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SWAIN SCHOOL OF DESIGN 



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(g) SWAIN SCHOOL OF DESIGN 




19 Hawthorn Street 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 02740 

(617) 9973158 

History and Purpose 6 

Location and Buildings 6 

William W. Crapo Gallery 7 

Admission 8 

Portfolio for Admission 8 

Tuition 9 

Financial Assistance 9 

Saturday and Summer Schools 9 

Academic Procedures and 

Regulations 10 11 

Housing and Medical Care 11 

Foundation Program 13 

Foundation Studio Courses 15 17 18 

Major Program 21 

Major Program Studio Courses 22 25 26 

Liberal Arts Courses 28 29 

Calendar 31 

Faculty 32 

Visiting Lecturers and Critics 32 

Trustees 33' 

Advisors 33 




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HISTORY AND PURPOSE 

In 1881, the will of William W. Swain 
established a non-profit educational 
institution whose Trustees and Faculty 
were charged with the responsibility to 
"qualify the pupils for the practical 
duties of life in the spheres they will be 
probably called upon to act in." Origi- 
nally named the Swain Free School, a 
variety of subjects were taught includ- 
ing courses in language, mathematics, 
science, history, logic and art. With the 
development of other educational facili- 
ties in the community, increasing em- 
phasis was placed on instruction in the 
arts. Today the Swain School of Design 
is a co-educational professional art 
school offering a four year program 
in the visual arts, leading to a Bachelor 
of Fine Arts degree. It holds the distinc- 
tion of being the oldest private art school 
in the State devoted exclusively to the 
teaching of fine art and design. 
The Trustees and Faculty of the Swain 
School believe that in developing a su- 
perior professional art school they are 
not only fulfilling a vital responsibility 
to the community but meeting a great 
challenge. If this country is to maintain 
a tradition of excellence in the visual 
arts, it must have artists and designers 
thoroughly trained in the fundamentals 
of their craft since the leading artists 
and designers achieved their greatest 
statement as a result of the struggle 
with the technical demands of their pro- 
fession. 

The Swain School of Design is a charter 
member of the American Federation of 
Arts, an associate member of the Na- 
tional Association of Schools of Art and 
a member of the American Association 
of Museums. 



The School is approved by the Board of 
Collegiate Authority, the Veterans Ad- 
ministration, and the United States De- 
partment of Justice for the training of 
foreign students, and the Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare. 
LOCATION AND BUILDINGS 
Built on the site of the original William 
W. Swain residence, the School is located 
in an area of New Bedford noted for im- 
portant examples of 18th and 19th cen- 
tury architecture. In close proximity to 
the campus is the New Bedford Public 
Library and the Whaling Museum. The 
Library is of particular value to the 
School for its fine collection of paintings 
illustrating the unique artistic tradition 
of the city. New Bedford was the birth 
place of Albert Ryder and home of Al- 
fred Bierstadt and Dwight Tryon. The 
Museum of the Old Dartmouth Historical 
Society records another aspect of the 
city's history, that of the whaling indus- 
try. Across the street from the museum 
is preserved the Seaman's Bethel which 
Melville describes in his classic novel 
Moby Dick. The cultural life of the city 
is further augmented by its advanta- 
geous position between Boston, Provi- 
dence and Cape Cod. 
The campus is bounded by County, Haw- 
thorn and Orchard Streets. The buildings 
include the main school complex, adjoin- 
ing Crapo Gallery, the Library building 
and the Design Graphics Studio build- 
ing. 

Following the loss of the Swain residence 
by fire in 1948, a new brick building 
was constructed housing three large stu- 
dios, library, storeroom, faculty and ad- 
ministrative offices. Two more studios 
and a fireproof vault for the storing of 



paintings were added in 1961, the gift 
of Mr. and Mrs. John M. Bullard and the 
William W. Crapo Foundation. All of 
the painting studios take advantage of 
northern light. 

