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Full text of "Murray's illustrated guide to Montreal and vicinity [microform] : containing map of Montreal, description of places of interest, cab tariffs, postage rates, business cards of representative business houses, street directory, &c."

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Ti ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS 

Is the oldest illustrated weekly published in the world, established 
y at London in 1842. It is now one of the most extensive illustrated 
publications of the times ; covering, in circulation- and events, both 
hemispheres ; having English, American and Australian editions — al- 
together reaching over one million readers weekly. 

The American edition, published in New York by the London pub- 
lishers, differs only from the London one by the substitution of 
"American matters of Interest " and "Americans Abroad," esj)ecially 
prepared for the Ignited States and Canada. 

The character of the publication needs no commendation — its record 
is among those things which are established. 

There is no illustrated paper published more absolutely indispens- 
able to the well chosen library, whether public or private, or more 
desiral)le and appropriate for the cultivated home. 

Americans and Canadians, recognized the world over among the 
greatest travelers and best informed people on the globe, find Thk 
Illustratkd London News (American edition) full of interest and 
illustrations of events abroad which they appreciate and would 
greatly miss. 

Subscribers to Thp: Illustrated London News (American edition) 
may count upon receiving, in addition to the first illustrations of 
prominent events, a host of separate articles by leading writers and 
other illustrations by the best artists and engravers. 

In addition to the fifty-two numbers of the weekly edition, there 
is issued special Midsummer and Christmas numbers with elegant 
wood engravings and colored plates. 

TERMS, when purchased et News-stand: Regular Issue, 10 cents; 
Midsummer and Christmas numbers, each, 50 cents; making a total 
of $6.20 per annum. SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, only $5.00. 

Subscriptions received by authorized subscription agenciea, or at the 

Publication Office. ADDRESS, 

iHCt^AM fit^OTHEf^S, Publishers, 

ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS, (aueeican edition) 

World Building, New York. 



*A GUIDE HOOK THAT Wy.L OUIDK." — NcW York TiltU'S. 



N'S 

By CHARLES G. D. ROBERTS. 

A Complete Hand-book of Information oonoernin^ Eastern 

Canada and Ne^vfoundland, iucludingr full Descriptions 

of Routes, Points of Interest, Summer Resorts, 

Fishingr Places, &c. 

'With Maps, numerous Illustrations and an Appendix sivingr 
Fish & G-ame Laivs, and Lessees of Trout & Salmon Rivers. 

12MO. Flexible Cloth, $1.25. 

"A handsome, handy, and entertaining panorama of Eastern Canada and New- 
foundland." — Ihooklyn Eagle. 

•• Handsomely gotten up, and with its many maps, time-tables, etc., will be 
found of great service." — Philadelphia I'clegraph. 

'• In securing Professor Roberts as editor, tlic publishers have insured its excel- 
lence from the point of view of correct, clear, and jjicturesfjue English." — 
Christian L nion. 

"Contains everything necessary to equip the sportsman for a season's enjoy- 
ment." — journal of Comtnerce. 

"Evidently I'rofessor Roberts is an enthusiastic sportsman of the nobler sort — 
a man to whom fish or game is but an excuse to go somewhere and get most of his 
enjoyment on the way. . . . Hesides being a good compendium of fact and fancy, 
this guide is a capital picturc-l)ook, the illustrations being numerous, selected with 
an eye to the i)ictures(|ue, and — wonder of wonders — there is not u hotel among 
them." — New York Herald. 

"The book is much more than an ordinary guide-book, possessing a literary 
nterest throughout while fulfilling .idmirably its primary purpose." — Toronto Mail. 

"Messrs. Appleton e-^ Company must be congratulated on i)ersuading Mr. 
Roberts to dowliat he has done. That he could do it weU and has done it well, 
and that consequently his work is highly to be recommended, goes without saying 
all the more also because here and there he has allowed hi;^ jjoetic vein to outcrop, 
as it were, and has treated his readers to poetry and prose illustrative of the scenes 
aad localities he has described." — Toronto Week. 

For lale by all Boosellers t or will be sent by maili on receipt of pricoi by the Publlsherii 

D. APPLETON it CO., 1, 3, and 5 Bond St., New York. 

- ■ ■ -• ^ *- ■■'■■ — 

O^^XH PRESS: o^^ 

Appleton's Oanadian Guide Book, Part II, Western 
Oanada. By Ernest IngersoU. 



i!- 




3 




*'■-•"""•"■•" ^^' 



DOMINION SQUARE AND WINDSOR HOTEL. 



. 



RAILWAY TIME TABLE. 



RAILWAY TIME TABLE-Corrected to Ist April, 1892. 

Trains Leave Bonaventure as follows: 

WEST — Chicago, Detroit, Toronto and Intermediate stations, 9.30 a.m., 8.40 p.m.» 

11.55. Hrockville (mixed), 1.30 p.-ni. Cornwall, 5.00 p.m. 
Ottawa, Hawkesbury and Malone, via Canada Atlantic, 9.00 a.m., 4.55 p.m. 
EA.ST— Portland, Boston, Quebec, St. John and Halifax, 8 a.m. Campbellton, 

Quebec and Portland, 10.15 p.m.- Island Pond, Arthabaska, Richmond and 

(Quebec, 4p.m. Actonvale, 5.35 p.m. Richmond, Island Pond vS^ Quebec, 6a. m 
SOUTH — New York, by D. d-^ H. R.R., via Rouse's Point, 8.25 a.m., 5.20 p.m. 
New York, by C.V. R. R., Boston via Fitchburg, 7.30 a.m., 5.30 p.m. Boston 

via Lowell, New York via Springfield, 8.50 a.m. Boston and New York via 

Springfield, 8.35 p.m. 4.30 p.m., St. Johns, Stanbridge and St. Albans. 
Hemmingford, Howick, Ormstown, Huntingdon, Fort Covington, Valleyfield and 

Beauharnois, 3.45 p.m. Mixed for Hemmingford Huntingdon and Massena 

Springs, 6.20 a.m. 
Local train for Chambly, Richelieu, Marieville, Farnham,(;ranby(2~= Waterloo, 5p.m 
Special train daily, at 5.15 p.m., for Dorval, Valois, Point Claire, Beaconsfield 

and .St. Anne's. 

Suburban Train Service: 
For Lachine wharf— 5.25, 6.35, 7.50, 9.05 and 12 noon, 2.00 p.m., 3. 30, 5.05, 

6.20 p.m., and 9.00 p.m. (11.20 p.m., Mon., Wed. and Sat.) 
For Lachine — 9.30 a-m., 1.30 and 5.00 p.m. 
For St. Henri, Point St. Charles, St. Laml)ert, 6.00 6.20, 6.40, 7.30, 8.00, 8.25, 

8.30, 8.50 a.m., 12.10, (2.00 Sat. only) 3.45, 4.05, 4.30, 5.00, 5.20, 5.35, 

6.30, 8.35, 10.15, 1 1.20 p.m. 
For Longueuil, 6.40, 8.30 a.m., 12 noon, (2.00 Sat. only) 5.00, 6.30, 1 1.20 p.m. 



F'or St. Laurent — 7.40 a.m., 12 noon, 5.25 p.m. 
For Sl. Ann's and Yaudreuil, 9.00, 9.30 a.m., 1.30, 



5.00, 6.15, 8.40, 11.55 p.m. 



F"or Valois, 1.30 and 5 p.m. Dorval, 1.30 and 5 p.m. (* daily except Monday.) 

Trains Leave Windsor Street Station as follows: 

For St. John's, Farnham, etc., 9.00 a.m., 4.00 p.m., 5.40 p.m., 8.15 p.m. ^"7.50 

p.m. Saturdays excepted.) 
For Boston, Portland, Manchester, etc., 9.00 a.m. and 8.15 p.m. 
For Sherbrooke, 9 a.m., 4 p.m. (7.50 p.m. except Saturdays). Lake Megantic, 

St. John, N.B., and Halifax, N.S., 7,50 p.m. (Saturdays excepted). 
For Newport, etc., 9 a.m., 5.40 p.m. and 8.15 p.m. 

For Ste. Anne's, Yaudreuil, Rigaud and all intermediate stations, 5.10 p.m. 
F'or Toronto, Smith's Falls, Brockville, Kingston and Peterboro, 9.20 a.m., 8.45 p.m 
For Detroit and Chicago, 8.45 p.m. 

F'or Ottawa and Buckingham, 7.50 a.m., 11.45 "•'"• ^"'^ 4- '5 P-m. 
For Sault St. Marie, St. Paul, Minneapolis, etc., 11.45 ^•'"• 

Leave Dalhousle Square Station: 

For (Quebec, 8.25 a.m. and 10 p.m. For Quebec and ]>oints on Intercolonial Ry. to 
Campbellton, N.S., 10 p.m. For Three Rivers, 8.25 a.m., 5. 15 p.m., 10 p.m. 
For Joliette, St. Felix de Valois, St. Gabriel, etc., 5.15 p.m. 

F«H' Ottawa, 8.50 a.m., 4.40 p.m., 8.40 p.m. 

For Winnipeg, Vancouver, Victoria, 8.40 p.m. 

For St. Lin, St. Kuslache, 5.30 p.m. For St. Jerome, 8.50 a.m., 5.30 p.m. 

For St. Rose, St. Therese and intermediate stations, 3 p.m., 4.40 p.m., 5.30 p.m. 
(Saturday, 1.30 p.m. instead of 3 p.m.) 



] 



BUSINESS HOFJSES OF MONTRKAL. 



5.40 p.m., 

p.m. 

ipbellton, 
Tiond and 
ebec,6a.in 
5.20 p.m. 
Jioston 

York via 
Ibans. 
yfield and 

Massena 

loo, 5 p.m 
aconsfield 



•30, 5-oS» 

.00, 8.25, 
•20, 5.35, 

1.20 p.m. 

'.55 P-ni- 
londay.) 

.m. ^7.50 
Megantic, 



,8.45 p.m 



lial Ky. to 
., 10 p.m. 



Messrs. W. DRYSDALE & CO. 

Invite the attention of Ministers, Students, S. S. Teachers and heads 
of families to their choice and well assorted stock of 



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Theoiogical, Classical and Miscellaneous, comprising every 

department of Literature. 

UNIVERSITY & COLLEGE TE.\T-BOOKS a Specialty, and furnished at lowest prices. 

Choice Office and P'amily Stationery, Sermon Paper, Student's Note- 
books, etc. Assorted Parcels made up and sent to any 
part of the Dominion or .United States. 

GOOD SOCIETY IN BOOKS. 

** We may by good fortune, obtain a glimpse of a great poet, and hear the 
sound of his voice ; or put a c|uestion to a man of science, and be answered good- 
humoredly. We may intrude ten minutes' talk on a cabinet minister, or snatch, 
once or twice in our lives, the privilege of throwing a bouquet on the path of a 
Princess, or arresting the kind glance of a (^ueen. And meantime there is a society 
continually open to us, of people who will talk to us as long as we like ; talk to us 
in the best words they caH choose : and this society, because it is so numerous and 
so gentle, and can be kept waiting round us all day long, not to grant audience, but 
to gain it. Kings and Statesmen lingering patiently in those plainly furnished and 
narrow anterooms our bookcase shelves, we make no account of that company, 
perhaps never listen to a word they would say all day long." — Kitskiu. 

A choice assortment of such companions at DRYSDAI.K'S HOOK STORE, 
232 St. James Street, Montreal. Send for Catalogue, liooks sent by mail are pro- 
tected and secure'y wrapped, and will reach their destination in perfect order. Hooks 
mailed, postage paid, to any part of the word, on receipt of price. Remittance 
should be made by money order, draft or registered letter to 

W. DRYSDALE <fe CO., 

Publisherts, Booksellers and Stationers, -wttoipsaie dnd setafi, 

232 St. James Street and 2366 St. Catherinc Street, 

THREE MINUTES WALK FROM THE WINDSOR. MONTREAL. 



|j,m. 
5.30 p.m. 



Orders taken for the Leading Magazines, Reviews and News- 
papers at the Lowest Rates. 

Catalofjfucs mailed 011 applieatiou. 



\ 




WINDSOR HOTEL. The Leading Hotel in the Dominion. 







A"N™,r-r'i- 



ST. LEON mmi WATER IS 11 SURE CURE 

l'"or Dyspepsip., Indi^'e^lion, Liver .unl Kidney Diseases, it 
will inlaliMy Cure Kheumalism, it is eii.^y to take and 

, contains nothing injurious to the System. This Water 
has been approved by all the Iriiicipal Dnctors in 
Canada. Circulars containing,' IMI'URTANT CER- 
'i'lK[( ATES sent free on ajiplication. 



This Celebrated Water is for sale by all Lead- 
ing Druggists and Grocers, and 
Wholesale and Retail by 

St. Leon Mineral Water Co., Ltd., 



Telephone 1432. 



54 Victoria Square, MONTREAL. 



BUSINESS HOUSES OF MONTREAL. 










C. ASHFORD, Bookseller, Stationer, 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 
800 Doivhester Street, - - MONTREAL. 



8 




WINDSOR HOTEL 



>J=oO^S>»<o- 




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66 




Windsor "^^ 



Has the world-wide reputation of ranking with the PALATIAL 
HOTELS of the world. With a situation unsurpassed for beauty 
and health, facing on Dominion Square, and in the vicinity of the 
famous Mount Royal Park. It is also within One Minute's Walk of 
the Grand Trunk and Canadian Pacific Railways. 



The Excellent Cuisine, Furnishings and Home-like comforts are such that the 
tourist will find in the "WINDSOR" a Model Hotel. 



GEO. iA£. SiA£ETT, 

MANAGER. 



MURRAY'S 



ILLUSTRATED GUIDE 



TO 

MONTREAL AND VICINITY 

CONTAINING 

Map of Montreal, Description of Places of Interest. 

Cab Tariff, Postage Rates, Business Cards of 

Representative Business Houses, Street 

Directory, &c. 



COMPILED AND COLLt.ED FROM THB MOST AITHENTIC SOORCHS BY 

N0RM:AN IMXJItK^Y. 




Mi*ga !isa*«iaMiBa leaaaiMfc** 



JVIFTH EDITIOK^ 



montreal: 

Norman Murray, 1'ublisiier, 
1892. 



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THE UNIVERSAL, 

238 AND 240 ST. JAMES STREET, 

:^^OI^^TE,E^x.. 





— IMl'ORTER OF — 

i-ine Fancy Goods, Novelties, 

^OUKS OF ABT. 

Leather Goods of all kinds, 

Art Metal Ware, Silver and Brass Ware. 

Fans, Opera, Field and Marine Glasses, 

Best Sheffield Cutler}^ Table and Piano Lamps, &c. 

Finest p]nglish and American Stationery,. 

Canadian Views of all Points of Li teres t, 

Canadian Souvenirs made on the premises, , 

"With a Large C .llection of Dolls, Toys, &c. Ac, 
on second floor. 

H^The largest assortment of goods to be found In 
Canada. '^Ml 

238 AND 240 ST. JAMES STREET, 

A few doorfi rroni Victoria N«iu»r4>. 



A.1T IlTDIA.liT LEQBITD 



-JLBOXTT 



THE ISLAND OF MONTREAL. 



The following very interesting legend and prophecy was at 
one time very common amongst the Mowhawk Indian8,Jthough now 
barely remembered : — 

Long, long ago there was a great lake where the Island of 
Montreal now stands, and the Mohawks dwelt upon its borders and 
were happy. Then bad people came and drove the Indians into 
the water, killing many of them ; and the great spirit, when ho saw 
the Mohawks so badly treated, raised up a country for them out of 
the lake and stocked it with game and fruits and maize, and gave it 
to the Mohawks ; but there was no mountain. Then the bad people 
came over to the Island and took possession of it, and drove the 
Mohawks away to the Isle of Jesus, which they made their hunting 
ground. Then when they stood on the shore one evening they saw 
a great fire leap up on the island, and there were dreadful peals of 
thunder, and terrible flashes of lightuing, and all the bad people 
Avere killed ; and after a while, when the smoke had cleared away, 
the Mohawks saw the Mountain, and they went back and took 
possession of the island ; where they lived happily until attacked by 
the Algonquins and Wyandots. Then the white man came and 
drove all the Indians away. This is the Legend. There is also a 
prophecy that one day the Mohawks shall see the fire break out in 
1 he mountain again, and that the whole Island of Montreal will 
sink, and the great lake again spread over the spot where the 
island now stands. The legend and the prophecy are pretty, and 
geological research may show pomo foundation for the upheaval. 



:--«»■■ 



St. James Dining Rooms, 

(LATE FRIEND'S DINING ROOMS,) 

518 ST. JAMES STREET. MONTREAL 



MEALS AT ALL HOURS. 

First class Furnished Rooms by the day, 
-week or month. 

MEALS 25c. 

Two Minutes' Walk from G. T. M. 
and C. P. JR. Stations. 

Don t forjel ttie No : 518 St James St. 

E. HILDITCH, 

Proprietor. 






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The Indian Pilot From Caughnawaga, 



TSi*wM»wnM 



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Published every Wednesday at 



— :761 .-. CRAIG /. STREET:— 



-418 • THEi- 



OLDEST dUTHOLlC WEEI^LY ^K^l\ 

IN CANADA. 

It is a welcome Weekly Visitor to Thousands of Families. 



Subscription Rate: (City) : $2.50. 

" (Country): $2.00 in advance. 



(( 



All kinds of Printing done at office of Publication. 

Special reductions to Clergy and Religious Institutions. 



(I 



Rally 'round the Flag, Boys !" 



• 



^ATOhf 




Patronize the Popular Printers ! 




f 11 MOW T F? F AL 




k:e!Y to atf a f 
— --- - *-4*» - 

No 8 Iw Pillar, . . a.II 

Nil .V Mi.iilr.i.l T..li,,Ki!iiii HMili- .. . I-I- 

N.> I t'lirli Tdb. Cfiiii Hli.lc. .4-1) 

Ni' ft 'rnnuiIiliiicSli.li. ... . 4-|f 

Nip. fi l.liriii«li,»m. HIi.le >».<! 

No, 10 AciMlii,.v<.f Music H.ii 

No. U C'iiihI'I'mikI' l>i|>it .. fl.J 

N.., I.t Cll,.,..!!;!,, I'u.illc Ill-lKlt ... I l-J 

No M--Vi(;toiii, sk.liiiK I'.i' k .1.11 

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Ni> IB M'liilri'il An'Tiii'in AlhMii! Alwi. (lull II.im:U' li.<; 

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Ni 19 Shaiiinrk l.noruK << UriiuiiilK anil 1riKk 1.4; 

No 3tl HiirhJuinH (lyniiiivsiuui 7.11 

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No W- I'liBt (•!«<■<■ H..I 

No, 2.1~Krf-nf'li I'ari^ii rliilrvli . h.K 

No 2I--Huiilfiur Holfl 15.11 

No al Hi l.nwp liw Hull S.J 

No. V- llillliioi^l llotil '9.|i 

No. 27 -Kich-'lirii Hol-l '..JB.J 

No, 88- AliHirifati Hoiinr . ,. ♦•It 

No. 89 AiW.iii lloM ,. i!'^. .'!.'!». K 

No 30- Ntw Vorii lliiiHp ..., ' 7,11 

No. 31-Hl IVtimCiilhiilriil ; ||.|| ' 

No .18 .Imniiu'iiCHniir Hi|iisreTobii|iiiuii Bliile .'. 111. J 

No XI Mu/r, iriiic«<l'Arnii-a| . f(,j 

No. 34 SnoWHhiirrii' Arrh y.j 

No :]6- HilntcrH'f.^nllili 7. J 

Any dfHinil placfiri ihi-ahovp liHt will liu fiMinil Willi in 
thf Minuri' ff.riiicil liy tlm !iiii » tirtwtcn the fipiin h 1 11 i.,|i 
HDil leticiH nil ri^ht Imml nidiMif tin? muiMf.r ' xuiii|ilr| 

IcH I'alacu, iu nquurp Nn. 5, iRlIrr H 



m 



^■ii 



I 




THE UNIVERSAL, 

238 AND 240 ST. JAMES STREET, 




% 




% 





rn 




-IMl'ORTKK OK — 



Fine Fancy Goods, Novelties, 

HOKKM OF ART. 

