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Full text of "The Pacific coast business directory for 1867 [microform] : containing the name and post office address of each merchant, manufacturer and professional residing in the states of California, Oregon, and Nevada; the territories of Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Utah; and the colony of British Columbia; also, a gazetteer of the counties, cities and towns, and an exhibit of the resources of the Pacific coast"




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Sciences 

Corporalion 




23 WIST mm STMIT 

V»r T'Kt.M.Y. 145i0 
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Collection de 


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microfiches. 

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Canadian Institute for Historical Microraproductions / 

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' Institut Canadian da microraproductions historiquas 




Technical and Bibliographic Notas/Notas tachniquaa at bibiiographiquaa 



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Pages wholly or partially obscured by errata 
Slips, tissues, etc., have been refilmed to 
ensure the best possible image/ 
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Additional commanta:/ 
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IrrtgularpaoiiMthHi: ii^eii, [1] • 112, 'lia •168, Mil] •112, 113468. 1'.96p. 



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Ce document est filmA au taux da rAduction indiquA ci-dessous. 

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TIm copy fllin«d httn Hm b—n raproducad thanks 
to tha ganaraaity of: 

Library Division 

Provincial Archivts of British Columbia 

Tha imagat apiiaaring hara ara tha baat quality 
posaibia conaMaring tha condition and lagibility 
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gAnArotitA da: 

Library Division 

Provincial Archives of British Columbia 

Las Imagas auhrantaa ont 4tA raproduitaa avac la 
plus grand soin, compta tanu da la condition at 
da la nattat* da raxampiaira filmi. at an 
confformiti avac las conditions du contrat da 
filmaga. 



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Maps, plates, charts, etc.. may be filmed at 
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illustrent la mAthode. 



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PAOiVIO COAST BU8IVBS8 DIREOTORT. 



L. 8. ADAM9, Front Street, 

. Corneir Clagr» 8ui Fran<;Uoo. 






(Baoowion to John Arnold * Oo.) 
'iXm-oorters and. lYl&oleaale Jo'b'bers In 

ftROGERIES, PROVISIONS ASD UQUOBS. 



C 

Selected by 

Blast; 

Agei 

QUIOi 

Age; 

96 FROjj 



THE CAL 



CAPITAl 



Loani made on 
at one per cent, pi 
terest from the da^ 

Bonds, Gold a 
■mall rent, for wb 




TTER 

iived by every steamer. 

P 

Santa Cruz. 

SII.VZSRt 

Franoisoo Friee*. 



CoUectio/v 



3 3DCE£XIpa^QClS^(» 

b OO. 

lAORAMENTO. 

mN&SBAHK, 

I - $600,000, 

handise. Deposits received 
^press or mail, passed to in- 

\ long or short periods, at a 

j 

ONEYt PrestderU. 

I. t=== 

^^ '■''••"C4^ gyjljjjpg j| iijg caijfflfnjg sayjngs ^^xiJn, 

^^ California 8t, one door from Sanwm. 

V ICBTHOD or BUBINBSS. 

First— Low Charges. 

Second — Prompt Payment of Losses. 

Third— No Law Suits. 

Fourth — All disputes which may arise are to 

be settled by arbitration. 

President THOMAS MOONET 

Secretary SAMUKL CRIM 

Actuary JOHN FOWLEB 




■tM 



ADVBRTISINa DEPARTMENT. 







mnvmxv ^i^m^mipi, 

"t ; r^ 



Gash 

Annual Incomei 



- «5y468y013 85. 

- ^4^600,000 OOir 



These sterling and, time-honored Compames continue to do a legitimate Fire 
Insurance business, insuring on all classes of desirable risks, at rates consistent; 
with solvency, and a fair New England profit, being uninfluenced by the tariffs' 
of " combinations," or the ruinous rates of companies that, through ignorance of 
the actual cost of underwriting, or a lack of confidence in the quality of the in- 
demnity furnished, are disposed to gamble away their assets in a suicidal compe- 
tition with companies of steriing wortii, inexhaustible resQurces and hnmense an- 
nual incomes, secured from small risks, scattered ov(§r the entire continent, 
making large losses impossible. 



Losses promptly adjusted by our Special Adjuster, 
and paid in United States Gold Coin. 



The .^TNA and Ph<enix are the only Companies doing business on this coast, 
that have fully commissioned agents at each prominent point, authorused to bmd 
the Compames by the immediate issue of policies. 



BRANCH OFFICE--SAN FRANCISCO, 

434 CALIFORNIA STREET, OOR. LEIDESDORipF, 

ROBERT E MA6ILL, Manager. 



J. B. HIVKS k CO., Agents for 8aa VrMieiseo. 



iv 



PACIFIC COAST BU8INBSB DIBBCTORT. 



mmmi mmiM 

mvMim tsomnm, 



or 



Saa Francisco^ 



^♦^ 



ORGANIZED, APRIL 2, 1863. 



OXr-xr-iOE: 



IN THE COMPAHT'S BniLDIHU, 406 CALIFOBNIA STMT, 



CAPITAL, 



$500,000. 



LOSSES PAID PEOMPTLT IN U. S. GOLD COIN. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 



0. L TATLOB, 
JABSZ HOWES, 
WnUAK METER, 
A. L TUBES, 



ISAAC E. DAVIS, 
0. ADOLPHE LOW, 
J. B. SOOTGHLEB, 
W. J. ADAVS, 
7. L 0A8TLE. 

C. L. TAYLOR, President. 
J, B. SGOTCHLER, Secretary. 



A. X. SIXFSOV, 

B. E. BAmOHD, 
H. FIEBCS, 
CALVnr PAIGE, 



THIS COMPANY IS ENGAGED EXCLUSIVELY IN 

MARnirE! nrSURANOEI. 



1 1 



Si 



H)^ 



i63. 



!ST, 



0. 



D, 



ADVBRTIBING DEPARTMENT. 



Padfe Hai! SttaatsUjp C$. 




FROM NEW YORK TO CHINA, 

VIA 

Istlms of Fanw, San Francisco ani Jajan, anl vice versa. 

Making trips from JVew Tork to San Frandaco in 22 days; 

From iN'ew York to Hong Kong ik 51 days; 

From Hong Kong to J{ew York in 4^ days, and from San Francisco 

to ^ew York in 20 days. 



STEAMEBS LEAVE NEW TORE THE 1st, Uth AND 2l8t OF EAOH 
MONTH ; LEAVE SAN FBANGI300 10th, 19th AND 30th. 



The StMmwof the Uth of each month firom Now York connects at San Francisco with the 
Steamer for China on the Sd of month following. Passcngero from China for New York leare San 
Francisco bj the Steamer of 1 9th of each month. 

This Company sells Tickets in connection with Steamers for Central and South America, Ana- 
tralia, France and England, by all the diiferent routes. . 



Steamen on the rente fkom 
New Vork to AaplnwalL 



Steamers on the route ttom San 
Ftanoisoo to Panama. 



Steamers on the route from San 
Franoisoo to China, 



Henry Chauncey, 
Arixona, 
Ocean Queen, 
Rising Star, 
J{ew York, 



Colorado, 
Great Republic, 
Celestial Empire, 
Jfiphon, 



Building. 



Golden City, 

Constitution, 

Saeram&ito, 

Montana, 

Golden Age, America. 

Allan MoLane, Pres't, New Tork ; Oliver Eldridge, Agent, San Franoisoo ; 
F. B. Paby, Agent, '* S. L Phelps, Agent, Hong Kong ; 

D.M. Oorwinei '* Panama; J. H. Phinney, Agent, Yokohama. 



n 



PACIFIC COAST BU8INKS8 DIRBOTORT. 



CA-LIFORlsriA. 

STEIH HIVIGATION 



Organized March 1st, 1854. - - Capital Stock, $2,500,000* 



The following are the Offloera for the Tears 1866-67 : 

Pn»i4ent, B. M. HARTSHORNE; Vice-PrMidcnt, W. H. TAYLOR; Secretary, 8. O. PUT-' 
NAM; Trustees, B. M. HARTSHORNE, W. H. TAYLOR, WILLIAM NORRIS, W. C, 
RALSTON, JOHN BENSLEY, C. L. LOW, A. REDINGTOS, LLOYD TEVI8 and 8. F, 
BUTTERWORTH. Agents, Sacramento, ALFRED REDINOTON ; MaryBville, C. H. KIM^ 
BALL; Red Bluff. J. B. ANDRUS ; Stockton, ARTHUR KIMBALL. 




Departure from Broadway Wharf^ 

CARRYING THE UNITED STATES MAILS. 

Steamer CAPITAL Capt. E. A.Poole. 

Steamer YOSEMITE Capt. E. A. Poole. 

Steamer CHRYSOPOLIS Capt. A. Foster. 

Steamer ANTELOPE Capt. 

Steamer CORNELIA Capt. W.Bromley. 

Steamer JULIA Capt. E. Conklin. 

OXO'B OF XXZE .AJBOVS STE^^Jt^EXlS "SVXLXi 

Leave every Day, at Pour o'clock, P.M. 

(BUSDATS xzoxara*BD) roB 

SAORAHESIVTO AUTD STOGKTOMT^ 

Connecting with the light draught Steamers for 

MARY8VILLE, COLUSA AND RED BLUFF. 

For Airther particulan, apply at the OFFICE OP THE COMPANY, 

N. E. Oor. Jackson and Front Sts., San Francisco. 

B. M. HA^RXSHOBtrfS, Preaident. 



ADYBBTISIMO DBPABTMBNT. 



VU 



California Steam Navigation Go. 





FOR 



fortlil Orw iMfieliiiii, Y. I. 



STEJ^X^SXiS 



Paeife, Ajax add A^tirt. 



FOB 



San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, San Pedro, 



JklO*!) 



S^]Sr DIEG^O, 



S. M. H1.HTSH0HNE, Presideat. 
N. E. Cor. Front anil Jackson Streets, 

SB ^^SS Cff> 02 J^ Sy (39 a SB CBS CD • 



via 



PAOIVIO COAST BUSINB86 DIRIOTORT. 



I'll £2 



SUaA-R COMJPA.lSrY. 



OA.I»IT-A.lLi, 



#soo,ooo. 



This Company owns the San Francisco Sagar Refinery and tlie Pacific Sagar 
Refinery, in the City and County of San Francisco, which, combined, form the 

LARGEST SUGAR REFINING ESTABLISHMENT 

iisr jjoagp: TJNiTEr) sta.tes. 

And possess a capaciff equal to the Refining of Twelve Thousand Tons annually. 

ITS PRODUCTS ARE 

"'le Befined £oaf, in Loaves and Cut, for table use, 
\) Standard Crushed Lump Sugar, 
(A. B) Second Quality Crushed Lump Sugar, 
(B) ComMwn Crushed Lump Sugar, 
Powdered Sugar, Best and Common, 
Granulated White Sugar for Coffee, 
Yellow Befined Coffee Sugar, marked (O) 
(This Sugar is, for Coffee, preferred to White.) 

TeUow Befined Coffee Sugar, Second Quality, marked (13) 
Syrup, Golden, 

Syrup, Sugar Souse, 

Sugars and Syrups, for export to the British Possessions, Mexico, etc., are entitled 
to a return of duty from the American Government, as follows : 

On White Sugars, three cents per pound. 

On Yellow Sugars, two and a half cents per ponnd. 

On Syrups, six cents per gallon. 

GEO. GORDON. Manager. R. FEUERSTEIN, Commercial Agent. 

BOASD OF TBXrSTEBS: 

Geo. Gordon, President, N. Lunlng, W. C. Ralston, Charles De Roe, 
R. Feuersteln. W. Hooper, Secretary. 

OFFICE, 310 COMMERCIAL STREET. 



T 



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4. 



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logar 

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MT 

lallj. 



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Itled 



ht. 



ADYBRTISIKG DEPARTMBNT. 



IX 



WELLS, FARGO & CO. 

Ill mM immmi mwmi, 

And Overland Stage Company. 



OAPTTAI., 



■ ■ 



«io^ooo,ooo. 



PRINCIPAL OFFICES 



NEW YORK. 



( No. 84 Broadwayi 

( N. W. cor. California and Montgomery Sts., • SAN FRANCISCO. 



S X P K. s s s. 

Dailt— To all parts of California, Nevada and Utah. 

Weekly — To Crescent City, Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 

Columbia and Southern Coast of California. 
Tri-Monthlt — ^To New York, the Atlantic States and Europe, via Panama. 
Monthly — To Hongkong, Yokohama, Cape St. Lucas, La Paz, Guaymas, Max- 

atlan, and other Mexican Paci6c Forts. 

Daily — Via Sacramento, over Central Pacific and Placerville Railroad, for Vir- 
ginia City, Carson, and other principal points in Nevada and Utah. 

BILLS OF EXCHANGE AND TELEGRAPHIC TRANSFERS ON 

NEW YORK, BOSTON and PHILADELPHIA, 

Payable in the principal cities of the United States and Canada. 

Bills on London, Dublin <& Paris, for sale r*t current rates, 

LETTERS OF CREDIT NEGOTIABLE THROUGHOUT 

i CALIFORNIA, OREGON, IDAHO, and 

NEVADA, WASHINGTON, UTAH TERRITORIES. 

We also itsne Credits on oar New York House, exchanseable for Circular Letters, pavable in 
all parts of Europe, affording to those going abroad the sarest and most convenient mode ot' provid- 
ing themselves with funds. 

COXiXiBCTXOXTS AJ^TID OOXiiCX^ISSIO£a-S 

of all kinds executed, and General Express Business promptly attended to throughout the United 
States, Canada and Europe. 

liCtters, Freight and Small Parcels forwarded to the Atlantic Sutes and Europe. 

We will also ship Bullion, Coin, and other articles of special value, on the most favorable terms, 
which can be insured if desired, under our open policies with English Underwriters. 

Orders for passage firom Queenstown, London, liverpool, Uimburg and Havre to New York ; 
also, from New Yo» to San Francisco. 



GEN'L SUPERINTENDENT FOR CALIFORNIA. 

N. W. comer Montgomery and California Streets. 



«Wi!F»|llMP7i' *} 



X ' PAOIIIO COAST BU8INBBS DIBKOTOBT. 



C. T. MEADEIl. 



C. P. LOLOR. 



MEADER, LOLOR & CO. 





%mwm^ m% mmm 

Pi". "W. Ooar. I«^roiit and Clay Streets. 

^^tnia Uv mUm and WiUiatu^' pne of ^lipptt Mvn fxm 

SOSTOXO* TO B-AlXO- OE'XlJ^ja'OXSOO. 



Goods for this Line leceived at Boston, and careflilly forwaitled free of charge bj 

FIRST 0X^.^.88 OXjXPPSXI SXXXFS 

Sailing promptly as advertised. 

The only really prompt Line of GOiips from the Atlantio Ports. 

BOSTON PAOKBT OFFIOB 

GLIDDEH, WILLIAMS k GO'S LINE OF CLIPPER SHIPS, FROM 



Loading only First Class Clipper Ships, sailing promptly as advertised. 

GOODS FOR THIS LINE RECEIVED AND CAREFULLY FORWARDED 

FREE OF COMMISSION. 



LIBERAL ADVMCES MADE ON WOOL, HIDES, ORES, DYEWOOD 

And other Merchandise forwarded by the above Line. 



4 



ADVBRTISIirO DIPARTMKNT. 



PACIFIC OIL ft LEAD WORKS. 



Capital Stock, 



$600,000. 



Established for the manufacture of Linsbbd, Castor and other Oils, and of 
Whitb Lead, Zinc and other Paints. Works are now in operation, and pre- 
pared to furnish Oils of first qi^ality and quantity sufficient for the supply of the 
Pacific Coast. Also, Oil Cakes and Meal in quantities required. 

Highest price paid for Flax Seed delivered at the Company's Works, King 
Street, near Third. 

OFFICE-302 MONTGOMERY ST„ SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Orders addressed to " Pacific Oil and Lkad Works," will have immediate 
attention. 

President, - ■ - JOHN BENSLEY. 

Superintendent, - - B. P. BRUNNER. 

Secretary, - - - SAML. I. C. SWEZEY. 



A. COBB. 



HHTOV. 



COBB « SIMTOZV, 

REAL ESTATE, STOCK, 

GENERAL AUCTIONEERS. 



t »»» > 



Spacious and Fine Sales Room, 

407 Oallfornla Stveetp 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



SST 



eXXSID SIXTOE 1861. 



N. B. — OUT DOOR SALES ATTENDED TO. 

A line of Desirable Homestead Property always on hand. 



zu 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 



OREGON STAGE CO 




THROUGH IN SIX DAYS! 

From Sa$r$m$iito to OrOTillo, 



Per Railroad. From there, per Stage, through 



Chico, 
Tehama, 
Bed Bluff, 
Shasta, 
Yreka, 



Jacksonville, O. Eugene City, 
Canyonville, Corvallis, 



Eosehurg, 
Winchester, 
Oakland, 
TO PORTLiAND, ORBGOIHT, 

Passing through the Valleys of Rogue River, Umpqua & Willamette. 



Albany, 
Salem, 
Oregon City, 



This portion of the Pacifio slope embraces the most beautiful and attracti ^, 
as well as some of the most bold, grand and picturesque scenery on the continent, 
the highest snow-capped mountains, (Mt. Hood, Mt. Shasta and others) deepest 
ravines, and most beautiful valleys. 

Office, Sacramento, near the Steamboat Landing; 

H. W. CORBETT & Co., Proprietors. 



^ 



tyj 



ADVERTISING DBPARTHBNT. 



XUl 



OCCIDENTAL M^nCE COMFANT. 



m ■ » 



©ibBk ©@L@ltiLl» $S 



OFnOE, S, W. COB. HONTGOHEBT AND OAUFOBNIA STBEETS. 

iMurs againtt Loss or Damage by Fire, on Dwellings and all kinds of Buildings, and on 
Merchandise, Household Furniture and all other Personal Property at the 

ALL LOSSES PAYABLE IN U. S. GOLD COIN. 



B. XOTHSCBILD, Beeretar^. 



CHB. CHBMTIAlfSEy, Prttident. 

■ ■« » 



DIRECTORS. 



J. A. Oonohoe of Donohoa, Kellr As Ca 

Jacob Sebolte of SoholIeBros. 

In P. Rankin of Goddard ft Co. 

John Sime of John Sine ft Co. 

Adam Grant of Murphy, Grant 4c Co. 

Jacob Greenbaum of H. Cohn ft Co. 

J. T. Hallook of JIY.HallookftCa 

Solomon Rich of & Rich ft Bro. 

BeiU- BrewKtor of Jenninn ft Brewster. 

J. Banm of J. Baum ft Bro. 

Isaac Heeht of Uecht Bro<. ft Co. 

Joaeph Seller. of Goldttein ft Seller. 

John N. Biadon of Coflby ft Risdon. 

M. Reese Merchant. 

J. H. Baird Merchant. 

Henry Greenberg Real Estate. 



N.Van Bergen of John Tan Bergen ft Co. 

John R. Mead of J. B. Mead ft Co. 

J. W. BrittRD of J. W. Brittan ft Co. 

Chr. Christiansen, President., .of J. Y. Hallock ft Co. 

Lewis Gerstle of Louis Sloss ft Co. 

John Landers Agent Manhattan Life Ins. Co. 

Martin Sachs of L. ft M. Sachs ft Co. 

A. Kline of Kline ft Co. 

A. Goldsmith of Goldrmith Broe 

Isaac Wormeor of Wormser Bros. 

James Thomas Boyd Attorney at Law. 

Leon Ehrman Merchant. 

W. W. Dodge of Dodge ft Phillips. 

C. Meyer of C. Meyer ft Co. 

A. J. Bowie Pbysieian. 



fitrfiiam Lift hssraiet Ct. 

oo laitoA.TywArs', nie:w york. 

Issues Policies Payable in IT. S. Gold Coin or Currency. 

VO EXTRA GHASOE FOE TEAYELDTO TO EASTERN STATES OR EITROPE. 



HUGO WESENDONOE, President. 

FBIEDR. SCHWENDLER, Vice President and Aot'g Sec'y* 

V. — ^ 

BOABD or BUrEBByCB FOB CALIFOBITIA. 

Joeeph A. Donohoe, Esq. William C. Ralston, Esq. 

Of Messrs. Donohoe, Kelly ft Co. Cashier Bank of California. 

C F. Mebius, Esq. EUe Lai ard, Esq. 

Consal for BaTarla. Of Messra. Laiard Frtres. 

J. W. Brittan, Esq. Edward Vtseher, Esq. 

Of Mes4n. J. W. Brittan k Co. Consulate of Austria. 

Gustare Mabe, Henry Seligman, Esq. 

Director French Sst. and Loan 8o& Of Messra. J. Seligman ft Ca 

General Agent for California and the Pacific Coast, 
BSRWHARD OATTEX., 



70.7 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRUCTORT. 



C. ■Of.BKOOK. I 
A. MBKRIIA. i 



I O. MIiBBII.1.. 

UI.In 



• CM] 
t«. F. 



HOLBROOK, MERRILL & GO. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

TO¥ES, TIN PLATE, 

SHEET IROiNT, 
Lead and Iron Pipe, Pumps, Zinc, Wire, 

TINNERS' STOCK, TOOLS AND MACHINES. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TIN, SHEET IRON AND COPPER WARE, 

13 AND 15 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, 

176 AND 178 J STREET, SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



AND 



MJkm OTESETw iLlUSTM, M3S5¥AJO)Ao 



BADGER & LINDENBERGER, 

411, 413 AND 415 BATTERY STREE"!', 



iscpoRrrxsRs ▲ind johsxsrs of 




AGENTS OF OAKLAND COTTON MILLS. 
AGENTS OF CALIFORNIA CLOTHING FACTORY. 
AGENTS OF SALEM, OREGON, WOOLEN MILLS. 
AGENTS OF PIANO MANUFACTURERS. 



T 



■if 



( 



/ 



c 



f 



-i 



■H» 



AOVKRTISING DBPARTMENT. 



XV 



BTEAMEE PETALOMA 

BUNB DAUiT TBIF8, 

ooamoTiHo 

SAN FRANCISCO 

WITH 

FETALUMA AND SONOMA 

VIA IiAKEVIX.!.!:, 

LoAviog Vtllejo Street Wharf, San Franeiaoo, 

JLT ZiEDTTOBD Xi.A.XES. 
C7j MINTUBN, Agent. 



STEAMER CONTRA COSTA 

nVKB XWIOK HAILT rXOM 

TO 

SAN QUENTIN & SAN RAFAEL, 

AND tMVt TBIPt TO 
t«aving Cor. Broadway and Davis Sta., San FranoiMO. 

C. MINTURN, Agent. 




<^S&aM»» <&K]Jb WWwLWii 



« »«» t 




Office-No. 318 California Street, 

Threa D^ ^ora Xut from Suuom Street, 



CAPITAL PAID UP $200,000. 

< »»» > 

C. T. HOFjOIS, Frest. L. STEYENS,Tice Frest. 
I. CMOWEIiL, Secretary. 

ALL LOSSES PAID IN U. S. COLD COIN. 



OF TH8 



/ETNA AND PHENIX INSURANCE COMPANIES 

(BIT ]Bi^]&wv4>i&]B» (B<&srsr» 
424 OAUFOBNIA STREET, Oorner of Lddesdorff. 

Oom-tolaxedL .AjmnotM, ... ^a.4ae,OX8 aS 
.^.xuxxui,! 0«MBli. Xai.oosia.e, - - • ^4,000,000 

LOSSES PAID IN GOLD COIN. 

Ageati in all promlnait pUwMi who an anthoriHd to luoo and nuw PoUdMi dinot. 

B. H. KAOILL, Manager. J. D. HAWKS & CO., Agents fi>r San Franoiioo. 

ly 8m page U of thia work. 



ZTl PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 

IV. FBAJTK ITBIITTIEB. nUk-B IT. JOHMSOV. 

CAMERON, WHITTIER & CO. 

IMPORTERS OP 

Paints^ Oils and Window Glass. 

< i»«» > 

OF THE 

FreiGli ni Belgian Plate Glass Coianies, 

For the Paoiflo Coast. 

MANUFAGTUEERS OF LOOEINa GLASSES, ALL SIZES. 
DAMAGED PLATES RE8ILVERED 

At a very gmaU expense, 
SOUTH-WEST CORNER FINE AND FRONT STREETS, 
' SAN FR ANC ISCO. 

PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO. 

CAPITAL STOCK, - - - ^^1,000,000. 

Established for the manufacture of Railroad and Merchant Iron. EVery 
variety of Shaftino, including all sizes of Steamboat Shafts, Cranks, Pis- 
tons, Connectinq Rods, &c. Car and Locomotive Axles aiui Frames, and 
Hammered Iron of every description and siae. 

OFFICE* 

302 MONTGO:AffERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 

Orders addressed to P'CIFIC Rollinq Mill Co. will have immediate attention. 
HICNE8T PRICE PAID FOR SCRAP IROK. 

FRESIDENT, WM. ALVORD. 

SUFERINTENDENT, B. F. BRUNNER. 

SECRETARY, SAML. I. C. SWEZET. 



; 



lEY. 



1 



ADVBRTISINQ DBPABTMBNT. 



ZYU 



BANK OV CALIFORNIA, 

Capital, paid up, - - - $5,000,000 



D. o. nnLiLiS^ - 



Presidonti 



ooziZiEsz>oxa'Dsxa-rrs = 
IN NEW YORK, - - MESSRS. LEES ft WALLER. 
IN LONDON, - - ORIENTAL BANK CORPORATION. 



THIS BANK IS NOW PREPARED TO ISSXTE 

£fil^l>l£i Q)W ©ElBI^e 

AVAILABLE FOR THE PURCHASE OF MERCHANDISE IN THE 

East Mes, CUna, Japan, Australia, and otlier Countries, 

AUTHORIZHa BILLS ON ORIENTAL BANK CORPORATION, LONDON. 



EXCHAJ^TGE FOR SAJjE 



ON THE 



9* 

LONDON, AMSTERDAM, 

DUBLIN, HAMBURG, 

PARIS, BREMEN, 

Arid other leading EUROPE A J^ CITIES. Also, on the 
Branches of the ORIEJSTTAL BAJ^K at Hongkong, and 

other Asiatic Ports. 



zviii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 



F^ 



IHI 



r 





m^, 



IP 




a 




PUBLISHER, IMPORTER AND DEALER IN 

W Si 9 ^ <lol <^^ Mr ft 

GLOBES, ATLASES, ETC. 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, 





AND 



511 Montgomery Street, 511 



(Between Oommendal ud BaoramentO)) 



siiS7 :f>m^s:r(sns(g(S)£) (s^ilig 



FIRE INSURANCE AGENCY, 



iMBIl & Bllll 



O^JPIT^^L, - - - $1,000,000. 

OOTXRX OF jkJTy^a.TsnemA.'rxoT^ 7 



Hamburg— A\JQ. JOS. SCHON, E8q., Prest. 
WILHELM GOSLLER, Esq, 
ALBKECHT KOCHEN, Esq. 
A. J. W0L8DEN, Esq. 
GUST. WIELER, Esq. 



Bremen— LOUIS DELIUS, Esq. 

CARL MELCHERS, Esq. 

CARL TEWES, Esq. 
Notary— "ED. SCHRAMM, Dr., Hamburg. 
Manager— ALE. KLAUHOLD, Esq., Ham. 



The nndersi^ed, Agent for California for the above hichly renowned Company, is prepared to issae 
policies against loss by fire, on the most favorable terms, in all parts of the City, on 

STORES, MEhCHANDISE, DWELLINGS, FURNITURE, ETC. 

D:^ ah Claims will be paid in Gold Coin immediately after the amonnt of lost is ascertained. 

MORRIS SPEYER, Agent, 

526 Washington Street, between Sansom and lontgomery, 



« 



T. 



ANY. 

►oo. 



1 



burg. 
Ham. 

1 to issae 



ETC. 

:ertained. 



ZJJkJLu 



ADVBRTISINQ DBPARTHrNT. 



XIX 



CHURCH 4ft CIiARK 




HAHUFACTURERS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Cdll Fireworks manufactured by us are guaranteed) 

ASD IHrORTEni AHD DSAI.EBS IX 

MEDITERRANEAN AND CALIFORNIA 



407 FEONT STREET, SAN FRANOISOO, OAL. 

Conntry Exhibitions attended to promptly, and men sent to superintend tbem when required. ..^ 



LEANDER RANSOM, 





AND PRACTICAL SURVEYOR. 

ALSO, 

STATE LOCATING AGENT FOR SCHOOL LANDS. 

Having been engaged in the construction and tnanagement of the Public Worits of 
the State of Ohio for twenty years, and having had charge of the Public Surreys of 
the State of California for seven years, and the disposition of the School Lands of 
the State for six years, and having provided his oiBce with maps of all the Public 
Surveys of the State, as well as with the Land Laws, Instructions, Rules and Regu- 
lations of the State and the United States, he deems himself prepared to give any de- 
sired information relating to the lands of the State, or to transact any business apper- 
taining to the entry, location, purchase, or sale of the same. 



Hspa «nd pUta ftimiahcd when xeauired. • -acrCi 

m«ld notM of intricate anrveya platted, and quantltlea oaloulated. ' "1 
Deeda with diiBoult deaoriptiona oarefliUy drawn. 

Field work, either aurvaylnc or leveliss, executed promptly, and every other kind of 
buaineaa oonneoted with Public Worka or Landa attended to with dlapatoh. 

Office, S. W. Cor. Montgomery and Jackson Streets, San Francisco, Cal. 



II 



f 



I 



It i- 



xz 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 



«0(i.TlIJ»Bff. 



I.I» 



TILiDESlff A BRESXSDy 

(Suooauon to Jno. Vnry, Jr.) 

No. 6U MONTQ OMEBY STREET, SAN F BANOISOO, OAL. 

Bondi, Mining Stocks, and GtoTemment SeouritiM, bonght and Mid in the 
San FranoiMo Btook and Ezohange Board. 

8TAT», COUNTY AND CITY BONDS BOUOHT AND 80LD. 

Heam. MACONDRAT * CO. Heun. JOHN 8I1.E * CO. UcMt i. E. OODUAH A CO., Boiton 

" WM. T. COLEMAN A CO. " TBKADWELL * CO. " , T. SKIMNEB * CO., " 

Hewn. EUGENE KELLY * CO., New York. 



'w.'w. ooriD. 



tFIBIJ>. 



COPE & DAINGERFIELD, 

4M®s^a@^s ami ©®mm^@l®^9 

OFFICES, 611 WASHINGTON STREET, 

(South Blue, between Montgomery and Ketrn/,) 8AN FRANQI800, CAL. 



^WWOmMMT A^ la A'W, 



AND 



Coniissioner of OeeAs for Orepn, IMo and WasUniiton Territories, 

N. W. Cor. Montgomery and Washington Streets, 




PHIIiADEIiPHIA: 

JBTo, 629 WASHINGTON 8TBEET, 



ADVBRTI8INQ DBPARTMBNT. 



XZl 



aOHV TJLiriAtM. d. Wt. PAOB. 

JOHN TA.YLOR & CO. 

ZHFOBTXBS AVD DIIAUDBS IN 

Assayurs' IMs, DTDgiiiits' miil GMsts' Glasswaio, 

AND DRUCCI8T8' SUNDRIES; 

Nos. 612 and 514 Washington St., San Francisco. 



^mvM4ir & ©@>^i ii^siii 






|^^^i^=i%^ 



To San 



Jose^ ITITatsoiivllloy Santa Gnix 
and Intormedlato Stations. 

Paelngoa forwarded by 8UgM to Wnrm Spring; Atmaden, ZecHngton and Lot AngeUt, Faok- 
MM of Coin, Lotton, Parcels and Freight of all kinda forwarded with the utmoit safttv and dlipatoh. Notec, 
nili, Draft«, fco., collected. Purchaies and Sale* made. Krrandi of all kinda atrfctly attended to. Our 
Wagona will call for and deliver Freight. Letters delivered promptly. 

Tront and Jaokaon, Front and Saoram'nto Front and Fine lEont.Blook,Mont.8t. 

Front and Waablng^ Stewart and Market Battery and Oalifomla Drunun and Clay 
Front and Clay Sanaom and 8ao*nto Sanaom ft Waahins'n Kearny and Market 

Iiuak'a (Faoiflo Fruit Market). 

XI. XI. •'Wtr Asimia-aTa^^yr^ Jk^^axtm 



'^S^BM^M, 



Importer and Dealer in all kinds of 

VEGETABLE, FLOWER, FIELD, FRUIT & TREE SEEDS, 

QMOSn TOOI^it l»l»AIITt> TMEtt ^t. 
No. 317 WASHINGTON ST., bet. Battery & Front, 



lO^. 



PH:OTOa:ElA.PHERS, 

429 Montgomery Street, corner Sacramento, San Francisco. 

First PremiaM for best Card Pietares & Large Pliotojpraplis. 

This Hagnifieent Establishment has more Room, Larger Light, Greater Facilities, and produces 
VINIR raoTOORAPHS than any other. 

■W. H. XVIiOFSOV. 



XXll 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINBSS OIRBCTORT. 



ijni cbanget cachi a new lock every day, <br ten 
yean, without extra expenie. 



COMATlOll LOCK GO. 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



INCOIlI>OIUILXX:i>, 



MAT, isee. 



CAPITAL, 



$250,000. 



President, ISAAC H. SOUTHWICK. Secretary, 0HABLI8 B. BSOWH. 

Treasurer, THOMAS E. STEERR Oen'l Agent, OHAS. 0. DICKEBMAH. 

ISAAC H. SOUTHWXOK, AIiVOBD O. MIUDB, JAIODB H. ABMmOTOir, 

ALTBUD OABFIDI.D, AUBBOBB B. BUBN8IDB, DUTBll WQtOOZ, 

THOUAS B. BTBBBB, DT7TBB ABNOLD, OHAB. O. PIOKBHMAN. 



<SJB!f23EiL]l, A<SI1SHT ITOB THE FA€I[OT€ €<0>MT, 

305 MONTGOMERY STREET, N. W. Corner of Pine, 



Tn introdoclng oarPermutatloii Looka to the pnblio, it is desired that Arotaiteota, Bnildera, Dealer*, Com- 
mittees 00 the erection of Buildinn, and gentlemen ereoting Private Beeidences, and others, should thorouohly 
understand the priucipio upon which they are constructed, together with a few of the manv advantages they 
possess over all other looks heretofore made. We have published an illustrated catalogue, wbicii will be fEmished 
gratis on application to the Agent of the Faeiflo Coast. This catalogue illustrates the diflbrent slses and style*, 
among which are Store Door Bim D«ad Iiooks. Iron Door uid Vault Looks, Mortise Dead 
Iiooks, Offloe Bim Dead Iiooks, Mortise Offloe Xiooks, Vront Door Mortise Knob Iiooka, 
Mortise Knob and Oatoh Iiooks^ Closet Xtooks, Drawer Iiooka, *o. Two Keys, with all tiiv triio- 
mings complete, go with each Lock. 

OUB Ix>CKB DiFFKB VHOX ALL 0THBB8, inssmucb as the lock conforms to the key in locking; whilst 
nothing but the precise combination and key. with which they are locked, will unlock them. With our Locks 
you have only to change the combination in the Key, and lock the door, in order to have a new look whenever 
you desire. 

Oim Looks abk operated with pkbfeot bafett and ho ikcomvuiibmcb. 

OtTR Locks are safer, with the Key thrown out of position and hung upon the door to which they 
belong, than any other common lock in use with the key in your pocket, with one of our ordinary locks upon 
your door; and the Key bung as above stated, it would require fdtt-bix bo0R8 ahd nrrxxM mindtbb 
to run the entire cleanses ! Here is mechanism, and security for the Merchant and the Housekeeper. No False, 
Skeleton or Duplicate Keys operate on the Lock, and they make itom 326 to 60,626 ohangea each, and vary in 
prieeflvm e&lfi to $16, according to size, style and finish. 

ly SSHD for a CATALOOCB. 

Our Locks took the first prize (a Silver Medal) at the Worcester, Mass., Fair the preseiit year. The merits 
of our Locks have been indorsed by the Mechanics' Institute and State Agricultural Society of California, and 
by the best Mechanics on the Pacific Coast as well as elsewhere. Messrs. Kenitzor and Farqubarson, (Archi- 
tects for the Bank of California) aay " they are superior in durability and security over any other manufkoturo." 
Messrs. S. H. Williams & Son, Architects, S. C. Bugbee ft Son, Architects, William Patton, Architect, and 
others, have indorsed their merits, and their published testimony can be seen in our Catalogue. 

People buy locks because they have the name of lock applied to them, supposing at the time they will pro- 
tect whatever they secure with them, when, in fltct. nine out of every ten sold are merely apologies for seeunty, 
and may be opened by almost any skeleton key or bent wire. If yoa want a look, buy a good one and one that 
will protect you. otherwise your money is exranded to no purpose. And whenever you are in want of a lock 
always ask for the XJ. 8. COMBINATION LOOK, and, if you purchase, you will have a lock superior to 
anything of the kind in the world, in point of durability, security, and excellence of workmanship. 

For i\irther partioulan, and all matters appertaining to the Dosinesa for the Padfio Coaat, eommnnicationf 
most be addressed to the Agent of the Company, 

V. 8. W. PARKHUR8T, 

SAN FBANOISOO, OAL. 






ADYBRTISINQ DEPARTUBMT. 



XXIU 





JPBICJS, $10. 

kV.s.w.parkhurst, i 

f\ Agt-fbrPaclfloCoMt, . gS 



IFORTANT DIFOBIATION 



FOR 



DEALERS, 

AND 

Ml Others who use Money Drawers. 



To thnie who uie • Money Drawer It it efpeelalljr of importance, m it brings to ttieir notice an invention 
whereby their money can be xeoure Oom the depredatlonf or the liaht-flugered. In every community tliere ii 
a clan of people who pilibr Blonev Drawer* fW>m a natural or cultivated deoire to talie that which dne« not 
belon g to tiiem; to those eip<>clally ii WHTFirS PATENT THIBF-DBTSGTINO MONBT 
SBAwJoR a source of annoyance, as it baffles their sliill, whilst to the merchant it is a guard of M>curitv in 
time of Danfcer. The usoflilness of this Drawer is apparent when it is realised that there are boys of vicious 
tendencies whos« habits am unlcnown to traders, who, whon the proper time oomee, empty a drawer of its 
contents, or abstract » valuable pieae, and with an air of superciliousness cover np tlieir theft by honest look* 
and assuming mKnncrs. 

In a moral point of view the'Money Drawer possesses a. virtue by putting temptation bovond the reach of 
all cla8Ae8 of depredators on tills, thpreby preventing crime, when it Is Icnown that a White's Tlilof-Uetccting 
r wer Is In use, and saving, nd doubt, to a would-l^tliiof, a moral character for life; for, by the vxpcrieuccs 
o Uato prisoners, in a minority of ease* they have recorded their first acts of crime, when in youth, to the 
f\ Tina of their employer's drawer, or the drawer of some trader; and by fl-equont and dextrous methods in 
al)straeung money, It beaoma* *e«ond nature to them, and in manhood it is carried on as a part of their 
vocation. 

Those who possess one of White's Money Drawer* are not only maUng themselves secure ttom the hand 
of the spoiler, but are rendering the commonwealtli aid and support in preventing crime, and a communitv 
from the scandal that always follows in the waico of a dishonest act ; therefore, it u the dutv of every intolli- 

fsnt person to avail himself of the practical Inventions of the age to aid and assist him In his avocations, 
hose who shove aside these useAil inventions are the one* who suflbr the most ; they are continually telling 
over their grievances and losses, whon, by a little forethought and the expenditure of a little money, their 
troubles would not have occurred. 

In illustration of this latter class of people, I will mention an incident, which is one oat of many occurring 
of lilce character: A San Francisco merchant, who in his general business is shrewd and intelligent, when 
aslted to purchase one of White's Money Drawers, replied, he had got along without *uch appliances, and did 
not need it ; a few days after liis drawer was relieved of a iarge sum of money, and rather than run the risk 
of losing more money in so unceremonious a way, he immediately procured one of White's Thief- Detecting 
Drawers. Here is a perfect counterpart to the man who looked his stable door after his horses were stolen. 
Among the prudent and thoughtAil business men on the Paciflo coast who surround themselves with appli- 
ance* of security from depredators, it is a notable fact that many of Wells, Fargo k Co.'s Agents are supplying 
themselves with White's Fatent Thief-Detccting Money Drawers. 

White's Fatent Money Drawer took the First Fremium (a Medal) at the U. S. Fair, at Cincinnati, and at 
New York, New Hampshire, Caliibrnia State Fair, and other Fairs wherever exhibited; and on the Facific 
Coast, its^erlts havx oeen fully attested and approved by the Judges at all our exliibitions, and indorsed by 
some of the first houses who have them in use. 

White's Moner Drawers catch the rogue*, and prevent any person opening the drawer except the ones 
who know the particular combination used, as there are numerous ways of setting it, and no one can detect it 
from a common drawer. 

The regular manuflictured size measures on the outside 16 in. fW>nt, 16) in. in length, and 8 in. deep on the 
inside. The front of the Drawer is made of black walnut, the rest of muple, and other wood of as durable a 
nature, and is dovetailed tliroughout The cover of the Drawer is *o arranged that it can be attached to the 
counter in a fbw minute*, and the Drawer ready for uie. 

The peouliaritie* of White's Money Drawer consist in its self-looking and self-adjusting principle— it is 
always ready to give the alarm. It has fbur bolts, by which sixteen diflbrent change* can Im made. It can be 
locked by one, two, three, or all four of the bolts, thus making the Drawerperftetly secure. It is so arranged 
that tliieves, by pulling any part of the Drawer, will raise the alarm. The lock is in the back part of Ihe 
Drawer, leaving the front part tree and clear for use. It has six sliding half-globe cups for change, designed 
for dillbrent pteces of money; separate apartments for greenbacks, and places to pack away silver, leners, 
bills, etc. 

Another peculiarity in the Drawer ia the stop-ke tch, pr eventi ng the Drawer trom coming entirely ont, 
except at the option of the owner. THE PBIOX OW THjB DRAWJUB IB TEN DOUJLBB, expense 
of transportation to bo added; it* weight is about twelve pounds. E^tra sizes from the above sp cciflcd size, 
to fit n arrow counters, can be made; the measure must alwavs be given from the outside. WHITE'S 
THZEF-DETEOTINO HONBT DBAWBB, DOUBIJI SIZE. OONTAININO TWO 
JjOOKS ; this Drawer is 21 Inches wide, IBi inches in length, and 8 inches deep, inside, making a complication 
of combinations which are numbered on the flrout of the Drawer, making it easy to adjust Th e Dra wer is 
fitted up the same as the single size, with extra conveniences indde, and THE FBIOB IS TWENT7- 

Among the largo number of thi* Drawer that have been sold I have heard of no complaints in relation to 
it, and have many testimonials fW>m parties who have purchased, speaking in the highest terms of its 
excellence. Send for Circular for flirther information. 



"XTm 0. "^KTm :P,^LZUS:3BETTXl0Ty 

Sole Proprietor of WUto'i Patent Thief Detecting Monej Drawer for the Pacific Ooaat, 

SOS MontffotHery Street, X, W, Cor. Pine, San Francisco, Cat, 



XXIV 



FAOiriO COAST BUSIMBBS DIRIOTORT. 



U. S. SOLDIERS' IIOUNTIE& 




UMED SUTEII in STAP iSEICT, 

(BSTAi. HSD nr 1869) 
FOR TIIXS « ^X^I.iSOmON' OV 

BOUNTIES, PRIZE MONEY, CLAIMS, ETC. 

■>» 
S-S* .A. XtSOEXTT J^OX 03? OOXTC3-XUBSS, 

Three Yeirt' Volunteer*, who enlisted between April 10th, 1861, and July 19th, 1864, and 
who have been discharffed by reason of "expiration of term of service," for wounds received in the 
line of duty, (the breaking of an arm or leg, or hernia, is a wonnd) or by the ending of the war, if 
not less than two years' service, are entitled to SIOO additional bounty. 

Those who have received mors than $100 bounty, by reenlistment or otherwise, are not entitled 
to the benefits of this Act. 

Two Yeert' Volunteers, enlisting between the same dates and discharged for same reasons, 
are entitled to $60 additional bounty. 

Regular*, who enlisted between July 1st, 1861, and the above dates, discharged as per above, are 
entitled to $100 additional bounty. 

Send the Discharge in ail cases. Claims will vot be examined nor paid without it. 

Those who have lost, sold, or oivbn awat their Diseharges, cannot obtain bounties under this 
law. 

Heirs of deceased soldiers, who died while in service, or after discharge, if in consequence of 
wounds or disease contracted while in the service, are entitled to the same bounties as living soldiers. 

Volunteer Offloer*, below the rank of Brigadier-General, who were in service March 3d, 1865, 
and whose resignations were presented and accepted, or who were mustered out at their own request, 
or otherwise honorably discharged ftom the service after Apiil 9th, 1865, are entitled to three 
months' pay proper. 

Sailor* and Marine* are not included in the late Bounty Act ; but, no doubt, justice will be 
done them at the next session of Congress, which meets December 3d, 1866, by putting them on the 
same footing with Soldiers. 

Soldier*' and Sailor*' Widow* are entitled to $2 per month additional pension for eacR child 
under 16 years of age. 

Soldier* and Sailor*, who have lost a hakd or foot, are entitled to $7 per month additional 
pension, in all $15. Those who have lost both feet, or omb hand and one foot, to an increase 
of $12 per month, in all $20. Those -ho have lost both hands or both btbb, and are helpless, 
an increase of $17 per month, in all $25. 

JS^^ Circalars containing full particulars and much valuable information will bo forwarded 
vberever desired, upon the receipt of Wells, Fargo & Co.'s envelopes or postage stamps. 

J. R. ROBINSOlffy 

626 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, CaL 



I will be 
I on the 

sB child 



CaL 



ADVBRTIBINa DIPARTMBNT. 



XZT 



itt Mi ^MXM ^UMtMtt 



INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF SA.]Sr FR^NOISOO, 

Nos. 416 and 418 California Street. 



STOCKHOLDERS PERSONALLY LIABLE. 



< »«» t 



THB OAIiIFORHriA IiIiOTDS 

Ha-vlniK Consolidated trltli. tlie 

TJlSriON INSTJIlA.ISrCE CO. 

Januarsr 1* IseOf ttiim Company !• noTr prepared to efltoot 

Marias as well as Wive Zasuraace 

ITpon tlie n&oat fttvorable teruks* 
« •»» > 

LOSSES PJROMPTLT AND EQUITABLY AD J VSTEB 
AND PAID IN GOLD COIN. 



a)aauB(Bv<D&o » 



J. Mora Mom, 
James Otis, 
Wm. E. Barron, 
J. O. Kittle, 
Jos. A. Donohoe, 
M. J. O'Connor, 
I. Friedlander, 
Moses Heller, 
Lafayette Maynard, 
Charles L. Low, 



Jacob Scholle, 
James Dows, 
Joseph Seller, 
L. H. Allen, 
Wm. Hooper, 
C. Temple Emmet, 
Joseph Brandenstein, 
Benj. Brewster, 
Lloyd Tevis, 
Thomas H. Selby, 



Nicholas Loning, 
John Parrott, 
J. Underhill, 
M. D. Sweeny, 
C. N. Felton, 
James Fhelan, 
Onstave Tonchard, 
Michael Castle, 
Nicholas Larco, 
N. Q. Kittle, 



Wm. C. Talbot, 
Patrick McAran, 
George C. Johnson, 
Caleb T. Fay. 

SAGHAMENTO. 

B. F. Hastings. 

MAHTSTILLB. 

L. Cnnningham, 
VnUiam Smith. 



CALEB T. FAT, ProBident, OEAS. D. HAVEN, Secretary. 

GUSTAYE TOnCHASD, Marine Director. GEO. T. BOHEN, Surveyor. 



XZVl 



PAOIFIO COAST QUSINBSS DIRBOTORT. 



McNALLY & HAWKINS, 

No. 645 MARKET STREET, 



A^oining Si 0. Oipluui Asylnm, nearly oppoitn Montgomery St 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



BUIL13IIVGS FITTE2I> tJI» "WITH 
AND ALL WORK WARRANTED. 



Have constantly on hand an assortment of 



GAS GHANDELIEBS, LEAD AND IBON PIPES, MABBLE SLABS, &;o. 



PIONZSZSR PAPER milili, 

TAYLORVILLE, MARIN CO., CAL. 

S. p. TAYLOR & CO. .... Proprietors. 

HanuAotnrera and Importera of all Unda of 

PA.PXIR "WJLREisiovsisi, 3»a ciji^'X' axxcx^xso:. 

The highest price paid for Rage, Bopr>, etc. 

JUNE Aim RAG DEPOT, 111 AND 113 DAVIS STREET, 



BOHM & CLAUSEN, 



MANUFACTUKERS OF 



DIAMOND SETTERS, 

AND 

I>-A.TBlSrTBBS OB IL^IDIBS' BXJOBILBS, 

Tiom 604 Merchant Street^ 

Between Montgomery and Kearny, jgjJ^H 7^12r(O]IS^<]i>0 (DMto 



% 



f 



», CAL. 
[ 



IS, dEO. 



;ors. 



setJ 



I 



Mia 



ADYERTISINQ DHPABTMBNT. 



XXVU 




STOW & POLLOCK, 

lm£t®S iti&tes 4g€)m^s 

Soldiers', Sailors' and Marines' 




Arrears of Pay, Prize Money, 

And for the prosecution of all kinds of 

CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES. 

HEIRS, OF DECEASED SOLDIERS who died in consequence of Wounds or Disease con- 
tracted in the Service, are entitled to a Pension and Bounty. 

WIDOWS, OF SOLDIERS, SAILORS AND MARINERS, are entitled to additional Pen- 
sions for themselves, and for each child under sixteen years of age ; also, to the additional Bounty 
of 1866. 

All Soldiers who volunteered unst* April IBth, 1861, ore entitled to U. S. Bounty. 

SOLDIERS, SAILORS, MARINERS, and all others in the Army or Navy during the 
Rebellion, who were Wounded or Disabled while in the service, are entitled to Pension, from four 
to twenty-five dollars per month, according to the disability ; they are also entitled to additional 
Bounty. Send your discharge and we will coUe' j it for you. 

ALL COLORED SOLDIERS ARE ENTITLED TO BOUNTY. 

Th>-; are also entitled to Pension for Wounds or Disability, from $4 to $25 per month. 

BOUNTY LAND WARRANTS. 

All Officers, Marines, Seamen, Clerks and Landsmen, and all Officers, Mnsicians, Clerks, Pri- 
vates nnd Teamsters, either in the United States Army or in any State Service, if (jaid for by the 
United States, are each entitled to a Land Warrant for 160 acres, if they enlisted previous to March, 
18SS. Apply to us and we will obtain it for you. 

We have a Bestdent Agent in Washington to attend to all Claims. 

CAVEATS FILED AND LETTERS PATENT OBTAINED FOR NEW INVENTIONS 
,. ^ . AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



! 



Governor S*. F. LOW. California. 
Oovernor H. O. BIiASDBIi, Nevada. 
TUOKBB ft BBIiIiS, Wadilnston. D. O. 

HENRY M. STOW, 

Has had 16 years' experience in the bnsinoH. 



FBTBB E. BUBNIEiTT, Brest. Faoiflo Bank. 
Hon. OOBIfBIjIUS GOLB, TT. B. Senator. 
Hon. JAMSS W. NYX, U. S. Senator. 

ROBERT POLLOCK, 

Late Colonel Callfomia Volunteers. 



SOLDI* RS, send us your discharges immediately. We can collect your Bounty in 65 days, 
having our .igent in Washington to attend to them. 

Wasbiiigton Btreet, Ssiii IFrsiiidsco, €ial. 



■ L.) Iiwillj i pi p i .f. ll l l '*' 



li ■' 



zxvm 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORT. 



JACOB SCSHRZSIBZSR, 

BEDDING and FURNITURE 

Sole Mannfactmer of Fuller's Patent Spring Beds and Lounges, 




CURLED HAm, 



TOW, EXCELSIOR TWINE, 

fHrnitiDir© Springs, Bed Lace, WelblbiMg, TlcMig, Etc. 

The Spring Beds, made with FULLER'S PATENT, receired the First Premium at the late State Fair, 
and the First Premium at the late Heobanics' Fair held in this City. 

They are the BEST and CHEAPEST in use. Jnst Try One. 

121 and 123 Sansom Street, bet. Fine and Bush Sts. 



T. B. BATCB A CO. 

mrnmlm 





FOB THE SALE OF 



H.E. Cor. Commercial, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



U. M. GORDON & CO. 

IHP0RTE..13 AND DEALERS If 



w ^itMr vuillF ilHl. ^^^ .^HBft tCvv^ vfPVk mmM 




AND A GENERAL ASSORTMENT OF LIQUORS, 

No. 709 SANSOM STREET, between Jackson and Faoific, 



ADVBRTISINa DBPABTMBNT. 



XXOL 



I. «. COBB. 



a. TBVIB. 



ktt0Ynie|jSi m& §mm\m^ M ^m 



030 CLAY STREET, 

Nob. 9 and 10 Court Blocic, ^JS^'M IFM^&Sf ©3©©©, ©.^Si. 



WALTER VAN DTKE, 

^ttovniH at faw, 

OFFICE IN COURT BLOCK, 

Entrance opposite City Hall, on Merchant Street, 
and 636 Clay Street, 



mORHEY & COUNSELOR AT UW, 

ojFjpicn, eoujtr slock, 

Entrance to Building opposite City Hall, Merchant Street, 
and 636 Clay Street, 

■ ▲V FBA.VC1BOO, OAI.. 



ALFRED A. MAC]£, 

(AVOCAT FRAN9AIS) 

Attorney & Cotinselot af law, 

OOUBT BLOCK, BOOM No. 7, 

Entrance, 616 Clay Stmt and 61$ Merchant Street, 

SAN FRANOISOO, CAL. 



M. H. MYRICK, 

LAW OFFJCE, 

COURT BL8CK, 636 CLAY STREET, 



J. n. A D. F. VERDBIVAI., 

MTitisisfi k igiinisim M law, 

OFFICE, 

No. 22 CPURT BLOCK, No. 636 CLAY STREET, (up stairs) 

Entrance on Clay or Merchant Street, below Keamj, 



XXX 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS BIRBOTORT. 



BUSSET'S N EW COMBINA TIOH LOCK. 

■■* — ^— — 

Wo arc Informed that this T<ock, Invented by William C. Busset, of Amador County, In thU State, li on an entirely 
new principle, and Is ncknowlcdged bv locksmiths to be tlie strongest, simplest and best Combination Lock ever In- 
Tente<l. It can be subjected to a million changes, and when these have been ran tiie buiglar Is no nearer entrance 
than when he commenced. The exact set of the comblnailon must be known before It aan be opened. The Inventor 
can Instruct any one, In a few minutes, to open and also to set the combination, so that the Inventor cannot sain en- 
trance without you flnt divulge the srt. Ko key Is used, nor Is there any guide on the ftice of the Lock. Ho derange- 
ment Is possible; Are cannot Injure it if not melted. 

The Bank of British Colunil)la ordered the first one of these Locks Introduced in this City, and the following 
recommendation has been received by the Inventor : 

Bank of British Coluhbia, San Francisco, May 24tli, 1866. 

Recently, two of Wm. C. BAssey's New Patent Cqmblnatlon Burglar-l'roof Loeks were placed up'in the vault 
doors of tlic Hank of British Columbia. They arc found to operate with ail the efficiency claimed by the Inventor, and 
In every way meet our fullest approval. They were ordered upon mature deill)crati(>n, uiter strict Investigation of their 
merits, hi comparison with some of the most noted and popular oiil xtylcs of Combination Locks. We deem the Lock 
entirely burt:lnr-proof. It is strong In construction, witliout intricate or delicate parts, with simple and easy move- 
ment We tind no difflculty In either opening or closirt; It, nor in chanKhix Its combinations, which miiy be made al- 
most innumerable. As a Callfl)mla Invention of extraordinary merit, wc take pleasure In recommendint; it to public 
attention, believing It to possess all the advantages which are claimed for it. 

Wk. H. Tillirohast, Sub-Manager. 

For nirther Inlbrmatton Inquire of 



SO*^. 18 Z*oflit Street^ 

Where Locks of all descriptions are manufactured. 



>aa.olflio^y Oa.1. 



F. P. DANN, 

No. 604 MERCHANT STREET, 

Rooms 7 and 8, BAN FBANOISOO, OAL. 



WM. H. McGREW, 

OFFICE: 

Boom JVb. 3, Barron's Building, 

N, W. COB. HONTOOMEBT k MEBOHANT STS. 

BAH FBAirCISCO, CAI.. 






n. F. BUTIiXSR, 

73 MONTGOMEBT BLOOE, 

8A.» V»A>8r(9II8(B(i)9 (Blift« 



JAMES E. WOLFE, 

Ko. 402 HONTOOMEBT ST., 

N. E. Cor. CalUbmla Street, oppoatto Wells, Fargo tt Co. 

Soom JVo. S 3%irtl Ftoor, 

SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 



I( on an entirely 
on Lock ever in- 
nearer entrance 
1. The Inventor 
cannot sain en- 
:k. Mo derange- 

id the following 

ay 24th, 1866. 
uppii the vault 
lie Inventor, and 
itlirntlon of their 
i ilccin the Lock 
and easy move- 
may bo made ai- 
ling It to public 



ADVEBTISING DBPARTMKNT. 



xxn 



FIRE AJNT> LIFE 




MSTABLISHED 1803. 



CAPITAL, 



$8,000,000. 



Insure Buildings, and Merchandise in them, on the most moderate terms ; also. Frame 
Buildings and Merchandise, or Furniture contained in same. 



Losses paid here in Cash immediately on adjustment, 

IN U. S. GOLD CO IN. 

LIFE INSURANCE FOR A PERIO D OF YEARS, OR^ E WHOLE TERM OF LIFE. 
FALiciVE^a, be:]l.]l. & oo. 

480 O.AXiXF'OXlN-X.A. STXiEET, 

AGENTS FOR CALIFORNIA. 




]g IMSWJ^JlM €Eo 



< » t 



THE BBinSH AND FOREIGN 

MARINE INSURANCE CO. 

OA.r»IT.A.lL., - - - $3,000,000. 

« * > 

The undersigned having been appointed Agents at this Port for the Company 
above named, are now prepared to effect 

INSUBANGE ON MEBOHANDISE, SPECIE AND FREIGHT, 
To and from all parts of the world. 

]l.osse:s i».A.ir> iisr 0011.0 ooiiv. 

faiiKhter, beimI. a go. 

No. 430 California Street, San Franoisco, CaL 



zzzu 



i 

PAOIFIO OOABT BUSINBSS DIBBOTOBT, 



AMP WAMB 





Ii. B. BBNOBLBT &, OO. 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 

♦ 






AaBIOULTimAL AND MININa IMPLEMENTS/ 



lb B. BBirOHIiIlT, I 
JOHN BBNBLSY. f 



SAN FRANCISCO, GAL 



(F. D. XBIiIiOOO, 
IJ. UoUBCHAN. 



Dealers and Consumerg of Hardware will find our Stock very fall 
and complete; and will at all times he furnished Goods at the Lowest 
Boies. 

Orders for Goods will have our best attention. 



F. •TEIirHA.KT,) 

KewTork. / 



Sm F«ncbco.{^"T»H."AMT, 



, HAOAS. 



STEINHART BROS. & GO. 



Importers and Jobbers of 

FANCY AND STAPLE 










% 



S. E. Cor. Battery and Pme Streets, 



SA-N FBtAJSCISCO, CAJL.. 




K 



keit» 



CBIiIiOOO, 



very full 
A Lowest 



illVHAKT, 

"loAjr. 



BO. 






ADVBRTISINQ DEPARTMENT. 



xxxiii 



JAMES LINFORTH, 



3 FBONT STEEET, near Market, 

SATV FRA.IVCISCO, CAL. 

1 ■ > 

Meroliaiidise and Machinery of all Descriptions purchased or imported to 
07.'der for Country Merchants, and for parties residing in Utah, Ari- 
zona. Idaho, Montana, Honolulu, and at other distant points. 
Actual Market Quotations fUmished on application. 

Qoods oonsigned for tegUpment oarefolly and promptly forwarded. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE EFFECTED IN THE BEST DOMESTIC AND 
FOREIGN COMPANIES AT THEIR RATES WITHOUT FURTHER CHARGE. 

N. B. — Ap^nt at San Francisco for the sale of Passages from New York to Liverpool, Antwerp, 
^ambnrfr, Bremen, Havre, and Paris, i)y the Vessels of the National Steam Navigation Company, 
sailing weelily. 

Steerage Passage Tickets to bring parties from LiTerpool or Qnccnstown (Cork Harbor) to New 
York for $30, Currency. 



SO- SI XV 





■WALTER. S. I»IERCE, 

No. 536 MARKET ST, (opp. 2d) SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Has fitted nn a new and the only complete Factory for the manufacture and repairing of Piano 
Fortes on the Pacific Coast. Repairing of every description done in the roost tliorough and satis- 
factory manner at moderate prices. The highest cash price paid for second hand Pianos. Work- 
men sent into the Country if desired. Also, Importer and Dealer in 

3F> X j£li. XMT €> S» 

of all the most approved makers, and agent for HALLET <C CUMSTOX'S NEW 
SCALE PIANO FORTES, combining the very latest improvements and in every par- 
ticular superior to any Instruments now before the public. 

No, 530 Market Street, opposite 2d, San Francisco, Cal. 



t »»» » 



X>X.A.Xa-OS X%BN-T£11>. 



8 



XXX17 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



IMPOBTEBS AH0 M AMDrACTOKERB OF 



WOODWORTH, SCHELL & GO. 

PABIS A SAN FBAHCI8C0, 

rVrACTOKERB OF 

PIANO FORTES, 

Ctorch & School Organs, 

HARMONIUMS, 

Melodeonsy XStci 

WAHB-ROOMS, BAH FBAHCISCO, 

MASONIC TEMPLE. Entrance, No. 1 2 Post St. 

iVHOi.iiaAiii: AOESTa foh 

STODAST PIANO POBTE, SMITH'S AMEBTCAN OHOANS and FBIHCE & 
COS MELODEONS and OBOANS. 

IMPORTEKS OF 

Piano Covers, Music Stools, Music Racks, Etc. 




FRISBEE & SCOTT, 



No. 139 KEARNY STREET, CORNER SUTTER, 

BOLE AOBMTS FOR TUX 

Celebrated Pianos of W. Knabe & Co., Baltimore, Md. 

THE FINEST INSTRUMENTS IN THE WORLD. 
Orders from tlie Country for 3£usio promptly attended to. 






Adapted to all grades of work ; strong, simple, durable ; not liable to get out of 

order, send for circular. 

H. A. DZSMIlffGy Agent, 

Xo. 137 Kearny Street, Comer Sutter, San Francisco, Col. 



GO. 

s, 

organs, 

s, 
Bto< 

istSt. 

EIIHCE & 
Etc. 



f 



e, Md. 



kd to. 



ttieisi 



rot out of 



ADVBRTISINO DBPARTMENT. 



XXXV 



GEO. C. JOHlffSOIff A CO. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



'9 

AND 



Nos. 33 and 3i BATTERY STREET, 211 anil 213 PINE STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 



A. JACOBY. 



JOSSra JACOBT. 



A. JACOBT A CO. 

COMMISSION MERCBANTS, 

AND SBAIiBBS IN 

California and Eastern Provisions, 

N.KGor.FRONT & COMMERCIAL STREETS, 

KEEP CONSTANTLY ON HAND 

BUTTER, LARD, PORK, MACKEREL, 

CHEESE, BACON, SALMON, CRANBERRIES, 

ECCS, HAMS, CODFISH, ETC., ETC. 

[C?~ Wo are prepared to moke liberal Cash Advances on consignments of all kinds of Dairy 
Produce, Eggs, Hides, Skins, Wool, Tnllow, Poultry, etc. ; and coll the attention of Traders, 
Farmers and Dairy Men especially to this card. 



EBW^ASI* MARTIir. 



D. V. B. HEarABIE. 



E. MARTIN 4& CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 




606 FROiyrT STREET^ 

SAM FEASf€JIIS€^, €ALo 



i! 



, j 



XXXVl 



PAOIFIO OOABT BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 



IMPOIfrSItS 0£^ 



SCHOOL BOOKS, STATIONERY, 

JUVENILE BOOKS, FANCY ARTICLES, Etc. 

632 Washington Streeti above Montgomery, and 691 Market Streeti corner of Third* 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



-♦ »m^ V- 



BTATIONEBT STAHFED WITH IHITIALS. WEDDIHO AND VISITDra OASDB ENOBAVED IN THE 

LATEST 8TTLE. 



ARCHITECT, DESIGNER AND DRAUGHTSMAN, 

No. 410 KEARNY STREET, SAN FRANOISGO. 

De8ign8 furnished for Public and Private Buildings, Tab' 
lets, Monuments, Fresco Painting, Etc, Etc, 

BUILDINQS SUPERINTENDED DURING CONSTRUCTION. 



SAN FRANCISCO TRANSIT OBSERVATORY 

z:s'rAii]:.isiix:i> xsn 184,8. 

LATITUDE SI' 47' 50.2" N. LONGITUDE 122' 23' 10" W. 

The »ub»crlber has devc ted many years of his life to acquire a thorouith knowlcdM 
of (Ihroiionictcni havlni; made it ono of his chief studies. Ho Is prepareil to nnder- 
takc th« repiilrhig and - .; istlin? of all Chroiiom-ters which fall to give sntlsftiotioii 
to tholr owners, and w.il guarantee them to perform ns well us ihev ever did before 

CilAUTS lor all parts of the world, from the most recent (iovomment siirvevs' 
and the best Nautical Works and Chronometers, by the most eminent makers "for 
sale or lenton hire. Nautical InstrumcnU of all kinds accurately repaired and 
adjusted. H^TTebiib Mockbatb. ' "-'"""■» »"" 

409 SANSOME STREET, 

[Between Commercial and Sacramento, under the St. NIeholas Uotcl] 




Toxx^r o. e^esxjX. 



CARPETS i FURNITURE, 

UPHOLSTERY, PAPER, OIL OLOTH AND WINDOW SHADE 




SUTTER ST. OPPOSITE FASHION STABLE, and MARKET ST. OPPOSITE SECOND, 

Amerloan Silk and Begimental Flass on hand and made to order. 



AOVERTISIMQ DEPARTMENT. 



XXX VU 



J. A.. BA-TJER, 

Chemical Laboratory and Assay Office, 

644 WASHINGTON STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

< ^ > 

OAIIZSFUX^ A.T9A.iyKmiE:& SiCA.T>X3 OF 

Ores, Minerals, Waters, Oils, Liquors, Products or Art, &c. 

PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS MADE TO ORDER. 

Opinions given on Ohemloal Questions and Oeology. 
Nitrnto of Silver in Crystals or fused, and Chloride of Gold and Sodium for sale. 



C. FIELD. 



A. FHEI. 



BEDSTEAD & FUEMTUEE 



AT MEIGHAIfflOS' THIIImIm^ 

Comer of Mission and Fremont Streets, 

SATS' FR,ATVCI®CO, CA.L. 




CRIBS AND EXTENSION TABLES OF ALL KINDS. 

All Kinds of Wood Turning. 



sr. 



A>ttexxc3.ec]. t^. 



,Z2tl3r 



233 KEARNY STREET, bet. Bush and Sutter, 

Near Bush, In Tittel's Brick Building, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



IMPORTKR AKD DBALBR IN 



GENUINE HAVANA AND AMERICAN CIGARS, 5 

SMOKIWO and rHBWIIVO TOBACCO In tho greatest variety. BDTITrFS, 
PIPES. IWATf^HES. Ac, direct Imported IVom Maimfacturcra. P. LorlUard'g 



Am.amB.s.*Kt;.,uirt:i:iiiiipur(euiruiiimaiiuiaciurera. i'. Lionuai 
Snufh, Coarse Rnppee, Maciboy, Scotch and Lundyfoot. Oall A Ax's aud K. 
A. Uoetze & Bros. German and American Smoking Tobacco. 



Xjo-^7 



looai X 



t Smoking ' 

Vera 



OamiIx X S 



XXXviii PAOIFIO COAST BUSINBBB DIRECTORY. 



PACIFIC 













No. 305 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

M'ortb'vrest Corner ot Pine, 



The object of this Institute is to furnish articles for Schools, including 

OF EVERT STYIaE, 

APPARATUS, 
MAPS, 
CHARTS, 

STATIONERY, 

Etc., Etc., Etc. 

Also, to keep and distribute 

Circulars anA Catalopes of Private Scbools ani Feiale Seminaries. 

< »■» > 

Teachers, County Superintendents, and Trustees, will be furnished with arti- 
cles for Scliools at the lowest cash prices. 

Principals of all Schools and Colleges are urged to send me a number of their 
Circulars, as I keep such for free distribution. 



SAN rBA-NCXSCO, CAIL.. 



ADVERTISING DBPARTMBMT. 



XXXIX 



B. B. rRBBMAH. 



a. W. B. M'OOMALD. 

B. H. FIIEEMA.N" & CO. 

Sueeettort lo SMITU d» FBEEMAN, 

SCROLL SAWYERS AND TURNERS, 

At Chace's Saw Mills, Cor. Market and Beale Streets, San Francisco. 



-. »»» > 



MT iM^ m 



.IJ£Jo 



Constantly on hand and made to order, STAIR RAILS, POSTS, BALUSTERS, Ac. 



MANUFACTURING JEWELERS, 

DIAMOND WQHES, Etc. 

No. 643 Sacramento Street, near Kearny, 



A large assortment of Calirornia Jewelry Constantly on Hand. 



W®01 AMI i¥©m¥ ot: 

309 Market Street^ near 

8A.lsr FRA-NCISCO. 



COLUMNS, NEWELS, BALUSTERS, BILLIARD AND TEN PIN BALLS, 
Ca'blnot and Sblp rTurnliiB ctono to Order. 



9 



J. IIXoGS-XX^I^. 



ManufUoturer of* 














9 .s^'^aRi) .»/««» •s^.si^^ 
BLINOS and. ]M:0XJLI>IIV»S, 

SCROLL SAWING and SCROLL PLANING. BRACKETS and MEDALUONS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS. 

Corner of Market and Beale Streets, Second Floor. 






N, B, Finishing Work for Buildings got up promptly to order. 



Ii I 



xl 



PACIiflO COAST BUSINESS T>IRBOTORT. 



JONATHAN KITTRFDGSy 

PHCENIX W^ORKS, 

Nos. 6 and 8 BATTERY STREET, NEAR BUSH, 
8A.N^ FRAisrcisco. 

IMC ^V. IV XJ DP ^4. O TTJ K, E H, OF 

FIRE-PROOF DOORS i^TlSSr^ J monitob safes, 



AND 



SHUTTERS, 

JiANK VAULTS, 




Bolt and Bridge Work, 



PRISON CELL AND JAIL YARD WORK, 

Aixd all kinds of General Blacksniithing. 

We particularly call the attention of Bankers and others to the MONITOU SAFES and VAULTS — an 
article lonj^ souKlit for in California— great care iieing taken in the manufacture of these Safes mlatlTe to 
their strength against the dcsij;n s of wily burglars. 



LiBOnr R. MYERS (£ GO. 

IMPORTtRS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

ITALI AN ANP^ A MERICAN 

MANTLES, CRATES, MONUMENTS, HEADSTONES, TOMBS, 

WASHSTAND, BUREAU & COUNTER TOPS, BILLiARD 

BED^i, FIRE BRIOKE, PLASTER, AC, AC. 

747 MARKET STREET, OPPOSITE DDPONT, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



LEON R. MYERS. 



.'AMia N. BLOCK. 



GOLD, SILVER AND 

mffm €MSHE11A SAMFIEE. 

All Work d one at the Short est Notice. 
No. «4. C-A.JL.IFOK3VIA. STTCKST, 

UETWKEN DAVIS AND DKUMM STUEETS, 

IN THE REAR OP THOMAS' PLANING MIIiL, ■ ■ SAN FRANCISCO. 

VOBTBIOlVMIiiBrTB 80I..ieiTfiI». 



SALE OF ORES FREE OF CHAROE. 

RRrEKENCRS! Moador, Lolur Jc Co. ; Martin & Co., Prof. Thomas I'ricc, Shippers and rurchasera of Ore; Kellogg, 
IIowBton & Co. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



xli 



JSJEV 







oossrozsjaLXAZi: 







PATENTED ISBO. 



suHmoiffs, Romrz: « co. 

204= and 206, California St., 



SAX FRANCISCO, 

SOLE AGENTS. 



ZXSGLiIO & MOORZ:^ 

783J MARKET ST., BETWEEN THIRD &. FOURTH, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Alanulboturora at' 

Italian and American Marbles^ 

Mantels, Grates, Monuments, Headstones, Tombs, 

Washstand, 

Bureau k Counter Tops, 

BILLIARD BEDS, 

Fire Bricks, 
Plaster* ^o. 





A. PALTENGHI, 

No. 812 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Uetneen Jackson and raciflc, ]Mt above IMoncerHall, 

SA]V mAivcisco, 

MARBLE OF ALL KINDS, 

ALSO 

Mantel-Piecea, Monuments, Qravestoneti, 
MAR13L13 SLA13S, ETC. 

Sculpture and Ornaments Made to Order. 
Also, IHarble Fountains, Statues, Ete Etc. 






KITTRZSbGEI^' A LEAVITT, 

FIRE-PROOF DOORS & SHUITERS, 

'""""""'^'""" Steel Lined Bank Vaults and Safes, 

PRISON CELLS, BALCONIES, AWNINGS, 

Grating and Iron Fences, Stairs, &o. 

ALSO, AGKNTS FOB 

MUS»EY»H IVEWLY I»A.TIi:NT 
COMBIlTATIOar BntOLAK-PROOr LOCK. 

KO KKY OK VI.S1ULE 8U!N8 OK Ol'ENINO. 

MARKET, BETWEEN FREMONT AND BEALE. 

Constantly on hand, a lorge assortment of second hand 11 re-proof Doors and Shutter*. 



s 




4 
s 



iJt 



xlii 



FAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORT. 



POINTER & HARRINGTON, 




WHOLESALE A.VD RETAIL 









MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SUCCESBOB TO WBBB ft HOLMBS, 

MANUFACTCTRER OF 



SACRAMENTO & SANTA CRUZ UM, 

IMPORTER OF 

Cement, Plaster, Lath, Hair, Nails, Fire Brick, £tc.. Etc. 

CORNER OF MARKET m FIRST STREETS, S AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

BRANCH STOBE, SIXTH STREET, SACRAMENTO CITY. 




A.m> 



COMMISSIONER OF T-EEDS FOR ALL THE STATES, 

And Territories of Arizona, Idalio, Montana, New Mexico, Washington, &c. 

AND 

O O SOT -XT' XI -X-.^. Sa* O E3 Zl. , 



EMPLOYMENT & REAL ESTATE AGENTS 

Asrn 

r^o. 401 BUSH STREET, 1st door ab ove Kearn y, San Francisco, M 

THE OITT FBOFT AND KEABNT STREET BAILBOAD OABS PASS THE OFnOL. 
— I ^ > 

Wo pny Btrlct attrntinn to Ihc Airntalilng of Ilolp of nil kinrt«. for both f'lty and Country. IIatIiik had lonu fxpcrl- 
cncr in tills lirniicli of bui*ini<fis, wn fi'el full eunfliloiico In RollcltlnK ordcn, as our Il('l|) nliiill li« of tlio inuHt select and 
best adapted kind fur tbo City and Country. All orders Uy .Mali or Kxpriss promptly attenili-il to. 

We also piy strict attention to the KenthiK and SellUiK of both Purnlslii'd and ITiifiirnlslied IIpiiscs. Sales of Rc«l 
Estate and Ranches made on the most reasonable terms. All orders lell fur the buyUiK and sclUnu ot Uushiusc I'lacei. 
and procurlnii of I'artners, Ac, will receive our particular attention. 

Ham Fiiancisco, Cal., IHW. 



ADVERTISINQ DEPARTMENT. 



xliii 



8> 



GOB. EEABNY & BUSH STS., SAN FBANOISCO, OAL, 

Horses and Carriages constantly on hand, 
for Sale or Hire. 

SADDLE UORSES FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. 

H0R8E$ TAKEN OK LtVERV 8V THE OAYt WEEK OH MONTH. 

ALSO, AI.!. KIITDS OF CABRIAOES TO liET 
W^ITH OB WITHOUT HORSES. 




A. CRAHITFORD « CO. 




4 




AND DEALERS IN 

SHIP & STEAMBOAT STORES, 

Flags and Buntings of all Colors constantly on hand, 

27 MAHKET STREET, 

3 doors west of Stewart, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

H 




SURGICAL AND MECHANICAL 




109 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Between Bush and Sutter, oppoalto south cnil of Occidental Hotel, 

M.TS WmMiUi<St>!, <SATL^ 

C^ DR. UBBEY (Irvoten his exclusive attention to the practice nf HKSTIHTBY. lie will not make 
elaborate protennloMs to any mysterious elnlms, made tiy many In the I'roft^sslon, hut flatters lilinsolf that a constant 
and extensive prai'llre nf twenty yean, with due attention to all Improvements extant, will capacitate hini to compete 
with any In the I'rofosslc n. 

TEKTH adapted In anv BTTI.R or on anynAsr, deslrert-OOLD. SILVER, PLATINt'M, or VITLOAKITE, Cnow 
much in vokuo.] 'I oetli VLrcoKn substantliilly, with all popular materials. Teeth kxtuactkd. with or without onnt- 
thetlc aitencles. ^^ All professional Services— Medical, Surgical or Mechanical-Insured to Rive satisfaction. 



xliv 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



MUTUALi LiIFE IlffSURAnCi: CO. 

OF ]>TB^W TrOIlK- 

CASH ASSETS, 
H. 8. HOMA-lSrS, 

4=34 BlontacomeJ'y- Street, San f ranolsoo. 

D. o'callag"han & CO. 
GENERAL AGENTS FOR LIFE, FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE, 

4:34 SfontKomory Street, San Franolsoo. 




LEADING HATTER, 

IHI-ORTEK AND UAMIFACTUREB OF 

HATS AND CAPS, 
227 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Second door from Tine, 



■WIIOI-1ESA.IL.E A^IVU HETA-IXJ. 



PREISXSRVi: TOUR SIGHT I 

BY PURCHASING PERFECT SPECTACLES, EXACTLY SUITED TO YOUR EYES, 



O. 3JCU1L.LEXI-. 



. OJPTIOIA.TV, 



205 Montgomery Street, Suss House Block. 



MY OWN SPKCIALIXY. 

From constant observation of tlifl HUMAN BYE, I have obtained a tliorouxli knowledge of this most 
valuable Organ. I am enabled to discern, in the majority of cases, from a mere inspection of tlie pupil, 
whether or not GInssesi can be of any Ix^netit for tlic Kyc, or the exact Focus retinired to enable the wearer to 
pursue the most minute employment witli an ordinary amount of light, without causing that weakness or 
fatigue tu the Urgau usually complained of. C >! U I^I^HIII, Ox>tlolan, 

No. 205 Montgomery Street, Rubs House Blook. 



PACIFIO ASPHALTUM OOMPAnT. 



ROOFING, SIDEWALKS AND PAVEMENTS 

OF EVERY KIND MADE TO ORDER, 

ASPHALTUM AND ENGLISH FELT FOR SALE. 

Office, 533 Kearny Street, corner of Sacramento. 

ALL CUB, WOKE WILL BEAB THE OOHFANT'B irTLE, AHD WILL BE WASBAFTED. 
IM. E. FITZ-QIBBON, SUPERINTENDENT. 



GO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



xlv 



MERCHANTS' FORWARDING LINE 

SHIPP INO" AO iaWTS, 

raiESALE DEALERS IN PEODDCE. 



ALSO, DEALERS IN 





9> 




M' 



TURPENTINE AND ROSIN. 

D^ The utmost caro and attention is given to filling orders and executing commissions. 

Gash advanced immediately on receipt of Qoods. 
MA.1L.OTT & CO. 

714, 716, 718 Front Street, San Francisco. 
50 E Street, Marysville. 



C. A. MARSTON. 



J. RILEY MAINS. 



EXCELSIOR FINE ART GALLERY, 

CRIJVI HOUSE, 
No. 523 Kearny Street, near Sacramento, 



CARD PICTURES OF EVERY STYLE 

Taken at the very Lowest Prices. 

Photographs, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Ivorytypes, Sun Pearls, etc. 

TAKEN IN THE HIGHEST PERFECTION OP THE ART. 



PARTICULAR ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

Copying and Restoring Old Pictures. 



I » > 



Fiotures taken equally as well in Oloudy or Rainy Weather. 

Dj^ This Gallery has the largest Operating Room and Sky-light on the Pacific Coast. .£4] 
iSm B.-«Oiily up one fliiplit of Stairs. 



I 



xlvi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



SAN FRANCISCO 

CORDAGE MANUFACTORY. 

» ^ > 

Constantly on hand, a largo and complete assortment of 

WHALE LINE, BALE ROPE, ETC. 

MANUFACTURED KKOM 

OFFICE AT TUBBS & CO., Nos. 611 and 613 FRONT STREET, 
iwffA.xTxrrA.OTOii'sr a.t the i»oti*eiio. 



8. H. DAVIS. 



W. L. WITHAM. 



PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

South West Corner Clay and Davis Streets, 



Ji^~ Particular attention paid to Purchasing and Forwarding Goods to the Interior. 



H. F. McKENNA. 



T. D. McKENNA. 



J. K. MoFAKLIN. 



ncKENNA BRO. &, CO. 



:<^ 



AND DEALERS IN HAY AND GRAIN, 

Drumin Street, One Door North of Clay, 

' »■» 

X. B.— Orders from the Interior promptly attended to. 



J. M. CURTIS. 



SHELDON ALLEN. 



Iffoi 313 Davis Stvoot^ 

SAB TIBJilSriOIISSD. 



Interior Orders and Consignments Solicited. 



ADVERTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



xlvii 



ORNAMENTAL DESIGNS IN EVERY STYLE. 




xlviii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORY. 



$500,000 WOBTHOF WATCHES, 

DimoBls, imH Silyerware, k 

CONSTANTLY ON HANr> JLNI> FOR. SJLUE BY 

J. IHT. TnCSZSR A CO. 

THE OLDEST AND LABOEST HAHUFAOTUBEBS OF 

iiwii.il m§ mimmmi 

ON- THE I»-A.aiFIO aO-A.ST. 

J[^~ Persons in California, Nevada, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah and Washington territories, 
Mexico, British Columbia and Sandwich Islands, will find that orders intrusted to this House, 
either direct or through Wells, Fargo & Co., will receive prompt attention, and at prices as low as 
though they were present to select for themselves. 

P. S. — A very large assortment of «if 

AMERICAN GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES, 

Which we are selling at Reduced Prices. 

We Refer to Ebc-Gov. UiLTOif S. Latham, Uanager of The London and San Fnncigco Bank. 

John Parrott, Esq., of Parrott k Co., Bankers. 

Chas. E, McLame, Esq., Manager of Wells, Fargo ft Go's Express and Banking Co. for the Paoifio Coast. 

J. ^W. TUCKER & CO. 

Montgomery Street, San Franeigco, Cat. 



P. J. REILIiT, 

No. 535 OOMMEBCIAL STREET, 2 DOOBS BELOW MONTGOMEBY, 

SAF ERAFGISGO, 

Importer and Dealer In Foreign and Domestic 

DRUGS, CHEMICALS, DYE STUFFS, ACIDS, 

Patent Medicines, Perfumery, Fancy Articles, etCi 

ALSO, ALL GOODS USED BY 

Druggists, Assayers, Bakers, Bre-wers, Soda Manu- 
facturers, Hair Dressers, Confectioners, 
Dyers, Etc. 



HES, 

c. 

LE BY 




m 



ton Territories, 
to this House, 
)riccs as low as 



CHES, 

Bank. 

tlic Faoifio Coast. 

3. 

eiacOf Cnl. 



TGOMEBT, 



9tlO 



iCIDS, 



a Manu- 



M 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



xlix 



A. R. BALDWIN & CO. 




MERCHANTS, 

Call the particular attention of purchasers visiting this City to the 

FINEST AND BEST SELECTED STOCK OF LIQUOES 

TO BE FOUND ON THIS COAST. 




These Whisliies have been put up expressly 
for invalids and family use, and have been 
pronounced by most of the principal physi- 
cians of San Fmncisco and throughout the 
State of California as what we recommend 
them to be — vert old and pdre — and ad- 
vise their use medicinally. 





219 & 221 FRONT STREET, 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 












JLTTT} 



MERCANTILE 

mumi COMPANY 



OF 



IiONDOnr AND EDINBURGH. 

» - ■ - ^m^ • — 

€AI>3f A!L» - « - 




ACCUMULATED AND INVESTED FUNDS, 
March 23cl, 1866, $12,247,422 18. 

Deposit in California, according to Law $75,000 

Deposited in Oregon, do. 150,000 

Limit on Single Risks $100,000 

SAN FRANCISCO BANKERS: 

messrs. TAIiIaANT A CO. 



a■B3^^^BK,-A.I:. omcB = 

S. E. Cor. Sansom and California Streets, San Franoisco, Cal. 

»»■ 

Insurances effected on the most favorable terms on Buildings of both BRICK 
and WOOD throughout the Pacific States and Territories, whether occupied as 
DWELLINGS, STORES or WAREHOUSES, together with their contents. 
VESSELS IN PORT, with or without Cargoes, also insured. 

LOSSES PAID HERE IN GOLD COIN. 



IB:. T 

GENERAL AGENT FOR THE PACIFIC STATES AND TERRITORIES. 




INY 




JNDS, 



. .$75,000 
. J50,000 
.1100,000 



CO. 



I, Cal. 

loth BRICK 
occupied as 
sir contents. 



IRIES. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



li 







DIAMONDS AND SILVERWARE, 

OF FIHSX CiXT-AJL.IX'Sr OlTIilT- 

I ■ > — ^— — 

NO INFERIOR OR IMITATION GOODS KEPT ON HAND. 



u 



Of every description with CHAINS to match. 

barrettTsherwood, 

517 Montgomery Street, second door North of Commercial Street, 




Pioneer Patent Asphahum and Brick Company, 



ROOFS, SIDEWALKS, CELLARS, WAREHOUSES, FLOORS AND PAVEMENT OF ALL KINDS, 

Constantly on hand, a large Stock of BBICK, for Sale. 

1 m I 

OFFICE, N. E. Ooraer Montgomery and California Streets, up stairs, 

.XXOlMIOOy OaI. 



i 'I 



lii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



BEHSHABD HEI.!*. 



•IMOM HGLD. 



DAVID HELD. 



vt» »«o»*«^^ 



n^POHTBUS OF 



^> 



iiracE Eswiii. mraii 



SILKS, VELVETS, LACES, 

RIBBO]SrS, STRA.^^ QOODS, 



ASn ALL (iORTS OF 



?) 



NO. 419 SACRAHEHTO STREET, 

Brtwnn SuMDi iiKl Ballerj, SAN FRANCI! , CAL. 



B. H. HAIOHT. 



W. U. FIIMOM. 



HAIGHT S- PIEBSOJ{, 

No. 510 JACKSON STREET, 
San FraneUcOf Cal, 



CHA8. H. S. WILLIAMS, 

AMD 

CLAMK CHURCHILL, 

ATTOBHEYB AT LAW, 

OFFICES: 

8. W. COR. KEARNT & SACRAMENTO 8TS., 

(Booms 15, 14 and 13) <A» FBANOtlOO, OAl. 



■AHVEL DAAS. DAVID HAA8. ABBAHAM HAAS. H. H. LEVY. 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 



GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, BOOTS AND SHOES, HATS AND CAPS, 
22» MONTGOMERT STREET, 

Buaa Haute BUteh, SJk.N FnJLSf CTSCO, CAJLt. 



BRANCH HOUSES: 

8. HAAS & CO., Nerada City, Cal. 8. HAAS k CO., Virginia City, Nev. 8. HAAS & CO., Gold Hill, Nev. 






ADVBRTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



liii 



H. I.. aiMOW rfc A. WBII^Ki. 

Him Frniu'liii'u. 



M. W. KTBIH, 

I'ttrls. 



IMrOIlTEBS AM> D£ALEK8 IN 




STEIN, SIMON & CO. 

Tailors' Trimmings, Billiard Cloths, 

Ladies' Gloakings, and Qentlemen's Furnishing Goods, 

NOS. 632 AND 634 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

AND 031 AND 033 COMMERCIAL. STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

*-^»>* 

Agency for the Cloths, Cassimeres, Tweeds, Etc. 

MANrrACn KKD BY THE 

MISSIOJf WOOLEJf MILLS. 

1 t^^-t 

W OBDERS FOR EUROPEAN OOODS promptly and oareftiUy flUed for a reason- 
able oommiuion by our Hoose in Paris, 28 Rne de I'Eohiqier. 



THURNAUER ^ ZINN, 



IMFOBTBB8 OF 

FRENCH AND GERMAN 

FAIOf M$M 

English and American 




Pi 




a?o 




and Mumthcturon of 



Cane and Willow Chairs, Ladies' Work Stands, etc. 
Nos. 320 and 322 (Old No. 92) Battery Street, 



Between Commercial and Clay Streets, 



SjH&jn* Fxt^^kisroxsoo. 



f 



ill! 



Uv 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORY. 



I.. FBI.DMAH7?. 



H. COKDES. 



L. PELDMANN & 00. 



MANUFACTURERS OP 




IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



WOOD AND WILLOW WARE, 

TWmES, LiIIVEiS^ SHOE THREADS^ 



CHILGHEH^B GmS, TOY WAGOHS, ETC* 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, 

253 WasiiiHgton Street, 211 & 213 California Street, 

NEW TOBE. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




GARDEN SEEDS FOR 1867. 








o. L. k:eil.lo»g-. 



427 SANSOM ST, near Clay, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

IHPOBTER ASD DEALEB IS 

GARDEN, - ^---^ - -^ «--* FiOWEB 

FIELD, 



FRUIT, 




AND 

TREE 



SEEDS. 



DUTCH BULBOUS ROOTS, imported direct from tlie First Fiower Nurseries of Europe. 



Sccdi will be nankcd In the best manner, to go (iny distance, and fonvardcd an denlred. Light kinds of Heeds can be 
forwarded through the mall, postage paid. All orders, by mall or otherwise, (with remittances) will be attended to with 
care and dlsfiaicli. The «reiitc«t care will be taken to have all Seeds i old by me pure, reliable, and the very best and 
choicest of tlielr kind. A Libfral Litcoutit made to the Trarie. The Agents of Wells, Fargo A Oo> Express, and Post- 
masters generally, are requested to act as agents for receiving orders foi Seeds. Boxes of Deeds, containing 100 rapers, 
or more, put up for the Country Trade, In such assortments 01 desired. 

r 



ADVERTISINQ DEPARTMENT. 



Iv 



VS. T. o. asMirr. 



I>1t. D. BVBBASTK. 



JESSUP & BUBBANK, 



N. W. Oor. Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. 



Over Tucker's Jewelry Store, 



BAJt^ FHAJSTdZaaO. 



I^^Partle* wishing Artificial Trrth Inserted In an artistic manner, have only to Inquire to know that Dr. BITR- 
BAMK Is one of tli« oldest, as well as one of the most successful Dentists on this Coast. Uls reputation at such Is 
sufficient guarantee lor his ability 

I>R. T. C. .lESSUP, formerly at No. 18 Third Street, makes It a specialty to cirg Abcessrs, pill FANoa, restore 
Crowns, and permanently save Tketii, that have t)een considered worthless, thereby avoldliii! the pains of Extrnct- 
ing, and necessslty of wenrlna an Artificial I'late. He Fills the Teeth with good solid «iol(lVillings that wUl last a 
lifetime. Special attention given to Cleansing and Beautitying the Teeth, Correcting Irregularities, etc., etc. 

CALL AND SEE US. 



Constructive and Landscape Architect. 



BUOO HOCnHOI^ZKB, 

Architect and Mining Engineer. 



OLiIffXST A HOCHHOLiZER, 



'9 AIM.M,A\I AA'J <UI *0,*MJMf VM*Vil*i,4M MdAU VIM.«i\l MMilMM.M'9 

Office, N. E. cor. of California and Sansom Sts. 

Over Bank of British Columbia, BAJ^ FXi.AJ^OZSOO. 

Drawings and Specifications prepared for building Bridges, &c., and the works superintended 
in any part of the State. 

Special attention paid to Landscape Gardening, Laying out of Estate, &c. 

Our Mr. HOCHHOLZER'S long experience as a Mining Engineer, gives us special facilities 
for the making of the necessary Surveys, Plots, Estimates, &c., for Mining Companies. 



03EXXOj^<2;-0 3EXOa?'£SXj. 



PACIFIC STREET, 

Between Battery 
and Front, 

San Francisco. 



■•>TIC!£Xcl!JBiCLkjL>lLiai 



frrnoitiiiiii 



'immniiiTrEiTif 



E. W. Heimburg & CO. 

Proprietors. 

A Coach bearing the 

Name of the Hotel, will 

convey Passengers and 

Baggage to the House, 

Free of charge. 

7 IEK.lS,ff,A.lSr 3DXIOSXE. 




TUIiLY & DURKUr, 

BOC 30 3E1. 3EK jAl SNT ■r' SI ^ 

J215 Clay Street, between Front and. Davis, 



11 



: 



I ' 



Ivi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



ATKINS HUkSSEY, 



' .r. 





ThKUE 



Would most respectfully inform his Friends and the Public tlmt ho has opened his 



AJT 



]VO. GSl 

SACRAMENTO ST., 

&ZLOW KEARNY, 




OLr) 

]Vo. lei 

SACRAMENTO ST., 

BELOW KEARNY, 



And is ready at all times, day or night, to attend to every call in his lino of business. His Stock 
is very complete, and will enable him to furnish every description of Funeral, plain or costly, at the 
shortest notice. A-mUllS^ M.AHi!$]£:Y. 



■" ' N. B. — All persons wishini^ to make 

INTERMENTS IN LONE MOUNTAIN CEMETERY 

Can do so by applying to me at 

No. 651 SACRAMENTO STREET. 



OmCB OF TUB CITY AJ^JD 00"CJimr 00I101>TER. 



UNION NURSERT, 

Situated on POST STEEET, near Cemetery Avenue, 

lOO, o. 



) ■■» « 



mhum MEYHB, 



PHOPHIHTOH. 



-♦-•»••-♦- 



Gardens and Burial Lots tastefully laid out and ornamented. Plants, Trees, 
and all kinds of Flowers for sale, and forwarded to any part of the Pacific Coast. 

OXmSXlB I>Il03S^I»TX.-5r .A.TTBX^Z>B33 TO. 



J. H. WHITE. 



WH. BTRISOKB. 



J. H. WHITE & GO. 

No. 109 COMMERCIAL STREET, 

Manufactiifpri nfand .Dealers In 

A Superior Quality of Machine Oils 

AND 

Warrenteil uncqualed by anytlilng of Mic kind yet ofTcred 
fur sale In tliU market 



New England House, 

2©6 8AI8®M STffiEET, 

Between Fine and Oalifomia, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 



i. ^tUUUUv, (Bi^tnMmtv, 



BOARD AND LODGING. 



[S, 
NTO ST., 

KEARNY, 

. His Stock 
costly, at tho 

ETERY 



>NER. 




inne, 



ETOH. 

ints, Trees, 
icific Coast. 



House, 

JEET, 

CAL. 



tviMmv, 

BINC. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ivii 













^7"» ^ r> 'w 



f 



?3. g « 



9 5 " Sij 5. 

S ^ 'S ?! §54 

'^ OS s a ,3 

k^j (-i. fH. ? y; 

5-g CO g ^ 

* S* *i ? 3. 

-« § c* O §. 



~ vs •«. a 
O ta S^. ^ «a 



3 S ?* 




Piott$9r Ornam^iital (class Cutter, 

CORNER MARKET AMD BE ALE STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Cut, Stained and Ground Olan for Sliding Doors, Dome Llghtf , Side Llgbta and Head Lights fbr Ilall Dooia of 
Prlvnto Dwellings, Churches, Stcamboata, Ac. 

Ground Ol<u» alway* on hand. AH Order$ punetHalli/ attended to. 



n; 



Iviii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



WM. T. COLEMAN & CO. 



i^nmtmtm 













CORNER FRONT AND CALIFORNIA STREETS, 

SA¥ EUAFGISGO. 



No. 171 Front near Wall Street, New York. 



Agents for ''Coleman's California Line" of Clippers, 

FBOM KiSW YOBK TO SAIV FRAITOISOO. 



A. WBtaaUkUSEN, 

Importer and Wholesale Dealer ia 













809 Montgomery St., between Jackson and Pacific, 



DEPOT OF THE STAR OF THE UNION STOMACH BITTERS. 



QEEENHOOD & NEWBAUEB, 

Dealers in 





gb 




9 

j^jN'D omoB or xxiE 

ao7 AXLd s2oe mjLxsrmoTMT mvitxarrf 

Bet. California an d Pine, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Oeneral Depot on Market Street, opposite the ^id Bailroad Depot 



I 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ivjt 



GOAL! 



COAL!! 



Wholesale and Betail Dealer ia 




Fa wa 





®g BE mM^'^ 



COAL DEPOT AND OFFICE, 



Iffos. 118 and 120 PACIFIC STREET. 



ORDERS SOLICITED AND PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



DELIVERED FREE WITHIN CITY LIMITS. 



B. H. RAMSDELL, 



WHOLESALK AND RETAIL 



€#4]L II14IL. 





f 



3.XO «r.A.o^aaosir avjEUEzsTr, ioielajei. 



J. Z: VERDING « CO. 

§T4m€E ii41ilf Mf Wilis, 

PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

AND 

Dealers in all kinds of Produce from Oregon and Humboldt, 

JVo. S6 Clap Street, below Drumtn, San Francisco* 
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 






! 



!|i 



Ix 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



BEUABD TABLE HANUFACTORT 

And Salesrooms for the Exhibition and Sale of 

Micbael P&elan's Model Billiard Tables 

. Airi» 

PATEFT COMBIFATIOF GUSHIOFS. 



CLOTH, 

CUE WAX, 

mo. 




Trimmings 



OF KVERT 



DESCRIPTION. 

Old Sails Becushioned with Sets of Fhelan's Patent Cushions. 

ITALIAN' SfARBLE and ENOLISII SLATE BEDS always on hand, of the proper dimensions. 



AGENT FOR ALL PHELAN'8 PATENTS, 

730 (Up Stairs) Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Oal. 

■»» 

CATTTIOK— Phelan's Patents cannot be procured flroni any other person in this State, Oregon, or Washington Territory. 



SUCCESSOR TO O. GORI, 




isM 'w@m 



4S1 PIIVE STK-EET, 

Bet. Mo tgomery & Kearny Sts. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 






PI^T7Xi.a:BS£iS' SXi^A-BS, BTC. 

On hand and manufactured to order. Goods Bliipped to all parts of the Pacific 
Coast. Orders respectfully solicited. 



DEALER IN 



STOVES AND TIN WARE, 

422 KEARNY STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Between California and Fine, 



AGENCY FOR STEWART'S STOVES. 



rORT 

aMes 

lojsrs. 

immings 

0» EYEBT 

SCRIPTION. 

Dushions. 

SCO, Gal. 

whington Territory. 



ADVERTISINO DEPARTMENT, 



bd 



L. ROSENB^UM & CO. 

mrholesale Stationers^ 

AW]> IMPOKTBRS OP 

IBLAI^ISI B^<DES, FA^ISE^S, IPLATiEIiW <3Amm, 

ALBUMS, WRITING DESKS.WORKBOXES.OOLD PENS, CUTLERY, PURSES, 

FANCY GOODS, WRAPPING PAPER AND PAPER BAGS, ETC. 

^Kenoy Roulstone Paper mills. 

Between Sacratnento and Cotntnereial, 



lilKIESRT &, SATOlf 



IMPORTERS OF 



3 












f 
ST, 

NCISCO, CAL. 

CO. 

parts of the raoiflo 



; 







lO, CAL. 



:s. 



G^7 uf^> iir^c a 
ALL KINDS OF LEAF AND MANUFACTURED TOBAOOO. 

OppoMite Custom Houce, 



SPROAT a WELCH, 

COMMISSIOS MEECHAHTS, 

525 FRONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



^ ^ > 

AGENTS FOK 



S. p. MOODY & GO'S SAW MILLS, Burrard Inlet, British Columbia. 



S. 



9 



MANUFACTURERH OF AND DEALERS IN 



BEDDING & FURNITURE 

OF BVBR"5r X>£3SORIPa:ZOI>3-, 

BLANKETS, COMFORTERS, SHEETS, ETC. 

Ids. 5D4 AlB 50S SANSOM STEET, lEAM CJLAl, 

SA]V FBAIVOISCO, OAI^. 

».» 

This Establishment is generaiiy Iinown to Im tlie Gluapest Place io tlie City for Good Bedding. 



i 









* 



bdi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTOR T. 



AIiFKIBD -W. KEAT. 



aAMKtf JOaVSTOV. 



JOHNSTON & BEAT, 

TIN, COPPER & SHEET mON WOSKEBS, 

JVb. 107 Sansom St,, (near Bush) San Francisco, 

G-as and Water pipe. Rubber Hose and Brass Goods. 
PATENT CHIMNEY CAPS MADE TO ORDER. 

House and Ship riuinbing and JlctalUc Rooflng, In all its variety, done with ncatncu and dispatch. 

■■■ 

Constantly on bancl a larve assortment cfi* 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



Iff. P. COIaE « CO. 

Maiiufacturers, Importers, Wholesale ard Retail Dealers in 



i 



AND 



313 Pine Street, San Francisco. 



B. C. AUSTIN, 

Importer of 

AND AGENT FOR THE CELEBRATED 



iiiiKi mm ® 





XiTo. 



AND THE 

FULTOlSr RA-israE, 

8B4 GJLM.AJV laiVTVUlMyVf S^ 



D. S. WEAVER. 

IHTOBTEB or 

STOTES, Tin FLITE, MET 111, Etc. 

Manufacturer of all kinds of 

TIF AFB SHEET IHOF WAHE. 



< ».» I 



Country Dealers Supplied at Lowest Bates, 



ADYBRTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



Ixiii 



a. e. HKiar, New York. 



J. BHAT« Ban FnnclKO. 



HEIN 4ft BRAT, 

Importers and Jobbers of 

French and American Leather, 

Boot and Shoe Machinery, 

TANNEBS' AND OUBBIEBS' TOOLS, ETC., ETC. 

4:16 Battery, cor. Merchant Street, 



A.. Hr. BIICHX:i.8, b%n Franclwo. lAtVlH H. MICHEL,B, Kcw York. 

A. Vr. mCHEIiS &, BRO. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Lalies' anl GeDtaen's Fimisliing Goois, 

FRENCH, ENGLISH AND GERMAN FANCY GOODS, 
Embroideries, Balmoral and Hoop Skirts, White Goods, 

LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S, MISSES', CHILDREN AND BOYS'. 



TOGETHER WITH A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF 

BOYS' AND YOUTHS' FURNISHING GOODS, 

AHQ YAHKEE HOTIOHB, 

No. 417 Sacramento St., betAveen Sansom and Battery. 



Ixiv 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRHOTORT. 



C. IVATBKHOVaBi San FranclMO. 



a. fr. I^ESTER, Now Tork. 



WATERHOUSE & LESTER, 



IXt^POXtXSXtiS OF 



HARD VOOD LUMBER 



AND ALL KINDS OP 



Carriage and Wagon Materials, 

Nos. 29 AND 31 BATTERY STREETp 

SA.lSr FE^NCISCO. 

17 and 19 SEVENTH STREET, bet I and J, 



Oafc» Second firowtb A$& and Hickory Plitiik, 



HIGEOBY AXLES, 
WAGON POLES, 
HUBS AND SPOEES, 
WAGON FELLOES, 
BENT Ems, 
POLES AND SHAFTS, 
WHITE WOOD, 



SINGLETBEE8, 

LEAD BABS, 

NECK YOKES, 

FINISHED POLES & SHAFTS, 

PLOW BEAMS & HANDLES, 

ENAMELED OLOTH, 

&0i, &0i, &0t 



We are in monthly receipt of New Additions to our Stock, carefully 
SELECTED in the EasterIt Markets, which we offer at the 

^ OBDEBB FBOM THS OOUNTBT WIIiIi BMOELVH FBOHFT AT T JU J I ' i'iOir. .J9 



I, New York. 

BR. 

ials, 

XT, 



mdJ, 



*UA, 



PTS, 
ES, 



lARBPULLY 



raoN. 






ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 



Ixv 




See Page Ixxxiv. 



STENCIIi PLJlTES 

OTTX B"5r 

321 FRONT STREET, CORNER COMMERCIAL, 

STENCIL TLATE^, when handsomely executed, present the cheapest and best mode of advertising that 
can bo adopted. This is the experience of all who use them. 

STENCIL PLATES OF EVERY PATTEKN cut at this Establishment in a (.tylc unequalod by any ot ler 
workman in California. 

Ilerchants and otherv are invited to call and examine tpecimens in proof of the above assertion. 

Orders fVom abroad, as well as those given in person, promptly executed and forwarded. Parties sendin ; 
orders by letter are particularly requested to white plainly and give the kxact spacb tiiky wish the 

LETTBItS TO OCCUPY. 

By close application and superior execution of work during nn experience often years, Mr.TRUEWORTHY 
has extended his business to its present proportions. His present facilities for rapid and tnstcf^ii execution of 
all work in his lino are far superior to those of any other in this State or in the Union. 

REMEMBER THE PLACE. 

321 Front Street, Comer Commeroial, (Up Stairs) San Francisco, California. 



aoHBT n. Hoi.Hi:«. 



doHsr A. Mooai'.. 



J. B. HOIalKEISS A CO. 



DEAIiBRS IN 






HAT & 6BAIN, 

Nos. 5 & 7 California Street, 
AndlOS&IIOMariietStreet, 



Ixvi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 



IMPORTER OF AND DEALER IN 



I 





OF THE NEWEST SHIES AND BEST QUUin, 

NO. 606 KEARNY STREET, 



@E41f@lf 1. m'&QtWW & @®< 



14^ ©Iaf ®tse@te Sam lsam@£@@@e ©aL 



'?) 



Maps, Plans, Portraits, Landsciipes, Marino Views, Diplomas, Show Cards, Kcccipts, State and 
County Bonds, Bills of Exchange, Certificates of Stock, Bank Checks, Bill Heads, Views, Ciiou- 
lars. Music Titles, and Labels of every description. 



H. F. Shepardaon. J. B. Oatea. 

SHEPARDSOnr A GATES^ 



IMPORTERS OP AKD WHOLESALK DEALERS IM 



AND FISHING TACKLE, 

U7 hHQ 4^9 SAHSOM HTHEET, 

Corner of Oommeroial, S.A.ST FXl.A.XQ'OZSOO. 



BOSMOSTD GIBBONS. 



8AMF80N TAM8. 



»■» — 

BODMOND GIBBONS & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




ET, 






'5) 



pts, Stato and 
Views, Cii\u- 



J. B. Oatea. 



uu», 



sTOXSOO. 



ON TAM8. 




ADVERTISIXO DEPARTMENT. 



Ixvii 



MARSH, PILSBURY & CO. 



ZI^POXiTSXiS OF 




N. E. Corner Front and Pine Streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

JLCHmTS FOR 

New Bedford Copper Go's Sheet and Bolt Copper, 

Morse's Patent Twist Drills, 

American Brass Tube Co's Seamless Tubes. 



MACHmiSTS* AHQ TmHEHS^ BTOCK AHQ TOOLS. 



Anvils, Vises, Files, J^^iits, Bolts and Washers, 

AXLES S- SPMIJVGS, Axes, Shovels, Sledges, Picks, 

A.ve, Pick and Powder and Fuse, Copper Rivets ^' Burrs, 

Sledge Handles, Lace Leather, Ituhher ^ Leather Belting, 

Rubber Hose, IROM PIPE, BLACK and GAL VAjYIZED. 



TOBIN, DIXON & DAVISSON, 

COR. SACRAMENTO & BATTERY STREETS. SAN FRANCISCO, 

FANCY GOODS, MEUNERY GOODS, 

SMALL WARES, WHITE GOODS, 

POCKET CUTLERY, LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS, 
PERFUMERY, HOSIERY , 

YANKEE NOTIONS, GENTS' FURNISH'G GOODS, 
LACES AND EMBROIDERIES, 
ETC., ETC. 



PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID TO ORDERS. 



I 'I 

5 \ 



II 






i i! 



• 8 






Ixviii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



MEAGHER, TAAPFE & CO. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS 

At JKHBLOlMlSiSALJE:^ IVo. 107 BattGi^r St. 
At RBTAIIay No. 9 IKEontgomGi^jf St. 



OF 




FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

FA.IS^CY GOODS, 
HOSIERY, YANKEE NOTIONS, &c. 

AGENTS FOB THE MT. VEJtNON BUCK CO. 



f> 



SuAJSr yHuflLlTCISCO, C-A.U. 



KISIiImT 4fi BEMDISRSOXff, 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



iraifwit 



mwanit 



ISTos. 309 and 311 Front Street, 

BETWEEN SACRAMENTO AND COMMERCIAL, 

SAW lM«4ir©IS©^» ©ikls. 



J. KEIiIiT. J 

p. HSNOBRSON. ) 



SIIOIONS, -ROW^ & OO. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



AQBIGULTUBAL, MININO AND CARPENTERS' TOOLS, 

NORTON & WATTS' SHIP CARPENTERS' TOOLS, 

AMD A COMPLETK ABSORTHBNT OF 

CQOPERSV CAULKEBSS ClRTEBiT k BLOCK MAKERS' TOOLS, nOUSE k STEAMBOAT TBUMINGS, 

S04: & soe i»iivE stueet. 

And 34 (old No, 13) CLAY ST., bet, J>rumm and Hast, 



CO. 

St. 



, &c. 




OOLS, 

TBIimSGS, 

- 9 

d East, 



ADVBRTISINa DEPARTMENT. 



Ixix 



INCOBPOBATEB, JUZY 23d, 1857, 

]SrO. 619 CL^Y STREET, 

BETWEEN MONTGOMERY AND KEARNY STREETS. 



President, E. W. BURR. Vice-President, BENJ. D. DEAN. 

TRUSTEES! 

T. L. Rutherford, Benj. 0. Devoe, Isaac Hyde, 

Wm. Bosworth, H. L. King, R. J. Tiffany, 

Annis Merrill, J. W. Cudworth, J. M. Shotwell. 

Auditor, James 0. Dean. Secretary, G. W. Garmany. 



GEO. T. CASEBOLT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF 







v?i4cr?i; 



ALL KINDS OP 



CARRIAGE AND WAGON MATERIAXS, 

Coach Trimmings k Hardware, 

Neax coraer Sattery, San Francisco. 







f IMl MJ 




TOBACCO, ETC. 
CORNER OLAY AND BATTERY STREETS, 



m 



! H 
i L 



I: 



Ixx 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORT. 




wwAmmhim 

BOOK AND JOB 

PEINTfflG OFFICE, 

FBANK EASTMAN, Proprietor, 

509 CLAY I m COMMERCIAL ST. 

BAH FHAHCISCO, tkh. 






IB. ]srA.TH:A.]sr, 

Successor to ADOLPII IIIICSCII, 

ttltPORTeR, JOBBER AND RKTAIUR m 

Cbina, Glass & Earthen Ware, 

BRITANNIA AND PLATED WARE, 

CUTLERY & LOOKING-GLASSES, 

Between Commercial and Sacramento, 

— •♦• — - — ■ 

Fnrticular attention paid to packing Goods for the 
Interior or Coast Trade. 



^<0*»' -^^- ^Ar;^ 

^^ BOOK, JOB AND WOOD-CUT ^0 

^ 509 SACRAMENTO STREET, ABOVE SANSON, 

^"^^^rilEET. between SASSOlt*^" 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxi 



OHABIiBS TXaSfCE, Ban Franoisoo. 



B. Euet, Paris. 



CHARLES TENCE & CO. 

Importers of and Dealers in 

FLOWERS, FEATHERS, FRAMES, LACES, 
MSBOJfS, EOFFET SILKS, GRAPE, 

415 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

Between Sansom and Battery, UhH FBA-HCISCO* 



No. 33 Rue du Faubonrg-Poissonniere, 



PARIS. 



OTIUSIIS FOU I»A.RI8 T»I10M:I»TI:.Y A.TT13Bri>Er> TO. 



SOIiOINION Gxrivip 

(SirOOESSOE TO D. HAUSMANN & 00.) 



IMPOBTER AKD MANnrAOTUREB OF 



PIER AND MANTEL MIRRORS, 

Spar$, Oval & AnUi Looking Ctla$$$$ 

OI' EVEWY DESCUIPTION. 



Looking Qlass Plates, Picture Frames, Photograph 
Ovals, Oords, Tassels, &c. 

Also has constantly on hand, the largest and best assorted stock of Gilt, Imita- 
tion Rosewood and Walnut Mouldings. 

«355 AIVI> 553T' GTL4ArV STR-EET, 

Few Doors below Montgomery, ffiiiSS" IPIEi\.S!rOIIS(@(2)9 (S^^ILlo 



II 



Ixxii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



EXTRA CRYSTAL HYDRAULIC PRESSED 

ADAMAHITim: CAlVDIifiS, 



MANUFACTURED BT 



.« inie 



« »mm > 



AGENCY, J. L. N. SHEPARD, 



Sam'l Qraaff. 



F. Iiieker. 



SAM'L GRAAFF & CO. 

HANnPAOTUBBBS OF AMD DBALERS IH 



No. 1102 Dupont St., and 539 Clay St. 

— ^^^ 

Snuff, Pipes, Matches, German Smoking Tobacco, and clioice selectiona of Loaf Tobacco always Icept on hand. 



FRAMCIS LOGAN 



Importer and Manufacturer of 

CIGARS, 

Wholesale Dealer in all kinds of 














No. 306 SACRAMENTO STREET, 



yXlAX X'BONT STMISET, 



SAISI !?^iVl£ItP]Ii^(Da 



ISED 



XXIS. 



Lieker. 



pt on hfuid. 




c 




>i 



ADVERTISIKQ DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxiii 



OBO. E. KOOEBS. 



H. W. BBOV7K. 



R08ERS & BROWN, 




No. 512 CALIFOBNIA STBEET, 

One door west of Montgomery, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



tie] 



"We would inform Pliotographers that we are prepared to work their Chloride of 
Silver and Ashes from their Paper Clippings. 

We have in connection with our Assay Business, a MILL, and are prepared to 

WORK COLD AND SILVER ORES 

in quantities from 25 to 500 pounds; also, Assayer'a Sweeps. 



WILSON & EVANS, 





IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



GUNS, RIFLES, & GUN MATERIALS 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Also, Importers of Enslish and American FishinK Taokle, made expressly for the Waters of 

the Faoilio Coast. 

The following articles constantlv on hind, (whicli, through our direct importation fVomtbo Manufactnreni, 
we arc enabled to soil at considerablo lowor rates than any other house in San Francisco): 

English, French and Belgian Shot Guns of every quality. Ilenry Rifles, Plain and Faney. 

Speneer's Rifles, Plain and Faney. Sharp's, Ballard's, Colt's and Wesson's Rifles, Plain 

and Faney. Colt's, Smith & Wesson's and Remington's Revolvers, Plain and 

Faney. Derringer's Cdebrated Pocket and Bolster Sizes. Dixon's Shot 

Pouches and Powder Flasks, and Sporting Apparatus of all kinds and 

at the lowest possible prices. Uenry's, Spencer's and Smith & 

Wesson's Cartridges, and every description of Breech Loading 

Ammunition. Eley's Caps. Wads & Wire Cartridge. 

HOQEBS' AND WOBTENHOTJI'B FOOEET OUTLEBT AHD BOWIE OIVE8, WABBANTED QENUIlIEi 

Itlflos and Shot Guns niado to order, and repairing in all its b.^ichcs done by competent workmen, which 
wo guarantcu to give BBtisfltotion. 

OUR ESTABLISHMENT IS 513 CLAY STREET, 

Between Montgomery and Saniom Streets, South Side, 



H. H. WILSON. 



J. B. EVAN8. 



r ■ 



?ii 



Ixxiv 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



HENRY B. WILLIAMS, 




ivo. 306 FRonrr strb&t, 



(XJP BTA.TRB) 



^ji^KS zs^ui^.^^^sc^ii'^cmcE^^ 



HAYWARD, COLEMAN & CO. 



lOIFOBTSRS AND BBFINSBS OF 













CONSISTINO OF 



Kerosene, Lard, Sperm, Elephant, Polar, Tanners^, 

JYeatsfoot, Boiled and Raw Linseed, 

Castor and China JVut. 

.A.r.so, 



siFnmn'iPS ®if '0'W]©iFissr'£?nss"iB asfid iiiL]0®iii®2Lo 



Note.— Wc would epccially call tlio attention of Mill Owners and Enginccni to our Buporior FARAFFINE 
OIL, wliicli wo manuncture iVom the California Petroleum. This Oil will not gum. Macbinerv thoroughly 
cleaned and lubricated with it will not heat, and after remaining at rest, can be started without cleaning off. 

liAHPIS ABTD liAMP STOCK. An clpgant and complete assortment on hand. 

^Iso, Agents for the Sale of the 

BLASTING POWDER. 

414 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ITiriLiSOlV A BROTHER^ 

Importers and Manufaoturera of 

BOOKS, WX]^BOWS & BhMM, 

FRENCH WINDOWS AND BLINDS, 

North-East Corner California and Drumm Sts. 



ADVBRTISIXa DBPARTMENT. 



Ixxv 



, 




HAY, GRAIF, CATTLE, 

COAL AND ORE SCALES, 

For weighing Loaded Wagons— 6,000 to 40,000 ponnds oapaoity. 
■ ••• 

Portable and Dormant Scales of all Sizes, 

Counter Scales, of various patterns, fine 

Gold and Druggists' Balances. 

Manofactorer's Branch House on the Pacific Coast, 

FAIRBANKS & HUTCHINSON, 

120 California Street, San Francisco. 



C. HOBS. 



». BBADI.I:. 



Commission Merchants, 

Between Clay and Washington, SAN FRANCISCO. 














S.W. COR. BATTERY AM) UNION. 



GAPITALi^ 



1 1ST a O R, I> O R, -A.T E I> - 



* »«» > 



And possesses a capacity equal to the Refining of Eight Thousand Tons annually. 

Extra Crushed Sugar, 
(A.) Crushed, 

Extra Granuiated Sugar, 

Oolden Coffee Sugar, marked (C), 
Powdered Sugar, 

Cfolden Syrup. 

IISR1MEA.1V »1E:e:SE:, President, 

OFFICE AT THE REFINERY, 

S.W. COB. OF BATTERY AND UNION STREETS, SAN FRANOISOO. 



Im 



1 



1 

il 



1 



Ixxvi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 



OOOS B^Y. 

u4.IVI> C ^^ IV ]V E ILi 



o o 



(^ 2Xi 523 533 O^ S3 S3 C£3 I^ Q C^ Q '^JP SIS3 S^ o 
DELIVERY FREE TO ANY PART OF THE CITY. 



COAL DEPOT, S. E. Cor. Broadway and Sanson) Sts. 

FRANILIN HOUSE, 

Corner Broadway and Sansom Streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

CORNELIUS MALONEY. PROPRIETOR. 

«»» — — 

Board, per Week $4 

Board and Lodging, per Week. . . $5 to $7 




An OMNIBUS, with the namo of the 
House on it, will be at all the Steamers to 
convey Passengers to the House, free of 
CHARGE. Inquire for 

m:alo]vey»s 

FRANKLIN HOUSE. 



Where Money and other Valuables are 
taken charge of at the Proprietor's risk. 






US' 



nSts. 




bl. 

lETOR. 

v4 

$5 to $7 



Uv 



of the 
earners to 

FREE OF 



USE, 

bles are 
'a risk. 






ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxvii 



113 LeidesdorfP Street, between California and Sacramento, 

Pn.AT.TlTt IXT 

BRANDIES « -UITBISEIXSS, 

^LE, PORTER, ETC. 



9 



MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 

1 ^ I 

Blasting Powder for sale. 

414 FRONT STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 



I. H. WsHTWORTH. BxBJ. HoBART, Jr. J. L. Cbamplin. Wm. H. DnNBAB, Boston. 

WENTWORTH, HOBART & GO. 

ZMX.AJaTTF.A.CrTTXlSRS OF 

Men's, Ladies', Misses' and Children's 

B00f S MM SHOES 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 



Commercial Building, 



San Francisco. 



< »»m » 



khh ^^m^ wkmkmm m Mmmm'sm. 



-« »«» > 



HOBART, DUNBAR & CO. 



' 1 



li 



ll 
f'-j.i 



yi 



u<\> 



Ixxviii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINBSS DIRECTORY. 



WILUAM F. BURKB, 

IMPORTKR OF 

FINE BOOTS, SHOES, 6AITERS, ETC. 

Oor« Montgomery and Pine Streets^ 

8A.N FRA1VCI8CO, OAIL,. 

lEF" LADIES' 0AITEB8 MANUFAOTUBED TO OBDEB, IN A SUFEBIOB HANNEB. 



aABf £• Mr AUK. 



DAJriEI. HOSHBB. 




WARE & MOSHER, 

JIANUFACTURER8 AND DEALERS IN 

Sasb, Doors, Blinds & Sbntters, 

AT THE LOWEST RATES, FROM 

k:il.iv r>it,iEi> lumber. 

No. 26 Galifoinia Street, San Francisco, Gal. 

Orders from the Country will receive prompt attention. 



a. U. ». FELVBCSH. 



F. BI. E.. PETERS. 



DIRECT IMPORTERS OF 



W®¥^« rJkl5C¥ ©®»®^. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 

ITITholesale Store^ 307 California Sf.^ 

BETWEEN SABSOM AND BATTEBT, 

RETAIL STORE, 207 MONTGOMERY ST., 

(In Mugs nouae Block) SA.N W^A^TiClSCO, CAJL,. 



G. W. MeNEAJt, 1 

San Francisco. I 



I 



J. A. MeXJEAB, 

Fetaluma. 



AND WHOLESALE PRODUCE DEALERS. 

AGENTS FOR ORIENTAL. FLOUR. 

3T CLAY ST,, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.. 



< »»» » 



Wheat, Oats, Barley and Hay famished by the Cargo on short notice. Orders promptly 
attended to. Consignments solicited. Liberal advances made on Consignments. 



I, 

ETC. 

iSHBJK. 

tters, 

CO, Gal. 

ittention. 

PETEBB. 



i, 



St., 



>, CAJLi. 



MnNEAB, 

'etaluma. 

>. 

at® 

DATL. 

romptly 
nts. 



ADVERXISINQ DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxix 



WM. A. ALDBIOH. 



J. 0. MEBBILL. 



JOHH MoOBASEN. 



Aldrlchy naerrlll A Co. 



A.^J> 







$rTi0i;KE 

A-OXSlVriS OF THE 

IBSIIUl IPATCI LINB OF iONOLIILII FlUm 

Anchor Line California and Oregon Steamships. 

PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID TO 

FOBWABDINO AND TBAN8HIFHENT OF HEB0HANDI8E, BALE OF WHALEMEN'S BILLS AND 

OTHEB EXOHANOE, INBDBANOE OF HEBOHANDISE AND SPECIE UNDEB OPEN 

POLICIES, SUPPLTINa WHALE SHIPS, CHABTEBINa SHIPS, ETC. 

NOS. 204 AMD 206 CALIFORNIA STREET, 



OEO. C. «HKETE. 



li. THOMJPSOar. 



&E^B. €« SMSiSSYJil ^ €e. 



IlttPORXKRS OF 



WATCHES, 4EWEUY, 



No. 525 MONTQOMEBY STBEET, 

BAK FRANCtSCO, CAL. 



IVatolies CarctUllsr Repaired "by Experienced IVorkmcn at 



GEO. C. SHREVE A GO^S. 



m 



hi' 



Ixxx 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 



OHAS. KAIV. 



K. II. WiaCHBaTM 



THOS. m. BAYSa. 



MAIN $ wmOBCSTER, 

SADDLERY WAREHOUSE, 



214 A 218 BATTZSAY 

SAiy FBAlVOIiSCO, OA-IL. 



IHFOBIEBS ANI) HAHUFAOTUBEBS OF EVEBT DESOBIFTIOH OF 

Harness, Saddles & Saddlery Hardware. 

LEATHER OF ALL KINDS. 

Dealers and Livery Stables supplied on the most liberal terms. Sole Agents for 

the Pacific Coast for 

HILL'S CONCORD STAGE HARNESS. 



'W. -w. nODOE. 



i». I.. raii.i.ips. 



DODGE &, PBILUPS, 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



D 






325 FRONT STREET^ 

Between Claj and Commercial, Sij^if jflBiiSISSSiSDj <SMi9 



TEUBNER & HOFFMAN, 




534 OALIFOBNIA STREET, Up Stairs, 



Between Kearny and Montgomery Streets, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



-^^'^-^^ •♦-♦- 



Show Oaaea made in everr Strle. Silver Plated, Brass, Bosewood, Satin Wood, fto. 
Old Snow Oases taken in Exolumge. 



ADVERTISING DBPARTMBNT. 



Ixxxi 



HATUIATMATIBIAL 



■.A.T- 



No. 628 Commercial, and 637 Clay Street, 



J.C. MEUSSDORFFER & BM 

IMPORTERS OF AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



HAf TIES' FIlSHEi, FIES, 

TRIMMINGS, TOOLS, 

^nd everthing requisite for the manufacture of Hats. 

, ^>» — ■ 

Our long experience in San Francisco, and extensive connections in Europe and 
the East, enable us to be in constant receipt of choice qualities in latest styles. Our 
stock is the largest and most select, and our facilities superior to any other house on 
this coast. 

Dealers who buy on short time, or for cash, will find it greatly to their advantage 
to favor us with a call, at 

628 Commercial Street, extending through to 637 Clay St. 

F-A.3JT Fit A.:tTaiSOO- 

■ ' — < i *fc > 

Retail Stores, 635 & 637 Oommercial St., San Francisco. 

No. 195 J Street, Sacramento. 

Comer D and Second Streets, Marysville. 

73 Front Street, Portland, Oregon. 
_ 



t i 



1/1 






Ixxxii PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 



DEALER IN 




TEENOH AND ENGLISH HOSIEEY, &o. 

502 EE/iRNT STREET, NEAR CALIFORNIA, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 



t> 





JOHNSON & CO., PROPRIETORS. 

MONTGOMERY STREET, COR. OF SUWER, 

HIBERNIA. 

SAYINGS km LOAN SOCIETY. 

^m^ 

omoBs 

No. 506 Jackson Street, near Montgomery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAI^. 

^s» . — -— . 

The objects for which this Association is formed, are, that by its operations tho members 

tliereof may be enabled to find a 

SECURE AND PROFITABLE INVESTMENT FOR SMALL SAVINGS, 

And may have an opportunity of obtaining from it the use of a moderate capital, on 
giving good and suiHcient security for the use of the same. 

PRESIDENT "..... M. D. SWEENY. 

VICE PRESIDENT C. D. O. SULLIVAN. 

TREASURER EDWARD MARTIN. 

ATTORNEY RICHARD TOBIN. 

' Any person can bcoome a member of this Society on payins an Entrance Fee of TWO DOLLABS, and 

subscribing to the By-Laws. 

Deposits can be made of any sum iVom TWO DOLLARS and FIFl'Y CENTS to any amount. 

lar LOANS MADU ON SECUUITY OF REAL ESTJiTE WITHIN TUE CITY AND COUNTY. .^1 



>» 



ADVBRTISINa DBPARTMBNT. 



Ixxxiii 



IiITHOGRAPHT 

EXECUTED IN ALL ITS BRANCHES BY 

No. 308 Front Street, Corner of Commercial, San Francisco, Cal. 

. ^BM ■ 

Diplomas, Uaps, Landscapes, DraninRs of Machinpry, Blll-IIeads, Certificates, Bonds, Circulars, Labels of all 
Ucscriptlono, Business Cards. I v;:'tlng of all kinds executed promptly. 




A. W. VON SCHMIDT, 

Civil Engineer and Surveyor, 

OTFICE, PIONEER BUILDING, 

MONTOOKERT STREET, NEAR JACKSON, 

m 

Or>I> FELLOTVS OFFICIAL. ORGS^AIV, 

A literary journal published weekly at 

No. 2 ODD FELLOWS HALL, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Indorsed by the R. W. Grand Encampment of California, tlio R. W. Grand 

Lodge of California, the R. W. Grand Lodge of Oregon, and 

the Right Worthy Grand Lodge of the United States. 



K.. -W. PAXHEB. 



a. OII.I.RSPIB. 



ir. IT. WTEWMV. 



EflUreka Broom F aotory, 

PALMER, GILLESPIE & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



DEALERS IN 

BROOM CORN, HANDLES, WIRES, TWINE, ETC. 

Between Mwket and MiMlOD, SAX VBAyciaCO, OAJ>. 






n 

r 

X. 

f 



i,.r'' 



l \\ 



Ixxxiv 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORY 




STANDARD SOAP CO'S WASHING POWDER. 

This rowdpr is approved by all who have need it. Far superior to 8oapg and compounds fur washing and 
cleaning It is made of pure material, and contains nothing that will injurethe flnent ihbric. Equally as good 
for usinjr in ii arp as eorr water. Ko soap eTcr required to be nsed with it. One pound will make thrkb 
OALLOHB of beautiful Soirr Soap. Give it a trial and you will naver be without it Put up in paclcaxes of 1 lb 
each, and in boxes of 10 lbs. bulk, with full directions. Sold by all Grcours throughout the racific Coast. 
See and bny none but Standard Soip Co's. 

KaauiaotuTed at 207 Commercial Street. Office, 201 Saoramento Street, San FrandBco, OaL 

Standard Sutp Co. also niMnnfactare superior Fale, Chemical, Olive and Detersive Soap, etjual to Eastern 
roannfacture, and sell at lowest mailet rates. 



I 

y> 




CO M 

g 



c/> 



fit'i SAC'KAMENTO ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

PURE CREAM TARTAR, SALERATUS, 

BICARBONATE SODA, SALT PETRE, SAL SODA, ETC. 



?> 



GEOROB MORROW, 

AVHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALKK IN 



AND FEED OF ALL. KINDS, 

21 CLAY STEEET and 28 COMMERCIAL STREET, 



Between Drnmin ftotl Emt Streets, 

COnaignr^nto Bolioitecl. Orders ftom the Oountrjr promptly attended to. 



'» 



ADVERTISIKG DBPARTMENT. 



Ixxxv 



BRASS AND BELL FOUNDRY, 

COR. MARKET & FIRST STREETS, OPPOSITE ORIENTAL HOTEL, 
SA-N* ra-A-isroisoo, 

INVFAmilllS OF FOICE 11 IM FIFS 



OF ATJI^ KINDS. 



Hydraulic Pipes and Nozzleg for Mining Purposes. 

HOSE & MiNiNa coui^Liisras, etc. 




Brass or Composition Castings of all kinds made to order. Also, manu- 
facturers of McGowan's Pumps and Pump Engines, and Garratfs Patent 
Improved Journal Metal Gns and Steam Pipe furnished with fittings. 

OLD COPPER AND BRASS BOUGHT. 

N. B. — A general assortment of Brass Work and Castings constantly on 
hand. Orders from the interior solicited. 

Agent for Macy's Patent Itifled Hydraulic Pipe, to which I would call 
the particular attention of Miners. 

Roper's Caloric Engines, and Bi'^ar's valveless Steam or Air Pumps 
repaired. 

W. T. OARRATT, Proprietor. 



MAMUFACTUIiER OF 



IRON DOORS AND SHUTTERS, 

Wrought Iron Girders, Beam Anchors and Tie Bonds, Burglar-Proof 
Bank Vaults and Safes, Jail Work, Bridge Work, Cast and 
Wrought Iron Cemetery, Stoop & Area Bailings, 
And all kinds of Agricultural, Plain and Ornamental Iron Work, 



Between Wellington and Jackson, below Front, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 




All orders for tho Interior, Oregon and Keviida, also, Montana 
Idaho anJ Wiishlngton Territories, attended to with proin|itneH and 
dlflpntch. Mr. 8lnis approciateK the pott liberal patrnnaxo of hla 
friends, and truats he iniiy continue to merit It In the I'liture. Forthe 
infurinatlon of AtriiUKors, he would say that he feriK conddent that 
his experience in liis particular calling Is anrpaascd by none on this 
ooast, which his superior work, sent to almost c-ery town in Califor- 
nia, Oregon, Victoria and Sandwich Islands, and to be seen on some 
of the best buildings in San Francisco, fully attest. 

N. B.— Mr. G. Ai. ISUBTON, of I'orUand, wUI make contracts for 
Iron Work In my name. 



THE 

PACIFIC COAST ALilKIAlirAC 

z"40zi. 3.aea. 

•WXXJlu BX3 ISHUKD ?rOVX2MUX3R 1, 1867. 

Henry 0. Langley, FubliaheT, San Pranoiseo. 



m 



I 



Ixxxvi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 













Nos. U6 SACRAMENTO & 115 COMMERCIAL STS. 

MALLORY, OEMING & CO, PROPRIETORS. 



i »»^ » 



LiBT OP Articles.— Baker's Extra, Family Flour, ex-Superfine Flour, Farina, Rice Flour, 
Rye i*lonr. Rye Meal, Indian Meal, Cracked Wheat, Buckwheat Floor, Buckwheat Groats, Graham 
Flour, Hominy (iarjce), Hominy (small). Oat Meal, Oat Groats, Pearl Barley, Split Peas, Ground 
Barley and Cracked Corn. 



(SUCCESSOR TO OSCAR LEWIS) 

— MANUFACTCRBB OF — 

Iron Fronts, Stoves, Fences, and Iron and Brass Work of every desoription, 

Opposite Battery Street, SAN FRANCISCO, 

3^~ PartEctitar attention stven to Mtodets for the Patent QifRoe. «4S8 



No. 30« DAVIS fiSXB£2£:'r, 

NEAR CLAY STREET, SAN PRABtetSC©. 

Have always on hand a Aill asaortment of 

IVEIlTir AND SBCOiyrD HAND BAGS. 



Also, Machine Sewing done at reasonable rates. All orders promptly attended to. 



x>. x«ZEissisrE*:s]XiX>, 

612 BATTERY ST. 




BET. JACKSON AND PACIFIC, 

&AJi^ FXl.AJ^OZSOO. 

Has constantly on hand a largo as- 
tortment of the bent Billiard Tables, 
with all the modem improrements. 
AlBo, Billiard Trimmings of every Je- 
■oription. 

All goods sold are warranted. 



9 



ST. 



ADVERTISIKa DEPABTHBNT. 



Ixxxvii 










Stair Railing, Baluster and Newel Posts for Sale. 

SCBOLL SAWING AND WOOD TURNING DONE TO ORDER. 

49 BEAIiE STREET, SAN FBANOISOO, OAL. 




JABIXSS R. DOiriaXi, 



DKALER IN 






« PACIFIC COAIi YARD, 

413 AND 415 FAOIFIC STEEET, 

BETWEEN SANSOM AND MONTGOMERY. 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

125 FIRST 8TBBET, OPPOSITE MINNA, 

s.AJsr Fn^AJsrcxsco, cajl,. 

All kinds of Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt Metal Castings, 

PURNItHGO AT THS 8H0RTE8T NOTtOE. 

Brass Ship Work of all klnda, Spikes, Sheathing Nails, Rudder 
Braces, Hinges, etc., constantly on Iinnd and made to order. Also, 
inunufiicture Ship and Steamboat Bells and Gongs ofsaperlor tone. 

All kinds of RIcnin, LI(iuor, Water, Oil, and Flange iJocks and 
Valves made and repaired. 

Hvdraullu I'Inca and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and Connections,- 
of all Sizes and I'adcrns, furnished with dispatch. 





TVE-W 



Auction & Commission Sale & Stock Yard, 

CORNER OP PACIFIC AND OHIO STREETS, 

Between Uontgomery and Saneom, SAM FRAVTCISCO, OAXj. 

SAIiB DATS. TtTBSDAYS AND FBIDAYS, AT 11 A. M. 

M017EY ADVANOED ON ALL KINDS OF STOCK. W. W. BLACK, Auotioneer. 



? I 






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'1 1 



' iSis 



f;!i 






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Ixxxviii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 



REMINGTON' 





ALBERT E. CR.A1VE, 

AGENT FOR PAOIFIO COAST, SAN FEANOISOO, OAL. 



THIS RZSMINOTOIHT REVOLiVXSR 

Has been approved by the United States Board of Ordnance, and has so satisfactorily met the re- 
quirements of the Government, not only in the field, but in the official tests and examinations made 
by prominent officers of the Ordnance Department, that it stands at once the most popular, service- 
able and approved arm of the kind in use. 

Upwards of 150,000 have been supplied to the Government since 1861, for the land and naral 
service, furnishing ample evidence of the estimation in which the arms are held. 

Simple and symmetrical in its entire construction, securely strong, of most modem improvement 
in mechanism and material ; its unequaled range and penetration, together with its durability, are 
points in its favor now well-known, and which challenge a comparison with any other pistol of the 
kind made in this country or in Europe. 

The superior strength and capacity of the arm for constant and long use is apparent from the fact 
that the entire frame is constructed of a SINGLE PIECE OF METAL, thus preventing the exten- 
sion of some portions of the frame, from the effect of firing — a serious defect in many pistols — in 
which the frame is composed of two or more parts. 

The frame of the Remington Revolver furnishing a TOP STRAP or support above t^e cylinder, 
serves to protect the base pin (on which the cylindc: revolves^, from any undue strain to which it 
would otherwise be subjecteil, and which wou'i immediately render the line of fire from the cylinder 
to the barrel imperfect, thus destroying fo.ce and accuracy. 

Another advantageous feature of tVi arm is the means afforded for the instantaneous removal of 
the cylinder from the frame. Thi^ not only facilitates the cleaning of the pistol, but by quick ad- 
justment of the cylinder, one pi lol can bo made as effectual as two — and, considering the difference 
of >veiglit, it is far preferable — by simply possessing a spare cylinder loaded and capped to instantly 
replace the exhausted one. 

The above is a general summary of the points of peculiar merit in the Remington Revolver, which 
a trial of the arm is only needed to attest. 



le re- 
made 
Tice- 



laral 



nent 
, are 
r the 



fact 
cten- 
1 — in 



ider, 
:h it 
nder 



alof 
: ad- 

enco 
ntly 

hich 



ADVBRTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxix 



OF 

Celebrated Steel, Iron and Stubs Twisted 

RIFLE AND SHOT G0N BARRELS. 

i < »»» » 

Cast Steel Barrels of 6 lbs. weight, or less, each $ 5 00 

" " " over 6 lbs., extra per lb , BO 

Iron Barrels, 7 lbs. weight, or less, each 3 00 

" " from 7 to 12 lbs., extra per lb 20 

" " from 12 to 18 lbs., extra per lb 30 

" " over IS lbs., extra per lb BO 

Stubs twisted, plain, usual proportions, each 6 00 

" " " over 6 lbs., extra per lb 60 

" " fine, usual proportions, each 7 00 

" " " over 6 lbs., extra per lb 70 

Matched Barrels (rifle) for double guns, cast steel, per pair 10 OO 

" " (shot) for double guns, cast steel, usual proportions 12 OO 

" " for double guns, plain, iron, per pair O 00 

" " stubs twisted, plain, per pair 14 00 

" " stubs twisted, fine IB to 20 00 

For putting on cone seat, working to a guage, grooving for rod, and for making barrels to a pab- 
TiccLAR LENOTH, CALIURB AND WEIGHT, an additional chargu will be made. Also, an extra charge 
for smaller calibre than 150, and for barrels over 3^ feet long. 

Correspondents ordering barrels, will greatly oblige us by observing the following suggestions : 

All orders should be Plainlt Written, to prevent mistakes in transferring to our order-book. 

All the dimensions of barrels — Length, Calibre and Weight (or Diameter) should be given, allow- 
ing as much variation as possible in the several dimensions, when it is not essential that the barrels 
be made of precise length, calibre and weight. 

« » I — 

PRICES OF GXJN MOUNTING. 

Brass Mounting, (Castings) per lb $ 60 

Iron " " " 30 

GermanSilver " " 2 OO 

Directions for forwarding should accompany each order, mentioning whether to send by Railroad 
as freight, or by Express. 

Ilion, New York. E. REMINGTON A SONS, 



SA.1V FRATSrCISOO, OA-L. 



^% 






'■a 



',\ ' i 



I 



xc 



PACIFIC COAST BU8INBSS DIRECTORY. 



TO B£AL£RS IN FIRS ARMS 1 

GREATLY REDUCED PRICES FOR 

HEMIIfOTOlV'S 

REVOLVERS, BREEOH LOADINe PISTOLS, 

RIFLES AND CARBINES, 

U. 8. MUZZLE LOADING MUSKETS AND RIFLES, 

ON- Ajsm A^FTiEiR jxjXjnr 1, isee. 

ALBERT E. GBANE, Agent for Pacific Ooast, San Francisco, Oalifomia. 

»■» 

VMt Fooket Fiatol. 

3 inch Barrel, using Uetallio Cartridge, Size No. 22, 1 ihot, Welglit, 8} ox S8 25 

3i " " " " ' ao, " " eloz 450 

4 " " " " " " " 82, " " 7 01 4 76 

4J " ■• " " " " " 88, " " 11 02 600 

Silver Plated, extra 60 centa. 

Vew Bepeatiag Fiatol. 

Calibre or Size of Bore, 20-100th8 of an inch ; using Metallic Cartridge, Size No. 22. 

8 inch Barrel , 6 Shots, Weight, 81 oz 9 00 

With Silver I'lated Frame— Extra 60 cents. Full Plated— Extra 91 26. 
S'ew Bepeatingr Fistol. 

Calibre or Size of Bore, 30-lOOths of an inch diameter; using Metallic Cartridge, Size No. 82L 

31 inch Barrel. 4 Shots, Weight, 18oz 9 60 

With Silver Plated Frame— Extra 76 cents. Full Plated— Extra 91 60. 
Pocket Barolver. Double Action or Self-Cocking. 

Calihro or Size of Bore, 81-lOOths of an inch ; carrying 140 Round Balls to the pound. 

3 inch Barrel, 6 Shots. Weight, 10 oz 7 60 

With Silver Plated Frame— Extra 76 centa. 
New Fooket Bevolvera. 

Calibre or Size of Bore, Sl-lOOths of an inch diameter; carrying 92 Elongated or 140 Round Balls 
to the pound. 

Si inch Barrel, 6 Shots, Weight, 14 oz 26 

4J " " " •• 16oz 960 

With Silver Plated Frame— Extra 91 00. 

ICew Folioe Berolvers. (Navy Size Calibre.) 
Calibre >ize of Bore, 36-lOOths of an inch diameter; carrying 60 Elongated or 86 Round Balls to the 
.>und. 

4^ ich Barrel, 5 Shots, Silver Plated Guard, Weight, 22 oz 10 00 

" " •' " " " " 23oz 10 26 

" " " '< " " " 21oz 1060 

With Silver Plated Frame— Extra 91 26. 

New Model Belt Berolver. (Navy Size Calibra) Single Action. 

Calibre or Size of Bore, 88-lOOths of an inch ; carrying 60 Elongated or 86 Round Balls to the 
pound. 

6 inch Barrel, 6 Shots, Wdght, 2 lbs. 2 oz 11 00 

With Silver Plated Frame -Extra 91 60. 

Kew Model Belt Bevolver. Double Action or Self-Cocking. 

Calibre or Size of Bore, SS-lOOth.i of an inch ; carrying 60 Elongated or 86 Round Balls to the 
pound. 

6 inch Barrel, 6 Shots, Weight, 2 lbs. 2 oz 11 60 

With SiWer Plated Frame-Extra 91 60. 

New Model Navy Bevolver. (Pattern now used in the U. S. Navy.) 

Calibre or Size of Bore, 86-lOOths of an inch; carrying 60 Elongated or 86 Round Balls to the 
pound. 

7i Inch Barrel, 6 Shots, Government finish, Weight, 2 lbs. 10 ox 11 00 

With Silver Plated Guard and Varnished Stock 11 60 

With Silver Plated Frame-Extra 91 75. 

New Model Holster or Army Bevolver. 

(Approved by the Ordnance Department, and adopted for the United States Servie&) 
Calibre or SIzeof Boi«, 44-lOOthB of an inch diameter; carrying 83 Elongated or 48 Round Balls 
to the pound. 

8 inch Barrel, 6 Shots, Government flnish. Weight, 2 lbs. U ox 12 00 

With Silver Plated Guard and Varnished Stock, 12 60 

With Silver Plated Frame— Extra 92 00 



R 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XCl 



Bifle Cane, 

Calibre or Size of Bore, SO-lOOths of an inch diameter ; nsing Metallic Cartridge, 

Size No. 32 
Barrel Steel, covered with Vulcanized Rubber, Weight, 24 oz $10 00 

Thto arm ii new In its eomtructlon and character, combining the advantagea of a WalklnR Cane and Rifle. 
It Is light and portable, but at the same time la nearly as efficient In point ofBange, Accaracy and Pen> 
etratlon, as a Rifle of the same length. 

Bevolving Breech JRiflea, 

Calibre or Size of Bore, 36-IOOths of ^ inch diameter ; carrying 44 Elongated or 
66 Round Balls to the pound, b Shots. 

24 inch Steel Barrel, Iron Mountings, Weight, 6 lbs 2.5 00 

26 " " '* " " " 6 1bs. 5oz 26 00 

28 " " " " " " 6 lbs. 10 oz 27 00 

With Plated Mountings, Adjustable Sights and Extra Finished Stock, extra. ... 5 00 

Bevolving Breech Bifiea. 

Calibre or Size of Bore, 44-lOOths of an inch diameter; carrying 30 Elongated or 
48 Round Balls to the Pound. 6 Shots. 

24 inch Steel Barrel, Iron Mountings, Weight 6 lbs 26 00 

26 " " " " " " 6lb8, 5oz 27 00 

28 " " " " " " 6 lbs, 10 oz 28 00 

With Plated Mountings, Adjustable Sights and Extra Finished Stock, extra. ... 5 00 

Bi flea— -New Model, (Single Breech Loading.) 

Calibre or Size of Bore, SO-lOOths of an inch diameter; using Metallic Cartridge 

Size No. 32. 

24 inch Steel Barrel, Weight, 5 lbs 23 00 

26 " " " " 5lbs.5oz 24 00 

28 " " " " Slbs. lOoz 25 00 

With Plated Breech, S2 00 extra. .,;,. j ^,, .;.•.».'( >< 'i iv. - 

Shot Gun— Single, (Muzzle-Loading.) 

34 inch Barrel, Weight, 6J lbs 8 00 

With Rib, extra $2 00. With Plated Breech and Mountings, extra $2 00. 

Carbine—New Model, (Single Breech Loading.) 

Calibre or Size of Bore, 44-lOOths of an inch diameter; using Metallic Cartridge, 

Size No. 46; also, 50-100ths; using Cartridge Size No. 52. 
20 inch Steel Barrel, Weight, 5 lbs 23 00 

U. St Bifle, Harper's Ferry Pattern — Model of 1861. Muzzle Loading 15 00 

Calibre or Size of Bore, S8-100th8 of an inch diameter. 
33 inch Barrel, with Sabre Bayonet. 

U, S, Bifled Muaket, SpringEeld Pattern—Model of 1 862 13 00 

Calibre or Size of Bore, SS-lOOths of an inch diameter. 
37^ inch Barrel, with Angular Bayonet. 

Ornamental Engraving on Holster, Navy and Belt Revolvers 4 00 

" " Pocket Revolvers and Repeating Pistols, 3 00 

" " Vest Pocket Pistol 2 00 

Ivory Stocks for Holster, Navr and Belt Pistols 6 00 

" " Pocket Pistols 5 00 

" " Vest Pocket 3 00 

Pearl " " " 4 00 

Ivorv Stocks for Repeating Pistols 4 00 

Pearl " " " 6 00 

Powder Flasks for Army or Holster Revolvers 70 

" " Belt Revolvers , 60 

Powder Flasks for Pocket Revolvers 40 

Metallic and Combustible Envelope Cartridges of siaes suited to the several 
Arms, furnished at current market prices ; also Metal Lined Percussion Caps. 



XCll 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 



SAIKEUEIi ADAnS, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

MMWM QM'Umi lalM^, 

AND DEALER IN_ 

Cement, Plaster, Marble Dust, Rre Clay, Fire Brick, Tile, Etc. 
CORNER OF MARKET AND MAIN STREETS, 

(At the Junotion of Oalifornla and Market Streets), 



Coos Bay Coal Mines. 

FLANAGAN & MANN, 

(SDD3 IBM. <QlMmiS» 



EDWARD FLANAGAN, 

San Francisco, Oal. 



MOROCCO LEATHER 

MAIUFAOTITBED TO OBDEB, 

Hat ft Gap Linings, Boot & Shoe Work, 

Fnrnitnre and Carriage Work, 

Book Bindings, Eto., Eto. 

BT JAMES J. GRADT, 

Gomer of 18tli and Folsom Streets, 
OFFICE, 18 JESSIE STREET, 



FIRST PREMIUM AWA RDED— FAIR OF MECHAN ICS' INSTITUTE, 1865. 
STEAM COFFEE AND SPICE MILLS, 

CHA.IILES BEIl]SrA.Iir>, 

Manuflustorer and Sealer in 

FiMiii GHMf MS mum. 

ALWAYS ON HAND, 

ROAST AND GROUND COFFEE AND SPICES OF ALL KINDS, 

No. 707 SANSOM STREET, CORNER OF GOLD, 

Between Jackson and Facifio Streets, SAN VIIAIIOISOO. OAL. 



IMPORTER OF 



Walnnt, Rosewood and Gilt MoBMrags, 

ENGBAVINGS AND PICTURES OF EVERT DESCRIPTION. 

209 AND 21 1 LEIDESDORFF STREET, NEXT DOOR TO P. M. S. S. CO. 

MANUFACTORY AND STOREHOUSE, 508 COMMERCIAL STREET, 

Fioturee, Needlework and Diplomaa neatly framed. Orders promptly executed. 



ADYBRTISINQ DEPARTMBNT. 



XOUl 













VERDIER, KAINDLER, SCELLIER & CO. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



» 



9MX COORDS 

No. 633 Clay Street, bet. Montgomery and Kearny, 
. SAN EIlA]SrCISGO. 



PARIS No. 5 Rue de Conservatoire. 



IiOCAN A CO. 

623 Clay Streeet, between Montgomery and Kearny, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 











in 



BERLIN ZEPHYR WOOLS, 

Embroideries, Patterns, Ganras, 

EMBROIDERING FLOSS AND TWIST, 
And all other articles for Needlework at Wholesale and Retail. 



hi 



1 ' 



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IMAGE EVALUATION 
TEST TARGET (MT-3) 









{./ 








«; 
V 






1.0 



1.1 



tii yi 12.2 

H^ |i£ i2.0 



K 
HI 



1.8 



11.25 1 1.4 



i^U4 



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7 






Photographic 

Sciences 

Corporation 







23 WIST MAIN STRUT 

WIBSTIR,N.Y. MSM 

(716) •72-4303 



ST 




XCIV 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 



B. B. KATflBW. 



TBOMAa i:SOI.ISB. 



RATHBUN A CO. 

430 SANSON STREET, BETWEEN GUY AND COMMERCIAL, 
SAIf JRASrCISCO, 

Candy Manufacturers 



AND DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 












INCLUDIMO CHIKA AND AFRICAK 




^R^b^ftb csi^ >ft> 






m 




f> 



ETC., ETC. 



N. B.— French Confectionery of every 
Description always on hand. 



Orders from the Country Promptly Filled, 



ADVBRTISINQ DEPARTMENT. 



XCT 



ITITM. A. VITHIT&HORlffi:, 

COMMISSIOlSr MEIlCHA.]SrT, 

998 BATTERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SOHUTLEB, HABTLEY, OBAHAM & 00. 

15i Sand Street, | 19 Maiden Lane, and 22 | 31 Rue du Chateau d'Eau, 
Birmingham. | John Street, New York. \ Paris. 



ZltfffPOZiTSXlS OF 



eUNS, PISTOLS, MUSKETS, RIFLES, 

MILITARY ASTB PAJfCY GOODS, 

OPERA, MARINE, AND FIELD GLAS3ES, 

Henry's, Spencer's, Ballard's, Wesson's, Sharp's and other Bifles. 

Colt's, Smith & Wesson's, National and other Pistols, Cartridges, Percussion Caps, Powder and 
Shot, Dram and Powder Flasks, Shot Pouches. 



Military Arzas and Equipments, Spurs, Flags, Etc. 

OTTTljBit-sr, 

TABLE AND POCKET KNIVES, SCISSORS, RAZORS, ETC., ETC. 



TRXSADlXriSIala « CO. 

Importcn and Manufactaren of and Dealerj In 



SHOVELS AND SPADES, AGRICULTURAL IKirLEMENTS, 
aira-oxzo'iaiB asifX.^LO^xzia-sBixi.'v .a.io-x3 

BuBseU's Threshing Machines, Kirby's Beapers and Mower, Hoadley's ft Hittinger's Portable Engines, 
Page's Portable Saw Mills, Noyes' l>ortabIe.Grist Mills. 

Corner Market and Front Streets, San Francisco, Cat. 



B. WEII.X., Paris. 



M. iriilUi, San Francisco. 



Zi. llirXSIIala « SOM, 



IMPORTERS OP 



CLOTHS, OASSIMERES, 

AUTD TAIImORS' GOODS, 

Old SACBAMENTO STREET, (near Montgomery), 
SAN FRAIVCISCO. 



XOVl 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINKS8 DIEEOTORT. 



SAMUEL TTHLFELDBB, ) Vev Toric 
LEOPOLD OAHH, } San Fraaoiioo. 



_ ^ , < ISRAEL OAHKi 
Bu nmaotaoo. ^ ^ ^^ BLAOHMAH. 



UHLFELDER & CAHN, 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS IN 

DRY GOODS. 

309 & 311 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

Office, NEW YOEK, 100 Franklin Street, near Church. 
Office, PARIS, 5 Rue du Oonservatoire. 



OPPENHEIMEB & BROTHER, 

IMPOBTEBS OF 

HAVANA AND DOMESTIC 

CMAES» TOBACCO. 



No. 226 Front Street, near Sacramento, San Francisco, Gal. 

»»^ 

ISy OPFENtlEIMER A BROTHER receive regular ahlpments of Havana Clgara, selected for this market by their 
agent In Havana. They also receive regular shipments of Havana and Seed Leaf Tobacco. 



m. FAI.KXiSB'nilIV,)No. ITS Pearl street, 
f Hew York. 



FAIiKENSTlilN A CO. 



IHFOBTSBS ANO DIlAIiBBS IN 



©MAM AM® T@MAm% 

Nos. 315 and 317 Clay Street, 

Between Front and Battery, SAN FBANOISOO, OAL. 



ADVERTISINQ DEPARTMENT. 



XCVll 



J. O. HANSCOM, 1 
H. S. SMITH. J 



! 



T. PENDERGA8T, 
W. W. HANSCOM. 




S. E. corner Fremont and Tehama Streets, 



PRACTICAL MACHINISTS AND IRON FOUNDERS, 

Manufacture Steam Engines, Quartz Mill Machinery of all kinds, 

Saw Mills, Flour Mills, Dunbar's Improved Self- 

Adjusting Piston Packing, 

Now so extensively used in tbe East and in thli State. Requires no springs or screws; is always (team- 
tight ; without excessive A-iction, and never gets slack or leaky. 

HANSOOH'S OBUSHEB, the best of the kind now in use in this State or anywhere else. 

WHEELEE & BANDALL'B NEW &BINDEB AND AUALOAMATOB, which only needs examination to be 
appreciated. 

TYLER'S IMPROVED WATER WHEEL, giving greater power at lower cost, than any Wheel in use. Send 
for one of our circulars, giving flill tables. All Wheels warranted to give the power as set forth, or the money 
will be reflinded. Sole makers for this coast of the " Fendergast White Iron Stamp Shoes and Dies." 

None genuine unless obtained ft'om us. ISvery one warranted. 

Tatented Machinery of all kinds will be furnished by us at market prices. Particular attention given 
to drawings and specifications of machinery, which will be made to order. The patronage of the ; -iblio is ro> 
speotflilly solicited. 

rl^©IFI© FILE f I^BaORYf), 

No. 53 Beale Street, between Market and Mission, 

Files of every description made and re-cut to order. Job grinding of every dosoription done at short notice. 
An assortment of new Files constantly on hand. 