The Swain Library is adjacent to the 
studios. It is maintained as a specialized 
collection, emphasizing those areas rele- 
vant to the school curriculum. All books 
and periodicals are readily accessible 
in open stacks. Swain students have the 
additional privilege of borrowing from 
the New Bedford Public Library through 
special stack privileges. 
WILLIAM W. CRAPO GALLERY 
The William W. Crapo Gallery was 
founded in 1925 to provide Swain stu- 
dents and the community with an op- 
portunity to view original works of art. 
Each year the Gallery offers approxi- 
mately ten exhibits including such di- 
verse achievements as primitive art, 
nineteenth century painting and the 
more contemporary efforts of the avant 
garde. In order to fulfill its educational 
function more completely, lectures and 
panel discussions are regularly sched- 
uled and often re-broadcast for the tele- 
vision audience. The Crapo Gallery is a 
member of the American Association 
of Museums. 



ADMISSION 

Admission requirements have been de- 
signed to select students who give prom- 
ise of excellence in the field of art. 
An applicant must be a high school 
graduate or have acceptable equivalent 
preparation. However, a candidate who 
evidences special interest and unusual 
ability or promise may be considered 
for admission as a special student at 
the discretion of the admissions commit- 
tee. Each applicant is considered on the 
basis of his aptitude as well as his 
character and personal qualifications. 
Most students are enrolled in a full five 
days a week program but in exceptional 
cases a special student is admitted for 
a more limited program. 
Each applicant must complete the 
School's application form and submit 
it together with $10.00 application fee 
(not refundable and not credited to 
any school bills) to the Registrar, Swain 
School of Design, 19 Hawthorn Street, 
New Bedford, Massachusetts. The appli- 
cant should request the principal of his 
secondary school to forward a transcript 
of grades at the time of application. He 
should file, also, three letters of recom- 
mendation and the school medical form 
signed by the family physician. It is rec- 
ommended that the applicant visit the 
School and arrange for a personal inter- 
view by the Director, preferably no later 
than April 1st. 



PORTFOLIO FOR ADMISSION 

Each applicant must submit a portfolio 
of original work clearly marked with his 
name, address, telephone number and 
the name of his school. The portfolio is 
to be no smaller than 16" x 20". A neat 
presentation is advised. Pieces submitted 
can be done either independently, or 
under guidance, but should be so desig- 
nated. Work executed from photographs 
is not acceptable. The following items 
are requested: 

Self-portrait in pencil or charcoal to 
be done from life in a line technique. 
Interior to be done from a room in 
your home. 

Still-life that includes at least four ob- 
jects plus branches, twigs, leaves or 
flowers in pencil or charcoal to be done 
from life. 
Repeat pattern to be printed in three 

^colors. 

v^Poster in three colors. 

Design using geometric shapes in black 
and white. 

Three drawings, paintings, sculpture, 
and/or graphics of one's own choice. 



8 



TUITION 

$650.00 per year 

$125.00 per year for one day weekly 
$250.00 per year for two days weekly 
$375.00 per year for three days weekly 
First Year Admission Application $10.00 

Lab Fee $20.00 
Locker Fee $2.50 

A deposit of $25.00 is required of all 
new students within two weeks follow- 
ing notification of acceptance for ad- 
mission. It is applied to the charges of 
the academic year and it is not re- 
fundable after May 1st. All fees must 
be paid at the time of registration, un- 
less special arrangements are made with 
the Registrar. Any student with bill not 
paid by the second Monday of the se- 
mester, will not be allowed to continue 
in classes. Since school operating ex- 
penses are planned on a yearly basis, 
no refunds can be made. The school 
store maintains a supply of materials 
required for classes. Prices are kept at 
a minimum. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

SWAIN SCHOOL FUNDS. Scholarship aid 
is available to a limited number of stu- 
dents from general school resources and 
the Clement L. Yaeger Trust. Financial 
assistance is allocated on the basis of 
proven artistic ability (usually limited to 
students above the freshman level) and 
need. 

FEDERAL ASSISTANCE. The Swain School 
participates in three government pro- 
grams: the National Defense Student 
Loan Program, Educational Opportunity 
Grants, and the College Work Study Pro- 
gram. Information on all Federal assist- 
ance may be received from the School. 



GUARANTEED STATE LOANS. Most states 
provide guaranteed loans for educa- 
tional purposes. Detailed information 
can be received through local banks. 

