. 

1817 infant daughtcr.May 9,1839 May 9, 18!{9 

3d wife. 

1818 Eliza H.Coatt's, Sept. 14, 1810 Jime 18, 1840. 



John B. Jkrvis. 

From an able and interesting memoir of American Kngineers, 
prepared for the Society of American Civil Engineers by John B. 
Jervis, we are permitted to make, for this work, an abstract, show- 
ing the b(!ginning, progress, and results of his eminent services in 
his profession. 

The first exp(n-ience of Mr. Jervis was upon the Erie Canal, 
which was conunenced in Novemljer, 1817, in Rome, where his 
father, Timothy Jervis, resided. A party of engineers came there 
to locate the line. As it led thiou^h a cedar swaniji, Judge 
Wright, the Chief Engineer, called uu the father of young Jervis, 
who was then only twenty-two years of age, for two axemen. 
Young Jervis was one of them. He was under the charge of 
N. S. Roberts, and the zeal he manife^i'M; and his duty so promptly 
and readily performed, at once g«i>i d the approval of his principal. 
In this employment his ••'• ition was drawn to the study of the 

oppoitunity to learn their use 

he could handle them under- 

■me an engineer. Aware that 

i iication, this, at first, ' :, feared 

his mastering the mysteries of engineer- 



ni 



instruments, and 

and operation 

standingly, a 't- 

he had bn' iiimon 

might stand ii; he way 

ing, but he soon d^tei lined to underi^^^ake it, feeling that ''what 

others had done, he 'ould do." 

At the end of his service as axeman, 'i. lired of the principal 



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ISO DESCENDANTS OF JONATHAN — FIFTH GENERATION. 

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DK8CENDANT8 OF JONATHAN — FIFTH GENKRATION. 



181 



what he would give him for his services the next year. The 
prompt reply, "Twelve dollars per month," surprised him, but 
with some trepidation the olTer was accepted, when his evenings 
and leisure time were devoted to the stiidy of surveying, this being 
considered, at that time, the basis of civil engineering. On the 
18th of April, 1818, he left Rome, on foot, in company with a 
locating party of about twelve p(>rsons, with a conveyance for their 
baggage and tents', all under the direction of Mr. Roberts. After 
a muddy journey, they pitched their tents at Geddysburgh, near 
Syracuse. Early in July, the location was completed to the Seneca 
river, at Montezuma. In three months, he had risen from an axe- 
man to the position of a regular rod man. They returned home 
and disbanded in July. 

From Utica to Montezuma, the work of the middle division had 
been mostly put under contract, and resident engineers were 
appointed to direct the work. Mr. Jcrvis was assigned to take 
charge of a section of seventeen miles in Madison and Onondaga 
counties, under the supervision of David S. Bates, who was only 
a good land surveyor, but who soon allowed him to run the levels. 
At the close of the woi'king season that year, he was sent to the 
quarries to weigh lock-stones for the canal. 

The following year he was made resident engineer of Mr. Bates's 
division, at a salary of $1.25 per day, and $50 expenses. This 
was considered as (|uite satisfactory, as the employment was but 
about nine months in the year. 

The population of New York, at that time, was hut 1,250,000, 
and a large part of the State was a wilderness. The inhabitants 
were mainly occupicnl in clearing the forests, draining the lands, 
and constructing mills, houses, etc , for their own u«e. To them, 
the financial difliiculties of the canal appeared insurmountable, and 
by men of intelligence, fears were entertained that it would sink 
the State in irretrievable ruin. 

The aid of the Federal Government was sought, but without 
81 • .ess. Mr. Jefferson replied to Mr. Joshua Fourmau, who was 
the commissioner to ^\^ishington, " We an; trying in vain to get 
Congress to help build a canal in this city but three miles long, 
and now you ask us to aid you in building a canal three hundred 
miles long through a wild(;rness. Preposterous! " Undaunted, 
however, by this repulse, the State of New York entered, single- 
handed, upon the construction of the ICrie and Champlain canals, 
and under a financial system, carried out the work with such 






182 



DESCENDANTS OF JONATHAN FIKTll GENERATIOIJ. 



I 



i 



i 



iiitepjrity tbat thoir five per cent, bonds were at a premium of fif- 
teen per cent. 

At the Rome summit, there was a level of sixty miles, which, 
from its length, was regarded by eiigiiuiers as too difiicult to con- 
struct, but this long level was tested by Mr. Canvass White, the 
principal assistant engineer, and found to be correct, much to the 
credit of the young engiiuHM-s. Trior to this period, a few small 
canals had been made to pass falls and rapids, as at Middlesex, 
Mass., Little Falls, N. Y., with a few others for bateau boats of ten 
or fifteen tons. 

When the preliminary surveys were made, in 1816, by the Hon- 
orable iienjamin Wright, James (>eddes, and John Brodhead for 
the Erie, and Lewis (iai'vin for the Cluunplain canal, the State 
entered upon the construction of these works. Mr. Wright was 
Chief Engineer of the Erie, and Mr. Geddes of the Ohamplain 
canal. Mr. Canvass White was the assistant of Mr. Wright, and 
to him WPS committed the preparation of plans and methods of 
construction, -"hich he did with consummate skill, and they were 
received with great satisfaction by his chief. 

The middle section was essentially completed at the close of 1819, 
but nearly all of the year 1820 was spent to fit it for use, and this 
trust was committed to Mr. Jervis. This was his third year's 
experience, and without an advance of salary. 

in the spring of 1821, a section of seventeen miles from the Nose 
to Arasterdain was assigned to him, involving greater difficulties 
than the middle section. This division and the greater part of 
the section between Utica and Schenectady was substantially com- 
pleted at the close of 1822. Still, as on the middle section, much 
remained to be done, and this labor was assigned to Mr. Jervis, 
and navigation was opened successfully in September, 1823. The 
work was chiefly done, and the amounts settled, during the winter 
of 1823. 

In the spring of 1823, Mr. Jervis was assigned to the superin- 
tendence of fifty miles fi-om the Minden Dam to the Upper 
Anueduct across the Mohawk. This service was one of valuable 
ex;> rience. Hitherto, the construction of the work had engrossed 
his attention, but now he had the opportunity to see the canal in 
operation. The first year, he had not the entire control of the 
canal, as some of his brother residents had not completed their 
share of the work; but the second year found him in full control 
of about one-seventh of the entire canal, with more expense than 



DESOKN'DANTS OF JONATHAN — FIFTH OKNERATION. 



183 



the general average devolving upon him. Weak points were 
developed and repaired, and great diligence and activity wore 
required to keep up tlw navigation at an expense of $()()() per mile, 
or $30,000 per annum. Unlimited authority was given to him by 
the Commissioner, Mr. Seymour, who made occasional visits for 
consulting freely on the requirements of the works. No political 
considerations interfered. He selected his foremen, and visited 
them all twice a week. All were under his personal supervision, and 
no other part of the work exhibited equal economy. In view of 
his expenses in the management of this part of the canal, it appears 
a strange waste to see subsequent expenditures of three to ten 
times the amount for like services. 

In 182") the (lanal was completed, and opened for navigation by 
a magnificent celebration; and in March, 182."), Mr. Jervis's connec- 
tion with it ceased, with the unqualified approval and compliments 
of the Commissioner. Tha success of this grand work caused 
others of the same kind to be projected, some of which have 
proved useless as commercial enterprises. 

Ml-. Jervis being iimbitious to engage in new works, on the 25th 
of March, 182.'>, he entered upon the Dclawar and Hudson canal, 
intending to facilitate the transportation of coals from the Lacka- 
wana valley to New York and the valley of the Hudson. Prelim- 
inary surveys and estimates had been made, and tlie mode of 
construction, partly by canal and partly by improvements of the 
river, determined on at a cost of .§1,208,000, but about one-half of 
its actual cost. Mi'. Wright was Chief Engineer, and Mr. Jervis 
his principal assistant, to conduct, under the advicii of Mr. Wright, 
all the details of the work. 

On examination of the entire line, Mr. J(>rvis reported against 
most of the slack-water plans, and he was sustained l)y Mr. Wright; 
the canal was 20 feet at bottom and 28 feet at top. The locks 
were 76 feet long and 9 feet wide in the chamber, with a capacity 
for boats of 30 tons. It was 106 miles long, and had 110 locks, 
and was mostly completed in the fall of 1828. It was not 
()])ened for )>usiness, however, until the fall of 1829. The railroad 
from Carbondale was carried to the summit of the mountiun, 
about three miles, by five inclined planes, worked by stationary 
engines. Passing the summit, a descent of nearly 500 feet was 
made in about one mile. Mr. Jervis made important improve 
ments in the expense and hazard of working these steep inclines, 
especially in utilizing atmospheric pressure to control "he prepon- 



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184 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FIFTH GENERATION. 



I 



deratiiifT gravity of loaded trains, and by an ingenious method, 
wliit^h is fully described in his memoir, tlu? complete success of 
his improvements was fully established. 

Near the close of the year 1827, Mr. Wright resigned his posi- 
tion, Mr. Jervis succeeded him as Chief Engineer, and Mr. R. F. 
Lord became his assistant. lender Mr. Lord's administration, 
the capacity of the canal was increased and its business greatly 
extended. 

In- May, 1830, Mr. Jervis left the Delaware & Hudson Canal 
Company, except making occasional visits during the ensuing year. 
He then took the ai)pointment of Chief Engineer of the Mohawk 
& Hudson Railway, from Al])any to Schenectady. The table-land 
of this road was reached by a sudden rise rom the Hudson of 200 
feet, and from the Mohawk of over 100 feet, over which were 
inclined planes, woi'ked by stationary engines, which were, a few 
years after, rejected. 

Mr. Jervis was a member of a commission who finally suboti- 
tnted a grade of 80 feet from Albany, and of 45 feet from Schen- 
ectady. Upon this road he made important improvements in the 
construction of locomotives, which were of great utility. He also 
invented a new plan for an engine for the Schenectady & Saratoga 
Railroad, of which he was (yliief Engineer. It was sent to Eng- 
land and constructed by R. Stevenson. This improvement has 
been adopted un the railway to the Pacific, and is now the general 
plan of American jo(!omotives. 

I'he Mohawk & Hudson, also the Schenectady & Saratoga R. R., 
were completed in April, 18.33. Mr. Jervis then engaged with the 
Canal Commissioners as Chief Engineer of the Chenango Canal, 
which is 08 miles long, with 100 locks. Upon this canal, for the 
fiist time in this country, resort was had to artificial reservoirs for 
the supply of its summit with water. For this purpose, Mr. Jervis 
(;onstructed rain-gauges, and ascertained, by a careful series of 
experiments, that 40 per cent, of the rain-fall could be utilized for 
the canal. 

During his engagement on this work, the enlargement of the 
Erie C/anal was contemplated, and he was called upon to make 
surveys and estimates for this object on the Eastern Section, which 
was made, in 1835, by Mr. William J, Mc Alpine, one of the Resi- 
dent Engineers on the Chenango Canal, under the supervision of 
Mr. Jervis. Though still Chief Engineer of the Chenango, he 
devoted much attention to the proposed enlargement. He pro- 



II 

«1 



DK80KNDANT8 OF JONATHAN — FIFTH OKNKKATION. 



185 



posed many corrections of errors in its original construction, wliich 
were generally adopted by the Canal Commissioners. At "Little 
Falls" he wholly re-arranged the flight of "locks." 

In September, 1836, he was offered the position of Cliief Engi- 
neer of the Croton Aqueduct, and in October following, he accepted 
that trust. Between Mr. William C. Bouck and Mr. Jervis, the 
most cordial relations existed, and it was with reluctance that Mr. 
Bouck consented to his leaving the Erie Canal. 

The appointment of Mr. J(!rvis upon the ('roton Aqueduct was 
without the least solicitation on his part, and he at first declined it 
from motives of honoral)le regard to the feelings of Mr. Douglas, 
who was then acting as Chief Engineer. Upon the full assurance, 
however, that Mr. Douglas was out of the question, he, at the 
earnest solicitation of the committee, accepted the appointment, 
which he regarded as professionally desirable. He therefore re- 
signed his position upon the Erie Canal enlargement, and Mr. 
Douglas was appointed Chief Engineer in 1835, and instructed to 
proceed in its construction. His location of the line and his estab- 
lishment of the grade of the aqueduct were, in the main, well 
done, but none of his plans for bridges and culverts were adopted. 
He had been occupied about 1 8 months on the work. All subse- 
quent plans and specifications were the work of Mr. Jervis. For 
a description of this magnificent work, see printed memoir. 

In the spring of 1845, the Bostonians appointed a Commission 
of one person from Philadelphia and one from New York to 
investigate the projects which had been presented for a supply of 
water for that city. 

Mr. "Walter Johnson of Philadelphia, and Mi*. Jervis, were 
selected as the Commission; and after making general examina- 
tions, it became apparent that the duty was essentially one of 
engineering, and as Mr. Johnson was not a pi'ofessional engineer, 
Mr. Jervis decided not to enter ui)on the service, unless the engin- 
eering was placed entirely under his control. This decision was 
received unfavorably by the Committee and Mr. Johnson; but Mr. 
Jervis tlioixght "one poor general was better in command than two 
good ones." He consented, howevei-, at the request of the Com- 
mittee, who regarded it as impoi'tant to secure the moral force of 
two commissioners, and that Mr. Johnson should sign the report 
with him, and be charged with certain details that would not con- 
flict with the general engineering. Under this compromise the 
investigation progressed and the result determined. 
24 



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186 



DKSCKNDANTS OV JONATHAN FIFTH «K.VKUAT10N. 



In the prosocution of this investigation, great efforts were made 
to obtain his opinions as the work progressed, but he persistently 
declined, from prudential motives, to givo any indication of his 
views until they were expressed in his report, and he here makes 
an important suggestion to young engineers to follow his example, 
thereby avoiding partial discussions and preventing embarrass- 
ments. Although the Committee failed in g»'ttiiig an insight into 
his views, and felt somewhat displeased, they wci'e, at last, satis- 
fied fully with the course he had pursued as being very judicious. 
The report was satisfactory, and he was appointed Consulting 
EiUgineer of the work, which he held until its completion in 1848. 

The next great work in whicli he was engaged was the construc- 
tion of the Hudson River Railway, which, from tlie expense of its 
building and completion, with steam navigation, was generally 
regarded as an enterprise extremely hazardous in a commercial 
and financial point of view. 

In the spring of 1847, he was appointed Chief Engineer of this 
railway, and, in 1849, the road was opened for transportation as far 
as Poughkeepsie. In August, he resigned his position as Chief 
Engineer, but was I'etained as Consulting Engineer; but finding 
his views did n(^t harmonize with some of the Board, he resigned 
his place in 1850, having no connection with the work since. 

Notwithstanding the general opposition to this grand work, Mr. 
Jervis, in 184(3, published an able article in /[nut's Merchants^ J\/nr/a- 
ziyie. in which he showed most conclusively that not only on the 
Hudson, but on other steamboat routes, the railroad would be a 
successful competitor. He quoted the Westminster Review, wliich 
says; " The system is viewed as one which mocks the age. Its 
progress has startled the most cautious. Its developments are 
revolutionizing the social and commercial affairs of mankhid." 
Subsequent events have fully sustained his wisdom in the above 
quotation. 

In the spring of 1850, after closing his connection with this 
great work, he went to Europe. While there, he witnessed the 
launch of one of the large tubes of the bridge over the Menai 
Straits, under the charge of Mr. Stevenson, and on that occasion 
he received from the English engineers the cordial and respectful 
attentions wliich his reputation as an y\merican civil engiiieer 
deserved. While on this tour, ho was mainly occupied with in- 
specting engineering works. 

After an absence of four months, he returned with improved 






i 



DESCENDANTS OF .lONATirAN — KIFTII (IKNKRATION. 



187 



[o 
111 
In 

111 



health, and immediately engaged in the construction of the Michi- 
gan Southern, and Northern Indiana Railways, practically one 
work, of about '24() miles in extent. Tlie route was favorable, and 
in about ones y(>ar, the line was open(>d to Chicago. 

During tiie summer of 1851, he engaged as President of tho 
Chicago & Rock Island Railway, extending from (yhicago to the 
Mississipjii at Davenport, a route of 180 miles. 

He next engaged in the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & (^hicago 
Railway, 486 miles long, which was in a ruinous ccjndition from 
imperfect construction and financial mismanagement. Under his 
superintendence, the whole character of the road was soon changed, 
and became successful. lie resigned in 1863 or 1864, but con- 
tinued to act as Engineer until 1866. This was the last great 
work in which he was actively engaged. 

From th(! rich and varied experience of Mr. Jervis in the con- 
struction and management of so many important works of internal 
improvements for more than half a century, his instructive memoir 
closes with sagacious counsel to his professional brethren touching 
the imj)ortance of their honorable profession, and the principles 
which should 'control them in the discharge of its responsil)le 
duties, and especially ui'ges tlu! importance of engaging the best 
engineering talent and skill in the superintendence as well as in 
the construction of public works. 

No wiser counsel could be given, and coming from this eminent 
engineer of four score years, they will not be unheeded by the 
members of his profession. Important and enduiing as may be 
the many great works in which he has been engaged, his fame as 
one of the greatest of American engineers will outlive them all, 
and the example of his indomitalile perseverence and energy, by 
which he overcame all obstacles and raised himself to eminence in 
his profession, will stand as a beacon-light to direct and encourage 
the young men of America to emulate his example. " Per sever entia 
vincit omniay 

Mr. Jervis is the author of two books, viz., " Railway Property," 
and "The Question of Labor and Capital." The honorary degree 
of LL.D., was conferred upon the Hon. John B. Jervis of Rome, 
N. Y., by Hamilton College, on the 27th of June, 1878. 



m 



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188 



0*:80KNDANTH OF .KlNATIIAN KIFTII (IKNKItATION. 



Born. 



Died. 



Married or Remarl<B. 



No. Nnmo. 

SuHiiiiimli M. 

JerviH, Jul\ IH, 18()(» May 21, 1828 June 24, 1817. 

1811) Samuel Bcacli, M.D. 

;i cliildicn. 

1820 Mloonif'd JerviH, Jan. 27, 1820 1 son, Jolm Bloom- 

fleld, 1.. May 5, 1866. 

1821 Henry Hyde, 1823 Phy.sician. 

1822 Sanuiel, 1824 Deceased. 

Bloomkii<;i,i) Jkhvis Bkach 

Was born January 27, 1820. He is the son of Dr. Samuel Beach 
and Susannah Maria, daughter of Timothy Jotvis. 

He was graduated at Princeton College in the class of 1842; was 
admitted to the Bar in 1S43, and was a member of the New York 
Assembly in 1848. He has continued the practice of law at Rome, 
N. Y., to this time. 

On the organization of the Rome Savings Bank, in 1851, he was 
placed in the execmtive (;liarge of the institution, and has continued 
to manage it to the present time. It was small in the beginning, 
but under his able and faithful management, it has grown, and 
now has over a million dollars in deposits, with a surplus of nearly 
10 per cent. Its securities are regarded of the most reliable kind. 
For about fifteen years it has paid depositors 6 per cent. No Sav- 
ings Rank in the State has a higher character. 

In his profession as a lawyer, Mr. Beach has few superiors in 
the section of the State in which he resides. 



<J. 



Timothy B. Jer- 
vis, Feb. 20, 1809 

182;i Helena Maria 
Bogart. 
1 child. 

1824 Emily Jervis, Dec. JJO, 1839 

2d wife. 

1825 Mary Ann Har- 

vey, 



Presbyterian minis- 
ter. May 30, 1837. 



Oct. 28, 18G9. 
Sept. 26. 1867. 



f I T 



wtt* 



DK8C1KNDANTS OF .FONATirAX SIXTH OENKRATION. 189 


irrr. 


I 


No, Name. Born, 


Died. 


Mnrrlod or KoinarkH, l| 


William Joivis, Nov. 24. 1813 




June 8, 1841. Civil '«' 
Engineer. 


182« Christiana 






Abranis, 






children. 






1827 Wm. Henry, Mch. 21, 1842 


Apr. 10. 1848 




1828 Kdwanl. Oft. 29, 1843 


Apr. 12, 1808 




1829 Susanna M., Apr. 19, 1847 






1830 Anna, May 24, 1851 






1831 Elizabeth U., .Iniw 9, 1854 






1832 Carrie D., May 23. 1858 


Mch. 2. 1801 




IT 


rs. 




IJenj'n Franklin 






Jervis, .July 2. 1810 




Prest. of Bank. H 


1833 Louisa M. 






Chandler, 




Aug. 19, 1840. H 


1 child. 






1834 John Bloomfield 






Jervis, Dec. 28, 1850 


Mch. 9. 1809 




0th Generation. 




irt>3. 






No. Name. Born. 


Died. 


Married or Reniarkg. 




Jonathan Jarvis, Apr. 1, 1802 




May 28, 1829. 




1835 Ann West, 




of N. J. 




2 children. 








1830 Sarah W., Mch. 2.1832 








1837 Emulus, Aug. 10, 1835 




Mch. 8, 1858, Louisa 
Casine of Brooklyn. 




1 ro.^. 






Philetus C. 








Jarvis, Dec. 1, 1800 




May 17, 1H30. | 


1838AlmedaB. Scud- 






der, June 18, 1800 






8 children. 






1839 Marg't Scuddcr.Mch. 13, 1832 


Jan. 2, 1835 




1840 Cornelia E., P\'b. 3,1834 


Jan. 13. 1835 




1841 Marg't Cornelia. June 13, 1830 


June 10. 1844 




1842 SelucasLeaudcr,()ct. 24, 1838 






1843 Joseph rcay, Nov. 5,1843 




II 


1844 Mervale Philet'isMch. 24, 1840 


July 18, 1850 




1845 WilmerE., Nov. 2,1847 


Jiuie 25, 1850 






1 1840 Fred M., Aug. 2, 1852 


Dee. 19, 1852 





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1!)0 



DESCENDANTS «>K .H (NATHAN — KIXTII OKNEHATION. 



I'llll-ETUH C. JaKVIS, 

Tho subject of this Hkotch in a native oftho town of Huntington, 
having been born tluu'o on Doct'inbor I, 18(M5. lie is u sclf-nuuie 
man, and has worked hi.s way in life up from th.i liun)blest bugin- 
ning. At tli" age of ten years, lie connrK^necnl to w<h'1< on a farm, 
and continued for six years, in the 8umeoccu|)ation, receiving only 
his board and clothing in payment for his labor. In 1822, he first 
commenced to go upon coasting vessels at wages of four dollars per 
month. After a service of seven years, in various capacities, upon 
vessels, he took charge of one, as Captain and part ovviKsr, and 
since that time (1829) he has been engaged in the coasting and 
carrying trade. 

Mr. Jarvis has been known to tho community as a business man 
of uitegrity, ever since he began the coasting trade, and has a large 
acquaintance with the merchants and farmers of the town of Hunt- 
ington, for whom he has transacted a large busint'ss. He was 
married May 1 8, 18;{(), to Almeda 15. Scudder, daughter of Thomas 
Scudder. He, with his two sons, S. Lee, and Joseph R. Jarvis, 
still conducts a freight business between Huntington and New 
York City, employing two vessels. Mr. Jarvis is highly esteemed 
among the people of his native town, as a good citizen and an up- 
right mail. 

No. Name. Born. Died. Married or Remarkti. 

Emulus Jarvis, Sept. 80, 1815 
1847 Ur.silla Maria 
Brown. 

2 children. 

1849 ITattic L. Jarvis.Sept. 28, 1857 

1850 LillicF. JurvLs, Sept. 5, 18«1 



OO. 



Wm. II. Jarvi.s, Sept. 25, 1818 



Nov. 12, 1845. 



i 



1851 MarthaP.Hunce, Apr. 16, 1820 Feb. 7,1868 
5 children. 

Mch. 24, 1847 
Aug. 24. 1855 
Juno 29, 1858 
\ug. 21, 1861 
June 13, 1805 



1852 Emma M. , 

1853 Mary E., 

1854 Annie E., 

1855 Susan R., 

1856 Martha P., 



ItKSfKNDANTS (IK .KiNATIIAN — HIXTII (iKNKUATIDN, 



l!)l 



I tsoo. 



Nc 



NniiK" 



Knl'li. 



DIimI. 



Miirrlud or RomorkH. 



.loliii l{. Jiiivis, .luiif 1((. \H2\ Apr. Ml, ISdl 1S41. 



1H57 Kli/iilM'tli 'rowiiHcnd. 

4 cliildrcii. 
iHnH Will. il. .Iiiivis, \nfr, ;tt, 1H|;{ Mdi. 1, 1,S(U Dic.l in miny iil Dii- 



vid'.s l.sliiiid. 



iwr.l) Almini, ()(;t. 7, 184r» 

iHdO .Mary Aim, Nov. 11», 1850 

l«(Jl Hariili Adelaide, May K, 1857 



1 MOM. 

David .larvls, Dec. H, 171»t Ndv. 2'2, 18«7 
18«3 Charity Wliil- 

iiian, Ist, wife, Aiij?. 11, 171)4 Feb. ii, ISiW .Meli. 4, 1815. 
1H0;J SophiiiOdell.Sdwife, Sept. 8i>, 1874 .'\Icli. 5, 18.14. 

(S cliildreii. 

1804 Experience, May 8, 1817 

1805 Ainandu, Jan. IH, 181» 
18(10 WilletU, Apr. IK, 1831 

INOT I'lutlie, Aug. Ill, 1825 1H(U 

1808 Kniily, July 31, 1880 

180i» Charity, Nov. 20, 1831 .huw 111, 1873 



Carlton JarvLs, Mch. 17, 1805 July 7, 1878 

1870 Su.saiiiiii lOveritt, 1800 Feb. 10, 1870 

5 ehildreu. 

1871 Henry, Nov. 31, 1834 

1872 Phebe A., July 10. 18:50 

1873 David U., Apr. 38, 1828 

1874 G(!or<,'c E., Dec. 14, 1834 

1875 Phebe A., Dec. 10, 1837 



>■■:! i 



Woodhiiil .lar- 

vis, xVpr. 35, 1811 
1870 Su.sanuah Hew- 
lett, June 7, 1812 
children. 

1877 Eliza Ann, Dec. 0, 1833 

1878 Mary Franee.s, Apr. 37,1835 Nov., 
187!) Johii Hewlett, Dec. 35, 1830 
1880Tlio.VVoo(lliull, Fob. 6, 1840 

1881 Eb. N().strand, Aug. 9, 1843 
1883 MaryAnnSusau,Oct. 11, 1847 



D(!c. 4, 1833. 



1835 
1835 

Dec. 4, 1850. 
1803 Nov. 4, 1803, Sarah 
iioger.s. 

Dec. 8, 1805, John H. 
Colyer. 




192 nKSC'KNDANTS OK JONATHAN SKVKNTll (IKNKUATION. 





18S4. 




No. Name. 


Born. Died. 


Married or Ut nmrliR. 


Emily Jervis, 


Dec. ;]0, 1830 


Oct. 38, 1869. 


1883 Robert B. Vail. 






1 child. 






1884 K. C. Vail, 


July 12. 1873 






7tu ({kneuation. 






1S4«. 




No. Name. 


Born. Died. 


Married or Reniarlte 


Selucas L. Jar- 






vis, 


Oct. 34, 1838 


Apr. 10, 1869. 



1885 Jeiimc U. Brant. 

4 children. 

1886 Jennie Lee, Aug. 8, 1869 

1887 Percy, Mch. 14, 1870 

1888 Gracie, Jan. 3, 1873 

1889 Frederick, Aug. 11, 1875 



|l"( 



is 

it 



IS!!^43. 



Josephlt.Jarvis.Nov. 5, 1843 

1890 Emily A. Hor- 

ton, Dec. 10, 1844 

2 children. 

1891 Philet's Horton.Sopt. 11, 1870 
^892Luella, Nov. 11, 1875 



Sept. U, 186V. 



isro. 



John II. Jarvis, Dec. 35, 1836 

1893 Elizii Pluce. 

5 chililren, 

1894 Edgar Hewlett, Dec. 38. 1857 

1895 Philo Piice, July 18, 1864 

1896 Anna Aus;iHta, Sept. 34, 1H66 

1897 Woodhu'.l. July 14, 1869 

1898 John Colyer. May 30, 1873 



Dec. 4, 1856. 



1874 



I 
I 



1 »» 1 . 

Ebene/cr Nos- 
tnind Jarvis, Aug. 9, 1843 

1899 Elizabeth Rogers. 

3 children. 

1900 Su.mn Mary Ann, Sept. 1, 1869 
• iVil Thos. Woodhull.Seiil. 3, 1872 
A, >)2 Hannah, Oct. 14, 1874 



DE8CENUANT8 OF NATllANIKL SKOUND GENEKATION. 



193 



i m 



DESCENDANTS OF NATHANIEL JARVTH 
IsT Genekation. 

Die- 



No. Nami!. Born. 

1903 Nalh'u'l Jarvis, • Sept. i), 1 *3 1778 

lt>04 Phebe Allen, Jane 39, 1753 Nov. 13, 1795 

4 children. 
1905 Sarah,'' 
1900 Ph(Bbe, 



Married or Remarkv. 
176-. 



1907 Nathaniel, 

1908 Mary, 



Fel). 30, 1770 Aug. 19, 1857 

Apr. 13,1772 Jan. 30, .851 Benj. Holmes. 2 sons 

ard 1 dauj^hter. 
Sept. 9,1775 Jan. 1,1840 No 11,1798. 
Aug. 4, 1787 Mch. 29, 1853 




3d Genekation. 



No. Name. 


Born. 




Died. 




Married or Rcniarlvs 


Nathau'l Jarvis 


Sept. 9, 


1775 


Jan. 


1. 


1840 


Nov. 11, 1798. 


10 children. 














1909 Ednumd Allen, 


Oct. 8, 


1799 


Oct. 


29, 


1837 




1910 Nathan St urges 


,Mch. 25, 


1801 


May 


13, 


1803 


1854. 


19J1 Pierre] lumphv 


,Fel). 13, 


1803 


May 


10, 


1S74 


Jane 30. 1828. 


1913 Nathaniel, 


Sept. 20, 


1805 










1913 Mary Ogden, 


Sept. 29, 


1807 


F.O). 


11, 


18:4 




1914 William, 


Dec. 23, 


1809 








A p. ., 1838. 


1915 Ph(el)e Francis 


Mch. 4, 


1813 








July 7, 1843. 


191G Jeannette, 


Feb. 27, 


1815 


Feb. 


20, 


i8i.: 


Feb. 19, 1834. 


1917 RenjamiM 11., 


Jan. 10, 


1818 


Apr. 


29, 


in 


Dec. 24, 1840. 


1918 Samuel M., 


Oct. 9, 


1833 








4 or 5 children. 
Laredo, Te.\as. 



Re^ 



Cai'T. Nathaniel Jahvis 

Was born at Huntin<fton, L. i., September 9, 1775. Soon after 
his birtli, hi,-; father entered the Hevohitionary army, and became a 
Lieutenant in the Second N. Y. liejijimeiit. He served in most of 
the contests on Long Island and New Jersey, and linally died, in 



' Married, at Huntingion, L. 1. . eldest daughter Dr. Samuel Allen. 
Died at Valley Forge, Penn. ; was Lieutenant 3d N. Y. Regiment of the 
Continental army; had been two years in .service. 

'■^ Married Rev. J. R. Matthias, Metho'^■ clergyman. Large family. 

2r> 












194 



DESCENDANTS OF NATUANIKl- — THIKI) UENEKATION. 



the winter of 1777, at V^ alley Forge, where General Washington 
had taken up winter quarters. 

His widow, with her little ones, after enduring great liardships 
and privations at Huntington, which was then in the possession of 
a party of British troops, moved to New York, where the subject 
of our sketch grew up to manhood with the growing city, and 
became identified with its interests. 

For upwards of thirty years, he sailed as master of a vessel on 
the Hudson rivei-, and, consequently, becanu^ well known to trav- 
ellers on that much frequented route. 

Captain Jarvis's life furnishes us an example of what may be 
done by patient industry and frugality, in connection with Christian 
principles. When he commenced business he was poor, but in the 
lapse of years he acquired, if not an independence vt ease and 
competence. He was a director in several New Yu..:. banks and 
insui'ance companies, and, in 1831, was sent to the State legislature 
as a representative from that city. 

For a number of years, he was associated with many of its 
benevolent institutions, and was, for a long time, connected with 
the Missionary Society of the M. E. Church, of wliich denomina- 
tion he was an active and influential member. 

A kind husband, an afl'ectionate parent, a consistent Christian 
gentleman, ho lived to see most of his children grown up around 
him, and some of them filling offices of trust and respc -'.sibility 
among their fellow citizens. And when, in the fullness of time, 
the final summons came, he sank peacefully to rest, full of years 
and honor. 



3d Generation. 



1 f>01>. 



No. Name. 

E(hninul Allen 

Jarvis, 
1919 Eliza Crissey. 

;5 childrcu. 
W20 Nathiuiiel. 
1921 Mary Frances. 
1923 Emma Jiinc. 



Bom. 



Died. 



Married or Remarks. 



Oct. 8, 1799 Oct. 29, 18;{7 



DESCHfNDANTS OF NATltANlEL — THIRD GENEHATION. 



195 



T)- 



!■, 1 



lOlO. 



No. Name. 

Niitlian Sturges 

Jarvis, 
Mrs. Jaue B. 
Miimfoitl.' 
3 children. 
1923 Wm. C, 
1924Edmuud A., 
1935 Nathan S., 



Born. 



Dioa. 



Married or Remai'is. 



';l 



Mch. 25, 1801 May 12, 1S62 1854. 



May 13, 1855 
Jan. 22, 1858 
June 30, 1860 



Surgeon Nathan S. Jabvis, 

Son of Natlianiel Jarvis, was born in the city of New York, in 1801. 
At an early age he entered upon the study of medicine in the ofiBce 
of Dr. Valentine Mott, the celebrated surgeon. Having received 
his degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, he was, 
for a short time, on duty at the College Hospital. He commenced 
the practice of medicine in Ithaca. N. Y. In 183;^, he received 
his appointment to the position of assistant surgeon in the army, 
and was stationed, for a number of years, at l<'ort Snelliug, on the 
Upper Mississ^'ijpi. He here first interested himself in the Indian ; 
studied their habits and customs, and sent several valuable com- 
munications in regard to them to the iV. )". Spirit of the Times. 
In the Mexican War. lie was on General Zachary Taylor's staff, 
and actively participated in several battles, among others, those of 
Palo Alto, Eesaca, and Monterey; and was afterwards stationed 
on the Mexican frontier. He also served in the Florida and Black 
Hawk wai"s. 

D'.'. Jarvis was a constant contributor to several literary and 
scientific journals. Among his papers we find letters from Pro- 
fessor Agassiz, Spencer F. Baird, and others, in regard to scientific 
subjects. His collections of Mexican and Indian curiosities were 
deposited with the N. Y. Historical Society, of which he was a 
member. We subjoin an extract from tlie resolutions adopted by 
the Society after his death. 

" Resolved, That in the death of Dr. N. S. Jarvis, for many years 
an eminent surgeon in the U. S. Army, the Historical Society of 
New York deplore the loss of a distinguished associate and corre- 
sponding member, to whom it has been largely indebted for 
numerous and valuable contributions.'" 



I't 



1 (>randdiiu";l)ti'r of llic liilc Kiv. .lohn Stanford. 



rr 



196 



DESCEKDANTH OK NATllANIKI- — Till HI) GENEKATION. 






At the commencomont of the late wai, Dr. Jarvis, having received 
the appointment of Medical Director of the Department of Marj 
land, was ordered from San Antonio, Texas, to Baltimore, and. 
shortly afterward, in ISG2, died of a disease contracted while on 
duty in the South. 

Following are some of the remarks made by Dr. Josiah Simpson, 
at a meeting of the Medical Department of Maryland, convened in 
consequence of the death of Dr. Jarvis: 

"In social intercourse, he was sprightly and entertaining; in his 
attachment, generous and constant; in his daily transactions with 
the world, punctilious and lionorable. As a sui'geon, his ability 
was unquestioned, and he ever acquitted himself, both in the execu- 
tive and professional relations of his position, with marked urbanity 
of manner, a keen sense of honor, and a conscientious regard to 
truth and Justice. 

" C^uis (lesiderio sit pudor m:\ modus 
Tiim cari capitis? " 

In 18G3, the following circular was issued from the War Depart- 
ment: 

"Baltimore, March lilst. 

" Whereas it is inconsistent and inappropriate that a military 
institution established by the National Government, and devoted 
to the care of its sick and vs^ounded, should be called by a name 
that is now, and must hereafter be, preeminent in its association 
with rebels and rebellion. It is hereby announced that, from this 
date, the United States General Hospital known as Stewart's Man- 
sion, shall be designated as the "Jarvis General Hospital," in 
tribute to the late Surgeon N. S. Jarvis, U. S. Army, Medical 
Director of this Department, the memory of whose virtues as a 
man, and excellence as an oflBcer, has not died with him." 

(Signed) "Josiah Simpson." 

As a tribute of respect to this eminent physician, on the day of 
his funeral, General Dix ordered out four companies of the Third 
New York Infantry, who escorted the remains to the railway 
dc'pot, preparatory to their removal to their last resting-place. 



Born. 



1 i> 1 1 . 

Died. 



Married or ReniarkB. 



No. Name. 

Pierre lluinpli- 
rey Jarvis, Feh. t:^, lH(Ki May 10,1874 June 30, 1838. 
:> cliildreii. 



UilSCENDANTS OK NATIIANIKI, TIIIUD OENEUATION. 



197 



No. Name. 

1926 Phebe. 

1937 Francos. 

1938 Mary Louise. 



Bom. 



Died. 



Married or ReinnrkB. 



lOlJi. 



Nathan'l Jarvis, Sept. 3«, 1805 
1 child. 
1929 .Tosepliine, 

1014. 



A. llolahan. N. Y. 
Apr. 4, 18:58. 



William Jarvis, Dec. 33, 1809 

* Eunice B. INIorgan. 

13 children. 

* Sarah Eloisa, Jan. 18, 1839 May 9, 1848 
19:K) Jean'ttc White, Feb., 1844 

1931 James Moigan, Sept., 184(i Nov. 7, 1878, to Ann 

F. Carpenter, 

1982 Eunice Morgan, Mch. , 1848 Dec. 20, 18(56, to S. R. 

Sherwood. 

1933 Nathan Sturgcs, Dec. , 1849 

1934Eloiaa, Feb., 1853 



1935 E'.i/abeth, 



Mch. 



1936 Mary Frances, Nov. , 

* Edmund Allen, Feb., 

* Rebecca, Mch. , 
19;i7 Alice Maud, Jan., 



1854 Nov. 37, 1878, to John 

Albiirtis. 
1856 

1858 Apr. 32, 1858 

1859 Dead. 
1863 



*Susann'hPcnn, Nov., 1867 Jan. 37, 1868 

10 1 -r. 

Benj. IT. Jarvis, Jan. 10, 1818 Apr. 39, 1858 Dec. 24, 1846. 
'5 childreu. 
1.938 Benja.iim. 
19^9 Cordelia. 
1940 Mary. 



*The above names were received after all tlii' records had been num- 
bered. « 



'/ , '. 



t > 



?^ 




198 



DKftCKNDANTH OF MOSES — HKCOND OENKHATION. 



I 



I 



t 



DESCENDANTS OF MOSES JARVIS. 
IsT Generation. 

No. Name. Bom. Died. Married or Roinarks. 

1941 Moses Jiirvis,' Nov. 37, 1749 Feb. 11, 1823 Mch. 29, 1773. 
1943 Phd'lH' Wicks, Oct. 11,1751 J.iri. 14,1814 

11 cliikircn. 
1943 Mat ilcla Jane, Dec. 25, 1773 June 38, 1801 Nov., 1799, to John 

lloss. 
April 4, 1774 June 33, 1852 Sept. 20, 1796; Jan. 39, 

1808; April 17, 1817. 
Feb. 11, 1775 Feb. 14, 1776 
May 18, 1777 April 30, 1844 Apr. 33, 1803; Auff.l8, 

181o. 
Nov. 18, 1779 Aug. 29, 1857 July 5, 1807. 
Jan. 27, 1783 Aug. 35, 1849 Oct. ;31, 1799, to Mat- 
thias Lull. 
Feb. 4, 1784 Sept. 2, 1839 May 17, 1808, to Moses 

Roff. 

1950 Joseph Wicks, Mch. 13, 1786 Oct. 4,1810 

1951 Elizabeth 2(1, Aug. 5, 1788 Aug. 31, 1789 

1952 Ilervey, Nov. 1, 1790 Sept. 3, 1792 

1953 Eli/abeth 3(1, April 5, 1792 Jan. 21,1848 Joseph Falconer. 

2d wife. 

1954 Mary Bears, Nov. 20, 1815; widow, 

sister of first wife. 



1944 James, 

1945 Elizabeth, 

1946 Moses, Jr., 

1947 Richard,^ 

1948 Mary, 

1949 Phoebe, 



2d Genkhation. 
1044. 



No. Name. Born. Died. Married or Remarks. 

Fames Jarvis, April 4, 1774 June 32, 1852 Sept. 26, 1796. 

1955 iJetsey Mott, April 25, 1770 May 29, 1803 

1 child. 

1956 Phd'be, Sept. 3, 1799 

3d wife. 

1957 Elizabeth Smith, July 37. 1815 Jan. 39, 1803. 

10 children. 

1958 Caroline, Nov. 12, 1803 Mch. 33, 1805 

1959 Caroline Eliza, May 7,1805 Aug. 14, 1873 
19(i0 Amelia Ann, May 33, 1806 

1961 James, Dec. 13, 1807 Oct. 23, 1846 

' 1778, Moses Jarvis .shot a Ilessian from his window. 
^Ist wife, Sally i{ose; 3d wife. Widow Koll. 



i 



I)E8CKNl)ANTrt OK M()HK8 — TJIIHD OKNKKATION. 



1!)!) 



No. Name. Born. Died. Miirrlod or Romarks. 

1!)63 Win. Alfred, Mcb. 39, 1801) July 35, 181 1 

1903 Ali^'non Syd'y, July 4, 1810 

1904 Anirdiim, July ;50, 1811 

l»(i5 (ieoige Wni.. Oct. 4,1813 July 17,1853 

1906 Ellzuboth, April 30. 1814 May 3, 1840 

1967 Jos. Ethvard, May 1, 1815 April 11, 1800 

3d wife. 

1968 Anna Cook, Feb. 8,1853 Apr. 17, 1817; widow. 

3 (bildreu. 

l!)(i!) Kob'l .Milucr, Sept. 14, 1818 Oct. 33, 1839 

1970 lAIoscs Ricb'd, Jan. 33, 1834 Feb. 7, 1830 

1 04<*. 

Moses Jurvis, 
Jr., May 18, 1777 April 31, 1844 April 33, 1803. 

1971 Maiy Brown, June 17, 1783 Oct. 15, 1811 

4 cbildrcn. 

1973 Matil.Mebit'bel,Sept. 9, 1803 July 11, 1850 Mcb. 17, 1831, to Piatt 

L. Wicks. 
1973 Jlary Wicks, Oct. 5, 1805 1803 Nov. 1, 1830, to Major 

Cook. 
i Nov. 10, 1831. 
"/ Oct. 33, 1844. 
1975 Jos. Wicks, Oct. 17, 1810 Sept. 18, 1843 

3d wile. 
1970 Ilan'b Fowler, June 31, 1785 Jan. 11, 1830 Aug. 18, 1813. 
3 cbildren. 

1977 Ilan'b Fowler, Jan. 13,1810 Dec. 13, 1844 June 39, 1841, to Wm. 

W. Clark. 

1978 Elizabetb, June 38, 1817 June 30, 1801 

3d wife. 

1979 Mary Fowler, Sept. 11, 1780 Dec. 8, 1800 Mcb. 34, 1831. 

1 cbild. 

1980 Pbujbe Deborah, Apr.25, 1833 July 13, 1833 



1974 Moses West,' Oct. 10,1807 






No. Name. 

Algernon S. 

Jarvis, July 4, 1810 

1981 Natbalia Pearce,* 

1 cbild. 
1983 Helen Pearce, Feb. 7, 1875 



3n Genekation. 

ioe3. 

Born. Died. 



Married or Remarlis. 



Feb. 10, 1870. 



' 1st wife, Susan Ann Crispin; 2d Avife, Frances F. Waters. 

•' Miss Pearce was tbe daugbter of Nutbaniel Pearce, of ^larylaud. 



200 



DKSOKNDANTB OK NATIIANIKI, 



KOONI) OKNKKATION. 



DESCENDANTS OF NATHANIEL JARVIS. 

In the interesting and admirabio "History of the Life and 'I'imes 
of William Jarvis, better known as Consul Jarvis, of Vermont," 
written by his daughter, Mrs. Mary Popperrell Si)arhawk Ciitts, 
we learn that the first settlers of their branch by the name of 
Jarvis in tliis country was Capt. Nathaniel Jarvis, who was born 
in "Wales, and had commanded a ship, for several years, between 
Bristol, England, and the Lsland of Jamaica. 

In the latter place he married the widow of a rich planter, gave 
up his seafaring life, came to Huston in IGOS (some traditions say 
in 1654) with his wife, settled there, and became a prosp(;rous mer- 
chant and inducntial citizen. Not long after this, two of his 
brothers came from England, and tradition .says that one of them 
went to Hartford, Conn.,' and the other to Concord, Mas; 

It is believed that John Jarvis, who married Rebecca Parkman, 
was his son. and we now ))rocccd to give their record, and those of 
the families descended frcnn them, in as complete form as we have 
been able to obtain them. 



No. Name. 

1988 Nathiinicl Jarvis 

1 child. 
1984 John Jarvis. 



DESCENDANTS OF NATHA^^IEL. 
IsT Generation. 

Born, Died. Married or Rcmarli!". 



Sept. 18, 1001. 



No. Name. 

John Jiirvi.s,-' 
1985 Rebecca Parkman, 

11 cliiUlrcn. 
1980 John, 



3d Generation. 

Born. Died. 



1062 



Mnrriod or Ucniark» 
Sept. 18. 1001. 



1 This may have been Stephen, who appeared in IIunU)igton, L. I., 
in 1001. 
'^ Will dated Jan. 19, 1688; admitted to Probate March 4, 1089. 



No. Name. 

1987 Elias. 
HWH Niclioliis. 
li»8)) James. 
liHtO William, 
1»!»1 Natliaiiii'l, 
1!)!I2 licbccca, 
l!»i»:! Saimicl, 
l!»y4 Mary, 

WW, l{<'lK'((a, 
li)!)r; Ahi-rail, 



DK8CENDANT8 OF NATHANIKI, — TiriKI) OKNKUATION. 201 

Dluil, Married or Honinrki*. 

younf?. Baptized ICOO. 



Bom. 

Jan. i!i, \mn 



Aug. 10, 106(1 

May 25, 1070 Doc. l.'J, 17.'W Sept. 28. 1601. 
April 17, 1072 
1074 
April 17, 1077 Jan. 20, 1000. Richard 

Collitr. 
Jan. 27, 1670 
Sept. 2. 1684 Dec. 4, 1718, Jno. Biss. 



3d Grnekation. 

No. Name. Born. Died. 

JobnJarvis,' 1662 

1997 Mary Waters, Aug. 28, 1667 



Married or Remarks. 

1738 Dau. Sampson and Re- 
becca. 



6 children. 
1998 John, 
1990 Sanii)son,'- 

2000 John, 

2001 Hcbecca, 

2002 W'illiani, 

2003 Mary, 



May 16, 1087 
Jan. 0, 1689 
Feb. 14, 1692 
Aug. 23, 1695 
Sept. 14, 1678 
Oct. 17, 1704 



Mr. Gooding. 

Mary . 

Sept. 30, 1731, Thos. 
Brown. 



Elias .Iarvis,8 .Tan. 13, 1063 

2004 Margaict. 

2 children. 

2005 Margaret, Mch. 24, 1691 

2006 Elias. Jan. 13, 1693 



1757 






i 



1 . , '-i 



Aug. 23, 1715. 



1 1>1>0. 

William. lai-vis, Aug. 10, 1666 

2007 Mary. 

2 cbildreu. 

2008 Mary, July 5, 168() 

2009 Sarah, Mch. 30, 1689 

2d wife. 



1 Will dated March 10, 173§; admitted to Probate Dec. 20, 1736. 
-Married Mary Atwood; 2 sons — John, born Nov. 8, 1715; William, 
born 1728. 
* Property adinin'stered May 23, 1695; inventory, Aug. 22, 1695. 
•26 



202 DKSCKN HANTS iiK XATIfAMKl. FdlUTII OKNKIIATION. 

Bom. Died. Murrlod or Rcinnrki*. 



No. Nniui'. 

SOtO Kli/.al)('lli. 
I cliild. 
2011 RelM-ccii. 



Miiv 32, 1«04 



I i*U 1 . 

Niiliri .Iiirvis. iMiiy 2'>. ItlTO Dec. i;i, 17:!K 

2012 Kli/.th Suiter. Oct. ((, 1071 Auj?. VA, 1700 Sept. 28, 1091. 
4 cliililrcn. 

Nov. 0, KIO:; May 2;{, 1723. 

.July 21, 1(100 EbiiiK'Zcr Allen. 

Dec. 11,1701 Alexander Parkmim. 



2014 Natlianiel, 
201.5 Klizulielli. 
201(( Kehee 

2017 William,' 

2(1 wife. 

2018 Eliz. Trevet,' 

1 ehild. 
2010 I.eoiiiinl, May 7, 1710 Sept. :50, I7(i0 



1078 Fel). V.]. 1700 .luly HI, 1713. 



No. Name. Born. 

EliasJarvis, Jr.,.Tan. 13, 1G93 



4tII (tKNKUATION. 

Died. 



2020 

2021 
2022 
2023 
2024 
202.') 



Mary Sunderland, 

.5 eliildren. 

Mary, May 10, 1722 

p:iia"s,3 .Tidy 23, 1724 

John, May 25, 1726 

Marfiaret,' ()<t. 18, 1729 

Ed\vard,(C'apt.,)'',Jan. 22, 1731 Feb 



Sept. 20, 1748 



1793 



Married or Remarks. 
An.!?. 23, 1715, Will, 
,Iulv 8,17.5.5. 



?iO 1 t. 



} *' 




NatlmnielJarvis.Nov. 0, Kii):) 
2020 Abi.u^ail Atkins, 
5 eliildren. 

2027 Abipiil, Mcb. 23. 1724 

2028 Eli/.abetb, Nov. 1.5, 1730 



Shipwright. 
May 23, 1723. 



1742 



' Died before his father. Left William and Mary, and one son, who died 
three days after bis mother, Auir. Kt, 1700. 

-Maiden name sujiposed to have been Peabody. 
^Ship-ehandler. Married, 1st, Mary Avis, 2d, Deliverance Atkins. 
■• Married Daniel Parker; bad son. Chief Jusliee Isaac Parker. 
^Married Katharine Ilammet: son, Edward, Administrator. 



DKf«(!KNDANTH OK NATII.WIKI, — KIKTII GKN 



No. 



Name. 



Biti'ii. 



DilMl. 



2()'2Jl Miurv, 



2();t(l Niilliiuiii'l. 
'JOai Til' iniLs. 



Apr. lit. nait Scpl. l.s(K) Sii 

Dcr. Jj.'i. 17ai Nov. IHl'J 
May H, 17;{4 ITU'i 



Leonard. Iiirvis, May 7, 171(5 S.-pl. W, 1770 M( 



a083 Susan ("ornly. 

I cliild. 
20iY>) Susan, 

'.M wile. 
3034 Haiah Cliurrli. 



!) cliildivn. 
20;t() Lfonard, 
20;57 Hlizaltelli, 
20;58 Sam'KJardincr, 



- ■■■■- 1 




1 


KKATION. 'JO.'l 






lurli'il or Ki'MiiirkR. 
iiKlf, loll ills iii'irs 

)|i;{.700.r)0. 






iptizcd liy Kcv.Hain 
uel Maliicr. 




1 


(M'clianI in Hoston. 
i.r. 1'.'. 17;tit. 




i 



LtMinanl Bradford. 



1721 Dec. 2;{, 178i) Int. of M., Xw^. 5, 

IMl. 



May 2il, 1743 Nov. 38, 18l;{ Nov. a, 1770. 



1748 May «, 1700 
1745 Auk. 



tslH Au!-. 0. 1773.1786. 



