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Full text of "Beard's directory and history of Marquette County [microform] : with sketches of the early history of Lake Superior : its mines, furnaces, etc., etc"

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2 ueabd's directory of marouette county 



MARQUETTE 




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Office with James Picdnds tj- Co. and E. 
B. Gay, Gqn'l Freight Agent, 



DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 



HAlB^BOFf COAL 



ft -~— 


Anthracite Egg Coal, 


Anthracite Steve Coal, 


Anthracite Chestnut Coal. 


Briar Hill Coal, 


Oak Hill Coal, 


^ ■^' d Blosshurg Coal. 






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ut Coal. 



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BKAKU'h DIRKOTOUy OF .>r|l»QUKTrK COl'HTY. 



F. B. SPEAR & CO.. 

CONSrONKES FOR 

Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago and Lake 
Superior Lines. 



DKALER IN 






SAiT. ilME. BflICK ETC, 

HABD AND 80JFT COAL, 

MARQUETTE, L. S., MICHI&AN. 



RICHMOND STOEE CO, 



DEALERS I$r 







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CROCKERY, &C., 

Palmer, Marquette Co., Mich. 

F. B. SPEAR & GO., 



2IABQVETTE, mCHISAN. 






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i BKARD'h DlRECTORlT OP MAHQTTETTE COUNTY. 



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NEW STOHR 



BONNETS, HATS, SUNDOWNS, 

Ladies' Furnishing Goods, 



Ribbons, -^ ,j 

Laees, 
Flowers, 
Featbers, 
Omanents, 
Silks, 
Velvets, 
Crapes, 
Veilo, 
Ties, 
Buchings, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, 
Parasols; 

Eid and Thread Sieves, 
Handkercliiefs, 
Belts, f&:, 
Undersl8#w, 
Satins, 
Fans, 



Aprons, 
Hosiery, 
Corsets, 
Hoop SUrtf, 
Bu&tles, 
Combs, 
Bracelets, 

Corset Skirt Supporters 
Pins, 

Jewelry, 
-^ Chains, 

Brushes, 
Buttons, 
Threads, 

sa!" 

Twists, 
Fringes, 
Simps, 
Edgings, 
Buttons, 



Human Hair, 
7am, 
Zephyrs, 
Canvas, 
Patterns, 
Initials, 
Curls, 

Frizses and Braids, 
Switches. 

Cloaks, 
Shawls, 
Scarfs, 
Wraps, 

Talanas and Capes, 
Nubias, 
Skirts, 
Jackets, 
tie, && 



|3ile9', |l(OireB$' ui |a{aiits' |adBfV9u. 



Prints, 
Cottons, 



Cleakings, 
Dress Gkods and Suitings, 



Cloths, 
Flannels, 



liAtfles' and OldlKreas' Para, 

Notions, Trimmings, ' Linings, lie, ft. 

Any everything else in Ladies' Ooods. 

CorBer Store, Eyerett's Bloct, MARQUETTE, L. S. MICH. 



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BEARD'S 



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Directory / History 



MARQUETTE COUNTY, 



WITb' 8KKT0HI8 or TH« 



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Early History of Lake Superior, 



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MINES, FURNACES, Etc., Etc. 



DETROIT : 

Hadger Sc BHYct, Stkam Book and Joi PttiNTEaa, 

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6 BEAKU's DIHECTORY OF MABQ^BTrE COUNTY. 



LAKE SUPERIOR 





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ALFRED QUEEN, MANAQEB. 

MANUFACTURERS. WHOLKSALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

Flooring, Sidlrag, Sasli, B^ors, BMiiiis, 



Lath, Uouldings, Lumber, etc., etc. 

NATIONAL BANK BVILIDHNO. 
FACTORY AND YARD, 



ALFRED-GREEN, 

ARCHITECT. 



AND 




0f ^iilUiniis, 



NATIONAL BANK BUILDING, 

KABQTTETTE, ICCHIQAN. 



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OUNTY. 



OR 

DKAl-KRS IN 

's, Blinds, 

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Ac, etc. 

■yiNG. 
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\mmp, 

MNG, 

TE, MICEISAK. 



PREFACE. 



'4^ nR^ presenting thi« the first Directory of Marquette county to the 
^J^^ public the compilor has neotmarily enciuntered many difBculties 
alwayn to t>e found in a new country. 

It wa8 the intention to piiblighihe names of every male adult in the 
county, and a canvawi wan taken with that object in Tiew but it wu found 
highly impracticable. The population, e. pecially amongHt the laboren*, ia 
a floating one, and John Smith at work in one mine to-day, may be Tom 
Jonet* nt work in another mine to-morrow. Consequently the mtmcB of 
thoHe living in the principal townfl have been published wiiich we think 
will meet the wan'H of s!l interested in a Directory at presenl. The com- 
piler defiircH to return thankH here for courtesies and aiwiHtance rendered by 
the cit'zens of Marquette County , where these favors have been so univer- 
sal it is impossible to particularize individuals. 

We are also especially indebted to Flon. C. I. Walker, of Detroit, for a 
very interesting and ably written article on the " Pearly History of Lake 
Superior," and to the " Mining Journal Co.'' for copious extracts from their 
" History of Lake Superior Iron District." It was deenred important to 
republish some part of the history of the mines, etc., inaBmuch as the work 
in to find its way into the public libraries of Europe and America, the 
. boards of trade of the principal cities of the Union and in other localities 
where a truthful account of Marquette county ami ^mineral resources 
may be of interest and profit to ciitside readers. 

In conclusion the publishers l>e;r the forbearance of the public for 
errors ./hich will unavoidably cr-sep into every work, to which none are 
more liable than a directory. We have taken much pains and troubl^pto 
present a first class " Directory and History of Marquette county," and 
hope that it will meet the expectation and approbation of our patrons, as 
this will be the only profits accruing t> 

Yours, truly, THE PUBLISHERS. ' 



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8 HKAIin'H DIUWnOUV of MAUgUKITK COUNTY. 



WX. MiLHOlT. 



PAY 3. WYCZOIT. 



MAHON&WYCKOFF, 



Matiu/ncturers o/ and "Dfalers in 




FURNITURE, 

UPHOLSTERY, 



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AND 



msE mmmiuG goods. 

OrPICE PUBNITURE A SPEOIALri. 

Masonic BilMing, Front Street, 



Marquette, Mwh. 



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)ITNTY. 



Tnrczorr. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



COFF. 




GOODS. 



LTL 



] Street^ 



Airiihlett, John W. A Co., Stoneware 

An cr»on,Chii.i. A.. Hqjare Dealing Olotblnc Store- 

liiiiik, l-'iriit Netionnl. Mnrqfuette. - 

lt»nk. FitHt NHtional, Neicaunee. 



78 
.19 

ion 



llrtiik, H«yilonii,Ne«aun«e--- -- ' .>j in 

Itiiiik, (/'iliien'n MKniuette. ?. 

Bemllo, Ooo. \V. A 8on, Merchant Tailori y::-\--- "' 

BenrJ. W. L. *0o.. IliUihIng PoiU InKKle buk .■"ver. 



itanoroft Iron (Jo 

Brimkii, r. B.. C E.. Iron Expert - 

Burt Freestone Co — — --• --- ••• 

rhumiiion Iron Co 

Child, H. Fv Photographer • 

City Livery Stable ■- ;.-v,— 

Clark. Thou. F-, Aift. Singer Sewing Maoblne 

Clovelnnd Iron Mining Co 

Cleveland, L. •)■• Eureka Ointment 

Congdon, I)., Merchant Tailor 

Conklin. (!■ N., Jewelry 



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119 

119 
91 

Irt 

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lit) 

96 
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va 

__ 52 

Crary, I,- V- A Co., Jiifi A Book Printer*- - j* 

I)eiyar«in«, L'r. J. A ,7, 

l)(ier Lake Iron and Lumber Co ';?' 

Karl C. M. W.. Boot* A Shoes — r' 

Karl. II. t;. A C<i,,<}roceriei and Provitioni ^ 

Knriglt A .>(>eneer. Harneri- - vj 

Fxcelsior Livery Stable. ^ 

(lay, H. A L. A Co., Architect*-- -. 

Oreen, Allred, A-ohileot and Builder 

Huron Bay .Slntoand Iron Co 

Iron Bay Foundry - 

Jackson, H. M. Milliiieiy. etc 

.Iiicobson, Julius Dry Oeods, Clothing, etc 

Kuhlninn A Hotop, (Irocern — „ .^n 

Lake Superior Powder Co 19ft 

LakeSnperior Iron Co "rj 

Lake View House "" 



64 

6 

27 

H 

4.48 

112 

SB 



Maebts, A. (Jrocer. 



44 



.Mahon A Wykoff, Furniture — **• ."if 

Marquette Hmwii Stone Co - f' 

.Maniuotte Iron Co '5 

Maniuetto Coal Co - - ,f 

Moad, T. Variety Store and News Depot " 

McCombor Iron Co • {y; 

Morgan Iron Co -.- - - ''^ 

Mining Journal — - ™ 

Nyidhart, B. Hardware f» 

NeolyA Edly. Hardware -^ '"j 

New Y-rk Irovi Co -'- -•• 'f* 

Fendiil A Boatty, General Store *» ♦" 

Preston, K. A. Millinery VT","". ."' 

Picands, Ja«. A Co-— - t""''* "•<>»• '^over. 

Picands, Van Cleve A Co — ' 

Republic Iron Co -a:"-: iw 

Hopes J. A tJo., Druggists A Chemists l;;j 

Kichinond Store Co - ;.'J 

.Scoville A Jtihnson, Hardware »A '7 

Ht«fford, II. H. Druggist , • 19 

Superior Foundry •';;■•■-.-.-"; : «? 

Toy, Biokford A Co., Safety Fuse, »,'. H. Call, Agent »j 

Union Store Co.. General Store — - 1^5 

WaUon. J. W. A Son, general Variety Store- « 

Ward A Webb. Pianos and Musical Merchandise ii 

Ward. Jno E. A Co.. Explorers and Land Agent* g 

Washington Iron Co- - - — 9b 

Wetmore A Bro., Dry Goods ,»» 

Wetmore, F. A Co., Crockery - }^ 

West.Hayden * Co.. iMiner'i. Store -~^": ,„ 

White, Peter, Foreign Passage Tickets end Bxcbaage- 10 

White, Peter, Insurance Agent- — 79 

Wright. Chas. K., Iron Expert ,- »' 



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JO BKAnD'H WUECTORY OF MARQUETrH COUNTY. 



PETER WHITE. 



AOKNT' 



Allan Line, Cunard Line, Inman Line, 



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NORWAY, DENMARK, 8WEDEN, GERMANY, EN- 
GLAND, IRELAND, SCOTLAND, WALES, 
TO MARQUETTE, MICH. 



Xw® W^lMmm ^Mmmw^w 



Than any other agent of the above lines, or any otner 
lines, in Marquette County. Also sells 



DRAFTS ON ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES 



At the Loiveat Rates, at the 



f Ifgl laifteaail ©fluife o! Maii?qitt@ie, 




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Directory of Marquette — ^'^* 

" of Negaunee •"" 

•' of iHhpeming — ^33 

" of Michigammp '^" 

of Cherry Craek - 162 

'Harvey 1^3 

" of Humbolt--- -• 183 

of Champion- l^^ 

ot Clarksburg.— -- - 1^4 

" of Oreenwoo'l — — 1"* 

Early HiRtory of Lake Superior — 165 

A sketch of some of the Mines and Furnaces of Lake Superior 201 

Appendix - **! 

-«»- ''' 

ERRATA. 



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12 beakd's dikectory of mapquette county. 



SCOVILLE & JOHNSON 



DEALERS IX 



HAHDWA 



E VERETTS BLOCK. 



l?^.', 



Pocket and Table Cutlerj, 
Shelf and Builaers' E<»"^.ware, 
ITails, Qlass and Bope, 
Shovels, Picks, Mattocks, Spades. 
Sees, Bakes and Forks, 
Scythes, Snathes &nd Stones, 



Carpenters, Blacksmiths and Ma- 
chinist's Tools, 
dans, Bevoh'ers, 
Powder and Shot, 
Fishing Tackle of all Descriptions, 
Wagon and Cwriage Woodwork. 



CHILSOFS BRICK AND PORTABLE FDRMCES, 

Cau give numerous referertee as to their superiority. 

CAIB'S HAIB MIIIKG PUMPS. 

These Pumpa are extensively used throughout the iron mines, and wbe^-e 
steana cannot be used are admirably adapted to the purpose. 

Maiiivfactui'srs of all Kinds of 

Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Work. 



* FLUHBINQ, aAS AND STEAM HTTINS, 
In all it3 Brandies. 

Chandeliers and Plumbing Material, Lead, 
Gas Pipe and Fittings. 

WOOD AND C0ALHE4TING AND COOKING 



STOVES- 



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iii.-.ia^>^» ^iaj ir^^ii»« r jg»^T.. 



l8t W&rd. 
Jan. Atfield, 
Tho8. E. Cook. 





U. S, COHNTT AND IDIICtPAL OFFICERS. 



Collector of the Port- 
Register of U. 8. Land Office- 



HIRAM A. BURT. 
AMBRaSE C. CAMPBELL. 



Coiinfy Officers. 

Circuit Judge—Hon. JAMES O'GRADY. 

Sheriff- JACOB IKJLF - - Marquette. 

County Clerk— FRANCIS M. MOORE, - - Marquette. 

Register of Deeds— FRANCIS M. MOORE, - - Maniuette. 

TreaBurer— JOHN P. OUTHWAITE, - - Ishi-e.ning. 

Judge of Probate— ED. S. HARDY, - - - Marquette. 

Prosecuting Auoney— JAMES E. DALLIBA, - Marquette. 

Circuit Court Com.— JOHN Q. ADAMS, - - - Nsgaunee. 

City Officers of Marffuette. 

SAMUEL P. ELY, Mayor. J. H. PRIMEAU, Recorder. 

F. M. MOORE, Treasurer. 



City Attorney- 



AliDEBMEN. 

2d Ward 3d Ward. 

B. Neidhart, Ed. Eraser, 

A. R. Harlow. Dan'l Brittell. 

-John L. Cochran. Marshall — T. B. Rundeli. 

Street Ccinmisgioner — M. McConnell. ' 



Marquette Lodgm 101 F. ^ A. M. 

OFFICERS, 

F. M. Moore, W. M. Jno. Coan. J. D. 

8. W. Bailev, S. W. A. P. Burroughs, Treasurer. 

J. J. Die«?, J- W. D. 8. Sooville, Secretary. 

E. B. Gay, 8. D. • Peter Hume, Tyler. 

Regular Communication, Ist Tuesday of each laonth. 

Marquette Chapter, JVb. 4^, R. A. M. 



H. M. Maynard, IL P. 

James E. Dalliba. K. 

H. R. Mather, S. 

F. M. Johnson, C. H. 

F. M. Moore, P. 8. 

L. M, Spencer, R. A. C. 

Regular Convocation, first Friday each month. 



E. B. Gay, Ist V. 
J. J. Drew, 2d V. 
L. W. Bailey, 3d V^ 
M. R. Maiihard, T'eas. 
D. S. Scoville, Sec-y. 



Lake Superior Commandery Jio. 30, K. T. 



James Dalliba, E. Q. 
H. R. Mather, G. 
Wm. H. Kaighin, C.G. 
M. H. Ma/nard, P. 
F. M, Moore, 8. W. 
J. J. Drew, J. W. 
E. B. Gay, Treas. 

Stated conclave 3d Monday each month 



D. 8. Scoville, Rec. 
H. H. Stafford, Std. Br. 
Alfred Oreen, Sword Br. 
A. P. BurrouKhit, Ist 6. 
M. R. Manhard, 2d G. 
C. E. Van Cleve. 3d G. 



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»m4 HJp i iU l WI i H! J II 




14 deabd'h uibectory of mabquette county. 



HIRAM A. BURT 







#:<^©. 





lilMI 



DEALER. 



li«ili%ii^t ^mmw 



TJpon nearly ©yery Street, and in every part of the 



CITY OF MARQUETTE,-: 



■^ 




-ALSO,- 



.¥• 



mn ^Mmmm pit i 

-■I 

AND MANUFACTURING SITES 



For Salr upon the most Liheral Terms to Purchasers 
fomj'mprovenient. 

Office Phoenix Block, Main Street, 



mm!iit^i>^*iiSsisa^k!0mJii$mk9!^'>i¥mfm 



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IG BKABP'S DIKECTOBY OF MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



0/ a// Pomi^« of Interest on the .Yorth and 
South Shores of Lake Superior. 



Chromos, Engravings, 



FRAMES, Etc. 



IN HREAT VARIETY AT 



MARQUETTE, MICH. 



The most Elegant and complete Establi.sh- 
ment of the kind in the J^orthwest. 






OEDEBS BY HAIL PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 





BEARD'S DIRECTORY 



OF 





MARQUETTE. 



A 

ABEL, Ransom, clerk, bdu. Bluff near Third. 
Adams, Sidney, contractor, over Stafford's drug store, res. 
Wash., near Third. 
Adams James, teamster, res. Bluff near Third. 
Adams, Chas. P., agent Grace Furnace. 
Anderson, Jas. A., road master, M. H. & O. R. R. 
Anderson, Andrew, foundryman, res. cor Fort and Wash. 
Aiiderson, John, laborer, Wash, west of Seventh. 
Anderson, Geo. carpenter, Wash. bet. Fourth and Fifth, 
Anderson, Charles, laborer, Wash, and Fifth. 
Anderson, Charles, blacksmith. Bluff near Fifth. 
Anderson, Peter blacksmith, Bluff near Fifth. 
Anderson, Joseph, laborer, Wash, near Third. 
Anderson, Charles J. Superior near Front. 
Anderson, John W. clerk, bds. Tremont. 
Anderson, John, clerk, bde. Rock near Third. 
Anderson, Elmer, tinner, Lake near Spring. 
Andrews, J. E. clerk, with Pendill & Beatty. 
Andrews, Donald, Arch east of Front. 
Anson, James, mason, Ridge near Front. 
Anthony, James, watchman, cor. Sixth and Bluff*. 
Anthony, James, jr. machinist, cor Sixth and Bluff. 






-A 




18 beabd'h uibkjuoby of mabquettk county. 



«.! 



Anthony, Thomaa, moulder, cor. Sixth and Bluff. 
Anthony, Robert, machinist, Fourth near Bluff. 
Archibald, Jitichael, saloon. Wash. bet. Fourth and Fiftli. 
Archaml)auli, Charles, weigher, Superior near Fifth. 
Archambanlt, W. clerk. Bluff near Third. 
Arms, W. B. ins.agt.. Bluff near Fourth. 
Armstrong. Mrs. B. Wash. bet. Fourth and Fifth. 
Armstrong, Bernard, laborer, Superior near Third. 
Arobie, James, laborer, Superior near Sixth. 
Asch, Paul, t^lothing, bds. Cole's House. 
Ash, Jacob, clerk, with Peudill and Beatty. 
AKhmead, Seely, bds. National Hotel. 
Atfield, Patrick, laborer, Bluff near Fourth. 
Atfield James, Superior near Fourth. 
Atfield, Michael, laborer. Spring near R- R 
Augustin, Geo. carpenter. Ridge near Seventh. 
Avery, Charles H. clerk, with H. H. Stafford. 
Am. Ex. Co.. W. S. Dalliba, agent. 



B 



BABCOCK, Silas, brakeman. Fifth near Wash. 
Backentaw, J. carpenter. Ridge and Fourth. 
Bailey, Fred'k, bookkeeper, cor. High and Mich. 
Bailey, Samuel, A. bookkeeper, cor High and Mich. 
Bailey, Samuel, carpenter, cor Pligh and Mich. 
Baker, A. harness maker, Wtsh. street. 
Baker, John A. bds. National Hotel. 
Baker, John, switchman. Bluff near Fourth. 
Balander, Isaac, laborer, Spruce near R. R. 
Baldue, Joseph, blacksmith, Fourth near Superior. 
Ball, Daniel H. attorney, office over Stafford's drug store, res 

Bridge at. near Pine. 
Ball, William carpenter, cor Front and Mich. 
Balloy, Maurice, laborer. Third near Fisher. 
Ballard, John, engineer, Superior opp. Jaih 
Baly, John, brakeman, Fourth and Wash, 






-^>miitSi&0ii^m 



^ w ii ia Mi rip i y i r »W^ < >W f' » « »* W ilt 



beard's viMSxrroM of xarqukttb county. 19 



H. H. STAFFORD, 



WlioUsale mA B«tAi^ Battler in 






DRUGS, MEDICINES, 






"'W 



Wmtw CI^Mftf 



BOOKS, STATIONERY, 



Lake Superior Views. 



FBESCBIFTIONS CAREFULLY PREPARED 
DAY AND NIGHT. 



Main Street^ near Superior. 



- ■'5:^ 



.1 ]!■ Hl'imii I II Ill ' I >li ■<i*iM««M>|p|(*M» 



.1. ■■ |iiiii l il liW iW)pW(|| 



k" m 



20 BBARD's DIRKCTOBY op MARQUETTB flOUKTY. 



H. O. BA.BLS. 



JKO. T. MoOBSaOB. 



H. C. EARLE & CO. 



DBALZB8 IN 



GBOCERIES, 



rcfil 



PROVISIONS, 



Crockery, Glassware, 



&G.. AiC. 



Cole's Block, Front Street, 



MARQUETTE, - - MICH. 



*'-/w*ii*vJ' i 4^W.4*if.-i 



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MICH. 



BBARD'h DIMEOTORY Of MAHQUBTTE COUNTY. 



21 



Bancroft Iron Co., B. C. Morse, secretary. 

Banerick, Williaiu, laborer. Arch near Front 

Bannerman, John, liquors and tobacco. Main iiear Front, res. 

Arch, eaat of Front. 
Banks, J. Stewart, Cole's House 
Barbo, Fred, conductor, Superior near Fifth. 
Barbeaux, A. laborer. Rock near Front. 
Barkey, Charles, laborer, bds. Central Hotel. 
Barklinn, William, laborer, Superior near Third. 
Barlow, Arthur, laborer, Superior nenr Front. 

Barnes, , clerk at court house. 

Barney, Samuel, engineer, Third and Genesee. 

Barton, Edward, laborer, Hampton near Third. 

Barnes, John, car;>ent«r, Hampton near R. mill, 

Barnes, Milton, titeam shovel, Superior near Fifth. 

Barnhard, F. H. quarryman, Wash, near Third. 

Barry, James, laborer, Superior near Third, 

Barry, John, brakeman, Superior near Third. 

Barry, John, carpenter, Hampton near Third. 

Barry, Cyrille, carpenter, Hampton near R. mill. 

Barrett, A. T. clerk, Spruce street. 

Bartholomew, Jas, laborer, Mich. House. 

Baxpndale, Thomas, machinist. Rock near Third. 

Bashaw, Nelson, carpenter. Wash near Sixth. 

Bashaw, Oliver, brakeman, Wash, near Sixth. 

Bassu, August, proprietor National House. 

Bastian, E. boarding house, Rock near Front. 

Beanstin, P. C. clerk, Ridge near Third. 

Beardsley, W. J. asst. P. M., Tremont House. 

Beatty, A. C. asst. bookkeeper, with Pendill & Beatty. 

Beatty, J. S. res. Front near Arch. 

Beck, Thomas, blacksmith. Fourth near Mich. 

Beck, Edwin, machinist. Bluff near Fifth. 

Bedeaux, J. laborer, Superior near Fifth. 

Beecher, Geo. L., foreman on dock at Carp. Furnace, cor. High 

and Arch. 
Belan, M. teamster, Rock near Third. 



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sfc&sri- 



St-.AS* 



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22 



beard's DiRBurroBY or mabquette counts. 



Beleron, JameH, laborer, Mich, near Fifth. 

Bell, Joseph, laborer, Superior near Front. 

Bell, George, laborer, Travellers Home. 

Belmont, Moses J. wi(it)w. Wash, near Seventh. 

Belanger, George, brakeman, Fourth and Wash. 

Bending, F. wines and liquors, ros. Ridge near Front. 

Bending, George, clerk, bds. Summit House. 

Benedict, Gerrge W. bookkeeper, Wash near Front. 

Bennett, Peter, prinUr, Mining Journal. 

Bennett, William H. laborer. Wash, near Third 

Benson, W. laborer, Superior near Front. 

Benpre, Anton, laborer, Rock near Fifth. 

Berdie & Heyn, liquors and cigars. Front near Spring. 

Bernier. William, clerk, with Peudill & Beatty. 

Bey, George, painter, Fourth near Wash. 

Bible, Theodore, laborer Fifth and Wash. 

Bice, David, carpenter, Sixth near Was . 

Bice, Sampson, carpenter. Sixth near Wash. 

Bice, James, engineer. Sixth and Wash. 

Billard, John, carpenter. Fourth and Wash. 

Bielrough, A. G. laborer, Superior near Front. 

Binnah, F. laborer, Fisher near Fourth. 

Bird, Frank, Lake near Superior. 

Birt, A. J. real estate. High near Arch. 

Bishop, Thomas, machinist. Seventh near Ridge. 

Bishop Charles, machinist. Wash near Third. 

Blackwood, James, la.borer, I^ke near R. mill. 

Blackwood, William, tinner. Lake near R. mill. 

Blair, Hugh, conductor. Wash near Seventh. 

Blake, Thomas, laborer, Superior near Front. 

Bleck, Andrew, laborer, Superior near Fifth. 

Blouin, Dennis, hostler, Fisher near Fourth. 

Blue, Mathew, mp.son. Ridge near Sixth. 
Blum, Nelse, laborer, Superior near Front. 
Bogan, Con. laborer, Ridge near Front. 
Boler, Maurice, laborer, Third and Spruce. 
Boler, Pat. laborer. Third and Superior. 



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llKAU!fyt« IHUEt^l'UHy OK MAHgUKlTK COUNTV. 23 



LAND^ 



And Eeal Estate Brokers, 



MARQUETTE, MICH 



MINERAL AND PINE LANDS 



And Minutes and Explorations for Sale. 



Payment of Taxes for Non Residents 



ATTENDED TO. 



REFEB BT PERM188IOM TO - 



JAY C. MOR8E. 
JAfi. PICKAND8. 
Aud others. 



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mmm 



mmtm 



mMw 



„r'yr"( f'-r -""'■(fy"«-'"'«"^' '"-•"-■■- ■ ■ ' ■ ' ■^■■•^'<ii-^''-'mr^*rmmtmnm>i^ 



24 beabd'h directory of mabquette county. 



Incorporatea under the Laws of the State of Michigan- 



mmt Capital, $500,000. Capital paid in, $200,000. 






MABQUETTE, MICH. 

TRANSACT A GENERAL 

BANKINa AND EXCHANGE BUSINESS. 



-OFFICERS- - 



AMBROSE CAMPBELL, Hres't. .1. M. WILKINSON, Ca«h'r. 

EDWARD BREITUNO, Vice Pifes't. FRED. M. STEELE, Aw't " 



Particular Attention Given to Collections, 

And prooeeds promptly remitted at the current 
rates of exchange, on day of payment. 

We sell Passage Tickets to and from the OLD 
COUNTRY by the favorite lines. 

—also— 

DRAFTS ON ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD. 

AT THE LOWEST BATES. 



■- .' M 






OUNTI. 



beard's dihectoby of mabqpette county. 



25 



*■ Michigan- 

\i in, $200,000. 

p1| 



BUSINESS. 



.KINSON, Cwh'r. 
STEELE, Age't " 



Collections, 

he current 
'ment. 

ora the OLD 
ines. 



/£ WORLD. 



Bookly, Pat. laborer, High and Arch. 

Boos, John, mason, Wash, near Fourth. 

Bovin, Peter, laborer. Rock near Front. 

Bowdan, Thomas, miner, Bluff near 6th. 

Bowdry, James, brakeman. Bluff near 4th. 

Bowdry, A. laborer, Wash near 7th. 

Boyles, J. Uboi^r, Bluff near 7th. 

Brag, Jesse, laborer. Wash near 7th. 

Braley, Gilbert, saddler, 7th near Superior. 

Bray, Harry, laborer, High and Mich. 

Bray, J. P. telegraph operator. Wash near 4th. 

Bray, T. H. clerk, Wash, near 4th. 

Brennan, Richard, laborer, Superior i^ear Front. 

Brennan, Thomas, laborer, Wash near 7lh. 

Bridges, J. A., flagman, res. near round house. 

Brevier, Louis, clerk, Superior near 5th. 

ririmacombe & Cundy, builders. Lake near Superior. 

IJrimacombe, William, builder, res. Wash neer Front. 

Brimacombe, T. P., boots and shoes, Front near Superior. 

Brille, Henry, brewer, Spring and 3d. 

Britelle, Henry, cari)enter, Michigan aear Cedar. 

Britelle, Daniel, contractor, Arch near Cedar. 

Britelle, Albert, Michigan, near Cedar. 

Bro, Alb, brakeman, 4th near Bluff. 

Brober, John, laborer, 3d and Superior. 

Brocker, E. C. machinist. Wash izear 7th. 

Brodie, C. A. clerk at Northwestern, 

Brousou, S. M. dry goods, res. High and Ridgo. 

Brooks, John, machinist, Superior near 4th. 

Brothertou, F. H. explorer, 3d and Bluff. 

Brotherton, Wilson, explorer, 4th near Ridge. 

Brown, Samuel, carpenter. Front near Michigan. 

Brown, John, laborer, Front near R. R. 

Erown, Michael, laborei, Superior and Third. 

Brown, Peter^ laborer, Superior and Third, 

Brown, J. pop manufacturer, Front near Superior. 

Brown, Ambrose,S. clerk, Lake near Bluff. 



l B«" i* M ' JIM ' 'W' ' > ' 



MiT i i ii riilcfHVii'iltWi * 



j'Vt':.i:-r-^-'-. " .■■-"-.■■Mi'rirlMVIWTI'i.-,'- 



i 



26 



BEAUD's UIKECTOUY OF MABQUETTE OOLNTY. 



Brown, Win, C. clerk, Lake near Bluff. 

Brown, Jos. J. clerk, Lake near Bluff. 

Brown, Chae. S. wagon maker, Lake near Bluff. 

Buehajian, John. Fourth near Bluff. 

Buckley, Pat. laborer, Superior near Front. 

Buckley, Barney, laborer, Superior near Front. 

Burr, John, foreman. Wash, near Seventh. 

Burt Free Stone Co , Jno. Burt, pres. W. A. Burt, Sec'y, 

Buraasee, C. saloon. Wash. bet. Fourth and Fifth. 

Birch, Anton, laborer. Fifth and Wash. 

Burk, Frank, carpenter, Fisher near Four'h. 

Burk, Thomas, laborer. Rock near Third. 

Burley, Adolph, sadler. Seventh near Superior. 

Burns, Andrew, furnaceman. Lake near R. mill. 

Burns, Thomas, laborer, Superior near Front. 

Burt, William, agent Burt Free Stone Co., res. High near Arch. 

Burt, Hiram, Coll. of Port., Lake near North-Western. 

Burt, S. Sm agent Grd. Cen. Mine, res. High near Arch. 

Bushel, John, proprietor Iron Mountain House. 

Butcher, Harris, Superior and Third. 

Butler, Fred, butcher, Superior and Front. 

Butler, Thomas, laborer. Wash, near Third. 



lit 






CAIN, Wm. brakeman. National Hotel. 
Caley, Chas. laborer, Superior near Front. 
Call, C. H. Cashier First National Bank, Tremont House, 
Caltin, 8. A. Auditor M. H. & O. R. R., res. Sixth near Bluff. 
Cameron, J. R. tailor, residence Bluff near Fourth. 
Camp, Henry, tailor, corner Third and Spring. 
Campbell, David, contractor, corner Third and Genesee, 
Cambell, Ambrose, Reg, U, S, Land Office, res. op. Coles House. 
Campbell, John, tailor. Bluff near Fourth. 
Campbell, Donald, Bluff near Third. 
Campbell, Wm. laborer, Superior near Front. 
Campbell, Robert, carpenter, Ridge near Fourth. 



fiwljltii i i i .plli li il 



:.ny . girri;*;>iiis ii rji i tf'#I'i*T i iyiM'!8*# ' 'j^ ^^^*' 



ii 




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JNTY. 



beabd's dibectobY of mabquette county. 27 



\.. Burt, Sec'y. 



aont House, 
ctb near BlulS*. 
th. 



np. Coles House. 



Brow nstone Com pany 

S. p. ELY, President. PETER WHITE, Treas. 

M. H. MAYNABD, Beo'y and Gen'l Manager. 



■ 


Own Hnd Operate the Celebrated Quarries of 




1 


:^'E11 fill if ill 


^ 


Igh near Arch. ^| 


Very Soft and Rich in color, eagily worked when new, and be- 
come" very hard upon expooure. In unchanged by the) 
elements and remarkably durable in color. 


h-Western. | 


Address, M. H. MA7NABD, Qen'l Manager, 


near Arch. H 


MARQUETTE. 



HURON BAY 

Slate and Iron Company. 

— , - ,- ■ ^. 

W. L. WETUOBE, President. K E. HA71TAIII}, Sec'7 ud Treas. 



Of very fine texture and lustre, equal to any in the world. 
QUABBIES ON HVBOIT BAT. 

General Office at Marquette, Mich, 

Address, M. H. MATNABD, Secretary. 



J 

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n^^'^! j !iJI» fp ms(« ' *'»Wm^ ' 



28 beard's dibectoby of icABgUn-rrE county. 



B. NEIDHART, 



■DXAIiBB IN- 



Poreign and Domestic 



iK^llW^Bl! 



STOVES, TIN, 



-ANU- 




Marquette, L. S., Michigan. 



' t C|.ii i' - i B L ' W ' ft' i. >M '- p;5" ' r' ! W ' A' I i !.#J!wi.f.n" i '':;.; '.'. tvi ''Tr-t""'\'"!r^tT°ftt^^ li,^ U'!''!?? ^^^^^ 



m 




m 



beabd's dibectoby ov mabquette county. 



29 



Campbell, Arch blacksmith, Bluff near Fourth. 
Campau, David, contractor. Third and Genesee. 
Canfield, Chas. telegraph operator, Ridge and iSeventh. 
Car by, Pat. teamster, Lake near R. mill. 
Carey, Thus, mason, Rock near Front, 
Carey, Thos. laborer, Fisher near Third. 
Carey, Edward, saloon, Lake near Superior. 
Carey, Pat. mason, Hampton near School. 

Carp. River Iron Co. uorth of Carp. River. 

Carson, Samuel, furnace man. Wash, and Fourth. 

CJasey, J. laborer, corner Spring and Front. 

Casey, John, laborer. Bluff near. Third. 

Cavis, C. H. V. civil engineer, Wash, near Front. 

Cecotte, John, laborer, Washington and Seventh. 

Cecotte, Octave, laborer. Fourth and Bluff. 

Champion Iron Co., S. P. Ely, Sec. and Treas. 

Chartiers, Joseph, brakeman. Fourth and Wash. 

Charlesworth, Robert, Wash, near Fifth. 

Chambers, 8. saddler, Superior near Fourth. 

Chamberlain, Greo. harness maker, Superior opp. Cathedral. 

Charlson, M, laborer. Third and Superior. 

Charlsou, Nills, laborer, Third and Superior. 

Charlson, I. laborer. Third and Superior. 

Charlsou, Dan, laborer, Third and Superior. 

ChildS, B. F. photof rapher. Masonic Block, bds. Northwestern. 

Christy, And. labo.e:, Superior near Front. 

Church, Sidney E. real est 'e, Watson's Bl)ck. 

(Jhubb, Robert, watchman. Fourth near l*-Iich. 

Chubb, Henry, laborer, Fourtn near Mich. 

Citizens' Bank, Ambrose Campbell Pres., J. M. Wilkinson, 

Cashier. 
Clayhorn, Jos. civil engineer, Bluff near Fifth. 
Clatk, W. clerk. Arch east of Front. 
Clark, John, laborer. Lake near R. Mill. 
Clark, S. T. fireman. Third near Bluff 
Clark, Wm. carpenter. Fifth and Wash. 
Clark, Wallace A. M., M. D. Crowley's Block. 






'^^tib^t^^^^^UOXw 



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fSjg^w'^^f^^^^^'^aiipJEpw^js.i 



m 



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30 beabd's directoby of marquette county. 



Clark, H. clerk, with Pendill & Beatty. 

Claricy, C. laborer, Superior near Front. 

Clapp, L. clerk, freight office M. H. & O. R. R., Ms. Northwesfrn. 

Cleveland Iron Mining Co. J. C. Morse, Geu'l Agent. 

Cleary, David, laborer. Travelers' Home. 

Cleary, James, laborer, Travelers' Home. 

Cloese, J. laborer, corner Spring and Front. 

Coakley, Maurice, laborer, Superior, near Front 

Coakley, Peter, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Coan, John, machinist, Michigan, near High. 

Coan, William, Arch St. West Front. 

Cochran, George E. corner Arch and Spring. 

Cochran, John & Geo. E. att'ys, over Murray & Robbins. 

Cochran, J. L. attorney, corner Arch and Spruce. 

Cochran, V. B. clerk, corner Baker «nd Ridge. 

Code, William, book-binder, corner 3d and Superior. 

Coffield, Thomas, laborer, corner 3d and Superior. 

Coffman, Samuel, tailor, corner Washington anJ 5th. 

Cole, James, laborer, Washington, near 7th. 

Cole, C. D. photographer, bds. Northwestern. 

Cole, Acklin, carpenter, corner 5th and Bluff. 

Cole, A. A. deputy collector, Burt Bros, building. 

Coles, Jeffrey, "l 

Coles, William, J- Proprietors Coles House. 

Coles, George B. J 

Coles, George, Coles House. 

Coles House. Front strfeet. 

Collen, E. carpenter, Michigan street, near Front. 

Collins, C. G. dry-goods, old P. O. building, res. Wash, near 3d. 

Collins, H. G. clerk, Washington, near 3d. 

Combau, Eugene, laborer. Travelers' Home. 

Condon, John, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Conklin, J. 8. clerk, corner Front and Bluff 

Conklin, G. N. jeweler, Adams Block, b. Blaker street. 

Connell, Pat, laborer, corner Spring and Front. 
Connell. J. laborer, corner Spring and Front. 
Connell, Jerry, teamster, Travelers' Home. 



,..3jy ^ . g ji j»,l ij.tll, ^ jiaj,^^^ ^ 



BEARD'h DIHECTORy OF MARQrKTTE COUNTY. .31 




TRUNKS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Cart and Fine Harness a Specialty. 



SUPERIOR STREET, NEAR CLEVELAND DOCK. 



f 






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32 UKAUd'h I.IBECrOBY OF MABQDETTE COUNTY. 



T. WARD 



WARD ^ WEBB, 



J. WEBB. 



-SBlAIiXBS IN- 



4WmmA§mm% 



1 



i-i^\JiD=^~' 



MUSICAL MERCHANDISE, 

violin and Oultar Strings. 

SHEET MUSIC A SPEOIALTT. 



j^xsmo ActBHwi-ai v<r> 




TRAOK MAnK 



Vll< 



^tore on Washinyton Street, 

the Cohs ta, MM^t^ett®^ Sieb. 



^mwa s s ^ a^^lfiia i itBii i ^ j^ g^^t^ 




.'M 



^S? 



3UNTY. 



UKARDS mUKCTOKY OF MAIiylKTTK CorNTY. 



33 



J. WEBB. 



DISE, 

itrlngs. 

If OS Eli 



street. 



Connere, John, laborer, corner Fisher, near 4th. 

Conner?, James, laborer, Superior, near Front 

Conney, J. D. furnaceraan, b. Brown and De Rush. 

Cook, Mrs E. D Washington, near Ucl. 

Cook, Christian, shoemaker, 5th, near Bluff. 

Cook, J. blacksmith, Bluff, near 3fl. 

Cook, Charles, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Cook, D. E. tinner, Washington, between 3d and 4th. 

Cooley, Pat, carpenter, Rock, near 3d. 

Cooney, Wm. cl'k with Pendill & Beatly. 

Corey, Duncan, lab. 3d and Supr. 

Corey, Rich, boiler maker, Bluff, near 6th. 

Corey, Geo. lab. Bluff, near 6th. 

Coughlin, John, laborer, 4th, near Washington. 

Courtney, Dan, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Coyle, James, laborer, Hampton, near 3d. 

Coyle, James Jr. laborer, Hampton, near 3d. 

Cozzens, Fred., carpenter, Superior, near Front. 

Crathy, Stephen, laborer. Travelers' Home. 

Craig, Reynold, Bluff, near 6th. 

Craig, Julius, Bluff, near 6th. 

Craig, John, furnaceman. Bluff, near 6th. 

Craig, James, puddler, Hampton, near School. 

Craig, Thomas, mason. Front, near Spring. 

Crambie, A. laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Crangle, William, laborer, Michigan House. 

Crevan, Ed. laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Creary, L. P. & Co. printers. Masonic Building. 

Creary, L. P. printer, residence near Methodist Church. 

Crenelle, Joshua, carpenter, 7th near Rock. 

C!ribo, Richard, helper, Washington, near Superior. 

Crist, L. laborer, 4th, near Rock. 

Crocker, J. plasterer, Central Hotel, 

Crohn, Meyer, clothing, Washington, between 6th and 7th. 

Croin, John, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Crow, John, laborer. Ridge, near Front. 

Crow, James, laborer, corner 3d and Superior. 



■.V,^*^^p«#!iK***^*^^'^*^'^'-^ 



34 



UKAUD'h DIUKi^ruHY (>K MABQUKTTK COUNTY. 



Crowley, Thomas, brskemau, Michigan House. 
Crowley, Michael, laborer, Lake, near R. mill. 
Cudlip, John, miner, Waahingion, near 6th. 
Cumminga, Put, laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Cummings, George P. civil engineer, 4th, near Bluff. 
Culhave, Dan. blacksmith, 5th, near Buperior. 
Culbort & Rood, livery, Superior, near Front 
Culbert, Josh., livery, Summit House. 

Cunningham, laborer. Ridge, near Front. 

Cundy, J. S. carpenter, Washington, near Front. 
Curtis, James, blacksmith. Rock, near 3d. 



D 




DALE, Samuel, boarding house, Superior, near Front. 
Dalin, Claes, laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Dalliba & M&pes, attorneys. Masonic Building. 
Dalliba, J. E. attorney, Coles House. 
Dalliba, W. S. Ex. Agt. and man. W. U. Tel. Colee House. 
Daly, James, laborer, Franklin House. 
Damp, Charles, mason, Washington, near 7th. 
Daniel, Hugh, painter, Superior, near Front 
Davis, Miss Lillian, dress-maker, Washington, near Front. 
Davis, Francis, carpenter, 5th, near Washiugtfw. 
Daw, Frank, moulder, High, near Michigan. 
Dearra, Peter, laborer, 4th, near Washington. 
Deckerraesser, J. laborer. Bluff, near 5th. 
Deetcher, William, laborer, Fisher, near 4th. 
Delany, James, laborer, boards Brown & De Rush. 
Delaf, Peter, blacksmith, Rock, near 3d. 
Deraay, Augustin, clerk, Genesee, near 3d. 
Demay, A. F. clerk, Genesee, near Lake. 
Demeyer, Zavier, saloon, 3d, near Lake. 
Denn, Peter, pattern maker, corner 3d and Fisher. * 

Dennis, Joseph, laborer, corner 3d and Washington. 
De Nevin, E. cashier, with Pendill & Beatty. 
Deuomy, David, surveyor, corner 5th and Washington. 



i n pl n ; T] ii | i ji» i i i| ^ il jlj jj 



wt^^.i»i 



f^»VM^i?^V ^ f ^i> i m i! JV >m »,ir;7T , \ r 



bbaro'b dibxotort of marquettb county. 35 




Agent for Strueder Show Cases. 



■1 



' ■% 



I lifi 



L S; V 



36 BEARD'b WKEOTORy OF MABQOSTTR COUNTV. 



Good Horses. 





g 



New Buggies. 



^^'^^m^^ 




CULBERT & REED. 

(At til* Old SUad gf JoAua Colbert,) 
HAVE THE LARGEST AND BEST 




ON THE UPPER PENINSULA. 



T 



Good Horses and Vehicles for all Purposes. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS IF DESIRED. 



FUNERALS RECEIVE ESPECIAL ATTENTION. 
MARQUETTE, - MICHIGAN. 



-,^y:»y^g? y ^ §^ w j§8 »f $l » g^ 



ONTY. 



nR4IU)'8 DIHEOTORY OF MABQUETTE COUNTY. 37 



Buggies. 



SED« 



BEST 

. i •*: 

JLA. 

// Purposes. 

ED. 

TTENTION. 
HICAN. 



Deporte, J. laborer, WaBhington, near 7th. 

Derry, Wm, C. laborer. Washington, near Jld. 

Deajardins, J. Phyaioiau, Wataon HUwk, res- 3d and Kock. 

l)eat«ch, .John, ma«on, corner 3d and Bluff. 

Deveroo, Jamea, olerk, Ilidge, near 4th. 

Deveru, J. with Pecanda ^. Co. 

DeWitt, Charles, hostler, Michigan House. 

Dietsch, John H. Uilor, Washington, between 3d and 4th. 

D.bey, John, blacksmith, 5th near Superior. 

Dobey, Robert, helper, 5th, near Superior. 

Doerr, Fred, shoemaker, Washington, near 7th. 

Doherty, Michael, laborer, Hampton, near 3d. 

Dolf; Jacob, sheriff, at jail. 

Doll", Frank, carpenter, Superior, near Front. 

Dollans, Frank, fisherman, Hampton, near R. mill. 

Dollan, John, laborer. Travelers' Home. 

Donaldson, Peter, porter, Coles House. 

Donahoe, John, laborer, Bluff, near 3d. 

Donahue, Michael, engineer, Bluff, near 3d. 

Donely, James, laborer, Superior, near 3d, 

Doner, John, laborer, 7th, near Superior. 

Doner, Thomas, engineer. Bluff, near 6th. 

Donovan, Jerry, laborer, Ridge, near 4th. 

Doukersley, C. Wash, near Front. 

Donovan, John, laborer, Superior near Front 

Donovan, James, laborer, Superior near Front. 

Dooley Tom. teamster, Mich near High. 

Doran, Octave, laborer. Wash, near Fourth. 

Dowling, Richard, carpenter. Bluff near Front. 

Downey, Patrick, laborer, Franklin House. 

Downey, Morris, laborer, Franklin House. 

Downs, Cornelius, laborer, Fisher near Fourth. 

Downs, Hylor A. Sp. Dep. Custom House, res. Lake soar North 

Western. 
Doyle, James, carpenter, Bluff near Sixth. 
Doyle, William J. laborer, National House. 
Doyle Patrick, teamster. Third and liock. 



sfsp^S^t? 



ftrtft'tiigijiaj^.*-- ' . 



■*wJ§B^6^j^(>i&itt.'K>^uH*^^ 



r/«.i-iM'^U','P53^ 



38 



beard's dibrctory of mabquette county. 



Doyle, Thoma?, teamster, Third and Rock. 

Doyle, Edward, boarding house, Superior near Front. 

Drater, Charles, laborer, Third and Wash. 

Drew, John, clerk. Ridge near Fourth. 

Drille, William, boarding house, Wash, near Third. 

Driscol, Michael, brakeman, Third and Superior. 

Dubois, E., blacksmith. Fourth near Superior. 

Duff, James, painter, Piflh uear Bluff. 

Dume, J. laborer, Spring and Front. 

Dunkley, Joseph, painter. Front st. 

Dunlavy, John, laborer, 3d and Hampton. 

Dunn, John, laborer, Superior near Front. 

Dunn, James, laborer, bds. Brown & De Rush. 

Duson, James, plasterer. Sixth and Bluff. 

Dwyer, Burt, carpenter Sixth i ' Blu.T. 

Dwyer, Daniel, laborer, Franklin House. 

Dwyer, John, laborer, Superior neat Third. 



E 



EARL, Wm. foreman R. R. Superior and Fourth. 
Earle H. O. 8c Co^ grocers, Coles Block. 
Earle, H. C. light house keeper. 
Elarle, C. M. W. B. and shoes, masonic building, res. Front 

near Mich. 
Earle, Peter, laborer, Fourth near Mich. 
E«'ay, E. F. foreman R. R. Bluff near Fifth. 
Edge, George, Rolling Mill, Third and Furnace. 
E)dward, L. brakeman, Wash, bet Fourth and Fifth. 
Egnew, Frank, laborer, Superior near Front. 
Eich, Hillard, Grocer, Third near Hampton. 
Ellenwood, Captain F. foreman, Fifth and Wash. 
Ellis, Charles, fireman. Wash near Fifth. 
E'lstrcLa, Fred, laborer, Bluff near Fifth. 
Ely, S. P. mayor, Lake near North-Western. 
Englas, Mathew, teamster, Hampton, near Third. 
English, James, clerk, Third and Rock. 




hi* 



40 beard's DIBEOTORY of MARQUETTE COUNTY 



PENDILL & BBATTT, 



-WSOLESALE AKD BETAIL 



1E# 





PROVISIONS, 

CROCKER 

Gh?ain, riour, Peed, 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 



D 






Wall Papers, Roofing and Building Pf s 



— ALSO— 



VESSEL SUPPLIES. &c. 
PAINTS, OILS, VARNISM 




m ^^tm" 





Enright & Spencer, harness and trunks, Superior near 

(lock. 
Enright, James, harnep>8, res. Rock and Third. 
Erbinding, H. wagon maker, Superior and Fourth. 
Ericson, Peter, machinist, Hampton near R. mill. 
Ernau, Felix, laborer, Washington, near 7th. 
Evans, 8. J. barber. Front and hairing, res. Rock and Third. 
Evans, J. L. barber. Front and Spring, res. Rock and Third. 
Ereau, Phillip, laborer. Third near Rock. 
Everett and Son, bankers, Front near Main. 
Everett, C. M. banker, res. Ridge and Front. 
Everett, P. M. banker, res. Ridge and Front. 
Erickson Manfg. Co , foundry and machine shop, neargas works. 
Excelsior Manfg. (Ui.,s. w. cor. Wyckoff and Porter, 



fj^AESSON, Ole, laborer, Superior, near Front 
Fagan James, laborer, near water works. 
Fahey, James, laborer, near water works. 
Farley, Thomas, laborer. Ridge, near 4th. 
Farmer, .James, furnaceman, Hampton, near School, 
Farrar, Mrs. Sarah Ann, laundress, 4th, near Michigan. 
Farrar, S. B. bds. National Hotel. 
Fassbinder, J. C. butcher. Rock, near 3d. 
Fee, F. M. laborer, corner Spring and Front 
Fenah, Charles, mason, Michigan street 
Field, Fred, plasterer, Superior, near 3d. 
Finch, laborer, bds. Michigan House. 
Finch, Charles, teamster, Arch, near Pine. 
Finch, Ed. moulder, corner 5th and Washington. 
Finney, Walter, ticket agent, Bluff, near Front 
First Nat. Bank, Peter White, Pres. Nat. Bank Building. 
Fisher, David, conductor, Washington, near 7th. 
Fisher, Medaugb, machinist, Washington, near 7th. 
Wisher, Ed. plumber. Bluff, near 6th. 
Fisher, John, teamster, with Pendill & Beatty. 



c. » 



fc^^ 



:„iAt».*;»&"v-\.;.'.: -^ 



i iii i u i ii. i i,». i ii : i.;, ' .?C^ 



42 



DKAUD'h DIUECTOIIY OF MAUQUETTE COUNTY. 



Fisher J, A. laborer, Waah. near 7th. 
Fiske, E. W. dentist, Watson's Block, res. rear R. mill. 
Fitzgerald, James, machinist, Rock, near 4th. 
Fitzsimons, Daniel, tailor. Spring, near Front. 
Flaherty, Thomas, carpenter, corner 7th and Ridge. 
Flaherty, Robert, carpenter, corner 7th and Ridge. 
Flanigan John, laborer, BluiT, near 3d. 
Flanigan, James, engineer, Wathingtcn, near 6th. 
Flanigan, William, Machinist, Washington, near 6th. 
Flanigan, Mathew, printer, Washington, near 6th. 
Flanigan, Richard, weigher, Washington, near 6th. 
Flanigan, Eil. carpenter, Washington, near 6th. 
Flanigan, John, engineer, 4th, near Fisher. 
Flannery, William, laborer, bds. Franklin House. 
Flat, John, shoemaker, bdti. with T. P. Brimacombe. 
Fleetwood, Rev. B. F. res. near St. Paul's church. 
Fletcher, Duncan, laborer. Bluff, near 6th. 
Floid, Thomas, boiler maker. Lake, near Bluff. 
Flood, Derry, mason, 3d, near Superior. 
Flooding, Andrew, mason, Hampton, near School. 
Flynn, Pat, Fisher, near Front. 
Flynn, John, Fishe**, near Front. 
Fogerty, Pat, laborer, corner Spring and Front. 
Foley, James, teamster, corner Front and Superior. 
Foley, John, laborer, Rock, near 3d. 
Foot, J. laborer, corner Spring and Fort. 
Foot, Mrs. Jane, laundress, Michigan street. 
Foot D. laborer, corner Spring and Front. 
Fountain, Arable, Front, near Superior. 
Fountain, James, moulder. Bluff, near Fifth. 
Forbush, Henry, mail agent, 6th, near Bluff. 
Ford, Maurice, laborer, Hampton, near R. mill. 
Foreman, Jacob, laborer, Superior, near 3d. 
Forsyth, Ed. printer, Washington, bet. 3d and 4th. 
Fortig, John, painter, Washington, bet. 3d and 4th. 
Fortune, L. carpenter, Hampton, near R mill. 
Fowler, T. B. gardener. Lake, near N. Western. 



mill. 



W^ 



beard's DIREOTOBt OF MARQUETTE COUNTY. 43 



o. 



lO 



Fuliiiiilii Milerj, Souet!, Eat!, Mmi 



lailea 


' f WPHlshing 


j i®a)i^« 


flihhons, 


Aprons, 


Tarns, 


Ldfips, 


Hosiery, 


Zephyrs, 


Flowers, 


Corsets, 


Canvas, 


Feathers, 


Corset Skirt Sup- 


Patterns, 


Orntunents, 


porters. 


Initials, 


Silks, 


Hoop Skirts, 


Human Hair, 


Velvets, 


Bustles, 


Curls, 


Satins, 


Combs, 


Switches, 


Crapes, 


Bracelets, 


Frizzes and, 


Veils, 


Pins, 


Braids, 


Ties, 


Jeivelrij, 


Suits, 


Riishings, 


Chains, 


Cloaks, 


Collars, 


Brushes, 


Talanas and 


Undersleeves, 


Buttons, 


Capes, 


Caffs, 


Tlhreads, 


Shawls, 


Handkerchiefs, 


Silks, 


Scarfs, 


Parasols, 


Twists, 


Wraps, 


Fans, 


Fringes, 


Muhias, 


Belts, 


Gimps, 


Skirts, 


Kid and. TJiread 


Edgings, 


Jackets, Sfc. 


Gloves. 


Buttons, 




Ladies', Childrens' %xA Infants 


' Underwear. 


Prints, 


Cloakings, 


Cloths, 


Cottons, Dress Gnod^s and Suit 


ings, Flannels 



ladles' m% @(kll&r<iii8' furs. 

Xotions, Trimmings, Linings, ^c, Sf-c. 

AND EVEBTTEma ELSE IN LADIES' OOODS. 

Coraer Store, E?eretfs Block, MARQUETTE, L. S., MICH. 



)*^ ij'rt i ra/i" ii' - 



■w ii ._H] i H jl ).y ii ' <j 






44 BEAUD'k DHIRCTOBY OF MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



-DKAXBIB IK 



Groceries "^ Provisions 



oCON FECTION ERY.o 

f pout itreelt near @u)^«ipt3ri 
Old p. o. Building. MARQUETTE, MICH. 



LEONAKD P. CRARY. 



JASON HcOREQOR. 



L. P. CRARY & CO. 



-<3-XIX«'XIXt..A.Xj- 



Book and Job Printers 



Masonic Block, over the Postoffice. 



D, %L» E*, 



^i«m- 



)UNTY. 



[sions 

RY,o 

RE, MICH. 

SON McQRBaOR. 

CO. 



Fraser, Robert, laborer, bds. Franklin House. 

Fraaer, C. H. clerk Treniont House. 

Fraser, E. lumber yard, and real estate, Bluff near Third, res. 
Ridge street. 

Fraser, John, teamster, corner 4th and Fisher. 

Frederick, Charles, piano tuner, Washington, near 3d. 

Freeman Bros, livery. Front, near Superior. 

Freeman, James, livery. Rock street. 

Freeman, Richard, blacksmith, Superior, near Front. 

Freeman, Andrew, carpenter, Washington, near Front. 

French, Robert, contractor, Washington, n^.tr Front. 

French, William, laborer, corner 3d and Hampton. 

French, George, carpenter, corner Rock and 3d. 

Frei, Fred, boarding house, corner 3d and Front. 

Frei. Jacob, grocer and baker, corner Front and Washington 

Freiburg, Robt. clerk. Rock, near Front. 

Freiburg, J. P. clerk, with Pendill and Beatty. 

Frink, Reuben, pile driver, corner Michigan and Front. 

Fuhrman, J. clerk, with Pendill A Beatty. 

Furgason, O'Neil, laborer, Genesee, near 3d. 

Furgason, Alex, engineer, Hampton, near School. 

Furgason, Anges, laborer, Ridge, near W. works. 



G 



i% 



nters 



9. 



GABRIELSON, W. laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Gaerdpie, Henry, brakesman, Washington, near 7th. 
Gago, Samuel, carpenter, Washington, near Front. 
Gagnes, Cheve, brakeman, 4th, near Was ington. 
Galbreath, Jamee, carpenter, corner 5th and Washington. 
Gallant, Peter, grocer, Washington, near 7th. 
Galler, Charles, laborer, corner 5th and Washington. 
Galvin, William, laborer, bds. Michigan House. 
Ganaw, Daniel, teamster. Ridge, near 3d. 
Garman, Moses, laborer. Arch street, near Cedar. 
Garrity, William, engineer, 3d, near Bluff. 
Garrow, Charles, explorer, Superior, near 3d. 



rli l il lWII. " i j i 'ill' « «[* ll Htl »iilli « i'i' 



'mm*' 



i ^ iM w i ' i " <i Wi ii .iM | 



46 



beard's DIRECTOBY of MARQUETTE CODNTY. 



Gasco, Joseph, carpenter, Superior, near 7tU. 

Gaskill, Joseph, carpenter, corner Front and Michigan. 

Gates, A.'uirew, plasterer, Michigan House. 

Gay, H. L. & Co. architects, Watson Block. 

Gay, E. B. Gen'l F't Ag't M. H.;<tO. R. R, cor. Front and Arch. 

Gehske, Albert, laborer, corner 3d and Washington. 

Geness, J. M. laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Gidly, Samuel, laborer, Bluff, near 5th. 

Gidley, Charles, boiler maker, Bluff, near 6th. 

Gienneger, George, laborer, Washington, bet. 3d and 4th. 

Gilmore, 8. F. restaurant, Washington near Front. 

Gilmore, Martin, mason, Superior, uear Front 

Girsch, Henry, laborer, corner 3d and Washington. 

Glazer, John, barber, Washington, bet. 3d and 4th. 

Glazier, Louis, train master, Everett Block, res. Wash, near 
Front. 

Gokay, Oliver, weigher, Superior, neai 5th. 

Goldsworthy, John, Arch, east of Front. 

Goodreau, James, Hampton, near School. 

