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Full text of "Bouquet of kindergarten and primary songs [microform] : with notes and gestures"



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Photographic 

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BOUQUET 



OF 



KINDERGARTEN 



AND 



PRIMARY SONGS 



IVi/k N'oles and Gestures. 



Ir^JTRODUOTiON BY MRS, vJ L. HUGH)H)c?. 



SELBV k CO., 42 CHaRCn Si REST, 

1891. 



Gntrred acoorJinsf to Act of Parliament of Cana.U, in ihe year mi, by '^KMiY & CO in tl.- Mffloe oi th. 

Minister of ^^rrioult lire, <JtUw:„ - ^^^ u. i. >j 









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BOUQUET 



OF 



T 




KINDERGARTEN 



AND 



PRIMARY SONGS 



PVith Notes and Gestures, 



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INT^RODUGTION BY MRS, J, L. HUGHES. 



SELBY & CO., 42 CHURCH STREET, 
1891. 



Entered according to Act of Parliament of Canada, in the year 1891, by SELBY & CO., in the Office of; he 

Minister of Agriculture, Ottawa, 



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1 1 
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<5 vi:) * 



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39127 



INDEX. 



\ 



Away Anioiig the Blossoms, 

Britannia, the Pride of the Ocean, 

Flower Voices, 

Good Morning, Merry Sunshine, 

God is Love, 

God Make My Life a Little Light 

God Save Our Native Land, 

God Save The Queen, 

Good-Night, 

Hirkl The Hells are Ringing, 

Imitating, ... 

Jack Frost, 

Lovely May, 

Little Raindrops, 

Marching Song, 

Now the Day is Over,... 

VOur Native Land, Fair Canada, 

JM-^'lv. Ready, 

Summer Rain, 

See, the Snow is Falling Fast, 

Thumbs and Fingers Say Good Morning, 

The Bright Waves, 

The Bee Song 

The Young Musician, 

The Robin's Egg, 

The Pretty Moon, 

The Busy Little Mother, 

The Marching Song, 

This is the Way We March, 

The Tip-Toe Song, 

The Red Rose Says Be Sweet 

The Little Sailor's Song, 

The Golden Boat Song, 

The Red, White and Blue, 

The Flag We Love, 

The Queen's Birthday— Kindergarten Song,... 

ihe Greedy Fishers, 

The Good Shepherd, 

Up Yonder Mountain, 

Violets, 

White Lambkins, 

Weary Fingers 

We are Bearing the Flag of the Red, White and 



Blue, 



22 
40 
34 

5 

6 

38 
38 
39 
46 

25 
18 

24 
9 
23 
3' 
45 
38 

31 
21 
26 
8 
12 

14 
16 
20 
26 
28 
30 
30 
32 
34 
34 
36 
40 
42 

43 
44 
48 
1 1 
10 
7 

19 
42 



INTF^ODUOTION. 



40 
34 

5 

6 

38 
38 
39 
46 

25 
18 

34 
9 
23 
3« 
45 
38 

31 
21 
26 

8 
12 

14 

16 

20 

26 

28 

30 

3'^ 

32 

34 

34 

36 

40 

42 

43 

44 

48 

1 1 

10 



Hy MKS. JAMKS L. HUdHES. 



19 

42 



TN all Kindergarten Songs there is an intentii)n to appeal to the whole nature of the child, moral, mental 
J and physical. The physical exercise of the gesture appeals to the physical side first, but not most, 
y The language of gesture is developed first, naturally. The little child expresses his thoughts through 
his movements, long before the power of speech is developed ; and, in asking little children for gesture 
with songs, we are following the guide Nature gives us. If with each separate thought expressed in words, 
we unite the expression of the same in gesture, the thought is doubly impressed, because both the physical 
and mental actions are centred on the sam^ thought, the one reacts upon the other, mutally deepening 
the impression. 

There should be an especial effort on the part of the teacher to have the gesture given definitely by 
the entire class ; otherwise the individual impression of each child, from the combined action of the whole, 
will be indefinite, and the result will soon be apparent in the growing indifference of the class. This should 
he secured through sympathetic means always, not by force. 

Besides the physical and mental strength gained through gesture songs, there is also a moral strength 
gained, which perhaps will not be so evident at first thought. The child's words and actions correspond, 
he says and does at once according to his word. It is the principle of putting the thought into action, 
promptly and honestly, that works on his character unconsciously, but none the less certainly. The words 
of songs are designed to embody truths, which, stated abstractly in bare words, would make no impression 
whatever on the child's mind, but when presented in a figure as in the songs, become living, active truths, 
and because alive are of interest and make a deep impression. 

This early impression of feeling, corresponds to the chiV's indefinite ideas of other things, and we 
expect the feeling to develop into the thought, just as mathemaucal truths grow in the child's mind, into 
rules which are a permanent part of his mind ; both grow into formulated law through constant use and 
application. In this way the moral growth is one with the mental and physical, and subject to the same 
laws of development. 

As illustrating the threefold effect of the gesture sougS upon the child, and pointing out the action 
and reaction of one side of the nature upon the others, let us take " Good Morning, Merry Sunshine." 
" Good Morning, Merry Sunshine," is that of a care that never sleeps, that is constant in its loving interest, 
a care that extends to all children, as well as the birds and flowers. He who extends this care is the God 
of nature as well as of man. The idea of His personality is embodied in an active expression of His care ; 
and, while the children are in sympathy with that care, through the visible presence of the sunshine which 
He sends, their hearts are responding with all the love and thankfulness a child's heart can, to the per- 
sonality which is the living heart at the centre of all things. It is all of worship the dawning mind can be 
conscious of. 

There should be no attempt to define this hidden truth to them, they feel but cannot think yet. Grown 
up ideas are incomprehensible when in words, but reveal themselves in things. Instinct leads the child to 
be interested in things ; it is nature's call to love the truth. We should foster this instinct, that the truth 
which they embody, and which is the vital principle of all things, .'^ay be felt, and in time become clear 
to the consciousness. 

The rhythm, melody and gesture, all help to rouse the child's feeling, and if the teacher is in sympathy 
with the children; and the song is sung joyfully, but never boisterously, it cannot fail to arouse and deepen 
a feeling of thankful love with each repetition. 



\ 



; 



The songs used should I)e appropriate to the season. If the air is fresh and invigorating with clear 
frost, the children's voices ring out in the notes of "Jack Frost " with a spontaneous sympathy of feeling. 
All the blood in their young veins responds to the thought embodied in the words, and there is no need of 
effort to arouse the feeling of sympathy. If the snow is falling fast outside, the song, "Oh, See the Snow," 
comes spontaneously, voicing the feeling which was not yet strong enough to find natural expression 
unaided, the heart is yet moved by each passing influence which, if unexpressed, is lost. Catch the 
inspiration from external conditions l)y selecting songs which embody the spirit of the external world, and 
the heart of the child comes into harmony with the heart of nature. 



• GESTURES FOR "GOOD MORNINC, MERRY SUNSHINE!" 



(/\) Throw a greeting witli the right hand twice to Ihc 
%\m, 

(B) Raise the arms to a vertical position, rapidly mov- 

ing the fingers. 

(C) l'"orm circle with the two thumbs and forefingers. 
(0) Point again to sun. 

(E) I'oint with decision toward the west. 

(F) Point with decision toward the sun. 

(C) With index finger represent apparent path of sun 
..V round earth. 



(H) Point definitely to east. 

(I) Extend arms from shoulder, flutter the forearms 
to represent flying, without bending elbow. 

(J) Close all fingers except index, and describe a quarter 

circle from extended position to top of head. 
I 

(K) Point to path from sun to ground. 

(L) Point to children. 

(M) ^wing hand above the head with handkerehirf. 