20;UM'harl(s, M.U., Oct. 30,1748 Nov. l.'), 1M07 



3040 Nathaniel. 

3041 Sarah, 

3043 Mary Church, 
204U Benjamin, 



Sept. 



IHOl 



im. 



Mch. 18;!8 Joseph Hussell. 
, 1830 
1810 Eli/a Hall of DorchcH- 
tcr. Merchant. 



3044 Phil 



'P. 



Nov. i;{, 1703 Dec. 3. 1831 Nov. 17, 1780. 



5tII Gl-'.NKKATTON. 

No. Name. " Born. Died. 

JSfathan'l.Iarvi.s.iDcc. 35, 1731 Nov. 9,1813 
2045 Eliz'th Taintor, 1749 June 7, 1794 

7 children. 
3040 Elizabeth, Feb. 15, 1708 



3047 Mary, 



AuL^ 35, 1709 



3048 Reb. Parkman, Dec. 13, 1771 

3049 Nathaniel, Feb. 30, 1774 Mch. 20, 1779 

3050 Susanna,' May 13, 1770 

2051 Leonard, Jan. 7, 1779 Nov. 16, 1845 

3052 Abigail Atkins, Oct. 17, 1783 



Marriucl or Keiniirks. 
Dec. 18, 1700. 



Jacob Wyeth of 
Fre.shpond. 

Phincas Stone, 1 
daughter, Eliza. 



jMary Cogswell. 
June 38, 1804. Sol. 
K. Livonnore. 



' Moved from Boston to Can'.bridge, I7.">5. 

-Married in Augusta, Me., Rev. Daniel Kendall of llubbardstown. 




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204 



DESCENDANTS OF NATHANIEL — FIFTH GENERATION. 




Leonard Jarvis, • 
Of Baltimore, was born in Cambridge, January 7, 1779, and 
entered college at a very early age, having been graduated in 1797. 

For ten years he followed maritime pursuits, and was master 
of a vessel in the India trade, making successful voyages. He 
afterwards quit his nautical life, became a merchant, and went into 
partnership with Mr. Asaph Hone. Their place of business was 
at the corner of Court and Washington streets, Boston. This firm 
continued in business for six years. 

During the war of 1812, Mr. Jarvis disposed of his interest in the 
business, residing in Cambridge till the close of the war, when he 
removed to Baltimore for the benefit of a milder climate. Here 
he was highly successful in business, and became wealthy, sustain- 
ing a fair and honorable name in all the relations of life. 

He died from paralysis, at his residence in Baltimore. Nov. 16, 
1845, after a sickness of three years. He lingered eight days after 
the last shock, which rendered him speechless. 

Mr. Jarvis left a large estate, giving one-half, by will, of '* The 
Melange Edifice," to Harvard College, after the death of hib widow. 
The other half of the same edifice he gave to several charitable socie- 
ties in Baitimoi'e. The remainder of his wealth, excepting some 
bequests, he left, after the death of his widow, to his and her rela- 
tives, each having twelve nephews and nieces. 

Mr. Jarvis married in 1806 or 7 Miss Mary Coggswell of Little- 
ton. They had no children. 

The house in which Mr. Jarvis was born is still standing on the 
right-hand of the road to West Cambridge, between the Common and 
Porter's. It has been in the possession of the family for a hundred 
years, and is occupied by two of his sisters, who still retain the wide 
lands around it, being part of the estate purchased by their father, 
Nathaniel Jarvis, who removed, when quite young, from Boston to 
Cambridge, and made this house his residence. 



?i03l 



No. Name. Born. 

Thomas Jarvis, May 8, 1734 

2053 Lydia Coolidge. 

2 children. 

2054 Elizabeth, Aug. 30, 1757 

2055 Thomas,' Sept. 16, 1759 



Died. 



Married or Remarke. 



1792 



1 Had a son Benjamin, who married Mary Porter of Roxbury. They 
had one son, Wm. Porter Jarvis, and one daughter, who married Dr. C. 
M. Weld. 



DESCENDANTS OF NATHANIEL FIFTH OENERATION. 



205 



No. Name. Born. Died. 

LeonardJarvis.'May 29, 1742 Nov. 28, 1813 
2056 Sarah Scott, May 31, 1753 1836 

12 children. 

Oct. 19, 1781 
Nov. 3, 1782 
Oct. 12, 1783 



2057 Leonard, « 

2058 Betsey Stelle, 3 

2059 Charles. 



Oct. 18, 1854 

Apr. 12, 1870 

1803 



2060 Edward, 

2061 Sarah Russell, Mch. 2, 1786 

2062 Charles, Feb. 16, 1788 

2063 Edward Scott, / Sept. 8, 1790 

2064 Susan Gibbs, f Sept. 8,1790 

2065 Francis Roach, Mar. 9, 1792 

2066 Andr'wSpooner,Dec. 4, 1793 

2067 Com. Jos. Rus- 

sell, May 3, 1795 

2068 Benjamin, Dec. 9, 1796 



Mch. 1860 

Apr. 4, 1865 
Dec. 23, 1868 
Feb. 8, 1869 

Nov. 18, 1799 

Aug. 18, 1869 



Married or Remarks. 
Nov. 3, 1776. 
Of Newport. 



Dec. 25, 1804. 
Eliza. Two sons in 
Castine. 

Saml. K. Whiting,Ill. 
Dec. 15, 1820. 
Sept. 20, 1818. 



1828. June 17. 1834. 



Samuel Gardner 
Jarvis, 

2069 Susan'h Pierce. 

5 children. 

2070 Joseph, 

2071 Charles. 

2072 Leonard. M.D., Jan. 

2073 Chas. Church, 

2074 Susan Pierce,* 

2d wife. 

2075 Prudence Davis. 

3 children. 

2076 Mary Sparhawk, 

2077 Russell, 

2078 Helen, 



S03S. 

1745 Aug. 1818 Merchant in Boston. 
1782 Aug. 6, 1872. 



i, 1774 Feb. 9, 1848 

1777 1792 

1778 T>ec. I860 



Died young. 
Died young. 



1799 1786. 

1827 
1790 July 1853 

1834 Guy Hunter. 



1 Merchant, in Boston; Treasurer of Commonwealth. Lived in Cam- 
bridge. 1790-1798. 

» MiirriedMary Green, Boston. Graduate Harvard. Twice M. C. from 
Maine. Navy Agt., Mass. 

" Married James Carr, Geneva, 111. 2 daughters. 

* John Jeffrey of Scotland. Editor Ediiiburgh Review. 






206 



DB^SCKNDANTS OF NATHANIEL FIFTH GENERATION. 



S030. 

No. Name. Bom. Died. Married or Reraarkf . 

Charles Jarvis.i Oct. 36, 1748 Nov. 15, 1807 

2079 Mary Clapham. 

1 child. 

2080 William, Feb. 4, 1770 Oct. 21, 1859 Mch. 1808. 

2d wife. 

2081 Mary Pepperrell 

Sparhawk. 

Doctor Charles Jarvis 

Was a distinguished physician and surgeon, a profound and 
sagacious statesman, and a brilliant orator. The friend and asso- 
ciate of Hancock, Adams, and Jefferson, he was alike illustrious in 
both his private and public character. He was devoted to the wel- 
fare and honor of his country, and took an active part in the coun- 
cils of those distinguished men, whose wisdom and patriotism, 
under the guidance of an over-ruling Providence, shaped the desti- 
nies of the Colonies during the Revolutionary struggle for Amer- 
ican independence. 

Dr. Jarvis was born in 1748, and died at the age of 59. His 
grandfather emigrated from Wales, and became a merchant in 
Boston. He was the son of Leonard Jarvis and Sarah Church, 
who was the daughter of Sheriff Church, and granddaughter of 
Colonel Benjamin Church of Bristol. 

At an early age, the Doctor developed those rare qualities of 
mind and heart which endeared him to all who knew him. Mag- 
nanimity, sincerity, and discretion marked his youthful character. 
His understanding was strong, his imagination ardent and refined. 
Liberally educated, his inborn habits of thinking were thus 
strengthened, and his influence and usefulness more thoroughly 
felt in the community. On his return from England, where he 
passed considerable time in completing his education in medical 
science, he began to discover a more than ordinary concern for the 
welfare and happiness of his fellow men. 

An enemy to tyranny and superstition, he studied the principles 
of civil liberty, and it was the wish of his heart to see them firmly 
established in his native land, and his country free from those 
calamities which had so often afflicted humanity. This induced 
him to abandon the most flattering prospects, at the commencement 

^ Del. Constitutional Convention, 1788, and one of the State Legislature 
until 1796. 






DESCENDANTS OP NATHAVtut or™. 

JNATHAMEL— FIFTH GENERATION. 207 

hs influence fltifl fai^^f • ^^'^'^'"^''^"-ourt. The recollection of 

than his powers of e Ln.nnJ j I°y»"6n- His integrity, more 
estimatio' of his nouZ ' '" '"'" ■•''»P''="'»le, even in the 

and wrong in everv t™ "'^"T' J""'"™*", tatolerance, 

disposition. BeneTo:„ee'ard1 '""' '° *^ ^™*"''^ °' ^^ 

of his heart. ''"""'°''"'" ""-^ '■■•"""""y ™re the reigning virtues 

thoi"™;r„r'nr:h'''r:^^'' »!'^--'"">-'- ">« recanof 

As a physician, he was enlightened skilfni i,-i. i 
In his domp«f,-r. i,^- I, , w^^^nea, siaitul, liberal, and humane. 

smmsm 

order, and he was ^esirrrame'lLam:^.:;::^ .^f f 

snouid equally secure the rio-hts of all if u^ , 

his demands were moderatf A thn; J. .' ''""'°^' "^ ^^"^^' 
for other, for himsel iflooked ^^^^^^^^^ thV" . T' ''''''''' ' 
lived and died an honest man ' ' "^^''''^" "' ^^^^'^"^ 



208 



DESCENDANTS OF NATHANIEL FIiiTH GENERATION. 







S040. 




No. Name. 


Born. 


Died. 


Married or Remarks. 


Nathaniel Jarvia, 




Sept., 


1801 Capt. Revol. Army 


3 children. 








2083 Hon. Wm. C. 






1836 Lawyer. 


3084 Susan. > 









The Hon. William C. Jakvis 

Was born in or near Boston, and was admitted to the bar in Suf- 
folk Co., in 1811. He moved to Pittsfield, Mass., in 1815, and 
represented that town in the Legislatures of 1821 '22, '23, and '24. 
Soon afterwards, he removed to Woburn, and was made director 
of the State prison. He was also one of the custom-house officers, 
but, on the election of General Jackson to the presidency, was 
removed. He was subsequently elected senator from Essex Co., 
and representative of the town. He was Speaker of the House of 
Representatives, twice while a representative from Pittsfield, and 
once from Woburn. 

In 1827, he was elected State Treasurer, but declined the honor. 
He was twice a candidate for Congress. 

lu 1821, he published a very creditable volume on political econ- 
omy, entitled " The Republic," copies of which are in the Berkshire 
AthsBueum. 

Mr. Jarvis was a man of line talents, in form and stature noble 
and commanding, with a genial and social nature. His manners 
were elegant, and his conversation rich and polished, abounding 
in humor and anecdote, which made him a favorite in society, 
beloved and cherished by his friends. He died suddenly in 
Weathersfield, Vt., leaving an afflicted wife to mourn his loss. 



Philip .Jarvis, 

3085 Ann Head, 

7 children. 

3086 John Head, 

3087 Mary Ann, 

3088 Jeanette, 

3089 Henry, 

2090 Pliilip, 

2091 Nancy Head, 

3092 Frederick, 

1 Married M. D 



Nov. 13, 1763 Dec. 3, 
Aug. 17, 1764 Dec. 30, 



1831 Nov. 17, 1786. 
1848 



Dec. 3, 1787 Jan. 18, 
May 13, 1789 Aug. 33, 



Mch. 30, 1793 May 8, 
June 8, 1794 Feb. 3, 
May 10, 1796 Nov. 37, 



1850 

1816 Sept. 36, 1806, Bnid- 

shaw Hall. 
May 14, 1790 Mch. 22, 1873 Jan. 29, 1805, Benj. 

Hooke. 
1839 Mch. 10, 1814. 
1807 
1837 Jas. Milliken, b. 1793, 

d. June 22, 1849. 
1872 Feb. 11, 1849. 



Sept. 28, 1798 Oct. 11, 
Gushing of Providence; 4 sons and 1 daughter. 



DKSCENDANT8 OF NATHavii-, 

"*- NATHANIKL—siXTH GENKRATION. 209 

6th Genekation. 

No. Name. ^^^^ 

Charles Jarvis, ' Feb 16 17Hu a ^'^!'" Carried or Remarks 

2096 Elizabeth Black.Peb I' ml 

2097 Edward, Mch 13 829 

2098 Ann Frances ' ^^'^ 

^''^'■'■' Oct 15 1831 

2099Cha.s jurvi... j^jy 7' jgg^ Everard F. Greeley. 

2 0^ToT«f^' •^""- 2«'1836 
2 03 To 'w''' ^"•'''- "' 1839 

210J AndVSpooner/Doc. 3.1844 

Sept. 17, 1870. 

Edward Scott 

2104 Elirsparhawk ^'^'' ^' ^^^'^ ^'"- ^^' ^^^^ Sept. 20, 1818. 

Spooner,- Nov. 25, 1799 
9 children. 

2105 /.eonard Fitz * 

2107 And-wSpoone'r.Ma'- 18'' S '""^ ^' ^^^^ 

.OJ Mary Church, Nov. 25, 1830 
jllO barah Leonard. Oct. 12, 1832 
2111 Howard Sand- 

nv^wlTlr. Mch. 28. 1834 

Hubbard, Nov., I839 

* Married Martha Eaton 1 Pl.iW ni 

B,o«.,u,i for ,.„,„,;. e™ j'J,'"""' ""«» V"" Cru. and Ci.j- of MexS 
27 



210 



DESCENDANTS OP NATHANIEI- — SIXTH GENERATION. 



Bora. Died. 



Marriod or Kemarks. 



No. Name. 

(Jom. .Toscph 
Russell Jarvis, May 3, 1795 Aug. 12, 1809 1838. 
8114 Sarah Leonard 

Bradford, 1804 Oct. 11, 1833 

3 children. 
2115 Leonard Brad- 
ford, 0(1. 13. 1330 Nov., 1835 

3116 Francis Carr, Sept. 11, 1833 Dec. 25, 1873. 

3d wife. 

3117 Mary Filsbury 

Otis, June 17, 1834. D. of 

Jos. Otis, Boston. 
6 children. 

3118 Susan Gibbs, Aug. 31, 1835 Aug. 15, 1861 

3119 Jos. Russell, > Nov. 9, 1837 April 0, 1869. 
3130Mary Hubbard, Apr. 31, 2 840 Oct. 14,1841 

3121 Josephine, Oct. 14, 1841 

3133 James Otis, Sept. 39, 1843 Apr., 1851 

3133 Wm. Mosher, Oct. 7,1847 Oct., 1876 

Commodore Joseph R. Jarvis 

"Was born in Massachusetts, May 3, 179.5, and entered the Navy 
in 1812, when he was sent to the Lakes, and served under Mac- 
Donough. 

He was commissioned as Lieutenant, March 2S, 1820; on the 
Frigate Constellation, West India Squadron, 1827; Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1829; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1837; commis- 
sioned as Commandant, September 8, 1841; commanding Brig 
Lawrence, 1845; commanding Sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 
1846; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1851; commissioned as Cap- 
tain, May 24, 1855; commanding Sloop Savannah, Home Squad- 
ron, 1858-1860; commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862. 

When in command of the Savannah, he captui'ed two Mexican 
steamers, and lodged, for a month, at his own expense, two Amer- 
ican families who sought shelter on board his vessel. A letter is 
in existence, written to him by one of the Mexican generals, 
requesting that his sons, two young boys, who were on board one 
of the steamers, might be sent to their mother. To this the Com- 
modore replied that, though deeply sympathizing with the father's 
feelings, he felt compelled to follow the course which his duty as 
an officer of the United States required. 

» Fruit farmer, Cobden, 111. Married Jennie C. Holcomb of Galesburgh. 



' 



I>E801CNDANT8 OP NATHAVTITT oi-ro-r, „ 

iNAiHANIRI, — srXTir OENKRATrON. 211 



Bom. 



No. Name. 

Dr. Leonard 
Jarvis. j„„ 

3124 Clarissa Draper. 
6 children. 

2135 Susan Pierce, iqqq 

2136 Dr. Sam'l Gardner, 1816 
3187 Leonard, jgjg 
2138 Leonard 2d, Jan. 15, 1820 

2129 Russell. Jan. 8,1824 

2130 William. Oct.. 1827 



Died. 



Married or Remarks 



22, 1774 Feb. 9. 1848 



Oct. 30, 1848. 



1818 
1848 

1828 



Leonard Jarvis, M D 
Boston, aLd on be " ad^'I, ' jf ™'' "" ™'°<'"' P''>'»'«»» of 

farmer. H wasX 1/ T' ff "^ ""^'i"" and pracfcal 
principles o,rJstr/t:ai:?nut:' '"d *"T°"°"' '° «'^ "■" 

wa^ w!^ "not TrX^Nett '" "i"- '"'''"« "' "^ -°' ^^ 
extensive and succ«ri 1 , ^ampslnre and Vermont, for his 

ware well knowTamon ' Z , "' " """'■g'™-- His flocks 

quality, and UswrL rr", . """ "■'"^' ""^ »!-*■■ 
i..g maLnfactuilr '' '"«" ''"P"""'™ """g ""> lead- 

Doctor Jarvis was distinguished for onerKV enterori- .„^ 
»evera„ce. and his talents wonld have earnS' foThtrt^rn 



212 



DK8CKNDANTS OF NATHANIKL — SIXTH GENERATION. 



in any profession. He was particularly successful in surgery, as 
he was not only a thonnigli anatomist, but was aided by great 
mechanical ingenuity and force of will. Although of a highly- 
wrought temperament, ho exhibited, in performing difficult opera- 
tions, a degree of coolness, self-possession, and resolution -equal to 
any emergency. 

His literary acquirements were highly respectable. He was a 
good classical scholar, an extensive reader of English and French 
literature, speaking French with great fluency and purity of idiom 
and accent. He encouraged talent in the young, especially in the 
professions. He was hospitable, liberal, and generous, and his 
attachments were strong and enduring. In religious belief he was 
a Unitarian, but entirely free from prejudice. 

In person, he was of middle height, thin, muscular, and active. 
His complexion, fair; eyes, blue; and hair, fine, straight, and 
chestnut color. He was very temperate, and, through most of his 
life, rather abstemious. He was a lineal descendant of Nathaniel 
Javvis of Boston, who married Elizabeth Peabody of Maine. 

He possessed a handsome ancient seal, with the family coat-of- 
arms engraved on it, and a valuable sword presented to him by 
Mrs. Dr. Charles Jarvis, who was granddaughter to Sir William 
Pepperell. This sword was presented by George the 'J'hird to Sir 
William for his gallant services in the siege of Louisburgh, which 
he took from the Frencli. 

Mr. Jarvis died at Claremont, N. H.,' February 9, 1848, in the 
seventy-fourth year of his age. 



No. Name. 

Russel Jarvis, 

2131 Caroline Dana, 

1 child. 

2132 Caroline. 

2d wife. 

2133 Eliza Cordi.s.' 



SO'7"7'. 

Born. Died. Married or Rr .narks. 

1790 July, 1853 
1822 



'Burned, with two daughters, on hoard steamer "Lexington," Long 
Island Sound. 









'^ /^>^^^^ 



JL. 



.'«>rsK>. 



vk. M»- 
2VM Kli/.. iiiirtlfit, !''• 



"i.J.i Ami ■ ■ 
artO Maj. . 



"1*4 i^i). ;' 



0, tHI^ .lul 



• I 



M: !.-ti. ISiC-i 



84''- :• '-^'M. 

iS Ft!?. 



H<>f»tem?^(i, ;-! I 



I 

i 



'cat. 



!if;/n:i!; 





^mt 



J 







/ 



DESCENDANTS OF NATHANIRI SIXTH GENERATION. 



213 



S080. 



No. Name. Born. 

Consul William 

Jiirvis, Fob. 4, 1770 

31 !M Mary Poppcrrcll 

Spaiiiawk,' 

2 children. 

2135 Mary Peppcrrell 

Sparhawk, May 21, 1809 

2136 Eliz. Bartlett, Feb. 

2d wife. 

2137 Anne Bailey Bartlett. 

10 children. 

2138 Ann Eliza,-' .luue 30, 1818 

2139 Harriet Bartlett, Feb. 8, 1830 
3140 Major Charles 

.larvis.s Aug. 21, 1821 

2141 William, Mc^i. 9, 1823 

2142 Thos.JelTersou, Sept. 4, 1824 

3143 Margaret, fJuly 20, 1826 

3144 Sarah, ( July 20, 182(i 

2145 Katharine, Mcii. 16, 1830 

2146 Kath. Leonard, Dec. 25, 1833 

2147 Louise Bailey. May 29, 1835 



Died. 
Oct. 21, 1859 



Married or Remarks. 



1811 July, 1848 



March, 1808. 



Sept. 9. 1829. 
Feb. 14, 1833. 



July 


17, 1849 


September, 1844. 
August, 1843. 


Dec. 


1, 1803 




Aug. 


1825 




Jan. 


1, 1842 


■ 


July 


7. 1847 


Twin.s. 


July 


3, 1857 


Oct. 30, 1848. 


April 


, 1830 





July, I860. 



Hon. William Jakvi*?, 

Son of Dr. Charles Jarvis of Boston, was born in 1770. He was 
educated for a mercantile life, and became an active and success- 
ful merchant in Boston in the year 1791. 

The failure of a friend, for whom he had endorsed, compelled 
him to relinquish his position in Boston, and spend the following 
five years as sujiercargo, captain, and i)art owner of his ship. At 
the end of this period his active industry and mercantile skill had 
been crowne 1 with such success as to free him from pecuniary 
embarrassment. The e.xperience thus "oquired in mercantile and 
maritime affairs led to his appointment by President Jefferson as 
Consul and Chanjr to Lisbon. Here, by his characteristic energy, 
his remonstrances, and diplomatic sagacity, he succeeded in stop- 

' Married by Mr. Ilackley, American Consul at Cadiz ; again in Lisbon, 
by a Roman Catholic priest, as was the law in that country; again by a 
Protestant (tlergyman.— 3 rings. (Mrs. Cutts' "Biography.") 

•Married Hon. Sanmel Dinsmore of Keene; 2 children — William Jar- 
vis, Samuel. 

* Shot b)' a rebel from behind a tree, near Newport barracks. 





214 



DESCRNPANTS OF NATHANIEL SIXTH OENKRATION. 



S 



I 



ping the impressment of American seamen by English authority; 
in securing the admission of flour with small duties, and in chang- 
ing the quarantine regulation for American ships from six weeks' 
detention to three days. 

The effect of these exertions on our commerce at the commence- 
ment of the Peninsular War, was of incalculable benefit. It gave 
us the immense neutral trade of the contending armies, and the 
expense of the war made the sale of the celebrated Spanish flocks 
of sheep necessary, which were the most renowned in the world. 
Spain had been improving and perfecting the value of their flocks 
for a thousand years. Mr. Jarvis, at different times, sent to this 
country 3,500 of these sheep, which was a larger number than 
came to America from all other sources, and has been the means 
of adding untold millions to the agricultural wealth of the United 
States, and to its manufacturing industry. 

While in Lisbon, Mr. Jarvis met Lord St \'incent, who claimed 
relationsh p with him. as the following incident will show: '-Lord 
St. Vincent, hearing of Mr. Jarvis, sent to him and requested an 
interview, thinking there must be a connection between them. 
Accompanied by Commodore Campbell, he called upon the English 
Admiral, and was much pleased with his noble, gentlemanly bear- 
ing, and was struck by the resemblance between him and some of 
the Jarvis family, especially to his Uncle Leonard. The Admiral 
treated the Consul in the most friendly, pleasant manner, and said 
that when he entered the navy as a midshipman he had spelled his 
name Jarvis, but had been rallied by some of the officers for so 
doing, saying it was a corruption of tlie old Norman name Jervois, 
and they had induced him to change it; but he had no doubt they 
sprang from the same ancestors, in which opinion Mr. Jarvis fully 
coincided. The Admiral afterwards invited Commodore Campbell 
and Mr. Jarvis to dine with him. The Commodore accepted, but 
the Consul declined. He admired Lord St. Vincent, but he had 
maintained the most cordial intercourse with the French officers,' 
and as France and England were at variance, he disliked the 
appearance of dining in amity on board of one of His Majesty's 
ships of war. Tn addition to which, the impressment of American 
seamen had caused unceasing collision between him and the British 
navy, ever since he came to Lisbon. 



* Among these he was most intimate with Mr. Legoy, Junot's Private 
Secretary; Magendie, Commander-in-Cliief of the Navy; Count de Bour- 
mont, the sou of the Baron; Viomenil, etc., and they frequently dined 
with him. 



DESCENDANTS OF NATHANIEL — SIXTH QENEKATION. 



215 



eU 

rs,' 

the 

ty's 

lean 

Itiah 



ivate 
IJour- 
lined 



The following very handsome note from Sir John Jervis, ex- 
presses his regret: 

"Lord St. Vincent presents his compliments to Mr. Jarvis, and regrets 
exceedingly the cause which has deprived him of the honor of a visit, 
begging, at the same time, to assure Mr. Jarvis that, it will afford him the 
highest satisfaction to show every attention in his power to the representa- 
tive of the United States of America. 
" HiBEHNiA, 10th September, 1808." 

After remaining about tv/o months, Lord St. V'incent and his 
squadron left Lisbon. 

After a residence of nine years in Lisbon, Mr. Jarvis returned 
to this country, and in 1810 settled in Wethersfield Bow, on a 
large and beautiful tract of land. Here he attended to the instruc- 
tion of his children, securing for them the best teachers, and also 
devising the best plans for developing the agricultural and manu- 
facturing industries of the country. 

He wrote for the journals of the day, and corresponded with 
eminent statesmen from 1816 to 1836 on the subject of the tariff 
and other matters affecting the industrial interests of the country, 
and his opinions and suggestions were received with the greatest 
consideration. His information on all such topics was accurate 
and comprehensive, it was that of a statesman in a useful and 
practical form. His love of reading was great, his memory reten- 
tive, which made him a most instructive and cheerful companion. 
Plis reading was varied and extensive, embracing history, philoso- 
phy, politics, and belles-lettres. Few men so fully understood and 
accurately remembered the facts connected with the formation of 
our political parties, or who could give so intelligent and instruc- 
tive an account of them. To hear him was like sitting at the feet 
of some ancient chronicler. In his early life, he was of the Jeflfer- 
sonian school of politics, but, in later life, he was a bwliever in Mr. 
Clay and his policy. He never sought but declined office, however 
flattering, whenever solicited, but rather chose the enjoyments and 
attachments of home and the society of friends. 

The most remarkable trait in his character, and around which 
others seemed to cluster, or which gave prominence to them, was 
the force of his will, and, when once resolved, his inflexible deter- 
mination. In practical life this is a characteristic of all great men, 
and of all representative men in the leading professions. The 
force and power of a determined will is the great feature in all 
men of celebrity. 

Of his religious views and feelings he was never publicly com- 



m 

w 

Mm ' 



f 



216 



DE8«5ENDANT8 OF NATHANIEL HIXTH GENERATION. 



I- 



f 






I 



! If 



municative. Ho loved justice tempered with mercy, and felt a 
strong sympathy for the poor and oppressed. He expressed his 
strong convictions as to the necessity of religious ordinances for 
the well-being of society and the perpetuity of the institution of 
the Sabbath. However men may differ in political and religious 
sentiments, still, in the death of such a man as Mr. Jarvis, it is like 
the removal of a strong supporting column from the great temple 
that upholds the welfare of society. Vhe structure, to us, seems 
weakened, and we are the more called upon to double our diligence 
to see that no good be lost, and that no evil may spring '' into life 
when such depart from us."' 

Mrs. Mary F. Jarvis. 

This lady was the wife of the late Consul Jarvis, and was a most 
estimabl woman. She died in Havei'hill, at the age of 30 years, 
and the following tribute to her memory, by Joseph E. Sprague, 
Esq., who married her cousin. Miss P^liza Bartlett, and who was 
intimately acquainted with her, shows the loveliness and excellence 
of her character: 

••Perfectly unaffected and unassuming, she possessed an equa- 
nimity of mind which prosperity could not elate nor adversity 
depress. Benevolent in her nature, she was without a personal 
enemy. Regardless of herself, she ever sought to ameliorate the 
cares, sorrows, and misfortunes of her friends, and her sympathy 
and affection were devoted to their ease and comfort. She was 
fond of painting, belles-lettres, and the study of the languages, and 
her leisure hours were spent in thus improving and liberalizing 
her mind. Though greatly attached to reading, she never suffered 
it to interfere with her domestic avocations, but, without reluct- 
ance, cheerfully fulfilled every duty in whatever station she was 
placed. She was thoi'oughly read in the best English authors, 
which was a great source of delight and interest to the friends 
who surrounded her, but the study which most engrossed her 
attention was the religion of the Saviour. His precepts she dili- 
gently studied and obeyed, and His religion she early professed. 
She returned to her native country to put in practice the benevolent 
purposes of lier heart, but that Being whose ways are inscrutable 
to human eyes, removed her to a higher sphere — to a brighter and 
a better world. She awaited the hour of her approaching death 
with calmness and resignation, and as her life had been conspicuous 
for every Christian virtue, her last end was tranquil, peaceful, and 
serene." 



e-t 



DESCENDANTS OF NATHANIEL SIXTH GENERATION. 



21' 



Mrs. Ann Eliza Dinsmoke 

Was the daughter of the late Consul Jarvis, and was a woman of 
rare virtues and womanly graces. She was the sunshine of both 
her parental and husband's home, and the idol of her children. 
She was surrounded by a large circle of admiring friends, and her 
domestic enjoyments were unalloyed by worldly cares. 

During this happy season, and just after her husband's election 
as Governor, amid the festivities of that occasion, she was attacked 
with brain-fever. She immediately returned to Keene, where her 
parents, sisters, and friends hastened to her relief; but all their 
efforts were unavailing. She lived but two weeks after, when she 
died, leaving her husband and two sons in inconsolable grief. 

M. P. S. C. 

Major Charles Jarvis 

Was the eldest son of Consul William Jarvis, and was placed 
under the tuition of Solomon Foote, at nine years of age, at Cas- 
tleton, Vermont. Mr. Foote, in speaking of him, says, " He mani- 
fested early in life, those noble and manly qualities which distin 
guished him in maturer years." 

From Castleton, he went to Exeter Academy, N. H., where he 
applied himself so assiduously, that, at the age of fourteen he 
entered the Vt. University, then under the presidency of Rev. John 
Wheeler. He was the youngest member of his class, but by his 
manly character, and excellent scholarship, he won golden opinions 
from his teachers and classmates. Hon. Charles P. Marsh, his 
intimate friend, and college associate, says of him: "His college 
duties were ever seasonably and fully performed, and his acts and 
influence were ever on the side of order and rightful authority. 
He scorned a mean act, and was firm and decided in his religious 
sentiments." 

He was graduated in 1839, and immediately commenced the 
study of law in the office of Hon. Leverett Saltonstall and Judge 
Ward in Salem, and soon ingratiated himself into their esteem. 

He entered the Law School in Cambridge in 1840, and was a 
favorite and admirer of Judge Story, then a professor in that insti- 
tution, but he was suddenly called from Cambridge by the death 
of his only brother, William. This affliction added to his religious 
sensibilities, awakening his sympathies to an almost womanly ten- 
derness. 

Although fond of his profession, like a dutiful son, he gave 
28 



r 






218 



DESCENDANTS OF NATHANIKL SIXTH GENEKATION. 



up all to devote himself to his parents, taking the place of his 
deceised brother, to relieve his aged father from the weiglit of 
busmess and its cares, as well as ministering to his wants, at the 
same time improving every spare hour in the pursuit of his studies. 
His father died in 1859, when he devoted himself to his mother, 
and the settlement of his father's estate. 

In March, 1862, he felt it his duty to devote himself to the ser- 
vice of his country, in that time of its greatest need, and, although 
his resolve was a great trial to his mother and sisters, he declared 
"he would rather be a martyr for his country than remain at home 
in ease." He raised a company for the 9th Regiment, Vt. Volun- 
teers, and was chosen Captain. 

As it proved, his whole term of service was one of suflfering and 
self-sacrifice. By the treachery of Col. Miles, at Harper's Ferry, 
twelve regiments, including the Vermont 9th, were made prisoners, 
ar.d paroled in the strictest manner. They were ordered to Chicago, 
where they endured great suffering and privation, for want of good 
food and comfortable quarters, until they were removed to Fort 
Douglas. 

Captain Jarvis exerted himself to mitigate the sufferings and 
wants of his company. The Colonel was absent, in order to 
effect an exchange, and the Lieutenant-Colonel being sick, placed 
the command of the camp under Mr. Jarvis, who was untir- 
ing in his efforts to relieve the sick, clieer and encourage the de- 
spondent, and maintain the necessary discipline. Six New York 
regiments were exchanged early in the winter, but the 9th Vt. was 
not exchanged until March. They were detained till June, when 
they were ordered to Yurktown, Va. In July, Capt. Jarvis, now 
Major, was sent North, when he visited his mother and sisters, but 
his stay was brief, as he was soon ordered to Boston Harbor to 
take charge of Vermont conscripts. His mother and sisters accom- 
panied him. 

The following extracts from a letter to his sister, Mrs. Mary P. S. 
Cutts, on the death of a favorite son, show the Christian character 
and tender sympathy of this noble soldier. 

"My Deak Sister: 

" My heart aches when I try to realize that so manly, so ingenuous and 
promising a youth, just ripening into manhood, and winning such favor 
from all who knew him, is no more on earth. If so trying to me, then iiow 
must it be to you, my dear sister, and his father, and to you all. 

"The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away, and still, though with 



DESCENDANTS OF NATTIANIEI. — SIXTH OENERATFON. 



219 



r 

10 



Ith 



broken hearts, let us join with His ancient servant, iuownin<rthatthe name 
of the Lord is blessed. 

" When all mortal consolations seem so inadeq\iate, there is One who 
has wept over such afflictions, and is touched with the feeling of our 
infirmities. 

" My duties prevent my being with you. 

" 1 must close witli my deepest sympathy for you all. 

Yours affeftionately, Charles Jabvis." 

In less than three months, Major Jarvis was called to follow his 
nephew and namesake, and " was no more on earth." 

Early in October, he rejoined his regiment in Yorktown, and 
found it had suffered greatly from sickness. With his usual 
promptitude, he made vigorous efforts to have the sick sent to 
hospitals in the North, and the remainder removed to Newbern. 
N. C. 

The regiment was removed to Newbern, and stationed at New- 
port Barracks, thirty miles distant. Ever mindful of his men and 
their happiness, he provided a generous Thanksgiving dinner for 
the regiment, and he hoped and intended that the giver should be 
unknown, but the generosity of their comi.aander was too well 
known to remain undiscovered. 

On the 1st of December, 1863, he was sent by Col. Ripley, with 
a cavalry escort, on a private expedition, when he was shot by a 
Confederate from behind a tree, and was mortally wounded. He 
was removed to a private house. 

The chaplain of the regiment gave this account of him: '-He 
has been my counsellor amid all my trials as chaplain, and I shall 
never find another that can fill his place." " He was accustomed 
to visit the hospital with me, when I went to read and pray with 
the sick and dying soldiers." " When the tidings reached the 
camp, that the Major was badly wounded, I rode directly out to 
him with the Colonel and other officers. He lay in an elegantly 
furnished room. I read one of the Psalms, and bowed in prayer 
by his bed-side. I then informed him that his situation was one 
of danger, to which he assented with great calmness. He suffered 
great pain. At half past three he peacefully expired, and a Chris- 
tian hero was crowned with glory. The world lost in him a Chris 
tian man, the regiment a father," 

The Vt. 9th Regiment passed a series of resolutions, expressive 
of his noble qualities as an officer, a man, and a Christian, and of 
condolence with his afflicted relatives and friends. 



■r^ 



ni 



220 



DKSCKNDANT8 OK NATHANIEI. SIXTH QENKKATION. 



ii 



His remains wore placed in a metallic coffin, and sent, under an 
escort of officers and privates, home to his afflicted mother. A 
largo concourse of relatives and friends followed them to their final 
resting-place in the family cemetery, where he was laid by the side 
of his father. A beautiful white marble sarcophagus has been 
erected by his mother to his memory. 



No. 



2148 

2149 
2150 
2151 
2152 
2153 
2154 



Born. 



Name. 
John Head .Tiir- 

vis, Dec. 3. 1787 

Rebecca Hall, May 15, 1791 

11 children. 
William, Apr. 25. 1811 

Elizab'h Smith, Dec. 27, 1812 
Jolm Head, Mch. 27, 1814 
Frod'k August '.s.July 20, 1810 
Francis Honrj', Feb. .S, 1819 
Rebecca Hall, May 10, 1821 



Died. 



Jan. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

May 



12, 1850 
5, 1858 

30, 1863 

31, 1813 



2155 Susan, 



Dec. 27. 1823 



2156 Mary Elizabeth, Dec. 5, 1826 

2157 Chas. Edward, Feb. 1, 1828 

2158 Audr'wJacks'n,Mch. 6,1830 

2159 Geo. Washing'n, July 12. 1832 



Dec. 17, 1862 



Oct. 19, 1869 



Married or ReniarlcH 
Jan. 6, 1810. 

Dec. 9, 1834. 

Sept. 14, 18:i«. • 
Sept. 9, 1841. 
Dec. 24, 1846. 
May 1. 1860, Isaiah 

Westcott. 
May 18, 1845, Henry 

Whiting. 

Mch. 12, 1854. 
Aug. 7, 1862. 



John Head Jarvis 



Was the son of Philip and Ann Jarvis, and his school and early 
business education were obtained in Boston, Mass. In 1807, he 
accompanied Miss Mary P. Sparhawk to Lisbon, as she was engaged 
to be married to William Jarvis, then United States Consul, and a 
resident there. They were married on her arrival at that pla( (\ 

In 1810, Mr. Jarvis formed a copartnership under the firm name 
of Witherle & Jarvis, in Castine, Maine, which continued until 
1844. He was a man of sound judgment and supen'or business 
talents, and was frequently resorted to for counsel and advice. 
He was quite largely interested in navigation, owning a share in 
seventy-one vessels, during the thirty-four years of his active business 
life. He was also interested in fisheries, and in the importation of 
salt, coal, iron, crockery, etc. Politically, he was of the demo- 
cratic school, and quite prominent. He was in the Governor's 
Council, and also represented his town in the Legislature. In his 
religious belief, he was a Methodist, uniting with that Clmrch in 
1843. 



DK8CENDANTS OF NATUANIKL-RRVRNTH OKNKRATIOK. 221 

During tlio last seven years of his life, his charitios were very 
largely and hberally bestowed upon the needy an.l deserving 
He died January 12th, 1850. 



N". Name Born. nied. 

iiciiry Jarvis, Mcli. 30. 1703 May 8 183!) 

2100 Sarah Mllliken, 1794 Dec. ao,' 1331 

3 children. 

3101 Mary Jane. Oct. 30. 1817 Jan. 31, 1874 

3103 Nancy Jarvis, Dec. 20, 1819 



8d wife. 
2103 Margaret Parker, 



Married or Remark*. 
Mch. 10, 1814. 



Apr. 11. 1843, Chas. 

Joy. 
Aug. 18, 1840. Wm. 

G. Triworgy. 



Fred'k Jarvi.s, 
2104 Mary Park(!r, 
10 children. 
8105 Henry Angus's, 
2100 Fred. William, 

3107 Charles, 

3108 James ().. 
2109 Mary Ann. 
3170 Margaret. 
2171 Philip, 
2173 John flead, 

2173 Francis Head, 

2174 Cai Louisa. 

3(i wife 
317.-5 Mrs. Paulina 

Barrch, 

1 child. 
2170 Geo. A. Jarvis, 



1803 July 33. 1832 

soos. 

Sept. 88, 1798 Oct. 11, 1878 
1801 July 33, 1843 



Oct. 33, 1833 

Jan. 19, 1884 

Dec. 31, 1835 

Jan. 81. 1837 

Apr. 3, 1839 

Jan. 18, 1831 

May 8, 1838 Oct. 3, 1835 

May 30, 1834 

June 8, 1838 

June 8, 1838 



Oct. 10, 1808 
June 14, 1849 



Apr. 0, 1845. 
Feb. 8. 1849. 
Oct. 1. 1849. 
Dec. 13, 1846. 
Jared Flagg. 
Ed. Hinckley. 

Dec. 10, 1802. 
1800. 

Ruins Osgood. 

Feb. 11, 1849. 
Lizzie Wakefield. 



No. Name. 

Leonard Fitz- 
Edvv. Jarvis. Aug. 33, 1819 



7th Generation. 
Born. Died. 



2177 Mary A. Robison. 

1 child. 

2178 Chas. Edward, May 4, 1858 Aug. 18, 1878 



Married or Remarks. 

Graduate of Bowdoin 
College; lawyer. 



222 DRHOKNnANTS OF NATHANIRL — SKVKNTH OKNRHATION. 

* CuARLFS Edward Jahvis, 

Tho only son of L. F, Jarvis of Vine Springs, Columbia, Cal., was 
a young man of the greatest promise. Born on May 4, J 858, he 
entered, at an early age, Washington College, Washington, (-al. 
There ho soon distinguished himscdf by his remarkable intellectual 
vigor, untiring industry, and unswerving loyalty to the interests 
and government of the college. When he reached his senior year 
he was offered the Valedictory and Centennial orations, but was 
obliged, on account of ill health, to decline these coveted honors 
and leave college. Shortly after, he fell a victim to the ravages of 
consumption. 

His manly, dignified deportment, his conscientious truthfulness, 
kind and genial disposition, noble aspirations, and calm trust in 
the goodness and mercy of God, endeared him to all who knew 
him intimately. Even now he continues to live in their memory 
as one whose shining brightness is not extinguished, but ever 
serves as a beacon light to lead others to imitate his example. 



Married or Remarks. 



Dec. 25, 1873. 



811 1 . 

No. Name. Bom. Died. 

Howard Sanford 
Jarvis, Mch. 28, 1834 

2179 Maria Reeder. 

3 children. 

2180 Wm. Pepperrell, Oct. , 1874 

2181 Charles Fitz, Oct., 1875 

2182 Neva Todd, June 9, 187« 

81 le. 

Francis Can* 
Jarvis,' Sept. 11, 1832 

2183 Emma Wiley. 

3 children. 

2184 Joseph Russell, Oct. 4,1874 

2185 Leonard Bradford. 

2186 Eugene Le Baron. 

Susan Pierce Jarvis, 1809 

2187 Jos. Thornton Adams. 

4 children. 

2188 Jeffrey, 1831 1862 

2189 Leonard, 1863 

2190 Susan, 1868 

2191 Ellen Derby. 

' Grain and lumber merchant, Mayhew's Landing, Cal. 



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DESCENDANTS OF NATHANIKL — SEVENTH GENERATION. 



223 



SI SO. 

Died. 



Married or KcinarkB. 
Oct. 30, 1848. 



No. Name. Born. 

Samuel 6. Jar- 
vis. M.D.. 1816 

2192 Sarah Jarvis. July 20, 1826 July 3, 1857 

2 children. 

2193 William, Sept. 16, 1849 

2194 Leonard. July 29, 1852 

S 1 SO. 

Russell Jarvis, Jan. 8, 1824 June 19. 1862. 

2195 Lucretia Everett Rice. ^ 

3 children. 

2197 Annie Ladd, June 22, 1864 April 14. 1867 

2198 Russell, Dec. 19, 1867 

2199 Wm. Rice, Oct. 10, 1871 

Jarvis Rouse, Clartsmont, N. H. 

[The following description of this venerable old mansion is abbreviated 
from an article which appeared in the Northern Advocate, of July 18, 1876:] 

" Here and there in the nooks and corners of old New England, 
colonial mansions yet remain, which carry us back in thought a 
century or more. While all else has changed, these old houses 
remain the same. They seem to speak and tell us what sort of 
men our forefathers were. Many may be found in the Connecti- 
cut Valley, and, possibly, the conservative influence of the staid 
old river, moving slowly onward in its course, may have been the 
cause of their preservation. 

" Claremont can boast of one of these, which is more than ordi- 
narily quaint and beautiful, namely, the residence of Col. Russell 
Jarvis, who was born within its walls, and has lived in it ever 
since. 

" The great timbers of its frame show that houses built a century 
ago were built to stay. The immense piazza, with its giant colon- 
nade, extending around three sides of the house, is nearly large 
enough to contain as many modern dwellmgs. The large elms in 
front, which spread their protecting arms above, are as sound and 
vigorous as they were a hundred years ago, but are bolted and 
ironed through and through that their great weight may not cause 
their own destruction. The cool plashing of the fountains beneath, 
the whispering of the winds through the branches, provide an 




1 




IB 




1 


1 



224 



DE8CKNDANT8 OF NATHANIEL 8KVENTH GENEI?ATION. 



I 



unceasing natural melody. Within are to be found an endless 
variety of ancient furniture and bric-a-brac, which would cause the 
insanity of one possessed by the nr v fashionable mania. Dark 
carved secretaries, chairs, and sideboard; a fjiano, which certainly 
is one of the oldest of its species, and looks the personification of 
modesty beside its more showy modern sister; china and tiles of 
the most quaint and curious pattern ; pictures upon the walls which 
unmistakably show the touch of the master-hand — one, the posses- 
sion of which the most lavish of modern collectors well might 
envy. It represents Thomyris, the Queen of the Scythians, caus- 
ing the head of Cyrus to be plunged into a vase filled with blood. 
This painting has a curious history, having been the property of a 
French nobleman living in San Domingo. During the massacre 
of 1791, his house was burned, and in that night of horrors he 
escaped, saving this, his most valuable piece of property, and little 
else He fled with it to Boston, where it was bought by Colonel 
Jarvis's grandfather. This painting attracted much attention at 
the art exhibition in Boston in 1S32, at which very many of the 
finest works of art in America were exhibited, Mr. Jarvis having 
loaned it to the association. In the room devoted to masterpieces 
in the Louvre, Paris, is to be seen a picture by Rubens, exactly 
similar to this in all respects, except that it is somewhat larger. 
From the known habit of the old masters of painting duplicates, 
from the masterly coloring, the great pains taken to select and save 
this from the conflagration, and the judgment of those whose 
opinions are valuable, there is every reason to suppose that this is 
an original, the work of the great master himself. 

" It would lead one to too great a length to attempt to describe 
all the objects of interest in this rare old mansion. From the 
grounds there are views which are admired by all who know them, 
and that of Ascutney and the valley was pronounced by Bierstadt 
to be one of the finest he Had ever painted. 

"The house is situated on a farm of over 1,000 acres, on which 
are many heads of fine cattle, and about 500 merino sheep. Col. 
Jarvis has raised over 200 tons of hay from this farm in one 
season. 

" In the carriage-house are to be found vehicles which were used 
in the olden time. The fainily coach, a quaint-looking structure of 
enormous size, was built in Boston about one hundred and fifty 
years ago, and was wont to roll through the streets of that city when 
it was but a provincial town. The size and strength of the running 



t:^ 



descb:ndants of Nathaniel — sevknth generation. 



225 



gear is simply immense. Its axles were forged by hand before 
the use of the lathe was known. A curious box in front is the 
driver's lofty perch; on a platform behind, the footman stands. 
Inside it is broad and roomy. The windows slide up and down in 
a curious sort of a way. Upon the sides are capacious pockets. 
In short, this is just such a family coach as one finds described in 
the English literature of a hundred years ago. Another carriage 
is still more interesting in some respects. The body, made of 
bamboo, was brought from England some ninety years since, and 
in form and construction is still a model of beauty. One of the 
ploasantest assoc'iations con.iected with this is that Marquis Lafay- 
ette, on his visit to America in 1825, was conveyed in it from 
Claremont to Windsor by the invitation of CJolonel Jarvis's father. 
"These old carriages had not been disturbed for twenty-five 
years, and when, on Centennial Independence Day, it was proposed 
to bring them forth as worthy relics of the past, it was found 
necessary to enlarge the doors, which had been constructed with 
reference to the less stately equipages of the present day." 



Died. 



Married or Reinarlis. 



'hich 
Col. 
one 

used 
fe of 
fifty 
hen 
ling 



No. Name. Born. 

Ca inline Jarvis. 
2200 Johu H. Uhl. 
2 children. 
3201 Rus.sell Jarvis. 
2202 Margaretta Christina. 

IS 1 3S. 

Mary P. Spar- 
hawk Jarvis, May 21, 180» Sept. 9. 1829. 

3203 Hon. Hampden 

Cutis, Aug. 3, 1803 April 28, 1875 

9 children. 

8304 Edw.Holyoke, May, 1831 Jan. 10, 1855. 

3205 Eliz. Bartlett 

Jarvis, Nov., 18H3 April 1, 1834 

2206 Anna Holyoke, June 17, 1835 Aug. 24, 1861. 

2207 Eliz. Bartlett, Aprill 2, 1837 Feb., 1864 Apr. 27, 1861, Alf. R. 

Bullard, M.D. 

2208 Wm. Jarvis, June 30, April, 1853 
3209 Mary Pepper- 

rell Carter, May 2, 1843 Aug. 18, 1848 
8310 Hampden, Aug. 19, 1845 August, 1848 
3211 Charles Jarvis, March. 1848 Sept. 13, 1863 
3812 Harriet Louisa, Feb. 1,1851 
29 



s^ 



226 DESCENDANTS OF NATHANIKL — HEVKNTH GENERATION. 

MB8. MaKY PePPEBRELL SpaRHAWK (^ITTTS 

Was born in Lisbon, May 21, 1809. She was the eldest child of 
William Jarvis, then American Consul and Charge d^ Affaires, and 
Mary Pepperrell Sparhawk. 

In 1829, she married the Hon. Hampden Cutts of Portsmouth, 
N.H., a graduate of Harvard College, and a lawyer of much ability, 
who was distinguished for his eloquence, scholarly attainments, and 
polished manners. 

Later in life, he was appointed Judge, and was four years a 
member of the Legislature, three years Senator, and until his 
death, Vice-President of the New England Historical and (renea- 
logical Society. 

Mrs. Cutts inherits her father's good practical sense, his taste for 
litorature, energy, uprightness of character, and warm and benevo- 
lent heart, together with her mother's piety and love of reading. 

At the time of the purchase of "Mount Vernon" by the ladies 
of the Union, she was Vice-Regent for Vermont, and labored for 
this patriotic cause with her characteristic energy and enthusiasm. 
She has been an occasional contributor to the press, and, after the 
death of her father, wrote a valuable work entitled " The Life and 
Times of William Jarvis," Riverside Press. This biography is inter- 
esting, and contains much valuable historical information. It is a 
work of much merit, entitling her to a high rank as an authoress, 
displaying the amiable qualities of her heart in the sacred relations 
of daughter, wife, and mother. She is d.^ tinguished for her piety, 
her hospitality, and love of children; and her house is the resort 
of both young and old, and the charm of her relatives and friends. 



SI 30. 

No. Name. Born. Died. 

Eliz. B. Jarvis, Feb. 22, 1811 July, 1848 

2213 David Everett Wheeler. 

3 children. 

2214 Mary Eliza'th, May 7, 1837 Nov. 7, 1838 

2215 Everett Pepper- 

rell, Mcb. 10, 1840 

2216 Mary Hannah, Feb. 23, 1842 

David E. Wheeler 



Married or Kemarki>. 
Feb. 14, 1833. 



Nov. 22, 181)6. 
May 24, 1865. 



Was the son-in-law of Consul Jarvis, marrying his daughter. Miss 
Elizabeth Bartlett Jarvis, Feb. 14, 1833. He was the second son 
of John B. Wheeler, who was a wealthy merchant of Orford, 
N. H. His father died Aug. 26, 1842. 



flsm^ 



^■& 



DK80ENDANT8 OP NATHANIEL — SEVENTH GENERATION. 



