(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A catalogue of the forest trees of North America [microform]"

IMAGE EVALUATION 
TEST TARGET (MT-3) 




■.r.» 



1.0 ^^ m 

■tt liii 12.2 



m m 

U 










1 


^ *// ^1 




u 


•'I 



Tl 




Photographic 

Sdmces 

Carporation 








•1>^ 





<^ 











v\ 



as WBT MAM STIHT 

WnSTII,N.Y. 14SM 
(71«)t72-4S03 



^ ^ 
^ 



f 




1 


•i- , ', ■,. 


'^ 


CIHM/ICMH 


CIHM/ICMH 


Microfiche 


Collection de 


k 


Series. 


microfiches. 






;\ 








CamdiMi ImtHuM tor Hhtoriul Microfaprixlucciont / Instltut c*radi«n d* mieroraprodiictloiw hlstoriquM 




Technical and Bibliographic Notas/Notaa tachniquaa at bibliographiquaa 



The Institute has attempted to obtain the best 
original copy available for filming. Features of ttiis 
copy which may be bibliographically unique, 
which may alter any of the imeges in the 
reproduction, or wliich may significantly change 
the usual method of filming, are checlced below. 



D 



D 



D 



D 
D 



n 



D 



Coloured covers/ 
Couver^ure de couleur 



I I Covers damaged/ 



Couverture endommag^e 



Covers restored and/or laminated/ 
Couverture restaurAe et/ou pelliculAe 



I — I Cover title missing/ 



Le titre de couverture manque 



Coloured maps/ 

Cartes gAographiques en couleur 



□ Coloured Inic (i.e. other than blue or black)/ 
Encre de couleur (i.e. autre que bleue ou noire) 

I I Coloured plates and/or illustrations/ 



Planches et/ou illustrations en couleur 

Bound with other material/ 
ReliA avec d'autres documents 

Tight binding may cause shadows or distortion 
along interior margin/ 

La re liure serrie peut causer de I'ombre ou de la 
distortion le long de la marge inttrieure 

Blank leaves added during restoration may 
appear within the text. Whenever possible, these 
have been omitted from filming/ 
II se peut que certaines pages blanches ajoutAes 
iors d'une restauration apparaissent dans le texte, 
mais, lorsque cela Atait possible, ces pages n'ont 
pas 6tA fiimtes. 

Additional comments:/ 
Commentaires supplAmentaires; 



L'institut a microfilm* le meilleur exemplaire 
qu'il lui a 4ti possible de se procurer. Les dAtaiis 
de cet exemplaire qui sont peut-Atre uniques du 
point de vue bibilographique, qui peuvent modifier 
une image reproduite, ou qui peuvent exiger une 
modification dans la mithode normale de f ilmage 
sont indiqute ci-dessous. 



D 
D 

D 

n 
□ 

D 
D 
D 



Coloured pages/ 
Pages de couleur 

Pages damaged/ 
Pages endommagAes 

Pages restored and/or laminated/ 
Pages restaurtes et/ou pelliculAes 

Pages discoloured, stained or foxed/ 
Pages dAcolortes, tacheties ou piqutes 

Pages detached/ 
Pages dAtachies 

Showthrough/ 
Transparence 

Quality of print varies/ 
Quality in^gale de I'impression 

Includes supplementary material/ 
Comprend du matiriel supplAmentaire 

Only edition available/ 
Seule Mition disponible 

Pages wholly or partially obscured by errata 
slips, tissues, etc., have been refilmed to 
ensure the best possible image/ 
Les pages totalement ou partiellement 
obscurcies par un feuillet d'errata. une pelure. 
etc., ont At* filmAes i nouveau de fapon h 
obtenir la meilleure image possible. 



This item is filmed at the reduction ratio checked iMlow/ 

Ce document est film* au taux de reduction indiqui ci-dessous. 



The 
toth 



The 
poss 
ofth 
filmii 



Origi 

begir 

the 

sion, 

other 

first 

sion, 

or illi 



The I 
shall 
TINU 
whici 

Maps 

differ 

entiri 

begin 

right 

requii 

methi 



10X 








14X 








18X 








22X 








26X 








aox 






























J 






























12X 








16X 








aox 








MX 








28X 








32X 





ilair* 
M d«tailt 
iqu«« du 
nt modif i«r 
vigar una 
la filmaga 



Tha copy filmad hara haa baan raproducad thanka 
to tha o*n«r<Mity of: 

UniMnMdtMontrfal 

Tha imagaa appaaring hara ara tha boat quality 
poaalbia conaldaring tha condition and laglbillty 
of tha original copy and in Icaaping with tha 
filming contract apacificationa. 



L'axamplaira fiimi fut raproduit grAca A la 
g^nAroaitA da: 

Uni«wsit«d«MoiitrM 

Laa imagaa auivantaa ont AtA raproduitaa avac la 
plua grand aoin, compta tanu da la condition at 
da la nattatA da raxampiaira fllmA. at 9n 
conformitA avac laa condltiona du contrat da 
filmaga. 



i/ 
luAas 



Original copiaa in printad papar covara ara filmad 
baglnning with tha front covar and anding on 
tha laat paga with a printad or illuatratad impraa- 
aion. or tha bacic covar whan approprlata. All 
othar original copiaa ara filmad baglnning on tha 
f irat paga with a printad or Illuatratad impraa- 
alon, and anding on tha laat paga with a printad 
or illuatratad impraaaion. 



Laa axampiairas originaux dont la couvartura 9n 
papiar aat ImprimAa aont filmAa an commanpant 
par la pramlar plat at an tarminant aoit par la 
darnlAra paga qui comporta una amprainta 
d'impraaalon ou d'illuatratlon, aoit par la aacond 
plat, aaion la caa. Toua laa autraa axamplairaa 
originaux aont filmAa an commandant par la 
pramlAra paga qui comporta una amprainta 
d'impraaalon ou d'illuatratlon at an tarminant par 
la darnlAra paga qui comporta una talia 
amprainta. 



Tha laat racordad frama on aach microficha 
ahali contain tha aymbol -—^ (moaning "CON- 
TINUED"), or tha aymbol ▼ (moaning "END"), 
whichavar appllaa. 



Un daa aymbolaa aulvanta apparattra aur la 
darnlAra imaga da chaqua microficha, aaion la 
caa: la aymbola -^- aignifia "A 8UIVRE", la 
aymbola ▼ aignifia "FIN". 



lira 



Maps, plataa, charta, ate, may ba filmad at 
diffarant raduction ratioa. Thoaa too larga to ba 
antlraly Inciudad In ona axpoaura ara filmad 
baglnning in tha uppar loft hand comar. laft to 
right and top to bottom, aa many framaa aa 
raqulrad. Tha following diagrama illuatrata tha 
mathod: 



Laa cartaa, planchaa, tablaaux, ate, pauvant Atra 
filmAa A daa taux da rAductlon diff Aranta. 
Lorsqua la documant aat trop grand pour Atra 
raproduit an un aaul cllchA, 11 aat fllmA A partir 
da I'angia aupArlaur gaucha, da gaucha A droita, 
at da haut an baa, an pranant la nombra 
d'imagaa nAcaaaaira. Laa diagrammaa aulvanta 
illuatrant la mAthoda. 



by arrata 
lad to 

•nt 

tnn palura. 

apon A 



1 


2 


3 




32X 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




F< 



[Y-164.] 
IDIGPA-RTMEiNT OF THE) INTERIOR. 

TENTH CENSUS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Forestry. ; ^ 



A CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



FOREST TREES 



OF 



ISTORTH ^MERIC^. 



BY 



OHAELES S. SARGENT, 

ARNOLD PHOFBSSOB OF ABBORICULTURE IN HARVARD COLLEGE, 
SPECIAL AGENT TENTH CENSUS. 



WASHINGTON: 

CSK)"VERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 
1880. 



-.. uV 



•Kr,sr,:=rrr. 



- ■..>.. 



Si7 



lU :!l 






It is proposed to join to the Report, on the Forest Wealth of the 
United States, now in course of preparation, a Catalogue of the Forest 
Trees of North America, with special reference to their geographical 
distribution and economic properties and uses. 

Knowledge of this nature in regard to our trees is still so imperfect 
that it is impossible to make such a catalogue at all exhaustive without 
the assistance of botanists, and others interested in trees and their pro- 
ducts, in every part of the country. 

Information on the following points is particularly needed. 

1. The extreme geographical range of any species. 

2. The region and elevation where any species is principally multi- 
plied and reaches its greatest perfection. 

3. The geological formation most favorable to the multiplication and 
development of any species. 

4. Dimensions of remarkably developed specimens of any species. 

5. The common or local name of ahy species in addition to those 
already given. 

6. The purposes, however unimportant, for which the wood of any 
species is employed. 

7. Products of any species other than wood, such as tannin, charcoal, 
dyes, i>otash, edible fruit, forage, &c. 

Any information or corrections which will serve to make the final 
publication more exact and complete will be gratefully received and duly 
acknowledged. 

To facilitate the collection and preservation of such information the 
present preliminary catalogue is now published. The blank pages are 
intended for field-notes and corrections. After these are written in, the 
whole catalogue, or the notes and observations separately, as may be 
most convenient, should be returned to — 

CHAELES S. SARGENT, 

BrooUine, Ma8s. 



FOREST TREES OF NORTH AMERICA. 



(^ 



\ r\j\\^^ '(^\ 



fv^ 



I ■ Jl i 



i>;A' 






■A i'.^i*-^: 



..\\..i: 



\ 



1. 



2. 



3. 



4. 



5. 



1. 



MAGNOLIACE^. 
Magnolia aotuninata, L. 

GUOUMBEB TREE. 



Western New York to Jefferson Oounty, Indiana; southward along 
the Alleghany Mountains to Georgia and Middle Tennessee. 

Wood soft, close-grained ; preferred for pump logs. 

A large tree, 60 to 80 feet in heiglit, with a trunk 2 to 4 feet in 
diameter. - 



2. 



Magnolia cordata, Michx. 



Ashe County, North Carolina, along the flanks of the Alleghany 
Mountains to the Savannah Biver, and in Northern Alabama. 
A small or medium-sized tree. 

3. Magnolia Fraieri, Walt. 

M. aurioulata, Lain. 

LONG-LEAVED CUCUMBEE TREE. 

Along the flanks of the Alleghany Mountains, from Virginia south- 
ward to Central Alabama. 
" Wood soft, spongy, very light, and unfit for uae."—{Michaiue f.) 



4. 



Magnolia glanoa, L. 

SWEET BAY. WHITE BAY. 



Essex County, Massachusetts, aud from Queens County, Long Island, 
to Louisiana and Southern Arkansas ; generally near the coast. 
A small tree ; in swamps ; the roots yielding a yellow dye. 



5. 



Magnolia grandiflora, L. 

BIG LAUREL. 



Cape Fear River, North Carolina, south to Florida ; west to Texas, 
and ascending the Mississippi River as far as Natchez. 

Wood soft, easily worked, very white ; probably valuable for interior 
work and cabinet-making. 

A large tree, 60 to 90 feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 3 feet in 
diameter. 




7. 



8. 



9. 



10. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 

6. If ftgnolia maorophylla, Midix. 

LAUOKLUAVKI) MAONOMA TKKK. 

Iredell and Liiieol^ CoiiiitieM, North Carolina, to Middle Floiida; and 
west of the Allejfhany MountainH, troni HontlieaHtern Kentucky Honth- 
wurd through TenneHMee to Central Alabama. 

A small tree, 20 to 40 feet in height, with trunk rarely exceeding one 
foot in diumoter. Uure. 



7. 



M. MpeUila, L. 



Magnolia Umbrella, Lmn. 



UMBRELLA TREE. 



York and Lancaster Counties, Pennsylvania, and southward along the 
Alleghany Mountains; throughout the Carolinas, (ileorgia, Northern 
Alabauui, and westward through Kentucky and Tennessee. 

A small tree, rarely exceeding 40 feet in height. 



8. 



Liriodendron Tulipifera, L. 

TULIP TREE. YELLOW POPLAR. WHITE WOOD. 



Bennington County, Vermont, south to Florida, and west to Eastern 
Kansas. 

Wood light, close-grained, strong, easily worked; extensively used for 
construction, interior work, shingles, carriage nanels, «Scc. 

A large tree, 70 to 100 feet in height, with a trunk 4 to 7 feet in 
diameter; one of the largest and most valuable trees of the Atlantic 
forests. 



ANONACE^. 



9. Anona glabra, L. 

DC.Pioilr.,i.85. Coult. Bot. Gazette, iii. 2. 

Banks of the Caloosa River, and neai Miami, Southern Florida 
(Qarher\ and in the West Indies. 

10. Asimina triloba, Dunal. 

Anona triloba, L. 

Uvaria triloba, Torr. & Gray. 

PAPAW. ^ 

Monroe County, New York, and North Erwinna, Bucks County, Penn- 
sylvania; south to Florida; west to Fremont County, Iowa, and the 
Indian Territory. , 

Wood light and spongy. 

A small tree, sometimes i\0 feet in height, or more often a shrub; fruit 
sweet and edible. 



11. 



12. 



13. 



14. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



6 



GUTTIFER^. 

11. Clnsia flava, L. 

Southern Florida, and in the West Indies. 



12. 



TERNSTRCEMIACE^. 
Oordonia Lasianthus, L. 

LOBLOLLY BAY. 



Southern Virginia to Louisiiina, near the coast. 
Wood reddish, light, brittle, close-grained, of little value. 
A tree 50 to CO feet in height, with a trunk 18 to 20 inches in diam- 
eter; in swamps; bark rich in tannin. 



13. 



Oordonia pnbescens, L'Her. 



From the Altamaha River, Georgia, near the coast, south to ? 
A small tree, rarely exceeding 30 feet in height. Not common. 



14. 



TILIACEiE. 
Tilia Americana, L. 

LIME TREE. WHITE WOOD. BASS WOOD. 



New Brunswick to the northern shores of Lake Superior, Southern 
Manitoba, and through the Northern States to Virginia; south along the 
Alleghany Mountains to Georgia; west to the Missouri River and East- 
ern Texas. 

Wood white, tough, pliable, easily worked ; largely employed in inte- 
rior work, turnery, and the manufacture of wooden ware. 

A tree GO to 80 feet in height, with a trunk 3 to 4 feet in diameter; 
the inner bark, macerated, is manufactured into coarse cordage and 
matting. Very common in the forests of Eastern America. 

var. pnbescens, Gray. • 

T. pnleacena, Ait. 

North Carolina to Florida, near the coast. 

Smaller than the species; in swamps or low ground. 




15. 



16. 



17. 



18. 



19. 



16. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 
Tilia heterophyUa, Vent. 



/ ( 



T. alba, Michx. f. 
7. lax\flora, Pursh. 



WHITE BASS WOOD. 



Alleghany Mountains, Pennsylvania, to Georgia, and westward to the 
valley of the lower Wabash Eiver. 
A medium-sized tree, rarely exceeding 50 feet in height. 



16. 



ZYGOPHYLLACEiE. 
Onaiaonm sanctum, L. 

LIGNUM VIT^. 



Southern Florida, and through the West Indies. 

Wood exceedingly hard and heavy. 

A small tree. \ 

17. Porliera angustifolia, Gray, PI. Wright, i. 28. 

GuUtoum anguatifoUum, Eugelnt. 

Southern Texas (San Pedro Eiver, Eagle Pass, Deadman's Hole, 
Pedernales River), and southward into Mexico. 

A small tree. 

"The hard and heavy yellowish-brown wood is called Chuijaoum about 
Saltillo, and is used as a sudorific and in venereal diseases." — {Oregg.) 



RUTACE^. 

18. Xanthoxylum Garibeeum, Lam. 

X. Floridanttm,'Sntt. 

SATIN WOOD. . 

Southern Florida. 
A small tree. 

19. Xanthoxylum Clava-Heroulis, L. 

X, CaroUnianum, Laui. ; / •; ^ 

TOOTH-AOHE TREE. PRICKLY ASH. 

Southern Virginia to Florida, near the coast j west to Eastern Texas 
and Arkansas. 

Wood yellow, solid, close-grained. 

A small tree, 12 to 20 feet in height ; bark, leaves, and fruit aromatic 
and intensely pungent, exciting salivation. 



,yr 



/ 



20. 



21. 



22. 



23. 



24. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 8e 

20. Xanthozylum Pterota, H.B.K. 

Southern Florida, Southern Texas (Fort Mcintosh), and southward 
to Brazil. 
Wood yellow, dense, exceedingly hard and heavy. ' j - 
A small tree. • 



21. 



SIMARUBE^. 
Simambra glauca, H.B.K. 

BITTER WOOD. 



Southern Florida, and southward through the West Indies to Brazil. 
A large tree. 



22. 



BURSERACE^. 
Bursera gummifera, Jacq. 

WEST INDIAN BIRCH. 



Southern Florida, and southward through the West Indies. 

Wood " white, soft, brittle, and seldom put to any use but as fuel." — 
{Nuttall.) 

A large tree; abounding in resinous gum soluble in alcohol and fur- 
nishing a transparent and valuable varnish. 

23. Amyris sylvatica, Jacq. 

A. Floridana, Nutt. 

TORCH WOOD. 

Southern Florida, and southward through the West Indies. 
Wood "yellowish- white, close-grained, and capable of receiving a high 
polish."— (^M«a/L) 
A small tree; exceedingly balsamiferous. 



24. 



MELIACE^. 
Swietenia Mahogoni, L. 

MAHOGANY. 



Lignum Vitte Key, east coast of Florida {Garber), Key West, and 
through the West Indies and Central America. 

Wood reddish brown, hard, heavy, very durable, and highly prized 
for cabinet work. 

A large and very valuable timber tree. 



|r~ 








j 


'■ • 


• 

% 


, . ^^ - 


■ 




• ' , * 


■ ' ^ 


1 


( 


■ u" 




' 


^ " 






1 

J 


* 


• 


r 


n , 


, 


• 




! 
■ 


.' 


• 


* - 


I 

,1 

1 
i 


* 

« 




■^1 

V 

s 


\ 

1 








E 

1 

1 ^ 








i 


■ . ■; i.. , 


• 




• : 
f ,■ 




1 





.Xf-: 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TBEE8. 



% 



25. 



OLACINEiE. 
Zimenia Americana, L. 

MOUNTAIN PLUM. HOG PLUM. 



Southern Florida, ^nd southward tlirough the West Indies. 
Wood yellow. 
"A small tree J fruit an edible, plum-shaped, yellow drupe. 

26. Schoepfia arboresoens, R. & S. 

DC.Pro(lr.iv.319. Conlt. Bot. Gazette, iii. 3. 

Banks of the Galoosa Biver, Southern Florida, and through the West 
Indies. 
A small tree. 



27. 



ILICINE^. 
nex Dahoon, Nutt. 

DAHOON HOLLY. 



Southeastern Virginia to Florida, and west to Louisiana near the coast. 
A shrub or small tree, sometimes 25 feet in height. 

28. Hex opaoa, Ait. 

AMERICAN HOLLY. 

Quincy, Massachusetts, south to Florida; west to Arkansas, Southern! 
Missouri, and Eastern Texas; at the north only near the coast. 

Wood white; the heart- wood brown, close-grained, heavy; used in 
cabinet work, turnery, &c. 

A small tree, rarely 40 feet in height. 



CYRILLACE^. 
29. Cyrilla racemiflora, Walt. 

C. Caroliniana, Richard. 

North Carolina to Florida and Alabama, near the coasts 
A small tree, 20 to 30 feet in height. 
2 



80. 



Fro 

As 

bordei 



31. 



8. 



Boat 
Woo 
A sn 



1 li 



I 



4 



./ 



32. 



Ft 



New 
A sn 



33. 



Comi 
ico. 
A sm 



34. 



Fr, 



Queei 

Moimta 

A sm 



CATALOGUE OF FOBEST TREES. 10 

80. Oliftonia lignitrina, Banks. 

MylocatiniM liguttrinum, Willd. ^ . 

BUCKWHEAT TBEE. 

From the Savannah Biver, Georgia, south to Florida and Alabama. 
A shrub or sometimes a small tree, 10 to 20 feet in height; along the 
borders of streams and swamps in the low districts. 



CELASTRACEiE 



81. 



Soheefferia ihitesoens, Jaoq. 



S. oompleta, Swartz. 
S. Imx^folia, Nutt. 



CRAB WOOD. FALSE BOX. 

Southern Florida, and in the West Indies. 
Wood hard and close-grained. 
A small ti'ee. 



RHAMNACE^. 

2. Zizyphus obtnaifoliiu, Gray. 

Faliurus Texetuis, Scheele. 

New Braunfels, Texas, to New Mexico. 
A small tree or shrub. 



33. 



Condalia oboyata, Hook. icon. , t. 28. 

BLUE WOOD. LOG WOOD. 



Common in Eastern Texas, Western Texas, and Southern New Mex- 
ico. 
A small tree. 



34. Bhamnus Caroliniana, Walt. 

Frangula Caroliniana, Gray. 

Queens County, New York, south to Florida j west to the Eocky 
Mountains and Western Texas. ,. . 

A small tree, or more commonly a shrub. 




M. 



86. 



87. 



40. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 

86. Ehuuiiii PnrshiMia, DC. 

IVangula Pur$Mana, Cooper. 

BEAR BERRY. 

Mendocino County, Galifornia, north to Puget Sound. 
A small tree, sometiwes 20 feet in height. 



11 



86. 



OMmothni ipinoras, Nutt. 

RED WOOD. 



Oalifomia, in the Goaat Ranges, ftom Santa Barbara to Los Angeles. 
A small tree. i 



87. 



Csanothni thyniflomi, Eachsclioltz. 

CALIFORNIA LILAC. 



California, in the Coast Banges, from Monterey to Humboldt Ooonty. 
A small tree. 



SAPINDACEiE. 



88. 



iBionlni jCalifomioa, Nutt. 



California, fh)m Mendocino County and Mount Shasta, south to San 
Luis Obispo, and east to the foot-hills of the Sierra Nevada. 
Wood "soft and brittle." 
A small tree, or more often a wide-spreading shrub. 

89. .Ssoului flava, Ait. 

Pavia flava, Moenob. 

^. aar^ruter Buckley, Proc. Acad. Phil. 1860, 443. 

SWEET BUCKEYE. 

Mountains of Virginia, southward along the Alleghany Mountains to 
Georgia and Northern Alabama ; westward to Jefferson County, Indiana^ 
and the Indian Territory; most common west of the Alleghany Moun- 
tains. 

A tree, sometimes 60 feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 3 feet in diameter. 

40. .Ssonlns glabra, Willd. 

^. OhiomsU, Mich. f. 

FETID BUCKEYE. OHIO BUCKEYE. 

Western Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Tennessee, and west to Western 
Missouri. 
A small or medium-sized tree; along streams. 



41. 



48. 



48. 



44. 



45. 



46. 



47. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 

41. UngnadU ipeoioMt, Eudl. 

Texas utul Eastern Now- Mexico. 
A small tree, or ofteo a shrub. 



12 



4S. 



Sapindvs marginatni, Wiiid. 

SOAP BERRY. 



Georgia to Southern Florida, near the uoast ; west to Arkansas, Texas, 
Southern New Mexico, Arizona, and in Sonora. 
A small tree. 



48. 



Sapindai Saponaria, L. 

SOAP BERRY. 



Southern Florida, and through the West Indies. 
A small tree ; the fruit rich in saponin, and used in the West Indies 
as a substitute for soap. 

44. Hypelate panionlata, Cambosa. 

it/eNoocca jMiHtcu/ato, JuHH. 

MADEIRA WOOD. HONEY BERRY. OENIP TREB. 

Southern Florida, and through the West Indies. 
A small tree. ' 

46. Hypelate trifoliata, Swartz. 

Southern Florida, and through the West Indies. 

46. Acer oiroinatum, Pursh. 

VINE MAPLE. 

Northern California to Puget Sound. 

" Wood fine, white, close-grained, very tough, and susceptible of a good 
polish." 

A tree, 30 to 40 feet in height, or sometimes a shrub forming impene- 
trable thiclcets along streams, the vine-like stems taking root wherever 
they touch the ground. 

47. Acer dasyoarpnm, Ehrh. 

A. eriocarpum, Michx. 

WHITE MAPLE. SILVER MAPLE. 

Northern Vermont, south to Florida; west to Minnesota, Eastern 
Nebraska, and the Indian Territory ; most common west of the Alle- 
ghany Mountains. 

Wood soft, white ; of little value. 

A large tree, 60 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk 6 to 8 feet in diam- 
eter ; along streams. Maple-sugar is occasionally manufactured from 
the sap of this species. 



48. 



I 






60. 



51. 



ill'.': • -I'-r I 



m 



62. 



48. 



CATALOaUE OF FOREST TBEES. 



Acer grandidentatnm, Natt. 



13 



Headwaters of the Golambia Biver, caSons of the Wasatch Moiint- 
ains, and Southern Utah to Ash Greek, Arizona. . 

Wood resembling that of the Sugar Maple. / / • 

A small tree^ 



49. 



Acer maorophyllnm, Pursh. 



Santa Barbara, California, to latitude 55^ north. In California, in 
the Coast Eanges and on the western slope of the Sierras ; in Oregon, 
and Washington Territory, west into the Cascade Mountains. 

Wood valuable, hard, close-grained, susceptible of a good polish ; the 
best substitute in the Pacific forests for eastern hickory. 

A tree, 80 to 100 feet in height, with a trunk sometimes 5 feet in diam* 
eter; in California much smaller. From the inner bark, mats, hats, and 
baskets of excellent quality are made; maple-sugar is manufactured from 
the sap of this species. 

60. Acer Fennsylyanicom, L. 

A. striatum, DaRoi. 

STRIPED MAPLE. MOOSE WOOD. STRIPED DOGWOOD. 

Lake Saint John, latitude 47° N. {Miehatue) ; southward throughout 
New England, and along the Alleghany Mountains to Northern Geor» 
gia, and west along the northern boundary of the United States to Wis- 
consin. 

Wood white, close-grained, very hard. 

A tree, 20 to 30 feet in height, with a. trunk 6 to 8 inches in diameter 

01. Acer rubmm, L. 

J. Drummondii, Hook. «& Am. 

RED MAPLE. SWAMP MAPLE. 

Latitude 47° N. (Michatix) ; southward to Florida; west to Minnesota, 
Eastern Nebraska, the Indian Territory, and Eastern Texas. 

Wood whitish or rose-colored, close-grained, moderately hard, sus- 
ceptible of a fine polish ; largely used in cabinet-making, for turn- 
ery, and wooden ware ; the variety with undulating grain, known as 
" curled maple," is highly valued. 

A large tree ; generally in swamps. Common in all the forests east of 
the Mississippi Eiver. 



62. 



Acer saoohariniun, Wang. 

SUGAR MAPLE. ROCK MAPLE. 



Northern New Brunswick to the western shores of Lake Superior 
southward through the Northern States and along the Alleghany 



I 



* I- 



s) 



Mountai 
Arkans£ 

Wood 
polish ; 
ferred fo 
eye map 

A tree 
uplands, 
the a8h( 
potash. 



63. 



Acei 



Shores 
emPeni 
to Wisco 
to the T\ 
Wood 
A tree 
along sti 

64. 



Galifoi 
A sma 



66. 







South( 
A sma 



66. 



From 
sio; Ark: 
Wood 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



14 



Mountains to Georgia; west to Minnesota, Eastern Nebraska, and 
Arkansas. Most common at the North. 

Wood hard, close-grained, smooth, compact, susceptible of a fine 
polish ; extensively used for flooring, cabinet-'work, and turnery ; pre- 
ferred for shoe-lasts. Two accidental forms, " curled maple " and << bird's- 
eye maple", are highly valued for cabinet-work. 

A tree, 60 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 4 feet in diameter ; in 
uplands. Maple-sugar is principally made from the sap of this species ; 
the ashes of its wood are rich in alkali, yielding large quantities of 
potash. 

63. Negundo aoeroides, Moench. 

Acer 2{eg undo, L. 

BOX ELDER. ASH-LEAVED MAPLE. 

Shores of Lake Ghamplain in Vermont, near Ithaca, New Yprk, East- 
em Pennsylvania, and south to Florida and Southern Texas j Aorthwest 
to Wisconsin, Minnesota, and the Saskatchewan in latitude 5i° N. ; west 
to the Wasatch Mountains, Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona. 

Wood soft and of little value. 

A tree, 30 to 50 feet in height, with a trunk rarely 2 feet in diameter ; 
along streams. 



64. 



Negnuido Califomicnm, Torr.v&Gray. 

BOX ELDER. 



Galifornia, northward in the Coast Eanges to f 
A small tree. Common along streams. 



66. 



ANACARDIACE^. 
Bhns Metopinm, L. 

CORAL SUMACH. MOUNTAIN MANOHINEEL. BUMWOOD. 



Southern Florida, and through the West Indies. 

A small tree j like many of the genus, poisonous to the touch. 



4 

t 



66. 



Rhus typhina, L. 

STAGHORN SUMACH. 



Froih Northern New England south to Georgia, and west to Wiscon- 
sin; Arkansas, and Louisiana. 
Wood orange-colored, aromatic, brittle. 



h.^ 



^fTC 



■(>ifl-A 



I. <:.:i, 



W'i: 1 jiiE, 



U5t 



iinc; 









i '«'■■: 



a ^>;'« 



'?':•) 



.J^: 



ii',,-. ;,-i: 



A 8m{ 
and bar 

57. 

Near 
southwa 
A sm£ 



H' 



■'■ i ;;;• 



,tii. 



68. 



! 



» f 



:i'.-:j 



i' <■. 



Southi 
tof wes 

Wood 
hard, sti 
lecture, 
for treen 

A tree 

69. 



In the 
Wood 
A tree 



60. 

Comm 

western 

A sm£ 

61. 



.i\. 



n\t.!,;..H.,n 



V ' - ^ 1 » ■ i: * 



i> zi^'^i^> //- 



South 
"Woo 

light br 

tall.) 
A smt 

cotic. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TKEES. 



15 



A small tree, rarely 30 feet in height, or more often a shrub; leaves 
and bark astringent, rich in tannin. 



67. 



Pistaoia Hezioana, hbk. 



Near the mouth of the river Pecos, Western Texas (Bigeloio)^ and 
southward into Mexico. 
A small tree. 



LEGUMINOS^. 



08. 



Bobinia Pseudaoaoia, L. 

LOCUST. 



Southern Pennsylvania, southward along the Alleghany Mountains 
to ? west to ? Now extensively naturalized in all the Eastern States. 

Wood reddish, greenish-yellow, or white, according to locality ; very 
hard, strong, and impervious to decay; largely employed in naval archi* 
tecture, for posts, construction, and turnery ; preferred to all other woods 
for treenails, and in this form largely exported. 

A tree, 70 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk 3 to 4 feet in diameter. 






69. 



Bobinia visoosa, Vent. 

CLAMMY LOCUST. 



In the high mountains of the Garolinas and Georgia, west to f 
Wood said to possess the same qualities as that of the last species. 
A tree, 40 to 50 feet in height. 



60. 



Olneya Tesota, Gray. 

ABBOL DE HIEBBO. 



Common in the valleys of the lower Colorado and Gila Rivers, South- 
western Arizona, and the adjacent portions of California. 
A small tree. , 



61. 



Fiscidia Erythrina, L. 

•JAMAICA DOGWOCto. 



Southern Florida, and through the West Indies to Central America. 
"Wood heavy, hard and resinous, coarse, cross-grained, and of a 
light brown color ; it is very durable either in or out of water."— (JVtt«- 

tall.) ; 

A small tree; a tincture prepared from the bark is an intense nar- 
cotic. 



-./■* 



63. 



. r> 



63. 



64. 



65. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



16 



62. 



Cladrastif tinotoria, Raf. 



rirgiUa lutea, Michx. f. 



YELLOW WOOD. 



From Central Kentucky, on the banks of the Kentucky River, south 
to Middle and Eastern Tennessee. 

Wood of a clear yellow color, said to split with difficulty, and to make 
valuable fuel. 

A small or medium-sized tree ; principally along streams, or on rich 
hillsides. Bare, and in danger of extermination for fuel. 



63. Sophora afflnis, Ton-. & Gray. 

Styphnohhium affine, Walp. 

" Prairies of Arkansas on the Red River"; Eastern and Southern 
Texas. 

"A small tree, 10 to 12 feet in height; the trunk 4 to 8 inches in diam- 
eter; rarely a small shrub; the wood very heavy." — {Lindheimer. Gray, 
PI. Lindh. 178.) 






64. 



Sophora secundiflora, Lag. 



S, Bpecioaa, Bentb. 



Western shores of Matagorda Bay to Western Texas. 

"A small tree, about 30 feet in height; the wood yellow, hard, and 
heavy, called Lignum Vitce. Flowers showy, blue, sweet-scented, exhal- 
ing nearly the odor of violets. The tree forms small groves on the 
shores of Matagorda Bay, where it is the only firewood. The wood dyes 

yellow." — {LindJieimer. Gray, Pi. Lindh. 178.) 

