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Iegetable and Slower 



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GARDEN AND FARM IMPLEMENTS, So. 




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yVlONTREAL : 

j J. STARKE & CO., PRINTERS, ST. FRANCOIS XAVIER STREET. ] 



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^wings' ^eed 'Warehouse, 

100 MoQ17*L STEEET, 

MONTREAL, ist February, 1875. 

We beg to hand yoa our Annual Illustrated and Descriptive Catalogue of 
Seeds, Bulbs, Bedding Plants, &c., for Season 1875. 

Our air-, is to supply our customers with the best quality of Seeds, and in 
order to attain this, we only purchase from the most reliable growers. 

The price we pay is to us a secondary consideration, a Ai^A quality is 
what we try to secure. We are safe in saying, that the produce from Seed sent 
out by our firm, has been such as to give the nost unqualified satisfaction to 
our numerous and constantly increasing pations. 

We take the greatest pains in proving, not only the growth, but the cor- 
rectness to name of all the growers' stocks that we offer. No disappointment 
can arise from Seeds sent out by us failing to grow, unless in an unpropitious 
season or by some accident ; for we will not sell them unless they show a good 
proof of growth. 

There is a matter connected with the Seed business in Canada that we 
:annot understand, viz : Some people sending to the United States for their 
Seeds, when they can get them as good-the chances are much better-at 
home, and at far less cost. Possibly the gaudy catalogues may have something 
to do with this, for we know, from our own observation, that it is not the quality 
of the Seeds, 

^ We have enumerated, in each species, only such varieties as are truly 
distinct and worthy of cultivation. 

We solicit, and confidently look for, a continued and increasing support 
and promise all those who shall favour us with their orders, that such will be 
executed with fidelity, care, and despatch. 

JEWIJ\G BBOTHERS, 

Will be issued in September, a Priced Catalogue of ' ' Dutch Flower Roots." i 



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TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



-:o; 



Unknown Correspondents will either require to remit when 
sending orders, or the Goods may bo sent by Express, and the amount 
collecteo' on delivery. 

In ordering FLOWER SKEDS, it will only bo necessary to 
give the numbers in the general list ; but the name will require to 
be given in /»Z; when ordering "ExTHA Choice and New Flower 
Seeds." 

All parcels of GARDEN or FARM SEEDS, (exclusive of 
grasses, clover, grain, &c.,) amounting to the value of Ten Dollars, 
sent, cafriage paid, to the principal Railway Stations or Shipping 
Ports in Canada ; 2 bushel bags or barrels (for packing in) charged 
at 40 cents each. 

Flower Seeds sent, post paid, to any addres?, when such 
orders are accompanied by remittance. 



*• » •» 



C02TT111TTS OF OATALOG'CJE. 



o:- 



Garden Seeds 

Herbs 

Culinary Roots, Plants, &c 
Lawn Grasses 



PAGE. 

1 to 16 

16 

16 

17 

Flower Seeds — Annuals 18 to 26 

" " Biennials and Perennials 26 to 29 

« " New and Extra Choice 34 to 41 

Ornamental Climbers 29 Lo 30 

" Foliage Plants 31 to 32 

Everlasting Flowers 32 to 33 

Ornamental Grasses F. 33 to 34 

Gladiolus, &c 42 

Bedding and Greenhouse Plants &o 43 to 44 

Vines 44 

Agricultural Seeds 45 to 47 

Garden and Farm Implements, &c 48 

Lawn Mowers Inside of cover. 

Oil Cake, Guano, &c 47 




Coaover's Colossal Asparagus— Page i. 



EWING BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 




-♦♦-« — - 



ASPARAaUS— (Fr. Asperge.) 

^'"^ °£i%'r'"^; \l """'" '' '''• °° *^° ^''" °"^' tran.r.lant:int'o permanent beds, four 
fee wide, and three rows ,n each ; plants one foot apart, leaving an alley o two 

s;l'Sni^^;r;.u'"^^^ 

QiantPurpleTop-The variety generally grown, per oz. 10 cts. per pkt Sets 
Conover's Colossal— A new variety of great size, 

often producing roots 3 and 

4 inches in circumference ; 

verytender u 35 „ „ jq „ 

BEAN—iFr. Five de Marais.) 

Sow as soon as the frost is out of the ground, in rows two feet apart, and six inches 
between the plants; when they (lower, pinch off the tops of the stems, whlh 
oaus« the pods to fill better; .ucceed best on a somewhat st'ff but deep hea^ 
loan. One pint will sow ninety feet of a single row 

Mazagan-Very early p^^ ^^^ ^0 cts. 

Jl^lyLongPod— Productive, good for general crop.. <« 20 

Broad Windsor— Very large, keeps long in condition . . « 25 



in fh« pi° ^l'""''^ directions are necessarily short, in some instances too much so ; but 
The mJrllT'f ""''"'"" reauiriug more information, it will be given with pi a ur" 
The man secret of success in gardening (of course ooupled with sowing good seed) i« 

prove t. If too stiff; sand, leaf mould, lime, .^o., should be applied ; if too li«ht 
or sandy, e lay and heavy loam should be mixed with it. Above airthe g ound shoSd 
be thorouahlv dr,nncd ; without this, success is impossible. Special attontbn hould 
be paid to trenohw-where the subsoil is good-iu the fall, and manuring at «a^e 
time, leaving the soil in ridges, so as to get the full beneflt of the action of frost A 
proper rotation of crops is also of great importance (for the soil tires, in most case; tf 
prod„.ing the same thing .ontinually) ; in gardens of ,ny extent this is oaX maZ'''S 

^nir'';T""«r',".°'u'^*^^^'"'^'°"^«'*P^°^"°°« ^"^"l^ growth and bad flavour in 
most vegetables. Shou'd the manure applied bo well decomposed, it is best not to di^ 
1 m deep; but if it be new and long, it should be laid in low, and the sucSing season 
; Jno/f Z • ''• rr°" '' '' thoroughly rotted. In gardens where p oper drSna-e 
cannot be obtained lime can be applied with advantage ; still no great success can bo 
looked for in such circumstances ; for manure, of any sort, decomposes but sTowirthe 
want of dramagc chills the soil, and prevents the entrance of air into it ' 



H 







£\\ ING BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 



■ l^"!!!^!! ^ I 



KIDNEY EEAN-(i^r. Uavkot.) 

Thrive best on a dry free soil, in a warm Bitiintion. The soil must bo in good heart, 
though it 18 not necepsiiry to have it henyDy nianurcJ. '^ow in rows, and thin 
out to three inches apart; iniist not be eown tilt alt J.atiRet of frodt is pant, and 
the ground perfectly J»y. tne quart will sow £0'J foot of a row. 

Per qrt. cts. 



All very bftrdy and excellent «roppcr8 



Dwarf China— Highly estetmod for general crop , " 

Negro Long Pod. ] " 

Early Marrowfat, i 
•• Mohawk. [ 
Yellow Six Weeks, j 
Refugee. J 

Dwarf Butter or Black Waz— A now variety, producing vwy 

thick waxy yellow pods, sina- 
ilar to the Butter Pole Bean. 
Ig th» best Dwarf variety 
in cultivation 



M 



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ro 

25 
20 
20 
20 
20 



60 



POLE or RUNNING BEAN. 

(^Fr, Ilcricot a Eames.) 

Should not be planted so early as tbe preceding ; plant in rows three feet apart. They 
rcciuiro stakes for support, but where those caniiot be had, a good crop can still 
be raised by continually pinching the tops out of the runners, which will cause 
them to branch out and keep close to the giound. Soil and cituation snjne as 
preceding. 

Speckled Cranberry.— Very productive r cr qrt. 40 cts. 

Scarlet Runners.— Beautiful scarlet flowers, and deli- 
cious vegetable .... " 60 

Dutch Case Knife.— "White, very prolific '• 60 

I^iina* — Late, but very tender, and fine flavour. ., « 50 

Butter- — Yellowibli coloured pods, very tender " 50 



BEET— (i^J-, Bettcrave.) 

Sow in rows as eoon bs the ground ean be wrought, and make successive sowings till 
end of June, so as to have tender roots for Buinmer use ; when three inches in 
Leight, thin out to six inches apart Rich light loam, trenched the previous 
autumn, with the manure put in it foot or so below the surfaoe, will be certain to 
raise a heavy crop of good clean roots. One ounce will sow fifty feet of a drill. 

Per oz. cts. per pkt. cts. 



Early Crimson Turnip.— Very sweet and tender «' 
Henderson's Pine Apple.— A superior small 

variety " 

Long Blood.— The heaviest cropper, fine quality " 
Whyte's Deep Blood Red.— Fine dark colour, 

good flavour " 



10 

15 
10 

10 



EWING BKOTIIEJiS' SEED LIST. 



BEET— (Cnntinued.) 



( 
( 

': 



Dwarf Deep Blood Eod.— Smnller timn the pre- 
ceding ; quality SHinc. 
Flat Bassano.— Very tender, snitablo for thai- 

low HOilfl. .,., , 

Deli'B Snperb Black—A .- to variety, deep red, 

fine flavour, dark foliage 

Egyptian Tumip. —Same sliape as a flat Dutch 

Turnip, fine quality, dark 

red colour, 7ieto 

Swiss Chard.—Cultivated for its haves which 
are used as spinage 



Per oa. eta. per pkt. ctB. 



15 



15 



25 



25 



15 



10 



6 f 



BORECOLE or KALE-(/>. C.ou Ven.) 

Sow early in Spring. Culture same as Cabbage. One ounce will sow a bed 4 fe«t by 12. 

Tall Green Curled Scotch.-Very hardy ^".f '• f, ""^F""'' '''^ 

Dwarf Green Curled Scotch.— Excellent variety 

for a small garden " 15 << 5 

BROCOLI— (F/-. Ch'^H lie Bruxdles.) 

^""^ ' altut fwo rr';^"^'' 7 ''? °°u"' "^ ^^"^ '" '^' "^^^^ «^«""^- Transplant i. rows 
and deeply du^'' ' "" '"°'°' ^"'^'''' "" '''°*'- ^'^ °^"«* ^« "°^ 

Large Early WhJte.-Very early per oz. 50 cts. per pkt. 10 cts. 

Purple Cape.— Large and hardy « 50 " 10 

Walclieren.--Best early variety ti 75 „ ^^ 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS-Ci^J-. Chou a jet de Bruxelles.) 

^^' Rn!int°°,'^ ^^'" ^f"'T ^'^'^'^' '' "''^ ^■'"'''^^ t° thot of the Cabbage. 
Si h t"'' " -t '" ^'""^ ""'"^'''■' "° ^^'^ '^'^' ^'^>«h ^rows about three 

earth ^'^^''^'^'^^ '"^^""^^ w'nter, store in a cool cellar with the roots in 

Roseberry.-RobuGt growing variety per oz. 20 cts. per pkt, 5 cts. 

Improved Dwarf.— Very fine flavour « 20 « 5 

Scrymgor'tj Giant— A ntw Bort, growing 

tea very large size.. * 25 <' 5 

CAHDOON. 

Large Smooth Solid perpkt.scts. 

CEEE¥IL— (i^r. Cer/euil) 
Make a succession of sowings, beginning in May. Cultivate same as Parsley. 
^^"^^^ per pkt. Sets. 



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EWING BEOTHERS' SEED LIST. 



20 
15 

15 
15 



(I 



10 
5 
5 

5 



CABBAG-E— (i^»-. Chou Pomml) 

Cabba«o thrive well in almost any soil, if well manured. Sow early sorta in hot-beds 
from February to April, and late varieties in May, in the open ground ; trans- 
plant when six inches hi'ih, into drills 18 inches apwt, and 15 inches b-tweeu the 
plants, except in the case of St. Denis and other large ?arie*ie8, which reouire 
considerably more room. When small tendev Cabbages are wanted, eight or nine 
inches will bo sufficient distance. If the weather bo drj , water copiously in the 
earlier stages of growth. n ^ 

Per oz. ctfi. per pkt. cts. 
Early Jersay Wakefield.— Very early and a Bure 
"header." The great favourite with New 

York market gardeners " 

Little Pizie.— Dwarf, early, and of delicate flavour. . . " 
Sugar Loaf. — Heads conical shape, second early. .... " 
WinningStadt.— OQC of the very best for general cul- 
tivation, second early " 

Early York, \ ■QQ^l^^ ^gn known and good sorts " 

Large J 

Fottler's Improved Brunswick.— This variety has a 

TiDe, large, solid head. If planted early, 
will be ready for use in July and August, 
and it can also be used as a winter 
cabbage. Very suitable for market gar- 
deners " 

Lars-e White Schweinfurt Quintal.— A very fine sum- 
mer and autumn sort; is the largest early 
variety in cultivation ** 

Large Brunswick.— Very heavy cropper, used as a 

second early and late variety. .. " 

Large Oz-Heart.— a fine flavoured second early sort, 
° " best for market gardeners " 



10 



20 



25 



Fine French late 
varieties; St. Denis 
being the standard 



late cabbage " 



25 
20 
20 
20 
20 
15 



St. Johns Day Early Drumhead. 
" " " Late 
St. Denis Large " 

Quintal or Cwt- " 

Large Late Drumhead ^ " 

Flat Dutch Early. \ Comes in early ; heavy cropper. . '« 
Late, i " " ■ " 

Marblehead Mammoth. — Fine late sorf; grows 

very large " 

Red Dutch.— For pickling « 

Large Red Drumhead.— For pickling ; very large ... « 

CAREOT— (i*V. Carotte.) 

Light, deep, well manured soil dcvelopesthis root best. Should be deeply dug, and the 
soil equ dly rich, to 18 inches below the surface. Sow whenever ground is clear of 
frost, in drills twelve or fiifceu iuches apart, and thin out the plants to six inches 
or so. One ouiice of seed will sow seventy feet of a row. 

All Clean Huehed Sked. Perlb.peroz.perpkt. 

Early Short Scarlet Horn.— Best for early use 90cts. lOcts. 5cts. 

T_i. ;ii^4.^ Ti^i^ni-aA J}nnt-aA "» TTfiavv nrnniifira : do 80 " 10 " 5 " 

«« fifnmn " J not require so deep 80 " 

soil as the long varieties. 



15 



20 
20 



5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

10 
5 
5 



Stump 



10 « 5 



Long £ 

Pa 



■t-beds 
trans- 
!eu the 
ef|uiro 
)r nine 
in the 

it. cts. I' 



10 
5 



10 



5 
5 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 



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« 5 
'« 5 



and the 
clear of 
t inches 

per pkt. 
s. Sets. 
1 5 " 
■ 5 " 



Long Blood Seet 

Page 2. 




Sandringlxam Superb 
"White Solid Celery 

Pago 6. 



Long Orange Can 

Pago 5. 





Egyptian Turnip Seet 

Page 3. 



Early Born Carrot 

Page 4. 





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Ozheart O&ll&zQ 



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Lone: Eed Pepper 



Long 

Long 
Orang 
Whiti 



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Early 
Early 
Half; 

Dwari 

Lenor 
Late I 
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White 
Red 
Cole's I 
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Dwarf 



Dwarf Blood 
Eed Beet 



Quintal Cal^'bag'C 



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EWING BROTHEES' SEED LIST, 




CARROT— (ContviueJ.) 

Porlb.peroz perpkt. 
Long Orange.— A very long Carrot, rich colour 75ct8. lOcts. 5ct8. 

" " Improved-— " " " 1.25 " lo « 5 «» 

LongRodAltringham.— Large and of fine quality.. 75 " 10 " 5 " 

Orange Belgian. \ Free growing and of extra large 50 « 10 « 5 " 



White 



} 



size 50" 10 « 5 



CAULIFLOWER— (/^r. Chou Fhur.) 

To grow this vegotablo to perfectioi,. the soil must be rich, a good space (24 inches or 
so) allowed to each plant, and liquid manure liberally applitJ. Sow in March in 
hot-beds, or in May in the open ground; when the plants are strong enough to 
lift, transplant into rows two feet apart. Stir the soil between the ])lant3 frequently 
in the first stage of their growth, and draw the earth up to their roots. 

■n 1 T -1 -rrr 11 , , Por oz. por plit. 

iiarly London.— well known early sort $ 50 " 10 cts. 

Early Paris. — Earlier than above, true 1.25" 25 " 

Half Early Paris — Best variety for general crop 1 . 00 " 25 " 

" Large White French.— " 75 « 25 « 

Dwarf Erfurt. — The earliest sort, pure white head 2.00 « 25 " 

Lenormand. — Very large late variety, short stem., 1.25 " 25 " 

Late London. 1 ^ ,, , 50 " 10 « 

WaiCherea. /Large ard hardy, late ^^ ,, ^^ ,, 

CELERY— (Fr. Celeri.) 