Leather Goods of all kinds. 

Art Metal Ware, Silver and Brass Ware. 

Fans, Opera, Field and Marine Glasses, 

Best Sheffield Cutlery, Table and Piano Lamps, &c. 

Finest English and American Stationery,. 

Canadian Views of all Points of Literest, 

Canadian Souvenirs made on the premises, , 

"With a Large Collection of Dolls, Toys, &c. &c., 
on second floor. 

tSTThe largest assortment of goods to be found in 
Canada, "^ic 

238 AND 240 ST. JAMES STREET, 

A few doors Troin Victorim S«iuar«>. 



in 



!'l 



MONTREAL PAST AND PRESENT. 



1 1 



" The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall 
lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and thefatling 
together ; and a little child shall lead them" — Isaiah. 



Rose-wreath and fleur-de-lys 
Shamrock and thistle be 
foincd to the maple tree 
Now and for aye. 

— John Rkade. 



MONTREAL PAST AND PRESENT. 

The City of Montreal, the commercial metropolis of the Dominion 
ot Canada, is built on an island of the same name, formed by the 
River Ottawa debouching into the Rivt-r St. Lawrence, at its western 
and eastern extremities, the former near St. Ann's, the latter at 
Bout de ITsle. The island is of a triangular shajjc, and is about 30 
miles long and 10 broad, situated in Latitude 45° 31' North, and 
Longitude 7cS° 35^ West and 250 miles above salt water. 

Montreal was founded on the 8th of ^L^,y, 1642, by ^Llisonneuve, 
107 years after the visit of Jacques Cartier and his crew in 1535. 
Jacques Cartier was the first Euroi)ean who visited the locality. On 
the arrival of Jacques Cartier there was an Lidian village calied 
Hochelaga on the site of the Montreal of today. The village was 
situated where the English Cathedral at the corner of University and 
St. Catherine Streets now stands. What is now known as Hochelaga 
was for many years a French town, two miles east of Montrerl, but 
is now joined to the City of Montreal. 

The first clearing for the city was made where tlie custom house 
now stands. The city proper is about 414 miles long by 2 broad, 
and over 200 miles of streets and lanes. Montreal is 315 miles near- 
er to Liverpool than the city of New York, and one-third of the whole 
distance, by way of the St. Lawrence, is in comparatively smooth 
water. The distance from Montreal to Chicago by the St. Lawrence 
system is 185 miles less than the distance from New \'ork to the 
same city. Montreal is 334 miles from Boston, 400 miles from New 
York, 845 miles from Chicago, and 2,750 miles from Liverpool. 

British troops were stationed at Montreal till 1870. The Barracks 
were situated where the C.P.R. Dalhousie Station now stands. The 
Military cemetery and powder magazine and store-rooms were on 
St. Helen's Island. 



12 



MONTREAL PAST AND PRESENT. 



Montreal surrendered to the British forces under Generals Murray 
and Amherst on the 8th Sept., 1760, a year after the capture of Que- 
bec. It was taken by the Americans on the 12th of November, 1775, 
and retaken by the British on the 15th of June, 1776. The English- 
speaking portion of the population were so disgusted with the Rebel- 
lion Losses Bill passed by the Liberals in 1847, that, when the Gov- 
crnor-(reneral. Lord Elgin, entered the Parliament House (erected 
where the St. Ann's Market now stands) on the 25th of April to give 
his assent to the measure, they gathered together from all quarters of 
♦ne city and entering the Parliament House they drove out the mem- 
bers and set fire to the building. That was the last parliament held 
in Montreal. One of the strangest features of this unfortunate affair 
is that some of the rankest Tories of that timehave joined themselves 
with the Liberals under Mr. Mercier since that time — Mr. Alfred 
Perry is one. 

The population of ]N[ontreal proper (Government census of 1891) 
was 216,650 or 245,971 including St. Henry, St. Cunegonde, Cote St. 
Antoine and Mile End. This is over 25 per cent increase during the 
last decade. Over one-half of the population are of French, one- 
fifth of L'ish, one-seventh of P'.nglish and one-seventeenth of Scotch 
origin, (bui the one-seventeenth of Scotch origin have as large a share 
in the enterprise and business of Montreal as any of the other nation- 
alities which form one-half, one-fifth, or one-seventh of the population) 
iind as to religion, about two-thirds are Roman Catholics. 'I'he gen- 
eral good feeling existing between parties of differeni shades of opinion 
renders Montreal less subject to party disturbances than other cities 
of the same population. This rule, of course, like every other rule, 
had one or two exceptions : but the following two instances show that 
the above rule has been very well followed. In the old limes, just 
after the Conquest, the Protestants used one of the Roman churches 
after the morning mass. Lor 20 years after 1766, the Church of Eng- 
land people occupied the Church of the Recollets every Sunday after- 
noon. The Presbyterians used the same church before 1792, and 
when the congregation moved to their first church in St. (rabriel 
Street, they presented to the priests of the Recollet Church a gift of 
vandles for the high altar, and of wine for the mass, as a token of 
good-will, and thanks for the gratuitous use of the church. 

The ])onsecours Church was very nigh being swept away, a few 
years ago. to make room for a railway station, but some Protestants, 
actuated by a love of the picturesque, and out of regard for the mem- 
ory of tlie good Sister by whom it was founded, made such a noise 
about it that the bishop interfered to prevent the sale. 



' 



i 



MONTREAT, PAST AND PRKSENT. 



'v> 



Murray 
of Que- 

Knglish- 
Rebel- 
le Gov- 
(erected 
to give 
irters of 
e mem- 
nt held 
affair 
?mselves 
Alfred 

)f 1891) 
Cote St. 
iring the 
ch, one- 
f Scotch 
: a share 
r nation- 
)u]ation) 
'he gen- 
" opinion 
er cities 
ler rule, 
low that 
les, just 
hurches 

of Eng- 
ly after- 
92, and 
Ciabrie! 

gift of 
:)ken of 

y, a fen- 
tstants, 
e mem- 
a noise 



•1 



I 



Louis Joseph Papineau who, with Wm, Lyon Mackenzie, took the 
lead in the troubles of 1837-8, had his head-quarters in Montreal. 

On the 9th of June, 1853, Father Gavazzi, a celebrated lecturer^ 
formerly a famous Roman Catholic priest, lectured against the Church 
of Rome in Zion Congregational Church (nov the Herald Building), 
and a riot ensued, in which about 40 persons were either killed or 
wounded. 

One of the most unfortunate events in the history of Montreal was 
the murder of Thomas Hacket, an Orangeman, on the 12th of July» 
1877, by a gang of Fenians, on Victoria Square, near the Queen's 
monument. Several of the bullet shot marks may yet be seen in the 
stone wall of the builduig now occupied by the Goodyear Rubber 
Company. 

The Bank of Montreal, the first bank in Canada, was opened in 
Montreal in 181 7. 

'j'he second steamer built on the continent of America was built 
at Montreal, by Mr. John Molson, and was called the "Accommoda- 
ticn." She made her first voyage in 36 hours, between Montreal and 
Quebec, on the 3rd and 4th November, 1809. 

From 1685 to 1801 Montreal was surrounded by a wall, extending 
along the site of Fortification Lane from Victoria Square to Dalhousie 
Square, at the Canadian Pacific Railway Depot. From Victoria 
Square the walls extended down to the river, about the site of McGill 
Street. The v:ity then was of a triangular shape, the small angle 
pointing towaids the east. At present the city is of a triangular shape, 
but the small angle points towards the west, it seeming to have 
l)een turned end for end. 

Montreal is less subject to epidemics than many other cities of the 
same size, although the small-pox got a hold of it in 1885, on account 
of the vast majority of the French-Canadians being prejudiced against 
vaccination, 'i'he number of deaths was 3,164 ; of these, 2.887 ^^^'re 
French-Canadians. i8t other Catholics, and 96 Protestants. 

A WORD ()!•■ ADVICF. 

If you dont wish to pay more than Irga' tender to the cabmen, you 
need not make any bargain before }'ou start to visit the jdaces of in- 
terest. Simply consult your watch and the cab tariff which you will 
find on another jjage of this book. If you carry United States silver 
change it at your hotel, wh.ere you will get full value for it; United 
States bank notes ])ass in Canada at full value, bul the silver dollar 
is only good for 80c. in some places. If you are an ( )ld Countr\ 
tourist change your gold at the banks, where y(>a will get full value 



14 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY, 



for it ; but keep your silver till you return if you do not wish to lose 
20 per cent on it. 

You may depend on all the advertisers in this book to deal fairly 
with you if you wish to trade with them. There are no advertisements 
of mean or sharp people in this book. 

While the publisher of this book does not deny that he wishes to 
make some money out of it, the first object he has in view is to give 
such information to the stranger or tourist as will be interesting and 
useful to him. As this is the only book of this kind that ever reached 
five editions in five years in Montreal, the author believes he is ac- 
complishing his object, and at the same time giving his patrons full 
value for their money. As this is an age of novelty, the author has 
adopted an original plan in putting the preface in the middle of his 
book. 

HOTELS. 

For first-class hotels Montreal is second to no other city in America. 
The Windsor Hotel, Dominion Square, is the largest and grandest 
hotel, not only in Montreal, but in the whole Dominion. It is on the 
finest site in the city, near the new C.P.R. and G.T.R. depots. It 
is within a stone's throw of the principal churches in the city, and 
close to the famous Mount Royal Park. The Classic Rotunda of the 
hotel, grandly frescoed, and its beautiful stained glass windows, is 
well worth a visit from all tourists passing through our beautiful city. 
In the evenings the Rotunda is always like a r-tock exchange where 
business men meet to talk business or hear the news, or make enquiries 
of Mr. McConniff about travelling arrangements, or to get the latest 
edition of the New York or Toronto i)apers at the news-stand, which 
is always open till midnight. 

The Balmoral Hotel, opened in 1886, is a first-class hotel, with all 
modern conveniences. It is near the C.P.R. and the Ci.T.R. depots 
and the wharf of the Upper Canada boats. 

The St. Lawrence Hall is the oldest established first-class hotel at 
present existing in Montreal. It is in the heart of the business centre 
of the city, adjoining the (ieneral Post Office, and has been so well 
known to the public for many years that it needs no recommend- 
ation. With such three hotels as the Windsor, the Balmoral and the 
Hall a traveller will make no mistake in going to either. 

The other principal hotels in Montreal are the Richelieu Hotel, 
the Albion Hotel, on Mcdill Street; the Canada Hotel, St. Gabriel 
Street ; the Jacques Cartier Hotel, Jacques Cartier Square ; the New 
York House, on Lagauchetiere Street; and the St. James Hotel, 
opposite the Grand Trunk depot. 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



15 



CHURCHES. 



After the stranger has fixed on an hotel to stop in, the first point 
of attraction in Montreal is the churches. Montreal is noted for the 
number of churches it contains, as well as for the number of its 
charitable institutions. There are at present 76 churches in Montreal, 
or one church for every 2,800 people. Of these 20 are Roman Cath- 
olic, 18 Presbyterian, 14 Episcopal, i Reformed Plpiscopal, 12 Meth- 
odist, 3 Congregational, 4 Baptist, i Swedenborgian or New Jer- 
tisalem Church, i United Free Church, i Luther or German Protest 
ant Church, i Unitarian, and 3 Jewish Synagogues. There are seven 
Protestant churches in which the services are conducted in the French 
language. 

Mark Twain remarked at the Windsor once, that he never saw so 
many churches within a stone's throw of each other before. 

St. Peter's Cathedral, properly speaking the Cathedral of St. James, 
(he being its patron saint), now in course of construction on Dominion 
Square, demands first attention. It is being built after the model of 
St. Peter's at Rome, of which, generally speaking, it is about half the 
dimensions. The foundation of it was laid in 186S. The dimensions 
of St. Peter's at Rome are : length, 615 feet ; breadth, 286 feet, ; and 
height, 435 to the top of the dome. 

I'he following are the dimensions of St. Peter's of Montreal, copied 
from the figures on the plan of the cathedral, very kindly given to the 
compiler of this little book, by gentlemen in actual charge of the con- 
struction. The exact heiglit to the top of the cross is 258 feet, that 
is 240 feet to the top of the c'ome, and the cross being t8 feet high, 
makes the entire lieight 258 feet. The breadtli of the cross is 12 feet. 
It weighs 1,500 lbs. The stone work is 132 feet high. Above this is 
the dome, 108 feet of wood work, with the cross, 18 feet high, fixed 
on the top. The extreme length of the building is 333 feet exterior 
and 295 feet interior, 'i'he greatest breadth is 222 feet exterior and 
216 interior. The general breadth is 150 feet. The general thick- 
ness of the wall is between three and four feet. The foundation wall 
is eight feet thick and eight feet deep lielow the surface. The cir- 
cumference of the outside of the dome is 240 feet. The view ot the 
city from the dome excells by far every other view in the city. 

Th<.' i)arish church of Notre Dame, erroneously called the French 
Cathedral, stands ui)on Place d'Armes, Notre Dame Street (the cold- 
est spot in Montreal at all seasons of the year). It is built after the 
model of Notre Dame (Our Lady) in Paris. It holds 10,000 people 
comfortably, and when crowded, as it often is, it has been known to 
hold 15,000 people. The length of the church is 255 feet, and the 



i6 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



?§' 



breadth 134 feet. The two principal towers are 227 feet high. The 
Bourdon bell, the largest in America, weighs 24,780 lbs., and cost 
$25,000. It is 8 feet 7 inches in diameter, and 6 feet 9 inches high. 
It is I foot thick. The clapper weighs 860 lbs. Besides this en- 
'ormous bell there are 10 other bells, which, when rung as on great 
occasions, make very agreeable chimes. It is stated that the entire 
church cost over $6,000,000. • It is the largest ecclesiastical edifice 
in America, except the cathedral of Mexico. It has 19 double con- 
fession boxes, Avhere 19 priests can hear 38 confessions at one time. 
It has two galleries, one above the other. 

The church of Notre Dame de Lourdes, built in 1874, for the pur- 
pose of illustrating the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception, is the 
most beautiful church in the city. The adoration of the Virgin under 
this name dates from the nth February, 1858, when it is stated that 
the Blessed \'irgin appeared to a young shepherdess fourteen years 
of age, named Bernadette Soubirous, at the Grotto of Massabielle, on 
the banks of the river Gave, near the town of Lourdes (Loord), in the 
the diocese of Tarbes, on the Upper Pyrenees, in the south-west of 
France, 530 miles from Paris. It is stated that the Blessed Virgin 
appeared to this girl eighteen times, and told her that "' she 
was the Immaculate Conception," and sent a message by her to the 
clergy, to tell them to build a chapel for her on that rock. It is also 
further stated that she revealed a secret to her, which she told her 
not to make known. It is also further stated that water, with healing 
qualities, gushed out of the rock at that time, and continued to ffow 
ever since. In the basement of Notre Dame de Lourdes, at Montreal, 
is a fac-simile of the Grotto at Lourdes, which strangers interested in 
such things should not fail to visit. Lourdes, at present, is a well- 
known place of i)ilgrimage. Lourdes is noted for its excellent choco- 
late, and is in the neighborhood of the best mineral springs of the 
Pyrenees. — (Anna T. Sadliers, Wonders of liOurdes.) 

The church of Notre Dame de Bonsecours (Our Lady of Good 
Help) is the oldest church in the city, being erected in 1771. 

Of the other Roman Catholic catholic churches, the most interesting 
to tourists and others are : the Jesuits' Church, on Bleury Street ; St. 
Patrick's Church, on St. Alexander Street; Notre Dame de Naza- 
reth ; and the church of St. James. 

PROTESTANT CHURCHES. 

Christ Church ('athedral (l'4)isco])al), on St. Catharine Street, is 
said to be the finest specimen of gothic architecture in North America. 
St. George's Church, and the Church of St. James the Apostle are 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY, 



:t high. The 
bs., and cost 

inches high, 
lides this en- 

as on great 
at the entire 
istical edifice 

double con- 

at one time. 

• 

for the pur- 
eption, is the 

Virgin under 

IS stated that 

burteen years 

assabielle, on 

Loord), in the 

south-west of 

llessed Virgin 

r that '• she 

by her to the 

ck. It is also 

she told her 

r, with healing 

:inued to flow 

>, at Montreal, 

> interested in 

mt, is a well- 

:cellent choco- 

iprings of the 

iady of Good 
1771. 

ost interesting 
iry Street ; St. 
ime de Naza- 



rine Street, is 
orth America. 
.' Apostle are 



17 



the next in importance of the Episcopal Churches in point of architec- 
ture. St. George's (Low Church) has the largest Protestant Congre- 
gation in Montreal. The Methodists can now boast of having one 
of the grandest churches in Montreal in St. James Church, on St. 
Catherine Street. 

Of the Presbyterian churches, Crescent Street Church, St. Paul's 
Church, and the American Presbyterian Church receive the most 
attention for architecture. St. Gabriel Street Presbyterian Church is 
tlie oldest existing Protestant Church in Canada. It was erected in 

^792. 

The Young Men's Christian Association, the oldest institution of 
the kind on this continent, on Dominion Square. Reading Room and 
Library, open from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Young men, whether resident 
in the city or strangers, are welcome. A young man coming to 
Montreal looking for employment would do well to call. Daily prayer 
meeting from 12.15 ^o i p.m. Young men's prayer meeting, Saturday, 
from 8 to 9 p.m. Sunday services : — Men's Bible Class, 9.30 to 10.30 
a.m., 3 to 4 p.m. 

The Sailors' Listitute, on Comm!. -loners Street, is a kindred ins- 
titution. There is also the Young Women's Christian Association 
Rooms, loi Metcalfe Street. A very useful institution. 



:J VICTORLV BRIDGE. 

A 

I A'ictoria Bridge, the longest bridge in the world, at the time of its 
•;? crecdon was considered the eighth wonder of the world. It is iJb 
miles long between stone work and 2 miles long including stone work 
approaches. It is made of twenty-five tubes, supported by twenty- 
four piers, and two end abutments. The lower side of the centre 
tube is sixty feet above the summer level of the River St. Lawrence. 
It was erected in 1859 by James Hodges, from the designs of Robert 
Stephenson and Alexander M. Ross. 

It was formally opened by the Prince of Wales in i860. The height 
from the bed of the river to the top of the centre tulje is 108 feet. 
The greatest dejjth of \Vatcr during the summer season is about 22 
feet, but in the spring the water sometimes rises over 20 feet above 
the summer level of ilie river. In the spriiic of 1886 the water rose 
25 feet above the average summer level. Tnc centre has an elevation 
of about 20 feet above the ends. The current at the bridge runs at 
the rate of seven miles an hour. The bridge cost over $6,000,000. 
It belongs to the Grand Trunk Railway Company. Trains generally 
take from four and a half to five minutes to cross the l)ridge. It took 
five and one-half years to build it. 



x8 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



:si; 



THE LACHINE CANAL is 8^ miles long, and overcomes a 
total rise of 45 feet. It has five locks, 270 feet long and 45 feet wide. 
Vessels drawing twelve feet of water can pass through it. The width 
of the canal varies from 163 to 208 feet. The first ground was bro- 
ken at Lachine on the 17th of July, 1821. 

WATER WORKS.— The water of the city is taken from the River 
St. Lawrence, about a mile above the Lachine Rapids, at a point 37 
feet above the summer level of the harbor of Montreal. One branch 
of the aqueduct starts at that point, and another branch starts from 
a point a little over half a mile above. Both unite and form a canal 
about five miles long to the wheel house, at the west end of the city. 
From the wheel house the water is pumped to the large reservoir, 
on the side of the mountain, a distance of about three miles. The 
large reservoir, dug out of the solid rock, is 200 feet above the level 
of the St. Lawrence. It is 810. feet long by 377 feet wide, and 24 
feet deep. It has a capacity of 36^4 millions of gallons. From the 
large reservoir the water that supplies the city above Sherbrooke 
Street is i)umped to a smaller reservoir 70 yards further up, on the 
side of the mountain. The Water works of the city cost $6,coo,ooo. 