227 



Mr. Wheeler prosecuted his preparatory studies for college at 
Kimball Union Academy in Plainfield, N. H. He was graduated 
from Dartmouth College in 1827, and spent one year at the Law 
School in Cambridge, Mass. He then went to New York, where 
he studied law two years with Hon. Jonas Piatt, and was admitted 
to the Bar in September, 1830. He resided in New York until 
the time of his death. 

In 1844, he was a member of the Assembly of New York, and 
a member of the Board of Education of the city. 

For four years, he was the Editor of two periodicals printed in 
New York, and while a member of the Legislature, he published 
a Report on the Quarantine Laws, and, in 1851, a discourse before 
the Order of United Americans. 

He married, for his second wife, Mrs. Myra Ann Haxtou of 
New York, daughter oi John M. Raymond of Kent, Conn., 
Feb. 6, 1854. 

He was a gqod lawyer, an honored member of the Bar, and 
in all the relations of life, was highly esteemed as a man of elegant 
manners, a kind and affectionate husband, and Christian gentle- 
man. 



%<il3&. 



No 



Name. Born. 

Harr'tB. Jarvis, Feb. 8,1820 
3217 Rev. J. DeForest 
Richards, 
children. 
2318 Wm. Jarvis, 
2219 DeForest, 
3220 Anna Bartlett, 
3321 Jarvis, 

3332 Sarah Margaret, Oct. 

3333 Bartlett, Jan. 



June 11, 1844 
Aug. 5, 1846 
Apr. 18, 1849 
Sept. 15, 1852 
21, 1867 
6, 1861 



Died. 



Dec. 3, 1873 



Oct. 21, 1849 



Mch. 13, 1858 



Married or Remarlce. 
Aug., 1843. 



Mrs. Harriet Bartlett Richards 

Was a daughter of the late Consul Jarvis, and inherited much of 
her father's character. She was noble, generous, and warm- 
hearted, and, like her sister, Mrs. Dinsmore, was suxTounded by a 
large circle of friends. 

Since the death of h- r husband, December 2, 1872, she has 
devoted herself to the ( Jucation of her children, and her whole 
life abounds with kindness, charity, and benevolence. 

M. P. S. C. 



E 



228 



DKSCKNDANTS OF NATIIANIKI, — SEVKNTH OKNKKATION. 



8140. 



No. "Name. 


Burn 


n 


Katlmrine L. 






Jarvis, 


r)(!0. 25, 


1832 


2224 Col. LeiivittHunt,' 




6 children. 






2225 ClydeDuVernct.May 30, 


1H«1 


2226 Jurvls, 


Aug. 5, 


1H»3 


2227 Maud Dacre, 


July, 


1804 


2228 Nina. 


Mch., 


1866 


2229LeavlttB., 




1868 


2230 Morris B., 


Mcb., 


1871 



Died. Married or Remarks. 

July. 1860. 



1871 



William Jarvis, Apr. 25, ISII Jan. 30, 1S63 Dec. 9, 1884. 

2231 Phcbe Perkins, Oct. 5. 1813 May 12, 1838 

2 children. 

2232 Wm. Henry, Sept. 30, 1835 Sept. 18, 1837 

2233 Phebe Perkins, May 15, 1838 Feb. 1, 1803 Albert Treat. 

2d wife. 
3234 Lydia D, Brida:- 

ham, July, 1823 

3 children. 

2235 Henrietta A., July 20, 1842 

2236 Charles W., June 5,1845 

2237 Edward B., Apr., 1852 

John Head 
Jarvis, Mch. 27. 1814 Sept. 14. 1836. 

2238 Sarah Elizabeth 

Hovey, Jidy 11, 1819 

1 child. 

2239 Delia Farley, « Nov. 4,1839 Sept. 13. 1866. 

John Head Jarvis, Jr., 

The subject of the present sketch, was the son of John H. and 
Rebecca Jarvis, and commenced his business education with the 
house of Witherle & Jarvis, about the year 1830. In ISSf), he 
commenced business for himself in Ellsworth, Maine. In 1843, 
he returned to Castine, and formed a copartnership with his 
brothers, under the firm name of WiUiam & John H. Jarvis & Co., 

1 Son of the Hon. Jonathan Hunt of Brattleboro, Vt. 
"Married John C. Chamberlain, who died August 11, 1867; December 
13, 1871, Thomas D. Chamberlain. 



DRSCKNDANTS OP NATHANIKI. — SKVENTH OENKRATION. '229 

doing an extensive trade, one branch of which was furnishing 
supplies to more than sixty sail of fishermen, annually. 

They were also largely interested in navigation, and in the 
importation of salt, iron, coal, etc. 

Mr. Jarvis witlulrew from the firm in 1857. He has frequently 
been impoiluned to accept offices of honor and trust, which he 
has almost invariably declined. Among the offices olferod were 
Governor's Council, Bank Commissioner, Treasurer of Howdoin 
College, Representative to the State Ijegislature, with many others. 



No. Name. Born. 

Frederick Au- 
gustus Jarvis, July 26, 1810 

2240 Fran cesM.Flagg. 

6 children. 

2241 Josephine Head, Sept. 22. 1842 

2242 Francis Plllsb'y, Aug. 26, 1844 

2243 Sarah Jane, July 3, 1847 

2244 Maria Sanford, June 25, 1850 

2245 Ann Olney, Mch. 21, 1852 

2246 Fred. Wm., Mch. 17. 1857 



Died. 



Married or Remarkfl. 
Sept. 9, 1841. 

(teo. Comb Folsom. 



SI S3. 



Francis Henry 
Jarvis, F'eb. 3, 1819 

2247 Caroline Head 

Hovcy. June 80, 1821 

4 children. 

2248 Frank Seymour, Jan. 21, 1848 

2249 Emma lioblns, June 21, 1849 

2250 Mary Elizabeth, June 20, 1854 

2251 Wni. Hovey. Aug. 15, 1856 



Dec. 24, 1840. 



Ohas.Ed. Jarvls,Fcb. 1,1828 Dec, 17, 1862 Mch. 12, 1854. 
2252 (/'aroiiue M. Jordan. 

1 cliihi. 
2254 Julia Alice, Aug. 27. 1855 



S 1 SO. 

Geo. ^\ asliiug- 
ton Jarvis, July 12, 1832 Oct. 19,1869 Aug. 7. 1862. 
2255 Lucy A. Verrill. 
3 chi'dren. 



-I'^Ta 



230 



DRSCENDANTB OF NATHANIEL — SKVENTII OENRRATTON. 



No. Name. Born. Died. Married or Remarkv. 

3256 Gtio. Howard, Aug. 4, 1864 Oct. 9. 1869 

2357 Annie G., Dec. 27, 1800 

3258 Henry W.. Aug. 15, 1809 

Henry A.Jarvis.Oct. 22,1823 Apr. 6, 1845. 

2259 Nancy A. Joy, Apr. 28, 1820 

12 children. 
3860 Anna Head 

Jarvis, .Ian. 8, 1840 Auj^. 18, 1848 

3361 Fred. Augustus, Feb. 36, 1847 Aug. 10, 1848 
2202 Henry Herbert, Jan. 17, 1840 

2263 Mary Parker, May 20, 1851 Byrou G. Mor^e. 

3364 Harriet Head, July 34, 1853 
2365 Arthur Edward,Feb. 30, 1855 
3266 Anna Lee, Nov. 19, 1856 

2267 Everard Angus., July 10, 1857 May 6,1858 
3?'!8 Irving Austin, Dec. 85, 1859 
3369 Hollis Joy, Feb. 89, 1801 

2270 Fred. William, Oct. 2, 1863 
2371 Mabel Sadie, Aug. 88, 1866 Jan. 13, 1875 

Fred. Wm. Jarvis, Jan. 19, 1834 Feb. 8, 1849. 

3373EmilineP.Milli- 

ken. May 17, 1834 

Child. 

3373 Annie Flagg Jarvis, 1857 Jan. 30, 1863 

Charles Jarvis, Dec. 31,1825 x Oct. 1, 1849. 

3374 Julia A. Barrch.Oct. 33, 1833 Aug. 88, 1868 

4 children. 

2375 Chas. P. , July 30, 1850 

3876 Fred. A. , Jan. 39, 1853 

3377 Ellen B., Aug. 14, 1856 

8378 Caroliiu' A., Dec. 35, 1858 Mch. 18, 1874 



Rosabella Lord. 



5S 1 OS. 

James O. Jarvis, Jan. 81, 1837 
8379 Augusta Barrch, July 6, 1830 
3 children. 

3380 James Edmund, Feb. 13, 1849 

3381 Lizzie Maud, Mch. 88, 1854 Mch. 31, 1867 
8388 Howard Barrch. Mch. 30, 1858 



Dec. 13, 1840. 
Elizabeth C. Brown. 



DESCENDANTS Of NATIIANIKI, — KtOIITH OKNKHATION. 



231 



No. Name. Born 

Jolin H. Jiiivi.s, May ;«», 18i{4 
2288 Emmilim- Harr(;li,.InMc7.1Ht4 Si-pl. :J, 18(0) 

1 child. 
3284 Ida May .larviH, Sopl. 7, im,l 



wirjus. 




Diod. 


Miinicd iir Uemfirkit. 


^i{4 


\h'V. 10, |H(i2. 



« 1 r:i. 



Fr'ncisH.JarviH.Juuc 8, 18;J8 
2285 Lucy Orindle. 
1 child. 

2386 0(!orgc, 1868 

3d wife. 

2387 Lama Fruthy. 

3 children. 
2288 Bainbridgc, Apr. 2«, 1873 
2380 Julia B,, Oct., 1874 



iH(ii). 



8th Genehation. 

No. Name. Born. Died. 

Ed. H. Cutts, May 1831 
3290 Annie Sherwood. 

9 children. 
2291 Wm. Hampden, Oct. 26, 1856 Oct. 35, 1883 
3202 Mary Sherwood, May 1,1858 Aug. 31, 1877 
3393 Eliz. Bartlett, Nov. 35, t8(i0 
2294 Edw'd Duncan, Jan. 15, 1863 Mar. 13, 1863 
3395 Katie Anna, Oct. 6, 1866 

2296 Lillian Ursula, Sept. 16. 1808 

2297 Hampden. July 26, 1870 

2298 Winnifrcd, June 9, 1874 

2299 Margaret Anna, May 23, 1876 



Married or Remarks 
Jan. 10, 1855. 



Captain Edward Holyoke Outts 

Was the eldest grandson of Consul Jarvis, and was educated at 
Thetford Academy, and at the Military College at Norwich, Ver- 
mont. He afterward prosecuted his mathematical studies with a 
civil engineer, and was fitted for that profession, but concluding to 
try his fortune in the far "West, he joined an acquaintance at Red 
Wing, Wisconsin. Not liking that region, he went to Minnesota, 
then almost an unknown territory, in company with two other 



232 



nKBCKNDANTH OF NATHAMKL — KIOIITII OKNKRATION. 



I 



r: 



I 



youtifj men. On foot, each with a kiiapHack, ap()(rk«it coinpaHH, and 
a liatchot, thoy travellml for throo dayw, when tliny found li()H))ifa- 
l»l(> f|uart('rs with a Krcncli f^nnthnnan, wlio had niarriod thtMJHUf^h- 
t<>r of an Indian chitif. Tho nanio of th(( Frrmdinian waw Kari- 
luudt, and undor hin advico, Mr. (JuttH Holoctcul a trtu'l of (Jovcrn- 
nient hind on the Strait Kivor, about four tnikw diHtant, cond)in- 
ing praino, woodland, and bhilTH. lloro l»o "Hot up stakes," wh«'n 
ho Hoon returned to Ked Wing for oxen, a stove, provisions, (it(!. 
He was one of the cldcwt pioneers of Minnesota, an<l (h'voted liiniself 
to agiicuhim! for many yj^ars, witnessing the; growth of Karihault, 
from a small settlement of one house, and a few s(]uatters and 
Indian huts, till it beeame a flourishing city, with churches, banks, 
(lour milla, etc. lie saw, under the missioiuiry influence of Mishop 
Whipple, and Kev. Dr. Buck, a cathedral, a grammar-school tV)r boys, 
a college, a beautiful chapel, and a ynung ladies' seminary (wtab- 
lished. 

With energy, fortitude, and firmness, Mr. ("utts endured the pri- 
vations and hardships of pioneer life, and his integrity and honor- 
able conduct won the esteem and rispect of all who knew him. 

At the commencement of the war, he left his wife and children, 
to serve his country as a [trivate soldier, and was first ordered out 
against the Indians, who had made a raid upon the settlement. 

In October, 1H61, he was attacked with a malignant typhoid 
fever, and, but for the devoted care of his wife, who went to the 
camp to nurse him, and the interposition of Dr. Ibuik, from whom 
he received much attention, and many sanitary privileges, he must 
have fallen a victim to the disease. 

After his recovery, he was permitted to go to Philadelphia to 
pursue his military studies, where he received commendation and 
promotion, and was ordered to Arlington Heights. About this 
time, his two little sons died, and in this great trial, Dr. Buck 
looked kindly and tenderly after the alllicted wife. After the war, 
Mr. Cuttsand his wife joined the '' Church of the Good Shepherd." 

Just before the close of the war, Capt. Cutts was attacked with 
malarial fever at Petersburgh, Va., and was consequently disabled 
from marching to Richmond with the victorious army, greatly to 
his disappointment. As soon as he was able, he visited his par- 
ents in Brattleboro, and then returned to his home in Minnesota. 
He has recently sold his farm, and built himself a home in Fari- 
bault, on account of the superior privileges afforded by it, of attend- 
ing public worship, and of educating his children. 



©MCENDADTH or NATIIANIEI KIOMTII OKNKHATION. 



2;{3 



No. Name. h,,,,,. 

Anriii U. (!llft^., Jim.' 17, IWW 

2aO() A. 'rniml.iill 

Ilowaid, Nov. I. IHItO 

7 cliildifti. 
C«'(il Miiiiipdoii.Hcpl. r». 1803 
Miiry (JiillH, Fcl). 22, 1«(W 
Kdilli EliziilM'tli,.Iiiii. 24, 1H(IH 
Uo.s(i .JiiiviH, Auk. -7, 1H0I» 
Maud .larviH, .Tidy H», 1H71 
Clias. 'rruiuhull.Ocl. 18, 1H7!J 
I'Mward Klliol,, Jidy 2, 1H7« 



DlciJ. 



Marriod or itcnmrk*. 
Aug. 34, IHdl. 



2801 

2«oa 
2m\ 
2im 

2'im 
2.m 



Hepl. 1», IH(W 
A 111!:. 17. IH70 
July 23. 187a 



V5t^ I rj. 

Kvorctf I*. 

WhwU'T, Mill. 1((, 1810 

3JJ08 Lydia lioriaim,- 

Hodges. 

5 childniri. 
2iHm Annie Lorraiii(;,()ol. !J0, 1808 
8810 Ethel .Iiirvis, Apr. 18,1871 
3311 David Everett, Nov. 23, 1872 

3313 Winifred Fay. Aug. 30, 1875 
2313 Beutiice. 

Mary 11. 
Wheeler, Feb. 23, 1842 

3314 Rev. Corneliu.s 

B. Smith. 
3 ehildren. 

3315 Mabel Wheeler, Sept. 8, 1807 

3316 Everett. Pep- 

pcrrell, Sept. 31, 1801) 

3317 Clar'ce Bishop, Oct. 17, 1873 



Nov. 83, 1800. 



May 34, 1865, 



30 



234 



DKSCKNDANTS OF JOHN JARV18. 



DESCENDANTS OF JOHN JAR VIS. 

In introducing the branch of our genoalogy, to whicli the emi- 
nent statistician and physiologist, Dr. Edward Jarvis, belongs, we 
cannot do better than give a synopsis of one of his letters to Dr. 
Milton B. Jarvis of Oanastota, N. Y., dated Mch. 16, 1870. 

In this letter, he gives an account of his exttmsive laljors in endeav 
oring to obtain reliable information of his ancestors, and, also, the 
results at which he has arrived regarding them. He says: 

" For thirty years, I have examined the Boston, Cambridge, and 
Dorchester town and church records, grave-stones, probate rec- 
ords, wills, administrations for 250 years, Brewster's transcripts, 
deeds, mortgages, household bills, genealogical registers, directo- 
ries, and newspapers; have had much correspondence, and collected 
the records in families, obituaries, etc. 

" Including these, I have a great quantity of fragments of fainily 
history. Out of these I have endeavored to form a complete 
account from the first of the name to the many now living, but 
although I have so much material, I yet want more to complete the 
connection of the generations, and have many Melchizedeks, with- 
out father or mother, and some of these stand alone, without either 
parents or children. (For many of these records, see Appendices 
C. and G.) 

"The first notice I find of the name is John Jarvis, merchant, 
who died July 24th, l(i48. Another notice of John Jarvis is in the 
mention of an estate October, 1651. In another administration of 
an estate the name of Mr. Jarvis is again introduced. Nothing is 
known of any of this name. 

" On the 18th of September, 1661, we find the marriage of John 
Jarvis to Rebecca Parkman, by Richard Belingham, Deputy Oov- 
ernor, yet he may have been the son of the other John, who died 
in 1648. Th(! family has been in Boston from that time until now, 
and in some families these lines are traceable. 

'» From 1749, for a period of a hundred years, the records Wfre 
neglected, and it is impossible to trace families through that century, 
except from family records and other casual agencies, 

"The tradition that seems to me the most reliable is, that John 
Jarvis, our first ancestor, in Boston, came from Yorkshire, Eng- 



DKS0ENDANT8 OF JOHN JARVIS. 



235 



but 



land. The name of Jarvis, Jervise, Jarvise, and Jervis, is very 
common in Yorkshire, and especially in the city of York, but, 
probably, not very common in the South ^r England. I did not 
find it in the London Directory, nor see a sign with the name 
in London, Liverpool, Birmingham, or elsewhere in England or 
Scotland. When I dined with the Society of Veterans in London, 
I was made to speak. The Newmarket Secretary of the London 
Statistical Society, in a speech, afterwards, pointing to me, said: 
" Our guest and friend is one of us. You see he is Yorkshire. 
We recognize it in his voice and his manner of speech. He has 
been gone only seven yenerations, and coJiies back. We recognize 
him," meaning that I reseml)led the family in Yorkshire. 

" There are Jarvises in Scotland, also in Ireland. In France, the 
name is Gervaise. 

" I have put these facts or names into a genealogical chart, that is, 
those that seem to have a home in my line, yet I have many names 
for which 1 can find no connection. 

" Unfortunately, my grandfather, John Jarvis, finds no recorded 
father. Traditionally, he was born in Boston, married in 1765, to 
my grandmother. Miss Bowmon, then twenty-three years of age. 

"In 1785, with the spirit of adventure, he w^ent to the interior 
of New York, leaving his family in Massachusetts. He was not 
heard from again alive, but a returning traveller brought intelli- 
gence that soon after reaching the new region, he, or rather a Mr. 
Jarvis from Massachusetts, was taken ill and died suddenly, but 
could not designate the place." 

We also extract the following notes from Dr. Edward Jarvis's 
collections : 

"Nathaniel Jai'vis was born IfiSl, in Boston, moved from Bos- 
ton in 1755, to Cambridge, where he purchased an estate a few rods 
northwest of the common, on the northeast side of the road from 
Cambridge to West Cambridge (Ai'lington), which estate was in 
the hands of the family as late as 185.3, and occupied by his two 
daughters, Mary, widow of Phinehas Stone, then 89 years old, and 
Rebecca Parkham Jarvis, then 82 years of age. 

" The estate is still (July \i\ J 868), called the Jarvis estate and 
was lately bought by the College.'' 



^?mi 



!J,J II.IIJAIJJIIJPJ 



236 



DESCKNDANTS OF JOHK — 8KC0ND ftEXKRATION. 



DESCENDANTS OF JOHN. 

1st Generation. 



No. 
2319 

2320 
2321 
2322 
2323 
2324 
2325 
2326 
2327 
2328 



Name. Born. 

John Jarvis, 
Elizabeth Bowmen, 

9 children. 
John, Oct. 3, 17G7 

Francis. Aug. 28, 1708 

Sam'lBowmon,Aiig. 11, 1770 



Died. Married or Remark?. 

j Oct. 30, 1765. Bothres- 
Nov. 16, 1819 ( idents of Camb'dge. 



Mry 
Oft. 



25, 1802 
1, 1840 



Stephen, 

Caleb, 

Sarah, 

Elizabeth, 

Susan, 

Ann, 



-Tan. 9, 1772 
Aug. 25, 1773 
1776 
1778 
1780 
1784 



April 25, 1835 



April 7, 1793. 

Margaret Wool. 

May 10, 1798. 
Elihu Janes. 

Abel Prescott. 



2d Generation. 
S3SO. 

No. Name. Bom. Died. 

John Jarvis, Oct. 3, 1767 May 25, 1802 
2329 Sally Cunning- 



Married or Remarks. 
April 7, 1793. 



ham, 

5 children. 

2331 John, 

2332 Sally, 

2333 John, Jr., 

2334 James, 
2385 Asa, 



May 11, 1816 

June 23, 1794 May 23, 1796 
Dec. 10, 1795 

Aug. 19, 1797 Jan. 2, 1855 

April 28, 1799 June 1, 1822 

May 27, 1802 Feb. 27, 1803 



Jan. 6, 1822. 



S3tJ I . 

FrancisJarvis.Aug. 28, 1768 Oct. 1,1840 Deacon. 
2336 Milicent Hosmer, 1768 April 23. 1826 

7 children. 



2337 Francis, 

2338 Mira, 

2339 Louisa, 

2340 Charles, 

2341 Edward, 

2342 Stephen, 

2343 Nathan, 



Nov. 5, 1794 April 5. 1875 Phcbe ITubbard ; 1 son. 

May 30, 1790 Nov. 1, IHOO 

Nov. 7, 1798 May 7, 1815 

Nov. 27, 1800 Feb. 24, 1826 

Jan. 9, 1803 Almira Hunt of Dor 

Chester. 

April 27, 1806 June 13, 1855 Lydia G. Prescott. 

Aug. 8, 1808 Jan. 16, 1851 Ellen Chinn, 



DEHCENDANTS OF JOHN — SECOND GENERATION. 



237 



[The following sketch of Dr. Edward Jarvis was written by the Rev. 
George W. Hosmer of Newton, Mass., who was his townsman, lifelong 
friend, and college classmate.] 

Dr. Edward Jarvis 

Was born in Concord. Mass., Jan. 9, 1803. His father, Francis 
Jarvis, came to Concord, a young man, in 1789. He married 
Milicent Hosmer, a daughter of one of the oldest families in town. 
They had seven children, five sons and two daughters. One of 
the daughters died very young, while the other passed away in 
the beauty of young maidenhood. This family was among the 
most respectable in t'. wn. 

Mr, Jarvis, for forty years, was an active and leading citizen. 
He was, originally, a baker, and began his business life in Concord, 
in ] 790, at the end of his twenty-second year. His home and 
place of business were in the centre of the village, next to the 
meeting-house. In his day, a baker's establishment was a large 
and respectable business, and only the larger towns had bakeries. 
To distribute and sell the bread in all that vicinity was as laborious 
as to make it. From the beginning Mr. Jan'is was successful. 
He seldom made mistakes, and whatever he touched seemed to 
prosper in a quiet, slow way, but surely. 

Aside from his bakery, he had a natural taste for gardening and 
agriculture, and, in 179."^, began the purchase of land. To his 
original purchase, he added, from time to time, other fields, until 
his farm was sufficient for his occupation; and ultimately he gave 
his exclusive attention to its cultivation. 

While yet a young man, his leisure hours were spent in useful 
and thoughtful reading, and he longed to turn from the farm, the 
bread and its distribution, to a student's life. He would have 
prepared for college, when his name might have been known as 
that of a profound lawyer, but he could not dispose of his bu.siness 
and property satisfactorily. He, consequently, kept on in the even 
tenor of his way, and, by wise economy and enterprise, conducted 
a useful business, acquired a competency, and for long years was 
loved and honored as one of the most intelligent and virtuous 
citizens. Possessing an active mind, he was well-informed in 
history, philosophy, political economy, and especially in works of 
divinity and morals. He made it a practice to read his Bible 
through each year. 

His was an extended horizon. His opinions had weight, his 



MHI 



238 



DESCKNDANTS OF JOHN — ftKCONO OENEHATION'. 



I 



S 



Is f- 



judgment was trustworthy, and his approbation for a young man 
or woman was, to them, a fortune. Calm and self-posressed, he 
shrank from cheap notoriety. He never cared much for office, 
but was always ready for duty, burdens, and sacrifice. He repre- 
sented the town in the Legislature, and for many years was one in 
an honored line of deacons in the Unitarian Church. As the 
writer looks back through sixty years to Concord as it was in his 
boyhood, the grave, saintly face of Deacon Jarvis in the seat of 
honor in front of the pulpit, is one of the prominent figures in the 
old meeting house. 

The home of Deacon Jarvis was a model. Mrs. Jarvis was a 
gentle, loving woman, and her heart was bound up in her family. 
She was greatly respected and beloved, and her children " rose up 
and called her blessed." 

The eldest son, Francis, remained with his father, and took his 
business. In his later years he became a farmer, and was a highly 
respectable citizen of Concord. He died in 1875, at the age of 
eighty. 

Charles, the second son, was educated at Harvard University, 
graduated in 1821, took his medical degree in 1824, and settled as 
a physician in Bridgewater, Mass. He was a most worthy, promis- 
ing young man, "one who did not need the smart of folly to make 
him wise, nor the sting of guilt to make him virtuous." Greatly 
beloved by those who knew his worth, and with his excellent and 
thorough medical preparatio)), he would have been a useful and 
honored member of his profession, but a fatal disease fell upon his 
young life, and with beautiful and manly resignation he turned 
back from his prospects of success, and died in 1826, in the twenty- 
sixth year of his age. 

Stephen, the fourth son, was born in 1806. He was an energetic 
and enterprising youth, went to sea, rose early to be master of a 
ship, and was successful, but lameness, from a fall on his vessel, 
compelled him to leave the sea, when he joined his brother Nathan 
in the wholesale drug business in New Orleans. 

Nathan, the fifth son, was born in Concord in 1808. He learned 
his business in Boston, and, for many years, was an extensive and 
successful merchant in New Orleans. He was distinguished for 
integrity and enterprise. Both brothers, within four years, were 
lost — Nathan, in 1851, by the explosion of a steamer on the Missis- 
sippi, and Stephen, suddenly, in 1855. He left one, and Nathan 
two, daughters. 



DESCENDANTH f)F JOHN SECOND GENERATION. 



239 



Doctor Edward Jarvis, the third son, now a resident of Boston, 
in the Dorchester district, is in his seventy-sixth year. In the 
"oiici sketches the writer has given of his parents, family, and early 
home, he has prepared the background for a picture of his school- 
fellow, college classmate, and lifelong friend. It is a labor of love 
to make the delineation. It is a privilege to portray a fine person, 
to describe a noble character. 

Doctor Jarvis had his earliest education in that good home, so 
full of love and wisdom, and then he went to the public schools 
of (yoncord. which have always been excellent. I think he read 
more books than most boys, and that he saw better life about him 
than many boys ever know or experience. 

Seventy years ago, enterprise in this country was greatly quick- 
ened in the direction of woolen manufactures. Merino sheep were 
imported, and superior cloths began to be made. Many young 
men turned their attention to the manufacture of woolens, and 
young Jarvis among the rest. He became an apprentice in a 
famous establishment. Rock Bottom in Stow, and, for a year or 
two, was looking forward to that kind of service as his life-work; 
but a change of purpose came over him, and he preferred to culti- 
vate his mental rather than his physical organization. He was, 
therefore, prepared for college at Westford Academy, and entered 
Harvard in 1822. In college he was known as a genial friend, as 
a young man of ability and of decided principles. He was a good 
general scholar, but not ambitious of college rank, and he studied 
and read much more widely than the prescribed course. An inci- 
dent occurred to reveal his high moral sense. 'I'here were funds 
then, though small compared with the large and numerous founda- 
tions now at Harvard, for students in need of pecuniary aid. 
Applications were made for help, and there were more iipplicants 
than funds. Young Jarvis had no thought of applying, but, by 
some mistake, he was put upon the list of beneficiaries, and money 
was sent to him. Many a father, as well off as Deacon Jarvis, 
sought for the privilege of these funds ond received it, but young 
Jarvis at once referred to his father^ and the money was returned. 
In all college incidental expenses, the father counselled economy, 
but was careful to say to his son: " Never fail to do your honest 
part." 

In 1825, when young Jarvis was in his senior year, his room- 
mate, who was of a wealthy family, desired to have a carpet on 
the floor of their room, and offered to pay the whole cost. This 



•diU 



240 



DESCENDANTS OF JOHN — SECOND GKNEBATrON. 



f-- 



was a rare college luxury in those days, as there were not a half 
dozen in all the rooms of the class. Jarvis wrote to his father, 
stating the generous proposition of his associate. His father at 
once wrote back: " 1 ought not to afford to give you a carpet, but 
I would not have you tread on a carpet that you did not pay for, 
nor would I prevent your room-mate from having this comfort. 
You must, therefore, have the carpet, and you pay one-half the 
cost." And thus the wise father trained his sons to honorable 
independence and manliness. Jarvis was greatly respected in the 
class, and at the end of college life was made Class Secretary. 
He was graduated in 1826, and still holds the office in 1878. 

He taught the Centre Grammar School in Concord for one year, 
showing thereby that a "prophet may have honor, even in his own 
country." He was faithful, and he and his school had a profitable 
and happy year. 

Then came the study of medicine, although at one time he had 
serious thoughts of entering the ministry, but this was given up 
from an impediment in his speech. He now turned to the study 
of medicine, with an enthusiasm and determination to be useful. 
He applied himself to his books, studied very hard, and enjoyed 
the best medical opportunities in this country. He became an 
adept in botany and chemistry, and, in 1830, he took his degree, 
at Harvard, of Doctor of Medicine. He settled, as a physician, in 
Northfield, Mass. However busy in his profession, he always 
found time for study. No plant or flower on the mountain or in 
the meadow escaped his eye. He also made himself familiar with 
physiology, lectured upon it, and afterwards published a text book 
for schools and academies. 

After about two years in Northfield, Dr. Jarvis removed to 
Concord, Mass., for a better and more useful field, and there, 
besides attending to his practice, he earnestly pursued his studies, 
pushing his inquiries toward every kind of vital statistics, freely 
giving, at the same time, a helpful service to the town in all its 
social and educational interests; but still a larger field was wanted, 
and after four and a half years in Concord, Dr. Jarvis removed to 
Louisville, Ky. In 1834, he had marrieil Miss Almira Hunt of 
Concord, and in 1837, they set their faces toward what was then 
the Far West, and never did a young husband and wife go West 
with a purer purpose to do good. Five years were spent in Louis- 
ville, with indifferent financial success, but with much study and 
earnest devotion to all humane interests. When the new Medical 



DESCENDANTS OF JOHN — 8KCOND QENEKATION. 



241 



College was established, in 1842, in Louisville, Dr. Jarvis was 
appointed Professor of Materia Medica; but Kentucky was not 
congenial, and the husband and wife returned to their New Eng- 
land home. 

In 1843, Dr. Jarvis settled in Dorchester, Mass. And here it 
was but a repetition of his life in Louisville, but it was here and at 
this time that Dr. Jarvis gave his attention to Insanity and Vital 
Statistics. He wrote elaborate articles, worked with the eminent 
physicians of Boston, and with the Legislature of the State, for 
en'arged provisions for the insane, and for the establishment of 
State Boards of Health and of Charities. For many years, he 
iriade his house a home for insane persons, bestowing upon them 
benevolent watchfulness and skillful care, which neither in their 
homes nor in a public hospital they could enjoy. Distinguished 
men and women were inmates of his House of Mercy. 

All this varied work made Dr. Jarvis known in Massachusetts 
and throughout New England. Then, in 1865, a call came to him 
from our Government at Washington, to work up the vital sta- 
tistics of the census of I860 into tabular form, in order to a greater 
usefulness among the people. 

He was strongly ixrged by the Secretary of the Interior to go to 
Washington, take the entire charge of the remaining work of the 
census, and write the final report of the mortality, ])ut he had no 
desire for offict . and was unwilling to leave his home and live in 
Washington. He was then requested to do the work in Dorchester, 
with the aid of as many female clerks as he might find necessary. 
For this purpose, he organized a band of educated young women, 
taken from the high schools in Dorchester and Boston. Under 
his supervision, a large and diflBcult work, involving abstruse 
mathematics, was done at a very little expense to the government, 
and which was of signal benefit to the country. 

In I860, Dr. Jarvis visited Europe. He was a delegate from 
the American Statistical Association, to the fourth International 
Statistical Congress in London, and there he cooperated with that 
great assemblage of statisticians and political economists from all 
civilized nations. He was surprised to find that his name had 
gone before him, and that the most flattering attentions awaited 
him in public meetings for Vital Statistics and Social Science, and 
in the homes of many distinguished men in England and on the 
Continent. Indeed, to-day. Dr. Jarvis is better known in Europe 
than in this country, as there vital statistics are a science, while 
31 



r" 



riMi 



242 



DESCENDANTS OF JOHN — SECOND GENERATION. 



!"• 



I 



r 1 



•ll 


1 


1 


1 



i| . ill 

I 



here they are just beginning to claim attention. For years, Dr. Jar- 
vis lias done a large service by sending reports of our cities, slates, 
and counti-y to state officers of Europe, receiving from them, in 
return, their Statistical Histories. These elaborate documents he 
has used in his writingp, and has them preserved for future use in 
public libraries, in which he will leave them. His correspondence 
with the savans of Europe is quite large, and boxes of books are 
passing to and fro by means of the international exchange system 
of the Smithsonian Institute at Washington. 

"When the Arch-Duke Alexis of Russia was in this country, a 
few years ago, (>ount Shouvaloff, son of the Russian Minister to 
London, was one of the Prince's attendants. While here, he 
received an injury of the knee which confined liim to his room in 
Boston. A ]ihysician was called, and the count being eager to 
learn from him everything about New England, the physician 
was often puzzled with his questions, when he begged the count 
to allow him to bring his friend. Dr. Jarvis, who could give him 
all the information he so anxiously desired. The count and the 
doctor had many interviews, which both greatly enjoyed. 

From all these outward activities, professional, statistical, and 
philanthropic, showing the ability and extended information of 
Dr. Jarvis, it is a pleasing task to turn to his inner life, a man so 
eminently conscientious, perhaps scrupulous. Like his father, he 
laid down a line of duty, and followed it to the letter. Tn giving 
in his property to the assessors, he. would count the change in his 
pocket. So great is the confidence in his integrity, that an eminent 
judge, obliged by ill health to leave the country for two years, 
asked the doctor, as a great favor, to hold his money and securities 
during his absence. Quite unwillingly he consented, for he was 
jealous of business, lest it should trench iipon his intellectual pur- 
suits; still, for many of the poor and inexperienced, he took charge 
of their little all, with a sharp watch for their interests. Truthful, 
careful, and strictly honest, his word was as good as his bond. 

The doctor was sometimes a keen censor, but " faithful are the 
wounds of a friend." If he exposed weakness or guilt, a real 
friendliness was the spring of what he did; indeed, there was an 
unusually large beneficence in his life, in public relations as well 
as in private friendships. He has lived to do good. There is a 
loving kindness in his writings on intemperance, idleness, poverty, 
and insanity. His heart bleeds while he lays bare the consequences 
of wrong-doing. Sometimes there is a beautiful tenderness, very 



DE8CRNDANT8 OF JOHN — 8KC0ND OKNKRATION. 



243 



close to his sharp discrimination. He was associated in an oflRce 
with a lady whom he could not like, although he thought her well- 
disposed. One morning li<' was to attend a meeting where he 
would be obliged to meet the lady in the business of their common 
office, and his wife saw him in the garden making up a bouquet, 
and she said, "Edward, what are you doing?" He replied, "I 

am making a bouquet for Mrs. . She is a good woman, but 

I do not like her; she means well, but is unpleasant to me, and I 
will carry her these flowers as a peace-offering." One day he stood 
in a long line of men and women, in the Boston Custom -House, 
awaiting his turn to receive his interest on United States Bonds. 
There was a long line, and the day was very hot; the waiting was 
long and tedious, and an Irish woman, with a baby in her arms, 
stood next to the doctor. Seeing the weary mother, he turned 
and took the baby, taking it to a window-seat near Ity. and gently 
laying it down, said to her, " Yoi; stay here, and f will see that 
you have your turn at the paying-counter." And lie did. 

The religious opinions of Dr. Jarvis are clear and strong. He 
believes in one God, and in Jesu.s Clunst whom He hath sent to be 
the Light of the World; that we are children of God, heirs of 
immortality, and subi<H;ts of righteous retribution here and here- 
after, for ever. And Ids faith is in his heart, and out of it are the 
issues of his life. 

Though the doctor and his wife have no children, still their 
hearts possess the freshness of youth. They love and are beloved, 
and their simple, pleasant, and cheerful home is the resort of troops 
of friends. Their ■A'ork of life is nearly done, and they make 
ready and wait, amidst the evening shadows, for the morning of 
another day. 

Besides the important works above mentioned, and others which 
space will not permit to enumerate, the doctor has written over 
eighty articles fur the various medical reviews and magazines in 
this country. 

The subjects upon which the doctor felt so great an interest 
were those upon which he treated and wrote, and in publisliing 
his Essays, he sought the channels through which he could best 
reach those whom he wanted to interest and persuade. 



-,j 


r 

1 








244 DRHOKNDANTH OF JOHN — THIRD GKNKRATION. 




»3«4. 






No. Namo. Bom. 


Died. 


Married or Remarks. 




Caleb Jarvis, Aug. 25. 1773 


April 25, 1835 


May 10, 1798. 




2344 Nancy Hyde, Oet. 21, 1770 


Sept. 11, 1876 






4 children. 








2345 Mary Ann,' June 15, 1800 


Dec. 22, 1874 


Sept. 7, 1823. 




2346 Caroline. Feb. 4, 1802 




July 25, 1827, John B, 
Howard. 




2847 Amelia Hyde,. Sept. 15, 1810 


Sept. 3, 1856 






2348 Eliz. Bowmon, Jan. 12, 1812 




Henry R. Healey. 




3d Generation. 






5^333. 






No. Name. Born. 


Died. 


Married or Remarks. 




John Jarvis, Aug. ll>, 1797 


Jan. 2, 1855 


Jan. 6, 1822. 




2349 Adeline Rust, July 24, 1799 


June 18, 1842 






6 children. 








aS.'iO J as. Lawrence, Feb. 4.1823 




Ainii 27, 1846. 




2351 Eliza Lane, June 30, 1824 








2352 John Q. A., Oct. 21, 1820 


May 16, 1827 






|l 2353 Helen Marion, Oct. 6,1828 








t' 2354 Adeline Matil., Jan. 11,1833 


.fune 28, 1842 






2355 Sarah Ann, Nov. 9,1835 


Nov. 25. 1858 






2d wife. 








2356 Hepzibah Locke, 




May 7, 1845. 




SSST'. 






t Francis Jarvis, Nov. 5,1794 


April 5. 1875 






2357 Phebe Hubbard, July 14, 1799 


Fel). 28, 1836 






7 children. 








2358 Louisa, July 23, 1820 


April 19, 1853 


May 16, 1850, .h>Hc]^\l 
Dfby. 




2359 Lucy Hubbard, July 22, 1822 




Oct. 30, 1855, Joseph 
Derby. 




2360 Cyrus Hubb'd,'Mch. 18, 1825 




Oct. 20, 1864. 




2361 Harriet, May 5, 1827 


Nov. 12, 1828 






2362 Fr'cesHubb'd, June 23, 1829 


Sept. 27, 1856 


Oct. 14, 1852, Silas B. 
Wilde. 




2363 Sus'l Hubb'd, Aug. 4, 1830 


Mch. 4, 1836 






2364 Margaret, Dec. 28, 1831 


April 19, 1836 




i . 'Married Nathaniel Hill; 1 child 


, Mary J. Hill, Mch. 27. 1824. 1 




^v " Married Mary Hosmer, who died Aug. 33, 1865 


• 



DKS0ENDANT8 OF JOHN — ;FOURTH OKNKRATION. 



245 



4th Gkneration. 



No. Name. Bom. 

Jas. Lawrence 

Jarvis, Feb. 4, 1823 

2365 Lue'tiaOooper.Nov. 24, 1828 

5 children. 
23G0 Fred. H.. 

2367 Mary A., 

2368 John A..' 
2361) Maria G.. 
2370 Annie G., 



Died. 



Mch. 9, 1847 
April 26, 1851 Dec. 
.Inn. 10, 1854 
Jan. 20, 1857 • 
July 28, 1866 



9, 1861 



Married or Remarka. 
April 27, 1846. 



April 12, 1876. 



' Married Anna M(;Glensiug; 2 children— Caroline L., born June 7, 1877 
James Lawrence, born Jan. 1, 1879. 



•^^imm 



mmm 



i 



246 



FBAOMKNTARV OKNKALOOIR8. 



No 



Name. 
Junies Jarvis, 
3372 Penelope Waters. 

2 children. 
2873 Johns.. M^... 3, 109B 

2374 Mary, Mch. 25. 1097 



FRAGMENTARY (JENKAUXJIEH. 
Born, Died. 



Married or RtMiiarkH. 
.TillV IH. l«i»*t 



«3r«. 



Wm. Jervis, 

2376 Hannah Forward, 

4 children. 

2377 Joseph. 

2378 Joan nab, 

2379 Hannah, 

2380 Sarah, 



Of Norwalk. 
Mch. 27, 1723. 



Feb. 17, 1724 
Sept. 27, 1725 
Nov. 23, 1727 
Dec. 27, 1730 



June 0, 1732 



l8T Generation. 
S381. 



No. Name. 

Stephen Jarvis, 

2382 Ann Wheeler, 

6 children. 

2383 Susanna, 

2384 Mary, 

2385 Sarah, 

2386 Esther, 

2387 Thomas, 

2388 William. 



Bom. 



Died. 



Married or Remark*. 
May 15, 1728. 
Of Smithtown. 



4, 1734 
12, 1730 
4, 1744 
May 20, 1750 
1701 



Feb. 
Dec. 
Feb. 



1794 



July 31, 1791. 
D. in Norwiilli 



No. Name. 

Thomas Jarvis, 
2389 Rebecca Piatt. 
7 children. 



2d Generation. 



Born. 



Died. 



1761 



Married or Remarks. 
July 31, 1791. 



RHAOMKNTAItY OKNKAI.OOIEH. 



247 



No. Name. 

mm Platl, 

2i«»l Jiuob. 
a31>2 Josopli, 
2803 ilcuhcn, 

2iiH Dorms, 
2im f;imrity, 
3aU6 Sally, 



Horn. 



Died. 



1808 



Married or Hnmarkt, 
Mch. 3, 1814. E. Jiir- 

YiB. 



lUiHidinj; wchI cikI of 

fiou^' Ittltmd. 
JamcH I)uiil)iir. 
Siiiuiicl Hishop. 
CliiiH. lluwcat. 



No. Name. 

.lacob .IiirviH. 
5 children. 
3897 Susan, 

3398 Alonzo. 

3399 (fcor^re. 

3400 Ira. 
2401 Mary. 



3u (Jenkkation. 
«30 1 . 

Horn. Died. 



Married or Rutuarlts. 



Bovvers. 



.Joseph Jarvis, 

2403 Esther. 

4 children. 
3403 Mary Esther, 

2404 Phebe Elizabeth, 

2405 Joseph lleury, 
3406 Keturah Ann, 



1803 



.John N. Tliomp8(}n. 
.John KiniHcn'. 
Sarah White. 
Townseud H. Gardner. 



Melaucthon 
Bryant Jervis, 1775 

3408 Polly Smith. 

3 children. 

3409 Hannah, , Oct. 9, 1798 

3410 Sally, Feb. 35, 1800 

2d wife. 

3411 Clarissa Jennings, 

2 children. 
3413 Eliza, 1805 

3413 George, 1809 



1856 Sept. 34, 1797. 



Knapp of Norwulk. 
. Ellas Foote. 

1831 1803. 

A. S. Ames. 
Cath. "Williams. 



248 



FRAGMENTAKY QENEALOGIKP. 



No. Name. Born. 

Giiorge .Tarvis, 1800 

2414 Catharine Williams, 

1 child. 

2415 Geo. M. Jarvis, 1847 



Natliaiiicl Jarvis, 
4 childrou. 

2417 'riu'CHlorus. 

2418 Susan. 

2419 Selah. 

2420 Brewster. 



Philip .larvi.s. 
2422 Elizabeth AVeeks, 

4 chihlren. 
242b Augustiii. 
2424 Moses. 

2 daughters. 



Died. Married or Reniarks. 

1886 

Dora Vail; 1 child. 



%£-L 1 €». 



Of Islip. 



«4« 1 . 



1814. 






APPENDIX. 



A. 

Town Order. 

From "TJiompson^s History of Long Tsland." 

"At a town Meeting held April 4, 1661, it was agreed that a 
firkin of Butter should be paid in at Stephen Jarvis' house, by the 
middle of June for the satisfaction of a debt due from y* to ffn to 
Ensign Brian t." 



B. 

Law Suits. 
' From '■'■Thomjysori's History of Long Island^ 

"October 23*, 1662. Stephen Jervice, an Attorney, in behalfe 
of James Chichester plf. vs. Tho' Scudder deft., acsion of the case 
and of batery. Deft, says that he did his indevor to st^'e y" 
pigg from y" wolff, but knows no hurt his dog did it: and as for 
y* sow, he donys thecharg: touching the batery, striking the boye, 
says he did strike the boye but it was for liis abusing his daughter. 

"The verdict of the Juiy is, that def" dog is not fitt to be cept, 
but the acsion fails for want of testimony: but touching the batery, 
the Jury's verdict pass for pl'lf, that def pay him 10 shillings for 
striking *-he boy, and the pl'il to pay dcf' 5 shillings fdr the boye's 
insovility." 

" October 23", 1662. Rachell Turner sayth that being husking 
at Tho' Powells, Jamos Chichester found a rod ear, and then said 
he must kiss Bette Scudder: Bette say'd she would whip his brick, 
and they two scufeling foil by her side: that this diponcnt and 
Tho' Scudder being tracing, and having ended his trace, rose up 
and took howld of James Cliichcster, and gave him a box on the 
ear. Robard Crumfield says, that being huskitig at Tho' Powells, 
32 



iiiniMffrfftfmi 



(■RIWPKin 



!1PW»I 



m^ 



m J 



250 



APPENDIX C. 



i 



James Chichester found a red eare and then said he must kiss 
Bette Scudder, and they too scufling, Goody Scudder bid him be 
quite, and puld him from her, and gave him a slap oti the side of 
the heade: the vardict of the Jury is, that James shall paye pi' 12 
shillings and y" cost of y* cort." 



1632. 
1637. 



1641. 

1645. 

1658. 
1660. 

1 664. 
1667. 



1700. 



m 



0. 

Names and Incidents, 
Furnished by Dr. Edward Jarvis of Massacliusetts. 

John, son of Thomas Jarvis and Elizabeth, his wife, of 
Charlestown, was bom Nov. 18, 1632. 

Homer Jarvis and wife Ann, and d. Ann and Mary, had 
James, born 1637; John, 1639; Mary, June 10, 1641, who 
died August 18, 1642. Another or second wife, Alice, 
had Stephen, born Nov. 24, 1642; Howard or Hannah, 
b. 1644; Mary, 1646. Third wife, Mary, who in another 
place is called Ellen, died Nov. 6, 1665. James was free- 
man. May 17, 1637; died February, 1685; married Sarah 
White, Oct. 13, 1658. 

John, son of Thomas and Margaret Jarvis of Dedham. born 
March 16, 1641. 

Stephen Jarvis, born about 1645; Howard, born Sept. 3, 
1662. 

John Jarvis, Ex. of will of Geo. Manning, July 21, 1658. 

James Jarvis and Sarah White, had Jpines, b. Oct. 23, 
1660, d. 1676; Mary, b. April 26, 1664. 

James, Oct. 23, 1660; Mary, April 26, 1664. ^ 

Stephen, son of Homer, m. Abigail Wood, Mch. 29, 1667, 
d. 1749. The family of Jervis were in • Staffordshire 
at .Medford and Chathill, in the time of Henry VIIT. 
Thomas, brother of first James, removed early to Hart- 
ford. 

Rebecca Jarvis, d. of William and Elizabeth, b. May 1, 
1691. Amofig the early settlers of Essex and Old Nor- 
folk was Andrew Jarvis, 1603 or 1694. 

Will of Elias Jarvis, 1695, Rebecca, wife, Ex.' 

Will of Elias Jarvis, 1697, Margaret, wife, Ex. 

Isaac and Abigail \^oden (?), m. Jan. 19, 1698; son of John, 
born 1692, Eunice Jarvis, married. 



APPENDIX 0. 



251 



3, 



23, 



olin, 



1700-1710. Nathaniel m. Elizabeth Aug. 13, 1709. This Nathan- 
iel, according to Dr. Miner, came from Wales, 
Benjamin, son of Leonard Jarvis and Sarah, his wife, b. 

Dec. 23, 1706, Cambridge. 
Will of James, 1705, Penelope, his wife, Ex. 
William, son of John and Mary, b. Oct. 17, 1707. 
Hon. Edward Jarvis, Surv'y M. M. C, married Elizabeth 

Sparhawk. Elizabeth Jarvis m. Edmund Quincy, son of 

Henry, who was born 1703. 
1710-1720. Nathaniel Jarvis and Elizabeth Trevit m, July 16, 

1713. 
Susan Jarvis m. Daniel Bradford, 1720; grandson of John, 

1715; William, 1728.— Gen. Reg. 
Meeting at house of Nathaniel Jarvis, 1717, to see about a 

meeting house. — Drake's History of Boston. 
1720-1730. Susan Jarvis m. Daniel Bradford, 1720; John 1st, 

Aug. 18, 1729; Margaret, Jan. 22, 1731. 
Robert Jarvis and Mary Cross m. Jan. 29, 1723. 
1730-1740 James Jarvis lived in Roxbury, Oct. 22, 1736. 
Will of Mary, 1732. 
Will of Nathaniel (w.), 1737. 

Leonard Jarvis and Susannah Condy m. April 12, 1739. 
James Jarvis and Abigail m. Aug. 14, 1732; daughter, 

Penelope, b. June 24, 1835. 
1740-1750. Will of Abigail, 1742, Leonard Jarvis and John 

Salter, Ex. ; widow of Nathaniel. 
Will of Robert, 1749, Mary (wife), Administratrix. 
Will of James, 1750, Abigail (wife), Ex. 
Elias Jawis and Mary Avis m. Nov. 11, 1747. 
Elias Jarvis, Jr., and Deliverance Atkins m. June 7, 1750. 
John Jarvis, born 1746, died 1823. 
Thomas, son of Nathaniel, d. 1742. 
William, son of Nathaniel, d. 1801-1805. 
Ann, d. Elias and Pleasant. 
Charles, 1796-1797. 
EHzabeth, 1820, died 1826, Dorchester. 
1750-1760. Penelope Jarvis m. Dr. Thorp Rogers of Norwich, 

Conn., 1754. 
Will of Elias, 1757. ^ 

Will of Elias, 1760, wife Administratrix; ship chandler. 
Edward and Catharine Hammett m. Nov. 5, 1754. 



2b2 



APPENDIX D, 



?. 



1750-1760. Robert Jarvis and Lydia Audebert m. Sept. 30, 1753. 

Elizabeth, d. of Thomas and Lydia, b. Aug. 30, 1757. 

Thomas, son of Thomas and Lydia, b. Sept. 16, 1759. 

Hannah Jarvis, b. 1757, d. 1811; Boston gravestone. 
1760-1770. Jarvis, b. 1761, d. 1811. 

Sarah Jarvis, b. 1764, d. 1816. 

Abigail Jarvis, b. 1767, d. 1818. 

Betsey Jarvis, b. 1797, d. 1820. 

Edward Jarvis, b. 1757, d. 1821. 

William Jarvis, b. 1820, d. 1820. 

John Jarvis, b. 1815, 

John Jarvis, b. August, 1748, d. 1823. 

John Jarvis, b. 1844. 

Timothy Jarvis and Rebecca Collins m. Aug. 30, 1764. 

John Jarvise and Mary Munsell m. Oct. 9, 1768. 

Capt. Robert Jarvis, buried in Quaker Lane, Mch. 20, 1760. 

Brig Hannah, Capt. Robert Jarvis, arr. from London, 1766. 