NOTE. — In "Britannia, the Pride of Ocean," the first part of the third verse has been changed from the original, 
which reads : 

The wine cup, the wine cup bring hither, 

And fill, fill it up to the brim ; 
May the mem'ry of Nelson ne'er wither, 
Nor the star of his glory grow dim. 
The above can be substituted if necessary. 

ERRATA.— Read "it" and "its," in the altered portion of verse, "she" and "her." 



originaU 



GOOD MORNING. MERRY SUNSHINE. 



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(A) Good morn - itifl mer - ry buii • shino, How did you wako ro hooii? (B)Y(>trve 
I iiev - er \<,o to Bltjop, dear child. 1 0)1 jtiHt )^'> round to bug, (||| My 













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Beared a - way the lit - tie Btiirs,(Q)And shiiied a - way the moon; 

lit - tie child - I'en of the eiint, Who riae and watch for nie; 



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saw you t^o to sleep last nif^ht, Be - fore I said my pray - er 
wak . en all the birds and(J)b-;es,(K)And flow - era on mv wav, 

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in the west you sank to rest, (P)How did you get up there, 

last of all (L)the lit - tie child,(||(J)To greet this hap - py day. 

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6 

"GOD IS LOVE.-MORNiNQ HYMN. 



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God is Love! the lit - tie bird - ies In the tree ■ tops o - ver head 







Seem to say, with their sweet voi - ces, Praising Him by whom they're fed. 



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All things tell us God IS LovE. 
— • • « — ^t— 1— * ■ • c 



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Little stars tliat shine in heaven, 
As they twinkle far above ; 

Peeping, smiling, at each other, 
Wiiisper gently, (led is love. 

God is love, etc. 



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God is love, the snow flakes whisper, 
As they linger in the air j 

God is love, the breezes murmur, 
As they meet us everywhere. 

God is love, etc. 



GESTURES FOR "WHITE LAMBKINS I" 



(A) Look and point upward. 

(B) Make a round moon with both hands. 
(Q) Look and point upward. 

(D) Cover eyes with hands and bow heads. 

(£) Make a peaked roof with both hands. 

(F) Flourish the right hand, as if showing a large field. 



(C) Look and point upward. 

(H) Raise both hands over head and "twinkle" fingers. 

(I) Raise right forefinger vertically. 

(J) Raise left forefinger vertically. 

(K) Raise Ixjth hands over head and "twinkle" fingers. 

(L) Two forefingers clasp, as if embracing. 



The song "Up Vender Mountain" will be found to correspond to one of Grimm's fairy tales, and 
although, generally speaking, Grimm's fairy tales are hardly adapted to children) yet it would do no 
harth in this case to explain the song by means of the story. 



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(P) Slio cnUutbcmout to puHt . turu.QUp - on her inuudi)WH({My, ' 



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pret-tymoon,CWhosehomeiaup onhiffh.Slie ria - es in the eve 
lam h-kiiiH.TIiov 'reneverBeeuby day, Like JHiH-ter andjlike bro 



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ningO^V>*)i>lil^ - tie children 
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sleep, 
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\ Cornea from her lit • tie oot-tage ^nd 
L They seem to love each oth • er, They 



calls her lit • tie sheep. 
Dev-er fret nor cry. 







THUMBS AND FINGERS SAY "GOOD MORNING." 







(A) Tlmmbs and (B)fiii-gers (C)say(D)"good niorning"(A)Tlnimi)Hand fU)fingers(C)say(D)"good morning," 



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ing, good morn 



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GESTURES FOR " THUMBS AND FINGERS SAY 
GOOD MORNING!" 



(A) Extend arms, fingers closed, thumbs pointing up. 

(B) 'lose thumbs and extend fingers. 
(C't Eixtend arms right and left. 

^0) Bring hands up in curve and bow the head as though 
all bowing. 



(E) Close all except the fore-fingers and bend them as if 

bowing. 

(F) Bend middle fingers. 
(6) Bend third finger. 
(H) Bend little finger. 

(j) Extend arms and bow hands and head. 
(J) Shake hands on right and left. 

(K) Each pupil shake his own hand and throw to either 
side. 



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iiig, Good 



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Livehj. 



LOVELY MAY- 






1. lAll the birds and "bees are singing, All the *li - ly bells are ringing, All * the brooks are 

2. ''Look my children, see the meadows,^ When the sunshine chases shadows, Are a-live with 
3.'"See the fair blue sky is brigh-ter, And our hearts with hopes are lighter,' 'AH the bells of 







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full of laughter, And the ^wind comes whispering after,*What is this the flow -ers say? 
fai - ry fa - ces, "Peep-ing from the gras - sy pla - cos. What is this the flaw- ers say? 
joy are ring- ing, And our grate-ful voi - ces sing - ing. What is this the flow - ers say? 



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say 



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What is this the flow - er. 
What is this the flow - ers say ? 

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What is this the flow - ers say ? It is love - ly 

What is this the flow • ers say ? It is love - ly 

What is this the flow - ers say ? It is love - ly 



:h=|: 



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d 







dl^2^d^. 



Much slower. 






May ; 
May; 
May; 



Bil 



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-•- 

It: 



The flow -ers say 'tis love - ly May, 
The flow -ers say 'tis love- ly May, 
The flow - ers say 'tis love - ly May, 



love - ly, love - ly. May. 
love - ly, love - ly, May. 
love - ly, love - ly, May. 



m 



It: 



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1 them as if 



w to either 



GESTURES. 
1 Arras outspread with flying movement, 
a Close all fingers except the index, move arms 

rapidly over the head in curved movement, until 

fingers touch top of head. 
» Arms extended, fingers clasping tiny bell, linging 

vigorously. 
* Move hands from right to left, with fingers moving 

up and down in horizontal poaition. 



6 Extend arms above head, and imitate waving of 

branches of trees, moving body from waist. 
o Gesture of listening. 

7 Point to meadows. 

8 Extend arms in front parallel, and move both to- 

ward the right with smooth movement. 
Cover face with hands moving head as if peeping. 

I o Point to sky. 

I I Ring bells again. 










111 



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10 

VIOLETS. 
^ — ^— 



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*^ " •' yon were dead Yet t h! ''^ ° ^"'"'" '«»'« now lika «, ^ « ' 

pzrjr;-"^=^^::=:- s=^'~T~t=Z • . -•- -• *^ '^ '" " y°« were dead. 







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(A) 

(fi) 

(C) 

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Hands represent flower curv . "^ "^ ^^^^ ^ ^ ' 

tips touchin.' ' •" '• '^"'1 finjjer- . /r) r ^- 

S.'^'"" "'■"■"*"<'" anger- 



apart. 

:ers 



11 



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tbeeaveN, The 
nd uoisa Ot the 




ing for you, So 
->, abed," Yet 



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flowers do, 
were dead. 






^i 



UP YONDER MOUNTAIN. 



Andantino. 




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1- A Up you - der on the moua-taiu, There stands a B house so high; And 

2. Had 1 the wild dove's £ pin - ions, I'd fly thro' all the land To 

3. A pret - ty H house I'd build me, All of the | olo - ver green ; I'd 




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GESTURES FOR " UP YONDER MOUNTAIN." 



Point towards an imaginary mountain. 
Make a roof with thumbs and Augers. 

81 Imitate flying of dcve. 
) Point to self. 



(E) Imitate flying of dove. 

(F) Wave right hand as if pointhig to "all the land." 
(0) Shake hands with nearest neighbour. 

(H) Make a roof with thumbs and Augers. 

(j) Point to imaginary "clover." 

(J) Indicate shape of roof by motion of both hands. 

(K) Make flowerb with thumbs and middle fingers. 



12 

THE BRIGHT WAVES. 

riie Ahr.;..u^ ^ — ' — ~ — 







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18 

THE BRIGHT W.*VES. (Conclwhd.) 