The undersigned, Tractical File HanuiVicturers, having established themselves in San Francisco, are pre- 
pared to execute all work in their line, with neatness and dispatch. Orders flrom the country promptly at- 
tended to. Also, Beaper and Mower Beotions (or Teeth) made to order. Having had large exnerienoo 
in this specialty, we can promise to give satis&otion in all cases. 



T. O. Durning. 



J. F. Fiaher. 



IQDlHr. mANDXSVUJaE, 

MAsvrAcxxmnn 

BLAmSMITHS' BELLOWS, 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, 

No. 2].6 Mission Street, between Beale and Main, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Bxtra Bellowi made to Order and warranted. Bepalrins and Be-dotbing done at abort notioe. 



XCVUl 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRSCTORT, 



•< 



AND 



769 MARKET STREET, 



f 



LOCKE & MONTAOUE, 



IMPORTERS OF 



STOVES AND METALS, 

112 & 114 BATTERY STREET, 

S^N FRANCISCO, OA.LIFOIJNIA.. 



liOCIS PAT.KESAir. H. O. HAKKB. 

PACIFIC CHEMICAL WORKS 

OFFICE— 629 WASHHTGIOir STSEET, SAN FBANCISCO, GAL. 

Laboratory, comer Center and Folsom Streets, Mission. 
1 ■ » 

HANUFAGTUBINa MS CONSDITINQ- GSEMISTa 

Thrtfenrir attention pxea to the analjreU of Ores, Minerals, UctalluTgical Frodscts, Uincral Waters, Soils, 
Conmoreial articlpt, &c. 



ninrBT k. blxck. 



XiI»MI7iri» 8AVI. 



N08. 715 AND 717 MABKET STREET, SAN FEANGISCO, 



XAIVFACrrKKRS of all KlKDe OF 



CARRIAGES. BUGGIES, WAGONS, STAGES, ETC. 

. »■»! ■ 

All kinds of Spritrg and TFioroBgh-Bmce Wngon*, Express Wagons, Stages, Soda and Butehcre' 
WrtgOTis, Groccrj, Lircrj and Snrrejors' Wagonsi, etc. 

Wagons and C^tninges of ererj deacnption, made to order, nnd genenl jobNng iono with ncRt- 
ness ai>d dispatch. Orders from the country promptly attended to. 



ADVBRTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



XCtX 



PHILADELPHIA 




Corner of Second and Folsom Streets, 



< ^«» » 



WE TAKE THE PRESENT OPPORTUNITY OF THANKING OUR 

Friends and Customers for the liberal support heretofore extended to the 

?HttAt)Etf HIA BREWERY, 

' And notify them that wo have added to our Establishment 



By which we hope, through the greatly increased facilities, now possessed by us, 

to furnish, as usual, 

A SUPERIOR ARTICLE OF BEER, 

That shall not only equal that previously furnished by us, but convince them 
that we are determined to merit their continued patronage and support. 

HOELSCHEB & WIELAND. 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSIMBSS DIRECTORY. 



JOHIV B. HOLMES. JOHV A. MOOSE. 

J. B. BOIiHES « CO. 

Dealers in 













9 



Nos. 5 & 7 California St., and 108 & 110 Market St. 



HEWBT K. CVMMIirefB. 



aOHBI M. MAXWEI.I.. 




OUMHIIVOS A MAXlTirXSLi]:., 

COMMISSION MEROHANTS, 

FOR THE SALE OF 

415 and 417 Davis Street, 
S. W. Corner of Oregon. SAN FRANCISCO. 



HOWABD CHAPMAN, 

TSTom. ao And. SB OaIUSoxtiiIa. ISItireety 

3^or</» Side between Davis and Drum, SAN FRANCISCO. 



MANUFACTURED TO ORDER: 



DOORS^ SASH AND BLINDS^ 

Brackets, Plain and Ornamental MedallionB and Scroll Work, 

For Buildings and other purposes. Mouldings of latest pKttems constantly on hand. 

Country Orders proirtptly attended, to* 



A. PAXiTENGHI, 

Wo. 819 Alontvomery Street* ISet. Jaokson and Paolflo* 

Just above Pioneer Hall, »AJSf PRA-WCISCO. 

-r-a-wiAT.Tir^ XXO* 



MANTEL-PIECES, MONUMENTS, GRAVESTONES, MARBLE SLABS, Etc. 

SCULPTURE AND ORNAMENTS MADE TO ORDER. 
JVZiSO, ■hO.AJRB.-USl FOTTX^rr.A.ZXO'S, SX.A.TX7E8, XTTO., EXO. 



ADVERTISINQ DBPARTMBNT. 



CI 



CSl-ElOflCa-EB T. 



109 & 111 MISSION STREET, between Main and Spear, 

SA.]V FBAJ JOISCO. OA.IL.. 

STEAM EK6IHE8, FLOUB AKD SA V H1LL8, 

QUARTZ MACHINERY, PRINTING PRESSES, 

And Machinery of Every Description made in the Best Manner, 

PAKTIOULAB ATTEBTIOK PAID TO BEFAIBIHa MAOHINEKT OF EVESY DESOBIPTION. 



No. 579 Market Street, near Second, San Francisco, Cal. 




Uakos to order all kindH of Carrioffe and Busey 
Work, Express and Ttioroughbraco Wagons. Alio 
Track and Road Sulkies, and a general assortment of 
new and second-hand Wagons on band. 

tTOPBIS'O done with Ifeatneat and IHtpateh, 

OHARTiWB MoABBON, Proprietor. 



]». A. 1IACDOHAI.D. 



J. H. MA.cnOJtXL.n, 



MACDONALD & BBO. 

(OHACE'S MILLS,) 

ALL KINDS OF PLANING AND SAWIN6 

Done in the Best Manner at Lowest Market Prices. 

Gor. Market & Beale Sts., San Francisco, Gal. 



Fint Premium of the Mechonios* Institute, 1865. Three First Premiums of the State 
Fair, ISOS. Two First Premiums of the San Joaquin Fair, 1865. Awarded to 




LOCKSMITHS AND BELL-HANOERS, 

Importers and Manufacturers of all kinds of Cutlery. Razors, Shears, and all kinds 
of Cutlery Omund and Renatred. BcU-Hanglnir and LncksmithinR done in the Dest 
Manner. FIRST ESTABLUHED IS CALIFOBHIA IS 18Sa. 

613 JACKSON STREET, 4TH DOOR WEST FROM KEARNY, 

BOLE AaSHTB FOB JAGKBOIPB PATENT HOTEL AinnmOIATOBB. 
COUyTBT OKDJBBa PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

FREDERICK A. WILL, Cutler and Surgical Instrument Maker. JULIUS FINCK, Bell-IIanger and Locksmith. 



ou 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTORT. 



EXCELSIOR IRON WORKS, 

712 Sansom Street, between Jackson and Pacific, 




GALLAGHER & KENNEY, 

Xanufacturera of all Kind* of 

ARCHITECTURAL & ORNAMENTAL IRON WORK, 

Bank and Store Vaults, Safes, Doors, Looks, Shatters, Baloony, Area and 
Cemetery Bailings, Gates, Stairs, etc., and all kinds of Black- 
smithing and Jobbing done with promptness and 
at reasonable Prices. 

H^^ Orders Arom the country promptly executed. 



xxzs 



BLACK DIAMOND COAL MINING CO. 



L. A. QARNETT, PRESIDENT. 



OFFICE, NO. 212 CLAY ST., BELOW FRONT, 



IHIB 



BILimSMM BAT GOAL m. 

».» 

L. A. GARNETT, PRESIDENT. 

^m^ — 

OFFICE, NO. 212 CLAY ST., BELOW FRONT, 



ADVERTISING DBPARTMBMT. 



cm 



V. OBACISB. C. B. UBALB. 

— MAirUrAOTCBBBf OV — 

WOODWARD'S PATENT SMOT MACHINE, 

F«tMt Olothei Btok, Bosewood Fanotti, OorUng MsoKinai, Bugi, Wine, Tap, Fork, BvUn and 

Deck Flags, Flag Stioks, Hard and Soft Wood Doweli, Broom, Fiok and Bledg* Handle^ 

Ifm^ Tokei, Spokei, Bingia and Donlile Treta, Iiixnut and Oragoa Flna, 8Up 

Tmnnali tuned to order. Al80,Oelling&IraaaalWa4geiMwed. 

PartlenUr attention paid to fitting up and repairing Atcrleultural and Mill Haebinery. Job turning of all 
Undg done. Damaged Hardware repolMbod, &e. Orders (h>m the city and country solicited, promptly at- 
tended to, and warranted as ordered. 

Jfio. ai FIlEM.OTfT STUEH'C; SAMT V*TtA.TSCimCO. 



@^J^i^&@^ ^l^it@@@«o 




A CON 



AND 




AKEK, 



N. E. cor. Jackson and Sansom Sts., San Francisco. 

^m^ 

Repairing and general machine work done at the lowest rates. New and second hand Wagons for sale. 



f tatnd mm motU, 

ANU XANDrAOTITBBR OF 

Stained, Ennmel and Bent Glass, Chureh Windows, 
Hail and Slcylights, cto. Hotel fc Bestaurant Lamps 
Worked to order or doHlgn,- 

MISSION STREET, NEAR BEALE. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



6. B. JESSE. H. M. DBEW. 

JESSE & DBEW, 



9 

MEOHANIGS' MILL, 

No. 407 Mission St., oor. Fremont, 

SJ&JT FX%.AJ>TaZ8CO. 

Constantly on hand and made to order, Stair Bails, 
Posts, Balusters, etc 











FOR 













No. 587 Market St., opp. Occidental Market, San Francisco. 



> 



Constantly on hand. Hilk Wagons, Ught Express, Thoronghbraee, and Lumber Gears, Extra Poles, Extra 
Whiffletrees and Lead Bars. 



OIV 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORY. 



aTDE A CBESTER, 



For Baiaing, Moving, aud Lowering Wood or Briok Buildings to rait Grades, 
and for taking out and patting on Board Steamer Boilers of any Weight 

^m^ ; 

ORDERS LKPT AT THKIR PLACE OF BUSINESS, 

619 Mission Street, between Second and Third, 



All work entnuted to their oluurse will be done with Safety. 



THEODORE EALLENBEBG, 

Ho. 416 Karket Street, BM FBANOIBOO. 

MA.CHIISriST, 

Maker of Models for Inventors, Drawing 

Instruments, Small Machines, Philosophical Ins- 

traments, Scales and Weights. 



All kinds of Erass and Iron work. 

Jtepairing promptly attended to. 



A. OAmnnoiif 



OZX.A.OB'S X^XXiXiS, 
aoo Slarlcet (Street, near ISeale, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Oolumns, Heweli, Balusters, Billiard and Ten-Fin Balls. 
'Cabinet and Ship Turning dune to Order— jpi 



FRANCIS DODGE, 

CONTRACTOR FOR 



'* 



No. 669 Mission Street, between Second and Third, 






OwA.Itl'BN'XBIt -S^OK.^ IDCITE TO OS-IDBH. 



Dr. N. T. WHITCOMB, 



No. 205 THIRD STREET, CORNER HOWARD, 



^ ■« » ,1 ^ 



TEETH FILLED WITH FINE COLD, ARTIFICIAL BONE, AND PLATINA. 

All plate -work made and repaired on the best material 
at the shortest notice, and -warranted. 

None cheaper or better on this Coast, Call and examine specimens, 

VOBTH BEAOfl ABD SOUTH FABK CABS PASS TEt, 'JC JB. 



ADVBRTIBIMO DEPARTMENT. 



CV 



SAN FRANCISCO AND SAN JOSE RAILROAD, 

GENERAL FREIGHT DELIVERY, 



Bamse and Freight delivered to all parta of the Citv. Wo keep a MeMOiiaer on the cars to rooolve orders 
and oheoks for baMa)(e. Oi'den for goodn, and erranda of all kindB promptly attended to. Wo also run an 
exprew to Half Koon Bay and Pegoadero. 



I* I €~^ TV !E3 Tn "R, 

3F" jAl O 'OC o :]Ei. -v^ 

558 Mission St., (Nortli side) bet. 1st & 2(1, San Francisco. 



B'S' J*. X>. 

Superfine White Uacaronl, 



viaisrv: 



Superfine large White and Yellow Macaroni. 

" flat " " 

Superfine largo White and Yellow Vermicelli. 
Extra Superfine White Vermicelli. 
'< " Yellow " 



Superfine Yellow Macaroni. 



Superfine White VermioRlIi. 
" Yellow " 



A-IV-A^HEIIM: l^IIN^E X>EI»OT. 



WhoUula and Betail Dealer in 

wiMii Amm m%WQ>m\ 

NO. 4:& mECONT> SXRX2E3X, 

NEAH MISSION STBEET, SA« mANCISCO. 

« » > 

lar ALWATS OV HABD A LABQE AB80BTHENT OF 8EQAHS, TOBAOOO, FIFES, &o. St 



'8) 



BANKS O'CIilTD 



fci''.-% 



n. E. COBfitEB SAMSOM* MABKET AND SUTTEB STBEETS, 
ANDREW CUNNINGHAM, PROPRIETOR. 



en 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRKCTORT. 



o. :Boit.onA.ii,i>, 



> »»^ > 



Manufaotures all kinds of CANDIES of the Best Materials, and will sell 
AS LOW AS ANY OTHER HOUSE IN THE TRADE. 

Ooods Warranted to keep in any climate. Country Orders promptly attended to. Dealers 
supplied on liberal terms. 



JAS. B. JOHnrsoivr^ 

iif Mm mm\M mm imii, 

CORNER FREMONT AND MISSION STS., SAN FRANCISCO. 

< n » 

All kinds of HATTERS' TOOLS made to order at short notice, and on reasonable terms. Pat- 
tern and Model making in all its branches. 

HOISTINa WHEELS FOR STORES, WAREHOUSES, ETC. SHIPS' WHEELS MADE TO ORDER. 

Slanofftoturer of my Patent Premium Windmill, of all kinds and sises. 



J. QWB. 



LUOOBFB'. 



ITO- IB XHIMD STS,BBTa 

EAST zm, nuti UAUtr, san fhancisgo, cal 

WHOLESALE AND RETA.IL DEALERS IN 
DR'V OOODS, dLtOmillVO, HA-TS ^ CA.T?S, 

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, Boots and Shoes, Ladies* and ChUdiien's Gaiters. 

A.II Orders promptly attended, to. 



INVX:iVXOR A.3VD 'TXSA.CIISR 



' OF TBB ' 



FIRST PREMIUM MATHEMATICAL MODELS, 

FOR CUTTtltC AU KiNOS Of UOIES' GARMENTS, 



SUCH AS ' 



The Qored Dress, Basquine, Sack, Postillion, Zouare, Girdles, Aprons, etc., and also for cutting 
all kinds of Gentlemen's and Children's Clothing. 

101 Second Street* near Ho^trard* San Franolaoo* 



ADVBRTISING DBPARTMKirT. 



CVU 



AUGUST KOEHLiEIR^ 

MANUFACTURER OF 

TRDSSES, ELASTIC SHOOLDER BRACES, 

FOR E2:P.A.I4-X3ZXa-a- XZXE OXXESX, 

XJ.AJDXZIS* ^OIXj'I^S JiJXm 8T7Z>3E*^Xl.*rZIXl.ia, 

Inatramenta for Club-Feet, Knook-Knces, Bow-Legs, Weak Ankle Joints, Curvature of the Spine, IMles and 
Frolapsus. Also, a very superior article of Silk, Thread, EUastio, and Lace Stockings, (for enlarged or vari- 
cose veins, of the leg, ftc.) Elastic Female Belts, Knee Caps, Chidren's Trusses, Surgical Belt and 

Bandage, and all kinds ot Suspensoriei). 

718 Washington Street, opposite the Plaza. 

«^- TRUSSES REPAIRED AND NEWLY COVERED. 



FBANCIS LIEPHABT, 

MANUFACTUBEB OF 

EXTRA LAUJfBIlY, EXTRA EAMILY, 

-AND- 

OHEimiCAI. OLIVES SOAP. 



Manufactory Comer Third and To-wnsend Streets, 
' ' aJL.lSr FR.A.XTCXSCO. 



FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, PRICE 2S Cta, 



L. CORRIVEA.U, 

joL jnL X JtCi JLM Jt^ jbS &S S9 
Hair Oatting, Shaving, Hair Dying, Ladies' Shampooing, 50 Ots. 



J. H. G. PORTlKIAlfflff, 



MANUFACTURBB OF 



CUcal, OliTe, Faily anl Marine Soap, 

POTRERO NUEVO, 

Mission Greek, East side, bet. 16th (late Center St,) and Brannan St Bridge. 

« » > 

OFFICE, 210 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



, 






§' 



CVUl 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



HAMKESRSHITH ^ RUSS^ 

IMPORTERS OF 

TOYS AND FANCY GOODS 

OF EVERY I>ESCM1»T10N, 

And Agents for Jacob Zeeh's Celebrated California make 
Gold Medal Piano -Fortea, 

No. 8530 MOINXGOMKIKY SXRESST*, NX2A.R FIP^E:, 

(IN RU8S HOUSE BLOCK) 





m 





T1I16. 



734 WA$»t»GTON 3T.* m, THE FUZA, %m FRANCISCO. 

— . »■» • 

0^ General Dyeing and Scoaring of Merino and Silk Dresses, Plain or Epingle Velvet, Satin, 
Barege, Cashmere Shawls, Chinese Crapes, Velvet Mantillas. Special attention paid to scouring 
Gentlemen's Clothing. Steam Cylinder for watering silks. Hydraulic Press for pressing and re- 
finishing Cashmere Shawls and Woolen Goods. 



» ■«» > 



Of every deteriptiou tahen at the 



FAVWIO ART GALLERY, 

No. 28 Third Street, West aide, near Market, San Franciaco. 

An Artist of 16 years practice sttperintends every sitting. Especial attention paid to copying. Old dairuerreo- 
types copied to any eize, and restored either by retouching with India Ink, Crayon Water Color, or OU Taint- 
ing. Or^"*^ from the country promptly attended to. Also, Oil Painting flrom life. 



WARM SWIMMING 



B /L "X" ^it^s 

Corner of Filbert and Powell Streets, 



ADVKRTISINa DEPARTMENT. 



CUE 



A. J. BRTAMT A CO. 

IMFOBTBBS AND WEOUBBAIiB DBAIiBBB IN 

FINE WIRES & LIQUORS. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



C. KAUITOir. 



C. HTfiUJi. 



G. RALSTON & CO. 

PBOICE AM COMH MGHMTS, 

Dealers in all kinds of Country Produce, 
223 ^W^^SHIISrGhTOIsr STREET, 



, r ?• ,r:j'-:' ' m ■ 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 



AND WHOXJQSAIiSI DWATiTlBa IN 



PROVISIONB, 

40G Front Street^ San Francisco^ Call 



I<. C. DODOB. 



H. I.. DODOIi. 



J. SBOirFi:. 



D. O'CALLAGHAN & CO. 

General Agents for Life, Fire and Marine Insurance. 
Advertising Agents for City and Country Newspapers. 
Advertisements inserted in the Leading Newspapers at 

Publishers' Eates. 
Notes, Bents and Accounts promptly Collected. 

424 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ex 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 



ttlPORTXR or ARO OXAUR IK 



230 AND 233 FRONT STREET, 



Corner Sacramento, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



ISAAC E. DAVIS. 



HENRY COWELL. 



DJLVIS A comrEiiia, 



DEALERS IN 



CEMENT^ rUSTEB, HAtB» lATH AND UTH NAtU, 

Oor. Front and "Wasliinfirton Streets, San Franolsoo. 



CO 



c/> 



f2 S 



08 




90 S 

r*i C3 

> m 

M rn 

■ CO 



SEED AND PLANT WAREHOUSE. 



« »«» ♦- 



J. I». STV'EEII^E 



Ac OO. 



400 iL]NI> 411 I>A.VIS STREET, »ATS FRAIVCISCO. 

ALL KINDS OF 

Garden, Field, Flo-wer, Fruit & Tree Seeds, etc. 

For Salo at tho Lowest Prices. A liberal discoant to the Trade. 



Near 



ADVBRTISINa DEPARTMENT. 



CXI 



W. J. IiOWRY Sb OO. 



AND DEALERS IN 

^LL KINDS OF I>RODUOE, 



'? 



S. W. COMER WASHINGTON AND DAVIS STREETS, 



J. vr. 0,& L,E. 



BOBEBT Hovri:. 



J. HV. GAIiZS A CO. 

Emit asl liefleral Coiiission Mercliants, 



AMD WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



CAUFOBHIA AHQ OHHGOH PROGOCE, 
iN'o. 325 DA. VIS STREET, 

SAN FRALCISCO, CAL. 



Tfcav "WasliIniEtonf 



a oi^QX OUST ^/LJcurrre soxixozxsx). 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 



AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



A.lao» n Ocnoral A.88ortinont; of Field and Onrden Seeds at 

most lieasonable Rates. 

204 WASHINGTON STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

^m^ 

Consignments solicited. Purchases made for parties in the Interior. Shipping supplied. 





Junction of Post, Montgomery & Market Sts. 

1 ■.» > 

The handromcrt and newest riGtar«., micb as Sun Pearl rictorei, Helntnotypct, Amlimtrpcs, Cartes de Tfslte and 
Trlsm. Solar PIctares are taken of every size and at lowest r|ites. 



m 



im 



mi 

2! *■ 



cxu 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 

■ — ■■■ 

The only Church Boarding School for Young 
Ladies in this Diocese. 

The Sixteenth Session of this well established Seminary will commence on the 
16th of July, at its commodious building on Silver Street, San Francisco. 

The few vacancies remaining should prompt early application on the part of 
Parents and Guardians, who desire for their wards and daughters the advantages 
of the th uough Christian, literary, and classical education, which is afforded by 
this Institution. 

The Princii>al will be assisted by a corps of thoroughly qualified Teachers ; 
and no pains will be spared to make this the best school on the coast, in all those 
branches of education which shall prepare Young Ladies to fill the duties of life 
with knowledge and accomplishment. 

The services of the Church, and such Biblical and devotional exercises as are ap- 
proved, are regularly attended by the Boarding pupils. 

For Terms and other particulars, apply to the Principal, Lock Box IGOO. 

Visitors. — ^The Rt. Rev. Bishops of California, Oregon and Honolulu. 

References. — The former and present patrons of the Institute, t^nd the Church 
Clergy of thfe Diocese. MISS M. LAMMOND, Principal. 



©AIiIlOEWIA M@^n« 



CORNER DUPONT 
And Oommercial Streets 

BE S T A. U R A N T 

AND BATHS 
IN THE HOTBIi. 



Esquina do las calles de 

Dupont 7 Oommercial. 

IiE8TUA.IlA.NTE 

Y baRos 

EN EL HOTEIb 



S) 



Encoignure des rues 

Oommeroial and Dupont. 

BESTATJIlAPfT 

ET BAINS 
DANS I.* HOTEIi. 



OAIIL.IIA.RD BROXIIC3RS, PROPRIXSXOICS. 



©liiiir mm© 

722 Front Street, San Francisco, GaL 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



cxm 



XIIX3 



BOARDMAN, GRAY & CO. 




ITITHOLiXSSAIiiX: AGBiyTGY. 



The Bubsoriber, late a member of this well known firm, has established a 

581 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY, 

Where he will be pleased to receive the orders of his friends and the public, and 
especially to hear from those Avho have so liberally bestowed their patronage on 
the firm heretofore. He will supply these superior instruments to the trade 

WHOLESALE AND EETML, 

AT THE VERY LOWEST PRICES, 

Made with the Insulated Iron Rim and Frame, (cast in one solid plate.) They 
excel all others in durability, superiority of tone, and elegance of external appear- 



ance. 



All these Pianos have overstrung Scales, giving in connection with the patent 
iron rim and frame, full, round, powerful and sweet mellow tones. The cases are 
elegant in appearance, and easily and safely handled. 

!ll^~ Warranted to Prove Satisfactoryp or the Money Returned. ..£0 

Address all Orders to 

SIBERIA OTT, 581 Broadway, New York. 

_ 



CXIV 



PAOIPIO COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORY. 



» 



S. D. ft H. W. SMITH'S 

AMERICAN ORGANS 

THE MOST PERFECT AND BEAUTIFUL 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 

IN THE WOSU), FOB THE 

AMERICAN HOME CIRCLE. 



« m » 



xzzs 



Makes home attractive, refines and elevates the minds of all, beautiful 
in appearance and effects. 

SIBERIA on, 581 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

"WHOLESALE -A^Ca^ENT. 

The immense popularity of these Organs, and their superior Musical powers, 
is fast bringing them before the public, as the instrument so long desired m 
American homes. And although the cost price is but a trifle over the Melodeon, 
yet the musical advantages, beauty of tone and quickness of touch and action 
are so far superior, that they are fast superseding the Melodeon, and the call is 
now almost exclusively for the American Organs. It is adapted to any Muuc, 
from the quickest and most lively, to the heavy tone of the Church Organ. And 
almost universally they are preferred to the Piano, by persons who have them, 
yet costing less than half, and only taking a small amount of room. 

Send for descriptive circulars, giving full particulars and prices. Exclusive 
Agencies secured to dealers, and large discounts to the trade and Teachers. 



TO MUSIC TEACHERS AND DEALERS. 

The subscriber is fully prepared to furnish Sheet Music, Strings, Musical In- 
struments, and Music Books of all kinds, at the lowest trade rates, wholesale and 
retail, from the largest collections in this country. 

Orders punctually and faithfully attended to. Address all orders, 

SIBEBIA OTT, 581 Broadway, N. T. 



ADVBRTISINa DBPARTMBNT. 



OZV 



AMERICAN ORGANS. 

(From "Godey's Ladies' Book," February, 1866.) t 



The followinff remarks and snggeitions relative to this immensely popnlar instmment will doubt- 
less interesl and profit very many of our readers. Wo commend the article to their careful perusal : 

A hundred and one makers of Organs, Cottage, Parlor, Cabinet, American, School Organs, etc., 
etc., are each claiming to make the best instrument in the world. Being comparativelv a new instru- 
ment, as at present constructed, we are convinced that the public are much less capable of judging 
of its merits, or demerits, than of most other instruments. If there is really an e«'ontial difference 
in them, if there are some excellent and some worthless ones, the public should have some criterion 
for judging of them, some facts which will enlighten them. We cheerfnlly concede the space for 
this article, knowing that there is hardly a family, or church, or school in all the land, but is more 
or less interested in this topic. We are also aware, of its being a great misfortune, a real calamity, 
to any of them to purchase an inferior or worthless Organ, ruinous to good playing, and often a 
source of much annoyance and vexation. Wo know this article to emanate from a candid and in- 
telligent source, and thus we give it to our readers. 

The (^nestion is often asked, what are "reed organs t" We answer, they are, in most cases, 
nothing in the world but the old melodeon in disguise. Many of the so-called organs have the same 
bellows, the same reeds, and the same general internal arrangement. With the bellows turned on 
edge to gain room, they have simply put on a more pretentious exterior, and a more high sounding 
name. But an oi^an, to be in reality an organ, most have a wind-chest or reservoir for air separate 
from the bellows, into which wind-chest the reeds open, and the tone has room to expand and per- 
fect itself into the full, round tone, similar to the flute or pipe organ, even, smooth, firm and mel- 
low ; and this tone from reeds cannot be obtained in any other way known. Nothing so annoys a 
true organist as to have the volume of sound swelling and jerking spasmodically with every varia- 
tion of force on the bellows, which is always the case where the reeas open direct into the bellows 
or air-passages, instead of a wind-chest or sound-box. And yet some makers even go so far as to 
claim this spasmodic or automatic jerking of the bellows on the reeds as an excellence, just as 
though they did not know that it must very soon throw the reeds out of tune, and injure the bellows ; 
and as though it were not an easier matter to obtain a much bettor and more easily managed swell 
by other methods. The truth is, any organ, so-called, or melodeon, which has the wind acting di- 
rectly upon the reeds, is nothing more nor less than a huge accordeon, dress it up as you may. And 
when onanists and true musicians become aware of the lact that they can obtain those that are or- 
gans in fact as well as in name, they will biy no more of the objectionable ones. Then again the 
swell should always be separate and distinct from the bellows, so as not to be acted on by the hard 
or soft blowing, but convenient, so that the player can use it with the knee, separate from the hands 
or feet, and thus always under easy control, to be used ad libitum. 

The large divided bellows, or double bellows, is also a very important improvement. By this 
means not only can the wind be supplied more evenly, but with far greater ease to the performer, 
from the fact that either bellows alone will be sufficient for the lighter melodies, thus permitting the 
player to change about and rest the feet at will ; then, if the bellows is of the requisite lai^^re size, 
and having the wind-chest or reservoir, all will be well. As to the rccds, they must be scientifically 
tuned and voiced, or all the other good qualities in the world cannot produce a good toned instru- 
ment. The inquiry now very naturally arises, where can the organ bo procured combining all these 
essential and desirable qualities 1 There is only one possessing all these points, and tnat is the 
AMERICAN ORGAN, made by S. D. & H. W. Smith, of Boston, Siberia Ott, Wholesale Agent, 
581 Broadway, New York. These organs have a wind-chest extending the whole length of the ifl- 
strument, and so constructed as to act at the same time as a reverberating sound-box or board, dkAd 
having the same important relation and part to perform that the sounding-board has to the piano. 
This feature the makers have pate'ited, and to it are owing in a great measure the entirely un- 
equalled fullness and richness of time so highly prized hj all who have used these organs. They 
also have the largest and best divided bellows in use, which is another important feature. No port 
of their work is slighted, no expense or pains spared to make the American Organs perfect mnsi- 
cally, as well as mechanically, and, judging from the immense sale of them at present, they bid fair 
to long maintain the proud position they have won by superior merit alone. We would most 
heartily advise all interested to call upon or address Mr. Siberia Ott, the Wholesale Agent, at 581 
Broadway, New York, and can assure them he will, in the most gentlemanly and truthful manner, 
impart to them all the information they may desire, and send them descriptive circulars, relative to 
this truly delightful instrument. 



iiji* = 



M 



OXVl 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 



. C. TAIXVTER, 



MOULDma, MOBTisma, tenonino, 

AND 

GENERAL WOOD-WORKINQ MACHIis3ERY, 




Salb at tbb JimoTioM Shop.— L. L. Mason w>M at anotion about seren thotuand dollan worth of tools 
and maohinerv at J. A. Fay & Co's yesterday afternoon. E. C. Tainter pnrcbased the good-will ant. part of 
the fixtures of the concern, and we trust will retain a laiveshare of the business of this well known firm. Ther 
have Just completed several large wood planing maohines for the Busslan Government; two of which wiU 

Slane fifty feet long each; others will be shipped to Liverpool this week. The sale will be resumed again to- 
ay at 10 o'clock.— fforeeiter DaUy S^, Sepkmbir 8d, 186L 



Having purchased the Good-Will of our late ftrin. 
Builders of SASH and DOOR MACHINERY, and 
started the business in connection -with Witherby, 
Rugg 8e Richardson, vrith Ne'W Patterns and superior 
facilities, -will thank our late Patrons and all in -want 
of first-class Wood- Working Machinery to favor me 
■with their orders. 

SEND YOUR ADDRESS AND RECEIVE A PRICE LIST AND CIRCULARS. 

WOSCXBTXS, XABS. 



E 



II 



TH 



ADVBRTI8IN0 DEPARTMENT. 



CXVU 



"X'UCICEiXl. 





Mannfaoturers of and Wholesale Dealers in 

IRON BEDSTEADS, 

SPRINO BEDS 

FOLDING WOOD COTS, 



■.A.X^X>- 



BRONZED GrA^B 



Ji.NT> 



ji^JgiiJbfLI|^^JLiX?9 Jgfl JiS JL^s» X O JffwJSf ^c 




1»@© 









<9 



Scomt Scotf Aso<« 



1 15, 1 17 & 1 19 COURT ST, BOSTON, MASS. 
59 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK. 

THOMAS J. FISHEE, Pres't. HIRAM TUCKER, Geni Sup't. 

R. S. TAT, Treasurer. 



oxyiii 



PAOIFIO OOABT BUSINESS DIRIOTORT. 



1 S 6 6 



COIiT'S PATENT 

REVOLVING BBEEOH 

FISTflU. MES. CmilHIS AlO M (IIHL 



VAVwACTvmKi* n-x 






TO WHICH COMPANY AL 



OMMUNICATIONt MUST Bl ADDRIMID. 



OIiD MODBIi FOOKBT FIBTOIiB. 



riatec! Honntinvf, Calibre or Siw of Bore 81*100thi of an 

Inch diameter (earr^iog 92 Elonnted_or 140 Rouna BulleU tojhe jpound). 



la BulleU to the 

4 inch Barrel, Lever Kamrod, Wulglit 24 oi Six Ahota, (110.26, Five Shoti, tO.Tfi 

6 " " " " " 26o« " " 10.66, " " 10.16 

e " " 27 01 " '« 11.00, <• " 10.60 

OIiD MODBIi HA.VY or BSIiT PIBTOIi. 

Plated Mountingi, Six Sbott, Ik inob Barrel, Calibre or Siie of Bora, 86-lOOthr, of an inch 
diameter (carryiiur 60 Elongated or 86 Round Bulleti to the pound). Welgbt 2 Ibe. 10 oi 14.00 

Witb an "AttaobaDle Carbine Breecb," plain extra. 7.60 

•• " " " witbCantcen •• 9.00 



mW FOOKBT FISTOZiB, lf«*i/ 8i»e CatUtre. 
"alibreorSizeof BoreBO-lOOtbuof ' " 

let! to the pound). 



Calibre or Size of Bore 80-lOOthii of an inoh diameter (carrying 60 Iilong«ted or 86 Round Bul> 



44 inoh Barrel, Five Shoti, Plated or Blued Mountingt Weight 26 oi. 11.00 

0} " " '• " " " " " 261oi.ll. 40 

q\ >' " •• << " " " " 28 01. 11.76 

WITH PATKirr OBntriKa LKTSB bamboo ATTAOBBIk 

JIJUW KODBIi FOOKBT FIBTOri8> 

Calibre or Size of Bore 8M00tb« of an inoh diftmeter (oarrying 98 Elongated or 140 Bound 
Bulleta to the pound). 

31 inoh Barul, Five Shot*, Steel Mountingt Weight 16 oi. 11.60 

«} " " " " " " " 16^01.12.00 

ZraiW MODBL FOIJOB FI8TOI18. 

Calibre or 8ixe of Bore 86-100th8 of an Ineh diameter (oartying 60 Elongated or 86 Bound Bul- 
let* to the pound). 

41 ineh Barrel, Five Shoti, Plated or Blued Mounting! Weight 241 oa. 11.7B 

5} " " " •' " " " '• 26101. 12.16 



e 



26 ox. 12.60 



mW MODBZi NAVY or BBIiT FXSTOL. Pattern now uted br the U. 8. Navy. 

Calibre or Size of Bore 86-lOOths of an inch diameter (carrying 60 Elongated or 86 Bound 
Bullet* to the pound). 

71inch Barrel, Six Shota, Bram. Plated or Blued Mountinn Weight 2 lb«. 10 01. 1600 

The same Arm with an "Attachable Carbine Breeoh," plun extrs. 7. 60 

" " " '• " " withCanteen " 9.00 

now HODBIi HOI18TBB FX8TOI1. 

(Recently approved by a Board of U. S. Army Offlcen, and adopted for the me of the U. 8. 

Regular Military Service). 
Calibre or Size of Bore 44-lOOtba of an inch diameter (carrying 88 Elongated or 48 Round 

Bnlleta to the pound'' 
8 inch Barrel, Six Shot«, Steel Handle Strap, BraM, Plated or Blued Trigger Guard. Weight, 

2 lbs. 11 oz .„ 16.00 

The same Arm with an "Attachable Carbine Breech," Plain extra, 7.60 

" " " withCanteen , " 9.00 

OXUTAMBNTAIi XNGBAVINO on Fooket FiatoU " 4.00 

" " Belt and Holster Fiatola " 6.00 

_" " AttMhable OwMne Breeoh " 8.00 

IVOBT 8TO0K, fbr Fooket Fiatole " 6.00 

<• " Belt or Holeter Fittols " 6.00 

FOWDBB FI1A8K8, for Holeter Fiatola " .70 

" " Belt " " .80 

" " Fooket and New Kodel Follce Fiatol " .40 



ADVBRTISING DBPARTMBNT. 



CXUC 



O OXb^' s 



BEVOLVINO 



RIFLES, CARBINES AND SHOT GUNS. 



New Model 8t<wl Kountlngi, Six Shoti, Calibre or 8Uf ofBoiti SMOOthi of an Inch diame- 
ter, earryinc 48 Elongated or 80 Bound Bulleta to the pouud). 

Twenty-four AobUanei :. Weight6lb«.|ao.76 

Twenty>ieTen inob Barrel " 10Ib«. 82. 2& 

Thirty inch Barrel Weight 10 Ibi. 8 ox. 88.76 

BXWUM. Same itvio, Hix ShntH, Calibre or Size of Bore 44-lOOtbi of an inch dlanetor (carrying 28 
Elongated or 48 Round Bullotii to the pound). 

Twenty-four inoh Barrel Weight81ba. Ifiox. 84.00 

Twenty-feven Inch Barrel " 9 Ibe. Sox. 8S.60 

Thirty-one and fi-16 Inch Barrel " 9lb«.10oz. 87.00 

BXTIiBB. Same ttvle, Five Shotn, Calibre or Site of Bore SO-lOOtbf of an inch diameter (carrying 14 
Elongated or 24 Bound Bullets to the pound). 

Twonty-four Inoh Barrel Weight 8 Iba. 14 ox. 86.80 

Twenty-neven inch Barrel " 9lbt.llox. 87.00 

Thi rty-one and 6-16 Inch Barrel (Pattern uied by U. 8. Army) " 9 Iba. 16 ox. 88.60 

OABBZVXS. Now Model, Steel Mountinm, Rilled Barrel*. 18 or 21 inchoi long. 

Six Shota, Calibre or Hixo of IloreSO-lOOtbi of an inch diameter (carrying 43 Elongated or 86 

Round Bulleta to the pound) ^'lRl>t 8 Iba. 8 ox. 28.60 

Six Shot*. Calibre or Slio of Bore 44-lOOtbi of an inch diameter (carrying 28 Elongated or 48 

Round BulleU to the pound) .height 8 Ibi. 12 ox. 81.00 

Five 8hol«, Calibre or SIxe of Bore 66-lOOtba of an inoh diameter (carrying 14 Elongated or 24 

Round Bulleta to the pound) Weight 9 Iba. 8 ox. 83.00 

SHOT OUlf 8. Calibre or Sixe of Bore 76-lOOtha of an ineh diameter* 

S7 Inch Barrel, FiveSbota WelghtOlba 9ox. 47.'*' 

30 " " " " " 9"18".48.i6 

is " '• « " " 10" ". 60.26 

Se " " " " " 11 " 4 " . 61.76 

OrdlnaiT Powder TlMka. for Carbine*, Shot Gun* and Rilea tl.eo and 1 .76 

Olobe Bichti, for Sporting Rifle* 00 

▲(UiutaMe Target BMk Bicht 3.40 

Teleaoope Blchta, for Rifle* 80.00 

All FiatoU, Rifle* and Oubines, are forniihed with a Bullet Mould, Bcrew Driver and Nipple 
Wrench, ttee of oharge. 

All Shot Oune are flimiabod with Wad Cutter, Screw Driver and Nipple Wrench, free of charge. 



« »«» I 



3E1LZ0 3ES IS 

OF 

Colt's Patent Combustible Envelope Cartridges. 

PACKED IN WATER PROOF CASES. FOR AIL OF THE ABOVE ARMS. 

PISTOLS, Old Model Pocket t 81-lOOths of an inoh Calibre, in package* of 1,300. . . .per thouaand, S14.00 

" " Navy or Belt.... 86-lOOtha " " " 1,200.... " 16.60 

" " ArmyorHol«ter44-100tha " " " 1,200.... " 18.60 

" New Model Pocket..... 366-lOOOtha " •• " 1,000.... " 11.60 

" " " 81-lOOth* " •' " 1,000.... " 14.00 

" " Police ao-lOOth* " " " 1,000.... " 16.60 

" " Navy or Belt.... 88-lOOth* " " " 1,200... " 16.60 

" " ArmyorHoliter.44-100th» " " " 1,200.... " 18.80 

RIFLES AND CARBINES 86-lOOtbs " " " 1.200.... " 18.00 

" 44-100th» " " •' 1,200.... " 22.00 

" " 66-lOOth* " " " 1,000.... " 2600 

SHOT GUNS, I with Shot from Na(60-100th* " " " 1,000.... " 2760 

" " J StolOBuck |76.100th* " " " 1,000.... " 82.60 

TERMS CASH, PAID ON DELIVERY, IN NEW YORK FUNDS. 



• A Shot Gun of 00-lOOth* of an ineh diameter Calibre la alao manuflMtnred, the prioe of which la #9.80 
leH than the «ame length of the other Calibre. 

t Order* for Cartridge* for "Old Model Pocket Piatol," *hoiild ipeclQr the kumbkb of Shot*. 



, I 



cxx 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTOBT. 



3m A.. WI^V & OO. 



Manufacturers of every Variety of 








6r?. 



WAKBANTED SUPERIOR TO ANT IN USE. 

MANUFACTORY AND OFFICE, 
CORNER JOHN & FRONT STREETS. 



Patent Planing and Matching Machines, all 
sizes. Patent Scroll Sawing Machines, all 
sizes. Patent Car Boring and Mortis- ■■;", 
ing Machines, Patent Huh Boring 
and Mortising Machines, Pa- 
tent Door and Sash Power 
Mortising Machines, 
Patent Chair Mortising and Boring Machines, Patent 
Iron Frame Tenoning Machines, Patent Iron 
Frame Sash and Moulding Machines, Patent 
Iron Frame Upright Shaping and Mould- 
ing Machines, Patent Iron Frame Cir- 
cular Ripping Saws, Patent Iron , , ^ : 
FramyC Railway Cutting Off 
Saws, Patent Vertical Re- 
Sawing Machines, 
Patent Circular Re-Sawing Machines, Daniels* Pa- 
tent Planing Machines, all sizes, Doane^s 
Patent Stave and Barrel Machines, 
Shafting, Hangers, Pulleys, ^c. Sec. 

J. A.. FAY Sc CO., OIlVCI]V]VA.TI, O. 



ADVERTISING OEPARTMKNT. / 



CXXI 



A. B. SANDS & 00. 

Xmporten and WholoMiIe Dealers in 



rii0#^ IJeirfiitiierii^ 




GLASSWARE, PAINTS, 





«:, 








AND 



Nos. 139 as(J 141 WIIUAM STREET, 



jsriBiXKr 



SSENTIALi OILS 

OF A.IL.L KIISTDS. 



.tLECT POWDERS, WARRANTED PURE, OF OUR OWN POWDERING. 



Particular attention pud to the prompt and thorough execuiicm and paokbg of 
Orders for the Pacific Coast. 



lii 



1^ 



m 



cxxu 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBBOTORT. 



PROTIDSIirOB 

TOOL COMPANY, 

PEABODY BREECH LOADING FIRE ARMS, 

For Infantry & Cavalry Service, and for Sporting Purposes, 
PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND, U. S. A. 

ESTABLISHED, 1845. 

JOHN B. ANTHONY, TBEASUBEB. 

Orders are Solicited for the following 



3 

Tackle Hooks and Thimbles, (black or galvanized) Match or Sister Hooks and 
Thimbles, (black or galvanized) Swivel Hooks, (black or galvanized) Wrought 
Iron Open and Welded Thimbles, (black or galvanized) Galvanized Malleable 
Iron Closed (Light, Heavy, Extra Heavy, Navy, and Lipp or Saddle) Thimbles, 
Brass Thimbles, Barrel or Cant Hooks, Common and Improved (chain) connect- 
ing Shackles, CUnch Rings, (plain or galvanized) Rigger Screws, Police Hand- 
Cuffs and Ankle-Shackles, Superior and Common Ship-Scrapers, (light and heavy 
blades) Marline Spikes, (black and polished) Caulking, Dumb, Bent, Spike and 
Reefing Irons, Live Oak Caulking Mallets, with Steel Rings. 

Penfield's Patent, Conical-pointed, Rolled-Rim Brass Grommets, Sheet Brass, 
Eyelet, Navy and Mail Bag Grommets, Setting-Dies and Cutting Punches for do. 

Grommet Rings, Ring, Heart, Topsail or ip, (with bar) Bridle or ship, 
(with bow) and Spectacle or Jib, Clews, (black or galvanized) Bur Mine Leaders, 
&c. . <. 



Comprising Nuts, Washers and Bolts, Chain Links, Chains, Plate Hinges (fast 
and loose joint) Pick Axes, (American and Swedes Iron, cast steel points) 
Threshing Machine Teeth, Superior Adze Eye Nail and Rivet Hammers, made 
from steel of our ovm manufacture, Tinned-Rings for Factory Cans, Stirrups and 
Levers, Machmisis' Tools, Cotton Machinery. 



ADVERTISINQ DEPARTMENT. 



CXXIU 




y 






OF 



WARRENS' 

B O O I" $ W C 

Are now in use throughout the United States, 

upon the most costly Public and 

Private Structures. 

By Twenty Years' actual test, its merits have been 

established as a Valuable and 

Durable Roofing. 

Ninety of the largest Mannfactnring Corporations in the New England States hare more than 
2,500,000 square feet of surface covered with Warrens' Roofing, many thousand feet of which has 
replaced Tin. 

WARRENS' ROOFING is both WATER-TIGHT and FIRE-PROOF. 

It will not expand and contract with heat and cold, liico metal roofs. ^ - 

One inch to the foot is all the inclination required on the roof. ,. 

It can be walked upon without injury. 

It can be used for drying purposes. 

It is not affected injuriously by changes of temperature. 

It is adapted to every climate. l < • ' 

It is not injured by the jarring of machinery. 

It will bear more than double the heat of zinc, tin, or galvanized iron, without danger to the 
boarding beneath it. 

Firemen can stand upon it in perfect security, and control the fire in adjoining buildings. 

It will withstand the action of chemicals in buildings where the same are manufactured or used ; 
and is not affected by gas which rises in founderios, blacksmith shops, etc. 

It is a non-conductor of heat. 

Upper rooms are cooler in summer, and warmer in winter, than with any-other materials. 

Its Cost is very much less than that of any other fire-proof in use. 

Insurance is effected in the best offices in the United States and abroad, at same rates as on build- 
ings covered with other fire-proof materials. 

MANUrACTURID BY THK 

IVomr ZSngland Folt Roofing Oompany^ 

B I^IBKRXY SQUARES. BOSTOM^. 






\ii 



' t. 

M 



CXXIV 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIREOTOBT. 



EVEREH STETSON, 

WALPOLE, MASSACHUSETTS, 

MACHINE 











OF EVERT DESCRIPTIOH. FOR 

COTTON AND WOOLEN MACHINERY, 

Diamond Pointed and Stripped Clothing, 

FANCIES AND DOFFER RINGS, &c, &c. 






ASD 



AX EXTENSIVE BEFERENCE OIVEN IF DESIRED, 



ADVERTISINa DEPARTMENT. 



CXXV 



MATHABD ft NOTES' 





Testimony of Parties who have used it for more than a Quarter of a Oentnry. 

Registrt of Deeds Office, Boston, Jan. IO»h, 1859. 
Messrs. Matnabd & Notes : Gentlemen — I am glad that longer<use of your Writing Ink 
enables me to repeat the testimony given in its favor many years ago. I have used it in this office 
thirty-seven years, and my oldest records are as legible ana black as when first written. This rare 
quality for permanence renders it invaluable for State and County Records, and all mercantile pur- 
poses where it is important that the writing should remain legible and unchanged in color by the 
lapse of time. 

Henry Allinb, TZe^wtcr o/'Z)ecds. 

BowDOiN Public School, Boston, Jan. 7, 1857. 
Messrs. Matnard & Noti s : Gentlemen— I have used your Ink in the Writing Department of 
this School the past thirty years, and take great pleasure in renewing my testimonial of its superior 
quality. It flows freely from the pen, its color is brilliant and permanent, and it combines all the 
necessary and desirable qualities of good Ink. ' 

James Bobinbok, Writing Master. 

The following extract of a letter from a well known and long established bookseller in Dover, N. 
H., is like many others often received, and will be found to express the opinion and correspond with 
the experience of a large number in the business : 

After trying various kinds of Ink, most of my customers come back to yours. I am tired of the 
miserable compounds offered every little while pretending to be superior to all other Inks, and will 
have nothing further to do with them. I have used your Ink on my books over twenty-six years, 
and my customers can see how it stands against time. Entries made in IS32 are us fresh as those 
made during this year. E. J. Lane. 

Dover, N. H., October 16th, 1858. 



MAYNARD & NOYES' COPYING INK. 

This Ink yields a copy as distinct and perfect as the original. It also combines all 
the properties of our Writing Ink, for which it can be substituted. 

MAYNARD & NOYES' CARMINE INK. 

This article is a beautiful red or crimson color, and surpassingly brilliant and rich. 
It is free from sediment, and will not mold, fade or turn dark by exposure to the air. 



The above popular Inks, together with 

Blue, Red, Indelible and Stencil Ink, Chemical Writing Fluid, Ink, Powder, &c. 

For sale by the Manufacturers, 

75 AND 77 WATER STREET, - - BOSTON, 

And by all Stationers and Booksellers in California. 



it 



i 



ii;. 



i\ 




CXXVl 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 



A@M01IITOEAI WAREHraSE. 




(SacoesMTs to Oliver Ames & Boni, and Nonne, Mason & Oo.) 

QUINOY HALL, over Quinoy Market, and No, 53 Beekman St., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



NEW YORK CITY. 



Manufacturer*, Wholesale and Retail Oealcro In Agrlcultuml Implements and Machines of every variety. Eagle 
Cost Plows, Boston Clipper Steel Plows, Ames' Shovels and Spades, Mowing Machines, Heaping Machines, Horse 
Powers, Threshing Machines, &c. tiarden, Omss, Field and Flower SeeJs. 

Manufiustories at Worcester and Oroton Junction, MassachoBetts. 



VOIiNET inr. MASON, 

MANUFACTDRER OP 

PATENT FRICTION PULLIES. 

ALSO, 

PATENT FRICTION GOnPLINGS 

FOR STARTING MACHINERY WITHOUT SUDDEN SHOCK, 

Saving wear and tear of machinery and belting. It is now; six years since wo first commenced their manofltcture 
and we are able to refer to nearly all our Eastern mechanics and manufactures who are conversant with their 
utility ,;among which are Corliss Steam Engine Co., Providence ; Tatham & Brothers, Now Yoric City ; Smith k 
Jewell, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Lowell Machine Shop, Lowell, Mass.; Wm. Sellers & Co., Philadelphia, Penn., etc 

Circulars, describing and illustrating them more fully, with prices, &c., sent on application. They are es- 
pecially useful on heavy machinery, such as for hoisting for Mining purposes, for Flour Mills, Grist Mills, Saw, 
Mills, Paper MiliSv^rint Works, BIcachories, in Factories for starting lines of shafting, or stopping without 
hindrance to motive power, and thousands of places which cannot bo enumarated here. 

Parties ordering or desiring further information, will please give fUll description as to size of shaft, diameter 
and width face required, space occupied, speed to run and power transmitted, ke. 

All ordei? o<. correspondence will receive prompt attention. 



ADDBKSS, 



VOLNEY W. MA.S01V, 

FBOVISBirOZ], B. I. 



V 



Si 



No. ( 



B 



M 



Ova 

ai 



Wa 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMBNT. 



CXXVU 



T7«r. C. DONALD A CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

COMMON" A-ISTD 

Superior Printing Inks 

FINE CUT AND BOOK INK, / ^ 

COLORED INKS AND VARNISHES, 

FRENCH LITHOGRAPHIC INK, 

COLD SIZE AND BRONZES. 

No. 9 Spring Lane, Boston. Factory at Andover. 



WILLIAM C. DONALD. 



CHARLES H. INGALLS. 






3Sd:AJN-0-rA.OTXJIlBIiS OF 

Coot's Patent Boring Mploments, 



— AND — 



MECHANICS' TOOLS 



I ■»» ■ 



Oval and Bevel Back Socket Framing Chisels, Socket Firmer Chisels 

and Gouges, Socket Faring Chisels, Drawing Knives, Screw Drivers, 

Augers and Bits, Bung Borers, Boring and Mortising Machines, 

Q-imlets, Steel and Iron Squares, Firmer Chisels and 

Gouges, Hollow Augers, Cork Screws, &o. 

WarehoHse, 70 Beekman St., New York. 



I ! 



CXXVIU PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRKOTORT. 



BAEDER & ADAMSON, 



MAxvi'ACTunEna of 



Gi.ni:^ oeimATIIv^ 




Emery Paper tS Emery Cloth, Ground Flint and Emerj/, Plasterers* 
and Saddlers' Hair, and Neats* Foot Oil* 



J^eui fUjo/^t, Jfa. b'J %ee.kin.an. SPti^et, LeLaui ^aLd, 
%a8.tan, Jfa. i^ %lack&tarLe SFt^eet, 
^hliadel/ihla, jTa. 730 jL.L^ket &t^eet. 

The Highest Prices given for Glue Pieces, Damaged Hides, Cattle Tails, Horns, Bones, Ccroons, &c. 
CHAKI.ES BAEDEB. 'WII.I.IAlf ADAMSOBT. 



Orum, Armstrong & Justi, 



S20 ARCH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Manuractnrers of all kinds of ^ 

porceimAin teeth, 

And also of the Celebrated Justi Star Patteim 
Section Teeth for Rubber Base, and Deal- 
ers in Gold Foil, Instruments, and 
all Goods used in the Den- 
tal Profession, 

RE Mcdonald & CO.and J. h. a.foleers, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF OUR TEETH. 



ADYBRTISINQ DB-PARTMKNT. 



CXXIX 



ft* 



IiABOR mADE EAST 

BY THE UNEqUALED AND JUSTLY CELEBRATED 

UiiionVasliiDg-IaGliuie anl CHes-Vrw. 

THE BEST IN THE WORLD! 

FIRST PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED IN EUROPE AND AMERICA. 

Warhantkd to wash perfectly, without soaking, rubbing, or boiling, and with but little labor or soap. 

Tho I/y I0\ WHIHOBIR lias a galvanized trams, cog-wheels, and pure rubber rolls; will tit any kind 
of tub or box, and is admitted to be tho oest and most durable made. 

These Machines are the most popuhkr in the United States, and have the laboebt balk of Washing 
Machines in the World, because they give univbbbal BATiarAOTiOM. 

17- ■Lj,Ta:EiRA.iu rrERMs to mix: I'ltA.Dz:. 



LAUNDRY WORK M. DE EAST! niONIN0 WTTHOUT HEAT! 

MMGLES OF ALL KINDS, ENGLISH AND AMERICAN. 

For smoothing or ironing every kind of plain household Linen. Suitable for Hotels, Institutions, and Private 
Families. 

23 CORTLANDT STREET, NEW YORK. 



1». I.. HARRIS. 



R. F. HAWKIW8. 



D. L. HARRIS & 00. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




If Hi 



i 



mu 



%nm AND nmtvi nm%, 

iiliiEi. TUill»TiiLEI 



»f 



(W. H. BURRALiI., Sup^t.) 

SPRINaFIELD, MA.SS 



9 



;P 









I 



^1, 



cxxx 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Witherby, Rugg & Richardson, 

MAinrrAOT0BlIB8 OF 
SUCH AS 

WOODWORTH PLANING, 

TONGUEING AND GROOVING MACHINES, 

Power MortlBO Machines^ Ac. 

24 AND 26 CENTRAL, CORNER UNION STREET, 
• WORCESTER, MASS. 



I.. B. WITHEItB-r. 



O. J. KVOO. 



•. X. KICHABltSOH. 



TXZE 



COLUMBIAN HETAL WORKS, 



MAyvrAOTvxESB or 



SKAMLiESS ROIiIiKD 

BM%% AHB COPPIR f UBIKS, 

For Locomotive and Marine Boilers, 

Copper Tubing for Ingress and Feed Pipes, Coils for Vapcuum Pans, Stills, and 
all other Coppersmith work. Tinned Copper Tubes for Brewing Pipes, Brass 
Condenser Tubes Tinned, Brass Tubes of Perfectly True Bore for Pump Cham- 
bers. Brass Tubes for Railing and Ornamental work. Tubing made by this 
Company being rolled, and not drawn, is perfectly homogeneous, and when an- 
nealed is sufficiently malleable to bend into any crook desired. 

M. M. FREEMAN & CO., AGENTS, 

NO. 436 BROOME STREET, 
Near Broadway, NEW YORK. 



ADVBRTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



CXXXl 



R. GSTBRBROOK A OO. 

STEEL PEN HANUFACTURERS. 

'WORKS, CAM:r>ElV, N. J. 

WAREHOUSES, 51 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK, 

AND 403 ABOH STREET, FHILADELFHIA. 

Samples and prices on application. Lots made to order of any pattern or stamp required. 



GOL» AND SILVER REFINER 



AND 



NO. 5 WORCESTER STREET, PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

Particular attention giving to Anaying and making estimates oftlie value of Ore*. The most refVactory Ores 
of Uold and Silver worked en the most improved ana economical plan. 



JOHN ROBERTS, 

PRACTICAL ORGAN RUILDER 

IN ENGLAND AND THE UNITED STATES 

ripe Organs of any ilimenslons unsurpassed Iri mechanical skill, quality of materials, and artistic perfection of tone 
built on reasonable terms. 

Beferenoes: 

a. J. WKIin.Frofessor of Muflic, 118 Mt. Vernon street, Hostun; O. F. ROOT, Professor and I'ublUber of Music, 
Clarke street, ChlcaKO; L.OWKLL MASON, Ur. of Music, Oranse, N. J. : H. U. THUNDER, l>rofC8Sor ofMuslc. Mouth 
4th street, Phlladelnhla; C1IA8. O. 80WKK, Esq., Publisher, ST North 3d street, Philadelphia; THOS. T. MASON, Esq., 
Dry lioods, 420 Market street, Philadelphia; A. W. KA NO, Heaters, Ac, 124 North «th street, Philadelphia; Rev. 
ALFRED COORMAN, 2023 Wallace street, Philadelphia; Rev. PATRICK STANTON, Ht Augustln's, 4th street, 
Philadelphia. Manufactory comer Orthodox and Penn Streets, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 



SAW MAKING, 1806. SPRING MAKING, 1842. STEEL MAKING, 1845. 

»»» 

Shovel Iron in Sheets, Iron Flow Plates, Steel Cultivator Teeth, Blister, Cultivator, Hoe, Flow, 
Spring, Sleigh Shoe, Tiro, Toe Calking, Saw, Shovel and Scabbard Steel. 

OOAOH SPBINOS, AND MILL AND OBOSS OUT SAWS, 

MA-lVXIFACXUFtED BY WBI. ROWLAND &, CO. 

048 Beaoli Street* Pbiladelpbila. 

An experience of twenty-four years has satisfied us that Swedish Steel makes the best SPRIKG. We use 
no other kind oi Steel. 



ii 



CXXXll 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 




Have been familiarly known to the American public for upwards of 
three-quarters of a century. They speak their own praise where- 
ever planted. . • 

Our WHOLESALE PRICE LIST, published for the trade only, 
will be mailed to all Country Merchants, Booksellers, Druggists or 
regular Seedsman, who apply. 

MARKET GARDENERS, to whom Pure and Reliable Seeds 
are of the first importance, will be supplied on favorable terms. 

PRIVATE FAMILIES, resident in localities remote from par- 
ties who vend our Seeds, will be supplied (by mail, post-paid, or 
express) with Seeds of quality seldom equaled. 

LAPBETH'S RURAL REftlSTER, 

PUBLISHED ANNUALLT, 

Containing numerous Hints on Horticulture, will be mailed to all applicants. 



NOS. 21 AND 23 SOUTH SIXTH STREET, 



ADVKRTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



CXXXUl 



GENERAL. COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

wo. ao PI.ATT ■THBET, HRW YORK. 

Fartioular Kttontion paid to FurohMlng Ooodi on Orders. 
Rrfkrkmcer.— DodRe, Gilbert A Co., Ilnfitnn, Mru. ; New England, Bntt Co., Provlilnnco, R. I. ; lillvcn & Mead, 
KowYork; RurKcnt ft Co., New York; TrowlirUlKP, Wilcox A Co., Detroit, Mlcb.; Tuttiv, llibbard A Co., Cblcago, 
III. ; llammcnd a Co., Nacramcnto, t'al. ; Win. Ilnfen >t Co., Han Kranclwo, Cal. 

Dr. B. B. Smith's Direct and To-and-Fro Onrrent Eleotro-Hagnetlo MaoMnei, for Medical Fnrpoiea. 

" The arrangement nftho Direct Circuit In Hmlth'a apparatui glvoi a much utronger phynlologlcal effect than I have 
seen (Vom any other apparntua. The Iniluced Current In extremely Intenae."— JJ. Silnman, Jr., I'rofcuor of General 
and Applied ChemlatrV, Yale Colleite, Cnim., .Inly, \m».* 

The »<)-ciillod Hlx <furrent« made hy illllercnt rombinalioni nfthrtt diilinfl heUctt, wernmndo many yenrii aijo hy .1. 
Jewell ft Co., Ilrlatol, Conn. The Six Currents, no-called, were made by mynclf aomo yeara before Jewell A Co. I called 
It the Torpedo Magnetic Machine, from Ita glvinu nut ahocka from all parta of It like tno torpedo. 

" I have had one of Dr. R. It. Hmlth'a Torpedo Magnetic Muchlnca In my poaacaalon ten year*. Six ihocka or more 
may bo obtained from It."- A. V. Nrteton. l\)r. Newton la proprietor of the "Drit(igi»ti' Cireulnr."'i 

I never applied for a patent for thU alx-curreiit contrivance. All the-' alx currenta can be obtulncd from my Direct 
and To-and Kro Current, by meana of a bit of auiall wire, Ave Inchea long, nttiiched iiceonlliiu to the dlrcutloiiii In my 

Samphlrt. I'rlce flH and t'iO. Extra oHIco alzo,t4S. Hunt to all piirta. I'ayment can be niaile to r.xprena Auenta on 
cllveryofgooda. Addreaa, Dft. S. II. HMITH.MH) Uroauway, N. Y. 

*I could give the tcatlmony ofone hundred phyilclani, and othen, but I adduoo that ofl'ruf. Sllllman alone, ai all- 
f ufflclcnt for my purpose. 



''It mrorks Uko a dharm/' 



HAOIC 
(3D £2 £2a 



PAIN 
KIL.L.INO 

MAOIC 



MAOIC 
CD £2 £2a 3 



THE •WONDER OF THE "WOIllL.D. 

Clean, dellclouaand aafotouae, and curea pain In any nnrt of the body aa walernnenchcs lire. Try it. It Is better 
for you than your money. DIrectlona with each bottte, now to uae Renne'a I'ahi-KiUlnK Manic Oil externally and In- 
ternnlly. Everv family should keep It In tne houae. All trnvelera ahould have thiA Ma^lc Oil with them. Everybody 
la liable to accident, to Hpralna, Headache, Toothache, Colic, Cholera Morbus, Cholera, Hnilaeti Iturna, Rheiimatlam, 
Ncuralfila, Coldaln the Head, Akuc In the Face, LumcueaH, Sciatica, Kits, I'olMonl Alltheae the Mnulc Oil curea! and It 
la now known to be the best Remedy In the world. A bottle of Kennr'a .Ma^Mc Oil la a perfect " Self, Health Insurance 
Company "—so the people aay. There la health, beauty, and happy home, sealed u|) in every bottle, waltluK for you, 
Beaaer. Inquire for It where you trade. Hold by Drugglats, Blerchants and Oroccrs, who are my Auenta throuKhout 
the country. WM. KEN NE, Solo Vroprlctor, rittatleld, Mass. 

Demas Hames ft Co., Whc'csah^ Agents, N.Y.: Geo. C. Goodwin ft Co., do do, Uoston; J. L. Thompson, Sons ft 
Co., do do, Troy ; Crane ft llriijliHin, do do, Han Francisco, Cal. 



IMPORTER or AMD DKALKR IN 

inOTV, STEEL. ^IVD 34 E T .A. L S . 

— ALSO, — 

MANUFACTURERSS MECHANICS', ENGINEERS', MINERS' AND RAILRO.U) SUPPLIES, 

N, K. CORNER THIRD AND WILLOW STREETS, PHILADELPHIA. 



THE PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL & LIFE ILLUSTRATED. 



8. XI. 'WSXiX.S, 



— COMTAINB — 



szsproxi. 



Xthnology.— The Natural History of Han; nations and races described. FhysioIOKy.— Heart, Lunfrs, 
Stomacli, lionos, Muscles, and Nervous System. Phrenology.— Temperamonts, Intellectual, Social and Itt>- 
lijirlous Nature. FhysiOKnomy, with " Signs of Character, and How to liead them." Eyes, Ears, Nose, 
Lips, Mouth, 7Iead, Uair, Eye-brows, Hands, Feet, Skin, Complexion. Fsyohology, the '-Science of the 
Soul," Han's relations to this life, and the life tu cnmo. Published monthly, in quarto form, at $2 a year. 
Sample numbers by first post, 20 cents. Address FOWLER & WELLS, 889 Broadway, N. Y. 



DEPOT OF THE SANTA CLARA FLOTJB MILLS, 



AND DEALBRB IN 




223 ClAY STREET, BELOW FROKT, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Liberal cash advances made on consignments, and Storage furnished at lowest rates. 



■::i 



CXXXIV 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIKBCTORT. 



H. H. BANCROFT AND COMPANY, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



BOOKSELLERS 



• AND- 



STATIONERS, 

609 Montgomery St., and 607-617 Merchant St. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



< »»» > 



Offer one of the most Complete Stocks in the World ; at wholesale, where dealers can 
supply themselves with everything they may wish in the Book and Stationery line ; and at 
RETAIL, where all can purchase in any quantity desired, from a single Toncil and quire of Paper 
to the fitting out of a Bank or Merchant's Counting Room, or from a Primer to a Complete 
Library in any department of Literature. 

The Business is divided into NINE DEPARTMENTS and a Catalogue of each Depart- 
ment is published, which will be furnished on application. 

L MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS— Eighteen f.ubdivisions in this Catalogue, and a very full 
and complete stock always on hand. 

II. SCIENTIFIC BOOKS— A very complete Catalogue of 58 pages octavo. 

III. SCHOOL BOOKS— All the School Books used on the Pacific Coast. Publish the pop- 

ular Clarke's Geographies. / . • '. 

IV. LAW BOOKS — Publish all the California Law Books, besides others especially adapted 

tr the Pacific Coast. . A large stock of Reports, Statutes, Digests and Text 
Books always on hand. 

V. MEDICAL BOOKS — / cop-.plete assortment of both American and English Works. 

VI. RELIGIOUS BOOKS— Bibles, Prayer Books, Hymn Books, Sunday School Libraries 
and a full assortment of Religious Literature. 

VIL SUBSCRIPTION BOOKS— Works sold only by Subsc; >tion, by Traveling Agents. 
Canvassers wanted all over the Coast Good profits for good industrious men. 

VIII. BLANKS— Law, Commercial and Mercantile Blanks. 

IX. STATIONERY— Blank Books, all kinds of Paper, Printers' Material, and everything 
in the Stationery Line. 

Printing, Engraving and Manufacturing done w order, in the best manner, on short notice. 

Country Orders will receive prompt attention. Books, etc., sent by Express or Mail to any of 
the Pacific States or Territories. . 



Consignments of Books and Stationery respectfully solicited. 

H. H. BANCROFT & CO., 



BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS, 

San Francisco. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



R. A. SWAIN A CO. 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEATKRS IN 

CROCKERY, GLASS WARE, 

White and Decorated Cl&iiia^ 




DXlVriffZZB.^ TISA 

TOILET SETS. 

VASES, &C. 

PLATED AND BRITANNIA WARE, 



KEROSENE AP OIL UMFS, UNTERNS, 

§$d #il mi ii0»I #11 ^iiiif 

N. E. Corier Pine anl Sassom Streets 

SAN FBANCISCO, CAL. 




CXXXVl PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



GUNPOWDER ! 




db aati 




FR3SSH FROM THE MILLS OF 

The California Powder Works 



fo:r bax^e b's* 



mwrn R is@®ii» J s imt 



'9 



No. 318 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



DAVID MEKK^R,) San Francisco 
a. COBBi:.£l>ICK, S Cal. 



wii:.i:.iAH JAMES, JNy^y''' 

MEEKER, JAMES & CO. 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

DEALERS IN 

WAGON AND GMRIAGE HATERIAm 

12 AND 14 PmrS STREIET. 








ISl Front Street, 

(Bet. Oalifdmia & Fine Bti. ) ,v ^o 




ADVERTISINQ DEPARTMBNT. 



CXXXVU 



LEATHER, HIDES, OILS & TALLOW, 

ASH IXPORTEBS or 

TAMEBS' AND OUBBIEBS' TOOLS AND MATERIALS, 
., 422 BATTERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, GAL 

JAMES ir. cox, Late Cox, WiUcott & Co. 



A. C. inCHOI.8. 



, ii;: i-'i 



E. T. DVItl.ET', 




DUDLEY & eERHABDT, 

IHPOBTBR8 OF AND DBALBBB IN 



C. OEBHARDT. 




Q^ 



6g) 



AJtm 



Ho. 404 BattersT Street, 

BUILDINO CORNER OF CLAY, 

^ SAN PEANOISCO, CAL. 



J^ 



Q§ 



ei^ 



d^ 



IMPOBTEKS OF ASTD DEAI^EKS IIT 

FUBNITURE, BEDDIN<3-, 

AND 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 

740 WASHINGTON STilEET, opposite the Plaza, 
And 638 HABKET STREET, 

H, HORSTMANN. p. HITFSCHMIDT. 




! i 



m 



cxxxviii 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORY. 




*S- HISTORY 

OF XXZS 




Located East Side of Napa Valley, 
on the Side of the Mountain, 

FIVE MILES FROM NAPA CITY. 



Anai i of the Napa Soda Springs, by Dr. L. Lanbzwbbrt, Practical Chemist, San Francisco. 
Made, May, 1856: 

TEHPEKATDRB FAHK «8 

BEBIDirCM FROH STAPOKATIOS, IS A 4|rAItTER CIAI.T^Sr, OR8.1T 1* 

BICABBOWATB OF SODA U »9 

CABBOWATIi OF MAOarESIA CAS 

CAJKBOVATB OF I.IlfB • «• 

OHKiOBIBE OF SODirW ISO 

■VBOABBOVATB OF IBOV 1 Ve 

•■JI.PBATB OF SOBA O 46 

■II.ICEOIJS ACIB O IT 

AXVMiaA CIS 

X4>M oa» 



IT 1* 



We, the nndersigned, Physicians practicing in the Cit^ of San Francisco, have examined the 
resnlt of the analysis made by Dr. L. Lanszweert, Practical Chemist, of the water from the Napa 
Soda Spring of Napa. The water, according to this examination, possesses Aperient, Antacid and 
Tonic properties, which cannot fail to be very beneficial in the treatment of Chronic Diseases, and 
alfording a pleasant, healthful and invigorating beverage. 



H. M. GRAY, M. D., 
ARTHUR B. STOUT, M. D., 
CHARLES BERTODY, M. D., 



J. P. WHITNEY, M. D., 
A. F. SAWYER, M. D., 
WILLIAM O. AYRES, M. D. 



NoTfOB. — I beg to sabmit to the notice of the Public the above Analvsis of the celebrated Napa 
Soda Springs, which aspires to the general favor of Medical Men, and the same attested to by six 
of our best and most eminent Physicians, who are perfectly familiar with the medicinal properties of 
this Mineral Water — which has been extensively used for eight years with perfect success, for the 
care of Heart, Liver and Kidney Diseases, Indigestion, General Debility and Female Weakness. 
In cases of Emaciation and Debility, an increased nutrition of the body is the result of the use of 
this Water. Nothing so beneficial I The components are so perfectly united by Nature, that for a 
healthful and refreshing beverage this Water surpasses any other Mineral Water in use ; and for 
Sea Sicktirsb it is infallible. 

Allow me to invite your attention, with the request that you will give it a trial, and if you find it 
worthy, your iiifiuence. 

Steamers, Hotels, Saloons and Families will be promptly served on leaving orders at the Napa 
Soda Office, No. 333 Bush Street, opposite Occidental Hotel, San Francisco. 

J. H. TV^OOr^, r»i-opi-ietor. 

jll^ N. B. — Some Bar-keepers, and others, have imposed npon the Public by palming off other 
water for Napa Soda. Look well at the Bottle I None is genuine unless in bottles with the 
following blown in the glass : " N/ PA SODA," on one side, and " NATURAL MINERAL 
WATER," on the other side ; and the same secured as Trade Mark. J. H. W. 



ADVERTISIKO DEPARTMENT. 



CXXXIX 













In MmHi ^tjilt», mi of M (^m\xtu»f 



■A.T- 




[ESSSIORFFER 



f: 



m 



Nos. 635 and 637 Cionimercial Street, 

GSJC^SS' Z5» Q^ dSl. SS' C^ Q 683 C^ C£> o 



Our establishment being identical with the progress of San Francisco, and our 
connections and facilities in Europe and New York with the best manufacturers, 
the most complete, we can confidently recommend our assortment as the 

BEST AND LARGEST IN THIS STATE, 



And while thanking for the unprecedented large patronage during the last four- 
teen years, we shall strive to deserve a continuance of the same, 



^i 



A.T 



No. 635 & 637 Commercial St., San Francisco, 

No. 125 J Street, Sacramento, 

Corner D and Second Streets, Marysville, and 

72 Front Street, Portland, Oregon. 



cxl 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



ELIAS H. JONES. JAMES PULLMAN. 



No. 400 SANSOM STREET, 

Comer Sacramento, , SAJ\r FEAJVCISCO, 



IMPORTERS OF 



^^t$^, Imlmhm^p ^hh ^mhp 



MILLINERY AND STEAW GOODS, ,. 

POCKET CUTLERY, RAZORS, AND GENERAL FANCY GOODS. 



The attention of the trade ia respectfully invited to the above stock which, in at 
tractiveness and cheapness, is unequaled on the Pacific coast. 



H. ▲ CRANE. 



W. H. BRIGHAH. 



J. RIDDELL. 



CRAIVE A BRIGKAM^ 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS, 

Importers of and Wholesale Dealers in 

DRUGS, MEDICINES, PROPRIETORY ARTICLES, 
Fancy Goods, Druggists' Sundries, Perfumery, Sfc, 8^c. 

Corner Front and Clay Streets, San Franolsoo. 



§[0. 314 (&mmtt\^\ ft., fr«twM» §att«ry antf |v«nt, fan gxmt\%tn. 



ADVERTISINO DEPARTMBNT. 



cxli 



WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS. 



&V& ^©wwsv. 



This Favorite Besort will remain under the management of Mr. ALSTBOM. 



Having made extensive improvements on the buildings and grounds, the public can 
rest assured that their sojourn at the Springs will be made pleasant. 

J. BREMBERG & CO., - - - - PROPRIETORS. 



WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS.— This popular watering place is pleasantly situated in Napa 
Valley, about eighteen miles from Napa City, and eight miles this side of Calistoga. Springs. The 
Sulphur Springs is fast becoming a favorite resort not only for pleasure seekers, but also for those who 
would while away a few days,weeks,or months, in agreeable and pleasing recreations, free from the dust, 
care, and bustle incident to city life. Those who have not frequented the place recently will be sur- 
prised on their next visit at seeing the extensive improvements, consisting in part of the most elabo- 
rate arrangements and artistic adornments in both the buildings and grounds ; also of the excellent 
provisions made in the culinary department of the establishment. 

We can assure those who wish to spend a short period in pastime and recreation, that there is no 
place to be found on this coast that offers inducements so favorable as the White Sulphur Springs. 



JONES & WOOLL, 



Manufacturers and Importers of 



LOOKING CLASSES, 



ENGRA-VINa-S, 

Artists' Materials^ ZStc. 

643 Market Street, nearly opposite Montgomery, 

SAF EUAFGISGO. 
FACTORY : Market Street, between Seventh and Eighth. 

PL^'^^S RE-SILVERED JND FRAMES RE-GILT. 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORT, 




751 MARKET STREET, between 3d and 4tb, 

■■■ 

An Institution designed to prepare boys, young and middle-aged men, for an 
active and successful business life. 

Regular Banks and Business Offices 
liave been Intvoduced^ 

By which we are enabled to fit our students in the best possible manner and at 
the least expense of time and money for the practical duties of the counting- 
house. 

Students can enter at any time of the year, there being no vacations. 

The " College Review," giving full particulars of the Course of Instruc- 
tion, Expenses, etc., can be had free by calling at the College, or addressing 

' President Business College, 

SAN VBANCISCO. CAIi. 



AND GENERAL PURCHASING AGENT, 
51 Third Street^ San Francisco^ GaL 



DEALER IN 



Plain and Fancy Stationery, School Books, Toy Books, Songs and Song Books, 

Pocket GnUery and Pocket Ooods, Albonis and Prayer Books, Piotnres, 

Local and Eastern Papers and Periodicals, and Standard 

and Current Light Literature. 

OBJDEIta BY MAIL PXOMPTZY AXIt ACCUSATEZT ATTENDEO TO. 



PACIFIC LAW & COLLECTION OFFICE 

OF 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW. 

Frinoipal Offloe at Rooms 11, 12 and 13 Armory Hall BuildinK, S02 Montsomery Street. Ban 

Tranoisoo, Oal. Branoh Offices in all the Cities and Towna on the Fooiflo Doast. 

ISr* ColleetUtna tnade with or without suit at all points on tho Paeifle and Attantie Coastt 

and Britinh Columbia. 



REYNOLDS, REIS & CO San Francisco, Cal. 

HUNTER, WAND 4 CO " 

CHRISTY* WISE " 

HATHER A CO " " 

EBV. A. WILLIAMS " " 

T.A.MORRIS New York City, N. Y. 



Zl Z"3ED 3E1. T 

GEO. C. DAVIS, Esq Plttobnrg, Pa. 

JOHN P. LOO AN, Esq '. Philadelphia, Pa. 



WILLIAM FENN, Esq Peoria, 111. 

OEO. R. ECKLEY, Esq Chicago, III, 

QiN. A. 8. BURNETT New Albany, la. 

Hon. J. M. EDMUNDS Washington, D. C 



ADVERTISINQ DEPARTMKNT. 



cxliii 



TXr. H. RICHARDS « CO. 

Importers of and Dealers in 




(IN BULK AND BOTTLED). 

No. 708 SANSOM ST, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



JOHN C. MORRISON, Jr. 

IMPORTER OF AND WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

FINE WINES & LIQUOES, 

614 FRONT STREET, 



JOHN SAULNIER & CO. 










OLIVE OIL, FRUITS, ETC. 

No. 719 Sansoffl Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



C. J. E. FAHLSTEN & CO, 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 








5^ 



THSEE D00B8 BELOW HONTOOMEBT, 



SAI2 ]?ai!Lia®ai(3®p Sikllai: 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 




IS. cf3 O". SI. Z>C>3SS^ 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTDRERa OF 

1% WIMBOWi MB iOIi 

AT. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 

!N"orth Side of Market Street, 

AT THE JUNCTION OF CALIFORNIA, 



JOHN HALL & SON, 

IMPORTERS OF AlTD DEALERS IN 

NOS. 11 AND 13 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

ISTos. 114= and 116 Market Street, 

ARimSS A DAImIiABI, 



IUFORTER8 AND JOBBERS OF 



BRUSIIE:S, TWIIVES, CORO AGE, &c. 

AND MANUFACTURERS OP 

Brooms^ Pails^ Tubs^ ITITashboards^ &c> 

215 AND 217 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

Between From and Davis, SAN FRANCISCOf CAL. 



LEilTHER HOSE & l&m/SM& 

OF .A.XmXm SX^SIS, 

SUCTION HOSE, HORSE COLLARS, ETC. 

MANUFACTURED AND SOLD BY 

801 BATTERY STREET, SUN FRANCISCO, CAL 



>BK. M. COOK. 



I. BT. COOK. 



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ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



cxlv 



FRISBEE A SCOTT, 














AIV» IMPORTER* OF 



^i»^ 

WHOLESALE AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF 

Wm. Knate & Go's nnrivalM Grani, Spare anA npriilit Pianos. 




SALESROOMS: No. 139 KEARNY STREET, Cor. Sutter 

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cxivi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



WM. H. KEITH & CO. 

m. 52^ MOHTGOMEBY STREET, 



Between Clay and Comrocrcial, 



SAX FBANCI8CO, CAL. 



t »»» » 



ESPECIAL ATTEJ^TIOJT GIVEjY TO THE COM- 

POUJ^DIMG OF FHYSICIAJ^S' PRESCRIP- 

TIOJ^S, AJVD PREPARATION^ OF FAMILY 

MEDICIJ^ES. 

IMP0KTER8 OF FIRST QUALITY OF T. 

MGUICINES, CHEMICALS, SUEICAL & DENTAL INSTRUMENTS, 

THE GENUINE FARINA COLOGNE, 

LUBIN'S EXTRACTS, LOW'S OLD BEOWN Wr OR SOAP, &o. 



< »«» t 



Particular attention paid to replenishing Family 
and Ships* Medicine Chests, 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

WM. H. KEITH & CD'S WINE OF PEPSINE, OR RENNET WINE, 

A New and Efficacious Remedy for Dyspepsia, Gastralgia, etc. 

WM. H. KEITH & GO'S GLUCOLEIN, 

A Now and Valuable Compound of Cod Liver Oil, put up in Glass Jars. 

Wm. H. Keith & Co's Lemon Aperient, or Purgative Lemonade, 

An Agreeable, Cooling and Active Purgative, or Mild Laxative, as required. 

JDEVIIVE'S PITCH LOZEIVGES, 

For the cure of Coughs and Colds. 

WM. H. EEITM & CO'S FLORENTINE TOOTH WASH, 

WM. H. EEITH & GO'S OBANULAB EFFEKVESOEBT OITBATE OF MAONESIA. 

WM. H. KEITH & GO'S SAPONACEOUS TOOTH POWDER. 

Wm. H. K@Ct(ti & Co*8 Btosecnairv and Gastor QEI MiaEii' Dnvtsorator. 
WM. H. KEITH & CO'S AURANTINE, 

For the immediate removal of Grease and other Spots from Clothing, &c. 
A New and Delicioiis Perfume for the Handkerchief. 



C^ Physicians and others, at a distance, ordering Goods from us, can depend npon having their 
orders filled witli the same regard to Quality and Price as though obtained in person, and we feel 
confident of giving satisfaction in every case. 



, 



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ADVERTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



cxlvii 



PALMER, mm ft m. 







Nos. 19, 21, 23 and 25 FIBST STREET, 

t m I 

MANUFACTURE ALL. KINDS OF 




ZLX .^ O ZX I 3>J E3 

STEAM ENGINES & QUARTZ MILLS ; 

DUNBAR'S IMPROVED 

Self-A^usting Piston Packing, 

Renuires no springs or sorews ; is always steam- 
tight ; without cxccHsivo friction, and never gets slack 
or leaky. 

WHEELEP. & RANDALL'S 

JfEW aHIJfBEIl AND AMALGAMATOH, 

Hepburn & Peterson's Amalgamator and Separator, 

TYLER'S IMPROVED WATER WHEEL. 

Giving the greatest power, at lower cost, than any Wheel in use. There arc over 1,500 running. 

KNOX'S IMPROVED PATENT AMALGAMATOR & SEPARATOR, 

With Palmer's Patent Bteam Chamber or Die. 

This cut rppro«Piit« an Amalitntnator and 
Si'piirator tlmt hus stood tlic test of ekiht 
TKAHS" pnu'tlcal workiiiK In tliogold mines 
of IJulltornln, and for nearly the same time 
In the 8llver mines of Nevudu, having been 
Introduced Into the first stenm mills built 
In the then Terrltorv, since which time thev 
hiivc been sncceflsnilly worklnR uguinst all 
competition. The great advantaitui these 
Amalgamators have over any others, arc— 

1st. Mt;<^H LEMS <?OgT. 

2il. They do nut "Hour" the mercury, 
and collect any that may have been " sick- 
ened " In the battery or Krinders, 

Sd. The " sloshlnij " motion (tiven to the 
pulp (by the revolution of the muller under 
the stationary fmme) against thcamalKani- 
Bted copper plates that arc fastened to tho 
frame, and by this means calchliit; the fine 
Rold and mercury that will not settle. 

4th. The Rate lu the conn, through which 
tho pulp is dIscharKcd, f^om the top, and 
wliere there Is the least motion, almost pre- 
cluding the possibility of any granulated 







mercury or fine gold escaping. 

Tliere are over SOO of them in use in 
California and Xevada, where those Inter- 
ested can «cc their practical worlilngs. 

Gbnuine ^YMte Iron Stamp 8hoe» 
and- Diet. 

Having been engaged for the past eight 
years In quartz mining, and being convers- 
ant with ail tho improvements, cither in 
Mining or Milling, we are prepared to fur- 
nish, at tho shortest notice, the must per- 
fect machinery fbr reducing ores, or saving 
either gold or silver. 






"i'W 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



OILS, LAMPS & LAMP STOCK 

REFINERS AND PACKERS OF 

CALIFORNIA PETROLEUM & LUBRICATING OIL 



< »»» > 



We call the special attention of Engineers, Millwrights and the trade generally, 
to the superior quality of MACHINE OIL which we are now manufacturing, and 
which we warrant to excel all other Lubricating Oils, and for sale at lower raies. 



Warehouse, San^ple Mooma and Office: 

121, 123 and 125 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Mefining Works: 

N.E. Comer Chestnut and Taylor Streets, 

gAS3 ^aAIHi3SilB®a 



I^O o 



inr C3-! 



No. 33 Market St., near Stewart, San Francisco. 



« »»— » 



NEW ROOFS PUT ON AND OLD ONES REPAIRED. 

« ».» > 

IT* This VarniBh '.. prepared reacts for use. It retains its lustre and will not &de. After trial it has 
proved a complete success. It costs less and lasts longer than any other Faint now in use for Yesscb. 
[P. O. Box 1970.] 



WXX«X.IAIffi MoKIBBIIir, 

HOXJ8E8]VriTH, 

JVo. 43 FIB8T STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, 

IRON RAILINGS, IRON STAIRS, IRON GRATINGS, IRON 
SHUTTERS AND DOORS, ETG., ETC. 



ADVBIlTISING DEPARTMENT. 



cxiix 



VULCAN IRON WORKS GO. 

ESTABLISHED, 1850. 

FIRST, NATOMA, FREMONT AND BEALE ST8. 



s.A.]^a- FHA-^^aiaao, o.A.ii~ 



mom i@OTF®iEi 



'8) 








Boiler Makers and Workers in Slieet Iron, Brass and Copper. 

. »■■ 

These Works have lately Iiecn increased by the addition of new shops on Fremont Street, doubling 
the capacity of the orip;inal establishment. Their facilities for turning out Machinery promptly and 
efficiently are now unequalcd in the State. Their Boiler Works have also been enlarged corres- 
pondingly. 

Stearasbip and Steamboat Macbinery, 

RAILROAD MACHINERY, 

LOCOMOTIVES, OAR TRUCKS, CAR WHEELS, 

FLOURINS MILLS, QnARTZ MILLS, Mkl MILLS, SAW MILLS, 

»»■ 

• 01.E MABriTFAOTIJItBItS OF 

Hepburn and Peterson's Reducing Pan and Amalgama- 
tor, Beath's Amalgamator, Hesse S; Moore's Improved 
Howell Quartz Crusher, Baux Sf Guiod's Amalga- 
mator and Separator, Jonval's Improved Water 

Wheel, Stevens' Piston Packing Mings. 

■»■ 

Particular attention IfS called to our 

References can be given to Mills and Mines, where a saving of from thirty to fifty per cent, of fhel 

ha^ been effected over other Engines. 

IMPROVED SAFETY STORE HOISTS, 

Fitted with Moore'B Friotion Fawl, unequaled for safetv, convenience and cheapness. 
The Friction Pawl can be applied to existing Hoist ways of any kind, either for hoist- 
ing in stores or in mining shafts. 

HESSE'S CONTINUOUS GBINDEB AND AMALGAMATOB, 

Capacity 10 tons per day. 

QUABTZ STAMFEBS, SHOES and DIES of a New Frooess of Oasting, 

Guaranteed to give double the wear of the nsnal White Iron Shoes. 

They have also a large assortment of Patterns for Pumping and Hoisting Machinery, Gearing, 
Pnllies, Water Mill Irons, Hydraulic and Screw Presses, Retorts, Furnaces, Grate Bars, House 
Fronts, Ornamental Fence Posts and Paling, Stove Ranges, etc., etc. 

QUARTZ S0REKN2 OF RUSSIA IRON PUNOHID TO ORDER. 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 










NATHANIEL GRAY, 



9 



G41 Sacramento Street^ 

SA.N F RA^S ^ CISC O, CA.IL.. 

THE TRADE SUPPLIED WITH . 

@ © 31" ^^ S ^1" 



AND 



EVERT ARTICLE IN THE LINE ON LIBERAL TERMS. 




@Oi:.X3 A.G-ENT' FOXl 

BAHBTOW^S 



a. S. KII.E.IP. 



EDHIJHD WATHAar. 




KIUiIP &, NATHAN, 

Mil %imi\ 







Known as the " RED STABLES," 

Nos. 704, 706 & 708 COMMERCIAL ST. 

Above Kearny, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

»♦• 

The flneet Teams nnd Saddle Horses can bcliad on ronsonablc terms. 

OABBIAQES for BalU and Parties kept constantly on handi 
BS^ Horses Bought ond Sold. |^~ Open Pay and Night 




JAMES M. ALLENp 

No. 669 MARKET STREET, 



SALE STABLE, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Cli 



SWEETT & GABSBY, 

HOUSE, SHIP, SIGN AND OBNAMENTAL 



9 



Na 28 THIBD ST., near Market, SAN FBANGISGO, GAL. 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 




JELLINEK & HABDENBUBGH, 

f OOD TOMlLPJiOll SAflEES. 

SPANISH CEDAR AND MAPIE LUMBER 

Constantly nil Imml and tiirsialc. 

A.'r.mt^^^ ZUJUVI/'ZIXi f'^STS ./kJO'SD EK./» X.aXTS'FZIZliS. 

Farticularattentlonpaldto Archltcctaral Work. Allklndaof Tiir nlngilono to order ou short iioiico. 

No. 14 CALIFORNIA STREET, RETWEEN DAVIS AND DRUMM, 

8A.N FRANCISCO, CA.11.. 



oEiz'O'r 














No. 2 IKEAIIV STRSETy 

Between Market and Mission Streets, S.A.XT f ]R.A.£TOXSOO, O.A.Xj. 

< ^ > 

A large assortment of Italian Marbles of the first 
quality and of every dimension, imported directly 
from Italy, for sale by 

BRIGNARDELLO BROS. 



,ii 



.ij, 






Olii PACIFIC COAST BUSIIfBSS DIRECTORY. 

OTIS la. BRIDGES, 

mr. p. HOFFmAiur, 








dz::^ 






J. F. HUTTOnr, 









533 EEABNY STREET, COR. SACRAMENTO, 

ROOMS 11 AND 19. 



"wx. H. ba»ox.i:y. 



n. a. TiLDBsr. 



BADGLEY & TILDEN, 

«0. 833 mmm STEEETt COHNEB ^ACBAMENTO, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 



>:v^- V ! -. -v 



HOAGLAND & NEWSOM, 












<» 



S. W. OOR. KEARNY MJ) SACRAMENTO STS, 



ADVERTISINQ DEPARTMENT. 



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ALBANY BREWERY, 

C. gPREGEEIS & CO, Fraprietnrs, 




I 





I 



This Establishment has been enlarged for the third time during the past season, and now pos- 
sesses facilities unsurpassed by any competition for the production of 

SUPERIOR CREAM ALiZ:, 

To supply the increasing demands of the Fublic. 



.O'T^aEl.' 



XZO* X80X. 



O^. ^%^EIVA.It,I> 



COFFEE AND SPICE STEAM MILLS, CREAM TARTAR, 
O .A. Zj X X* O Zt. Sa* Z U9L ACT7Sa*.^XLI>, 

Manufactured by a New Procegg, Warranted Superior. 

Nos. 625 and 627 FRONT STREET, near Pacific, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Every Package bean the Signature of the ICannfaotiirer. Beware of Oonnterfeits* 



J. m:. JOHNSOJsr, 



.A-d-SNTT FOXi TXXJEi 



prrrsBUBe coal Hmme comfant, 

(MOUNT DIABLO) 

227 JACKSON ST, near Battery, SAN FEANOISOO, UAL. 

ALL KINDS OF COAL FOR SALE. 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Jf<yiBiJSf XKTXJST'VlBiJEt, 

(ESTABLISHED 18533 

No. 208 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

IMPOUTER AND DEALER IN 



Materials for Br ewers, Tanners and Soda Manufacturers. 

J|@* Orders from any part of the Pacific Coast promptly attended to. 



L. CHASSAGNE & M. DENAVEAUX, 

BuooesBors to A. B. FAVBB, 

IMPOBTEBS AND WHOLESALE DEALEB3 IK 








IQIU0ES 



605 FRONT STREXST^ 

SAX FRANCISCO, CAL, 




A.. EBERHA-IiT, 

SrCCESSOB TO B. D. W^ILfSOW <k HOIT, 



WUULKSALE DKALEU IN 







. m. 

Agent foi Jie sale of B. D. Wilson's Wines from the 
MISSION SAN GABRIEL, LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

DGpot»S. XS. Cor. First A Market Stsi 

SA.1V FK.ANCISCO, CAT^. 



Nos. 210 and 212 PACIFIC STREET, 

Between Front and Battery, SAST IPIBiilffOIIiSlSDj, OBMio 



JOHN McMAXUS, 



PBOBBIETOB, 



Gk)od Accommodations for Families or Single Gentlemen. Board and Lodging by 

the Week, Day or HeaL 

PRICES OF SO Alio t 

Board, per Week $4.00 

Board and XjodglnR, per Day 1.00 

Board and Ijodginff, per Week 6.00 

An UmnlhU8 attends each Boat to convey Patscngcn and Baggage to the Hoase, fVeo of charge. 



ADVBRTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



clv 



UENnr nVTTOlf, jr. 



li. MeEWUlf. 



DUTTON « nnoEiiirsMp 



DEALERS IN 






PIER 7 STEWART STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



>?) 



Comer of Mission and Fremont Streets, 

MAHijim, zocoMoi'iYE, ^xf) cizz a-Ij\i>s of high 

S^nESSUStJB ST£HM SOIZEItS MA7)E. 

The Proprietor Imports Ills own C. II. nnil B. Iron ncross llio latlimn-, and TnbOB of 
every olzc. Other parties inn never liloekiidetlie uinrket. lie lias iiiailiMiiiinirenicnts 
with the best houses In the Kiist tofliriilsh hhn wltheverylhiiiK hi the shape of I run ho 
wants. All Hollers Kuarniitccd nnd tested h.v r. .>*. Holler liispeetor lnlnre they are 
suit out of the shop, at shop expense. All kinds of Sheet Iron and Water I'lpc, C'oul 
Oil Stills,Wruught Iruii Wonus,cte„inauufacturc(l tuordcr. Oli> lluri.kiis kki'Aikei). 

D. CAMKKOar. 

K. B.— Mr. Cameron nas been In this business In San Francisco for 17 years. 




PATTERN & MODEL MAKER, 

28 FREMONT STREET, OVER CITY FOUNDRY, 









SAN FRANCISCO PIONEER SCREEN WORKS, 

BEMOVED TO VULCAN IRON WORKS, 

SAN FBANCISOO, OAL. 

I am now prepared to fill orders for Flour and Rice Mill Screens, 
Smut and Cem,ent Screens, and Screens of all kinds made from all 
qualities of Materials and to any extent that may he required. 

Orders solicited and promptly attended to. 

JOHN "W. QXJICK, BCanufaotnror. 



' ■*' I 



clvi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINBSS DIRBOTORY. 



NILE & DURNEY, 



SJLH ¥ai.HGISCO, 








JL0TUEEBii 



OF ajzjT^ iki^tds of 



Looking Glass, Portrait, Picture, 



MB frnmBmAfM 



^^ 










OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

Cornices, Pier, Center Tables, &c., &c. 



Have superior facilities for manufacturing the above by 
improved machinery at their 



COE. OF CHESTNUT AND TAYLOR STEEETS, 



ADVERTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



civil 




IBS i3a 

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THE BEST AMALGAMATOR IN USE. 






& 





ELEPHANT, TANNERS', NEATSFOOT, 

Machinery and otl&er Oils^ 

The best QUALITY and Cheapest Bates, 



« »»» » 



OUTTA PEBCHA BELTINO, all sizes, at half the usual prices, to close out the lot 
Also, Agents for MoKEE'S CELEBRATED BOILER FLUID, for removing 
Scale from Boilers. 

C H. H^KRISOIV, 

Send for Circulars. 617 Front Street, San Francisco. 



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olm 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



OAIiIiAOBAN, 

MANUFACTUREB OF 

BillllirS YMSf PO WBIM, 

CREAM TARTAR, SODA AND SAL^RATUS, 



•f 



SAN FRA.N0If90O. OAX.. 

D. OAIJiAaHAN. Proprietor. 



ODD FELLOWS' AND MASONIC CLOTHING AND FDRNISHING EMPORIUM, 

No. 5 Hamnio Temple, Montgomery Street, Sui Tranoiioo, CaL 

I ^1 1 

irOBOKOSS continues to manufhcture and ftirniih CltOTniVO and KEAAI.IA of every description 
for Encampments, Degree and Subordinate Lodges, Blue Lodges, Chapters, CounolU and Commandorlei, and Invites 
the attention of the Brotherhood to bis samples nf work for the dtfTerent branches of the Order, which, fbr quality of 
material, superior workmansliip, and low price, cannot be equaled by any other House on the Paclflc Coast. 

Manufacturers and importers of BIliK and BITimSO FI.AOS> BAWSSIKS, MII^ITAKY and 
ITAV All OOOD8, and EMBBOIDEBIES, of every description, constantly on hand. SOBOBOWii 
No. 3 Montgomery Street. 

PACIFIC FBIMOE, COBB. TASSlil. AVB BDTTOV FACTOBY. Every descrlpUon of 
Ladles' Dress Trimmings on hand and made to order at 

93*0X1.0X1.000', 

9IO. S HOITTeOHEB'r STBEET, BAV FBAITCIBCO, OAI.. 



" IMttt over due beeotne doubl/Ul by delay,'* 

614 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

VOTES, DBAFTS AIVB OTEB-BUE ACCOVSTTS promptly recovered and proceeds returned 
THE DAY I'AYMKNT I.S KKCEIVED. Corrcupondcntawillbemily advisodlnregardtoclainusentmeforcoUeotion. 

Suitn cnniluctod in nil the Courtii of the State, with tlie aiil of a thoroughly qnalifled Attorney. 

rarticuliir nttentlon kIvcii to imlobtedncsa duo by incorpurated companies. 

lienta cullcctcd, and City, County and State Taxes paid in San Francisco for non-residents. 

Commissions of ii contldcntial nature prudently consummated. Liabilities compromised. 

Copies of Titles, Wills, Mortgages, and all other Kecords ohtaincd. 

CHABAES MOBEBATE. 

Persons in tho Countr)' requiring a corrcspondcut In San Francisco may rely that all business intrusted to me will 
receive careful and personal prompt attention. 

JOHH HoOOHBE, San Franoiioo, CaL 

BEFEBESrCES-Mcssrs. WEAVER, WOOSTER A CO., MerchanU; Messrs. CASTLE BROTHERS, Her- 
chanU; HALL .t (J. MCALLISTER, Attorneys. 



511 Front Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

IMPOBTBB ABTB Wfl[OI.niAI.E BBAXEB VS 

PDBE BOUBBOH & ETE WHMT, 

ALE, POHTEE. AFB CIDER. 

Always on hand a large Stock, ready for shipping at shortest notice. 
Orders from the Country promptly attended to. 



ADVERTISINQ DEPARTMENT. 



clix 



M. UIiIaBSAllirN A CO. 

IMPOBTBB8 AKB DBAIiBBB IN 

BEAVER, BROADCLOTH, GASSIMERE, 

hm TAILOHS* THIMMIKGS, 
628 S^CRj^MENTO STREET, 

(Itetwoon Montgomery and Kowny Streets) 



mow BMB nmrnm maeei, 

IVo. 3ie BATTERY STREET, 

Second Door North of Commercial, ^^SS S^IE^^SfOS^SD, ©^3i» 



GENTLEMEN'S BOOTS MADE TO ORDER, 

At »hort tuttiee, and ffuaranteed to fit. 



SUSTAIN HOME INDUSTRY t 

p. B. COMIIVS Sc C^O. 

PIONEER BRUSH FACTORY, 

417 Mission Street, up stairs, San Francisco, CaL 

Are in«nuf«otuiinir nruatiM of all kind* flrom Brintles, Hair, Amain, or Soap Root,&c. 
I'artldilar attpiition to urdor work. AU urdors promptly fllled.nnil work giiarauteed. 
The trade supplied at Kasterii rates. Our motto is Good Wohk and tulr prices. Xho 
public arc respcctftiUy Invited to call and sec us. 

EUPECIAli IVOTICE.— Ilutohers and Fanners are requested to save all their Bristles, Horses' Manes and 
Tails, for which wo will pay the highest price In cash upon receipt at our Factory. Address, 

P. B. COM INS & CO., San Francisco, Cal. 







tT. H. -WUXTK. 



■WX. STRISOEB. 



J. H. ^V^HITE & CO. 

No. 109 COMMERCIAL STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

UANCFACTDBBRS OF AND DEALERS IN 

A SUPEBIOB QVAUTT OF MACHIHE OILS 



AND 



Warranted nneqiiallcd by anything of the kind yet ofiered for sale in this market. 



lijtl 



Pi'nJ 






t;i; 

hi 



N'l i 



olx 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINB88 DIRBCTORT. 



Pacific ^Muxamt €0. 



or 



-*^ 



@s. ^l 



-4-*- 



CASH CAPITAL, - 
SURPLUS, JULY 1, - 



$750,000 00 
363,862 82 



CASH ASSETS, - - - $1,113,862 82 
I i <i i i ■ 



AllL 




* 1 ■ 




ID 

I a p t I 



I i^i I I 



The Pacific Insurance Company having arranged with Messrs. Bigelow & Brother for the transfer 
of the business of the Fire Insurance Companies lately represented by them, is now prepared to 
oiFer to all parties formerly insured by said Companies, equally good terms, and prompt payment of 
losses in United States gold coin. 

Mr. H. H. BIGELOW will be the General Agent of this Company Arom this date. 



■*+■ 



i**- 



SDSsaiBviDiBB v4i(BSva(B ssisv;&4ist(Ba (B^atviisr'X a 



San Fbancisco : 
IiOUli McLanc, 
W. C. Balaton, 
A. L. Tubba, 
Wm. Alvord, 
A. J. Ralston, 
Jonathan Hunt, 
A. B. Forbea, 
A. O. Stllea, 
A. Seligman, 
L. B. Bcnchl«y, 
Wm. Khermao, 
h. Sachi, 



Jaa. I>e Fremery, 
J. O. Bra}-, 
J. B. Newton, 
David Stem, 
D. O. Mills, 
J. G. KelluKg, 
O. H. Howard, 
Moses Heller. 
H. M. Newhdl, 
O. T. Lawtun, 
Edward Martin, 
Ci.a<. Mayne, 
MoBu i!:iUs, 



£. L. Goldstein, 
W. T. t'olcman, 
J. O. Earl, 
Lloyd Tevis, 
Geo. W. Beaver, 
Adam Grant, 
Alphens Bull, 
B. M. WUson, 
D. J. Oliver, 
W. Scholle, 
Morton Cheesman, 
U, Hanssman, 
D. W. C. Klce, 



Oliver Eldridge, 
£. \V. Leonard, 
8. Stcinhart, 
P. L. Weaver, 
Wm. Hooper, 
Alfred Borcl, 
A. Hayward, 
T. L. Barker, 
Alex. WeUI, 
Chas. Meyer, 
J. D. Fry, 
M. Rosenbaum, 
H. H. Bigelow, 
T. Lemmcn Meyer. 



Sacramemto : 
Edgar Mills, 
G. W. Mowe, 
C. T. Whcelor. 

Makysvilu: 
J. H. Jewctt 

Stocktoh : 
T. B. Anthony, 

POBTLASU, DkBOOK I 
W. S. Ladd, 
Jacob Kamm. 

ViBGitiiA, Vbvada: 
Wm. Sbaron. 



JONA. HUNT, President. J. M. SHOTWELL, Secretary. 

H. H. BIOELOW, General Agent. 0. A. LATON, Marine Seoretaiy. 
T. 0. GBANT and J. E. BIQELOW, Local Agents. 



1 



and ac 






Mi 

Con< 

m 



Mnmi 



Between 1 



^m 



OFFICE 



Ml 0? 



lOf 






ADVERTISINa DEPARTMENT. 



olxi 



STERETT & GUBERY, 

S33 OImAY street, 



- « »»» ♦ 



Every description of BOOK, CARD, PLAIN and FANCY JOB PRINTING promptly 
and accurately execated, at reasonable rates. 



THOm. IV. OJLZiVEA.XJ, 

iDSDiioicB BMer & Aister of Hn Losseii M Areraps. 

♦ »t^^ n > 

MARITIME AND ALL COMMERCIAL WRITINGS AND DOCUMENTS DRAWN. 

Consultations upon all Insurance and Maritime Subjects. 

OFFICE, 436 CALIFORNIA STREET, NEAR MONTOOMERT, 

FULTON FOmYAND IRON Wm. 

miSrCKLEY & CO. 

MANUFAOTURBRS OP 

QUARTZ, FLOUR AND SAW MILLS, 
MININOMACHIirERT, AND ALL KINDS OF IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS, 

45, 47 AND 49 FIRST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Between Market aiid Mtulon, 



THOMAS THOinSOIV, 



ASD 



Mannfaoturer of all Machinery appertainiDg to Well-Boring. 

OFFICE 28 THIRD STREET, AND RESIDENCE 262 CLEMENTINA STREET, 

SAN FKANOISOO, OAL. 

■ ♦ ■ 

All Orders from the City or Country promptly attended to. 
_ 



( r 






11 



1 



mm 



clxii 



PACiriO COAST BUSINBSS DIBBOTORT. 



This favorite place of resort, situate in San Mateo County, has been neatly 
fitted up for the accommodation of 

INVALIDS, FAMILIES AND VISITORS, 

And now presents one of the roost pleasant spots in the State for a few days' 
sojourn away from the noise and dust of the City. Located about 

FOUR MILES FROM THE SAN MATEO STATION, 

About twenty-four miles from this City, with an excellent road for traveling by 
Buggy and Horseback, it is convenient of access. Surrounded with some of the 
noblest Oak Groves in the State, with a fine Trout Stream running around the 
Grounds, with the finest climate in the world, it offers great inducements to those 
who require recreation with but brief time for its enjoyment. The fare to and 
back, by Railroad, only one dollar, from Saturday night until Monday. 

M. KElfflffY^ 



G. A W. SlffOOK^ 



AND 

TIN, COPPER AND SHEET-IRON WORKERS, 

No. 806 Montgomery Street, North of Jackson, San Francisco, Cat. 

HOUSE FTAJ-BflTtnSG HVf ikl^lL. ITS BRA-IVCHX^S. 

TOBOB FUMF8 PUT UP, AND OLD OITZB KBPAIRED. 



■ale 



Uy A (rood UDortment of Pumpa, Lead Pine, Rtores and Tinware of every variety, constantly on hand 
s at the lowest prlcea. TIN ROOt IKU and all kinds of Jobbing done at the shortest notice, and In the best i 



and for 
manner. 



m:. kenisty. 



"*. 



PROPRIETOU OF 



DUNBAR AIiIiET, 

BBAB OP OITT HALL, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PAl 



C] 



p 



i 



62: 



\ 



\ 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



cbdii 




No. 303 IVIontgomet7 Street, 

O £« O C 1£ S* 



THE FINEST AND LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF 

PARLOR, 

KITCHEN, 

MANTLE, ' ' • • . ^; • 

OFFICE, 

CHURCH, 

TOWN, 

GI«OCKS AND REGUIiATORSy 

I Of American, Oertnan, and French Manufacture, 



PIONEER ENGRA¥ER, 

(ESTABLISHED, 1849) 

621 ^w^^sHiisraTOisr street. 



OFFICIAL SEALS, STAMPS AND STEEL PUNCHES, 

Engraved at Short Notice and in worl(manlil(e manner. 



W. KOOSBR 







I 





©s 



» 



North-West Corner Montgomery and Washington Streets, 

XtOOX^ ^TO. 538, ^T3C:OI3:A.3^TG^B BTTIXiZDIXTGh, 



Mm I 

ifti 



■' (if 



rr 



clxiv 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



WHL SHSRMAN A GO. 



MANUFACTUUEB8 AND IMPORTERS CF 










9 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, Trunks and Valises. 

»■■ — 

WE ARE BECEIVING BY EVERY STEAMER 

SUPERIOR AND MEDIUM CLOTHING OF OUR OWN MANUFACTURE 

ALL OF WUICH WB WARBANT TO BE OF THE HOST SUPERIOR MAKE. 

* ^** » 

Always in Store a Large Assortment of ' ' 

SOLE LEi^^THER TRUIS^KS, 

LADIES' FRENCH TEAVELINa TRUNKS, VALISES & SACKS 

Of Xivery Description. 
q;^ Orders for CUSTOM CLOTHING will receive our most careful and prompt attention. 

]Vos. 41S and 414 SA.IVS03f: STK,EET, 

SOVTH-XAST COXNEM OF COMatEHCIAL. 



D. E. APPLETON & CO. 

DIRECT IMPORTERS OF 



'» 



JONATHAN 



[TBADB MARK.] 




CROOKE'S 



POCKET GUTLiERYy 

STATIOI^EEf, FANCY ©0€)3)S AND OOL® FENS, 

MAJnTFAOTUREBB AND JOBBEB8 OF VALBiraiNES, 
SOS HOirreOMEBY btkeet, sait fkaivcibco. 



ixrin. IS. laoomis, 

B. E. OOB. WASHINOTOir AND 8AH80H 8T8., BAIT FRAN0I8U0, OAL 
D:^ Subscriptions received for Periodicals published in any part of the World, 

THE LEADING PAPERS AND MAGAZINES, 

AMMO, 

STATIONERY, CUTLERY, COLD PENS, ETC., 

Alwkyi on hand. 
COUNTRY OnOESIiS mOMPTriY AXTJENUEr* TO. 



k 



\ 



E 



i 
59 



i 



r 



9 



s*» 



ADVBRTISINO DBPARTMENT. 



clxv 



Established in 1 854, and the ONLY OPPOSITION. 



« ^«» > 



J. STRATMAN, 





SAN FBANCISCO, CAL. 

Opposition Conrtei ! Compari son Invilei ! Coipetition DefieJ ! 

NOW IS YOUR TIME TO SUBSCRIBE FOR 

ATLANTIC PERIODICALS. 

SPECIAL AGENT FOR THE PACIFIC COAST OF ALL OF 



Oomprising the " niustrated News," the "Chimney Oomer," "lUuBtrated Zeitung," 
"Budget of Fun," "Family Mogasine," and the "New Monthly." 



the 



Special Editions for the Pacific Coast of the "Illustrated Family 

Alrtharuic," "Ladies' Illustrated Almanac," "Comic Illustrated 

Almanac," and the " Tribune Alm,anac." 

10,000 different kinds and subjects of CARD PICTURES, Plain and Colored. FLAGS, Silk and 

Buntinfir, all Sizes and Prices. A complete assortment of MILITARY BOOKS. NEW 

NOVELS by all the best authors. A complete assortment on hand of all kinds of 

D;^ Attention is called to my extensive catalogue of American and Foreign Periodicals, for 
which I receive subscriptions. Permanent arrangements having been mnde by the United States 
Oovemment for the carrying of the Mails from the Atlantic States by steamer three times a 
month, I am enabled to receive subscriptions at a much lower rate than formerly. The same care 
and attention will be paid to the forwarding of all packages, for which this establishment has 
gained such an enviable reputation throughout the Pacific Coast. 

By special arrangements with the Publishers, I am able to receive later dates of the LEDGER, 
and other STORY Papers, in advance of other News Agents on the Pacific Coast ; and also, with 
the Tribune Publishing Co., I receive the Tribune Almanac a month in advance of other dealers. 

If I am running out of business all other News Dealers in this city, I can't help it. I can, 
and I will sell cheaper than any other house in this city. 

Any Newspaper, Magazine, or Review not mentioned in my published catalogue, will be 
furnished to order. Orders for Books, Music, Cards, Card Pictures, and Fancy Articles, etc., filled 
promptly at the lowest rates. Subscriptions payable invariably in advance. 

And remember, I make good all copies lost by Mail. Money at my risk, if in Registered 
Letters. 

Wholesale Country Agent for the Spirit of the Times, Police Gazette, and SUNDAY 
MERCURY. 

D:^ Subscriptions received for all the San Francisco Dailies and Weeklies at Publishers' Prices. 
Addi-ess J, STBATMAlf, News Agent, No. 506 Washington Street, near comer of 
Sansom, San Francisco, Cal. 

D3^ Send for cafalogne. Any work referrbd to therein will be sent to any place, A^e of 
postage, on receipt of price. 

tt^ Send Cash Orders to JOHN STRATMAN, San Francisco, Cal. 



wammmm 



clxvi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTOKT. 



ISANBATTA 



OF NETST yore:. 



INCORPORAXEO 



1881. 



GAPITALi . . - $1400^000. 

Deposited in the Banl< of California, as additional security to Policy Holr'ers, $76,000. 

FIRE AND MARINE RISKS 

Taken at as Low Rates as by any other Responsible Company. 

VMi iflASfiQj^vMS! iiasisn&jiLSKBi (UDSsmPMrsr, 

From and after this date, has absolved itself from everj obligation as to rates npon Fire Risks, and 
is now prepared to issue Policies upon thb most rbabonable tbrhs consistent with security and 
safety. 

H- B. S^VAIIV &. CO. 

OBSTBBAIi AOBNTS FOB OAIiIFOBNIA. 

206 Front l?treet, Cor. California, San Francisco. 



VBANE O. SNOW. 



JOSEPH Rooa. 



SNOITir A ROOS^ 

Importers and Manufacturers of 



Frames, Mouldings and Artists' Materials, 

£28 SAN80H ST., 427 WASHINGTON ST., and 
!19 MONTGOMERY ST. (Russ Block), 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

.-♦-• 

Carving, Gilding and rc-O.ildlntr. Picture Cord, Tassels, 
NalU, Etc. 



J. H. BLOOD, 

ooxt£X>czsszox<rsx%, 
JVb. 24 Montgomery Block, 



J9u«ineM trantaeted in ihe EngUth, JVenofc 
and SpanUh Language!, 



E. T. PECK. 



C. O. TVJBHEB. 



PECK &, TURNBR, 

( Successors to J. B. STEWART & CO. ) 

GOMMISSIQH MERGKAnXS 

AND WHOI.B8AIJ! SmAIiBBS VX 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS, 

North-East Comer California and Battery Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 



\ 



Ai>VERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



A^ivE. sohm:olz, 

MATHEMATICAL 



IJKoiiiuAtlSni lIlAlilSiil. 





Transits, ^ ; 
Theodolites, 
Solar Compasses, 
Y Leveling Instruments, 
Leveling Staves, 
Compasses, 
Mountain Barometers, 
Distance Rods, 
Chains, 
Meridian Transits, 
Bullion Balances, 
Assaying Scales, 
; Etc., Etc. 



REPAIRS EXECUTED IN THE BEST MANNER. 



No. 420 MONTQOMEET STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 






; lil! 



I 






clxviii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



DANIEL T. MURl'UY. ADAM OKANT. THOMAS BREEZE. JOHN DEANE. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

(Suooeaaors to BUaBNl! KEUliY & OO.) 
IMPOBTEBS OP 

F0BEI6H & OOHESnC DRY GOODS 

COR. SANSOM AND BUSH STREETS, 



IP. F. I.OXJQHEA.N^ & CO. 

IMPOKXEHS AlTD tlOBBEItS OF 




OIL CLOTHS, MATTING, 

ItTTCa-S, ST-A.IS. XtOX>S, ETC., EXC. 

SANSOM STREET, near Gor. Bush, S MS FBANGISOO, GAL. 



ADELSDORFER BROTHERS, 

IMFOBTBBS OF 

American, German, English and French 





COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF FANCY GOODS, HOSIERY, 

Silk ©siLTSLt@« Mmh Wimt ^Mrmt, 

Furnishing Goods, Towels, Vienna Matches, Pipes, Playing Cards, 

Stationery, Pocket and Table Cutlery, 

Gomiis aad Brt&slies, Musical kstrume&ts, Perfnmery, 



AJSriD 



No. 2 CUSTOM HOUSE BLOCK, 

Corner of Sansom and Sacramento StreetSf 



t 



•1 

! 



t 



ADVBRTISING DEPARTMENT. 



dxix 



J. ISAAC. 



H. KOBITSCHKCK. 



or. xisjOljOuC «fts oo. 



IMPORTERS OF 



PLAYING CARDS, BLANK BOOKS, WRITING AND WRAPPING PAPERS, 
TVo. 5513 S^IVSOAi: STK-EET, 

j Comer Merchant, MS WlMSm^mg (SMia 

A Large Assortment of Essences and Oils, for Liquors, and Liqnor Laliels constantly on hand. 



"W. W. MII.I.ER. 



a. F. HAIiET. 



Eli^iRS ilEl^li niliL 




Conatantlv on hand and made to order 



Sask, BlinAs, Doors, Franies, M\m, Moldings, 



FILASTEBS, BEADS, 0A8INQB, PANEL WOBK, BASE H0LDIN08. 

I every dcscrlntlnn of In!>ldc Fiiiliih. HR ACKKT and SCKOT^T. HAIVIB 

Also, WOOn TURMIIIIO, In all its branches, dune with disiwtch. 



MILLER & HALEY, Proprietors, 



29 Fremont Street, near Market, San Francisco, Cal. 

jy COrNTRY OUnER? PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



PIONEER LAMP STORE 



MANUFACTURER OF 



XS. erosexxe 011» 

AND IMPORTER OF 

OFFICE AND STORE, 512 SANSOM STREET, 

Comer of Merohant, SA.7f FRA.NCI@CO» CAJli, 

CAMPHENE MANUFACTURED FOR THE TRADE. 



J. P IN E T, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



nKJkh>K 





llilt^d&JU»i 



DEPOT, Nos. 14 & 16 FEEMONT STREET, 

VKXT TO TREAniTEU:. A CO. 

na- x^xi.A.za'oxso^, o .a. Xj x x" ^ zt. so- x 



(23 CO 



£2a G63CSa 



, '■ :, ii 






! I 






At 

I 



.1 II 



clxx 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIBBOTORT. 



HARVEY M. LOCKWOOD & CO. 

"Wbolesale and ' Itetall I>ealera In 

GENTS', BOYSS AND CHILDREN'S 











.A.XTr> 



Purnishing Goods, 






h 



(Between Montgomery and Kearny Streets,) 

SAN FRA-ilSr CISCO. 



JACOB SHZsmr, 

PI0HEEE PHOTOCrRAPHER 

(Late of 315 Montgomery Street,) 

Removed to 612 CLAY STREET, North side, 

Four doors above Montgomery 9AN FRANCSBSOi^o CAL. 

Takes the moBt euperior Cartes de Visltc, sharp and dear, and Photographs of all kinds and sizes. Greatly 
reduced rent, enables him to establish his prices about twenty -five percent l>elow the Montgomery Street Gal- 
leries, and e<iually as lo w as the most inferior establishments in other parts of the city. At the same time none 
but the best of work will be produced, and the greatest pains taken to give entire satisfaction. 



PIONEER PRESS PRINTINe OmCE. 










9 



North-East Oomer Olay and Montgomeiy Streets, 



< m*^ > 



Every description of BOOK, JOB AND CARD PRINTING, correctly and expeditiously ex- 
ecated, at reasonable rates. 






ADVBRTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



clxxi 



BANK EXCHANGE, 

GEORGE F. PARKER, 
mofiTQOinfiiiY atotHt r 

South-East Corner Montgomery and Washington Streets. 



f^..i'"^ Hz <f~'''''' 




THE BANK EXCHANG 

Contains the most Magnificently Furnished and most Commodious 

BILLIARD room: 

IN TIE imiTEI STATES, mcil IS SUPFUED VITH TEN OF - 

PHELAN'S BEST TABLES, 

A BAR, at which the choieett 



Of 8DP{BI0R VISTAGI m soU, being Imported dirtet bj the Proprietor. And i Wkoltsalo 

WIl^S KWh LX01OFOR ST0R3B, 

Whert Ciutoinert eti be supplied by the Boitk, Dtnjjolin or Flukige, if itf lirti 
29^^ The Proprietor also feels a pleasure in stating that he is the 

SOLE AOEHT FOB THE PAOIFIO COAST FOB THE OELEBBATED 

J. H. CUTTER'S OLD BOURBON WHISKY. 

GTXy, jr, PARKX3R. 









> H 



i i 



Clxxii PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 

AlOBRIOAir BZOBANOB, 

Oomer of Sansom and Halleck Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Pire-Proof— 200 Hooms, all Hard-Finished— Well 
Ventilated and Nioely Furnished. 

The most comfortable and homelike Hotel in the State, where every want is an- 
ticipated and cheerfully supplied. 

Board from $1.50 to $2.00 per day. 

< » > 

The AMERICAN EXCHANGE OGAOH with BED LIGHTS, 

will always be in readiness to convey passengers to the Hotel free of charge. 

TIMOTHY SAKGENT, Proprietor. 

(SnccEsaoRs to Jab. Fiielan and McAban & Codt,) 
IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS m 

ISTos. QOO and 203 Front Street, 

N, E. Corner California and Front Streets, 

MORRIS SPZSYZSRy 

No. 526 Washington Street, San Francisco. 

@0]L.X3 A.G-ENT FOR 

SUOENE GBEGOIBE & CO.'S Cognac Brandies. 

J. D. CASTILLO SAZEBAC &; CO.'S do. 

E. LAGABDEA; CO.'S do. 

LEG'EB FBEBES' do. 

J. GOEBG ft CO.'S Champagne, La Ferle. 

C. CHATELAIN DE MONTIGNY & CO.'S Champagne. 

KOCH FILS ft BUMILLEB'S do.. 

NUGUE BICHABD'S Vermouth. 

BICHABD ft MULLEB'S Kiraohwasser. 



1 



f 



ADVKRTISING DBPARTMBMT. 



olxxiii 



BRITTON & REY, 










wmw. 



J^XtTt 



533 COMMERCIAL. STREET, 



IN ALL THEIR BKANOHES. 



O. A. nicNUIiTT, 



AND 



COLLECTOR OF CUSTOM HOUSE CLAIMS, 

Bepresented by an active and reliable Business Oorrespondent at 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 

OflBce, Nos. 19 and 20, Third Story, Merchants' Exchange, 



B.A.XXSZI.' 



SXREEO?. 



Messrs. Macondray & Co. 

" Falkner, Bell & Co. 

" C. A. Low & Co. 

" Barron & Co. 

" Koopmanschap & Co. 

" Lazard Fr^res. 

" Parrott & Co. 
Capt. Oliver Eldridge, Ag't F. M. S.S. Co. 



REFERS TO 

Messrs. R. Feuerstein & Co. 

." Cross & Co. 

" Rodgers, Meyer & Co. 

" Alsop & Co. 
B. E. Auger, Esq. 
Morris Speyer, Esq. 
Chas. E. McLane, Esq., 

Ag't Wells, Fargo & Co. 



m. 



M 



I ! 



ii 



clxxiv 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIHECTORT. 



THE EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY, 

MUTUA^L. 

ASSETS-TWO AND THEEE-QUARTERS MILLIONS. 
Income for 1866— Two Millions. 



KINDS OF POLICIES. 

Policies will be issued, assnring any amoont between $250 and $25,000. 

For Life. 
For a Term of Years— One or More. 

On the Endowment Frinoiple, payable when the assored attains a certain a|^ ; or at 
death, Bhuiild ho die liitoru. This kind of Policy is rapidly paining favor with the public, as it 
makes provision liotli for one's self in old age, and also for one s family in case of curly death. 

On Joint Lives, payable at the death of the first of two or more persons. 

On SurTivorship, payable to a party named, in case he survive another. * 

And, in a word, all Contingencies of Life, that can be calculated, will, if practicable, 
be provided for by the Society. 

POLICIES WILL BE ISSUED, 

In favor of the Person whose Life is assured, transferable by assignment, and 
payable to himself, his heirs, executors, or assigns. 

In fftVOr of Another, transferable and payable as above. 
In favor of any Person as Trustee for Others. 

In favor of a Wife and payable to her ; or, in case of her death, to her Children 
or their Guardian. 



UNITED STATES CASUALTY INSURANCE CO. 



-* ^um » 



mSUPiAFGE AGAIFST AGCIDE^STTI 

<>■» ■ — ■ '■ 

TEH DOLLARS Annual Premium will secure a Policy granting Insnrance for 
TWO TH:OTJSA.IVI> DOLLARS 

IN THE EVENT OF DEATH BY ANY DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT, 

WITH TEN DOLL.A11S PER WEEK COMPENSATION, (with partici- 
pation IN profits) for ary Personal Injury — Total I)isal)ility from Business, so that should the 
Policy continue in force ^br Five Years, any one Accident causing disability for five weeks, will 
reimburse the assured for tit? whole cost of his Insurance. 

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS PREMIUM ^^i". in like manner, secir« a 
Policy for FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS, and TWENTY-FIVfi DOLLARS 
per week compensation, with ])ividends. 

FIFTY DOLLARS PREMIUM ^ilK in i'l^c manner, secure a Policy for 
TEy THOUSAND DOLLARS, and FIFTY DOLLARS per week compensation, 
with Dividends. 

A GENERAL ACCIDENT $5,000 POLICY FOR FIVE YEARS, 

008TS ONE FfiEHJUH OF $:oa Dividends will rednce the next Payment at the " Ordinary" rate, and a 

$5,000 POLICY FOR THREE YEARS, 

COSTS OHE FBEMIDH OF $62.60, with Dividends. 



« »»» > 



GENERAL AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST AND ADJACENT TERRITORIES, 
Bouth-Baat Ck>mer Montgomery md Oalifomia Strseta, Baa 7naoiaoo. 



T 



Hi 



Lead 
Hose, 



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Siamoo 




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ADVBRTISINQ DBPARTMBNT. 



clxxv 



THOMAS E SELBT & CO. 

HFOKTERS OF lETAlS, 

IffoB. 118 and 118 Gallfovnla Stvoef. 



Bar Iron, Cast Steel, Boiler Plate, Axlea and Springs, Tin Plate, Sheet Iron, 
Lead Pipe, Zinc, Sheet Lead, Water Cocks, Plumbers' Tools, Iron Wire, Rubber 
Hose, Tinmen's Tools and Machinss, Blacksmiths' do., Cumberland Coal, &c., &c 

ALSO, PROPRIETORS OF THE 

SAN FRANCISCO AND PACIFIC 

LEAB PIPE ANB SHOT WORKS, 

CORNER HOWARD AND FIRST STREETS, 



C. E. COIiIiINS A CO. 




No. 808 MOlffTOOMERY STREET^ 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

And 42 and 44 Nassau Street, New York. 

■«■ 

A. vents on tVie Paolllo Coast for tbe 

jSlMERICjSlH WjSlTCE FjSlCTOKY 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

AK^RICAN, ENGLISH AND SWISS WATCHES, 

Diamonds, Fine Jewelry, Watoh Makers' Tools and Materials, Speotacles, Clocks, &c. 

MAKUVAOTUnKBS 0» 

California Gold Jewelry and Washoe Silver Jewelry. 

Baying our Ooodi dinotly from tiie Manafftotuen, FOS 0A8H, ws oan nil at 
prices that defy competition, and for leu than any other Houe in Ban Franoiaoo> 

Terms, exclusively Cash. Goods sent by Express to any part of 
the State, with bill for collection on delivery. 

WATCHES REPAIRED Bf THE BEST WORKMEN. AT NEW 70RK FRIGES. 





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clxxvi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 



NORTHERN ASSURANCE CO. 



OF 



LONDON AND ABERDEEN. 



1 ■ I 

R « a « 
< ^ t 



DEPOSIT IN SAN FRANCISCO 



■ - $75,000. 



NET FIRE REVENUE EXCEEDS 
NET LIFE REVENUE EXCEEDS 



$700,000. 
$400,000. 



IT»rSXJ»A.NCES EFFECTED OIV 



AND ALL INSURABLE PROPERTY. 



< »«» > 



^iSa^lS^Zm If>iX>S:£aIICSBI2S:Sa^ S2^3!Ji3^;DrQaQ:>. 



W. L. BOOKES, Agent, 



MUh MMh $nm mmm m< 



No. 428 CALIFORNIA STBEET. 



Notice is hereby given tl;at Arrangements have been entered into between the 

ROYAL MAIL HTEAM PACKET COMPANY 
PACIFIC MAIL STEAHSHIP COHPANT. 

FOR the forwarding of treasure to the Bank of England, and to the Bank 
of France, in Havre, by the Hteamships of the two companies, by means 
of througii bills of lading, to be granted by the Commanders of the Ships 
of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, for delivery to C. A. HENDER- 
SON, Agent of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, to bo sent across 
the Isthmus, and embarked on the Ships of the R. M. S. P. Co. For par- 
ticulars as to through rate of freight, apply to the undersigned. 

Arrangements can bo made for the shipment of Gold and Silver Ores iVom Aspinwall by the 
Company's Steamers, on favorable terms. 

The steamships of the R. M. S. P. Co. depart from Aspinwall to the West Indies and Southamp- 
ton on the 6th (7th when there are 30 days in the previous month) and 22d of each month. 

Passages can be secured on application to the undersigned, who will give any further particulars 
that may bo required about the Company's business. 

■W. L. BOOKER. 




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Imp- 
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ADVERTISINQ DBPARTMENT, 



clxxvii 



Harvey D. Parker. 



William H. Vandewater. 




617 and 619 Montgomery Street, 

Opposite Montgomery Blook, san francisco. 



Parker & VaMewater, - - Proprietors. 



Have coDstantly on hand and for sale, 

OLD LONDON DOCK BRANDIES, 

Port ¥KrinGs^ Shevviesy 

AND ALL THE CHOICEST BRANDS 



PAGME, APPLE JAC] 



PISCO. ARRACK 



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Cordials, 




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clxxviii PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



SAisr FRAisrcisoo fire 

HffSURAMCZ: COIIIIPAM7, 



488 MLOXfTVOrOJMXMIC^ir lUw.«>»«^^ , 

South-east corner Sacramento — Donohoe, Kelly & Co.'s Bank Building. 

. ._ ■ « »»» I '- 

XN COUPON A-T'ETt 1VCA.IIC!1I» ISOl. 



omoBiiSs 

O. C. BOABDMAir, President. 

O. D. O. SULUVAir. Vice President. 

< -mm^ » 



p. MoSHANE, Beoretary. 
S. BIQBLOW, SoUoitor. 



OLDEST LOCAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY IN CALIFORNIA. 



HETNEMANN & CO. 



Importers of 



BMTISE,FilEEFCH,j8LlD SWISS 
DRY Q^OODS, 



-A.1V1> A.G:B:NTtS FOR 



II 



SAN FRANCISCO PIONEER WOOLEN FACTORY. 



« »»» > 



ORDERS RECEIVED FOR 

Any description of BLANKETS wFiich may be desired. 

Hides and Wool Bought at Highest Market Bates. 



Exchange on England, France, and New York. 



311 to 31^ CALIF-OK^IVIA. STR-EET. 



THE CHARTER OAK 

LIFE IISIFRJlMCE COMPJlEPY, 

OF MARTrORO, CONN. 

__ 4 ■ » 

OUGh-A-lSriZEID A.- ID- 1850. 



CAFITALi AlVr> SUK,I»LXJS, #1,100,000 

U. P. COOIST, State j^gent. 



W. 0. AYRES, M.D., MEDICAL EXAMINER. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



I 



o 



ADVERTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



clxxix 



J. K. PRIOR, 

Importer and Dealer in all kinds of 












730 Montgomery Street^ 

NEAR JACKSON STREET, 0pp. Metropolitan Theatre, 



« »»■ > 



Fancy and Plain Wash Basins, 

SILVER PLATED COCKS, BATH TUBS, SHEET ZINC, 
SHEET LEAD, LEAD PIPE, 

GALVANIZED AND PLAIN IRON PIPE, 

ALL. SIZES, FOR 

GAS, STEAM AND WATEB, 

In lots to suit, together with Elbows, Tees, Return Benda, Stop Cocks, Plugs, 
Bushings, Nipples, etc. ; Rubber Hose, Hose Bibbs, Hose Pipes, etc. 

The Celebrated Medal and Monitor Ranges,, 

COPPEB BOItEHH, ETC. 

Gas and Steam Fitting and Plumbing in all its Branches. 

Agent Empire State Gas Machine, 

For supplying Dwellings, Stores, Factories and Pablic Bnildings. The Empire State Gas Machine 
is the most simple and cifective means known for producing gas without heat. The gas produced 
is equal to the best known illuminating gas. It renders it easy for persons living remote from 
street gas pipes to enjoy the luxury of a pure gas light, at a comparatirely small cost, and with little 
trouble. 






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cbcxx 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRKCTORT. 



II 



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B. H. BKOWir. 



». JHT. MABTIMDEI.r, 



BR-OTTJV & CO. 

REAL ESTATE AND GENERAL BUSINESS AGENTS, 
No, 20 Montgomery Street, opposite Lick House, San Francisco. 



< -mmtm'*- 



Special attention given to the sale of Business Places of every description. Rents collected promptly. 



n 



MAS 

4 



1! 




ADVERTISINQ DEPARTMENT, 



clxxxi 



DSTE^VV^ MUSIC STORE 




Received the Gold Medal at Fair of Am. Institute^ 1863. 

MASON & HAMLIN'S CELEBRATED CABINET ORGANS 

AMERICAN AND FOREIGN 

ROMAN VIOLIN AND GUITAR STRINGS, 




S) 



AND EVERY DESCRIPTION OF 



AND 



MUSIC MERCHANDISE, 

' Qa, CD U q> ra 3^ U c^ s^jxicil Oiii c& a a:i 0. IL o 
KOHLER, CHASE & CO. 



401 ivacoasrxa-0]sa:E2?i-z' street. 



la. POMTON De ARCZS, 



HlH;UKl<«OU TO 




French 



a.A.]sr niA-isrcisoo. 



OOTTNTRY OIlI>EKS fROMl'TLY ATTENDKT) TO. 






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«Ixxxii PAOIPIO COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 













STEINWAT Su SONS 

■WERE AWARDED A 

First-Class Prize Medal at the International Exhibition, 

Held at Ijondon, in 1862, for 

POWERFUL, CLEAR, BRILLIANT AND SYMPATHETIO TONE, 

With excellence of workmanship. 
There were 269 Pianos entered for competition from all parts of the world. 

A constant supply of these Instnunents to be fonnd at the Store of 



. GRAY, 

Publisher, Importer, and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Musical Instruments, Book and Sheet Music, 

AND EVERT ARTICLE TO BE FOUND IN A 

Wfitt Hei»T mil8l€ STORE. 



< »«» » 



613 CLAT STREET, (SOUTH SIDE) THIRD DOOR ABOVE MONTGOMERT. 

Q:F~ Piinoi Toned and Repaired bj Eipcrieneed Workmen. Second Band Pianos taken in part payment. 



ESTABLISHED 1859. 

MISSION WOOLEN MILLS, 

mum Sf BEET, Betweea IM mi IQth, 

MANUFACTURE- 
BLANKETS, FLANNELS, SHAWLS, 

C^SSIMERES JLNID T^^^Ii:EDS, 

Broadcloth, Military Cloths, Horse and Sluice Blanketings. 

Made to Order at Short Notice. 






Messrs. IiAZARD FRilRES, 

115 BATTERY STREET^ 

Between California and Fine, 



I 



gs. 



ADVERTISINQ DEPARTMENT. 



clxxxiii 



C. P. Sheffield. 



N. W. SpatMtng. 



J. Patterson. 



PACIFIC SAW MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

los. IIS audi {IS Tim Street, Saa Francisco, 

MANUPAOTUJBBBS OF 

Cast Steel, Patent Ground Oircular, Shingle, Cross 
■>r.-. Out, Gang, Mill, Mulay, Pit and 

Drag Saws. 

Also, Turning, Felloe, Butcher & Billet Webs of a superior make 



—♦—••»-»- 



All descriptions of Saws made to order. Repairing in all its brandies, such as 
Straightening, Bc-toothing, Grinding and Polishing, promptly attended to. 

Steel-faced Planing Knives fitted to pattern. Reaper sections made to order at 
short notice. All kinds of best Sheet Cast Steel for sale. 






113 Pine Street, bet. Battery and Front, 




Spaulding's Patent False Teeth inserted in 
Circular Saws. 

Saw Teeth fitted, tempered ready for use. 

I would particularly call attention to my 
Patent Saw Gummei , for small Circular and 
Crosscut Saws, safer, more simple and supe- 
iclo of the kind ever before 



any 



used : it 



no 



press, 



but can be used 



requires 
with a hammer, on an anvil or a block 



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clxxxiv 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINBSS DIRBCTORT. 



^ mm mas ugn,^ 



t« 



JKF. A I. STGINHART, 



m 



.. SAF EUAJfCISGO, GAL. 



AGENTS FOB S. RPINSTEIN'S CALIFOHNIA MADE 
MEN'S AND BOTS' CLOTHING. 



Are offering them to the trade in lots to suit, and on the most reasonable terms. 
Tliese Goods are made of the very best material and trimmings, and are in every 
way superior to the imported Clothing in quality, price, style and making — the Cutter 
of the Clothing having been connected with one of the largest and most fashionable 
clothing houses in New York City. None but perfect fitting clothing can be relied 
upon. 



GEO. -W. STEVETVS. 



J. Y. 'wii.soar. 



nriiisoiir a stevehs, 
PORK PACKERS, 

DEALERS IN 

CALIFORNIA HAMS, SHOULDERS, 
B-A.co2sr, LA.i^3D, si^ok:eid. beef, «ScO, 

ST@Bi, No. 5a@ MAEtKiT 8TBtET» 

Extending throngh to No. 9 Sntter Street, 6 A.Br f XI A.N'OISCO. 

Paoklns House, Slaolc Folnt. 



WIE^E^MM E« ©Il^lI^M 



$ 



AND DEALER IN 



Sniar-Ciirel Hams, Bacon, Fork, Lari, MM Beef ani Tonpes. 

SA.TJSA.GX2 SKIIVS BY THE: JS.1E1G. 

Nos. 54 and 55 Washington Market, San Francisco, Cai. 



i 



ADVERTIBINQ DEPARTMENT. 



clxxxv 



uimvERSiTir 




Incorporated, San Francisco, January 23d, 1867. 

1 m I 

400 Shares, each Share embraciDg 4 lots of 25x120 feet each. Total cost 
of Shares $315. 1st payment, $20 per Share, and $10 monthly per 
Share thereafter. 29 Months to complete payments. Total assess- 
ments for expenses LIMITED to $15 per Share for the entire term. 

PROPERTY OF THE ASSOCIATION— 43 full Blocks, and 15 fractional 
Blocks, in the '' University Mound Tract Survey," Bernal Ranch. 
TITLE, UNITED STATES PATENT. 

SPLENDIDLY SITUATED, within a half hour's drive from tho City Hall, and half a mile 
from the City Cars. In the direct line of the City's jjrowth, and in the immediate neighborhood of 
large and extensive improvements. Fine soil, abundant water, and magnificent prospect. Ap- 
proaches easy, and little or no grading required. An equitable distribution of the property to take 
place, when all shares are sold. Full information contained in tho prospectus and maps of the 
Association, for general distribution at tho office of the company, or seut to any part of tho country 
upon application. 

— <■«♦«»» 

OiBoers of tlie ./Lssoolatlon. 

E. THOMAS, D. D Phesidbnt. 

L. L. ROBINSON Trkasureb. 

THOS. B. LEWIS Secbktabt. 

Board, of Directors* 

E. THOMAS, D. D. LESTER L. ROBINSON, 

H. A, GORLEY, THOMAS B. LEWIS, 

GEO. B. TAYLOR. 

ADDRESS UNIVERSITY HOMESTEAD ASSOCIATION. 

THOHAS B. LEWIS, Secretary. 

Room Tfo» 8, Ste-venflM>n*B Sulldlnir* corner Montaomery and 
California Streets. San Francisco. 



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olxxxvi 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINBS8 DIRBOTORY. 






4 »»» t 



The annual Conno of Lectures of tbli initltution commences on the flnt Monday of June, and continues 
four months. 

JDurins the rcRular term, the students will have an opportunity of visiting the various hospitals of the city, 
under clrcumstanccH which will enable th^m to observe medical and surgical treatment, to listen to clinical 
teaching, and make records of the progressive develoumrnt of diseases, with the results of Medicine and 
Hygiene. The Fuculty dcvire to call attention to the following local advantage* 

Ist. There Is noclimutc, | " " '" " " 

fh)m the interior of our 8tal ... „ - -- , 

and inspiration. 2<i. No city of the same population has more ample hospital fsoilitio!!, or greater opportuni' 
ties for orgmiizinf^ and maintaining the very best elements of clinical teaching. 8d. The singular characteristic! 
of our climuto arc Kuch, that every Dranch of Medical study can be prosecuted during the outiro year. In win- 
ter or summer, didscclions can be made without detriment to the health of the student 



, perhaps. In the world, which has a more invigorating ellbct upon persons coming 
atos and Territories, thereby qualifying the votaries of study with pni<onlial health 



Fees and Regulations. 



The aggregate fees of the Professors for a f\ill term 9180 00 

The Alairiculation fee, (this fee is paid but once) 6 00 

The Graduation fee 40 00 

The Demonstrator's ticket 10 00 

XEQUIBEMEXTa FOX ORADUATlOy. 

Ist The candidate must be 21 years of age. 

2d. He must have attended two l\ill courses of Medical leeiuros, one of which must hare been delivered in 
this Institution. 

8d. He must have attended a course of practical anatomy in the dissecting room. 

4lh. The candidate must have studied medicine for three years, (the terms of attending lectures included) 
under the direction of a respectable medical practitioner. 

6th. He must write a Medical Thesis, and submit the same to the Faculty two weeks prior to the commence- 
ment. 

Graduates from other Medical Colleges, in good standing, are required to matriculate only. 

BOABDINO. 

Students can obtain good board in the citv, at prices varying fVom five to ton dollars per week. 
.Application for further information may do addressed to the Dcau. 

, Board of Trustees. 

J. B. FEIiTOir, President. IBA F. BANEUl', Beoretary. 



Gov. F. F. Low, 
Lt. Gov. T. N. iMachin, 
Hon. Milton S. Latham, 
Hon. Stephen J. Field, 
Judge P. De La Gucrra, 
Ira P. Rankin, Esq., 
John O. Earl, Esq., 



E. J. Pringle, Esq., 
A. Holluh, Esq., 
Thos. H. Selby, Esq., 
Ex-Gov. P. H. Burnett, 
Ex-Gov. .Toiin G. Downey, 
Hon. H. P. Coon, 
Hon. Frank McCoppin, 
Andrew Glassell, Esq. 

Medical Faculty. 



Jas. P. Whitney, M. D., 
C. Badarous, M.I)., 
J. B. Feiton, Esq., 
Sam'l J. Bridge, Esq., 
Lloyd Tevis, Esq., 
Wm. Binnding, Esq., 
Jno. Sime, Esq., 



H. H. TOLAND, M.D., President, Professor of Principles and Practice of Surgery; JAMES 
BLAKE, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children ; L. C. LANE, 
M.D., Professor of Anatomy ; WM. O. AYRE3, M.D., Professor of Physiology ; J. F. MORSE, 
M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Diagnosis ; THOS. BENNETT, M.D., Professor of 
Principles and Practice of Medicine; HENRY GIBBONS, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica; 
THOMAS PRICE, M.D., Professor of Chemistry. 



W. 0. AYRES, M. D., Dean of Faculty. 



ADVBRTI8IN0 DBPARTMBNT. 



olxxxvii 



TaZS UNIOlff - ' 

BUSINESS COLLBCB 

- Merchants' Insurance Building, 



9 



s 



This Institution is designed to prepare Boys and Men for Business pursuits, and to impart a 
thorough Commercial education. It is conducted upon actual business principles. The student, 
upon entering this College, is furnished with a capital in Cash and Merchandise — rents a place of 
business, opens an account with the Bank, insures hij goods in the Insurance Office of the College, 
and enters upon 

... The Arena of Business. 

Ho commences speculation, carrying out all the details of trade, buying and selling goods, depos- 
iting in and checking from the Bank, making and negotiating Notes, Drafts, Bills of Exchange, 
etc., (foreign) recording the transactions, and keeping the books in a regular and scientific manner. 
From this ho advances to a field of labor, calling forth the highest order of executive skill, from 
the simplest forms of Co-partnership, as a Dry Goods and Commission Merchant, Flour, Qrain, 
Jobbing and Produce Dealer, to the more advanced exercises of Insurance, Exchange, Brokerage, 
Mining Secretary, and Custom House business, the pupil holding each and every position, from the 
least to the highest; thus becoming practically familiar with Stock and Joint Stock Companies ; 
Simple and Compound Fellowship ; Simple and Compound Equation ; General Average, or loss at 
sea, Merchandise and Adventure Companies, Board of Directors' Meetings, Organization and Man- 
agement of Banks, Custom Duties, ad valorem and specific, and Internal and External Revenue, 
together with the thousand and one details essential to each. Everything is conducted upon real 
Money, Merchandise and business paper bases. A graduate from this College will be competent to 
fill creditably any position in the various departments of business life. 

The public are invited to call and examine the various departments. Students enter upon any 
business day during the year. 




SESSIONS, DAY AND EVENING, v 

PRIIHrOIPAI.. 







IMAGE EVALUATION 
TEST TARGET (MT-3) 







1.0 



1.1 



■to ^^ H^H 

[^ U£ 12.0 

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Photographic 

Sd^ces 

Corporalion 



23 Wit I MAIN STMIT 

WllSTn,N.Y. MSM 

(71«)t7a-4S03 




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clxxxviii PACIFIC coast business dirbotort. 



J. C. JOHNSON & CO. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERR IN 



SADDLERY, HARNESS, SADDLERY HARDWARE, 

•W^HIPS, &c. 

104 ac lOe FROISTT STREET, 

I ^ > 

Kirby's Santa Cruz Leather and Hill's Concord Harness. 



Gop. Moatgomepy & Bash Streets, Sam l^pamcisoo, 



IMPORTER OF 



Foreign Brags, Ghemicals, 

Svirgical Instruments, Apparatus, Appliances, &a 

■ - ■ ■ ^•^ 

Sole Agent for CHARRIERE, of Paris, JOHN WEISS & SON, and COXETER, of London. 

Begs to call the attention of Physicians and Sarp^eons to his most complete stock of Instruments, 

among which are — 

General Operating Casca, Tournlqiieta of every description, iSriscollnncous Instramentt of all kinds, 

Amputatinv, Necrosis and Trepanning Amputating Knives, Scalpels, Chloroform Inh.iiers, 

Cases, Artery Korcopr<, etc., Instruments for Diiignosls, 

Necrosis Cases, Snws, Hone (^ rveps, Trephtne»,Oouges Splints and Fracture Apparatus. 

Large Amputating Cases, and Cliiscis, Eye Knives, Eye Needles Belts, Trusses, i'essarles and Urinals, 

Small Amputating Cases, and Hooks, Eye Hclssors and Forceps, Nyrinffcs and Domestic Apparatus, 

Trepanning " Eye Instruments, Forceps, I'robcs, Fracture liandagcii. 

Instruments for minor operations. Laryngoscopes, ArtlHcial Eyes, 

Pocket Cases of tvery description. Instruments for the Mouth, Larynx ArtlHcial Tympanums, 

among which are and Esophagus, Hearing Tubes of various lengths, 

Charrierc's New Model Eye Cases, Nose, Trachea, Medicine Chests of all kinds, 

~'~ Aural Instruments, Adhesivcl'lastcr, very superior quality, 

Ear Instruments, Lint, very superior quality, 

Litholohritv Instruments, Spongeo I'illne, 

Urethra and Uladdcr Instruments, Cupping Glasses, 
Instruments for Hernia, Varicocele, 8iik Elastic Stockings, Bandages, Ac 



Lithotomy Case«, 

LIthotrlty Cases, 

Spencer Wells* Ovariotomy Cases, 

Vaginal Fistula Cases, 

Uterine Cases. 

Rectum Cases, 

Cupping Cases, , . 

Post Mortem Cases, 

Dissecting Cases, 

Army Regulation Cases, 

Detachment Cases, 



Hydrocele, &c. 



Best Englisli Bougies and Catheters,— 



Instruments of every description for in Ihct the largest and most complete 



Female Diseases, 
Instruments fur Rectum, 
Ecnisseuros, 
Midwifery Instruments, 



assortment of articles required by Phy- 
sicians nnd .Surgeons to be found in the 
United States, ail of which will be sold 
at moderate prices. 



JOHN D. BOYD, 
STAINER, VARNISHER, 




Of Piano Fortfis, Billianl Tais, Secretarimi, Etc. 

413 PINE STREET, 

Four doom Weit Of KontcomnyStrMt, SAN FRAN0I900. 

Piano PollsliliiB a Specialty. 




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An 
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sold at 
P] 

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ADVERTISING DBPARTMEXT. 



clxxxix 



4^ ^' 




GOLD ANO SILVER MEDALB AWAHDEQ TO 

mr. B. J. KESxnvBT. 



FOR THE 




Mechanlui' IiMiltutc, Ran Frenelico, 1S64, OOIiD HEOAI^ FIKST PK KM! VM. 

Mechanic!' InMUutP, Han Franeiiivo. IRt», FIRST PREMIUM FOR "Jl'Sf E BEST OOi:.I» PEITB. 
ASTD UPECI AL PREMIITM, ■II.VEB. MEDAIi, lur my new I'ATKNT FOU^ITAIN FEN, that pos- 
acMca niprlts unknown in nny other pen. 

American Institute, New Vorl(,lH44, CIOE.l> MEDAI. AIVI* FIRHT PREMIITM. 

American Inatltule, New York. 184H, OULD MED Al. ASr» ItlPLOMA. 

UaryUnd InMltute, Baltimore, ISKi, M1E.VEH MEI»AI< ASI> FIM«T PKEMIITM. 



CELEBRATED 

©4Ml@)Mlf£4 ^Q>hm Fills 

UNEQUALED FOB DnBABILITT, FINENESS AND FINISH. 

Ttl-y We-w Dlatnonrt -Pointed, Patent Fountain Pen Is "Warranted 
to IVrlte 'Tj^o Hides of f oolsoap t>y Onoe I>lpplnK In tlie Inlc. 

On every one of my flnt quality Pcna my name U stamped, which warbamts an excuanqb at amt Tim dubino 
TWO YEARS fVom the period of purciiMe, If not broken. 

MY PEHB OF THE IIECOMD 4IVAI.ITT are equal to the BEST IMPORTED ARTICLE, and are 
iold at Nbw York I'ricis. 

PENS MABriJFACTIJREO FOB THE TBADB AT PBICES BAHOIWtt FBOM M 
TO ••• PEB BOZEW. 

Addreis W. B. J. KENNET, Gold Fen Maker, San Franoiaco, Cal. (Box 2044.) 

MANUFACTORY AND SALESROOM, 

ARMORY HAll, N. E. COR. ONTGOMERY AND SACRAMENTO STREETS, 

Ueco loor (Roomt Not. 1 and ». 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINBSS DIRECTORT. 










THROUGH IN TWENTY DAYS. 



\i 






ir. r^ 



sachmento, ul, to Leavenworth city and omaha, 

•VIA. 

PLACER VILLE, 

VIRQIISriA. CITY, 
REESE RIATER, 

FORT CRITTENDEN", , "^ 

SALT il,a.k:e city, 

EORT BRIIDQER, 
JULESBURGH, 

.,- u '-. ', I !' - ,, «i (!'. (Orosains of South Platte) and 

FORT KEARNY. 

The Mails and Passengers will lie over one night at Salt Lake City. 

Passengers will be permitted to lie over at any point on the road, and resume 
their seat when tliere is one vacant. To secure this privilege, they must register their 
names with the Stage Agent at the place they lie over. Passengers allowed 25 
pounds of Baggage ; alt over that weight will be charged extra. 

The Company will not be responsible for loss of Baggage exceeding in value 
Twenty-Five Dollars. 



cU 



Stage Office,— What Cheer House, Sacramento, 
H. BJCOT^TJET'OIl.T, ^^ent, 

OR 
TVXjTjXjS* F^ROO a Co,, San Franolaoo. 




m 



•f.Ml 



3^Y. 



value 



nto, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



CXCl 



MERC A DO A S EUImLY. 

SAINSCTAIN BROS. 

NATIVE CALIFORNIA WINES 

CELEBRATED VINEYARD OF EL ALISO, 

Sainsevflin's Extra Cal. White Wine, Salusevaln's Extra Fine Madeira Wine, 
Sainsevain*s Port Wine, Sainsevain's California Wine Brandy, 

Sainsevaiii's Superior An^^elica Wine, Sainsevain's California Wine Bitters, 
Sainsevaiu's Claret Wine, Sainsevain's Sparkling^ Champagne. 

PIONEER BUILDING, 808 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Between Jackson and Pacific Street!, ^^ 

S A. N F R A. ]Sr C I 8 O O . ^ ^' 



a. A. rKITCHABB. 



I BBVERIir. 



r. I^AKSEKKIIK. 



PIONEER STEAM MABBLE W0BE8 CO. 




DBALEBS IN 



MABBLE MANTELS AND OB AXES, 

HOOTTMBNTS. OBAVXSTOirBB. MUBAIi AND FIiUUBBBS' BIOlBB, 
OF SVAST VABUBTY AND FBIOB. 

MANTEL WAREROOMS, 526 CALIFORNIA ST., 

MONUHENTAL YARD AID FAOTORT, 422 JAOKBCfl STREET. 
All work done at the Lowest Rate*. SAS FBAVCISC!0> CAI.. 



XKi:. IBC 3E}S Xr 3ES 3Ft. X XV^ 

NORTH END OF MONTOOMERT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Tho MMllMt to the Itrgeit Job of SI ONE WORK exeonted with promptneM and diipatoh on the mott 
flkTorable tomu. 

I hare now opened the celebntod ALAMEDA FREESTONE QUARRY, and any penon who ii a Judge 
must pronounce it the best for building purposes in the Paciflc States, and equal in durability to the celebrated 
Eastern Drownttone; and I am prepand to flimish this Stone for all building purposes at a price fltr below 
what it has ever been heretofore oflterod at. For cemetery work it doBca competition. 









I'll 



1. 



cxou 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 



GEO. B. HITCHCOCK & CO. 



Direct Importers of 



F. J. AHHOLB'S WaiTHM flMn AID Z^niM INIC, 
WHATMAN'S DRAWING AND WRITING PAPERS, 

AND 

Sogers and Wostenholm's Cutlery, 

ALSO, 
All of which will be offered in quantities to suit, at reasonable rates. 

Nos. 413 and 415 Sansom Street, Comer of Gommercial. 



ODD FELLOWS' HALL, 325 MONTGOMERY ST. 




2iA.AJNTTf .A.OTX7RER OF 



HASONIG & ODD FELLOWS' MAUA, 

Mir.ITA.EY GOODS. Etc. 



I 



[A, 



THE 



PACIFIC COAST 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



FOR 1867: 



OONTAININO THK 



NAME AND POST OFFICE ADDRESS OF EACH MERCHANT, 
MANUFACTURER AND PROFESSIONAL 



RESIDINO IN 



THE STATES OF CALIFORNIA, OREGON, AND NEVADA ; THE TERRITORIES OP 

WASHINGTON, IDAHO, MONTANA, AND UTAH; AND THE 

COLONY OP BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

ALSO, A 

GAZETTEER OF THE COUNTIES, CITIES AND TOWNS, 

AND 



PIBST YEAR OF PUBLICATION..^ 



COMPILED BT 



HENRY G. LANQLEY. 