An exceedingly poisonous alkaloid, to which the name of Sophorin 
has been given, is produced from the seed of this species. — {Eothrockj 

Coult. Bot. Gazette, ii. 133.) 



I 
if il 



65. 



Gynmocladns Canadensis, Lam. 

KENTUCKY COFFEE TREE. 



From Western New York and the province of Ontario, south to Ten- 
nessee, west to Wisconsin, Eastern Nebraska, and the Indian Territory. 

Wood rose-colored, close-grained, compact, very tough, with little sap- 
wood ; susceptible of a high polish, although cross-grained and difficult 
to season and work. Its specific gravity .609. 

A tree, 60 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk sometimes 2 feet in diam- 
eter. 



"> 



p 



" 


r 




- 


m 








• 


J 






ft 




w 




, ; ^l*x ■ 


% 


.1 








-'■ ' ^ .| .'■ ■■ i 


,■ -.,,■>«! 


■ ■ : *'(■■' 


.' .,-., . • , . - .• 


i\^W''l'-- Ij" i t '■ 




,-' 






















' 




'' ' ' . - •■ 


.,!_•. 1 . 






_ 


, 


' 






' 


■■ . '^ i 


' ■ ,•'. . 


■ 








-\ - ' ' 


1 ■ ■ ■ 




i ' ■ 1 


... • .T' 


i 


•' 


' 




* 


!■ 


■ 




• 1 /■ '■ 1 ' , t ■.■;■'■, 
,. ' 1 ■ ■ ,■ * ; 

i 

\ 

M t i 


1 

I 


- 










. V 


t 


- i . . - , - 


.I' 




* 


\ 


r 

r 


« 


• 




/ 

- ■ ■■ V ■ ; 

''V 

- - 1 - * 


i 


• 










-« 







66. 



CATALOGUE OF FOBEST TREES. 
Oleditiohift monoiperma, Nutt. 

WATER LOCUST. 



17 



South Oarolina to Florida, near the coast ; and from Southern Ulinoii 
to Northern Alabama, Louisiana, and Eastern Texas. 
A small tree; in deep swamps. 



67. 



Oleditiohia triaoanthoi, L. 

HONEY LOCUST. THBEE-THORNED ACACIA. 



Western Pennsylvania to Eastern Nebraska, the Indian Territory! 
Louisiana, and Florida; probably not east of the Alleghany Mountains. 
Wood hard, heavy, coarse-grained. 
A large or medium -sized tree; in rich bottom land. 

68. Farkinsonia florida, Watson, Proo. Amer. Aoad. zi. 135. 

Ceroidium floridum, Benth. . x. . 

Southern Texas. 

A small tree or shrub ; not to be confounded with the next species. 



'4 
't, 

■ I 



'.i! 



69. Farkinsonia Torreyana, Watson, Proc. Amer. Aoad. xi. 135. 

Ceroidium /ortdum, Torr. 

PALO VERDE. OBEEN-BABK ACACIA. 

Common in the valleys of Southeastern Arizona and the a^acent 
portions of California. 
Wood hard, furnishing a valuable ftiel. 
A small tree, often 30 feet in height. 



70. 



Ceroifl Canadensif, L. 

BED BUD. JUDAS TEEE. 



New York, south to Florida ; west to Minuesotaj Wyoming, Louisiana, 
and the Indian Territory. 
Wood hard, compact, susceptible of a good polish. 
A small tree, rarely exceeding 30 feet in height. 



71. 



Cerois occidentalis, Torr. 



C. CaHfornicum, Torr. 



RED BUD. JUDAS TREE. 



California, Mount Shasta and Mendocino County, southward along 
the foothills of the Sierras to San Diego. 
3 



J' a 



•n;;:/' v. >-'( it. 



iJ! .^^'■.'■ti^^ '* ff 



ii>:. 



;.•►•-., I, 






)i 



1-/I 



i'.ltr,: Mi::i 



: 7 'On 



'S -.'■ 



JV .!■. 



.:7«5vrr' : ^J. v:;.. ^f^kiK't 



'?•;, tM ■. '. 



i-i:!.^- .X 



S'- 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



18 



A small tree, or more Arequently o, large shrub. A small slinibby 
variety {0. reniformisj Engelm.) occurs in Southern Texas and New 
Mexico. 

72. Proiopii jnliflora, DC. ^ 

Algarobia glattduloaa, Ton. &, Oray. 

ALOAROBA. MESKIT. HONEY LOCUST. 

Valley of the Guadaloupe, plains of Western Texas, to San Felipe 
Gauon, Southern Galifornia; north to Southern Colorado and Southern 
Nevada; and southward through Mexico. 

Wood hard, very heavy and durable, affording fuel of the best quality 
and excellent charcoal. The unripe and pulpy jiods edible and a valu- 
able forage. A gum resembling gum arable is produced by this tree^ 
and the seeds are rich in grape-sugar. 

" Trees 30 to 40 feet high, with few and large erect branches; the trunk 
often from one to two and one half feet in diameter; the heartwood 
dark reddish-brown ; but often occurring as a small tree or shrub. Im- 
portant as flirnishing the only firewood in Western Texas, and also for 
its edible fruit." — {Lindheimer. Gray, PL Lindb. 181.) 

73. Frosopis pnbesoens, Beutb. 

Strombocarpa puheacens, Gray. 

TOBNILLA. SCREW BEAN. SCREW-POD MESQUIT. 

Southern New Mexico, along the valley of the Rio Grande; west to 
San Diego County, California; north to Ash Meadows, Southern 
Nevada; and southward into Mexico. 

Wood resembling that of the last species. 

A small tree ; the seeds affording excellent forage ; or ground into 
flour, Indian food. 



74. 



Acacia Oreggii, Gray. 



Western Texas, through Southern New Mexico and Arizona to San 
Diego, California. 
A small tree, 10 to 20 feet in height. 



75. 



Pithecolobium Ungnis-Cati, Benth. 



Inga Unguis-Cati, Willd. 
P. Ouadalupense, Nutt. 



cat'sclaw. 



Southern Florida, and through the West Indies. 
A small tree, 10 to 20 feet in height. 



IB, 



11. 



i 



78. 



79. 



-/ 



\ 



80. 



i-i-. .- -.•--(" 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



19 



ROSACEiE. 



re. 



Pmnai Amerieana, Marshall. 

WILD PLUM. CANADA PLUM. 



From Hudson's Bay to Florida; west to Denver City, Colorado, 
Sliawneetown, Indian Territory, and Central Texas. 
Wood reddish, hard. 
A small tree ; often cultivated for its red or yellow acid fruit. 

'^ » 

77. Pnmni Oaroliniant, Ait. 

CeratiM CarolinianOf Michx. 

MOCK OBANOE. 

North Carolina to Florida, near the coast, and west to Louisiana , 
Arkansas, and Eastern Texas. 

Wood rose-colored, fine-grained, brittle. 

A small tree, sometimes 40 feet in height; often cultivated for orna- 
ment. . 



78. 



Pmnui Chioaia, Mlchx. 



Cwaaua Chioasa, Soring. 



OHIOKASAW PLUM. 



Probably native in the regions immediately east and southeast of the 
Bocky Mountains, but now widely naturalized in all the Atlantic 3tates 
south of Pennsylvania and Illinois. 

A small tree, or often a shrub ; frequently cultivated for its globose, 
red and yellowish fruit. 

79. Fmnna emarginata, Walpers, var. mollis. Brewer. 

P. mollia, Walpers. 
Corasua tnollU, Dougl. 

Northern California to Puget Sound, and east into the Cascade 
Moimtains. 

A small tree, sometimes 30 feet in height. Common in Oregon and 
Washington Territory. 

The shrubby P. emarginata, Waipers, is the common form of California. 

80. Pnmus Feimsylvanioa, L. 

Cerasua borealia, Micbx. 
Ce)'aaaa Pennaylvanica, Bering. 

WILD RED CHERRY. 

From Newfoundland to the headwaters of the Saskatchewan ; through- 
out the New England and Northern States ; on the high mountains of 
North Carolina, and in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. 



•t ( 



81. 



J! *■• 






.1 'K* 



'C, "^ 



;><>J-^y' 



.t-'f"'- '-'. 



81 



■^1^^J^), ^ 



}!) 



.K 



■W, 



^ItT'US;*. 



\, 



-<N' 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



20 



A small tree, sometimes 30 to 40 feet in height. In Northern New Eng- 
land taking possession of the immense tracts annually cleared of the 
coniferous forests by fire. 



81. 



Pnmns serotina, Ehrh. 



Ceraaua Virginiana,'MiCihx. 
Ceraaua serotina, Loisel. 
P. CapolUn, Zucc. f 

WILD BLAOK CHERRY. 

Hudson's Bay, south to Florida, and from the Atlantic coast to East- 
ern Nebraska, the Indian Territory, Eastern Texas, and probably fiirther 
southwest. 

Wood light red, becoming darker with age, close-grained, compact, 
light, easily worked, and not liable to warp ; its specific gravity .454 ; 
largely employed in cabinet-making, for which it is one of the most 
valuable of North American woods. 

A tree, 60 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk often 4 feet in diameter ; 
reaching its greatest perfection in the valley of the Ohio. 



82. 



Prunns umbeUata, Elliott. 



South Carolina, to Florida and Alabama. 

A small tree, often a shrub ; <' in very dry and sandy soils." — {Mliott.) 



83. 



Nuttallia oerasiformis, Toir. & Gray. 

OSO BERRY. 



From San Luis Obispo, California, north to t>uget Sound; along the 
Coast Ranges in California ; in Oregon and Washington Territory, east 
into the Cascade Mountains. 

A small tree, or often a shrub. 



'■;! 



4 



.. u 



[ 



A<: 






84. 



Ceroooarpiu ledifolim, Nutt. 

MOUNTAIN MAHOGANY. 



Wasatch Mountains, Utah, west to the eastern slopes of the Sierra 
Nevada ; and from the 36th parallel north into Oregon and Idaho. 

Wood mahogany-colored, very hard, remarkably heavy, and suscepti- 
ble of a beautiful polish, although too brittle and difftcult to work to 
be usefal in the arts ; furnishing the most valuable fuel of Nevada ; 
its specific gravity 1.117. 

A small tree, sometimes 40 feet in height, and often only a shrub* 
Very common in all the mountain ranges of the " Great Basin " at 6,000 
to 8,000 feet elevation. 



\\ » • 



. y 



86. 



Sorb 



Green 
em Stat( 
Garolina. 

A sma 



86. 



Mai 



From 
confined 
ghany M 

A sma 



87. 



Malt 



< .'ffA- 



:i. ' 



V; I', 



,?v-fi 



■.'■ ,» ' 



•'0:~i''y'\ ^fTitf'nnr 



■&• 



From 
Georgia, 
along the 

Asmal 
and exce( 



88. 



Mah 



From I 

Washing 

Wood 

A sma] 

forming ! 

sweet, ed 



89. 



Sorb 



On th< 
the nortl 
Colorado 
Sierra Ni 
ranges n 

A sma 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 21 

85. Piros Americana, DC. 

Sorhm Americana, Marsh. 

AMERICAN MOUNTAIN ASH. 

Greenland and Labrador, south through the iNe x England and North- 
em States, to Wisconsin; on the high peaks of the mountains of North 
Oarolina. 

A small tree ; in swamps and moist woods. 

86. Finu ang^stifolia, Ait. 
Malua angusHfolia, Michx. 

NARBOWLEAYED CRAB APPLE. 



From ! Pennsylvania, to Florida and Mississippi ; probably 

confined to the low country and not ascending or crossing the Alle* 
ghany Mountains. 

A small tree. 

87. Pirns ooronaria, L. . 

Maltu coronaria, Mill. 

AMERICAN CRAB APPLE. 

From Oneida County, New York, west to Wisconsin, and south to 
Georgia, Arkansas, and Louisiana ; in the South Atlantic States, only 
along the Alleghany Mountains. 

A small tree, sometimes 30 feet in height; fruit small, yellowish green, 
and exceedingly austere. 



88. 



Pirns rivnlaris, Dougl. 



Malm rivttlaria, Dcsne. 



OREGON CRAB APPLE. 



From Sonoma County, California, north to Alaska; in Oregon and 
Washington Territory, east into the Cascade Mountains. 

Wood hard, tough, susceptible of a good polish. 

A small tree, sometimes 30 feet in height; more often shrubby, and 
forming low, impenetrable thickets ; fruit small (the size of a pea), 
sweet, edible. Common along streams in moist ground. 

89. Pirns sambnoifolia, Cham. & Schlect. 

Sorhm sambuoifolia, Roem. 

On the high mountains of New England, and far northward; along 
the northern frontier of the United States; in the Eocky Mountains of 
Colorado and Utah; on the East Humboldt Eange of Nevada; in the 
Sierra Nevada, fi«m "Big Tree Eoad" northward, and in all mountain 
ranges north to Sitka, and in Kamtschatka. 

A small tree. 



i 

I 



i 


f 
















1 


i 










. .' ' ,JS'^,r/^t;A: ii rr'l^ ■'■ 




'* ^'' ' 


1 ' 
















li . 


, f 






" -■ ■ 


■ . y-:^'\ >> ).■ '• ^•^' ■'■ ' 




■''>;'.■■;.'■■ . 


». \ 


• 


' ^' 






..." ■•■'-:; •;.-••'..■■ 




^ '.:.•■' ,■ 










• 


"'-'?". "■■. -^ ? . .-,- 




,''.- 


•> 










. - •" ' ',' i .' o : ■ ■'' •'.<•■■ 








"; ,: 






'9 






• ■■ ' ',■■ ■ 








• 


~ 




St.' 














• ,: - ■...• ;_; ■ 






« 










; 






14 










'^ ' . '" ■■ • -■- - ' ,- 






. 










^ ^'^ • ■ " '^ ■ 


.", ", «. 


: 1 . - 


i ' 








, 


■ ..> ;; ■ 




"".'-■ '■■ ') ■ '■■ . 








■ 




• 


,'< " 


. 


> 








• 








• 


J/ 






.. ■"'., -:, 


' - ■' - ■ -' . : . ' ^ '>: . • "* ' 


« 




» 


, , , -■ 






"'• 




r V { ' 




.„. 




. ,,. ^ 








, . •■ - .,- ?'■ r- '' .» ■•.:.• ^ .- . 




• ■' ~.\S.' f* '■ 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



22 



90. 



Cratsgns sstivaliB, Torr. &, Gray. 

MAY HAW. APPLE HAW. 



South Garolina to Florida; west to Louisiana and Arkansas. 
A small tree, sometimes 30 feet in height; margins of streams and 
ponds, in sandy soil. 



91. 



Crateegns apiifolia, Michz. 



Virginia? to Florida, near the coast; west to Louisiana,^Arkansa8| 
and Eastern Texas. 
A small tree. 



92. 



GrateeeriM arboresoens, Elliott. 



Near Fort Argyle, on the Ogeechee Eiver, Georgia (Elliott), to Florida, 
Louisiana, and Eastern Texas. 
A small tree, 20 to 30 feet in height ; on banks of streams. 



93. 



Cratsegns berberifolia, Ton. & Gray, Fl. i. 469. 



Prairies of Opelonsas, Louisiana. (Prof. Carpenter,) 
A small tree, 20 to 25 feet in height. 



8: 



(< 



■ 



94. 



GratsBgus cocoinea, L. 

SCARLET-FEUITED THORN. 



Canada and Northern Vermont, southward to Florida, and west to 
Eastern Nebraska. 

A small tree, 10 to 20 feet in height, running into various forms ; the 
best marked var. popuUfolia^ Ton. & Gray, Fl. i. 465, and var. viridiSy Ton. 
& Gray, 1. c. 



98. 



Cratsgus oordata, Ait. 

WASHINGTON THORN. 



Virginia and Kentucky, southward to Georgia. 
A small tree. 

96. CratfiBguB Cms-galli, L. 

COCKSPUR THORN. 

Canada and Northern Vermont, south to Florida ; west to Missouri, 
Arkansas, and Eastern Texas. 

A small tree, 10 to 20 feet in height, running into various forms ; the 
best marked var. pyricanthifoUa, Ait. Hort. Kew. ii. 170; var. oval'^oUaf 
Lindi. Bot. Reg. xxii. 1. 1860 ; var. linearis, DC. Prodr. 2, 626 ; and var. pruni- 

folia, Ton. & Gray, Bot. Reg. xxii. 1. 1868. 



ill 



^i 






m 



r. 














* 














• 


• 


' 'i'\ ■'« -1 -■ ■■-''■ 


, 


^ 


,/'* 


• 

/ 


•^ 


* . ' ■ 


* 


'V 




; 










^ ' 


\ 




I 

1. ■ ■ '• ■ 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



n 



97. Crateegns Donglani, Lindl. 

C. Banguinea, var. Douglaaii, Torr. &■ Gray. 

On Pit Biver, California, northward to Paget Sound, and east to 
Montana. 

A small tree, 10 to 20 feet high; common in Oregon and Washington 
Territory along streams. 



98. 



CratsBgns flava, Ait. 

SUMMER HAW. 



Virginia, southward to Florida, and west to Southern Arkansas. 
A small tree, 10 to 20 feet in height; " in shady, sandy places." — {Tor* 
rey& Gray.) 



(< 



i.; 



99. 



Gratsegoi rivnlaris, Nutt. 



Sierra and Plumas Counties, Oalifornia ; north to Puget Sound, and 
probably east to Montana. 
A small tree, 10 to 20 feet in height. 

100. ' CratSBgtu spathulata, Michx. 

C. mlorocarpa, Lindl. 

Virginia, southward to Florida, and west to Louisiana, Arkansas^ and 
Eastern Texas. 
A small tree, 10 to 20 feet in height, or often a shrub. 

101. Crateegus subvillosa, Scbrad. 

C. c<Mxinea, var. mollis, Torr. & Gray. 
C. tomeniosa, var. mollis, Gray. 
C. mollis, Scheele. 

Davenport and in Fremont County, Iowa ; south through the valley 
of the Mississippi Eiver; Shawneetown, Indian Territory, and San An- 
tonio, Texas ; the range of this species still obscure. 

A small tree. 



102. 



Crateegus tomentosa, L. 

BLACK THORN. PEAR THORN. 



Northern Vermont, to Georgia ; .west to Iowa and Arkansas. 
A small tree, or more often a shrub. 

var. punctata, Gray. [C. punctata, Jacq.) , 

Canada and Northern Vermont, to Georgia and AIa|)ama ; west to 
Wisconsin, Eastern Nebraska, and Arkansas. 
Wood hard, heavy, close-grained. 
A small tree, sometimes 30 feet in height. 



•^ 1 



4 



•,4 



!-| 



$1 



i 



'!j 



• r 










• ■ ' 


-; .V ,. 


> V 


■ " ■ ■; 




■ '- ' ' ;. '-i 


t; ■ f ' ^ • 



f. 



, l.-f 



f* V 



r.,, ; , i 



ii J 



'■■" 



■)- ?j i:irr.i 



i ■i'-i\x;& 



r. i).;:.i*5. 



-1.^ n i-i«:. 



.A <^„ 



i(H-.f< 



■-<:: :>r;iV'-,> 



J-s 



;'fc;<^:H'-jft 



.<-f/k >.i: 



103. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 

CratsBgni species. 



u 



A Crateegm of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, Utah and Wyom- 
ing, and the Clover Mountains of Nevada, which has been generally re- 
ferred to C. rivularisj Nutt., will probably be found to be a distinct species. 



104. Heteromeles arbntifolia, Roemer. 

Oratagua arbuHfolia, Poir. 

Aronia arbuti/oUa, Nntt. 

PhoUnia arhutifolia, Lindl. 

Meapilua arbut^folia, Link. 

Photinia aaUcifolia, Presl. 

H. FrenMtitiana, Dosne. , 

TOYON. TOLLON. 

California, Mendocino County to San Diego, in the Coast Banges, 
and east to the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. 
A shrub, or near San Diego a " tree 12 to 20 feet high." — {Bothrooh.) 

106. Amelanchier Canadensis, Torr. & Gray. 

Meapilua arhorea, Michx. f. 

JUNE BEBRY. SHAD BUSH. SERVICE TREE. 

Hudson's Bay, south to Florida, and west to Nebraska and the In- 
dian Territory. 

Wood exceedingly hard, heavy, strong. 

A small tree, sometimes 40 feet in height, or often a shrub, running 
into many forms, the best marked var. Botryapiumj Torr. &. Gray ; var. 
ohlongifoliaf Torr. &. Gray. The small fruit sweet and edible. 



106. 



HAMAMELACEJE. 
Liqoidambar Stjrraoiflna, L. 

LIQUIDAMBER. SWEET GUM. BILSTED. 



Greenwich, Fairfield County, Connecticut, south to Florida, and 
southwest to Missouri and Arkansas ; in Mexico and Central America. 
Wood reddish, compact, fine-grained, moderately tough and solid. 
A tree, 40 to 60 feet in height, with a trunk 3 to 5 feet in diameter. 






1«; 



t' 



|v: 



'''■'■' .; 



■ • . ■ I 



If 



1 



'I: 



u 



y 



Soutlu 
America 

A 811111 



Tanipii 
Brn/jl. 
A siiiii 



Soutlit 
A snia 



iU>>U'.- 



Soutlic 
A Sinn 



'^^K,l- 



Soutb€ 
A siiia 



^}rU 



■ v.aum'. 



Soutlit 
A suia 



J(4'i' 



(•'■■ ^^^---Ll*-* ■' iW\' -^li' f} 



%-f- 



Valley 
A tree 
4 



CATALOGUE OF F0RK8T TREES. 



25 



107. 



RHIZOPllOUAOE.E. 
Rhizophora Mangle, L. 

MANUUOVE. 



• 



Soiitlierii Floridn, Luiiisisina, Texas, ami southward through Tropical 
America. 
A small tree; always in maritime swamps. 



108. 



Conooarpus ereota, L. 

BUTTON TREE. 



Tampa Hay, Florida, and southward through the West Indies to 
Brazil. 
A small tree or shrub ; along muddy nnirine shores. 



109. 



Lagunoularia raoemosa, Gaitn. 

BLACK BUTTON WOOD. WHITE MANGROVE. 



Southern Florida, and through the West Indies to Brazil. 
A small tree, or more often a shrub. 



■h 



110. 



MYRTACE.E. 
Eugenia bnxifolia, WilWL 



Southern Florida, and through the West Indies. 
A small tree. 



111. 



Eugenia dichotoma, DC. 



Southern Florida, and through the West Indies to Central America. 
A small tree. * 



112. 



Eugenia procera, Poir. 



Southern Florida, and through the West Indies. 
A snuUl tree. 



113. 



CACTACE.E. 
Cereus giganteus, Knj^cini. 

Am. Jour. Sci. {'I ser.), 14. 3:55, and 17. 231. 



Valley of the (Jila liiver, Southwestern Arizona; and in Sonora. 

A tree 25 to GO feet in height, with a trunk sometimes 2 feet in diameter. 



















Ii 














* Mt 














-■' <*? 






•. 








• * 


- 








> 


/ 


''. 


• 






« \ 


/ 


"u 


.» , .f 














3' 














p. 

- 'i 














^ 








• 






-I'l 








. 




i 


" 


i 


( 


• 






■V, 




] 














' 




























\ 


•M 
















"ii. 








• 




• \ 


• -. '. 


- 








\ * 


\ 


t 






-.'■'. 






.>i I ■•■ 


t ■ 






• 


/ 


' '>M 


>■--* 








■ , : ^ ', 


. .;'.■..,.. 


-•■ ' 








1 




.,- -. , . 


» 




i 




/ 


f 


t 


> 


• 


i . 






. ■■■<! '. - 








P 




' , . ' 
























iiii'^/ 










• 




^ii! 




























^ ^' ■■ 














1 '^ ' 














^ ^ i 
















is Kji 
















ill 

















114. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TRKEfl. 

ARALTACK.K. 
Aralia ipinosa, l. 

ANGELICA TREK. nERCiri-Es' (LUn. 



26 



IVMinsylvaiiia aiul Kentucky; 8outh to riorida, wost to MLssonri and 
l^asti'i'ii Texas. 

A shrub or 'U,rn<>, whicli in rich soils (Louisiana) attains tlic height 
of .'JO to 40 or even GO feet, witli a dianu'ter of 3 to 12 inches" {Pro- 
fessor Carpenter); the bark yieldin;; a diaphoretic stiniuhuit. 



115. 



CORXACI'LK. 
Cornns Florida, Ti. 

FLOWEKINO DOGWOOD. 



Canada to Fhu'ida, west to Eastern Kansas; soutliwest to Arkansas 
and ]*^astern Texas. 

Wood hard, heavy, tine-grained, susceptible of a beautiful i>olish. 

A small tree, sonictinies IK) to 40 feet in height ; the bark used as a 
tonic and astringent. 



116. 



Cornus Nuttallii, Amiuboii. 



In California, Monterey and Mendocino (/ounties, nnd from Mariposa 
('ounty north to ]*ugct Sound; in Oregon and Washington Territory 
east into the Cascade Mountains. 

Wood very hard, <!lo8e-graincd, strong. 

In C'aliforuia, a small tree ; at the north, often 70 to 81) feet in height. 

117. Xyssa capitata, WaU. 

X, vaiid'uuiiiH, M it'll K. 

OGEECIIEE LIME. SOI" 11 TIPKLO. 

Ogcechee Uiver, (Jeorgia, south to Florida, and west to Louisiana and 
Southern Arkansas. 

A small tree, rarely M) feet in height; in swamps and on the banks of 
streams. A conserve, known as '' Ogeechee Limes," is prepared from the 
large, acid fruit of this si)ecie8. 



118. 



Nyssa Caroliuiana, I'oir. 



X. aqnailca. 



(JUM THEE. 



North Carolina to Florida, and west to ? 

Wood firm, close-grained, very unwedgable; emploj*ed for hubs of 
wheiils, hatters' blocks, and similar uses. 
A small or nuulium-sized tree ; in swamps and wet ground. 



: 



•II 



I ■ 



T 



•1 - S 



I 



^j 



1} 



119. 



120. 



121. 



122. 



123. 



119. 



CATALOG UK OF FOUKST TREKS. 

Nyssa multiflora, Wan^'. 



27 



! ( 



y. uqHal'uHt, L. in part. ' '" 

y. hi flora, Mi«r1ix. 

TUPELO. SOUR GUM. PEPrEKIDGE. 

West Milton, Vermont, soutli to Florida; west to ]\Iicliigan, Missouri, 
and Arkansas. 
Wood very nnwedgable; employed f()r hubs of wheels, &c. 
A small or njedium-sized tree; in swamps and low ground. 



'^■' 



120. Xyssa sylvatica, Mmsii. 

.V. riUosa, Midix. 

.V. multiflora, var. niflralica, Watson, IniU'x. 

BLACK GUM. 

lianks of the Schuylkill Kiver, Philadelphia {Mkhaux f.)', southward 
to Florida, and west through Kentucky and Tennessee. 
A large tree; its specific characters not yet satisfactorily defined. 

121. Nyssa uniflora, Wan?;. \ 

X, affiiatica, L. in part. 

X toiiteiilom, Miclix. 

X. grandideiiluta, Miclix. f. 

LARGE TUPELO. COTTON GUM. 

Southeastern Virginia, south to Florida, near the coast; west to Ken- 
tucky f , Louisiana, and Southern Arkansas. 

Wood light, soft, nnwedgable; somewhat employed for wooden ware; 
that of the roots very light, supplying a substitute for cork. 

A large tree ; in water or deep swamps. 



122. 



CAPRIFOLTACE.E. 
Sambuons glauca, Xntt. 

ELDER. 



Throughout California, Oregon, and Washington Tenitory ; east into 
Montana and Idaho; on the mountain ranges of the " Great Basin"; east 
to the Wasatch MountJiins, and in Southern New Mexico. 

A small tree, sometimes 20 feet in height, or often a shrub. 









123. 



Viburnum Lentago, L 

SHEEP BERRY. 



ITudson's B.ay and the Saskatchewan, southward through the North- 
ern States ; west to Fremont County, Iowa, and south along the Alle- 
ghany Mountains to Georgia. 

A small tree, 15 to 20 feet in height. Most common at the North. 



■!(; 



II .1«r;l 






\ \ 



'i ■ ■ i 




t < 




1; ■ 




' '' 


,.■ 


?' :.•:; 
*■ 






>| 



124. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 
Viburnum prunifolium, L. 

BLACK HAW. 



28 



Fairfield County, Connecticut, and Fishkill Landing, New York, sottth 
to Florida, and west to Saint liouis County, Missouri, Arkansas, and 
Eastern Texas. 

A small tree, 15 to 20 feet in height. < • 



125. 



KUBIACE.E. 
Finokneya pubens, Michx. 

GEORGIA BARK. 



South Carolina to Middle Florida; in swamps near the coast. 
A small tree; the bark with the taste and niedicinal properties of 
Cinchona. 



126. 



ERICACEAE. 
Arbutus Menziesii, Piuvsii. 



A, laurifoUa, Liiidl. 
J. procera, Dongl. 
J. Tt'xana, Buckley. 



:maduona. 



Paget Sound, southward through the Coast Ranges of California 
to Southern Arizona, and in Western Texas and Mexico. 
Wood white, hard, brittle. 
A large tree at the Xorth, rarely more than a shrub at the South. 



127. 



Arctostaphylos pungens, HiiK. 

MANZAXITA. 



Southern California, Southe¥n Utah, Arizona, and south into Mexico. 
Wood hard, heavy, mahogany-colored, and susceptible of a brilliant 
polish ; employed in the best cabinet work. 
A shrub, often 20 feet in height, or probably sometimes a small tree* 

var. platyphylla, Gray. 

^rt7(>8/flj>/(y/08 (jiJrtHOrt, Watson, Kiiij:; Rt'p. V. aiO [not Liiull.]. 

Oregon, south through California to Western Arizona, and in tho 
Wasatch Mountains. 
The common Man^sanita of Xorthern and Central California. 



■•hi' 
V 

Mi 



•i 



t^i 



\ (l 



128. 



Califoni 

Wood 1 

A sbrul 

foot or m< 



129. 



Judr 



Peimsy 

principall 

A snial 

130. 



Canada 
and Alab 
Tennessei 

Wood < 
of tools, I 

Genera 
a tree 30 



131. 



Nova ► 

along the 

Wood 

Geners 

tree 30 tc 



; 



132. 

M.J 
M. J 
jRapi 

Soutlie 
A sbrii 



128. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 

Arctostaphylos glanca, Lindi. 

MANZANITA. 



29 



California, Monterey and through the southern portion of the State. 
Wood probably similar to that of the last species. 
A shrub or small tree, sometimes 25 feet in height, with a trunk a 
foot or more in diameter. 

129. Oxydendrum arboreuni; DC. 

Judrometla arborea, L. 

SORREL WOOD. SOUR WOOD. 

Pennsylvania and Ohio, south to Florida, Mississippi, and Arkansas; 
principally in the Alleghany Mountains. 
A small tree, sometimes 40 to GO feet in height. 



130. 



Kalmia latifolia, L. 

LAUREL. CALICO BUSH. SPOON WOOD. IVY. 



Canada, Maine, and Korthern Vermont ; south to Western Florida 
and Alabama ; west to Wisconsin {Lapham), and through Kentucky and 
Tennessee to Arkansas. 

Wood exceedingly hard, heavy, close-grained, strong ; used for handles 
of tools, and furnishing a valuable fuel. 

Generally a shrub ; in the southern Alleghany Mountains sometimes 
a tree 30 to 40 feet in height, with a trunk 1 to 2 feet in diameter. 



131. 



Bhododendron maximum. L. 

GREAT LAUREL. ROSE BAY. 



Nova Scotia, Southern Canada, Northern New England, and south 
along the Alleghany Mountains ; never on limestone. 

Wood hard, heavy, very close-grained. 

Generally a shrub; in the southern Alleghany Mountains often a 
tree 30 to 40 feet in height, with a trunk a foot or more in diameter. 



MYRSINACE.E. 
132. Myrsine Rapanea, Rwui. & Sclmlt. 

M, florihuiida, Griscb. 
3f. Floridana, A.DC. 
Kapanea Onyanensis, Aubl. 
Samara floribunda, Willd. 

Southern Florida, and through the West Indies to Southern Brazil. 
A shrub or small tree. 



1 



-l: 



ill 



■'J 



i ■ 



"■i' 



:} 



■f 

n ■ 



•■1 



II 



6. 



\ ( 



138 



134. 



13S. 



136. 



137. 



138. 



\ 



CATALOGUE OF FOKEST TREES. 30 

133 Ardisia Fickeringia, Toi-r. & Grny. 

Cjirilla i-anicHlata, Xutt. 
rickiriiigia panivulata, Niitt. 