SATURDAY AND SUMMER SCHOOLS 

Classes for adults and children are 
held on Saturdays and in the summer. 
A separate bulletin is issued describing 
these programs and listing fees. The 
Trustees and Administration reserve the 
right to make changes in all phases of 
the school program without further noti- 
fication when deemed necessary. 



ACADEMIC PROCEDURES AND 
REGULATIONS 

GRADES A grade scale of A B C D and 
F is used to designate the students 7 
standing. The letter grades are consid- 
ered the equivalent of the following 
percentage scale: A=90-100 / 6=80-90, 
C— 70-79, D=60-69. The grade of E or 
Incomplete is a substitute grade for situ- 
ations in which students could not com- 
plete required assignment due to circum- 
stances beyond their control. The re- 
quired work must be completed by a 
designated time for a student to be 
awarded credit. For the computation of 
scholastic averages, reported grades 
have the numerical value of A=4.0, 
6=3.0,0 = 2.0, D = 1.0, F=0 for each 
credit hour. 

CREDIT HOURS. Studio credit hours in 
all courses are based on a ratio of one 
credit for every two hours of scheduled 
studio time. Credit hours for academic 
subjects are based on a ratio of one 
credit for every one hour of class attend- 
ance. 

PROBATION A first year student earn- 
ing a semester average of less than 1.7 
and an upper class student one of 2.0 
is placed on probation. Any student who 
is on probation for two consecutive se- 
mesters will be subject to dismissal. 
ABSENCE Absences are considered per- 
missible only in case of illness or for 
other reasons of necessity. It is the stu- 
dent's responsibility to notify the School 
immediately of his absence and its 
cause. Missing work must be made up 
whenever a student has been absent. 
GRADE REPORTS Grade reports will be 
given out at the end of each semester. 
Freshman and other students whose 



10 



grade average is D or less will receive 
a grade report at mid-semester. 
REGISTRATION Students already in the 
School are required to register and make 
out tentative schedules for the following 
year by June 1. Students enrolling af- 
ter school opening date are required to 
pay a five dollar late registration fee. 
TRANSCRIPTS Graduates and students 
in good standing are entitled to one 
complete statement of their school rec- 
ord without charge. One dollar will be 
charged for each additional copy. 
STUDENT WORK The School reserves the 
right to retain two works of each student 
for exhibition purposes. All other prop- 
erty must be removed from school prem- 
ises at the end of the academic year. At 
no time does the School have responsi- 
bility for student property. 
MEDICAL CARE AND HOUSING 
The services of a school appointed physi- 
cian are available to all students. Charg- 
es are made directly to the student. All 
students are urged to avail themselves of 
low-cost Health and Accident Insurance 
policies. Forms for the Blue-Cross Blue- 
Shield student policies are available 
through the School. 

The School does not maintain dormitor- 
ies. A diversified list of accommodations 
is available. It is suggested that any stu- 
dent wishing to make housing arrange- 
ments apply well in advance of the 
opening of school, stating type of accom- 
modations and price range desired. 



11 



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FOUNDATION PROGRAM 

The Foundation Program, involving the 
first and second year, is directed at four 
goals considered necessary in the mas- 
tery of the artist's craft. 
An ability to render the likeness of the 
human figure, still life objects and land- 
scape in common drav/ing and painting 
media. 

A knowledge and understanding of tra- 
ditional theories of color and composi- 
tion. 

An ability to analyze and resolve a va- 
riety of problems in two and three dim- 
ensional design. 

A view of civilization as a whole evolv- 
ing process in which clear relationships 
exist between all of the accomplishments 
of man. 

The Foundation Program correlates work 
in drawing, design, the humanities, 
painting and the graphic processes. In 
contrast to the more traditional ap- 
proach, the emphasis in each course is 
not on an independent body of informa- 
tion but common or contrasting solu- 
tions to the basic problems such as line, 
shade, space and volume. The student 
is led through a carefully planned se- 
ries of problems and research projects; 
for example, line is introduced in both 
the drawing and design classes during 
the same week. While the drawing in- 
structor emphasizes the use of line to 
convey a naturalistic image, the work 
in design involves the use of line as an 
abstract element that can be used to 
create solutions to whole new functional 
problems such as lettering or a poster 
layout. 