THE LACHINE RAPIDS are about seven miles above Montreal, 
and about two miles below the town of Lachine. The Rapids extend 
about half a mile in length between Heron Island on the north and 
Devil's Island on the south. During the summer season trains leave 
Bonaventure Depot 7.55 a.m. and 5 p.m., to connect with the boats 
sliOoting the Rajjids in the morning and evening. The round trip 
may be made in about two hours — return tickets 50c. Oi)posite 
Lachine is the Indian village of Caughnawaga, where a remnant of the 
Mohawk tribe of Iro(}uois are settled upon a reserve. These Indians 
are famous for their skill in boating, so that when the British Govern- 
ment, in 1884, sent a boat expedition up the cataracts of the Nile, for 
the relief of Kartoum, a gang of fifty Caughnawagas were sent to lead 
the exi)edition, and how saiisfiictorily they performed their task is 
known to all who took an intcixst in the history of these times. 

PARKS AND S(2UARES. 

Mount Royal, so called by Jacques Cartier, on his first visit to 
Canada, 1535, in honor oij the King of France, rises over 700 feet 
nl ovc the level of the River St. Lawrence. The mountain park 
er: 430 acres of ground. A fine view of the city and surrounding 
i .'•ry may be got from the summit. Looking southward across the 
: /i'". the first niounfain to tlie left is Montarviile ; seven pretty 
^ r... .ire concealed in the recesses of this mountain. Next is Bela'il 



I 



,-.* 

* 



i> 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY 



19 



mountain (or St. Hilaire), with the ruin of a chapel on the summit. 
A depression in the midst of this mountain is occupied by a lake of 
singular clearness and depth. 

Next is Rougemont, almost concealing the Yamaska mountain be- 
hind it ; and to the right the conical shape of Mount Johnson, or 
Monoir, sharply breaks above the level surface. In the far distance 
are to be seen the green mountains of Vermont to the left, and the 
Adirondacks, in New York to the right. 

The cemeteries may be mentioned in connection with Mount Royal 
Park, of which thev nov/ form a part. The first Catholic Cemetery 
was situated at Place d'Armes, and the Protestant Cemetery was 
located where St. James and St. Peter Streets meet. As the city ex- 
tended, the Roman Catholic Cemetery was removed to Dominion 
Square, and the Protestant Cemetery to Dufferin Square^ on Dorchester 
Street east. There was also a Civil and Military Cemetery on 
Papineau road and on St. Helen's Island ; and finally they were all 
removed to their present location. In the Roman Catholic Cemetery 
the ascent to Mount Calvary, by the 14 stations of the cross, appeals 
to the devotion of Roman Catholics, and interests Protestants, as 
being a feature not met with in the cemeteries usually visited. 

St. Helen's Island, now used as a public park, is the most po[)ular 
place for picnics in the city. The island is named after Hdlene 
Boulle, Champlain's wife, the first European lady that came to Can- 
ada. It was used for many years by the British Government as a 
depot for military stores and a station for troops. The fort and 
barracks still remain. 

Viger Square, or as it is popularly called, Viger Garden, in St. 
Denis Street. 

The Champ-de-Mars, upon Craig Street, is a fine exercise ground 
for troops. 

Jacques-Cartier Square, near the City Hall and Court House, has 
a fine outlook ui)on the river. A column, surmounted by a statue of 
Lord Nelson, is placed at the head of the square. It was erected in 
1808 by the merchants of Montreal, short' y after the death of the 
Admiral at Trafalgar. 

Victoria Squark, at the junction of St. James and McGill Streets, 
is on the sit« of the old hay market. The name was changed in i860, 
in honour of the Queen, on the occasion of the visit of the Prince of 
^Vales to Canada. Upon it is a colossal statue of the Queen, in 
bronze, by Marshal Wood, an English artist. 

Dominion S(,)i:are is the finest square in the city as to site. Till 
late years it was knows as the Catholic Cemetery. The Windsor 



20 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



Hotel, St. Peter's Cathedral, and several other churches, give it im- 
portance architecturally. (See list of streets, etc.) 

Place d'Armes (so called on account of a battle that was once 
fought here with the Indians), the site of the first Roman Catholic 
Cemetery in Montreal, is opposite Notre Dame Church ; it is sur- 
rounded on all sides by important buildings. This is said to be the 
coolest spot in Montreal at all seasons of the ye^r. 

THE ST. LAWRENCE. 

The River St. Lawrence is 2,200 miles long. Its remotest 
source is the St. Louis, a small stream falling into the upper end of 
Lake Superior. It is the fourteenth longest river in the world, and 
the fifth longest river in America. From Quebec to Montreal, a short 
distance below Quebec to the Gulf of St. Lawrence, it varies from 10 
to 35 miles in width. Half way between Montreal and Quebec it 
widens out into Lake St. Peter, which is 20 miles long and 9 wide. 
Jacques Cartier sailed for the first time on the Gulf of St. Lawrence 
on the loth of August, 1535, and that being St. Lawrence Day, he 
named that body of water in honor of the saint, and the Gulf and 
River St. Lawrence have been known by that name ever since. 

At Quebec the river rises 14 feet, but it ceases to be observed at 
the lower end of Lake St. Peter. The depth of the river is so great, 
that Quebec was one of the few ports in America which the "Great 
Eastern " was able to visit. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

The principal public buildings are : — the Court House, Bonsecours 
Market (should be visited on Tuesday or Friday), the Custom House, 
the Examining Warehouse, the new City Hall, the Harbor Commis- 
sioners' Building, Inland Revenue Office, the office of the Board of 
Arts and Agriculture, and the Exhibition Buildings and Grounds, 
Mile End. 

RAILWAY STATIONS. 

Montreal has three of the best railway stations on the continent, 
all new. The Grand Trunk and Canadian Pacific Railways, have 
Bonaventure and Windsor stations in the west end of the city, and 
the Canadian Pacific Railway has also Dalhousie Station in the east 
end for the Quebec line. The Grand Trunk Railway depot at Bona- 
venture, or St. James Street, and the Canadian Pacific Railway Sta- 
tion, on Windsor Street, should be visited by any one who has time. 
The order and discipline around Bonaventure Depot is very credit- 
able to Mr. O'Hara who spares no pains to have everything right and 
leave everybody satisfied. 



W' 



Jive It im- 

was once 

m Catholic 

it is sur- 

to be the 



s remotest 

per end of 

world, and 

eal, a short 

es from lo 

Quebec it 

nd 9 wide. 

Lawrence 

ce Day, he 

le Gulf and 

since. 

observed at 
is so great, 
the "Great 



, Bonsecours 
stom House, 
)or Commis- 
he Board of 
id Grounds, 



le continent, 
ilways, have 
he city, and 

in the east 
pot at Bona- 
Railway Sta- 
10 has time. 

very credit- 
ing right and 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



21 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 

Montreal is as remarkable for the number and variety of its philan- 
trophic institutions as it is for the number of its churches. Every 
national society has its " home " for those of its own nationality. The 
St. George's Society for English, St. Andre . for Scotch, St. Patrick's 
for the Catholic Irish, the Irish Benevolent Society for Protestant 
Irish, the German Society for Germans, and St. John the Baptist's for 
French-Canadians. The social organization of Montreal is so com- 
posite, that in order to work well, many institutions require to be 
triplicate at best. Race and language divide the French from the 
English and Irish, and religion divides the English from the French 
and Irish ; and the Irish are subdivided by religion, so that they 
require two separate national benevolent societies. 

The following are the principal institutions : — 

Protestant Insane Asylum, Verdun. 

The Montreal General Hospital, corner Dorchester and St. Dom- 
inique, founded in 1822. 

Protestant House of Industry and Refuge, 680 Dorchester Street. 

The McKay Institute, for Protestant Deaf Mutes, Cote St. Luc Road. 

The Montreal Dispensary, 145 St. Antoine St.eet. 

The Ladies' Benevolent Institution, 31 Berthelet Street. 

Church Home, in connection with the Episcopal churches in the 
city, 116 University Street. 

Protestant Infants' Home, 508 Guy Street. 

St. Margaret's Nursary for Foundlings and House of Mercy for 
Fallen Women (Undenominational), 12 Kensington Ave., Cote St. 
Antoine. 

St. Margaret's Home, Church of England. 660 Sherbrooke Street. 

Home for Friendless Women, 41 8 St. Antoine Street. 

Protestant Orphan Asylum, 2409 St. Catherine Srreet. 

Boy's Home, 117 Mountain Street, 

St. Andrew's Home, 403 Aqueduct Street. 

St. George's Home, 139 St. Antoine Street, 

The Hervey Institute, Mountain Street, near Dorchester. 

The Montreal Maternity, 93 St. Urbain Street. 

The Western Hospital, 1251 Dorchester Street. 

The Women's Protective Immigration Society, 141 Mansfield Street. 

Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 189 St, James 
Street. 



V.ti 

J; 

I 



I. 



22 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



Grey Nunnery, corner of Guy and Dorchester Streets. At one 
time this institution served as an hospital. It is now more of a 
foundling institution and boarding-house for old men and old women. 
The name "Grey Nuns" was first given them in derision. The 
malicious reports circulated against the ladies, especially that of their 
"furnishing the Indians with alcohol, and making too free a use of it 
themselves," gave rise to tne epithet " Sceurs Grises " (Grey Nuns), 
the word grise (grey) bearing a double meaning in French, "iz., a grey 
color, or tipsy. The peculiar dress worn by the sisterhood of that 
order was adopted by them for the first time in August, 1775 ; seven- 
teen years after the foundation of the order. The order was founded 
in 1738, the first list of members being Mme. d'Youville, with three 
pious companions and four or five infirm poor. In the year 1747, the 
management of the old General Hospital of Ville-Marie, founded in 
1694, was given to the sisters of this order. During the year of the 
ship fever in 1847-8, these sisters took a leading part in their attend- 
ance on suffering humanity at that time. This institution has about 
800 inmates, between nuns and patients. Although visitors are al- 
ways welcome, twelve o'clock noon is the time that is best for visitors 
to call, as special preparations for the reception of visitors are made 
then. 

On a little spot of ground (neatly fenced in) at Point St. Charles, 
near the end of the Victoria Bridge, is an enormous stone, called the 
Immigrant's Memoiial Stone, taken from the bed of the River St. 
Lawrence, and erected on a column of stone work by the working 
men employed in the construction of the Victoria Bridge, bearing the 
following inscription : — " To preserve from desecration the remains of 
6,000 immigrants, who died of of ship fever, A.D. 1847-8, this ^tone 
is erected by the workingmen of Messrs. Peto, Brassey and Bctts, 
employed in the construction of the Victoria Bridge, A.D. 1859. 

Tne Hotel Dieu Hosi)ital is the oldest institution of the kind in 
Montreal, being founded in 1644, two years after the foundation of 
the city. It is under the management of the Black Nuns. It con- 
tains a hospital, a convent, and a church. Eighty of the sisters are 
cloistered, and do not go outside of the building and grounds. 

In the Notre Dame Hospital the management is decidedly Roman 
Catholic, but it is open for the relief of the sick and suffering of all 
creeds; and the patients have thy privilege of sending for a clergy- 
man of the denomination they belong to. 

The sisters of the orders of Asile de la Providence have eight 
institutions under their charge at Montreal. They have also charge 
of the Insane Asylum at Longue Point. 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



23 



St. Charles, 
e, called the 
ie River St. 
the working 
:, bearing the 
le remains of 
5, this "^tone 
y and Bctts, 
). 1859. 
the kind in 
Dundation of 
ns. It con- 
'i sisters are 
iinds. 

edly Roman 
fering of all 
"or a clergy- 
have eight 
also charge 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

The school laws for Montreal are, in some respects, peculiar. An 
assessment of one-fifth of one per cent is levied annually upon all the 
real estate in the city, collected by the City Treasurer with the other 
taxes, and handed over to the two city boards of Protestant and 
Catholic School Commissioners. The tax on the property of 
Protestants goes to the Protestant Board, and that on the property 
of Catholics to the C .tholic Board. One-third of the tax on Com- 
panies, etc., goes to the Protestant Schools, and two-thirds to the 
Catholic Schools. 

McGILL UNIVERSITY was founded by James McGill, a native 
of (ilasgow, ScoMand, who died in 1813, leaving $150,000 for the 
foundation of a College to be called by his name. It is Protestant 
in its general character, but undenominational, all the leading Pro- 
testant denominations having like privileges in it. It has over 500 
students and 40 professors. It has four faculties, of Arts, Applied 
Science, Medicine, and Law. Being non-denominational, it has no 
Theological Faculty ; but it offers advantageous terms of affiliation 
to other Theological Colleges. It is affiliated with the Presbyterian, 
Wesleyan, Congregational, and Anglican Diocesan Theological Col- 
leges at Montreal. It has also two affiliated colleges in Arts ; Morrin 
College, Quebec, and St. Francis College, Richmond. It is also 
affiliated with the McGill Normal School. 

The Presbyterian College of Montreal is entirely devoted to the 
training of missionaries and ministers speaking English, French, and 
Gaelic, in connection with the Presbyterian Church in Canada. 

The Montreal College and Grand Seminary, or the Seminary of 
St. Sulpice, on Sherbrooke Street West, has a large number of students 
and professors. There are two courses of study, one for the church 
and the other for a business course. 

Laval University. — What the McGill University is to the English 
and Protestants of the Province, the University Laval is to the French 
Catholics. The chief seat of this institution is at Quebec. 

The establish'ment of Laval University at Montreal profoundly 
agitated the French community, and the matter does not seem to have 
been finally settled as yet. 

St. Mary's College, otherwise called the Jesuits' College, on Bleury 
Street, is under the nianagement of the Jesuit fathers. 

Ville Marie Convent is the mother house of the order of Grey Nuns. 
It has accommodation for 1,000 nuns. The nuns of this order make 
an annual retreat here from all parts of the country. The building 
is better known to some under the name of Monklands. It was at 



24 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY, 



one time the residence of the Governor General of Canada. A fine 
view of this building is got sailing down the river on a clear day. ^ • 

The sisters of this order at present number about See professed 
sisters, 90 novices, 50 postulants, and about 20.000 pupils. 

The nuns of the order of the Sacred Heart have three establishments 
in Montreal. The home of the order is at Amiens, France. 

The Hochelaga Convent is the mother house of the siste-s of the 
order of the holy names of Jesus and Mary. 

The Veterinary College. — Montreal possesses a very important 
School of Veterinary Science, under the care of Principal McP^achran. 
Students from a great distance come to attend this College. It has 
six professors besides the principal. 

Board of Art Schools. — These are free evening classes for drawing. 
The Montreal School has 300 pupils. 

SCIENCE, LITERATURE AND ARTS. 

Libraries. — The principal libraries in Montreal are : the McGill 
College Library of 25,000 vols. The Advocates' Library in the Court 
House, 15,000 vols. Presbyterian College Library, 10,000 vols. 

The Mechanics' Institute has a very large library. There is a free 
public library in the Eraser Institute, Dorchester Street. The Y.M.C. A. 
has a very good library, and a well supplied free reading room. 

THE FINE ARTS. ' 

Music. — There are several musical societies in the city, but only 
two, the Mendelssohn Choir and Philharmonic Societies are regularly 
organized. 

The Art Association. — This institution owes its existance to the 
late Bishop Fulford and the late Benaiah Gibb. There is a permanent 
collection which is being gradually added to and improved. All art 
exhibitions of any importance in Montreal take place here. The 
Cralleries are open from nine to dusk, and are situated at the corner 
of St. Catherine Street and Phillips Square, Saturday, except when 
special exhibitions are in i)rogress, is fr:'e. 

The Natural History Society. — The Mufeum of this Society is on 
L^niversity Street, near the English Catliedra]. It is well worth a 
visit. Among the interesting articles to be seen there is the first 
breech-loadmg gun ever invented. It was sent. out to this country by 
the French Government. It was used by the French in one of their 
expeditions against the Indians of Lake Oka. The Indians attacked 
the canoe in which the cannon was placed and upset it. The cannon 
lay for a while in the bottom of the lake and one part of it was lost 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



la. A fine 
ir day. ^ • 
professed 

iblishments 

e. 

Jte.s of the 

important 
^IcP^achran. 
Ige. It has 



as 



ibr draw 



ang. 



the McGill 
in the Court 
o vols. 

ere is a free ^i 
ieY..Ar.C.A. 
room. 



ty, but only 
ire regularly 

ance to the 
a permanent 
2d. All art 
here. The 
t the corner 
xcept when 

•ciety i'< on 
ill worth a 
is the first 
country by 
ne of their 
is attacked 
rhe cannon 
it was lost 



there and never found. The finest specimens of mummies to ne seen 
in any museum may be seen there, some of them 3,500 yeais old, 
without a hair of *^he head removed. It contains several v'aluable 
relics relating to Canadian history, and several articles of ger.eral in- 
rerest too numerous to be mentioned, such as the scarf of Mary Queen 
of Scots; Egyptian sun-dried brick, manufactured, it is supposed, at 
the time the children of Israel were in bondage there. The best col- 
lection extant of Canadian birds is to be seen there. 

AMUSEMENTS. 

Theatres. — The Academy, on Victoria Street. The Queen's, cor- 
ner of Victoria and St. Catherine Streets. The Royal, on Cote Street. 

tobogganing. — This is the most popular of the winter sports of 
Montreal ; although, like most other amusements, it is not without its 
dangers. 

Hunting. — Montreal can boast of the best conducted hunting 
establishment on this continent ; Kennels, at Papineau Road. 

Skating. — The Victoria Skating Rink is the largest and best Skating 
Rink in Europe or America. Besides this Skating Rink there are 
several others of less importance. 

Gymnasium. — The Gymnasium of the Montreal Amateur Athletic 
Association (M. A. A. A.), 114 Mansfield Street, is a very good and 
useful institution. 

The following kinds of amusements are also well represented in 
Montreal : — Cricket, Base Ball, Foot Ball, Curling, Chess, Boating, 
Bicycling, Golf, Racket, Lawn Tennis. (Racing — Blue Bonnets, about 
5 miles west of Montreal, and Lepine Park, about 3 miles east of 
Montreal, are the principal places for this amusement, where vast 
crowds of people gather on a racing day.) 

Militia. — Volunteering is a favorite occupation of the young men of 
the city. There are six regiments of Infantry, one troop of Cavalry, 
one company of Engineers, one battery of Horse Artillery, and six 
batteries of Garrison Artillery. 

NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 

The newspapers and periodicals of Montreal, in English and French, 
are about fifty in number. There are five French and four English 
daily and ten French and eight English weekly newspapers. There 
are eight French and eleven English monthly and two English 
quarterly periodicals. 

The Gazette (Conservative) and Herald (Liberal) are the English 
morning papers. The Gazette is the oldest existing pajjcr in the 



26 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 






m 



Dominion, being established in 1778. It was orininally written in 
French, afterwards half French half English, and finally it was wholly 
issued in English. 

The Quebec Gazette, published in 1764, was the first paper printed 
in Canada. 

The Star is a general newspaper, and has the largest circulation in 
Canada. It does not devote much space to editorials, but when it 
does start its weight is always felt. The letters from the general 
public on the topics of the day, in its Saturday issue, are always very 
interesting. It upholds British connection ancl advocates the building 
uj) of a Canadian Nationality. It was established in 1869. 

'J'he Witness is a religious, ])olitical, temperance and comic paper. 
It advocates prohibition but opposes high license. At the last 
general election it took sides with anti-British party. It advocates 
that unknown quantity called Unrestricted Reciprocity. 