Eastern ami Soiitbcrn Florida, ami tliroiigli the West Indies to Mexico. 
Geueralli^ a shrub j on the Florida Keys a small tree 20 feet iu height. 



'li 



131 



SAPOTACE^E 
Chrysophyllum microphyllum, DC. 



Southern Florida, Caloosa IJiver, and near Miami {Garber); and 
through the West Indies. 
A small tree. 

135. Chrysophyllum oliviforme, Laiu. 

C. monopyrfnum, Sw.nrt/. ■- 

Southern Florida, and through the "West Indies. 
A small tree. 



136. 



Sideroxylon mastichodendron Juc(i. 



S. pallidum, Spreng. 
Jiumelia piilUda, Swai'tz. 
BitmcHa futidimma, Nntt. 

Charlotte Harbor and Key West, Southern Florida, and through the 
West Indies. 



.1 



137. 



Dipholis salicifolia, A. DC. 



Aihrait saUci/olia, Ij. 
Bumelia mVidfolUt, Swartz. 



Keys of Southern Florida, and through the West Indies to Brazil. 



A tree, GO feet in height. 



•:'\ 






138. Bumelia cuneata, Swai-tz. 

B. myrsinifolia, A. DC. 
B. parvifoUa, A. DC. 
B. anguslifolia, Nutt. 
B, reclinata, Toit. 

Southern Florida, Tampa Bay to Key West ; Texas, from Laredo on 
the Rio Grande to the mouth of that river, and southward into Mexico. 
A ^mall tree, 20 to 30 feet in height. 



.'•'I 



vl 



3 



:iti 



i r 



w 



■%v 



!• <1 



X 



i 






ii|i 


r *Im 


|,iii| 



■fea 



139. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 

Bumelia lanuginosa, rii-H. 



81 



// tomeiilom, A. DC. 

//. ohloiiffi/oUa, Nutt. 

H./eirufjiiiea, Nutt. ■ ,^ 

(loorgia and Florida ; Southern Illinois (opposite Saint Louis) to Ala- 
bama ; Missouri, Arkansas, and Eastern Texas. / / 

A snuill tree, 20 to .10 feet in height, with a trunk sometimes 2 feet iu 
diameter. 



140. 



Bumelia lycioides, Gnitu. 

IKON WOOD. SOUTHERN IIUCKTIIORN. 



Coastof Viry:inia an«l Southern Illinois, to Florida and Eastern Texas. 
A small tree, 20 to .'50 feet in height. 



141. 



Bumelia tenax, Wiiid. 



North Carolina to Florida, near the coast ; in sandy soil. 

Wood bard, heavy, very tough. 

A small tree, 20 to JJO feet iu height. 



H 






(< 






142. Mimusops Sieberi, A.DC. 

M. dhsevia, (IriMfl*. 

ftcms Xapolillu, var. parrijtora, Nutt. 

NASEKEURV. 

Kej's of Southern Florida, and through the West Indies. 
A small tree, sometimes .'{0 feet in height ; the edible and agreeable 
frrit the size of a pigeon's egg. 



143. 



E13EXACE.E. 
Diospyros Virginiana, i. 



PERSIMMON. 



Light-llouse Foint, New Haven, Connecticut, south to Florida and 
Alabauui; Ohio to Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, and south to Louisiana. 

AVood brownish, hard, heavy, very close-grained ; employed in turn- 
ery, for shoe lasts, «S:c. 

A tree, 20 to 70 feet iu height ; the yellow edible fruit exceedingly 
austere until after frost, then becoming sweet and hiscicms. 



r( 



:.,V 



if: 



V 



t ■■ 



V > 



■^1 



1 f 



■ 


• 


























1 








• 




















i 
























• 




4 








•" 










\ 1 








' 1 .'= 


*' ffl 


























*' 3K 






















1 ' ' 


• ■•■" ■ '■ 


ti:' 








• 




















4 ' 




















' 






v.( 


: 1.* 








/ 






» 










i 


t 


,, .; 


1 




























» 






















s 


■ h 














« 












L 


























I 
























• 


■ ','■ 


P 
















• 










i'. 


^; 






















*" . 




;\ \\ 


,' _ 


















- 










s 




























1 1 


















f 


1 






\ ■ : 


1 


























:■. 


n 
























* 




«■ ; 


























' 


* t 














































1 --'- 


' " • - 






■ ''^W . 


- * 








■ > ■ ■ w .' 

7 ' ■■ ^ -' 


-, ' 


* 
r 


■■ 


■ - 




4 






\ 

-r^-.. 


^ '1 






« 




t 

1 


















1 





























/'. «« 


/'.a 


/-'. ji 


K V, 


l'\ t 


Nov.a i 


perior; f 



144. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 

Dioipyrot Tezana, Seiiocio. 

MEXICAN VERSIMMON. 



82 



Southern and Wosteni Texas, ami southward iuto ]\rexleo. ) 

Wood white and lieavy. 

A small tree, 10 to 30 feet in height; " fruit globoHO, black, luscious^ 
ripe in August." — {Oruy, Syu. Fi. l. 70.) 



145. 



JIoptH Ihtrloreo, \j 



STYRACACE.E. 
Symplocos tinctoria, i/llor. 

HORSE SUiiAU. SWEET LEAF. 



Southern Delaware to Florida; west to Louisiana an<l Southern Ar- 
kansas. 

A small tree or shrub ; leaves sweet to the taste, greed II3' eateu by 
cattle and horses, and yielding a yellow dye. 



146. 



Halesia diptera, l 



(Jeorgia to Florida, Louisiana, and Southern Arkansas. 
A small tree or shrub. 



141. 



Halesia tetraptera, !■<. 



SNOWDUOr TREE. SILVEUBELL TREE. 



West Virginia to Southern Illinois ; south to Arkansas, Louisiana, 
and Florida ; principally along the southern Alleghany IMountains. 

A small or, in the mountains, niedium-si/ed tree, with a trunk some- 
times exceeding 18 inches in diameter. 



t ' 



■■'- 



*« 
'M 



J 



148. 



/''. acuminata, Lain. 
/''. alba, Mai'Hli. 
F. juglandifoUa, Lam. 
/•'. tpiptera, Michx. r 
/•'. CiirtiHHii, Vasi^v. 



OLEACPLE. 
Fraxinus Americana, Ji. 



WHITE ASH. 



Nova Scotia and Xew Brunswick, to the western shores of Lake Su- 
perior; south to Florida and Louisiana ; west to Eastern Nebraska and 
Kansas. 



'1 
a. 

k 

" 



\^ 



u 



\\ 



Wood 
the man 
Avork, &c 

A tree, 
the first ( 

149. 



I <• !■! 



l':/r| 



I 'i - '' 1 

h : + 



\ 



»--i'. 



Labyrii 

Vorgeu, I 

A sinal 

160. 

Or HH 

A sinal 



151. 



F.pt 
F. gt 



•* ' 



Piiget I 

borhood ( 

Wood'i 

A hirgi 

nia. 

158. 

Soiitlu 
A snm 

Wlu'cler. 1 



m 



F. r 
F.oi 

Ash > 

A sinti 

158. 

F. d 

F. 

Fl 

Ft 

F. I 



South 

and Sou 

A snu 

5 



CATALOGUE OF F0RK8T TREES. 



88 



Wood light, toiigb, very strong, clastic ; extensively employed in 
the manufacture of agricultural iinplenioutH, carriagCH, oars, cabinet 
>vork, &c. 

A tree, GO to 80 feet in height, \\'itli a trunk 4 to feet in diameter ; of 
the first economic value. 

149. Frazinui anomala Torr. 

Watwm, King Kt«i». v. 28'.J. 

Labyrinth Cafion, Colorado Biver, and near Saint George on the fiio 
Vergen, Southern Utah. * 

A small tree, 10 to 20 feet in height. ^ 

180. Frazinui dipetala, Hook & Am. 

Oi'HHt dipctah, Niitt. 

A small tree. Common in California, west of the Sierra Nevada. 

161. FraxinuB Oregana, Ntitt. 

F. pHbeaceiiH, vnr., Hook, Kl. Hor. Am. ii. 51. 
F. gniHdi/oUa, Beiitli. liof. Siilpli. :M. 

OREGON ASH. 

Puget Sound ; south near the coast to Fresno County and the neigh, 
borhood of San Francisco, California. 

Wood 'said to equal that of the- W^hite Ash. 

A large tree in Oregon and Washington Territory, smaller in Califor* 
nia. 

162. Fraxinus pistacinfolia, Ton-. 

Southern and Western Texas, co Ash Creek, Southern Arizona. 

A small tree, "20 feet high, with a diameter of 18 inches." — {Bothrocl^j 

Whoeler. Rep. vi, 18«.) 

var. coriacea, Gruy,Syii.ri.i.74. 

F. veltttiua, Torr. in Emory Rep. 1H4H, 1849. 

F. coriacea, Watson. Am. Nat. vii, a02. Rothrock Wheeler, Rep. vi. 1^6, t. 22. 

Ash Meadows, Nevada, and Sonthcrn Arizona. 
A small tree. 

163. Frazinns platyoarpa, Miilix. 

F. Caroliniana, Lam. 
/'. Americana, Mai>«li. 
F. patlida, Bose. 
F. paueiflora, Nutt. 
F, triptera, Nutt. 

WATER ASH. 

Southeastern Virginia to Florida, near the coast, and west to Louisiana 
and Southern Arkansas; in the West Indies. 
A small tree, 30 to 40 feet in height; in deep river swamps. 
6 









■u 



•■h 



L ? 



I 



i 

,K 



i-n 



■} . 



■I 



'if > ■'■■: 



■', n 



It . .■ : if 



m 



\\ 



'*H' 



tVs.'M. 



f.f>' 



fr- 1> 'T:, i. 



>* -i n ! 



J"! <fc ' i 



no 






i 



,UH;^U-f 



h-' :"\ ►i\"'..' 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES, 



34 



154. Fraxinns pubescens, Lnm. , 

F. Veumtjlvanica, Mai'Hii. 

F. nigra, DuRoi. 

F. tomvntosa, Miclix.f. 

Canada to Florida; west to Dakota; most commftn in the Eastern 
States. 
A medium-sized tree; borders of swamps, and in low ground. 



155. 



Fraxinus sambuoifolia, Lam. 

BLACK ASH. 



Newfoundland to the southern shores of James Bay; south to the 
mountains of Virginia; west to Wisconsin and Arkansas. 

Wood brownish, very tough, elastic; easily separable into thin layers; 
employed in basket-making, &c. 

A smoll or medium-sized tree;jn swamps and along low river banks. 



156. 



Fraxinus quadrangulata, ^liciix. 

BLUE ASH. 



Michigan aiul Wisconsin; south to NovMiern Alabama. 
Wood said to equal that of the White Ash. 
A large tree. 



157. 



Fraxinus viridis, Mkhx.f. 



/•'. coiK'olor, Mull I. 
F. jiiglamUj oUa, Will«l. 
F. ('aroliniana, Willd. f 
/''. expanaa, W'ilhl. 

Canada to Florida; west to Dakota, Texas, and Arizona. 

A small or medium-sized tree; along streams, or in low ground. 

var. Berlandieriana, Omy, Syn. Fi. i.*'). 

/''. lUrlnndiemmt, DC. Prodr. vii.27:5. 

Texas. 



158. 



Chionanthus Virginica, L. 

FRINGK TREE. 



Lancaster County, and banks of the lirandywine, Chester County, 
Pennsylvania; Southern Ohio {Newhvrry), south to Florida and Texas. 
A shrub or snuiU tree, sometimes 20 to M) feet in lieight. 

159. Osmanthus Americanus, n«Mitli. & Hook. 

Oha Americana, L. 

DEVIL WdOU. 

Southeastern Virginia to Florida and Alabama, near the coast. 
Wood exceedingly hard, close-grained, ditticult to split or cut. 
A small tree or shrub. 



HI 

■It 

. I 



■ }: 



I 






ul 



" fi 



• '.5 



* \ 



160. 



*i»i| 



162. 



^iii 



164. 



A m 



CATAI-OGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



35 



160. 



BORRAGINACEiE 
Cordia Boissieri, DC. 



Extreme Southwestern Texas, the adjacent portion of Xew Mexico, 
and in Mexico. ' 

A small tree, I.j to 20 feet in height. 



161 



Cordia Sebestena, L. 



C. »pecio8a, \Vilhl. 



Southern Florida, and in the West Indies. 
A small tree, or often a shrub. 

162. Bourreria Havanensis, Micrs. 

Ehretia Haranen»\H, WilUl. 

B. tomentoaa, var. Havancna'm, Griscb. 

Ehretia lonientosa, Lam. 

Pittonia amilia, Catcsb. 

Ehretia Beurreria, Chapman, [ncjt L. ] 

B. sueculenta, Jacq. 

Florida Keys and in the West Indies. 
A small tree. 

var. radula, Gray, Syii. Fl. i. 181. 

B. radula, Don. 

B. virgata, Griseb. [not Swartz ox Mie)*).] 

Ehretia radiila, Poir. 

Cordia Floridana, Niitt Sylv. ii. 147, 1. 107. 

Keys of Southern Floridji, and in the West Indies. 

163. Ehretia elliptica, DC. 

Texas, (yorpus 0/liristi, and along the valley of the lower Rio Grande. 
A small tree, 20 to 30 feet in height, with a trunk often a foot in 
diameter. 



H 



164. 



BIGNONIACEiE. 
Catalpa bignonioides, Walt. 

Gray, Manual, ,'> e»l., ;{2l, and Syn. Fl. i. :U9, in part. 



Bignonia Catalpa, L. 
C. cordifoUa, Junme. 
C. aynngosfolia, Sims. 

Western Georgia, Florida, and perhaps west to Louisiana. 
Wood very ligUt, close-grained, remarkably durable; its specific grav- 
ity .405; valuable for fence-posts and cabinet work. 
A medium -sized tree. 



Ill 

j4 



M: 



ii. ■ i ' 



\^:M 



I 



M' 



t!| 






• 




'■■''a 








• ,' 


M 








1 






■ 


' 


f 


* * ' 






• 




■■■■'■* 






■ 


"'*• 


1 ^ ; 


"r- 








■ 











CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



36 



165. 



Catalpa speciosa, Wunirr. 

Eiigulin. ill Coult. Bot. fJazotto, v. 1. 
WESTERN CATAT,l»A. 



Southern Indiana and Illinois, AVestern Kentucky and Tennessee, 
Soutlieastcrn Missouri, and possibly southward through Louisiana. 

"Wood rather heavier than that of the last species its, specific grav- 
ity .402; valuable for cabinet work, and almost imperishable when 
placed in contact with the soil; largely employed for railway ties, fence- 
posts, &c. 

A large tree in rich bottom-lands, often 80 feet in height, with a trunk 
4 feet in diameter; one of the most valuable trees of the American 
forest. 



166. 



C. linfaris, DC. 
Bignonia linearin, Cav. 
C. glutinosa, Eiigolin. 



Chilopsis saligna, Dnn. 



DESERT WILLOW. 



Southern Texas to Southern California, and south into Mexico. 
A shrub or small tree, sometimes 20 feet in height; along water 
courses in the dry districts. 



YERBENACEyE. 
167. ' Avicennia nitida, Jacq. 

A. /omeMYosfl, Mpyt'r [not Jacq.] 



A. oblongi/olia, Nutt. ? 



WHITE MANGROVE. 



Southern Florida ; Louisiana, at the mouth of the Mississippi River ; 
and southward to Brazil. 
A small tree; along the sea coast in saline marshes. 



* 



i 

.,1 

t 

t 

if 

M 



POLYGONACE^. 

168. " Cocooloba Floridana, Moisncr. 

C, pairi/oUa, Nutt. [not Poir.] 

PIGEON PLUJL 

Southern Florida; Miami River {Oarher), Key West, &c. 



'• ■ 7*1 



169. 



■f 



!' fNl 



\» 



Soutlie 
West Ind 
Wood 
A larg( 



170. 



Laur 
Laur 
P.Jii 



;Southe; 

Wood 
brilliant ; 
cabinet-iu 

A tree, 
15 to 20 i 



171. 



Laur 
Perai 



^■■1- 



Canads 
sas, and 

Wood 
aromatic 

A tree 
bark, en 
ulant. 
in inipar 

172. 

Orci 
Teh 
Dri 

MOUNTA 

Oregc 

the wes 

Woot 



169. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 

Cooooloba unifera, Jaiq. 

SEA GRAPE. 



87 



Southern Florida, Miami liiver {(/ar6er),Key West; and through the 
West Indies. 
Wood violet-colored, very hard, heavy, valuable for cabinet-making. 
A large tree ; the edible fruit of an agreeable subacid ilavor. 



LAURACE^E. 
170. Fersea Carolinensis, Nees. 

Laurua Borhonka, L. 
Laurua CaroUneims, CatoBb. 
P. liorbomea, Spr. 

RED BAY. 

iSouthern Delaware to Florida and Eastern Texas ; near the coast. 

Wood rose-colored, very durable, strong, comi)act, susceptible of a 
brilliant polish ; formerly somewhat employed in shii)-building and for 
cabinet-making. 

A tree, in the Gulf States, sometimes 70 f6et in height, with a trunk 
15 to 20 inches in diameter. 



171. 



Sassafras officinale, Ncch. 



iMurua Sassafras, L. 
J'ersea Sassafras, Spreng. 



SASSAFRAS. 



Canada and Northern Vermont, to Florida ; west to Missouri, Arkan- 
sas, and Eastern Texas. 

Wood white or reddish, according to soil, light, very durable, slightly 
aromatic. 

A tree, sometimes 50 feet in height ; the roots, and especially their 
bark, enter largely into commerce, and afford a powerful aromatic stim- 
ulant. The oil of sassafras, distilled froia the roots, is largely employed 
in imparting a pleasant flavor to many articles of domestic use. 



172. 



Umbellularia Califomica, Nutt. 



Oreodaphne Califomica, Nees. 
Tetranihera Californica, Hook &. Am. 
Drimyphjfllum paucijioruvi, Niitt. 

MOUNTAIN LAUREL. CALIFORNIA LAUREL. SPICE TREE. CA.TEPUT. 

CALIFORNIA OLIVE. 

Oregon to San Diego, California, in the Coast Ranges, and aloilg 
the western flank of the Sierra Nevada. 
Wood brownish, close-grained, pusceptible of a fine polish, and highly 



^>: 






■>ife 

'(I 

I 






esteemed, 
lor this 
forests. 

In Orej 
leaves vie 



■■\.: 



173. 



Schii'l 



Sonthei 
A shrill 



■■'■>'• 



**|l 




174. 



(I'l/'iii 

Kxrai 



Soutliei 
" Wood 
A siual 



175. 



Sou the 
to the Pi 

Wood 
shades o 
ing. 

A tree 
caustic, 



176. 



r.i 



South 

Territor 

Wooc 

A smJ 



CATALOGUK OF FOREST TREES. 



88 



esteemed, especially that of the roots, for c<al)iiiet-inakiiijj:, and yielding 
for this purpose the most valuable material produced by the Paciflo 
forests. 

In Oregon a tree, 00 to 101) feet in height, smaller in California ; the ' 
k'iivos yield a volatile oil, Orcoihphne (Am. Jomn.of rimnn. xlvii. ior>.) 



173. 



EUPHORBIACE.E. 
Drypetes crocea, Toit. 



Scluvffcria latcnftoiui, Sw. 



Southern Florida, Key West, and through the West Indies. 
A shrub, or on Key West becoming a large tveo (BloAgett). 



174. 



Sebastiania Inoida, Mucil. 



thjmnanthva Uicida, Hw. 
JCxrucaria hicida, Hw. 



POISON WOOD. 



Southern Florida and through the West Indies. 

" Wood yellowish white, hard, and close-grained." — {Xuttall.) 

A small tree. 



175. 



Hippomane Haneinella, L. 

MANCHINEEL. 



Southern Florida, and through the West Indies and Central America 
to the Pacific. 

Wood heavy, durable, close-grained, and beautifully variegated with 
shades of brown, white, and yellow ; highly esteemed for cabinet-mak- 
ing. 

A tree, 30 to 40 feet in height ; abounding in white, milky, exceedingly 
caustic, poisonous sap. 






il 



URTICACE.E. 
176. Ulmns alata, Michx. 

U.pitmila, Nutt. 

WHAHOO. WINGED ELM. SMALL-LEAVED ELM. 

Southern Virginia to Florida ; west to Eastern Nebraska, the Indian 
Territory, and Southwestern Texas. 
Wood hard, compact, unwedgable ; employed for hubs of wheels, &c. 
A small tree, 30 to 40 feet in height. 



177. 



m 



■.'"'T^ 



!.i! 






\ii 



''M 



#!!' 



-.'f .'' 






^IW 



w 



^ I J,l( 



South 
liititudc 
ilia; wes 

Wooil 
ill the ni 

A tree 
generally 



178. 



U. 



Southe 
ritory, ai 
Kiver. 

A 8ina 



171^ 



r. n 



Caiiadi 

iana. 

Wood 1 

A smal 

inner bai 

nal prepa 

130. 






.jiijai 



i[..i 



Provin( 
{Robbintt) 

Wood 
tible of a 
iu the ma 
all purpo: 
solidity. 

A lar|;c 



CATALOOIE OF FOREST TREES. 



89 



177i ^ Ulmni Amerioana, WiiM. 

/' Floriduiin, Cliiipiiiiui. 

WHITE ELM. AMEUICAN ELM. 

Southern Newfoundland, Northern New hruuHwiek, Lake Nipigon (in 
latitude 50° N.), soutk through all the Eastern United States to Flor. 
Ida ; west to Nebraska, Kansas, and Eastern Texas. 

Woo<l bro>vTi, moderately strong, very tough, unweiigablc ; employed 
in the manufacture of hubs, water-pipes, &c. 

A tree 00 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk to feet in diameter ; 
generally in deep, moist soil, or low woods. 

178. UlmUl Onuwifolia, Nutt. TnniH. Am. riiil. 8o<;.(ii. HIT. ) . 
U. ojKua, Nutt. 

Southern and Western Arkansas, adjacent portions of the Indian Ter- 
ritory, and south to Southern Texas, from San Antonio to the Pecos 
River. 

A small tree. 

179. Ulmus fulva, Michx. 

r. rubra, Miclix. f. 

BED ELM. SLIPPERY ELM. :M00SE ELM. 

Canada to Florida, west to Eastern Nebraska, Arkansas, and Louis- 
iana. * 

Wood reddish, hard, heavy, very tough, durable. 

A small or medium-sized tree ; along streams and in low woods ; the 
inner bark mucilaginous, and extensively employed in various medici- 
nal preparations. 






3 
i 



in 

J-ri 






m 

11. 'OM 



130. 



Ulmns racemosa, ThoiuuH. 

KOCK ELM. AMERICAN CORK ELM. 



Province of Onttirio, south to Kentucky. an<l from Western Vermont 
{Robhins) to Eastern Nebraska. 

Wood fine-grained, compact, flexible, very lieavj, strong, suscep- 
tible of a beautiful polish ; its specific gravity .832 ; largely employed 
in the manufacture of heavy agricultural implements, furniture, and for 
all purposes rcipiiring a material combining strength, toughness, and 
solidity. 

A large tree; of the Hrst economic value. 



181 



P. ( 
r. u 

J HOI 



Capo 1 
Moridu ii 

A 811)11 

182. 



^ 1' » » 1 • 



H*' 



Near C 



>'.r 



183. 



C. o<; 
C. la 
('. Oct 
V. ini 
C. loi 



Valley 
tiu^ky, 8(»i 
A larjrt' 




m 



,»,»., 



;H'^»V« 



184. 



C. trt 
C. occ 



Northoi 
tlie Indiai 

\Voo<l V 
m a 8ubst 

A small 

Th« liinitt 
nttt>ntiou of 
iiiid I'Hpnciiil 
iiivi'Htigutiu 



li'- 1: 



liH 



I:) M. 



■■.■^'■\ '.p.. 



ih .-l 



iiH' 



186. 



Cellh 



In the V 
crri New J 



181 



CATALOaUK OF FOREST TREKS. 

Planen aquatioa, Omci. 



40 



P.ulmiMla.MU'hx.f. 
' Auonymon atiiiatira, Wiilt. 



PLANER TUKK. 



Cape Fear River, North Carolina, and Sontliorn Kentucky, south to 
riorida and LouiHiaiui. 
A small tree, 'M) to 50 I'ect in hui}{ht; alunj; streams. Itare. 



M 



Celtit brevipes, WutNou Prof. Am. Acn<l. xiv. wn7. 
IJothrink, \Vlu'»«h«r R<i». vi.'^;W. 



Near Cami) CJrant, Houthern- Arizona {Kothrock). 

"A small tree, becoming 20 feet high and IS incites in diameter.'' 



183. 



Celtis Mississippiensis, Konc 



C. ocrUkntalh, \av, IvHiiifoUa, Prrs. 

C. Uvrigahi.WiM. 

I'. occUkntuliit, vnr. iiUvtjriJ'oliu, Nntt. 

C, itileffrifolitt, Xiitt. 

C. longij'olia, Niitt. 

Valley of the Mississippi Hiver, from Southern Missouri and Ken- 
tn<!ky, south and southw(>stwar<l to Eastern Texas. 
A large tree. 

184. Celtis ocoidentalis, t.. 

C. tranni/oHii, l.niii. 

C. occldeiilulii, var. rrnnHi/oHa, (Jniy. 

SU(}Att BERRY. HACKllERRV. FALSE ELM. 

Northern Vermont, south to Western Florida, and west to Nebraska, 
the Indian Territory, and Texas. 

Wood white, soft, and ju'obably of little valuej somewhat employed 
as a substitute for American elm. 

A small, or, at the West, often a very large tree. 

Tht) liinitH of tluM iiiul tlio liiHt Hpocies iir«<i not y«>t HiitiHt'actorily tloHiied, iiiul the 
nttciititiii of Ainuricnn botuiiistH is called to tlie importance of Htu«lyin)r in the field, 
iind cHpeeially in tho valley of the MiNHiKsi])]>i, this ditticnlt gennH, to which fnrther 
invcHtigation may r«'store one «»r possibly two HpecicM, or rednce it even still further. 



1| 






■ ''ill 



i■^^l 



,. ''.'IT 






« - , ■■'.>■ 

1 :M 
It F'/ I 



"^m 



185. ^ Celtis Tala, Gillies, var. pallida, Planch. 

DC. Prodr. xvii. 19L 
Cetlia (MomiHia) pallida, Torr. Hot. Mex. Hound. 203, t. 50. 

In the valley of the lower Kio Grande, and westward through South- 
ern New Mexl(!0 to Sonora; and in Southern Florida {Qarber, 1879). 



■m 



i 



:..i •}'•,- 



/ 



iMii' ■' "l^ 



186. 



187. 



188. 



*! ■190. 



191. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



41 



Generally a shrub, C to 10 feet iu height; but as seen by Dr. Garber 
iu Southern Florida, a small tree, sometimes 20 feet in height. 

186. Ficus aurea, Nutt. 

Southern Florida, Key West, Indian liivev {Palmer), Mvdmi {Oarber) 
A large tree. 

187. Ficns brevifolia, Nutt. 

Southern Florida, Key West, Miami {Oarber). 
A small tree. 



188. 



Picas pedunottlata, Ait. 



Southern Florida, and common in the West Indies. 
A large tree. 



189. 



if. Canailensia, Lam. 



Moms rubra, L. 

RED MULBERRY. 



Western Vermont, Western Massachusetts, Long Island, New York, 
and south to Florida; west to Dakota, Kansas, Western Texas, New 
Mexico, and Chihuahua. 

Wood yellowish, heavy, exceedingly durable; valuable for posts, tree- 
nails, &c. ; formerly somewhat employed in ship-building. 

A small or medium-sized tree, sometimes 70 feet in height, with a 
trunk 2 feet in diameter, or in the far Southwest reduced to a shrub; 
the large, dark purple fruit sweet and edible. 



190. 



Maolara aurantiaca, Nutt. 

OSAGE ORANGE. BOIS D'ARC. 



Southwestern Missouri, south to Natchitoches County, Louisiana, and 
west into the Indian Territory and Eastern Texas. 

Wood yellow, solid, heavy, elastic, exceedingly durable; valuable for 
constniction, railway ties, fence posts, &c. 

A mediiim-si/ed tree, sometimes 50 to 60 feet in height, with a trunk 
2 to 3 feet in diameter. Very common, aiul attaining its greatest perfec- 
tion in the rich bottom lands of the Ked and Kiamesua liivers ; now 
extensively planted as a hedge plant, especially in the Western States. 






:ic':.:^ 






PLATANACE.E. 
191. Platanus oooidentalis, L. 

AMERICAN PLANE TREE. SYCAMORE. RUTTONWOOD. 

Along the northern shores of Lakes Ontario and Erie in the Province 
of Ontario; Northern Vermont, Southern Maine, Eastern New Hamp- 
6 



•III 



I 



\ \ 



192. 



V >'. 



193. 



1 


*",. 


P 


« 


;^'JfU 


1 


.''W 




i 


-1 ]f ^ 




''V 


i 


• ,; 




f' 


* ^, 


t 



' ■ '■; 



■.*i.. 



194. 



196. 



»:w: 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



42 



sliire, .and Massacliusetts; south to Florida; west to Eastern Nebraska, 
Kansas, and Texas (Devil River Valley, Bigeloic). 

Wood not durable when exposed to the weather, reddish, close-grained, 
liable to warji, very unwedgable. 

The largest tree of the Atlantic forests, reaching its greatest dimen- 
sions in the rich bottom lands bordering the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, 
where specimens occur 80 to 100 feet in height, with trunks 10 to 14 feet 
in diameter. 



192. 



Platanus racemosa, Nutt. 



Sacramento Valley to Southern California and Arizona. 
Wood said to be more valuable than that of the last species. 
A large tree, sometimes 100 feet in height. 



-Si;! 

:4 



if . 



'*■;; 



193. 



Platanus Wrightii, Watson, Proc. Am. Afjul. x. 34y. 



In Southeastern Arizona, near the San Pedro River. 
A large tree ( Wright). 



■ ■^' '4 



JUGLANDACE^. 



194. Jaglans Califomica, Wataou, Proc. Am. Acad. X. 349. 

J. ritpextris, var. major, Torr. in Sitgr. Rep, 171, 1. 16. 

Valley of the Sacramento River, and in the neighborhood of San Fran- 
cisco, California ; eastward through Southern Arizona, New ^Mexico ; and 
in Sonora. 

A large slirub, or sometinies a tree 40 to GO feet in height. 



$M 



195. 



Jnglans cinerea, L. 



J. ohhmja, Mill. 

J. catltartka, Micb. f. 



BUTTERNUT. WHITE WALNUT. 

Northern shores of Lakes Erie and Ontario, Northern Vermont; south 
to Northern Alabama, and west to Missouri and Arkansas. Rare at the 
South, except along the mountains. 

Wood brownish, light, soft, easily worked, susceptible of a beautiful 
polish, very durable; extensively used in cabinet-making. 

A small or medium-sized tree ; a tincture used as a cathartic is pre- 
pared from the inner bark, which also yields a valuable dye. 









196. 



MM 



■\ \ 



V 3> 



Soutliei 

80Uth to ] 
tory, and 

Wood ( 
polish, ve 
cabinet-Ill 

A tree, 
tlie first e 
of the U 
scarce. 

197. 



•i:t. 



Devil's 
Arizona. 
A sijrul 



':■* 



198. 



Canada 
Northern 

Wood 
valuable i 
manufacti 
si>eciflc gi 

A medi 
in diamet 
the most 

Carya t 
tion be f 
occurs frc 
of Georgi 



199. 



Jugia 
JugUi 



Canada 
em Nebn 

Wood ^ 
and in ev 

A smal 
thin-shell 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



43 



196. 



Juglans nigra, L. 

BLACK WALNUT. 



Southern portions of the Province of Ontario, Western Vermont; 
isouth to Florida ; west to Eastern Nebraska, Kansas, the Indian Terri- 
tory, and Eastern Texas. 

Wood dark brown, light, soft, easily worked, susceptible of a beautiful 
l)olish, very durable ; its specirtc gravity .577 ; more extensively used iu 
cabinet-making and for gun-stocks than that of any other American tree. 

A tree, 60 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk 4 to G feet in diameter; of 
the first economic value. Rare at the east ; most common in the valley 
of the [Mississippi and its tributaries ; but now everywhere becoming 
scarce. 



19f. 



Juglans rupestris, Engi^im. 

Bot. Sitgr. Rep. 171, 1. 15. 



Devil's River, Western Texas ; Southern Arizona, and Walnut Grove^ 
Arizona. 
A shrub, or small tree, sometimes 20 feet in height. 



•III 



»?■ 



i:^ 



■'if 4, 



■ : ■■•■ ft 



im 



Carya alba, Nutt. 

SHELL-BARK HICKORY. SHAG-BARK HICKORY. 