Capt. Robert Jarvis died in London, 1773; left widow, 

Lydia, and sons, Philip and John. 

1770-1780. Nathaniel and Samuel Jarvis (residence unknown) 

were grantees of St. John, N. B., 1783. John settled 

'ohere about 1783, died at Portland, N. B., 1845, aged 93. 

Robert Mariner of Boston, an assessor of Hutchinson in 
1774, went to Halifax, 1776, was prosecuted and ban- 
ished, 1778, was in London, 1779; a LoyaHst. 

John Jarvis of Boston, was Protector. 

Enoch Jarvis and Sarah Dunovan m. April 14, 1774. 

Timothy Jarvis moved out of Boston to Newburyport, 1775. 
He followed the sea; was captain. Married Rebecca Col- 
lins. His daughter Phoebe was b. in Newburyport, Dec. 
20, 1777. 






D. 

Extracts from the Records of the Town of Huntington, L. I. 

1668, Jan. 1. "It was ordered and agreed at a Town meeting, 
the same day, that John Finch is to have six acres of land on the 
bottom of East Neck, and Stephen Jarvis, six acres." 
1668, July 1. "Land granted to Stephen Jarvis." 
1676, June 5. Land grants to Steven Jarvis, Jr. 



APPENDIX D. 



253 



1679. Stephen, Jr., Land granted by Town. 
1679. Aaron Jarvis, Land given by his father. 
1C79. Thomas Jarvis, Piece of Swamp in East Neck. 
1679, Aug. 20. Stephen Jarvis to Samuel Griffin. 

Daniel Wicks to Aaron Jarvis. 

Daniel Wicks to Thomas Jarvis. 

Stephen Jarvis to Samuel Wilson. 

Land grants to Thomas Powell, Thomas Wicks, 



Land grants to John Wicks, Timothy Conklin, 



1679, Dec. 22. 
1679, Dec. 22. 
1679, Aug. 20. 

1681, Oct. 31. 
Steven Jarvis, Jr. 

1682, April 1. 
Steven Jarvis, Sr. 

1682, Jan. 2. The Town Court ordered the estate of an intem- 
perate person to be attached, that it might be "secured, preserved, 
and improved, for his livelihood and maintenance, and that the 
town might not be damnified." 

1082, July 29. They order a person to pay a fine of 20 shillings 
or make such acknowledgment as the court would accept, for hav- 
ing brought a bag of meal from Oyster Bay on the Sabbath. 

1683, June 3. They required a written confession of shame and 
repentance from three men who had travelled on Sunday from the 
town of Hempstead. 

1684, Stephen Jarvis, Sr., Deed of land at the Cove, East 
Neck. 

1684. Jonathan Jarvis, Deed of land from Kellam. 
1684, Nov. 27. Daniel Wicks to Stephen Jarvis. 
1684, Dec. 22. Robert KeHum to Jonathan Jarvis. 
1686. Stephen, Deed from Thomas Highbee. 
1686. Stephen, Lot of Meadow south side of L. L 
1686, Oct. 16. Land grants to Jonathan Jarvis. 

1686, May 23. David Scudder to Stephen Jarvis. 

1687, Sept. 20. "At a Town meeting Sep. y" 20'" 1687, granted 
to Steven Jarvis, Sr. one hundred acres of land, Eastward of y° 
path going into y"" East Neck, opposite to Jas. Chichester, Sen." 

1687, Sept. 20. Land grants to Steven Jarvis, Jr. Privilege 
of Well on the Commons granted Jonathan Jarvis. 

1688, Sept. 10. Joseph Wood to Wm. Jarvis. 

1688. Wm. Jarvis, Deed for property at Cove, East Neck. 

1688. Stephen Jarvis, Sr., witness. 

1688. Stephen Jarvis, Jr., Private highway from Benjamin 
Scudder. 

1690, April 1. Land grants to Thos. Higbee, Mr. Wood, James 
Chichester, Jonathan Jarvis, Steven Jarvis, Jr., Steven Jarvis, Sr. 



^-MMiiiWII 









254 



APPKNDIX D. 



1692, Jan. 2. 



Vote.d that Jonathan Jarvis have 16 acres of 
laud. 

1692. Stephen Jarvis, Jr., Grant for highway. 

1693. Stephen Jarvis, Jr., Bought land of his father at Great 
East Neck. 

1693. Thomas Jarvis, Land bought hy Stephen from his father 
Thomas. 

1693, Dec. 14. Thomas Jarvis to Stephen Jarvis. 

1694. "An account of y* hundreds in y' Town of Huntington, 
and by whom paid for in y* purchase of y* New Patten in y* year 
1694." 

"First — Y" purchased hundred made or purchased from the 
settlement of y* Town, having right to all divisions from the first 
settlement of y" Town. 

1 Hundred,' belonging to y* lott of Widow Cain, paid for by 
Tho. Fleet. 

2 H. belonging to Lott of Tho. Jarvis — paid 1 qr. of a hundred 
by Jonathan Jarvis and 1 qr. by William Jarvis." 

" 1 H. paid for by Widow Jarvis, belonging to y" lott of Steven 
Jarvis, Jr. 
' 1 H. paid by Jonathan Jarvis. 
1 H. belonging to y* lott of William Jarvis paid for by him. 

1696. William Jarvis for witness. 

1697. "Land grants To y" Survaiors of y^ Town of Hunting- 
ton, April y« 30'" 1697. 

" These are to order you to lay out y" hundreds, hold on by Jona- 
than Jarvis, a piece of land in East Neck, on y' South side of y" 
highway joyning to y' point, between y'' land of Jonathan 

Jarvis, and Joseph Wood, and y° Harbor bank. John Wood, Jr. 

'' The same daie it was voted and granted by y" trustees of the 
freeholde and Comrionalty of y" town of Huntington that Jona- 
than Jarvis's hous lot he lives on shall joynd to Jonas Piatt's house 
&c. 

1698. Jonathan oarvis, Land on south side of Island. Deed 
for meadow from Thomas Fleet. 

1698. Thomas Jarvis, Land on south side the Island. 

1698. William Jarvis, Deed for land at Cow Harbor. 

1698. Among the purchasers of Baiting Place and Squam Pitt 
of the Indians, we find the names of Thomas Jarvis, William Jar- 
vis, Jonathan Jarvis, Stephen Jarvis. — 7 M' 8 day, 1698. 

1698, Oct. John Ketcham to Thomas Jarvis. 



APPENDIX D. 



255 



Pitt 
Jar- 



1690, May 2. Boggy Swamp, lying by Jonathan Rogers', was 
sold at Vendue to William Jarvis for four pounds, two shillings in 
current silver money an acre. 

1699. "Huntington, May y" 2'"* 1699. Chosen for trustees, 
Justis Wicks, Justis Wood, Captain Wicks, Piatt, Jonas 

Wood, John Ketcham; the same day, the boggy swamps lying by 
Jonathan Rogers, was sold or granted to William Jarvis for Four 
pounds, two shillings, in Curant silver money." 

1699. "Toy" Survaiors of the Town of Huntington, January 
ye jjih i699_ Thos are to order you to laie out eighteen acres of 
land to y hundreds holden by Thomas Jarvis joyning to Johnathan 
Chichester's land on y" North side, in lieu of eighteen aicres for- 
merly granted to y* s** Jarvis which lay near Capt. Higbee's land 
in y° hollow in y" East Neck." 

"To y° survaiors of y* Town of Huntington, &c. — Jonathan Jar- 
vis, Stephen Jarvis." 

1700. William Jarvis, Deed of Meadow land south side of 
Island. 

1700, April 5. Benjamin Bender to William Jarvis. 

1701, Sept. 3. John Green to William Jarvis. 

1702, "To y' Survaiors of y* Town of Huntington, March y" 
5"" 1702. Thos are to order lay out the right formerly held by 
Eliphalet Jarvis, ten acres of land, part joyning to the land for- 
merly s'' Jarvise's in the East Neck, and the remainder joining to 
the East side of the land of William Jarvis Junior at the Long 
Swamps." 

1702, Nov. 26. Joseph Wood to Wm. Jarvis. 

1702. Wm. Jarvis, Agreement with Joseph Wood for land. 

1703. Wm. Jarvis, Deed to S. Ketcham. 

1703, May 21. Thomas Jarvis, Deed to Wm. Johnson. 
1703, Nov. 26. Joseph Wood, Deed to Wm. Jarvis. 
1703, Aug. 21. Thomas Jarvis, Deed to Wm. Johnson. 

1703, Oct. 9. Thomas Jarvis, Deed to Thomas Ketcham. 

1704. "To y* Survaiors of y" Town of Huntington, January 
y" 10, 1704. — Thomas Jarvis." 

1708, March 3. Thomas Ketcham, Deed to Thomas Jarvis. 
1708, March 8. Thomas Ketcham, Deed to Wm. Jarvis. 
1708. "To ye Survaiors of v" Town of Huntington, April y" 
29, 1708.— Thomas Jarvis &c." 

1708. Wm. Jarvis, Deed for land at Cove. East Neck. 
1710, Dec. 15. Ebenezer Blackley, Deed to Wm. Jarvis. 



m 






iniiiig^ 



iigriTTrri' 



mmmmm 



256 



APPENDIX D. 



■ i 



1710. Wm. Jarvis, Deed of land to F.. Blackley. 

1711. May 1. Thomas Jarvis to Cnleb Powell, Meadow on 
South Side. 

1712. "Huntington, February the ?5"' 17jJ. To the Surveyors 
of the Town of Huntington. Thos are to Order you to lay to I'he 
hundred holden by Elislia Jarvis, ten acres of land in the East 
Neck, joining to his land, at che Vinoyard, the place will afford it, 
joining the same on the South East side." 

1712, March 6. Eliphalet Jarvis to Thomas Whitehead. 

1712, Nov. 7. To the Surveyors of the Town of Huntington. 
Those are to order you to lay out the hundred and quarter, holden 
by Eliphalott Jarvis, fifteen acres." 

1713, Sept. 5. Eliphalet Jarvis to Obediah Rogers. 

1715, June 14. Memorial in relation to the site for the erec- 
tion of a church. Signed by William and Thomas Jarvis in con- 
nection with the inhabitants generally. 

1716, Sept. 19. Daniel Lewis to Thomas Jarvis. 

• 1717, " Apl. 15'". Eliphalett Jarvis, 12 acres of land." 

1719. Thomas Jarvis, Land in Half Hollows from Daniel 
Lewis. 

1720, Jan. 8. Eliphalet Jarvis, Deed lO John Carman. 

1720, Eliphalet Jarvis, Deed for land of John Carman. Witness, 
Jonathan Jarvis. 

Grants for land from Cove, East Neck, 1713, 1717, 1718, 1724, 
1725, 1729, 1734, 1737. 

1722, June 27. Joseph Wood, Deed to William Jarvis. 

1722, "Apl. 4"'. To the Surveyors of Huntington. Those are 
to order you to lay out to the right hold by Eliphalett Jarvis, 9 
acres of land in the East Neck part joining to his own land, and 
part joining to the land of William Johnson." 

1723. L. Grants. April 11, 1723, Wm. Jarvis— Thos. Jarvis. 
1723, Feb. 20. Thomas Jarvis — 25 acres. 

1723, April 19. Thomas Jarvis and others to Timothy Wood. 

1724, April the 21"'. To the Surveyors of Huntington. Those 
are to order you to lay out to the right formerly holden by Jona- 
than Jarvis, 12 acres and a half of land. 

1724, May 5. William Jarvis received two votes for Trustee of 
town. ^ 

1725. William Jarvis elected Trustee. 

1725. William Jarvis, Jr., Deeds land to Epenatus Piatt. 
1725, April 7. "To the Surveyors of Huntington, those are to 



APPENDIX D, 



257 



order you to lay out the right formerly held by Eliplialet Jarvis, 
ten acres of land, part joining to the land formerly s'' Jarvise's in 
the East Neck, and the remainder joining to the East side of the 
land of William Jarvis Junior at the Long Swamps." 

1726-1731. Wm. Jarvis re-elected Trustee. 

1729, March 5. Isaiah Jarvis to Jacob Conklin. 

1729. Isaiah Jarvis and Wm. Jarvis, Deed land to Jacob 
Conklin in Half Hollows. 

1730, "April 6'^ To the Surveyors of Huntington. Those are 
to order you to lay out to the right hold by Thomas Jarvis, five 
acres of land, part joyning to the South side of his other land, on 
the South side of the Cow path &c." 

1733. Stephen Jarvis, Deed for land from Jeremiah Smith. 
1733-1744. Wm. Jarvis, Jr., elected Trustee. 
1736, May. Thomas Jarvis elected Constable. 

1743. Benajah Jarvis, Deed of land in or near Clay pitts. 

1744, March 19. Epenetus Piatt, Deed to Epenetus Jarvis. 
1744. Jonathan Jarvis, Deed to P. Jarvis. 

1747. Henry Jarvis, Deed for land between Huntington and 
Cow Harbor. 

1748, May. Wm. Jarvis elected Trustee. 

1750, April 1. From records of Session of Church: Abraham 
Chichester or Benajah Jarvis were chosen by the C'liurch, either 
the one or the other, as best shall suit their conveniency, to sit 
with the Presbytery as the Churches delegate at Brookliaven next 
Wednesday. 

1752, March 12. Ebenezer Titus, Deed to Augustine Jarvis. 

1752, Dec. 4. Wm. Jarvis, Deed to Henry Jarvis. 

1752. Henry Jarvis, Land given by his father William. 

1752. Augustin Jarvis, Deed for land in Clay pitts. 

1753. Benajali Jarvis sells land in Clay pitts to Samuel Smith. 
Witness, Stephen Jarvis, Jr., and Thomas Jarvis, signed by Bena- 
jah Jarvis and Joseph his son. Moses Scudder, Justice of Peace 
for Suffolk Co. 

Land grants to Benajah Jarvis in 1739. 

1754, "April 25. To y" Surveyors of Huntington. Those are 
to order you to lay out to y° right held by Thomas Jarvis, a small 
piece of land, Southside of his house, one rod wide from y" high- 
way, down to y* Bank. — Joseph Lewis." 

1755, "February y" 27"'. Toy"' Surveyors of Huntington, these 



33 




«■ 



^- 



ri 



358 



APPKNDIX D. 



are to order you to lay out to )'" right held by William .Tarvis, one 
acre and a half of land, joyiiing to his other land, or elsewhere." 

17r)5, Aug. 6. Benjamin Jarvis and others to Wm. Jarvis. 

1755. Wm. Jarvis, Jr., Deceased. Benajah and Henry acquit 
claim to his widow. 

1757. Henry Jarvis, "Deed for land on road to Cow Harbor. 

1760. Jonathan Jarvis, Land given by his father, William Jar- 
vis, north and south side of the Island. 

17G0, March 4. Wm. Jarvis, Deed to Jonathan Jarvis. 

1760. Wm. Jarvis; Jr., Spoken of his land in Cow Plarbor. 
Land grant 1699. Land laid out 1704, 1718, 1723, in East Neck. 

Wm. Jarvis, Sr. Land grants 1723, 1728, 1737, Kast Neck. 

1762. Deed for land in Clay pitts, from Daniel Rogers. 
Grants of land to Henry and Jonathan, which belonged to 

father William. 

1763. Thos. Jarvis, Justice Peace Suffolk Co. 

Benajah Jarvis and Suriah Jarvis (who was the widow of Wil- 
liam Jarvis) released for £24 to William and Henry Jarvis, Ex. of 
William Jarvis. 

William, for love and good will and affection, gives to his son 
Henry Jarvis certain lands. Vol. 3, p. 236. 

William Jarvis, for love and good will, gives to his son Jonathan 
Jarvis certain lands. Vol. 4, p. 302. 

1764. Stephen Jarvis, Sr., Gives land in Old Fields in Centre- 
port to Stephen Jarvis, Jr., and Austin, his sons. 

1765. Philip Jarvis, Abraham Jarvis, William Jarvis, Henry 
Jarvis, were appointed overseers of Highways, and Capt. Jarvis 
Commisioner of Highways. 

1767-1768. Robert Jarvis, Overseer Highways. 

1769-1770. Nathaniel and Henry Jarvis, Overseers Highways. 

1771. John Jarvis, Henry Jarvis, Overseers of Highways. 

1771. Eliphalet Jarvis appointed to collect and drive in the 
sheep. 

1772. Austin Jarvis elected Overseer Highways. 

1773. Jonathan and Henry Jarvis, Overseers Highways. 

1775. Abraham Jarvis, Jr., \ 

Robert Jarvis and Henry Jarvis, j h j • 

1776. Eliphalet Jarvis, Claim for hording two men one week 
and letting them have two coverlids. £4 0. 
Nov. 10'^ 1776. 

1776. "^iintington, September 4'", 1776. 



APPENDIX D. 



2'i9 



" By John Dunbar, who took horses, at the time for the use of 
General (Heaven's artillery, took from Jonathan Jarvis two horses, 
and a driver, gone 1*2 days. Received no pay; one horse never 
returned, nor no pay — for value 20 pounds &c. To Carting wood 
for the 43 Rogiinent, By order of General Leland, twenty days 
with an Ox team &c. Jonathan Jarvis." 

1776. To 4 days' carting wood for General Dclancey's 2 & 
S"' Batt" at 12 per day. John Jarvis. 

1777. Claim of Philip Jarvis for Carting wood. January- the 
29"', To carting one day, wood for the 2"" Battalion of Gen. De- 
lancee's B. 

1777, "February 4'". To Carting one day for the 3"" Batt" of 
Gen. Delancee's Brigade. Robert Jarvis." 

1778. "To Carting Gen' Tryon's baggage from Huntington to 
Jamaica with an Ox team ; gone 4 days at 1 6 per day. 

, John Jarvis." 
1777. Abraham Jarvis, Robert Jarvis, Henry Jarvis, Overseers 
Higliways. 

1777. " What has been taken by his Majesty's troops, June 
29"*, 1777, a mare taken by Colonel Fannon. 

"November, 1776, To carrying Captain Wooley's men Eastward. 

Philip Jarvis." 

1778. Eliphalet Jarvis, Abraham Jarvis, Robert Jarvis, Henry 
Jarvis, Overseers. 

1778. May 17. Taken from Moses Jai'vis for his Majesty's ser- 
vis 3 spoons. 

1779. Taken away by Dicks Conductor March the 17"' 5 hun- 
di'eds of fresh Hay by Col. Simcoe's orders. Robert Jarvis. 

1780. Robert Jarvis, Henry Jarvis, Overseers, 

1780, August. "Government Dr. to Abraham Jarvis; To span 
of horses, and waggon in Government service, commanded by Col. 
Simcoe's on a tower. East end of Long Island 11 days at 3/_ for 
each horse and at 3/_ for wagon pr day, and at 3/_ per day for 
driver. £6 12 00." 

"Huntington, 10"' June 1783, then personally appeared y" above 
Abraham Jarvis, and made oath .to the above account, against 
Government for service." 

178 1-1 7. S2. Eliphalet Jarvis, Abraham Jarvis, Henry Jarvis, 
Overseers Highways. 

1782. Received into his Majesties Magazine at Hempstead nine 
Hundred of salt Hay. John Jarvis N. C. L, 



k. , ■■'^" 



1 


1; 


1 






f 


1 
1 





if 



i 



260 



APPKNDIX D. 



1782. Recoivod of Robert Jarvia lot of corn, hay, &c. for the 
General Comrnauding. Long Swamp, Oct. 28, 1782. 

John Hewlett, 8up' Forage. 

1782. On the 24"* of October the dwelling owned })y John 
Hurti.s at tlm head of Cow Hay was attacked about midnight by a 
gang of niaruiiders, having first assaulted the store of James Burr 
a few rods off, and killed the owner, whoso position they ascer- 
tained by hit) voice, having by their devices called him from his 
bed. David Jarvis an apprentice to Mr. Burtis saw the robbers by 
the light of their own fire, and shot at them from the windows of 
the house. M" Jarvis with admirable courage employed hcsrself 
in loading the guns (of which tluiy had several) while Jarvis tired 
upon the gang as often as opportunity offered. They succeeded 
in beating off the robbers with the loss of their leader Captain 
Martin, and the wounding of several others, indicated by the traces 
of blood found next day in their paths to the boats. 

1782. " Received from M' George Norton, forty hundred 
weight of salt hay into his Majesty's Magazine at Hempstead, 
IP" Feby 1782. John Jarvis, A. C. F." 

To George Brinby, Esq., Com. of Forage. 

1782. " Received from M'' Israel Kerle, six hundred weight of 
salt hay into his Majesty's Magazine at Hempstead, IH Feby 1782. 

J. Jarvis, A. C. Q." 

To Geo. Brinby Esq., Com. of forage. 

1782. ReC* of Robert Jarvis lot of Corn, Hay, &c for the Gen- 
eral Commanding. 

Long Swamp 28'" Oct. 1782. 

Jn" Hewlett 

Sup. of forage. 

1782. Receipt for forage from Robert Jarvis. 

Feb. 19'" 1782. Jno. Hewlett 

Sup. forage. 

1783. Eliphalet Jarvip aiai Ichabod Jarvis, Overseers High- 



ways. 
1784. 



Htn- 



>n Jnny 12"' 1784 



£20 0. 





22 0. 





50 0. 






17b4. 



, and little Q) 40' 
loard fence 

Tho' Jarvis." 
Thf'uas Jarvis, Jr., D»!ed May 26, To James Townsend 



Jr., land cm ii-ast side of 'I anting* )n Harbor, inherited from bis 



▲PPBNDIOEH K. AND V. 



261 



father TlioinaH Esq. These Tliomases had land granted by Town, 
by father's rights, 16G9, 1704, 1721, 1731, 1732, 1737. 

1785. Isaiali Jarvis, son of Jonathan and Charity Jarvis, Deeds 
of land in East end of Village, Witness William Jarvis and John 
Ketcham. Land grants William Jr. and Isaiah, 1729 and 1732. 
Isaiah named in records deceased 1737. 

1788. Jonathan Jarvis, Gives land in east end of Village to his 
son Isaiah. Land granted 1697, 1722, 1723, and 1724, rightE of 
Jonathan Jarvis deceased. 

1788, April 7. Jonathan Jarvis and Charity his wife to his son 
Isaiah 50^ acres of Little Neck. 



E. 

Tax List. 
IVom State Documents, Iluntingtov , L. I., 1683. 

1683. Stephen Jarvis, £123 00. 00 

Stephen Jarvis Jr., 31 00. 00 

1755. Thomas Jarvis, 1 female slave. 

Benajah Jarvis, 1 female and 1 male. 

Tax list, 1776. 

1775. Stephen Jarvis, 13 head of Cattle. 

5 " " Swine. 
5 Vessels. 
16 Acres. 



F. 

Contract Between Jos. Wood and Wm. Jarvis, Dated 

Sept. 4, 1688. 

This indenture made the fourth day of September in y" fourth 
year of y*" reign of our Sovereign Lord James y" second over Eng- 
land, Scotland France and Ireland, King and in y° year of Christ 
1688 between Joseph Wood of Morice in y° town.ship of Hemp- 
stead upon Long Island })eing in the Queens County yooman and 
Joanna his wife of the one party and William Jarvis of Hunting- 



I 



1^ I 



:' f 



m 



SI [ 



■f i 



x*^ 



i 
1 

t 

1 

! 

! 
f 




' '1 
LJ 


1 



262 



APPENDIX F. 



ton In y" county of Suffolk in y" said island — both in jurisdiction 
of York. In service of husbandmiiu of the oiher party witness- 
eth that the said Joseph Wood for and in consideration of those 
several sums of money have y' saved to be payed by y" said Wil- 
liam Jarvis, his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns to y" said 
Joseph Wood, his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns at 
times and places hereafter expressed. Y" is to save y° just and 
whole sums of seven poundos, thirteen shillings and four pence — 
at or before the first of May next Insuing if y' s"* William have a 
good voyage in whaling y* year before if not then to pay the fore- 
said sums of good and lawful money without fraud or further 
delays — at or before the first of December next Insuing and 
shall be in year of our Lord 1689 — at y" now dwelling house of 
Ebenetus Piatt, sqe in Huntington aforesaid and also y* like sums 
of seven pounds, thirteen shillings and four pence of like lawful 
money to pay at or before y" first day of May which shall be in 
y" year 1()90, if he has a good voyage in whaling — y" year before 
— If not then to pay y" aforesaid sums at y'' place aforesaid — with- 
out fraud or fu'ther delays — at or before y* first of December next 
after y* also y" like sums of sev n pounds, thirteen shillings and 
four pence — to pay at or before y" first of May which shall be in 
y" year of our Lord 1()91 — if y° said William have a good voyage 
in whaling- y* year before, if not then to pay y"" aforesaid sums at 
or before y° firsu of December next after at y" place aforesaid, 
without fraud or any further delays — for and in consideration of 
those foresaid sums thus saved to be payed y° said Joseph Wood, 
and Joanna his wife doth hereby barcjain and solo allonoato 
Enfoof, confirm and make over our right, title and interest, claims 
and demands — unto j" said William Jarvis l.us heirs, executors, 
administrators and assigns of all that house and building to go 
and havo with that lot of land upon which it standoth being by esti- 
mation two acres be y° same more or less — abutting upon y" north 
aide of lot where Captain Baylis now liveth and unon y« north- 
east side upon y* way that leadeth to y" harbor with all y* fences, 
liberti')S, Easomonts-wator, woods underwoods and Emulhimotis 
whatsoever being part or parcel of my hundred pound right which 
I lastly purchased or had granted from and by free houndors of 
Huntington y" re-^ords of y" court will approve with all our right, 
and title there ^ .ito pertaining whether it be in land layed out or to 
be layod out with all our right of Comanage thereto belonging or 
appertaining to liave and to nold to hirn and his hoyors, executors, 



appb:ndix a. 



263 



administrators or assigns forever at y° v vogdinisd [organized] 
premises with all its appurtenances from y" said Joseph Wood and 
Joanna his wife or their heirs, executors, administrators and assigns 
he y said William Jarvis paying & discharging all debtors & 
demandors and doings & performing all just services as pertains to 
y° premises and he y'' said Joseph Wood doth hereby own and 
ackno'.vledge to be the lawful owner and possessor of y° premises 
and doth hereby covenant and promise and grants for himself his 
hoyoi's, exectutors, or administrators to warrant and defend y° same 
to him s"* William Jarvis his hoyors, executors, administrators 
and assigns from all former bargains, giftors, grantors, morgages, 
foyutors [founders] Dowry or title of Powry from all persons 
whatsoever lawfully claiming of, for, by, or under those in witness 
have of y* parties above named to those indentors interchanging 
have set their hand and seals this day and year before expressed — 
sealed signed and delivered in the presence of us — 

Jonas Smith, Joseph Wood 

Stephen Jarvis Sen. y" 

John Lumis. his 7nark 

Joanna Wood. 
The day and year above mentioned appeared before me the sub- 
scribors and acknowledged this indenture to be their acts and 
deeds. Epanetus Piatt, 

by me John Ketcham voce. 



G. 

List of Births and Mauriaqes. • 
Furnished hy Dr. Edivard Jarvis of Massachusetts. 



Rebecca, daugh. of Wm. and Elizabeth, 
John, .:on of James and Penelope, 
Mary, daugh. of James and Penelope, 
William, son of John and Mary, 
Elizabeth, daugh. of Thomas and Lydia, 
Thomas, son of Thomas and Lydia, 
Melicent, daugh. of Stephen and Lydia G. 
of New Orleans, 



born May 


1, 


1694 


" Mch. 


% 


1695 


" Mch. 


22, 


1697 


" Oct. 


17, 


1707 


" Aug. 


20, 


1757 


" Sept. 


16, 


1759 



Feb. 1, 1844 



■w^ 






264 



APPENDIX H. 



I 



f f 



I 



Records of Marhiages in Boston. 
Edward Jarvis (Boston) and Nabby Porter, 

Isaac and Abigail Boden, 
Nathaniel and Elizabeth Trevet, 
Robert and Mary Cross, 
Leonard and Susannah Condy, 
Elias and Mary Avis, 
Elias, Jr., and Deliverance Atkins, 
Timothy and Rebecca Collins, 
Enock and Sarah Dunnevan, 
Edward and Sarah Storer, 
John and Hannah Seabury, 
Daniel and Sukey Candredge, 
Edward and Catharine Hammett, 
Robert and Lydia Audebert, 
John Jervise and Mary Ingersoll, 
Boston and Mary Ann Malcolm, 
Denning and Ann Smith Statson, 
Leonard and Mary Hubbard Gruin, 
Benjamin and Mary Porter, 
John Jarves and Ann Wilson, 
Charles and Nancy Thayer, 
Stephen and Lydia Grafton Prescott, 



Marshfield, 




Feb. 8, 


1793 


Jan. 19, 


1698 


July 16, 


1713 


Jan. 29, 


1723 


April 12, 


1739 


Nov. 11, 


1747 


June 7, 


1750 


Aug. 30, 


1764 


April U, 


1774 


July 19, 


1781 


April 10, 


1788 


Dec. 12, 


1797 


Nov. 5, 


1754 


Sept. 30, 


1753 


Oct. 9, 


1768 


Jan. 5, 


1783 


May 24, 


1815 


Aug. 15, 


1816 


Nov. 30, 


1809 


April 28, 


1812 


Sept. 12, 


1824 


Aug. 21, 


1838 



H. 

Deed of Joseph Wood to William Jarvis, 1702. 

This Indenter made the twenty sixth day of Novembar In the 
first yeare of the raign of our Soveraign Lady Ana by the grace 
of God, queen of England, Scotland, Franc, and Irelands defendar 
of the faith and in yeare of our I^ord Christ, one thousand seven 
Hundared and two. Between Jose})h Wood of Huntington in the 
County of Suffolk upon the Island of Nasaw in the Collanay of 
Newyork In Amaraca ycman, of the one part and William Jarvis 



» 



APPENDIX H. 



265 



the 
jrace 
sndar 
leven 
n the 
ay of 
arvis 



of the same town, County and Oollany. Aforesaid yoman of the 
other part witneseth that the aforesaid Joseph Wood for and in 
consideration of a sartain sum of good and lawfull money of New- 
york to him the said Joseph Wood in liand paid by the said Wil- 
liam Jarvis at or before the ensealling and delivary hereof of him 
the said Joseph Wood doth acknowledge himself heare with to be 
fully satisfied, contented and paid, and there of, and there from 
and of, and from every part and being in the town of Huntington 
aforesaid, and is Bounded as followith, on the West by the hiway, 
on the North by John Piatt horn lot, on the est by the Woods In 
Comans on the South, by Thomas Smith hom lot togathjr with all 
housings, barns fences gardins orchards with all the Right, title, 
interest posesion proparty, Claime, and demand, whatsoever the 
said Joseph Wood made unto the said land to have and to hold 
The said land with the apertanances unto tlie said William Jarvis 
his haires Excutors and administrators unto the sole and only 
propar use and behauf of him the said William Jarvis, his heires 
and assignes for ever apd the said Joseph Wood doth for him selfe 
his heires and assigns that he the said Joseph Wood now at the 
insealling and delivary heare of standeth and is soly Rightfully 
sesed of the said premisis of a good and perfict Estate in fee 
simpoU to Him his heires and asignes for ever and that the premi- 
ses now are and forever hereafter, shall be, and remain to the said 
William Jarvis, his heires and asignes, full and clerely acquited 
releced and discharged of, and from all, and all manar of other, 
and formar bargins, sales alanations morgages Judgments, Exe- 
cutions, and all other charges and Incumberences whatsoever, and 
the above said Joseph Wood, his heires Executors and Adminis- 
trators and asignes, doth Covinant, promis, and grant, to, and with 
the said William Jarvis, his heires, Executors, Administrators or 
asignes, that at any time or times, heareafter, upon Requests made 
shall give any further security as he the said W illiam Jarvis or 
his larned councel in the law thinks fit and. further the said Joseph 
Wood doth ingago him self, his h aires, Executors, Administrators, 
and asignes, that from time to time, and for ever shall and will 
save harmles and Indemnifi, the said William Jarvis his heires, 
and asignes, from any person, or persons, whatsoever that may, or 
shall lay any just clame to him, or the said William Jarvis or his 
successors in his or there quiet possession in witness whereof the 
said Joseph Wood hath hereunto set to his hand and fixed his seal 

34 



r 



f 



" -" III — 



266 



APPENDIX I. 



t ! 



1 1,; 



^11 f 



the day and year first above written. Sealed and delivered In the 

presence of 

Jonathan Jams, ^ '- — -•— ^ 

Nathaniel Wickes. -j Seal, t 



Joseph Wood. 



1702. 



] Seal. [ 



Memorandom that on the fifteenth day of October 1703 aperaed 
before John Wicks one of her Majestis Justises of the peace, for 
the County of Suffolk the within named Joseph Wood, and doth 
acknowledge the within writen conveiance to bee his free and vol- 
lantary act and deed. ''*" John "Wickes. 

Memorandom that on the 25 day of October 1703.apeared 
before John Wickes one of her Majestis Justises of the peace for 
the County of Suffolk Ennis Wood the wife of the with in named 
Joseph Wood and doth acknowledge the within writen convaiance 
to bee her free and vollantary act and deed with her dear husband. 

'•'"' I John Wickes. 

This deed of sale is recorded in page 63 by Mr John Ketcham, 

Clark. 



! i 



m 



I. 

List of Marriages and Baptisms, Presbyterian Church, 
Huntington, L. I. 

Marriages by Rev. E. Prime. 

1724, June 1, Daniel Kellogg of Norwalk, to Eunice Jarvis of 

Huntington. 

1725, May 3, Samuel Stratton and Esther Jarvis, dau. William, 

Testator. 

1726, Jan. 14, Thomas Jarvis and Abigail Smith, 2d wife, Hunt- 

ington. 

1728, May 15, Stephen Jarvis and Ann Wheeler, Smith Town, 

Huntington. 

1729, July 4, Isaiah Jarvis and Hannah Whitman, Huntington. 
1731, May 5, Benajah Jarvis (son of William, suj^posed to be son 

of Jonathan) and Jemima Smith, Ist wife. 



APPENDIX I. 



267 



1<J4, Feb. 26, Abraham Jarvis (son of William, Testator,) and 
Lavinia Rogers, Huntington. 

1736, Sept. 2, John Wood and Phebe Jarvis, Huntington. 

1739, May 20, Elnathan Smith and Hannah Jarvis (widow), Hunt- 
ington, 

1743, June 26, Sylvanus Sammis and Deborah Jarvis, Hunting- 
ton. 

1745, Dec. 30, William Jarvis, Jr. (son of William), and Zerviah 

Rogers, Huntington. 

1746, Jan. 20. Jonathan Jarvis (son of Wm.) and Annie Brewster, 

Ist wife, Huntington. 

1747, Jan. 27, Benajah Jarvis (widower) and Annie Sammis, 2d 

wife, Huntington. 

1749, Nov. 12, Philip Jarvis and Elizabeth Sammis, Huntington. 

1750, Mch. 6, Stephen Higbie and Esther Jarvis, Huntington. 

1751, Nov. 21, Jonas Rogers and Mary Jarvis, Huntington. 

1751, Nov. 26, Zebulon Whitman and Phebe Jarvis, Huntington. 

1752, April 30, Richard Piatt and Elizabeth Jarvis, Huntington. 
1752, May 26, Henry Jarvis and Sarah Rogers, Huntington. 

1754, Sept. 22, Augustin Jarvis and Sarah Bunce, Huntington. 

1755, Feb. 4, Hezekiali Weeks (son of Thomas) and Louisa Jar- 

vis, d. of Stephen, Huntington. 

1756, July 13, Stephen Jarvis, Jr., and Sarah Mott, Huntington. 
1758, Feb. 23, Losee Ireland and Elizabeth Jarvis, Huntington. 
1758, Nov. 2, Joseph Jarvis and Phebe Burtiss, Huntington. 
1760, Mch. 16, Austin Jarvis (son of Stephen, Sr.,) I'ld Jemima 

Whitehead, Huntington. 

1760, July 31, Abram Jarvis (widower) and Hannah Conklin (wid- 
ow), Hvmtington. 

1760, Dec. 1, Robert Jarvis (son of Isaiah) and Sarah Ireland, 
Huntington. 

1762, June 20, Seth Jarvis and Charity Gates, Huntington. 

1762, July 29, Eliphalet Jarvis and iiuth Whitman, Huntington. 

1763, Feb. 15, Isaac Dennis and Sarah Jarvis, Huntington. 
1763, Aug. 24, Benjamin Conklin and Keziah Jarvis. Huntington. 
1763, Sept. 12, Joseph Jarvis (widower) and Elizabeth Rogers, 

Huntington. 

1763, Sept. 29, Thomas Jarvis, Jr., and Hannah Bryant, Hunting- 

ton. 

1764, April 12, Robert Deane and Elizabeth Jarvis, Norwalk and 

Huntington. 



I ' ! 



I 



V\ . 



Il.j 



I 



i \ 



!:S«i 



268 
1Y64, May 

1765, Dec. 

1767, Mcli. 

1767, Dec. 

1768, June 

1769, Mch. 

1770, Dec. 

1772, May 

1772, Feb. 

1777, May 
1779, June 



1779, 

1780, 
1780, 

1781, 

1782, 
1782, 
1782, 

« 

1783, 
1781, 
1784, 
1785, 
1786, 

1787, 
1788, 



April 

Jan, 

April 

Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Dec. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Sept. 

Dec. 

Jan. 
July 



1789, Feb. 



APPENDIX 1. 

2, Abram Camp and Milerson Jarvis, d. of Benajah, 

Huntington. 
1, Jonathan Jarvis (widower, son of William) and 
Charity White, 2d wife, Huntington. 
24, Michael Bedell and Esther Jarvis, Huntington. 

30, Joshua Rogers and Savinah Jarvis, Huntington. 

10, Abram Jarvis, Jr. (son 6f Abram), and Jerusha 

Chichester, Huntington. 

1 1, Nathaniel Jarvis and Phebe Allen, d. of Dr. Sam'l 

Allen, Huntington. 
19, Ichabod Jarvis (son of Abram) and Phebe Bunco, 

Huntington. 
21, John .' rvis (son of Stephen) and Naomi Bunce, 

Huntington. 
8, Benjamin Dennis and Ruth Jarvis, d. of Stephen, 

Huntington. 
28, Zachariah Rogers and Mary Jarvis. 
26, Nehemiah Brush, Jr., and Mary Jarvis. 

Marriages by the Rev. Joshua Ilart. 

5, Nathaniel Jarvis and Elizabeth Wires. 

31, Samuel Jarvis (son of Henry) and Mary Ruscoe. 

19, Ephraim Oakes and Mary Jarvis, dau. of Stephen, 

son of Thomas. 
31, Daniel Jarvis (son oi Austin) and Deborah Rogers. 

6, Ebenezer Blachley and Sarah Jarvis. 
6, Zophar Nickols and Drusilla Jarvis. 

15, Isaiah Jarvis (son of William) and Phebe Whit- 
man. 
15, Samuel Nickols and Elizabeth Jarvis. 

20, Thomas Jarvis and Keziah Conklin. 
19, Joel Rogers and Elizabeth Jarvis. 

26, Eliphalet Jarvis and Siisanna Weeks, Huntington. 
31, Isaiah Jarvis (son of Robert) and Christian Gould, 

Huntington. 
11, Philip Jarvis and Julianna Smith, Huntington. 
6, Daniel Jarvis (son of Austin) and Patty Smith, 

Huntington. 
17, Augustin Jarvis (son of Philip) and Martha Den. 

ton, Huntington. 



^;\ 



» 



AI'PKNDIX I. 



269 



1789 

1789 

1789 

1789 

1791 
1791 

1792 

1792 
1793 

1793 

1794 

1794 
1798 

1799 
1802 

1802 

1803, 

1803 

1800 

1807 
1807 

1807 
1810 

1813, May 1 



, April 


7, 


, May 


1, 


, Nov. 


9, 


, Nov. 


23, 


, Mch. 


5, 


, July 


31, 


, Jan. 


15, 


, June 


10, 


, Feb. 


16, 


, June 


16, 


, May 


25, 


, July 


3, 


, May 


7, 


, April 


1.5, 


, Feb. 


4, 


, Nov. 


6, 


, Oct. 


22, 


, Nov. 


5, 


, Oct. 


11, 


, Feb. 


7, 


, Mch. 


20, 


, April 


H, 


, Dec. 


22, 



Piatt Rogers and Phebe Jarvis, dau. of Robert, 

Huntington. 
Joseph J. Jarvis (son of Robert) and Phebe Carll, 

Huntington. 
Natlianiel Jarvis and Jemima (rildersloflve, TTnnt- 

ington. 
William Jarvis (son of Henry) and Nanpy Smith, 

dau. of Jacob, Huntington. 

Samuel Jarvis and Wiser, Huntington. 

Thomas Jarvis (son of Stepheii).and Rebecca Piatt, 

Huntington. 
Elkanah Bunce and Lavinah Jarvis, d. of Abram, 

Huntington. 
Eliphalet Sammis and Mary Jarvis, Huntington. 
Jonathan Jarvis (son of Robert) and Deborah 

Whitson, Huntington. 
Augustin Jarvis (son of Austin) and Charity Piatt, 

Huntington. 
Joshua Duryea and Sarah Jarvis, dau. of Robert, 

East Woods, 

Silas Smitli and Jarvis, Cow Harbor. 

Jacob Jarvis (s. of Abram) and Experience Rogers, 

Huntington. 
Eliphalet Bunce and Hannah Jarvis, Huntington. 
Jacob Jarvis (s. of Abram) and Experience Rogers, 

Huntington. 
Thomas Jarvis (son of Rohert) and Phebe Remp, 

Huntington. 
John Jarvis, Jr. (son of John), and Keturah Oakes, 

dau. of Ephraim, Cow Harbor. 
Ebenezer Smith and Frcelovo Jarvis (wid.), Hunt- 
ington. 
Israel Jarvis (s. of Ichabod) and Bethshoba Rogers, 

Huntington. 
Jacob Jarvis and Nancy Udall, Cow Harbor. 
Enoch Smith and Hannah Jarvis, d. of Ichabod, 

Old Fields and Cow Harbor. 
Piatt Sammis and Keturah Jarvis, Htintington. 
Gilbert Fleet (son of Thomas) and Keziah Jarvis, 

dau. of Abram, Huntington. 
, Enoch Smith and Sarah Jarvis, dau. of Ichabod, 

Huntington. ' 



[i 



270 APPKNnix I. 

1813, June 24, Augustin Jarvis and Fhebe Oakes, Huntington. 

1814, Feb. 16, Jarvis Dennis and Ruth Jarvis, dau. of William, 

Huntington. 

1814, Mch. 2, Philip Jarvis, Jr., and Ehzabeth "Weeks. 

1815, Mch. 4, David Jarvis (son of Jonathan) and Charity Whit- 

man, West Hills. 

181G, Nov. 30, Stephen Ritchie and Maria Jarvis, dau. of Joseph 
Jarvis, Huntington. 

1817, Nov. 22, Rufus Jarvis (son of Daniel) and Annie Gilder- 
sleeve. Huntington. 

1817, Dec. 31, James Smith and Mary Jarvis, d. of Daniel, Hunt- 
ington. 

1817, Jan. 31, Augustin Jarvis (son of Philip) and Phebe Piatt, 
Huntington. 

1819, Dec. 30, Treadwell Carll (son of Oliver) and Hannah Jarvis, 
d. of Daniel. 









List of 


Baptisms, 












By Rev. 


E. Prime. 






1724, 


Aug. 


16, 


Henry Jarvis, 


1738, 


Nov. 


12 


Jemima Jarvis, 


1726, 


Mch. 


27, 


Deborah Jarvis, 


1739, 


Nov. 


4 


Elizab'h Jarvis, 


1727, 


Sept. 


'■^4, 


Isaac Jarvis, 


1742, 


Jan. 


10, 


Nath'l Jarvis, 


1729, 


April 


7, 


S. P. B. Jarvis, 


1744, 


Feb. 


4, 


Sarah Jarvis, 


1729, 


Aug. 


3, 


August. Jarvis, 


1744. 


June 


3, 


Keziah Jarvis, 


1730, 


July 


26, 


Ann Jarvis, 


1746, 


June 


29, 


Abra'm Jarvis, 


1730, 


Aug. 


2, 


Isaiah Jarvis, 


1746, 


June 


29, 


Levina Jarvis, 


1731, 


Dec, 


26, 


Elizab'h Jarvis, 


1746, 


Oct. 


31, 


Millers'n Jarvis, 


1732, 


Feb. 


6, 


Esther Jarvis, 


1746, 


Dec. 


7, 


Elizab'h Jarvis, 


1732, 


June 


4, 


Joseph Jarvis, 


1746, 


Dec. 


28, 


Samuel Jarvis, 


1733, 


April 


29, 


Louise Jarvis, 


1748, 


June 


^h 


Ichabod Jarvis, 


1734, 


Jan. 


4, 


Susanna Jarvis, 


1748, 


Aug. 


14, 


Ruth Jarvis, 


1734, 


Feb. 


24, 


Sarah Jarvis, 


1749, 


May 


7, 


Isaac Jarvis, 


1735, 


Oct. 


10, 


Stephen Jarvis, 


1750, 


May 


20, 


Esther Jarvis, 


1736, 


Jan. 


4, 


Thomas Jarvis, 


1750, 


Nov. 


11,' 


William Jarvis, 


1736, 


Feb. 


8, 


Eliphal't Jarvis, 


1752, 


M(;h. 


8, 


David Jarvis, 


1736, 


May 


16, 


Robert Jarvis, 


1752, 


Oct. 


4, 


Jacob Jarvis, 


1736, 


July 


18, 


Sarah Jarvis, 


1755, 


May 


16, 


P. P. B. Jarvis, 


1736, 


Doc. 


12, 


Mary Jarvis, 


1756, 


May 


2 


Jemima Jarvis, 


1737, 


Sept. 


25, 


Austin Jarvis, 


1757, 


Feb. 


27, 


Maiy Jarvis, 


1738, 


Aug. 


13, 


Isaiah Jarvis, 


1757, 


Mch. 


6, 


Phebe Jarvis, 



Al'PKNDIX I. 



271 



1758, May 
17r)8, July 

1759, July 

1760, May 

1761, Moll. 
1761, Aug. 

1761, Aug. 

1762, Mch. 
1762, May 
1762, Aiig. 

1762, May 

1763, Fob. 

1767, Feb. 

1767, April 

1768, Aug. 

1768, Dec. 

1769, Mch. 

1769, July 
1709, Dec. 

1770, Oct. 

1770, Dec. 

1771, Mch. 

1771, June 

1772, Jan. 



28, Mary Jarvis, 1763, May 
23, Z. R. Jarvis, 1763, Oct. 
15, Philip Jarvis, 1764, Sept. 
30, Isaiah Jarvis, 1764, Sept. 

29, Daniel Jarvis, 1764, Sept. 
13, David Jarvis, 1764, Oct. 

30, Sarah Jarvis, 1764, Oct. 
23, Timothy Jarvis, 1765, Jan. 
30, Isaac Jarvis, 1765, Mch. 

8, August. Jarvis, 1765, June 

15, Sarah Jarvis, 1760, Aug. 
0, Tsaiah Jarvis, 



8, Alex. Jarvis, 

9, Deborah Jarvis, 
2, Hannah Jarvis, 
2, May Jarvis, 

2, Sarah Jarvis, 

28, Josepli I. Jarvis, 

29, Timothy Jarvis, 
29, Lemuel Jarvis, 
31, Elizab'h Jarvis, 

9, Esther Jarvis, 

3, Timothy Jarvis. 



1772, 
1772, 
1773, 
1773, 
1774, 
1774, 
1774, 
1774, 
1775, 



Aug. 

Oct. 

April 

May 

Mch. 

June 

June 

Nov. 

April 



7, Simon Lessee Jarvis, son of Robert, by Rev. Wm. 
Schenck. 
26, Phebe Jarvis, by Rev. B. Prime. 

1 4, Charity, wife of Jonathan Jarvis, by Rev. William 

Schenck. 
28, Hannah, dau. of Henry Jarvis, by Rev. William 

Schenck. 
9, , son of Robert Jarvis, b}/ Rev. William 

Schenck. 
2, Augustin, son of Austin Jarvis, by Rev. William 

Schenck. 

15, Thomas, son of Stephen Jarvis, Jr., by Rev. Wm. 

Schenck. 
7, Phebe Jarvis, by Rev. E. Prime. 
15, Margaret, dau. Abraham Jarvis, Jr., by Rev. Wra. 

Schenck. 
25, Stephen Jarvis, by Rev. E. Prime. 

15, Jesse, son of Henry Jarvis, by Rev. Wm. Schenck. 
19, Lavina, dau. of Abraham Jarvis, by Rev. William 

Schenck. 
23, Isaac, son of Robert Jarvis, by Rev. Wm. Schenck. 
1 0, Jane Jarvis, by Rev. E. Primo. 

18, Abbie, d. of Jacob Jarvis, by Rev. Wm. Schenck. 

16, Mary Jarvis, by Rev. E. Prime. 
13, Rebecca Jarvis, " " 

10, Sarah Jarvis, 
10, Keturah Jarvis, 
5, Phebe Jarvis, 

19, Hannah Jarvis, 



<( 


« 


t( 


a 


(( 


n 


1( 


<( 



"W ll M 



272 



APPKNDIX t. 



n 



I 

f 



1775, 


Jan. 


1775, 


Oct. 


1776, 


Feb. 


1776, 


June 


1777, 


Nov. 


1777, 


Mch. 


1786, 


May 


1786, 


May 


1787, 


Mch. 


1787, 


Mch. 


17S7, 


Mch. 


1787, 


Sept. 


1789, 


Feb. 


1789, 


June 


1789, 


June 


1796, 


April 


1790, 


April 


1797, 


July 


1800, 


Sept. 


1800, 


Sept. 


1800, 


Sept. 


1800, 


Sept. 


1800, 


Sept. 


1801, 


Jan. 


1802, 


Jan. 



1804, Aug. 



13, Nicholas Jarvis, by Rev. E. Prime. 

1, Joanna Jarvis, " '• 

13, Elizabeth Jarvis, " " 

9, Zebediah Jarvis, " «« 

7, Hannah Jarvis, " " 

31, Susanna Jarvis, " " 

7, Phebe, wife of Isaiah Jarvis, by Rev. Wm. Schonck. 

7, 3 children, not named, *' 

7, Stephen, s. John Jarvis, " 

7, John, s. of " " 

7, Hannah, d. " " 

16, Elkanah, s. Isaiali Jarvis, " 
25, Mary RloonifioM, g. d. Henry Jarvis, by Rev. Wm. 

Schenck. 
15, Hannah, d. Isaiah Jarvis, by Rev. "Wm. Schenck. 
15, Child of Philip Jarvis, " " 

10, John Bloomfield, s. Timothy Jarvis,* by Rev. Wm. 
Schenck. 

24, Elkanah, s. Isaiah Jarvis, by Rev. Wm. Schenck. 
9, William, s. " " " 

28, Robert, s. Simon Lessee Jarvis, by Rev. William 

Schonck. 
28, David Conklin, s. Simon Lessee Jarvis, by Rev. 

Wm. Schenck. 
28, Thomas Highbee, s. Simon Lossee Jarvis, by Rev. 

Wm. Schenck. 
28, Elizabeth, d. Simon Lossee Jarvis, by Rev. Wm. 

Schenck. 
28, Esther, d. Simon Lossee Jarvis, by Rev. William 

Schenck. 
3, Moses, s. Philip Jarvis, by Rev. Wm. Schenck. 

25, Jonathan, a. Simon L. Jarvis, by Rev. William 

Schenck. 
5, Phebe, d. Simon L. Jarvis, by Rev. Wm. Schenck. 



*"John Bloomfield, son of Timothy Jarvis and Phebe, his wife, who 
at the same time made a profession of their faitli uud renewed their cove- 
nants." 




APPENDIX J. 



273 



J. 

List of Members of Pkesbytehian Ciiubcii, IIuntinoton, L. I. 

Jiev. E. Prime. 

1724, July 15, William Jarvis, Sr., 
" " Esther, his wife, 

1725, Dec. 2, Mehitabol Jarvis. 
" " Wm. .Jarvis, Jr. 

1726, Dec. 1, Millerson Jarvis. 
1738, April 2, Bonajah Jarvis, 

" " Jeniinia, his wife, 

" «' Hannah, his child. 