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beau - ti - ful rye, so grace 

oth - er do chase, so mer 

loud - ly shall ring, we'll rove 



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while our 



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GESTURES FOR "THE BRIGHT WAVES." 



(A) Hands clasped in a ring, and raised to shouldor-level, 

whilst rising and falling on tiptoe in au undulating 
movement, in time to the music. 

(B) Hands brought together in a light clap, and immedi- 

ately carried apart with fingers "twinkling" in 
imitation of the breaking of waves. 

(C) Same as g, only executed above the head. 

(D) Hands raised above heads to represent branches, 

body turned a little to the right ; undulating move- 
ment from right to left. 



(E) Bowing forwards, to the right, to the left, forward, 
(and repeat). 

(P) Hands raised above heads and held in horizontal posi- 
tion to represent clouds ; move the body from side 
to side in undulating motion. 

(8) Hands rapidly shifting before and behind each other. 

(H) Hands rising and f aUing, in imitation of falling leaves ; 
fingers twinkling. 

(I) Hands chasing each other from right to left. 

(Last Stanza.) March round in some fanciful form. 




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14 



TfiE Bee sojve. • 




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«^ • 'ry one is a .oJd '""t'-^T- 



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THE SEE SON®.— Concluded. 



CHORUS. 




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F Hark I hark I 



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if a band from fai * ry land Were com • ing from nnder the ground. 



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fai - ry queen, in gold-en sheen, Q Ta beat • ing a 



sil • ver drum. 



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GESTURES. 



(H) Point out, -extending both hands. 

(B) Ask one another. 

(Q) A swinging movement. 

(0) Point up. 

(£) Hands jcined to lepresent flowers. 



(P) Listening attitude. 

(Q) Represent beating cf drum. ' 

(H) Look up, arms extended with waving motion. 

(I) Fore-fingers brought rapidly together. 

(J) Look op. 



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16 



THE YOUNG MUSICIAN. 



Words by JOHN IMUIE, Toronto. 
Simply, 



Muslo by Prof. J. F. JOHNSTONE, Toronto. 






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1. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, That's "the scale" as you may see; On the "lines" and 

2. E, G, B, U, F, on "lines," Learn by sight the use - ful signs ; F, — A, — C, — E, — 



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in the " space i" Each in or - der you may trace!) \ -a r T\ V V r 

in the " space," Don't for - get the spell-ing FACE. J ^' ^' ^' ^' ^' '» ^» 



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I would be ; 



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17 



THE YOUNG MUSICIAN.— Concluded. 



NSTONE, Toronto. 



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Notes are simply *^ signs" you see, 
Round and black as black can be ; 
From the perfect number ^^ seven," 
Each its proper place is given. 

Chorus,— .\, B, C, D, &c. 



*'5/w;;^j" and ^''Jlats" some patience need, 
If at music you'd succeed ; 
But ^'■siueet melody" is there, 
When you take great pains and care ! 

Chorus,— h, B, C, D, &c. 



5 

Soon my little friend may try 
Something greater by-and-by, 
If her (his) teacher she (he) obeys, 
And remembers all he (she) says I 

Chorus— k, B, C, D, &c 



6. 



Just be patient — never fret, 

Or into a passion get ; 

Else " a discord''^ you will make. 

Which would be " a great mistake ! " 

Chorus. — A, B, C, D, &c. 



CopyriRht.— Ry perniission of the Publishers. 



18 



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Cla88. 






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IMITATINQ. 

One Child. 







Coinpau-ion in ^leo What now shall we see, I show you ex - er • ci • bob as 



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clev-er as I can; We wish to itn - i - tato you, oh funny lit -tie man, So stand quite 



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Btill do what I will, Wo stand quite still do what you will, And all here in the 



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circle now their duty will f ul - fil, And all here in the oir - cle now their du - ty will f ul - fil. 



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Movement, &C. — This is a " circle game " in which the children join hands and march 
around, singing as far as " sea." One child, standing in the centre, sings from 

" / show (701." The class answers "We wish man," 

The child sets in " .So stnnd 1 trill," The class answers " We stand you will." 

xiviv. Me child makes either some funny gesture or performs some gymnastic exercise, which 
all imitate to the end of the strophe, when the marching begins again. Each child should have 
its turn in the leadership. 



10 



WEARY FINGERS 



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the lit • tie 

the lit ■ tie 



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place to place; F Work 



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sweet 
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ing. Hum. 
ing, Hum. 



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GESTURES FOR "WEARY FINGERS." 



S'A) Finger tips pressed, each to each, as if kissing one 
another "good-night," 
(3) Fingers clasped, hands lowered. 



(C) Swing gently to and fro. 

(D) Each finger opens independently. 

(E) Move fingers rapidly, in a twinnling motion. 

(F) Resume work. 



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20 



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THE ROBIN'S EGG. 



Oompoieil nnd DfiUcnteil In my llttln daiiohter Klud 



William Nrlht. 



I. What was ev - er so dainty of hue? Who can tell, is it green, is it blue? 



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Look, lit-tlc K""!, At this bcau-ti-ful pearl Hid in the nest of the rob - in! 



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Nay, lit - tic },'irl! Nay, nay, don't touch ! Wait for a week — a week's not much — Then come 



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here and see What there will be 



Hid in the nest of the 



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3. What shall you see ? A won - der - ful sight, Then, lit - tie girl, step light, step light, That no 






81 



William Silbt. 



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THE ROBIN'S EGG.— Concluded. 







sound may be heard by the ba - by bird Hid in the nest of the rob 



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Afodcrato. 

Jn. * 



SUMMER RAIN. 



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Afusic by the tale T. CRAMrTON. 



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T, Drop-ping, soft - ly 

2. On the low roof 

3. Droop- ing buds and 



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Falls the sum - mer rain ; 

Drip -ping from the caves, 

Lift their grate - ful heads, 

♦ * * ^ ^ — 



drop - ping, 
fall - ing, 
bios - soms 



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1. Drop- ping, soft - ly, soft - ly drop-ping, Fails the sum - mer rain; 

2. On the low roof fall - inp, fall - ing, Drip - - ping from the eaves, 

3. Droop -ing buds and blossoms, blos-soms. Lift their grate - ful headsi 



'*feli^MPi 



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1. Hear its 

2. Cheer - ing 

3. Spring - ing 



• 

sil - v'ry plash - ing 

low - ly grass -es, 

up with glad - ness 






On the win - dow pane. 
Glis - t'ning on the leaves. 
From their moist - ened beds. 



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1. Hear its 

2. Cheer - ing 

3. Spring with 



plash - ing On the 

grass - es, Glis - t'ning on 

glad - ness From their moist - ened beds. 



t? — i?- 

win - dow pane, 
the leaves. 




CHORUS. ;«/ 







There's music in the summer rain,The drops sing out a sweet refrain, That fall so gen • tly on the plain. 



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22 



AWAY AMONG THE BLOSSOMS' 



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1. 'A - way, a - way, a - way, a - way, ^a-mong the blos-soms, 

2. A - way, a - way, a - way, a - way, a-mng the blos-soms, 

3. A - way, a - way, a - way, a - way, a-mong the blos-soms, 

4. A - way, a - way, a - way, a - way, a-mong the blos-soms. 



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A - way, a - way, a - 

A - way, a - way, a - 

A - way, a - way, a - 

A - way, a - way, a - 



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-way. 