Canada ; York County, Maine, to the upper districts of Georgia, and 
Northern Alabama ; west to Eastern Nebraska, Kansas, and Arkansas. 

Wood very heavy, strong, tenacious, elastic; furnishing the most 
valuable fire- wood of the Atlantic forests ; extensively employed in the 
manufacture of agricultimil implements, carriages, baskets, &c. ; its 
specific gravity .838. 

A medium-sized tree, 50 to 70 feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 5 feet 
in diameter ; of the first economic value, producing, next to the Pecan, 
the most highly esteemed of North American nuts. 

Carya microcarpa {iintt. Gen. ii. SJ21), will probably on further investiga- 
tion be found not specificallj' distinct from this species, with which it 
occurs from Pennsylvania and Delaware, south to the upper districts, 
of Georgia. 

199. Carya amara, Nutt. 

Juglans angustifolln^ Lam. Di<t iv. ,<04. 



Juglans. amara, Michx. 

BITTER NUT. SWAMP HICKORY. 



WHITE HICKORY. 



Canada and Northern Vermont, sovith to Florida, and west to East- 
ern Nebraska, Kansas, and Eastern Texas. 

Wood with the general characteristics of the last species, but lighter, 
and in every way less valuable. 

A small or medium-sized tree ; genersilly iu low grounds ; the nut 
thin-shelled, exceedingly bitter, not edible. 



f-fe 






i ; ' t 



;(- V ii'ir,';;' 



200. 



Jnglan 



♦••If 



\( -f^ 



'*m 



North Cj 
Southern i 

Wood pi 
species of 

A small 



201. 



Juglan 



t^ 



V > 






" South 

{Bavenel), 

A small 



202. 



Juglan 
Juglan 
Juglan 
C. glal 



Canada 

Eastern T 

Wood V 

A large 



WESTEB 

Lancast 

Heart w 

A large 

tains; mo 

thick-shell 



£•<•< * 



mPSt' 




Canada 
ern Nebra 
Wood r 
A medi 
of stream 
large, thii 
Biver, Ne 



200. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 

Carya aquatica, Nutt. 



44 



v' 



JuglattH aqtiatica, Miclix. 



WATER HICKORY. 



North Carolina, in the low districts, to Florida, and Alabama ; and in 
Southern Arkansas ? 

Wood probably of little value in comparison with that of the other 
species of the genus. 

A small tree, 30 to 50 feet in height ; in low swamps. 

201. Carya myristioeeformis, Nutt. 

Juglana myristicwformia, Miclix. 

NUTMEa HICKORY. 

"South Carolina, at Goose Greek" {Michaux), " Berkeley District " 
{Ravenel), and in Western L(»uisiana. 
A small tree ; in swamps or low ground. 



202. 



Carya porcina, Nutt. 



Juglana glabra, Wang. 
Juglana porcina, Miclix.f. 
Juglana obeordata, Willd. 
C. glabra, Torv. & Gray. 

PIG NUT. BROWN HICKORY. 

Canada to Southern Florida, west to Eastern Nebraska, Kansas, and 
Eastern Texas. 
Wood very similar to that of Carya alba. 
A large or medium-sized tree j in dry uplands. 

203. Carya sulcata, Nutt. 

WESTERN SHELL-BARK HICKORY. THICK SHELL-BARK HICKORY. 

Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and west to Eastern Kansas. 
Heart wood lighter colored, but similar to that of Carya alba, 
A large tree in rich bottom lands. Eare east of the Alleghany Moun- 
tains; more common in the valley of the Mississippi Eiverj the large 
thick-shelled nuts sweet and edible. 



204. 



Carya tomentosa, Nutt. 

MOCKER NUT. WHITE-HEART HICKORY. 



Canada and Northern New England, south to Florida ; west to East, 
ern Nebraska and Arkansas. 

Wood resembling that of the last species. 

A medium-sized tree ; in dry uplands, or more rarely along the banks 
of streams in deep and often submerged soils ; a fine variety, bearing 
large, thin-shelled, valuable nuts, is known in the valley of the Genesee 
River, New iTork, as " King Nut." 






■AM 



:-rm 



', H 



^u'm 



' ',("1 



v\ 



S205. 



Sacraniei 
A shrub 
with a diam 



I 



^m 



' S'f -' 



206. 



Californij 
occasional!; 

<*A large 
to 21 feet, 
a spread o: 
occurring a 



207. 



Southwei 
latitude of 
the northei 
Florida, an 

Wood li^ 
ity .662; h 
cabinet-ma] 
preferred t( 
I'acture of i 
piles, posts 

A large i 
eter; of th 
American < 



208. 



Marylan 

Eastern Te 

AVood toi 

A small 1 

ponds. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



45 



205. 



MYRICACEiE. 
Myrioa Californioa, chum. &. Bchl. 



Sacramento River, Califoruia, north to Washington Territory. 
A shrub or small tree, "sometimes attaining a height of 30 to 40 feet, 
with a diameter at base of two feet or more." — ( Watson, Bot. Cal. il. 81, ined. 



206. 



CUPULIFP:RiE. 
Quercns agrifolia, N^«. 

ENCENO. 



California, near the coast, principally south of San Francisco, and 
occasionally reaching Mendocino County. 

"A large tree, with a stout, low trunk, often 8 to 12 feet, sometimes 16 
to 21 feet, in circumference (base of Monte Diablo, Bretcer), and with 
a spread of branches of 120 feet" — {Engelm. in Bot. Cal. ii. 98, jjierf.); also 
occurring as a small shrub. 



i 



m 



W 






."•tU 



- ' "^rl 



207. 



Quercns alba, L. 

WHITE OAK. 



Southwestern Nova Scotia, Southern New Brunswick, Canada in the 
latitude of Quebec (rare), and west along the Manitoulin Islands, and 
the northern shore of Lake Michigan to Wisconsin ; south to Northern 
Florida, and west to Western Missouri, Arkansas, and Eastern Texas. 

Wood light-colored, strong, heavy, elastic, durable; its specific grav- 
ity .662; largely employed in ship-building, construction of all sorts, 
cjibinet-making, cooi>erage, for which inirpose and basket-making it is 
preferred to all other American woods ; also very largely in the manu- 
facture of agricultural implements, carriages, &c., and for railway ties, 
piles, posts, and fuel. 

A large tree, 60 to SO feet in height, with a trunk 6 to 8 feet in diam* 
eter; of the very first economic value, and superior to all other North 
American Oaks in the quality and value of Hs wood. 



208. 



Quercns aqnatica, Nutt. 

WATER OAK. 



Maryland, and Sebastian County, Arkansas, south to Florida and 
Eastern Texas. 

AVood tough, but probably of little value. 

A small tree, 30 to 50 feet in height; in low ground, along streams and 
ponds. 



■'■■.•'•■*l 


















m> 



V. I'liiu 
Q. I'riiti 



Caiinda, I 

erii Stat«!.s. 

Kastern Ne 

qiicreux). 
WikmI sai 
A large t 

feet in oin; 

and along is 

vai 

Q. Prhn 
(^K Milk 

From Del 
In low gi 



lis 



•a* 



■m 

m.. 



y 



m 



210. 



TURK 



North Ca 

A small 1 

rons, uejxr t 



211. 



Q. Phch 



North Ca 
A small 
the bark yii 



212. 



Q. fuh'f 

(jl. C»'(I8« 



Californii 
the Sierra ] 

A large t 
to a shrill 
racclniifolk 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



46 



mod. Querons bioolor, Wiiia. 

(^K I'lhiiiH, vnr. tomvntonn, MivliK. 
Q. I'riiiun, viir. dhcolor, Miolix.l'. 

S\VAM1» WIUTK OAK. 

Ciiiiada, Xorthern Vermout, aiul AViscoiisin, Houth through tho North- 
ern Stjit«^s. Jiiul along tho Alleghany Moiintain.s to Georgia; west to 
Kiistern Nebraska and Arkan.sai!i ("bottoms of tho Washita llivor," Leu- 
quereux). 

Wood said to equal that of the White Oak. 

A largo tree, with a trunk sometimes, although rarely, exceeding 30 
fet't in circumference ("Wadsworth oak," ireneseo, N. Y.) ; in swamxis 
and along streams, in deep alluvial soil. 

Var. Michauxii, En^fclm. Trans. St. Louis Acad. iii. IVJO. 
(|>. il/jV/jflMjrJi, Niitt. 

From Delaware and Southern Illinois, south to Northern Florida. 
In low ground. 



s 



• '< 



■'•■' "'! 



■■■" * "'^ 

- . ■* 'I 



210. Querous Catesbeei, Michx. 

TURKEY DAK. SCRUB OAK. FORKED-LEAF BLACK JACK. 

North Carolina to Florida and Southern Alabama. 
A small tree, rarely exceeding 25 feet in height; only in sandy bar- 
rens, near the coa.st. 






211. Querons cinerea, Ukhx. 

Q. PlicUoH, var, cinereH, Spacli. 

UPLAND WILLOW OAK. BLUE JACK. 

North Carolina to Florida and Eastern Texas, near the coast. 
A small tree, rarely exceeding 30 feet in height; in sandy barrens; 
the bark yielding a yellow dye. 

212. Quercus chrysolepis, Litbin. 

(^. falrcHcens, KeUoffff. 
Q. craaaipoculu, Torr. 

CALIFORNIA LIVE OAK. 

California, in the Coast Eanges and along the western slopes of 
the Sierra Nevada. 
A large tree, 3 to 5 feet in diameter; or, at higher elevations, reduced 

to a shrub, [var. f vaccinufolia, Eugclm. Traus. St. Louis Acad. iii. 393. Q. 

vacciniifoliay Kellogg]. 



:''§■ 




■'M 


i^ 



.--^. 










IMAGE EVALUATION 
TEST TARGET (MT-3) 







1.0 



1.1 



11.25 



>tt liii 12.2 

Hf lag ■" 

!!f us. 12.0 







Sciences 
Corporalion 



^ 




S3 WIST MAIN STRUT 

WMSTIR.N.'' I49M 

(716)«72-4S03 



^^^*/^ 

v^" 



^ *^% 



5r 



^ 



K^ 









1 


uH 


h 


^8 


f' 




§ 1. 


^fi 


i '; 




1 


^Mni^t'' 




1 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



47 



213. 



QneroiM ooocinea, Wang. 

SCARLET OAK. 



Eastern Massachusetts, southward near the coast, in light sandy soils ; 
and in Minnesota {Engelmann). 

The raugo of this specieH, ofteii coufonndc-d with the foriito of Q. tinctoria with 
deoply-ciit loaves, is still obscure, and especially deserves the atteutiou of boti> niats. 



! ij 






214. 



Qnerciu densiflora, Hook. & Am. 



Q. vehittaocn, Torr. 



California, '^ from the Santa Lucia Mountains {Palmer), through the 
Coast lianges, and especially among the Bed Woods, to the Shasta 
region. 

" A pretty large tree, 50 to 60, or rarely 80, feet high (Santa Cruz 
Mountains, Brewer), and a foot or two in diameter; often a mere shrub, 
5 to 7 feet h\g\i.'^—{Enge1m. inBot.Cal.ii.99,ii«"<f.) 



215. 



Qnerciu Douglasii, Hook. & Am. 

MOUNTAIN WHITE OAK. BLUE OAK. 



California, '' in dry foothills of the Coast Banges, from Monte Diablo 
and Mount Oso to Sacramento Valley. 

" It resembles a middle-sized White Oak of the Eastern States in 
its size, pale, scaly bark, and quality of its timber. The largest tree 
seen by Professor Brewer has a circumference of 7 feet." — {Engelm. 
in Hot. Cal. ii. 9.5, hied.) 



216. 



Queront domosa, Nutt. 



Q. berberidifolia, Liebm. 
Q. acHtidens, Torr. 



California, ^'common in the ca&ons and on the arid sloi)es of the Coast 
Ranges from San Diego to San Francisco Bay; the variety (var. bullata, 
Eugeliu) in the Santa Lucia Mountains {Brewer) and northward to Lake 
County {Dr. Torrey)."" — {Engelmann in Bot.Cal.ii.96,iwe<f.) 



217. 



ttneroTU Emoryi, Torn 



Q. hattata, Liebni. 



Comal County, Texas, through Southern New Mexico to Bocky Caflon, 
Arizona {Rothrock). 
A small tree, or often a shrub. 




218. 



219. 



220. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 48 

218. Qnercns faloata, Michx. y 

Q. elongata, Willil. 

Q, discolor, var. foliata, Spach. 

Q. triloba, Michx. 

Q, falcata, var. triloba, DC. 

SPANISH OAK. 

New Jersey to Missouri, and south to Florida and Eastern Texas ; 
most common in the Southern Atlantic States, where in the middle dis- 
trict it is the most prevalent forest tree. 

Wood reddish, coarse-grained, not durable, of little value ; somewhat 
employed in cooperage. 

A large tree, often 80 feet in height, with a trunk 4 to 5 feet in diam- 
eter ; its bark rich in tannin. 



219. 



Q. Neivi, Liebm. 



QaercuB Oarryana, Dougi. 



Vancouver Island and British Columbia, south to San Francisco Bay, 
near the coast. 

Wood hard, brittle, probably of little value. 

A large tree, 70 to 100 feet in height ; extending farther north than 
any oak of the Tacific forest. 






il 



220. Quercus heterophylla, Michx. 

Q. aquatica, var. heterophylla, DC. 

Q. I'hellos X cocviuea, Eugelm. Trans. St. Louis Acad. iii. 385, 391, 541. 

New Jersey, near Camden, Haddonfield, Mount Holly, and in Cape 
May County; Delaware, near Townsend Station and Wilmington; 
North Carolina {M. A. Curtis in Herb. Canby.) ; Eastern Texas {E. 
Hall). 

A small tree, of uncertain origin. 



221. Qnerous hypoleuca, Engeim. 

Q. confertifolia, Torr. "Bot. Mex. Bound. 207 [not HBK]. 

" Sanoita Valley, Southern Arizona, at 7,000 feet altitude {Rothrocky 
1874 ) ; also found in the San Francisco Mountains. 

" A very conspicuous and as yet little known species, which Dr. Roth- 
rock found 30 feet in height and 1 foot in diameter." — {Engeim, 
in Wheeler Rep. vi. 251.) 

222. Q^ercus imbrioaria, Michx. 

SHINGLE OAK. LAUREL OAK. 

New Jersey, south along the Alleghany Mountains, and in the upper 
districts to Georgia; west to Wisconsin and the Indian Territory. 



Woodl 

A small 

Alleghan; 

223. 

Q.ru 
Q. tin 
Q. So 

Galifori 
Sierra Nc 
fornia oal 

A large 



224. 



Q, aq 
Q. Pi 



North ( 
A larg( 



Q.S 

Califor 
foothills; 
inonntaiT 

'*A vasi 
with a wj 
the grou] 

"Thev 



ov 

North 
Arkansa: 

Wood 
of Q. all 

A larg 



Q.O 
B 

Ganadi 
vania: w 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



49 



Wood hard aud heavy, but probably of little value except as fuel. 
A small tree, sometimes 53 feet in height. Most commou west of the 
Alleghany Mountains. 

223. QuerOOl Xelloggii, Newberry, Piicif. R. Rep. vi. 286, 6. 

Q. mfcra, Benth. PI. Hartw. 337. 



(J. tinotoria, var. C'al{fornioa, Torr. 

V. Sonomenaia, Benth. ; DC. Prodr. xvi>. 62. 



S'- 



California, in the Coast Ranges, and along the western slopes of the 
Sierra Nevada, reaching a higher elevation than any other of the Gali- 
fornia oaks. 

A large tree, or often at high elevations reduced to a small shrub. 

224. Qaercns lanrifoUa, Miolix. 

Q. aquatiea, vat. laurifoliaf DC. |, 

Q. Pkelloa, var. laiiri/olia, Chap. 

LAUREL OAK. ' 

North Carolina, in the middle and lower districts, south to Florida. 
A largo tree. 



Qaerous lobata, N^e. 

Q. i/ind»ti, Bentli. Bot. Sulpb. 55. 

^. itatwomi, Kellogg, Proc. Calif. Acad. i. 25 r 

California, "common throughout the State, in the plains or in the 
foothills; or in the southern part of the State somewhat higher in the 
mountains. 

"A majestic tree, sometimes 15 to 20 feet in girth, 100 feet high, and 
with a wider spread of branches" {Brewer)^ which often hang down to 
the ground. 

"The wood is said to be brittle." {Engelm. Bot. Cal. ii. 95, wed.) 

226. Qneroni lyrata, Walt. 

OVER-CUP OAK. SWAMP POST OAK. WATER WHITE OAK. 

North Carolina and the valley of the lower Ohic ; south to Florida, 
Arkansas (rare), and Eastern Texas. 

Wood moderately compact and resembling, though inferior to, that 
of Q. alba. 

A large tree; in deep and often submerged swamps. Not common* 

227. ' Qneroni maorocarpa, Michx. 

Q. olii'te/ormiB, Michx. 

Q. macrocarpa, var. oUvw/ormia, Gray. 

BURR OAK. MOSSY-CUP WHITE OAK. OVER-CUP OAK. 

Canada and Northern Vermont, south to Lancaster County, Pennsyl. 
vania; west to Wisconsin, Eastern Nebraska, and Kansas. 

7 



I 



I 






! as 



Wood ] 

A Iarg( 

diameter. 

228. Qa< 

Q. cfl 
V. Pi 

Perrysl 
Kiver, La 
Arkansas 
Mountain 

Wootl 
posts, &c 

A smal 



229. 



Q. ni, 



Long I 
braska, tl 

A smal 
soil. 

230. 



Mounts 
geles; an 

" The T 
feet in d 
{Engelm.j 

2dL 



Wester 

Island, ai 

Wisconsii 

Wood < 

A medi 

238. 



Long Ii 
andfh>m 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



50 



'i 



Wood probably of little valae, except as ftiel. 
A large tree, GO to 80 feet in height, with a trunk 4 to over 8 feet in 
diameter. Not common east of the Alleghany Mountains. 

228. Qaeroui Mohlenbergii, Engelm. Trana. St. Louis Acad. iii. 391. 

Q. matanea, Miihl. ap. Willd. 
V. PriHUH, var. acuminata, Micbx. 

Perrysburg, Vermont, near Newburg, New York, on the Gonestoga 
Kiver, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and west to Eastern Nebraska, 
Arkansas, and the Indian Territory. Very common west of the Alleghany 
Mountains, and extending south to Western Florida and Mississippi. 

Wood compact, strong, very durable ; largely used for railway ties, 
posts, &c. 

A small or medium-sized tree. 



A; 



Querouinigra, L. 

Q. ferruffiHea, Michx.f. ^^■ 

Q. qmnqneloba, 'Eiige\m. 

Q. nigra, var. quinqneloha, A.DC. 

BLACK JAOK OAK. BABBEN OAK. 

Long Island, New York, south to Florida, and west to Eastern Ne- 
braska, the Indian Territory, and Eastern Texas. 

A small tree, mrely exceeding 25 feet in height ; in gravelly, barren 
soil. 



230. 



Qneroni oblongifolia, Torr. 

EYEBOBEEN WHITE OAK. LIVE OAK. 



Mountains of Southwestern Calitbruia, from San Diego to Los An- 
geles; and in Chihuahua. 

" The wood is said to be hard, but brittle. A beautiful tree, 2 to 2^ 
feet in diameter {Brewer)y with the aspect of the eastern Live Oak." 

{Engelm., Bot. Cal. ii. 97, iued.) 



23L 



Qnerons palnitrii, DuRoK 

PIN OAK. SWAMP SPANISH OAK. 



Western Massachusetts ? {Emerson), New Haven, Connecticut, Long 
Inland, and south to the District of Columbia ; west and southwest to 
Wisconsin, Eastern Nebraska, Kansas, and Eastern Texas. 

Wood coarse-grained, moderately strong, not durable. 

A medium-sized tree ; in low ground. 



m 



"V, 



"^I 



1*1 



232. 



Qneroni Phelloi, l. 

WILLOW OAK. 



Ijong Island, New York, south to Florida, generally near the coast ; 
and fh)m Kentucky to Alabama, Arkansas, and Eastern Texas. 



888. 



884. 



885. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



61 



Wood reddish, coarse-grained, not durable; sometimes used for the 
fellies of wheels, but of little alae. 

A medium-sized tree; generally along the borders of swamps, in low, 
cool situations. 

883. Queroni Prinus, L. 

Q, PHhiu, var. montiatla, Michx. 



Q. montana, Willd. 

CHESTNUT OAK. 



ROCK CHESTNUT OAK. 



Vermont, shores of Lake Ghamplain, to the valley of the Oenesee River, 
Livingston County, New York; south through the whole length of the 
Alleghany Mountains, and rarely eastward to the coast; in the mountains 
of Kentucky and Tennessee. 

Wood reddish, porous, strong, somewhat employed in construction, 
cooperf <;c, &c., although inferior to white oak. 

A large or medium-sized tree. 



/', 



834. 



Qnereui rubra, L. 

RED OAK. 



y\ 



Northern Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, valley of the Saint Lawrence, 
northern shore of Lake Huron, western shore of Lake Superior, south to 
Florida, and Eastern Texas ; the most widely distributed of the North 
American oaks, extending farther north than any sxtecies of the Atlantic 
forests. 

Wood varying remarkably in different localities; at the east reddish, 
porous, light, not durable, principally employed in cooperage; In North- 
ern Wisconsin and Minnesota heavier, durable, compact, and quite gen> 
erally used in construction. 

A large tree. Very common in all rich woodlands. 



835. 



Qnercoi itellata, Wang. 



Q. obittniloba, Michx. 
Q. DuraHdii f , Buckley. 



POST OAK. 



Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, south to Florida; west to Missouri, 
Nebraska, Kansas, and Eastern Texas. 
Wood resembling and probably equaling that of Q. alba, 
A small or medium-sized tree, rarely exceeding 50 feet in height. 

836. Queroni tinetoria, Bartram. 

Q. nigra, Marsh, [not L.] 

Q. veltttina, Lara. 

Q, ctK-ciitea, var. tinetoria, Gray. 

BLACK OAK. YELLOW-BARKED OAK. 

Canada and Northern New England, south to Tallapoosa County, 
Alabama, and west to Wisconsin, Eastern Nebraska, and Eastern Kan- 
sas (rare). 



:i 



.M 




Us?. 



338. 



239. 



CATALOOUE OF FOREST TREES. 



52 



Wood closo-^rained, Htroug, durable, and probably superior to that of 
the other North American Black Oaks ; employed in the manufacture of 
carriages, cooperage, construction, &c. 

A large tree, 80 to 100 feet in height, with a trunk often 4 to 5 feet in 
diameter; the bark rich in tannin ; the intensely bitter inner bark yields 
A valuable yellow dye. Very common in all the Atlantic forests. 



^1, 



Qneroni Tmdnlata, 'ton. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SCBUB OAK. 



Eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado fVom Denver south< 
ward, through New Mexico into Western Te:^a8 ; west through Utah 
aid Arizona into Southern California. 

A small tree, or otten a shrub running into innumerable forms, of 
Wiich the best marked are: 

Tur. Oambelii, Endolm. {Q. Oambelii, Nutt., and Q. Drummondiif Liebm.). 

yar. Jameiii, Engeim. ■ ^ 

▼ar. Wrightii, Eiigoim. 

▼ar. breviloba, Kugeim. {Q. obtusiloba, var. breviloba, Torr. ; Q. 8an 
Sabtana^ Buckley f ). 

nx. oblongata, Engclm. {Q. oblongifolifij Torr. in Bot. Mex. Bound. 306 [not 
Bot. atgr.]) 

nr. griiea, Engeim. (Q. grisea^ Liebm.). 
vir. pnngeni, Eugelm. {Q.pungens, Liebm.). 

See Ingelmann in Trans. St. Louis Acad. iii. 372, 'Mi, 392, and Bot. Cal. ii. 96, in«d 






838. 



Qaeroos yirens, Ait. 



Q seiiipervireM, Ait. 

Q oleoidet, Cham. &. Schl. 

Q.retuta, Liebm. 



LIVE OAK. 



Mob Jack Bay, Virginia, south to Florida, near the coast; west 
along tie Gulf coast to Mexico; in Texas penetrating to the high plateaa 
north o- San Antonio {Engelmann in PI. Lindh. ii. 237), where it might 
without fruit be easily confounded with Q. Emoryi. 

Woo4 yellowish, very heavy, compact, fine-grained, strong, and dura 
ble ; laigely employed in ship-building, for which purpose it is preferred 
to all other North American woods. 

A tree, 50 to 60 feet in height, with a trunk 4 to 7 feet in diameter; of 
the flnt economic value; or reduced to a shrub (var. maritima and den- 
tatttf Clapmau; Q. maritima, Wilid.); the bark rich in tannin. 

839. Qneroat Witliseni, A.DC. 

Q. Jorehut, Kellogg. 

Califonia, "common in the valleys and in the lower mountains 
throughoit the State, and ascending into the Sierra Nevada.'' The 



wi 



/ 






CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



53 



variety {var.frutescens, Engeim.) is the " Desert Oak*'* of the southeastern 
desert region, ranging northward to Mount Shasta. 

"A magnificent tree, with very dense dark-green and shining foliage; 
sometimes 10 to 12 and even 18 feet in circumference (Shasta, Brewer)y 
and 50 to 60 feet high." {Engeim. in Bot. Cal. ii. 98, ined.) 

The following Korth American shrubby species do not properly find 
a place in this catalogue: 

Q. Breweri, Engeim. in Bot. Cal. ii. 96, ined. {Q. lohata^ var. fruticosay 
Engeim.) Western slopes of high Sierra Nevada, California. 

d Oeorgiana, M. A. Curtis. Stone Mountain, Georgia. 

Q. myrtifolia, WiUd. {Q. PhelloSj var. arenaritty Chapman). 

Q. aqnatioa, var. myrtifolia, a.dg. Sea coast, South Carolina to 
Florida. 

a ilioifolia, Wang. {Q. Banisteri, Michx.). New England to Ohio and 
southward. 

d. prinoidM, Willd. (Q. Prinus pumila, Michx.; Q. Prinua Chinquapin f 
Michx. f., A.DC. ; Q. Chinquapin, Puroh .). New England to Arkansas. 

d pumila, Nutt. ( Q. Phellos, var. pumila, Michx. ; Q. cinerea, xar.pumilaj 
Chap.), and var. serioea, Engeim {Q. sericm, Wiiiti.; P. Phellos, vat. seruxa, 
Ait.). Pine barrens of South Carolina. 

Q. reticnlata, hbk. Southern Arizona and Mexico. 



840. 



Castanopsis chrysophylla, a.dc. 



Castanea chrysophylla, Hook. 
C. tempeit'irmt, Kellogg. 



CHINQUAPIN. 

Western Oregon and California, along the western flank of the Sierra 
Nevada, and in the Coast Banges south to Santa Cruz. 

A tree, 30 to 50 feet in height, in the Cascade Mountains, or in Cali- 
fornia often a low shiiib. 



f] 



i^tf5 



241. 



Fagu« pumila, L. 



Castanea pumila, Mill. 

CHINQUAPIN. 



Lancaster County, Feunsylvania ; Marietta, Ohio; south and south- 
west to Florida, Arkansas, the Indian Territory, and Eastern Texas. 

Wood strong, compact, even-grained, very durable. 

A shrub, or in the southern Alleghany Mountains, Florida, and 
Arkani^as a tree, 30 to 50 feet in height, with a trunk often 18 inches in 
diameter ; the sweet fruit smaller than that of the next species. 



r 



213. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



54 



212, Caitanea ynlgarii, Lam., var. Amerioana, a. dc. Prodr. xvi>. 114. 

Fajna <'astaiiea,h. 

C. reana, Gwrtn., var. Amet'kana, Miclix. 

C. Americana, Rat. 

Northern shores of Lakes Erie and Ontario, Southern Maine, Nevf 
Hampshire, and Vermont; south to Western Florida, and west and 
southwest to Michigan and Arkansas; reaching its greatest development 
in Tennessee, along the western slopes of the Alleghany Mountains. 

Wood light-colored, coarse-grained, moderately strong, very durable, 
but difficult to season and liable to warp ; largely employed in cabinet* 
making, and for railway ties, posts, fencing, &c. 

A large tree ; of the first economic value ; the fruit, although smaller, 
superior in sweetness and flavor to that of the European chestnut. 



213. Fagus fermginea, Ait. 

Faff tt» ni/hisfrig, Miohx. 

AMERICAN BEECH. 



.-v 



Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, through the valley of the Saint 
Lawrence and Ottawa Rivers, and the northern shores of Lakes Huron 
and Michigan to Missouri and Minnesota; south to Florida and Arkansas. 

Wood light-colored or reddish, varying greatly with soil and location, 
close-grained, compact, heavy, and susceptible of a beautiful polish ; 
employed in the manufacture of shoe-lasts, handles of tools and in turn- 
ery; used largely as fueL 

A large tree. Very common in all northern forests cast of the Missis- 
sippi Kiver, and in those of the southern Alleghany Mountains. 

244. Ostrya Virginica, Willd- 

CarpinuB Oatrya, L. 

Varpinua rirginiana, Lam. - 

O. Americana, Miclix. 

O. vttlgaria, Watson. 

Carpinua triflora, M«i'ncli. 

Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, through the valleys of the Saint Law 
rence and the lower Ottawa Kivers, along the northern shores of Lake 
Huron, to Northern Wisconsin ; south to Florida, and west to Fremont 
County, Iowa, Missouri, and Arkansas. 

Wood white, compact, fine-grained, very heavy, durable. 

A small tree, rarely exceeding 40 feet in height, or with a trunk more 
than 12 to 15 inches in diameter. 



■r.i 



245. 



Carpiniu Caroliniana, Walt. 



C. Americana, Miclix. 
AMERICAN HORNBEAM. 



BLUE BEECH. WATER BEECH. IRON WOOD. 



Northern Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, through the valley of the 
Saint Lawrence and lower Ottawa Rivers, along the northern shores of 



.^■Mff 



,-• ,- )< 



r^'f- 



*,; ■ • 1 ■ ' -1 ■ 



Lake Hu] 
and East 
Wood ] 
At the 
southern 
a trunk 2 



•^rt* Jirxvt* 



V^' 



246. 



£. at 
B.ct 



■'f ■■: . 



i; rlj-i;4'; «« i'J?? '^iwi ^^'^ 



i)<i-^l« ■■.• 'f* ij' 



XewB 
River soi 

Wood 
polish; e 
cently lai 

A smal 
gravelly 
on aband 






247. 



B. C€ 

B. le 



€HEERY 

Nova S 
nois, and 

Wootl 
of a brilli 
and excel 

A medi 



248. 



B. ei 
B. U 



Newfoi 
New Ens 
Mountaii 

Wood 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



55 



Lake Huron to Northern Wisconsin and Minnesota ; south to Florida 
and Eastern Texas. 

Wood resembling that of Ostrya. 

At the North generally a shrub or small tree, but becoming, in the 
southern Alleghany Mountains, a tree sometimes 50 feet in height, with 
a trunk 2 to 3 feet in diameter. 



BETULACE^. 
246. Betula alba, L., var. populifolia, Spach. 

B. populifoUa, Willd. 



B. acuminata, Ehrh. 
B. citapidata, Schrad. 

WHITE BIRCH. 



OLD FIELD BIRCH. GRAY BIRCH. 



New Brunswick, and from the valley of the lower Saint Lawrence 
River south to Delaware, near the coast. 

Wood white, nio<lerately hard, close-grained, susceptible of a good 
polish ; extensively manufactured into spools, shoe'-pegs, &c., and re- 
cently largely exiwrted. 

A small tree, rarely exceeding 20 to 30 feet in height ; in dry and 
gravelly soil, or on the borders of swamps ; springing up everywhere 
on abandoned land in New England. 



K« 



247. Betnla lenta, L. 

B. carpinifoUa, Ehrh. 

B. lenta, Regel in DC. Prodr. xvi*. 179, iu part. 

CHERRY BIRCH. BLACK BIRCH. SWEET BIRCH. 



MAHOGANY BIRCH. 



Nova Scotia, Canada, and through the Northern States ; west to Illi- 
nois, and south along the Alleghany Mountains to Georgia. 

Wood reddish, close-grained, compact, moderately hard, susceptible 
of a brilliant polish ; furnishing a valuable material for cabinet-making, 
and excellent fuel. 

A medium-sized tree. Common at the North in rich woodlands. 

248. Betola lutep, Michx.f: ^ 

B. exceha, Pnrah [not Ait.] 

B. lenta, Regel in DC. Prodr. xvi'. 17P, in pait. 

YELLOW BIRCH. GRAY BIRCH. 

Newfoundland to the western shore of Lake Superior, through the 
New England and ]Sorth western States, and south along the Alleghany 
Mountains to the high peaks of North Carolina. 

Wood resembling, and perhaps surpassing, that of the last species 



V-?" 



m 



The lai 
New Engl 
diameter. 