1740, Jan. 30, Thomas Jarvis, 

" •' Abigail, his wife. 

1748, Mch. 30, Zerviah Jarvis. 

1750, Oct. .5, Phebe Jarvis. 

1764, Oct. 28, Annie, wife of Stephen Jarvis, Jr. 

1765, Mch. 31, Levina Jarvis. 



1786, 

'it 

i( 

1796, 
(I 

1800, 



u 



Rev. W. Schenck. 

Dec. 3, Isaiah Jarvis. 

" Charity Jarvis. 

" Phobe Jarvis. 
Sept. 1 6, Annie Jarvis, wife of WiUiam. 

" Martlia Jarvis, wife of Augustin. 

Nov. 7, Simon L. Jarvis. 

" Keturah, his wife. " 



Deaths of Members on Records of Rev. W. Schenck. 

1771, Mch. 30, Stephen Jarvis, Jr. 

" July 25, Sarah Jarvis, wife of Stephen, Jr. 

1772, Mch. rs, Stephen Jarvis, Sr. 

" Sept. 23, Jonathan Jarvis, wife. 

1773, April 7, Wife of Samuel Jarvis. 

1786, Sept. 27, Philip Jarvis. 

1787, May 12, Widow Jarvis, Cow Harbor. 
1795, July 25, Jonathan Jarvis, aged 77. 

1800, Mch. 17, Charity Jarvis, wife c^f Jonathan, aged 74. 



35 






' ■■'W 



274 



APPENDIX K. 



K. 

CoNTHAOT OK Samiikl Stkatton OF IIuNTivoTON, L. I., May 8, 1727. 

Know ftU mon by tlioao prcHonts, tlmt T, Sanni<!ll Rtratton of 
huntiiigton, am licld, ami (irmly bound unto William .larvis, my 
fathor-in-Law, of tho wimo placo, in tho full and justHumof nineteen 
pounds, P^levon Shillings, of good Current Money of New York, to 
be paid nnto the Sd. William Jarvis, his Attorney, heirs, Ex., 
Ads. or assigns, the which payment well and truely to Ixnnade and 
done, I do bind inyscjlf, my heirs, Exs. and Adms., jointly and 
severally, and (irmly, by these I'resents, S((aled with my S(!al, and 
dated this eighth of May, in the thirteenth year of the Reigne 
of our Sovereign Lord George, King over great brittain and Ire- 
land. Annodomini 1727. 

The Condition of the above-written obligati(m is such that the 
above boundeu Samuell Stratton, his hturs, Ex. or A dm., or either 
of them, shall, when his daughter, Easter Stratton, now living with 
her Grand Father, William Jarvis, Shall Marry, or come to the Age 
of Eighteen years, which shall first happen, give and alow to his 
S'd daughter Eastor, a good bed and furniture to the Value of nine 
pounds, fifteen shillings and six pence, which he hath now in his 
hand, which was given to his wife at their marriage, or nine 
pounds, fifteen shillings and six pence, of good Current Money, as 
her own Estate, without fraud or further delay than the above- writ- 
ten obligation to be void and of no effect, otherwise to remain in 
full force and virtue, and if tlu; S'd Eastor die before she attains 
to the Age of eighteen years, or marryeth, the obligation is void. 

Signed, Sealed, and delivered 
in the presents of us. 

Jehiel Smith, ,^i^<..^ 

Eponetus Platt. SAMUEL STRATTON. | seal I 



4 



w 



AI'l'KNDIOKH r,. AND M. 



275 



L. 

Extract from a TiETTER of Rev. T)r. Ukardslky. 

" Thd oarlioHt (widonco which I have discovemd of any of your 
name Ix'iiig aftuclied to tlic Kpiscopal Church, readios hack to 
Norwalk, in 1738. Tho Rov. Henry Canor liad tlien been ofliciating 
in that place about ten years a., a missionary of the 'Society 
for the Propagation of tho Gospel in Foreign Parts,' and in 
1738, an earnest memorial was addressed to the General Assem- 
bly, signed by nearly six hundred persons, ail over sixteen years 
of age, and embracing all the mah) ' members and professors 
of the Church of England, living in his Majesty's Colony of Con- 
necticut.' 

"Among the forty-two signers fi'om Norwalk, were Samuel 
Jarvis,* and directly under him, Samuel Jarvis Junior, and a little 
further on, William Jarvis. 

" As none of this name are to be found at that time under the 
pastoral care of the other six missionaries in tho colony, I infer 
that these men are the first of the Jarvis line who broke away 
from the standing order, and helped to extend the Church, finally 
giving us the second Bishop of Connecticut." 



M. 



From " New York Hook of Mahriages." 

1738, Nov. 22, Hannah 'Jervis and Jonathan Pierson. 
1753, Sept. 15, Jain(!s Jarvis and Mary Bell. 
1764, April 30, Millisent Jarvis and Abram Camp. 
1755, Dec. 10, Mary Jarvis and Joseph French. 
17G0, June 26, Sarah Jervias and Reuben Arthur. 
1760, July 29, Abraham Jarvis and Hannah Conklin. 

1762, July 14. Eliphalet Jarvis and Ruth Whitman. 

1763, Sept. 9, Tlionias Jarvis and Hannah Bryan. 
1763, Oct. 20, John Jervis, Jr., and Susannah Thomas. 
1769, Mch. 6. Nathaniel Jarvis and Phebe Allen. 
1772, Jan. 28, Ruth Jervais and Benjamin Dennis. 



* Father of Bishop Jarvis. 



!. 



276 APPENDIX N. 

1772, May 8, John Jervais and Neamy Bunts. 

1777, Sept. 29, Abigail Jarvis and John Sayer. 

1778, Feb. 21, Elozabeth Jervas and Loose Ireland. 
1782, Jan. 2, Druselle Jarvis and Zophar Nichols. 
1782, Jan. 2, Sarah Jarvis and Ebinezer Blackley. 

1782, Nov. 29, Isaiah Jarvis and Phebe Whitman. 

1783, Feb. 20, Grace Jarvis and Joseph Smith. 




Extracts from " Olden Times in Huntington." 

The following extracts are from " Olden Times in Huntington," 
an historical address b}' Hon. Henry C. Piatt, delivered at the 
Centennial Celebration at Huntington, Suffolk County, New York, 
on the 4th day of July, 1876. 

" The people of Huntington, at the beginning of hostilities with 
Great Britain, called a general town meeting on the 21st day of 
June, 1774. The resolutions passed at that meeting maybe termed 
Huntington's. 

" '1st. That every freeman's property is absolutely his own, and 
no man has a right to take it from him without his consent, ex- 
pressed either by himself or his representative. 

" ' 2d. That therefore, all taxes and duties imposed on his Majes- 
tie's subjects in the American Colonies, by the authority of Parlia- 
ment, are wholly unconstitutional, and a plain violation of the most 
essential rights of British sabjects. 

" ' 3d. That the act of Parliament, lat^ely passed, for shutting 
up the Port of Boston, or any other means or device, under color 
of law, to compel them or any other of his Majestic 's American 
subjects to submit to Parliamentary taxations, are subversive of their 
just aud constitutional liberty. 

" ' 4th. That we are of the opinion that our brethren of Boston, 
are now suffering in the common cause of British America. 

"'5th. That therefore, it is the indispensable duty of all the 
Colonies to unite in some effectual measure for tho repeal of said 
Act, and e'":!ry other Act of Parliament whereby they are taxed 
for raising a revenue. 

" ' 6th. That it is the opinion of this meeting, that the mos.- 
effectual means for obtaining a speedy repeal of said Acts, will be 



V 



APPENDIX N. 



277 



to break off all commercial intercourse with Great Britain, Ireland, 
and the English West India Colonies. 

" ' 7th. And we hereby declare ourselves ready to enter into these, or 
sucli other measures as shall be fxyreed upon by a General Congress of 
the Colonies, to take such measures as '^\dX\ be most effectual to pro- 
vent such goods as are at present in America from being raised to 
an extravagant price.' 

• " A commi.coe was appointed to act in conjunction with the com- 
mittees of other towns in the county to correspond with the com- 
mittee of New York. 

"May 2, 1775. A* a general tov/n meeting in Huntington, it 
was voted that there .should \ eiglii/y men chosen to exercise and 
be ready to march. 

" The Committees of Correspondence for the County of Suifolk, 
met at the County Hall, on Nov. 15th, 1774, and it was then and 
there recommended to the several towns to set forward a subscrip- 
tion for the employnient and relief of the distressed poor in Boston, 
and to procure a vessel to receive and carry donations to Boston. The 
proceedings of the Continental Congress, which had met at Phila- 
delphia, Sept. 4, 1774. were fully approved. 

" Under the I'ecommendati ins and suggestions of the Provincial 
Congre.ss of May 22, 1775, county and tuwn c imittees were 
appointed to aid the rause. Huntington set to work in earnest to 
prepare for the coming struggle. Two regiments of militia were 
to be organized, one in the eastern, and the other in the western 
part of the county, to join the Cont'uental Army. 

"On the 22d day ot July, 177 6, the news of the Independence 
of the thirteen United Colo'-'is readied Huntington (no railroads 
or telegraphs in those days' A grand parade of all of the militia 
and artillery, a salute of thirteen guns, a reading of the Declaration 
of Independence, called forth tlie animated shouts of the assembled 
people from all parts of the to vn. I'he jJritish flag was hauled 
down, and the ligure of Geoi'ge III was rijiped off. A liberty pole 
was then raised. 

" But gloomy days were at hand. The British fleet soon 
appeared in sight of our shores. British troops landed to the east 
of Huntington, and carried off cattle and provisions, On the 27th 
of August, 1776, the disastrous battle of Long Island, at tlie west 
end, was fought. Tins defeat placed the whohi of Long Island 
within the British lines, a.id left its conquered inhabitants entirely 
in their power. 



.i I 






, 






1 

i 




!- i 


I 


\ 


'r ' 




, 


-^ ! 




■ 


■■ ■ 



2*78 



APPENDIX N. 



: li 



1 i 



" The conquest of Long Island by the British was now com- 
plete. The county and town committeed of patriots were by force 
and fear compelled to revoke, annul, and diravow their previou" 
proceedings, to repudiate the authority of the Continental Congress, 
and the inhabitants were compelled to take the oath of allerjiance 
and of good hehavtor to the crown of Great Britain. Those who 
had taken an active part in favor of the Rebellion, fled to Con- 
necticut, or within the American lines, left theii' < amilies • unpro- 
tected, and their property here to be occupied and seized by Brit- 
ish officers, or native loyalists. The Tories wore red rags on their 
hats, to distinguish them from the Rebels, and also as a badge of 
safety and protection. 

" Huntington was permanently selected and occupied for the 
British foraging parties of cavalry t " '' nze and ship provisions for 
the British army and navy. 

" Thousands of troops were in Huntington in camp and fort, and 
houses during the war. The 17th Liglit Dragoons, 71st Infantry, 
Tarleton's Legion, Queen's Rang"rs, Hewlett's Provincials, Loyal 
Refugees, Jersey Loyal Volunteers, Hessian Yagers, and Prince of 
Wales American Regiment, were, at various times, quartered on 
the inhabitants and encamped in their orchards and fields. Among 
the prominent British officers were Gen. Sir William Erskine,Gen. 
Tryon, Brig.-Gen Leland, Brig.-Gen. DeLancey, Col. Tarleton, Col. 
Simcoe, Col. Heedlett, Col. Abercrombie, CjI. Bruinton, Col. Cro- 
ger. Col. DeWormb, Col. Ludlow, and some twenty or thirty 
others. 

"The first British regiment that arrived in Huntington after the 
battle of Long Island, was the 1 7tli Light Dragoons. They found 
no American troops to oppose them. The officers stopped at the 
house of Mrs. Stephen Ketcham, who had a large family, and a num- 
ber of slaves. The officers turned their horses into a house lot, 
part of which was a peach orchard. Mrs. Ketcham had Just iin- 
ished baking in her oven fifteen leaves of bread. She requested 
an officer to turn the horses into another lot, as they might destroy 
the peach-trees, which request was politely granted, but the officer, 
seeing the bread, without comment or apology seized and carried 
off every loaf, leaving the old lady as mad as a hornet. Later in 
the day slie missed her cooking pot, a very necessary article in 
those days, and suspecting the British had took it, put on her bon- 
net, and waiideriug about the encampment, at last discovered it 
over a fire made of some of her fence-rails, containing some savory 



I 



APPENDIX N. 



279 



It 'a 
oy 
cr, 
i.'d 
ill 
in 
)()n- 
i it 



mess in process of cooking. Watching, when no soldier was near, 
she turned it upside down, ' dumped ' the contents into the fire., 
retreated in good order, havihg recovered her property. This was 
the first raid of the British on women and children in Huntington, 
and victory perched upon the banner of the brave old lady. 

"From this timi; until the close of the Revolutionary War, con- 
sider the condition of the people oi Huntington. They were 
reduced to poverty and want. A powerfyil British force was 
quartered in their midst, living upon them by forced levies; the 
British vessels and transports were in the bays and harbors, 
shutting off every escape to the Connecticut shore; the fathers and 
brothers of many families had fled, and a numDer had joined the 
patriot army, leaving old men, women, and children to live as best 
they could; their crops, farms, fences, and buildings .seized, burned, 
and destroyed at the whim of petty British officers, who lorded it 
over the conquered people and ate up t.^eir substance like an army 
of locusts. They were the "hewers of wood and dra^^ers of 
water" ior the King's military service. Capt.-Gen. Jemes Robin- 
son, a British officer, issued an order to the inhabitants of Hunt- 
ington, Islip, Smithtown, and Brookhaven to cut and cart 3,000 
cords of wood to the nearest landings before the 15th of August, 
1780. 

"In 1781 the people of Huntington were forced to raise £176 by 
tax, for digging a well in the fort on Lloyd's Neck. 

"Robert Jarvi , grandfather of Capt. Philetus C. Jarvis, who 
lived at the east eid of the village, and afterwards at Sweet Hol- 
low, was gashed and cut in his head to force him to tell where his 
money was. He did not tell, but he carried the marks of his 
injuries to the grave. 

"A party of armed men, with bayonets, robbed Gilbert and Simon 
Fleet, Moses Jarvis, merchant, of Huntington, and numerous 
others, of all the money and plate they could find, and nearly 
strangled one of them to death by hanging him to a beam in his 
kitchen. 

"The Britisli officers took the farmers' horses, cattle, poultry, and 
occupied their houses, t irning their families adrift. It is stated 
that British loyalist soldiers stole the bedding and clothing of 
their ancestors, even to the blankets of infants in their cradles. 

"The crowning outrage committed by the British in Huntington 
was the desecration of the cemetery. The graves were levelled, 
and a fort erected in the centre of the grounds, under orders of 
Col. Thompson, called "Fort (Jolgotha." Over one hundred tomb- 



■If 



J 




280 



APPENDIX N. 



stones were destroyed. Barracks for the troops were built over 
the bones of Huntington's early inhabitants. Tombstones were 
used for tables, aiid for building fireplaces and ovens. Loaves of 
bread were drav/n from the ovens with the reversed inscriptions 
of the tombstones imprinted on the lower crust. 

" Before closing, I want to vindicate the Town of Huntington 
from the charge I have heard made by those who have never 
investigated the matter, that the people were not in sympathy with 
the patriot cause. It is true that there were some tories in Hunt- 
ington, as there were in almost every town in the land, but their 
numbers were few. 

"The town at the early jtages of tlie Revolution put itselt on 
record by its firm and patriotic resolutions. It is true that a forh: 
of recantation was drawn up and sent to each town in the county 
to be signed. It was genercUy but not voluntarily signed, and 
only under compulsion. As far as this town is concern"d, but one 
man signed it. A large majority of the membeis of our town 
committee fled to Connecticut, joined the rebels there, and never 
signed any revocation or disapproved of their proceedings. 

"Sir Guy Carleton in 1783 instituted a Board of ComUiissionero 
for the object of adjusting such demands and claims against the 
British army as had not been paid. 

" Over three hundred accounts were rendered of losses, consist- 
ing of horses, cattle, and stock, seized and stolen; houses, barns, 
fences, and wood burned and destroyed; furniture, clothing, 
blankets, silver and other ware, stolen ; teams of horses and oxen 
impressed into service, and other similar charges. The amount 
of property stolen and destroyed in the town during the war must 
have been about §150,000. 

"The bills were sworn to before a magistrate, but the commis- 
sioners sailed for England without giving them any attention, and 
the people of Huntington never obtained any compensation for 
their losses. 

"To sum up the losses by the war, it was pretty evidently a losing 
game for George III, as he not only lost the brightest jewel in his 
crown when he lost the thirteen Colonie, but he had lost an army 
of soldiers, and luitold wealth. His bar^s'S'in with the Landgrave 
of Hesse is certainly worthy of record. The Landgrave let his 
troops on hire during our Revolutionary War for ,'ti2,355,000, 
which was at the rate of $150 a head for each Hessian killed. 
This must have been a killing bargain for both, as it worked no 
good for either." , 



I 



APPENDICES O. AND P. 



281 



o. 

TjIsts ok IjOYALISTS. 

I77H. A list ol' t;{() luuiK^s ol' moil in the township of Uuntinjj;- 
ton wlio took th(? oath of loyalty and peaceable! behaviour to the 
British Government before (Jovornor Tryon in 1778. Anioiig 
them are found — Austin .larvis, lehabod Jarvis, Henry Jarvis, 
Philip Jarvis, John Jarvis, Eliplmlet Jarvis, Daniel Jarvis, Abra- 
ham Jarvis, Ro})ert Jarvis, Nathaniel .Jarvis, Jonathan Jarvis, 
Jos(!pli Jarvis. 

Certified by Wm. Tryon, M. CI. and (Jov. 
Province of New York. 

To be recorded in the office of the County (\)urt Clerk for 

Suffolk County, 

Wni. Tryon, (Jov. 

To Messrs Ireland and ^'oung•s, 

Huntington township. 
1778. Tn an additional list who took the oath of allegiance and 
peaceable behaviour before John Hewh^tt Kscp- Justice of tlu^ 
Peace, as certilieil by him to his K.xcellency Gov. Tryon, a list of 
! 19 names. Among which are found Philip Jarvis aged 57, 
B\'irmer, Huntington. Samuel Jarvis aged 51, Cordwainer, Hunt- 
ington. Moses Jarvis, aged 28, Cordwainer, Huntington. 

I hereby certify the I H) persons named in the foregoing list took 
the oath of allegiance and peaceable behaviour to the British Gov- 
or-..iient before me Justice, John Hewlett as certified l)y him to me, 

Wm. Tryon, Governor &c. 
This additional list of names in Huntington Townshi]» to bt; 
recorded in the office of the County CJourt. 

;;!erk for Suffolk County— 1778. 



iny 

live 
liis 

KIO, 

■d. 
no 



CoNt'lSt'ATION 1)KI-:I» ok PkoI'EUTV ok i>KN.(AMlN JaKVIS, NoK- 

WALK, Or-v. ;>, 1781}. 

Know all men by these presents, that whereas the Estate both 
real and [xM'sonal of H(>njamin Jarvis fornu'rly of Norwalk, in the 
County of Fairfield ana State ol Connecticut, who has gone over 
to, and joined himself with thci enemies of the United States of 
America, luitli by law been adjudged and declared forfeit to this 
3G 



irT 



i ; 



282 



APPENDIX P. 




rr 

t 




State 1111(1 Ix'cii procccdcil with iU'Cdnliii^' to tlic laws ot tlii.s Stutc 
in such (^ascs niado and provided and whereas the Debts and 
Charges allowed against the Kstate of the said Henjaniin Jarvis 
surmount the Movabhi Kstato the sum of .K15 10 lawful money, 
the Court of Pi'obate for th(* district of I'^airfield, authorized 
directed and impowered Sanuiel Cruman of said Norwalk 7\(lm'' 
of said Estate to sell and dispose of so much of the r(>al estate as 
shall be sufficient to pay and disc^luirge the said sum of £7') 10 
and the incident (charges arising on said sale. Now know ye that 
1 th»^ said Samuel fJniman Adm"" as aforesaid by force and virtue 
of th(* power and authority given by said ('ourt of Probate, and 
for and in consideration of the sum of eighteen pounds lawful 
money received of Nathanic;! Benedict .lun' of Norwalk aforesaid 
for the purpose of paying said Debts &c. Do give, grant, bargain, 
sell and confiini unto him the said Nathaniel BejuMlir-t .Fmi' his 
heirs and nssigns forever, the one half part of a certam piece of 
land lying in said Norwalk, situate on th(! West side of the river, 
it being his former homestead land, the whole containing al)Out two 
acres and bound East by the County road, North and West by 
highway. South by the said Nathaniel Henedits home lot and Jolni 
S(>ymore's land, together with the appurtenances thereof. To have 
and to hold the nbove gniiited an<l bargained premises with the 
appurtenances thereof unto him the said Nathaniel Hcne(lict Juii' 
his heirs and assigns forever to his and their own propei- use and 
behoof without any reserve oi' condition and as amply and fully 
as the Gov"" and Comj)atiy of said State held the sanu\ In witness 
wh(Meof I have henMinto set my hand and seal this ;?Otli day of 
October Anno Domini 1 7S;]. 

Samuel (Jruniaii ^^'^ — 



Signed, Sealed and Delivered 
In presence of 
Fsrael Judson 
Sarah (irunian 



Seal. 



< )n the above date person- 



al ly appeared Samuel Cruman, the 
sigiHM' and sealer of the foregoing 
Instrument and acknowledged the 
same to be iiis free act and deed. 
Before me, 

Elii)halet Lockwood, 

Justice of the I'eace. 
A true copy of the original deed rec"' to Record Dec. 4, 1783. 

• per me Sam' (auman Reg''. 



I 



API'KNDICKS Q. AN'K U. 



283 



Q. 

Petition of tiik Inhabitants of Huntinoton, \i. I., 17s;{. 

'J'o liis p]xcelleiicy Robert Digby, Hoar Admiral of tlio Red and 
Conimandor in Chief &,c &c. 
The Memorial of tlui iidiabitaiits of Iluntiiigton on Long Island, 
llnml)ly slioweth, That your Mc'moralists an? still losers, in sup- 
plying his Majesty's armed vessels in this Bay, with fresh Beef, 
and that your Kxcelhuiey may remeniluir a former memorial that 
we were th(5 greatest losers at tliis season last year, and we woidd 
observe! to your Excellency that we have always supplied the 
shipping with fn^sli lieef at your own price witliout a contract. 
Also that th(U'e is not a sufliciency conuiS from the other shore; to 
supply the Tnjops in Town, and that Beef is \ and J per lb. 
Therefore TJeg your Excellency woidd take the matter into con- 
sideration, and tliat he would \h'. pleased to (!ontract or allow us 
a price, accordingly. And as in Uuty bound will ever Pray. 
Signed ~l)y the I'n^sident, Thomas J ax' vis. 

Huntington March Hi, 178:{. 

Sent by Natlianitil Williams 
To His Excellency 

Robert Digby Esqr., 
Rear Admii'al of the Red, 

And Commander in Chiijf &c &c kc. 



R. 



■pon- 
tile 

.i:ig 
he 

"Cd. 



183. 



Pktition to (iov. (jIeo. Clinton, 1783. 

To His Excdleiicfi * 

Gj:o. Clinton, Ksyu., (Iui\, (fv., of 

the State nf New York. 
We, the Subscribers, being desired by as large a number of the 
princi[tal inhabitants, as the time will admit of. of Huntington, 
Sniithtowii, and Brookhaveii, to congratulate your Excelleiuiy on 
a return of peace and the Independence of the United State.^ of 
America, and to express tlu; dangerous situation this ('ountry is in 
for want of regulation and Law, as we have been, and still are, 




Hi 



2S4 



API'KNDIX 8. 



;i1i 



' 



till* moat exposed to Dej^i't'datiou iuid plunder ot luiy ( bounty in 

the State under your KxcelliMu^v s ( iov(!rnnient, l)y reason of our 

insidar situation, and Inive now two Robbers in irons, which w(^ 

know not wliat to do with; to prevent wiiicii we would Inunhly 

\h'^ your Kx(!ell(!ncy's interposition. And that we niij^ht he 

indulged, it' it cnn \m conveniently done, in the inestinuibhi privi- 

h%(i ol' a vote in th(* approaching' election. 

We would likewise b(^g your Kxcellencry's atiiMition to a safe 

restoration ui)oii a surrendering of the Archives and Records of 

the County. We could heartily wish for, and do not in the hnist 

doubt of the cheerful concurrence of every Town in the County, 

would time axhnit of taking tlie sense and wishes of this extinisive 

County. We with pleasure* subscribe your Excellency's Devoted 

Friends, 

.lOlTX WICKS. 

THOMAS JAPtN'lS, 
\ NATHAN I Eli VVOODlITILh, 
I AUSTi:: ROE, 

PIIILETUS SMITH, 

CALER SMITH. 



I" or Huntington, 
For Rrookhaven, 
For Sniitlitown, 



s. 

Lettek FROM Rev. Ahuamam .Iai{V!s to Rev. Sam'l rKTF^us. 

MiDui-KTowN, April Ith, 17'.)(!. 
Rev. & dear Sir — 

Your last favor of Oct. 1st, 179.'), 1 have had by me for a con- 
siderable time. T could without loss of timi* have given you my 
sentiments of the Canon referred to in your hotter, as it may 
respect ycm. I thought it might I'ondcr what I should .say the 
more satisfactory, if 1 took the opinion of others. 1 accordingly 
wrote to Bishop Seabury, and wished his sentiments, that my 
answer to you might contain his, and what you might understand 
to be the general sentiment of the Clergy in Connecticut. Rut 
alas! on the sanu* wecsk I wrote, he ended all his mortal cares and 
2)ainful labors. On Thursday evening, Febiniary 'i5th, he suddenly 
expired ; to all apptjirancH! perfectly well, he walked with his 
daughter Ivlaria to Mr. Saltoiistall's; when there, complained of an 
extreme pain in his stomach & bi-east, and expired forty minutes 



rJ 



i 



AI'I'KNDIX S. 



•2h:> 



after. he entered tlio house. IJy his th-atli, we liave sulTered ii Idss 
to the Churcli, perhaps irreparabh). He was justly coiisichM'ed as 
a iiuui of siiififuiar al)ilities, universally admired in the pulpil, his 
method of il(*liv(!rv ever ^ravt^ and eommaiidin<;, his discourses, hy 
the best judfi;es, were estecMued unconuiionly solid, (dear & int(M'- 
esting. As a l»ishop, lu^ eoutluctt'd with m;reat prudence, liUed his 
office with dif.';tiity, and lived in perfect harmony wi*,h the Clergy. 
Such t|ualities &, beluiviour failed not closely to attach the Clergy 
to him, and to secure the reverence anil alfectiiJii of tlu^ Churirh at 
large, Ihroiighout the dioces(\ What (HTect his ih'ath will have 
ii|)oii tile (;huri;h, what will l)e done, time must rc^veal. Bishop 
Seabury was a man who thought and spok(!! for himself. What 
he spoke, he thought. N'ou may l)e sure when Ik^ said lie knew 
of MO obstn.cl(! to your being coiisecrated in America, he fully 
lK!li(!ved then; was none. My being personally known, I couc(Mve 
the Canon means such full information of the chai-acter and repu. 
tution of the person as to enable those who subscrilie to the testi- 
monial to (h) it with integrity and conticlence that he is qualitied 
and lit for the office! for which he is recommended, liesidence is 
not mentioned, tliorefore not required as a condition. Your con- 
tinued communication and corresjiondence with your friend and 
Brethren in these parts will not admit the words ''for three years 
last past" to be made use of against you. To a number of tliA 
Clergy and mon^ of the Laity, still living, you are personally known 
in the most comprehensive sense* the word is oi'iginally used. As 
a native and a citizen, you hold property in tlie State, and may, 
whenever you |)l(!ase, return and occupy it. You cannot tluMvlore 
be considereul as a foreigner. Mr. Jay must have formed ids 
opinion of the Canon and general convention from some Reporttn*, 
not from his own reading. Tiuiii 1 think any one may see, who 
will r(,!ad what 1 thought is absurdly called the Constitution of the 
I'l'ot.estaiit Episco])al Churedi. In that Instrument the Church is 
considennl by .states. No State can be represented, nor liave any 
voice in the (Jeneral Convention, without having acceded to and 
subscribed that Instrument. Actual subscription, then, limits the 
Convention, and detertiiines how far it is general; it also deter- 
mines what churches are bound by the Cano'i. 1 know not that 
the Bishops are laid under any disti'aint in respect to their Conse- 
crating a Bishop for a State not in the Union. Tlu!y being at 
liberty to act discretionary in that case, all that they couUl be 
obliged to, or could properly require would l)e that the testimonials 




288 



Al'PKNDIX 8. 



!■ 



pi 
V") 



r ill 



shoultl ho iu iminncr ami ft»riii jih prcHcribod by tho ('anon. VVIiut. 
you relate of Hishop Provost and Dr. Hcac^li, I hoard sonictliinf^ of 
last June, at New York, Irniii hr. licaniin^'. I nuMitioiiod it to 
Dr. Beach; h<! said hi! know ol" no such Canon (none, I Hiipptwo, 
that would admit of sucli a sons(\ or ov(Ui ho wordod); ho tlicn 
aHsun'(i nic tiiat ho liad novcr wiitton a8yUal)lo to tlio Arch-hiHhop 
of Catitorhury upon any hucIi businoas and did not beliovo Hishop 
Provost had; and further, tliat lic^ hnd never convcsrsod wilh the 
Bishop about you. I only replied thai something' of Ihut t(>noi' 
must have appeared tluMi from somebody, or you would not have 
written in that numner, mid e.\pres.sed my surpri.se. At that time 
i inquired of your son Hirdsciye, wlio told nu- he did not think a 
letter would tin<l you in London, as he suppo.sod, if you won* not 
on your passaj^o (o America then, that y<Mi soon would Ik*. What 
you speak of as havin^j; passed at Ijandieth, 1 am to sup[)oso was 
not lunirsay. Hut I oliscu-ve you name Dr. Jewel* for your author- 
ity as to nuuiy thinf;vs you say of Dr. iJc^acli. 'I'hat fj;entleman left 
America with a mind very unfriendly to Dr. Beach. I low far 
j»or8onal resiMitment may have carried him. and what allowances 
are to l)o made in respi'ct of what is said und(U' the; circumstances, 
f leave with you to jud^'o. I \iikv leave to observe that in th(> lat- 
ter part of youi' letter tlmro an; some expressions foi' \\\t\ nuuining 
iff which, con.sidered as y<jurs, I am at a loss — say " Epi.scopac}- in 
Now Kngland, against the hieran-hy in tho South." By tho former, 
do you m(?an the nonsense of Presbyterian Kpiscopacy in opposi- 
tion to the true Episc(»pal hierarchy? if not, why thti distinction 
between Epis(V)pa(!y and hierarchy? I)o you not know that the 
(Jonvontion at i'hiladolphia, iu 1789, deidared uneiiuivocally their 
l)oliof in the validity of the Connoctitnit Episcopacy, and formed 
the union of Eastern antl Southern Ohurclies upon one Episco[)ato ? 
Episcopacy is an hi-'rarchy. Vou mention Dr. Styles; has he. 
sincf he madc^ his (!xit from Ikmico, made you a visit, and convei-t.od 
you to the faith of Episcopa y without a hierarchy? Even Styles, 
if he is sulfered to converse with tlu; renowned lathers of the 
Church, I trust even then, knows better. As little to my under- 
standing do you speak in saying, when you ad(jpt a hierarchy — 
farewell Episcopacy, and woIcouk; to ituinarchy and popery, twin 
sisters, &c. What could Dr. Styh^s have said more ! Whither are 
you got ? into what are you transformed ? a sour re])ublican and 
Presbyterian ? Monarchy and Popery are not twin sisters, nor yet 

*Or Sinitii. 



MM'KNniX T. 



287 



twill 



l.roll 



MM's, fur the (inc is ('crtaiiilv iiiiicli olucr lliuii the o 



llicr. 



;)si- 
loll 
tlu' 
icir 
ii.mI 
lie ? 
lu', 

I..S, 
tilt' 

,1.T- 

ly — 
will 

i- arr 
and 

I- yet 



Let l'o|M'rv Im' 11 liiiiitliiifz; of I'aiidoni'H liox. Ynt I cannot think 
tho King of Sal»Mii iiiid I'riost of tlic most liij^li (^lod «w»'r run in 
swell ii l)o.\. while I rcnioinbci' so anci(Mit a inonunumt of monarchy 
and pri(!S^hood, and consider thiit his Antitype, tlie Captain of our 
Salvation, is also a Monarch and Ili^h Priest, and that h(^ acknowl- 
e<lfred the authority of both I'ilate and Cesar to 1k> from Heaven. 
I cannot feel myself disposed to think so hatefully or apeak so 
reproaclifully of eidier ol these diji;nilaries, lest I should rail 
against Cod. If you court no a<'(|U!iiiilatice with an hierarchy, 
why have you ever thought of being a Mishop ? There are thos(5 
among us who think you liav(^ not had llie geiu'rous treatment 
they wish you to luive met with,— but you will allow me to say I 
am sorry to (iiid that disappointiiieiit, and your ideas of iiialtreat- 
lueiit, should cloud your iiiiinl with so dark and violent a resent- 
ment as to causes a language to fall from your pen whicli may bo 
grateful to tlie dissenters and iiilidels, but to the real friends of 
Kpiscopacy and the Ciiurch, can give no pleasure. I thank 
r)r. Mosely for liis friendly remembrance* of me. and beg you to 



Mr. J 



arvis 



give him my coiiipliiiieiits ami liearly good wishes 
r(!(|uests your ac<-e|)laii<'e of his most friendly compliiiKnit*? and 
wislies to see you once more at our own, littl<* parsonage in Mid- 
dletowu. Whether we shall enjoy that pleasure, diod knoweth. 
However you may determine, and (!od may order, the same 
friendly .sentiments and benevolent wishes 1 have ever entertained 
towards you shall al)ide with 'ue. In confidence that you will not 
doubt this, 1 trust- you will continue to l»eli(*ve me, though unavail- 
ing, your real friend and lirother, 



ABRAHAM JAH\1S. 



Rkv. Sami'kl I'ktkhs. 



TlIK iiOVAMSTS. 

h'.i/r<icf frmii "L<issiiif/'s /<)'</i/-/ii)o/i- o/' llic iliTulrtlinn," \ttl. ,.\ /i. <!67. 

"The Loyalists of the Revolution were of two kinds, active and 
l^assive, and these were again divided into two classes each, the 
mercenary and the honest. We have elsewhere ob.served that 
when the Declaration of Independence was promulgated, many 




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288 



APPENDIX T. 



influential men who were fully alive to the importance of demand- 
ing from Great Britain a redress of existing and increasing griev- 







RKCEPTION OF THE AMEUICAN LOYALISTS IN ENGLAND. 

[From Lossiiig's "Field-Book of the Revohitioii."*| 



* This is from an nllegorical picture hy Benjamin West. Religion and 
Justice are seen extending the mantle of Britauni.i. while she herscdf is 
holding out her arm and shield to receive the Loyalists. Under the shield 
Is the crown of Great Britain, siuToinidi'd by Loyalists. The group has 
representatives of the Law, the Church, and Government, with other peo- 
ple. An In<lian ("Mef extends ime hand tow mis Britannia, and with tlie 
other points lo widows and orphans, rendered so hy the war. In a eloutl 
near lleligion and Justice, are seen the Genii of Great Britain and America, 
in an opening glory, l)inding up the broken. />?.•*('<','« of the two countries, as 
emblematic of the treaty of peace. At the head of the Loyalists, with a 
large wig, is seen Sir William Pepperrell, one of their most ctHcient 
friends iii JCngland, and iinnu'diately behind him, with a scroll in his 
hand, is (Jovcrnor ^Vllliam Franklin of New Jersey, son oi Dr. Franklin, 
who remained loyal unti' the last. The two ligures on tiu; right are Mr. 
West and his wife, both natives of Pennsylvania. 



APPENDIX IT. 



289 



and- 
riev- 




on and 
rt<i'lf is 

shield 
nip hiiH 
icr peo- 
vith the; 
a cloud 
iiu'rica. 
trii's, as 

with a 
crticicnt 

in his 
nmklin, 
an; Mr. 



ances, were not prepared to renounce all allegiance, and they 
adhered to the interests of the crown. These formed a lai'ge class 
in every rank in society, and, being actuated by conscientious 
motives, command our thoi'ough respect. Many of these took up 
arms for the King, remained loyal throughout the contest, and 
suffered severely in exile when the contest was ended. Others, 
for purposes of gain, and some to indulge in plunder and rapine 
under legal sanction, were active against the patriots, and theii* 
crimes were charged upon the whole body of the Loyalists. The 
fiercest animosities were engendered, and common justice was 
dethroned. The Whigs, who suffered dreadfully at the hands of 
the marauding Tories, hated the very name of Tioyalist, and, 
through the instrumentality of confiscation acts and other meas- 
ures, the innocent were often punished for the crimes of the 
guilty. Hut when peace came, and animosities subsided, justice 
boi-e sway, and much property was restored." 



u. 

Nelson .Tarvis Waterbury. 

By Hon. John L. O' Sullivan, Late Minister of the United States to 

Portugal. 

The writer of the present sketch has accepted with cordial 
pleasure the invitation to prepare it, addressed to him by the 
compiler of this volume. No member of the widely extended 
and honorable family to which, on the mother's side, Mr. Water- 
bury belongs, can fill a fairer page in the record of its annals. 1 
have known him intimately from his early youth upward, alike in 
his private, political, and professional life, and, though not always 
concurring witli him in his political action, know him to be one 
of the most pure and conscientious, of the. most generous and high- 
minded, of the most patriotic and devoted, as well as one of thc^ 
ablest, of the limited number of men who constitute now the 
front rank of the legal profession of New York. If friendship 
should seem to warm any of the colors of this slight porti*ait 
sketch, its lines are traced with the pen of truth and justice alone. 
Distrustful of my competence to judge him properly in the special 
aspect in which "he is to be viewed, as a lawyer, from having been 
absent from the country during the greater part of that period 
37 



290 



APPKNDIX L*. 



which has witnessed liis rise to his present distinction at the Bar, 
I have addressed myself to several of its most eminent members 
who have had the best opportunity of observing him, both from 
the bench and on the level ground of association in practice, 
whether on the same or on opposite sides of the intellectual con- 
tests of that noble profession, for thek experience and judgment 
of Mr. Waterbury; and it is their portraiture of him which in 
these lines T only reflect and report. And I confess to have been 
strongly impressed, most agreeablv, at the warmth and force of 
language witli which, with substantial unanimity, so many men by 
whom to be praised is praise indeed, exprcissed themselves in 
regard to Mr. Waterbury as a lawyer. 

"Mr. Waterbury is one of the ablest men at the Bar," was the 
language of one, himself second to none; "and there is probably 
not one in ten who wins as large a proportion of the cases he 
undertakes. If he had devoted himself solely to the profession 
and left politics alone, which only cost him money instead of 
gaining it, and if he had been somewhat less generous, he would 
by this time have made a large fortune " 

"Mr. Waterbury is a great man," said another; "though it is 
not everybody who knows it." "And among those wlio do not 
know it," r replied, "is himself." He continued, "Waterbury 
has remarkable promptness, activity, imagination, resource, and 
boldness. He has unflinching nerve and is fearless as a lion. For 
the j)]anning and direction of a campaign he has no superior. 
And while lie takes tlie broadest views, he neglects no detail. He 
has often been the inspiring soul of movements of which others 
have had the chief credit." 

"The important legal office of District Attorney of New York," 
said another, " has never been filled more ably, uprightly, houtir- 
ably, and satisfactorily than it was by Mr. Wfiterbury. Nor is 
there any position to which he is not equal." 

There was a genern- concurrence in recognizing that among the 
elements of his success there shone conspicuously his perfect fair- 
ness, his evident conscientiousness. Judges and juries alike felt 
this. Before he pleaded his case, it had undergone trial in the 
forum of his own conscience. He pi'obably would not sur^ceed 
well in a case of whose honest merits he should himself have mis- 
givings, though 1 doubt whether Mr. Waterbury 3ould ever be 
found the advocate of any such cause. . 

Thoroughly satisfied of its justice, of its rightfulness, he becomes 



APPENDIX IT. 



291 



'or 
I or. 
lie 

UTS 



;iir- 
folt 
tlie 
ceed 
mis- 
be 



then filled with a devoted zeal for its success. His special faculty 
and power of organization enable him to coordinate all the ele- 
ments and means of success in the most logical sequence and 
method. In such preparation he spares no labor. He has an 
int(?nse love of justice. As a public prosecutor, recognizing its 
enforcement to be indispensable to the peace and order of such a 
comnmnity as that of New York, he was inflexible and indefati- 
gable in the discharge of what he felt to be a high moral duty, 
from which not all his real tenderness of heart would make him 
swerve, while at the same time he never strained justice into 
cruelty, nor the power of the law into oppression. Every syllable 
was true in the following solenm pasfjage from a speech of his on 
a trial in which he had to prosecute the author of two atrocious 
mxirders mentioned further on, which, if they had passed unpun- 
ished, would have placed in constant jeopardy the life of every 
peaceful citizen walking the brown-stone-fronted avenues of New 
York: 

" If I know my own self, I would do no wrong to any njan. I 
never kjiew any motive of benefit, nor any impulse of feeling, 
which could induce me deliberately to injure a single being in all 
the world; and T certainly could not wilfully oppress a person 
accused of criirie, in regard to whom 1 am liound by a solemn 
oath, the obligations of which not only rocpxire me to conduct the 
prosecutions of the State, but also to make sure that, by my action, 
no injustice is done to any man. Standing in the position in which 
r do, if by any act of mine, any intentional act of mine, a man 
was convicted who was really innocent of an offense which involved 
his life, 1 would be, gentlemen, in the sight of God and man as 
l)lack and as depraved in heart as he who took the lives of those 
two men in reference to whose death we are now examining. I 
trust that I have not, in all this prosecution, exceeded what justice 
would pcM'mit, and I believe 1 have done nothing more than duty 
absolutely required." 

On one occasion, after Janies T. Brady, the greatest advocate in 
criminal cases of the New York Bar, had made an addres" which 
seemed to carry away all the feelings of the jury on a wave of sym- 
pathy for the family of his cliont, the accused defendant, and after 
the District Attorney had followed in reply, Brady said that Mr. 
Water bury's speech was the best he had ever heard in court, and 
that though he had at first thought he had captured the hearts of 
the jury, Waterbury had taken them all away from him by his 




292 



APPKNDIX V, 






I 



counter presentation of the wrongs and sufferings of other innocent 
families, caused by such acts as his client was Ijeing tried for. I 
mention this circumstance to illustrate what was the truth, that 
the zeal for jmlice, which was the mainspring of Mr. Waterlniry's 
action, was not a mere stern and cold logical appreciation of an 
abstraction, but had its source in a deep and genuine feeling of 
synipathy for the human sufferings of those who are the innocent 
victims of crime and wrong-doing. 

While a very modest, not to say diffident man, Mr. Water})ury 
had a properly high sense of the dignity, as well as of the moral 
duties of the office of District Attorney, to which he had been 
elected by the confidence of the people, ratifying the judgment of 
the more intimate friends who had proposed him for it. On one 
occasion he had sent a suhpama to (yommodore Vanderbilt, that great 
power in the State, who recently died, leaving an estate of a hund- 
red millions of dollars, who was then the owner of the I'acilic Mail 
Steamship line, requiring the attendance of a witness to prove an 
indispensable point in a case he was prosecuting, with a memoran- 
dum of the point to be proved, for which the testimony of one of 
his employees would suffice. The great money potentate took no 
notice of it, nor sent any witness. When the case was called Mr. 
WatQrbury quietly proceeded with the trial, but he took out an 
attachment, and sent down an officer to arrest the person who had 
dared to disobey a subpoena. In half an hour the Commodore 
sailed majestically into the court-room, attended by a retiiiue of 
about a dozen lawyers and friends. The effect was highly sensa 
tional. The required testimony was furnished, and the accused 
person was convicted. The i^omniodore was not a little astonished 
to find himself arrested for the first and only time in his life. But 
he afterwards had no ill-will for it, while he understood better than 
before the duty of every citizen to obey the lawful process of 
the courts. On another occasion, a bank functionary had to be 
l)i-osecuted in a case deemed very ii' nortant, and a committee of 
l)ank presidents had, by way of securing the very highest legal 
talent for the prosecution, requested Mr. Waterbury, who was a 
young man, to allow the prosecution to be conducted by Charles 
O'Conor, and other counsel employed by the bank. Mr. Water- 
bury said that he made no pretensions to rank professionally with 
Mr. O'Conor, and should be glad and grateful for his powerful 
aid in the management of the case, the argumentation on the admis- 
sion of evidence, etc., but that he could not abdicate his duties 



rrsi- i 



APPKNDIX U. 



293 



and responsibilities; while he thought also that the piiblic officer, 
acting and speaking from the point of view of the public interests, 
might have a certain weight with the jury difTerent from that of 
any private counsel, even thougli so able and eminent as Mr. 
()'(!onor. He accepted the cooperation proposed, but said the linal 
submission to the jury by the people would be by himself. It 
hap[)ene(l that at the time of the trial Mr. Waterbury was quite ill, 
and did not attcmd any day until an hour or two after the opening 
of the court. He sat leaning against the wood-work of tli(^ raised 
platform where presided the court, a nw.rc. listener to the evidence, 
until the testimony was closed on both sides. The court-room was 
crowded to its utmost canacity, with spectators attracted by the 
forensic duel between two such advocates as Charles ( )'Conor and 
James T. Brady. When the latt"r had (inished his address for the 
prisoner, Mr. Waterbury, feeling strongly the pressure of duty, 
notwithstanding his feeble physical condition at .such a trying mo- 
ment, but having his own clear views of the aspects in which the 
case should be presented on behalf of the people, walked round to 
his accustomed seat, took off the wrappings which his illness had 
caus<!(l him to wear, and, without a note of any kind to refresh his 
memory, commenced his addi-ess to the jury, which lasted a couple 
of liours. He then, with g* "eful recognition of his great eminence, 
offered to yield to Mr. O'Conor, if he had omitted or inadequately 
presented any points which ought to be further argued. Mr. 
(TConor replied that there was nothing more to be said, nor could 
the ai'gument have been better presented. He suggested oidy a 
single minor point which had been omitted, and which he begged 
Mr. Waterbury to state, as he had set forth all the rest. This was 
done, and the case was won, and with it Mr. Waterbury won also 
the liighest respect and esteem of the whole crowded court-room, 
l>ench, bar, and sp(>ctators. 

In thus speaking of the legal ability and high moral elevation o^ 
character exhibited by Mr. Waterbury in his discharge of the im- 
portant office of the public prosecutor of the City of New York, I 
have been led to anticipate dates, since it was not until 1858 that 
he was elected to that position, as will ap{)ear below in the proper 
chronological order. 

Mr. Waterbury 's capacity and character were early appreciated 
by observant men. His law studies had beim pursued in the office 
of Messrs. Wells & Van Wagenen, a firm now pass(^d away without 
succession, but then held in high esteem by the substantial men of 



294 



AHPKNDIX i;. 






: 



the city. He was aomitted to the Bar m attornoy, bytho Supreme 
Court, tlicn consisting of three judges. Samuel Ncslson beiri'!; (/liief 
Justice. Wliile in Albany, where tlu! court sat in IH4.^), to obtain 
his license as counsellor, his name was erroneously, and witliout his 
knowledge, included for Justice of the Marine Court, in a |)ub- 
lished list of candidates for the various oflices, a large number, 
then to be filled by the Governor, Sila^ Wright. On his return 
home, just admitted as (lounsellor, he was constantly nsked if he 
was going to be appointed. His reply that lu; was not a can- 
didate did not stop the course of •events, for several gentlemen vol- 
untarily wrote to the Governor, recommending the appointment, 
and Governor Wright, having had personal opportunity of observ- 
ing the capacity and usefulness of this young lawyei", gav(* to the 
suggestion his cordial approval. 

Mr. Waterbury was thus suddenly elevated immediately after 
his admission as counsellor to the Bench of a court which had Ix^en 
graced by many distinguished lawyers (among the number, .lohn 
Wells and Samuel Jones), while still so youthful as to appear a 
mere boy. The title of judge seemed oddly fitted to that long and 
slender youth, with small, beardless, and colorless (acv, blue; eyes, 
very light hair, and no breadth of chest and shoulders to speak of, 
always suggestive of the idea of feeble health, yet he made one of 
the best, most respected, and useful judges that had ever presided 
in that popular court, which was one of real importance, though of 
minor jurisdiction. 

The truth is, that the judicial character of his »nind, his analyt- 
ical lo!j;iral power, his quickness of apprehension, and conscientious 
good judgment, singularly qualified him for the position. But he 
did not hold it more than four years. 

In 1848, one of the most remarkable politictal contests ever 
known in the Str-.te of New York was fought to the bitter end. 
Silas Wright (who had refused to accept the Presidential nomina- 
tion tendered to him at Baltimore in 1844, but who had consented 
to accept that of Governor in order to strengthen the D(*mocratic- 
party in the Polk and Clay campaign of that year) had been defeated 
for re-election in 1846, through the hostility of the wing of the 
party called the "Hunkers," by a small majority, though the Dem- 
ocratic candidate for Lieutenant-Governor was elected. The sud- 
den death of Silas Wright a few months afterwards aroused the 
most intense hosiility on the part of his friends against those whom 
they regarded as "the murderers of Silas Wright." At the Balti- 



'¥'[ 



APPKNDIX tl. 



2!t: 



yt- 

ous 
he 

ivor 
end. 
i na- 
il ted 

itic- 
atod 

t,he 
)oin- 
Hud- 

the 
horn 
Jalti- 



niore Convention of 1844, Mr. Van Huron's renomination had been 
defoatod by the opposition of the same faction, wlio aimed at the 
nomination of (Jenoral (^ass, thouf?li after they saw the vehemence 
of resentment tlicy hail awakened, fearing the hjss of th(! Presi- 
dential election, they offered the nomination to Mr. Wright, which 
he refused, and the compromise result was the nomination of the 
comparativtily second-rate man, Polk of Tennessee. 

Nevertln;less, Mr. Wriglit consented to accept tlu? (irovernorship 
of New York, as the iiKuins of saving the State and the election to 
the Democratic party, with Polk for its ['residential candidate. 
The old enemies of Van Buren still strove for the nomination of 
Cass in 1848, and it was for the purj)ose of killing off Gov. Wright 
for 1848, that they defeated his re-election for (Jovernor in 184(i, 
which was soon followed by his death, as aliove mentioned. Siias 
Wright was rcganled by the young men as the ('ato of the Democ- 
racy, or, lik(^ Brutus, as the "noblest Roman of them all." They 
would tolerate no association with those at whose door they laid 
"the deep damnation of Ins taking off." Cass was again and still 
tlie candidate of thes(^ latter, and the; unforgiving, friends of Silas 
Wright in his grave, preferred any and all consequences rather 
than the triiuiiph of Cass and the Hunkers. The fascinating influ- 
ence and brilliant eloquence of John V^an Buren fed the flame of 
this superheated pai'ty feeling. To defeat at all hazards them 
and ('ass, for whom personally they entertained a profound con- 
tempt, was their aim and i)assi()nate resolve. The result was the 
strange nnd unnatural coalition which was represented by the 
nomination of Van Buren and Adams on the " Buffalo platfoi'm." 
SubseqiiLMit history has proven (in my opinion) that this was a 
grievous mistake, though it had its origin in natural and generous 
emotions. The result was that Cass was utterly defeated, Taylor 
being, in the State of Nmv Vork, first. Van Buren second, and Cass 
third. The Whigs swept the State and the country. Mr. Watei'- 
bury was second to none in his participation in the general feeling 
and action of the young Democrats of New York, nicknamed the 
" Harnburnert'.."' Th»^ election of Taylor for a single term was. to 
them, a minor evil in comparison with what they would have 
regarded as the abomination of Cass under those circumstances. 
Silas Wright was at least avenged. 

To Mr. Waterbury, ont^ immediate consequence was the loss of 
his position on the bench. The Whigs, in full possession of the 
State, and eager to posse.ss all the offices, vacated his seat by 



2U() 



AI'PKNDIX V. 



! ^ II 



reducing the term of the incumbent judges, and Mr. Watorbury 
contentedly returned to th(! private practice of liis profewsidu. 