EDITOR OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE REGISTER, STATE ALMANAC, ETC. ETC. 

Piloe Fivk Solluii Odd Ooiii. 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

HENRY 0. LANOLEY, PUBLISHER, 612 CLAY STREET, 
TOWMB A BAUOK, EXCfLSIOB STEAb PBESSES, N6 CLAT STREET. 

1867. 



^- 1 



i 



^3 



THE SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 

FOR iser, 

WILL BE PUBLISHED EARLY IN MAY, 1867. 



H 



THE PA^CIFIC COA.ST j^LMi^lST^O 



WILL BE PUBLISHED NOVEMBER IStb, 1867. 

HENBT a. LAMLET, FubUsher, 



ei9 Ctatf Btreet, San FraneUeo, Cat. 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the Year of Our Lord eighteen hundred and sixty-seven. 

By HBNBY O. XiAiraZiBT, 
In the Clerk's OflBce of the District Court of the United States for the District of California. 



> ,. - ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. .. % 

Golden Citt Chemical Works. — Since the sheets of this work, giving an account of the manufiicto- 
ries of San Francisco have been printed, a company has been incorporated under this title, with a capital 
of $500,000. They have an extensive laboratory, with all the modern improvements, located on the corner 
of ^veuth and Townsend streets, under the superintendence of H. P. Wakelee, Esq. The operations of 
these works have been, thus far, principally contiued to the manufacture of sulphuric, nitric, and muriatic 
acids, their capacity being sufficient to manufacture 20,000 pounds of the former each day. These works 
have the contract to supply the U. S. Branch Mint, and the San Francisco Assaying and Retiiiiug Works. 
They are prepared to munufactu.e every variety of chemical preparation for which there is any demand. 

QOARTZ Mills, California, Paok 73.— The aggregate number of stamps in the State is four thousand 
nine hundred and ninety-seven. 

Mbtalluroic and Assay Establishments, page 103. The San Francisco Assatinq and Rkfinino 
Works are also engaged in the assaying of the precious metals. 

Newspapers, Page 111.— Sinee the list has been compiled, The Recorder, a weekly paper, has been 
commenced at Vallejo, by George A. Poor &, Co. 

Area and Resources, Oregon, Page 118. — In a part of the edition, the area of the State is placed at 
130,000,000 acres, the extent of the old Territory, instead of its present limits, 60,000,000 acres. 

HANurACTDRES.— Oakland Cotton Hills, page 96 ; California Clothing Company, page 97 ; and Salem, 
Oregon Woolen Mills, page 134* ; add to each, Badger tc Lindenberger, agents, 411 Battery street, San 
Francisco. 



' 



■'rr-; 



' thousand 

IRkfinino 

baa been 

I placed at 

Ind Salem, 
Itreet, San 



( 'l.:.-i,V'.\t ■i/'.l 



■ '.i .)'■,.■■: 



PREFATORY. 



The publication of a periodical viork of a statistical character, on the resources 
of the Pacific Coast, has long been contemplated by the compiler of the present 
volume ; but the want of success of similar enterprises in other sections of the 
Union has deterred him from prosecuting his intention in the form ori^nallj 
designed, and induced him to adopt the title and plan of the present volume as 
the one more likely to secure 'popular attention and patronage. 

The Pacific Coast Business Directory is intended to be a biennial publica- 
tion, which will contain the name and post office address of each merchant, manu- 
facturer, and professional engaged in business in the States and Territories 
bordering on or in the immediate vicinity of the Pacific Coast, with such informa- 
tion connected .with the resources of that section of the country as will best 
exhibit their variety, character, and extent ; together with any other data of 
general interest that will add to the value of the work as a useful manual of 
reference. 

A work of the above description, if faithfully prepared, will be of essential 
importance to the interests of the residents of the Pacific Coast, for it will be the 
aim of the compiler to furnish in each volu'ne an exhibit of their advance as a 
people, and the progress made in the de /elopmcnt of the valuable and inex- 
haustible resources placed within their reach. The necessity of circulating infor- 
mation of this character is universally admitted, and the success of The Pacific 
Coast Business Directory, it is believed, will accomplish much in that direction. 

In accordance with the above plan, the present volume has been prepared, and 
a brief reference to its contents will show the varied character of the information 
embraced therein. The first part of the work contains the organization of the 
different departments of the Federal Government on the Pacific Coast, and the 
officers thereof, with a variety of useful data of a general character ; the orgam- 
zation of the different States and Territories on the Pacific Coast, and the officers 
attached thereto, with appropriate references to the various departments of each ; 
and a carefully prepared exhibit of the resources of the States and Territories 
included in the plan of the work. In this department the agricultural, the mineral, 
the commercial, and the manufacturing interests have each received careful atten- 
tion, and a large amount of valuable information, including an important contribu- 



PATIFIO COAST BU8INB8S DIRBOTORY. 



tion upon the minoral resources of California, by W. S. Koyos, Eac]., will be 
found contained therein, more complete and thorough in its details than any hith- 
erto published. Fart second embraces a gasetteer of the counties, cities, and 
towns of the Pacific Coast, the local officers governing the same, with the address 
of each merchant, manufacturer, and professional residing therein. Part third 
includes a classified Business Directory, containing the name of each merchant, 
manufacturer, and professional in the States of California, Oregon, Nevada, the 
Territories of Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Utah, and the Colony of British 
ColumMa, arranged under the head of the business or profession in which he is 
engaged. The number of different addresses referred to in these various depart- 
ments of the work exceeds forty thousand. An analytical table of contents, and 
a full and complete index, are added, which will exhibit at a glance the variety 
and character of the subjects referred to in the work, and greatly facilitate ref- 
erence thereto. 

The labor of collecting and preparing for the press the information for a work 
of the above character has required an amount of time and expense which, if 
stated, would be, perhaps, scarcely realized. In addition to the assistance of a 
num*~ " ' '' special agents, who traversed nearly every section of the States and 
Terr embraced within the plan of the work, over ten thousand communicar 

tions nave been forwarded to federal. State, County, and Municipal officers, and 
those engaged in developing the resources of this coast. In this way a mass of 
material was collected together which has required a much longer time to collate 
and tabularize than was anticipated when the work was first announced, and 
which has been the principal cause of the delay in its publication. 

In submitting the results of bis labors to the attention and consideration of the 
public, the compiler would express his thanks to his numerous correspondents for 
their valuable assistance. To Messrs. Wells, Fargo & Co., he is especially 
indebted for their courteous assistance and the valuable facilities extended 
through the numerous and attentive representatives of their House on this coast, 
by which he has been enabled to complete many subjects of importance, thereby 
adding increased value to his efforts. He would also express his obligations to 
the editors of the different-newspapers throughout the coast for the interest mani- 
fested in the success of the enterprise ; to his patrons, for their numerous sub- 
stantial evidences of good will ; and to Messrs. Towne & Bacon, for the care 
bestowed in the execution of the typographical department of the work. 

The second volume of The Pacific Coast Business Directory will be issued 
on or about July Ist, 1868. 






CONTENTS. 



[The pugea fVoin III to IM ire dnpllcated, and ara dlitlngalihed by an aiterlik (*) afflxod to oaoh.] 



UNITKD 

PAOK. 

BXKCrTIVEANDrAUINKT 11 

CONOKKHN, ANDTHKOHUANIZATION THICKKOP IT 

MINIHTKKN ANIlDII'MlMATU' AOKNTH IH 

CONHULN AMU'ONSri.All AdKNTH IN 

AUMY, ANDTIIKOKUANIZATIUNTIIKKKOt'.... I» 

IMvUloii of tho i'lKlHu 19 

KrKlOK'iitn nlliiclioil ID 

Htailonii of 'rriiuiifi !iO 

NAVY, ANDTIIKomiANIZATIONTIIKREUr .... -il 

North I'acillv Si|iiailri>n 'il 

Hnutli I'aclllc S(|iijulriiii II 

Navy Yiirit, Mnrit Inlnnil 'it 

POSTOKKirKS. I'AC'iriC COAST IB 

Rateaof roHtiiKr 'tl 

J'lintal Muiicy iinlcrSyati'in ri 

Pontmaiilpni iiiiil Offlcci, California V3 

roKlniaHtcrn mid Ottlvfii, Urviion '^tt 

INiDtiniiHtiTH and < tWci-it, Novaija 27 

PoKtninati'ni nnd OHIrci, Waalilngton Territory.,., 'it 

I'ontnmnli'rn nnd < tWccii, Iduh; 2H 

rottniiwtcn and Oltlct'ii, Montana 3H 

Poituiaitcra and Ufllvi-s, Utah 'M 



STATES. 

rAOB. 

I'oituiaiiton and Offlcpa, Mfltlah Cnluinbla W 

Kcvcnuc of the l>i-parlinfiit, IMW » 

JUDICIAKY-HITPKKMKCOl'HT W 

Clrculla and J iidgva 10 

(Courts and Term*, California 10 

Cniirtii and Tcnnn, Ort'iioii 30 

(N>-irtii nnit Torinii, Ntnailit (I 

(!ourlaaiid Terma, WanldngtonTiTrliory II 

Courla and Temia, Idaho II 

Courta and Temia, Montana U 

Cnurta and Trmia, (Jtah H 

OFKICKKH, l'A(;iriCCOAHr 13 

I'CltMC l)KI«T 34 

ARKA AND I'OI'I'LATIOS Ill 

AI'I'OUTIONMKSTOKCOSnitKSH S« 

VOTK KOR rRKMIDKNT, IH04 3» 

l'OI'l!LATII)N OHKATURITAINCOMI-AKKI) 3A 

8TATK C A I'lTA I.H SB 

(JOVKHNORMOrTIIKNTATKH, ANDNAI.AKIKS.,. » 

STATKI-KdlHI.ATt'RKS, WIIKN CDSVK.NKU 30 

8TATK ELKCTIONS, WIIKN IIKLI» 96 

rorilLATION AS!) WEALTH, IWH) IS 



PACIFIC STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



STATES AND TKRUITORIF;. AND DATE OF OR- | 
OANIZAllON 37 I 



Areanf pnch 17 

Population and Capital of each 17 



CALIFORNIA 



EXECU-nVE AND STATE OFFICERS 

REPKK.SKN'|-AT1UN IN CONUUESM 

LEUIHLATritE 

Senate, Oflleora and M cmlirra 

Aaacnibly, Oltliu'ra nnd .Mi'nilx-ra 

JUDICIARY-Nl'I'RKME I.OIIIT 

DIatrlct .ludKca 

JUDICIAL DIVrUICTH 

TERMS OK DIH'IUICT COURTS 

SENATORIAL DIXTHICrH 

AHHEMIIL Y DIH I Kl(.' IS 

KXECUTIVE AND STATE DEPARTMENTS .... 

Exccutlvo 

SUte 

Controller 

Treaaurer 

Attorney Ucni'ral 

Surveyor (leneral 

Adjutant Uenoral 

Education 

Exanilnen 

Military Audltora 

Bounty CInlnni 

Stamp (?<>niuil»iil(>ncra 

State Lllintry 

NOTARIES I'l'llLIC 

COMMISSION Kits OF DEEDS 

STATE APPOINTEES, MISCELLANEOUS 

LocaK'iK Aitfiits 

Inaane Aayluni 

State PriHon 

MILITARY DEPARTMENT 

OIHcrra nnd StalTa 

AREA AND RESOURCES 

AUKICULTURAL PRODUCTS, 1864 

Land Inclosed 

Land Cultivated 

YIeldWheat. Barlevand OaU 

HIacellaneoua Proifucta 

Onipeand Wine Urowtng 

Wine and U'andy Crop, I86» 

Fruit and Fruit 'f rrea 

Livestock 

Hldea an', Wool 

MINERAL (ESOURCES 

Uold K glon— Its extent, and modes of mining. 

Silver 

Quicksilver 



Copper . 

Coal— Asphaltum . 



Petroleum 

Borax 

Sulphur 

Tin and Iron.. 
Ulacellancous, 

8VARTZH1LLS 
ANALS AND WATER DITCHES 

MANUFACTURES Hand 

Urist Mills and Flour 

Lumber and Saw Mills 

Woolen and Cotton Uoods , 

Cotton Wadding 

Silk 



37 
37 
87 
37 
SH 
3» 
3» 
3» 

a» 

40 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
4i 
4'i 
4i 
44 
47 
47 
48 
4H 
48 
48 
48 
49 
49 
49 
49 
50 
ft'i 
5J 
M 
S3 
A3 
M 
3.5 
63 

<>e 

68 
(>9 
70 
71 
71 
71 
71 
79 
99 
84 
88 
96 
96 
97 



Clothlng-Iioots and Shoes— Shirts 17 

Blank Hooks 97 

Paiicr-Powaor—Ulauware-Cordngo— Matches .. 98 

Leather 99 

Saddlery and Harness (9 

Typo 99 

Furniture (6 

Matting 99 

Kroonis 99 

IlllllanI Tables ItO 

Wooden Ware 100 

Show Cttaea lOO 

Planoa— Mirrors 100 

Mniahca 100 

Uold and Silverware— Jeweliy 100 

Simiir Kcllnerlea 100 

Macaroni and Vermicelli 101 

Yeaat I'owdcm 101 

M uatard 101 

Distillation of SplrlU 101 

Cigars 101 

Preservetl Frults,etc 101 

Cured MeaU 102 

lircwertea 102 

Confectionery 102 

Soap 102 

Iron Foundries 102 

Rolling Mill 103 

Lead Pipe anil Shot 108 

Saws and Saw Teeth 103 

Wire and Wire Rope 103 

Agricultural Implements 103 

Carriages and Wagons 103 

Metsllurglcal and Assay Works 103 

Chemicals 2 and 104 

Salt 104 

Oils and PoinU 104 

Turpentine, Pitch and Rosin 104 

Petroleum Reflnerles 104 

Pottery wore 104 

Marble Works 105 

Furs 105 

FISHERIES 106 

COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS 105 

LEGAL DISTANCES 106 

POPULATION, I860 and 1866 108 

VALUE REAL AND PER.sONAL PROPERTY 106 

BANKS AND INSURANCE COMPANIES 106 

DEBT OF THE STATE 107 

DEBTS OF THE COUNTIES 107 

COUNTY RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 107 

ELECTION RETURNS, 1860, 1861, 1863, and 1864 108 

TREASURE SHIPMENTS 108 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS, SAN FRANCISCO 108 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENBITURES, FEDERAL ... 108 

LIBRARIES. PUBLIC AND SOCIETY 109 

NEWSPAPER AND PERIODICAL PRESS 110 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS 112 

COLLEGES 112 

RAILROADS 112 

TELEGRAPH LINES 113* 

SHIP BUILDING 1I3» 

MINERAL SPRINGS 11*> 



: it 



! 



6 



PAOiriO COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 



OBKOON. 

EXECntlVR ANn STATE OmCERS Yu^'qUABTZ MILM 

KKI'KKMKN'rATlON IN C'UNUUKHb lU* CANALH AND WATER DITCHES 

LEUIHI.ATt-KK lU'iMANlTKAVrORIKX . 

flinulKnml IIoiim- of RpprmrnUUvei 114* 

JITDICIAKV. HlIl'UKMK COURT MS* 

JITDICIAL IIISTKICTH l|iy* 

TKRMH OK CIRCriT AND COUNTY C0CRT8 IIS> 

DISTRICT ATTORNKYH ||«* 

SENATORIAL DIHTRirTfl Il«» 

RKI'RKMKNTATIVK DISTRICTS 1I»» 

MOTARIKH ITHMC Il«« 

COMMINHIONKIW OK DEEDS 1IT» 

AREA AND RKHOCRCKH IID* 

AURICCLTl'RAL l-RODVCTS, 1864 ll<»* 

Ylclilof (lr«ln, etc IIK* 

MINERAL RESOURCES 119* 



rAOl 



fill* 
. II4* 



NEVA 

EXECUTIVE AND STATE OFFICERS I*I» 

REFRESKNTATION IN CONGRESS I'Jl* 

I.EUIOLATURK ij* 

Senate hikI AMcmbly fit* 

JUDICIARY, mi; ntKME COURT 1J8* 

DiHrictJiiiluvi l-i8* 

JUDICIAL, DISTIUCT8 1»* 

TERMS DISTRICT COURTS. Ii«* 

SENATORIAL AND ASSEMDLY DISTRICTS UH* 

NOTARIES PUHLIC 1.81* 

COMMIHSIONKKS OF DEEDS 120* 

STATE LANDS 130* 

AREA AND RESOURCES 131* 

MINERAL IJl* 

WASHINQTON 

EXECUTIVE AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS IJ7' 

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS 13T 

LEOISLAIIVK DISTRICTS I3T* 

REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICTS 137* 

NOTARIES I'lnLIC 137* 

C<»MMIS>I()NKI(S OF DEEDS I3H* 

AREA AND KKSOURCES 138* 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS I31»* 

Yli-lil of Grnln-Llve Stock 139' 

MANUFACTORIES I3»> 

Flour, OrlatUilla 13»< 



Flour, Grill Mill! 
Lumber, Haw Mllli 

Woolen Good! 

Paper VW 

Iron Fouiitlrlea— Leather, Tannerloi I'iS* 

Llnneetl (III— Turpentine anil Roiln IW* 

PUBLIC F":ilOOLH-RAILROADS J'iJI* 

COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS IJI* 

popu;. u'loN, INW AND law IM* 

VOTES, INM AND IMW IM* 

VALUE OF REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY . IM* 

NEWHPAPEItS-LIURARIES llf 

FINANCES AND DEBT m* 

DA. 

Quartz Mill 131* 

CanaU and Wnter Ditchoi IM* 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS IM* 

Lanil and Live Stock 134* 

MANUI'ACI'ORIES 13(1* 

Fl.iiir, Orirt Mills 13«* 

Lumher, Saw Mllln 18»* 

FINANCES-PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS** 

LIBRARIES-NEWSPA'/ERS ISB* 

COUNTIES AND COUMTY SEATS 13«* 

ELECTION RETURNS, laW 13(t* 

POPULATION 136* 

VALUE OF REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY . 136* 
PRODUCT OF MINES, IMS AND INO 136* 



TERRITORY. 

Lumber, Saw MIIU ISA* 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOL 140* 

STATISTICS, PORT TOWNSEND I4«* 

COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS 141* 

POPULATION, IH63 141* 

VOTES, 1863 AND I8US 141* 

VALUE OF REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY.. 141> 

FINANCES 141* 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 141* 

LIBRARIES-NEWSPAPERS 141* 

NATURAL RESOURCES 141* 



IDAHO TERRITORY, 



EXECUTIVE AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 14»* 

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS 14'i 

LEGISLATIVE DIS'IRICTS 14'i> 

NOTARIES PIHLIC 142* 

COMMISSION Kits Of DEEDS 143* 

AREA AND RESOURCES 143* 

MINERAL 143* 

QuarU MllU-Wntcr Dltchei 144* 



AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 146* 

MANUFACTORIES I4IJ* 

Flour-Griat Mllla 14ft* 

Lumber-Saw Milli 14ft* 

COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS 14ft* 

ELECTION RETURNS, IMW 14»* 

PRINCIPAL CITIES AND TOWNS 14«* 

LIBRARIES-NEWSPAPERS :. 14«* 



MONTANA TERRITORY. 



EXECUTIVE AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 146* 

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS UK* 

LEGISLATURE 146* 

Leglalatlvo Dialrlcta I4«* 

ReproKcntuti ve DIatrlcta 147* 

NOTARIES PUBLIC 147* 

COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS 147* 

AREA AND RESOURCES 147* 

MINERAL 148* 

Quartz Mills- Water Ditchoi 148* 



AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS UfP 

MANUFACTORIES 149* 

Flour-Griat Mllla 149* 

Lumber-Saw Mllla 149* 

FINANCES 149* 

COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS 14»» 

TERRITORIAL REVENUE 149* 

VALUE OK REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY.. 149* 

PRINCIPAL CITIES AND TOWNS 149* 

LIBRARIES-NEWSPAPERS 190* 



UTAH TERRITORY, 



EXECUTIVE AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 180* 

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS ISO* 

LEGISLATURE ISO* 

Council DlBlrlfta 160* 

KeprMcntntive Diatricta ISO* 

KOTARIES'PI BLIC IftI* 

AREA AND RESOURCES ISl* 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS Iftl* 

Yield Wheat, Barley, etc ISi* 

Fruit Treeaand Livestock ISi* 



IRRIGATING DITCHES 1»»* 

GRISTMILLS AND FLOUR ISl* 

SAW MILLS AND LUMBER ISJ* 

COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS.. 186* 

POPULATION, I860 189* 

VALUE OF REAL AND PER.SONAL T'ROPERTY... !»»• 

PRINCIPAL CITIES AND TOWNS I»»* 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS-FINANCES 16ft* 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES Iftft* 

MEktSPAPERS-LIHRARIES 1S<* 



COLONY OP BRITISH 

EXECUTIVE AND CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT I86> 

JUDICIAL ESTABLISHMENT 1»7* 

AREA AND RESOURCES 1S7* 

SHIPMENTS OK GOLD 1»7* 

MANUFACTORIES 147* 



COLUMBIA. 

Flour-Oriit Mllla 1S7* 

Lumber-Sftw MIIU 1«»* 

FINANCES, 186ft IBS* 

PORT STATISTICS, VICTORIA, 1865 188* 

LIBRARIES-NEWSPAPERS 186* 



BUSINESS REGISTER AND OAZETTEER. 



CALIFORNIA Ill* 

OREGON 887 

NEVADA !»ft 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY 319 



IDAHO TERRITORY 3« 

MONTANA TERRITORY 347 

UTAH TERRITORY 386 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 176 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS 

SANFRANCISCO 188 

CAUFORNIA 411 

OREGON 511 

NEVADA 513 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY 847 



DIRECTORY. 

IDAHO TERRITORY 551 

MONTANA TERRITORY 565 

UTAH TERRITORY 810 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 861 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT foUowi 869 



rAna. 
... V»' 
...IiO« 
...Ml* 

,..m» 
... vu> 

... U4* 
...!•»• 
... !•»• 

... m' 
■•••iSl 

...IM* 

... m» 

...IM* 
Y. 1«* 

....vw 
.... m* 



HI* 

1M« 

\*V> 

134* 

1S»» 

!»»• 

IM* 

IM* 

!»• 

lS(t» 

l!l«» 

las* 

;ty . lat* 

136> 



If; 
•i 

.Ml* 
. 141* 
.141* 
.141* 

:tti: 



. 14»* 
.141k* 
.\VI> 
. IVf 
.148' 
. 145* 
. 14«» 

. m* 



..US" 
.. 149* 
.. 14B* 
.. 149* 
..149* 
..14»* 

14»* 

^TY.. Uf 
...149* 
,.. 150* 



..1S2* 
.. 1»2* 
.. 1.M* 
.. ISS* 
...ll»* 
ti'Y... IM* 
...IM* 
...1»* 
...1IW» 
... IM* 



, 1»7* 
, 1«H* 

. wr 

.188* 
.188* 



3*1 
S47 
386 
116 



Ul 
88» 
88» 

an 

.860 



**i'.i 11 I 1 



GENERAL INDEX. 

[The piigai ttom 111 to 188 are duplicated, and are dlitlngulihcd bjr an aiterUk (•) afflxod to eaob.] 



rAoa.! PAoa. 

AtUutant Qeneral, California ... 41 BmlncM Diroetorjr, Idaho Ter> 

Agricultural Iniulenienti, Han- ritory 661 

uiholure, Califuruia 108 Buiinpw Direetorr, Mo*itana 

ARficulturo BritlKh Columbia . 167* Territory 666 

Agrioultural (.'aliloriiia ... .48 and 49, BuilneM Directory, Mevuda. ... 688 
Agrioulturo, Idaho Territory .. 146*; Buaincn Directory, Ore.^on.... 611 
Agriculture, Montana Territory 14B*]Buiiuo«H Directory, Han Vnui- 



ib Terri- 



cloco, . 

Buiiinon Directory, I". 

tory Co9 

ButineM Dirvctoky.WaihinKton 

Territory 647 

. y _ ... . ^ 

118* 



Agriculture, Nevada 184* 

Agriculture, Oregon 119* 

ARriculturc, Utah Territory. . . . 161* 

Agriculture, Waahingtou Tcrrl- 
tory.... 189* 

Apple Crop, ('allforuia 68 Butter I'roduet, California. 

Apple Crop, (Jregun 119* Butter Product, Oregon 

Apple Crop, Utah Territory. . . . 1S2* Cabinet, U. 8. 

Apportionment, U. 8. Congreat- 
ional 17 and 86 

Area and Itcoourcoa, Britlih Co- 
lumbia 167* 

Area and I{ei<oiirci>R, California 48 

Area and Ktw v. <'c- «, Idaho Ter- Califbrnia Judiciary. . . 
ritory 148* Caltlbruia, UtUceni, etc. . . 

Area and itpgourcea, Montana California, I'oet OtUcei... 

'i'erritnry 147*| California, Begiiter of Mamei. . 

Area and Itc80urc«>«, Nevada. . . 181* Calllbruia, V. 6. Court* 

Area and UeHourcoH, uregon. . . 118*|Canalt and Water Ditches, Cal- 

Area and Ucoourccit, Utah Ter> ifurnia 

ritory 161* Canala and Water Ditches, Ida- 
Area and liPKOurces, Washing' 



California Bwiness Directory. 
Calllbrnia, Citie* and Town*. . 
California, Department of, U 



17 



PAOB. 

CommlMioncra of Deeds, Cali- 
fornia 44 

CommiMionem of Deeds, Idaho 
Territory 148* 

Commissionom of Deeds, Mon- 
tana Territory 147* 

Commissioners of Deeds, Mo> 
vada ia»» 

Commissioners of Deeds, Ore- 
»..M 117* 

Comnii' oners of Deeds, Wash- 
inK* .' 1 Territory 188* 

Conl'ecilonery, Hnuufheture, 
' aliibrnla 102 

Cougrefs,Mcimtiersof)California 87 



86 

18 
887 



ton Territory 188* 

Area I'aoiHo mates and Territo- 
ries 87 

Area States 86 

Army,U.8 19 

Asphaltum, California VH 

Assay Kstabli^lmicnts, Cal 108 

Assembly, California 88 

Assembly, Nevada 128* 

Assembly DUtrlots, California. 41 
Assembly UiHtricts, Nevada. . . . 128* 
Attorney (iciivral, California. . 41 

Banks, Caliturnia 100 

Barley Crop, <'alif«)rnia.. . .49 and 60 

Barley Crop, Nevada 134* 

Barley Croi>, Urogon 119* 

Barley Crop, Utah Territory. . . 162* 

Beau Crop, California 60 

Billiard Tables, Manufacture, 

California 100 

Blank Books, Manufticture, Cal' 

ifornia 07 

Boots and Shoos, Manulhoturo, 

California 

Borax. California 70 

Bounty Claimn.Board of Exam' 

iners, California 41 

Branch Mint, U. 8 

Brandy Product, California. ... 62 

Breweries, California 1<>2 

British Columbia Business Dl 

rectory 668 

British Columbia, Uovern- 

ment, etc 166* 

British Columbia, Post Offices. 29 
British Columbia, Begister of 

Names 876 

Brooms, Hanufhcture, Califor- 



48Si;Cougrri'>. .Momber'< of, Nevada. 137* 
lil*X'ongreiM>, Mcnibpniof, Uregon. 114* 

iCongreitii, U. 8 17 

8. Army. .'. 10, Coiigrcwiuiial Apportionment. " 

California 1' inanoes 107 1 CouhuIh and Commercial Ag'ls, 

■ ■ ■■ • 89{ U.8 

87 Consuls, Foreign, San Francisco 
28 Controller's iJepartmout, Call- 

111*1 Ibrnia 41 

VOiCopper, Truductof, Calllbrnia . 66 
i Cordage, Manuikoture, Califor- 

70 uia 98 

Cotton Crop, California 61 

ho Territory 144* Cotton Crop, Utah Territory... 162* 

Canals and Water Ditohes,Mon- Cotton Uoods, Manufacture, 

tana Territory 148*! California 96 

Canals and Water Ditches, No- Counties and County Seats, 

vada 131* Calilornla 106 

Canals and Water Ditches, Or^ Counties and County Seats, 

egon 120*1 Idaho Territory 146* 

Capitais,State and Territorial 86 8(87. Counties and County Seats, 

Carriages and Wagons, Manu- Montana Torritory 49* 

fkcture, California 108! Counties and County Seats, 

Cattle, Califbrnia 68 Nevada 186* 

Cattle, N evada 184* : Counties and County Seats, Or- 

Cattle, Oregon 110* egon 136* 

Census, U. 8 86 Counties and County Seats, 

Cheese Product, California .... 60 Utah Territory 166* 



Clieese Product, Oregon 119* CountioH and County Seats, 

Chemicals, Manufkoture, Call- Washington Territory 141* 

fornla 3 and 104 County Courts, California, 

Cigars, Manulkcture, California lull Terms 89 

Circuit Court, Terms, Oregon. . 116*ICouuty Courts, Oregon, Terms 110* 

Circuits, U.8 80 1 County Finances, Calilornia... 107 

Cities and Towns, British Co- iCountyOilicers, California, 

lumbia 876 lll*to26e 

Cities and Towns, California. . . Ill* County Officers, Idaho Ttrri- 
Cities and Towns, Idaho Terri- tory . ^ 837 to 846 



Brushes, Manufacture, California 100 
Buckwheat Crop, California ... 60 
Business Directory, British Co- 
lumbia 668 

Business Directory, California . i 



tory 146* and 387 

Cities and Towns, Montana Tei^ 

ritory 149* and 847 

Cities and Towns, Nevada 296 

Cities and Towns, Oregon 267 

Cities a..d Towns, Utah Terri- 
tory 166*and866 

dtleaand Towns, Washington 

Territory 819 

Clothing, Manulkcture, Califor- 
nia 97 

Coal, California 68 

Coast Survey, U. S., Wc Joast 83 

Cobalt, California 71 

Collector of Customs, Faciflo 

Coast 88 

Colleges, California 112 

Colleges, Washington Territory 140* 
Columbia, Department U. 8. 
Army 19 



County Officers, Montana T^rri' 

tory 847 to 866 

County Officers, Nevada. .296 to 818 
County Officers, Oregon . .267 to 294 
County Officers, Utah Territory 

866 to 878 
County Officers, Washington 

Territory 819 to 886 

Courts, see respective headings. 
Cured Meats, Manufacture, Cal- 
ifornia 103 

Customs, Collectors of, U. 8. . . 88 

Debt, State, California 107 

Debt, State, Nevada 186* 

Debt, SUte, Oregon 120* 

Debt,U. 8 84 

Delegate in Congress, Idaho 

Territory 148* 

Delegate in Congress, Montana 
Territory 148* 



fjl 



1 



¥• 



[i 



i 



it 



8 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 



PAQK. 

Delegate in Congress, V • .h Ter- 

ritory '. leO* 

Delegate in Congress, Washing- 
ton Territory 187* 

Distillation of Spirits, Califor- 
nia 101 

District Attorneys, Oregon 116* 

District Court«, Califurnia 89 

District Courts, Nevada 128* 

District Cour»4, U. S., TaciBo 

Coast ao 

Ditches, see Water Ditches. 

DryDock, U. 8.... 118» 

Kducation, State Board of, Cal- 
ifornia 41 

Education, U. S .' 86 

Egg Product, Oallfornla 63 

Breotion Keturns, Calilornla. . . 108 
Election Keturns, Idaho Terri- 
tory 145* 

Election Returns, Nevada 136* 

Election Returns, Oregon 126* 

Election Keturns, U. 8., 18C4. . 86 
Election Returns, Washington 

Territory 141* 

Elections, State, when hold. ... 86 
Examiners, Board of, California 41 
Examiners, Board of, Nevada. . 127* 
Executive Department, Califor- 
nia 37 and 41 

Executive Department, Idaho 

Territory 142* 

Executive Department, Mon- 
tana Territory 146* 

Executive Department, Nevada 127* 
B^ecutive Department, Oregon 114* 
Executive Department, U. 8. . . 17 
Executive Department, Utah 

Territo.y 150* 

Executive Department, Wash- 
ington Territory 187* 

Exports, San Francisco 108 

Finances, British Columbia. .. . 168* 

Finances, California 107 

Finances, Counties, California. . 107 
Finances, Montana Territory . . 149* 

Finances, Nevada 135* 

Finances, Oregon 126* 

Finances, Utali Territory 156* 

Finances, Washington Terri- 
tory 141* 

Fisheries, Calirornia 106 

Fisheries, Washington Terri- 
tory 188* 

Flax Culture, California 51 

Flax Culture, Oregon 110* 

Flour Manufacture, British Co- 
lumbia 167* 

Flour Manufacture, California. 84 
Flour Manufacture, Idaho Ter- 
ritory 145* 

Flour Manufacture, Montana 

Territory 149* 

Flour Manuthoturc, Nevada . . . 135* 

Flour Manufacture, Oregon 121* 

Flour Manutiacture, Utah Terri- 
tory 162* 

Flour Manufacture, Washing- 
ton Territory 189* 

Foreign Consuls 897 

Foreign Ministers, U. S 18 

Fortifications, Pacific Coast ... 19 

Foundries, California 102 

Foundries, Oregon 126* 

Fruit Growing, Califurnia 62 

Fruit Growing, Oregon 119* 

Fruit Growing, Utah Territory 162* 
Fruits, Califomia.wkien matured 58 
Furniture Manufacture, Califor- 
nia 99 

Fun, California 106 

Gaxetteor, Cities and Towns Pa- 

olBo Coast in* 

Glass Manufacture, California. 98 
Gold and Silverware Manufac- 
ture, Califoriiirt 100 

Gold Product, California 64 

Gold Product, Idaho Territory 144* 
Gold Product, Oregon 119* 



PAOIt. 

Gold Region, California 64 

Gold Shipments, British Co- 
lumbia 167* 

Gold Shipmenta, California .... 106 

Governors, State 86 

Governors, Territorial 86 

Grain Crop, California 49 

Grain Crop, New York, com- 
pared 80 

Grain Crop, Oregon 119* 

Grain Crop, Utah Territory. . . 162* 
Grape and Wine Growing, Cal- 
ifornia 62 

Great Britain, Population 86 

Grist Mills, British Columbia. . 167* 

Grist Mills, California 84 

Grist Mills, Idaho Territory. . . . 146* 
Grist Mills, Montana Territory. 149* 

Grist Mills, Nevada 186* 

Grist Mills, Oregon 121* 

Grist Mills, Utah Territory 162* 

Grist Mills, Washington Terri- 
tory 189* 

Gypsum, California 71 

Hay Crop, California 60 

Hay Crop, Nevada 134* 

Hay Crop, Oregon 119* 

Hay Crop, Utah Territory 162* 

Hay Crop, Washington Terri- 
tory 189* 

Hemp Culture, California 61 

Hemp Culture, Oregon 119* 

Hides, Exports, California 64 

Hides and Wool, California... 68 

Hogs, California 68 

Hogs, Nevada 184* 

Hogs, Oregon 119» 

Hogs, I'tah Territory 152* 

Honey Bee, Calit'ornia 60 

Hop Culture, California 51 

Hop Culture, Oregon 119* 

Horses, California 53 

Horses, Nevada 134* 

Horses, Oregon 119* 

Horses, Utah Territory 152* 

Horses, Washington Territory. 139* 
House of Kcpro.-cntatives, U. 8. 17 
Idaho Territory, Bu^iiuvss Di- 
rectory 561 

Idaho Territory, Government, 

etc 142* 

Idaho Territory. Post Offices. . . 28 
Idaho Territory, Register of 

Names 337 

Idaho Territory, U, 8. Courts. . 81 

Imports, British Columbia 168* 

Imports, San Francisco 108 

Imports, Washington Territory 140* 

Incorporated Companies 408 

Indian Aflhirs, U. 8. Superin- 
tendents of. 34 

Indian Agents, Pacific Coast. . . 34 
Indian Corn Crop, California . 50 

Indiau (.'om Crop, Oregon 119* 

Indian Corn Crop, Utah Terri- 
tory 162* 

Indian Com Crop, Washington 

Territory 189* 

Insane Asylum, California 48 

Insurance Companies, Califor- 
nia 106 

Insurance Companios,San Fran> 

Cisco 409 

Internal Revenue Officers, Paciflo 

Coast 

Iron, California 71 

Iron, Oregon 120* 

Iron Foundries, California 102 

Iron Foundries, Oregon 125* 

Jewelry, ManuiUcture, Califor- 
nia 100 

Judges, see respective Courts. 
Judicial Districts, California. . . 

Judicial Districts, Nevada 128* 

Judicial Districts, Oregon 116* 

Judicial Districto, U. S. Pacilio 

Coaat ao 

Judiciary, British Columbia. . . . 167* 
Judiciary, California 89 



PAGE. 

Judiciary, Nevada 128* 

Judiciary, Oregon 116* 

Judiciary, U. S W 

Knit Goods Manufacture, Cal- 
ifornia 96 

Land Agents, California 47 

Land Ag'ts, U. 8. Pacific Coast 88 

Land Office, California 42 

Land Office, U. 8. Pacific Coast 88 
Lands, Agricultural, California 48 
Lands, Agricultural, Idaho Ter- 
ritory 146* 

Lands, Agricultural, Montana 

Territory 149* 

Lands, Agricultural, Nevada. . . 184* 
Lands, Agricultural, Oregon . . 119* 
Lands, Agricultural, Utah Ter- 
ritory 161* 

lAnds, Agricultural, Washing- 
ton Territory 139* 

Lands, State, California 48 

Lands, State, Nevada 180* 

Lands, State, Oregon 119* 

Lead, Manufacture, California. 108 
Leatlier, 3Iuuufacture, Califoi^ 

uia 9B 

Leather, Manufacture, Oregon. 126* 
Legal Distances, California .... 106 

Legislature, California 87 

Legislature, Idaho Territory. . . l«i* 
Legislature, Montana Territory 146* 

Legislature, N evada 127* 

Legislature, Oregon 114* 

Legislature, Utali Territory. . . . 160* 
Legislature, Washington Terri- 
tory 187* 

Libraries, British Columbia. . . . 168* 

Libraries, California 109 

Libraries, Idaho Territory 146* 

Libraries, Montana Territory. . 160* 

Libraries, Nevada 188* 

Libraries, Oregon 126* 

Libraries, Utah Territory 166* 

Libraries, Washington Territory 141* 

Library, State, * alifornia 42 

Linsooa Oil, Manufacture, CaU- 

fornia IM 

Linseed Oil, Mauufacturo, Ore- 
gon 126* 

Live Stock, California 63 

Live Stock, Nevada 184* 

Live Stock, Oregon 119* 

Live Stock, Utah Territory. . . . 152* 
Live Stock, Wasliington Terri- 
tory 189* 

Lumber, Imports, San Fran- 
cisco 88 

Lumber, Manufacture, British 

Columbia 168* 

Lumber, Manufhcture, Califor- 
nia 88 

Lumber, Manufacture, Idaho 

Territory 146* 

Lumber, Manufacture, Montana 

Territory 149* 

Lumber, Manufacture, Nevada 185* 
Lumber Manufautun>, Oregon.. 128* 
Lumber, Manufacture, Utah 

Territory 168* 

Lumber, tlanufacture, Wash- 
ington Territory 189* 

Macaniiii, Manufacture, Califor- 
nia 101 

Mail Service. U. 8 29 

Manganese, California 71 

Manufactures, California . .84 and 95 

ManufhcturcE, Oregon 121* 

Marble,Manufaetiirt>, California 106 
Marble, Quarries, California. . . 106 
Matches, Manuflacture, Califor- 
nia 98 

Matting, Manutikoture, Califoiv 

nia 99 

Merchants and Professionals, 

British Columbia 668 

Merchants and Profoislonali, 

California .. 4i>8 

Merchants and Professionals, 
Idaho Territory 661 



QENBRAL INDEX. 



9 



PAOC. 

...MS* 
...116* 
... W 

... 96 
... 47 
>Mt S8 
... 42 
Mst 88 
rnit 48 
rer- 

. ... 146* 
tana 

....149» 
a...l84» 
,n..n9» 
Te^ 

161» 

ling- 
.....189» 

48 

180* 

11»« 

rnia. 108 
»lifo^ ^ 

.gon! 126* 

*.... 87, 
,ry...l«» 
rtlory 146» 
..... 1«» 

114» 

ry....l60» 
Terri- 

187» 

,ia....l68» 

..... 109 

r 146* 

tory. . 1B0» 
...... 188» 

126* 

166* 

rritoryl4i; 

5, Cat 

: IM 

o, Ore- 
,...126« 
.... 68 
.... 184* 
....119» 

|.rv. . . . 152» ! 
terri- 



FAQI. 

MerohanU and Profbsaionali, 

Montana Territory 666 

Merchants and ProferaionalB, 

Hevada 688 

Merohanta and IVofteeionala, 

OKgon 611 

Merotaanti and Protessionalp, 

San Franoiiioo 886 

Merchants and Froi^ionali, 

Utah Territory 669 

Merchants and Proi^ssionals, 

Washington Torritoiy 647 

Metallurgic and Assay Estab- 
lishments, California 108 

Metallurgic and A»say Estab- 

liibments, Nnvadn 181* 

Military, Calitornia 48 

Military, U. 8., I'aciUu Coast. . . 19 
MiliUry Auditors, Board of, 

California 41 

Military Posts, U. 8., Paclflo __ 

Coast 20 

Mills, Flour, British Columbia. 167* 

Mills, Flour, California 84 

Mills, Flour, Idaho Territory. . 146* 
Mills, Flour, Montana Terri- 
tory..... 149» 

Mills, Flour, Nevada 186* 

Mills, Flour, Oregon 121* 

Mills, Flour, Utah Territory. . . 162* 
Mills, Flour, Washington Turri- 

tiry.... 189» 

Mills, Iron, San Francisco 108 

Mills, Paper, California 98 

Mills. Paper, Oregon 126» 

Hills, Powder, California 98 

Mills, Quartz, California 78 

Mills, Quartz, Idaho Territory. 144* 
Mills, Quartz, Montana Terri- 
tory..... 148* 

Mills, Quartz, Kevada Iit2* 

Mills, Quartz, OrcRon 120* 

Mills, Kice, tian Francisco .... 419 

Mills, Salt, San Francisco 419 

Mills, Saw, British Columbia.. 168* 

Mills, Saw, California 88 

BHIls, Saw, Idaho Territory. . . . 146» 
Mills, Saw, Montana Territory. 149* 

Mills, Saw, Nevada 136* 

Mills, Saw, Oregon 1}!8* 

Mills, Saw, Utali Territory 158* 

Mills, Saw, Washington Ter. . . 139* 

Mills, Woolen, Caliloruia 96 

Mills, Woolen, Oregon 124* 

Mineral Uesources, British Co- 
lumbia 167* 

Mineral Kesources, California. . 64 
Mineral Kesources, Idaho Ter- 
ritory 148* 

Mineral Kesources, Montana 

Territory 148* 

Mineral Iteeourcos, Nevada. . . 131* 

Mineral Kesources. Oregon 119* 

Mineral Springs, California. . . . 118* 
Mining, varietiOM of, Calilbrnia. 68 

Ministers, Foreign, U. S 18 

Mint, U. S. Branch, San Fran- 
cisco 83 

Mirrors, Manuikctui-e, Califor- 
nia 100 

Montana Territory, Busi<>ess Di- 
rectory 666 

Montana Territory, fjovernm't, 

etc 148* 

Montana Territory, I'ost Offices 28* 
Montana Territory, Htcgister of 

Names 847 

Montana Territory, U.S. Courts 82 

Mortality, U. 8 86 

Mulberry, Cultivation of. .61 and 97 
Mustard, Uanuiltoture, Califor- 
nia 101 

NaTy,U.8 31 

Navy, U. 8, Paoiflo Ocean 21 

Navy Yard, U. S. Mare Island. . 21 
Nevada Business Directory .... 688 

Nevad;' Qovemment, etc 127* 

Nevada, Post OWoes 27 

Nevada, Register of Names .... 296 



PAoa. 

Nevada, U. 8. Conrti 81 

Newspapers, British Columbia. 168* 

Newspapers, California 110 

Newspapers, Idaho Territory. . 14<<* 
Newspapers, MontanaTerritory 160* 

Newspapers, Nevada 186* 

Newspapers, Oregon 126* 

Newspapers, Utah Territory... 166* 
Newspapers, Washington Terri- 
tory 141* 

Nickel. California 71 

North Paoilio Squadron, U.8.N. 21 
Notaries Public, California.... 42 
Notaries Public, Idaho Terri- 
tory 142* 

Notaries Public, Montana Ter- 
ritory 147* 

Notaries Public, Nevada 129* 

Notaries Public, Oregon 116* 

Notaries Public, Utah Territory 161* 
Notaries Public, Washington 

Territory 187* 

Oats, Crop, California ... .49 and 60 

Oats, Crop, Oregon 119* 

Oats, Crop, Utah Territory 162* 

Oats, Crop, Washington Terri- 
tory 189* 

Officers, U. 8., Paclflo Coast. . . 
Oils and Paints, Manufocture, 

California 104 

Oil Keaneries, California 104 

Olives, California 63 

Oregon, Business Directory. . . . 6ll 

Oregon, Government, etc 114* 

Oregon, Itegistcr of Names. ... 267 

Oregon, Post Offices 26 

Oregon, U.S. Cou'ts 80 

PacTflc Division, U. 8. A . 19 

Pacific SUtes and Territories . . 87 
Paints, Manufacture, California 104 
Paper, Manufacture, California 98 
Paper, Manufhcture, Oregon. . . 126* 

Pea Crop, California 60 

Peach Trees, California 68 

Pension Agents, U. 8., Faciflc 

Coast 84 

Periodicals, California 110 

Petroleum, California 69 

Pianos, ManufiictUTe, California 100 

Pilot Examiners, S. F 47 

Pitch. Manulhcture, California 104 

Platinum, California 72 

Plumbago, California 71 

Population, California 106 

Population, Great Britain and 

Ireland 86 

Population, Nevada 188* 

Population, Oregcm 126* 

Population, Utah Territory. . . . 165* 
Population, Pacific States and 

Territories, 1806 87 

Population, U. 8 35 and 86 

Population, WashiT.^n Terri< 

tory 

Port Wardens, S. F •. . 

Post Office Department, U. 8. . 
Post Offices, British Columbia 
Post Offices, California. . . . v . . . 23 
Post Offices, Idaho Territory.. . 28 
Post Offices, Montana Territory 28 

Post Offices, Nevada 27 

Post Offices, Oregon 26 

Post Offices, U. 8., PaoiHo Coast 22 
Post Offices, Utah Territory. ... 28 
Post Offices, Washington Ter'y. 27 

Postage Hates 22 

Postal Money Order System ... 22 

Potato Crop, California 60 

Potato Crop, Nevada 134* 

Potato Crop, Oregon 119* 

Potato Crop, Utah Territory. . . 152* 
Potato Crop, Washington Ter- 
ritory 189* 

Pottery, Manufacture, Califor- 
nia 106 

Poultry, California 68 

Powder Manui1ioture,CaliA>mla 98 
Preserved Fruit and Vegeta- 
bles, California 101 



141* 

47 
29 



PAGB. 

Probate Courts, California, 

Terms 89 

Property, Beal and Personal, 

Calitbmia 106 

Property, Seal and Personal, 

MontanaTerritory 149* 

Property, Beal and Personal, 

Nevada 186* 

roperty, Real and Tersoual, 

Oregon 126* 

Property, Real and Personal, 

Utah Territory 156* 

Property, Real and Personal, 

Washington Territory 141* 

Public Debt, U. 8 84 

Public Instruction, California . 41 

Public Schools, California 112 

Public Schools, Nevada 135* 

iniblic Schools, Oregon 126* 

Public Schools, UUh Territory. 165* 
Public Schoou, Washington 

Territory 140* 

Quarries, Marble 105 

Quartz Mills, California 72 

Quartz Mills, Idaho Territory. . 144* 
Quartz Mills, Montana Terri- 
tory 148* 

Quartz Mills, Nevada 181* 

Quartz Mills, Nevada Co., Cali- 
fornia 78 

Quartz Mills, Oregon 120* 

Quartz Mining, California 00 

Quicksilver, California 65 

Railroads, Calilbrnia 112 

Railroads, Oregon 126* 

Real ftnd Personal Property, 

California 106 

Real and Personal Property, 

Montana Territorv 149* 

Real and Personal Property, 

Nevada 186* 

Real and Personal Property, 

Oregon 126* 

Real and Personal Property, 

United States 86 

Real and Personal Property, 

Utah Territory 165* 

Real and Personal Property, 

Washington Territory 141* 

Receipts and Expecditures, 

British Columbia 168* 

Receipts and Expenditures, Cal- 
itornia wr 

Receipts and Expenditures, 
Montana Territory 149* 

Receipts and Expenditures, Ne- 
vada 185* 

Receipts and Expenditures, On 
egon 126* 

Receipts and Expenditures, U, 
8 84 

Receipts and Expenditures, U. 
8., Pacific Coast 106 

Receipts and Expenditures, 
UtahTerritory 155* 

Register of Names, British Co- 
lumbia 376 

Register of Names, California. Ill* 

Register of Names, Idaho Toi^ 
ritory 887 

Register of Names, Montana 
Territory 847 

Register of Names, Nevada ... 296 

Register of Names, Oregon. . . . 257 

Register of Names, Utah Terri- 
tory 866 

Register of Names, Washington 
Territory 819 

Representative Districts, Ore- 
gon 116* 

Representatives, Uouse,Oregon 114* 

Resources, British Columbia. . 167" 

Resources, Agricultural, Cal. ... 49 

Rewuroes, Agricultural, Idaho 
Territory 146* 

Resources, Agricultural, Mon- 
tana Territory 149* 

Resources,Agricultural, Nevada 184* 

!{e8ourcei,Agrioultural, Oregon 118* 



i' 5 



10 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



FAQI. 

Besonroes, Agriealtun), Utah 

Territory IBl* 

R«M>urce«, Agricultnral, Wash- 

inftton Territory 188* 

RMOUrccs, Haiiutkcturing, Cal. 96 
Uosources, Mannfacturing, Or. . 121* 
ReKCurces, Mineral, CaliTornia. M 
Resources, Mineral, Idaho Ter- 
ritory 14a» 

BoMurces, Mineral, Montana 

Territory 148» 

Resources, Mineral, Nevatia. . . 181* 
Resources, Mineral, Oregon. . , , 119* 

Rloe Culture, California 61 

Rolling Mill, California 108 

Rope Hauufacture, California. . 98 
Rosin Manufacture, California. 104 
Rosin Manufacture, Oregon . . . 126* 

Rye Crop, California 60 

Rye Crop, Oregon 1W» 

Saddlery and Harness Manufac- 
ture, California "" 

Salt Manufacture, California. . . 
San Francisco Business PireO' 

tury 

Saw Mills, British Columbia 

Saw Mills, California 

Saw Mills, Idaho Territory . . 
Saw Mills, Montana Territory 



PAOS.I _ _ VAQM. 

State Debt, Nerada 136* United States Exeeative De- 
State Debt, Oregon 126* partment 17 

State Departments, Califurnia.. 41 United States Foreign Minister* 18 

' • •• "" United States House of Hepre- 

sentatives 17 



State Elections, when held 
State Legislatures, when con- 
vened 86 

State Library, California 42 

State Library, Nevada 186» 

State Library, Oregon 126* 

State Prison, California 48 

State Prison Commissioners, 

Nevada 127* 

State Prison Labor, California. 96 

State University, Nevada 127* 

Sugar Cane, California . .■ 61 

Sugar Kedneries, California .... 100 

Sulphur, California 71 

Superintendents Indian AffiUrs, 

U. S., PaciUc Coast 84 

Supreme Court, California 89 

Supreme Court, Nevada 128* 

Supreme Court, Oregon 116* 

104 Supreme Court, U. S 80 

Surveyor General's Depart- 
ment, California 41 

Surveyor General U. 8. Pacilio 

Coast 84 

Swamp Land, California 48 



386 
168* 



146* 



149* : Sweet Potato Crop, California. 60 



Saw Mills, Nevada 136* Tanneries, California 



Saw Mills, Oregon 123* 

Saw Mills, Utah Territory 163* 

Saw Mills, Washington Terri- 
tory 189* 

Saws and Saw Teeth, Manufac- 
ture, California 108 

School Census. 112 

School Fund 112 

School Lands, see Lands, State 

Schools, Public, California lU'Tcrras Prubate Courts, Califor- 

Schools, Public, Nevada 186*1 nia 

Schools, Public, Oregon 126* Terms, Supreme Court, Call' 



Tanneries, Oregon 126* 

Telegraphs, California 113* 

Terms Circuit Courts, Oregon. 116* 
Terms County Courts, CaFifor- 

nia 89 

Terms County Courts, Oregon . 110* 
Terms District Courts, Canfor^ 

nia 

Terms District Courts, Nevada. 128* 



Schools, Public, Utali Territory 166* 
Schools, Public, Washington 

Territory 140* 

Seats, Uovernmont, diflbrent 

Ktatps 88 

Serdtc, California 87 

Sc^nate, Nevada 127* 

Senate, Oregon 114* 



fornia 

Terms Supreme Court, Nevada. 128* 
Terms, Supreme Court, U.S... 30 

Tin. Califurnia 71 

Tobacco Crop, California 61 

Tobacco Crop, Oregon 119* 

Treasure Shipments, British 

Columbia 161 



Sei-atc, U. S 17 Treasure Shipments, California 108 

Ser.aturhil Districts, California. 40 Treasure Shipments, Nevada. . 186* 
Senatorial Districts, Nevada.. . I28*)TreaBurcr'8 Department, Cali- 

Seiiatorlal Districts, Oregon. . . 116* | fornia 41 

Sheep, California 63 Tunnage, British Columbia 168* 

Sheep, Nevada 134* Tunnage, San Franoieco 108 

Shee]), Oregon 110* Tunnage. Port Townsend,W.T. 140* 

Shcoji, Utali Territory 162* i Turpentine Manufacture, Cali- 

Shecp, WaMiingfon Territory. . 139*1 fornia 104 

Ship Building, California 113*: Turpentine ManuflMture, Ore' 

Shirts, Muiiulncturp, California 97 gon 126*{ Wine Growing, California 

HShow Cares, Manufacture, Cal- Type Manufacture, California.. 99. Wire and Wire Rope Manuflto- 

ifornia 100 Union Business College 118* ture, California 108 

Silk Culture, California 61 United States, Area 36 Wooden Ware Manufkotnre, 

Silk Manufacture, California... 97 United States Army, Division California 100 

iiilver Mining, California 661 of the Paoiflo 19 Wool, California 68 

Sliver Mining, Nevada 131* United States Army, Organiza- Wool, Oregon 119* 

Silver Product,Ncvada 181* and 138*1 tion of 19 Wool, Washington Territory . . 189* 



United States Judiciary 80 

United States Navy, Organisa- 
tion of ......" ai 

United States Mavy, Paciflo 

Coast 21 

United Stateb Officers, Faciac 

Coast 88 

United States, Population. .86 and 86 

United States Public Debt 84 

United States Senate 17 

United States Supreme Court. . 80 
Utah Territory, Business Direo- 

toiy 669 

Utah Territory, Government, 

etc 160* 

Utah Territory, Post Offices. ... 28 
Utah Territory, Register of 

Names 866 

Utah Territory, U.S. Courts. ... 82 

Vegetable Crop, California 60 

Vegetable Crop, Nevada 184* 

Veigetable Crop, Oregon 119* 

Vegetable Crop, Utah Territory 162* 

Vote, California 108 

Vote, Idaho Territory 146* 

Vote, Nevada 186* 

Vote, Oregon 128* 

Vote, Presidential, 1864 86 

Vote, Washington Territory.. . 141* 
Washington l^rritory. Business 

Directory 647 

Washington Territory, Govern- 
ment, etc 187* 

Washington Territory, Post Of- 

ttces 27 

Washington Territo-y, Register 

of Names 819 

Washington Territory, U. S. 

Courts 81 

Water Ditches, California 79 

Water Ditches, Idaho Territory 144* 
Water Ditches, Montana Terri- 
tory 148* 

Water Ditches, Nevada 184* 

Water Diiches, Oregon 120* 

Water Ditches, Utah Territory 162* 

Water Works, California 79 

Wealth, U.S 86 

Whale Fisheries, California . . 106 
Wheat Crop, California. . 49 and 60 

Wheat Crop, Nevada 134* 

Wheat Crop, Oregon 119* 

Wheat Crop, Utali Territory. . . 182* 
Wheat Crop, Washington Terri- 
tory lo9* 

■ • " •- • 62 



Woolen Goods, Manufkoture, 
Califbrnia 

Woolen Goods, Manufacture, 
Oregon 124* 



96 



Slave Population, U.S 18G0.36and 86 United States Army, PaciUc 

Soap Manufacture, California . 102| Coast 20 

Sorghum Crop, Utah Territory 162*, United States Cabinet 17 

South Paciflc Squadron, U S.N . 21 United States Circuits 80 

Stamp Conimissiouers, Board of i United States Congress 17|Woolen Mills, California 96 

Cnlifornia 42 United States Consuls and Com- I Woolen Mills, Oregon 124* 

Stale Appointees, California. . . 471 mercial Agents 18!Yeast Powder Hanuikctnre, 

State Capitals 86, United States Courts, PaoiUo California t 101 

State Debt, California 107 Coast 80 



TO S£3 PXTSZ^ISZZEX) Z^-OVEACBEXi 16, 1867. 

The Pacific Coast Almanac and Tear Book of Facts, 

Tor 1898, One TotMme, 19mo, 90 Page*. Prle«, SO CenU. 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, Publisher, 

BAN TBAirOIBOO, OAIi. 



ritory IBB* 
...... 108 

145* 

186» 

lae* 

86 

ory...l«* 
iivine«a 

M7 

overn- 

m* 

'ostOf- 

*«^S819 

"• 8- „ 

81 

ia 79 

rritory 144* 
Terri- 
. . 148» 
..184* 

!»• 

irritory 162» 
... 70 
86 
|tiJ»'.".' 106 
49 »d 60 

134» 

119* 

itory... 182» 
Terri- 

...139« 
i» 62 

'""^r 108 

'"^r: 100 
.... 68 
.... 119* 
itory . . 189* 
fltoture, 

96 

**""'' ia4» 

. 96 

184* 

factnre, 
101 



'acts, 



lep, 

|00. OAL. 



' f 



INDEX TO ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



CITT OV BAN FRANOISOO, 



PAGE. 

Adama, Snmnol xcli 

AdclsilorfiT Krot clxvlil 

iElna nml I'hoenix InBumncc Com- 
panies back and ill and x v 

Alameda I'ark Asylum 161 

Aldrlch, Merrill & Co Ixxlx 

Allen, James M cl 

Allen, W. H cxlll, 

American Exchance clxxit 

Anderson & Cliambcrlln back cover 

Applcton, I>. E. A Co clxiv 

Armes A Dnllam lxIIv 

Artliur, J. D. lb Hon ulxxx 

Atkinson, .loseph H 177 

Atlantic House cllr 

Austin, B.C Ixll 

Badger A Lindcnberger xlv 

Badglev & Tllden clli 

Baldwin, A. K. A Co xllx 

Bancmft, II, H. <fc Co cxxxlvi 

Bank ExchanKo clxxl 

Bank ot Callfumla xvll 

Barrett & Sherwood II 

Bartllng A Kimball back; 

Barton, U.IT.&Co Ixxxlv 

Bauer, J. A xxxvil 

Bar Sugar Refinery Ixxv 

Bell, Jonn C xxxvl 

Belllnsliam Bay Coal Co ell 

Benchley, L, B, & Co xxxil 

Bernard, Charles xcll 

Black A Haul xcvIM 

Black Diamond Coal Mining Co ell 

r:»ck, W. \V Ixxxvll 

Blood, J. H clxvl 

Bohm & Clausen xxvl 

Bonnet, li, & Co 11 

Booker, W, L clxxvl 

Booth, H, J. A Co S8 and M 

Borvhard, C cvl 

BosquI, Kdward A Co., register of 

names 1 12 to 1)68 

Boyd, J. D elxxxvlll 

Bradley A Rulohon xxl 

Braverman A Levy front cover 

Bremtierg, J, A Co cxll 

Bridges. Otis h cllt 

Brignardello Bros ell 

British A Foreign Miir'e Ins. Co, ,xxxl 

Brit ton * Key clxxlll 

Bro<iklyn Life Insurance Co., reg- 
ister of namet 932 

Brooks. W, II cxlll 

Brown A Co clxxx 

Brown, Oraflon T. A Co Ixvl 

Brown, K, tl back cover 

Bryant, A.J. A Co els 

Builders' Insurance Company II 

Burke, William F Ixxvlil 

Bush, II cxI 

Bussey, W, C xxx 

Butler, M, F xxx 

California and Idaho SUigo Line, 

register of names J36 

California Building and Savings' 

Bank II 

California Hotel cxll 

California Marino Insurance Com- 
pany XT 

California Steam Navigation Com- 
pany Tl and vll 

Callaghan, U clvill 

Cameron, Whittler A Co x vi 

Cameron. A xxxix and civ 

Cameron, I> civ 

Caseboll, Ueo. T. A Co Ixlx 

Cazneau, Thomas N clxl 

Chandler, H.U Ilx 

Chapman, Howard c 

Chaiaagno A Denaveaux dlv 

Cherry, J. W zilii 

Church A Clark xix 



PAGE. 

Chicago Hotel Iv 

Clayton, C, A Co. cxxxlll 

Cobb ASUiton xi 

CobbaS.cviS xxlx 

Cole, N, P. ACo 1x11 

Coleman, W.T. A Co Ivlii 

Collins, C. E. A Co clxxv 

Comins, P, B, A Co cllx 

Conger A Oniy cxI 

Connolly Bros cxll 

Cook, M. M. A Son cxilv 

Cooke, Wm, B. A Co fVont covet, Gump, Solomon Ixxl 

and register of names U2toMf Haas, .<), A Co Ill 



Coon. H. P cixxvlll 

Cope A Daingerlleld xx 

Corrivenu, Louis evil 

Cox <t Nichols cxxxvll 

Crune A Brlgham ,c«l 

Crane, A. E, lxNXvlll,lxxxlx,xc,and xel 

Crawford, A, A Co xllll 

Crystal Hprlnus clxli 

CumnilnssA Maxwell c 

CuiinliiKlinm, Andrew cv 

Curtis A Allen xlvi 

Curtis, .M, .Mrs cvl 

Diinicl, J ohn Ix 

Dunn, F. P xxx 

Davis A Cowell ex 

Davis & WItham xlvi 

Day, George civ 

Day, Thomas fl-ont cover 

Dell, Crannadc Co front cover 

Deining A Cutter xxxlv 

DlelrlcTi, W. K clxxxlv 

Dodge A Phillips I,\xx 

DiMlge Hnm. A Co clx 

Dodge, Francis civ Hills. Ilonry A Co, 

Doe, B, A J. 8 cxlivj Hinckley * Co. 



PAGB. 

Gibbons, R. A Co Ixvl 

Goddard&Co \W 

Gordon, IT. M, A Co xxvlll 

Graatr, Samuel <b Co Ixxli 

(inicler A lleald clil 

Gmdy, James J xcll 

Gray, .M clxxxll 

Gray, Nathaniel cl 

Greeiihood A Newbauer Ivllt 

Grover A Baker Sewing Machines 

back cover 



Han, E. E zx 

Haight & Plerson Ill 

Hall, John A Son cxllv 

Hamburg-Bremen Fire Ins. Co xviii 

Hammeniinlth A Russ cvlli 

Hanscom & Co xcvll 

Harrisim, C, H civil 

Huskt'll A Co Ixxxlv 

Hatch, T. II. & Co xxviU 

Hayward, Coleman A Co. 

Ixxlvand Ixxv'i 

Heald. E. P ex il 

Heimburg. E. W. * Co i. 

Heln&Bray Ixlil 

ilelblng and Straiu 5 

Held Bros Hi 

Ilendy , Joshua 59 

llentsch A Berton 3 

Ileuck, Herman xxxvli 

Heverin, M cxcl 

lieviieinann A Co clxxviii 

lllliernia Havings & LoanSoc. ..ixxxii 

Hill. Samuel back cover 

.xlii 
clxl 



Dorr, J. B. &Co xlllllHItcbcoek. G. B, * Co cxcll 

Doyle, James ii l.\xxvllUlo»i(laud A Nrwsom clll 



Dudley * Gerhardy cxxxvll 

Dunne, P. F cllx 

Duniing A FlKher xcvll 

Duttoii A .VcEwen civ 

Eastman, Frank Kx 

Eaton, J. A, A Co, ..112 to 868 and 374 

Eberhart, .\ cllv 

K.lain& Howes 4 

Elmore. M,G 144 

Emery A Katon Ixl 

Equltalde Life Assura^cc Sec. clxxlv 

Everdlng, J, ,t <^o lix 

Fahlsten, C, J. E. & Co cxilll 

Fairbanks and Hutchinson Ixxv llowlniid 

Falkenau A Hanks xcvlll 

Falkeiisteln A Co xcvl 

Falkner, Bell A Co xxxi 

Feldbu»h&Co Ixxvill 

Feldi" mn, L. A Co llv 

Fenkiiausen, A Ivlii 

Field* Co, xxxvil 

Fliiley, Tlinmas E Ixxvli 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co., 

register of names Ill to.W? 

Flanagan A Mann xcll 

Fletcher, E Ixxxlll 

Florence Sewing Machine, .back cover 

Folleau.A '241 and 242 

Fordham A Jcnningt 14.t 

Foss, l>scar Ixvl 

Franklin House Ixxvi 

Freeman, B, H. A Co xxxlx 

Frfsbeo A Scott xxxlv and cxlv 

Gatlhard Bros cxll 

Gale, J. W. ft Co cxl 

Gallagher A Kennoy ell 

Gallagher A Weed Ixxxvll 

Gailego, R. C. & Co Ixxxvl 

Qamtt, W. T Ixxxv 

Gelb ALudorfr cvl 

Gensoul, A xvlli 

Oermanla Lifo Iniuranee Co xlll 



Holibs, ( iilmnre ft Co II 

Hodge, John G. ft Co. back cover ft 176 

HoerHcher ft WIeland xcix 

HoflHian. W, P clll 

Holbrciok. Merrill ft Co xlv 

Holmes, J, B, ft Co Ixv and c 

Holmes. H, T xlll 

li(dt, Warren xxxvlll 

lloinans, H. S back cover and 16 

Home Mutual Insurance Co,, reg- 
ister of names 383 

llorstniann, H, A Co cxxxvll 

Howlnnd, Angell ft King 2 

llowlniid, S, M xl 

Hughes, M. E Ix 

Hutton,J. F clll 

Hyde ft Chester elv 

Imperial Fire and Life Ins, Co. . , ,xxxl 

Isaac, J, ft Co clxlx 

Jacoby, A.ft Co xxxv 

Jelllnek ft llanlenburgh ell 

Jesse ft Drew clll 

Jessup ft Rurbank Iv 

Jewell, Jarvis xx 

Johnson, Geo. C, ft Co xxxv 

J ohnson, J ames B uvi 

Johnson, J. C, ft Co elxxxvlll 

Johnson, J. M clill 

Johnson, T. Rodgers cxcli 

ilolinston ft Reay Ixli 

Johnston, W, B I 

Jones ft Wooll cxll 

Jones, Edmund ft Co cxl 

Jones, E, H, ft Co cxl 

Jordan, A. H xxxvl 

Josseiyn, B. F 193 

Kallenberg. Theodore elv 

Keith, W.H. ft Co oxivl 

Keliett, WilllamF ox 

Kellogg, C. L llv 

Kelly ft Hendenon I xviii 

Kennedy ft Bell ftt>nt cover 



• ' ) 



'li^ 



12 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PAOK. 

Kcniiedjr A Co cv 

Keiiney, W. U. J. clxxxlx 

Kenny, M clxll 

Kiinp& Nathan cl 

Klng,S. T 532 

Kittredge J: Leavitt zll 

KlUredRe.Jonitlian xt 

Koehlcr, August evil 

Kohlcr, A., i'eKl8terofnainea..lll toStd 

Kohler, Chaae ii Co clxxxi 

Kuncr. A ulxlll 

Lanimond, M. Miss cxil 

Lamutt, A xllv 

Langland, N. I* IxxxrII 

Langley , Henry O. adv. dept IM 

register of names, 123 to M7, and MH 
Lawrence lb Houscwortli...back cover 

Lazard Frires .clxxxll 

LIbbev, W. L xlhl 

Lick House Ixxxil 

Llepiiart, I'rancis evil 

LlescnfKld, !• Ixxxvi 

Ltnfortli, James xzxlil 

Liverpool and London and Globe 

Insurance Company 1 

Locan it Co xclil 

Locan, Francis Ixxli 

Locke <lE Montague xcvlli 

Lockwooil, !Iarvey M. & Co clxx 

Lobse, John F cxxxvi 

Loomis, Wni. E clxlv 

Loughran. 1'. F. A Co clxvill 

Lowry, W. J. * Co cxI 

M aLott ii Co xlv 

MacDonald 4c Bro cl 

MacA, All're>l A xxlx 

Main & Winchester Ixxx 

Uaiion, John Ivii 

Mallory, Deming & Co Ixxxvl 

Maloney, Curnelhis Ixxvl 

Mandcviile, Kdwanl xcvll 

Mangcot, Charles ctll 

Hannattan InNiiranco Co clxvl 

Markt & FIcIbIu'I xxx 

Harsh, riisbury Jc Co Ixvii 

Harston & Mains xlv 

Martin, E. ik Co xxxv 

Massey, Atkins Ivi 

Maybluni, M ex 

McAran A Co clxxll 

McArron, Charles cl 

McAnlin &U'l>ay xcviili 

HcCi mbe, John civili I 

HcUil.J xxxix 

McO .-egor, J xxxvi 

McO-ew,W. II XXX 

McK nna, Hro Ac Co xlvl 

McKI >bln, William oxlviii; 

McMs'ius, John cllv 

HcNaLiy & Hawkins xxvl 

McNear A Uro Ixxviii j 

McNultv,C.A clxxilll 

McQi'ilfan, H xcll 

Meail,J. K. A Co I!l4i 

Meader, Lolor and Co x 

Meagher, TaalTe <fc Co Ixvlil 

Mears, James clvlil i 

Meeker, James A i.'o exxx vi 

Mcrcado A Scully cxcll 

Meri'hantH' Mutual Marine Insur- { 

ance Company iv > 

Mcussdorffer & Uro cxxxix \ 

Meussdorfler, J. C. ifc Bro Ixxxl' 

Mever, William Ivi, 

Michels, A. W. A Hro Ixill' 

Miller* Haley cl: 

Hills A Evans cJii 

Mills, Uobert ctll 

Miners' Foundry 2 

MIntum. C xv 

Mission Woolen Mills clxxxll 

Mooser, W clxlli 

Morris, B. A Co xxxix 

Morrison, John C. Jr cxilll 

Morrow, tlporge Ixxxiv 

Moss A Beadle Ixxv 

Muller, Adolph back cover 

Huller, xllv 

Murphy, Grant A Co clxvill 

Mutual Life I'ls, Co.. back cover and IH 

Myers, L. K. ■); Co xl 

Hyrtck,M. H xxlx 



PAOB. 

Napa Soda Springs cxxxvlll 

Nathan, B Ixx 

National Ins. Co., register of names. 2.W 

N ew A ge Ixxxtll 

New England House Ivi 

Nile * Uuriiey clvl 

Norcross, I). Mrs '■Ivili 

North America Life Insurance C. 

register of names, 112 lo.WS. and 374 
North British A Mercantile Ins. C0...I 

North Western Insurance Co 144 

Northern .\Htiurunce Co clxxvi 

O'CiiilHghan, 1). A Co xllv and cix 

Occiilental Insurance Company xlit 

Ogdcn, K. L. & F .'....clxxiv 

Oliiey & HoeUholzcr Iv 

Oppenhelmei^& Uro xcvi 

Ovorliind Mall cxc 

I'aclfle Asphaltum Co xllv 

"avlflc Business College cxlii 

aclflu Ins. Co. register of names, 

112 to 568 and clx 

Pacific Iron Works 160 

Pai'ilic Mall 8. S. Company v 

Pacific Oil and Lead Works xl 

Pacific Powder Mills Ixxvii 

Pacific KiilllngMill Company xvl 

Pacific Maw Manuf. Co clxxxlll 

Palmer, Gillespie A Co Ixxxlli 

Palmer, Knox A Co cxlvil 

Palteiighi, A xli and c 

Parker * Vandcwater clxxvli 

Parker, Wattson & Co lYont cover 

Parker, George F clxxi 

Parkhurst. V. S. W xxU and xxiii 

Peek* Dwyer 145 

Peck A Turner clxvl 

Peck, George H Ixxvl 

Pierce, Walters xxxiil 

Plnet, J clxlx 

Pioneer Clothing Company . . .clxxxlv 
Pioneer ."<ti'nm Marble Works Co. .c.\cl 

Pioneer Woolen Mills clxxvlli 

Plate, A. J xlvil 

Pointer A Harrington xlil 

Ponton. l)e Arce L clxxxi 

Portmiinn,J. H. C evil 

Power, E xlvil 

Pracy. George T cl 

Prinz, John cv 

Prior. J.K clxxlx 

Oulck.John W civ 

Italsliin, ('. A Co cix 

Kamsdell.B. H Ilx 

KaiiHoni, Lennder xlx 

Kathbun A Co xciv 

Kelllv, I'. J xlviii 

ItlcbHrds, W. H. A Co cxilll 

Kobhins, C. F. A Co 144 

Koblnson, J.K. xxl v 

Kogers A Brown Ixxlii 

Koman, A. A Co., register of names 

531, and HI to 567 

Itosenhaum A Friedman 4 

Koscnlmuni, A. 8. A Co Ixlx 

Kosenbaum, L. A Co Ixl 

Koyal .Mail 8team Packet Co. . . .clxxvi 
San Franeiseo and Pacific Sugar 

Coinimny vill 

San Francisco Cordage Manuf. xlvl 

San Francls<M) Fire Ins. Co....eixxvili 

Sargeni, TImotby clxxll 

Saulnier,John A Co cxilil 

Xuviiigs and Loan Society Ixlx 

.Sehafor, J. F. & II. H Ixl 

.Ichleleher. J Ivi 

Schmidz, William clxvii 

Schrelber, Jacob xxvlil 

Scoville, W. H. ACo Ixxll 

XrXbv, Thomas II. A Co clxxv 

She lard, J. L. N Ixxli 

She )anlson A Gates Ixvl 

She -Mian, Win. A Co clxlv 

Shi'W, Jacob clxx and 194 

Shreve, tieo. C. A Co Ixxlx 

SIckler. <'aleb M Ix 

Sllberste. ., 8 IxxxH 

Silvester, «Seo. F xxl 

Simmons, Itowe A Co xll and Ixvlil 

SlniM, John It Ixxxv 

Smith, N. Proctor xlll 

Buook, U. A W clxll 



PAOB. 

Snow ARoos clxvl 

Son A Briggs, register of names 113 to S6S 

Spauldlng, N. W. clxxxlll 

Spear A Co. clxx 

Speyer, Morris xvlll and clxxll 

Sprcckels, C. A Co cllU 

SproatA W'elch Ixl 

StandanI Soap Co Ixv and Ixxxiv 

Stanford Bros cxivlll 

Stein, Simon A Co lill 

StelnMart Bros. A Co xxxll 

Steinbiirt, W. A I clxxxlv 

Stcri tt A Cubery clxl 

Stevens, George W Ixx 

Stockman, J. M Ixxxvl 

Stott, Clmries clxlx 

Stow A Pollock xxvll 

Stratman, J 57 and clxv 

Swain, It. A. A Co cxxxT 

.Swain, It. U. A Co clxvl 

Sweeney, J. P. A Co cx 

.Swcett A Gad8l>y cU 

Taylor, James M xxlx 



Taylor, John A Co. 
Taylor, S. P. A Co..... 
Tenee, Charles A Co. . 
Tenlhorey.J. P. A Co. 
Tcubner A HotTman , 



.xxl 
.xxvl 
..Ixxi 
....cv 
.Ixxx 

Tbiiniiis, F cviil 

Tboniiion, Thomas clxl 

Til urnnuer A Zlini Illl 

Tilden A Breed xx 

Tlleston, F. L 195 

Tlllingbast, W. H 1 

Tobin, Dixon A Davlsson Ixvll 

Tolanil Medical College clxxxvl 

Townu A Bacon, register of names 

119 to 563 

Tozcr. Oharies H. adv. dept 192 

Treadwell A Co xcv 

Truman A Co xxl 

Truworthy, F. M Ixv 

Tulibs A Co xlvl 

Tucker, J. W. A Co xlvlll 

Tully A Durkln Iv 

TvliT Urothera xxxvl 

rhll'elder A Cahn xcvl 

riimann. M. A Co - cllx 

I'nion Iluslness College clxxxvlt 

Union Insurance Co xxv 

Union Iron Works 58 and 59 

rnited States Casualty Ins. Co.. clxxiv 
University Homestead A8so"n..clxxxv 

(J. .S. Coniblnullon Lock Co xxll 

Vai. Dyke, Walter xxlx 

Van VleckAKeith Ivll 

Varney, T civil 

Venarcl, G cllll 

Verdeiinl. J. M. A D. F xxlx 

Vertlier, Kalndlcr, SccIIIer A Co. .xclll 

Von Schmidt, A. W Ixxxlli 

V^L-lcan Iron Works cxiix 

Wakelec, II. P clxxxvlll 

Walker, A tlront cover, and cxxxvi 

Walton, iV. C cxivlll 

Ward, Georgv: W back 

Ware A Mosher Ixxvlll 

Warm Swimming Uaths cvlil 

Waterbousc A Lester Ixtv 

Weaver, D. s Ixll 

Weill, E.ASon x v 

Wells, Fargo A Co ix and 336 

Wenlworth, Hobarl A Co Ixxvll 

Wenzel, II clxlli 

Wheeler A Wilson Sewing M. Co.. . 195 

Whltcomb, N. T civ 

Whlte..l.ll.A Co Ivlandclix 

W liite Sulphur Springs cxU 

Whlteborne, W. A xcv 

WillAFInck cl 

Williams A Churchill Ill 

Williams, Henry U Ixxlv 

Wilson A Urotbcr Ixxlv 

Wilson A Kvans Ixxlll 

Wilson A Stevens clxxxlv 

Winter, John cllv 

witiram, C xxx 

Woin<, James B ...xxx 

Wood, J. H cxxxvlll 

Woods, I). II cvli; 

Woodworth, Scholl A Co x:^xlv 

Zegllo AMoorc xU 



AmeaPIow Co cxxvi 

Bacder A Adamson cxxvltl 

Oolt'i Fire Arms Manu.'. Co. 

cxvlli and exis 
Columbian Metal Worki cxxx 



BABTSBir 8TATSB. 

Darling, L. B cxxxl 

Donald, W. C. A Co cxxvll 

Douglass Manufiicturlng Co. ...cxxvll 
Ksterbrook, l{. A Co.. cxxxl 



Freeman, M.M. A Co oxzx 

Hamnilll, Caleb oxzxIU 

Harris, D. L. A Co cxxlx 

- -- Landrcth, David A Son oxxxll 

Fay. J. A. A Co oxxiMaaon, Voluey W oxxvl 



I X. •■"> i «ci 

Cheadic & 11 
ChMlcy, G. 
Chloo Holol 
Cbltrpndon, 
Chlttle ft Co 
Church. J. 1 

Clinton Flou 
I Coohranp, R. 
Cohen, Willi, 
Cohn.A.ftc 
Cohn, D. ft c 
Cohn, O.... 
^ojg«n, F. r. 
Cole, JaniM.. 
ColuM UOUK 



I 



INDEX TO ADVBRTISINO DEPARTMENT. 



13 



PAOK. 

Mavnanl IfSoyea cxxv 

N. k. Felt Rooilng Co cxxlll 

Orum, Armstrong A JiutI cxxvlll 

OtI, SIbiTia cxill, cxiv, and cxv 

Phrcnolnalcnl Journal cxxxlll 

PottB, Albert cxxxlll 

Providence Tool Co cxxll 



PAGE. I PAUB. 

Remington, E. A Son* ' Stetson, Everett cxxlv and rcg- 

Ixxxvlll, Ixxxlx, xc, and xcl Inter of names 384 

Rcnne, William cxxxlll T;. nter, K. C cxvi 

RobertK, John cxxxl Tucker Manufacturing Co cxrll 

Rowlanil, Wllllnm&'Co cxxxl Wnrd, .1. A Co isxxlx 

Sands, A. ». * Co cxxl Wells, S. R. cxxxlll 

Smith, S. U. . . ; cxxxlll WItherby, Rugg A Richardson . . .oxzx 



STATU OF OAIiIFOBNIA. 



Academy of Notre Dame 11 

AdamK, MoNoill A Co il 

AitkenftCo 44 

Allen, CO 20 

Alpine Chronicle 8 

American Hotel 2T 

Andomon & Stockwell 28 

Aubrey & Harrington 75 

Babb, L. H OS 

Babson, Seth 43 

Baker & Hamilton 6ii 

Banning&Co 87 

Bannister, E. Itev 10 

Barrett, J. A. Mra 43 

Barton, Frank A 9i) 

Basnoy & Nutter 79 

Baspctt & Co 16 

Baylis, T. F. * Co 28 

Beardflcv, W. D. fc Co 84 

^azcll, CrowcU ft Rix 17 

^lla Union Hotel 8» 

Belie View Nursery 16 

Benicia College 21 

Bernard ft Parsons 71 

Bidwell.T.J 89 

Binet, l<Mward 

Blair, .lames D 86 

Blake. U. M. Mrs 18 

Bloch, Joseph 86 

Bockius, Charles G 68 

Boflngpr, William F 67 

Bonner ft MoKonzic 13 

Boon, Cummins & Co 63 

Booth ft Co 51 

Bosch, Ferdinand 81 

Boyd ft Newcomer 83 

Boyd, A. P 86 

Brndwav, J. U 93 

Brandt ft Coulon 86 

Brayton, I. H. Kev 19 

Bremberg, J. ft Co cxii 

Breuner, John ft Co 4'k 

Brewster, 8. T 88 

Briggs, William 49 

Brighton Cattle Market 16 

Brind ft Houilcr 78 

Brotnloy, Ueorge T 9 

Brown,A. U 82 

Browne, J. H 48 and 49 

Brush, Uouben W 81 

Bryant, A. F 174 

Buokere Klouring Mill 62 

Bucklus, .1. J. ft Co 8i 

Budd,J. H 3U 

BuKbey,B. N 5 

Burricnter, Henry 96 

Bufh,r.CftCo 96 

Oaiifoi id Idaho Stage Lino 83iS 

Canfleld, C. L 95 

Cappelinann, C 67 

Carlock.A. B 97 

Cassey.l'.W 11 

Central Pucilio Rail Road 60 

Cheadle ft Hardy 17 

Chesicy.G.W 88 

Cbico Hotel 91 

Chittenden, Henry II 81 

Ch'ittleft Coult 66 

Church, J.U 98 

Clapp, H. C 44 

Clark, J. M 86 

Clinton Flour Milla 16 

Cochranp,R. A 8Si 

Cohen, Williom ft Co 74 

Cohn, A. ftCo ,•, 8Si 

Cohn.U.ftCo 178 

Cohn, U 77 

Colgan, F. r 87 

Cole,Jame«. 84 

Colusa House 60 



Cook, Hiram 

Cook, Jacob 

Cowan ft Flint 

Cowin8,J. W. ft Co 

Cox ft McKenney 

CYandall, Cliarica O 

Crist, G.F.ftCo 

Crocker, U.S. ft Co 

Crussman ft Itoscrs. . . . « 

Cummlngx William. ...v 

Cutting,! M 

Darling, ' 

Davenpr t, H. G 

Davis,!. tV 

Davis, Joshua 

Dawson House 

Dennery, Alphonse ft Co 

Denncry, Bernard 

Denton, W. H 

Dibble, John U 

Diggles.H.J 

Dooly, M. J. ft Co 

Duffley ft Smith 

Duren. W. H 

Earl.D. W 

F.arnsbach«r, F, A. ft Co 

Eokert, I 

Eolectlo Water Cure and Hy- 
gienic Institute 

Kdwards ft Co 

Kdwards, James 

Ellison, A 

Elwcll, D. A. ft Co 

Kmerson, P. N 

Excelsior Hotel 8 and 

Fallon's Hotel 

Female College of the Pacillo... . 
Female Collegiate Institute.. ... 

Fischer ft Hofstotter 

Fisherft Itro 

Fisher.S.ft Z 

Flatt.C. J 

Fletcher ft Hobson 

Fioberg ft Conrad 

Fogarty, William ft Co 

Folger, Robert M 

Fontninebleau Garden 

[Forsting, L. W 

Foulk, George A. ft Co 

Fox ft Strutz 

Franco- American Hotel 

Froment, K 

Galland ft Bro 

Galland, S.B 

(iiarsey, L. 

Gvlatt ft Moore 

George, 1> 

Gerkhardt, H. F 

GIbbs ft Holmes 

Gibson ft Upham 

Giibert.C. W 

Gleln ft Eborhard 

iGlobe Foundry 

'Globe Hotel, Camptonville 

itilobe Hotel, Marysville 

Goldsmith, A 

Gordon, David E 

iGrcone, Tom 

Greene's Hotel 

Groves, W. H 

Grozelier ft Nelson 

Gyle, 8. A. ft Co 

Habieh, Henry 

Hall's Hotel 

Uallctft Loy 

Handy,R.R 

Harland, William 

Hastings, B. F. ft Co 

Hoam.F. G 

UillftKnangh 



62|Hitzelberger, A.J 98 

45 Hochstadterft Bro 74 

77 Uocscli, J 77 

72 Holbrook, Merrill ft Co 89 

81 HookerftCo 60 

93 Hopkins, W. L 87 

Ti Hotel De France 45 

43 Hughes ft 8mith 88 

f>3 Hunt, Eugenie D. Mrs 45 

42 Huneman, Louis 98 

31 Ingalls, C. H 46 

95|IngliBm, J. ft J 14 

86 Ireland ft Eldred 63 

36 Irwin, William U 87 

79 Johnson ft Wetherbcc 91 

64!Jone8ft Hewlett 29 

40|JudkiM8ft Hamor 82 

41 Junkans, Henry 92 

76 Keep, Blake ft Co 80 

14 Kenny, M clxii 

97 King,F. J 98 

32 King, John ft Co 86 

6»Kliig, R M. Rev 17 

») Ulien, William 68 

63iKniglit & Co 66 

83 Knight ft Gignoux 66 

76: Krait, H 94 and 96 

I Lamping, P. A. ft Co. 81 

32' Lange, Henry ft Co 67 

61 Lansing, E. .1 64 

69| Lawrence, William L 72 

79; Lewin, E. ft Co 96 

67ILiening, John H 60 

27!Loclier, riieophilus 88 

176iLovett, W. E. ft Co 176 

831 Lowrcy, IL H. ft Co 68 

Oi Luebbert, William & Co 47 

10 Luhrs, Henry W 96 

68lLuthcr ft Ollu 81 

72{Maguer,M 31 

82'Marcu8C, M ft Co 78 

21! Mariposa Hotel 86 

66jMarnie8s, Leon 99 

42jMartin,T. C 76 

29 Marysville Flouring tlills 66 

8 Mar) sville Foundry 62 

16 .Mason, H 84 

57 Mason, J. A 44 

68 Matthies ft I'fefllTle 48 

44 Maxson, Warner & Co 91 

9U McCoramous, W 95 

13 McCormack, J. F 68 

92 i McCormick, Thomas J 80 

94 UMcCread V.John R 85 

48! McDonald, M. 8. Miss 24 

471 McFarland Bros 84 

80iMc(>rath, J 69 

271 .McKanna, John & Co 85 

40;McNess, James J 80 

661 Meudenhall, E.T 176 

82|Merrcll, I. L 12 

ISlMeyers, F. I.&Co .1 

80i Miller, Frank 94 

83 Miller, William P 82 

76 Monalian & Whipple 88 

47 .Moody & Baxter 82 

7 Morris, William Gouverneur.... SO 

96 Morris, William J 20 

96 Morrisania Orchard 20 

83 Napa Collegiate Im-titute 26 

13 Napa Ladles' Seminary 24 

93iNapa Valley Rail Road 28 

06i Nessler, I^oronz 81 

88INew York Hotel 49 

91 Nolan, 8 16 

North American House 84 

North, George ft Co 70 

61 Northey, V. 8 16 

eONyp.D.B 88 

ri O'Conndl, Ryan ft Co. 64 



w 



'•' i 



14 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 



rAQE. 

Oakland Colleso School 19 

Oakland Flour MUl8 10 

Oakland Seminai'v 18 

Orovillo Iron and BraM Foundry 88 

Owens&Fino 176 

I'aciHo Ocean Houw 9 

Paitliburg, John 99 

raiquler, M 41 

I'eaku, C. A. & Co Al 

Fendteton&Co 16 

PerkinHfc Brookit. 

Perking, OeorKO C 86 

Perry, 11 ermon 48 

PetcrH, Charles & Co 99 

Peters, J. D 81 

Piister,A.& Co 14 

Phelps, David N 10 

Picrson, H. H 63 

Pioneer Hotel 27 

Pionc«'r House 176 

Poland, Peter 98 

Poston, E. C. Mrs 64 

Powers, I. S 175 

Preicott ft 8chcidol 63 

Prince.B.K 83 

Purdy.G.L 49 

Kallsback, W. H 6 

Randolph,!. M 46 

Katz, William 84 

Beadv, W. It. ft Bro 66 

Bed BluiT Hotel 95 

Bedding, W. & Co 8 

Boblin, J.lt 79 

Bohr, John fc Co 66 

Boss, E C. ft Co. 70 

Russell, J 84 

Sacramento Seminary 48 

San Jose Foundry Co 18 

San Jose School for Colored Pu- 
pils 11 

Santa Clara College 12 

Schrld, Henry 99 

Scheuft Swank 76 

Scblageter, U 85 



PAOI. 

Schneider, William 87 

Schoenfeld, 8. D 94 

Scholl.CF. 69i 

Scliroter, U. C 96 

Schwartz, Charles 70 

SeavyftFitch 71 

Seeley.A. L 88 

SelbyleCo 70 

Selby, T. H. * Co 29 

Senntx, A. J 66 

Shippeo, McKee ft Co 29 

Silverstein, Julius 78 

Simpson, A. ti 87 

Smith ft Cliosebro 28 

Smith ft Leonard 47 

Sotoyome House 26 

Sotoyomo Institute 28 

Sperry ft Co 29 

Spring, T. W. ft Co 11 

St. Catherine's Academy 22 

St Charles Hotel 88 

St. Nicholas Hotel 64 

S'<mp, J. M 80 

Starr.A. D 62 

Stevens, George 28 

Stimmei, H. E. 99 

Stockton City Flouring Mills. . . 29 

Stone,ICftCo 62 

Stout, Henry C 84 

Stowell, John 81 

Stronsr.W. B 49 

Sutter Foundry 46 

Suydam ft Jones 80 

Swain, W. C 76 

Switt,Joseph 48 

Swinertonft Co 176 

Swinerton, G. H 42 

Taggart, G. 1 92 

Terry,C.S 35 

Thflms,A.0 85 

llbbits, Francis 46 

Tiiden, M. C 46 

Tipton ft Burtt 98 

Toll'sUotel 45 



PAOB 

Tomlinson ft Co 87 

Tower House Hotel 93 

Traver ac Smith 46 

Trinity Journal 7 

Tremont Hotel 95 

Turner, W.S 25 

Union Academy 17 

Union Hotel, La Porto 85 

Union Hotel, Oroville 87 

Union Hotel, Petaluma 48 

Union Hotel, Sonoma 27 

Union Iron Works 68 

Union Lumber Co 61 

University of the Pacific 10 

Vincent, Sevin 16 

VtsaliaHouse 86 

Visalia Water and Steam Mill*. 49 

Wagner, Henry 74 

Walker. Moore ft Co 63 

Ware,G.W 60 

Warm Springs Hotel 8 

Waterhouse ft Lester 88 

Webster ft Cadwell 15 

Webster Bros 80 

WeilftBemhclm 74 

Weil,Jnhn 82 

Wheeler ft Stetson X9 

Wheeler & Thomas 84 

WhItneyftCo f» 

Whitney, E. W. ft Co 61 

Whitteniore ft Bedican 176 

Whittemoro, B. F 8 

WIdtwell, W 78 

Willard,E.L 60 

Wlllard, Emory L 86 

Williams, Root ft Neilson 62 

Will »r«, W. L. ft Co OB 

Williamson, James 67 

Wood ft Chapman . 90 

Wrlght,B.C 26 

Wright, E.M 69 

Yost, F 82 

Young Ladies' Academy of 

KotreDame 78 



Albany Foundry 

Albany Steam Flouring Mills. . 

Allen & Lewis 

Arrigoni's Hotel 

Ballard, W.G. ft Co 

Barlow, William 

Barman Bros 

Barrows, J. ft Co 

Beach ft Monteith 

Beck, William 

Bell, John C 

Bennett House 

Bills* Co 

Brelsfoard ft Ewry 

Bunnell Bros 

Burchardt, C. A 

Canon, William R 

Carter, W.D 

Chapman ft Watklns 

Charman ft Bro 

Cheadle, R 

Chenoweth. F. A 

Cherry, A. F 

Clark,J.E 117 and 

Conner, John 

Cook, J. D 

Cooper, Wni. E. ft Co 

Cramer, H. P. ft Co 

Currcy ft Hammer 

Day.H.I 

Drake ft Moore 

Dunn, F. B. ft Co 

Elfelt, A. B.ft Co 

Eugene City Flouring Mills 

Everding ft lieebe 

Failing, Henry . 
Farg-Aly, D., 



Ferry ft Foster. . . . 

Fisher, J. A 

Flickinger, H 

Fliedner, William. 



8TATB OF OBEGON. 

108 Floedft Co 102 

11)8 Forrest, John 118 

122 Forsyth, Patty ft Co 116 

137 Fox, E. ft Bros 1(16 

136 Fox, J. M 185 

118 French ft Gilman 120 

129 Gilbert, John W 116 

111 Godley.C.C 67 

1U8 Goldsmith ft Friendly 7 

186 Graham, JameeK 119 

118 Gray,G.W Ill 

119 Gross, L 130 

189 Griiber, John 188 

138 Hake, F. A 121 

127 Hamilton, S 102 

141 Hampton ft Mcliride 110 

111 Handley & Simiott 121 

138 Healy, William 189 

182 Heudershot, J 119 

118 Hendrie, R 124 

1U9 Modes, Gustav 106! 

1061 Hodge, Calef ft Co 125 

108 Hopkins, C 186 

119 Houghton ft Plannett 107 

111 Huorta. Blanuel 120 

121 I'jnt&Bickel 107 

128 k urgron & Shtndler 138 

140;Irving ft Meyer 1191 

117 Johnson & Stratton 108 

107 Judge, Henry 101 

116 KeMer, C. M. 112 

103 Kilbuurn, Oscar 140 

137 King. Mvrick ft Co 182 

1118 Knaup, Burrell & Co 123 

123;Knott. Ladd& Co 184 

ISt Kriev,'.baum, John G 105 

189 Lakiuft Witter 104 

182 I.«ppeu8 ft Knowles 184 

140 Leezer.J. M 148 

106 Lincoln House 140 

lOi Logan, David 182 



LoveftBilger 101 

Maok,C.H 180 

SIack,M. W 106 

Marks, 8. ft Co 108 

Marshal & Schlosser 189 

Martin ftAllen 119 

Martin, E. ft Co 124 

Mason, John 141 

Matheny.J.N 119 

McClure, A. 8 104 

HcCraken. Merrill ft Co 132 

McFarland, W. H 107 

Mealey, C. ft Co 109 

Mehl ft Rast 103 

Metzler, John M Ill 

Millard ft Van Scliuyver 124 

Milwain ft Jovnt 127 

Mitchell, Dolph ft Smith 131 

Mulholland, f. ft E 108 

Muller& Brentano 100 

MurrBy,J.W 106 

Myers, C.H 186 

Neuber.John 101 

Nicklinft Co 116 

Northrnp, E. J. ft Co 127 

Oregon City Foundry 112 

OregonCity ManufacturingCo.. 112 

Oregon City Woolen Mills 112 

Oregon Herald, register of uamea 294 

Oregon Iron Works 181 

Oregon Stage Company xii 

Oregonian, register of names.... 394 

Osburnft Maxwell 108 

Parmenter.C. M 118 

Parrish & Atkinson 181 

Parrish ft Keeler '. . ...... 118 

Parrish, J. L. ft Co 188 

Parrish.W. W. ACo. 110 

Parsons, Henry 108 

Pearoe,A 106 

Peck, P. ft Co 1.0 



Pennh 



... 87 



46 
7 

96 
36 
17 
86 
87 
48 
37 
63 
61 
10 
16 



Mill*. 4» 

74 

63 

60 

8 



16 
80 
74 
83 
1# 

t» 

61 

176 

8 

76 

60 

86 

63 

, 66 

. 67 

. 00 

. 36 

. 60 

. 83 

f 

. 78 



ngCo., 



no8.. 



101 
180 
108 
108 
180 

lie 

. 124 
, 141 
. 110 
, 104 
. 133 
. 107 
. 109 
. 103 
. Ill 
. 134 
. 137 
. 183 
. 108 
. 100 
. 106 
. 186 
. 101 
.. 116 
,. 127 
.. 113 
113 
113 
ru*ines394 
181 
xti 
394 
108 
118 
181 
118 
188 
, 110 
. 108 
, 106 
. 1.0 



INDEX TO ADVBBTISING DEPARTMENT. 



16 



rAos. 

PennliiKtoii & Co HI 

People's Tranf portetion Co 114 

Portland Steam Flour Mill 141 

Purdy, A ,.••• 106 

RalitonftHyon 118 

Randall, EG 188 

Riobardton, A. B 187 

Robinion ft Lake 188 

Rodgert.T 184 

Roaenbaum & Kohlberg 186 

Rosenberg Distillery 103 

Rosenblatt, H 104 

Sachs Bros 101 

Saflbrd, Thomas J 110 

Salem Foundry ft Machine Shop 116 

Savage ft Sutton 100 

SavierftCo 136 

Schonfbld, J. ft Co 186 



PAOK. 

Sohutz,Velt 100 

ScottftCo ;.... 128 

Settleroier ft Co 100 

Sherlojk. 8. ft Co 187 

Silver ft Fain 189 

Skiff. L.S 117 

SmithftDavis 136 

SmithftQuimby 140 

Smith, R. ft Bros 113 

Sutherland, R. Mrs 189 

Thompson ft Paxton 110 

Twing, Nathaniel T and 140 

Umatilla House 121 

Underwood, J. B 104 

Uaafovageft Wright 118 

Vaughn, G.W 141 

Vf adsworth, F. M. ft Co Ill 

Walkor.JohnP. 139 



PAQK. 

Wallamet University, register of 

names 610 

Walling, Albert G. ft Co 181 

WalterlBros 129 

Watenft Clark 106 

Watkinds, W. H. ft Co 116 

Weatherford, W 180 

Western Hotel 140 

Wettorer, Joseph 100 

Wilcox, W.F 188 

Willamette Iron Works 128 

Willamette Woolen Munufactur- 
ing Co., rrglHter of names.. . 610 

Williams, D.W 136 

Wilrau, John 136 

Winter,J.A 104 

Young, WiUiam 188 



STATU OF NBVASA. 



Agency Bank of California. 

Amiranx & Bowie 

Baron Bros 

Betz, Henry 

Bishop, wniiam W 

Blakefy, W. G 

Cobb,S.G 

Cohn,D. ft Co 

Corbett House 

Cox,B.A 

Crystal, G.W 

Davis, Edwin A 

Davii,G.'r 

Davis, John H 

Demling ft Glootz 

Dom, G. W. ft Co 

Doyle,P.H 

Orieabach ft Smith 

Driesbach.A.B 

Edwards ft Wiegand < 

Ennor ft Co 

Epstein, H. ft Co 

Erlanger ft Wertheimer . . 

Fall, J. C. 

Foulks, J.P. 

Fox, John G 

Gainer, James 

Galvin, H. W 67 and 

Gareschfi.F 

GilUg, Mott ft Co 

Gilman, Charles 

Gold Hill Evening News, regis- 
ter of names 

Green, A. A 

Hale, JohuL 



144 Hammer. Chas. S 169 

161 Hamed, W. T 166 

171 Harris, Charles N 104 

170 Harris, H 158 

164 Harvev. Joel A 166 

169 Hendrie ft Bowstead 169 

174 Hoolo, S. F. 149 

178 Howe ft Gallatin 156 

162 Hyman, J 171 

168|Janin, Louis. Jr 146 

163 Johnson, J.R 16o| 

158 Kennedy ft Mallon 146 

160 Keppler ft Mack 174 

166 Keyes, E. W.v 161 

147 Kostor, Monke ft Co 168 

172 Krause, H .• 170 

164 Kuh, Leopold 146 

186 Lambert ft Co 168 

160 Levy ft Co 172 

153 Lewis. H 168 

173' Llvermore, Charios E 149 

166JMageeftDealy 161| 

168i Maudlebaum ft Tobriner 161 

ITliMason, HuffftCo 158 

164|Mau, Albert 147 

ISSlHaynard, H. G 163 

170;McDaniel ft Co 168 

I67iHeadftMcCone 156 

173 BIcrchants' Exchange Hotel, ... 151 
146 Merchants' Exchange Hotel. ... 173 
160 Hilatovich, Vincent. 147 i 

Millerft Ripley 150| 

SlSMoch, John A 161^ 

174>MolinelU ft Mariotti 166| 

167 1 Moouey, William 148l 



Moore ft Parker .... 

Moore ft Riorden 

Munckton ft Warner 

Nevada Foundry ft Mach'eShop 

Noland ft Van Dyke 

Novacovich, C 

Olln,A.8 

Packsher, Simon 

Pioneer Boiler Works 

Poor,J. W 

Kail.E.B 

Kickard, W. T 

Ruhling. E. ft Co 

Scliooiimaker, Frank 

Sharp, R.B 

Sloat.C.O. 

Sinith, Fraacis 

Smith,J. P. 

St. Charles Hotel 

Sutterley Bros 

Territorial Enterprise, rogieter 

of namoii 

Treat, W. W. 

Tufly. George 

Van Bokkelen, W. A. H 

Van Wyck ft Sanchez 

Veuve, Kelime 

Vorbe Bros 

Wallace, B. Frank 

Waterhouse, H. M 

Wilkin, D 

Willia&Wecd 

Willis, O. P 

Wilson, John A 

WIso&Co. 



164 
164 
160 
166 
163 
178 
148 
176 
164 
178 
157 
146 
160 
178 
159 
147 
166 
161 
157 
149 

Sli 
166 
167 
144 
168 
167 
169 
151 
167 
163 
168 
161 
170 
171 



WABHIirOTON TEBBITOBT. 



Barnes, George A 177 1 Granger ft Davis 178|Rotligchild, D. C. H 181 

Bnrmeister, Charles 178 Grenricn ft Cranney 180! Sire's Hotel 181 

Clancoyft Pray 178 Hinds, Sumner B 17U, Terry, C. C 179 

Crosaby,C.& Co mHubbs, Paul K 180 jutsalady Mill 180 

Dennison, B. F. 181 Lightner, 1 177 i Washington Standard, register 



Eisenbeis, Charles 1811 Pacific Hotel 178 

Fowler.ES 181 Parker, John G. Jr 177 

Gerrlsh, O. F. ft Co. 180 Percival, S. W 177 



of names. 

Willard, fiuiVis 179 

Ycsler, H. L. ft Co 179 



IDAHO AND UTAH TSBBITOBIB S . 

Blossom. James M 142 I Long, John V., register of names 878 

CurtU, E J 121 and 148 I Munday ft Burner 148 

OOIiONT or BBITI8H COIiUUBIA. 



Alway ft Bailey 191! 

Armstrong, W. J 187 

Astrico, Andrew ft Co 187 

Bank of British North America 188 

Barlow, A 191 

Barnard,F.1 190 

Braverman, Isidor 184 

Brooks, Charles 186 

Campbell, Francis 186 

Clarkaon, G. C. ft Co 188 

Colonial Hotel, New We«itmin- 

ColonlaV Hotel,' Victoria! '. '. '. '. '. '. '. 186 

Colonial Hotel, Yale 191 

Crease, Henry P. P. 189 



Cunningham Bro« 189 

Cunningham, Thomas 187 

Davies, J. P. ft Co 186 

Denny, William 182 

DIetzft Nelson 190 

Driard, 8 186 

Ellard, James 187 

Gilmore, A. 186 

Grelley ft Fiterre 186 

GrelleyBros 188 

Heisterman, H. F 184 

Hibben,T. N.ftCo. 186 

Holbrook, Henry 187 

Hudson's Bay Co 182 

Kimball ft Gladwin 191 



KwongLeeft Co 186 

London House 182 

Mntthiessen, Peter 186 

Nathan, Henry 184 

Nelson,Uriahft Co. 191 

Oppenheimer ft Co 189 

Pacillc Telegraph Hotel 187 

Pcrrier ft l^tremoullier 191 

Pioht, Ernest 188 

Shepherd, J. G 188 

St. Nicholas Hotel 186 

Turner, J. H. ft Co 183 

Victoria House 188 

Wilson ft Murray 184 

Wlthrow.D 188 



( i 



; 



1 - 



16 



PAOiriO COAST BUSINISS DIRkOTORT. 




xziaro4 



vxt^. 



F. S. WINSTON, President. 



ASSETS, 



$19,000,000 



Annual Income, 1866, $7,000,000. 



This is a pdrelt mi, iual Company, there being no stockholders to share the 
profits. The entire profits are divided annually among the policy-holders. 
Dividends can be used as cash, or added to policy, at the option of the assured. 

Dividends larger and Rates lower than most other companies. 

The business of this Company is conducted entirely upon the cash plan ; its 
assets, receipts, &c., being in cash only. No Premium Notes are received or held. 

Life Policies issued payable at death and payable for life, or paid up in 
full in FIVE or ten years. 

Ordinary and Ten Years' Endowments, Children's Endowments, Survi- 
vorship Annuities, &c., &c., issued. 

Dividends can always be used to reduce the Second Annual Payment. 



GENERAL AGENT FOR PACIFIC COAST, 

424 HOHTGOMBRT STREET, 

Next Door to UiSiTreasuiy, S.^Sr IPm^S7(9nS3(9(Q)9 (D^lLo 



100 

00. 



share the 
cy-holdere. 
assured. 

plan; its 

led or held. 

ptud up in 

[ts, Subvi- 

[mbnt. 



AST, 



L (SiJLo 



UNITED STATES. 



r. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT, 

Dbcbmber 1st, 1866. 



TXZE BIXBOXTTrVB. 

ANDREW JOHNSON, of Tennessee, Pretident of the United StaUt Salary, $25,000 

LAFAYETTE 8. FOSTER, of Connecticnt, Preiident pro tempore of the Senate, and 

Acting Vice Preiident " 8,000 



^ TZZS O.A^XXTST. - 

WILLL4M H. SEWARD, of New York, Secretary of State Salary, $8,000 

HUGH Mcculloch, of Indiana, Secretary of the Treaiury " 8,000 

EDWIN M. STANTON, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of War ". " 8,000 

GIDEON WELLES, of Connecticut, Secretary of the Navy " 8,000 

O. H. BROWNING, of IlUnois, Secretary of the Interior " 8,000 

HENRY 8TANBERY, of Oiiio, Attorney General '« 8,000 

ALEXANDER W. RANDALL, Po(<ma(ter General " 8,900 



Second Session THIRTY-NINTH CONGRESS, convened Monday, December »d, 1866; expires 
March 3d, 1867. 

Senate— LAFAYETTE 8. FOSTER, of Connecticut, Pretident; JOHNW. FORNEY, of Penn- 
sylvania, Clerk. Number of Senators, seventy-two. Vacancies, twenty, viz : Alabama, 2 ; Arkansas, 
2; Florida, 2; Georgia, 3; Louisiana, 2; Mississippi, 2 ; North Carolina, 2; Sonth Carolina, 2; Texas, 
2; Virginia, 2. 

House of Representatives — SCHUYLER COLFAX, of Indiana, Speaker; EDWARD 
McPHERSON, of Pennsylvania, Clerk. Number of Representatives, two hundred and forty-two ; 
qualified, one hundred and ninety -two, viz : California, 3 ; Connecticut, 4 ; Delaware, 1 ; Illinois, 13, and 
1 at large ; Indiana, 11 ; Iowa, 6 ; Kansas, 1 ; Kentucky, 9 ; Maine, 5 ; Maryland, 5 ; MaMachusetts, 10 ; 
Michigan, 6 ; Minnesota, 2 ; Missouri. 9 ; Nevada, 1 ; New Hampshire, 3 ; New Jersey, 5 ; New York, 
31 ; Ohio, 19 ; Oregon, 1 ; Pennsylvania, 24 ; Rhode Island, 2 ; Tennessee, 8 ; Vermont, 3 ; West Vir- 
ginia, 3 ; Wisconsin, 6. Vacancies, fifty, viz : Alabama, 6; Arkansas, 3 ; Florida, 1 ; Gkorgia, 7 ; Loa- 
isiana, 5 ; Mississippi, 5; North Carolina, 7 ; South Carolina, 4 ; Texas, 4 ; Virginia, 8. 



18 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



MINISTERS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

Envots Extraordinary and Mikistkrs Pmniputkntiart. 



"WEJiT 

Rpp'lll. 

1865 
IH61 

im\ 
\m\ 
m\i 
i8*;t> 
184 !:> 

18l').'> 
I8(!,> 
18(>5 

1863 
1861 

istn 

1861 
1865 
1861 
1865 
186:i 
1863 
1N65 
1861 

mn 

1863 
1861 
1861 
I86:i 
1861 
1805 
1861 
18(i2 

1863 
186,3 



rountry. 



AuDtria 

Brasil 

Chile 

ChinH 

France 

Great Uritnin.. 

Italy , 

Mexico 

Peru 

PniRsiu 

ItiiRiiia , 

Spain 



Capital. 



Bllnlatprt. 



Argentine Confederation. 

DeViuin 

Holivia 

CoBta Kira 

Denmark 

EciiHclur 

Oiiatemulii 

Hawaiian iBJands 

Hondnras 

Japan 

Netliei'lands 

U. 8. of Colombia 

Nicaragiu 

Paraguay 

Portugal' 

Uome 

Sweden and Norway.. . . . 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

Venezuela 



Vienna J. Lotlirop Mollev. Mans 

Kio Janeiro lames Watson VVeldi, N, V 

Santiago Hugh Jndson Kilpatrick, N. J. 

Pekin AuHun Kurlingamu, Miiks 

Purls John A. Dix, N. Y 

London ('harles Francis Adams, Muss. . . 

Florence Gooive P. Marsh, Vt 

Mexico Lewis 1). Campliell, Ohio 

Lima {A. P. Hovey, Ind 

Jterlin {Joseph A. Wright, Ind 

St. Petersburg... Caiimus M. Clav, Ky 

Madrid John P. Halo.N.H.. 

Ministers Uksidknt. 



Hslnry. 



Hnyti... 

Liberia. . 



. Iliucnos Ayres... liobert C. Kirk, Ohio 

Henry S. Snnford, Conn 

Allen A. Hall, Teim 

Charles N. Uioite, Texas 

George H. Yeanian, Ky 

William T. Cogge8hall,'Oliio. 
Fitz Honry Warren, luwa... 

E. M. MfCook, Ohio 

Thomas H. Clay, Kv 

H. J. Van Valkcnburg, N. Y. 

James S. Pike, Maine 

Allen A. Ilurton, Ky 

Andrew H. Dickiiii^n, N. Y. 
Charles A. Washburn, Cal . . 

James E. Harvey, Pa 

I{ufu8 King, Wi'st'onsin 

James H. Campbell, Pa 

George Harrington, D. C... 

Edward Jov Morris, Pa 

Erastus D. t^ulver, N. Y 

COMMISSIONKRS. 

Port-an- Prince.. I Henrv E. Peck, Ohio 

Monrovia lAbntham HHiimm, Wis 



Buenos Ayres. 

Brussels 

La Paz 

San Jos*' 

Copenhagen. . . . 

Quito 

(inatemala 

Honolulu 

Comayagna. . . . 

Yedo 

Hague 

Bogota 

Nicaragua 

Asuncion 

Lisbon 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Berne 

Constantinople. 
Caraccas i.. 



$13,000 
13,0(M) 
10,060 
l:i!,0(K) 
17,500 
17,500 

wm 

l'^,000 
10,000 
1-^000 
lU.IXM) 
1:2,000 

7,500 
7,500 
7,1)00 
7,500 
7,500 
7,500 
7, .500 
7, .500 
7,500 
7,500 
7,500 
7,500 
7,500 
7,.'M)0 
7,500 
7,500 
7,500 
7,.')00 
7,500 
7,500 

7,500 
4,000 



•coxsui-s and commkrciai. aoknts of thk united states, at the ports ok the pacific, and 
Adjacent Thereto, with their Residences. 

Those marked 0. arc Consuls; C. A. Commercial Agents; V. C. Vice Consuls. 



AUSTRALIA. 

William Blanchard, C, Melbourne 94,000 

U. D. Merrill, C, Sydney Fees. 

BORNEO. 

C. Lee Moses, C, Bninai Fees. 

CHILE. , 

Charles C. Greene, C, Coquimbo Fees. 

James U. Trumbull, 0., Talcabuano 1,000 

Ambrose W. Clark, C, Valparaiso 3,000 

CHINA. 

William Irvin, C, Amoy 8,000 

Oliver II . Perry, C, Canton 4,000 

B. T. Sandford, C, Chee Foo Fees. 

J. L. Kieruan, C, Chin Kiang 8,000 

Augustus CaiiUeld, C. , Foo Cbow 8,600 

U. a. C. Salter, V.C. Hankow Fees. 

Isaac J. Allen, C, Hong Kong. 8,600 

Henry U. Bridges, V. C., Kiu Kiang Fees. 

Francis P. Knight, V.C, New Chwang Fees. 

A.L.Clarke, C., Ningpo Foes. 

Ueorgo F. Seward, Consul tieneral, Shanghai. . 4,000 

Joseph C. A. Wingate, C, Swatow 8,600 

8. W. Pomeroy, V. C, Tien Tsin Fees. 



EAST INWES. 

George A. Kittredsc, V. C, Bombay Fees. 

MBthaiiiel I*. Jacobs, Consul General of British 

India, Calcutta 96,000 

G. W. I'reBCOtt, C. A., Ceylon 1,000 

Isaac Stone, C, Singaporo 2,600 

JAPAN. 

E. E. Rico, C, Ilakodadi Foes. 

George .S. Fisher, V., Kanagawa 8,000 

W. P. Manguin, C, Nagasaki 8,000 

MEXICO. 

Gilbert M. Colo, C. A., Acapulco 2,000 

Edward Connor, (;., tiuaymas 1,600 

F. B. Elmer, C, La I'az l,eoo 

Wm. H. Blake, C, Manzanillo 1,600 

Isaac Sisson, C, Mazatlan Fees. 

Thoo. i>. Edwards, C. A., Minatitlan Fees. 

, C, San Bias Fees. 

Boshrod Lott, C, Tohuantepoo - 91,600 

NEW ZF^LAND. 

, C, Bay of IsUuds 1,000 



* For a list of Foreign Consuls residing in Ban Franclsoo, see page 397. 



— wisnri 




npp Ul. 


1 






1861 




18i>l 




1865 




1861 




18t>*) 




1861 


) \m\ 


) IStili 


) 18(15 


J IStVi 


[) l8tW 


1) 18t'<5 


ISfi.*) 


181)1 


K) 18l» 


K) 18()1 


H) 1865 


M) 1H61 


W 18G5 


W lafilJ 


m I8r>3 


BO 1865 


00 1861 


00 1861 


00 1863 


flO 1861 


>«H) 


1861 


.no 


186:) 


>(H) 


1861 


m 


181)5 


>oo 


1861 


iOO ' 186-i 


iOO 1 1862 


I0( 


) 


1 1863 



iCIFlC, AND 



iBritish 



F0P3. 

1 

.96,000 
. 1,000 
. 2,600 



Foc«. 
8,000 
8,000 



3,000 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 

. Fees. 

. FeoK. 

. Foes. 

.-81,600 



1,000 



ARMY — UNITED STATES. 



19 



NICARAGUA. 
D. 8quira Cotrell, C. A., Han Juan D«lNorie and 

Punt* AroDM l^iOOO 

, C, Han Juan Del 8ur 3,000 

PACIFIC ISLANDS. 
Jonaa M. Coe, C. A., Apia, Navigator'! and 

Friendly Islands 1,000 

John Worth, C, Hllo, H.I Foes. 

Alflwd Caldwol, (\, Honolulu, S. 1 4,000 

Kllai Perkins, LahHlni, H. 1 8,000 

K F. Bunnell, 0. A., Ijtntlmla, Fojen Island!. . . 1,000 

.loseph Vandor, C, Taliiti. 8ociuty Islands 1,000 

Oharlea Urlswold, (.'., iUnila Foe*. 

PEHU. 

John T. Lansing, C, Arioa Feea. 

James H. McColtoy, C, Callao 8,600 

, 0., Lambayeque Fees. 

II. M. Columbus, C, I'ayta SOO 

lUram It. Hawkins, C, Tumboi. 1,600 



RUSSIA. 

Perry MoD. ColHo!, C. A., Amoor Rlrer •1,600 

Edmuudt Brandt, C, Archangel Fees. 

SL^H. 
J.U.IIood, C, Bangkok 3,000 

TASMANIA. 
Duncan McPhorson, V. C, Uobart Town Fee*. 

UNITED STATES OF COLOMBIA. 

FranolK W. Rico, C, Asplnwall 3,600 

William B. Little, C, Panama 8,600 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. ^ 

Allen Franels, C, Victoria Fees. 



MILITARY DIVISION OF THE PACIFIC* 

(Includes Depiirtnicnts of Culifomia and the Columbia.) IlendquarterB, No. 204 Snttor street, comer of 

Kearny, Sun Francisco. 



Miyor-Oencral IlKKRy W, 

llrev. Maj. flen. Jamc« H. Fry. ..Attjutant-Oeneral 
Itrev. Mul. Oon. Robert Allen. Chief Ouarterrouster 
Urev. Col. John McL. Taylor.. Chief Commissary 
Hrev. Col. Robert Murray Medical Purveyor 



Halleck Commanding. 

Mai, Roger Jones Inspector General 

Brev. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott A. D. C. 

Urev. Lieut. Col. W. K. Smedberg A. D. C. 

Captain Charles A. Whittier A. D. C. 



DEPARTMENT OF CALIFORNIA. 

(Includes California, Nevada and Arizona Territory.) Headquarters, No. 742 Washington street, S. P. 

Brevet Major General Irvin McDowell Commanding. 

li^or John P. Sherlmme Adjutant-General I Drev. Lt. Col. CImrlea McCormick.. Medical Dir. 

irev. Col. R. \V. Kirkbam.. Chief Quartermaster | Brev. Lt. Col. Edward R. Piatt.. Judge Advocate 

DEPARTMENT OF THE COLUMBIA. 

(Includes Oregoq, and Idaho and Washington Temtories.) Headquarters, Portland, Oregon. 



Mnior-General V. Stkki.k Commanding 

Col. Edwin li.* Babbitt Chief Quartermaster 

Itrev. Mig. Sam. A. Foster Chief Commissary 



Brev. Lt. Col. P. G. S. Ten-Broeck.. Medical Dir. 

Lieutenant Richard P. Strong A. D.C. 

Lieutenant George Williams A. D. C. 



REGIMENTS ATTACHED TO THE DIVISION OP THE PACIFIC. 

P'RST Cavalry— Colonel G. A. H. Blake, Commanding. Headquarters at Fort Vancouver, W. T. 

Eighth Cavalry — Brevet Brigadier General John J. Gregg, Commanding. Headquartera at 
Benicia Barracks, California. 

SscoND Artillkry— Brevet Brigadier General W. H. French, Commanding. Headquarters at 
Fort Point, California. 

Ninth Ikfantry — Brevet Major General John H. King, Commanding. Hendquartei-g on Angel 
iHland, California. 

Fourteenth Infantry— Colonel Charles S. Ijovell, Commanding. Headquarters at Fort Yuma, Cal. 

Twenty-Third Infantry — Brevet Mi^or General George Crook, Commanding. Headquarters at 
Fort Boise, Idaho. 

Thirty-Second Infantry— Colonel Thomas L. Crittenden, Commanding. Headquartera at Tucson, 
Arizona. 



* Fortlflcations hare been erected at the following points. San Francisco Harbor : Fort Point and Alcatraces Island ; 
Mouth of the Columbia River: Forts Stevens and Capo Disappointment 'Batteries have also been erected at I'oint 
San Jose and Angel Island, San Francisco Harbor. 

KoM.— Under the act of .Tuly 28, 1886, the Regular Army now comprises ten regiments of cavalry, live regiments of 
artillery, and ibrty-flvc regiments of Infantry; making an aggregate maximum strength of scventj'.flva thouiiand three 
hundred and eighty-two rank and flie. Its present strength is fljiy-four thousand three hundred and two. In addition 
to this force there are eleven thousand volunteers, white and colored, still remaining in service. 



• 1' 



PAOlFIO 00A8T BUSINESS DIRBOtTORT. 



STATIONS OF TROOPS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF CALIFORNIA. 



STATIONS. 



CALirOKNIA. 

Preaidio 

Fort Pol n t 

SuiJoad Point 

AlcatrHcea IiUnd 

YerbH Uuena Island 

An({el Iiland 

Benicia Harracki 

Benlcia Arsenal 

Fort Keadinfc 

Camp Wright 

Camp Independence 

Camp Fish Lake Valley . . 

Drum Harracks (Wilniingtoi'. J)epot). 

Camp Cady 

Camp Kock Springs 

Fort Qa ston 

Camp Lincoln 

Camp Did well 

Fort Crook 

Fort Yuma 



COMMANDINO OKHCKK. 



Major H. A. Allen 

Hvt. Hria. Gen. W. H. French.. 
Bvt. Lieut. Col. EJi. I'latt . . . . 

Uvt. Mnjor J. A. DsrllnK 

Lieuleimnt C. K. Kilbonme 

Hvt. Mujor-Oenenil J. H. King. 
Bvt. Lieut. Col. E. V. Humner.. 

Lieutenant W. A. Marye 

Uvt. Minor R. H. Cliapin 

Cuptiiin W. H. Jordan 



Bvl. Lieut. Cul. J. U.Devin. 

Lieutenant C. P. Kgun 

Lieuteniint A. Morton 

Captain J. E. Yard 



NB VADA. 



Fort Churchill 

Camp Ruby 

Camp McGarry 

Camp MoDermit 

Camp Wiutteld Scott . 



AIIIZONA TinRITORT. 



Camp Mojave 

Camp Kl Dorado 

Fort Whipple 

Camp Lincoln 

Skull Vullev 

Camp Uooiuvin 

Cunip Bowie '. 

Camp Lowell 

Camp near Ft. Buchanan, to be formed 
trom Camps Waller and Cameron 

Camp McDowell 

Camp Reno, to be formed frm FtCrook 



Mi^or A. W. Bowman 

Captain W. E. / 'ipletou 

Captain S. Munt 

Lieutenant M. J. k raid. . . . 
Bvt. Lieut. Col. E. ' illiston. 



Bvt. Major C.O.Wood 

Lieutenant J. F. Trout 

Bvt. Colonel A. O. Brackett . 
Bvt. Lieut. Cot. J. P. Baker.. 
Captaiu M. Da vis 



Bvt. Major R. H. Porter 

Captain John E. Yard 

Captain D. Krause 

Captain Q. M. Downey 

Captain J. W. Weir 

Bvt. Colonel G. Chapiu 

Lieutenant J. R. Eschenburg . 
Colonel C. S. Lovell 



UAKKIMON. 



Lieut. Col. E. McOarry... 
Captain G. B. Sanford'. . . 
Bvt. Lieut. Col. G. llges 



Light Batteries A and M, 9d Art. 
Ileadquartera •• II," M Artillery. 
Co. D, SM Artillery. 
Cos. B and G, 'M Artillery. 
Detachment from Alcatraces. 
Hdqrs. tnh Inf., & Recr. 8th Cav. 
(;ott. I, U and K, 8th Cavalry. 
Ordnance. 

Co. G, 8th Cavalry. 
Co. A, Oth Infantry. 
Co. B, !)tli Inf., and D, 1st Cav. 
Det. from Camp Independence. 
Detai'hment Co. B, 8th Cavalry. 
Co. I), !)th Iiif , and B, 8th Cav. 
Detachment from Camp Cady. 
Cos. E and K, 9th Infantry. 
Co. G, !Hh Infantry. 
Co. C, itth Inf i Co. A, Ist Cav. 
Detachment from CuinpBidwell. 
Co. A, 1 Ith Inf, and K, 3d Art., 
Ildqrs. 14th under orders. 

Co. F, 9th Infantry. 

Co. I, 9th Infantry. 

Co. H, 9th Inf ; B, 1st Cav. 

Co. L, 1st Cavalry. 

Co. A, 8th Cavalry. 



Co. E, 14th Infantrv. 
Co. D, 9th Inf, uud'. orders to fm 
Co. G, 14th Inf [Camp Cady 
Co. C, 14th Infantry. 
Co. II, 14th Infantry. 
Cos. D, F and H, 3ad Infantry. 
Co. G, 32d Infantrv. 
Hdqrs. 14th Inf ; C, Ist Cav. 
Ildqrs. 3'Jd under orders. 
Co. E, :K>d Inf ; (1 &. K, Ut Cav. 
Cos. B,D,F, 14th Inf; E, Ist Cav. 
Cos. A & B, 3ad Infantry. 



STATIONS OF TROOPS IN THE DEPARTMENT OP THE COLUMBIA. 



WASHINOTON TERRITORT. 

Fort Vancouver 

Vancouver Arsenal 

San Juan hlund 

Fort Steilacoom 

Cape Disappointment 

Fort ColviHe 

Fort Walla Walta 

O RI GO N. 

Fort Stevens 

Fort Klamath 

Fort Dalles 

Camp Watson 

Camp Logan 

Camp Warner 

Camp C.F.Smith 

IDAHO TERRITORT. 

Fort Boise 

Camp Lyon 

Camp Winthrop 

Camp Lapwai 



Bvt Lieut. Col. A. O. Vincent 

Bvt. Captain L. Babbitt 

Captain Thomas Grey 

Captain Charles H. Peirce. . . 
Captain John I . Kodgers ..... 
Captain John S. Wharton. ... 
Lieutenant Converse 

Captain L. L. Janes 

Captain Sprague 

Lieutenant Borrowe 

Bvt. Lieut. Col. E. M. Baker. 

Lieutenant Western 

Captain P. Collins 

Captam J. C. Walker 

Bvt. Col. James B- Sinclair .. 
Bvt. Major James C. Hunt. .. 
Bvt.Lient.Col. John J.Coppinger 
Lieutenant Gallagher 



Co. C, 8th Cav. i Co. F, 2d Art 

Ordnance Detachment. 

Co. I, 2d Artillery. 

Co. E, 2d Artillery. 

Co. L, 2d Artillery. 

Co. G, 23d Infantry. 

Co. D, 8th Cavalry. 



Co. C, 2d Artillery. 

Co. — , Ist Oregon Infantry. 

Indian Sconts. 

Co. I, let C«v. J Co. P, 23d Inf. 

Co. F, 8th Cavalry. 

Cos. B Al D, 23d Inf; H, 1st Cav. 

Co. C, 23d Inf., detach. Cavalry. 

Co. F, 1st Cav. ; Co. H, 23d Inf. 
Co. M, 1st Cavalry. 
Cos. A and E, SM Infantry. 
Co. E, 8th Cavalry. 



dM.adArt. 
ad Artillery. 

rtiUery. 
IcHtmcei. 
ecr. 8th Cav. 
h Caviilry. 



1 D, l«t CaT. 

ieitendenee. 
Hill Cavalry. 
1 H, 8th Cav. 
Jnnip Cady. 
Infantry. 

1. A, l»t Cav. 
}mnp Widwell. 
id K, 2d Art., 
uder orders. 



l,"l»t Cav. 

y- 



try. 

id. orders to fm 
[Camp Cttdy 
,ry. 
itry. 
32d Infantry. 

C, Irt Cav. 
iider orders. 
& K, list Cav, 
nf.i E, let Cav 
Infantry^ 



iniA. 



I Co. P, 2d Art 
jmeut. 



ry- 

(try. 



jry. 

^n Infantry. 

:o. F, 23d Inf. 

TnfiH.UtCav. 
BeUoh. Cavalry. 



I Co. H, 23d Inf. 
|rj 

Infantry. 



NAVY — UNITED STATES. 



21 



UNITED STATES NAVY*— PACIFIC OCEAN. 

NORTH PACIFIC SQUADRON, 

Embrace! the coast of North America and the Sandwich Islands. I!«>ir Admiral II. K. Thatcher, Com- 
manding. Headquarters, San Francisco, CHiifomiu. 



Nsmn. 

Pensacola 

Vnndertiilt 

Saranac 

Suwaneo 

Mohon^o 

Lackawana 

Mohican 

Ossipee 

Resaca 

Saginaw 

Jamestown 

Indcitendenre 

St. Marys 

Cynno 

Aionadnoclc 

Camanche 



Motive Power. 

Screw 

Paddle Wheel. 

" " 

II 41 

■ I II 

Screw 

It 

" W'.'.'.'.'.'. 

It 

Paddle Wheel 
Sail 

Sail 

II 

II 
Iron-Ciad.'i... 



TunnsKc. 



2,158 
3,3«0 
1,441! 
1,030 

i,(nn 

WH 

1,240 

UflO 

403 

985 

2,i»7 

»85 

972 

1,564 

844 



No. nvtii 



21 

15 

13 

12 

10 

9 

8 

6 

8 

4 

21 

40 

22 

18 

.4 

3 



Commnnilcr. 



Com. J. P. Sandford. 
Capt. n. II. S4'ott. 
Com. Paul Shirlev. 
Com. .1. W. A. N'i( liolson. 
Com. Wm. Reynolds, 



Com. S. R. Franklin. 
Lieut. Com. C. J. MoDmiKal. 
Receiving ship, Mare Island. 
In ordinary. Mare Island. 
In ordinary. Mare Isliind. 
In ordinary. Mare Islnnd. 
In ordinary. Mare Island. 



SOUTH PACIFIC SQUADRON, 

Embraces the Piiciiic Coast from Panama to Cape Horn, and includes within its limits Australia. 
Admiral' John A. Dahlgren, Commanding. Headquarters, Callao. 



Rear 



Vtanv. 

Powhattan 

Tuscarora 

Wateree 

Dacotah 

Nyack 

Farralones 

Fredonia 



Motive Power. 

Paddle Wheel, 

Screw 

Paddle Wheel. 

Screw 

II 

Storeship 



Tunnage. 


No. Ouna 


2,415 


22 


997 


10 


974 


10 


996 


7 


593 


8 


382 


6 


400 


4 



Commander. 



Capt. D. B. Ridgely. 
Com. F. SUinley. 
Com. F. K. Morray. 

Com. L. H. Newman. 
Acting Master, N. Ptevost. 
Com. T. M. Brasher. 



NAVY YARD— MARE ISLAND. 

REAR ADMIRAL THOMAS T. CRAVEN ...Commandant. 

CAPTAIN J. C. SPOTTS Executive Officer. 

EDWARD C. DORAN Paymaiter. 

COMMANDER C. H. BALDWIN Ordnance Officer. 



INDEPENDENCE RAZEE— RECEIVING SHIP. 
Com. W. R. Parker Commandant. J. M. Browne 



. Surgeon. 



CIVIL opriccRS. 



Edward C. Doran. Pay Agent. I Melvin Simmons Naval Constructor. 

Charles A. Morse Naval Storekeeper. | John D. Hoffman Civil Engineer. 



* The Navy of the Vnltcd Ststes consists of 278 vessels, armed vith iMi guns, of which 61, carrying 187 guns, are Iron 
Clads. In commission, 119. Total number of sesmen In the Naval and Coast Survey Service, 13,400. 

Note.— The following are the different squadrons as at present ormknlzed. European Squadron, Rear Admiral L. M. 
Ooidsborough. Asiatic Squadron, Rear Admiral H, H. Boll. North Atlantic Squadron, Rear Admiral J. 8. Palmer. 
Sooth Atlantic Squadron, Kear Admiral 8. W. Uodon. North Pacino Squadron, Rear Admiral H. K. Thatcher. South 
Paclflo Squadron, Rear Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, Oulf Squadron, Cvmmodoro John A. Winsl-)w. In addition to the 
vessels attached to these squadrons, there are several others engaged on special service. 





, 1 


1^ 




! I'- 




I!" 




V 

■ 1 


1' 

1 


: 1 
■ 1 


si 



• ; 



22 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT. PACIFIC COAST. 



V ... 



DEPARTMENT OP CALIFORNIA. 
Benj. C. Triimnn, Special Agent, San Francisco. 



DEPARTMt:NT OP OREGON, NEVADA, WASHINGTON AND IDAHO. 
Q. A. Brooks, Special Agent, Portland. 



RATES OF DOMESTIC POSTAGE. 

Letters to any part of the United States, U <eiit8 for each half ounce. Drop Letters, 1 cent — where car- 
riers are employed, 2 cents. Ke^tistration Pee, for valuable letters, not exceeding 20 cents. 

Transient Newspapers, Periodicals, Pamphlets, Blanks, Proof Sli"et8, Book Munuscripts, and all maila- 
ble printed matter, (except books and oircnlars) 2 cents for each four ounces. 

Books, 4 cents for each 4 ounces or fraction thereof. 

Unsealed Circulars, not e^ceedin^ 3 in number to one address, 2 cents, and in the same proportion for a 
greater number. 

Seeds, Cuttings, Roots, etc., 2 cents for each 4 ounces. 

All Packai;es not charged with letter postage must be so arranged that the same can be conveniently 
examined by Postmasters; if not, letter postage will be charged. 

Dngnerreotypes, when sent in the mail, are to be chargeji with letter postage by weight. 

Photograph's on Cards, Paper, and other flexible material, (not in cases) caii be sent at the same rate as 
miscellaneous printed matter, viz : 2 cents for each 4 ounces or fraction thereof. 

Photographic Albums are chargeable with book postage — 4 cents for each 4 ounces or fraction thereof. 

No piickage will be forwarded which weighs over 4 pounds. 

All Postage Matter, for delivery within the United States, must bo prepaid by stamps (except duly cer- 
tified letters of soldiers and sailors) ; otherwise letters are sent to the Dead Letter OIHee. 

Newspapers and Periodicals, not exceeding 4 ounces in weight, to any part of the United States, if paid 
in advance — daily, per quarter, 9a cents ; six times per week, 30 cents : tri-weekly, 15 cents ; semi-weokly, 
10 cents; weekly, 5 cents. Semi-montlily, monthly, and quarterlv periodical's, 1 cent for each copy. 
Newspapers and {leriodicals, when weighing over 4 ounces, double the above rates. 

Weekly Newspapers, within the county where published, free, if passing through the mails to regular 
subscribers. 

Quarterly payments, in advance, may be made either where published or received. 

Any word or comnmnication, whether by printing, writing, marks or signs, upon the cover or wrapper 
of a newspaper, pamphlet, magazine or other printed' matter, other than the name and address of the person 
to whom u is to be sent, and the date when subscription expires, subjects the package to letter postage. 

RATES OF FOREIGN POSTAGE. 

Note —The fluurcs foIlowitiK the name of each country are Intended to represent, first, tho postage In cents, on letters 
weighini; onc-lmlf ounce or under; and socond, tlie postage on slnglo newspapers. 

North /Imcrico.— British ColuniMa, 10, 2. Canada, 10, 2. Mexico, 10, 2. Mexico, (West Const) 10, 2. 
Costa Rica, 10, 2. Guatemala, 10, 2. Honduras, 34, 6. Nicaragua, (Gulf Coast) 34, 6. Nicaragua, 
(Pacific Coast) 10, 2. West Indies, (llritish) 10, 2. Cuba, 10, 2. Bahama Islands, 10, 2. 

South America. — Argentine Republic, 45, 4. Aspinwall, 20, 2. Bolivia, 34, ti. llrazil, 45, 4. Chile, 
34, 6. Ecuador, 34, 6. New Grenada, 18, 6. Panama, 10, 2. Paraguay, 45, 4. Peru, 22, 6. Uruguay, 
45, 4. Venezuela, 10, 2. 

Europe. — Austria, 30, 6. Bremen, 30, 6. Belgium, 2r, 5. Corsica, 21, 2. Denmark, 35, 6. Prance, 
30,2. Prance, (qi. oz.) 15, -. German States, 30, 6. Great Britain, 24, 2. Greece, 42, H. Hamburg, 30, 6. 
Holland, 42, 2. Lonibardy, 42, 6. Modena, 42, fi. Norway, 46, 6. Parma, 42, 6. Poland, 37, 6. Port- 
ugal, 45, 8. Prussia, 30, 6. Rome and Papal States, 44, 6. Ruhsia, 37, 6. Sardinian States, 42, 0. Sicilies, 
(the Two) 47, 6. Spain, 42, 2. Sweden, 34, 6. Switzerland, 35, 6. Turkey, 28, 6. Tuscany, 42, 6. 
Venetian States, 30, b. 

A»ia. — Arabia, 45, 8. China, 5, 2. Hindostan, f)8, 13. Japan, 5, 2. Jerusalem, 3,3, 4. Siam, 45, 6. 
Smyrna, 40, 6. Syria, 45, 6. 

Africa. — Algeria, 33, 6. Canary Islands, 45, 6. Cape de Verde Isl., 37, 4. Cape of Good Hope, 45, 4. 
Rgvpt, 45, 8. Liberia, 33, 4. Tunis, 60, 2 West Coast, 33, 4. 

Eait Indiei. — Auetrnliii, 22, 6. Borneo, 53, 10. Ceylon, 60, 6. Java, 60, 6. Manila, 5, 2. New 
Zealand. 22, 6. Philippine Islands, 5, 2. Sandwich Islands, 3, 2. Singapore, 60, 6. Sumatra, 60, 6. 

On either letter or packet, of any weight, the u-holc postage or none at all should he prepaid. If any- 
thing less than the wuole is prepaid, no account is taken of it, and it is entirely lost to the sender. 

THE POSTAL MONEY ORDER SYSTEM. 

The Money Order System is intended to promote public convenience, and to insure safety in the transfer 
of money through the mails. Orders may be obtained at any of the money order offices for any amount 
up to fifty dollars, on payment of the following fee : On sums up to and including $20, 10 cents ; above 
that sum, 25 cents. Instructions are inuorsed on the back of each order. The money order offices on the 
Pacific Const are distinguished in the list of Post OlUces by an asterisk (*) affixed to each. 



, on letters 



2. New 
60,6. 
If Bny- 



POST OFFICES — CALIFORNIA, 



23 



POST OFFICES— CALIFORNIA. 

* Money Order Officea Capituls, Count;' Seats. 



\ 



Name P. O. County. 

Alameda Alameda 

Alamo Contra Costa . 

Albion Mendociuo . . . 

Alisal Monterey. ... 

AlleKliany Sierra 

AlvHiado A lamedu 

Alvieo .Santa Clara.. 

Amador City — Amador 

American Ranch. Sliasia 

Anaheim Los Anfj^elcs . 

Anderson'HVal'y Mendocino .. 
Ansel's Camp. ..Calaveras ... 

Annnly Sonoma 

Antelope Yolo 

Antiocu Contra Coiita. 

Areata Humboldt . . . 

'AUBURN Placer 



rostmostcr. 
• Arthurs. Barber, 
.•lames Foster. 
James Townseud. 

J. H. Clute. 
.A. iT. Lowell. 
F. Kaircliild. 
.Robert Oilmore. 
. Elias Anderson. 
John Fischer. 
A.B.Kendall. 
.George Stickles. 



A. W. Dunnigan. 
D.S. Woodruff. 
J. A. Whaloy. 
Sulon M. Stevens. 



Bangor Butte A. Kitchen. 

Bath Placer S. Burt. 

Battle Creek.... Tehama . 

Bear Valley Mnrindsa J. S. Bates. 

Belmont San Mutco Edw. Waltermire. 

*Benicia Solano A. L. Stiles. 

Benton Mono R.J. Morrison. 

Bidwell'sBar . ..Butte Joliu S. Bcndle. 

Bif Bar Trinity John Sammons. 

Big Oak Flat Tuolumne William Urick. 

Big Trees Calaveras •. 

Binghaniptou Solano O. Bingham. 

Black Point Marin .Jus. B. Sweetzer. 

Bloomtield Sonon.u C. R. Arthur 

Bodega Sonoma John Dougherty. 

Bolinlis Marin O. W. Rusenburg. 

BRIDGEPORT. Momi A. F. Bryant. 

Brighton Sacramento ...Thos. C. Perkins. 

Brooklyn Alameda O. C. Lewellin. 

Brown's Valley. Yuba ... ..James L. H.ii. 

Brownsville. ..'..Yubrt Martin Knox. 

Brush Creek Bulto Julius Jod. 

Buckeye Yolo liunjamin Ely. 

Buck's' Ranch . . . Plumas William Wagner. 

Buena Vista Amndor John Fit/.sinimonB. 

Ballard's Bar . ..Yuba A. J. Batchelder. 

Bunntt Santu ClL;ra...C. D. Richmond. 

Burwood San Juaquin... J. Munroe. 

Butte Valley . . . .Butte Robt. W. Durham. 



Cache Creek 

Cuhto b . . . . 

Culistoga 

Callalia'u'sRanch 

Calpella 

Canmnche 

Cani|)o Seco 

•Camptonville... 

Canon City 

Carey's Mills.... 
earner's Place... 
Central House... 

Centreville 

Cliarleston 

Chei-okee 

*Chico 

Chili 

Chinese Camp... 

Chrysopolis 

Chnmtown 

Cisco 

Clairvillu 

Clurksville 

Clayton 

Cleveland 



Yolo A. Hoffman. 

Mendocino ...Robert White. 

Napa S. M. Woodworth. 

Siskivou Ana White. 

Mendocino . ..JiicohWurteuberg, 

Calaveras Nicli. Zimmerman. 

Calavunis K. R. Svmo. 

Yuba RicharaH. Bliss. 

Trinity . 

Alpine Win. B. Wade. 



Butte John S. Hutchins. 

Alameda C. J. Stevens. 

Yolo .'. Charles H. Gray. 

Butte Thos. McDaniel. 

Butio Thos. J. Bidwcll. 

.Calaveras >' A. Hodgdon. 

Tuolumne ( lUtrles Cutting. 

Inyo Frank B. Fleming. 

Shasta Sylvester Hull. 

Placer James Huoton. 

Sonoma D. O'Dell. 

.EI Dorado ....D. CumminB. 
Contra Costa.. R. Muuvais. 
Humboldt Thos. Dungan, jr. 



NameF. 0. County. FoBtmaiter. 

Clipper Mills Butte Enoch Pmtt. 

Cloverdale Sonoma Charles Cook. 

Cocumunyo SanBernardinoF. L. Rich. 

Cold Spring El Dorado ....8. C. Dean. 

Colegrove's PointSiitter T. S. Kirk. 

Colfax Placer V. W. Cleaveland. 

Collinsville Solano. . .^ E. Rankin. 

Colouia El Dorado ....8. F. Child. 

Colorado Mai iposa . 

'Columbia Tuolumne W. 8. Hutchinson. 

'COLUSA Colusa John H. Lieniiig. 

Copperopolis Calaveras ....M. Armstrong. 

Coppervale Lassen C. C. Goodrich 

Cosumnes Sacramento ...Wm. D. Wilson. 

Cottage Grove. . . Klamath Win. Elliot. 

Cotton wmiil Tehama A. B. Jackson. 

CRESCENT 

CITY ........ Del Norte Wm.H. Woodbury. 

Crystal Lake Nevada . ...Henry PoUey. 



Damascus 

Danville 

Denverton 

Diamond Springs 

Donner Lake 

DoiighertvStat'n 
Douglas Cilv.. 
'DOWNIEV'E. 

Dry»<nvn 

Duncan's Mills 
'Dutch Flat... 



Placer H. K. Devely. 

Contm Costa.. M. Cohen. 

Solano S. K. Nuise. 

KIDorado....W. 8. Day. 

Nevada Eli S. Drew. 

Alameda John Green. 

Trinity Edw'd A. Kelton. 

Sierra A. J. McKineey. 

Amador B. F, Richtmyer. 

Sonoma Thomas Becoru. 

Placer J. H. Boke. 



Eel River rlumholdt B. Feigenbaum. 

Elbow /rcsuo John R. Edgar. 

El Dorado El Dorado Robert Steere. 

Elk Grove Saci-amento ... Pliilin Woodward. 

Elliott San Joaquin . . . G. W. Purjions. 

El Monte Ix>s Angeles. . . Ira 8. Thompson. 

Etna Mills Siskivou A. Swain. 

'EUREKA HumWdt C. H. Heney. 

Evans Ranch. . . .Lassen Alvaro Evans. 



Fairplay 

Farmiiigton 

Ferndale 

Ferry Point 

Fiddletown 

Firebaugh's F'y. 
Fisherman's Bay 

Fish Springs 

'Folsoin 

Forbestown . . . . 

Forest City 

'Forest Hill 

Forest H<mie 

Forks of Salmon. 

Fort Jones 

Fourth Crossing. 

Franklin 

Freejwrt 

French Camp . . . 
French Corral... 
French Gulch... 



El Dorado . ...P. F. Covert. 
.San Joaciuiu ..J. W. Morrow. 

Humboldt Edward J. Dodge. 

Del Norte John Titus. 

Amudor R. B. Wight. 

Fresno Jacob Carman. 

Sonoma A.J. Fisk. 

Mono Josiah H. Gibbs. 

Sacramento ...Miirk Ayer. 

Butte L. P. Siiiitb. 

Sierra R. S. Weston. 

Placer R. Parkliurst. 

Amador A. B Tiew. 

Klamath M. Forgey. 

Siskiyou A. B. Carlock. 

Calaveras Wm. Reddick. 

Sacramento ...H. Shiutius. 
Sacramento ... Erskine Greene . 
San Joaquin ..G. W. Sampson. 

Nevada J. Olson. 

Shasta Patrick Hughes. 



.James TunnahiU. 



Garrote Tuolumne. 

Oeneseo Plumas 

'Georgetown ... El Dorado Benj. F. Shepherd. 

'Gibsonville Sierra Robert Jacks. 

'Gilroy Santa Clara. .-I). Hiiber. 

Gold Run Placer O. W. Hollenbeck. 

Goodyear's Bar. .Sierra Win. Westfleld. 

Gralton Yolo J.H.Goodhue. 

Grand Island. . . .Colusa C. J. Diefendorff. 









M 



Il ' 



!•: !. 



24 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Xamo P. O. County. 

"Grass Valley... Nevada 

Green Springs... Tuolumne ... 

Green v alley El Dorado . . . 

Greenwood El Dorado... 

Grizzly Bear H'e Placer 

Grizzlv Flat El Dorado... 

Gualala Mendocino .. 



Postniuter. 
.D.B.Nye. 
.Geo. A. Hildretb. 
.John M. Arnold. 
.George W. Ferree. 
. J. Steiner. 
•S. F. Davis. 
. C. D. Robinson. 



Half Moon Bay . San Mateo W. T. McDonald. 

Hapjjy Camp Del Norte Lawr'e Unteman. 

Harrisburg Alameda Geo. W. Peacock. 

HAVILAH Kern: M. H. Kittredge. 

Haywood Alameda William Hayward. 

"Healdeburg Sonoma J. E. Fenno. 

Henley S'skiyou A. Hazarack. 

Hermit Valley ..Calttverus . 

Hermitage Mendocino C. H. Cooley. 

HicksvilTe Sacramento . ..George Patterson. 

Honcut Yuba James M. Reese. 

Hoopa V^alley... Klamath H. W. Lake. 

Hopeton Merced Ernstus Eagleston. 

Hope Valley ....Alpine D. W. Peck. 

Hopewell Colus-. W. M. Slierer. 

HoinitoB Mariiwsa E.G. Hall. 

Horr's R:inch ...StuiiiBluus Calvin \V. Salter. 

Horsetown Sbnsta William Goodall. 

Hydesville Humboldt Elias Smith. 

INDEPEND'E . Inyo J. B. Rowley. 

Indian Diggings.El Dorado J. Edmondsou. 

Indian Gulch. . . .Mariposa J. Porritel. 

Indian Springs ..Nevada H. L. Hatch. 

Indkip Butte Samuel L. Dewey. 

* lone Valley »... Amador W. H. Scudder. 

Iowa Hill Placer S. N. Calvin. 

Jacinto Colusa Stephen Smith. 

•JACKSON ....Amador Charles M. Meek. 

Jacksonville Tuolumne A. Orcutt. 

Jamestown Tuolumne li. F. Butterfield. 

Janesville Lassen L. N. Breed. 

Jenny Lind Calaveias L. Rosenburg. 

Johnson's Ranch Sutter Y. D.>ughertv. 

Junction City ...Trinity William H. May. 

Kelsey El Dorado .... Samuel A. Smith. 

Kernville Kern My i-on E. Harmon. 

Keysville Kern . 

Kingston Fresno O. H. Bliss. 

KNIGHT'S 

FERRY Stanislaus William A. Fisher. 

Knox ville Lake Frank Mahon. 



Lafayette 

La Grange.... 
Lake House .. 
LAKEPORT . 
Lukeville. .. .. 
Lancha Plana ... 

Lanuworth 

•La Porte 

Latrobe 

I^wiston 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Lincoln 

Linden 

Lisbon 

Little Ijake 

Little River 

Little York 

Lockeford 

Ijocust Shade 

Longville 

•LOS ANGLES 

Lob GbIob 

Lower Lake 

Loyalton 



Contra Costa.. B. Shreve. 

Stanislaus Chas. Wichelhaus. 

Sacramento ... George luglis. 

Lake L. D. Winchester. 

Sonoma Niles Mills. 

Amador Joseph Schumer. 

Stanislaus H. Langworthy. 

Plumas John H. Thomas. 

El Djrado A. G. Davis. 

Trj-.iity Fred Frev. 

S'.uta Clara... Isaai' E. Paddock. 
San Joaquin . . WilliHrn Allport. 

Placer James Barnes, 

Sim Joaquin ..Isaac S. Smith. 

Placer Geo. W. Apniegate. 

Mendocino ...Hiram Willets. 
Mendocino ...Isaiah Stevens. 

Nevada Alonzo P. Schutt. 

Sail Joaquin ..Luther Locke. 
Sail Joaquin ..J. B Boody. 

Plumas Andrew Miller. 

Los Angeles ..Geo. J. Oarke. 
Santa Clara... H. D. McCobb. 

Lake P. H. Parsons. 

Sierra A. G. Doom. 



Name P. O. County. Postmaster. 

Lynn's Valley. ..Kern Hugh Ovens. 

Magalia Butte W'lliam S. Green. 

Maine Prairie ...Solano J. C. Meritheu. 

•MARIPOSA . . Mariposa Geo. W. Temple. 

•Markleeville ...Alpine A. C. Folger. 

Mark West Sonoma H. G. Gianiiini. 

•MARTINEZ... Contra Costa.. O. F. James. 

Martinsburg Butte Robert Davis. 

Miirtin's Ferry ..Klamath . 

"MARYSVlLLEYuba E, E. Meek. 

Maxwell's CreekMariposa Nelson T. Cody. 

Maytield Santa Clara. ..J. L. Chandler. 

Meadow Lake. ..Nevada M. W. Wilson. 

Meadow Valley . Plumas M. D. Smith. 

Meinecker ....'..San Joaquin. .. . 

Mendocino Mendocino . . . L. Woodward. 

Merced Falls. . . .Merced William Nelson. 

Meridian Sutter John F. Fonts. 

Michigan Bar. ..Sacramento . ..G.B.V.DeLtimater 

Michigan Bluff. .Placer F. S. Washeim. 

Milfonl LasHen Charles Batterson. 

MILLERTON.. Fresno George Gieierscii. 

Millbiiie San Mateo.... Hugh S. Jones. 

Mlllville Shasta John Wheatley. 

Milpitas Santa Clara . . . F. Creighton. 

Mission San Jose Alameda R. A. McClure. 

Mix's Crossing ..Yuba A. J. Gove. 

•Mokelumne Hill Calaveras ....William Innes. 

Monitor Alpine S. G. Ijowis. 

•MONTEREY .Monterey ....Johnl). Callaghan 

Monte Vista Alameda M. Kimball. 

Montezuma Tuolumne William Mitchell. 

Moon's Ranch. ..Tehama N. P. Merrill. 

Moore's Flat ... . Nevada Samuel Ca Idwell. 

Mormon Island.. Sacramento . ..J. T. Becroft. 
Mountain Ranch. Calaveras ....W. H. Holmes. 
Mountain View .. Santa Clara... S. P. Taylor. 

Mount Bullion... Mariposa Geo. W. Hanna. 

Mount Eden Alameda F. Brustgrum. 

Mount Ophir Mariposa J. H. Miller. 

Murphy's Calaveras . . . .Charles A. Hunt. 

Musquito Calaveras G.E. Albers. 

•NAPA CITY ..Napa W.R.Brown. 

Natividad Monterey Wni. S.Johnson. 

Neillsbnrg Placer William Buchly, 

•NEVADA CITY Nevada Frank G. Guild. 

Newcastle Placer A.J. Danforth. 

Newtown El Dorado ....Joseph Miller. 

New ville Colusa S. Fuder. 

Nicolaus Sutter P. N. Harris. 

North Bloomtield Nevada Caleb Nash. 

North Branch ...Calaveras D. Latimer. 

North Columbia. Nevada Levi Ayres. 

North San Juan . Nevada R. A. Langbead. 

•Oakland Alameda George M. Yard. 

Olema Marin A. Abbott. 

On ■»ga Nevada .... George Roberts. 

Onion Valley . . .Plumas obn B. Overton. 

Oiiisbo Sacramento ...A. E. Hutchinson. 

Oregon House . . . Yuba Peter Rice. 

ORLEANS 

BAR Klamath John A. Pearch. 

•Oro Fino Siskiyou W. F. S. Naylor. 

•OROVILLE ..Butte H. P. Downer. 

Owensville Mono T. H. Soper. 

Pacheco Contra Costa.. H. M. Hale. 

Painsville Nevada M. I). Hatch. 

Pattee's lianch ..Calaveras Orange Lilly. 

Patterson Nevada M. W. Martib. 

Paulinsville Yubu . 

Pentz Butte M. Pence. 

Pescadero Santa Cruz Charles Kinsey. 

•Pctniuma Sonoma James Hunter. 

Pelrolia Humboldt R. M, Laiigdon. 



POST OFFICES — CALIFORNIA. 



25 



NRtno P. O. County. Postma»tcr. 

Pilot Hill El Dorado . . . . W. K. Creque. 

Pine Creek Butte V. PbillipB. 

Pine Grove Amador S. F. Dexter. 

*PLAC'KVILLE El Dorado ...Albert J. Lowry. 
Plciisunt Valley .El Dorado — .Tolin B. Hflas. 

Plum Valley Sierra P. B. Kleocker. 

Poland '. San Jomniiu ..D. Gillis. 

Pope Valley Napa J. Marvin. 

Poverty Bar Calaveras J. Fitzsimmons. 

Prairie Yolo Tlieo. Wiejiand. 

Princeton Coliiea Almond Lull. 

Punta Arenas ...Mendocino ...A. W. Hall. 

QUINCY Plninas William Moore. 

Rattlctinake Bar. Placer John McBride. 

*KED BLUFF. Tebania Jos. 11. Bradway. 

Red Doir Nevada Wm.F.Heydlauff. 

REDWOOD 

CITY Siui Mnteo. . . .S. S. Merrill. 

Reynolds Ferry .Tnolinmio Win. Henderson. 

Rich Gulch. .'...Calavc-ruH T. S. Bever. 

Richland Sacramento . . . John F. Woolley. 

Rio Seco Butte A.J. Crum. 

Rio Vista Solano W. K. S<|uire8. 

Rock Creek Butte James L. Keefer. 

Rock Springs San Beniardino . 

Rockville Solano James Gilmorc. 

Roseville Placer Wni. A. Thomas. 

Roufj;li &. Ready. Nevada S. H. Sheifield. 

Round Tent Nevada . 

Round Valley ■ . ■ Plumas J. D. Compton. 

•SACRAMENTO Sacramento ..Georjre Rowland. 

Salinas Mouterey Austin Smith. 