249. 



liaiiks ( 
Counties, 
Tallapoosi 
Texas. 

A nie<li 

250. 

Califori] 
Valley, at 
as abunde 
fencing ai 
and comu 
'Black B 
katchewai 

Bot. Cal. ii. 
251. 



Latitud( 
Northern 
Eastern 1^ 

Wood w 
extensive] 
and now 1 

A large 
latitude th 
durable b 
and is lar| 



252. 



Newfoui 
land, Wise 

Wood hj 
in Northei 

A shru 
ground. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



56 



The largest deciduous tree of the forests of Canada and Northern. 
New flngland, not rarely 80 feet in height, with a trunk 3 to 4 feet in 
diameter. . 



219. 



Betnia nigra, L. 

RED BIRCH. RIVER BIRCH. 



/' 



liauks of the Merrimac and Spicket Rivers, in Middlesex and Essex 
Counties, Massachusetts, and from New Jersey south to Florida and 
Tallapoosa County, Alabama ; west to Missouri, Arkansas, and Eastern 
Texas. 

A uietlium-sized tree ; along the borders of streams and ponds. 



250. 



Betnia ocoidentalis, Hook. 



California, ''in the eastern canons of the Sierra Nevada, above Owen's 
Valley, at an altitude of from 4,500 to 10,000 feet, where it is reported 
as abundant and often the main reliance of the settlers for timber for 
fencing and other purposes ; Surprise Valley, Motloc County {Lemmon)^ 
and common along streams in Siskiyou County, where it is known as 
< Black Birch.' It is frequent from Washington Territory to the Sas- 
katchewan and in the Rocky Mountains to New Mexico." ( WataoHj 

Hot. Cal. ii. 7U, iHcri.) . • 



251. 



Betula pap3rracea, Ait. 

CANOE BIRCH. WHITE BIRCH. PAPER BIRCH. 



Latitude 65° N. {Richardson), south through British America and the 
Northern States to the mountains of Pennsylvania ; west to Minnesota, 
Eastern Nebraska, and Dakota ? ; most common at the North. 

Wood white, compact, moderately hard, furnishing an excellent fuel ; 
extensively employed in the manufacture of spools, shoe-lasts, pegs, &c., 
and now largely exported. 

A large tree, as far north as Hudson's Bay, and extending to a higher 
latitude than any deciduous tree of the Atlantic forests; the very tough, 
durable bark, is easily separated into thin layers impervious to water, 
and is largely used in the construction of canoes, tents, &c. 

252. Alnns inoana, Wiild. 

SPECKLED ALDER. HOARY ALDER. BLACK ALDER. 

Newfoundland to the Saskatchewan, and south to northern New Eng- 
land, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Nebraska ; and in Europe. 

Wood hard and heavy ; furnishing fuel preferred and largely employed 
in Northern New England for the final baking of bricks. 

A shrub, or sometimes a small tree ; along streams and in swampy 
ground. 






■,* ■iH 






M 



il'J 






m 






.!!'f- 



^'■i; 



253. 



254. 



255. 



256. 



257. 



258. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



67 



▼ar. virMoeni, Watson (Bot. Cai. ii. 81, ined.) exteuils from Oregon east to 
the Bocky Mountains, and south to the southern Sierra Nevada and 
New Mexico. 



263. 



Alnni maritima, Muhi. 

SEA-SIDE ALDER. 



Delaware and Eastern Maryland ; and in Japan T 

A small tree, sometimes 20 feet in height ; along streams. 



254. 



Alnni oblongifolia, Torr. 



Banks of the Mirabres Biver, and near Santa Barbara, New Mexico ; 
Arizona ; in the Gayumaca Mountains, San Diego County, and in the San 
Bernardino Mountains, California ; also in Northern Mexico. 

A tree, sometimes 80 feet in height with a tnink 2 or 3 feet in diame- 



ter. 



265. 



\ 



Alnns rhombifolia, Nntt. 



From Oregon to Southern California; at San Felipe, California 
(Palmer), known as White Alder. " The common California Alder, 20 to 
30 feet in height, and 2 to 3 in diameter, according to Bolander; 30 to 
50 feet in height (Peckham) ; bark light ash gray." — ( Watson, Bot. Cal. ii. 
80, iMed.) 



256. 



Alum rubra, Bdii^uni. 



Sitka, south to Santa Barbara, California; common in the neighbor- 
hood of San Francisco. 
A tree, 30 to 40 feet in height. 



257. 



SALICACE^E. 
Saliz cordata, Mniii. 



Great Slave Lake, Saskatchewan, and Lake Winipeg; south through 
the New England States to the District of Columbia. 

A small tree, rarely 20 feet in height; along streams and in wet 
ground ; running into many forms of which the best marked are : — 
var. rigida. Gray (8. riyida, Muhl. 8. Torreyana, Burratt). 
wax. angustata, Audors. [8. anymtata, Pursii). 



268. 



Salix IsBvigata, Bobb. 



California, Sierra County, and from the valley of the Sacramento River 
to San Diego. 

8 



259. 



260. 



261. 



262. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



68 



« An erect pyramidal tree, 15 to 50 feet higb, growing in bottom lands 
near streams ; trunk straiglit, a foot or two in diameter, with fissured 
dark brown bark."— (C L.Antlenonj in Bot. Cal. ii. 84, ined.) 

259. Saliz laiiandra, Benth. 

S. Jluffmauiiwnu, Hook. & Am. ^ 

tS. Hpevioxa, Nutt. • 

S. arguta,\ar.liiHiaHilra,Aiu\iirfi. . 

British Columbia, and south to the valley of the Sacramento Biver, 
California. 

"A tree, 20 to 60 feet high, growing along streams." — {Behb, In Bot. 
Cal. ii. 84, ined.) 

▼ar. lanoifolia, B»bb. {8. lancifoUa, Anden. 8. luddaf var. macri^hyllay 
Anders.). With the species. 

var. Fendleriana, Bebb (8. pentandra, var. caudata, Natt. 8. Fendle- 
rianttj Anders. 8. argxita^ Anders.). Colorado, New Mexico, and in the 
Sierra Nevada of Central California. 



260. 



Saliz Inoida, Muhi. 

SHININO WILLOW. 



Mackenzie River, in latitude 65° north, through British America and 
the New England States, south to Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

A shrub or small tree, rarely exceeding 20 to 25 feet in height; along 
streams. 

261. Saliz nigra, Marsh. 

8. ambigna, Pursh. 

8. Hoiutoniana, Pnrsbr 

8. Caroliniana, Micbx. 

iSf./a/ca/a, Piirsh. (.^. /'«rs*jana, Spr. S.nigra,ya,T./alcata,QTay.) 

Canada (rare) and Northern Vermont ; south to Florida, and west to 
the valley of the Sacramento Eiver, Clear Lake, and Fort Mohave, Cal- 
ifornia; most common betweeu the Alleghany and Bocky Mountains. 

A small tree, 20 to 40 feet in height, with a trunk sometimes 10 to 18 
inches in diameter. 



262. Populns angustifolia, James. 

P. Canadenaia, var. angiiHtifoUa, Wesmael in DC. Prodr., xvi*. 3'^9. 
P. bahamifera, var. angustifolia, Watson, Bot. King Rep. v. 327. 

In the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and New Mexico; Central Ari- 
zona ; in the Shoshone Mountains, Central Nevada, and northwestward 
to the valley of the Columbia River. 

Wood considered of little value. 

A medium-sized tree. 




268. 



264. 



265. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREE8. 
868. Popnlnt baliamifera, l. 

BALHAM POPLAR. TACAMAIIAC. BALM OP GILEAD. 



69 



Mackenzie River and the Great Slave Lake ; Houth through British 
America to Northern New England and WigconHin. 

A large tree. Common in Arctic America, and furnishing, acconling 
to Dr. RichardHon, the greater part of the drift timber on the .shores of 
the Arctic Sea. 

vftr. oandioftni, Gray {P. vandicanff^ Ait. P. nigra, CuteHb. P. maoro' 
phylla, Llnill. P. Ontariensis, PohI'.). 

Arctic America to Northern New England, WiscouMin, and Kentucky ; 
weHt to Colorado and Idaho. 

A large tree. Rare in a wild state, although very common in cultiva- 
tion. 

264. Popnlni Fremontii, Wntaon, Proc Amer. Acad. X. :<50. 

J', moiiilifera, Nowliorry, PaciHr K. Rep. vi. f^ ; Watson, Hot. King Rep. vh 1^27. 

Valley of the upper Sacramento River, California j eastward in Ne- 
vada and Southern Utah. 
A large tree, 
var. Wiilizeni, Watnon, in Am. Jour. Sci. (3 8er.), xv. 137. (P. monili/eraf 

Ton. Hot. Mcx. Bound. 204.) 

" The prevalent Cottonwood in the more southern districts, ranging, 
from San Diego County, California (Jam»d Valley, Palmer), and the 
Colorado Valley (Fort Yuma, Schott), to Southern Utah and the Rio 
Grande."— ( Watson, Hot. Cal. ii. 92, ined.) 



265. 



Populni grandidentata, Mlcbx. 



Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Canada, and through the Northern 
States ; along the Alleghany Mountains to North Carolina, and west to 
Wisconsin and Iowa. Rare at the South ; common at the North. 

Wood white, soft, very light ; large quantities of the wood of thia 
species have of late years been ground into pulp in Northern New 
England and Michigan, and used as a substitute for rags in the manu- 
facture of paper. 

A medium-sized tree, sometimes 70 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk. 
20 to 30 inches in diameter. 

266. Popolus heterophylla, L. 

P. argenieOf'Michx.f. 

P. heterophjfUa, var. argentea, Wesniael in DC. Prodr. xvi*. 326. 

DOWNY POPLAR. COTTON TREE. 

Western Massachusetts ; ? Northport, Long Island, to the valley of 
the lower Ohio River ; south to the Cape Fear River, North Carolina, and 
Southern Arkansas. 



1 

Mi 







, 1 . 




267. 



268. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



60 



Wood white, soft, probably of little value. 

A large tree, often 70 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk 3 to 4 feet in 
diameter ; in swamps and along river bottoms. Bare. 



267. 



Populus monilifera, Ait. 



P. angulata, Ait. 
/'. anguloaa, Miclix. 
P. Canadeiuis, Desf. 
P. Marylandica, Bos*-. 
P. Iwvigata, Wilhl. 
P. glatidalosa, Mtrncli. 

COTTONWOOD. NECKLACE POPLAR. CAROLINA POPLAR. 

Western New England, west to the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and 
Idaho?; south to Florida and Louisiana. 

Wood white, soft, of little value. 

A large tree, 80 to 100 feet in height, and with a trunk 4 to 8 feet in 
diameter; the common Cottonwood of the western plains, bordering all 
streams flowing east from the Rocky Mountains. 



vifi', , 



268. 



Fopulns tremuloides, Michx. 

AMERICAN ASPEN. QUAKING ASP. 



Arctic America, south to the mountains of Pennsylvania, New Mexico, 
and the valley of the Sacramento River, California. Very common on all 
the mountain ranges from the Rocky Mountains, west and north, at 
6,000 to 10,000 feet elevation, in moist slopes and bottoms. Not yet 
seen on the high peaks of the southern Alleghany Mountains, to which 
it might naturally extend. 

Wood white, soft, easily worked; esteemed and somewhat used in 
Utah for flooring and in turnery, and in Northern New England with 
that of P. grandidentata in the manufacture of paper. 

A small tree, sometimes 50 feet in height, with a trunk rarely exceed- 
ing 18 inches in diameter. The most widely distributed of North Ameri* 
can trees. 

269. Populus triohooarpa, Turr. & Gray. 

p. huhami/era, var. y Hook. Flor. Bor. Am. ii. 154. 

P. bahamifera, var. (f) CaUfornica, Watson, Am. Jour. Sci. (3 set.) xv. 136. 

<' San Diego, California, northward to British Columbia, and extend- 
ing into Western Nevada. Accordiiig to Douglas it attains in Wash- 
ington Territory a height of 60 to 100 feet, with a diameter of 2 to 6 
feet. It is generally found scattered, or in open spaces along stream 
banks and in river bottoms at an altitude not exceeding 6,000 feet." — 

Watson^ hot. Ca\. li. 91, ined.) 




270. 



271. 



272. 



273. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



61' 



TAXACEiE. . / 

270. Torreya Californica, Ton-. 

T. JIdjfristica, Mnir, Ediub. New Phil. Journal, x. 7, t. 3j Bot. Mag. t. 4780. 

CALIFORNIA NUT3IEG. 

California, from Mendocino County to Yuba and Mariposa Counties. 

Wood light-colored, close-grained, compact, heavy, odoriferous, prob- 
ably valuable. 

A tree, 50 to 75 feet in height, with a trunk 1 to 3 feet in diameter j 
when cut throwing up suckers very freely from the stump. 



271. 



Torreya tazifolia, Am. 

STINKING CEDAR. 



< 






Along the eastern bank of the Apalachicola Eiver, Middle Florida. 

Wood exceedingly durable, odoriferous, especially when burned. 

A small or medium-sized tree, 20 to 40 feet in height, with a trunk 1 
to 3 feet in diameter; like the last throwing up suckers when cut from 
the stumj) ; an exceedingly local species, 
extermination. 

272. Taxus brevifolia, Nutt. 

T. haccata, Hook. Fl. Bor. Am. ii. 167, in part. 

T. Bouraieri, Carriere. Rev. Hort. 1854, 228. 

T. Lindlejfana, Muir, Edinb. New Phil. Journal, i. 294. 

British Columbia, and south to the Sierra Nevada of Central California. 

Wood reddish, hard, tough, elastic, very heavy, durable, susceptible 
of a brilliant polish. 

In Oregon a tree, 40 to 60 feet in height, with a trunk sometimes ^ 
feet in diameter, in California rarely exceeding 20 to 30 feet in height. 



,1?: r li 



273. 



Taxus Floridana, Nutt. 



Banks of the Apalachicola River, Middle Florida. 
A small tree, 10 to 20 feet in height; very local, and still imperfectly 
known. 

Taxus baocata, L., var. Canadensis, Gray. (T. Canadensis, Willd. 

A shrubby species ; common in Canada and the Northeastern States, 
south to the mountains of Virginia. 



^. h¥ 



*1 



* 'I 
il 

4 









274. 



276. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 62 

CONIFER^E. 
274. Juniperns Californica, CiirritM«. 

J. Andina, Nutl. 7 

J. tetragona, var. OHteoaperma, T«)rr. 

J, C'erroaianua, Kcllog^r. 

J. occidental is, Pari, in DC. Prodr. xvi'. 48i), in part. 

California, in the Cloast Ranges, from the valley of the Sacramento 
River, south to San Diego. 
Wood light-colored, slightly aromatic, close-grained, moderately heavy. 
A shrub or small tree, sometimes 20 to 30 feet in height. 

var. Utahensis, Kngelm. Trans. Acad. St. Louis, iii. 588 ; {J. 0Ccidentali8j 
Watson, Bot. King Rop. v. 336, in part.) 

On all the ranges of Central Kevada, south to Arizona and Southern 
Utah ; very common at 5,000 to 8,000 feet elevation. 

Wood resembling that of the species, and in Central Nevada furnish- 
ishing the common and cheapest fuel. 

A shrub or low bushy tree, 10 to 20 feet in height, with a trunk rarely 
exceeding 2 feet in diameter. 



275. 



Junipems occidentalis, Hook. 



J. exceUa, Pnrah. 



Oregon and Idaho, south to California, on the high Sierra Nevada. 
In Oregon, a large tree; smaller in California, or often reduced to a 
shrub. 

var. monospdnna, Eugelnu Trans. St. Lenis Acad. iii. 590. 

Pike's Pejik, Colorado, through Western Texas and New Mexico to 
Arizona and Southern California. 
A shrub or small tree. 

var.? oonjnngens, Engelm., l. c. 
"Western Texas, where it forms forests and is an important timber 
tree, although not as large nor as easily worked and useful as the Red 
Cedar of the plains of Eastern Texas." — {Lindheimer.) 

276. Junipems paohyphloea, Torr. 

J. plochydenna, Torr. in Sitgr. Rep. t. 1(5. 

New Mexico and Arizona. 

"A middle-sized tree, with a spreading, rounded top, thick and much 
cracked bark, and pale, reddish wood." — {Engelm., Trans. St. Louis Acad. iii. 

589.) 

277. JuniperuB Virginiana, l. 

RED CEDAR. SATIN. 

New Brunswick and Canada up to latitude 45° north ; south to Flor- 
ida, and west to British Columbia, Washington Territory, and Eastern 



^.-m 



■ ""'*; 



.-1^ 



■ ."i;;" 




m 

• ■>■''?' 

M 









%\. 



278. 



279. 



280. 



281. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



63 



Texas; not in Western Texas, California, or probably Oregon j rare in 
IJtab, Arizona, and Central Nevada. 

Heart-wood red, aromatic, close-grained, compact, very durable; 
largely employed in cabinet-making, for fence posts, railway ties, pencils, 
&c. 

A tree, sometimes 60 to 80 feet in height, or, near its northern limit, 
reduced to a low shrub or small tree. 

The most widely-distributed and one of the most valuable of North 
American Conifer a\ .. 



278. 



CupresBus Ooveniana, Gordon. 



"A shrub or small bushy tree, to 10 feet high or more. 

"California, in the Coast Kanges from about Monterey to Sonoma 
County. 

" In Marin County it is said to sometimes attain a height of 40 to 80 
feet. A doubtful form is reported from Cedar Mountain, Alameda 
County (Dr. Kellogg), descjribed as a handsome tr ee, 30 to 40 feet high, 
of dense 8ymmetri(5al growth." — { Watson, Bot. Cal. ii. 114, hied.) 



279. 



Cupressus Macnabiana, Muir. 



California, "about Clear Lake {Torrey, Bolander); originally reported 
by Jeftrey from Mount Shasta, at 5,000 feet altitude. 
"A shrub or small tree, C to 10 feet high or more." — (Watson^ 

Bot. Cal. ii. 114, nierf.) 



280. 



Cupressus maorocarpa, Hart 



w. 



C. LambiTtiana, Gord. 
C. Harlwegii, Carriers. 



MONTEREY CYPRESS. 



California, " on granite rocks near the sea ; from Point Pinos, near 
Monterey, southward 4 or 5 miles to Pescadero Kanch. The largest 
measurement recorded ( Brewer) is a circumference of trunk 18§ feet at 
a height of 5 or G feet from the ground." — ( Watson, Bot. Cal. ii. 113, ined.) 

A tree, 40 to 70 feet in height. 

These species are still very iniperfeofly known, and the attention of California 
botanists is call«'d to the importance of stndying, in the feld, the various species of 
Cuprea8U8 native of their State. 

281. ChamsBoyparis Lawsoniana, Pari, in DC. Prodr. xvi^ 464. 

Ctipresaun LitiraoHiana, Mnrr. 

Cuprexnuti Nitlkaeiixiii, Torr. Bot. Wilkes, t. 1(5. 

Cupreasiiii fratjrani^, Ki'Ungtf. 

CupreHHUs atteiiuttia, Gonloiu 

OREGON CEDAR. WHITE CEDAR. 

Oregon and southward along the Coast Ranges to the Mount Shasta 
region. Northern California. 




'1 J| 















V ~ 1 T- 



.5 .'>'; 



mi 



283. 



284. 



280. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



64 



Wood white, fraj^ruiit, close-^'ained, compact, elastic, free of knots, 
easily worked, very durable. 

A large tree, 100 to 150 feet iu height, with a trunk 2 to 6 teet in 
diameter. 

282. msBcyparis Nutkaensis, Spucii. 

Thuya exceha, Rmtfi. 
CiipreHHHS XutkaetimH, Lninb. 
Citpnmus Amcrkaiia, Trautv. 
C. exvelm, Fisfli. 
Thu\ioimahoreaUH,\\ov{. 
Thityopsia Tchugatskoi/, Horfc. 

Sitka; southward to the Cascade Mountains. 

Wood white, soft, (jloar, easily worked ; susceptible of a beautiful 
polish; probably very valuable. 
A tree, sometimes 100 feet iu height. 

283. ChamsBcyparis apheeroidea, Spacli. 

CiiprcMHUH Thyoidea, L. 



Thuya Hpharuidalia, Kich. 



WHITE CEDAR. 



Essex County, Massachusetts; south to Florida, near the coast; and 
in Wisconsin. 

Wood reddish, light, soft, fine-grained, easily split and worked, 
very durable; employed for shingles, in boat-building, cooperage, and 
largely for railway ties, posts, fencing, &c. 

A tree, 40 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk often 2 to 3 feet in 
diameter^ always in deep, cold swamps. 



284. 



T. pHcata, Doiin. 
T. Menzieaii, Doiigl. 



Thuya gigantea, Nntt. 



WESTERN ARBOR VIT^. 



Sitka, and southward through the Coast Kauges and the Cascade 
Mountains to Northern California. 

Wood light-colored, soft, easily worked, moderately durable ; used 
lor shingles, and often sawed into boards, althougji liable to split and 
warp when exposed to the sun. 

A large tree, 100 to 150 feet in height, with a trunk 3 to 12 feet in 
diameter. 



285. 



Thuya occidentalis, L. 

ARBOR VITiE. WHITE CEDAR. 



James' Bay and the Saskatchewan, south through British America, 
except Newfoundland and Nova Scotia ; common in the Northeastern 









::.::i 















I 



Lip. ■ lr4 



''n:-^.\i.' 



vv: 



.«,■;•, -:■ -S' .f.. 



<'-n 



286. 



288. 



CATALOaUE OF FOUEHT TREES. 



65 



states tJ Poniisylvania, and occasionally along the Alleghany Mount- 
ains to North Carolina ; west to Northern Michigan and Wisconsin. 

Wood light-colored, compact, light, very dunible ; largely employed 
lor posts, railway tics, fencing, «&c. 

A small tree, 20 to 50 feet in height, with a trunk 1 to li feet in diaui- 
eter; in Hwami)s and along the rocky banks of streams. 



fr 

ins 



286. 



Libooedrns decnrreni, 'I'orr. 



Thiijiu Craiyiaun, Halfoiir. 
.' Thuya gifiaiilea, Cnl■|•i^I•••. 
llvjldfi'm ileninriiH, Kocli. 



WHITE CEDAR. 



Oregon, to Han Diego, California; in the Coast Ranges and in the Sierra 
Nevada, up to 8,500 feet elevation. ( 

Wood light-colored, soft, and said to be durable. 

A large tree, 100 to l.'iO feet in height, with a trunk 4 to 7 feet in 
diameter. 

287. .' ' Taxodium distiohum, lii«-imr«l. 

Cupt'enHiiH dialivlui,h. 

BALD CYPRESS. BL.U'K f'VPRESS. WHITE CYPRESS. DECIDUOUS 

CYPRES^ 

Southern Delaware tu Southern Florida, near tlie <;oast ; and from 
Carroll County, Indiana, Southern Illinois and Missouri, south to Ala- 
bama, Louisiana, and Eastern Texsis. 

Wood reddish, strong, light, compact, easily split and worked, very 
durable. Largely used in construction in the form of boards and square 
timber, for shingles, posts, railway ties, fencing, &c. 

A large tree, sometimes reiiching uuiler favorable circumstances in 
the Southern States, a height of 150 feet, with a diameter of trunk of 
10 to 12 feet or more ; in swamps, or the inundated borders of streams ; 
one of the most valuable trees of the North American forests. 






.i Ml 



m 



288. Sequoia gigantea, Dtctiisnt'. 

U'eUhiglonia ghjHntea, Lindl. 

JFaHh'tHgtonia CaliforHicii {Turotlhim ffitshhiyloiihitiiim), \\"m»ht\v. 

S. fVelUHgtoiiiaiia, Seoiii. 

TuxtMlinm gigaiitrum, Kt-ll. & Ih-lir. 

BK; TREE. 

California, along the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada at about 
4,000 feet elevation from IMacer County to Deer Creek, on the southern 
borders of Tulare County ; in small or isolated groves, except toward its 
southern Wmit where it forms an extensive forest, some 40 miles in 
length by G to 8 miles in width. Wood didl red, very .light, and 
9 



• :'i-- 



-4] 



■:^'ii 



ir 



. . l\ 



■'J'. 



hA.' 



289. 



290. 



291. 



CATALOGUE OK P0BE8T TKKE8. 



66 



riMiiarkubly (himblc. (Hco Mnir in l>r<»c Ahht. Awmm-. XXV. 343.) TlielargeMt 
I I'M) of the Anioricaii f'orcstH. 

*< It has an average height of 27o feet, with a trunk 20 fct^t in diameter ; 
tlio hirgeHt moasuronient being 3U0 feet in height, and a diamet«r of 35 
feet 8 inches within the bark, at four feet alwve the ground."— ( WataoH 
ill H«t. ('111. li. iir, ;««/.) 



289. 



SequoU lemperTirent, Kmli. 



TiuwHhm HemiM'i'i'ifi-HH, Lniiib. 
S'hubrrliii nemiM-rrh'eH*, SpiK-li. 



RED WOOD. 

California, from tlie northern portion of tlie State, Month onl^' in the 
Coast KangeH to Han LuiH ObiM])o. 

AVood red, light, elo.se-grained, compact, easily Hplit and worked, sus- 
ceptible of a tine pnlisli, and very durable ; largely sawn into boards and 
shingles; and furnishing the common and cheapest lumber, railway ties, 
]M)sts, and fencing, of the Pacific coast. "^ 

The forests of this species are economicnilly the nio.st valuable of Cal- 
if4»mia; but owing to their a<r('essibility to tidcsvater, are in great 
danger of speedy extermination. 

»' In size the red wood usually averages 8 to lli feet in diameter, and 
from 200 to .')00 in height, with a straight cylindrical barrel, naked to 
the heiglit of 70 to 100 feet or nu>re." ( Watson in M»t. Ciil. ii. 117, iucd.) 

This species is remarkable for its tenacity of life, the stumps and 
i-oots throwing up for a long time great-numbers of vigorous suckers. 

290. Abies baltamea, MarHimil. 

PIhhh hahamm, L. 
A. balmmijmi, Miclix. 
I'iccti huhumra, LoihI. 

HALSAM riK. HALM OF (ilLKAl) VUl. 

(*anada. Nova Scotia, and the Northeastern States, south along the 
Alleghany Mountains to Virginia; west along the great lakes to Wis- 
consin and Minnesot^i. 

W«M>d white and soft ; oc(;asioually made into shingles, but of little 
value. 

A tree, sometimes 70 fc in height, with a trunk rarely exceeding 18 
inches in <liameter; in cold, <l imp woods and mountain swamps; or at 
high elevations reduced to a prostrate shrub {A, HiKhnniann, Hort.). 



291. 



Abies bracteata. Nutt. 



I'hiim reiiHiiUi, Doiijjl. 
P'muH bi-acteala, Don. 
Piceii bnu'teufd, LiiuU. 

Southern California, only in the Santa Lucia Mountains, at an eleva- 
tion of 3,000 to 6,000 feet. 
A little known tree, 100 to 150 feet in height. 



r !■ 
' 4 



^i 






• l-l 









298 



♦M ;,.:?> 



^\::-:h{i 



'■''.iMi 



>- 



<i-. 



*<!,' 



'iv'^J.;;, ii;,.;'j. i;,;.?^^. 



.■»'?*. 'U ' ,< 



I ^' : ' >■ . " t ( 



•>i,?,(;t;i*!!. 



• iV.i. i-''?^ 



>-) 'SHvi'i 



'■;.i«;,:^ .>:, .;M- 



2)3. 



.i i 



U-, 



■»«M. 



**S»SVJ,.,' .?<, 



294. 



CATALOOUE OF FOREST TREES. 67 

292. Abies ooncolor, Lindi. 

J'kea fOHvohr, (iordon. . 

I'inuH coHcolor, Engelm. • .. ' -/ 

J. Lowiana, Murr. * /' 

A. grandis, of the California botanists. 

A. amabilia,{l) Watson, King. Kep. v. :):<3. 

A. lasioearpa, Hoii;. [not Hook.] 

A. Parmniaua, Hort. 

A. amabiliH, Hort. 

WHITE FIR. 

From SoutUeru Oregon through the Sierra Nevada, at 3,000 to 8,000 
feet elevation, and through the mountains of Oregon to Utah and South- 
ern Colorado. 

Wood i>robably of little value. 

A large tree, 80 to 150 feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 4 in diameter 



232. 



Abies Fraseri, LinUi. 



Finan Frumri, PnrHli. 



Only on the summits of the peaks of North Carolina and Tennessee, T 
which exceed 0,000 feet in height. 

Wood white, soft, of little value. 

A small tree, 20 to 40 feet in height, Avith a trunk not exceeding 18 
inches in diameter. - • 

294. Abies grandis, Liniii. 

/'(«H«i grauiUs, Dongl. 

Pinvs amahilw, Dongl. f [not of later authors]. 
, Picea grandis, Loud. 

A. Gordoiiiaita, Carrion*. 

British Columbia, south to Mendocino County, California, near the 
coast. 

Wood considered valuable. 

The largest species of the genus, reaching 200 to 300 feet in height 
with a trunk 3 to 4 feet in diameter. 

Var. densiflora, Engclm., Trans. St. Louis Acad. iii. 594. BaiSC of Mount 
Hood to British Columbia. 

295. Abies magnifloa, Murr. 

J. <iMUi((7i«, of the California botanists. 

BED FIR. 

"The Red Fir of the higher Sierras is not rare at an altitude of 7,000 
to 10,000 feet, but forms no forests by itself. Easily distinguished from 
the next species by the inclosed bracts. Forms, however, are said to 
occur (Mount Silliman, Brewer), with exserted bracts, and it remains to bo 



11 
It 



i&i-^i 



■■.:il 



f:: : <*W-, 

1. ■■rf*-'f 



■ ;v»i, 



i>r ;'"''!kl 






'■1l 




296. 



297. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



68 



Heeii whether the slight diifereuces in the leaves, scales, and seeds will 
suffice to keep the species separate." {Engelm., iu Bot. Cal. ii. 119, i»e<f.) 

A large tree, 200 feet or more in height, v ith a trunk 8 to 10 feet in 
diameter. 



296. 



Abies nobilis, Lindl. 



riiiiiH nohilin, Doiigl. 
Vkva HohU'm, Loud. 



Base of Mount Shasta, California, Avhere it forms extensive forests at 
an elevation of 0,000 to 8,000 feet, and north through the (Cascade 
Mountains to the Columbia Kiver. 

Wood said to be more valuable than that of the other species of the 
genus. 

A largo tree, 200 feot in height. 

297. Abies subalpina, Kiiju'elm. 

J. Umoanpti, YUmk. V\. Ii<»r. Am. ii. 163? [not Hoit.]. "^ 

J. biJ'oUa, MiuT. '" 

A. umahlUs, Pari, in DC. I'lodr. w'vK 42(5, in part. 
A. ijrundlH, of th« Colorado botauLsts. 

"It extends from the higher nwmutains of Colorado and the adjoining 
parts of Utah, northward to Wyoming and Montana, where it is the 
only species, and westward to the mountains of Oregon, and into Brit- 
ish Columbia (Fraser River), and southward probably to Mount Shasta; 
always scattered in the subalpine forests, and, at least in Colorado, com- 
ing up almost to the timber limit; but never alone constitutiug forests." 
{Kngehn.y Trans. St. Louis Acad. iii. 597.) 

Wood light-coloied, soft, almost worthless. 

A tree, GO to 100 feet in height, with a trunk often more than 2 feet 
in diameter. 

var. fallax, Engi^m. l. c (.1. amabllis, Xcwborry, I'iic. K. Uop. vi. .")1.) 
High summits of the Cascade Mountains, south of the Columbia liiver, 
and in the Wasatch Mountaius, Utah. 



If 



'\''''"<iit 



irii 






m 



:'-^ 



298. Pseudotsuga Douglasii, Ciurii-rt'. 

/'. Doiif/lasii, SaMnc. 
AbieH J >0Hgla8U, Dollar], 

Tuiiga UoHijlam, Carrioro. 

DOUGLAS Sl'Rl'CK. 

Oregon and California, in the Coast Ranges, and along the west flank 
of the Cascade and Sierra Nevada Ranges up to 0,000 to 8,000 feet ele- 
vation, extending south into Mexico, and east through Arizona and 
New Mexico to the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. 

Wood yellow or reddish, coarse-grained, heavy, strong; largely sawn 
into boards and square timber; used for masts, spars, &c. 



m 




299. 



300. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



69 



A treo, 200 to 300 feet i.i heij^ht, with a trunk 8 to 15 feet in diameter; 
the most valuable timber tree of Oregon, reaching there its greatest de- 
velopment, and forming probably the heaviest forest growth known, 
vat. maorocarpa, Engelm., n<»t. Cal. ii. ViO, hud. {Abies macroearpa, Vasoy in 

Gard. Monthly, ,1 nn«', 187(5.). 