It is best to sow in a hot-bed in March or April ; but if in the open air, about the middlfj 
of May. When plants are fit to handle, transplant into a well prepared bed, and 
carefully protect from frost. In July again transplant into a trench fifteen inches 
deep, and a foot wide, into the bottom of which a ^ood quantity of thoroughly de- 
cayed manure has been previously dug and covered with rich mould. Plant in 
a straight row in the bottom of the trench, allowing six or eight inches between 
each plant ; give plenty of water in dry weather. After the plants have grown for 
some time, earth up for blanching— performing this operation in dry weather, and 
being careful to keep the hearts free from soil. The simpler plan, however, is 
after the plants are sufficiently strong to handle, to transplant into nicely prepared 
ground (on the dat) in rows 3 feet apart, and (3 inches between the plants ; care 
must be taken to press the earth firmly to the roots. About August, draw the 
earth firmly up to the plants, continuing this as they grow. 

Turner's Licomparable IJ^rarf White.— Fine flavour, very 

crisp, a favourite variety. . . . 20 cts. 10 cts. 
Incomparable Red. — Very slnilar to the preceding, but cf 

a fine crimson colour 20 " 

Giant Rod.— Extremely large, though rather soft 20 « 

White Solid. I Very large and crisp; good for g^eral use ^^ " 
Red ■» 15 « 

Cole's Crystal White.—An early variety of delicious flavour 15 " 

" Superb Red. — "Very crisp, and good flavour 15 " 

Dwarf Solid White.— Self-blanching 15 « 



5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 



«» 

^ 



EWING BEOTHERS' SEED LIST. 



CELERY— iContinued.) 

Peroz. perpkt. 
Boston Market.— Branching habit, and very dwarf; keeps 

well, and of fine flavour 10 eta. 

Sandringham Superb White Solid— A new variety, is 

without doubt the best White Celery yet introduced. 25 cts. 10 " 

Wright's New Giant White.— New.— Grows to an im- 
mense size, and will be of great value to market 
gardeners ; fine nutty flavour , 10 " 



CHICORY. 

Is a perennial plant : requires similar treatment to Carrot, 
with Coffee, the leaves as a Salad. 

Per oz. 10 ots., per pkt. 5 cts. 



The root is used to mix 



COBN SALAD— (Fr. Mache.) 

Sow in September in shallow drills, and protect with straw during winter. The leaves 
are muca esteemed as an early spring salad. 

Per oz. 10 cts.. ^jor pkt. 5 ots. 

CRESS— (F'-. Cresson.) 

This much used salad should be sown thick in shallow drills, and sowings continued 
during the season, as the plants soon run to seed. The water cress should either 
be sown on, or transplanted to the banks of a running stream, or placed in the 
bed of it, with a stono put on each plant to keep it from shifting. 

Plain per oz. 10 cts., per pkt. 5 cts. 

Curled " lo " " 5" 

Water " lo « 

CUCUMBER— (i^/-. Concomhre.) 

About the end of May, for open air culture, dig a hole about a foot each way, and fill 
up with very rich, sandy loam, to about six inches above the level ; these hills 
should be five or six feet apart ; and plant three or four seeds in each ; nip off 
the points 'is soon as the plants show three rough leaves ; this will cause the 
vines to branch out, and the fruit ^o be earlier. To have early fruit, sow in a hot 
bed in February or March, being very careful to cover at night, and during '' 
day to admit the light. Great care must be taken to keep the bed in an equable 
temperature. Transplant into frames with bottom heat for fruiting, 

London Long Green, Uark green. excellent, .per oz. 10 cts., perpkt. 5 cts. 

White Spine, Medium size, fine market variety 

Early Cluster, Very early and productive .... 

" Frame, Small, good flavour 

*' Russian, Early and hardy ; small 

Gherkin.— For pickling 

And a choice selection of splendid English varieties at 50 cts. per pkt. 



10 

10 '« 

10 " 

20 « 

OR «l 



5 
5 
5 
6 





Early Cluster Cucumlser 

Page 6. 



Lon&r Oreen Ctienmlser 

Page 6. 




Evergreen Sug-ar Com 

Page 7. 



St. Sonis Ca'b'bag'e 

Page 4. 




TThito Spine Cuci 

Page 6, 






BarlT Sugar | 

Page 7. i 



Eg-gr Plant 

Page 7. 




IIM*M^ 



\ 
) 
I 



< f 

:■! 



5 Ahyl 


j Purp 
) WMl 


i There 


) * 
; ] 


) Whit 
) Drun 


»-••• ■•■•-■• 



\ 



EWING BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 



) 



• EGG-PLANT— (Fr. Aubergine.) 

Sow in a hot-bed, and plant out about the end of May, into a deep ri'jh soil, with a 
warm exposure ; plants two feet apart. 

Long Purple per pkt. 5 cts. 

Early White Long «< lo «« 

" " Round " 10 «' 

Striped « lo « 

Lnproved New York Purple— "Very large « lo <• 



■ All good earljr varieti a. 



\ ENDIVE— (/^r. CJdcorh.) 

': Sow fromlMay till July in drills one foot apart, and thin out to about the same distance. 
, Tie up to blanch a few weeks before required for use, and draw ;up tho earth 

round the plants. Be taref ul that tho leaves are dry when tied up, but give 
I plenty of water during dry weather. 

; Greeii Curled— Hardy , per oz, 20 cts., per pkt. 5 cts. 

i White *' — Not so hardy as the Green.. « 20 " " 5 « 

: Moss *• " 20 <* « 5 •'« 

INDIAN CORN— (/^r. BU d'Inde.)l 

Sow from May to July, on hills, three feet apart, and four or five plants in a clump ; or 
in drills three feet apart, and six inches between the plants. 

Per doz. ears, per qrfc. 
Adam's Early. 
Early Sugar. 
Darling's Extra Early. 
Early Tuscarora. 

Evergreen Sweet. — "Very large and tender 40 

Mammoth " " " « ' 

Canada Yellow. — Early and very hardy 40 

KOHL RA3I— (i^r. Chou Rave.) 

A hybrid between the Turnip and Cabbage ; oulturp same as Cabbage. Immediately 
above the ground the stem swells into a bulb similar to a Turnip. Should bo used 
before it is thoroughly ripe. 

Purple per oz. 15 cts., per pkt. 5 cts. 

White.- " 15 « «< 5 « 

LETTUCE— (F/-. Laitue.) 

There are are two separate classes of Lettuce, the " Cos" and the " Cabbage." The 
former has long, upright leaves, and the latter, as its name implies, resembles a 
Cabbage. Begin sowing in hot-beds in February, and continue at intervals in 
the open air till September, so as to secure a succession of fine tender Lettuce 
during tho whole season. To grow the Lettuce well, it must bo grown quickly ; 
hence a liberal manuring and watering is indispensable. Sow in beds or drills, 
and thin out to one foot apart. 

Per oz. per pkt. 
Whit*< Summer Cabbage.— A crisp, mild flavoured variety 15 cts, 5 cts. 

Drumhead " A Summer Lettuce 15 «' 5 «( 

Largo Green " Hardy and very crisp 15 «« 5 « 



40 cts. 


20 


cts. 


40 » 


20 


(( 


40 « 


20 


(( 


40 « 


20 


(1 


40 " 


20 


tt 


50 " 


25 


u 


A.n « 









8 



EWINd BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 



LETimCE—CContinned.) 

Per oz. per pkt. 
Imperial Cabbage. — Somewhat similar to Drum- 
head in habit, but much finer 

flavour 15 ots. 5 cts. 

Victoria ." '-rho earliest good sized variety 15 " 5 «• 

Neapolitan " Vory dwarf, with large firm head 20 « 5 " 

Bossin Giant " Largest of all varieties, does not 

run to seed readily 25 " 5 " 

Early Cnrled Si? *»sia " Early and tender 15 '• 5 <« 

Tennis Ball " feaiall, compact head 20 " 6 »' 

Wheeler's Tom Thumb Cabbage —Very early and firm 

headed. Fine for forcing, . 25 « 5 " 

(Large, compact and crisp— excel- "j 
lent for summer u„e ; the former I ^^ ,, 

wmie •• I heing the hardier is more suited [ 
[ for early sowing j 

Bath or Brown Cos.— Large, firm head 20 « 5 " 

LEEK— (Fr. Poireau.) 

Requires a rich fon, well manured the previous Fall. Sow as early in Spring as practi- 
cable ; lift when six or eight iiiclies high acd dibble out into rows, allowing six 
or seven inches between each plant. Soil must bo deeply trenched, and very 
rich. 

Flag.—Large, but not hardy Per oz. 10 cts. per pkt. 5 cts. 

Musselburgh. — A much esteemed nriety, 
very hardy, and grows to a 
large size " 20 " " 10 " 

MELON. 

The treatment required by the Melon, both in the open air and frame, differs little 
from that for the Cucumber ; and: the same care is necessary in roguiating the 
temperature of the frames as with Cucumber. 

Per oz. per pkt. 

Pino Apple.— Grjen Flesh, oval shaped 10 cts. 5 cts. 

Large Yellow Musk.— Very early and productive, oval 

shaped, yellow flesh 10 " 5 " 

Montreal Kutmeg.— Light green flesh, fair size and 

splendid flavour " 10 " 

Nutmeg. — Oval, finely netted, green flesh 10 " 5 " 

Green Citron. — Fruit nearly round, early 10 « 5 " 

Skillman's Netted.— Early and very sweet 10 « 5 " 

White Japan. — Medium sized, round, creamy white 

skin, fine flavour 25 « 10 '• 

Christiana.— Pied flesh, ver>- early 25 •'•' 10 « 

A large assortment of choice European varieties at 50 cts. per pkt. 



( 



ll: 




Green Citron lAelon 

Page 8. 




I^utmesr ICelon 

Page 8. 




"Water SiCelon 

Page '^. 




¥ethers£leld Larere Bed Onion 

Page 9. 




White Fortn^al Onion 

Page 9, 




Teller Sanvers Onion 

Page 9. 





^ -•* 



r" 



^^^MBM^nM^tfi^^M* 



' o r - r . * . ' r 



i) 



EWING BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 



WATEE MELON-CFr. Melon d'eau.) 

Cultivate same as prec-xling, only the si-aeo betwoen i.iantrt must be greater. To 
grow to a largo size, there sliould bo hree or four feet between each plant. 

tur i • « , -n,. Perot, perpkt. 

JJIOUntain Sweet.— Fine quality, oval, scarlet flesh 15 cts. 6 cts. 

Citron. — Bound, used in makinfr prea.'xves 25 "10 '« 

Ice Cream,— White flesh, nearly round 15 «< 5 « 

Long Island.— Red flesh ,. jr, « 5 « 

MonntainSprout— Very large, red fleeh, excellent quality.. 15 «< 6 " 



MUSEROOM SPAWN. 

The easiest, and at the same timo a very suocossful plan for raising y ishrooms, is 
the following :— In preparing tho porraanent Melon or Cucumbor beds, place tho 
spawn in small pieces on the lanuro, and then cover over with soil. The 
Melons or Cucumbers being planted on top, supply tho necessary shade for the 
young plrnts. 

Per brick, 30 cts. 



MJJSTA^D- 'Fr. Moutard.) 



Bequirec similar culture to Cress. Make frequent sowinss to keep u,, a succession of 
tender plan';). 

White.— Bes'. for general use Per lb. 50 cts., per pkt. 5 cts. 

Brown.— "Very pungent « 50 « u 5 u 



OmON-(Fr. Ognon.) 

To grow ft large ore. of Oniomi, the grouad must '^e well pulvcrif od and heavily man- 
ured. Sow in drills one foot apart, as snon as the grounu is perfectly dry. As 
tho plants advance, thin out to four inohe-). If the seed be deoply covered, the 
proportion, of " chick necks" will be great. Cover as lightly as possible, and 
roll or press down with the back of the spado. One ounce of seed will sow 100 
feet of a drill. Unlike many other vegetables, it succeeds well when grown 
from year to year on the same ground. 

Peroz. perpkt. 
Grown by the most eminent 30 ots. 10 cts. 



Danver*s New Yellow. 
Wethersfleld Large Red. 
" Eaily Red. 
White Portugal. 



Srower in the United States 25 «' 10 «« 

and warranted true to name 80 " 10 • 

and of best stock ..,, SO " 10 « 

Small Silver Skin.— For pickling ] « 5 « 

Flat MadClTa.— Mild flavour, Large bulb 20 « C « 

Round " " » 20 •• 5 » 

New Giant RQCfla.~~A globe shaped sort "sllovyigh "olour 

Grows very large Perpkt. iQ cts. 



Im 



^ .. * . 



10 



EWING BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 



) 
' 'J 



\\ 



PARSLEY— (Fn Persil) 

Sow early in wall manured soil, in drills (covering seed about half an inch), and as 
the plants grow, thin out to six inches apart. Cut the foliage as it grows, and 
there will thus be a constant supply of tender leaves. 

Tripled Curled Peroz. lO cts. perpkt. 5o*,s. 

Giu^t " " 10" " »" 

Myatt's Garnishing ■- " lo « " i« 

MossCurled « lo " " 6" 

PARSNIP-Ci^/-. Panais.) 

Sow in drills, fifteen inches apart, as soon as the ground is fit to receive the seed, and 
thin out the plants to six or eight inches. Deep, free, heavily manured soil ia 
ti..:'""ired to grow the Parbnip to perfection. Oc J ounce of seed will sow 100 feet 
of a row. 

Large Guernsey. — Good, useful variety. . . Per oz. 10 cts.. per pkt. 5 •ts. 

Hollow Crown.— Heavy cropper " 10 " " 5 « 

The student — A new variety, better fla- 
voured than the other sorts ... . « 10 " " B " 

PEPPER— (i^'-. Piment.) 

Sow in a hot-bed in April, and be careful not to transplant till the weather is warm. 
Set the plants in warm soil, in rows about one foot apart each way. For a small 
garden, a sufficient supply of Pepper for family use can be had by sowing th» 
seed in the open ground, in drills, after all danger arising from frost is past- 
Thin out to one fbot apart as the plants grow. 

large Red.— Good for general crop Per pkt. 

Sweet Spanish.— Large, but sweet and mild flavoured., " 

Cayenne. — Small red pods, extremely pungent « 

Yellow Snani'-Il.- Best variety for pickling alone " 

Large Boll. — Large and early, bright red colour " 



10 cts 


10 


({ 


10 


(( 


10 


(( 


10 


(t 



I 



PEAS-(Fr. Pois.) 

To have a couptant supply of Peas fit for table use, continuous sowings must be made, 
beginning as soon as the ground is in a workable condition. Sol 1 should be vi«h 
and well trenched : Land Plaster or Lime should also be applied where the soil 
does not contain sufficient proportion of calcareous matter. For late sow- 
ing, the early varieti^js must be used. Sow in single rows, and range stakes 
alongside as the plants grow ; one pint will sow forty to sixty feet of a row, 
according to size of Pea. The wrinkled varieties have the best flavom-, and 
should be used for gener"! crop ; but being tender, are unsuited for either very 
early or late sowings. 

EARLY. 

Carter's First Crop.- Very early and prelific ; 3 feet. . . . P'^r qrt. 30 cts 
Dickson's First and Best " « " .... " so « 

Daniel O'Rourke " " " .... " 20 «• 

Kentish ]JlviCta."~'A'he earliest Blue Pea in cultivation ; 

2feet " 40" 



EWINa BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 



11 



40 « 
30 « 



TEAS— (Continued.) 

Laxton's Alpha. — A splendid wrinkled sort, and very 

early ; 2 J feet Per qrt. 50 cts. 

McLean's Blue Peter.— New. Splendid dwarf sort of 
robust habit ; produces a great crop 
of exquisitely flavoured Peas ; is by 
far the bsst dwarf sort yet intro- 
duced ; i foot Per pint 75 cts. 

Multum in Paxvo. — A fine wrinkled sort, early and pro- 

^ ductive; li feet Per qrt. 50 cts. 

Beck's Gem, or lom Thumb.— 1 foot .. « 23 « 

McLean's Little Gem.— A green, wrinkled sort, of deli- 
cious flavour, 1 foot 

" Advancer. — Green, wrinkled variety, very prolific. 