The principal Canadian newspapers outside of Montreal are the 
Toronto Mail, Globe and Empire. The Mail is independe.it and is 
the leading morning paper in Canada. The Globe is liberal and the 
Umpire is Conservative in politics. 

The True Witness is the Irish Catholic National and Home Rule 
Organ. It was the only paper in Montreal that did not make any de- 
monstration for the Queen's Jubilee ; but it stood up for the British 
ilag at the last election. 

The Shareholder, published in Montreal, is a very valuable paper 
to business men. 

French Press. — La Minerve (Conservative). La Patrie (Liberal). 
L.a Presse [Conservative]. LAurore (French Protestant organ). 
LEteiidard (the Ultramontane and Jesuit organ). Le Monde [Con. J 

Canadian Antiquarian and Numismatic Journal, published 
quarterly. 

Canadian Journal of Commerce. 

Canadian Journal of Fabrics, j)ublishcd monthly, and the Canadian 
Textile Directory, published by Mr. R. B. Biggar, Fra: er Building, 
St. Sac-ament Street, are the only publications in Canada as far as we 
know (_ oted entirely to the interests of Canadian Textile AEanufac- 
tures and kindred trades. Those interested in these lines need not 
be reminded that it will be to their interest to procure both of these 
useful publications. 

Canadian Pecord of Science, quarterly. 

Church Guardian, published weekly in the interest of the Church 
of England, by Dr. L. H. Davidson, 190 St. James Street. 

Canadian Medical Record, monthly. ' 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



27 



the Church 



Dominion Illustrated, month\v ; treats of Canadian subjects. It 
is the only paper of the kind in Canada. Price, $1.50 a year; 15c. 
a copy. 

Echo, the Labour organ, weekly. 

Educational Record, monthly. 

Insurance and Finance Chronicle, published monthly by R. W. 
Smith, 1724 Notre Dame Street. 

Lci^al News, published weeklv at the Gazette office. 

LovelVs Montreal Directory, published every year, price $2.50. 

LovelVs Montreal Business Directory, $1.00. 

Lower Canada Jurist, monthly. 

Montreal La7c> Reports, monthly. 

Montreal Produce Bulletin, weekly. 

Northern Messenger, semi-monthly. 

Presbyterian Record, monthly. 

The Real Estate Record, monthly, indispensable to every one inter- 
ested in real estate in Montreal. J. C. Smipson & Co., 181 St. James 
Street. 

Sporting Life, weekly. 

Trade Bulletin. 

Montreal Medical Journal, monthly. 

The Trade Re7'ie7u, weekly. 

Presbyterian College Journal, published monthly during each ses- 
sion, is considered the leading journal of the kind in Canada. 

University Gazette, published weekly during the session by the 
students of McGill College. 

AUTHORITIES CONSULTED. 

The foUov/ing are the authorities consulted in compiling this book : 
Handbook of the Dominion (Dawson's). Montreal Past and Present 
(Oeorge Bishop c\: C!o.) All Round Route (Canada News Co.) 
ABC Railway Guide and Starke's Almanac (Theo. Robinson). 
" Reminiscences of my \'isit to the Grey Nunnery," for sale there. 
History of Notre Dame de Lourdes, for sale by the Sisters of Notre 
Dame de Lourdes. Historical Sketches of Notre Dame of Montreal, 
for sale at the church. Our Caughnawagas in Egypt (W. Drysdale 
&: Co.) History of the Montreal Prison (J. D. JJorlhwick). The 
Montreal Herald, McNally's Pocket Cvclopicdia. Hayden's Diction- 
ary of Dates. Montreal Directory, 1S90-1. C. P. R. Time Table, 
with notes. Api)Ieton's Canadian Ciuide Book. 

For the historical account of the origin of the names of the streets, 
I am indebted to a [)aper contributed by Mr. Woodly, of Cole St. 



I 



28 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



Antoine {a boy 13 years old), to the Witness, and also for information 
gathered from the Rev. Mr. Borthwick's contribution to the Siar on 
the same subject. 

For the information of readers of this book, who may wish to get 
some information a])Out other places outside of Montreal, I may state 
that after perusing all the publications I could get my hand on in this 
line, I know of no more useful book than Appleton's Canadian Guide 
Book. The Appleton's were fortunate in securing the services of 
Prof. Roberts of Kings ('ollege. Nova Scotia, who is regognized, on all 
hands, as the best versed in Canadian literature of our living authors. 



SUBURBS AND NEIGHBOURING TOWNS AND VILLFXIES. 

[N.B. — 'i'he distance is calculated from the Post Office]. 

Caughnawa(;a, an Indian village opposite Lachine. 

CoTEAU St. Lolms. — Two miles from Montreal, east of Mov.nt Royal, 
has large stone quarries. Poi)ulation about 3,500. 

CoTEAU St. Pierre. — On the upper Lachine road, 3 miles from 
Montreal, has large brick works. Poi)ulation al)out 300. 

Cote St. Luc. — Three miles from Montreal, on the Lachine road. 
Population, 250. 

Cote St. Paul. — Three miles from Montreal, on the Lower Laciiine 
road. Population about 2.000. 

Cote Visitation. — On Papineau road, two miles east of Montreal. 
Population about 600. 

Lachine. — Nine miles from Montreal, is one of the favorite summer 
resorts in the neighbourhood of Montreal. It is the principal boating 
place in the vicitity of Montreal. There are regattas on the lake op- 
posite the town annually. At Lachine the boats snooting the Rapids 
always connect with the Montreal trains, morning and evening, during 
summer for tlie excursionists who come to shoot the Rapids, many of 
whom come a long distance on i)urpose. Shooting the Lachine 
Rapids of late years is someting like going to see Niagara Falls, 'i'he 
population is about 5,000. 

Lafrairie. — A village on the south side of River St. Lawrence, 9 
miles south-west of Montreal. Pojjulation about 2,000. During the 
summer season the ferry boat makes three trips a day to Montreal and 
back. The first railway in British North .America was constructed 
from here to St. John, in 1836. It was discontinued and the rails 
taken \i\> a few years after. 

Longueuil. — On the south side of the St. T,awrence, oppos'.Le 
Hochelngn. Some years ago a railway was run on the ice across tne 
j-iver from Montreal to Longueuil. Population, 3,50c. 



•11- 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



29 



information 
he Star on 

wish to get 

I may state 
id on in this 
adian Guide 

services of 
nized, on all 

ng authors. 

ILLEGES. 

1- 

loi'.nt Royal, 

miles from 

ichine road. 

wer Lachine 

of ^Tontreal. 

orite summer 
cipal boating 
the lake op- 
5 the Rapids 
Miing, during 
ids, many of 
the Lachine 
I Falls. The 

I-awrence, 9 
During the 

Montreal and 
constructed 

nd the rails 

ce, opposite 
V across tne 



I 



LoNGUE PoiNTt. — Six miles east of Montreal, known now through 
[the world as the site of the lunatic asylum, which was burned, in 
[which many human beings were burned to cinders. The exact num- 
Iber is not known. Population about 800. 

IMaisonneuve. — East of Hochelaga, about four miles from Montreal. 
Population about 1,350. 

Montreal Junction. — A new village on the C. P. R. Montreal and 
[Toronto line, five miles from Montreal. Population about 200. 

Mount Royal Avenue lies east of ^Nlount Royal, at the terminus 
I of the street railway. The grounds of the Provincial P^xhibition 
buildings are here. Population about 400. 

Mount Royal Vale, off Cote St. Luc road. Population about 150. 

Notre Dame de Grace. — A small village at the back of the 
Mountain. Population about 400. 

Notre Dame de Neiges lies in rear of Mount Royal. Population 
about 800. 

Outremont lies at the west end of Mount Royal. Population 
about 500. 

Petit Village Turcot, near Cote St. Paul. Population about 200. 

Sault au Recollkt is near the east end of the Island of Mont- 
real, about 7 miles from the city. Population about 400. 

St. Cunegonde, an old town joined to the west end of Montreal, 
with a corporation of its own. Population about 12,000. 

St. Lambert. — A village on the south side of the St. Lawrence, 
opposite Montreal at the end of Victoria Bridge. Population about 
1,200. 

St. Louis of Mile End, formerly part of Cote St. Louis, has a 
population of about 3,000. It is one of those small French villages 
at the east end of Mount Royal. 

Cote St. Antoine is principally inhabited by Montreal business 
men. It is at the western terminus of the St. Catherine Street line 
of the street railway. Population about 2,000. 

Monklands, formerly the residence of the governors of Canada, 
now occupied by nuns who call it Villa Maria, is located here. 

St. Henry is an incorporated town with a population of about 
10.000. It is about 3 miles west of Montreal. 

Verdun, formerly called FiOwer Lachine road, is about 3 miles west 
of Montreal on the banks of the St. Lawrence. The new Protestant 
Insane Asylum is built here. A ferry crosses from here to La Tortue, 
a small village on the other side of the river. 



I 



30 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 




pr r 



HOW TO VISIT THE PRINCIPAL PLACES OF INTEREST IN THE SHORTST 

TIME FOR THE LEAST MONEY. 

In whateves quarter of the city you are lodging, the first place to 
visit is Notre Dame Church. 

From the Windsor, if you do not wish to hire a cab, walk down 
Windsor street to the corner of St. Antoine street or up to the corner 
of St. Catherine street. From there take the street cars going east, 
and tell the conductor to let you off at the Post Office, and then a few 
paces from you is Notre Dame Church and several other places of 
interest. A few blocks east from there is the new City Hall, the 
Court House, Nelson's monument, St. Gabriel street old Presbyterian 
Church, and not far away is the Bonsecours Market and Bonsecours 
Church. While there you may visit the Harbor and the new Custom 
House, about a half mile further west. Then walk up McGill Street 
to Victoria Square, from whence you may get the street cars to take 
you to the principal places of interest up town. P'irst visit the Notre 
Dame de Lourdes, near the corner St. Catherine and St. Denis Streets. 
From thence retrace your steps westwards, till you come to Bleury 
street, and there is the old Jesuits' Church and College. Then turn 
up to St. Catherine street west, till you come to the Art Gallery, cor- 
ner of Phillips square. Then visit the English Cathedral and the 
Museum of the Natural History Society. Then take the street cars 
till you come west as fur as Guy Street and visit the Grey Nunnery at 
noon. After dinner, hire a cab to take you to McGill College (there 
is a very interesting museum in connection with the College, which 
visitors may enter on payment of a small entrance fee)' and close by 
are the two city reservoirs ; and if you don't wish to hire a cab to take 
you to the top of the mountain, you cau go up by the elevator for 5 
cents. Then after you have taken a good view of the surrounding 
country from the top of the mountain, and visited the two cemeteries, 
you can come luick to the city by the omnibuses for 15 cents, and 
you have a dny well spent, and not over a dollar of necessary expense, 
besides your hotel bill. 

Street letter boxes in INIontreal are visiled four times daily, viz., 
9.15 a.m., 12.30 p.m., 5.30 p.m., and 7.45 p.m. 

BANKS. 

liank of Montreal, 109 St. James street. 

Sir Donald A, Smith, Pres. E. S, Clouston, General Man. 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, 157 St. James street, 

A. M. Crombie, Local Manager. 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



31 



IHE SHORTST 



[rst place to 

r, walk down 
the corner 
going east, 
id then a few 
r places of 
y Hal), the 
iPresbyterian 
Bonsecours 
new Custom 
IcGill Street 
cars to take 
sit the Notre 
Denis Streets, 
le to Bleury 
Then turn 
Gallery, cor- 
dral and the 
street cars 
;y Nunnery at 
oUege (there 
allege, which 
and close by 
a cab to take 
levator for 5 
surrounding 
cemeteries, 
5 cents, and 
sary expense, 

es daily, viz., 



Man. 



Merchants' Bank of Canada, 205 St. James street, 

Andrew Allen, President. Geo. Hague, General Manager. 
Bank of British North America, 140 St. James, street, 

R. R. Grindley, General Manager. 
Quebec Bank, New York Life Building, 

T. McDougall, Local Manager. 
The Molson's Bank, 200 St. James street 

John A. Molson, President. T. W. Thomas, Manager. 
Bank of Toronto, 168 St. James street, 

J. Murray Smith, Local Manager. 
Ontario Bank, 8 Place d'Armes, 

R. N. King, Local Manager. 
Merchants Bank of Halifax, 1720 Notre Dame street, 

E. L. Pease, Local Manager. 
Banque du Peuple, 95 St. James street, 

J acq. Grenier, President. 
Union Bank of Canada, 1764 Notre Dame street, 

G. H. Balfour, Local Manager. 
Bank of Nova Snotia, 130 St. James street, 

T. O. McDonald, Local Manager. 
Banque d'Hochelaga, 107 St. James street, 

F. X. St. Charles, President. M. J. A. Prendergast, Manager. 
Banque Jacques Cartier, 7 Place d'Armes, 

Alphonse Desjardins, President. A. L. DeMartinguy, Manager. 
iJanque de Ville Marie, 153 St. James, 

\V. Weir, President. 
Hanque Nationale, loi St. James street, 

A. Gebourg, President. Alf. Brunet, Manager. 

CHURCHES. 

Roman Catholic. 

Cathedral, Dominion Sfjua'^e. 

Notre Dame ('hurch, Notre Dame street. 

Notre Dame de Bonsecours, St. Paul street. 

Notre Dame de Lourdes, corner St. Catherine and St. Denis streets. 

Jesuits, 144 Bleury street. 

Crrey Nunnery Ciiurch, corner Guy and Dorchester streets. 

Hos])ice St. Josejih, 473 Mignonne street. 

Hotel Dieu Church, Pine Avenue. • 

Notre Damede Grace, village of Notre Dame de Grace. 

Notre Dame des Anges. 537 Lagauchetiere street. 

Notre Dame des Neiges, Cote des Neiges. 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



Notre Dame de Pitie. 

St. Ann's, 28 Basin Street. 

St. Bridget's, corner Dorchester and Champlain streets. 

St. James, 127 St. Denis street. 

St. Joseph, 306 Richmond street. 

St. Mary, corner Craig and Panet streets. 

St. Patrick, corner St. Alexander and Lagauchetiere streets. 

St. Peter's corner \'isitation and Dorche.ster streets. 

St. Vincent de Paul, 138 St. Catherine street. 

Presbyterian. 

Chalmer's, St. Lawrence street, above Sherbrooke street. 

I'^glise du Sauveur, French Presbyterian, 90 Canning street. 

P2rskine, corner St. Catherine and Peel streets. 

Cote des Neigec Chun i Cote des.Neiges. 

Crescent, corner Du -^i - and Crescent streets. 

Knox, corner DorcLe^n-i uod Mansfield streets. 

Melville Church, Cote St. Antoine. 

St. Cabriel, 2148 Su Ca'^^erin'^ '"^reet. 

Calvin, Notre Dame street \ve;n. 

St. Mark's, corner William and Dalhousie streets. 

St. Matthew's, Point St. Charles. 

St. Paul's, corner Dorchester and St. Monique. 

Stanley Street, (free seat), 102 Stanley street, adjoining Windsor 

Hotel. 
St. John's, French Presbyterian, corner St. Catherine and St. Justin. 
Taylor Church, 99 Champlain street. 

American Presbyterian, corner Dorceester and Drummond streets. 
American Presbyterian, Inspector street. 
St. Andrew's, corner Beaver Hall Hill and Lagauchetiere streets. 

Church of England. 

Cathedra], corner University and St. Catherine streets. 

Crace Church, 458 Wellington street 

Eglise du R^dempteur, French P^piscopal, 123 Chatham street. 

St. (reorge's, corner Osborne and Windsor streets. 

St. James the Apostle, 2557 St. Catherine street. 

St. John the Iwangelist, corner Ontario and St. Urbain streets. 

St. Jude's, corner Coursol and Vinet streets. (Free seats.) 

St. Luke's, corner Champlain and Dorchester streets. 

St. Martin's, 472 St. Urbain street. 

St. MathiaF, corner Cote St. Antoine Road aud Church Hill Avenue. 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



33 



t. 



ig Windsor 
St. Justin, 
i streets, 
streets. 



reet. 



eets. 



11 Avenue. 



St. Stephen's, corner College and Inspector streets. 

St. Thomas, corner Voltigeurs and#Jotre Dame streets. 

Trinity Church, St. Denis street, opposite Viger square. 

Methodist. 

St. James, St. Catherine street, near Phillips square. 

East End, corner Lagauchedere and Plessis streets. 

Mountain Street Church, 124 Mountain street. 

Dominion Square, corner Dorchester and Windsor streets. 

Douglas, 2794 St. Catherine street. 

First French Methodist, corner Craig and St. Elizajbeth streets. 

West End, 198 Canning street. 

Sherbrooke street, cor. St. Charles Borromee and Sherbrooke sts. 

Pointe St. Charles, 59 Wellington street. 

Dorchester, corner Dorchester and St. Urbain streets. 

Cote St. Antoine Church. 

Reformed Episcopal. 
St. Bartholomew's, cor. Beaver Hall Hill and Lagauchetiere streets. 

* Congregational. 

Calvary Church, 302 Guy street. 

Emmanuel, corner St. Catherine and Stanley streets. 

Zion Church, Milton street. 

Baptist. 

First Baptist, corner St. Catherine and City Councillors streets. 
Olivet, corner Mountain and Osborne streets. 
French Baptist, Mance street, above St. Catherine street. 
Grace Baptist Church. 

Other Churches. 

German Protestant, 129 St. Dominique Street. 
Unitarian, Beaver Hall Hill. 

New Jerusalem, corner Dorchester and Hanover streets. 
Gaelic Services in Stanley Street Presbyterian Church. 
Welsh Services in Y. M. C. A., Sunday, 3 p.m. 

Jewish Synagogues. 

I St, McGill College Avenue. 

2nd, Stanley street. 

3rd. 2462 St. Catherine street. 



34 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



Thk Origin of the NaIies of some of the Streets. 

The first names gi\en to the streets of old Montreal were given by 
M. DoUier de Canon, the Superior of the Seminary, the priests of the 
Seminary, being the seigneurs of Montreal. 

Amherst street was named in honour of General Amherst. Some 
of his exploits were the taking of Louisburg from the French in 1758. 
He was engaged in the capture of Quebec and compelled the 
capitulation of Montreal in 1760. 

Aylmer street was named after I,ord Aylmer, who was Governor- 
General of Canada in 1831. 

Champlain street was named after Samuel de Champlain, the famous 
explorer. He founded Quebec in 1608. He was the first Governor 
of Canada in 1633. 

Common street is so called on account of the common pasturage 
for cattle along the banks of the River in that locality in the olden 
times. 

Craig street was named after Sir James Craig, who was Governor 
of Canada from 1807 to 1811. In the olden times a creek ran where 
Craig Street now is. There were several wooden bridges across the 
creek where the steet cars now run. 

Dollard Lane was called after Dollard, a French Commander who 
made himself famous in the wars b, -ween the French and the Indians. 

Dorchester street was called after Sir Guy Carleton, the first 
Governor-General of Canada, after the British conquest. He was 
Governor from 1786 to 1797. 

Fortification Lane was called after the old fortification wall, the 
north side of which was built on that site. 

Frontenac street was called in honour of the popular French Gov- 
ernor of Canada of that name. He was Governor from 1672 to 1682. 
He built Fort Frontenac now called Kingston. 

Gosford street was named after the Earl of Gosford, who was Gov- 
ernor-General in 1835. 

McGill street was called after the Hon. James McGill, the founder 
of McGill Uuiversity, and the first English-speaking Mayor of 
Moni.cal. 

Maisonneuve street was named after Monsieur de Maisonneuve, the 
founder of Montreal. 