The four semesters of liberal arts were 
planned in relation to the studio pro- 
gram. The objective of these courses is 



to provide the students with a broader 
and more critical view of civilization. 
Through the seminar approach, the 
reading of assigned texts and the writ- 
ing of research papers, the student is 
encouraged to develop his ability to 
analyze and express himself verbally. 
The emphasis on basic skills and con- 
cepts in the first two years makes it 
possible to maintain instruction in the 
Major Programs on a high professional 
level. Furthermore, the individual will 
have to face many unexpected and un- 
planned challenges within the full span 
of his career. The Foundation Program 
assures the student of having a wide 
frame of reference and skills with which 
to meet these problems. 



FIRST YEAR 



Credits 



Foundation Drawing 


5 


5 


Design 1 


5 


5 


English Composition and Literature 


3 


3 


Problems of Western Civilization 1 


3 





Art History 1 





3 



16 



16 



SECOND YEAR 



Credits 



Life Drawing 


2 


2 


Graphics 


2 


2 


Introductory Painting 


3 


3 


Design II 


3 


3 


American Literature 


3 


3 


Problems in Western Civilization II 


3 





Art History II 





3 



16 



16 



13 




A 




FIRST YEAR DRAWING Emphasis is 
placed upon the observation and un- 
derstanding of natural forms and their 
translation through line, form, light and 
shade. A complete study of the human 
skeleton and muscle structure is includ- 
ed. Media used are pencil, charcoal, 
crayon, silver point, and a limited pal- 
ette of black and white oil paint. 
GRAPHICS While continuing the basic 
studies of the previous year, Drawing 
and Graphics places special concentra- 
tion on composition and freer technique, 
and introduces wet and mixed media. 
Incorporated in the program is a com- 
prehensive course in graphics that allows 
each student the opportunity to acquire 
a working knowledge of relief printing 
(linoleum and wood block), intaglio 
printing (drypoint, etching and aquatint), 
in serigraphy. 

LIFE DRAWING A concentrated study of 
the model. 



15 




16 



DESIGN I The course is concerned with 
the basic elements and principles of de- 
sign. Line, shape, color, value, texture, 
space and form are studied not only as 
tools for the description of nature but as 
abstract elements with their own laws of 
structure. In the first semester the stu- 
dent is limited to simple media in black, 
white and gray. A close coordination of 
assignments with problems incurred in 
drawing emphasizes similarities and 
contrasts of approach. The second se- 
mester is devoted exclusively to color 
and its relationship to space, light and 
form. Three dimensional as well as two 
dimensional exercises are used. 
DESIGN II The emphasis is on the ap- 
plication of the experience and ideas 
learned in the previous year to the reso- 
lution of functional problems such as 
lettering, package design, and pictorial 
composition. 

Design includes lettering, perspective, 
color theory, and varied techniques. 



17 



INTRODUCTORY PAINTING is based on 
the drawing, design, and color experi- 
ences gained in the previous year. A 
groundwork in traditional methods of 
representation and composition is stud- 
ied in a series of studio problems and 
seminar type criticisms. Problems in the 
visual organization of volumes in space 
through still life, figure composition, and 
the portrait, provide the student with a 
basis for representational painting and 
illustration. Introductory Painting in- 
cludes perspective, anatomy, color the- 
ory and basic oil painting techniques. 




18 




19 



MAJOR PROGRAM 

The three Major Studio Programs offered 
are Design and Illustration, Painting, 
and Graphics. The Major Program, 
which comprises the last two years at 
Swain, is a radical departure from the 
Foundation Program. The Program, built 
around the student's specific vocational 
needs, is more individual in nature since 
the student instead of taking formal 
courses, spends the principal part of his 
time in his major workshop. Essentially 
this program most resembles the tutorial 
or honors program in a liberal arts col- 
lege. The weight of responsibility for 
organizing research materials, equip- 
ment and time is gradually transferred 
to the student. The teacher's role bcomes 
that of the critic, approximating, as 
clearly as possible, a professional situ- 
ation. 