Salisbury Sacntniento . ..T. O. Salisbury. 

Salmons' Falls ...El Dorado ....R. K. Berrv. 

SAN ANDREAS Calaveras A. Severance. 

San Antonio. Monterey Frank Sylvester. 

SAN BERNAR- 
DINO San Bernardino.!. C. Peacock. 

S. Buenaventura Sitnta Bat baru. Vol. A. Simpson. 

SAN DIEGO... San Diepo ....Thomas S. Bush. 

Sauel Mendocino . . .William Connor. 

•S. FRANCISCO San Francisco R. F. Perkins. 

San Gabriel Los AuKeles ..D. F. Hall. 

*SAN JOSE.... Santa Clara. ..Simon M. Cutler. 

San Juan Monterey John W.Whitney. 

S. LEANDRO ..Alameda H. Keeney. 

San Lorenzo Alameda J. L. Shiman. 

SAN LUIS 

OBISPO . -.8. Luis Obispo Alex. Murray. 

San Luis Rey . ..San Dicuo Marcus A. Forster. 

San Marcos S. Luis Obispo J. P. Lewelling. 

San Mateo Snn Mateo . . . . J. E. Skidmore. 

San Pablo Contra Costu.. J. M. Tewksbury. 

SaiiQuentln Marin James J. Green. 

*SAN RAFAEL Marin T. Muhon. 

San Ysidora Santa Clara. ..Jas. W. Gould. 

SANTA BAR 

BARA Santa Barbara. Angustin .Tanssens. 

Snnta (<lara Santa Clara. ..Sam'l Henderson. 

•SANTA CRUS5 Santa Cruz.... Silas Felker. 

Santa Inez Santa Barbara. Jttse M. P. Indart. 

•SANTA ROSA. Sonoma Thomas Spencer. 

Saratoga Santa Clara. ..C. Newhouse. 

Sawyers Bar Klamath Wm. Grant. 

Scott River Siskiyou Sigmund Simon. 

Searsville San Mateo William Page. 

Sebaslopol Napa B. W. Arnold. 

Sebastonol Sonoma J. H. P. Morris. 

Secret Ravine. ..Placer J. H. Mitchell. 

Seind Valley Siskiyou Wni. B. Reeve. 

•SHASTA Shasta Lewis Wellendorfl' 

Shaws Flat Tuolumne A. Bullerdick. 

Sheldon Sacramento ...J. B. Maliolni. 

Shingle Springs.. El Dorado Jacob Smith. 

Sierra Valley Sierra William Arms. 



..T. M. Whitesides. 

. D. B. Carver. 
.A. C. St. John. 



Name I*. O, County. Postmaster. 

SILVER MT'N . Alpine J. O. Courson. 

Silveyville Solano R. W. Murphy. 

Slippery Ford ...El Dorado Charles Wutson. 

Smartsville Yuba L. B. Clark. 

Smith River Del Norte S. L. Grow. 

Smith's Ferry ... Fresno Clay burn Wright. 

Smith's Ranch... Sonoma Geo. W. Briurd. 

Sniithville Placer L. G. Smith. 

SNELLING ....Merced John S. Williams. 

Snugville Sun Joaquin ..L.J. Dougherty. 

Solano Solano W. Dripsbach. 

Soldier's Bridge. Lassen I. N. Pine. 

Somerville Contra Costa . . Geo. H. Scammon. 

Sonoma Sonoma I>ewis W. Worth. 

•SONORA Tuolumne Harlow L. Street. 

Soquel Santa Cruz Edward Porter. 

Spanish Flat El Dorado C. H. Wattles. 

Spanish Ranch ..Plumas Rich. Thompson. 

Sportman's Hall. El Dorado James Blair. 

Springfield Tuolumne. . . 

Springville San Joaquin 

St. Helena Napa 

St. John Colusa 

St. Louis Sierra John M. Logan. 

•STOCKTON ..Sun Joaquin... CO. Burton. 

Stony Point Sonoma Robert Avers. 

Strawberry V'l'y Yuba William Youlin. 

Suifar Pine Tuolumne T. J. Northrop. 

•SUISUN CITY Solano William Losh. 

Siuiimit Plumas J. (J. Halbert. 

•SUSANVILLE Lassen Isaac N. Roop. 

Suiter Creek Amador John 1). Dennis. 

Sweetland Nevada William Menner. 

Table Rock Sierra T. A. McFarland. 

Tahoe El Dorado William Mac. 

Tavlorville Plumas J. T. Tavlor. 

Tehama Tehama Charles llarvey. 

Telegraph City.. Calaveras G. L. Fislier. 

Thompson's Flat. Butte Chns. E. Campbell. 

Timber Cove Sonoma F. Helmke. 

Timbuctoo Yuba S. C. Wessels. 

Todd's Valley. ..Placer John Miner. 

Tomulcs Marin W. Dutton. 

Trinidad Klamath Wm. Cbilds. 

Trinity (N. Fork) Trinity John Meckel. 

Trinity Center ..Trinity Chas. H. Vose. 

Truckee Uiver ..Placer M. J. King. 

Tule Tulare George McKilvey. 

Two Rocks Sonoma J . B. Schoobeda. 

UKIAII Mendocino . ..Henson Hazell. 

Ihiclo Sam Lake William Gard. 

Union Merced P. B. Bennett. 

UpperClearLake Lake J. Davis. 

•Vacaville Solano Mason Wilson. 

Vallecito Calaveras J. D. Gray. 

•Vallejo Solano G. .P. Westcott. 

Vernon Sutter C. G. Roth. 

•VISALIA Tulare John A. Keyes. 

Volcano Amador P. A. Cluto. 



Walnut Creek . . . 
Walnut Grove. .. 
Washington . . . . 

Washington 

Waterloo 

*\Vat8onville — 
•WEAV'RVLE 

Webster 

West Butte 

West Point 

Western 

White River 

•Wilmington 

Wilson's Ranch . 
Windsor 



Contra Costa. .H. 1'. Pemiiman. 
Sacramento ...John L. Chamblin. 

Nevada J. F. Mason. 

Yolo ■— . 

San Joaquin .. . 

Santa Cruz Edward iilartin. 

Trinity Richard Clitlbrd. 

Placer . 

Sutter E. B. Crouch. 

Calaveras J. H. Gratacap. 

Sacramento . .. . 

Tulare Chas. R. Worland. 

Los Angeles ..H. Jacoby. 

Ph'.ccr . 

Sonoma Wm. S. Clark. 



1 






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If 3!' 



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'S-.CT. 



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26 



PACIPIO COAST BUSINESS DIRKCTORY. 



Nnmo P. O. County. I'ostmiutcr. 

Woodbridfte Snn Joaquiu ..Daniel Cri»t. 

WOODLAND.. Yolo J. 8. Cunningham. 

Woodside San Mateo U. O. Tripp. ' 

Wyandotte Butte W. 8. Wilkereon. 

Wyatt's Store. ..Mariposa Manuel DeSilva. 

Yankee Hill Butte M. H. Wells. 



Nnmo r. O. County. Postmaster. 

Yankee Jims ... . Flucer S. M. Jamison. 

Yeoniat Amador ■ . 

Yolo Yolo A. Griffith. 

•YREKA Siskiyou C. H.Pvle. 

YUBA CITY . . . Sutter R.)bert Dinsmore. 

Yuba Bar Yuba A. J. Bachelder. 



POST OFFICES— OREGON". 



•Albany Linn K. A. Freeliind. 

Amity Yuinbill G. E. Getcliel. 

Applegiite Jackson Iiiines A. Wilson. 

Ashland Mills . ...Huksou A. D. Helinan. 

Af"U)nH (Clatsop Charloe L. Parker. 

•Auburn Baker I. 8. Morgan. 

Aurora Mills Mariou Fred Keil. 

Baker City Baker W. F. McCiary. 

Belpassi Mitrion Robert Hnnna. 

Bethel Polk J. IL Huwley. 

Bloomington Polk . 

Biidgeport Polk M. M. Jones. 

Brovvni^ville ....Linn Alexander Kirk. 

Buena Vislu Polk H. Linnville. 

Butteville Marion T. X. Mathieu. 

•Canon City Grant F. C. Sels. 

Canyonville Douglas B.J. Sidemnn. 

Centerville Washington. ..Edward Jackson. 

Chetco Curry A. F. Miller. 

Condit Marion William Morriss. 

•Corvallis Benton R. M. Thitmpgon. 

Cottage Grove ..Lane Nathaniel Martin. 

'Dallas Polk J. Emmons. 

•Dalles City Wasco Henry J.WaUlron. 

Dayton Yaudiill Johu'Cary. 

Diamond Hill ...Linn James U. Pierce. 



East Portland ■ ..Multnomah 
Egun Station Umatilla 



.Milton Horsford. 



Elkton Douglas Levi Kent. 

Ellensburg Curry John Dewey. 

Empire City Coos David Morse, Jr. 

Eola Polk ....A. W. Witherell. 

Etna Polk T.J. Riggs. 

•Eugene City . . - liane . . . ; P. W. Jiilinson. 

E.xpress Ranch.. Baker C. W. Durkee. 

Fairfield Marion . 

Forest Cove Baker . 

Forest Grove Washington... C. A. Reynolds. 

Franklin I^ane Dr. Egleston, 



Guleaville Douglas D. A. Ijcvens. 

Gardiner Douglas David Morey. 

Glad Tidings — Clackamas G. W.Jackson. 

Grand Ronde ...Polk 0. C. Litchlield. 

Grant's Puss Jackson Thomas Croxtou. 

Harrisburg Linn Hiram Smith. 

Hillsboro Washington. ..L. J. Patterson. 

Hood River Wasco Charles C. Coe. 

Independence ...Folk C. P. Cooke. 



•Jncksonville ... Jackson... . 

Jefferson. ■. Mariou . . . . 

John Day's City. Wasco 



...J. M. Sutton. 
...H. A. Johnson. 



Kellogg's Donglas L. Kellogg. 

Kerbyville Josephine 8. W. Sawyer. 

Kings Valley Benton . 



*La Omnde Union 

•Lafayette Yamhill .... 

Lanca'stur Lane 

f iObanon Linn 

Leland loHi-pliine. . 

Liberty Benton 

Locust Grove ... Douglas ... 
Luukimute Polk 



...B. P. Patterson. 
. . . R. L. Simpson. 
...M. M. Crow. 
...S. H. Claugton. 
. ..Sumuel Harkness. 
...W. G. Pickett 



.Isaac Staats. 



Marshall Umatilla . 

Mc Kenxie Ijune Thomas Lester. 

McMiimville Yamhill D.J. Yearguin. 

MilwHiikie Clackamas Mrs. H. Bell. 

Monmouth Polk J. B. V. Butler. 

Muddy Yandiill Jetf'. Davis. 

Myrtle Creek Douglas L. Laneve. 

Need V Clackamas. . . . J. Moreland. 



! Newelsville Marion.. 

North Canvonv'leDouglas . 
North Yamhill ..Yamhill.... 

Oakland Douglas . . . 

'Oregon City Clackamas . 



J.J. Murphy. 

....J. B. Siduiun. 
J. M. Fryer. 

....E. C. Lord. 
..E. B. Kelley. 



Peoria Linn W. P. Smith. 

Plucnix Jackson E. D. Foudray. 

Pine Linn . 

Pleasimt Hill I^me W. Gilfroy. 

Phim Vallev ....Polk . ■ 

Port Orford Curry I>ewig Knapp. 

•Portland Multnomah . ..E. G. Randall. 



Randolph Coos . 

Ranier Columbia Deni- Blanchard. 

Rickreal Polk Nathaniel Ford. 

Rock Point Jackson John B. White. 

•Rosebnrg Douglas J. 8. Fitzhugh. 

•Salem Marion L. 8. Dy ar. 

Salt Creek Polk J. H. S:i«»!ry. 

8andv Multnomah ...J. M. Stott. 

Saavies Island ..Multnomah .. ..Hilton Bonser. 

Scio Linn E. E. Wheeler. 

Scottsbing Douglas Geo. S. Hinsdale. 

Sheridan Yamhill T. Falconer. 

Silverton Marion J. C. Davenport. 

Slate Creek Josephine S. McAllister. 

Springville Multnomah C. B. Comstock. 

St. Helens Columbia B. F. Gihner. 

St. Louis Mariou Capt. Minnis. 

Starr's Point Benton W. C. Woodcock. 

Sublimity Marion J. W. Cusick. 

Suislaw Lane H. Colenain. 

Sunnnerville .. ..Union H. Rcinhart. 

Swift's Station ..Umatilla J. Switt. 

Tillamook Tillamook G. W. Millar. 

•Umatilla Umatilla J. II. Koontx. 

Umpqua City Donglas Edward Drew. 

Union Union E. C. Brainard. 

Waconda Marion Charles Calvert. 



)yar. 
kV«ry. 

itUtt. 

lioiiBer. 
A'lieeler. 

Hinsdale. 

loiier. 

nvenport. 

Ilister. 

ometock. 
Itner. 

ilinnis. 

Woodcock. 

Cnsick. 

enmn. 

nhart. 

ft. 

Millar. 

Coontx. 

d Drew. 

_}ruiiinrd. 

I Culvert. 



POST OFFICES — NEVADA, 



27 



Name P. O. County. l'o»tmo«ter. 

Waldo Jofiepliiiie A. B. Mcllwuin. 

West CbehBlim..YumliiIl Isaac UoKere. 

Westport Clatsop Joliu West. 



Nunc I*. O. County. I'ostmuter. 

Willnmette ForksTjUiie fl. W. Vaaghn. 

Willow Springs . Juckson 8. P. Dean. 

YoDcallu Douglas Juste Applegate. 



POST OFFICES— NEVADA. 



American City ..Storey TT. S. Winn. 

"Aiironi ". . . . Ksme'ralda W. C. Meredith. 

'Austiu Lander liobert Allen. 



Canon City liandor 

•Ciirson City . . . .Ormsliy. . . . 

Clan AInriie Chiircfiill .. 

Crvstal Peak Washoe 

Columbus Ksineraldu . 

Como Lyon 

Dayton Lyin 

Deep Hole Uoop 

Duu Glen Uuuiboldt.. 



.L. I). Bnrkuloo. 
.U.F. Small. 



. H. F. Smyles. 
.Cliarlcs Dumur. 
.G.W. Walton". 

.J. M. Shay. 



...C. S. Osboru. 



Egan Canon Lander Patrick Lngan. 

Ellsworth Nye 1). Edioumn. 

iCnipire City ....Ormsby 11. L. Deicbiuouu. 

Etna Humboldt . 

Franktown Washoo Fred. A. Eat. 

Genoa Douglas J. II. Davis. 

Glen Hamilton ..Nye . 

Gold Hill Storey S. W. Chubbuck. 

Granite Creek . . Koop . 

Huffaker's Waslioc G. W. Huiruker. 

Humboldt City.. Humboldt L. C. Pease. 



Hardin City Soop . 

lone City Nye John L. Craig. 

La Plata City ...Churchill Ira E. Pierce. 

Mammoth Douglas D . L. Hawkins. 

Ophir 



.Washoe H. A. Cheever. 



Kagtown Churchill . 

Kuby Valley .... Lander Sam' 1 Woodward. 

Sheridan Douglas James Billis. 

Silver City Lyon J. A. Itonham. 

Silver Peak Esmeralda ....J. H. Harris. 

Smoke Creek. ...Koop , 

Spring City Uooji . 

St. Olnir Station. . Cburcbill James A. St. Clair. 

Stnr Ciiy Huniboldl U. C. Johnson. 

Stiil'.vater Churchill . 

Unionville Humboldt M. P. Freeman. 

'Virginia City . . . Storey C. C. Warner. 

Washoe City Washoe JamoH H.Kinkead. 

Wellington Eemerulda E. (.'. Phelps. 

•willow Point ... Humboldt . • 

Wiunemucca.... Washoo . 



POST OFFICES— WASHINGTON TERRITORY. 



Arkada Mason Aaron M. Collins. 

Reaver Tliurston C P. Judson. 

Uoistfort Lewis Charles F. White. 

Uruceport Pacific G. W. Parker. 

Cascades Clarke J. S. Hamilton. 

Castle Rock Cowlitz Henry Jackson. 

Catliiamet Wahkiakum... A. I). liirnlu. 

Cedarville Chuhalis James Smith. 

Clicliaiis Point. ..CiiehaliH Giles Ford. 

Chimmto Lewis I. T, Itrowning. 

Coal Bank Thurston . 

Coppei Walla Walhi..L. Ilenshaw. 

Cuupeville Island John Uobertson. 

Cowlitz Lewis H. II. Pinto. 



Ebey'g Landing. Island . 

Elma Chehalis James Waldrip. 

Fisher's LandingClarke Solomon Fisher. 

Fort Colville Stevens Park Winuns. 

Fort Stevens Thurston . 

Fort Willopa Pacific Sebiielian Oiesy. 

Franklin Pierce J. P. Stewart. 

Grand Mound . . . Thurston , Axtell. 

Grand Prairie .. .Lewis Joseph Manning. 



Kamilchie 



.Mason David C. Forbes. 



Lincoln Clarke . 



.Guatuve Greve. 



Miami Prairie. ..Thurston A. E.Young. 

Montesimo Ciiehalis J. L. Scnmmon. 

Monlicello Cowlitz A. U. Burbank. 

Muckilteo Snohomish J. I>. Fowler. 

Mullau's Bridge. Wulla Walla.. H. II. Spaulding. 

New Dungeness. Clallam Elliot Cliue. 

Oak Point Cowlitz A. S. Ahemethy. 

Oakland ..Mason Wni. M. Morrow. 

"Olympia Tluuston F. JI. Saritent. 

Oystarvillo Pacific John Crellin, Jr. 

Pekin Clarke Oustav Greve. 

Port Angelos Clallam Simmel Stork. 

Port Discovery . .Jetl'orson . 

Port Ludlow Jefferson . 

Port Madison .... Kitsap . 

Port Townsend . . Jefl'ei-soii James Seavey. 

Port William . 

San Juan Whatcom Isaac E. Higgins. 

Sanders Prairie . . liowis O. B. McFadden. 

Scatter Creek . . .Thurston . 

Scabeck Kitsap . 

Seattle King Gardner Kellogg. 

Sherwood's MillsMason Joseph Sherwooid. 

Skokomish Mason Edward A.Wilson. 



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28 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 



Namo P. 0. County. rostmastor. 

Skookumchuck ..Thurston James Frame. 

Snohomish City.. Snohomigh....E. C. FeivuBon. 

*SteilRcoom Pierce E. A. Liunt. 

Swinomich Wlmtcom Cbarleg H. Habbs. 



Teekalet Kitsap . 

Touchet Wallu Walla. -G.W. Miller. 

Tnlalip Island . 

Tumwater Timrston James Biles. 

Union Kidge Clarke Asa Richardson. 



Name P. O. 
Utsalady 



County. Postmaiter. 

. Island Law 'uce Orennan. 



'Vancouver Clarke Hiram Cochran. 

Walla Walla ....Walla Walla.. II. E. Johnson. 

Wallula Walla Walla. .Alvin Flanders. 

Washougal Clarke George Hurt. 

Whatcom Whatcom ....Eugene Jusper. 

Wynokee Chehalis . 



Yelm Thurston. 



.Charles O'Xeil. 



POST OFFICES— IDAHO TERRITORY. 



'Boise City Ada J. H. Misener. 

Centerville Boise H. M. Elsworth. 



Elk City Ncz Perce. 

Esmeralda Alturus . . . 



Florence Idaho S. S. Fenn. 

"Idaho City BuiHe James A. Pinney. 

John Day Creekldaho John Wessell. 

Le wiston Nez Puree ... .J. Flanagan. 

Slalade City Oneida 



Middleton Ada E. Burner. 



Mount Idaho. ...Xez Perce ....Loval P Brown. 



Payetteville. 

Pierce (;ity Shoshone 



Pioneer City ....Boise C. N. Boatman. 

Placerville Boise J. II. Robinson. 

Rhonerville Jas. Weinheruer. 

Rocky Bar Alturas J. Anderson. 

*Ruby City Owyhee W. Clenimins. 

Slate Creek Idaho John Wood. 

Union Ada E. Price. 

Warnerville Boise M. Warner. 

Weiser Ranch... Ada . 



POST OFFICES— MONTANA TERRITORY. 



Bannack Beaver Head . . H. D. Weed. 

Bluckfoot City ..Deer Ijodge...S. H. Crounse. 
Boulder Valley ..Jefferson.. W. O. Barkley. 

Deer Lodge CityDeer Lodge . . . R. J. Percy. 

Helena Edgerton John Potter. 

Jefferson Bridge. Madison C. Flanaghan. 



Jefferson City... Jefferson William Rutan. 

Missoula Mills... Missoula . 

Nevada Madison J. R. Aldey. 

Prickly Pear.... Jefferson Frank Wells. 

Virginia Madison James Gibson. 



POST OFFICES — UTAH TERRITORY. 



Alger 

Almii Sevier . 

Alpine City I'tuli .. 

American Fork.. L' tub .. 



T.J. McCuUough. 

L. E. Harrington. 



Beaver Benver 

Berry ville Kane 

Brigliani City Box Elder .. 



. H. A. Skinner. 



.Samuel Smith. 



1. 



Cedar City Iron Isaac C. Haight. 

Cedar Sj)ringB... Millard Richard Jonson. 

Cedar V alloy Utah Lewis Greely. 

Centerville Davis William Reaves. 

Chicken ('reek . .Juab James Wilson. 

Circleville Piute . 



Cloyde Weber Rich'd Ballantyne 

Coalville Summit Norton Harmon. 

Cole ville Sitn Pete John Reese. 

Croydon Morgan James Walker. 



Millard Jacob Croft. 



Desci-et City 

Diamond . 

Dra|)er Ot. Salt Lake . . 

Ephraim ,. .San Pete H. F. Petersen. 

E. T. City Tooele G.W. Bryan. 

Fairview San Pete . 

Farmington Davis Jno. R. Blanchard 

Fayette Piute . 



Bullantyiie 
V\ Harmon, 
lieese. 

Walker. 

I Croft. 



I Petersen. 
Bryan. 

Blancbard 



POST OFFICES — UTAH TERRITORY. 



29 



Name V. O. County. 

Fillmore City Millard 

Fort BridKer Oreen River 

Fountain Orecn. . Sim I'ete 

Franklin Cache 



Poatmaiitcr. 
.R. A.McBride. 
.W. A. Carter. 
.K. K. Lewellyn. 
.L. II. Hatch. 



Grafton ...Kane . 

Ooeben Utah William Price. 

OrantBville Tooele William Jetfrieg. 

•Great 8. L. CityGt- Salt Lake- Nat Stelti. 

Greenville Beaver .Simmel Kershaw. 

Gunnison Sun Pete H. II.Kearns. 



.John Willis. 
.James Lewis. 



Harmony Washinjjton . 

Harrisburg Washimjton. 

Heber Wasatch . 

Herriman Salt Jiake . 

Henneferville . .. Sumr jit 

Summit T. S. Hovt. 

Huntsville Weber Eractus Bingbnm. 

Hyde Park Cache William Hyde. 

Hyrum Cache O. N. Lilyenquist. 



Kamas Summit. 

Kanarravi lie Iron . 



Kaysville Davis John Barnes. 

Lehi City Utah David Kvans. 

Ijog&n Caclie H. W. Isaacson. 

Lynne Weber Louis Tuft. 

Manti San Pete John L. Bench. 

Moroni Siui Pete Geo. W. Bradlty. 

Meadow Millard H. B. Bennett. 

Mendon Cache A. P. Shiimwuy. 

Midway Wasatch . 

Millville Cache George A. Pitkin. 

Minersville Beaver James H. UoUins. 

Mona Juab William Newton. 

Morgan Morgan T. It. G. Welch. 

Mormon Gt. Salt Lake. . 

Mound Wasatch . 

Mountain .Morgan E. D. Spanlding. 

Mt. Pleasant San Pete David Coudluud. 

Nephi Juab Timothy B. Foot. 

New Harmony.. Washington. .. . 

North Ogden Weber Henry Holmes. 

Ogden City Weber C. W. West. 

Panquitch Iron ~. 

Paradise Cache David James. 

Paragoonah Iron Silas S. Smith. 



Name P. O. County. Postmaster. 

Parowan Iron Richard Benson. 

Payson Utah JohnT. Hardy. 

Peoa Summit Abr'ni Merchant. 

Petersburg Milli"^ Peter Robinson. 

Pine Valley Wa8iiington...rU Whipple. 

Pinto Washington. . . . 

Phiin City Weber William McOuire. 

Pleasant Grove . . Utah W. G. Sterrett. 

Porter Morgan James Woods. 

Pranavah Iron John Willis. 

Providence Cache William Budge. 

Provo City Utah A. F. Mavdouald. 

Richfield Sevier . 

Richmond Ciiclie M. W. Merrill. 

Round Valley... Millard . 

Rockville Millard . 



Saint Thomas Wash ington . . 

Salina Sevier 



Salt Creek Juab Timothy B. Foot. 

Santa Clara Washington... William Crosby. 

Santaquin Utah H.Green. 

Scipio Millard Benjamin .Tonson. 

Shambip Tooele George Burrige. 

Slatersville Weber Jere'h Beatman. 

Smithtield Cache .Tolin Boyce. 

South Weber Davis Eli Smith. 

Spanish Fork Utah D. W. Davis. 

Spring I^ke VillaUtuh B. F. Johnson. 

Spi'ingdale . 

Springtown San Pete .Joseph Ellis. 

Springvillc Utah Aaron Johnson. 

St. George Washington... James G. Bleak. 

Stockton Tooele.. P. A. .Johnson. 

Stoker Davis P. Sessions. 

Summit Iron William Dalley. 

Tooele City Tooele John Rowberry. 

Toquervillo Washington ... John Steele. 

Union Gt. Salt Lake. . 



Virgin . 



. Kane S. Johnson. 



Wanship Summit Stephen Nixon. 

Washington Washington. ..W. H. Crawford. 

Weber Weber . 

Weber City Moivau John Boy den. 

Wcllsville Cache Ira Ames. 

West Jordan.. ..Suit Lake . 

Willard Box Elder ....Abraham Zondall. 



POST OFFICES— BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Name P. O. Postmaster. 

Ashcroft E. S. Cornwall. 

Douglas R. White. 

Fort Shepherd John Jane. 

French Creek John White. 

Hope A. S. Hull. 

Kootenay J. Normansell. 

Lake Lallocbe W. Anderson. 

Lilloett T. H. Sharwood. 

Lytton H. B. Guerra. 



Name P. 0. Postmaster. 

New Westminster W. R. Spalding, 

P.M.G. 

Qnesnelsmouth F. Trevor. 

Richfield J. Bowman. 

Suvuna's Ferry C. Warren. 

Seymour A. It. Milne. 

Soda Creek J. T. Sonay. 

Victoria G. S. Evans, P.M.G. 

Williams Creek J. Bowron. 

Yale L. Agassiz. 



Note.— Revpiuips of the Post Office Department for the fiscal year endlns June .TO, 1866, wore, Ueccipts. $14,3)*6,»i<«, 
Expcnilitiircs, Cl»,3.V2.0'!l. showtuK a ilcflcicncy ot'$M.\V!)3. It Is estiniatt'illiy the I'ust Master (iciu'ral. tliat tin- opcra- 
tloiiB of till' Dcpiirtment for tlie next fiscal year, will sliow an excess of $l,f7H,ttl». Total number of Post Olttccs In 
operation, 'iS,))^^, of which 709 are subject to the appoliiliiu'iit of the Preslclcnt. Xinnln'r of Post Ofilces In the late 
Insurgent States, is 8,839, of whlih 3,234 have been re-opeiieil since November, 186,'S. Au'ureirate length of mail routes, 
180,9x1 miles. AKgreKatc annual transportallon, 71,8^I,!A4 miles. Annual cost, (7,)><10,474. Itallroad service, aKgrcgate 
length, 3H,<m miles. Steamboat service, 14,346 miles. 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORT. 



THE JUDICIARY. 

Si'PiiicME Court or thk United Statics. 



NaiiiB. 



Salmon P. Clinge.., 
Jiimes M. Wttyiio. 

Samuel Melaoii 

Robert C. Orier..., 
Nathan CiilTord... 
Noah II. Swiiyiie. 

David Davis 

Samuel F. Miller.. 
Stephen J. Kield.. 



Office. 



Cliii'f ilustice — 
AHBociule JuHtice 



Unto of 
.Vppxlnt't 

184.S 
184t) 

law 

18ti>.2 
18t« 
18fi-J 
|8ti3 



Circuit. 



Htate wlioiiou 
Appolntvd. 



Fourth... 
Fifth.... 
Second.. . 
Third.. , 

Firiit 

Sixth 

Seventh., 
KJKlith.., 
Ninth... 



Ohio 

Oeoruia 

New York.... 
PennHvlvania.. 

Muiiio* 

Ohio 

IllinoiH 

Iowa 

Oaliritniia .... 



Salary. 



|i6,.5O0 
6,1)00 
6,001) 
6,000 
6,0110 
6,000 
6,000 
6,0110 
6,000 



Circuits. Fir>t— Maine, New Hampshire, MaBsachusetta and Rhode Island. Second — Now York, 
Vermont and I'onnectlcHt. Third — Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. Fourth — Maryland, 
West Virginia, Virjfiniii, North Carolina and South Carolina. Fifth — Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mis- 
sissippi. Louieiaiiu, and Texas. Si.rth — Ohio, Miuhif^n, Kentucky, and TennesmiC. Seventh — Indiana, 
Illinois, and Winconsin. iS(|^A<A— Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and Arkansas. AVh//i— California, 
Oregon, and Nevada. 

The Court holds one general term, annually, at Washington, D. C, commencing on the first Monday 
in December. 

D. Wesley Middloton, of Washington, Clerk. John M. Wallace, of Pennsylvania, Reporter. 



UNITED STATES COURTS. 

•NINTH CIRCUIT— COMPOSED OF TIIK STATES OF CALIFORNIA, OREGON, AND 

NEVADA. 

NINTH CIRCUIT— CALIFORNIA. 



John O. Whcoler, Deputy Clerk and Commis- 
sioner, San Francifico Fees. 

Samuel Neiill, Deputy Clerk and Commis- 
sioner, Sun Fmiiclsco Fees. 

Daniel T. Sullivan, ComnilB»ioner Fees. 

Charles W. Rand, Marshal Fees. 

Terms held at San Franoinco, first Mondav in February, second Monday in June, and first Monday in 
October. Special Terms at the discretion of tlie Court. 



Hon. Stephen J. Field, Associate Jnstice 
U. 8. Supreme Court, and ex officio U. S. 
Circuit Judge, Sin Francisco. |(>,000 

Delos Lake, District Attorney, San Fr.incisco. Fees. 

George C. Oorliani, Clerk and Conimispioner, 

San Francisco Fees. 



Hon. Ogden lIoflTman, .Iiidgc, .San Francisco.. $."),000 
DeloB Lake. DiKtricl Attorney, San Francisco. Fees. 
George C. Gorhaiu, Clerk and Commissioner, 

San Francirico Foes. 



DISTRICT COURT-CALIFORNIA. 

Daniel T. Sullivan, Commissioner, San Fran- 



Charles W. Rand, Marshal, San Krnncisco. 



Fees. 
Feen. 



Regidar Teinia held at San Francisco, first Monday in April, second Monday in August, and first 
Monday in December. Special Terms at the discretion ot the Court. 

NINTH CIRCUIT— OREGON. 

Ralph Wilcox, Clerk and Commissioner, Port- 

l.ind, Oregon Fees. 

William H. Hennett, Marshal, Portland, O. Fees. 

Special 



Hon. Stephen J. Field, Associate Justice U. S. 

Supreme Court, San Francisco t 

Joseph N. Dolpli, District Att'y, Portland, O. Fees 

Regular Terms held at Portland on the first Monday in January, May, and September. 
Terms at the tliscretion of the Court. 

DISTRICT COURT-OREGON. 



Hon. M. P. Deady, Judge, Portland $2,.')00 | 

Joseph N. Dolpli , Attorney, Portland Fees. 



Raliili Wilcox, Clerk and Comm'r, Portland.. Fees. 
William H. Bennett, Marshal, Portland Fees. 



Regular Terms held at Portland on the first Monday in March, July, and November. Special Terms 
at the discretion of the Court. 



• niirlne the nl>soncc (Yoni tin State of tlio presiding Juilgc, tlio Terms of tlie Court are held by one of the Judscs of 
the tinltcd Stated District Court. 

t Salary as Jiulsje of tlic United States Supreme Court. $1,000 additional allowed for travrllnR expenses. 



6,1)00 
0,000 
6,000 
6,01)0 
6.000 
6,000 
6,0lt0 
6,000 



.. Fees. 

8- 

.. FeeB. 

.. FCCH. 

.. Fet'B. 
Mondny in 



port- 

.. Fees. 
I, O. Feeg. 
|r. Special 



|iid.. Fees. 
.. Fees. 

kcialTermn 



Ihc Judges of 



UNITED STATES COURTS, PACIFIC COAST. 



81 



NINTH CIRCUIT-NEVADA. 



Hon. Stephen J. Field, Antoointe JnBtice U. 8. 

Snprenio Conrt, San Franeigco •. . . 

J. M.Hayden.Dietrict Attorney, Carson City. Fees. 



-, Clerk and Commiuioner, 

Carfon City Feei. 

Edward Krwin, Marghal, Carson City Fees. 



Regular Terms held at Carson City on the tirst Monday of March, Augnst, and December. 

DISTRICT COURT -NEVADA. 



Hon. Alexander W. Daldwin, Judge, Virginia 

City 13.500 

J. M. Hayden, District Attorney, Carson City. Fees. 



Clerk and Commissioner, 



Carson City Fees. 

Edward En^in, Marshnl, Carson City Fees. 



Regular Terms held at Carson City on the first Monday of February, May, and Octol)cr. Special 
Terms at the discretion of the Conrt. 

SUPREME COURT*- WASHINGTON TERRITORY. , 



Christopher C. Hewitt, C. J., Olympia $2,500 

James E. Wvclie, Assoc. Justice, Vancouver. 2,500 
Charles H. Darwin, Associate Justice, Walla 

Walla 2,500 



Lenndcr Holmes, Dist. Attorney, Vancouver. Fees. 
R. H. Hewitt, Clerk and Comm'r, Olympia.. Fees. 
William Huntington, Marshal, Vancouver... Fees. 



Regular Terms held at Olympia first Monday in December. 

DISTRICT COURT— FIRST DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Stevens, Yakima, Spokane, and Wall i ^Valla. Sessions held first Monday 
in April and October at Walla Wnlla, and first Monday in Septembei it Colville. 

Hon. James E. Wyche, Judge, Vancouver., t Park Winans, Clerk, Colville Fees. 

8. 11. Fargo, Prosecuting Att'v, Walla Wulla. Fees. William Huntington, Marshal, Vancouver... Feeg. 



'iiting 
i, VVa 



B.N. Sexton, Clerk, VValla Walla Fees. 

DISTRICT COURT— SECOND DISTRICT. 

Includes the Connties of Klikitnt, Clarke, Wahkiakum, Cowlitsi, Pacific, Chehnlis, Lewis, Tliurston, 
and Mason. SesHions held second Monday in JIarch and third Monday in October at Vancouver ; and 
first Monday in May and second Monday in November at Olympia. 

George T. McConnell, Clerk, Vancouver.... Fees. 



Hon. C. C. Hewitt, Judge, Olympia t • • • • 

H. G. Struve, Pnwecutiiig Att'y, VuiKOUver. Fees. 
R. H. Hewitt, Clerk, Olympia Fees. 



William Huntington, Marshal, Vancouver... Fees. 



DISTRICT COURT— THIRD DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Pierce, King, Kitsap, Jefferson, Clallam, Whatcom, Island, and Snohomish. 
SeBsions held first Monday in March and first Monday In September, at I'ort Towneend ; and second Mon- 
day in April and second Monday in October, at Seattle ; third Monday in May and first Monday in Novem- 
ber, at Steilacoom. 



i Charles B. Darwin, Judge, Walla Walla t 

; J. R. Keiuiedy, Pros. Att'y, Port Townsend. Fees. 
i iJamcs Seavey , Clerk, Port Townsend Fees. 



John Latham, Clerk, Seattle Fees. 

William Huntington, Marshal, Vancouver. .. Fees. 



SUPREME COURT— IDAHO TERRITORY. 



•lohn R. McRridc, Chief Justice, Idaho City.$2,.')00 I 
] Jolin Cummins, Associate Justice, Boise Ciiy. 2,.')00 | 

Milton Kelly, AHsociate Justice, Lcwiston... 2,600 I 
I George C. Hough, District Att'y, Boise City. Fees. | 



W. B. Smith, Clerk, Idaho City Fees. 

P. W. McMunus, Commissioner, Oneida Co. Fees. 

F. Shipler, Commissioner, Florence Fees. 

J. H. Al vord, Marshal, Florence Fees. 



DISTRICT COURT -FIRST DISTRICT. 



Includes the Counties of Nez Perce. Idnho.and Shoshone. Sessions held second Monday in April 
md first Monday in November nt Lewiston ; and fourth Slonday in JIuy and first Monday in October at 
Florence ; and ffrst Monday in September at Pierce City. 



: and 
F 

Milton Kelly, Judge, Lewiston t.... I W 

Frank Dulton, Prosecuting Att'y, Lewiston. |1,. 500 ( P. 



. A. Belcher, Clerk, Lcwiston Fees. 

H. Howe, Marshal, Lewiston Fees. 



i DISTRICT COURT— SECOND DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Boise and Alturiis. Sessions held first Mouduv in July and fourth Monday 
' in October at Idaho City ; first Monday in June and first Monday in September at Rocky Bar. 



Hon 
J.J 



. John R. McBride, Judge, Idaho City., t.... I 
May, I'rosecuting Attorney, Idaho Cfty.|l,500 j 



W. B. Smith, Clerk, Idaho City Fees. 

Orlando Robbins, Marshal, Idaho City Fees. 



• The LeelBlaturc of 1867 lias chnngpil the time for the terms of the Territorial Courts, partlcnlars not yet attainable. 
Tho JuilKea hear anil cleterniine at (.'hambers, on thirty days' notice, all cases not rcqiilriuK a Jury. Adinlmlty Courts 
j are held ntsame times and places a» Ucuerul ISesslons and Siieelal Tennis, at Port Townsend, on the third Tuesday of 
' .January and .lune. • 

t Salaries as .ludges of the Supreme Court of the Territory. 



m !i 



82 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



DISTRICT COURT— THIRD DISTRICT. 

IncliiileH the Counties of Ada, Owyliee mid Oneida. SciiHiona held third Mondny in April and 11 rat 
Mondav in |)ei'enil)er at DuiHu Citv i seoond Monday in June aiul llrHt Monday iu October at Ruby City ; 
fourtli Moiulay in July at Mulade City. 

John CuniiuinH, Jud^e, Buiae Citv * I 8. Haabrook, Clerk, Boise City Fees. 

E. J. Curtis, I'rosvcuting Att'y, (ioise City.. $1,. 'MM) | K. C. Sterling, Manthal, Uuise City Fees. 

SrPRKME COURT— MONTANA TERRITORY. 

One term of the Supremo Court is held annually nt VirKiiiiii City. 

tiun of the Court. 



Special terms are held at the discro- 



H. L. Ilosnier, Chief Justice, Virginia City ..$'J,.')00 I K. B. Ncaly, District Attorney, Virginia City. Fees. 

L. E. MnuHon, Associate Justice, Helena '-'..'MK) J. Allan Hosmer, Clerk, Vi'ginia City Fees- 

L. P. WilliHton, Associate Justice, Deer Lodge Oeorgo M. Pinney, Marshal,' Helena Fees. 

City a,500| 

DISTRICT COURT— FIRST DISTRICT. 

IncluiU'H the Counties of Madison, Gallatin and Big Horn, Sessions held flrst Monday in March, 
July, and November, at Virginia City ; second Monday in April and October at Oallatin City. (Hig Horn 
is attached to (iallatin for judicial purposes.) 



J. Allan Hosmer, Clerk, Virginia City Fees, 

George M. Pinney, Marshal, Helena.' Fees. 



ILL. HoHnier. Judge, Virginia City • 

Sam. Wood, Prosecuting Attorney, Virginia 

City |1 , JOO and Fees. 

DISTRICT COURT— SECOND DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Beaver Head, Missoula and Deer Lodge. Sessions held llrst Monday in 
November at Kannaik ; llrst Monday in July at Missoula Mills, and nrst Monday in June and December 
at Deer Lotlgo City. 

L. P. WilliHton, Judge, Deer Lodge City • C. E. Irvine, Clerk, Silver Row Fees. 

Louis Mc.Mui'try, Prosecuting Attoniey, Deer Neil Howie, .Marshal, Helena Fees. 

I.KMlge City |1.5(K)and Fees. 

DISTRICT COURT— THIRD DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Edgerton, Jett'erson, Chotean, Meagher, und Muscleshell. Sessions held 
flrst Monday in March, .July and November at Helena ; tirst Monday iu June ut Prickly Pear City. 
(Choteau County is attached to Edgerton, and Muscleshell to Meagher, for judicial pur()oBeB.) 

L. E. Mnnson, .fudge, Helena * I Charles W. Fowler, Clerk, Helena Fees. 

J. H.Shrober, Pros. Att'y, Helena.. $1,500 und Fees. | John Feutherston, Marshal, Helena Fees. 

SUPREME COURT— UTAH TERRITORY. 



John Titus, Chief Justice, Gt. Sidt Lake City 2,500 
Thomas J. Drake, Associate Justice, Prove 

and Manti 2,500 

Solomon P. McCurdy, Assoi'iate Justice, St. 

George 2,500 

Charles II. Hempstead, District AttDrney, 

Greiit Salt Luke City |-,»00 and Fees. 



William I. Appleby, Clerk, Great Salt Lake 

City Fees. 

David O. Calder, Commissioner, Great Salt 

Ijuke City Fees. 

Joaiah Hosmer, Marshal, Great Salt Luke 

City $20()aud Fees. 



The term of the Justices of the Supreme Court is four years. One session of the Court must be held an- 
nually at the seat of the lerritoriul Governuieut. 

DISTRICT COURT— FIRST DISTRICT. 

Includes the counties of Millard, San Pete, Juab, Utah, Sevier, und Wasatch. 
Monday in October, at Provo City. 



Sessions held third 



John McEwan, Clerk, Provo City Pees. 

Josiah Hosmer, Marshal, Grdkt Salt Lake City Fees. 



Thomas J. Drake, Judge, Provo and Manti. • 
Benjamin F. Steward, Prosecuting Attorney, 

Provo City Fees. 

DISTRICT COURT-SECOND DISTRICT. 

Includes the counties of Washington, Iron, Piute, and Beaver. Sessions held first Monday in Feb- 
ruary, at St. George. 



Solomon P. SIcCurdv, Judge, St. George.... • 
Angus M. Cannon, Prosecuting Attoniey, St. 

George Fees. 



James G. Bleak, Clerk, St. George Fees. 

Josiah Hosmer, Marshal, Great Salt Lake 

City Fees. 



DISTRICT COURT-THIRD DISTRICT. 

Inclndes the counties of Tooele, Great Salt Lake, Summit, Green River, Richland, Cache, Box 
Elder, Weber, Morgan, and Davis. Sessions held last Monday in March for United States business, and 
second Monday in March for Territorial business, at Great Salt Lake City. 

Hon. John Titus, Judge, Great Salt Lake City * I E^trick Lynch, Clerk, Great Salt Lake City- Fees. 
Charles H. Hempstead, Acting Prosecuting I Josiah Hosmer, Marshal, Great Salt Lake 

Attorney, Great Salt Lake City Fees.) City Fees. 



* Salaries as Judges of the Sapremo Court of the TcrriHry. 



and lint { 
l)y City i 



Fees. 1 
Fees. 



IB discro- 

ily. Fees. 
... Fees- 
... Fee». 



in Murch, 
(IJig Horn 

Fee*. 

Feeg. 



Monday in 
December 



Fees. 
Fee*. I 



eBsionH held 
I'eur City. 



Fees. 
Fees. 



Lftke 

. Fees. I 
Salt 

. . Fees. 
Luke 
and Fees. 

I bo beld an- 



held third 

Fees. I 

;eCity Fees. 



iiday in Feb- 
Fees. 



Lake 



Fees- 



Cache, Box 

business, and | 

, City. Fees. 
Lalte 
Fees. 



UNITED STATES OFFICERS, PACIFIC COAST 



88 



UNITED STATES OFFICERS, PACIFIC COAST. 



Name of Incumhpnt. 



1). W. Cheor>niun 

■T. M. Gitchell 

•). ItoHH Browne 

Thos. W. Ilincliman ... 

Liiciiiu Curtis 

L. C. Gunn 

Bichitrd Savage 

N. M. Orr 

John Biuler -. 

W. A. Elinson 

Tliomas Fraxar 

Warren Wasnon 

Samuel D. Howe 

Oeorge Woodman 

Truman C. K verts 

John E. Sniitli 

Frank 8oul6 

William N. Slocura .... 

John 8ed|j(wiok 

Alfred Briirgs 

W. C. 8. Sinith 

IC. D. BackeuBtos 

Stephen T. Gaiio 

Philip D. Moure 

J. C.Oeer 

N. P. Lanuford 

Kobort T. Burton 

CImrlcs H. Hopkins... 

John H. Houf>eman 

William W. Morrow... 

Itobert B. Swiiin 

D. W. Chcesman 

B. T. Martin 

J. M. EckfL'ldt 

William Sclimolz 

R. II. Waterman 

(Charles C. Bemis 

William Burnett 

Joseph C. Tucker 

Com.J.M.Watsou, u.s.n. 

J.F.Miller 

J. Frank Miller 

L. M. KelloKJf 

Etiielbert Bnrko 

J.W.Foard 

H. M.Miller 

S.J. Brid(<e 

Tliomas B. Shannon... 

Tliomus Gray 

David Wooster 

W. L. Adams 

F. A. Wilson 

George Davidson 

W. E! Greenwell 

A. F. Rodders 

Jnmcs S. Law»on 

Edward Cordell 

W. S. Edwards 

J. Kinrheloe 

J.W. Shanklin 

L. B. Ayer 

John Keleher 

Svlvanns T. Nye 

Iicnry W. BriKRs 

Cfaas. H. Chamberlain . 

C. G. Bockius 

W. H. Pratt 

6. C. Havens 

6. M. Gerrish 



Offlcc. 



AsHistant Treasurer U. S 

SiK-'rial Agent, Treasury Department 

It. S. Comniiiwicmer of Mining StiitisticR 

IT. 8. Internal Revenue Agent, Pacific Coast. 
V. 8. Inti-riml Revenue Inspector, Puc. Const 
Assessor Intenial Revenue, 1st Dist., Cala... 

" " " Ud Dist., Cala... 

" " " 3d Dist., Cala... 

" " " 4lh Dist., Cala... 

" " " 5th Dist., Cain... 

" " " Oregon 

" " " Nevada 

" " " Wash. Terr 

" " " Idaho Terr 

" " " Montana Torr... 

" " " riahTerr 

Collector Internal Revenue, Ist Dist., Calu.. 

" " " 2d Dist., Cala.. 

" " " 3d Dist., Cala.. 

" " " 4th Dist., Cala.. 

" " " 5th Dist., Cala.. 

" " " Oregon 

" " " Nevada 

" " " Wash. Terr.... 

" " " I.lalioTerr.... 

" " " Montana Terr.. 

" " " Utah Terr 

Internal Revenue Inspector, 1st Dist., Cala.. 

3d&4thD.,Cal. 

" " " 2dit5tbD.,Cal. 

Superintendent U. S. Branch Mint 

Treasurer " " " 

j^saver " " " 

Melter and Refiner " " 

Coiner U. S. Brnncli Mint 

Inspector Steamboat Hulls 

" " Boilers 

Supervising A^ent Steamboats 

Resident Phvsician. U. S. Marino Hospital... 

Lighthoueo Inspector, Pacitic Coast 

Collector of Customs 

Deputy Collector and Auditor 

" " of Customs 



" " and ex-oflicio Storekeeper. 
Appraiser of Customs 



Surveyor 

Naval Oflicor 

Special Examiner of Drugs. 
Collector of Cuftonis ...... 



Atjistimt U. S. Coast Survey, West Coast 



Sub-Assistant " " 

Register U. 8. Land Ollice. 



Receiver " 



Residence. 



San Fmnciaco. 



Sun Joco 

Stockton 

Sacramento 

Santa Rosa 

Portland . . . .' 

Carson City 

Olympia 

Bo'ise City 

Virginia City 

Great Salt I.^ke City 
San Francisco .....'. 

San Jose 

Stockton 

Sacramento 

Napa City 

Portland 

Virginia City 

Olympia 

Boiee City 

Vi-ginia City 

Great Salt Lake City 

San Francisco 

Sacramento 

Santa Rosa 

San FraiTcisco 



Salary. 



Per diem. 



t3,30U. 
pr. d.St fees 
10 p.d. & ft 



15,000. 

3,.')00. 

3,500. 

4,000. 

3,.5n0. 
1500 & fees 



$8 p.d. & fs 
6 " " 
It II 

$4,500. 
4,5IH). 
3,000. 
3,000. 
3,000. 
1,500. 
1,.500. 
1,500. 
3,000. 



Astoria, Oregon 

PortTown8e'nd,W.T. 
San Francisco 



Marysville 

Humboldt 

Stockton 

Visalin 

San Francisco. 

Marysville 

Humboldt 

Stockton 

Visalia 



t6,400. 
4,0110. 
3,000. 
3,000. 
3,000. 
3,000. 
2,51)0. 
■1,(100. 
4,.'>00. 
2,000. 



1000 & fees 

1,900. 

1,700. 

1,400. 

1.200. 

1,200. 

000. 

800. 

500 & fees. 



• Salary as Trcasnror of riillcd States ISrancli Mint. 



t The amount of moneys collooted for Hues iind vIoLttlons of the Revenue Laws, arc appropi 
to the Treasury of the United MatoH, nnd the remaining one-half, In equal portions, to the Ci 
Surveyor of the I'ort. where said fines arc collected. 



Hated as follows : One-half 
ollcctor. Naval Oflloor and 



8 



i'l !l 



i! 



84 



PACIFIC OOABT BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



UNITED STATES OFFICERS, PACIFIC COAST.— CoNTi»u«f). 



Mamo of Iiioambcnt 

Owen Wude 

John Kelly 

Henry Wurren 

A. F. Flint 

Wurren T. Ijockhurt... 

David L. OtK^K 

Edwin Muntli 

Joieph M. Flotclier ... 

Joiiepb Cunlinmn 

S.W.Brown 

J. W. Slmnklin 

William T.Muiloc-k... 
Samuel W. Uruwn .... 
Lanren UpBon 

E. L. A nplvuato 

8. OarHelde 

Iiafayette Carter 

M.Huvd 

John Pierre 

H. C. WhitinK 

J. W. P. Ilunliugton. .. 

H. O. Purker 

W. U. Waterman 

James O'Neill 

A. H. Chapman 

F. H. Head 

O.P. Judd 



Offlo*. 



lieuintur " 

Itecoiver " 

tl 14 

RpKinter " 

Heccivor '• 

Ueuitiler " 

•1 li 

Receiver " 



Peniiiun Agent, California 

" " Oreuun 

" " Waiihington Territory 

Survcyor-Qvneral, Califurnia and Nevada... 

" " Oregon 

" " WattliiiiKton Territory.... 

" " Idaho Territory 

" " Montana Territory 

" " Utah Territory . .■ 

Superintendent Indian Att'airs, Calil'ornia — 

" " " Orejjon 

" " " Nevada 

" " " Wash. Terr.. 
" " " Idaho Terr... 
" " " Montana Terr 
" " " Utah Terr.... 
Pbyician U. S. Marine Hospital 



Rfildcnce. 



SaUrjr. 



Oregon City, O 

Roaeburg, O 

Oregon Cilv, O 

RoHuburg, O 

Cui'Bon City, Nev.... 
Canon City, Nov.... 

Olympia, W.T 

Va'nconver, W. T. ... 

(Mympiu, W. T 

Vancouver, W. T.. .. 

San FranciHco 

Oregon Cilv, O 

Vaniouver.'W.T.... 

Sun FnuiclKco 

ICugene City, O 

Olympia, W.T 

ItoJHe Citv, I. T 

Virginia City, M. T.. 
(treat Suit I^tko City 

San FninciHC'o 

Salem, O 

Virginia City, Nov.. 

Olympic 

Lapwai 

Flat Head 

(ireat Salt Lake City 
Honolulu 



MO &, feei. 



Fees. 



t3,()<)0. 

a.rrfio. 

iJ.flOO. 

:),ooo. 
2,noo. 

3,000. 

a.ooo. 

2,000. 

I, MO. 
1,500. 
3,000. 



STATEMENT OF THE PUBLIC DEBT, OCTOBER 31, 18GG. 

[Compiled from the Report of the Secretary of tbeTreuRnry, December 3d, ISo'O.] 

Bonds, lO-Wg, 5per cent., due in 1904 $171, OS!) ,350 

Bonds, Pucilic Railroad, ttnercent, due in 1895 and 1896 9,882,000 " 

Bonds, 5-20's, 6 per cent., due in 1882, 1881 and 1885 823,944,000 

Bonds, 6 per cent., duo in 1881 2o5,;K4,750 

Bonds, 6pcr cent., duo in 1880 18,4I5.0(H) 

Bonds, 5 per cent, due in 1874 20,0()0,000 

Bonds, 5 per cent., due in 1871 7,022,000 

Navy PenHJou Fund, 6 per cent 11,750,000 

$1,327,407,100 

Bonds, Cpcrccnt, due in 1808 8,290,941 

Bonds, 6 per cent. , due in 18«7 7,742,800 

Compound interest notes, due in 18()7 and 1808 148,512,1 10 

7-30 treasurv •;otc». .i.ue in KWuiid I8G« 721,014,300 

— _ 88.>\"i"),l£: 
Bonds, Texas Indemnity, past due, not presouteu 384,0^1 

Bonds, treasury notes, temporary loan, fei-tilicatcs of indebtedness, etc., past 

due, not presented 36,604,009 

36,988,90'J 

United States notes 390,19.^785 

Fractional currency 27,.''»88,01 1 

Gold certificates of deposit 1 0,89ti,<)SO 

428,680,776 

Total outstanding $2,081,636,966 

Less cash in the Treasury 130,326,960 

Actual debt $2,551,310,006 

The estimated receipts for the three quarters of the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1867, are pbtced at 
$316,500,000, and the expenditures at $237,167 143— leaving a surplus of $79,330,857. 

The receipts for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1868, are estimated as follows ; 

Pro'ii custoir" $H.''i,000,000 

From intei'uui revenue .uu,00i<,ii .0 

From lands 1,000,000 

From miscelUneouB sources 35,000,000 

$436,000,000 



Ury. 
tL fcei. 



()00. 
.MIO. 
.500. 
,000. 
,1100. 
i.OilO. 
|,(«>0. 
i.OOO. 

!,m). 
),r)0(i. 
i,:)00. 
\;m. 

i,0OO. 



18GG. 



,327,407,100 I 

30,988,901) I 

428,680,770 I 

(,081,036,960 
130,326,960 I 

|!,551 ,310,006 
\te pluced at 

l|436,000,000 



STATISTICAL TABLB OF TIIK UNITED 8TATK8. 



86 



The expenditure! are ettimated ui followi i 

For the civil ■crvlro $,'.0,067 ,.142 

Kur iiciinioni and liidiaiii 2.''>,:<HH,4H9 

For the Wnr llt^pHrtnioiit, including, $61,000,000 for bounliot 1 I0,H6I .!)6I 

For tlie Navy DepiirtniLMit !I0.2.')I ,m!> 

For intorcit on the public debt 133,678,243 

$350,247,641 

Leaving tt surplus of. $85,752,358 



TABLE 



SliowiniD; the Area and Population* of the difTeront StiitcB ; the CoiiKroBsionHl Apportionment of 1800, 
and the returnH of the election for President, 1861. (Compiled from Tribune Almanac, 1866.) 



STATIta. 



AlHbania 

ArlOuiBUH 

Oiiliibrniu 

Conuectij'ut 

Deluwiiru 

Florida 

(leor)(iu 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Murylund 

Mu88acliuiiet(8... 

MiuhiKun 

MinnvHota 

MissJMippi 

MiHHuuri 

Nevada 

New lIumpHliire. 
New JeiBey .... 

New Yorit 

North Cui'uliuu. . 

Ohio 

Oi'e)(oti 

reiiMgylvtinia . . . 
lihudu Itiland. . . . 
South C'arulinu.. 

TenncHcve 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

WcBt Virginia .. 
Wisconeiu 



ASEA. 

8q. Mllci. 



50,722 

52,198 

)55,.50« 

4,674 

2,120 
5!»,2(i8 
0«,00(t 
55,409 
33,80>» 
55,045 
78.418 
37,()80 
41,2.W 
31,760 
11,124 

7,800 
56,243 
8I,2.VJ 
47,156 
67,380 
81,5:»9 

9,280 

8,320 
50,519 
45,000 
39,' 164 
95,274 
46,0(H) 

1,:<06 

30,213 

45,0tM) 

237,321 

9,056 
38,;152 
2:1,000 
53,924 



FOPl'LATIOK, 18M. 


Free. 


Slave. 


Tout. 


529,121 


435,080 


9(^,201 


324,335 


111,115 


4:»,450 


379,!KI4 




:i79,994 


4(iO,147 




460,147 


110,418 


1,798 


112,216 


78.679 


61,745 


l40,4-.>5 


595,088 


462,198 


1,0.')7,28« 


1,711,951 




1,711,951 


1,:J.')0,428 




l,35<t,428 


674,913 




•71,948 


107,206 




Iffi ,'i06 


930,201 


825,483 


I.I.Vi,684 


376,276 


331,726 


708,002 


628,279 




628,279 


599,860 


87,189 


687,049 


1,231,066 




1,231,066 


749,113 




749,113 


172,023 




173.8,55 


354,t)74 


4:)6,t->3l 


791.305 


l,067i081 


114,931 


1,182,012 


4,8;J7 




6,857 


326,073 




326,073 


672,»i35 




672,o:i5 


3,880,7:15 


■■•■>■ 


3,880,735 


66l,.5(>:) 


331,059 


91*2,622 


2,:«39,502 




2,:W9,502 


.')2,4t!5 


.....". 


52,465 


2,906,115 




2,90«5,115 


174,620 


...... 


174,620 


301,302 


•02,4(10 


703,708 


834,082 


275,719 


1,109,801 


421,6-19 


182,566 


604,215 


315,098 


••■••• 


315,098 


1,105,453 


490,865 


1,596,318 


775,881 




775,881 



Sa 



6 
3 
3 
4 

I 

7 

14 

11 

6 

1 

9 

5 

5 

5 

10 

6 

2 

5 

9 

1 

3 

5 

31 

7 

19 
1 
24 
2 
4 
8 
4 
3 
8 
3 
6 



THE8IDSKTIAL VOTB, IWI. 



Lincoln. 



62,134 

44,601 

8.155 



189,406 

150,422 

89,075 

16,441 

27,786 

tis.iii 

40,153 

126,*42 

91, -Wl 

25,060 

72,750 

9,8-J6 

.16,400 

60,723 

368,735 

2'(ii>,i54 

9,888 

296,391 

14,349 



42,419 
83,458 



HcClclUn. 



43,841 

42.285 

8,767 



1.58,7:10 
130,233 

49,.596 
3,(>91 

64,:i01 

46,9{>2 
32,739 
48,745 
74,604 
17,375 

'31,078 

6,594 

32,871 

68,024 

361,986 



205,568 
8,457 

27(vn0 
8,718 



13,321 

10,438 
65,884 



Lin. M«J. 



18,293 
2.406 
t6l2 



30,766 
20,189 
39,479 
12,750 
t36,515 



21,122 
7,414 

77,997 

16,917 

7,685 

vr.of'i 

:J,232 
3..529 
t7.301 
6,749 



59,586 
1,431 

20,075 
5,631 



29,098 

'lV,7i4 
17,574 



Total area, iiieluBive of Tcniiories, 2,81'J,.n 1 square miles. Population, 18C0, includinK Territories, 
(Slave, 3,953,760) 31,143,322. Total representation in ConKrew, 234. Preftidential vote, 1864: Lincoln, 
2,223,035; McClellan, 1,811,754; toUil, 4,034,789 ; Lincoln's majority, 411,281. 



• Popnlation of Great Britsin and Ireland, 1801 : Enfcland and Wales— Malet, 9.825,246; Females, 10,880,26& 
Total, 20,206,604. ScoUand— Males, 1.446,982; Females, l,614,a6&-Total, 3,061,251. Ireland— Males, 2,804961; 
Females, 2.059,582— Total, 6,764,54a Total. Great Britain and Ireland, 20,081,298. The decrease in Ireland Ti^m 
1841 to 18S1 was 268.468 fhmllios, belnr at the rate of 18-28 per cent ; ithe averase number of persons to a ihmlly 
in 1861 was 610; in 1861, 644; in 1841, 6'64} results showing a sradual thinning out of the households, attributa- 
ble to emigration and the other causes loading to a decline in the population. From these statements it will be 
perceived that the people of Great Britain and Ireland but little exceed 29,000,000, and thnt the population of 
the United States has not only, for the flrst time, reached that of the mother country, but has run beyond it 
near two and a half millions of people.— fedtnii Oeiuwi, 1860. 

t Democratic majorities. 



m 



■(• i> 



86 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TABLE ' 

Slio'wing the nnines of the Governors, with Term and Suhiry of each, and the Capital of the different 
States and Territories ; the time of holding State Elections, and meeting of the State Legiulutures. 



States. 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delnware 

Florida 

Georjjia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Knnsas 

Kentucky 

Liinisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

MnwinchusettB.. 

Michigan 

MinneRota 

MiifsisMpin 

MisBOuri 

Nevada 

New Hai<i[ishirc 
New Jersey.... 

New York". 

North Carolina. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Peuusylvunia. . 
Kbode Island... 
South Carolina. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

WestVi'-ginia.. 
Wisconsin 

TERniTOniES. 

Arizona 

Dakotah 

Idaho 

Montana 

Nebraska 

New Mexi'-o-.. 

Utah 

Washington .. . 



Capitals. 



flovcmors. 



Montgomery 

Little Rock*. 

Sacramento 

Hartfd & N. Haven 
|l)over 

Tallahassee 

IMilledgcville 

iSpiingtield 

Indianapolis 

Des Monies 

Topeka 

! Frankfort 

j Baton Konge 

i ^MglI»ta 

i/ 'r ;|)oli8 

I uostou 

I Lansing 

iSt. Paul 

I Jackson 

I Jetferson City 

j Virginia City 

! Concord 

; Trenton 

Albany 

Raleigh 

Columbus 

Sulem 

Harrisburg 

Kew,;ort &. Prov'ce 

Columbia 

Nashville 

Austin 

Montpeljpr 

Richmond 

Wheeling 

Madison 



R. M. Paiton 

Isaac Murphy 

Frederick V' Low . . . 
Joseph R. Hawlcy .. 

Gove SanlsburA' 

Davids. Walker.... 
Charles J. Jenkins .. 
Richard J. Oglesby .. 

Conrad IJiikor ... 

William M. Stone . . . 
Samuel J. Crawford. 
Thomas E. IJniinlette 

J. Madison Wells 

J. L. Chamberlain... 

Thomas Swann 

Alex. H. Bullock.... 

Henry II. Crapo 

Wm."R. Marshall.... 
Benj. J. Humphreys. 
Thomas C. Fletcher . 
Henry O. Blasdel . . . 

Frederick Smyth 

Marcus L. Ward 

Reuben E. Fent.'n... 

Jonathan Worth 

Jacob D. Cox 

George L. Woods ... 

John W. Geary 

Ambrose E. Burnside 

James L. Orr 

Wm. G. Brownlow.. 
J. W. Throckmorton 

Paul Dillingham 

Francis H. Pierjxjnt.. 
Arthur I. Borenian .. 
liUciuB Fairchild .... 



TcmiExp's.'anlary. 



Jan. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
May, 
Jan. 
iJan. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jup. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
I June, 
'Jan. 
I J an. 
;Jrtn. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
iJan. 

& 

I Oct. 

June, 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Mar^ 

Jan. 



18()8 
18()8 

ism 

18(57 

1871 

1870 

18(57 

18(5!) 

18(5!) 

1808 

18()!t 

18(57 

18158 

18(58 

1800 

18(58 

18tii> 

18(58 

18f)8 

18C7 

1871 

18(57 

18li!l| 

IHt5il 

IS(5!» 

18)58 

18(58 

18(59 

18(57 

186!) 

18)57 

1870 

18()7 

18(58 

18)5!) 

18(581 



Prescott 

Yancton 

Boise Citv .... 
Virginia City .. 
Omaha City . .. 

Santa Fc 

Great Salt Lake City ■ (Miarles Durkeo 
Olyn piu i George E. Cole 



Rich'd C.McCoru !ck 
Newton I^lniunds... 

D. W.Ballard 

Green Clay Smith. .. 

Alvin Saunders 

Robert Mitdiell 



|ia,.'iOO 
:>,0(iO 
7,000 
1,100 
l,33;i 
1,500 
3,000 
l,oOO 
1,500 
2,i.'00 
2,500 

2jm 

4,000 
1,500 
3,000 
3,500 
1,500 
2,500 
3,(M)0 
2,,'iOO 
0,000 
1 ,000 
3,000 
4,000 
2,(100 
1,801- 
1 ,500 
3,500 

i;ooo 

3,500 
3,000 
4,000 
),000 
3,0(10 
2,0(M) 
1,200 



1,.500 
1 ,i)00 
2,500 
2,.500 
2,500 
1 ..>00 
I ,.)00 
l,;>(M) 



Leslslntur.) 
Meets. 



Nov.. 
.Nov.. 
. Dec. 

May . 



•2M 
•1 M 
"I M. 
1 W 

*1 Tu. Jan 
•aM. Nov.. 

I Th. Nov . 
.•a M.Jan... 
*1 W. Jan.. 
*2 M.Jan... 

2Th. Jan.. 
*1 M. Dec .- 
"3 M.Jan... 

1 W. Jan.. 

1 W.Jan.. 

1 W. Jan.. 
*1 W. Jan.. 
•1 Tu. Jan.. 
'1 M.Jan... 
"Last JI. Dee 

1 M.Jun. .. 

1 W. June. 

2Tu. Jan.. 

I Tu. Jan.. 
MM. Nov.. 
*1 M.Jan... 
»2M. Sept.. 

1 Tu. Jan.. 
Mav &, Jan. 
3W. Oct.. 

•1 M. Oct... 
•J M. Aug.. 

2Th. Oct.. 
•■■i M. Jan... 

3Tu. Jan.. 

2 W.Jun... 



Time of 
State Election 



1 M. August. 
I M. August. 
1 W. Sept. 

1 M. April. 

2 Tu. Nov. 
1 M. Oct. 

1 W. Oct. 
1 Tu. Nov. 
2Tu. Oct. 
2Tu. Oct. 
I Tu. Nov. 
1 M. Aug. 

1 M. Nov. 

2 M. Sep. 

1 Tu. Nov. 
1 Tu. Nov. 
1 Tu. Nov. 
1 Tu. ':.)V. 
1 M. Oct. 
1 Tu. No\. 

1 Tu. Nov. 

2 Tu. March. 
1 Tu. Nov. 

1 Tu. Nov. 

2 Th. Aug. 
2 Tu. Oct. 

1 M. June. 

2 Tu. Oct. 

1 W. April. 
4 M. Nov. 
I Th. Aug. 
4 M. June. 
1 Tu. Sept. 
4 Th. Mav. 
4 Th. Oct. 
1 Tu. Nov. 



Population of tilt Vnit.'d Stali:r.—T])c total population of the United .States, ISfiO, is 31,443,822, of which 
3,968,700 arc slaves, and 487,070 uro free colored. Ag^rff-atc iiicrcniJC since 1860, 35-59 per cent. Tbo tjlleeu 
slavcholding States contain 12,240,000 iiiliabitants, of whom 8,0,39,0(10 are whites, iiCl.lHX) free coloicd persons, ; 
and 3,960,000 are slavt*. Tbe actiu\l gain of the whole population in those .States from 1850 to 18)30, was 2,627,000, > 
equal to 27-33 nor ; 't. The slaves advr.U'^ed in nunibeis 740,931, or 2344 per cent. This does not include the i 
slaves of the b.stnct of Columbia, viUo .,crea,.id 602 in tbo course of tlie ten years, 'ilio nineteen free .States ! 
and seven Territories, topctber with the Federal District, contained, according to th? eighth census, 19 201,540 
pei-sons, inducing 27.749 Indians; of whom 18,036,579 wero white, and 237,"l8 Ihie colored. The increase of 
both classes wss 5,598,603, or 41'24 per tent. According to the best estimates, the total population of the United 
States, at the close of the present century, will amount to 100,000,000, as follows, viz: 1870, 42,828,433; 1880, 
66,460,241; 1800, 77,266,989; 900, 100,.S56,802. The excess of the Males is about 730,0(0. The number of Deaf 
and Dumb persons is 14,260; Blind, including slaves, is 12,635; insane, including slaves, 23,999; idiotic, includ- 
ing slaves, 18,865. 

Wealth.— The assessed value of Heal Estate, 116,978,106,049; I'crsonal, 95,111 ,568,956. Total, $12,084,660,005. 
True value, S16,169,616,068. 

MortalUy.- Tbe number of deaths in tbe United Stat«8 during the year 18(M), was 892,821— about 1 In 79. 

SduoaUon.—Durlna the year 1860 not liar from (15,000,000 of persons received education in the varioua eduoa- 
tional institutions of tbo dlilbrent States, or about ouo-Hftli of tlie white |M)pulatiun of the country, 

* Sessions held biennially. 



»12,084.660,005. 



PACIFIC STATES AND TERRITORIES, 



3T 



PACIFIC STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



ORUANIZED. 



Califori.ia, 1850 

Oregon, r ■ 18'>i> 

Nevada, 18(i4 
Wiuliiiigton Territitrv, 1853 

Maho, " ■ 18(i3 

Montuna, " 18G1, 

Utah, " 1850 



Area. 
8q. Miles. 



154,116 
!(5,'i74 

ino.ono 

«il,9il4 
9r.,(IOO 

sjoo,nno 

10<I,3S2 



ronulnti<>ii, 
!R60. 



3fi5,43!» 
51',4f>5 

11,108 



40,273 



I'opiilatlun, 
1866. 



480,000 
05,090 
.')0,0()0 
12,000 
20.01)0 
20,000 
90,000 



Capital. 



Sacranvnto. 
j Salem. 
I Carson City. 
IC/lynipia. 

Boise Citv. 
I Virginia City. 
I Great Salt Lake Citv. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA.* 



,1 „^ 



-.1 .li.; ■ 

• 1 ft^ . > ; 
<i ■■h\' > 



Capital, Siicr.iiiento. 
State Officeus Executive Department. 



NAME OF INUUMHEST. 



V. V. Low 

T. N. Macliin 

IJ. D. Kedding 

George Onltun 

liomuaido Paclieco 

John G. McOnllougli 

.T. V. Iloiigliton 

John Swett 

O. M. Claves 

Ge&igc S. Evans 

W. C. Siratlon 

C. L. Tavlor ! State Harbor Commis'n'r 

S. i\ Tilt..!) 

,TameR Lai>iiey 

Wil'iam E. Urown 



Office. 



Governor 

Lientenant Governor 

Secretary of State 

( "outroller 

Treasurer 

.Attorney General 

Surveyor General 

Snp't Public Instruction . 

State Printer 

Adjutant General 

State Libnirian 



Keslilcnce. 



Governor's Private Sec'v 



Sacramento... 
San Quentin . . 
Sacramento. . . 



San Francisco. 

Sacnimento. .. 

San Francisco. 
(t »( 

(t i( 

Sacramento . . . 



Tcnii E.tp's. 
Dec, 1867. 


Salary. 


$7,000 


4t l( 


Per diem 


tl 14 


$4,000 


(( U 


4,000 


(( t( 


4,000 


it l( 


4,000 


t( {( 


2,000 


(( 4t 


3,000 


(I (■ 


Pees. 


At will ... 


3,00C 


It 


2,500 


Nov., 1867. 


3,000 


Nov., 1868. 


3,000 


Nov.. 1869. 


3,000 


At will ... 


2,400 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
Thirty-Ninth Congress Ending March 3d, 1867. 



NAME. 



James A. MvDougall. 

•John c^onnesH 

Ponuld C. McRuer. . . 
William lligby 



It 'sidenco. 



Jolin Bidwell |Chico 



San Ftiincibi'o. . . 

Placerville 

.San Fnincisco... 
Moktiumne Hill. 



Office. 



Senator 

Representative. 



Term Expires. 



March 3, 1867. 
" " 1869. 

" " 1867. 



LEGISLATURE OP CALIFORNIA.t 

Sixteenth Session, commenced December 4tb, 1865. 

Senate— Officers. 

President-— T. N. Mucliin., Tuolnnine. I Secretary— John White San Franrisco. 

President pro tem.—S. P. Wright Del Norte. | Sergeant-at- Arms— John H. Moran Napa. 



* The State election takci place on the Ant Wednemlay of September, 1867, and every two vcara thereafter. The 
term of office of each of the State officers Is four years, commonclnti with the first Monday ill December after the 
election. 

t Meets biennially on the first Monday of December. The Senate Is composed of forty, and the Assembly of elRhty , 
memliers. Terms of Senators fbur yean. Assemblymen two yean. Compensation, 910 per day during the session, and 
mileage, at the rate of twenty cents per mile. 



II t 



?i iS 



38 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



16th District. 

17th DiBtiict. 

18th District. 

19th district. 

20th District. 

31et District. 

S3d District. 

33d District. 



Mkmbers— 40. 
Conntlca. Kamci. Term Exp's. 

..SanBevnarainound San Diego M. C. Tuttle Dec. 1867. 

-Los Aiiueles Phineas Banning Dec. ISfiO. 

..San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara. . P. W. Mnrphy Doc. 1869. 

. .Fresno, Kera and Tulare J. W. Freeman Dec. 1 809. 

..Mariposii, Merced and Sfanislans W. S. Montjtoinery Doc. 1867. 

..Monterey and Santa Cruz W. E. Lovett Dec. 1867. 

..Santa Clara William J. Knox Dec. 1869. 

(U.h. Dodge, J. S. Hager and Horace > p^^ |ggy 

< William J.'shawandA. L. Tnbb8*."...Dec. 1869. 

.Alameda Henry Robinson Deo. 1869. 

.Contra Costa and Marin C. B. Porter Dec. 1867. 

.San Joaquin S. Myers Dec. 1867. 

.Inyo, Mono and Tuolumne J 8iit''wTcoVt::::::::;::::.\\\\":::Dlc- ll^! 

f, , ^„ (W.H.Leonard Dec. 1867. 

.Calaveras ^ Thomas Hardy Dec. 1869. 

.Alpine and Amador A. H. Rose Dec. 1867, 

wi n^,..A^ SF. L. Maddox Dec. 1867. 

.El Dorado ? James Johnson Dec. 1869. 

i J. E. Benton Deo. 1867. 

186!'. 
186!/. 
1S67, 



niHtrict. 
I St District . 
2d District . 
3d District . 
4th District. 
5th District. 
6th District. 
7th District. 



8th District. ...San Francisco and San Mateo. 



9tb District. 

10th District, 

nth District. 

13th District. 

13th District. 

14th District. 

ISth District. 



..Sacramento j E. H. Heacock Dec. 

..Solano and Yolo L. B. Mizner Dec. 

..Lake, Mendocino and Napa C. Hartson Dec 

. .Sonoma George Pearce Des. 

..Placer E. L. Brn.dley and J. E. Hale Doc 

•N-ada SM'Sa:::::::::::::::::::::::E^^: 



)«(i7. 
1869, 



..Sierra L.E.Pratt Dec. 1869. 

Siittor nnH ViiKa 5 Lcwis Cunningham Deo. 1867. 

..Sutter and Yuba ) E. Teegarden. Dec. 1869. 

\F. M.Smith Dec. 1867. 



34th District Butte, Lassen and PInmaa < o Ewer Dec 1869 

35th District Colusa and Tehama J. A. Rush Dec. 1867. 

36ih District Shasta and Trinity John P. oones Dec. 1867. 

27th District.... Del Norte, Humboldt and Klamath... S. P.Wright Dec. 1867. 

28th District Siskiyou E. Wadsworth Dec. 1809. 

ASSRHBLT— OrriCERS. 



Speaker— John Yule Placer. 

Speaker pro <cm. — J. W. Wilcox Mariposa. 

Clerk — Marcus D. Bonick San Francisco. 

Assistant Clerk — John H, Roberts Solano. 

Minute Clerk— J. M, Wood San Francisco. 

Sergeantat-Arms — Benjamin Dore..San Francisco 
Asst. Sergeant-at-Arms — Chas. Roberts. El Dorado. 



Enrolling Clerk — J. E. Youngberg.... Santa Clara. 

Engrossiiig Clerk — B, S. Marston Alameda. 

Joumiil Clerk — John Drum San Francisco. 

Copying Clerk — E. L. Selfridge ....San Francisco. 

Copying Clerk — J. C. Breen Merced. 

I Watchmau— J. H. Hathaway San Joaquin. 

I ChapliMQ— r,ey. M. C. P'iggs Sacramento. 



McMnRRS— 80. 



A1ame<1"— Thomas Eager, John L. Wilson. 
Alpine arJ Amador — A. C. Brown, Haryey Lee.* 
Butte— George E. Smith, W. P. Tilden. 
Calaveras— Isaac Aver, M. M. Collier, N. G. 

Sawyer. 
Colusa and Tehama— W. 8. Long. 
Contra Costa— Thomas /> . Brown. 
Del Norte and Klamath- L. H. Muroh. 
El Dorado— J. S Campbell, J. F. Kidder, E. L. 

Smith, Ed. F. Taylor. 
Fresno — R. P. Miice. 
Humboldt — A. J. Huestis. 
Inyo and Mono — J. E. Ooodall, 
Ke"n h ■^ Tulare — J. C. Brown. 
Lake and Napa — J. M. Coghlan. 
Lassen and Plumas — J. D. Goodwin. 
Los Angeles — E. C. Parrish, W. H, Peterson. 
Marin— D. Olds. 

Mariposa— J. W. Wilcox. ' 

Menaocino — William Holden. 
Merced and Stanislaus — R. H. Ward. 
Monterey — M. C. Ireland. 
Nevada — George D. Dornin, H. L. Hatch, Reuben 

Leech, JobnPattison. 
Placer— John Bosqait, William Sexton. John Yule. 



Sacrameiito — ^Thomas Hansbrow, D. Hollistor, P. J. 
Hopper, W. B. Hunt. J. B. Maholmb. 

San liernardino — J. W. Satterwhite. 

San Diego^Gcorgu A. Johnson. 

San Frnncisco — Jitnivs Bowman, M. A. Braly, S. C. 
Bugbee, E. Jacob Chase, C. Clayton, Henry Dnt- 
ton,' David Dwyer, M. Hawkins', Georue Hearst, 
S. L. Lupton, J. A. McClelland, C. L. Wiggin. 

San Joaqnm— C. H. Cliau-.berlain, W. E. Greene. 

San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara — R. J. Hill. 

San Mnteo — George H. Howard. 

Santa Clara— J. M. Cory, A. B. Hunt. John Zuck. 

Santa Cruz — William Anthony. 

Shasta—.!. N. Chappell. 

Sierra — G. Meredith, M. A. Singleton. 

Siskiyou— J. K. Luttrell, Thomas H. Steele. 

Solano— J. M. Lemon. 

Srioma — A. C. Bledsoe, J. L. Downing, O. H. n^^ag. 

Sutter — Francis Hamlin, 

Trinity— J. C. Dorr. 

Tuolumne— L. I. Hogle, and Taolnmne, Inyo and 
Mono, O. Perrin. 

Yolo-Charies F. Reed. 

Yuba- A. J. Batchelder, T. J. Sherwood, O. 
Stewart. 



• Drcoaaed. 



rm F.xp'». 
)ec. 18fi7. 
)ec. I8fi9. 
)ec. 18(59. 
)ec. 1869. 
)ec. 1867. 
)ec. 1867. 
[)ec. 1869. 

Bee. 1867. 

Dec. 1869. 
Dec. 1869. 
Dec. 1867. 
Dec. 1867. 
Dec. 1867. 
Dec 1869. 
Dec. 1867. 
Dec. 186!>. 
Dec. 1867. 
Dec. 1867. 
Dec. 1869. 
Dec. 1867. 
Dec. 186P. 
Dec. 186l(. 
Pee lSi)7. 
.Dej. "•-" 
.Dec >J 
.Di)c. KSW. 
.Dec. 1869. 
.Dec. 1869. 
. Dec. 1867. 
.Dec. 1869. 
.Dec. 1867. 
.Dec. 1869. 
..Dec. 1867. 
.Dec. 1867. 
..Dec. 1867. 
..Dec.l8C9. 



Santa Clara. 
, Alameda, 
an Francifco. 
in Francisco. 
.Merced. 
San Joaqnin. 
Sacramento. 



olliBter, P. J. 



Braly, 8. C. 
, Henry Dnt- 
iorite Hearst, 
J, Wiwin- 
E. Greene. 
B. J. Hill. 

John Zack. 



Steele. 
.O.H.n^ag. 

ne, Inyo and 

Iherwood, O. 



JUDICIARY OF CALIFORNIA, 



39 



JUDICIARY— Supreme Court.* 



NAME OF INCUMBENT. 



John Currey 

Jjorenzo Sawyer 

X. L. Rhodes'. 

O. L. Shufter 

8. W. Sandei-son — 

C. A. Tiittle 

W. D. Hitrriman — 
William U. Wood... 
Charles 11. Pomeroy 
John Uvnion 



Office. 



Chief Justice .... 
Associate Justice 
Associate Justice. 
Associate Jastice 
Associate Justice 

Reporter 

Clerk 

Deputy Clerk... 

Secretary 

Bailiff 



Residence. 



San Francisco. 



Sin .ToB^ . . . 
Oakland.... 
Sacramento. 



Term Exp'a. 



Jan. 1868. 

" 1870. 

" 1872. 

" 1874. 

" 1876. 
Dec. 1867. 

" 1867. 

" 1867. 

At will. 



Salary. 



|6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
4,000 

Fees. 

Fees. 
1,800 
1,200 



District JuocEs.t 



District 



Ist ... 

2d ... 

3d ••• 

4t.h... 

5th... 

6th... 

7th... 

8th... 

9th... 
10th... 
nth... 
12th... 
13th... 
14th... 
15th... 
16th... 



Name of Incumbent. 



Palilo He La Guerra 

W.T. Sexton 

Samuel B. McKee.. 

E. D. Sawyer 

Joseph M.'Cavis. .. 
John H. McKune .. 

.1. B Southard 

Wm. U.Turner 

E. Garter 

Isiiiic S. Belcher ... 
S. W. Brockway. . . 
O. C. Pratt........ 

Alexander Deering. 
T. B. McFarland... 
Slim. H. Dwinelle.. 
Theron Reed 



Residence. 



Ijos Anireles 

Oroville 

Oakland 

Sun Francisco .. 

Columbia 

Sacrnmenio 

Petnluma 

Eureka 

Shasta 

Marysville 

Mok'elumne Hill 
San Francisco .. 

Mariposa 

Nevada 

Sun Francisco .. 
Havilah 



Term Expires. 



December 2, 1869. 



Salary. 



$5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
6,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
6,000 
5,00b 
5,000 
6.000 
4,000 



JUDICIAL DISTRICTS, AND THE COUNTIES COM! ')SIN6 THE SAME. 



Ist Dist. — Los Angeles, San Beniardino, San Diego, 
San Luis Obisno and Santa Barbara. 
-Butte, Lassen, Plumas and Tehama. 
;. — AInmcda, Monterey, Santa Clara and 

Santa Cruz. 
. — Part of San Francisco. 
•-San Joaquin and Tuolumne. 
—Sacramento and Yolo. 
-Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Nupn, Solano 
and Sonoina. 



ad 


Diet.- 


Sd 


Di.< 


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8th Dist.— Del Norte, Humlwldt and Klamath. 

9tli Dist. — Shasta, Siskiyou and Trinity. 
10th Dist. — Colusa, Sierra, Sutter and Yuba. 
11th Dist. — Amador, Calaveras at. , El Dorado, 
lath Dist. — Part of San Francisco and S.'n Mateo. 
13th Dist. — Fresno, Mariposa, Merced, Stanislans 

and Tulare. 
14th Dist. — Nevada and Placer. 
15th Dist.— Contra Costa and part of San Francisco. 
16th Dist.-r-Alpine, Inyo, Kern and Mou^.. 



TERMS OF THE DISTRICT COURTS.^ ' ' 

Alameda Cor.irr Third Monday in February, June, and October. 

Alpine CouNi First Monday in March and .September. 

AMAnoR County Second Monday in March, June, September, and December. 

Butte County Second Monday in March, fourth Monday iu July, and second Monday in 

December. 

Calavkkas CouNTi Second Monday in January, April, July and October. 

Coi.usA County First Monday in Januarv, May, and September. 

Contra Costa Couniy T'lird Tuesday in April, July, and November. ^ 



_J 



*/.S"r ."'"'''"£,''' **"" y"J"-.. Terms of the Court are held at Sacramento on the llnit Monday In .lanunrv. April, July 
and '^oWKr. tor ormnizatlon, names of Judges, and Terms of the United Htatos Court on the I'aclhc Coast, see 

tTermof offlep,«lx years. The present Incumbents hold office untU December, 1869. For names of Probate and 
County Judges, see KeKlstorofNamcs, pjfte 111. uovu ....u 

t The Supreme Court has appellato turlsdictlon In all cases In e(|ulty, In all cases at law involvlne the title or pos- 
scaslnn of real estate, or the leKallty of any tax, toll, lino, etc., or In which the matter In controversy amounts to liioo : 
also Id all cases arising In the I'robato Couru; and in all criminal oases amounting to fislony, on questions of 



alone. 



law 



The TemiB of the County and Probate Courts are held on the first Monday of January, March, May, July, Septem- 
ber, and November, unless otherwise flxed by law. 1 .w> "J. »»..«.... 



if 



M 



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40 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTOHY, 



Del Norte County SeconO Monday in May, Angnst, and November. 

£l Dukado County Second Monday in February and May, and third Monday in August and 

November. 

Fresno County Third Monday in February, Jnne, and October. 

HuMDOLDT County Second Mondav in Miircli, Jnne, September, and December. 

Inyo County ■:'.... First Monday in May and November. 

Keun County Firet Monday in June and December. 

Klamath County Second Monday in April, July, and October. 

Lake County Third Monday in April, and second Monday in November. 

Lassen County Firet Monday in June, and second Monday in October. 

Los An'jelks County First Mondtiy in Fel>ruiiry, May, and November. 

Marin County First Monday in March, first Monday in July, and third Monday in 

November. 

Mariposa County Fourth Monday in March, July, and November. 

Mendocino County Second Monday iu April, third Monday in July, and first Monday in 

November. 

Merced County Fourth Mondtiy in January, May, and September. 

Mono County Fii-st Monday in April and October. 

Monterey County First Monday in April and October. 

Napa County First Monday in A-bruary, .Tune, and October. 

Nevada County ■ . .Second Monday in March,* June, September, and December. 

Pi.ACEK County •'•' Monday m February, May, Au><UBt, and November. 

Pi.UMAS County . i Monday in May, ami fourth Monday iu September. 

Sacka.'.iknto County .foiiduy fn February, April, .luno, August, October, and December. 

San Ukkxakdino County. .. .1- .. Monday in April and Septeni'.ier. 

San Dif.oo (.'ounty Firpl Monday iu October, and third Monday in April. 

San Fraxclsco County Fourth nistrict— First Monday in February, May, August, and Novem- 
ber; Twelfth District, — First Monday ni J;inuary, April, July, and 
October; Firteonth District — First Monday iu March, June, Septem- 
ber, and December. 

San .Ioaquin County First Monday iu April, Au.Kust.and December. 

San Luis Obispo County Fii-st Monday in Slarch and August. 

San Mateo County Third .Monday in March, and fourth Monday in June, September, and 

Dei'omber. 

Santa Uariiara County Third Monday in June and December. 

Santa Ci.ARA County Second Monday in January, May, and .September. ... 

Santa Cku/. County Second .Monday iu April, 'August, and December. 

Shasta County Second Slonday in .March, Juno, and November. 

Sierra County First Monday in April, second Monday in July, and Fourth Monday iu 

October. 

Siskiyou County Third Monday in January, May, and September. 

Soi-ANo County Third Monday in Jannur", May, and September. 

Sonoma County Third Monday in Febrn ry, June, and October. 

Stanislaus County First Mondav in February, June, and October. 

Sutter County Fourth .Monday in February and June, and third Monday in October. 

Tehama County Second Monday in February, fourth Mouday in June, anct second Monday 

in Novemtier. 

Trinity County Second Monday in April, August, and December. 

Tui.are County Fourth Monday in February, June, and October. 

Tuolumne County Firrt Monday in March, July, and November. 

Yolo County Third .Monday in .March, July, and November. 

YuuA County Third Monday in January, May, and September. 



SENATOIUAL DISTRICTS, THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME, AND REPKESENT- 

ATION OF EACH. 



Ist Difct.— San Hernardino and San Diego, elect one 

Senator. 
2d Dist. — Los Angeles, elects one Senator. 
3d Dist. — San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara, elect 

one Senator. 
4th Dist. — Fresno, Kern and Tulare, elect one 

Senator. 
5th Dist. — Mariposa, Merced and Stanislaus, elect 

one Senator. 
6th Dist. — Monterey and Santa Cruz, elect one 

Senator. 
7th Dist. — Santa Clara, electa one Senator. 
8th Dist. — San Francisco and Sun Mateo, elect five 

Senators [four by San Fmncisco and 

one by San Mateo and San Fraucisco 

iointlyj. 
9th Dist. — Alameda, elects one Senator. 
10th Dist. — Contra Costa aud Marin, elect one 

Senator 
11th Dist. — San Joaquin, elects one Senator. 
13th Dist. — I»yOi Mono and Tuolumne, elect two 

Senators. 



1.3th Dist.- 
Hth Dist.- 
l.'ith Dist.- 
Kith Dist.- 
17th Dist.- 
18th Dist.- 

lilth Dist.- 
aOth Dist.- 
21 St Dist.- 
22d Dist.- 
23d Dist.- 



2Uh Dist.— 



25th Dist- 
2()th Dist.- 
27th Dist.- 

28th Dist.— I 



-Calaveras, elects two Senators. 
-Alpine and Amador, elect one Senator. 
-El Dorado, elects two Senators. 
-Sacramento, elects two Senators. 
-Solano and Yolo, elect one Senator. 
-Luke, Mendocino and Napa, elect one 

Senator. 
-Sonoma, elects one Senator. 
■Placer, elects two Senatois. 
•Nevada, elects two Senators. 
•Sierm, elects one Senator. 
Sutter and Yuba, elect two Senators 

[one l>y Yuba and one by Sutter and 

Yuba jointly]. 
Diitto, Lassen and Plumas, elect two 

Senators [one by liiitto and one by 

Plumas, Lassen and Uiitte jointly]. 
Colusa and Tehama, elect one Senator. 
■Shasta and Trinity, olect one Senator. 
'i)el Norte, Humboldt and Klamath, elect 

one Senator. 
Siskiyou, elects one Senator. 



STATB OF CALIFORNIA. 



41 



ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS, AND THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME. 



Alameda— Two members. 

Alpine and Amador — Two. 

Bntte— Two 

Calavems — 'lluee. 

ColiiBa and Teliania — One. 

Contra Costa — One. 

Del Norte and Klamath— One. 

El Dorado — Four. 

Fresno — One. 

Humboldt — One. 

Inyo and Mono— One. 

Kern and Tnhirc — One. 

Lake and Napa — One. 

Laaoen and riumu« — One. 



IxiB Angeleg — ^I'wo. 
Marin — One. 
Marinosn — One. 
MenUtM'ino^One. 
Merced and StauislauB — Que. 
Monterey — One. 
Nevada— Four. 
Placer — Three. 
SucrHniento— Five. 
San Herminlino — One. 
San Diugo-T-Ono. 
Sun Fruncidco- -Twelve. 
San Joaquin — Two. , 
San Luis Obispo aud Santa Barbara 
—One. 



San Mateo — One. 
Santa Clara — Three. 
, Santa Cruz — One. 
Shasta— One. • > 

Sierra — ^Two. 
Sibiiiyou — Two. 
Solaiio — One. 
Sonoma — Three. 
Sutter — One. 
Trinity— One. 
Tuolunnie — One, and with Inyo 

and Mono, One. 
Yolo— One. 
Yubu— Three. 



EXECUTIVE AND STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

.Saliiry. I Salary. 

Fiodcrick F. Low flovcrnor $7,(K)(tiWilliam K. Browu Private Secretary.. |2,4U0 

T. N. Machiu Lieut. Governor, per diem. , 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

B. B. Redding Secretary of State {I.OnCIOcorKe C. Garrison. Clerk $1,800 

W. H.Ault Clerk '-VIWlF. W. Redding Clerk 1,800 

CONTROLIiER'S DEPARTMENT. 

George Oulton Controller $ 1,000 

E. M. Howison Clerk '>>,400 

J. E. Dent Clerk a.JOO 



A. W. Perley Clerk $1,800 

L. H. Fuller Clerk 1,800 

W. II. Friuk Clerk 1,800 



TREASURER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Romnnldo Pacheco Treasurer $1,(H)0| Fnincis Clark Clerk. 

W. Wadsworth Clerk 1,800 



.$1,800 



ATTORNEY GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 

John G. McCullough.. Attorney General.... $ 1,0001 Edward P. Weeks Clerk $1,000 

SURVEYOR GENERAL S DEPARTMENT. 

J. F. Houghton . . . Survevor General $i,0001 .\ B. Bowers Clerk $1,800 

A. S. Bender Dep. Sur. Gen'l,noconipensation.l 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. I 

John Swett Superintendent $3,0001Willittm F. Tracy Clerk $1,800 

ADJUTANT GENERALS DEPARTMENT. 

George S. Evans Adjutant General $3,000|C. J. Robinson Clerk $1,800 

W. L. Ustick As»ibtant a,000|A. Leonard Clerk 1,800 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



F. P. Tjow Governor President. 

John Swett Sup't Pub. Instruction. .Secretary. 

John C. Pelton.-.Sup't Public Schools, City and 

County of San Francisco. 

Melville Cottle ... Sup't Com. Sch'°!8, San Joaquin Co. 



F. VV. Hutch Sup't Com. Sch'ls, Sacramento Co. 

Wesley Tonner... " " " Santa Clara Co. 
Henry' P. Carlton, Prin'l State Normal School, 8. F. 
Stmi'lI.C.Sweiiey. Editor Cal. Teacher, San Fran. 
J. M. Sibley Teacher Oakland College. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS. 

Frederick F. Low, Governor, Examiner, no comp'n. i J. G. McCuUongh, Att'y Qen'l, Examiner, no comp'n. 
B. B. Redding, Soc'y of State. Examiner, no comp'n. JW. E. Brown Secretary $1,200 

BOARD OF MILITARY AUDITORS. 

Frederick F. Low, Commander-in-Chief, no comp'n. I J. O. McCuUough, Attorney General nooomp'n. 

George S. Evans, Adjutant General no comp'u.l 

BOARD OP EXAMINERS, BOUNTY CLAIMS. 

Frederick P. Low, Governor, President, no comp'n. |RomualdoPacbeco,8tateTreaB.Examiner,no comp'n. 
Goo. 8. Evans, Adjutant General, Seo'ry, uo comp'n. I 



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PAOIPIO COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



BOARD OF STAMP COMMISSIONERS. 

Frederick F. Low, Governor, ex-ofBcio CommiBBioner no compeimation. 

J. G. McCiilloiigh, Attflmey General, exofficio CoinmiBsioner no conjpcnstttion 

Romaaldo Pacheco, Stole Treasurer, ex-oHicio ComniiBWoner no compensation 

McCullough, Clerk •. $600. 



STATE LIBRARY. 



Joeepli W. Winana, President Trustee 

J. G. MoCuIIoukIi, Attorney General " 

H. W. Harkness " 

O. G. W. French " 



W. C. Belcher Trustee. 

W. C. Strutton, State Lihrarian $9,.500 

A.Hart, Deputy Librarian 1,800 



STATE LAND OFFICE. 

J. F.Hounrhton, Surveyor Gen' 1. Register $2,000 |L. E. Crane.. 

A. 8. Bender Draughtsman 2,400 ' 



.Clerk. 



..$1,800 



NOTARIES PUBLIC. 



[Coixected at the office of the Secretary of State, December S4th„ 186().] 



[The figures after the names of the Counties repre- 
sent the number of Notaries to which they are en- 
titled.] 

ALAMEDA COUNTY— 7. 
Date Appoint Kame. Realdcnce. 

March 2, '6,5.. Asa Walker Brooklvn. 

May 3, '66..W. B. Clement Alameda. 

May 3, 'Co.. George M. Yard... Oakland. 
May 3, '66..Benja'n Williams .Alvarauo. 
May 3, '6(>..Benia'n F. Ferris . Oakland. 

May 3, '(i6..G. E. Smith San Lcandro. 

May 3, '66. .John W. Kottinger . 

ALPINE COUNTY— 5. 

Sept. 8. '65.. Charles P. Goff....Markleeville. 
Dec. 8, 'Ci.-Henrv Morris ... . Marklecville. 
Oct. 12, '66..DeWitt C. Riddell .Silver Mountain. 
Oct 12, '66.. Nash C. Briggs Silver Mountain. 

AMADOR COUNTY-8. 

Jan. 31 , '65. .Jesse Bowen . 

Nov.l'J.'65..M. B. Church. 



Feb. 8, '66. .John A. Robinson.. Jackson. 
June 18, '66. . Harvey E. Babcock Jackson. 
Oct. 27, '66.. Edward G. Hunt ..Jackson. 

BUTTE COUNTY— 13. 

Dec. 9, '65. .L. P. Smith Forbestown. 

Feb. 8, '66. .W. H. Duren Chico. 

April 7, '66.. John D. Dick Oroville. 

Ap'l 17, '66. -Andrew Ilallet Chico. 

June 18, '66. .Justus Brooks Oroville. 

Ang.20, 'C6..Ja8. A. Wardivell. .Oroville. 
Sept. 14. '66.. J. M. Burt Oroville. 



CALAVERAS COUNTY— 13. 

'65..ChaB. M. Whitlock.San Andreas. 

'65. .W. K. Boucher Mokelumne Hill. 

'66. .Samuel S. Abbott ..CoppcropoliH. 
'66. . Walter L. Hopkins. Mokelumne Hill. 
'66.. Edward Burrows.. Murphys. 
•66..TI10S. K. Wilson. ..Mokelumne Hill. 
'66. -John J. Stoddard ..Copperopolia. 

'66..RienKi Hopkins.... . 

'66.. Allen Taylor Vallecito. 



Ap'l 29, 
Aug. 23, 
Jan. 12, 
Feb. 13, 
June 18, 
Nov. 16, 
Nov. 24, 
Nov. 28, 
Dec. 5, 

COLUSA COUNTY— 5. 

Jane 21, '65. .Thomas J. Taylor. .Colnsa. 
Oct 24, '65. .J. G. Treadway ...Colusa. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY-5. 

Sept. 27, '65. .E. 8. Sayles Pacheco. 

Aprfl 7, '66..0bed F. Alley MartineK. 

May 3, '66. .Geo. F. McCoy Antioch. 



DEL NORTE COUNTY— 5. 

Date Appoint. Name. Residence. 

Dec. 18, '65. .Geo. Russell Crescent City. 

June 18, '66. .Franklin Knox ....Crescent City. 



EL DORADO COUNTY— 13. 



Mar. 6, '65.. 
May 22, '65.. 
June 7, '65., 
Sept.30, '(i5.. 
Nov. 4, '65., 
Dec. 8, '65., 
Feb. 20, '6(>.. 
April 7, '66.. 
May 3, '66.. 
June 18, '66.. 
July 18, '66.. 
Sept. 14. '66. 
Nov. Hi, '66. 



James MeCormick 

E.G.Bradley 

Williiim Taylor... 
O. H. Burnham — 

F. A. Hornblower. 
N. A. Hamilton... 
J. L. Perkins 

G. J. Carpenter... 
VVm.T. Gibbs. ... 
Wm. H. BodHsh . . 
Geo. G. Blanchard 
,(jieo. H. Ingham.. 
James B. Hume .. 



El Dorado. 
El Dorado. 



Georgetown. 

Plucorville. 
.Placerville. 
.riucerville. 
.riacerville. 
.Georgetown. 

Coloma. 

Placerv;''c. 

Coloma. 

Placerville. 



FRESNO COUNTY— 5. 

(No appointments.) 
HUMBOLDT COUNTY— 5. 

Feb. 28, 'a').. James Bassett Mattole. 

Sept. 28. '65.. John W. Pugh .... . 

Jan. 2.5, '66.. John A. Watiion. ..Eureka. 

May a'i, '66. .D. W. Nixon Eureka. 

June 18, '66.. Byron Deming ....Areata. 

INYO COUNTY— 5. 

Mav 3, '66.. .John G. Kelley ...Independence. 

May 3, '66 . . Paul W. Bennett . . . . 

Sept. 14,'66..F. K. Miller Independence. 

KERN COUNTY— 5. 

May 3, 'Wi. .B. 8. Coffman Hnvilah. 

July 18, '66.. T. F. A. Connelly.. Havilah. 

KLAMATH COUNTY— 5. 

Mar.23, '66.. Hiram Eldridge.... Sawyer's Bar. 

LAKE COUNTY-5. 

June 18,'66..S. P. Guiberson ...Lower Lake. 
June 18, '66. .W. B. H. Dodson.. Uncle Sam. 

LASSEN COUNTY-5. 
May 30, '66.. John S. Ward ....Snsanville. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY-8. 

Nov. 20, '65.. M. W. Childs Ijob Angeles. 

Jan. 20, '66. .Henry O'Harra Los Angeles. 

Jan. 27, '66. .James H. Lander.. Los Angeles. 

June 18, '6(;..W. O. Still Los Angeles. 

July 14, '66.. John Fischer Los Angeles. 



CALIFORNIA. NOTABIBS PUBLIC, 



43 



MAUIN COUNTY— 5. 

Date Appoint Same. Kesldenco. 

Ap'l at, "65. .Edward B. Mahon. Snn Kitfuel. 
Dec. 2ii, '«!().. Thoa. H. Hnnaon ..San Itafuol. 
Jan. 23, 'Oti. .Warren Dutton Toraiiles. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY-8. 

Jan. 21, 'C5.. Alex. Deering Mariposa. 

Feb. 3, '(>5 . . Edward C. Bell Mariposa. 

Dec. 8, '65. .Maurice Newman. -Bear Valley. 

Mar. 8, 'f)6..J. Mentzer . 

April 7, '0(i.. Samuel C. Bates... Hornitos. 
May :<, '(iO.. George S. Miller. ..Mari|)oga. 
June 20, ■G6..E.0. Darling Bear Valley. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY -5. 

June 21, 'O^.-OuHtavusLlndcroosUkiali. 

Jan. 20, 'lUi . . F;»gene Brown Mendocino. 

Ap'l 17, TCWillinm Hecser Mendocino. 

June 2.'>, 'fi6. . Robt. WcOarvev . . . Ukiah. 
Aug. 25, 'OC. Isaac P. Smith Cahto. 

MERCED COUNTY— 5. 

(No appointment.) 
MONO COUNTY— 5. 
June 18, '66.. Geo. N. Whitman.. Bridgeport. 

MONTEREY COUNTY— 5. 

Jan. 6, '05 . . J. W. Whitney Monterey. 

Mav a.'), '<)(>.. J. D. Cnllahan Monterey. 

May 25, 'GO. . W. E. Lovett San Juan. 

NAPA COUNTY-8. 

May 3, ■()6..J. H. Howland Napa City. 

May 3, '00. .Louis Brurk Napa City. 

May 3, 'OO..VVm. A. Ilaskins... St. Helena. 
Aug. 20, '00.. A. A. Ilunncwell ..Nupa City. 

Sept. 14,'00..B. W.Arnold Sebastopol. 

Dec. 5, 00. .0. W. Towlo Napa City. 

NEVADA COUNTY-18. 

Ap'l 2!», '05. .William M. Eeddy. . 

Ap'l 29, '00. .A. A. Sargent Nevada City. 

Feb. 8, '00..H. G. Robbins Moore's Flat. 

Mar. 15,'00..E. W. Roberts Grass Valley. 

Mar. 15, '00..<lohn C. Deuel Grass Valley. 

Mar. 15, '00.. W. K. Spencer Orass Valley. 

Mar. 15, '00. .J. E. Squires . 

Mar. 15,'0O..D. E. Sykes Summit City. 

Mar. V>, 'GO. . Edwin Fowler Meadow Lake. 

May 3, '00.. John Caldwell Nevada Citv. 

May 8, 'GO.. Richard K. Allen ..Meadow LaKe. 

May 23, GO. .T. P. Hawley Nevada City. 

June 25, 'GO. .J. B. Johnson North San Juan. 

July 18, 'GO.. J. I. Caldwell Nevada City. 

July 24, 'GO.. Thomas C. Nye ... . 

Oct. 20, •(«!.. Wm. H. Clarke.... . 

Nov. 8, '00.. O. P. Stidger Nortr San Juan. 

PLACER COUNTY— 10. 

Aug. 16, '05. .William P. Miller.. . 

Feb. 17, '05. .Edwin Tyler Michigan Bluff. 

Oct. 21, '65.. L. B. Arnold Dutch Flat. 

Oct, 21,'G5..0.W. Hollenbeck..Gold Run. 

Feb. 20, '66. . P. Stone Iowa HilU 

May 3, '00. .George G. Webster Forest HilL 

June IS, '00. . R. C. Poland Auburn. 

June 19, '00. . Wm. B. Storey Colfax. 

July 18, '66. .D. W. Madden ....Cisco. 

PLUMAS COUNTY— 5. 

Sept.30,'<k5..M. B. Sturgesa Sawpit Flat. 

Mav23, '66. .John R. Buckbe« ..Quincy. 

June 18, '66.. A. H. Crew La Porte. 

June 25, '66. . Seneca Carroll . 

June 25, '66. .A. J. Gifford Taylorville. 



SACRAMENTO COUNTY— 1 0. 
Date Appoint. Name. Residence. 

April 1, '65..0.B.V.DcLaraater. Michigan Bar. 
Nov. 4, '65..Edw. J. Robinson ..Sacramento City 

Dec. 27,'65..C. C. .lenks Sacramento City. 

,Ian. 6, '66.. John S. Barrett.... Sacramento City. 
May 3, '00.. Samuel Poorman. ..Sacramento City. 
May 3, '00. .A. C. Sweetser ....Sacramento City. 

May 3, '00.. Samuel Cross Sacramento City. 

May 3, 'OC.Edw. Cadwalader . Sacramento City. 
May 30, '60. .P. J. Hopper Folsom. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY— 5. 
Mar. 2, '66.. Horace C. Rolfe ...San Bernardino. 
May iW, '66.. Henry M. Willes. ..Sun Bernardino. 
May 25, '66. .A. A. M. Jackson. .San Bernardino. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY— 5. 

(No appointments.) 
SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY— 20 

Feb. 2, '65..Emile V. Sutter San Francisco. 

June 12, '65.. 8. 8. Murfey San Francisco. 

June 12, '65.. Henry DreBchfeld..San Francisco. 

Nov. 14, '65.. Geo. C. Waller San Francisco. 

Nov. 20, '65. .J. H. Blood San Francisco. 

Feb. 8, '60..Tho8. A. Lynch ...San Francisco. 

May 3, '06. .E. V. Joice San Francisco. 

May 3, '06. .Henry Huight San Francisco. 

May 3, '60. . F. J. Thibault San Francisco. 

May 3, '66..Wm. Heufner San Francisco. 

May 28, '66. .Otis V. Sawyer .. ..San Francisco. 

May '28, 'GO. .John White San Francisco. 

May 28, '00. .W. W. Lawton . ..San Francisco. 
May 28, '06.. Isaac T. Milliken ..San Francisco. 

May 28, '66. .John Gorman San Francisco. 

May 28, '60.. J. W. McKenzie ..San Francisco. 
Juno 21, 'GO.. Rodman P. Lewis. .San Francisco. 

July 18, '66. .8. Hermann San Francisco. 

Sept. 14, '66.. Henry 8. Tibbey ..San Francisco. 
Sept. 14, '66. .N. Proctor Smith ..San Fr»ncisco. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY— 12. 

Mar. 16, '65.. Angus McQueen ..Woodbridge. 

Jan. 13, '60. .J. N. Burke . 

Mar. 2, '66..Jo8iah Gorham Lockeford. 

Mar. 19, '66..Fredk, G. Low.... . 

April 19, '66.. John H. Webster.. Stockton. 

May 3, '66. 

May 3, '66. 

May 23, '06. 

May 23, 'GO. 

June 18, '00. 

Aug. 20, '00. 



.Lewis M. Cutting .Stockton. 
.A. G. Brown. . . .. .Stockton. 

.John C. Reid Stockton. 

.Reuben W. Brush. Stockton. 
.David .11 iggins ....Liberty. 
.Herbert E. Hall. ..Stockton. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY— 5. 
Dec. 27, '65. .P. A. Forrester.... San Luis Obispo. 
May 30, '66. .Walter Murray San Luis Obispo. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY-5. 

May 3, '66. .T. W. Lathrop . . . .Redwood Citv. 

May 28, '66. .A. 8. Easton Redwood City. 

May 28, '66. .J. E. Skidmore San Mateo. 

Oct. 12, '66. .John P. Johnson .. . 

Oct. 12, '66..J. P.Ames Half-Moon Bay. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY— 5. 

Sept. 14, '66..Tadeo J. Sanchez.. Santa Barbara. 
Sept. 14, '66.. A. Ma. de la GnerraSanta Barbara. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY-8. 
July 20, •65..Cha8. O. Thomas. .San Jose. 

May 3, '66.. F. E. Spencer San Jose. 

May 28, '66 . . David H uber . . . San Jose. 

. nelS, '66. .J. H. Logan San Jose. 

>.ine25,'66..A.B. Hunt San Jose. 

Sov. 6, '66 . .J. M. Billings Santa Clara. 

Nov. 24, '66.. D. W. Harnngton . San Jose. 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



SANTA CRUZ COUNTY— 5. 
nato Appoint. Name. Kosldvnce. 

Mar. lit, '66. .n. F. Bavley Wutaonville. 

May 3, '60.. Ed wind Martin . ..WatHonville. 
May i.'3, 'OCJumes C. VVanzer . Santa Cnw. 

SHASTA COUNTY— 5. 

April 17, '66. .Samuel Cooper Sliasta. 

May 3, '(i6..(51eo. 1). Foil)e8 . ..Shasta. 
June 18, '66. .Lorin Scott Ku^le Creek. 

SIEUUA COUNT y— 13. 

Sept. 8, 'f)5..Win. Stoddard Dowiiieville. 

Oct, 23, '65. .Win. Cam Goodyear's Uar. 

Nov. 4, '6.5.. John C. Leconey .. . 

Nov.aS, '65. .John Konts....... Alleghany. 

Jan. 17, '6fi..Clm8. T. Tracy.... . 

April 16, "66. '.John Gale Forrest City. 

April Ui,'(')6..Janieij M. Haven ..Dowuievilfe. 

April 16, 'tic. .G. Meredith Table Kotk. 

May 3, '66.. Joseph Downa St. Ix>iii8. 

May 31, '66.. John Corhett Gibsonville. 

Nov.iil, '66. .(Jurland Harris Downieville. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY— 15. 

Nov. 4, 'i'lo. . E. F. llcrvy Fort Jones. 

Mar. 2, 'CS. . V. A. ItoKers Yreka. 

Mar. 31, '66..Ijevi A. Koss . 

Aug. 2I(, '6<>.. Homer B. Warren. Yreku. 
Aug. 20, '66.. Lucius S. Wilson. .Oro Fine. 

SOLANO COUNTY-6. 

Nov. 28, 't>5.. John Doughty Fnirfield. 

Jan. 17, '66..Wni. S. Dryden . .. . 

Jan. 17, '66. .W. S. Wells Fairfield. 

Mar. 23, %6.. C. W. Itilev Vallejo. 

May 3, '66. .James F. iJwuin. ..Keniiia. 
May 14, '66.. S. G. Ililborn Vallejo. 

SONOMA COUNTY— 8. 

Mar. 2, '66 . . Jared C. Hoag .... Bloomfield. 
April 7, '6(i..U. L. Woodworth . Petulunia. 

May 3, '66.. L. D. Latimer Santa liosa. 

June 25, '66. .John O. Darrow . . Heuldsburg. 

Aug. 20, '66. .1). D. Carder Petalnma. 

Oct. 12, '66. .A. W. Thompson ..Petaluma. 
Oct. 12, '66.. I. (^. Wickerebam . Petaluma. 



STANISLAUS COUNTY-5, 
Date Appoint, Name. Kcsldcnce. 

Sept. 8, '65..Clms.Wicbelbaiis.. La Grange. 

•Fan. 12, '66..I). B. Horr . 

Mar. 2, '66.. Geo. W. Scholl Knight's Ferry. 

SUTTER COUNTY— 5. 

July 18, '66.. James Hart Nirolaus. 

TEHAMA COUNTY— 5. 

JmielS, •66..I>. B. Lyon Red niuH'. 

June 18, '6(5.. A. B. Jackson (^iltonwood. 

June 18, '66. .A. W. Ilroadt Tehunia. 

I TRINITY COUNTY— 5. 

Juno 18, '66.. A. J. Felton Weuvervillo. 

June 18, '66.. E. P. I^vejoy Weuvervilie. 

TULARE COUNTY— 7. 

Jnne21,'6.5..F. F. A. Cormclly.^ . 

Dec. 9, '65. .O. L. Mathews San Carlos. 

Jan. 12, '66. .Win. P. Pool . 

Mar. 8, '66..B. S. CotTman . 

Alar. 19, '66. .Jolui R. Evartson . . 

.May 28, '66. .Alva J. Atwcll ... .Visalia. 

Oct. 12, 'tUi . . Andrewri Van Valor . 

Oct. 12, '66. .S. C. Brown Visiilia. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY— 1,3. 
Jan. 31, '65. .William Urick ....Big Oak Flat. 

Oct. 3, '65.. Paul S. Niles Don Pedro's Bar. 

Jan. 9, '66. .Edwin A. Rogers.. Sonom. 
Mar. 8, '66. .Gideon Thompson . Sonoru. 

Juno 18, '66.. H. B. McNeil Sonora. 

Juno2.'5, '66.. E. E. While Columbia. 

June 25, '66.. A. B. Preston Jamestown. 

July 18, '66. .11. G. Crane Shaw's Flat. 

July 18, '66. .Abraham llalsey ..Chinese Camp. 
July 18, '66.. John N. Stone Sonora. 

YOLO C0UNTY-.5. 
May 3, "66. .Jerome C. Dnvis ..Putiih Creek. 
Dec. 5, '66. .Charles F. Reed ..Knight's Lauding. 

YUBA COUNTY— 10. 

Jan. 31, '1)5. .Joshua H. Variel..C.imptonville. 

May 2, '65. .George May Camptonville. 

Aug. 15, 't>5..B. F. Hemfei'son .. . 

May 25, '66. .C. M. Gorham Marvsville. 

May 25, '66. .J. L. Hall BroWus Valley. 

Nov. 6, '66. .S. P. Semper Marysville. 



COMMISSIONERS OP DEEDS. 

CAppointctl for Four Years.] 
WITH NAME, RESIDENCE AND DATE OF EXI'IRATION OF COMMISSION OF E.\^CII. 

[Corrected at the office of the Secretary of State, December 24th, 1866.] 

IOWA. 

Reaidenco. 



ALABAMA. 
Name. Residence. Exp'nofTcrm. 

Sidney T. Douglas.. Mobile Dec. 8, '69 

Lawrence Warrall . . " Feh. 8, '70 

ARKANSAS. 
Charles P.Redmond Little Rock Nov. 28, '70 

CONNECTICUT. 

William Goodman . . . Hartford May 9, '68 

ILLINOIS. 

Simeon W. King Chicago May 2, ' 69 

Philip A. Hoyne " Oct. 3, '69 

INDIANA. 
Lather R. Martin Indianapolis Oct. 23, '69 



Name. Realdence. Exp'n of Term. 
Wm. A. Burton Ottumwa Aug. 15, '70 

KANSAS. 
J. R. De Land Leavenworth Feb. 13, '70 

KENTUCKY. 
N. R. Wilson Louisville Oct. 23, '69 

LOUISIANA. 

Walter H. Peters... New Orleans Oct.20,'67 

James Graham " " June 15, '69 

Arthur Brocard " " Sept. 8,'«9 

J. Bendernagel " " May 29, '70 

Robt. T. Buckner. . . . Shreveport June 20, '70 

P. C. Cuvellier New Orleans June 13, '70 



CALIFORNIA, 



COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS. 



46 



Name. Bcsldcnco. Exp'ii of Term. 

George W. Christy. -New Orlenns July 19, '70 

Justin Cimmiiie " " Aug.SJ5,70 

Henry J. Lnbtttt " " Nov.28,70 

MAINE. 

ArtemnH Liliby Augusta Jan. 3, 'fi7 

Edwin Cliirk Hangor Mar. 4, 'CjS 

JoBoph M. Mesernc.AiigiiHta " 29, '(>H 

Dunl. W. F«m<en(len.PortlHiid Mny 7, '(i8 

John E. Godfrey Uiingor Jan. (i, '6'J 

JamcBO'Donncll.... Portland " 20,70 

Lewis W. Howes... Lockland Feb. 12, 70 

MARYLAND. 

William P..Enton.. . . llaitiinore Mar. 21, 'f>9 

H. L. EnimonH, .Ir. . . " April 29, '«) 

Thomas Wiielan, Jr. " Nov. 4, '69 

William D. Hill " May 14, 70 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



Peter J. Wliccloik.. 

John C.Park 

Hen. Hale Currier... 

Henry M. Parker 

Hales W. Sutter 

George S. Hull 

Sanniel S. Curtis 

Samuel C. Crocker.. 

Otis G. Kiiiidall 

Wm. Henry Towne.. 

Samuel Curt Ih 

(Charles A. h\ awan. 
CImrle.s II. F. Adams. 
Albert W. Adams... 

J. Henry Hill 

George T. Augell 

Daniel Sharp.." 

James B. Hell 

Simuiel Jeniiisoii 

N. C. Towie 

Charles E. Kendall . . 

H. F. Sherman 

Charles C. Kendall 



Norfolk Mar. 

Hoston April 

" Aug. 

" Dec. 

" Mar. 

" Jnlv 

" Oct. 



-Nov. 

(i 

.Dec. 
.Jan. 
. April 



Worcester Jidy 

DoBton Aug. 

" Sept. 

" Oct. 

" Feb. 



New Hedford . 
Do. tn 



.April 
.Jan. 
. April 



19, 

4, 
14, 

9, 
23, 

3, 
24, 

Si 

19, 
2(), 
29 
M. 
18, 
27, 
3, 
27, 
27, 
2(J, 
13, 
21, 



'07 
'67 
'67 
'67 
•68 
'68 
'(i8 
'68 

'm 

•(58 
'68 
'69 
'()9 
•69 
'69 
'69 
'69 
'69 
'70 
•70 
•70 
'69 
•70 



MICHIGAN. 



28, 


'(>9 


31 


'69 


20, 


•70 


18, 


•68 


13, 


•70 


18. 


'70 


13, 


'70 


•>, 


'70 



W.J. Waterman Detroit Oct. 10, '07 

James O. Forrest " Feb. 15, '70 

MINNESOTA. 

John Murray, Jr Minneapolis April 

P. Hett'ennan Ramsey County . . . May 

Cyrus Aldricb Minneapolis Aug. 

MISSOURI. 

S. Rawle St. Louis Feb. 

Francis W. Ha wie... " Feb. 

(leorge W. Lubke. .. " April 

Nelson C.Gridley... " June 

Joel O.Harper " Dec. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Chas. W. Woodman. Dover May 

NEW JERSEY. 

II. Howard Burgess. South Orange Sept. 

NEVADA. 

James D. Meagher.. Virginia City Jan. 

Samuel H.Wright... • " " " 

K.D. Ferguson " " Feb. 

Fred. A. Tritle " " .... " 

J. A. Van Arsdale... Jacob's Creek " . 

A. W. Russell Dayton Tidr. 

Morris W. Starling., f' '• 

E. E. Eyre " 

.T.J. Dunne Star City " 

John W. Clark Clifton (Reese R.) " 

H. A. Pierce April 

0. M.EvaoR Unionville •' 



31, '69 



8, '69 



4, 


•67 


28, 


•67 


(> 


•67 


12, 


'67 


28, 


'67 


4, 


'67 


6, 


•67 


11, 


'67 


26, 


•67 


28, 


'67 


7 


•67 


11 


•67 



Name. 
Thoraiison Campbell. 

John Mallon 

E. W. Councilman... 
Charles F.Duval.... 

P. M. Johns 

Thomas J. Tennent.. 
Julius E. Garnet.... 

T. O. Wakeman 

Miles A.Mitchell.... 

J. B. Low 

AlpbeusW. Smith. .. 

Thomas Barclay 

Peter N. Ryan 

Edmimd S. Davis.... 
Marcus D. Lnrrowis. 
George W. Kinney.. 
Thomas J. Murphy.. 
William L. Crowell. 

William L. Card 

B.F.Moses 

E. F. Dunn 

William E. Hal...... 

George E. Burnett... 
Baldwin Gardner, Jr. 

David Bush 

George W. Tnrnoy.. 
Samuel H. Parsons.. 
Thomas K. Altnik... 

P.G.Clark 

William B. Little.... 

Heiirv J. I^nbatt 

E.D.Blair 

W. F. Stevens 

William ('. Daggett. 
Chas. J. Leonard, Jr. 

R.J.Merklev 

M. A. Sawtclle 

F. K. Bechtel 

W. H.D. Morrell.... 

Isaac Allen 

J. W. Coleman 

W. A. McClure 

J. H. Warwick 

J. D. Bourn 

W.J. Berry 

Frank Wilder 

E. A. Protoiso 

Cyrus I.ieland 

E. R. S. Murphy.... 
Andrew J. Hutch.... 

Robert Wilson 

Bartholomew Shay.. 

Henry Jacobs 

Rirhard Brown 

H. W. Beatty 

J. W. Dawley 

William C. Meredith. 
George H. Bradshaw. 

C.W. Bilker 

Charles H. Dexter... 
Sidney C. Herbert.. 

W. A. Holcomb 

Joseph E. Molony . . . 
George R. Foardf. . . 

John Hanua, 2U 

L. C. McKeeby 

David H.Hall 

Thomas A. Hale 

A. S. Pease 

Joseph Jacobs 

Oscar Shuck 

J. Blackburn Jones. 
Richard Lambert. . . 

H. L.Blodgett 

W. P. Hutchiugs... 
A.T.Knox...:.... 

Thomas Fitch 

Stephen C. Johnson 



Residence. 
Jjandcr City.. 
Virginia City 

Virginia City.... " 

Hiunboldt " 

Clifton " 

May 

Peavine May 

A'irginirt City Jime 

Gold Hill " 

Clifton " 

Virginia City " 

Virginia City " 

Austin " 

" July 

Clifton'.'.".'.!.'.".'!'. " 

Gold Hill " 

Silver City " 

Virginia City " 

Star City " 

Gold Hill Aug. 



Austin " 

Virginia City " 

Gold Hill " 

Carson City " 

Virginia City.... " 

it t( II 

Austin " 

" Sept. 



Star City Sept. 

AiiBtin " 

** 
Silver City.!..'.".'. " ' 

Austin " 

Aurora " 

Virgi ia " 

.Vudtin " 



Virginia City Nov, 

Austin " 

Austin " 

Washoe ('ity " 

Virginia City " 

Austin '. " 



Clifton " 

Union City Dec. 

Austin...!....... " 



Unionville " 

Austin ,Ian. 

Washington " 

Austin..' " 

Carson City Feb. 

Austin " 

Virginia City " 

Silver City " 

Austin " 

Virginia City •' 

Austin " 



Virginia City. 



Anstin. 



Exp'n of Term. 

.. " 13, ^67 

.. " ai,^67 

.. " 28, ^67 

.. " 29, '67 

29, •O? 

2<), •67 

7,^67 

7, •e? 

1,^67 
2, '67 
2, ^67 
5, ^67 
5, '67 

12, •e? 

10, '67 
10, •o? 
10, ^67 
10, '67 

10, •67 
27, '67 
27, '67 

3, '67 
4, '67 
4, '67 
6, '67 
8, '67 
11, '67 

11, '67 
29,-67 
29, -67 

1,'67 
11, '67 
11, 67 
14, '67 
18, '67 
18, 67 
19, '67 
21, •e? 
24, ^67 
24, '67 
25, '67 

29, '67 
10, '67 
10, -67 
10, '67 
20, '67 

7, '67 
11, '67 
16, '67 
16, '67 

16, -67 

20, •or 

20, '67 
23, '67 

30, •07 

23, •e- 

27, '67 

28, ^67 

4, '67 

18, '67 
19, '67 
30, •O- 

2, '68 

9,^68 

25, '68 

1,'68 

3, '68 

10, '68 

12, '68 

13, •es 

17, 68 
19, '68 

19, '68 

27, •es 

4, '68 
9,^68 

16, •es 

12, '68 



.Oct. 



...-Mar. 






I ■■ 






46 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIUECTORY. 



Exp'n ofTorm. 

Miiy 3, '68 

3, '68 

5, '08 

10, '68 

3, '68 

3, '68 

3, '68 

6, '68 

15, '68 

y6, '68 

26, '68 

27, '68 

3, '69 

17, '69 



.Feb. 



Kame. Renldence. 

A. T. iliiwley DoukIuh Co 

S.J. ItolierUi AiiHliii ' 

8. A.Iliown Aiiruro Nov, 

Henrv M. Moigiin... Virginia Cily " 

Edwurd C'Hiiill " " Dec. 

William E. Hulo....Gold Hill " 

A. C. Knox Vii-jiilnia Cily " 

Samuel I>. King Carnoii Cifv " 

John E. Garrett " "' " 

Andrew J. Holmes.. Austin " 

George W. Turney-.Gold Hill " 

Geoi-ge E. 'rHimiigo.. Virginia City 

6. A. Swasey Iniio City .... 

CliarleH H. V\gb Virginia*Cily 

John W. Urier Silver City Mar. 21, '69 

W.A.M.VanUokkeriiVirginia City " 30, '69 

8. A. Mann Wanhoe City April 1, '69 

HichardL.Thoiiiaa.. Austin " 20, '69 

Thomas llarclay Virginia City Jan. 13, '70 

A. E. Siiannon Austin " 13, '70 

W. E. F. Deal Virginia City Mar. 8, '70 

John H. Scberniier..Au»lin .' April 7, '70 

John 8. Bowkor Wiislioe (Mtv Mav 29, '70 

Sanil.W. Clial>lioc'k..(iold liill..'. Iniio 25, '70 

VVilliani L. Hoover.. Virginia City Julv 6, '70 

W. H. Hiirrall " " "" 19, '70 

Joseph L. King " " Sept. 14, '70 

H.Doyle Genoa " 20, '70 

Joel A. llarvov " Oct. 18, '70 

Thomas Wells.' Carson City " 18, '70 

James M. Meredith.. Aurora. ..." Nov. 26, '70 

W.N. Hall Gold Hill Dec. 5, '70 

NEW YORK. 
Frederick Kapp New York Mar. 27, '67 



Charles Nettleton 

Edward Cliace '• 

And'w M. Hitchcock. " 

Augustin I*. Mange.. " 

Henrv W. Allen.... " 

Edwfn Uissell " 

G. W. I'lvmptou " 

Andrew J. Hoe " 

Joseph li. Nones.... " 

Harris Lowenberg.. " 

Charles II. Earl White Plains.. 



27, '67 

April 11, '67 

•' 15, '67 

April 29, '<i7 

Muy 25, '67 

, " 2.'>, '07 

July 11, '67 

Nov. 2, '67 

" 23, '07 

" 27, '67 

Dec. U, '67 



William II. IJuldwin.Now York " 19, '67 



8. U. Farnham " 

Henry C. lianke " 

A. F' Cushmnn... .. " 

H. W. Colver " 

Frederick J. King... " 

Joseph C. Levi " 

Moses I/. McCliiy... " 

Lafa\. . G<> 'i ' " 

Allen itlcKic; ..c... 

E. B.Merrill " 

Samuel L. Kennedy.. " 

F. A. Wilcox " 

Frederick F. Conncll. " 

John Bis^<ell " 

Charles E. Patterson. " 

Julius Silversmith... '* 

Meyer S. Isaacs " 

Augustus I. Brown.. ■* 

William I). Powell.. " 

William N. Denman. " 

Amos 6. Hull •' 

William H. Field.... " 

Josiah Porter " 

JohnK. Hackett.... " 

Edmund Ketcbum... " 

O. P. C. Billings " 

G.J.Turner " 

Christian Von Hesee. " 

Henrv It. De Witt... " 

Clinton liice " 

J. O.Hyer " 



.Feb. 4, -68 

" " 20, '68 

" " 20, '68 

" " 20, 'ti8 

" Mar. 1,'68 

" " 22, '68 

" " 22, '68 

" May 10, '68 

" 16, '(>8 

" " 16, '68 

" " 21, '68 

•' Juno 3, '«M 

" " 3, '68 

" " 22, '68 

" July 21, '08 

" " 22, '03 

" " 23, '08 

" Oct. 12, '68 

" " 27, '68 

" Nov. 21, 'as 

" Dec. 6, '68 

" " 31, '68 

" Jan. 16, '69 

" " 16, '69 

" " 16, '69 

" " 21, '69 

" Feb. 17, '69 

" Mar. 11, '69 

" " 11, '69 

" May 4, '.69 

" " 31, '69 



Name. 
Fislier A. Baker. — 
Edwin F. Corey, Jr. 

liowis Hurst 

F. 8. Winchester 

John Hoyt 

Aug. B. Sage 

Frederick Bull 

William L. Gardner. 

Martin H.Lutt' 

Clianning G. Fenner. 
William H. Meeks.. 
•lohn Whipple, Jr... 

li. W.SloHt 

George P. Johncon.. 
J. Spencer Smith.... 
Alexander Ostander. 

John Butcher 

Aiidred Anderson, Jr. 

Horatio C. King 

Charles Stebbins, Jr.. 
George W. Colles... 
Sand. C. Bradsliaw.. 
John Livingston.... 

A.A.Aiken 

'I'lionius Sadler 

Fred. li. Anderson.. 

Kobcrt Madav 

Andi-cw J. ifenning. 

Samuel Swan 

F. Alarkoc Bache 

Gordon L. Ford 

Frank Full.'r 

Michael Pliillips 

A. J. Bcriiiin 

JohnWarren Lawton, 

James C. Clovd 

William Funiiss 

C. 11.8. Williams, Jr. 



Residence. Exp'n of Term. 

New York June 15, '69 

" " 1.5, '09 

" " " 15, '69 

" " " 21, '69 

" " Julv 20, '69 

" " Sept. 8,-69 

" " " 27, '69 

" " " 27, '69 

" " " 30, '69 

" " Oct. 7, '69 

" " " 23, '69 

" " " 23, '69 

" " Nov. 28. '69 

" " " 28, '69 

" " Jan. 20, '70 

" " Feb. 8, '70 

" " " 13, '70 

" " " l.\ '70 

" " " 27, '70 

Cazenoviu " 27, '70 

New York Mar. 8, '70 

" " April 20, '70 

" " MMy2St, '70 

" " June 13, '70 

" " 13, '70 

" '• 15, '70 

" " " 15, '70 

•' " " 25, '70 

" " " 25, '70 

" " July 6, '70 

Brooklvn Aui{. 15, '70 

New York '•' 15, '70 

" " 15, '70 

" " 25, '70 

, " " Sept. 10, '70 

" " Nov. 14, '70 

" " " 24, '70 

" " Dec. 5, '70 



NOUTH CAROLINA. 
A.G. Breni/.er Greensboro Feb. 27, '70 

OHIO. 

Alex. II. MGufley... Cincinnati July 10, '67 

John A. Lynch " Nov. 4, '69 

Jas. E. Campbell Hamilton Iune21, '69 

Saml.S. Carpenter... Cincinnati ;.Mav 29, '70 

ReubenTyler " Sept.20,'70 

OREGON. 

W. Lair Hill Portland Mar. 4, '67 

C. II. Larrabee " Jan. 6, '(59 

I>. W. Williams .... " Sept. 8, '69 

Hamilton Boyd " Feb. 8, '70 

Setli R. llauiuier.. ..Salem Nov. 4, '69 



PENNSYLVANIA. 



Ed w.Wickcrsham. . . 

Jolin H. Frick 

Alister M. Grant.. .. 
Bernard Sharkey.. .. 
John Mitchell..'.... 
Theodore D. Rand. . . 

Joshua Speriiig 

John McClarren 

Robert Arthurs 

Wui. V^. Archer 

Chas. H.T. Collis... 
Belli. F. Blood 

0. W. A. Hathwell 

John O'Neill 

Henry U. Hirst 

Samuel L. Taylor... 
Warner Jackson.. .. 

1. H.T.Jackson 

Samuel B. Huey.... 
Edw. Shippen 



Philadelphia Jan. 28, 

Julv 8, 

" Nov. 28, 

Mav 25, 

Mai. 22, 

" Oct. 12, 

" Mar. 21, 

Pittsburg April 29, 

" May 15, 

PhiladeUibiu Aug. 18, 

Sept. 8, 

" " 30, 

" Nov. 14, 

Titnsville " 27, 

Philadelphia Feb. 9, 

" " 8, 

" June 20, 

" July 19, 

" Ang. 15, 

Sept. 20, 



CALIFORNIA, 



COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS. 



47 



Name. Itcalilcnce. Exp'n ofTenn. 

Win. H. Martin Pliiliidelpliiu Oct. 26,70 

Ourdou 8. Uerry Tilusville Nov. 28, 70 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Henry Mmtin Vrovidencei Feb. 27,70 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
Nathaniel Levun.. ..South Curulinu Mar. 7,70 

TKNNESSKE. 
. Memphis May 29,70 

TEXAS. 
.Houetou April 



C. Canning Smith 
Christopher Dart 



7,70 



VIRGINIA. 

John Johns, Jr Richmond Deo. 9, '69 

D. H. I^iulon " Feb. 8,70 

ThoB. W.Upshur.... " " 12,70 

Ednar M.Garnelt... " Aug. 15, 70 

J. W. Jenkins Winchester Nov. 28, 70 

WISCONSIN. 

Fr'ncis BIoodf,'ood...Mil\vaiikie April 10, '60 

James Chupmau La I'oint May 31, '09 



DISTRICT OF COLUMUIA. 



John F. Calliin Wusliiugton . 

H. C. SpaldiiiK 

Frederick Kooucs... " 

John S. Hullinsliead.. " 

William Lilley 

Joseph T. R.lMaut.. 



.Jan. 19, -69 
.April 10, '69 
.Feb. 20, '70 
.April 20, '70 
.Aug. l.'i, '70 
.Sept. 29, '70 



ARIZONA TERRITORY. 

Frank H. Skinner July 2, '67 

M. D. Fuirchild " 8, '07 

C.W.C.Rowell " 27, '67 

George G. Webster Aug. 6, '67 

Chan. H. IJrinlcy....La I'az " 11, '67 

Frederick A. Wilder Oct. 20, 67 

James Dunlevv La Pu/. Jan. 12, '68 

Wm. Hutterrn;ld....(;a8tle Dome City. " 25, '68 

Charles O. Joluison . . La Pa/. '. . Mar. 12, "68 

Edward Carlson Fort Mijuvi; April 211, '68 

J. Roland llavVs El Dorado Canon Ma v 3, "68 

William I. IliMry....Preacott Jaii. 6, '69 



IDAHO TERRITORY. 



Name. 
Lewis II. Roliie.... 
William A. Duel... 

8. W. Corey 

Charles F.lllake.... 

I.T. Brown 

Wm. Wilnierding... 

John C. Henley 

Jerome U. Knight... 

A. Raphael... J 

Thomas M. Pomoroy. 

W. R. Keithley 

O. 8. Tihbits 

James Lyman 

Elansen'S. Pen well'. 
Louis Lobenstein . . . . 



Residence. Exp'n of Term. 

UannackCity Feb. 18, '68 

Boise City Mar. 14, '68 

" 16,'68 

Idaho Citv " 18, '68 

BannackCity " 22, '68 

" April 2'J, '68 

Idaho City July 23, '68 

Oct. 3,'68 

Idaho City Jan. 19, '69 

Lewiston Mar. 1,'69 

Idaho City " 6, '69 

" 11, '69 

Owyhee Dec. 8, '69 

Soda Springs April.23, '70 

Ruby City Nov. 14, '70 



MONTANA TERRITORY. 

James Thompson.... Virginia City Mar. 8, '70 

J. B.Johnson Black loot Cit v.... May 3, '70 

Otto Geeenbood Helena Oct. 39,70 

TERRITORY OF NEW MEXICO. 

Mahlon D. Fairchild.New Mexico Mar. 5,'fi7 

Frederick G. Fitch. .La Paz April 1,'67 

C. H. Brinley " 7, '67 

Theodore 8. Greiner.Santft Fe July 10, '67 

John Walt " " 27, '68 

Sarril Ellison " Sept. 27, '68 

William W. Beman..Me8illa June 6, '69 

UTAH TERRITORY. 

Patrick Lynch Gt. Salt Lake City.Mar. 22, '68 

Joseph A. Thompson. " " Nov. 1,'63 

Willmm Clayton.... " " July 6, '70 

WASllING'rON TERRITORY. 

H. Parker Walla Walla Feb. 28, '69 

H.E.Johnson " " May 29, '69 

T. P. Johnson " " July 6, '70 

KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRE 
LAND. 

John Copeland Victoria, V. I May 28, '68 

John H. Grain Loudon Dec. 8, '69 

William Grain " " 8, '69 

REPUBLIC OF MEXICO. 
W. P. Jones Sinaloa Mar.31,'68 



STATE APPOINTEES— MISCELLANEOUS. 



:: -0. 

J. D. \i iiitney 

Seth H. Wetherbce 

B. B.Thayer 

Robert Cashing 

Michael Keinn'y... 
ilacob Deeth...". ... 

Lonis R. Lull 

8. M. Mouser 

N. Pierce 

H. S. Brown 

W. T. Thompson... 
George 8. Porter. . . 

S. P.Wells 

John Martin 

R.F. Parks 



State { icologist 

Commissioner of Emigration 

Stale Assayer 

State Ganger 

Ini-pector Gas Meters 

Inspector of Stamps 

Inspector of Stamps 

Vaccine Agent 

Pilot Examiner 

Pilot Examiner 

Pilot Examiner 

Port Warden 

Port Warden , 

Port Warden 

Port Warden 





TlTlll 




!!■ .ililcnce. 


i:\|>lre8. 


Sal:'.-v. 








San Francisco. 


At will. 


11,500 


San Francisco. 


ii 


Fees. 


San Francisco. 


1868 


11 


San Francisco. 


It 


li 


San Fnuicieco. 


It 


li 


San Francisco. 


• ( 


$3,000 


San Francisco. 


li 


u 


San Francisco. 


At will. 


Fees. 


San Francisco 


tt 


11 


San Francisco. 


14 


It 


San Francisco. 


t( 


ii 


San Francisco. 


It 


ti 


San Francisco. 


(t 


<t 


San Francisco. 


It 


It 


San Francisco. 


it 


II 



LOCATING AGENTS. 



liato ut cumm'n. 

April 25, 1861— G. W^ Colby, Marvsville Dist. Fees. 
JuIt 14, 1858— Johns. Murray. Humboldt " Fces< 
Jan'y 11, 1864— John C. Rcid, Stockton '• Fees. 



I iJBU li iJumj.i'ii. 

April 9, 1H()3— Stanley Willey, Visalia Dist. ..Fees. 
Oct. 11, 1858 — Lcander Ransom, San Francisco 

District Fees. 



48 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



INSANE ASYLUM, STOCKTON. 

AnRtin Sperry PrcRiHont no toinp'n. I William M. Bnggn.. Director no comp'ii. 

T. R. Anthony Vico PreHident no coinp'n. L. E. Lyons Treun'ramloxolHcioSco. • 500 

A. J. Spencer Director no conip'n. Q. A. Sfiiirlleff UoBiilent I'liyHiciiiu S/iOO 

Nowton llootli " noc'oMip'n. I Abii Clurk AoHiHtant " 2,500 

N.D.Pimert " no coni|i'ii. j rjorenzo Hubbard. ..Modii'ul ViBJtor no conip'n. 

£.8. Uolden " no coinp'n. I U. M. Lunipaou " '* uocomp'n. 



STATE PRISON. SAN QUENTIN. 



T. N. Maciiin, Lieut. Governor and ex ofHcio 

Warden |:»,C00 

J. J. Gyeen Deputy Warden 2,400 



JimicH Towlo Ciiptain of flnurd $1,.500 

Cbarieg W. Oordon.Clorlj 1 ,200 

Cluiries Unrrelt — Physician 1,800 



MILITARY DEPARTMENT OK THE STATE. 

In reorgani/.lnKtbo military of the State under the hiw of IHOli, the trnopH mngtored into the service, ae 
the National Gutird, conuigt of one Division, which ig divided into gix Brigades. 

OrFiCEns—OnNEnAi, Staff. 

Governor K. F. Low Commander-in-Chief. 

Stf^lfofthe CommnndcriH-Chief.—lMff. Gen. Geo. 8. Evans, Adjutant General and Chief of Staff; Col. 
J. B. Fiisbie, Chief Engineer; Col. S. Pattce, Payninnter; Col. J. M. MrNully, Surgeon: W. H. L. 
Barnes, Judge Advocate; Lieut. Cols. William Harney, T. It. Mosely, William' B. Hyde, Thomas W. 
Knox, Stove Venard, Aids-de-Camp. 

M^. Gen. L. H. Allen, Commanding National Guard, Cnl. 
Staff.— hient. Col. S. C. Ellis, Assistant Adjutant (Jeneral ; Lieut. Col. A. W. Von Schmidt, Engine 
Lieut. Col. D. Norcross, Paymaster; Lieut. Col. J. H. Steams, (Juarlermaster ; Lieut. Col!/ 
Houston, CommiHsaiT; Lieut. Col. George Hewston, Surgeon; Lieut. Col. Robert Simson.Ordi 
OfHcer; Lieut. Col. J. W. lirumagim, Judge Advocate ; Majors Theodore A. Mudge, Jumos L. U 
Samuel P. Middleton, Aids-de-Cauip. 



Phineas Banning - . Brigadier General . . 1st Briunde. 
John Ilewston, Jr. . " •' ..2d Brigade. 

W. A. Davies " " ..3d Brigade. 



Josiah Howell. . .Brigadier General. .4th Brigade. 

John Hidwell " " . .5th iirigade. 

" " .. Oth Brigade. 



AREA AND LANDS OF THE STATE. 

The State of California extends from latitnde 32"^ 20' south to -13^ north, is seven hundred miles long, 
with an avernge width of two hundred and twenty miles, making an aggregate area, including all interior 
lakes, bays, and precipitous mountains, of l.'i4,llti square miles, or 9S,G34,2'I0 acres. Of this amount it 
is estimated that ()."),onO,000 are adapted to agriculture, 15,000,000 to grazing purposes, and 4,600,000 are 
swamp and overflowed lands. The greater portion of the latter is capable of reclamation, and is, to a 
great extent, each year being added to the cidtivatcd lands of the State. The area of the lakes, bays, and 
mountains is about 14,000,000 acres. Congress luis made the following grants of land to the State : 

For Common School purposes — the sixteenth and fhirty-si.vtli sections in each township, 

or lands in lieu thereof, amounting to 5,479,680 acres. 

For Internal Imi)rovement8 (changed to schools) : 500,000 " 

Fcra Seminary of Learning 46,080 " 

For an Agricultural College 150,000 " 

Total for Educational Purposes 6,175,760 " 

Also, for Public Buildings 6,400 " 

Besides about 4,600,000 acres of swamp and overflowed lands. 

Of the 65,000,000 acres of agricultural land, there were returned by the County Assessors, for 
the year 1865, as under fence, 4,055,690 acres, and under cultivation 1,504,680 acres. It will thns be 
seen that there is but six per cent, of the agricultural lund of the State under fence, and little over two and 
one-half per cent, under cultivation. The returns for 1866 will increase these estimates about fifteen per 
cent. 



RES0UUCE8 — AQRICDLTURB. 



49 



RESOURCES— AORICULTUllE. 

With a moit Koniul climuto, and a Roil nniiurpuiiiod for fertility, nowUero under ttio auu is tl)o lubor of 
the agriculturitt more uniply repaid tlian in tlio region compriaod within tlie lioutidiirioH of tlie State of 
California; and the wondorfut vcgctublu productions of this region are H8 widely colebnitud ua the nmr- 
veloiM development of her niincritl woiiltb, which followed the diHcovcry of the goltl in her inountaini. 
Every quality of soil, as well no varied degrees of temperature, favorable to u varied vugetablu growth, 
is encompaated Avilhin licr borders. In this mild region, both oniinul uiul vegetable life flourish to a 
degree unknown In more rigorous and less favorable latitudes. All the ncrcsiiurics of life, and ahnost all 
the luxuries, are produced upon tho soil, and the varied operations of the busbandaian can be successfully 
carried on with but little interruption. While the grape, tho tig, tho orange, the olive and pomegran- 
ate flourish here as luxuriantly as on the shores of the Mediterranean, those great Htaples which supply 
homo consumption, and enter largely into tho commerce of the world, wheat and the other cereals, flax, 
hemp, cotton, tobacco, with every variety of vegetable, can be produced from tho soil. 

TABLE 

Exhibiting the Number of Acres of Land Inclosed and under Cultivation in California, during the 
year 1805, with the umouut of Wheat, Durlvy, and Oats, raised thereon. 



COUNiv. 



Alameda 

Alpine 

Amador 

Hutto 

Calaveras 

Colusa 

Contnk Coetu 

Del Norte 

El Dorado 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Kern 

Klamath 

littke 

Ijassen 

Los Angeles 

Marin 

Mariposa 

Mendocino 

Merced 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napa 

Nevada 

Placer , 

IMumas 

Sucramento 

San Uernardino . . 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

San iJoaquiu — 
San Luis Obiiipo . 

San Mateo 

Sauta Itarbara . . 

Sauta Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus , 

Sutter , 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare , 

Tuolumne , 

Yolo 

Yuba 



No. Acrvs 
Incluscd. 



108,!».| 
4,UUU 

3;»,uoo 

47,!)78 
10,7'J4 
7y,6i>7 

6,aai 

110,8(>i2 

11,874 

a8,015 

1,000 

:i,4U!t 

14,815 
3,500 
6li,0viG 
150,018 
18,:JU7 
84,000 

7a,7a5 

3,.'i85 
105,350 
90,000 
5'.i,800 
5i>,ld5 
38,000 

ao!t,;77 

37,000 
5,000 

13,000 
243,848 

22,iaG 
130,000 

.16,300 
513,t>ll 

80,.%6 

58,750 

14,300 

40,167 
400,000 
ai6,095 

75,000 
113,346 

70,715 
8,009 
8,005 

24,785 
126,833 
138,225 



Totals 4,055,690 1,504,680 



No. Acrvs 

under 
CiilUvu'ii 



78,797 
400 
14,000 
61,775 
23,510 

5,031 
70,459 

2,892 
16,000 

2,978 

11,548 

300 

806 

1,575 

4,662 

1,1)50 
14,100 
20,921 

4,652 
15,000 
15,3;}5 
862 
23,240 
38,059 
21,288 
20,121 

3,743 

104,320 

25,tX)0 

3,300 

1,779 
117,169 

2,460 
60,000 

7,260 

232,007 

18,005 

23,.W0 

14,831 

.24,510 

89,567 

40,000 

14,016 

15,974 

2,363 

2,240 

6,328 

.')7,132 

36,815 



Whrat. 

Auri'H. Himlicls. 



40,051 

12 

2,000 

19,975 

300 

1,243 

28,615 

915 

3,275 

478 

905 

22 

140 

457 

2,027 

500 

650 

3,2<)0 

737 

6,500 

2,895 

190 

3,283 

33,156 

525 

3,078 

523 

10,142 

1,250 

240 



47,558 

573 

16,000 

175 

93,000 

6,179 

7,000 

50 

3,391 

55,500 

30,465 

10,000 

10,664 

7,832 

769 

1,165 

475 

20,232 

3,100 



1,010,944 

210 

40,000 

511,170 

6,000 

26,680 

5.'>0,854 

i4.'>?: 

60,000 

4,785 

29,557 

675 

4,307 

3,(i89 

50,675 

12,500 

13,000 

85,578 

14,740 

120,000 

52,110 

3,800 

98.51 1 

773,640 

10,500 

27,702 

12,4 8 

li)2,jjfi 

25,000 

3,330 



1,096,276 

17,190 

320,000 

4,300 

2,790,000 

190,927 

105,000 

.582 

65,399 

1,640,000 

674,053 

80,000 

213,375 

147,478 

10,175 

' 13,232 

8,800 

580,778 

62,000 



481,472 11,579,127 



Hari.kt. 



Acrpa. 



24,516 

;!; iM) 

5;i.<i7 

1 ,2i)6 

2,250 

37,451 

102 

1,50)1 

726 

250 

98 

466 



1,113 

1,000 
5,000 
1,510 
2,831 
2,000 
9,736 
333 
18,986 
3,762 



4,707 

22 

5;J,771 

5,000 

3.'i8 

123 

65,620 

243 

3,61)0 

220 

90,000 

5,093 

7,. 500 

7*10 

1,085 

40,))00 

12,169 

14,000 

26,436 

8,068 

1,012 

1,415 

378 

26,103 

18,000 



KualicU, 



,025,990 

2,500 

95,000 

698,227 

40,580 

109,440 

496,890 

1,910 

40,000 

13,440 

9,.5ti9 

3,780 

18,740 



44,420 
30,(M)0 

150,000 
40,812 
56,620 
50,000 

214,190 
8,215 

728,,'j'.i,' 

116,622 



58,8;{8 

.■>r>o 
i,6;4,:{23 

100,000 

6,750 

1,537 

1,706,120 

10,9.15 

108,000 

6,500 

3,400,000 

237,851 

192,500 

24,980 

23,461 

980,000 

a.52,124 

200.000 

756,570 

153,965 

1,799 

9,192 

8,333 

919,413 

633,500 



658,916 15,462,783 77,776 2,078,627 



0.\T». 
Acres. UuKlicli. 



3,880 

50 

600 

05 



114 

2,927 

607 

3,187 



2,872 
10 



117 

398 
100 

8,477 

323 

3,000 



92 
200 
857 



859 

1,862 

3,631 

100 

1 

421 

44 



8,000 

60 

14,000 

1,564 

1,500 

275 

2,603 

500 

7,171 



284 

25 

99 

60 

300 

141 

6,400 



175,500 

1,500 

12,000 

3,000 



2,600 
98,018 

8,177 
66,776 



119,533 
492 



2,360 

24,880 

3,000 

410,462 

6,460 

100,000 



5,620 

6,000 

29,995 



14,603 

71,361 

62,937 

2,000 

15 

1,421 

1,315 



240,000 

1,600 

70,000 

50,680 

4,000 

8,387 

70,668 

2,650 

194,600 



6,260 
1,080 
2,635 
600 
1,675 
2,247 
192,000 



m 

1 ^ 



H.; 



M 



60 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



The precfdinjr exhibit for 18G5 are the -eturnB collected, with few exceptions, by tlie County AsBeHSoru 
during their olliciul duties fertile yciiv 1H66. ^utheyenrlyasseBBment is levied between the first of March 
and the first of August of each year, the statistics of the crop collected by the Assessors refer to the year 
preceding. When it has been found necessary 'r* seek other channels of information, the most reliable 
have been applied to, and the greatest care exercised to use such Cdtimates only as would approximate to 
the actual amount raised. 



"Wheat. — The amount of land in cultivation in 
1865 was 48) ,472 acres, producing 1 1 ,i)79,l27 bushels, 
anaveruge of over24 bushels pei-acre. Tlie county of 
Humboldt averaged 'M bushels, the counties of Mon- 
terey, Sautu Clara, and Santa Cruz averaged 30, 
Alameda and Butte >'5, and Sonoma 18. The county 
of Santa Clura is the heaviest wheat growing county 
in the State : number of acres, 93,000, producing 
2,790,000 bushels. These figures are an improvement 
ou those for the year 1858 of 1!)J bushels per acre, 
the latest complete returns heretofore published. 
" It is now a well ascertained fact, established by 
8e"3ral years' experience, that California stands 
without a rival in respect to her capacity for produc- 
ing wheat and other small grains. She proQuces it 
in larger quantities to the acre, of belter quality, 
with more certainty and with leas labor than any 
other country in the known world." Instances are 
frequent of particular crops averaging forty and fifty 
bushels to the acre. 

Baulky. — The number of acres in cultivation in 
1865 was 558,911), producing 15,102,783 bushels, an 
average of nearly 27 J bushels per acre. The county 
of Colusa produced an avtrage of 48 bushels, Santa 
Cruz 4fi, Alameda 41, and So ' 'a Clara 37 bushels to 
the acre. Santa Clara is the heaviest barley grow- 
ing county in the State : number of acres, 90,001), 
producnig 3,1110,000 bushels. The soil of California 
IS admirably adapted to the cultivution of this cereal. 
In many portions of the Sacramento and other val- 
ley lauds of the State, the product will average 
seventy-five bushels to the acre, and in the red lands of 
the mountain districts, the yield is correspondingly 
large. As many as half a dozen successive annual 
crops are harvested from one sowing, the volunteer 
crop of the seco!;;' seasi^r. jitoducing a greater yield 
than that of the preceding year. In one instance, in 
the Santa Clura Valley, the fifth crop from a field of 
fifty acres averaged a yield of forty -two bushels to 
the acre. 

Oats. — The number of acres in cnltivation in 
18li5 was 77,776, producing 2,078,627 bushels, an 
average of 2(JJ bushels per acre. The county of 
Lake yielded an average of 62 bushels, Butte 46, 
and Alameda 45 bushels per acre. Although this 
product turn.-) out well in most instances, from the 
superiority of the yield of wheat and barley, aiul the 
greater demand for these cereals, there is not that at- 
tention devoted to its culture which is given to it in 
the agricultural districts of the Atlantiu States. 

Indian Coun. — The returns from forty-one coun- 
ties give the crop of 181)5 as follows: acr^) under 
cultivation, 31,295, producing 1,003,914 tjshels; av- 
erage, 32 4-5 bushels per acre. Los Angeles County 
produces 180,000; San Luis Obispo County, 80,00(5, 
and Sonoma County, 145,135 bushels ; each aver- 
aging about 40 bushels per acre. Volo County re- 
turns 82,575 bushels, averaging 45, and Sutter, 40,160 
bushels, averaging 56 bushels to the ace. 



* For tlio purpose of comnnrlng the prolific character of 
tlio Holl of this .Slate wltli tfint of Now York, wc lnvc com- 
piled IVom llie census of IHSS, the fullowinK Interesting 
statpmciil of till! pri)(liR'tli)n« of that Suite: Wheat— acres 
culllvateil,1)«6,4i47; iiui,hi-li',ti,U!>J,4U2; uveraKC, 11'^ bushels. 
Uarley— ueri'S, ^I'i.tiUH; hushels, 3,S«»,540; averaKe, 1«H 
buihcls. Uats, iiventKe 20^ liushels; Kye, lOH hiishels: 
Buckwheat, S^ hushels; Corn, 'il bushels; I'otatoes, 7v 
bushels; I'eaa and lleuns, lA l)UBhels per acre, each. 



■ Ryb and Buckwhkat. — The returns from thirty 
counties give the crop of rye of 1865 as follows': 
acres, .1686, yielding 33,411 bushels, an average of 
about 20 busliels per acre. Butte County returns 
200 acres, yielding 8,000 bushels, and Yolo County, 
75 acres, 3,000 bushels, each averaging 4U bushels 
per acre. The crop of buckwheat for the entire 
State is estimated at 1,0U0 acres, yielding 24,000 bash- 
els, an average of 24 bushels to the acre. 