»The 


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The 


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lOThe 

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sum-mer time has come, 

mer - ry birds are there, 

dai - ses are all bright, 

hap - py world is ours, 



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We hear the *sing - ing 
''We hear the cho - rus 
^And in the dew - y 
i^Then praise our heav'n-ly 



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wa - ters, We 

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mea-dows The 

Fa - ther, Whose 



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hear the '' in- sects hum, 
thril-ling on the air, 
clo - ver -tops are white, 
smile is on the flow'rs, 



We hear the sing - ing wa- ters, 

We hear the cho - rus ear- ly, 

^A\id in the dew - y meadows, 

Then praise our heav'n-ly Fa - ther, 



We hear the in- sects 
'Tis thril-ling on the 
The clo- ver - tops are 
Whose smile is on the 



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A 
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way, a • way, a • way, 

way, a • way, a • way, 

way, a • way, a • way, 



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a 
a 
a 



way, a - way, 

way, a - way, 

way, a • way, 

way, a • way, 



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GESTURES. 
1 Arms extended parallel, move tow&,rds the right in 

three distinct movements. 
« One loiij:; sweep. 
8 Point to window. 

4 Move hand from right to left, with rippling finger. 
» Geattire of bees in "Lovely May". 



! E-^tend arms with flying gesture. 

" Attitcde of listening. 
Extend arms, with vibrating movement. 

Pass the hand, as if caressing clover tops. 
»o Both arms sweep out from body. 
* 1 Hands clasped, face turned upward as in praise. 



23 



lyi a - way, a - 

y, a - way, a- 

y, a - way, a - 

y, a - way, a - 



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■ ters, We 

- ly, 'Tis 

-dows The 

■ ther, Whose 
— • * — • — r 



the in- sects 
ling on the 
ver - tops are 
le is on the 






a - way. 

a - way. 

a • way, 

la • way. 



1 



lent, 
pr tops. 

3.S in praise. 



LITTLE RAINDROPS. 

"N — ^ — :^ r — IS ^-T' 



Words and Music hy CLEMEXTIN" WARD. 

N ^ — h \- 






I. Pit - a - pat - ter, Pit - a - pat- ter, Fall the lit - tie drops of rain ; 
Pit - a - pat - ter, Pit - a - pat - ten Child - ren can't go out to play ; 



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1. Pit - a - pat - ter, Pit - a - pat - ter, Hark ! a-gainst the win - dow pane ; 

2, Pit - a - pat - ter. Pit - a - pac - ter, " Lit - tie rain-drops, go a - way !" 



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1, All the lit - tie plants are thirst - y — Rain -Hiv/ps come to give them drink, 

2. See I the sun is peep - ing bi ight-ly From be-hind the clouds so high ; 



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1. Pit - a - pat - ter. Pit - a - pat - ter, Lit-tle plants are glad, I think ! 

2. Now no more of Pit - a • pat - ter, "Lit-tle rain-drops all, good-bye!" 



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JACK FROST- 



Lively but not fast. 










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1. JackFroBt ia a ro-guiah lit - tie f el-low, When the A wintrywinds be-gin to bel-low, Hd 

2. He makeslit-tle girls H cry oh, oh, oh, He makes lit - tie boys [say ho, ho, ho. But 



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B flies hke a lit -tie bird through the air. And steals through the Q lit cracks ev-'ry-where, He 
when wo kin - die up a J good fire. Then Jack Frost is com - pel - led to re - tire, So 



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■ \'l 



hU i 




< 









-# -!■ 



jVizxz^-i^i^i 



D nips lit - tie chil - dren on the nose, He £ pin-ches lit - tie chil - dren on the toes, He 
K up the chim-ney skips the roguish boy, And all the lit -tie chil -dren [clap for joy. He 






I 



I ■ ■ —I 5? 



^fc 





m 



P pulls lit - tie chil-dren 
makes lit • tie girls M cry 



by the ears. He Q draws from their eyes the 
oh, oh, oh. He makes lit -tie boys N say 



big round tears, 
ho, ho, bo. 






I 



y 



t 



-I- 



m 



GESTURES FOR "JACK FROST." 

(A) Arms above head, body swayed from waist, as if by 

wind. 

(B) Arms outspread, and fluttering like wings, 

(8) Point, with index finger, to cracks under door and 

window. 
(Q^ Pinch nose. 
(E) Pinch toes. 



(F) Pull both ears. 

(6) Wipe away tears. 

(H) Shivering gesture with pained expression. 

(I) Open arms and cheerful faces. 

(J) Point to stove. 

(K) Indicate skipping up, with right hand. 

(I) Clap joyfully. 

(M) Shivering. 

(I) LaughiDg. 



25 



HARK! THE BELLS ARE RINGING. 



o bel - low, He 

>. bo, But 




1. A Hark I B the bolls 

2. E Hear a voice 

3. H Three hur - rahs 



.^ii-^« \- 



1#3 



lEi: 



-\- 



i 



are 
that 
for 



ring • lug 
whia • peiB 
snow and 

-r-4 



I 



gay, 'Tia 
near, Like 
ice, I Slides 



-^- 



^-\- 



the eve 
an an - 
and J snow • 

^_ 



of 
gel 
balls 



Christ - maa 
in your 
are so 



a^i 



s 



i 



±: 



day, 
ear, 
nice, 



i 






ry- where. He 
re - tire. So 




m 






V- 



Hol - 11 - days have now be - gun C Full of mer . ri • ment and fun, 

F You have poor - er neigh - hours near, Q Share with them your Christ • mas cheer, 

We the hap • py play now see, And K per • haps a Christ - mas tree, 



-l-T 






^ 

^ 




toes, He 
joy. He 



—I- 



m 



< 



* 



.i/_j. 



-d: 



ZKZZin 



T-HV- 



V- 



Mer • ri - ly we pass our time, Mer - ry as the Christ - mrs chime, 
Ev . 'ry child can spare a - part, And re - joice an - oth • er's heart, 
Who loves dauo - ing, who can skate. Who de- lights to sit up late. 









l: 



n; 



* 






I 







und tears, 
10, ho. 



^i 



|>n. 





May the com - ing New Year too. Be a hap - py one Qto 

Win - ning love that nev - er dies, Love the best of ha • man 
Let us raise a L hear - ty cheer, M Christ-mas comes but once a 



m. 



-J*— ^- 



-A- 



r=i^^E^a 



-A- 




-j. 



;i; 






t 



GESTURES FOR "HARK! THE BELLS ARE 
RINGING." 



I) 



Listening attitude. 

Joyful telling to each other. 

Indicate fulueas with both bauds. 

Point to each other. 

Listening. 



you. 
ties, 
year. 



1 



(F) Turn to each other. 

(fl) Both hands in front to show generous giving. 

(H) Swing handkerchief over head. 

(I) Both hands quick movement from upper right down, 

(J) Make quickly and throw aorrsa table. 

(K) Hand at aide of mouth telling secret cautiously. 

(L) Sw-ng hands over head. 

(M) Clap hands joyfully. 



i^;::!! 'i 



36 



I r I.I I .m. 



i m-n 
i i; 



'•f 



SEE THE SNOW IS FALLING FAST- 



Lively. 




-K V \- 



I--^TI:^-^-_::^^ 



i«il 



Jtrzf: 



-^-l 



::rS— : 



A Oh ! see the iinow ia fal - ling now, g It pow - dere all the trees, 

'Tia snow-ing fast, and cold the blast. But [yet I Lope 'twill stay. 

Jack Frost ia here, we feel him near, He's on his i - cy sled, 

I Come out and play thia wintry day, Amid'st the fal - ling snow 



Its 
FOhl 
And 
Come 



^ J 


i > ,^ 


^ 


^ 


% 


\ 


. Wn 




"■^ 








'■^ 


^ m m 


> 


^ 


P 


i^ N \ 


P ^ 




II 




\ 9 W 




' 


-•— 


._rj. . jf... .p 


. J p 


' J^ 




II 






.. ^ _. 


• 


•- "9 -5. 