Laxtou's William the First.— New. The finest first 
early, combining flavour, earliness, and productive- 
ness, 3 feet Per pint $1.00 

SECOND EAELY. 

Bishop's Long Pod.— 2 feet Per qrt. so cts. 

Dickson's Favourite.— Pods Ici.g, very good bearer, 4 

feet « 20 " 

Marrow Fat— Very prolific ; pods ripen all at the same 

time, so successive sowings should be made ; 4 

feet , . . , « 20 " 

Champion of Ens^land.— Green wrinkled, of fine flavour, 

producing a heavier crop than any other variety; 4 

feet 

Tall Sugar.— The young pods are very tender ; 5 feet. , . . 
Dwarf " •' " " " 2 feet.... 

Forty-fold.—^ fine tea, of the same class as Champion 

of England ; 4 feet 

Yorkshire Hero.- -Large and of fine quality; very prolific ; 

3 feet 



LATE. 

British Queen, — A great bearer ; 1 feet , 

Napoleon or Climax.— "Very good ; Si feet 

Veitch's Perfection.— A choice wrinkled sort; 3 feet.... 

Blue Imperial. — Hardy and productive ; 4 feet 

Woodford's Marrow.— A fine flavoured blue pea, keep- 
ing long soft and fit for use ; 3 feet 



( 



(( 


20 


" 


u 


50 


« 


« 


50 


(1 


l( 


30 


: 


<l 


20 




(i 


30 


<l 


<( 


30 


« 


u 


30 


K 


u 


20 


« i- 



« 25 « 







PUMPKIN -(i^r. Courge.) 

This vegetable is only suited for tLo field, or some out-of-the-way corner in the kitchei 
garden, as it is apt to hybridize with Melons and Cucurnbers. CvPivation 
much the same as Melon, though of course it does "ot require so particularly 
prepared soil. It is generally grown in the field between " hills " of Indian Com. 

Mammoth Per pkt, lO cts. 

Keld Per lb. 40 cts. 

Cheese, | g^ .^^^,^ for cooking f Per lb. $1 . 00. per pkt. 5 cts. 

Cushaw. J ^ I « 1.00, " Sets. 



POTATOE— (i^n Fomme de Tcrre.) 

Sandy iloam is best for potatoes; but if planted in heavy soil, well mixed with 
good stable manure and ashes, a good crop may be obtained. Sets ehould be cut 
a week before ^'lanting, and spread out thinly to dry. Many plant good-sized 
tubers, whole. It is a popular fallacy that small tubers are best for seed ; the 
larger the eye, the stronger the shoot— this has often been proved by experiments. 
Plant in ridges, and frequently stir between, until the tubers have begun to 
grow, after which any cultivation might injure the growth. 

Earlj Rose.— Produces an enormous crop of well flavoured 
tubers. The skin is of a rose colour, while the flesh 
is white and solid Market price. 

" Goderich.^ « " 

Harrison. f Well known and highly approved va- 

Gleeson. C rieties ft «i 

QarnetChili. ) « " 

And naany other varieties. 



RADISH-(Fn Hadis.) 

May be sown any time uroughout the Spring and Summer months ; the earlier sowings 
in February and March should bo in a medium hot-bed. Should never be 
allowed to grow too thick, as this renders the roots tough and stringy ; should bo 
copiously watered in dry weather to promote rapid growth, thus securing tender 
bulbs. Will succeed well in any .garden soil not over moist or too heavy. Gener- 
ally sown in beds 4 or o fsntwide, with 1 foot alleys between. 

Scarlet Tornip. | ^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ r Per o.. lO cts. per pkt. 5 cts. 

White "J ' ■' ^ \ <« 10 « « 5 « 

Early Flu^^. — An early, long scarlet varie, y « 10 " « 5 " 
Scarlet Olive Shaped.— Deep scarlet, grows 

quickly, and is very tender «< 10 « " 5 «« 

Long Scarlet Short Top.— Fine long root, 

about the best for 
general crop " 10 " " 5 " 



( 






Lalner's Svreds Turnip 

F»gd 16, 



Stude&t Tar: 
Page 10. 




Tu'iiilp Eadi)'h 

Pftgo 13. 




EX 



;iW^v . _^Hv^*'A-:?VvTr---J'7*^;' .-^YS^Ri*-;?^ 



EWING BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 



13 



B.ADlSE—CContimied.) 

Black Spanish.— Very pungent, hardy. . . . Per oz. 10 cts. per pkt. 5 cts. 
White '• " " .... « 10 « «' 5 « 
FreD^h Breakfast. —New Per pkt. i o cts. 

Ra" :.! . 3 Caudatus.— Produces seed pods 2 feet in length, 

which are used as a Salad , . Per pkt. 20 cts. 

SAMPION. 

Per pkt. 10 cts. 

Prepare for sowing in good, free, well manured soil, the surface of which should be 
raked finely and evenly to receive the seeds, which should not be covered with 
soil, only beat down gently with the back of the spade ; f hade till the seeds ger- 
minate. This root is cooked like Parsnip, and the leaves may be used as a salad 
or cooked like Spinage. 

REJJBAUB—CFr. Rhularhe.) 

Let the soil bo carefully and deeply dug, 'and the seeds sown in May ; transplant when 
sufficiently strong into deeply trenched and heavily manured soil. Plants will 
take two years to produce a crop. Cover during winter. 

Albert. \ 

Linnsus. f ■„ , x - x 

Victoria. \ I'e'^ pkt. 5 cts. 

Tobolsk. ) 

SAVOY— (i^/-. Savoie.-) 

This fine vegetable requires similar treatment to the Cabbage. 
Green Curled,— Medium size, very tender. . Per oz. 15 cts. per pkt. 5 cts. 
Drumhead-— The largest of all the varieties " 15 « " 5 " 

SALSIFY -Oyster Plant— (/?^r. Sahifis.) 

Per oz. 10 cts., per pkt. 5 cts. 
Cultivation and use much the same as Parsnip. 

SCORZOITERE. 

Is also to be cultivated and used in the same manner as Parsnip. 



ill 



) 



I 14 



EWING BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 



SEA KALE— C^'-. CramU Maritime.') 

Per pkt. 5 cts. 

) Sow in May, in richly manured soil, and when the plants are sufiBoiently strong, trans- 
plant into rows three feet apart, with two feet between the plants; in the Fall, 
cover over with about two feet of leaves. For blanching, transfer to a dry cellar, 
and treat same as Rhubarb. 



SPINAGE— (F/. Epinard,-) 



Begin sowing in drills, one foot apart, as soon as the frost is oat of the ground. Suo- 

eessive sowings should be made every fortnight till August, for the Summer 

erops and for Fall crop, about the end of August, on raised beds of light, sandy 

) soil. The plants should bo thinned out to about three inches apart. Water 



eopiously during d«ii' weather. Being quite hardy, it can be sown late in Sep- 
tember for early Spring crop. 

Eound.— Best for general Gummer crop Ter lb. 30 cts. per oz. 5 cts. 

Prickly.— Hirdy, for Autumn sowing « 30 " " 5 " 

New Zealand. — Very luxuriant, resists the 
severest drought; should be 
Bown in heat, and transplant- 
ed out three feet apart Per pkt. 10 cts. 



SQUASH- (i^r. Courge.) 

Cultivate in " hills " same as Cucumber or Melon, sowing the late and hardy varieties 

first. 

Turban. — A superior late variety, of fair size. Per pkt. 10 cts. 

White Bush, f Both very productive and l 

Yellow " Nearly jPerclOcts. « 5« 

Custard. — Superior flavour, but small fruit.. " 10 " 

Summer Crookneck. "j Both good, the Sum- « lo " " 5 " 

f mer being the best 

Winter " -' early Squash grown « 10 « « 5 « 

Green Striped Bergen " lo " « 5 " 

Hubbard.— The best late Squash « 15 " " 5 » 

Vegetable Marrow. — A tender and rich 

variety for late use ... . " 15 " " 5 " 

Boston Marrow.— -A. late variety, a good 

keeper, and fine flavour... " 15 " " 5 " 

Yokohama. — Bound and deep ribbed, very 

sweet and early ...... .....^ " 15 " " 5 ** 

Mammoth, — Grows to an immense size... " 10 " 



;': 



J 




Tilden's Tomato 

Page 15. 



Early Bush Squs 

Page 14. 




Subbard Somasli 

Page 14. 



. 1 'SS- 

J' V i 

'If,. '''W 111, ;1 fliliii 

lilt' 11 m J'ii 



TurlsaxL SoLuash 
Page 14. 




1 


M 

il 



. *'^- ^H 



Soston A£arrox7 Squasli 



.ttiffl 



^oocyr . *r 



m 



Sow on 

ei 

01 

ei 

tr 

01 

&'. 
fo 

Gener 

Eaxlv 
Large 
Pear-6 
Keye'i 

Tildei 



Cherr 
Tree.- 
YelloT 
Straw 

"The 



Sow in I 
Pl 
ai 

Havai 
Virgil 
Maryl 
Connei 
Ohio. 



EWING BPtOTHEES' SEED LIST. 



15 



TOMATO— (i^r. Tomate.) 

Sow OD a hot-bed in March ; in April, prick out into a cold frame, six inches between 
each plant. After all danger of frost is over, trinsplant to "hills," three feet 
apart ; the soil must be rich and warm— water freely to cause them to root. For 
open air culture, sow in drills, in a sheltered situation, being careful to have the 
ground thcroughlj pulverised. When the plants are three or four inches high, 
transplant to where they are intended to be grown. In small gardens a good 
«rop can best be obtained by driving a six foot stake in each hill and tying up 
as the plantu grow. Trimming frequently, leaving only the main shoots, will he 
found beneficial. 

Hi;bbard's Curied Leaf.— The earliest Per pkt. '■ cts. 

General Grant. — New.— Produces a heavy crop, and is very 

early « 10 " 

Early SmoothRed.— Early, smooth and round, per oz,. 25 cts " 5 " 

Large Yellow.— 'Jsef 111 for preserves "25" « 5 " 

Pear-shaped.-— Early, fine for preserves " 25 « " 5 «« 

Keye',! Early Prolific— Early, and at the 

same time rt very prolific bearer « 25" " 5 « 

Tilden's New Seedling.— Large smooth fruit ; 
keeps a long time after being ga- 
thered — aTaluable variety « 10 " 

Cherry. — SmallTariety,grovrs in clusters... « lo « 

Tree. — G-'ows tall, fruit not large but solid... «' lo " 

Yellow Plum. — Good lOr pickling « lo « 

Strawberi'y. — Has a strawberry flavour, and 

is used lor preserving « 10 " 

"The Trophy."— A newly iutroduued va- 
riety. Grows to an immense 
size; ia' solid, and of fine 
flavour, and keeps long in 
good condition «« lo « 



TOBACCO— (i^/-. Tabac.) 



Sow in March in a hot-bed ; prick out into a cold frame in April. In May, again trans- 
plant into rows throe feet apart each way— soil should be rich. Pick off flowers 
and side shoots as they appear. 



Havana. 

Virginia. 

Maryland. 

Connecticut 

Ohio. 



Per pkt. 5 cts. 



Many other Varieties. 



Ill 



J J'" 






•; 



I! 



) 



16 



^'^^^^■^^■^^^^^■^^■^^■^^■^^■^^^^■^^^^■■^^■^^■^■■^M^M 



EWING BEOTHERS' SEED LIST. 



'^^^^i^^^'*y^Y 



TURNIP-(i^r. Navet) 

Sow as early as the stato of tho ground will allow, in drills ; thin out the plants to nine 
inches. Make successive sowings of early sorts until end of August, so as to have 
nice tender bulbs all the season, The situation should be a warm border for the 
earlier sowings. Sucoeod be.st in sandy soil and loams containing a largo pro- 
portion of sand. The Swodish varieties are most suitable lor storing through 
winter. 

Robertson's Golden Ball.— The best of the yellows 

for general crop ; keeps well Per oa. 10 cts. per pkt. 5 eta. 

Altringham Yellow.— Keeps well " lo « « 5 <« 

Early Stone. — Good for late Bowing " 10 " «« 5 " 

White Dutch.— Very fine and juicy, best for " 10 « « 5 " 

early sowing « 10 " '■ 5 " 

American Eed Top, Strap Leaved " lo " " 5 «' 

" White " " »' 10 " » 5 «« 

Green Top Swede. i Best varieties 

Laing's Purple Top Swede I ot Swede for 
White Sweet Swede. | garden culture «' 10 " " 5 " 



SWEET and POT HERBS. 

Sow early in Spring, in a corner by themselves. They are for the most pait peren- 
nials ; and also multiply from the seed thoy drop. Thin out the yount; plants 
thus raised, and keep beds free from weeds. 



j Angelica 


Safiron 


Summer Savory 


) Basil, Sweet 


Wormwocd 


Borage 


DuaU 


Anise 


Carraway 


•; Coriander 


Fennel 


FsDuugreek 


: Henbane 


Eorehound 


Hyssop 


> Marjoram, Sweet 


Balm 


Marigold, Pot 


Pot 

i 


Sage 

Winter Savory 


Thyme 


> 
•i 
i 


All at 5 cts. per packet. 





CULINARY ROOTS, PLANTS, &c. 



Asparagus 


Pepper 


Rhubarb 


Celery 


Cauliflower 


Cabbage 


Tomato 


Savoy 




&c., &c. 

AT MARKET PRICES 



V^ 





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EWING BROTHEKS' SEED LIST. 



17 





ED lEASSES 



FOR LAWNS, &c. 

Per Ih. 35 ota. 



It w impossible for a garden to be neat without having the lawn well kept; and to 
seoare this it must be sown down with cuoh grasses as grow low and compact, and 
present at all times a luxuriant verdure. The mixture offered only containa the 
finer grasses. In ordering, state whether wanted for sowing u\der trees, or for 
the open lawn. Two to tnree bushels is sufficient seed for an aci«. 



Special Quotations to Market Gardeners and others 
using Seeds in large quantities. 



The hot-bed should bo in a warm position, facing the South and sheltered from 
the North and West. Procure fresh stable manure— shake up with a f jri'. and throw 
it into a heap, in wh'ch state allow it to remain for four or five days ; then again shako 
it up as before, and in three days more it will bo in a fit state for making the bed. Lay 
out the ground six inches larger every way than the frame that is in' •. ded to be used, 
and build up the bed with this dung to the height of 2i feet, (this height will answer for 
vegetables, and flower ser is can be put in after they are removed), pressing it firmly 
together as it is put on. The frame should be 12 inches deep in front, and eighteen 
in the rear, so as to have a good slope to carry off the rain. After putting on the lights, 
allow 1 day or two to ela :e, so as to let the violent heat be exhausted, and then spread 
evenly over the whole bea, four or five inches of light sandy loam. Sow seeds in pots, 
and place in the frame ; but should 't be wanted to sow seeds in the soil of the bed, add 
three inches more of light sandy loam. To have a " Cold Frame," set the hot-bed frame 
on any spot of warm ground, covering it at night, so as to retain the warmth gai'^^ ^d 
dnring the day. 



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LWING BEOTHEES' SEED LIST. 




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As an inducement to parties to " club " together in order 
to get Flower Seeds cheap, we will send, free of charge, 100 
five cent pkts. on receipt of four dollars, and the more expen- 
sive varieties, when ordered in 50 pkt. lots, at a similar reduc- 
tion on the List price, and all Elower Seeds sent Post-paid. 

In arranging this department of the Catalogue, we have thought it 
advisable to have the kinds suited for the different positions in the 
Flower Garden classed together, in order to facilitate selection, thus ; 

Annnals, hardy, half-hm dy, and tender, suitable for beds or clumps. 
Biennials and Perennials " " " " 

Ornamental climbers, annual and perennial. 

" foliaged plants » " 

" KTMses ^ " «' 

Everlasting; flowers. 
Extra Cboice and New Floiv^r Seeds in packets and in collections. 



There are a great many Flower Seeds to be had which are in reality not worth 
growing, but in this list care has been taken only to enumerate such varieties of Annual, 
Biennial, and Perennial Flower Seeds as are really worth tho attention of Cultivators. 

Those parties who are unaoquainted with the names and comparative merits of 
tha different sorts, would do well only to mention the number of packets wanted, and 
the amount they wish to expend, of course stating whether hardy or tender Annuals, 
Bioi-nials or Perennials, and the position they wish them to occupy. 