Gordon, Rev. J. M. Front, uear Michigan. 

Gordy, John, painter, 3d, near Superior. 

Gormaly, Ed. explorer, Superior, near 3d. 

Gorman, Thomas, laborer, Michigan street. 

Gorman, Pat. laborer, Michigan street. 

Gould, Orville, flagman, bds. at Bishops. 

Grabel, James, laborer, Hampton, near school. 

Graff, John, carpenter. Bluff, uear 5th. 

Graham, J. J. clerk, Superior, near Front. 

Grant, Alex, clerk. Lake, near N. Western. 

Grand Central Iron Co. J. 8. Waterman & S. S. Burt. 

Gray, Noah, director of Carp River Iron Co, bds. N. Wratern. 

Gray, W. A. explorer, 5th, near Bluff. 

Greble, John W. engineer, Washiigton, near 4th. 

Greble, Josiah, tinner, Washington, near 4th, 

Greble, John, laborer, Washington, near 4th. 

Greble, Richard, boiler maker, Washington, near 4th. 
Greble, Charles, tinner, Washington, near 4th. 




BKAHD's DinECTOUy of MAUQUErrE COUNTY. 47 



J. W. WATSON ft SON'S * 



Or«at Wholesale and Setall 



pMl^^Iiilf^ 



f^ 



DRY GOODS, 



Groceries and ProrisioaSj 

C01\lf£CT!01\(£!lY, 



Boots and ShoesO ^ 



TOYS, YANKEE NOTIONS, Etc. 



Watson 31ock, 



MARQUETTE, Mich. 



E<l" 



1,4 



Ml 






wi tf" ' ' ir i >w" >iii ■> 



48 IIKAUD'h DIUECTOHY OF MABQtJSTTE COUNTY. 




TUB 




tntnn 



MARQUETTE, L. S., MICH. 



-PUBMHHKD BY — 



THE MINING JOURNAL GO. 

Subscription, $3.00 per Annum, 

IN ADVANCE. 






'''«J)he Mining Journal is a large, hand- 

r* somely printed twelve page first class 

(§// paper. It circulates largely through the 

%, ^ iron, mining and manufacturing district, and 

is the acknowledged exponent of the iron and 

manufacturing interests of the Northwest. 

As an advertising medium, the Journal is unex- 
celled. 

Advertising rates furnished on application by letter 

or otherwise. 

» 

THE MINING JOURNAL (30. 

mmm |®b ftinftirs, Mok lloleip^, 

AND BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS. 
Every class of work executed with neatness and dbpatch. 



»->..*-* t ii U l t^4fi*^<W i 'wiHrtfe« ii r i "' H M t W t tA i ^1S t ^, i pi^- 






fNTY. 



UEAKD'h UIBECrOHY OK MAHgUKTl'K COUNTY. 



49 



Gregory, Henry, builder, comer 4th and Ridge. 

Green, Alf. architect und manager, L. 8, Building Co., red. 

corner Arch and Pine. 
Cireen, William, engineer, .Superior, near 4th. 
( Jrcen, Ned, laborer, Travelera' Home. 
Green. G. W. Arch, E. of Front. 
Green, Frai:k A. Arch, E. ot Front. 
Green, Samuel, tailor, Bluff, near 4lh. 
Greenhart, Frank, brakeman, Bluff, near 4th. 
(ireenwald, Mich, stone-cutter, '.id, near Washington. 
Grecnwald, Frank, marble works, 3d near Washington. 
Grirtin, Ed. mason, Washington, near Front. 
Griffonl, Joseph, gas-litter, Superior, near 4th. 
Gries, M. boots and shoes, cor. Front and Spring, res. Rock, near 

Front. 
(Jrinnell, James H. dentist, rear Coles Plouse. 
Gruner, A. G. bookbinder, bds. Natioiuil Hotel. 
Gastaperson, Andrew, laborer, corner 3d and Superior. 
Gutke, Ludwig, laborer. Bluff, near 5th. 



1.- '> 



PHif 



is unex- 



lon by letter 



H 

TT ADDLE, William, laborer, corner Washington and 5th. 

•■- -1 Hadley. David, laborer, corner 3d and Superior. 

Hadley James M. carpenter, corner 5th and Bluff. 

Hagelin, James, blacksmith. Bluff, near 5th. 

Hagelin, E. bartender, corner 3d and Superior. 

Hager, G. A. upholsterer. Lake, near R. mill. 

Haggerty, M. saloon, corner Front and Spring. 

Hagerstom, C. A. carpenter, Washington, near 7th. 

Halpin, Ed. butcher. Superior, near 5th. 

Halpin, E. clerk, at Pendill & Beatty's. 

Halpiu, D. clerk, at Pendill & Beatty's. 

Hallam, John, carpenter, Front. 

Hall, L. A. watchmaker, Washington, near Front. 

Hah, R. M. book-keeper, city bank, 6 Ridge, bet. Cedar and 

Spruce. 
Hamm9nd, C. F. carpenter, c>jr. Washington and 7th, 



^" ■ y 



M 



HKAltUH UlllKtrroilY OF MABQUBTIE COUNTY. 



Ilapguo*!,.!. iiiachiuiHt, 7th, near Rook. 

Hanfonl, John, Arch, E. of Front. 

Hanft, Philip, laborer, VVaahington. near 4th. 

llanley, John, laborer, Washington, bet. 'M and 4th. 

Hannah, Sidney, laborer, Lake, near R. mill. 

Han.ton, 8 butcher, VVashing'.on, bet. 4th and 5th. 

Hansen, Swan, laborer, cor. Superior and .{d. 

HauHcn, Charles, cor. Lake and Superior. 

Hardy. E. S. probate judge and harborniaBter, rcH. Front 

near Ridge. 
Harlow, Andrew R. lumber dealer, 4th and R. R. track, residea 

Front, near Ridge. 

Harnian, , painter, 5th, near BlufF. 

Harrington, John, laborer, Ridge, E. of Front. 

Harrington, Philip, laborer, Travelers' Home 

Harrington, Jerry, laborer, Arch St. 

Harrington, Con. laborer, Ridge, E. of Fror 

Harrington, Mich, laborer, Franklin Houh 

Harris, Wra. clerk at Pendill & Beatty's. 

Harris, Isaiah, machinist. Front, near Arch. 

Harrison, John F. Fisher, near Front. 

Harvey, James, Arch, E. of Front. 

Lassie, John, engineer. Bluff near 5th. 

Hasselvist, Abe, laborer, cor. Superior and 3d. 

Hastings, Thomas, Rock, near 3d. 

Hatch, P>nest, billiard rooms, Coles House. 

Hatcher, Edmond, blacksmith, Bluff, near 7th. 

Hav'kinson, N. laborer, Superior, near Fiont. 

Hawkinson, Peter, boarding bouse, Superior, near Front. 

Hays, Vic. laborer. Travelers' Home. 

Hays, Philip, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Hays, Thomas, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Haynes, C. H. moulder. Bluff, near 4th. »» 

Haynes, Henry, boiler maker, Bluff, near 4th. 

Hefferman, Thomas, contractor, 3d, near Genesee. 

Helmert, John, fireman, tug Dudley, res. Lake near R. mill. 

Henderson, L. F. laborer, cor. Washington and 5th. 



%s 



iJ'^^^MsMm^-niiniKtiina^t 



m Jil'ilriiNnwli'i 



ry." 



JNTY. 



BRAHD'h DIKErTORY OF MAIigrKTTE CorNTY. CA 



th. 



3r, rcH. Front 
. truck, resides 



Front. 



Iroi Si; Poiidry. 



\km Soier Wirks. 



D. H. MERRITT, 



PBOPRIliTOR. 



AKA.IVTTVA.O'X^TmxiKI. OV 



Steam Engines, 

BOILERS, 



Blast Furnace, Uining | Mill Uachinery, 



IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS. 



rARTICULAR ATTKMTIOjY GI\KX TO RKlUni- 
im} AMD GENERAL JOB WORK: 



Lake St. from MwE t© Wasliiieg-tora, 

MARQUFTTE, MICH. 






■jS^^ 



msm 



W ii i i f i 'f i i ii inr'r iii i ii 'i ■'i'- | i i m «MiiHwiiji%i "il i i'<i < 'iV' >'«'' "i i iy i '' 



m l ^r |l ^^^ l| lj ll ll: || |l l ij(| l i)^M) ij i | f >l ^ il i^ )^ nT | |lg 



52 BF.AUd's DlJiKCTDUY OF MAllQUETTE COVNTY. 



G. N. CONKLIN, 



JEWEiLEB 



FINE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 



i 



Tourists are inmted to call 
wmifie my stock of 



ex- 



Late SHperioriForeip Siiecmefls, 



INDIAN CURIOSITIES, ETC. 



The Finest Collection on Lake Superior. 



wm 




beard's directory of MARQUETTE COUNTX. 



53 



Hegan, F. O. boots aud shoes, Superior, near Front, res. Rock 

near Front. 
Heineman, Ed. laborer, Washington, near 3d. 
Hendrick, H. B- jeweler, cor. Michigan and 4th. 
Hennesey, Michael, laborer, 7th, near Ridge. 
Hansel, Charles, laborer, cor. 3d and Washington. 
Herbst, Fred, laborer, cor. Wash, and 5th. 

Herman, , shoemaker, bds. P. P. Brimacombe. 

Herbert, J. boarding house, Rock, near 3d. 
Hesse, Herman, laborer, cor. Bluffand 7th. 
Hetier, Moyse, brakeman, cor. 4th and Washington. 
Heyn, Barthold, clerk, bds. Ridge, near Front. 
Hicks, J. C. local editor Mining Journal. 
Hicks, William, carpenter, cor 5th and Blufl". 
Hickey Luke, carpenter, 5th, near Bluff- 
Highland, James, laborer, cor. 3d and Superior. 
Hillsdale, Wm. clerk. Bluff, near Front. 
Hinckley, Michael, cutter, Superior, nea'r 3d. 
Hirsch, John, laborer, Michigan, near 4th. 
Hocking, John, miner, Bluff, near 6th. 
Hodeer, C. N. National Hotel. 
Hodge, Charles, printer, Journal office. 
Hoffman, Peter, laborer, cor. 3d and Washington. 
Hogau, Ed. teamster, Fisher, near 4th. 
Hogan, John, teamster. Bluff, near 6th. 
Hoggerty, Wm. boiler maker, cor. Front and Mich. 
Holden, John, blacksmith, Washington, near 7th. 
Holden, James, laborer, «Vashington, near 7th. 
Hollister, Robert, clerk, boards Tremont. 
Hollister, W. R. Clerk, boards Tremont. 
Hollister, Miss Sophie, dressmaker. Front, near Wash. 
Holt, Cyrus, moulder, 6th, near Bluff. 
Homer George, musician, Bluff, near 6th. 
Hood, John, fireman. Bluff, near Front. 
Hope, Henry, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Hopkins, J. ^ ,^ , „ iir i • . 

, ' , . TT T ( Hardware, Front, near Washmgton. 
Hopkins, H. J. ) 




„£j<).4MSiMl«>k.u„.u»dl 



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■» n i .»'< i Mn .■ iiHIWiri i - i j i iWWIcy'iiVH ' '' »yi jl l i #» 



54 



beabd's dibectoby op mabquette coukty. 



Hopkins, Samuel, painter, foot Spring, boards Tremont. 
Hotop, L. Grocer, corner Washington and 3d. 
Howe, Wra. painter, 3d, near Rock. 

L.nve, , laborer, corner Washington and 5th. 

Hughes, Michael, laborer, Michigan House. 

Hughes, Joseph, laborer, bds. Travelers' Home. 

Hume, Peter, carpenter, Washington, near 7th. 

Humphrey, 8. D. physician, Washington, near Front. 

Hunt, Pat. saddler, corner 3d and Superior. 

Hunt, Joseph, carpenter, 4th, near Mich, 

Hunt, J. K., clerk at Tremont. 

Hunt, H. H. prop. Tremont. 

Hurlburl, Rev. C. E. Ridge, near Cedar. 

Hurlburt, Capt. printer, Journal oflSce. 

Hurley, T. T. harness and trunks, ^ cor.Front and Superior. 

Hurley, T. T. Jr., " " " \ re?,, cor. Rock and 4th. 

Hurlick, Charies, carpenter, Wash, between 3d and 4th. 

Hurny, John, laborer, corner Washington and 5th. 

Huseby, A. J. laborer, corner 3d and Superior. 

Hirsley, J. ^ 

Hirsley, Bur, ^ Vessel owners, Ridge, near 4th. 

Hirsley, Wayne, ) 

I 

ICKSTRUM, Alfred, moulder. Bluff, near 4th. 
Isler, Henry, physician, corner 3d and Bluff. 
Ivey, J. machinist, 4th, near Michigan. 

Iron Bay Foundry* ^' H. Merritt, prop. 



JACK, Thomas, carpenter, Ridge, near 7th. 
Jacker, Max, Pattern maker, Washington, near 7th. 
Jacobs, Frank, carpenter, corner 4th and Washington. 
Jacobs, Leopold, porter Coles House. 
Jacobs, John A. sup't stone quarry, Hampton, near 3d. 



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iil>'ilMWwfn'?-rn-r' w- 




)UNTY. 



emont. 



Front. 



BEARD tJ WBECroRY OF MARQUKri'B COUNTY. .W 



SCOVILLE & JOHNSON, 

DBAIiBBB IN 

HARD'WARE 



EVSBSTT'S BLOCE, 

MARQUETTE, - MICHIGAN. 



r« 



d Superior, 
k and 4th. 
and 4th. 
th. 



th. 



Pocket and Table Ciitler7, Carpeoters, Blacksmiths and Ma- 

Shelf and Builders' Hardware, ehinist's Tools, 

Nails, Qlass and Bope, Quns, Bevolvers, 

Shovels, 7iclcs, Uattoclcs and Spades, Fowder and Shot, 
Hoes, Bakes and Forks, Fishing Tackle of all Descriptions, 

Scythes, Snathes and Stones, Wagon and Carriage Woodwork. 

Chilson's Brick and Portable Furnaces, 

Can give numerous references as to the superiority. 

HAND MTNII««. ^VMVS. 

Theae Pumps are extensively used througlioiit the u m-a, and where 

steam cannot be used are admirably adapted to tiie pi i.wi 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

T1M5 Copper and Sheet Iron Wm^r 



near 7tb. 
lingtuu. 

lear 3d. 



PLUMBING. GAS AND STEAM FITTING 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHKS. 

Chandeliers and Plumbing Material, Lead, G 
Pipe and Fittings. 

WOOD AND COAL HEATING AND COOKING 

C3::^ST0VES. 









if 



r)6 UEAItu's DIBEOIOHY OF MABQUETTK COUNTY 




JNTY. 



beabd's dibectoky of mabquettk county. 



r)7 



OR 



i in 



TING 



. & Treas. 



Jackson, Ed. Arch, E. of Front. 
Jackson, Henry, blacksmith, 6th, near Bluff. 
Jackson. A. M. laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Jackson, W. laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Jackson, H. M. dry goods, corner Front and Main. 
Jagger, Joseph, gunsmith, 4th, near Mich. 

James, , car|>enter, Washington, near 6th. 

Jammel, Joe, saloon, 4th, near Mich. 

Jenkins, C. S. clerk, at Peudill «fe Beatty's. 

Jenkins, Charles, R. mill, res. Arch, near Front. 

Jenkins, Charles, book-keeper, corner High and Mich. 

Jewell, Thomas, foreman R. mill, res. south of mill. Lake St. 

Job, Stephen, brakeman, corner Bluff and 7th. 

Job, Elijah, brakeman, corner Bluff and 7th. 

Johnson, Andrew, laborer, Washington, near 3d. 

Johnson, Alex, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Johnson, Andrew, laborer, corner 3d and Superior. 

Johnson, August, laborer, corner 3d and Superior. 

Johnson, Alex. laborer, boards Brown and De Rush. 

Johnson, Charles, laborer, corner Washington and 4th. 

Johnson, Casper, laborer, Washington and 3d. 

Johnson, C. bartender, Superior, near Front. 

Johnson, Charles, baker, Tibbets House. 

Johnson, Charles, laborer, corner 3d and Superior. 

Johnson, Chris, laborer, corner Washington and 3d. 

Johnson, D. laborer, bds. Brown & De Rush. 

Johnson, E. A. shoemaker, bds. T. P. Brimacombe. 

Johnson, Fred. M. hardware. Lake, near Northwestern. 

Johnson, John, carpenter, Washington, near 4th. 

Johnson, J. B. clerk, Genesee street. 

Jo nson, Henry, carpenter, 5th, near Superior. 

Johnson, O. C. moulder, Bluff, near 4th. 

Johnson, William, teamster, Bluff, near 7th. 

Johnson, Wm. clerk at Pendill & Beatty's. 

Johnson, Wm. iireman, Superior, near 6th. 

Jones, J. J. clerk, Ridge street. 

Jon^, Jacob, laborer, Superior, near Front. 



m 



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r)8 



BEAKIJ'S DIBECTOHY OF MABQUEITE COUNTY. 



Jones, John L. carpenter, Michigan HoUse. 
Jones, James, carpenter, Washington, near 7th. 
Jone.s, Mrs. M. Ridge, near Pine. 
Jones, W. T. clerk. National Hotel. 
Jory, John, Arch, east of Front. 

Jory, , painter. Front, near Arch. 

Joslin, G. W. carpenter, Arch, near Front 
Juthill, J. printer. Journal office. 

K 

KAHLANGE, John, carpenter. Ridge, near 3d. 
Kaiser, Michael, shoemaker, boards Washington House. 
Kaufraanu, A. jeweler, with Leib. 

Kiinun, Michael, boiler maker, boards Superior, near 3d. 
Kciin, Thomas, printer, boards Superior. 
Keeley, James, laborer, boards Naticnal Hotel. 
Kecley, Joseph, laborer, boards 4th, near Fisher. 
Keegun, Williuni, laborer, boards 4th, near Bluff. 
Keh lance, Casper, porter. Ridge, near 3d. 
Keif, George W. book keeper, Washington, near 4th. 
Kelling, Chris, limeburner, Genesee, near Lake. 
Kellog, Charles, clerk, boards Coles' House. 
Kelly, William, painter, boards Superior, near Front. 
Kelly, Janiv. , laborer, 3d, near Fisher. 

Kempc, Herman, cutler, with Levy & Co., res. Arch, near Front. 
Kempe, John, assistant yard master, boards Bluff, near 5th. 
Kempe, William, clerk. Bluff, near Front. 
Kemmel, William, laborer, Washington, near 5th. 
Kenk, Frank, laborer, boards Michigan House. 
Kendy, J. laborer, boards Central House. 
Kennedy, John, mason, boards Central House. 
Kern, John, telegraph operator for W. L. Witmore. 
Kern, John, foreman Merchandise Pier, res. Main street. 
Kibbce, James S. clerk, boards 3d, near Ridge. 
Kidder, A. agent Pittsburg and Lake Angeline and Edwards 
mine, boards Coles' House. 



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60 BKAUD'h DIBKCTOBY of MAHyUETTK COUNTY. 



DR. J. A. DESJARDINS, 



Plfsiciao 3il Sineii, 



Above Old Post Office Place, 



Front Street, ' UAEQUETTE, lUcli. 



jFtor Consultation, address 



P. O. BOX 203, 



Residence Cor. Third and Rock Sts. 



~. m i M i r »i» ■ »'.■■! i>.*»-*-^ 



:~^. ., ^ f u. . - , > i ^ ^i ^) i, m , 0t^<uti i 'ntr|n j rt )> ln i ^j t ilSi'»n ii . 



JNTY. 



MS, 



beard's uibbctory of mabqobttb county. 



61 



ace, 



Kilroy, Michael, laborer, boards Bluff, near Gth. 

King, Michael, shuemaker, Bluff, near 3d. 

King, John, laborer, Lake, near rolling mill. 

Kindlaw, James, proprietor Michigan House. 

Kirlin, John, laborer, Michigan House. 

Klunian, Carl, clerk, Spring, near Front. 

Kiueg, Heury, laborer, Washington, near fnh. 

Knightly, Robert, laborer, corner 3d and Superior. 

Knox, Thouiaa, plasterer, corner Lake and Superior. 

Koch, August, saloon. Front street. 

Kreger, Peter, stonecutter, 3d, near Washington. 

Krerjausen, James, corner 4th and Washington. 

Krumer, J proprietor Marquette House. 

Kuhlman, August, grocer, comer Washington and 3d. 

Kuhlraan, Gustav, clerk, corner Washington and 3d. 

Kuhlman & HotOp, grocers, corner Washington and Third- 



rS, Mich. 



ress 



sk Sts. 



LABATT, Joseph, explorer, Bluff, near Lake. 
La Dross, Antony, teamster. Bluff, near 4th. 
Lake Superior Iron Co. S. P. Ely, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Lake Superior Building Company. 

Lake, H. N. clei-k at Pendell & Beatty's. 

Lake Superior Powder Company, C. H. Call, Secy. 

Lamore, Lewis, carpenter, Washington, west of 7th. 
Lamar, Ed. machinist, Washington, near 4th. 
Lamson, James, laborer, boards Michigan House. 
Lang, John R. R, boards Washington, near 3d. 
Landrie, Charles, brakeman, corner 4th and Washington. 
Larson, John, laborer. Travellers' Home. 
Larson, 8. F. boarding house, Superior, near Front. 
Larson, Jacob E. tailor, boards corner Spring and 3d. 
Larasha, Joe, saloon. Front, near Superior. 
Larashiel, S. laborer, Fisher, near 4th. 
Lamed, Thomas H. agent Collins mine. Coles' House. 
Larry, Patrick, laborer, 3d, near Lake. 



imm^l^' 



iriWttiiWilttI' ■ -&'.Mrt»-aBiai^'iM». i i^ ' i , i. T i Wu -| . M > n. 



■liWli 111 



62 



beard's UIBKCTOIIY OF MABQUEIIE COUNTY. 



Lawler, John, brakeman, 4lh, near Wa«hingtou. 

Lawler, Patrick, brakemau, Kock, uear 6th, 

Lawton, ICd. lather, boards Michigan House. 

La Plant, i'eter, flagman, Bluff, near 5th. 

Ijapland, John, carjwnter, Washington, west of 7th, 

Laxsen, V. laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Leary, Thomas, laborer, Superior, near 3d. 

IjcFav jur, H corner Fourth and Washington. 

LeFdvour, Lucien, brakeman, corner 4th and Washington. 

Lehnen, Frederick, tinner, 4th, near R. R. 

Lenhald, Peter, furnaceman, WashingtciU, near 3d. 

lA'8i)erine, J. brakeman, corner 4th and Washington. 

Letorinfe-, Oscar, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Levy, I. M. & Co. merchant tailors and clothiers, Nationa' 

Bank Building and Cole's Block. 
Levy, S. M. res. Ridge, near Front. 
Levelet, C. laborer, Hampton, near rolling mill. 
Lewis, J. C. surveyor, Ridge, near 4th. 
Lewis, J. G. explorer, Washington, near 5th. 
Lewis, N. B. explorer, Washington, near 5th. 
Liberty, Godfrey, teamster, Washington, bet. Front and 3d. 
Libby, William D. carpenter, Washington, west of 7th. 
Lieb & Ritchie, saloon. Front street. 
Lissort, F. laborer, Ridge, near 4th. 
Lightfu«8, Charles, boards Vibbitt's House. 
Litchfield, Geo. T. brakeman, boards Franklin House. 
Lobdell, A. J. teamster, Washington, near 3d. 
Lobdell, S. B. carpenter, between Bluff and 3d. 
Lodge, George, laborer, boards Franklin House, 
Long, Hiram, tinner, Rock, near 3d. 
London, Charles, laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Longtime, Oliver, boarding house, Superior, near Front. 
Longtime, Ezra, laborer. Lake, near Furnace. 
Loork, Peter, laborer, boards at Brown & DeRush's. 
Lowe, William F shoemaker, Fisher, near 3d. 
Ludlam, J. L., M. H. & O. Land Office, boards N. W. Hotel. 
Luke, James, miner. Ridge, near water works. 



■^j. ^l^asH^/.^ ^ f^H^w fcWfl ffirtW )f as. - . 




OEAHD'h WIlECTOBY OF MABgUKlTE (BOUNTY. f)3 



EXCELSTOn 



imm pilfer 



FREEMAN & BRO., Prop's. 



CarriapsJlPsiSaiflle Horses 




TO LET AT REASONABLE RATES. 






FISHING PAMTIBS^O 



Supplied with Conveyances and Guides to the best Fish- 
ing Grounds. 



IVearly OppoNtte the 

First IVatlonal Bank, 



Marquette, Mich. 



fliSr Tourists visiting Marquette are \iuviteii to (•(ill 
anrl cxdrnine our stock, find cdti rest assured that 
their wants can be fully complied with at all hours. 



w 



inf i t mt i it i 111! n iri ' i ! '" ■■ i ''i«"" rnw iiMT-ii', 



fU HKAKD'h ItlUKcrroUY ok llAIiyUElTK COUNTY. 




HENRY L GAY ft CO. 






^>/' iifjoi'f firm, lof'itted in 



-.-^CITY OF MARQUETTE. 



HENRY L. GAY, 

90 Lasalle Street^ CHICAGO, III. 



4 




mi Ij^niMxnAUm 



-PRKPAREU FOR- 



Public Buildings, Churches, School Houses, Hotels, 
and Private Residences. 



OFFIC£, WATSON BLOCK, 

MARQUETTE, MICHIGAN 



■•|^^i.»n>iii;i.ffl^)W>jV'<,-nri»i^tga^^ - 



NTY. 



REARDR DIRECTORY OF MARQURTTE COUNTY. 



65 




TE. 



lIlMI^ 



ses, Hotels, 



liiiixltrom, (/harlea, proprietor 0(K»(Ioiiough Homo. 

Liitzio, H. O. prinUir, Uiiigc, near 4th. 

Lynn, Col. B. F. II. mining editor Mining Journal, bdti. Huinmit 

I lout e. 
Lyon, Faruhuni, proprietor North Western. 
LyoHK, H. I), car builder, Bridge, near Blaker. 

• 

M 

MACY, Joseph, laborer, Washington, near 7th. 
Macy, Tim. carpenter, Washington, near 7th. 
Macy, Jame.-*, brakcinaii. corner 4th and Bluff. 
ALickey, James, brakeman, corner 7th and Superior. 
MachtS, A. grocer, old P. O. block, res. corner Front and 

Fisher. 
Mfii^k, John, laborer, corner 4th and Fisher. 
Mack, John, contractor, corner Washington and Front. 
Maciway, Walter, brakeman, Washington, near 4th. 
Mdhan, W. A. engineer, Washington, near 6th. 
Maher, Iludias, lai)orer, Bluff, near 7th. 
Mahoii, William, furniture, Spruce. 
Mahon & Wyckoff. furniture. Masonic building. 
Mahony, John, laborer, corner Front and Spring. 
Main, Eph. laborer, Lake, near Bluff. 
Main, Madi.son, fireman, Luke, near Bluff. 

Maitlaud, Fred, book-keeper Mining Journal, bds. Summit Houae^ 
Malburg, William, teamster, Washington House. 
Mailman, A. J. clerk, Front street. 
Mallory, James, blacksmith, Superior, near 5th. 
Mallory, Pat. machinist, Superior, near 5th. 
Mancher, Louis, laborer, corner 3d and Washington. 
Mander, Andrew, butcher, corner 3d and Washington. 
Manhard, M. R. clerk, corner Front and Arch. 

Mapes, , attorney, Arch. 

Marey, Pat. laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Marine Boiler Works, D. H. Merritt, J. C. Morse & James 

Picands, Lake Street. 



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"■>)1!«T|#Sk»»-». . 



<\H 



UEABD's DUIECTOKY OF MAUyUETTE COUNTY. 



Marian, P. corner Fourth and Blutf. 

Marks, Aug. brewer, corner 3d and Spring. 

Marquette, Houghton & Ontonagon R. R.. D. H. Merritt, Bup't. 

Marquette, Houghton & Ontonagon R. R. Telegraph Line, D. H. 

Merritt, Superintendent. 
Marquette & Pai;ific Rolling Mill, Lake st. 
Marquette IVOn Co. I- C. Mor.-e, General Agent. 
Maiqueite Brown Stone Co. Sidney Adams, Managing 

Director. 
Marquette Coal Co- James Picands, Agent. 
Miiran, Ed. brakeman, corner 4th and Washington, 
"lartin, W. R. printer, National House 
Martin, Robert, clerk. Arch, near Spruce. 
Martin, Henry, First National Bank, Ridge, near Cedar. 
Marx, Aug. grocer, Fisher, near Front. 
Masters, Alex, brakeman, corner 4th and Washington. 
Mason, James, blacksmith, boards at Brown & DeRust's. 
Mathews, Thomas, brakeman, Washington, near 6th. 
Mailiews, Abe, explorer, 4th, near Ridge. 
Maxon, Natluvn, carpenter, Washington, near 7th. 

May, William, upholsterer, Washington, ner r 7th. 

Maynard, JUL. H. Manager Gas I^iglit Co. and Marquette 
Brown .S'ont" Co., Sec'y Huron Bay Slate and Iron Co. 
Office, over StHH'i>rd'8, res. Ridge. 

McAndrew, B. laborer, bds. Michigan House. 

McAndrew, Thomas, clerk, boards Bluff, near 3d. 

McAllum, John T. clerk. Arch street. 

McAllister, George, book-keeper, Spruce street. 

McArren, Tim, laboi-er, Superior, near Front. 

McBride, , saloon. Lake, near rolling mill. 

McConnell, D. A. clerk, Spruce street 

McConnell, Waither, farmer, corner Front and BluiT. 

McCarty, , carpenter, Washington, west of 7ta. 

McCarty, William, laborer, Hampton, near rolling mill. 

McCarty, John, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

McCarthy, John, printer, Journal office. 

McChesney, John, carpenter, corner Front and High. 



■\ fi ii ii^ fH ^i 'ift lihi^ S ^nhi ' 



p? 



I ^ W$ i MWSfiyt;#Mi#^f i gi'i» ' i . \r^^ ^ ^^^^^ 



■,iiT»yifira.Wai)M)^.,T 



M 



68 BEAKD'h DIKEClOliV OF MAUQUETTE t:OUNTY. 



WETMORE «c BRO 



DEAIiEBB IN- 



Staple and Fancy 



PRY OrOODS. 



GEOCERIES, PROVISIONS, 



WmJp imlM.^ 



Adams Blocks 



iij^mnOTfi, I., i., 



Goods Shipped on Order to any part 
of the County. 



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f-: 



w^mmmmmmmmiifm. 



NTY. 



BEAKD'h niRECTOBY OS MARQUETrK COUNTY. 



6i) 



RO. 



'■y 



■s, 



any part 



Mi'Cabe, Jr)hiu, blacksmith, Fisher, near Front. 
McCoraiick; William, fireman, Kock, near 3d. 
MoClaiii, Pat, brakeman, Michigan House. 

McComber Iron Co. Jay C. Morse, Agent. 

McDonald, Allen, carpenter, corner High and Mich. 

McDonald, William, carpenter, corner High and Mich. 

McDonald, John, engineer. Bluff, near 5th, 

McDonald, M. P. carpenter, Ridge, near water works. 

McDonuld, WilHara, laborer, Michigan House. 

McDonald, Murdict, carpenter, corner 6th and Wash. 

McFarland, John, Bluff, near 3d. 

McFariand, Charles, printer, Journal office. 

McGregor, H. C. Arch, east of Front, 

McGregor, Jason, asst. supt. P. R. R., res. Front, near Ridge. 

McGunn, John, Carpenter, 6th, near Bluff. 

MoGilbony, Malcolm, laborer, 5th, near Bluff. 

McGillimau, teamster, Bluff, near 4th. 

Mclnnes, Neil, laborer, corner High and Arch. 

Mcintosh, William, v!arj>enter, Bluff, near 4th. 

McKenzie, Heniy, hemlock bark extractor, Ridge street. 

McKinnon, Donald, laborer, 6th, near Wash. 

McKinnon, John, mill hand, 6th, near Wash. 

McKinnon, Neil, carpenter, 6th, near Wash. 

McKinnon, Alex carpenter, 6th, near Wash. 

McKinnon, Archibald, clerk, Gth, near Wa.sh. 

McKinley, Robert, exilorer, 4th near Ridge. 

McKov, Alex, laborer, .\ationai .House. 

McLui hlin, Henry, laborer, Fisher, near 5th. 

McLau^ Hn, T. laborer, corner Front and Spring. 

McLain, ma.son, corner Washington and 4th. 

McLain, i nry, weigher's office, Washington, west of 7th. 

McLain, Daniel, machinist, Washington, west of 7th. 

McMercer, James, boiler maker. 

McMaher, lime burner. Rock, near 4th. 

McNamara, T. ooarding house. Spring, near Front. 

McNamara, John J. carpenter, Michigan, near High. 

McNab, C. engineer, corner Washington and 6th. 



II 






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■>l1>'?r;- 



rgayS'Sil^isi.^^lija<ii>yaewiw-^.'^i.'as-- 



illS8S l ?yS>< ( Li>'' i ""i' i|> l • i | i nM| * "" ill'W t i 



'T^ 



70 



BEABD'h UIRECTOUY of MABQUEITE COUNTY. 



m 



McNulty, John, grocer, corner Front and Mich. 

McNulty, James, laborer, corner Front and Mich. 

McNulty, Mathew, laborer, Arch street. 

McPherson, Peter, laborer, Superior, near 4th. 

McPherson, Alexander, laborer, boards with J. W. Watson. 

McQuay, William, clerk, 3d, near Bluff. 

McRae, James, Bluff, near 6th. 

McRae, James, Jr. blacksmith. Bluff, near 6th. 

McRae, W. B. clerk. 

McVean, John, yardniaster, corner 3d and Wash. 

Meads, T. variety store. Front, near Superior, boards Cole's 

House. 
Meer, Mi laborer, corner Washini^ton and 6th. 
Megan, C. laborer, Bluff, near 5tU. 
Mehan, John, laborer. Arch. 
Melody, James, blacksmith, Superior, near 3d. 
Miller, N. brakeman, corner 4th and Washington. 
Merrett, William, laborer, Travellers' Home. 
Merrett, Alf. brakeman, corner 5th and Washington. 
Merrett, Frank, cierk at Pendill & Beatty's. 
Merrett, D. H. Superintendent M. H & O. R. R., res. corner 

Front and Ridge. 
Messe-, Joseph, Washington, near 7tb. 
Messer, Isaac, brakeman, Washington, near 7th. 
Meyer, Herman, tailor, Fisher, near Front. 
Michalowsky, Louis, dry goods, Superior, near Front. 
Michigan House, J. Kindlaw, proprietor. 
Miciile, Mitchel, carpenter, Washington, bet. 4th and 5tb. 
Miller, Robert, laborer, corner Washington and Fourth. 
Miller, Pat. plasterer, Clentral House. 
Miller, Fred, laborer, corner 3d and Washington. 
Mills, Henry, fiaheiman, Ridge, near water works. 
Miner, D. laborer, Hampton near 3d. 
MINING JOURNAL CO. 
Moffat, Cliem, laborer, Superior near 6th. 
Molleu, William, laborer. National House. 
MoUen, Michael, laborer. National House. 



V< 






;nty. 



IlEAKDH DIBEOTOBY OF MARQUETTE OOUNTY. 71 



SFECIUENS, CURIOSITIES, 



Watson. 



$'l#lil«i^ f ^elfle 



-ANI)- 



boarda Cole's 



on. 



R., res. corner 



>nt. 

md 5tb. 
'ourth. 



^v 



GENERAL MEROHAnOISE 



-AT- 




MEAD'S 




'Ws mm 



MUSEUM AND VARIETY 



s "ir o m j^ . 






,,i^,:imif 



lt:;ffyy?^"f*^'^" '■^■^''^ ■''^^^^'■''-'■■'^'lii^Pif'''^ f«,.;.w:..«j. 



72 HKAltn'H DIHECTOBY OK MABQUETTE COCNTY 




foo A 



House Furnishing Goods, 



OFFICE FURNITURE A SPECIALTY. 



Masonic Building, Front Street, 

MARQUETTE, MICHIGAN. 



■ ■■-•--' 'rPr"''^-t"'1gtf'^:"'^-~."' '''-,''^;'~^i^^^.'T^'*^^^ f^'-:. '"^ ^''i ? ^j ' i" ' . !^ . y* * ■^^- : 



DNTY. 



HKAUU'S DIRECTOUY OF MAUyUETrE COUNTY. 



73 



l. WYOKOPF. 



9i 



>. 



ALTY. 



IGAN. 



MINING JOURNAL, a firet-class 12-8heet paper, of large 
circulation. Subscription, $3.00 per year. A very superior 
iMlvertising medium. Main street. 

Modie, W. J. clerk, Washington, near Front. 

Mooie, T. H. barber, waiter Cole's House. 

Moore, Terancc, P. M. res. Superior, near Cathedral. 

Moore, Frank, carpenter, 6th, near Bluff. 

Moore, Frank, county clerk, 4th, near Bluff. 

Monui, M. laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Moran, John, moulder, corner 7th and Ridge. 

Moran, Mike, laborer, Superior, near Front 

Moran, E.l. laWtrer, Superior, near Front. 

Morgan, Philip, sup't water works, res. Hampton, near 3d. 

Mor<^an, John, puddler, Hampton, near School. 

Morgan, Thomas, carpenter, Superior, near 3d. 

Morgan Iron Co. S. P. Ely, Sec'y and Treasurer. 

Moriarty, Thomas, plumber, corner Fisher and 4th. 

Moriarty, Jivhn, painter, corner Fisher and 4th. 

Morri.son, Charles, shoemaker, corner 3d and Superior. 

iMorse, Mrs. M. E., Ridge, east of Front. 

Morse, J. C, agent McCumber Iron Co., Bluff, near 

Front. 
Mosher, Alex, laborer, Washington, bet. 3d and 4th. 
Mosher, James E. teamster, 3d, near Arch. 
Moussarr, Frank, carpenter, Superior, near 3d. 
Mowers, William, carpenter, corner Washington and 5lh. 
Moyer, Joseph, laborer, Superior, near 3d. 
Muland, Tl^omas, carpenter, corner 5th and Washington. 
Mulligan, Alvin, brakeman, Ridge, near 7th. 
Mulligan, Henry, carpenter. Ridge, near 7th. 
Munday, Sam. teamster, corner 4th and Bluff. 
Munroe, Benjamin, teamster, Fisher, near Front. 
Munroe, C. clerk at Pendill «fe Beatty's. 
Murdock, Henry, boiler maker, Lake, near Bluff. 
Murphy, Dan. clerk, boards at Summit House. 
Murphy, John, laborer. Ridge, near 3d. 
Murray, David, grocer. Ridge near Blaker. 



fflSi>*tJWyigf)'J>»c?i! | 



lpipP^|iJ3git.iifS^.^Sir>ss^^ 



iW t fe " 




74 beaiid'h DiREfrrouy of mauqukite county. 



Murray & Robbins, grocers, Wat«on block. 

Murray. Cyrille, laborer, 4th, near Bluff. 

Muriha, Put boarding house, Superior, near Front. 

N 

j^TAEHR, F. P. proprietor Summit House. 

■i-^ Nail, Sanford, fisherman, Bluff, near 4th. 

Neals, L. M blacksmith, bds. Brown A DeRush. 

Negengast, Fred, mason. Bluff, near Sth. 

Neidham, L. B. Lake, near Bluff. 

Neidhart, B. hardware, -?ront, near Superior, res. Washing- 
ton, near 4th, 
Nelson, James, Arch, east of Front. 
Nelson, Gust, miner, corner 6th and Bluff. 
Nelson, Peter, laborer, Washington, n<?ar 3d. 
Nelson, N. laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Nelson, Ole, laborer, Michigan House.. 
Newman, John, carpenter, Superior, near 3d. 
Nido, Peter, brakeman, Washington, near 7th, 
Nielson, James, wholesale cigars and liquors, Main, near Front. 
Nillson, John, laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Noble, H. W. foreman R. R., comer Washington and Third. 
Nobles, Henry, corner 4th and Bluff. 
Nonner, Andrew, laborer, corner 3d and Rock. 
Norman, Peter, laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Northrup, G. J. physician, Ridge, near Blaker. 
Norval, Freeman, Cole's House. 
Northwestern Hotel, Farnham Lyon, proprietor. 



1 



O 

OAK, George W. explorer. Keystone House. 
Oakes, James, blacksmith, corner 6th and BiuH". 
Oakes, Daniel, blacksmith, corner 6th and Bluff. 
O'Brien, John, teamster, Fisher, near 4th. 
O'Brien, William, laborer, Rock, near 5th. 



\^ 



r«*v- *j[V. v.^-t.aiWt'S vt^ i i w ri^ ■ i t t i ij j W I^ H ay m 



Tor-!tft« S '^;asg^l^^r-^f^'^tijg?ss^ i-^a - i'g 4 i^ 




D* 



MWM 



beard's directory op MARQUETTE COUNTY. 75 



« 4« m^mmm 



DXAIiKB IN 



FASHIONABLE 



iiiiEi Mm%% 



DRESS GOODS, 



f) 



OLO^EJS, 



9 



HAIR GOODS, 



Sto., Eto. 



t street, opposite Coles Moise, 



MARQUETTE, MICH 






MWrt .i. Hh' ii ^lI i fe'^Jl . ■'''»»^i .i Vwi i !^^i<a t i i'«' 'mr .^-3 ^, ni,^: „^ :SiV . f!'i : M:ai . lr . ifira > a^M i4 'n' i ii n i r ! ''gM»i'| i i i i| i, M ) |i. 



7G BEAUD'h DIUECrORY OF MAKQl'ErrE COUNTY. 



JOHN W. AMFHLBTT. 



J. B. QUILBAULT 



JOHN W. AMPHLETT &. CO., 



^WHOLKSaLK DKAl-KRS IN. 





fiOCR'I.Vtih.iM AJ^'i) OHIO 



STOl^E 





£ 



6- z; j1 ss a .yd s •/ ojvB 






"^t 



AND 



HAMW« YASES, 



553 JEFF'ER.SOIV A\ I^IVUK, 



Betroit, Ificli, 



OUNTY. 



BEAHliH DIKEOTOBY OP MABQUErrK i OUNTY. 



77 



]. QUILBAULT 



CO., 



'O 



O'Ony, Put. laborer, TrBvellere' Hume. 

()glenby, (ieorge A. gas htter, Spruce. 

* )'Hurtt, John, laborer, Travellers' Home. 

( )KeeHi', George, Justice of the Peace, Watson block, re«. corner 

4th and Huperior. 
O'Kief, M. laborer, Travellers' Home. 
O'Kief, Pat. proprietor Tavcllers' iloiue. 
Olcotl, H. Su|)erintendeut Co. Schools, res. coiner Front and 

Bind: 
Olds, Mortimer, res. water works.* 
O'Jveary, John, labor r, Washington, near 7th. 
Olesou, John, laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Oleson, Ole, laborer, corner BlufT and 3d, 
O'Mara, Pierce, laborer. Rock, near 5th. 
( )'Mara, M. laborer, TravellerH' Home. 
O'Niel, O. laborer, Hampton, near rolling mill. 
O'Neil, Hugh, deputy collector. Burst Bros.' building. 
O'Neil, Pat. laborer, Franklin House. 
N'Iseil, Mich, laborer, Superior, near 3d. 
O'Neil, Jerry, Franklin House. 

O'Neil, William, blacksmith, corner Ith and Washington. 
O'Neil, John, laborer. Bluff, near 5th. 
C'Neil, Mathew, blacksmith, corner Washington and 7th. 
Orschel, Herman, clerk, Ridge, near Front. 
Osborn, C. Y, manager Mining Journal, boards Cole's House. 
Osborne, Albert, telegraph operator, Washington, near 3d. 
Ondotte, John, boatkeeper, Lake, near Blurt". 
0\MtiH, George, proprietor Central House. 
Oxiian, W. B. cabinet maker, Washington, near 6th. 
Oxville, picture framer, Washington, near 6th. 



PAISLEY, , foreman R. R., Washington, bet. 3d and 4th. 
Palmer, J. Dwight, Northern Iron Company, Arch. 
Palmer, E. B. civil engineer, Ridge, near 3d. 
Palmer, Leander, Arch, east of Front. 



'■|f9 



78 



nKAUn'H DIUKCIOBV OF MARQl'KTIK COUNTY. 



Parker, JaiiieH, fiHherniuii, Lake, near Superior. 

ParkH & Ilayden, attomcyH, over Staffbrd'ii. 

ParkH, W. H. attorney, Aroh Htreet. 

Paro, Angoiiiie, laundretM, Michigan, ea«l of Front. 

Parry, John, brakenian, 4th, near Bluff. 

Patneau, Tim. laborer, 4th, near Uock. 

Patternon, J. H. clerk, Cedar. 

Pattenion, W. foundry, Arch. 

Patterson, William, explorer, Keystone Houne. 

Patterson, C i«hoemaker, boardH at T. P Briinacouibe's. 

Payette, H. laborer, corner 4th and BluB". 

Pearnon, A. laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Prick, , clerk, boards Tremont House. 

Pecket, (J. NV. carpenter, Keystone House. 
Pelliser, Ame de, brakeman, corner 4th and BluH". 

Pendergart, , painter, r)th, near Bluff. 

Fendill & Beatty, general st re, Superior, near Front. 

Pengelly, William, laborer, Bluff, near 6th, 

Peninsular House, Charles Khet, proprietor. 

Peterson, Nelson, boarding house, Fisher, near 3d. 

Peterson, M. laborer, corner 3d aad Superior. 

Peterson, W. carpenter, Keystone House. 

Phelan, John, Bluff, near 4th. 

Philip, J. W. laborer, Franklin House. 

PicandS, JaS. & Co. heavy hardware, corner Superior aud 

Lake. 
Picands, James, hardware, res. corner Bluff aud Front 
Picands, J. D., Arch, east of Front. 

Pierce, George, moulder, Lake, near Bluff. * 

Pine, William, explorer, 3d, near Washington. 
Pine, John, brakeman. 3d, near Washington. 
Place, Hiram, brakeman, Bluff, near 6th. 
Place, William, laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Plumb, Charles, laborer, Franklin House. 
Pomeroy, Charles, fireman, corner 5th and Washington, 
Potter, Henry, tailor, Washington, near 3d. 
Porter, John, grocer, Washington, near 7th. 






,,i',jpj : '; ' .t.',ii|y t :'is:gjjWjtt;i i jiW'Vi'^ ^ ^ 




ukaud'h uiitKcrrouv ok XAugiKrrK colnty. 71I 



lY. 



:)e ». 



Front. 



ton. 



SIIDO.OIMJ.OOO. 

f£T£B WttlTE, 

/^'O /.' A Z /. 7///[' UK/, /A /i A/T 

FIRiE, lAMKiE AKIO LIFE 



j;v /'///!; i'VOULix 



Tlie Liverpool, Ijondon anti Giube limuiuiice dmiDHnieH. 

A-^els . -.- 818,r)0(),(K)(» 

The Detroit Fire luul Marine ln8nran<'c ('onipanv, of Detroit, 

Mich. 

Assets - 827(),()(M) 

The Tiiiveler's Ijil'e tiiid Accident Insurance Company of Hart- 
ford, (.y'onn. 

Assets - «l,r)0(),0()0 

The Pha-nix Insurance Company, of Hartford, Conn. 

Assets - $1,800,000 

The Home Insurance Company of New York. 

Assets 8r),(M)0,000 

The North British and Mercantile Inusuriince Conif>any. 

Capital (m jrold) «10,000",000 

The Underwriter's Agency of New York. 

Assets --.$4,000,000 

The /Etna Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

AsHets $6,000,000 

The Insurance Company of North America, of Philadelphia. 

Assets .--' -$8,000,000 

The Hartford Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

Assets , - $2,600,000 

fhe Connecticut Mutual Life Ins. Company of Hartford, Conn 

Assets -. -. - .--_"-._ $80,000,000 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York. 

Assets -.- $40,000,000 

The Universal Life Insurance C-»mpany of New York. 
Assets - -. $800,000 



»*«=-'- -...-SfeloL-ifcl'S'-H-V -.I't^-iS-^y: .V'-V-rt' -i-T--'-.- 



■m- 






4i;»f-.u- ■. ^s>i-<*'-"'^- *■•"'- '■'«*«''.-.«*■■ 




^. .^ !^■ V .■.^il l l». '^ . w , ^ ^ l l'i^i^^^^^l.■^ ^^^ . fa.■. .^ f *i - J^'.^,S-^''-.\:^ii:.^-^':'li:^i^s£^ 




So UI-.AHD's UIHECTOBY of MABQUEITE COUNTY. 



INCOBIOEATED TODEE THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF MICHKJAN. 



Authorized CaBital, $500,000. Capital m in, $200,000. 



ti 



^^ V 



HmMMnM%W^^^ 






'^^> 



MARQUETTE, MICH. 

TRANSACT A OKNERAL 

Banking and Exchange Business. 



-OFFU'KRS- 



AMBROSE CAMPBELL, Pre«'t. J. M- WILKINSON, CashT. 

EDWARD BRKITUNG, Vice PreH't. FRED. M. STEELE, A«('t " 



PARTICULAR AHENTION GIVEN TO COLLECTIONS, 

Aud proceetls promptly remitted at the current rates of exchange, 
on day of payment. 

}re sett "Passage Tickets to and from the Old Country 
by the fikivorite Lines. 

-ALSO- 

Brafb m AM Farts of tlhe WorW, 

A T I'HB LO WMST "RA TES. 



J>i ^ <^ tfj«aj tB ' r-J- ^te flfcv^^*^.^ ' 



ttta 



*'**^« 




UNTY. 



OF UICHI&AN. 



in, $200,000. 



BBABd's DIBEOTOBY of MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



81 



usiness. 



KINHON, Cash'r. 
STEELE, Asi't " 



lUECTIONS, 

ites of exchange, 
Old Ctuntry 



Porter, John, fruits, etc., Front, near Arch. 

}Vst, John, 4th, near Bluff. 

Powell, Edmund, Arch, near Cedar. 

Powell, Edmund, jr. laborer, Cedar, near Arch. 

Pratt, James, laborer, boards at Brown & DeRush's. 

Prentis, Allen, carpenter, Rock, near 3d. 

Preston & Moore, barbers, corner Front and Superior. 

PrestODt E. A. millinery, Fr'-'it. near Washington. 

Pretiton, G., barber, National Ht^cel. 

Price, Joseph, carpenter, 7th, near Rock. 

FriniBaU, J. H. city recorder, res. Superior, bet. 3d and 4th. 

Priraeau, Antoine, Bluff, near Front. 

Frimeau, Peter, clerk. Bluff, near Front. 

Probert, John, brakeman, Michigan House. 

Prouls, A. clerk, Superior, near 4th. 

Proulx, Albert, clerk, Superior, near Court House. 

Pryor, Pat. boiler maker. Lake, near Bluff. 

Pynn, Arnold, switchman, Washington, near 7th, 

Pynn, George, switchman, Washington, near 7th. 

Q 

QUARTER, John, Rock, near 3d. 
Quinn, Henry, shoemaker, Superior, near 3d. 
(^uinn, Pat. laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Quinn, Ed., Genesee, near 3d. 
Quinn, I., Genesee, near 3d, 

R 

RAGUSETT, Henry, laborer, cor. Fourth and Washington. 
Rahn, Andrew, laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Rahn, Peter, laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Rahn, Carl, proprietor Peninsular House. 

Ralph, , saloon, Lake, near rolling mill. 

Raron, John, laborer, coroer Spring and Front. 
Rayl, J. painter, corner 7tb and Washington. 
Reed, Geo. W. livery, Superior, near Front. 



"*«»Mj«Mlt^^-i*»aif.t;^J.>4 



,^iS>-Jf..,i^^ m^ f^ 1« 



i.,,uisa-u,jsm«i^^- 



82 



HEAUD's DIKECTORY of MAaQDETTE COUNTY. 



Ueediiiger, Julin, stock dealer, comer Front and Superior. 

Reediiiger, L., meat market, curner Front and Superior. 

lieoc, O. M. engineer, corner Gtii and Wasliington. 

Regan, John, laborer, Michigan House. 

Reid, F T. b<)ards with E. B Palni<?r. 

Reiley, F. laborer, corner 8p and Front. 

Republic Iron Co.. S. F i^^iy, Secretary and Trea'^urer, 

SujK'rior street. 
Rese, .Voseph, ship carpenter, Superior, near oti>. 
Re.se, Alexander, ship carpenter, Superior, near 5th. 
Reynolds, Michae!, laborer, Superior, near Front. 
Rheinhardt, Fred, laborer. Ri^ck, near Froiit. 
Rhodes, Henry C foreuiau R. R. dock, boai'd.'j Tremont House. 
Rice, W. 8. carpenter. Keystone Hoitso. 
Rice, Rev Father, res. rear Cathedral. 
Richards, E<1. engiiK-^r, Michigan, near Cedar. 
Richards, Jerry, shoemaker, opp<xsitc M. H. & (.). R. R. 
Richmond, James, sexton, ?'di, north of Ridge. 
Richter, (Jharles, saloon, res. Front, near Rock. 
Rickels, George, wfitchiiian. Rock, near 3d. 
RiddfcU. J. F. carpenter,, Front, Jiear Arch. 
Rikey, John, laborer, fttichigan House. 

Ripka, A. A . general freight and shipping agent M. H. & O. R. R. 
Kisdon. E. B. saloon, Washington, near 4th. 
ilisdon Bros. lunch house, Superior, near Front. 
Ris. on, Ed. corner 4th and Fisher. 
Risdon, Dau. corner 4th and Fisher. 

Risdon, , bartender. North Wcstrrn. 

ROBBIES, B. P. grocer, res. Arch. ,, 

Robinson, Alt', cwptain tug Dudley, res. cor. Waahington and 3d. 

Robinson, Thomas, .ship carpenter, fiuptsrior, near 7th. 

Rock, Samuel, laborer, boards at Brown »fe DeRush's. 

Roe, John, tailor, Spring, near 3d. 

Rogers, R. H. fish, fruits, etc., Cole's block,, res. corner l?r,int 

and Fishei*. 
Rogers, N. W machinist, Washington, near 7th. 
RobI, Charles, proprietor Peniiisular House. 



mmamiisismwamsusamm 



84 beard's DIllECTOBY OF MABQUETTE COUNTY. 



'D 



a;K^ 



LAKE flEW MO" 



THIS li^ A NEW AND 



FIKSf CLASS HOUSIE, 



And the most Convenient jar 



Lake Superior Tourists. 



FiR/OlsTT STI^JUET 



MARQU£TT£, MICH 



'■'t s iS ^-Z '-^Kt i ' A r— - "-^i:-■^Jrr: ^L ^ i^^ ^;^ tel'. '■ ■«,^ T■ y l ay' !? Jv :;^^ '.-.z.t: ~~ - ^- , j.v;^»^'.-r2*|rt=iij f,^«^»»ftfe«B*i^)(feSfe«*afe^^ 



mmm 



UNTY. 



BEAKD's DIBECTOBX OF MARQUEITE COUNTY. 



85 



>IJSE. 



Rollin, R. P. laborer, corner 3d and Superior. 
Konau, Thoina.s, laborer, Hampton, near rolling mill. 
Rouey, James, helper, corner Superior and 5th. 
Root, Mrs. E. A. widow, Blutf, near 5th. 
Rothschild, David, wines, etc., Ridge, near Front. 
Rose, James, stonecutter, Superior, near 3d. 
Rose, Samuel, stonecutter, Superior, near 3d. 
Rouse, Waiter, laborer. Spring, near Front. 
Row, John, tailor, Blufi" near 4th. 
Rowe, E. carpsjnter, Hampton, near School. 

Ruddle, , plasterer, 3d, near Bluff. 

Kuuquest, Otto, laborer, corner Superior and 3d. 
Ri^h, M. puddler. Lake, near roiling mill, 
Riislii.'igton, S. laborer, Ith, near Rock. 
Kiitlierf'ord, — — , porter at North Western Hotel. 






irists. 



EO? 



S 



SADLER, Anton, plasterer, 3d, near Bluff. 
Sageur, Morriy, weigher, Su|)erior, near 5th. 
Salter. Ed. laborer, Washington, near 7th. 
Sung, David, sieamboat owner, Superior, near 4th. 
Sang, James, carpenter, Superior, near 4th. 
Saunders, Charles, laborer, boards at Brown & DeRu-th's. 
Scher, Joseph, laborer, corner 4th and Bluif. 
Schloon, Mathew, laborer, Washington, uear 3d. 
Schott, Fred, clothing, res. cor. 3d and Bluff 
Schott, N. corner 3d and Bluff 
Schott & Co., clothiers. National Bank building. 
Schott, John, carpenter, 6th, near Bluff. 
Schrosky, E laborer. National Hotel. 
Schuin, J. M. foreman, corner Washington and 3d. 
Schultz, Peter, brakeman, corner 4th and Michigan. 
Schultz, William, laborer, Washington, near 3d. 
Sehnandt, John, moulder, Ridge, near 7th. 
Schvenfikfa, Henry, carpenter, Washington, between 4th and 5th. 
Schwartz, John, laborer, Rock, near 3d. 



•td^f^uMtitiliiia^^Ji^-^-^^-- ''- 



86 



BEAKD'h UIBEOrOKY OF MARQUEITE COtTNTY. 



Schwurtzby, John, laborer, corner 3d and Genesee. 

ScOVille & Johnson, hardware and gasfitting, Everett block. 

Hcoville, David 8. hardware, Front, near Bluff. 

Seach, Wni. carpenter, Superior, near 3d. 

Seach, John, plumber, Superior, near 3d. 

Seager, James, general land pgent, Adams' block, res. Bluff, near 

Front. 
Seageru, Charles, moulder, Michigan House. 
Selander, John, laborer, Suj)erior, near Front. 
S<nnett, John, carpenter. Bluff, near 5th. 
Seymour, William, mason, Washington, near 7th. 
Shabel, Henry, mason, 7th, near Bluff. 
Shabel, Joseph, printer, 7th, near Bluff. 
Shabel, John, mason, 7th, near Bluff. 
Shabel, John, jr. mason, 7th, near Bluff. 
Shambs, David, carpenter, Washington, near 7th. 
Shanor. John, carpenter, Bluff, near Front. 
Shanteleau, Felix, carpenter, Washington, iieai 7th. 
Shave, Henry, laborer. Bluff, near 7th. 
Shaw, A. C, grocer, Washington, near 4th. 
Shed«rick, John, plasterer, Superior, near 3d. 
Shetfif !d, Myley, mason, Superior, near 3d. 
Sheldon, Ti. H- chief engineer S. St. M. & M. R. R., Adams' 

block, res ilidge, near Cedar. 
Shepard, E. M liiit(i)iilli''l, 3d, near Bluff. 
Shine, Harry, llliliur, 3d, near Main. 
Shorty, Aug. brakemnn, Bluf.', near 4th. 
Shatboneau, 1. laboi' i, Washington, near 7th. 
Shuron, Peter, jeweler, Supciior, near 3d. 
Sick, William, laborer. Front, near Spring. V 

Siegel & Basset', proprietors National Hotel. 

Seitz, , cook at North Western. 

Siller, Louis, laborer, Franklin Hou.se. 
Simpson, W^illiam H. carpenter, 3d, near Washington. 
Simpson, Henry, carpenter. Keystone House. 
Slocum, W. W carpenter, Washington, near 7th. 
Slyfield, Andrew, engineer, Washington, near 5th. 