Peas. — Returns from twenty-six counties are as 
follows : acres under cultivation, 2,998, producing 
89,232 bushels, an average of nearly 30 bushels to 
the acre. The yield of Ilumboldt County is 33,890 
bushels, an average of over 40 bushels per acre ; and 
Sacramento County, 2,136 bushels, uveruging over 
50 bushels per acre. 

Beans. — The returns of the crop of 1865 are: 
acres under cultivation, 5,622, producing 150,1 10 bush- 
els, ail average rf 26J bushels to the acre. San Luis 
Obispo County produces 70,000 bushels, an average 
of 3j bushels per acre ; and Yuba County, ii,MO 
bushels, at an average of 50 bushels per acre. 

PoTATOE.s. — Returns of the crop for 1805 are as 
follows: under cultivation in forty couuties, 32,624 
acre), producing 1,372,141 bushels, an average of 42 
bushels per acre. Ilumboldt County produces a crop 
of 205,965 bushels, an average of 218 bushels to the 
'.icre ; Marin, 200,000 bushels, an average of lOU 
bushels ; Sacramento, 69,000 bushels, 150 bushels to 
the acre, and Sonoma, 235,279, au average of 62 
bushels per acre. { 

SwEET Potatoes. — Returns from eighteen coun- 
ties for the crop of 1865 are as follows : acres under I 
cultivation, 812, producing 90,475 bushels, an av- ! 
erage of 111 per acre. Merced County returns ' 
lO.oOO bushels, averaging nearly 300 bushels per ! 
acre ; and San Joaquin, 9,443, an average of 20U 
bushels to the acre. 

Hat. — Returns from forty-four counties of the 
crop of 18()5, give the nnmber of tons at 375,893, at 
an average of 1 1-7 tons to the acre. Several of the i 
counties average over two tons per acre, and 12 j 
coimties average 1 1 tons per acre. The crop of the : 
entire State is estimated at 5110,000 tons. j 

Honey Uee.— I'he experiments to introduce the 
honey bee into the State have met with the most 
complete success. The number of hives returned ' 
for 1865 is about 27,000, yielding about 300,000 j 
pounds of honey annually. i 

. Butter and Cheese.— The returns from forty- j 
I two counties for 1865, exhibit a production of nearly 
I 2,250,000 pounds of butter. The largest yield iu it i 
single county is in Marin, which produced 932,427 
pounds. Saciuiuento produced 331,120 pounds, and i 
Sonoma County 203,794 pounds. It is estimated 
that the yield of the entire State will aggregate | 
3,000,000 pounds. Returns from twenty-seven coun- 
ties show a productionof 1,601,782 pounds of cheese.; 
Marin County yielded 523,000 pounds; Santa Clam I 
County, 500,000 pounds; and Sautu Cruz, 231,0U(J 
pounds. 

VEOETAnt.RS.— (t is estimated that there are ii! 
this State 40,000 at res devoted to the prodactiou o(|L 



,.M-' 



8BeB8f>rij 
f March 
ibe year | 
reliable 
imate to 



(in thirty I 
follow B : 
^eruge of I 
f returns 
) County, 
buehelB 
,lie entire | 
.(•OObush- 



ieg are as 
producing 
bushels to 
y is 33,890 
•icre ; and 
iiging over ] 



• 1865 are: 
)0,110buah- 
. San Luis 
an average 
unty, a,&00 I 
acre. 

1865 are as 
»tieB,3a,624 

^•eruge of i* 
jducesacrop 
,ushel8 to the 
ivage of 100 
\M bushels to | 
■erage of O'-i i 

1 

gbteen conn- 
acres under 1 

be\s, an av- 1 

unty returns | 
bushels peri 

erage of ^00 i 



lUities of the I 
rtt 375,893, at , 
Several of the i I 
acre, and l-i 
crop of the j 



introduce the 
Lvith the most 
lives retumeil 
about 300,000 1 

•ns from forty- 1 
ction of nearly 
rest yield in a | 
Iduced 932,4.i7', 
iO pounds, anil 
It is estimated 
will aggregate 
ity-seven coun- i 
lunds of cheese, j 
g: Santa Claruj 
btM, 'J3l,0UJ 



»t there are «| 
prodactiou oi;l 



RESOURCES — AGRICUL'i'fJRB 



51 



vegetables, of which almost every variety is pro- ] 
duced in the greatest abundance. As an evidence ' 
of the capacity and character of the soil, we append I 
the following'deseription of prodncts exhibited at a , 
recent St4(te Agricultural Fair : 

" Two pumpkins from Sacramento, weighing two 
hundred and ten and two hundred and forty pounds ; 
a beet grown by Col. Hall, of Sacramento^ City, 
weighing seventy-three pounds; a carrot, weighing 
ten pounds, measuring one foot and eight inches in 
circiimference and thiee feet and three inches in 
length— there were fitly in the same bed of equal 
size, the seeds were sown on June 2Jth and the car- 
rots dug September 20th ; a tomato, Beventeen inches 
in circumference; a squash weighing one hundred 
and forty one pounds ; an onion, weiglnng two po".nds 
and fifteen ounces, and measuring twenty-two inches 
in circumference ; a cornstalk twenty-one feet and 
nine inches in height ; water melons from near Ne- 
vada — twenty-seven gave an aggregate of five hund- 
red and fifty pounds ; a sweet potato from San Jos^, 
weighing eleven pounds and two ounces; an Irish 
potato, from Uodega, weigliing seven and a quarter 
pounds ; a bunch of petiitoes of the Oregon red 
variety, from a single eye, weighing ten pounds, 
grown at the forks of the Turnback CreeK, near 
sonora ; grapea — several bunches, weighing over 
four pounds each ; peas, second crop, fine ana good, 
from Los Angeles ; a citron lemon, sixteen and a half 
by eigliteen and three-quartets inches in circumfer- 
ence, weighing two poundB and fourteen outices, from 
IjOS Atiyeles ; tig tree — a slip one foot in length and 
five-eighths of aii iiicli in tliiekneBs, w.is planted April 
1, and In the month of iSeiiteniber following, was 
eleven feet and six inrhes high, and nine and a 
quarter inches in circumference at the base, with a 
corresponding growth -ji branches ; peach trees, in 
twenty-eight months from the planting of the seed, 
bore iVuit < or nine inches in circumference, and 
weigliing fi'nn seven to eight and a half ounces; 
there were thirty-four of these large peaches on one 
tree ; an apple, measuring fifteen and one-third inches 
each way, weighing twenty-three oum.'es, grown in 
the Yamhill Orchard." 

Cotton. — Within the past few years, during the 
time which this great staple commanded so large a 
price, owing to the circiiniBtances of the case, the 
culture of cotton attracted much attention from the 
agricnltiu'ists of this State. In the southern portion 
of California, where the soil and climate are i)ecu- 
liarly favorable, and whci'e the facilities for irrigation 
are abundant, the experiment has been tried upon an 
extended scale, and found to be a thorough success. 
The fii-st attempt to cultivate this staple to any con- 
siderable extent here wu- made by Alatthew Keller, 
of Los Angeles, to whom was awariled the premium 
of $3,0U0 offered by the State for the first cotton 
plantation. During the last season, increased crops 
were grown in Los Angeles, Tulare, and Fresno 
counties. That in those sections of the State, and, 
in fact, along the whole southern coast, this wonid 
prove a highly remunerative crop, is a fact estab- 
lished beyond question or doubt. 

Tobacco.— Although the soil and climate of this 
region appears to be well adapted to the culture of 
tobacco, and the manufacture if this article in San 
Francisco during the past vear amounted to consid- 
erably over a niillion of dollars, there has not been 
that attention devoted to the matter that the subject 
deserves. Limited quantities only have been raised in 
Sacramento, Contra Costa, IIuml>oldt, Sonoma, San 
Joaquin, San Mateo, Shasta, Trinit;tr, Los Angeles, 
and other counties, but the raw materi'-il manufacturea 
here i'j almost entirely imported from abroad. Among 
the liberal premiums' ottered by this State in 18()3, for 
the encounigemcnt of the cultivation of this staple, 
but one, that of $300 offered for the first one hund- 



red bales, which crop was produced by Thomas Ed- 
wards, of Sacramento, has been taken. The Cali- 
fornia leaf produces a superior article of smokinv 
tobacco, but there is little of it manufactured at 
present for chewing. 

Rice. — Notwithstanding the abundant field offered 
by the iinmense and unsui'puseably fertile tracts of 
swamp, overflowed, and tule lauds of the State for 
the successful cultivation of rice in California, where 
an iinmense Asiatic population creates such a heavy 
demand for this article, nothing has yet beeu done 
in the matter. Tlie time, however, must sooner or 
latter arrive w hen this will form one of the staple 
products of this portion of the Pacific. 

Sugar Cane. — Although the experiment of cul- 
tivating sugar cane has ueen tried in some of the 
southern counties of California and found to succeed, 
yet there has never been a sufticieiit quantity raised 
to warrant any atteuipt at its manufacture except in 
limited quantities. Considerable quantities of the 
sorghum, or Chinese sugar cane, are produced in 
various portions of the State, from which a fair 
article ot syrup and molasses is mauufactured. 

Hops. — The soil and climate of California proving 
most propitious for the cultivation, ripening and cur- 
ing of the hop, the growth of this crop has, during 
the past few years, assumed a considerable degree of 
importance among the staple productB of the State. 
The absence in the climate here, during the growing 
season, of that excess of moisture wliich in other 
hop growing localities produces the mildew which 
ruins the crop, is one great advantage possessed by 
the grower here. The damage caiiBed the article 
by a long sea voyage, and its lapid deterioration by 
a^e, are also largely in favor of the home grown ar- 
ticle. The ciop raised last season was large, aver- 
aging about 6(J0 pounds per acre. The prices ranged 
from 70 to 87 cents per pound. 

Silk Culture.— To Mr. L. Pievost, of San Jos6, 
belongs the credit of being the picmeer in this im- 
portant department in California. Upon the arrival 
of that gentleman in this State, in 1849, he was 
attracted to the facilities ottered by the climate 
for the production of silk. Acting upon the impres- 
sion, he procured from France the seeds of the mul- 
berry, from which he raised a quantity of trees. 
After two importations of silk-worm's' eggs from 
China, which failed to hatch, he procured some from 
France, with which he was suceesBful, and in I860 
raised a quantity of superior cocoons. Since that 
time this gentleman, as well as numerous others in 
the Sacramento Valley and the southern poriiou of 
the State, have gone extensively into the business, 
pliintin^ out large orchards of the mulberry, and 
producing last season a considerable quantity' of co- 
coons, bnough has bt- :i done to prove that this is 
bouud to assume an iuiiiortant position among the 
products of this coast. The erection of the extensive 
establishment at Sun Jos6 for the manufacture of 
silk is a fair indication of its importance. 

Flax and Hemp. — Notwithstanding the predic- 
tions that the dryness of the summers on the coa»<t 
would prove an insuperable liurrierto the s-iccessful 
pn)duction of this branch of textile fabrics, Hufflcient 
quantities of these articles have been produced here 
to show that ciiey can be cultivated with a profit. 
The ercctiim of the extensive oil and paint mill at 
Sun Francisco, during the past season, attbrding a 
steady and i-emunerutive market for all the fi.tx seed 
that cuu bo produced, will give an impetus to the 
business. Hemp of a superior qualitv has been 
raised for some years past iii several ot the valley 
counties. A qiiantitv produced in Sonoma County 
last season met with a ready sale at the cordage 
manufactory in San Francisco, on account of the 
strength and superior quality of its fiber. 



l'<, 



r' 



52 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



GRAPE AND WINE GROWING. 

Next to the mineral reeourcea and extended mining operations of California, the culture of the grape 
and the manufacture of wines and brandies from this product are tb" most important. Every portion of 
the State, from the extreme north to the southeiii boundary, has proved to be admirably adapted to this 
purpose ; even the mountain sides of the mining regions, once deemed iucapabin of producing anything 
but gold, teem with millions of vines, which produce superior grapes, from which bunureds of thousands 
of gallons of wine are made each year. Previous to the passage of the act of Congress, levying a tax 
of two dollars per gallon on native brandies, the distillation of this article was carried on to a consid- 
erable extent, and was rapidly increasing; but the heavy impost has caused an almost entire suspension 
of this highly important adjunct of the grape growing interest. The soil and climate of Californiii have 
proved by actual experiment to be adapted to the successful cultivation of every variety of the grape, 
whether for the table, the manufacture of wines and brandies, or prepared in the form of raisins. The 
average crop of a well cultivated vineyard in full bearing is about seven tuns per acre. The average 
yield of each vine is about fourteen pounds, the amount ueccsBiiry to produce a gallon of wine. 

TABLE 

Shov.-iiig the Number of Grape Vines cultivated, and the product of Wines and Brandies, in the State 

during the Year 18G5 : 



County. 



Alameda 

Alpine 

Aujador 

Butte 

Calaveras.... 

Colusa 

Contra Costa. 

Del Norte 

El Dorado . . . 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Kern 

Klamath 

I^ake 

Lassen 

Los Angeles. . 

Marin 

Mariposa 

Mendocino ... 

Merced 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napa 

Nevada 



Carried forward . 



Vines 
I'laiitvd. 



1 



186,329 

None 

266,073 

900,000 

429,799 

80,000 

180,601 

31 

,305,221 

3,632 

839 

1,000 

6,000 

1,721 

10,605 

1,000 

},000,000 

28,130 

44,943 

15,114 

96,930 

30 

116,540 

700,210 

124,000 



13,497,848 



(inllona 
Wine. 


Gallons 
Brand}'. 


3,200 

planted. 

22,439 

17,700 

19,025 

30 

6,720 


20 
25 


114,869 


3,234 






















600,(H)0 

10,000 

1,045 


70,000 


4,500 


800 


300 
48,395 
10,000 


100 

2,669 

200 


858,223 


77,048 



County. 



Brought forward 

Placer 

Plumas 

Sacriiiiienlo 

Siui Bernardino.... 

San Diego 

Sun FmiitlBco 

San Joaquin 

San Luis Obinpo ... 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz , 

Shasta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Yolo 

Yuba 



Totals . 



Vines. 
IMuntcd. 



13,197,848 

306.520 

4,000 

884,110 

341,500 

31,998 

31 

4,543,425 

7,102 

16,000 

202,300 

1,200,000 

85,000 

2,000,000 

4,324 

14,070 

.526,500 

2,291,449 

125,000 

1.59,233 

100,071 

11,404 

5,385 

459,000 

561,374 

900,000 



Unllnns 
Wine. 



858,223 
22,450 



50,000 

100,000 

450 



11.670 



28,278,244 



2,000 

21,000 

1,876 

10,000 

400 

70 

75,000 

149,449 

10,000 

11,490 

4,190 



2,225 
33,000 
32,240 
38,200 



1,133,933 101,159 



Qallons 
Urandy, 



77,048 
850 



4,200 
4,092 



150 
800 



1,500 



4,000 



500 



280 

800 

939 

6,000 



Total number of vines growing 1865, 28,278,244, of which it is estimated 5,600,000 are bearing. Wine 
manufactured, 1,433,933 gallons; brandy, 101,159 gallons. These figures will bo materially increased by 
the returns for the year 1866, which are estimated as follows: vines planted, 35,000,000; wine manufaU' 
tured, 2,100,000 gallons. The Counties of Los Angeles, Sonoma, Santa Clara, Kl Dorado, and Yuba ex- 
hibit a large excess over the previous year, and throughout the State the wine growers generally arc 
manifesting an increased interest in the development of this important branch of our resources. 



f FRUITS. 

There is probably no area of territory of the same extent in the world which produces so great u variety 
of the fruits of the earth us is included within the boundaries of California. This is mainly attribittable to 
the great varieties of soil and climate embraced within the limits of the State. All the hardier productions 
peculiar to a rigorous northern clime are here found in abundance, along with every variety of tropical 
fruits peculiar to the milder latitudes. The apple, peach, pear, plum, nectarine, grape, fig, orange, lemon, 
citron, pomegranate, and other tropical varieties, are produced here in abundance, along with the almond, 



«ew rori 
produced i.. 
here prodiic 
crease far i 



, • J)atf nf , 
IS: lilaekl>i'ri 
July to Deep 
P<!achoa,Jun( 
berries, Kty 



e grape 
rtion of 
i to this 
inylliing 
lousands | 
ig a tux 1 
1 confiid- I 
ispengion 
uiabave | 
le grape, 1 
ns. The 
I average 



the State 1 




23 77,048 
50 850 1 



00 
)00 
150 

570 


4,200 
4,00'J 


... 




000 
000 

87 li 

ooo 


150 
800 

"l',566 



400 . 

70 . 
,000 
449 . 
,000 , 

400 
[lOO 



4,000 I 



500 



,000 

1,240 

>00 



,933 



5280 

800 

939 

6,000 I 

ToU59; 



Iring. Winei 
[inciett»ed by , 
liie roanufac- 
lud Yuba ex 
/euerally are i 



Lai a variety 
Ittributftble to I 
If prodiictioni 
Ity of tropical 
nge, lemon, 
I the almond, 



FKUITS AND LIVE STOCK, 



53 



English walnnt, and other varieties of nut«. Of apples and pears, it is not uncommon in some localities, 
to And two, and even three crops produced in a single reason. The oranges grown in the vicinity of Los 
Angeles, and in other portions of southern California , urn an abnndavit crop, and of a quality snperior to 
those imported from abroad ; while the almonds, of which >onsiderable quantities of the solt-shelled va- 
riety are raised, are fully equal to the best qualities imported from Languedoc, and othei' districta in the 
south of France. The cultivntion of the best varieties of the fig has largely increased within the past 
few years, and when the requisite care is devoted to the preparation of this fruit the imported article will 
be driven from the market. California riiisins are already a staple article of trade ; and as tije growth of 
the grape in this region is nowhere surpassed in the world, the time is not far distant when this article will, 
like her extraordinary wine produit, take a high rank as an article of trade. The peanuts grown in Cal- 
ifornia, of which the crop of last year amounted to 200 tons, are of quality, in point of size and flavor, far 
superior to any imported from abroad. Tlie number of fruit trees in the State, exclusive of the grape and 
other vines, is estimated at about 4,500,000, of which 2,500,000 are peach, 1 ,250,000 apple, and the balance 
of difle-ent varieties. Value of the fruit mised during the year 1865 is estimated at $1,625,000.* 

Olives.— In the establishment of the Missions, in the early history of California, great attention was 
devoted to the cultivation of the olive, from which considerable quantities of oil were mannfactured. 
Although these cetablishnients have mostly gone to ruin, yet the liiixe orchards, still remaining, show 
the extent of their cultivation in foinier times. The trees bear abundantly, nnd the olives put up for the 
market are of a superior quality. 



LIVE STOCK. 

Prior to the discovery of gold in California, and the rush of immigration to tlipse slmrcs, almost the en- 
tire pursuits of the native population were confined to tlie riiising of horses ami cattle, with sparse flocks 
of sheep. The fertile plains of this then pastoral region were dotted with immense bands of horses and 
herds of cattle, and the annual rodeon, when the rancheros n\et to identify and brand their stock with 
their peculiar Individ. lal brands, were seasons of festivity and excitement. The staple exports from this 
coast in those days of primeval simplicily were conflned solely to hides and tallow — Monterey, Los Angeles, 
Santa Darbani, and San Diego constituting the principal ports from whence these articles were shipped. 
Along with immense droves of elk and herds of antelope, bunds of mustangs, or wild horses, were found on 
the plains in great numbers, and until within a few years were still to be found in purl ions ot the j.'reat Tu- 
lare Valley. In those days, with all these countless herds of cattle, those products of the dairy, milk, butter 
and cheese, were almost entirely unknown. Since the taking posse- of thin country by the Americans, 
stock of all kinds has largely increased, and the breeds vastly impn Instead of the uutiuned mustang, 

or almost equally wild Spanish horse, we have the thorough-bred Anuri. ,i, -a c tosh bet «■<•.■ i which and the 
native produces a quality of saddle-horse nowhere surpassed. The chanicter of t lie ('alif iniu romUier stiiuds 
deservedly high, and the carriage and draft horses r.iised here are also a superi'i ■ The lient breedn 

of the short-horned Durhams, imported from the Atlantic States and Europe — unsurpiisHpiI citln'r for milk 
ing qualities or for beef— have entirely driven out the lank, long-horned natives of the coimtry ; and the 
fine-wooled Merino, Leicester, and Cotswold, with the heavy-bodied Southdown, have taken the place of 
the coarse-haired flocks of former days. The earliest improvements in this department were from the im 
purtatinns of the Hudson's Hay Company, since which time valuable additions have been made from abi' >ud. 
Number of Horses in the State, 185,033; Sheep, 983,886 ; Cattle, including cows, .'iOO.OOO ; Hogs, 21' 101. 
Value of cattle, hogs, and sheep slaughtered during the year 1865 is estimated at about $6,000,000. 

Potn.TUY .-Number of Poultry of all kinds in the State, 850,000. Eggs produced per annum, 2,500,000 
dozens. 

Wool. AND IIinE.s. — Notwithstanding the general opinion which prevailed for several years after the 
settlement of the State that the business of wool growing could never be prolitably pursued in Califi iiin 
the results of the past few vears.und the extensive and increasing manufactures here, have forever sett!- : 
oiiestion at rest. The first flocks were composed entirely of the native or New Mexican sheep ; shortly alter 
the conimencemeiit of the first immigration to these snores, herds of sheep fi-om the Western States were 
driven hero across the plains ; and the best breeds belonging to the Hudson's Hay Company, together with 
others from Australia, were introduced hero about the year 1854. Since that time the herds of sheep have 
been still further improved by the addition of the finest varieties of thorough-bred stock from Vermont, 
New York, and other States, until the quality of the wool produecd here will compuro favorably with that 

firodurcd abroad. Owini; to the favorable influences of the climate and abundant feed, the sheep raised 
lere produce a heavier fleece than is the case in other countries, and, owing to the same causes, they in- 
crease fur more rapidly than elsewhere. With some varieties flvo lambs are produced at a birth, and with 



• Dale nf Appearanee <\f Fniitt at San Franeiteo.—KppU'K, .luno and thmugliont tlie yoar; apricots, Miiv to Juno 

: lilneklii'rrU'H,,luuonnil,luly ; clierrU'S.ilani'ninltluly ; (tKa.Jiily toNuvcnibpr; i;uu!*>'l>(!rrU'8, Muv aiKDuiif; grupcs, 

July to Dccpmhcr l.t; llmcB, Novumhor to Jiiniiury; noclnrlnri, July IS to /lUKUHt; onmiirs, Novi'inhcr to March; 



Krachcs.JiinotoNovcmlier; pcnm, ,laly to Dcccnil>er; plums, •luno to August; quinces, 8cptvml)cr to January; rasp- 
crrlea, May '20 toAuKUntlS; ntrawborrlua, Jaauiiry to December. 



i 









54 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



, most breeds triplets and twins are common. The sheep rau|u;o of this State is extensive ; as the season ad- 

', vunces, and the feed dries up on the foot hills, abundant pasturaue is afTorded in the woods that skirt 

the snow belt of the mountains. The production of wool in the State, for the year 1865, was, according 

to the Mercantile Gazette, 6,4.'i5,070 pounds. It is estimated that 6,546,750 pounds were clipped during 

the year 1866. 

Hides.— The number of Hides exported during the year 1865 was 340,690, and during the year 1866, 
157,358, of which about one-third are received from the Mexican ports und Oregon. A laiuc number of 
hides are annually manufactured into leather in this State, which renders it difficult to obtir i an approx 
imation to the actual yield. 



MINERAL. 



MINERAL RESOURCES OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 

BY W. S. KEYES, MINING ENGINEER.* 

The opening of the year 1848 marks the beginning of a new era in the history of 
modern civilization. 

A small company of hardy pioneers had sought the western limit of the continent, 
and, under the leadership of Gen. Sutter, had founded the colony of New Helvetia. 
These few adventurers formed the advance guard of an army of immigrants compar- 
able only to the flood of population to America immediately subsequent to its discov- 
ery by Columbus. 

Some of the members of this company discovered, on the fourth of January, 1848, 
a few particles of gold on Mormon Island, Sacramento ; but it was on the ninth of 
February that Marshall, while digging a race for Sutter's mill, near the site of the 
present town of Coloma, made his discovery, the report of which had, by the Spring 
of 1849, spread to every hamlet in the United States. 

That the northwestern provinces of Mexico, of which California then formed a 
part, were rich in mineral wealth, had, long previously to 1848, been understood and 
stated by men of science and practiced obi^ervation. We have also good resvson to be- 
lieve that the Jesuit missionaries were convinced of the fact of the existence of the 
precious metals, but forbore either themselves to inaugurate extensive explorations, 
or to encourage the pursuit on the part of others. 

Professor Dana observed, in the year 1842, on the banks of the Umpqua River, in 
southern Oregon, certain talcose and micaceous schists, which were auriferous, and, 
turther, distinctly stated that similar pieces of rock had already been met with on the 
line of the Sacramento River, in California. 

Likewise De Mofras, who made a survey of the country for the French Govern- 
ment, in 1841, mentions, in his report, the fan tliat a gold mine was worked near San 
Fernando, Los Angeles, and that ther<' was jd xhiced from it about one ounce of gold 
per day. He also alluded to the similarity of the schists of the foot hills of the Sier- 
ras to the gold-bearing rocks of Mexico. 

Moreover, the Mexicans obtained, in the year 1842, a " bonanza" of thirty to forty 
thousand dollars from the superficial deposits of the San Franeisquito Ctinon, Los 
Angeles County. Of this amount one thousand dollars and upwards was carried, by 
Don Alfredo Robinson, through Mexico, to the Mint in Philadelphia ; the certificate 
of deposit for which he still preserves. 

This gentleman has thus the honor of having been the first American to bring Cal- 
ifornia placer gold into the United States. 

These deposits were ultimately abandoned by the Ml leans, owing chiefly to a 
deficiency in the water supply. From time to time, however, some needy native would 
laboriously wash out with his "batea," suflUcient gold to fill a large sized eagle's quill ; 
on obtaining which he would return to the " pueblo " of Los Angeles, to live lux- 



* Facts drawn from personal observations ; reports of the county iiNsessoi's and other authentic sources. 
Statistics of production, mainly from the Mercantile Gazette and Prices Current of S"n Francisco. 



lIlNBRAii RESOURCES OF CALIFORNIA. 



55 



uriously as long as his treasure lasted. The greater portion of the gold found in 
thpae placers was fine ; but occasionally there were found pieces of the size of a dime. 

This re-discovery of gold by Marshall, taking place after the occupa ion of the 
country by the Americans, opened up to the vision of the old world not only the rich 
placers and quartz mines of California, but also induced such a search afler the 
precious metals, as brought to light the gold fields of Australia, the silver mines of the 
State of Nevada, and more recently the gold and silver regions of Oregon, Arizona, 
Montana, Idaho, and the interior territories. 

As soon as the facts cf Marshall's discovery became substantiated, the hopeful and 
vigorous, the energetic and adventurous youth of all nations began to flock to the 
shores of the modern El Dorado. The early part of 1849 saw many thousands on 
their way, and otiicr thousands making all haste to set out. Once arrived within the 
limits of California, the onpouring wave of population quickly spread itself over the 
interior portions of the State, and, with eyes shiirpened by an eager longing for sud- 
den fortune, began an ardent search after the half hidden treasure of the valleys and 
foot hills of the Sierras. 

Myriads of ages had rolled away since the yellow dust, set free from some deeply 
rooted vein system, washed, tossed, and rounded by the down-pouring floods, sank 
quietly to the " bed rock," there to await the all-searching energy and indomitable 
perseverance of the composite Anglo-Saxon race. 

. Naturally, the first rude efforts of novices in the metallurgic art were directed to 
the simplest and readiest means of separating the precious metal from the worthless 
matter accomi)anying it. Tlie ordinary pan, the rocker, long torn, sluicing, and hy- 
draulics, as the art of mining became better understood, supplemented and gradually 
supplanted the at first unaided labors of tlie adventurers, until the present perfected 
means of crusliing and amalgamation have introduced and domiciled in the State a 
comprehensive and lasting industry. 

Before treating more at length of tlm various methods of mining for and reducing 
the different metals with which the lavish hand of Nature has filled the land, it may 
not be out of place, here, briefly and cursorily to touch upon the limits and extent of 
the mineral regions of California. A glance at any good map of the State will read- 
ily show two main chains of mountains : the Coast Range, outlining the western coast 
and having a general northwest and southeast course, and the Sierra Nevada, lying on 
the eastern border and separating the States of California and Nevada. These two 
mountain systems are parted longitudinally through the central portions of the State, 
by the long valley drained by the rivers Sacramento and San Joaquin. Towards the 
north and towards the south these ranges again unite, and nowhere at these points has 
the line of demarcation between them been, as yet, sharply determined. On the east- 
em flanks of the Sierras are found the principal silver regions of the coast; while the 
western slopes are the chief habitus of the gold quartz, placer deposits, and copper 
mines. The Coast Range has had, here and there, some trifling placers and one or 
two gold quartz veins ; but its economical importance is due more to its valuable beds 
of coal and sulphur ; its rich deposits of cinnabar and asphaltum ; its borax, soda, and 
petroleum ; as well as various minor minerals, lime, gypsum, clays, etc. 

EXTENT OF THE GOLD REGION. 

The gold region of the State of California, embracing, under this term, all superfi- 
cial detrital formations as well as the injected or infiltrated system of gold quartz veins, 
may be said to extend from the thirty-fourth to the forty-second parallel of latitude : 
a distance of about five hundred miles, in a northwest and southeast direction, 
conformably to the general trend of the main chains of mountains. This tract of 
country has a varying width up to one hundred miles ; being narrow towards the 
south but widening out in the upper and middle counties, and embracing an area of 
upwards of twenty thousand square miles. 

The principal field of mining operations has, however, been limited to the range of 
country extending from the lower edge of the county of Mariposa, on the south, to 



i) 



i 






f 



! 



56 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 



the upper limit of the county of Plumas on the north ; in length not exceeding two 
hundred miles. This stretch of country is largely covered with placer formations, 
and has very numerous quartz veins. The volcanic scoriae and lavas poured forth 
from the craters of now extinct volcanoes, have, however, in many places, so deeply 
overlain the gold bearing strata as very materially to thin out the regions of super- 
ficial exposure, and thereby to limit the fields of profitable prospecting. Assuming 
a length of two hundred miles, and an average width of only twenty-five miles, we 
have an auriferous area of five thousand square tniles in the central part of the State. 
Added to this area the mining region centering around Clear Creek, in Kern County, 
and a comparatively unexplored tract of country in the northern part of the State, in 
the counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity, etc., and we have a gold bearing zone suflH- 
ciently large to warrant the probability of realizing from the State, for centuries to 
come, a very considerable gold product. 

The gold belt extends tiirough California into Oregon, and probably thence through 
British Columbia into the Russian Possessions. 

Both the northern and southern counties of the State have been retarded in their 
development by causes, which year by year are giving way to conditions more favor- 
able to enterprise. The former are, as compared with the central counties, diflUcult 
of access ; are inhabited by a hardy and warlike race of Indians, and are largely 
covered with eruptive volcanic matter. The latter, comprising very nearly one-half 
of the superficial area of the State, have, in like manner, been but little explored. 

Water is in many places with difficulty attainable ; the great Mojave Desert fills a 
considerable portion of the counties San Bernardino and San Diego ; and the most 
valuable lands are covered by Spanish grants, so that but trifling inducements are 
offered to tiie settler or prospector. 

The many millions of gold, which California has contributed to stimulate the pro- 
ductive industry of the world, have been derived from three classes of deposit, viz : 
the Superficial Placers, the Deep Placers, and the Quartz Veins. 

In the early history of the country, enterprise contented itself with those of the 
first class ; mainly, because, besides a pick, shovel, pan, and rocker, no other capital 
was required — saving and except a strong arm and an adventurous disposition. 
Fabulous stories of the richness of banks and bars have come down to us, which have, 
doubtless, lost no roundness of proportion while passing from mouth to mouth. That 
many nuggets, weighing each a number of pounds, were discovered, is, however, a 
matter of authentic history. Most of them were melted down and turned to imme- 
diate practical account, instead of finding their resting places on the shelves of Gov- 
ernment or private cabinets. 

Now that the mineral interests of the United States have attained so great a prom- 
inence and bid fair to exercise an ever-increasing influence on the national economy, 
it is time that steps be taken by the authorities to continue to collect and publish 
reliable statistics of production; estimates of yield and profit, and detailed maps of 
the mining localities ; and further, to establish technical schools for instruction in the 
various branches of mining for the precious and useful metals and minerals, somewhat 
similar in plan and scope to the mining schools of Saxony and France. 

The superficial placers have furnished the capital which has been expended with 
such reckless energy, not, however, always combined with the best of judgment, to 
develop the resources of California and the other States and Territories on its 
borders. 

I'LACKUS. 

The term " placer " is derived from the Spanish, in which language it is used 
to designate merely such surface deposits as yield up the precious metal by a 
simple washing in a " batea " (species of pan). The genius of the America" mmer 
has, however, greatly extended the significance of the term, and has rendered valuable 
vast fields of auriferous earth containing too small a per centage of gold to be worth 
the saving by the slow and laborious methods of washing practiced by the Mexicans. 



MINERAL RESOURCES OF CALIFORNIA 



67 



These deposits, embracing under the generic term of placers both the loosely 
aggregated earthy particles and the compact cement, are evidently the result of the 
disintegration of certain primitive quartz veins, through the eroding action of water. 
The auriferous detritus thus formed was deposited along the borders of inland lakes, 
on the shores of former seas, or found its resting place in the channels of now extinct 
water courses, where pressed upon for aeons by volcanic matter, either scoriaceous or 
liquid, it has hardened into a species of conglomerate so tenacious as to require for its 
disintegration the use of stamps. The simple surface deposits have been found over 
a very extended area, and at altitudes above the sea varying from 1,000 to 5,000 feet. 

We find auriferous earth more or less valuable as far south as San Bernardino and 
Los Angeles counties, in Holcomb Valley, Lytle Creek, the foot-hills of the San 
Fernando Mountains, in San Frnncisquito Caiion, and some other points in the Coast 
Range in the lower half of the State. Inside th^se mountains, in places on the rivers 
Kings and Kern, in Kern County. Further north, along the coast, placers of some 
value are reported in Monterey County near the Mission San Antonio ; these have 
been purchased and are to be worked by one of the Chinese companies. Traces of 
gold are to be found in San Mateo County, and in Saucelito in Marin County. 
Placer deposits have been j-eported also in Mendocino County. 

Not the least curious of the various forms of gold detritus are the so-called "Sailor's 
Diggings," located on the sea-shore, two and a half miles south of Crescent City, in 
Del Norte — the northwosternmost county of the State. These deposits, under the 
name of the " Gold Beach," gave rise to a great excitement in the year 1854, which 
caused an exodus of the more credulous portion of the mining population ; only to 
return after having, by a personal inspection, dissipated the illusion. This formed one 
of those migratory movements, which, fortunately, are becoming year by year of less 
frequent occurrence, and exercise a less marked effect on the permanent prosperity 
of the State. 

In these diggings, the pay dirt or sand extends back from the ©cean in places a 
distance of one hundred yards, and claims have beei> located along the shore for many 
miles. The pay stratum does not appear to be constant either in richness or locality, 
but varies with the state of tides, currents, etc. The gold is saved by washing in long 
toms, six by four feet, having near the upper end a sieve made of perforated sheet- 
iron, and underneath a series of amalgamated copper plates. 

In the most northerly counties. Trinity, Shasta, and Siskiyou, placers are still 
worked, and new discoveries are reported — particularly in the vicinity of Yreka, on 
Humbug and Cottonwood Creeks, Siskiyou. 

The central counties, from Mariposa to Plumas, inclusive, have had the most ex- 
tensive and most lucrative surface diggings. These deposits have been mainly worked 
out and have fallen into the hands of the Chinese, who patiently and laboriously 
glean over tlie fields abandoned by the whites. This people are contented with a 
small return for their l^.^ors ; but their contributions, small in themselves individually, 
nevertheless make up for the whole State a very considerable aggregate. Within 
three years after the discovery at Coloma, the gold produced from the supei-ficial 
placet's alone amounted to an annual average of over 60,000,000 of dollars ; and the 
year 1853 saw the highest amount produced in the State. So intense was the search 
after this species of mines and so numerous the seekers, that the richest deposits were 
soon exhausted, and the rocker and long-tom became incapable of washing a sutflciency 
of low-grade earth to return a profit. 

The necessities of the case spoke loudly to tiie inventive genius of the gold-seekers, 
and the method of mining called " Hydraulics" sprang into existence, which has con- 
tinued to offer a profitable field for enterprise up to the present day. 

HTDRAULIC DIGGINGS. 

Under the head hydraulic diggings are to be embraced all those varieties of 
placer deposits which are worked by large bodies of water, with the help of 
flumes, ditches, etc. — in its more restricted sense, the term is applied to those 



In 



58 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRKOTORY, 



accumulations of auriferous detritus which may be disintegrated and washed down 
by the force of streams of water issuing from contracted orifices under a very high 
hydraulic pressure. This species of washing is chiefly used for working the hills 
and deep placers, or cement diggings. The quantity of water requisite for the 
purposes of hydraulics could not be supplied at all points, either by damming the 
streams or forming reservoirs by collecting the winter's rains ; and hence, in order to 
work large fields of auriferous earth distant from a water supply, there was built an 
intricate and extensive system of canals, flumes, and ditches. Large capitals were 
embarked in these enterprises, and water was brought from the High Sierra to wash 
the earth of the foot-hills. Costly excavations, lofty flumes, and many miles of ditcher 
attest the giant energy of the early gold-seekers. The water thus turned to economic 
uses, was made to perform, under the guidance of man, precisely the same kind of 
labor as the streams of ages had performed in the vast laboratory of nature. The 
heavier particles of gold dust, obedient to the laws of gravity, settled themselves on 
the bottoms of the sluice-boxes, which were fltted with blocks of wood, rounded stones, 
rifiles, quicksilver, etc., to detain the precious dust, while the lighter and less valuable 
particles were borne down by the current. 

Various ingenious contrivances, undercurrents, etc., etc., were adopted, all having 
in view a more thorough saving of the gold. 

In many of the central counties, the bare and unsightly hills which disfigure the 
landscape bear witness to the prodigious wearing power of these artificial water- 
courses impinging against the hill-sides with the terrific force due to a head of two 
or three hundred feet. Frequent accidents have arisen from the unexpected detach- 
ing of large masses from the higher portions of the hills ; and in some instances the 
ground has been so cut away as to give rise to very extensive land slides, as lately 
happened at Deadwood, in Siskiyou County — the mountains above that place, for a 
distance of one hundred and twenty yards in length, and nearly as many in breadth, 
slid downwards into the bed of the creek, completely blocking it up, and forming a 
dam which filled with water to a depth of sixty feet, and temporarily covered up a 
large number of claims. 

A very interesting center of hydraulic diggings is at Ma ^nita Hill, near North 
San Juan, Nevada County. Here, perhaps the heaviest blast for mining purposes, of 
which we have any record, was discharged during the present year, with the object 
of loosening the hard ground before hydraulicing. A drift was run into the hill a 
distance of ninety feet, from the ends of which wings were extended at right angles 
some sixty feet ; five hundred and ten kegs of powder were placed in the tunnel, the 
entrance clostly tamped, and the charge fired. A dull report broke upon the ear, 
and a mass of earth, one hundred and fifty feet deep, two hundred feet wide, and 
three hundred feet long, rose a short distance into the air, and fell back thoroughly 
disintegrated and in a fit condition for washing. 

Still another species of hydraulic working consists in running long drifts under the 
hills, in order to tap the very extensive accumulations of auriferous gravel in the 
beds of ancient lakes and water-courses, which have been covered by volcanic matter 
and alluvium. These drifts vary in length, from a few hundreds to several thousands 
of feet, and have been driven, many of them, at a cost of thousands of dollars, and 
four, five, and even six years' continuous labor. They must frequently be blasted the 
entire distance, through hard bed-rock ; they rise from the mouth inwardly, with a 
grade of one in twelve to one in twenty, and, in coming in under the gravel, are 
intended to be from fifty to one hundred feet below the lowest point of the deposit. 
Very frequently the work of years is rendered abortive from a miscalculation as to 
the exact locality of the gravel, and a lower gallery must be driven in before the work 
of hydraulicing can begin. In cases where a connection cannot be made with a 
neighbci'ing claim, it is frequently necessary to run a supplementary tunnel for ven- 
tilation, or for the purpose of not interrupting work while cleaning up the sluicns ; it 
being necessary during this operation merely to turn the current from one tunnel into 
the other. From the end of the gallery a shaft is driven upwards to the deposit. 



MINERAL RBSOUROES OF CALIFORNIA, 



59 



The pay dirt is either carried from the tunnel by tramway — the excavation taking 
place after the manner of working a horizontal coal bed, or the tunnel itself is made 
to serve as a sluice way, the boxes being set up throughout its entire length, and often 
extending far beyond its mouth. Where the gravel does not lie too deeply, the shaft 
is made to serve the purpose of a huge funnel, down and through which the entire 
surface of the hill is hurled, disintegrated by the fall, and washed into the sluice boxes. 
A representative center of this species of mining is at Smartsville, in Yuba County, 
eighteen miles from Marysville. There are a number of hydraulic claims in this 
vicinity, the mo.st celebrated of which is the Blue Gravel Mining Company. This 
claim was opened by a tunnel, started in 1855 ; it is reported to have yielded, since 
Marcl 1864, the gross amount of over $600,000. A new tunnel, sixty feet deeper, 
has been started, in order more thoroughly to wash the bed-rock. The sluice-boxes 
are over 3,000 feet long; a cleaning up is made eight or nine times in the year, from 
each of which there are obtained varying amounts, up to $50,000. One of the largest 
incomes derived from mining, for 1865, is credited to the principal owner in this claim. 
The returns from this species of mining are often very great from the accumulations 
of dirt mined during the dry season, the washings of which for a few week:* often 
yield $100,000, and upwards; while it is by no means uncommon for the less im- 
portant claims to clean up from a few hundreds to fifteen or twenty thousand. The 
Live Yankee claim, at Forest City, is reported to have paid over $3,000,000. The 
importance of the washings will be better understood by the statement of the fact, 
that nearly all the gold produced on the coast has been obtained in this way ; and even 
in California, until within a year or two, fully two-thirds is due to the washings, since 
only comparatively recently has the quartz vein and cement interest obtained a prom- 
inence, justly their due, as the main source of supply for permanent workings. The 
field of hydraulics is very nearly co-extensive with the gold belt, and gives employ- 
ment, during the rainy season, to a large number of hands. The beds of auriferous 
gravel vary in thickness, often having a depth of eighty to one hundred feet, and in 
places as much as two hundred and fifty feet. The bo<ly of the deposit is composed 
of rounded quartz pebbles, pieces of greenstone and other rocks, mixed with sand and 
clayey matters, and forming a very peculiar species of conglomerate. In places 
where these gravel beds have been covered up, often to a depth of several hundred 
feet, the conglomerate has been hardened into a species of cement, the richest . of 
which has been found in what is known as the Blue Lead. 

The Blue Lead, and similar deposits, have been found, from time to time, occupy- 
ing a belt of country two to three miles wide, and extending from Feather River, on 
the north, to the Tuolumne River, on the south. Sufficient data are not at hand to trace 
out, with any degree of accuracy, the channels of this preadamite river system. This 
is part of the plan of the geological survey of the State, which will, in due time, map 
out the entire network of vein, channel and placers. The task undertaken by Professor 
Whitney and his assistants is but faintly understood by the general public, and the 
accuracy and completeness of the work already done is not yet appreciated. 

The gravel beds of the southern mining districts appear to have been formed in 
rivers, whose courses followed the same direction as the present rivers, while those of 
the northern mines appear to have run at right angles. 

The Blue Lead is supposed to run entirely through Nevada County, to Gold Run, 
in Placer County. It carries a width of from thirty to one hundred feet, and upwards. 
Cement deposits are found at Forest Hill, in Piacer ; near Folsom, in Sacramento ; 
near Placerville, in £1 Dorado ; near Mokelumne Hill, in Calaveras, and under Table 
Mountain, in Tuolumne. The stratum immediately next to the bed-rock is naturally 
the richest, from four to seven feet of which will pay for crushing under stamps. 
Many of the cement claims, until recently deemed worked out, have returned gratify- 
ing results from crushing. The amount pulverized under each stamp is very large ; 
and in order to prevent clogging up the screens, a portion of the bed-rock is stamped 
along with the cement. In certain of the hydraulic claims, he upper and poorer 



:® 



'I 



i V 



60 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORY. 



portions of the gravel are washed down by the force of water, leaving the more indu- 
rated cement to be treated in a mill. 

The report of George Black, M. E., of San Francisco, 1864, gives some computa- 
tions whereby a better conception may be obtained of the extent and richness of the 
deep placers. Speaking of the hydraulic diggings between the South and Middle 
Yuba, he estimates the ground supplied with water by the Middle Yuba Canal Com- 
pany at five miles in length, three hundred and fifty yards average width, and forty yards 
average depth. These figures give a grand total of 123,000,000 cubic yards; of this 
amount, only eight per cent, was worked out in' twelve years, the average yield of 
which, as saved, was thirty to forty-five cents per cubic yard : hence, this mass of au- 
riferous earth would yield over $38,000,000. But the total area of the gravel deposits 
worked on the ridge is estimated to be equal to fifteen square miles, which, assuming 
a like average width and thickness, would contain, at thirty cents per cubic yard, the 
enormous sum of nearly $550,000,000. Mr. Black makes some interesting estimates of 
the cost of manipulating one cubic yard of auriferous earth; assuming that the wages 
of the miners are four dollars per day, which sum, for the purposes of comparison, 
serves as well as the lower rates of the present time : with the ordinary pan, $20.00 ; 
with the rocker, $5.00; with the long-torn, $1.00; and by hydraulics, twenty cents. 

The chief expense attending this species of mining, after the deposit has once been 
reached, consists in the sums paid for water. Successful claims consume, on the 
average, from twenty to thirty per cent, of the gross yield, for running expenses. The 
fascination in this species of mining is kept up through long years of doubt and sus- 
pense, by the hopes of striking, sooner or later, some rich spots in the channel. 
Undertakings of this character, owing to the sinuosities in the river's bed, or breaks 
in its course, or miscalculations, often terminate unfortunately : so that this species of 
mining cannot arrogate to itself any peculiar immunity from the risks usually 
attending underground explorations. 

A class of gold-bearing rock (which may be said to form a connecting link between 
placer and vein mining) has lately attained considerable prominence. In the County 
of Placer, some five miles from Lincoln, there crops out a deposit of soft and decom- 
posed matter, some two hundred feet broad, and eight hundred feet long. At the 
time of the copper excitement, a large number of hills, somewhat similar in external 
characteristics, were located, and worked for copper, generally without finding that 
metal in remunerative quantities. The surface rock bears considerable resemblance 
to the gozzan of the copper veins. After the original holders had explored the hill 
for copper to no purpose, it fell into the hands of Mr. Harpending, who, observing a 
marked similarity between this deposit and others in Mexico, known to be prolific in 
gold, gave up the search after copper, and erected a mill for stamping the ore, after 
the manner of a quartz vein. The entire mass of the hill, as far as exposed, pros- 
pects largely in coarse gold. So soft is the rock, and so large the deposit, that each 
stamp can doubtless crush several tons. On the line of the copper belt, we hear of 
the discovery of similar masses of decomposed rocky matters, in Yuba, Placer, 
and Calaveras counties. 

QUARTZ VKINS. 

The injected or infiltrated quartz vein system forms the basis from whence were 
derived all the other deposits of gold bearing detritus. As such, they offer a 
permanent field of remunerative enterprise ; a better acquaintance with which, on 
the part of the entire community, will serve only to excite a still greater interest in 
their exploitations. Most fortunately for California, speculative mining has hardly 
obtained a foothold within her borders ; and her people, quick to learn from the harsh 
experiences of the past, have begun to turn a more critical glance at the mineral 
resources within her limits, and to regard as a vital element in mining ventures an 
estimate of minimum yield and maximum cost, and from the comparison to deduce 
the margin for profit. 

The region for quartz mining has, until recently, been confined chiefly to the tier 



MINERAL RESOURCES OF CALIFORNIA 



61 



of counties extending from Fresno on the south to Shasta on ih" north, and 
following the line of the foot-hills on the western slopes of the Sierras. New 
districts are being opened and worked in the northern and southern portions of the 
State. The mines of Kern County, of which the town of Havilah is the county seat, 
have been attracting considerable attention, under the name of the Clear Creek 
mining district. This stream is a tributary to Kern river — coming in from the 
south. The mines of Clear Creek proper are included in a strip of country one mile 
wide and about four miles long. They are situated on the eastern side of the slope 
lying west of Havilah, and within a distance of three miles of the town. The 
couniry rock is chiefly granite, which near the surface has been much disintegrated 
by the action of the elements, and hence permits an easy extraction and crushing 
until the permanent water level is reached ; at which point the rock becomes harder 
and more dilflcult to manipulate. Some 500 to 800 locations have been made ; but 
not more than a dozen claims are reported as being actively and remuneratively at 
work. Tiiere are several other districts in the county, owners in which feel sanguine 
of good results so soon as the quickening hand of capital shall be stretched forth to 
assist in their exploitation. 

Hence, northwardly on the great quartz belt, the first important mining region 
is in the county of Maiiposa. A quartz mill was constructed in this county as early 
as 1850, and the year following the first mill was built at Grass Valley, Nevada 
County. The southern mines, notwithstanding that they were started earliier than 
the northern mines, have in the last few years been steadily outstripped by the latter. 
Recent developments in the Josephine mine, on the Mariposa estate, and the activity 
displayed round the various mining centers of Tuolumne County, give promise of a 
brighter future fur the lower half of the mining field. The great mother vein 
of California commences in Mariposa, follows more or less nearly the general trend 
of the Sierras, and finally passes out of the State at its northern limit. It is distinctly 
traceable, by its outcrop, for a distance of nearly 100 miles from Mariposa into El 
Dorado County ; being thus the longest quartz vein of which we have any record. 
Northwardly, in the counties of Nevada, Sierra and Plumas, the quartz belt appears 
to approach a more nearly north and south direction. The course of the quartz vein 
is by no means to be followed over every mile of the spaces between its points of 
outcrop. Nor are the productive mines confined to the line of the mother vein itself; 
but the parallel formations of\en carry valuable lodes. The country rock is mostly 
slate, to whose dip and direction the quartz veins are generally conformable ; although 
they sometimes run at right angles to the stratification. Some of the 
best mines have been found in greenstone, granite and metamorphic sandi^tune, and 
even in limestone ; so that the country rock cannot be taken as conclusive evidence 
either for or against the probability of persistence in depth and richness. In size 
the lodes vary from a few inches to forty feet and upwards, with a likewise varying 
yield ; although, as a rule, the per centage of gold, relatively to the mass, is greater 
in the small than in the large veins. The distribution of the pay portion is by no 
means uniform ; nor is the entire vein mass worthy, under present conditions, of 
being passed through the mill. The best mines of Europe seldom extract, even for 
the purposes of concentration, more than one-third the matter contained between their 
walls ; and the valuable ore here, as elsewhere, is distributed in shoots, chimneys, 
kidneys, or cuneiform masses, often having a very marked and persistent dip and direc- 
tion : and it is upon the extent and richness of these zones of ore in the vein that 
the value of a quartz mine chiefly depends. An acquaintance with the true char- 
acter of ore bearing deposits can be of no disadvantage to, and will advance rather 
than retard, legitimate mining investments. Nor are the best mines confined to a 
northerly and southerly direction ; indeed, some of the best mines in the township 
of Grass Valley, which locality is at present the main focus of profitable vein 
mining, have an east and west course. It will be impossible in the limits of a single 
paper to treat at length of all the localities of mining ; the centers only can be 
touched upon, and these, commencing on the south, may be enumerated as follows : The 



I- 



I ,.-. 






t i; 



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62 



PAOIVIO COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 



Mariposa eslnte, Hite's Cove and Coulterville, in Mariposa County ; thence north, in 
Tuolumne County, at Soulabyville, Jamestown and Sonora ; in Calaveras, at Carson 
Hill, Angel's Ciimp, San Andreas, West Point and Mokelumne Hill ; in Amador, 
at Jacknion, Sutter and Amador ; in El Dorado, near Placerville ; in Placer, near 
Auburn ; in Nevada, at Grass Valley, Nevada City and Meadow Lake ; in Sierra, 
near Downieville ; in Plumas, at Indian Valley, etc. New locations are being made 
continually throughout the gold belt; while around the centers of greatest past 
yield an ever incrcat>ing enthusiasm has been called into being. For example, 
from the Ist of January to the 8th of October, of the present yeor, 10,351 claims, 
averaging 100 feet each, were recorded in Nevada County alone ; and that, too, in a 
region where quartz mining has been profitably carried on for many years. 

The' most interesting mine in the State is, for many reasons, the Eureka, of 
Amador County ; which, with the adjoining mine, the Badger, is the property of Mr. 
A. Hayward. This mine is located on the great mother vein, at the point of junc- 
tion of the slates and greenstone, and is therefore of the nature of a contact vein ; 
that it is a true Assure vein as well, is not negatived by the fact that the crevice was 
formed between two rocks of different character: for, other things being equal, that is 
precisely the point at which we should expect the occurrence of a fissure. The 
lode carries a varying width up to 26 feet in the Eureka, and 40 feet in the Badger. 
The upper workings did not pay very largely; the average yield, at 600 feet, as 
stated by the Geological Survey, being a trifle over $10 per ton. In spite, 
however, of all drawbacks, its present owner battled persistently' until the mine now 
occupies as favorable a position as any in the State. At a depth of 1,250 feet, the 
vein is large and carries a very high per centage of free gold. The gross yield from 
this mine has doubtless been very great ; but the owner has not, as far as known, 
published any authoritative statement as to average yield or gross returns. That 
the mine has improved in depth, is evident to the most superficial observer ; and 
the present average yield is probably from $20 to $30 per ton. This mine is remark- 
able as being the deepest gold mine in California, and probably in the world ; and, 
OS proving that the gold mines of this State, at least, are persistent in depth, 
it merits detailed description and observation. The old time theory, that gold 
mines would not contain pay ore at greater depths than 250 feet from the surface, 
has been most emphatically disproved by dozens of mines on our quartz belt; 
and, as the facts now show, we may anticipate centuries of profitable returns 
from this source. The pay chimney in the Eureka and Badger, which for the 
purposes of description may be taken as one mine, does not exceed 600 feet, including 
the barren zone between them. The expenses of mining are very materially diminished, 
owing to the very slight flow of water into the shaft : this is due to the fact that the 
eastern wall is formed of the more compact rock, which is impermeable by the waters 
of the High Sierra. The western wall is composed of crumbled quartz, and fatty, 
black and decomposed slates, called by the miners " the gouge." This gouge 
contains iron pyrites and some free gold — not in sufficient quantities to be workable. 
Owing to the pressure from above, the soft matter of the western wall is gradu- 
ally creeping inwards, and will ultimately All up the spaces from whence the quartz 
was stoped. The vein is nearly vertical ; sufficient ore is raised to supply two mills 
aggregating 56 stamps : the one, of 40 stamps, driven by water a part of the year, 
and by steam when the supply of water runs short; and the other, of 16 stamps, 
driven by water alone. The amalgamation is performed inside the batteries, from 
whence the pulp passes over shaking tables lined with copper plates. The per centage 
of sulphurets in the ore is small, and no especial pains is taken to save them. 

Each one of the mining counties has had mines which have produced very largely, 
but the counties, in the order of prominence, are, Nevada, Amador, Tuolumne, Sierra, 
and Plumas. The county of Mariposa has been, of late, a point of diminished in- 
terest, owing to the ill-success of some of the mines on the Mariposa estate. Recent 
developments, and better jiethods of working, give hopes of improvement. The 
Mariposa Mine, an east and west lode in the lower portion of the grant, has had a 



MINERAL RE80UK0RB OF CALIFORNIA 



63 



number of rich pockets, from one of which a yield of $75,000 m reported. Another, 
the Princeton, near the center, haa yielded between two and three niillions ; and at 
the north, the Pine Tree and Josephine have aggregated a very large sum. The 
mines of this county are by ni> means c-o iflned to the limits of the grant ; and the 
popular belief that such is the cise, has, doubtless, exerted a depressing infiuunce on 
the mines and mining interests of that section. 

A few of the more prominent mines northwards, are the Raw Hide, Soulsby, App, 
Golden Rule, etc., of Tuolumne ; the Cnrsvtn Hill mines, and those of Angel's Camp, 
in Calaveras — the former of which are ct'ebnited for their once fabulously ilch 
pockets ; the Hay ward, Bigelow, Oneida, Ktystone, Seaton, etc., of Amador ; the 
Sierra Buttes, in Sierra County ; the Indian Valley mines, of Plumas ; the Placer- 
ville and Georgetown mines, of El Dorado. At the IVoodside mine, near the last 
mentioned town, there is reported the discovery of a mass of gold weighing one hun- 
dred pounds and upwards ; and last and most prominent, the Nevada County mines 
at Grass Valley and Nevada City. 

The average width of the veins of Nevada County is probably less than that of 
the lodes in the other quartz mining counties, but they fully make up for their dimin- 
ished size by an enlarged average yield. The country rock is chiefly hard and com- 
pact greenstone and granite, which, combined with the narrowness of the veins, 
increase? the expense of extraction over the large veins in the softer slates. The 
mine which has of late attracted the most attention in Nevada, is the Eureka of Grass 
Valley. This mine is in greenstone ; and is interesting not only by reason of its 
high yield, but also, being an east and west vein, as disproving the theory that the best 
ore deposits are found in lodes whose course approaches, more or less nearly, the 
magnetic meridian. The Eureka is located about one and a half miles northeast of 
the town of Grass Valley ; it has attained a depth of somewhat over three hundred 
feet, and has drifts of about eight hundred feet. The dip is nearly vertical. It has 
.70 engines: the one for hoisting ore, and the other for pumping. The mill has 
twenty-four stamps. Amalgamation in the battery is not practiced at this mill ; but, 
instead, the pulp from the stamps passes over blankets, the washings from which are 
treated in Atwood's Amalgamators. These consist of covered boxes, in the bottoms 
of which two semi-cylindrical cavities have been scooped out and partially filled with 
quicksilver ; a stream of water washes the blanket concentrations, little by little, into 
the amalgamators, where they are kept in motion by the iron spikes of a roller, the 
points of wiiich dip slightly into the quicksilver. There is a large per centnge of sul- 
phurets in this vein, which are reduced by the ehlorination process. They are valued 
at from $200 to $300 per ton. This mine was sold towards the end of 1865 for the 
sum of $400,000 in gold. During the last year, ending September 30th, 18G6, there' 
were extracted from the mine 11, 375 jf tons of ore, averaging $47.15 per ton, and 
yielding in the aggregate $520,431.41— - $368,042.18 of which was profit. Tba 
report of tiie Assessor, for the year 1866, giving the product of ihe year 1865, gives 
some very interesting facts in regard to this county. He places the number of mines, 
both quartz and cement, at one hundred and sixteen, the greater portion of which 
are, as yet, merely prospective. Of the seventy-one mills, fifty-one are devoted to 
crushing quartz, and twenty to cement. The yield of nineteen mines fully reported, 
of which tiie Eureka above mentioned is one, was $2,227,000, giving an annual aver- 
age per mill of $111,947 from quartz alone. Prom twenty-three mills the amount 
crushed is reported at 70,760 tons, being an average of 3,076 tons to each mill. 

The most successful mining, taken as a whole, must be credited to the county of 
Nevada, and no county in the State has, within the past year, attracted so large a share 
of attention. Its total yield in gold has not been, by the most moderate estimate, less 
than from $25,000,000 to $30,000,000. The mines of Massachusetts Hill, Gold Hill, 
New York Hill, and Allison Ranch, have yielded each from two and a half to five 
millions of dollars, while many others have yielded very high returns of interest on 
the amount of money invested. It must not be supposed that all the largely paying 
mines have been confined to this region in the northern tier of quartz counties. 



J 'ill 



i : 



k ,', 



11 



m 






lii 



64 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Amongst others, the Sierra Buttes of Sierra County, having three large veins, and 
twenty-four stamps, is reported to have paid to its owners, for the year 1865, the sum 
of $122,000 ; and the Crescent, of Indian Valley, Plumas County, is reported to 
have yielded over $100,000. * 

COSTS OF MINING AND MItLING. 

These two items of expense are necessarily variable, but are very materially under 
the control of a prudent and sagacious management. The greater or less cost of min- 
ing depends upon the nature and hardness of the rock ; whether the inclosing walls 
are compact or stratified, and whether there be a "gouge" or not; the size of the vein 
is to be considered ; the depth of the workings, and the presence or absence of large 
quantities of water. The cost of milling is subject to less variation, and is determined 
by the proximity or distance of the mill from the mine and the power used, whether 
steam or water, the latter being by far the cheaper ; and lastly, whether small or 
large amounts of rock be crushed at once. 

The narrow veins of Grass Valley, some of the richest of which have been from 
twelve to thirty inches thick, necessarily cost a much higher sum to mine than such 
large veins, as the Hayward, and the Sierra Buttes ; mines of the former class often 
costing from §13 to $26 per ton for mining and milling, while the latter, crushing 
very large amounts, often do not cost over $5 per ton. The larger deposits, similar to 
the Harpending of Placer County, can probably be quarried and milled at an expense 
not exceeding $1.25 per ton. It will thus be seen that local peculiarities, proximity 
to navigable streams, or railroads, affect not only the first cost of mills and hoisting 
works, but have also a considerable influence in increasing or diminishing the daily 
running expenses. Under ordinary average conditions, however, a yield of $10 per 
ton, in free gold, will, at prescMt prices of labor, materials, and food, leave a margin 
for fair profits ; and under favorable conditions, viz: water power, large vein, prox- 
imity to lines of regular communication, a like yield offers a certainty of a very large 
interest on the money necessary for mine and reduction works. 

The number of stamps throughout the mining counties, as reported by the different 
assessors, reaches to about 4,000. Unfortunately, it is not stated what number have 
been running continuously ; and hence, this must be a matter of conjecturer Assum- 
ing, however, that of this number not more than 2,500 have been in continuous oper- 
ation three hundred days in the past year ; and estimating the crushing capacity of 
each stamp at an average of one ton in every twenty-four hours, we have a grand 
total of 750,000 tons of quartz, cement, etc., crushed in one year. 

Placing, now, the average yield for the whole State at only $15 per ton, and we 
have a total product from the stamps of $11,250,000. The average yield of some of 
the narrow veins of Grass Valley far exceeds this sum ; but the paying mines of the 
entire county will probably not exceed an average of $30 per ton. The larger veins 
in other counties will warrant our putting the average for the whole State at $15. 
Under average conditions, this sum leaves a clear profit of cent per cent, and where 
everything is favorable, double that amount. Individual mines often exceed this rate 
of profit ; but it is not from exceptionally favorable instances that we should estimate 
the general well being of this industry. 

According to the " Mercantile Gazette," the receipts for the first nine , months of 
the year 18G6 were as follows : 

From Ciilifornio, northern mines $18,711,783 

From Califurniii, gouthcrn mines 3,418,436 

From Stntu of Nevada 11,003,218 

From Coastwise ports, Oregon, etc 4,416,010 

From British Columbia 2,031 ,801 

Total $39,641,248 

Of thisitotal, $33,499,432 was bullion, from the gold regions of California and from 
the silver districts of the State of Nevada; if to this sum we add ten per cent, for 



, and 

Bum 

jd to 



under 
f n\in- 
walls 
e vein 
' large 
•mined 
hether 
nail or 

n from 
in such 
33 often 
rushing 
tnilar to 
expense 
•oxiraity 
hoisting 
lie daily 
$10 per 
\ margin 
in, prox- 
ery large 

different 
iber have 

Assum- 
0U3 oper- 
ipacity of 

a grand i 

I, and we 
[f some of 
lies of the 
rwer veins 
[te at $15. 
md where 
this rate 
Id estimate 

months of | 



1,783 
18,436 
13,218 
16,010 



ia and from 
ler cent, for 



MINERAL RESOURCES OF CALIFORNIA, 



66 



the amount brought by private hands, the greater part of which should be credited 
to California — since, by reason of its bulk, but little silver finds its way to San Fran- 
cisco outside the regular channels — we shall have a to.tal for California and Nevada 
of $36,849,375, for the first nine months of 1866. The total receipts from all 
sources during the year 1866, amount to $52,691,653. 

The revival of the quartz interest in California, stimulated to greater energy by 
the recent brilliant success of so many mines on the Gold Belt, bids fair to cause the 
gold product from quartz to rival that produced from the washings. 

SILVER. 

The silver interests of the State of California have, as yet, attracted but little 
attention. The silver product of the Coast must be mainly credited to the State of 
Nevada — whose famous " Comstock " lode has already taken rank as one of the great 
silver bearers of the world. 

Unlike the ores of Nevada, the greater part of the silver mines of California con- 
i tain the precious metal in such complicated combinations as requires the aid of smelt- 
ing for its extraction. 

Amongst other varieties, we may enumerate Antimonial Silver, Ruby Silver, Ar- 

! gentiferous and Auriferous Galenas, Copper Glance and Fahlerz. Under the 

j Mexican riSgime a small quantity of silver was extracted from a mine at a place called 

'< Allsal, in Monterey County, and made into plate ; some pieces of which are still in 

the country. This is the only Instance, as far as can be learned, of the occurrence of 

silver in the Coast llange. Along the western slopes of the Sierras, silver ore is 

found in small quantities on the line of the Gold Belt. Amongst other places, native 

silver may be seen in the Harpendlng claim, in Placer County ; and silver ore has 

j been found near OphlrvlUe, in the same county. In the Columbus District of Tuolumne 

1 County, and in the Excelsior District of Nevada County, where the galena is aurif- 

i erous as well as argentiferous. 

I The High Sierra and its eastern slopes are the only localities where we may look 
i for the occurrence of silver ores in appreciable quantities. Some tons of valuable 
! silver ores have been received from Shasta County. Traces of silver are found in 
' Plumas County ; and then a^^ain south in Alpine County, in the vicinity of the town 
I of Monitor ; thence passing along the eastern flanks of the Sierras, southwards, at 
I various places in the counties of Mono and Inyo, including the mines of Owen's 
j River ; aiid again in the western portion of San Bernardino County, where the Slate 
I Range silver mines are located. Excepting a shipnrent of $6,000 from a single 
j claim in Alpine County, no considerable amount of bullion is reported from the silver 
j mines of the State of California. 

! Furnaces for reducing the silver from its ores have been constructed in two or 
three localities, with only measurable success. The rebellious nature of the ores, the 
distance from the lines of easy communication, combined with the prevailing inex- 
perience as to the proper methods of treatment, have hitherto very materijiUy retarded 
the development of this interest. 

QUICKSILVER. , - 

The occurrence of the gold and silver of the Coast, mainly in such combinations 
as admit of reduction by means of amalgamation, rendered necessary a large supply of 
quicksilver. The production of the old world, derived chiefly from the old Almaden 
mine in Spain, and the Idrla mines of Austria, was supplemented by the discovery of 
very extensive deposits of Cinnabar in the Coast Ranges of California. The supply 
from these sources has sufficed not only for all mining purposes at home, but also 
largely for export. 

The ore of quicksilver is mostly in the form of a sulphuret ; the method of its 
occurrence is not, properly speaking, in regular veins, but in irregular masses in the 
.Vm of bunches, stringers, etc., and occupying a certain zone of impregnation. Traces 
of Cinnabar have been found in nearly all the counties of the Coast Range, from 



fr?rr; .\ vm 



I : 



66 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINI3S8 DIRBCTOHY. 



Klamath, on the north, to Santa Barbara, on the south. It occurs, likewise, at 
various places in the foot-hills of the Sierras : for example, in Nevada County, near 
Grass Valley ; in lone Valley, Amador County ; and most curiously in connection 
with auriferous quartz in a mine on the north bank of the Merced River, near H<»''se- 
shoe Bend, in Mariposa County. The cinnabar in this locality is found forming a 
thin seam on the foot-wall of the vein. The only mines of this metal of economical ! 
importance are confined to the Coast Ranges. Of these, the most important is the I 
New Ahnaden in Santa Clara County, which has given employment to as many as , 
thirteen hundred 0{)eratives at once. From this mine has been extracted the major ; 
portion of all the quicksilver produced on this Coast. The ore is found in a zone of! 
impregnation, whose general course is northwest and southeast, and vi'hich extends | 
some five miles from the main workings of the New Almaden, following the direction 
of the inclosing strata. Northwardly from the Mine Hill ore the two mines Enri- [ 
queta and Guadalupe — the product from both of which has by no means approached 
that from New Almaden. The grand deposit of ore was embraced within the com- 
paratively limited space of some forty yards square, and extending downwards with 
a dip towards the north. The bunches and mnsses of ore found within this limit 
were of irregular form and size, and irregularly distributed. 

Next, in importance, we may cite the New Idria mine, situated on the western 
border of Fresno County — the metal from which must all be hauled to San Jose, a > 
distance of one hundred and thirty miles; and the Redingfon Lake Company, of 
Lake County. Amongst the minor localities, may be mentioned the deposits on 
Mt. Diablo of Contra Costa, and those of Napa County. 

The quicksilver is extracted from the cinnabar sometimes in retorts, which are 
charged with ore mixed with reducing and desulphurizing agents; the volatilized metal 
thus set free from its combinations being caught in appropriate condensing apparatus; 
or generally, in large furnaces, where the flume and heated air together effoct the 
chemical disintegration of the cinnabar; while the products of the combustion and 
the volatilized metal are passed through condensation chambers, and thence through 
long canals, in order to allow of as thorough a deposition of the metal as possible. 
When we reflect that mercury is slightly volatile at ordinary temperatures, it will be 
readily understood that all the metal contained in the ore is saved with great difliculty. 

The total production of quicksilver, the grenter portion of which must be credited 
to New Almaden, amounted, up to January 18G6, to 419.077 fl.isks; each flask con- 
tains 7CJ pounds of metal, and, hence, we have 32,059,390 pounds, equal to 1G,029 
tons; in value from sixteen to eighteen millions of dollars. The Rcdington Lak(3 
Company is reported to have produced a total of G,755 flasks since 1802. In May 
last, large contracts were ma<le for all the quicksilver producible by the various mines 
of the coast; and the production for the year 18GG has not been made public. The 
"Mercantile Gazette" states the amount shipped through the Custom House, during 
that period, to have been 30,287 flasks. 

COPPEK. 

Tlie great copper belt of the State occupies a strip of country running along the 
western limits of the foot-hills, from the county of Fresno on the south, to Plumas on 
the north. It carries a varying width up to ten miles, and is traceable by the gozzati 
or ferruginous outcrop, at intervals, throughout its entire length. 

In the far northern coast counties there occurs a second copper bearing region , 
extending from Klamath County into and through Del Norte County, and having a ' 
width of about four miles. Elsewhere in the Coast Ranges, traces of copper havel 
been found in Colusa, Lake, Contra Costa at Monte Diablo, Marin, and Los Angelcbl 
counties ; but nowhere, aa yet, in paying quantities. In the Sierras and their foot-F 
hills, we find copper ore in Plumas County, where smelting has been attempted ; and | 
mines of greater or less promise in Sierra, Nevada, El Dorado, and Amador counties 
Likewise in the Chowchilla region, in the counties of Mariposa and Fresno. Thf 



I most I 

opolis 

For 

lation 

precioi 

I i»Je dep 

jSummc 

I most es 

claim, t 

[ brought 

[where a 

I dred loc 

expenses 

The c 

j copyrite 

I or less p( 

ferent pn 

I ates, and 

I cient depi 

Ores yieJ, 

be shippci 

I useless ga 

The fin 

I smelters si 

withstand! 

of such cor 

The systen 



FrI 



ipuimp^)mj.iiir 



36, at 

near 

!ction 

ling a 
jtnical 1 
is the! 
any as , 
major 
tone of; 
ixtends ' 
reclion 
3 Enri- \ 
reached 
\e com- 
■ds with 
lis limit 

western 
\ Jose, a ' 
ipany, of 
)Osits on 

vhich are 
zed metal 
pparatiis; 
effect the 
stion and 
5 through 
I possible, 
it will he 
difficulty. 
|c credited 
fla^k con- 
to 16,029 
l^ton Lake 
In May 
lious mines 
lie. Tl>e 
e, during 



ftlong the 
|Pluma.^on 

I the gozzini 

[ring region 
d having a 
ppper have! 
[iOS Angelefcj 
I their foot] 
npted ; and] 
lor counties, 
lesno. TIm 



MINERAL RESOURCES OF CALIFORNIA. 



67 



most important mines, however, are to be found in Calaveras, at the towns of Copper- 
opolis and Campo Seco. 

For many years after the settlement of the country, the nomadic prospecting popu- 
lation gave no attention to copper indications — the belief prevailing that only the 
precious metals could be mined remuneratively ; and hence it was that the very valua- 
ble deposits of the Union and Keystone claims remained so long untouched. In the 
Summer of 1860, Mr. W. K. Reed located what has since proved to be one of the 
moat extensive copper lodes of the world. So rich were the developments in this 
claim, that a furore of prospecting was inaugurated, which, in the following year, 
brought to light very many localities where traces of copper may be found, but no- 
where a deposit comparable to that of the Union. Of the three hundred to four hun- 
dred locations made in the county, it is improbable that more than a dozen have paid 
expenses and declared dividends. 

The copper ores of California consist, in the main, of the yellow sulphuret or chal- 
copyrite ; this is found of various degrees of purity, being contaminated with a greater 
or less per centage of mundic (iron pyrites). Near tlie surface may be found, in dif- 
ferent parts of the State, copper glance, red and black oxides, green and blue carbon- 
ates, and silicates. These, however, give place to the yellow ores, as soon as a suffi- 
cient depth has been reached to shut off the decomposing action of the atmosphere. 
Ores yielding less than twelve per cent, of copper cannot, under present conditions, 
be shipped with profit ; and, in order to obviate the transporting of large amounts of 
useless gungae, concentration both by fire a' d water has been inaugurated. 

The fire process has been moderately successful, although the chief object of the 
smelters seems to have been a search after some refractory furnace lining capable of 
withstanding a molten mass either basic or acid, instead of endeavoring to form a slag 
of such composition as shall have but a slight tendency to eat out the furnace material. 
The system of concentration by water, with shaking tables, round buddies and jigs, 
does not seem as yet to have met with any degree of success. 

A few lines of description of the Union and Keystone mines of Copperopolis may 
not be uninteresting. Tnese mines are situated in the county of Calaveras, some 
thirty-eight miles east of the city of Stockton. Both claims were located, at the same 
time, in the year 18G0; the former consists of l,9r)0 feet, and the latter of 3,300 feet. 
The general direction of the vein is northwest and souiheast, with a slight dip to the east. 
The country rock is chloritic slate and serpentine. The Union has been opened by a 
shaft five hundred feet deep, which discloses a mass of pay ore varying in width, in the 
different levels, from eight to forty feet. At the northern end of the claim the ore 
divides into two portions, and continues thus into the Keystone. 

The Keystone has a shaft some three hundred and sixty feet in depth ; the ore of 
the western vein contains but little copper as disclosed from the lower shaft, while 
the eastern lode carries a valuable pay chimney from one to six feet wide. In the 
upper slmft the conditions are reversed, the western vein being the richer. 

There are several other claims of prominence in the county, amongst which may be 
enumerated the Campo Seco, in the neighborhood of which smelting works have been 
erected — the Napoleon, P^mpire, and Table Mountain — from each of which shipments 
have been made. 

The export of copper ore from the town of Copperopolis amounted, in 1863, to 
5,900 tons; and had increased, for 1804, to 14,300 tons. The total amount shipped 
from the Union mine, up to June 1st, I860, was 46,373 tons; and fiom the Key- 
Ptone, up .0 the same date, 5,163 tons. 

From Campo Seco there were shipped, in 1865, some 950 tons. Some few tons of 
black copper, regulus, andore have been shipped from the Chcwchilla mines, in Mar- 
iposa and Fresno counties. 

The value of the copper ore received in San Francisco for shipment to the East dur- 

ng the year ending December 31st, 18^6, was $1,800,000. Amount shipped in 

I18C5 was 25,000 tons, valued m $2,000,000 ; in 1864, 13,300 tons, valued at 

1,094,000, and in 1863, 5,900 tons, valued at $512,000. 



11 

1 






rn7' 



ii 









68 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



COAL. 

The coal heretofore found within the limits of the State, is of the variety known to 
geologists under tlie name of Lignite, or recent coal, as distinguished from the more 
compact masses of carbon found in the formations called carboniferous par excellence. 
Whether or no the harder varieties of coal will yet be found, remains to be elucida- 
ted. The opinion of certain geologists, however, seems to be meeting with favor, that 
coals approaching more or less nearly the characteristics of those of tho trun carbon- 
iferous era, may and have been found, at great depths, at those points where the coal 
measures have been tilted up at a high angle, and where the lower portions of thf 
beds have been exposed to the greater pressure. 

That the formation of the coals is due to the aggregation of woody fibers in the 
deltas of former rivers, and in the basins of former lakes, does not admit of any { 
doubt ; and that new coal beds are now forming in various parts of the world, is ; 
equally true. j 

Subsequent to this deposition, and as a consequence of the cliangcs in the superfi- j 
cial configuration of the earth, great masses of sandstone, earth, etc., have been super-, 
imposed, and, from pressure and time, a thorough carbonization of the woody fiber has | 
taken place. Accepting this theory of formation as true, it is preferable to use the | 
term bed instead of vein ; without reference to the fact that the coal measures arc ! 
found tilted up at all possible angles. ; 

The coal beds of California are confined chiefly to the cretaceous formations of the ! 
Coast Ranges, and find their best exemplification on Monte Diablo, in Contra Costa. 
Traces of coal are reported at various points near the coast, from Del Norte to Los 
Angeles ; in Humboldt, within three miles of the town of Areata ; in Colusa, Monte- 
rey, etc. Lately, while excavating to lay the foundations of some buildings on Marc 
Island, a few very thin seams of coal were discovered. In the hydraulic diggings ol 
the foot-hills of the Sierras, in Shasta, Nevada, and Amador counties, we find small 
bodies of Lignite and pieces of silicified wood. 

On Dry Creek also, seven miles from FoUom, there is reported a sm.all deposit of 
coal. The past conformation of certain portions of the county of Contra Costa oflercd 
the conditions most favorable to the deposition of large and workable beds of coal. 
We find traces of this basin extending southeastwardly as far as Corral Hollow, in 
San Joaquin County, and perhaps the few seams of coal southwest of Manly's Ferry 
may mark its continuance "into the foot-hills in that direction. No commercial im- 
portance, as yet, attaches to any of the beds outside the Mount Diablo region. The 
mines at this point, the most important of which are the Black Diamond, Union. 
Eureka, Pittsburg, and Manhattan, were discovered on the 19th of December, IS.'iO, 
by a Mr. Frank Somers. The beds have an average thickness of about three and 
one-half feet. The mines are distant from the point of vshipment, on the San Joaquin 
River, about five miles ; they give employment, directly and indirectly, to over seven 
hundred operatives. The first attempts at burning the coal from Mount Diablo were 
unsuccessful, but an alteration in the construction of the furnaces demonstrated il- 
usefulncss for raising steam, until, at the present time, it is used for hundreds of stH- 
tionary engines, and for the furnaces of the steamers which navigate the inland water- 
of the State. 

Four years after the discovery by Somers the coal product of Mount Diablo luid 
reached, for the year 18G3, a total of 37,4.03 tons; the amount raised has gone on 
steadily increasing until we have for the present year n product of 80,000 ton?. 
With the increase in manufacturing, and greater extension of the means of ea>y 
transportation, the yield of the Mount Diablo mines will, doubtless, be much enlarge 
— since the present rate of production by no means greatly taxes their producind 
capacity. 

' ' ' \ . ' A8PHALTUM.* 



This mineral being an inspissated product of a rock oil. or petroleum, is founi 



• Facts from Don Alfredo Uobiiifton. 



lown to I 
e more 
eUenoe. , 
elucidn- 1 
iTor, that 1 
carbon- I 
the coal j 
13 of thf 

rs in tlip 

it of any ,• 

world, is 1 

i 

! 8uyierfi-j 
en Buper- j 
fiber has j 
to use the \ 
i?ures are ! 

on 9 of the 
tra Costa, 
rte to Lo: 
ga, Montc- 
^ on Mari' 
Hggings ot 
find small 

I deposit oi 
)sta ofTerctl 
'(h of coal. 
Hollow, in 
nly's Ferry 
nereial ini- 
^gion. The 
)nd, Union, 
nber, ISM. 
t three and 
Ian Joaquin 
over seven 
iablo were 
nstrated it> 
;lreds of sta- 
dand water- 

Diablo Imil 
I has pone on 
180,000 ton?, 
lans of ca^y 

ich cnlarp-'li' 
producinil 



MINERAL RESOURCES OF CALIFORNIA 



6i> 



im, IS 



founJ 



and formed at those points where the bituminuu.-i shales and sandstune.^, tilted up ut u 
iiigli angle, crop out upon the surface. Tiie oil is, doubtless, brought upwards to the 
iiurfiice by capillary attraction, or hydrostatic pressure, and on being exposed to the 
air the lighter hydrocarbons become volatilized, leaving behind a viscous residuum, 
which gradually hardens into asphaltum. This substance, under the name of "brea," 
was known to the inhabitants of California long before the advent of the Americans, 
and was used by them to form a water-tight covering to their houses. They were 
accustomed to form a layer of broken bits of " brea " over the usual thatch, where, 
exposed to the rays of the sun, it soon ran together and formed a homogeneous stratum. 
A?phaltum is found in greater or less abundance for a long distance on and near the 
coast at La Brea, near Gilroy in Santa Clara ; in Monterey, San Luis Obispo, Santa 
Barbara, and Los Angeles counties. The largest deposit, however, is to be seen in 
the county of Santa Barbara, about three leagues west of the town of the same name, 
and situated directly on the coast. The "brea" is found in the greatest abundance at 
a place called La Goluta, adjoining the Ranchos de la Patera and de Los Dos Pueblos. 
Thonfands of tons are lying on the sea beacli, and for a distance of two miles large 
masses are seen on the face of the cliifs at heights varying from seventy-five to one 
hundred feet above the ocean. The method of its occurrence is in diagonal veins at 
the upturned extremities of the bituminous shales. The masses of " brea" formed at 
these points project outwards, and finally through the washing away of the earthy 
strata beneath them they roll downwards to the water. There is found, occurring in 
thin strata, and in nogreatabundance, a variety of asphaltum very materially differing 
in appearance and structure from that used for paving and roofing ; it is brittle, jet 
black, liighly lustrous, and susceptible of being converted into a very superior varnish. 
Large deposits of " brea " ura found in Los Angeles County, on some of the Ranchos 
of Don Abel Stearns ; on Las Bulsas, La Habra, and some others. On the Rancho 
of Dos Pueblos the " brea " may be found by digging a few feet below the surface, ut 
points where its presence is indicated by exudations of tarry matter. The chief source 
of the supply of asphaltum used in California for paving and roofing, is the Rancho 
de la Patera. The ammal conriumptlun amounts to about 2,000 tons, valued at $20 
per ton. 

rETROLEUM. 

Traces of petroleum, or rock oil, are to be found in many places in the coast range, 
from Humboldt County on the north, very nearly, to the southern limit of the State. 
Tiie bituminous shales and sandstones are seen in San Mateo County ; near Santa 
Cruz, in Santa Cruz County; at (lilroy, in Santa Clara County; and "indications" 
of oil have been reported in Lake, Colusa, and Napa counties ; and near San Pablo 
and Antioch, in Contra Costa ; likewise in Los Angeles and San Bernardino. The 
only localities from which any considerable quantities have been shipped are the Hay- 
ward & Coleman, Charles Stott, and the Stanford Bros, works, in Santa Barbara Co. ; 
the Union Mattole well, of Humboldt County ; and the Buena Vista Company's 
works, near Buena Vista Lake, Kern County. The production from these localities 
lias been, according to the " Mercantile Gazette," as follows : From the Hay ward Pe- 
troleum Company, from October 8th, 1865, to October 8th, 1866, 2,569 barrels ; 
iVom the Stanford Oil Works, from September 4th, 18G5, to October 4th, 1866, 1,187 
l)arrels — making in all 3,756 barrels. The receipts from the Union Mattole and 
Buena Vista, added to small amounts from minor localities, will bring the total pro- 
duction sinCe mining for oil was inaugurated, up to about 4,000 barrels. The flow of 
crude oil from the oil creek, Santa Barbara County, is from five to six barrels per 
day. 

Wells have been bored at various points where the surface indications would seem 
to warrant the probability of finding flowing wells, but hitherto without any marked 
success. A number of wells have been sunk to very considerable depths ; the deepest 
of which is the Davis well, in Humboldt County, reported to be down over 1300 feet. 
From many of the wells small quantities of oil have been pumped. Jets of gas, salt 
water, and other indications, deemed reliable in the East, have, as yet, failed to bring 



Km 



Li 



'J J- 






tl 






. 1! 



t«:jli 



H 






S i 

i 



70 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIllECTORY. 



to light a flowing well. The upturned position of the shnlea, allowing thus the oil to 
exude and evaporate, may perhaps be responsible for the phenomena as exhibited in 
the oil districts of this State. The superintendent of the Hay ward Company being 
convinced of the abundance of the oil in the shales and sandstones, was the first to 
adopt the plan of running into the hills and collecting in the soles of the tunnels the 
exudations from the oil repositories ; and the result has shown the soundness of his 
method of procedure. The crude oil thus collected must be submitted to a preliminary 
purification before it can be used for the purposes of illuminating or lubricating. For 
this purpose refining works have been erected in San Francisco, and in some localities 
at the wells. Whether the rock oils of this coast be identically similar in chemical 
composition to the hydrocarbons at the East is a very interesting problem for hcicutific 
investigation, but is a subject of very little moment in the popular estimation. 

BOKAX. * 

The borax of commerce, or chemically speaking, the bi-borato of soda, has been, 
heretofore, chiefly manufactured from a combination of the boracic acid waters of the 
springs of Tuscany with common soda. This salt is very extensively used for glazing 
pottery — upwards of 11,000 tons being annually consumed for this purpose in Eng- 
land alone ; also, as a flux for assaying, for welding, and for the formation of the finer 
glasses and enamels. 

The presence of this substance in California was first delected by Dr. J. A. Veatch, 
as early as 1856, but it was not until 1864 that systematic efforts for its collection were 
undertaken. The locality of its occurrence is in Lake County, about sixty miles N. 
W. of Napa City. There is one other small lake in the county, which contains traces j 
of boracic acid, and likewise the boiHng springs on the shores of Clear Lake. The | 
Borax Lake, so called, is on the property of the Borax Company ; it is elliptical in : 
form, about one mile long by one half a mile wide. | 

The United States Survey reports the superficial area of the lake at two hundred 
and nineteen acres at the latter part of the dry season. The accumulations of the i 
winter's rains, however, enlarge its area to some four hundred acres ; of which space ! 
some three hundred may be said to be more or less productive of borax. The aver- \ 
age depth of the lake is not more than two and a half feet. The waters, surcharged j 
with boracic acid and soda, and becoming concentrated by evaporation, deposit the | 
salt in monoclinic crystals in the mud of the bottom. | 

The stratum immediately below the water to a depth of some six feet is soft and i 
prolific in fine crystals ; below this succeeds a zone of stiff blue mud, wherein are 
found the large ^ized crystals. The method of extraction consists in sinking small! 
coffer dams into the muddy bottom, exhausting the water, washing out the finer i 
crystals in a manner tiimilar to the process of panning out placer gold ; and picking 
out the larger masses by hand. As a result of this rude process, the company have ! 
been producing an average of two tons per day. j 

Repeated analyses of air dried samples of mud taken from the bottom at various 
points, gave eleven and nine-tenths to eighteen and seven-tenths per cent. cryv>-tallized i 
borax; and there was obtained by actual lixiviation, fifteen per cent, of borax, twenty! 
eight and a naif per cimt. of carbonate of soda, and eight and one-fourth per cent. ; 
of common salt. i 

Admonished by this result, the company determined to erect works for extracting! 
the microscopic crystals by lixiviation ; these, it is anticipated, will be in active opera-' 
lion by the spring of the ensuing year. j 

With a view to arrive at the depth of the borax impregnation, an artesian boring 
was put down a distance of sixty feet ; the mud taken from the bottom yielded three 
and a half per cent, of borax. To the better understanding of the vast amount of 
borate in the mud of the lake, we may make the following estimates ; assuming that 
the productive ground embraces no more than two hundred acres, with au average 



* Complied firom tlio Report of the Borax Compkiijr. 



I TheS 

I whose de 

following 



MINERAL RESOURCES QF CALIFORNIA. 



71 



depth of only six feet, we have, ut 43,560 square feet to the acre, a body of mud 
equal to 5,227,200 cubic feet ; allowing twenty cubic feet to the ton, we have 2,G13,G00 
tons of air dried mud ; if now we estimate the yield of borax at ten per cent, instead of 
fifteen per cent, as per working analysis, we have a mass in sight containing at least 
261,360 tons of the biborate of soda (borax) and a very much larger amount of the 
carbonate. Some eighteen months since, there wa^ reported a discovery in the 
southern part of the State, of a substance resembling the borate of lime found in 
the vicinity of Iquique, Peru, which an analysis, however, proved to contain no 
boracic acid. 

The causes which 'Viduced the crystals of borax, being doubtless still in operation, 
the supply from I ' """nify may be deemed inexhaustible. 

SULPHUR. 

This metalloid is founa various places in the State ; chiefly in the counties of the 
Coast Ranges. Its presence is reported in Klamath, Lake and Colusa ; in Santa 
Barbara, near the Mission San Buena Ventura, eight and a half miles from the 
Ocean ; also, in Los Angeles. 

Works for purifying the crude sulphur by sublimation have been erected upon the 
grounds of the Borax Company, with a capacity per day of eight to ten tons of the 
refined article. 

UNDEVELOPED RESOUUCES. 

The State of California is rich in minerals, other than those above enumerated, and 
whose development is merely a matter of time ; amongst these we may enumerate the 
following : 

TIN. 

The ores of this metal are reported in the county of Los Angeles, on the Rancho 
Teraescal, claimed by Don Abel Stearns. The mines are located thirty miles south- 
west of the town of San Bernardino. The tract of land whereon the ore has been 
found contains about five square leagues, and is bounded on the north and northwest by 
the Rancho La Sierra and the Santiago Mountains, on the west by the Santa Ana Plains, 
and on the south by the Rancho La Laguna. The district contains some five hundred 
different claims, on one of which a shaft has been sunk, from which, as reported, 
seventy-five tons of ore have been extracted. The mines are now idle, on account of 
water and disputed title. . 

IRON. 

Deposits of iron ores, hoematites, and magnetic oxides are reported at various 
points, but nowhere in the State have any efforts been made to undertake the erection 
of smelting works. Iron ores are found in Lake County, ten miles from the lower 
lake ; in Santa Clara, near Gilroy ; in Butte, extending from the southern boundary 
of Plumas to a point on the south side of the Feather River ; in Calaveras County, 
to the north of Murphy's ; and near Auburn, in Placer County. 

Of the minor minerals we may mention : 

Chromic Iron, used for preparing green and yellow pigments, and for chromates 
of potash and soda, occurs in Serpentine, near the Crimea House, Tuolumne, and 
in Monterey and Santa Clara, 

Matiffanese, of excellent quality, at Red Rock, in San Pablo Bay, and on the 
Peninsula of San Francisco. 

Graphite, or Plumbago, is found in large quantities in Los Angeles, within eight 
miles of the ocean ; in Mariposa, Tuolumne, and Calaveras. 

Gyptum, in large masses, occurs in several of the coast counties, Santa Cruz, Los 
Angeles, and Sun Diego. 

Cobalt and Nickel, in small quantities, are reported near Dutch Flat. 
Fire Clays are found in the coal measures of Mt. Diablo, and discoveries of 
Kaolins are reported in Mendocino and Napa. 



w 



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It"! .• 



72 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



Platinum, nnd its n.osociate metals, are known to exist, and two or three small ' 
diamonds have been discovered. 

CONCLUSION. 

A State which numbers amongst her productions an annual yield of $25,000,000, \ 
and upwards, in gold ; nearly 50,000 flasks of quicksilver ; between eighty and j 
ninety thousand tons of coal ; twenty-five to thirty thousand tons of copper ore ; six j 
hundred tons of borax, and two thousand five hundred tons of sulphur, with capa- 
city for great expansion — to say nothing of the production of asphaltum, petroleum, 
clays, etc. — needs no rhetoric to embellish the brilliant array of her mineral resour- 
ces. They speak the irrefragable logic of facts, and bear living witness, not only to 
the wealth of her prolific bosom, but alt-o to the energy and enterprise of her 
population. 

From 1848 to 1866, a period of only eighteen years, there has been a gratifying 
increase in the products of the stable mineral industries. The year 1853 saw the 
greatest yield from the superficial placers, which are now, in the older counties, 
pretty thorouglily exhausted. Naturally, there is required a longer time to build up 
the machinery, sink the shafts, and prepare the quartz mines for a production com- 
parable to that of the placers. But, once constructed and set to work with becoming 
energy, skill, and prudence, a permanent annual yield of $25,000,000 from this source 
profits the State far more than the fitful yield of far greater sums from repositories 
which must inevitably very soon become dried up. 

That mining investments, under proper supervision as to location of mine, manage- 
ment, etc., are not to be considered a precarious so'irce of revenue, let us examine 
the results obtained from a careful calculation of the profits from legitimate mining 
enterprises, as compared with those derived from railways, canals, w.ater works, navi- 
gation, gas, dock, and land companies, held in the City of London.* It was found 
that the average annual returns from the latter class of investments were three and 
seven-eighths per cent, on the average selling price, while the three hundred and fifty 
mines in the Mining Share List, including copper, lead, and tin, divided annually 
thirteen and one-half per cent., thus showing that sound mining adventures pay, on 
the average, more than three times as much as is derived from all other species of 
investments. 

However gratifying may be the exhibit of the mineral productions of the State in the 
past, it is to be looked upon only as an earnest for the future. With denser popula- 
tion, cheaper labor, more secure title, and extension of the means of easy communi- 
cation, we may confidently anticipate a still better, because safer, field of enterprise 
fur capital, and a vigorous and healthful development of all our resources. 



QUARTZ MILLS. ■■^ \ 

Tlie number of quartz mills in (iperation in this State in April, 1857, was one hundred and thirty-eight, ^ 
with an aggregate of iifteen hundred and twenty-one stamps ; the cost of erection of which was one mil- 1 
lion seven hundred and sixty -tliree IhouBiind dollars. The number in operation, November, 1858, was two i 
hundred and seventy-nine, with au average of two thousand six hundred and tun stamps ; the cost of eren- i 
tion of which wuB three million two hundred and seventy thousand dollars. The number in operation,; 
January Ist, 1867, is four hundred nnd eleven, of which two hundred and seven are propelled by steam, I 
one hundred and eighty-six by water, and eighteen by steam and water. The cost of machinery is 
estimated at five million nine hundred thousand dollars. In addition to the stamps here enumerated, 
there are employed four hundred and nineteen arustras, of which three hundred and fifty are connected 
with different quartz mills, and the remainder arc employed in diffei'ent sections of the quartz region. 
Included in this estimate are thirty-five cement mills, viz : in El Dorado County, six ; in Nevada County, 
twenty ; and in Placer County, nine— which are distinguished in the table by an asterisk. (*) 



• London Mining Journal, August lltb, 1866. 





QUARTZ MILLS — CALIFORNIA. 


78 


TAIJLE OF QUARTZ MILLS. 

[Compiled at the ofllce of tlio PaclHc Coast llushicas Directory, January Ut, 1867,] ' 

WITH THE I.OCATIO.S, NAME OK MILL, I) ATE OK ERECTION, NUMDEU OK STAMI'S, COiT OK MACHISKIIV,* 
AND THE DIKKCTOU'a OK OWNEU'S NAME OF EACH. 


. Location. 


Name of SlilL 


1^ 
(5 c 

IS 

1863 
1804 
186(i 

1850 
1858 
18r.(i 
1867 
185U 
IK,G 
18U5 
1858 
IHtiO 
1857 
1865 
18fi5 
1864 
18H0 
1862 
1866 
1854 
1.S64 
1H64 
1858 
1808 
1858 
1868 

1869 
1868 
1869 
1866 
1858 
1865 
1865 
1802 
1800 
1863 
1856 
18C0 
1864 
1805 
1866 
1805 

1806 
1866 
1866 
18t)6 
1866 
1856 
1867 

1863 
1850 
1850 
1866 
1852 
1865 
1861 
1864 


1^ 
3 o 

1' 

10 

6 

10 

10 

8 

10 

8 

40 
40 
10 
10 
20 
lU 
20 
10 
16 
10 
10 
10 
40 
4 
10 
20 
16 
10 
40 
20 
16 
20 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
20 
10 
20 

"if.' 
1 

12 

4 
12 


10 
12 
10 
15 

10 
12 
17 
12 

6 


12 
10 


> 

it- 

r 

"i' 

4 
4 


i 


Cost. 


2:? 
1 


rrcsout Occupants, 


ALPINE COUNTY. 

Marklopville 


I'ioncer 


steam 

n 

steam 
s & w 
steiim 
water 
steam 
s & w 
steam 

s& w 

water 

s& w 

II 

steam 
water 

II 

steam 
II 

II 

water 

ti 

s ft w 
« ater 

II 

II 

II 

8 & W 

water 
8& w 

' water 

" 
ateom 
8 & w 

II 

steam 
water 
btcani 

steam 

;i 
It 
II 
II 
II 
II 

water 

steam 
II 

water 
li 
11 

steam 
water 


950,000 
15 000 
20,000 

10,000 
12,000 
10,000 

6,000 
40,000 
40,00(( 
10 000 
10,000 
20,000 
10,000 
100,000 
10,000 
10,000 

8,000 

6,000 
10,000 
40,000 

7,600 

10.000 

16,000 

10,000 

10,000 

40,000 

10,000 

16,030 

20,000 

10.000 

12,000 

9,000 

10,000 

20,000 

8,000 

4,000 

20,000 

15.000 

20,000 

9 000 

8,000 

5,000 

8,000 

3,000 
21,000 
12,000 
15,000 
30,000 
15,000 
15,000 

15,000 

10,000 

20,000 

4,000 

8,000 

■18,666 

10,000 


Silver 

II 

Gold. 
II 

:: 

tl 
,, 

ft 

It 

If 

tk 

fi 
tl 

11 

ft 

II 
ft 

ft 

14 
ff 

If 

it 
tt 
tt 
tt 

11 

ft 
II 
ft 
11 
tl 
If 

(f 
il 

II 
fl 
if 
ff 
it 

(f 
II 
ff 
fl 
t( 
ft 
If 
If 


Jones, Wado & Co. 

W, Whitesides 

U. VVasb'n M. & M. Co. 

MIddlefon & Co. 
William A. ruliner. 
Cnrdncr & Fleeliart. 
Gardner & Flwliart. 
Gusliwildor & Co. 
Hooper & Co. 
W, J. I'augh. 
E, T. Steoii. 
Hooper & Co. 
Creed & Wood. 
.Soatou M. C;o, 
Eagan & Co. 
C. T. Meader. 
S. C. Fogus. 
C. T. Meador. 
Tubbs & (;o. 
.lames Morgan. 
Bruno & Co, 
Cushing. Ryder & Co. 
Hurst & Co. 
A, Havward. 
R. C, bowns. 
A, Havward. 
R. C. Downs, Sup't. 
Slahoncy Brothers. 
C, T, Meader. 
C. T, Wheeler, 
California Furnace Co. 

I'ine, Sup't. 

J, T, Farley. 
Uurd & Co. 
Rose & Co. 
Fogus & Co. 
Lawton & Co. 

C. T. Jleadcr. 
J. T. Farley. 
W. U. Thoss. 
Lawton & ('o. 
Tulloch k Co. 
M, Tynan. 

BInny & Co. 
E. C. Ross k Co. 

Ilnlstcad. 

Ncsbit k Co. 
OrovilleG. &S, M, Co. 
M. H, WoUst Co. 
U.N. Tilden. 

N. Lurco, Prince & Co. 
Mill. 

D. Southworth. 
E ft. G. Stickles. 
Winters & Bovee. 
Spence 4 Co. 
Mina Rica Co. 
Jones k Co. 


Silver Mountain 

II II 

AMADOn COUNTY. 

Amador Citv 


Star 


Wasliinif toll 


Anindor .... 


41 i( 


lUuikor Hill 


tt *i 


Kluoluirts 


It II 


Hazard 

Kevstone 


tl (1 


14 tt 


SDriiic Hill 


Clinton 


Hocky Futlu 


\t 


l^nfoii 


Drytown 

II 


IMymoutli 


PotOBi 


tt 




FiUdlotown 

Jackson 

1* 


Hichmond. 


Coney H 

Hubbard!* 


II 


Tubbs 


II 


Oneida 


Lower Randicclii 

rine Grovo 


Itnliiin 




lianchcria 


l<oval LOQIFUO 


Sutter Crook 




If II 


Downs 


tl it 




tt tl 


Lincoln Q. M. Co.'s 


** i« 


U tl 


Meador 


II *1 


Wildmaiis 


Volcano.. 


Ilelding 


If 


fi 


Fogus 


ff 




If 


Italian 


II 


Monday. . 

Mitcliclls 


If 


If 


I'ioiieer,. ... ... 


1* 




fi 


Sulpliurct . 


II 




ff 


Tulloch 


ti 


Tynan 


BUTTB COUNTY. 

Ohcrokco Ravine 

Jordan 


Binnv St Co 


I'orlcr M, Co 


Oregon City 




M II 


Ncsbit 

Sparks & Smith 

Virginia. 

•49aiid'58(i. M. Co. ,., 

Altaville Q. M. Co 

Hills 

Southworths 

Stickles 


Oregon Gulch 


Virginia 


YankooUill 


CALAVKllAB rODHTY. 

Altaville 

Anffols CamD 




II II 


II n 


Winters 


Angel Creek 


Angel Creek 

Flores 

Carson Creek 


Camp Flores 


Carson Creek 


* In estlmntlnR Hic cost. 
or the amount expended ii 


the flRurcs of the assessor 
its development. 


liavo been included, which do not cmb 


1 
race the value of the mine 



Br, 



1. 



74 



PACIFIC COAST BUSING'S 8 DIRECTORY. 



Location. 



CALAVKUA8 — eoiltinuKl. 

Clieroki ■ Flat 

Coppvrupolis 



Dry Crook 

EIDorHdo 

H. F. Mok. U. 

MU8(|UC>l0 

San AudroBH, . 



Sandy (iulcli. 
Skull Flnt... 
West Point... 



HL DOHADO COCKTV. 

Cold .Spiingi- 

Coloiim 

Cosumucs 



Diamond 8prlng8. 
Kl Dorudo 



Georgetown., 



Goorjdn Slide. 
Grizzly Flat. .. 

Lyonifdalp 

Kelsey 

riuccrvillc 



Shingle Springs. 
SmitVi'ii Flat. . . . 



Soap Weed . . 
Texas Hill . . . 
Volcanovillo. 
White Ituck . 



INYO COUNTV. 

Chr)'8opolis City . . . 

CoHU DiKtrlct 

George's Creek 

Inyo Diirtrict 

Keaniarge City 

Koarearge District. . 



Slate Range.. 



KBRM COU.VTY. 

Erskino Crook 

Greenhorn 

Uavilah 



Name of Mill. 



r 



II 



Cherokee 1S80 

Duncans IJotiS 

Kesorvdir J8ti4 

1802 
1866 
18U0 
1863 
1864 
1864 



Dry Creek 

Kl Dorado 

Cnrlton'H Ai.istra£... 
.Musqucto Q. M. Co8 

Kiithgobs 

Taitc* SIcGlynn.. . , 

Tubbs I860 

WoodhouBO 1868 

Casners 11859 

Harris ;1860 

Hopes 1860 

Uceys 1861 

.Sohuiidt & Fisher 1864 

Vaucea 1862 



r* I M 

Softs 

r r 



Columbus 

l.^abollG.& S. .M.Co.. 
.Stillwugon & Morton . . 

TullochSt Ault 

*Cookc9 

Fort Yuma. 

I.ogtown 

Montezuma 

N. V. Kl Dorado 

8u)|;ar Loaf. 

rnioM 

Wilders 

Clipper G. & S. M. Co.. 

Wooilsidc 

Hlue Kock 

KugU^ 

Itlue Lodge 

I'lynuiuth 

Uiiiniou 

Loafer's Ilolluw 

Manning 

Now Kl Dorado 

Kow York 

•acilic 

'overty I'oint 

(■rays 

•Brewster & Co.'s 

*llo(ik& Ladder 

•Tafts 

Cobb& Co 

•Stewarts 

French 

•Live Oak 



1866' . . . . 
18IM! 6 

I8au: 4 

1866; 8 
18661 6 



1868 10 
18661 40 



1866 
1866 
1866 
1865 
18B3| 



Lafayette, Owens K. . . . 

Owen's Lake 

Owen's Itivcr, east side. 
San Carlos 



OroFino 

Josephine 

I'assmoros 

N. Y. Co.'s 

I'auls 

Koarsarge Co 

Kearsarge 

Union 

Owen's Kivor Mill 

N.Y. Mining Co 

Ida : 

San Carlos 

Slate Range 



Erskino Creek 1866 

Alpine C. M. Co 1868J 

Agua Calionto 1866 1 

Freemans 18^ i 

General Grant G. M.Co 1866; 

Howe&Oders 18851 

Kellum & Wright 18661 

Loyola 1864| 

Marsh & Kennedy 1866 

N. Y. & Clear C'k'M. Co 18661 
Pioneer Il866> 



18631 2 

18661 10 

1866; 20 

18611 2 

18611 15 

1806 16 

1866 10 

186tl 4 

18631 16 

18621 20 

1867 i 10 

1864 1 10 

1863 10 

1866 12 

1866 4 

1860 10 

1866 12 

1868; 10 

1869, 20 

1868 8 



1866 20 

1866, 6 

1866 4 

1865 1 16 

1866' 6 

18661 20 



1866 
1863 
1864 
1866 
1863 



1866 10 



1866 



8 



o 
9 



Cost. 



I 

steam i93,000 

" I 16,000 

wotcr 10,000 

stoani 10,000 

"• I 10,000 

water 200 

steam 16,01)0 

wat<-i 7.000 

• I 6,000 

•' 8.000 

" 15,000 

3.000 

3,000 

16,000 

4.000 

water 8,000 

steam 15,000 



SEo. 

a 
.■" S 



Gold. 



water 



steam 
water 
steam 

water 

ste;i 



water 

steam 
water 

steam 
water 

steam 



6,000 

1,6IK) 

4,0(KI 

LOOOjCem't 
iGold. 

9.000: " 

(K),(H»0 " 

20,000' " 

15.000 " 
12,000: " 

2,600' " 

12.0001 " 
6,000 " 
l.OOO! " 

lij.ooo; '• 

60.000 '• 

1 " 

20.0001 " 
12,000' •• 

5,000| " 



wufori 



steam j 
water 



steam 

water 



10.0001 

16.000, 

8,000' 

1,500; 

6,(KI0; 

500, 

2,000 

4,000 

8,000 i 

40,000 

2,000 



I 



water! 
steam i 
Wttteri 
steam 
water 
steam 
woter 
steam 



G&S 



water 



35,000 
30,0 X) 
2,000 
50,000 
10,000 
60,000 
15,000 
15,(X)0 
15,000 
20,000 
lO.OuO 
20,000 
28,000 



5,000 Gold. 





steam 


30,000 
16,000 






6,000 






12,000 






16,000 






10,000 
22,000 


4 


water 


17,000 




steam 


22,000 
9,000 



Present Occupants. 



CherokeoM. Co. 
Duncan k Co. 
.Shoppard & Co. 
Knux & Co. 
William Irvine. 
H. F. Caritou. 
Cutter ft Waten. 
John Rathgeb. 
lullo & McGlynn. 
Tubbs ft Co, 
C. Smith. 
Casner ft Barnes. 
A. Harris. 

Ho|K!. 

A. Lacey. 
Schmidt ft Fisher. 

— Bernard. 



■I.e. McTarnahan, Sup't. 
IPIiilo Isabell, Sup't. 
Stlllwagon ft Norton. 
Tulloch ft Ault. 
J. Cooke ft Ca 

JGuldv ft Burlingham. 

Spenco, Agent 

!n. Y. Kl Dorado Co. 
I It. Dlekerman, Sup't 
ij. T. lliilioock, Sup't 

B. W. Wilder. 

IR. Cushnuin, Sup't. 

Ash, Lime & Knox. 

John llinosJ^cCo. 

Willitini Bigler. 

A. M Stetson, Sup't. 

' Potior, Sup't. 

lllnrnion (j. ft S. M. Co. 

C. W. Moulthrop, Sup't. 
jltlain, Aldorson ft Co. 

A. Lazeas, Sup't 
F Rood. 
J. M. Douglass. 
Burdiekft Whito. 
i(iray, Bros, ft Son. 
Brewster ft Co. 
Andon^on ft Redd. 
P. M. Taft, 
Cobb ft Co. 
Stewart ft Hall. 
French Co. 
Ward Bros. 



Now York Co. 

New York Co. 

Thos. Passmore. 

N. Y. Co., M. Dorc.Ag't 

New York Co. 

Kearsarge Co, 

(ioldtliwaito ft Co. 

Union M. Co. 

Owen's R. M. Co. 

New York M.Co. 

Ida JI. Co. 

San Carlos M. Co. 

Slate Range Co. 



Krskino Crook Co. 
W. F. White ft Co. 
Wolskill ft Co. 
N. Y.ftClcarCr'kM.Co. 
(loneral Grant M. Co. 
Howe & Co. 
Kellnm ft Wright. 
II. McKcaduoy. 
Marsh ft Kennedy, 
N.Y. ft Clear Cr'lc M.Co. 
J. II. Thomaii. 



* Cement Mills. 





it 




ti 




1, 




41 
it 


• Cemon 



QUARTZ MILLS — CALIFORNIA. 



76 



Locutiou. 



KKllH—eonlinueil. 
llttviluh 

KoIkuo Cimou 

II II 
Kcnivilli' 

Koj'Hvillo 

I'oHH Flat 

Wulkor'8 Uusiii 

KI.AMATII COUNTY. 

Itliiuk Hour Uulcli 

Kdcly's <jiulcli 

11 II 

MARIPOSA (•(lUtlTY. 

Aqun Frio Cieuk 

Ik'Br CiiH-'k 

II II 

Hoar Vnlloy , 

Uoiulurnut 

liriilfrcport 

Hnfliilo Uulcli 

Hull Croek 

CliiincHul 

Coultervillo 

(iciitry'H (iiiiuh 

HIte'sCovc 

Ilornitoii 

Muriposu 

Maxwell ('rci>k 

Mercoil Kiver 

II II 

11 II 

II II 

Mount (iaiiu'!) 

Mount Ophir 

Nortli Fork Merced U 
II Ik II II 

Vrinccton 

HIierlock'H Creek 

Sweetwater 

II 

Split Rock '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Stockton Creek 

Teiuperauct! Creek. . . 

II II 

White's Flat 

Whitlocks 

MOKO COUNTY. 

Kodio 

II 

Hot SpriugH 

NKVADA COUNTY. 

llloomtiold 

Ciaco 

French Corral 

11 41 

I. II 
(jriBS Valley 



Kamc of Mill. 



Itaud & Co.'ii 

Rood & Llllios 

Union 

tulunchoO. & S.M. Co 
I'ottuHU. ft S.'M. Co... 

Rogori! 

Hiffliluuti. &S. M. Co. 

Sunnier 

Mammoth 

RobertR ft Co.'g 

Lons Tom 

Joo Walker M. Co 



r 



1866 
14tI6 
18tl6 
18«U 
18B6 
IStW 
1804 
18H4 
18iW 
1855 



lllack Bear.. . 
lAvj Yankee. 
L'nion 



Mullen k Co 

J. Bobblo 

G. Chittenden 

Bear Valley 

lIeHle|H< 

Sliimer & Co 

WatthbuniK 

Feliciunu Vein 

Bliick & Munu8 

! Floyds 

Joluisonii 

{CowurdH 

Illten 

illurniluHU.&S. M.Co. 

I Francis 

{Muripoiia 

Maxwell (i.fc S.M, Co, 

i Benton MillH 

' FerL'usouH 

IMilfer A Co.'g 

{Peek, FountBin & Co.. . 

: Rutherford Bros 

I Mount (jaines 

'Mount Upliir 

Clark, Derrick & Co. . . 

(joodman k Co 

I'rinceton 

('ashman & Co.'s 

Ellis 

Rollins & Co 

Crown Lead Co 

Mariposa Co 

Barretts 

Lafayette M. Co 

Dun Breen k Co 

Whitlock U. & S. M. Co. 



)Empiro. 

ilomestake 

Williams & Wicklaud. 



.Co. 



Kuroka H. 8c M. 

Enterprise 

American M. Co.'s. . . 
*Amorican M. Co.'s, . 

•Empire 

Allison Raucli. 

Alta Hill 

Byers 

CAmbridge 

Eureka U. Co 

Forest Spring 

Gold Hlh 

Hartcrey 

louo M. Co.'s 

Lady Franklin 

Laramies 

Latona 

Lucky H.Co.'i 



IKIiSi 10 
I8(iU 20 



186' 

I8li6 

18tt4 

1865 

1860 

1863 

1866 

18(i& 

1860 

1861 

1869 

I860 

1863 

18(10 

1866 

18fM 

1864 

1858 

1861 

18ti2 

1862 

1860 

18)12! 10 

1868: 24 

1S57; 10 

1866| 8 

18601 24 

1863, 16 



1861 
1863 
1863 
1868 
1860 
1866 
1865 
1863 



1866 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1862 
1866 
1866 
1864 
1867 
1863 
1866 
1866 
1856 



1864 
1866 



10 



stcum 
water 
steam 



steam 
II 

water 

II 

II 

II 
steam 



water 



steum 



water 
steam 



water 
steam 
water 
steam 
li 

water 



steam 



water 
steam 



water 
steam 



water 

steam 
II 

water 



Cost 



01? 

C:2. 
< o. 



91lj,000 Gold. 

6000 " 

18,000 1 •• 



15,000 
10,000 
40,000 
30,000 
45,000 
8,(Hi0 
22,000 
26,000 



2,000 

4,000 

10,IjOO 

20,000 

10,000 

12,(J00 

6,000 

6,ij00 

2,000 

4,000 

12,000 

26,000 

22,000 

30,(100 

4,(X)0 

82,000 

60,000 

120,000 

6,000 

6,0«0 

6,000 

12,000 

18,000 

95,000 

7,000 

4,000 

40,000 

20,000 

6,000 

8,000 

20,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

1,600 

22,000 



130,000 



2.500 



steam 
water 



steam 



water 
steam 



water 
steam 



water 
steam 



30,000 
7,000 
3,000 
7,000 

Z8',o66 



80,000 
20,000 



20,000 
20,000 



10,000 
8.000 
8,000 



I'resout Uooupants. 



A. A. Rand k Co. 
Iti>cd & Lillle. 
J. II I'leiior k Co. 
OlancheG.ft S.M. Co. 
I'ettns U, k 8. M. Co. 
R, II. Rouurs. 
Biff Bine tj.fc S.M. Co. 
Kern River G. ft S.M.Co. 
Mammoth d, M, Co. 
G. D. Roberts k Co. 
<i. D. Roberts & Co. 
Joo Walker M. Co. 



Daffgct, Coiighlin k Co. 
Wm. Coddingtou. 
Monry Swain. 



Mullen k Ca 
Juun Bobblo. 
Geo. Chittenden. 
Muripo.ia Co. 
lleslep fcCo. 
Shinier & Co. 
Washburn & Ca 
L. Trubucco. 
Black k Munn. 
J. D. Wilson. 
J. F. Johnson. 
II. (;. Coward. 
J. liite and I*. Wvnants. 
Ilornitos (i. & S.M. Co. 
Charles Fruiicis. 
Marl|M>>a Co. 
jMuxn.'llG. k S.M. Co. 
JMuripiiFa Co. 
E. Fergu.-ion. 
'Miller k Jenkins, 
jl'eck. Fountain k Co. 
Jas. Tniinerliill. 
I Felix Deville. 
SIuripoKB t'o. 
W.W. Helton. 
I Goodman k Co. 
I Blariposa Co. 
jCushniun k Co. 
I Samuel Ellis. 
I Rollins fc Co. 
I Crown Lead Co. 
i Mariposa Co. 
iJosrpli Barrett. 
' LafUvotte M. Co. 
Duiiiel Breen & Co. 
Whitlock v. & S.M. Co, 



Silver 



Gold. 

ii 

Cem't 
Gold. 



Empire M. & M. Co. 
Ilomestake M, & M. Co. 
Williams & Wickland. 



Eureka M. & M. Co. 
Frank Max.son, Sup't; 
I. 8. Crall, Sup't. 
1. S. Crall, Sup't. 
B. Vilain. Agent. 
Stanton k Co. 
J. JeflVoe, Sup't. 
John Byers. 
Cronire, Bulkley k Co. 
William Watt, Sup't. 
J. H. Bayliss, Sup't. 
J. K. Edwards, Sup't. 
J. S. t,ambert, Sup't. 
S. T. Curtis, Sup't. 
J. R. Rush. 
John Laramie. 
W. R. Taylor, Sup't. 
W. R. Taylor, Sup't. 



>Cem«nt Mills. 



t Unfinished. 



t Valued by Assessor. 



t^ 



I I 



76 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



LooatJon. 



TT — :,'■ 




it ti 




H II 




II II 




11 II 




<l tl 




II II 




II II 




*l II 




II l« 




II II 




II l« 




ilunt'i Uill.. 




1 II 


II It 


LIttIo York 


it H 
II II 


Meadow Lukt* 




II It 




II II 




«l n 


Nevada Towiii^ 


hip 


tt tt 




II it 




tl tt 




It *t 




tt tt 




tt II 




II II 




II II 




II II 




II .1 




II 11 




it tt 




it tt 




Bed Door 




it 11° 


It *i 


It II 



Kamo of UllL 



Wuhingtou Xuwnslilp. 



1 



Tou B«t. 



PLACBK COUNTY. 

Auburn 

Bath 



Colikx 

Damascus 

Dovil'g Canon., 
Dutch Flat. ... 
Forest Uill 



Morrlmnc 

5lolullurf(ical Works.. . 

New Orleans 

NurthHInr 

((plilr— New 

Ophlr-Old 

I'aollio Ore Co 

Kooky liur 

Subuhtopol 

Town Talk 

Union Hill 

Wolf Crook 

Woodwortli & Co. '8. . . , 

*i"lny k Co.'s 

♦Kustcrn 

•(ioiiKO Kyo 

'Curian ft Itucknian's. 

•.Jenny LInd 

*i{cinlngt(in & roiiil'H. 
Cal. Con. M. X: M. Co... 
h^xcolslor il. & M. Co. . 
(■rant Mining Co.'s. . . . 

Winton 

Ilannor 

CornUh 

•Km|iiro..., 

Federal Liiuii 

ForoKtUlll 

French 

Gold Tunnel 

*(ireon Mountain 

Manznnlta 

Mnrulili'N 

Novuiln H- M. Co.'s 

Oriental 

Oro Fino 

I'alnierK 

I'ennsylvania 

I'rov'cntJ. ft S. M. Co. . 

Sneath & Clays 

Stiles 

Wiirliam 

•Cni noy & JackKons 

•Wolr k Uarbcrs 

•Willinms, HIgits k Co. 

•Wright & Co.'s 

Brandy Flat M. Co 

Marietta Mining Co 

Milton Willis M. Co.... 

Stary. M. Co 

Tecumsoli M. Co 

•Hrovvn Bros. & Co.'s. . 
•I'ozzuns & Ciarbcrs. . . . 

•Hovdlaulfs 

•Mallorv t Co.'s 

•Nceco & West 

•Union 



Milletto 

•I'aragon 

•Kougli Gold Co.'s.... 

Live Oak 

I'ioneer 

•Missouri Co 

McCullough 

•Baltimore 

•Big Spring Co 

•Hope Co 

•Oro Co 

Gold Run I •Indiiina Hill 

Uarponding Mine Itanker 

" " tSnn Francisco Co.'s. . 

Iowa mil •Morning Star 

Newcastle Sclinabcls 

Ophirville. i I'ughs 

" Welty'a 

Saundor's Kanch 'tSander's Ranch Mill.. 

Secret Canon Secret Spring 

Stewart's Flat I Stewart's Flat 



- 2 



1864 10 
18021.... 

IHtia 8 

ISM Ifl 

18tMi 80 

18n4t 6 

18UI) 6 



VMi 16 
18<I3 12 
1804 
1866 
1803 



1866 
180U 
1866 
1860 
1864 



1S66 
18tU) 
1806 
186<'> 
1865 
I860 
1869 
1860 



1801 
1861 



1860 



1863 
1861 
1864 

186U 
1868 
1804 

18tM 



1866 
1801 
1804 
18'J6 



1S63 
1864 
1304 
1806 
1806 
1800 
1866 
1806 



1806 
1803 
1866 
1802 
1856 
1800 
1806 
1800 
1866 
1800 
1806 
1866 
1805 
1860 
1866 
1806 
1863 
1865 
1866 
1864 
18S4 




18031 12 

1801 1 8 

IJ 

8 

6 

12 

10 

4 

6 

4 

8 

8 

8 

10 

10 

8 

10 

10 



steam 



o 



Cost. 



water 
Hicani 
water 



i^tenni 



water 

stenm 

|s k w 
jstouni 
water 
stenm 
water 



steam 
water 
Hteam 



walur 

sleam 

water 
tl 

hteam 
water 



steam 
water 



Sl&.OOO 

8,000 

16,000 

40,000 

126,000 
20,000 

W.OOO 

20,000 

10,000 

20,000 

6,000 

80,000 

6,000 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

8,U0() 

9,000 

17000 

76,000 

16,000 

22,000 

15,(XK) 

8,000 

4,000 



c 






Trcsent Occupants. 



Gold. 



8.000 
'24,000 



7,000 



5,000 

•26.000 

10,000 

8,500 

8,000 

9,000 

20,000 

Oij.OOO 

5,000 

'3.666 
2,5' 

15.000 
6,000 



16,000 
16,000 
6,500 
Moam 16,000 



water 



steam 



water 

stenm 



water 
steam 



water 
steam 



6,000 
4600 
6,000 
7,000 



3000 
16,000 
12.000 

4,000 
12,000! 
12,000 Cem't 

6,000 Gold. 

7,000 Cem't 
10,000 " 
15,000 " 
12,000 " 

8,000 " ' 

6,000;Gold. 



Cem't 



Gold. 



Cenrt 
Gold. 



Cem't 
Gold. 



Snp't 



Cem't 



Gold. 



Cem't 



Gold. 

Cem't 
II 

Gold. 



10,000' Cem't 
2,000 Gold. 
2,000 
6,000 



10,000 
8,000 



IL.Scadden, Sup't. 
Willinm Hill, 
.lohn Smith, Sup't. 
W. II. Ilodda, Sup't 
Kinplro Bllning ('o. 
Kniiilro Mining Co. 
W. A. Willinms, Agent. 
A. B. Brady, Sup't 
Watt k Co. 
•I. JofTro?, Sup't. 
Fhidloy k Co. 
•loKeph I'eriin. 
Daniel Metirath, 
('. C (iolng, Sup't. 
John Knox, Sup't. 
Fuller, Goods|)eed k Co. 
Ciirrun k Buukman. 
F. Larkln, 
Ueniingtnn k I'ond. 
•I. K. Stewart, Sup't. 
•Ins. S. Harrison, Sup't. 
.1. R .Siinlrcs, Sup't. 
N. W. Winton k Co. 
(ieo. W. Kidd. Sup't. 
riill Kiuhurdx, Sup't. 
■liicobs k Surgent. 
•S. Hooker, Snp't. 
K UuoKoomb. Sup't. 
h. Cliaroiiiiat. Snp't. 
(i. W. KIdd, .Sup't. 
.Iiioob>i, Sargent k V.o, 
W Maltmnii. Sup't 
.Mnreliie Bros. 
William Katclifr, Sup't 
F. A. Bliller. Sup't. 
Brown, Hinds k Co. 
O. I'alnu-r. 
.1. H. Hulm, Sup't 
Tti.is. F. Dlngley, Snp't. 
K. Uunpcomb, Sup't. 
W. (.:. stiles. 
S. I). Merchant. 
A. Tucker, Sup't 
.lumes Weir. 
T. Will!'', Sup't. 
Frank Kniiin, Sup't 
N. Knowltou, Sup't. 
("apt l.indM'v, Sup't 
S. D. Wciolfey, Sup't. 
Kdw'd Witliington.Az't 
.John I'atterson, Sup't. 
II. K. Itrown, Agent 
Cozzons k timbers. 
W. F. llevdliintr, Sup't. 
S. Stelting, Agent, 
A. Necce, Agent. 
Collins & Sons. 



- Mlllctt. 

J. Wheeler, Agent. 
William Davis, Agent. 
John SlcKinncy, Agent. 
C^olman k Co. 
A. Jloore * Co. 
McCullongh M. Co. 
William Northwood. 
J. 1'. Castner & Co. 
George W. Reamer. 
Geo. W. Keamer, Ag't 
A. H Mallorv, Agent 
Har]>onding H. Co. 
Harpending M. Co. 
James Dod^t k Co. 

— Sohnabel, 

C. D. I'ugii k Co. 
Wolty & Co. 

Grant k Co. 
J. Rogers. 



• Comeivt Mills. 



t Unfinished. 



Chlpps 
Div 



■T: 



QUARTZ MILLS — CALIFORNIA. 



77 



Lomtion. 



vi.MiKn—rontlnnrit. 

WtilKkoy DlRglngB 

(I It 

Wixconaln mil... ".'.!'.. 



I'LCMAft COlI^•J^. 

Arponliiia 

lIultoHnr 

Dixie 



Kiin-I(ii Lako. ... 
Krniiklin Hill.., 
(icHci'fCo Valloy. 
(jrociivillo 



Indian Vnltoy. 



Jamifion Creek. 



Mohawk Valley. 
UoiinUVnllcy... 
KuhIi Crcc'k 



BAN BEUNAnDINO TO. 

Ilolcomb Valley 

MaruiiKa 

Mojave 



■RANT A COUNTY. 

Copper City 

French Uulch 



Lower Springs. 

Muletown 

Old Diggiiign..'. 



RIERRA cor NTT. 

Alloghnnytown 

(I 

American Hill 

ChippH. 

Divide 



Downieville. 



(iold Lake 

(iold Viilley 

Hog ('iinun 

Jim Crow Canon., 



Namcof)ti1l. 



Kakor k Cronby. . . 

OrlenlBl,, 

Arnold, Loo ft Co. 



Shermnn, Hoot k Co. '8, 

Hiitio liar Co 

AbboltK 

Comptona 

Dixie 

Wilen 

Kureka 

Krniiklin Hill Co 

Ward* Co 

(irpenvillo 

Lone Ktar 

Ciofcpnt 

(Iroscent 

Indian Valley 

TennHylvania 

Mammoth 

■7H Co 

King ft Co 

(ioldnn (jiito 

licrgMill 



MpIIur 

McIioIp 

Green l^iodo. 



I'cokB 

Highland... 
Honevcomb., 
Washington., 

(■corgo'H 

Ihiion 

Kanaka 

rotoKi 

Mammoth... 



IHOO 
1800 

mm 

1800 



IS&I 

1804 
1808 
1808 
18t!3 
1R08 
1863 
18tK) 

ma 

1802 
1802 
1802 
18(10 

isia 

1808 
1861 
1862 

1800 
18)8 
1808 



1800 
1S04 

1803 



1804 
1808 
18f«> 
1851 
1800 
1800 
18(iO 
1805 
1804 



Kanaka Creek 

Kanaka liaviiip. ... 
Middle Yuba IJiver, 

Minncsotp. I Hriggs k Co 

Calitbrnia 
Uountai>: Hoiifu 
Sierra ButtcB.... 



Wob Ravine 

Yuba River H. F. 

" " 8. F.. 

" " 8. K.. 



Kiigle 1800 

21y.M.0o 1806 

AmoiicnnHill 1868 

IJainbow 1867 

Charcoal Co 1858 

KeyMono U, M. to 1868 

(iold Hhiff 1868 

Mont|)elior Co 1868 

OroCo 1800 

Slug Canon 186» 

HnvenKfc Co 1800 

Cold Valley 1868 

I'rimroso Oo 1858 

Ironsides 1904 

IMumbngo 1802 

Sierra Consolidated 1803 

Oak Flat Co 18ta 

Kanaka (^ M. Co 18ti5 

French .Hti6 

!8t3 
1856 

Mountain ilouro 1858 

BigeiowCo 1858 

ludcpvndonco 1868 

KanoftCo 1806 

Mexican Co 1868 

.Sierra Uuttcs Co 1852 

Union 1800 

FourllillB 1862 

Chlpps 1868 

Kcntuokjr 1860 



BISKITOir COUNTY. 

Humbug Creek I 

Indian Crook , 



Quartx Valley. 
Siskiyou 



Lash ft Co. . 

London 

Siskiyou 

Turk^a. 

Sleeper Mill. 






I 



Coat 



ilowcll 
Cruslior. 



1802 
1869 
1858 8 
1867 4 
18QSl 8 



■team 



water 



• ft w 
water 



■^t(am 



water 



steam 



water 
steam 
wafer 

«« 

steam 

14 

water 



se.ooo 

60,000 
26,000 



1,600 

1,600 

1,600 

0,000 

7,000 

6,000 

100,000 

2,000 

1,600 

0,000 

7.000 

26,000 

00,000 

20,000 

ao.ooo 

20,0(X) 

8,000 

2.000 

20,000 

15,000 



20,000 
10.000 

26.000 



go 



Tresont Oooupanta. 



Gold. 



Ccm't 



Gold. 



Peachy. HofTtnan ft Co. 
Coiiklln. Ilosmer ft Co. 
Arnold, Leo ft Co. 



Sherman, Root ft Co. 
Hutto liar Co. 
H. n. Abbott. 
J. D, Comiiton. 
H, C, Kiiluoll. 
Wiles ft Uro. 
John I'arriitt. 
Franklin Hill Co. 
Ward & Co. 
H, K. Uidwell. 
Ilidweli ft AFchlm. 
W. A, Ilolingerft Co. 
W. A.Rolingerft Co. 
J. N. Illood ft Co. 
Trucks ft Walcrworlh. 
Mcticc ft Thompson. 
KIwell, Nuvo ft Co. 
King ft Co. 
IIowpll ft llaynes. 
'■ llolthuuso. Miller ft Co. 



• A.Wnde, 
Silver Mnroiiga M. Co. 

G.ftS, George E. Moore. 



0,000 

10,000 

0,000 

10,000 

1,600 

0,000 

3,000 

8 000 

atoam 2oi00O 



Gold. 



wotor 
s ft w 
steam 



., 


water 




steam 


1 


water 


1 


«' 


2 


,1 


1 


11 








steam 




s ft w 




water 




steam 




water 




It 




steam 




water 




steam 


2 


41 


2 


water 




<» 




41 




«i 




(f 




t( 




41 




44 




steam 




44 




44 




water 




steam 



12.000 
4,600 
8,500 
8,600 
8,300 

12,600 

14,100 
7.00U 
6,000 
7,100 
6,150 

16,200 

16,400 

lO.WX) 
2,000 

00,000 
4,500 

22,500 
4,000 
6,600 
4,000 
6.360 
6,000 

36,00r) 
1,000 
1.000 

80.000 
8.600 
6.300 
4,200 
6,000 



6,000 
10.000 
8,000 
6,000 
5,000 



Peck. 

Thos. I'urnell, Sup't 
S. (irovcr 
J. Syme, Sup't. 
W. Ij. Gcorgo. 
H. .Jones. 

Kelly. 

C'otron. 

I. Isaacs. 



Eagle Q. M Co. 

21 *}. SI. Co. 

Young & Co. 

P. A. Lamping. 

Bcauclininp & Laugton. 

Keystone y. 51. (.'o. 

Slumpf ft Co. 

Jloutpelicr ii. M. Co. 

v. A. I.nin))iiig, 

ainckstono i}. M. Co. 

'lavcns .' Lenipricb, 

'.lerrick ft tirey, 
iPrimrosoM. Co. 
[Ironsides Q. M. Co. 

Hottdlcv ft Co' 
I Sierra Con. O. M. Co. 

Ouk Flat Q. sr. Co. 

Kanaka l}. M. Co. 

French Cunipany. 

Itriggs &Co. 

Wiiglit ft Ho wen. 

Watson ft Co. 
, Uigelow & Sloore. 
i Independence M. Co. 

Kane ft Co. 

Maldonado ft Co. 

Sierra ISuttes Co. 

Union Q. M. Co. 

Spencer ft Grey. 

English & lliggins. 

McKenzio. 



Lash ft Co. 
London Q. M. Co. 

F. Turk. 
Sleopor ft Co. 



^ 



n ■ 



78 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Location. 



Nnme of Mill. 



TULA UK lOUNTV. 

White Ulvcr 



TUOLUMNK COINTV. 

Amorii' . Cniiip 

Itulil y- .iiitnlii 

llliio (lulch 

Cherokee 



Cnrters.... 
Houston. ,. 
liudiiiit. .. 
Josephiiip. 



Caldir's liniieli 

Coiilitieiice District., 



Deer Creek.. . 
5-iMlIe (.reck. 



Jackass Hill 

JJ. F. Tuolumne 11.. 



I'overty Hill. 



Kawhiile Itnncli., 
Soulsbyville..'. ... 



Sonorn 

8u>;ar I'lne. 



Summcrville 

Summit I'asF 

Stanislaus Hiver.. 
'luoluniiie liiver.. 
Turnbiick Creek., 
Tuttletown 



Whiskey lllil. 



Whitman's I'liss.. 
Wood's Crohslnj?. 



Yankcx Hill. 
Yorktown.. . 



YUBA COUNTY. 



Brown's Vniley Damcbroge.. 

)ef!';r.'on 

I'ennsylvania 



Jones & Woodmnri. 

Sophia 

Kajrle 

l.arco .. . 

Mngce 

Coinstdck 

Conlldoiico 

Inde|ieiiileiicc 

DciT Creek 

Mazel Dell 

Kversona 

Walters 

Kig Cniton 

Koiiita 

Consuelo 

(irizzly 

8tarr Kinjt 

(■olden Kitle 

Hesleps 

Rawhide Knncli. . ., 

(iilsons 

Sonlsby 

Sonora 

Daegner 

Kureka 

Kxcelslor 

( i reen s 

i.oniburdo 

Monitor 

I'irate 

Summers 

Col. ti. & S. M. Co. 

Teleffriiph 

ISucliniuin 

Laurel Hill 

I'ttttersons 

Valparaiso 

I'restons 

Heists 

Whitmans 

Apps 

Clem & Co.'s 

Duncans 

■Shanghai 

Mre. Hills 



WJ^ If I 






Cofit. 



< a 



Eaglevillo 

Indian Ranch. 
Middle Yuba. 
Smartsvillc . 



.Sweet Vciijjcanec. 



T(*inple, No. 2. . . . 

Mount Hope 

Andrew Jackson. 



iRon 
vm 
mm 

186t 



18C4 
18(10 
IRfifi 

1«0« 
l-nfjft; 

IRMl 

\m 

1R«2 
ISfif) 
1864 

1805 
1)V)9 
1868 
1860 

18«6| 
1861)' 
18661 

18(i5l 
ISfiOi 

I8r.t! 

1860 
1858 
18t«! 
18ti4 
la59 
1800 



ISW) 
1803 
ISiiO 
18(iO 
1804 
1800 
1869 
1867 
1867 
1868 
1800 
1800 
1806 
1800 
1859 
1869 
1802 
1859 



1869 

\mi 

1802 
1806 
1806 
1860 
1806 
1800 



isteam'«2O,00O gold 
water; 8,fMK) '• 
3,000 " 
1 " -6,000 " 



p & w 

water 



steam 



. I water , 
, steam 
. i water 

•' " i 



! steam i 



wafer 
'steairi 
.water 



10.000! 
6,000 : 

10,0001 
3,000: 
7,0(K) 
8,000' 

10,000 1 

10,000! 

8,(X»0i 

4,000, 
10,000' 

5,000 1 
15,0001 
10,0001 
20,000 
20,000 1 

7,0001 
16,000 ! 
10,000] 
46,0(K) 

8,0(K), 
20,0(K)1 

16,o;m>: 

10,0»K> 
•20.0(Kl 
10,000 



stciim 




water 


lil.OOO 




!0,(XI0 


II 


10,000 




8,000 


II 


20,000 


II 


20,000 


II 


10,fK)0 


II 


3.0(.0 


ti 


10,0(10 


II 


0,000 


11 


4,fi(lO 




2,0(K» 


II 


5,0<K) 


8& W 


10,000 


water 


8,(KW 


" 


3,000 


" 


10,(HKI 


II 


4,000 



20,0(10; 
40,000' 
40,(I0<)! 
60,000 i 
15,000 
30,000 
10,000 
12,000l 



Trescnt Occupants. 



J. Carter. 
J. C. Itlrdseyo. 
Hudnnt & C'o. 
J. C. Itlrdseyo. 



Jones * Woodman. 
Joseph! & Co. 
Kaiflo M. Co. 

C. Lombardo. 
riatt ItroH. 
Comstock & Fry. 
T. Soulsby. 

A. 1'. Itrayton. 
Deer Creek Co. 
I'helps & Co, 
M. Hruniaglm. 
Walters & (;;o. 
Cobb & Sinton, 
llonita Co. 
Consuelo Co. 
(iashwiler & Co. 
K. Inch & Co. 
(ioldon Kulu Co. 
Heslcp & Co. 
K. 1>. Johnson, Ag't. 
(iilson & Hum|>tou. 

D. Davidson S Co. 
Sonora (fold Co. 
Wm. Daeuner. 

Kdwaids. Agent. 

Wright it (iihnoie. 
— (jreen. 
C. I.onibardo. 
Monitor (i. & a. M. Co. 

C. Dorsey. 
(i. .Summers, 
(ioddurd & Co. 

D. DavidM)n & Co. 
Tuol. (i. M. I'll. 
.San Francisco Co. 

|W. I'tttterson. 
'Valparaiso Co. 
, Kosecrans & Co. 
it:. Keist 
iMllnerft Co 
I John App & Co. 
I Clem & Co. 

J. Duncan. 

(iashwilder & Hooper. 

Mrs. L. Hill. 



Damebroge JI. Co. 
JetTerson .M. Co. 
I'ennsylvania M. Co. 
.Sweet Vengeance M. Co. 
Incorporated. 
Incorporated. 
Mount Hope M Co. 
Andrew .lacksun M. Co. 



In Nevndti foiinty tliere nro IIG mines beintf worked at the present time. Many of tlieiu have not yet 
been thorouia;hly opened, inul (inito a number hi.ve no other machinery thnn hoistiu),' workc Tliere ure 
5.5 qiinrtz nnd 50 cement mills, making a total of 7,5 mills in tlie county. Two of tlie mills are dry crushers, 
and the remaining Git have 7HS stamps. The mines have, for mills iind hoisting works, 0!) Bteam engines, 
and "t ."50 mines llic wlioie or a part of tlie nmeliinery is run by water power. Fifty seven companies 
report the nuni'ier of men employed. In that number of eluinm 1,797 men are engaged. The Supeiin- 
tendents of HJ mills report the total amount erushed during the year. This number of quartz mills have 
cruehed, in the aggregate, 85,800 tons of roek, aveniging 'i,(J8l J tons to the mill for tiie year. The aggre- 
gate yield of the 18 mines, of which the total yield is reported, is $2,187,300 for the year. This is Irtmi 
quart/, alono, as none of the cement mines or gravel claims are reported. The average yoHily yield of tlie 
mills reported is aliout $120,000 each. The largest yield is from tlio Eureka, of (iiiiss Valley, which 
crushed 11,100 tons, yielding nearly f (100,000. The next largest yield is from the Allison Ranch Mine : 
7,000 tons of rock were crushed, producing an aggregate of flh'W.lHK). — AmicsKor'ii Report, 1860. 



There are 
purposes, cr 
hundred do 
aggregate le 
ditches in tli 

In additioi 
for mnnicipa 
and the cnpi 
San Knincisi 
Angeles has 
completed in 



For Minin: 



Name 



A, MA DO I 

Amador 

Amador Co. ( 

Moyle 

Huckeye 

Huena" ViMa. 

Hutte Canal.. 

Hosumnes Wii 

Drv Creek 

ludiin ({ulch.. 
" " J 

Kellum Hitcl. 

Lancha I'lann 

Lorees 

Meeks 

Mile Oulcli, . 
Open Cut Flu 

I'urdees 

I'uriiHon'H. 

Fhelps &c Co. 

I Tigeon t;reek. 

Potosi 

I'roctor, Wiilk 
Reiehling St. \ 
Hiclitmycr. . 
liieh At'Co.'s. 

Uitter 

Sutler Creek ii 
Volcano . . . 

nUTTK 

Abbott & Co. 
Hutte Creek . 
Clienikee Co. 

Doweys 

Forbestown . . 

Hutchings 

Little Uiitlo... 
Oregon (J ulch. 
Rock Creek... 
Spring Valley. 
Table Moimtaii 
Williams.... 

CAT.AVKIIA1 

Calaveras Com 
Campo Seco i 
Canal Co... 
Clark & Co.'s. 
Conmds 



CAiVALS AND WATER DITCHES — CALIFORNIA, 



79 



CANALS AND WATER DrTCIIES. 

Tliere are five tboiisiind throe Imiidrcil mid twenty-eiifht miles of arlilioiiil wnter conrRoa, for mining 
purpoRea, constrnctpd in tliiB Stiite, at a coBt of fifteen million five linndred and fleventy-live tliniipnnd four 
hnndred dollura. In addition to the length here stnted, there uro niinierouB Biilmidiaiy hninclicR, the 
iigf^reKHte length of whieli Ib enliinafed lit over eight hnndred miles, and several hundred niilcH of new 
ditches in tht cotirso of oonHlniclion. 

In addition to those eniiineratcd in the ahovc, there lire nHiiioroiis cnterprifcH ormiiii/.ed to fiirniHli water 
for mnnicipal and a^'rii'ultnral pnrpoBCB. Twenty-Buveii tities and towns in llio interior are tlniB Hnpplied, 
and the rapitsl employed anumnt'i to sovernl niillioim of dollars. The Spring Valley Water AVorl;a, of 
Snn Francisco, is nn extensive aad costly niidertiil<iiig, with a capital of $(),(IO0,O()0. The Cdiinty of Los 
Angeles has nearly three liundred niilea ■•! ditches, and extciiHive worlts for the supply of water luive been 
completed in San Dcriiardino, Volo, and Boveral other ugricnltiiral co.mtieg of the State. 

TAIJLK OF ('ANALS AND WATER DITCHKS 
For Mining pnrposes in the State, with the Loention, Sonrce of Water, Length, Cost, etc., of each. 



Knmp of nitrli. 



Sonrce of Water. 



AMAOOIl COINTV. 

Amador 

Amador Co. Cmia! 

Hoyle 

Hnckeyo 

Uuena' ViMa , 

Hutte Ciinal 

CoBumnes Water Co 

Drv Creek 

Indi-in (iulch 



Sutler Creek 

.'tokelnmne h'iv(T, N'. F. 



Sutter Ciw'k. N. F 



i.Mokeliinme Itivei-, \. V 

('iiMMiuics liivcr, S. ]•" 



Dry 



Kellnm Hitches {'l 

Lancha I'lana 

Lorees 

Meeks 

Mile (inlcli 

Open Cat Flume 

I'urdees 

Purinion'N 

Phelps &; Co 

Pigeon Creek 

Potosi 

Proctor, Wi'.lker iV. Ch.'h. . 

ReichlingiV Alt {••) 

Wichimycr 

Kich A:"Co.'b 

Uitlcr 

Sutter Cieek and Volcmio. 
Volcano 



.lacksoii Creels, ,M. F... 

I Kanclieria Creek 

.lackson Creek, M. V... 



Kjiicluiiu Creek, S. F 

.luckpoii (.'reek. S. F , 

Kiincheri;! (Jreek 

'. Sutter Ci eek 

^.(nckson Cretk, S. F , 

Sutler Cieek, M. F 

Dry Crei'k , 

|Cii.siiiiiiU'S Kiver, S. F , 

Dry Creek 

.(ackw)u Cni'k 

Sillier Creeli, S. F 

iDry ("reek. 

Itig Itar ranou 

(NwuiniU'H Hi'v-r 

ISutliT Creek 

.Mokelumno U., Trihut.iries. 



nUTTK COfNTY. I 

Abbott & Co I 

Butte Creek , i Hulte Creek 

Cherokee Co 'T;ihle Mouutaiii 

Doweys Feather Uiver, W. UriimJi... 

Forbestown {South Fealht'r lilver 

HiitchingH ' 

Little Hutte ! Hutte Cieek 

Oregon (iulch ! ( )iegi)n (iulch 

Kock Creek 1 l.'ock Creek 

Spring VuUey .Spring Valley. 

Table Mountuin Table Mountain 

Williams 



CAI.AVRUAS COl'NTV. 

Calaveras Connly Ditch Co 
Campo Seeo &'Mok. Hill 

Canal Co 

Claik&Co.'B 

ConradR 



Stanislaus Uiver 

Mokelumno Kiver 

Mukelumne, South Fork. 
" Forks 



!t a 
S3 






t 

10 

:< 



4 

H 

■ih 
t) 

7 
.1 

it 
S 

15 



4:1 



1} 

10 
10 

11 

"a' 
II 

:» 

:< 

I 

t 

2 



3C 

2.5 
8 



Cost. 



$'.20,1)11(1 
■lOO.OOO 

;t,.")Oti 

.3,00(1 

IS.OliO 

K>.^,()00 

40,(100 

(>,0(I0 
10,(K)0 

2,(100 
22,000 

:!0.ooo 

2,000 

l.oOOi 

2,000 

!)0,0()0 



Name of Owi.cr. 



.Tiiriie.i .lohnpton & Hros. 
Piodie iV Uiiyeniue. 
thiuii'H .Mehan. 
While and (,'o. 
.1. Foete Turner, 
liiilte Canal (Jo. 
(;. A. Piiriiiton. 
DaviK & Co. 
W. L. McKiin. 
Duell A; Co. 
liulte (Jaiuil Co. 
Pi'octor lit liiiwdon. 
Sau.uel Loree. 
Aleeks & Sous. 
N. Paivons. 
Pioche &. Bayerqne. 



I5,000l Reuben Frv, Agent. 

t),000: Phelps &. Co. 

«,000lsinipM)n &. Co. 

2,:)00,ninkMou & (ih.ver. 
10,0011 1 Walker & Lancaster. 
IO,000|Iieichling& Alt. 
10,0001 H. K. !ticlilniver. 

■l,000lRich At Co. ■ 
l.jO,(l(IO|K»lale of William Rilter. 
IS.OOO .r. K. Wiiriicr. 
1 10,000 Pioche & Hayerque. 



roo Abbott Si Co. 
10,000; Harbour &, Co. 

.''i.OOd (;lien.kee(;o. 
20,000 :s. L. Dewev. 
1 S. Feather SVuler Co. 

1.000' llntcliin!.'s. 

S.OOOMcKenny <Si. i;ver. 

;«,000! Logiie. 

l,20o! Hiichens. 

'1,0001 

(i.OOO Welch A, Co. 

2,000 Williams. 



150,000 



80,000 
20,000 



Cohen Si Levy. 

C. C. Howman & Co. 

Clark Si Co. 
(}. A. Conrad. 



^H.^i 



.'■ 'i 



h i 



ii 



m 



!' 



I 



80 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Name of Ditch. 



CAI.AVKRAS- 

FiBliers 



-continued. 



Harria 

KHdifib 

Old Gulch 

Pillsburys 

Pope 

San Antonio 

Table Mountuin.. 

Union 

Union Water Co. 



DKI. NOIITF, 

Bunker Hill 

Cox & Fruzier. . 

Curly Jack 

Griders 

Independence. . . 

Indian Flat 

Lone Pine. 



Source of Water. 



Mokelurane, Middle Fork... 

" North Fork 

" Middle Fork... 

" Middle Fork... 

O'Niel'B Creek 

Lincoln Fork, Mok. IJiver. . 

VVillow Creek 

San Antonio Creek 



Murray Creek 

StanielauB, North Fork. 



Independence Creek. 

Myer'B Creek 

Gridcr Crock 



Independen''e Creek. 

Slyer'a (!reek 

Indian Creek. 



McLaufrliliii iK'i.xtou'B Creek. 



Moo res.. 

Patricks 

Quartz Oulch 

Stevens W. M. & M. Co. . 
WiuL'ate 15;ir 



F.I. TionAno rnrs'TY. 

Hiownpville 

Cataract 

Clay Hill 

Euffle 

El Donido & Tiiimel Hill. 

Eureka Canal Co 

Foster 

Gold Hill 

G ranilc C^reek 

lowc 

Italian 

iloncs' Hill. 

MicliiKan IJur 

Montezuniu 

Parker 



Pilot Creek 

Mulls (:i| 

Itoek Creek fc Micliigiin Flat 

Uossinpton 

Itoush (fc Simpns 

Shannliae 

Sbobcr 

South Folic Canal 

Texas 

VVcliber 



Buzzard Hill Creek., 



Quartz Cinlch 

Coon tJreek and Cn'.ifj'K Creek 
Oak Flat Creek 



Cosumnes Hiver, S. F 



Hiinjitown Creek 

Cosumnes Hiver 

American Hiver, ,S. F... 
CogunnioH Kivor, N. F.. 
H:ini(to\vn Creek 



American Kiver, S. F 

Iowa and liiusli Caiin..') 

ChnnI; Ciinon 

Olter Creek 

Co.suniiici Kiv. I', M. I'".. . .. 

HaiiKtovvM Creek 

Webber ('reek 

Pilot and Hock C'rci-ks 

|Hn!ji.'liiwn (!ieeU 

\.\m. Ii.,S. v.. and Knck C'i:.. 
I V\ ebber ( "k Mti(l("liiuik Cam in 
! Canon (Jicck 

CoHumnr.-' Kiver, Xl. F 

Iliji Cafmn 

Aineiiciin Hiver, S. F 

Hantitown (reck 

rimiilc Canon 



INYO COIjNTV. 

San Ci'.rloB 



Owen's River. 



KI.AMATH COl'NTV. 

Camp Creek Camp Creek . 

("eciiville j Salmon Hiver, K. F.. 

Nordlieimer Creek lNordlieitiier'n Creek. 

Petersburg : Salmon Hiver, S. F. . 

Sawyer's Bar | " " N. F. 

SuiKlrv other nitclies 



t.AFSKN COUNTY. 

AdaniR Susan River.. 

Adan)R &. liulcbelder 

Emerson ] Willow Creek. 

SuHunvillc Piute Creek. . . 



MAKIPOSA COl'NTY. 

Mortons 

Snow Creek 



Maxwell's Creek. 
Snow Creek 



?i 






i; 


Cost. 


■ Name of Owner. 


1.5 


115,000 


Dr. Fisher. 


SiO 


20,000 


Dr. Fisher. 


7 


10,000 


Harris &, IJro. 


12 


11,000 


'M, Kadisli. 


10 


■ 15,000 


Estiite of W. F. McDcrniott. 


li 


10,000 


I). Pillsburv. 


7 


8,000 


Thos. Silver. 


ir, 


15,000 


TaKJtert Bio." 


i!8 


i ',000 


Table JI. Ditch Co. 


10 


10,000 


Thomas McOlvnn. 


50 


:)50,ooo 


Union Water Oo. 


■•^f 


18,000 


W. A. Hamilton. 


a 


1,000 


Co.\ & Frazier. 


;i 


3.000 


Doolittle & Moore. 


o 


^.-iOO 


L. B. Gridcr. 


1 


4,000 


Hailev iV. Co. 


:< 


3,500 


Cliinii Co. 


4 


8,000 


11. Doolittle. 


n 


800 


,1. McLau'.tlilin. 


•2 


1,000 


William Mooro. 


o 


2,000 


Moore Ik. Bros. 


u 


•100 


Thorpe iV- Merry. 


7 


15,000 


W. A. Hamillon. 


I 


2,000 


Rood & Phillips. 


H 


15,000 


.1. M. Douu'lasH. 


(> 


10,000 


•lames Findlev. 


» 


.'•,00 


(Jlmrles Hosnior A:. Vo. 


H 


."iOO 


.lames Jordan. 


10 


1,5,0110 


O. Merrill &, Co. 


■150 


,500,0110 


1). W. Slaudeford, Afjenf. 


o 


1,200 


Charles Ilosnier &. Co. 


1!> 


12,00l) 


.South Fork (Janal Co. 


:) 


0,000 


William .Sloiirns & Co. 


21 


20,000 


.Soiuli Fork Canal Co. 


:) 


3,000 


S. Lavronia iV Co. 


I.-) 


10,0(iO 


Becbe &. Co. 


20 


00,0110 


.1. M. Dou^laiis. 


10 


f),000 


Moiitezuni:i Co. 


10 


30,0011 


K L. Pari,, r. 


I.W 


300,000 


Pilot Creek Water Co. 


i;« 


4,000 


Cieorf,'e Mull. 


.... 


1.50,000 


Hiibeit Bell, A^ent. 


10 


30,000 


.1. B. HoH.-iMKton. 


10 


(i,ooo 


Hoiish & Co. 


16 


12,000 


J. M, DoUKlass. 


r> 


5,000 


(!luirles llosiner fc Co. 


:t;» 


300,000 


('Iiarlc'i llosiiicr & Co. 


1 


300 


CIkii'Iis llosmcr iV, (Jo. 


11) 


10,000 


Soii'h Fork (Janal Vd. 


15 


30,000 


N. Y. and .San Carlos C. Co. 


I 


2,000 


Shelton Si. (irahatn. 


7\ 


7,500 


A. J. Ciaw I'lnl. 


') 


2,f)00 


Mni'ch & l<:ilir. 


5 


7,000 


Wallers A: Brown, 


:< 


5,000 


J. T. Barrows. 


7;i 






5 


7,000 


C. &. A. Adams. 


4 


5,000 


Adams tt. Batcheldcr. 


H 


12,0110 C. T. Emerson. 


H 


2,000 


I. N. Hoop. 


15 


$10,000 


Morton &, Co. 


10 


800 


James Malono. 



Nam 



MON( 



Mono.. 



NKVADi 

Buckmnn Sc 
E. Williams 
Empire Co.'g 
Eureka Watc 
Excelsior Car 

Gardners 

Nevada Watc 
Remiuffton H 
Surjfent & Ja 
South Yuba ( 

Stehrg 

I Union 

nr.ACER 

Ameriean Rive 
Auburn A-. lj,.,| 
Bartlett & Tin 
Byrd'g Vallev. 
Dutch Flat VVi 
El Dorado Wa 
(fold Hill and I 

(frizzly 

Hall &. Hubbat 

Hancock 

Hills ■■ 

Independent . . . 
Indian 

Indiana Water ( 

Janiison 

McKce 

McKinstry... 

' "'ners 

; >untain 

I --oith Shirt Tail 
; Secret Cufion... 
i South Yuba... 
jTodii's Valley.. 

I iilon 

jl'nion, Yankee J 
I »olcauo 



P'.UMAS c 

Burton Guhh.. 

' Cascade WhIim' i 

l-'catber R. &, A\ 

•iiiib Flat 

lluinlMi;,' 

"luiKarian iiiVl' 

"idiun Bar 

■^losiiuito 

M(.unt Pleasant. 
•V'lson Point,. 

I loneer 

I'linnas 

liichmond Hill 
■•^HW iMIII iV 'i'avl. 
■>"iish Hancli.'. 
Spring (Jiirdeii... 
iwclve-Mile Bar 



[Up Nevada or .Slimiv 

j™ Inn (Voni Dcor Or 

' m: ''•*'1','''<''"""'vl)( 



CANALS AND WATER DITCHES — CALIFORNIA. 



81 



Xame of Ditch. 



MONO COUNTY. 



Mono.. 



NEVADA COUNTY. 



Backmnn & Ciirmim . . 

E. Williiima 

Empire Co.'s 

Eureka Water Co 

Excelsior Cunul Co 

Oardiierg 

Nevada Water Co 

Iieinin);ton Hill 

Surffeiit & Jii<(il)8 

South Yul)tt Canal Co. 

Stelirs 

Union 



Co. 



Pr.ACEIl COUNTY. 

