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Full text of "Cinderella picture book; containing Cinderella, Puss in boots, Valentine and Orson"

EFERE- "ir-^'JRE BOOK 

C \0 2. A- fee 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 
, in 2007 with funding from 
IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive.org/details/cinderellapicturOOcran 



CINDERELLA 

PICTURE BOOK 

CONTAINING 

CINDERELLA; PUSS IN BOOTS; 

VALENTINE AND ORSON: WITH 

THE ORIGINAL COLOURED 

DESIGNS BY 

WALTER CRANE 




DODD, MEAD AND COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



THE NEW \OyiC\ 

PUBLIC UB«ARY I 

ASTOR, LdN^JA *'<0 
TtLOEN fOVHLlAtlOtt*. 



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They dressed themselves so fine in silks, and pearls, and 

flowers, and lace, 
Poor Cinderella hadn't time to wash her pretty face. 
When they started for the ball, full of haughtiness and pride, 
Poor Cinderella felt quite sad, and sat her down and cried. 
She had not cried much longer than a quarter of an hour. 
When a wonderful bright creature appeared upon the floor, 
Looked compassionately on her, and said in accents mild, 
" I am your Fairy Godmother, so cry no more, my child : 
I know that you are sad, and that your sisters are unkind : 
Now go and fetch for me the largest pumpkin you can find." 
She went and fetched the pumpkin, and the Fairy shook her 

wand, 
And changed it to a splendid coach, with cushions rich and 

grand. 



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A MILLER lay dying, — he made his last wil 
He left his three sons his cat, ass, and mill : 
To the eldest the mill, to the second the ass ; 
The third had the cat, and he cried out, " Alas 
I must starve now, unless I take Pussy to eat 



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So the Puss put on boots, and he started abroad. 
And caught a fine rabbit just near the high road, 
Which he took to the palace, and ga\'e to the 



" This I from the Marquis of Carabas bring." 
Again Puss went hunting, and carried the prey 
To the King, with the Marquis's duty, each day. 





'le promised, and with joyful heart she gained the palace 

hall, 
And danced, and laughed, and looked indeed the fairest of 

them all. 
The King's son danced with her, and praised her lovely shape 

and air; 
All treated her as if she were the greatest lady there : 
But in good time she slipped away, and waited safe at home, 
In kitchen comer sitting till her sisters back should come ; 
And when they came they told her all about the stranger fair, 
And what she wore, and how she looked, and how she did 

her hair. 
Next night another ball was held — the sisters dressed, and 

went, 
And pretty Cinderella, too, by Godmother was sent 




Prince danced with her every dance, and praised her 
more and more, 

And laughed and talked so much, that when the cloci^ 'gan 
strike the hour — 

The fatal hour of twelve— it took her greatly by surprise ; 

She turned and fled so quick before the Pnnce's wondering 
eyes, 

That in her haste to reach her coach she dropped her crystal 
shoe ; 

She had no time to pick it up, as towards home she flew. 

The sisters later home returned, and told her all they knew 

About the lady and the Prmce, and all of it was true. 

As Cinderella heard them talk, she turned away her head. 

Nor said a word that might not lit her place of kitchen- 
maid. 




Next day was proclamation made : " Whereas, a crystal shoe 
Has been discovered at the ball, who is the owner — who? 
All ladies now must try it on ; the Prince will marry her, 
Whoe'er it be, who easily the crystal shoe can wear." 
No foot was found to fit the shoe : they tried throughout ilie 

town ; 
At last they came unto this house, aiul called the ladies down. 
The sisters try to get it on, and pull, and push, and squeeze, 
When Cinderella calmly said, "Allow me, if you please." 
The sisters scorned her for the tiiought, and much surprise 

they knew. 
\Vhen Cinderella from her pocket pulled the fellow shoe. 
She tried them on — they fit — and she, no longer kitchen- 
maid. 
Stands up to meet the Prince in all her beauty fair arrayed. 





One morn, said the Cat to his Master, " 1 pray 
You to go and to bathe in the river to day ; 
The Marquis of Carabas, too, you must be. 
And leave all the rest of the business to me." 
Now, while the King down by the river passed by. 
He heard dismal cries of — "Help! help! or he'll die! 
The Marquis of Carabas drowns! — O my master!" 
The King sent his guards to avert the disaster. 
The Miller's son finds himself pulled out, and drest 
In all that his Majesty had of the best: 



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At last he arrived at a castle so grand, 

Which belonged to an Ogre, as well as the lain! ; 

Puss conversed with the Ogre, who said that he 

could 
Assume any shape that he chose — bad or good, 
Great or small^as he'd show; and the Ogre, so 

fussy. 
Turned into a mouse, and was swallowed by Pussy. 
At this moment his Majesty's carriage was heard ; 
Puss hurried down stairs, and he shortly appeared 
At the door, flung wide open before they could ring: 
"The Marquis of Carabas welcomes the King!" 







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1 he Miller's son thus became lord of the place, 
And he feasted the Kine with much crrandeur 

and grace. 

After dinner, his Majesty, smiling and bland, 
Said, " Marquis of Carabas, give us your hand ; 
And if there is aught that seems goodly of ours — - 
Yes, even our daughter — dear Marquis, 'tis 

yours." 
So the Miller's son married the Princess next day, 
And Puss was a groomsman, in top-boots so gay; 
For the Marquis of Carabas owed him his life — 
His lands and his corn-helds — his castle and wife. 




CENTRAL CIRCULATIOr 

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