Metcalfe street was called after Lord Metcalfe, Governor-General 
in 1842, 

Montcalm street was named after the famous French General 
Montcalm, who fell on the Plains of Abraham, when Quebec was 
taken in 1759. 



i 



lEETS. 

k given by 
riests of the 



;rst. Some 
ich in 1758. 
ipelled the 

Governor- 

I, the famous 
Jst Governor 

)n pasturage 
n the olden 

as Governor 
;k ran where 
IS across the 

imander who 
i the Indians, 
ton, the first | 
est. He was | 

:ion wall, the | 

French Gov- 
1672 to 1682. 

vho was Gov- 

1, the founder 
ing Mayor of 

isonneuve, the 

ernor-General | 

ench General 
I Quebec was | 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 35 

Murray street, named after General Murray, the first Governor- 
General of Canada after the Conquest. 

Papineau Road was named after the Hon. L. J. Papineau, the leader 
of tlie French Canadian Rebellion in 1837. 

Richmond street was named after the Duke of Richmond, who was 
(iovernor in 18 18 and 1819. He died on the 20th August, 17 19, 
from the effects of the bite of a pet fox. 

Sherbrooke street was called after .Sir John Cope Sherbrooke, who 
was Governor in 1816 and 181 8. 

Wolfe street was named after General Wolfe, the hero of the 
capture of Quebec in 1759. 

CONSULATES. 

Argentine Confederation, Chili, Peru and ) F. C. Henshaw, 4 Custom 

Republic 01 Uruguay ] House Square 

Austro-IIungarian 509 St. Paul Street. 

Eelgian 156 St. James Street. 

Urazii 6 Port Street. 

Danish 32 St, Sulpice Street. 

French 86 Union Avenue 

<iERMAN Empire 61 St. Sulpice Street. 

Hawaiian Kin(;dom 227 Commissioners Street. 

Italian 17 Beaver Hall Hill. 

Netherlands 89 St. Fra^ois-Xavier Street. 

Sweden and Norway 32 St. Suljjice Street. 

Spanish 961 Dorchester Street. 

Switzerland 412 St. Paul Street. 

Portugal 195 Commissioners Street. 

United States 246 St. James Stret. 



Presbyterian College Journal. 

_ — _ — _ ^^^, 

Published Monthly during every Session, six months, 
from November to April inclusive. 

PRICE: 20 CENTS SINGLE COPIES, OR $1.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE. 

STTHSCPlI^'nONS or ^VI)\' J^'iJ^TISJi^lNTKJS^'rp^ Keieived by 

NORMAN MURRAY, 

38 VICTORIA STREET, - - MONTREAL. 
i w P.O. Box 713 -^--i 



i 



36 



INFORMATION FOR TRAVELLERS. 



• IM^t ice to Tourists 



(» 



G) 



WINDSOR HOTEL TICKET AGENCY^^ 



(5x2- 



RAIL AND STEAMER. 



-£^ 



^OURIST^S are invited to purchase Railroad, Steamer, 
Parlor, Sleeping Car and Theatre Tickets at 

-BUNION TICKET AND TELEGRAPH OFFICEI> 

In Rotunda of above Hotel. 



Telegparns Sent Evefyxxihepe. 

Every Ififoi'inalion afforded. Tiiiie-Taliles and Tour Books furnished free. 

►*-« — — 

J. McCONNIFF, 

Union Ticket Agency, Windsor Hotel, 
M0r4Tl^EflIi, Canada. 

Travellers' complete accommodation, via all Lines from 
Montreal (Rail and Steamer), secured at this Agency. 

Berths reserved in advance of deiiailiires. Open till 10 p.m. Daily, Sundays inehiaive. 



* Special *^^Xoticc ^ ^ 

A Souvenir of your visit " ILI^USTRATIW MONTRUAI,," 

charmingly written, beautifully illustrated, &c. 
Price, 75c. and $i.oo. Sold eveerywhere. Buy it. 



irili 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



37 



tS ^ 

G) 



I, Steamer, 
at 

FFICE^ 



e. 

furnished free. 



tel, 



Lines from 
5 Agency. 

[iiiilavs inrluiiive, 



mTRMAt," 

I, &c. 
Buy it. 



GUIDE TO PRINCIPAL STREETS. 

'ihe numbers on the streets run from east to west and from the 
river towards the Mountain, or north and south. 

The principal streets of the city, running east and west, are : — 

Wellington, William, Commissioners, St. Paul, Notre Dame ^about 5 

miles in length from Hochelaga to St. Henry, the east end of which 

was formerly called St. Mary and the west end St. Joseph street ; 

these three streets are now under the name of one street). St. James 

street ; the west end of this street was forme.ly called St. Bonaventure 

street, Osborne is a continuation of Lagauchetiere. Craig and St. 

Antoine streets are continuations one of the other. Tagauchetiere, 

St. Catherine, Dorchester, Mignonne, Ontario and Sherbrooke streets. 

A large portion o*" the dwellings of the upper classes of Montreal are 

on this last street. Latour, Jurors and Vitre form one street. 

The principal streets running from the river towards the Mountain 
are St. Denis, St. Lawrence Main, St. Peter, Bleury and Park Avenue 
are a continuation one of the other. Bonsecours is a continnation of 
St. Denis street towards Bonsecours Market. St. Elizabeth street 
and Laval Avenue are a continuation one of the other. Cadieux 
street is a continuation of St. Constant street. St. Dominique street. 
St. Urbain street is a continuation of St. Sulpice street. Mance street 
is a continuation of St. George street. McCiill street. University 
street. Metcalfe street is a continuation of Cathedral street. Peel 
street is a continuation of Windsor street. Mountain street. 

The following streets have different names at different parts. The 
question of having a single name for them has been long under dis- 
cussion : — Mountain and McCord. Hanover and University. St. 
Peter, Bbury and Park Avenue. Berthelet, Ontario and Burnside 
Place. Champ de Mars and Rousseau. College and St. Paul. 
William and Foundling. Latour, Jurors and Vitre. St. George and 
Mance. St. Constant and Cadieux. St. Lambert and St. Lawrence. 
Bonsecours and St. Denis. Gosford and Sanguinet. Monarque and 
Papineau Road. Port and St. Nicholas. Callieres and St. Franc ^i"- 
Xavier, Windsor and Peel. Cathedral, Metcalfe and McTc.^":^h, 
Brunswick and Union Avenue. St. Elizabeth and Laval Avenue. 
St. Charles Borromee, Arcade and Mitchison Avenue. Guy and Cote 
des Neiges Road. Quiblier and Tupper. Comte and Lincoln Avenue. 
Longueuil Ferry and St. Suzanne. Pantaleon and German. 



38 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



NEW Al-PHABETICAL LIST OF STREETS. 



Albert Av., at 125 Canning 

Albert Lane, off 205 (niy 

Albert Place, 78 to 82 St. Urbain 

Albert, from 98 Delorimier to Shaw 

Albert, off 42 Cliaboillez Square 

Albert, from 1 16 Canning 

Albina, off 392 St, Denis 

Alexander Place, off 131 St. Alexander 

Allard, from 212 Panet to 169 Visitation 

Amherst, off 1307 2sotre Dnme 

Anderson, off 696 Dorchester 

Ann, from 153 William to Common nor. 

Aqueduct, cross at 215 St. Antoine 

Arcade, from 17 Guilbault to Roy 

Archanibault Lane, from 26 to 54 Fullum 

Argyle Av., formerly Scotland, from 365 

Aqunduct West to Guy 
Argyle Terr., 2332 to 2334 St. Catherine 
Ashheld, between 151 d-^ 159 St. George 
Atwater Av., from Canal to Wheelhouse 
Aylmer, off 2179 St. Catherine 
Aylmer Terrace, between 55 and 65 

Aylmer 
Bagg, from 521 St. Lawrence to Mance 
Balmoral Place, at 185 1 St. Catherine 
Balmoral, oft" 2080 St. Catherine 
Barclay Place, at 28 Barclay, off I173 

Notre Dame 
Barrack, off 1424 Notre Name 
Barre, from 17 Eleanor to Guy 
Baron Block, from 160 to 168 St. J-'imes 
Basin, from 31 McCord to Seigneurs 
Bayle, oir3i St. Mark 
Beauchamp Av., oft" 32^2 St. Urbain 
Beaudry, from 201 Craig to Sherbrooke 
Beaver, now part of Victoria Square 
Beaver Hall Hill, frcim Victoria Square 

up to Beaver Hall Square 
Beaver Hall Sq., at the head of Beaver 
Beaver Hall Terr., ivnv Beaver Hall Hill 
Belmont, off 39 Beaver ILill Hill 
Berard, from 1322 Ontario North 
Beresford, otf 919 Wellington 
Berri, from 61 Dubord North 
Berry Lane, olf 334 Craig 
Berthelet, otf 226 Bleury 
Bishop Av., off 263 St. Antoine 
Bishop Lane, olf 36 St. Ignace 
Bishop, off 2557 St. Catherine 



Bisson, otf 163 St. Antoine 

Bleury, from 669 Craig to 679 Sher- 
brooke 

Bonaparte, off 58 Visitation 

Bonsecours Market, between 96 and 186 
St. Paul and 51 to 155 Commissioners 

Bonsecours, oil' 368 Craig 

Bourgeois, off 625 Wellington 

Brewster's Road, from Lachine Road 
to the Canal 

Britannia, oft' 5 St. Etienne 

Brock, from Water to 1222 Notre Dame 

Bronsdon Lane, opposite 584 Dorchester 

Brouillet Place, at i486 St. Catherine 

Bruchesi, off 2137 Notre Dame 

Brunswick, oft" 798 Dorchester 

Buckingham Av., from 2637 St. Cath. 
to 16 St. Luke 

Burgess, see Bourgeois 

Burnside Place, oft 82 Union Av. 

Busby, from 785 Craig to 39 Latour 

Bute Place, at 818 Sherbrooke 

Cadieux, off 413 Sherbrooke 

Caithness Place, at 43 Argyle Av. 

Callunder I'lace, at 190 Mountain 

Cailieres, from I Common to 2 Found- 
ling 

Cambridge Terr., at 73 McGill Col. Av. 

Campeau, oft' 1353 Notre Dame 

Canal, off 276 Wellington 

Canning, off 338 St. Antoine 

Capitol, of 7 Francois Xavier 

Carleton, from 69 McTavish 

Cat heart Place, at 28 Cathcart 

Cathcart, off 102 Mansfield 

Cathedral, from 55 Chaboillez Square 
to Osborne 

Cavan Place, at 91 Cathedral 

Cemetery, now Cathedral 

Centre, off 459 Wellington 

Cerat, off 955 St. Domini(iue 

Chaboillez Square, at 249 Notre Dame 

Chaboillez, oft" 532 St. James 

Champ de Mars Place, near City Hall 

Champlain (St. Mary's Ward), from 46 
Lagauchetiere to Sherbrooke 

Champlain (St. Jean Baptiste Ward), 
from Rachel to city boundary 

Charbonneau, oft" 575 St. Lawrence 



»: 



INDEX TO STREETS. 



39 



1 679 Slier- 



11 96 and 186 
mmissioners 

on 

chine Road 



Notre Dame 
Dorchester 

Catherine 
ume 
;ter 
;7 St. Cath. 

m Av. 
19 Latour 
olce 
e 

yle Av. 
^untain 
to 2 Found- 
Gill Col. Av. 
)anie 

le 
ier 
h 
:art 

illez Square 

■al 



le 

S'otre Dame 

es 

• City Hall 

id), from 46 

oke 

iste Ward), 

Jary 

awrence 



Claremont PI., bet. 209 and aiyBlenry 
Charlotte, off 133 St. Dominicpue 
Charron, from 32 Hibernia to Favard 
Chateauguay, off 632 Lagauchetiere 
Chatham, off 252 St. Anloine 
Chausse, formerly Paris, off i Sher- 

brooke 
Chenneville, off 615 Craig 
Cherrier, off 402 St. Denis 

' errier (St. Jeam Haptiste), from 990 

ht. Dominique to 1157 St. Lawrence 
Chomedy, off 2786 St. Catnerine 
City Councillors, off 2166 St. (jatherine 
Clarke, from St. Jean Baptiste North to 

Mount Royal Av. 
Clifton Place, at 375 Mountain 
Clon])ur Place, at 08S Lagauchetiere 
Clyde I'lace, at 666 Lagauchetiere 
Chmtarf Place, at ()58 Lagauchetiere 
Closse, off 182 St. Catherine 
Clyde Terrace, at 40 City Councillors 
Cochrane Place, at 222 St. George 
Colborne, formerly Kennedy, from the 

Canal North to 2067 Notre Dame 
Colborne Av., see Delormier Av. 
College, from 124 McGill to Chaboillez 
Colorane, off 85 Hibernia 
"olumbus Place, at 199 Bleury 
commissioners, from i Barrack, below 

the C. P.R. East End Depot to III 

McGill 
Concord, opposite 271 Bleury 
Conde, oil' 479 Wellington 
Congregation, off 584 Wellington 
Congregation Lane, in Favard 
Contant, off 84 Campeau 
Conway, off 25 St. Etienne 
Cornwall Terrace, at 64 St. Denis 
Costigan Lane, off 263 Richmond 
Cote des Neiges Road, off 1227 Sher- 

brooke 
College Row, at 52 City Councillors 
Cot6, off 581 Craig 

Coursol, from 198 Canning to city limits 
Courville, off 525 St. Lawrence 
Craig, from 342 vSt. James East to 

Hochelaga 
Crescent, off 2498 St. Catherine 
Custom House Square, at 227 Com- 
missioners 
Cypress, off 130 Peel 



Dalhousie, from 98 Common to 128 

William 
Dalhousie Square, at 1410 Notre Dame 
De Bresoles, off 43 St. Sulpice 
Deslisle, from 96 Canning West 
Delormier Av., formerly Colborne, from 

893 Notre Dame to city limits 
De Rouard Place, at 22 St. Elizabeth 
De Salaberry, off 11 19 Notre Dame 
Desery, oil' 257 Notre Dame 
Desrivieres, off 605 St. James 
Desrivieres Av., off 10 Desrivieres 
Devienne, off 227 St. George 
Devon Place, at 688 Lagauchetiere 
Devonport Place, between 38 and 44 

St. Alex;inder 
Devonshire Place, at 62 Craig 
Devonshire Place, at 714 Sherbrooke 
DoUard, off 224 St. James 
Dominion, off 420 St. Antoine 
Dominion Square, formerly Catholic 
Cemetery, on Dorchester, Peel, Wind- 
sor, Metcalfe and Os])orne 
Dominion Av., off 142 Fulford 
Donegani, off 126 Windsor 
Dorchester runs froi; »ne end of the city 
to the other, beUseen Lagauchetiere 
and St. Catherine 
Dorchester Av., formerly called Sisson's 
Lane, western continuation of Dor- 
chester, Cote St. Antoine 
Dorchester Terrace, at 91 St. Constant 
Dowd, formerly St. Germain, off 90 

Bleury 
Drolet, off 13 St. Louis Square / 

Drummond, from 80 Osborne 
Dubord, otr65 Campeau 
Dubrule Lane, off 35 Versailles 
Dufaux Lane, off 159 St. Elizabeth 
Dufferin, from 85 Rachel North 
Dufresne, off 689 Notre Dame North 
Duke, from 81 Common to 121 College 
Dumarais, off 1 16 German 
Dunedin Place, between 30 and 74 

University 
Dupre Lane, off 1973 Notre Dame 
Duquette Lane, off 91 Versailles 
Durham Place, between 26 St. Louis 

and Lacroix 
Durham, see Plessis 
Durocher, off 735 Sherbrooke 



40 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



P^ 



Echelon Terrace, at 536 Sherbrooke 
Edgehill Av., off 1260 Dorchester 
Edinburgh, from 37 Charron to Liver- 
pool 
Edith Terrace, between 72 &= 86 Fortier 
Eglinton I'lace, Mance 
Eleanor, from 207 OttaM-a to 266 Wil- 
liam 
Elizabeth Terrace, at 25 Elizabeth 
Ellengowan Terrace, at 239 University 
Ellesmere Place, at 1 21 Drummond 
Elliott's Block, at 2078 St. Cathnrine 
Eden Cottages, at 143 Canning 
Elysc rl.ice, between 63 and 6g Dubord 
Emerald Place, at 70 Victoria 
Emery, see St. Emery 
Emma Terrace, at 641 Ontario 
Erie, from 32 Delormier Av. to 45 Shaw 
Ernest, oil' 394 St.'Denis 
Essex Av., otr 1265 Dorchester 
Etienne, see St. Etienne 
Evans Block, between 37 and 49 Bleury 
Evans, off 270 St. Charles Borromee 
Evans Court, off 10 St. Monique 
Evans Court, off 4S9 St. Paul 
Evans Place, bet. 24 and 34 Argyle Av. 
Exeter Terrace, between 387 and 393 

St. Lawrence 
Farm, oil' 425 Wellington 
P'avard, formerly Congregation, from 

88 Sebastopol to 105 Bouigeois 
Forfar, from the River West to 67 St. 

Etienne 
Foyne Av., off 183 (luy 
Fort, off 1 157 Dorchester 
Fortier, runs 011381 St. Lawrence 
Fortification l.ane, from 17 St. (iabriel 

to Victoria Square 
Fortune, oil' 711 Wellington 
Foster's Court, see Elm Av, 
Foundling, o])p()site St. Ann's Market 
Fournier, ofl 392 Seigneurs 
Frederick Place, at 31 St. George 
Friponne, off 64 St. Paul 
P'rontenac, off 603 Notre Dame 
P'ronteiiac Lane, off 50 Fryntenac 
Fulford, off 2727 Notre Dame 
Fullum, oil' 775 Notre L>ame 
Fullum Lane, off 294 Fullum 
(lain, oil' 975 Notre Dame 
Gale, off 463 Notre Danie 



George Hypolite, see St. Hypolite 
German, oil' 443 Craig to 476 Sherbrooke 
Gosford, off 1533 Notre Dame 
Grand Trunk, off 10 Conde 
Grant, oti" 1273 Notre Dame 
Grant Lane, off 36 Dufresne 
Gratton Place, at 205 Bleury 
Greenfield Place, at lo University 
Greenock Place, at 1959 St. Catherine 
Grey Nun, from 45 Common to 12 Wil- 
liam 
Grothe, north from 1256 Mignonne 
Groulx Lane, off 63 Versailles 
(hiilbault, from 585 tn 164 St. Urbain 
Guy, from 433 Wi'liam to I128 Sher- 
brooke 
Guy Avenue, off 157 Guy 
Haldane Place, at 321 St. Urbain 
Hanover Terrace, at 87 Bleury 
Flanover, off 834 Dorchester 
ILirbour, off 550 Notre Dame 
Harmony, near Fullum 
llavelock Terrace, at 176 Mountain 
Flermine, olf 761 Craig 
Hester's Court, near 12 Bleury 
Hibernia, off 837 Wellington 
Hillside Place, at 239 University 
Hillside Terrace, at 589 Seigneurs 
Holyrood Place, at McGirl College Av: 
Hochelaga Market, from Desery to St. 

Michael 
Hos])ital, off 78 St. Francois Xavier 
Hotel Dieu, see Pine Av. 
Houle, from 537 Wolfe to 354 Amherst 
IJudon, .rom 24 Desery lo St. Micliel 
Hunter, opp. 17 Chatham to 12 Canning 
Iberville, off 621 Notre Dame 
hikerman Terrace, at 33 Drummond 
Inspector, off 66 St. Antoine 
Island, from 268 St. Patrick to Mullins 
Isaac Alley, off 70 St. Urbain 
Jacques Carlier Place, at 187 Bleury 
Jacques Cartier, ofl 1330 Notre Dame 
Jacques Cartier Sip, oil 1554 Notre Dame 
Jamaica Place, at 43 German 
Jean, off 1070 Si. Lawrence 
Jessie's Terrace, at 58 St. Hypolite 
Joachim Lane, olf 16 Dufresne 
Joly Lane, off 1 530 Ontario 
Josephat, off 133 Papineau Road 
Josephine, opposit) 246 St. Urbain 



INDEX TO STREETS. 