American Kivcr W. &, ^J 

Auliarn &•■ IJcar Kivei- 

ISuillett Si. Tlioniiis 

Ilvrd'e Vallov 

iVntdi Flut NValcr Co 

El Doriiilo Water Co. 

(idid Hill and brjnclieH 

(Jrizzlv 

Hall& Hublmrd'M 

Hancock 

Hills 

Independent 

Indian 

Indiana Water Co 

.Jamison 

McKec 

McKiiiBtry 

'■•'lers 

■ >untain 

:.ortli Shirt Tail 

' Secret Canon 

South Yuba 

Todd's Valley 

I I'nion 

! I'nion, Yankee Jim 

' Volcano 



Source of Water. 



Virginia Creek. 



Steep Hollow Creek. 



Shady Creek. 

Middle and South YubaKivers 
South Yuba and D^er Creek . 

Hear Kiver 

Shady Creek 

Steep' Hollow Creek 

Greenhorn Creek 

South Yuba Kiver 

Greenhorn Creek 



IK 8 



-\mprican Kiver. . 
Hear Kiver 



Volcano Canon 

Am. R.,N. F., it Little H'rU. 

I Kl Doradi) Canon 

I Hear Kiver 

jshiri Tail Cafum 

i Hear Kiver 

1 Volcano Ciifuin 

'Indian Ciifion 

Volcano Canon 

I Indian Canon 

('aiifin ("reek 

Indian Canon 

j Sli i rt Tai I Canon 

;Owl Creek 

j.Shirt Tail (^afioii, S. F 

' 1 >eep ("anon 

Shirt Tail Canon 

i Secret Cafion 

I South Yuba Kiver 

I Volcano (Cafion 

1 Shirt Tail Canon 



PI.UMAS COUNTY. 

' Ihirton (lulch 

Cascade Water Co 

Kcather K. &. Warren Hill. 

(iriil. Flat 

Iliiiiibu^' 

Iliin).'arian Hill 

' Indian Har 

•Mosipiito 

.Mount Fleusant 

NVIson I'oint 

Pioneer 

I'hnnas 

liichnicmd Hill 

Saw Mill At Taylor Hill,... 

Spanish Hmuli 

.S|)rinjf (tiirden 

Twelve-Mile Bar 



Volcano Canon. . 



Burton Gulch 

South Feather Kiver. 



Mead Vullev Creek.. 

Butte Creek 

Slute Cieek 

Chipp's Creek 

Mo«(luito Creek 

Silver Lake 

Nelson Creek 

Feather Kiver, S. F. 

Silver Lake 

Onion Valley Creek.. 

Mill Creek 

Spanish Creek 

Spring Garden t'ri'ck 
KhsIi Cn-ek 



20 



13 
16 
13 

150 
()9 

aa 

13 

I(j 
5r, 

■200 
4 



22 

2!in 

20 
3 
f)0 
31 
■10 

iJi' 

10 
10 
10 

lu 

10 
2 

]? 



12 
16 
2.5 
12 
8 
12 
10 



4 

ir> 

14 
4 
4 
2 
3 
3 

10 
6 

10 
8 
4 
5 

30 
4 
4 
o 

2 
o 



Cost 



Kame of Owner. 



$75,000 J. W. Ounn. 



20,000 1 Bncknian& Cnrran. 
40,000 E. Williams. 
50,000 1 B. Vilian, Agent. 



30,000; J. Gardner. 
40,O00Ia. U. Eddv, Agent. 
40,000 Timinons, Hussy & Co. 
30 ,.000 Sargent & Jacobs. 
1,. 500,(1001 James VVhartciiby, Agent. 
4,.500 H. Stehr. 
12,000, L. W. Preble. 



100.000 Am. River W. Si Jf. Co. 
6.00,000! Auh nvV BenrK.W. &.M.Co. 

65,000 : Ha II & Allen. 
2,0(lO|Gaman Keiser. 

100.0001 Bradlev & Gardner. 
100,0001 Kdwin'Tvler, Agent. 

1 10,00(11 Aub'n&.lV:irK.W.&M. Co. 
.5,000!(;oleman&. Dods. 

50,000 .(nmes L. Gould, Agent. 

15,000 r)ard;>nelles .M. & D. Co. 

10,000 J. T. ir.M. 

10,0(l0'DHrdanellt« M. & D. Co. 

10,000;Mrs. Adeliallill. 

10,0001 
4,000 .TamiHon M. Co. 

23,O00Heinv Zurmiihien. 
0,000 E. MiKinstrv. 

3.5,000|Thomas Cauipbell. 

l5,0l)0,Kilbourn& Michael. 

25,(mo Mi-8. A<lelia Hill. 
100,000 Secret Canon W. Co. 

50,000 Kidd & Co. 

32,000 Pond, Constaldo & lluber. 
9,<)00 Mrs. Adelia Hill. 
128,000 Thomas Caniphell. 

15,000 Dardanelles M. & D. Co. 



5,000 

30,000 

20,000 

5,0011 

6,000 

2,000 

3,000 ! 

4,000 

30,000 

30,000, 

10,000' 

25,(M)0' 

12,000; 

15,000 

1.50,000' 

4,000 

8.(MI0 

1,500 

1.000 

2,500 



Crtllens St. Co. 
Gaskill & Co. 
Conlv Sc Oowell. 
K. B". Jacks. 
E. Wallick. 
Kelley & Co. 
McKlroy &. Co. 
Thompson & Co. 
Iiollingsworth. 

Secret Diggings Co. 
Maxwell & Bro. 
N. B. Sturges. 
Clark Si. Co. 
W. Jacks. 
Henry Beethe. 
Halsied, Reiser Sc Co. 
H aisled Sl Duvis. 
W. J. York. 
Brown St, Scrrin. 



•Till" Eureka Water Compnny own (lipdttclipsln Novmln County hctwecn the Middle nnil South Yulm Hlvers, except 
llic NeviidH or SliHilv Creeli Wsler l'iini|i»>iy'» Ditcli. 'i'lie Kxeelnlor Csnal Company, of Yuba County, own tliedltelius 
leaillnR ffoni Deer Creclt, and n ditcli tVoni :. ' Sdutli Yutia. Tlie South Yulia Cnnsl Coaiimiiy own nearly all the ditches 
In .Nevada County l)etwei'n Ihe Soiitli Yub.: and Hear lllver; aUo a branch 'U miles In leiixtli, ruaiiinit In Dutch Flat, 
I'laccr County. The County Assessor, In his returns for 1H6B, reiiorts thcnumbcrof ditches 91. with an aggrcgato length 
OIH50 miles. 

-_ — 



I 



Hi 

! 



82 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINEiSS DIRECTORY, 



Name of Ditch. 



SACUAMENTO rciUNTY. 

American IJiver \V. & M. Co. 
Deer Creek W. & M. Co.... 
Nuloina VV. & M. Co 



Source of Wntor. 



American Kiver. 
Cosumncs Kiver.. 
Americiin Uivcr. 



Sac'to & AraaJor Canal Co.. iCosumnes Kiver. 



D A 



30 
6 

16 
6 



SHASTA COUNTy. 

Arbiiciile Cottonwood, M. P 

Bald Hill Cottonwood Creek 

Cedar Flat Whiskey Creek 

Clear Creek i (-'lenr Creek 

Cottonwood i Cottonwood Creek : j 18 

Davis Clear Creek I 8 



12 
8 
li 

;V3 



Eagle 

Know Miickf 

Prairie 

Quartz Hill. . 
Sacramento. . 
ring Cr 



^: 



1 oHon Clear (!reck 

Watson JernBalcm 



Eagle ; 16 

Clear Creek | 4 

Cottonwood, N. F | 17 

Cliurn Creek ' 8 

Sacramento Creek [ 22 

Spring Creek j 10 



SIERRA COUNTY. 

American , 

Arnott , , 

Council Hill 

Cox Har 

Depot , 

Featlicr Kiver 

Fiddle Creek 

Fisk , 

■Goodyear's IJar 

Grass Flat 

iGreen & I'urdy 

•Grizzly Hill 

Hosier 

Humbug 

Indian Hill , 

Irish 

,Iim Crow 

.Kanaka 

Kiml.all 

.Itock Creek 

Said&. Keese 

Sailor 

•Siiyer'B Union (I) 

Slale Creek & Gilisonville. . 

Snow Creek -. 

Trnckee 

■Waukegan 



17 



Cost. 



$ 



Name of Owner. 



300,000 John Bennett, President. 
133,000 James Jordan. 
yoO.OOO H. (}. Livermorc, President. 
125,000 Sac'to & Amador Canal Co. 



Little Grizzly Creek 

Kiddle Creefe 

Kock Creek 

Yulm Kiver 

Indian Creek 

Feather Kiver, S. Branch. 

Fiddle Creek 

Goodyear's Crenk 

Yuba Kiver 

Grass Flat 

Little Grizzly Canon 

Cherokee Creek 

Cannon Creek 

Humbug Canon 



SISKIYOI' COUNTY. 

Altona, M u^yinsville 

Altona, Oil) Kino 

Barker, Oro Fino 

Barkhouse 

Brown 

Callahan's Kanch 

Cottonwood 

Crawfordu , .... 

French Flats 

Fort Gotf 

Hawkii>BVille 

Jackson's Ha;- 

McKinney's Creek 

iMuggiuRville 

Quartz Hill 

Quartz Valley 

Scott Bar 

Scott Kiver 

Shasta Kiver Canal 

Siad Valley 

Whiting Hill 



Vuba Kiver. 

Jim Crow Canon 

Ladies' Canon 

IJunker Hill 

Kock Creek 

Sardine Lake 

Shower Uranch 

Slate Creek and tributaries... 

" " West Branch 

Snow Creek 

Truckee Lake 

Slate Creek, West Brunch 



Kidder's Creek.. 



7 
3 
1 

I' 

2 

4 

2 

3 

4 

2 

11 

3 

3 

3 

8 

2 

6 

3 

7 

6 
15 

3 

4 



10,000 
15,000 

3,000 
140,000 
10,000 
12,000 
10,000 
10,000 

5,000 
15,000 

4,000 
25,000 
1(),000 

4,000 
18,000 



Barkhouse 

Kidder's Creek 
Scott Kiver, Sou 
Cottonwood Creek. 



16 

15 

12 

5 

9 

3 



Seott River, South Fork 

Turner Creek 

Greenhorn Creek 

.MeKinney Creek 



Howard Creek. 

Mill Creek 

Howard Creek. 

.Mill Creek 

Scott River 

Shanta River... 
Klamath Kiver. 
Lake Whiting.. 



8 
4 
5 
C 
3 
4 
5 
4 
7 
5 
20 
85 
4 
3 



50,000 

12,0011 

4,000 

2,.500 

3,0011 

4,0(M) 

l,5it0 

18,()0il 

5,0011 

2,.'i(MI 

13,000 

3,0110 

50,000 

2,0(H) 

6,(100 

5,000 

12,000 

14,000 

40,000 

10,000 

34,0011 

10,0011 

1.50,000 

lO.OlH) 

0,000 



7,000 



3,000 
4,000 
4,000 
2,00(1 
3,500 

300 

10,500 

8,000 

800 
3,0tl0 
4,000 
2,500 
3,000 
2,800 
2,500 
2,500 
4,000 
40,000 
300,000 
2,000 
2,500 



Howe & Co. 
Love & Co. 
Kenihle &. Co. 
Clear Creek Ditch Co. 
Gordon & Keguu. 
Davis Co. 
Davis Co. 
Ludwig it Co. 
A. Andrews & Co. 
E. Jones. 
Battams & Co. 
Sacramento Co. 
Sprintr Creek Co. 
Wilkinson Co. 
Andrews & Co. 



T. Smith & Co. 
A. Arnott \- Co. 
Schatler &. ("o. 
W. (Jrief & Co. 
1". Russell. 
.McFarland & Co. 
C'rawCord Br.)R. 
T. Baird & Co. 
Iliggins &. Co. 
1). ,McLauglilin. 
II. Bliss. 

SeltVidge. 

Cole &. Stephens. 
S George. 

Crawford Bros. 
!l. .lacoliH. 
Kanaka Q. M. Co. 
M. Kimball vS:. Co. 
Hoyce &, Bro. 
Said &. Kecse. 
.1. O. Cole & Co. 
Williams &, Co. 
McFarhind &. Co. 
S. (Jarniichiiel. 
Trnckee Luke Co. 
McFarland Sl Co. 



Cloufe Gottsche. 
Clonse (idllHche. 
CIoiiHc (ioilM'lie. 
.Morgan <V Co. 
Gottscli'3 cSi, Wright. 



Cri'wford iV. Co. 

J. Foch & Co. 

C. Khitt & Co. 

Lopez &. Co. 

McKiuiiey &. Jackson. 

')ulch Co. 

D S. lloilenbeek. 

J .)b GarretHon. 

Shelly, Benke Sc Co. 

B Jacobs tSt Co. 

W. Shores. 

Quinn, Rosborough & Co. 

VVood & Bro. 

Pi Whiting. 



STAI 

Knjipelii 
Knight's 
La Gran 
Mountaii 
San Joacj 



j Attingers 

Canyon ( 

Canyon ( 

Carders. . 

Carrier (5 

Chafimam 

Curries... 

Depinetts, 

Dunhams. 

East Fork, 

l;;«»t Fork. 

I Eastmans. 

Evans' Ba 

Pegans.... 

I '''ennings.. 

Gold BlufK 

' Hatchet Cr. 

Honest Bai 

Junction Ci 

" " 

Lewiston... 

Moonev's (J 

I North Vork. 

'Ohio Flat.. 
I'e'ti.iolm .fe 
i'"vert,y Fla 

'H'-'dFfaf... 
"t'dlliii.. 

R'dgoville 
Rush Cree 

Steiiier 

Strattons.. 

Swift Cree 

'i'avlor Fl 

Trnn'ly Cm, 

1 urner Har 

Wares (3). 

Weaver Cr 



Fill 



Weaverville 

Tri.Aii 
Broder iV, W 
Browns M 
Camphell A 
Davenports. 



vertoiis . 



^•'ishcrn 

Jenniiijf, 

'••'• •■ • IIS... 

- 'ng.>iich. 
Low;y, Won 
''wens 

, Peoples 

Reservation 

Rices 

I Town Ditch'.' 

lownspmig. 

IJiiion \'iiiey' 

„, Ttloi.UM.N 

, Bitf Oak Flat L 
I Hydraulie Col 
''itiiieetown &,l 



CANALS AND AVATER DITCHES — CALIFORNIA 



83 



Name of Pitch. 



Soaroe of Water. 



STANISt.AUS COUNTY. | ] 

Kappclniuiiii Vo iSi.xMilo IJar 1 10 

Kninht'B Ferry & Table Mt.. jStmiiHlmiii Kivor ' 7 

La Grange...', .i ]' ruoliiimic Hivtir ' 7 

Mountain Urow Liltlejulin's Crick 4 

San Joaquin Stuni«l«u8 Uivcr 15 



f fiO.nno .TamcB R. Bolton. 
:J.'>,000!JnnioB R. Bolton. 
40,000 Rcedv, Dye & Bixby. 



Indian Creole , . 
On/.iier fiuii'li.. 



TUI.N'ITY COUNTY. 

Attin({ert( 

Canyon Oecik 

Canyon CrecU W. Co.'s |('anyon Creek. 

(!ari^erH jKasluian (Jnleli 

Carrier (iiileli j (Carrier (iiilch 

Clia^imanH jSolilier (Jreek .-. 

CarricH JKrunklin Creek 

DepincttB J Canyon Cieek, Kact Fork... 

DnnliainH 'Sloonev (iulcli 

KhbI Fork j Fast Fork 

Fast Fork ' Fant Fork of Nort li Foi'k . . . . 

Kaetinans lFaplinMn'n (Snleli 

Evans' Bar ^MaxweH'M Creek 

Fcffuns !(!|eiir (inleli 

Fenninfjs jUriz/.lv Ouleli 

Gold Blnll MeKiiiney Gnlili 

Hatcliet CreoU Ilaleliet ('reek 

Honest Bar ITriuity River, Nortli Fork . . 

Junction ("ily ! Canyon ("reek . 



COBt. 



Name of Owner. 



Ijewinton lOeadwood Creek 

Moonev's (iuUli 'Mooney's Gulch 

North Fork ITriuity River, North Fork.. . 

" " llx)Kaii Creek 

Ohio Flat 'Gianh Valley Creek 

I'ettijolin «t Co. (I!) .Monuev and Calvin Gulohes.. 

I'overty Flat 'Fuk' \Veaver 

Rod Ffat iGwiiin (iiiKli 

l{ed Hill ICouiiorV Creek 

" " iRushCreek 

RidLTCville Stuart's Fork, E. F 

KusM Creek |Uush Creek 

Steiiier's Flat i lirown's Creek 

SirattouH Indian Creek 

Swift Creek Swift Creek 

Taylor Fl.it French Creek . 



Trinity Center ... 
TurueV liar Co.'s. 

Wares (H) 

Weaver Creek.. . 



Weaverville Basin. 



Tin.AiiK roii.\Tv. 

Broder iV, Van (iurdun 

Browns M ' 

('ainphell &.'. .'!rlin8 

Dttveiiiiorts 

lOvertouB 

/ishers 

Jenningi 

•Ji : . IIS 

,i\K .)iteli 

liowiy, Worlliley iV Co 

i> wen's 

Peoples 

Reservatioi> . 

Rices , 

Town Ditch 

Townseiids 

Union Viney 'd &. Fanning Co. 



Swift Creek 

Heddiuff's Creek 

Fast (St West Weaver tJreeks 
Weaver Creek 



Kawiali 

I'lukwdod Creek <, 

I'ule River , 

.Siiud Creek 

Kuwiiili 



2 
2 
4 
1 

2 

2 
2 
5 
2 
5 
ij 

3 

2 

3 
2 

2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 

5 

1^ 

2 

I' 
,5 
8 
2 

it 

8 
2 

4 
It 
2 

4 

8 



Sand Creek 3 

Mill Cnek I 4 

Deep Cieek 

Kawiiili , 

.Sand Cieek 



3 

■• " :::::::::::i 1 

Kawiah ' 10 



Tiile River 

Kawiah 

liio\virs Mill Diteh 

Sand Vreek 

Kawiah 



Tt'OI.llMNK CliI'MV. 

Bijif Oak Flat ITnolninno River . . 

Hydraulic (Jo " " N. 

Jamestown &. Chinese (,"ainp.!Wood Creek 



4 
5 
4 



5,000 
40,000 



Daniel Spicer. 

San Joaquin Water Co. 



3,500 D.' Attinper. 

3.000 Price &. Berber. 
12,00n;Flower8&,Co. 

l.-WOiS. Carder. 
2,01101 A. R.Chase. 

4.000 1 George 1". Chapman. 
4,0001 A. S. Carrie. 

8,000 Jos. Depinett. 

3,000 W. Dunham. 

fi.OOO:Dod>re&. Co. 

3,IIOO.Aherns& Co. . 

fi.OOO C. B. Eastman. 

2,tl00 Glover & Co. 

4,000:M. J. Fegan. 

2,000^ Fenning Bros. 

2,1100 ;jreKinnev&. Co. 

.5,000|H. Y. Fit'ch. 

(),000; Joint Stock Co. 

5,0(10 (Siveen & Co. 
10,0(M)IJ. W. Philhrook. 

2,.500;O. Phillips. 

3,,')00 ' Bates &. Van Miitre. 

2,000 Everett &, Co. 

2,000 R.J. Holmes. 

2,000 L. Frey. 

5,000 Pettijohn & Co. 

l,.">OllUartiett& Co. 

1,000, A. G. Price. 

(!,000 Evans & Barllett. 

l.-WOW. F.Nelson. 
lO.OOOIG. F. Deiner. 

8,000 John Am. 
10,000 Thompson, Gunn & Co. 

2,0011 i('. M. Sfatton. 

4,00' I Bovington & ('o. 
10,000 Fieneh Creek Ditch Co. 

a.OOOK. R. SiUcB. 

ti.OOO : Turner *Bar Co. 
12,000 William Ware. 

2,000' Estesit Co. 

0,000 R. N. Davidson. 
10,000 Hyde & Co. 



1,000 Brodor & Van Oordan. 
4,00li J. M, lliown. 
|,,'ilH» Caiiipliell, Miirti!! * Co. 
l,M) Davenport & Co. 
;l,00ll A. EveiliMi. 

800 Fisher Si Co. 
1,000' Jennings A Co. fCo. 

I,.'')00 .loliiiHiin, Van Vulkenburgli & 

801) II, Hamilton. 

700 Lowrv, Woillili'v & Co. 
1.000 W. RiOw.ii 
8,000 lliiiilam. Nichols & Co. 
2,00i. Indian Reserve. 
2,0iHt G. F. Rice and others. 
2,(»00 Town of Visalia. 

."iOO Townsend and others. 

i,m)\v. \.it V. Co. 



f>(K»,000 J. II. Watts & Co. 
300,0(M)|Phu'ni.x Water Co. 
7 I 15,000|Gro8&. Bradhury. 



I'l; 



I 



!1'^ 



li^t 



84 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORT. 



Same of Ditch. 



TUOLUMNE— Co«</«WCrf. 

I'ha-nix Wiiter Co 

Soiiora ajid Yorktown D. Co. 
Tuolumne County Water Co. 

YUBA COUNTV. 

Hirmingbam 

lirowna . 

Burnetts ^ 

Camptonville 

Collyer 

Dea'vers 

Dennisong 

Dunns 

ElcelHior Canal Co 

Feather Hi ver 

Little Willow 

McQneen8 

Monroe & Cornell 

Mrooks 

MuIIhub 

Nevers 

New York 

Nine Ilorfie 

Orejfon Creek 

Peacock 

Pine Hill 

Sleigbvilie 



Source oi Water. 



Tuolumne River, N. F. 
li tt ti 

Stanislaus River, 8. F. 



Strawberry Creek. 

Oregon Creek 

Dry Creek 



Spencer . . 
TiirflVcvfi . 



Dry Creek 

Oregon Gulch. 



Sleigbvilie Gnlcii.. 

Deer. Creek 

Feather Kiver 

Willow Creek 

Dry Creek 

New York Itavine. 
Dry Creek 



r o 



100 
10 
33 



150 



Indian Creek 

Oregon Creek 

New York Huvine. 

Oregon Creek 

Yuba River 

Bear River 

Sleigbvilie Gulch... 

Dry Creek 

Oregon Creek 

Indian Creek 

Dry Creek 



Cost 



t 

300,000 



550,000 



1,500 

500 

10,000 

3,000 

600 

900 

500 

1,500 

5(H),()()0 

10,000 

i,ao() 

8,000 

12,000 

600 

1,0011 

2,000 

600 

500 

6,000 

1,000 

1,600 

2,000 

3,000 

10,000 

6,000 

8,000 



Name of Owner. 



A. Reed & Co. 

A. Reed, Secretary. 

Tuolumne County Water Co. 



Birmingham. 

J. P. Brown. 
L. Burnett. 
,1. P. Brown. 
W. Collyer. 

Denver. 

S. H. DenniBoii. 
Dnnn & Bros, 
Siinnson, Morrison & Co. 
Giiskell Sl Co. 

McQueen & Co. 

Mrock & Co. 
Thomas Mnllan. 
Antone Nevers. 

Oiisper. 

linnsonic. 

Walton & Co. 
John Peacock. 
Woodriitl<!t Co. 
Glalt &. (?o. 
Sam. Hutcbings. 
N. A. Watwm. 
Spencer & Co. 
S. Turllrev. 



M ANUF A(Vru RES. 



FLOL'R-dlllHT MILLS. 

The nnniber of grist mills in the State is one hundred and forty eight. The iiggregnto run of stone, three 
hundred and twenty-nine. Si.xty-two mills are propelled l)y slcuni, and eiglity-six by water. Tlie aggre- 
gate capacity per day of the water mills is live tiiousand nine hundred and lifty ; of the steam, seven 
thousand nine hundred barrels. Estimating the water mills to be in opi'mlion six months of the year, 
the aggregate capacity of the mills of the State is, three million fosir hundred and sixty six tliousand tlirec 
hundred and eighty barrels i)er annum. 

The cost of the erection of Ibe above mills is estimated at two million eight hundred thousand dollars. 
The asscsped value is about one million live hundred thousand dollar.*. 

Of the above mills, eleven are in Snn Francisco, ten in Santa Clara, and twelve in Sonoma Counties. 
Sacramento has six mills, with twenty three run of stone, and an aggregate capacity of 2,1!M) barrels per 
day. According to the published statistics, tho Hour exported during the year lH(i(i amounted to 
324,353 barrels, and of wheat 2,267,!Kt3 sacks, a great portion of which went to the .\tlantic. markets. 
What a commentary on the piediction made upon the first emigration of the American population, 
that California never could become an agricultural C( unlry. and would be obliged to import her bread- 
etutfg from abroad. Every season tin: icrlile valleys of ("alifdrniii lecni with niiilions of acres of 
grain — a portion of which yields the astonishing product of seventy live bushels per acre. The wheat 
< I'op of last season was unusually large, and the proiluct the heaviest ever raised in the State. The 
prospect for the coming season is equally tiallcring; and from the indications, after an abundant supply 
for home consumption, there will bo a large surplus for shipment to other markets abroad. The arrange- 
ment recently made, by which largo amounts of Hour are shipped to tho Eastern markets, by the Pacillc 
Mail (,'ompany's sican ers, and by railroad across the Istbnuis of Panama, is an important era in this de- 
parlnicnt of trade; all bough, owing to the increased freight charges, there is allowed but a narrow mar- 
gin to shippers, the diU'ereiicu in the time, between this channel and the usual Hbipiiient around Cape 
Ilom, is believed to be amply sullici.'ut to make up the deficit. 



' VVith the 



L 

Ar.A.MK; 

Al.imeda ( 
! Alvarado . 
Brooklyn . 
Mission' Sai 
Oakland . . 

A.MADOI 

Fiddlefown 

lone City. . 

' lone City, . 

ni'TTK 

Butte Creek 
I Cliieo 

KeepeiB. . . 
I Orovillo...! 

CO I. list 

Colusa 

I Orand Island 

CO.MUA COS! 

Lafayette ... 
Pucli'eco [ 

OKI. NOUTK 

Smith Rivoi-v 

Er, noiuno 
Bear Crock 
I Lutrobe 

FHK.S,\o a 

' Centerville 

HOMnoi,/)|- 

I Areata . . . 
BydesvilleV 
Robnerville 
Mattole 

Kt.AMATK , 

Hoopa Valley 

, i.AKK rot; 

[;ower Lake.. 

I Kelsey Creek. 

r.A.S.SKv (.,,(. 

•/ohnstonvillu . 
Milford. 

I-OS ANfiKI.,.s 

Aziisa Ranch... 
LoH Angeles.. 
I ''OS Aiiteles .. 
Piiente Umn]i '. 
Mission Biejo . 

•ME.NDOCINI. c 

hV';''"''!'"" Vallev 

' "Ipella ... 

I'ii.Vote Valley"." 

i''»le Lake.:. 

J'Oiig Valley. 
I foiuid vr„|, • • 

iJkiah. ■ 



I 



GRIST MILLS — CALIFORNIA. 



86 



TABLE OF GRIST MILLS, 

With the liocation, Name, Run of Stone, the Capucity |ier Day, Power Used, Cost or Valuation, and 

Occupant's Name of each. 



Location. 



Ar,AMKn\ COUNTY. 

Alameda Creek 

Alvariido 

Urooklyn 

MisHioii San Jo8(J 

Oakland 



AMADOK couNry. 

Fiddletown 

lone Citv 



Name of Mill. 



VallejoB 

Union City 

Clinton 

Minoion 

Oakland 



Wheelers. . . 
Golden Stiir. 



lone City lone City 



niJTTE COUNTY. 

Uiitte Creek 

Cliico rliico . 

Kei'iiers. | Ki^opei 

Orovillo Opiur. 



No.riinlCapnclty 
.Stone, pcrdny. 



COI.IISA (' 

Colusa 

Grand Islund 



CO.STIIA COSTA COU.STY. 

Lnfiiyctfe 

I'aclieco , 



nKI. NdUTK COUNTY. 

Smith River Vallcv 



Er. DOUADO COUNTY. 

Hear Oeek 

Latrobe 



FllKSNO COUNTY. 

Contcrville 



IIUMHOI.IIT <'i)rNTY. 

Areata 

Hydesville , 

Rohnervillo , 

Maltole 



Kt.AMATIl COl'NTY. 

Hoopa Valley 



I.AKK COUNTY. 

Lower Lake 

Kelsey Cret'k 



r.A.SSKN COINTY. 

.ToluiBtonville 

Milford 



I,OS ANCiKt.f.S COUNTY. 

Azumi Ranch 

IjOh AukcIch , 

TiOH AniieloH , 

I'liente Hunch , 

Mission Uie jo 



MKNDOCINO COl.'NTY. 

Anderson Valley 

Calpella 

('ayote Valley 

Little Lake 

Lonjf Viilley 

Kduiid Valley 

Ukiah 



C(dnsa 

(irand Island . 



Lafayette. 
Paeheco . . 



Del Norte . 



Demiths. 
Lalrobe . 



Swcems . 



.\rcatn 

Cooper 

Dix it Wliitiiioro . 
Langdoim 



Hoopa Valley. 



Fowlers . 
Allisons . 



L^issen 

Honey Lake. 



Daltor s 

KiiKle 

AIIko 

Rowlands . 
Worknams . 



Gschwinds 
Calpella ... 
Clevelands. , 

•fames , 

Ilennettfl . . . 

Grays 

Moores 



Bills. 
i!00 
200 
i>20 
7.') 
300 



l'r> 

70 



125 

100 



80 
130 



50 



50 
50 



10 



20 
2.'i 

«) 



10 

25 



(>0 
40 



15 
30 
15 
15 
15 



20 
30 
3(1 
20 
15 
15 
20 



I'owor. 



water, 
steam. 



water. 
Hteam. 



water, 
steam, 
water. 



stenm. 



water. 



stenm. 



water. 



S.&. w. 
water, 
stean). 
water. 



water. 



water, 



Cost. 



125,000 
30,000 
20,000 
11,000 
18,000 



5,000 
20,000 
20,000 



15,000 

Vc'oot') 



Present Occupants. 



Alameda Flour Mill Co. 
C. J. Stevens. 
Kassett & Co. 
If. G. Ellsworth. 
Pendleton & Co. 



James Wheeler. 
Midi & Harron. 
.1. Cunimingg. 



.1. Bid well. 

Keeper. 

Perkins & Urooks. 



[Cook. 

10,000|Shermnn, Spalding Si. 
8,000 William Ogden. 



5,000 
12,000 



5,000 



P. H. Stnndish. 
W. J. Ireland. 



Anthony & Van Pelt. 



Hi. Demith. 

7,000 Davis & Witham. 



15,000 



J. B. Sweem. 



1.500 Spencer,Mannliam &. Co. 
2,000 William Tavlor. 
3,000;Dix & Whitmore. 
200 M. K. Langdo:'. 



U. S. Government. 



2.000 O. Simons *. Co. 
3,000 Tims. Allison & Co. 



7,000 Uricelnnd & Co. 
5,000 Wemple & Co. 



7.000 

15,000 

11,001) 

5,000 

5,000 



2,000 
4.000 
2,0110 
2,000 
1 ,500 
1,500 
2,000 



Henry Dalton. 
.lolin'Tnrner. 
J. H. Sainsevain. 
John Rowland. 
W. Workman. 



Jno. Gschwinds. 
Wichelhausen & Co. 
W. J. Cleveland. 
W. C. James. 
8. F.. Bennett. 
Andrew Gray. 
Moore ic Saiiders. 



^ .1 i 



V:'\ 



PMl 



86 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TABLE OP GRIST MILLS— Continued. 



Location. 



MERGED COUNTY. 

Merced River . 

Merced River 

Merced Fulls 

Merced River 



NAPA COUNTY. 

CnliKto'fii 

CbildBVulley 

Xapn City 

Nh{)u Valley 

Nupii Valley 



NKV.VDA COl'.VTY. 

Nevada City 



rr.ACKU COUNTY. 

Auburn 

Lincoln 

JlcCortucy's Croismng --■ 

PIIMAS COUNTY. 

American Valley 

Indian Valley 



Name of Mill. 



Eden ..., 
SlnrravB. 
Nelnoiis . 
Gwins. .. 



Calistoga . 
Childs.... 
N'crnon. . . 
Helena .. 
Pacilic ... 



Xevada City 

Auburn City Mill. 



Bear Kivor 



Ilaitwc'lla 
Taylors... 



SACRAMKNTO COINTY. 

"Ashland lOranite 

Folsom I Natonin 

Michigan Bar Michigan Bar. 

Sacramento L:i niliai d 

Sacramento . . I'liojnix 

Sacramento Pioneer 



SAN UEHNAUDINO COUNTY 

Allan Manga Meeks. 

San Bernardino Cowns 



.SAN niK(;() COI'NTY. ! 

Agua ( 'aliente i Dyes 

Escondedo , E<'Condeii( 

Sun Dit'ffo I Ames 

Temecnla . ' Mugees. . 



SAN FRANCISCO f ' 

San Francisco . . . 



....JAlta 

Capitol 

■-••jCity ,... 

Connnercial.. 

(ienessee 

— ! Golden Age.. 

iGolden Gate. 

. ... ] National 

.... Tacilic 

Pioneer 

. . .. Juniper 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

Linden ' Linden . 

Polunds Lone Star . . 

Stockton I City 

Stockton Ijanes 

VVoo>Ibridge Woodbridge . 



SAN l.UIS OUISPO COUNTY, 

Sun Luis Obispo 

Sail Luis Obispo 



SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

Redwood City 

Spauisbtowu 



SANTA nAKBARA COUNTY. 

Santa Barbara 



Arroyo Grunde 
Queslu 



Redwood City . 
Ames 



Montecito . 



No.run 
Rtoiic. 



Capacity 
per day. 



120 
75 
00 
40 



15 
li.'5 

40 
50 



150 



75 



30 
30 



fiOO 

400 

40 

450 

aoo 

500 



25 
15 



30 

80 

80 

100 

i>00 

i!00 

250 

250 

40 

75 

75 



150 

50 

500 

240 

50 

40 
20 

100 
100 

15 



Power. 



water. 



j steam 
water. 
; steuin 

's. &w 
I water 



steam. 



water. 



Cost. 



rroscnt Occupantii. 



|15,n00iHamlin&,Lvon. 
12,0(M) D. P. Quii liii. 
7,.')II0IC. C. NelM)... 
5,000 S. R. Owin. 



5,000 

5,000 J. B. Cbilds. 
30,000|Nupa Milling Co. 
lO.OOOIJ. Mecklehburg. 
15,000:F. W.Ellis. 



20,000!cinrk&Torson. 



14,000iMalIctt&. Mobrel. 
John Ziegeiibein. 



isteuni. 



water. 



steam. 



stcnm. 



water. 



steam, 
water. 



15,000 J. F. llartwid 
30,000 J. T. Tjylor. 



85,0n0l.T. II. Carroll & Co. 
10,0i;0|I). W. Conice & Co. 

4.50 i. lames Jord:in. 
80,000! Rcdinglon vV Williams. 
25,()00|C. & B. McCreary. 
05,000 [Smith fi. Garlield. 



2,0001 Nathan Meek. 
7,000 Wm. A. Cowns. 



.1. M. Dye. 
I). A. llolli!,ter. 
R. Ames. 
John Jlagee. 



2,000 Whelan &. Co. 
10,000 Malloi v, Deming & Co. 
10,000]Slieehv & HiggniB. 
10,(K)0j(}roHh'& Rnllie:ford. 
25,000 Kennedy & Hopkins. 
F. 1). Conro it Co. 



25,000 
40,0(10 
50,000 
8,00(1 
10,000 
10,000 



Ifi.OOO 
10,000 
50,000 
20,000 
10,000 

3,000 
2,000 

8,000 
6,000 

3,000 



II. Davis & Co. 

,1. .Marlenstein iV. Co. 

J. Zeile. 

Kisen Bros. 

W. .M. Reiny. 



Rynerson &. Waeley. 
S. L. Mageo. 
Sperrv, BurkettiSc Co. 
R. B.'Lane. 
Runkiu Bros. 

F. Z. Brunch. 
.Mariano Bouillu. 

Jesse Jewell. 
J. P. Ames. 

William Benu. 



* Destroyed by Fire; will bo roliulll. 



L 

SANTA CI 

I Alviso.... 

I Gilroy 

I Los rtutos 
McCartv8\ 
Hio Omidu 
San Jos<5 . , 
San Jos»5 . , 
San Jose . . 
Santa Cbmi 
Santa Clara 
s*ST\ en 

I Coriilit:ig .. 
Pescadfro . 

Santa Cruz . 

' Saiittt Crui! . 

So<|uel 

Soijuel .' 

Wutsonville' 

•SHASTA 

I CoKonwood. 
JlilJville 

I „ SISKIYOU 

Scott Vallcv . 

Scott ViillJv. 

Scott ValleV. 
Scott Vallt.y. 
Scott Vallev.. 
Scott ValleV.. 
S liastji Vallev. 
I Shasta Valley. 

SOI.ANO C(| 

f-rceu Valley. 
iSmsmi City... 

, . SO.VOMA t(| 

Aniil/y TownslJ 

Bodega Town J 

I J 'overdale ToJ 

'ilendociiio 'I'o J 

'Ueiidoeiiio To J 

1 etalunia Towl 

ietuluma Towl 

Santa Rosa 'J\, J 

^aiita Rosa 'I'oxl 

•^ononiH Tounsll 

I ,\" fj'> To\v„«|| 

> "llejo TownslJ 

SI'ANISI.ACS 

, ''".Grange ... 
I '^'"gilt's Ferry 

TKHA.MA col 
Antelope Cieek f 
Battle Creek. 
Ked Bluff. .. . 
Teliauju 

, TRINITY coil 

Bay Fork . f 
I Weaver Creek.' 

I ,, TULARE COlj 

People's Ditch. 
I visalia 

, _ TUOLUMNE - 

I J^olumbia. . . 
Woods' Creek 



GRIST MILLS — CALIFORNIA. 



87 



TABLE OF GRIST MILLS.— Continued. 



Location. 



Namo of Mill. 



SANTA CI. AHA CorNTV. 

Alviso ; AlviBo 

Oilroy : . . . Oilrov 



LuB (^lUog 

McC'artyHville 

Rio GiiaJuliipo 

San Job6 

Sail Jo8(5 

Sun JoBo , 

Simla ("lnra 

Santa Clam 

SANTA CUl'Z COU.NTV 

Coriilil:iB lOrtons 

IVBcadt'io ' Vdiis. . . 

Santa Crnz j KIitUh . 

Santa Cm/, [ .MhJimh . 

Si)(|Ufl lliiMie.s . 

SiHiiit'l I WiJHona 

Wutsonville Fords . . 



Saula HoMi . 
IJodwood ... 

Licks 

.MoodyH 

Oninite 

Vineyard . . . 

Dixon 

Santa Clara. 



•SHA.STA COUNTY. 

Cottonwood 

Millville 



SI.SKlVOi; COUNTY. 

Scott Vnllev 

Scott Valley 

Scott Valley 

Scott Valley , 

Scott Valley 

Scott Valley 

Sliastii Valley , 

SliUBta Valley 



FannerB . . . 
North Star. 



JCtna 

Fort Jones 

'Lafayette 

Uonjfli and Ready. . 
Roni;li and Ready. . 

Union 

Hiilteville 

Sliasta River 



SOI.ANO COUNTY. 

Orecu Valley. 



Suisun City j Siiisuu 



Green Vallev. 



SONOMA COUNTY. 

Anally Townsliiji lOverlialser . 

liodejjta Towiisliip | Smiths 

Cloverdale TownHliip iOeyner 

Mendocino To\vii»hiii ! llealdsbnrg. 

Mendocino To\vnMlii|> .Mill Creek. . 

i'etalunia TownKlii|> t.'enlral 

I'etalunai TownKliij) 1 Oriental 

Santa Rosa Townslii]) . .. ! Hoods 

Santa Rosa Townsliip . .. I Mark West. 

Sonoma Township IChanvets. .. 

Vallejo Township I Mathews . . . 

Vallejo Township ' OccidcnUiL . 

I 

STANISLAUS COUNTY. i 

La G range Stanislans .. 

Knifflit's Ferry La Orange . . 



TKHAMA COUNTY. 

AnUilope Creek 

Battle Creek 

UedUlurt' 

Teliauia 



TKINUrY COUNTY. 

Hay Fork 

Weaver Creek 



TULAIIE COUNTY. 

People's Ditch 

Visalia 



TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

Colnmbia 

Woods' Creek 



Antelope. . 

Union 

Red Hlutr. 
Tehama. . . 



Hay Fork . 
Uavidsona . 



Illinois . 
Visalia . 



No.run 
8lunc. 



Colnmbia 

Tuoliunne Co. 



Capacity 
per clay. 



llhls. 
3IIII 
81) 
L'il) 
75 
250 
100 

aoo 

110 

100 
200 

100 
100 

;w 

50 

50 

200 

150 



100 
100 



50 
75 
50 
75 
50 
50 
35 
35 



f>0 
100 



80 
100 

40 
120 

liO 
130 

50 
125 

40 

30 

40 
125 



90 
•JO 



125 

50 
125 
200 



30 
20 



15 

120 



80 
80 



Vower. 



Btenin . 

a 

watt 



steam. 



water. 



steam. 



water. 



steam 
water 
stei\m 
water 



S.& w. 
steam. 



Co»t. 

$75,000 
10,000 
75,000 
15,000 

:i80,000 
20,000 

100,000 
14,(100 
15,000 
20,000 

15,000 

5,000 

8,000 

8,000 

10,00! I 

12,000 

10,000 



10,000 
12,000 



water, 
steam. 



water, 
steam. 

water. 



steam, 
water 



8.&. w. 



water. 



30,000 
15,000 
30,000 
10,000 
11,000 
8,000 
8,000 
15,000 



Present Occupants. 



Rowlov &■ Adams. 
C. McCoy. 
VV. 11. Rogers. 
John Whismau. 
James Lick. 
Moody IJros. 
Dehnas & I'onlin. 

Cotiell. 

Dixon & Co. 
L. Robinson. 

R. Ortoii Sc Co. 

I. N. Voris. 
John Fleck. 
J F. I. Rennett. 
llameH 6c Danbinbis. 
O. P. Wilson & Co. 
C. Ford & Co. 



Gcer & Nickols. 
Wilkinson & Ross. 



Jnliun & Davidson. 

Ft.Jones Joint Stock Co. 

K. Bean. 

A. Swain &. Co. 

A. Swain & Co. 

C. Abbott & Co. 

II. Stewart. 

Schlitch & Co. 



20,000 Townscnd & Repeuu. 
35,000 J. U. Murslon. 



5,000 A. W. Overhalser. 

C,0U0|Thonia8 Smith. 

3,000 Lamphier &. Alexander. 
10,000 ilossets & Vanghn. 

8,000 \'alentine Miller. 
10,000 McCnne Bros. 

8,000 G. R. Rose. 
12,0110 Hood Sc Co. 

4,0(M) Geo. W. Mitchell & Co. 

2,000 G. Chunvet. 

3,000 Overton & Sons. 
20,000 Iluinpvie, Lane & Co. 



30,000 
10,000 



10,000 
12,000 
10,000 
50,000 



4,000 
2,600 



3,.500 
20,000 



D. W. Tnlloch. 
Reedy, Dye &. Bixby. 



Northam & W^oodward. 
W. S. Carver. 
licdinKton &. Williauis. 
Reel & Co. 



A. I>. Bay less. 
R. N. Da'vidsou. 



J. M. Nelson. 
J. M. Browne. 



7,000 II. 8. Miller. 
12,000 James Bell. 



88 PAOIPIO COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 


TABLE Ok^ GU18T MILLS.— Concludkd. 


Location. 


Name of Mill. 


Nii.ruii 
Htoiic. 


C'ttpiiclty 
piT liny. 


I'owor. 


Coat. 

$I4,0IH) 
30,000 
10,000 

15,000 
40,000 
20,0it(, 


I'roariit Occupants. 


YOI.O COU.NTY. 

Ciiolio ville ....... 


f !iir)u*villu 


:< 

2 
4 
4 


Illilit. 

i:oo 

175 
150 

'"ioo" 

SO 


water. 
Htcam. 

. 

water. 

Htcaiii. 
It 


DinKli'V & Hatch. 
Kubci't'Oartlncr. 
Frueuiuii St. Dearner. 

McDonald. 

A.I). Slnrr. 

VV. L. AVilliiiinii & Co. 


Knight'H LiindiiiK 


KMjfle 


YUBA COUSTV. 




Murysville 

Miirvsvillo 


Hiickcvd 

.Miirvrtvillu 








• 





SAW MILLS. 

The erection of enw millB and the man u fact tire of hiinber was one of the carlioHt and most important 
entcrpriHt's en<,'iif,'ed in upon this portion of tho Pacilic Coast. The doinaud for materials for building' 
and niininj; pnrposoB, attendant upon tlie discovery of (itold in California, Kave rise to the erection of .a 
large number of saw mills, both in the interior and at various pointa alon^'the const in tliis State, Oref?on, 
and Washington Territory. The vast and incxhanstible forests of the best (luality of timber for this 
purpose were peculiarly favorable to this braiu-h of manufai'tures. While a lar^e amount of the lumber 
used in Sail Francisco is shipped to this port from the rcfj^ion of Humboldt Kay and Mendocino in this 
State, the greater portion comes from I'ort Orford, in Oregon, an<l Paget .Sound, in Washington Territory. 
The cedar lumber from Port Orford is considered the best material for flooring, in use. The umount of 
domestic lumber imported during the year ending Dec. 31 , ISbli, as exhibited by tlie books of the Lumber 
Dealers' Association is: Pine, 8,"),0l)0,000 feet; redwooil, 55,000,000 feet; laths, yj,OOO,O0O; shingles, 
25,000,000, Two of the laiwft plaiilis ever produced in any country were exhibited at the Fair of the 
San Francisco Jlechanics' Iiist'fute in September, 18(i5, and attracted univerail attention. They were of 
the native redwood, entirely free from sap and knots or flaw of any kind, seven feet five inches in width, 
and twelve feet long. They were sawed nt a mill on the Noyo, a river up the const, in a region abounding 
with a giant growth of timber. The proprietors of the mill, desirous of attracting iilteulioii to the great lum- 
ber refiourcps along the northern coast of Califoinia, sent an order to a leatling New York house for a eash- 
811 w twelve feet long, the largest saw ever made of this description being but ten feet. An article was 
specially maniifiictured in Sheftield, England, and shipped here for this purpose. After the close of the 
e.^hibition here, one of these mammoth plunks was donated to the SmitliHoniaii Institute, at Washington, 
am! the other was reserved for exhibition at the World's Exposition at Paris, in I8C7. Tho number of 
millb in the State is three hundred and ninefyeight, of which two hundred and eight are propelled 
by sib I in, and one hundred and ninety by water. Cost of erection estimated at two and a half million 
ofdollirs. Aggregate capacity is about five hundred millions of feet per yc.ir. The Surveyor General 
returns as. the product of US counties in 18()5, 11.2,046,053 feet. 

TABLE OF SAAV MILLS. 

With the Locution, Name of Mill, Capacity, Cost, Occupant's Name, etc., of each. 



Locntion. 



AI.I'INE COUNTY. 

Blue Lake 

(-arey's Mills 

Centerville 

Fredericksburg 

Forest Dale 

Hope Valley 

Murklee ville 



Middle Carson I{iv.,W.B. 

Silver King V'alley 

Silver Mountain 



Name of Mill. 



Blue Lake 

(,'aiey's Mills 

liichardsons 

Cast Iron 

Forest Dale 

Hope Valley 

Morgan, Ayres & Co. 

Pocket 

Biiena Vista 

Minnesota 

Davidsons 

Dennis &. Oihr.an ... 
Pearson & Itobinson. 



No. If'npnclty— 
Saws. Kt.porday. 



4,000 

3,000 

r,',(M)0 

10,000 

4,000 

8,()IK) 

5,0(M» 

12.000 

20,000 

4,000 

12.000 

15,001) 

3,000 



Power. 


Coat 


water. 


$4,000 


it 


3,000 


steam. 


8,000 1 


water. 


8,000 ; 


t( 


1,0(M)| 


steam. 


4,000: 


water. 


5,000 


ti 


10,000 


t( 


7,000 


t( 


1,(>I)II 


tt 


12,000 


tt 


20,000 


ti 


3,000 



Present Occupants. 



.1. P. Williamson. 
W. B. Wade. 
II. Rhodes. 
Patrick Kenady. 
Brock, Huile & Co. 
Win. Herriford. 
Morgan, Ayres & Co. 
A. Sedgley. 

Coon .Uncapher Sl Toby. 
W. H. H. Oraham. 
M. Davidson. JCo. 

S. B. (iilman, Dennis & 
Pearson & Robinson. 



Local 

AMADOU 

Cosumnes, So 
I Jackson 

.lacksoii Crt-el 
I Pine fJrove. . 
I Volc:ino 



IIUTTK Co 

I Chiio .Meadowi 
Dogtowii 



i Orovillo . 



, CAT,.\VKRAS c 

J Big Trees 

i <'ulaveiasKiver 
I El Dorado 



•lesus Maria 

[ San Antonio ("ro 
West Point 



cor.usA Co 
Head Cache Ci 
Stony Creek... 



DKI, .NOItTE C( 

iKIkVallev.. 
Happy Cainj).. 
Indian Creelt . . 
Smith River!.. 

KI. DOIUDO CO 

Cosumnes ... 



Diamond Springs! 



! Georgetown . 



Kelsey 

Mount GregJi'y. 
I'luccrville 



Mieasant Valley- 

I Spanish Flat . .'. . 

Sugar Loaf 



SAW MILLS — CALIFORNIA, 



89 



TABLE OP SAW MILLS.— Continued. 



Locution. 



Name of Mill. 



I 5io. irVimclty— 
!8hwi. .(''t.poritay. Power 



AMAIIOIl COl'NTY. 

CoDiiiniieB, Soiitli Kui'k... 

Juckxon 

JiickHoii Oeuk, 8. F 

Pino fh'ove 

VoliMiiu 



(^OHUDiiicH \V liter Co. 

Hiilto 

ViiMKlins I 

JoliimtonH I 

Autehipo j 

i Avfrys • 

iKlcilerickH : 

! L«tili«-g '■ 

IMorKinig I 

iTllITB j 

Tyiiiin 

! \V'uImIih 



IIUTTK COUNTY. ! 

Cliii'O MciitlowH ■ AIori'illH . . 

DoglOWIl II(I|>|IH ... 

" KinHoii ... 

" Ijl.'olllll'llri . 

Tiijifiiinl . . 



i Orovillo . 



Tinfi 

(illl'liotlH 

!('llHrii(lu . . 
j Clipper .. 



CAT.AVKnAS COUNTY. ! 

Iti^ TrceH iKiin1>iill iV Ciitliiij,'.. 

(,'iiliiverii» Hivfi' IVak & Co 

Kl Doriido ! Diimiiiij,' & Co 

" " i Kl Doratlo 

" " 'KIDoni.lo 

" " j Wiley iV WuBlibiini. 

JeRUB Mui'ia j Doak & Co 

i San Antonio Creek ! DiinbarB 

West Point !Clark8 

" " Kiiielicrit 



COI.USA COUNTY. 



1 

I !: 

1 
1 



Head Ciiclie Creek Hnniphreys | 1 

Stony Creek Williaiim 



DEI. .SOUTE COUNTY. 

KIk Valley 

Happy Camp 

Indian Creek 

Smith liiver 



Kl. DOUADO COUNTY. 

CuaunmeH 



Kin^'HlnndH ... 

Dodlittlt'B 

Indian Creek 
Lakes 



Faridiania 

I'utnaiiiH 

Tylers 

Diamond Springs j Diamond 

" jKinpire, No. 1. 

" Hooper At Co.. 

Slv Park 



j Georgetown . 



Sonth Weblier . . . 

Stone-breaker 

Turner Sc Leatcli. 

Canon Creek 

Dry Creel' 

jKmpire . 

Junotion. 



I liock Cufi '11 

Kelsey ilJear Creeh 

Mount Grej^ory j Ml. Oregor^ 

Plafcrville i Ashland 

" |Klklioru 

" illlinois 

" 1 Pacitic 

" I Sportsman's Hall. 

rieasant Valley | IJultic 

Spanish Flat . .'. { Deinitlis 

Sugar Loaf | Sugar Loaf 



4,500 

10,000 

3,01)0 

10,01)0 
8,001) 
8,000 
,1,000 
0,000 
21,000 
10,0(M) 

a.ooo 



water 
steam, 
water, 

stoiim, 



13,101) 
20,01)0 



10,000 
2^,(H)0 
10,000 

0,000 
30,000 
10,000 
10,000 

8,000 
21,000 
12,000 



water 



water 



jntejim. 



■1,000 
6,000 



2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 



6,000 
1,000 
3,000 
12,000 
8,000 



9.000 

4,000 

12,000 

-1,000 

2,000 

8,000 

8,000 

6,000 

5,000 

6,000 

12,000 

10,000 

12,000 

8,000 

12,000 

14,000 

12,000 



watei 



3,000 



steam. 



water 



steam, 
water. 



steam. 

41 

water. 

steam. 



water, 
steam. 



wi'.ter 



steam, 



water. 



Coit. rrcirnt Occupant!. 



$3,000 CosnnineH Water Co. 

3,0II()'N. llownian. 

1,500; VaiiKlin. 

3,000 ,1. L. F. .loliiiHton. 
- .'i.OlM) Smith & Mai tin. 

4,000 Averv &■ Sons. 

4,000 Ilenrv Frederick. 

3,000 .1. L/slie. 

3,000 II. Hobinson. 

6,000 ,1. Tarr. 

4,000. C. Foster. 

2,000 .1. E. Warner. 



8,000 ; Woodson iV. Co. 
4,OI)0[||<>,.pt<& llro. 
2,0110 1 W. Ilastv. 
2,.'i00 William Leonard. 

.|,(IO(l| Wiillier. 

3,l)imi .Sinker. 

3,(011 <;la(kiMif. 

H,0(IO I'nioii l.miibfrCo. 
lO.OUOiUnioii Lumber Co. 



8,00(1; Kimbnll iV Cutting. 
10,01)0 1 Peak A: Co. 

6,000; Dunning &, Co. 

3,0II0!.I. Osborii. 
10,000 ;Wm. Irvine. 

6,0l)l);Wilev iV, Washburn. 

5,00o!.l. K.'Doak. 

6,(100 F. Dimliar. 



10,000 
3,000 



3,000 
3,000 



2,000 
5,001) 
3,000 
2,501) 



4.000 
I ,.')()() 
3,0(10 
7,001) 
4.0(10 
4,000 
2,000 
2,0(10 
10,0(10 
1,000 
2,000 
6,000 
7,000 
5,000 
7,000 
6,000 
8,000 
7,000 
5,000 
3,000 
6,000 
11,000 
15,000 
5,000 
2,000 



W. V. Clark, 
(leorge Fisclior. 



Ilumphrev &. Smith. 
John Wiriiauis. 



T. O. Kingsland. 
A. Doolittle. 



I. Lake. 



Fanihum. 

W. H. Putnam. 

It. S. Tyler. 

Hry ant Bros. 

A."(!. Fleming. 

11. (). lIi>oner & Co. 

Cutler iV (Slid. 

K. L. Miisie. 

OiitHth &. Bryant. 

T'lirner iSt Leatcli. 

UoubIi & Co. ^ 

Peato & Co. 

S. S. lugliain. 

William Clark. 

liobert Noble, [worth. 

lleiisofW. H.Hollings- 

MeKoy & Co. 

Jones '& Blunchard. 

J. & J. Blair. 

II. Brightmaii & Co. 

Jones Si. Blancbard. 

J. & J. Blair. 

[ionis Lepetit. 

U. Deniith. 

James Smith. 



..^... 







IMAGE EVALUATION 
TEST TARGET (MT-3) 




1.0 



1.1 



I^|2j8 |2^ 

■so ■^" MHI 

■^ Uii 12.2 

£f 144 ■" 
2.0 






■ 40 



L25 MU 



I 

1.6 






.%fe 



V 



^ ""-^ 





[C 



Sciences 
Corporalion 




23 WBT MAIN STIIIT 

wnSTM.N.Y. MSM 

(716)t72-4S03 







^ 




6^ 



Is 






4^ 

r 




90 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



TABLE OF SAW MILLS.-Continued. 



Locntiiin. 



FR-ISNO COUNTY. 

Kings iiiver, N. V. . . 
San Joaquin, N. P. .. 



HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

Areata 

Eureka 



Hydesviile.. 

Muttole 

Patrick's. . . . 
Sohuervitic , 



INYO COUNTY. 

Black Kock 

Kearsarge 



KEUN COUNTY. 

Green Horn Mountain . 

Havilab 

KhIboc Canon 

Tebachape 



Name of Mill. 



Peoples 

Clark & Witt. 

Converses 

McColiouglis. . 



Titlow 

Hay 

Jones 

Vances 

Wriglit & Langdon. 

Mattolu 

Patricks 

Dix Si, Wliitmore .. 



Bells... 
Pioneer. 



No. CapBclty— 
Saws, Ft-perday. 



Summit ' 1 

Cross, Narbonne&.Co| 2 

Cross & Narbonne .. I 2 

Tebacbape 3 



KLAKATH COUNTY. 

Hoopa Valley • . 

Orleans Bar 

Salmon River, Main. .. 
11 » j^ JO 

i. F.... 



Sawyer's Bar . 
Trinidad 



LAKE COUNTY. 

Cobb's Valley 

Mount Hanali 



Hoopa Valley I 

Uearcb & Alexnndersj 1 

Nordhuiuier Creek . . ; 1 

Crawfords 1 

Uitners ; 1 

Sawyer'.) Bar I 1 

Trinidad 2 



Standifor^s , 
Moores 



LASSEN COUNTY. 

Honey Lake Valley Adams 3 

Janesville .* i Shatter | 2 

1 

Richmond ; Bates 

Kingsbury 



I 



Susanvillc .. 
Susan River . 



MAKIN COUNTY. 



MAUIPO.SA COUNTY. 

Bear Creek 

Chowcliiila 

Coulterville 



Snow Creek . . . 
Sweetwater ... 
Wbitlock'B 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. 



Albion River. 
Anderson Valley. 

Cahto 

Caspar Creek 

Dry Creek 

Gualala River 

Little Lake 

Little River 

Long Valley 



Root) . 
Stocktons 



Dixons . . 
Shearers . 



Clarks 2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 



White & Hatch 

Buck & Hoborn 

Oreelys 

Smith, Dudley Sc Co. 

Lovejoy Si, Co 

Rollins & Co 

Humphreys 



Albion 

Oscbwind .. 
Simpsons . . . 

Caspar 

Dry Creek . . 
(tuulula .... 
Blossors . . . . 
Ijittio River. 
Bennetts 



6,000 
1,500 
3,000 
3,000 



Power. 



4,0(10 



7,000 
2,000 



5,000 
7,000 
7,000 
5,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
5,000 
1,000 
12,000 



1,000 
3,000 



0,000 
14,000 
6,000 
2,000 
4,000 
10,000 
6,000 



12,000 
12.000 



5,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
9,000 
3,000 
3,000 



25.000 
1,500 



steam, 
water. 



s.&w 
steam. 



water. 



steam. 



water. 



steam. 



Cost 



water. 



steam. 



water, 
steam, 
water. 



steam. 



water. 



22,01)01 steam. 

2,000 1 " 
20,000i " 

2,000, water. 
18,000 steam. 

1, 000 1 water. 



$6,000 
2,000 
4,500 
3,000 



3,0(10 

25,000 

50,000 

50,000 

3,01)0 

3,000 

2,000 

3,000 



4,000 



I'rcsciit Occupants. 



9,000 
lv,,0(IO 

5,000 
12,000 



Wm. Ausbiim. 
Clark & Witt. 
C, P, Converse. 
Geo. McCoUough & Co, 



Spencer & Melinn. 
Dolbeer fi. (.Larson. 
Jones Si, Keutticld. 
.Jolui Vance. 
Wright Si. Langdon. 
\'\mn Si. Co. 
N. Patrick. 
Dix it Whitmore. 



Bell & Co. 
J. Aiken & Co. 



A. D. Hight. 
Cross, Narbonne St, Co. 
Cross & Narbonne. 
Tehachape M. Co. 



U. S, Government. 
Reaich & Alexander. 
Murch Si, Buhr. 
A. D. Crawford, 
•loacpli liitner. 
il, T. Burrows. 
Gibbs & Whiting. 



l,200|Tho8. Standiford. 
2,300 1 Moore & Allen. 



10,000 Charles Adams. 
16,000 1). R. Cate & Bro. 
7,000 T. H. Fail-child. 

2.000 iKingBbury Si. Bates. 

3.0001 Drake &'Kingsburv. 
12.000il)rake& Spencer. " 

7.000 H. C. Stockton. 



James Dixon. 
Isaac Shearer & Co. 



3,000 iD, Clark. 
S.OOO ! White & Hatch. 
9,000; Buck Sl lliiboru. 
8,000 J. F, (Jreelv. . 
9,000' Smith, Dudley & Co. 
8,0001,1, (). Lovejoy & Co. 
4,000 Rollins Si. Co. 
4,000 J. C. llumpbieys. 



30,000 McPberson&Wetherbee 

2,000 John Gschwind. 

J. H, Siuipunu. 
30,000 J, (1. Jackt'on. 

3,000 liriish & Co. 
30,000j.r, S, Rutherford & Co, 

2,000 BI<»8or Bros. [Reeves. 
20,000 Stickily, Coombs St, 

1,000 8. F. Bennett. 



Loca 



MENDOCINO- 

Mendociiio. . . 
Navarro Riv« 
No^o River. . 
Point Arena. 
Pryor Creek , 
Redwood Val 
Round Valley 
Russian Gulc'l 

MONO c 

Adobe Jleario' 

Big Pine 

Bridgeport. . . 
Hot Springs... 
Mono Lake... 
« II 

Owensvillo..., 
Twin Lukes . . 

NAPA COC 

Napa Valley.. 
St. Helena 'Ml 



NEVADA C( 

Bloody Run... 
Buena Vista Ri 

Cherokee 

Eureka South. 
Greenhorn Cre 

Lake City 

Little York .... 
Meadow Lake 



I Nevada City. 

I " 

, North Greenlim 
I Upper Coif IX I 
Wolf Creek - . 



PLACER CO 

Bear River... 



Blue Canon. 
„" " Lai 
Brushy Canon. 

" " 

i Canon Creek . . 



I Cape Horn... 

t. 41 

Dutch Flat!!!.. 
I " " .... 
IPorestHill.... 
I Herbert's Statii, 

Illinoistowu Rt 

41 , 

" I 

Indian Canon.. 
Lake Tahoe. . . 
I-iltle Oii/.!!lv._ 
Michigan Bluff, 



Alichiirt 
Owl Cr 



•eek . . . 



* Amount of Lumlicr sawed In this County during the year 1866 was 1S,'230,70V feet, valued at 1167 ,MT. 



SAW MILLS — CALIFORNIA. 



9i 



TABLE OP SAW MILLS.— Con fiNUED. 



Location. 



Name of Jlill. 



No 
Siiws. 



ME.N'DOCI.MO — cjiUiimcd. I 

Menducinn 

Navarro River 

Noyo River 

Point Arena 

Pryor Creek 

Redwood Valley .... 

Round VHlley 

RuHsiau Gulch 



MONO COUNTY. 

Adobe Meadows 

Bi|^' Pine 

Bridgeport 

Hot SprinKH 

Mono Lake 



Owenaville.. 
Twin Lakes 



NAPA COUNTY. 

Napa Valley 

St. Helena Mountain. 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

Bloody Run...' 

Bueiui Vista Ranch. . . 

Cherokee 

Eureka South 

Greenhorn Creek 

Lake City 

Little York 

Meadow Lake 



I 



'• Nevada City . 



North Greenhorn Creek . 

{ Upper Colfax Road 

Wolf Creek 



PLACER COUNTY. 



Bear River. 



Blue Canon 

" Lake. 
I Brushy Cafiou 

i Canon Creek 



Cape Horn. 



Dutch Flat.. 



I Forest Hill 

: Herbert's Station.. 
Illiuoistown Road. 



Indian Canon.. 

LakeTalioe 

Little Grixzlv.. 
MichiuHn Bluff. 
Owl Creek 



Page 

Navarro 

Novo 

Tilibs 

Holdens 

Reeds 

Grays 

Russian Gulch. 



Best &, Hess 

Bells 

Robinsons 

Yaney 

Lundy 

Smith & McAfee.... 

Owensvilie 

Robinson & Tinkhnni 



Calistoga . 
Lillics 



Bloody Run . 

Mohawk 

Cherokee .... 

Eureka 

Voss 

Lake City . . . 

(Jard'.iers 

Alfords 

Fordice 

Fredericks... 
McFurlaues.. 

Grefforya 

SouliiardB .... 

•Stiles 

Enterprise ... 

Monitor 

Grass Valley. 

Wolf Creek.". 



Bear River 

Neal &Crandalls .. . 

Magnolia 

Sugar Pino 

Lost Camp 

Forest House 

Brushy Canon 

Mavflower 

Hall, Aikin & Co ... 

Kearsarge 

Richmond & Days . 

Cnpe Horn 

Pacille 

D. F. S. M. Co.'s... 

Dutch Flat 

Reas 

Tibbets &. Williams 

Mountain 

New England 

Peonies 

BucKeyo 

Saxons 

Mount Pleasant 

Ijust Chance 

Owl Creek 



C»paclty— 
Ftpcrday 



60,000 

25,000 

30,000 

1,000 

2,000 

2,000 

1,500 

10,000 



5,000 
6,000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,000 
5,000 
5,000 
8,000 

3,500 
5,000 



10,000 
45,000 
16,000 
20,000 
20,000 
4,000 
10,000 
20,000 
15,000 
20,00(1 
20,000 
20,000 
10,000 



15,000 
24,000 
30,000 



Power. 



steam. 



water. 



steam, 



s.&w. 



water, 
steam. 



water. 



steam, 
water, 
steam. 



15.000 



8,000 
10,000 
10,000 

4,000 

5,000 
12,000 

3,000 

6,000 
12,000 
10,000 
10,000 
12,000 
30,000 
12,000 
10,000 
12,000 

9,000 
10,000 

8,000 
12,000 
12,000 

8,000 
12,000 

3,000 

2,000 



water. 



Cost 



I'rcacut Occupants. 



|60,000| Mendocino Mill Co. 
30,000iTichenor & Blxbee. 
35,000 McPherHon&.Wotherbee 

2,000| TibLs 

3,000! S.Holden. 

2,000 J. C. Reed. 

1,500 Andrew Ornv. 
12,000 J. E. Le Ballister & Co. 



steam. 



water, 
steam. 



water, 
steam. 



water, 
steam, 



4,000 
5,000 
8,000 

10,000 
1,.500 
2,500 
4,000 

20,000 



4,000 
4,000 



5,000 

15,000 

10,000 

10,000 

8,000 

1,.500 

4,000 

5,000 

3,500 

15,000 

6,000 

16.0U0 

5,000 

10,000 

7,000 

6,000 

10,000 



Best & IlesB. 
Bell & Co. 
M. Robinson. 
,J. P. Y'aiiev. 
N. T. Lundy. 
Smith & McAfee. 
Owensvilie Lumber Co. 
Robiuaou & Tiukham. 



6,000 



L. G. Lillie. 



Samuel Funk. 

C. Leech 

McMurrv & JIurphv. 

Eureka Lake Cuual Co. 

L. Voss. 

James Creegan. 

Joseph Gardner. 

A. Rhodes. 
Young, Siiell Sc Co. 
Fre<leiitk & Dyer. 
S. McFarlaiie. 
Gregory, Perry & Marsh 
H. Southard. 

W. C. Stiles. 
Brunstetter & Smart. 

B. F. Reynolds. 

Brunstetter &, Smart. 

(( it 

Joseph Perrin. 



2.000 Halsey & Stranbo. 
i5,000|NealikCrandull. 

3.0001 Wni. Ragfdale. 



Van GoJBoa & Co. 
A. Towle. 



2,600 
2,000 
6,000 
2,700 
3,5IH) 

6,0001 Hall, Aikin & Co. 
5,000 Towle & Bhinchard. 
3,500 Richmond, Day & Co. 
6,000lEgbcit&Co. 
10,000:F;gbert&Co. 
5,000'D. F. S. M. Co. 
2,000Ia. Towle. 
6,500, Thouins Rca. 



4,500 
5,000 
4,000 
5,000 



I'ibbita &. Williams. 
E. T. Meiidenhall. 
Hart & Brown. 
Sturbnck & Miller. 



5,000| O. J. &, E. G. Spencer. 
8,000 Saxon St. Co. 
5,000 O. J. & E. G. Spencer. 
3,500 Michels &, Kilburn. 
4,000 Arnold. 



* Siwh, Door and Planing M<lla. 



f'i^ 



1 






ijli 
iii 




1 



92 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TABLE OP SAW iMILLS.-CoNTiNUED. 



Lc;:ntloii. 



PLAi-KK — cniitiniied. 

Shirt Tail Chuou 

Todd's Vailev 



Yankee Jim's . 
Yubtt River. . . 



I'l.UMA.S COUNTY. 

Americuu Viilley 



Big Meadows. . . 
Biiite Valluy ... 
Genessee Viilley. 
HumI -IK Valley. 
Indian Valley... 



La Porte 

Meadow Valley... 

Nelson CrceU 

Onion Valley 

Poor Man's Creek. 

RicIiBar 

Ronnd Vallev 

Yellow Creek.... 



SACKAMENTO COUNTY. 

Sacramento 



SAN DERNAKDINO COUNTY. 

Bear Valley . . ._. 

" " ' Canon 

Holeomb Valley 

Mountain .' 



SAN FUANCISCO COUNTY. 

San Francisco 



SAN i.uis onisro county. 
San Luis Oliispo 



SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

Deer Gnlcli 

Purissinio 

Redwoods 



Templetou's (Uilcb , 



SANTA CI.AUA COUNTY. 

Lexington 



SANTA CHIIZ COUNTY. 

Branciforto Creek 



CorallititB . 



Name of Mill. 



McBrides 

Spring Garden . 

VVatsons 

Devil Cauon... 
Cisco 



Barkers 

CliryHtiiionds . 
Har'twclls ... 
Lawrences... 

McHctlis 

Clianibers 

Wallioks 

Ascliheiins... 

lil(H)ds 

Nii'kerHons .. 

Tnyloi-b 

Youngs. 



La Porte . 
Jacks . 



Uotchkiss' 



Kcnsons . 
.Fuiiies .. 
Wades . . 
Hustons . 



Culverwells . . 
Macdonalds... 
Mechanics.... 
San Francisco. 
Thomas 



Santa Rosu . 
Santa Rosu . 



Saunders 

Connellys 

(iilberts* 

Murphys 

"Huntington .. 

•Irish 

•Taylors 

Hansou St Co. 



Chuscg 

Covals 

Doughertys. 
FronieniB . . . 
McMillens . . 



Moody s. 
Thomas 



Jones 

Warners .... 
Williamsons 



No. Capoclty- 
Snw». I'tpcrday. Power. Cogt. 



Nelson Creek 

Overtons 

Poor Man's Creek. .. 

HiihBar 

lionnd Valley 

McElroys 



5,000 
3,000 
7,000 

a.ooo 

16,000 



1,500 
5,0(10 
2,500 
4,000 
l,.'iOO 
4,000 
2,000 

:t,()00 

5,000 
1,200 
3,000 
4,000 
14.000 
4,000 
2,.")00 
5,000 
2,000 
2,000 
3,000 
1,500 



water. 

it 

steam, 
".vater. 
steam, 



water. 



Htenui. 

water. 

tt 

steam, 
water 



115,000 



Present Occupants. 



5,500 steum. 



4,000 

10,000 

4,000 

6,000 



15,000 
20,000 
10,000 
15,000 



4,000 
2,500 



10,000 

4,000 

2,000 

3,000 

25,000 

25,000 

25,000 

15,000 



4,000 

2,.'i00 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 

8,000 
10,000 

8,000 



20,000 
2,000 
7,000 



water, 
steam. 



water. 

(( 

steam. 



water. 

t( 

<!team. 

water, 
steam, 
water. 



steam, 
water, 
steam. 



' Shinglo Mills. 



6,000 
2,000 
8,000 



M. McBride. 
Smith Bavles. 
Lemmon Bros. 
Adams & Orr. 
Towle & Blaucbard. 



1,200 John Barker. 
3,000 H. C. Chrystmond. 
2,000 J. F. Hartwell. 

2.000 !C Lawrence. 

1.000 1 John Mclieth. 
2,000 A. L. Chiimbers. 
1,500 E. Wallick. 
3,500 1 M. S. Aschheim. 
3,500 Kr.tnte of W. H. Blood. 
1,500 A.J. Nickerson. 
3,000 J. T. Taylor. 

3,500 W. G. Young. 

! Union Lumber Co. 

2,000 IE. H. Jacks. 

3.000 NelHon Creek Mill Co. 
5,000iJolin B.Overton. 

2.0001 Poor Man's C'k Mill Co. 
2,000 i A. L. Clark & Co. 
1,500 C. Luwrfence. 
2,000 John McElroy. 



5,000 



2,000 
5,000 
2,000 
2,500 



25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
20,0110 
24.000 



1,800 
1,000 



Uotchkiss & Co. 



Benson & Pine. 
Calev &. Richardson. 
A. Wade. 
D. P. Huston. 



Miller. 

D. A. Macdonald & Co. 
James Brokaw. 
Hobbs, Gilniore & Co. 
C. W. Thomas. 



Wm. Gillespie. 
W. LelUngwell. 



r-.OOO Ambrose Saunders. 
6,1100 Bordon & Co. 
2,000 J. B. Selleck. 
4.000 A. S. Laugley. 
3,000 S. P. Pherris. 
3,000 Hanson Sl Co. 
3,000 Hanson & Co. 
15,000 Hanson cSe Co. 



4.000 

2,500 

10,000 

14,000 

10,000 

5,0110 

5,000 

5,000 



10,000 
5,000 



8. II. & J. W. Chase. 
C'oval & Bro. 
Wni. P. Dougherty. 
E. Kroment. 
J. Y. McMillen. 
J. Y,^McMillen. 
Moody Bros. 
C. Thomas. 



A. Jones & Co. 
D. Lear. 



Location. 



SANTA CRUZ- 

Fall Creek.... 



I Pajaro 

Pescadero 



Pete's Creek 

San Lorenzo Rive 



Santa Cruz. 

II II 

Sequel 



Creek . 



SHASTA COUNT 

Battle Ci-eek 



licar Creek 

Krandy Creek . . . 

Clear Creek 

" S. F. 

Copper City 

Cow Creek 

Krei.ch Gulch 

Oak Run , 

Spring Creek 

IVLiskoytown 



SIERRA COUNTY 

Brandy City 

Dujf Valley 

tJiBt Fork 

Eureka 



forest City. 



Fwks of C. Cwek. 

Iibsonville 

ioodyear's Bar 

ndian Valley. . . 

BdianHill '. 

Monte Cristo 

Monntain House 

JF. Yiiba River.. 
jorth Yuba, JI. F. . 

Pike City... 

fine Grove 



'oker Flat. . . . 
Ifbbit Creek . 



6,000|Fordfc Sanborn. 



tandolph 

iwlt Creek.... 
Wine Vallev. 

odes ■.. 

'ndyFlat.....' 

icruCitv 

ierra Valley . . 



I & Co. 



SAW MILLS — CALIFORNIA. 



93 



TABLE OF SAW MILLS.-Continded. 



Location. 



9ANTA CRUZ — Continued. 
Fall Creek 



I'njaro 

PeBcadero 



Pete's Creek 

'San Lorenzo Ris-er. 



Santa Cruz. 

" " 
$o<luel 



" Creek . 



SHASTA COUNTY. 



Battle Creek. 



llcar Creek 

Brandy Creek . 

I Clear Creek. .. 
" S. 

I Copper City . .. 

I Cow Creek 

iFrei.ch Gulch.. 

lOakRun 

1 Spring Creek.. 

Inbiskeytown.. 



Kamo p: Mill. 



AslileyB 

Ottos 

"OttOB 

Urowns 

Williamson 

*Bureh&Co.'»... 

Carters 

'Carters 

"Spalding & Co.'s. 

TuB^B 

Voris 

•Voris 

Waddells 

Pioneer 

Kllsworth 

Hicks 

Silvers 

Davis & Cowella.. 

GlaBsells 

Dutes 

Cullioiins 

'Callionns 

Sava)j;e 

Nichols 



No. 
Hawa. 



SIERtlA COUNTY. 

iBrandv City 

IDu|B[ Valley 

Ite Fork 

lEureku 



iForest City. 



iForks of C. Citek. 

iGibtionville 

iGoodyear'B Bar... 

llnJiaii Valley 

IMian Hill 

iHoute Cristo 

iKountain House . . . 
Is. F. Yuba Uiver. 
IXcrth Yuba, »I. K. 

Pike City 

Pine Grove 



foker Flat. . . 
^bbit Creek 



tandolph 

'nek Creek 

irdine Valley. 
Hes. 



Balls 

Klotz 

CJarvers 

Farrin^tons 

Canidens 

Ellsworths 

Crocker & Babcocks. 

Wineif^trs 

Hunters 

Predmores 

Spring Ci'cuk 

FlemiugH 



Dixons 

East Fork Mill Co. 



G. Bur Mill Co. 
Indian Valley . 



Cole &. Co.'s. 
North Fork.. 
Empire 



flmdy Flat.... 
liernCitv ... 
lierra Valley . 



Smith & Co.' 
WinterB .... 
Parsons 



Shady Flat M. Co. 

KaneB 

Church St Co.'s... 

Dwinells 

Fletcher & Co.'s.. 



Capacity— I 

Kt. per (I ay. I Power. 



2,000 

3,000 

20,000 

25,000 

20,000 



3,000 
20,000 



2,000 

3,000 

20,000 

30,000 

15,000 

5,000 

8,000 

8,000 

15,000 

8,000 

5,000 

4,000 

10,000 

3,000 

10,000 



3,000 
(J.OOO 

L.ioo 

2,000 
1,500 
2,500 
4,000 
2,000 
1,000 
3,000 
3,000 
2,.')00 



4,000 
10,0110 
3,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3,000 
3,000 
2,000 
3,000 
3,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
4,000 
6,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
5,000 
2,000 
8,000 
3,000 
4,000 
8,000 
5,000 
6,000 
1,2000 



water. 



steam. 



water, 
steam. 



water. 



stenm. 



water. 



steam 
water. 



steam. 

IC 

water. 

«i 

steam. 

tt 

If 
If 

water, 
steam, 
water. 



stenm. 
water. 



steam, 
water. 



Cost. 



|2,000 
5,000 



10,000 
10,000 



5.000 



3,000 
5,000 



J'ri'»ent Occupantn. 



25,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

8,000 

10,000 

10,000 

6,000 

8,000 



Otis Ashley. 

Georue Otto, 
.f tt 

Brown, Williamson & 

Ford & Sanborn. [Co. 

Burch iL Co. 

Johnson & Co. 
tf tf 

Spalding & Co. 

John 'I'uHy . 

I. N. Vol is. 

I. N.Voiis. 

W. W. Wuddoll & Co. 

Page 4 Peui's. 

J. W. Ellsworth. 

Hicks Bros. 

S. Merrill. 

Davis It. Cowell. 



5,000 
3,000 



6,000 
12,000 
2,000 
5,000 
6,000 
2,500 
6,000 
2,000 
l,.50O 
4,000 
7.000 
2,500 



8,000. 
8,000 
4,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,00t) 
8,000 
5,000 
8,000 
4,000 
5,000 
5,000 
7,0110 
4,000 

5,om) 

3,000 
5,000 
12,0IH) 
10,000 
6,000 
7,000 
7,000 
3,000 
4,000 
6,000 
5,000 
6,000 
8,000 
5,()00 
6,000 
10,000 



Gardner & Co. 
J. W. Batclielder. 
J. W. Batchelder. 



B. C. Nichols &, Bro. 



H. S. Bull. 
Klotz & Co. 
W. S. Carver. 
N. Funiiigton. 
Chas. Camden. 
Churles Ellsworth. 
Crocker & Babcock. 
Carter <t Co. 
Hunter &. Co. 
J. H. Predinore. 
Woodward iV Co. 
John Fleming. 



John Dixon. 
Ben. Panlv & Co. 



Porter & Co. 



Stewart & Co. 
James Golden. 
James Golden. 

D. T. Cole Jt Cory. 



Empire Mil! Co. 

Thumton & Co. 
Thurston »V Co. 



Smith & Co. 
Winter & Co. 
Parsons &. BroR. 



D. L. Whitney. 
Kane & Co. 
Church ic Co. 
Dwinell tt, Bro. 
Fletcher, Son it, Co. 



* Lath Hllla. 



11 



ilii 



t1! 
'I .1 I 



I 



94 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



TABLE OP SAW MILLS— Continued. 



Location. 



siKURA — continued. 
Sierra Viille v 



South Fork . 

Sumiiiit. 

Wolt Creek. 



SlSklYOU COU.NTY. 

Cottonwood Creek . . . 

Gordon Creek 

Greenliorii 

HiirtBtramlH 

Kidder Creek 

Kliiiimlli Kivor 

Little Sliimtu Creek. . . 

Muxwell'H 

Kougli iiiid Heady 

Scott Uiver 



Sliarpsliiirg 

ShuRtti Viilley 

Struwberrv Valley , 

Surprise Valley 

Uiiiouville 



SONOMA roUNTY,' 

Anally Township.... 



Bodega . 



Mendocino. 



Salt Point Township. 



TEHAMA fOUNTY. 

Buttle Creek 

Coaet Uiiu're 



TUINITY COUNTY. 

Big Bar .., 

Cedar Flat 

Canon Creek 

" " K. F... 

EaBt Weaver Creek . . 



GraBR Valley Creek. 

Hay Fork 

Hynniponi 

I..ewiston 

Swift Creek 

Trinity Kiver 

Weaver Creek 



TULAnE COUNTY. 

Foot of SieiiiiH 

King's Uiver 

Packwood Cicek 



TCor.UMNK COUNTY. 

Bald Mounluin 

Bear Creek 

Cherokee 

Columbia 

Davis Flat 



\ 



Five Mile (.'reek. 



Name of Mill. 



Pattersons . . . 
Smith Neck. , 
Flandreau .. 
Burnhardt's . 
Wolf Creek. . 



Cottonwood 

Gordons , 

(xreenhorn , 

Ilartstrands' 

Oliver , 

Thoinpsons 

Cleland 

Maxwells , 

Rough and Ready . . . 

Jacksons 

Scott Valley , 

Websters 

GreggB 

Ilickerson & Grays . 
Coburns 



LudolfTs . . . 
Olnisteads . 

Powers 

Wilsons . . . 
Curllons . . . 
Duncans . . 

Gays 

Fullers 

Meulds .... 

Meads 

Nortons ... 
Mclnikc . . . 



Elliotts... 
Mountaiu. 



Simonds 

McCanimons. 

Gulhiies 

Depinettes. . . 

Scolields 

Wares 

Burns 

Bay lees 



[loudlcys . . . 
Morrisons. . . 
SturdivantB . 
Davidsons . . 
Mabies 



Ilcrrald & Rogers . . . 

ThoinuB 

ElliottB 



Bald Mountain. 

Chalmers 

Cherokee 

Hall&. Hales.. 

Center 

Davis Flat 

Pine Grove 

ProvoBts 

Enterprise . .. . 



So." CapMclty— 
SnwH. Ft.pcrduy. Power. 



(i.oon 

5,00(1 
3,000 
3,00(1 
5,000 



l.',500 
2.500 
2,500 
3,500 
2,.500 
2,000 
2,500 
2.500 
2,500 
2,5il() 
4,000 
3,000 
3,000 
2,500 
3,000 



3,000 
2,00(1 



1,500 
1,500 
1,1)00 
2,500 
2.500 
1.200 
2,000 
^.-iOO 
1,500 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,500 



5,000 

12,000 

3,000 



8,000 
5,100 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,000 
5,000 
5,000 

3,rm 



water, 



steam. 



water. 



steam, 
water, 



steam, 



water. 



Kleum. 



water, 
steam. 



water. 



steam, 
water. 



steam. 
t( 

water. 

u 

steam. 

water. 

steam. 
(1 

water. 



Coat 



|s,flon 

5,000 

4,0(10 

3,500 

12,000 



5,000 
4,000 
5,0(10 
4,000 
5,000 
4,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5.000 
6,000 

r,5oo 

6,000 
6,000 
5,000 
5,000 



4,000 
5,000 



2,500 
2,000 
2,500 
2,.50ll 
5,000 
5,000 
2,,5II0 
4,000 
2,000 
4,000 
4,(100 
5,(1011 
4,000 
3,000 



6,000 
11,000 
4,000 



3,500 
5,000 
3,000 
1,000 
5.000 
5,000 
2,500 
5,000 
5,000 



I'rcupnt Occiipanta. 



Pat'erson, Son & Co. 
Cojb & Co. 
Clement & Ayres. 
Burnhardt & "Co. 
Smith &. Anderson. 



Smith Si. Shattuck. 
Gordon & Co. 
Horey & Co. 
Hurtstrand &, Co. 
Cluus Gottache. 



J. S. Cleland. 
Muxwell &, Son. 
JanicH Vogan. 
Le Due & Co. 
•fenner &. Vauilusen. 
Webster &. Co. 
Andrew Gregg. 
Hickerson &. Gray. 
Eustleck & Bro. 



Henry Lndolff. 
O. A. Olmstoad. 
S. T. Powers. 
Est lie of Wilson. 
C. Carltnu. 
S. M. Duncan. 

B. (lav. 

C. Fnfler. 

Ileuld, (iiecn &. Co. 
FoMter. Hill & Co. 
Norton &, Co. 
F. Helmke. 



O. F. Elliott. 
Gillmun & Patten. 



Simonds & Co. 
■Tolni McCanimon. 
Wm. Guthrie. 
Jos. Depinette. 
T. Scotiehl. 
Wm. Ware, 
.lohn Burns. 
A. D. Bayless. 

.1. F. lioadley. 

Morrison.' 
Sturdivunt & Whitmorc,| 
R. N. Davidson. 
Moss & Mabie. 



Herruld & Rogers. 
Isaac H. Thouius. 
Jas. Elliott. 



Bradford & Co. 
G. H. ChalmerB. 
Robert Marshall. 
Hall & Hale. 
Carter & Adams. 
G. Shcrnma & Co. 
Lewis & (^0. 
Smith Si. Bro. 
J. A. S. Trout & Co. 



* C'apaclt)' per year. Total umouat of Lumber «awcJ per Annum, 11,150,000 feet. 



Local 



TUOI.UMNK — 

' Haslin's Banc 

I Sugar Pine Ci 

Sullivan's C're 



Turnbnc'' Cre 



VOLOCOI 

Washington . . 
I Woodland 

I YunA coi 

Dead wood Cre 
I>ry Creek... 



Galena Hill... 
Knox Road.... 
Mo<mshine Cree 
Now York Ram 
Oak Vallev... 
Oregon Hill.... 

Strawberry '\'a|| 



There is prohal 
ties for carrying „ 
f'fforsofdimate, 1 
iliis character in tl 
I manufacturing op( 
I State in localities 
j is no scarcity of fi 
' the other needed n 
nianufactures, that 
eat, drink, or w<'a, 
I retained in this Sti 
J l-.v the State have I 
'ature have been a 
A considerable j. 
; at a rate of about tl 
j labor of this eluFs 
unavoidable. Of 
\m making shoes, 
I Itwks, and 20 enga; 
The low rate at v 
I which are not posse 

j 'The returns of th( 

I Wot, comprisliiK tlic c 

WU bo found, arrange 



li 



MANUFACTURES — CALIFORNIA 



95 



TABLE OP. SAW MILLS.— Concluded. 



Locatlun. 



TVOl.VMHK— CI) nliiivcil. 

Haslin's RhiicIi 

SiiKor Pine Cieek 

Sullivan's Creek , 



Turnbac'' Creek. 



YOLO COUNTY. 

WnBhington 

Woodlnnd 



YUnA COUNTY, 



Pendwood Creek 
Dry Creek 



Galena Hill 

Knox Road 

MoonBliine Croek. 
Now York Ranch. 

Oiik Vallev 

Oregon Hill 



Strawberrj- Valley . 



Name of Mill. 



Kmpire 2 

Fletchers 2 

Center I 2 

Hydes 2 

LonKcwiiys 1 

Clialnicrg 2 

Smiths 2 



Washington 
Woodland . . 



Deadwood 

Dry Creek 

Sliiiron Valley . 
Weed's Point.. 
Sweetzer & Co.' 

^[oon^llline 

RvaniK 

Oiik Valley 

ISrooks 

Dasliaway 

Chiillennu 

Cottage 

Kxo('l»ior 

Independence. . . 

Maniinoth 

Union 



8,noo 

5,00t) 
5,000 



16,000 

»),()00 

10,000 

4,000 

12,000 

12,000 

4,000 

4,000 

VtfiOO 

15,000 

15,000 

15,(i00 

15,000 

20,000 

17,000 

15,000 



Power. 


Cost 


steam. 


|3,,50n 


water. 


20,000 


steam. 


5,000 


\vater. 


2,.500 


li 


2,500 


steam. 


2,500 


It 


3i000 


II 


2,000 


II 


1,000 


II 


6,000 


water. 


3,000 


II 


4,000 


steam. 


4,tl00 




4,000 


steam. 


5,000 




3,000 




4,0110 




8,000 




6,000 


steam. 


8,0110 


II 


8,000 


11 


8,000 


II 


10,000 


II 


10,001' 


II 


10,00!) 



I'rcHcnt Ocuupants. 



IJradforrt, Way & Co. 

A. Fletcher. 

Carter St. Co. 

M. Hyde. 

I). Longew.iy. 

H. G. Ch'.ilniers. 

8. &. D. Smith. 



Hunt & Co. 
Samuel Sliryack. 



Springer & Co. 

Crane & Dros. 
T. Mnntz. 
Springer & Co. 
Cliarles lleniiett. 
Rvant & Co. 
.l.'R. Rideont. 
Union Lnniber Co. 
.J. F. Smith. 
Uni(m Lumber Co. 



MANUFACTURES — MISCELLANEOUS,* 

' - v 

There is prohuhly no State in the American U"'on that is provided by nature with all the varied facili- 
ties for carrying on every species of manufacturing, in a greater degree than is the case in California. The 
rigors of climate, and tlie extremes of temperature, which prove such a serious drawback to enterprises of 
this character in the Xorlhern States, are here unknown ; and in no portion of this State is there a day when 
inannfacturing openitions are interrupted by inclement weather. The water power distributed over the 
State in localities highly favorable to manufa(!turing enterprises, is inexhaustible in its extent ; and there 
is no scarcity of fuel, rurnishing steam power where it is required. Timber of the best quality, with all 
the other needed accessories, is abundant. Such are the advantages for currying on every department of 
manufactures, that the time is not far distant, when all articles needed tor home consumption, all that we 
eat, drink, or wear, will bo produced here; and the immense sums paid for articles imported from abroad, 
retained in this State to assist in developing its incxhni'stiblc resources. The aids to manufactures afforded 
by the State have been numerous and liberal ; and several of the munilicent pren^iums ofl'ered by the Legis- 
lature have been already awarded to the pioneers in the manufacture of staple fabrics among us. 

A considerable portion of tlie labor of the convicts in the California State Prison is let out to contractors 
lit a rate of about lliirtyone cents per day. While we do not approve the bringing into competition of the 
liibor of this class with that of the honest citizen, in the emergency of the case, this is an evil which seems 
unavoidable. Of the number of convicts employed by contract, 150 are engaged on harness and whips, 88 
are making shoes, 63 making up .voolen goods, 33 at work in the cooper shop, 30 manufacturing blank 
books, and 20 engaged on wagons and cf.rts. 

The low rate at which Chinese labor can bo had in California, affords certain manafactorics advantages 
which ore not possessed by any other portion of the country. 

• Tho returns of tlie Intcrniil Kevcnuc Department roierreil to In this part of the work are tliosc. of tlio First Dis- 
trict, comprising the counties of Hun Kranelsco and Sun Mateo. In the ClssKifled Uuslncss Directory, pp. 385 to 568, 
will be found, nrranged under appropriate heads, the dllfcrent mercantllo and mechanical firms on the I'aclflc Coast 



li 



96 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Woolen Maniikactohiks. — Two innniifactorica, 
largely enpigcd in tlio iiroiliictioii of ull kiiuU of 
woolen goodi), but more uvpeciiilly the Htiiplu fiibricg, 
have been in Huccceitiful oneration" in San Frinioisco, 
for several yearn oust. TluMngli tlie iniprovonient 
of the qnality of tlie raw material, by the intnidiic- 
tion of tlie best breedH of linewoolud Hheu]) into the 
State, and the utio of all the modern improvenientH 
in machinery, the urtielcH turned out at tJie Pioneer 
and Mission Mills are nowhere aurpuseed, and the 
goods manufactured to till army contrarts during 
tne war, bore away the palm on account of the 
superior quality of the material and fabric. The 
quantity of goods nuuiufactnred at these entabliwh- 
ments during tlie year ending June 30th, IStifi, 
returned to the Internal liuvenue Department of this 
District, amounted to $S!t;t,7:M.t)H. 

The fintt manufacture in this important branch on 
this portion of the I'acitie Const was commenced in 
1858, by MeBsrs. lleynenmn. Pick & Co., an enter- 
prising' Snn FninciKco mercantile firm. Erecting 
spacious and suitable buildinfjfs for the purpose at 
Illack Point, on the Bay, they imported from abroad 
all the requisite inipro'ved niaclnnery, and engaged 
competent workmcii from Eastern establishments 
to perform the work. Although the breeds of sheep 
had not then been improved as they are at present 
by the introduction ot the liner wooled varieties 
from abroad, the supply of the ordinary stock for 
the manufacture was abundant. In the fall of IStil, 
the entire establishment was unfortunately burned, 
but with charucterislic energy, in the course of a few 
months another building, superior to that destroyed, 
was fnlly completed and filled with new machinery 
from abroad ; and iinder the direction of a joint-stock 
company, with a capital of 1300,000, resumed opera- 
ations. This establishment keeps 351) hands con- 
stantly employed, runs 18 sets of carding machines, 
6,000 spindles, and 7:i looms; and manufactures 
annually into bhinkets, flannels, tweeds, cassimeres, 
flannel and tweed overshirts, undershirts and druw- 
ers, 1,600 0110 pounds of wool. To the Pioneer 
Mills was awarded the lirst premium ottered by the 
San Vrancisco Mechanics' Institute, at their Fair, iu 
September, 18ti.'>. 

The Mission Woolen Mills were established by the 
individual exertions of Donalil McLennan, an enter- 
prising manufacturer from the East, in connection 
with Mr. Laitard, the head of a leading mercan- 
tile house in San Francisco, in 1861. The location 
on Folsom street between Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
streets, in close proximity to Mission Creek and the 
Bay, is peculiarly adapted to the purpose. Tlie con- 
cern has been merged into a joint stock corporation 
with a capital of $)U( 300, of which Mr. McLennan, 
the original projector of the enterprise, is the Presi- 
dent, and who superintends the operations of the 
manufactory in person. The goods manufactured 
at the Mission Mills, consisting mainly of blankets, 
heavy army and navy and other cloths and flannels, 
bear a high reputation both at home and abroad ; 
fairly competing} with the best foreign fabrics. In 
order that California manufactures may be properly 
represented at the World's Fair at Paris, the enter- 
prising proprietors of these mills have forwarded for 
exhibition specimens of the various styles of goods 
manufactured by them. 

A company, with a capital of |50,000, was incor- 
porated in June, 1866, for the purpose of erecting a 
■woolen manufactory at Murysville, the work upon 
which is going on. Similar enterprises are in con- 
templation in Santa Crn/., Copperopolis, and at Fol- 
som, where an inexhaiistilile water power affords the 
best facilities for every kind of manufacturing. 

Knit Woolen Goods. — Extensive works for the 
manufacture of all k inds of knit goods, have recently 
been completed and put in operation by the Pacific 
Woolen Mill Company, on the corner of Folsom and i 



Eaulo streets, Snn Francisco. The main building is 
112 by .W feet, and three and a half stories in height, 
with an engine and boiler '.oiise, dry-house, and dye- 
lioiise, and dwellings for operatives attached. The 
machinery; which is of the most approved patterns, 
both foreign and American, consihts of seven sets 
of cards, six mules of 4(K) s]>indles each, of English 
make, and thirty stocking looms— the greater |)ortioii 
of which are. of American miinufacture, Aitken's 
Patent — with a few of Lamb's niacliines from Eng- 
land. The machinery is driven by a high-pressure 
engine of lOOhorse power, the fly-wheel ot which, 
16^ feet iu diameter, weighs al'ioul 20 tons. The 
erection and entirs arrun'.;eiiicnt of this establish- 
ment has been under the cliarge of Mr. James Rob- 
erts, for miiny years Superinlendenl at the Mission 
Woolen Mills. The capital stock of this company is 
|.')IIO,(IOO. George F. Bragg is the ngeiit. 

Another esfablishiiu-nl of u similar character was 
put in operation on the corner of Turk and Pierce 
streets, by Messrs. Sharp and Goldstein, in August, 
1866. In addition to the carding and spinning appa- 
ratus in use, the machluery includes a number of 
Aitken's Patent knitting macliines. Every variety 
of knit goods, including men's, women's and chil- 
dren's underclothing, for which there is ample de- 
mand in this market, are manufuctured ut this 
establishment. 

Cotton Manufactouy.— The nrlides of incor- 
poration for the erection of the first cotton manu- 
factory iu Califurnia, were tiled in the office of the 
(Merk of San Francisco County, in August, 186.1, 
under the sty le of the OaklantI Cotton Manufacturing 
Company — Wm. If. Hector & .Son, the present man- 
agers, bi'ing the principal stockhohlers — with a cash 
capital of f 100,000. Shortly after, a brick building 
'.10 by 45 feet, and two stones high, was completed, 
and fitted up with the requisite machinery for the 
manufacture of cotton goods. This mill, which is 
eliifiblv located near Oakland, Aliinieda County, con- 
tains tliiity two looms, iiropellcd by a .■'team engine 
of 10 horse power. Tlie concern gives constant em- 
ployment t(. about thirty openitivcs. The company 
have erecied three coinmodions brick buildings con- 
tiguous to the mill, for the accommodation of the 
employes. When first put In operation, the supplies 
of the raw material worked up, were principally 
drawn from the East, with a portion from Mexico; 
but the culture of cotton in the southern portion of 
California, having been fully demonstrated to be a 
decided success, the premium of $:i,0()0, offered by 
the State for the flrst and best cotton plantation 
having bcv:ii a'«'ardcd two years since to Matthew 
Keller, of Los Angeles, and a large crop having 
been raised last season, there is no doubt but that a 
sufficient supply will soon be afl'orded at home. This 
establishment manufactures 30,000 yards of shirflng 
per month. The product during the vear 186fi 
amounted to 100,000 yards of shirting and 50,000 
of brown sheeting. 

Cotton WAnniNo. — Mills for the inanulactnrc 
of cotton wadding, batting, etc., combining all the 
later improvements in this department, including 
recent patents, were erected by 1. C. Mayer & Son, 
the present proprietors, on the south side of Turk 
street, between Scott and Pierce streets. San Fran- 
cisco. Wadding is made single or <t()ublc glazed, 
and of any desired weight, to suit the requirements 
of the market; and butting can also he furnished to 
order, cither for the use of tailors and other manu- 
facturers, or for surgical purposes. About twenty- 
five bales, orl,000 pdiinds of wadding, and the same 
of batting, can be produced each day. All the ma- 
chinery in use was ordered in the East, and the 
workmen, about thirty in number, who are engaged 
for a term of years aiid reside on the premises, are 
also from some of the leading Eastern ir.auufac- 



toriea. Tlie 

som, over th 

J Uosenbaum 

I street, are tl 

, Silk.— Dii 

I of maniif^cti 

I lined to assni 

in our State. 

ticulturist at 1 

China, a qua 

I from the man 

I amount of c( 

I in the enter 

j State being pi 

j mulberry and 

I From the prod 

« Myeng, of S 

turiiig a coiisid 

gropdeofvarioi 

silk. The arti 

point of linenei 

with the best 

Japan, or tlios< 

Specimens of tli 

ifomia State Fii 

J a handsome pre 

I in the course of 

every requisite) 

provenients in tl 

and evcrv prena 

j to Its fullest exte 

Clothing.— T 

the Internal Rev 

the year endinij 

over a million of, 

"""■manufacture 

woolen niillH of C 

worked up, the n 

«PParent. With 

making np of do 

dented extent wit 

uractures, too, of 

divided up among 

Pioneer Clothing 

i« located on the c 

•treetfl, ia tnost t 

iS^J^'"'"- «nd 1 
f •fl',000 per month 
wcated on Siinsom 
tommercial. were 
mannfaciuretoani 
the business for th' 
.other articles of c 
PWed in the manu 
aiiddmwers. Thei 
ffoods are made, 
them a decided pre 
ufactured in the 
Clothing Company, 
[tneirmannfuctorvoi 
regular employ m"en 

, Boots anh Shoi 
partmenttofheAss 
tie year ending Jm 

JnearliHlfatniiiion, 
.'ne fact that no hrai 
increased with great 
•W". This is an en 

|eMirely within a co 

I pater portion of 

i Here being imported 

&/"«••.*»'* "•""" 

X^**" prices dema 
infacturers towork; 



CALIFORNIA. MANUFACTURES — MISCELLANEOUS. 



97 



torie«. Tlie office of iheso milli ia at No. 324 San- 
Bom, over the Hank of Uriti«h Columbia. MeurB. 
UoMnbaiiin & Friedman, Noe. S2 and 24 Battery 
Btreet, are the Agenta. 

Silk. — During tbe paat year an important branch 
of mannff^ctures baa been commenced, which ia dea- 
lined to aeanme n conaideniblu degree of importance 
in our State. Mr. L. Prevoat, a well-lcnown hor- 
ticultnriat at Sun iToad, having imported, direct fWim 
China, a quantity of egga of tlie ailk-worro, raieed 
from tlie atime, dining tlie aummer of 18<>ti, a large 
amount of cocoona. Other partiea alao engaued 
in tlie eiiterpriae, tbe roil and climiite of this 
State being pvrnliHrly adapted to the growth of the 
mulberry and the aiicceaaful rearing of ailk-worma. 
From the product of tbiaenterpri^e, Meaara. Newman 
St, Myers, of _Stin Kraiiciwo, aucceeded in nianufac- 
turing a coiiaidciuble amount of elegiint ailk dreaa 
gooda of varioiia atylea, ua well na vnrietieaof aewing 
ailk. The Hi-ticlea produced will fully compare, in 
point of iincneHH, evvnneaa, and lirmneaa of texture, 
with the beat apcciineiia imported from China ana 
Japan, or ihoae produced by the looma of Lyona. 
Siiecimena of tliia inanufucture, exhibited at the Cal- 
ifornia State Fair, in September, 1866, were awarded 
a handwmie premium. An cxtenaive mnnufiictory ia 
in the course of im-vlion at San Joac — niuchinery of 
every requisite quality, embodying all the recent im- 
provenienta in tliia department, liim been procured — 
and every preparation made to carry on the buaineaa 
to ita fulleet extent. 

Clothing. — Theamonnt of clothing returned to 
the Internal Revenue Office of thia Diatrict, during 
the year ending June 30tli, 1860, waa conaidentbly 
over a million of dollara. When it ia considered that 
thia maniifiicturc denenda almoat entirely u|H>n the 
woolen niilla of Culiforniii and Oregon for tlie atock 
worked up, the magnitude of thia intereat muat he 
apparent. With many other manufucturea here, tbe 
making up of clothing baa increaacd to an unprecc- 
dentedextent within a few years. Like other man- 
ufactarea, too, of a aiinilar nature, the buaineaa ia 
divided up among a large number engaged in it. The 
Pioneer Clothing Factory, S. Keinatein, proprietor, 
ia located on the corner <>f Commercial and liattery 
Btreeta, ia tnoBt extenrively engaged in thia buai- 
neaa ; thia concern giving conatant employment to 
ICO handa, and manufacturing to the extent of 
t'.2U,000 per month. Meaara. Weidenreid & Lehman, 
located on Sanaom atreet, between Sacramento and 
Commercial, were among the flrat to commence thia 
manufacture to any extent, having been engaged in 
the buaineaa for the paat five yeara. In addition to 
other articlea of clothing, they are extenaively en- 
gaged in the manufacture of w'hite and flannel aliirta 
and drawers. The aubataiitial manner in which their 
gooda are made, with their auperior finieb, give 
them a decided preference over aimilar articlea inan- 
ufiictured in the Eaatern citiea. The California 
Clothing Company, nlao, do an extenaive buaineaa at 
their manufactory on Pine atreet near liattery , giving 
tegular employnient to over one hundred persons. 

Boots and Shoes. — ^The return made in this de- 
partment to the Aaaeaaorof Internal Revenue during 
the year ending June 30th, 1866, which amounta to 
near half a million of dollara, ia the fullest proof of 
the fact that no branch of domeatic inanufacturea has 
increaced with greater rapidity t ban that of boots and 
shoes. Thia ia an enterprise that haa sprung up almoat 
entirely within a comparatively few yeare past, the 
greater portion of all the articlea in tfiia line in nae 
here being imported from abroad. Tbe increase of 
tanneries, and manufucturea of leather producing a 
better article than can be procured elaewhero, and 
the high pricea demanded abroad, aet our home man- 
ufacturers to work ; and with their improved facili- 



ties, better atock, and superior quality of work, they 
are able to compete aucceaafully with manufacturers 
abroad. The moat extensive concern engaged in this 
business is that of Meaara. Wolf & Co., who, a 
abort lime since, completed, for this purpose, a build- 
ing on Folaom, between Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
streets, 40 by sO feetj and 3} stories high, with a tan- 
nery attached, covering an area of 15U by 245 feet ; 
steam power ia uaed, and one hundred and twenty- 
five banda are employed. The atock uaed ia all pro- 
duced in California. The manufactory of Went- 
worth, Hobart &. Co., at No. 210 Pine street, afforda 
another evidence of the rapid increase of this buai- 
neaa. The proprietors commenced, about two years 
since, with but three workmen ; now they employ 
not less than a hundred, with all the latest appliances 
of machinery, tuniiiig out soinelhiiig like a tliousand 
pairs of boots and ahoea per week ; about five thous- 
and aides of aole and akina of upper leather are 
worked up each month. Meaars. llein St, Bray, on 
Battery street, are alao extenaively engaued in this 
manut'aclure, employing about aeventyiive hands, 
and turning out about aeventyeiuht paira of men's 
and boy a' kip and calf boota per day, beaidea a large 
number of paira of pegged siioes. The sole leather 
used by them is from the Santa Cruz tanneries, and 
the work produced ia of a auperior character. An- 
other mannfuctory baa been ealabliahedon tbe corner 
of California ami Sanaom streets, by C. A. Morrill 
St, Co., a firm formerly engaged in the buaineaa in 
the Eaat, who propoae to enter largely into thia 
manufacture. 

To George K. Porter, who baa been for many 
yeara an owner in one of the principal tanneriea <>f 
Santa Cruz County, ia acconled tbe credit of being 
the pioneer in tliia important branch of inanufacturea. 
which be entered into for the pur^ioae of working up 
tbe productaof the tannery in which he ia intereated. 
In connection with aome outside aaaialance, he has a 
contnu'l with tbe State for the labor of thirty or forty 
convicta in the State Prison, who are employed in the 
manufacture of the coarser quality of IJoots and 
shoes. 

Shirts.— During the past year the manufacture of 
sb.rta on an extenaive acale was commenced at 61 J 
Sacramento street, San Francisco, by (i. F. Falkeii- 
stein St, Co. ; and the enterprise has succeeded so 
well, there being such a steady demand for the do- 
mestic munufactiire, that others have followed. Most 
of the large clothing manufacturers include thia in 
their buaineaa. The concern named keepa 75 to 100 

Iiersona conatantly employed, a room 35 by 80 feet 
leing devoted to the buaineaa. The front is occupied 
for the manufacture of the best qualities of linen and 
cotton shirts, 35 giria, each provided with a sewing 
machine, being engaged in the work. In the rear 
end, the same number of Chinamen are employed, 
each with a sewing macliiue, at work upon hickory 
aliirts, and the heavy and coarser atylea of gooda in 
nae. Tbe concern turna out from 40 to 50 dozen of 
hickory, and from 20 to 30 dozen of linen and cotton 
abirtaeach day. M. L. Haas Sc Co , and Eaber^ Sc 
Co. , are alao engaged in this manufacture. 

Blank Books. — Wm. B. Cooke it, Co., the enter- 
prising law stationers of San Francisco, having ar- 
ranged with Taylor St Co., of the Pioneer Mills, 
for a uniform and siiflicient quuntitv of paper, liave 
commenced the manufactuie of all kinds of blank 
books. They have contracted for the labor of fifty 
of tbe convicts at the State Priaod. where thev have 
put up the requisite apparatus and ruling machinery 
for the purnoae, the whole being under the direction 
of Alexander Buawell, who haa bad a long and ex 
tensive experience in thia dcniirtment. In addition 
to blank books and paper ruling of every descrip- 
tion, an extensive booabiudery will be connected 
with the concern. 



I 



11' 



w 



\i 



ill 






98 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Papir. — Owing to the iiicreiuted demand /or 
printinfi; paper upon tliib count, and the IiIkIi priccHof 
stock at tliu niilU in tlie Atlunliu StateH, tlie nmiinfar- 
ture of tliii) article here ia every day luwinninK a 
greater degree of importance ; and, notwitlmtanding 
the capacity of the two mills that have been in snc- 
ceasful operation in this State for a nuniher of years 
past, they are unable to snpply the df niiind. The 
abundant water power wliicli exists throughout this 
region, and the purity of its crystal stretiniH, iilford 
every facility for the 'successful" prosecution of tlii* 
branch of manufactures. The total value of the stock 
produced at these mills, during the year 1806, 
amounted to |l7a,80i. The first or these, the Pioneer 
Mill, erected ten years since, at Taylorsville, Marin 
Co'intv, by 8. P. 'Taylor Jt Co., pro'diiced during the 
year t86(>: of book and map yiayer. 1,110 reams; 
uewB, 3,:)38; assorted colors, !iVi; Manila wrapping, 
7,083. The pa|)er used lor the Suite Printing during 
the last sessiou of the Legislaiure was produced at 
this establishment; and the greater portion of the 
paper used in the miip-publihliing buHiiiesg of this 
coast conies from the same quarter. The San Lo- 
renzo Mills, on San Lorenzo Creek, Santa Cruz 
County, owned by Messrs. Harrison. Sinie & Smith, 
which have been in successful operation for the past 
six years, mauufuctursd, during the year 18(><i : (i,717 
reams of news, and 31,(HI0 of straw paper. The 
quantity of material worked up in botn establish- 
ments, during the same time, wtis 500 tons of cotton 
rags, 600 of straw, and 100 of waste rope. 

Powder. — The immense quantity of powder used 
ip '-'Hstinginthe mining and other n|)erHt ions on this 
early created a demand for the iirtiirle. No ut- 
tg were, however, made at its manufacture until 
, when the California Powder Works Company 
w<i4 organized, with u ^-nital stock of $100,000, 
which has since been iucrei.sed to $300,000. The 
first powder made was in May, 1S()4, since which 
time the mills have been in succcMifiil operation. 
The works are located in Santa Cruz County, on 
Sun Lorenzo Creek, which stream attbrds abniidant 
water power for all the operations of the concern. 
The machinery is of the most approved styles, and is 
in no respect surpassed by that of any siiullar estab- 
lishment )n the Lnited Suttes. It includes five sets 
of wheels and two double presses, with a capacity of 
manufacturing six hundrtd kegs per day. The sul- 
phur used has hitherto been imported from Europe ; 
Iiut aa immense bodies of the crude article exist in 
various portions of the State, and refiniuji^ works 
have b^eu put in operation by the Californm Borax 
Company, at Clear Lake, and also in Colusa County, 
where crnde sulphur is abundant, there no longer 
exists an excuse for importing this material from 
abroad. The nitrate of soda, which is essential in the 
manufacture of blasting powder — alilioiigh refiued 
saltpetre is sometimes substituted in itsstead for sport- 
ing powder — is imported from Peru, where it exists 
in abundance. Large quantities of the willow 
and alder growing in the vicinity, the charcoal used 
is manufactured on the ground. For the purposes of 
security, the works are distributed at considerable 
distance from each other, over an area of one hund- 
red acres, and such precaution is taken to render 
an accident alinost an impossibility. During the 
year 1865 these works produced over 40,000 kegs of 
blasting and 300 kegs of sporting powder ; and dur- 
ing the year 1866 double that amount of blasting, and 
over 5,000 kegs of sporting powder, all of which meets 
with a ready market. The only other manufactory 
of this character in California is that of the Pacihc 
Powder Mill Company, located on Tokeliinui Creek, 
near San Ilufael, in Marin County. This company 
was organized in April, 1864, with a capital stock 
of $30,000, which was afterwards increased to 
$60,000. The machinery, which is of a capacity 
sufficient to produce about two hundred kegs or pow- 



der per day, is distributed in a number of buildings 
located at a distance from each other, over an area 
of .'iOO acres, lioth water and steam |M>wer is used. 
The company import their nitrate of soda fn>ii) Peru, 
but have adopted the refined sulphur inunufactiired 
by the (California liorax Company, which is found 
to fully answer the pur)H>se. Innumerable acci- 
dents, resulting in the loss of life and linib, to the 
large number of people engaged iu blasting in the 
mines, from the defective quality of fust- imiKirtld 
from abroad, the want of a home manufactory of this 
indispensable article has been felt here for a long 
time ; and although the merits of the subject have 
been fully canvassed, nothing permanent has as yet 
been done in the matter. 

Glass.— Although the manufacture of glitss during 
the yi-ar 186»i amounted to but little over $80,(K)0, its 
importance should not lie underrated. Tlie (|iiuntity, 
owing to the consiuiit and rapidly-increasing de- 
mand growing out of the extendeu wine products, 
tIruggistM' and manufuctnrurs' wares of vurioiis kinds, 
mineral waters, mustard, pickles, and similar manu- 
factures, falls far short of the demand. The first 
manufactory of glass in San Francisco was by the 
Pacific Glass Company, which was incor|N>ruted in 
I86'J, who erected a large building on a tnict of ten 
acres, purchksed for the purpose, on the Potruro, and 
contiguous to the Kay. Cflass blowing was com- 
menced here on the 16tb of June, 18ii:i, hince which 
time the work has been steadily continued. From 
forty to fifty hands are employed, and every variety 
of glassware demanded by the increaHliig iiiauufac- 
tares of the country, are produced. Tlieso works 
are at present con'ducted by Messrs. Saulsbury, 
Kirk, and Mordecai. The San Francisco Glass 
Works, owned by Messrs. Newman and lirannun, 
located on Towiisend street, between Third and 
Fourth, have been in successful operation for two 
vears past. They employ forty hands, and turn oat 
lamp chimneys, bottles, jars, luid driiggixtH' wuro to 
theaiiionnt of $l5(M)euch week. Tliiscstalilishinent 
is prepai'ed to furnish retorts needed in clieiiiicul lab- 
oratories of any capacity, uptotwenty-live gallons; 
and during the past season manufactured tor the 
chemical works of Judson St, Co. twelve twenty- 

?rallon retorts, to be used in the manufactory of acids 
ur the Sun Francisco United States Mint, as well as 
twenty four sixteengulloii ret^orts, and u large num- 
ber ot glass uypliong for the chemical labonitory of 
B. B. Thayer and Co., of this city. The white sand 
used for the finer quality of glass made at these 
establishments is found in large quantities in Mon- 
terey County ; the next quality comes from Oak- 
laim, across the Bay ; 'whilst that for the common or 
ordinary quality is found iu immense quantities iu 
the hills of Sau Francisco. 

Cordage. — The only establishment iu this depart- 
ment is the Pacific Cordage Manufuciory, located at 
the Potrero, and owned by Messrs. Tubbs Sc Co. It 
was established in 185t), since which time it has 
been in successful operation, there being u constant 
demand for the articles produced. The rope walk in 
fifteen hundred feet in length, and the building, 
comprising the spinning department, is one hundred 
feet long liy forty in width. Fitly hands are kept 
constantly employed, and over 2,000,000 lbs. of cord- 
age wera manufactured during the past year. The 
stock worked up is imported from Manila direct. 

Matches.— Although the maimfacture of friction 
matches was only commenced in this city six years! 
since, it has steadily increased, until the domesticl 
article has almost wholly monopolized the market— 
the article produced here being a superior as well at 
cheaper article tlian the imported. This article re- 
quiring to be stamped direct, we have no means oil 
arriving at the exact quantity produced during the] 



I past year, 
establisliniei; 
I on Twelfth i 
I Jossnp Si c 
I idea may bo i 

. Leatheh.- 

I AssesHur of I 

I ing June 30, 

Owing to th 

prices abroad 

stowed upon | 

1 10 shippiiin^ 

I though previoi 

I ma tliiH truffle . 

"on of the !»,, 

vastly increase 

leHlher, was ii 

.'he number ol 

increased diiriiij 

l*iiig depeiideii 

articlu, large qi 

IcHlher are shii 

Isthmus of p,l 

Iliese shipmeni 

nionfh, with a 

mmiiiishing. Tl 

diiced hero are t 

although the atti 

ufactuie is beiu, 

sKins and inorocc 

and firm cliuractt 

tered here, the so 

to that produced 

found along the 

docino, noted for 

H'l'ipted to this nu 

;'«."'?e"8ofthe;oi 

this ini|)ort«„t end 
carried i„ some 

o«k upon which 
Cerro «„,! hj, f„„ 

»ftiefin,t white, 

of Monterey, by o 

trunk has Seen en 

V'""lu, whose bu, 

Ijeen similarly n«t 

tliepregent. The I 

account '.f (he pecn 

I reK'wi, are located 

, numerous others, V, 

„7««''e'J over the { 

or the coast. The i 

« "early forty, of 
I Cisco. ■" 

SADDr,ERr AND 

leather worke<i up 
(fmncisco, during th 
oftheKeyenueAsse, 
! "le quality ig moetl 

jcharacter^farticleg- 
•"""Ke harness and 
this line are not sun, 
(East. The leather 

LT'nfe substantia 
"••road, 18 better ad 

(("'^mentsofthela, 

foujfh mountain road 
b^megg requiring tb 
,«rticIegofh«rneggtl 
[^•"auufacturere- 
^. Messrs. Main 



in 



& 



CALIFORNIA 



MANUFACTURES — MISCELLANEOUS. 



99 



past year. When it in known, however, that one 
e»tiil>li8hiii«nt — the Eureka Match Factury, located 
on Twelfth street, near FoIhoui, uwnud hv VV. H. 
JuMnp & Co.— tiimB out eighty yroMH dally, some 
idea may be inferred of the extent of thiH uut'erprise. 

Leatheh.— The amount of leather returned to the 
AsaeBHor of Internal Uevenue during thn veiir elid- 
ing June 30, 18(U), fi-ll t)Ut little Hliurt of 'f-moOO. 
Owinx to the abundance of Htock, and the liiKli 
prices abroad, a greater dcffree of attention is be- 
Htowed u(H)n home manufHclurcH. It is found that 
tliu Hhippin^ of liiduH to the Kastein markets — nl- 
tliouuh previous to the discovery of ^old in CBlifor- 
niathiH traffic constituted the main trade of this por- 
tion of the Pacilic — to have the same returned at a 
vastly increased rate in the form of manufiictureil 
leather, was neither a wise nor prolilalilc policv. 
The number of tanneries in California lias rapidly 
increased dnriuff the past few years, until s» far froi'n 
lieiiiK dependent u|H>n Eastirn manufactories for this 
article, lar^e quantities of the best (piality of sole 
leather are shipped to tlie Atlantic itlHles via the 
Istlinuis of I'anuma by each outKoinj; steamer. 
These shipments amount to about :.',(H)U sides per 
month, with a prospect of increasing rallier tlum 
dimiidshiuK. The principal qualities of leather pro- 
duced here are sole, kip, harness, beltinjir, aiitl hose, 
althou|i{h the attention of those en^axed in tiiis nuin- 
ufaclure is being turned to the production of calf- 
skins and moroccos. Owin^ to tlie huxe nhc, lieavy 
and firm character of the hides of the cattle slaugh- 
tered here, tlie sole leather manufactured is superior 
to that nroduced in the tanneries of the Eastern 
States. The bark of the peculiar species of oak 
found along the coast from Monterey Uay to Men- 
docino, noted for its excess of tannin, is peculiarly 
adapted to this purpose ; and many of these ancient 
deuizens of the soil have been strijiped bare to serve 
this important end, To such an extent bus this l>een 
carried in some instances that even the ancient 
oak upon which the venenited Padre Juniper, 
Cerro and bis foUowera commemorated the landing 
of the first white men u|ion these shores at the liny 
of Monterey, by cutting a large cross deep into the 
trunk, has been entirely denuded of its bark by some 
vandal, whose bump of reverence f<ir the past had 
been similarly razed down by tlie utilitarian spirit of 
tlie present. The largest tanneries in the State, on 
account '<f the peculiar advantages atibrded bv that 
region, are located in Santa Cruz County ; altltongb 
numerous others, various in extent, ai'e more or less 
scattered over the State and tliroughout this portion 
of the coast. The number of tanneries in this State 
is nearly forty, of which twelve are iu Sau Fran- 
cisco. 

Saddlert and Harness. — The quantity of 
leather worked up in this form in the city o{ San 
Francisco, during the year, according to the showing 
of the Revenue Assessor's books, amounts to $1 1 1 ,(M)0. 
The <iuality is mostly of the heavier and substantial 
character < f articles In this department, although the 
carriage harness and finer class of nminiiactiM'es in 
this line are not surpassed bv any imported from the 
East. The leather i>i'oduced here being of a heavier 
and more substantial nature than that im|)orted from 
abroad, is better adapted for ordinary use and re- 
•^uirements of the large number of teamsters exten- 
Nvelv engaged in the transportation of goods over 
rougli mountain roads to distant mining regions — a 
business requiring the most substantial and durable 
articles of harness that can be produced. The heav- 
iest manufacturers in tiiis branch in San Francisco 
are Messrs. Main St, Winchester, pioneers in the 
bnsiness, who early established themselves here and 
opened an extensive trade at various points. Mead 
and Co., J. G. Johnson Sc Co. are also extensively 
engaged in the business. 



Type Foun-jrv.— Although the business of man- 
ufacturing tvpo,_stereotvping, and eleclrotyping has 
been carried on in San Francisco on a limited scale 
for a number of years past, vet it is only recently 
that the manufacture of full fonts of type of every 
variety, embracing every style oi plain and orna- 
mental letters, has been commenced. Messrs. Faulk- 
ner Sl Sons, having imported all the necessary ma- 
chinery, and engaged the most skillful workii'ien in 
this department, and beginning work in November 
last, have already produced a suttii^lent snpplv of all 
sorts in this line to meet the dema:id, including full 
suits of type for u number of the newspapers of this 
Coast. 

Furniture. — A reference to the returns made to 
the Federal Assessor of the Internal Revenue De- 
partment shows the amount (>f Furniture manufac- 
tured in the city of San Francisco for the fiscal year 
to be $1,():)*J,',>70. When it is considered that for a 
long time even the mostcommon articles of household 
furniture in use hei-e, were mnniifactnred and im- 
ported from abroad ; and, also, that although this por- 
tion of the Pacific produces many beautiful wimmIs, yet 
the greater iiortion of the material worked is pro- 
duced elsewhere, the magnitude of this manufacture 
seems really wonderful. Within a comparatively 
short time a nnmlier of extensive manufactories have 
been erected, in which all the recent and improved 
machinery has been introduced, where every variety 
of articles in this department, suited to the wants of 
tliis coiniiiiinity, arc turned out in large quantities. 
Of the numerous (lartics engaged in this business, 
the most extensive establishments are those of Messrs. 
Ooodwin &., Co., J. Peirce, N. P. Cole & Co., and 
W. (}. Weir, who has recently erected a larjfe build- 
ing for this iiurpose in Hayes Valley. Some higlily 
polished aiiu beautiful specimens of laurel and other 
native California woods were sent to the World's 
Fair at I'aris by Mr. J. P. Uovd, furniture manufac- 
turer. No. 412 Pine street. Messrs. Field & Co., 
4U7 Mission street, are extensively engaged in the 
manufacture of bedsteads, tables, etc. ; and Messrs. 
Jacob Schreiber and J. F. ik. H. H. Schafer daily 
produce for their large and increasing trade a con- 
siderable amount of ueds and bedding. 

Mattino. — The manufacture of M'.nila Matting 
was commenced in San Francisco in May, 186G, ity 
D. Jordan & Co. This ex|)erinient, which was com- 
menced on a small scale, has been found to succeed 
so well that the product has almost driven the im- 
ported article from this market; in fact, since its 
going into operation, the price of niatliiig has been 
Induced twenty per cent. The manufactory, which 
is located at No. &M Ellis street, contains six mat- 
ting looms, two skeleton mat machines, and one mat 
loom, and produces nine hundred yards of matting, 
with eighteen or twenty dozen mats jier week. The 
material used, termed " coiet yarn," spun from the 
fiber of the outside husk of the cocoanut tree, is im- 
ported direct from Manila. As the raw material 
exists in large quantities much nearer ihis coast, it 
is the intention of the proprietors to put up the req- 
uisite machinery for spinning the article. They 
also intend, during the coming season, increasing 
their looms to thirty in number, and are about erect- 
ing a dye-house ; so that iu a shoit time all the various 
operations connected with the business will be con- 
ducted directly on the spot. 

Rroons. — ^There are fouiteen manufactories of 
Brooms in California, ten of which are locHt«d in 
San Francisco. The material worked up is of Cal- 
ifornia production ; the growth of broom com being 
heavy, the brush is of a quality much 8U|)erior to the 
imported article, which has been entirely driven from 
the market. The broom corn used commands a price 
ranging from $50 to $75 per ton, and the manufac- 
tured brooms from (3 to f 6 per dozen. 



100 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 



niM.iARn TAnt.KS.— There are Miree mnniifHo- 
toriea of Killiiiril THbleH in Sun KranriHro: tlmt of 
Mutliew K. IliiKlieii, on Montffonierv it(rc«t, who 
inunufiiclnres f ii)ni Hoventv -tl ve to one hnndred tiihles 
It yenr, iim) wlio hui niuiie Hince c<>nin)enein||{ hiisi- 
li«ii8 'J,^AW tithle*. Kvery porlioa of those liilileH JH 
niuinifnctnred here, except the cUHhiona— Phehin'i) 
Patent — which are made in Now Yorlc. Jacol. 
Slruhle Sc Co., the nioneerH in tliiR depurlmont, com- 
inenced tlie maniiractiire of tiiblen in IH.'il, iiinc« 
wliieh time tiiey have turned ont '2,()0!) tahleg, one 
of whicli,exhil)ited ut the tlrHt MeehanicH' Fair, lield 
in Sun FrunuiHco in 1856, tool( tlie premium, and 
oflerwardM Mold for |l,l.'iM. In the yearn IHAT-H, the 
hiiHineHH of tliis tirm amounted to $)l)0,Ou'./ per year. 
A lar){e number of tlio tables in private eetabliHh- 
nientu were manufactured by tliem. They make 
from lifty to Boveiity-live tables each year. The 
remaining manufuctory, that of 1*. liieiienfeld on 
llattery street, turns out about twenty-tlvo tables 
per iinnum, and lias, duriuf^ the eleven years he 
Ims lieeii engaKed ■» tl>e business, produced three 
hnudrcd tables. Many of the native woods of this 
ref^ion. California rosi-wuod, curled maple, and other 
varieties, are employed in this maiuifucture. (Since 
the foregoing was written, Messis. Hughes and 
Stralile have formed a copartnership, and have re- 
moved their manufactory to 567 Market street.) 

WooDKN Ware. — One of the most extensive 
estal>1i8hments for the manufacture of wocdun-ware 
on this coast 'i that of Messrs. Elam & }(owes, 
which is located on the corner of Main and 
Mission streets, San Kruncisco. The building is 
of brick, sixty by sixty feet, and three stories high, 
and fitted up with all the requisite madiinery 
driven by steam-power, for the manufacture of 
pails, tuCs, and every variety of wooden-ware in 
use. Thirty men are l<ept constantly employed, and 
all the material used, pine and cedar — about 100 
cords of which are worked up each niontli — is of 
California and Oregon growth. This manufactory 
turns out regularly every day 25 dozen pails, 50 
uests of tubs, 10 dozen washboards, 150 powder 
kegs, besides other minor articles, sufficient to supply 
the market of this region. Messrs. Arnies&. Dallam 
are also engaged in the same business, and employ a 
large nnmber of persons. 

Show Cases. — There are several manufactories 
of show cases of tlie various sizes suited for the trade 
in San Francisco ; that of Teubner Si Iloti'man, cor- 
ner of California and Kearny, is largely engaged 
in the business. 

Pianos. — Tliere is but one manufactory of pianos 
on this Coast, tlmt of Jacob Zeuh, Ninth street, be- 
tween Howard and Folsoin. During the ten years 
in which Mr. Zech has been engaged in the business 
lie has manufactured four hundred and eighty in- 
struments, of superior tone and iinish. Many of the 
native woods of this region, ash, laurel and other 
varieties, are used in uieir manufacture. Mr. J. 
Mayer is engaged in the manufacture of church or- 
gans, and has produced several excellent instruments, 
of great power and sweetness of tone. 

MiHROits. — The silvering of glass and the manu- 
facture of mirrors was first commenced in San Fran- 
cisco in ISKJ by Messrs. Cameron, VVliittier 5t Co. 
The action of tlie sea air, and damps attendant npon 
the sliipment from Europe and the Atlantic States, 
had the effect of corroding the amalgam and dim- 
ming the luster : this materially depreciated the value 
of the imported articles, and rendered such manufac- 
ture an absolute necessity. This firm commenced 
with only one workman and one silvering table, 
but the demand caused by the superiority of the 
article produced has steauily increased until they 



have now in use three silvering and two polishing 
tables, by which they are enabled to silver the 
largest sized plate glass in use — the largest table 
lieiiig capable of coating glass Wi bv U4 inches. 
The finest quality of phii < glass used in this manu- 
facture is procured from France, Uermany and Itel- 
giiim. Old and damaged mirrors can be re-silvered 
at this establishment at a comparatively slight cost. 

BmJSHK.'t.— The first mnnnfaotory of bnishei was 
that of Messrs. P. U. ConiinH tc Co., who commenced 
business at 417 Mission street, San Francisco, June, 
l(«!(i. Although these enterprising manufacturers 
had nnmerous difHciilties to contend witli at the 
stni'tthey have surmounted every obstacle, and their 
business is now on a permanent basis, and steadily 
increasing. They are constantly at work making 
nearly every variety of brushes !n use. The greater 
portion of the materials us<mI are produced here. In 
addititm to tl',e ordinary n. aerial of bristles, which 
enters largely into this mi.nnfnctnre — the Amo/e dt 
soap root, H native Culifornian plant.which exists in 
large qv.anlities in every |)ortion of tlie State, has 
been substituted with success. 

Ooi.n ANn Sii.vEH Ware Attn Jewelry.— The 
manufacture of gold and silver ware, and all the 
finer nrtlclcs of jewelry, is carried on to a largo ex- 
tent in San Francisco— wliich affords one of tlie best 
miirkets of the sumo extent in the world for this 
character of goods. For beauty and artistic merit 
of design, elegaiu'e of workmanship and elaborate 
finish, in this deparlment San Francisco may de- 
servedly claim the palm— her productions in this 
Hue having a wide reputation in the Atlantic and 
European cities. When it is known that many of 
the best artists from altroad were attracted hither 
bv the golden harvest, this is not to be wondered at. 
Many of the designs for the plate and jewelry manu- 
factured here are alike original and uiii(|ue,*uiost of 
them embodying emblems and features of a pr.mii- 
iient local character. The richest and most elegant 
Oold Service ever gotten up in the ITiiited States 
was manufactured by J. W. Tucker, at San Fran- 
cisco. This service, which was made to the order 
of the citizens here, and |)resented to Cornelius K. 
(larrisiin, upon the occasion of his retirement from 
the Mayoralty, in 1854, consists of a large SJSinch 
salver, highly embossed and elaborately engraved 
with scenes and emblems, characteristic of the 
Ooldeii State, coffee 4nd tea urns, etc., comprising 
filly pieces in all. The cost of the entire set was 
over 550,000. It was the intention of the owner to 
have exhibited this magnificent specimen of Cali- 
fomian ]>roduction at the World's Fair, in London, 
in I85C, but from souie cause this was not done. It 
is to be hoped tlmt it will be sent to the coming Ex- 
position in Paris, to -how to the world what our 
State can produce in this department. Elegant pre 
sentation services of silver have been at various 
times manufactured by Messrs. J. W. Tucker, 
Shreve & Co. and liarrelt and Sherwood. There is [ 
also considerable diamond setting dono by the San 
Fnincisco jewelers and lapidaries, and tlie elegant 
gold quartz jewelry, which originated here, has 
become universally popular. 

SiioAR Refineriks.— The only sugar refineries 
on the Pacific Coast arb three in number, and located 
in the city of San Francie:!o. Their operations are 
very extensive ; this important branch of manu- 
facture being increased during the past year by the 
erection of an extensive establishment, and a consid- 
erable increase in the operations of those previously 
in existence. The first and longest established of 
these is that of the San Francisco and Pacific Sugar 
Company, the extensive buildings of which are lo- 
cated on the corner of Harrison and Eighth streets. 
Tills establishment is of a sufili'' unrou ,<acity to refine 



CA 



1,500 tons of 

during that 

crushed, and 

liasiness doii< 

18(i(i amount! 

' , Uav Suoa 

I immediately ( 

Uatlery Htreel 

sive, and ig c 

sugar per day. 

I CALiroKNI, 

refining establ 

nan and Eigl 

Mangels, witi 

barrels of 81,^,1 

cessful oi(eniti(, 

pi-oduced tlie f 

WHS |3,W,f).3a. 

mostly importei 

tlie Sandwic'h J 

cultivation of 811 

amount prodnce 

year ending j,„ 

ut the Internal J 

a fraction of f„ 

than double that 

I tures. 

MACARlLVr Al» 

commenced ,,t S, 

Messrs. UrijfUrtrd 

'"'en coiJHtaiitly 

"at time in orde 

the su()eiiority „f 

driven all otfiers 

U'ed at their est 

tweon Jackson ai 

"bout 20,(((H) box", 

POHO lO.Ooo Bueks 

j tfi-owtli, and over 

Yeast Powdei 

but little versed in 

fOHlied to the moJ 

'"etals. ye„g,.p„„.J 

Peiisable .inicles iil 

W'; ll'e f,.r,„e,. J 

ulthoiwh civiliiiingl 

Lr '"d" 'WliancJ 

he article still col 

l>onolly & Co., N,f 

ninnufactiircd hut J 

and puckiid 50,0001 

! amount of bicarboij 

joftartar, coiitaiiiinr 

, MirsTAKD Tliel 

has been carried oil 
irancisco for 8evef 
MlfsbeenthenufivJ 
Which was so nroll 

baffle the edbrts of I 

to root It out and mJ 

proved to be a pest 1 

Wed saved byTlieT 

commanding « readl 
per pound \M 

"' point of streiitfthl 
for the table «„r^| 

J'niportedfromabro^ 

nals nged Hre barlel 
'" 'ne event of a gl 

J^WnUtiesofniolasgT 



OALI FORNIX 



MANUFACTURES — HISCELLANKOUS 



101 



1,500 tons of raw lumr each month, and tnrna out 
(hiring; thHt time 7,000 barrelH of wliitu BiiKur, 4,000 
cruHlied, iiixl .'>(),0()0 ffalloiio of goldun Myi'iin. The 
hnxiiietiii doiitt lit thiH utttublinliiueiit during tiie your 
18<i<i umnuntod to |-J,008,'.ii:i. 

Day Suiuu IIkkineuy,— Thin retinorr is located 
iminedliitely on the Uuy, ut the corner o^ Union and 
Hattery tilreutti. The machinery ciiiployud in exteii- 
Hive, and h capable of refining about .^0,000 Ibit. of 
Ru^ui' per <lay. 

Camkounia Suoah KEFiNKiir.— An extenmve 
rotlning establishment erected on the corner of Itraii- 
nan and EJKhth Htreeto by MextirH. Spreclculii Sc 
Mangels, witli a capacity of working about 100 
barrels of sugar exch day, Iuim licen in full and suc- 
cessful oiieration for some months nast. Tlie amount 
produced tlie few months it lim* iieen in operation 
WHS f;<i">;j,(>31!. Tlie raw material consumed is 
mostly imported from China, Central America, and 
the Sandwich Islands, in which latter country tho 
cultivation of sugar is largely on the increase. Tlie 
amouni produced in these es'tubliHhmunts during the 
year ending June !iO, 186<), as shown liy tlie exhibits 
of the Internal Uevenuo Departiiiciit, readies witliin 
a fraction of four millioiiH of dollars, u sum more 
than double that of any single branch of manufac- 
tures. 

Macaho.vi asi) Pastk.— This manufacture was 
coumienccii .it San JVancinco in tlio year ISijti. by 
Messrs. lirignardello Macchiavello & Co., who liav'e 
l>r>eu constantly extending their operations since 
tliat time, in order to supply the iiu'reuHcd demand ; 
the 8U|ierioritv of the articfes they produce, liaving 
driven all others from the market. They manufac- 
tured at their estuMishmont, on Sanhoni street be- 
tween Jackson and Paciflc, during the year IKtSO, 
about 120,(100 boxes of macaroni, using for this pur- 
pose IO,()ll() sucks of macaroni wlie^it, of California 
growth, and over 000 barrels of flour. 

Yeast PownKn.s. — In the early days of the gold 
excitement in California, when thousands of men 
but little versed in the mysteries of the culinary art, 
rushed to the mountains in search of tlie preci(nis 
iiietals, yeast-powders, or self-rising Hour, were iiidis- 
iiensable articles in the miner's cmltit. The demand 
for the former was extensive and steady ; and 
although civilizing intluences have done away with 
the rude appliances of early times, the demiliul for 
the article still continues to a considerable extent. 
Uonolly & Co., No. I'Jl Front street, San Francisco, 
manufactured last year, 3,000 gross of yeast-powders, 
and packed 50,000 pounds of sala>ratU8, and the same 
amount of bicarbonate of soda, with 100 cases cream 
uf tartar, containing about 300 pounds to the case. 

MusTAiiD. — The manufacture of ground mustard 
has been carried on to a considerable extent in t!an 
Francisco for several years past. The article ased 
has been the native, or wild mustartlitlie growth of 
which was so prolific — the stalks attaining such a 
gigantic size in the fertile valleys of Cul'*brniii as to 
baffle the efforts of the early cultivators of the soil 
to root it out and make room' for other crops. What 
proved to be a pest, was made a source of profit, the 
seed saved by the separators in tfireshing grain, 
commanding a ready price, at from two to foiir cents 
per pound. The seed is of the black variety, and 
in point of strength and pungency, is superior, both 
for the table and medipinul purposes, to the article 
imported from abroad. 

Distillation of Spirits. — The quantity of dis- 
tilled spirits returned in this District during the 
year 1860, amounted to 4!? ',151 gallons. The mate- 
rials used are barley, wheat, Indian corn, rice, and 
in the event of a scarcity of giain in the market, 
quantities of molasses, imported from the Sandwich 



Islands, have been substituted toadvantage. A largo 
number of small distilleries have been in operation 
during the past year, but the product has been mainly 
drawn from the two leading oHiabliHlinients, of 'a 
capacity inferior to but few if any similar concerns 
of this chrtlncter in the United States. The first of 
these, that of J. Dows St Co., located on Mission 
Creek between Hranniin and Folsom streets, haa 
Iteen in successful o|)eration for more than ten years 

rit. The ccmsiimplion of grain each month iim<miits 
over 1,000,000 of pounds, and tlie amount of 
whiskey produced during the same time is iilxail 
75,000 gallons. About three hundred tons of coal 
from tlie Monte Diablo mines, are consumed each 
month. A column still is in use for the manufacture 
of high proof spirits and alcohol, which is capable 
ot producing fi-om five to six hundred gallons daily. 
Tl 6 establishment is also provided with an extensive 
reetifyiiig apparatus, tlie greater portion of the prod- 
uct being '.jiade i.' juire spirits. The other lead- 
ing manufactory in il" line, is the Pacitiu Distillery 
of Messrs. Scott and I'.i ice. 

CioAns.— The i..,'t, that the books of the U. S. In- 
spector in tlii^depiirtineiit, and those of the Assessor 
of Interniil Kevenue, show that there were iiiiiiiu- 
factured, in San Francisco, during the veur 18(56, 
cigars to the amount of over a million of (follars, is a 
fair criterion of the importance of a business that a 
few yeais since was comparatively unknown here. 
There are near one hundred firms engaged in the 
business; about one half of this numlter being coni- 

iiosed of Chinese, the remaining half consisting of 
)^renchmen, Germans, and otiier Europeans, who 
employ Chinese labor to a large extent. As the 
best evidence of rapid increase of this business, the 
taxes up<ai cigars, made here in the year 1864, 
amounted to less than two thousand dollars, while, 
in the year enduig September 30, 1866, this tax 
amounted to over acjnurler of a million. Although 
the experiment of raising tobacco has been tried in 
California with success — the premium of #300 ottered 
by the State a few years since for the first one hun- 
dred bales having been taktu by a citizen f Siic- 
riimenlo County — so limited has beeiF its cultu.ii, that 
the greater portion of the article used in this manu- 
facture here conies from Ohio, Illinois, Missouri and 
other Western States. The cigars made here at- 
taining a wide reputation abroixl, it is not improbable 
that parties producing the material may consuino 
tobacco of their own raising shipped to'the Pacific 
coast and returned to them in a manufactured form, 
constituting another extraordinary instttncu of the 
numerous strange anomalies of trade. So great is 
the demand for cigar boxes, caused by this extensive 
manufacture, that several firms are e'ngaged in their 
manufacture, imiiorting the material used — red cedar 
— from abroad for the purpose. Among the numer- 
ous manufacturers in tails line, the heaviest returns 
are made bv the following: Max Armar, John 
Clawson. F. L<ican, Fruchtnicht it. Co., Vogesldorf & 
Co., li. Mayrish, E. Uoslinsky, Heardink & Co., U. 
C. Geilson.'J. Morris, lienjamiu Yom, I.iong Sing & 
Co., Kee & Ah Chun, Gee Gon. The amount of to- 
bacco manufactured in other forms, is, compared 
with the cigar trade, but a small item, tlic sum ex- 
hibited by the Internal Kevenue returns lor the year 
being bat 966,000. 

HESERVIfD Fr.UITS, VEUETABLES, AND DltlED 

FuuiTs. — This is an important department in Cali- 
fornia manufactures. In the first settlement of the 
State, and for a long time after, all articles of canned 
fruits and vegetables were im|iorted from abroad ; 
now, not only is a sufficient quantity of a sii|>erior 
article put up here to supply the home demand, but 
shipments abroad are made to a considerable extent. 
Cutting &. Co., No. 'Mii Front street, who are most 
largely engaged in the business, have a capital of 



102 



FAOIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



$150,000 invested, and at certain Beasong employ 100 
iiandg ; tliev put up during tlie year 18()6, goinetliinK 
like 300,000 cans of friiita and veKetables, and aliuut 
1U0,(MMI gallons of pickles, besides ketclinps, siiuces, 
and oilier articles. These articles, shipped by this 
firm to New York, have been pronounced superior 
to anything of the ':<ind put up on the Atlantic side ; 
their caiuied tomatos, peas, and beans being con- 
siderad of a finer quality than those fresh gathered in 
that quarter. Cutting & Co. are also extensively 
cngaj{ed in putting up canned meats, and other arti- 
cles in this department. They furnished in this 
manner 100,000 pounds of fresh beef for the French 
Heet on this coast, and have filled numerous orders 
for vessels going to sea. 

In tlie department of dried fruits, the domestic 
product has almost driven the imported article from 
the iniirket. The peaches, pears, apples, and 
prunes dried here, are in every respect lar superior 
to those which come from abroad. The Cxliioruia 
prunes are pronounced a better article than those 
imported from France ; and California raisins are 
l>ecoiiiiiig an article of commerce. Owing to the 
defective mode of curing, the dried tigs are not eiiual 
to the imported. Weston & Co., Pacific Fruit Mar- 
ket, put up during the past season six tons of various 
kiiiils of drie<l fiuits. Precht St. Kggers, of the same 
market, are also largely engaged in the business. 

Ci'REn Meats. — For a long time, it was supposed 
that owing to the mild climate of California, it was 
impossible to cure pork and beef sufficiently to stand 
the requisite test. Tiie experience of the past few 
years, has deaily demonstrated that these articles 
can be cured and put up iii su<;h u manner as to 
insure their keeping in any climate. In fact, exjie- 
rieiice has clenrly proven' that, so far from being 
unfavorable to this enterprise, the temperature is 
ailiiiirably adapted to the business ; and tiiere is less 
ri.sk now in packing meats in Sail Francisco In Jiilv 
or August, f fiaii is the case in the soft weather whidi 
often occurs in the winters of the Northern States. 
The article put up here has so completely monopo- 
lized the mnrkct, that pork and beef from abroad, 
once leading (Waples, have become a nirity. It is 
estimated that there are slaughtered daily in San 
Francisco, giunuthliig like 161) hogs, averaging 101 
puaiiils each — about Xi> pounds of ench carciiss lieing 
cured into hams and liacoii; the residue being sold 
in the markets, ami converted into lard. 

The pioneers in the pork and beef p.icking busi- 
ness in California were Koot. Hrady &. Sleiiiberger, 
men of large experience in iliis department in the 
Atlantic States. The parties most extensively en- 
gaged in the business at this time, are Messrs. Wil- 
son &'. Stevens, who have erected at Klack Point, 
immediately on the Hay. about two miles from the 
cilv, an extensive slaughtering and packing estab- 
lishment, modeled after the best arnmged concerns 
of the kind at Cincinnati and Chicago. The main 
building is iOO by 'M) feet, the capacity sufficient to 
pack 1 ,000 hogs per i!ay. The Point affords a uni- 
form teiii|ienitHre of low degree, favorable to the 
business. Messrs. Dietrick & Co., and Willouuhby & 
Co., Third street, also do a large business in tills lino. 

niiEWERiEs.— The number of establishments in 
San Francisco where fermented liquorg are manu- 
factured, is 3'i ; and the ({iiantity produced during the 
vent IStiO, amounted to aboiU ■i,.'>00,000 gallons. Tlie 
Wley used for the malt is exclusively of California 
growth — and a considerable portion of the hops used 
are raised hi re ; lieiiig preferred to the imported, on 
account of a greater degree of strength and fresh- 
ness — a sea voyage deteriorating the quality of the 
article. The principHl establishments wliich are 
miiinly devoted to the manufacture of that popular 
beverage, lager beer, are tho<ie of Messrs. Spreckles 
&. Co., whose extensive brewery is on Everett 



street between Third and Fonrtli, and the Philadel 

Shia Brewery, occupying the Folsom property on 
ccond. Lyons & Co. are the most extensively 
engaged in the manufncfare of ale and porter. The 
number of breweries in the State is about 125. 

CoNFECTioNEUY.— The manufacture of confection- 
ery in San Fiiincisco, amounted last year to some- 
thing over $300,000. This branch of business is 
divided up among a large number of small dealers. 
One of the most extensive manufacturing establish- 
msnts in this line, is that of Kathbun & Co. on San- 
som street, between Clay and Commercial. 

Soap. — ^The fact that the books of the Internal 
lieveime Department show a return dnring the 
year ending ilune 30th, 181)0, of 361 ,.5UO,<iOO pounds 
of snap, amounting in value to $:)00,OltO, exhibits 
the extent and rapid increase of this mannfaclure. 
Every variety of plain, fancy, and toilet soaps are 
made at the numerous establishments engaged in this 
business in San Frnncisco. The materials employed 
are abundant, and in addition to home productions, 
large ([uantities of whale oil, ocoa-nut and palm 
oil from aliroad are consumed. The establishment of 
J. Hv C. Portmann, who first commenced the business 
on a limited scale, in 18,57, on Market street, from 
whence he removed to bin present extensive works 
located on Mission Creek rear Center, where he hag 
invested in the Imsincss over $')0,000, and produces 
about '.'OO.OOO pounds per month. The Eureka Soap 
Co., The .Standiird Soup Co., .1. C. HIair &, Co., Lucy 
& Hiiiies,.F. i). Bergiii,. John Fay, Charles Peterson, 
and F. Licphart, are also largely engaged in the 
business. 

Ikos Fni'NiiniES.— The amount of castings pro- 
duced at the Inm Foundries of San Francisco diir- 
iiig the vear 18(lt», was but little less than two mil- 
lions of' dollars, the greater portion being (piartz 
and mining iiiachincrv. When thi! time shall arrive 
for the reduction of these extensive deposits of iron 
oie known to exist at various points along this iior- 
tion of the coast, the niagiiitiide of this branch of 
industry will be of incalculable extent. There are 
thirteen foundries in constant operation in Snn 
Francisco, in which about one thousand workmen 
are kept employed. Several of these establish- 
ments are of the most extensive charncter; and 
being niiiiily provided with all the necessary ma- 
chinery, lliey are fully capable of meeting all the 
demands that may be made upon them. The nrinci- 
iml works are tlie Union Iron Works, II. J. Ilooth, 
(J. W. Prescott, and I. M. Scott, tiroprictors ; Pacific 
Iron Works', Ooddard iV. Co.; Vulcan Iron Works, 
N'ulcan Iriai Works Co. ; Fulton Foundry, Hinckley 
& Co.; Miners' Foundrv, Ilowlaiid, Aiig'ell& Kini;; 
(Solden Slate Foundry, I'almer, Knox & Co. ; and tlie 
./Etna Foundry, Ilanscom & Co. In addition to these, 
there are niiincrous foundries to be found at variouB 
m)iiit8 throughout the .State, almost every miuiiig 
locality of any extent being provided with thi iry 
' useful and essentially necessary adjunct to iii iiig 
operationg. The niimlier of Iron Foundries in the 
State, exclusive of .San Francisco, is '.W. The works 
at Sacramento, Marysville, and .Stockton are well 
furnished with the necessary appliances for the con- 
struction of machinery of the lieaviest description. 
The amount of business transacted by these estali- 
lishineiits forms an important item in the interior 
trade of the State. 

The other departments of metal working occupy I 
the attention of a large number of enterprising; 
firms throughout the State, and afford constant em-; 
ployment to a nnmerous and indugtrious class of 
our population. In the bnginegg department of the 
work will be fonnd, arranged under appropriate 
heads, the various firms engaged in these branctiegof 
our mechanical resources. i 



CA 



. Pacific 1 

in August I 

first Kolling 

San Fraiicisi 

erecting a w 

freight from 

mill, which ^ 

150 feet bv 2 

85 by 100 fee 

ning order in 

chinery and 

California, ha 

way to San I 

tensive armnji 

I sufficient for 

(sized ocean gi 

I that lias long 

tude of this * 

in which the ii 

out, it will 1,0 

work in the wl 

The Pacifi,, 

ment of MvHsn 

large biiildinjf , 

street, which h 

ery for forging 

in guccessful op. 

the intention of 

machinery for n 

Lead —The e 

portion of the P, 

H. Scll.v & tV 

terprisnrjr |,„„i,„, 

the year IHti.,, ,„| 

Bti'cels San Fran 

at tlie base, and i 

"lanufactiiro of i, 

market require,., 

to the smallest 1 

1 hey also maniit 

lead, and lead pi 

the market suddIj 

t"W, which c,,;,,' 

with the latest , 

present rc,(iilreinJ 

ntleen hundred tl 

Ufed. Tfu's large! 

abroad ; but expj 

opmenf and pi.ifitl 

posiiH of ^„|e„„ pi 

roast, imiiiv of wll 

the precioiis nictf 

produce an article! 

imported. ' 

Saws and SavI 

Jacific .Saw Jlail 

menced work m i 

between Hatterv , 

an important e v., I 

Hrts of .San Fraiu 

aepaitment heinr 

rope, when sp(.<lal 

rten eiii(.rgcii(i,.H J 

expense were tli<l 

"Hs gone into ,mJ 

"^viated. As thJ 

'ifacfire that c.-niiiJ 

notic-.. evervthiiiLrJ 

mid gang saws fori 

niechanica! and otJ 

1ucr,| at this uHtabi 

most perfect in urJ 

provjments in thol 

•^ro ». patent, for ijf 

™"Kh. as they nrJ 

•mopth and nniforril 

""•ttilig, tem|)eringj 



CALIFORNIA 



MANUFACTURES — MISCELLANEOUS 



103 



Pacific Rolmno Mux. — Work was commenced 
in AuKiiHt iHKt, prepHratory to the erection of the 
first Rolliii|{f Mill at Potrero Point, on tlic Bay of 
Sun Francisco, l>v doin^ the necessary grading and 
erecting ii wharf^ into the Bay for tlie diHcharge of 
freiglit from tlie largest sized vessels. Tlie rolling 
mill, which will consist of a snhstJintial building of 
15()feet by 235 feet, with a machine shop attuched, 
85 by 100 t'ect, will he Knished and in complete run- 
ning order in twelve months; all the requisite ma- 
chinery and tixtnres which cannot be produced in 
California, having been selected in the East, is on its 
way to San Francisco. Connected with other ex- 
tensive ariiingements, will be a forge of a capacity 
sntticient for manufacturing shafts fur the largest 
sized ocean steamers, which will supply a want 
thiit has long been meriously felt. From the magni- 
tude of this enterprise, and the thorough manner 
in which the parties engaged in it design to carry it 
out, it will be in no respect inferior to any similar 
work in tlie whole country. 

The PaciHc Forge Company, under the manage- 
ment of Messrs. Hall & ,lolinson, have erected a 
large building on Mission Creek, north of Fifteenth 
street, which is supplied with the requisite machin- 
ery for forging pur))ORes. These works have been 
in'succcssful operation for some time past; and it is 
the intention of the proprietors to add the necessary 
machinery for rolling iron. 

LEAn.— The only manufacture of lead npon this 
portion of the Pacific Coast is carried on by Thomas 
H. Selby & Co., one of our oldest and most en- 
terprising busincHB firms. Thene parties erected in 
the year IH(ir>, on the cqrner of lioward and First 
Bti-eels, San Fiancisco, a' tower SO liy 70 feet, square 
at the base, and two hundred feet iii height, for the 
nianufactiue of shot, of which fliey produce, as the 
market reciiiireii, every description, from buck shot 
to the smallest si/.es, two hundred bags per day. 
They also maiuifacture Minnie bulls, bar and sheet 
lead, mid lead pipe, in siitticieut quantities to keep 
the market cupplied— the capacity of their manufac- 
tory, wl;icli comprises all the requisite mncliinery 
with the latest iiiiprovements, being double the 
present iiMiuirements in this deparlment. About 
nfteen Imiidred tons of crude lead per annum are 
used. Tliis large stock is nearly all iiiqiorted from 
abroad; but exiierimeuts are milking for the devel- 
opment am' proiituble working of the immense de- 
posits of galena existing in various portiiuis of this 
coast, many of which coiiliiin u large per ceiitage of 
the precious metals, wliicli is eventually bound to 
produce an article at home which will supersede the 
imported. 

Saws and Saw Tkkth.— The operations of the 
Pacific Saw Manufacturing Company, who com- 
menced work III ilieir manufactory on Pine street, 
between Hatterv ai.d Fnnit, in August, IHtili, was 
an important event in the history of the mechanic 
srts of Sun Fraiiciseo. Hitherto' everything in this 
department beinj: imported from the East and Eu- 
rope, when special orders were to be lillefl for sud- 
den emcrgcucicH, great delays and a large addititnial 
expense were the result. "Since this manufactory 
has gone into operation, all these diffloiillies are 
obviated. As thi.>re is nothing in this line of man- 
ufac!>!re that cannot be furnished to order at a short 
notic, everything, from the largest sized circular 
nnd gang sa'ws for mills to the smallest blades for 
niechanica! and otlier purposes, can readily bo pro- 
duprd at this establishment. The machinery is the 
mosi perfect in use, embracing all the niod'ern im- 
provt ments in the business, among which is Hub- 
vardV patent, for grinding the circular plates in the 
rough, as they arc imported from England, to a 
amooth and uniform surface. All 'he opemtions of 
cutting, tempering, hammering, and polishing are 



gone through in regular order, the result of which 
is the production of a superior article, suited to the 
wants of this portion of the coiMitry. The improved 
furnace for tempering long saws, by which u great 
saving of hibc <■ is etfeeted, originated in this estab- 
lishment. Adjoining is the manufactory of N. W. 
S|>aulding, whose patent saw teeth are in general 
use in almost every portion of the United States, 
from tiieir superiority to all others in use. 