The cultivation of Flowers does not receive the amount of attention which their 
beauty merits Many, sowing a few packets of Annuals, never thin out, stake thotaUer 
ones, nor in fact pay any attention to them after sowing. The consequence of th»o is; 
that the Flowers are never fully developed, and the patches present anything but a neat 
appearance. By paying attention to the tollowing brief instructions, amateurs wiii have 
a roijult that will well repay them for any extra trouble they may be put to. 



■: 
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EWING BROTHEES' SEED LIST. 



19 



"li 



I 



SOIL. 



A free, medium rioh soil produces the best flowers. If the soU be poor, the plaat 
wiU not iMt long in bloom ; while if it be too rich, taere will be an overgrowth of leaves 
with comparatively few flowers. "*w»vob 

i SOWING. 

\ Never sow too early in the open air. The plants will flower much better if the 

; seeds be sown when the temperature of the soil is warm. The ground should be dug 
j deeply, a.id earefully raked over; smaU seedsshould havethe leastpossible coveriag- 
larger ones a little more, m proportion to their size. 

i THINNING AND STAKING. 

■ When suflEciently advanced to handle, the plants •'>:^stbe thinned outto aprooer 

<listano9!fromeach other, so that ea«h plant will have plenty of room and air ; thetaUer 
Borte, som. of whwh have weak stems, should be supported by neaf , straight wooden 
stakes, and the plants secured to those by a narrow strip of garden matting Many a 
flower border presents a slovenly appearance for the lack of thinning end staking. 

TRANSPLANTHiTG. 

This operation should be done, if possible, when the weather is cloudy. Groat 
care should be taken to preserve the roots entire, and with as much earth adhering to 
them aa possible ; thoroughly drench the plants before lifting, to effect this. Plant 
rather thick to allow for failures, and water copiously in the evenings. 

ARRANGEMENT, <fec. 

In sowing or planting, special attention should be paid to the height of the plants 
so as to have the smalLst in front of the bed or border, and the taller ones in thejoentr^ 

or D£LOK* 

Care should be taken to have a contrast of colours, otharwise the effect will not 
be pleasing. 

When grown in " Masses" or " Ribbons," Annuals should completely cover the ' 
ground they occupy : should the ground be visible, the effect is somewhat marred In ' 
smaU gardens, however, where they are sorn in a mixed bed or border, itia best to let i 
every plant or patch form a distinct object of attraction. i 

i 

TENDER ANNUALS. \ 

Half-hardy and Tender Annuals require much the samf. after-treatment om the ( 

hardy varieties. They should, however, be sown in a hot-bed or boxes, in April, in a '■ 

lightsoil.composedof leaf mould, loam, and river sand, i'-, equal proportions. The '' 

amateur can place the boxos or pots in the wuidow of anj spare room, and great care < 

must be taken to water sparingly in the earlier stages of gnwth. When the plants are \ 

two or three inches high, transplant to where they are intended to bloom. ■: 

BIENNIALS AND PERENNIALS. 

Many varietiesof these Hardy, Half-hardy and Tenuer, will flower the first year, 
if sown at the same time as Annuals. To have them flower the succeeding year, the 
best time for sowing is perhaps the month of July or August, so that the hardy varieties 

•Til i-o'--- rtiaivicat aucuHUi lu ssaaa mo trintcr. lij sowing at tUi» Umo there 

will be a fine show of flowers the succeeding Summer. All the hints given regarding 
the onlture of Annuals, are applicable to B>nnials and Perennials. 



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EWING BEOTHEES' SEED LIST. 



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Ahbretiiationa tued : h.h., half-hardp : t., tender ; 
all others are hardy annuals. 

.<iE DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF ANY FLOWER CAN BE HAD MIXED. 

— *" pkt. 

Cto. 

I— Abronia umbellata, rosy lilac h. h. J foot 5 

Somewhat resembles the Verbena in flower and habit of plant ; sweet 
scented ; suitable for beds, rockwork or hanging baakets. 

2— AdocSs flosf red, handsome foliage, 1 foot ; suitable for shrubberies 5 

3— Ageratum Mexicanum, blue, lifeet,h. h 5 

4— " coelestinum, blue, i foot h.h 10 

5— " nanum, i foot, h. h 10 

Makes a good bed, and when out shows well in a bouquet. 

&—Agrcsteniacoe]i rosea,! foot 5 

A c. ompact growing plant, profusely covered with rose coloured flowers. 

7_j|.IyH(ynm sweet, white, swoet scented ; makes a neat edging 5 

8— AlloK3oa "WarcceiCTlczli!, . h. bright scarlet, IJ feet 5 

9— Aiiietliy8tlieacoerulea,blue, 2feet S> 

10— Amiiagallis* mixed, i foot 5 

Beautiful trailing plant, looks handsome when cultivated in pots or 
vases, and makes a pretty bed. 

11— Aoiperula Azurea setosa, 1 foot < • • • • 10 

A profuse blooming plant of dense habit. Beautiful light blue, and 
very sweet scented; very suitable for hand bouquets. 

12— Aeter china, h. h. IJ feet • 5 

13— " Quilled German, mixed h. h. li feet 5 

For display the Aster is unsurpassed, and is consequently very popular. 
For the ither varieties of this fine annual, i^ee Extra Choice Flower Seeds. 

14— Baleam double, fine mixed, t. 2 feet 5 

15_ •' Camelia-flov. red, mixed, t. 2 feet 10 

Is an old favourite of easy culture, producing its brilliantly coloured 
flowers in the greatest profusion. See Extra Choice Ilotoer beeda tor 
choice varieties and collections. 

16— Bartonla aurea, yellow, 2 feet 5 

Leaves resemble those of the thistle, while the blooms are large and 
bright. Sow where it is intended to bloom. 

17— Hracliycome, mixed, h. h. i foot 10 

Daisy habit with flowers not unlike the Cineraria. Effective for edgings 
or rustic baskets. 
18— Ero-wallia, mixed, h. h, li feet 5 

19— Cacalia aurea, golden yellow, h.h. li feet ) "jassel like flowers % 

20— " coccinea, orange " S ** 

21— Calandrlnla, mixed varieties, J foot 5 

Creeping plant, looks well in rookeries. 

22— Calendula, hybrida, white, 1 foot 5 

23— «' Pongeii flore pleno, double white 1 foot 5 

Showy plant of the Marigold family, produces a fine effect in beds or 
mixed borders. 

Aj ^^.«ia«.v> AM *^nAn^n vioviQ tMimIn urifll XcrYllfA AVA. I Tnof.. ..■.■•>•*..« O 

wj — ^^jjjj.. .j,.^ .„....,. i,^ , . ...„, 

A beautiful annual, producing large, partially cup-shaped flowers, 
suits well either in beds or single specimens. 




Salpig: 

Page 



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Salpigrlos&is 

Page 25. 



AmaraxLthns Salicifolius 

Page 36. 




Leptosiphou 

Page 23, 



JSweet Scalsiou: 

Page 28. 



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25— Compannla Loreii, bine, Jfoot 5 

26- " " white,ifoot 5 

A ohanningannnai. blooms freely in the open border, and is also very 
asefol for pot culture. 

27— Oandytaftf crimson, 1 foot >.. 5 

28— " white, 1 foot 5 

2»- " purple " 5 

A great favourita, is extremely hardy, continues long in bloom, and looks 
well in alm:3t any position in tha Tlower Garden. 

30-Oatchfly Iiobel's red, 1 foot 5 

31— " " white, lioot 6 

Free flowering plant, good either for beds or borders. 
32— Centauroa, mixed varieties, 1 foot 5 

Fine free growing plant, very hardy and rather a showy flower. 
33— Centrauthus macrosiphon, rose, 1 foot 5 

34— " albus, white, 1 foot 6 

35— " nanus, pink, i f<K)t 5 

Very hardy and good for mixed borders ; useful for bouquets. 

36— Cinrysantkomum coronarium, white, i foot 5 

37— " Burridgeanum, white, with crimson pnd yellow 

centre, 1 foot 5 

38— " purpuieum, purple, 1 foot 5 

Very showy Summer border plant 

39— Clarkla pulchella, rose, li feet 5 

40— " " alba, white, li feet 5 

41— " " " Tom Thumb, J foot 6 

42— " integripetala, rose, li feet. 5 

43— " pulcherrima, dark red, li feet 5 

A favourite Annual, all the varieties of which are of very easy culture 
and if proper attention be paid to thinning out, it makes a very 
pretty bed ; is also good for patches. 

44r-Cllintoiila elegans, blue, h. h. i foot 5 

A pretty little plant, with flowers somewhat resembling the Lobelia ; 
suitable for edgings or rockwork. 

45— Coxcomb, mixed varieties, 1 foot 5 

46— " extra choice varieties 10 

Curious looking, but ornamental flowers, very attractive in the green- 
house or border, when mixed with other plants. 

47— Collinsia bicolor, purple and white, 1 foot 5 

48— " " alba, white, 1 foot 5 

4^— " grandiflora, blue, white and lilac, 1 foot 5 

Beautiful annual and very attractive either in beds or borders ; free 
flowerer and exceedingly hardy. 

50— OonvolTUlus Minor, mixed, Ifoot 5 

51— " " white.lfoot 5 

The Convolvulus belongs to a very showy genus of plants ; their largo 
bell-shaped flowers produce a fine effect either in beds or patches. 
Should bo grown in every garden. 

52— Coreopsis, mixed, 3 feet 5 

A free flowering annual, shows to beet advantage in lar^e masses. 

53— Cosmea atropurpurea, crimson, 2 feet • • 5 

Flowers somewhat resr- ible the Dahlia ; showy. 

54— Cyanun major, mixed, 2feec .^ 5 

*• minor " " 5 







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rpkt. 

Ct8. 

56'-Datnra Wrightii, white, bordered with blue, 2 feet, hardy 5 

57— " purple 5 

Trumpui, shaped flo\7ers and very ornamental folia«e, specially adapted 
for shrubberr borders. 5 

58— jc'ry.-^lnianiFeroffskianum, orange, U feet 5 

59— " Arkansanum, light yellow, IJ feet .... 5 

The Erysimum is a very showy annual, thrives iwll in almost any situ- 
ation, and continues long in bloom ; sweet soented. 

60— Esebaclioltzta califomioa yellow, orange centre, 1 foot 5 

61— •' orooea, orange, 1 foot 5 

62— « albi, white, 1 foot 5 

63— " tenuifolia, straw-coloured, i foot 5 

The brilliant colours and large size of the flowers render the EEohsoholt- 

zias very attractive, whether in beds or small patches. 

64— Entoca, mixed varieties, 1 foot 3 

Attractive plant in mixed borders, useful for cutting- 

65— Fenzlia dianthiflora, lilac, crimson centre, J foot 25 

Well adapted for rustic work or vases. 

66— Gaillardia, mixed varieties, 1 foot 5 

67— " white margined 1 foot 5 

Is in reality a perennial ; but flowers freely the first year ; is among 
the gayest ornaments of summer flower-beds. 

68— Gilla, mixed varieties, 1 foot 5 

Is of neat growth and makes a neat edging; grows better under the 
shade of trees, rose bushes, <&o., than almost any other annual. 
69— Godetia, mixed varieties, IJfeet 5 

Well deserving of the most extensive culture. The profuseness of 
bloom and the delicate tints of colour of this annual render it a uni- 
versal favourite. 

70— C}y,r<«oplilla elegans, purple and white, Ifoot 5 

71— " rosea,lfoot 5 

72" " muralis, pink, i foot 5 

A nice annual of free bushy habit; the elegans is speciE^Iy adapted 
for rock work. 

73— Hellopliila araboides, blue, h. h. J foot 10 

Good either for beds or edgings. 
74— HIbiacus, mixed varieties, h. h. 1 foot 5 

Belongs to a very ornamental genus of plants ; is of vory slowgEOWthi 
so that it is necessary to sow early and transplant 
75— Ice Plant, h. h 5 

Trailing plant; its leaves having the appearance of being covered 
with ice. Very ornamental in rockeries or for garnishing cUshes. 

76— Jacoboea, mixed, 1 foot 5 

77— *• Dwarf, mixed, J foot 5 

Compact growing and free flowering. Makes a splendid bed and is 
well adapted for ribbon work. 

78— Kanlfnssla amelloides, blue, Hoot. 5 

7^ " atroviolacea, violet, Hoot 10 

A very pretty annual, is very hardy and flowers early. 

80— Larkspur^ Dwarf Glerman rocket, mixed, 1 foot 5 

81— « tall " " 2feet 5 

82— " branching " " 2feet 5 

83^ " Hyacinth-flowered, mixed, 1 foot 5 

84— " Candelabrum " " 10 

Handsome annuals ; retain their lively coloured flowers for a length of 
time. The Hyacinth-flowered and Dwarf German Rocket do best 
for sowing in masses, while the others are most effeotive in groups 

nr nfl.ti>h<>a, Tholnjat, nitmnH in thn ViAaf. nf nil- .. 



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85— Leptoslplion androsaoeus, rosy lilao, J foot 5 

8&— " hybrid, new, various colours, i foot , 10 

Amongst the most beautiful of hardy annuals ; is admirably adapted 
either for beds, ribbons or edgings ; succeeds b«8t in the shade. 

87— lilmnuntlieg Douglassii, pale yellow, i foot 5 

A I'ree blooming fragrant plant ; good for either olamps or edgings. 

88— lilnarla, purpurea, purple, Ifoot 5 

89— lilnum grandiflorum rubrum, scarlet, Ifoot 5 

One of the best annuals ever introduced ; its rich, perfect shaped, 
bright scarlet flowers, have a most striking effect, in beds, ribbons 
or patches. It should not be thinned out too much. 

90— liObella trracilis, blue and white, h.h., Ifoot 10 

91— " speciosa, h. h. i foot, intense blue, fine 10 

A most useful genus of plants, of neat habit, and are much admired 
in ed^ngs, rookeries, vases, &o. Do best in a somewhat shady 
situation. Sie " Extra Choice Flower Seeds." 

92— LiOTe liies Bleeding, crimson, 2i feet 5 

y3- •• " white " 5 

Ornamental plant with hanging flowers ; useful in the shrubbery or 
mixed border. 

94— I<otu« Jacobeus, dark brown, adapted for hous'ioulture 5 

9S— Liupinus Cru ickshanki', blue, yellow and white, 3 feet 5 

96— " Dunnetti suiwrbus, purple and white, li feet 5 

97— « Harfwegii, blue and white, li feet ,. 5 

98— •* Memiesii, orange, 1 foot 5 

99— " nanua, blue shaded, i foot 5 

100— " sulphareus, pale yellow, 1 foot 8 

101— " bicolor elogans, light purple, 2 feet 5 

102— " subcarnosus, pink, 1 foot 5 

Fine free growing plants, with long spikes of richly coloured blossoms ; 

well suited for growing in groups in the back ground of a mixed 
border, for which, from three to five plants in each clump will be 
sufficient. 
103— liitpliiB, large bluo, li feet , 5 

104— «' " rose,24 " 5 

105— " '• while, 2 " 5 

106— " " yeUow,lJfeet 5 

Valuable for the shrubbery or mixed border, on account of their 
robust growth. 

107— Malope grandiflora, purplish red, 2feet , 5 

Strong growing plant, with bell-shaped flowers ; will thrive in almost 
any soil. 
lOS-marlgold African,, orange, h. h. 2 feet 5 

109— " •« lemon,; •• 2 » 5 

110— " " orange, " 3 " 5 

111— '• Freucli, extra fine striped, h. h. 1 foot 10 

112— " •< mixed " " 5 

113— " " •« dwarf " ifoot ^ 5 

114— " " dwarforange, " ifoot S 

These annuals are general favourites, and deservedly so, as no other 

surpasses them, either for their glowing colours, or the ilength of 
time they continue in bloom. There should always be a space o[ 
fifteen inches between each, when planted in beds or small groups. 




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V pkt. 
Cts. 
115— RlAl^el ofPern, finest mixed French hybrids, h. h. 2 feet S 

116— " striped leaved, » " 10 

Dark green glossy foliage, with beautifully coloured flowers. A striking 
and effelotiTe plant. Sweet scented. 

117— REeMmbryanthemnm pomeridianum, yellow, h. h. ifoot 5 

Elegant dwarf plant ; when in a sunny situation is well suited for rus- 
tic baskets, vases, do. 

118— nilcnoneUe, large flowering, i foot 5 

119— " Giant pyramidal 10 

The latter is quite a distinct variety, of pyramidal habit, and grows to 
a great size. Like the old variety, it is extremely sweet scented. If 
well thinned out will be strong, and spikes of bloom very much larger 
than if allowed to grow thick. 