Southern California, in the caDons of the foothills of the San Ber- 
nardino ^Fountains and in the San Felipe Canon. 

A small and little known tree, 40 to 50 or rarely 80 feet in height, 
with a trunk 2 to 3 feet in diameter; cones much larger than in the 
species. 

299. Tsuga Canadensis, Carriii-c 

I'lniiv ('aiindviinh, L. 

ricea Cfj««f?t;»»»»'«, Link. 

ilEMLOCK. 

Xorthern New Brunswick, through the valleys of the Saint Lawrence 
and upper Ottawa llivers to the western shore of Lake Superior ; south 
through the Northern States and along tlie Alleghany Mountains south 
to Ilabershaw County, Georgia. 

Wood light-colored, coarse and crooked-grained, light, very liable to 
splinter ; largely sawn into boards of aii inferior quality. 

A tree, 70 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 3 feet in diameter ; 
in rather dry, rocky situations, generally on the north side of hills ; of 
grciit economic value on account of its bark, which is richer in tanniu 
than that of any common tree of the Northeastern States. 

300. Tsuga Mertensiana, Can-itro. 

• rhius MertvHitiana, 1t«>ii);. 
Abk'H MerleH8lana,lAntl\. 
.thiea AlbertiduafMnrr. ' 

Ahks Uridgeitii, Kellogg. 

In the coiist regions, from Alaska south to Mendocino and ]N[ariu 
Counties, Caliibrnia. 
Wood less coarse and straighter-graincd than in the last species. 
A tree, 100 to 200 feet in height. 

301. Tsnga Pattoniana, KiigHni. 

AliUti l'atlonU,»v Pattoniana, Jvft'vvy. 
Abies nookcriaiia, Muvv. 
Abies fViUiamaoiiiiy'Scwhvrvy. 
Pinun PuttoniaiKi, Paii. 

California and Oregon, "in the highest timber regions of the Sierra 
Nevada, at 8,000 to 10,000 feet altitude ; from the head of the San 
Joaquin liiver, northward and through the Cascade Mountains, near 
Crescent City descending to near the coast. {Brcicer.y {Engehn., Bot. 
Cal. ii. 121, ined.) 



''■"'5I 






' Ml 

■'"IT 



'la 
Pfi 






: ■ »l 

■ ■ ?I 






- ":«.|5 






i;:i 




302. 



303. 



304. 



CATALOGrE OP FOREST TREES. 



70 



A large tree, KK) to ITiO feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 4 feet iu 
diameter, or at high elevations redncod to a low shnib. 

302. Pioea alba, Link. 

I'iuHs «//;«, Ait. 
Abkx »lha, Mi«-lix. 

WHITE SPRUCE. SlXCil.E SlMtUCE. 

From abont latitnde 07^° north, sonth through British America to 
Korthern Maine, the southern shores of Lake Superior, Northern Min- 
nesota, and Dakota? 

Wood light-colored, ligliter than that of the Black Spruce ; preferred 
for the masts of boats, small spars, &c., but probably little used within 
the limits of the United States. 

A small tree, sometimes 50 feet in height, with a trunk rarely, if ever, 

exceeding 18 to 24 inches in diameter. 

-\ 

'\ 

303. Picea Engelmanni, Kn^^'cim. 

Abies uiiiru, VAifrfhu.'luot. Voir,'], 
JbkH Kngclmaiiiii, Parry. 
n»ufi vommntata, I'tirl. 

British Columbia, and Oregon, south through the Kocky Mountains 
to Arizona (San Francisco ]\[ountain8, Sierra Blanca, Blount (Jraham), 
and east to the Black Hills of Dakota. 

Wood resembling th at of the eastern Black Spruce. 

A large tree, with a trunk sometimes 2 to ',\ feet in diameter, or above 
the timber line reduced to a prostrate shrub; in Colorado forming ex- 
tensive forests at 8,.^()0 to 11,5()0 feet elevation, and furnishing the most 
valuable tindier of the central Bocky Mountain region. 



304. 



Picea nigra, Link. 



I'inns tiiijt'H, Alt. 

AbieH nigra, Mic-lix. , 

/'/««<* rubra, Lamb. 

Abiea rubra, I'oir. 

.tbien nigra, var. rubra, Michx.f. 

/'. rubra. Link. 

Xewfoundland, Xova S(H)tia, and ('anada; through the Northern 
States, from Maine to Wi8(;onsin, and soutl^ along the Alleghany 
Mountains to the high peaks of North Carolina. 

Wood light-coloi-ed or reddish, light, elastic, strong; largely sawn 
into boards and square timber; formerly somewhat used in ship- 
building, for spars, &c. ; also now largely employe<l in the manufacture 
of paper. The Si>ruce lumber of the eastern markets is derived from 
til is sjiecies. 




!■■■> 



r, 1 1 

'in 









•*iil 









■■'■ '^if 

•■■•■% ' 



,*tfi*- Jm^'SH 



305. 



., > 1- 'M ■ 



If:! .f: 



yi i. 



'■■'>■,.',■ .ji. 



^f ^h 



msit'i A: 



U 



lit/- i; r;>»(? J. . •* 



>•';■(••<•'*< ">.*'„.( 



■,V -V-'"),- 



t'Hf; 



ift'tdji^ 



1 '-i 



* ,■ <>' \>\'< 



.1 : tii ?i-.vJ' j.'-.nf ; iMtiiifsi .Ji.VK'S'y'i 



'/, .' II; 






• 1 n\ ]-i'/' '> 



;' •*» .">','.)j > MM'tf. 



'biapdl* rf 



! ?* 'M'SO/ 



306. 



ia,i.^n!i{{»«^fi,fl Rr)r>jf 



M«« i 



U\if'' 



;!' ;J| 



;.i?:T)'-v v;.i!,i/l 



307. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



71 



A Htnall or mediitm-si/ed tree, 50 to 70 feet in height, with a tnink 
2 to 3 feet in diameter; in high mountain woods ; sometimes in cold^ 
deep swamps, when it is small, stunted, and of little value. ' 

305. Piosa pungens, Kn^rt'im. 

Jbieit M4-ti:ie)iii of C'olorndt) ImttiniHtH. 

Rocky Mountains of CNtlorado, extending into Wyoming and perhaps 
Idaho. 

A large tree, 100 to 150 feet iu height, with a tiunk 2 to 3 feet in 
diameter; at 0,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; never forming forests but 
scattered along streams, in damp, moist soil. 



306. 



Pioea Sitchensis, cairitrc 



Phi UB Sitvhenais, Boufi. 

I'imis Mem'teaii, Dougl. ^ 

Ahie» Men:\e»u, Liiidl, 

Alaska, south to Mendoeino ('ounty, (California, near the (roast, and 
east to ? 

Wood light-colored, straight-grained, valuable; resembling and prob- 
ably surpassing that of the eastern Black Spruce. 

A tree, 150 to 200 feet in height, with a trunk C to 9 feet in diameter ; 
in wet, sandy soil, generally near the mouths of streams. Rare. Its 
range to the east still uncertain. 

A peculiar Spniee hIiouM be looked for in Strawborry VnUcy and otlu'r valleys and 
HlopcH about Mount Shnnta, California, at 3,500 to 4,000 feet eh^vation; about which 
nothing in known but "that itn hnvcr braiiehen are very lon^r, slender, and handsome, 
and its loaves nuuih naiTower tlian thiise of P. Sitchenitis ; 7 to 9 lines long, and two- 
tliirils pf n lino wide, «|uito obtuse, strongly keeled, and stoniatoso on the upper side 
and without sfouiata beneath." {Engclm., Rot. Cat. ii. 12:<, \nv(\.) 



:^m^ 



307. 



Larix Americana, Michx. 



Phiiis pvudithi.Xit. • ' 

A. ^'N(/H/(i,Siilisb. 

A,. »»acr«»«i»7w, Forbes. 

L.iiitenHedia,LoAi\. 

PiHU» mnei'ocarp(i,\4amh. -'-.'. 

AMERICAN LARCH. HLACK LARCH. TAMARACK. HACKMATAC. 

Latitude 05° north, south through British America ; in the Northern 
States tVom Maine to Wisconsin, and south to the mountains of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Wood light-colored, strong, very durable ; extensively used and pre- 
ferred for the upper knees of ships, and for posts, railway ties, &c. 

In Libraior and Newfoundlml, a tree 80 to 100 feet in height, with 




338. 



309. 



310. 



311. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



72 



a trunk 80iiictiiii08 2 to 3 feet in dinmoter; oii inoiHt iiplandH or interval 
lauds ; within tlio limits of the United States, smaller, less valuable, 
and ohvayH i:: cold, damp swanipN. 



338. 



Lariz Lyallii, I'ari. 



I'hnit Lyallii, Purl. 



Oregon, in the Cascade and GaUon Uangeis, at <>,()()0 to 7,(MK) feet ele- 
vation. 
A Mmall and little known tree. 



309. 



Lariz oooidentalis, Nntt. 



L. Amofimiia, vur. hirci/oUa, ('urHJ-rc 
I'lHUH XiillaUii, I'nrl. 



Oregon and Washington Territory, in the Cascade Mountains up to 
5,000 feet elevation, and eastward to the western slopes of the IJocky 
Mountains. 

A little known tree, said to attain a height of J 50 feet, with a trunk 
2 to 3 feet in diauneter. 



1 1 



310. 



PinuB Arizonioa, EnKt'im- 

WheekM-'H Kcp. vi. 'M). 



On the Santa llita jStountain, Southern Arizona. "The bt*st lumber 
of that region ; there called Yellow Pine." — {Rothrock.) 

A little known tree, 40 feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 3 feet in diam- 
eter ; only collected by Dr. Rothrock in 1S74. 



i 



til 






.,,.:■ 



•M^ 



m 



■; )l 



Finns australis, .Mi*iix. 



311. 

I', pal list rin, Mill. 
LONtJ-LEAVEl) IMNK. SomiERN riXK. (JEORtJlA IMNK. 

PINE. YELLOW PINE. HARD PINE. 



BROWN 



Southern Virginia to Florida and Mississippi, Louisiana, in the Val- 
ley of the lied River, and probably in Eastern Texas ; not extending 
more than 100 miles from the coast. 

Wood superior to that of any other North American J*ine ; strong, 
compact, straight-grained, remarkably free from sap-wood, very dura- 
ble ; largely employed in construction of all sorts, ship-building, and 
for fencing, railway ties, &c. From this species nearly all the turpen- 
tine, tar, pitch, and rosin produced in the United States is derived. 

A tree of the first economic value, 60 to 80 feet in height, witli a trunk 
2 to 4 feet in diameter; in dry, sandy soil, or more rarely in low swamps. 



.'■til 







312. 



313. 



314. 



315. 



318. 



CATALOGUE OV FOREST TREES. 
Final Balfouriana, .ifttrey. 

FOXTAIL IMNK. IIICKOIIY PINK. 



78 



Calitorniii, in the Mount Slin-stn region, on tlie HnnkM of Scott Mount- 
ain, at 5,<M)<) to H,00() t'l'i^t elevation, forming; an extensive forest (Lem- 
mo/(); on Mount VVIiituey and on the heaihvaters of Kin^^ and Kerr 
Rivers. 

A niediuinsi/cd tree, rarely exccedinj; 50 feet in Iiei^ht,witli a trunk 
H(»uietinies.'> fe«>t in diameter. 

var. ariitata, Hiip'lni., Hot.Cal. ii. i'ir>, im<i {Pinita ai'iHtata, llufivhu. Am. 

Juiirn. 8('i. {'2 wr.) xxxiv. XVi, iiud TriiiiH. Acad. 8t. LoiiIh, ii. '2(Ci, t. r>, 0.) 

Mountains pf Southeastern California ; on the high mountains through 
Nevada, Northern Arizona, and Southern Utah to Colorado, above 7,500 
feet, antl in Colorado reaching 12,000 feet elevation. 

Wood reddish, close-grained, tougli, very strong ; in Central Nevada 
preferred for the timbering of mines. 

A tree, 5(» to 100 feet in height. ^ 

■■■"■■■■" i 

313. ' ' Pinni Banksiana, Lamh. 

/', IliiHitoniru. Poir. 
■ ' /'. rnjM'»i<rif, Miflix. f. 

SCRlll FINE. (;RAY fink. 

From latitude r»5^ north, south through Ilritish America to the north- 
ern borders of Maine, Michigan, Wisconsin ; and in Minnesota and 
Dakota f 

Wood hard, very rc^sinous, of little value ; in New Brunswick some- 
what used for railway ties. 

A low shrub or tree, rarely exceeding 20 feet in height. 



(11 

4 



Ui\ 



I. If"! 



I 5;i 



'ijiii 



■'■k 



314. 



PinuB Chihuahuana, Kii};t-iui. 



Sanoita Valley, Southern Arizona, at C,5(K) feet elevation, and com- 
mon in Western Chihuahua. 
A tree, .'iO to 50 feet in height. 

315. Pinus contorta, Dougi. 

r. inops, Ifoiig. Vt'H. Sitcli. 4'). 

P. IMaiukri, Fail, iu UC. Frodr. xvi-. :»79. 

Alaska, south to Mendocino County, California, near the coast. 
A small tree, 5 to 25 feet in height, with a trunk rarely exceeding 6 
inches in <liameter ; in wet, sandy soil. 

var. Murrayana, Engelm. Hot. Cal. ii. F2G, iiml ( p. contorta, Newberry, Pacif. 
R. Rep. iv. 34, t. 5, and of the Californian botanists. P. IHOps, Beutb. PI. Hartw. 
P. Murrayana, Murr. P. contorta, var. latifoUa, Engelm. in Bot. King Rep. 
vi. 331,&c.) 

Tamarack. 

10 



'id 



■''^'i<tl 



ittji 



'V' 



316. 



^*< ■' '/> 



■;t«;;>^'» Av.iV 



'i^ vj^K^ 



317. 



•^'f^^l^ ■ 



.4?*' 



318. 



319. 



CATALOGUE OP FOREST TREES. 



74 



Oregon, ia the Cascade Mountains ; common in the high Sierras of 
California, where, at an elevation of 8,000 to 9,000 feet, it forms exten- 
sive forests; in the Bocky Mountains of Colorado and Southern Utah. 

Wood white, very light, straight-grained, valuable. 

A tree, 60 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 4 feet in diameter. 

316. Finns Conlteri, Don. 

I', macrocarpaf Lindl. 

California, in the Coast Banges, from Monte Diablo south to the 
southern border of the State. > 

Wood said to be brittle. 
A tree, 50 to 70 feet in height, with a trunk 1 to 2 feet in diameter. 







:, 












317. 



Finns ednlis, Engelm. 

PlSfON. NUT PINE. 



Canon City, Colorado, south through ISew Mexico and Arizona. 

Wood supplying a valuable fuel. 

A small tree, rarely reaching 30 feet in height, with a trunk 8 to 12 
inches in diameter; the large edible seeds furnishing to the Indians a 
valuable article of food. " 



318. 



Finns Elliottii, Engelm. ined. 



South Carolina, to Florida and Southern Alabama, near the coast. 
A large tree, probably often confounded with P. Taeda. 



319. 



Finns flezilis, Jamea. 

WHITE PINE. 



In the Bocky Mountains, from Montana to New Mexico ; on the high 
mountain ranges of Nevada (above 8,000 feet elevation), Arizona, and 
on the Inyo Mountains and Mount Silliman, California. 

Wood white, soft, and, although not free from knots, of fair quality ; 
intermediate between eastern white pine and sugar pine. 

A tree, 50 to CO feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 4 feet in diameter ; 
the most valuable timber tree of Central Nevada, where it is sawn into 
boards. 

Var. albioanlis, Engelm. Bot. Cal. ii. 124, incct. (P. aWicauUs, Enirolra. p. 
cenibroides, Newberry. P. Shasta, Carri^re.) 

Montana, British Columbia, and on the alpine peaks of the Sierra 
Nevada, from Mount Shasta to Mono Pass, and in the Scott Mountains, 
California. 

A tree, 40 to 50 feet in height, or at the highest elevations reduced to 
a low shrub. 



M 



^■0 



m 



; "1 - , 



>:i:i.^:'-T.;-iir;ji!:(c 



320. 



381. 



.■S*'»,t;fl 



.t .:;ii 



322. 



r,/r. *i 



323. 



320. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 
Finns glabra, Walt. 

SPRUCE PINE. 



75 



South Carolina, to Florida and Mississippi, near the coast. 
Wood soft and white. 

A tree, 40 to GO feet in height, with a trunk 12 to 18 inches in diam- 
eter; in swampy soil. Eare. 



321. 



Finns inops, Ait. 

JERSEY PINE. SCRUB PINE. 



Middle Island, Long Island, Totteuville and Clifton, Sfcaten Island, 
New York, south to Cedar Keys, Florida, and from Kentucky to Ar- 
kansas {N^uttall). 

Wood probably of little value, except as inferior fuel. 

A small tree, 10 to 40 feet in height, with a trunk rarely 2 feet in 
diameter; in sterile, sandy soil; springing up everywhere on the aban- 
doned tobacco-lands of Virginia and North Carolina. 

A variety with serotinous cones (P. clausa a \d P. imps^ var. elausa, 
Chap.) has been detected in Florida by Dr. Chapman. 



M 



W 



I 



■ .'1 



322. Finns insignis, Dougl. 

I*. Californica, Lois. ? ' 

i'. adunca, Bosc. 

P. radiata, Don. 

/*. tuherculata, Don [not Gordon]. 

MONTEREY PINE. 

Seacoast of California, from Pescadero south to Monterey and San 
Simeon Bay. 
A tree, 80 to 100 feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 3 feet in diameter. 



t; »!i 






*'. "' .t 



■*t '-'11 

I, -'^ ';il 

■■ -I'ii:!! 



-.i.'M 



323. 



Finns lambertiana, Dongl. 

SUaAR PINE. 



California, on the Coast Ranges, from the Santa Lucia Mountains 
north to Humboldt County, along the Sierra Nevada throughout the 
length of the State, especially on the western flank, at 4,000 to 8,000 
feet elevation ; and in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon north to the 
Columbia River. 

Wood resembling that of the eastern white pine, but heavier, stronger, 
coarser-grained, and probably less easily worked. 

A tree, 150 to 300 feet in height, with a trunk 10 to 20 feet in diameter. 




324. 



325. 



326. 



327. 



328. 



! CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 76' 

384. Piniu mitis, Micbx. 

P. mriabUis, PnrBh. 

YELLOW FWB. SHORT-LEAVED PINE. SPRUCE PINE. V 

Gifford's, Staten Island (a single specimen), south to Florida and 
Tallapoosa County, Alabama; on the Ozark Mountains of Missouri, 
where it is the only Pine, and south into Arkansas ; doubtless in many 
intermediate stations. 

Wood yellow, hard, compact, durable ; inferior to, although employed 
for the same purpose as that of P. australis. 

A tree, 40 to 70 feet in height, with a trunk rarely 2 feet in diameter. 

325. Finns monophylla, Torr. <& Frem. 

P. Fremontiana, Enill. . .: 

NUT PINE. 

Through Central Nevada, Southern Utah, and Arizona; along the 
eastern slope of Sierra Nevada ; and in the Californian Coast Ranges 
about Fort Tejou. 

Wood white, soft, very resinous, furnishing valuable fuel; and in 
Central Nevada, where it will soon be exterminated, largely made into 
charcoal. 

A small bushy tree, 10 to 20 feet in height, with a trunk sometimes 2 
feet in diameter ; the large edible seeds invaluable to the Indians of the 
"Croat Basin," and their principal article of food. 

326. Finns monticola, Dougi. 

Washington Tenutory and Oregon in the Cascade Mountains, and 
south along the Sierra Nevada to Calaveras County, California, at 7,000 
to 10,000 feet elevation. 

Wood said to resemble that of the eastern white pine. 

A tree, 60 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 3 feet in diameter^ 



827. 



Finns mnrioata, Don. 



p. Edgariana, Hartw. 



California, " only near the coast, where it is exposed to the sea winds- 
and fogs, to an altitude of 2,000 feet from Mendocino, where it grows 
tallest (in peat bogs) to Tomalis Point (in the most sterile soil), Mon- 
terey and San Luis Obispo." {Engelm., Bot. Cai. ii. 128, ined.) 

A slender tree, 25 to 50, or rarely 80 to 120 feet in height, with a. 
trunk 1 to 3 feet in diameter. 

328. Finns Farryana, Engeiui. 

/*. Llaveana, Toir. 

Only collected by Dr. C. C. Parry, 40 miles southeast of San Diego, 



m 

•«■;'! 

II 

-1(1 



■I 



■S!; 









.f% 



m 



■I 



'^;. 



• ( ''■'■■' £.<. 



329. 



,Kr>' 



Irh 



330. 



Ai-- 4(, .. - i,w J, 



331. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



77 



California, and beyond the limits of the United States, to which, how- 
over, it may yet perhaps be found to extend. 

A small tree, 20 to .'10 feet in height, with a trunk 10 to 18 inches in 
diameter. 



329. 



PinuB ponderosa, Dougl. 



i*. Benthamiana, Hartw. 
r. lieardnleyi, Murr. 
P Craigana, Murr. 



YELLOW PINE. 



Throughout Oregon and California, especially along the western 
slopes of the Sierra Nevada. 

Wood yellow, hard, heavy, strong, durable, very valuable. 

A large tree, 200 to 300 feet in height, with a trunk 12 to 15 feet in 
diameter ; with its varieties the most widely distributed (not yet seen 
on any of the mountain ranges of Nevada), and the most valuable of 
the M estern Pines. 

var, Jeftceji, Eugelui. But. Cal. ii. 120, hied. (P. Jefreyi, Murr. P. deflexa, 
Torr., in part.) 

Oregon and California, principally along the eastern slopes of the 
Sierra Nevada, above 5,000 feet elevation. 

A tree, 100 to 200 feet in height, with a trunk 30 to 15 feet in diam- 
eter ; often in the most arid situations. 

var. scopulonim, Engolm. l. c. (P. ponderosa of the Colorado botanists.) 

Throughout the Kocky Mountains from British Columbia to New Mex- 
ico and Arizona. 

A tree, 80 to 100 feet in height. 



330. 



Finns pnngens, Michx. 

TABLE MOUNTAIN PINE. 



In the Alleghany Mountains, from Pennsylvania (Port Clinton, Har- 
risburg, «&c.,) to North Carolina. 

A small tree, 30 to 50 feet in height, with a trunk 18 to 20 inches in 
4liameter. Rare. 



331. 



P. rubra, Miolix.f. 



Pinna resiuosa, Mt. 



RED PINE. NORWAY PINE. 



From about latitude 50^ north, south through the extreme Northern 
and New England States to the mountains of Pennsylvania, and west 
to Minnesota. 

Wood light-colored, resinous, hard, heavy, durable; employed in con. 
Btruction, ship-building, &c. 

A tree, 60 to 80 feet in height, or in Michigan 100 to 150 feet in 



'. If < 



i 



m 



i'..''.x 






ml 
W 



i 



l-M 




335 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



78 



height {B€88€y)f with a trunk 2 to 3 feet in diameter; in light sandy soil. 
Nowhere very common ; forming scattered groves, rarely exceeding a 
few hundred acres in extent. 



332. 



Finns rigida, Mill. 

PITCH PINE. 



Mount Desert, Maine, and Northern Vermont to the upper districts 
of Georgia, not extending'^west of the Alleghany Mountain region. 

Wood heavy, resinous, or when grown in low gi'ound soft and largely 
composed of sap wood ; little used except as fuel, although sometimes 
sawed into cheap boards. 

A tree, 40 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk sometimes 30 inches in 
diameter ; in the dryest and most barren, sandy soil, or in deep swamps. 



333. 



Finns Sabiana, Dougi. 



California, throughout the Coast Eauges; on the foothills of the 
Sierra Nevada, up to 4,000 feet elevation, and in the valley of the Sac 
ramento River ; east of the Sierras only seen in Owen's Valley. 

A small tree, 40 to 50 feet in height, with a trunk rarely exceeding 2 
feet in diameter ; the edible seeds supplying the Indians with a valuable 
article of food. 

334. Finns serotina, MiL-hx. 

P. Tmla, var. alopecuroidfa, Ait. Hort. Kew. 

POND PINE. 

North Carolina, to middle Florida, near the coast. 
A tree, 40 to 80 feet in height, with a trunk rarely exceeding 20 inches 
in diameter J injow, swampy, peaty soil. 



335 



Finns Strobns, L. 

WHITE PINE. WEYMOUTH PINE. 



Newfoundland, the northern shores of Lake Nipigon and the Saskatch- 
ewan ; south through the New England and Northern States, and along 
the Alleghany Mountains to Georgia. 

Wood white, soft, clear, free of knots; easily worked, and suscept- 
ible of a beautiful polish ; durable when not placed in contact with the 
soil, although hickiug in strength ; immense quantities of boards annu- 
ally sawed from this species are used for the outside covering of build- 
ings, packing cases, cabinet work, and many domestic pui'poses. 

A tree, 80 to 150 feet in height, with a trunk sometimes, though rarely,, 
exceeding 4 feet in diameter. 






1 






* ] 



. ';< ( 



1 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 



79 



336. 



Pinui TflBda, L. 

LOBLOLLY PINE. OLD FIELD PINK. 



Southern Delaware ami Fredericksburg, Virginia, to Florida, Ala- 
bama, Eastern Texas, and in Arkansas. 

Wood '' sappy, coarse-grained, liable to warp and shrink, and soon 
decays on exposure.'' 

A tree, 50 to 70 feet in height, with a trunk 2 to 3 feet in diameter; 
in low, moist situations where it reaches its greatest developement, or in 
dry, sandy soil ; everywhere springing up in abandoned lands near the 
coast in the Southern Atlantic and Gulf States. Turpentine of infe- 
rior quality is produced from this species. 

In the vicinity of Albemarle Sound, in low, swampy districts, the 
Loblolly Pine is said to occasionally attain a height of 150 to 170 feet, 
and to produce timber of great value, and is there locally known as 
♦'Swamp Pine," "Slash Pine," "liosemary Pine." 

337. Pinus tuberoulata, CJortion. ' '\ 

/'. Californka, H.'irtw. 

California, from the Shasta Iiegion through the Coast lianges to San 
Bernardino and the Santa Lucia Mountains, and on the foot-hills of the 
Sierra Nevada at 2,500 feet elevation, near Forest Hills, Placer County 
{Bolander). 

A small tree or bush, 3 to 20 or rarely 40 feet in height. 



■-i 



l.ii':' <;■ 



m 



PALMACE^E. 



338. Sabal Palmetto, K. s. 

Cliamivrops Palmetto, Miolix. 

CABBAGE TREE. CABBAGE PALMETTO. 

North Carolina (rare), and south to Florida, near the coast. 
Wood porous, resisting the attacks of the Teredo, and almost imperish- 
able under water; highly valued for i>ile8, wharfs, &c. 
A tree, 20 to 40 feet in height. 

339. Washingtonia filifera, Wendi. Hot. Zeit. xxxvii. ch. 

Braheadiiki8{1), Cooper, Smith. Rop. 18(50, 442. 
Brnhea fihimentoM, Hort. 
Vritchardia filamentoaa, Wi'ndl. 

San Bernardino County, Cjilifornia, to Western Arizona. 

A tree, 20 to 40 feet in height, with a trunk sometimes 2 to 3 feet in 
diameter; "in rocky localities, in dry sheltered canons, solitary, or few 
in a group." ( WaUon, in Bot. Cal. ii. 2ii, ined.) Some other species, a« yet 
very imperfectly known, possibly occur in Southern California. 



', ■-! V I 




S40. 



311. 



342. 



S40. 



CATALOGUE OF FOREST TREES. 

Thrinaz panriflora, Sw. 



80 



"Keys along the Florida reofs, extending up the weitt coast as far as 
Cape RoM'ano." — {Chapman, in Couit. Hnt.Gaz. ill. 12.) 
A small tree, 10 to 30 feet in height. ' 



LlLIACEiH 
311. Taooa brevifolU, Kngclm. 

r. Dracottia f, var. arboreacent, Torr. 

Southwestern Utah, Northwestern Arizona to Southern Nevada, and 
Southeastern California ; forming near the Mohave Biver, on the desert 
plateau, at 2,000 to 4,000 feet elevation, straggling forests. 

Woo<1, as in the whole genus, brittle and fibrous. 

A small tree, 15 to 30 feet in height, with a tnmk often 2 feet in 
diameter. \ 



342. 



Tneoa Treouliana, Currl^re. 



Southern Texas, Matagorda Bay, and from the Brazos and Guadaloupe 
Rivers south into Mexico. 

A small tree, 15 to 25 feet in height, with a trunk 1 to 2 feet in diam- 
eter; the bitter-sweetish fruit cooked and eaten by the Indians. 



ADDENDUM. • 

Under Acer iaooharinam, No. 52, insert : 

var. nigrum, Torr. & Gray {A. nigrum, Mlchx. f.). Black Sugar Maple. 
Western Vermont to Missouri, and south to ? 

A large tree ; along streams in lower situations than the species, from 
which it is perhaps specifically distinct. 



II 



tliil 



:<1 'I ; 



-:S 



V 



'lb .; I 



I 4 ft-ii, ,.i?» JH 









/■r- 



'T'')/^ 



V>iV-P 



INDEX 



Name. 



1^ 0., 



Name. 



1 a> 

I • 'Sti 



11 

.<6iV««/6« a0270 

AhUn Jlberliahu 300,69 

Ahie« amabiliH ? (AbieH coiifolor) 29267 

Abies amabilh (Abies cuncolor) 29267 

Abies amabilis (Abies niagnifica) 29567 

Abies amabilis (Abies snbalpiiia) 1297|68, 

.-IftM-H atNafri/is (Abies 8nba1i>iiia, var. 

fallax) 29768 

Abies balsaiiiea 290 66 

A hies balsamifera 290 66 

Abies bifoUa 297 68 

Abies braeteala 291 66 

Abies Bridgesii 30069 

A bies Canadensis 29t> 69 

Abies c«»iu'ol«r 29267 

Abies Douglasii 29H 68 

Abies Engelmanni :}0;{ 70 

Abies Fraseri 29367 

Abies Gordoniava 294 67 

A bies graiulis 2iMi67 

Abies grandis, var. ilensiHora 29467 

Abies grandis (Abies eoiicolor) 29267 

Abies grandis (Abies snbalpiiia) 29768 

Abies Hookeriana 301 69 

Abies lasiocarpa (Abies eoneolor) 29267 

Abies laaioearjM (Alties subalpiiia) . .297 68 

Abies IxiKiaua 292 67 

Abies niaguitiea 29567 

, ( fc»e« mavrocarpa 298 69 

Abies Menziesii (Pic«'a piiuueiis) 30571 

Abies Menziesii (Pieea Siteueiisis) . .. :K)671 

Abies Mertensiana :M)069 

Abies nigra (I'icea Kiigelinaiiiii) :W3'70 

Abies nigra (IM<'e« nigra) 30470 

Abies nigra, var. rnbra '.VH<7(i 

Abies nobilis 29668 

Abies Parsoniana 2{)2 67 

Abies I'attonii or I'attoniana ...: :W1 69 

Abies rubra 30470 

-\bie8 snbalpina 297 68 

Abies snbalpiua, var. fallax 29768 

Abies WiUiamsonii :W1 6t> 

Acaeia, (Jreen-bark 6iU7 

Aoacia Greggii 74 18 

Aeacia, Tliree-tliorn«*tl 67 17 

.Veer cireinatnm 46 12 

Aeer rtasycarpuui 47 12 

Acer Drnmmondii 51 13 

Acer erioear^}Hm 4712 

Aeer grandidentatiini 48 13 

Aeer macrophyllnni 4913 

Aeer Xegundo 53 14 

Aeer nigrnm .5280 

Acer Peunsyl Yani<MiiH .50 13 

Aeer rnbrnni 5113 

AcA\r saceharinuni .52 13 

Acer saceharinuni, var. nigrum .52 80 

Avtr siriatum 50 13 

11 



Aehras saUeifolia 137 30 

Acras Zapotilla, var. jtarrijlora ,142 31 

Aisvnlvs arguta 39 11 

iEscnlns Califonii«*a ' 38 11 

^scnlusflava 3911 

iEscnlns glabra 40 11 

JEscnlas Ohioensis ; 40 11 

Alder, Black 25256 

Alder, Hoarv 25256 

Alder, Seasi«le 253 57 

Alder, Speckled 2.5256 

Algaroba 7218 

Algarobia glandulosa 72 18 

AInuH incana 252 5(> 

Alnus inrana, var. vireseens 25257 

AInus niaritima 25357 

Alnus oblongit'olia 254 57 

Alnus rhumbifolia 255 57 

.\lnns rubra 25657 

Amelanchier Canadensis 105 24 

Amelancbier Canailensis, var. Hotry- 

apium 10524 

Amelanchier Canadensis, var. oblon- 

gilolia 10524 

American Asp* ii 268 60 

American Heech 243 .54 

American Cork Elm 18039 

American Crab Apple 87 21 

American Elm 177 39 

American Holly 28: 9 

Americavi Hornbeam 245.54 

American Larch |307;71 

.Vmericau Mountain Ash ! 85{21 

American Plane Tree ,19141 

Amyris Floridana : 23; 8 

Amyris sylvatica 23 8 

AXAi'AUniACK.K 14 

Andromeda arborea 129:29 

Angelica Tree 114'26 

Anona glabra 9: 5 

AuDna triloba 10 5 

AXOXACK.K ; 5 

A nongmos aqualiea 181 40 

Apple, American Crab ' 87'21 

Apple Haw 90J22 

.\pplo, Narrow-leave*! Ci'ab 86;21 

.\pple, Oregctn Crab .'. . . 88!21 

Aralia spinosa 114'26 

Aramack.k !26 

Arbol deHierro ; 60'15 

Arbor VitH' 28564 

Arbor Vita", Western 284164 

Arbutus hmrifolia 126 28 

Arbutus Men/iesii 126'28 

Arbutus proeera 126;2H 

Arbutus Texuna - 126:28 

Arctostaphylos glauca 12829 

Arolosiapbglos glauea (Arctostaphylos 

pungonS; var. platyphylla). ..1... 127^28 
Arctostaphylos pungens 127 28 



! 



fit 



■ill ; 

w 

Ilk. 