WiuE AND WiRB Rope.— The manufacture of 
wire and wire rope and cordage was commenced in 
San Francisco, in the year 1837, by A. S. Hallidie 
and Co. From a coiiiparatively small beginning, 
this manufacture has increased until the firm siippiy 
the whole of this portion of the Pacific Coast. They 
manufacture round ropes of wire from one-sixteentn 
of an incli to two inches in diameter, and flat ropes 
from 'ix i to 5x1 inch. For this purpose they use 
about 200 tons of forty -two sizes and kinds of wire 
per annum. Of the former they have turned out in 
one piece ropes ;t,0(M) feet in length ; and of the lat- 
ter, pieces of 1,200 feet, weighing H(),000 lbs. Thev 
have supplied the principal mines in Nevada witii 
the wire rope used in their extensive hoisting appa- 
ratus, nnd guy ropes, as well as furnishing the mate- 
rial used for the construction of wiie suspension 
bridges and aqueducts throughout California, Idaho, 
Orejjon, and liritish Columbia, of from 200 feet to 
400 feet span. One of the most extensive of these 
is tlie wire suspension bridge erected by this firm 
over the Frazer River in tlie last named territory. 
They have in operation three sets of machinery of 
modern Eiiglisli invention and make. The iron 'and 
steel wire need by this firm in the manufacture of 
ro|H'B and other varieties of wire work is drawn 
in their mill, located o.'i North Bench. OlHce, 
No. 412 Chiy street. 

Amiifi-i.Ti-UAt, iMPt.EMENT.s.— The fact that a 
large nuijority of the most extensive and useful ugri- 
eultiirul implements aie patented inventions is a bar 
to tlicir manufacture here, although every facility is 
affoi'ded for the successful production of tliis im- 
portant branch of business. This iiiaiiufacture bus 
thus far been mainly contined to plows, of which a 
large variety is made — a preference being given to 
them by the farmers over the imported article. 
Tlie (luantity produced in this State during the past 
year niiioiuited to over 3,000. The reapers and 
'tlireshers, of which there have been a number maiin- 
factured liere during the past year, have demon- 
strated the advantages of producing such articles at 
home. The freiglit upon bulky articles of tliis class 
imported from alii-oail aniuunting to u considerable 
sum, the benefits arising from their homo production 
are fully apparent. A number of inyentions nnd iin- 
pi'ovenreiits in agricultural implements, suited to the 
wants of this locality, which have originated here 
within the past few' years, have been generally 
adopted. 

CAiutiAGE.s AND VVaoons.— The manufacture of 
carriages in San Francisco is steadily increasing; 
and such is the superiority of the vehicles turned out 
here that they have almost entirely superseded the 
importations from abroad. The amount returned to 
the Revenue Office of this district during the year 
ending June 30, IStKi, was $337,200. The principal 
manufacturers m this city are R. S. Eells & Co., 
Caseholt Sc Co., Kimban & Co.— who have a con- 
tract for the labor of twenty men at the State 
Prison, engaged on wagons and carls; H. M. Black 
Sc Co., Pacific Concord Carriage Factory, and O. F. 
Willey &. Co. The number of men employed in the 
TaiiouB manufactories in Sau Francisco is over two 
hundred. 

Metallvrgic and Assay Estadlisiiments. — 
The business of smelting, refining, and assaying the 



' I ! 



M 



104 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRKOTORY. 



precious metals, is carried on to a considerable ex- 
tent_ in California. Although there are several es- 
tablishments in the first named department located 
in various portions of the State, owing to the uni- 
versal adoption of the milling process ft}r the reduc- 
tion of metals, this business is not curried on to that 
extent that might be reasonably supposed. There 
are fifteen assay establishments in San Francisco, 
among which the following occupy a prominent posi- 
tion: Rogers 6c, Drown, Hciitscli & Berton, Falk- 
enau dc Hanks, B. B. Thayer, O. C. Pope, and 
J. A. Bauer. The most extensive refinery of metals 
in the State, next to the U. S. Mint at Sun Fnin- 
cisco, is the Sun Francisco Assaying and KeHning 
Works, located on Bmnnan, near i^eventh street, San 
Francisco. This refinery consists of a substantial 
brick structure, one story high, one hundred and 
thirty feet in length, aim sixty feet wide, fitted up 
with a powerful steam engino and all the necexHary 
apparatus for melting uud refining metals in lurge 
quantities. The oHicc of the establishment is at 
No. 416 Montgomery street. 

Chemicals. — Although the returns made in this 
department during the past yeur uiiiuunt to only 
about $60,000, the demand for nil urtioles of 
this churacter consumed in the numerous metalluruic, 
photographic, and manufacturing estubjishnients gen- 
erally is steadily increasing. The oidcKt concern of 
this cliiiracter is that of E. iTudson & Co., on Vu- 
lencia, between Fifteenth and Sixteenth streets. The 
operutiona here have been mainly confined to the 
production of acids, this manufactory having, for 
the past twelve years, furnished the nitric, sulphuric, 
>4ud muriatic acids used in the U. S. Branch Mint in 
San Fruncisco. Tlie lurge quantities of nilinte of 
soda used, are im|)ortcd {mm Chile and Mexico; 
and, notwithstanding large beds of sulphur are found 
all ulong this portion of tiie Pacific, the article re- 
quired liere is imported from Europe. 

The Pacific Chemical Works, established by 
Messrs. Fulkenau& lianks, six months ago, on Six- 
teenth, between Folsom and Harrison streets, man- 
nfucturo every article in this line for which there 
is any demand here, and are fully prepared to fill 
all onlers for the trade. Theiruppurut'iH is extensive, 
and they are engaged in the nmnufucture of uci<l8 
and every variety of chemiruls used in nietalliirgic, 
photographic, and other operations — all kinds of 
medical and pharmaceutical preparations, pigments 
;tnd dye-Btutfs. They are also pi'epared to make as- 
says ant' scientific cliemical investigations, analysis 
of mineral waters, our mineral uud metallurgical 
products, and commercial uiticies. 

Salt. — T.iarge deposits of salt are said to exist in 
certain portions of California lying beyond the Sierra 
Nevada Range* and farther simtli in the Territory of 
Arizona. Their distance from navigation, and the 
consequent cost of trttiiB|)ortution, render their work- 
ing impracticable at present. Extensive deposits of 
11 similar character ure found in portions of the State 
of Nevada, from which the large quantities of the 
urticle used in working the silver ores of that region 
are procured. The manufacture of salt from sea- 
water by solar evajwration is Airried on to a consid- 
erable extent in Los Angeles and Alameda Counties, 
ihe latter works being immediatel^y across the Bav 
from Sap Francisco. Xarge quantities of rock salt 
ure also shipped to this market from the mines of 
Carmen Island, on Ihe coast of Lower California. 
Four mills are engaged in grinding the product from 
these sources, while a considenihle portion is used 
ungrouiid for the northern codfish trade, mining pur- 
poses, and pickling meats and vegetaltlei. About 
:i5,000 tons were ground at the mills in this city dur- 
ing the past year. Notwithstanding the extent to 
which the business has already been carried, it may 
he regarded as only in its infancy here. 



Oils and Paints. — One of the most thorough 
and complete establishments for the manufacture of 
oils and paints to be found in the United States has 
been completed, and will shortly go into operation 
in San Francisco. The building, which is located 
on King street, between Second and Third streets, 
near the Bay, is a substantial brick structure on a 
solid rock foundation, and is 43 feet front by 96 deep, 
with four stories and a basement in which the engine 
and the larger portion of the heavy machinery is 
placed. The chimney is ninety-one feet in height. 
The fitty-horse power engine used iu driving the 
extensive inachinerv of this establishment was man- 
ufactured at the Vulcan Iron Works in this city j and 
einbodying all the recent improvements in this de- 
partment, is one of the most perfect s()eciinens of the 
kind ever produced here. A large hopper is located 
in the basement, from which the seed to he crushed 
is ccmveyed to the upper floor, to bo stored in bulk 
until siicii time as it may be needed. A lurKe iron 
tank is also provided for receiving the oil. The two 
tempering stones, located on the second floor, which 
are of solid blocks of Angel Island stone, are seven 
feet in diameter and eighteen inches ucross the edge, 
und are each near five tons in weight. The iron bed 

itiute traversed by them wciglis near 3,000 lbs. 
<^ur rollers for crushing, and three hydraulic pipes, 
are located on the same floor. The third story is 
occupied by the machinery for crushing oil cuke for 
feed, and for other purposes. Tlie machinery, which 
is of a capacity sutncieiTt to crush 4,000 busliels of 
flaxseed |>er week, is calculated for crushing linseed, 
custor-bean, mustard, rape and other seeds msnu- 
fuctured. There is ulso connected with this eatab- 
lislunent u mill for the grinding in ,>il of white lead 
and zinc paints, and the manufacture of every 
variety of paints used in munufuclui es and urts. The 
entire urrangenients have been under the superin- 
tendence und direction of Mr. B. P. Brunner, who 
visited all the pvincipal estuhlishnientsof tlie kind in 
the United Slates and Europe for the purpose of in- 
specting their works ; and this mill is the einbodi- 
uient of his observations. Tiie powerful presses 
used are the inventions of this geiitleinan, patented 
some years since. Nolwithstuii'^'ig the soil and 
climate of California are well adapted to the culture 
ot flux-seed, owing to the want ot a market for this 
product, which druwbuck is obviated by the going 
into <>peration of this manufactory, there has been 
but little of this article raised. Until a siitficient 
quantity can be furnished at home, theciiiiipuiiy will 
be compelled to draw their supplies from Calcutta 
and other countries abroad. The cultivation of the 
castor-beau promising to prove u prolilable crop in 
this regi(Mi, through the introduction of this raunu- 
factory, considerable attontiou is devoted to the sub- 
ject. 

Turpentine, Pitch, and Rosin The manni'ac- 

turing of these articles engages the attention of nu- 
merous enterprising linns in this State and Oregon. 
In Yuba und Butte'Counties the production is nearly 
one hundred tuns per month, which can be increased 
to an almost unlimited extent, us the supply of the 
raw material is abundant. Notwithstanding the low 
prices obtained for these important urticles ot trade 
during the past year, the receipts from the interior 
ure regular, and their production must ufi'ord to those 
engaged in the busiuess u remuuerutivc return. 

Oil RKriNEUiEs. — There are two establishments 
engaged iu the refining of crude petroleum in San 
Francisco, one of which is owned by Stanford 
Brothers, and the other bv Messrs. llayward & 
Coleman ; the first of whicli produced, durinv the 
past year, about 35,000 gallons, and the latter 45,000 
gallons of the refined article, although, owing to the 
nou-aiTivul of a supply of the crude article, operations 
have been slightly interfered with, Mr. Charles Stott 



CA 

has erected « 
Ventura, Sant 
ful operation, 
the tunnels at 
per day. The 
different arlici 
the Atlantic Si 
monstrated thi 
at a cheaper ru 



Potteries.. 

this diameter i 

tery, J. W. Or 

m the munutac 

quality of clay, 

Sacramento t.'oi 

of ware of this 

as for chemical 

order recently 

Works for a nu 

Mxty gallons ea( 

i he pottery of ] 

cipally occupied 

of which u largi 

Marule Wo 

within a year or 

factiire has been 

tent in Sun Fraiu 

pnrtment bein^ ii 

of the man n fact 

ceased, and inst( 

blocks and slahs- 

airect— and work 

tares in this line 

year, amountinir < 

$200,000, with tlie 

future. Thepriru 

business, the I'i(i 

cttled on Jackson 

nrst steam maniif 

which commenced 

employs twenty fl 

menial and furintu 

ofnativeCalitornii 

tones here. The I 

a fine quality of «■ 

P'KKings, El Don 

III J8o7, larjre ,.„ 

for monuments, si 
lend in the State 
'quarry is owned ui 
.Sacramento. D. I 
working u quarry 
which 18 extensive 
nrst work from thit 
liuilding of the Pa 
corner of Californii 
were furnished by ( 
Another extensive 
near Columbia, Ti 

quarry of black, viil 
I pressing want in t 
i the white and clou 
lucer County, con 
I twilroad, and owne 
^ilfie pioneers in thii 
I 'Ills niurhio takes ii 
artupted for niantcia 
imd other purposes. 

, FlSHERtKS._D„r 

tlementhero by the 
excitement und oth 

piit of or dependent 
although it wiw a w< 
quantities of the fln^ 
found all along this , 

[catching of salmoii 



mmi 



CALIFORNIA. MANUFACTURES — MISCELLANEOUS. 105 



lias erected a refining egtabli«1iinent at San Baena- 
Ventura, Sanla ]<arbura County, wi)icl) is in snccegg- 
ful operation. The flow from tlie eipringg, tlirouKli 
tlie tunnels at tliis place, is from five to six barrels 
per day. The petroleum of this const is an entirely 
aiffei'ent article from that produced from the wells of 
the Atlantic States, «ud practical experiment has de- 
monstrated that the refined oil can be produced here 
at a cheaper rate. 

PoTTKHiKS.— There are several establishments of 
this character in San Frur .^isco. At the Mission Pot- 
tery, J. W. Orr has been en^u^red for the past year 
in the manufacture of stone ware from a superior 
nunlity of clay, founo in the southeastern portion of 
Sacramento County. He manufactureo ; jryvarietv 
of ware of this de'scription, in common use, iis well 
as for chemical manipnlutions, amon^ which is an 
order reoenlly lilled for the San Francisco Acid 
Works for a number of condensers of a capacity of 
fiixty gallons each, to be used in their manufactory. 
The pottery of K. Chabot, c*. North ISeacli, is prin- 
cipally occupied by the manufacture of sewer pipe, 
01 which u largo amount is made annually. 

MAHnt.K Work and Quaurieb. — It is only 
within a year or two past that the marble manu- 
facture has been carried on to any considerable ex- 
tent in Sun Francisco — almost everything in this de- 
partment being imported from abroad. Importations 
of the nmnufai'tured article have almost entirely 
ceased, and instead, the material is im|)ortcd in 
blocks and slabs — most of it from the Italian quarries 
direct — unci worked to order here. The manufac- 
tures in this line were largely increased the piist 
year, amounting during that time to not less than 
$'.20U,000, with the prospect of a large advance in the 
future. The principal establishment eiigii(;ed in the 
business, the I'ioneer Steam Marble Works, lo- 
cated on Jackson street below Montgomery — the 
first steam nuinufuctory of this kind in this' city — 
which commenced operations during the past year, 
emplovs twenty five hands upon liuilding, inonu- 
nientul iindfurn'iture work. A ccmsidcrable quantity 
of native Califdruia marble is used in the manufac- 
tories here. The first quarry discovered was that of 
a tine quality of clouded marble located at Indian 
Uiguings, Kl Dorado Co. Since the first working 
iu 186/, large quantities iuive been used, mostly 
fur monuments, some of the finest works of the 
kind in the State being of this material. This 

Suarry is owned and worked by Aitken & Co., of 
acramento. D. P. Myers has recently commenced 
working a quarry nc^ar Drytown, Anuidor County, 
which 18 extensive, nnd of a superior quality. The 
first work from this material is the steps of the new 
building of the Pacific Insurance Company, on tlie 
corner of California and LeidesdorH' streets, wliich 
were furnished l»y the Pacific Steam idarble Works. 
Another extensive quarry is that of John Grnnt, 
near Columbia, Tuolumne Co. The first and only 
((uarry of black, variegated marble — needed to fill a 
pressing want in this particular — the others being 
the white and clouded varieties — is that located in 
Placer County, contiguous to the line of the Pacific 
Itailroad, and owned by James A. Pritchard, one of 
the pione'jrs in this dopurtinent in San Francisco. 
This marble takes a high polish, and is admirably 
adapted for mantels, table tops, mosaic work, tiles, 
and other purposes. 

FiSHERiKS. — During the early years of the set- 
tlement here by the Americans, o'wingto the mining 
excitement and other brunches of business arising 
out of or dependent upon that all-alisorbing matter, 
although it was u well established fact that immense 

?;UantitieB of the finest varieties of fish were to be 
iiuiid all aUing this coast, with the exception of the 
catching of suTinon with nets in the Sacramento and 



San Joaquin Rivers, and the capture of th$ whales 
that occasionally lost their reckoning and sttnyed 
into the Bay of "Monterey, by the enterprising Por- 
tuguese, wlio have made this a paying business, it 
WHS only during the past year that Ihe Imsiness has 
been carried ou to any great extent iu this quarter. 
At the commencemeut of last season a fioet of from 
fifteen to twenty large sized vessels sailed for the 
Sea of Ochotsk*, and other fishing grounds on the 
northwest coast of America. These vessels have all 
been highly successful, returning with full cargoes 
of fish, ana considerable quantities of cod-liver oil, 
which is pronounced by chemists, who have analyzed 
it, to bo a very pure article, and superior to that 
imported. The fisli are caught by I'.aiid lines, imme- 
diately cleaned and salted away in the holds of the 
vessels, in which condition they aro brought here 
and dried on scafiblds, when they are fit for market. 
The average weight of the codfish caught in the 
Sea of Ochotsk , wlien dried, is three and tliree-fourth 
pounds, about half that of those caught on the At- 
lantic side. The fishing season commences in June, 
the fish improving as it advances, the fattest being 
caught by the whalers for their winter's supply dur- 
ing the month of October. The round trip from this 
port usually occupies about four months, allowing 
about forty days' time for fishing. The crews, 
mostly Americans, engaged in fishing range nine 
men to double that number, and the tottil register of 
the vessels employed was about 3,000 tons, and the 
total amount of dried fish did not full slior^ of 
l,riOO toirs, which, at the usual rate of $12 5i per 
100 |Hiunds, will net a handsome sum. Some t f the 
vessels engaged during the past season realized ^s 
high as $15,000 the trip. This flourishing branch of 
business is destined to increase in importance each 
year. A fine quality of halibut is caiiulit along the 
coast of Oregon, and' herring are abundant in these 
V aters. The waters of the southern portion of this 
oast are alive with myriads of sardines, and the 
time will come when, with the product of the olive 
')rchnrd8of California, this delicious little fish will 
DC properly prepared and form a staple of the 
market. 

The oneriitions of the whaling companies in the 
Bay of Sloiiterey and Ciirmelo for the year 18G5, 
are": "Whales caught — California graysj ~6; yield 
of oil, 780 barrels. Huiniibiicks, 12;*yield of oil, 
480 barrels. Total whales, 38 ; total barrels, 1,260. 
The barrel is of the capacity of 32 gallons. The 
early season of I8*i(i has been a good deal better, 
several right whales having been captured." 

The quantity of fish cured and salted for export- 
ation by theCliinese in Monterey Coniily during the 
same year, is calculated to be 2i j tous. 

Furs. — Prior to the settlement of this portion of 
the Pacific Coast by the Americans, aiitl the dis- 
covery of the gold mines, it was more celebrated for 
its extensive fur trade than for any other character- 
istic. The o{ierations of the Hudson Bay Company 
form a prominent portion in the history of the 
North Pacific. Altiiough the production of the 
precious metals has overshadowed this and every 
other branch of the trade of this region, yet the 
traffic in furs here forms a large item. The amount 
of furs annually imported into Sun Francisco from 
the north, including the Asiiftic Coast, is estimated 
at not less than half a million of dollars. Furs are 
sent here from every section of the coast west of 
the Kockv Mountains, extending as far north as the 
linssian I'ossessions, and quantities are yearly im- 
ported from Siberia and Kamschatka. Of the amount 
received here, about $.'i00,ll(HI are exported annually 
to New York and Europe, while the reniuinder, 
about $200,000, are disposed of or manufactured in 
various ways here. Tne following parties are en- 

r:ed in the business in Sun Francisco : A. MuUer, 
Wasserman, and II. Liebes & Co. 



106 



PACIPIO COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 



TABLE . 

Exhibiting the County Seats of the different ConntieB, Li,. hI Dietances, Popalation of 18C0 and 1866, etc. 



C0CNTIE8. 



Alameda 

Alpine 

Amador 

Butte 

Calaveras 

Colusa 

Contra Costa. . . 

Del Norte 

El Domdo 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Kern 

Klamath 

Lake 

Lasson 

Los Anf^L'les 

Karin. 

Mariposa 

Menduciuo 

Mercod 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napa 

Nevada 

riaccr 

Plumas 

Sacramento .... 
San Uernardino 

San Uk'go 

San Frniicisco. . 

San Joaquin 

Bar liuis Obispo 

San Mateo 

Santa linrbara 
Santa C'lHru . . . 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Sierra 

Sislciyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanit^laus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tularo 

TuoUimuo 

Yolo 

Yuba 



County Scat 



i 
Totals...!. 



San Leandr^ 

Silver Mom .ain. . 

.Tack8on 

Orovillc 

San Andreas 

Colusa 

Martinez 

Crescent City 

I'lacervillo 

Millerton 

Kureka 

Independence 

llavilah 

Orleans Itar. . , . . . 

Lakeport 

Susanville 

Los Anseles 

San liarael 

Mariposa 

Ukiah 

Suelling 

Bridgeport 

Montcrt'v , 

Napa City 

Nevada I'ity 

Auburn 

ijuincy 

Sacramento 

San liernardino 

San Diego 

Sun Francisco 

Stockton 

San Luis Obispo. 

lU'dwood Clly 

; Santa Ilarbara . . 

!SanJos6 

iSouta Cruz 

{ Shasta 

Unwnievillo , 

Vreka 

I'airlield 

Santa Kosn 

Kniifht's Kerry.. 

iYubu Citv 

iKedHlulf 

! Wcaverville 

IVisulia 

ISonora 

JVVood'» I 

I^Iarybillo 




13fi 
140 

C5 

75 

60 

75 

90 
465 

60 
190 
890 

t 

t 
460 
120 
200 
550 
136 
145 

t 

115 
260 
245 

60 

65 

85 

146 

.'apifal 

600 
750 
117 

51 
335 
140 
435 
150 
245 
185 
110 
350 

90 
131) 

W) 

50 
146 
255 
250 
115 

16 

50 






1868 
18t>t 
1854 
1860 
1860 
1850 
1860 
1867 
1860 
1856 
1853 
1866 
18G6 
1851 
1801 
1864 

:8uo 

1850 
1850 
1850 
1855 
1861 
1850 
1850 
1851 
1851 
1854 
1860 
1854 
1850 
18j-)6 
1850 
1850 
1860 
1850 
1850 
I860 
1850 
1852 
1852 
1860 
1850 
1854 
1850 
1856 
1851 
1852 
1850 
1860 
1850 



ropulation 
1860. 



8,926 

"l0,933 

12,107 

10,302 

2,274 

6.328 

1,992 

20,562 

4.606 

2,694 



11,336 
8,334 
6.243 
3,967 
1,141 

"' 4.739 
5,516 

16,447 

13,270 
4,3<>3 

24,145 
5,554 
4,826 

56,805 
9,434 
1,782 
3,214 
3.545 

11.912 
4,!)45 
4.360 

11.389 
7,629 
7,170 

11,867 
2.246 
8.390 
4,044 
5,126 
4.6.38 

16,229 
4.716 

13,671 



380.018 



Vote, 1864. 



Clilldren 

undrr IS 

yrs. of age* 

18W. 



2,278 

612 

2.691 

2,866 

8,635 

699 

1,480 

806 

6,071 

451 

685 



261 

618 

654 

1,299 

1,1)95 

1,609 

1,364 

291 

8i)6 

779 

1.328 

4.577 

8,792 

1.497 

5,956 

736 

294 

21,019 

8.276 

408 

977 

423 

3.132 

1,426 

1.471 

3,088 

1,882 

2.163 

4,362 

(i23 

1,263 

846 

1,114 

1,167 

3.156 

1.128 

3,203 



4,681 

231 
2,816 
2,806 
3.600 

966 
2,682 

299 
8,892 

486 

1,601 

28 

■■'197 

995 

426 

3,882 

1,347 

1,258 

2,301 

596 

■ '2.123 
2,176 
4,970 
3,123 

982 
6,914 
1,679 

464 

80,(i94 

6,143 

ma 

1,644 

i.tm 

6,509 
2,780 
1.276 
1.555 
1.727 
4,75r- 
7,585 

940 
1,7.39 
1,016 

728 
1,363 
2,951 
2,125 
3,126 



103,136 ! 137,498 



Estimated 
popi latlon, 
UBB. 



16,430 

■ 'ilm 

9,850 

12.000 

3.180 

8,960 

12,976 
1,680 
6,880 



3.360 
1,420 
12,940 
4,490 
4,170 
7,670 
1,980 

"7,666 
7,260 

16,560 

10410 
3,670 

23.000 

5,260 

1,,'iOO 

102,313 

17,140 
2,850 
5,148 
6,470 

21,696 
9,260 
4,250 
6.1>*0 
5,756 

15,850 

26.280 
3.4ti0 
6.796 
3.386 
2,426 
4.890 
9,836 
7,0S0 

10,420 



Am'tofRcnl 

and Personal 

Property, 

1866. 



94,683,660 

460.000 

1,907,262 

5,128.868 

1,890,667 

1,689,166 

2,544.282 

879,025 

8,476.626 

826.000 

2.200,000 

^600,000 

819,825 

288,089 

896,708 

$750 000 

2,368,892 

2,247.,')71 

1.287 'TO 

1,900,1 »«) 

842.847 

887,961 

l,2>f6.450 

2.797.688 

6,178.887 

2 826.243 

1.192.621 

10,316,976 

695.201 

448,706 

88,402,274 

5,275,016 

768,330 

2,700,000 

771,861 

7.972 899 

1,441.739 

1.091,723 

2.314,0»; 

1,617,822 

8,044,120 

6.846 680 

1,026,216 

1,7I8.2«,S 

1,598,600 

653,1811 

1.299,370 

2,15t).42- 
4,150,500 



456.4.S7 ail97,133,345 



HANKS AND INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

There is prohnbly no oily of tlie sunie poniilntion in nny other portion of tlie world where institntinns 
of t'lis clinrHeter u're in it more lieulthv una tionrlHhinf; condition limn is tlie cnse in Shu Kranciseo. Tlie 
liberal eneouiiigeinent oH'ured liy tlie laws of this State for inveatnientg of this character has been tlic 
means of conreiitraling here, ' large ainoiuit of capital in the.<<e dupartmentH. a conHiilerable portion of 
which comes from aliroad. The profits of banking have been hirge, and the securities ample ; a vast 
amount of foritign tloiitiiig capital, always on the looicout for the safest and most nrolit^tlilc investments, 
bus been diverted to this point. The State law compelling the fiiltillment of gpecitic contracts payable in 

gold coin, has tended to swell the profits of money lenders in California to an enormoiii extent. Tbe 
anking capital employed in San Francisco is estiniated at |30,U00,()0U. The amount invested in the in- 
surance business in San Francisco is proportionately large, and as no losses from fit 1 or murine risks, to 
any considerable extent, have yet accrued in this depaitnient, the proHls have also been liiglily renm- 
nerativo. Almost every species of risk is amply provided for, and the amount of business done, hy both 
home uii'l foreign institutions, is immense, its activitv during the past year baving been ttreatly inereased. 
The capiial invested in the various insti'Aitions of this character in San Francisco aiiiounts to ^.'>,<iOO,000. 

*The figures in the above table rererring to the population of this State for 1866, are taken fVom the report!! 
of the State Su)U'rintendent of Public Schools. Mr. John Swett, and are estimated upon tlie basis that the Msnool 
children uiuUt fittocn years iif ago constitute thirty per cent, of the population. In the absence of official data, 
this is probably as fair a mode as can be adopted to arrive at an approximation of tke population of our State. 
We think, however, that the estimate for San Frauciaoo Is at ]3ut 18,000 too low.— CoMFiLBa 

t Not yet defined by law. t Estimated. 



COITNTIES. 



Alameda 

Alpine 

I Amador 

Buena Vista*. 

Butte ; 

Calaveras.. . , . 

Colusa 

Contra Costa 

Del Norte '.] 

El Dorado .... 

Fresno 

Humboldt..'" 

j"}'ot ": 

Kern 

Klamath.,..'" 

Lake .' ." 

I*»gen. ..,[.'"' 
Los Angeles. ..'.' 

Marin 

Mariposa. ...![' 
Mendocino. . . . . ' 



Merced 

Mono$ .'__■ 

Monterey ...','" 

Napa I" 

Nevada ...'.'."" 

Placer "■ 

Plumas .'.'■■ 

Sacramento. . "' 
San Bernardino." 

San Diego 

San Franciscoif ' 
San Joai)uln . 
San Luis Obispo 
San Mat 00... 
Santa Ilarbara 
Santa Clara ....." 
Santa Cruz. .. 

Sliasta '■ ■ 

Sierra... 
Siskiyou...' ;.'.";" 

Solano ['" 

Sonoma .'.','." 

Stanislaus. 

Sutter .■.'.■j 

Tehama... I 

Trinity. . . 
Tulare .... 
Tuolumne. 
Yolo .... 
Yuba 



ilflls. 



PI 



Amount of IJonds < 
Amount of Honds < 
Amount of Soldier 
Amount of Soldier 



Amount of cash 



in 



Jit 



Heceipts into Slate ' 
•onrces of reve_ 
18<«, to Nov. 3 

t-xcess of Receipt* 



• Vnorganl: 
T Orffanlxoi 

* No debt- 



i 



CALIFORNIA. COUNTY FINANCES 



107 



TABLE 

Of the Finances of the Beveral Connties. 



COUNTIES. 



Alameda 

Alpino 

Amador 

Buona Vista*.... 

Butte 

Calaveras. 

Colusa 

Contra Costa 

Dol Norte 

El Dorado 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyot 

Kern 

Klamath 

Lake 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Marin 

Maripo!ia 

Mendocino 

Merced , 

Mono§ 

Monterey 

Mupa 

Nevada 

Placer 

Plumas , 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino. . 

San Diego , 

San FrnnciscolT 

San Jouquin . 

San Luis Obispo 

San Mateo 

Santa Karbara . . 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulore 

Tuolumne , 

Volo 

Yuba 



Date Return. 



May . . . . 
October, 
March . . 



1866 
1866 
1866 



January, 

August.. 

"eb'y. . 

iiiay.. .. 

May 

April... 
Nov'r. . 
Dec'r . . 



1866 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1866 
18(>6 
1866 



Nov'r. . . 
March . . 
March . . 
Sept. . . . 

Juno 

January. 
July ... 
Nov'r. . . 
May — 



1868 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1866 
18ti6 
1866 
1866 
1866 



Funilcr] 
Debt. 



Rate of 
Interest. 



»34,000!l0pcrct. 
10,000 6pcrot. 



200.000 10 per ct. 
186,176 8 and 10 

34,00r lOporct. 

52,46 lOperct. 



200,000 10 per ct. 



20,430 10 per ct. 



167,900 7porct 



June. , , . 

May 

March . . 
January. 

June 

March . . 

May 

May 

July . . . . 
March . . 
January, 

May 

July.... 
Dec'r.. . 

May 

March . . 
March . . 
May . . . . 
March . . 
April . . . 
August.. 
May . . . . 

June 

March . . 
January, 
Fob'y... 
March . . 
May 



B.060 10 per ct. 
42,857,10 per ot. 



1866; 

1866 
1866 1 
1866! 
18(18; 
18661 
18661 
18«il! 
1886 
1866, 
1866 i 
1866 
1885, 

18(i6; 

1866, 
1868' 
1866! 
18(i6! 
18(i6i 
1866 
18ti«! 
18861 
1868, 
1868; 
1866 
1886 1 
18(i6: 
1886 



28.682 7perct. 
87,000,10 per ct. 



250,000, 8pcrct 



Floating 
Debt. 



»6,658 
11,000 
96,542 



105,000 
10,000 
3,211 
4.688 
27.369 
66,559 
17,473 
13,500 



Assets. 



«il5.B58 
11,000 



27,48V 
1,722 
3,720 

18,869 
4,686 



3,000 

8,624 

51 

17,000 

30,322 

8,299 
46.905 

7,000 
17,000 



82 000 
30,000 



11,500 



17,190 

12,235 

700 

26.928 

7,823 

3,696 

6,000 



2,918 



7*5,171 8 and 10 

14,024 1 7perct. 

80,706 10 per ct. 

4,047,294 6, f & 10 

450,000 7, 8 <t 10 
36.800 10 per ct. 



),500 



8,000 
49,800 



8,000 

34,266 

600 

70,148 

1,017 



40,300 7perct. 
440,000 7, 10 & 12 



69,700 10 per ct. I 
96,'.'&2 7 and 10 
16,500 10 per cf. 
13,800 10 per ct. 



1,200 

6.000 

6,026 

60.398 

51,197 



66,582 



1,401,744 
853,132 



100,000 10 per ct 



81,000 10 per ct. 
40,300 10 per ct. 



183,400 10 per ct. 



14,375 
11,*206 
10,746 
48.000 
28,000 
95,666 
80,131 
16,000 



m,486 
1,500 

175,000 
3,587 
3,808 

4.r 

4,3ii0 

8,000 

t24,600 

13,687 
9,111 

12,000 
4,000 
2,000 

21,600 
5,270 

12,000 



Actual 
Debt. 



824,2001 yr 
10,000 1 yr 
96,642 1 yr 



8105,707 1 

9,137 

40,510 



8100,131 
10,327 
29,340 



277,613 1 yr 

194,453 1 yr 

a3.491 1 yr 

33,286 1 yr 

22,683 lyr 

266,659 lyr 

17,473 lyr 

2,000 1 yr 



3,000 
11,864 



16,300 
171,296 
476 
47,759 
43,857 
17,000 



26,714 

69,000 
22,000 

215,745 
8,000 

665,023 

21,007 

80,005 

3,485,650 

1196,868 
36,800 



40,000 

270,000 

2.439 

46,590 

46,402 

65,340 

149,834 



■ >;nls 1 88,513,757 - 1,046,828 82,403,115 



14,608 
2,096 
98,746 
44,000 
62,000 

114,808 
24,855 

187,400 



87,179,139 



1 yr 
1 yr 
1 yr 



lyr 
lyr 
1 yr 
lyr 



1 yr 
lyr 

ly 

lyr 
1 yr 



111,728 

84,578 1 
24,1131 
4t,275! 
14,6961 
1(13,790! 
11.154! 
25,000 



10,573 
1,199 
8,608 



32,072 
81,059 
a5,000 
13,000 



58,790 

90,5'2O 

29,5.32 

890,780 

7.510 



lyr 
lyr 
lyr 
lyr 
1 yr 
lyr 
lyr 
lyri 
lyrj 
lyri 
1 vr; 
lyr 
lyr 
1 yr 
lyr 
1 yr 
1 yr 
1 vri 



1.624.408 

102 638 

13,832 

67,434 

18n,(K)0 
27,497 
30,ii.81 
79,81.3 
32,974 
59.473 
72,000 
20,792 
14,701 
30,(100 
17,5(H) 
18,000 
83,9,30 
47,927 



I 



90,239 
82,856 
20,894 
32,092 
10,010 
95,666 
10,287 
21,560 



7,269 

8,486 

14,121 



33,135 
83,916 
84,000 
16,000 



68,790 

88,426 

29,596 

878,2.38 

6,692 



1,487,281 
97,695 
10,798 
64,950 
9,086 
190,000 
26,650 
25.900 
71,187 
84,294 
86,691 
48,000 
14,221 
12,168 
16,000 
22,000 
16,000 
64,986 
42,651 



FUNDED DEBT, STATE OP CALIFORNIA, JANUARY 1, 18G7. 

Amount of llonds ontstHndiiiff niider Act of April 27, 18,57 |3,5S),500 00 

Amount of Honds outstimdintt under Act of April 28, 1800 187,.'>00 00 

Amount of SoldicrB' Relief lionds oiilstundinf; 5'.20,000 00 

Amount of Soldiers' Bounty Bonds outstanding . 1 ,0^8,000 00 

Tot«l Funded Debt (interest at 7 per cent, per annum) $.'),;i'i2,0n0 00 

Amount of cash in the Treasury December 31, I8()6 1,5-24,847 02 

Total actual debt $3,797,152 98 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES— STATE or CALIFORNIA. 



Rccciptt. 

Receipts into State Treasury from all 

sources of reveime, from Dec. 1, 

1805, to Nov. 30, 18Cti |3,84I,716 82 

Excess of Receipts over Expenditures.' 



Expendituret. 
Expenditures for all pnrpoees from 
Dec. 1, 1865, to Nov. 30, 1866... 



$3,623,271 87 
$218,444 95 



* Unorganized. 

t OrKSnlzed 1866. No debt 

i No debt— cash on hand. 



I Returns refused. A small floating debt 

II Also •310,(X)0 In railroad bonds, etc. 

i City and County consolldatwl 1896; entire debt flinded. 



I 

raid 



n : ■! 



108 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 



OFFICIAL RETURNS OF CALIFORNIi^ .• 

Elections ot 1860, 1861, 1863 and 1864. 





Fbesidedt, 1860. 


(iOVERNOB, 


IWl. 


OOVBBMOB, 1863 


President, 1864 


COUNTIES. 


i" 

a 
p 


1 
t 


a 

1 




en 


? 


• 

1 




r 


f 


i 

3 


Alameda 


1,033 


518 


481 


62 


1,932 


611 


868 


1,404 


804 


1,470 
384 

1.392 

1,739 

2.070 
274 
958 
167 

2,948 
92 
423 
139 
212 
318 
65 V 
686 
767 
676 
78 
167 
415 
735 

2.784 

2,310 
828 

4,193 

243 

97 

12,667 

1,849 
259 
600 
343 

1,930 
975 
909 

2,051 
924 

1,266 

2,026 
277 
677 
482 
t«W 
628 

1,589 
653 

1,871 

69,531 


811 




228 


Amador 


995 

1,437 

978 

268 

608 

176 

2,119 

63 

835 

92 


1,866 

1,602 

J, 880 

236 

413 

88 

2,695 

22 

444 

877 


945 178 

1,173 826 

1,717 240 

386 78 

391 134 

217 39 

1.901 834 

271 123 

232 20 

163 33 


1,299 

1,782 

1,980 

348 

959 

172 

2,775 

64 

402 

198 

92 


1,258 

1,284 

1,606 

198 

298 

64 

2,202 

78 

81K) 

235 

54 


827 

1,106 

1,572 

581 

830 

213 

1,870 

818 

2<>6 

301 

167 


2,245 
1,876 
2,278 

479 
1,064 

184 

3,210 

83 

602 

204 


2,064 

1,490 

2,029 

5«V1 

634 

152 

2,139 

878 

196 

199 


1,199 


Butte 


1,116 


Calaveras 


1,664 


Colusa 

Contra Costa 


426 
622 


Del Norte. 


139 


El Dorado 


2,122 


Fresno 


859 


Humboldt 


262 


Klamath 

Lake 


122 

406 
















283 




352 
408 
262 
198 
42 


475 
282 
489 
235 
62 


688 2 
286 

816 S 
499 1 
233 


!01 
38 
19 
16 
64 


455 

591 

666 

491 

69 

360 

499 

767 

3,2.50 

2,222 

659 

3,264 

297 

122 

10,728 

1,837 

176 

702 

131 

1,995 

916 

628 

2.147 

1.168 

1,449 

1.608 

247 

658 

405 

888 

163 

2,025 

726 

2,014 

66,036 


198 

206 

687 

273 

87 

518 

305 

277 

1,521 

1,403 

602 

2,836 

261 

52 

3,178 

414 

102 

383 

436 

371 

183 

l,(t76 

1,200 

1,280 

456 

879 

231 

291 

368 

777 

33'i 

976 

367 

869 


1,195 
300 
710 
659 
309 

r?s 

Ld6 
658 

1,779 
898 
517 

1,127 

401 

90 

1,243 

1,688 

200 

100 

24 

1,081 
367 
628 

1,423 
717 
689 

1,616 
416 
570 
507 
608 
670 

i,(a6 
694 

1,426 


702 

640 

836 

632 

96 

1,009 

622 

898 

2,882 

2,067 

1,288 

3.653 

3'il 

116 

9,261 

1,981 

260 

834 

481 

2,084 

904 

936 

2,.380 

1,053 

1,521 

1,700 

847 

718 

633 

785 

1,818 

610 

8*i6 

1,989 


982 
489 
921 
571 
329 
695 
607 
660 

1,766 

1,620 
766 

1,944 
376 
132 

6,452 

1,473 
219 
340 
143 

1,52.5 
403 
617 

1,.303 
999 

1.124 

1,712 
399 
679 
453 
604 

1,8(H 
715 
768 

1,393 


744 


Marin 


410 


Mariposa 


842 


Mendocino 


778 


Morced 


218 




188 


Monterey 

Napa 

Nevada 


306 
441 

2,539 

1,748 
468 

2,670 

305 

81 

6,825 

1,181 

148 

889 

46 

1,463 
670 
464 

1,468 
956 
681 

1,236 
167 
403 
243 
593 
181 

1,638 
635 

1,665 


233 

618 

2,373 

1,858 

503 

2,836 

224 

29 

4,035 

783 

120 

543 

306 

881 

28* 

1,094 

1.589 

1,503 

603 

611 

232 

441 

496 

885 

211 

1,608 

497 

1,360 


246 

f.79 1 
1.653 4 
1,448 7 

453 S 
1,684 £ 

lit2 

148 
2,560 8 
1,.373 1 

155 ... 

131J 

123 !... 

722 1 

319 1 

685 2 
1,347 a 

760 6 

746 2 
1,467 4 

4.33 

440 

311 2 

516 1 

574 4 
2,0.34 a 

606 
1,874 1 


■4 
41 
100 
75 
11 
162 
98 

8 
140 
99 

41' 

if 

29 
.52 
189 
16 
92 
49 
67 
40 
58 
53 
08 
72 
74 
_59_ 

36 


364 

692 

1,79& 


Placer 


1,474 


Plumas 


669 


8acrnmento 


1,768 


San Bernardino 

San Diogo 


493 
197 


San Francisco 


8,352 

1,427 

149 

877 

80 


San Joaijuin 


San Luis ubispo 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara 


Santa Clara 


1,202 
462 


Santa Cruz 


Shasta 

Siorra 


662 

1,037 

957 


Siskiyou 


Solano 


908 


Sonoma 

Stanislaus 


2,336 
846 


Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 


686 
633 
461 


Tulare 


689 


Tuolumne 


1,606 
476 


Yolo 


Yuba 


1,333 


Totals 


38,739 


38,020 


33,976 |9,1 


30,944 


32,760 


60,124 


44,482 


43,863 





STATISTICS-PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO.t 

Treasure.— Tho total sliipmeut from Sun B^runcisco from 1819 to 1866, both iaclueive, in i789,183,603. 
Amount m ISC.C, |I4,364,393. 

I},ipor/ n.—'riimmge emplo\ -d 1865, 708,6.')6 tung; 1866, 748,28:1 tuna. 

Exports.— ilerchttudm!, value, |17,303,018 j treaeuie, 144,364,393. Total, $61 ,667,411. 

FEDERAL RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES-PACIFIC COAST, 1866. 

Receipts. Expenditures. 

Duties on imjwrts, etc $7,4.'')5,913| Army service $9,919,330 

Internal revemie 7,609,433; Naval service 650,000 

Sulo of slumps 455,000 Revenue service 725,525 

Post Office Depurtraent 201,500 Postal service 372,380 

Miscellaneous 



240,000 



Total in coin uud currency |15,96I,846 



Miscellaneous . 



380,150 



Total in currency > |12,047,385 



* In Oclnlicr, 1X6.1. an eloctlon wig held for Judge of the Supreme Court, nt which about 65,000 votes were polled, 
rcsultinK III thir clccllon of H. W. Handersoa over H. U. Hartley by about 7,000 majority. 
t Compiled trnm the Mercantile Uozette. 



One of the 

exhibited by tl 

extending theii 

The number 
nearly 150,000 
there are a na 



County 



Butte 

Contra Costa. 
Pel Norte . . . 

El Dorado 

Humboldt 



Klamath 

Monterey. ..i. 

Napa 

Nevada ." 

Placer 

Plumas * 



Sacramento 



Snn Froncisco! 



I San Joaquin. 

San Mateo .. 

i Santa Clara.'." 



Santa Cruz . 

Shasta 

Siskiyotf 



Solano 



I II 

I Stanislaus 
.'Sutler ... 
Triuity. . . 

Vuba 




The public lilirnric 
Ij Association numberii 
|iie8rly 16,000 volun 
Biwordsof these, BiK 
I reading people. Sev 
jail the leading paper 
[alaodard works. 



9,919,;«0 
f)50,(HtO 
725,525 
372,380 
380,150 



CALIFORNIA, 



LIBRARIB8 



109 



LIBRARIES-PUBLIC AND SOCIETY. 

One of the moat gratifying evidences of the growing litemry tfwtea of the people of this State is 
exhibited by the increase of libraries and literary aswciations, and the interest manifested generally in 
extending their itphere of nsefiilness. 

The number of libraries in the State, with over 200 volumes each, is 50— containing an aggregate of 
nearly 150,000 volume*. This enumeration does not include School and Sunday School libraries, of which 
there are a number scattered throughout the State. 

TABLE OF LIURARIES IN CALIFOKNIA. 



County. 



Butte 

Contra Costa. 
Del Norte . . . 
El Dorado. . . 
Humboldt . . . 



Klamath . 
Monterey. 

Napa 

Nevada . . 

Placer 

Plumas. . . 



Sacnimento 



San Francisco . 



San Joaquin. 
Snn Mateo .. 
Santa Clara.. 



Santa Cruz . 

Shasta 

Siskiyotf 



Solano 



Stanislaus . 

Sutler 

Trinity. . . . 

Yolo 

Yuba 



Location. 



Kame. 



Ladies' 

Library Association. 

Union Club 

Neptune , 



Oroville 

Pacheco 

Crescent City 

Placerville 

Areata I Areata Association 

Eureka | Eureka Association 

Sawyer's Bar 

Monterey 

Napa City 

Nevada 

Auburn 

Spanish Ranch 

Meadow Valley 

Sacramento 



0;ld Fellows 

Library Association 

OddlVllows 

Library Association 

Odd Fellows 

Library Association 

Library Association 

Odd Fellows 

Li brary Association 

8t«te Library 

State Agricultuml Society 

San Francisco | Acadeinv of Natural Sciences. 

Law Librarv 

Mechanics' Institute 

Mercantile Association 

Odd Fellows' Association .... 

Pioneer AHS(M:iatiun 

Public School 

St. Mary's Association 

Superintendent Public Instruct'n 

Verein Association 

What Cheer House 

Young Men's Christian Assoc'n 

Stockton I Insane Asvlum 

" !Odd Fellows 

Redwood City ' Franklin Association 

Woodside .. 

San Just* 

Santa Clara 
Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Yrektt 

Oro Fino.. 
Scott River 
Benicia. ... 



l)nto of I 
OrKaiiiza- 
tlon. 

18.58 
18iil 
18(;3 
1858 
18()0 
18(i0 
18()0 
18li> 
18(i(> 
18;')t> 
IStiii 
1857 
1858 
1855 
1857 
1850 



Vallejo 

Knight's Ferry . 

Yulw City , 

Weaverville . . . 

Woodland 

Marysviile 



■ 



Woodside Association 

Academy of Notre Dame 

College 

Literary and Debating Society 

Library Association 

I^iadies Association 

Library Association 

South Fork Association 

Benicia College 

St. Catherine's Academy 

Y'oung I^iiidies' Seminary 

Library Association. . . .'. 

Public Library 

Enterprise ]x>dge 

Odd Fellows 

Hesperian Societv 

High School....: 

MaVysville Library 

Odd Fellows 



So. Vols. 

1,000 
200 
250 

1,500 
800 
600 
350 

1,000 
275 

3,000 
250 
500 
400 

4,000 

4,500 
30,000 

2;ooo 



1853 


1,000 


i8i;o 


t • ■ ■ ■ 


1855 


8,000 


1853 


24,000 


18.55 


16,000 


1850 


2,0(M) 


181)3 


2,500 


1855 


2,000 


1850 


1,.500 


1851 


4,500 


18.j(> 


5,000 


1853 


3,000 


1855 


1,000 


18.55 


1,500 


]8(iG 


250 


1857 


600 


1851 


1,500 


1850 


2,500 


18(50 


200 


1858 


500 


18.57 


300 


18t>2 


583 


1804 


623 


1850 


1,000 


1850 


300 


1854 


500 


18t)0 


800 


ISGO 


1,000 


ia')0 


400 


181)0 


240 


1862 


200 


1800 


1,000 


1856 


3,000 


1860 


1,500 



The public libraries of San Francisco are numerous and wall supplied, that of the Mercantile Library 
Association numbering 24,000 volumes. Mechanics' Institute 8,000 volumes, and the Odd Fellows' Library 
nearly 16,000 volumes, including many valuable works relating to the early history of this coast. The 
records of these, and other institutions of a similar character, prove that Californians are essentially a 
reading people. Several of the hotels are supplied with ample libraries and reading-rooms, furnished with 
all the leading papers, for the accommodation of their guests. One of these contains 5,000 volumes of 
atandard works. 



nt 



110 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



NEWSPAPER AND PERIODICAL PRESS. 
There are one hundred and thirty-two different newRpiipora and periodicals published in the St ite of Cul- 
ifomia: of which, twenty -six are issued daily; two, triweekly; live, semiweekly ; eiKhty eight, 
weekly; one, tri-monthly ; one, semi-monthly ; eight, monthly, and one bimonthly. In addition to the 
regular isHues of these publications, live of the dailies issue steamer editions, and twelve issue weekly 
editions— making a total of one hundred and forty-nine publications, viz: daily, twenty-six; triweekly, 
two; semi- weekly, live; weekly, one hundred ; tri-monthly, one; semi-monthly, one; steamer, ttvei 
monthly, eight ; and bi-monthly, one. Seven are published in foreign languages, two in French, two in 
German, one each in Spanish, Italian, and Chinese. There are Kfty different publications issued in Sail 
Francisco; live in Sacramento ; two in Stockton ; and two iu Marysville. 

LIST OF NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS, 

Published in California, with the Locality and Time of Publication, Name of Publisher, etc., etc., 

February l.'ith, 1807. 



County. 



Nnnie. 



Alameda ; Gazette 

" ■ News 

Alpine ' Hulletin 

" {Chronicle 

" I Miner 

Amador j Dispatch 

" ! Leoger 

Butte ; Couraut 

" JRccord 

Calaveras ! Chi-onicle 

" j Courier •-.. 

" I Register 

Colusa I Sun 

Contra Costa ■ .. jGuzette 

" " ... Pacilic Cumb. Presbyter. 

El Dorado [Courier 

*' " I Mountain Democrat 

Hnmboldt Journal 

Times 

Kern Courier 

Lake Clear Lake Courier 

Clear Lake Sentinel .... 

Lassen Sage P->jsb 

Los Angeles Tournal 

News 

Marin Journal 

Mariposti Gazette 

Mail 

Democrat 

Herald 

Herald 

Gazette *. 

Register 

Reporter 

Gazette 

National 

Sun 

Transcript 

Union 

Placer Euciuirer 

» Herald 

" Stars and Stripes 

Plumas National '. . . 

" Union 

Sacramento Bee 

" I California Express 

'* I Record 

" I Rescue 

Telegraph 

Union 

San Bernardino. Southern Guardian 

San Francisco... Abend Post 

AltH California 

Baimcr of Progress 

California and China Mail 

California Demokrat 

California Farmer 



Mendocino. 



Merced .. 
Slonterey 
Napa 

Nevada . . 



Lucallt.vori'ubll- 
cntliin. 



San I^andro 

Oakland 

Silver .Mountain. 
Murkleeville . ., 

Monitor 

Jackson 



Chico 

Oroville 

Mokelumne Hill. 
Copperopolis.... 
Siui Andreas.... 

Colusa 

Pacheco 

Alamo 

Plucerville 



Eureka. 



Huvilah 

Lakeport 

I»wer Ijuke.. 
Siisanville .... 
Wilmington .. 
Los Angeles .. 
Sun Rafael.... 
Mnriposa 



Ukiab City. 



Snelling . . . 
Monterev. . 
Napa Cfty. 



Nevada City... 
Grass Valley... 
Meadow I.iake . 
Nevada C'ity... 
Grass VulleV ■• • 
Dutch Flat".... 
Aubnrn 



Quincy 



Sacramento. 



Folsom 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino . 
San Francisco . . 



When iMued. 



Weeklv .. .. 
Daily &, W. 

Weeklv 

Semi-Week. 
Weekly.... 



Semi- Week. 
Weekly .... 



D. and W.. 
Daily 



Semi-Week. 
Weekly . . . . 



Daily 

I), and W... 

Daily 

Weekly.... 

D.W.&Sfr. 
Weekly .... 
D. and W... 
D.W.&Sfr. 

Weeklv 

Monthly.... 

Daily 

Weekly 



Vol 



\'i 
2 
2 
4 
3 
8 

12 
2 

14 

16 
2 
4 
6 
U 
7 
1 

14 
2 

13 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 

17 
6 

12 
1 
2 
7 
2 
4 
4 

10 
6 

18 
1 

13 
5 
7 

15 
4 
1 
5 

21 

16 
1 
3 

10 

32 
1 
7 

19 
1 
1 

11 

27 



I'ubllshcn. 



Saul Sl Nye. 
(iiigan & Co. 
W.O. Hayes. 
RolMsrt M. Folgor. 
8. G. Lewis. 
Penry Sl Page. 
TlionuM A. Springer. 
A. W. Bishop. 
William DoMott. 
Chronicle Pub. Co. 
Ransom Ac Belniui, 
KanHom,Be'm& Denig. 
W. 8. Gi-eeii. 
Bunker At Porter. 
T. M. Johnsun. 
Myers Sl Yurnell. 
Dan. W. Gelwicks. 
J. B. Buociis, Jr. 
J. E. Wyman. [Co. 
Huvilah Print. Sl Pub. 
J. H. F. Farley. 

D. M. HaiiBoin. 
A. C. I.iongniure. 

A. A. Polhamus Sl Co. 
A. J. King & Co. 
Jerome A. Barney. 

A. M. Swaney. 
Angeviue Reynolds. 
Mat. Lynch. 

E. R. Budd. 

J. W. Robertson. 
tT. Selwyn Brittuin. 
R. T. Mfuitgomery. 
Ijunk Higgins Sc Co. 
E. F. Bean. 
National Publish'g Co. 
W. Lyon & Co. 
Brown Sl Deal. 
Byrne Sl Mitvhell. 

E. B. Boust. 

T. & C. H. Mitchell. 

W. A. Selkirk. 

H. L. Gear. 

W. W. Kellogg. 

L. P. Davis & Co. 

Express Publishing Co. 

Association. 

Wm. A. Mills, Editor. 

P. J. Hopper. 

James Anthony Sl Co. 

H. Hamilton. 

Leo. Eloesser Sl Co. 

Fred. MacCrellisb Sl Co 

B. Todd Sl Co. 

F. Marriott. 
F. Hess Sl Co. 
Warren Sc Co. 



CAI 

County. 
I San Franc^co 



CALIFORNIA. NEWSPAPBR AMD PERIODICAL PRESS. Ill 



NEWSPAPRRS AND PKBIODICAT.S— CONCLUDED. 



County. 



Kama. 



San Franc^co. .. CiilifoiniH Police Gnzettu. 

" " ....jCHlifoniitt Teacbbr 

" " ....ICalifornian 

Cliri»tian Advocate 

Coninierrinl Uecord 

Coiirrier (le Sun Francisco 

Dramatic Clii-onidu 

El Niievu MunUo 

Elevator 

Evangel 

Evening Dulletin 

Evening Uifpatch 

Every Day Lii'o 

Examiner 

jOlad Titlingg 

(loldttn Era 

(luide 

I Hebrew 

I ilelirew Olinerver 

'InduBtrial Magazine.... 

j IriHJi Nc WR 

J L' Ecu Delia Patria 

IjB National 

I Medical and SarvicalJoiir 

j Mercantile Gazette 

I Mining Si Suientitic Preos. 

iMonitur 

Morning Call 

New Age 

News Letter 

. j ( Accidental and Vanguard. 

. I Uur Ma/.e|)|ia 

. Paciltc 

. I Pacitio Appeal 

.Il'acilio Law Magazine... 

. Pacilic Pioneer 

. 'Keal EHtate Circular 

. I Spectator 

. : Spirit of the Timex 

. I Stock Circular 

.1 Sunday Mercury 

.iTemperance Uainier 

.iTimeH 

. I World's Cri»i8 

j San Joaquin Herald 

I " " .... Inde|)endent 

I " " .... MesHenger 

1 San Mateo ! ( iazette 

iSantaClaru {Argus 

" " iMercury 

" " Patriot 

Santa Cruz Pajaro Valley Times 

" " Sentinel 

Sliaata Conner 

Sierra Advocate 

" Mountain Messenger 

Siskiyou lounial 

" Union 

Solano Herald 

■' I PresH 

Sonoma ! Democrat 

" I Democratic Standard . . . . 

Journal and Argus 



Locality olTubll- 
catlon. 



When Itaued. 



San Francisco. 



Tehama . 



Trinity. 
Tulare . 



Taolumne 



Yolo. 
Yuba. 



Independent 

Sentinel 

Journal 

Delta 

Literary Ledger... 

Times 

Citizen 

Henild 

Union Democrat . . 

News 

Appeal 

North Californlan , 



Stockton. 



Woodbridge ... 

Redwood City 

San Jos6 

it It 

It 11 

Santa Cruz 

It II 



Yreka 

II 

Suisun City. 
It It 

Santa Rosa . 
Healdsburg. 
Petaluina .. 
UedUluti... 



Columbia. 
Sonora . . . 



Woodland . 
Marysville. 



Weekly 

Month {y.... 
Weekly .... 
Weekly.... 
Semi- Week. 
D.W.&Sfr. 

Daily 

Tri-VV'eekly. 
Weekly.... 
Semi- Month. 
D.W.&St'r. 

Daily 

Monthly.... 
D. HiidW... 
Monthly.... 
Weekly .... 
Tri-Weckly. 

Weekly.... 

It 

Monthly 

Weekly .... 

Semi -Week. 

Weekly.... 

Hi Monthly. 

Tri Monthly. 

Weekly.... 
II 

Daily ...'.". 
Wfee'kly 



Monthly... 
Weekly... 
Monthly . . . 
Weekly ... 



D.W.&St'r. 
Monthly.... 
Daily ."..... 
D. andW... 
Weekly .... 



Vol. 



Shasta 

Downioville .... 



Weayerville . . . . 
Visalia 



D. andW.. 
Weekly... 



D. andW- 
Daily ..... 



8 
4 
6 
15 
2 
2 
5 
7 
2 

4 

23 

1 

1 

4 

1 
15 

4 

4 
22 

1 

7 

4 

4 

10 
IG 
14 

9 
21 

3 
l(i 

2 

3 

ir> 

5 

1 

5 

1 

2 
24 

4 
10 

1 
3 

4 
6 
2 

8 

2 

14 

4 

4 

11 

15 

2 

13 
14 
15 
12 

5 
10 

2 

13 
7 
1 

12 

8 

2 

1 

1 

2 

13 

15 

15 

1 



ruhllahen. 



F. S. Harlow & Bro. 
Cal. Edncational Soo. 
UogarduB Si, Bowman. 
Comniitteu. 
C. A. Gardner. 

E. Derbec. 

Chas. DeYoung & Co. 

F. P. Kamirvz.' 
P. A. Bell. 
Stephen Hilton. 

San Fran. Bulletin Co. 
H. M. Bideii Sl Co. 
Mrs. Wush'tou Wright. 
Moss & Co. 
C»(.y Tract Society. 
Brooks Si. Lawrence. 
Bishop Sl Co. 
Pliilo Jacoby. 
William Saulburg. 
W. F. UuHsell. 
Jett'rey Nuuau. 
F. Biesta. 

Theodore Tliiele & Co. 
Henry Gibbons. 

E. D. Waters & Co. 
Dewey & Co. 
Lyons & Hurry. 

B. ForHter Si, Co. 
NorcroBS &. Davisson. 

F. Marriott. 

Occid. St. Vang'd Ass'n. 
T. De M. Ilyllon. 
Trustees. 

P. Anderson & Co. 
F. Clarke. 
Smith & Co. 
(.;. D. Carter. 
Key. O. P. Fitzgerald. 
Chase & Boruck. 
J. H. Carmany. 
J. MacD. Foard & Co. 
B. F. Pinkhuin Sc Co. 
Times Publishing Co. 
J. L. Hopkins. 
William Biven. 
N. E. White & Co. 
J. D. Spencer. 
ScoHeld Si. Warren. 
W. A. Jannarv. 
Owen & Cottle. 
F.B.Murdocb. [Duchow 
Kearney, McQuillan & 
Kooeer Si McPhersou. 
John J. Conmy. 
John M. Dormer, 
Dewey & Vaughn. 
Robert Ni.xon. 
William Irwin. 
O. B. Powers Si, Co. 
( jeo. A. Gillespie Sl Co. 
T. L. Thonipsou. 
John B. Fitch. 
Samuel Cussiday. 
W. M. Rockwell. 
A. Townsend St, Co. 
David E. Gordon. 
Henry M. BriggH. 
Visalia Lyceum. 
R. H. Shearer. 
W. G. Diiismore. 
Brunton Si, CofBn. 
A. N. Francisco. 
Orover & St. Louis. 
Appeal Association. 
W. L. Cowan. 



112 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

When the yontli of onr State !i tiiken into cangidoratUtn, tlie number and extent of the Public Schools 
of California in a source of pride to her citizens. lu no other Stuto Ium a more lilioral support been Kiven 
by the government to this clnss of institutions, iind in no other iwrtion of the Americun Union has more 
willing or heullhy aid been extended to the cause of education among the great mass of the people. The 
Public Schotils of every portion of the Slate are in the most flourishing condition ; and in Han Francisco, 
some of the edifices erected by this department will not sufler in comparison with many of the buildings 
of the flrst class colleges of the Kastem States. 

Statistics or IHtiti. — Total number of children in the State between Ave and fifteen, 84,179; nnder 
fifteen, 5'V.M ; total, lU0,nO». Number of children attending Public Schools, 3t),<J0r>; attending private 
schools, 15,071 i total, 53,.''>77. Total cxpeuditures for school purposes, |36!),^£). The school property of 
the State is valued at $1,!;>0C,5U8. 

COLLEGES. 

The Collegiate nnd other institutions of learning in Ciilifornia are a credit to the intelligence and liber- 
ality of the 8t4ite. They are well supported and in a flourishing condition. There are five first class 
institutions of tills chiiructer empowered to confer the customary degrees. Taken in the onler of seniority, 
there are the three Colleges under the direction of the Catholic denomination. Suutii Clara College, located 
about three miles distant from Sun Jos<^, on the line of the railroad between that place and San Francisco ; 
St. Ignatius (^'ollege, the extensive buildings of which are situated on Market street, S^n Francisco ; and 
St. Mary's College, about four miles from the city. The Toliind Medical College, the elegufnt building of 
which is located at the foot of Stockton street, near the Hay, is the only institution of its class in the 
Stale. The College of California, in Oakland, directly acrons the Hay from San Francisco, is in a higlily 
flourishing condition. The biiildings provided for the accommodation of students in each of these are 
ample, nnd littcd with all the appliances necessary for acquiring a thorough education in every de- 
partment of science. Tlie Uenorul Government having made the liberal donation of l.W,0(M) acres of the 
public lands lying within lier borders to the State of California 'or this pur|)08e, at the last session of the 
Legislature an Act was passed creating the Agricultural, Mining, and Mechanic Arts College. A Hoard of 
Trustees, elected at the same seHHion, (luring the past reason visited the most eligible localities in the State, 
to select the most favorable site for this institution, but have not yet made a decision in the premises. 

RAILROADS. 

Among the most striking indications of the rapid progress of the State of California, and Ihe healthy 
and ])ro8|)ei'ou8 condition of her aftiiirs, is the system of railroads she bus so liberally aided and encouraged. 
Every assistance has been extended to enteq)rises of this character, by the State Government ; and this 
wise policy bus had a marked cfl'ect upon the public prosperity. While the iron links of the great national 
chaiu, that is to bind more tiriiily together the Atlantic and Pacific portions of the Union, are steadily 
progressing — the lesser but highly important enterprises of this character here, have not been neglected. 
The number of miles completed and in running order, three hundred and thirty. This is exclusive of 
nearly thirty miles of street rnilroadH in San Francisco. The following is a list of these improvements, 
destined to confer a lasting benelit upon our State and this portion of the Pacific Coast. The first in point 
of magnitude nnd importance is the— 

Centraf, Pacific Railuoad. — This great work, which is to connect with that of a similar character, 
steadily progressing in this direction from the Atlantic side, was commenced in 186.3, Ninety-three and a 
half miles of the road have been completed, and the cars are running regularly to Cisco — a point but u 
few miles from the summit of tbe sierra Nevada Range. Extensive preparations are making to prosecute 
the work witli vigor during the coming season ; and in the course of another year this great barrier will 
be overcome. In a few years more, what was not long since conceded to be the work of a lifetime, will 
be entirely completed. 

Saciiamento Valley Railroad. — Although this line extends but a distance of twenty-two and a half 
miles, from Sacramento to Fobom, it is deserving of prominence on account of being the first work of tliu 
kind commenced in California. 

San Francisco and San Jose Railroad.— This road, connecting San Francisco with Santa Clara 
Valley and the extensive agricultural regions south of that flourishing locality, exercises an important 
influence upon the public prosi)erity. This road was incorporated in 186(), with a ca|)ital stock of 
$2,000,000. In three years from that time, the entire length — fifty miles — was completed, and the cars 
running, with a steadily increasing business. 

Western Pacific Railroad.— This work, which is to form a connecting link between the San 
Francisco and San Josd Railroad and the Central Pacific, in the laying down a track from San Jos6 to 
Stockton, and from thence to Sacramento, was incorporated in 1863, with a capital of $5,400,000. It is 



OAL 

designed us tl 

between San 

completed, pr 

In addition 

mento V«||ey 

Central, from 

completed) ; tl 

from Stockton 

-''«ywo,)d, fou 

Point to Clint 

I Thi South I 

route indicated 

devoid of siiov^ 

was organized 

Jo a point on tli 

Mexico and Ai 

Government, to 

Other r>»„ 

Northern Califo 

doiiated six tho.i 

or Oregon havii 

the rate of sevei 

'.here is also a s 

h'"'e- A similar 

, The State Telei 
most important p! 
niuniculion betw, 
progress of constr 
encircle the worl 
National Telegran 
ooniinent, which,' 

UW'- A bill ha 
tlie (lovernment tl 
'no ri^ht to constri 
of using timber an 
signifies the inten 
m operation in t 
and the colony of 

I Tlie facilities af 
! being ample, there 
Potrero to HIack 1 
fleet engaged in tl 
act v,ty prevailed i 
tliat time will give 
'll<i00t<,iis,tl.r«e, 
Sloops, three , Bnn 
tlie extensive C 
I'een used in repni 
allowed their use 1 
with a capacity sntf 
lue present vearrai 
point on the Bay be 

There are a Ian 
I i« be found interspe! 
I water from the Nun 

rhe difterent varieti 

"upregnated with si 

J lie Geysers, situat, 

|n«tDrarcurio'sitie8„; 

Ir, . ^'-^P*"' which 
I State. The whites 
I Ins region. The W 
VJosO, owing to their 

IZi-"'- '^''« "'" S 
[•lulancearediflicult 



|,,i"«w and import. 
I^!^*';.^" *>«>'cisco 
Jmodationshavebeenr 
r^^P^T»o«8 and objj 



CALIFORNIA, 



RAILROADS — BUSINESS COLLEGE 



'118 



the San 

1 J086 tfl 

loo. It >» ! 



designed m the Western Division of the Pnciflc Kailroad. Considerable woric has been done on the line 
between Sun Jos*) uud Stocliton, and the surveys between tlie iatter point and 8ucruniento have been 
completed, preparntory to the resimmtion of operations. 

In addition to the al)ove, the following are in successful operation, vis : Tho I'JHcervillo and Sacra- 
mento Valley, extends from Koliioni to Hhingle Springs, a distance nf twenty -si.x miles ; tlie Culifornia 
Central, from Foltoni to Lincoln, twenty-one miles; tho Yubn, from Lincoln to Mnrysville (Hixteen miles 
completed) : the Northern CHlifoniian, from MaryHville to Oroville, twenty-six miles s tho Copoeropolis, 
from Stockton to Copperopolis, thirty-tlvo miles; the San Vrancisco and Alameda, from the Encinal to 
Haywood, fourteen miles; the Napa'Valley, from Suscol to Napa, four miles; the Oakland, from Oakland 
Pomt to Clinton, four miles; the I'ctnluinu, from UiidsiU's Landing to Petalumu, three miles, 

The Suvthrrn Pacific Railroad.— That sooner or Inter a railroad will be completed over the 
route indicated bv nature through the southern portion of California, through some of the favorable passes 
devoid of snuwsln that region, to some point on the Atlantic side, is a foregone conuliinion. A company 
was oriiranized in tins citv more than a yenr since for the purpose of constructing a railroad from San .los<5 
to a point on the Coloraao River, to connect with the Southern Huilroad from Missouri, through New 
Mexico and Ariz-ona. From the etforts made by parties on the other side of the continent, aided by the 
Government, to co-ojiemte with this movement, its commencement will not be long delayed. 

Othrr RAii.noAn Rntf.rprisrs.— From recent indications, the long talked of railroad connecting 
Northern Culifornia with Portland, Oregon, will soon prove a reality. The General Government having 
donated six thousand four hundred acres of the public lands for each mile of the road, and the Legislature 
of Oregon having passed an net giving interest on the company's bonds, amounting to |1,0()0,OUO, at 
the rate of seven ymr cent, per annum, is a suttlcient encouragement to enter upon the work at once. 
There is also a strung prospect of the work being resumed on the railroad between Vullejo and Marys- 
ville. A simiiai- enterprise lieing also in contemplation between Uenicia and Sacramento. 

TKLEGBAPH8. 

The State Telegraph ramiflesthroughont every portion of the limits of California, and connects with the 
most important points in the adjoining States and Territories, and forms a portion of tho overland com- 
munication betv;eeu the Atlantic and PuciHc sections. The liussuAmericau Telegraph, now in the 
progress of construction, will form another important link in the great tulegrtiphic chain that will soon 
encircle the world. An association was organized in New York in April, 18t)C, under the title of the 
National Telegraph Company, for tho purpose of constructing an additional line of telegraph across the 
continent, which, considering tho high tarin of charges existing at prencnt, would prove ot grunt public 
benefit. A bill bus been passed by Congress to aid in the construction of telegraph lines, and to secure to 
the Government tho use of the same for |iostal, military, and other purposes. It grants to this company 
the ri^htto construct and maintain telegraph lines throuulioiit the States and Territories, with the privilege 
of using timber un*l materials required found on the public domain. A published notice of this companv 
signifies the inleiitiun of immediately entering upon the work. There are .'),.')OII miles of telcgrapn 
in operation in the States of California, Oregon, Nevada, the territories of Washington and Idaho, 
and the colony of Uiitish Columbia. 

SHIP HUILDINO. 

I The facilities afforded at the Port of San Francisco for conducting this important branch of business 

! being ample, there is a large amount of ship building done at various points around the Uav, from tllb 

i Potrero to lilack Point. During the year IStKi, owing to the demands made for vessels in titling out the 

fleet engaged in the Cod Fishery in the Ochotsk Sea and other northern waters, an unusual degree of 

activity prevailed in this department. The following list of the various kinds of crall built here during 

that time will give some idea of tho extent and charact«r of the business : Passenger Steamers, from 300 

to ItiUO tons, three ; Stem-wbeel Steamboats, five; Steam Propellers and Tugs, three ; Schooners, fifteen ; 

Sloops, three ; Barges, four. 

The extensive Oovernnient Dry-Docks, belonging to the Navy Yard at Mare Island, have hitherto 
been used in repairing vessels of the largest size, many first-class ships of foreign nations having been 
allowed their use for this pnrpose. There is in the course of erection at Hunter's Point a Dry Dock, 
with a capacity sutticient to accommodate vessels of 4,0(10 tons, which will be completed in the course of 
the present year ; and arrangements are being made for constrncting a floating dock of similar extent at a 
point on the' Bay bounded by Beale, First, Bryant and Brannan streets. 

MINERAL SPRINGS. 
There are a large number of Mineral Springs of varied character and of diversified medical efficacy 
10 be found intersiiei'sed thronghout ditferent portions of the State, both in the valleys and mountains. The 
water from the Nupa Soda Springs is of so superior a character as to have almost entirely monopolized 
tlie market. Smla Springs also exist at New Alinadcu, on Russian River, and various other localities. 
The different varieties of the sulphur and chalybeate springs also abound ; and hot springs, some of which 
impregnated with siilohur are specifics in chronic rheumatism and other diseases ot a kindred character. 
The Geysers, situuted at the head of Napa Valley, sixty miles from Napa City, are among tlie greatest 

I natural curiosities of the St^ite, and aiv quite a resort for invalids. Calistoga Springs, lui^utcd in Napa 

II Valley, upon which a large sum has been expended, is one of tho most fusliionable summer resorts in tne 
plate. The white Sulphur Springs, in Napa Valley, are also one of the most popular watering places of 
llhis region. The Warm Springs, situated in a beautiful locality between the ^IiB8ion and Town of San 
iim6, owing to their medicinal virtues and eligible location, are much frenuented by invalids and pleasure 
I seekers. The Hot Springs of San Luis Obispo are said to possess remarkable virtues, but owing to their 
I distance are difficult of access. 

UNION BUSINESS COLLEGE. 
A new and important institution with the above name has been recently established at 408 California 
[street, San Francisco, under the charge of Mr. James Vinsonhaler. Extensive and comniodions accom- 
Imodationa have been provided, and every effort will be made by its conductors to insure its success. For 
Ithe purposes and objects of the College, see page clxxzvii. 



/>! 



I 



114* 



PAOiriO COAST BU8INB88 DIRBOTORT. 



STATE OF OREGON.* " 

Capital, Sulom. 
Statk OrrioBRs Exicutivk Dkpartmint. 



MAMK or INOtTMBENT. 



Oeorffe L. Wood* 

Samuel K. Muy 

Edwin N. Coo'lie 

Williuin A. MavPbenou . 
P.L. Willi* 



Ofllca. 



Oovernor 

Secretary of State. 

Treuiiirer 

State Printor 

State LihrHrimi . . . 



Reildrnr*. 



Salem . 



Term Exp'i. 



Sept. 1870. 



Sept. 1868. 



Halary. 

|l,.')00 

l/iOO 

800 

Fee*. 

tAOO 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 

Thirty-Ninth CongrePi Ending March 'M, i867. 




Dlitriot*. 
Ut District. 



Conntloi. 



LEGISLATURE OF OREQON.t 

SiMATK — Mkmbkhk, 92. 

Nsmei. 



.Marion . 



3d District — Linn 
2A District Laue 



4th District. 

• 5th District. 
6th District. 
7th District. 
8th District. 
9th'Distiict. 

10th District. 

llth District. 

I2th District. 
13th District. 
14th District. 
1.5lh District. 
IHtb District. 
17Ui (District. 



Districts. 



...Coos, Curry and Douglas. 



T«rm Exnlrn. 



DlltrfclA 
4th DLtrict. 

5th District. 

^^ District., 
'th Digtriot., 

8th District.. 

9tli District.. 

jJOth DiHtrict... 

I'lth District... 
'-•fh District... 

I '3th District.... 

'4th District.... 

I '5th District.... 
I6th District...'] 
'7th District...: 
l«tn Diiiirict I 

19t»i District...." I 
80th District.... Q 



Sessions 



ll>l"frlcei. I 



,<th.. 

1 5th... 

M ... 

I3d... 

I '«t . . . 



Name 
JK. D. sliiu 

i- o. WiiH 

K. K. Strat 

« P. Hois 

II'- P- PrinJ 



Samuel Drown Sept. |X7)I. 

•John C. Cartwriglit Sept. 1870. I 

H. H. Crawford Sept. l«70 i 

William Cyrus Sept. 1H70. 

8. B. CrnuHton Sept. I8fi8. 1 

II. C. Huston Sept. 1870. ! 

G. S. Ilinsdiilu Sept. I8tl8. 

James Watson Sept. IStW. 

..Jackson .".J. N. T. Miller Sept. 1870. 

..Josephine C. M.Caldwell Sept 18t»). ,. 

..Denton Jnmes R. Hayluy Sept. 1870. 

..Pollc W. D. Jeflcrs Sept. 1870. 

..Yamhill Joel Palmer Sept. 1868. 

\ ^ wTil;inS^^'!'. '^'"!'.'"??!' ."".f ( T»«>n"« »• Cornelius Sept. 1868. 

Multnomah j J. N. Dolpl. Sept. 1870 

..Multnomah ^ David Powell Sept. 1870. 

..Clackamas - W. C. Johnson Sept. 1870. 

..Wasco Z. Donnell Sept. 1868. 

..Ruker S. Ison Sept. 1870. 

..Umatilla « N. Ford Sept. 187C. 

. . Union James M. Pyle Sept. IStiS. 

. .Grant James Stearns Sept. 1870. 1 

IIousB or Rbpresentatives— Mehbkrs, 47. 
Cuuntles. Names. TermExplren.! 

'C. B.Roland Sept. im.\ 

B. A. Witiel Sept. 1868. 

L. S. Davis Sept. 1868. 

John J. O. Nicklin Sept. 1868. 

(W. C. Parris Sept. 1868| 
E. B. Moore Sept. 1868.| 
G. R. Helm Sept. 1868.1 
J. Q.A.Worth Sept. 1868.1 
J. K. South Sept. 18681 

i.W. C. Baird Sept.. 18681 

John Whiteaker Sept 18681 

• " P. Witliers Sept. 186(i| 

Cochran Sept ISCT 

• The Stste election Is held on the first MnnUsy of June, and every four years thereafter. The term ofthoHtateofflccB 'The.Tiirti,.!,.! I 

Is four yean. Kor ilat of Federal ofllcen lu the SUie, ace page 3». For Post Offices In the Slate, ice page 26. lorilve Jii«tir-eV /''k^*'*' °l 

t Meets biennially, on the second Monday of September. The mcmben of the Senate arc elected for four yean, UBdislrlctg Tli..if »'"" 'I 
RepreHcntativcs for two years ; compensation, $3 00 per day. ^People fo, two ye "'' 



1st District — Marion 



2d District — Linn. 



<)d District — Lane . 



C John 
Jj.E. 
(R. B. 



JUDICIiJ 

l«tDi8t.-.|„ekg„, J 
1^ I)ist-Hf„t«n. v\ 
M «<st.~Linn, Mar 



'B*KKR COU.VTY J 

B«NTONCoi;NTy""l 

irJ'^ii'*''*'^* Cot/NTyl 
Clatsop County ' 

CO'-UMIl.A COITNTV.". 

Coos County 
CuRiir County'" 
"oiof.As County 
URANT County 
M*CKsoN County' 



'-'<s County , 



ORBOON. LBOIBLATIVB AND JUDICIAL. 



116* 



DlttrlcU. 
4th Diitrict. 

5th Diitriot.. 

nth Diitrirt.. 
7lh DiKtrict.. 

8th Diitrict.. 



9th DiRtrict....Polk 



10th I)iiitrict....Yuinhill 



CountlM, MtmM. Term Kxplmit. 

(M. M. Melvin Hept. IHOR. 

..DonglM ^HiitKer Herman Svpt. IHOH. 

(Jumea Cole Sept. 186B. 

(K. D. Foiidniy R«pt. IStlR. 

..jRvkion ? nileK W«)llei Hept. 1868. 

(John K. Horn Hcpt. 1868. 

. . Jofephine Imiic Cox Sept. 18H8. 

..CooB and Curry F. (J. Lockharf Sept. 1868 

l,-„,„_ J K. A. Chenoweth Sept. 1868. 

••"*"'*"* ? JameM Oiniflei Sept. 1868. 

'J. StonlTer Hept. 1868. 

J. J. Deinpiiey Hept. 1868. 

William llair. Sept. 1868. 

.1. Uiiiaon Sept. 1868. 

K. K. I»iiKhlin Hept. 1868. 

OeorifeCDay Sept. 1868. 

A. lliimian Sept. 1868. 



llth Didtrict Washington , 

lath District Clatiop, Columbia and Tillamook. ...\Cvru(i OIney..... Sept. 1868. 



W. W. Upton Sept. 1868. 

13th Di.triet....Mu.tnomah ] ii::'^.^^:::::::::::::::::":::^ Im 

— ... .. ,f^ 

1868. 
1868. 
1868. 



14th Diitrict.... ClackamBR. 



15th Diitrict. 

16ih Diitrict. 

17th DiHlrivt. 

18th Divlrict. 

19tb Diitrict. 

30th Diitrict. 



Yv SO. Iluniaiun 

•■•"^**^ ^F.T. Dodge 

. . .Ttaker A. C liorinir 

.Union Janiei llenderihot 



J. P. Oarlick Sept 

•I. I). Ixicev Sept. 

J. D. (Juirett Sept, 

W. A. Starkweather Sept 



. ..Uaker and Union. 
...Umatilla . 



Sept. 

.Sept. 1868. 

.Sept. 1868. 

.Sept. lt>68. 



.Grant . 



..W. (^ lliiidman Hept. 1868. 

IT. W.Avery Sept. 1868. 

•H.A. Oher Sept. 1868. 

;.?. M. McCov Sept. 1868. 

18. W. Kuiieley , Sept. 1808 



JUDICIARY-SUPBEME COUHT." 

Sciiioni held at the Seat of Government on the flnt Monday in September, annually. 



PfitrlcU. 



4th 
5th 
3d 
3d 

let 



Name of Incumbent 



E. I>. Hlinttuck 
J. O. Wilson.. 
R. K. Stratton. 
K. P. linise. . . 
P. P. Prim.... 



Offlcc. 



Roaldenca. 



Chief Jnitice 

AiwH-iato JiiHticu . . . . 

Asiociate JuHtire 

A88ociii(« JuHlice. . . . 
Aiiociute Juitice.... 



Portland — 

DallcB 

Kugene City 

Salem 

•larkMmville 



Term Rxplrci. 



September, 1868. 



1870. 
1S70. 
1872. 



Salary. 



I'i.OOO 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



JUDICIAL DISTRICTS, AND THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME. 



lat Diit. — <)nrkeon and Joicphine. 

2d Dint.— Hcnton. Coos, ('urry, Donchw and Lane. 

3d Dist. — Linn, Marion, Polk', and Yumhill. 



4th Diet. — Clnckamai, Clatsop, Columbia, Multno- 
mah, Tillamook, and WashinKton. 

5tb Dist.— Raker, Grunt, Umatilla, Union, and 
Wasco. 



TERMS OF THE CIRCUIT COURTS. 

Rakkr County Fourth Monday in May, and first Monday in November. 

Benton County Second Monday in April, and November. 

iCiArKAMAs County Third Monday in March, and fourth Monday in October. 

"Clatsop County Fourth Tues((ay in At^rii, and tint Tuewlay in October. i ■ - i 

CoLUMiiiA County Tliird Tuesday in April. 

Coos County Fourth Monday in Afay. i ' 

CuRHY County First Monday in June. 

Dni'ot.As County Second Monday in May and October. i 

Grant County Second Monday in June, and third Monday in October. ■ , 

Jackson County Second Monday in February, June, and November. ■' 

JosKPHiNE County Second Monday in April, and fourth Monday in October. 

Lane County Third Monday in April, and fourth Monday m October. 

*Th(> .Tuillctal power or the Htate is vested In a Supreme Court and Ave Circuit Courts. The Supreme Court conaiatx 
■ of Ave Justices, (chosen In districts, by tho electors thercofi who are also Judges of the Circuit Court In their respcollve 
Idislrlcts. Their term ofotllcc Is six years. There Is one Trosecutlnii Attorney In each Judicial District, elected by the 
|p«oplo for two years. For organlxutlon and terms of the United Stat.-M Courts, see pages 30-3°i. 



116* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINBSS DIRBCTORT. 



Linn County Fourth Monday in March and October. 

Marion County Second Monday In March, and fourth Monday in June and November. 

Multnomah County Second Monday in February, June and Noveml)er. 

Poi.K County Fourth Moiidiiy in April, ai'itl 'bird Monday in November. 

Tii.LANuoK County Alliiched to Cluckamug, for judicial purpoBes. 

Umatii.i.a County Second Monday in May, autf third Monday inNovember. 

Union County Third Monday 'in May, and second Monday in November. 

Wasco County Third Monday in April, fourth Monday iu ,June, and second .Monday in 

December. 

Washington County Third Monday in May and October. 

Yamhill County Second Monday in April and November. ' 



TERMS OF THE COUNTY COURTS 

Are held in the several countieH as follows: In the Counties of Ituker, Denton, Clackamaa, DoukIuk, 
(irant, Jackson, Lane, Kiun, Marion, Multnomah, I'olk, Union, ,WushinKton, and Yamhill, on the tirst 
Monday in each month. 

In the Cuunties of Clatsop, Coluiiiliiii, Coos, Curry, Josephine, Tillamook and Umatilla, on the tirst 
Monday in January, April, July and September. 



DISTRICT ATTORNEYS. 



District. 



First District. . . 
Second District. 
Third District.. 
Fourth District. 
Fifth District . . 



Nuinc. 



J. R. Neil 

James F. Watson. 
P. C. Sullivan.... 
M.F. Mulkey.... 
James H. Slater.. 



Rosldouco. 

Jacksonville... 

Roeeburg 

Dallas 

Portland 

Auburn 



Term Expires. 



July, ISfia 
July, 181)8 
Julv, 18t)8 
July, 18t)8 
July, 18t)8 



Salary. 



1500 and feed. 
$600 and fees. 
frm and fees. 
I^OOanc^fucB. I 
|r>OI) and fees. ; 



SENATORIAL DISTRICTS, THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME, AND REPRESENT 

ATION OF EACH. 



Ist Dist. — Marion, elects two Senatoi-s. 

-'d Dist. — Linn, elects two Senators. 

3d Dist. — Ijane, elects two Senators. 

4th Dist. — Coos, Curry, and Douglas, elect two 

Senators. 
5th Dist. — Jackson, elects one Senator. 
6th Dist. — Josephine, elects one Senator. 
7th Dist. — Benton, elects one Senator. 
8tb Dist. — Polk, elects one Senator. 
Dth Dist. — Yamhill, elects one Senator. 



10th Dist. — Clatsop, Columbia, Tillamook and Wash- 
ington, elect one Senator. 
11th Dist. — Mulliioinah, elects two Senators, 
l.'tli Dist— CliickuniHS, elects one Senator. 
IJHIi Dist. — Wasco, elects one Senator. 
14lli Dist. — liakor, elects one Senator. 
I5tb Dist. — Umatilla, elects one Senator. 
ICth Dist. — Union, elects one Seimtor. 
17th Dist.— Grant, elects one Senator. 



REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICTS, AND THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME. 



naUer— One member, and with Union, one. 

Uenton — Two. 

Cluokauias — Three. 

Clatsop, Columbia, and Tiilamook— One. 

Coos and Curry — One. 

Douglas — Three, 

Grant— Two. 

Jackson— Three. 

Josephine — One. 

Lane — Three. 



Linn — Five. 
Marion — Five. 
Multnomah — Four. 
Polk— Three. 
Umatilla — Two. 
Union — One. 
Wasca— Two. 
Washington- Two. 
Yamhill— Two. 



NOTARIES PUBLIC. 

[Corrected at the office of the Secretary of State 



l>«to Appoint. 
|Ap"l 1, '(is..) 

(Oct. 24,'64..( 
Dec 7, '64.. I 

|Sept.IfJ,'6i..i. 

May 20, '65.. D 
>eb. 5, 'fiC.o 

I June 19, -66..^ 

Jan- W, '66..A. 

I Dec. 9, '(55.. J i 
(Vl23,'66..j;e 

^.Pri' «, •G5..W 

May30, •6,5..H.> 
Dec. II, '65. A V 



I Oct. 4, 
,0c». 10 
lOci. 21, 

JJan. ;il, 
iMayie 

1 1 Oct. 13, 

liOit. 25, 
Juno 21, 

[July 14, 

J 'Sept 16, 
Sept KJ, 
Sept. 16, 



MA] 

;fi4..Gus„, 

'?^-^0a 
<>4..N. p 

;<,«--ThoH; 

*»5..S.D.f 
;<j5-. Sethi 
b5.. James 
fie-Cheste 
bb-.Georgi 

MULTN 

W-Oeo. \i 
'64..S.E. 



Date Appoint 
Julv 26, 't)5 
April 2:1, 'fiO 
July 11, '66 

.Sept. 12, '64 
Sept. 13, '64 
Oct. 18, '64 
April 1, '65 

Sept. 16, '64, 
Dec. 6, '64 
Aug. 1,'66. 



BAKER COUNTY. 

Name. Kesldcnce. 

. Marcus T. Colt Auburn. 

..E. W. Reynolds.... Baker City. 
..C. M. Foster Auburn. 

BENTON COUNTY. 

..A. D. Barnard Corvallis. 

..George Mercer Corvallis. 

..T. B. Odeneal Cor\'8llis. 

. . J. W. Souther Corvallis. 

CLACKAMa.} COUNTY. 

..J. E. Hurford Oregon City. 

..Hector Campbell. . . Milwaukie. 
..Dan'l P. Thom|NK>n. Oregon City. 



Date Appoint. 
Sept. 16, '64. 



Sept. 10, '64. 
Aug. at), '1)5. 
Ay] 16, '66. 
May 5, '66. 

Oct. 10, '64. 
Oct. 10, '64. 



Sept. 16 '64. 



, September Ist, 1866.] 

CLATSOP COUNTY. 

Name. Resilience. 

.W. W. Parker Astoria. 

COLUMBIA COUNTY. 

. Philip I^affer St. Helens. 

Benj. M. Watts ....St. Helens. 

F. Dillard St. Helens. 

Dean Blanchnrd . ..St. Helens. 

COOS COUNTY. 
T. P. Muchester . ..Empire City. 
S. S. Mann Empire City. 

CURRY COUNTY. 
R. W. Dunbar Port Orford. 



I'Ict, 18, '62 

|*<- IS, '62: 
J Jan. 22, '(«. 

I J"*'' 17, ••a. 

|;Viv.l7, '(Xi. 

lMar.28, '64. 
Jliir.as, '64. 
JJiiue ;i, '(jj. 
■June .•}, '(i4. 

■ ^'■■SC, '64. 
I ••"• 4, '(i5. 
TfP"l I, 'fi5. 

m i«. '05. 

1!''''23, 'C5.. 
»f' 7, •66.. 

CONJ 

fP"ll5,'63..Job„T. 

fH' l.'64..Edw'dlJ 

KPIL 
f^' '65..N. R. Wii 



ca| 

'L 

•W.A.1, 
•N. ProcI 
•Vi" B. jl 

-t'liarlesf 
•('harlesl 
■A. S. Ool 

•D.T. v<r 

SUi7l'| l.l 

Alfred If 
. Edward \ 

v-r.ni 

J; D. Stel 

-Samuel fl 
-Otis V. 4 
•I.-ewis Ml 
• llciirv hi 
J. II.'BlJ 



OREGON. COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS. 



117* 



Date Appoint. 
Ay'l 1, •(». 

Oct. 24, 'M. 
Dec. 7, '64. 



Sept.lfi,'61. 
Miiy 20, '65. 
Feb. 5, 'fiC. 
June 19, '66. 



DOUGLAS COUNTY. 

Name, KeBldcncc. 

.S. V. Chadwick....Rosebarg. 

GRANT COUNTY. 

.George B. (^ering.. Canyon City. 
.L. O. Sterng Cunyon City. 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

. I. D. Ilalnefl JackHonville. 

.D. M. C. Ganit Juckgonville. 

.Charleii W. Kahler JavlcBonville. 
.Wm. Hoffman JackHonville. 



JOSEPHINE COUNTY. 
Jan. 12, '66. .A. B. Mcllvaine. ..Waldo. 



Dec. 9, '65, 
Ap'l23, '66. 

Dec. 7, '64. 
April C, '65. 
April 6,-65. 
May 30, '65. 
Dec. II, '65. 
May 28, '66. 



Oct. 4, '64. 
;0c». 10, '64. 
lOcu 21, '64.. 
Jan. 31, 'ti5. 
May 16, '()5.. 
lOct. 13, '()5., 
Oit. 25, '(i5., 
Jmio21,'66.. 
July 14, '66., 



LANE COUNTY. 
.J. B. Underwood ..Engene City. 
.Joel Ware Eugene City. 

LINN COUNTY. 

.J. H. Stenson Albany. 

.John Smith Peoria. 

.W. M. McCorkle ..Peoria. 

.H. N. George Albany. 

.A. F. Wheeler Albany. 

. A . E. Ellis Brownsville. 

MARION COUNTY. 

Gnstave A. Conc...Bultcville. 

•T. Gai<ton Salem. 

N. P. Caton Salem. 

Thou. McF. Piitton. Salem. 

S. 1). Siiowden Belpassi. 

Scth K. Hummel... Saleiii. 
James Ov..iirie, Jr.. Jeti'orson. 
Chester N. Terry ..Salem. 
George P. Holman. Salem. 



MULTNOMAH COUNTY. 

iSept 16, '64 . . J. J. Hottinan Portland. 

Sept. l6,'64..Geo. W. Mnrniv. ..Portland. 
Sept. 16, '64. .S. E. Bwro Portland. 



Date Appoint Mamo. Residence. 

Nov. 16, '64.. E. D. Buckenstos ..Portland. 
Nov. 22, '64..Sam'l A. Clarke ...Portland. 

Jan. 31, '65..Cliafl. M. Carter Portland. i 

Mar. 30, '55. . Geo. Venable Smith Portland. 

Mar. 30, 'eS.-Wm. B. Carter Portland. 

May 15, '65. .Clinton P. Ferry. ..Portland. 

Sept. 6, '65 . . H. W. Scott Portland. 

Oct. 23, '65.. Ralph Wilcox Portland. 

Nov. 10, '65. .Ben). F. Goodwin.. Portland. 

Dec. 6, '65. .J. l\ McCov Portland. 

Jan. 15, '66. .M. F. Mulkey Portland. 

Feb. 21, '65. .Edward S. Morgan. Portland. 

Mar. 7, '66.. W. W. Upton Portland. 

Mar. 7, '66. .A. M. Loryea Portland. 

July 21, '66..Cvru8N. Dolph.... Portland. 
July 24, '66.. Theodore Wygant .Portland. 

POLK COUNTY. 

Oct. 23, '65.. J. L. Collins Dallas. 

TILLAMOOK COUNTY. 

(No appointment.) 
UMATILLA COUNTY. 
Oct. 13, 'f>5..JohnD. Crawford. Umatilla. 
May 8, '66. .M. Ainsa Umatilla. 

UNION COUNTY. 

Nov. 26, '64..Jiime8 M. Pyle I'niontown. 

May 5, '65.. Alex. T. Campbell. Uniontown. 

WASCO COUNTY. 

Sept !o, '64..Jnnies A. Odell DallesCity. 

Sept. 16, '64. .Geo. L. Woods Dalles City. 

July 26, '65.. C. R.Meigs DallesCity. 

June 9, '66..WeMworth Lord ..DallesCity. 

WAS.IINGTON COUNTY. 

(No appointments.) 

YAMHILL COUNTY. 

Muv28, '66. .E. D. Whitlow ....LafayeUe. 
May 28, '66. . R. P. Earhart Grande Ronde. 



lens, 
lens, 
lens, 
lions. 



1 City, 
e City. 



iDatc of App 
lOct. 18, '62 
lOct. 18, '62 
IJan. 22, '6:» 
lMur.27, '63 
IXov. 17, '(hi 
|Xnv.l7, '(i3 
IXov. 17, (tii 
IXov. 17, 'Si 
lMar.28, '64 
ISIiir.28, '64. 
iJime 3, '64 
iJuiie 3, '64. 
llleo. 26, '64 
llVb. 4, '()5 
lAvril 1, '65, 
Tliily 18, '65, 

f)ct, 23, '05. 

th. 7, '66. 



..W 



COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS, 

WITH DATE OK APPOINTMENT, NAME, AND RE.SIDENCE. 

[Correoied at the Office of Secretary of State, September Ist, 1866.] 
CALIFORNIA. 

Name. Residence, 

A. Knapp San Francisco. 



.N. Proctor Smith ..i^an Fmiicisco. 

.\V. B. Ijalham Snu Fnmcisco. 

-Charles Cook San FntnciHcu. 

.Charles I*. Semple. Marvsville. 

-A. S. Gould Sail VranciBCO. 

. D. T. Vcrdenal San Francisco. 

.Suiii'l I. C. Swo.ty.Sau Francisco. 

. Alfred Bursto w Sun Francisco. 

.Edward Flanagan.. San Francisco. 

.F. J. Thibault San Francisco. 

.J. D. Slovciisou Sun Francisco. 

.H. S. Homuns San Francisco. 

.Samuel Gobs. .... . .Sacramento. 

.Otis V. Sawyer.... San Francisco. 

.Lewis M. Cutting.. Stockton. 

. Henry Iluight S n Francisco. 

.J. H. Blood ..n Francisco. 



CONNECTICUT. 

|iprill5,'63..John T. Waite Norwich. 

ILLINOIS. 
^ug. 1, '64..Edw'd H. Bruckett.Chicago. 

KENTUCKY. 
fov.as, '65.. N. R. Wilson Uuisville. 



MARYLAND. 

DatoofApp't. Name. ItCBidenco. 

May 30, '65.. Herman L. EmmensBaltimore. 
Mar. 7, '66. .William B. Hill.... Baltimore. 

MASSACHUSE'ITS. 
Dec. 7,'63..Henrv M. Parker.. Boston. 
May 15, '65. .Charles W. Adams. Boston. 

Jan. 16, '66. .James B.Bell Boston. 

Mar. 7, '66. .Samuel Jennison- ..Boston. 

NEVADA. 
Nov. 19, '62.. W. A. M. Van Bok- 

kelen Virginia City. 

April 22, '64.. Thomas Fitch Virginia City. 

Novr25, '65.. A. E. Shannon Austin. 

NEW JERSEY. 

Feb. 20, '64. .James M. (^assidy.. Camden. 
April 12, '66. .II Harard Binges. .South Orange. 



Mar. 24, '63. 
Nov. 21, '63. 
Jan. 5, '64. 
April 29, '64. 
April 2't, '64. 
April 29, '64. 
July 26, '65. 



NEW YORK, 

.Thomas Sadler 

Wm. H. BaMwin.. 
. Herris Lowonberg. 

Allen Scott 

.Samuel Lake 

,E. U. Lawis 

.James A. Hamilton. 



New York City. 
New York City. 
New Y^ork City. 
Ellicottsville. 
Buffalo. 

Sitckett Harhor. 
New York City. 



118* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Jan. 
Mar, 
Mnr 

Mar. 



Date of App't 
Ang. 19,'65., 
Aug.26,•65., 
Oct. 23, '65.. 
Dec. 11, '(55. 

6. '66.. 

7, '66. 

7,-66.. 

7, '66.. 
June 9, '66.. 
.?nnel9, '66., 
June 19, '66. 
June 19, '66. 
June 19, '66. 



May 5, '66. 



Oct. 31, '62. 
Feb. 4, '0.5. 
July 26, '65. 
t<ept. 13, '65. 
Oct. 10, '65. 
Jan. 16, '66. 



Aug. 4, 'f)5. 
Mar. 7, '66. 



Nnmp. Resilience. 

John 8. Hyer New York City. 

.J. J. Foote Middlctown. 

.Gordon L.Ford Bi'ooklvn. 

-Oeorge P. Johnson. New York City. 

. Martin H. Lntt New York City. 

.Horatio C. KiiiK- ..New York City. 
.A. Anderson, Jr.. . . New York City. 
.CbriBtian Von HesseNew York City. 
.O. P. C. BillinKB.-.New York City. 
.John H. McKarland.Snlem. 

.Joseph Patton Whitehall. 

.A. D. Wait Fort Edward. 

.Moses Wurren Troy. 

OHIO. 
.J. B. Powell Cincinnati. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

-Theodore H.MorfjnnPhiladelphia. 
.Samuel L. Taylor. .Pliiladelphia. 

.Ji<hn Mcl^aren Piltshuriit. 

.William F. Rol)b...Pittsl>nrK. 
.Chas. H. T. Collins. Philadelphia. 
-JohnC. O'Neill.... Titusville. 

TENNESSEE. 

.Thomas H. Pearne. Knoxville. 

VIRGINIA. 
.D. H. London Richmond. 



V'ISCONSIN. 
Date of App't. Koine. Ru^tldence. 

May 1, 'e.*).. Francis Blood;^ood.Milwaukie. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

April 21, '66..Cha8. A. Stephens. -Washington. 
April 21 , '66. .Oilhert A. Pierce. . .Washington. 
June 9, '66. .Frederick Koones. .Washington. 

IDAHO TERRITORY. 

June25, '63. .Charles Howard. ..Idaho City. 

Jan. 25, '04. .John Cummins Idaho City. 

Mar. 7, '64. . A. C. Swift Boise City. 

Sept. 16, '64.. A. G. Cook Boise City. 

Sept. 17, '64. . Edward C. Sessions.Boise City. 

Dec. 7, '64.. H. B. Shipley Boise City. 

April 1, '05.. I. D. Haines'. Ruby City. 

Nov. 25, '65..Jan)es Lyman Silver Cil v. 

Jan. 26, '66. .C. B. Wiiite Idaho City. 

April 23, '66.. William Vincent. ..Ruby City. 

MONTANA TERRITORY. 
Jan. 20, 'Oe..Josiah B. Johnson. Bluokfoot City. 
TERRITORY OF NEW MEXICO. 

Oct. ID, '55. .John Watts Sunta V6. 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY. 

April 15, '63. .II. G. Strove Vancouver. 

Feb. 20, '64. .L.J. Rector Walhi Walla. 

Dec. 9, '65. .William N. Smith.. Walla Walla. 
July 8, '66. .J. W. Tripp Stevens County. 



AREA AXI) RESOURCES. 

Oregon, the most westerly portion of the domain of the United States of North America, is iiituatcd 
between 42^ and 46- 20' north latitude, and between llO-" 31' and 124° 30' west longitude; being about 
395 miles in length, and 295 'iiiles in width. The area is estinuitcd at 101,400 sqtairc miles, containini; 
120,000,000 acres of land, of which it is calculated that about 10,000,000 are susceptible of cultivation. The 
State is usually divided into three portions, seventlly sityled the Lower, Middle, and llp|)er Countries. The 
first is that portion next the ocean; the second lies between the Cascade Range and the Blue MountiiinR; 
the third being situated between the latter and the Rocky Mountains. The first is from 75 to 120 miles in 
breadth, and includes the Willamette, Umpqua, and Rogue River Valleys, the former running parallel with, 
and the latter two at right angles to the sea. The valleys vary from 40 to 150 miles in length, and are 
from 5 to 85 miles wide. The middle portion, which consists mainly of an elevated plateau, is about ItiO 
miles broad, while the upper country is a desolate an<l steiile region, occupying the western slope of the 
Rocky Mountains. The area of the State is diversified with valleys of the richest agricultural iiid grazing 
lands alternating with abrupt mountain ranges, many of the peaks of which rise to the height of 
14,000 feet above the level of the sea, and are covered with perpetual ■snow. The resources of this 
region are extensive, rich, and varied— embracing agricultural and mineral wealth, combined with viiiit 
forests of the finest timber, fitted for every p-irpose, a'ld inexhaustible water (Hiwer for maniifacturiiii; 
purposes. Th&re is probably no portion of the Union that combines w i the same space, to a siniih)r 
extent, all the varied elements of wealth, and a steadily increasing pii <*perity. Placer gold diggiiif;) 
have beon extensively worked for a number of years past, both in Southern Oregon and the N, tlierii 
portions of the State ; and extensive and permanent lodes of gold and silver bearing quartz exist in the 
same regions, which need only the requisite capital for advantageous worki^ig, to produce rich returim. 
The extensive coal mines discovered at Coose Bay and other iMiints have been profitably worked for several 
years past ; and large deposits of copper, lead and iron — the latter of the purest quality — and inexhaustihli' 
iu quantity, are distributed throughout the State. Salt Springs, of large cajiacity and strength, are also 
abundant. The liberal donations of land to actual fettlers made by the General Government, gave the 
flrat impetus to immigrntion to the Territory of Oregon. The vast and fertile valleys of this region| 
ofTering the most favorable field for agriculture and the raising of stock, the operations of the early set 
tiera were mainly confined to those bpranches ; and the nnparnlleled rush attendant upon the discovery oi 
gold in California, at once opened a ready and rernunerative market for these products. The climate ami 
soil of the agricultural portions of the State are highly favorable to the growth of every variety of yiroA 
uce common to the Western and Northern States — all the grains, fruits, and vegetables flourishing licit 



in the highest 
of the latter 
temp, hops, a 
nature of the 
uess. The sail 
in quantity, cc 
portion of the 



Showing the N 



COl'NTY. 



Baker 

Benton ...'. 

Clackamas . 

Clatsop 

Columbia .'. 

I Coos 

I Curry . . . ."." 

Douglas.'"! 

Grant 

Jackson.... 
Josephine . . 

I^ane 

I Linn .'. 

I Marion ".' 

I Multnomah.. 
Polk 

I Tillamook . . . 

j Umatilla 

Union 

I Wasco v.. 

I Washington.! 
I Yamhill 



Totals 



ORAIN.—Tlicni; 

i and oats, produced 
I CIS. 1 [e fi-op „f 

' and will probably 

j Tobacco An 

I I ™;?f<l in "everul en 
; 1«M exceeded 70 

'leaf *"'*'' ^■"'"'"") 

"''■'' State, and are 
I where. The clinia 
I'lieir cultivation, HI 
jlwh, at Salem, cxtei 
of oil, will serv.. t 
manifested to add 
products of the Slat 
Fruits.—" I'uke 
tlie best fruitgiowi 



The mineral resoi 

I. Yielded large amouiii 

have produced a eon 

I '" various portions ( 



OREOOX. HINBRAL RESOURCES 



119« 



in the liighert perfection. Wheat, oats, barley, potatoes, and apples are the staple products (the export 
of the latter amounting to 100,000 boxes each year) ; and experiments in the cnltnre of tobacco, flax, 
hemp, hops, and other products have proved highly satisfactory. The -wide range of pastnrage, and the 
nature of the climate being highly favorable to sheep-raising, wool-growing has become a leading bnsi- 
uess. The salmon and other tiHheries are extensive. Anu the superior quality of the timber, inexhaustible 
in quantity, combined with other facilities, otter inducements for ship-building superior to those of any 
portion of the Atlantic ur Paciiic Coast. '■- 

TABLE OP THE CROP OF 1864, 

Showing the Number of Acres under Cultivation in 1865, and the Pi-oduct of 1864 of Wheat, Barley, Oats, 
Corn, Rye, Tobacco, Hay, Potatoes, Apples and Wool. 



COUNTY. 



Huker 

Benton 

Clackamas . . 

Clatsop 

Columula ... 

Coos 

Curry 

Douglas 

Oraiit 

JackHon 

Josephine ■ . . 

Lane 

Linn 

I Maricm 

Multuuniah.. 

Polk 

Tillamook . . 
I Umatilla 

Union 

Whbco 

Washington. 

Yamhill 



No. 

AcrcH. 



Kll!l1lCl!l ! ItURll. 

Wlieut. iliarlpy 



i,i:.5 

11.474 

6,t)()a 

737 
74.'> 
.')!•.'■> 
:ili6 
21 ,'10 1 

:j<>4 

13,!)0I 

2,873 

30,683 

43,405 

45,610 

4,051 

86, 1 ','7 

521 

5,770 

7,<Ui» 

3,831 

14,224 

2ti,343 



2.">0! 2,130 
!t8,6!>5' 7,03(t 
38,651 1,652 



1,021 

1,464 

5.50 

70,400 

348 i 

37,891 1 

6,598 

140,245 

199,168 

220,186 

2,827 

119,6.')7 

XM 

16,739 

10,912 

1,.'>82 

86,541 

lf)5,159 



64 
94 



9,693 

567 
7,076 

766 
7,208 
5,575 
6,936 

928 
2,916 

180 

11,404 

10,5i9 

8,011 

\;m\ 

3,424 



liusliela 
OuU. 



liush. 
Corn. 



7,540 

111,193 

76,473 

2.)i05 

1,347 

1,561 

1,241 

90,854 

3,010 

71.8:11 

18,767 

39,846 

298,395 

32i,:«« 

9,390 

139,822 

1,:J05 

51,736 

78,207 

17,202 

i;«,890 

146,414 



Uye. 



20 
1,168 
2,017 

"558 

1,410 

40 

14,029 

's'iTk') 

l,.'i50| 

5,421 

9,042 

2,562 
2,579 
1,135 1 

i',2t'i.^ 

774 
971 1 
765 1 
974 



40 
107 

292 

"'8 



74 

'i32 

126 

18 

71 

585 
16 



89 
.')77 
168 
299 
135 



Totals 334,160 1,219,034187,691 1,631,962 54,38012,737 70,045 38,030 2t»,104 318,7181779,546 



U>8. 

Tobac- 
co. 



2,866 
11,026 

5',6;« 

1,514 

123 

3,347 

4",o66 

2.')0 

8,.592 

9,.'i54 

10,395 

270 

3,462 

145 

1,284 

26 



5,02;» 

2,.527 



Tons 
Hay. 

1,151 

1,411 

3,1(!7 

313 

908 

177 

66 

1,849 

1,143 

1,551 

543 

2,818 

1,888 

4,667 

3,178 

3,271 

183 

114 

1,833 

1 ,421 

3,015 

3,363 



liuahela 
I'ota- 

tOCB. 



6,313 

7,847 

33.386 

7,095 

4,125 

4,980 

2,134 

4,780 

3,420 

6,a'i0 

3,995 

15.091 

23,444 

37,70!) 

26,850 

7,126 

5,6(i5 

10,.526 

11.191 

10,407 

14,539 

13,131 



Budhpls 
iVpplcs. 



14,741 
49,521 
4,345 
1,135 
2,390 
50 
6,131 

"2,943 

170 

19,212 

.')3,9()l 

99,392! 

13,384 

19,145 

785 

261 

'"ist; 

8,02i» 
22,987 



Lbs. 
Wool. 



9 

46,440 

23,907 

3,275 

3,473 

126 

120 

109,826 

5,600 

12,809 

30 

106,477 

132,148 

102,223 

4,999 

94,128 

493 

7,604 

68 

6,187 

21,564 

98,040 



' Grain. — The anKi'fgate amount of wheat, Imrlev, \ 
j and OtttH, iirodiictHi in 1864. is nearly 3,000,000 buHli- 
, eU. The crop of 18t)5 ix liirgclv in excess of tliis, 
i and will probably reach 4,000,0()'0 buahiin. 

I Tobacco. — An excellent quality of tobacco is 
j raised in several counties of the Slat*. The crop of 

1864 exceeded 70,000 poundn, a large piirt of winch, 
I it is said, was fully equal to the best Junies River 

leaf. 

I Fi.Ax AND IIkmp. — Thcpc nIantR grow nipidly in 

I this Slate, and are more promictive here than el^o- 

1 where. The climate is exceedingly favornble for 

j their cultivation, and the recent movement to estali- 

liHh,at Salem, extensive works for the manufacture 

of oil, will serve to increase the intercBt already 

manifested to add these important articles to the 

products of the Slate. 

Fruits. — " Taken as a whole, this Stnte is one of 
the best fruitgrowing States in the Union. In no 



part of the world do fruit trees grow bo rapidly, bear 
so early, so regularly, and so abundantly, and pro- 
duce fruit of Hucli large Bi/.e. Nor is there any other 
country where so great a variety of fruit can oe pro- 
duced in high excellence. Fruit trees in Oregon 
are generally as large at two years old as they are 
in New York or Ohio at four years." This is owing 
to the climitte. The product of 1864 amounted to 
318,718 bushels, a great part of which was shipped 
to San Francisco and Victoria. 

Hops. — The cultivation of hops ongagcB the atten- 
tion of a numerous class. The soil and climate aie 
admirably adapted for their growth. 



Live Stock. — The returns of 1864, for the State, 

f[ive the following: Cattle, 125,536; horses, 49,519; 
logs, 104,170; mules, 2,182; sheep, 313,199. The 
clip of wool, for 1864, was 779,546 pounds. The 
vield of butter, 1861, 1,044,210 pounds; of cheese, 
111, 950 pounds. 



MINERAL 



The mineral resources of the State are varied and extensive. The gold placersof Eastern Oregon have 
yielded largo amounts. The mines of Jackson County in southern Oregon have been worked since 1850, and 
liave produced a considerable amount, estimated at 1 1, 000,000 annually. ExtenBive deposits of silver exist 
in various portions of the State, and those of the Owyhee region are believed to be exceedingly rich. 



M 



! • 



! n 



i 



13'i 



I'lSMS 



m 



120* 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIREOTORT. 



There are numerous quartz veins of silver in southern Oregon, and the yield of gold for the year 1864, 
for the Stute, is reported by the Secretary of State to have amounted to 106,936 ounces, value, 91,900,000. 
This sum is exclusive of large amounts taken by parties leaving the State. Rich lodes of copper exist ii^ 
the counties of Josephine, Coos, Baker, and Douglas, an<l immense beds and veins of iron are found in 
Washington, Multnomah, Jackson, Josephine, and Curry counties. The mine in Washington County is 
located in the vicmity of the Willamette River, and is regarded as one of great value. Lead is found in 
Jackson, Josephine, and Curry, but no attempt has as yet been made to reduce the ore. Coal exists in 
various portions of the State. The vein at Coose Bay is very productive, and is capable of yielding a large 
amount annually. 

TABLE OF QUARTZ MILLS, 

With the Location, Name of Mill, Date of Erection, Number of Stamps, Cost of Machinery, and the 
' Director's or Owner's Name of Each. 



Location. 



BAKSR COUNTT. 

Baker City 



ORANT COUHTY. 

Prairie Di;;gingH 

Vincent Creek 



JACK80M COCMTT. 

Applegato 

Dardanelles 

Jackson Creek 



Rogue Hivcr 

Sterling 

Thompson Creek.. 



JOSBPHIKE COCNTY. 

Enterprise 



UNION COUNTY. 

Eagle Creek 

Hoquim 

Koostcr 



Name of Mill. 



Ruckles. 



Aldred k Co.'s.. 
Crowchers 



Steamboat 

Occidental 

Hopkins 

Johnsong 

.lewotts. , 

Ives 

Thompson Creek. 



Enterprise. 



Eagle 

Carter ft Davis. 
La Grande 



■8- I 



I860 
1866 
1860 
1862 
1861 
1866 
1865 



1865 



1866 
1866 



20 



10 






Cost. 



water 



water 

steam 
fi 

water 
steam 
horse 
water 



water 



water 



•8,000 

i,aoo 

8,000 

4,000 

10,000 

600 

1,600 



18,000 



n 



Uold. 



Gold 



Gold. 



Gold. 



8,000 1 Gold. 

8,000| " 



Present Occupants. 



J. S. Ruckles. 



Aldrcd & Co. 
Crowoher ft Co. 



Fowler ft Co. 
Hogan & Co. 
Hopkins & Co. 
Johnson k Co. 
Byba k Co. 
Porter Ives. 
Morris k Co. 



■ Cohen. 



Meacham Bros, k Co. 
Carter k Davis. 
La Grande Co. 



TABLE OF CANALS AND WATER DITCHES 

For Mining Purposes in the State, with the Locution, Source of Water, Length, Cost, etc., of Each. 



Name of Ditch. 



nAKKK COUNTTf. 

Auburn Cunul Co 



JACKSON COUNTr. 

Buzzell 

Foot's Creek 

Gallagher 

Orifliii Creek 

Hoffman 

.lohnson 

Keeler 

Mountain 

Pleasant Creek 

Wagner 

Willow Spring 



Source of Water. 



Poor Man's Creek. 

Foofs Creek 

Applegate Creek.. 

Oriffln Creek 

Applegate Creek. . 



Pleasant Creek . 
Ashland Creek. 
Jackson Creek. 



jnSKPHINR COUKTT. 

Hunt's 

Sailor Diggings 

Willinras Creek 



Illinois River . . . 
II (t 

Williams Creel. 



^2 Cost. 



40 



4 

5 
4 

4 
4 
5 

10 
6 
7 

lU 
7 



9 

8 

12 



9 

175,000 



2,500 
5,000 
2,000 
4,000 
5,000 
12.000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,000 
3,500 



7,000 
25.000 
16,000 



Name of Owner. 



Oregon Steimi Nav. Co. 



H. R. Brown & Co. 
flieen Moore. 
Lin Clunaman. 
Clans Klinehammer. 
L. J. C. Duncan. 
Lin Cluniiniau. 
James Wilson. 
O'Brien Sc McKoy. 
Hale 6i Co. 
Rockafcller & Co. 
John Sears dc Co. 



Logan 8l Thompson. 
DnrkesB & Co. 
J. T. Layton. 



Name I 



I Lnin Citv Cu 
Basin Co... 

, „ UNION < 

Homimi 

I La Grande D.'i 

WASCO ( 

I Hood River an 
Water Ditch < 

VAMHILI. 

I Liifayette Wate 
M. Co 



Tlie attention o 
settlement of the 
which the greater 
towards the divei 
other portion of tl] 
mainly make up tli 
able to give the fol 



The number of ( 
j aggregate run of Hi 
a capacity of from r 



With the Location! 



Locution. 

I BAKKR ColJNTyl 

I Baker City 

Pocahontas ... .\ 

I BKNTON count! 

I torvallis ... 
King's Valley.".'! 
''ystervilie .*. . . 
Starrs Point 

Cr.ACKAMAS counJ 

Branch 

Milk Creek.'.'.."" 



I MHwankie. . . 
Ofefeon City. 



, cotOMr-iA count! 
[Scappoose 3reek... 



OREQON. MANUFACTURES. 



121* 



TABLE OF CANALS AND WATER DITCHES— Concluded. 



Kame of Ditch. 



MNN COUNTY. 

Linn Citv Cuual, Lock and 
Busiu Co 



UNION COUNTY. 

Homiim 

La Qrande D. and W. Co. 



WASCO COUNTY. 

Hood River and Mill Creeli 
Water Ditch Co 



YAMHILT. COUNTY. 

Lafayette Water D., M. and 
M. Co 



Source of Water. 



Ea^le Creek. 



It s 

OS* 



^3 Cost. 

~3 ! 



10 



$40,000 
10,000 



5,000 



10.000 



Kamo of Owners. 



[8on. 
Dement, Lovejoy & Tbomp- 



Pcters Sc Co. 
Arnold, IlalKcy St, Co. 



Ferguson, Clmpman & Gates. 
Allen, EckleB Sc Canipl)ell. 



MANUFACTURES. 

Tlie attention of tbe early inhabitants of this portion of the Pacitic, having been for yeure after the first 
settlement of the Stute almost entirely devoted to' aKrioultnnil pnrsuitH and the raising of stock, for 
which the greater portion of its area is admirably adapted, but little was done for a sorios of years 
towards the diverxion of its innncnBC watur ])<>\ver and other resources to manufacturing purposes. No 
other portion of the world possesses 8Ui>erior advantages for the uuinufacture of the great staples which 
mainly make up the commerce of the world. This department is yet in its infancy here, and we are only 
able to give the following brief synopsis of its operations. 



! GRIST MILLS-FLOUR. 

The number of Grist Mills in the State is sixty-three, of which tifty -five are propelled by water, with an 
aggregate run of stone of one hundred. Several of these mills are of the most extensive character, with 
a capacity of from two to three hundred barrels per day. 



TABLE OF GRIST MILLS, 

{With the Location, Name, Run of Stone, the Capacity per Day, Power Used, Cost or Valuation, and 

Occupant's Nunie of each. 



Ixicntlon. 



BAKER COUNTY. 

Daker City 

Pocahontas 



BENTON COUNTY. 

Corvallis 

King's Valley 

Oysterville .'. 

Starr's Point 



Cr.ACKAMAS COUNTY. 

Branch 

Milk Creek 



MAwankie. . . 
Oregon City. 



COLUMBIA COUNTY. 

Scappoose ?reek 



Nnmo uf Mill. 



1 No.riiii 
.Stoiii". 



Ruckles ..., 
Pocahontas . 



Altrees :. 

Chambers | • 

Dodge, Bensil & Co. . 
Reedei's , . 



Fosters .. 
Cuttings.. 
Hardings . 
Howarxls . 
Standard . 
Imperial. . 



Poppletons ' 3 



Capacity ! 
per rtay. Tower 



111)18. 



135 
150 



100 



water. 



Cost. 



(30,000 
40,000 



Tresoiit Occupants. 



J. S. Ruckles. 
Chambers & Bowen. 



Edward S Altree. 
iidland Chambers. 
Podge, Benvil & Co. 
Thomas Ueeder. 



i'. Foster. 
Cutting St, Son. 
A. M. Harding. 
C. T. Howard. 
Brndbury Sl Kellogg. 
Lorocque, Savior £ Co. 



2,000 W. G. Poppleton. 



122* PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 


TABLE OP GRIST MILLS— Contikubd. 


Locntinn. 


Name of Mill. 


N'o.run 
Stone. 


Ca|ia«;lt.v 
pcrdsy. 


Power. 


Cost. 


FrPicntOccupanU. • 


DOUOLAS COUNTV. 

Calapooyii Creek 

Canvonville 


Oakland ....... 


2 
2 

1 
2 
2 
1 

2 

2 
2 
1 

1 
2 

1 

2 

1 
2 
2 

3 


30 
40 
20 
30 
50 

20 

150 
100 
100 
150 

100 


water. 

tt 
tl 
tt 
tt 
tt 

11 

It 

" 
ft 

It 

t( 

tt 

tt 
It 

tt 
tt 

steam. 


$5,000 

9,000 
8,000 
0,00(1 
5,000 
12,000 

5,000 

fi,000 
0,000 
0,000 
8,00(1 

25,000 


YoiinK & Erbanks. 
Murks, SIdeman St. Co. 
Clark & Sherrill. 
John Jtmes. 
John Mnll. 
Mike Everline. 

A. R. McCallum & Co. 

VVa),nier & Klum, 
A. F. Farnham. 
J. P. Parker. 
Me Daniel Sl Sons. 
E. D. Foudray. 

(I. T. Vining. 

•lohn T. ({ilfrey. 
Vaughn & Savior. 
J. L. Hroadoy'. 
J. B. Undei-wood St, Co. 

Henoh Si. Monteitb. 
Williain Crawford. 
MeKiinicy & Turner. 

John ftiesy. 
lloefer &."Zorn. 
James MeKay. 
(ieo. \V. Turner. 


RobtirtB 


V 




Deer Creek 


UoHtiburff . .....■-.■• 




Myrtle Creek 

KverlineB.. 


South Umnnua 


GRANT COUNTY. 

John Day City 

JACK8UN COUNTV. 

Aahland .... .. ........ 




Anliland 




Enjfle 

WiisliinKton "... 

l^nion 


t( it 

Butte Creek 

Phoenix 

JOSEPHINE COUNTY. 

Kerbyville 

LANE COUNTY. 

Cloverdale 

Coast Fork 

Eugene City 

Springfield 

LINN COUNTY. 

Albany 

Scio 

MARION COUNTY. 

Aurora Mills 

Chainpoex 


Valley 

Kerbyville 

Cloverdale 

Mountuin 

Eiineiie City 

Nonpnreil .......... 


Albany 


Scio 










Aui'ora 




















*\IcKavH 










Condit 


Turnei'B 

(%)nu(i|*o 










Salem 




5 
2 


300 
150 


steam. 

tt 


50,000 
Ifi.OOO 


W. W. Mann & Co. 

0. W. Vaughn. 

Oeorge & Beach. 
J. Wayinire. 
Dempsey St, Thorp. 

Henry Bowman. 
VV. L'. Loveland. 

S. O. Freixb. 
J. U. WilkiLSon. 
Olds it Co. 
liiiiebart Bros. 
Hannah &, Wright. 
Reynolds &. Co. 

Dalles Mannf'g Co. 
Walker Bros. 

1. Hondrickgen. 
•J. B. Javksun. 


MULTNOMAH COU.STY. 

Portland 


Vauj^hiifl 


Por.K COUNTY. 

Buenu \ iyta 


0(*t>rL''e & lif^iicti'H 


Dallas , 


WavtnireB 










Uickreal 












U.MATILLA COUNTY. 

Birch Creek 

Tiidinn Air*'nf'v 


nowmiiiiR .... .--- 




















UNION COUNTY. 

Forest Cove 


(^,ve 


2 
1 
3 

1 


CO 

40 

100 

30 


water. 

steam. 

water, 
tt 


10,000 
12,000 
15,000 

r.ouo 


La (Irande 




OroDell 

Suuimerville 

(1 


OroDell 


Stuiirnei-ville 


Union lowii 

WASCO COUNTY, 

Dalles City 

Fifteen Mile Creek 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 


Union 


2 


75 


water. 

tt 
tt 


10,000 

""2,'(i6o 


Dalli's Manui'^ Co.- 


VValkere 












» 11 












■ i It 












William Parsons. 

.lohn Loosley. 
Palmer &. Brown. 
R. C. Kinney. 
Thomas Standley. 
Jiieob Wiiiier. 
Coovert. St McTier. 
John Williamson. 


YAMHILL COUNTY. 

Baker Creek 


Relief 


1 

1 

1 
1 
I 
1 


25 
100 
100 
30 
30 
30 
35 


water, 
.t 

ft 
ft 
ft 
tt 


3.000 
20,000 
10,000 
2,000 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 


Da vton 




Mcilinnville 

North Yamhill 




North "Yamhill 

tl It 

Webfoot 


It 1. 


Palmer Creek 


West Chehaliin 


GleiniB 



The nun 

I hundred an 

feet each p 



Loc 
BENTON 

torvallig .. 
tt 

Va<|uinnI{oi 



CLACKAMA 

Branch 

ft 

ft 

' Canemah ..." 

Clackamas.. 

ft 

Milk Creek!! 



Oreifon Ciiv! 

I Sucker Cieik 

Tualatin 

COLUMItIA 

Beaver VulJe^ 

Rainier. .. 

, " ••■..'.".1 
Sca|i|iooBe Cie 



COO.s (•„, 

!.n>pire City.. 



noUOLAS 

I Calipoovn Cr 
Cunyonvillo 



I Deer Creek.. 

" fi 

[Elk Creek. 

I Oardiner . . . 
LookingGlasV 
M.vrtle C'ek. 
South Umrnni,! 

I len Mile Creel 



GRANT C01 

iliao Creek... 
" ft 

Susan ville ..' 



JACKSON CO 

Applegate Cree 

Ashland Creek. 

*' ft 

Uiitte Creek.. 
Bear Creek.. 
•1 .t 

Jacksonville"".!' 
I I'leaaant Creek f 



yi" i>'--i,- 



[cTier. 

11800. 



OREGON, 



LUMBER — SAW MILLS, 



128» 



LUMBER— SAW MILLS. 

The number of Saw Mills in the State is estimated at one hundred »-\d twenty-Rvc, of which one 
iiundred and ten are propelled hv water. The capacity of theBo mills is estimated at i.n average of 3,500 
feet each per day when in operation. 

TAULK OF SAW MILLS, 

With the Location, Name of Mill, Capacity, Cost, Occupant's Name, .etc., of each. 



Location. 



BKSTON COUNTY. 

Corvallis , . 



Yu(|tilnaIioad. 



Namo of Mill. 



j No. Icapnclty- 
.Siiws. t'l.pcrilay, 



Corvallis 

McCiiiicH 

MiiBons 

iieeder & Co.'s . 



ri.ACKAMAS COUNTY. 

lirunch ('owfields . 

MaKiictlH . . 
Ziimwolls 

Canemah Caiieniiih , 

Clackamas Oluckanias 

" Madooim 

Milk Creek Howards 

" MavK 

" " JTiiillinKors .. 

Oreifon City ()reKon City. 

Sucker Cicek ()8wenro 

Tualatin Tualatin 



COI.UMIIIA COUNTY. 

Heaver Valley 



Oilbreaths 
. Illaiiiiltons . 
liainivr Rainier 



Scnppoose Creek I'oppletoiis . 

Kicliliind .. 



CdllS COUNTY. 

Empire City 



Simpsons 

IjUscs 

Winch'ter 8c Wasson 



DOUGLAS COUNTY. 

Calipooya Creek 

Caiiyonvillo 



Pollocks 

Canyon 

Catcliin^rs 

Lawrences 

Yocnms 

Deer Creek | Itnideiis 

" " IPcleis 

Elk Creek | Mnlvanys 

Gardiner (lardiner Mill Co. 



Looking Glass Creek 

Myrtle Cicek 

South Ummpiii 

Ten Mile Creek 



GRANT COUNTY. 

Pino Creek 



Snsanville . 



JACKSON COUNTY. 

Applegate Creek 

Ashland Creek 



Utitt« Creek. 
Bear Creek.. 



Jacksonville 

Pleasant Creek 



Doyles 

l)y "res 

Everlines. 
Gunieys. . 
Ten Mile . 
Weeklys . 



lioys 

Deans 

Porter Sl Co.'s. 



Wells 

Hur^adine. . 

Hemans 

Southerland . 
Lindleys . . . 

.Veils 

Kurroughs . . 
Hop wood... 



1,200 



2.000 

10.000 

8,000 



3,000 



12,000 
8,000 
4,000 



4,000 

2,(M)0 

10,000 



1,000 
6,000 



2,000 



Power. 



water. 



steam, 
water 



steam. 



Cost 



Trcscnt Occupants. 



Henry P. Harris. 
Robert Y. McCune. 
Gcor|i{e Mason. 
Ueeder St, Co. 



$1,000 



2,000 

10,000 

6,000 



4,000 



water. 



steam. 



3,000 



2,000 

1,(M)0 

10,000 



2,.')00 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
6,000 
2,000 



water 



Cowtield k Sou. 

Mii^nett Sl Co. 

J. Zumwolt. 

Canemah AL Co. 

W. W. & H. 8. Back. 

Mallijon & Bro. 

C. T. Howard. 

L. May. 

J. G. Trullinger. 
6,000 Miller & Pease. 
12,0001,1. G. Trulliiiirer. 
10,000 Pease &. Moore. 



3,0(10.1. C. Gilbreath. 
2,OO0i,T(>el Hamilton. 
8,000 Dean Blanchard. 

S. A. Howe. 

2,000 W. (J. Popplfiton. 
4,000;R.M.&K.H. Watte. 




A.M. Simpson. 
W. H. Luse. 
Wiuchester & WasBou, 



steam. 



water. 



steam, 
water. 



1,^00; Harris St. Williams. 

Cliarlcs Kinimel. 

Ijulin Catching. 

i B. V. Lawrence. 

Clurk St. SliirriU. 

S. B. Braden. 

iPbil. Peters. 

3,000 N. E. Mnlvanv. 

IGiirdiner M. Co. 

James Doyle. 

iJiimes Dyre. 

I Mike Everline. 

Robert Gnrney. 

iMcCullucli. 

I William Weekly. 



5,000:j. Roy&Co. 
3,000 T. P. Dean. 
10,000 J. R. Porter & Co. 



2,0001 Justice Wells. 



2,000 
800 
2,000 
2,000 
800 
5,000 
2,000 



R. B. Hargadine. 

A. V. Gillette. 

Willinm Soutlierland. 

M. Lindley. 

Giles Wells. 

D. H. Burroughs. 

Thomas Hopwood. 



■'•f 






I' 



124* 



PAOiriO COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TABLE OF SAW MILLS.-Continukd. 



Location. 



Mamo of Mill. 



TTfHT 

HawH 



JORCPHINE COUNT*. 

IllinoiB Uiver Illinois River. 

JuupOtt' Joe Jump Olt' Jou. 



I.ANK COUNTY. 

Bear Creek 



Saylora . 



Cloverdule Cloverdiile.. 

Coast Fork HHzletons. . . 

" " I Mountain .. . 

East Fork 0(<le 

Eugene City I 

" " Eugene City 

Hillg Creek 

Long Tom 



LoBt Valley 

Middle Fork 

Siuslaw 

SprinKtield 

West Fork 

Willamette River . 

(( (( 

WilliamB Branch.. 



LINK COUNTY 

Albany 



HilU . 

Boyd8 

Clieshires 

Ij<mt Valley.. 
Middle Fork. 

Siualaw 

Nonpareil 

Whilneyg 

GayB . .* 

Manolieldg . . 
Willinmi) .... 



RiipertM 



Scio Smith & Curl 



MARION COUNTY. 

Aurora 

Salem 



MULTNOMAH COUNTY. 

East Portland 

Portland 



POLK COUNTY. 

Buena Viata ■ 

Dallas 



UNION COUNTY. 

Forest Cove . . 

Lu Grande 

Oro Dell 

Summerville 



WASCO COUNTY. 



Dalles City. 



Fifteen Mile Creek. 

i( t( li 

Hood River. 



Estes St. Stimson'e. . 
Ilarbaugh Si. Stit^cl. 



Tiipaclty— I 
Kt.iicrilay. Power. 



4,0()0 



George St, Beach's. 

Cruwfordfl 

Ualloi'ks 



DemosB . 
Mvers... 

Ofds 

Linktou . 



" Neals 



Moshiers 

Smiths 

Burfords 

Stone Sl Parker" i 
Corums 



YAHHII.I. COUNTY. 

Baker Creek 

Branch 

Deer Creek 

Dodson' B Creek 

Nortl) Yamhill, Branch. 



Panther Creek. 



West Chehulim. 



Johns 

Gaines 

Toneys . . . . 
Thomas ... 

Alveys 

Fairchilds . 
Hibbards . . 
Adams . . . . 
Ensleys ... 

Moors 

Brntschers . 



2,000 
1,5U0 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,(K)0 

a.ooo 

2,(KM) 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 

;},oo(i 

2,000 
2,000 
10.000 
2,(KMI 
•l,0(K) 
5,000 
1,500 



water. 



steam, 
water. 



Coiit. 



Preient Occupantj. 



$'^,000 liOgan dc Thompson. 
William Gibson. 



3,000 
3,000 
4,000 
4,INm 
4,000 
4,(MI0 
1,000 
5,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,001) 
3,000 
4,000 
3,000 
10,000 
4,000 
4.000 
8,000 
2,000 



S. H. Suylor. 



Ilnzlfton. 

William Kolfey. 
-^— I'ctree. 
M. O. Mt(;arty. 
F. B. Dunn St, Co. 
Hills St. Moore. 

Boyd. 

Cheshire. 

Ij. Trobridgu. 



•T. B. Underwood Sl Co. 



5,000 



J. W. Gay & Co. 

MauHrmld St Bro. 
Thomas Williams. 



Jutnes Howard. 
Smith St Curl. 



5,000 



Mirhnel Rappn. 
Forsyth, Patty St Co. 
Roork & Witiou. 



J. H. Smith. 

Carter, Haydcn St Co. 



Genrgo St Beach. 
K. J. ('lawford St Co, 
E. T. Ilallock. 



7,000 
5,000. 



2,000 water. 
2.000 " i 



DemogH. 
Mvers. 
7,000 1 Olds &.'(;o. 



3,000 
3,000 
3,000 i 
3,000! 



5,000 
2,000 
2,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
6,000 
3,000 
3,000 
4,000 



5,000 



2,500 
2,.'>00 
4,000 
4.000 
3.000 
3,000 



O. II. Weslev. 



•T. II. Moshicr. 
Theodore Smith. 
G. W. Burfoid. 
Stone St Parl<er, 

Coram. 

P. Neul. 



8,000' . 

l/iOOi Gaines. 

l,.'>00iToiiev&: Co. 

2,01MI Klomis. 

2,000 Wimer St Co. 
2,000 FaiiihildH St Co. 

2.000 J. J McCov. 
S.OOOJAdamsAi Jones. 

2.0001 John Enslev. 
2,000 j Oliver M<K)r. 
2,000 8. Bnitschcr. 



Woolen Mills. — There are four woolen mills in the Stale of Oregon. That belonging to the Wil- 
lamette Manufacturing Company, located at Salem, incorporat«d by the Legislature in 185C, and which 
has been in active operation since that time, is the oldest establishment of the kind on the Pacillc Coast. 



The capital 

thousand tw 

plain and ft 

Oregon woo 

thirty-three 1 

machinery is 

The Orego 

1865. The , 

of brick and 

half stories hi^ 

and tliirty-eig 

hundred and I 

thoinannfactoi 

I remaining two 

! Company at I) 

I operations of t 

I 1,000,000 poun, 

, Papkr.— TIm 
Oregon Citv, 
other niannJiuf( 
ufactmc has ihi 

j printing paper v 

Fou.vnniK.s- 
einploycd, the d 
opmeiit of the e 
inuy he enunien 
Iron Works, anc 
I Cherry at Alban 

Tannkriks.— 
the arlicle cornnii 
ol leather is cnrr 
quality are ahinn 
bark, there are b 
only lo a limited 
and Oregon will 

Manufacture 

Pioneer Oil Com 

I 1 his company pn 

j erecting three mi 

almidy progrt'KKe 

the businetiM, wei 

ex|)erinieiit of <ii| 

to be Well aduplec 

. TURPE.NTINK Al 

extent in Oregon. 
I sive «el,| for the li 
I for some time piiKt 

for which they tin 
I to be of a siip'erioi 



Congress has gn 
pnrposes.and the 1 
up toSept. 1, 18(j(i 



, The Oregon Ce 

j of Oregon, for the 

I inal capital, |2,()00, 

i iifuctory , J, R. Mo 

Supreme Court ; J. 

ifomiB St Oregon 

and contractor ; J. ^ 

Ihis Company has: 

acres of line "agricu 

per cent, interest on 

very valuable one, i 

commenced— not lat 



^^'^fr'rmrmmfrr 



OREQON. MANUFAOTURBS — RAILROADS. 



126* 



The capital Btock of the concern is $3(M),000, and the cnpncity of the works jh aufflcient to tnni out one 
thouiand two hundred yards per day. The styles of goods manufactured consist of blankets, cloths, 
plain and fancy cnssimeres, tweeds, flannels and yam, all of a superior quality, and exclupively of 
Oregon wool. There are in use Ave sets of cards, one thousand eight hundred and sixty spindles, and 
thirty-three looms, with all the accompanying machinery. One hundred hands are employed, and the 
machinery is propelled by a double turbine water wheel of over one hundred horse power. 

The Oregon City Sfunufacturing Company, incorporated in 1864, has been in operation since August, 
1865. The company has a cash ciipital of $100,000, paid up in gold coin. The main building, which is 
of brick and stone, is one hundred and ninely-flve feet long by flt>y four feet iu width, and is throe and h 
half stories high. The works coiipist of six sets of curds, one thousand nine hundred and twenty spindles, 
and thirty eight looms, with all the other requisite machinery, which is propelled by water, equal to one 
hundred and fifty horse power. One hundred and sixty operatives are employed, and the capacity of 
the manufactory is two thoustmd yards per day, of cloths, cassimeres, blankets, tweeds, flannels, etc. The 
renmining two CHtitblishments— the Kagle Woolou Mills at Hrownsville, and the Ellendale Manufacturing 
Company ut DuIIhs, are iu succ(>s8ful operation, the former turning out 500 yards of cloth per day, and the 
operations of the latter being conflned to the manufacture of flannel. These establishments work up 
1,000,000 pounds of wool eucli year. 

Paper. — The only manufactory in this department is that of the Oregon City Paper Mills, located at 
Oregon City, wliicli hits liecn l>ut a short time in operiition. The facilities for this, as is thu case with 
other niannfactories in Oregon, are abundant. Owing to the want of the requisite machinery, the man- 
ufacture has thus fur been conflned to straw paper. It is culciil' 'cd that during tlie present year sutflcient 
printing paper will be niunulactured to supply llie wants of thi- 'W8pa|>ers of the State. 

Fou.sniiiE.s. — There are a number of foundries an<l machine shops in Oregon, which are kept steadily 
employed, the deinund for this character of work couKtantlv increahing with the rapid growth und devel- 
opment of the e.xteiiHivu resources of the State. Among the principal establisliments ni this department 
may be eniinierutLMl tlio foinidry and machine shop of Drake Ac Moore, at Salem, Oregon; the Oregon 
Iron Works, and the Willamette Iron Works, at Portland ; and the foundry and machine shop of A. F. 
Cherry at Albany. 

Tannkhiks.— When the abundant facilities for the businef>s in this State, and the high prices which 
the article coiiinitinds abroad are taken into consideration, it is a nmttcr of surprise that the manufacture 
of leather is carried on in Oregon to so limited an extent. Wliilo the supplies of hides of the very best 
quality are abundant, and the article cheap, with inexhaustible quantities of goodoak,flr and hemlopk 
bark, there arc but tiftcen tanneries in the whole State, the operations of most of which are curried on 
only to a linntcd extent. Tiie example set by California will doubtless soon be followed by this State, 
and Oregon will send a superior article of lea'ther to the Atlantic markets. 

Manufactuuk ok Li.NSKEi) Oil.. — Some months since articles of incorporation were filed by the 
Pioneer Oil Company of Oregon, with the Secretary of State, the capital stock being fixed at $800,000. 
This company propose to enter largely into the numufucture of linseed oil, for which puipose they intend 
erecting three iiiiils, located at Salem, Oregon City, and Portland, the work upon the first of wfiich has 
alivady progressed to a considerable extent. An' agent of the company of considerable experience iu 
the busiuetis, went to tlie Atlantic States some months since to purchase the requisite machinery. The 
ex|)eriment of cultivating flax, wliich has been thoroughly tested, proves the soil und climate of Oregon 
to he well adapted to its production, the yield being from twenty to thirty bushels of seed per acre, 

TuuPENTiNK AND Kosi.N. — The manufacture of 'turpentine and rosin is carried on to a considerable 
extent in Oregon, tlie imuienBe furctits of fat pine and balsam producing trees uflbrding tlio most exten- 
sive field for the buniness. Messrs. I. A. Wood & Co., of Portland, the pioneers in this department, have 
for some time past been engaged in the manufacture of turpentine, varnish, rosin, pitch and axle grease, 
for whicli tlicy find a ready market. Tlie articles shipped by them to the Eastern States, are pronounced 
to be of a superior quality. 

PITIILIC SCHOOLS. 

Congress has granted to the State one-eighteenth of the 'surveyed la^ds in the State for educational 
purposes, and the fund arising from the sale thereof is placed in the State Treasury. The amount received 
np to Sept. 1, 18G6, is: School Fund, $lU,:^r4 ; Uuivci-sity Fund, $'J,'>>0(}. 

i 
RAILROAD. 

The OiiEtiON Centkai.. — This Company was incorporated October 6th, 1866, under the Ooneral Laws 
of Oregon, for the purpose of constructing the Oregon end of the California iV Oregon Kuilroad. Nom- 
inal capital, $'J,l)00,0()0. Incorporators : ,T. 8. Smith, agent and manager of the Willamette Woolen Man- 
ufactory ; J. K. Moores, merchant and capitalist ; Jesst^Applegate, farmer ; E. D. Shuttuck, Judge of the 
Supreuie Court : J. H. Mitchell, attorney ; Hon. H. W. Corbett, wholesale grocer and proprietor of the Cal- 
ifornia k, Oregon Stage Line, and recently elected United States Senator; Joel Palmer, fanner, miller, 
and contractor ; J. Gaston, attorney ; Mr. Gaston has been appointed the General Agent of the Company. 
This Company has received the Congressional land grant, consisting of about three und a half million 
acres of fine agricultural, grassing, and timber lands. The State has also assumed the payment of sev^n 
I per cent, interest on $1,0<IO,000 of the Company's^ bonds, running for twenty years. Tlie franchise is a 
very valuable one, and as soon as the county and individual subscriptions are received, the work will be 
commenced— not later than May, 1867. 




126* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TABLE 

Of the Countlei of the State, with the Popnlation and Vote of each. 



COUNTIKH. 



Baker 

Benton 

Clackamua. . 

ClatBop 

Columuia . . . 

Cuog 

Curry 

Douglas 

Grant 

Jackfon 

Josephine... 

Lane 

Linn 

Marion 

Multuomali . 

Polk 

Tillamook . . 

Umatilla 

Union 

Waeoo 

WuBhinuton . 
Yamhill 



County Rcati. 



Anbum 

Corvalli* ■ . . ■ 
Oregon City. 

AHtoi'ia 

St. Hfleng . . . 
Kmpire City. 
Ellensburg. . . 
KuBeburK ■■•. 
('anyon City. 
•FHckBonville . 
Kei'byville .. 
Eugene City. 

Albany 

Salem 

I'ortland 

Dalian 

Lincoln 

Umatilla 

Tja Orando... 

Dalles 

HillHlioro 

Lafayette. . . . 



Totals 52,164 



I'cipiiliitlon, 
INW. 



;j.074 

:i,4<ir) 

4!)8 

rm 

384 

39:j 

4,514 



3,7:if) 

4.780 
«.77a 
7,(188 
4.150 
a.G'J.'i 



l.tiSit 
2,801 
3,245 



I'oniilntlon, 
INDft. 



Kt7 

3,802 

(i89 

428 

551 

:i06 

3,7(m 

2,l!t3 

2,!t55 

792 

5,527 

7,70'.t 

8,371 

f,,:j8(i 

4,093 
211 
1,805 
2,a34 
1,898 
3,106 
4,018 



65,090 



Vote, IM4. 

405 
700 
952 
181 
128 

100 
1,015 



1,036 

348 

1,186 

l,7.'>fi 

1,!MI1 

l,!Kt5 

864 

48 

911 

728 

678 
834 



18.3.50 



Vote. IH«6. I Value of all 
rroperty, IHW 



1,021 

1,240 

172 

193 

219 

92 

l,l«i*i 

571 

1,239 

322 

1,279 

2,250 

2,193 

2,220 

1,120 

88 

7!»2 

699 

762 

824 

1,128 



20,170 



t:J22..'.01 

1,193.972 

l,t!05,594 

321,473 

l.V.t,970 

180,900 

■ m,rm 

l,:i3l.208 

441,763 

1,298,465 

220.409 

1,686,953 

3,485,816 

2,944,628 

4,517,291 

l,03:i,179 

43,911 

869,132 

462,3!).'i 

1,771,424 

888.82.1 

9!IO,4.'i0 



t24,872,7(>2 



LIST OP NEWSPAPERS 

Published in Oregon, with the lioculity and Time of Publication, Name, PubllBherB* Names, etc. 



COUNTY. 



Maine. 



Benton lOn/.ette 

Clackamas 'Enterprise . 

Jackson 'Rc|)oi-ter. . . 

" ;Sentinel ... 

Lane 

Linn 

Marion 

Multnomah . 



Umatilla. 
Wasco , 



Yamhill Courier. 



State Journal 

States Rights Democrat.. 

American Unionist 

Henild 

Oregonian 

Paciiic Chriatlan Advocate 

Press 

Mountaineer 



Locality ori'ukll- 
cutlon. 



Corvallis . ... 
Oregon City. 
Jacksonville . 

Eugene City . 

Albany , 

Salem 

I'ortiiind 



Umatilla. . 
Dalles. . . . 
Lafayette 



Wlien Issued. 


Vol. 


Weekly.... 


4 
1 


D'ly&wly 

" " 


3 

12 

3 

2 

1 

2 

17 


Weekly.... 


13 

1 
7 
2 


D'ly&W'ly 

Weekly.... 



Pulilisliers. 



William H. (Jurter. 
D. C. Ireland. 
F. R. Stewart. 
B. F. Doweil. 
Harriiion R. Kincaid. 
Abbott Sl Kruwn. 
W. A. M.PhcrBon it Co. 
Oregon Herald Prt'gCo. 
Henry L. Pittock. 
Devore, Sti-atton Sc Co. 



Cownie St Ilullorun. 
J. H. Upton. 



LIBRARIES-PUBLIC AND SOCIETY. 



COUNTY. 



Marion 

ti 

Mnltnomah. 

II 

II 

(I 

Yamhill 



Location. 



Siilem .. . 
II 

Portland. 



Forest Grove. 



Name. 



I Date of 

j Orgiini- 

zation. 



State 

W.' Unmet University IRW 

( 'ill liolic Association 181)5 

Library .Xssociation I 1865 



Mechanics' Institiite 

Odd Fellows 

Paciiic University.... 



18(15 



No. 

V(d8. 



3,500 



L.-iOO 
2,.'>II0 I 
1,000 



STATE FINANCES— DEBT OP THE STATE. 

Bonds, Bounty, 1864 (7 per cent.) $135,000 

Bonds, Bounty, Relief, 1866 (7 percent.) 83,471 



Total debt $218,474 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Receiptt. 

BeceiptB from all Ronrces from Sept. 17, 

1864, to Sept 1,1866 $332,443 



Expenditures. 

Expenditures for all purposes from Sept. 

17, 1864, to Sept,1.1866 $292,3041 



Balance in the Treasury 40,I3*J 



St; 



NAl 



Henry Q. in„„, 
t James 8. Sli„> 

i?|- "■■ I «>*in«t 
fcben Khoades . 
Robert M. Clarl 
S. H. Marleite . 
A. N. Fisher. . 
Joseph K. Kckle 
I ihomns Wellg 



STATI- 
I The Governor, Si 



The Governor, Sc 



Thirt' 



-VA 



William M. Sfewai 
James W. Nve . ' 
il^B. Aslilev 



nisfrict 

'st District SU 

2d District j), 

^d District Kk 

■I'll District if,, 

5th District La 

"Hj District.... iLy 
Jt'i District. , 
«h District. . 



.Cl.t 
.xVy 



9tli District oil 

JOth District.... Wa 



|offlc«?.,f'r"'«'''™"'<'ni 
Z'if,™'»'<'ur.vrarn,c(i 

I SJIcetshicnnlallyon] 



NEVADA 



STATE OFFICERS, 



127" 



STATE OF NEVADA* 

Capital, Canon City. 
Statk OrFiccRi Executive Dkpaktment. 



NAME. 



Offlco. 



Rcildonoo. 



Henry O. HlHiidel ! flovenior | Carson City 

tJaniOH 8. SlliiKcrlmid Liuutvnaiit Oovernur.... 

i C. N. Note wiiro 1 St'cretiiry of Stale 

W. K. I*Hrl<iuHun IControllijr 

Gbeu Khoadc8 iTreuHiirer 

Kobert M. Clarke Attorney Oenci-al 

8. H. Marleite Siirvevur Oeiieral 

A. N. Fislier Siip't Vnblit! IiiHtriietion . 

Jnecph K, Kcixley i Slate Printer 

ThoinnN Wells l(lovernor'n Private Sec'y 



Salary. 



Tonn Exp's. 



3,*i(M) . 

.'l.tiOO . 

ii,rm . 

VirKinia City 1 1,'JOO . 

CarHon City a.OOO . 

FeeH.. 

" I |-.',.»00 . 



|(>,000 Jan'y 

10 per (liein. I " 
a.fiOII 



m\. 



" 1869. 
At will. 



STATK IJOAUn OF EXAMINERS AND STATE PRISON COMMISSIONERS. 
The Governor, Seeretury of State, and Attorney General. 

REGENTS OF STATE UNIVERSITY AND MINING SCHOOL. 
The Qovemor, Secretary of State, and Superintendent of Public Ingtruction. 

REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
Thirty-Ninth Congress Ending March 3d, 1867. 



NAME. 


Offlco. 


Kesldcnce. 


Term Expires. 


William M. Stewart 


Senator 


Virginia City 

Carson City 

Austin 


March 3, 1870. 
Miircli 3, 1867. 


Delos R. Anhlev 


Representiitive 


March 3, 1867. 









LEGISLATURE OF NEVADA.} 
Se.sate— Memdehs, 19. 



DIatrlct 



Counties. 



let District Storey 



2d District Don;,'iiiH James W. Haines 

3d District Esnieraldu 



Nnnios. Terms Expire. 

^C.A.Sunmer ^ Nov. 4, 1868. 

I John Neldon \ ' 

C. C. Stevenson i\nv 9 1870 

lO. H. Grev ^^ov.J.imi*. 



5th District Lander 



Nov. 9, 1870. 

John Ives Nov. 4, 1868. 

I^w Doriin Nov. 9, .1870. 

1.1 i-w . • » It I 1 1. > E. Hutching Nov. 4, 1868. 

^'•'l^»t"«t Humboldt )j J ,i„„ Nov.9;i870. 

George T. Terry Nov. 4, 1868. 

I). W. Welty Nov.9,1870. 

K.i. r»io.,;„. T.,„„ S I^- L. Iliislings Nov. 4,1868. 

''"> !'"•"*=* I^y"" \c. C. Carpenter Nov.9,1870. 

7th District Churchill W. G. Munroe Nov.9,1870. 

8th District Nye F. M. Proctor Nov. 4, 1868. 

«"' District o;n.shy i^] }i: ^i^^::::":::"::::::::::::^:^:^. 

iothDistrict....washoeandRoop J ^\i''^!;s:;;;;^.;::;::::::;::::::::::::::nov:9;{8!^: 



• The State election Uikca piiice first Tuesilnv of Xovembcr, and every two years tliorcaftcr. The terra of the State 
olBccrH is four .veiir», e<>innieni;liiK with the first Monday in December after the election. For list of U. 8. otllccrs in 
Uie .State, sec pane il3 : I'nst OfflfeH, page 27. 

t Ex ollleio Warden of the Wtate Prisiin— salary, $2,S0O perannuin. t Ex oftlcio Adjutant General. 

S Meets biennially on the first Monday of January ; coinpensutiun, $10 per day. 



i'M 




1; ' 



128* 



PACIFIC COAST BU8INB8S DIRBOTORT. 



Ai'xKMiii.y— Mk.mhkiis, .TH. 



Churchill— W. C. Orimcii, J. A. St. Clair. 
Douj<liu(— Wm. M. Ciiiev, K. Miilliirv. 
Eimernlda— II. V. I'oor, J. S. MiiyliiiKh, A. M. 

WiiitfHto. T. M. Hrnwno. 
lliiniholdt— T. V. Juliun, P. V. Punimter, O. K. 

Stamplev. 
Lander — J. U. Jiit'n1)g, Tliomaa J. Teiiimnt, Roburt 

Culleu, J. M. DorNoy. 
Lyon— J. V. Rooney, A. Koncnian, O. W. Wiiltoii. 



Nye — W. T. Jones, JiinieH M. Oroves. 

Onnahy — George Miinclcton, II. II. lience, I). A. 

Ilurton. 
Storev- M. M. Mitchell, John Welnh, A. II. LlwiHk, 

8. K, llime, (}. I. LHmmon, TlioinH* Piirkor, K. 

Hlrothcr, U. 1). Fcrffimon, A. K. Potior, J. L. 

SwHiiuy, OiMir^ti- II. Diiim, J. A.Whcolor. 
Wunhoo &'Roop — ThoniuB II. Prince, W. Ciildwcll, 

G. Foliioiii. 



JUDICIARY— SunuMK Coimit.* 



N.VME OP INCl'MHENT. 



Offlco. 



Rctldonco. 



Tcmi Kxplroi. 



Ralary. 



H. (). lieiitiy I Chief Jiialire |Vir|^iniu City . 

C. M. linmimn ^AxMX'iHte JiiBtico i " " 

J. V. Lewla JAHHOcinte Juatico iCunion City. 

Alfred Htlen 'Clerk I " " . 



iJaniiiiry, IHt>!)l |7,ntM) 

1871 r,ooo 

I " IH73 7,000 

I " IH7li Keea. 



TERMS OP TIIK SUPREME COITRT. 

Firat Mondiiy in Juiiuuiy , April, July and Octolicr. 

DiSTKICT JuixiRa. 



District 



lat. 

ad . 

3d . 

4th. 
5lh. 
6th. 
7th. 
8tb. 



N'aniK of Incumhont. 



lioxlilcnco. 



Ricliard RiainK \ Virginia City January, IH7 1 

Samuel II. \\>ight (^nraon " [ " l«ri 



ICharlea N. Hurria iWaalioe 

I William llitvdon Dayton.... 

jGeorgo G. llerry , ITnionviilu 

'William H. lieatly Analin 

ilienjamin F. Curler .La Plata.. 

is. 11. Chaae JAurora 



Term Expire*. 


lanuar 


y,187l. 




isri. 




isri. 




1871. 




1871. 




1871. 




1871. 


*i 


1871. 