This Now York " HarnburnerH " revolt in tin* Dtunocratic party, 
in 18'I8, was a purely local and temporary (ipisode. Tim two 
divisions of the party in New York soon came togetlu^r again l)y 
natural gmvitation, and the result was seen in 185*2, in the ovor- 
wluOining majority by which Tierce, a mere brigadi(M'-general in 
the Mexican war, was elected ov(U' (Jenc'ral Scott, its brilliant and 
pojiular comniander-in-chief. Mr. Wat('rl)ury approved tlKvClay 
compromise nu^asures of 1850, and has never since* separated from 
the National party. 

After his retirement, in 1840, from his four years of service on 
the bench of the Marine Court, Judge Waterbury pursued the 
modest carec^r of a young lawyer with a practice* yet to makct, and 
with (jualifications for success, and the achievenmnt of distinction 
more solid than showy. And if he was thus legitimately wedded 
to Themis, she was far from possessing his whole heart. Anothei- 
passion divided it and led him often into truancy from his law 
office — that of politics. A full-blooded American, an earne.'it 
patriot, an ingrained Democrat full of sincere faith in the people, 
thoroughly ind)ued with the spirit of what may be termed the 
Jacksonian era, imbibcKl by him from association with that pure 
and noble set of men of whom, in New York, Van Buren, Wright, 
Young, Flagg, Michael HolTnian, and others were the chiefs (his 
intimate friend, Tilden, being anotlier high pupil of the same sj)l('n 
did school), a born organizer, and of that temper of character whicli 
made disinteret>'-ed zeal and indefatigable work for the promotion 
of what was to him right and duty a very law of his nature, a 
necessity of his very conscience, the pale and slender young num 
who, though nearly six feet, weiglied less than l.'H) i)()unds {\\e, ciin 
now boast his 180), soon came to occupy quite an unique* position 
among the leading men of his party. His politics were a sort of 
religion to him, and a i-eligion of work as well as of words. lie 
had the confidence of their inmost circle, and was always found of 
excellent counsel. He was of most useful private benefit to the 
Democratic press. Possessing a remarkable; niemoiy, attentive to 
details as well as to generalities, and fond of statistics, he was 
familiar with the figures of the past votes, not merely of .States 
and cities, but of counties and wat'ds, and not alone of his own 
State, but of the principal States of the Union; so that in electiem 
times, when returns would come in much more slowly and scat- 



AITKNTUX v. 



297 



tcriiijily tliHii in thcao niodcrii days of »iUH!tririty, Im wuh iiivHliiablo 
ill holpiiig to th(! earli<!8t judffriienis of tlio rHsults. TIk^ taMcs of 
compurativc returns wliicli, at such jM'rioils, \v(^r(^ tho nioist imporl- 
ant and inton'stin>ij reading in tlio cohmins of the Icadiiijj; Dcnio- 
(•rali<- papers, were always sun* to have pniC(H'(h'd from his accuriitc 
iiiid indofatij^ahl(> pencil, t() which they were a lalior of lovo. And 
in the city of his own rosidenro, N(!W N'ork, lui always took an 
active and always most s(«rviceable part, orf^aiiizat ion lieiii^ at oiu-e 
his Jhrte and d<'li^ht. At the; same tiiM(^ he wiis seldom one of 

the sp«uikers at public, meetings; not or.ly did he not possess the 
nvpiisite power of Iwiif^s and voi(!e, hut his style, though easy and 
(excellent in the ])rose(;ution of a logical line of arj^ument to carry 
conviction to the reason of a judge, anci the mingled reason and 
heart of a jury, was not of the kind most effective with popular 
assend)lages. Moreover, at such linns he was always too busy 
otherwise — and after the victory often too much exhausted — for 
that kind of political work. Hut many a time, when the hrilliant 
popular t)rat()r would seem to carry oif si> laige a share of the 
credit f o ■ tlu; victory achieved, Mr. Waleihury had really con- 
trihuted ten times more of elTectivti though silent influence to tlie 
result. 

A sworn enemy to corruption and every form of dishonesty in 
politics or in nuirals, and ever unrelenting to the old enenues of 
Silas Wright (to this day tears have hevn seen to come to his (^yes 
at that name), while ho ])ossessed tht* uidinuted conliilence and 
esteem of all the leading men of his own wing of the Democratic 
party, lie lu^came, of course, the object of a si)ecial animosity ami 
dread to those of the other. 

In 18r),'i, th<^ members of the Common Council of the city had 
already becouM' po])ularly known as "the forty thieves ;" and the 
jjegislatiire, upon the appliciitioii of a committee consisting of 
Peter Cooper, llt^nry Cirinnell, James Hdorman, and otln'r leading 
citizens of that high category, which had been organized for the 
sole purpose of securing municipal reform, passed a series of 
amendments to the city charter, to Ije siil)mitted to a popular vote 
before taking effect. The election for this object was a special 
one, and none of the politicalorgani/atioiis took any part in it. 

The danger was, however, imminent that it would be controlled 
>)y the members of the Common Council, the most influential poli- 
ticians of their respective wards, and all interested in defeating 
the proposed amendments. Only two weeks remained before the 
38 







ips 



n 



2»8 



AIM'KNDIX r 



I 






oloction, iind the Iric'iidH of reform found tlicMuselvoH in dan>^or of 
d»'f<>at. .fud^c VVat<'rbiiry's ubility as an orj^ani/rr was well 
known, Itiit. lie was not a mcndn'r of tlic roiiiniitfcd. Duncan ('. 
I'cll, afUu'wiird liiciitonant < Jovcruor ol Kliodc Island, and (Ico. H. 
Butler, a conlideiitial businoss associato of t.lm late A. T. Stewart, 
wore sent to rofpiest him to prepare a plan for orj;!;ani/-in^; the briiif 
cam])aign, and to direct it. Ho pr ptiy prepared a ])aper settini;' 
forth a perfect plan tofirouse tluMlu.. and liiii;!,iiid ]iui)lic attention, 
so as to siicure sncc<'ss at tiu^ election. 'Plie coniniittce unaniniousiy 
and gratefully apj)rove(l Ins plan of organization and action, and 
urged liim to assume the task of its execution. JTe linally con- 
sented, on tlie condition tliat he should have the soUi management, 
and sliould not liavci to (ronsult with any committee or other 
autlunity whatever; to whi<*h the committee had tlu« good sense 
to agree. When tlie caucus of the C'onimon Council l(!arne(l that 
the cam[)aign was to be condu(!ted by him, they realized that any 
attempt to defeat the anuMidmenta would be useless, and all opposi- 
tion was abandoned. The reform mov(!ment was, however, organ- 
ized with the most perfect and com])lete system, every detail being 
arranged with the greatest care, and with such success that tlu; 
anKUidnunits wei'e adopted by a majority of .'JO, 009 in a vot(! of 
about ;U),000; quite a full vote for a cpiarter of a century ago. 

About two years before this, in 18;")], the part of the city in 
which Judge Watorbury n^sided was set ofT as a new ward, and 
the Democrats selected him to re})resent it in the l?oard of Educa- 
tion of the city ; a position always (^steennnl one of high honor. 
He declined the nomination, but was nevertheless elected. He 
could not be insensible to such an (expression of confidence, and 
sucli an appeal to his philanthropy; and for nearly eleven consecu- 
tive years scM'ved as a school o(li(;er, taking at once a leading part 
in educational matters. ll(( brought to these lunv duties the same 
spirit of zeal and thoroughgoingness which characterized his action 
in all matters in which he saw duty to be performed and public 
good to be accomplished. The service was wholly giatuitous, and 
involved much labor, sacrifice of time, and ev(m some (expense. 
At that period, and for years before, vehement controversy existed 
between the Roman (yatholics, under the lead of th(Mr pri(!sthood, 
and the powerful Public School Society, over the question of the 
religious intluenco exerted upon the minds of the children by the 
spirit and tone of school education. On the one side a Protestant- 
izing influence was produced, or claimed to be produced, through 



"▼Wfl( 



ff^flf 



APPKNniX V. 



•-MM) 



of 

in 

uul 

•a- 
or. 

lo 
iiid 

)iirt 
lino 
tioii 
•lie, 
and 
jiise. 
stod 
ood, 
tlie 
tlio 
taiit- 
>ugh 



the ruudiii^ of tlm liiblo in tho hcIiooIh and tho uso of books con- 
taining or Hiig^(!Htiiig aiiti-('at}iolic idtuis. Tho Catholics (chiclly 
Irish and Democratic in their party assocnations) not only nuide 
snch complaints, Imt clainicd that an aflirnnitivc religions inllncncc 
ougiit lo \)v. cxcitt'd in the conrsc' ul! early ctlncation; and tliey 
wanted the existing public scliool system broken up, and specially 
Catholic schools estal>lislied to work sido by side with the Vrotest- 
ant ones, acicording to the prefer(Mic(;s of the parentc. There was 
a great deal to lui r<>asonably urged on both sides of such a contro- 
versy. Personally Mr. Waterbury was a. I'rotcHtant (Kpiscopaliari, 
and strong for the "Apostolic succession "), and shari-il thegeiu'i'al 
unwillingness of the community to seeing a sectarian disruption of 
the groat common school system of New York. Hut he was at the 
same time a i-(msonal)lo, just, and, above all, a i)ra(rtical man. In 
the first year of his service he W)»s appointinl by the President of 
the Hoard, the Hon. K. C. Pent^ilict, ui)on a conunittec^ to confer 
with tlu! Publico Sirhool Soci(ity for the transfer of its .schools (ubout 
equal in nundxT with those under tlus (jontrol of the Board of 
Kducation) to the control of the latter body; and to his tact and 
ability the accomplishment of that union was largcily due. As 
chairmaji of the linance committee or of tlie committee on bydaws, 
and as a mendier of other important committees, his labors were 
constant and of great valuta The statutes of the State isolating to 
the Board, and the by-laws of th(! Board, were constantly under 
amendment by him, until linally nc^arly the whole of both bore the 
impress of his :'(>vision. One signal triumph may bt; here specified 
whicli mark(Hl his service! in the Hoard. Some of the schools, in 
wanls with population almost entirely Roman Catholic, were not 
opened with the reading of the Bible. Wlien the bitterly anti- 
Irish and anti-Catholic party, which strangely gloried in the name 
of "the Know-Nothings," ol)tained for one year coatrol of the 
Board, a majority of the committee on by-laws reported a by-law 
to comi)el such reading of the Hibh^ ; under such penalties that, if 
the local officers failed to obey, the schools should be closed. 'IMie 
proposed by-law had not been considered at any meeting of the 
committee, so that no remonstrating nunority report could be heard 
against it, but was embodied in a report signed by a nuxjority of 
its members. Judge Waterbury, in the Board, asked that its con- 
sideration should be postponed to enable him to subnut the views 
of the minority. I'his fair and rightful request was refused, 
and the by-law was passed by simple for(!c of nund)ers. At the 




300 



APPENDIX V. 



\ I 




next meeting (July, 185!)^ he submitted a minority report, which 
also here the signature ol' the Hon. Wilham E. C'urtis, now chief 
judge of the Superior Court of tlie city of New York, but the 
Board refused to receive or print it. Judge Waterbury had it 
printed at liis own expense as a pamplilet, and distributed to the 
members, the newspapevs, and the pTibHc, and the result was that 
the by-law at once became as dead as tliough a blank paper. Tt 
was uttei'ly disregarded, and no attempt was ever made to enforce 
it. Indeed, the subject was so completely dispose d of tliat in the 
twenty years wliich have (ilapsed, {.Ithough the agitation of the same 
question has disturl)ed other co.uiiiunitie.s, tlie city of New York 
has remained entirely free from it. Some years afterwards, at the 
last meeting of the Board attended by Judge Waterbury, and on 
his proposition, a motion repealing the dead by-law was unani- 
mously ado])ted. S])ace permits me to quote only the following, 
which was the conclusion of the report ref(!rred to: 

'•The undersigned, while tliey are thus decided in their op| -;i- 
tion to th(^ polic}^ of compulsion, are also earnestly in favor of the 
daily reading of the Bible in oiii' scliools. Tliey realize fully the 
inestimable value of that sacred l>ook, in its influence upon the 
formation of character, in its guidance of our daily lilt' and con- 
duct, and in the ])r{>pai"ation which it affords to all who accept it 
for the eternity Iteyond the grave. In their own Wnrds, where 
their advocacy of the policy of the daily reading of the Hible is 
proper and available, they have uniformly expressed these senti- 
ments, and it is gratifying to them tliat the Bible is, and lias lieen, 
read daily in every school in tJieir r(>sp('ctiv<' Wards, from the 
organization of ( ach school to the present time. Yet they do not 
deem it necessary or proper to seek o(!CHsion for the reiteration of 
these sentiments, mi eh less (hi they believe that that sacred book 
should be us(?(l as a sliibbol'-i^'v by a political or any other seculai' 
interest. When I'cligioxis niatters are degraded from their high 
and holy sphere to the uses of partisanship of any kind, it i> too 
often found that those who are loudest in their professed advocacy 
are not always, eitlier in their language or conduct, tlu* most con- 
sistent with religious purity or principle. Without inqjuting any 
such deficiency to their coih'agues in the Board who have supported 
these by-laws, the undersigned have failed to observe anything in 
*he ])r(went agitation denoting a iiigher pui'pose than they hav»^ 
above indicated; on the contrary, it set^ns to them to be clearly 
imbued with the unworthy spirit of pcsrsonal and i)o]itical ends, 
rather than with tlit^ peaceful and beiuivolent spirit of the (iospel 
of (..iirist. 

" While the un(l(>i-signed have ai'gU(,'d that the lioard possesses 
no power to ado|)t the conq)uls;»ry By-[;aws, it is due to themselves 
to declare that they would be averse to the policy of conqnUsKMi, 




APPKNDIX U. 



301 



even if the power to adopt it were undoubted. They are entirely 
convinced of the wisdom and expediency of tlie rule which leaves 
this matter to the action of each locality. There is no subject 
whatever, notwithstandinfij the gentleness and nioileration of its 
own principles, and tlu; brotherly love and charity which it incul- 
cates, upon which numkiiid feel so keenly, or often manifest so 
much asperity, as u[)on that of religion. It woi'ks its way onward, 
not l)y reason of the occasional intoh^-ance and violence of its 
advocates, but by its inherent beauty, wisdom, and power. They 
do not beli(3ve that a sincere convert has evei- lieiui made to any 
religious doctrine by outward compulsion, whether ecclesiastical, 
niilitary, or political. It is not jjrobablc that any gr<>atcr success 
will attend an attempt to force the daily reading of .tlie Hihle upon 
the people of any locality, whatevtu- may be the motives that 
prompt their opposition to its use; but, on the contrary, the 
attempt is likely to arouse a more determined ri'sistance. 

"In conclusion, because the Hoard has no authority whatever to 
pass these By-Laws, because they uproot tlu' wis(; and beneficent 
policy consistently pursued during the whole continuau'^e of the 
existing school system; becausi; tlun'e is no nect'ssity for- tht;ir 
adoption; because they are harsh, unjust, and oppressive in their 
provisions; b(>cause they proceed u])on a basis of violenc(> and 
force, hostile to the very spirit of the llible itself; and lu^cause 
there is inmiiiu'nt danger that they will substitute for a state of 
prosperity and peac^e, the issues of strife and dc^struction, the 
ui ;lersigned wen^ and are opposed to tiieir ado|)tion, juid thev 
believe that such opf)osition will (!ommend itself, not only to every 
friend of the pi'inciples ujion whi<'li our civil institutions are based, 
but also to all who [)ri/e and venerate tlie precious and immut- 
■.Mo principles of the (Christian faith." 

In tlie summer of 1853, the newly-appointed postmaster of New 
York earne.stly solittited Judge Waterbury to accept the position 
of assistant postmaster, for the special purpose of securing his 
recognized al>ility as an organizer, for the establishment of an 
improved system for the delivery of letters through(jiit th(> city: 
offering to niak(> to the salary such addition, out of his own, as 
would make it [troperly remunerative. With great reluctance 
Judge Waterl)ury finally consented. Huch diversion of liis iitten- 
tion and time from his profession wns invtsssarily dain;)ging to his 
practice of the latter ; for the law is a jealous and exacting mistress. 
I'robabiy the laboricms work to be done, for a good pul)lic service, 
and in tlie element in which he took a certain intellectual delight, 
exerted a fascination upon Judge Waterbury, which tempted him 
into an unwise deviation from his proper \hw of professional life. 
At that time the (hilivery was inadc^ by carriers who colh'cted a, 
fee of two cents on each letter for their compensation. Some 



•; ! 



• !;■, I 






¥ ! 






302 



APPKNDIX U. 



routes were worth over $2,()()() a y^nr, otliers under $500. Every 
carrier liad to attcmd at the genei'al i)08t-otIice to receive his lettei"8, 
tliough some routes were nearly five miles distant from it. Some 
made three or four deliveries a day, to others oidy one was possible. 
And tluM-e were a number of private establishments scattered 
throughout the city, styling themselves "post-offices," and making 
rival deliveries. Instead of such system as ought to work the postal 
service of a great meti'opolis, there was chaos, and a chaos (!(|ually 
absurd and injurious to the public acconimodiition. He first brok(* 
up tlu' undue advantages of carriers on the dense business routes 
by requiring half of the carriers' fees to be paid into a common 
fund, and distributed on a plan by which the carri(!rs on routes 
covering large areas received a larger sum per letter than those on 
routes embraced within a circuit of a few huiulred feet. Having 
thus secured the means of equalizing the delivery over the whole* 
city, he also establislicd hundnuis of locked boxes at suitable places 
throughout the city, from which letters wen; taken at stated hours 
each day, by re^'ulai- collectors, fle next assailed the private post- 
offices, as they were called, and at last, after a desperate resistance, 
comp<>lle(l tln"in to discontinue tluMr illegitimate business. Thus, 
step by step, he gradmdly, and with great tlifliculty — becaussj every 
movement, strenuously resisted by those whose intenwts were nec- 
essarily damaged by reform, had to receive the approval of the 
department at Washington — prejjared the way for an entirc^ly new 
sysicm. At the end of about two years Ik; had th<; satisfac^tion of 
bfiing abUi to nuike his reform comprehensive and ('ompU^tc'. The 
city was divided uito seven districts, in each of which (other than 
the one containing the general post-office) a station was established, 
designated as stations A, U, etc., each one of which was practically 
a post-office for the district; so that, while lettei-s contiiuied to Iw 
dirccU'd to the New York post-office, they were there distributed 
and sent in bulk to the proper districts, from which they riiceived 
their local deliv(U-y with the utmost possible promptitude and 
regularity. Conversely the collectors from tlus boxes dcilivered at 
the stations of their nispective districts, from which transmission 
was made to the gtjueral office. The constant and rapid commu- 
nications between the central otilce and the stations, to and fro, 
was effected by circulating wagons, making the circuit of the city 
at stated intervals each day. Not merely the general system, but 
every detail, including the mapping out of the districts, the hiring 
and (itting up the stations, the selectin.g and drilling of the men, 



APPENDIX U. 



303 



lU- 
■o, 
ty 
ut 

lie 
'r> 

n. 



etc., was personally attended to by Judjjje Waterbury; and so 
thoroughly, that the new S3'8tein was a <ronipl<'t(i 8U(X'ess from the 
very day of its opening ; working like clock-work, in the whole and 
in all of its parts. VVitli the growth of the city, the districts have 
been increased to nearly twenty, l>ut the system remains unchangi'd, 
except only that the delivery of letters is now free fj-om any cai"- 
rier's charge*. Once or twice minor changes have* been imuh?, but 
they did not work well, and Judge Waterbury 's system, pure and 
simple, was soon restoi'ed. Tims a very model for city delivery 
of mailable matter was established in New York, which has led to 
an impn)v<>ni(>nt of the carriers' delivery (n'lM-ywhere, and to a very 
large yearly increase* in the* revenues of tlio r()st-( )nice Dt^partment. 
Yet few reflect or remember to whose orgaidzing and creative 
genius all this is dut^ 

The reaction from liis excessive labor brought upon Judge 
Waterbury a seven* sickness, a condition of fevered nervous 
exhaustion. H(* had all along fc'lt an undue confidence that his 
elastic, while delicate constitution could (!ntlure the strain of any 
amount of work that should not exceed twenty-four hours in the 
day. With a pulse at 120, and unable to leave* the house, he had 
a cl(>rk from the pv)st-office to attend him every day with the papers 
re(|uiring his action. The grat(>ful postmaster, learning from his 
physician that his recovery was hopeless unless he should abstain 
from work, directed that no more papers should be taken to his 
house. Without the employment which had sustained while it was 
killing liini, he broke down, as the thorough-bred who can, or at 
least will, go while between the shafts, sinks to the ground the 
nionuMit thev are withdrawn. .Judge Wat(*r])ury was th(*n pros- 
trated in bed with a fever wliich continu(*(i nnbi-oken for two 
months. As he began to rally a little in the* spring of 1850, he 
proceede'd to Cuba, and thence travele*el home through the so ^th- 
em state's, re*aching Ne*w Ye)rk at the end of May, with health 
completely revstal)lish(^d. Sue-h is the history, not before written, 
of the establishment of the pre*sent pe)stal system of the (Jity of 
New York. 

While yet in the post-office*, it bee'ame> nee-essary in Novend)er, 
IS5S, to elect a new District Atte)rne>3' for the city. That func- 
tie)nary is the public prose*cutor, anei ocenipie's a relatie^n so e-lose* to 
tli(> administration of the general polie*ei system, that, while the two 
branches are e)Hicially distinct, he* is in some sense its inte'lle'ctual 
head. The leading men in the Democratic party appeared to turn, 









304 



Ai'PENnrx IT. 



willi iilinostonc iiiiiid, to Jiulgc Wiiterbiii'V- 1J«' suggested that 
iis ]m iia(i bsen out of the practice of th(i Uiw for over five years, 
it was a (hmg(>rous experiment to ])ut liim in that position; but 
tli(\v liad full conlitlciice in his ahility to (ill any oflice with < redit 
to hiniseir and those who had selected him for it, and he was nom- 
inated with great xinanimity, and triumphantly elected. Their 
sagacity was soon vindicated from all doubts wh(!th(T of himself 
oi- of otliers. He had not b(>en four montht, in the olTicc; before lu^ 
had won the entir<i confidences of the ])ublic. The wif(! of ti man 
named St(s[)hens had di(!d one year pri'viously, and thv.n^ were such 
strong grounds of suspicion that she had been poisoned, that.ludg*^ 
Waterbury directed the disinterment of the body, and an exam- 
ination to be made by Prof. R. Ogden Doremus, the (eminent 
chemist. It was found to be permeated in every [)art with arsenic, 
wliicli had preserved it from decay, and Stephens wa:s indicted for 
murder, lie was one of the false professors of an ostentatious 
l)iety, and his fellow-worshippers in his church rallied indignantly 
to ids defense, and supplied the means for it to be made with 
ability and vigor. The trial lasted three weeks, and ended in the 
conviction of the nnirderer, who, aft<>r the case had been taken to 
tlu! C!ourt of .\i)p(sals, and tin* conviction aflirmed, sulTm-ed the 
penalty of t\w law. The work so elliciently begun was vigorously 
followed up. Every case of the wilful use of deadly weapons, 
whethej" fatal or not in the result, was prosecuted, and the guilty 
were punished. 'JMiere was a large, powerful, and dangerous 
class in New Vork, against whom this bold and firm course was a 
personally hazardous, and very hazardous, declaration of war. 
William Mulligan, a gand)ler. one of its most noted members (who. 
when «'xcited with drink, was a i-(>ckl(»ss ruHian, and who was after- 
wards shot to death ijy the police of San Francisco), foun<l himself 
compelled to exchange the fashionable broa<lcloth and diamond 
studs with which he promenaded Broadway for the sim[)ler uni- 
form of Sing Sing, for the crime of aiming a loaded pistol at a 
police o(1ic(!r. And while the assaults endangering tlu; lives of 
public officers were inflexibly and severely punished, these latter 
were made to know that they too would be held to strict account- 
ability for any luniecessary degree of severity towards (!ven the 
criminal class, .ludge Waterbury held that thei'e should not be 
an outcast class in any ('hristian or civilized community, and that 
care should be taken to siiow the offenders that while the law 
exacted obedience it did not withhold just protection. 'I'he r >8ult 



APPENDIX U. 



.^O") 



was not long in manitosting itHelf. Even the more depraved, when 
they found that justice was not a one-sided word, and that, while 
one hand held the sword of public* duty, the otlier held the shield 
for the defense of all entitled to it, felt the good and wise molli- 
fying iiiHuenec ; and New York, reversing its bad rc^pute, bticanic 
known for a time as unsurpassfl for onhu- and (|ui(!t by any city 
of its size in the world. 80 in ifgard to the frauds known* as 
ticket-switidling, which made New York a place of terror to the 
multitudes attracted by its business fa(riliti(^s, who daily (unbarkt-d 
at its wharves. Judge Wat«!ibury took uj) the task of correcti* n 
in his (characteristic, thorough-going way, and nuide short and 
sharp work of the principal ollendcirs, and so paralyz(Hl and deter- 
red the rest that the system became, and has remained a tiling of 
the past. 

The great case of Charles Jefferds for the murd(M' of John 
Walton and John W. Mathews, was th(! most important one of 
Mr. Waterbury's term of the District Attoriu^ysliii). 'J'he prisomn- 
had the powerful aid of James T. Brady as liis leading counscd. 
It was a horrid case; an intricately tangled, and every way a mcist 
extraordinary one. Jefferds was a step-son of Mr. Walton, luMug 
son of Mrs. Walton by the first of the several marriages of 
which that with Mr. Walton had been the last. Walton was shot 
down at the corner of Third Avenue and 18th street, at 20 min- 
utes past 11, of a bright moonsliiny night, when there was no lack 
of people in the streets. The assassin, who had been lying in wait 
for him behind a tree, stepped up close to him, after he had passeii, 
killed him on the spot by a large bullet through his brain; fhnl, 
was pursu(!d, turncni upon his foremost pursuer, Mathews, and by a 
shot in the l)reast, laid him also dead on the spot, himself escaping 
The pistol was found the next r.iorning in a neighboring yai'd, 
where it had been flung, with two barrels out of the live dis- 
charged in their work of twofold murder. As there W( re two 
distinct crimes, separated by an interval of time, and i)rompted 
by different motiv(!s, though the one grew out of the otluu-, there 
were two indictments. On the first, that for the deliberate lying- 
in- wait assassination of his stei)-fathor, Walton, the evidence was 
insufficient for a conviction. His face had been seen too rapidly 
by moonlight, and at too great a distance, for conclusive id(;nti(i- 
cation. After a few minutes of hiding under a stoop, \u'. had got 
off on a streetcar, and had crossed the ferry to South Brooklyn, 
where he reached his lodgings so promptly that, in view of some 
39 



3(>r> 



AI'I'KNDIX V, 



V. 

it 



(liiTeroncos of time, as ostimatcid by tho various wituossos wlio 
hoard tlio sliots, it was a point strenuously disputed foi- the defense^ 
wlietlicr he could have accomplished the distance in his llif^ht. 
And that which was the real motive to the crime, was at onci; as 
diflicult tfi prove as it was horrid and revolting, nainely. a prompting 
1)V his mother to rid her of her husband; prompting in which hin^ 
wafe cond)ined with hate. She had a strong interest in Mr. Wal- 
ton's death at that time, so that she could receive ]wj widow's 
dower in his considerable estate; for he had recently ])ut \un- away 
for ju.st cause, and she kiu)W him to l)e on the track of the evi- 
dence which would show her to be either the undivorced wife 
of a husband still living, or to have at least passed for the wife of 
that other man without the sanction of marriage. On the indict- 
ment for the murder of Mr. Walton, .lefferds had escaped con 
viction, but the District Attorney remained thoroughly convinc(ul 
of his guilt, and held the other indictment still over him, for the 
niurd(M' of Mathews, his pursuer in his flight; a conviction \nM 
also by the brother of the murdered Walton, now guardian of his 
orphaniMl children, and as such resisting the suit of Jeflerds's 
mother for her dower. Judge Waterl)ury did not, however, 
choose to proceed at once to the trial of the second indictment, 
but, on tlui contrary, surprised thc^ [)ubli(t by releasing JelTerds 
from prison on his own recognizance. More evidence to bring the 
crime home was necessary, and he trusted to that providential law 
which always tends to make the murderer himself l)etray his 
ever-toi turing secret, aiul was not unwilling that his apparent 
triumph over public justice, and consequent sense of security, 
should, together with his habits of dissipation and intemperanco, 
favor the operation of that law. The able Chief of I'olice, Mi-, 
.lohn A. Kennedy, who had been surprised to see Jeffords thus 
released from custody without a second trial for the second crime, 
proposed to the J)istrict Attorney to have him "shadowed" by a 
skillful detective, who should fall into acquaintance and intimacy 
with him, and so obtain the needed clues to other circumstances 
of a character to complete the evidence. 

Nfi-. "Watei-bury felt th(! strongest obligations of a civic as well 
as of official duty which called for a conviction in such a case. If 
such a crime, pei'petrated with an audacity so defiant of the public 
justice, should be crowned with impunity and triumph, no peace- 
able citizen's life would be safe on the best streets of New York 
against the hand of murder, whether prompted by greed or by 



APPKNDIX V. 



307 



revenge. The profligate hal)its of the criminal thus allowed to go 
at largo rendered the task of the detective no very difficiilt one, 
notwithHtanding that JefTerds was informed by his mother that 
she was told that liis new associate was a policeman, lie let out 
wheie he had bought the pistol, and (iven ('onf(!SS(!d the first 
murder, for which Ik; knew that lie coulti not now be tried again ; 
ind(!e(|, in his cups, he had rather a tendency to boast of it. He 
was arrested and tried for tlie second murder, that of Mathews. 
The ('as(^ was still a difJicidt one, b(ung almost wholly one of cir- 
cumstantial evidence, sinc(^ a detectiv<^'s testimony to confi'ssions 
was V(!iy «|U('Stionablcv, It also invoivtid the curious point, that the 
Walton murder, for which the criminal was now safe, had virtually 
to be tried over again; not to convict him lor it, but to fasten it 
upon liiin as a vital element in the proof of the other '.iiurdcr 
which had growJi out of it ; the two being insc^parable, mid it 
being conced(!d that \w (.ould not Ix; convicted of the second 
muider unless he liad committed the first, there being otherwise 
no pi'oof of motive. 

The trial lasted a week. Judge Waterbury's management of 
the witnesses was very masterly, and liis address to tlie jury was a 
model of dear exposition, lucid amdysis, effective groui)ing of a 
large variety of details, all coiivcjrgiiig to the fiK^al point of demoii- 
.stration and ccmviction, and of that calm and dignified strength, 
conscientiously directed to a righteous objeiit, which became a 
public prosecutor who felt his high but painfid function to be that 
of a priesthood in tlui tempU; of justice. It was in the course of 
this address that he repelled in llu^ language above cpioted an 
attempt that was made by the defense* to prejudice tlu* jury by tint 
imputation of a vindictive excess of zeal in the prosecution, giv- 
ing it a character of persecutioJi. When he sat down all felt the 
doom of the criminal to be sealed, and the jury were so completely 
satisficMl that upon n'tiring they inunediately voted by ballot, with 
out di.S(ru.ssion, that he was guilty. 

This trial won high praise* for Judge Waterbury for the forensic 
power displaye(l by the District Attorney, and b(>tter si ill, the 
respect of ail who had followed it, for the man. The wnitched 
murderer eventually, howev«ir, escaped the doom of the scaffold. 
He wiis killed in prison by a fellow-convict, in an affray provoked 
by the reckless violetice of character which had thus conducted 
him to its foot. A lawyer present at this trial (since a distin- 
guished judge), Inferring to Waterbury's success as public prose,'- 



308 



AIM'KNDIX U. 



1 



i- 



I f- 









cutor, said that "Speakinf^ witliout notes, ho had a habit, when ho 
had finislind a point, of hitting liis eyelids close for a few si^conds, 
while he selected the next that he would ])resent. It thus hecamo 
an axiom among the frequenters of th(! court, that when the dis- 
trict attorney shut his eyes the prisoner's last chance was gone." 

'^riie signal success of Judg*^ Waterbury as a prosecuting officer 
was du(* to an unusual (H)mbination of qualities — those qualities, 
mental and moral, which have been a])ove indicated. His quick- 
iK^ss of perception, rennirkable memory of facts and faculty of coor- 
dinating them, firmness of purpose, (conscientiousness, and intense 
earnestness, would carry his juries along witli liim almost uncon- 
sciously. His firmness was as manifest as was his fearlessness. If 
he felt any doubt of a person's guilt, he would frankly say .so. 
[le would luiver pn^hs a jui'or into the box to whom an objection 
could be made with the smallest show of reason. No testimony 
offered by a prisoner was excluded unless it was so clearly incom- 
petent as to be a merti waste of time; and no prisoner failed to 
have a material witness because he could not himself procure him, 
if the public jnoiu^y could bring him. 13ut while lie thus gave 
every fair and proper chance, even to the most guilty, and no word 
nor act ever nianifested the least spirit of injustice to tin i)risoner, 
even in the mind of the District Attorney, this very conduct of the 
prosecution gave additional force against him, so that it became 
almost a settled axiom, that for Waterbury to try was to convict, 
unless he himself declared to the jury that the case involved some 
reasonable doubt. 

If I have dwelt a litth; on this feature of Judge Waterbury's 
professional life, it is not alone because I regard it as signally hon- 
orable to him, but with a view to present it as a model, alike in its 
nol)leness of method an(i in its practical success, to all to whom is 
assigned the delicata function of the public prosecutor, — a function 
which in Krance is called and tlieoretically regarded as a mmjis- 
fraci/, though we so rarely see it exercised in the semi-judicial spirit 
befitting that title. In the present instancie, I really think it was 
performed in a spirit not less sincerely judicial than if the District 
Attori\ey had been sitting on the bench instead of pleading be- 
fore it. 

It may .seem strange that such a model District Attorney was 
not re-elected on the expiration of his term in 1861, but the reason 
for that was an additional honor to Judge Waterbury's name, 
l^efoi'e the close of his term he had felt it his duty to bring before 
the Grand Jury and investigate certain action of the Common 



I! 



AI'I-ENDrX ir. 



3()!> 



be- 



Council, for which it was reported that large sums of money had 
been paid. The members of that body, the inlhiential local poli- 
ticians of the wards, to whom such a propjcution by such a prose- 
cutor opened up a vista in which, through the stages of exposure 
and disgorgenuMit, the cells of Sing-Sing closed the perspective 
before thcnn, saw in Judge VVaterbury (though himself u zealous 
and active Democratic politician) at once their foe and their fate. 
The (candidate of the Republicans was indorsed by the Moz-art 
branch of the Democratic party controlled by the then Mayor of 
the city, and though Judge Waterbury ran 7,000 ahead of his 
ticket, he was defeated hy only ahout 900. Had he been nvelected 
to continue the campaign of investigation and prosecution theu 
opened by him, it seems probable that the noxious plant of muni- 
cipal corruption, already vigorously started in a rank soil, could 
never have flowered out into the sphuidid and gorgeous prop(»r 
tions it attaiuinl just ten years aftctrwards, when tlu* (ixposui'c; of 
its enornu)Us growth alarmed the whole country, and added to the 
American language a word which, as the name of a man now 
gone to his last account, has become the name of a thing which 
unhappily is not yet equally defunct. 

The (ixtraordiiiary vigilance and efficiency of Judge VVaterbury's 
dischiirge of the duties of this ollice were curiously brought out to 
public light soon afterwards. The Board of Supervisors had 
voted to raise the salary of his succes.sor from $.'),000 to $7,000. 
Tlw- Mayor, Mr. Opdyke, a Republican, vetoed the measiire, in a 
message in which he contrasted the work of Judge Waterbury in 
th(> last year of liis term (lM(il), with those of the proposed bene- 
liciary of the increase of the salary in the oidy year of his tiuK? 
(18(12) which had ('lapsed. The Mayor's figures were as follows, 
to which are appended the results of the contrast. Dealing with a 
question reftu'ring to Judge VVaterbury, he seejn<Ml to ha,ve caught 
a little of his genius for figures tabulated in statistical foi-ni to 
pi'ove important facts. 



No. of indiotnients found l»y the 

Gr^nd Jury, . . . 

" of convictions, 
" " acquittals, 

" sent to City Prison, . . . 

" Penitentiiuy, 
" " State I'risou, 
Aggregate of .sentences to State Prison 
other than for life, . . 



1861. 


ISOi. 


Decrease. 


F'ercentnge of 
Decrease I'roiu 
18(11. 


1,239 


949 


290 


.23 


('.no 


:599 


391 


.42 


154 


97 


57 


.37 


7<J 


59 


20 


.25 


245 


1.37 


108 


.44 


279 


114 


165 


.59 



977iy.338jy. 638|years. .(i5 



iukfcii 



310 



Al'I'KNDIX I' 




Tlio strutlloHt. docroaso wjus in tho number of indictments found 
l)y tlio (} rand Jury. In th(! pr()H{icutiun of tho iiidictiiuMits, the 
decniiiso wuh nut as gn-at in the uwiuittais as in tho convictions. 
In the punisliments, tlio decrease waH hirger, as thi^y increased in 
severity, until in the iiggntgate of sentences to the State Prison, 
whicli incrludes both the number sent and tlie iengtii of Uunr t(;rmH, 
the decreas(^ was nearly two-thirds of the total for IMOI. As the 
samrt judges presided each year, the comparison illustrates the i.i- 
lluence (ixerted by an ellicient prosccMitor over the entire adminis- 
tration ol' the criminal hiw. It Is no wttnd<M" that the Mayor (H)id(i 
see no good reason lor an increase of pay to remunerate so great 
a falling f)!!' in iHuformanc-e. It would be still higher crtMlit to 
.luilge VValerbury, nnd praise to his administration, if we slwnild, 
without any compiirative disparagement to that of his successor, 
ac(rept the BUpi)osition that the dcitcirrent induentie of the certainty of 
punishment, wliich had grown up under the fornuM", combined with 
those wholesome! moral inlluences of a dilfiM'ent character of which 
mention has becm made above, had so acted on the vicious habits 
of the criminal classes of the city as really to have wrought tlu? 
elTect of producing so great a rculuction in the fi'etjuency and grav- 
ity of tluiir ofl'ens(!S against the* law and the public justice. 

When the news reached New Ynvk of the lire opened on Fort 
Sumter, in tin; harbor of t.'harhiston, in April, Lstll, .ludge Water- 
bury was selected by the Democratic (Jemn-al Committee of the 
city of New York to draft an (expression of its scoitiments 
(the duty of drafting impoi'ta.nt resolutions was one frequently 
deferred to liim), and his cit^ar, strong, aiid patriotic resolutions 
wene ado])ted with (Mithusiasm, and wei'e greatly elTective in giv- 
ing hop(! and (tourag*^ to tlu; ui)holders of the Union evcu-ywhtire, 
as an authcuitiir declaration of thee opinion of the mass of the Dem- 
ocratic pyrty in theii- gn.'at stronghold. 'rh(;y are a]ipeiided in 
a note,* as the best [tossibh; presentation of the ideas of a " War 

* irA'/vv/N, 'I'liis (Jeiifnil (JoinniiMco, and liiose llicy represent,, iiiivts. lo 
t.lic present time, Ix'cii Ilit- consistent iKlvticalcs of Uw. risj^lits of every sec- 
tion of our country, and the linn defenders of Mie (.'onsthntional rij^iits of 
t\w Soulliern jieoiile, to i)rotccli(!n from every spcjeicsol' ussault uim)ii their 
jjccuiinr donirslic institutions, nnd liavc always maintained tiieir riijlit to 
share, upon <'(£uital)Ie terms, in tJicsctticiiient of tlu! National domain, and 
have made resolute and strenuous (ilTorts to secure an adjustment of the 
whole matter in controversy, upon a basis at once just and liberal toward 
liie South, and li(moral)le to our wliole country; and 

Wliereux, Several of the Southern States have assumed the position of 



AVI'KNDIX I'. 



.Til 



to 

SCI' 

of 

icir 

to 

iiiul 

1 1 ho 

or 



DcMiiocnit." Kv(Mi vvliilo r«M'liii^ Im»iiii<I to iiadw I.Ii;iI, not. It«ss con 
8ci(witi()iiHly, nor less pjitrioticiilly, (Imii .hidjic VVjilcrlmty Fniniod 
them, the vvritiM- of fchoso pHj^os would liuv(» Ikhmi coniitollcd to 

viohMil rc'sislan(!C to the Niitioiiiil iiutliority, wliicli rcHisliiiicc lias Itccin nr- 
ricd to tlu) (!,\toMt of actiiid war, niaiiifcMtntl l»y oulniijos on tlic lla;; ol llic 
United Slates; the forciljlc scizuro of llicir fortillcalioiis and jiropcrly; tlic 
prc|)aralioM of extensive arnianientsaiid liatteiies for assault upon the forces 
of the nation; llu! hoiniiarduKMU ol' Fori Sumter; and, linally, hy an invi 
tation to tlie frucliootcrs of the \vorhl,to proy upon the; conuiHsrce of our 
peopI(!; and 

\\7ii r(tis. The rulor.s of the Seceded Slat(!s, hy tlic nieasincs aloreijaid, 
iiave coninu'iiced a civil war upon tlu- United Stales, tlM'ealenin,y: liieir 
existence as;i. National power; and 

W/Hiritti, The ineniliers of the Democratic party— a I)arty whose history 
is the record of an eminent and succtessful part in the forinalioH of onr 
institutions, the adnnnisliation of our (loveiiiment, ;iiid the piosperity of 
our country, are especially .called uju)!! Iiy all the memories of I he past, and 
all the hopes of th(^ future, to rally with promptness and vij^or to the di 
fenae of their country a<?ainst all foes, whether at home! or ahroad; there 
fore, 

ItiSidrcil, That the Democracy of this city are he.irtily uniled, with all 
of its citizens, :is OIK! man, to uphold the Conslitution, enforce the laws, 
maintain the Union, dei'end the Ulau, and prolecl the Capital of Ihese Unile(| 
States, ill the I'lill and liriii lielief thai this preseivalioii of oiir national 
unity is the only security for llu; riyhls, liiierlies, and power of our own 
peo|ile. and the ureatesl hope of op))resse(( humanity Ihroiii^houl the world. 

Jicsii/nd, That tliis rally for the coiuilry is nohly and wisely ma<le hy 
our whole people, irrespe(;tive of party oruanizations, and without reijard 
to past dilferences of oj)inion or action, for the piiipose of snstaiiiiiiii,' the 
(iovernment in tin; exercise of its powtM's :ind duties as the constitiiled 
authority of the nation; and that in the same spirit, and for the same piir 
pose, all questions as to what has iKseii done or omitted in the way of con- 
cession and concilialion, and all (juestions respectinn- the course and jxilicy 
of the Administration, should lie forgotten until the national honor has 
lieen vindicated, and the national power lirnily eslaltlisiied. 

Ri'Kctriil. That the unanimity and spirit with which the people of the North 
have responded to the call of the President for iii.iterial aid in the present 
crisis, should not It<' taken as an indication of Hie least desire, or even vvil 
lin.i^iu'ss on their part, to wai' upon the jieopleof the South; liiil only asjiii 
evidence of their determiiialiou to preserve the Union, as a hiessin.i;' of in- 
estimahle value, and to defend the sacred Fla.ijof our e(uintry, which com- 
mands the honia,u;e of all our hearts; and of their intlexiiile resolve that 
Bunker Hill and Mount Vernon, New York and New Orleans shall never 
be dissevered. 

liesolced. That we cannot disrcirard the evidimces which have lieen pre- 
sented, that in many parts of the Soutli, the resistance to the National 
power has been ai etunplished by the terrorism of mob rule, and against 



■m: 



312 



AI'I'KNDIX r. 



oppoM^ fliciii, tiiiil to siippt<i1 riitlici' tlic policy «^\pl•(>ss<'(l by Ojmi- 
oml Scott uihI Mr. (in-dcy. in tlu* t^xprcMsioii, " Kiriiij; SiHt*^!^, 
go ill pcwo," in tiit> (inn coiivictioii tlint \vhh rliati liv<> yciirH 
vvdiiM liiivc witiicHstHJ a sum return, :iii(l a Ix'ttrr Hniinnit. Mut 
victory crowned the policy ol' the wur, which wuh not less a coiillict 
of idcns, iiikI princMplcs, mid coiiHcii'iiccs, lliaii of iirniH. Kv<*ry nijiirs 
duly in 8U<'h linics and cvciitu, wiis what wan dictated t(» hini by 
his own soul. I f iiiiii;^led good and evil hav(* iieeii its residts. so 
would lh(\v liiiv(^ been (d' a. dilTen'tit is-tiie. Happily, till can now 
meet fraternally on the ground of iiiiitual respect :iiid self-iespect, 
oblivion of the old uniinositi((H, and all be at oiuf in recrogiiiziiig 

that 

" 'I'lirre's II f)iviiiilv tliiit sliiipt's oiu' cads, 
Uniiyli hew llicia how we will. " 

'I'he truth is, tliat th<' " nanduirners " of IHIS, the friends of 
\'an IJureii, ami the avengers of Silas Wright, did not beli(!ve in tluj 
reality of tho long threatened "danger to the I'nion" from the 
anti-slavery agittition. History soon taiiglit them better, when the 
Whig party, after 1H,')'2, assuming the lunv name of the " Uepubli- 
can " party, made! with tht^ Abolitionists, on the large national .scale, 
tliat same alliance which the >' TJariiburiun's " in N('w York had 
virtually entered into for a momentary occasion, as thoy deemed, on 
the " HulTalo platform." Tho result was, that FreiiKJiit was all but 
elected in isr)(5, Lincoln elected in ISflO ; and tho dread history of 

tlie interests and wishes of the conservative classes, cnihraciiijuf a large por- 
tion of the (ixtensive owners of slaves; and wo yet look to Tennesse(! and 
I\<'iitU(ky, eontainini;; tlie tombs of An(h('W Jackson and Henry Clay, and 
the homes of James Guthrie, Joim J. Ch'ittcnden, and Andrew Johnson, in 
the hope that their fld(^lity to the Union and th(! National Flag will bo 
maintained amid all the difhculties of their position; and wc pliMlgc our- 
selves to those Slates, and to all the loyal men of the South, to defend tiie 
Constitutional rights and interests of every section of the Union, at all 
times and under all cireumstancos, with the .same Zealand tidelity with 
which we will uphold tlie National power, and aid in the piomi)t and 
proper puui.shinent of all traitors. 

liesolwd. That we have witnessed with pride and adnnration the calm 
and fovb(!aring |)08scssion and huroi(! defciusc of Fort Hiuntcr, by Miijor 
Robert Anderson, a gallant and noble son of Kentucky, and for his patri- 
otic efforts for peace, his brilliant defense of his Flag, and his inanlj' refusal 
to surrender to the enemy, we render to hiiu our heartfelt thanks; and that 
all who may distinguish themselves in the service of this glo"ious Union 
in its present peril, will be honored throughout the country, and enshrined 
in every patriotic heart throughout all time. 



aM'kndix r. 



ai» 



lit 
.f 



111(1 

ill 

he 
II r- 
tl»« 

all 
'Hh 
111(1 

ilin 
jor 
tii- 

IHill 

hat 
ion 
iccl 



tlic four yoara tlmt, su('(!(««1«mI wc all know, hh rIho i\w Hccoiidary 
('()iiM»'(|ut!nriis to the whole coiiiitry, inorul, political, and iiKliistriiil, 

lit lialci'iil 



I f 



fh'u'h have traiUul through 



4ky, like the tail of 



liave 

coinot, from then even till now. Like Seymour and Tilden. Mr. 
Waterhury and the bulk of the party known as " War DeinocratH " 
HUp|)()rted the government with steady lirinness and zeal in vho 
sustainnient and enforcement of the llnioii, (hough neither he nor 
they ever gave any approval to many ariiitrary acts of tlur party in 
power, in(;idental to the prosecution of the war, which were deemed 
to IxMiot less unnecessary than they were in violation of estal)lish(>(| 
priiK^iples of law and the; croiihtitution. 

In the full of iHd'i, Judge Waterlmry was noniinat»>d for iiiemlier 
of Congress liy all of tlu( thr((' organizalions into which his party 
was at that time (livided. His «'lection was certain, the Demociatic 
majority in the city and in his district being overwlmlming. Miit 
there was a close contest for the governorship iietweeii Horatio 
Seymour and (Jeneral Wadswortli, in which the I'oniKM- had to a 
considc^rable exUmt the support of the "Old Liiic^ Wings," an 
induential iuxly of men in all the large counties of the State. < )ne 
of their number, Janu^s Brooks, Editor of the h'.ipress, desired 
strongly to go to Congress from Judge Waterbury's di8tri(;t, which 
he had formerly represented as a Whig of the Clay and Web- 
ster times, it was a siil)ject of coinplaint on the part of that 
inttirest throughout tlu* Stati; that, while they \v^n•^' /.(piously 
supporting the Democratic party, they wen' not even allowed a 
single member of Congress. They pressed their claim for a seat 
from the city, and Mr. Hrooks was their most promincMit representa- 
tive man. It was deemed important towards securing the election 
of tiov. Seymour that their IU!W Democratic synipathies should not 
be chilled by refusing them this satisfaction. Judge Wuterbiuy 
consented that the question of his withdrawal in favor of Mr. 
Brooks should be referred to CJharles O'Conor, John Kcilly, and a 
third person whom Mr. Brooks should select. The result was that 
it was deemed judicious that Mr. Hrooks and his party slioiild be 
gratified, and Mr. Waterbury at once withdrew, unwilling that in 
the event of Gov. Seymour's defeat ho should appear to have con- 
tributed to that result by not having appeased that dis.satisfaction 
on the part of the "Old Line. Whigs." The local disappointment 
was very great. Indeed, the Hon. Elliott C. Cowdin, who was the 
Republican candidate, stated that he would have withdrawn in Judge 
Waterbury's favor rather than that the latter should retire. Though 
40 






vi m 



'(i 



m 
k 



si 

ijil 



':|i| 




314 



AI'l-KNDIX U. 



Judge Waterbury did not believe that the result iii the State would 
be controlled by his action, he preferred, if the n^presentative men 
of his party would take the responsibility, to avoid any possibility 
of the imputations which might attend an adverse result. He has 
several times since been urged to be a candidate for Congress, 
with a certainty of election, but' he felt constrained to adhere to 
the practice of his profession. This is to be regretted, for it is 
certain he would have; made one of the most useful and influential 
members of that body, and have done good service to ou!' country. 

Gov. Seymour tendered to Judge VVatei'bury the position of 
Judge-Advocate-General of the State, and, fearing tliat he would 
not accept it, requested the late William Cassidy, then the Editor 
of the Albany Argus, to visit New York and urge Mr. Waterbury to 
take the office as a matter both of personal frieudshi[) and of public 
duty. He finally consented, l)ecau.se, though nominally a mihtary 
position, it was really a law oHice, and the dark days were come 
which gave it an importance not attaching to it in the ordin- 
ary "piping times of peace." it carried the lawful rank and title 
of Brigadier-General, but Judge Wateibury had so little taste for 
military display by mere civilians, that he never wore his uniform 
in public but on a single occasion, and habitually refused to answer 
to the salutation of " General." Among the great number of our 
"generals," he therefore enjoys the distinction of being perhaps 
the only man who refused to be styled by that title, so that we 
have to adhere to the old customary designation of -'Judge." 

In the first year of his service occui-red the ttjrrible New Vork 
riots of July, 18G3. They b(^gan on a Sunday, and Judge Water- 
bury reached the city on the evening of Monday, and after that 
was constantly on duty. Gov. Seymour, who arrived in the city on 
Tuesday morning, had great confidence in his ability and tact, and 
found in him a most efficient aid. On Wednesday noon he sug- 
gested to the (lovernor that the chief cause of trouble was less a 
riotous dispv)sition on the part of the people, than their enforced 
idleness, business having been ellectually stopped by the fact that 
neither omnibuses nor railroad cars were running. The Governor 
authorized him in his name to take measures to remedy this state 
of things. Proceeding alone in a cannage to the various depots 
and stables, he saw before midnight tlie representatives of over 
twenty of some twenty-six railroad and stage lines, generally situ- 
ated in the midst of the riotous district (a service of no small 
danger and daring) ; and using words of mingled entreaty and 



APPENDIX V. 