\%y 



iL. 1(1 






,;ij. <if 



Xnnio. 



INDEX. 



55 'Z 



82 



Niune. 



o 



IS 



ArcfostniilivloH piinfjois, vai'. platv- ' 

phyllti .." '.. 12728 

Avdisia Piiki-iiiijjia i:J3 :M) 

Aronica arbiitij'olin 104 24 

Asli, AiniM'icaii Mouiitniii 8521 

Aali, Jilack 15534 

Ash, Blue 15034 

Ash, Oregon 151 33 

Ash, Prickly 19 7 

Ash, Water 15333 

Ash, White 14832 

Ash-leaved Maple 5314 

Asinaina triloba 10 5 

Asp, Quaking 2fi8 fiO 

Aspen, Aniencaii 2(58 00 

Aviceunia iiiti«la 167 3(5 

A vicennia ohlongifoHa 1(57 30 

Ai'icetiiiia tomeiitoaa 167 3(5 

Bahl Cypress 287 65 

liahn of (iilead 2(53 5l> 

Halm of (iilead Fir 20(»(56 

Halsani Fir.. 290 66 

Balsam Poplar 263 59 

Barren Oak 22950 

Bass Wood 14 6 

Bass Wood. White 15 7 

Bay, Lohlollv 12 6 

Bay, Red 170 37 

Bay, Rose 131 29 

Bav, Sweet 4 4 

BaV, White 4 4 

Bear Berry 35 11 

Beech, American 243 54 

Beech, Blue 24554 

Beech, Wat»r 245 54 

Hetiila acumhiaUt 248 55 

Betula alba, var. populit'olia 24(5 55 

JMula rarphiifolia 247 55 

lictula ciiapidata 24(5 55 

Jietiila exciha 248 55 

Betula lenta 247 55 

JMiila Ivnia 247 55 

lU'tnJa hntn ( Betula lutea ) 248 55 

Betula lutea 248 .55 

Hetula nigra 249 56 

Betula oecideiitalis 2.50 56 

Betula pajtyiacea 251 5(5 

IMula populifolia 246 .55 

BKTI'I.ACK.K. .55 

Big Laurel 5 4 

Big Tree 288 65 

JHffHoiiia ( 'alttlpti 164 :55 

It'Kjnoitia liinui'iH !6<> 36 

Bl«NONlACi:.K :55 

Bilsted 106 24 

Birch, Black , 247 55 

Birch, Canoe 251 5(5 

B'rch , Cherry 247 55 

Birch, (jiray (Betula alba, var. popu- 
lifolia) 246 55 

Birch, Gray (Betula lutea) 248 55 

Birch, Mahogany 247 55 

Birch, Old Field 24655 

Birch, Paper 25150 



Birch, Bed '249.'>(5 

Birch, River 24956 

Birch, Sweet 247 55 

Birch, West Indian 22 8 

Birch, Wliitc(Betula alba, var. popu- I 

lifolia) 24655 

Birch, White (Betula papvracea).. . 2.5156 

Birch, Yellow ' 248 55 

Bitter Nut 19943 

Bitter Wood 2l| 8 

Black Alder 25256 

Black Ash 15534 

Black Birch 24755 

Black Button Wood 109 25 

Black Cvpress 287.65 

Black Gum 120'27 

Black Haw 124'28 

Black Jack, Forked-leaf 210 46 

Black .lack Oak 22950 

Black Larch 307,71 

Black Oak 23651 

Black Sugar Maple I .52 80 

Black Thorn 102123 

Black Walnut 19643 

Blue Ash 15(534 

Blue Beech 24554 

Blue .lack 211 4(J 

I51ue Oak 21547 

Blue Wood 3310 

liiahea dnhh 33979 

Brahea fihnnciitosa 33979 

Brown Uickorv 202,44 

Blown Pine ..' 31172 

Bois d'Aic 19041 

Boi!i{.\(ii\A( I, i: 35 

Bonrreria llavancnsis 16235 

Bonrreria llavancnsis, var. ladula.. 1(5235 

ItitiirrvvUi miUila 162 35 

liu'irrffUi siKviiIenln 1(52 35 

//oi. rci id lonuiiloxii, var. llaraHciiKiM.. KiJi 35 

lloiiinriu v'nijala 1(52 >{5 

Box FIdcr (Negundo aceroltles) 53 14 

Box Klder (N»>gnndo Californiciini). 54 14 

Box, False 31 10 

Buckeye, Fetid 4011 

Huckeve, Ohio 4011 

Buckeve. Sweet :{9 11 

Buckt lunn, Southern 14031 

Buckwheat Tree 30 10 

linmdUi ttiifiuHlij'olitt 138 30 

Bunudia ciineata 1:18,30 

/iiimi'UttJhriifihu'a 139 31 

Itnnu'liu JolidixHimtt 136|30 

Bunudia lanuginosa 139|31 

Bumtdia lycioides. 140|31 

linnu'Vm mtii»\ni folia 138 30 

Biimt'liu obhiifiij'oliu 13931 

linmi'litt pallida ] 3!) 30 

liiimclia parrifolia 138130 

Ihimilia rtrliintta 1 38 30 

liumtVw nalirifolia 137 30 

Bunudia tenax 14131 

Itiimelia loiiicntosa 139!3l 

Binnwood 5514 

Burr Oak 227 49 

Bursera guuunifera 22. 8 



M 

^ i 

1] 



11 



•^ f! 



'"■,i: 



n 



INDKX. 



83 



Nnmo. z V 

y* — 

Hl'HSKIt.VCK.K 8 

Hutloii Tive IIW *') 

Hiittoiiwnod 19141 

Button w I. niii.k 101) -vV) 

|{iit»«'nnit 1J)5 42 

... G. • ,. i 

CiiMmjj;*' I'aliiM'tttt :{:W71) 

CalihuKt' Tire :UW 71> 

Ca<ta<i;.k 25 

Cajeimt 172 'Xi 

Calico Bush i:{()29 

Califoniiu Laiiivl 172 :<7 

C'ulifornia hilar :{7 11 

California Livo ( »ak 212 4(> 

California Nntnu*K 27001 

California Olive 17237 

Canada riuni 7(519 

Canoe Birch 251 r>6 

Capuihh.iack.k 27 

Carolina Poplar 2(57 (50 

('ar[nnii8 JmiTicanu 245 54 

CarpinuN Caroliniana 24554 

('arpiniin OHtnja 24454 

CarphiHs huftoni 244 54 

CarphiiiH Virijiiiiatin 244 54 

Caryanlha 1984:5 

Carya aniara 19J)4:5 

Carya aqnatica 200 44 

Cat'ya (jlahra 20244 

Carya niyriHticu'foiinis 20144 

Carya porcina 202 44 

Carya Hiilnata 20344 

Carya tonientoHa 204 44 

i'aatanea Amevimiia 242 54 

Caatanea chryitonhiiUn 240 53 

( 'astanea puniila 241 53 

Cantanea renea, var, Aiiwricaiui 24254 

Caatanea vulfrarin, var. Americana.. 24254 

CaHtanopHis dirysophylla 240 5:5 

CantanopftiH sempervire'm 240 5:5 

Catalpabi^nonioides 1(54:55 

Catalpa cordifolia 164 :55 

Catalpa Hpeciosa 1(55 'Mi 

( 'olalua HfinttgaJoJia 1(54 :55 

( 'atalpa, Western 1(55 :56 

Cat's-claw 7518 

CuanotluiH Hiiinosiis :5(5 11 

CeunotliUH tliyrsitlonis :57 11 

Cedar, Oregon 281(53 

Cedar, Red 277 H2 

Cedar, Stinking 271 (51 

Cedar, White (Channucyparis Law- 

souiana) 281 f>3 

Cedar, White (ChannecypariK wplne- i 

roidea) ." 28:564 

Cedar, White (Liltoeednisilecnrrens) 28(565 
Cedar, White (Thuya occideutalis) . . 285(54 

Cki-astuackk ....' 10 

Celtis ImnipcH 18240 

( '«//»« crn»HiJoHa 184'40 

( 'eltiii ititeqilJoUa 18:5 40 

CeltU hevU/ata 18340 

( ellis longifolia 183 40 

CeltiH MiHsiHHippienmH 18340 



Name. 






Celti.s occidentalis 184 40 

Velth wcUU'iitaUn, var. vraHni folia 18440 

(tlfiM ocvidenliilin, var. iHUujnfoliu ... 183 4<( 
Celliv ofcidviitalis, var. UnuiJ'olm .... 18:540 

t'vltix ( Momhia) pullidu 1854ft 

Celtis Tala, var. jiallida 1854*1 

CeniHtin horvoUn 80 19 

CcruHUH < arolhiidiiu 77 19 

< 'fniHiiH I 'li icanu 78 19 

CvrttsiiM molliH 79 19 

CvmsiiH l'fniii>!ilruiiiv(t 80 19 

< 'emnm mrot'nm 81 2(t 

CeraxuH rirfihiiuiio 8120 

CtTvidliim ftoridnm (l'arkins(Miia liori- 

da) ....' ()817 

Cvn'tdUim Jloridum (I'arkinsonia Tor- i 

reyana) 69 17 

Cirrix ( 'alifuniii'um 7117 

Cen-is Canadensis 7017 

Cercis occidcntalis 71 17 

Cercis reniforniis 7118 

Cercocarpns ledifoiins 84 20 

( 'erens giganteus 1 13 25 

ChamorypariH atteniiidn 281 6:5 

Chamifvyparis excvlsa 282 (54 

ChanuvcypariH fragraitx 281 (53 

Chama'cyparis Lawstmiana 281 (53 

( 'hama'«-y]taris Nutkaensis 282 (i4 

Chamnrifpur'tD Xulkaeiisin (ChaMiie<y- 

paris Lawsoniana) 281 63 

Channecyparis spha-roiih'a 283(54 

ChamoropH Pal met to :5:{879 

Cherry Birch 247 55 

Cherry, Wild Black 81 20 

Cherry, Wild Ke;l 80 19 

Chestnut Oak 2:5:551 

Chestnut Oak, Rock 2:5351 

Chit'kasaw IMum 78 19 

Chilop»i» gluthioHit 166 :5(5 

< 'liilopxiH Ihiear'tH 1()() :i6 

Chilopsis sali);na 1(5(5 :{(> 

Chini|ua|tin (Castanca piimila) 24153 

(.'hini|uapin (Castanopsis chryso- 

I>hylla) 240 53 

Chionanthiis Viryinica 158 :54 

Chrysophyllum uiicrophyilum i:54:50 

Chryxophylliim vionopiftTiinin 135:50 

Chrysoidiyllum «divifornic i:55 30 

Cladrastis tiuctoria 62 16 

( 'lanmiy I .oeust 59 15 

Cliftonia lignstrina ;50 10 

Clusia tiava 11 6 

Coccolo'oa Floridana 1(58:56 

i 'ocvoloha parvifoUa 168 :56 

Coccololta unifera 169 :57 

CocksiHir Thorn 96 22 

Cott'e Tree, Kentucky 65 16 

Condalia oho vata 33 10 

CONIKKK.K (52 

Conocarpus erecta 108 25 

Coral Sunnich 5514 

Cordi a Boissieri 160 ;55 

Cordia t loridti mt 162 :55 

Conlia Sebesteua 161 :55 

Cordia upmom 16135 

Cork Kim, American 180:59 



?• 



3^' * 



k«i 



,),'i 



(■>■' 



1 u: 



(J 



INDEX. 



84 



Naiiic. 



-•I 



Nimu'. 



COIIXACK.K 

(.'oriiiiH FUtridii 

CuriuiH Niittallii 

Cotton (iinu 

Cotton Tiop 

Cottonwttoil 

Crab Ai»i»l«', Ani*-ri<-an 

Cmb Ai»|»li', XaiTow-U'avLMl 

Crab AJ>i»U', ()iV};on 

Crab A> ood 

Crata-gUH a-Htivalis 

Cratii-^nn apiifolia 

Crata'fjns arbon'Hi'cns 

Crahvijun arhutifoUa 

Crata'jjns bcrb«>ritulia 

Crata'gnH «'occin«'a 

Crata'gns coccinca, var. ])0|nilirolia. 

Crata')tn8 (•oi'cnmi, var. viriilis 

CruUvijHH voci'itua, var. mnU'tx 

Crata>gn8 cordata 

CratH'giihCrns-galli 

CratwgiiN Crns-jsalli, var. lincariH.. . 
Crat.Tgna Cru8-galli, var. ovalit'olia. 
Crata'gns CrnH-galli, var. ]M-niii folia. 
Crata'gnH Crns-galli, var. pyrii-anthi 

Iblia 

Crata'gns Dttnglasii 

Crata'gns Hava 

( 'ra tttijm microva t'lta 

Cruttt'gus mollh 

Crata'gns pnnctata 

Crata'gns rivnlaris 

Ci'titwgus Naiiguineii, var. Douglnnii .. 

Crata'gns spathnhita 

Crata'gns species 

Crata'gJissnbvillosa 

Crata'gns touicntosa 

Crata'gns tomentosa, var. jmnctata.. 

Vmtagua tonwntoM, var. hioIUh 

Cncninber Troe 

Cnciinil)er Tree, Long-l«'av«'«l 

I'uprvHSKn Amerkatid 

Ci(pirH«iiiidi»lirliit 

Cnpreasns (iovcniana 

(iipreBMUit Hartivcffii 

CuprcssHg Lamhcriinna 

('iipremHun lAUVHoniana 

Cnpressns Maenabiaua 

<^'nprt'8ans nniemc-arpa 

( 'iipres8Un Xutkaeiisin 

CiipresHUS Thtjoukn 

CriTUKKHK 

Cypress, Hald , 

( 'ypresa, Black 

( 'ypresa. Deci(ln«>ns 

< 'ypvess, Monterey 

Cypress, White 

t yrilla CarolhiUiuu 

( urina'paineulnta 

Cyrillii raceniiHora 

CYKILr.ArKK 



. . . Ufi I )osert Willow 

n.''.'i(i Devil Wood 

I1H5J6 Dios]iyros Texunu 

1'21 '27 Diospyros Virginiana 

i!6(>5i* Dipbolis salieit'olia 

'267 Wl Dogwood, Flowering 

H721 Dogwood, Janiaii'a 

8t)*-il Dogwood, Striped 

88^1 Donglas Spnue 

M 10 Downy Toidar 

1W122 DnmifphyUiim puurijioruin. 

Ul 5i'2 Drypetes erocea . . .'. 

ii2'ii 
104 24 E. 

i»4 'i'j' '*' i»i">> A<'K.i'; 

94 22 '''"■''"' JteiirrcrlH 

94 2d '''^ii'*^^'"- ulliptiea 

101 2'.\ /^'"'''''" Uni'iineiiHiit 

95 22 ^'''^"''''"^ radula 

9)) 22 '''"'*''"' fonieiito8n 

9G22!i^J'l''»- ••■-: 

9fi22^tj"''^)"»'i'."'»" ■■•: 

<w<.>> hnn, Aniencan Cork 

'" :Elni, False 

% 22 ^'''"'' ^I""'^*' 

07 •>■) Ehn, Hock 

98 23 *-'"'' ^1>1>I»' -ly 

10023 ''•'^'"> Snnill-leaved 



10123 '^'"'' R^'«l---- 
iiwri Elm, White... 



l()6:t(i 
ir)934 
144 32 
14331 
137 30 
1152« 
6115 
5013 
29868 
2(5659 
17237 
173 :»8 



... 31 
16235 
163 ;J5 
162 :»5 
160 :15 
162:15 
12227 
17739 
18039 
184 40 
17939 
18039 
17939 
176;i8 
179 :» 
177:19 
176:18 
20645 
...28 
11025 
11125 
11225 
...38 
230.50 
174:18 



P. 



1). 



Dahoon Holly 

Decidn«)ns Cypress. 



y923|'^''»'^^'»S"'"^ 

97 23 ^^'»'«»" 

10023 ^^'"<^'^V*-,'- ••:;•,: 

10324 ■"'"K*^"'" bnxitolia 

10123 l'^<iK*'»i>i *li(>l>utoniu 

1022:1 K»K«">>i procera 

UWi'll Eri'lKHllUACKK 

im-l'v l-AerKreen Whit.' Oak .... 
. ^ hxciiTuna iiirida 

3 4 
28264 

287 65 Fiii/iia ( aHlitiiea 

27863 Fuf^ns t'errngiiiea 

2806:1 FagiiH piniiild 

2H0 6:1 FMi/iiH HiilroiWix 

28K3 False Hox 

J796:i False Elm 

280 6:1 Fetitl Bnckeye 

28264 Ficns anrea.* 

28364 Ficns brevii'olia 

... 45 Ficns pediniculata 

28765 Fir, Balm ofGileud 

28765 Fir, Balsam 

28765 Fir, Red 

28063 Fir, White , 

287 65 Flowering Dogwood 

29 9 Forked-leaf Black Jack 

13:130 Fox-tail Pine 

29; 9 Frangula Carolimnna 

... 9 Franguhi I'urHhiana ■ 

I Fraxinua ncuminata 

Fraxiniis alba 

' I . Fraxinns Americana ■ 

27 9 Fraxinns .^wf)'tc'a/«i(Fraxiun8 platy- 
28765 carpa) 153:13 



24254 
24354 
241 53 
24354 

31 10 
184 40 

4011 
18641 
18741 
18841 
29066 
29066 
29567 
29267 
11526 
21046 
31273 

3410 
I 3511 
148:12 
14832 
148:12 



irM 



ii A\ 



il i 



NUOKS 



INDEX. 



& 



y. i- 



Naiiu>. 



85 






Fruxiinis unoiiiitln Wi'XS 

FraxiniiH UerUtmHeranu 1 W :M 

FraxiitNH ('aroUntana (FnixiiiiiN plii- 

tycftrpa) 153 :W 

Fnu-hiim i'ai'olhiiniiM (FriixiiiiiH viri- 

<liH) 157 34 

FraxiuuH coiivohr 157 ;M 

Frarin m vnritu^u 152 33 

Fi'axinm Cm-t'maW 148:ttJ 

KraxiiiiiH dipntnin 15033 

FmxinuH epiiilem 148 ;12 

Fmxinm exiHiima 157 34 

Frtulnnt fimndi/olia 151 :i:{ 

Fraxinm jinjiamliJ'oUa (FraxiiiiiH 

Amerieaiia) 148 :J2 

FraxinWH jmjlamlifoHn {Vv\x\m\\n. viri- 

«Hh) 157:14 

FruTimia nigra 154 34 

FraxiiiUH()re}j;aua .•... 151'.W 

Fraxinm paUida \W,VX\ 

Fraxinua pauciflora 153 JKl 

Fraxinu» Vennnyhanica 154 ;14 

Fraxiiius iiistariii'folla 152 33 

FraxiniiH JMHtacia't'olia, vat-.i-ni-iucea 152:U 

FraxiiiUH i»lat ycarpa 153 :»3 

FraxiniiH piibttHcciiH 154 :14 

Fraxiiiua imlteHtrna, var 151 :W 

FraxiiiUM qnadniiiKulata 156 :i4 

FraxiniiH sanihiicifolin 155 :t4 

FraxinuH lomentona 154 :M 

hVaxinHt triutern IM 3:^ 

Fraxiniig reluHHu 152 3:< 

FraxiniiH viridin 157 ;14 

FruxHUiH viriilis, var. iterlamlit'i-ana 15734 
Fringi'Tiw 15834 

(i. 

Gt^ntp 'five 44 12 

(•iMtrgia Hark 12528 

(•«or|;ia Pino 31172 

GIt'ditHchia inonoHiiorina (kt 17 

(iluditschia triacanthoH {yjn 

(•ordouiaLaHiantlniH 12 6 

(lurdoniu piibosciMiH 13 fi 

Grape, Sea lOOtff 

(iiray liireli (Hctiila allia, var. popu- 

lifolia) 24(5.55 

Gray Hircli (Hetnla Intisi) 248.55 

<Jniy Pine 31373 

(Jwftt Lanrul 131 2{> 

Green-bark Acaciu fi917 

(liiiatttm anijuHtifnlium 17 7 

(tiiaiacnm Hanctiiin 10 7 

(iHajaciim 17 7 

(Juni, Black 12027 

<;iini, Cotton 12127 

(Juin, Sour 11927 

<Jnin, Sweet 10<{24 

(inniTreo 1182(5 

(JUTTIFEIMO (> 

(iymnanthvH hivida ; . . . 174 38 

(iyinnocludiiH CanadeiiHis U5 1(5 

H. 

Ha«kb('irv 18440 

Haikinataf 307 71 



HalcHJa dipt.'ia 14(5 32 

MalfHia tetrajiti-ra 147 32 

Hamamki-ack.!-; 24 

Hard I'inv 31172 

Haw, Apple 9022 

Haw, Black 12428 

Haw, May 9022 

Haw, Riininier 98 23 

Heiniock 29U(5» 

HercnliH' Club 1142(5 

HetcroaieleH arbutifolia .. 10424 

HeleromeicH tWrnonliaim 10424 

Hejideria decurrciia 28(5 (55 

Hickory, Brown 202 44 

Hickory, Xiitnicjj iJOl 44 

Hickoiv Pine 31273 

Hickory, KIiu«-l»ark 19843 

Hickory, Shell-bark 198 43 

Hickory, Swamp 19943 

Hickory, Thick Shell-bark 203 44 

Hickory, Water 200 44 

Hickory, Westeru Shell-bark 20344 

Hickory, White 19943 

Hickory, White-licart 20444 

Hipponiane Mancinclla 175;:)8 

Hoary Alder 2.525(5 

Hojr i'luin 25 9 

Holly, American 28 9 

Holly, Dahoon 27 9 

Honey Berry 4412 

Htniey LociiHt ((UcditHchia triacan- 

thos) (5717 

Honey LocuHt (Promipin jnlillora). .. 7218 

Hopea tim'iorea 145 S^i 

Horn beam, American 24554 

HorHC Sugar 14532 

Hypelate paniculata 4412 

Hypelat*' trifoliata 45 12 

I. .: I 

Ilex Dahoon 27 9 

Ilex upaca 28 9 

II.U1XK.K : 9 

Iiii/a UHgiiis-Caii 75 18 

Iron Wood (Buinelia ly<^ioideH) 14031 

Iron Wood (CarpiunsCaroliniana).. 24554 
Ivy 13029 

.Tack, Blue 2114(5 

.lack. Forked-leaf Black 210 4(5 

.laniaica Dogwood 01 15 

.lei-wy Pine 32175 

Judas Tree (Cercis Cana*lenHi.s) 70 17 

.luda« Tree (Ccrcis occidt>ntaliH) 71 17 

.Irijr-AxnACK.K • 42 

Jtiglans amaru 199 43 

Jnglann angusiij'oiia 199 43 

Juglana aqualica 200 44 

JiiglaiiH Californica 194 42 

Juglaua catiutrtica 195 42 

Juglans cineroa 195 42 

Juglana glabra 202 44 

JiigiauH murUilico'formis 201 4 1 

Juglans nigra 19643 

Juglunn obcordala 202 44 



r J 



m 



l .M 



!i 



•'I 

1 






•'I I: 



Nnimv 



INDKX. 






Ntiiiiiv 



80 



i 



If 



Jiiglaii* ohlnngn 10.') 42 

JiightHS poniiiit *^<)2 44 

.lii{{l>iiiH i'iip«>Htri.s ti>7 4:< 

Jtujlann r»iKHhtx, vur. major 11)4 42 

.1 iui« Hciry ior> 5i4 

Juniper HH A udinn 274 02 

.)iinip«>niM Caliloniii'ii 27402 

Jiiiiiptu-iiHCulifoi'iiica, viir. rttiliciiHiM274 1)2 

Juniperua C'rrroaiamiH 274 02 

Jiiniperns exvelaa 275 02 

.FuniperiiM oceidnitiilis 275 r>2 

JiiniperuH occidcnliilm (.Iiiiiipfi'iiN Cu- 

lifoniini) 27402 

.TmiipcriiHocritifiitaliH, var. i (onjiin- 

K«>iim) '/7502 

.TiuiiportiH oi'cidfiitalis, var. moiio- 

Hp«>niia) 27502 

.liuiiporiiH )))u-li.vplilnMi 27002 

Juniper UH plorhyderma 270 02 

Jiiniperua tctragona, var. oateoxperma. 274 02 
.luiiipcriis Virjjiiiiaiia 277 r>2 



K. 



Kiiliiiia laHfiilia .... 
Ki'iitiicky CoHVc Tree 

I.. 



t:w)2H 

05 10 



Ln};iuuMilai'ia laniiKisa I(K)25 

Larch, Aiiierii-an \Wt 71 

Larch, Hluck :ut7 71 

Lur^ru Tupelo 121 27 

Large-lravcd Ma^^iioliu Tn-u 5 

I^arix Aiuericana :107 71 

Larix Amerirana, var. brerifoliu :10{)72 

Larix inttrmedia ;m>7 7 1 

Larix Lyallii :WH 72 

lAirix nuiororarpa 308 7 1 

Larix occideiitalis :W)1)72 

Larix pendula H0771 

IjAL RAi'K.r.1..... ■■>-..••.. I.. ...•■ .,, •f/ 

T-aurel 1:10 2$) 

Latircl, Bijr 5 4 

Laurel, California 172 H7 

Laurel, Great i:n29 

Laurel, Mountain 172:17 

Laurel Oak (QnercuH inibriearia) ... 22248 

Laurel Oak (QuereuH lauril'olia) 22449 

Laurua Borboniva 170 :I7 

Laurua Carolineiixia 170 37 

Laurua Saaaa/raa 17 1 :<7 

Legumixos.k 15 

LibocetU'Us decurnMis 280 65 

Liffnuni VitH< 10 7 

Lilac, Calif«)ruia 37 11 

LiLIACK.E 80 

Limo, Ogcechee 11726 

Lime Tree 14 6 

Liquidanibar StyraciHua 10624 

Liquidauiber 10<)24 

Liriodendron Tulipifera I 8, 5 

Live Oak (Quercus oblonjirifolia) 23050 

Live Oak ((^uen'us virens) ,23852 

Live Oak, California 21246 

Loblolly Bay 12 6 



Loblolly rine .UIO*'.) 

LoeuHt .V 15 

Locnnt, Clannny 51)15 

LoeiiHt. Ilonev (<iledits('liia triaian- 

thoH) 07 17 

LocuNt, Honey (I'roNopisJnlillora) .. 72 H 

LoeuHt, Water 0()17 

Log Wood 3310 

Lonjj-leaveil Cnenniliei' 'life 3 4 

Lon^r-leaved I'ine 311 72 

.Maelnra aurantiaca ltM)41 

Madeira Wood 4112 

Madnina 120 2« 

Magnolia aenniinatu 1 4 

Magnolia aurirulatu :< 4 

Magnolia eordata 2 4 

Magnolia Fra»eri 3 4 

Magnolia glanea 4 4 

Magnolia grandiilora 5 4 

Magnolia niaeroidiylla <i 5 

Magnolia Tree, Large-leaved t! 5 

Magnolia tripelalu 7 5 

Magnolia rnd)rella 7 5 

M.\(iX<»i,iA(i:.i'; 4 

Mahogany 24 '^ 

Mahogany llin-li 247 55 

Mahogany. Mountain 84 20 

Mnlua anifuaUfolia 80 2 1 

Malua coronaritt 87 21 

MaluH riruluriH 88 21 

Mauehineel 175 :W 

Manchineel, Mountain .')5 14 

Mangrove 107 25 

Mangrove, Whilc(Avieennia nitida) 167 :<0 
Mangrove, White (Lagnncularia ra- 

ceniosa) 101) 2.'» 

Man/aiiita (AretoHtaphyloM glanea) . 12^21) 
Manxanita(ArctoKtapliylo.spungen8) 127 2h 

Maple, Ash-h'a ved 53 14 

Maple, Black Sugar .52 80 

Maple, Kcd 5113 

Maple, Koek 5213 

Maple, Silver 47 12 

Maple, Ktriped 5013 

Maple, Sugar .52 13 

Majde, Swamp 5113 

Maple, Vine 40 12 

Maple, White 47 12 

May Haw 9022 

Mia.IAtK.K I 8 

Melivocca panivulala 44 12 

Me»kit 7218 

Meapilua arboriM 105 21 

Meapilm arhutifolia 104 24 

Mesquit, Screw-pod 73 IH 

Mexican Persiinuion 144 :12 

Mimuaopa diaaccia 142,31 

MiniUHop.s Sicberi 14231 

Mock Orange 77 ID 

Mocker Nut 204 44 

Momiaia {Celtia) pallida 185 40 

Monterey Cypress 280 63 

Montere'v Tiue 322 75 



■ ; 



li 

. r 
it- 



i t 



l. 



' f 



/•■ 



\iit V 



Huk, 
Oak, 
Oiik, 

< >ak, 
Onk, 
Oiik, 
Oak. 
Oak, 

< hik, 
Ouk, 
Oak, 
Oak, 



Niiiiif. 



INDEX. 



e S 



Niiiiiu. 



87 






Mo.m.- Kim I7!»:R> 

MtMm»< WtMMl r.oi:« 

Mhihi* Canadrimiii IHJMI 

MoniH rtibriv IHlMt 

MoHH,v-cii]t Wliit«'<)iik '■i-jn49 

Moiiiitnin AhIi, Aiiu>riuiiii Kt'iX 

Moiiiitniu liUiii-fl IT'i:)? 

Moiiiifuiii Maliopiiiy H4t2() 

Moiiiitiilii Mancliini'cl TtT) 14 

Moutitiiin Plmii 25 S» 

Mountain WliJt«^ ihik -iir, 47 

MnH.eriy,Ked IH«41 

Milloairhim liijiiHlriinim :U) 10 

Myrlca ('alifornicn rHVt 45 

MvHirACK.K 45 

MvKHiNArK.K ai) 

.yfuraiiie jHorihuiula 1 IW/J 

Myt'nine FhrUluiin IIW til) 

M.v>"Hin«' H)i|MUu>a i:Wtil» 

Myhtac r..i-. '^5 

NiiiTow-lfii vi'd Crnl» A|i|tli' HiJ'il 

NniM' Wvny W'i'.W 

\«'gnnil«» n«-«>rnid<'H 53 14 

NV^nndo ('aliforniiinn 54 14 

Nciklac*' I'oitliir '2<>7 fiO 

Norway V'ww 'X\\ 77 

Nut, BIttft HK)4:i 

Nut, M«M'k«r '^04 44 

Nut Pin«' (riniiH cdnliN) :n774 

\nt I'inii (IMnuH nionoitlivlla) :V^576 

Nut, IMk >*(h*44 

\utni«>);, Calitornia 'i7(Mil 

Nutnieu Hickory a<H 44 

N'uttalfia c-tM-iiHiforniis Kt^O 

XjIMHa ai/iititica (Ny.sNa Caroliniana) . lIH'^i 
.Xf/HMM aiiiiafiin (Xyssa nniUiHora) . . . 111>'.>7 

XifHHo aqimlira (Xyssii nnitioni) 1'il *27 

A>Kfl hijiora 1 1927 

XifHita caiidieaiin 1 17 'ifi 

Ny»Ha capitatii 117*2(» 

NyHHa Caroliniana llr<!2() 

S'tfHHii (itaud'ulvHtutH 121 '27 

N.VHHa nniltitlora 119*27 

yiijsM muHifiora, \;\v. utilnilira 12027 

Nyuna Hvlvatica 120 27 

SifUMU UnueiiloiiH 121 27 

Xyiwa nnitlora 121 27 

yt/MHa viHoHH 12027 

O. 