• d 




• ■ 


- m II 




V L/ 








on 

far 
snow 
winda 

-e- 




• • 11 


■ 




flakes a • 
see it 
Hcov - er'd 
young and 

-•- -#- 


bound 

blow 

deep, 

old. 


and 
tho 
the 
fear 


Ball 
fall - 
flow 
not 


a - round. They 
ing snow, In 
• ers sleep, Bo - 
the cold, Nor 


float up 
shad-owa 
Death their 
liow - ling 


the breeze, 
a - way. * 
- y bed. 
that blow. 

m 






m 


.... -. 


lA 




c % 


f 


m 


JJ 




i ■ ■•- » 


s 


•1 . 


1 i " 1 




m 






N. \t 




t WW 

1 1 


W ' 


7 









rn___5L-,| 



GESTURES FOR "SEE THE SNOW IS FALLING ! (D) Shiver. 

I (E) Change expression of face to one of delight. 

(%) Point quickly towards ^falling snow. i 'P^ ^°'"* ^«*'" *'^ ''"°^- 

^ .^, „ . , , MB) Wave the baud, gradually extending the arm with 

(B) Hold the hand m front with fingers hanging loosely, ( 

1 slow movement, 

with gesture of Bhaki.ig powder. j („) gp^^^^ ^^^^ ^.^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

(0) Sweep the arm out in a curve with waving movement. | (|) All join banda, shaking vigorously, continue to end. 



ii 



! !l 



THE PRETTY MOON. 



Lively but not too fast. 






H^ ^ — *- 



-I — I- 



-j^ — i^—is^zs: 



:g- 



=s:c.q: 



\fi }fi IS (S _ ^ 

1. Ohl mother, how pret-ty the (A)nioon looks to-uight, 'T was nev - er bo cunning be- fore; 
2.(F)We would call to the stars to keep out <if the way. Lest we should rock o - ver their toes • 



:z:z=EzzzS 



tB 



:^i?^ 



E|^3=qzz!z»z^ 



:gz^-q=z|z:: 



:q=5=: 



(B) Its 
And 



ri 



:q: 



-SI— 






-5-E3-- 



~:i 



S5— j Si y 



-a) 1 — s)_- 



* 



27 



THE PRETTY MOON.— Conclu-ed. 



of delight. 

Jing the arm with 

from the body, 
oontinne to end. 




two lit - tlo horns are so sharp aud so bright, I hope theywon't grow any more; 
there we would sit till the dawn of the day, Aud see -where the pret - ty moon goes ; 



If 

And 




\ m m~m :gr-.Sr^ 



.^. .^. -^ -^ .^ .0. .0. ..^. .^. .0. { \ 1 I i 

q- — ^ i^— - ^ — q — ^ q— — — =i 1 =1 — v-0 — *E — m —S. — sj— J 



zM~mzzMz 



zti: 



:z==!!EEJ?zr*-JI*~*?^z=*^^Efz.-J 



Oradually Slower. 



--iq: 



I wore up there with you aud my friends, (C)We would rook in it nice - ly, you see, 
(G) there wo would rock in the beau - ti - ful skies Or (H) thro' the bright clouds we would roam, 



zmzzm 



it r^ — «. 



:^==1- 



-• — «i — m- 
•m- -m- •m- 

■0- ■0' ■0- 



i 



ii^^ 



iaSESSEfe-BEEIE^^ 



^"-EEH^EI-d 



\ist a 



))u: 



l2nd. 



STi^i *' ^ .0T^^ •0-<^-0- 



(D) Wo would sit in the middle. And (E)hold by both ends, Oh! what a bright cradle 'twould be.! 
We would J )soo the sunrise, And(J)seethe sun set, Aud(K)on the next rainbow come home. 






i 



g|^=p 



:q: 



=i: 



!:-:l^E^^-3SE^^^£li.^ 



^^^ 



GESTURES FOR "THE PRETTY MOON." 



(B) Its 
And 






(A) Point to moon. 

(B) Place the hands with index finger pointing upward 

on each side of the head. 

(C) Clasp the fingers and form a semicircle with them, 

rocking from side to side. 

(D) Clasp the hands, extending them directly in front. 

CE) Close the fists as though holding to a rope in swing- 
ing, and swing from side to side. 



(F) Wave the hand above the head with gesture of 
caution. 

((JV Rocking gesture again. , 

(H) Wave the hand as though floating above. 

(I) Point to east. 

(J) Point to west. 

(K) Form a rainbow over the head. 



■ ! i^MiJ ijijl 



m4 



uw 



t 



I ,'R 



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m ! 






'1 fJl 

rf 
11 



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II' -Ml 



26 







THE BUSY LITTLE MOTHER. 




-jFirst I .ash :he clothes o„ Z:Z\v7i"' '""^'^ ^-- ^^X ^o day 






^You 
^«For 
"And 



w: 

will nev - 
I've had 
I might 



er 
a 

be 



lE 





=3--, , , '" ""»» '»'•"• 'Then .he "a ?l ' """« So, And 




-iSi- 





:sL:: 

*stillthedayisdim, 
as I turn a - way, 
morning un-to night. 



For fa..h«-worl« so hard for „. .^r~T"~'~''*-0=^ 
I ™S'ken„rrieslsong3lfc"o. ?"\' «"'* hard for him. , 
'Wha..e,.„ „„k «n,ainf „":::; Setr"" '°^' <'^'- So 



I'm 




a-^== 



1^^:\:= 



^^^ 



3u will nev - er 
>r I've had a 
d I might be 



F=- 




29 



THE BUSY LITTLE MOTHER:*-Concluded. 



*up in the morn 



3: 



ing ear - ly, 



I 'm up in the morn-ing grey ; 



I'm 












ike the tea While 
[ must go, And 
t be 'lone From 






i^iy 



-&- 






hrt- 1 



im. 
It. 



So I'm 



"©- 






:/: — / -:_ / — <^ — ^ — y: 






washing, and ''scrubbing, and cooking, and ^mending, The whole of the live-long *day. . 



— — I — ■ 



I-— «=:i: 






-H i — s- 



■m- 

I 



Ie^P.^!^^ 



» 






I 



yi 



=i=E=J 



i?^ 






ill 



:2^d=:?s:t--j=:T 

-• — « — •' 



I :::: 



Movement, etc. 




I. 


Beat on knees in time. 


2. 


Stand. 


3- 


Pour tea out. 


4. 


Sit. 


5- 


Pound one hand on other clenched. 


6. 


Stand and mark time. 



7. Scrub pinafore. 9. Sew. 

10. Shut eyes and rest head on hand. 

11. Sit up and beat on knees. 

12. Turn mangle simultaneously. 

13. Nurse, rocking baby backwards and 

forwards. 



* Tbia charming Actiou Soug, written by the Bev. H. W. Hawlies, Liverpool, deserves special attention. 



1 ; I ;» 



3Q 



THE MARCHING SONG. 




^^m 



-3--^==??== 



—t- m 






MRS. U OKMISTON CHANT. 



m^ 



IS 

is 



il^jzj^^l=*± 



the way we march ; This is the 
the way we jump ; This is the 



way we march ; march, march, 
way we jump; jump, jump, 



"-^>-$ \— 



ff ♦ 
1= 



ZtlZl 



::-x 



3ES 



g-H^ 



t-.- 



:Z 



^ 



■^ 



It: 



:=i: 



_J__t_, 



.•_ 



iFM 



! : ii;i 




march, march, march !. 
jump, jump, jump ! . 

Z'2= 






This 
This 



is the way we clap ; 
is the way we stop : 



Dzczrdz: 



-I — 



^^ 



t:ti~ 



-&■ 






-— iS*- 






-I — 




iplB 



9'i^^ 



Se 



-H- 
— I- 

i: 



f 

It" 



■I 1 1 ( 



--X 






J- — I- 



-/CN- 



Id: 



i 



-(5»- 



:;!' 