315 



authority arcording to circumstances, and working with his charac- 
teristic earnestness and tact, he induced them all to listen to his 
proposals and enter into his views. They were very- apprehen- 
sive of the consequences by reason of the threats which had heim 
made by the leaders of the rioters that their buildings should be 
burned if they should recommence business, but Judge Waterbury 
arranged with them that military forces shoiild be stationed at 
various convenient points for the protection of their property. 
Keacliing the police headquarters at one o'clock in the >"orning, he 
wrote an order by the Governor to Ma,jor-(ieneral Sandford to 
detail a military force to each of the several places designated, and 
to have them at their posts by five a. m.. and handed it to the 
clerk of the commissioners to be imnu'diately delivered. All was 
thoroughly combined and executed, and worked like magic, and at 
an early hour the people were delighted l)y the customary sight 
and sound of the public vehicles, not less cheering to them than 
was the simultaneous sunlight, for it was the best assurance that 
order was restored. If Judge Waterbury had chosen to accept his 
lawful title of "(jrcneral" (by which (Idv. Heymour always persists 
in addressing him), he certainly hud on this critical occasion fairly 
earned it; and by better means, and the display of better qualities 
of good sense and good feeling combined with courage, than those 
required for the winning of the crimsoned honors of the battle- 
field. 

'{'he provoking cnuse of these riots had been the dis[)roportion- 
ate and imfair allotment for th(^ draft made against the city; an 
injustice the more irritating because, in its exeaution, it was made 
to bear with a peculiar degree of oppression upon a particular 
nationality. It looked very much like a political discrimination 
against a Democratic population; at the same time it admitted 
])erhaps the palliation that those who arranged the allotments may 
have supposed tliat our Irish fellow-citizens have such a natural 
love and genius iov fiijhting that they might rather like than other- 
wise the being conscripted for the war, in however excessive a 
disproportion, (rovernor Seymour directed the Judge-Advocate- 
(Jeneral to investigate the facts in relation to the imrolment in the 
metropolitan cities of New York and Brooklyn as a basis for tli(^ 
draft of soldiers. After an examination made with his usual 
thoroughness, accuracy, and exhaustiveness. Judge Waterbury 
made a report which proved to demonstration that the enrolment 
in the metropolitan districts was twice as large in proportion to 



316 



APPENDIX V. 






population as in the interior counties of the State. He proved 
the political character of the enrolment V)y showing that while the 
total votes in 186() had been, for the Lincoln and Anti-Lincoln 
Congressional districts, respectively, 457,257 and L5 1,253, the 
conscripts required from them were, respectively, 31>,f)2(i and .'53, - 
729; and that while in 1862 the total votes in the Wadsworth and 
Seymour Congressional districts had been, respectively, 353,621 
and 186 255, the conscripts required from them were, respectively, 
33,068 and 40,287. Such figures, viz., 40,000 conscripts required 
in the Seymour districts (chiefly New York and Brooklyn) from 
186,000 voters, against only 33,000 required from 353,000 voters! 
The calm and persuasive demonstration of Judge Waterbury's 
report was irresistible. Nor in the President (Lincoln) did he 
encounter any other than a fair and honest spirit. There had also 
been great unfairness in the drawing. " In the drawing in the })th 
district, which is in the city of New York," says Judge Waterbury 
in his masterly report, "so far as the list was published, there was 
a great disproportion in the names of i)eople of a particular line- 
age, althouf;h only one-fourth of the inhabitants of the district 
were born in Ireland. I called the attention of the President to 
this fact, and suggested to him that such a result could not be con- 
tinued throughout the city without being followed by a belief in 
the public mind that the draft had been unjustly made. He 
answered, 'Of course not'; and added with an earnestness I was 
glad to observe, ' I will not permit either a real or an apparent 
fraud.' " The effect of Judge "Waterbury's report was that a 
commission was appointed by the Secretary of "War to examine 
the matter, and upon its report the quota required from the city 
was reduced by 20,000 men. 

In May 1862, Judge Waterbury was elected Grand Sac' nm (or 
presiding officer) of the Tammany Society, and served one year. 
At the close of 1 8615, he retired from the Tammany General (com- 
mittee, and has ever sincte been an unyielding adversary of the 
virtual domination of " Tammany Hall " ov(U" the Democracy of 
New York. A time serving politician, (mc; less disinterested in 
patriotism and democracy, less stern and uncompromising in his 
passion for political purity inseparable from public economy — in a 
word, one less thoi'oughly imbued v.ith the spirit of the idol of his 
youth, and the exemplar of his manhood, Silas Wright, would rather 
have tended to keep on good terms with the leaders controlling the 
majority of his party in the great city of his own residence. But such 



APPEXniX u 



317 



(or 
Ve&r. 
[om- 

the 

|y f^^ 

ll in 

his 

(in a 
his 

Ither 
the 

liuch 



is not, and never has been the temper of Judge Waterbmy. Such 
a man must necessarily inake many formidable political enemies, 
but they respect as W(dl a.s dread him, even on the field of irrecon- 
cilable conflict between them. Jliiuself fears nothing and nobody, 
and rather exults in the " stern joy " of the fight, than shrinks from 
its blows, or takes account of his own interests or his own labors 
in its conduct. At the same time, while in local politics for muni- 
cipal reform, and honestly economical good government, he is thus 
uncompromising, in naticmal politics he is one of the most thorough, 
sound, and devoted members of the great Democratic party of the 
Union, and as such is one of the most sagacious, prudent, and prac- 
tical. He is a truly valuable citizen of the Union, the State, and 
the City, to all of which he has nmdered — and will to the end, con- 
tinue to render — truly valuable patriotic service. si .sic omnes ! 
Many passages in the life of Judge Waterbury have been neces- 
sarily omitted from this honest and sincere, wiiile friendly sketch 
of him, which does not pretend to the character of a biography. 
One other only will be numtioned. In 1871, an Act was passed by 
the Legislature for the appointment of three ( 'ommissioners to revise 
the Statutes of th(; State. Francis Kernan, the present eminent 
Senator in Congress, who was appoin'^ed as one of them, declined 
to serve, and Governor Hoffman appointed Judge WaterV)ury in 
his place; one of the highest tributes of compliment that could be 
paid to a lawyer and public man. Cov. Hoffman made the spon- 
taneous selection, because convinced that he could nt)t find abetter 
man at the Bar to do justic to the work involved. When the 
Commissioners proceeded to their work, a radical difference was 
found to exist in their views. The majority insisted on extensive 
amendments of the statutes.* Judge Waterbury, with his ever 
j^ractical mind, urged that such a course would inevitably array, 
against whatever report the Couunissioners sliould make, a combin- 
ation of interests affected by, or differing in opinion from, the 
sweeping chang(!s proposed, resulting in the proV)able eventual 
defeat of the work. He claimed that only such amendments should 
be made upon the statutes, already not very long before revised, 
as were clearly necessary, nnint'ly, such as were merely verbal. 
Each side i)resented a repoit to the Legislature, setting forth its 
views, but no action was taken by that body. With wide differ- 
ences of opinion among the Commissioners, which continued in 
spite of all attempts to harmonize them, the work proceeded but 
slowly. Both sides again submitted conflicting reports to the 



318 



APPKNDTX r. 



Jjegislaturc, und as that body, after the lapse of two weeks, ftill 
took no action, Judge Waterlmry, unwilling to Ak'aste his time in 
what ho considered useless work, resigned the uiiice. Time has 
justified the wisdom of his views. After the lapse of nearly eight 
years from tlie creation of tlie commission, and a cost to the State 
of a quart(M' of a million of dollars, the commission has ceased to 
exist, having only partially accomplished its work, of which only 
a part has been enacted by the Legislature; the profession is pro- 
foundly divided over the subject, and the present question appears 
to be, not whether any more shall be adopted, but wliether what 
has been (macted shall be allowed to stand. 

Judge Waterbury is a son of Col. Jonathan Water bury, a highly 
esteemed citizen of New York, who died in 1821), at the early age 
of thirty-one. His mother was Elizabeth Jarvis, daughter of 
Elijah Jarvis (iiei)lKnv of Bishop Jarvis), and of Betsey Chapman, 
daught(T of Dr. Chapman, a distinguished {)hysi('ian of that day, 
of Norwalk, Connecticut. Both of his mother's jjarents were car- 
ried off by yellow fever, in New York, in her infancy, in the year 
i S(» 1 . It is said that at the great ball given by the city to Tjafayette, 
at Castle tJarden, in 1824, (\)l(mel and Mrs. Waterbury were the 
handsom(!st couple in the room. It is related that on the occasion 
of that ball, the streets and approaches to Castle Garden wen^ so 
blocked by the crowds of carriages, and people on foot, that Colonel 
and Mrs. Waterbury had to take a small boat at the foot of Court- 
landt Street, to reach the scene of the festivity. 

Judge Waterbury married eai'ly in life. Miss Gibson, a lady 
whose parents, resident in Boston, Mass., had died in her infancy; 
her mother was of the Cooledge family. Sh(^ has betm ever the 
blessing and solace of her husband'i? life. They have three lovely 
daughters, and one son, now a student in Colunil)ia College, 
destined, like his father, to the profession of the law. Judge Water- 
V)ury is one of the most amiable and unselfish of men, and a true and 
constant fricmd, too often, perhaps, too generous a one. Among 
the million of its })opulation, New York contains no more affection- 
ate and nnostentatiously pious a home, one in which the parents are 
the friends and companions of the children; nor has its portal 
ever yet been darkened by the shadow of death. Long may it 
continue to enjoy that favored exemption. 



^ 



VALEDICTORY. 



I 



ady 
ncy; 

the 
vely 
ege, 
iter- 

and 

Ollg 

ion- 
are 
rtal 

y it 



"Aye, thus it is! One _u;eii('nilion coiues, 
Another ,t!,<)es, and iniiigles with tiie dnst. 
And thus we come mid i^o, ai.d come and i^o, — 
Eacli for a moincMil tiliinn' up 
Some little space. And tlius we disapi)eiir 
In (|uick succession. And it shall l)e so 
Till time in one vast perpetuity 
JJe swallowed up." 

By the guidance and support of Divine Providence we liave now- 
reached tlie end of our labors, liaving completed, to the extent 
of our ability, tlit; history and genealogy of the " Jarvis Family." 
We send the volume forth among the generations of the Jarvises 
throughout the land, in the hope that they will 1)e as hajipy and 
proud as we oui'selves are in rejoicing in the fact that there are 
and have l)een many very eminent and jnous members of the 
Family, and that the coimtry has been much benelited by the 
good they have done. It is the hope of the Authors that this 
little volume may outlive them for the edification and instruction 
in our genealogy of the many gent^ations yet to come who shall 
arise and call their progenitors blessed. 

One family circle is but the reflex and epitome of the great 
numbers scattered ov(^r the country. We hope that the book will 
bind all the families closer in the bonds, not only of kinship, but 
o( friendship, and that on tlie great day when all will be called 
together, they may be found with their hands clasped and their 
hearts in unis(m. 

That the importance and value of these family histories are daily 
becoming mon; manifest, is illustrated by the fact that they are 
increasing in numbers year by year. Few persons, comparatively, 
however, duly appreciate their importance, or are aware that to the 
same feeling among the Hebrews, which promjtted their produc- 
tion, we owe, under Uod, the historical portions of the Bible. Th(> 
history, too, of the most ancient kingdoms of the earth, as (yhina, 



320 



VALEDICTOUY. 



Egypt, Chaldea, Babylonia, etc., would have remained unknown to 
other nations, but that their people were inspired to make a gene- 
alogy of their soverelijiis, which necessarilv embodied a history of 
their country. 

P^roni the earliest ages genealogy has occupied much of the 
attention of mankind, and whether we consiilt sacred or profane 
history, we shall find the extraction or derivation of the individual 
always considered as making an important part of his history. 

Although the actions of a man himself are the truest proof of 
his merit, yet it is im])ossible for the mind net to connect with 
these the opinion we have of his extraction. And so, whoever 
pays due attention to the natural sentiments of mankind, while he 
keeps clear of the absurd prejudice which gives honor and respect 
to extraction alone, will acknowledge that the actions of men are 
not the only ground of respectability or estimation in the world. 

The reader will observe that our genealogy is more minute in 
some families than in others. Our original plan was to have given 
only so much of the genealogy as was necessary to connect the 
biography of the successive heads of the Family, and'pi'event any 
doubt about the descent, but we found a pretty general inclination 
tc have the line traced minutely, and have thought it right to yield 
to the wish, as well as to respect the opinion of such a number of 
persons. Respectfully, 

TH^. AUTHORS. 



INDEX IN TWO PARTS. 



i 



PART 1.— CHRISTIAN NAMES OF PERSONS HEARING THE 
SURNAME OF .lARVIS. 

PART II.— NAMES OF PERSONS WHO HAVE MAlHilEI) INTO 
THE .lARVIS FAMILY. AN!) NAMES OF DESCENDANTS RKAR- 
IN(} OTHER SURNAMES. 

N. B. The references arc to the numliers opposite the names on the 
left-hand side of each page, except in a few cases where the number of 
the page is referred to, marked (j)). 

The number in large type at the head of each family record is the num- 
ber of the 'ather or mother, as the case may be, brought forward from the 
margin of v.iepage on wliichthe name occurs in the preceding generation. 
The number given in the Index will, therefore, give the place where ii 
person's name occurs in his or her father's fanuly, and, by looking for the 
same number in the large type, his or her own family record, if there be 
one, can be found. 

PART 1. 
DESCENDANTS NAMED JARVIS. 



Name. 


No. 


Name. 


No. 


Aaron, 


1807 


Adiel, 


587 


Abatha, 


373 


Adoljihus, 


1509 


Abigail, 


73 


Albert F., 


1676 


Abigail, 


126 


Albertina 8. , 


165 


Abigail, 


319 


Alfred, 


190 


Abigail, 


1996 


Alfred, 


1516 


Abigail, 


2027 


Algernon Sydney, 


1963 


Abigail Atkins, 


2053 


Alice. 


1043 


Abigail C, 


1563 


Alice B. . 


1068 


Abraham, 


4 


Alice Maud, 


1937 


Abraham, 


10 


Alma, 


1545 


Abraham, 


21 


Almira, 


1797 


Abraham, 


41 


Almira, 


ia59 


Abraham, 


91 


Alonzo, 


2398 


Abraham, 


345 


Alvah, 


1506 


Abram, 


97 


Amanda, 


1865 


Abram, 


(p.) 120 


Amelia, 


101 


Adalinc l'rs\da, 


355 


A melia, 


• 225 


Atla Dagma, 


1127 


Amelia, 


552 


Addie Stone, 


1087 


Amelia Ann, 


1960 


Adeline Matilda, 


2354 


Amelia Hyde, 


2347 


41 









I" 



1 



322 


INPKX. — 


PART I. 




Naiuo. 


No. 


Name. 


No. 


Amelia Jane, 


897 


Arthur H. K. (Jervis), 


1707 


Amelia Harali, 


789 


Artliur Leonard Fitz Gerald, 


818 


Andrew Jackson, 


3158 


Arthur Murray, 


558 


Andrew Spoonrr, 


2066 


Arthur Murray, 


1142 


Andrew Spooner, 


2103 


Asa, 


2885 


Andrew Spooner, 


2107 


Asahel, 


1496 


Angelina, 


278 


Asahel, 


1497 


Angelina, 


1964 


Asahel, 


1623 


Ann, 


78, 188 


Asahel Amos, 


1647 


Ann, 


2328 


Asahel Hatch (Jervis), 


1621 


Ann Augusta, 


733 


Augusta, 


151 


Ann Christina Farmar, 


305 


Augusta, 


279 


Ann Eliza, 


276 


Augusta Lavinia, 


930 


Ann Eliza, 


1084 


A 1 1 <:u8tin, 


2433 


Ann Eliza, 


1773 


Augustine, • 


1741 


Ann Eliza, 


2138 


Aurelia B., 


1629 


Ann Elizabeth, 


155 


Aurelia Content, 


1645 


Ann Ellen, 


450 


Austin, 


33 


Ann Frances, 


594 






Ann Frances Carr, 


2098 


Bainbridge, 


2288 


Ann Olney, 


2245 


Belle, 


653 


Anna, 


168 


Benajah, 


1737 


Anna, 


289 


Benjamin, 


135 


Anna, 


1813 


Benjamin, 


381 


Anna (Jervis), 


1830 


Benjamin, 


601 


Anna Augusta, 


1896 


Benjamin, 


1938 


Anna Head, 


2260 


Benjamin, 


2043 


Anna Lee, 


2206 


Benjamin, 


3068 


Anna Louisa, 


1732 


Benjamin Atwater, 


328 


Anna Maria, 


412 


Benjamin Franklin, 


1778 


Anna Maria, 


1662 


Benjamin H. , 


1917 


Anna Mary, 


843 


Benjamin L., 


515 


Artna Sprague, 


1651 


Benjamin Sturges, • 


330 


Anne, 


399 


Betsey, 


74 


Anne Decima, 


588 


Betsey, 


79 


Anne E. , 


1566 


Betsey Stelle, 


2058 


Annie, 


1461 


Bill, 


1490 


Annie E., 


1854 


Blanche E., 


1431 


Annie Elizabeth Stewart, 


817 


Brewster, 


3420 


Annie Flagg, 


2373 


Brice W.. 


514 


Annie G., 


3357 






Annie G., 


2370 


Caleb, 


3334 


Annie Ladd, 


2197 


Carlton, 


1813 


Antoinette Augusta, 


601 


Caroline, 


393 


Arthur, 


592 


Caroline, 


584 


Arthur Clay, 


1429 


Caroline, 


1958 


Arthur Edward, 


2265 


Caroline, 


3133 


Arthur Henry Boyd, 


846 


Caroline, 


2346 



DKSCKNDANT8 NAMKD JARVTM. 



3 2 a 



328 
1778 
11)17 
515 
320 
74 
79 
12058 
1490 
1431 
1 2420 
514 



2324 

|1812 

393 

584 

|1958 



3346 



Namo. 


No. 


Name. 


No. 


Caroline A., 


8378 


Charles Fitz, 


2181 


Cnrolino Ameliii. 


418 


Charles Frederick, 


455 


Caroline Amelia, 


734 


Charles IT. , 


1710 


Caroline Eliza, 


1959 


Charles Flerbert, 


459 


Caroline Elizabeth, • 


829 


Charles J. , 


1090 


Caroline Louisa, 


2174 


Charles James Anson, 


174 


Caroline W., 


2100 


Charles Lavallctte, 


1012 


Carrie D. (Jervls), 


1832 


Charles Leonard, 


942 


Catharine, 


61 


Charles Maples. 


1223 


Catharine, 


200 


Charles Mercer, 


285 


Catharine, 


209 


CJharles M. 8. (Jervis), 


1706 


Catharine, 


.299 


Charles P., 


2275 


Catharine Amelia, 


339, 720 


Charles Ralph, 


891 


Cecilia Sophia, 


786 


Charles W., 


1628 


Celina North, 


1659 


Charles W. , 


2286 


Charity. 


1869 


Charles William, 


849 


Charity, 


2395 


Charlotte, 


127 


Charles, 


99 


Charlotte, 


173 


Charles, 


301 


Charlotte Augusta, 


453 


Charles, 


495 


Charlotte Maria, 


487 


Charles, 


511 


Charlotte Maria, 


488 


Charles, 


669 


Charlotte Mary, 


1111 


Charles, 


1020 


C. Willis. 


1061 


Charles, 


1045 


Che8t(*r, 


1543 


Charles, 


1810 


Chester, 


1668 


Charles, 


2039 


Chloe, 


1495 


Charles, 


2059 


Chloe, 


1498 


Charles, 


2062 


Clara, 


1090 


Charles, 


2071 


Clarissa, 


497 


Charles, 


2099 


Clarissa, 


1023 


Charles, 


2140 


Colborne Dennis, 


1209 


Charles, 


2167 


Constance Kingsmlll, 


1147 


Charles, 


2340 


Cora Elizabeth, 


1011 


Charles A., 


618 


Cordelia, 


1939 


Charles Abraham, 


819 


Cornelia, 


600 


Charles Alpheus, 


489 


Cornelia E., 


1840 


Charles Augustus, 


722 






Charles Augustus, 


725 


Daniel, 


105 


Charles Beverley, 


556 


David, 


1430 


Charles Brydger, 


1128 


David, 


1803 


Charles Church, 


2073 


David Conklin, 


1789 


Charles Edward, 


45'2 


David R. , 


1873 


Charles Edward, 


743 


David Sandford, 


507 


Charles Edward, 


2106 


Deborah, 


35 


Charles Edward, 


2157 


Deborah, 


108 


Charles Edward, 


2178 


Delancey, 


196 


Charles Edward L., 


792 


Delia Farley, 


2239 


Charles Edwin, 


1663 


Douglass, 


1082 



324 



INDRX. — fAHT I. 



■ ; ?l I 






Name. 


No. 


Name. 


Vo. 


Dorcas, 


2804 


Elijah Albert. 


817 


Dwight, 


1S44 


Eliphalet. 


1742 


Dwight, 


16«1 


Eli/.a. 


603 






Eli /.a. 


1785 


Ebenezer, 


119 


Eliza (.FcrvisH 


2412 


Ebenezer, 


376 


Eliza Ann, 


Oil 


Ebi'iie/cr Nostrand, 


1881 


Eliza Ann, 


1877 


Edgar, 


560 


Eliza E.. 


1567 


Edgar K(3auiiioiit, 


1149 


Eliza Lane, 


2351 


Edgar Hewlett, 


1894 


Eliza Rowland, 


717 


Edgar Ralph, 


1129 


Elizabclli, 


14 


Edniuiid, 


371 


Elizabeth, 


39 


Edmund A. , 


1924 


Elizabeth, 


117 


Kdmund Allen, 


1909 


Elizabeth, 


172 


EdniuDd Allen, 


(p.) 137 


Klizabeth, 


393 


Edmund Head, 


1134 


Elizabeth, 


811 


Edmund Meredith, 


1097 


Elizabeth, 


321 


Ednuind Owen Mereditii, 


824 


Elizabeth, 


338 


Edward. 


138 


Elizabeth, 


496 


Edward, 


406 


Elizabeth, 


1493 


Edward, 


1117 


Elizabeth, 


1775 


Edward (Jervis), 


1828 


Elizabeth, 


1791 


Edward, 


2025 


Elizabeth, 


1816 


Edward, 


2060 


Elizabeth, 


1946 


Edward, 


2097 


Elizabeth. 


1961 


Edward, 


2341 


Elizabeth, 


1968 


Edward ^Emilius, 


931 


Elizabeth, 


1966 


Edward B., 


2237 


Elizabeth, 


1978 


Edward liuckinghani, 


360 


Elizabeth, 


2010 


Edward Clifton, 


845 


Elizabeth, 


2016 


Edward Lutwich, 


389 


Elizabeth, 


2028 


Edward Scott, 


2063 


Elizabeth, 


2087 


Edward W., 


1091 


Elizabeth, 


2046 


Edward W. Boyd, 


407 


Elizabeth, 


2064 


Edward William, 


834 


Elizabeth, 


2826 


Edward Winslow, 


1016 


Elizabeth Arnold, 


400 


Edward Worrell, 


415 


Elizabeth Bartlett, 


2186 


Edwin, 


1547 


Elizabeth Black, 


2096 


Edwin Rogers, 


1731 


Elizabeth Bowmon, 


2848 


Electa, 


1503 1 


Elizabeth Colt, 


782 


Electa, 


1504 


Elizabeth Hannah. 


211 


Eli, 


75 i 


Elizabeth Harriett, 


416 


Eli Starr, 


221 


Elizabeth Hart, 


852 


Elias, 


1987 1 


Elizabeth R. (Jervis), 


1881 


Elias, 


2006 


Elizabeth Smitli, 


2160 


Elias, 


2022 


Elkanah, 


1765 


Elijah, 


92 


Ella, 


1066 


Elijah, 


1491 


Ella P., 


1073 



|)K8CKNDANT8 NAMKD JARVI8. 



325 



3037 



348 
782 
311 
416 
352 
■1831 



[066 
.072 



Name. 


No. 


Naint). 


No. 


Ellen Aiidoi-Noii, 


677 


Florence Isidore, 


1681 


Klloii B.. 


3327 


Foster, 


1065 


Ellen Ciiroliiio, 


798 


Frances, 


1927 


Ellen Miuiii, 


586 


Frances Amelia, 


213 


Elma Muriel Murray, 


1362 


Frances Amelia, 


8M 


Eloisa, 


1934 


Frances Amelia, 


580 


Eloisu L., 


714 


Frances E. , 


1595 


Kmeline, 


1619 


Frances Hubbard, 


2862 


Enioline C, 


617 


Frances Huldah, 


341 


Knilly, 


1868 


Francis, 


716 


Enuly (Jervis), 


1824 


FraiK'ls, 


2321 


Emily Caroliue, 


793 


Francis, 


2337 


Kmily Elizabeth, 


461 


Francis C, 


610 


Emily Maude, 


941 


Francis Carr, 


2116 


Emma, 


1701 


Francis H., 


1675 


Emma Bowne, 


1724 


Francis H., 


1679 


Emma Jane, 


1922 


Francis Head, 


2178 


Emma M., 


1852 


Fran(;is Henry, 


2153 


Emma Robins, 


2249 


Francis Qriswold, 


1643 


EmuluH, 


1798 


Francis Qriswold, 


1709 


Enuilus, 


1837 


Fraiuis Pillsbury, 


3348 


ErHHtus, 


1617 


Francis Proudfooi, 


1153 


Ernest, 


• 1151 


Francis lioach. 


2065 


Ernest Frederick. 


847 


Frank. 


669 


Ernest Leonard, 


1347 


Frank, 


1033 


Esther, 


6 


Frank Adolphus, 


1698 


Esther, 


10 


Frank noi)e, 


836 


Esther, 


27 


Frank Pepperrell, 


3113 


Esther, 


60 


Frank Seymour, 


3348 


Esther, 


84 


Frederick, 


390 


Esther, 


1793 


Frederick, 


1334 


Esther, 


3386 


Frederick, 


1889 


Esther, 


2403 


Frederick, . 


3093 


EsthiT Lucretia, 


296 


Frederick A., 


3276 


Ethel Hazen, 


1350 


Frederick Arnold, 


825 


Eugene LeBaron, 


2186 


Frederick Augustus, 


1093 


Eunice Amelia, 


331 


Frederick Augustus, 


2152 


Eunice Morgan, 


1932 


Frederick Augustus, 


2261 


Eva. 


t!56 


Frederick ('larence. 


1096 


Everard Augustus, 


2267 


Frederick II. , 


2366 


Experience, 


1864 


Frederick M., 


1846 






Frederick Sandford, 


291 


Fanny, 


1131 


Frederick Starr, 


212 


Fanny Fayerweather, 


185 


Frederick Starr, 


1119 


Florence, 


1026 


Frederick Starr, 


1145 


Florence, 


1047 


Frederick Tiffany, 


1643 


Florence Annie, 


1349 


Frederick William, 


551 


Florence Caroline, 


1095 


Frederick William, 


2166 






;;jf| 



d2d 



INDliyt. — I'AItT I. 



Namo. 


No. 


Name. 


No. 


Fmlcrick William, 


2340 


Ilannali, 


M8 


Fr.'.lcrick Wiliiiun, 


3370 


Hannah, 


87S 


Krcdcricii AiigiiHta, 


««« 


Ilannali, 


1746 






Hannah, 


1708 


(l«'orge, 


818 


Hannah, 


1902 


George, 


780 


Hannah (Jervis), 


2879 


George, 


22S« 


Hannah (Jervis), 


2409 


George, 


2:ilH) 


lliinnah Fowler, 


1977 


George, 


34ia 


Hannah Owen, 


164 


George A. , 


2170 


Harold. 


1153 


George A.twiiter, 


.424 


Harrie, 


1323 


(}eorg«' AtwiiUT, 


H25 


Harriet, 


498 


(Jeorge Cypriiui, 


41)1 


Harriet, 


1507 


George K.. 


1874 


Harriet, 


1558 


(Jeorge lliiinilton, 


1094 


Harriet, 


3801 


George Howard, 


2250 


Harriette, 


604 


George Ij. Bowiie, 


1725 


Harriet Amelia, 


881 


0(H)rge M. , 


2415 


Harriet Augusta, 


882 


George Milton, 


1080 


Harriet AuguHtii, 


669 


Get)rge Murray, 


449, 815 


Harriet Hartlett, 


2189 


G<!orge Oglevie, 


175 


Harriet E., 


1025 


George Oglevie, 


1015 


Harriet E., 


1S84 


Georf' Robinson, 


1110 


Harriet Elizabeth, 


168 


Gciorge Rogers, 


785 


Harriet Head, 


8S64 


George Seymour, 


388 


Harriet Rebecca, 


84S 


George Sherwood, 


585 


Harry Augustus, 


1141 


George St( ulien Benjamin, 


215 


Harry N(!Wton, 


1428 


George Tiinmas, 


553 


Harry St. John, 


1310 


George Waaliington, 


2159 


Hattic! L. , 


1849 


George William, 


284 


Helen (Jervis), 


1031 


G(!orge William, 


1905 


Helen, 


2078 


George William Hope, 


819 


Helen A., 


168Q 


Graee Gillet, 


1090 


Helen Amtilia Margaret, 




Grace Lnthrop, 


14g0 


Helen Loui.sa, 


1678 


Oracle, 


1888 


Helen Marion, 


8353 


Griethene, 


1520 


Helen Mary, . 


889 


Guslavus, 


1511 


Helen Pearce, 


1982 


Gustavus. 


1514 


Henrietta, 


191 


Guatavus Roelifort, 


395 


Henrietta, 


868 






Henrietta A., 


3385 


Haller, 


1508 


Henrietta Doh.son, 


143 


Hannah, 


53 


Henriettas., 


847 


Hannah, 


05 


Henry, 


63 


Hannah, 


70 


Henry, 


194 


Hannah, 


85 


Henry, 


333 


Hannah, 


112 


Henry, • 


870 


Hannah, 


129 


Henry, 


1789 


Hannah, 


275 


Henry, 


1871 



Name. 
Henry. 
Henry A., 
Henry Au^niN(„H^ 
Henry AukumIuh, 
H(!nry Clay, 
Ifenry DohkIhhh, 
H. FitzOenild, 
Henry Herbert, 
i.N'nrv Jiunes, 
Henry Kent, 
Heniy Sunford, 
Henry Htiirr, 
Henry Stone, 
Henry W., 
Henry W., 
Henry William, 
Herlx'rt Cherriniau, 
HerlM'rt MiuiHon, 
• Herliert Murray, 

Hervey, 

Hester A., 

HeHt(!r Klizaheth, 

Hetti(! Frederica, 

Hetty, 

Hetly Hart,. 

Uezekiah, 

Hczekiah JSIasli, 

Hezekiah Nash, 

Holda, 

!I()llis Joy, 

I lorace, 

Horace A., 

Horace B., 

ITorace Benjamin, 
i^Iowanl, 
Howard Barrcli. 
Howard Sandford, 
How land B., 
Huldah, 

lantba, 

Ichabod, 

Ichabod, 

Ida May, 

Ira, 

Ira, 

Irving Austin, 

Isaac, 



DKHCKNDANTS NAMKP .fAHVtH. 



Nam*. 

Isaac, 

lH»ac, 

rsaac, 

Fsahel Grace, 

Isabel Helen, 

Isal)el Maria, 

Isabel Mary Hubbard, 

Isabella Maule, 

Isabel McLean, 

Isaiah, 

Isaiah, 

Isaiah, 

Israel, 

Israel, 



Jacob, 
Jacob, 
I Jacob S., 
James, 
James, 
James, 
James, 
James, 
James, 
James, 
James, 
James, 
James, 

James Edmund, 
James Grant, 
James Lawrence, 
James Lorenzo, 
James Morgan, 
James O. , 
James Otis, 
James White, 
James White, 
Jane, 
I Jane, 
Jane, 

Jane Hannah, 
Jane Josepliine, 
Jane Maria, 
Janet McNary, 
Jane Mercer, 
Jared B. , 
Jared B. , 
Jay, 



3283 



.327 

No. 
26 
UW 

nm 

vm 

nm 

2n;t 

ii-ii 

7»1 

i7;ui 
\7r>7 
i7o;j 

VM 
»84 

116 

3891 
1563 
68 
94 
198 
818 
1634 
1»44 
11)01 
1989 
3884 
8371 
8380 
199 
3350 
1031 
1931 
3168 
3133 
340 
ir)19 
307 
386 
510 
457 
1(577 
394 
1014 
383 
1588 
1583 
306 



■ 




328 



INDEX. PART I. 



I 

i 



Name. 


No. 


Name. 


No. 


Jay, 


539 


John S. , 


2373 


Jeanette, 


308 


John Samuel, 


358 


Jeanette, 


3088 


John W.. 


1069 


Jeannette, 


1916 


Jonathan, 


1734 


Jeanette Hart, 


304 


Jonathan, 


1740 


Jeanette White, 


1930 


Jonathan, 


1765 


Jennie, 


1091 


Jonathan, 


1793 


Jennie Lee, 


1886 


Joseph, 


1489 


Jenny, 


1063 


Joseph, 


2079 


Jerta Marin, 


Hid 


Joseph (Jervis), 


2377 


Jerusha, 


379 


Joseph, 


3398 


Jesse, 


67 


Joseph A., 


. 1565 


Jesse, 


118 


Joseph Albert, 


.1694 


Joannah (Jervis), 


2378 


Joseph Church, 


1594 


Joel, 


1780 


Joseph Edward, 


1967 


Joel 8., 


1633 


Joseph Henry, 


2405 


John, 


15 


Joseph Ireland, 


1762 


John, 


33 


Joseph Ray, 


1843 


John, 


50 


Joseph Russell, 


3067 


John, 


57 


Joseph Russell, 


3108 


John, 


110 


Joseph Russell, 


3119 


John, 


171 


Joseph Russell, 


2184 


John, 


1434 


Joseph Sidney, 


1550 


John, 


1808 


Joseph W., 


619 


John, 


1984 


Joseph Wicks, 


1950 


John, 


1986 


Joseph Wicks, 


1975 


John, 


1998 


Joseph Wood, 


3103 


John, 


2000 


Josephine, 


651 


John, 


3033 


Josephine, 


1939 


John, 


2330 


Josephine, 


3131 


John, 


3331 


Josephine Head, 


3241 


John, Jr., 


2333 


Josie Kinyon, 


1035 


John A.. 


2368 


Judson, 


540 


John Abram, 


303 


Julia, 


205 


John Black, 


3101 


Julia, 


561 


John Bloomfiekl (Jervis), 


1773 


Julia, 


1123 


John Bloomlield (Jervis), 


1834 


Julia, 


1627 


John Buuce, 


1800 


Julia Alice, 


3354 


John Colyer, 


1898 


Julia Ann, 


358 


John Head, 


2086 


Julia Ann, 


259 


John Head, 


2151 


Julia Ann, 


274 


John Head, 


3173 


Julia Ann, 


315 


John Henry, 


300 


Julia B., 


3289 


John Hewlett, 


1879 


Julia Conkliu, 


1089 


John Jay, 


513 


Julia Eliza. 


579 


John Lindsay, 


591 


Julia Eli/a, 


1108 


John Q. A. , 


3So3 


Julia F., 


1695 


John Racy, 


460 


Julia Maria, 


1667 



nESCENDANTS NAMED JAKViS. 



Name. 
Julia Ravmond, 

Kasinni P. (Jervis), 

Kathiirine, 

Katharine Leonard, 

KenI, 

Kent, 

Kent, Jr., 

Kent, 

Kclunili, 

Ketiirab, 

Keturak Ann. 

Keziali, 

Launcelot, 

Laura Ann, 

Laura Matikla, 

Lavinia, 

Lavinia, 

Lavinia, 

Lavinia, 

Lavinia Todd, 

Le(}rand, 

L. H., 

Leonard, 

Leonard, 

Leonard, 

Leonard, 

Leonard, 

Leonard, 

Leonard, 

Leonard, 

Leonarfl Bradford, 

Leonard Bradford, 

Leonard Fitz Edward, 

Levi S., 

Levinah, 

Liliie F., 

Lizzie Ida, 

Lizzi(! Maud, 

Lorenzo TayJor, 

Louis Raymond, 

Louisa, f 

Louisa, 

Louisa, 

Louisa, 

Louisa Sophia, 

Loinse Bailey, 

4'i 



No. 

718 

1633 

:il45 

3146 

14l>3 

1546 

1657 

1713 

138 

1784 

3406 

130 



Name. 
Louise Heath, 
Louise Jcanette, 
Luciiida Fri.sbie, 
Lueretia, 
Lucretia, 
Lucy, 

Lucy Caroline, 
Lucy Cushing, 
Lucy riubbard, 
Lucry Josephine, 
Luella, 



178 

m\ 

833 
37 
54 
100 
115 
164 
314 
1436 
3019 
3036 
3051 
3057 
2073 
3137 
2138 
3104 
3115 
3185 
3105 
508 
133 
1850 
1033 
3281 
1616 
1155 
38 
595 
3339 
3358 
490 
3147 



Mabel 8adie, 
Marcy, 
Margaret, 
Margaret, 
Margaret, 
Mai-garet, 
Margaret, 
Margai-et, 
Margaret, 
I Margartit, 

' Margaret Aiuiabella, 
Margaret Ci.-nelia, 
Margan^l Emma, 
Margaret Isabella Mauie, 
Margaret Wcudder, 
Maria, 
Maria, 

Maria CJliajtman, 
Maria Frisbic, 
Mariii G. , 
Maria Lavinia, 
Maria Mabel, 
Maria Sauford, 
Marietta, 
Marietta Bradley, 
Mariett*!, 
Marion Zeta, 
Martha, 
Martha Louisa, 
Martha Margaret, 
Martha P., 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 



329 

No. 

1088 

1038 

*583 

189 
1468 

767 



875 
3359 
1463 
1893 

3371 
3039 
114 
133 
3004 
3005 
3034 
3143 
3170 
3364 
1120 
1841 
388 
1113 
1839 
343 
1786 
719 
533 

2369 
150 

1311 

3244 
378 
608 
509 

1133 
48 

1018 

161 

1856 
11 
35 
71 
80 

102 



mum 



I It 



I I 



t 
I 

lis 



330 

Name. 
Mary, 
Maiy, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary. 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary, 
Mary A. , 
Mary Abigail, 
Mary Emilia, 
Mary Amelia, 
Mary Ann, 
Mary Ann, 
Mary Ann, 
Mary Ann, 
Mary Ann, 
Mary Ann, 
Mary Ann, 
Mary Ann, 
Mary Ann, 
Mary Ann Susan, 
Mary Beatrice, 
Mary Boyles, 
Mary Calharine, 
Mary Caroline, 
Mary Caroline, 
Mary Caroline, 
Mary Church, 
Mary Church, 



)EX.— 


-PART 1. 




No. 


Name. 


No. 


104 


Mary E. , 


1070 


136 


Mary E., 


1853 


277 


Mary Elizabeth, 


286 


337 


Mary Elizabeth, 


838 


367 


Mary Elizabeth, 


2156 


383 


Mary Elizabeth, 


2250 


394 


Mary Esther, 


316 


557 


Mary Esther, 


2403 


852 


Mary Frances, 


1878 


1494 


Mary Frances, 


1921 


1625 


Mary Frances, 


1936 


1749 


Mary Hannah, 


162 


1752 


Mary Hubbard, 


2120 


1908 


3Iary Jane, 


408 


1940 


Mary Jane, 


1660 


1948 


Mary Jane, 


2161 


1994 


Mary fjouisa. 


357 


2003 


Mary Louisa, 


1207 


2007 


Mary Louise, 


1928 


2008 


Mary M. , 


1581 


2021 


Mary M. (Jervis), 


1632 


2047 


Mary Minerva, 


1693 


2094 


Mary Nutting, 


794 


2374 


Mary Ogden, 


1913 


2401 


Mary Parker, 


2263 


2384 


Mary Pepperrell Sparhawk, 


2135 


2367 


Mary Shrieve, 


788 


1669 


Mary Sophia, 


581 


928 


Mary Sophia, 


582 


256 


Mary Sparhawk, 


2076 


292 


Mary Theodora (Jervis), 


1704 


326 


Mary W., 


1703 


600 


Mary Wicks, 


1973 


1548 


Matilda, 


398 


1805 


Matilda Jane, ' 


1943 


1860 


Matilda M., 


1973 


20H7 


Maud jVFaria, 


1427 


2i«9 


Mehilal)el, 


130 


'^345 


Mehitabel, 


369 


1882 


Mtlancthon Bryant (Jervis), 


2407 


1125 


Mellville, 


1063 


821 


Mervale Philetus, 


'844 


1116 


Mildred Bleiuierhassett, 


1363 


4.54 


Miles O'Ueilly, 


94U 


723 


Milerson, 


1748 


724 


Milerson, 


1751 


2042 


Milison, 


38 


2109 


Minerva, 


600 






No. 
1070 
1853 
286 
838 
3156 
3350 
316 
3403 
1878 
1921 
1936 
163 
2120 
408 
1660 
2161 
357 
1307 
1938 
1581 
1633 
1693 
794 
1913 
3363 
3135 
788 
581 
583 
3076 
1704 
1703 
1973 
398 
1943 



I 



Name. 

Mira, 

Moses, 

Moses, 

Moses, Jr., 

Moses, 

Moses Richards, 

Moses West, 

Munsou, 

Miinson, 

Myron A. (Jervis;, 

Nanoy, 

^ancy, 

Nancy Head, 

Naomi, 

Nathan, 

Nathan, 

Nathan, 

Nathan 8. , 

Nathan Sturges, 

Nathan Sturges, 

Nathaniel, 

Nathaniel, 

Nathaniel, 

Nathaniel, 

Nathaniel, 

Nathaniel, 

Nathaniel, 

Nathaniel, 

Nathaniel, 

Nathaniel, 

Nathaniel, 

Nellie, 

Nellie May, 

Neva Todd, 

Nelson, 

Nicholas, 

Noah. 

Nostrand, 

Owen, 

Paul, 

Panthea, 

Percy, 

Percy, 

Per Lee, 

Peter Robinson, 



DESOENDANTS NAMED .lARVlS. 

Name. 
Peter Robinson, 
Phebe, 
Phehe, 
Phebe, 
Phebe, 
Phebe A., 
Phebe A., 
Phebe Elizabeth, 
Phebe Perkins, 
Philumela Elizabeth, 
Philander, 
Philander Robinson, 
Philetus Conklin, 
Philetus Horton, 
Philip, 
Philip, 
Philip, 
Philip, . 
Philo, 
PlKBbe, 
Phoebe, 
Pha'be, 

Phoebe Deborah, 
PhfEbe Francis, 
Philo Place, 
Pierre Humphrey, 
Piatt, 
PlatI, 
Polly. 
Polly, 
Polly, 
Polly, 
Polly, 
Polly Martha Marvin, 

liachel, 

liachel, 

Rachel. 

Rachel H., 

Ra(!hel Isabella, 
1505 Ralph Muuson. 
Rebe(;ca, 
Rebecca, 
Rebec<;a, 
Rebecca, 
Rebecca, 
Rebecca, 
Rebecca, 



331 

No. 
1126 
1760 
1794 
1867 
1926 
1872 
1875 
3404 
3233 
486 
1626 
360 
1795 
1891 
3044 
2090 
3171 
2421 
187 
1906 
1949 
1956 
1980 
1915 
1895 
1911 
364 
2390 
23 
47 
169 
1517 
1522 
140 



72 
297 
1435 
1564 
314 
185 
179 
(p.) 197 
1993 
1995 
2001 
2011 
2016 



H32 



INDKX. — PART I. 



i 



Name. 


No. 


Name. 


No. 


Rebecca Hall, 


2154 


Samuel Gardiner, 


2038 


Rebecva Parkman, 


2048 


Samuel Gi>vdner, 


2126 


Reuben, 


23!)3 


Samuel M. , 


■ 1918 


Rhoda, 


;J66 


Sanmel Odell. 


160 


Richard, 


1047 


Sanmel Peters, 


149 


Richard Win., 


354 


Sanmel Peters, 


152 


Robert, 


1744 


Samuel Peters, 


447 


Robert, 


1781 


Sanmel Peters, 


943 


Robert, 


1788 


Sanmel Raymond (Sir), 


181 


Robert E. Colborne, 


598 


Sands, 


66 


Robert Jones, 


1424 


Sarah, 


29 


Robert Milner, 


19(J9 


Sarah, 


49 


Rodney, 


197 


Saraii, 


98 


Rufus P. , 


1700 


Sarah, 


121 


Ruasell, 


2077 


Siirah, 


181 


Russell, 


2129 


Sarali, 


223 


Russell, 


2198 


Sarah, 


375 


Ruth, 


34 


Sarali, 


597 


Ruth, ■ 


133 


Sarah, 


1804 






Sarah, 


1905 


Sally, 


188 


Sarah, 


2009 


Sally, 


1499 


Sarah, 


2041 


Sally, 


1770 


Sarah, 


2095 


Sally, 


2332 


Sarah, 


2144 


Sally, 


2390 


Sarali, 


2192 


Sally (Jervis), 


2410 


Sarah, 


2325 


Sally Burrill. 


141 


Sarah (Jervis), 


2380 


Salter Mountain, 


590 


Sarah, 


2385 


Sampson, 


1999 


Saraii A., 


349 


Samuel, 


8 


Sarah Adelaide, 


1861 


Samuel, 


13 


Sarah Ann, 


336 


Samuel, 


40 


Sarah Ann, 


2355 


Samuel, 


46 


Sarah Fliz. Marie Anto 


nette, 308 


Sanmel, 


58 


Saraii Eloisa, 


(p.) 197 


Samuel, 


70 


Saraii Hitchcock, 


262 


Samuel, 


•81 


Sarah Isabel, 


1107 


Samuel, 


96 


Sarah J., 


620 


Samuel, 


218 


Sarah Jane, 


53(5 


Samuel, 


350 


Saraii Jane, 


2243 


Samuel, 


499 


Saraii Jessica (Jervis), 


1705 


Sanuiel, 


1993 


Sarah Leonard, 


2110 


Samuel Rowmon, 


2322 


Saraii Maria, 


330* 


Sanuiel I)., 


1754 


Saraii Maria, 


396 


Sanmel Farmar, 


87 


Saraii Maria, 


(i09 


8am>iel Farmar, 


88 


Saraii Peters M., 


166 


Samuel Farmar, 


306 


Sarah Russell, 


2061 


Sanmel Fermor, 


307 


Sarah W., 


1836 


Sanmel Fermor, 


076 


Selah, 


2419 



No. 
2038 
3126 
1918 
IfiO 
14!) 
152 
447 
943 
181 
66 
29 
49 
98 
121 
131 
223 
375 
597 
1804 
1905 
3009 
2041 
2095 
2144 
2192 
2325 
2380 
2385 
349 
1861 
336 
2355 
308 
.)197 
262 
1107 
620 
536 
2243 
1705 
2110 
330' 
396 
ri09 
1()6 
2061 
1836 
2419 



■niuer. 



Name. 
Seleptu. 
Se)"" ; 
Set]). 
Seymour, 
Seymour, 
Sidney IJerdoe, 
Simon Lessee, 
Soi)hiu, 

Soplironia, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, Jr., 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

StejHien, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

Stephen, 

Stephen Jervis W., 

Steplien Maule, 

Stei)]ien Murray, 

Stephen Starr, 

Susan, 

Susan, 

Su.san, 

Susan, 

Susan, 

Susan, 

Susan, 

Susan B., 

Su.san (jfibl)s, 

Susan Gibbs, 

Susan Mary Ann, 

Susan Pierce, 

Susan Pieree, 

Susanna, 

Su.sanna, 

Susanna M. (Jervi.s), 

Su.sannali, 

Susannah Ilubbnrd, 



DKSOENDANTS NAMED .TARVfS. 



Name. 
Susannah M., 
Su.saiHiah Penn, 



Theodorus, 

Thomas, 

Thomas, 

Thomas, Jr., 

TJiomas, 

Thomas, 
Thomas, 
Tliomas, 
Thomas Henry, 
Thomas Iliuby, 
TJiomas Jefferson, 
Thomas Neilson, 
Thomas Newton, 
Thomas Stin.s(;u, 
Thomas Woodhull, 
Thomas Woodhull, 
Timotliy, 
Timothy B., 
Tully Church, 



Walter Beam. 
Walter Scott, 

Wellington, 

Whitman, 

Willard, 

Willet, 

Willetts, 

William, 

William, 

William, 

William, 

William, 

William, 

William, 

Willianj, 

William, 

William, 

William, 

William, 

William, 

William. 

William, 

William, 

William, 

William, 



333 

No. 
1774 
(p.) 197 

2417 
31 
1483 
1484 
1767 
2031 
2055 
2387 
1143 
1790 
2143 
1131 
493 
1114 
1880 
1901 
1759 
1776 
1501 

1433 
287 
536 
1806 
1713 
280 
1866 
5 
7 
62 
64 
83 
103 
137 
201 
348 
669 
1487 
1735 
1738 
1753 
1777 
1782 
1809 
1914 



fl 



3a4 



INDKX. — PART t. 



Name. 


No. 


Name. 


Williiim, 


IflflO 


William Henry, 


Williiim, 


20(13 


William Henry (Jovvis), 


Williiim. 


2017 


William Henry, 


Williiim, 


2080 


William Henry Stuart, 


William, 


2130 


Willi im llovey, 


William, 


2141 


William Irving, 


William, 


2149 


William Kemper, 


William, 


211»:{ 


William Manle. 


William (Jcrvis), 


2375 


William Morley, 


William, 


2388 


William Moslier, 


William AU'ml. 


1962 


William Mini.son. 


William Aui^ustus, 


224 


William Mun^on, 


William MolsFonl, 


216 


William Oliver, 


William Hull, 


2r.7 


William O.scar, 


William C, 


1923 


William Oscar, 


William V., 


2083 


William l^vxton. 


William Cooper, 


1518 


William ]V'pi)errell, 


William Duminer, 


596 


William Keginaltl, 


William Dummor Powell, 


448 


William Uice, 


W. (t. Townsciid, 


411 


Wilmer E., 


William George, 


944 


Woodlnill, 


William H., 


1858 


Woodhull. 


William Hamilton, 


1726 




William riait. 


766 


Zophar, 


William Uavilaiid, 


1799 


Zerviah (Mrs.), 



No. 

395 

1837 

3283 

6S3 

33ftl 

920 

859 

1109 

1146 

2138 

158 

404 



580 
1085 

183 
2180 
•1208 
2199 
1845 
1814 
1897 

362 
1750 



^ 



■4 



DKSrKNnANTW NAMKD .IAI{VI,«<. 



3:i5 



PART II. 

NAMKS OK l»ERSONK WHO IIAVK MAIilUEl) INTO TIJi 

JAUVIS FAMILY. AND NAMKS OF DESCENDANTS 

li EARING OTHER SURNAMES. 

Name. 
Abnuris, i;iuistiiuia, 
AdaniH, Ellon Derby, 
Adiuns, JofTicy, 
Adiinis, ,I<),so,)h Thornton, 
Adams, Leonard, 
AilainH, Snsan, 
iMlen, Phehe, 
\nios, Mari^aret Elliot, 
Arnold, Mary, 
Atkins, Abigail, 
Atwater, Mary Auu, 



Riineroft, Anna (!., 
Haiuroft, F. J., 
IJanerol't, Georg(^ .1., 
Hancroft, Mary MeLean, 
Barlow, Lydia, 
Barnt^tt, Francis K., 
Barnett, Frederick, 
Barnett, ({eorge, 
Barnett, Jamei, 
Barnett, June. E., 
Barnett, .T(!annette, 
Barnett, John, 
Barnett, John, 
Barnett, Try])hena, 
liarrch. Augusta, 
Barrch, Eniiiiiline, 
Barreh, Julia A., 
Barrel), Mrs. I'nuliiia, 
Bartlett, Aiine Bailey, 
Barthat, Elizabeth, 
Bassett, Annie L., 
Bassett, David, 
Bassett, Elizabetli V., 
Bassi.'tl, George J., 
Bassett, Harriet A., 
Bassett, John E. , 
Bassett, Mary L. , 
Bassett, Sarah J.. 
Beach, Bloomfleld J. , 



No. 


Name. 


No. 