41 



Jubilee Avenue, off 249 Guy 

Jurors, from 54 St, George to Victoria 

Square 
Kelvin I'lace, bet. 74 and 76 Ontario 
Kempt, see Young 
Kennedy, see Colborne 
Kensington Terrace, at 649 St. Lawrence 
Kent, from 78 Delormier to 67 Shaw 
Kilmun Terrace, at 216 Mountain 
Kilwin Place, bet. 68 and 70 Victoria 
Kilwinning Place, Richmond Square 
King, from 57 Common to 26 William 
Kingsbridge Terrace, at 317 St. Urbain 
Knox, off 37 Hibernia 
Labelle, off 1638 St. Catherine 
Lacroix, off 1391 Notre Dame 
I.afontaine, oil 277 Visitation 
Lagaucheticre, from 24 Shaw to Cath- 
edral. That part between Catheilral 
and Heaver Hall Hill is now known 
as Palace 
Lagauchetiere l.ane, at 350 Lagauche- 
ticre 
Larin Avenue, of! 477 Seigneur*-- 
Lariviere, off 383 Visitation 
Lartique I'lace, near 405 Sherbrooke 
Latour, from Victoria Square to 20 St. 

Monique 
Laval Avenue, off 445 Sherbrooke 
Leclaire Avenue, of 342 Riciimond 
Leduc Lane, off 3173 St. Dominique 
Leicester I'lace, at 76 University 
Lemoine, from loo St. Peter to 147 

McCiill 
Leon XIII, off 166 St. St. Denis 
L'Epiphany i'lace, near 48 St. Denis 
Leroux, off 361 Seigneurs 
Le Koyer, off 39 St. Sulpice 
Lincoln Avenue, off 478 Guy 
Lincoln Place, between 217 
Bleury 



and 225 
142 



Lionais, from 3S2 Cadieux to 

Piintaleon 
Little Manufacturers, off 152 Shearer 
Little St. Antoine, off 320 St. James 
Liverpool, from 773 Wellington to the 
end t)f (.'harron 
Lock Lane, olV 230 Richmond 
Logan, off 159 Papineau Road 
Logan, Farm, from I'apineau Road to 
Champlain 



Longueuil Ferry Lane, off 633 Notre 

Dame 
Longueuil Lane, from 21 College to 

1849 Notre Dame 
Lome Avenue, off 40 Prince Arthur 
Lome Crescent, off 40 Prince Arthur 
Louis Ilypolite, off 26 St. Christophe 
Lusignan, off 264 St. Antoine 
Lynedoch Place, at 2295 St. Catherine 
McCiregor, off 84 Simpson 
Mackay, from 998 Dorchester to [094 

Sherbrooke 
Magdala Place, at 2197 St. Catherine 
Magdalen, off 603 W'ellington 
Maisonneuve, formerly Sydenham, from 

72 Lagauchetiere to Sherbrooke 
Mance, off 2065 St. Catherine 
Mansfield Place, Mansfield, between 

St. Catlierine and Sherbrooke 
Manstield, from 852 Lagauchetiere to 

862 Sherbrooke 
Manufacturers, off 144 Shearer 
Majtle, near 265 Sherbrooke 
Maple Avenue, between 2122 and 2124 

Notre 1 )ame 
Maple Avenue, from the Railway Track 

to 102 Mullins, Point St. Charles 
Marbach Place, at 422 Dorchester 
Marianna, off 252 Fullum 
Marie Anne, off 58 Champlain 
Marie Joseph, off 31 St. Andre 
Marie Louise Avenue, 01X323 Sanguinet 
Market Square, off l8l St. Lawrence 
Market, at 1087 St. La\vrence 
Marlborougli PI., bet. 214 &^ 224 Bleury 
Marlboroiigli, 01X383 Noire Dame 
Mathieson Place, i)etween 31 and 47 

City Councillors 
Mathieu, off 947 Ontario 
Mfiyor, from 204 iSleury to 35 Aylmer 
McCord, v)iV22l2 Notre Dame 
McDiarmid Terrace, at 20 St. Martin 
Mc( lill, from \ ictoria Sq. to 33 Common 
McGill Collei.;e Av., olt ^aSy'Si. Cath. 
McTavish, oil SS7 Sherl)rooke 
Mcnai, from 44 Britannia North to 86 

i'Orfar 
Merchants Exchange Court, off 10 Hos- 
pital 
Metcalfe Block, between 86 .md 1 10 

Cathedral 



i; 



42 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



Metcalfe, from Dorchester, opposite St. 

Peter's Cathedral, to S87 Sherbrooke 
Metcalfe Lane, off 300 Richmond 
Mignonne, off 227 Si. Urbain 
Mignonne (llochelaga), from 222 St. 

Michel 
Mignonne Lane, now part of Mignonne 
Mill, between the upper basin of the 

canal and the river 
Milton, from 65 Shiiter to Lome Av. 
Milton Avenue, off 92 Mance 
Mitchison Av,, near 684 St. [>awrence 
Molson riace and Terrace, off 306 Notre 

Dame 
Mondelet, now called Eleanor 
Monarcjue, off 1000 Notre Dame 
Monet Lane, off 344 Aqueduct 
Montana, off 28 Cherrier 
Montcalm, intersects Notre 1 )ame at 1252 
Montcalm Terrace, between 2 and 14 

Montcalm 
Monteith Place, between 94 and 102 

Cadieux 
Monteith Terrace, between 90 and 108 

Uni\ersity 
Monigreenan Place, betweeh 

121 Nazareth 



119 and 

and 2S5 



Montmorenci, between 275 

Dorchester 
Montrose Terrace, between 55 and 04 

1 )runimond 
Ab)reau. fiom 347 Notre Dame 
Morland. o If 287 St. Martin 
Moulton Av., off 456 St. Lawrence 
Mount Charles Place, at 115 St. Dom- 
inique 
Mount Royal Av., from 771 St. Denis 
Mount Royal Cemetery Road, near 

Mile Lml 
^^nuuain Terrace, between 237 and 249 

Mountain 
M'luniain, off 2212 Notre Dame 
Mounl Si. Mary Av., ofl 227 St. Antoine 
MuUins, from 489 Wellington 
Munro, off 246 Champlain 
Murray, off 2131 Notre Dame 
Mysterious Lane, now called Leclaire 

Avenue 
Napoleon Road, off the extreme end of 

Wellington, Point St. Charles 
Napoleon, irum Oyo St. i,a\vrence 



Nazareth, from 89 Common to 114 

William 
Normand, off 68 P^oundling 
Notre Dame extends from lloclielaga to 
St. Henry, a distance of about five 
miles. The t^ast end of Notre Dame 
was formerly called St. Mary ; the 
centre, around the vicinity of Notre 
Dame Church, was called Notre Dame, 
and West of that it was known as 
St, Joseph 
O'Leary Avenue, off 414 Seigneurs 
(Jlier, from 31 McCord to Richmond 
Ontario, from 237 Pleury to St. Michel 
Osborne, at C. P. R. Depot 
Ottawa, from 90 (^ueen to Canal liasin 
Overdale Av., 011372 Atpieduct 
Oxenden Av., olf 17 Prince Arthur 
Palace, see Lagauclietiere 
Panet, from 69 Water to Sherbrooke 
Pantaleon, from 3 Napoleon 
Panlaleon, in rear of 1 10 Laval Av. 
Pa])iheau ^Larket, at 1003 Notre Dame 
Papineau Road, from Papineau Square 
Papineau Stpiare, oil' 1003 N\)tre Dame 
Paris, from 59 Charron to 82 Liverpool 
Park Av., fmm head of IJleurv to Mount 

Royal Av. 
Parker, oM' 356 Visitation 
Parthenthais Sq. and St., oirSl5 Notre 

Dame 
Palerson, oir2l8 Delormier Av. 
Paxton Avenue, oil' 303 Richmond 
Payette, oil 252 Seigneurs 
Pea L,ane, oil' 11 Roy Lane 
Peel, from Dominion Sq. to Mount Royal 
Perrault Court, olf 21 St. Dominique 
Perrhius, oil' 27 Campeau 
Phillip's Place, from P.eaver Hall Sq. 

to Phillip's Sq. 
Phillip's S()., head of Phillip's Place 
Picard Lane, (ill 1721 St. Catherine 
Pichette, oil 209 B irre Lane 
Pine Av., formerly Hotel Dieu 
Place d'Armes. oil' 170I Notre Dame, 

opposite Notre Dame Church 
Place d'Armes liill, from ilo St. James 

to 504 Craig 
Plateau Av,, otl' 1999 St. Catherine 
Plateau, east from 3 1 Mance 
Platl, oil 1791 Ontario 



ll'HI" 



INDEX TO STREETS. 



43 



Plessis, oir 107 Lagauchetieie 
Plymouth Grove, oil' head of Canning 

and in rear of 385 St. Antoine 
Poele Lane, oti'g Rolland Lane 
Port, from 10 Common to 18 Foundling 
Poupart, oil 19 Logan 
Prefontaine, oil' 297 Notre Dame 
Prince, from 68 William to the Canal 
Prince Arthur, oil' 27 1 Univeasity 
Provencal Lane, oil' 157 Dufresne 
I'rovost, otr 117 Desery 
(^)ueen, from 67 Common to 48 William 
(^uesnel, from 1 14 L'lilford 
(^)uil)lier, see Tiipper 
Rachel, oiV 107 1 St. Lawrence 
Railway Track, from Bonaventure Sta- 
tion to city limits 
Rapallo, oil' 303 Craig 
Recollet, from 89 St Peter to 207 McGill 
Redpath, oil' 1059 Sherbrooke 
Richarrlson, from 37 Conde to 39 Island 
Riclimond, oil' 305 St. Antoine 
Richmond Sep, at 305 St. Antoine 
Riclimond Av., oil' 296 Guy 
Rivard, oU' Roy 
Rivet, oil' 40 Lulliim 
Robillard, oil' 85 Moreau 
Robin, oil' 250 Visitation 
Rolland, oil' 37 Mountain 
Ro]icry, from 336 St. Patrick 
Rousseau, olf 14 Campeau 
Roxburgh Place, at 33 Metcalfe 
Roy, crosses at 426 St. Denis 
Roy Lane, oil' 1915 Notre Dame 
Royal, from 107 ililiernia 
Rushbrook, from 123 llibernia 
Ryde, oil" 57 llibernia 
Sanguincl, oil' 401 Craig 
Scliiller Ci)iiages, at 360 Dorchester 
Schoolliouse, formerly St. Phillip Lane, 

oil' iq Mountain 
Scotland, sec Argyle A v. 
Seaton, oil' Rachel, near I'apineau Road 
Seaver, oil' 24 Robillard, Ilochclaga 
Sebasto])ol, oil' 576 Wellington 
Seigneurs, fioni Lacliine Canal to 1 154 

1 )orchesler 
Seminary, oil' 164 McCord 
SlianiKni, oil' 207 Wellington 
.Shaw, (\\>n\ 1)51) Notre Dame, to city Its. 
Shearer, froniG.T.R. track to Lach. cnl. 



Sherbrooke runs from East to West 

above St. Catherine 
Shuter, oil' 751 Sherbrooke 
Simpson, oil 1094 Sherbrooke 
Smith, from 46 Colborne to 41 McCorJ 
South Esk Place, at 269 Mountain 
Spier's Lane, oil' 102 Prince 
St. Adolphus, oil' 10 1 6 Notre Dame 
St. x\gnes, oll'G Farm, Point St. Chas. 
St. Albert, from 98 Island, I't. St. Chas. 
St. Alexander, oil' 713 Craig 
St. Alexis, oil' 1770 Notre Dame 
St. Alexis, oil' 59 Suzanne 
St. Alphonse, oil' 13 10 St. Catherine 
St. Amable, oil' 18 Jacques Cartier Sq. 
St. Andre, oil' 249 Dorcliester 
St. Andrew's, oil' 304 St. Patrick 
St. Ann's Market, 01193 McGill 
St. Antoine runs east to west above St. 

James 
St. Antoine Market, at the junction of 

Mountain and St. James 
St. .Agustin, oil' 125 McCord 
St. Bernard oil' 10 1 Bleury 
St. Catherine runs east to west, from 

Hochelaga to Cote St. Antoine about 

four miles 
St. Christophe, oil' 335 Dorchester 
St. Claude, oil' 1518 Notre Dame 
St. Columban, oil' 371 W'ellington 
St. Constant, oil' 461 I'raig 
St. David Lane, formerly St. Edward 

from 1988 Notre Dame to 44 St. Ant. 
St. Denis, frtjni 633 l,'raig to city limits 
St. Dizier, oil' 107 Commissioners 
St. Dominique, frojn 4S9 Craig crosses 

at 1900 St. Catherine 
St. Edward, oil 1O5 lUcury 
St. Eli/abetii, from 429 *.'raig north 
St. Eli<i, oil' 449 St. Paul 
St. Emery, oil 176 St. Denis 
St. Etienne, fnmi the river to Lachine 

canal 
St. Famille, from 629 Shcibrooke north 
St. Felix, oil' 2080 Notre Dsme 
St. Francis, oil' 153 Grand 'i'runk 
St. Francois, oil lia rack 
St. Francois Xavier, oll'()o6 L'raig 
St. Gubriel, 011486 Craig 
St. Gabriel Market, >il'(l on Montmorenci 

Centre and Richmond, I't. St. Chas. 






1^ 



44 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



St. Genevieve, oH" 19 St. Antoine 

St. George, off 2064 St. Catherine 

St. Germain, from 53 Mignonne 

St. Germain, see Dowd 

St. Helen, oH' 18 15 Notre Dame 

St. Henry, oil' 1S66 Notre Dame 

St. Henry, Point St. Charles, off 291 

Grand Trunk 
St. Hubert, off 312 Craig 
St. Hypolite, off 500 Sherbrooke 
St. Hypolite Lane, off 1649 Ontario 
St. Ignace, oil' Lagauchetiere 
St. James runs from Court House and 

City Hall to St. Henri, between Notre 

Dame and St. Antoine 
St. James Market, at 1253 Ontario 
St. James Square, at 122 St. Denis 
St. Janvier, see Osborne 
St. Jean Baptisle, off 1635 ^otre Dame 
St. Jean Baptiste, from Montana to St. 

Urbain, St. Jean Baptiste Village 
St. Jean Baptiste Market, 1072 St. 

Lawrence 
St. John, otr 1759 Notre Dame 
St. Julie, off 88 St- Pierre 
St. Justin, oir 1876 St. Catherine 
St. Lambert, from 1659 Notre Dame 
St. Lawrence, from 509 Craig to St. 

Jean Baptiste Village 
St. Lawrence Market, at 181 St. Lawr. 
St. Leon Lane, at 19 Holland Lane 
St. Louis, otr 29 Gosford 
St. Luke, west from 46" Guy 
St. Margaret, off eo8 St. James 
St. Mark, oil' 117S Sherbrooke 
St, Martin, oil' 324 St. Antoine 
St. Ma/thew, off 1890 Dorchester 
St. Maurice, oil' 150 McGill 
St. Michel Lane, oil' 1785 Notre Dame 
St, Monique Av., oil St. Moniquc 
St. Moni(pie, oil' 43 St. Antoine 
St. Nicholas, from 379 Commissioners 
St. Patrick West, from 347 Wellington 
St. Paul, from Dalhousie .Square to 125 

McGill 
St. Peter, from 23 Common to 572 Craig 
St. Philip, off 1008 St. Catherine 
St. I'ierre Lane, oil' 331 Mignonne 
St. Radegoncic, now Victoria Sq. 
St. Koch Lane, on'68 Dufresne 
St. Rose, otr 80 Papineau Road 



St. Sacrament, off 52 St. Frs. Xavier 
St. Sulpice, off 1702 Notre Dame 
St. Therese, from 20 St. Vincent 
St. Thomas, off 320 William 
St. Urbain, off 551 Craig 
St. Vincent, off 1576 Notre Dame 
Stanley, back of Windsor Hotel 
Summer Hill Av., off 21 Cote des 

Neiges Road 
Sussex, off 1257 Dorchester 
Suzanne, from 637 Notre Dame north 
Sydenham Lane off 44 Maisonneuve 
Tansley, off 100 Delormier Av. 
Tar Lane, off 129 Nazareth 
Theatre Lane, oil' 158 Vitre 
Thistle Terrace, off 128 St. Monique 
Torquay, at Durocher 
Torrance, off 126 Mountain 
Tower Av., off 2723 St. Catherine 
Tapper, off 48 St. Matthew 
Tweed Cottages, at 7 Mayor 
L'nion Av., from 801 Dorchester to 759 

Sherbrooke 
Union Row, Union Av., near Dorch. 
University, from 828 Dorchester 
Upper Sanguinet, at Roy 
Vallee, off 211 St. George 
Vaudreuil, from 265 St. Paul 
Vercheres Av., opp. 157 St. Chs. Borr. 
Versailles, off 248 St. Antoine 
Victor, off 93 St. Paul 
Victoria, from 2244 St.Cath. to 881 Sher. 
Victoria Sq., from McGill to Beaver 

Hall Hill 
Viger Sq., at the junction of Craig and 

St. Denis 
Visitation, off II 53 Notre Dame 
Vitre, from 12 St. Denis to 63 St. Geo. 
Voltigeurs, oil' 1045 Notre Dame 
Water, from Voltigeurs "* 

Waverly Terrace, at 239 Blcury 
W^ellington, from 52 McGill to Point 

St. Charles 
Widows Lane, from 39 St. Rose 
William, from 92 McGill to Canning 
Windsor, from 601 St. Jas. to Dom. Sq. 
Wolfe, from 12S0 Notre Dame 
Woodyard, at 1358 Noire Dame 
Workman, from 56 Can'g to city limits 
Young, from 239 \Vellington to 214 Wm. 
Youville, from 23 Common 



il 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF CITIES. 



45 



ester to 759 



to88iSher. 
I to Beaver 



ALPHABETICAL LIST of the Cities, Tows and Chief Villages in the 
Dominion, with Population, Line of Railway on which situated, and the 
distance from Montreal : — 



NAME 



ONTARIO. 

POPULATION ROUTE MILES 

Alexandria 1614 C.A.. 60 

Almonte 3071 *-•,, '^^ 

Arnprior 334i '' ■■ 

Barrie 555o N. fN.W. ...... . 

Belleville 99^4 G. 1 -K. 6^ C.^-K . 

Berlin 7425 ') 

Bowm.-xn ville 3377 , , 

Brampton 3252 ' 

Brantford i2753 ^- ^ •^- ■ • • • • ' • • • • 

Brockville 8793 *' ^C.P.R. 

Carleton Place. . . 3000 ^-l;-!^ 

Chatham 9"52 <J' I ;R. 

Cobours; 4*^29 ''^ 

Coliingwood 494" ^^ 

Cornw.iU 6805 '^ 

Deseronto 3338 '^| 

Dundas 354^ 

(;alt 7535 

Gananoqne 36P9 , 

Goderich 3^39 ' 

G-.ielph ir>539 \ 

Hamilton 4898" ' 

IngersoU 4191 '' 

Kemptville 2000 C.I.R 

Kine-ston 19264 G. 1 .K. iv C.l -K. i73 



&C.P.R. 



171 
396 
220 

395 
393 
365 
454 
125 
148 
321 
264 
427 
67 

470 
391 

155 



Whitby 2786 G.T.R. ... 

Windsor 10322 " 

Woodstock 8612 " 



381 

372 

&C.P.R. 470 
108 



Lindsay 6089 

London 3i977 

Merrickville 2000 

Mnrrisburg 2000 

Nap.inee 3434 

Niagara Falls ... 3349 

O.angeville 2962 

I IriUia 4752 

Oshawa 4^>'-'''' 

( )wi.n Sound .... 7497 

Ottawa 44154 

I'luis J094 

I'cmbroke t4"' 

I'erth 3136 

Peterborough ... 9717 

I'utroloa 4,-57 

Picton 3-''''7 

Port .\rt!uir 2(19^ 



324 

&C.P.R. 454 

C.P.R "9 

G.I' R 92 

198 

470 

C.P.R 404 

G r.R — 

" 299 

466 
120 



C.P.R 

" &(;.i.R.. 