: 'i'i 



■) 



-«»ii|f| 



DIRECTIONS. • 

The children can be Arranged for this sons; in broad rows, if the room is long enough to admit of the twenty-four paces required 
by one verse, to be done without turning ; in this case they will simply right-about-face to begin the second verse, and jump and march 
book,' letting the word " stop," at the end of the third line, bring them back to the place from which they started. 

In ordinary ronms the best way is to place one child in front of another, letting them move round and round the room in Indian 
File. Indeed in a large room it is a very pretty change from the row, to let the children change to Indian File, by turning half round 
after " mark time, stop !" and beginning the song over again in this position. 

The clapping must be in strict time to the marching. The word jump was chosen as being easier to sing than leap, but the proper 
movement is a short high leap, or 1)0imd. 

When the marking time is finished, the feet must be brought to the ground with aloud stamp, on the word " stop." 

This song can go on over and over again. 



81 



JBMISTON CHANT. 

h ; inarch, march, 
J J"'"P, jump, 




.j__-t 



:;:=q: 



3:~: 



]-^ 5— tZD 



way we clap ; 
way we ston : 



L=5 

tr~d 






^-\ 1 



m 



-rrs 



j_^__. 



II 



5=^ 



^1 



paces requlrerl 
ump and marcli 

room in Indian 
ning half round 

but the proper 



MABCHING SONG. 



Words hy KMILIE POTTLHSON, 

-7 



Muslo bv WILUAM SELnV. 




I. 

n 

2. 

3- 



Rea - dy 1 Rea - dy 1 Qui - et eve 
Left, right — left, rij^ht — Stiir - di • ly 
Tip - toe — tip - toe— Ve - ry light 
Tramp.ttamp! Tramp, tramp! Hca-vy now 



ry 
we 

ly 

a 






foot and hand, 
march a - long, 

now we go, 

gain we tread. 



Z=t:—t=t—r^§=^=- 



:»-p=^ 



^=F= 



m 



fei 






=i- 



^ -0- -m- 

Rea . dy ! Rea - dy I All 
Left, right — left, right — Care 
Tip ■ toe — tip - toe— As 
Tramp, tramp 1 tramp, tramp I Till 



— I 



-=^*^^E^=^, 



^i^ii^.i. 






at - ten - tive do 

■ ful lest a foot 

if steal - ing on 

the march-ing time 



we 

go 
a 
is 



stand. 

wrong. 

foe, 

spsd. 




1=1 



SJ-^.— d 










For - ward I For - ward ! Till 
Left, right— left, right— While 
Tip - toe — Tip - toe — Sure - 
Tramp,tramp! Tramp, tramp! Till 



'i=- 



we 


hear 


the 


next 


we 


sing 


our 


march 


ly 


they 


would 


nev 


a 


sud 


- den 


word 



$=f 



-I ^- 



:c=: 



i_i^. 



i 






:p: 






com - mand ; 
- ing song, 
er know, 
is said. 

__• • 



-I 



r 



:p: 

i; 



i 



ii: 



fcl2, 



-(-- 



-h- 



O-T 



For - ward march ! 
Lett, right — left, 
Tip - toe — tip - 
Tramp, tramp 1 Tramp 1 



95^: 



-I — '—•-•- 

Then March 
right — March 
toe — We 
ihtn—Haltf 

—9- 



^ 



— q: 

— m- 



m 



■ ing 

■ ing 
were 
The 



on 

on 
march 
march 



we 

we 

ing 

is 



go. 

go. 

on. 

done. 



^fe 



±: 



It: 



:t: 



r 

r 



r 



m 



The Staccato marks only apply to the words march and halt, printed in italics. The 1st verse 
should be sung p (soft), the 2n(l verse tnf (loud), the 3rd verse fp (very soft), and the 4th verse 
j^ (very loud) accompanied with heavy tramping. 




! niKS 
I klh., 



^1 

1 I , 1 



• 1,1 ' 'I 



.) 



i ' li 



M 









,1 U 



82 



THE TIP -TOE SONG. 



MRS. L. ORMISTON CHANT. 




^^-> — S- -J— 



:-l2i: 



ff2ii2: 



-1- 



:]^::ziiq— 



::|^=p: 



:t: 



I 



Soft 

In 

Tell 



ly 

the 
ing 



we 
twi 
we 



come 

light 

are 



creep 
steal 
near 



rl>-r 



.91 



iif^ZzziX 






- ing ; Light - ly step - ping 

- ing, Not a foot - fall 
her. (or him). If her (cr his) sleep be 

4 Ji. 



i=i=i 



--X 



:Z 



r- 



9:sfc=t: 



r 



r 






-r ^- 



itr; 



:q: 



It: 









-^- 






:t- 



:t. 



::l: 



I 



as 

as 

short 



we 
we 
or 



go, 
pass 
long 



For 
Chil 
Wak 



our ba 

dren's steps 

ing we 



b/s 

re 

shall 



sleep 
veal 
hear 



ing. 

Hig- 
her (or him). 






T tr^ 



'-^- 



-\- 



r" 



m^^ 



^^. 



ft^ = 



=t 



I 



X-- 



m 



r 



r 



I — 1_ 






I 



88 



U ORMISTON CHANT. 



ing 
the 

ber 



snow 

grass 
song, 



*-t 



MZITZZZ 



THE TIP-TOE SONG.— Concluded. 



liJ??=S3=^=jE^ 



X 



-p — 



.H^;:=dzz=^: 



Tip - toe, 



To and fro, 



Soft - ly we come creep - ing 



gjlEJP^iP^TJEJPl^iHJ 




::^fe 



J-^ 



k^^m 



'•J-.-*-3 






:Ej35iT.: 



t 



^ 



ly step - ping 
a foot - fall 
his) sleep be 





^ 


>-^ — 


-J-H 


- 1 : « 




^ J 


1 


T 






pi 



ing. 
ing. 
her (or him). 



I 



-A- 



m 



roll 



;s^ 



rifirrp: 



re: 



S^ 



:N- 



/T\ 



■■X 



/7\ 



t- 



-N- 



■-tz 



^^ 



Light - ly step - ping 



our ba - by's sleep - ing. 



2nd time ppp 
^^ — 




DIRECTIONS. 

This song is specially designed to teach the little ones the useful art of noiseless stepping. It is not 
the easiest thing in the world to walk on tip-toe ; and it is probable that many a valuable life has been 
lost in illness for want of the quiet, unbroken sleep that noisy and clumsy footsteps, inside as well as out- 
side the sick-room have made impossible. i ■ 

Walking on tip-toe is splendid discipline both for foot and head ; but care must be taken not to keep 
the children at it for any length of time, as it is extremely tiring, and apt to give cramp in the arch of the 
foot, or the calf of the leg. 

The children must proceed in Indian file, and their voices sink to a whisper at the end. 



M 



FbOWER VOICES. 



I ! 



fi^^^ 



1 



Wm. Sitnv. 



— *— • — « — » 



-g-T^^ 



The 
The 

And 

--I--, 



red rose says, " Be sweet," And the li • ly bids "Be pure," 
vio - let whis - pers "Tiive," Nor grudge nor count the cost, 
so each gra - cious flower Has each a sever - al word 



tJ:rfc^*-3=S^=itSi3Zt:;3-p.-l:zprS=p=3E«zz|»=qi: 



|2.. 



«-•• 



^1 iil 



ftLfcjE 



:i 



r 



^i 



:t 



i 



r 



m 



5 



=j 



P=Bf 



--^■^ 



I 



The stur - dy, brave chrys • an - the -mum, "Be pa • tient and en 

The wood -l)inc, "Keep on bios - som -in^'," In spite of chill and 

Which, read to - geth - er, mak - eth up The mes - sage of the 



■^l 



A- 



tri2zz:*i: 



--^-^ 



-A- 
-•- 



-, — I — I — « — J — I — I J — n — n — ,•— 



i=::1=^ 



^? 



f 



• dure." 
frost. 
Lord. 