120-Na«turMum, Oattell's dwarf, scarlet, ifoot 6 



121- 

122— 
128- 
12(1— 
125— 
126- 
12T- 
128— 



lom Thumb, crimson, 

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5 

scarlet, " 5 

yellow, " 5 

spotted, " 5 

pearl, white, 3 foot 5 

Crystal Palace gem, sulphur yellow, I foot. 5 

Golden King, J foot 10 

King Theodore, new, very dark 10 

Very showy, and most useful annuals either for beds, ribbons or 



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r aij- ouuyvj', auu uiuBt UBUiui uuuuaiH oiiuur lur oeus, riuoouH ur 

patches ; they are quite hardy, and their brilliant bell-shaped flowers 
continue long in bloom; should be in every garden. 

129-?remesla, Mixed, h. h., 3 foot 5 

130— Nemopblla atomaria, white with dark spots, J foot 5 

131— " coelestis blue, i foot 5 

132— " maoulata, white, purple and black, i foot 5 

133— " discoidalis, black with white border, i foot 5 

134— " insignis, blue, J foot 5 

135— " " marginata, white edged, I foot 5 

These extremely pretty annuals are useful in various ways for decor- 
ating the flower garden. Their neat and compact habit of growth 
and striking shades of colour, make them especially prized fur bedSi 
ribbons or edgings, and they!will bloom extremely well in the shade. 

136-NlgelIa, Mixed varietes, IJ feet 5 

Compact grower, pretty foliage. 
137— Nolana, Mixed 5 

Handsome trailing plant, somewhat resembling Convolvulus. 
138— <Enothera bistorta Veitchiana, yellow, crimson spotted, 1 foot 5 

Opens its large and showy flowers in the latter part of the day. 
139— Oxalls rosea, rose, ifoot •• 10 

A very elegant little plant of bushy habit, with blight rose coloured, 
salver-shaped blossoms. 
140— Oxynra chrysanthemoides, 1 foot « 5 

A showy plant, yellow flower, fringed with white ; branching habit. 

141— Poppy carnation, double mixed, 2feet 5 

142— •* ranunculus-flowered, 2 feet... 5 

I4»— " Poeony-flowered, 2 feet 5 

Very showy ; their bright coloured flowers are a great acquisition for 
shrubbery borders ; are very hardy. 
144— Phlox Dramaiondll Leopoldii, crimson and white, h. h. 1 foot 10 

145— " Radowitzii, rose, white stripe, " " 10 

146— " Princess Royai, light purpio, '.vhito stripe, h. .. 

Ifoot 10 



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Crerman Ton "Weels Stock (Sin^lo F/pike) 

Pages 25, 40 and 41, 



T47-P1 
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14»- 
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151- 



> 15a-Po 

J 

1 153— Po 

j 154- 



) 156-Pr: 

156-Sa] 

157- 

168- 



159-Sa! 
160-Sai 

161-8ai 
162- 



163— Sell 
164-Seii 

165-S«0( 



166-Sw< 

167— 

168— 



16£-9an 

170— Ta« 



171-Vlr( 
172- 



■: 173-Vttc 



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ii 



EWING BEOTHERS' SEED LIST. 



148— 
14»- 
1£0— 
151- 



M 



T47-PltIox Draminvndll Iiab«Uia«, 1 foot, pair yellow 

white 

scarlet 

blue 

m'jted 

For riohnoss of colour and diiration of bloom, no annual rarpauet 
thoTarietieg of Phlox Drummondii ; prcduoea striking effect in 
beds or masges, and in fact show well in any positiou in the floner 
garden. Also see " Extra Choice Flower Seeds." 

152— Fodolepl», mixed varieties, h. h. 1 foot 

Elegant free flowering plant ; does well in mixed bordan. 
^53— Portul»ca erandiflora flore pleno, double, various colours- '• h, J foot. 

15*— *• mixedvarieties, h. h. Jfoot... 

Beautiful little annuals of extremely orilliant colours ; make a 
pretty bed in any sunny situation in iue flower garden. Being of 
compact growth and easy "uHure, is extremely popular. 

156— Prince'* Feather, dark crimson, 2 feet 

Attractive plant, with el-s' ' plumesof rich coloured flowers. 
156— SalplfflonU, fine mixed, '•.. ^ '. feet 

157— ** New, large flortoring, h. h. IJ feet '. 

158— «* Dwarfmixed " 

Produces very picturesque fa jnel-shaped flowers, beautifully vein- 
ed and marbled, of al' "-odes of colour. Fine border plant 

159— Sal via Roemeriana ; beautiful scarlet tender, 3 feet 

160— Sanvltalla procumbens, yellorr, i foot 

/ pretty creeping plant, well suited for edgings or small beds. 

161— Sapouaria calabrioa, pink, i foot , 

162- " alba, white, i foot 

Dense carpet-like habit completely studded with brigl t cross-shaped 
flowers, continuing in bloom the whole summer; admirable for 
bedding or ribboning, is also very pretty in vases and rustic 
baskets. N • flower garden can be complete without these two 
varieties. 

163— Sclilaautliu8Grh''amii, red and orange, h.h. 2 feet 

161-Seusltlve Plant, t., Ifoot 

A curious plant, the leaves close upon the slightest touch. 

165-S«ock», Ten week, fine mixed, h. h. 1 foot 

This annual is so well known^ and so univeraally admired thatnoth- 
ing need le said in its favour. For varieties and eoUections, see 
'* Extra Choice Flower Seeds." 

166— Sweet Sultan, white, li feet 

yellow " 

purple " 

An old favourite, and is much esteemed for its large showy flowers ; 
is specially adapted for growing in patches in a mixed border. If 
sown in May, will make a fine display in August 

les -Snnflo w«r, ♦all, double, orange, 5 feet 

Well known plant, best adapted for the shrubbery. 
170— Ta«ete« signata Pumila, h. h. Ifoot 

A dwarf variety of Mar;;--)ldwith fern-like leaves ; is adapted either 
for beds, nclons or patches. *- » u«i 

171- Virginian Stock, red, j foot 

172- ** \'hitc ifoot 

A pretty little swe«t scanted annual, the S: wors completely hide the 

173— Vl«4. aria oculata, rose, with dark eye, Ifoot 



rpkt 
Cts. 
10 
10 
10 
10 
5 



26 
5 



5 
10 
10 



10 
10 

5 
5 



5 
10 



167- 
168- 






5 
5 
5 



5 
6 








m 



mm^" 



v , 







i.-"J 



m 






t> 



■4 






I 1^^ 'l II ll~l ■'! l' 

26 



) 



■i^^^^f^ 



i 



EWING BEOTHEES' SEED LIST. 



V vkt. 

Ct8. 

17i—VI«c«irla Dunnettii, white, with dark eye 1 foot 19 

Preiiy, free flowering plant. Produces a striking effect in a mixed 
border. 

175— "WliltlBvla grandiflora, violet,lfoot 5 

Showy ; does well for beds or edgings, and flowers well in the shade. 

176— Zinnia donble mixed, h, h. IJfeet 5 

177— " »• " saved from choice flowers, h. h. li feet 10 

178— " Haageana^ a new dwarf vanety 10 

The Ziunias will grow in the open border, if sown in May, bnt if sown 
earlier, under glass, the blooms will be superior. The profusion and 
duration of the flowers, as well as their riohneis and d arsity of 
colour, render this annual a necessity in every flower ga ^en. For 
collections, see " Extra Choice Flower Seeds," 



®l©mmlal@ ami l^©t©mmlal@e 



L 



AbhreviationH used: h. r Hardy Perennial; h. h. p., Malf Hardy Perennial; 
h. b., Hardy Biennial ; he >., 6., Half Hardy Biennial; g. p., Greenhoute Perennial. 



^P- pkt. 
Cts. 

179— Acbir^te fiUipenduIa, yellow, h. p. 2 feet 5 

180— Agrostemma (Ro Campion,) mixed, h. p., 2 feet ^ 5 

181— AlysHom saxatile doW(h. p. Hoot c 5 

182— Anobusa statice, dy, 2feet 5 

ISS^Anemoaelhortensis, fine mixed, h. p. Ifoot • 5 

184— Antlrrblnum mains, flne mixed, h. p. 2 feet • 5 

185— " Extra choice, mixed, h. p. 2 feet t 10 

r?he Antirrhinum or Snapdragon, if sown under glass and iransplanted, 
will flower the first year ; is a very showy plant when grown in bed8> 
and is also suitable for pot culture. 
78&—Aqailegia (Columbine,) fines': mixed, h.p.lHcet 5 

187— " hortensis, h. p. 1 foot < 5 

188— «• reddi8hviolet,(new,)h. p. Ifoot... 10 

Blooms early; its great beauty renders it deser^ng of a place in every 

flower border. 

189— Anrlcnla, see Extra Choice Flower Seeds 

19C-€alceolarIa, '• •' " «.. 

ldl-€lnerarla, " *• " 

192— Campanula oarpatica, blue, h. p. 1 foot 5 

193- " " white, " " 5 

One of the most useful plants in cultivation ; makes pretty beds or 

edgings, and is useful for pot culture. 
194— Canterbury Bells, blue, h. b. 2feet 5 

195— " white, h. b. 2 feet 5 

196- " double blue, h. b. 2 feet 5 

Most effective plants in the shrubbery or mixed border. 

197— Carnation, good mixed double, h.p ^ -^ 5 



ill 

I- 






i 



.,1 













Sianthus Reddewi^i Siadomatus, Double 

Page 27. 




H— ir'P'.yj^ opg!0 > . 



EWING BROTHEES' SEED LIST. 



27 



VpkU 

198— Carnation, fine mixed jn* 

The Carnation is a very %eneral favourite, on account of its remarka- 
bly sweet perfume and rich shades of colour. Also, see " Extra 
Choice Flower Seeds." 

199— Ohrysautbemam indicum flore i^leno, finest mixed, g. p. 50 

20(>-Clielone barbata, orange and scarlet, h. p. 3 feet 5 

20I-C0W8UP, fine mixed, h. p. J foot 5 

202-Cupl»ea, finest mixed, tender, 3 foot !.*.'...'.*.'.'!.'.'.' 10 

203— Dahlia, from priie flowers, h. h. p. 4 feet ...!!!...!'..! 25 

204— Daisy, double h. h. p. Makes a pretty edging 10 

205— Delpblninm formosum, blue, h. p.3 feet .*. 5 

206— *« grandiflorum, white, h. p. 2feet ..', 5 

207— *' Hendersonii, h. p. 2 feet .' 5 

One of the handsomest perennials grown ; when planted in large beds 

or in groups, its long flower spikes render it very attractive. 

208— DlantiiuB superbus, mixed, h. h. b 5 

200— «' laciniatus " jn 

210- «* «« double " .*.'.'.'.'* 10 

211- «* Heddewigii " , * *** in 

212- «* «• double " '.'.'.'.'.'."' 10 

21t- ** latifolioB " 10 

214- " " double " ...*..*.'!.*.'.' 10 

215— <* Heddewigii, diadematus, double !*.**. 15 

The tribe of Dianthus is the most useful of all biennials or perennials, 

comprising, as it does, the Sweet William, Carnation, Piootee, &o. 
The.varieties enumerated above, though biennials, will flower the 
first year, and with their large blooms, (some of them three to four 
inches in diameter,) of rich and varied shades of colour, have a 
remarkably fine eflFeot in beds or groups, and are likewise very 
showy in the green-house. The last named is new, and is a 
splendid vb.lety. 

216-Dlgitall8 (Foxglove) finest mixed h. p. 3 feet 5 

217— •* gloxinoides, beautifully spotted, h. p. 3 feet '.*.*. 5 

A fine free grower, producing lon^ beautifully spotted bell-shaped 
flowers, suits well for shrubberies. 

218— Forget-me-not, mixed, h. p 5 

Pretty little plant, grows well round fountains orin any moist situation, 

219— Brytbrlna crista galli, 4feet, crimson 25 

A strong growing tender perennial with peculiar coral-like flowers ; 
very ornamental. 
220-Gnranlatti, Soarlet, Zonale, Tom Thumb, and other varieties, h. h. p.. 25 

221—H[eart8ease or Pansey, choice mixed 25 

22a- '; " finemixed,h.b !!!.'.'." 10 

This pretty plant is well deserving of its wide reputation; the seed 
oflered has been selected from the collections of the most celebrated 
European Florists. Also see " Extra Choice Flower Seeds." 

223-Hellotroplnm Peruvianum, lilac, h, h. p. 2 feet 10 

Very fragrant ; with Geraniums and Calceolarias makes a fine bed- 
ding plant, and is also well suited for house culture. 

224— HoUyliock, finest mixed, h. p 10 

The stately growth, and magnificent flower spikes of the Hollyhock 
render it a most striking and effective plant See " Extra Choice 
Flower Seeds." 

225-B[oney8uckIe, French, mixed, h. b. 24 feet 5 

i:;s>—*Ocjii»Bemporvir'3n8, white, h.p. J foot .....V. 10 



? 





«i '■] 



II 





227— Ipomopsla, mixed, h. h. b. 2 feet - S 

Prodnoes long spikes of brilliant flowers. 
228— IJantanaf mixed, t. p 25 

A remarkably handsome free flowering plant ; very attrMtive in bedSt 
and it is also well suited for pot culture. 

229— Isabella oardinalis> tender perennial, scarlet, 2 feet -2S 

230— I<.yclialachaloedonioa,h. p.,8oarlet2 feet 5 

231 •• Haageanar " " 1 " 5 

Haageana is different shades of scarlet. Handsome aad effectiTe bor- 
der plants, 

232— I»ytlirum roseum snperbnm, rose, h- p.,2feet 5 

233— numulasf finest mixed, h. h. p., } foot W 

234— " MosohatuB, (Musk scented) I foot W 

The first is much admired for the rich and stiikindy baautifal mark- 
ings of the flowers, and the Musk for its exquisite perfume. 
235— Nleremberg^la gracilis, striped, h. h. p., 3 foot • ■ 5 

Charming littU plant for clamps or edgings. 
236— JTyctorlnla, h. a. p.,} foot 10 

Free floweser, and of compact habit ; used for rookeries a\nd edgings. 
237— CEnolheraLamarkiana, bright yellow, h. p., 3 feet 5 

238— " oampylooarpa, crimson, h, p. 1 foot 5 

239— " taraxacifolia, white, h, p. 1 foot 5 

240— " biennis, mixed, h. p. 1 foot. 5 

Among the showiest plants in cultivation. Their large and handsome 

flowers render them very effective in almost any poeidon. The 
flowers open towar^ls evening only. 

241— Pensteinon, mixed, h. p. 3 feet • • 5 

Handsome long tubular flowers ; makes a fine show in either beds or 
"clumps," and is quite hardy. 

242— Petunia, tender perennial 5 

Its brilliancy and diversity of colour, as well as its fragrance aiid dur- 
ation in bloom, render the Petunia a most valuable bedding plant. 
Makes a fine contrast with scarlet Geraniums, Verbenas, i;c. Is 
also useful for green-house decoration. For select varietieii, see 
"Extra Choice Flower Seeds." 

243— Plilox, finest mixed, h. p. 3 feet W 

Tall and elegant habit, with beautiful tinges of colour ; has a splendid 
effect in the mixed border. 

244— Pink, Pheasant's eye, h. p 5 

245— " Chinese, h.p 5 

246— PolyantftuB, fine mixed, h. p. 1 foot •■•.. W 

247— Pj4mula sinensis (Chinese Primrose), mixed h. h. b •, 10 

A green-house biennial, which does remarkably well as a house planu. 
For the fine fringed varieties, see " Extra Choice Flower Seeds." 

248— Rocket, white, h. p. 2 feet 5 

249— " purple, " " 5 

Resembles the Phlox, fine for the shrubbery or mixed border. 

250— Sweet Scabious* tall, mixed, h. b. 2feet 5 

251— " dwarf " •' Ifoot 5 

A plant of easy culture, with beautiful large globe-shaped blooms ; 
if sown early, will flower the first year. Very useful for bouquets. 

252-Sweet William, auricula-eyed, h. p. IJ feet W 

258— " mixed, " " ^ 



yrstsKsnoo 



14' 
<1 



^V 




Vertena-Ia Varieties 

Pages 29 and 41, 



i 

255-Sto« 

256-Val 
257— Ver 
£5&- 



259-Wa 
260- 



Forgra< 
specially i 
covering, 
pots or ha 
suited to 1 



261-Cali 

262-Cob 
263-Coii 
264— Cyc! 