■■i'-ift"n^ijii<iWMrifa'i"i'i'MMl(^iM"i 



88 beabd's dibectoby op mabquette county. 



REPUBLIC 



Iron Company* 



Dealers in Iron Ore, and Proprietors of the 




In Township 46, Range 29, 



And of various other Iron Locations iu Marquette County. 



President, JONATHAN WARNER, Mineral Ridge, Ohio. 
Vice President, EDWARD BREITUNG, Negaunee, Mich. 
Secretary and Treasurer, SAMUEL P. ELY, Marquette, Mich. 



" j- " : '.■.. ' m j-^' m ama^ g g f ^ ^ fgi 



INTY. 



uKAiiDH tmiwrrouY of MAiiyiirrri'. county. 



89 



,NY. 



the 



tte County. 



Ridge, Ohio. 
;aunee, Mich, 
•quette, Mich. 



Small, E. L. I'lcrk at i'Jorth WcHteni. 

Sniiillcy, R. carpenter, Michij;aii House. 

Siiiitli, Autr. latjorcr, corner Micliiffan and 4th. 

Smith, ("harles, jiorter, corner Arch aixl 4tli. 

Smitli, MrH. D. I)., doctress, Blurt", near F\ont. 

Smith, J. I) , teleirraph operator, American Expre.S8 ottice. 

Smith, Sohastiiin, saloon, Ham|)ton, near -'id. 

Smitli, 'I'hdinas, clerk. Rock, near 3d. 

Smith, Thomas, i)' cksiiiith, 8n[)erior, near 3d. 

Smitli, Tlionias, tinisher, Ilock, near .3d. 

Smith, W'm. lahorer, Wa-shington, between 4lh and 5th. 

Smith, W. A. carpenter, corner Ridge and 4th. 

Smith, William, hihorer, MichigiMi House. 

Smith, Williaii), shoemaker, HluH", near 3d. 

Smith, Win. A. builder, Superior, opposite jail. 

SoihI, (Jeorge, laborer, Washington, near 6th. 

Sdiel, John, laborer. Ridge, near 6th. 

S,,\vast, (Jeorge, brakeman, Washington, near 7th. 

Sdwast, Thoman, laborer, Washington, near 7th. 

Sparrow, .John, blacksmith. Keystone House. 

SpaiiDw, Richard, mason, Washington, near Front. 

SpauKling, John, s[)"culator, corner Ridge and 3d. 

Spear, J. W. forwarding, Bluff', near Front. 

Spear, F. B. ev 'iimission merchant, Blaker, near Ridge. 

Spear, F. B. A Co , iorvvarding and commission, steamboat agentfe, 

Lake, near Superior. 
Sjieiicer, Leroy, saddler. Front street. 
Spencer, L. M. harness, Front, near Michigan. 
Spencer, Ripley, marble cutter, 3d, near Washington. 
Spetzlei, John, laborer, corner 3d and Wushington. 
Stafford, H. H. druggist, Adams' block, res. corner Blaker 

and Ridge. 
Stake, John, laborer. 4th, near Michigan. 
Stanley, Alt', blacksmith, Wa,shington, near 4th- 
Steed, George, carpenter, corner 5th and Michigan. 
Steele, Andrew, engineer, Fisher, near 4th. 
Steele, Fred. M. asst. cashier City Bank, res. Ridge, near Cedar. 



.'■,'ytsci^A-' '" *'ifi'*'«, -»-■ 



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!)t) 



HK.VKDS DlUEcrrollY OF MAUyUKlTE COUNTY. 



Steywiller, L. jeweler, Front, near Cole's House, boards Cole's 

Iloiwe. 
Sleinbaeh, Peter, clerk ut Pendill A Beatty's. 
Stewart, T. J. ( arpentor, Superior, near .3d. 
Stevens, Williiiin, clerk with Pi'iniill & Realty. 
Stevens, John, puddler. Hampton, near School. 
St. Luiiit*, E. laborer, Ridge, near 4th. 
Stone, Win. E. clerk, boards Cole'n Huu.se. 

Stonland. , mason, Superior, near Front. 

Stowe, L. J. book-keeper, boariLs Suniinit House. 

Strange, J. res. Bluff, near 5th. 

Stratton, Clark, sup't Carp, furnace, res. corner Washington and 

Front. 
Strong, S. A. l.'iborer, Bluff, near 5th. 

Stuck, C. T. architect, Watson bhick, 0th, near Western. 
Styles, John, plasterer. Central House. 
Slyli's, Jarne.s M. explorer, WHshington, near 5th. 
vSuilivun, John I', laborer, Fishe:-, near 4tti. 
Sullivan, I'ul. lal>()rer, Superior, near ;kl. 
Sullivan, Hugh, laborer, Superior, near 3d 
Sullivan, Levi, laborer, Sujierior, near Front. 
Sullivan, Con. laborer, Franklin House. 
Sullivan, Daniel, laborer. High street. 
Sullivan, James, laborer, Washington, near 7th. 
Sullivan, Thomas, carpenter. Ridge, near 7th. 
Sullivan, Pat. laborer. Ridge near 7th. 
Sullivan, .John, telegraph operator, Bluff, near 6th. 
Sullivan, John, laborer, corner 3d and Hampton. 
Sujierior House, M. Johnson, proprietor. 
Surrey, George, laborer, Washington, between 5th and 6tj). 
Sutherland, William, laborer, corner High and Michigan. 
Sutton, David, carpenter, Washington, between 5th and 6th. 
Swansiin, G. laborer, corner 8d and Superior. 
Swinneford, A. P, ed. Mining Journal, bds North Western. 
Swift, Eugene A., carpenter, Superior, near 5th. 
Sweeney, James, pressman, Washington street. 
Sweitzer, L. boarding house, corner Front and Spring. 







JUNTY. 



e, boards Cole's 



BRA:U).S DIUIXTOnY ok MAHQI'KTTK CoI'VTY. 91 



CHAMPION 





e. 



Washington and 

h, near Western. 
th. 



6th. 
II. 

5th and Gtll. 
Michigan. 
I 5th and 6th. 

8 Nortli Western 



■spring. 



DEALERS IN IRON ORES, 



FROM THEIR 



Champioin. Mine, 

A T CHAMPION. MARQUl TTE 00. . 



CHN I'AININa DKCOSIT.S OK BOTH 



:viAGNETIO I 8FJECULAK (DIES, 

or GREAT PTJRIT7, 
And Proprieiors of other Iron Locations in that vicinity, 




'/Jostb», Mass, 
Marquette, Mich. 




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)UNTY. 



UEAIID's mURCTOKY OF MAKQUETTK COUNTY. 



i)3 



laf^ 



\^ 



:)hio. 

, Cleveland, 0. 
Mich. 



T 

TACH, Frank, marhinist, VVashinf»ton, near Ttii. 
Tuft, H. iS. phyfiician, over Stattiml's, r. Wash, near Front. 
Tait, H. F. pliysician, Spi iig, near F"ri)nt. 
'i^iU'cr, (iiilt^.n, lilacksniitli, \Va.sliinj,'t(in. near 4lb. 
TiiyKir, J. F. eli-rk, ;iil near Washington. 
'I'liylor, A. B. houk-kecper, Lake, near Superior, 
Taylor, .John, carpenter, Superior, near -id. 
Taylor, H. C. corner Washington and 3d. 
Teuney, Will, machini.st, .'M, near Blnfl". 
rilson, Janief, carpenter, .Spring, near Front, 
riieiender, Oscar, laborer, corner .'5d and Superior. 
riiiell, Alex. C. yardmaster M. O. & H. R. R. 4th, near Ridge. 
Tlionia.s, Henry, laborer, Michigan House. 
Tlionip.son, H. 8. P.-of. music, S|)ruce, near Arcl>. 

Tlioin[)8on, . Carpenter, 5th, near Bluff. 

Tliomp.«on, Geo. carpenter. Spring, near Front. 
Tiiliin, John, clerk, Superior, near 4th. 
Tiiliy, Wni. upholsterer, Washington, near 7th. 
Todd, Robt. R carpenter, 3d, near Bluff. 
Toner, Thomas, engineer, 4th, near R. R. 
Tony, John, mason, 3d, near Bluff. 
Tony, Mike, mason, Superior, near 4th. 
Torrence, Samuel, laborer. Lake, near rolling mill. 
Tiidi, L laborer, Hamj)ton, near rolling mill. 
rurbcr, Frank, laborer, Washington, near 3d. 
Travense, Thos, laborer, Bluff, near 3d. 
Travense, Rich. R. R office. Bluff, near 3d. 
Travense, Mat. blacksmith, Bluff, near 3d. 
Tremont House, H. H. Hunt, prop. Superior. 
Truthevy, J. K. painter, Ridge, near -Jth. 
Tretlievy, Geo. moulder, Ridge, near 4th. 
Trethevy, John, carpenter, Ridge, near 4th. 
Trim, Chas. blacksmith, Washington,, near 7th. 

Tionibly, , laborer, cornc- 4th and Blisfl'. 

Tiiukey, Felix, Rock, near 4th. 



T"^ 




94 



beahdV dihectoby of mabquettr county. 



Trudean, Ami. brakeman, uoriier 4tli and Bluff. 
Treloar, Thos. polioeman, Superior, near 4th. 
Treloar, Wm. boiler uiuker, Superior, near 4th. 

u 

ULUICH, Chas. hiUoror, Bluff, uear oth. 
Upstrum, Alfreii, laborer, Bluff, near .')th. 
Uren, Phillip, biat■k^4mith, 3(J, near Bluff. 

V 

VALE, John, laborer, Fisher, near 4th. 
Van Iderstine, John J. niaebinist, Mich. St. 
Vim Iderstine, Clias. carpenter, Ridge, near 4th. 
Van Iderstine, J. P. ear|)euter, 5th, near Bluff. 
Van Ness, ,Jas. Ridge, near 4th. 
Varinaun, A. laborer, corner .3<1 and Superior. 
V^eneau, T. brakeman, corner 4th and Wash. 
Verron, F. D. car|)enter, corner Fisher and Front. 
Vierling, Martin, Cleveland House. 
Vose, Robert, laborer, Bluff, near 5th. 

w 

WAGNER, Herman, laborer, Frout, near Spring. 
Wagner, Geo. builder, Front, near Washington. '' 

Walker, Chnrles, carpenter, 4th, near Front. 
Walker, Francis, carpenter, Sujjerior, near 3d. 
Walker, Richard, plm.terer, Su perior, near Front. 
Waltz, Samuel, mason, Bluff, near 6th. 
Wallace, Morris, laborer, corner 3(1 and Superior. 
Ward & Webb, musical merchandise, Washington, opp. 

Coles House. 
Ward. Connell, Summit House. 

Ward, JnO. E. real estate and mining lands, bds. N. West'n. 
Warner, Peter, boarding house, Front street. 
Warner, Chas. painter, Bluff, near 5th. 



* ", u4^-^ i I 



BKAIID'8 UIKEtTOUY OF MAltgUETl'E c:oUNTV. Uf) 



GhMYWil^MB 








r)Ej^rjE:E?.s iisr 



fciiat p)i0i mti^ 



<*>- ^ 



WBOM THEIR MINEH 



AT 1SHPEMINQ» 



MJCIIIGAJV. 



President and TreuHurer, SAM. L, MATHER, Cleveland, O. 
Vice President, JOHN OUTHVVAITE, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Secretary, FRED A. MOORE, Cleveland, Ohio. 
General Agent, JAY C. MORSE, Marquette, Michigan." 



Ml KK.AiiD's i)ii:i;(T(iuy (H' MAiuM'i'rrJ" coi'nty. 



WASlJl'MlTifOI 




\ ^^^.^j^# 



til SiWiWi.! 






Tliis Company miii, ami soil tlieir well-known, excellent 



[agnetiic and Specular 





FROM TUKIK MINKS IN 



TOW.USEIP 47 NOSTH, SANSE 27 WEST, NEAE HUMBOLT, 



MAEQUETTE COUNTY. 



President, . SEPH S. FAY, Boston, Mas.' 

Vice President, EDWARD BREITUNG, Negaunee, Mioli. 

Secretary and Treas., SAMUEL P. ELY, Marquette, Mich. 



H m^MM^^& i ^^'^i''MM 



JUNTY. 



UKAUU'h JiIRECTOBY of MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



97 






, HUMBOLT, 



.uiiee, Mich, 
quette, Mich. 



Wiirg, Peter, helper, Bluff, near Lake. 

Washington Iron Co., s. P. Ely, pres't. 

Washington House, Trai Trudrek, prop. 

Washer, Cha.s. clerk, \Va.shiugtoii, bet. 6th and 7th. 

Watson, E. M. Lake street, nenr Furnace. 

Watson, Geo. Lake, near Furnace. 

Watson, J. W. Lake, near Furnace. 

Watson, J. W. & Sen, general merchandize, Watson Bl'k. 

Walts, Thos. laborer, V ash -igvon, near 4th. 

Webb, James, machinist, \V lington near 6ch. 

Weber, B. clerk, at Pendell . Beatty's, Wash, south of 7th. 

Weiss, Henry, bartender, Sunanit House. 

Welch, Pat, laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Westkkc & Brown, general store. Front, opp. Coles Honse. 

Westlake, A. S. Washington, bet. 3d and 4th. 

Wertman, M. laborer. Superior, near Front. 

Wetmore, W, L Pres't M. &S. St. M. & M. R R. Prop. 
M. & M. Tel. Line. Pres't Munissing Co Pres't Huron 
Bay Slate and Iron Co. Pres't Huron Bny Iron and Slate 
Co. General Manager N. Y. Iron Mine. Office Adams 
Block. 

Wetmore, F. P. res. Ridge street, near Cedar. 

Wetmore & Bro., dry goods, Front street. 

Wetmore, L. Arch, east of Front. 

Wetmore, R. C. clerk, bds. with F. P. Wetmore. 

Werner, Jno. plasterer, Washington, near 3d. 

Weston, Robert, carpenter, Washington, near 5th. 

Wheaton. W. W. Treasurer and General Agent Beecher 
Furnace and Marquette Rolling Mill. 

Wheatley, Jas. laborer, Ridge, near Front. 

Wheeler, Frank, carpenter, Blufl", near Front. 

White, Peter, Pres't Ist Nat. Bank, Ridge, near Cedar. 

White, Mrs. M. widow, .3d, near Bluff. 

White, Ripley, printer, 5th near Bluff. 

White, George, laborer. Traveler's Home. 

White, Martin, laborer. Front, near Spring. 
Whiting, I. policeman, Washington, near 4th. 






'.>8 BEAUD'h DIBECTOUY op MABQUE'lTE COUNTY. 

Whitlaw, J. M. book-keeper, bds. Northwestern. 

Whies, J. W. laborer, National Hotel. 

Whitley, Jaa sup't dock. Bluff, near 4th. 

Whitman, L. Arch, east of Front. 

Willman, Dietrich, laborer. Rock, near 5th. 

Williams, Tho8. laborer, Michigan House. 

Williams, Geo. laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Williams, Jno. J. Sup't of Slate Quarries. 

Williams, J. H. miner, 4th, near Mich. 

Williams, John, surveyor, 4th, near Mich. 

Williams. E. P. book-keeper, Front, near Wash. 

Wilson, George, weigh office, Washington, near 7th. 

Wilson. Booker, porter, Tremont House. 

Wilson, Wm. tel. op., 7th, near Ridge. 

Wilkes, Geo. section boss, Superior, near 3(1. 

Wilkes, Dan. laborer, Superior, near Front. 

Wilkes, 8. engineer. Bluff, near 5th. 

Wilkinson, J. M. cashier Citizen's Bank, bds. Lake street. 

Willis, Thos, blacksmith, Lake, near rolling mill. 

Winkle, Fred, mason, Lake st-eet. 

Wood, Z. brakeman, Washiii,-' i, west of 7th. 

Worts, Dan, blacksmith, Keystone House. 

Worth, Chas. tailor, rear Cath. church. 

Wote, Fred, laborer, corner 3d and Arch. 

Wright, J. H. carpenter, 4th, near Mich. 

Wright. Wm. carpenter, Superior, near 3d. 

Wright, C. E. iron expert, Adams Block. 

Wyckoff, J. W. sash and blind manufacturer Wash, near Fronf 

Wyckoff, Clark, book-keeper, Washington, near Third. 

Wyckoff, Wm. overseer, Washington, near 3d. 

Wyckoff, Fay, Arch, east of Front. 

Y 

■YTOUNG, A. M. engineer, 3d, near Bluff. 
■■• Young, Jas. W. laborer, 3(1, near Bluff. 
Young, Thomas, plumber, Lake, near rolling mill. 






-y*^. 




beard'h dibeotoby of mabquette county. 



99 



T. B. BROOKS, C. E„ 



EXFEBT, 



AND 



EXPLORER, 



m CHARGE OF 



OF THE 



MARQUETTE IROX REGTOJ^, 



Hi Exslorer for the Marpette, Hoflfi:!iton & Ontouapn R. R. Co. 



Gives exclusive attention to Explorations and Sur- 
veys of Iron Ore and Timber Lands 
and Mines. 

EeferencoB and Terms made known on application. 



100 BEA'ID'8 DIRECTOUY OF HAHqUBTTE COUNTY. 



AkUUi iii»iiii<iii 




tupuaf 



MARQUETTE, L S., MICH. 



C. H. CALL, Secretary m\i Treasurer. 



lu ill tijmf-tif > jiy n iiii. ;»-wh<»-..».l ■ fawaw.-^ 



,V. 



JOUNTY. 



i@af 



H. 



reasaarer. 




Young, David, laborer, Huperior, near Fro.it. 
Y.)Uiigblood, Henry, laborer, 4th, near ridge. 



OYD, Joseph, painter, 6th, near Bhiff. 



. ^lA^/i^ l.l,u» !»-»»,•■* 



^^iiAi-iiiiiiaiiSir-'*M>ig. 'I'imm 



iiiiiiiiii|H>iiii>iH I I .^|i.iwawwH<|||i||MW)> 



1()2 DKARD'8 DIBEOTOBY of MABQUETrK COUNT 



NEGAUNEE. 



A BARE, A. cHrpenter, Iron street. 
Abraharnsen, Peter, laborer. Iron. 

Adara, John, butcher, Iron. 

Adams, J. (^. Ass't P. M. rea. Main near Teal. 

Adams, J, Q. att'y at law, office PoHtoffice Building. 

American M. U. Express flompany, O. W. Doolittle, agent. 

Anthony, E. C. harness. Iron. 

Areland, L. laborer. Peck, near Teal. 

Asmuth, C. W. t?vi>or, Iron. 

Atkinson, John T. clerk, Iron. 

Atwater, George R. hardware. Iron. 

Atwater, John E. furniture. Iron. 

Atwater, A. furniture. Iron. 

Avrill, Jno, civil engineer, Lincoln, near Pioneer. 



B 



BAILEY, T. saloon, Iron. 
Baldwin, William, baggage master, bds. with Mrs. Capis. 
Ball, Henry, bi-akeman, bds. with Mh.. Capis. 
Bandin, V. shoemaker. Peck, near Pioneer. 
Bank of Negaunee, James Mathews, prop. Iron. 
Bartle, John, miner, Peck, near Renter. 
Bartle, J H, clerk. Peck, near Kanter. 
Bashaw, Frank, laborer. Peck, near Pioneer. 
Barraby, Joseph, laborer, corner Brown and Case. 



ililtlf^ll^iHfeiitMii 



" ";; * -»?'ii:'?|%i- ' ' Tm^^m^ f ^^^t^'^ ^^ 



iwiTiw'»yj)»wtihiiilWiWg)rii-fi}ai# 



UNT 



1 I I. I J ii ..l, I H ■ W iii m l rm i * ' '! ■ i m ' ■ - ' » ■ 



llliAUlJH mUKCTMUY OF MAUyUKITK COtN'iy. lU.'J 



THE BANCROFT 



IRON COMPNY, 



MANUrAOTURBRB OF 



Building, 
little, agunt. 



CHARCOAL PIG IRON, 



er. 



FROM 



Specular and Hematite Ores, 



OF 



ith Mrs. Capis. 



MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



lae. 



PETER WHITE, Presidwit, Marquette, Michigan. 
SAMUEL L. MATHER, Treasurer, Cleveland, Ohio. 
JAY C. MORSE, Secretary, Marquette, Michigan. 



#- 



iWn i i<' i ii' < *l |- 



„..,7WV 



» 



104 BEABD'h WItECIORY OF MAnQUETTE COUNTY. 



THJE IcCOlBEfi 



Iron Company. 



H) BALK as IJV 



u mi Pieraatit-c §11:011 #w, 



FROM THFAB. MIMES AT 



[I 



SAMUEIj L. MATHER^ PreaH and Treas. 

Cleveland, Ohio. 
FBEI>, A, MOOMEf Secretary, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 
J A Y C. MORSE, General Agent, 

Marquette, Mich. 






l l H il l l. U l<*i m i> hu 



COUNTY. 



ANY. 



tm ®ws, 



nd Treas. 
leveland, Ohio. :'r 

Icveland, Ohio. 

irquette, Mich. 



Barrett, Ed. laborer, near I. C. furnace. 

Barrett, Pat, miner, near Sheldon's brewery. 

Barry, James, laborer, near I. C. furnace. 

Barry, JoBeph, carpenter, corner Case and McKenzie. 

Bastedo, John, wagon maker. Case, near Kanter. 

Beaumont House, A. Wheatland, prop. 

Bedinny, George, miner, near I. C. furnace. 

Belrose, George, saloon, Iron. 

Eengley, Alexander, clothing. Iron. 

Bennallick, John, miner, Kanter, near Case. 

Bennett, Charlos, furnace. Peck, near Pioneer. 

Besiny, Mic.iael, laborer, Clark, near Kanter. 

..est, John, contractor, Jackson Mine. 

Bezza, Richard, miner, near I. C. furnace. 

Bezza, William, miner, near I. C. furnace. 

Bezzo, Thos. contractor, Jackson mine. 

Blackie, Thomas, saloon, Iron. 

BuUhumeser, Michael, cabinet maker, Jackson. 

Blake, Ed. book-keeper, Jackson mine. 

Blake, William, laborer, Case, near Pioneer. 

Blodgett, E. S. meat market, Iron. 

Blopeslelt, Paul, carpenter, Iron. 

Boesch, Ed. jeweler, Iron. 

Bonei, Joseph, carpenter. Iron. 

Bollman, Chris, proprietor Empire House. 

Boner. Frank, laborer, Jackson mine. 

Bourja, E teamster. Case, near McKenzie. 

Bowdry, Peter, niachiuist. Main, near McKenzie. 

Bourrett, A. clothing and dry goods, Iron. 

Boyer, Henry, harness, Iron. 

Bradley, William, physician, Iron. 

Brackenburg, Robert, clerk, Lincoln, near Pioneer. 

Breitung, Edward, operator and dealer in mining and 

timber lands, Cyr street. 
Brinn & Peizer, dry goods. Iron. 
Brinn, J. dry goods. Iron. 
Brisflon, Raphael, Peck, near Pioneer. 






•«•?* 



1()« 



BKAIiDH DIliKClOKy OF MAHQUETTE COUNTY. 



Britt, David, carpenter, bds. with Mrs. Capia. 
Brodeur, A. dentist, over Oyr's office. 
Brooks, James, carpenter, Kanter, near Peck. 
Brown, Henry, corner Pioneer and Clark. 
Brown, James, barn boss, Jackson mine. 
Brown, John, laborer, Jackson, near Pioneer. 
Brown, Jacob, soda water bottling works. Silver. 
Brown, W. H. blacksmith. Jackson mine. 
Buckley, Thomas, carpenter, Kanter near Peck. 
Buckley, William, Cyr. 
Bulcher, Joen, saloon. Iron. 
Burder, William, furnace, Casi-, near McKenzie. 
Burns, Thomas, miner, Iron. 
Buyer, Henry, harness, Iron. 

c 

CAIN, M. machinist, Iron. 
Calhoun, W. M. saloon. Iron. 
Calhoun, W. R. Main, near Pioneer. 
Calhoun, William S. clerk, Main, near Pioneer. 
Campbell, N. clerk, Iron. 
Cancel, Alt", shoemaker. Silver. 
Capis. Mrs. boarding house. Iron. 
Carney, O. & Bro., livery, Iron. 
Carney, Dennis, Iron. 
Carney, O. Iron. 

Carney, Pat. Lincoln, near Pioneer. 
Carr, Miss M R. millinery. Iron. 
Carr, B. candle manufacturer. Iron. 
Carr, John, clerk, Iron. 
Carson, John, saloon. Iron. 
Carter, Joseph, grocer, Iron. 

Carter, Samuel, drup, Iron, res. corner Case and Pioneer. 
Cary, Cor. stable boss, near I. C. furnace. 
Cary, Samuel, barber, Peck, near Kanter. 
Cassady, Daniel, shoemaker, Iron. 
Cassady, F. shoemaker, Iron. 



>iii.ilw»j > «g j(, gKig;>g i !Wgu# j | j ^ 



isaes 



m 



•■^^^mi^kimm'm''- 




NAILS, GLASS, 

Woodee-Wcmre^ Etc. 

IRON STREET, 

J{KQAVKEE, L. S. MICE 10 AX. 

m, i mm stobe n ishpeming, 

Where we carry a full line of Goods in our business. 
MANUFAOTUREES OF 

Tie, Copper and Slaeet Jroa War©. 
JOBBING, 

IN OUR LINE, A SPECIAF^TY, 



yjy. I i d. . . i i ^. n j Uwt^ ^W ji W i W^C'^M *'^ * yi" 



;aL 



mn 



108 beard's DIBKfiTOHY OF MABQJETTE COUNTY. 



E. 7<. HA7D0N, President. 



FBED STAFFOBD, CasUer. 




ifstH atiouu Aniikl- 



HEGAUNEE. MICH. 



Thi8 Bank is now ready for business, and solicits the patronage of the 

public. Its affairs will be conducted in a manner .strictly 

in accord with safe banking. 

A SPECIALTY WILL BE MADE OF 

FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

AND PASSAGE TICKETS, 

With the assurance to parties purchasing that thev are doing so at the 
LOWEST MARKET RATES. 



Will be issued, and Book Accounts opened bearing interest, thus enabling 

people with small means to have their savings increased 

from time to time. 

Exchanges available at all points Fast and West will be sold to parties 
keeping Comniercial Accounts 

AT ONE aUARTBR OP ONE PER CENT. PREMIUM. 



G^COLLECTIONS^^^ 

Entrusted to our care will receive prompt and careful attention. 







rest, thu3 enabling 
increased 



be sold to parties 

FEBMIUM. 



^^:) 



reful attention. 



beard's DIKECTORY of MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



109 



Cascade Iron Company. 

Chicago and N. W. R., O. W. Doolittle, Agent. 

Chappel, J. shoemaker, Case, near Kanter. 

Chalafer, Charles, engineer, near I. C. furnace. 

Cholette, A. M. saloon, Iron. 

Christiansen, Andrew, laborer, Jackson Mine. 

Crocker, Allen & Co. iron manufacturers. 

Crocker, M. H. attorney at law. 

CroU, A. watches and jewelry, Iron. 

Christmas, John, laborer. Peck, near Pioneer. 

Chweig, Rich, upholsterer, Iron. 

Clark, Thos. P., Singer Sewing Machine, iron. 

Cochran, C. F. physician, Iron. 

Colon, J. laborer. Peck, near Railroad. 

Colwell, H. J. agent Michigan furnace. 

Corcoran, James, laborer, near I. C furnace. 

Cory, Martin, Pioneer Mine. 

Cotts, E. baker. Case, near Pioneer. 

Courtney, Mike, laborer, Jackson Mine. 

Cox, G N. carpenter, Jackson, near Pioneer. 

Cox, L. carpenter, Jackson, near Pioneer. 

Crepaut, William, book-keeper. Iron. 

Crocker, M. H. attorney at law, res. Main, near Teal, off Iron. 

(iroll, Adolph, jeweler, Iron, 

Cromley, Charles, policeman. Case, near Pioneer. 

Crystal, J. W. machinist. Case, near McKenzie. 

Cummon, Byron, laborer, Jackson Mine. 

Cum, John, laborer. Case, near Kanter. 

Curren, Owen, laborer, Jackson Mine. 

Curren, Tim, laborer, Jackson Mine. 

Curry, Thomas, St. James Restaurant. 

Cyr, L. D. physician, off. Iron, near Cyr. 



no 



^r 



beard's directory of MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



D 

DALY, Charles, Engineer, near I. C. furnace. 
Daly, Daniel, engineer, near I. C. furnace. 
Damp, George, tuason. Peck, near Railroad. 
Davis, liiaac, miner, near I. C. furnace. 
Davis, John, plasterer, Jackson, near PioneeV. 
Davis, Stephen, blacksmith, near i. C. furnace. 
Demontgier, Simon, carpenter, Kanter, near Peck. 

Doherty, , teamster, boards with Mrs. Capis. 

Donahue, Tim. machinist, Jackson Mine. 

Duntawill, Wallace, baker, Case, near Pioneer. 

Doolittie, O. W. freight ag't, M. H. & O. R. R., Main, n. Teal. 

Dorn, James, tinsmith. Iron. 

Dow, Thomas, laborer, Kanter, near Case. • 

Downing, C. clerk, I. C. store. 

Ducharme, Frank, laborer. Main, near Pioneer 

Duesler, U. civil engineer, Case, near McKenzie. 

Dunn, John H. brewer, Peck, near Kanter. 

Dunn, Michael, laborer, Jackson Mine. 

E 

EAGAN, Pat. laborer, Case, near Railroad. 
Eaughn, Pat. laborer, near Sheldon's brewery. 
Eddy, C. C, hardware, Iron. 
Eddy, Frank, hardware. Iron. 
Edgial, B. laborer, Empire House. 
Edwards, Ant. laborer, Kanter, near Case. 
Edwards, James, laborer, Kanter, near Case. 
Ellsworth, L. L. clerk, I. C. store. 
Emmet, Frank, saloon, Iron. 
Engels, J. furniture, Iron. 
Esher, Stephen, laborer, Iron. 



F 



ALK, Jacob, carpenter. Main street. 
Feibish, Philip, liquor and cigars, Iron. 






, MaiD, D. Teal. 



beard's DIBBCTORY OP MAKQUEITE COUNTY. Ill 



HA.YDON'3 






H. E. HAYDON, President. 
FRED. STAFFORD, CanhV. 

:negaunee, l. s., michioaw. 



^0m§E mi 




For sale at Lowest Current Rates. 

PASSAGE TICKETS 

To and from the Old Country, 

BY ALL THE FIMST CLASH LINMH, 

Parties wishing 

To Send Money Abroad, 

Or who desire to bring out their friends, will always save money 

by purchasing 

Drafts or Tickets at this Bank. 



m Bvsj 

TIL/L\SACTED. 



^r3^^vS3v^3.^s«- . , -,- ,- 



«PB 



112 ukaiu/h uihkctoky of mauquktte county. 



JULIUS JACOBSON, 



DEALER IN STAPLE AND FANCY 

DRY OOODa 

CLOTHING, 
HATS. CAPS. 

BOOTS & SHOES, 

LADIES' WHITE UI\IDERWEAR. 

Traaka, Mte., IHta. 
MY STORE IS ON IRON STREET, 

NEGAUNEE. 

HEMEMBEH TttE ?tAC£, 

THE SIGN READS 

JULIUS JACOBSON, 



«-i^ 



COUNTY. 



N, 



IlNCY 



DS, 



RWE/[R. 



STREET, 



IAC£, 



beard's DiBwrrouY of mauqueite county. 




Finnegan, B. Jaborer, Jacksou Mine. 

First National Banic, H. E. Haydon, Pres't, Iron 

Fish A Pierce, general store, Iron. 

Fish, 8. Main, near Teal. 

Fitch, Ernst, engineer, Jackson Mine. 

Flauegan, B. laborer, 'acksr Mine. 

Flanegan. Ed. brakeinan, boarde with Mrs. Capis. 

Fiery, John, saloon. Pioneer. 

Flynn, James, laborer, Jack.-^on, near Pioneer. 

Flynn, James, laborer, near I. C. furnace. 

Flynn, J. P. tailor. Iron. 

Foley, James, mason, corner Case and Teal. 

Foreman, C. A. musician. Peck, near Pioneer. 

Fc.rest, E. clerk, boards Ogden House. 

Forest, John, cook, St. James. 

Fortier, C. A. physician. Iron. 

Fortune, Job. saloon, Iron. 

Foster, T omas, steward ar Va. James restaurant. 

Fossbender, F. wagon maker, Marquette. 

Fountain, Charles, laborer, Iron. 

Fox, C. harnee:3, Iron. 

Foye, H. teamster, near I. C. furnace. 

Frazee, Rev. E. W. corner Caae and Teal. 

Frost, L. clerk. Iron. 

Frusch, Theo. brewer, Peck, near Kanter. 

Fuchs, Fred, saloon, Silver, near depot. 



C-^AFFNER, F. T. near I. C. furnace. 
J Garghier, M. boarding house. Iron. 
Gibbon, H. E. photographer, Case, near McKenzie. 
Gibbs, M. A. book-keeper, 1. C. store. 
Gilbert, John, miner, Kanter, near Caae. 
Giroux, H. saloon, corner Pioneer and Peck. 
Girzikowsky, Ed. & Co. jewelers. Iron. 
Gleason, Pat, laborer, Jackson Mine, 
Gordon, James, contractor, Jackson Mine. 



tjl^t; 



114 



UKAIIDH DIRRrrroRY OK IIAUQIJEITE COUNTY. 



Grnham, C. laborer, near I. C. furnace. 

Gratzie, William, laborer, near I. C. furnace. 

Gray, Gilbert, ostler, Case, near Teal. 

Gray, Thomas, shoemaker. Case, near Kanter. 

Gregory & ShornLerg, saloon, Iron. 

Gregory, L. D. saloon, Iron. 

Green Bay Iron Co., R. P. Harriman, aupt. 

Green, Charles B. clerk, boards Ogden House. 

Green, E. 8. ag't I. C. .nine, Main, near Pioneer. 

Oriffis, John, minei, near I. C. furnace. 

(»rigg, Joseph, miner. Peck, near Railroad. 

Griswold, Alonzo, carpenter, Main, near McKenzie. 

Gustafsen, Svan, near Sheldon's brewery. 

H 

HAGANY, A. barber, Iron. 
Hall, William, tinsmith. Iron. 
Haly, James T. grocer. Iron. 
Haly & Hopkins, grocers. Iron. 

Hamilton, George, brakeman, boards with Mrs. Caplis. 
Hananer, H. clothipg, Irrn. 
Hand, H. laborer, Iron. 
Hanske, Ernst, carpenter, Iron. 
Hansen, Charles, time-keeper, Jackson mine. 
Hansen, Eber, laborer, Jackson mine. 
Hansen, Hans, blacksmith, Jackson mine. 
Hansen, James, engineer, Jackson mine. 
Hansen, Peter, saloon. Iron. 
Hardy, John, laborer, Chicago House. 
Harrington, James, laborer, Silver. 
Harrington, John B. miner, Peck, near Teal. 
Harrington, Pat, miner, Peck, near McKenzie. 
Harris, John, boarding-house. Iron. 
Harris, Thomas, grocer. Iron. 

Hartman, Conolly & Co. lumber dealers, cor. R. R. and Case. 
Hartman, C. J. Jackson House. 



':w^^^"^ 



enzie. 




beard's directory of MAKQUETTE COtlNTY. 115 



MORGAN 



mM M^Mfm^'*^ 



OHARCOAL PIG IRON AND BLOOMS. 



From Ihire Lake Superior Ch'es. 



PROPRIETORS OF 



MORGAN FURNACE 



At Morgan, and 



CHAMPION FURNACE, 



At Champion, Marquette Co., Mich. 



I. R. aad Case. 



S. P. ELY, Marquette. Mich., Secretary and Treasurer. 
C. DONKERSLY, do Vice Pres't and Geu'l Ag't. 



•:^3^^P? 



^ I . rt i. . ^iuii Umtmt ,l ^■^*'Ta M^^ ^ ^ * *i rt »« r" i*M^^*ww.^^■■v•^-^ 



Si*- 



116 BEAHU'h DIHKlTOBY OF MAItglK'ITR COUNTY. 



THOMAS F. CLARK, 



.KSKjVr FOH THE 



SINGER 



SJEWWiU MAC'HIIE, 



TUB S£ST IJV TUB WOJiZD. 

219.75S SOLD IN 1872. 

NINE OUT OF TEN BEING FOR FAMILY USE, 

Being 4)500 more Machines than any other ( 'ompany, 
And 1-4 of all machiuea sold during that year, 

jnSO DEALER /JV 

PIAM8, OIGASS, lELOBEOlS, 

-AND- 

MUSICAL WEMCHAWr I8E. 

IRON STREET, 

Xeur Kirkwoud's Drug Store. 






COUNTY. 



BEA.BD'8 DIKE(rrORY OF MAKQUETTE COUNTY. 117 



\RK, 



iJIIE, 



ZD. 



1872. 



'AMILY USE, 



4Iier i 'imvpany, 
hat year, 



OBEOSS, 



I8B. 



Hartraan, T. W. Jackson House. 

Haiipt, E. bakery, Iron. 

Haydon'S Negaunee Bank. H. E. Haydon, I'rea., Iron. 

Hayden, H. E. banker, Cyr. 

Heiser. Martin, carpenter. Peck, near Teal. 

Henderson, James, shoemaker, Iron. 

Henly, Thomas, restaurant, Iron. 

Hewett, Silas T. saddler. Case, near Pioneer. 

Hewett & Snyder, harness. Silver. 

Hurrimau A Spurr Mine, R. P. Harriman & J. L. Spurr, Agto. 

Hartman, Connelly & Co. lumber dealers. 

Healy, W. P. attorney at law, Iron. 

Hibbard, Nathan, carpenter, Jackson Mine. 

Hibbard, Peter, carpenter, Jackson Mine. 

Hicks, Philip, plasterer, Jackson, near Pioneer. 

Hinckley, Ira, nit. glyc. manufacturer, Case, near McKenzie. 

Hirschman, F. L. physician, office with L. D. Cyr. 

Hocking, John, mason, Jackson, near Pioneer. 

Hocksen, Gus. laborer, Jackson Mine, 

Holmgreen, John, tinsmith, Iron. 

Horastein, Albert, clerk, Pioneer. 

Hooper, H. mason, near I. C. furnace. 

Hopkins, C. H. Main. 

Hopkins, William, Justice of the Peace, Main, near Pioneer. 

Howell, Henry, ostler. Iron. 

Hubert, George, stable boss, near I. C. furnace. 

Hule, F. grocer. Iron. 

Hutchingsen, G. L. express agent, Main, near McKenzie. 



IRELAND, Thomas, carpenter, Peck, near Railroad. 
Iron Cliff Company, E. B. Isham, sup't. 



Iron Cliff House, Frank Johnson, prop. 
Isham, E. B. corner Main and Pioneer. 



^re. 



^^>A.^.....in^m.>,j«^*'^^^<ff^ • '-£• 



f 



118 beard's DIRECTOBY of MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



FACKSON, Robert, baggage raester, corner Kanter and Case. 

I Ji'jkson House, E. A. Trelease, prop., Iron. 
Jacobson, Julius, clothing, dry goods, etc.. Iron. 
Jacobaou, Morris, clerk. Iron. 

Jacknon Iron Co. and Mines, F. Brown, general agent. 
Junsen, Martin, laborer, Jackson, near Pioneer. 
Jansen. Michael, laborer, Jackson, near Pioneer. 
Joukins, David, miner, near I. C. furnace. 
Jenniug.s, D. book-keeper, I. C. Co. 
Johnson, Frank, prop. I. ('. House. 
Johnson, Frank, saloon, Iron 
Johnson, John, boarding house. Iron. 
Johnson, Rasmus, laborer, Jackson, near Pioneer. 
Jones, C book-keeper, Lincoln and Pioneer. 
Jones, John, miner, near I. C. furnace. 
Johes, G. clerk, Iron. 
Jones, Fred, clerk, Iron. 
Jones, John, grocer, Iron. 
Jones, John, Jr., clerk, with Marsell & Co. 
Jones, Robert, book-keeper, Lincoln, near Pioneer. 
Jones, R. plasterer, Jackson, near Pioneer. 

Jong, , harness, Iron. 

Julian, John, blacksmith, near I. C. furnace. 
Julip, James, mason, Kanter, near Peck. 

K 

TT-AMMERDINER, A. butcher. Iron. 

■*^ Kaniller, R. C. carpenter, corner Case and Pioneer. 

Kane, John, miner. Main, near Teal. 

Kappe.^, R. baker, Peck, near Pioneer. 

Kassen, R. F. chief clerk, I. C. store. 

Rating, B. laborer, Jackson mine. 

Kating, Con. laborer, Jackson mine. 

Kauster, Henry, butcjher. Case, near Teal. 

Keeley, G. P. saloon, corner Case and Pioneer. 




BEABD'S DIRRCTOKY of MAflQUETl'E COUNTY. 119 



tttt ^m^Um 0pOm 



MARQ UETTE, MWHIQAX, 



Quarry and ship, hy cargo or single stone, the several 
varieties, (brown, mottled and, clouded) of 








Sl 



FOUND IN THE MARQUETTE REGION. 



For Beauty. Durability, and Adaptability to General 
Building, or Ornamental purposes, 



THIS STOSE !S OSKCOALED BY AM OTHER 



ACCESSIBLE TO WESTER.h' MARKETS. 



OFFICERS. 

JOHN BURT, Pres't. HIRAM A. DURT, Vice Pres. 

WM. BURT, Treasurer. 



WM. A. BURT, Secretary. 






t^^m^m^^&M^ 



120 BEAHD'h directory of MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



Vi&Mm mwwmmnm 



IBOH 





PRODUCE AJ^D SELL 



SPECULAR AND HEMATITE 



IRON ORES 



From their well-krmwti Mines at Ishpeming, 



MICmQAN. 



JOSEPH S. FAY, Boston, Mass., President. 

S. P. ELY, Marquette, Mich., Secretary and Treasr'r. 




'^ > f^j^^ij4|i S'-i ?J^- '' S*''- !'»' i !? Sgy;^ g^jf;i*^fgff '*"' 



■T^-^^SO'- 



DOUNTY. 



MATITE 



shpeming. 



jnt. 

lud Treasr'r. 



BEAUD's DIltEOTOnY OF MARQUETTE COUNTY 




Keller, Louis, brewer, Kanter, near Peck. 

Kelly, G. P. clerk, boards with W. L. Mann. 

Keely, John, laborer, Jackson Mine. 

Keely, John A. laborer, Jackson Mine. 

Kernel, Peter, laborer, near I. C. Mine. 

Kiren, Conrad, grocer, corner Case and Kanter. 

Kirkwood Bros, drugs. Iron. 

Kirk wood, John A. drugs. Iron. 

Kiikwood, P. B. drugs. Iron. 

Kiley, John, tenraster, near I. C. furnace. 

Kiley, William, teamster, near I. C. furnace. 

King, Peter, laborer, corner Case and Kaiiter. 

King & Wheeler, uitro-glvcerine manufactory, Iron. 

Kinner, S. Peck, near Kanter. 

Kirby, B. teamster, near I. C. furnace. 

Kittson, H. shoemaker. Iron. 

Klen, S. H. mason. Main, near Teal. 

Knese, Aug. carpenter, Kanter near Peck. 

Kremer, J. boards with Mrs. Caplis. 



LA FAVOUR, Atit. explorer. Case, near Kanter. 
Lamar, Adolph, laborer. Peck, near Pioneer. 
Lamsen. Charles, teamster, corner Peck and Teal. 
Lander, J. Jackson mine. 
Landrey, M. saloon, Iron. 
Lanseigae G. & Co. general store. Iron. 
Lans, M. laborer. Pioneer, near Iron. 
Lanser, Michael, machinist, Jackson mine. 
Laterelle, John, labprer. Peck, near Railroad. 
Laughliu, Ed. saloon, Iron. 
Laughlin, Michael, saloon. Iron. 
Lawless, James, laborer, Chicago House. 
Larren, F. furnace, near I. C. furnace. 
Lamson, O. G. tailor. Iron 
liCe, John, Lincoln, near Pioneer. 
Lehman, William, carpenter. Case, near Pioneer. 



"•"■rf-t^^ 



122 beard's dikectoby of marqueite county. 



Lene, Mathew, laborer, Iron. 
^Light, J. saloon, Iron. 
Ijilc, Anton, laborer, Case, near Brown. 
Londrie, Jo8. tinsmith, Iron, res. Case, near Pioneer. 
Lonstorf, N. dry goods, Iron. 

Low, Cbester, veterinary surgeon, Case, near Kanter. 
Lum & Peck, props. Ogden House. 
Lum, H. Ogden House. 
Lynch, John, laborer, near i. C. furnace. 



MADDSFORD, Will'ara, contractor, Jackson mine. 
Mahan, James, laborer, Jackson, near Pioneer. 
Maitland, A. W. lawyer, I. C. Co. 
Marsell & Co. dry goods, boots and shoes, crockery, etc., 3 sior'*. 

Iron. 
Mathews, Jos. machinist, Jachson mine. 
Mathews, Jas. banker. Iron. 
Mathewson, Duncan, engineer, Jackson mine. 
Maxwell, Robert, engineer, Jackson mine. 
Mazara, John, laborer, Jackson mine. 
McCarty, Martin, tear^aitsr. near I. C. furnace. 
McCarty, Michael, engineer, near I. C. furnace. 
McCloud, Norman, painter, Main, near McKenzie. 
McComber, W. C insurance agent, Iron. 
McComber, Alex, foreman, near I. C. furnace. 
McConley, Tim, miner, near I. C. furnace. 
McCrea, A. miner, near I. C. furnace. 
McGinnis, B. plasterer, Jackson, near Pioneer. 
McGowan, Pat, laborer, near I. C. furnace. 
McKenzie, physician, Iron. 

McKenzie, Thomas, livery and boarding house, Silver. 
McMullen, Daniel, wagon maker, Lincoln, near Pion^r. 
McMuUen, J. carpenter, Lincoln, near Pieneer. 
McRuloff, John, laborer, Jackson mine. 
Mergan, Charles, teamster, near I. C. furnace. 



wmm 



;OUNTY. 



neer. 



inter. 



ion mine, 
'ioneer. 



ery, etc., 3 8ior'«. 



zie. 



Silver. 
Pion^r. 



beard's directory of MMIQUETTE OUUNTY. 123 



ESTABLISHED 1S40. 




^^MiVt # ^ 



K 



Importers aad Jobbers of 




l#© 







OK ^v/ 



Our l«.iliti.w eiv.blc us. I. offer dealeii. PRICEj; aid TKBMS as favorable a» 
.•an behndiii Eiintern .Mart-ct«. 

ilRliKRS BY MAIL will receive especiiil attention, and our long experience 
„ the Luke .SuiTerior irade will be (ound of advantune in eelecting goods for that 



1 
market. 



WO Woodwara Avenue, DETROIT. 



D. CONGDON. 

(Successor to Fitch k Congdos,) 




'lo f oolf art Ai:i., DETROIT, Mick. 



Finest Stock west of New Yorli. 

LOVTEST PRICES. 

OBest Fitting Garmonts.O 

EVEYRTHING UNEXCPXLED. 



H^Speoia,! .A^ttention to Orders."^ 






u 

i r., . 

\J. > 



% 



-r:r^'^^!S^^^^^^^^^^^ 



m^m^m^^^^^ 



C' 



124 DEAKD'h DlllEClOBY OF MABQUErrE COUNTY. 



THE NEW YORK 




roniilompany 



PBODUCE PKO"!! THEIK 





i^il^ 



Situated on Sec. 3, Town 47, Eange 27, 



Ores of Great Purity and Best Quality. 



BAM'L J, TILJDEN, 

President, New York, 



\ L. WETIMOMM, 

General Manager ^ Marquette 3 Mich, 



i-Mrtuwnai 




i Quality. 



DEN, 

, New York, 



lettea Mich, 




Merrett, J. carpenter, Jackson, near Pioneer. 
Merrett, Wm. carpenter, Jackaon, near Pioneer. 
Mengaij, John, laborer, near I. C. furnace. 
Miner's Bank, D. G. Stone, prop. Ir.>n. 
Mitchel, George, contractor, Jackson mine. 
Mitchel, James, contractor, Jackson mine. 
Mitchel Jos. teamster. Empire House. 
Moran, Michael, contractor, Jackson mine. 
Morrow, C. B. boards at Mrs. Sterling's, 
Morton, A. saloon. Silver. 
Murphy, Michael, laborer, Jackson mine. 
Muck, Chas. meat market. Iron. 

N 

NABEL, E. near Sheldon's brewery. 
Nash, William, clerk, Peck, near Pioneer. 
Neely & Eddy, hardware. Iron, 
Neely, Benj. hardware. Case, neai* Teal. 
Neely, Wm. clerk, Iron. 
Nelson, B. shoemaker, Iron. 
Nelson, Rasmus, laborer, Jackson mine. 
Nelson, W. D. clerk, boards Jackson House, 
Nero, James, laborer, near Sheldon's brewery. 
Nesbit, James, saloon, Iron. 
Newton, Pat, near Sheldon's brewery. 
Noe, William, machinist, Jackson mine. 
Norris, Hicks & Morrow, general store, Iron. 
Norris, James W. boards M. Page. 
Norry, George, Jackson mine. 
Norry, Henry, agent, Jackson mine. 
Northwestern Telegraph Company, John Kern, opp. Iron. 

O 

OATLY, S. E. saloon. Iron. 
Ogden House, Lum & Peck, props., Iron. 
O'Leary, John, telegraph operator. Case, near Kanter. 
O'Leary, John, blacksmith, Jackson, near Pioneer 



^4;/S!.^ '^ vW i wg-^'" 



«^? 



.126 beaiid'h dibectoby of MABQuarrE county. 



O'Leary, Michael, laborer, Case, near Kanter. 

Oleson, Andrew, laborer, Jackson mine. 

O'Neil, M. grocer. Iron. 

O'Neil, Robert, engineer, corner Main *nd McKenzie. 

Orthey, Julius, near Sheldon's brewery. 

Orthey, Mrs. J. R. millinery, Iron. 



PAGE, 0. A. ass't sup't C. and N. \V. ra,ilroad, Cyr. 
Pagot, T. C, clothing, Iron. 
Peck, H. O. prop. Ogden House. 
Pendill, B. P. Silver, near Railroad. 
Pendill, Frank, clerk. Silver, near .Railroad. 
Pendill, Henry, clerk. Silver, near Railroad. 
Pendill, James, clerk. Silver, near Railroad. 
Pendill, J. P. general store, Silver, near Railroad. 
Peninsular Brewery, G. C. Sheldon, prop. Silver. 
Perkins, George, attorney at law, Cyr. 
Pettibone, Day & Morrow, general store Main. 
Perry, Ed. clerk, corner Lincoln and Pioneer. 
Peters, Robert, laborer, corner Jackson and Pioneer. 
Peterson, A. saloon. Iron. 

Peterson, Andrew, laborer, Lincoln, near Pioneer. 
Peterson Chris, laborer, Jackson mine. 
Phillips, Thomas, miner, Kanter, near Case. 
Pierce, A. grocer, Iron. 
Pierce, L. S. Center. 

Pierce, N. sup't mine, corner Pioneer and Case. 
Pische, Joseph, carpenter, Iron. 
Purvis, Robert, miner, near Cliff furnace. 

Q 

OUALSTROM, John, carpenter, Case, near Brown. 
Quinn, John, clothing. Iron. 
Quinn, Joseph, clerk. Iron. 
Quinn, Robert, clerk, Iron. 



*" Jvy.rf^-'a- c-.?^^3.A*' 



■ ''■i V. " ' ■ " ■ " j ag e Wg g WWi 



BBAH0*8 DIRECl'ORY OF MAUyVKTrK COUNTY. 



127 



.R 



R 

AIN, Michael, machinist, Jackson mine. 
Rang, C. saloon, Iron. 



Ray, Capt. school teacher, bds at Mrs. Caplis. 
Regarr, Jas. laborer. Peck near Kanler. 
Renny, B. laborer, near Sheldon's brewery. 
Risharr, Francis, laborer, near I. C. furnace. 
Revere, Peter, Main near McKenzie. 
Rice, Frank, fireman, boards at Mrs. Caplis. 
Richards, W. H. contractor, Jackson mine. 
Richardson, Geo. laborer, near I. C. furnace. 
Riley, Geo. engineer, boards at Mrs. Caplis. 
Roach, Jas. miner, near Sheldon's brewery. 
Roach, Wm. laborer, Empire House. 
Roberts, Henry, contractor, Jackson mine. 
Roberts, Henry, laborer, near Sheldon's brewery. 
Roland. Wm. book-keeper I. C. Co. 
Rosmursen, Chris, laborer, Jackson mine. 
Rosmurseo, Hans, laborer, Jackson mine. 
Rosmursen, Mil. laborer, Jackson mine. 
Ross & Wyman, fruit and vegetables, Iron. 
Ross. Alexander, helper, Jackson mine. 
Ross, Charles, American House. 
Ross, Robert, engineer, Jackson mine. 
Ross John, engineer, Jackson mine. 
Rough, H. contractor, Jackson mine- 
Rowland, William, P. M. boards St. James. 
Rowley, Paul, carpenter, Iron. 
Roy, T. clerk, boards over N. Y. store. 

Pendle, Thomas, soda water and bottling establishment. Silver. 
Ruplet, Albert, tinsmith, Iron. 
Ryan, T. liquors and cigars. Iron. 



« AUNDERS, Jno. miner, Peck near R. R. 
^ Saunders, Wm. miner, Peck near R. R. 



c^f*' 



»liiSiai# (i (t i iiii (ii j i » » 



M^^^ 



j^^^fet^g^i*" fA'i">^®^^^^'^ 



128 



BEAKD'h DlIlECTOllY OF MARQIIRTTE COUNTY. 



Sawyer, A. carriages, Silver. 

Scaiilon, John, laborer, JaekHon mine 

Seanlon, Tim, laborer, Jackson mine. 

Sehalmo, P. saloon, Iron. 

Schmidt & Ring, saloon. Iron, 

Schmidt, A. saloon, Iron. 

Schneider, Jacob, saloon, Iron. 

Schneider, John, tinner, Iron. 

Schrara, Fred . drver, Irion. 

Schwartz, Chas. mason. Peck near Kanter. 

Schwartz, J. shoemaker. Iron. 

Schwarz, John, miner, Iron. 

Seer, Jos., laborer, Brown and Case, 

Sein, Adam, mason, Peck near Kanter. 

Senecan, Alf. Pioneer near Iron. 

Seymour, Rev. E. Peck near R, R, 

Shannessy, Wm. shoemaker. Case near Kanter. 

Shehau, Joh,n laborer. Case near McKenzie. 

Shehan, Thomas, teamster, near I. C. furnace. 

Sheldon, Geo,, brewery. Gold. 

Sherman, Wm. engineer, near I. C furnace. 

Smitbauer, Jos. laborer, Pioneer near Clark. 

Smith, G. N. book-keeper, I. C, store. 

Smith, Jas. laborer, near I. C. furnace. 

Smith, Jos. machinist, Jackson mine. 

Smith, M. W. ass't road master. Case near Teal. 

Smith, R. laborer, Iron. 

Snow, F. E. Case near Teal. 

Snyder, Chas. harness. Peck near Pioneer. 

Snyder, John, tinner. Case near Pioneer. 

Sowstorf, N. general store. Iron. 

Sporley, G, boarding house, Iron. 

Stack, Geo. laborer, near I, C. furnace. 

Stafford, Fred, boards Jackson House. 

Stecker, G. saloon. Iron. 

Steele, S, H, laborer, near I. C. furnace. 

St. James Restaurant, Iron. 



, . , p ,, .. ... , ri ,. . W , l ,, gt, | ).WItl(i» . .|lj n »1 .* ^ M-. >i' »» ytMft? l )^'g^ 



beabd'b dibectoby of mabquette county. 129 



Stirling, A. J. clothing, nor. Main and McKenzie. 

Stirling, Walter, clerk, cor. Main and McKenzie. 

Stockwell, A. E. clothing, Iron. 

Stone, D. G. banker, dry goodfl, groceries, etc., Iron. 

Stone, Samuel, janitor, Hayden'a Bank. 

Strand, Nelaon, oatler, Iron. 

Strebbe, A. carpenter, Iron. 

Sullivan, Daniel, miner, near Sheldon's brewery. 

Sullivan, Tim, laborer, near I. C. furnace. 

Sundberg, Chaa. watchmaker, Iron. 

Sutherland, Jas. clerk, Main near McKenzie. 

Sweeney, E. livery, Case near Teal. 

Sweeney, John, clerk. Peck near McKenzie. 

Swink, Peter, butcher. Case and McKenzie. 



T 



TAF, George, engineer, Jackson, near Pioneer. 
Tatty, M. laborer, near I. C. furnace. 
Taylor, Thomas, clerk. Iron. 
Tellon, Martin, foreman Jackson mine. 
Tiddy, William, contractor, Jackson mine. 
Tiller, George, miner, near I. C. furnace. 
Thela, Charles, carpenter. Main, near McKenzie. 
Thiel, Chris, laborer, Jackson mine. 
The S. C. Smith Iron Company. 
Thom, Charles, tailor. Case. 
Thomas, John R. machinist, Jackson mine. 
Thompson, A. J. Barber, Iron. 
Tobin, Michael, constable, Chicago House. 
Tongung, Joseph, laborer, Jackson mine. 
Town, Charles, tailor, corner Case and Pioneer. 
Trelease, E. A. prop. Jackson House. 
Trezone, Joseph, engineer, Jackson mine. 
Trudell, A. near I. C. furnace. 
Truant, John, mason, corner Case and Pioneer. 
Tyler, John, laborer, Peck, near Railroad. 



g ^te» ^#^^ fe*^'^ ^--^"'"'^'-''^'' ^---^^*^'^^^ 



w 



130 



UKAUU'h DIRKCTOBY of MAligUETTE COUNTY. 



U 

UHRBACH, John, butcher, Iron. 
Uren, 8. cabinet maker. Iron. 



VA8HR0N, Louii, carpenter, Cn«e, near Brown. 
Vashron, Louis, Jr. clerk, Case, near Brown. 
Vick, George, laborer. Peck, near Kauter. 
Vigors, H. laborer, Jackson, near Pioneer. 
Virren, William, shoemaker, Iron. 
Volker, J. J. jeweler, Iron. 

W 

WARD, J. laborer, Jackson mine. 
Warner, Wilkes, Uilor, Case, near McKenzie. 
Warm, Joel, agent Green Bay store, Main, near Teal. 
Warm, Joseph, clerk. Main, near Teal. 
Wasley, Frank, miner, corner Case and Kanter. 
Wiitony, John foreman Jackson mine. 
Weed, Charles W. book-keeper, bank of Negaunee. 
Weyman, J. W. jeweler, Main, near McKenzie. 
Welch & Morton, saloon, Silver. 
Welch, Richard, Silver. 
Wells, T. L. clerk, I. C. store. 
Westlie, tailor, Iron. 
Wilup, Ed. laborer, near I. C. furnace. 
Williams, Joel, stage line to Cliff mine, Iron. 
Winter, Joseph, butcher, corner Main and Teal. 
Winter's Opera Hall, Wheelock & Winters, props. Iron. 
Wheatland, A. prop. Beaumont House. 
Wheeler, E. G. clerk Ogden House. 
Wheelock & Winter, meats. Iron. 
Wheelock, J. meats. Iron. 
White, John, barber. Peck, near Railroad. 
White, Ole, laborer, Jackson mine. 
Wohl, Peter, mason, Iron. 
WoUner, H N. merchant tailor, Iron. 
Wyman, H. D. Iron. 