Cg^-T- 



1 



tS>- 



THE lalTTLE SAIloORS' SONG. 



If i 



Oaily, 



Mrs. L. Ormiston Chant. 




1. We are lit - tie sail - ors sail - ing O'er a storm - y sea ; 

2. We are lit - tie sail - ors cross - ing O'er a rest - less deep ; 

3. We are lit - tie sail - ors drift - ing O'er a sil - ver sea ; 

4. We are lit • tie sail - ors hast - ing From our ship straight home ; 




THE LITTLE SAILORS" SONG.— Concluded. 



Wm. StLnv. 

Is "Be pure," 
int the cost, 
sr - al word 



-•-.- ,_iS, 






^iSiJ 



en - dure." 
and frost, 
the Lord. 



1 

2^- 



^^ 



;s 



tS^- 



Ormiston Chant. 














— J #-t-*-^ 



^ ggEp;^g^^^_ ^:^ 



And the 
And the 
Througli the 
Nut u 



wind is 

waves are 

mist the 

step nor 



wail - ing, wail - ing, Wild - ly as can be. 
toss - in^f, toss • ing, E - ven in their sleep, 
wind is rift • ing, H.ir-bour lights we see. 
mo - ment wast - ing, Joy - ful - ly we come. 



And the waves are 
For the moon calls 

Soon our voy • age 
See our dear ones 




r 




-N~^ 



■!^rd=r 



-#—#—#- 



+-?^- 






1^1-^- 



1=-^^ 



9 



And the sea-weed hur-ries by- 



Fol - low -ing both night and day- 
We on land safe home at last.- 



O so high, And dark clouds are in the sky, 
out " this way I" And the tide must her o - bey, 
will be past, And the an - chor we shall cast, 
quick-ly gather 1 There is mo - ther 1 there is father ! Oh I we're glad to see you, rather / — 



i 



'ft*-*-Vfl' 



-E=± 



ff 

-• (B. 

:p=::~t; 




z=ri==T-i--==j=j^=z:^=i:=^ig=:a=il=i-^-j.| 
-g=±|^Egiz*ii ^l-^=b3 J::z^=:i!f::^Jz:M 



^=^ 



^ 



f^ 



4 



DIRECTIONS. 



The children must stand in a row, or rows, according to space at command. The hands must be 
waved to and fro with the palms uppermost, and the undulations of waves must be carefully imitated, 
and continued through the first three verses with these exceptions, — viz, the sixth line of the first verse, 
when they must point up at imaginary clouds, — the third line of the second verse, when they must 
imitate tossing, with both hands,— the fifth line of this verse, when they must beckon at the words 
" This way ;"— and the second and third lines of the third verse, when they must shield their eyes with 
their hands, as if looking over the surf at the "harbour lights." 

At the fourth verse they must scamper with well raised and bent knees, not in long, but high steps, 
for the first four lines ; suddenly stand still at the fifth, and point to the imaginary " dear ones," singing 
the words as rapidly as possible, till "rather" is reached, and that word must be spoken in quite a natural 
but very arch tone of voice. Then sing the first four lines of the song with sea-wave action, ending in 
" Wildly as can be," by way of a finale. 



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THE GOLDEN BOAT-SONG. 



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Here we float in our gold - en boat, 
Here we float in our gold - en boat, 
Here we float in our gold - en boat, 

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Far 
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See how we splash, and wa - ter dash, 
See how we splash, and wa - ter dash, 
See how we splash, and wa - ter dash, 



While ''n the air the sun shines fair, 
While m the trees the sum - mer breeze 
While all the stars thro' cloud - y bars, 



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DIRECTIONS. 

The children must seat themselves on the floor as though in a boat, but with this difference, that the 
feet, instead of being close together and knees bent, as in actual rowing, must be wide apart, and legs 
straight on the floor, in form of the letter V, the distance between each child being no more than is 
necessary for the extension of arms out straight in front. 

The best and most skilful child will of course be " stroke," and the others should be placed according 
to size. 

T'le coxswain may be a very little one ; and if the small thing puts the others out by rowing out of 
time, it might be instructed to hold a tiny flag during the performance, and be allowed to sing only. To 
begin the song, the children will all be ready for the rowing action by bendi.ig forward with arms straightout, 
and thumbs touching ; backs of hands uppermost, and on a level with shoulders. The sweep of the arms 
brings the hands to the floor twice in every bar. 

When " See how we splash," is reached, the movement is altered, and instead of rowings the children 
simply pat the ground with the opr^n palm of each hand, as though splashing water. 

There should be no longer pause between the verses than the beats of each concluding bar. 

The last refrain " So we float," etc;, should go at increasing speed to the end. 



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88 



GOD MAKE MY LIFE A LITTLE LIGHT. 





. 


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To my little Niece Sarah. 



1. God make my 

2. God make my 

3. God make my 



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William Sribv. 



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life 
life 
life 



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a 
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lit - tie light, With - in the world to glow, 
lit - tie flower, That giv - eth joy to all, 
lit - tie staff, Where - on the weak may rest, 



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A lit - tie flame that burn - eth bright, Where ev 

Con - tent to bloom in na - tive bower, Al - though 
That so what health and streng^th I have, May serve 



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OUR NATIVE LAND-FAIR CANADA. 



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Tune— "Gfl// Save the (lueenP 



Arranged by JOHN CHESHIRE, 



Verses by JOHN IMRIE, Toronto. 




1. God save our 

2. Fair as an 



na - tive land, Free may she ev - er stand, 
open - ing flower, Plant - ed in Heav - en's bower. 



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39 



T. 



OUR NATIVE LAND— FAIR CANADA.— Concluded. 



William Srlbi-. 



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world to glow, 

joy to all, 

weak may rest, 



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be small, 
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Fair Can - a • da ; 
Fair Can - a - da ; 



Lon^ may we ev - er be, Sons of the 
Here ma - ny na - tions dwell, Lov - ing their 







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N IMRIE, Toronto. 

er stand, 
en's bower, 




Land of great inland seas, 
/ .]l_ Swept by the mighty breeze, 
J^^i Fair Canada ; 

Reaching from sea to sea, 
Great will thy future be. 
Land of the brave and free, 
Fair Canada ! 



God save our gracious Queen, 
Long live our noble Queen, 

God save the Queen ; 
Send her victorious, 
Happy and glorious. 
Long to reign over us, 

God save the Queen. 



Land of the prairies wide. 
Stretching like ocean's tide» 

Fair Canada ; 
Land of green hill and dale. 
Mountain and pleasant vale. 
Here worth shall never fail, 

Fair Canada ! 



GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. 



Thy choicest gifts in store. 
On her be pleased to pour, 

Long may she reign 1 
May she defend our laws, 
And ever give us cause 
To sing with heart and voice, 

God save the Queen. 



Come, then, from many lands, 
Brave hearts and willing hands. 

To Canada ; 
Cone where rich virgin soil 
We.its to reward your toil. 
Share in the harvest spoil 

Of Canada ! 



O Lord cur God arise. 
Scatter her enemies, 

And make them fall ; 
Confound their politics, 
Frustrate their knavish tricks, 
On thee our hopes we fix, 

God save us all. 



40 

BRITANNIA, THE PRIDE OF THE OCEAN 

OR 
THE RED, WHITE AND BLUE 






1— 



V- 



Arrnnged by T. S. GLEADHILL. 