.'■^1 
^i 



EWING BEOTHEES' SEED LIST. 




25iHitreet "William, mixed, double h. p., IJ fevt io* 

An old fayourite ; bardly any plant presents a gayer appearance, either 
in beds or in oluups. It is .aite hardy. 

255— Stoclt» Brompton, finest mixed, ki. h. b Jo 

Useful for green-house decoration, and for early flowering outside. 

256— Valerian, mixed, h. p. IJfeet 5 

257— Verbena, hybrid, mixed, h, h. p jq 

258— " " Extra choice mixture 25 

The Verbena is deservedly a great favourite, and no plant excels it 
in beds or ribbons ; it is also useful for pot culture. Sow in a hot- 
bed or in boxes in the house, early. Prick out the plants into small 
pots when 2 or 3 inches high. About the middle of May transfer to 
flower bed, being careful not to disturb the roots when taking out of 
the pots. Let [the plants be two feet apart, and peg down as they 
grow. 

259— lirallflower, mixed, h. p 5 

260- " double.h.p 25 

The delicious perfume of the Wallflower makes all anxious to have it. 
Unfortunately it will not generally stand the severity of our winters, 
and it has to be taken in-doors in the Fall. Makei' a fine house plant 



» ♦•* « 




For graceful beauty, Climbing plants are unsurpassed. The stronger varieties are 
specially adapted for covering fences, &c., clothing with beauty what, without their 
covering, would be quite the reverse ; while the less robust are invaluable for trellises, 
pots or hanging baskets. Care must, however, be taken to place the plants in positions 
suited to their habits of growth. 



*" pkt, 
Cts 
261— Calampells scabor 5 * 

Bright orange flower and pretty foliage ; is rather tender, and should be 

sown in heat. Though it succeeds well outside, it is best adapted 

for house cu' ture. 

262— Coboea fecandens 10 

A half-hardy perennial with purple flowers ; suits best for green-house 

decoration. Grows quickly and has fine foliage. 

263— Con volvulus major ( Morning Glory), mixed colours 5 

This annual is quite hardy, while the delicacy of colour of the flowers 

is unsurpassed. Makes very rapid growth. 

264 — Cyclaa tliera explodsns = = ^ = = = ! = ;;..! = ^ : = = = = ^ .,; ^ >» ^ > ^ ^ s. »»,.>.>.> 10 

Hardy and quick growing; finefoliaged annual, producing pretty oval 

shaped fruit, which explodes when ripe— thus its name. 



I i 



m Mtto'l 








;•.* 






4 

1: 

r 

: if' 

'I 



30 



EWING BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 



265— DolicliOB, pnrple 6 

266— " white 5 

267— " gigonteus, purple 5 

Tender annuals, but when sown on a hot-bed or in a box in the house, 

will germinate readily, and when fit for handling, can be trans- 
planted to where they are intended to bloom. They grow 20 feet 
high if trained properly, and in addition to their pretty flowers, the 
seed pods are very attractive. 

268— Gonrda^ ornamental varieties 10 

Very useful for eovering old stumps of trees, walls, &o. The great 
variety of ourious fruit which they produce, render the climbing 
gourds very interesting. 

269— IpomoBa quamo«lit (Cyp. ^ss vino), mixed colours • . • 10 

270- " limbata, violet and white 10 

Half-hardy annuals of great beauty, having remarkably handsome 
foliage, and flowers of great brillianoy of eolour. ^x'he effeot produced 
by growing the Ipomoea along with the " Canary Creeper," is very 
pleasing. It also does nicely in hanging baskets. 

271— liOaza aurantiaoa 10 

A half-hardy orange coloured annual, specially adapted for trellis or 
wirework. 

272— Lopliospermnm scandens 10 

An extremely pretty half-hardy biennial, with purple flowers. Very 
useful for green-house decoration, and likewise succeeds well in any 
warm situation in the open air. 

273— maurandya Barclay ana 10 

A half-hardy perennial, producing very fine purple flowers. Its slender 
growth specially adapts it for in-door decoration, though, if not 
planted out till the weather be warm, it succeeds well, and blooms 
profusely till quite late in the season. 

274— Sweet PeaS) finest mixed annual 5 

275— " perennial 5 

Nothing need be said in favour of "Sweet Peas ;" every one has seen 
and admired them. Be careful not to have the ground too rich. 

276— Thunbergia, mixed varieties 10 

A half-hardy annual, used principally for green-house decoration ; its 
twining habit being admirably suited for trellis work or hanging 
baskets. Is not a very rapid grower. 

277— TropfBOlnm majus (Indian Cress, ) mixed varieties 5 

The Tropoeolum is quito hardy and sueceeds well in almost any soil. 
When a wall or anything else is wanted to be thoroughly hid, no 
other plant will do it so suooessfully as ;the Indian Cress. Both 
foliage and flowers are beautiful. 

278— Tropoeolum Canariense (Canary flower) yellow 10 

279— " Lobbianum, Mixed Hybrids 10 

No climber is more popular than the " Canary Flower," and justly so ; 
as for graceful habit, none excel it The foliage is both abundant 
and pretty (a main feature in a climbing plant), and it is an 
extremely free flowerer. T. Lobbianum (which should be started 
in the house) has also a fine effect as an "outdoor" climber, and 
deserves to be more popQlsr than it iS: thonsh it is specially ad^pt-ed 
for house culture. 

Aasortment of HB varieties Choice CUmberSt $1.25. f 





Oanaa "Warscewiczii 

Page 31. 





Bicinus or Castor Oil Flant 

Page 31. 






Perilla Naakiaeasis 

Page 32 




Striped Leaved Japanese Maizw 

Page 32 



rjoeeoTfr 



:•'■ I 



f I 



k ' 

s 
ft 






This ola 
plants pro 
greatly enj 
of some of 
of differen 
are indup< 



280— Ami 
281— 

282— 
283— 

284— 

285— 

286- 
287- 



288— Cam 

289— " 

290- " 
) 291— " 

I 









292-Celo! 
A 

293-Huii 
L 



{ • 



294-Ricii 

295— •' 

296- «' 

297-- " 
298— " 

Tl 



-I 



r50gygoryso g < 



EWING BROTHEES' SEED LIST. 




4> f 



This class hu of late years become deservedly popular. Until recently, only those 
planta produoina the most vividly coloured flowers were used in bedding, but now a 
greatly suporior "ffeot is produced by the judicious introduction into the beds or borders 
of some of the undermenUoned varieties. FUhei in •' Ribbons, " (that is where plants 
of different colours are axranged In rows) oi * m;ixed borders these fine folfaced plants 
are indispensable. 

280— Amaranthna bicolor, leaves crimson and green 5 

281— " melanoholicus ruber, compact habit, 12 to 18 inches in 

height, with strilting blood-red foliage 5 

282— " speciosissimus, carmine and yellow foliage, 2 feet 5 

283— " bioolor ruber, a fine new variety with the lower part of 

the leaf brilliant red and the upper maroon and yellow 10 

284— " tricolor, green, red and yellow foliage, 2 feet 5 

285— " Atropurpureus, of a fine vigorous branching habit with 

dark foliage and plumes, new jq 

286— " Hypoohondriacus, (Prince's Feather) 5 

287— " Caudatus, (Love Lies Bleeding) 5 

The six first named varieties are half-hardy annuals, and make a 

S^.^?,»^^°^ *''"*^"1*^ *?u^ ^^T'?^ ^'^^^^l ' produce the brightest 
W)loured leaves when the soil is somewhat poor. The blood red 

r !i?"n° • , ^S7° J^'®^ Bleeding are long and drooping, while those 

of the Prince's Feather are shorter and stand erect 

288— Canna indi ja, h. h. p. red, 2 feet 5 

289— " gigantea aurantiaca, 8 feet, orange red iq 

290— " coocinea, scarlet, 2 feet , .*!!!!!." 10 

291— " warscewiczii, brilliant red, striped foliage, 3 feet '.'.'.*.!.'!."! 10 

The large and handsome foliage of the Cannas render them hiehlv 
2E^l*i5®"^*i'- To have them flower the first year, plants must be 
raised early on a hot-bed. Soak the seed in wirm water before 




capital pot plants, for house decoration. 

292-Celo8la aurea pyramidalis. Tender annual, 1 foot, yellow lo 

A fine plant for green-house decoration, and is also very suitable for 

growing m vuses outside. It retains its colour when dried, and is 

consequently useful m making winter bouquets. 

293— Kumea elegans. Half-hardy biennial, 4 feet jq 

Is g^erjJly grovm ^ the green-house, where its graceful drooping 

bloom IS much admired, but it has an equally fine effect in the 

Flower Garden or Lawn. When dried, it wUl keep for years7 

294— Bicluns giganteua h. h. a., immense leaves, 12 feet 10 

295- •' mioroearpus, " whitish foUage, 6 feet 10 

29<>- «' purpureus major, " purple,6feet lo 

297-- " Borboniensis " 15 feet \\\ 10 

298— " new speties from Phillipine Islands, 8 feet .!!....... 10 

•''''lH°"^"lf"'_^^*^^''- ^^' Plant, is certainly the finest of the strnng 
p.v.„.iig oiuamentai ivhuaod plauuj. u;ither in single specimens' or 
in beds on the Lawn, its large and handsome leaves show well, 
impartmg quite a tropical api-earanco. ' 



I 

1 





■■ ilii 



; -- ■ .'■ t\-sr ■•• ■■ft-. — -t '.' 



'!yW7r$^^ <^ 



I 




t^i^^i^m^^ v mt^m^m^m^^^^m0tl»^^^^^^^^^^^^^*^m^^0m^'^^m^^^^^^m^m^ 



EWING BKOTHEES' SEED LIST. 



20&-Pertlls NankinenRla* li fMt S 

800— " Atroparpnrea Tarlegata, 1| feet 5 

Hwdy annuals ; the former has dark mulberry oolonred foliagv, while 
the Utter is slightly rariegatcd Nothing surpasses them for " Rib- 
bons," and their dark coloured leaves xtre extremely appropriate in 
the mixed border, amongst bright coloured flowers. 

SOI— Pyretbrnuif Oolden Feather ; golden foliage, fine for edgings 10 

302— Salvia argontea, I feet 5 

Is a beautiful silvery-'eaved hardy perennial plant of easy growth. 
None of the fine-foliaged plants look better in the mixed border, 
and it makes a most f^i>propriate edging for a bed of Cauna or 
Rioinus. 

SOSHStrlped laeaved Japanese Maize, 4 feet 5 

Oreen and white striped, and in its earlier stages of growth has also a 
rose coloured stripe. Makes an exceedingly graoeful group. 

801— Cineraria maritima, 3 feet 5 

Is a silvery-leaved hardy perennial, and is much used and admired as 
a border plant or in " rockeries." 

AssorttnerU of 12 varietiei. Choice Sorts, 60 ctB, 



tveii[h§im^ Ml^wtrn. 



In order to have flowers " all the year round," every one having a garden should cul- 
tivate " Everlastings." If out when the flowers are fresh, and dried carefully in the 
shade, they will retain their colours ; and with a few ornamental grasseSj oplendid 
bouquets can be made for decorating rooms in winter. 

r pkt. 
Cts. 
305— Acroclinum roseum, h. h. a., 1 foot 5 

306- " album, " " 5 

Well known annuals of easy cultivation ; besides their use for winter 

bouquets, they show to great advantage in tht flower border. 

307— Ammoblum alatum, h. a., white, 2 feet 5 

308~Globe Amarantli, purple, 1 foot 5 

309— '• " white, " 5 

310— » " flesh, " 5 

311— " " striped " 5 

312— " " aurea superba, 1 foot 10 

Tender annuals, requiring to be raised in heat. Keep plants 1 foot 
apart. If cut when the flowers are well matured, will retain their 
beauty for years. 

313— Helipterum Sanfordii, 2 feet 10 

Ja .1 new half-ba.rdy annual of very nice habit; producing large globular 
clusters of bright golden yellow flowers. Cut before it fully expands. 



i 









_ / 






I 



{ 




OoclsscomT)— Pago 21. 




ft^ ■■:■■ ..'. -> 



BhoAantho Manfflesii 

Page 33. 




&lol3e Anlaranth 

Pngo 32. 



314-He 
316- 
316- 
317- 



318-Rb 

819- 

320- 



321-Wa 



322-Xe 

323 

324 



CoU 



n 



H 18 neoc 
of grasses. 
bouquet by 
well adapt 
among thi' 
Qynerium, 



hM 



l-'Sl 



•''••SI 



)u 



325-Agrro 
326- " 
827- " 

328— Aveii 
329-Brlzi 
330- " 
331— Chryi 
33iJ-€oIx . 
333-Kragri 



■^^^^^^^^■^^a 



"^^■^^i^^^ff^M 



EWING EEOTHERS' SEED LIST. 



33 



314-Hellclury«iun braoteatum, yellow, 1 foot 5^' 

315— " atrosanguineam, orimson, 1 foot ..',', 5 

Sift— " monstroBum album, white, " .'.'.!.*.'!!." 10 

317— " double mixed, various, '• !*.'.*.'..' 5 

Handsome half-hardy annuals. Besides being among Oie best for win- 
ter bouquets, they are well adapted for bedding and cultivating in 
pots. In order to keep well, the flowers s'aould be out when young. 

318— RIkoda.ntbe maoulata, yellow and crimson, 2 feet iq 

819- ♦• ^twwJguinea, new, shaded purple, li feet....... /.!..'!.... 10 

320— " mangl' ., rose and yellow, 1 foot .'. jO 

Higblyomamental hali-hardy annuals, and if gatheirtd ere ttey'fully 
expand their flowers, are perhaps the most delicate and pretty of aU 
the " Hverlastings." •* - »« 

321— Waltzia aurea, yellow ,„ 

A tander annual requiring to be raised in heat. Grows about 18 inches 
in height; branches out at ihe base, and produces clusters of bright 
-ellow flowers. 
322— Xe *.l»ei.jum annuum, purple ■ = 

323 " double ""hite ..V.V.V.V.V **.*." "'.V 5 

324 " oompa. ^m coeruleum, light blue !!".*.'.!... 10 

Ha ..y annuu!?; a >wing about 1 foot liigh ; plants should be placed 1 

foot apart. The t]owers are large, and produced in great abundance ; 
they retain their peculiar shining lustre, as weU as their colour, after 
being out and dried. 
CoUeetion of 9S extra choice varieties of ** Evorlaatinga,*' $1.25, 



kt. 




K is necessary, in making up winier bouquets of " Everlasf a, " to have a mixtu-a 
of grasses. The bouquets will not look well without them ; besides, many uiake a fine 
bouquetby themselves, when dried. They are of singularly graceful habit, and are 
well adapted for growing in the mixed border, presenting a very pleasing variety 
among th. dowenng plants. AU can be tieated as "hardy," with the exception of 
Gynerium, Stipa, and Erianthus. « -oci^uou i« 



^Pkt 

325-Ag:ro8tl8 nebulosa ^^' 

326- " pulohella Z 

827- « argentea *.*.!'.*.*. *.*.!! I 

328— Aveiia storilis (animated oats) * % 

329-Brlza grsoilis "..'....'.'.'.'.'.'.'...'.* 5 

330— " maxima (quaking Grass)..." .•■.*.*.'•'•.".*.!.*.'..*.'.*.'.'...","* 5 

331— Chryguriis oynosuroides .,,,,,,,,,,..„ .!.'.".'.*,*,.'.'.*.',' 

332— €oIx Laohryma) (Job's Tears) ..*]..'"! ' c 

333— Kragr»o»ti8elogans.. ..' ". 






la 



IS 



'% 




\ 



34 



EWING BROTHEKS' 



334— ErtantlinB ravennae '"'.'"!* '*, 

A superb perennial grass, growing 10 feet in height ; producing hand- 
some feather-like plumes of silvery white. 

335— ©ynerium argenteum (Pampas Grass) 

336— Hordeum jubatum 

337— Pen nlae turn villosum -^ 

338— Stlpa pennata (Feather Grass)... "T 

Collection of 12 choice varieties ^ Onmim^ak €fr<u»ea, 50 cto. 



Cts. 
25 



25 
5 

10 
10 



\ 



ilT: 






% 



It". 