Since the Major Program is essentially 
individual in nature, imposing no speci- 
fic standards or requirements on the stu- 
dent, the problem of guidance and eval- 
uation of student achievement becomes 
particularly important. During the third 
year the adviser plans a program of 
studies with the student. At the begin- 
ning of the fourth year the student pre- 
sents to a committee of the faculty an 
outline of his plans, a first draft of sket- 
ches, layouts or models. Periodically the 
student meets with the committee to pre- 
sent work done and discuss revisions 
and projected plans. Though no school 
can program into being an independent 
and responsible individual, such a curri- 
cula does set up a situation in which the 
student can achieve genuine maturity 
as an artist and as a person. 



21 



PAINTING WORKSHOP I AND II Paint- 
ing Workshop develops from materials 
first presented in the introductory draw- 
ing and painting studios. In conjunction 
with the Painting Workshop, a concen- 
trated study of traditional and modern 
art theory is made in composition and 
criticism. The student is introduced to 
painting techniques in which the history 
and practice of a variety of basic paint- 
ing media is studied. Through class and 
individual problems the student is en- 
abled to develop as a serious painter. 
Painting includes oil, encaustic, egg tem- 
pera, and eggoil emulsion media. 



THIRD YEAR 




Credits 


Painting Workshop 1 




6 6 


Life Drawing 




2 2 


Studio Elective 




2 2 


World Literature 




3 3 


Problems in Western 


Civilization III 


3 


Art History III 




3 




16 16 


FOURTH YEAR 




Credits 


Painting Workshop II 




12 12 


Literature Seminar 




2 


Criticism and Aesthet 


ics 


2 



14 



14 



22 






23 




5585 



AVK A GAJSSIST'T 




GRAPHICS WORKSHOP I AND II The 
printmaking workshop gives a tradition- 
al grounding in the basic techniques of 
relief and intaglio printing. The relation 
of graphics to type and industrial meth- 
ods is discussed. The advanced student 
is encouraged to experiment and unify 
graphic techniques with his individual 
approach. Graphics includes linoleum 
cuts, wood cuts, wood engravings, dry- 
point, etching, metal engraving, aqua- 
tint, lithography, and typography. 



THIRD YEAR 


C 


redits 


Graphics Workshop 1 


6 


6 


Life Drawing 


2 


2 


Studio Elective 


2 


2 


World Literature 


3 


3 


Problems of Western Civilization III 


3 





Art History III 





3 




16 


16 


FOURTH YEAR 


Credits 


Graphics Workshop II 


12 


12 


Literature Seminar 


2 





Criticism and Aesthetics 





2 



14 



14 



25 



DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION WORK- 
SHOP I AND II The Design and Illustra- 
tion Workshop integrates the basic de- 
sign elements with the functional and 
creative applications of typography and 
technical skills into a strong, direct pres- 
entation of graphic design. Communi- 
cation in advertising and other design 
areas is investigated through class re- 
search and individual projects. Illustra- 
tion includes painting, graphics and 
drawing within the framework of design 
communication. A scheduled critique en- 
courages an exchange of creative ver- 
bal as well as visual ideas. Design and 
Illustration includes calligraphy, letter- 
ing, typography, layout, and production 
techniques. 

THIRD YEAR Credits 



Design and Illustration Workshop 


1 


6 


6 


Life Drawing 




2 


2 


Studio Elective 




2 


2 


World Literature 




3 


3 


Problems of Western Civilization 


III 


3 





Art History III 







3 






16 


16 


FOURTH YEAR 




Credi 


its 


Design and Illustration Workshop 


II 


12 


12 


Literature Seminar 




2 





Criticism and Aesthetics 







2 



14 14 



26 




27 



LIBERAL ARTS COURSES 

PROBLEMS OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION I 
A semester' s course that seeks to suggest 
the problems faced by an individual in 
relation to his society. Readings from 
the Bible and the works of Thoreau, Paul 
Goodman, Jonathan Kozol, Janson and 
others will be used. 3 - 
ART HISTORY I An examination of Paleo- 
lithic, Greek and Roman art forms the 
basis of this course. The iconography of 
these periods will be explored in detail 
as the means of understanding and ap- 
preciating ancient and contrasting cul- 
tures. - 3 