Oak, Harivn 22950 

Oak, mack 2:«J51 

Oak, Hlack Jiick 229,50 

Oak, Hhio 21547 

Oak, RniT 22749 

Oak, Caiit'ornia Live 2124(> 

Oak, Cht'stnut 2:W51 

Oak, Evcigrcon White 2:«)50 

Oak, Laurel (Qucrcns imbricarla) .. 222 48 
Oak, Laurol (Quimcus laurifolia) ... 224 49 
Oak, liivc (QuorcuH oblon^ifolia) . . . 2H050 
< )ak, Live ((^iktcun vin-ns) 2:5852 



< )ak, MoHMV-cup M'liiti' 227 19 

Oak, Mountain \Vliit«> 215 17 

Oak, (»vor-«Mi|i ((/u<ti-un lyrata).. .. 22(t49 
Oak, Ovt'r-cu|i ((/urrruH niacroiar- 

IMi) i27 19 

Oak, Pin 2:U .50 

Oak, Po«t 2:1551 

Oak, UmI 2:1451 

Oak, Hock C'li.Ktnut 2:«5l 

Oak, Rorkv Mountain Scrul) 23752 

Oak, Scarlet 2i:»47 

Oak, Scrul. 21046 

Oak. Shingle 22248 

( >ak, Sj.auiHh 21H 48 

Oak, Swamp PoHt 22H49 

Oak, Swamp SpaniHh 2:tl .50 

Oak, Swami» White *-'<»94«» 

Oak, Turkey 2104« 

Oak, Upland WiMow 2114« 

Oak. Water 208 45 

Oak, Water White 220 49 

Oak. White... 207 45 

Oak, Willow 2:12 50 

Oak, Yellow -harked 2:«1.5| 

Oueechcc Lime 117 2(5 

< >liio liuckcy*' 40 1 1 

Ol.ACIXK.K." 9 

OiKACKv; ;»2 

( Ud Field Hirch 240 .->5 

Old Field Pine :»:W}79 

(Hea Amerkaiiu 1.59 :t4 

Oliv«, California 172 :17 

Olncya TcNota 6015 

( >rvgou Ah]i 151 :{:i 

Oregon Cedar 281 (W 

Oregon Crah Ajiple 88 21 

Ori'Mlaphnr Call/oruiva 172 ;17 

(triitio dipttaia 150 3:i 

Osage Orange 19041 

OHnuinthUH AmericanuN 159:14 

Oho Berry 8:i20 

(Mi'iia Ameriraim 244 54 

< >Htrya Virginica 244 .54 

Otirifa ntlffariH 244 54 

Ovei-cup Oak (QuercuM lyrata) 22649 

Over-cup Oak ((Jnercus uiacrocarpa)227 49 
(txydendruni arhorenni 12929 

P. 

I'alhinm Texetinix ;12 10 

Palmack.k 79 

Palmetto, Cabbage 33879 

Pjilo Verde 0917 

Papaw 10 r> 

Paper Birch 251 .56 

ParkiuHonia Horida ". tiSn 

ParkiuHonia Torreyana 69 17 

Paria ftava :i9ll 

Pear thorn 10223 

Peppcridge il927 

I'vfHm Borhotiicu 170 ;17 

PerHiMi CaroIinenHiH 170 ;{7 

I'rrsea Sanxafraa 171 :{7 

Persiniuion 14331 

PcrHiunu«ui, Mexican 144:12 



( ! 



I , ' 



t 1 



;0v' 



W 



ken 



. VV: 



!'?:■ 



I •! 



^^Vit; 



, V i- 



•i>- 



Name. 



INDEX. 






88 



Niiiuc. 






I'hofinia arbiitifoUa 1 04 24 

I'hot'iniu salicifoUu W4'i^ 

I'icea alba :tn2 70 

I'icea balaamea iW t56 

J'irea bracteata 291 W' 

Picea Canadenm ii9i> ^'^ 

I'icea concolor 292 67 

Pinoa Engelmanui ;{0:i70 

Vkea grandis 291 W 

Picea nigra :}04 70 

Picea nobilia 21MiOH 

Picea piitigens SOn 71 

Picea rubra 304 70 

Picea Sitchensis :W(>71 

Piekeringia paniculata VX\ '-iO 

PigNut 20244 

Pigeon Plnm KW :M5 

I'in (lak 2:n TiO 

Pinokneya jtuhens 125 28 

Piiion :n774 

Pine, Brown ;Ul72 

Pine, Fox-tail ai27:r 

Pine, Georgia :U172 

Pine, Gray :}i:{73 

Pine, Hard 31172 

Pine, Hickory 31273 

l*ine, .lersev 32175 

Pine, Loblolly 33t) 79 

i'ine, Long-leaved 31172 

Pine, Monterey 32275 

Pine, Norway 331 77 

Pine, Nut (Pinus edulisj 317 74 

Pine, Nut (Pinns nioiiopliylla) 32576 

Pine, Old Field 330 79' 

Pine, Pitch 33278 

I»ine, Pond 33478 

IMne, Red 33177 

Pine, Rosemary 'XM^ 79 

i'ine. Scrub (PinuM liaiiksiaiiii) 313 73 

Pine, Scrub (Pinus iuo|»H) 32175 

Pine, Short-leaved 324 70 

Pine, Slash 33079 

Pine, Southern 31172 

Pine, Spruce (Pinus glalna) 32075 

Pine, Spruce (i'inus niitis) 324 76 

Pine, Sugar 32375 

Pine, Swamp 33079 

I'ine, Table Mountain 33077 

Pint), Wevniouth 335 78 

Pine, White (I'inusflexilis) 31974 

Pine, White (I'iniis Stnibus) 33578 

Pine, Yellow (Pinus australis) 31172 

I'ine, Yelh)w( Pinus mitis) 324 70 

Pine, Yellow (Piuus ponderosa) 32977 

PinuB adunca 322 75 

Pinmalha 30270 

Pinns olbirauliH 31974 

Pinux anuibilin 294 (>7 

Pinna (tristata 31273 

Pinus Arizonica 310 72 

Pinus australis : 31172 

Pinus Ualfouriai'.a 312 73 

Pinns BaU'ouriani!, var. aristata 3'273 

Pinna balaamea 290(»6 

Pinus Banksiiina 31373 

Pinua Jieardaleyi 32t> 77 



I'inna licnthamiana 329 <7 

I'in na Holandrri 315 13 

Pinna bracteata 291 (5(5 

Pinna Californira (I'inus insignis) .. . 322 75 
Pinua Cali/ornica (Pinus tuberculata)337 79 

Pinua Vanadenaia 299 <'>9 

I'inna cembroidea 319 74 

Pinus Chihnahnana 314 73 

Pinus clausa 32175 

Pinna commutata 30370 

Pinua coiiolnr 29207 

Pinns contorta 315 73 

PinuH contorta, var. Murrayana 31573 

Pinna cottorta, var. lati/olia 315 73 

Pinna contorta (I'inus ccmtorta, var. 

Mnrrayana ) 315 73 

I'inus Ctnilteri 31074 

Pinna Craigana 329 77 

Pinna dejiexa 329 77 

Pinna Edijarianu 327 70 

I'inus edidis 317 74 

Pinus Klliottii 31874 

Pinus Uexilis 31974 

Pinus Oexilis, var. albtcaulis 31974 

Pinua Fraacri 29307 

Pinus Fremont iana 325 76 

I'inus glabra 32075 

I'inna grandia 294 07 

Pin na Hudaon ica 31373 

Pinus inops 32175 

Pinus inops, var. clausa 32175 

Pinna inopa (Pinus contortii) 31573 

Pinna inopa (I'inus contorta, var. 

Murrayan:i ) 315 73 

I'inus insignis 32275 

Pinua .leffrcfii 329 77 

Pinus Lambertiaua 32375 

Pinna JJoreanu 32870 

Pinna Ljiallii 308 72 

Pinna macrocarixi (Larix Anu'ncana)307 7I 
Pinua macrovarpti (Pinus Coulteri) .. 31G74 

I'inna Mcnzicaii 30071 

Pinna Mcrtenaiana 300<)9 

Pinus niitis 324 70 

Pinns monojdiylla 32570 

Pinns UKUiticoia 32(>70 

Pinns nnniciita 327 70 

Pinua Murrayiina 315 73 

Pinna nigra 304 70 

Pinua mibilia 290 »18 

Pinna Xuttallii 30972 

Pinna palufitria 31 1 72 

Pinns Piirryana 328 7(> 

I'inna Paltoniana 301 69 

I'inna pendula 307 71 

Pinus ponderosa 32977 

Pinns pondcroau 329 77 

Pinus ])onderos)i, var. .letl'reyi 32977 

I'inus ponderosa, var. scopulornm. . 32977 

I'inus pnngens 33077 

Pinna radiata 322 75 

Pinus resmosa 33177 

Pinus rigida .... 3327H 

Pinna rubra (Picea nigra) 304 70 

Pinnn rubra (I'inus resinosa) 331 V7 

Pinua rupentria 313 73 



ii • 






<i 'il 



: !! 



.r. 













Pinus Sab 




Pinus Hero 




V'mn» iSha 




Phiu8 Slid 




Piuus Strr 




Pinus TiiM 




Pinm Twd 




Pinus tube 




Pniits tube 




Pinii8 vari 




Pinus Venn 



f 



:jl...,;.U; , X< '\V ' I 






13 



INDEX. 



89 



Name. 



I M 

Oh 



Piniis 8abiiiiiii j33;i 78 

Pinus .seiotiuii 1334 7e 

J'inus Shantrt |319!74 

P\nu» Siti'henHia ;30i5'71 



Name. 



o 
>5 



04 



PopiiIu8 Mari/landica. 2Ci7:G0 

Popnlns moiiilifera 267i60 

FopnluH monUlfera (Popiilus Frenion- | 
tii) 264I59 



PiuuH Strobiis j33578j!P<)/jh;hs nwnilifera (Popnlns Fremou- 

Piuns TiiMl.i ,33«79! tii, var. WiHlizeni) ^MpQ 

Pinu8 Twda, var. alopecnroidea j33478 /'o^>h/«» nii/ra '. '263J59 

Pinna tubercnlata 337 79 Popnlns Onta'-ienHiit *2(i359 

Pinits tubcrciilnta (Pinns insignis).. . 322 7.')i Popnlns tromnloides ;268JfiO 

Pinm variabiliD i324|76| Popnlns trichocarpa j26960 

Phiua venuxta 29l66iiPorIiera angnstifolia I 17 7 

Pirns Americana 852l!lPo8t Oak 23,')51 

Pirns augnstifolia ' 8321 Post Oak, Swamp 22fi49 

Pirns coronaria 87 21 i'rickly Asli ,i 19 7 

Pirns rivnlaris 8^21 Pi itchnrdiufilamentom 33979 

Pirns sambncifolia , 89,21 Pro.sopis juliflora 7218 

Piscidia Erythrina ' 61 15J|Prosopis pnbescons 7318 

Pistacia Mexicana ! 57:15 iPrniins Americana 7f);19 

Pitch Piue 33278J|PrMH«8 Capollin 8120 

Pithecolohium (imidalupense ' 75 18 Prnnns Caroliiiiaua 7719 

Pithecolobinm Ungnis-Cati ; 75 18; Prnnns Chioasa 7819 

Pittonia n'lmUiH 1(523."), Prnnns cniiU'^inata 7919 

Plane Tree, American 191,41 Prnnns emargiuata, var. nioUis 7919 

Planer Tree 18) 40i Pninitu mollis 7919 

Planera aiinatica 18140; Prnnns Pennsyivanica ' 8019 

Plunera (iineliiii 181 40. Prnnns serotina 8120 

Planera nlmifolia 181 40 Prnnns nni))ellata H2 20 

Pl,AT.\XAC'i;.K . . . 41 Psendotsuga Donglasii 298fi8 

Platanns occidentalis 19141 I'studotsnija I)on(jlus\i 29868 

Platan ns racemosa 192 42 Psi'ndotsuga Donglasii, var. macro- i 

Platanns Wrightii 193 42 carpa . 29869 

Plnm, Canada 7619 n I 

Plnm, Chickasaw ! 78 19,j '*' I 

Plnm, Hog I 25; 9 Quakii\g Asp 268 60 

Plnm, Monntaiu , 25 'JQneirn-i uvnlidenH 21647 

Plnm, Pigeon 1(58 36 Qnercns agrifblia 20645 

Plnm, Wild 76 10 Qnercns alba 207 45 

Poison Wood 174 38 Qnercns aqnatica 208 45 

P»»LY(JONACK.K 36 Qncrcns aqnatica, var. myrtifolia. .. 2:59 .^l 

Pond Pine. 33478,(j>«c/(h.s aqnalicu, var. helerophiilla. .. 2:20 48 

I'oplar, Balsam 263 59 (,>«(irr'H« a<iiiati<n, var. laurifolia 224 49 

Poplar, Carolina 2!57''50 V"'''"'' Hanintr '.... 239r,3 

Poplar,Downy 2(56.59 V"'''''"" bcrherUli folia 21t>47 

Poplar, Necklace 2(57 60 Qnercns bicolor 2()'»46 

Poplar, Yellow 8 5 Qin-rcns bicohn', var. Michanxii 201> 46 

Populnn umjulata 267 60 Qnercns Breweri 23'».53 

PopnIuH anijnlona 2(57|60/<,>mc)c»» casta nea 228.50 

Poi»nlns aiignslitbiia ;2(52 58jlQinMcns Cate.sbiei 210 46 

Popnlns arijentea 2(5(5 :59|i V««'»t)m ( Idnqnapin 23953 

Popnlns balsamifera 263.59 Qnercns chrysohqds 21246 

Popnlns balsamifera, var. candicans. 263.59 Qnercnsclirysolepis, var. vacciniit'olia 212 46 

Popnlns huhami/ira, var. y '2'59|(50 Qnercns cinerca 211 46 

Popnlus balsamij'tra, var. an<fnstifolia'262Xt>^ V"''''"" 'inrrra, var. jynmila 239.53 

Popnlnn balsamifera, var. Ca/i/or/jwictf 269,(50 Qnercns coccinea 213 47 

Popnlus Canadensis 1 2(57(50 (^mcccmn eoccinen, var. tinctoria 23(551 

Popnlns (.'anadensis, var. angnsiifolia.2{)2^iS}(,}nerens confertifolia 22l!48 

Papains randieans |2(53!.59,'V««v'i(.'* enisnipornla 212 46 

Popnlns Fremontii i26459] (jnercns densitiora 214;47 

Popnlns Fremontii, var. Wisli/-eni..|264,59;:(i>«e/cMN (/iff':o/«r, var. /«/ia<a 21848 

Popnlus ylandnlosa 267 (50: Qnercns Donglasii 215 47 

Popnlns grandidentata 2(5.5 .59;: «i)««w(« Drnmmondii 237'52 

Popnlns heteropliylla 266.59j;Qnercn8 dnmosa 21647 

Populns heterophylla, var. argentea. .. 266 59|.(^tf crous IJuraniii 23,551 

Popnlns Uvviijala 2()7;(50j (^nercHS echinacea 214,47 

Populns macrophylla 263l.59||^u('rc«« elungata 218^48 

12 



t I 



w 



I 








, 




I 


i: 


.V. [ ' 


\ 














.1. . .- 


.■4\': ~r '-■■■ 








• 










■A ■ - ' 
r. 


if 


1 

#■ 


• 


if 


« 


« 


* 


J,' 


■■t>-''. 



INDEX. 



90 



Name. 



! o 



i 4* '' 

A {I 



Name. 






13229 

170 37 



Quercns Emoryi 217 47 Quercua sempervirens 238 52 

Qiiercus falcata 218 48 ijuercus nerkea 23953 

Quervm fakaia, var. triloba 218 48 Quercua Sonomenaia 223 49 

Quercua ferruginea 22950; QuercuH stellata 2'<i551 

Quercua fulreacena 212 46 Qiieicns tiuctoiia 2:]<> 51 

Quercua Gambelu 237 52' Quercua iinctoria, var. CaUfornica 22349 

Quercns Garryana 219 48 Quercua triloba 218 48 

QuercuB Georgiaua 239 53 Quercun niidulata 237 .52 

Quercua griaea 237 52, Quercns undulata, v ar. breviloba . . . 237 52 

Quercns hastata 217 47! Qnercus undulata, var. (Jara1*elii.... 23752 

Quercns heterophylla 220 48 Quercus undulata, var. grisea 237 ^)2 

Quercua Hindaii 225 49 Quercns undulata, var. Janiesii 237 52 

Quercus hypoleuca 22148 Quercns undulata, var. oblongata.. . 237 52 

Quercns ilicifolia 239 53 Quercus undulata, var. pungens .... 237 52 

Quercus imbricaria 222 48, Quercus undulata, var. Wriglitii.... 237 52 

Quercns Kelloggii 223 49 Quercua vacciniifolia 212 4G 

Quercus lanrifolia 224 49 Quercua velutina '23651 

Quercns lobata 22549 Quercus virens 238.52 

Quercua lobata, var. fruticoaa 23953 Quercus virens, var. dentata 23852 

Quercns lyrata 22649 Quercns virens, var. maritiiua 23852 

Quercns macrocarpa 927 49 Quercus Wislizeui 239 52 

Quercua macrocarpa, var. olivd'formia . '■227 49 Quercus WisHzeni. var. frutescens.. ^39 53 

Quercua maritiina 23852! ] 

Quercua Michauxii .•$ 209 46 1 R. | i 

Quercua montana 233 51; 

Quercua Morehua 2.39 .52 liapauea Gnyanensia 

Quercus Muhlenbergii 228 50 Red Bav 

Quercus niyrtifolia. 23953 Red Birch 24956 

Quenua Xeai 21948 Red Bud (Corcis CanadenslH) 70 17 

Quercns nigra 229 50 Red Bud (Cercis occideutalis) 7117 

Quercua nigra (Quercns tinctoria) 23651 Red Cedar 277 62 

Quercua uigra, var. quinqueloba 229 .50 Red Elm 179 39 

Quercns oblongifolia 230.50 Red Fir ^95 67 

Quercua oblongifolia (Quercus undula- i Red Maple 51 13 

ta, var. oblongata) 237 52 Red Mulberry , .. Ie9 41 

Quercua obiuailoba 235 51 Red Oak 234 51 

Quercua obiuailoba, var. breviloba .... 237 52 Red Pine 331 77 

Quercua oleoiilea 23852 Red Wood (Ceanotlins spinosus) 3611 

Quercua oUtaeformia 227 49 Red Wood ( Sequoia senipcrvirtns) . . 2^*9 66 

Quercns ]>alustns 23150 Rhamna<e.k 10 

Quercus Thellos 232.50 Rhanmns Caroliniana 34 !0 

Quercua riielloa, var. arenaria 239 53 Rhamnua obtuaifoliua 32 10 

Quercua riielloa, var. cinerea 21146 RlianinnsPurshiana 3511 

QutrcHx rinllna X voccinia 22048 Rhizophora Mangle 107 25 

Quercua I'hcllos, var. laurifolia 224 49 Riiiz<>!'H( »rack.e 25 

Quercua I'lulUm, var. pumiUi 23953 Riiododendron niaxiniiini 13129 

Quercua I'helloa, var. airicea 239 53 Rhus Metojiinni 55 14 

Qin reus prinoidi's 23953 Rhus tyi»hiua... .5614 

Quercus Triuiis 233 51 River Birch 249 56 

QutrcuK 1'rinu.y, var. acuminata 228 .50 Robinia I'seudacacia 5!; 15 

Qucrcux I'rinwt Chinquapin 239 53 Robinia viscosa 59 15 

Quenn I'rinus, var. tUacolor 20<» 46 Rock Chestnut Oak 233 51 

(^•iircuK i'rinna, var. moniic^!'^ 23;{51 Rock Elm 18039 

Quercua I'rinua pchiatria 209 46 Rock Maj))? 5213 

Quercua rrinit pumila 239.53 Rocky Mountain Scrub Oak 237,52 

Quercun I'rinua, var. iomcntoaa 20946 Rosack.k Jl9 

Quercus pumila 239.53 Rose Bay 13129 

Quercus pumila, var. sericeu 239.53 Rosemary Pine 3;J()79 

Quercw* pungcnx 237.52 RiniAi k.k "iri 

Quercua (juinqucloba 229 50 I{ltace.i; i . . . ; 7 

Quercua lianaomi 225 49! 

Quercus reticulata 239 53 1 g. 

Quercua retuaa 238 .52 

Quercus rubra — 234 51 Sabal Palmetto 33879 

Quercua rubra (Quercus Kelloggii). .. 223 49 Saucack.*: :...|57 

Quercui iSau Sabeana 237 ,52 Salix ambigua 261 ,58 



INDEX. 



91 




Salix aufiiiHtnta 257,57 

(S'rt/jjc ai'ijntu |25y 58 

Salix arfiHta, var. Umamlra 259,58 

Salix Caroiitiiuna j261 58 

SiiHx cordata |257,57 

Salix conlata, var. anj^UHtata ^257 57 1 

Salix cordata, var. rigida 257 57 

Salix falcata '26158 

Salix Femlleria ua |259 58 

Salix Hoffman Ilia na 259T)8 

Salix Homtoniaua |261j58 

Salix lii'vifiiata '2^^% .'>7 

Salix laiicifolia 25958 

Salix lasiaiidra 259 58 

Salix la^iandra, var. Fendleriana... 2.'>9,.58 

Salix lasiaiidra, var. hmcifolia 2.59.58 

Salix Incida 260.58 

Salix liicida, var. macrophylla 259 58 

Salix nigra ". 2fil 58 

Salix niijra, var. fa hata 261 •'"'8 



136 

47 

147 



Salix peniatulra, var. caiuhita. 



2.5958 



Salix J'iirnhiaiia 261 .58 

Salix ri(ji(la 257 57 

Salix H))eciom 2.59 58 

Salix Torre !ia na 257 57 

Samara JioribiDida i;i2'<i9 

SaiiibnciiM ••iauca 12227 

SAPlXDACK.t; 1. .. 11 

Sai>iiidiiM niarjiinatus j 4212 

Sa]>iiKlii.s Suiioiiaria 43 12 

Sapotack/K i ... 30 

Sassafras 171 37 

Sassafras ottitiiialo 17137 

Satiu Wood i 18 7. 

Savin 277 62 

Scarlet Oak 213 47 

Scarlct-tniitcd Thorn 9422 

Schaffiria hnxi folia 31 10 

Sfluvfferia eompleia 3110 

SclnctU-ria Irntcscens 31 10 

Schaff'triu lateriflora 17338 

Schocptia arlioirsccns 26 9 

Schuberlia semperriniix 28J» 6(5 

Screw Hean 73 18 

Screw-jiodMcsqiiit 7318 

Scrub Oak 210 46 

Scrub Oak, Rocky Mountain 237 52 

Scrub I'ine (I'iims llanksiaiia) 31373 

Scrub Tine (Tiniis iuops) :!21 75 

Sea GrajH' 169 37 

Sca-sidc Alder 2.53 57 

Sebastiania Incida 17438 

Secpioia gigantca 288 6."> 

Sequoia sempervin'ns 289 ()6 

Sequoia fVellingtouiana 28H (ir» 

Service Tree . ." lO.'', 24 

Shad Bush 105 24 

Shag-bark Hickory 198 43 

Sheep Berry '. 123 27 

Shell-bark Hickorv il98 43 

Shell-bark liickorV, Thick 203 44 

Shell-bark Hickory, Western 20344 

Shingle Oak 222 48: 

Shining Willow 26058 

Short-leaved Pine 32476 

Sideroxylou luastichodendrou 113630 



21 

302 

336 

179 

176 

147 

42 

43 

63 

64 

64 

85 

89 

129 

119 

117 

129 

140 

311 

218 

231 

2.52 

172 



Sideroxiilon pallidum. 

Silver Maple 

Silver-bell Tree 

SiMAUUBE.K 

Siinarubra glauca 

Single Spruce 

Slash Pine 

Slippery Elm 

Small-leaved Elm 

Snow-drop Tre«! .... 

Soaj) Berry (Sapindns marginatus).. 
Soaji Berry (Sapindns Saponaria) . .. 

Sophora alilinis 

Soidiora seciinditlora 

Sophora npeviom 

Sorhiis Amtricatia 

Sorbits Mttml)iicif(dia 

Sorrel Wood. I 

Sour (Sum 

Sour Tupelo 

Sour Wood 

Southern Buckthorn 

Southern Pine 

Spanish Oak 

Spanish Oak, Swamp. 

Speckled Alder 

Spice Tree 

Spoon Wood 130 

Sj>ruce, Douglas ; 298 

Spruce Pine (Pinus glabra) 320 

Spruce Pine (I'inus miti«) 324 

Spruce, Single 302 

Spruce. White 302 

Staghorn Sumach .56 

Stinking Cedar 271 

.Striped Oogwood ; 50 

Striped Maple ' 50 

SIromliocarpa iiitbescviiH , 73 

Stjiiihiiololiiinn affine 63 

Stvi!.\(A('i: i: ' ...' 

Sugar I'lcnv 18440 

Sugar Maple ; .5213 

Sugar Majde, Black 5280 

Sugar Piue 323 75 

Suinacli, Col a I 5514 

Sumiuli, Stiigliorn .5614 

Sumiii.r Haw 9823^ 

Swami> Hickorv 19943- 

Swamp Ma])le 5113 

Swami> Pine 33679 

Swamp Post Oak 226 49 

Swamp Spanish Oak 23150 

Swamp White Oak 20946 

Sweet Bav 4 4 

Sweet Birch 247 55 

Sweet Buckeve 39 11 

Sweet Gum..' 10624 

Sweet Leaf 145 32 

Swieteuia Mahogany 24 8 

SycaiiKue , 191 4 1 

Symplocos tinctoria 145 32 



30 
12 
32 

8 
8 
70 
7» 
39 
3t* 
32 
12 
12 
16 
IG 
16 
21 
21 
89 
27 
26 
29 
31 
72 
48 
50 
.56 
37 
29 
68 
75 
76 
70 
70 
14 
61 
13 
13 
18 
16 
32 



■Ti. 



Table Mouutain Pine 33077 

Tacamahac....* 263 59 



INDEX. 



92 




Tamarack (Larix Americana) 30771 

Tamarack (Pinua contorta, var. Mur-1 

rayana) I31573 

Taxaok.e i... 61 

Taxodium distichum 128765 

Taxodium giganteum 388 65; 

Taxodi nm sempervirena 289,66; 

Taxodium Washingtonianum 288,65: 

Taxu»baccata 27261 

27361' 
27261 
27361 
27361 
27361 
27261 



TaxuH baccata, var. Canadensis) . 

Tuxua Bouraieri 

Taxus brevifolia , 

TaxKH Canadenaia 

Tuxns Floridaua 

Taxua Lindlegana 

Tkuxstikemiace^ I . . . 6 

Tefranthera Californica il72 37 

Thick Shell-bark Hickory 203 44 

Thorn, Black '1(><>23 

Tliorn, Cockspur 9f>22 

Thorn, Pear 10223 

Thorn, Scarlet-fruitt'd 94 22 

Tliorn, VVashiujtton ' 95 22 

Three-tljorned Acacia 67 17 

Thrinax parviflora '34C80 

Thuya Craigiana ,28665 

Thuifa exceha 128264 

Tlm'ya gigantea 1284 64 

Thuya ifujantea (Liboc»Mlru8 decnr-i 

rens) '. ,' 28(5 65 

Th uya Minziem 284 64 

Thn'ya o<!cidentaU8 2^5 64 

Thuya plicata 2846J 

Thuya uphwroidalia 2K{64 

Th uyopaia botralia 2H2 64 

Th uyopaia Teh ugatakoy 282 ()4 

Tilitt alba - 15 7 

Tiliii Americana 14 6 

Tiliu Americana, var. pubescens 14 6 

Tilia lictt'rojthylla 15 7 

Tiln4 hijriflora 15 7 

TiUa pubcHvenn 14 6 

TlLlA( K.K 6 

Tollon 104 24 

Tootiiaclic Tree 19 7 

Toreh Wood I 23 8 

Toniilhi ; 73 1.-< 

Torreya Californica ,270 61 

Toneya Myriatica 270 61 

Torreva taxitolia I27MJ1 

Toyon 104 24 

Tnuga Canadensis 29l» 69 

Tanya Donglaaii 298 fiH 

Tsuga Mertensiana 3U0 69 

Tsuga I'attoniana 301 69 

Tulip Tree 8 5 

Tnpelo 11927 

Tupelo, Large |l21ti7 

Tupelo, Sonr •. |ll72t> 

Turkey Oak 210 4(5 



Ulmua Floridana 

rimns ful va 

Ulmua opaca 

Ulmua pumila .. 

Ulmns racemosa 

Ulmua rubra 

Umbellularia Californica . 

Umbrella Tree 

Uugnadia speciosa 

Upland Willow Oak 

Urticack-K 

Ururia triloba 



177 
179 



V. 



Vkuhknack.k .. 
Viburnum Lentaj;<» 
Viburnum prunitoli 
Vine Maiile.... 
1'irgilia fntia ... 



39 



17839 

176:i8 

18039 

17939 

17237 

7 6 

4112 

211|4U 

..38 

10 f> 



um. 



W. 



36 
123|27 
12428 
46112 
16 



U. 



Ulnnis alata 

Uliiius Americana. 
IJlniuB craouifolia . 



17638 
177 39 
17839 



Walnnt, Hlack [19643 

Walnut, White 19542 

Washington Thorn 1 95:22 

TVaabingtotiia Californica j28865 

Washingtonia filifera j339i79 

Water Ash 15333 

Water Beech 245154 

Water Hickorv 200,44 

Water Locnst ! mil 

Water Oak [208;45 

Water White Oak 226 49 

Wdlingionia gigantea 28865 

West Indian' Bireh | 22i 8 

Western Arbor Vitic 284,64 

Western Catalj>a 165;36 

Western Shell-bark Hickory 203 44 

Weymouth Pine 3;15;78 

Whahoo 17638 

White Ash 14832 

White Bass Wood \ 15 7 

White Bay j 4 4 

White Birch (Bctnla alba, var. popu- I 

lifolia) 246|55 

White Birch (Betulapapyracea)...., 251,56 
White Cedar (Chaiuiccvparia Law -; 

soniana) 28163 

White Cedar (Chauuecvparis spha;- I 

roidea) |28364 

White Cedar (Libocedru8decnrrens)28665 
White Cedar (Thuya occidentali8)..,285l(>4 

White Cypress " i287i65 

White Elm 177I39 

White Fir ;29267 

White Hickory 199 43 

White Mangroye (Avicennia nitida) 16736 
White Mangrove (Lagnncnlariarace- 

mosa) 109,25 

White Maple 1 4712 

White Oak 20745 

White Oak, Evergreen 23050 

White Oak, Mossy-cnp i227:49 

White Oak, Mountain (215 47 

Whi te Oak, Swamp J209;46 



White 
White 
White 
White 
White 
White 
fera 
White 
White 
Wild! 
Wild] 
Wild] 
Willoi 
Willow 
Willoi 
Willow 
Wiiigc 



Xantli 
Xanth 



INDEX. 



93 



Nnine. 



White Oak, Water 

White Pine (PinnH floxills) 

White Pine (Pinua Btrobus) 

White Spruce 

White Walmit 

White Wood (Liriodendron Tullpi- 

fero) 

White Wood (Tilia Americana) 

White-heart Hickory 

Wild Block Cherry 

Wild Plum 

Wild Red Cherry 

Willow, Desert 

Willow Ook 

Willow Oak, Upland 

Willow, Shining 

Winged Elm 



X. 

Xanthoxylum Cnrilinonni . 
J[anthoxylum Carolinianum. 



II 






33649 
31974 



335 
303 
195 

e 

14 

304 

81 



78 
70 
43 

5 
() 
44 
30 
7619 
8019 
166 3« 
333 50 
31146 
360l5H 
17638! 



18 7 
19| 7 



Name. 



Xanthoxylum Clava-H»'rcnli« 

Xanthoxylum Floridanum 

Xniitlioxyhim I'tcrota 

Ximcnia AmiTicaua 



I? 



191 7 

IH 7 
30, H 



Y. 



Yellow Birch 348 55 

Yellow Pine (Finns auHtralis) 31173 

Yellow Pine (Pinus niitis) 334 76 

Yellow Pine (Pinus ponderosa) :33l>|77 

Yellow Poplar | 8| 5 

Yellow Wood 6816 

Yellow-barked Oak 336 51 

Yucca l»revifolia 341 80 

Yucca Drncouin, var. arhorescem 341 80 

Yuccu Treculianu 343 80 



2. 



Zi7,y]thii8 obtuHifoliuH 3310 

Zygoi'HYLLacea: |...l 7 



©