%m ui 



M 



Imit 




We would invite special attention to this section, as we have taken the greatest 
pains to procure " Choice Flower Seeds " worthy of the name. We still continue to 
offer the same strains of Primula, Calceolaria, Pansey, &c. , which we have for a numlier 
of years, and are sure of those being as good as ever. In Stocks, Asters, Zinnia, 
Petunia, and in fact in everything, we only keep Seed which weare as certain of 
being choice as we can be of anything. Gardeners continually a^k, in ordering Choice 
Seeds " to let them have the same strain as they had from us before." This, while 
gratifying to us. is at the same time satisfactory proof that our efforts in former years 
to secure everything of the finest quality, have been attended with success. The 
Novelties which we introduee wiU all be found worthy of a trial as we have procured 
none but what we think will prove a great acquisition. 



Pbice. 



ASTERS. 

TBAUFFAUT'S SUPERB PCEONY-PLOWERED PERFECTION—' 
Very large beautiful flowers with long petals, curving in towards tiio 
centre. 
Collection ot 18 separate colours ?)i.ou 

Collection of 12 separate colours 1«00 

Collection of 8 separate colours O-'^ 

Finest mixed Per pkt. 0.10 

PCEONY-FLOWERED GLOBE— 

Flowers are very large and early. Strong branching habit of plant. 
Collection of 10 separate colours 0-75 

CHRYSANTHEMUM-FLOWERED— 

Good eized flowers and erect habit of plant, very suitable for beds. 
Collection of 12 separate colours— Tall 0.75 

C.il-_i.:n.> ^f ^0 aa-narat.a mlniirR.—DwAItP ...•..• V.iO 

Mixed, of either variety per pkt. 0.10 



%}^mm-^'''rr 



I ymmm^-3r^w^:i&^'^^m^':: m '^^^m^^-'^' j-m^^w^'^ 



kt 



( 




itest 
leto 
aber 
inia, { 
in of I 
loico ( 
rhilo ; 
ears I 
The i 
ured 



BICE. 



1.50 i 
1.00 
0.76 
0.10 



0.75 



0.75 
0.75 
0.10 



:ii 



i 



1 






HNfl&i.ji£aaliHBHIilBB 









, ' 




i 


Reid'3 aiolje Quillod Aster 


' Page 35. 



UA^Ja 




ITesdls or Sedgelios: Aster 

Page 35. 



^•j^ 







Truffaut's Superlj Poeony Flowered Aster 
Pngo siii 



Victoria Aster 

Page 35. 



) EOSE-F 



rpc 



EWING BEOTHEES' SEED LIST. 



35 



QUILLED GLOBE— 



AZTEBS,— (^Continued,) 



Brice. 



0.90 



The flower is globular and very neat, with beautifully quiUed short 
petals. Does well in bouquets. 

Collection of 18 separate colours 

Collection of 12 separate colours * ' q'Js 

Pinestmixed V.'.V.VpeV pkt! o.'lO 

REID'S GLOBE QUILLED— 

Collection of 12 separate CO 'ours 75 

Collection of 6 separate colours 

Finest mixed * V. ".'.'.'.;.' .'per pkV. 

TRUFPAUTS IMBRIQUE POMPONE— 



0.60 
0.10 



) 

i 

I 
■ 



A free flowering and compact growing variety, nice for bouquets 
Pinestmixed p^^ pj^^ 



0.10 



GIANT EMPEROR— 

Not a very free flowerer* but flowers are of great size; 
Pinestmixed p,, pj^t_ ^ ^^ 

CROWi'* OK COCARDEAU— 

Flowers have all white centres, and are bordered with carmine, blue, 
crimson, &c. ; elegant habit of plant and very showy. 

Collection of 6 separate c .ours 75 

Pinestmixed V. .'..*.'.' .■p;;pkt. o".10 

NEEDLE OB HEDGEHOG— 



Very showy ; petals of flower are quilled and very long. 
Finest mixed 



.per pkt. 0.10 



NEW SCHILLER— 

A new variety, growing li feet high, with very large and numerous 
flowers. Is one of the finest sorts grown. 
Pinestmixed p,,pl^t ^^^ 

DWARF BOUQUET— 






Free blooming variety; blooms form a complete Bouquet. 
Finest mixed 



per pkt. 0.10 



PYRAMIDAL— 



Late flowering, and branching habit. 
Pinestmixed 



EOSE-FLOWERED— 

Grows very tall ; la'-ge flower, double to the centre. 
Finest mixed 



.per pkt. 0.10 



VICTORIA— 



.per pkt. 0.10 i 



A fine variety for competition ; robust plant, producing an abundance 
of magnificent large double flowers. 
Collection of 6 separate colours q 75 ^ 



Finest mixed 



.per pkt. 0.10 



f«i 



m 



i 

If- 



i' ' ' 



i,|: 






i-yx (■ 



f^s 



ST'*-.; 



•■■>fcts 



?3 



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^^■ 



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36 



EWING BROTHEKS' SEED LIST. 



050 



0.15 



ASTERS— (Continued.) 
GOLIATH— Price- 

A splendid new strain ; the flowers are of great siae, and very double, 
wnile the plant is of robust growth. 

Collection of 6 separate colours fl.25 

Finest mixed per pkt. 0.20 

WASHINGTON— 

This is a new acquisition, and is decidedly the finest of all the Asters. 
Originating from the Viotoria, it has its fine habit, tho'igh far more 
robust, while the flowers are of great size and of globular form. The 
colours are peach and white ; the former is exceedingly delicate, 
while the white is pure as snow- 
Finest mixed per pkt. 0.50 

NEW CELLULAR VICTOEIA CRIMSON. 

This new aster is of a fine glowing colour. Very large flower, double 
to the centre, and comes true from seed per pkt. 

AMARANTHUS. 

SALICIFOLIUS per P^*- 

Grows 3 feet high, branching close to the ground, the lower branches 
generally being 15 inches in length. The colour of the leaves vary 
from a bronzy-green in the earlier stages of growth to a bright 
orange colour as the plants acquire strength. Makes fine single 
specimens for rases or small beds. 

AURICULA. 

SAVED FROM FINEST STAGE FLOWERS per pkt. 

BALSAM. 

DOUBLE-FLOWERED— 
From choice varieties. 

Collection of 12 separate colours 

Finest mixed per pkt. 

CAMELIA-FLOWERED— 

Collection of 12 separate colours 

Collection of 6 separate colours 

Finest mixed per pkt. 

ROSE-FLOWERED- 

Collection of 12 separate colours < . 

Finest mixed per pkt. 

PYRAMIDAL— 

. Finestmixed per pkt. 

NEW SOLFERINO— 

Striped with scarlet on white ground ;' fine per pkt. 

NEW CARNATION— STRIPED— per pkt. 

Large double flower, very pretty. 

NEW VICTORIA— 

Satiny white groti:. ', spotted with delicate scarlet,very pretty 
The three last varieties are all new. 



0.50 



1.00 
0.10 

$1.25 
0.75 
0.10 



; 

1.25 )\ 
0.10 



0.10 

0.10 
0.10 

0.29 





Camelia-Flo'(;7erod Balsam 

Page 36. 




Delphinium— Page 37. 



r'-^i^'^-cm, -j^:,:4^-: >^^^> x^:.-i^-^. ;'^^^ 



fe*i3i3ila9iS'»iffcliSSK'":I*1i4^' 




CHOIC 



PEEPE 
CHOIC 



Sav 
i PINES! 
1 DOUBL 



) VERY ( 



MAUBI^ 



) 
i 

i ATRORl 

WIGGIi; 

MIXED 



NUDICA 
( 



^^a 



EWING BROTHERS' .SEED LIST. 




I BEaONU SEDENI VICTORU. Price. 

' mv. , ?" Pk*. $0.60 

; Thi8 ig a splendid new variety of Begonia, suitable for bedaiu»- out. 

Its habit IB strong and compact, while it produces a profusion of bright 

oamine scarlet flowers. In muses it presents a gorgeous appearance. 

and will keep in bloom during the whole summer. 

CALCEOLARIA. 

CHOICE MIXTURE FBOM PRIZE FLOWERS per pkt. 0.50 

CARNATION. 

Saved with the greate«l - f-om a large and choice collection of 
named plants. 

PERPETUAL FLOWERING OR TREE-Choice mixed.. per pkt 
CHOICE MIXED BORDER « ' 

CELOSIA HUTTONU. 

Per pkt., 50 ots. 
A splendid new foliage plant, with erect flower spike and very dark 
and graceful leaves. 

CENTAUREA CANDIDISSIMA. 

Per pkt., 50 cts. 
A beautiful silvery leaved plant of very elegant habit; makes a fine 
contrast to scarlet Geraniums. 

CINERARIA. 

Saved from a collection of prize plants 

Donnf^^'f '^'^ ^™'''' • ' P-P^*- 0-50 

DU UBLB-A new variety which will be a great acquisition. « i , qq 



0.50 
0.25 



VERY CHOICE MIXED. 



COLEUS. 



.per pkt. 0.50 



:| 



CONVOLVULUS. 

MAUBITANICUS p,, p,^ ,^,, 

This variety of Convulvulus is admirably adapted for hanging bas- 
kets. Very pretty blue flower. 

.^r.r.r.rr^r. CYCLAMEN PERSICUM- 

ATRORUBRUM-Splendid Crimson..., per nkt 75 

WIGGIN'S PRIZE STRAIN Zlu 75 

MIXED VARIETIES ..::;v;.v.v.:.:;p': p\t l:ll 

DELPHINIUM. 

NUDICALE p^^p,, ^25 

one of the best novelties, among perennials, that has been introduced 

tor manv years. Thn flnmor. nrK.;»i.<. ....i.^ j j. . 

. - -- , „. .J, ,j.„,. -uCTuot, ttio jjruuuscu IB ini- 

mense profusion, completely hiding the foliage, thus producing a 
perfectly dazzling effect. 



mil 

i Ota 



[ 



\ i 



f • 



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i: 






f 



w 



k' 



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38 



EWmG BEOTHEES' SEED LIST. 



DIANTHUS. 



Pr 



LACINIATU8 8TRIATU8 DOUBLE per pkt. $0 . i5 

A nev variety of this popular flower. The markings and shades of 
colour are exquisite. 

EGHEVEBIA. 

MI:LED VARIETIES por pkt. 0.50 

A flno plant either for green-house or bedding. The broad bronzy 
leaves make a very striking and beautiful contrast, quite distinct 
frona any other plant yet used for that purpose. 

FEENS. 

TREE. , 

CHOICE GREEN-HOUSE VARIETIES 



per pkt. 0.25 
« 0.25 



FEVERFEW OR BRIDAL ROSE- 

FINE DOUBLE WHITE , per pkt. O.IO 

GERANIUM. 

CHOICE MIXED ZONALE 0.25 



GLADIOLUS. 

CHOICE MIXED HYBRIDS 



0.25 



GLOXINIA. 

CHOICE MIXED VARIETIES 0.50 

HYBRIDA PUNCTATA VARIETATEB 1 .00 

The latter is a first class novelty. Flowers punctated with blue and 
red, on a soft white ground. 

HOLLYHOCK. 

DOWNIE, LAIRD AND L A-ING'S CHOICE STRAIN .... per pkt. . 25 

LOBELIA. 

COMPACTA CRYSTAL PALACE GEM per pkt. 0.25 

WHITE PERFECTION per pkt. 0.50 

'' • Crystal Palace Gem was introduced last year, and proved good. It 

-^ is of the same ahade as Speoiosa, but of much more compact habit* 

and consequently stands wet weather much better Jian any of the 

old sorts. The last named is new this year and o'l account of its 

being pure white will prove a very great acquisinon. * 

MESEMBRYANTHEMUM. 

CORDIFOLIUM VARIEGATUM.... per pkt. 0.25 

This is a most useful novelty, and is said to be the best variegated 
Summer plant in cultivation. 

MYOSOTIS. 

ALPESTRIS— White per pkt. 0.10 

AZORICA CCELESTIS— Blue per pkt. 0.10 

" ALBA— White per pkt. 0.25 

Very choice new varieties of Forget-me-not. 









Slift 




Petunia 

Pngea 28 and 39. 






•(•,« 



rff 




'4i 



n 



ifti 

i 



M 









n 

:^4 




; COLLE 

I fines: 



Largo Flowering' Pansey— rftees 27 and 39. 



0/, 



I 



EWING BROTHEES' SEED LIST. 



MIMULTrS. 



TILINGI , 

Grows three feet high, branching habit 



per pkt. 

Produces bright golden yel- 
low blossoms in great abundance. 

TIGRINUS— White ground varieties per pkt. 

Nothing can exceed the beauty of the markings of this variety, the 
pure white ground contrasting finely with the purple and pink 
blotches. 



.per pkt. 



MIGNONETTE. 

RESEDA VICTORIA 

« PARSONS—White ..,''.. [..... 

The Victoria is a very strong growing variety of branching h ,bit and 
reddish flowers. The white variety also grows very strong and both 
are very suitable for Greenhouse culture. 

PANSEY. 

CHOICE MIXED, from the best Biitish collection per pkt. 

" " German varieties , , 

KING OF THEBLAOKS 

WHITE „ !.........' 1 

YELLOW ..''.*.'..!..!.....*......!.*...!..!*** 

FANCY STRIPED *. ....'......,'.. . .* 

MARBLED .'.......!!!!.!..!!... 

GOLD MARG INED— Fine .... '. '. .. '. [ ] '. [ ' * .* .' .' . * .'.' ..],..., .*.' ,," 

AZURE BLUE ! i.* *.."''.*.*.!.*!!!!!]!! !!!! 

oDiER OR FIVE BLOTCHED....*..*!!!.'..'!. .!!!!!!'.!!!'!.!!!' 
EMPEROR WILLIAM !.!!.*!!'.!!!!!.!!!!!'. 

The "Emperor William " is a brilliant Ultramarine Blue, with large 

purple violet eye. The flowei?i have great substance, are very large, 

and are carried well above the foliage. This is a splendid novelty. 

COLLECTION OF 12 CHOICE VARIETIES 

PETUNIA. 

CHOICE MIXED— Saved from the most showy flowers. ..per pkt. 
COUNTESS OF ELLESMERE— Dark rose with white throat •' 
HYBRIDA GRANDIFLORA— Large flowering— very finest. . «< 
CHOICE MIXED DOUBLE « 



0.10 
0.10 



pelargonium: 

CHOICE MIXTURE— From show varieties.... 



PHLOX DRUMMONDn. 

I COLLECTION OF TEN BRILLIANT SHADES-Separate 



FINEST MIXED 



,per pkt. 



0.10 
0.10 
0.25 
0.25 



^ 



39 

>; 



Price. ( 
$0.15 } 



.• 



0.15 ( 



, per pkt. 0.50 



i 



0.75 
0.10 



0.50 
0.25 
0.15 
0.15 
0.15 
0.15 
0.15 
0.25 
0.15 
0.25 
0.50 



1.00 i 



m 

ii 



it ' 

• ill 



w ti 






^ 






Mok 



1/ 



i'; 







< 



DOUBLE FOBTULAGGA. 



Price. 



A splendid bedding plant. Will produce a very large proportion cf 
double flowers. 
COLLECTION OF SIX COLOURS— Separate $0.75 

FINEST MIXEJD per pkt 0.25 

PRIMULA SINENSIS FIlOBIAl'A. 

Though used almost exclusively as f^ green-house plant, the Primula, 
or Chinese Primrose, will be found to suit remarkably well for grow- 
ing in rooms, on account of the very long time it continues in bloom. 

NoTE'— Purchaiers are assured that the seed now offered is the same 
strain supplied by us in former years, end which produces such 
magnificent flowers. 

ALBA per pkt. 50c. /S 1.00 

RUBRA. per pkt. 50c. fa> 1.00 

MIXED per pkt. 50c. /d) 1.00 

FILICIFOLIA ALBA per pkt. 0.75 

" RUBRA per pkt. 0.75 

« MIXED per pkt. 0.76 

The three last named are beautiful fern-leaved varieties, with hand- 
somely fringed flowers. 

DOUBLE, RED AND WHITE MIXED— true per pkt. 1.00 

PRIMULA JAPONICA per pkt. O.liO 

The latter is a new variety recently introduced from Japan. Is a very 
vigourous grower, throwing a flower pceml foot high, and completely 
covered with blossom. The prevsdling oolour is bright magenta, 
but pure white, carmine, iilao and rose will likewise be obtained 
firom the seed we now offer. 

BHODODENBEON. 

CHOICE MIXED, FROM NAMED VARIETIES per pkt. 0.50 

STOCK. 