YIRKE, Fred, saloon, Iron. 
Young, Ed. harness, Iron. 



t ' >V;K « l il. i i r » , i Wl| l »i ( j l i | «y ^ .^^^- r 1 i « |i > »l '>»^H . tn(> . .» .i i ' »|) ■i | ii. g^ i ,uml »l . |i||i nM-l i) Kri i >i . i w,<u« . n .w. |. . , . Bi»i .|i T . -1iyi i llf« l ttWI <> j! i » >ii H i { i, ri 



BKARD 



I'a DIRKCTOBY OF MABQUETTE OOCNTY. 131 



Bmmm il&me 



Brown, 
■own. 



tm uA Mmhv mo. 





MANUFACTURBR8 OF 



Kenzie. 
lear Teal. 



mmoiiL nG ii m urn, 



aunee. 
zie. 



fHOM f UHE MKE SUf EBIOIl 0W8, 



AT TBBIB 



eal. 

props. Iron. 



Furnace near Ishpeming, Mich. 






GARDNER GREEN, President, Norwich, Conn. 
D. R. SULLIVAN, Vice " " " 

THEO. P. McCURDY, TreasT. 
C. H. HALL, Agent, Ishpeming. Mich. 



, , ji« t ni n»-' i -r . Siti i i<iy^yjVi f-*>-y /;'W ' j:fj,.r? ^ 



mm 







)UNTY. 



beard's directory of MARQUETTE COUNTY. 133 



'© 



ISHPEMING. 



A 



, &c. 



Is made. 



ADAMS, Jno., book-keeper, with N. Hodgkins & Co. 
Allen, Henry, carpenter, Pine. 
Allen, Henrj'. laborer, Division. 
Allen, Juo., laborer, 2d, near Marquotte R. R. 
Allen, Jno. carpenter, Pine. 
Allen, Wm., laborer. Main, near Division. 
Allisv>n, Jno. M., barber, Main. 
Amraerson, C. foundryman, Superior foundry. 
Andtrson, A. A. jewelry. Main. 
Anderson, Bangt, laborer, 2d, near Marquette R. R. 
Anderson, C. saloon, Main. 

Anderson, Ch.aS. clothing, corner Pearl and 1st. 
Anderson, Chas. clerk, Union Store Company. 
Anderson, G. laborer, Main, near Division. 
Anderson, Jno., laborer. Division. 
Anderson, Oscar, Agent Union Store Company. 
Anderson, Severn, saloon. Main, 
Andrews, H. weigh-maater, near Lake Angeline. 
Andrews, Jno., laborer, 2d, near Marquette R. R. 
Astenius, J. O. clerk, Main. 
Atwood, Wm., laborer, Ist, near Marquette R. R. 
Austin, F. & C, meats, etc.. Division. 

B 

BACON, Mrs. S. millinery, Main street. 
Baptist, Robert, blacksmith, corner 2d and Cleveland. 
Barnes, L. clergyman, corner Division and 3d. 



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'nw^^" ^ 



, „ >viiMm'i'u»i' » %6;-t?:i--:t'^ ' i}^.fl^^ 




134 BEABd's DIBEOrOBY OF MABQUETTE COUNTY. 



Baruum Iron Mine, W. H. Murray sup't. 

Bauer, Seb. clerk with Henrietta & Co. 

Beckman, Ed. policeman, corner Pearl and Main. 

Benberg, O. N. saloon, corner 2d and Cleveland. 

Bennett, A. butcher. Main. 

Beunett, C J. clerk with Myers & Biglow, Main. 

Berg, Charles, laborer, corner Cleveland and Ist. 

Besnit, N. laborer, Ist, near Marquette Railroad. 

Bewnander, John, clerk, Main, near Front. 

Bice, Win. laborer. Division, near Main. 

Bicale, George, laborer, 1st, ?<ear F-v.quette Railroad. 

Bissonette, Louis, teamster fj ^"i' "' Biglow. 

Biglow, B. S. physician to rainw, iiue. 

Bjorkslaud, And. laborer, 2d, near Marquette Railroad. 

Blackwell, T. blacksmith, Superior foundry. 

Blake, Wm. clerk with Henrietta & Co. 

Bout, Fred, fireman, Superior foundry. 

Bourke, P. wholesale wines and liquors, Main street. 

Boyce, H. N. book-keeper, with B. M. Colwell. 

Braasted, Fred, agent, Nora's Store Co. 

Brasear, Xavier, saloon, Pearl. 

Bundy, ,D. R. clerk, with B. M. Colwell. 

Burschel, Andrew, livery, Division, near 1st. 

Burk, George, saloon, Main. 

Burns, Andrew, saloon. Division. 

Bush, V. A. saloon, corner Ist and Clevela.^ 



CAIN, Pat. saloon, Division, near Main. 
California House, P. Haspel, prop. Pearl. 
Campbell, C. D. clerk with J. C. Ward. 
Canfield, D. F. Ish. Bank. 

Carpenter, W. T. physician to mines. Main, near Division. 
Cliabebeau, Nau, boarding house. Division. 
Chamberlain, Oscar, book-keeper. Union tore Company. 
Christiansen, Chris, book-keeper, Unio'^ '• 'e Company. 
Christiansen, W. clerk, Noras Store Comi tuy. 



-tt\T,-:: 



i'^**«'WS 



^^gg5^ia4sit*''i iii?!S|gSj!!}5»l| 




■^^■"-^^^- 



BEARD'S 



DIBECTORTf OP MABQUETTE COUNTY. 135 



ISHPEffiNG SQDARl DEALING CLOTHIHG STORE. 



CHaS. a. anberbos, 



'DSALB'R IJ^ 







HING, 



IttJsiuWni) fido^S, 



HaU, Gaps. Trunks. Valises. &c. 



A Splendid Line of 



Ym%M and B©ys' ClotMiig. 



Corner First and Pearl Sts., 3 doors from Union Store, 



ISHPEMINQ. MICH. 



• ^imif i ^^j- t^T's^^s^^^s M . m - ^^ 'i-'^ ^y • "» "WJV ' 4;^ i'j"" .»"w 



136 beard's directoby op marquette county. 



Union Store Company 



OSCAR ANDERSON, Agent. 



DEALERS IN 





®illll 




PROVISIONS, 



BOOTS AM) SmOE 



OROCKERY AND GLASSWARE, 






CLOTHING, 

HATS AM) CAPS. 



ISHPEMma, MICHIOAJ^. 



on 



COUNTY. 




INT. 



=>, 



mm 



riRE, 



MICHIGAJ^. 



Christy, John, laborer, Division, near Main. 
Clark, James, yard-master, boards at Mrs. Crawford's. 
Clark, W. S. soda water works, Division. 
Clayton, G. telegraph operator, Marquette Depot. 

ClevelaOid Iron iline, F. B. Mills, Supt. 

Clines, E. teamster. Main, near Division. 

Cofferits, John, butcher, Pearl, near 1st. 

Cofferits, Sam. butcher. Pearl, near Ist. 

Coleman, John B. taxidermist, Division. 

Colwell, B. M. hardware. Main. 

Combs, Wm. H. laborer, Main, near Division. 

(k)ngden, Mich, laborer, 2d, near Marquette R. R. 

Conners, John, laborer, with And. Burchel. 

Cough, Pat. saloon. Division. 

Corlson, J. machinist, Supr. Foundry. 

Crabb, Richard carpenter. Main, near Division. 

Crabb, Simon, laborer. Main, near Division. 

Crawford, Mrs. E. boarding house, near Marquette Depot. 

Cundy, Chas. butcher, Cal. House. 

Cylling, Philip, saloon, Main. 

D 

DAHLIN, A. blacksmith, Superior foundry. 
Daniel, J. pattern maker, Superior foundry. 
Daniel, Samuel, laborer, 1st, near Marquette railroad. 
Datcher, A. J. general store, corner Ist and Cleveland. 
Day, Jetf. book-keeper, Pine. 
Decker, D. Steele, lumber, corner 2d and Division. 
Demaric, Joseph, laborer, 2d, near Marqette railr id. 

Deer Lake Iron and Lumber Company, C. H. Hail, 

sup't, 2 miles distant. 

Demearais, George, blacksmith and wagon-shop, 2d near Cleve- 
land. 

Devine, Pat, saloon. Main. 

Devan, John, laborer, Division. 

Divan, P. saloon. Main. 

Dolan, John, laborer, Division. 



,. ., i w ri M#« iri w» i iiig|p«! ii y'i' »y"-< 



■;<gff,#iwfe»l-'» g l ' ."t'»^ 



138 beabd's directory op marquette county. 



Donahue. Con. clerk with B. M. Colwell. 

Donahue & Co. boots and shoes, corner Pine and Division. 

Donahue, T. F. liquors, corner Pine and Division. 

Donpier, Fritz, laborer, 2d, near Division. 

Donpier, Jacob, laborer. Id, near Division. 

Duffy, James, saloon. Division. 

Dunn, George, with N. Hodgkius & Co. 

Dunn, M. T. bakery and restaurant, corner Division and Ist. 

E 

EAGAIT, John, laborer, Division, near Main. 
Earle, C. M. W. boots and shoes. Main. 
Ebstrup, butcher, Pearl, near lat. 
Eddy, Eugene, clerk. Main. 
Edyrain, John, harness, 1st. 
Ekland, John, laborer, 2d, near Marquette R. R. 
Ellis, John, laborer, 1st, near Marquette R. K. 
Elson, H. 8. butcher, Main. 
Ely, C. R. clerk, with B. M. Colwell. 
Emery, A. G. photographer. Pearl. 
Endelman, M. jeweler. Main. 
Ericson, A. laborer, Cleveland and Ist. 
Excelsior Iron Mine, J. Fredericks, sup't., 3 miles distant. 
Excelsior Kilns, J. Fredericks, prop., 3 miles distant. 

• 

F 

FEEDER, George, plasterer, corner Pearl and Main. 
Fenah, Andrew, laborer, 2d. near Marquette Railroad. 
Finney, R. P. clerk, corner Pearl and Main. 
First National Bank, R. Nelson, pres't. Main. 
Fleming, James T. laborer, 2d, near Marquette railroad. 
Foley, I. C. & Cc. clothing and dry goods, Main 
Frpr.vlo, John, clothing and dry goods. Main. 
Franscene, F. O. clerk, corner Pearl and Ist. 
Frontz, John, plasterer, corner Pearl and Main, 
Fugles, Aaron, bartender, corner 1st and Cleveland, 






wm 



mmmmmm 



OUNTY. 



beard's direotoby op marquettk county. 139 



i Division. 
»n. 



ision and 1st. 



les distant, 
istant. 



id Main, 
te Railroad. 



railroad. 



land. 



G 

GALLAGHER, James, laborer, Main, near Division. 
Galline, A. teamster, with Myers & Biglow, Main. 
Geary, John, general store, Main. 
Gettman, John, butcher. Main. , 
Gevert, B. laborer, 2d, near Marquette R. R. 
Gillenberg, Peter, laborer, corner Pearl and Main. 
Gilling, T. F. saloon, Main. 
Girline, Andrew, laborer, Cleveland, near Isi. 
Girzikowsky, E. & Co., jewelers, Main. 
Glasson, James carpenter. Pine. 
Glcason, Pat., laborer. Main, near Division. 
Gleason, Pat., laborer, Ist, near Marquette R. R. 
Gochin, John W. clerk, with Neely & Eddy. 
Gold, John, laborer, 2d, near Marquette R. R. 
Gong, Eli, laborer, 2d, near Marquette R. R. 
Gonier, C. hostler. Main, near Division. , 
Green, Richard, moulder, Division, near Main. 
Gribbon, James, laborer. Division. " 

Griep, B. liquors, Main. 
Griep, Bernhard, merchant tailor, Main. 
Grombach, Isaac, agent Kahn & Newman. 
Guisnier, Marcell & Co., dry goods and clothing, Main. 
Guisnier, F. clothing. Main. ^ 
Gunther, Frank, saloon. Division. 
Gylding, John F. saloon. Main. 

H 

HALY, John, laborer, Ist, near Marquette R. R. 
Hall, David, veterinary surgeon. 
Hansen, Peter, policeman, Superior Foundry. 
Harrigan, Cal. laborer, Division, near Main. 
Harris, John, saloon. Division. 
Harris, John, laborer, Main, near Division. 
Harris, Thomas, laborer. Main, near Division. 
Hawkins, John, carpenter, Division. 



«s 0&m:i '' :a0i:¥fw s ^ f> ^ssismsm-im^f'f"'i'^ 



':w^' 



140 BEABD'b DIREOTOBY of MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



Hawley, M. carpenter. Division. 

Hays, Jamee, book-keeper, Main. 

Hays, Thomas, laborer, Ist, near Marquette R. R. 

Heaton, T. physician, Pine. 

Heineman, H. 8. clothing. Main. 

Heineman & JacoSson, clothing, Main. 

Heudeyx, F. A. machinist, Superior Foundry. 

Henley, Peter, laborer, Division. 

Henleyson, C. laborer, Main, near Division. 

Henrietta, J. & Co., meats. Main. 

Henrietta, Miles, meats. Main. 

Hickey, Wm. laborer. Main, near Division. 

Higgins, John, shoemaker. Division, near Main. 

Hill, Edwin, clerk, with Myers & Biglow. 

Hillsdale, Wm. clerk, corner Pearl and Ist. 

Hocking, Wm. laborer, Main, near Division. 

Hodgkins, N. & Co., livery, Pearl, near Ist. 

Hodgkins, Gilbert, livvy» Pearl, near 1st. 

Holman, Frank, near Lake Angeline. 

Hornstein, Ed. derk, Main. 

Hosking, Wm. Main. 

Hospel, P. prop. Cal. House. 

Houle, Cyrille, baggage-maater, 2d. 

Howard, Henry, clerk, corner Pine and Division. 

Hubbard, Samuel, laborer, 1st, near Marquette R. R. 

Hughes, Jas. butcher. Division. 



ISAACS, Justus, laborer, Division, near Ist. 
Ishpeming Bank, Robert Nelson and H. E. Hayden, 
props., D. F. Wentworth, cash., Pine and Main. 
Ishpeming Hospitjil, R. Nelson, pres.. Main. 



TACKSON, G. W. barber. Main. 
I Jacobi, Aug. baker. Division, near 1st. 
Jacobson, Henry, jewelry, Main. 



ik-uhk. . 



mmfmmm^^ 



;:^F^' 




Jacobson, A. clothing, Main. 

Jacques, A. laborer, 2d, near Division. 

James, H. machinist, Superior foundry. 

Jenks, M. furniture. Main. 

Jochim, John, saloon, Main. 

Jones, P. boards Mr^. Crawford's. 

Johnson, Aug. engineer, Division. 

Johnson, Aug. laborer, 2d, near Marquette Railroad. 

Johnson, C. laborer, 2d, near Marquette Railroad. 

Johnson, Charles, shoemaker, 1st, near Cleveland. 

Johnson, Fred, book-keeper, Cleveland, near 1st 

Johnson, Gust, pattern maker, Superior foundry. 

Johnson, G. D. carpenter, Superior mine. 

Johnson, H. saloon, 2d, near Cleveland. 

Johnson, J. book-keeper. Main. 

Johnson, L. B. laborer, 2d, near Marquette Railroad. 

Johnson, M. saloon, Ist, near Front. 

Johnson, M. & Co. saloon. Pearl, near Main. 

Johnson, S. clerk, Nora's Store Co. 

Johnson, Seymour, clerk, Superior mine. 

Johnson, J. B. clerk, with Myers & Biglow. 

Jury, Mrs. M. Saloon, Cleveland. 

K 

KAHN & Newman, clothing. Main. 
Kendergaw, B. fireman. Division. 
Keeve, Jas. laborer. Division, near Main. 
Kennedy, Cornelius, Justice of the Peace, Division. 
Kennedy, C. weigh-master, Division. 
Kennedy, Jas. laborer. Division, near Main. 
Kirkwood Bros., drugs, stationery, etc., Main. 
Kretchmar, H. furniture, corner 1. ' and Cleveland. 



AIRD, Jas. clerk, Hetirietta & Co. 
La Fever, Henry, butcher, Cal. House. 



ii ta -ii. i .i rwa^ ii p.lp' i RSBjgja ji ?^^ •; M '' 'i^^^ 



142 beard'h dibeotoby of mabqoette county. 



Lake Angeline Mine, H. Deamond, aup't. 

Lake Superior Iron Mine, G. D. Johnson, sup't. 
Lake Superior Peat Furnace, J. B. Lyon, sup't 
Lake Superior Peat Works, J- H. Welch, sup't. 

Laeflin, Jas. plasterer, corner Pearl and Main. 

Larseii, Andrew, clerk with Myers & Bige^ow. 

Larange, Jos. saloon, Pearl street. 

Larsen, Andrew, saloon, corner Cleveland and Ist. 

Lawson, J. laborer, corner Cleveland and 1st. 

I^ee, Scoville, machinist, Superior Foundry. 

Le May, Nap. shoemaker, corner Division and Main. 

Lewis, 8. W. foreman, Superior Foundry. 

Linn, Michael, mason, Division. 

Linquist, August, laborer, corner 2d and Marquette R. R, 

Londquest, P. O. shoemaker, Cleveland, near Ist. 

Lonvil, A. shoemaker, Euclid. 

Lorenge, Jos. saloon, Pearl. 

Loth, Jos. saloon, Maioi 

Lund, Missel, machinist, Superior Foundry. 

Lundbery, Andrew, clerk, corner Cleveland and Ist. 

Lynch, D. saloon. Pearl, near 1st. * 

Lyon, Dennis, laborer, 2d, near Marquette R. R. 

Lyons, F. engineer, near Lake Angeline. 

M 

MACK, Daniel, laborer, 2d, near Marquette Railroad. 
Madden, John, mason. Main, near Division. 
Malone, John, clerk with Henrietta & Co. 
Malquist, Charles, laborer, 2d, near Marquette Railroad. 
Malquist, John, laborer, 2d, near Marquette Railroad. 
Maualy Arthur, wagon maker, 2d, near Cleveland. 
Marchant, B. saloon, Pearl. 
Marquette, Houghton & Ontonagon Railroad, W. J. Newman, 

agent. 
Maroney, John, saloon, Division, near Main. * 

Mathews House, M. Mather, prop., Main. 
McCallen, W. J. machinist, Superior foundry. 



-a;,-*»^4^ 5*r *!- -frV^^tJ s S^^ "^^ rj f? " "yy ^ ^ijBiqtT- 



DOUNTY. 



n, Bup't. 
)n, sup't. 
1, Bup't. 



St. 



IVIaiu. 



ette R. R. 

t. 



BKAMD'S WBECTOBY ok MABQUErrE COUNTY. 143 



Ist. 



i Railroad, 
on. 

Railroad. 

iiroad. 

nd. 

W. J. Newman, 



McCulloch, P. carpenter, Division, near Main. 
McDonald, A. prop. Sherman House. 
McFarland, T. F. harness, Division. 
McGinty, Ed. Clerk, Pine. 
McGinty, Pat. wagon maker, Pine. 
McGinty, Wm. freight agent, Pine. 
McHugh, E. J. watchmaker. Main, near Pearl. 

Mclnness, , clerk, lat, near Cleveland. 

McNamara, Charles, harness maker, and dealer in trunks, 

etc.. Division. 
Meeter, Joseph, harness, 1st 

Mertine, Casper, blacksmith, corner Pearl and Main. 
Michael. James, laborer, Pearl, near 1st. 
Milbach, Charles, laborer, 2d, near Marquette Railroad. 
Mildon, H. H. liquors, Main. 
Miles, John, laborer, Ist, near Marquette Railroad. 
Mills House, J. H. Mills, prop. Division St. 
Mills, Capt. F. P. Cleveland mine. 
Mills, J. H. prop. Mills House, Division St. 
Mockler, John, grocer, Main. 

Mocklcr, Wra. clerk, Main, near Front. 

Monahan, Peter, grocer, Ist, near Cleveland. 

Moran, Hugh, clerk, Division, near 1st. 

Morley, Pat. machinist Superior foundry. 

Morrison, John E. wagon maker, Euclid. 

Morthey, Jas. machinist, Superior foundry. 

Mullen, Daniel, clerk, Ist, near Cleveland. 

Mullen, J. lal)orer, Euclid. 

Murray, Robbins & Co. general store, Main, 

Murray, Frank, blacksmith, 2d, near Cleveland. 

Myhre, B. shoemaker, 1st, near Cleveland. 

Myers & Biglow, general merchandise, next door to Bank of 
Ishpeming. 

Myers, A, A. res. Euclid St. 









N 



N 

AIL, Ed. laborer, Main, near Division. 
Nedo, Mrs. C. saloon, Pearl street. 



a T ii ii l f i g- . TjCii il yi l jIjI l ^ 



■ ;ji i; i i Hyi t v ;,i« ,. ;' , '; ji ;il IgS ' ft tSgy^ 



.- '■ ...■■'-! Jit! * ?. ' IWJi 



.M-ess 



144 beard's DIKECTOBy OF MABQUErrE COUNTY. 



ISHPEMING. MICH. 

MANUFACTURKR8 OF 

ENGINES, 



Blast "^urnace, 



Mir^ITVO^ JILIVD lyilLI^ 






Iron and Brass Castings, 

BOILERS 



BUILT AND BEFAIBED. 

A full Block of STEAM AND GAS GAS PIPE, AND FITTINGS of 
all kinds and descriptions. A large and complete stock of 

RUBBER AND HEMP PACKING. 

All sizes of Bar and Round Iron always on hand. 
Agents for Knowles' Patent Steam Pumps, Wm. Canfield & Co's Empire 

Packing. 









i^'AjSeSasi, 



BOUNTY. 



'» 



IILI^ 



ngs, 



^D FITTINGS of 
ete slock of 



\CKING. 

I hand. 

eld & Co's Empire 



deabd'h niuErrouY op jiARQUKrrK county. 145 



Neely & Eddy, hardware, Main. 

Neely, Thos. agent, Ne«ly & Kddy. 

Nelson A ftayden, iron agenU, Main street. 

NelBon, E. D. cashier, Ist National Hank, 

NeUon, U. president 1st National Bank. 

Nelson, R. president Ish. Hank. 

Nelson, VV. S. grocer, Main. 

Nelson, U. & Co., meat market, Division. 

Neuberger, U. millinery and clothing, Main. 

Neuberger, P. auction and commission, Main. 

Newman, V. J. age.it American Express Company, Depot 

New England Mine, Hon. H. C. Williams, sup't. 3 miles distant. 

N. Y. Mine Store, gen. mer., J. H. Gillett manager, N. Y. Mine. 

New Superior Mine. G. F. Tracey -p't. 5 miles distant. 

New York Mine. Hon. ^'' E. Dickenson, sup't. 

Niles, C. ph>(tician, Pii 

Nixon, John, clerk, with H. M. Colwell. 

Nolan, Michael, laborer, 2d, near Marquette R. R. 

Nolen, John, laborer, 2d, near Marqi:ette R. R. 

Noras Store Co. gen. store, Fred Braasted agt., Cleveland, near Ist. 

Norberry, John E. agent, hardware, Main. 

Norton, VVm. laborer, 1st. near Marquette R. R. 

Northmore, John, prin. High School, Main. 

Mygraw, Ernest, clerk, Kahn & Newman. 

O 

ODGERS, Richard, laborer, Ist, near Marquette R. R. 
Oie, J. N. grocer. Main. 
Oie & Nelson, grocers. Main. 
Oien, Henry, saloon, Cleveland, near Main. 
O'Leary, M. J. billiard room, Division. 
O'Leary. Michael, shoemaker, Divisidn, near Main. 
Olesen, L. carpenter. Division. 
Oliver, Wm. & Co., livery stable. 

Oliver, John, carpenter, Hematite mine, near Marquette R. R. 
Oliver, Thoma , book-keeper. 
O'Niel, Terance, machinist, Superior Foundry. 
Osborn, L. E. manager Superior Foundry. 



i! 






•I 
-ft* 



■U-' 



■JM 



146 beard's DIBECrOBY OF MABQUETTE COUNTY. 



PAINTER, William, Main, near Division. 
Parks «fe Haydcn, attorneys, Main street. 
Parkes, A C. machinist, Superior foundry. 
Parkes, Samuel, machinist, Superior foundry. 
Fendill & Beatty, general store. Main. 
Penglase, John, laborer, Division. 
Peuna, J. P Superior mine. 

Perry, William, laborer, Ist, near Marquette Railroad. 
Pet«reon, A. shoemaker, 1st, near Cleveland. 
Peterson, A. E. saloon, 1st, near Front. 
Peterson, A. O. clerk, Nora's Store Co. 
Peterson, Charles, laborer, 2d, near Marquette Railroad. 
Peterson, John, saloon, Ist, near Front. 
Peterson, K. laborer, 2d, near Marquette Railroad. 
Peterson, Peter, saloon, Cleveland, near Ist. 
Ficands, Van Cleve & Co., hardware, mining supplies, etc. 
Pierce, N. laborer, Main, near Division. 
Pierce, Samuel, Main, near Division. 
Ponthwait, John, 
Provost. Michael, shoemaker, division, near Main. 

R 

RAISKY, W. F. saloon. Main. 
Reynolds, J. engineer, Pine. 
Rice, Samuel, liquors and tobacco, Main. 
Richards, Alfred, moulder, Division, near Main. 
Richards, A. J. machinist, Superior Foundry. 
Richards, F. W. machinist, Superior Foundry. 
Rider, Richard, butcher, Division. 
Filey, W. machinist, Superior Foundry. 
Riplel, John, photographer, with Emery. 
Robbins, E. clothing, boots and shoes. Main. 
Roden, John, laborer, Cleveland, near 1st. 
Rogers, Wm. laborer, Division. 
Rones, J. post-master, Pine. 



"i^j^r^- 



n , ii' ii iii|i » > p i >' >*M .i * ft i» »" « 



OTJNTY. 



beard's directory op MARQrFTTE COUNTY. 147 



Ropes, J. & Co., drugs, Stationery, and consulting chemist, 

corner Pine and Division. 
Russell, Frank, shoemaker, Division, near Main. 
Ryan. John, carpenter, Division, neai' Main. 
Ryan, John, lahorer. Main, near Division. 
Ryan, Mathew, saloon, Main. 



ilroad. 



in. 



SAGINAW Iron Mine, J. P. Mitchell, sup't. 5 miles distant. 
Sanson, John, saloon, corner Cleveland and 3d. 
Sandberg, Andrew, clerk, with Myers & Biglow. 
Sargent, VVm. clerk, Main. 

Schlin, John, clerk, with Union Store Company. 
Shaner, Chas. clerk, Henrietta & Co. 
Sheldon, Geo. clerk. Pine. 
Sherley, W. machinist, Superior Foundry. 
Sherman House, A. McDonald, prop., Division. 
Shiel, Pat., shoemaker, Division. 
Sieble, Philip, butcher, Cal. House. 
Sillistrap, P. R. watchmaker. Main. 
Slatlerly, Michael, shoemaker. Division, near Main. 

Sloat, O. D. agent C. & N. W. Railway, Main. 

Slyney, J. laborer, 1st, near Marquette R. R. 

Smith, Jas. B. book-keeper, Superior Foundry. 

Smith, Peter, machinist, Superior Foundry. 

Smith, W. machinist, Superior Foundry. 

Smith, W. G. harness, Division. 

Smith, W. R. pop works. Division. 

Soddgreen, Gus. teamster, Division, near Main. 

Solberg. Samuel, clerk, Union Store Company. 

Spencer, J. L. harnsa-maker, Pearl. 

Staftbrd, W. 8. Division. 

Stanley, L. H. agent, Dicker & Steele. 

St. Germain, John B. policeman, Pearl. 

Stockwell & Ward, dry goods. Main. 

Stolt, J. P. saloon, corner Cleveland and Ist. 

Streeter, E. 8. lumber, come. Lake and Front. 



.i-a^AjUi4«*<M*ij«^¥*'*!^^^^^«*'™^"r 



,^,:z.jsssi 



148 



beard's DIBECTOBY op MArtlUETTE COUNTY. 



Superior Foundry, comer Lake and IVont. 
Swift, W. F. attorney-at-law, Main. 



T ALLEN; John A. clerk, Hineman & Jackson. 
Tengue, T. J. machinist, Superior foundry. 
Thomson, S. A. clerk, Cleveland. 
Tislor, W. O. saloon. Pearl, near Ist. 
Trebilcock, William, laborer, Pine. 
Trevilcock, James, laborer, Division. 
Truan, John, saloon. Main. 
Truscott, William, clerk, Main. 
Trygsland, S. clerk, Kahn & Newman. 



UNION STORE CO., cash capital $10,000, Oscar An- 
derson, agent. Pearl, near Ist. 



V 



AUGHN, Misses A. D. millinery, Main. 
Volker, N. saloon, Main. 



WADSWORTH, D. F. cashier Ishpeming Bank. 
Wallace, L. laborer, Division. 
Ward, J. G. clothing and dry goods, Main. 
Waters, John, contractor. Main. 
Webster, William, laborer, Main, near Division. 
Welsh, Alex, saloon, Pine. 
Wesley, John, wagon maker, 2d, near Cleveland. 
White, Jacob, boarding house, Ist, near Marquette Railroad. 
Wheeler, 8. S. physician. Main. 
Wilhurst, M. machinist, Superior foundry. 
Wilkinson, K. physician, Pine. 

Williams Iron Mine, S. S. Curry, supt. 3 miles distant. 
Williams, Thomas, laborer, Main, near Division. 









beard's dibectoey of mabquette county. 149 



kson. 



Wilson D. contractor, opp. Marquette depot. 

Wingate, C. H. genera! store, Main. 

Winters, Joseph, meat market, Main. 

Winthrop Mine, Richardson & Wood, supts. 3 miles distant. 

Wilt, A. A. butcher. Pearl, near Ist. 

Woodlock, William, saloon. Division. 

Wright & Outhwaite, general store, Cleveland Mine. 



'OUNG, Max, clerk. Main. 
Young, O. clerk, Pine. 



0,000, Oscar An- 



ETHRALUS, F. G. W. clerk, Division. 
' Znerol, A. P. jeweler. Main. 



Bank. 



d. 

3tte Railroad. 



listaut. 




r^ y * ™ * ' '^*' ^ '^" I S''.'^^ ' .' ' '! '' '■ ' ^ ' V^ '-''' ' W % '*W?^^ B i jim i ij y w o i i n' ii rm i t^' 



wr 



'■■r?>^s 



150 BEABP'a DUIECTORY OF MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



MICHIGAMME. 



This town having been totally degtroyed by fire, in June, 
1873, and rebuilt in August of the same year, we give the adult 
names taken from the census rolls, compiled in August, as an 
evidence of the wonderful energy, enterprise and resources of 
the citizens of this town. On account of the unsettled state of 
affairs, we are unable to ^rive the business or occupation of all 
the residents, many being ac a loss themselves to state what they 
intend as yet to follow for a livelihood. We do not wish to be 
understood by this that the town is mado up of idlers, far from 
it, there seems no drones here, on the ":ntrary, all is life, activity 
and business. 

A 

Anderson, Peter, board'g house. 

Anderson, Simon. 

Angefe, David. 

Anson, John. 

Anson, Ole, 

Armstrong, G. 

Armstrong, J. B. 

Arroatroiig, W. H. 

Ayotte John. 



Alexander & Hanna, hotel. 
Ai Jerson A. 

Anderson, Andrew, saloon. 
Anderson, Chas. 
Anderson, H. 
Anderson, John. 
Anderson, Laws. 
Anderson, Lewis. 
Anderson, Martin. 
Anderson, P. 



Backman, Oli. 
Bang, Peter. 
Bank'iead, Wm. 
Bargoau, Louis. 



B 

Barker, A. 
Barman, Fred. 
Barnes, H. M. 
Barry, A. 



■Mi'&Mi^'i^^ 



'I'.fc'SSer 



Hn 



. _..-, 1 I . r. ' t^' i - jt^m 



COUNTY. 



BEAKD'S directory of MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



151 



E. 



by fire, in June, 
we give the adult 
in August, as an 
and resources of 
unsettled state of 
occupation of all 
to state what they 
io not wish to be 
3f idlers, far from 
ill is life, activity 



er, board'g house, 
ion. 



B. 



L. J. CLEVELAND'S 

EUREKA 

OINTME^NT 

CURES ALL KINDS OF SORES ON 
AND ALL SWELLINGS CAUSED BY 

Huvts^ Sprains or Bruises. 

, » ^ § ■» — ... . - ■■' 

CORNS.— It virtually euros corns in twenty-four hour*, relievinn all pain and sore- 
ness, and effectually cures In ten days. , - . , J 11 1 ■ J n. 

MOSQUITO BITES.— It cures mosoulto. insect and fly biles, and all kinds i)f bee 
atinua in one to twelve hours, and keeps them off. 

CHILBLAINS.— It cures chilblains in three to five days. 

LAM K BACK.— It cures lame back in three to ten days. , , . . 

UURNS.--It Ukos all soreness out of burns in twelve to twenty-four hours and 
heals very taat. 

SCALDS.— The same as burns. 

SORE rilROAT.-Itrplievesall pain in one night. 

SWBELLED FACE.-U relieves the pain m one to twenty-four h,)ar8. 

CUTS AND WOUNDS.— It takes out the soreness m tour to forty-eight hours. 

BOILS.— It takes out pain in boils in six to twelve hours and cures in 3 to 5 dayi- 

KELONS.— Same as boils on!v longer to cure them. .. . ^t 

SORE EYES cured in 5 to 10 days. Put the ointment around the eye not m the eye. 

FKOST BITES cured in five to ten days. ... , j 

PILES cured in seven to eightaon days. Use a small syringe twice a day. 

•\!1UPPED HANDS cured in four or Hve days. 

CHAFES and OALLS o( any kind cured in twelve to forty-eight hours. 

NKURALOIA cured in three to ten da.vo. 

EAR ACHE cured in fifteen minutes to three hours. 

SCRATCHES cured in three to eight days. 

SPEED CRACKS.— Same as scratches. 

OREASED UKEL cured in ten to eighteen days. „,,„,, „ u oi,.„-, ntA 

Itoh Sourvey, Ring Worms, Scrofula. Fever Sores. Poll Evil, Salt Rhenm, Old 
Sores and Erysipelas cured in two to twelve weeks. 



Apply the ointment in any way most cii enient and not hurt the sore or part 
affected. In case of sores where there is swelling, get it all over the swelling as well 
as the sore. It does not smart any sore. For corns, pare them every aigbt, (n jt 
hurt them) for eight or ten nights and they will disappear. 



TESTIMONIALS PEOM THE TOLLOWINCl PASTIES : 

David Hall. Veterinary Surgeon, Ishpeming. Mich; A. E. McDonald, foreman 
Spurr .Mountain Mine Stable, Spurr Mountain, Mich-: B. F. Reed, foreman m 
Miohiganirae Mine Stable, .Miohigaiume. Mich. ; Win. Watkins, foiem«n in Chaui- . 
Pion Furnace Stable, Champion. .Mich.; A. W. Wheat, foreaian in tinma Mine 
Stable, Cascade. Mich.; Robert Parker, foreman in '^hampion Mine Stable, Cham- 
pion Miah. : Frederick Lamsoii, foromim in Washingion Mine Stable, Uumboldt. 
Mich.; Joseph French, foreman in Barnum Mine Stable, Isnpeming. Mich. ; t^lem. 
(3onyo, foreman in Livery Stable, Ivhpeming, .Mich. ; R. McMillan & Co., Lumber- 
men, Ushkosh, Wis. ; J. B. MoCuiuber, Fond du Lac. Wis. 

x<L XI V XI x«. jm »r o ai s • 
Capt. John Mitchell, of Saginaw M'ne, Mich.; Cant Duun, of Kloman Mine, 
Republic, Mich: Joshua Culbort, Livory, Marquette, Mich. ; J.N. Lighthall, 269 
W. Tyler stieet, Chicago, III. _ 



Put up in one, two and four ounce vials. 

. L. J. 




Betails 25e, 50c and $1.00. 
CLEVELAND, 
Islipeinlnir? Mich. 



^^u> y„^,*finf-^'-'^'~'Tf, 



COUNTY 




iwu i u iii ij ^i' M i i i' inr i! 



f*r- 



r Michigamme and 
old stand, and 
of 



beard's DIllECTORY OF MABQCETTE COUNTY. 153 




Bastedo, Jas. 
Bauman, A. J. 
Bayden, E. S. 
Bayle, Jno. 
Beard, H'^.nry. 
Beckman, Andrew. 
Beckinan, Chas. 
Bellmau, E. 
Beng, L. E. 
Bennie, Geo. 
Benson, S. 
Bergstrom, G. 
Betsberg, H. E. 
Blodget, E. L. 
Blomquest, A. 
Bloom, Wm. 
Blum, Jno. P. 
Bodeau, A. 
Bonely, H. 
Botaford, L. 
Bour, Jos. 



Call, Jas. 
Campbell, Robt. 
Camaran, Jno. 
Canestrang, C. 
Cansgo, M. T. 
Careaon, A. W. 
Carinaugh, G. 
Carpib, Kee M. 
Carg, Eph. 
Cary, Jno. 
Chapman, L. P. 
Christiansen, C. 
Christiansen, H. C. 
Christiansen, T. 



Bourgo, Frank. 

Bournett, Oliver «k Bros., gro- 
cers and liquors. 
Boushan, J. 
Breraan, Jno. 
Bright, M. 
Brooks, Wm. 
Brown, Edgar, 
Brown, F. 
Brown, Jno. 
Brown, Nelson. 
Brown, Saml. 
Burdamis, E. 
Burdamis, Wm. 
Burk, Frauk. 
Burns, David. 
Butler, Chas. 
Butler, Jas. 
Butler, M. 
Bvland, Jno. 



Christoosen, A. 
Cleveland, L. J. 
Clifford, M. 
Coakly, I., saloon. 
Coakly, Morris. 
Cole, B. H. 
Coleman, Peter. 
Cogins, M. 
Conners, M. 
Cook, Smith. 
Coon, Jas. 
Coughlin, Jno. 
Coyle, J. P. 
Craig, Chas. 



. * ^ n <ii .W# it!M< U.) i«*l ' 'i "" H ' fi ' ¥' ' * 



w 



154 



BEABD's directory of MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



Crosby, J. L. 
Cryler, 8. T. 
Cuckins, Jaa. 
Cuddy, Pat 



Curley, Jno., capt. of niioe. 
Curtis, Wm. 
Cuyler, J. S„ 

D 



Dolf, Warren, Deputy Sheriff. Dowe, Ed. 



Daniel, J. 
Deal, A. 
Domasey, Jno. 
Denton, W. A. 
Depete, A. 
Derusha, Fred. 
Deschamp, J. 
Dishno, A. 
Ditch, Henry. 
Divine, Wm. 
Dix, C. H. 
Dolan, Jno. 
Dolan, Larry. 



Doyle, Jno. 

Dinglo, Wm. 

Drake, Saml. 

Duff, Jno. 

Dugan, Pat., groceries & liquors. 

Duggan, Jno. 

Dunn Daniel. 

Dunn David. 

Dunn Jas. 

Dunn Jno. 

Duquetto, Jos. 

Dwyer, J. H. 



Ebnew, Paschel. 
Eddy, Jas. saloon. 
Ederstrom, J. 
Einkoff, Chris. 
Elk, L. P. 
Ellison, Swan. 
Elnes, O. 
Eltrop, Peter. 
Ely, C. M. 



Falck, Wm. 
Falcomer, R. J. 
Faren, S. B. 
Farnsberg, Peter. 



Engstrom, Frank. 

Erickson, A. 

Erickson, E. 

Erickson, J. 

Erickson, John. ' 

Ericson, Henry. 

Erkson, Wm. 

Erendon, Jas. 

Eytenberg, Edward, gen. store. 

F 

Fams worth, E. M. 
Farnsworth, M. J. 
Fay, J. O. 
Fay, M. 



*i,^ 



Wiiili i kyl l ^ ii i l 



X 



COUNTY, 



apt. of niioe. 



roceries & liquors. 



uik. 



Iward, gen. etore. 



i:. M. 
I.J. 



BEAIID's directory of MARQUETTE COUNTY. 



155 



Flicke, Chas. 

Frisk, A. P. 

Forrest, P. 

Fowle, J. C. caah. Michi. mine. 

Franks, A. 

Furlong, R. 

G 

Gillis, John. 

Gillia, Neil. 

Qlailand, Isaac. 

Glass, F. 

Gleason, M. boarding house. 

Godfrey, F. A. 

Qoe, J. W. 

Gokay, A. 

Gongo, Jas. 

Gongo, Lewis. 

Gort, Chas. 

Gouchie, C. 

Gould, John. 

Green, John. 

Greenbery, Fred, 

Gulby, C. 

Gullin, E. 

Gustafsen, C. 

H 

Hackett, Richard. Hamlin, Jas. 

Haley, M. Hamon, Thos. 

Hall, E. D. & Co., dry goods Hanahan, Xfios. boarding house. 

groceries and drugs. Hanston, Robt. 

Hal!, John. Harrington, John. 

Halverseu, Louis. Harrington, T. J. 

Halverson, R. Harris, G. 

Halyon, A. Harvey, Samuel. 



Fiiinegan, John. 
F'innegan, Thos. 
Fish, A. J. 
Fish, E. 
Fisher, Wm. 
Fitzgerald, John. 
Flannery, M. 

Gabrie, O. 
Garberg, L. 
Gardner, Robert 
Gardner, 8. 
Garrett, A. 
Garvin, Simon. 
Garanson, A. 
Geary, R. 
Grenberg, John. 
Gendron, A. 
Geran, Ely. 
Gibbs, Wm. 
Gibbs, Fred. 
Gilbertson, K. 
Gillen, A. 
Gilles, John. 
Gillis, Alex. 
Gillia, Donald. 
Gillis, Duncan. 



^i i, ia .i,»i ii i #r i » ii | ii »y i * i < l iifi » ' ii i i '"SB»''*J» i g>» 



V iiii^Wttjj 



l u. ii .j Kj ii i i f. ij M jtiii i ;j. 



»?'jjir 



156 



beard's DIIIECTORY OF MARQUBnTE COUNTY. 



Hathaway, J. D. 
Haulaby, A. A. 
Haydcn, J. J. 
Hays, John. 
Haysler, John. 
Henderson, Chas. 
Herrin, Morris. 
Hickley, John. 
Hindle, Walter. 
Hitchcock, E. 
Hoalden, N. 
Holland, D. 
Holland & Bcott, hardware. 



Halm, John. 

Holmes, J. J. 

Hooper, John. 

Hooper, Thos. 

Hooven, A. 

Hopkins, Martin. 

Hopkins, Peter. 

Houglin, Chu8. 

Houghton, Jacob, sup't. Michi- 

gammi Mine. 
Howe, Thos. 
Harley, D. 



Idell, A. G. 
Isaacs, Peter. 



Isaacson, E. 



Jacobson, J. 

Jacobson, M. 

Jack, Thomas, 

Jackson, John. 

Jackson, L. 

James, H. C. 

Jant, Charles. 

Jenkins, F. G. 

Jercan, Isaac. 

Jereuson, C. 

Jewell, Henry, engineer. 

Jewsberg, A. 

Johannasen, A. 

Johns, Wm. blacksmith. 

Johnson, A. 



Kelly, E. 
Kelly, M. 



Johnson, Andrew. 

Johnson, A. L. boarding house. 

Johnson, A. W. 

Johnson, C. 

Johnson, Chas. boarding house. 

Johnson, E. S. 

Johnson, Henry. 

Johnson, John. 

Johnson, L. 

Johnson, Ole. 

Johnson, Peter. 

Johnson, Swan. 

Johnston, Joseph. 

Jolder, E. 

Jones, P. 

K 

Kennefick, J. 
Kennefick, P. 



, -.0.. 





MpiwmwiPMtn 



J, Bup't. Michi- 



w. 



boarding house, 
boarding house. 



beabd'h dikeotory op mabquettk county. 



157 



Kerr, John. 
Kindstraud, C. 
King, A. 
King, Joseph. 



King, Mark. 
King, O. 
King, Lamb. 
Kinney, S. 



Ladue, P. E. 

Lagreen, A. T. 

Lally, James, bearing house 

and saloon. 
Lamb, Henry. 
Lamb, John. 
Lambert, Charles. 
Lamene, Peter. 
Lapimere, L. 
Lame, C. 

Lavene, Frank, board'g house. 
Lawson, Andrew. 
Lawson, C. 
Lawson, E. 
Lawson, E. Q. 



Lawson, John. 
Limburger. Joseph. 
Liucour Arcale. 
Lindahl, O. P. 
Lindenstreth, O. 
Linn, John. 
Lockhart, J. 
Lombake, T. 
Longreen, John. 
Lovejoy, H. B. 
Ludwick, John. 
Lundberg, 8. 
Lynch, Frank. 
Lynch, George. 
Lynch, J. L. 



Magean, Jos. 
Magnosen, John. 
Malmberg, L. 
Malone, John. 
Maloney, J. S. 
Maloney, D. 
Malvern, Norris. 
Malvy, Austin. 
Marsh, H. P. 
Marshall, Thos. 
Martin, Jos. 
Maxou, Geo. 
M^yham, E. C. 



M 

Mayham, F. K. 
McAllister, Wm. 
McCrimmon, John. 
McCuin, Geo. 
McCumber, G. H. 
McCumber, J. R. 
McDonald, A. 
McDonald, D. 
McGraw, Jas. 
McGregor, Henry. 
McKennon, A. 
McKenzie, H. 
McLean, Wm. 




,, i<rf< n i iiii SixiX^1 itm mm^ > ^j i ^ - ^r s fi}^ ^- i' ■»i*>-* - ! ni tff j )fc^ 



-*-^ 



158 



BEARD'h DIREOTOIIY OF MABQOETTE COUNTY. 



McLean. W. H. 
McMahon, J. 
McPhee, John. 
McTige, J 08. 
Meekin, James. 
Melene, Peter. 
Merry, Joe. 
Mikner, Wm. 
Miller, A. W. 
Mills, D. 
Mitchel, A. 
Mitchel, J. 8. 
Monahan, M. 
Monahan, P. 
Moore, Hugh. 
Morin, J. 



Morris, John. 
Morrisey, M. 
Morrow, Morris. 
Mower, H. E. 
Mulbar, £. 
Mullen, B. 
Munck, A. 
Murphy, John. 
Murphy, Henry. 
Murphy, Hugh. 
Murrey, John. 
Murrey, 8. T. 
Murrey, W. J. 
Myers, A. 
Myers, E, 
Myers, J. 



Neddo, Peter. 
Neice, Lew. 
Nekle, F. 
Nelson, Fred. 
Nelson, Henry. 
Nelson, Peter. 
Neunent, Max. 



N 



Nilson, A. 
Nolen, H. O. 
Nord, lohn. 
Nord, S. 
Norman, N. T. 
Nostrum, G. 
Numan, John. 



Obie, D. 
Obirg, C. E. 
Okestroni, H. 
Olsen, A. 
Olsen, Andrew. 
Olsen, Charles. 
Olsen, H. 
Olsen, J. 



Olsen, Martin. 
Olsen, N. 
Olsen, Ole. 
Olsen, S. 

Ollrick, William. 
O'Neil, James. 
Osmensen, P. 
OuUette, H. J. 



t^^i 1 ! . m jililMim 



^sit-. * -yJ *■=.« 



I 

i 

1. 



beard'h dibectoby of mamquette county. 15 





p 


ParkiB, W. 0. 


Peterson, John. 


Perry, 8. 


Peterson, M. 


Peters, D, 


Peterson, Nils. 


Peterson, A. 


Pierce, P. 


Peterson, Andrew. 


Pierce, Richard. 


Peterson, Anton. 


Pinzie, Leon. 


Peterson, Ans. 


Pippin, P. saloon and b. house. 


Peterson, C. 


Piquette, J. 


Peterson, C. F. 


Plock, Geo. saloon. 


Peterson, E. 


Pollack, D. W. 


Peterson, G. 


Porter Frank. 


Peterson, Gust. 


Pouliat, 0. 


Peterson, J. 


Powers, John. 


Peterson, Jas. 


Prout, Jas. 




Q 


Quilty, A. 


Quirk, James. | 


Quilty, Michael. 






R 1 


Randell, David. 


Roberts, A. W. | 


Eeady. E. 


Roberts, Jos. 


Reed, M. 


Rock, Henry. 


Reid, B. F. 


Rock, J. W. 


Rexter, Ole. 


Rogers, John. 


Reynolds, Jas. 


Rondguest, M. 


Richards, E. 


Rosengreen, T. 


Richardson, B. W. 


Ross, John. 


Richster, Chas. 


Ross, P. 


Riley, John. 


Ross, R. 


Ringwood, John. 


Ryan, P. 


Riopel, Dennis. 


Ryan, Thos. 


Riopel, G. 





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m^ 



-t ^ ii^i^m^ixt ^ ifm uv 



IG'I beabd's dibeovorv: of mabquette county. 



Saleberry, Fred. 
feaies, John, 
feandstrom, Fritz, 
fiuqu'^ot, A. 
Sanquest, J. 
SautHang, Samuel. 
Santg, PhilJp. 
Sanstorf, J. 
Sawyer, Chaa. 



S 

Smith, Johr. 

Smith, Richard. 

Smitii, Samuel. 

Soderberg, S. E. 

Southcombe, Wm. 

Spr>^tley, G. 

Standenmaicr, J. boots & abof ~. 

Stevens, E. I . 

Stuvena, H. C. Justice of Peace. 



Sawyer & Snavely, proprieiora St. Amene, R. 

Adams House. St. German, Peter. 

Scaalan, Jas. Stoddard, F. S 

Schafer, F. Stonlone, Eli. 

Scheizer, Louis. Stout, Ed. 

Scully, Michael. Strait, J. 

Senthany & Neddo, jewelry, Stremberg, J. 



liquors and cigars. 
Settler, Jas. 
Seymour, Chas. 
Seymour, J. J. 
Shaffer, Jacob. 
Shea, C. 
Shea, John. 
Stepham, M. 
Shields, John. 
Sheron, John 
Shoulderbaeh, S. E. 
Simuer, Henry, 
Simon, Perval. 
Simons, N. 
Sinclair, Robt. 
Smith, Jas. 



Strom bach, John, saloon. 

Sul'"van, M. T. hotel and hitloon. 

Suiiivan, T. 

Sullivan, Wm. 

Sundberg, Frank. 

Sutherland, J. A. 

Swallen, John. 

Swan, John. 

Swanson, A. M. 

Swansea , C. 

Swanson, G. 

Swavely, G. A. 

Swellin, B. 

Swenderson, P. 

Swereason, C. 

Swerenson, J, 



Taylor, F. 
Tersmach, Charles. 



Theber, Adnrew. 

TibbittB, J. boarding house. 



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-JA*w.-.E.<JJ.fc. 



NTY. 



beahd's dibectouy of mauquette county. 



161 





Tibbttts, H. L. 






Trudo, Jerry. 




Tillson, Stephen. 


Trudo, Joseph. 




Todd, William. 


Turcott, Frank. 




Trelean, E. 


Tuttle, D. 




'"rudo, Isaac. 


U 




Ure, A. 




ots & shof ".. 




V 


ce of Peace. 


Vandervelt, J. 


Verestr&iu, Fred. 




Vansou, E. 


Vodden, Robert 




Varufty, C. J. 


Vogtlin, A. 




Vellum, Oie. 


Yogtliu & Weber, butchers. 

V/ 




Wade, J. E 


West, liayden & Co., 




Walden, Jos, 


clothing, and groceries. 


aloon. 


Walden, Peter. 


Weterstrom, Jas. 


1 aud hiiloon. 


Walker, G. W. 


White, Chas. 




Wallraan, Jno. 


White, D. W. 




Walstein, A. 


White, Jos. 




Watson, Frank. 


White, 8. 




Waahareu, J. 


Wicklander, A. 




Weber, R. 


Wilander, A. 




Webster, S. 


Wilson, E. 




Week, Chaa. 


Wilson, Gust, 




Wekeland, W. 


Wilson, Peter. 




Welander, P. J. 


Wise, Chas. 




Welander, P. S. 


Word, Eugene. 




Welauder, W. S. 


Wyley, Jas. ' 




Wertemberg, A. 


Y 




Young, P. A. 


Z 


nor hniine. 


Zimner, M. 





(I 



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i mW ! »i |<HJIIII» a i iil ll< M i » i I 



lia BEAED'b DIBECTOKY of HAIWBETrE COUNTY. 



CHERRY CREEK. 



Barns, Edward, teamster. 

Barns, Henry, carpenter. 

Bishop, O. D. sawyer, Eraser's luills. 

Bergham, Charles, farmer. 

Cundy, Charles, farmer. 

Conol, William, carpenter. 

Ewing, George E. farmer. 

Ford, William, farmer. 

Ford, John, sawyer, Frazer's mills. 

Garvey, Thomas, farmer. 

Garvey, Peter, farmer. 

Goodman, Barney, contractor. 

Griffin, James, foreman, Fraser mills. 

Rowland, James, Fraser mills. 

Johnson, Angus, contractor and farmer. 

King, Allen, farmer. 

King, Frank, carpenter. 

Kipp, Daniel, farmer. 

Knox, William, farmer. 

LaPete, Jack, farmer. 

Lemarr, Antoine, farmer. 

Mahaffa, R. J., Fraser mills. 

Mahatfa, John, Fraser mills. 

Mahaffa, Andrew, Fraser mills. 

Mahaffa, William, teamster. 

McCuUom, Murray, farmer, Fraser mills. 

McCoombs, John, teamster, Fraser mills. 

McLaughlin, Duncan, teamster, Fraser mills. 

Moore, James, Fraser mills. 

Preb, Fred., farmer. 

Preb, William, farmer. 

Richards, R. N., farmer. 

Roberta, W. B., farmer. 

Saunders, James, laborer, Fraser mills. 



iiiiiiittti'^fe' 



lihi^ 'wu'i l fufii iwii wr i ti Bift n i tti i M mm 



ii iiwrw ii Mg. ■ 



164 beard's directory op marqdette county. 



CHAMPION, 



Champion Kining Ck>mpany. 
Champion Furnaoe Company. 

Doty, L. H., Postmaster, 



CLARKSBURG. 



Amerman, A. S., physician. 

Colwell, H. J., superintendent Michigan Iron Company. 

Diilong, E., general store. 

Ferray, John, druggist. 

Kaiser, John, jeweler. 



GREENWOOD. 



Michigan Iron Co., manufacture pig iron, and general store. 



yz^^^v,i«^i. 



''''^"^■■ii 




Uompany. 



sneral store. 



■fc.fc^.„. ■Ji'fcAii. 




EARLY HISTORY 



LAKE SUPERIOR 



SKETCH OF THE EABLY EXPLORATIONS, WITH A NOTICE OF 
THE MISSIONARIES AND THEIH LABORS. 



BY C. 1. WALKER. 



It is now more than two centviriK? since civilized men 
penetrated the vast solitudes of the region of Lake Superior. 

The history of the early explorations, missions, and settle- 
ments in this region is full of deep, romantic, and sometimeo 
tragic interest The particular site on which has sprung up the 
city of Marquette was not early brought into prominence. 
There were here no trading posts, missions, stations, or settle- 
ments, but Marquette has outstripped its elder sisters, and is now 
the metropolis of Lake Superior. In population, wealth, and 
business, and in its means of communication, it is far in advance 
of any other point upon the lake ; and in a work devoted to this 
particular locality, it is eminently appropriate that there should 
be a reference to the early history of the whole region of witieh 
it is now the metropolis and principal city, mill a reverent 
tribute to the men who here first planted the i^'.'oSvS and esiTecially 
to Father Marquette from whom it derived its name. 

From the time when the footstejis of the white man. first 
penetrated the forests of our commonwealth, until the power of 
France on our continent was terminated by the victory of Wolf 
on the plains of Abraham, the entire teiritory of Michigan was 
under the undisputed dominion of France. And virtually it 
remained a part of Canada until 1796, when, under the pro- 



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166 



EABLY HISTORY OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



visions of Jay's treaty, it was surrendered to the \ iiited States. 

From France we received our first laws, om original social 
polity, our early religious character. And althinigii the wave 
of Anglo-Saxon immigration has. within a half of a century, 
rolled in upon us a population of more than a million, it has not 
oblfterated, and it is to be hoped it never will obliterate, the 
clear and distinct influence upon our social character, of the era 
of French dominion. 

We may not forget, we should ever be proud to remember, 
that, for the first century of its existence, the metropolis of our 
State, the " City of the Straits," was essentially French in all 
ita characteristics. 

MISSIONS. 

We should never forget that the pioneers of civilization and 
Christianity, along the shores of the noble rivers and mighty 
lakes that form the boundaries of our State, weie the French 
Jesuits. 

These men, with a firm step and intrepid mien, in the face of 
dangers, toils, sacrifices and suflerings, which no language can 
portray, and no imagination adequately conceive, bore aloft the 
torch of christian truth, amidst the moral darkness and desola- 
tion tha*; here reigned in terrible and savage grandeur. And, 
sustained by a mental and moral discipline, known to few save 
the followers of Loyalla, and by that unfaltering trust in God, 
which, thank heaven, is confined to no creed, and to no sect, 
they met, nay, even welcomed, torture and death with a calm 
joyousness that finds few parallels in the annals of mankind. 

The memory of those early Jesuit Missionaries to the Indians 
has been embalmed in the glowing pages of Bancroft. 

It may not be inappropriate or uninteresting to enter some- 
what more into detail in relation to their labors upon the shores 
of Lake Superior. 

Quebec waa founded by Champlain in 1608. In 1615 the 
first priests (Recollects) arrived. They were reinforced in 1620, 
aud in 1625 some Jesuits arrived. But these all returned to 
France in 1629 on the mpture of Quebec by the English. 
But in 1683, when Champlain returned to his government he 
brought with him Brebeuf and another priest 



aak'Mm wiWMU1iia»itfafth*ft*W 



T-Vl 



EABLY HISTORY OF LAKE 80PEBI0B. 



167 



'iited States, 
(■igin^i social 
fji the wave 

|f a century, 
)n, it haa not 
)Iiterate, the 

Jr, of the era 

o remember, 

polls of our 

''reach in all 



ilization and 

i and mighty 

the French 

in the face of 
language can 
tore aloft the 
I and desola- 
ideur. And, 
1 to few save 
rust in God, 
d to no sect, 
with a calm 
mankind. 
} the Indians 
oft. 

' enter some- 
)n the shores 

[n 1615 the 
■ced in 1620, 
returned to 
the English, 
rernment he 



Before this perio.l (1638) but little progress had been made 
in the conversion of the Indians. The Hurons were the first 
nation that cordially opened their hearts to the reception of 
Christian truth. 

They occupied a somewhat anomalous position in relation to 
^he two great divisions, into which the Indians, bordering on the 
St. Lawrence and its tributaries, were divided — the Algonquins 
and the Iroquois. 

When Jaqucs Cartier ascended' the St. Lawrence in 1534, he 
found its banks iniiabited by tribes of the great Algonquin race, 
and at Hocelaga oi Montreal he found a very populous Indian 
town. 

When Champlain in 1608 first raised the banner of France 
on the rock of St. Louis, the Algonquins gathered around him 
to give him a welcome. 

He found them the hereditary enemies of their neighbors, the 
Iroquis, a race with similar habits, but with a radically different 
language, fewer in numbers and occupying a far less extent of 
territory. But these disadvantages were more than compensated 
by their compactness ; by their admirable system of govern- 
ment ; by their superior prowess, and by their haughty ambition. 