C.P.R. 

" &GT.1V' 

M . Central 

Cent. Oiii 

C.P.R. 



2«4 
14T 
263 



903 
270 



P.irt Hope 5042 <J'i' •■^ •,,,,, ,, ,,_ 

Prescott 2919 ^, „ ^^^■l'■l- "3 

Kunlrew 2hT, C.P R '"^ 

Sarnia ('O93 <; I R _f'2 

Si:ni:oe 2074 

smith's F:ills ■<Sh4 

St. t'athartiiL's. . . 9170 

St. .Mary's 34XJ 

^.| '1 li.nnas lo.'wO 

Stratl'cinl 9V" 

Strathroy .v!''' 

Toro.ito 1812J0 

'I'renlon 43''4 

N'anklei.'k Hiil . • ■ '•'"<") 
Walkerton 3>-'^" 





P.R 


129 


( 1 


.T.R 


375 

432 


^^ 


.P.R 


470 


i 1 


T.R 


42 1 

474 




p R . i^ t ; 


T.R. 333 




■r.R .... 


2-:!2 

bo 



QUEBEC. 



3551 



Coaticook 3082 G.T.R 

Farnhain 2822 " & C.P.R . 

Fraserville or ? 

R.duLoup ... i •♦'"5 

Hull 11265 C.P.R 

Himtingdon 2000 

Joliette 3347 C.P.R 

Lachute 2751 " 

Lauzon or ? 

St. Joseph 'i 

Nicolet 2518 

Quebec 63090 

Richmond 2056 

Sherbrooke loiio 

Sorel 6669 

St. Hyacinthe . . 7016 G.T.R. 

St. John's 4772 

Three Rivers.... 8334 C.P.R. 

Valleyficld 5516 C.A.... 

Waterloo 2951 (i.T.R. 



305 
599 
460 



125 

49 

118 
"48 



C.P.R. &G T.R. 

G.T.R 

C.P.R- &G.T,R. 



& C.P.R. 



172 

77 
104 

45 
36 
27 

94 
45 
48 



NEW BRUNSWICK 



P. E. I. 



Cliarlottetown . . .ii374 
Fredcrickton .... 6502 

Moncton 8765 

St. John 39179 

Woodstock 3290 



C.P.R. 



NOVA SCOTIA. 
C.P.R... 



C.P.R. 

Inl 

C.P.R. 



Aniherpt 3781 

Dartimuuh 6249 

Halifax ;3855i' 

l.unenlnng 4>^44 

New (;iasgow 3S39 

i'icton 2999 

Spring Hill 4813 

Trin-o 5102 

Yarmouth 6089 



MANITOBA. 

Br.indon 3788 C.P.R.. 

Calgar" 3^75 ' •' 

Portage I. a Prairie 33(..3 

Winnipeg 2f642 " .. 



459 
570 
482 
449 



618 

756 

737 
749 
63s 
694 



..'557 

, .22t.i4 

..1497 
..1342 



i;ritisii coi,lmi:ia. 

... J5V5 I'l'.l^ 



Nanaimn 

New Wes'.nilitster tb\\ 

Vancouver J.^f'Ss 

\'ictoi ia 16H4' 



.3034 

.aSgi 

•»9"7 
,1960 



m 



46 



LODGE DIRECTORIES. 



INIASONIC niRECTOIlY 



No. Name of Lodge. 



Monthly Meeting. 



Place OF Meeting. 



25 Royal Ai.HERT, 2nd Monday (except June, July and Aug.), 6 Philips Square. 
227 Antiquity 3rd Wednesday 1743 Notre Dame St. 

57 Hociif:la(;a ist Thursday 118 Mansfield St. 

44 St. CiiARLEh 4th Monday 1743 Notre Dame St. 

53 St. Andrkw's 

38 Mount Mori ah ist Friday 1743 Notre Dame St. 

7 Ei.c.iN 1st Monday (except July and Aug. . . . 1743 Notre Dame St. 

Argyi.e 

RoYAh Arch. . .3rd Monday in Feb., Apl., Oct and Dec. .6 Phillips Square. 
Carnavon Chatter | 3rd Thursday, (except June, J ^,^^ Nnt,-^ Dnm^ St. 



OK Royal Arch . . \ July and August \ '743 ^otie uame 

6 Arch Ciiai'TER Mount Horeb Royal. 2nd Wednsday. 1743 Notre Dame St. 



0130FELT.OWS' DIRECTORY. 

No. Name of Lodge. Monthly Meetng. Place of Meeting. 

3 1 15 Loyal Montreai Everry alternate Thursday. . . . 662)4 Craig St. 

5896 Loyal Victoria Alternate Monday St. Charles Club House. 

2 1 Nelson Every Monday 662 j^ Craig St, 

6237 Loyal Excelsior Alternate Tuesday 662^4 Craig St. 

6313 Loyal Star of the West. Alternate Tuesday 134 Chatham St. 

89 A. J, O. Kesih.r Shel Harzel De Sola 

I Mount Royal Every Monday 251 St. James St. 

3 Mlzi'AH Every Thursday 662^ Craig St. 

4 Duke ok EDiNiiURGii Every 7'uesday 118 Mansfield St. 

1 Montreal Encampment .2nd and 4th Wednesday 662^^ Craig St. 

Patriarchs Militant ) 1 tv 1 j re ,/ r- ■ c^ 

Canton Mt. Royal. . \ ^^^ Wednesday 662;^ Craig St. 

6 liKAVER Every Tuesday. .Oddfellows' Hall, Pt. St. Chas. 

2 Wellington Wednesday Oddfellows' Hall, Chatham St. 




ORANGE DIIiECTORV. 

The following Primary Lodges meet in Orange Hall, 246 St. James Street, 
Montreal : — 

Name OF Lodge. Monthly Meeting. Degree Meeting. 



No. 



.4th Thursday. 
.Chatham St. Hall. 



224 1 )KRRY 2nd Thursday . 

304 ILxcKK.iT Ist Thursday . . 

350 V ICTORIA 4th Monday 

364 Prince ok Walks ist Wednesday . . .3rd Wednesday. A 

401 Hoynk 3rd Friday isl Friday. 

413 DuKK OK Ycrk 3rd Monday 

1263 Dominion 2nd Monday 3rd Thursday. 

1373 LoRNK 4th l'"riday Fomas Hall, Point St. Charles. 

1474 Diamond 2nd Tuesday 1240 Notre Dame Street. 



THE publisher's ADVERTISEMENT. 



47 



OF Meeting. 

lilips Square, 
tre Dame St. 
stield St. 
tre Dame St. 

tre Dame St. 
tre Dame St. 

Hips Square. 
itre Dame St. 
tre Dame St. 



OF Meeting. 
! Craig St. 
Club House. 
\ Craig St. 
Craig St. 
Chatham St. 



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publications. 

Prayer Books 

Specially made up for PRESENTATION PURPOSES, 

being handsomely designed and of the hignest finish in j S"' J2 
Standard Bindings, including "Two Volume Com- ji | 




o =t 



e .- 



liiNATiON Sets " (Epistles and Gospels separate), bound in ' „ 
Fine German Calf, French Seal. Turkey, Morocco, Pearl ; g-- ? 
and Tortoise Shell bindings. , 



Silver and Gold Medals, 

Crosses and Crucifixes, in Gold, Silver, Pearl, Fine Ivory, Ebony, 
Nickle and Hone. 

Rosaries 

In fine rich Silver Mountings, in Garnet, Coral, Jet, Amber, 
Pearl, Agate, and Cocoa. 



o 



o ^ 

E ca 

•C o 

O 

o 



3 ~0^^^«>^^<--'^ C 



Catholic and Miscellaneous Literature 



--T^' 




D. &. J, SADI^IER & CO.» 

Catholic Publishers, Booksellers and Stationers, 



1669 Notre Dame St., 

Haifa Block East of the Church of Notre Dame, 
MONTREAL, P.Q. 



123 Church St., 

Two Doors South of Queen Street, 
TORONTO, Ont. 






I' *.^ 



52 



<]THE MONTREAL BOOK TRADE I> 



I 
I 

■I- 
llli 



This GUIDE 
Book Stores: — 



is always for sale at the following 



WINDSOR HOTEL NEWS STAND. 

W. DRYSDALE \: CO., 232 St. James Street, and Corner Peel 
and St. Catherine Streets. 

JOHN PARSLOW, Stationer and Bookbinder, 160 St. James Street. 

MRS. FISHER, Stamp Vendor and Periodical Dealer, Corner St. 
Francois Xavier Street, o])posite Post Office. 

W. G. CLARKE, Fancy Goods, &c.. 238 St. James Street. 

J. T. HENDERSON, Bookseller and Lending Library, 139 St. 
Street. 

ST. LAWRENCE HALL NEWS STAND. 

C. ASHFORD, 800 Dorchester Street. 
EBEN PICKEN, 33 Beaver Hall Hill. 

D. & J. SADLIER, Catholic Publishers and Booksellers, 1669 
Notre Dame Street. 

BALMORAL HOTEL NEWS STAND. 

METHODIST BOOK ROOM, 3 Bleury Street. 

F. E. PHELAN, 2331 St. Catherine Street. 

H. .^' M. WHITE, 133 St. Peter Street. 

JOSEPH FORTIER, 254 St. James Street. 



French Booksellers and Publishers. 

CADIEUX cS: DEROME, 1603 Notre Dame Street. 

FABRE & GRAVEL, 161 9 Notre Dame Street. 

GRANGER FRERES, 1699 Notre Dame Street, opposite Notre 
Dame Church. 



ADVERTISKMENI'. 



53 



site Notre 




Before you leave Montreal 



BUY A COPY OF 






The Magazine of Select Fiction, contain- 
ing each issue 15 to 20 Stories, 
by the best Authors. 

SALL COMPLETE STORIES 
BRIGHT, Entertaining, and of High Grade. 



The new periodical of cosmopolitan fiction, "Short Stories," has adopted the highest standard 
for literary merit and entertainment, and is edited very critically to maintain it." — Boston Globe. 



SHORT STORIES can be bought at any of the News 
Stands mentioned on the opposite page.'^^K 

It"is|theibest TraveUng Companion you can have. 



PRICE, 350. 
Sub^ei'iptioii, S3.00 i>ei' yeai*. 



PUBLISHED BY 



ThAt^urrent literature publishing §0. 



(J 



52 and 54 LAFAYETTE PLACE, 
NEW YORK. 



54 




C. P. R. BRIDGE, LACHINE, 








VICTOR!^ BRIDGE, MONTREAL. 



55 



MOTH MRS m 

"«»VASK FOR AND SEE THAT YOU GETi^». 

^^^ DAWSON'S ^r-^' 

(L^l)ocolate trre^aiDS 

THE GREAT 

WOl^IVL I^EIVIEDY. 

Requires no after medicine ; and being- In the form 
of a Chocolate Cream, children never refuse them. 



,.i I 



— -< t • • -4 



T^ 



25 cents a Box. 

F()()M)-Hcl)(^ = 

POSITIVELY CURED BY 

-> STOPlI T ! 1^ 

_.— 1* 

ONE ArPLTCATlON io tlio TOOTI! IS SUFFK'IKNT 

Sold by all Druggists. 15 cents a Bottle. 

WALLACE DAWSON, 

Pharmaceutical Chemist, MONTREAL. 

Mail and Telephone Orders prom^:tly attended to. 



A 



57 





_ MANUFACTURERS OF _ 




FINE ELEGTRO-PLATED WARE, 



CONSISTING OF 



FRUIT STANDS,TEASETS^<''WAITERS, 

EPERGNES, TETE-A-TETE SETS, 

CRUETS, &c., &c. 





h-^ ■* * * * 






i 


BS^&l^^^^^^^ 


.*. A A ^4.-*^^ r 


(• ^ 










r^dj^Wk 


^ 




< 




Re^ 


^^ 


nlj^KffiK^H^^^j^^Q^^^^S 


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if, 




m^ 




■^ _^'"~.<fiyBi|.W'-iiy|BB 




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'■II li^ . , "■ i ■ 






-T--T--T— »- 






r-T-T-T-T—r-T-V-T-T- 



9 

9 



SOLE PROPRIETORS AND MANUFACTURERS 

OF THE CELEiT.ATED 

WM. RODGERS' 

^nives, * Ilorks, * ^pcons, * &c., * Ac. 

Head Office, Wallingford, Conn. 16 & 18 DeBresoles St., Montreal. 
A. J. WHIMBEY, Manager for Canada. 



58 




Interior of Notre Dame Churcli, 




^II..L 









f7.. - jv 

■■■■niTi r J,lv 












:;;^--=t-- 



'^''C^. 






St. Gabriel Old Presley terian Church, 




59 



- CARRIA(S€S - 



^^. 



OF i. ALL '•' KINDS 



4 







TH 






HUNDREDS TO CHOOSE FROM, 

Wholesale and Retail . 
Good Goods and Lov/ Prices. 



CALL AND EXAMINE OR SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

-^^-^ -•- ^JJ- -I- ^*<*--' 

R. J. LA TIMJER, 

66, 68 aud 70 Oolleii-i- S(i-eet, 

jworiTt^Enu. 



f 

i 


TABLE SHOWING THE CANADIAN CUSTOMS VALUES 

OF THE PRINCIPAL FOREIGN CURRENCIES. 






COUNTRY. 


MONETARY UNIT. 


STANDARD . 


VALUK IN 

DOLLARS & 

CENTS, 


Austria 1 


Florin 


Silver 


$0.37.1 
.19.3 


Belgium 

Bolivia 


Franc 


(v)ld and Silver. . 
Gold and Silver.. 
(.iold 


Dollar 


.1)0.5 


lirazil . , , 


Milreis 


.54.5 


Bogota . 


Peso 

iJollar 


Gold 


.90.5 


Central America 


Sil\ er 


93 5 


Chili 


Peso 


Gold 


.91.2 


Chiiuv ■ 


Tael 


Silver 


1 38 


Denmark 


Crown 


Gold 


.20.8 


Ecuador 


Do lar 


Silver 


.93.5 


J'^RJ'l't 

France 


Pound of 1(0 ])ia8tre8 

Franc 

Drachm i 


Gold 

Gold and Silver. . 
Gold and Silver. . 

Gold 

Gold 

Silver 

(xold and Silver. . 

Gold 

Silver 


4.97.4 
19 3 


ijlreece 


.19.3 


(German Empire 

•Tapan , 

India 


:\[ark 


.23.8 


Yen 

Rut)ee of ] (5 annas 


.1^9.7 
44 4 


Italy 

liiberiii 

Mexico 


Lir.i 

Doilar 

Dollar 


.19.3 
1,00. 
1 01 5 


Netherlands 


Florin 


(iold and Silver. . 

( Jold 

Silvtjr. . . 


38 5 


Norway 


Crown 


.20 8 


Peru 


Dollar 


93 5 


J^ortugal .... 

Russia 


^lilreis. 


Gold 


1 os! 


Rouble 

Dollar 

Peseta of 100 centimes. . . . 

Crown . . .... 

Franc 

Malibub of 20 ])ia8tres .... 

I'iiister 

Peso .... 


Silver 


74 8 


Sandwicli Islands 


(^(.Id 


1 00 


Spain 

Sweden , 


Gold and Silver. 
Gold 


.19.3 

ao 8 


Switzerland 

Trii.oli 


(lold and Silver. . 
Silver 


.19.3 
.84 4 


Turkey 


Gold 


.04.3 


United States of Columbia. . 


Silver 


.90.5 








PENCE. 

1 2 cents 

2 4 

.'! <; 

4 8 

r> 10 

() ... 12 
7 14 

H ... It; 

«» IS 

10 20 

11 22 

12.. . 24^ 


SHILLINGS. 

1 24J| cents 

2 48i{ 

;5 7-X 

4 \)7h 

.") .... m.2i;| 

(i .. 1.4()" 

7 1.70J| 

H i.'.m; 

1) .... 2.]',l' 

^^| 2.4;u 

11 . . . 2.ti74 

12 2 KL' 


SHILLIIS 

r.i $a.i»^ 

14 3.4(iji 

15 3. Co 

10 ;J.8!H 

17 4.13.4 

18 4.38 

1!) 4 62 

20 4.8G^ 


rGS. 



m 





THE 



New Willian^s 



Give universal 

satisfaction and are 

^!| the most popular 

Machines in the 

market. 

^old on Ea?^ Tern? 

AT THE COMPANY'S HEAD 
OFFICE & SALESROOMS, 

nsaXotrcDameSt. 

MONTREAL. 



ESTABLISHED 1847 



BELL TELEPHONE 1982 



h ^ \ 



JOHN 4ITKEN & GO. 

>- - - H<^*^i^i'*^ **n(l Oiitfittcrs - - - 

Always on hand a very carefully selected stock of 

The Finest Scotch Hosiery and Underwear. 

The Perfection of Comfort and Durability. 

Importers of the best lines in Shirts, Gloves, Scnrfs, 

Umhrelhis, I^ndies' Underclothing, 

Baby L,inen, etc. 



'W^V 2^ Notr3 H Dam<e h Street, 

MONTREAL. 



;s 



lEAD 
IS, 

St. 



TAEirr roR hackney oaeeiages. 

One Horse Vehicles. — One or two persons, 15 :ninutes, 25 cents ; 30 
minutes, 40 cents; the first hour 75 cents, and 60 cents for every 
subsequent hour. Throe or four persons, 40 cents for 15 minutes, 
60 cents for 30 minutes, $1.00 for the first hour and 75 cents for 
every subsequent hour. 

Two Horse Vehicles. — One or two persons, 50 cents for 15 minutes, 
65 cents for 30 minutes, and 81.00 per hour. For three or four 
persons, 65 cents for 15 minutes, 75 cents for 30 minutes and $1.25 
per hour. 

UNITED STATES CUSTOMS. 

( Ii(uj(iatje Examination.) 
Traveller^ are permitted to take with tlieni as baggage across the 
line, free of duty : — Souvenirs, in the shape of Views, Indian Curios- 
ities, etc., on which the duty would not exceed .$2.00. Goods amount- 
ing to over .$2.00 of duty charges are liable to duty for the full amount. 
The duty on Lithographic Views is 25 per cent; Photographs, 20; 
Indian Curiosities, according to value of texture. Furs, 30 per cent. 

(The word Tariff is derived from the town of Tariffa, on the coast of Spain, near the entrance 
to the Straits of Uibrattar, where customs were originally levied of ships trading iu the Mediter- 
raneaa Sea. ) 

POSTAL RATES. 

Letters. — Canada and U. S., 3 cents per 1 oz. ; Britain and Xew 

foundland, 5 cents per h oz. City or Drop Letters, 2 cent per 1 oz. 

Post Cards; — Canada and U. S., 1 cent. Reply cards for Canada, 

2 cents. Post Cards for other countries, 2 cents. 
Newspapers are .sent free from office of pu])lication to any place other 

than place of publication, in Canada, Newfoundland and U. S. 

Newspapers otherwise posted, 1 cent i)er 4 oz, Creat Britain, 1 cent 

per 2 oz. 
Book Post: — Canada, U. S, and Newfoundland, 1 cent per 4 oz. 

Britain 1 cent per 2 oz. 
Registration: — Canada and Newfoundland, 5 cents ; U. S., and Croat 

Britain, 5 cents. Parcels, 5 cents ench (Canada only). 
Parcel Post, for Canada only, 6 cents per 4 oz. Parcels must not 

exceed 5 lbs. 
Pattern and Sample Post : — Not to exceed 24 oz., 1 cent per 4 oz. 

U. S., special rate, per parcel 10 cents. To U. S. not to exceed 8 oz. 



Money (jrdkrs, Canada 

If not exceeding § 4 , 
" " 10. 

«« " 21). 

" " 40. 

" " m 
*• " m. 

♦' " 100. 



other Coiiidi'ii'-^ :■ 



2 cents. 



.10 




.20 


(( 


.•M) 


(( 


.40 


(( 


..^O 


(» 



If not e.xceedinf,' STO .... 10 cents. 