1826 


Beach, Cyprian N., 


773 


2191 


Bea(;h, Elizab.-th H. J., 


774 


2188 


Beach, Henry Hyde, 


1821 


2187 


Beach, Samuel, 


1819 


218!) 


Beach Sanuiel, 


1822 


2190 


Bears, Mary, 


1954 


1904 


Beer, Jane Hope, 


833 


282 


Beaumont, (!harlotte. 


1148 


134 


Bernard, Agnes C. G., 


936 


202(i 


Bernard, Ed. Henry, 


938 


323 


Bernard, Ellen M., 


935 




Bernard, Gerald Luke F., 


934 


1321 


Bernard, l-uke Fitz Gerald, 


932 


1318 


Bernard, Mary K., 


933 


1320 


Bernard, Renee H. B., 


937 


1319 


Bla(;k, Miiry Ann, 


2093 


492 


Blackman, Cliarles, 


1445 


027 


Blacknian, Hiram, 


1443 


628 


Blackman, Jennie, 


1444 


029 


Bliss, Harriet J., 


1711 


631 


Bloomlicld, Phebe, 


1771 


632 


Bogart, Helen Maria, 


1823 


630 


Borden, Abigail M., 


1685 


625 


Borden, Asa, 


1082 


633 


Borden, Charles M. , 


1684 


620 


Borden, George P., 


1683 


2279 


Borden, Joseph A. , 


1680 


2283 


Boultbee, Alfred, 


888 


3274 


Boultbee, Alfred E., 


891 


2175 


Boultbee, Constance M., 


893 


21.37 


Boidtbee, Frank. 


890 


1373 


Boultbee, Horatio C, 


892 


1325 


Boultbee, Reginald, 


889 


728 


Boulte, Eli/abet li, 


170 


730 


Bowcrman, Mary, 


513 


1324 


BownioM, Elizab(!th, 


2319 


731 


Bowne, Maria, 


1040 


729 


Boyd, Anna Maria, 


405 


1323 


Boyd, ('aroliiie. 


403 


1320 


Bradford, Sarah L., 


2114 


1820 


Bradley, Abigail C, 


1609 



■^wi 



I 



336 

Nam*. 
Hni(lk\y , Augusta Sophia, 
Uradlcy, (lymw Y., 
IJradlcy, Elislia, 
Hradley, (Jcor^c II., 
Uradloy, Harriet C, 
Jiradley, Jlarv. Shcpparil, 
liradley, Henry, 
Bradley, Joel, 
llradley, Joseph J., 
Hradley, Joseph W. , 
Bradley, Julia W., 
Bradley, Lydia C, 
Bradley, Maria C. , 
Bradley, Maria L., 
Bradley, Rachel, 
Bradley, Rhoda J. , 
Bradley, Williams., 
Brant, Jennie R. , 
Brayton, Cynthia, 
Bresce, Asahel A. , 
Bresee, Carl A., 
Bresee, Charles H., 
Bresee, Chester J., 
Bresee, David C, 
Bresee, Ella C. , 
Bresee, Emma, 
Bresee, George L. B., 
Bresee, William J., 
Brewster, Annie, 
Bridgham, Lydia D., 
Brower, Eliza, 
Brown, Alice C, 
Brown, Ann, 
Brown, Barbara A., 
Brown, Joseph B,, 
Brown, Margaret L., 
Brown, Mary, 
Brown, Ursilla M., 
Ikown, Warren C, 
Brush, Naomi, 
Bryant, Mary E., 
Bryant, William F., 
Bryden, Sarah A., 
Budgen, Alice C, 
Budgen, Caroline M., 
Budgeu, Ellen I., 
Budgen, Fanny Lydia, 
Budgeu, George, 



INDKX. PAMT II. 



No. 
1(514 
151)2 
1(105 
1611 ! 
1010 i 
151(1 I 
1587 
158(5 ! 
1588 
158!) 
1(507 
1(508 
1500 
16i;{ 
1578 
1000 
1013 
1885 
1810 
1730 
1783 
1731 
1719 
1714 
1716 
1717 
1715 
1718 
1756 
3334 
1044 
1074 
1648 
1408 
1073 
1075 
1971 
1847 
1076 
12 
1369 
1368 
983 
11(53 
1161 
1163 
1160 
1164 



Name. No. 

Budgen, John, 11S8 

Budgen (Major (Jen.), 1157 

Budgen, Mary, 1165 

Budgen, William Thomas, 1159 

Bull, Polly, 254 

Himce, Martha P., 1851 

Bunce, Naomi, • 109 

Bunee, Pheltc!, 128 

Bjirt, Mary Frances, 1080 

Butler, Jean(!tt»! J., 1027 

Camp, Caroline S. , 642 

(;amp, Charles Edwin, 648 

(.'amp, Charles IL, 646 

Camp, Elizabeth A., 644 

Camp, Elizabeth Ann. 1276 

Camp, Elsie E., 1271 

Camp, Frances I., 648 

Camp, Frank B., 1272 

(?amp, FnMlerick W. , 641 

Camp, George II. , 1273 

Camp, (Jeorge William, 646 

Camp, Helen Maria, 647 

Camp, Silas, 640 

Camp, Silas W., 1275 

Camp, 'IMieodore E., 649 

Campbell, Elizabeth J., 976 

CanHcld, Cantield, 1442 

Canticad, Carrie, 1440 

Canflc^ld, Charles, 1489 

Canfiekl, Edwin, 1488 
Canfield, John. . 1487 

Canfield. Wilfred, 1441 

Carll, Phebe, 1779 

Carr, E. W., (p.)~7 

Carruthers, (Jrace, 919 

Charter, Harriet E., 1388 

Cary, Mariotte J., 1283 

Cary, Sarah F., 1234 

Cary, Solomon F., 1281 

Cary, Wiilinm Ely, 1232 

Chandler, Louisa M., 1833 

Chapman, Betsy, 320 

(!hapman, Louise, 602 

Chase, Edward A., 1673 

Chase, Kent Jarvis, 1672 

Chase, Mary A., 1671 

Chase, William A., 1670 



DKSCENKANTS, KTC, HKAKINO OTHKII SIHNAMKS. 



a 3 7 



(i4t) 

!)76 

443 

1440 

I4:ut 

1438 

1437 

1441 

1779 

.)77 
!)1'.) 

[1388 

Il233 

ll234 

11331 

Il333 

ll833 
330 
tU)3 
l()73 
1(173 
1 071 
1(170 



Niimo. 


No. 


Naino. 


No. 


('hiircli, AliiKiiil, 


1500 


Cutts, Hampden, 


2203 


Church, Samli, 


3082 


Cutis. Hampden, 


2210 


(*hi('h()Hl<'r, Jcnishii, 


113 


Cutts, IIampd(^n, 


2307 


(/lapliatn, Mary, 


2079 


(Jutts, Harriet L., 


2212 


Chirk, ('larissa. 


1018 


Cults, Ki\\'u' Anna, 


2205 


Clark, Harah, 


957 


Cutis, Liliiui Ursula, 


3206 


Coalcs, F<:ii/a R. 


1818 


Cutts, .Margaret A., 


3399 


Coliurn, .lames IM., Jr., 


1477 


Cults. Mary V C., 


3309 


Coburn, Lamont I)., 


1479 


Cutts, Mary S., 


3303 


Coliurn, Holicrl II., 


1478 


Cults, William H., 


3391 


Colos, (!aMi(!rin<' A., 


1349 


Cutis, William J., 


3308 


Coll, Caldwell H., 


770 


(Uifts, Winnifred, 


3398 


Colt, Elizabeth J., 


771 






Colt, Henrietta 8., 


772 


Dana, Caroline, 


3131 


(!olt, Samuel, 


768 


Daniel, Mary ()., 


1689 


Colt, Samuel J., 


769 


Davis, Prudence, 


3075 


Condy, Susan, 


3033 


Dean. Fannie, 


1336 


Conklin, Hannah. 


43 


Dean, Ida S., 


1338 


Conklin, Keturah, 


1787 


Dean, John P., 


1335 


Cook, Anna, 


19(18 


Dean, Minnie, 


1337 


(!ooley, Mary, 


ib;;o 


Dennison, A<la M., 


1399 


(*ooli(lf!:e, [jydia, 


3053 


Diiiinison, Ceorgc, 


1397 


Coojier, JiUcretia. 


3365 


T.N'imison, William ('., 


1398 


Cordi.s, Kliza, 


3133 


Dibble, IVggy, 


146 


Crawford, Alvali Carpentor, 


536 


Dibble. Ralph, 


147 


Craw lord, Ciiroline L., 


535 


Dibble, Tyler, 


143 


Crawford, (Catharine U. , 


530 


Dibble. Waller I)., 


144 


Crawford, ('hauncey II., 


518 


Dibble, William. 


145 


Crawford, Daniel, 


534 


Douglass, Pillen, 


1081 


Crawford, F^lijah II., 


517 


Draper, Claris,sa, 


3134 


Crawford, James Kodnian, 


531 


Duckett, Alva J., 


1416 


Crawford, Joliii Bemtis, 


519 


Duckelt, Frederick W., 


1415 


(■rawford, Jothan, 


516 


Duekett, Walter (}., 


1413 


Crawford, Margaret Ann, 


533 


Duckelt, Willard S., 


1414 


Crawford, Martha J. , 


538 


Duff, Ale.xander, 


950 


(h'awford, Warren S. , 


537 


Duir, .Mmira Helen, 


1409 


Crawford, William Non.ian, 


533 


Duir, Augusta, 


951 


Crissey, Eliza, 


1919 


Duff, (Jalharine H.. 


1411 


Cunningham, Sally, 


3339 


Duff, Je.sseO., 


1410 


Curllss, Jane M., 


1674 


Duff, William A., 


1412 


Cushing, Lucy, 


674 


Duff, William A. H., 


953 


Cutts, Anna JI., 


3306 


Dunn, (!ora K. , 


1653 


Cutis, Charles J., 


3311 


Dunn, James K., 


1654 


Cutt.s, Kdward D., 


3394 


Dunn, Julia K., 


1656 


Cutts, Edward II. , 


3204 


Dunn, Julia M. (Mrs.), 


1653 


Cutis, Elizabeth H., 


2205 


Dunn, Mary A., 


1655 


Cutis, Elizabeth B.. 


3307 


Dunsford, Augusta, 


1303 


Cutts, Elizabeth M., 


2203 


Dunsford, Marlhi, 


1391 


43 









r 



388 



INI>KX. — I'AKT II. 



' 



Ninnu. 
Diiiisfonl, Willifiin, 
Diiniiul, ('aroliiKi Aug. ()., 
Dtimiid, KU/Ai G. , 
Duniiid, (tfor^'o, 
Diiraiul. llanuiili, 
Duniiul, .TcsMo, 
Duraiitl, Mary C, 
Dyer, lillcu, 

EdMon, A.Halu'l. 
EdHon, Itilly. 
Edsoii, Kli/alx'lli, 
Edsoii, Orcucll, 
Edsoii, Polly, 
Edaoii, Sally, 
Edson, TheodoriLs, 
Edson, Thomas, 
Ed.soii, William J., 
Eldridgc, Lucy J. , 
Ells, Sally, 
Ely, Charles P. , 
F^ly, Gcorgc! M., 
Ely, Henry O., 
Ely, Tiouisa G., 
Ely, Marietta P., 
Ely, William, 
Emery, Jane Pomeroy, 
Everitt, Susauua, 

Fairchild, Alhcrl. 
Fairchild, Jlarmaii, 
Fairehild, Iliiiiry, 
Fairchild, .lolm, 
Fairchild, .lidia, 
Fairchild, Marsh, 
Fanchcr, Sarah, 
Fancher, Mary, 
Farmar, Ann, 
Fay, Charles ,1 . , 
Fay, Elizabeth, 
Fay, Estelle L., 
Fay, Gilbert O., 
Fay, Louie J. , 
Fay, Louis P., 
Fitz Gerald, Anna G., 
Fitz Gerald, Duncan, 
Fitz Gerald, Elizabeth J., 
Fitz Gerald, Frederick, 



No. 

v.m 

IHKI 
»70 
l)(ir» 
0«7 

\)m 

»74 

vm 
\rM 

1541 

irdw 
1 ■);!;! 
\rm 
irAO 
\r,:\2 

um 

170 
1230 
133!) 
133(i 
1337 
1338 
1335 

743 
1870 

1450 

144(5 

1448 

1447 

1451 

1449 

1!)5 

1377 

8(i 

1739 

1738 

1483 

1737 

14;J1 

1430 

779 

876 

77(5 

775 



Name. 


No. 


Fitz Gerald. Frederick, 


780 


Fitz (ierahl, Harvey, 


877 


Fitz (Jerald. John, 


778 


FitziJerald. Mary C, 


777 


Fitz (ierahl, William 11.. 


875 


Flagg, Frances M., 


3340 


Forbes, Susan, 


1064 


Forward, llaiuiah 


2876 


Fo.ster, Charley, 


608 


Foster, Charley, 


1379 


Foster, CJeorjif, 


656 


Ko,sler, (}, M., 


654 


Foster, Henry, 


650 


Foster, Mary J., 


657 


Foster, Mary L., 


1878 


Foster, Sarali C. , 


655 


Fowler, Hannah, 


1976 


Fo\vl(!r, Mary, 


1979 


Fra.ser. A ugust a. 


901 


Eraser, (JliarlesT., 


903 


Fraser, Frederick, 


905 


Fniser, James, 


000 


Fraser, ]\Iaria, 


904 


Fraser, William B., 


903 


Freeman, Alice M., 


888 


Freeman, Arthur H., 


883 


Freeman, Charles E., 


884 


Freeman, Christabelle, 


887 


Freeman, Clarence, 


880 


Freeman, Frank, 


886 


Freeman, George, 


1389 


Freeman, (}(!org(! O., 


879 


Freeman, Ida Maria, 


881 


P^rceman, Lottie M., 


1390 


Freeman, Manfred, 


886 


Freeman, Samuel B., 


878 


Fri.sbie, Tempe, 


529 


Fruthy, Laura, 


3287 


Fuller, Amelia, 


1598 


George, Thomas li. , 


1733 


Gibson, Nancy D. M., 


1305 


Gilbert, Kobert J., 


1344 


Gilbert, Sarah H., 


1343 


Gilbert, William J., 


1343 


Gilbert, William J., 


1345 


Gildersleeve, Statira, 


1010 


Gllkinsou, Agnes, 


918 



DKSCKNOANTH, KT("., HKAHINO dTIIKl! SIKNAMKS, 



:\-M) 



mi 

887 
880 
885 
i:{8!» 
87!) 
881 
|:iS>0 
88« 
878 
52}) 
!3H7 

i5i);5 

i7;i;j 
i;i05 
i:]44 

134S 
1843 

i;vi5 

1010 
918 



Niiinc. 


No. 


Oilkiiisori, AlcxandtT 0., 


1)10 


(filkiiiHoii, An-liil)al(l, 


1)0(1 


QilkiiiHon, AiijfUNtuN I. <>., 


1)15 


Oilkinson, ('. U. (}.. 


913 


nilkiiiHon, Kllcii ]>., 


1)17 


GilkiiiHou, George ()., 


i)ia 


Gilkiiisoii, Grant, 


1)07 


(Jilkiiison, Isalicllii («., 


1)08 


(lilkinson, .Tiispcr G., 


1)11 


Gilkin.soii, Jfisptr 'P., 


1)14 


<}ilkiiis()ii, Marv .1., 


))!(( 


(iilkiiiHon, Tlioiims.i;. H. C. 


000 


Gillcl, i.ouisu. 


1585 


(Jillics, Fanny. 


1107 


•Gillies, iM.. 


1100 


Gilliim, Manila. 


1017 


Glover, Amelia, 


210 


Gould. Sarali, 


50!) 


(TOiiinan, Marietta \j.. 


1!W5 


(Jraliani, Marv Ann, 


))!«) 


Grant, Mar;, \V., 


];i(i4 


Gray, Kli/.abetli. 


414 


Gray, Elosia. 


7i:J 


Greer, Nancy. 


5:54 


<}rin(ile, Lucy, 


2385 


Qriswold, Abiuail, 


1542 


Gross, Lydia K., 


1058 


llaldenian, Sanielda P., 


1425 


Hall, Arlluir C, 


684 


Hall, Christina, 


(582 


Hall, Edward F., 


679 


Hall, Edward S., 


(578 


Hall, Eli/.ai)elh J., 


781 


Hall, Frank de Peysler, 


681 


Hall, Mary, 


68;$ 


Hall, lieheeea. 


2148 


Hall, Theodore M., 


680 


Hamilton, A^nes H. , 


864 


Hamilton, Alexander, 


461 


Hamilton, Augusta C, 


4:55 


Hamilton, Augusta H., 


48;J 


Hamilton, Auiiusta M., 


87« 


Hamilton, Augusta Owen H., 


472 


Hamilton, Caroline, 


958 


Hamilton, Caroline M, 


470 


Hamilton, Caroline M., 


870 


Hamilton, Catharine, 


434 



Nninu. No. 

Hauulton, Catharine H., 421) 

Hamilton, Catharine li., 86:t 

Hamilton, Catharine M., 462 

Hamilton, Charles ('.. H7H 

Hamilton, Cyrus J., 9rt9 

Hanulton, Elizabeth, 466 

Hamilton, Kmma H., 471 

Hamilton, Kthel Maud, 1470 

Hamilton, Eva May. 1471 

Hamilton. (Jeorge, 437 

Hamilton, (Jeorge, 4J52 

Handlton, (Jeorge, 1175 

H:imillon, George E., 868 

Hamilton, George W., 1176 

H.imilton, (hace. 1)63 

Hamilton, Grace. 963 

Hamilton, Hannah H., 463 

Hamilton, llehn, 467 

Hamilton, .TaiH! C., 872 

Hac'ilton, .lesse Augusta, 464 

Hamilton, Jessie, 80(! 

Hamilton, John H., 871 
Hamilton, Joseph .\lexander, 468 

Hamilton. Julia. 1178 

Hamilton, Maria J., 869 

Hamilton, Maria Laviina, 431 

Handlton, Mary, 874 

Hamilton, Mary Jane, 465 

Handlton, Minetta, 904 

Hamilton, Robert C., 1177 

Handlton, Robert C, 1180 

Hamilton, Robert H., 805 

Hamilton, Robert Jarvis, 428 

Hamilton, Samuel Askin. 430 

Hanulton. Thomas C, !)(!(» 

Hamilton. William, 802 

H.unilton, William .larvis, 469 

llanna, KllaH., 1723 

Hansard, Arthur C., 1384 

Hansard, Hugh 11.. 1387 

Hansard, John St. L., 1386 

Hansard, Richard M., 1385 

Harding, Frances fi., I(i65 

Harding, Jonathan, 1168 

Harding, Leonard, I(!(i4 

Harding, Lucy 1)., 844 

Harmon, Jeanette, 54!) 

Harmon, .hidsou, 548 



I 



«) iw m* wnmumwHinpi 



340 



INDKX. — PAHT II. 



I I 



n 



t i 



^--Bt 



Niinio. 


No. 


lltiniion, .lulictto. 


049 


Iliirnioii, Mar^nirctta, 


B4« 


HarriHoii, A^'iics K. 11., 


i:{r)8 


IIiirriHon, Frank MrOlicc, 


i:ui(> 


IlarriHoii, IIitIktI (}., 


i:tr.7 


HarriHoii, l.cdiiard .1., 


i:<r)i) 


HurriHon, Marion .1., 


12B9 


IlarriNon, Murray, 


liWfl 


Ilttrrison, William, 




Hart, Eli/.abfth Miller, 


ji 


Hart, Sarah McCurdy, 


:Wi 


Harvoy, Mary Ann, 


IHW 


Hatch, Amelia, 


1520 


Hatcli, Ira. 


ir.27 


Hatch, .John, 


1524 


Hatch, Malatiah, 


152:{ 


Hatch, Malcnda, 


l.^);io 


Hatch, Matilda, 


15: 11 


Hatch, Polly, 


1525 


Hatch, Solomon, 


152(i 


Hatch, William, 


152H 


Huyard, Ku^cnc .1., 


14 1« 


Hayard. Willi.im H., 


1417 


Ha/en, Arthur V.. 


■•<70 


Haxen, Cecilia K., 


'2 


Hazen, Eli/al)cth, 


\ 


Ha/eu, Ethel, 


i.»»j) 


Hazen, Harriett S,, 


1375 


Hazen, Joanna, 


832 


Hazen, Lilian, 


IHfiS 


Hazen, Margaret Ann, 


831 


Hazen, Maria A., 


13(17 


Hazen, Robert, 


401 


Hazen, Itobert Eraser, 


402 


Hazeu, Robert M., 


827 


Hazcu, liobert M. R. , 


1305 


Hazen, Robert P., 


1374 


Hazen, Sophia F., 


1366 


Hazen, Susan, 


82tt 


Hazen, William, 


828 


Hazen, William, 


1371 


Head, Ann, 


2085 


Hewlett, Susannah, 


1876 


Hiles, Anna, 


<(68 


Hill, Christina Jane, 


851 


Hilson, Eliza Jane, 


1688 


Hilson, Robert, 


1687 


Hitchcock, Solomon, 


236 



Name. 


No. 


Hobart, Cordelia, 


1019 


Hodp-H, Lydia L. , 


8808 


Horlon, Endly A., 


1890 


HosuKtr, Milicent, 


8886 


Houston, Marjraret, 


901 


Huvcnden, Kli/.a, 


1106 


Hovey, (!aroline 11., 


8247 


Hovey, Sarah E., 


8888 


Howard, A. Trumbull, 


8800 


Howard, (Veil H., 


8801 


Howard, Charles T., 


8800 


Howard, Kdith K., 


3808 


Howard, Edward K. , 


8807 


Howard, Mary C., 


8808 


Howard, Mau<l J., 


8806 


Howard, Hose J., 


8304 


Hoyt, Betsey A., 


1060 


Ilidtbanl, Phebe, 


8367 


llubbell, Sally M.. 


684 


HuKhcy, Laura F 


1488 


Huiii^erlord, Arthur, 


1465 


Hunii:erford, Edwin, 


1464 


Hun^i-erford, Martin L., 


1468 


Hun,u;(!rford, Robert, 


1468 


Hunt, Clyde Du V., 


8886 


Hunt, Jarvis, 


8886 


Hunt, lioavitt. 


8224 


Hunt, Leavitt B., 


8889 


Hiuit, Maud 1)., 


8827 


Hunt, Morris B., 


8880 


Hunt. Nina, 


8888 


Htirlbut, Charh)tte J., 


978 


Htirlbut, Leon B,, 


971 


Hurlbut, Sylvia E., 


972 


Hyde, Nancy. 


8344 


Ireland, Sarah, 


1760 


Irving, Diana, 


987 


Isbell, Betsey .lane, 


1598 


Isbell, Cecilia Abi<iail, 


1601 


Isbell, Felic'ia M.. 


1608 


Isbell. George T., 


1604 


Isbdl, Horaces., 


1599 


Isbell, Nathan. 


1597 


Isbell, Oliver C, 


1600 


Isbell, Sophroiua E,, 


1602 


Jackson, Ann Eliza, 


1058 


Jackson, Charles, 


1059 



DKSCKNKANTH, KTC, RKAIUNO OTMKU NUUNAMKH. 



341 



1760 
927 
1598 
1601 
l()0:i 
1604 
ir)99 
ir)97 
1600 
1602 

1058 
1059 



Nnmo. 
Jiu'kMon, Florence, 
.Iiicksoii, FranecH, 
.luekHOii, Helen, 
il.ickwdM, Jane .Inrvis, 
.Ttickson, .loliii ('iilvin, 
Jaeksnn, Johu Ciilvin, 
.Tiiekson, Julia, 
JacJxHoii, ,Miin l-andon, 
JackHon, Nelnon, 
Jaeksoii, Mayniond, 
.lenkiiis, Maria I*., 
Jeiuihiirs, (Harissa. 
Jones, Manili J. K., 
Jones, William W., 
Jordan, Carolina M., 
Joy, Nancy A., 

Kello<ffr_ Ann, 
Kello^Tf;-, Caroline, 
Kin^, Eu^reina I!., 
King, Engenia S. , 
King, Eva B. , 
King. Theodore C, 
Kinney, ('liarles, 
Kinney, William II., 
Knnpp, Abigail J., 
Kiiapp, Alice M., 
Ki, ipj), Amelia, 
Knapp, (Comfort Starr, 
Knapp. Delia Anne, 
Knapp. Knnna, 
Knapp, Evilina, 
Kna})p, Fanny, 
Knapp, Franci.s, 
Knapp, Franci.s, 
Knapp, George F. , 
Knapp, Harriet Lowndes. 
Knapi>, Marganit Augusta. 
Knap)). Mary. 
Knapp, Rebe(!ca, 
Knapp, Heuben, 
Knapp, William Jarvis, 
Knapp. William Starr. 

Larned, Sarah E. , 
Leonard, Caroline, 
Leonard, Pjllen, 
Lewis, Charlotte, 



No. 


Nniiic. 


No 


10«7 


Lewis, J. M. M.. 


tlN6 


1056 


Lewis. John (}. S,, 


1187 


105:< 


liowis, Lucy, 


(p.) 19 


1459 


fioekc, Hep/il)ah. 


3350 


1053 


liong, Martha IL, 


IT03 


1055 


L»ike, Henrietta L.. 


1170 


1054 


Lyon, Ann Fiouisa, 


. 650 


1458 






1456 


Maelear, Annie S. , 


1140 


1457 


Marshall, I'hilamela, 


485 


737 


Marvin, David .M , 


1316 


3411 


Marvin, Elizabeth, 


lilO 


1374 


Marvin, John F. , 


1314 


1307 


Marvin, Julia J., 


1312 


3358 


Marvin, Mary I*., 


1311 


3350 


Marvin, Nelson J., 


1315 




Marvin, Walter T., 


1310 


77 


Marvin. Walter T.. 


1317 


i;}02 


Marvin, William J. K,, 


1313 


997 


Maule, Arthur Dillon, 


574 


990 


Maule, Caroline. 


S69 


998 


Mauh-, Charlotte, 


578 


995 


Maule, Edith H.. 


1171 


io;{7 


Maule, Klizabeth, 


568 


10M6 


Maule, Elizabeth, 


S64 


345 


Maule. Ellen. 


570 


008 


Maule, Frances Amelia, 


567 


342 


Maule. Fr. J. F.. 


1174 


240 


Maule, (leoi'ge. 


566 


004 


Maule, CJeorge Fr»'derick, 


571 


341 


Maule, Henry Hudgen, 


577 


344 


Maule, Isabella, 


673 


3H9 


Maule, John. 


563 


2;i7 


Maule, Lilian B., 


1172 


023 


Maule, Mary C'. , 


575 


246 


Maule. Percy S., 


1173 


247 


Maule. Itobert, 


576 


060 


Maule, William, 


565 


001 


Maunoir. ('hristine E., 


673 


243 


Maunoir, Leon D. A., 


671 


600 


Miiunoir. Louise A. W., 


673 


238 


Maunoir, Theodore, 


670 


024 


Mc Alpine, Amelia A., 


• 687 




McAlpine, Anna (}., 


1292 


1285 


Me Alpine, Catharine L., 


1291 


387 


McAlpine, ('liarles Le(4rand, 


692 


790 


MciVlpine, Charles ()., 


689 


1464 


McAlpine, Elizabeth O,, 


688 



342 



INDKX. PART 1'. 



•J 



■I ri 



i . -1 



B ' 






(^ 



Nftine. 
McAliiine. Eliziiliclli .1., 
McAlpinc, Kli/.iiliftli M., 
McAlpiiK^ (iciirt^'c, 
MfAIpinc, George, 
McAlpiiic, .loliii IT., 
McAlpinc, Julia J.. 
McAlpiuc, Miuy A., 
McAlpinc, Sarah J., 
McAlpinc, William I). McG.. 
McAlpinc, William J., 
McConnick, (Hiarlcs. 
McGonnick, Cluulcs William 
MciConnick, Emma A., 
McCormick, EslliRr M., 
McC'ormick, (Jcorgc, 
McCormick, (TCoru,i! Dichl, 
McCormick, Ilannali, 
McCormick, Harriet F. F^., 
M(!Cormick, Janctte A,, 
McCormick, Jasper, 
M(;Cormick, Marsvarct A., 
McCormick, Mary PI, 
McCormi<!k, Mary S., 
Mc(^)rmlck, Napier, 
McCormick, Paul J., 
McCormick, Samiiei Peters, 
McCormick, Thomas, 
Mc(^)rmick, 'honnis. 
McCormick, Thomas I)., 
McCormick, T. Friinces, 
McCormick, William, 
McC'ormick, William, 
McCormick, William .1., 
McChee, Annie, 
McGiiee, A,i>nes, 
McGliee, Annie E. L., 
McGliec, Caroline, 
McGhee, [iConanl, 

McGl , Malcolm, 

McGhee, Mary, 
Mc(}hec, Mnrray, 
McGhee, Thomas, 
Mc(.ihee, William, 
Mc(}rc,n()r, James L., 
McCJreji'or, John Alpine, 
McGreii'or, INIary S. . 
Mclntyre, Annie, 
McKean, Anna B., 



No. 


Niimc. 


No. 


1386 


McKean, Franklin B., 


1340 


«{)() 


McKean, ITcnry J., 


1343 


(IIH 


McKean, Josejth B., 


13:50 


()!t:i 


McKetui, Katharine, 


134:^ 


685 


IMcKean. Marietta li., 


1344 


1388 


McKnight, Harry, 


1281 


1287 


McKnight, Uoltert, 


1280 


t3i)(> 


IVIcKnight, Walter M., 


1282 


138!) 


Mc]j(Nin, Annie L., 


1338 


(186 


McLean, Charles J., 


1337 


!»3;{ 


McLean, Frederick V., 


i:541 


4:58 


McLean, John A., 


755 


8!)6 


McfiCii.:, John S., 


18:^6 


8s)8 


McLeiin, John Wilson, 


756 


930 


McLean, fjangdon H., 


i8;;o 


445 


McLean, Lill'e H., 


i:54(; 


440 


Mclican, Maiy, 


721 


8i)S) 


McLellan, Margaret F., 


i;^94 


8i)5 


McMiirdoe, Aston E., 


1405 


025 


McMurdoc, A. Keith, 


1407 


4:50 


McMnrdoe, V., 


1404 


441 


MciArnrdoe, Kathleen, 


1400 


1895 


Mead, Elizaheth, 


1130 


030 


Meredith, Alice L., 


1191 


1:596 


Meredith, Clarenci' G.. 


1104 


444 


Meredith, (\)ll)orne P., 


1197 


4:56 


Meredith, Ednnind A,, 


1189 


033 


Meredith, Ednnmd A., 


1108 


487 


Meredith. Ethel C, 


1195 


443 


Meredith, Harriet M., 


1193 


443 


Meredith, Mary E., 


1100 


034 


Meredith, .Morna 1., 


1196 


807 


Merr'gold, Susan, 


550 


i;m6 


Mesbuin. Charles, 


i:i53 


807 


Mesham, Charles E., 


1:558 


800 


Mesham, Margaret B., 


1:554 


812 


Miller, Harrison, 


665 


814 


Miller. Tfenry H., 


667 


818 


Miller, Samuel .1., 


(166 


811 


Milliken. Ennline P., 


3272 


808 


Milliken, Sarah, 


2160 


806 


Millspaugh, Frances E., 


1368 


810 


Millspaugh, Frederick W., 


1365 


1309 


Mills|^lugh, Pethuel. 


1363 


1:501 


Millspaugh, Silas C, 


1364 


1:500 


JLllspaugh, William W., 


1366 


1188 


Morgiui. EuiMce B., 


(p.)iir 


^341 


Morris, Content, 


1641 



DKSrKNDANTS, KTr., MKAIUNO OTHKK H.HXAMKS. 



Name. 
Mott, Botsoy, 
Moiintiiin. Aiiiic M., 
Mil 111 Con I, .Til 11,. 15. (M,..s. 

Naiitou, Au^'ii.stus, 
Niintoii, Augustus AI., 
Niuiloii, Edward, 
Nun ton, I [any W., 
Naiitoii, ircrhcrt ('., 
NiiiKou, John (}., 
fianton, Lilian (.'., 
Nan ton, Mary K., 
Nash, Mary," 
Nasli, Sarah, 
N caving, Coylii„hi. 
Ncilson, Marion, 
Northrop. Mary E., 

Odoll, Isabella, 
Odell, Sophia, 
Ord, Arthur H., 
<^i-<l. Oraveii !{., 
Old, Edmund T., 
Ord, Plorcnco A.' 
Old, Lewis U., 
Old, Lewis W., 
Old, Louisa, 
Old, Violet L, 
Old, William n., 
O'Kcilly. JOmma,' 
Osborn, Aurelia, 
Osbon,, Caroline K., 
OMb.irn, Charles, 
Osliorn, Charles p., 
Osborn, Ciiireiiee F., 
Osborn, Eliza Ann, 
Osborn, lOli/abeth, 
Osborn, Plnathan, 
Osboru, Fran(>es M., 
Osborn, Proderiek, ' 
Osborn, George, 
Osborn, George L., 
Osborn, George Oglevle, 
Osborn, Jlenry, 
Osliorn, Ilosnier H., 
Osborn, Jaeob, 
Osborn, Julia Ann, 
Osborn, Julia Esther, 



N'«>. j Niiiii.'. 
1055 I Osborn, Lewis, 
58!) ; Osborn, Lewis, 
(!>.) 11)5 I Osborn, Liieinda, 
I Osborn, Maria, 
111*8 j Osborn, Maria F., 
1303 Osborn, Afary E.,' 
1205 I Os])orn. Prosper H., 
Osborn, Ste|)hen W.. 
Osborn, William, 
Osborn, William J., 
Osborn. William J. [ 
Osborn, William Wright, 
Otis, Mary Pilsbufy, " 
Overbangh. Mary, 



Palmer, AdaM., 
Palmer, Ch.irles, 
I'alnier, diaries Wm., 
J'a liner, Ethel M. , 
I'almer, Helen A.. 
Palmer, Louise C., 
Palmer, Mary Anna, 
Palmer, Robert E., 
Parker, iMargaret 
Parker, Mary, 
Paikman, Itebeeea, 
Parsons, Julia, 
j Patridge, Mary A., 
j Peabody, Elizabeth, 
j Pfarc, Nalhalia, 
I Peek, Albert \V., 
I Peck, Charles A.', 
P<'ck, Cornelia P., 
Peck, Elizabeth .1., 
Peck. Elizabeth J., 
Peck, Jabciz U., 
Peck, Mary, 
Peek, Nelson A.. 
Peck, Nelson J., 
Peck. Xelsoii J., 
Perkins. Phebe, 
Per Lee, Elsie, 
Peters, Albert Jarv.s, 
P'-'ters, Hannah Owen, 
Peters, Harriet Emma' A., 
Peters. Harriet Augusta, 
P<'»«'rs, Hugh Albert, 
Peters, John IJ., 



No. 
365 
706 
1555 
267 
698 
708 
1558 
7();{ 
268 
704 
705 
1560 
2117 
1071 

855 
853 
860 
857 
858 
856 
854 
861) 
216;{ 
2164 
1!»85 
616 
!)!)!) 
2018 
1981 
761 
758 
764 
762 
1 ;!;{() 
757 
621 
75!) 
760 
76;i 
22:il 
10-11 
424 
M8 
419 
425 
426 
417 



11 



I 



i 



1 


344 


[XOKX.— 


-PAI{T II. 


• 


H 


Name. 


No. 


Name. 


No. 


^H 


PcUm-s, Mary, 


621 


Quackenbush. AVilliam N., 


1079 


■H 


1 Peters, Miiry ElizahcMi, 


418 






JPI 


' IVters, Miiry Elizabeth, 


421 


Racy, Anne, 


456 


r 


f 1 


J^'ters, Raeliel, 


1221 


Hanney, Margaret, 


1206 


' 1 




Pelers, Sally llaunah, 


422 


Hamiy, Percey. 


273 


f 


1 


Peters, Sainiul Jarvls, 


420 


UatelilTe, Martha M., 


1138 




\ 


Peters, William Birdsy, 


42;{ 


Raymond, (-atharine, ' 


56 




]-■ 


Pierce, Siisauiiali, 


2()(5i) 


Raymond, Helen M., 


1029 




' ■ ■ 


Pinekney, Echvard A., 


<r)4 


Raymond, Mary, 


715 




; 1 


Pinckney, Elizabeth T., 


1334 


Rea<l, Mary, 


894 


1 


i '; 


Pinekney, Family, 


753 


Reeder, Maria. 


2179 


jm^j^ 


I'iiH'kney, Emily A., 


745 


Remp. Phcbe, 


1811 


'"^H 


i Pinekney, Frances II., 


745) 


Reynolds, Abby A.. 


614 


^^^1 


I'inckney, Henry W., 


1332 


Reynolds, Harriet P.. 


615 


^^H 


Pinekney, Ilobart, 


750 


ReyiM)lds, Jane Eliza, 


613 


mm 


Pinckney, James W., 


744 


Reynolds, J. P., 


612 


\ 


Pinckney, James W., 


751 


Reynolds, Sarah J., 


1270 


f . ; 


Pinckney, Jennie A., 


752 


Rice. Ij\icretia Everett, 


2195 




IMnekney, Jennie E., 


1331 


Richards, Anna B. , 


2220 


r ■ ^ 


Pinckney, Lillian M., 


1333 


Ri<-hards. Bartlett. 


2223 


Pinckney, Louisa J., 


746 


Richards. I)e Forest. 


2219 


' j ■ 


Pinckney. ilicajah, 


748 


Richards, Jarvis, 


2221 


* 


Pinckney, Sanmel J., 


747 


Richards, J. Ue Forest. 


2217 




Place, Eliza. 


1893 


Richards, Sarah M.. 


2222 


] 
j 

f ; I 


Plait. Lucy. 


506 


Richards, William J., " 


2218 


Phitt, Rebecca, 


2389 


Richardson, Augusta, 


1284 


Powell, Mary Boyles, 


446 


Richardson, Ezra, 


1283 




Powell. Mary Boyles. 


593 


Rider, Charles. 


235 


, 1 


I'ratt. Sarah B., 


1322 


Rider, (}eorge. 


232 


Prescott, Caroline M. , 


1345 


Rider, Hannah. 


234 


'■ 


Preston, Abigail. 


1699 


Rider. .lolin. 


226 


> 


Prissiek, Charles I)., 


1379 


Rider, John, 


227 




Prissick. Frances H., 


1380 


Rider, Mary (Polly), 


228 




Pri.ssick, Marunret J., 


1381 


Ride,-. Hachv'l. 


230 




Prissick. UoI»ert M., 


1383 


Rider, Ralph. 


231 


i 


Prissick, Thomas B., 


1378 


Rider, Stephen. 


229 




Prissick, Thomas II., 


1382 


Rider. William Harvey, 


233 




I'roudfoot, Alexander, 


1098 


Ridgevvay, Sarah, 


538 




Proudt'oot. Alexander, 


1104 


Robe, Emily, 


1039 




Proudfoot, Amelia, 


1103 


Robe, Harriet, 


1040 




Proudfoot, Elizabeth. 


1102 


l{obe, Lucian P., 


H)38 




Proudfoot , Frederick, 


1100 


Robertson, (Catharine, 


861 




Proudfoot, Mary, 


1101 


Robison, Mary A., 


2177 


, '' 


I'roudfoot. Thomas, 


1105 


Robinson, Joanna, 


826 


— ' 


Proudfoot, William S., 


1099 


Rodgers, Mary L., 


1730 








Rogers, Bethsheba, 


380 


- r 


Quuckeubush, Jeanette, 


1078 


Rogers, Deborah, 


361 




•■1 i' 


Quackenbush, Tunis, 


1077 


Rogers, Elizabeth, 


1H99 



DKSOKNDANTS, 

Name. 
Hogois, Laviiiia, 
Roircrs. Lucy A., 
liijssell. Miii-Hiiret P., 
Rust, Adeliue, 

Salter, Elizabeth, 
Sanimis, Annie, 
Sandford, Betsey. 
SanfonI, Abigai!, 
Sanfoni, Marietta, 
Siiyles, Julia E., 
Sfurritt, Edgar Alonzo, 
Scarritt, Eleota E., 
Scarritt, George Hall, 
Searritt, f4iistavus A.', 
Searritl, James J., 
Scarritt^ Nancy Aiirelia. 
Scarritt, Nancy Aurelia, 
Scarritt, Richard, 
Scarritt, Sarah A., 
Scarritt, Sarah A., 
Schernierhorn, .Ararearct, 
Scott, Sarah, 
Scovel. Mary L., 
Scudder, Alnieda B., 
Sears, Clara M., 
Sears, Edwin, 
Sears, James E., 
Sears, .Mary A. , 
Seaver, Maria, 
Seymour, Alvah, 
Seymour, Carrie Taber, 
Seymour, Charles J., 
Seymour, Charlotte F., 
Seymour, Charlofi,. J.,' 
Seymour, Charlotte J.,' 
Seymour, (ieorge L., 
Seymour, Jemiie W., 
Seymour, John, 
Seymour, Kate R., 
Seymour, .Afartha. 
Seymour, Martha B., 
Seymour. .^lary A., 
Seymour, Mi\ry Ami, 
Seymour, Sanuiel J.. 
Seymour, Samuel John, Jr., 
Seymom-. Sarah E., 
Seymour. William P. 
44 



ETC., BKAKIXG OTIIKH Sl'K.NAMES. 345 



No. 

m 

765 

204 

2:m 



2012 

17^7 
290 
217 
000 I 
141!) ■ 
1577 ' 
1572 
1576' 
1571 i 
1575 j 
156!) 
1570 
1568 
1573, 
. 15741 
1561 ' 
2056 I 
837 
1838 { 
1040 I 
1048 I 
1050 
1051 
1697 
482 
1005 
481 j 
483 j 
1000 I 
1002 ! 
1008 
1007 
479 
1003 
44 
1001 
999 
100! 
4S4' 
1006 1 
480 I 
1009 ! 



Nnnip. 
Seymour, \Villiam Woods, 
Shalinon, Ida, 
Sherwood, Antiie, 
Sherwood, Julia, 
Slirievc, MartJia, 
Skynner, Caroline, 
Skyniier, Eleanor I., 
Skynner, Emily M., 
Skynner. Francis l!. 
Skynner, Henry, 
Skymier. Heiiry J., 
Skynner, William J., 
Slawson. Sally. 
Smitli, Abigail, 
SmitJi, Clarence B., 
Smitli, Cornelius B., 
Smith. Eli/ab<-th, 
Smith, Ellen J., ' 
Smith. Everett P.. 
Smith, Harriet. 
Smith. Jemima. 
Smith. .Mabel W., 
Smith, Polly, 
Smith. Sarah. 
Sparhawk, M;u-v P.. 
Sparliawk, MarV Pepperrell 
^ Spooner. Kli/abeth Sparhawk 
Sprattin. Frances S. L. (Lady) 
Starr. Frederick William. ' ' 
Starr, Maria Gore, 
Starr. Rachel. 
Stebbins. Hannah, 
Steeve. .Mouisa T.. 
Stewart. Alexander, 
Stewart. Alexander J., 
I Stewart. Alice E.. 
j Stewart, Caroline M.. 
•Stewart. Charles Edward, 
j Stewart. Frances M. A., 
j Stewart. Frederick, 
Stewai-t. Fre<ierick W., 
Stewart. George A., 
Stewart. Grace C, ' 
Stewart. .Afargaret 31. , 
Stewart, 3Iary Long. ' 
Stewart. AViliiani Thatcher. 
Stinson. .Mary. 
Stone. Isabella L.. 



No. 

994 
1433 
2290 

578 
784 



1002 
1134 
1186 
1188 
1133 
1136 
1137 
167 
1486 
2317 
2314 
1957 
1013 
2316 
1303 
1745 
2315 
2408 
850 
2081 
2134 
2104 
180 
840 
841 
68 
183 
1708 
797 
798 
800 
805 
803 
1401 
804 
1402 
1400 
1403 
799 
802 
801 
1112 
I085i 




^^^mmmmmmmmmmum 



^ 



1 I 



INDKX. — PAKT II. 



Name. 
Sunderland. Mary. 
Swlt't, Elizalietli. 
Swords. Edward Jcnncr. 
Swords, Edward Jenner, 
Swords, William Yorhcos. 
Swyninu'r. Anni'tte. 

TiiLcr, Alvah S., 
Talu'r, Amnion C. 
Tuber, Caroline M., 
Tiiber. Charles J.. 
Taber, Charlotte L.. 
Taber, Edward M, , 
Taber, Eugene D, , 
Taber, Helen M,, 
Taber, Mary B., 
Taintor, Elizabeth. 
Taylor. Cyrel, 
T"ylor. I)ai)liany, 
Taylor. Frances A.. 
Taylor, Frances A.. 
Taylor, John K, . 
Taylor, Mowbray, 
Taylor. Seaton F., 
Tench, Frederick. 
Teiu'h. Frederica. 
Tench, .Mary. 
Thompson, Sarah Ann. 
Thompson, Elena Anita C., 
Todd, Ambrose, 
Todd, Ambrose S., 
Todd, Charles J.,. 
Townsend, Charles J. . 
Townsend. Elizabeth. 
Townsend, Gill)ert, 
Townsend, J. Thomas, 
Townsend. Samuel H.. 
Trevet. Elizabeth (Jlrs.), 
Tyug. Anita E.. 
Tyng, Charles. 
Tyng, Charles. 
Tyng. Charles D., 
Tyng. Dudley A.. 
Tyng. Dudley A.. 



No. 
2020 
17T 
1480 
1481 
1482 
1370 

988 

!I84 

986 

987 

985 

091 

989 

992 

990 

2045 

1184 

1615 

732 

1182 

1181 

1185 

1183 

947 

949 

948 

978 

1472 

156 

157 

158 

955 

1857 

950 

953 

954 

2018 

1295 

1293 

1473 

1294 

1475 

1476 



Name. 
Uhl, John II.. 
I'hl, Margaretta C., 
Uhl, Uu.ssel' J.. 
Upham. Frances. 

Vail, Robert H., 
Vail, Robert C. 
Verrill. I,,ucy A.. 
Voorheos, Abrain. 
Voorhees, Willard P., 

Waddle. Barbara. 
Walker. Frances S.. 
Warner. Dudley J., 
Wa ner, Elam. 
Warner. Elam, 
Warner, Frank E.. 
Warner, (Jeorge Rolland, 
W^arner, Harriet, 
Warner, Orchard, 
Walerbury, Charles A., 
Walerbury, Elizabeth (4.. 
Waterliury. Elizabeth J., 
Walerbury, Jonathan, 
Vraterbury, Lucy S., 
Waterbury. ^laria G.. 
Walerbury. Nelson Jarvis, 
Waterbury. Nelson J. , 
Waters, Mary. 
Waters. Penelope, 
Weed, Alvah. 
Weed. Frances M.. 
Weed, James II.. 
Vreed. James Jarvis. 
Weed. Robert. 
Weed, William Harvey. 
Wellman, Annie A., 
Wellnian, Annie H. , 
Wellman, Betsey Ann, 
Wellman, Caroline, 
Wellman, Charles II.. 
Wellman, Charles II.. 
Wellman, Edward J.. 
Wellman, Edwin II., 
Wellman, Frederick. 



No. 
2200 
2202 
2201 
1649 

1383 

1884 

2255 

546 

547 

921 

842 

786 

737 

730 

738 

740 

628 

735 

711 

712 

1307 

709 

1300 

1308 

710 

1309 

1997 

2372 

503 

505 

500 

501 

504 

503 

1257 

1247 

251 

250 

1248 

1256 

1250 

1260 

253 





Tyng. (icorge. 


1297 


NVellman. George Frederick, 


635 




Tyng, George. 


1474 


Wellman, George H., 


1246 




Tyng. Julia G.. 


1296 


Wellman. Henry Honu'r, 


(i:iH 




Tyng, Julia G.. 


1298 


Wellman. Herbert J., 


1201 


i 

1 











DESCKNDANTS. ETC., BKAKIXG OTi.KK SI li.NAMKS. 



Wc'liiioiX', 
VYetinoro, 
Wetmore. 



Nami'. 
Wcllniiin. Homer Henry. 
Wcllman. Jcdcdiah, Jr , 
Wellmaii, Julia 11, 
Wellnuin. Maria W.. 
WcIIiiian, >rary X.. 
Wcllman, McrritI H., 
^^^'llman, Tiieodore C, 
AVcllman, Thomas C. 
Wcllman, AVilliam Alfred, 
Wcllman. William Walson, 
West, Ann, 
Wctmorc, Tliarlos F., 
Wctmorc, Darwin W.. 
Wetmore. Elizal)etli A., 
Elizabctli J.. 
Emma J.. 
(Jeor<j:e Thompson. 
Wetmore. (icorcic W.. 
Wetmoi-c. .Mary F. . 
Wetmore, Mary J.. 
Wetmore, Sylvia E., 
Wetmore. Truman S>. . 
W\-tmore, William Jarvi.s. 
Wheeler. Ann. 
A^'heeler, Annie L.. 
Wliecler, JJcatrice. 
Wheeler, David E. , 
Wheeler, David E. 
Wheeler. Ethel, 
Wheeler, Everett P., 
Wheeler, (ieor<>-c, 
AVlieeler, Ueoriiina (■., 
Wheeler. Mary Iv, 
AVheeler. >Fary II.. 
Wheeler. WiniCrcd P., 
White. Charily, 
White. C'harle'^.Iav. 



No. I Xnnif. 
63!) j White. Elizabeth. 
248] While. Harriet 
1255 j White, Jluldah. 
1252 I White, Jonatlian, 

Wliiie, Marsiaret Jarvi.s, 
White, Mary, 
White, Mary Ann, 
White, Prudence, 
White, Susan Jarvi.s, 

j Wliitlock, Sarah Ann, 

I Whitman, Charity. 
Whitman, Deboiali, 
Whitman. Hannah, 
Whitney, Sarah, 
AVick.s, Elizabeth, 
Wicks. I'lKvbe,. 
WiH>ur, Emily. 
Wilbur, Harriet A.. 
Wiley. Emma. 
WilliauLs. Andnjw J., 
Williams. Catharine. 

William.s. Daniel, 

Williams, Euretla M., 
Williams. Mary M.. 

Williams. Nancv. 

Williams. Silas ]{.. 

Williams. William, 

Winther, Maiy S, . 

Wood. Adah L.. 

Woodbury, E. D.. 

Woodbury, Koger A., 

AVoodbury. Saiiford J.. 

Woods. Xancy. 

Wright, Mary. 

Wright. Mary Jane. 

Vieldini., Allie, 



1258 

637 

1251 

1253 

6;i6 

24i) 
1835 
478 
475 
075 
980 
077 
!»70 
477 
981 
983 
474 
473 
476 
2383 
230!) 
2:!13 
2213 
2311 
2310 
2215 
795 
796 
2214 
2216 
2312 
1758 
544 



;U7 

No. 
310 
542 
385 
541 
545 
1515 
702 
005 
543 
344 
1862 
1801 
1743 
95 
2423 
1943 
1024 
1400 
2183 
1640 
2414 
1037 
1650 
1638 
1636 
1639 
1635 
741 
1067 
1327 
1328 
1329 
993 
1488 
867 

1301 




Ai 



11 ' II 



i 



f ■- 






f . , i 



1 



ERRATA. 



Piige 2, last line. F'/r iiii, read une. 

" 35,4th " Fw Sir Patterson, rf«^? General Pattison. 

" 45, 1st " For Farmer, read Fiivmnr. 

" 59, No. 395. For Gustavus Ratchfonl, 7'ead Gustavus Rochfort; 
and again, on same imge, 3(1 line from bottom, for ('apt. R, H. 
M. Racliford, rmd Capt. R. II. M. Rociifort. 

" 99, Record 390. For 7 cliildrcn, read 8. 

" 118, Sketch of Milton Barlow .liirvis, .5th line. For Canastoke, read 
Cana.slota. 

" 151, Record 1053. For i chMren, read 5. 

" 184, Running Title, i'b?' Descendants of Thomas, /•««? Descendants 
of Jonatliaii. 

" 204, Sicetch of Leonard Jarvis, Oth line. For Asaph Hone, read 
Asaph Stone. 

" 232, 14th, 25th, and 31st lines. For Rev. Dr. Buck, read Rev. Dr. 
Breck. 



Family Record. 



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