Occupying a territory but H^tle larger than the State of New 
York, they arrogantly aspired to become the Romans of this 
western world ; the arbiteis of peace and war, from the Atlantic 
to the Mississippi, from the great lakes to the everglades of 
Florida. Their tomahawks carried terror and destruction into 
the villages of the peaceful Illinois on the broad prairies of the 
west, and the fiendlike yells of their war parties were echoed 
back by the rocks that ranged themseWes along the shores of 
the mighty lake of the north. 

THE HURONS. 

The Hurons, or Wyanduttes, were of the same lingual stock 
of the Iroquis, and Occupied for a time a kind of neutral posi- 
tion between the great contestants for aboriginal dominion. 
They were the intellectual superiors of the Iroquis, without their 
love of war, or their lust of power. 
They had gathered in large numbers about Georgian Bay 



ii'^ftft' wlHWi^V'^* - 



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iii n i wMwiri iiiM iaft ^ u i i" ii ' H I " 



1(58 



EARLY HIHTOBY OF LAKE SUPEftlOR. 



and Lake Siracoe, where they sustained themselves by hunting, 
fishing, and a better system of agriculture than generally pre- 
vailed among the Indians. 

The year of the settlement of Quebec, Champlain joinwl an 
expedition of the Algonquins of the St. Ijawrence into the 
country of the Iroquis, by way of the beautiful lake that bears 
his name. From him, in that expedition, those fierce warriors 
first learned the terrible power of firearms. 

From that moment they became the bitter enemies of the 
French, who had thus espoused the cause of their hereditary 
foes, and at frequent intervals, for a century and a half, the 
French colonies suffered from their vindictive and cruel wrath. 

The Hurons, at a very early day, became the fast friends of 
the French. As early as 1615, lather Carron visited them, on 
an embassy of peace and love. And from 1622 to 1625, the 
Recollects had a mission among them. 

On the arrival of the Jesuits, they commenced their labors 
among the Hurons, — labors that were to have so tragic an end. 

Brebeuf acquired a knowledge of their language and man- 
ners, and was adopted into their nation. 

By the conquest of Canada, 1629, the mission was broken 
up. But on the restoration of th^pFrench power, in 1633, it was 
renewed with increased zeal and numbers. Then villages were 
reached by the circuitous, laborious and dangerous route of the 
Ottawa river, the more direct route being through a country 
where the Iroquois were found upon the war path. 

The journey was replete with difiiculties, hardships and dan- 
gers, — reaching for 300 leagues through dense forests. The 
rivers were full of rocks and waterfalls, and the missionaries 
were compelled to ply the paddle, to draw the canoe over rapids, 
and 10 carry heavy burdens over roughest portages. 

Food was scarce, and the Indians unfriendly. But after 
severe toil and intense suffering, the sacred envoys, Brebeuf and 
Daniel, reach the heart of the Huron wilderness, and commence 
their labors, soon to be followed by the gentle Lailemant, and 
many others. 

Here, for fifteen years, with calm, impassive courage, and 



'.(W 



by hunting, 
enerally pre- 

lin joined an 
ace into the 
ce that bears 
erce warriors 

emies of the 
ir hereditary 
1 a half, the 

cruel wrath, 
ast friends of 
ted them, on 

to 1625, the 

1 their labors 
ragic an end. 
ge and man- 

1 was broken 
a 1633, it was 
villages were 
I route of the 
gh a country 

tiips and dan- 
forests. The 
i missionaries 
)e over rapids, 
I. 

f. But after 
, Brebeuf and 
ind commence 
allemant, and 

courage, and 



EARLY HISTORY OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



IGJ) 



wearied patience, the Jesuits continued their self-denying labors, 
in the midst of privations, peril, suffering, insult, contumely and 
dttiigera the most imminent, the details of which would make a 
volume of thrilling interest. 

The arm of French power had not yet taught the savages 
the sacred character ol the " Black Coats," a« the Jesuits were 
tailed, to distinguish them from the Recollects, or " Grey Coats." 

The medicine men of the Indians, feeling that their craft was 
in danger, spared no opportunity to arouse against the missiona- 
ries savage hate. Misfortune, sickness aud death were all 
charged upon them, as the fruit of their prayers and ceremonies, 
and the baptism of a dying infant was sometimes a source of 
imminent danger. 

To avoid this they often resorted to stratagem. Father 
Pigart, being rudely repulsed from a cabin, whose iumates re- 
fused to have a dying infant baptised, offers to the little sufferer 
a piece of sugar, and unperceived, though watched, pressed from 
a wet cloth a drop of holy watc* upon its ftvtred brow. 

But ultimately the patience and loving perseverance of the 
Missionaries overcame all opposition, and the Huron nation 
received the truth. But the kour of their destruction waa at 
hand. The terrible Iroquis came down upon them like a wolf 
upon the fold. 

In July, 1648, at early dawn, while the men were mostly 
absent on a hunting expedition, the populous town of Te-an-an- 
sta-que was aroused by the fearful war cry of the Iroquois. 
The few defenders rally at the feeble palisades, encouraged 
by the Godly father Daniel. Hastily, as if the salvation of 
souls hung on each flying moment, he confesses, baptizes by 
aspersion, pronounces a general absolution, and flies to the 
chapel where many of his flock have gathered for safety. 
He does the same there, exhorts them to flee from the rear of 
the building, while he bodly opens the front door and faces the 
approaching foe, to give a moment's time to his flying flock. 

They recoil at the brave man's presence ; but soon they rally ; 
his body is pierced with arrows, a fatal bullet finishes the work. 




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■"MMMUlillfNfiM 



170 



EABLY HI8TOBY OF liAKE HI I'FKIOli. 



He fallo, — breathing the name ofJesua, and hiH body is < ist iuu, 
the fire made by his burning chapel. 

The following year, in March, other townH fell. The brave 
and noble Brebeuf and the gentle and loving Gabriel Ln' inant 
met death by tortures, that only demons could invent or demons 
inflict. 

The whole annaln of martyrdom scarwiy afford a pfirallfl, 
either in the ingenious cruelty of the tormentors, or in the 
wonderful fortitude and heroism of the victims. 

The Huron nation was destroyed. Many perished by the 
hand of the enemy ; others submitted and became incor[)orated 
to their tribes. Another portion settled near Quebec, and a 
.mil fraction, consisting of 600 or 800 fled, first to the Mana- 
toulin Islands, thence to Mackinaw, and from thence to Bay de 
Noquet. And when the mission at La Point was established in 
1666, they gathered ^iround the standard of the cross, erected by 
Father Alloney. Driven thence by the Dacotahs, they were 
eetablished at Mackinaw by Marquette, in 1671. 

When Detroit was founded in 1701, they removed to this 
poi.nt. In 1751 they mostly removed to Sandusky, and subse- 
quently, by the name of Wyandottes, took an active and con- 
spicuous part, on the side of the British in the war of the 
Revolution. They have been, since their dispersion, wanderers 
without territory of their own, depending for a home, upon the 
hospitality of other nr ons. 

FIRST VISIT TO LAKE SUPERIOR. 

It was from the Huron mission, that the first Mis- nary 
explorers were sent forth to examine the moral desolation of our 
own territory. At a feast of the dead, held in Huronia, in early 
summer 1641, there were in attendance a delegation from the 
Chippewas of Sault St. Marie. 

The Missionaries, with that skill which was peculiar to them, 
soon ingratiated themselves into their favor and were cordially 
invited to return with them to their homes, on the confines of 
the "great lake," the charms of which they depicted in glowing 
colors. 



itBiBi^iBii 



?.«B.J^3taKat^,a.».. 



RARLY HIHTORY OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



171 



1 



ily is cast inUi 

The brave 
riel Ln' iiiant 
ent or dfinons 

(1 a |i!irallf'l, 
irrJ, or iu the 

riHhed by the 
e incorporated 
Quebec, and a 
t to the Mana- 
nc6 to Bay de 
I established in 
rosa, erected by 
ihs, they were 

emoved to this 
iky, and subse- 
ictive and con- 
he war of the 
sion, wanderers 
home, upon the 

R. 

iirst Mis- mary 
esolation of our 
urouia, in early 
Ration from the 

3culiar to them, 
I were cordially 
the confines of 
cted in glowing 



The MiMsionariefi, ever anxious to extend the dominion of the 
cross, joyfully accepted the invitation. 

Charles Raymbault, a father, thoroughly versed in the 
.\lgonquin language and customs, and Isaac Joques, equally 
familiar with the Huron, were selected. These men were the 
tir^t who planted the cross within the limits of our State. 

On the 17th of Juno, 1641, they started upon their adven- 
turous vo3'age. For sevenleen days, they plied the paddle on 
the clear waters of the Northern lakes, and through the channel 
uf the 8t. Mary's River gemmed by a thousand beautiful islands. 

They were kindly ami honpitably received by the Chippewas 
ut the 8ault, who urged them to remain with them, that they 
might profit by their w^rds. They told them of the " Great 
Lake," of the fierce Dacotahs, and of numerous other tribes, of 
whom the fathers had never before heard. 

But they were compelled to relum, and after planting the 
cross, they left, hoping soon !> be ab. to establish a mission at 
this promiiiiing point among the docile Chippewas. 

Raymbault died with consumption the following year, and 
Jaques met a martyr's death among the Iroquois. 

No further attempt was made to send the gospel to the great 
Northwest, until 1656. After the destruction of the Hurons, 
thi' Iroquois ranged in proud and haughty triumph, from Lake 
Erie to Lake Superior. 

Upper (Janada was desolation, and even the route by the 
Ottawa river was not safe from tlie war parties of these bold 
marauders. 

During this year, some Ottawaa made their way to the St. 
Lawrence. Two missionaries left to return with them, one, the 
celebrated and devoted Dreuilletts. They were attacked by the 
Iroquois. Father Garreau was mortally wounded, and Dreu- 
illettes brutally abandoned. 

Another company of Ottawas and other Algonqiiins, appeared 
at Quebec iu 1(560, and a.sked for a missionary Mia.sion» had 
now received a fresh impulse from the pious Levulle, the first 
bishop of Quebec, who came out in 1659. 



ii 






m 



t -I I Mil I II 1 19 



172 



EAKLY HIHTOBY OK I,AKR Hri'EniOR. 



FATHER ME8NARD. 

Father Mt«nar<I whm selected ah the first ambaMHador of the 
(•ro88 oil the HhoreH of "Gitchie Gnmoe," the '* Big Sea Water." 

The clioicc was a fit one. He ha(! been a compeer of those 
noble men who had enriched Hurunia's soil with their blood 

He had experienced every vicissitude of missionary service 
and suHcring. He had rejoiced in baptizinj^ many a convert on 
the banks of the beautiful Cayuga, and his seamed face attested 
the wounds he had received in the cause of truth. Tha frosts of 
many winiors adorned his brow, and severity of toil and suffer- 
ing had somewhat broken his frame, yet his spirit was still 
strong, and ho was ready for the sacrifice. 

Although not buoyed up by the enthusiasm of youth, or in- 
experience, he not only did not recoil from the labor, peril, 
suffering and death, which he fefl awaited him, but ho cheer- 
fully looked forward, a.s the true-^t happiness, to a death of 
misery, in the service of God. 

Alone, in August, 1660, he leaves the haunts of civilization, 
and put« himself into the hands of savage strangers, who treated 
the aged priest -.vith coarse brutality. From morning till night, 
in a cramped position, they liompei him to ply the unwelcome 
paddle ; and over sharp rocks to drag the canoe up the foaming 
rapids ; and at portages, to carry heavy burdens. 

He is subjected to every form of drudgery ; to every phase of 
insult and contempt. Want, absolute and terrible comes in to 
enhance the horrors of the voyage. Berries and edible moss are 
exhausted ; and the moose skin of their dresses is made to yield 
its scanty and disgusting nutriment. 

Finally, with his breviary contemptuously cast into the 
water; barefooted, wounded by sharp stones, exhausted from 
toil, hunger, and brutal treatment ; without food, or the means 
of procuring any, he is abandoned, upon the desolate shores of 
Lake Superior to die. 

But even savage cruelty relents. After a few days, during 
which time he supports life with pounded bones, his luditun 
companions return, and convey him to their winter rendezvous, 
which they leach October 15th, St. Theresa Day. From that 






Ki 



^^^ 



j£, 






KARLY HIHTOKY OF LAKE HlirEllIOU. 



173 



^ador of the 
"^ea Water." 
)eer of those 
their blood 
nary service 
a convert on 
face attested 
Thj frosts of 
1 and sutfer- 
irit wait still 

youth, or in- 
labor, peril, 
but ho cheer- 
) a death of 

f civilization, 
i, who treated 
ing till night, 
le unwelcome 
) the foaming 

very phase of 
1 comes in to 
liblc moss are 
made to yield 

cast into the 
liausted from 
J! the means 
ate shores of 

days, during 

i, his Indian 

r rendezvous. 

From that 



circumstance he called it "Ht. Theresa Bay," probably 
Keweenaw Hay. 

Here, amidst every discouragement and privation, with no 
white brethren nearer than Montreal, he began a mission and 
said " Mass," which he says, " repaid mo with usury, for all 
my past hardships." 

For a time he was permitted a place in the dirty camp of Le 
Bouchet, the chief of the band, and who had so cruelly aban- 
doned him. But this aged and feeble servant ot God was soon 
thrust out and forced to spend the long and bitter cold winter on 
that inhospitable shore, in a little cabin, built of fir branches, 
piled upon one another, through which the winter wiiid:^ whistled 
freely, and which answered the purpose, " not so much," says the 
meek missionary, " to shield me from the rigor of the storm, as 
to correct my imagination, and persuade me that I was sheltered." 
Want, famine, that frequent curse of the improvident tribes that 
skirt the great " Northern Lake," came, with its horrors, to make 
more memorable this first eflbrt to plant the cross by the waters 
of Lake Superior. 

" O the long and dreary winter ! 
O the cold and cruel winter ! 
Ever thicker, thicker, thicker, 
Froze the ice on lake and river ; 
Ever deeper, deeper, deeper. 
Fell the snow o'er all the landiicape, 
Fell the covering snow, and drifted. 

Through the forest, round the village, 
Hardly, from his buried wigwam. 
Could the hunter force a passage ; 
With his mittens and hiw dnow-shoes, 
Vainly Wiilked he through the forest ; 
iSought for bird and beast, but found none. 
Saw no track of deer nor rabbit. 
In the snow beheld no foot-print , 
In the ghastly, gleaming forest. 
Fell, — and could not rise from weakness, 
Perished there, — from cold and hunger. 

() the famine and the fever ! 
O the wasting of the famine ! 
O the blasting of the fever I 



> 



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Sti<:sslBiasSS!^S!SIBm>'^.' 



| i Mt lti^ 'l | 1^IH l |i ^ t i >yn; ii 'j 



174 



EARLY HrSTOBY OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



() the wailing of the chldren ! 

() the anguish of the women 1 

Ail t'.ie earth waA nick and fa.aished, 

Hungry was the air around them ; 

Hungry was the sljy above them ; 

'lUd the hungry stars in heaven, 

Like the eyes of wolves, glared at them." 

Yet, the good father found sources of consolation even here, 
and desired not to be taken down from the adorable wood. 

A few adults listened to his words of love, and some dying 
infants were baptized. 

Spring came and relieved the pressure of physical suffering, 
and hopefully did the missionary labor on. 

The band of partially christianized Hurons, — who, on the 
destruction of their nation, had sought refuge from the Iroquois 
in these northern fastnesses, — were now at Bay de Noquet ; and 
they sent for Father Mesnard to come and administer to them the 
rites of religion. It was a call he could not resist, although 
warned that the toil of the journey was too great for his failing 
strength, and that dangers beset his path. He replied, " God 
calls me thither, I must go, if it costs me my life." 

He started ; but on the 10th of August, 1661, while his only 
attendant was getting the canoe over a portage, he wandered 
into t' .. forest, and was never seen more. 

Whether he took a wrong path and was lost in the wood, or 
whether some straggling Indian struck him down, was never 
known. 

Thus ended the life of Father Mesnard, the first christian mis- 
Monary who labored within the bounds of our commonwealth. 
Although possessed of no striking qualities, yet, by his fervent 
piety, by his faithful and incessant toil ; by his calm endurance, 
of hardship and suffering ; by his noble christian courage ; by his 
earnest faith and christian hope, he had become one of the ruoat 
useful missionaries in the nev world ; commanding the respect 
of his superiors, the love of his equals, and the veneration of the 
Indians, 

As a pioneer in '^ur own State, Michigan should cherish liis 
memory, and seek to perpetuate a knowledge of his virtues. But 



F,ABI.Y HISTORY OF LAKE 8UPEBI0B. 



175 



even here, 
ood. 
[)mo dying 

suffering, 

ho, on the 
le Iroquois 
)quet ; and 
o them the 
, although 
his failing 
ied, "God 

ile his only 
) wandered 

e wood, or 
was never 

'istian mis- 
lonwealth. 
lis fervent 
;ndurance, 
ge ; by hia 
>f the most 
le respect 
tion of the 

herish his 
ues. But 



as yet, not a stream, not a bay, not a headland, bears his honored 
name ; and on the shores of the great lake where he first raised 
the cross, that emblem of our faith, even his existence is hardly 
known. 

Hardships, discouragements, persecutions and death, seemed 
only to excite the Jesuits to renewed and more energetic effort 
to carry the gospel to the poor Indian. 

FATHER ALLOUEZ. 

In 16Q^, Claude Allouez left Quebec to commecce a chris- 
tian mission on the shores of Lake Superior. He may well be 
called the founder of uorthwastern missions ; the real pioneer of 
Christianity and civilization in the region bordering on the great 
northern and western lakes. 

He bad not that cultivated intellect ; that refined taste ; that 
genial heart ; that elevation of soul ; that forgetfulness of self; 
that freedom from exaggeration, that distinguished father Mar- 
quette ; but he was a strong character, of dauntless courage ; of 
ceaseless and untiriug energy ; full of zeal ; thoroughly acquainted 
with the Indian character, and eminently a practical man. For 
a full quarter of a century, he was the life and soul of the mis- 
sionary enterprise in Wisconsin and Illinois, and to some extent, 
Michigan. 

On his voyage to the Sault, he was subjected, — as was gener- 
ally the case with the missionaries until the arm of French 
power was distinctly felt in those remote regions, — to the keenest 
insult and to the coarsest brutality from his Indian conductors. 
He reached the Sault early in September. He passed on beyond. 
For a whole month he coasted along the shores of the Great 
Lake, which he named de Tracy, in honor of the Marquis de 
Tracy, then in command of Canada as governor, and in 
October, at Chegonnegon, the beautiful La Point of our day, he 
raised the standard of the cross, and boldly preached its doc- 
trines. 

The Hurons, in search of whom father Mesnard lost his life, 
iome of the couvorts of father Mesnard, and many heathnn 
bands, gathered around the solitary priest, and listened to his 



m 



i 



170 



EAKLY HIHTOBY OP LAKE SUPERIOR. 



words ; yet they opened not their hearts readily to "the prayer." 

He visited remote tribes, and after seeing how broad was the 
harvest, and how ripe for the sickle, he descended, in 1667, to 
Quebec, for more laborers. Quickly he moved ; promptly he 
acted. 

In two days after Ir.s arrival, he was on his way back to his 
beautiful northern field, with an additional priest and a lay 
brother in his company. 

He remained at La Point until father Marquette took his 
place, in the fail of 1679, when he founded the mission of St, 
Francs Xavier at Green Bay. 

After father Mnrquette'n death, he succeeded him in the 
Illinois mission, and aftorward.s founded the mission of St. 
Joseph, on onr own beautiful river of that name. 

It does J-iot fall in witl; cue pisrpose to trace the intereUing 
career of this man, and point out his abundant labors and Uintir- 
ing zeal as a roiasioaary, or his valuable services an an explorer ; 
for our own soil vras but incidentally the field of his efforts, 

FATIIETR M \RQl' ETTE. 

But of all the meti, whose names are connected with the; early 
history of I/ake Superior, thers is iioae toward whom we turn 
with so warm a love and feo high a veneration as to James 
Marquetf*. 

Ilia cultivated mind, his refined taste, his warm and genial 
nature, Ida temdet love for the «ouls in his charge, his calm and 
immovable courage in everf hour of danger, his cheerful sub- 
mission to the little privations and keen svifferiug attending the 
missionary life, bis important discoveries, his devotion to truth, 
his catholic spirit, and liwit but not least, 'lji,s early, calm, joyous 
and heroic death, ail entitle him to that high pi ace in the regard 
of posterity which his memcfy ha,8 beeji slowly, but surely 

acquiring- 

Marquette was born in 1637. He was of gentb; blood, 
hav-.iig descended from the roofit notable family in the small, but 
ancient and stately city of Leon, in the north (tf France. 

Tht) family havo for centuries, been eminent for s, dovotioji 




UMl 



mmiitamtaaicmumiiumiiiiMimMiiimtmiam 



;he prayer." 

oad was the 
in 1667, to 
ironaptly he 

back to his 
, ami a lay 

:te took his 
iasion of St. 

hiiu in the 
ssion of St. 

3 intereiting 
i'8 and uiiitir- 
111 explorer ; 

efforts, 



itli the early 
lom we turn 
is to James 

I and geoDial 
lis calia and 
iieerful sub- 
.ttending the 
Jon to truth, 
calm, joyous 

II the regard 
but surely 

lenth; blood, 

he small, but 

aiice. 

r e, devotion 



KAltLV HlSTOitX OF LAKE SLU'KiaOU. 



177 




to military life, and three of its memlxsra shed their blood ufmu 
our own soil during the war of the Riivolution. 

Through the iii.struetions of a pious mother,, he became, at an 
early age, imbued with an eanief*t dessire to devote hiaibelf to a 
religious life. 

At the age of weventeen he renounced the allurements of liie 
world, and entered tlie Bociety of Jesus. ,\8 required by the 
rules of the oider^ he spent two year? in tho.se spiritual exercisra 
proscribed by their great founder. Then, for ten king years, lie 
remained under tlie remarkable training and leachiug of the 
urder, and aL-cjuired that wonderful .self-control, that quiet 
repose, that power of calm endurance, that unquestioning 
obedience to hi.s superiors ; thut thirst for trial, sutfej'ing and 
(ifutli that marked the Jesuits in this, the gohlen age of their 

pOWlT, 

III' took for hisi lU'idel in life the great Xavier, and, like 
liim, longed to des'ote his (iayft to the convei-sion of the heathen, 
and like him, to die in (he midst ol Id.-, lahon, in a foreign 
laud, alone. 

Although he had not that joyous hilarity of soul; that gay 
huoyancy of spirit ; and tlmt vi/oiiderful pc»wer over men, tliat 
.■^'j distinguished the Aj'ioslle to tlie Indira ; yet, he had nuich of 
Uiat Hweet)ie.ss of disposition, that genial temporament., that 
facile a(i;.ipt,ation to cir(!Uin.^lftrice.4, that depth of love., and that 
apostolic /;eal vt^hieh behniged to that wonderful man. 

Panting fir a missionary life, My.rqiiette, «,fc the age of 
ivvealy-nine siiJed fior New France, which he reached i-teptember 
20, 16()0. 

Early in October, he was placed imc^er the tuition of the 
celebrated Father Drenilletle at " Three Eivei*" U) learn the 
native language. 

After a year and a half of pfapzratUm, be left for the Sault 
>'t. Mary to plant the first permaaeicit inisi-iion and settlement 
witliin the bounds of our State. 

Th(5re were then about 2,000 }:&di;5.n/i at this point; the 
liicilinr with which they <;ould live by fishing, niakiag it one of 
rhe most populous pla.'es in Indian territniry. 




fltilSKHIW 



itH^«e%'«i£iiHia$iie£sitQB«Aift^%wni«MHWti.iQni 



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ITS 



KAliLY aiNTOHY OF LAKE SUPfiUIOB. 



They were Algonquin?, mostly Chippeways, and received the 
teachings of the good father with great docility, and would 
gladly have been baptized, but the wise and cautious missionary 
withhold the rite until he could olearly instruct them in 
ciiristian duty. In the following year, he was joined by Father 
Dablou, when the first ciiristian church on Michigan soil was 
erected. But he was not long to remain in thia first field of his 
labors. In obedience to ordei-s iVom hi.s superiors, in the fall of 
1609 he went to La Pointe, to take the place of Allouez, who 
proceeded to found a mission at Green Bay. For a whole 
month, through much suffering and in constant peril of hia life, 
he coa.-^ted along the shore.s of J^ake Superior, contending with 
fierce winds, ice and snow. 

At La Point, he found 400 or -500 Huronf<; a company of 
Ottawas and some other tribes. 

The Hurons had mostly been baptized; and, he isaya "still 
pre.ierve some Christianity." " Other tribco," to use his own 
language, " were proud and undeveloped " and he had so little 
hope of them that he did not baptize healthy infanta, watchinj,' 
only for those that were sick. 

It was only after long months of trial that he baptized the 
first adult, i,fter seeing his assiduity in prayer, his frankness in 
recounting his past life, and his promises for the future. 

Here an Illinois captive was given to him, and he imme- 
diately commenced to learn the language from this rude teacher, 
and as he gradually acquired a knowledge of it, his loving heart 
warmed towards the kind hearted and peaceful nation, and he 
longed to breuk to them the bread of life. 

" No one," he exclaims, " must hope to escape crosses in our 
missions, and the best means to live happy is not to fear them ; 
but ia the enjoyment of little crosses hope for others atill greater. 
The Illinois desire us, like Indian:;, to share their miseries and 
suffer all that can be imagined in barbarism. They are lost 
sheep, to be sought through woods and thorn.s." 

Here it was, in the heart of this Northern winter, surrounded 
by his Indians, talking in a broken manner with his Illinois 
captive, that he conceived the idea of a voyage of discovery. 



'^''^^uSiTn^mummxafn^r. 



W)''- 



EARLY HlflTOBY OP LAKE SUTEUIOB. 



179 



received the 
and would 
missionary 
t thera in 
i by Father 
itan soil was 
field of his 
in the fall of 
A.llouez, who 
''or a whole 
■il of hia life, 
tending with 

company of 



K; .says 



'still 



use his own 

had so little 

int«, watching 

I baptized the 
i frankness in 
uture. 

^nd he immc- 
I rude teacher, 
8 loving heart 
ation, and he 

crosses in our 
to fear them ; 
'8 still greater. 
' miseries and 
They are lost 

er, surrounded 

,h his Illinois 

of discovery. 



He hears of a great river, the Mississippi, whose course is 
southward. He says, this great river can hardly empty into 
Virginia, and we rather believe that its mouth is in California. 
He rejoict* in the prospect of seeking for this unknown stream, 
with one Frenchman and this Illinois captive as his only 
companions, if the Indians will, according to their agreement, 
make him a canoe. This discovery, he aay.s, will give us a 
complete knowledge of the southern and we.'jtern sea. 

But his further labors at La Pointe and his pian.s of present 
discovery were suddenly terminated by the breaking out of war. 

The fierce Dacot^hs, tiiose Iroquois of the West, who 
inspired the feeb'-' tribes about them with an overpowering avre, 
thieatened to det ' 'e the region of La Pointe. 

The Otiawas fii-st left, and then the Hurons, who soenjcd 
destinod to be wanderers upon the face of the earth without a 
spot they could cull their own, turned their faces to the east. 

Their hearts fondly yearned for that delightful home, from 
which they had been so cruelly driven iwonty year,} before. 
And we may well imagine that the devoted missionary longed 
to labor in that field, made sa'red by the blood of Daniel, 
Brebeuf, Lallemant, and others. 

But the dreaded Iroquois were too near and too dangerous 
neighbors for such an experiment, and with their missionnry at 
their head, they selected for their home the point known as St. 
Ignace, opposite Mackinaw. 

Bleak, barren and inhospitable as was this spo*, it had some 
peculiar and compensatory advantages. It abounded with fish, 
and was on the great highway of a growing Indian commerce. 

Here, in the summer of 1671, a rude church, made of logs, 
and covered with bark, was erected, and about it clustered the 
stiil ruder cabins of the Hurons. Near the cha^wl and inclosing 
the cabins was erected a palisade to defend the little colony 
against the attacks of predatory Indians. 

Thus did Marquette become the founder of Mackinaw, as he 
had before been of Sault St. Mary. Some of the Hurons wore 
still idolaters, and the Indians were weak and wayward, but ho 
looked upon them with parental love. 



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i ^ai^^--imi i/ i0^^^'^ ii ^iV ii J ^ ' i f^ 



180 



EABLY HIBTOBY OF LAKE SPPEBIOB. 



" They have," he writes, in 1672, " come regularly to prayers 
and have listened more readily to the instructions I gave them, 
consenting to what I required :o prevent theirdisorders ana abomi- 
nations. We must have patience with untutored minds who 
know only the devil ; who, like their ancestors, have been his 
slaves, and who often relapse into the sins in which they were 
nurtiii?d." " God alone can fix their feeble minds and place 
and keep them in his grace, and touch their heart while we 
stammer at their ears." 

A large colony of Ottawas, located near the mission, although 
intractable, received his faithful and Ibving a'tention, thus, 
" stammering at their ears," and trusting that God would reach 
the heart, the good father, through privation, suffering and inces- 
sant toil, subjected to every caprice, insult and petty persecution, 
labored for two years, cheered by the privilege of occasionally 
baptising a dying infant, and rejoicing in a simple, mournful, 
loving faith in its death. Hearing of a sick infant, he says, " I 
went at once and baptized it, and it died the next night. Some 
of the othev children, too, are dead, and are now in heaven. 
These are the consolations which God sends us, which make us 
esteem our life more happy as it is more wrotehed." 

Htre, again, his attention was called to the discovery of the 
MiHsifisiitpl, which he sought, that new nations might be open to 
thi' U'i'ImM III peace and good will. 

Ii: 11 letter to his superior, after speaking of his field of labor, 
he suv)^ ' I am ready to leave it in the hands of another mis- 
sionary, and go, on your order, to seek new nations towards the 
South Sea, wlii) an: M\\\ unkiio\>a to us, luid teach them of our 
great (iftd, wiiom tliey have hitherto unknown." 

His fond wishes in this regard were nhout to be gratified. 
The newi! ol the great river at the westward, running to the 
southern ssea, had reached the ears of the great Colbert, and 
through him, of Louis XIV. himself. 

Tiiey did not lail to see the infinite advantage of dib^overing 
and possessing this great element of territorial power. 

The struggle for dominion in America between the English 
and the French, was then pending. If the English settlements. 




KABLY HISTORY OF LAKE 8DPEBI0R. 



181 



y to prayers 
gave them, 
s ana abomi- 
minds who 
ve been his 
h they were 
18 and place 
,rt while we 

on, although 
ention, thus, 
would reach 
ig and inces- 
persecution, 
occaaioually 
e, mournful, 
, he says, " I 
light. Some 
V in heaven, 
lich make us 

3overy of the 
It be open to 

field of labor, 
another mis- 

s towards the 
them of our 

be gratified, 
nning to the 
Colbert, and 

if disb-iovering 

er. 

1 the English 

li settlements, 



then feeble and scattered along the Atlantic coast, couid be 

hemmed in by a series of French posts, from the " Great Lakes" 

to tht Southern Sea, France would control the continent, and 

ambitious schemes of Britain would be nipped in the bud. 

Colbert authorized the expedition, and was ably seconded by 

the wise energy and sagacious forecast of Count Frontenac and 

of Talon, Governor and Inteudant of New France. 

Jolliet, a young, intelligent and enterprising merchant, of 

Quebec, and Marquette, were appointed to execute the project. 

In the fall of 1672, Jolliet arrived at Mackinaw with the 

joyful news. Marquette had. as he says, long invoked the 

" blessed virgin" that he might obtain of God the grace to be 

able to vinit the nations of the Mississippi. 

He is enraptured at the good news that his desires are about 

to be gi-atified ; that he is to expose his life for the salvation of 

those nations, and especially of the Illinois. 

They were not to leave until spring During that long 

dreary winter on that desolate point, he spent his leisure time in 

gathering from the Indians all possible information of the 

unknown region they were about to visit, and tracing upon the 

bark of the birch, maps of the courses of rivers, and writing 

down the names of the nations and tribes inhabiting their banks, 

and of the villages they should visit. 

On the 17th of May, 1673, in two bark canoes, manne;"» by 

five men, and stocked with a small supply of Indian corn and 

dried venison, the two explorers left Mackinaw. 

" Our joy at being chosen," says the good father, " for this 

expedition, roused our courage and sweetened the labor of 

rowing from morning till night." And merrily over the clear 

waters of Lake Michigan did they ply the paddle of their 

light canoe . . 

" And the forest life wa« in it ; 

All its mystery and maRic ; 

All the brightneaa of the birch tree, 

All the t()iighne«w of the cedar. 

All the beech's supple sinews, 

And it floated on the wat»T 

Like a yellow leaf in autumn, 

Like a yellow water lily." 



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•l .,ii ^ i ) i» n^ . 



182 



EABLY HI8T0BY OP LAKE SUPERIOR. 



At Green Bay, the friendly ludiai s did all in their power to 
prevent the further progress of the ejcpedition. They pictured 
U) the courageous explorers, the fierce Dacotahs with their long 
black hair, their eyes of fire, and their terrible toraahawke of 
stone ; who never spared strangers. 

They told of the wars then raging, and the war parties on 
every trail. They described the danger of navigation, of frighu 
ful rapids and sunken rocks, of fearful monsters that s-vallowed 
up men and canoes together ; of a cruel demon that ftops the 
passage and engulfs the navigator who dares to invade his 
dominion; of excessive heats that would infallibly cause 
their death. 

The good father told them that the salvation of souls was 
concerned, and that in such a cause he would gladly lay down 
his life ; that of the dangers they described, they had no fear. 
On went the travelers, toilfully ascending the Fox River, 
dragging their canoea up the rapids, over sharp stones that 
lacerated their bleeding and unprotected feet. 

In ten days ftom leaving Mackinaw, they had passed the 
portage; had launched their canoes upon the wateis of the 
Wisconsin and commenced its descent towards the Mississippi. 
For seven days they floated down its crystal waters. Vine- 
clad islets, fertile banks, diversified with wood, prairie and hill, 
alive with deer and moose, delight their vision, but no human 
being is seen. 

On the 17th of June, 1673 with joy, " which," says the good 
father, "I cannot express," they entered the great river, and the 
longed-for discovery is made, and the " Father of Waters" is 
given to the civilized world. 

It is true that De Soto, in that fool-hardy and sadly unfortu- 
nate expedition, that has added a thrilling chapter to American 
history, had, 130 years before, discovered the lower Mississippi, 
but it seems never to have been revisited, and the very knowledge 
of it had died out. 

For seven days more the joyous adventurers floated down its 
broad bosom, following its gentle curves, before they saw a 
human being. 



M 



lir power to 

py pictured 

their long 

lahuwks of 

parties on 

, offrighu 

t H-vallowed 

it t<tops the 

invade his 

il)ly cause 

)f souls was 
y lay dowu 
ad no fear. 
Fox River, 
stones that 

passed the 
iteis of the 
Mississippi, 
ters. Vine- 
rle and hill, 

no human 

ys the good 
'er, and the 
Waters" is 

lly unfortu- 
' American 
Mississippi, 
knowledge 

id down its 
hev saw a 



EARLY HIHTOBY OF LAKE 8UPEIIIOR. 



183 



The scenery has changed. The islands are more beautiful. 
There is little wood, and no hill ; deer, moose, bustard and 
wingless swans abound. As they descend, the turkey takes the 
place of smaller game, and the buffalo • f other bii"st8. Although 
the solitude becomes almost insupportable, and they long to see 
other human faces than their own, yet they move with caution. 
Th 7 light but little fire at night, on shore, just to prepare a 
meal, then move as far as possible from it, anchor their canoes 
in the stream and post a sentinel, to warn thei" of approaching 
danger. 

Finally, on the 26th of June, they discover footprints by the 
water side, and a well beaten trail leading off through a beauti- 
ful prairie, on the west bank. 

They are in the region of the wild and dreaded Daootahs, 
and they conclude that a village is at hand. Coolly braving 
the danger, Marquette and Jolliet leave their caiocs in charge 
of the men ; they take to the trail, and in silence for two leagues 
they follow its gentle windings, until they come in sight of two 
Indian villages. 

Having committed themselves to God, and implored his 
help, they approach so near that they hear conversation, without 
being discovered, and then stop and announce their presence by 
a loud outcry. The Indians rushed from their cabins, and see- 
ing the unarmed travelers, they after a little, depute four old 
men to approach them, which they do very slowly. 

Father Marquette inquires who they are, and Is rejoiced to 
learn that they are Illinois. He can speak to them in their 
own language. 

They ofler the pipe of peace, which is here first named the 
" calumet." They are most graciously received at the first 
village. 

An old man, perfectly naked, stands at the cabin door, with 
his hand raised toward the sun, and he exclaims, " How beauti- 
ful is the sun, O Frenchmen, when thou comest to visit us. Our 
town awaits thee, and thou shalt enter all our cabins in peace." 
There was a crowd of people who devoured them with their eyes. 
They had never before seen a white man. As the travelers 



II 






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■^MrtV^ilUiyHiMMlMia 



'''"'''""-Tln i f ii il i il iii r i ir i r'^"' 



184 



KAUIiY IIISTOUY Of I^KK HUl'KUiOK. 



ptwsod to another village, to visit the chief sachem, the people 
ran ahead, threw themHelves upon the grass by the wayside, and 
awaited their coining, then again ran on before in order to got a 
itecontl and third opportunity to gaze at them. 

After several days stay with tlii^ kin<l and hospitable 
(Hjople, our adventurers pass on down the river as far aa 
Arkansas, when finding that they could not safely proceed 
further, they cuminenced to retrace their steps on the 17th of 
July, just one mouth after entering the Mississippi, and just two 
months after leaving Maitkinaw. 

They ascend the beautiful Illinois, whicii is now, for the first 
time, navigated by civilized men. They are delighted at the 
fertility of the soil, with the beautiful prairies and charming 
forests which swarm with wild cattle, deer, bustards, swans, 
ducks, and parrots. They stop at an Illinois town of seventy- 
four cabins and Father Manpiette promises to return and 
instruct them in the truth of religion. 

One of the chiefs, with his young men, escort the company 
to the lake at Chicago, and they return to Green Bay. 

Thus ended that eventful voyage that added the delightful 
region of the upper M888i88ii)pi to the geography of the known 
world, and gave to Fiance advantages which, had they not been 
prodigally thrown away, in the wicked folly of the reign of Louis 
XV., might have given to America a widely different history. 

Jolliet, with his journal and maps, passed on to Quebec, 
but he lost all his papers by the capsizing of his canoe, before 
reaching there. 

Marquette remained at Green 'Bay to recruit from a disease 
brought on by his exhausting toils and his many exposures. 

From here he forwarded a report of his journey to his supe- 
rior. It was drawn up with admirable skill and a genuine mod- 
esty that became his magnanimous soul. The map accompany- 
ing the report, drawn, as it was, without surveys and without 
instruments, is wonderful for its accuracy of outline. Indeed, 
this may be said of most of the maps of that period, which were 
drawn up by the Jesuits, who, while they seemed mainly to have 
in view the conversion of the savage's, yet proved themselves to 



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EAHI-Y HISTORY OK LAKE HUPERIOK. 



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iy not been 
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he the most valuable of discoverers, and the most careful of 
observers. 

It was not until late in October, 1()74, that Marquette was so 
far recruited as to attempt to perform his promise to the Illinois. 
He then left Green Bay with two French voyageurs for his 
companions, but before he reached Chicago, by the slow process 
of coasting the shores of a stormy lake, at an inclement season, 
his disease, a chronic dysentery, returned upon him with its full 
force. 

The Hlreanis by which he expected to reach his mission 
ground were frozen, and ho was too weak to go by land. Here, 
in this then .solitude, but where now stands a city with over 
300,000 inhiibitant.s, uloue with his two voyagers, in a rude cabin 
which afforded but slender protection from the bitter inclemen- 
cies of the season, in feeble health, living on the coarsest food, 
with a consciousness that he vas never to recover, he passed the 
long winter of 1674-5. 

He spent much time in devotion, beginning with the exer- 
cises of St. Ignatius, .saying mass daily, confessing his compan- 
ions twice a week, and exhorting them, aa his strength allowed. 
Though earnestly longing to commence his mission amongst his 
beloved Illinois, yet he was cheerfully resigned to the will of 
God. 

After a season of special prayer, that he might so far recover 
as to take possession of the land of the Illiuois, in the name of 
Christ, his strength increased, and on the 29th of March, he 
left his solitary and desolate wintering, >ind in ten days he 
reached his destination. 

The Illinois, to the number of six hundred fires, were await- 
ing his arrival. They received him with unbounded joy, as an 
angel from heaven, come to teach them the pra3'er. After much 
private teaching from cabin to cabin, and exhortation to the 
principal chiefs, he gathered them in grand concourse, and there, 
on a lovely Apr! day, upon a beautiful open plain, with thou- 
sands of the ta^trny sons and daughters of the prairie hanging 
upv>n his lips, tlic dying man preached Christ, and him crucilied. 
m« persi'.dsive vords were received with univerhi.i approba- 



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186 



EAULY HIHTOBY OF LAKE 8UPEKIOB. 



tion, while his fast-failing strength warned him that his own 
days were numbered. 

He desired to reach his former mission of St. Ignatius, at 
Mackinaw, before his departure, that he might die with his re- 
ligious brethren, and leave his bones among his beloved Hurons. 
He {.romised the Illinois that some other teacher of the prayer 
should take his place and continue the mission, and bade them 
a loving and regretful farewell. 

They escorted him, with great barbai'ic pomp to the lake, 
contending with (tne another for the honor of carrying his little 
baggage. 

For many d^ys, accompanied only by his two voyageurs, he 
coasted in his frail canoe along the eastern shore of Lake Mich 
igan, his strength rajtidly failing and his precious life ebbing 
away. He became entirely helpless, and was lifted like a child 
into and from the canoe. His vision also failed, but his gentle- 
ness, his cheerful joy in the prospect before him, and his calm 
trust in God never faltered. 

Daily he recited his breviary. He encouraged his despond- 
ing companions, and exhorted them to put confidence in the God 
of their salvation, who would not forsake thorn. 

They read io him, at his request, a meditation on death, 
which he had long before prepared for this eventful hour. Often 
did he, with hopeful voice exclaim, '• I believe that my Reedemer 
liveth." On the evening before his death, with a face radiant 
with joy, he told his companions that on the morrow he should 
die. Calmly and sweetly, as if talking of the death of another, 
he gave directions us to the disposition of his body. 

On tho following day as he approached the mouth of a river, 
he pointed out the place for his burial, upon an eminence on its 
bank. The weather was propitious, and tho voyageurs passed 
on. But a wind arose, and they were driven back to the rivers' 
mouth, which they entered. He was carried on shore ; a fire 
was kindled ; a slight she'ter of bark raised, and he was laid 
upon the sand. 

Here he gave bis last instructions ; thanked his followers for 
their faithful and long s rvice ; administered to them the rites 



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Ignatius, at 
with his re- 
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F the prayer 
\ bade them 

to the lake, 
in^ his liUle 

oyageurs, he 
Lake Mich 
I life ebbing 
1 like a child 
It his gentle- 
and his calm 

his despond- 
LC in the God 

)a on death, 
1 hour. Olleii 
my Reedemer 
, face radiant 
•ow he should 
h of another, 

ith of a river, 
ainence on its 
ftgeurs passed 
: to the rivers' 
shore ; a fire 
I he was laid 

s followers for 
them the rites 



EAfiLY HISTOBX OF LAKi! SUPERIOR 




of their religion ; sent by them his last kind raesaagfc to his 
religious brethren, and bade them go and take their rest, until 
his final hour should come. After two or three hours, and as 
he was about to enter his agony, he called them, gave them a 
las'; embrace, asked for the holy water, handed one of them his 
cracifix from his neck, asking him to hold it before him, and 
with his eyes fixed sweetly upon it, pronounced his profession of 
faith, and thanked God that, he had granted him the grace to 
die a midsionary of the crods, in a foreign land alone. 

As his spirit was about to pass, one of his companions cried 
aloud " Jesus Marie !" Aroused by the sound, he repeated the 
words, and as if some glorious object appeared to him, he fixed 
his dying gaze beyond, and above the crucifix, and with a coun- 
tenance all beaming with holy rapture, his soul departed without 
a struggle, as gently as if he had fallen asleep. 

Thus, on the 18th of May, 1675, at the cge of 38, and after 
nine years of faithful service in the missionary field, father Mar- 
quette departed, and like his great model, the apostle to the 
Indies, he died upou a desolate beach, and like him, his dying 
hour was illuminated by a radiance from a brighter world. 

The little stream, upon whose banlts he breathed his last, 
still bears his honored name. An( there will ever be connected 
with that spot tender remembrancer and hallowed associations. 
In 1821, father Richard, the well beloved priest at Detroit, paid 
to it a loving pilgrimage, and erected thereon a wooden cross, 
with an inscription traced in rude characters with a pen knife, 
in its crude simplicity a fit tribute from a fit man. 

Bui no enduring marble is required to preserve in fresh fra- 
grance the memory of his virtues. His is one of those few, those 
immortal names, " that were not born to die." 

But his mortal remains do not repose in their original rest- 
ing place. Two years after his death, the Indians belonging to 
his mission of St. Ignatius, returning from their winter hunting- 
grounds, stopped at his grave, sought his remf'.ns, and according 
to an Indian custom, cleaned his bones, placed them reveren- 
tially in a box of birchen bark, and then in a mournful proces- 
sion, the thirty oanoes moved on towards Mackinaw. 



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188 



EABLY HISTORY OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 






Before reaching the roission, they were met by fathers Pierson 
and Nouveile and all the Indiana at the Misaion, who came out 
to pay a fond tribute to their best beloved naissionary. 

Then the solemn De Profundig was intoned, and then, with 
all appropriate rites the precious remains were deposited in the 
church, and on the following day, in a vault beneath the church. 
The mission was subsequently removed to Old Mackinaw, 
and the rude church has long since disappeared, and the precise 
spot where the remains of father Marquette now lie, mingled 
with the dust, is not known. 

AT THE 8AULT. 
When Marquette left the Sault, in 1669, the wise and evan- 
gelic Dablon, then prii lipal of all the Ottawa missions, — as the 
missions of the upper lakes were named,— waa in charge of 
the mission at that point. 

He was succeeded by father Drouilleta, who, full of sanctity 
and zeal, labored there with most wonderful success, for nine 

years. 

Large numbers were baptized, and in general council, the 
Indians adopted the God of prayer as their God. 

Here, in June, 1671, took place a most impressive ceremony. 

In October, 1770, M. Ta'on, Inteiidaut of New France, com- 
missioned Sieur de St. Lusson, commissioner to search for copper 
mines, and take possession of the country through which he 
should pass, in the name of the King of France. M. Perrot, an 
interpreter well known to the Indians, and of great influence 
among them, in the Spring of 1671, was directed to gather to- 
gether the Indian nations of these northern lakes, at the Sault, 
and a grand council was held on the 14th of June, at which 
fourteen of these nations wore largely nepresented. St. Lusson 
caused a cross to be prepared Bnd erected, and near it a cedar pole 
to which was affixed the arms of France, and then " In the name 
of the most high, most mighty, and most redoubtable monarch, 
Louis 14th, ol the christian name, King of France and Navarre," 
he took possession of the whole lake region, and the countries, 
rivers contiguous and adjacent thereto, whether discovered, or to 
be discovered, bounded by the Northern and Western Seas, and 



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lere Piereon 
10 cume out 

then, with 
>8ited in the 

the church. 

Mackinaw, 
1 the precise 
ie, mingled 



se and evan- 
ions, — aa the 
u charge of 

11 of sanctity 
.•ess, for nine 

1 council, the 

ve ceremony. 
France, com- 
■ch for copper 
;h which he 
tf. Perrot, an 
eat influence 
to gather to- 
sit the Sault, 
ne, at which 
. St. Lusson 
, a cedar pole 
' In the name 
)le monarch, 
nd Navarre," 
,he countries, 
overed, or to 
irn Seas, and 




by the South Sea, declaring that these regions were dependant 
upon his majesty, and subject to his laws and customs. There 
were present on this occasion fathers Dablon, Drouillets, Allouez 
and Andre, together with various officers, soldiers and citizens. 
Allouez made a famous speech in praise of the greatness of the 
French King. The ceremony was one calculated to deeply im- 
press the savage roiud. 

RESULTS OF JESUIT MISSIONS. 

It would be a grateful task to dwell upon the labors and 
character of those Jesuits who were the compeers of Marquette 
and Dablou. 

But with these men passed away the " golden age" of the 
Jesuits in the Northwest. They were among the best fruits of 
that wonderful system which for a century and a half made the 
order of Jesus one of the greatest powers of the world. 

They were placed in circumstances that developed in an eX' 
traordinary degree many of the best results of that training and 
disi;ipline instituted by Loyalla, without at the same time bring- 
ing forth those bitter evils that are among their natural fruits. 

They exhibited great learning, a high self-control, an inflex- 
ibility of purpose, an enduring constancy, an unweari(;d patience 
in toil and hardship, a calm courage that despised danger and 
triumphed over the intensest suffering, a fervent zeal, and an 
earnestness of devotion that find few parallels in history. They 
did uot develop, nor did the circumstances of their situation 
tend to develop that bitter intolerance, that hatred of civil and 
religious freedom, that passion for intrigue, that systematic 
treachery, that insatiate lust of power, and that unscrupulous 
and cruel abuse of power when obtained, that marked the Jesuits 
of Europe, and aroused against them the deep indignation of 
Protestant and Catholic Christendom, and that led to their ex- 
pulsion i'roia the most enlightened Catholic kingdoms of Europe, 
and their suppression by the Pope himself. 

But the influences that were already operating in the courU 
of Europe, and undermining Jesuitical power there, began to be 
felt in the wilds of Canada. 



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190 



EABLY HISTORY OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



Colbert, the great minister of the grand monarch, liked them 
not, and Frontenac cordially hated them. 

From 1671 to 1681, and Irom 1689 to his death, in 1698, he 
was at the head of affairs in Canada. The RecollecU, whom he 
favored, were re-established in the new world. 

Jealousies and dissensions sprang up, and in a thousand ways 
the plans and the purposes of the Jesuits were thwarted. Special 
efforts were made to ruin their influence at court. 

It ie a curious study to read the voluminous dispatches that 
passed between Canada and the court of France. 

Louis XIV was at the very culmination of his power, and in 
the full exercise of that system of centralized absolutism foui>ded 
by Richelieu and perfected by himself. 

He was as minutely informed of the transactions of an in- 
significant post on the watery wastes of Lake Superior, as if 
they were taking place on the banks of the Seine. And the 
minutest orders issued from his ministers, and sometimes from 
himself in relation to these distant places. 

In seeking to givc to the Jesuits who distinguished themselves 
in the early annals of the Northwest, their true place upon the 
pages of history, we cannot place them beside the founders of 
New England. 

They were not, in any sense, the founders of empires. They 

did not lay foundations broad and deep for free institutions. 

And even as missionaries among the Indians they seem to have 

exerted but little permanent influence upon Indian life and 

character. 

"As from the wing the sky no scar retains, 
liie parted wave, no furrow from the koel ;" 

So Indian character and destiny show us no distinct trace of the 
abundant and self-denying labors of these men. 

At least those traces are sadly disproportioned to the learn- 
ing, the piety, the fervent zeal and the precious human life be- 
stowed upon this field of labor. 

Doubtless, some of the causes of this result lie deep in Indian 
character, and the unfavorable circumstances surrounding them. 
But there are, as we conceive, other causes, growing out of the 



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in 1698, he 
l^, whom he 



>U8and ways 
ted. Special 

jatohes that 

Dwer, and in 
ism fou;>ded 

Q8 of an in- 
iperior, ai^ if 
s. And the 
letimes from 

d tliemselves 
ice upon the 
I founders of 

pi res. They 

institutions. 

leem to have 

an life and 




trace of the 

to the learn- 
man life be- 

!p in Indian 

nding them. 

out of the 



EARLY HISTORY OP LAKE 8UPE1U0B. 



191 



fundamentally erroneous system of Jesuit Catholicism still more 
effective ; causes that must ever prevent that system from ac- 
complishing any great permanent good for the race. 

There is no blument of freedom in it ; unlimived, unquestion- 
ing obedience is of its very essence. To develop the human soul 
and intellect, it must, like the body, have freedom. 

But if ihey were not founders of empires, if they did little or 
nothing towards the elevation of Indian character, these men 
siill have a proud place upon the historic page, which all should 
readily concede. 

As discoverers and explorers, they have had few superiors. 

Persevering, self denying, toil-enduring, courageous — no pri- 
vations disgusted, no hardships appalled, no dangers terrified. 

Contemptuous uf threatened evil, they boldly placed them- 
selves in the power of untutored and unfiiendly savages; living 
with them in their dirty camps ; partaking of their inconceiv- 
ably filthy food; sleeping with them and their dogs; annoyed 
by their vermin; poisoned with their stench ; submitting meekly 
to the contumely of the haughty, and the insults and brutality 
of the mean. 

Calmly, persistently they braved the forced toil of paddling 
the canoe, or over sharp stones and up foaming rapids of drag- 
ging its weight, often wading waist deep in water, or plunging 
through ice and snow. 

Piercing winds, bitter cold, dire want, and terrific danger, 
were among their common trials. Yet they persevered with a 
ceaseless a^^jiduity and untiring energy, that no suffering could 
subdue. Industriously they traveled, e^xiously they inquired, 
carefully ihey observed, and carefully ond minutely, under every 
disadvantage, by the light of the glimmering camp fires, they 
committed the result of their travels, itquiries and observations 
to writing. They opened to France and the 'vorld a knowledge 
of the great Northwest, of the mighty lakes and noble rivers, of 
these beautiful prairies and extensive fore-sta. 

They were not only discoverers, but they were pioneers, in 
the pathway of civilization. 

Following in their footsteps came the trader, the voyageur, 





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EAllLY HISTORY OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



192 



th« soldier, and ultimately the mechanic, the farmer, the mer- 
chant and tho gentleman. 

Delightful French hamlets sprung up by the side of the 
mission sUtion, and there was reproduced in the forest recesses 
of the new world a new and delightful edition of rural life, 
amid the vales and vine-clad hills of France. 

But their chiefest claim to admiration lies in their personal 
character, th.ir apostolic zeal, and their sublime and heroic 
virtues. Actuated by no love of glory, inspired by no hope of 
self-aggrandizement, but panting with an earnest desire to save 
souls for whom Christ had died, and to open the pathway to 
heaven to benighted heathrn, they faced the untold horrors of 
the missionary life, among wild, wandering, irreverent, brutal 
savages; and here developed in the midst ot trials the most 
severe, those christian graces of character to which our attention 
has been called, and which entitle them to a high rank among 
the christian heroes of the world. 

Success could have added nothing to the rich fragrance of 

their virtues. 

It becomes us, who now occupy the soil, enriched and made 
sacred by their tears, their toil, their suffering and their death, 
not only to revere, but to perpetuate their memories. 

FUR TRADE. 

It is probable that the French fur traders had penetrated the 
region of Lake Superior in advance of the missionaries. Buf 
of this we have no authentic record. But the establishment of 
the missions and the success of the missionaries very largely 
promoted the fur trade, and it became a source of very great 
profit and wealth. The settlement of Canada, the growth of 
Montreal and Quebec, and the prosperity of all the French 
aettlemeuts therein was very largely owing to the importance of 
this trade. The commerce in beaver skins alone was immense, 
and the profits enormous. 

It is said that two-thirds of the furs that entered into this 
trade came from the region of the upper lakes. 

At first this trade was carried on without restrictions, and 
especially by a class of persons known as Coureurs de Bois, or 



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192 



EARLY HI8T0RT OF LAKE RUPERIOR. 



193 



sr, the mer- 

side of the 
rest recesBes 
rural life, 

eir persoDBl 

and heroic 

no hope of 

esire to aave 

pathway to 

horrors of 

sreut, brutal 

Is the most 

)ur attention 

rank among 

fragrance of 

id and made 
their death, 



inetrated the 
naries. But' 
blishment of 
very largely 
t very great 
e growth of 
the French 
iportance of 
ras immense, 

ed into this 

rictions, and 
I de Bois, or 



rangers of the wood, njany of whom were of a most disorderly 
character. 

F'or the purpose of regulating the trade the Governor-Gen- 
eral of Canada, by direction of the King, granted to some 
twenty-iive gentlemen each }'ear, a license to engage in this 
trade, and all others were strictly prohibited from engaging in it 
upon pain of death. At first each licensee was permitted to send 
out two canoes, with six men and a thousand crowns in merchan- 
dise suitable for the savage trade. Ic was expectiyl that this 
merchandise would purchase one hundred and sixty packs of 
beaver skins, worth eight thousand crowns. 

The profits upon the trade wore divided between the licensees, 
tiie merchant who furnished the goods, and the Coureurs de 
Bois, who collected and bought them in. In addition to this, 
the merchant who took the furs usually made a large profit 
thereon. 

The immense profits of this trade aroused the cupidity of the 
English traders residing in New York, and they were determined 
to at least share in the trade of the upper lakes, and if possible, 
tc control it. 

For nearly a century the English spared no eflTorts and no 
expense to secure this result. They paid higher prices for beaver 
skins than was paid by the French at Montreal, and they suc- 
ceeded in corrupting many of the French tradei's, and induced 
them to sell their furs to them. Through their allies, the Iro- 
quois, they endeavored to enlist the Ottawas and Chippewas in 
their interest, sometimes through fear, sometimes through hope 
of gain. 

It was a matter of vital interest to the French of Canada to 
keep the control of this trade, anu especially to retain in their 
intci'est the Ottawas and Chippewas, who were among the most 
successful hunters. 

To this end they employed enterprising and active agents to 
go among the Indians and obtain an influence over them. 

One of the most useful and successful of these agents was 
Duluth, whos'^ name has been perpetuated by naming a town 
for him. Duluth was a Captain of these Correur de Bois, of 



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KAULY IIIHI'UUY UK LAKE HUPKUIUK. 



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fjieat energy, and complete knowledge of Indian character, and 
of dauntlctM courage. Ab early as 1679 be was stationed near 
the rtault St. Marie for the purpose of prevdnting thr English 
from engaging in the fur trade of I^uke Superior. He subse- 
quently erected a temporary fort near La Pointe. For many 
years he held the entire confidence of Fronteuac, Dc La Barre 
und I)e Nouville, who were successively in command iu Can&da. 
Ami ill their dispatches to France they recognize his great iu- 
tiuetR'c with the Indians and the important services that he ren- 
dered in delieating ilie Enulish project of securing this trade. 
In 1682 he was present at a conference of great officers at Mon- 
treal for the purpose of concerting measures for this purpose. 
In 1685 he led a force of Lake Suj)erior Indians to Niagara 
ugiiinst tiie Iroquis. In 1686, under r.n order from the Governor 
(lenori'l, he establisiied what was called the Fort of Detroit, of 
Ijuke Erie, where Fort Gratiot now stands at the foot of Lake 
Huron. 

The object of this fort was to command the passage to Mack- 
inaw and Lake Superior, and thus prevent the English from se- 
curing the trade of those regions. In this he was so far success- 
ful that in 1687 he captured an exftedition of sixty Englishmen 
with an Indian escort who were seeking access to the upper 
lakes. But the English were not discouraged. Tliey gave 
eight pounds of powder or six quarts of rum for one Beaver 
skin while the French gave but two pounds of powder, and not 
to exceed one quart of brandy. In this way they held out 
great inducements to the Indians and to the regular French 
traders to bring their beaver to New York. 

