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Full text of "Cinderella, or, The little glass slipper"

CINDERELLA, 



LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER. 




LONDON : 

GRANT AND GRIFF I 

S SSSOBfl TO 
J. HARRIS, CORNER OF ST. TAUL'S CHURCH- YARD. 



CHILDREN'S BOOK <> 

COLLECTION 4f 



<f* LIBRARY OF THE 

<fr UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

i> LOS ANGELES 







CINDERELLA, 



LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER 




LONDON: 

GRANT AND GRIFFITH, 

SUCCESSORS TO 
J. HARRIS, CORNER OF ST. PAUI/S CHURCHYARD. 



CINDERELLA. 




WHAT females are these, introduced to our view ? 
Three sisters : most proud and unfeeling are two, 

I mean pompous Martha and Bella ; 
The other, ill-treated by night and by day, 
Their drudg'ry must do, their commands must obey, 

And is called, in contempt, Cinderella. 



CINDERELLA. 




One ev'ning a ball being given at court, 
The ladies went out, after making their sport 

Of their amiable heart-broken slave ; 
She saw them depart, and she heaved a deep sigh, 
Then burst into tears, and exclaim'd, " O that I 

Such a treat as my sisters could have !" 



CINDERELLA. 




Her godmother just at this moment appears, 

And says for her comfort, " Come, dry up your tears, 

For I am a Fairy, you know ; 
I wonders perform with this magical wand, 
So instantly do what I choose to command, 

And you to the palace shall go. 11 



CINDERELLA. 




"Go fetch me a pumpkin:" 'twas brought in a 

trice ; 
" Now open the mouse-trap : Oh ! here are six mice, 

Which soon six fine horses shall be :" 
Twas said and 'twas done, and then by a touch, 
The pumpkin was instantly changed to a coach, 

Most superb and delightful to see. 



CINDERELLA. 




"The rat-trap now bring me:" a large rat was 

caught, 
And soon, from the yard, six fine lizards were brought, 

For the fairy her skill to display ; 
The former, a grave steady coachman became, 
And the latter were changed by a touch of the dame, 

To six footmen, in liveries gay. 



CINDERELLA. 




The glittering equipage stood at the door, 
When the good-natured, kind-hearted, Fairy once 
more, 

Waved her magical wand in the air ; 
Cinderella's mean garments at once we behold, 
Transferr'd into robes all bespangled with gold, 

And fit for a Duchess to wear. 



CINDERELLA. 




A pair of glass slippers the Fairy next gave, 
And then of her god-daughter took a kind leave, 

After giving the needful advice ; 
" Stay not till 'tis midnight, I charge you, for fear 
Your dress, coach, and servants, should all disappear, 

And your horses again turn to mice." 



CINDERELLA. 




Our heroine now drove away to the ball, 
Where her peronal charms were admired by all 

Who saw the young stranger advance ; 
The Prince who desired no fairer a bride, 
Respectfully begged she would sit by his side, 

And afterwards asked her to dance. 



10 



CINDERELLA. 




The clock struck eleven and once more began, 
When away from the palace our heroine ran, 

With such speed, not a creature could find her : 
Through the guards she escap'd, as a servant quite 

plain, 
But though all research and enquiry proved vain, 

She left a glass slipper behind her. 



CINDERELLA. 



11 




The Prince was distracted, and taken so ill, 
Physicians could yield him no aid by their skill ; 

The seat of disease was his mind : 
The slipper, with sighs, to his lips he oft pressed, 
And, at length, to his mother, the Queen, he con- 
fessed 

That for love of its owner he pined. 



12 



CINDERELLA. 




A herald, on horseback, now went through the town, 
Proclaiming aloud that the heir to the crown 

Would certainly make her his bride, 
Whom the little glass slipper exactly should fit ; 
And all were invited next morning, to meet, 

At a place where it lay to be tried. 



CINDERELLA. 



13 




The ladies in crowds were assembled next day, 
But went disappointed and blushing away, 

Unable to thrust in a toe : 

Cinderella, at length ; said "I'll try, if you please :" 
The slipper went on with astonishing ease, 

And the other she also could show. 



14 



CINDERELLA. 