H- 



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Bri -tan ■ nra, the pride of the o ■ cean, 
I. W'licn war siiread its wiilc des ■ o - la - tion, 
;. 15ri - tan • nia, IJri - tan -nia, for ev ■ er, 



The home of the brave a.d the free, 
And tlircaten'd this land to de - form, 
Our glo - ri - ous em - pire's hymn, 



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shrine ot each patriot's do - vo - tion, 
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the wreaths it has won nev - cr wither, 



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The worKI of - fers hom-age to thee. 
I?ri - tan - nia rode safe through the storm. 
Nor the star of its glo - ly grow dim. 



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ser-vice u . ni - ted ne'er sev - er, 



When Li - ber - ty's form stands in view, 
So brave-ly she bore up her crew, 
But still to her col - ours prove true. 



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AN 



BRITANNIA, THE PRIDE OF THE OCEAN.— Concluded. 



ly T. S. GI.EADHILL. 




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banners make ty ■ ran - ny trem-ble, 
flng iloal-cd proiul-ly be - fore her, 
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the Red, White and V>\ue. The 

the Red, White and Bhie. Three 



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When borne by the Red, White and Blue. 

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42 



THE FLAG WE LOVE. 



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1. *We are bear 

2. ■'With the hon - 

3. ®March-ing on, 



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Armnffed by WM. SELBY 



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DIRECTIONS. 

I.— Stand erect, flag over left shoulder, right arm at side, tread left and right through first three lines. 
2. — Right arm horizontal sidewise, palms down at this word. 3.— Back of finger tips at temple. 4. — 
Right arm horizontal again, then drop at side. 5.— Flag over right shoulder, tread left and right through 
three lines. 6.— Left arm horizontal. 7. — Back of fingers at left temple. 8.— Left arm horizontal again 
sidewise, then drop at side. 9.— Eight steps forward, wave flags. 10.— Eight steps back. 11. — Turn 
around in time to place, wave flags over heads. 12.— Flag clasped in both hands and raised, look up 
steadily, till close of last line. 



48 



THE QUEEN'S BIRTHDAY KINDERGARTEN SONG. 



xnged by WM. SELBY 



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has 



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:arred, still it 
lead to re ■ 



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Words by L. T. NEVVCOMB. 



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I. iVic-to - ri -a, the Queen so true, Who rules this land for me and you; Great 



2. Wic - to - ri - a, we love thy name ; Vic - to - ri 



we know thy fame! We 



3, Wic-to-ri -a, we're greet - ing thee, In this our "Kin-der - gar - ten Home!" May 



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sovereign, from each girl and boy, Ac - cept our heart-felt love and joy ! 
''wave our coun-trys flag on high ; Thy name, we know, will nev - er die. 
ma - ny years in roll - ing on. Still find thee seat - ed on thy throne. 



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'Marching here in mer - ry glee, We'll be soldiers true to thee I 

Vic - to - ri - a, there's none like thee! Our no-ble la - dy, brave and free. 

^Thy ban-ners wave and children sing, Long life and safe-ty bless our Queen ! 



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1. Pointing to a picture of the Queen. 

2. Children all marching to circle, carrying flags. 

3. All wave flags high in the air. 



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1 !'.:■-;■' ^', 



44 



THE GREEDY FISHERS. 



Words by J. A. MAXSON. (I'rom lio-Pevp.) 



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M\i8lo by the IIEV. F. PEEL, I!. Miis., Oxod. 



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1. Four storks a - fish - ing they did go, Throuyli 

2. And when they reached the slia - dy \)0(A Where 

3. For hours they fished a - niong the reeds, Those 



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fields they took their way; Nor rod nor line, nor an - gling net, Nor 

frogs ami fish - es pl<iy, They jumped for joy, those fun - ny birds, ^'ou 

bu - sy fish - ers four, But strange it is, the more the) caught. Yet 




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might have heard them say — 
still they want - ed more ! 



But their legs were long, and their bills were strong, For 

"O merry it is to have sport like this, All 

O greed - y storks, O self - ish storks:, O 






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45 



THE GREEDY FISHERS. 



PEEL, I!, Mils., Oxon. 



did go, Through 
<ly pool Where 
the reeds, Those 



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catch - ing of their proy,. 

on a sum - mer day ! 

greed - y fish - ers four! 



their prey.... 
mer day !". 
ers four!". 







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JMOW THE BAY IS OVER. 



Wm. Selby. 



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Now the day is ov - er, 

Je • sus, give the wea - ry 
Through the long night-watch - es 



Night is draw- ing nigh, 
Calm and sweet re - pose ; 
May Thine an - gels spread 



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Shad • ows of the 
With Thy ten- der 
Their white wings a - 



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Steal a • cross the 

May mine "ye - lids 

Watch - ing roand my 






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close, 
bed. 



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Now 
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Stars 

Vis 

Then 



be - gin 


to peep ; 


Birds 


and beasts and flow 


• ers 


Soon 


ions bright 


of Thee ; 


Guard 


the sail - ors toss 


- >ng 


On 


may I 


a - rise 


Pure 


and fresh and sin 


- less 


In 



will be a -sleep, 
the deep blue sea. 
Thy ho • ly eyes. 



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46 



GOOD NIGHT. 



MRS. L. ■ /UMISTON CHANT. 







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1. Go - ing home, go 

2. Go - ing home, go 

3. Go - ing home, go 



ing home. Through the si - lent niea 
ing home, Hear the sheep - bells ring 
ing home, Sleep • y heads are nod 



dows ; 

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Go - ing home, go - ing home. Thro' the dark - 'ning sha - dows. 
Go - ing home, go - ing home, Near us bats are wing - ing, 

Go - ing home, go - ing home, Wea - ry feet are plod - ding ; 



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GOOD NIGHT.— Concluded. 



iMtSTON CHANT. 



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Play is done, 

Soft and white, 

Sound shall rest ; 



light is gone, 

glow - worms bright 
calm and blest, 



Day in night is shroud - ed. 
On the path be - fore us. 
Sleep un - til to • mor - row ! 



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.,.'., DIRECTIONS. • 

The children should sing this song, walking slowly in pairs ; but stand still during the singing of the " Good 
night " at the end of each vers»>. It adds much to the pretty efTect of the latter if the children are taught to kiss their 
hands to the imaginary trees and stars which are above them, and from beneath which they are " going home." 

At the fifth line of the first verse they should half-close their eyes, hang their heads and sing sleepily. > : / 

At the second line of the second verse the disengaged hands must be raised in the attitude of listening ; at the 
eighth of the same verse, the imaginary glow-worms must be pointed at. 

The last verse must be sung very sleepily, more softly, and altogether slower than the others ; and the last " Good 
night ' with prolonged and concentrated energy. 



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48 



THE GOOD SHErnEBD. 



Word* by Da. FLEMING KTEVT.NS(»N. 

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Mutio by WIUUJAM BIXBY. 









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1. I am Je - sus' 

2. Safe ly in and 

3. Shall I not be 



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al - ways glad ? 






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Ev - er 

Je • sus loves and 
None whom Je - sus 



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[ ; And when this short life is end 



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All things (air and good He shows me ; Ev - en calls me 

When 1 thirst my Shepherd leads me ; Where the wa - ters 

Tho'se whom the Good Shepherd tend - ed Will be talc - en 

iiiz_:»: 



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SELBY & COMPANY, 



42 Church Street, Toronto. 



Stationers - and - Publishers. 



AGENTS IN CANADA FOR THE 



Milton Bradley Co., Springfield, Mass. 

Kindergarten Goods, . . . 

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Bradley's Primary School Aids, Catalogue on application 

Kindergarten and Priro ^ry Drawing Course, Parts 1 and 2, each 10c, 

Authorized for use in the Provinces of Ontario 

and Prince Edward Island. 

Kindergarten & Primary Drawing Practice Book, Parts 1 to 4, each 6c. 

Progressive Teachers and Drawing Masters use this series. 

Adopted by tke Toronto School Board. 



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