The establishment of a permanent fort at Detroit iu 1701, 
aided very much in securing this trade to the French, but it did 
not put an end to the strujjgle. 

Tiius iu 1747 one Le Due, a fur trader, was robbed by the 
Lake Superior Indians ot his furs at the instigation of the Eng- 
lish, and it is reported that a famous chief had accepted the 
hatchet from the English and that the Indians had collected to 
the number of over 100 to waylay the French, 

In order to check the English, the Governor General in 1750 



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EARLY RIBTORY OF LAKE 8CPERIOH. 



19: 



cter, and 
jned near 
P^nglUh 
le Hubse- 
or many 
iU Barre 
Can&da. 
great in- 
at he ren- 
lliia trade. 
•8 at Mon- 
pur[K>se. 

Niagara 
Governor 

Detroit, of 
it of Lake 

B to Mack- 
sh from se- 
:ar success- 
InglJHhmen 
the upper 
L"hey gave 
me Beaver 
T, and not 
y held out 
ar French 

it in 1701, 

1 but it did 

bed by the 
f tilt' Eug- 
cepted the 
sllected to 

ral in 1750 



granted a Urge tract of land at the Sault for a siguiory loSieurs 
de Bonne and Repentigny, the object of which Ih set forth in an 
exceedingly interesting letter written by him the following year 
to the French Minister. 

" Quebec, Canada, October 5th, 1751 . 

" My Lord : By my letter of the 24th of Auguat taut, I hail the honor 
to let you know that in order to thwart the movements that the Kn^cliHli 
do not ceam to make in order to seduce the Indian nationn of the North, I 
had sent the 8r. Cheur. d« Repentigny to the Sault >Ste. Marie, in order to 
make there an establixhinent at hin own exiienHeo, to build there a |>aliHadi 
fort, (forle de piatx) to ntop the Indiana of the Northern |K>HtH who go to 
and from the Engliah to intercept the commerce they carry on, i)toi> and 
present the continuation of the talka ("parolefl") and of the preaenta which 
the F^ngliah send to thoac nation? to corrupt them, to put them entirely in 
their intereata, and inapire titem with feelings of hate and aversion for the 
French. • 

"Moreover, I had in view in I hat eatabliahnient, to aecure a retreat to 
the French voyageura, eapecially to thoae who trade in the northern part, 
and for that purpose to clear the landa which are proper for the proouction 
of Indian corn there (bled' Inde) and to flubMrve thereby the victualing 
necessary to the people of said post, and even to the needa of the voyagers. 

" The aaid 8r. de Repentigny forbid the Indiana of hia \x)Ht to go and 
winter at Saginaw, which >m not little to aay, for these nations go thence 
from there very easily, and in a short time to the English, who load them 
with presents. These Indiana kee^ the promises which I required from 
them ; they all stayed in Lake Superior, whatever were the inducements 
the English made to attract them to themaclvea. * » « 

" He arrived too late laat year at the Sault Sle. Marie to fortify him- 
self well ; however, he secured himself against insulta, in a sort of fort I irge 
enough to receive the traders of Michilimackiniko. 

" The weather was dreadful in September, Octoly^r and November. 
Snow fell one foot deep on the 10th of October, whiuh caused him a great 
delay. He employed hia hired men during the whole winter in cutting 
1,100 pickets, of 15 feet, for his fort, with doublings {"reiuloublayes".') and 
the timber necessary for the construction of three houses, one of them 30 
feet long by 20 feet wide, and the two others 25 feet long, at>d the .same 
width of the first. 

" Hia fort is entirely finished with the exception of a redoute of oak, 
which he is to have made 12 feet square, and which shall reach the same 
diatance above the gate of the fort, As soon as thia work shall be com- 



II 



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ii'jiltiWriiiil'l>iiil«t>'if 



196 



KARLY HIHTOBY OF LAKE 8UPERIUB. 



plet«d, he will Mnd me the plan of hU esUbliahmvnt. Uii fort !■ 110 feet 
•quara. • » » 

"K» for the cultiTation of the l»nd»— the Sleur de Repentigny had a 
bull, two bullocks, three cowa, two heifeni, one horae, and a mare, from 
Michilimackinao. 

" He could not, on hia arrival, make oletring of lands, for the works 
of his fort had occupied entirely his hired meu, (engaye*.) 

" Last spring he cleared cfl all the smalt trees and buahen within the 
range of the fort. 

•' He engaged a Frenchman, who married at the 8aull 8le. Marie, an 
Indian woman, to take a farm ; they have cleared it up and sowed it, and 
without a froat they will gather 30 to 35 sacks of porn. {biedMe.) 

" The said 8i. de Kepentigny so much feels it his duly to devote him- 
self I') the cultivation of the«« land*, that he has already entered into a 
bargain for two slave*, whom he will employ to take care of the corn that 
he will gather upon these landM. 

" I beg of you, my 1^, tu be well persaaded that I sltall spare no 
pains to render this establishment equally useful to the sei vice of the King, 
and to the recommendation of the travelers (vojfagetirii.) 
" I am, with very profound respect, Ac., 

"La JONQUIERE." 

In 1754, a succeeding Governor General writes : 
" The Sir Chev'r de Ref>entigny who commands at the Oault 
Ste Marie occupies himself much with the establishment of his 
post, which is essential to stop the Indians who come down from 
Lake Superior to go to Cheneguen, (Oswego) but I don't hear 
it said that thij peat is of [yields him] a great revenue." 

This establishment was erected for the fur trade at 2,000 
francs per year from 1755 until it was accidently burned in 
1762. At this time Henry gave the following descriptiou of the 

Sault ; 

" Here was a stockaded fort, in which under the French Gov- 
ernment, there was kept a small garrison, commanded by an 
officer, who was called the governor, but was in fact a clerk, 
who managed the Indian trade here, on government account 
The houses were four in number, of which the first was the gov- 
ernor's, the second the interpreter's, and the other two which 
Were the smallest, had been used for barracks. The only family 
was that of M. Cadotte, the interpreter, whose wife was a Chip- 
pewa." 



I 



EARLY HI8T0BY OF LAKE BUPEBTOB 



197 



brt ii 1 10 feet 

I ft 

iniigny had • 
luare, frum 

for the workH 

lex within the 

8t«. Marie, an 
Kowed it, and 

inde.) 

to devote liim- 

m'.ered into a 
the corn lliat 

glial I spare do 
ceof the King, 

IQUIERE." 

I at the Bault 
hment of his 
le down from 
I don't bear 
enue." 

rade at 2,000 
y burned in 
riptiou of tbe 

French Gov- 
inded by an 
fact a clerk, 
ent account. 
. was the gov- 
er two which 
J only family 
was a Chip- 



The fire compelled the garrisoa to remove to Michilimacinac 
and tbe Sault was not again [>ormanently occupied as a military 
fort until Fort Brady was established in 1822. 

Col. and afterwards Qen. Bradstrect tu December 1764, after 
tb ) conquest of Canada, in a letter to Governor Gage, at New 
York, rp'M)ramends that th.^ vessels be sent to Lake Superior to 
engage in the fur trade, and the establishment of two tort.s upon 
the banks in addition to that at the Sault, and this recommend- 
ation is repeated by Col. Croghan to Sir Wm. Johnson the fol- 
lowing y>;ar. The fur trade continued to be of great value dur- 
ing the entire century and the first third of the present century. 
In 17S5 the exclusive right to trade in furs on Lake Superior 
was given to Alexander Henry, an English merchant. He left 
Michilimacinac in August for the Sault, where he entered into 
partnership with Mr. Cadotte, a Freucfanman who came to the 
Sault undoi Repentigny, and was the principal man of the fort, 
and had been in command there under the British. 

He went up the lake, reaching Ontonagon August 19, where 
he found an Indian village, and proceeded to Chagonemig, or 
La Pointe, where he found fifty lodges of nearly naked Indians. 
Here he established himself for the winter. For a ;vinter's atock 
of provision he caught 2,000 trout and whitefish, tome of the 
former .7eighing fifty pounds. These were hung up by the tail 
in the open air, end were boiled and roasted as wanted, and 
eaten without bread or salt. As the result of his winter's enter- 
prise ho embarked in the spring with one hundred and fifty 
packs of beavers, weighing fifteen thousand pounds, and the 
Indians with him had one hundred packs, which he was unable 
to purchase. In the following winter, he with his men, were 
driven from the Sault by the want of food ; the fish, usually so 
abundant, having failed. Two succeeding winters he spent on 
the nor h shore, engaged in this trade. 

At this time specie was so wholly out of the question that bea- 
ver skit t was the measure of values. Other skins were accepted 
as payment, being first reduced to their value in beavers. A man 
in going into a drinking saloon would take a marten's skin to 
pay the reckoning. The goods Mr. Henry took from Michili- 



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198 



EABLY HISTORY OF JJlKE 8UPEW0R. 



■ 

I 



macinac on his firet oxpeditiou fiUsd four canoea, and 'vere esti- 
mated to be of the 'ralue of ten thousand pounds of beaver 

skins. 

The magnitude of thw fur trade can perhaps be best shown 
by a few figures. The North West Company, «ngaged in this 
trade, according to Mackenzie received in one year, 1798 : 

1(J6,000 beaver skins, 2,100 bear skins, 1,500 fox skins, 
4,000 kitt fox skins, 4,600 otter skins, 17,000 musquash skins, 
32,000 marten skins, 1,800 mink skins, 6,000 lynx skins, 600 
wolverine skins, 1,650 fis^ er skins, 100 racoon skins, 3,800 
wolf skins, 700 elk skin' , 750 deer skins, 1,200 dressed deer 
skins, 500 Buffalo robes. 

Of these. Lake Superior must have furnished a libe.al pro- 
portion. Its furs were a source of wealth then, as its mines are 
now. The Americi* Fur Company, organized by John Jacob 
Afltor, in 1816, succeeded to the business of the Northwest Com- 
pany. 

MINERALS. 
The knowledge that the region of Lake Superior was rich in 
minerals waa almost cotemporaneous with its discovery. As 
early as 1659-60 the Jesuit raisbionaries report " that its borders 
are enriched with lead mines, and copper of such excellent qual- 
ity, that it is already reduced in pieces as large as the fist," and 
ten years later father Dablon gives very fall account of the 
various reports of the wealth of copper which existed 'n various 
places about the lake. 

In Septembar, 1670, M. Talen, Intendant, appointed Sieur de 
St. Lusson " to search for the copper mine in the countries of the 
Ontarios', &c., in North America, near Lake Superior or the 
Fresh Sea," and also, it would seem, to discover the South Sea 
passage; for in February 1671, M. Colbert, the French Minister, 
writes : " The r^olution you have taken to send Sieur de la Salle 
toward the South, and Sieur de St. Lussoa to the North, to dis- 
cover the South Sea passage, is very good ; but the principal 
thing to which you ought to apply yourself in di;'ooveries of this 
nature is tc look out for the copper mine." 

In 1687, Denorvuli, Governor of Canada, writes to the French 



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EABLY HI8T0EY OF LAKK 8UPEBI0B. 



199 



rPERlOR. 



canoes, and 'vere esti- 
nd pounds of beaver 

)erliap8 be best shown 
pany, «ngaged in this 
one year, 1798 : 
iu8, 1,500 fox skins, 
7,000 musquash skins, 
;,000 lynx skins, 600 
racoon skins, 3,800 
8, 1,200 dressed deer 

urnished a libe.al pro^ 
I then, as its mines are 
mized by John Jacob 
►f the Northwest Com- 



Le Superior was rich in 
th its discovery. As 
eport " that its borders 
of such excellent qual- 
large as the fist," and 
•y fall account of the 
dich existed 'n various 

mt, appointed Sieur de 
in the countries of the 
Lake Superior or the 
liscover the South Sea 
■t, the French Minister, 
o send Sieur de la Salle 
a to the North, to dis- 
od ; but the principal 

slf in dL'ooveries of this 

ft 

da, writes to the French 



Minister: " The copper, a sample of which I sent M. Arnore, i« 
tound Rt the head of Lake Superior. The body (,f th*) mine has 
liot yet been discovered." He anticipates great results from its 
discovery, but adds, " This knowledge cannot be acquired from 
the Indians, who believe they would all die did they show it to 

us." 

The first attempt at mining was made after the conquest of 

Canada by the British. 

Mr. Henry, in 1765-6, found at OntonagoD an abundance of 
virgin copper " in masses of various weights," and among them 
•' a mass of <;opper of the weight, according to my estimate, of no 
less than four tons." 

As the result of this discovery, in 1768, an application was 
made to George HI. for a grant of all the copper mines in the 
country within sixty miles of Lake Superipr. A copy of this 
application was transmitted to Sir Wm. Johuson for the purpose 
of ascertaining his opinion upon the propriety of the grant, and 
especially what effect It would have upon the Indians. 

In December of the same year Sir. Wm. Johnson reports upon 
this application that he is assured there is a large quantity of cop- 
per in the environs of Lake Superior, and that " it has been found 
extraordinary good and rich." He suggests some practical dif- 
ficulties arising from t^e scarcity and value of white laborers, 
while " the Indians are indolent and cannot be relied upon." 
He aays some Canadians formerly took away a gooa deal of ore 
and lost by it. He says there is no serious objection to the grant 
80 far as the Indianb are concerned, if groat painn are taken to 
protect them. 

The grant was irade, but never issued out of the seal office, 
and a company was formed, consisting of the Duke of Glouces- 
ter, Mr. Secretary Townsend, Mr. Baxter, consul of the impress 
of Russia, Sirs Wm. Johnson, Alexander Henry, and others. 
Mr. Henry, Mr. Br-starch and Mr. Baxter had charge of the 
mining operations. They spent the winter of 1770 at the Sault 
and at Point Aux Pins, a few miles above ; they built a barge 
and a sloop of fifty tons. Early in May they set sail and first 
visited the Island of the Yellow Sands, but found no gold as 



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EARLY HISTORY OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



they had hoi>ed. At a point on the North Shore they found 
veins of copper and lead. They erected an air furnace »>/; Point 
Aux Pina, and the assayer found silver in the lead org. On the 
South shore one of the company picked up a stone of a blue 
color, weighing eight pounds, which contained sixty per cent of 
silver, and which was carried to England and deposited in the 
British Musnum. 

They ccasted westward to Ontonagon, built a house, set their 
miners to work, and left them for the winter. Early in the 
Spring of 1772 they sent up a boat with provisions, but it soon 
came back with all the miners, who had found that mining was 
impracticable without a much greater force and greater conven- 
iences. 

That season aijd the next they experimented on the northern 
shore, with similar results, and in 1774 they disposed of their 
sloop and other property, and sent some ore to England. Thus 
ended this first systematic attempt at mining on Lake Superior, 
nor was any further effort ma<Je in that direction until 1843. 

When Michigan became a State, in 1837, the only settle- 
ment on Lake Superior within its bounds, was at the Sault, which 
contained a population of 3t8. The population must have 
largely increased from 1820. Schoolcraft thus describes the 
place as consisting of fifteen or twenty buildings, occupied by 
five or six families, French and American. 



Note. — I have drawn the '^jateriai for the above sketch from many 
Rourcett, and in relation to that portion which relates to the Jesuit mission- 
aries, I desire eiitiecially to exprecj my obli|;ations to Mr. Shea'ti admira- 
ble vTork, " The Discoveries and Explorations of the Mississippi, and 
" Cath'jlic Missions to the Indiuns." 






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the> found 
ace »A Point 
yrs. On the 
6 of a blue 
per cent of 
ted in the 



1 



use, set their 
i^arly in the 
, but it soon 
. mining was 
later conven- 

the northern 
)8ed of their 
land. Thus 
ike Superior, 
util 1843. 
J only settle- 
Sault, whicli 
must have 
Jescribes the 
occupied by 



itch frotn many 
Jesuit mission- 
Shea'H admira- 
[igsissippi, and 




A SKETCH 



OF SOME OF THE 



MINES AND FURNACES 



OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



THE MINES. 

It is nut more than twenty-five years since the first iron ore 
vva*^ taken from what is now known as the Jackson location, and 
less than half a ton of :t packed upon the backs of half breeds 
to the mouth of the Carp, and from thence transported in canoes 
to the St. Mary's River, only lo be pronounced worthless upon 
its arrival at Detroit. Yet in 'hat short interval the develop- 
ment of t)ur mines has been so rapid that they now contt;buf,f 
th? ores from which is made more than one-fifth of all the iron 
manufactured in the United States. Less than a cjuarter of a 
century ago, the district which now supplies the ore for a hun- 
dred and fifty furnaces, and which boasts a population of not 
less than fifteen thousand people, was an unexplored wilderness, 
never penetrated save by the wild Indian anJ t.he devoted mis- 
sionary. Little did our venerable citizen, P. M. Everett, Esq., 
imagine when, in 1845, he visited this place and carried away the 
first specimens from what is now the Jackson Mine No. 1, that he 
would live to read the report of shipments — over a Million Tons 
in 1870. Yet such is the grand result, long since announced, 
and the iron hills of the tipper Peninsula scarcely afford the 
evidence of a commencement having been made. More than 
this, ihe developments of the year 1870 render certain a largel) 
increased product for 1871, an' each succeeding year, should 
the demand require it ; and yet the Lake Superior Iron District 
is in its infancy, and only neuds to be fully developed to become 
the great iron center of the West — if, indeed^ it has not already 
attained that distinction. 

It is our purpose to present in this little book an elaborate 
history of our iron mines and furnaces, embodying such facts 
and figures as we have been able to collect, touching their early 
history and subsequent development — first indulging in a few 
general remarks upon the geological formation and classification 
of the ores. 




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202 



MINES AND FURNACKH OF LAKE KUPEHIOH. 



CiKOLOGICAL FORMATION. 

The iron ores of this district are generally found ui hills, 
vising from one to five hundred feet above the level of the sur- 
rounding country. These hills (those given to exaggeration call 
them mountains) are simply immense deposits of iron ore, though 
partially or wholly covered by layers of earth and rock. It is 
true they are also found in the valleys, but where so found are 
usually Covered with a deep drift, and consequently cannot be 
so easily mined. 

That part of the Lake Superior Iron Region in which the 
most gratifying results have been obtained, is all included within 
the limits of Marquette county, west of Negaunee, within a range 
of six miles wide, running in a nortliwesterly course from Lake 
Fairbiink:*. in Town 47 N. of Range 26 V,'., to Keweenaw Bay, 
in Town 49 N. of RanjiC 33 W. — a disttnce ol nearly one hun- 
dred miles. The mines now opened and being worked are all 
situated on the east end o ' the raogo above mentioned, the most 
remote being the Champion, near tlie east shore of I^ake Michi- 
gammi. 

Anothe*" extensive district or range is that known as the Me- 
nominee, extending, so far as known, from the south part of 
Town 40, on both sides of that river up to its headwaters at 
Lake Michigammi. The deposits in this district are not only 
numerous, but said to be very rich and valuable, though, as yet, 
but little has been done towards their development. 

The iron range again crops out some thirty miles south of 
Bayfield, where ore of a tolerably pure quality has been foucd. 
By reference to a geological map, it will be seen that the 
Manjuette and Menominee iron ranges cross each other upon 
the south side of Lake Michigammi, the one continuing to the 
west and northwest, and the otlier soi thward into Wisconsin. 
Verv large deposits of magnetic ore have been found south and 
west of the lake in question, some of which are known to be as 
pure as the ret! oxydes of the Jackson and Superior. 

CLASSIFICATION OF ORES. 

This table names five varieties of iron ore. The most valua- 
ble, so far as developed, is the specular hematite, which is a very 
pure anhydrous sesqui-oxyde, giving a red powder, and yielding 
m the blast furnace from 60 to 70 per cent, of metallic iron, 
which is slightly red short. The ore appears both slaty and 
granular, or massive. It is often banded or inter laminated with 
a bright red quartz or jasper, and is then called " mixed ore." 

The next in order of importance is probably the soft hema- 
tite, which much resembles the brown hematite (Liraonite) of 
Pennsylvania and Connecticut This ore is generally found as- 
sociated with the harder ores, from which many suppose it is 
formed by partial decomposition or disintegration, it contains 



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]tfINEH AND FruNACES OF LAKE SUrEUIOR. 



203 



nd in hills, 
)f the 8ur- 
fj;oration call 
ore, though 
ock. It is 
80 found are 
y cannot be 

II which the 
■luded within 
ithin a range 
so from Lake 
iveenaw Bay, 
ivrly one hun- 
•rktd are all 
ned, the most 
I^ake Michi- 

vn as the Me- 
son th part of 
headwaters at 
are not only 
liough, as yet, 

niles south of 
lis been found, 
een that the 
;h other upon 
inuing to the 
to Wisconsin, 
jud south and 
nowa to be as 
or. 



le most valua- 
■hich is a very 
, and yielding 

metallic iron, 
>th slaty and 
aminated with 
mixed ore." 
he soft hema- 
(Limonite) of 
•ally found as- 

suppose it is 
. It contains 



some water, chemically combined — is porous in structure — yields 
about 55 per cent, in the furnace, and is more easily reduced 
than any other ore of the district. It forms an excellent mixture 
with the speculars. There are, probabiy, several varieties of 
this ore which have not been well made out. That found at the 
Jackson, Lake Superior and New England, is associated with 
the specular, while the Foster bed is several miles removed from 
any known deposit of that ore, and has probably e. different or- 
igin. 

The magnetic ore of the district has thus far only been found 
to the west of the other ores — at the AYa^hington. Edwards and 
Champion Mines — at which none of the other varieties have 
been found except the specular, into which the magnetic some- 
times j)aases, the powder being from black to purple, then re<l. 
It is not improbable that they may be varieties of the same ore, 
«LS they are much alike in richness, nature of iron, and geologi- 
cal structure. This view is much stre'-igthened by the fact that 
the specular ore is often found in octahedral chrystals, which 
form is well known to belong exclusively to the magnetic oxyde; 
hence it is probable that our specular deposits were once magnet- 
ic, which by some metamorphic action have been robbed of one 
ninth their oxygen, which would make them, chemically, hem- 
atites. 

The flag ore is a slaty or schistose silicious hematite, contain- 
ing rather less metalic iron, and of more difficult reduction than 
either of the varieties above named. It is often magnetic, and 
sometimes banded with a dull red or white quartz. The iron is 
cold short, which is one of the best qualities of this ore — the 
other ores of the district being red short. This on varies much 
in richness, and comparatively little has been sh pped. It is, 
however, probably, the most abundant ore in the district. 

A silicious iron ore, containing a variable amount of oxyde 
of manganese, is found at several points, accompanying the flag 
ore. This ore is unquestionaoly of great value as a mixture, 
but as it has but just been introduced, its importance cannot yet 
be determined. 

The generally received geological theory of the origin of 
these ores is, thai they were aqueous deposits, which have been 
highly metamorphosed. Thfe mas.ses are lens-shaped, varying 
much ii> thickness, on which the value of the mass chiefly de- 
pends. These masses are interstratified with a soft green slate, 
which always accompanies the specular and magnetic ores. 
Overlying these beds is usually found a quartz rock, which is 
probably one of the most recent of the district. Below the spec- 
ular is a green stone, often slaty, and beneath this is one or more 
horizons of the flag ore, separated by chrystalline schists. Next 
older than the flag ores is another quartzite, which stems to be 
sometimes replaced by a silicious marble. Yet older are the 
gianite rocks, which are supposed to belong to the Laurentian 



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204 



MINES AND FURNACES OF LAKE 8UPEBI0B. 



system of Canada — the schists above named including the ore» 
belonging to the Huronide system. These roclcB :;re mu h bent 
and folded, several axes, running nearly east and ivest, being 
plainly discernible. 

FIRST DISCOVERY. 

Prof. Chas. T. Jackson, United States Geologist, in his Re- 
port to the Secretary of the Interior, made in 1849, says that 
during his first visit to Lake Superior, in the summer of 1844, 
he obtained from Mr. P. B. Barbeau, then a trader at Sault Ste. 
Marie, a tine specimen of specular iron ore, which he (Mr. B.) had 
received from an Indian chief He also learned at the same 
time that this chief knew of a mountain mass of ore, somewhere 
between the head of Keweenaw bay and the head waters of the 
Menominee river. The next summer he informed Mr. Lyman 
Pray, of Charlestown, Mass., what he had heard, and suggested 
to him the propriety of looking up the mountain in question. 
Mr. Pray immediately proceeded to the Sault, where he employed 
the son of the Ojibway chief as a guide, and "went with him to 
L'Anse; from thence, guided by the Indian, he traversed the 
then unbroken forest, and found the mountain. On his return 
he informed Prof Jackson that he had traveled four miles 
.around the mountain, and found only the same kind of ore, and 
no rocks. To Mr. Pray Prof. Jackson ascribes credit of the first 
practical discovery of iron ore on the Upper Peninsula, deeming 
it probable that no white man had ever before explored this 
locality. If such were really the case, it would appear a little 
singular that Mr. Pray did not take measures to secure the re- 
ward due to such a discovery, and that his name has never since 
been heard of in connection with the development of our mineral 
resources. It is more than probable, however, that Mr. Pray's 
discovery was not within the limits of the iron district to which 
developments have thus far been confined, since we find that in 
the same year Mr. Joseph Stacy, of Maine,' explored that portion 
of the iron range between the mouth of Dead river and Lake 
Michigan, and found, ua he says, an inexhaustible amount uf 
compact and specular iron ore. The exact localities which he 
visited are not definitely known, but it is more than probable 
that the Jackson location was ofte of them, since Prof. Jack- 
son, in the same connection, speaks of having afterwards ob- 
tained specimens of ore " from near the forge called the Jackson 
furnace. 

ANOTHER AND MORE RELIABLE STATLMENT. 

On the other hand, Mr. Barbeau, who is the father-in-law of 
J. P. Pendill, Esq., of Negauuee, informs us that the existence 
of iron ore all over the Upper Peninsula — not only in that por- 
tion of the district since developed, but in the Huron Mountains 
— was known to the white traders as early as 1830. Mr. Barbeau 



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■I 



^ 



R. 



ing the oreo 
inu h bent 
v.est, being 



if! 



in his Re- 
says that 
r of 1844, 
lit Sault Hte. 
Mr. B.) had 
at the same 
, somewhere 
waters of the 
Mr. Lyman 
id suggested 
in question, 
heemphtycd 
with him to 
raversed the 
In his return 
i four miles 
i of ore, and 
it of the first 
ula, deeming 
xplored this 
ppear a little 
eoure the rc- 
s never since 
four mineral 
t Mr. Pray's 
rict to which 
) find that in 
! that portion 
er and Lake 
e amount of 
ies which he 
lan probable 
Prof. Jack- 
terwards ob- 
the Jackson 



lENT. 

fier-in-law of 
he existence 
in that por- 
a Mountains 
Mr. Barbeau 



MINES AND FURNACES OF LAKE 8UPEM0B. 



205 



is an old Indian trader — being at an early day in the employ of 
the American Fur Company — and perhaps no man on the Upper 
Peninsula is more familiar with its early history. He knows 
every acre of it, having traversed iu foresU, and ciossed its hills 
and mountains long years before its immense mineral wealth 
was known, or even dreamed of, except by hardy adventurers 
like him.self. He informs us that he himself knew ot the exist- 
ence of iron ore at Negaunee in 1830, in which same year was 
discovered the great mass of native copper in the Ontonagon 
Rapids, which was afterwards removed to Detroit by a gentle- 
man named Eldred. This mass of copper weighed ove»" 3,000 
pounds, and after reaching Detroit was seized by the United 
States government, and vemoved to Washington, where it still 
remains. 

The Indians knew of the existence of iron in this district for 
many years previous to its discovery by the whites, but were, of 
course, ignorant, of its uses, or, at least of th*^ means by which it 
could be mnde available. They knew also of the existence of 
lead, in large quantities, and Mr. Barbea informs us that in 
1830 he met Indians who had collected lead sufficiently pure to 
be used for rifie balls, und that they did so use it. Lut they 
could never be persuaded to tell were they found it, and to this 
day refuse to give any information whatever concerning it. They, 
api>ear to entertain a superstitious fear that some dreadful ca- 
lamity will befall them should they discover their secret to the 
white man. 

But to retnrn to the discovery of iron. Mr. Barbeau says 
that in 1845, Achille Cadotte, a French and Indian half breed, 
wa" informed bv an old Indian chief, then living at the mouth 
of the Carp river, near the site of the present village of Mar- 
quette, that he knew where there was a mountain of iron, and 
went with the chief to see it. The name of the chief v.as "3/an- 
je-ki-jik" (Moving Day), and his brother, " Man-gon-see" (Small 
Lmm), is still living. Cadotte then communicated his discovery 
to Mr. John Western, who went with him to the piountain, and 
under his direction nearly a ton of ore was packed from what 
is now known as the Jackson location, to the mouth of the Carp, 
thence iu canoes to Sault Ste Marie, and thence to Detroit. It 
is more than piobable, however, that it was P. M. Everett, Esq., 
of this place, to whom Mr. Barbeau refers, since it appears that 
John Western did not visit this region in 1845, and Mr Everett 
did. 

In June, 1845, the Jackson Company was organized with a 
view to operations in the copper district, and Mr. P. M. Everett, 
one of the original incorporators, came to Lake Superior the 
same si'mmer, and located what is now the Jackson Mine, under 
a permit from the Secretary of War. While at Sault Ste. Marie, 
Louis Nolan, a half-breed, told Everett of the existence of iron 
on Lake Superior, and voluuteered to show him where it was. 







iii^^S; 



i »i H!j^^fawj;!v^fci ^ 



n',f-i,tf.v^>»;.r'; 



206 



MINE4 AND FURNA058 OF LAKE SUPKBIOR. 



Nolan came to the mouth of the Carp with Mr. Everett and hit 
partv, and they all went as tar as Teal Lake in aearc'i of the 
iron, but faile(r to find it ; they then returue<l and proceeded on 
their way to Copper Harbor. Afterwards Mr. Everett fell in 
with the Indian chief Manje-kiiik, who returned with them to 
the mouth of the Carp, and piloted the party to the Jackson 
mountain, and also to what is now the Cleveland Mine. Mr. 
ICverett, as agent for the Jackson Company, was provided with 
a number of permits from the Secretary of War for the location 
of such lands as he might selt.<t for the company. These per- 
mits were intended to cowr one square mile each, to be described 
by such permanent boundaries as would admit of their being 
entered upon a map, kept for that purpose in the land office at 
Copper Harbor. At the time of Mr. Everett's first visit the 
whole country for twenty-five miles west of Presque Isle, had 
been coverea with these permits. The first one located was sur- 
veyed from a designated |k int near Preeque Isle, and being 
entered upon the map, formed the eastern boundary for the next 
permit, which in its turn served a similar purpose for another, and 
80 on for a distance of twenty-five miles. The "square mile'' on 
which the Jackson is situated had been located under one of 
these I I niits by a man named Hamilton, who was entirely 
ignorant of the immense wealth it contained. Everett and h's 
party, in locating upon the same section, were unable U* desuribt. 
the land accurately, and made Teal Lake (not then laid dt)wn 
on the map) its northern boundary. The mineral land agent, 
not knowing the exact locality of Teal Lake, entered the permit 
so that it appeared on the map about twelve miles southeast of 
its actual location. At this time the copper fever was at its 
height, and Dr. Houghton having reported strong indications of 
gold on what is now known as the Silver Lead Range, many of the 
permits issued by the Secretary of War were located as stated 
above. These permits were entered in pencil marks upon the 
map at the Mineral Office, so that they could be lifted and trans- 
ferred at the option of the owner. When Mr. Everett announced 
his discovery, and exhibited specimens of the iron ore found at 
the Jackson Mountain, the owners of these locations began to 
examine their lands, and failing to find ore lifted their permits 
and located them elsewhere. The lifting of one permit destroyed 
the boundaries of all the others, and they were abandoned one 
after another, necessarily. As soon as Hamilton abandoned his 
(in fact it is doubtful if he was able to find it a second time,) 
the Jackson Company managed to find the township lines, and 
entered the land from which they have since realized such 
immense products of iron ore. 

On his first visit Mr. Everett packed some of the ore down to 
the mouth of the Carp, and carried it with him to Detroit and 
Jackson, as specimens. Some of this ore was sent to Pittsburg 
to be tested, but the Pittsburg iron masters pronounced it worth- 



I 






1 




5R. 



erott and his 

learc'i of the 

pr'joeeded on 

trerett fell in 

with them to 

the Jackson 

Mine. Mi-. 

rovided with 

the location 

These per- 

bc dt'scrihed 

their being 

uiid office at 

lirat visit the 

{\ie Isle, had 

ated was sur- 

e, and being 

y for the next 

r another, and 

uare mile" on 

under one of 

was entirely 

verett and h's 

ble to desuribt. 

hen laid down 

il land agent, 

•ed the permit 

es southeast of 

)ver was at its 

; indications of 

je, many of the 

:;ated as stated 

arks upon the 

fted and traus- 

rett announced 

>n ore found ai 

lions began to 

1 their permits 

irm it destroyed 

ibandoned one 

ibandoned his 

, second time,) 

ship lines, and 

realized such 



be ore down to 
to Detroit and 
at to Pittsburg 
iinced itworth- 



g y^ ' -'4-'* ' r' ' 1). 1 



MINER AND FURNACES OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



207 



lesB. Another small quantity was sent to rn old forge at Cold- 
water, where was made the first iron from Lake Svperior ore. 
This was only a small bar, one end of which Mr. Everett had 
made into a knife-blade, the better to exhibit the sterling quali- 
ties of the metal. 

That Mr. Everett was really thi pioneer in the discovery and 
development of the Lake Bu|)erior Iron Mines, can not be suc- 
cessfully disputed It is true others may have visited the Jack- 
son mountain about the aume time, but we have no evidence that 
any of them discovered or knew of the existence of its hidden 
treasures. Certain it is, that if Mr. Pray visited the Jackson 
mountain at the time referred to by Prof Jackson, he could not 
have been in advance of Mr. Everett, otherwise he would have 
taken some measures to secure the reward due to such a discov- 
ery. 

In this connection we are permitted to copy the following 
extract from a letter written by Mr. Everett to Capt. G. D. 
Johnson, of the Superior mine, soon after his first visit to Lake 
Superior : 

Jackson, yich., Nov. 10, 1845. 
Dear Sib :^8ince I have returned from Lake Superior, CharleH tellg 
me that he prumi e<I lo let you know all al>oiit ray axcuntiun, and wiHheH 
me to perform the tank for him. In compliance with hin rtqucMt, 1 will 
therefore try and give you a brief description of uiy trip. I left here on 
the 23d of July lat>t, and wax gone till the 24tli of October. I bad Home 
idea of Koing to Lake Superior \»%t winter, but did not think Heriouxly of 
going until a short time before I left. I had considerable difficulty in get- 
ting any one to join me in the enterpritte; I at la«t Hucceeded in forming a 
company of thirteen. I whu appointed treaHiirer and agent, to explore and 
make locations, for which last purpose we bad secured seven permits from 
the Secretary of War. I took four men with me from Jackson, and hired 
a guide at the Sault, where I bought a boat, and coasted up the lake to 
Cop|)er Harbor, which is over 300 miles from the Sault Sle \iarie. There 
are no white men on I^ke Superior except those who go there for mining 
purpo.se.^. We incurred many dangers and hardships, ♦ » ♦ 

We made several locations— one of which we called Iron at th«; lime. It 
is a mountain of solid iron ore, 150 feet high. The ore looks as bright as 
a b ir of iron just broken. Since coming home we have had some of it 
smelted, and nnd that it produces iron and something resembling gold — 
some say it is gold and copper. Uur location is one mile square, and we 
shall send a company of men up in the spring to begin operations. Our 
company is c*lled the Jackson Mining Company. » « ♦ 

***** Yours, etc, 

P. M. EVERETT. 

We copy the above extract from the original letter, which 
also contains a copy of one of the original shares of the Com- 
pany. 

EXTEx,i' OF THE IRON REGION. 

It must not be inferred from the statement of the number of 
mines actually opened and now being worked, that they consti- 
ttxte the extent of our iron deposite. The mountain to which 



II 



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II 
It 



A 

1 






y^m^- 



mtmt$im0*ii'tm 



J 



J££. 



208 



MINES AND FURNACES OF LVKE HUPEBIOB. 



" Manjekijik" conducted Mr. Everett, and from which all the 
JackHon nhipinenta have l)een taken, i» within the corpor»-.te lira- 
itM of the village of Negaunee, only a dozen milea from the lake 
shore. Since Everett firet brought it to the notice of the orig- 
inal incorporatorH of the Jackson Company, by whom it is tiiill 
owned, developments have gradually extended westward, until 
we have had to record the newest and most promising 0|)ening8 
at and around Lake Michigammi, about twenty miles west of 
Negaunee. And still the iron interest of the Upper Peninsula 
is in its infancy— for though the shipmeute embrace in the ag- 
gregate several million tons, scarcely a perceptible mark has 
been made on the va^t and inexhaustible deposits which are 
known to exist, many of them still untouched, and far removed 
from the scene of active mining operations. On all sides of 
Lake Michigammi— north, south and west— and on the Menom- 
inee, southward, immense deposits have been discovered, com- 
pared to which the famous " Iron Mountain " of Missouri sinks 
into insignificance. 

Nor is iron the only mineral which is known to exist in that 
portion of the Upper Peninsula known as the Iron Region. 
Copper, silver and lead have been discovered, and we believe 
that developments yet to be made will shortly prove that they 
exist in paving quantities. On the Menominee has been discov- 
ered an immense marble quarry, and in other localities slate 
suitable for roofing purposes. In many portions the soil is well 
adapted to agriculture, and experiment has demonstrated the fact 
that wheat, oats, barley, and even fruits, can be grown to pj r- 
fection. With its immense mineral resources, its boundless for- 
ests of pine and hard wood, a fertile soil and healthful climate, 
it certainly possesses all the natural advantages requisite to the 
growth of a great and powerful State. But our limits will not 
permit us to take anything more than a superficial view of its 
resources, outride the iron interest. 

THE FIRST OPENING 
In the Iron District was made by the Jackson Company in the 
fall of 1846, in the summer of which year they commenced the 
erection of a forge on the Carp, about three miles east of Ne- 
gaunee. The forge was put in operation in the spring of 1847, 
and the first ore mined at the Jackson was there manufactured 
into blooms. The forge, however, only ran a day or two after 
being started, the dam being taken out by a freshet. It was not 
started again until fall, when it was worked quite successfully. 
It had two fires, and made four blooms, each about four feet 
long and eight inches thick, per day. Here was made the first 
iron of any importance from Lake Superior ore. The first 
blooms were sold to E. B. Ward, and from them was made the 
walking beam of the steamboat " Ocean." This forge was kept 
in operation till 1854, when it was entirely abandoned. Auoth- 



"T-^ '"•' S. '■^ ' i ' . - 'f-} : r . *' ^ '^ !-,?'. ■ r I f .'^^y * "?! I" !* 



MINEH AND KHUNACKH OK LAKE Hl'PRlUOH. 



200 




hich all the 

Irpof.te Jiin- 

^om the lake 

of the orig- 

|)m it is b'till 

tward, until 

jug 0{>eningg 

I ilea west of 

ir PeniiiHuia 

e in the ag- 

e mark has 

which are 

far removed 

all sidea of 

the Menom- 

)vered, com- 

isHouri Hiuks 

exist in that 
ron Region. 
I we believe 
Ve that they 
been discov- 
L-alities slate 
e soil is well 
a ted the fact 
■own to prr- 
jundless for- 
iful climate, 
uisite to the 
nits will not 
1 view of its 



pauy in the 
menoed the 
east of Ne- 
ng of 1847, 
■inufactured 
r two after 
It was not 
uccessfully. 
ut four feet 
de the first 
The first 
s made the 
;e was kept 
d. Auoth- 




er forge was built at Marquette, just south of the shore enil of 
the Cleveland dock, by a Worct'st»'r (Mans.) company, in 1849, 
under the direction and supcr'-Ucndonct- of A. U. Harlow, Kk(|. 
It was di'Htroyed by fiie tho following? winter, and never relxiilt. 
Two other forges were subsequently built at Forestville and Col- 
linsville. 

Thou};b all these forges, while in operation, were supplied 
with ore from the Jackson Mine, not much |)rogress was made 
in mining until after the cotn|)letion of the company's docks at 
Marquette, which were begun in 18.'74, and finished the next 
year In 1853, three or four tons were Hhij)ped to the World's 
Fair, at New York, but regular shipruents did not commence 
till the spring of 1856. 

When the first opening was nmdc in the iron deposit on the 
Jackson loc^ation, there were, perhaps, not to exceed 50 white 
inhabitants within the present limit'< of Manjuette county 
There was then nothing but an Indian trail from the " Mouth 
of the Carp" to the "Iron mountain." IJjioit the erection of 
the Jackson forge a wagon road was constructed from thence to 
the mine, and when, a few years afterward, it was concluded 
that our iron deposits would pay for working, the road was com- 
pleted from the lake to the mountain. Then a plank road was 
projected, commenced in 1853 or 1854, and completed in 1856. 
It was subsequently converted into a tram railway, on which 
mules wsre used as locomotive*, and answered the purpose for 
which it was designed until, in 1857, what is now the 

MARliUKHK & ONiOKAOON KAILKOAD 

Waa foinpletcd «!!d put into operation between Marquette and 
the Lake Superior Mine. This cntc;pii-c was originally com- 
menced in 18.'>3, by the late Heman B. Ely and his a-ssociates, 
who, in 1855, became the incorporators of the Iron Mountain 
Railroad of Michigan, which name it retained until o|)ened to 
the Lake Superior Mine, 1856, when it was consolidateil with 
the Bay de J*ioquel <t Marquette Railroad Company. This con- 
solidation was perfected in 1858. 

While upon this subject we may as well give a brief sketch of 
our Lake Superior 

RAILROADS, 

Since they are so intimately connected with, and inseparable 
fror.i the successful working of the mines. 

In the year 1857 a negotiation was completed between the 
Chicayo, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroa.i Company, through 
the Hon. Wm. B. Ogdeu, its President, and the railroad and 
plank road proprietors, by which that company became the own- 
ers of both roads (the Iron Mountain Railroad and the plank 
road), and of the charter of the Marquette & Wisconsin State 
Line Railroad, to which the grant of public lauds had been 



II 



*l 












:'J1/Jg. t* ?* ; »' . ' 



' -.■ 'J/ *!' -' 



W^""!"*"* 



jMi ii )jii[.r>;j iji ij pl ^l^ir !i'''i:^ 



j^i^Pfi-y^-^lii^'ffiWMtiVtTriii iilTiii 



-t-v 



210 



MINKH ANU KURNAOEH OK I.AKK rtUI'KKIOB. 



made by CoiiKrcKH. In virtue of tlicso trannferH it wa^ exiwcted 
llmt a railroad hue. would be immeiJiately built from P'onddu Lac 
to a \ni\nl on tho Mrnominoe Uivcr, in townsliin H north, range 
;{(» .v«*t, from whence it wbh to diverj^c in two bruncheH— one to 
Marquette, and the other to OntoiuiKon. But the panic and 
Knaneial eri«is of that year prevented the jieKotiationn of the 
pni|)oned loans in Europe upon the l)aniM of the land grants; the 
Chicago, Ht. Paul tlf P'ond du Lac Company retained, however, the 
the Manpiette <fe State Line H. H. charter. In the course of time 
Chicago & NorthweHt«"rn Uailway Company xucceeded to the 
property and etlect« of its predece)*i<ur, including the Manpiette 
(fcStatoLine land ;<rant. It seemed im|)ractieable theri to build a 
line of railroad on the route tin't nurveyed in IHf)?, auvl accord- 
ingly the Chicago it Nortliwestern Con»pany obtained from Cou- 
grcHH the privilege of a change in the line of the Marquette & 
State Line road to the Green May shore and the present line of 
the Peninsula division. This line whs ho nearly identical witn 
that of the Bay de Noquet and Mar(|uette grant, that the latter 
company determined not to continue tho line to Bay de N.Hpiet. 
The land grants, as to their intertering provi^'ions, were adjusted 
l)y mutual consent between the Chicago & Northwestern and the 
Bay de t^oquet Companies, and the latter company became 
merged in interest with tiie Marquette <fe Ontonagon Railroad. 
It will thus be seen that Mr. Ogden, at a very early day, ap- 
preciuled the im|)ortauce of extending a line of railway from 
Chicago to the iron and copper regions of Lake Superior, nii't it 
is piincipallv to his inHuence and exertions that we are indebted 
for the building of the 

PF.NIN.SULA RAILROAD, 
From Escanaba to the iron mines. Prof. Jackson, in the report 
referred to in the beginning of this paper, pointed out the route 
ot the Peninsula road as the proper and moat feasible outlet for 
the iron product, and though it is not our purpose to compare 
the merits of the respective routes, we apprehend that he did 
not then anticipate that his suggestion would so soon be acted 
upon. 

The preliminary survey of the Peninsula Railroad line was 
made in 1865, it being then the intention of the company to run 
their road from the bead of Little Bay de Noquet to Chocolay, 
four miles below Marquette. The next spring, however, the 
present line was selected, and work commenced on the 4th of 
.July In a little less than eighteen months the track was laid 
into Negaunee, and in less than two years after ground .vas brok- 
en at Escanaba, the cars wore carrying ore and pas-sengers over 
the line The nmin line is 025 miles in length, with about ten 
miles of track branching off from Negaunee to the mines. The 
business of the road has more than answered the expectations of 
the company. Recently their rails have been laid to the Bar- 



J 



WFf 



(IK. 



was pxiiected 

Fond (lu Lac 

north, range 

iclit'i* — one to 

he ]>anic and 

iatioHH of the 

<l grants ; the 

however, the 

course of tinu; 

ceed((l to tlie 

till' Mnri|nt;tte 

:Ui:r, U) build a 

7, anvl accord- 

ncd from Con- 

Marquftte A 

ir.HfMl line of 

identical witn 

that the hitter 

uy de N(i(|uet. 

were udj tinted 

■eHtern and the 

ipany liecume 

igon Railroad. 

early day, ap- 

f railway from 

inperior, an'l it 

^e are indebted 



I, in the rejwrt 
i out the route 
lible outlet for 
we to compare 
id that he did 
) soon be acted 

Iroud line was 
onipany to run 
t to Chocolay, 
:, however, the 
on the 4th of 
track was laid 
jund .vas brok- 
•assengera over 
kith about ten 
e mines. The 
ixpectations of 
d to the Bar- 



MINKH AND rilRNACEM Of I.AKK KlIPKItlOlt. 



num, Lake AngeMne and New England minen, which are ex- 
pected in future to make nearly, if not <|uite, all their HhipmentH 
over the Peniimula line. The Peninsula road now han connoc- 
tionx with the Jackiton, New York, (leveland, liarnum, Lake 
Aiigeline, Iron Mountain, New Kngland, McComber, Grand 
Central and Houghton MincH. The M. Jk O. K. li. ha» excluHive 
connections with the l^ake Superior, Edwardw, Washington, 
('liampion, {'unions and Winthrop inineH, an<i dividt>M with the 
Peninsula road the huMineHs of the Cleveland, Lake Angelino, 
Jackson, New England, McComber, Grand Central and Lough- 
tou. 

THE FIRST OPKNING 

At the Jackson mine, and, indeed, the Krst in the district, was 
made in the fall of 1846 Very little progress was made, how- 
ever, until after the building oi' the company's docks ai Mar- 
•juetle — which were commenced in 1854, an<I finished the next 
year — and the subsetpient o|H;ning of the St. Mary's canal. 

The Jackson Company's mines are situated within the corpo- 
rate village of Negaunee, on section I, of town 47, range 27, the 
whole of the section belonging to the company, and comprising 
the original entry mudc by Mr. Iwerett in 1845. The mines 
consist «d nine cuts or openings, on as man}' ditTerent deposits of 
ore, though it is believed that xomc of them are continuous. 
The ore is a hematite, including both the hard and soft varieties 
— cla8sifie<I into specular, granular, slate and hematite — the 
latter referring solely to the foft ores. The beds are very irreg- 
ular in their formation, but, generally, have a very perceptible 
dip to the north. 

CLKVELANI) MINE, 

From which the first shipments were made in 1855. The first 
opening was made in tin- spring or summer of 1854, the property 
having been previously explored by Messrs. John Outhwaite, 
Dr. Hewett, S. L. Mather, and W. J. Gonkjn, who were among 
the original incorporators of the company. The product of the 
year preceding the first shi|)ment8 (about 3,000 tons) was made 
into blooms at the different forges, of which mention has already 
been made. The Jackson had commenced work the year previ- 
ous, but did not make any shipments till 185(5, so that the Cleve- 
land is really the pioneer company of the district, so far as ship- 
ments are concerned. In 1850 the Jackson shipped about 5,000 
tons ; the same year the Cleveland shipped 6,343 tons, against 
1,447 tons the year previous. 

In 1853 the Jackson and Cleveland Companies joined in the 
construction o'' . plank road from the .settlement then known as 
Carp River, (k )w Marquette), to their mines, completing it in 
1856; ill which same year it was converted into a iram or wooden 
railway. It answered the purpose for which it was designed 
until the summer of 1857, when what is now the M. & O, Kail- 




II 




> 



-.^•* 



wBmmm 



" f^ ' t^x" ^es/^" 



^P^t^jgf.. 



21-2 



MINIS AND FUKNACE8 OF LAKE HUl'KUIOll. 



way was coinnlett.-l and put into operation as far as \ he Superior 
mine. Up to this time the shipments from the Cleveland had 
been less l!ian ten tlioiisand Ions, hut the completion ol the rail- 
way had the effect to i'lcrease shipuienLs very matermlly, the 
product f,;r 1857 being over 13,900 tons. For some reason ship- 
ments fell oif the succeding year, and rallied again the year after 
reaching 40,000 toni in 18(>0. 

THE CLEVELAND DOCKS 

At Marquette, which now have (1872) twenty-nine vessel, and six 
steamboat pockets, with an aggregate capacity of 2,200 tons, are 
to be extended, if weather and circumstances will permit through 
the winter, 350 feet, which will afford space for 54 additional 
pockets, or an additional aggregate capacity af 2,700 tons, 
making in all a pocket capacity of about 5,000 tons, and room to 
load six vessels at once. 

They will also construct, on the shore east of their docks, a 
bulk-head with GOO feet water front and 400 feet in width. Their 
bulk-head, or in-shure dock, on the west side of the ore-docks is 
210 feet front bv 300 feet deep. So it will be seen that tney 
propose to have double theiv present dock room for the accom- 
modation of business next season. 

The stockholders of the Comps-jy have also organized a barge 
company, which is now having built, four steam barges, with 
consorts, for the transp()rtatii)n of ore, in order to relieve the 
oompany of the dictation and oi)p.?ssiou of vessel owners when 
transportation is brisk and -esse's scarce. 

The officers of the company remain as before, with J. C. 
Morse as the efficient agent and local manager, and F. P. Mills, 
mining Superintendent. 

We append a statement of the total product of the mine since 
the commencement : 



Year (iroKs tonn. Year. 

ia54' :it'00 18(i5.-. 

lijoi'i _ — 1,44'J 1 «()«.-, 

1850 MW ; 18H7... 

lS;-)7 13,-.J04 1808 -- 

1858 7,909 

1859--- 1<V87 

18(iO — - 40,091 

1861 --- 11.796 

lH(i2 37,009 ■ 

1803. — 40.842 \ lotal 

1864 45,C27 ] 



GroM tons. 
33,9.57 

42,125 

75,804 

.102,213 

1809 111.S97 

1870 132,984 

1871 168,047 

1872 151,585 



.1.032,098 



NoTK.— The iinprovements liere mentioned, have Seen mostly com- 
pleted since the iitM)ve was yrrhten. -Compiler of Directory. 



■IHVI 



HUPKUIOH. 



.8 far as \ he Superior 
the Cleveland had 
•rnpletion ol the rail- 
very mr.teriHlly, the 
''or some reason ship- 
again the year after 



y-niiie vessel, and ^ix 
'' ty of 2,200 tons, are 
will permit through 
ice for 54 additional 
aeity af 2,700 tons, 
)00 tons, and room to 

iast of their docks, a 
feet in width. Their 
le of the ore-docks is 
11 be seen that tney 
room for the accom- 

ilso organized a barge 

steam barges, with 

order to relieve the 

f vessel ov ners when 

as before, with J. C. 
iger, and F. P. Mills, 

iuct of the mine since 



Gro8H tons. 

- 3;?,9o7 

42,125 

75,864 

102,213 

111.897 

132,984 

158,047 

151,685 

1.032,698 



lave been moHtly com- 
ireclory. 




•Jf -^T W i" ' ' ff , ' ' ■.? ' * Wj i i ' gjfl'^i ; 



mUKS AND FURMAOEB OF LAKE SUPEItlOR. 213 

Thd following are the officern of the company : 
President — Samuei. L. Mather. 
Vice President — Johk Outhwaite. 
Secretaiy — Frederick A. Morse. 
Treasurer — 8. L. Mather. 
Agent — Jay C. Morse. 
Mining Hupt. — F. P. Mills. 

THE MARQUETTE MINE, 

Is coutigwous to the Cleveland, and is owned by the stockholders 
of the latter com})any, though under a separate organization. 
The following is a list of its officers : 

President — John Outhwaite. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Samuel L. Mather. 

Agent — Jay C. Morse. 

Superintendent — F. P. Mills. 

The first shipments were made in 1864, though it appears that 
work was commenced much earlier. We append a statement of 
the product of the mine from 1864 to 1872 : 



Years. Tonn. 

1864 3,922 

1865 .-..6,652 

1866 7,907 

1867 7,862 

186'< 7,977 

1869 --2,798 



Years. Tons. 

1870 3,702 

1871 12,000 

1872 _- ---11,924 



65.746 



THE LAKE SUPERIOR MINE 

Was opened in the fall of 1857, the first shipments being made 
the following year. The first work was done under the supervis- 
ion of Cflpt. Gilbert D. Johnson, who has ever since remained 
in charge of the locition. The company owns a large estate on 
the " range," and has mines opened on sections 9, 10, 16 and 21, 
town 47, range 27. The principal mine, or what is known as 
the Lake Superior Mine Proper, is on sections 9 and 10, the ore 
being of the varieties known as slate, granular, specular and soft 
hematite. The deposit on section 2J is a soft hematite, continu- 
ous with the New England vein or bed, and believed to be quite 
extensive. But little has yet been done, hower, except to pre- 
pare the mine for future operations, though it is more than prob- 
able that the deposit will be extensively worked the coming sea- 
son. The machinery for hoisting and pumping is all in place, 
and we expect to see this new opening contributing largely to 
the product of the mines the present year, (1870.) 

The opening on section 16 is contiguous to the olc" Parsons 
Mine, which was opened in 1864, and abandoned in 1866, after 
5,299 tons of ore had been raised. Subsequently the property 
was sold to the Lake Superior Iron Company, who are still its 
owners. The present owners have not, as yet, engaged in any 



II 



^-H 



i 



I 






R?ff^;^^i|;?^!ig %gs;a^ ' ^g ! ij ; ^ ' - ^ ffl ' g ' ?" ?' 



iflimm^i^fimi*!^ 



tJ 



-tr-' 



214 



MINES ANE FURNACES OF LaKE SUPERIOR. 



mining operations on the Parsons tract, but are now working an 
opening on t^t adjacent section (16), which is often confounded 
with the Parsons. 

Most, if not all, of the work on sections 16 and 2i has been 
done under the supervision of Capt. George Berringer, a most 
industrious and capable miner. 

During the past two years the track of the M. & O. Railroad 
has been extended to the mir.e on section 21, and also to the 
New England, thus affording shipping facilities not before enjoy- 
ed bv either. 

The great center of attraction at the Lake Superior, however, 
is at the original location, on sections 9 and 10. It is to these 
mil es or openings that operations are principally confined, and 
from them has been taken the great bulk of the ore mined and 
shipped during the past ten years. 

THE HEMATITE MINE. 

Tlie hematite mine of this company, adjoining the specular 
mine at Ishpeming, is, without doubt, the most remarkable, in 
point of the extent of deposit and quality of the ore, in the en- 
tire district. The open level, 90 feet deep, heretofore worked, 
has shown a richness, as depth was obtained, which was not ex- 
pected. . 

This hematite opening is 400 feet long, in nearly an cast and 
west direction, with an open level nearly 90 feet deep. This 
level is worked down close to the walls on both sides, at an 
average width of 60 feet, but each end shows a continuation of 
the vein to an undetermined distance. On the west end there is 
an immense quantity of ore mixed with rock, on the 90-foot 
face, which at this point is more than 80 feet wide ; and at the 
east the work has been contracted to a much narrower space 
Two incline skip roads, located about the center of the north 
side of the opening, on the north wall, are now used to elevate 
the ore from this mine, or a portion of the ore which is worked 
out of the open level. But a perpendicular shaft has been put 
down, through the north wall of the mine, to the depth of 130 
feet— 40 feet below the open level. Drifts had been made a few 
feet below the 90-foot level, and some ore was taken out by 
means of them, but not long since these drifts fell in by not 
having been sufficiently well supported by timbers, and it is now 
intended to work from the deeper, or I'JO-foot level. 

It is ou this level where the most wonderful and promising 
features of the mine are shown. A drift has been made from 
the bottom of a 130 foot shaft, east and west, to a distance of 
400 feet, through ore, and on the west division of the drift, two 
cross-cutj?, 50 and 60 feet respectively, have been made into the 
ore, in a northerly direction. Winzes are also down, in ore, on 
the main drift, to a considerable distance from the points where 
these cross-cuts are started, showing a body of hematite 40 feet 



^^ 



m0ttllHiv«m,!m« 



mm^m^^sm^^W^> 



R. 



MINEH AND FUUNACE8 OF :.AKK SUPEUIOK. 



215 



working an 
confounded 

21 has been 
f^cr, a most 

O. Railroad 
altso to the 
jef'ore enjoy- 

ior, however, 
t it) to these 
>iiKned, and 
: niined and 



the Hpeciilar 

narkable, in 

•e, in the en- 

)re worked, 

was not ex- 

an vast and 
t deep. This 
I sides, at an 
titinuation of 
t end tliere is 
a the 90-foot 
; ; and at the 
rrnwer space 
of the north 
ed to elevate 
oh is worked 
has been put 
depth of 130 
] made a few 
taken out by 
(eli in by not 
and it is now 

id promising 
n made from 
I distance of 
he drift, two 
nadc into the 
a, in ore, on 
points where 
latite 40 feet 



deep by 60 feet wide, and of unexplored length — possiblv as 
long as the main drift on the lower level — 400 leet — but most 
likely much longer. 

Suffice it, that this deposit of hematite astonishes the best 
miners, in its magnitude. It is intended to sink the peri)endicu- 
lar shaft low enough to make drift connections with the winzes 
which have been sunk below the lowest, or 130-foot level, now 
ready for the stopers. 

It will bf roadily understood, especially by miners, how much 
ore can be taken out of the line of 510 feet of drift which has 
been made in this mine, on the 130-foot level, and how much 
more can be taken ot.t aller the hoisting shaft has been carried 
deeper and drifts have been made to connect the winzes already 
down. 

The only question with stopers would be, as to the quality 
of timber, and the care exercised in putting it up to i)rotect 
them, while taking out the ore, for as there is no rock, and the 
deposit is composed chiefly of the soft dark and red hematite, 
the labor of mining will be almost as easy as the labor of dig- 
ging into a soap bank. 