" " ''0 20 " 

" " iio.'.i'.-io " 

" " 40.... 40 

" ♦' 50..., 50 



(t 




printing ^^^^lalionerij Co. 

747 CRAIG STREET, - MONTREAL. 

TELEPHONE 9095. 

¥me Boofi omd Job Prirati'^f • 

-< COLOR WORK A SPECIALTY O 



BLANK BOOKS, 
INKS, 
PENCILS, 
PENS, 
LETTER BOOKS, 



ENVELOPES, 
NOTES, 
DRAFTS, 
RECEIPTS, 

CHEQUES, 



STERLING EXCHANGE BLANKS, 
CUSTOMS FORMS, 

A COMPLETE STOCK ALWAYS ON HAND. 

MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT AND CAREFUL. 

ATTENTION. 



; A^ 



I 



--A 



L. 



^> 



'UL 




THOMAS SONNE, 



MANUFACTURER OF 



AW\I\(iiS, TE\TS, SAILS and FLAGS OF ALL XATIOAS, 

WAGGON COVERS, HORSE COVERS, 

Telephone 1161. 187 & 189 COMMISSIONERS ST., MONTREftL. 



■■'0 





5,000 

HANDSOMELY BOUND $1.00 BOOKS 

G:^ REDUCED TO=^e^ 

TWENTY-FIVE GENTS EACH 



FIVE CENTS EXTRA PER POST. 



F. n. PHMIAN, 

2331 • 3t. ♦ Catherine e Street. 



/'E sop's Fables 

Adniu Hede 

Anuerson's Fairy Tales 

Arabian Nights 

Harnaby Rudge 

lir.rori Aliinchausen 

Bryant's Poems 

Beecher, Henry Ward, Life of 

Christinas Stories 

Character Sketches 

Children of the Abbey 

Creassy's Battles 

Court and Times of George IV 

Child' J England 

Cast up by the Sea 

Dora Thorne 

David Copperficld 

Don Quixote 

Dr. Jckyll and Mr. Hyde 

Dee; slayer 

Daniel Boone, Life of 

Emtrson's Essays 

Esther 

Ecoiioiriical Cook Book 

Eve 

Forging the P'etters 

Foul Play 

Favorite Poems 

France, History of 

Fairy Bells 

Grimm's Fairy Tales 

Gulliver's Travels 

Household Book of Wit and Humor 

House Party 

Handy Andy 

Hauff's Fairy Tales 

Ingelow's Poems 

I vanhoc 

Imitation of Christ 

Jackson, Andrew, Life of 

Jack ol all Trades 

Jane Eyre 

John Halifax 

Kil Patrick and our Cavalry 

King Solomon 

Little Dorrit 

Longfellow's Poems 

Last Days of Pompeii 

Last of the Mohicans 



Eliot 



Dickens 



Dickens 

Dickens 

Roche 



Bertha M. Clay 
Dickens 

Stevenson 
Cooper 



Carey 



Yonge 
Lender 

Swift 

Ouida 
Lover 



Scott 



Reade 
Bronte 

Mulock 



Dicke 



Cooper 



Lady Audley's Secret 


Braddon 


2o,ooo Leagues Under the Sea 


^'erne 


Lorna Doone 




Middlemarch 


" Eliot 


Mill on the Floss 


Eliot 


Mystery of Blencarrow 




Nicholas Nickleby 


Dickens 


Nun's Curse 




Oliver Twist 


Dickens 


Old Mamselle's Secret 




One Maid's Mischief 




Outdoor Life in Europe 


Thwing 


Pickwick Papers 


Dickens 


Paul Clifford 


Bulwer 


Prairie Pioys 




Perfect Etiquette 




Prairie 


Cooper 


Pioneers 


Cooper 


Peter the Whaler 




Put yourself in his place 




Robinson Crusoe 


DeFoe 


Rory O'More 




Rob Roy 


* 


Roniola 


Eliot 


Robert Elsmere 


Ward 


Sheridan, General P. H., Life of 




Stories fiom American History 


- \ 


Scenes of Clerical Life 


i 


Swiss Family Robinson 




She 


- 


She Might Have Done Better 




Self Help 


t 


Terrible Temptation , 


Reade 


Trooper's Adventures 




Thaddeus of Warsaw 


Porter 


Thrilling Adventures 


Hughes 


Three Men in a Boat 




Tom Brown's School Days 


Hughes 
Dickens 


Uncommercial Traveller 


Vanity Fair 


Thackeray 


Vicar of Wakefield 




Willis's Poems 




Virginia Housewife 




Whittier's Poems 




Willy Rcilly 


Carleton 


Woman in White 




Woman Hater 




Widow Bedott 


.* 


Young Folks Book of Birds 





►^1 



KS 



Braddon 
^'erne 

Eliot 
Eliot 

Dickens 

Dickens 



Thwing 

Dickens 

Bulwer 



Cooper 
Coo per 



De Foe 



Eliot 
Ward 



Reade 

Porter 
Hughes 

Hiiehes 

Dickens 

Thackeray 



Carleton 



o 
w 
z 

n 

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> 
r 

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o 

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o 
o 

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w 
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,: :'s fc:'» '.■ 


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' '-'i-ii! 


■^' ' .;■ 


:■■ '//i'l 


■' ?'W; 


: -''1; 



"i ■ : ;! 'ill 



I'M 'll:!:!!t 



■ in': 

ff we 



■m 



mM 



li!.:l!g|!i|'lil 



H. & M. WHITE, 



Successors to L. E. RIVARD, 



^ISTATIOXERY, BOOKS, >USU AM) FA^( Y (iOODSi^ 

133 ST. PETEH STREET, mOl^lTl^EALi. 



I 



f MOUNT ROYAL €L€VATOR * 

Any visitor to Montreal who has not visited and taken a ride on the Mount 
Royal Elevator, cannot say that he has seen the principal sights of the city , This 
masterpiece of modern engineering has been in working order since September, 
1885. Cars run from 15th April ta iSth November of each year, and Uikes 
passengers from the bottom to the top of Mount Royal, 1728 feet incline and 422 
feet perpendicular height, in three minutes, for the small sum of five cents. It 
connects with the St. Catherine, lileury and St. Lawrence lines of street railway. 
It is close to the Exhibition Grounds. This is the shortest and cheapest way to 
the famous Mount Royal Park, and Cemeteries. In 189 1 250,000 people passed 
throui h this line. The construction cost $45,000. Every possible precaution is 
taken as to safety. The engine is loo horse power, and can move eleven tons or 
150 passengers to the top, but only 75 people are allowed to get on at one time. 
Besides the cables attached to each car and the motive power there is also a safety 
cable connecting the two cars which balance even with the same number of passen- 
gers going up and down. These safety cables are controlable by strong brakes. 
All the machinery is carefully tested and examined every morning before the com- 
menccn.ent of the day's travel. 



-jiex^i 



DAYID «, HOGG, 

S2t CRAIG STREIEITi-^ 



(Tlic ITraiiituii lioitor in CTrtttrtDn for 

PHOTOGRAPHIC STOCK and APPARATUS, 
AMATEUR OUTFITS and 

DETECTIVE CAMERAS, 
DRY PLATES and CHEMICALSr 
MOULDINGS AND PICTURE FRAMES. 

Dark Room for the accommodation of 

Customers. 



Ithe Mount 

:ity, This 

peptember, 

and lakes 

10 and 422 

cents. It 

let railway. 

pest way to 

Jople passed 

recauticn is 

ven tons or 

It one time. 

also a safety 

er of passen- 

ony brakes. 

>re tlie com- 



■U>ri^<' 



?ATUS, 
=?AS, 

s, 

VIES. 

"*' fTUl!'^ 'II, 

ion of 







70 



THE FIRE BRIGADE. 



THE FIRE BRIGADE. 

Montreal has fifteen fire stations and 432 fire alarm boxes. The 
fire stations are situated as follows : — Central, on Craig street 
opposite the Post Office; No. 2, St. Gabriel street; No. 3, corner of 
Wellington and Dalhousie streets ; No. 4, Chaboillez square ; No. 5, 
St, Catherine street, near Bleury street ; No. 6, corner Ontario and 
German streets ; No. 7, Dalhousie square; No. 8, corner Craig and 
Gain Ltreets ; No. 9, St. Gabriel Market, Point St. Charles; No. 10, 
St. Catherine street, near Guy street; No, 11, corner Ontario and 
Beaudry streets ; No. 12, Seigneurs street; No. 13, Desery street; 
No. 14, St. Dominique street; No. 15, Island street. 

There are fire alarm boxes at the following buildings and institu- 
tions : — The General Hospital ; Ogilvie's Mills, Mill street, Point St. 
Charles ; Canada Sugar Refining Co. ; Granc. 1 runk Works, Point 
St. Charles ; Montreal Gas Works, East End ; Montreal Rolling Mills, 
St. Cunegonde : vShedden Co. Stables, William street ; C, P. R. 
Elevators, near Dalhousie square ; P^astern Abbatoir ; C. P. R. Work 
Shops, Delormier avenue ; C. P. R. Work Shops, Hochelaga ; Can- 
adian Rubber Works; Manthn's Mills, St. Charles Borromee street; 
the Wheclhouse , Exchange Hotel, Mill street; Hotel Dieu Hospital; 
Windsor Hotel; City Hall; Notre Dame Hospital; Grey Nunnery, 
Guy street ; McDonald's Tobacco Works ; Exhibition Grounds. 

There are fire alarm boxes at the following corners on the principal 
streets of the city : — On St. James street, corner St. Peter, opposite 
St. Michel lane; St. Martin, Windsor, Place d'Armcs Hill; on Notre 
Dame street, corners of Dupie, McCord, Canning. Fullum, Gale, 
Moreau, I'rontenac, near Ciuy stree., Honsccours, ojiposite St. Lam- 
bert's Hill, St. Francois Xavier, McGill, St. Ignace, Wolfe ; on Sher- 
l)rooke street, corners St, Lawrence, Mance, l^niversity, Peel, Mac- 
kay, Shaw. St. Denis; on Dorchester street, corners St. Urbain, 
Bleury, Union avenue, St. Elizabeth, xMaisonneuve, Mansfield, St. 
Mark, Crescent; on St. Catherine street, corners St. Lawrence,, St. 
Denis, McGill College avenue Mountain, Panet, Parthenais, Amherst, 
.Papineau avenue. Fort; on Craig street, corners of Cami)eau, op- 
posite St. Alexander, Little St. Anloine, Visitation, St. Lambert Ilill; 
on St. Lawrence street, corners of Charbonneu, opposite Marie 
Anne, Shorhrooke and St. Catherine; on Wellington, corners of 
McCord and Congregation, St. J^tienne and Mibernia. 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



71 



FIRE ALARM TELEGK\PH. 



IS. The 
5 street 
orner of 
; No. 5, 
irio and 
•aig and 

No. 10, 
irio and 

street ; 

institu- 
'oint St. 
s, Point 
ig Mills, 

:. p. R. 

^. Work 
I ; Can- 
street ; 
'ospital ; 
[unnery, 
Is. 

•rincipal 
jpposite 
n Notre 
1, (iale, 
t. Lam- 
II Sher- 
■1, Mac- 
Url-ain, 
icld, St. 
nee., St. 
mhcrst, 
:aii, op- 
rt Hill; 
Marie 
ners of 



14 Cor. Vitre and Sanguinet 

Lagaucheti^re and St. Law- 
rence 
Beaver Hall Hill and La- 

gauclietiere 
Shutcr and Prince Arthur 
King and Common 
Duke and Ottawa 
St. Antoine aud Cathedral 
Tupper ;ind Sussex 
Ottaw ' id Colborne 
S! Aiuoine and Mountaine 
St. Antoine and Guy 
Chatham and St. Antoine 
Coursol and I'ulford 
Seigneur? and V 'liam 
Roy and Drolot 
Prince Arthur and Cadieux 
St. Christophe and Mignonne 
78 St. Patrick, nnnosite Seigneurs 
81 Cor. Visitat .ni uiui Robin 



15 
18 

35 
36 
37 
39 
44 
46 
48 

52 
55 
56 

57 
68 

/:> 

75 



(I 

(( 
(< 
i< 
<• 

(( 
(( 
(< 
(I 



84 

S5 

S7 

93 

94 

116 

117 

119 

123 

124 

125 

127 









Logan luni •- !iani]ilain 
Champlain and Ontario 
Menai and Forfar 
Ontario and FulUim 
Berri and Dubord 
Ontario and Moreau 
Logan and Marlborough 
Iberville and Logan 
^Volfe and Lagauchetiere 
Du'"resne and Mignonne 
St. Christophe and Ontario 
Chcrrier and St. LIubcrt 
132 College, opposite I)upr(5 
134 Cor. William and Dalliousie 
i\^ " McCord and Seminary . 
136 " William ami Cny 

144 " Simpson and Macgregor 

145 McTavish Street Reservoir 

148 Pai)ineau Ave., ojiposite St. Rose 

Si -eet 
1 5 1 Cor. St. Moniiiuc and Lagauchetiere 
154 " Windsor and Osborne 
157 " Ontario and St. Urbain 
162 Hibernia, ojiijosite Knox 
164 Cor, Centre and Kojiery 
171 " St. Pat-ick and Napoleon 
RcKid 



173 

175 
211 

212 

213 

214 

215 

218 
2iq 



172 Cor. St. Patrick and St. Andrew 
Magdalen and Favard 
Centre and Napoleon Road 
St. Hypolite and Roy 
Napoleon and Cadieux 
St. Jean Baptiste and St, 

Lawrence 
St. Jean Baptiste and St. 

Denis 
Sanguinet and Rachel 
Pantaleon and Marie Anne 
Cadieux and Mount Royal 
Avenu« 
221 Maple, near St. Jean Baptiste 
223 Cor. Dufferin and Marie Anne 
2?,5 " Park and Milton Avenves 
226 Rachel, near No. 14 Police Station 
231 St. Paul, opposite Friponne 
("or. St. Louis and Berri 
" Craig and Bonsecours 
" Cot6 and Vitr^ 
" Mignonne and St. Constant 
" St. Claude and St. Paul 
" Jacques Cartier Square and 

St. Paul 
'« St. Paul and St. Jean Baptiste 
'< St. Sulpice and Le Royer 
324 Custoii. House S(iuareand St. Paul 
341 St. Francois Xavier, opposite St. 
Sacrament 
Cor, St. Henry and St. Maurice 
" St. Sacrament and Si. Peter 
" McCill and St. Paul 
" Foundling and Port 
•' Youville and St. Peter 
" Grey Nun and Wellington 



232 

234 
236 

237 
242 

312 

313 
323 



414 

415 
421 

423 
431 
43' 



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NEW Y.M.C.A. BUILDING. 




CRESCENT STREET PRESBYTERI A.N CHURCH, 



CAMPBELL'S 

QUININE WINE 

Original and onCsy genuine.. 



THE m] mimm tonic 

FOR 

LOSS 9FAPPETITE. LOW SPIRITS, 
SLOW DIGESTION. MALARIA, *^ 

< .Etc.. ETC; Etc. 



bewa're of the many iwitations. 










CH. 



Drive in Mount Royal Park around Reservoir. 




Montreal bible house, 



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■4 







ESTABLISHMENT OF 



-":> 



McDERMID c& LOGAN, 

SubBcriptioi) Book Pablisbers, 

LONDON, Ont. 

NORMAN MURRAY, 

38 VICTORIA STREET, 

AGENT IN MONTREAL. 



N.B. -Only flrst-class Bookfi issuod from this establlRhment. 




C. p. R. WINDSOR STREET DEPOT. 



MONTREAL AND VICINITY. 



77 



LETTER AND NEWSPAPER BOXES. 



Paquette's Mills, opposite Viger Market 
Cor. Lagaucheti^re and St. Denis 
St. Catherine and St. Denis 
St. Catherine and Jacques Cartier, 

Eastern Receiving House 
Amherst and Ontario 
Plessis and Ontario 
Fullum and Ontario 
Fullum and Notre Dame 
Rubber Factory, Notre Dajne 
Panet and Craig 
Plessis and St. Catherine 
Wolfe and Lagauchetiere 
Montcalm and Notre Dame, and 

one Newspaper box 
C.P.R. Depot and Notre Dame 
Bonsecours and Notre Dame 
City Hall and Notre Dame 
Commissioners and Jacques Car- 
tier square 
St. Gabriel and St. James 
Craig and St. Lawrence 
Dorchester and St. Lawrence 
St. Lawrence and Ontario 
Ontario and St. Denis 
Roy and St. Denis 
Roy and St. Lawrence 
Sherbrooke and St. Lawrence, and 

one Newspaper box 
vSherljrooke and .lutchison 
Bleury and Ontario 
University and Sherbrooke 
Drummond and Sherbrooke, 

one Newspaper box 
Mountain and St. Catherine 
Guy and St. Catherine, and 

Newspaper box 
St. Mark and St. Catherine 
Essex Avenue and Dorchester 
Guy and Dorchester 
Metcalfe and St. Catherine 
Union Avenue and St. Catherine, 

and one Newspaper box 
Hanover and Dorches'tcr 
Beaver Hall and Dorchester 
William and McGill 
Brennan and Prince 
Ann and Ottawa 



and 



one 



Cor. Murray and McCord 

William and and McCord 
Western Receiving House, cor. 

Versailles and Notre Dame 
Notre Dame and Seigneurs, and 

one Newspaper box 
St. Martin and St. James 
Canning and Albert 
Fulford and St. Antoine 
Mountain and St. Antoine and one 

Newspaper box 
Cathedral and St. Antoine 
Bonaventure Station, and one 

Newspaper box 
Inspector and Notre Dame, and 

one Newspaper box 
Palardy's Pharmacy, St. James 
Craig and Victoria square 
Colborne and Common 
C.P.R, Depot, Windsor street, and 

one Newspaper box 

St. Jean Baptiste Ward. 

Cor. Cadieux and St. Jean Baptiste 
" Mount Royal and St. Lawrence 
•' Mount Royal and St. Denis 
•' Rachel and St. Denis 
•• Rachel and Dufl'erin 

Point St. Charles. 

Cor. Conway and River Front 
" St. Etienne and W^ellington 
" Magdalen and Wellington 
" Richardson and Shearer 

St. Gahriel Ward. 

Cor. St. Patrick and St. Andrews 
" Centre and Napoleon 
" Hibernia and Coleraine 

HOCHELAGA WaRD. 

Cor. Harbor and Notre Dame 
" Moreau and Noire Dame 
*' Desery Fire Station 

At Carmelites Monastery, Notre Dame 
. street 



.' 







OLD Y. M.C.A. BUILDING. 



W. H. WHIiSH, 

- - Mcrcb^Dt- Tailor - - 



40 VICTORIA SQUARE, 

TELEPHONE 2804. 



MONTREAL. 



*>. 










IMAGE EVALUATION 
TEST TARGET (MT-S) 




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Photographic 

Sciences 
Corpordtion 



23 WIST MAIN STREfT 

WEBSTER i^Y I4S80 

(7161 873-4503 




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Jobo&too's FlCiid Beef 



Forms SIN EW and MUSCLE and 

gi ves SO UNDNE SS to the 

CONSTITUTION. 



^ «^ •( ESTABLISHED 1842 )^ ^ ^ 




219 ST. JAMES STREET, 



MONTREAL. 



^CONFECTIONERY. COFFEE .^^ LONCHEON ROOMO^ 

Visitors to Moiitrvtil will fttul this n lUrst-Cliiss Uiniufi Kootn for l.tulifs 

atitl (if'iitlf'tnrn. l.tHlics vuti Iftivf tlwir pnrvvis tnul haud Imfitiafiv 

with us, whilv doitifi their shoppiiiji in tlic City, 

-^ -.T." MANUFACTUBEK OF .7^- t»- 

.1 PURE : CONFEZCTIONEZRY ^ 

'RETAIL ONLY). 

i IIAin.KS ALEXANDEH. 



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