Salary. 

|7,noo 

.'V.OdO 
5,0(M) 

4jm 

3,WII0 

.'>,iN)n 

3,*!()0 
3,000 



JUDICIAL DISTRICTS, AND THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME. 



lat Diat.— Storev. 

2d Diat. — Orniahy and Douglas. 

3d Diat. — Wiiahde and Roop. 



4th Diat. — Lvon. 
5th Diat — Hunilioldt. 
Cth Dist. — Ijander. 



• 7ih Diat. — Nye and Churchill. 
8ih Diat. — Esmeralda. 



TERMS OF THE DISTRICT COURTS. 

Chuhchili. County Kiiat Monday of March, July, and Novrmhcr. 

Douoi.Aa " " " February, May, Auguat, and November. 

E.sMKitAt.nA " . " " Febrnury, May, Auguat, and November. 

lIu.Mnoi.DT " '' " April, Auguat, and December. 

La.siikh " " " MiU'vli, June, September, and December. 

Lyo.n " " " March, June. St.>ptemlier, and December. 

Nyk " " " January, April, and Auguat. 

Orm-siit " " " March, June, September, and December. 

Stouey " " " January, March, June, and October. 

Washok AND Root' Cou.NTiKs " " February, May, Auguaf, unU November. 

SENATORIAL DISTRICTS, AND THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME. 



lat Diat. — Storev County, electa four Senators. 
2d Dist. — Dongfaa Comity, electa one Senator. 
3d Diat. — EamerMlda County, elects two Senators. 
4th Diat. — Huinboldt County, electa two Senators. 
5th Diat. — Lander County, electa two Senators. 
6th Diat. — Lyon County ,'electB two Senators. 



7th Diat. — Churchill County, electa one Senator. 
8th Diat.— Nye County, electa one Senator. 
9th Diat. — O'rniaby Comity, elccla'two Senators. 
10th DJHt.— Waalioe and Roop Counties, elect two; 
Seuutors. | 



[The (Ignrei 

aent the numb, 

|lomiof olflce 

CHI 

I Oato App'e, 

I April'J.5,'Cfi..c 

DC 

June9I, 'n,'>..(-| 

l«<"' '0, •(!<!..!) 
Mar. 21, '(!.'-.. |i 
April 28, '05.. I,; 

ESMI 

I Oct. 99, •C(!..A|, 

,••"'•'(', b7..l,i 
J April .yet!..,!,,, 



Jfw.SI, T^ 

';'ar.2I,T.5. 
I •'"tie 21, '(W. 

Jhh. 12, •fi7. 

Mar. 21, '65. 
I -{"v. r,, -65. 

Mar. 21, 'M. . 
I Di'c 18, •(!«. 
?/''•••'•'■•<!.■>. 
\eh. 2, 'fifi. 

•'line 14, '66. 
Mar. 21, -65. 
•"«r.21,'66.. 



[Uar.21, '65. 



LAND 
■ • Urowi 
•RIakel 
■HInke. 
•f'ox, I 
•Fonrd, 
• FiitH, 
•Holme 
Mifche 
•Pardy, 
•Sawtfll 
•Scherni 
•Sichel, 
•Tlionmi 
Welty, 

LYON 
■Orier, J 



ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS, AND THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME. 



Churchill — Two members. 
Douglas — ^Two. 
Eamenilda— Four. 
Huinboldt — Three. 



Lander — Four. 
Lvon — ^Three. 
Nj-c— Two. 
Ormaby— Three. 



Storey — '"welve. 
Waslioe and Roop — Throe. 



•The terms of Supreme Court Juilt;es, six years; District Judges, four years. For terms of U. 8. Courts, rtc.,scep. 30. 



iDileApp't. 
pc.20, -66 

h""- 6,-65. 
■Jan ;J0,'66. 
I Was, -65. 
K^it-ae, 'fifi. 

^''•8I,'65. 

rj'".'65.. 
r'''l3,'fi5.. 



AR 

Ni 



••Hedmonc 
CAL 
•Abbott, I, 
-Anderson 
• Andrews, 
-Harrett, 
•Harstow, 
■Hilling ' 
. Bliss, 1,. 
Blood, J. 



NEVADA. COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS 



129* 



NOTAHIER PUHLIC-NEVADA. 

[Corrected at the oTxe of the Secretary uf State, January 13th, 18(>7.] 

Date Appoint. Name. Itcitileno*. 

May 31, 'M.-Konilrirk, Daniel.. Dayton 



(The llitnret after tlie nameiof the coiinlieR renre 
Rent the number of Nularieiito which vucli in cntilied 
Term of otttco, two yeurti.] 

CHUUCIIILL COUNTY-1. 

nate App'L Naioo. Rualdcncc. 

April 'J5, 'CO.. Chandler, H. 11.. ..lift Plata. 
DOUGLAS COUNTV-3. 

JuneSI, 'C^.-Chmde, II. O nivnlirook. 

Oct. 10, '(!(!.. Ddvic, Ilenmn Ocnoii. 

Mar. Ul, 'fi!i.. Ilhrvey, Joel A . . . .Oenou. 
April'.28,'(i5..Huwley, A. T Genoa. 

K8MKUALDA COUNTY-,J. 

Oct. 'ia, 'f)r...Al)rahaniii, T. VV... . 

Aug. ll,'fi.'i..Applehv, \V. 1* Aurora. 

,lun. 10, '(ir..l«echlel. V. K . 

April .■), 'liti.. Harris, J. il Silver Veak. 

Mar.'JI, MW»..MeriMlith, W. C.-Auiwii. 
Miir. 'Jl, 'r)5..1'lielpg, K. C Wellington's. 

HUMHOLDT C'()UNTY-12. 

Mar. 21 , VVi . . Uiirneg, H . 

Mnr.ai, •(■).5..niuke, KnmU . 

Mar. 21, 'H.V Dinin, J. J Slur City. 

Mar. 21 , 'Go. . I lolconil). W. A . . . . Unionvillo. 

Mar.2l, 'f).5..KelloKK, •'•-' • 

! Mar. 21, 'to. .Ijewiit, Cliarles . 

i Dec. 24, 'Ct)..Oebonrn, ('harlea 8. . 

April 4, 'fi(i..Koot», I'. K Unionville. 

Dec. 19, T)*'). . Schoppmunn, E....Dnn Glen. 

Feb. 9, 'ti6..8pargur, II. L Hluck Rock. 

LANDER COUNTY-IG. 

Mar. 21, 'to..IJrown, J. D Austin. 

Mar.2l,'to..Hlakely,W. O AuBtin. 

Jmie21,'ti.'j..Hlake, W.J AuHtin. 

Jim. 12, '07. .Cox, U. A AuBtiii. 

Mar.21, '65. .Foard, George R... Austin. 

Nov. ri, '65..Fitt8, G. I' Hig Creek. 

MHr.21, 'to. . llolnieH, A. J Autitin. 

Mar. 21, 'to. . Mitdiell, John A.. -Austin. 

Dec 18, 'f)O..Pttrdy, William Austin. 

Slar.21, '(■>.')..Suwtelle, M. A Austin. 

Feb. 2, 'fiCScherniier, J. II.... Austin. 

I .lime 14, '66..Sichel, J Austin. 

Mar. 21, 'to. .Thomas. R. D Austin. 

[ Mnr. 21, '66. . Welty, 1). W Austin. 

LYON COUNTY— 8. 
iMiir.Sl, '©..Orier, J. W SilverCity. 



Mar.21, 'W.-McDulHe, C. D. 
Junel5,'to..Walton,a.W... 



Silver City. 
Como. 



NYE COUNTY— 13. 
Fob. 23, '60..Henton, A. P . 

Sept. 3, '<i6..Cahill, Thoniw.... . 

Jan. 31, '66. .Carl, A. V Toiynbe City. 

Dec. 24, '6«.. Cook, Justin E . 



June 23, 'to..EdBon, lleinaniiu. 
't. 10, '66.. Fountain, Elius... 



Oct. 



Juno l.'j,' to.. Marker, C. W Mammoth. 

Dec. 26, '65 . . Hunt, Samuel O Indian Spring*. 

July 25, 'to..M.iiuiiiig, W. W... . 

Dec. 18, '66. . Miiloney, Joseph E. . 

May 6, 'to..8hun), John lone. 

Mar. 21, '65. . Soiitli worth, E. C. Ionu> 
Mar.21, '()5. .Stephens, W. S....Ione. 

ORMSHY COUNTY— 4. 

Juno23, '65..DonRon, 8. C Carson City. 

July 14, '66. .Hatch, J. F Carson City. 

Mar. 21, 'to. . Kiug, Samuel D... . Carson City. 
Nov. 24, '66..Wuitz, Adolphus... Carson City. 

SrOREY COUNTY— 12. 

June 13, 'fi6..Hiiriall, W. II Virginia City. 

Juno 18, '66..Chubbuck, S. W...Gold Hill. 
Mar. 21, '<'i^'>. . Fish, Charles H ...Virginia City. 

Mur.22, '6.5.. Hall, W.N Gold Hill. 

Juno 25, '66. . Hoover, VV. D VirginiaCity. 

Sept.2.5, '66.. King, Joseph L.... Virginia City. 

I Mnr. 21, 'to.. Knox, A. C Virginia City. 

Dec. '.il, 't)6. . Lillie, II. C VirginiaCity. 

Doi '.<", tit).. Morgan, II. M Virginia Citv. 

Di'i . 31, '66. . Thompson, M Virginia City. 

Jan. 18, '66.. Van liokkelen, W. 

A. M VirginiaCity. 

Mar.21, '65. .Winn, H. 8 American City. 

Aug. 9, 'tit;.. Wood, W. 8 Virginia City. 

Dec.:)l,'66..Yoi«ig, W. II '■ — . 

WASHOE COUNTY- 6. 

Aug. 10, '66. . Ilowker. J. 5'. Washoe City. 

Oct. 17,'to..Hovlo, William.... Ophir. 

Dec. 19, '1)6. .Coldren, W. D . 

Mar.21, '65.. Clark, Charles S.... Washoe City. 
Mar. 21, 'to. .Harris, Charles N.. Washoe City. 
Nov. 21, 'to..IIackett, Tlios. W.. Washoe City. 

Jan. 2, '67.. Kennedy, W. C .. . 

Mar.21, '65..Smyles, J. C Crystal Peak. 



I " 



i;ii; 



.>'H «! 






lator. 

ators. 
llect two 



rhrce. 



,«ceP' 



,30. 



COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS, 

WITH MAMG, RKSIDKNOE, AND DATE OF COMMISSION OF EACH. 

[Term of office, four years.] 



ARKANSAS. 

■ Date App't. Name. Kciililcncc. 

|Dcc.20, '66. .Redmond, Chas. P. Little Rock. 
CALIFORNIA. 

IXov. 6, 'to.. Abbott, J. M Summit City. 

iJan. 30, '66. .Anderson, N. D Sun Francisco. 

lApril28, 'to.. Andrews, W. O San Francisco. 

iKeb.ae, '66. .Barrett, J. S Sacramento. 

TPeb. 21 , 'to . . Harstow, A San Francisco. 

pan. 7, '67..l)illiugH, J. M Santa Clara. 

1'"cb.ll,'to..Bli8s, W. D Sonoma. 

peb. 13, 'to.. Blood, J. H San Francisco. 



Data Appoint. Name. Rcaldencc. 

Feb. 11, 'to. . Brewer, J. II San Francisco. 

Feb. 11. 'to. .Brack, I^ewis Niipa. 

Dec. 19, '66..Buckbee, John R. .Quincy. 

Feb. 27, '65. . Cad wallader, E Sacraiiiento. 

Fob. II, 'to. .Caldwell, J. I Nevada. 

Mar. 8, 'to..Chubbuck, C. E.. . . Placerville. 

May 20, 'to. .Crosby, H. K San Francisco. 

Feb. II, 'to. .Cross, 8 Sncrnintnto. 

Jan. 5, '66.. Dick, John Oroville. 

Mar. 15, '&5.. Elliott, L. W Red Bluff. 

Feb. II, 'to.. English, W. O Sacramento. 

Jan. 5, '66. .Fowler, E Summit City. 



130* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIHBOTORT. 



Date Appoint 
Feb. 11, '65. 
Feb. 11, '65. 
Nov. 6, '65. 
Feb. 11, '65. 
B^eb. 21,66. 
Nov. 6, '65. 
Feb. 21,-65. 
Aug. 9, '66. 
Feb. 13, '65. 
Feb. 21,-65. 
Feb. 21, '65. 
Feb. 11, '65. 
Nov. 14, 65. 
Feb. 11, '65. 
Feb. 11, 'R).. 
Feb. 11. '65.. 
Feb. 11, '65.. 
Mar. 18, '65.. 
ApriI17,'65.. 
Feb. 11, '65. . 
Aug. 14, '66.. 
July:?, '(a.. 
Feb. 11,'«5.. 
Oct. 22, •(■ 
Feb. 11, T.^.. 
April 1,-65.. 
Sept. 25, '65.. 
May 18, '65.. 
Feb. 10, '66.. 
Feb. 11, '65.. 
.June 23, '65.. 
Feb. 11, '65.. 
Feb. 11, '65.. 
Ang. 18, '66.. 
Mar. 19, '66.. 
Feb. 11, '65.. 
Mar. 7,-65.. 
Mar. 4, '65. 
May 4, '(>.'>.. 
Jnne 3, -65.. 
Feb. 11,-65.. 
Feb. II, -65.. 
Sept. 25,-66.. 
Dec. 5, 'G!).. 
Feb. 27, -65. . 
Feb. 20, '65. . 
Feb. 21, '65.. 
June 23, '66.. 
Feb. 11, '65.. 



July 17, '65. 
Dec. 18, -65. 



Mar. 11, '65. 
Jan. 10, '67. 
July 28, -Co. 



Maj 10, -65. 
Junii 23, '66. 
Feb. 21, 66. 
Feb. II, '65. 
Mar. 5, '66. 
Jan. 10, '67. 



Name. Residence. 

.Green, Jumea Oroville. 

. Uuuld, A. 8 San Francisco. 

.Gnemey, Clinton ..San Frar."i8co. 

-Hall, Bradley San Rafael. 

.Hallet, Andrews. ..Cliico. 
.Hauiilton, N. A. ...Placerville. 

. Haigbt, Henry San Francisco. 

. Hermann , Samuel . . San FninciBco. 

.Huefner, W San Fnuicisco. 

.IIonianB, H.S San Francisco. 

. Hopper, P. J Folsom. 

.llorublower, F. A.. Placerville. 
. Hubbard, C. V. D . . Mary sville. 

.Johnson, J. B San Juan. 

.Johnston, J. J Markleeville. 

.Joice, E. V San Francisco. 

.Kno.x, G. T San Francisco. 

.I^utham, W. B., jr.. Mary sville. 

. Lawton, W. W San 'Fnuicisco. 

. Lowis, S. G Monitor. 

.Lewis, K. P Sun Francisco. 

. Martin, Edward . . . Watsonville. 
. MeiiU, S San Francisco. 

'.iiller, F. K Independence. 

. Milliken, I. T .San Francisco. 

-Mitchell, D. C Markleeville. 

.Morgan, H. M San Francisco. 

. Murdock, F. B San Jose. 

. Murfey , S. S San Francisco. 

. Peck'iain, E. P. . ..San Francisco. 

.Uhees, H. N Marysville. 

. Kobinson, P Sacramento. 

.Sawyer, O. V San Francisco. 

.Senter, Charles N..San Jo.'fe. 

■ Simpson, J. L lied Blutf. 

.Smiih, N. P San Fraficisco. 

.Spencer, W. K Grass Valley. 

oievtnson, J. D.. . . San Francisco. 

. Strange, H Downieville. 

.Swim, D. K Silver Mountain. 

.Taylor, J. M Sun Francisco. 

.Tliibault, F. J .San Francigco. 

.Tibbey, Henry S...San Francisco. 

Walton, T. H.' O. . . Camptonvillo. 

Ward, J. S Susauville. 

Webster, J. H Stockton. 

. Wetzlar, J Sacramento. 

. Wliite, John San Franciscr . 

Williani.s, L. W. ..Nevada. 

IDAHO TERRITORY. 

Hays, J. M Ruby City. 

Lyintin, James Silver City. 

ILLINOIS. 
Hoyne,P. A Chicago. 

LOUISIANA. 
.Labatt, Henry J...N'iw Orleans. 

MAINE. 
, O' Donnell , James . . Portland. 

M\ssAcnur,.:iTK. 

Angell, Geo. F Boston. 

Bell, J. S BoBton. 

Jennisuu, S Boston. 

Swan, C. A. F Boston. 

Tolle, N. C Boston. 

.WpyjJobu M Buetoii. 



MARYLAND. 

Date Appoint, Na' i". Rcildcnce. 

Feb. 2, -66. .Hill, W B Baltimore. 

Nov. b, '65..Whelan, Cbas Baltimore. 

MICHIGAN. 
Jnnel.5, '65. .Waterman, W. J.. .Detroit 
NEW JERSEY. 

Jan. 24,''67..Slaigbt, N. C Jersey City. 

■ NEW MEXICO. 
May 18, '65.. Watts, J Santa F6. 

NEW YORK. 

Dec. 22, -66..Barnum, E. P New York city. 

June 13, '66.. Billings, O. P. C. . .New York city. 

Oct. 3l,-66..Cloyd, J. C New York city. 

April 3, '65..Compton, M New York city. 

June 15, '65. .Corey, E. F..Tr New York citv. 

Mar. 9,-66..CowIes, G. W New Y^ork citv. 

Feb. 23, '66.. Dean, J. J New York citv. 

Feb. 5, '66..Earl,C. H White Plains." 

Mar. 6, '65. . Fenner, C. G New York city. 

Mar. 2, '65. . Fuller, F New York city. 

June 21, '65..Furni8s, W New York city. 

Aug. 23, '65. .Hamilton. J. W.. ..New York citv. 
Feb. 26,'66..IIollister,E. P. ... New York citV. 

Mar. 27, '65. . Hyer, J. G Ne- York city. 

Nov. 6, '65.. Irons, Samuel New York city. 

Nov. 27, '65.. Johnston, Geo. P.. .New York city. 

Feb. 23, '66. . King, H. C New York city. 

Nov. 20, '6J..Lay, S Now Yorir citv. 

Dec. 12. '65. . Lull, M. II Now York d, V. 

Mar. 4,'65..Merydith, II. B. . ..New York city. 

May 15, 'f>5..M(,nee, J. B New York city, 

Jnne28, '65..Nettlet<)ii, Chas. ...New York city. 

June 23, '65... Silversmith, J New York city. 

Nov.27,'t')5. .Sloat, L. W New York city. 

July 7, '66. .Smith, I. S New York city. 

June 15, '()6.. Swan, Sanmel. ...New York city. 

Jlay 15, 't!5..Tillot8on, G New York city. 

Feb. 22, '65.. Turner, G. J New York city. 

June 15, 1)5. .Van Ilesse, C New York city. 

Nov. 6, '65. .Whipple, J. Jr New York cilV. 

Mar. it, '66. . Wilc().\, F. A Now York city. 

June2l,'(i5.. Winchester, F. S...Now York city. 
Aug. 14, '66. .Young, N New York city. 

OHIO. 
Mar. 4, 'tW.. Carpenter, S. S. ...Cincinnati. 

OREGON. 
Feb. 5, '66. .Boyd, II Portland. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Oct. 17, '65.. Blood, B. F Philadelphia. 

Sept. 12, 'ti5.. Burton, A. M Philadel|ihia. 

July 16, '66.. Jackson, J. H. T...Philiidelphia. 
Jnuo23, '65..McClaren, John ...Pittsburg. 
April 17, '66. .Taylor, S. L Philadelphia. 

RHODE ISLAND. 
July 29, '65. . Martin, Henry Providence. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
Feb. 21, '66.. Levin, N Ciiarleston. 

UTAH TERRITORY. 

June 23, '66. . Clayton, W Salt Lake Citv. 

June 13, '66. . Wood, D Salt Lake City. 



The State ol 

f'"' 1 the thirty 

its present limi 

tlie water of tli 

Congress, upp„ 

tween the thir 

from the thirty 

11,520,000 „o,.e, 

gent upon »;ie u, 

area, there is a ( 

tion— iirig,„io„ 

available - prodi 

valleys watered 

and Esmeralda, ^ 

¥ng in the Un'm 

'ng to irrigation. 

wliich supply a j, 

vailed in this reg 

Itisowinggolel 

tion among the me" 

principal wealili. 

'852, owing to the 

a f'ch deposit of 8u 
, present site of Vi,.^ 
'amoug throughout 
j'"at caused by the f 
; mines were opened 
pVhilethise.voitemel 
I'o send forth a laJ 
ptt'Klily on the incre 
'ypeofwliuti„,f..g,iJ 

'" >vhich (1,0 OonerJ 
;ProdP:u,ftM„Sfa(el 
"•■^ entire cost of thil 
I'w'ils will amount tJ 
''"«'" at $li,<Ml7,H[)] 
lliiit over |."j,0(IO,()oo i 
""■"•C". Improveme.] 
opemtions in thig jA 
ilie future to prove til 



STATE LANDS, 

The lands belonging to the State arc estimated at 5,014,622 acres, as follows : School, 3,85'/^,943 ; Afj 
cultural and MecJianical Arts, 1,500,000; Internal Improvements, 500,001); University, 46,080 ; Publj 
Buildings, 12,800; State Prison, 12,800; Congressional Representation, 90,000. 



TlionumberofqnJ 
''liich one hundred atl 
.;' "•«'<"•• The HfrJ 
If'imchineryandthel 
l«''tivothousarul,I„i|f 
^"Pcration, prin.ipalL 
;l establishments an J 
taount of business, 

, ,'?.'"<'' the, ||,c„v„yi 



m- 



Bston. 



NEVADA. AREA AND RESOURCES 



131^ 



AREA AND RESOURCES. 

The State of Nevada extends from the thirtvBeventh to the forty-Becond dejrree of north latitude, an^ 
fp'. .1 tlie thirty-eighth to the forty-third degree of longitude, west from WaBliington. It comprises within 
itB present limits nn area of about 81,53;t square miles, or 52,181,960 acres, 8:J2,000 of which are covered by 
the water of tlie various lakes in this State, IcuviiiK a total land area of 51,353,060 acres. I^y an Act of 
Congress, approved May 5th, 1866, there was added to this State on the east all the territoiy lying be- 
tween the thirty seventh and thirty-eighth degrees of longitude west from W. r.'.iington, and extending 
from the thirty-srventh to the forty third degrees of north latitude, embracing 18,000 eqnare miles, or 
11,520,000 acres. The same act contained a further enlargement of the boundaries of the State, contin- 
gent upon the action of the Legislature. Notwithstnndi-g the mountainous and broken character of this 
area, there is a considerable portion of it agricultural land of good quality, which, under proper cultiva- 
tion — irrigation being required in certain localities, for which purpose abundant supplies of water are 
available — produces fine crops of grain and vegetables. This is particularly the case in the extensive 
valleys watered by the Carson and East and VVett Walker rivers, in the counties of Ponglas, Churchill, 
and Esmeralda, where heavy crops of grain and hay are produced each year. '"Extensive bodies of land 
lying in the Humboldt and Reese River region, it is eeiinuited, can be made largely productive by resort- 
ing to irrigiUion. In the mountain portions Imniense '(UantilicH of the finest quality of tiniber exist, 
which supply a large number of saw mills, put in operiition during the mining excitement which pre- 
vailed in this region, attracting an energetic and enterprising population from all quarters. 

It is owing solely to bur rich mineral resources that this young State has already attained a prominent posi - 

tion among the members of the Federal Union, and it is her inexhaustible silver lod'*^ that constitute her 

principal wealth. Although the first discovery of hilver in Ncviida was made by the brothers Orosch . in 

1852, owing to the untimely death of theuc parties, nothing definite wiis arrived at until the discovery of 

a rich deposit of sulphuret of silver, in June, 18.^9, by some p:irt>eB engaged in placer mining near the 

present site of Virginia City. Immediately following this discovery, the rich lode which has Income 

fainouB throughout the world as the Conistock, was claimed for miles, and an excitement fully equal to 

tliat caused by the first discovery of gold in California was the result. A large population streamed in, 

jmiiieswere opened, mills built, and an nr:preccdented activity prevailed in every branch of business. 

jWhile this excitement has, to a great extent, gradually quieted down, the mills of Nevada still continue 

'lo send forth a large amount of bullion, and the quantity of silver bricks, instead of diminishing is 

iiteaUily on the increase. Vast as have been tiie results from the silver mines of Nevada, they are but the 

lypeof what is d-stined to follow. The proposed Sutro Tunnel to dniin the Comstock ledge — an enterprise 

lo \vliich Ow llcneral Government seems disposed to lend its fostering aid, will largely enhance the silver 

prodi'.i of this State, and add greatly to the material wealth of the country. While it is estiim.ted that 

tH.; entire cost of this work will not exceed $2,000,000, it \a lonfidenlly anticipated that the net annual 

jirolits will amount to $2,500,00 '. The entire* yield from the Ccmistock Lode, during the year 1866, is set 

liown at $11,9(17 ,891, being about $2,01)0,000 over the product of the previous year. It is e:<timated 

that over $.'i,01IO,000 are annually lost through the p'vsent wasteful mode of working the ores of the 

mines. Iinproveiueiits are constantly making to remedy this evil. Notwithstanding the magnitude of the 

opcmtions in this dep.irtment, mining in the I'tato of Ne\nd:i is still in its infancy, and it is reserved for 

the future to prove the vaBtness of its extent. 



MINERAL— QUARTZ MILLS. 



W,942; As 
,080 ; Pu^l 



The nnmbcr of quartz mills in operation in this State, January, 1867, is one hnndred and fifty-Bix, of 
Miich (me hnn<lred and eighteen are propelled l>y steam ; twenty-three by water, and fifteen by steam 

Mil water. The aggregate number of stamps is two thoutiund five huuf'.red and seventy-seven. The cost 
kf iiiHchinery and the works connected with the dillcrent mills is estin<atcd at nine million four hundred 
piJ two thousand dollars. In addition to the stamps aliove enumerated, there are about twenty nrastrns 

1 operation, principally connected with the mills of Lyon County. There are several largo nietnllurgi- 

1 establishments and numeroiiB private assay ing olllces in the State, which annually transact a heavy 

mount of buBinesg. 

' Since the rtlRCovcry of Hllvor In tills State, tlierc linve boon ox traotod and added lo the wealtli of the world, |i8(),000,00O 
< liullloii, niul tlie main source of all tills wealth, from the most rollablo aullioriticii, has bat Juat been uncoverod."— 
hti Hill AVwi. 



» : tl 



r i 



n:r,! 



I 



132* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TABLE OP QUARTZ MILLS, 

With the Location, Name, Date of Erection, Number of Stamps, Cost of Machinery, etc., of eacli. 



Location. 



CHURCHILL COUNTY. 

Averhill 

Clan Alpine 

La Plata 



Name of Mill. 



Connecticut. . 
Clan Alpine. , 
Silver Wave.. 
Desert 



BSMERALDA COUNTY. 

Aurora lAItnras 

" lAntolope 

" j Aurora 

" (iibbons 

•' I Independence 

" i Na|>a. 

" H'ioiieer 

iKealdcl Mnnto 

" I Kcd Mountain 

" , 'Union 

Wide West 

I'inc Creek I I'inc Creek 

Silver I'cak 'Martin & Co 

New York & Silver I'oak 



HUMBOLDT COUNTV.t 

Dun Glen Anld Lang Syie. 

Etna i Nasons 

" iStevcnsons 

Ginaca Dridge I Holts 

Oreana I Webbers 

Fuebia I'uebla 

Star City Slieba 

" •• OldSlioba 

Unionvillo Iriouccr 



LANDER COUNTY. 

Aubtin 



Boston & Nevada. 

California 

Long Island 

Mauliattau 

I'ionocr 

Silver Hill 

Union 

Ware 

Kureka 

I'arrott 

" " Il'holps 

t'utto Canon i San Francisco 

Cortcz I Cortez . 

Egnn Canon 



Big Creek. 



IS 



3? 



1866 16 
18851 10 
1866 10 
5 



18ti2 
1863 



1863 



1883 



186? 



18621 16 



1862 



1864 

1865 

1806 

1888 

1866 

1866 

1868 

18831 10 

1862 8 



10 
4 

10 
8 

10 



Emigrant CaBon 

Kingston..., 



New York Caiton . 
Telegraph Canon.. 
Yankeu Blade 



LYON COUNTY. 

Carson Uiver 



Hope.. 

Social Co 

Steptoe 

Keystone 

New Kng. & Nevada. 

Stirling 

Metacom 

Midas 

Onfldonce 

Empire 



Eureka 

Franklin 

Hydes 

" " ; Island 

" " iLindaucr A Hiri^clinians 

" " lophir, No. 1 

" " Ophir, No. 2 

" " San Francii^co 

Oomo I'almyra 

Dayton \ Birdsall k Carpenter. . . 

" I Daney. 

" Dayton, No. 1 

" I Dayton, No. 2 

" I Dayton Keduct'n W'ks. 

" (joldcn Eagle 

" I Illinois 



1865 
1803 
1863 
1864 
1883 
1866 
1883 
1885 
1885 
1866 
1484 
1886 
1864 
1886 
1885 
lHi«j 
1885 
1866 
1865 
1866 
1866 
18t» 
1866 



1881 

1861 



1862 
i86t 

isoi 

1804 
1866 
1863 
18ttl 
1864 

i86i 

1804 



10 

10 

6 
20 
20 

6 I 

10 : 

6 I 
10 I 
15 ! 
10 

18 ! 

5 

5 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
15 
10 
10 



>• 
3" 



o 
4 



steam 



steam 



steam 



water 



; steam 



Cost.* 



ia 



100,000 Silver 

100,000 

100,000 



100,000 Silver 
40,000 



60,000 



150,000 



10,000 
76,000 
15,000 
40,000 



30,000 
35,000 
60,000 
20,000 
35.000 
20,000 
60,000 
.30,000 
30,000 



80,000 

75,000 

40,000 

lOO.OOJ 

100,000 

50,000 

70,000 

40,000 

60,000 

. I " 80,000 

water 30,000 

steam 40,000 

90.000 

30,000 

36,000 

100,000 

95.000 

100,000 

100,000 

50,000 

120,000 

100,000 

80,000 



Present Occupants. 



Conn. Mill and Land Co, 
t'lan Alpine M & M. Co. 
Silver Wave M.&3L Co. 



J. D. Winters. 



•I. J. Poor. 
WidoWo8tM.iP'!:vr 



8. B. Mar J 
N. Y. & Si 



*C 



Tf 



Gold. Auld Lang Sync M. <'o. 
Silver A. W. Nason. 

Nevada S. M. Co. 

G. W. Holt. 

Nevada S. M. Vo. 

G. Faulkner. 

' . rJI.ro. 

Pioneer & Inskip M. and 



Silver 



I Water 
steam 



I water 

"jS & w 

water 

's & w 
1 water 

s «t w 

steam 
water 
steam 
water 
fteam 



66,000 
36,000 
6,000 
36,000 
80,000 
•20,000 
75,000 
85,000 
16,000 
46,000 
65,000 
60,000 
40,000 
16,000 
36.000 
36,000 



Silver 



location 



Dunbar, Hurd ft Co. 
Bank of Calilbniia. 
W. B. Hyde. 
C. A. Hill. 

Lindauor k Ilirschman.l 
Gpliir SI. and M. Co. 
II II 

C. A. Shad k Co. 

Birdsall k Carpo.r 
Daney G. and S.ii-'- 
J. D. Winters k Co. 

!• 1( (I 

It. Helm k Co. 

Uule & Co. 

Bank of California. 



• Tlie estimate of the Assessor for tlie machinery; ttio value of the inlr.o noi Inuludcil. 

t Wchhers Mill at Orcnnii lias sniellInK ftiniaccs conncotcil, with fincltlnKenimi'lM -'f 1^ to 20 tons of metal i 
(lay. The Uumboldt Klvcr Mill unil Slinlnij Co. arc preparhiK to erccl a lliin tO-staiii)i n Jll iitur Uun Ulcn. 



'Thci 




1 




NEVADA. 


QUARTZ MILLS. 188* 


ll 


TABLE OF QUARTZ MILT-S— Continued. 






Locntlon. 


Kamc of Mill. 




09 

r 

66 

16 

15 

5 

12 

6 

8 

6 

18 

10 

6 

16 

20 

15 

20 

15 

10 

20 

16 

10 

'26' 
15 
20 

» 


1? 

'"2' 

1 

. . . . 

.... 


? 


Cost 




PrcEent Occupants. 


a. 


LYON CO. — continued, 
Dayton 


Imperial, No. 1 


s & w 
water 
Ktoam 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 

water 

steam 

II 

u 

tt 

water 
steam 

II 
water 

Blenm 


S 

170,000 

40,000 

85,000 

6,000 

26,000 

7,600 

8,000 

6,000 

40,000 

25,000 

7,000 

40,000 

40,000 

35,000 

46,000 

35,000 

10,000 

60,000 

26,000 

25,000 

3,500 

1,500 

85,000 

45,000 

50,000 

.1.000 


Silver 

i( 
(1 
It 
11 
II 
14 
II 
11 
II 
11 
II 

n 
u 
(1 
II 
11 
II 
tt 
11 

11 

11 

Silver 

11 
11 
ll 

II 
11 

U 
ll 

Sliver 

11 

11 

II 
II 

Silver 

41 
tl 
ii 

ll 

II 
II 
l( 
II 
II 

14 
11 
II 
14 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 


Imperial G. and S. M. Co. 
II II II 

Bank of California. 
D. L. Smith. 
Apple M. Jt M. Co. 
Cole & Co. 
Palmer & Flood. 
R. T. Mullin. 
K McLean. 
Briggs ft Co. 
Hirsiiman & Mayo. 
J. C. Corey & Co. 
II II 

Woodruir,Hunt& Moore. 
Bank of Ci'.;iforn<«. 
Wcstoa a, Co. 
II II 

Bacon M. and M. Co. 

Henry & Co. 

N. Y. & Nevada M. Co. 


1 


*« 


Im))ei'ial. No. 2 


' 


dCo. 
1. Co. 
L Co. 


n 


Metallurgical Works. . . 
Smiths 


1861 
1865 


ll 


GoldCaBon 






Atlanta 


. • . • 




II II 


Bartolo 


18a3 


1 


K 11 


Eagle • 


1 


II II 




1862 
1861 


1 


II II 


Excels-or 


1 


Uirshmans 


1 


I'hoenix, No. 1 


1861 
1862 
1861 
18C2 
1862 
1862 
1863 
1861 

isei 

1861 
1861 

1805 


1 

1 


M II 
II II 


Phoenix, No. 2 

Sacramento 




ll 1* 

II t* 
tl It 


Swanpca 


1 1 


Weston, No. 1 

Weston, No. 2. 




Silver City. 


Bacon 


:>i.Co. 


II II 
II II 
II II 
ti ll 
11 II 

ii II 
11 II 


Devil's Gate 

Kelseys 

Knickerbocker, No. 1. . 
Knickerbocker. No. 2.. 
New York & Neviula.. . 




N. Y. and Nevada iL Co. 
I'ioneer t^. M. Co. 
Joseph Trench. 

W. T. Jones. 
New York Co. 


M.''o. ■' 


Trcnchs 


NYB COUNTY. 
Kllsworth 


Mammoth 

Atlantic & I'licilic 




lono 


18661 10 


ll ! 

'• iso.iloo 
" .w.ooo 
■I KKi.nno 






1866 


20 
10 
10 
40 
3 
10 
10 




11 




[M. Co. 
p M. and 






1866 
1866 


Murphy & Co. 
Hughes & Co. 
U. E. Uuell & Co. 
(ircat Salt Basin Co. 
N. Y. and S. I'cak M. Co. 

Isaac Ralley. 
Merrimac Mill Co. 
Santiago Mill Co. 
1'. Froihingham. 
Bank of California. 
Harrii .jton ft, Beach. 
Mexican M. .!nd M. Co. 
Yell. Jacket li'. & M. Co. 

Payne & Co 
Rigby & Co. 
J. B. Haggin. 
L. S. Bowers. [others. 
N. Y. and Nev. M. Co. and 
Crown Pt.G & S. M.Co. 
Wheeler & Douglass. 
^Kclipse JI. and M. Co, 
Kniuire M. and M. Co. 
Cold Hill q. M. & M. Co. 
Parke Brothers. 
ImporialG.fcS. 51. Co. 
Glasier, Rule & O'Neal. 
Land, Skac & Co. 
J. L. & A. L. Greeley, 
ilcnning. Trench ft Co. 
Khode Island O. M. Co. 
Sapphire Q. M. fc M. Co. 
C. C. Stewnsou. 
Succor M. Co. 
William Kidd. 
Dickinson & Lent. 


Oohir Canon 


Murnliv Co 


II 
II 

tt 

wotcr 

II 
II 
II 

8 & W 
II 

steam 


175,000 
.3,500 
7S.000 
60,000 
60,000 
20,000 

26,C>,) 

88,000 

60,000 

22,000 

8,000 

6,000 

100,000 

200,000 

"mm 

26,000 
85,000 
100,000 
40,000 

4o,a)o 

40,000 
60,000 
75.000 
30,000 
80,000 
75.000 
60,000 
120,000 

80,co;i 

60,000 
100.000 
40.000 
10,000 
60,000 
25.000 
76,000 
86.000 

wiooo 

SRonn 


Hed Mountain 


U(»d Mountain 




Silver Hend 








Silver Teak 


tircatSalt Uatin ('o.... 
N. Y. * Silver Teak... . 


1864 


1 
* 

tc Co. 
)rnia. 

Irfclimaf. 
M.Co. 

ll 

Co. 


•( 11 


Washington 


VVatihinirtun 


1864 


6 

8 
20 
24 
16 
16 

8 
44 
40 

16 
23 
10 
16 
20 
16 

8 
10 
15 
10 
14 
10 
44 
16 
SO 
16 
20 
25 
16 

8 
20 
14 
13 
10 

6 
21 
16 


' * * * 


ORMSHY COUNTY. 

Carson Uiver. 


Brunswick 


41 II 






li ll 


Santiago 




II II 


Vivian 




Car on 








Sierra 




'^.njr.rjCity 

II 






Yellow Jacket 






I -iV V COUNTY.* 

-^^'-^^■'^ -ity 

jGoM '■:' 


Atwood 

Hay State 

Uipbvs 


.... 


Atlan 




i " '* 

•. ll 
ll II 
11 II 






('Omet 




(^rown Point 








11 11 


Kclipse 




1 II 11 
1 II 11 






Gold liill 




' l( II 


(iranite 




II t* 






II 11 






II II 
II 11 


raciflc 








11 fl 


IHuto 




ll II 


Rhode Islftid 




1 '* " 






M " " 


Stovcnsous 




rpc.i 

.5. Si- • 

i&Co. 


i ' " 

^ 'liruihia 


Succor 




Union 




Central 






■ " 






A. Dcland 


0. 


1 " 


Desert 




B. F. Hastings ti Co. 
Empire M. auU M Co. 


rornia._^ 


1 '• 






1 ■• 






■ - 








, — w, »» 




of 


metal 


m * Tlic vn 


uo of the inlllii and machin 


cry of Storey County li estimated at $3,500,000. 



Am 



i 



Hi 



mt\ 



h ■ 



134* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORT. 



TAULE OF QUARTZ MILLS.— Concluded. 



Location. 


Name of Mill. 


It 

is 


80 
8 
20 
13 
22 
10 
20 
16 
18 

60 
72 
20 
16 
20 
20 
10 
24 
16 
24 


— 
.... 


4 

n 

ri 

steam 
II 

II 
II 
11 
II 
II 
II 
11 

« & w 
steam 
8 & w 

" 
water 
a fc w 
steam 

B & w 

i( 


Coat. 

» 

960.000 

40,000 

en,ooo 
20.000 
50.000 
25.000 
60,000 
35,000 
80,000 

250,000 

500,000 
80,000 
76,000 

100,000 
80.000 
60.000 

100,000 
76,000 

110,000 


Si 


FrcBcnt Occupants. 


ftTORKY co.-^ontinued. 


Gould & Currv 


Silver 

u 
t( 
II 
II 
II 
tt 
(1 

4* 

SilTcr 


Gould k Curry S. M. Co. 
J. C. Clarke. 




Hoosior State 




^t 






Charles Land. 


n 






Davis & McCurdy. 
Ogdon, Corev & Co. 
Kodgers 8. M. Co. 
.Summit Mill Co. 


it 






11 






n 


Summit 




a 






Bassett k Vo. 


it 


Winfleld 




L. A. Booth. 


WASHOE COUKTr, 


DallB 




.1. D»II A Co 


Onhlr 

rloasaut Valloy... 
II II 


Ophir 




" l«»nhir M. .t M. To. 


Nnpa 




II 

i( 

11 
it 
II 
II 
1. 




"''ipclic 




W. C. Wallace. 


Truckeo Meadows. . . 


hCo 




W. C. G. & S. M. Co. 








L. Tevis. 


'• VH 




L Mason. [M. Co. 
N. Y. »t Nevada U. & S 


11 






II 


MinD(*8otA 


' 


Savage M. A BI Co. 
N. Y.it W.HI. 4 M. Co. 


II 





















CANALS AND WATER DITCHES. 

In addition to those enumerated in the followinfjf table, tiiere are numerous irrignting ditches and 
several important works now being constrncted. The Humboldt Canal will, when completed, furnish 
power for a large number of mills, and sutficieut water to irrigate the agriunltural districts in its imme- 
diate vicinity, and the Summit Lake and Virginia Aqueduct Co., with a ca|iltul of $°.*,0()l),000, propose 
conveying; the waters of Summit Lake a distance of thii ty miles, supplying the cities of Carson, Silver 
City, Gold Ilill, and Virginia City with an abundance of water for mining, agricultural, and municipal 
purposes. 

TAULK OF CANAl S AND WATER DITCHES, 

For Mining Purposes in the State, with the Location, Source of Water, Length, Cost, etc., of each. 



Name of Ditch. 



nOUOI.AS COUNTY. 

Clear Creek 

I.YO!« COU.NTY. 

liirdsall &. Carpenter... 

UK.MSHY COUNTY. 

Mexican 

WASHOE COITNTY. 

English f 

Truokee 

Washoe 



Source of Water. 



Clear Creek . . . . 
Carson River . . . 
Carson River . .. 

Trnckee River . . 

II 11 

SteanH>oat Creek 



^3 



20 



Coat.* 



Numo of Owner. 



A. W. Pray & Co. 
Hirdsall Sc Carpenter. 
Mexican M. &. M. Co. 



$10,000 Washoe M. C. O. &. S. M. Co. 
4O,O00iTriickee Dilch Co. 
10,0001 Washoe Milling &, Manuf Co. 



AOHICULTURAL. 



Land. — The umnunt of lar.d in the connties of 
Churchill, Humboldt, Ltini'ei and Nye, Hduiited to 
iigricultiiiiil and grazing purposes, is '■.'27, 000 acres. 
Under cultivation in Hun\l>oldt, Lander, Lyon, 
Nve and Wimhoe, nearly 22,0110 aci-cs. " Many 
millions of acres of lard in this Slate now compar- 
atively worthless, would be valuable if irrigated, 
and several hundred thousand acres of e<wanip and 
overflowed land might be reclaimed by a proper 
system of drainage." 

Products,— The different cerools are prodnred 



in abundanro in several counties. In DoukIh8,| 
HumbohU and Nye counties good crops have beciil 
raised, the wheat averaging tliirty bushels uikII 
barley forty bushels per acre. The amount of liay[ 
cut in 1 805 'is estimated at 100,000 tons. A sutficieiill 
amount of vegetables is raised for home consuniiif 
tion, and the~(M)lato crop has been more than tliej 
average yield in other States, and of an excelleiit| 
quality. 

Live Stuck, 18&5.— Horses, :<,900; Mules, 650| 
Cattle, 10,650; Sheep, 5,6U0; Swine, 750. 



There io lui 
I power nseu ih 
I has made arrai 



The demand ; 
I ment. The nu 
I five by water, t 
I aggregate capac 

With the Loca 
I'Ocatlon. 



I „, """"LAS cot 

I Clear Creek 

I ** II 

I Carson Valley 
jE.F. Carson l{iv, 
!I.«keTahoe.... 
1 Oenoa 



I KSMERALDA COI 

I Sweetwater . . 

I 

! LANDER COUNI 

! Keese River Valle 
I " " It 

iSmoky Valley ... 

' NYE COUNT] 

I Reese River Valle 



OHMsnv COU.M 
Clear Ci< ek . . 
Kmpire City . . 



I WASHOE COUN- 

I Hrown's Creek . . 

! ** it 

(Thomas Cafion..'.! 

** 11 

'Truckee River 
I Washoe.. 



I State Debt.— 1 
'«"!". Of this umo, 
j The balance in the 
year from all source 
"JI the different fun 



The Legislature v, 
A most thorough syj 
i» found, free schooW 
liige, and the cause] 



Katlmuted. 



mmmm 



i. M. Co. 
iiimf. (> I 



Douulas, 
mvo been 
»hel8 liinl 
lilt of Imy 
. Biitficieiil 

coiiBumi" 
. tlian tlie 
1 excelleui 



ules, 650 



NBVADA, 



ORIST MILLS — SCHOOLS. 



136* 



GRTST MILLS— FLOUR. 

There if )>nt one Griet Mill in the State. It is located near Genoa, and owned by W. M. Carey. The 
power nsea it. water, run of etone fonr, and the value estimated at $8,000. John W. Varney, of Austin, 
has made arrangements for the erection of an extensive mill at that place. 



SAW MILLS— LUMBER. 

The demand for lumber for mining and building purposes renders its manufacture a profitable employ- 
ment. The number of saw mills in operation is twenty-one, of which fourteen are propelled by steam, 
five by water, and two by steam and water. The value of these mills is estimated at $150,000, and the 
aggregate capacity, per day, is about 180,000 feet. 

TAHLE OP SAW MILLS, 
With the Location, Name of Mill, Number of Saws, Capacity, Cost, Occupant's Name, etc., of each. 



Location. 



DOUOLAS COUNTV. 

Clear Creek 



Carson Valley 

E. V. Carson River. 

liakeTahoe 

Genoa 



I 



! KSMERALDA COUNTY. 

I Sweetwater 



LANDER COUNTY. 



i Reese River Valley. 

i i( ,( t( 

J Smoky Valley 



I NTE COUNTY, 

i Reese River Vallev- 



OHHSnY COUNTY. 

; Clear Cr< ek 

Empire City 

■ WASHOK COUNTY. 

I Brown's Creek 



I Thomas Canon. 



'Truckee River 

I Washoe 



Name of SI ill. 



ShaelTer & Co.. 

Snmmit 

Shed 

Youngs 

I'l-ays 

Sierra Co 

White & Chase . 



Greens 



Hawes 

Hei<berger& Howell, 
Stone bergcrij 



Mt. Hope. 
Mountain . 



Monitor 

Uuesell Si, Co. 



Mncfarlands [gcr. 

Prince, Brown & Ea 

Culdwells 

Thomas 

Eastmans 

Knox & Co 



No. 
Sawn, 



(Capacity— 
Ft.pcriiay. 



8,000 
8,000 
5,000 
8,000 
10,000 
8,000 
5,000 



6,000 



Power. 

steam. 

ti 

water. 

(( 

steam, 
water. 

water. 



8,000 steam. 
8,000 " 
8,000 



6.000 steam. 

6.0001 " 



10,000, steam. 
20,000!b.&.w, 



10,000 
15,0110 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
5,000 



steam. 



8,& w. 

steam. 



Cost.* 



$5,000 
5,000 



6,000 

10,000 

6.000 

5,000 



6,000 



6,000 
6,000 
6,000 



6,000 
6,000 



3,000 
10,000 



lo.ono 

15,000 
6,000 
7,000 
7.000 
5,000 



Frcaent Occupants. 



ShnefTer & Co. 
Elliott Bros. 



J. V, N. Young. 
A. W. Pray. 
Sierra Co. 
White &, Chase. 



George A. Green. 



II. L. Hawes. 
Uesbei'ger & Howell. 
A. Stoneberger. 



Hendrie &. Co. 
Berlschi & Steiuer. 



Jones & Denton. 
J. C. Russell Sc Co. 



Mncfarland & Co. 
Prince, Urown & Eager, 
Caldwell & Co. 
J. Thomas. 
Eastman Si. Co. 
Knox tt, Co. 



I FINANCES— STATE DEBT. 

' State Debt. — The State debt, exclusive of Territorial liabilities assumed, approximates $278,000 in 
I coin. Of this amount there will be due, February Ist, 1867, $218,000, and of floating debt, $60,000- 
I The balance in the treasury, January 1st, 1866, was $51,000. The total receipts during the lest fiscal 
year from all sources, were $4'.'5,00(). The total disbursements were $320,000. The buhince on hand, in 
all the different funds, is about $156,000, mostly in currency. (Governor's Message, 1866-7.) 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The Legislature of the State has made the most liberal provision for the support of the public schools, 
A most thorough system of education has been inaugurated, and wherever a sufficient number of pupils 
ii found, free schools are in successful operation. The average attendance of the pupils is commendably 
lurge, and the cause of education generally is in a highly prosperous condition. 



* Estimated. 




ii 



186* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 



LIBUARIES. 
The State Library at Cureon City contains 4,721 volumen, of wliich 2,20D are of law, and 2,512 of a 
miscellaneoiiB characier. The increase in 186(> was 1,432 volumes. Tbe rapidity with which this library 
has accumulated, and the number and importance of the works contained therein, reflect great credit 
upon the State. 

LIST OF NEWSPAPERS 
Published in Nevada, with tlie Locality and Time of Publication, Name of Publisher, etc., etc. 



COUNTY. 



Esmeralda 
Humboldt . 
lender . . . 
Ormsby .. 
Storey" — 

4t 
ll 

Washoe . . , 



. Kamc. 



Union 

Register 

Reese River Reveille 

Appeal 

Enterprise 

News 

Trespass 

Eastern Slope 



Locality of Publl 
cutlon. 

Aurora 

Union ville 

Austin 

Carson City 

Virginia City . .. 

Oold Hill 

Virginia City . . . 
Washoe City 



When Issued. 



Weekly 

t4 

Daily .. 

11 
ii 
it 
11 

Weekly 



Vol, 



Publishers. 



McClintock Sc Avard. 
W. J. Forbes. 
.1. D. Fairchild & Co. 
Robinson & Mighels. 
J. T. Goodman. 
Philip Lvnch. 
W. J. Forbes. 
J. C. Lewis. 



TABLE 

Exhibiting the County Seats of the diflereiit Counties, Estimated Population 1863, Vote 1S65 and 18(jn,ctc'. 



COUNTIES. 



Churchill.. 
Douglas... 
Esmeralda . 
Humboldt . 

Lander 

'Lincoln .. 

Lvon 

Nye 

Ormsby . . . 
*Roop .... 

Storey 

Waslioe . . . 



County Seats. 



La Plata . . 

Genoa 

Aui'orn . . . . 
Unionvillc. 
Austin 



Dayton 

lone 

Carson City. 



Totals . 



Virginia City 

Washoe City 



Estimated 
Pop. 1863. 



l/iOO 
4,01)0 

4,rm 

6,500 



3,500 
'3,566" 



18,000 



45,000 



Vatc, IMS. 



J 28 
20(i 
216 
143 
85.'> 



401 

87 

495 



2,712 

429 



5,672 



Vote, lRfi«. 



UlaMlel, 
17nlon. 



273 
208 
192 
780 



474 
281 
460 



1,718 
628 



5.126 



Wliuors, 
Deni. 



107 
70 
122 
115 
758 



284 
246 
279 



1,56'< 
540 



4,106 



Vatnatlnn of 
Prop. 1H6J. 



|335,76K 

1,029,849 

845,498 

385,460 

2,154,994 



2,581,765 

I!tO,206 

1,995,792 



6,924,483 
2,254,461 



$18,698,27 



At the Presidential Election iu 1864, tbe total vote was 16,420, of which Lincoln received 9,826 votes 
and McClellau 6,594. Union majority, 3,232. 

PRODUCT OF THE MINES FOR 1865 AND 1866.t 



1866. 

January 

February . . , 

March 

April 

May 

Juno 

July 

August 

Scptoml>cr... 

October 

November, . . 
December. . . 

Totals . . . . 



Gold Hill. 



Virginia. Totals. 



9263.602 89 i 
229,866 24 
285,486 681 
150,102 46; 
197,802 30: 
246,726 02! 
260,001 69 i 
314,808 081 
899,013 991 
496,165 00 1 
408,307 90 
864,426 00 



«940,162 13 

1,033.866 89 

1,164,849 76 

1,191,172 00 

1,012,486 59 

694,266 11 

611.127 57 

650,780 78 

492,203 79 

647,866 68 

539,217 76 

619,456 28 



•1,193,765 

1,263,712 

1,390,335 

1,341,274 

1,210,237 

940,981 

771,129 

8(i5,639 

891,817 

1,043,530 

947,525 

978,880 



1866. 



January . ... 

February . . . 

March 

April 

.May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . 

October 

66 iNovember . . 
28 .December. . . 



Gold Hill. 



Virginia. 



»3,646,897 69 1 «9,286,822 24 »12.S33,719 88 I Totals . 



9482,044 28 i 
476,491 63 
490,123 89; 
413,177 111 
662.074 83 
673,111 40i 
673,386 93 
672,690 14! 
700,940 83 
726,464 08; 
613.770 02I 
606,984 70 



f620,177 20 
492,322 91 
706.210 33 
646,987 51 
>)48,776 71 
6(8,938 70 
595,503 77 
779,276 69 
643,963 97 
686,517 23 
789,512 80 
786,438 96 



Totals. I 



$7,100,268 001 87,807,626 18 914,907,894 18 



8962,221 48 
967,814 54 1 
1,196,834 22 ' 
1,060,164 68 
1.210,861 64 
1,236,050 10 
1,268,889 70 : 
1,451,966 73 
1,844,904 30 
1.412.981 31 
1.363,291 92 
1,463,423 66 



The above are the amounts shipped through Wells, Fargo &. Co. for the years 1865 and 1866. There 
should ba added to the figures of the year 1866, au a part of the product of the year, thtt following as the 
yield of the districts not included in the table, viz : From Carson City, $341,366 ; Reese River, $100,587 ; 
Anront, $171,534 ; and by other parties outside of Wells, Fargo & Co., $350,000, together making an 
aggregate of $16,171,381 as tbe yield of the entire State. 



* Not organized. 

t We are Indebted to the " Gold Hill News" for the valuable data Included In this table.— Cokpilbr. 



NAUE ( 

George E. Coli 
./ohii M. Mnrpl 
Benjamin H„„ 
RandiillH. lie 
fclwood Eviiiis. 
A. W. Moore ., 
8. N. Woodiiift- 



Arth 



UP A. Denn 



LEGISLATIVE 

Clallam and Jeffei 
Pierce and Mh«,„ 
Tliui-8to„ and Lew 
island, Snohomish 

cilnian. 
King and Kitsap— 

KEPRESEN' 

Chehalis-Onc niei 
Clallam— One 
Clarke— Thiw. 
Cowlitz and Wahk 
Island— One. 
JetTerson— Two. 
King— Two. 
hiisHp- Two. 
Khkitat and Yakini 



[Termof ollicc 

CLA 

»«t0App't. N„ 

Jiircd 

Henry 

CLA 

II. L. 
Jay D. 

Nuthaia 
JEFFl 
R. F. 
Paul K 
Henry 
Jaiiies . 
J. Paul 
J.J.H. 
KINl 

Edwin 
G.F. W 

KITS 

SnniucI 
^Fred. 1) 

Il'ms'or'r" "^Ju-Hcliu 
jUko, place on II c first 
I "y of members, «6 per 



There 
ig ae the | 



WASHINGTON TERRITORY. OFFICER! 



187* 



WASHINGTON TERRITORY. 

Capital, Olympia. 

EXECVTIVB AND TERKITORIAL OFFICERS.* 



NAME OF INCUMHENT. 



Office. 



Oeorgo E. Cole : Governor , 

John M. Mnrphy 'Aiulitor 

Benjamin HHrned iTreusurer ...., 

Itandiill H. Hewitt Pnblic Printer 



Elwood Evung. 
A. W. Moore ... 
S. N. Woodruff' . 



Secretiiry . 
Executive Clerk 
Librarian 



Residence. 



Olympia. 



Term Exp's. 



Salary. 



" Jan.,lS(i8 



At will... $3,(100. 
Jan.,18(«. $.m. 

CuminiHsionB 

Veen. 
At will... 13,000. 

$l,i^OO. 

1300. 



DELEGATE IN CONGRESS. 



NAME OF IN'Cf-MBKNT. 



Arthur A. Dennv. 



Residence. 



Seattle. 



Tenn Expires. 



March 3, 18tj7 



LEGISLATIVE DISTRICTS,! THK COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME, AND REPRESEN 

TATION OF EACH.— COUNCIL. 



Clallam and JeiTersoii— Elect one Coiincilinan. 
Pierce and MaHon — Elect one Conncilniun. 
Thurston and Lewis — Elect one Cuuncilnnin. 
Uland, Snolionii(ih,und Whatcom— Elect one Coun- 
cilman. 
King and Kilsap — Elect one Councilman. 

REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICTS, AND 

Cbehalis — One member. 

Clallam— One. 

Clarke— Three. 

Cowlitz and Wahkiakum— One. 

Island — One. 

JeHerBon — Two. 

KinK— Two. 

Kit«ap — Two. 

Klikitnt and Yakima— One. 



Clarke, Cnwlit/., Walikiaknm, Cliehfllia, and Pacific 
— Elect one Councilman, and Clarke with 
Klikilat elecU one Councilman. 

Walla Wulla — Elcct« one Councilman, and with 
Stevens and Yukinui elects one Councilmuu. 



THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME. 
I LewiH — One. 
jMawm — One. 
j Pacific— One. 
I Pierce— Two. 
I Snohomish — One. 
I Stevens — One. 
I Thurston — Three. 
W'ulla Walla— Five. 
I Whatcom- One. 



NOTARIES PU 

[Term of oflice, three years from date of connnission. 
CLALLAM COUNTY. 
Date App'U Kiinie. KcsUIcik-c. 

Jared C. Rrown Port Anjfelos. 

Henry A. Webster. ..Neah Bay. 

clarRe county. 

H. L. Caples Vanconver. 

Jay D. Potter Vancouver. 

ISLAND COUNTY. 
Nathaniel D.Hill ...Coupeville. 
JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

B. F. Dennison Po> ■■ Townsend. 

Paul K. Hiilibs Port Tow naend. 

Henry M. McGill . . . Port Townsend. 
Jame's K. Kennedy.. Port Townsend. 
J. Paul JuHson ..."... Port Townsend. 
J.J. H.VunBokkolen Port Townsend. 

KING COUNTY. 
Edwin Richardson ..Scuttle. 
G. F. W hitworth .... Seattle. 

KITSAP COUNTY. 
Snnuiel F. Coombs ..Port Madison. 
Fred. Drew Teekalet. 



BLIC. 

Have power to net for the entire Territory.) 
MASON COUNTY. 
Date App"t. Name. Residence. 

E. A. Wilson Union City. 

PIERCE COUNTY. 

Frank ('lurk Steilacooin. 

\Vm. H. Wood Sleilucoom. 

E. A. Light Sleilucoom. 

SNOHOMISH COUNTY. 

Jacob D. Fowler. ...Muckilteo. 

E. C. Ferguson Snohomish City 

THURSTON COUNTY. 
Andrew J. Moses ...Olympia. 
N. Crosby , jr Tumwuter. 

WALLA WALLA COUNTY. 

W. W. Jo'inson Walla Walla. 

Sheldon B Fargo ...Walla Walla. 

E. T. Grn Walla Walla. 

Edward I^ igent — Walla Walla. 

WHATCOM COUNTY. 
Edward Eldridge ...Whatcom. 



. •Forl.lit of Judicial and Revenue Officers, Terms of <'nlted States Courts, etc., sec pa,' 13; Organization and 
I Terms of CourU. iinRes 30-32: I'. S. Officers I'nclllc Coas ge 33; Post Offices In the Terrlti.y, pogo 27. Election 
Itikcs place on llic flrst Monday In June, 1H67, and cvci ■ > years therenftcr. 

I tTlic sosHlons of the Legislature arc held biennially. uaof Councllraen, six years ; Representatives, two yeart. 

I I'ay of members, 96 per day . 




la- 



! ' m 






138* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTOEY. 



COMMISSIONERS OV DEBD8. 
[Commission at the pleasure of the Governor.] 



Date App't. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Name. Ucsldencc. 

Eiiifciie Dnpr<5 Mtirysville. 

W. H. Lalliinn, Jr...MuryHville. 

Win. (}. KiiKlish Sacrameiito. 

\V. VV. Prioe Siicraniento. 

P. B. Cornwall Sim Francisco. 

V. J. Tliibault San Francisco. 

H. U. Coiiffilon San Francisco. 

William L. Hig)rinB..Siui Francisco. 

F. C. Andrew. Stockton. 

ILLINOIS. 

J. n. Bradwell Chicago. 

riiilip A. Hoyne (,'bicago. 

John W. Mu^ill Chicago. 

INDIANA. 

Wm. T. Wiley Indianapolis. 

LOUISIANA. 

DeWitt C. Jones Uayou Sara. 

MAINE. 

James O'Donell Portland. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 
George T. Angell . . . Boston. 
Belli. II. Currier Boston. 

G. tdward Rice ....Boston. 
Oliver Stevens Boston. 

MISSOURL 

James B. Gogg St. Louis. 

NEW YORK. 

J. R. Pomerov Brooklyn. 

John W. Mcdill ....Buttalo. 



Dato App't Name. Ruslilcnco. 

Horace Andrews New York. 

Edward Bisscll New York. 

E. F. Do Selding....New York. 

Gordon L. Ford New York. 

Oliver Holden New York. 

John Livingston New York. 

Charles Netlleton . . . New York. 

J. B. Nones New York. 

W. J. Sinclair New York. 

OREGON. 

Amory HoUirook Oregon City. 

B. F 'Goodwin Portland. 

I). W. Williams Portland. 

Chester N. Terry .... Sulom. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

D. D. Birnev Philadelphia. 

Arthur M. Burton . . . Philadelphia. 

John II. Frick Philadelphia. 

Benj. F. Blood Pittsburg. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Henry Martin Providence. 

TENNESSEE. 
John H. Harrison . . . Memphis. 

VIRGINIA. 
Alex. B. Gingon ....Richmond. ' 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

John F. Callan Washington. 

N. Ciiliuii Washington. 

Charles De Selding-. Washington. 
Charles Walter Wushingtou. 



AREA AND RESOURCES. 
Tbo Territory of Washington lies between 45° 33' and 19^ north latitude, and between 116^ 56' and 
124° 43' west longitude, and occupies the extreme northwestern portion of the domain of the United States 
of North America. It is about 330 miles east to west, and '.Ki5 miles north to south, and its area is estimated 
at 70,000 square miles. According to the eighth census, taken in 1860, 381,289 acres of this was unim- 
proved claimed, and 81,8(>9 acres of land under cultivation, producing large crops of wheat, oats, barley, 
Indian corn, potatoes, and other staples. Although the general cburaeter of the country is mountuiuous and 
broken, the Territory abounds in numerous well watered valleys of prairie and timbered lands, the soil of 
which is capable of producing abundant crops, as well as affording a wide range M the grazinir of stock, 
of which the enterpiising wool-growers of this region have taken advantage. The rich mineral discoveries 
which have attracted a large population to the region north of this, have opened up a proHtable market for 
all that is produced here. Various mineral discoveries have been made in ditferent parts of the Territory -, 
but the extensive coal deposits at Bellingham Bay, from which large quantities of a good article are 
shipped to San Francisco, comprise the only mines worked to any considerable extent; valuable coal 
seams exist the entire length of Puget Sound. The vast forests of the finest timber, for ship buildiii); 
and other purposes, existing here, give to this region its greatest value. " The tinest spar and mast 
timbers to be found in the world," says one well qualifled by position and experience to speak 
knowingly in the premises, " is here grown and shipped to all quarters of the globe." The 
superiority of the lumber shipped from Puget Sound and other points of this Territory to the San 
Francisco market, is generally acknowledged. Fine harbors, easily accessible and unsurpassed for 
capacity and safety, exist along this portion of the coast. The annual manufacture of lumber on Puget 
Sound exceeds 130,000,000 feet, 33,000,000 laths, over 30,000,000 shingles, 150,000,000 feet of piles, 3,000 
spars, and a number of ship knees. There is also an extensive trade in cattle and domestic produce from 
the Territory to Vancouver and the British Colonies, amounting to nearly $1,500,000 annually. The 
fisheries of Puget Sound, in ood, salmon, herring, and halibut, are rapidly assuming great importance, 
besides the trade in whale oil and llsh oil, which is confined as yet mostly to Indians. ' The United States 
have made reservations for military and naval purposes, at Point Wilson and other places near Port 
Townsend and at Point Defiance, forty miles up Puget Sound. 



PaoDUi 

I ritory -. Li 

I 86,81!) hui 

l>utter, 15J 

LiVK St 



With the r 



Loc 

I tolumbiu Ri 
' Salmon Crec 

I „ 'Sr.AND 

I Penns Cove. . 

, KING C( 

I Seattle . . 

KITSAP c 

I Teekulet 

LEWIS C( 

' Huquato 

Willopa Vullej 
I thambers Ciee 



STKVKNs Cf 



ey 



Colville Vuil 



THi;nsTON 
Tumwiiter. . . 
I Upper Turn Watt 

>Valla Walla. 



vakima'cou 
^kmia ReservHl 



With the ; 



location. 
CLARKE c^ 

JtolumbiaKiver. 



Creek . 



llUdy'""^"'"' 



WASHINGTON TERRITORY. GRISTMILLS. 



139* 



AGRICULTURE. 

Pboducts.— Tlie census of 1860 gives the following statistics of the agricultural resources of this Ter- 
ritory : Land, unimproved in furnis or clnims, 284,28!) acres ; improved, 81,869 acres. Wheat produced, 
86,219 Uuiihels ; oats, 134,334 bushels ; com, 4,712 bushels ; potatoes, 153,594 bushels ; buy, 4,850 tons ; 
butter, 153,092 pounds; wool, 19,819 pounds. 

LivK Stock, 1860 —Horses, 4,772 ; cows, oxen, and other cattle, 28,459 ; sheep, 10,157. 



TABLE OF GRIST MILLS, 
With the Locution, Name, Run of Stone,. the Capiicity per Day, Power Used, Cost or Valoation, and 

Occupant's Name of eucb. 



Location. 



Knmo of Milt. 



CI.AHKK COfNTY. 

Columbia River JHexters 

Loves 
Salmon Creek 



No.riin 
stuiio. 



ISLAND COU.NTY. 

Penns Cove , 



KINO COUNTY. 

Seattle 



KITSAP COUNTY. 

Teekalet 



I.KWIS COUNTY. 

Claquato 



PACIFIC COUNTY. 

Willopa Valley 



PIKHCK COUNTV 

Chambers Creek 



Mailettes. 
Buzbys. . . 
Seattle ... 
Kitsap ... 
Davis — 
Giesys . . . 



Birds 

; Chambers . 



.STKVKNS COUNTY. 

Colville Valley iFulcon 

" " ' ; Hudson Buy Co. 

" iPen d'Oreille... 



THURSTON COUNTY. 

TumwHter Lincoln 

UpperTumwater iWard & Coulters.. 

WAMA WAt.I.A COUNTY. 

Walla Walla 'Excelsior 

" " i Frontier 

Ijock & Co.'s 



YAKIMA COUNTY. 

Yakima Reservation. 



PbcDuix . 
Stiiiidard . . . 
Washington 



Simcoe . 



1 



Capncltv 
pur (lay. 



Ubls. 



Power 



water 



24 



40 
40 



30 
30 
30 



150 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



30 



steam. 



water, 



water. 



water. 



steam. 



water, 
steam. 



water. 



Oost 



93,000 



Proscnt Occupants. 



6,000 
5,000 
6,000 



24,000 
6,000 



10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
30,000 
12,000 



5,000 



John Hexter. 
Lewis Love, 
A. Marlette. 



James Buzby. 
Yessler & Plummer. 
Puget Mill Co. 
L. A. Davis & Bro. 
Giesy & Co. 



J. P. Bird. 

T. M. Chambers. 



R. II. Douglass. 

G. B. Woiinacott. 

D. H. Ferguson St, Co. 



Crosebv & Co. 
vVard &. Coulter. 


■" 
l( 
t. 

■ 


Henry P. Isaacs. 
Amos H. Reynolds. 
Lock, Long '& Gilbreth. 
Overholtzer & Jacobs. 
Ishain T. Reese. 
8. M. Waite. 





TABLE OF SAW MILLS, 
With the Locution, Name, Number of Saws, Capacity, Cost, Occupant's Name, etc., of each. 



Location. 



CLAKKG COUNTY. 

Columbia River 



Salmon Creek . 



ISLAND COUNTY. 

Utsakdy 



Kama r." Mill. 



Hexters . . 
Loves . . . . 
Marlettea . 



Utsalady 2 



No. 
Saws. 



Capacity— 
Kt.pcrilay. 



12 hours. 



Power. 



water. 



Coat. 



Present Occupants. 



John Hexter. 
Lewis Love. 
A. Marlette. 



35,000 steam. $60,O00Grennan Sc Cranney 



Mfi 










140* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINBSS DIRGOTORT. 



Locution. 


Name of Mill. 


Xo. 

1 

7 
7 

2 
2 

7 

4 
15 

3 
15 

3 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

1 


(Inpnclty— 
Kt. pur (lay. 


P^ncr. 

water. 

Hteam. 

11 

steam. 

11 

steam. 
11 
11 
11 
11 

water. 

water. 
11 

water. 
11 

water. 
11 

water. 

water. 
11 

11 

11 


Cost. 


Prcient Occupuiit«. 


jKrrnusou county. 
Cheiuiciim 




I'i hour*. 
20,000 
40,000 
40,000 

25,000 
20,000 

40,000 
.'">0,000 
35,000 
40,000 
50,000 

5,000 

2,000 
3,000 


(5,000 
100,000 
100,000 

80,000 
20,000 

125.000 

150,000 

30,000 

80,000 

150,000 

10,000 

1,500 
2,000 

'12,666 

5,000 
10,000 

3,000 


F. A. WilKon. 


Port Discovery 

Port Ludlow 


Port Discovery 

Port Ludlow 


8. L. Muslick Si Co. 
Whitmoro. 


KI.VO COUNTY. 

Preeport 


Pluinmer, Phillips Sc Co 


Seatt e 


Seatt e 


LEWIS COUNTY. 

Claquuto 

KITSAP COUNTY. 

Port Bliilielv 


Davis 

Port niakely 

Port MadiHo'n 

Port Orclmrd 

Wushinutoii 

Puget ^uiid M. Co.. 

Sherwoodfl ..... .... 


L. A. Davis & Bros. 


Port MiidiHon 


Meif{8 & (lawley. 


Port Urcliurd 


Seubeck 


VVasliiiiKtou Mill Co. 
Pope Sl Tulbot. 

Joseph Sherwood. 

KhoiidoH ^ Co. 


Teekalet 


MA8UN COUNTY. 

Sherwood Mills. ........ 


PACIFIC COUNTY. 

Palix l{ivur 


Palix 


Willopa Valley 


Willopa 


8. Soule &, Co. 


PIERCK COUNTY. 

Cliambcrs Creek 


Hirdg 


J. P. Bird. 


NisQuulty Buy 


IJuleh 4; Webber.... 
DoiiirlnfiH 


12,000 

2,000 
0,0110 

4,000 


Balch ii. Webber 


STEVENS COUNTY. 

Colville Vallev 


Ilenrv IjuHeiir. 


.. .. ' 


Grovemmeut 

Tumwater 


George Weaver. 
Ward & Coulter. 


THUIISTON COUNTY. 

Tumwuter 


WALLA WAI.LA COUNTY. 

Coppei Creek v 

MilCreek 


Co.\ 




r.iiiiktoii8 






8. Linktoii. 


44 M 


Mill Creek 








Touchet 


Vunter & Cox 






Vunter i.V. Cux. 


Wallu Wulla 










ti 11 


"Oiassford & Shields. 
Whatcom SI. Co. '8.. 
Simcoe 










Glueeford tt. Shields. 


WHATCO.M COUNTY. 

Whatcom 


2 

1 


4,000 
3.000 


water. 


8,000 


Henry Roder. 
Waters Carman. 


YAKIMA COUNTY. 

Yakima Uescrviition 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS. 
The General Government has donated to the Territory 46,080 acres of unoccupied land for the endow- 
ment of a Territorial University, which, it is estimated, will create u fund of not less than |75,000. The Leg- 
islature of 1862 |)U88ednn act incorporating a Territorial University, and providing for the election of a Board 
of Regents for its government. The university is located at Seattle, and is in a highly prosperous con- 
dition, under the superintendency of G. F. Whitwortb. Much attention has been paid to the establish- 
ment of district schools throughout the Territory. The General Government has set apart two sections in 
each townsliip, or one-eighteenth of the public land, for common school purposes. The amount thus 
donated to this Territory is eciuivalent to some 3,C00 square miles of land. 

Statistics, Pout Townsend, for the ye au ending June 30, 1866. — Vessels cleared for foreign porta 
American, 207 — tannage, 28,783 ; registered, (of course not including licensed) 25— tunnage, 7,128 ; for- 
eign, 69 — tunnage, 24,185. Total, vessels, 301— tunnage, 60,096. 

VesseU entered Foreign and Coatlwitc. — American, 231 — tunnage, 28,469; coastwise, 20 — tunnage, 
9,278; foreign, 72— tunnage, 23,440. Total: veBsels,323— tunnage, 61,187. 

Import*. — American vessels, value, 937,378 — duties, $14,195; foreign vessels, value, $11,807 — duties, 
$8,406. Total: value, $49,185— duties, $22,601. 

£xpor<«.— American vessels, value, $247,008 ; foreign, $179,250. Total, $126,258. 



W/ 



• rianlng Mills. 



I Showing the Couni 



COUNTIES. 

' Chehalis. 

Clallam.. 

Clarke... 

Cowlitz . . 

Island ... 

Jefferson . 

King 

Kitsap 

Klikltat .. 

I Lewis 

j 'Mason... 

Pttciflc... 

I Pierce 

I Skamania. . 
Snohomish. 
tSpokane .. 

I ^^Steveiis 

Thurston , 

Wahkiakum '.'.'. L 

Walla Wnlla....--"! 

Whatcom ■■■ji 

Yakima """' i 

Totals 



The receipts of the din 
K) ahotit $ii,ooo, for ,i,j 



The T 



erritorial Libra 



I of literature. S. Wood 
Published in Washing 



j COITNTY. 

I ^"r'-. :::::: i{':S 

; ^VuIlaWaNa;;; ^^^ 

I Natuiul KesoukcesI 

i '.""■ «°""f.V has cominenl 

''■om Its position, and it isf 

ton Territory lying hetwel 

andeaseoftransportutionj 
lor clearing its forest and ( 

on the other hand, stretch] 
fertile valleys and much 1 

which, us population increl 
vast field to American entl 
one which nature herself J 
in furnishing mannlucturel 
"nsurpassed^by^portiof 

I * Formerly Sawan 



; ': ( 



WASHINGTON TERRITORY. COUNTY SEATS — NEWSPAPERS. 



141* 



TABLE 

Showing the Counties nnd County Seata of the Territory, Mrith the Population and Vote of 1863, Vote 
of 1865, and Valuation of Real and PerBonal Property, 1863. 



COUNTIES. 



County 8PBt, 



ChehaliH 

Clallam 

Clarke 

Cowlitz 

Inland 

ifeflerson 

KinK 

Kitdiip 

Klikitut 

Lewis 

"Mason 

Pacific 

Pierce 

Skamania 

Snohomish j Snohomish City. 

tSpoknne United witli Slev'sCo. 

{Stevens [Pinokney City 

Thurston lOlympia 

Wahkiakum j Catlilamct 

Wnlla ^^'alla Walla Wulhi 

Whatcom i Whatcom 

Yakima | Unorgunixed 



Monlesnno 

Now I)unKeiie.ss . 

Vancouver 

Alonticello 

Coupeville 

Port Townsend .. 

Seattle 

Port Miidison.... 

Kockland 

('lannnto 

Oakhind 

Oysterville 

Sleilaroom 

Cascades . 



Totals 



Estltnntod 
poniiliulon 

im. 



2H5 
270 

2,384 
406 
2i)4 
531 
427 
544 
230 
384 
162 
420 

1,115 

2a'» 

77 
674 



1,507 

42 

1,017 



12,306 



Vote, 1863. 

55 
133 
334 

<I6 

103 

270 

173 

231 

64 

140 

55 

101 

201 

83 

6!) 

00 



343 
12 

500 
88 



Vote of imii. 
Denny III.) Tlllon (I).) 



63 

95 

242 

66 

93 

245 

193 

258 

29 

72 

24 

78 

91 

62 

68 



45 

219 

6 

336 

66 



3,231 



i,351 



7 

42 

120 

30 

:>6 

23 

93 

5 



67 
40 



110 
28 
13 



141 

406 
12 



1,212 



Viiluatlon of 
I'roperty, 18U3. 



$72,403 

57,708 
618,203 

12,504 
191,281 
241,854 
203,594 
463,796 
304,000 
220,088 

46,216 
101,533 
532,861 
219,443 

22,738 
142,174 



664,646 

6,300 

1,112,911 

148,268 



15,382,521 



FINANCES-UKCEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

The receipts of the different departments of the Federal ami Territorial governments hnvecach nmonnted 
to ahout $25,000, for the year ending June 30, 18(>6, and the expenditures about the same amount. 

LIimAKIES. 

Tlio Territorial Library, at Olympia, contains over 5,000 volumes of books, in the different departments 
of literature. S. Woodrulf, Librarian. 

LIST OF NEWSPAPERS 
I'nblished in Washington Territory, with the Ijociility, Time of Publication, Name of Publisher, etc. 



COUNTY. 


Name. 


Locality of Publi- 
viitiim. 

Vancouver 

Seattle 

Olympia 

Walla Walla'.'.!'. 


Wlicn laaucd. 


Vol. 

T 

6 
7 
6 


l'ul)ll9hcr. 


Clarke 

King 

Thurston 




Weekly .... 

It 
It 

tt 


II. G. Struve. 
Oeorge Uevnolds. 
U 11. Ilewilt 


Vw^tit Sound Weekly.-.. 
I'ucitic Tribune 


ti 




.lohn M. Mnrnhy. 
William 11 Newell. 


Walla Walla 


StateHinaii 









Natuuai. Uksouuces of the Teukitouy. — "It is only recently that the settlement of this part of 
our country has commenced to develop its resources, or to show the advantages which may be derived 
t'loin its position, and it is these points which I doire to bring to yotir notice. That portion of Washing- 
ton Territory lying between the Cascade Mountains and the ocean, although equaling in richness of soil 
and ease of transportation the best portion of Oregon, is heavily timbered, and time and labor are required 
for clearing its forest nnd opening the earth to the production of its fruits. The great body of the country, 
on the other hand, stretching eastward from that range to the Rocky Mountains, while it contains many 
fertile valleys and much good land suited to the farmer, is yet more especially a grazing country, one 
which, us population increases, promises in its cattle, its horses, and above all its wool, to open a new and 
vast field to American enterprise. But in the mean time, the staple of the land must continue to be the 
one which nature herself has planted, in the inexhaustible forests of fir, of spruce, and of cedar. Either 
in furnishing manutactured timber or spars of the first description for vessels, Washington Territory is 
unsurpassed by any portion of the Pacific Coast." — Qovernor's Menage, 1854. 

i ♦ Formerly Sawamlsli County. t Now forming n part of Stevens County. 

I t Established by Lcgialaturo in 1863, but not then organized. 



V.'l 



1 ■, 



142* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



IDAHO TERRITORY. 

Capitiil, HuiBe City. 

EXECUTIVB AND TKKIllTorilAL OmCKKt.* 



MAMK OF IX(;iTMllK\T. 



D. W. IJulliird . 
S. R. Howleit . . 
C. H. LuiiP . . . . 

E. C. Stcrlinif.. 
R. W. Hi8li<>|i . . 
Frank Kenvon . 



Onico. 



Iloflrtoncc, 



flVnii Exp'r 



flovcrnor I lloise City . . . 

8ucrctai'y iiml liiUriirian JUuit'e City... 

Comptmllcr Uoivo City... 

Treasurer Hoino City . . . 

Siip't I'lililic Iniitriietion....!l<i>i8e (Uty... 
I'liblic Printer I liuiHe City • • ■ 



Atwill... 
Alwill... 
At will... 
Atwill... 
Atwill... 
Atwill... 



Siilnry. 



a,0(M) 

Pb«m. 

I, mi 

Fues. 



DELEOATE IN CON(}UESS. 



NASIE OF ISCI'MHENT. 
E. D. llolbrook 



Redilrnco. 
Idalio City 



Term Kxplroi. 
»tarrli 3, IStjr. 



LEGISLATIVE UISTUICTS, THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME, AND REPRESEN 

TATION OK EACH. 



Ada — ElectB one Councilman and tliree Repnjpuu- 

tativeti. 
AlturaB — ElectB one Connoilman and two Repreeen- 

tHtivCB. 

Boise — ElectB four Councilinen and eight Represen- 
tativeB. 

Idabo^ElectB one Councilman aud two Represen- 
tatives. 



Nez Perce— Elects one Councilman and two Rep- 
reBentatives. 

Oneida — Elects one Councilman and ono Rcprcson' 
tntivc. 

Owyliee— KIcctBonc Comicilman and three Rcpre- 
HentativL-B. 

Shoshone— Elects one Councilmnu and onn Repre- 
sentative. 



" SesHions hold annually." 

" The Council consiBtB of eleven memhers, who are elected for two yearR, and the of 

RepreBentalives of twenty-two memhers, who are elected annually." 

" The compenBiilion of memhers is $-1 per diem, and $1 for every twenty miles of t-avel going to anil 
retaruing from the sesBioua." 

NOTARIES PUULIC. 

[Term, two years.] 
[Corrected at the olBco of tlie Secretary of the Territory, Oct. 3lBt, IHliG] 



ADA COUNTY. 
Date App't Nnme. Kosidonco. 

July 11,18().').A. O. Redvvay lloise City. 

Oct. 6, 1865..T. II. Slater.." IJoise City. 

.Ian. 19, I8fi(). W. A. George. Uoise City. 

Jan. 19, 18<it). Theodore Burmisler. Uoiee CitV. 

Ap'l l8,186li.V. R. Fuller Boise Valley. 

ALTURAS COUNTY. 

Nov. 17, 1864.nrant Gilford Rocky Bar. 

Nov. 17, 18fi4. James C. O'Conner. . Rocky Bar. 

Dec. 23,1801.8. B. Dillev Rocky Bar. 

May 8, 18(i5.I)avid G. Campbell. .Rockv Bar. 

May 8, 18fio.E. F. Gniy Rocky Bar. 

Aug. 2C, I8(i5.,hime8 Lodge Rocky Bur. 

Nov. 29, ISfi.'i.L. F. Carter Rock v Bar. 

Dec. 18, ISaORaBov Biven Rocky Bar. 

Dec. 26,1865.11. W. O. Margary.. Rocky Bar. 

July 11, 1866.JohM II. Baker Volcano District. 

BOISE COUNTY. 

Nov. 19, 1864.A. L. Fish Idaho City. 

Nov. 19, 18fi4.M. Moore Idaho CitV. 

Ap'l 22,1865.C. W. Kirkner Idaho Chy. 

Ap'l 22, ISe.'i.John Charlton Idaho Cily. 

June 12, I865.Sainuel W. Blakely.. Idaho City. 

Nov. 19, 1866.G. I. Gilbert Idaho City. 

Jan. 11, 1866.W. H. Habersham ..Idaho City. 
Jan. 18, 1866.J. \V. Brown Idaho City. 



BOISE COUNTY- 



•CONTlN'I'Kn. 

Ue»l(lonce. 



Dtttp Aiip't. Name. .»-i.i.i. nc 

Jan, 18, 1.S(l(i.John C. Henley Idalio Cily. 

Fc), 10, I8(16..\. K. Callowav Ceutrevilfe. 

Feb. 13, 1866. F. VV. Bell . . ." Idaho City. 

June 15, 1866. W. R. Keithlev Idaho City. 

IDAHO COtTNTY. 

Sept. 10, 1866.C. A. Sears W.irrenn Dig'n^r! 

NEZ PERCE COUNTY 

Oct. 3, 18C5.F. Diilton Lewiston. 

ONEIDA COUNTV. 
Ap'l 18, 1866.P. W. McManus ....Mulado City. 

Sept. 1 , 186t;.B. F. White .Malade City. 

Sept. 1,1866.J. 1). Morris Malade City. 

Sept. 1, 1866.R. Anderson Mulade Cily. 

OWYHEE COUNTY. 



Ap'l 19, 
June 30, 
Aug. 28, 
Oct. 13, 
Nov. 29, 
Dec. 14, 
Jan. 18. 
Feb. .'3, 
June 2i>, 



1865., 
ISltt. 
18(i5. 
1865. 
186,'>. 
18()5, 
1866, 
1866. 
1866. 



.Tohn A. Pott Ruby City. 

J . Ly nam Ruby City. 

J. L. Bonne Rnby City. 

W. Chimins Ruby CitV. 

T. H. Smith Ruby City. 

•W. Vincent Ruby City. 

Seth Catlin Ruby City. 

F. VVelcker Ruby City. 

O. R. Johnson Flint District. 



ID 



•For list of IT. .S. .Indicial anil Itcvcnuo officers, bpo page 33. For organization and tcrni<i of V. H. Court, nee 
pngcR 30-32. For ll»t (if IT. S. Officers I'acillc Coast, nee page 33. For list of I'oat Offices In tlie Terrltorj', sec piiKC V!n. 
Election takes place in August, 1868, and every two years thereafter. 



I)nto App't. 
Noy.J;i,'(i,|..II 
Oct. 3, '65..F 
Dec. 12, 'ft5..Ai 

Dec, 12,'(|.'i...s„ 

Jan. 26, '66... I. 

Mpl 17, •66..H( 

June 15, '(;«.. si„ 

[March 2, '66.. W. 

Mar. 27, '66.. N.I 

Apl ,, '66.. San 

I Aug. 17, '66..J,,,, 

I Nov. 28, '65.. T. t 
|Ang. 2, '06..A. t 

|Oct. 2,'65..Cha, 
I )ec.l| ■(^^..,.,„„ 

Dec. 23, '65.. w. i 
Dec.as '65..j„|,„ 

poc.23, •65..1K.U,, 



Tlie Territory of I 
tHde. ItsgrcaifHtl 
with dn area eniiina 
its limits have been 
the country is g,,ii, 
timbered valleys fo 
the richest and" most 
Rcontains, also, nin 
resources of thiHrog 
but the greatest dru' 
operations during ih 
since the discovery 
h'cter. Until 18.02, i 
|of the whites, excep 
liiscoverod in this ye 
linding of other phic 
which time, the (illi. 



•' The discoveries , 
I ! Iiuva developed it en 
, is believed to he rid 
I Jwant period, 8u,,poi 
I " Boise Basin is ih 
jtent and lichncBs all 
many rich and valua 
I the development of i 
'fill; it is cold in the 
" The natural resou 
perior, (o any on the 



IDAHO TERRITORY. AREA AND RESOURCES. 



148* 



COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS. 

[T«rni, two yeurg.) 
[Corrected ut tlie olllce of the Secretary of the Territory, October 31, 18CC.] 



Unto App't. 
Nov. IJ, 'til. 
Oct. 3, •O.'i. 
I>ec. 12, 'fti. 
Dec. Vi, •«.'). 
Juu. ati, fiC). 
Ap'l 17, '06. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Niinic. Kciiiilpnnp. 

II. 8, lldiiiniiH Sun KniiiciHco. 

V. J. Tliihiiiilt Sim Friinciacn. 

Alfred liinHtow Sun Kninciiico. 

Siiiiiiiul CriinB ,Smi FriiiK'iHco. 

J. II. lllciod Sun FriinciHco. 

Ili'iiry Ihiiftht San Francisco. 

ILLINOIS. 

June 15, '(!().. Simon W. Kini{ Chicngo. 

MARYLAND. 

Murch-2,'66..W. U. Hill naUimore. 

MASSACIIUSKITS. 

Mar. 27, 'Hi.. N. C. Towl MoHton. 

Ap'l 17, '(>().. Sainuelilennirum ....KiMlun. 
Aug. 17, '()<!.. JuineH It. lii'li lioHton. 

MINNESOTA. 

Nov. as, '6.5.. T. Chircmloii St. Cloud. 

NEVADA. 

Ang. 2, 'CO. .A. E. Sliannon AnHtin. 

NEW YORK. 
Oct. 2, 'fi.1..CharU'H NVtlleton... Now York city. 
Dec. 11, '().'). .('liailcH F. Turner. ..New Yorlc city. 

Dec. i.>3, '65.. W. II. Fit-Id New York city. 

Dec. !i3, '()5..Jolm OiliHon Xtixv Y'ork city. 

Deo. !i3, 'U5..1k'ury Kendall New York city. 



Date App't. Nitino. 

Dec. y3, '('(5..A»a W. I'arki-r . . 
.Ian. 10, 'fi(}..Mnrtin II. Liitl'... 
Jan. 31, '(!<).. JuliuH Silvfrmnith 
Jan. 31, '(><;.. Ilein'y .1. Cullun 



Kolilpiivr. 
.New York city. 
. Ni'W York city. 
. Now Y'ork city. 
New York city. 



Jan. 31, '(Jr)..Jaint'H W. (Ici'iird. ..Ni!W York city. 

Mar. 'Ja, 'tit!.. Horatio ('. KIiik New Y'ork citv. 

Ap'l 14, '()t>..A. J. Hoc New York city. 

Ap'l 14, 't)fi..Jolin lliKHcll New York city. 

Ap'l 14, •(!f...OcorKe W.Collif.....Now York city. 
Ap'l IH, 'tJfi-.lHaac Spencer Snjilli. New York city. 

Junot^O, 'til)..Jolin LivingHton New York city. 

Aug. 1, 'fit>..Jolin 8. Wood ward.. New York city. 

OREOON, 

Dec. 17, '04. .C. II. Larralieo Portland. 

Dec. 1^, 'r>5..Sulh R. llainnior....Salein. 
Mar. 5, '00. . llaaidtoii Itoyd Portland. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Nov. 0, '05. .John MeClaren PittHhnrg. 

Fel). 0, 'OO-.W. V. Archer Philadelphia. 

July 30, '00. .J. II. T. Jackeon Philudelphiu. 

DISTRICT OF COLl'MBIA. 

Ang. 1, '00.. Frederick Knoi\eH... Washington. 
Sept. 1, 'OO..Nicli(ilaH ('allun WuHliiugton. 

Ul \1I TERRITORY. 
Dec. 33, 'C5..\V. L. IlalHcy Sidt Luke City. 



AREA AND RESOURCES. 

The Territory of Idaho U Hiluatcd hetwcen 4i2^ and 49^ north latitude, and IW and 117-' west longi- 
tude. Its greatcHt length, from iioith to uouth, Ir aliout 480 miloR, and itH extreme breadth in about 340 miles, 
with an area eHtinmted at about iMi.DOO niiuare miles. Since the organization of this Territory in 180:1, 
ita limitB have been (iimewhat reduced by the formation of the Territory of Montana. The character of 
the country i« gcncndly mountainous, although there are occiisioimlly fertile, well watered, and linely 
timbered valleys found distiibuted throughout its extent. The largest of ihcHC — lloioe Dasin— containH 
the richest and most extensive placer nniies yet discovered on (his coast outside the limits of California. 
It contains, also, ninnerous rich and extensive quartz lodes, which give a permanent value to the mineral 
resources of this region. The climate here is mild, dry, and pleasant duiiug the suniaier and full seasons, 
but the greatest drawbiick is the severity of the weather and immense fall of snow, which retard mining 
operations during the winter months, NotwitliManding these disadvantages, the growth of this Territory, 
since the discovery of the richness of its ndncs, has been rapid, and its prosperity of a permanent char- 
acter. Until IKOU, this region was entirely in the jjossession of hostile savages, and never visited by any 
of the whites, except the hardy and adventurous trappers am' mountain men. Altliougti gold was first 
discovered in this year in a portion of this country, the discovery wiu> not followed up till IHOI, when the 
I linding of other placer diggings gave i ise to a large immigration from abroad the siicceedinf; year, since 

I which time, the filling up of the Territory has been rapid. 

j 

I MINERAL, 

" The discoveries of placer and quartz mines which have been made in Idaho within the Inst five yearn, 
I liavo developed it enough to prove its richness in mine.als. A large area of territory, hitherto unexplored, 
,18 believed to be rich in auriferous deposits and gold and silver-bearing qimrtz lodes, which will, ut no 
distant period, support a large ndning population. 

" Boise Uasin is the largest placer mi 'iug region yet discovered in Idaho Territory, and exceeds in ex- 
' tent and richness all other placer mining regions, outside of California, on the I'acific coast. There are 
I many rich and valuable quartz lodes, and an ubimdance of timber and water, oti'ering excellent faciliticB for 
I llie development of its mineral resources. The climate is mild, dry and serene during the Bummer and 
I full ; it is cold in the winter, but generally equable and healthy all the year round. 

" The natural resources of tlie Owyhee District for the development of her mines are cqnnl if not su- 
perior, to any on the continent. Hero timber in quantity and quality sufficient for all purposes is found 



H 



m 



144* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



within the immediate vicinity of the mines, aud the nnmerous creelse, gulches and springs !»fford an 
abundance of water for milling purposes." 

It is estimufed that the yield from tlie quartz lodes amounted, in 1866, to f 4,500,000, and from the placer 
mines $1,265,000. 

' QUARTZ MILLS. 

The number of mills m operation in September, 1866, was thirty-two, of whicii about three-fourthfi are 
propelled by steam. Aggregate number of stamps, 357 ; cost of erection estimated at nearly $1,500,000. 

TABLE OP QUARTZ MILLS, 

With their Location, Name, Cost, Date of Erection, Number of Stamps, and Occupant's Name. 



Location. 


Xiimo of Mill. 


1866 
.... 


en 
fit/! 

3 5 

13 
.» 

12 
10 
40 
10 
10 
10 
20 
10 
10 

10 

8 

6 

8 

10 

10 

12 

26 


> 

it- 

3' 

. • . . 


J1 


Cost. 


1 GoUl or 
j Silver. 


Vrosent Occnpnnts. 


ALTCHA8 COUNTY. 




Bteam 

14 

htcnm 

ii 

water 
steam 

n 

It 
It 
u 




...... 




G.AS. 
** 
II 

It 

u 

41 

u 
l( 
II 
(1 
11 

14 

(4 

*' 
ti 

11 
11 

<l 
41 
44 

if 
ft 

4i 
11 
44 
14 
II 
44 


TdnlioM.Co. (Co. 
Waddingliam G. Ac S. M. 




Wudding'mU.AS.M.Co 

ritt*b'B.feId.G.&S.M.Co 

liarris & Kciison 

N. Y.& Idaho G.M. Co.. 
Victi)rG.& S. M. Co... 
Defreps 


Clifden 


KIk (-rook 


!• and I G I'k S M. Co 


Red Warrior Crock.... 
Vnlcftlio 


Harris & Itpnson. 

N. Y. & Idnlio (i. M. Co. 

Victor G.&S.M. Co. 


Yiihn Dintrict 


Ulcdsoo 






BO:9B COUNTY. 






11. II. Rnvmond. [son. 
Hibb, .lackson A Iluma- 
Klk-llorn Mill Co [son 


Divide 

Elk Crcpk 


.Summit Flat 

KIk-llorn [son. 

' ''jb, Jackson & Huraa- 
v^'Ombs & Co 




(Jrimca' Creek 

Idaho Cltv 


Hibb, Jackson ib Iluma- 


tt (f 


Middleton 




J A. Middleton 


Ice-IIouso Gulch 

Mooro'ti Crock 


ColHiis & llolliday 

Cobdcu Mining Co 

(.intcs 




Union (i. M. Co. 
( obdcn M Co. 


«( 41 


Union <i M Co 




VanWyck 




6 








Laugdons 




J. A. Langdon. 

• 
Lincoln fl M Cn 


OWYHEE COUNTY, 
fioldcii Crrok 


Lincoln 




20 

10 

20 

6 

8 

10 
20 

'I 

10 

10 

6 


.... 

.... 


steam 

4t 
If 
14 
44 
44 
II 
41 


940 m 
76,000 

i2o.6o6 

100,000 
10,000 


•lordaii Creek 


Cogmos 




CoKmoH S M Cu 


41 II 


Martin & Co.'s 




.1. h. Mnrtin A Co. 


It H 


Mint'Rr 




More, Fogus & Co. 
More, Fogus Jt Co. 
More, Fogus A Co. 
Kobbins A Styles. 


It 44 


Morning Star 




44 41 


N. Y. ifc Oro Fino 




44 44 


N. Y. .fe Owyhee 




14 14 






44 (4 


Vass & Moreo 






Sinker Creek 


AiuHWortii 




Orejron S. Nav. Co. 


i* M 


Cironzeback 






Wobloot 







ir 



TAULE OF WATER DITCHES, 
With the Location, Source of Water, Length, Cost, etc., of each. 



Name of Ditch. 


Source of Wiitor. 


Is 

3 

I' 
3 


Cost. 


Nnino of owner. 


UOISE COU.NTir. 






J. M. More & Co. 


Rannnck ...... ..-. .... 


li:'iiniiok Uiir ............... 




J M. More & Co. 


Big Ditch 






.1. M. More &, Co. 








J. M. More & Co. 


Ceiitervillc 






• Woltr.in. 

Clirista Sl More. 


Christji 




8 




Deer Creek Dilcli Co.'a 


Deer Creek. 




Deer Creek Ditch Co. 


GoldstriiD Sl Co.'s 




•) 

13 

7 

5 




Doldstrup &. Co. 
Thatcher. Badger &. Co. 
More, Wilson ot Co. 








More &. Wilsons 


More* 8 Creek 












I'luc'crville.. 






!.,vncli & CInyton. 










WriKhtfl 





9 




Tliomus Wright. 



There are noi 

valleys. The bi 

I contains some j 

abundance, the , 

dant with luxuri 



' With the Locatio 
Location. 

_ . ADA COUNT 

Boise City. 
Boise Kiver .".■■"" 

"Bz peuck cou 
Clearwater Kiver 



With til 



Location. 



n.ry Creek... 
Pioneer On Ml .■"■ 
I Moore's <'mek..'.'.', 

I Ked Warrior Creek 

iWahoaty.'^""^-"- 

I Pioneer City. .■■" 
jPiacerville ."' 

IDAHO COUNTY I 

Florence 

L-iu^l'"*"*^" ccxjntJ 
I tlk Citv ... I 

I Indian .'{eservation".' 

. OWYIIKE COUNTY.! 

Jordan Creek. .. . 



Exhibiting (he cJ 
COtJNTIES. 1 Co J 

U^."'^" UockylJ 

1 'T MuhoCil 

.Wwho...... KlorencJ 

I 'Kootenai ..Sin.naa(f 

'•'orward. ... 



IDAHO TERRITORY. 



GRIST A^D SAW MILLS 



146* 



AGRICULTURE. 
There are numeroas tracts of One aRricultaral land, of limited extent, to be found in the vicinity of the 
valleys. The bottoms of Boise and Payette Valleys are productive to some extent. The Owyhee region 
rontains some excellent land, with an abundance of water, " well calculated to yield, in profitable 
abundance, the different varieties of grain, vegetable, succulent roots and hay, and the hillsides are ver- 
dant with luxuriant and nutritious grasses, being unsurpassed as a stock range." 

TABLE OP GRIST MILLS, 

With the Location, Name, Run of Stone, Capacity per Day, Power, Cost, and Occupant's Xame of each. 




Location. 


N.imo Of Mill. 


No.run 
.Stone. 


Capacity 
per (liiy. 


Power. 


Cost. 


Present Occupants. 


AHA COUNTY. 

Boise City 


More & Co 's. ..... . 










More &r Co. 


Boise River 


Emereon & Wileong. 












M«Z PERCE COU.NTY. 

























TABLE OF SAW MILLS, 

With the liocation. Name of Slill, Capacity, Cost, Occupant's Name, etc., of each. 



Locution. 



ADA COU.NTV. 

Dry Creek 

Pioneer Gulch 

Moore's Cicek 



Name of Mill. 



ALTUUAS rOUNTV. 

Red Warrior Creek . 

IIOISK COUNTY. 

Idaho City 



Pioneer City. 
Placcrvilie... 



IDAHO COUNTY. 

Florence 



NKZ PERCE COUNTY. 

ElkCitv 

Indian jteservntiun. . . . 



OWYHEE COUNTY. 

Jordan Creek 



Drv Creek 

lioliicB 

Mountain .. 



Kipley & Co.'s. 



IdahcCity 

Langburys 

ParkisonH 

Upton, Miller &, Co.'s 



Florence . 



Eik City.. 
Liipwai . . 



Bloom & Herds . 



No. 
S;iW8. 



Capacity— | Power. 
ft.lieriliiy.: 



la.OOO-tteam. 

."i.onn 

8,000 



10,0(10 
7, 000 1 
1,000 1 



water. 



Coat. 



fl.'i.OOO 
8,000 



rrencnt Occupants. 



Albert H. Robie. 
Albert II. Robie. 



8,000 Sampson, McNary At Co. 
W. H. Moulthrnp, Ag'k. 



7,000 
.■".,000 



Butler Sl Taylor. 

LiiiiKliui'v. 

Parkixon, Wilwon & Co. 
Upton, Miller &. Co. 



i 



• Baker. 



Bell, Brolbein & Co. 
James O'Neal. 



Bloom & Herd. 



TABLE. 

Exhibiting (he Counties of Idaho Territory, the County Seats, and Retunis of the Election, 186fi. 



COUNTIES. 



Alia 

Alturas 

Ilolse 

Idaho 

'Kootenai .. 

Forward . 



County Seats. 



Boiee City 

Rocky Biir 

Idaho City 

Florence 

Sin-na-ac-qua-teen. 



Klectlon, 1888. 1 1 


Klrkpnfk 


llolbrnok I 


3'.>» 

IfiO 

4,208 

100 


38!) 

i(i0 

1,087 

mo 






i 1,972 


2,716 



COUNTIES. 



Forward . 
Lahtoh . . 
Nez Perce . 
Oneida ....' 
Owyhee .. , 
Shoshone.. 



Totals. 



Klertlon, 18«6. 



County Seats. 



KIrkpal'k 



Clear d'Alene. 

Lewiston 

Malade City . . 

Ruby City 

Pierce City . . . 



,97J 



Hulbrook 



2,746 



230 


155 


131 


38 


551 


675 


30 


27 



2,923 I 3,(H1 



• UnorganlEeil. 



10* 




111 



146* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TABLE 

Showing the principal Cities ami Towns of Idaho Territory, the County in which each is located, the 
estimated Popiihition Sept., 1806, and the Distance of each from Boise City, the Territorial Capitul. 



COUNTIES. 



Name of Town. 



I til 

1 r* " o. 



Ada j lioise City 

Altiiraa i Koel<y Bar 

Boise j Centerville 

„ ( ildalioCity andBnena 
;| Vista Bar 

" Pioneer City 

" i I'lacerville 

Idaho ' Florence 

" Miller's Camp 

" i Slate Creek 

" iV.'arren's DiKfcings.. 



9? 



2,050 

»>75 100 N.E, 
1,100 45 N. 

5,860 



1,700 
1,000 



36 N.E 

55 N.E 
40 N. 

(iOOiJ.'-.O N. 

1.5(1 i.':«) N. 

r.'i'yooN. 

1,100 :230N. 



COUNTIKS. 



Nez Perce.. 



Nair« of Town. 



Clearwater Station . 

Elk City 

Lewiston 

Oneida | Bear Liike 

" MahideCity 

" [Soda Springs 

Ow vhee | Boone ville 

'■' ....iKuby City 

" ....;Silver City 

Shoshone .. Oro Fino 

" ... 1 Pierce City 



- =-3 



290 
4.')0 

a'jo 

300 

4'J5 

75 

400 

1,000 

3,175 

'.m 

300 



2.3 



330 N. 

350 N. 
350 N. 
450 E. 
348 E. 
450 E. 

72 8. 

70S. 

70 8. 
4.'iO N. 
450 N. 



LIBRARIES. 

The Territorial Library, at Boise City, was organized in 18C6, and contains nearly seven hundred 
volumes of works in the different departments of litcmture. 

LIST OF NEWSPAPERS, 
With the Locality and Time of Publication, Name of Publisher, etc. 



COL'STY. 



Name. 



Locnlltv <if Piibli- 
Vlltlnll. 



When Issued. 



Ada 

Boise . . . 

Owyhee. 



Slatesimin i Boise Cil y jTri-W. & W. 

Times I Idaho City Semi-Week. 

World I Idaho (Mty Weekly 

Avulani'lie I Silver CitV : Weekly 



Vol. 



PulilUhcrs. 



3 j Idaho Stiites'n Pub. Co. 

1 Shepherd & Co. 

3 I. H. Bowman & Co. 

2 I.Imo. &. Jos. Waspon. 



MONTANA TERRITORY, 

Capital, Virginia City. 
E.XECUTIVE A.Ni) Tkiiimtuuial Officeus.* 



NAME OK INtTMBENT. 



Office. 



Governor. 



flreen Clay Sinitli 

Thomas Franiis Jhaglier Secretary. 

ilohn II. Ming Auditor'.. 

John S. Hockl'cllow ITreaHnrer 

A. II. Bfirrct jSup't Public Instruction 

J. II. Ming 

John P. Bruce 



Resilience. 



I 

ITorm Expires. 



Virginia City.. 
Virginia City.. 
Virginia(;ity.. 
Virginia City.. 
Virginia City.. 



Salary. 



At will 
At will 
At will 
At will 
At will 
At will 



j Librarian j Virginia City 

iTerritoiiiil Printer | Virginia City.. |.\t will 



!j;i,.')(K) 
2,000 
700 and fees. 
700 and fees. 
(;iH) 



DELEfiATE IN CONGRESS. 



XA5IE OF IXCrSIBENT. 



Samuel McLean . 



Residence. 



Bannack CitV. 



Term Expires. 



March 3, 1867. 



LEGISLATURE.! 

COUNCII, — CoU.NTIES COMPOSINO EACH DiSTIlICT, A.ND THE REPIIESENTATIOS OF EACH. 

Missoula, elect onel 



1st I>ist. — Madison, elects three Conncilmen. 
2d Dist. — Deer Lodge, elects three Councilmen. 
3d Dist. — Edgerton, elects three Conncilmen. 
4th Dist. — Meagher and Cboteau, elect two Coun 
ciluien. 



5th Dist. — Beaver Head and 

Councilman. 
6th Dist.— Muscle Shell, Big Horn, Gallatin, aiid| 

Jetferson, elect one Councilman. 



paie 33. For orKUiilziltlon and tenns of L'lXirIa, sec pages 30-X.I 
Fiirllst "f I'i)«t ntti<'C» In llic Terrllnry, see p««c 2H. Election takes place, first Tucsilay In Sepemlier. 



•For ll»t of .Iiidli'lal and Ucvcnun ofllcers, see 
'or list iif I'lmt < Ittiren In llie Terrllnry, see pKKc 2H. 
tTlie Ciiiinoll l» cnnipiiHeil ot thirteen nienibem, and the House . 



Ueprescntutlvcs of twenty-six members. 



MO] 



Rephe 
Beaver Head-Two t 

DeerLodge-Fi.a. 
adgei ton— Five 
Gallatin and Big' Hon 



fCorr 
, BEAVER 

mtcApp-t. Name. 

Sept.l0,'C6..Ben. S. F 

CHOTE. 

M"y36,'66..H.D. Up 

IJEER LO] 

Mar. 3. '66.. Richard T 
|J"ly », •(ifi..J. J. R|„k 

EDGERT( 

U,;fi.5..u,.„vv. ;» 
^i- ,"•'■• John Mom 

Jan. 1 ,'fi(i..Ii:enrvM 
.Jan. (,,(i(5..j. „ -J , 

Jan 27, •fi,i..K„,.e,,t7'; 

'^P"l '- fiC.R. W.Min 

• »y,f'. <.!«!•■ W. J. Stev 
•'".vll, 'fi6..r. K.;,i,,K 

j July 18, '66.. .Tames E. V 

I OALLATIJ 

|M»yl6,'05..L.BranchI 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 



r>ateof App't 
Mar. l;», •{,(•,. 
June 27, '66. 

May 15, '66. 
June 2, '«(!.. 
June 21, '66., 

I VI 8, '66.. 



|;JulylI, '66, 

April 8, '66, 

;Oct. 11, '65. 

Oi't. l(i, '6,'i. 

i Kcb. IS), '«(;. 

j M'»r. 27, -66. 



fCorrecIc 
CALII.'( 
Name. 
•N. Proctor,, 
•J. 11. Blood. 

iLLi: 

•John M. Bill 
■S. W. King. 
Phil. A. 11.. 
LVDI 
"• C. .Martii 
JIASSACI 

• James H. Be 

NEV; 
-A. E. Shaiuu 

NEW 
-James Tiiftg . 
■«•, M. Evans 
Julius Silvers 

• Charles Neft 



The Territory of Montam 
between 45^ «i,d 4a<^ north 

"••■St is about 750 miles; br 
iji'" TTritory wa, org,,,,;,,, 



msmm 



MONTANA TERRITORY. COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS. 



147" 



ItEPKESKNTATIVE DiSTHICTS, AND THE COUNTIES COMPOSINQ THK SAME, 



Beaver Ileud — Two memberg. 

Deer Lodge — Vi ■ a. 

Edjtei ton— Five. 

Gallatiu uud Big Horn — Two. 



JeffTBon — Ouo. 
Miidrnon— Five. 
MoiikImm- and Choteau — Four. 
iMisBoula — Two. 



NOTARIES PUBLIC. " 

[Term, two years.] 
[Corrected at the office of the Secretary of the Territory, July 25, 1866. 



Sept. 
Mar. 
Mur. 
July 



BEAVER HEAD COUNTY. 

Date App't. Name. Residence. 

Sept. 10, '66. -Ben. S. Peabody Bnnnacic City. 

CHOTEAU COUNTY. 

May 26, '66 . . H. D. Upliam Benton City. 

DEER LODGE COUNTY. 
1, '6.')..W. J. MrCorniick. ..Deer Lod«eCitv. 
U, '66.. Richard T. Kenyon-.Deer Lodye City. 

9, '66.. Charles Wullier Elk Creek. 

9, '66.. J. J. Blake Einniet«biirg. 

EDGERTON COUNTY. 

Oct. 14, '6.5.. Ray W. Andrews... Helena. 

Oct. 24,'6.'i..John Molfilt Helena. 

Nov. 8, 'ta . . S. W. PanI Helena. 

Dec. 9, '6.5.. Peter H. Rea Htlena. 

Dec. 18, '6.5.. L. W. Miller Ilelenii. 

Dec. 2(», 'li.5...Iohn H. Shrol.er ...Helena. 

Jan. 1 :», '66.. Henry M. Hill Helfna. 

Jan. 16, "66.. I. B. .lohnson Helena. 

Jan. 2?, '66. .Robert Hereford Hclernt. 

April 6, '66. .R. \V. Minnns Helena. 

July .5, '66. .W. J. Stevens llel.n.i. 

Jnlv 11, '66.. C. R. llipkins Helma. 

July 17, '66. .Robert B. Piirrott ... Helena. 
July 18, '66. .James E. Vinton Ilelena. 

GALLATIN COl'NTY. 

May 16, '65. .L. Branch Lyman. ..Gallatin City. 



Date App't Name. Residence. 

Nov. 8, '6.5.. John 8. Mendcnhall. Bozeman City. 
Feb. 15, '66. .A. Williams Clark... Gallatin City. 

JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

Jan. 16, '66.. John Adams Jefferson County 

Jan. 26, '66.. William G. Barkley.,Te<rer8on Comity 

July 9, '66. . Ben. Ezekiel Parke City. 

July 17, 'W)..Tho8. Baume Parke City. 

MADISON COUNTY. 

Aug. 3, '65. .L. S. Peck Virginia City. 

Sept. 10, '6.5. . D. Gilbert Virginia City. 

Sept. 10,'65..W. II. Chiles Virginia City. 

Oct. 12,'65..Natli8nielT. Hall. ..Central. 
Oct. 14, '65. .Frank C. Diemling.. Virginia City. 

Oct. 14, '65. .David Cowan Virginia Cit'v. 

Oct. 30, '65.. N. P. Lanford Virginia City. 

Nov. 8, '65.. B. H. Robertson Nevada City. 

Dec. 18, '65.. George W. Irwin.... Virginia City. 

Feb. 5, '66. .A. B. C. Smith Virginia City. 

Mar. 3, '(>().. Joseph Dowdell Mill Creek. 

May 8, '66. .A. H. Barret Virginia City 

MEAGHER COUNTY. 

Dec. 9, '65. .Sample Orr Diamond City. 

Stay 15, '66.. J. M.Morrow Diamond CitV. . 

May 26, '66. .Joseph K. Clark .... Diamond City. 

MISSOULA COUNTY. 
July 23, '06. .A. H. Clmpiiian Jocko Reservat'n 



COMMISSIONERS OF DKE"H. 

[Term, two years] 
[Corrected at tlii3 ollice of the Secretary of the Territf.t y, July 25, 1866 



Date of .Vpp't 
Mar. i:t, '1)6. 
June 27, 'iM. 

May 15, '66. 
June 2, '66. 
Jmie21,'66. 

Ap'l 8, '()6. 

i 
|Jiilyll,'66. 

1 April 8, '66. 



Oct. 11, '65. 
Oct. 16, '65, 
Feb. 19. '66. 
Mar. 27, '66 



CALIFORNIA. 

Nuiiie. Ri'sliloiH'P. 

.N. Proctor Smith San Francisco. 

.J. U. Blood San Francisco. 

ILLINOIS. 
.•John M. Barrett ....Pontiac. 

.S. W. King Chicago. 

.Phil. A. llovne Chicago. 

INDIANA. 

.II. C. .Martin Indianapolis. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 
. James B. Bell Boston. 

NEVADA. 

. A. E. Shaiuion Aust in. 

NEW YORK. 

.James Tufts New York city. 

-R. M. Evans New Voik city. 

.Julius Silversmith ...New York city. 
.Charles Nettletou ...New York city. 



Date of App't. Name. Residence. 

April 8,'66...r. Spencer SuiliI New York city. 

April 8, '66.. Thomas Sadler N'ew York city. 

June 26, '6().. Nathaniel Young..... New York city. 

OREGON. 
Jan. 11, '66. .Geo. Venable Smith .Portland. 
PENNSYLVANIA. 

Dec. 9, '65.. John McLaren Pittsburg 

Feb. 24, '66.. John W. Boyd Pbiladelplu.i. 

July 9, '66.. J. II. T. Jacl<B(«i Philadelphia. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Mar. 19, '66. .Henry Martin Providence. 

TENNESSEE. 

Mar. 21, '66. .S. V. Clerenger Chattanoogii 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

June 26, '66. . Fred. Koonse Washington. 

UTAH TERRITORY. 
Oct. 26, '65. .A. G.Lawreuce Salt Lake City. 



AREA AND RESOURCES. 

The Territory of Montana is, with the exception of a small projection in the aonthwest portion, situated 

between 45-' and 49^^ north latitude, and between 104-^ and 116-^ west 'longitude. Its length from east to 

west is about 750 miles ; breadth, about 275 miles ; and its area is estimated at about 300,000 square miles. 

This Territory was orgtuiixed in the year 1864, previous to which it formed a part of the Territory of 




U 



t) 1.' 



i K 



! ly 



148* 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINKSS DIRBCTORT. 



Idaho. The surface of the country is genenilly moiintainons, the great Rocky Mountain Ran^e extending 
across the Territory, witli minor cliains extending in various directions thronghont other ))ortionti. The 
Yellow Stone River and other valleys on tlie eastern border, once the favorite hunting grounds of the 
savage, and where the adventurous trapper secured his richest harvest of furs, are unsurpiissed in fertility ; 
and that portion lying between the Yellow Stone and Missouri. 'vhich abounds in extensive well- watered 
prairies, interspersed with clumps of timber, is pronounced by experienced exjiN rers to be among the 
most beautiful to be found west of the Mississippi River. Placer gold diggings have been found on both 
sides of the Rocky Mountain Range— the Eastern and Pacific Slopes— and worked to a considerable 
extent. Extensive lodes of gold and silver-bearing quartz have also been discovered in the same local- 
ities, which promise rich returns. Since the organization of this Territory, it has rapidly filled with an 
enterprising and industrious population. 

MINERAL. 

This Territr y is i ich in mineral wealth. The placer mines in the vicinity of Helena and Virginia 
cities, have yielded large amounts of gold. Extensive and valua))1e quartz lodes exist in the counties of 
Beaver Head, Edgerton, Jefferson, and Madison, which alt'ord employment to a numerous and active popu- 
lation. 

QUARTZ MILLS. 

The number of mills in operation in August, 1866, was fourteen, of which ten are propelled by steam. 
The number of stamps employed, one hundred and nincly-tive. Aggregate cost of mills and machinery, 
five hundred thousand dollars. Several of the mills have a number of arastras iu addition to the stamps 
herein enumerated. 

TAI3LE OF QUARTZ MILLS, 

With the Location, Name, Cost, Date of Erection, Number of Stamps, Occupant's Name, etc. 



Locntlnn. 



Name of SIlll. 



BEAVKR HKAD COUNTY.! 

liannuck 'Dacotah . 






EnOEIlTON COUNTY. 

Helena Park M. fo.'s 



.lEPFEKSON rOUNTY. 

Pipe Stone 



MADTSON COUKTlT. 

Hot >Spiiug 



Mill Creek. 
Summit .. . 



1800 
Kcw.lerpey M. Co.'i-.. . I80ti 

1806 



Herman & Co.'k. 
McKiustrys 



1800 



Clark A- Up'on 1805 

New York J!, lo.'s ISOi 

Hugliiiid, I ope it (.'o.'s.. 181* 

Hrunlium it I'o.'s ■ IBOfi 

Uuscli A Co '» 'imi 

Idaho M. Co.'H ilS06 

iScranfou M. i'o.'s. . . ISiiO 

: Seneca Falln 1S05 

! St. Louis M. < o.'s IWO 



20 



40 
15 
15 
20 
'-'0 
• 

15 
40 



12 



12 



steam 



steam 



water 



Cost 



aiCi 

;^0 



9 , 

30,00() Gold. 

12000 



8,000 



steoTi 


00,000 


wal ' 


75,000 


Htea 1 


25,0iy) 


vfat • 


15.000 


"tea 1 


ai.ooo 


" 


100,000 


f< 


a5,ooo 


if 


80,000 


i< 


75,000 



Gold. 



Present Occupaiitt. 



Dacotah Co. 
New JorRey M. Co. 

Park BI. Co. 



Gold. Herman .t Co. 

JIcKinHtrj' A Co. 



(■old. 



CInrk A Upson. 
N. Y.M. Co. 
Itiif;)nnd, Cope * Co. 
Ifi'iinhani it Co. 
Uusch it Co. 
Idalio M. Vi). 
.Scrantiin M. Co. 
Soncea Fall^ Co. 
St. Louis M. Co. 



TABLE OP WATER DITCHES, 
With the Loc.ition, Source of Water, Length, ('ost, etc., of euch. 



Name of Ditch. 



KiKiKUTON cou.srr. 
Ton-Mile Uitch Co.'s Ten-Mile Creek. 



Source of Wnter. 



3? 



10 



MADI.'ON COII.NTY. 

Norwegian lilteh Co.'s 

Ram's Horn Ditch Co.'s 

iSilver How Ditch Co.'s 

Stinking Water Ditch Co.'s . 

The Roach Ditch ('o.'s 

Virginia Water Ditch Co.'s. 



Cost. 



Name of Owner. 



|.^0,000 Ten-Mile Ditch Co. 



South WIIow Creek ' 10 

Rum's Horn Creek C> 

Silver How Creek 9 

Stinking Water River 8 

Brown's Gulch 4 

Pine Lako 8 



40,000 



10,000 

10,0110 

6,000 

10,000 



Norwegian Ditch Vo. 
KetieH ii, Stanley 
Humphrey & .Vllison. 
Cowan, Ilall Sc Co. 
Roach St. (,'o. 
il. MeEvely. 



MO 



I ,^''6 ngricultur 

of grt-wmH- the t 

I m the world. Tli 

and wherever tli 

of both the Hell 

tainardck, or larc 

run through the 

well timbered wil 

jnotedpiueofOrei 

There ig one grii 

JV't'|_the Locafi( 
location. 

j MAni.SON COUM 

Granite Creek 

I Junction... 

I Meadow Creek.'"" 
Prickly Pear.. '■■ 
Virginia City..; ■■■ 

I Willow Creek...." ." 

i 

Territorial Wnrnmts 
Icmtoriul Warrant! 
I ■^inoiiiitpuid... 

I .""'""ce unpaid..".""" 
I "KCEiPTs.-Amount 

Exhibiting the Count 



cou.vrr: 

I Beaver If cad. 

1% Honi... 
Clioteau... 

peer Lodge. . ." 

Iwprfon ... 

Ifiallaiiii ."_" 

jJelff rson . ..".'.". 
jMadrsoii ...'."..' 
Llleiiglier. ...'.'"' 

I'lissoula .".*" 

|)Iii8clo iShell..".' 

Totals... 



pliiliting the prineipa 
tl'e estimated Populmj 



|<="^-^^-TV. Name, 



fc':':"««''i"Hmmek , 
llenton Cit 
Blackfoot 
Deer Lodg 
Reynolds C 
Silver Bow 
Helena . 



Ilioteaii 
per Lodge 



%ertoii . 



Crusher. 



p^ii'"'".... Bozeman": 
'Dennison . 



MONTANA TBRRITORY. QRIST AND BAW MILLS 



149* 



AGItlCULTUIlAL. 

The nf^ricultural and ^razinff facilities of this Territorjr are said to )>e iinfliirpassed. The soil ig capable 
of grcwintr the fluest wneHt, barley, etc., while the hill-sides are covered with the most iitritious grasiies 
in the world. The valleys of Gallatin, Deer Lodge, and Jefferson have produced fine crops of the cereals; 
and wherever they have been planted, rich returns have rewarded the liusbandmun. " Along the valleys 
of both the Hell Gate and Bitter Root there is a great abundance of excellent timber — pine, hemlock, 
tamarack, or larch, predominating. The numerous mountain rivnlets tributary to the Bitter Root which 
run through the valley afford excellent and abundant mill seats. The valley and mountain slopes lire 
well tiiiihercd with an excellent growth of pine, which is equal in every respect to the well known and 
noted pine of Oregon." , 

GRIST MILLS, FLOUR. 
There is one grist d)5!1 in the Territory, located at Bozeman City, and owned by Coover &. McAdow. 

TABLE OP SAW MILLS, 

With the Location, Name of Mill, Number of Saws, Capacity, Cost, Occupant's Name, etc., of each. 



Location. 



HADISON COUNTY. 

Granite Creek 

Jiniction 

Meadow Creek ; 

Prickly Pear 

Virgiiiia City 

Willow Creek 



Name of Mill. 



Granite 

Brundys 

Meadow Creek 

Lees 

Cafl'erys 

House & Bivens .. 



No. 
Saws. 



Capac 'V- 
Ft. per (lay, 



Power. 



Cost. 



Present Ocuupants. 



Spencer, Harrison & Co. 
|10,OOII J. W. Brimdv. 

I lO.OOOiS. R.Blake & Co. 

C.&H.Lee. 

water.] 5,000 J. R. Catfery. 
\ I Alex. House. 



FINA^X"ES. 

Territorial Warrants outstanding, originally isemed $8.5,004 50 

Territorial Warrants registered October 31. ISliO ^ 62,7.57 M 

.Amount paid 8,713 5.3 

lialance f.npaid 51,044 45 

llECEiPTs. — Amount received for the fiscal year ending October 31, 1866 23,316 95 

TABLE 

Exhibiting the Counties and County Seats of Montana Territory, the Revenue of the different Counties, 
and amonnt of Real and Personal Property in the Territory. 



COUNTIES. 



I Beaver Head . 

I nig Horn 

I Choteau 

I Deer Lodge. . . 

iKdiferfon 

l0<illa\iii 

iJelff rson 

■ Madition . 



County ScaU. 



Bannack City 

Unorganizi'd 

Benton City 

Deer I^odge City. 

Helena 

Giillatin City 

Prickly Pear 

1 Virginia City 



iMeaglier i Diamond Citv . 

iHissonIa Missoula Mills. 

iMnscle Shell Kercheval 



Totals $23,316 1)5 



Territorial 
Kcveime. 



$330 OU 



4,231 99 
7,368 90 
a'lO 75 
902 50 
8,607 72 
500 00 
745 00 



Ueal and Por- 

sonul rrop'ty, 

ISWt. 



$250,000 



4C6,<>91 
1,320,386 
444,363 
190,628 
1,732,905 
250.000 
296,901 



$4,957,274 



TABLE 

|£xhibiting the principal Cities and Towns of Montana Territory, the Counties in which each is located, 
the estimated Population in September, 1866, and Distance from Virginia City, the Territorial Capital. 



COfNTY. 






Name of Town. 



ivcrHead BannackCity. 

(liotcau 

leer Lodge. 



Jltterton . 
liHllutiu . . 



Benton Citv 

Blackfoot Citv... 
Deer Lodge City. 

Reynolds City 

Silver Bow .'. 

Helena 

Bozeman 

Dennison 






800 
1,,500 
2,000 
1,,500 



■• = ? 
^1 



COUNTY. 



?01W. 1 1 Gallatin. 
400NW. 
200 N W. 

80 NW, 



2,000! I80NW. 



1,250 

8,000 

200 

1,500 



100 W. 
125 N. 
.60E. 
155 N.E. 



.Tctferson . 
Madison . . 



Sleagher . . . 
Missoula.... 



Name of Town. 



Gallatin City.. 
Prickly Pea'r.. 
Nevada City.. 
Steriing City., 
Summit City . . 
Virginia City. 
Diamond Citv, 
Missoula Mills, 



o '»• 

•o =■ 
c a 



500 

"250 
2,000 

500 
1,000 
4,000 
2,000 

500 



100 N.E. 
90 N. 

2NW. 
30 E. 

8 8. 



165 N.E. 
150 W. 



h'li'ifi 



p'j ■ 



^liRiri'^ 



ll ■!■ 



150* 



PAOIPIO COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



LIDRARIEP. 

Tlio Territorial Library at Virginia City was organized in 1865, and compriBes at the present time about 
500 volumes of workb in the different departments of literature. Librarian, J. H. Ming. 

LIST OP NEWSPAPERS, 
Published in Montana Territory, witli the Locality, Time of Publication, Name of Publisher, etc. 



COUNTY. 



Edgerton Radiiitor . . , 

Edgerton Republican . 

Madison i Democrat... 

Madison ' Post 



NAME. 



r.ounllty of rublica- 
tluii. 



When Issued. 



Helena Weekly .... 

Helena [Tri- Weekly . 

Virginia Citv | Weekly 

Virginia City iTriW. & W 



Vol. 



Fubllshors. 



T. J. Favorite. 
1). W. Tilton &, Co. 
John P.Hruce. 
n.W.Tihon&Co. 



UTAH TERRITORY. 

Capital, Great Salt Luke City. 
Pedkhai. and Tkuuitoiuai. Okkicers," 



NAME OF IXCIMUENT. 



Offlcc. 



Charles Durkee 

t Amos Reed 

Albert Carriiiglon 

.Tolm D. T. McAllister. 

William Clavton 

David C. Ciilder 

.lesne W. Vox 

Robert L. ('aMi|ibell. .. 

William C. Stiiines 

Henry McEweii 

Theodore McKcun 

Williiini Clayton 

Naihiin Diivitt 

Albeit P. Rdckwood .. 



fSovornor 

Secretary 

Attorney General 

Marshal 

Auditor 

Treasurer 

.Surveyor Genernl 

.Siip't Public Instruction. 

I^ibrariun 

Public Printer 

Road ('ommissioner 

Rec'r Marks & Krands . 

.Sealer W'ts &, Meas 

Warden Penitentiarv. -. 



Ilcsidencc. 



Salt Lake City. 
Suit Lake City. 
Salt Lake City. 
Salt Lake Chy . 
Salt I.,ake City . 
Salt Luke City. 
S;ilt Lake City. 
Salt Lake City. 
Salt Lake City . 
Salt Lake Citv. 
Suit Lake City. 
Salt IjukeCity. 
Salt Lake City. 
Salt Lake Citv - 



Term Expires. 



At will 

At will 

Jan., 1870... 
Jan., isro. .. 
Jan., 1870. .. 
Jan., 1S70. .. 
Jan., 1870... 
Jan., 1870. .. 
Jan., 1870... 
Jan., 1870... 
Jan., 1870... 
Jan., 1870... 
Jan., 1870... 
Jan., 1870. .. 



Salary. 



',',000 
Pees. 
Pees. 

$400 

400 

PeCB. 

F(!ei>. 

1400 
Peee. 

P(-CS. 

Fees. 

Fees. 

$1,000 



Dki.kgate in Conghk.s.s. 



NAME OF INCUMBENT. 



n?8ldcnco. 



William H. Hooper Great Salt Lake VMy 



Term Exjilrca. 



Slavch 3, 1807. 



LEGISLATURE. 

The Legislative Assembly is composed of a Council and House of Representatives, and conveneil 
ann\iallv, at Great Salt Lake City, on the second Moiulay in December. r 

Tile Council is composed of thirteen memheix, who are elected for two years. The House of Repreeeii- 
tatives is composed of twenty -six members, electeu juiiiially. 

COU.-JCII. Dl.STUlCTS, THE CoU.VTIKS CO.MI'OSINO THE .SAME, A.ND ReI'UESKNTATIOX OF EACH. 



Great Salt Lake, Tooele, Summit, and Green River 

— Elect four Coiincilmen. 
Davis and Morgan — Elect one Councilman. 
Weber and IJox Elder — Elect one Councilman. 
Cache and Richland — Elect one Councilman. 



Utah and Wasatch — Elect twoCouncihnen. 
San Pete and Sevier — Elect one Councilman. 
Millardand Juab — Elect one Counciluiiin. 
Heaver, Iron, and Piute— Elect one Couiu ilinim. 
Washington aud Kane — Elect one Couiiciliimii. 



ReI'KKSENTATIVE DiSTKlCTS, AND THE COUNTIES COMI'OSINO THE SAME. 



Reaver and Piute— One member. 

Uox Elder — One. 

Cache and Richland — Two. 

Davis and Morgan — Two. 

Great ShIi Lake — Six. 

Green River and Suntmit — One. 

Iron — One. 

Juab — One. 



One. 



1 



Kane and Washington 

MiMard— One. 

S'i'.i Pete and Sevier — Two. 

Tooele — One. 

Utah— Three. 

Wasutch — One. 

Weber— Two. 



] 

(Ja«. H. liolhuH. 
HO 



I John Burt , 



< 



Henry Standage 

Jiis. A. Leishmai 

J Alex. Stalker . . . 

I Arthur Stavner. 
I Jacob Miller 

, GREAT ( 

JV W.l'lielpH.. 
Patrick Lynch... 
Wm. Clayton 

gree: 

I Wm. A.Carter ... 

I Martin Slack 

I Tliomns Ord ; 

Sextus E. Johnsoin 

MILI 

•Jof- V. RohinKon..^ 

I John W. Kadford.Il 

MOIv't 
I John Hoyden \\ 

"m.J.AIIrcd 



•Tlio (lencral Election is held on the first Monday In AuKUSt. The Territorial ofticers are nil elected by tlie Lepluli 
tare, for four yearn, except those marked thus : t, who are appointed liv the President of the United Stales. For IIkI' 
United t^tates oAlcers, see page U3. For list of Tost Otllces, sue p.tKe 28. For orcanizatioa and terms of tlie Feili'i 
Courts, see paijes 30-Si. 



I The Territory of V 

i longitude, heit.;fabo„ 

iarea of 103,000 s,,uar, 

I,mountaiii8, which rise 

I'lie highest peaks of X 

tlie settled poi(i„„ oft 

[lyingwestof the Wm 

'[Great Basin, tl.o rive 

»'lver quartz loik.g |,„v 

(Within its |i„,i,„, „^y„ 

I'ttle has been done in 
principal business of th 
iK'ohe. There are abo, 
.|i"ebestqtmlity. The 
lion of Mont.ina is m, 
I'lie same nmrket. Cot 
pptedtoitsproducli 

■eoitn^""'"' ^'"""♦7 ftl'e 
■01 the fanmiis Arctic ex. 
loap'tal of Ut.,h. p iueip' 
Iwtlemenfsand,Wies' 
lf'^7" 7,000 of then, ar, 
If^^;[;|fe8 about 480,000 



UTAH TERRITORY. AREA AND RESOURCES. 



151* 



NOTARIES PUBLIC. 
[Elected by the Legiislatiire for four years.] 



DEAVER COUNTY. 
Name. Kpniilrnco. Term Kxpircs. 

W. FotlienriKliiim. Denver City Juii. IH7U. 

Jas. U. UolliiiH MinerHville Jau. 1870. 

UOX ELDER COUNTY. 

John Burt ItriKlmin City Jan. 1870. 

CACHE COUNTY. 

Henry Standajje . . liOfran Jan. 1870. 

JuB. A. lieixliumn . Lo^an Jan. 1870. 

Alex. Stalker LuKaii Jun. 1870. 

DAVIS COUNTY. 

Arthur Stayner. . . Farniinffton Jan. 1870. 

Jacob MiiicV Fariiiington Ian. 1870. 

OREAT SALT LAKE COUNTY. 

Jno. T. Caine Ot. Suit Lalse City Jan. 1870. 

W. W. I'helpa ....Ot. .Suit Uihe Citv Jan. 1870. 

Patrick Lynch Oi. Salt Lake Citv Jan. 1870. 

Win. Clayton Ot. Salt Lake City Jan. 1870. 

(5REEN RIVER COUNTY. 

Wm. A.Carter ... Fort Hridjtcr Jan. 1870. 

IRON COUNTY. 

Martin Slack Cedar City Tan. 1870. 

JUAB COUNTY. 

ThomaB Ord Xcpbi City Jan. 1870. 

KANE COIJNTY. 

Sextus E. Johnson Vir>,'in City Jan. 1870. 

MILLARD COUNTY. 

Jos. V. RobinHon.. Fillmore City Jan. 1870. 

John W. Radfiira. Dcseret City Jan. 1870. 

MORtJAN COUNTY. 

John Boyden Weber City Jan. 1870. 

Pll'TE COUNTY. 
Wm.J. Allred.... Jan. 1870. 



RICHLAND COUNTY. 

Kamc. Resldi'iu'C. Term 

Rich'd R. Hopkins Saint Charles Jan, 

Morris Phelps Montpelier Jan. 

SAN PETE COUNTY. 

F. C. Robinson . . . Manti Jan. 

John Kirkhnm.... Jan. 

C. A. Madscn Onnnison Jan. 

David Candland ..Mount PleaMUit ...Jan. 

SEVIER COUNTY. 

R. W. nien 

John Rcadhead.. 



ExDircs. 

18/0. 

1870. 



1870, 
1870. 
1870. 
1870. 



— .Tan. 

— Jan. 

SUMMIT COUNTY. 

11. W. Brizzee Wansblp Jan. 

Thos. Bullock Wanship Jan. 

TOOELE COUNTY. 

Lysander Gee Tooele City Jan. 

E* P. Johnson Stockton .'. Jan. 

UTAH COUNTY. 

John T. Hardy . . . Payson Jan. 

.1. F. IIatchin8on..Spi'in!{ville Ian. 



Ikiiii'I Evans. . 
William Price. 
John Caraon.. 



.Sp} 

.St. Oeorjie. 

.Goshen. ... 



.Jan. 
....Ian 
. ..Jan. 



WASATCH COUNTY. 

Thonuis Giles Cent;'rvillB Jan. 

WASHINGTON COUNTV. 

James G. Bleak.. .St. Georju'e Jan. 

Jon. E. .lobnson... St. George I, in. 

.lolin T. Geary Jan. 

Jos. L. lleywot)d.. Jan. 

WEBER COUNTV. 

William Lritchlow Ogclcn Tan. 

John Spires Plain Cily Ian. 

Joseph Oi-over Ogden Valley Jan. 



1870. 
1870. 

1870. 
1870. 

1870. 
1870. 



1870. 
1870. 
1870. 
1870. 
1870. 

« 

1870. 

1870. 
1870. 
1870. 
1870. 

1870. 
1870. 
1870. 



i! I 






AREA AND RESOURCES. 

The Territory of Utah is situated between 'V!^ and 4'J'-' north latitude, and between 109^ and ll.V west 
lonf;itude, bcin^ about >iV> miles in len){th from north to sonth, and 'T'JO miles in width, with an estimated 
area of 103,000 sipuire miles, or 65,020,000 acres. It is divi<led in tlie center by the ^Wattatch Rau^'e of 
mountains, which rise to a height ranginK from 4,000 to 7,000 feet above the level of the iidjacent valleys, 
llie highest peaks of which are covered with perpetual snow. The elevation of some of the valleys in 
tiic settled portion of the Territory is fixed at 0,000 feet above the level of the sea. That porlion of Utah 
lying west of the Wasatch Mountains forms a part of the extensive and sterile region known as the 
Great Basin, the rivei-s and lakes of which have no communication with the sea. Although gold and 
silver quartz lodes have been discovered in this Territory, aiKl copper, iron, and lead are known to exist 
within its limits, owuig to the general discouragement of mining enterprises by the Mormon leaders, but 
'little has been done in this department. Hitherto, agriculture and stock raising have constituted the 
jprincipal business of the large population, <<onipoBed of representatives from every civilized portion of the 
((lobe. There are about 200,0IM) acres of land under cultivation, producing grain, fruits, and vegetables of 
ilie best quality. The Territory produces about 500,000 sacks of flour each year, from which the )K>pula- 
tion of Montana is niaiidy supplied. Quantities of dried fruit, produc>ed hero each year, also supply 
ilie same market. Cotton has been extensively raised in Southern Utuh, the soil and climate being well 
Hdupted to its production, and the manufacture of this staple is carried on to a considerable extent. 

AGRICULTURAL. 

Cache County (the granary of Utah) comprises fifteen cities and seltlements ; Washington County, (the 
cotton country of' Utah) eleven ; San Pete County, eleven ; Kiine County, (named in honor of the brother 
of the famous Arctic explorer) eight ; Iron County, eight ; Millard County, (with Fillmore, the former 
capit4>l of Utah, principal) six ; Groat Salt Lake County, five ; eleven more counties, including thirty-two 
KttlementB and cities. Total, ninetv-six settlements and cities. UtMh consists of about 100,000 'souls. 
About 7,000 of them are farmers, wno have under cultivation about 140,000 acres of land. The Territory 
produces about 480,000 sticks of flour yearly. A large quantity of dried fruit is also raised, part of whicu 



wm 



152* 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTORY. 



^ocR to Jlontitna. Great Salt I^ke City is a city of orchnrds, and from the " bench " on the mountaina 
t he honseH eeem , in the Bummcr, to be peeping out of u forent. The most plentiful fruits are apricots, apples, 
iind Rtntwberries. Slock raising is also an important brunch of the furniinff interests, sonthem Utnh 
will be a land of vineyards and cotton. Cotton has ulreudy been raised in considorahio quantities. In 
miiiiufHctures, of cotton particularly, a ftooti beginning has been made. A large quantity of cotton yarn 
is nlreudy tpun from cotton grown in the Territory. There are two large cotton factonos, one of them 
belonging to Urigham Young, and there are several smaller ones. The whole Mormon community has 
long been, and is still, clothed in cloth and linsev of homespun, and almost every bouse is u manufactory." — 
Corrc»p<>ndLnce Alia California, Nov. 21, 1^06. 

TABLE OP AGKICULTUUAL PRODUCTS, 
Showing the amount of Wheat, Barley, Oats, Com, etc., raised in 1865. 



COUNTIES. 



WiTEAT. 



Acr'H. 



Beaver 1,781 

BoxKlder 1.845 

10,278 
1.947 
3,999 
2.S1Q 
1,(KK) 
41G 
2,C11 
1,272 
880 i 

2.na)j 

10,122 
1,1951 

810 

7W; 

7,<jo4 

988; 

790 
8,223' 



Cache . 

U&VJH 

(jreat Suit Lake . 

Iron 

Juab 

Kane 

Millard 

.Morffun 

I'i-ute 

Itichland 

.San I'cto 

Sfvicr 

Summit 

'I'ooolo 

Utah .: 

Wafiatch 

Washinutou 

Weber 



Ifllsllol!!. 

37,401 
55,a50 

23«,."»4 
50,«22 
91,977 
40,300 
26,000 
7,072 
62,731 
34,344 
13.200 
82.000 

202,440 
20,290 
22,680 
19.0(10 

189,726 
21,736 
14,220 
67,683 



DARLEr. 



Oat.h. 



Corn. 



Ac'« I Uiisli. [Acr'H. HunIi. Ac's 



112 2,2401 

308 10,164' 
858 24,^82, 



291 

63S 

164 

8 

6 

162 

127 

10 



I 1 



867 

17,724 

4,100 

76 

240 

4,636 

4,445 

300 



660 22,000 1 



80 

6 

87 

W 



l,7iiO 

180{ 

1,8691 

6001 

818: 22,0,S6! 

26: 625: 

19' 2851 

462 13,860 : 



1351 

484) 

2,478; 

860 

910 

181 

200 

7 

223 

487' 

2261 

470 

2,8lX> 

202 

102 1 

1001 

1,355 

297: 

13 

662 



2,970 

21,296 

84,262 

11,200 

28.210 

8,801 

6,000 

140 

6,913 

15.732 

2.250 

18,8001 

84.0001 

7,474 

4,080 

4.000! 

87,940 

ll,28Hi 

299: 

18,536 



15 

288 

1,760 

402 

1,108 

271 

250 

426 

230 

9 

50 

6 

115 

25 



490 

2,107 

1 

926 
1,035 



Ituiih. Uallunft. 



SoRn'M. Potatoes. 



Ac'8 Itiisli. 



800'. 
8,352 
36,000; 
8,8441 
31,024 
4,878 . 
3,750; 
6,875 1 
6,0601 

243*. 

750, . 

100 . 
1,840 ' . 

600 



14.196 
11,026 
37.667 
44,640 



160 
226 



7,600 

14,608 

6,180 



287 



11,7(»| 
35,819 1 
16' 
17,694 1 
20.700 



1,260 
42,804 



86,926 
18,642 



9,300 
46.675 
1,118 ,199,004 
1161 11.716 



689 

406 

125 

26 

68 

112 

30 j 

175 i 

645; 

44 

18 

66 

598 

74 

99 

231 



^8,182 

27.608 

12.500 

2.912 

6,800 

17,920 

2,040 

52,500 

37,060 

3.823 

2,400 

11,660 

63,986 

13,320 

18,316 

28 007 



Hat. 



66,536 1,246,166 4,681 189,228 11,631 369.179 9,502 192,904 235.476'4,832 654,21t3 66,044 79,614 



Acr'8. 'roim. 



1.108 

1.436 

6,436 

1,618 

2,170 

605 

1.500 

120 

1,686 

910 

226 

24,700 

9,860 

600 

660 

630 

7,811 

1,177 

672 

2,878 



1.662 
2,152 
6,794 
2,427 
3,265 

869 
2i260 

480 
2,725 
1176 

281 
24,700 
10,618 

876 
1,100 

927 
9,766 
1.669 
1,680 
4,309 



Fruit Trees— Crop of 186.5. — Apples, acres, 717; average, 100 bushels per acre. Peaches, 962 ocres ; 
average, 184 bushels per acre. Grape, 178 acres ; average, \(,7!)[) pounds per acre ; different varieties, 289 
acres ; average, 145 bushels per acre. Total number of acres under cultivation, 2,146. 

Live Stock, 1866. — Horses. 40,410. Mules and Asses, 11, K" Cuttle, including Cows, Oxen, etc., 
151,000. Sheep and Goats, 158,000. Hogs, 13,800. 

lUUIGATING DITCHES. 

" The County Table of the Irrigation Stutiftics shows that there have been constructed two hundred and 
xeventy-seven main canals, in length amounting to one tlioui<and and forty-three miles and one hundred 
and two rods, at a mean width of live feet six inches, and mean depth of two feet two inches, which 
water one hundred and fifty-three thousand nine hundred and forty-nnie acres of land, at a cost of one 
million seven hundred and sixty-six thousand nine hundred and thirty-nine dollars ; and that there is in 
C(airse of construction, canals, ut an csliinated cost of nine hundred thousand dullurs." — Report of Deieret 
Agricultural Society, January II, IS66. 

TABLE OP GUIST MILLS, 
With the Location, Name, Run of Stone, the Capacity per Day, Power Used, Cost or Valuation, and 

Occupant's Name of each. 



Lociitlon. 



DEAVEIl CODNTY. 

Beaver 

nOX Kl.nER COUNTY, 

Box Elder 

CACHE COUNTY. 

Logan 

DAVIS COUNTY. 

Bountiful 

Parinington 

14 

Knyesville 



Kamc of Mill. 



Bartons 

Beaver 

Box Elder 

Thatcher Hi, Co.'s. . . . 



North Cation.. 

Richards 

Smith & Co.'s. 
Whinells 



No. run 
Stone. 


Capat'lty 
per day. 


I'owcr. 


Cost. 




Uusliciii. • 






1 

1 


06 
108 


water. 


14,000 
5,000 


1 


100 


water. 


10,000 


2 


150 


water. 


18,000 


2 

2 
2 

I 


200 

l.-iO 

100 

60 


wat«r. 


20,000 
18,000 
16,000 
12,000 



rrcscnt Occupant. 



P. Pariisworth & Co. 
Edward Thompson. 

Smith, Snow tc Co. 

Thatcher & Benson. 



H. C. Kimball. 
P. D. Richards. 
Eli'is Smith St. Co. 
J. Whinell. 



Location. 



iCedar'.""".?:""'"' 

Puiigwitch....' 

I Parowan """ 



iJ'ortiirrch.r"'- 
INephi ■■"■ 



i»r?'>on . 
I J'prii'gdale ." 
ytruiu Citv 



''I'-giu City ;;;; 

MlI.r.ARD COU.VTV 

Deseiet Citv 

Fillmore City'.'::; 



R'CHr.A.VD CaU.NTY 

I Saiut Charles... 



I Pnr?\~ T"-" ''OfNTY. 

I ton tphi-uini .. 
Mnnti 



.Voroni ..." 

|Mountpifa'Hunt::::: 

iRiciS".'/"''"'- 



SUMMIT COUNTY 

Coalville... 

vvauship ....:::::" '■ 



I t'TAH COUNTY 

AmeiionnKork....: 
Hobble Croek.... 
ILchi Citv. 

Lower Salt Creek::" 
Payson 

Petutnut. 

ProvoCitv.! 



I Spanish Pork 
{Spring Creek , 



,:.,*y*«"'N"TON COUNTY 

I >>Hint George. 
'Washington....:!;; 



|,V„ „ .^"'';" COUNTY. 

|NorthOifden 

[i^Kden Citv. 

I ■' " " 
Weber Riv 




li hours. 



With the Locatie 
I-ocadon. 

I BeAVEIl COUNTY. 

I leaver-. ... ,„ 

l-vorth Beaver;;;;:;::::; J; 

an 



UTAH TBRRITORT. SAW MILLS. 



168* 



TABLE OP GRIST MILLS.-Continubd. 



Location. 



IKON COUNTY. 

Oedar 

PuiiKwilch 

Parowun 



•lUAn COUNTY. 

Fort Birch 

Neplii 



KANK COUNTY. 

Or- **oii 



Mamo of Mill. 



Cedar 

I'anf{witch. 
Pa row an .. 



Fort Birch. 
Nephi 



Spriiif^dale 

Virgiu City Virgin City 



flrafton. 
SprinKdale . 



MII.I.AUn COUNTY. 

Peaeiet City 

Fillmore City 



RICHLAND COUNTY. 

Saint Charles 



Sprii 
Viru 



Doaeret. . 
Crofts . . . 
Fillmore. 



Rich 6c Co.'s. 



SAN PETE COUNTY. 

Fort Ephiiiini Cottonwood. 

Mnuti TiOwrys . 

" iManti 

Moroni j Moroni 

Mount Plunsant Mount Pleasant ■ 



.SEVIEK COUNTY. 

Bichfifild 



SUMMIT COUNTY. 

Coalville 

VVanship 



UTAH COUNTY. 

American Fork 

Hobble Creek 

I.K;hiCity 

I.owcr Salt Creek.. 

I Payson 

!Petutnut 

' Provo Citv 



Spanish Fork 
Spring Creek 



WASHINOTON COUNTY. 

I Saint Oeorf(e 

Washington 



WEHER COUNTY. 

11 North Ouden 

louden City 



I Weber River. 



Richfleld . 



Hoyts 

Alexanders . 



Allen &, Co.'s 

Snringville 

Mnlliners 

Lower Salt Creek , 

Pavfion 

Petutnut 

Mills , 

Tanners , 

Taylors 

Spanish Fork 

Spring Creek 



Snow & Adams . 
Washington 



North Ogden. . . . 

Tari-s 

West & Youngs. 
Taylors 



No. run 
Stone. 



Capacity 
.per (lay. 



Uushcls. 
70 
tiO 

ro 



15M 
96 



S4 
00 
75 



96 
50 
70 



100 



200 

61) 

70 

100 

150 



50 



100 
100 



100 
100 
150 
120 
100 
100 
75 
150 
100 
200 
200 



50 
60 



100 
200 
200 
200 



I'owor. Coat. 



water. 



water. 



water, 



water, 



water, 



water, 



water. 



water. 



water. 



Frcient Occupants. 



water. 



water, 



112,000 
2,000 
6,000 



12,000 
7,000 



2,000 
3,000 
6,000 



5,000 
2,000 
8,000 



12,000 



12,000 
4,000 
5,000 
6,0(K) 
7,500 



3,000 



15,000 
12,01)0 



7,000 
12,000 
20,000 

'.),000 
12,000 

9,000 

8,000 
16,000 

8,(HI0 
18,000 
15,000 



5,000 
8,000 



12,000 
18,000 
20,000 
16,000 



J. D. Lee & Co. 
Nelson Hollingsbead. 
W. C. McGregor dt, Co. 



Joseph Birch. 
Zimri Baxter. 



A. P. Winsor. 
Albert C. Petty. 
M. Clawson & Co. 



A. O. Snioot Sc Co 

.Jacob Croft. 

Willis Bartholomew. 



Rich & Hopkins. 



Bernard Snow. 
•John Lowry, Jr. 
S. ChriHtoHorsen. 
Georfro Bradley & Co. 
McClanahan St. Co. 



J. Hoyt. 
Alexander & Co. 



A. Johnsrvn & Co. 
S. MulHiicr. 
Keeler & Co. 
O. Symonds. 
Hancock 6l Co. 
.lohn Mills. 
Myron Tanner. 
John Til y lor. 
A. Gardner. 
Jacob Uoutz. 



Snow & Adams. 
Erastus Snow. 



Dunn & Co. 
L. Si. A. Tarr. 
West & Young. 
John Taylor. 




'. '*. 



TABLE OF SAW MILLS, 
With the Location, Name of Mill, Capacity, Cost, Occupant's Name, etc., of each. 



Location. 



BEAVEll COUNTY. 

Beaver-. 

North Beaver 



BOX RI.OEn COUNTY. 

Box Elder 



liameof Mill. 



Beaver 

North Beaver. 



Snow, Smith St Co.'s 



No. 
Saws, 



Capacity— 
Ft.pcrduy. 



1,200 
1,500 



Power. 


Cost. 


water, 
water. 


$6,000 
4,000 



Present Occupants. 

Thoinpaon St, Stewart. 
Sheppard. 

Snow, Smith St, Co. 



164* 



PAOIFIO COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TABLE OF SAW MILLS.— Continued. 



Location. 



CACHE COUNTY. 

Logttii 



DAVIS COUNTY. 

Bountiful 



ORKAT SALT LAKE CO. 

Big Cottonwood Cufion. 



•I 



Bingham Canon 

City Creek 

Little Cottonwood Canon 
Mill Creek Canon 



inON COUNTY. 

Coal Creek 

Paragooimli 

Parowun 



Xeplii . 



JUAB COUNTY. 



KANE COUNTY. 

North Creek , 



MII.LAUD COUNTY. 

Fillmore 

Scipio 



MORGAN COUNTY. 

Littleton 



RICHLAND COUNTY. 

Saint Charles 



SAN PETE COUNTY. 

Fort EiiLraim 

Fountain Green 

Manti 

Mount Pleasant 



TOOELE COUNTY. 

Granttiviile 

Stockton , 

Tooele City 



UTAH COUNTY. 

American Fork .... 

Payson 

Pleasant Grove 

ProvoCity 



Spanigh Fork. 
Springville . . . 



WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Ash Creek 

" South 

Pine Valley 



WEDER COUNTY. 

Ogden City , 



Name of Mill. 



No. tinpnclty— 
Haws. Ft.prrday. 



Thatcher & Co.'s. 



Bear St Co.'s. 



Big Cottonwood. 



Binghnm Canon. . . 

City Creek 

Little Cottonwood. 
Mill Creek 



Conl Creek. 
Puragoonah 
Parowan . . . 



Bosnell it, Co.'s. 
North Creek.... 



Fillmore. 
Scipio ... 



Peterson &. Co.'s. 



Rich &. Co.'s. 



Snow Sl Co.'s... 

Snows 

Uuchanan & Co.' 
Scovilie Sl Co.'s. 



Gmntsville . 

Connors 

Tooele City. 



American Fork . . . . 

Webb & Co. 's 

Pleasant Grove . . . . 
Holduway &. Co.'s . 

Mills 

Gardner &, Co.'s... 
Huntington & Co.'s. 
Johnson & Co.'s ... 



Harmons . . . 
Forsyths ... 
Hawleys . . . 
I.iower Mill. 
Pine Valley. 
Upper Mill . 



WeBt&.Co.'B. 



1,000 

800 

1,500 



1,000 



2,000 



1,000 

ecu 



1,000 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 



5,000 



1,000 
1,000 

GOO 
1,200 
1,200 

800 
1,000 
1,000 

800 
1,000 
1,200 
1,.=»()0 
3,000 
1,500 



Power. 


Coat. 


water. 

4* 




II 




II 




water. 
II 




water. 
II 




II 




II 




II 




steam. 


$18 hm 



Preacnt Occupants. 



Thatcher, Benson & oth. 



Bear St, Co. 



[Co. 
Little, Decker, Young & 



Katon & Cownes. 
" I 15,0001 B.Young & Son. 
water. I | Woolley & Davis. 



water. 
II 

II 

water. 

water. 

water, 
II 

water. 
It 

water. 

water, 

II 

It 
II 

water, 
tt 

II 
water. 



water 



water. 



8,000 
2,000 



f>.0(Mtl.S. I^e ite Co. 
3,000 Kobiiton & Co. 
5,000 Hollingsheud St, Co. 



3,000 



5,000 



Bosnell Sl Gardner. 



Joel 11. Johnson. . 



4,000 j Thomas Ciillister. 



3,000 



Cole Si, Co. 

Peterson & Co. 

II II 

Charles C. Kich Si Co. 



3.000 Snow St. Co. 

4.0001 Bernard Snow. 
4,000 ! Buchanan & Co. 
4,000IL.N. Scovilie &. Co. 



4,000 Rowberry , Clarke St, Co. 

P. Kdw. "(Jmiiior. 

4,000 Kowberry, Clarke & Co. 



3,000 

3,000 Wel>b & Co. 

2,.'>00 

4,000 

4,0(10 

2,500 

3,0011 

3,000 



S. IloldHway & Co. 
M. W. Mille. 
Gardner & Co. 
Huntington & Co. 
Johnson Sl Co. 



4,000 Harmon Si. Woolley. 
4,000!Tlioina8 Forsyth. 
3,(H)0'Johu Hawloy. 
7,000' Brown & Brice. 
16,000 Whipple & Co. " 
5,0U0 W. UurgeuB St Son. 



West St, Co. 



UTA 



Exhibiting the Com 



C'OITNTU 

Beaver 

Box Elder. 

Cache 

' Davis ... 

Great 8,,itL,;i;;;;;;-' 

Green Kiver. 

Iron 

I Juab ll'.j 

Kane 

Millard..;.";; 

[Morgan 

Piute 

Kichland .. 

I San Pete ....; 

Sevier 

Summit 

i