We would not undertake to call this the finest hematite mine 
in the world, but it is certainly the finest one we have ever seen 
located under ground, and more extensive than any which has 
come under our notice, among those which are located near the 
surface, or on the side of a blufl', as they usually ar^. 

The "Hard Ore Mine," "Section 16 Miiie,'' the " Parson 
Mine," " Section 21 Mine," and the " Prolific Mine," all belong 
to the Lake Superior Co.» and show not only a large variety of 
ores, but all oi them of the best and purest qualities. 

The following is a statement of the product of this company 
up to the close of 1872 : 



Year. QroHB tonn. 

1868 4,686 

1859 24,668 

1860 33,016 

1861- -- 26,195 

1862 — 37,709 

1883 78,976 

1864.— - 86 773 

1865- - — 60,2'>1 

1866 68,002 



Year. GroBs tons. 

1867 119,935 

1868-- 108,745 

1869 - 131,343 

1870 166,582 

1871 - 158,047 

1872 185,070 



Grand total. 



1,275,919 



THE NEW YORK MINE. 



This mine is located, as is well known, on the north and ad- 
joining the Cleveland. The geology of this mine seems peculiar 
to itself. Two parallel veins of ore have been worked for some 
eight years past. The south vein yields a very hard specular 
ore, which runs at times into a steel ore, the grauulation of which 
is almost as fine and compact as hammered steel. Upon taking 
a piece of this ore from the dump, and breaking it over the edge 



*. 



sy^ f^-i 



'^»w^$m^. 



mm~ ' -y^mmf^im: ' 'f&?m^^" ' " ' » ' - ^m^'^-'mjyx 



fm 



M^M 



!^4 



w 




216 MINES AND FURNACES OF LAKE 8UPEBIOR. 



of an iron-bound wagon box, we found a fractured face which 
preseuted a peculiarly tough and elastic appearance, with a fibrin 
80 close that had it been presented, with finished exterior, as a 
sample of steel, we would have been puzzled to determine whether 
it was genuine or not, without the use of a glass or the appliance 
of a tool. 

This specular opening is now worked out for a distance of 
500 feet, by 49 feet in width, the eastern end still yielding a 
good quality of hard ore, and the western end, which is being 
stoped on two or three levels, yielding the first quality of steel 
ore we have mentioned. On the south side of the eastern end of 
the opening, breast mining is being done under the hanging wall, 
following the dip of the vein, and there seems lo be no reason 
why a sha*"t or cross-cut into a lower level would not guarantee 
a good fa>.«^ of ore on the same area which has been worked over. 

A wall of rock some twenty-five feet wide, forming the foot- 
wall of the specular vein, intervenes between that and a parallel 
lode of slate and hematite. This wall is used as a working level 
for the derricks, pumps, dumps, skip roads, steam power, &c., in 
use in both veins The north vein, ot hematite and slate, dips 
to the north jand cast, leaving a " horse back,'' the wall men- 
tioned, between them. It has been worked out to nearly the 
same extent that the specular vein has been worked. The hang- 
ing wall of soap stone and slate rock, on the north side is being 
taken off, to expose, so far as possible, the lead of ore. This is 
quite an expensive operation, as the covering h quite thick, but 
it cannot be avoided because the formation is not sufficiently 
firm to remain as a roof. 

Some distance east of where the vein dips toward the east, a 
shaft has been sunk to tap the ore, and if possible get a good 
working face upon which to go back over che area worked down 
to the present level. This shaft is forty feet deep, but has not 
yet struck the ore. Drifting back under the old level, from tliis 
shalt, will probably next be done, to determine the prospects of 
the plan in hand. 

Neither of these mines are seriously troubled with water, and 
the machinery and fixtures for working them are very complete. 

A little distance north of these openings, and running nearly 
parallel with them, ano*her vein of slate and hematite is being 
worked. It seems to t. .i,end a distance of nearly one thousand 
feet, and is from ten to twenty feet wide. This is on the north 
side of, and running parallel wi!h, the Chicago and Northwest- 
ern railroad. Its depth we did not ascertain, as it was filled 
with water at the time of our visit, and workmen were engaged 
preparing for the erection of an engine and pump, to enable the 
miners to renew their operations. 

The following is the statement of the New York product for 
the nine years since the commencement of mining operations : 



^^Mmrnm^^ 





ion. 



MINEH AND FUltNACEH OF IJiKK HUPEltlOB. 



217 



Mi 



face which 

with a fibrin 

exterior, aa a 

mi tie whether 

le appliance 

a distance of 
i yielding a 
eh is being 
itility of steel 

■astern end of 
htuiging wall, 

b(> no reason 
not guarantee 

worked over, 
niiig the foot- 
md a parallel 
working level 
power, iic, in 
nd slato, dips 
ho wall meu- 

to nearly the 
I. The liang- 
1 side is being 
ore. This is 
ite thick, but 
ot sufficiently 

r<l the east, a 
le get a good 
worked down 
), but has not 
vel, from tliis 
e prospects of 

th water, and 
ery complete, 
inning nearly 
latite is being 
>ne thousand 
on the north 
d Northwest- 
it was filled 
were engaged 
to enable the 

c product for 
>perations : 



Year. OroHs tons. 

1864 8,000 

1866 12,214 

1866 - — 33,761 

1867 43,302 

1868 45,666 

1869 - 67,698 



Year. GroHx tonii. 

1870- 94,809 

1871- -7fi,381 

1872 68,950 

Total 460,775 



W. L. Wetmore, of Marquette, still ha.s charge of the business 
interests of the niiue. 

THE WASHINGTON IRON COMPANY 

Own an estate of 1,000 acres of valuable iron lands in Town- 
ship 47, Ratige 20. The company was organized in 1864, and 
mining operations coniinenccd the same year. The ofticers of 
the company are: 

President — Edwin Parsons, N. Y. 

Vice President and Superintendent — Edwaijd Breitung. 

Secretary and Treasurer — S. P. Ely, Marquette. 

Mining Captain — Gko. St. ('lair. 

Agents at Cleveland, A B. Tuttle & Co.; at Chicago, A. B. 
Meeker 

The first shipments from the Washington were made in 1865, 
since which time the figures have been steadily increased, as will 
be seen ny the following table, showing the amount of production 
for each year up to and including 1872 : 

Year. Gross tons. 

1865 _ 4,782 

1866 15,160 

1867 - 25,440 

1868 35,757 

1869 - 58-462 



Year. Grotw tons. 

1870 - 79762 

1871-.- - 48,726 

1872 38,841 



Total, 



316,919 



In 1869, the openings were embraced within a spacf of about 
2,000 feet on what was then considered the principal, if not the 
only vein, which averages about 80 feet in width. Since tb 'n a 
number of new discoveries have been made, all adding la^^ely 
to the previously acknowledged value of the property. 

The company now have on the location about 100 buildings 
of all classes. A new railroad depot, hotel, and a drugstore, 
are among the new improvements. The company has also a 
general store, the sales of wliich amounted to $100,000 the past 
year. 

The system adopted for the operation of the Washington 
mine, at the commencement of 1872, is being carried out, so far 
very satisfactory. The geology of the mine is very |)eculiar, 
and it has hitherto been quite difficult to determine where or 
how the ipost effective blows could be struck. The deposit is 
very heavy, with an incline to the north and west, but is pocket- 
ed in such irregular form, with heavy walls of talcose slate be- 
tween, that until the openings were sufficiently extensive to de- 



(i 



m. 



sm simim ^ 



-:<yj^ :mmJ^M;m:""^' ''' -"'<^'"'^ ' i- 1 ^^ 



i MP 



mms 



218 



MINES AND FURNACE8 OF LAKE tfUPERIOB. 



signate the pn»iuinence of the deposits, there seemed to be no 
means of determining how the work could be carried on to ad- 
vantage. 

It will bfc .-«^membered that this mine is worked by a tunnel, 
which was driven in from the base of the elevation in which the 
mine is located, about 500 feet from the first shaft put down, 
the surface of the hill varying from 50 to 150 feet above the 
tunnel level. 

Commencing on the east of the main deposit, we find added 
to the work of previous years, the skip shaft, known as No. 1, 
dova. iOO feet below the third or tunnel level. A winze was 
put down on the third level near this shaft and a 40 toot stope 
opened, which is to be worked back 70 feet west to shaft No. 2, 
the extremes being now connected by a drift. 

At No. 2 shaft a Burleigh drill is at work driving the drift 
150 feet to connect with shaft No. 4. This drift is also to be 
carried to i.^o. 5 shaft, 120 feet further west. No. 4 shaft is 
down to within 22 feet of the drift level. At this point the de- 
posit of ore is from 20 to 60 feet wide, intervened by a horse of 
mixed ore and rock. When the shaft has reached the drift lev- 
el this deposit can be worked on a 40-foot face over a distance 
of 100 feet. 

The extent of the deposit at No. 5 shaft cannot be stated to 
a certainty. The drill was put down into 17 feet of good black 
and slate ores. The shaft at its present depth is in ore, but its 
bottom is yet 60 feet above the drift level, following the dip of 
the ore. 

This drift level is to be extended still further west to investi- 
gate the deposits which are thought to lie there. 

Considerable work was done during the past season on stones 
above the tunnel level, where considerable ore is obtained and 
in bridging and f^crengthening the bridges which span the open- 
ings below this level for the extension of the tunnel westward. 
A drift started some weeks since in what was supposed to be 
the hanging wall of the main deposit, has shown, after passing 
til rough 8 feet of rock, parallel veins of magnetic and slate ores, 
3 and 6 feet thick respectively, and continues to show a good 
slate ore, with fair indications of a body of ore lying beyond. 
It is intended to work this discovery vigorously. 

The work at Nos. 9 and 10, ou the west, is being pursued as 
fast as prudence will allow. At No. 10 from four to five hund- 
red tons of ore per month can be taken out. Explorations on 
the south of the old work on the hill, have shown good deposits 
of magnetic and slate ores, of the same grade ta! en from the 
old mine, which can be worked to good advantage whenever it 
may seem practical. 

The working improvements for the season have "been sub- 
stantial and permanent. They consist principally of hoisting 
machinery applied to the principal skip shaft, and a skip road, 



iii M ii (n i ii.j^j i <»i ''""'"'''"""^^iji'y.i'i'^igsitSiJBR ' i-- ' ■-. 



--■m^i^^^^::t:f'''ilf^i^-'^!^fii\: 




w^mmmm 



^ 



id to be no 
id on to ad- 

y a tunnel, 

1 which the 

ft put down, 

et above the 

; find added 
ivn as No. 1, 
\ winze was 
10 loot stope 
shaft No. 2, 

ing the drifl 
8 also to be 
). 4 shaft is 
point the de- 
ly a horse of 
the drifl lev- 
!r a distance 

be stated to 

good black 

1 ore, but its 

g the dip of 

ist to investi- 

son on stones 
obtained and 
)an the open- 
lel westward. 
ipposeJ to be 
after passing 
ud slate ores, 
ihow a good 
flag beyond. 

g pursued as 
to five hund- 
j'.orutions on 
;<)od deposits 
en from the 
whenever it 

ve <ieen sub- 

of hoisting 

a skip road, 




-^y^fk-r^ 



mmmm 



MINES AND FURNACES OF LAKE 8UPERI0B. 



21!) 



which supplies the tunnel, from below, with more tha'i half the 
product the tunnel takes out, an engine for the same, and a Bur- 
leigh rock drill. 

A new store and some new dwellings have been erected. Ev- 
erything about the mine, and in all the departments of its busi- 
ness, seem to be iu the best working order, uuder the general 
supervision of Mr. St. Clair. 

The followiug is the product of the mine up to the end of the 
year 1872 : 



Year. Groiw tonH. 

1868 4,782 

1866- 16,150 

1867 25,440 

1868 36,757 

1869 68,462 



Year. Growi tonti. 

1870 79,762 

1871 48,726 

1872 38,841 



Total, 



216,924 



THE CHAMPION MINE 

Is in the south half of section 31, Town 48 North, Range 2y, 
West. It is a deposit of magnetic and slate ore of remarkable 
extent, uniformity and purity, and seems likely to become one of 
the great mines of the country. Operations were begun iu 
November, 1867, though very little was done, except in the way 
of preparation, until the followiug spring, when, just as the first 
shipments were about to be made, the destruction of the docks 
at Maiquette occurred, and operations were almost entirely sus- 
pended until October, 1868. In that year, owing to the destruc- 
tion of the docks, it was impossible to furnish shipping facilities 
to all the older mines, and the Champion was, therefore, obliged 
to wait until the docks could be rebuilt The fiist shipments 
were made in October, 1868, the product for that year being 
6,255 tons. 

At this time the property belonged to the M. & O. R. R. 
company, but iu September, 1869, the Champion Iron company 
was organized, and is now a corporation independent of the rail- 
way company. The officers of the company are as follows : 

President — Joseph S. Pay, Boston. 

Secretary and Treasurer — S. P. Ely, Marquette. 

Directors — Joseph S. Pay, Edwin Parsons, Peter White, 
Frances 8. Poster, 8. P. Ely. 

Mining Superintendent — J. W. Wilson. 

It is now but little over five years since the first shipments 
were made from the Champion, as its history can scarcely be 
said to have commenced until the fall of 1868. The newest 
mine in the district, it presents, however, a record that has no 
parallel in the history of the Lake Superior Iron district. A 
difficultjf is always experienced in the introduction and sale of a 
new ore, however good it may be. It is equally true that the 
obstinacy of iron masters in adhering to an ore with which they 



m 






r^r 



■■■■I 



220 



MINEH AND FUBNACEH OF LAKE HCPEBIOR. 



are familiar often works to their disadvantage by delaying 
the introduction of new ores which may be aa good or better. 
The Champion has been fully tetsted, however, as ia shown by 
the yield of nearly 65 per cent, at the Champion furnitce, with a 
mixture of two-ntlhs of leaner ore. An analysis made at the 
iron masters' laboratory, of Philadelphia, from specimens picked 
up at random, gave 69.92 per cent, of metallic iron. 

It was determined in the beginning to adopt the underground 
system of mining, instead of the quarrying process in vogue at 
nearly all the other mines. This system of mining, of course, 
required elaborate machinery, without which comparatively little 
could be accomplished. The necessary machinery was not 
ordered till some time in February, 1869, and was not received 
ainl put into operation till the latter part of the following summer. 
Bo t will be seen that the mine was not fully prepared for suc- 
cessful operation until it was too late to make much of a showing 
in the shipping list of 1869. 

That the great bulk of the ore at the Champion mine is mag- 
netic, there is no room to doubt ; but about 75 feet west of No. 
2 shaft on the first, and 125 feet on the second level, the drift 
strikes a deposit of very heavy slate ore, apparently the purest 
in the district. This ore, which appears to be of great extent, is 
easily mined, and requires very little breaking after being thrown 
down by the blast. There is no division walls — only a seam — 
between this and the magnetic. From the time the visitor enters 
the first shaft until he again ascends the ladder, he is not able 
to discover a single particle of rock or foreign matter — nothing 
but ore of the purest quality on all sides so far as the work has 
progressed, with a single unimportant exception. The vein (the 
deposit presents all the characteristics of a vein) has been traced 
over a mile in length, and it is at least 80 feet in width. 

No other mine in this region has been opened with less 
expense, or attained in so short a time a larger capacity of pro- 
duction. Its distinguishing leature is the coutiuuousness and 
unitormity of the ore, which thus far, in al! the drifts and shafts, 
with the single exception referred to, proves to be entirely free 
from rock, or any deleterious admixture. 

The working force at present numbers about 275 men, nearly 
all of whom are employed underground. Capt. J"hn Wilson, 
the mining superinteudetit, is an old and experienced miner, and 
will, we firmly believe, demonstrate the superior advantages to 
be derived from the adoption of the underground system in the 
beginning. The mine is situated a littleover half a milefrom the 
Champion furnace and postoffice, and is regarded as one of the 
best, if not the best working mine in the district. The belt of 
ore which was commenced upon in 1867, has not been, found to 
vary from its nearly direct east and west course, and it lies in 
such mass, without being interrupted by r^ck divisions or bands, 




^ 



)y deUyiDg 
i or better. 
s shown by 
lace, with a 
nade at the 
nens picked 

inderground 
in vogue at 
5, of course, 
atively little 
ry was not 
not received 
ring summer, 
ared for suc- 
of a showing 

mine is mag- 
west of No. 
teh the drift 
y the purest 
eat extent, is 
being thrown 
)ly a seam — 
visitor enters 
B is not able 
ter — nothing 
he work has 
'he vein (the 
i been traced 
idth. 

ed with less 
tacity of pro- 
iiousness and 
ts and shafts, 
entirely free 

5 men, nearly 
"hn Wilson, 
;d miner, and 
id vantages to 
system in the 
mile from the 
as one of the 
The belt of 
een, found to 
iind it lies in 
ions or bands, 



MINEH AND FURNACES OF LAKE SUl'ERIOB. 



221 







or material contractions, that the supply of ore seems inexhaust- 
ible. The only point in question i» how to take out the ore 
most economically and in sufficient quantity to meet the demand 
in market for it. 

All the workings of this mine continue in pure ore, as has 
been the case from the beginning, in a succession of shafts and 
drifts extending over a distance of a half mile in length, by 
from 50 to 100 feet in width, the slate (^re in the west end and 
the magnetic in the east, the o-ly case of foreign matter being 
a light seam of rock running across the formation between the 
two classes of ore. 

The mining has been done by taking out the ore in drifts 
and breasts, on different levels, leaving from twenty to thirty or 
more feet of the formation between the levels, and elevating the 
ore in skips through shafts, of which there are four in operation, 
the hoisting cable for all of which is driven by the same en- 
gine, simultaneously or separately, as dcicasion requires, the ca- 
ble being transmitted over sheeves from the engine house to the 
skips. 

• This system is to be continued, and is now being considera- 
bly extended by the sinking of a shaft 360 feet fiom or east of 
No. 1, and an «Aer 700 east of the first. Some 700 feet further 
ejist is the oldest, or first opening made in the mine, but which 
has not been worked since 1868, owing to the more favorable ad- 
vantages presented for work by the ground on the west. 

The first ot these shafts, adjoining No. 1, is down thirty-five 
feet, and the second one has but lately been commenced. It is 
intended to sink them dt ep enough this winter to connect by 
means of a drift with the 100 foot level of No. 1, and the drift- 
ing from No. 1 toward the new shafts luis already been carried 
forward 140 feet. Of course, they will eventually be carried 
lower, and be put in 'communication with the deeper levels of 
the series of shafts on the west. 

Shaft No. 2 is going down to the fourth level, which will make 
it 240 teet deep. The foot wall in this shaft assumes a more 
vertical position as it is followed deeper, while the hanging wall 
maintains the same angle as was found above, thus gradually giv- 
ing greater width .o the vein as the miners get deeper into it. 
On the third level of No. 2, and 65 feet west of the shaft, a 
winze is being sunk to the fourth level, and this winze and the 
shaft will be connected. On the second level and 60 feet east a 
winze is being sunk which is to be connected with the third 

Shaft No 3 is going down to the fourth level, with a winze 
on each side of the third level to connect with the fourth. 

Shaft No. 4 is going down t(» the second level, which, owing 
to a falling off of the ground going west, will bring this second 
level of No. 4 on a line with the third level of No. 3. Wmzes 
are going down on each side of the first level of No. 4, which 
will connect with the second. 




mmsM:,i^-^^&'^'^ ' '^:^'''^viim:^^*^' 



I ii ifl ii ^ ii' 



.# 



•ii^trr.rn 



222 



MINE8 AND PCBNACE8 OP LAKE HUPEKIOR. 



There have have been no further underground iniprovemente 
during thw year, nor no new discoveries of ore, the wt rk pro 
gretwing favorably and satiafactorily ; but Capt. Wilnon has rea- 
son to believe that a large body of slate ore will be found be- 
tween the new shafts on tne east. 

Above ground a hointing engine has been procured to work 
the first new shaft and Nn. 1, and the services of the engine at 
present in use will be confined to Nos. 2, 3 and 4. Another en- 
gine will have to be put up to operate the new shaft on the Ex- 
treme oast. A new shaft house has been erected at No. 4. The 
company have put up a new, large warehouse and barn for 
their own use, and a new hall, which Beats |20() people, for the 
use of the people of the village. Four new pocketM have been 
e-ected at the shipping docks. 

One hundred thousand tons is the figure set as tht amount of 
ore to be taken out of this mine next year. The product so far 
is as follows : 



Year. Qrow tonH. 

1868 -- 6,265 

1869 19,468 

1870 T3,161 

1871- - 67,588 



Year. 
1872- 



Grow tons. 
. — 70,668 



ToUl, 



237,080 



The improvements during the year 1873 consist of 2 engine 
houses, 5 shaft houses, 1 carpenter and 1 blackshiih shop,*! pow- 
der magazine, 1 barn, 1 store and office, and 43 dwelling nouses. 
Besides the company's buildings, there is a hall, 1 school house, 
1 church and 30 small houses. The population numbers nearly 
1,000 inhabitants. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MINE 

Is situated on section 29, township 47, range 27, and was first 
opened in the spring of 1864, in which year a number of te^t 
pits were sank by Capt. H. G. Williams. 

UNDEVELOPED IRON LANDS. 

During the year 1870, several new and important discoveries 
of ore were made, all of which will undoubtedly lead to the de- 
velopment of valuable mining properties, and add largely to the 
production of the district. Indeed, it seems to be a fixed fact 
that the future increase in the supply of Lake Superior ores must 
come from the Michigammi district. Mines that are now yield- 
ing over a hundred thousand tons annually, cannot be expected 
to increase their product to any considerable extent. Nor is it 
probable that any considerable number of new mines will be de- 
veloped east of the Washington or Edwards, although there un- 
doubtedly yet remain some valuable properties within the Ne- 
gaunee district that can be developed. To the Michigammi 
district, therefore, the attention of iron men, particularly those 
looking for investments, is mainly directed, and everything 




^ 



MQIBH AND FURNAOBM OK LAKE HUPEKIOH. 



223 



iiprovemenU 
le wt rk pro- 
Ihoi) has rea- 
l)e found bo- 
red to work 
tie engine at 
Another eu- 
i\ on the ix- 
No. 4. The 
md barn for 
eople, for the 
!ta have been 

hi amount of 
product 80 far 



Groiw ton*. 
_ . 70,{'>68 

237.030 



3t of 2 engine 
h shop,'! pow- 
iielling nouses, 
school house, 
ambers nearly 



and was first 
lumber of test 



ant discoveries 
lead to the de- 

largely to the 
te a fixed fact 
)erior ores must 

are now yield- 
lot be expected 
tent. Nor is it 
ines will be de- 
lOUgh there un- 
within the Ne- 
le Michigammi 
rticularly those 
ind everything 



points unerringly to the rapid development of the immense de- 
posit which are there known to exist. 

MICHIGAMMI DISTRICT, 

From Maj. T. B. Brooks' geological report : 

" In the fall of 1868 attention was uirected to this range and 
what is now known as the Spurr Mountain was discovered, or 
rather, I should say, rediscovered, ou the north half of thesouth- 
wdst quarter of section twenty-four, town forty-eight, north of 
range thirty-one west There is a lar^e outcrop of pure mag- 
netic ore (the largest I ever saw of this kind of ore) occurring 
in an east and west ridge one hundred and eighteen feet above 
the surface of Michigaiumi Lake. The direction of the bed is 
due east and west, dipping to (he south at a high angle. It pre- 
sents a thickness of thirty feet of first quality of merchantable 
ore, add facilities for commencing to nine which I have never 
seen surpassed. The exposure along the range is short, owing 
to the covering of earth, but, the magnetic attractions, which 
are very strong, continue east and west for a long distance, de- 
termining the position of the range with great precision. This 
ore is of the saiiy^ character as the magnetic ore of the Champion 
and Washington mines, differing only in being softer from the 
effects of the weather. A specimen collected for analysis in Oc- 
tober, 1868, by breaking indiscriminately numerous fragments 
from all parta of the outcrop and from the loose masses, with the 
view of obtaining a safe average, afforded Dr. C. F. Chandler, 
of the School of Mines, New York, the following constituents : 

Per cent 

Oxide of iron 89.21 - — 

Pure metallic iron 64.00 

Oxygen with the iron 24.61 

Oxide of manganeHe, a trace 

Alumina 2.67 

Lime-- - - ^-^l 

Magnesia— - ^.19 

Silica — - - »"'° 

Phosphoric acid, a trace. 

Sulphur —- - - - -^ 

99.37 
M'COMBER MINE. 

The latest and most important developments of the year 1870, 
however, have been at Negaunee. Half a dozen new mines 
have been opened in that vicinity, all promising the most valua- 
ble results. Late in the summer of 1870, Wm. C. McComber 
leased the Peudill farm, adjoining the village on the south, and 
proceeded to open a deposit of hematite, from which he has 
already mined and shipped over 5,000 tons of ore. Edward 
Breitung, Esq., followed suit, by leasing of C. T. Harvey, about 
1,300 acres in the same locality. The existence of good ore 



II 



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I 



-*'»-^;?|!?s 



^i' 



mittm 



•224 



MINKH AND F'JUNACKH OK LAKK wrPKItlOH. 



U|)<)ii the Ilurvey property had been known to Mr. Broitiing for 
H niiinhcr ot'yeurH, from explortitiontt made by him in 1867, and 
it iippuarH that lie had been keeping the tact quiet until Much time 
UH h(! could Hucuro to hiniHelf the bcnefilH to be derived from the 
knowledge thus obtained. Hince obtaining a lease of the lands, 
extensive explorationn have been made, revealing the presencfc 
of immense beds of u peculiar but at the name time moxt valua- 
ble soft hematite, and, when it became known that Mr. Breituog 
would sub-let the property in small tracts, a very great desire 
was manifested on tlii' part of citizens to secure leases. Rough 
maps of the property were made and armed with pick an<l shovel, 
scores of excited individuals il ronged the hills and valleys until 
tiie thirteen huhdre<l acres presented more the appev ranee of an 
exaggerated |)«pper-box, than anything else we can think of. 
Mr. Breitung was besiiged day Kud night by eager and excited 
prospectors, for this "f,)rty" and t ia» "eighty," until the whole 
was taken by at least a dozen ditterent individuals or firms, all 
of whom appeared certain of having secured an immense fortune. 
That some of them will succeed in developing good mines, we 
have very little doubt — that all wil! realize their expectations is 
scarcely |)robabIe. 

The McC'omber mine is the best representative of the nature 
of the Negaunee H"matit^ Hange. It Is the oldesr mine of the 
groun and has been worked tlie most extensively. It was 
opened in 1870 by Mr. Wm. C. McComber, and (|uile a quantity 
of ore taken out and whipped that year. In 1871 he look out 
and shipped over 17,000 tons. This ore reached two or three 
furnaces in the Marquette district, the Alien furnace, at Bharps- 
ville, Pa., and the Cleveland Iron Co.'g works, at Cleveland, and 
seemed to meet their requirements exactly for mixing with the 
specular ores, causing a yield of from 50 to 60 per cent, of an 
excellent quality of clean No. 1 iron from the mixture. This 
season, in order to secure a continuance of tlis supply a few 
gentlemen interested in the Cleveland Company, in mining ore 
and manufacturing iron, secured the j. »)erty and formed a com- 
pany with the following offiisrs: S!\; "i 1 L. Mather, ClevelandJ 
President and Treasurer, and Frea. !\. Morse, Cleveland, Secre- 
tary. The lease was made to this coinpany in July last, and 
the work of taking out ore has been pushed with much vigor 
since that time. The shipments so far this season amount to 
25.000 tons, leaving some 2,000 tons in stock. Many important 
improvements are in contemplation, for the purpose of supply- 
ing everv facility possible for the economical and thorough 
working f the miile. 

Builv.ings for the accommodatio': of an engine and hoisting 
machinery are to be erected, and four hoisting shafts are to be 
located at different points iu the mine, to be conveniently oper- 
ated from the engine house. Cable drums with friction gear 
will be used for hoisting, and each shaf^ will be supplied with 



r 



•■ ».>55 f' 



)1<. 



^t" 



MINKH AND KUHNACEM OK IJiKK HIU'KMIOK. 






intituiig for 
III 1807, and 
til Huch tim« 
vetl fronj the 
)(' the laiulB, 
the prexenee 

llior't Vttlua- 

Mr. HroituuK 
great desire 
iscM. Kotigh 
k and Hhovel, 
viilleya until 
'ifruiue i)f' an 
■an think of. 
' and excited 
til the whole 
\ or hrnis, ail 
neiise fortune, 
od mines, we 
cpectationH is 

of the nature 
( mine of the 
!ly. It was 
ite a <|uantity 
1 he look out 
two or three 
ce, at Sharps- 
leveland, and 
xing with the 
er cent, of an 
lixture. This 
supply a few 
in mining ore 
ormed a com- 
er, ClevelandJ 
velaud, Secre- 
July last, and 
h much vigor 
}n amount to 
my important 
jse of 8upj)!y- 
ind thorough 

) and hoisting 
alls are to be 
eniently oper- 
friction gear 
supplied with 



aufBcient pocket receiving capacity to obviate the neceasity of 
waiting for cars or dumfMt when there may be any delay. A 
central drain shaft will be sunk to the depth of 150 feet, and 
supplied with the best pumping machinery. Additional side 
tracks, cars, <&c., will bo provided, and everything necessary to 
work the mine to its full capacity put in order for all the bus- 
iness which can be done next, season. 

THE UKPUHLIC IKON CO. 

The mine of this company is the famous Smith mountain, 
located on section 7, town 46, range 2i), being a part of 1,827 
acres of land vwned by the company iu the neighborhood of the 
mine. 

The dejMMiit of ore lies behind a (piartzite rock which seems 
to form the bed of « small laka which lies on the north of Smith 
mountaiq. The quartzite is the basin and margin of the lake, 
making a curve from north-east and south-west to the north, 
forming a crescent around the south base of the water-b<!d. The 
quartzite has a dip varying from ten to forty-five degree*, toward 
the north and west, or basin of the lake. Behind and beneath 
it lies the ore veii;i — tirst the black magnetic, and then a slate 
ore, with sometimes an intermediate seam of slate or soap rock. 
Back of the ore is a diarite, a silicious schist, and a white gran- 
ite, in regular order. This formation will be better understood 
aft we describe the different openings which have been made in 
the ore beds. 

The ore outcrops on the side of the hill, near its summit, like 
a composition which has been poured into a basin, and adhering 
to the side of the basin, another composition had been poured in 
and cooled upon the top of it, leaving the first not quite cov- 
ered. This outcrop is at sufficient elevation to afford from 20 
to 40 feet working face, and yot leave a working level sufficient- 
ly high to be used for the head of inclined tram roads to carry 
ore to the pockets, docks and stock piles at the point where it is 
loaded upon cars for shipment, near the margin of the lake. 

HISTORY OF THE PROPERTY. 

The discovery of this ore vein is accorded to Silas C. Smith, 
and by him entered iu the land office. Subsequently Edward 
Breitung, and othe*^, became interested with him in its devel- 
opment, and in 1871 a company, composed principally of the 
following persons, was formed to operate it ; 

Jonathan Warner, Mineral Ridge. Ohio, President ; Edward 
Breitung, Negaunee, Vice President; S. P. Fly, Marquette, Sec- 
retary &v<l Treasurer; Peter Pascoe, Superinccident. 

The v/hole space now occupied by seven onenings is 2,00() 
feet in length, every foot of which seems to be a part of the 
ledge or veins which have so far been struck when looked for. 

It is more than likely that before the tunnel is completed to 



I 



I 



rr^": 



'^y iW - f^ ' i 









226 



MINES i^ND FUBNAOES OF CAKE SUPERIOR. 



the shaft the black ore will be encountered, placed as it haa 
been found in the other openings. 

Explorations which have been made north-east of this open- 
ing, show a continuation of these veins of rich black and slate 
ores, while above them a leane", second-class ore forms the bare 
face of the mountain. 

Work has been going on at this mine but about a year. The 
time last winter was spent in survej's and test-pitting. A saw 
mill was erected, supplies had to be taken in, nine miles over a 
new wagon road. A railroad had to be constructed — by the M., 
H. & O. company — and all the work commenced in the most 
primitive style. Yet, on the second of October last, a train of 
ore cars was dispatchei'. from the mine-docks, tramways,, pock- 
ets, &c,, had b(!en coPi^tructed, and the mine was full-Hedged for 
business. 

Now there are thirteen houses on the location, a company 
store, a drug store, commodious barns, &c. 

The shipping facilities are being so extended as to have a 
tram road from each opening to the railway, and the accommo- 
dations for loading from the docks and the pockets will be such 
as to enable the laborers to handle twenty cars at the same 
time. 

In short it is intended to handle a thousand tons of ore every 
day during the i^hipping season of 1873. 

The buildings are of a better class than those erected by 
any other mining company in the Marquette district, and con- 
siderably better than those in use by many of the old companies. 
During the present year a school house and church will be erect- 
ed, and every eflbrt made to care for the positive as well as the 
temporal interest ot the operatives. 



Ste.iiBWS-*^' 



> > 



SUPERIOR, 



ered, placed as it haa 

)rth-east of this open- 
rich black and slate 
88 ore forma the bare 

|ut about a year. The 
test-pitting. A saw 
in, nine miles over a 
instructed — by the M., 
inienced in the most 
ctober last, a train of 
ocks, tramways,, pock- 
ne was fuU-tiedged for 

e location, a company 

extended as to have a 
'ay, and the accommo- 
e pockets will be such 
snty cars at the same 

isand tons of ore every 

than those erected by 
lette district, and con- 
i' of the old companies, 
d church will be erect- 
positive as well as the 



BLAST FURNACES. 



As might readily be inferred, the most important manufac- 
turing interest on Lake Superior is the smelting of iron ore in 
the blast furnace. The attempt to establish iron manufactures 
on Lake Superior was made under many disadvantages, and at 
a time when, if successful, those engaged in the enterprise could 
not hope for large returns on the amount of capital and labor 
invested. It was made, in fact, before anything had be<^n done 
toward the development of the mines, and when it would have 
been next to impossible to get the iron to market, except at an 
immense expense for transportation. And, in fact, the first effort 
at iron making on these shores succeeded only in so far that it 
served to show the sterling qualities of the ores, and the readi- 
ness with which t^iey could be converted into blooms or pig 
metal. 

In the summer or fall of 1846, one year after the discovery 
of the Jack'ou mountain by Mr. Everett and his party, the Jack- 
son Company undertook the erection of.a forge on the Carp river, 
about three miles eas* of Negaunee. The building of the forge 
was intrusted to VVm. McNair, who was sent here as agent for 
the company. He had never seen a forge and did not suc- 
ceed in acc()mj)lishing anything toward its erection till the fol- 
lowing year. In July, 1847, Ariel N. Barney and his brother- 
in-law, Aaron K. Olds, arrived at the mouth of the Carp, having 
been sent up by the company. They were both practical iron 
makers, and expected to find the forge nearly ready for work. 
In this they were disappointed, as nothing had been done save 
that a few timbers had been hauled upon the ground ; they soon 
discovered that McNair knew absolutely nothing about the 
business he had undertaken, and it was not long until Mr. Bar- 
ney was empowered to go on and build the forge, and to him 
really belongs the credit of having built and put in operation the 
first iron manufacturing e8tal)li8hment on Lake Superior. The 
first bloom was made on the 10th day of February, 1848, by Mr. 
Olds, and wa.s hammered into bar iron by Mr. Barney. This is 
the correct date uf the first manufacture of iron on Lake Supe- 




rior. 




In May, of the same year, Messrs. Barney, Olds, and one or 
two others, started in a small boat for the Sault, taking with 
them about 300 lbs. of bar iron, among it the first bar made at 
the forge. This iron was taken to Jackson, and there exhibited 
as a specimen of what could be done on Lake Superior. 



'iWS^;'^'<^i5Sl^gf'^^!J5S*<^3J!r;3rrr**' 



sr '!Cc ' .;jy : !: nra !n ? 



M^> 



228 



MINEH AND FURNACES OF LAKE 8UPEBI0B. 



The forge continued in operation till sometime in 1850, when 
it was abandoned. It never paid the interest on the money in- 
vesteil, hut, having served the purpose of a thorough test of the 
Jackson ore, the company very wisely concluded to i«b»i<don it, 
and devote the whole of their capital and energy to the develop- 
ment of their mines. 

Another forge was built here at Marquette, just south of the 
shore end of the Cleveland dock, by a Worcester, (Mass.) cora- 
j)any, in 1849, under the direction and superintendence of A. R. 
Harlow, Esq. It was destroyed by tire the following winter, and 
was never rebuilt. Two other forges were subsequently built at 
Forestville and Coilinsville. 

The first pig iron from Lake Superior ore was made by S. R. 
Gay, at the Collins forge. It wa,s made as an experiment, in the 
torge chimney, whicii had been converted into a temporary stack. 
The result confirmed Mr. Gay in his determination to build a 
blast furnace, which he afterwards did. 

There are now in the district sixteen blast furnaces, ad one 
rolling mill. 

THE MORGAN FURNACE, 

Built and owned bv the Morgan Iron Company, went into blast 
November 27, 186;^ making in the first year 837 Urns of iron. 
The Morgan has been, perhaps, the most successful enterprise of 
the kind in the district, having made, in the first ten months, a 
clear net profit of 220 per cent., thus enabling the company to 
pay back all the original* outlay for land and machinery, leav- 
ing a dividend of 100 per cent, to be divided among the stock- 
holders. The Morgan is situated on the line of the M. & O R. 
R., eight miles west of Marquette. It was built under the im- 
mediate 8Ui)ervi8ion of C. Donkersley, Esq., one of our most 
practical and efficient iron masters, who still occupies the posi- 
tion of general agent. The product of the Morgan for the seven 
years she has been in blast is given as follows : 

Year. Ciross tons. 

1863- :«" 

1864 4,023 

1866 -— 3,489 

1866 3,749 

1867 6,067 Total, 35,352 

1868 4,203 

The furnace was out of blast for over a year previous to the 
last week in December, 1869, when she again commenced mak- 
ing iron. Her being out of blast for so long a time was occa- 
'sion by the exhaustion of the fuel supply immediately about the 
furnace. This difficulty has been overcome by the building of a 
wooden railway to lands owned by the company, nine miles 
north of the furnace, where kilns were built during the summer 
of 1869. The coal used in the furnace, or, at least, a greater 



Year. Gross tond. 

1870.— 6,952 

1871 4,792 

1S72— .- - 4,356 



1 



%m « 



m^rrt'^.TWr' 



T'^ 




>B. 



MINta* AND FTTItSACES OP LAKE SUrEMOU. 



229 



1 1850, when 
le money in- 
h test of the 
1 i«b»Gdon it, 
the develop- 
south of the 
Ma«8.) cora- 
nce of A. R. 
5 winter, and 
tutly built at 

lade by S. R. 
imeiit, ill the 
porary stack. 
)n to build a 

ices, ad one 



eiit into blaat 

tons of iron. 

enterprise of 

BU months, a 

! company to 

:;hinery, leav- 

ng the Btock- 

eM. &0 R. 

juder the iin- 

of our most 

pies the posi- 

for the seven 



GroBB tonR. 

5,952 

4,792 

4,356 

35,352 

revious to the 
menced mak- 
ime was occa- 
ely about the 
building of a 
f, nine miles 
1^ the summer 
ast, a greater 



part of it, is now l)eing transported over thb road. In the 
meantime, extensive repairs have botn made on the furnace, and 
as the above figures for 1872 show, she is running under the 
most flattering auspices. 

The officers of the company are : 

L. H. Morgan, President. 

8. P. Ely, Secretary and Treasurer. • 

C. DoNsKERLEY, General Agent. 

About two years ago, the Fayette furnace wrested the 
" broom " (the emblem of victory) from the Champion furnace, 
and has held it ever since, on 211 tons of pig iron made in one 
week. In August, however, the Morgan furnace, with its nine 
foot bosh, made an unprecented run of 230 tons ! It may be of 
Id - 't to charcoal iron men to know some of the details of the 
"> and ita working during the week, kindly furnished the 

wuier at the works by Mr. J. E. Barnum, the superintendent, 
and Mr. Carrol, the founder. The present height of the stack 
is 45 feet ; height of bosh, 16 feet ; diameter of the hearth at 
bottoir, 44 inches; diameter of bosh, 9 feet; diameter tunnel- 
head, 52 inches. Using two tuyera five inches in diameter, and 
32 iches from botton^ of hearth. Pressure of blast, 28 pounds ; 
tem{)erature of blast, 700 to 800 deg. (F.) Charcoal is two-thirds 
hard an., one-third soft. Charge consists of 

Lake Superior «lat€ ore — 197 !b«- 

Lake Superior hematite ^o* lj»* 

Republic mine, ore. 591 Ita. 

Native lime BtoneL. 8.— - — „„ J^ 

Charcoal— 30 buH. 

About an average sample of the Lake Superior slate ore 
gave by analysis : 

M»*„lin irr- - 66 00 

Metalic irr, — — oo oo 

Oxygen eob. . -h iron ■ - i^ ^^ 

Insoluble f. f /.Y 

Undetermi.iu >f nts and loss ^ ^- 

100 00 

Lake Superior hematite analysis : 

Metallic iron - -- ^^ ^0 

Oxygen combined with iron i'* W 

Silica I "" 

Water — - ^ °" 

Undetermined ingredients and lo88 3 90 

100 00 

This ore contains small pieces of kaolinite, a soft, greasy- 
feelict "! ^eral, usually white or a pinkish color, and composed 
of a h> ijous silicate of alumina. 



mm0gg///g//igm''^'m'f^mm^i 



^ •g- M; « g(>f ^ igti0m ' >^s}w\ ' »>^'m ' ^^^^^^ 



w nrtw 



230 



MINES AND FDBNACES OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



A satnpk of the Republic mine ore gave by analysis : 
Metallic iron - 69 58 

Oxygen combined with iron . 29 82 

IiiHoluble residue 44 

Undetermined ingredients and low 16 

kkToo 
This will give an average for the charge of 65x24 per cent, 
of metallic iron. 

An analysis of the limestone (L. S.) afforded : 

Carb. of lime - — 49 10 

Carb. of iron 43 

Corb. of magnesia . . 4100 

Silica - - 8 80 

Loss, etc., _ 67 

ioo~oo 

A portion of the iron should be estimated as a peroxide, as 
may be seen by a slight discoloration (reddish) of the limestone. 

An analysis of the cinder gave : 

Silica 64 

Alumini _- 17 40 

Protoxide of iron 1 26 

- — 17 



Lime- 



60 



Magnesia --- 7 90 

Alkalies, loss, etc 1 64 

lob'oo 
It will be seen that the ingredients of the cinder are very 
well proportioned for making foundry iron. 

The quality of the iron produced was 179 tons of an opened 
grained No. 1 foundry, 33 tons of No. 2 foundry, and 18 tons of 
No. 3. The amount of charcoal used was a traction over 100 
bushels to the ton of iron made. The furnace worked very free, 
and did not act as if it was at all pushed. It require' but very 
little "working out," except "breaking up" tBe fire after casting. 
This is, for a charcoal furnace with a nine foot bosh, the best 
week's work on record in this country or abroad. — Mining Jour. 
THE BANCROFT FURNACE, 

Now owned by the Bancroft Iron Company, is situated on Dead 
river, about four miles from Marquette, and was built in 1860 
by S. R. Gay, Esq. The first account we have of it is in 1861, 
in which year the shipments were reported at 2,430 tons. We 
are able to give a statement of the product of the furnace for 
every year except 1864-5, of which the records were destroyed 
in the fire of 1868. The following is the table, estimating the 
vears referred to : 



Year. Gross tons. 

1861 6,430 

1862 — 2,802 

1863 2,626 

1864 (estimated) —3,000 

1866 (estimated) 2,700 

1866- 2,451 

1867 — 3,246 



Year. 
1868-. 
1869- 
1870.. 
1871.. 
1872- 



Gross tons. 

3,800 

3,407 

3,710 

3,860 

4,260 



Total- 38,261 




^i^.r/^'it.V** ■ 






unii^ 




■■■V 



R. 



raw : 

— 69 58 

— 29 82 
44 

— 16 

100 00 
24 per cent. 



— 49 10 

43 

41 00 

8 80 

67 

100 00 
peroxide, as 
le limestone. 

— 64 40 
-.- 17 40 

— 1 26 

— 17 60 
-- 7 90 
— __1_M 

100 00 
ider are very 

of an opened 
nd 18 tons of 
ion over 100 
ked very free, 
ire' but very 
after casting, 
bosh, the beet 
Mining Jour. 

ited on Dead 
buiit in 1860 
it is in 1861, 
!0 tons. We 
3 furnace for 
ire destroyed 
timating the 

QroM tons. 

- 3,800 

3,407 

- 3,710 

3,860 

4,260 

38,261 




■^C*": 



rsf:- 



BflNKR AND FURNACFA OF LAKE SUPBBIOB. 



231 



The product of this furnace for 1872 amounted to 4,250 tons, 
4,006 tons of which were shipped. 

In ..he fall of 1871, this furnace was rebuilt, and a 20.r()ot 
turret of iron put on th :< top A new casting and top-house was 
also constructed, the hot blast enlarged, and a new lining and 
hearth put into the stack, so that her product was increased 400 
tons over any former year. She was very carefully managed, 
and will do still better, as the company have purchased consid- 
erable additional wood lanH and added eight 45-cord charcoal 
kilns to iheir coal capacity, to avoid the contingency which too 
often occurs, of being short of fuel. 

The officers of the Bancroft Iron Company are now as fol- 
lows : Peter White, of Marquette, President ; Samuel L. Mather, 
Cleveland, Ohio, Treasurer ; J. C. Morse, Marquette, Secretary 
and manager. 

THE CHAMPION FURNACE 

Is about thirty-two miles west of Marquette, near the east end of 
Lake Michigammi, and on the line of the M. & O. K. R. It 
was built bv the Morgan Iron Company, and went into blast on 
the 4th of f)ecember, 1867. Made the first year, in a run often 
months, 4,282 gross tons of metal. 

This furnace has made a splendid record for herself — the 
best, probably, of any in the district. Though out of blast two 
months during the time, she made in 1869, 5,560 tons of metal — 
an increase of 1,278 tons. Her average daily product during 
the year was Hi tons — though for the last four months it was 
very nearly 20 tons. She made during the time the largest 
weeks work of any charcoal furnace of the same size on record, 
b*'ing no less than 171 tons of first-class metal — an average of 
25 tons per day. Her last year's make was accomplished with a 
mixture of Lake Superior hematite and the other three-fifths 
Champion slate and magnetic ores, and an average of 70 lbs. of 
flux. The average yield of these mixed ores was 64 71 per cent, 
and the average amount of coal 103 bushels. The following is a 
summary of tne product for the fiive yeare the furnace has been 
in operation : 



Year. 

1868 

1869 - 

1870 

1871 — 



Gross tons. 

4,282 

6,560 

6,576 

6,094 



Year. Gross tons. 
1872 — 5,006 



Total 26,518 



The furnace is under the immediate supervision of J. R. 
Case, of whose efficiency sufficient evidence is found in the figures 
given. 

There is a considerable village at and around the furnace, 
the company having a large store and warehouse, and about 
forty buildings for the use of employes. It is a point of consid- 
erable interest, being but a short distance trom the east end of 



n 



^-H 



'-"■^tT:t'g-^ ;^'gr?J4^?Vi;'^'-'^' ' * ' *jy ' 



^•E.,.:) 



232 



MINES AND FUBNACE8 OF LAKE 8UPEB10B. 



Lake Michigamini, one of the most beautiful an<l picturesque of 
the sparkling, fresh water gems with which the Upper Peninsula 
is studded. 

tub: deer lake vurnace 

Was commenced in the summer of 1868, and went into blast 
about the Ist of September of that year. It is owned by a num- 
ber of gentlemen who reside at Norwich, Connecticut, whose 
interests here are repre8ente<l by Mr. Ward. The furnace is the 
smallest in the district, and consequently can not be expected to 
present the same array of figures as some of the older and larger 
ones. The furnace is run on a strictly moral plan, being " shut 
down" regularly on .Saturday nights, making no iron on Hundays. 

The total product of the furnace for the four yeiir-s she ha.s 
been in oja-ration is given at 10,553 tons. About 450 tons of 
this was made during the last four months of 1868, showing the 
product for 1869 to have been a little over 2,500 tons, the same 
amount being reported for 1870. 

Late in the summer of 1872 the iron bn)ke out through the 
arch, onthe left side, under the tuyere, and set fire to the blowing 
house. The fire was soon communicated to the casting and top 
honse.and consumed them, leaving the premises a complete wreck, 
with nothing but the stone stack and hot blaat remaining. With 
characteristic energy, Mr. C. H. Hull, managing agent, com- 
menced clearing away the debris before the flames had ceased to 
act upon the larger timbers, and having succeeded in drawing 
the charge without permitting a salamander, he had the build- 
ings reconstructed and the furnace at work before the expiration 
of five weeks. 

BAY FURNACE. 

The quantity of iron produced at the Bay furnace last year 
was 4,900 tons, 4,339 tons of which were shipped. 

A second stack was built during the season, and went into 
blast on the 1st of December. It is an iron shell, on columns, 
10 feet in the boshes, and 46 feet high — the same size as No. 1. 
It is supplied with a steam hoist, as also a water hoist, either of 
which can be used, according to convenience. The boilers, 
blowers, and all the rest of the iron work of this furnace were 
made at the Bay foundry, Marijuette, being the first furnace 
built entirely in tiiis district — and it is regarded as good work in 
every particular. 

Twenty-two new coal kilns were built to add sufficient sup- 
ply of fuel for No. 2. About 4,700 tons of ore is en the docks 
for the joint use of both furnaces during the winter. 

The shipping accommodations are very good, there being a 
dock 1,000 feet long, with a front nf 400 feet on Hi feet of 
water, which is not disturbed by rough weather, except in cases 
of the most severe nor'-westers. 

The company own 20,000 acres of land in the neighborhood 



. •" aj T i T i - i t a. if . '^^ . j . fc i 'j 'i W BM 



?,^-^\ 



-r 



^-^BH""^™ 



OB. 



JUNfc.8 AND FUBNACE8 OF LAKE SUPERIOB. 



233 



ictureaque of 
ler Peninsula 



it into blast 
sd by a num- 
;ticut, whose 
uriiace in the 
e expected to 
er and largir 
, being " shut 
1 on Sundays. 
|rear.s siie lias 
450 t(»n8 ol' 
, showing tlie 
unf, the !>anic 

; through the 
o the blowing 
iting and top 
raplete wreck, 
ining. With 
; agent, coin- 
had ceased to 
d in drawing 
ad the build- 
the expiration 



ace la»t year 

,nd went into 
, on columns, 
size as No. 1. 
oist, either of 
The boilers, 
furnace were 
3 first furnace 
I good work in 

sufficient sup- 

i on the docks 

sr. 

there being a 

m lli feet of 

xcept in cases 

neighborhood 



of the furnaces, on Grand Island Bay, which is valuable alike 
for its timber, for coal and lumber. A State road has been 
worked toward Marquette, which will be completed the coming 
season. The distance is 40 miles. 

The following is the product of this location ; 

Year. '^°"*- 

1071 .-.-. 3,597 

mL:::::::::::::::-.:: - - 4.900 



Total, 



8,497 



The officers and management of the company remain as be- 
fore. , ~ . 

The company has 52 brick and stone kilns, of size ensuring 
constant supply of charcoal for both furnaces. Both furnaces 
are run on the red specular ores, and make a speciality of iron 
adapted to steel rails and car wheels. 

The entire machinery— boilers, hot blasts and shi 11 stack for 
these furnaces was built' by the Iron Bay Foundry, of Marquette, 
D. H. Merritt proprietor, and are in every department equal to 
the best eastern work. 

WHERE THE ORES GO. 

The largest portion of our ores go to Cleveland, whence they 
are re-shipped to the coal fields of the Mahoning and Shenango 
valleys, by railroad. The freight from Cleveland to Youngs- 
town is about 81, to Pittsburg, 82. About one hundred furnaces 
in Ohio and Pennsylvania use Lake Superior ore, while nearly 
all the charcoal furnaces in the Northwest are supplied from our 
niinesy The number of furnaces is rapidly multiplying— the 
new ones built in 1869 increasing the demand for Lake Superior 
ore by at least 100,000 tons. 

THE MARKET 
For our ore is not confined to the Lake Erie ports, though they 
have hitherto taken the great bulk of the product. Our market 
place is the entire great West. 

The day is forever past when iron manufacturers east ot the 
Alleghanies will furnish the west with iron. They have ceased 
to do 80. Henceforth 75,000 out of every 100,000 tons of iron 
ore that goes to the coal fields west of the Alleghanies for man- 
ufacture will be from Lake Superior, while 90,000 out of every 
100 000 tons of iron used in the West will have been produced 
west of them. Then consider the present population of the 
West— some 15,000,000— the rate at which it is being augment- 
ed—the commercial facilities which exist to foster and encour- 
age manufactures and the mechanic arts— the numerous rail- 
roads that must still be constructed, and the ten thousand other 
imp)PO\ ements that are rapidly developing, and which require 
vast amounts of iron. Another year will give us a new outlet 




-^-^^smmm^s^is's mmf^ f ^ ^ m ^ u .,,,.,.i^.., .^iv a-^ ^^ 



,^gm^^ 



"^ 



234 



MINEH AND FUBNACES OF LAKE BUPEBIOB. 



throngh the western extremity of Lake Superior, and the con- 
struction of the Northern Pacific Railroad, which is sure to 
come, will lead to the building of huiidruv^s of lurnpces in the 
heavily timbered country that will thus be o[»ened up to trade 
and commerce. When we look at these facts, the question of 
market is forever settled. Then, in the course of human events, 
Lake Superior iron is going to Europe. With some this may ex- 
cite a smile, but ere long the fact will be realized, since, forcer- 
tain important uses, it has no equal in the world. 

STOCKS AND DIVIDENDS. 

The stocks of the iron mining and smelting companies are 
not offered in the market, the owners being perfectly satisfied to 
keep them ; nor are their profits and disbursements officially 
made public. Unlike most other Lake Superior stocks, those of 
our iron mines have never been heard of in the stock markets, 
from which facts the uninitiated infer they are barren of re- 
sults. The contrary, however, is the fact. They are so highly 
appreciated by those who hold them, that they are not only kept 
from stock boards, but are seldom heard of on the streets even. 
Such is the faith of those who hold them, that they are not dis- 
poned to part with them under any circumstances, having no- 
thing as a permanent investment that can and will bring them 
so sure and safe a return This being the case, the holders do 
not care to brag on their dividends abroad, but prefer rather to 
quietly share them. All the mines now working will pay divi- 
dends the present year. 

We doubt whether, in view of all these facts, there is an in- 
terest in the United States that promise better and surer returns 
for a long series of years, than the mining and smelting of iron 
ores in this district. And, in conclusion, we may safely add, 
that, considering the magnitude of its mineral wealth, the time 
is near at hand when the iron district of Lake Superior will as- 
sume a front rank in the sublime destiny of the great and grow- 
ing West, 



We are indebted to Swineford's HJRtory of the "Lake Superior Iron 
DUtrict for 1870-71-72," for the foregoing short sketcheH of Dome of the 
principal Iron mines of this region, and also the following RtatisticR re- 
garding the shipinentfl of ore, etc. The above histcry, with Hp|>endixes, 
contain a very full and correct account of all the mines, as published by 
Mining Journal, Marquette, Mich. Price, SI, 00. — Compiler of Beards Li- 
rectory. 



BMBH*BiaiM»«Sb^MBMidn<MWAM«laMH 



— •- ■ mmmtmftfnmimn Mm r i.- 



ind the con- 
is sure to 
ip.ues in the 
up to trade 
question of 
iman events, 
[this may ex- 
lince, forcer- 



Dmpaniee are 
y satisfied to 
nts officially 
)ck3, those of 
ock markets, 
)arren of re- 
re so hiehly 
lot only kept 
streets even, 
are not dis- 
I, having no- 
1 bring them 
le bolderH do 
ifer rather to 
v\U pay divi- 

lere is aa in- 
surer returns 
siting of iron 
safely add, 
Jth, the time 
erior will as- 
at and grow- 



Superior Iron 
of Rome of the 
I BtatiHticR re- 
h ap|)€ndix8(i, 
I piibliahed by 
o/ Beards £1- 



MINES AND PTTRNACEH OP IJ^KE 8UPERI0U. 235 



The following table exhibits in gross and net tons the amount 
of iron oreshipped from the Lake Superior mines during the season 
of 1872, together with its total value at $6 per ton, gross : 



MINES. 



Jackaon 

New York-.. 

Cleveland 

Lake Superior. 

Champion 

Lake Angeline- 

Barnum 

WaHhinj^ton 

Edwards 

Haginaw 

New £)ng<and.- 

Cascade .. 

Silas C. Smith.. 

McCombcr 

Foster 

Winthrop 

Negaunee- 

Marquette 

Republic . 

Marquette and Pacific Rolling Mill- 
Allen - - 

Grand Centra! 

Wilcox <x|Hagaley ^ 

Mather 

Green Bay . 

Franklin 1 - 

Albion 

Pittsburgh and Lake .Superior 

Michigan — 

Quartz 

Excelsior . 

Williams 

Iron Cliff Red Ore 

Shenango 

PendilL — . — - --- 

Michigammi 

Carr 

Shelden 



Total - 952,055 I,066,297l$5,712,330 



Gross 
tonn. 

118.842 

68,050 

162,607 

185,070 

68,405 

35 221 

38,381 

38,841 

26,026 

19,160 

17,466 

36,069 

13,445 

24,153 

18,139 

14,2.39 

6,897 

11,924 

11.026 

6,772 

8.707 

9,925 

4,426 

2,288 

7,633 

2,007 

1,100 

1,160 

1,227 

718 

756 

447 

545 

197 

127 

141 

18 

7 



Net tons. 

iliSlos 

77.224 

170,919 

207 279 

76,613 

39 407 

42,992 

43,506 

29,149 

21,461 

19,560 

39,278 

15,058 

27,051 

20,316 

16 946 

7,725 

13,356 

12,348 

7,583 

9,751 

11,616 

4,957 

2,512 

8,548 

2,248 

1,232 

1,298 

1,.374 

804 

846 

555 

610 

217 

142 

158 

21 

8 



Value. 



712,052 

413,700 

914,442 

,110,420 

410,430 

211,326 

230,186 

233,046 

216,026 

114,960 

104,790 

210,414 

80,070 

144,918 

108,834 

85,434 

41,382 

71,544 

66,150 

40,632 

62,242 

69,950 

26,666 

13,368 

45,798 

12,042 

6.600 

6,960 

7,362 

4,308 

4,636 

2,682 

.3,270 

1,182 

782 

846 

108 

42 




ft 



f 




g gJ i! « S# asg J. w^sg.;.v. ' Sg;j5^ - . ' . 



236 



MIKEH AMD FUBNA0E8 OF LAKE SUPERIOB. 



The folluwitiK table hHowb the total product of the Lake Su- 
perior furnaces from 1858 to 1872, iucluaive: 

Furnace. Grow tons. 

Pioneer - 64,697 

Northern - --15,0«8 

Collin* - 40,949 

Michigan - -27,346 

Greenwood - - —29,352 

Morgan - — 36,991 

Bancroft— _ - 88,261 

Champion —- _ 26,666 

JackHon — 34,242 

Schoolcraft - — 10,067 

Deer Lake - - -10,663 

Bay - 11,996 

Marquette and Pacific (pig metal) - 6,942 

Marquette and Pacific (muck bar and merchant iron) 999 

Lake Superior Co.'b Peat furnace 200 

ToUl • 367,880 

The following is a statement in gross tons of the production 
of ore and pig iron in this district from 1856 to 1872, inclusive, 
together with the aggregate value : 



TKAR. 