PROBLEMS OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION II 
The city as a "corporate personality" in 
Greece, the Renaissance, and in nine- 
teenth century Industrial Society will be 
examined. Emphasis will be given to a 
consideration of changes in architectural 
forms as expressive of various economic 
and social forces. 3 - 
ART HISTORY II The lives and works of a 
sequence of artists will be examined to 
see how individuals such as Cellini, Del- 
acroix, Van Gogh, and Ben Shahn have 
encountered and resoJved such issues as 
the political events, taste, and religion of 
their times. The use of autobiographical 
material will be used. 0-3 
PROBLEMS OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION III 
The relationship of developments in sci- 
ence and in technology to traditionally 
humanistic definitions of the individual 
and his world will be explored. Particular 
attention will be paid to a consideration 
of the conflicts and reconciliations be- 
tween science and the visual arts at var- 
ious periods in the course of history. 3 - 



28 



ART HISTORY III Close attention will be 
given to the ideas, philosophies, and 
techniques behind the major movements 
in twentieth century painting and sculp- 
ture such as Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, 
and Abstract Expressionism. The rela- 
tionship between European and Amer- 
ican versions of these styles will be ex- 
amined to see how particular national 
characteristics may influence the devel- 
opment of artistic styles. 0-3 
CRITICISM AND AESTHETICS (Eighth se- 
mester) Through readings in criticism 
and aesthetics, viewings of past and 
contemporary art and classroom discus- 
sion, the student will acquire a height- 
ened awareness and a responsible criti- 
cal judgment in the visual arts. 0-2 
ENGLISH COMPOSITION AND LITERA- 
TURE (First and Second Semesters) This 
course in the fundamentals of prose com- 
position will pay particular attention to 
the development of language skills. 
Readings of literature classics will be 
required. 3-3 

AMERICAN LITERATURE This course on 
19th and 20th century writers will in- 
clude the works of Poe, Hawthorne, 
Thoreau, Hemingway, Lewis and others. 
3 - 3 

WORLD LITERATURE Paying particular 
attention to form and imagery, this 
course will include the works of Homer, 
Aeschylus, Beowulf, Shakespeare, Mil- 
ton and Dante. 3 - 3 

LITERATURE SEMINAR Such concepts as 
form, texture, space and tension will be 
related to selected works of literature. 
To better emphasize the relation of these 
studies to the students 7 own creative 
problems, small group discussions will be 
employed. 2-0 



29 



CALENDAR 1968 T969 

September 1 6 Monday First Semester begins 

November 1 1 Monday Veterans Day 

November 27 Wednesday 1 2:30 PM. Thanksgiving Recess begins 

December 2 Monday 8:30 A.M. Classes resumed 
December 1 8 Wednesday 1 2:30 P.M. Christmas Recess and Independent Studies Period 

January 2 Thursday 8:30 A.M. Classes resumed 

January 1 7 Friday Classes end 

January 20 Monday Examination week begins 

January 24 Friday First Semester ends 

January 27 Monday Second Semester begins 
April 4 Friday 12:30 P.M. Spring Recess and Independent Studies Period 

April 14 Monday 8:30 A.M. Classes resumed 

May 5-9 Senior Reviews 

May 1 6 Friday Classes end 

May 1 9 Monday Examination week begins 

May 22 Thursday 3:30 P.M. Second Semester ends 

May 23 Friday 8 P.M. Commencement Exercises 



31 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

WILLIAM J. FINN Director and Instruc- 
tor in Sculpture, University of Toronto; 
B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design. 
EDITH R. CADEMA Assistant to the 
Director. 

MARION H. HANFORD Librarian, Har- 
vard; State College, Boston. 
MRS. ALFRED U. COLLINS Director of 
Saturday School and Instructor in Sculp- 
ture. 

KETURAH KOWALKE Instructor in Design, 
B.F.A., Art Institute of Chicago and Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

RONALD KOWALKE Instructor in Draw- 
ing and Graphics, Art Institute of 
Chicago and University of Chicago; B.A., 
Rockford College; M.F.A., Cranbrook 
Academy of Art. 

DANIEL RADIN Instructor in Design and 
Illustration, Queens College; University 
of Connecticut; B.F.A., M.F.A., Cranbrook 
Academy of Art. 

DAVID LOEFFLER SMITH Instructor in 
Painting and Drawing, B.A., Bard Col- 
lege; M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art. 
HAROLD R. SNEDCOF Instructor of 
Humanities and American Literature, 
A.B., Colgate (Phil.); further graduate 
study, Brown University. 