DWARF GEFMAN— LARGE FLOWERING TEN WEEK— 

A most useful variety of compact habit. Grows about 1 foot high 

Collectionof 12 colours— separate... 1.00 

Finest mixed per pkt. 0.10 

NEW LARGEST FLOWERING DWARF GERMAN— 

Collection of 18 colours — separate , 1.25 

Collection of 12 colours— separate 1.00 

LARGE FLOWERING BRANCHING TEN WEEK— 

Collection of 8 separate colours 0.75 

Finest mixed 0.10 



i 

! 

V 

} 
f 

[ 

f 

i 

1 



h 




J 


■1 



— ^j^B^Mii^ — — 



Ti f 



r^M^^ 




•A^. '=^'^ 






,i 



LAHi 



TRE] 



EASI 



DouTjIq Zinnia— Pages 26 and 41. 



COBS 



SWEI 



i',i 




) 



CHOK 

SWEE 
DEFL 



TALL 



Double Zinnia, Sinerle Bloom, Natural Size-Pages 2g and 4i. 



EWING BEOTHERS' SEED LIST. 



41 



STOCK— (Continued.) 

LARGE FLOWERING PYRAMIDAL— 



•} 



Collection of 8 colours— oeparate , 
Finest mixed 



Price. 

$0.75 

.per pkt. 0.10 



TREE GIANT oe WINTER— 

Finestmixed per pkt. 0.10 f 

EAST LOTHIAN INTERMEDIATE— 

A leading authority in flower gardening pronounces the different colours 
of this neio stock to be "the finest bedding plants in existence." 

Collection of Scarlet, purple and white— sepwate . 50 

In mixture per pkt. 0.10 



VIOLA. 

CORNUTA, PURPLE per pkt, 0.10 

WHITE per pkt, q.IO | 

Suitable either for edgings, beds, or pot culture. Flower very freely, 
and continue in bloom from May until frost sets in. 

SWEET SCENTED VIOLET , per pkt. 0.10 

VERBENA. I 

CHOICE LARGE FLOWERING VARIETIES in mixture, per pkt. 0.25 I 



STRIPED 



.per pkt. 0.25. ,' 



SWEET SCENTED per pkt. 0.25 . 

DEFIANCEjthe popular Scarlet Bedding variety ; fine habit.per pkt. 0.25 [ 

DOUBLE GERMAN WALL PLOWEE. | 

TALL BRANCHING AND TREE, mixed colours per pkt. 0.25 | 

ZINNIA ELEOANS DOUBLE. 

Collection of 6 separate colours .....o..., 0.60 I 

Finestmixed .'per pkt. 0.10 



42 



EWING BEOTHEES' SEED LIST. 



1 



rhe introduotion of the beautiful Hybrid varieties has been attended with great 
success, and now this ma«rificent tribe of Flowering Bulbs occupies a very prominont 
position in the Flower GarUen. The bulbs should be planted (covering them about 2 
inches) in May ; dry and somewhat sandy soil being the most suitable for their growth. 
They are generally placed in jrows 1 foot apart, and 9 inches between the bulbs ; but 
maybe planted in the mixed border in "clumps "of3 or 4. In any situation their 
splendid tall Flower Spikes of brilliant colours render them special objecta of attrac- 
tion. In autumn, before frost seta in, lift the bulbs and remove to a dry cellar, or 
any other placa free from frost, but still not too warm. We have on hand a very large 
and varied assortment, and trust to have a great demand for them ; in most situations 
no flower can ex«el the Gladiolus for brilliant effect. Instead of giving a full list of 
names and descriptions as in former years, we will, this season, make them up in col- 
lections, at differeni; prices. We will give in each collection of a dozen bulbs a variety 
of colours (marked on each), and all correctly named. 




No. 1 — Collection of t dozen named bulbs $4.50 

'I 2— « " «« « " 3.00 

« 3 — " " " " « .1.76 

"4— " « ''unnamed" 0,15 

" 5 — " " " common mixed 0.50 




Anemone, mixed , ^doz. |0.50 

lilllum auratum Each. 0.75 

" candidum " 0.25 

" lanoifolium album " 0.50 

" " rubrum " 0.25 

" " roseum " 0.25 

Tiffrldia pavonia ^doz. 2.00 

Tuberose, double ■• 1.50 







CHadiolua— la Varieties— Page 42 



p»r 



I 



'A 



■• <* 







EWING BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 



^mttlfw* mi '^dim flmk, 



The arrangements wo have made this season will enable us to supply any quantity 
of Bedding Plants, well grown, and at moderate prioes. Having the stock of six growers 
to select from, it follows that we will be able to supply a general order bett^ than anv 
one i,er.on, for It IS nearly a certainty that no grower's plants will be all equally ex- 

f^ t" t. Y° "■.' ^'"^ °°'^ ^'^ ''^^' ^""""^ «"'°^ *^°<i '° t^i8 way will be enabled to give 
the highest satisfaction to any one favouring us with their orders. Parties ata distanoa 

T '! ^.? '"°"''* *"°°'io° to their commands, and that the packing wUlbe carefuUy 
attended to, and boxes or baskets for packing charged at cost 



Each. 

1 ■ «. m. IT doz. ots* 

X— Aenyrantlias Thompsonii and other varieties $1.00 10 

2-Ageratuin, very pretty, blue, and sweet scented 1*00 10 

3— Carnation, Tree or monthly, in variety ioo 30 

4-€aIceolarla, of sorts igg jg 

5--Cera»tIumTomentosnm; apretty variegated plant...! ...'.... 1.60 15 

6— Coleus— The collection includes all the newest sorts 1.00 10 

7— Cylamen, of sorts ; a fine house plant ' 25 

8-Cbry8anthemum-I<arge Flowering, in variety , . . . . 2.00 25 

„ ^ , '' Pompone •♦ 2.OO 25 

S—Daalia, strong plants and good varieties , 2.50 25 

^*^ " " grown from prize varieties, imported from the 

greatest Dahlia grower in Europe 3.00 SO 

II— Daisy-Double 2 25 15 

12— Fuschla, selection from a large collection of named flowers 200 20 

13-Geranium-Xonale and Nosegay, splendid named varieties. . 1.50 15 

^*— Silver variegated, '• " •« . 200 20 
15- '• Gold " .. ., ..g^i, o;25to50 

^r" .. Sweet seented, «• «« u^p-^^ 2.OO 20 

i'~ Ivy leaved, fine for baskets 2.OO 20 

The Geraniums are specially fine, all carefully grown, and only 
the very best varieties. 

18— Heliotrope, from named flowers 1.00 10 

ig-KonigaVariesata, a very pretty edging plant ...'.'.*.....".' LOO 10 

20— JLantana, invarieties , 100 jq 

21— liObella, line for baskets ..*..'.....*....*!.*.* 1.00 10 

22— raimnlns, nicely grown plants "... 1.00 lo 

23-Pansey, tl e very finest varieties, large flowers and distinotmarkings. 1.00 10 

21— PeuNtemon, good sorts, a fine border perennial 1 00 lo 

25-Pelarg'onlum, all of the rarest varieties 3,'oo 30 

26— Primula (Chinese Primrose,) a fine bouse plant 2!oO 25 

27— Petunia, grown from the best named flowers l.oo 10 

28— " Double— named varieties 20 

29-Ko«es-lIrbrid Perpetual, named plants 4 00 40 

30- " monthly. ,. .« g'^o 30 

31— •« OToss.fromafineooIleotion 6,00 50 



|i| 







!i !i[ll 







f^\-7. 



.*7- 



^^^ 



44 



EWING BEOTHEES' SEED LIST. 






Each. 
V doi. ots. 

32— Verbena, from a splendid oolleotion of named flovera 1.00 10 

33— Violet— Doable, BWGOt scented 2.00 25 

34— BMketPlanta, of different sorts 1.50 15 

The foregoing are all thoroughly rooted plants, in pots, aod par« 
ehasers can rest assurod that there will be few, if any, failures, 
when they plant thorn out in the flower borders. We have known 
parties planting them in the small pots we send them out in, and 
of ooune the plants would fail ; they should be turned out of the 
pots, and oare taken not to break the ball of earth, and to dis- 
turb the roots but asllittle as possible. 



ACiscdllaneous FUnts for Sodding^. 

Per doe. 

35— Asters, of the various varieties $0.20 

36— Antlrrlilnnm (or snap dragon,) very showy 0.20 

^7— Amaranth ns, a very ornamental fine foliage plant 0.20 

38— Balsan, of tho various varieties 0.25 

39-Dianthus " " 0.20 

40-Hollyliocl£ " •• 1.50 

41— raarigold. " «• , 0.25 

42— Pblox Drnmmondll, of the various varieties 0.20 

43— Portnlacea " " 0.20 

44— Ten-week Stocks •« " 0.20 

45— Zinnia— Doable " " 0.25 

The preceding " miscellaneous " plants we take out of the seed-bed, and care must 
be taken, if transplanted in dry weather, to water copiously j it is best, however, to 
plant out on a wet or cloudy day. 



■ <^> I 



HARDY VINES. 

Of Named SortSj 60 cts. eacb ; $S per doz. 












Si-t J'S* 







YelloTT SloTbo Mangel 




"WTiite Sttffar Sjet 
Long" Red Mangel ^1 11 




Eolil Rabi 





1 




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IMAGE EVALUATION 
TEST TARGET (MT-3) 




1.0 



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HIM m 

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33 WEST MAIN STREET 

WEBSTER, N.Y. 14580 

(716) 872-4503 






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EWING BROTHERS' SEED LIST. 








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The Agricultural Seeds offered have been selected from the stocks of 
different growers, every one of whom is celebrated for the growth of 
particular varieties. * 

This most important department of the business will always receive 

»peeicd atUntion, and farmers may rest assured that no effort will be spared 

to supply them with the best quality of seeds that can possibly be obtained 

At the last Provincial Exhibition the prizes, with very few exceptions' 

went to roots produced by seed supplied by our firm. ' 



CARROT. 

Carrot Seed, if sown when the soil is cold, germinates slowly, so that it is best to allow 
the warm weather to have fairly set in before sowing. A good plan to hasten its 
growth IS, to mix it witL damp sand two days before sowing. The Altrinoham 
grows rather aheavierorop than the Long Orange, and both are very nutritious Of 
the 5eZflr»anvaneties,the TfAt<e grows the greatest crop; while the ye«ow, though 
hardly producmg so well, is considered the more nutritious of the two 



C/ean Subbed Seed, 



Long Orange, 
long Red Altringham, 
White Belgian, 
YeUow, •' 



MANGEL WURZEL. 



per lb. 75c. 
" 76c. 
" 60c. 
" 60c. 



This root thnv«s best in hot, dry climates, and is comparatively free froiu the risks at- 
tending Turnip culture. The proper way to feed with Mangel is to have the roots 
pulped and mixed with chaff, straw or hay. It grows well either on heavy or light 
soas ; Lorwvarteue, being best suited for the former, and the Globes for the latter, 
while the Oval will yield a splendid crop on either. 



Yellow Globe, 
Berkshire Prize do. 
Red Globe, 
Orange Globe, 
Intermediate Yellow 
Yellow Oval Shaped 



per lb. 35e. 
*• 40c. 
•' 35c. 
" 35c. 
" 35c. 
" 35c. 



Ward's large Oval 

Shaped, per lb. 

Red Oval Shaped 
long Red Mammoth 
Long White 

•• Yellow 



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40c. 
35c. 
35c. 
35c. 
35c. 




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EWING BROTHEES' SEED LIST. 



TUENIP. 

Of the varieties of Stojde Turnip, the Skirvings, Drummonds, Bangholm and Cham- 
pion produce the hep.dest crop ; tae Green Top is not so large, but ia hardier, the 
flesh firmer, and is ihuB a better keeper. The Purple Top Yellow Aberdevn and 
Bales Hyhrid are the largest of the YeUoxoa ; while the Qretn Top Yellow Aber- 
deen and wlitrinflrAam, though not growing such a bulky crop, keep much longer. 
The Whiu varieties all grow to a large size ; but must be consumed early, as 
they will not keep. 

SWEDES. 

Skirving's Extra Improved Purple Top per lb. 

EastLothian do 

Bangholm d© 

Sutton's Champion do 

Shamrock do 

Drummond'ii do • 

Laing's do 

Matson's Improved do '* 

Carter's Imperial Hardy Green Top " 

Hardy Green Top «• 

White Sweet •• 

YELLOWS. 

Green Top Yellow Aberdeen per lb. 30c. 

30c. 
30c. 
40c. 



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30c. 
30c. 
30c. 
30c. 
30c. 
30c. 
3dc. 
30c. 
30c 
30c. 
3dc. 



Purple 

Sale's Hybrid " 

Altringham Yellow ' *' 

WHITES. 

Green Top Globe " 

Bed " 

Pomeranian White Globe " 

Grey Stone « 



30c. 
30c. 
30c. 
30c. 



GRASSES, &c. 

Grass Seeds in mixture, for laying down permanent pasture. " 200. 

Natural Grasses, various sorts •• 

Italian Bye Grass •' 20c. 

Pacey's Perennial Rye Grass " 20e. 

Chinese Sugar Cane '* 35c. 

Lucerne Clover «« 35c, 

Dutoh White Clover, imported v . Bawdon Bed Clover. 

" 'Bed " •• I Market I Timothy. 

Large Late Bed Clover. V < Kentucky Blue Grass. 

Alsike Clover. \ P"«^°8. i orchard Grass. 

Western Bed Clover. ^ ^ Bed Top. 



EWING BEOTHERS' SEED LIST. 47 (, 



GBAIN, &c. 

Sampiet and J>riee» witt befornarde^ on appUoatt'on, 

Beans, various sorts in^^n Com. 

^eas, " " Buckwheat 

Oate. •• " Linseed. 

Bwley. " « Rape. 
Wheat, " '• 



POTATOES. 

VAEIOUS VARIETIES. 



ALL OTHER SEEDS AKD GRAIN NECESSARY FOR THE FARM. 



GENUINE IMPORTED PERUVIAN GUANO, 
LAND PLASTER, 
OIL CAKE, WHOLE AND GROUND, 
TOBACCO JUICE FOR SHEEP WASH, 
TOBACCO STEMS FOR FUMIGATING GREEN- 
HOUSES. 
GISHURST COMPOUND AND FOWLER'S 
INSECTICIDE. 



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48 



EWmG BEOTHEES' SEED LIST. 



70^ TmC QASSE'S AlTD 7AE2C. 



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Bills, Band. 
" Hedge. 
ChairSt Garden, iron. 

•* " wood. 

Chisels, Pruning. 

Flower Gatherers, different sizes. 
Flower Pots, in all sizes, imported 
and home made. 
" •' Ciocns. 
" " Hyacintli. 

Flats, same sizes as pots. 
Seed Pans, round. 
'• " oblong. 
Ornamental Va8es,various patterns. 
Ornamental Fern Stands. 
Forks, " Parke's Cast Steel Digging. 
" Hay. 
•• Manure. 
Glasses, Propagating. 

♦• Hyaciatli,di£ferent patterns. 
Gloves pruning, 
Hand Frames, various sizes. 
Hammers, various sizes. 
Handles for Hoes, Rakes, Sliovels, 
&c., &c. 

Hellebore Powder. 

Hoes, Draw — solid and riveted. 

" Dutch— « *« 

Knives, Budding, "J Saynor & Cook's 

Pruning, J make. 

Grass Edging. 

Hay and Straw. 
Lines, Garden. 
Mats, Archangel. 
Matting, Cuba 
♦• Rafia. 



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Shanks' Patent Lawn Mowers. 

American " " " 

Picks. 

Ea]r>es, Garden. 

«• Lawn or Daisy. 
" Hay, wooden. 
Beel and Stake, Garden. 
Biddies. 
Saws, Pruning. 
Scissors, Flower gathering. 

" Vine or Grape thinning. 
Scythes, Bhort Grass, Eng. Make. 

" Hay. 

" Grain. 

Scythe Snaiths. 

" Stc es. 
Shears, Pruning. 

'• Grass edging. 

•• Sheep. 
Shovels, Round Pointed. "^*'^ 

" Square " 
Spades, " Lyndon's" Garden. 

" " Saynor & Cook's" Garden. 

•* various other patterns. 
Spuds or Weeders. 
Syringes, Saynor & Cook's Green- 
house. 

Thermometers. 
Wooden Tallies. 
ToolS) set of Garden. 
Wooden Stakes for flowers. 
Trowels. 
Watering Pots. 



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