Astonishment now was excited of course ; 

But she who could change a small mouse to a horse, 

Determined to do something more : 
She comes, and the stranger, who danc'd at the ball, 
Is instantly seen and acknowledged by all, 

In a dress as superb as before. 



CINDERELLA. 



15 




Adieu to the doctors ; go, bid the bells ring ; 
Cinderella has married the son of a King, 

And pardoned her sisters beside : 
Those sisters, most humbled, now cheerfully own, 
That none is more worthy to sit on a throne 

Than this virtuous and kind-hearted bride. 



farm's 

One Shilling each, Coloured. 



1. ALPHABET OF GOODY TWO- 
SHOES ; " by learning which, she 
soon got rich." 

2. CINDERELLA ; or, the Little 
Glass Slipper. 

3. COCK-ROBIN; a very pretty 
Painted Toy, for little Girl, or 
little Boy. 

4. CRIES OF LONDON (The). 

5. COSTUMES OF DIFFERENT NA- 
TIONS; Illustrated. 

6. COURTSHIP, MARRIAGE, and PIC- 
NIC DINNER OF COCK ROBIN 
AND JENNY WREN. 

7. COWSLIP (The) ; with 32 new 
woodcuts, plain (Is.Qd. coloured). 

8. DAISY (The) ; ditto, (ditto.) 

9. DAME PARTLETT'S FARM, an Ac- 
count of the good Life she led, 
and the Riches she obtained by 
Industry. 

10. GRANDMAMMA'S RHYMES for 
the NURSERY. With 24 supe- 
rior woodcuts. Plain. 

11. DAME TROT AND HER CAT. 

12. HISTORY OF THE APPLE PIE. 
Written by Z. With DAME 
DEAKLOVE'S DITTIES. 

13. HISTORY OF THE HOUSE THAT 
JACK BUILT. 

14. HISTORY OF PRIMROSE PRET- 
TYFACE. With 4 plates, plain. 

15. HOLIDAY PRESENT (The).With 
4 plates, plain. 

16. INFANT'S FRIEND (The) ; or, 
Easy Reading Lessons. 

17. INFANT'S GRAMMAR (The); or, 
a Picnic Party of the Parts of 
Speech. 

18. LITTLE RHYMES FOR LITTLE 
FOLKS: 

19. MONKEY'S FROLIC (The), &c. 

20. MARGERY MEANWELL ; or, the 
Interesting Story of Goody Two 
Shoes, rendered into Familiar 
Verse. With 20 plates. Plain. 



21. MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER 
DOG. 

22. NURSERY DITTIES from the 
Lips of Mrs. Lullaby. Illus- 
trations by Leech. Plain. 

23. OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG. 

24. PEACOCK AT HOME (The) ; with 
the BUTTERFLY'S BALL; and the 
FANCY FAIR. 

25. PEEP AT THE STARS, in easy 
Rhymes. 

26. PORTRAITS AND CHARACTERS 
OF THE KINGS OF ENGLAND. 
Parti. 

27. PORTRAITS AND CHARACTERS 
OF THE KINGS. Part II. 

28. PETER PIPER'S PRACTICAL 
PRINCIPLES of Plain and Perfect 
Pronunciation. To which is 
added, A Collection of Moral 
and Entertaining Conundrums. 

29. Puss IN BOOTS ; or, The Mas- 
ter-Cat. 

30. RATIONAL ALPHABET (The) ; 
and The ROYAL PRIMER; or, 
High Road to Learning. 

31. SIMPLE STORIES, in Words of 
One Syllable. By the Author of 
" Stories of Old Daniel." 

32. SNOW-DROP (The) ; or, Poetic 
Trifles for Little Folks. 

33. TAKE YOUR CHOICE ; or, The 
Alphabet Community. 

34. TOMMY TRIP'S MUSEUM OF 
BEASTS. Part I. 

35. TOMMY TRIP'S MUSEUM OF 
BEASTS. Part II. 

36. TOMMY TRIP'S MUSEUM OF 
BIRDS. Part I. 

37. TOMMY TRIP'S MUSEUM OF 
BIRDS. Part II. 

38. WALKS WITH MAMMA ; or, Sto- 
ries in Words of One Syllable. 

39. WHITTINGTON AND HIS CAT. 

40. WORD BOOK (The); or, Stories, 
chiefly in Three Letters.