JONATHAN ORR SWAN Instructor of 
Humanities, B.A., Harvard; M.A.T., Har- 
vard; M.A., Courtauld Institute, London; 
further graduate study, Columbia. 

PANAJOTIS VOTORAS, Instructor of 
World Literature, University of Genoa; 
University of Athens; B.A., M.A., Wayne 
State University; B.A., further graduate 
study, University of Connecticut. 



VISITING CRITICS AND LECTURERS 
1967 1968 

LELAND BELL widely-known painter who 
has exhibited internationally; visiting 
critic and painter in residence at Mary- 
land Institute 1967-68. 
HOWARD BESNIA Scarab Press, nation- 
ally respected printmaker. 
DR. WALTER J. CASS Department of Edu- 
cation, Southeastern Massachusetts Tech- 
nological Institute. 

MANUEL E. COSTA Director, Project 
COYL, Brockton. 

WILLIAM COSTA Chief of Graphic De- 
sign, Boston Redevelopment Authority. 
RICHARD SUIB Exhibits Designer, United 
States Information Agency Washington, 
D. C. 

J. MALCOLM GREAR Head of the Depart- 
ment of Graphic Design, Rhode Island 
School of Design, Providence. 
DR. VERNON INGRAHAM Head of Eng- 
lish Department, Southeastern Massa- 
chusetts Techrological Institution. 
REV. RICHARD A. KELLAWAY Minister, 
First Unitarian Church, New Bedford. 
BLAIR LENT Illustrator and author of 
children's books. 

A. HYATT MAYOR Former Curator of 
Prints and Drawings, Metropolitan Mus- 
eum of Art, New York. 
DR. HAROLD R. MUSIKER Director of Psy- 
chology, Rhode Island Hospital. 
PAUL GIAMBARBA Free lance Designer, 
Illustrator and Author, Centerville, Mass. 
JAMES H. OTTAWAY, JR. Publisher, 
Standard-Times, New Bedford. 
DR. ALVIN J. SIMMONS Chief, Commun- 
ity Mental Health Services, Department 
of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General 
Hospital. 

JOHN XIFARIS Lawyer, New Bedford. 
ALEXANDER NESBITT Head of Graphic 
Design Department, graduate school, 
S. M. T. I. 



32 



TRUSTEES 

GEORGE C. PERKINS President 
THOMAS N. BUCAR Vice-President and 
Treasurer 

MRS. JOHN M. BULLARD 
MRS. ALFRED U. COLLINS 
GEORGE L. CONSIDINE 
MRS. WILLIAM E. COYKENDALL, JR. 
EARL W. DEWALT 
HH€HAftO-Mr-HALtE : R 1 r-^. 
RICHARD A. PLINE — 
SIMON RUBIN 
- MRS. PAUL A. SCHMID 
WAfc TCft K N I GHT -STUPES 
W. JULIAN UNDERWOOD 
MRS. RICHARD -R. WATERS 

ADVISORS f\\) 

/ROBERT L. BFRTOLLI President, Massa- 
chusetts College of Art 

^JOSEPH A. COLETTI Sculptor 

^GILBERT FRANKLIN Chairman, Fine Arts 
Department, Rhode Island School of De- 
sign 

^BARRETT H. HAYES, JR. Director, Addi- 
son Gallery of American Art 

-PHILIP HOFER Curator of Printing and 
Graphic Arts, Houghton Library, Harvard 
University 

^-BORIS MIRSKI Director, Boris Mirski Gal- 
lery 

ARTHUR POPE Professor of Fine Arts, 
Emeritus, Harvard University 
OLIVER PRESCOTT, JR. Attorney 
/ PERRY T. RATHBONE Director, Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts 

S. MORTON VOSE Director, Vose Galler- 
/ ies of Boston 




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33 



Titles set in linotype 10 point Spartan 
bold and text in 10 point Spartan me- 
dium; lithographed on 80 pound Hamil- 
ton Starwhite and Strathmore Grandee 
duplex cover. 

Design by Keturah Kowalke. 
Photography by Milt Silvia. 
Lithographed by Reynolds-DeWalt Print- 
ing, Inc. 



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