1856.- 
1857- 
1858- 
1859- 
1860- 
1861- 
1862- 
1863- 
1864- 
1865- 
1866- 
1867- 
1868- 
1869- 
1870- 
1871- 
1862- 



Iron Ore. 



7,000 

21,000 

31,035 

65,679 

116,908 

45,430 

115,721 

186,267 

2.%,123 

196,256 

ls96,972 

466,076 

607,813 

633,238 

856,47 

813,379 

972,055 



Pig 
Iron. 



Total 5,537,373 357,880 5,903,803 44,373,833 



1,629 

7,258 

5,660 

7,970 

8,590 

9,813 

13,832 

12,283 

18.437 

30,911 

38,240 

39,003 

49,298 

51,225 

63,195 



Ore and 
I'ig Iron. 



7,000 

21,000 

32,661 

72,937 

122,668 

63,400 

124,311 

195,070 

248,956 

207,539 

315,309 

496,987 

546,069 

672,241 

904,319 

864,604 

1,015,250 



Value. 

5 28,000 

60,000 

249,202 

575629 

736,496 

419.501 

984 977 

1,416,935 

1,867,215 

1,590,430 

2,405,960 

3,475.820 

3,992,413 

4,968,436 

0,300,170 

6,115,895 

9,188,056 



^— .T_» l^V-JM.*-! W- fT-»-ft-'t> » 'l» ' tivl w f.*! 



X r^ <»%. f^ ' 



-W€^.VU S5- -''* **' ^^^ 



MINK8 AND FUBMACE8 OF LAKE 8UPBRI0R. 



237 



he Lake Su- 



QruM tons. 

64,697 

15,068 

40,949 

-27,346 

29,352 

36,991 

88,261 

25,666 

34,242 

10,067 

10,663 

11,996 

6,942 

999 

200 

367,880 

) production 
2, inclusive, 



nd 


Value. 


•oil. 




ouo 


$ 28,000 


000 


60,000 


661 


249,202 


m 


575529 


668 


736,496 


400 


419,601 


311 


984 977 


070 


1,416,935 


955 


1,867,215 


539 


1,590,430 


309 


2,405,960 


987 


3,475.820 


059 


3,992,413 


241 


4,968,436 


319 


6,300,170 


604 


6,115,895 


250 


9,188,056 


803 


44,373,833 



The following table exhibits the total product of the several 
furnaces for the year 1872, together with the value : 



^URHACn. 



Orow tona. 



Pioneer — 

ColJin* - 

Michigan 

Oreenwood 

Bancroft 

Morgan 

Champion 

Deer Lake ■> 

Jackson 

Schoolcraft 



Marquette & Pacific Roiling Mill (Pig) 

Marquette & Pacific KoUing Mill (Muck Bar). 
Lake Superior Cktmpanjr's Rit Furnace 



Value. 



6,985 

3,431 

4,001 

4,212 

4,260 

4,356 

6,006 

2,720 

10,080 

2,600 

4,900 

4,332 

622 

200 



Toul. 



384,176 
188,705 
220,085 
231,660 
233,760 
239,580 
276,330 
149,600 
564,400 
137,500 
269,600 
238,260 
49,760 
11,000 



63,196 t 3,476.726 



The iron traffic for 1872, was divided between two railways 
as follows : 

lEON OEE. 

Over M., H. & O. B. B — 464,912 

Over C. A N. W. R. R - 488,686 



Difference in favor of C. A N. W. R. R 

PIG IRON. 



33,774 



Over M., H. A O. R. R 28,991 

Over CAN. W.R. R -- - - 9.16» 



Difference in favor of M., H. A O. R, R- 

Total ore and pig iron over C. A N. W. R. R— 
Total ore and pig iron over M., H. AO. R. R— 



— 19,825 

— 497,852 
483,903 



Totol Bhipmento 981,756 

With a difference of 13,949 tons in favor of the C. & N. W. 
R. R, 




PiWj y tJinwi''' ' "">'■ '' ■"'"'"' ' 



HOMES AND FtTRNAOKS OF LAKE 8nt>ERIOR. 



The following table exhibits in grow tons the total product 
of each mine from 1856 to 1862, inclusive: 

MinM. OroM tona. 

Jackaon 1,197,226 

CleveUnd - - 1,026,201 

Marquette - 62,998 

Lake Huperlor.- — 1,276,919 

New York - - 460,780 

Lake Angeline - 296,747 

Edward* _ 121,077 

Iron Mountain _— -— 16,594 

Barnum — - 120,977 

FoBter 73.781 

New England- _ - i- - 108,809 

Wanhington 308,919 

Champion 234,867 

Caacade.--- _ 39,240 

Orand Central 14,766 

McComber - 44,163 

Parsong - - 1,896 

Winlhrop - 26,027 

riaginaw - - 19,160 

Negaunee — - 11,687 

Iron Cliflk red ore 874 

8. C. Smith - -- 13,446 

Republic -- - 11,026 

M. & P. Rolling Mill - 6.772 

Allen 8,707 

Wilcox & Bagaley - 4,426 

Mather - -- 2,288 

Green Bay - 7,633 

Franklin - 2,007 

Albion - 1,100 

PitUiburg & Lake Superior 1,160 

Michigan - - 1,227 

Quart* .- - 718 

Excelsior—. -- .- 766 

WUIiams -- - 447 

Shenango 197 

Pendill - - - 127 

Michigamme 141 

Carr- - — 18 

Hariow 83 

Sheldon - — - — 7 

Total 6,667,373 



»R. 



)tal product 



GroM Ion*. 
. 1,197,226 
. 1,026,261 
,. 62,998 
.. 1,276,919 
.. 460,780 
.. 296,747 
.. 121,077 
.. 16.594 
.. 120,977 
. 73.781 
.. 108,809 
.. 308,919 
.. 234,867 
39,240 
14,766 
44,163 
1,896 
26,027 
19,160 
11,687 
874 
13,446 
11,026 
6.772 
8,707 
4,426 
2,288 
7,633 
2,007 
1,100 
1,160 
1,227 
718 
756 
447 
197 
127 
141 
18 
83 
7 

— 6.667.373 



MINBH AND Kl!HNArK8 Of LAKE HUPEBIOH. 



239 



THE ORE 8111PMENT8. 

The following is a statement of the Hhipmenta of iron ore and 
pig iron from Marquette for one week in August, 1873, and the 
total shipments thus far this season: 



COMPAHY. 



/rw» Or«. 



CleTeland 

Lake Superior 

Champion 

Lake Angeline--- 

WaKhington 

Edwartln— -- 

toComber 

inthrop -- 

mblic 

Albion..- 

KeyKtone 

Shenanffo. 

Himrou liematite. 
Bart Hematite — 
Kloman --- 



Xl 



IS^ 



a. 






41,463 

t)7,778 

3l.3',i9 

o,197 

I9,")76 

18,4i)« 

15,4:io 

1,9911 

37,9H2 

9.')4 

5 709 

3748 

1.077 

3,088 

9,818 



Total - — - 

Pig Iron. 

Champion farcace 

Morgan furnace 

Michigan furnace 

Greenwood furnace 

Bancroft furnace 

Grace furnace "--- 

(Jollins furnace 

Iron Cliff furnace 

M. & P. Rolling Mill 



263,587 

l,8"o 
1,H04 
1,683 
1,127 
1,747 
2,288 

483 
60 

100 



1.8331 

2.461' 
930 i 

1,103 

1.883! 

l.«-,i8| 
263 1 

6,869 
232 
42;^ 



128 
1,304 



Total - — - 11.167 



Total ore and pig iron— - 274.754 26.798 301 552 



24,900 

,H42 
91 

'87 
743 
180 
455 



43 296 
73.611 
33 79«t 

6.132 
20.67H 
20,376 
17.<I6S 

2.259 

44 81)1 
1,186 
6,132 
3,748 
1,077 
3,216 

11,121 

288,487 



2,217 
1 ,895 
1683 
1,214 
2.490 
2,468 

938 
60 

100 



1.898 13,065 




eiimsm ^M -' S "^*^''" 



Y>> 



(I 






1 



m .1 



J 






238 



MIMES AKD FUBMAOES OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



The following table exhibits in gross tons the total p- 
of each mine from 185G to 1862, inclusive; 



Juct 



Mines. Qrom tons. 

Jackston--- - 1,197,226 

Cleveltiad.— - -- 1,026,261 

Marquette .-- - 62,r 8 

Lake Superior — - 1,275,919 

New York— - -— 450,780 

Lake Angeline 295,747 

Edwards _ — 121,077 

Iron Mountain 16,594 

Barnum 126,977 

Foster - - 73,781 

New England- -- — i 108,809 

Washington — — 308,919 

Champion- 234,8C7 

Cascade - — 39,240 

Grand Central 14,755 

McComber - 44,153 

Parsons - - - 1,896 

Winthrop - - 25,087 

Saginaw 19,180 

Negauneo - 11,687 

Iron Cliffs led ore 874 

8. C. Smith- 13,446 

Republic 11,025 

M. & P. RolJing Mill— - 6.772 

Allen 8,707 

Wilcox & Bagaley - 4,426 

Mather 2,288 

Green Bay — 7,633 

Franklin — 2,007 

Albion — - — — — 1,100 

Pitt«burg <& Lake Superior 1,160 

Michigan 1,227 

Quartz - 718 

Excelsior 768 

Williams 447 

Shenango 197 

Pendill - 127 

Michigarame 141 

Carr 18 

Harlow 83 

Sheldon- - 7 

ToUl — _ 6,667.373 



-^.-.^- 






»»,. - .,.1i.)u-,..-,w.. 



■■/v-*^'"^^'*''^'''' 

"#>^^.- 



■■ 



■■ 



1 



BDPEBIOB. 



ns the total p** Juct 



Gro88 tons. 

- 1,197,225 

- 1,025,261 

52,( 8 

- 1,275,919 

- 450,780 
.- 295,747 
.- 121,077 
-- 16,594 

- 126,977 

- 73,781 
. 108,809 

- 308,919 

- 234,8C7 

39,240 

14,755 

44,153 

1,896 

25,037 

19,180 

11,687 

874 

13,445 

11,025 

6.772 

8,707 

4,426 

2,288 

7,633 

2,007 

1,100 

1,160 

1,227 

718 

756 

447 

197 

127 

141 

18 

83 

7 

- 6,667.373 




MINES AND FUBNACE8 OF LAKE SUPERIOR. 



239 



THE ORE SHIPMENTS. 

The following ia a atalement of the shipments of iron ore and 
pig iron from Marquette for one week in August, 1873, and the 
total Bhipments thua far this season: 



COMPANY. 



Ir<m Ore. 



Cleveland 

Lake Superior 

Champion 

Lake Angeline — 

Wachington 

Eklwanls 

McComber 

Wintiirop 

Republic 

Albion 

Keystone 

Shenango 

Himrod hematite. 

Burt Hematite 

Kioman 



Total. 



Pig Iron. 

Champion furnace 

Morgan furnace 

Michigan furnace 

Greenwood furnace 

Bancroft furnace 

Grace furnace " 

Collins furnace 

Iron Cliff furnace 

M. & P. Rolling Mill 



Toul- 



Total ore and pig iron 274,754 



ii 


eek. 


•=" 


> 


? a. 




^S 


'k 


a,« 


a. 


41,463 


1.833 


67,773 


5,83« 


31.329 


2,461 


.1,197 


935 


I9,')76 


1,103 


18.403 


i'.883 


15,435 


1,628 


1,99() 


263 


37,932 


6,809 


9.J4 


232 


5 709 


42;5 


3 748 


. _ . 


1,077 





3,088 


128 


9,818 


1,304 


263,587 


24,900 


1,875 


342 


1,804 


91 


1,683 




1.127 


87 


1,747 


13 


2,288 


180 


483 


455 


60 





100 
11,167 


... 


1,898 


274,75-J 


26,798 



I 



43 296 
73.611 
33790 

fi.132 
20.678 
20,376 
17.063 

2,259 

44 801 
1.186 
6,132 
3,748 
1,(77 
3,216 

11,121 

288,487 

2,217 
1 .895 
1683 
1,214 
2,490 
2,468 

938 
60 

100 

13,065 




■Si 



■^ 



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m«MNM3M 



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240 



MINES AND FUBNA0E8 OF LAKE SDPEWOB. 



The following is a statement of the shipments of iron ore and 
Dig iron, from the port of Escan iba, up to and including the 
20th day of August, 1873 



Mine. 



IRON Oli'^. 

Gro88 ton«. 

Sw Yo'rk -7.- 38,803 

Cleveland .-- *0'«^2 

Angeline ff^ 

Cascade - -- - — — 1^,988 

McComber ~ ?'*"! 

Grand Central -■ -- - ^'p.^ 



Rmith. 
Green Bay. 



„.^.. -.- ^32 

Wi^thr^"'/".-V-T- - 13.577 

Wilcox 3k By «.36fl 

Section 18 — — — J^* 

Fmma — — - — _— - - — - o,\)'kZ 

P. & LrsV-'Ji:.-""---"-"."-... — - - 11,960 

Carr -- ]'l^ 

Saginaw——-- -— 18-»^^ 

Burt Hemaiito— — ">;'»' 

Howeii Hoppock - _h^f 

Total iron ore 315,177 

PIG IRON. 

D^^rTakVr™ "_"."'---- - - — - l',990 

EBcanaba Eurnace l?o 

Total pig iron b, F>92 

ToUl jre and pig iron 320,769 

Statement of shipments from the port of L'Anse up to and 
including August 20, 1873 : 

Spurr Mountain. — - ^1,230 

Michigamine _'31_ 

Total — - 38,540 

Statement of the toul uhipments of iron ore and pig iron 
from the Lake Superior i:on district up to Aug. 21, 18/3, (ex- 
clusive of ore to local furnace) ; 

IRON ORE. 

GroRs tons. 

Marquette — 288,487 

Escanaba - 316,177 

L'Anae JS.^l? 

Total - - -- 642,204 

PIG IRON. 

Marquette - - - 13.0&6 

Escanaba — 6.692 

Total 18,667 

Total ore and pig iron, 660,861 









**•.« ^X^' 




evsRssisSPavn 



OR. 



iron ore and 
acluding the 



QrocH tona. 

67,736 

38,803 

10,662 

18,882 

31,659 

17,297 

14,988 

6,104 

5,223 

7,626 

932 

18,577 

6,366 

794 

6,042 

11,950 

1,431 

1,427 

18,822 

5,297 

_V(239 

316,177 

3,117 

— „-. 1,990 

485 

6.692 

320',769 

ise up to and 

21,230 

n,31() 

58,540 

and pig iron 
51, 1873, (ex- 



Qrofia tons. 

- 288,487 

- 316,177 

- ^,640 

- 642,204 

-- 18,066 

- 6.692 

• ■ i?!?5! 
. . 660,861 



APPENDIX. 



A STRANGER'S IMPRESSION OF MARQUETTE a)UNTY. 

The compiler of this, the finst Directory of Marquette county, feels 
very loth to cut Ioohc from his readerw without recor.liuK on these conclud- 
ing pages hif< own imprensions, cnule thuu^h they may oe, of this wonder- 
ful, rich and Iwautiful ri'gion, located in one of the moiit wonderful, rich 
and heautiful States of the Union. 

Wonderful for its greal expanse of pure sweet waters, magnificent 
scenery, and early as-touiationn. Rich in silver, copper, iron and other 
minerals, jiiade beautiful in its natural scenery, splendid location, and the 
purity and healthfiiliiess of the prevailing atmosphere. 

Seated on the verandah of Coles' Lake View House, we command a 
range of the spacious harbor of Marquette. A harbor s)00 feet above the 
level of the sea, and 000 feet ubove the cross which surmounts the spire of 
Triiiity church. New York. A harbor alive with all manner of steam and 
sail craft, which annually bear away to the busy world below, over a mill- 
ion tons of the purest and richest .if iron ore. 

A harlwr that sends fofih every year products equal in value to the 
foreign commerce of France, or Italy. Listen to the continual rumbling 
of the ore trains, (laden with the r'.ch yields of inniunerable mines far 
away into the interior, I as they swiftly follow one after another, thnxigh 
the city out on to the great trectle docks, into whose pockets they deposit 
their precious burdens, from whence it is poured into the hold of many 
ves.sels, and is thence distributed to consumers throughout the world. See 
in front of the city, and along the border of the broad lake the blaze ■ 
great furnaces, roaring night and day with the continued tires that redu 
the ore to marketable iron. Behold the extensive wharves, loaded wii> 
thousands of tons of coal and merchandise for home consun* 'on. Look 
on the fair city itself, the growth of only a few years, its .■ .j churches, 
convenient school-houses, substantial banks, elegant residences, and attract- 
ive business houses, and after inhaling a draught of the pure bracing air, 
you And yourself intoxicated with the many delightful and attractive sur- 
roundings. 

" The stranger who arrives at Marquette at night would have no diffi- 
culty in believing that he had reached a stirring business town. A light- 
house directs the mariner to the little bay, appropriately enough called 
Iron Bay, upon whose border? the city id situated. The government 
lireakwatei' that reachrn for a thousand feet across the entrance, had a num- 
ber of lights to show the situation. Every vessel at anchor under its shel- 
ter, at times renching the number of fifty, has a lamp in the rigging, and 
the long ore docks, high over all, have rows of gas lights As if this were 
not enough in the way of illumination, at the right hand and the left of the 
hay two gigantic furnaces send forth from their tall stacks a flickering 
flame that sheds a wave of light far over tlie waters." 

Here are located the U. S. Custom House, where were registered 
during the season of 1873, up to Sept. 23, vessels representing 380,917 
tons. Adding to the alwve a large number of vessels of which no official 
record is kept, and we have the tonnage of vessels arriving at Marquette 
at over 400,000 tons. 

The U. S. land agency is also located here, and under the courteous 



K 



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i 



* ^; '.' cut ^ : y j " 



■"Vrf u, ' : ' - ^" ^j 'nr'' . ^ .f' y- 



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:? 



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ii.A^lm%.M^.i■.mm'mM;&,mmimmm^ 







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iV..: , 1 i;: 



mmditmlMMMmML^iibiiaXSi 



u 



APPENDIX. 



and able management of Mr. Ambrone Campbell, does a large and thrivine 
biiHineDM, The operatiunH of this otiice alone for ihe last tive yern would 
niuku a very iniereHting book. 

Although Maniuetie, bh melropolw of the great mining region of the 
NorihweHt, ii<^--atly interested in mineral pro>luctionH, yet there are many 
other brancheH of induxtry w'<- h have grown and now thrive within her 
limitH. Without any intention on our part, or any deHire on the part of itH 
ciiizenH to indulge in or be the recipiontH of adulatory puiting, we uannot go 
further without mentioning, for the benefit of many readers who have never 
vlitiled this region, an<l who denire ito to do. Home of the enterpriaert and in- 
duHtri"tt of (he citizens of Marquette. We commence with a brief notice 
of the " Mar(}uette Kolliiig Mill and Ueecher Furnace," which we copy 
from a late number of the Miming Juuknal. 

MARtiUErrE AND PACIFIC ROLLING MILL COMPANY. 

The plant of the Marquette and Pacific Rolling Mill company embrac- 
er twenty-four acres of land with 1,400 feet of water front on the bay of 
Marquette, with a bluMi furnace, amuck bar train of rollit, a merchant bar 
train, eight puddling and one heating furnacen, a branch iruiH. connection 
with the Marquette, iluughtun & Untonagon railroad, and about live hun- 
dred feet of (lock, which extendi* into the bay and has a goo.l depth of 
water on both xideH for the receipt and Hhipment of freights. 

This is a very valuable property, and in its present worki-ig condition 
promiseH to become the plant for a rail mill and a nut and uoU factory, as 
well as for the manufacture of pig iron and muck and n erchant bar on 
its present scale. 

The stock of the company i^ $500,000, of which $247,000 has been 
paid and invested in the works leaving $263,000 to be sold if the company 
may think best. Last fall the works were slopped, the furnace first con- 
structed having burned out. it was a stone stack, of primitive style, but 
it has been re(ilaced by a large iron shell furnace with two Player hot blast 
ovens, each with 48 pipes, and the simple hot blast formerly in use. The 
arrangement for the use of these ovens is inlerchangable, so that one, two 
or all of them can be used, as may be desirable, 'ihe ad> ntage of this 
arrangement is am)arent to all furnace men. The work, in boiler capaci- 
ty, Otis hoist, and every auxiliary belonging to a furnace is first class, in 
short the old stack, with its fixtures, has Eleen disposed of entirely, and 
the new one with its appliances, is of the most modern style, and first 
class. The furnace has been in blast something over three weeks, averag- 
ing up to Monday last twenty-five tons of No. 1 bituminous foundry iron 
l>er day. This week she has been fully burtheiied and promises hereafter 
to make at least thirty-five tons per day. The name of the furnace has 
been changed to the " Ueecher," and the work is in charge of Mr. John 
Fisher, a founder who is known as one of the bcttt in the country. 

THE ROLLING MILL. 

This department of the work resumed operations a few days ago, Aug. 
1873, and has been averaging nine tons of muck iron per day, with eight 
furnaces, though later thirteen tons were rolled at a single turn, the 'boys' 
having concluded to see how the ' old thing would work ' put i' up to il« 
greatest capacity. It is expected to put thu department on double turn 
within a short time, when, of course, the product will be doubled, and 
average neiirly twenty tons per day. 

The merchant train embraces some twenty-four diflerent 'w of iron, 
and heating furnaces will be added just as they may be nece iry to sup- 
ply the local demand for merchant iron. Of late they have iieen making 
some bolt rod, on Hi>ecial orders, which is f^r su{>erior in strei „-th and gen- 



I and tbriviiis 
yei-s woulil 

region of the 
lei-e are many 
ve within her 
the part of iti) 
we cannot go 
I) have never 
rpriseHand in- 
brief notiw 
which we copy 



3MPANY, 

iipany embrac- 
un the bay of 
muruliant bar 
icK cuiineciion 
u-Umt five hun- 
goo.l depth of 

■i{)'>g condition 
ooU, factory, as 
erchant bar on 

7,000 has been 
if the company 
rnace first con- 
lilive Htyle, but 
L'layer liot blant 
ly in use. Tlie 
K) that one, two 
t nta);e of ihia 
boiler capaci- 
I tirHt ciaxii. ill 
if entirely, and 
I style, and tiret 
weeks, werag- 
is foundry iron 
imiHex hereafter 
the furnace hai* 
ge of Mr. John 
untry. 



daynago, Aug. 
day, with eight 
turn, the 'boys' 
put ir up to its 
on double turn 
i doubled, and 

at ^ c.en of iron, 
ce.- .iry to 8up- 
e been making 
eii^-th and geo- 



APPEKDIX, 



III 



eral quality to iron which ifl imaally put upon the market for this purpose. 
It in not intended to make merchant bar and hold it in stock, but all deal- 
ers and consumers in this region can be supplied by this mill with any 
grade or size of merchant iron which they may have use for. 

The, mill is to be known as the Marquette Rolling Mill. It is in 
charge of Thos. Jewell, Esq., late of the Wyandotte mills, who is a gentle- 
man of large and thorough experience. 

A portion of the property belonging to this company is the Rolling 
Mill hematite mine, on the Negaunee hematite range, which haa always 
been acknowledged to be one of the finest hematite minefl in this district, 
James Bale, Superintendent, The dock and grounds are under the suiter- 
vision of Geo. L. Beecher. Mr. Beecher baa the authority of the compa- 
ny to put the premises in complete order, and the plan embraces a fence 
in the water front as well as one to separate the iron works from the high- 
way, and to erect such buildings and make such external improvementa 
as will put the plant in complete order, and make it express by its appear- 
ance just what the owners desire, thrift, order, system and prosperity. The 
stockholders have selected \V. L. Weimore. Esq., President, Peter White, 
Esq., Secretary, and Wm. W. Wheaton — late of Detroit — Treasurer and 
General Agent, with Chas. Jenkins an Assistant Agent. Mr. Wheaton 
enterx upon his work with a zeal and energy which foretells success, and 
there is the best of reaisons for believing that the old Marquette and Pac- 
ific "Iron Works — now the Beecher Furnace and the Marquette Rolling 
Mill — ha» entered upon a career, with nearly one hundred men employed, 
which will, before the expiration of twelve months, give work to three or 
four hundred men. _, 

Nest in order comes the' very extvnsive foundry and machir ., ►■iiops of 
D. H. Merritt, F-eq. 

These alwpn occupy a large area of river front, and are well supplied 
with ail the modern and improved machinery necessary to carry on a busi- 
ness of this kind in all its extensive details. Boilers of any capacity, en- 
gines of any power, and machinery of any description, can be turned out 
of these extensive shops, equal in workmanship and design to anything 
that can, be procured in other cities. 

These •^orks have grown up step by step, and are a standing monu- 
ment of that zeal, enterprise and liberality which characterize the citizens 
of Marquette. 

in this connection the establishment of Jas. Picands & Co., wholesale 
dealers in heavy hardware, etc , may be mentioned, as a proof of the de- 
mands and needs of this rapidly increasing country. 

To such an extent has the growth and wants of this region been 
brought, that it was deemed necessary by Messrs. Picands <£• Co. to establish 
a large branch house in Ishpeming, although a glance at the variety and 
completeness of the stock at Marquett* wouIJ jieem to convince any one 
that the "lemand must indeed be enormous to equal the supply alrew^y 
on hand in their extensive warehouses. 

The prosperity and high commercial standing of this house is only 
one of the niAny instances whtre success has attended the honorable effbrta 
of competent and liberal business men commencing and growing up with a 
new country. Marquette is peculiarly favored with thii> class of citizens. 
We could make a book filled with the lives of men who have gone to Mar- 
quette poor, and in a few years have passed through an honorable and 
enterprising career to immense wealth. In fact we had a desire to publish 
in this work the business career of a few of Marquette's prominent citizens, 
but their well known modesty and natural delicacy'of feeling in regard to 
being " put in print," or made conspicuous, forbade us in indulging in any 
remarks where only deserved eulogium might appear to them, like com- 
pliments bordering on dattery. 



.1 



i 



<M '":» 









liiiifiiiiiiiiiWiii 



...^ 



h 



i 



IV 



APPENDIX. 




Manjuetle has ita car-Hhop« and round-houseti for the useo of the Mar- 
quette, lluughton and Ontonagon R. K., very i >inplete, well munt^'ed and 
giving employmeni to a large number of iukii. There in quite a large 
Hash, blind and door factory, supplied with lumber from several saw mills 
advantageously located throughout the county. Also, several prominent 
building Arms, and we believe a large company for that pur|>ose is now 
being organized, with Mr. Alfred Green, a well-known and competent 
architect and builder of Marquette, as President, or general manager. In 
short, all the trades may be said to be represented here by com|>eteiit and 
skilled workmen, it being a notorious fact that whatever a Marquette 
man or woman wants, that want must be supplied with the best. 

There are two banks located here, the 1st National, with a capital of 
40U,000 dollars, and the Citizen's bank, with a capital of $200,000, The 
First National has just completed k magnificent building, (of Lake Su- 
perior stone), which not only affords large accommodation for office and 
store room, but is an ornament to the city. 

Both of these banks do a large, safe and profitable bu.iiness, and eniov, 
to the greatest extent, the conlidence of their de(>osUors and the public 
generally. One feature of this section of the country may be mentioned 
here ; we mean what are called "genera l^stores." One of thsse stores, Pen- 
dell & Beatty, deal in almost everything consumable, and employ about 
fifty clerks. 

Watson <& Sons, variety store, comes under the same head, and carries 
an immense stock of ditierent kinds of goods absolutely bewildering to 
enumerate. The business done by these firms is really enormous. 

Another one of the features of Marquette, extensively patronized by 
all the tourists visiting the region, is the store or museum of Mr. T. 
Mead, where can be found some very fine mineral specimens, consisting of 
silver, copper and iron ores, crystals, agates, etc., etc., etc., many of the 
products of Indian industry, in the way of birch canoen, bead work, etc 
Here, also c»n be found the papers and magazines published throughout 
the country. Mead's, especiaJly in the summer season . is the great resort 
and he!id quarters for strangers seeking the amusing, useful, and fiarvel- 
lous in and around Lake Superior. 

Marquette is rather famous for ita handsome and intelligent women, 
and there are very few cities outside of New York where the ladies disp'ay 
better taste in dress and general make up than hcr> It rcKiuires some 
judgment and capital to cater to the fastidious wants oi hese belles, but a 
visit to the large dry goods house of Wetmore & Co. would satisfy any 
one that they need not go out of Marquette to be suited in anything in 
this line, from the moot expensive laces and dress goods to the cheapest of 
every day wear. 

As the city grows, different lines of buxiness become exclusive, &nd as 
a proof of the growth of Marquette we have been somewhat particular in 
calling attention to the ditierent business houses of Marquette. The house 
of H. M. C. Karl, with a branch at Ishpeming, for the exclusive sale of 
Boots and shoes being among the most prominent. 

The grocers carry as fine and well assorted a stock in their lines as can 
be found in any large city ; Earl & (Jo. doing the leading business, while 
the jewelry Luniness as represented by Mr. Conklin, cannot be exceeded 
for same amount of capital invested, in any city in the Union. 

One of the most complete drug stores, including a fine laboratory and 
manufacturing department it has ever been our good fortune to visit, 
is located in Manjuette. The business done by this hou."», taking into 
consideration the size of Marquette, is something wonderful, and is only 
another proof of my before as.'ierted fact, regarding the enterprise and 
business tact prevalent in Marquette, to whose citizens it would be un- 
necessary to mention the name of H. H. IStaiTord, as proprietor of the 



of the Mtu"- 
luuiit^'ed ar.d 
(|iiile a large 
al 8aw niillH 
I pruiiiinent 
r|K)«e is now 
1 competent 
ariager. In 
ii|)eient and 
a Marquette 
beHt. 

1 a capital of 
;00,000, The 
(of Lake Su- 
for office and 

enH, and enjov, 
d the public 
be mentioned 
le stores, Pen- 
employ about 

id, and carries 
ewildering to 
noiiR. 

patronized by 
m of Mr. T. 
I, consisting of 
:., many of the 
ead work, etc 
ed- throughout 
he great resort 
1, and fiarvel- 

ligent women, 
ladies display 
requires some 
e belles, but a 
lid satisfy any 
in anything in 
he cheapest of 

elusive, &nd as 
; particular in 
f. The house 
elusive sale of 

:ir lines as can 
Misiness, while 
t be exceeded 
on. 

laboratory and 
rtune to visit, 
i.'O, taking into 
jl, and is only 
interprise and 
would be un- 
iprietor of the 



"- ' .V Ujr i U ! ^ 



APPENDIX. 



above store, he being so universally popular <tnd well known that we are 
at a loss to say whether there is another dr'ig store in the city or not. 

There are several well stocked and prosperous retail hardware and 
house 'urnishing stores, represented at one end of the town, by Messrs 
Scovilie & Johnson, and at the other end by Mr. B. Neidhart. These 
houses do a large and prosperous business, and enjoy the contidentte and 
esteem of their fellow-townsmun and customers. Several tine clothing 
houses, and an extensive furniture tirm, known an Wyckofl' iSt Mahon, two 
very extensive and largely stocked livery stables, comuiand a large thare 
of the public patronage. One of the most elegantly arranged photograph 
galleries in the West, presided over by Mr. B. F. Childx, is located here, 
and during the summer months is crowded with tourists inspecting and 
purchasing stereoscopic views of Lake Superior's magnificent scenery. 

The hotels here (and Marquette needs more) are well kept, reasona- 
ble in their charges, and aflbrd accommodations that will compare favora- 
bly with any hotel in the country. 

A business, profession or calling, as the case may l>e,peculiar to this 
region, in that of the iron expert. These gentlemen must necessarily pos- 
sess qualifications of a rare nature. They are called upon to m»ke ex- 
ploration:*, assay ores and report upon their qualities, examine titles, pay 
taxes, make collections, etc. There are several firms of this kind in 
Manpiette, whose advertisements appear in the front part of this work, 
and to whom we can refer as worthy of all and every confidence that 
may be reposed in them. 

Enright & Spencer represent the harness business in Marquette, and 
supply large demands on tfieir stock from all over the Lake Superior re- 
gion. 

It is from this port that the celebrated varieties of brown, mottled 
and clouded sandstone, which for beauty, durability and adap'ability to 
general building and ornamental purposes is unequalled by any other 
stone. See advertisement on pages 27 and 119. While the slate from 
the Quarry, represented by W. L. Wetmore as President, is of a quality 
and fineness absolutely equal, if not superior, to any other siate in the 
market. 

We must not forget to mention the Mining Joubnal, to whom we 
are under too many obligations to pass lightly over. 

Perhaps there has been ro one cause more than another which 
has tended to enhance the interest in mines and mining affairs as much as 
this great mining organ of the Northwest. Too much praise cannot be 
bestowed upon this .Journal, for the enterprise, ability, and business man- 
agement exhibited by its proprietors. Their corjw of editors and attaches 
I." large, wmplete and very competent. Their outfit in presses and type is 
of the most improved class and quite extensive. In their job rooms they 
tu rn out as good work as is ever done in the average of first class printing 
houses ; and lastly, they publish a 12 page Journal, finely printed on good 
paper, ably edited, and which no one interested in anything pertaining to 
iron or minerals should be a day without. In connection with the office 
is a bindery equal in itii apimintments to any emergency. 

We have dwelt somewhat on the business interests of Marquette, and 
although we know that we have not done it full justice, yet we cannot 
but wish we had the space, ability and power to introduce all the buninunA 
men of Marquette to the notice and consideration of business men of other 
cities. 

The writer of these lines had necessarily much and frequent inter- 
course with the (commercial men of Marquette, and never in a single in- 
stance met with anything except the utmost courtesy, forbearance, patience 
and liberality, (for it is not always pleasant to be bored for subscriptions, 
advertisements, and general information). The impressions made U|X)n hia 



..-v^:; 



/>/ •"* -., 



# J 



t:: 



VI 



APPENDIX. 



W 



*?■ 



mind are of the plesRanteat, and we Hay to any one Reeking new fieldn for 
labor if you are looking for a place where, by your induNtry and buRineM 
<|iialificationH, you dei*ire to add to your own utore, and the pr.,«}>erity 
of your adopted city, go to Man|uette. Any man of thift dew-iplion will 
be received with open arniH, and he will lind friends at every turn. To 
the invalid or touriHt, needing a few weekn recreation, we rei-oniniend 
them liy all nieani) to rteek the pure air and splendid climate in and 
around the fair city of Marquette. 

Sailing over the broad, clear waterH of Lake Huperior, trolling for 
the large 30 (>ound lake tii*h, beating the mountain HtreamH for npeckled 
trout, visiting the rolling mill, furnaceH, niinen and other objectii of intereHt 
will nerve to paiw away Heveral weekn in an amiiHing and profitable man- 
ner. The hotelti here are well kept, very comfortable and ohargex reai«m- 
ublc, and araongfit other attractive featurcH we call attention to the follow- 
ing itketch, from the Mining Journal, of the new park and cemetery : 

"The people of Marquette are remarkably well favored with tlie 
grand in nature — in the IuIIh and valleyR, the swift-flowing river and the 
rivulet, the expanRU of lake and Rtretch of nhore line, the riHing jilain und 
unnumbered tintM of foliage, by which the city Ih Rurrounded. It would 
l>« difficult to Rclect a point which o\Z h a greater divertiity of Rtriking und 
beautiful Rcenery, in the midi". / a moving commerce which ifl averting 
itoelf as the mist jKiwerful ',<> the world. A finer picture never covered 
the canva.<w of an artist than is presented by Marquette from the center of 
the bav, with the docks, and ships and steamers in the foreground, bust- 
ling with life, and the city dropping from the highland to the right and 
left on l)o(h sidefl of the bay, with a horizon of hills to the extreme right 
and left and in the back ground. As a vessel advances toward this scene 
an irresistible emotion, inltuenced by beauty, creejwover the soul of the be- 
holder, and OR (he heart dilates with quickened pulsation he feels that 
words are Ufleless — the vision i.s suflicient. 

"Upon disembarking and passing through the busy streets and moving 
up the broad avenues, the ettect of the irapreHsion is not removed, but 
rather intensified by the surroundings, in fine residences with lawns and 
foliage, the continuous view of harbor and lake below, and the hills which 
crown the highlands back of the dty. But we are l« have a still more beau- 
tiful picture to look upon than all of these. Passing up Washington ave- 
nue to Seventh street, we find on the right of Washington a grove of pinea, 
dark, tall and as symmetrical as the masts of ships, covering the entire 
front of Washington between Seventh and Eighth streets, and extending 
back on a gradual incline to the depth of half the square, and then 
climbing a higher but not an abrupt elevation, they intermingle with ma- 
ples, low evergreens and beech, when, at the crown of the hill, the di- 
versity of the foliage is almost entrancing. Here, by returning the exam- 
ination toward Washington street, there will be found eight acres of a« 
beautiful park grounds as could be deoired, which, when completed with 
lawns, and drives, and'fountains, and the undergrowth of vegetation more 
completely cut out, will not only be made a charming landscape, but over 
and through which the life and bustle of the city can lie seen, with the top- 
masts of Uie flhipping in the harbor and Lake Huperior in full view In 
the distance. 

"At this point the we^itern boundary of the cemetery has been eatab- 
liHhed, and the monuments and improvements show a very complete sys- 
tem already adopted for carrying out the plan of improving and beautify- 
ing thiji de|)08itory of human dust. About eight acres have been set apart 
for this purpose, which nature seems to have especially intended to be 
made very beantiful by the Uast assistance. In the rear and forming a 
part of the cemetery grounds — the whole comprising some sixteen acres in 
addition to the front park — are prominent elevations and depressions, of 
such character as to be conTerted mto as beautiful a spot as one can desire 
to see. 



i 



AI'l'ENDlX. 



VU 



fielilH for 
nd bufiinem 
e pr.v<)})erily 
•■iption Kill 

lurii. To 
reconiiuend 
iiate in and 

trolling; for 
Tor K[)ecklcd 
In of interent 
lilHble mati- 
rm* reanon- 
I) the follow - 
iietery : 

id witli the 
iver and the 
ig plain und 
il. It would 
Htriking and 
IH awerting 
ever covered 
the center of 
{round, bust- 
le right and 
Ktrenie right 
rd thi« Hcene 
lul of the be- 
he feeU that 

I and moving 
■emoved, but 
h lawnH and 
i hillH which 
il more beau- 
hington ave- 
ove of pines, 
Ig the entire 
id extending 
•e, and then 
g;le with ma- 
hill, the di- 
ng the exam- 
l acres of as 
lupleted with 
elation more 
ipe, but over 
with the top- 
full view In 

fl been e«tab- 
ximplete sys- 
.nd beautify- 
een set apart 
tended to be 
d forming a 
teen acres in 
pressions, of 
[)e can desire 



''Near the center is a largo depression of from five toaizacrea, with 
irregular margins, its northern extent terminating near the north bounda- 
ry on EiKlith street. This depression is now being excavated to be formed 
into a lake. It was evidently the hiinie of a colony of beavers, centurieM 
ago. A small stream pasHes through it and a beaver dam had been con- 
structed at the outlet, and now in trenching to drain it und in taking out 
the vegetable accumulation of years, timber is found as having unmistaka- 
bly been placed there by the work of beavers. The soil is brown, a coarse 
vegetable fibrin, from three to four feet deep, lying on a pure white san<l 
bottom, and when removed and the depression allowed to hll with water, a 
silvery-bottomed lake of a depth of four feet will cover the space. The 
largest area of water will be located directly at the head of the central 
drive through the park and cemetery from Washington street ; and to the 
right, OS the lake is approached, extending oil' at an angle of forty degree:) 
with the unproach, is a mound some three liundrci feet in length, its crown 
and the side looking u(k>ii the lake, covered with full growth trees, witli a 
wide lawn and drive lietween the mound and the lake. Fronting the 
mound, and near the center of iti* length, there has been left in the lake 
within a few feel of the shore, a forniiition 'vhich is peculiarly adapted to 
a small island. This island will lie ciillivated in shrubbery and a small 
observatory placed uiion il. to which access will be given by an arched 
bridge suthcienlly high to allow of the passage of boats beneath it. 

"From this iioini looking to the north, and about six hundred feet dis- 
tant, lying parallel with the east shore of the lake, with hut a narrow chan- 
nel between, there lies a ntu'iitor-shaped island, with a huge granite rock 
rising from the middle Home six or eight feet high, and twelve feet across 
the top, having the ap[iearaiice of a turret. In the crevices of this rock 
moderate-8ized maples and evergreens have taken root, and it is susceptible 
of being oouverted into a most lieautiful and novel object. With shrub- 
bery upon the deck and the rock dressed to conform to the appearance of 
a turret, covered with evergreens, nothing could be made more striking or 
novel. 

"To the left of this point is aiother island, sutliciently large to he 
adapted to the cultivation of evergreens and such shrubbery as will be 
best adopted lo lieaulify it. 

"A series of archtd bridges will extend in an east and west line, con- 
necting the evergreen and monitor islands with the shores of the lake, and 
the amount of beauty and interest which may be added lo the approaches, 
the briJges and the island will begoverneti entirely by the amount of labor 
and taste expended upon them. The situation of each, and their relative 
position, is such as to admit of any amount of ornamentation, and the 
whole CHii be made h reality, far more attractive than most pictures so far 
presented of any park or garden thrown open to the public in America. 

"The interest does not cease here. East of this lake are several acres 
of wild and primitive land, with hill and valley, rock and forest, which 
can be converted by the mere touch of the engineer into pleasant walks 
and drives without disturbing the natural beaiilv of the location. Near 
the extreme north-west boundary of the grounds is a rocky prominence 
which commands a view of the lake in the cemetery, the cemetery and a 
large portion of the city and Lake Superior. This seems especial I v in- 
tended lor an interesting spot, and will be llie most attractive feature of the 
entire ground on account of its prominence. And all that portion of the 
tract north and east of the lake 18 of a character which furnishet. the best 
plat p<issible for adding, at little expense, to the most interesting natural 
scentry, such artificial embellishments as will make it attractive beyond 
measure. 

"Gondolas are to be placed upon the lake, which in their voyage over 
its entire surface will pass under four bridges, around three islands, enter 



II 




t •'*! 



1 



^ 



TT, ,. .- 



I 



vm 



APPKNDIX. 



Mvnral <-ov<!h, and paiw in front of the lawn on the iioiith Hide, which voy- 
a^e for uharniinK and iH>ctical l)eaiity cannot t>e NiirpawuHl. 

"Thin conipriiwM the Icadinx featureH of the park and cenieterv of Mar- 
quette, hill docH not hy any nieanii comprise the Jc' /, or ituerent, in de- 
tail, which can be found in the combined attractionn of the plac-e. We 
iMtlievv theimintry hoMoot yet ftirniahed itHe<pial, however much hait been 
done in many localitieH by the occupation of hundreda of acreti of land and 
the iiHe of innumerable auxiliaries lor adornment. We have all the attrac- 
tiouH of hill, valley, lake, forent, nvulet, fountain, lawn, evern^reeno, nhrub- 
liery, nK-k, ravine, hridgeM, b.mlK and the panorama of the Murrounding 
country, to plenxe the eye and the taate, cr to ar^w'>r the call of Hcholarx in 
veKetabie or geolof(ical Kcience. 

"Several hundre<iH of the pine* which Htood upon the WiiNbington 
street face of the park have been cut down — nmplex are to l>e Hulwtituted, 
and a hiwii culti/ated next year. KngineerH are now ciignf^ed m Hurvey- 
iiiK the property with a view of tixinx upon linen tiy which it fihull be 
liiiidH('ape<i. Two or three acrcH of the lake have been excavate-! and the 
Moil hoM >>een piled with lime to haxten itH decompottition, for the purpone 
of having ii ready to UHe next year in all canefi where it in demanded to 
atwiHt vegetation. The avenueH are l>cing graded with graniUj woii ; and a 
great auiount of other work ii* being <lone preliminary to the compli-iion of 
the wnole. 

"It may be thodght that we are over enthuHiaHtic, or that we are claim- 
ing too much for our little pet of twenty-tive acrex, in Maripiette , but having 
viniteil the leading (mrkH and ceniclerieH of the it)iu)try, including tlioHe at 
Philadelphia, New York, Brooklyn, Roston, ]ialtimore, St. Louin, and 
other important localitiei«, we are prepared U> Hay, that for beauty of land- 
»oa|K', pointH of enpecial interewt to the lovern of the curioux, novel and 
beautiful, we believe the Manpiette park will flurpiiiw them all. 

''The plan of combining the two, itHeeiux, in original with Marqnetle, 
and the iniluence of the plan must reHult in their muliial advantage. The 
premiHert will bepro eriy ]>oliced and the park will l>e protected, while the 
tombs of the dead, and the respect due thoHe who have pniwed away, will 
inxtill a Hpirit of decorum, and an a(>preciation of the good iind the beauti- 
ful into all who enter the ground, which feeling will itervude and Hurround 
the pla<'e aw with a charm of case, and repose, and acfmiration," 

The Holly works improved furnixh an ample supply of pure, fesh 
water to its 7,000 inh^tbitants, while extensive gas works illuminate the 
city with a pure aixl brilliant light. 

And now, in bidding adieu to Marquette, and its hospiiable, enterpris- 
ing and liberal citizens, we wish them all the success, pronperity and 
growth which they most iwsuredly deserve, and wending our way to the 
de|>ot of the Marquette, Hought«>n and Ontonagon railroad, prepare to give 
our readers some account of other towns in the interior, ai d in order that 
thev may not think we are blindly enthusiastic in all that concerns this 
region, weappeii<i the following account made by another stranger in these 
parts, Yusef, the very able correspondent of the Detroit Free Prt»», who 
writes : 

"That the Marquette, Houghton and Ontonagon Railroad has other 
means of income besides those derived from carrying ore and merchandise 
and disjjosing of land grants is evident. The passenger destined for the 
iron mines will find a throng of (>eople at the station in Marquette await- 
ing the departure of the train for the mining region. Every seat in the 
coiiches will be found filled, many persons standing in the aisles, and all 
available space in the baggage car occupied. The larger number of the 
passengers — men employed in the mines in the vicinity — have been down 
to Marquette on matters of business ; others are new arrivals jnst going 
into the interior in search of jobs. 



wamm 



^ 



■■» ^^; 



APPENDIX. 



I', wliich Tojf- 

elerr of Mar- 
iterwt, in de- 
pliice. We 
iiicli liim been 
i-x (if land and 
all tlieattrac- 
irct'riK, Hhnib- 
Hiirroiiiiding 
of HcholarH in 

' Wn»hinjfton 
M) HiilMtltiited, 
(t>(l in Hiirvey- 
li it rIiuII b« 
vated and the 
• the |iiirp(me 
demanded tu 
t)i miil ; and a 
completion of 

: we are claim - 
te , l)iit having 
iidin^ tliDxe at 
it. lM\m, and 
>eaiit.v of land- 
UH, novel and 
all. 

itii Marqnette, 
vantage. The 
cled, while the 
led away, will 
ind the beauti- 
I and Hiirround 
m." 

of pure, f'eHh 
iliuininate the 

ible, enterpriH- 
>ronperity and 
iir way to the 
•repare togive 
I in order that 
concerns thi» 
■anger in thene 
ee Premi, who 

)ad iian other 
I merchandiKe 
'Htined for the 
rquette await- 
•y neat in the 
ainleH, and all 
number of the 
ive been down 
alf) jnst going 



A BIJMV AHPECT. 

"Among the rent are iiever.-il Rwediah anri Oernian minent, who are oun- 
ducting to their future quartera relativeH anii friendu, fr««h iininigrantfl, 
juMt landed from the lake HteamerM. There are contractont and btiildurx, 
very buHy, having much work on Uixnd that nee<li< attention and rather 
drove for time, and life insurance i\. ii who are urging the infecurity of life 
and the niu-owiity of making provixion for the fuMire on ni<t unwilling ear*. 
Age tH and managem of niinea are going out to look after mattem, and 
ownerx of develo|)ed pm|>erty and pro)t|)«ctive locationa guiding ittrangt-rx 
to a view of the richnena of the land. 

" Iron and furnace men from I'ennitylvania and other Stalea have come 
to latinfy themxelveM of the advaritagex oHered by the ut<e of variiiuM orex, 
and drurrmerx for mercantile houiteM with (Hinderimx wmple cvxeM, an.xiouH 
only to make giH>il Kalex. Kailroad men and vcHHel captains are intent on 
hurrying up HhipmentH, and Kiimmer touriHtH on Hc^ting the Htrango xightx 
of a mining region. Every one haH xomething to talk about, and the Mow 
of con vernation ia Htrangely in contriiHt to the usual refwrvs and Hilence of 
pamengerx in railroad can* in other l<H;ulilieH. 

, TIIK ROAD TO NEOAtlNEK. 

" Laden tlum heavily, the train UnU up the ateep grade from tlie lake 
level at Marqiie'.'e to the heigh(j< of the iron range, Hiopping at three or 
four HtutiouM at which bla»t fiirna(«M are located, Tnit retaining moHt of ita 
paasengers until at a diHtance of twelve mileH from the starting {toint Ne- 
gaunee iH reached. ThiH in the nite of the tirHt iron mincH, a numl)er of 
which are located witliin the corporate limitaof the city, fsr Negaunee 
in an incori)orated city, with ir.tiinet's activity and life pertaining to that 
dignity. In 1S70 itj« population wii-* set down at 2,500; at preHcnt it has 
more than double that number, 

THE KIRST IMPRE88tON8. 

" Probably the first thing that will arrent the attention of the ntranger 
will be the concotinie of people on the ntation platform awaiting the arrival 
of the train. Having made hin way through the crowd he will next won- 
der at the nieantng of the large luiniber of carbov« of vitriol benide the rail- 
road track, and when informed that nitric acid to the value of $7,000 ia 
every month con- mimed in the nitro-glycerine factory, a mile or ho from the 
town, will begin to appreciate the labor of extracting froui rocky fnterHticea 
the precioua iron ore. 

AN ACTIVE PLACE. 

" Then if he careH to initpect the place before visiting the mines he will 
find extensive stores in all the lines of trade and all apparently doing a 
profitable business, two or three banks, a number of good hotels crowded 
with guests, churches, schools and private residences of neat appearance, 
but none of architectural pretensions. Negaunee has the advantage of 
two railro?d lines, the Chicago and Northwestern and the Marquette, 
Houghton and Ontonagon. 

THE MINES AND THE 0R& 

" South of the city a considerable elevation, styled a mountain, rears 
itself. The original growth of timber has been cut off, and the operations 
of the miners reveal a number of openings in the rocky side. These mines 
are distinguished as belonging to the Negaunee hematite range. The ore 
is red and brown color, easily mined, and, in places, so friable as to be 
readily loosened with the pick and removed with a shovel. The hematite 
orei4, though valuable, if not indispensable to mix with the harder quali- 
ties, are of the lean character — that is, averaging in a given weight buv 44 
to 55 per cent, of iron. 



ft 










-*■ .-I...... 



APPENDIX. 






'V^; 



OPENINO A MIHB. 

" If B |>«nion connecU with a L»ke Hin>erior iron mine the iile« of a 
miWterranoan worliing in the uroiind U) which accewi i« had by means of 
narrow Hhafwof iinaruin deplTi ami conitUnt glooiu and darknentj, he will 
be i|iiiiu diH«|i|KiinUHl on witnewing tli« reality. Oi>er»tionii in mining are 
iixually l*giin at tlie Hide of a hill or mountain, upon which explorationn 
and teBl piln have revealed the pre«ence of ore. The limber ia first cut 
down and the nurfate noil removed. Then, if the vein Ib immediately at 
the outidde or foot of the hill or mountain, an in HometimcH the cajie, nothing 
remiiinH to be done but U) atUck with drill, and i)owder, and pick and 
HJiovel, loatl it into carta or railroad cam, and draw it away. Vore fre- 
<{iientiy a out wide enouph f<ir a road liaii t() lie made through the interven- 
ing rod; until the vein i» reached, whom; counte afterward detcrininen the 
direction of the workingH. In other placcK the outcrop of the vein on the 
surface Ik followe<l down, often of Huch width and depth an to reaemble 
monHtrouR craters. 

WIDK MOUT' .. ' ITB. 

" Iron mining, in iihort, in conducle. .Mich on the same principle* » 
quarrying, and the veiii' vary in width from a uiii-ow pannage in whig), 
but one man can l<e employed, and he Hometimeri unprolitably, to o|)eni,]gg 
HO broad and cuvernouH afi to contain a reginitinl. In ail caiWH the I'onfjg,,. 
ration of the vein regulaten the iihape of the mine, biit|gcnerally Hpea^Jng^ 
the dimenaioaof the Hurface o|)«ning are retained to the very l)Ottom of the 
cavity. 

CHAHACTKH18TIC8 OF TUK IRON MINES. 

" The veini) dip at tolerably regular angle;* from the (>eriiendicular, and 
when tiiey are puntued for any dinlance the hanging wall in Mupported by 
timl)erH, iSomciimeH an iuland or " liorHe" of rock obtriideH iiHelf in the 
very midrtt of ii vein. Ju hucIi caHen, if very large, i». is Hutlered to remain 
and the windingH of the valuable nuneral followed around it. In some 
mincH, aH the Jacknon, interposing walls of rock between large depoHiw of 
ore are tunneled through, giving ndmiwiion to railroad coth, into which the 
ore Ih Hhoveled direct from iUt original bed. 

MODUS OPERANDI. 

"At the firHt opening of a mine horxea and carta are driven into the 
opening, and the ore removed to a " Htock pile," which in a vaHt heap con- 
tigiiouH to the railroad track, or carted direct and dumped through MhuotH 
into the railroati cnrH. An the mine progreHxeti in depth, of courHe it be- 
comes inconvenient, if not im|M>s8ible to drive into its abyss horses and 
carts, as however great the superiicial opening the impracticable point will 
ultimately be reached. Wo in some of the older mines are used inclined 
railway tracks and cars, in other tracks well nigh perpendicular, traversed 
by cars of boiler-iron denominated "skips," and ingeniously devised to 
dump their contentM when at the summit without jumping from the track. 
Powerful engines are used for hoi'^ting in such mines, and for pumping, 
though in the summer season, but little water tinds its way into the bottom. 

AT WORK ON THE ROCKY FACE. 

" Into these broad pits, open alike to the sunlight and the rain, the 
hanly miner betakes himself, and with his sledge and drill attacks tho 
glistening face of the ore-bearing rock. The miners proper work in gangs 
of three, usually, and are paid by the foot or cubic fathom. Perching 
himself where directed by the captain, at a convenient place, upon the side 
or the bottom, he starts his drill, :'.n instrument of steel, of no great length, 
which is driven into rock by the re(>eated blows of his stalwart colleagues. 



\ 



XTUKmilK'SMKm^^imt. 



ittB 



d 



the itle* of a 
by means of 
rkneM, he will 
n mining are 
ezploratiunH 
ilwr ia firnt cut 
mmediately at 
he cane, nothinu 
and pick and 
A' ore fre- 
jh the interven- 
determineK the 
the vein on the 
an to retteuible 



iiini- priniiiilea 8 
iiiwagc in whip), 
bly, to oiwningg 
iimM llu' contjjjy. 
lerally H|>fuking, 
■ry lottoni of the 



rpendicular, and 
I tH Miipported by 
JeH iittelf in the 
itlt-red to r«;muin 
ind it. 1m Home 

large depoHiin of 
rH, into whicii the 



3 driven into the 
a va»t heap con- 
i tliroiigh MhuotH 
1, of course it be- 
abysH horHes and 
ticable uoint will 
ire uiteu inclined 
licular, traversed 
JUHly devised to 
; from the track, 
md for pumping, 
J into the bottom. 



and llie rain, the 
drill attacks tho 
;r work in gangs 
Lhom. Perching 
ice, upon the side 
fno great length, 
ilwart colleagues. 



•^^r- 



Ari'KNDIX. 



XI 



BLAMTINU. 

" When a sufficient number of hole* of the proper inclination havt- l>een 
drilled to give a '• go<K) throw," the cAvilieH are charge<t with giant |H)wder 
or nitroglycerine, and a warning idgnal given, hearing which all liarwU 
quit work and seek shelttr until the blast has taken place. These blawts 
are usually made four times a day— ai ten o clock and at one, at three 
and at siv. When the blast is over, the other workmen Het hlmut removing 
the ore, and also the other ruck which may happen to U- disengngetl with 
it. Home " throws" loosen larger quantiiies of ore than others, as some 
mines are more favorably *itnat«>d or easier workefl than others. New 
York mine, situated at Ish|>eniing, has a vein sixty-tive or seventy feet in 
width, the opening being 54M) feet superlicial in lenuth, and down at the 
present time some sixty feet, dipping at an angle of atstut 3U (ie^roos. Ke- 
centlv, at a single blast, 1,075 pounds of giant powder lieing used, over 
4,0UU tons (8,U0U,IHX) |HJunds) of ore was thrown from this mine 

DIFrKREMCK IN VEINH. 

" The hematite veins are easier worke<l than the specular or the mag- 
r<etic. At Ncgaunee, ui>on some of the same locations are foinid IxHh 
classes of ores. It may Ite said, however, that the hematite mines have not 
l>een so energetically worked as those containing ores of the harder varietiea. 

ExrKNHICM UF A MINE. 

"A considerable ex()enditure is attuched to the working of a mine, so 
that if valuable ore in found u|mmi a side hill, awaiting the pick and shovel 
of the miner, he cannot att^'-lt it without tirst making extensive prepara- 
'.ions. In the first place dwellings for workmen have to be erected, which 
is no nlight task when the iiuniber reaches, as it dues in most cases, tifty or 
more, -^evt'ral locations liave a hundred. Then roads are to be cut, and 
switches and side tritcks made, platforms and spouts for loading cars built, 
and repair sho|>s put u(). in ulaoes remote, stores have to be supplied, 
and giHuls of all descriptions kept for the use of the lalxirers and their 
families. It frequently happens that months are consumed in this prelim- 
inary labor. 

TIIK miner's homes. 

" riif dwellings of the workmen are either frame or !6g houses. If the 
former, xoiiietinies painte<l, but in all cases made exceedingly comfortable. 
There Is a certain sameness in the structures, and the stranger notes the 
alMciHte of fences and inclosures, and the lack of gardens that he is accus- 
loinc<i to see attached to dwellings of like character " below.'' Most mines 
have school-houses and teachers u|K)n their locations, though not all of 
them are thus provided. In such cases of course the reason is the neglect 
of the parents themselves, who are quite as well satisHed to have their 
boys earn wages as to lay up a store of " book learning." 

DOCTOK8 AND LAWYERS. 

"A physician is an indispensable attache of every mine, hisservices be- 
ing paid for by retaining from each single employe's wages seventy-five 
cents monthly, and from each married one $1.'26. Mining accidenta, how- 
ever, a-e not so numerous as one might natural I v sujipose. Preacliers are 
not BO common, but occasionally one deems it his duty to visit the mining 
locations and attend to their spiritual wants. There are lawyers, too, but 
few of them thrive in this r^ion. Each mine is contiguous to the rail- 
road, and thus noramunication is made easy; moreover, at each is a post- 
ofi'ce and a telegraph station. As for justices of the peace and constables, 
a distribu ion of the offices is made at each election— two or three, or more 
mines comprising a township, and law and order reigns as well as iii any 
other well regulate<l community." ' 

We'must beg to differ from " Usef " in regard to the hotels in which 



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